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The i Newspaper – December 29, 2017

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THE
PAPER – BRITAIN’S FIRST AND ONLY CONCISE QUALITY TITLE
l Films l Theatre l Music l Dance l Comedy
FR DAY
REVIEW
OF THE
YEAR
PART 3
Those we lost, what we’ve
learned and the state
of the nation P26-31
PLUS The weirder side of 2017
P35
FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
Number 2,214
News.co.uk
NATIONAL ARCHIVES
Revealed: plan
to save Royal
Family after
the Queen’s
‘annus
horribilis’
‘Drunk tanks’
could help
ease burden
on the NHS
» Health service chief says it’s
‘frankly selfish’ for drunken
revellers to expect treatment in
our overstretched hospitals
» Alcohol-related admissions
will be monitored over New Year
» Recovery centres would
provide alternative to A&E
departments
Stephen Bush on the
Government’s problem
with students
P17
P8
i@inews.co.uk
@theipaper
theipaper theipaper
P5
It’s not too late to give!
i and Magic Breakfast
Charity Appeal
P15
INSIDE ISIS BOMBERS STRIKE IN KABUL
P23
Twitter and Facebook
Saving our bacon?
face sanctions over
Rashers with less
fake news inquiry
added cancer risk
P11
I HOMES & DESIGN
P48
I TV & RADIO
P42
I RACING
P7
P55
The
News
Matrix
TRAVEL
Who has
ruled out a
Rovers
return?
See p.21
The day at
a glance
FRIDAY
29
DECEMBER
Snow and ice cause
Stansted delays
Up to 300 passengers were left
stranded at Stansted after snow and
ice forced dozens of Ryanair and
easyJet flights to be cancelled or
delayed. The airport appeared to be
returning to normal yesterday, but
many affected passengers remained
in the terminal. PAGE 4
ROYAL FAMILY
UNITED STATES
SECURITY
FRANCE
Meghan’s sister hits
out at Prince Harry
Falling demand for
medical marijuana
Police presence
boost for New Year
Polish sailor ‘adrift
for seven months’
Meghan Markle’s half-sister has hit
out at Prince Harry after the royal
said that he and his relatives are the
family his fiancée “never had”. He
made the comment on BBC Radio 4’s
Today programme on Wednesday.
Samantha Markle said: “She has a
large family who were always there
with her and for her.” PAGE 7
Revenue from the sale of medical
marijuana is expected to drop from
an estimated $2bn (£1.5bn) in 2016
to about $1.4bn next year, according
to a study by the University of
California. At the same time the legal
sales of recreational marijuana are
forecast to increase to more than
$5bn – 62 per cent of total sales.
Security for the New Year’s Eve
celebrations in London has been
reviewed in the wake of this year’s
terror attacks, Scotland Yard said.
The hundreds of thousands of
party-goers expected to descend on
the capital on Sunday evening can
expect to see armed police on patrol,
plus dog units and vehicle barriers.
A Polish sailor has claimed his
boat drifted for seven months on
the Indian Ocean before he was
rescued off the French island of
Réunion. Authorities are seeking to
determine the circumstances that
led rescuers to find Zbigniew Reket,
54, on a boat with no navigation or
communication systems. AP
Quote of the day
The significant problems
we face cannot be solved at
the same level of thinking
we were at when we
created them
ALBERT EINSTEIN
AUSTRALIA
NORTHERN IRELAND
UNITED STATES
CHARITY
Actress and sister
critical after crash
Sinn Féin ‘had peace
strategy’ in 1987
Child slave labour
suspect arrested
Mystery donor gives
pet hospital £1,000
Home and Away actress Jessica
Falkholt, 28, and her 21-year-old
sister Annabelle are fighting for
their lives after a crash that killed
their parents and another man
in New South Wales on Boxing
Day. The sisters are in a critical
condition and have yet to regain
consciousness.
Sinn Féin’s Gerry Adams was said
to have been working on a peace
strategy in early 1987, according to
state papers. It is claimed the Sinn
Féin president believed that the
IRA campaign would not succeed
and terrorism was hampering his
attempts to win support for the
party at the ballot box. PAGE 10
A man accused of taking part in a
scheme to smuggle teenagers into
the US and force them to work at
an egg farm for little pay has been
arrested at the Mexican border. The
children from Guatemala had to live
in run-down trailers with no heat
and little food before being rescued
in 2014, investigators said.
A mystery donor dropped £1,000
in cash through an animal charity’s
letterbox over the Christmas break.
PDSA received the donation at its
Aberdeen Pet Hospital. All that was
written on the envelope was “PDSA
XXX”. Senior vet Fiona Gregge said:
“We are absolutely over the moon
with this very kind donation.”
Birthdays
Jude Law, actor, 45;
Marianne Faithfull, singer,
71; Jon Voight, actor, 79;
Dereck Chisora, boxer, 34;
Charlotte Riley, actress, 36
Subscribe to i at
i-subscription.co.uk
index
Crossword.............24
TV & Radio...........42
Homes......................48
Puzzles.....................52
Weather...................54
One in five Britons intends to learn a new language as a 2018 new year’s
resolution. A study by the British Council calls for a ‘‘bold new policy’’
to give foreign language lessons the same priority as maths and science
in schools and warns that if we are to remain globally competitive
post-Brexit, we need to address the UK’s languages deficit.
SOCIETY
The List
Are we nearly
there yet?
Can I speak
your language?
The languages people would like to learn in 2018
1 “I need the toilet” (47%)
2 “Are we nearly there yet?” (45%)
3 “There’s a traffic jam ahead” (43%)
4 “I’m bored” (40%)
5 “We’re going the wrong way” (25%)
6 “I don’t know where
we are” (24%)
7 “We need petrol” (18%)
8 “We forgot the tablet/
mobile phone” (17%)
9 “We haven’t downloaded
enough movies/TV shows
for the trip” (15%)
10 “The GPS doesn’t have
any signal” (14%)
Newspapers support recycling
The recycled content of UK
newspapers in 2015 was 71%
10%
French
7%
Italian
5%
German
3%
Japanese
At secondary school
Mandarin
2%
Arabic
2%
Russian
2%
Portuguese
2%
UK population’s language skills
Fall in
entries for
10%
French
this year
at GCSE level, compared
with last year
Said that they
have always
wanted to
speak another
language fluently
Fall in
entries
for GCSE
level
German compared with
last year
Admit being
embarrassed
by the level
of their
foreign language skills
13%
CREDIT: DISNEYLIFE
21%
Spanish
British families can spend up to
20 hours travelling to visit loved
ones over the Christmas holidays.
These are the top ten things
children say en route:
64%
45%
58%
Over half
believe
learning another
language is a worthwhile
resolution to make
33%
Only a third
said they
are able to hold a basic
conversation in
another language
Regret never
making the
effort to
speak another
language fluently
56%
16%
Can speak
a foreign
language
to a high
standard
WORDS: VALERIE BROWNE SOURCE: BRITISH COUNCIL
©Published by Johnston Publications Limited, 2 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0PU, and printed at Trinity
Mirror Printing, St Albans Road, Watford; Hollinwood Avenue, Oldham; and Cardonald Park, Glasgow. Also
printed at Carn Web, Carn Industrial Estate, Portadown. Back issues available from Historic Newspapers,
0844 770 7684. Friday 29 December 2017. Registered as a newspaper with the Post Office.
Select journalism in i is copyright
independent.co.uk and copyright
Evening Standard, beyond those
accredited as such.
NEWS
2-34
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
35-47
ThePage3Profile
TV
42-43
BUSINESS SPORT
50-51
55-64
ISRAEL
SIBU KURUVILLA, KARATE-KICKING SHOPKEEPER
Israel’s Agriculture Minister
Uri Ariel sought an unconventional
solution to end the country’s
water shortage yesterday: rallying
thousands of worshippers to pray
for rain at Jerusalem’s Western
Wall. Four years of heavy
drought have choked Israel’s
most fertile regions.
If transparency is so
important, why hold
back so many files?
Three climbers had to be rescued
from a mountain after forgetting
to bring a map. The party, from
Merseyside, set off from the
Cairngorm ski centre in the
Highlands but got lost in a blizzard
on the plateau. They were rescued
by volunteers after the alarm was
raised on Wednesday. PAGE 5
UNITED STATES
Three elephants
denied ‘personhood’
A terrible scare on Christmas Eve...
Mr Kuruvilla’s two young daughters,
aged seven and nine, were waiting
in the shop office for their father
to finish work. They could see the
danger unfold on the shop CCTV. The
shopkeeper said his girls had been left
scared, and they told their grandfather
it had been “the worst Christmas ever”.
A Connecticut judge has denied a
petition by an animal rights group
to grant “personhood” to three
elephants in a travelling petting
zoo, calling the request “wholly
frivolous”. The Nonhuman Rights
Project sued in November on
behalf of three female elephants at
Commerford Zoo, based in Goshen.
NATURE
A local hero?
Yes. News spread of the father-oftwo’s bravery and how he defended
his family and business. Mr Kuruvilla spent three years building up
Leo’s Super Saver grocery shop in
Evington, Leicester. Local customers
congratulated him for his actions.
Of the young man he tackled, he
said: “I hope he will learn his lessons
and move on as a better person.”
Valerie Browne
Letter from the
Chief Reporter
Cahal Milmo
SCOTLAND
The man got more than he bargained
for then?
Yes. Mr Kuruvilla waited for the
assailant to get closer and then
snatched the pistol in one swift
movement. He and his colleague
wrestled the attacker into submission
in a struggle, using a leg lock, which
left the attacker “begging” to be let go.
The shop owner set off the silent
alarm when the man first showed his
gun, summoning police who arrived
in 13 minutes.
Leicestershire Police said a
17-year-old male was arrested in
connection with the incident.
3
Thousands pray for
rain at Western Wall
Climbers rescued
after forgetting map
A truly courageous shop owner...
A young man who attempted to rob
a corner shop with a gun at 10pm
on Christmas Eve picked the wrong
shopkeeper to victimise.
Shop owner Sibu Kuruvilla, 43, is a
black belt in Seibukan karate.
He and his colleague managed to
disarm the robber and pin him to the
ground in a leg lock until the police
came to arrest him.
“He was a big bloke,” said Mr
Kuruvilla, explaining it took a lot of
nerve to disarm him. “At first, I was
like, ‘Please, don’t hurt us.’”
But then he said his inner
monologue changed and he told
himself: “You have to do something
and you have to react... I have the
courage to do it.”
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
A direwolf pup is not
just for Christmas…
Two dogs from Northern Ireland
who played direwolves in Game Of
Thrones are helping drive a surge in
the rare breed’s popularity. William
Mulhall, owner of Odin and Thor,
two northern Inuit dogs, has been
inundated with inquiries about pups
and has turned away celebrities
wanting to buy them.
i@inews.co.uk
Alongside the New Year’s
Honours, every post-Christmas
period offers a second insight into
the functioning of the Establishment - the release of historic
Downing Street documents.
Once upon a time, this was a
relatively simple affair. Under
the so-called “30-year rule”, the
Cabinet Office released papers
from No 10 which it considered fit
to enter the public domain from
precisely three decades earlier.
The decision to turn the 30-year
rule into a 20-year-rule made
things more complicated, if not a
little random.
The stories emerging this year
range from an intriguing 1981
tale of Margaret Thatcher’s views
on mixing prime ministers and
pandas to her handbagging of her
successor, John Major, more than
a decade later.
More concerning, however, is
the extent to which important files
are retained. The list of permanent
retentions this year includes
dossiers on the breakdown of the
first marriage of the heir to the
throne, the Lockerbie bombing and
nuclear weapons.
At the same time, of 45 files on
“European policy” - a subject of
obvious interest in these days of
Brexit - only seven were available
to the media at a preview earlier
this month. Since then, a further
26 have been released but 12
remain out of reach.
The Government insists it takes
its responsibility for transparency
“very seriously” and points out
that the percentage of files from
the Prime Minister’s Office which
it has closed or retained has fallen
from a quarter to a tenth since
2015. This year’s performance
suggests strongly that there is still
room for improvement.
4
NEWS
Josef Jackson, seven, and Corieme Preston (left) sledge on
Worcestershire’s Malvern Hills yesterday; a deer keeps warm
in the bracken (above) in Richmond Park, south-west London;
snow in the Derbyshire Peak District near Edale PA: GETTY
WEATHER
TRANSPORT
Arctic air brings coldest night of the
year with 15cm of snow expected
Seven million
rail journeys
delayed in
just one year
By Dean Kirby
NORTHERN CORRESPONDENT
Britain’s deep freeze was set to
continue today with warnings that
vehicles could become stranded and
rural communities cut off.
Arctic air hovering over
the UK was expected to cause
temperatures to plummet last
night, with a low of nearly -14°C
(8.6°F) expected in parts of
Scotland. The Met Office has
issued an amber warning for snow
in north-west England, Yorkshire
and the Humber and the East
Midlands, with up to 15cm due to
fall on higher ground.
Yellow warnings of snow also cover
large parts of central and lowland
Scotland, and northern England.
North-east Scotland and much of
England including the Midlands
and the South East, have been
issued with a yellow ice warning.
The Met Office said vehicles could
be stranded and trains and flights
cancelled in the amber snow
warning area today, which covers
towns and cities on both sides of
the Pennines including Leeds, York,
Harrogate, Rochdale and Burnley.
It warned: “There is a possibility
that some rural communities could
become temporarily cut off. Power
cuts may also occur.”
Nicola Maxey, of the Met Office,
said central England was likely to
be affected by the heaviest snowfall
and it was expected to be the coldest
night of the year last night.
“The coldest temperature we have
seen this year is -13°C in Scotland,
and we are likely to see temperatures
slightly below that,” she added.
“But we are not talking about those
extremes in the town and city
centres. It is out in rural areas, more
exposed areas, where you will see
temperatures drop the most.”
The Irish meteorological
service, Met Éireann, said snow
accumulations of up to 2cm were
expected in some areas and a yellow
warning for snow and ice was issued
for 18 counties.
Power was restored to thousands
of homes after a day of heavy snow.
Western Power Distribution and
Scottish and Southern Electricity
Networks said it had reconnected
more than 40,000 properties
since Tuesday.
Snowfall also caused widespread
disruption with a lorry crash on
the M1 resulting in the closure
of the southbound carriageway,
a jackknifed HGV on the M5
in Gloucestershire, and severe
A Russian cargo ship
which got into difficulty
in the Solent was towed to port
at Southampton yesterday after
an earlier rescue was abandoned
because of stormy seas.
conditions on the A14 near Kettering.
The Mancunian Way in Manchester
was closed between London Road
and Fairfield Street for more than
an hour yesterday because of ice and
after a collision involving four cars.
The RAC said it saw a 15 to 20 per
cent spike in call-outs on Wednesday
compared with this time last year,
while the AA said it had dealt with
significantly more breakdowns than
a normal Wednesday in winter.
Weather, page 54
TRAVEL
Stranded passengers suffered ‘nightmare’ delays at Stansted
By Ryan Wilkinson
Passengers at Stansted Airport
described their “nightmare” after
snow and ice forced dozens of Ryanair and easyJet flights to be cancelled or delayed.
Up to 300 passengers had to
wait in the terminal on Wednesday
evening while trying to rebook
flights, with some sleeping
in queues through the
night and others unable
to get return flights
home for days.
The airport appeared
to be returning to
normal by mid-morning
yesterday, but many
passengers whose flights
were cancelled remained in
the terminal.
Anwschka Weabers,
37, said she was stranded
with her two children
after their flight back
to the Netherlands
was cancelled.
“I tried to call Ryanair
but they don’t pick up – I’m
still on the phone. With two young
children, it’s a nightmare.”
There were reports of outgoing
passengers having to wait for hours
to reclaim their luggage after their
flights had been axed, with some
complaining of a “shocking” lack of
communication by officials.
Stansted Airport officials said
they had provided beds and blankets.
By Neil Lancefield
Passengers lost at least 3.6 million
hours to train delays in 2016-17 and
delays of at least 30 minutes affected
7.2 million journeys, the consumer
group Which? reported yesterday.
Virgin Trains East Coast had the
highest proportion of delays, with
3.7 per cent of its services running
between 30 minutes and two hours
late. This was followed by Virgin
Trains West Coast (2 per cent) and
CrossCountry (1.1 per cent). The best
performance was by c2c at just 0.2
per cent, according to the analysis
of Office of Rail and Road data from
April 2016 to March 2017.
Fares will go up by an average of
3.4 per cent on Tuesday.
A separate poll of 8,200 adults
by Which? found that two in five
commuters were not told of their
right to compensation when they
were last delayed. This rose to 54 per
cent of leisure passengers.
Paul Plummer, chief executive of
the Rail Delivery Group, representing
operators and Network Rail, said:
“Rail companies are working to
ensure more people arrive on time
but when things go wrong it should be
easy to claim any compensation due.”
A spokesman for Virgin Trains
said: “Clearly, it’s harder to run trains
exactly to time over a 400-mile route,
and around 80 per cent of delays are
outside our control.”
NEWS
2-34
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
35-47
TV
42-43
BUSINESS SPORT
50-51
55-64
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
5
COVER STORY
SCOTLAND
‘Drunk tanks’ could help hospitals to
beat the scourge of ‘selfish’ revellers
Schools could
be forced to
make uniforms
gender-neutral
By Chris Green
“Drunk tanks” could be rolled out
widely across England next year
to relieve the strain on accident
and emergency units caused by
intoxicated festive revellers, NHS
bosses have announced.
NHS England chief executive
Simon Stevens said it was “frankly
selfish” for people to assume
that they would be treated in the
country’s overstretched hospitals if
they drank too much.
He added that the health
service would be monitoring how
emergency services coped with the
spike in alcohol-related admissions
over the New Year period with a
view to making changes in 2018.
If the evidence suggests that A&E
wards and the police would benefit
from the introduction of more
drunk tanks, more cities across the
country will launch the services in
time for next Christmas.
So-called “drunk tanks” provide
a safe place for those who have
over-indulged to be checked over
and sleep off the effects of alcohol,
rather than being taken to casualty
or a police station.
They are already used in some
cities around the UK including
Manchester, Newcastle, Cardiff and
Bristol. The Scottish Government
said it was not aware of any
operating north of the border.
According to a 2015 study in the
British Medical Journal, up to 15 per
cent of attendances at emergency
departments around the UK are
caused by acute alcohol intoxication.
The number of affected patients
peaks on Friday and Saturday
evenings, particularly over the
festive period, when as many as
70 per cent of attendances can be
alcohol-related.
The average cost of a person
attending A&E after drinking too
much was £249, climbing to £851 if
they had to be treated repeatedly,
the study found.
“When the health service is
pulling out all the stops to care for
sick and vulnerable patients who
genuinely need our support, it’s
EXCLUSIVE
By Chris Green
SCOTLAND EDITOR
Up to 70 per cent
of patients treated
at some A&Es at
the weekend are
drunk GETTY
Easing the pressure How the system works
Cardiff’s Alcohol Treatment Centre
(ATC), which was launched in 2012,
provides a safe environment in
which intoxicated people can be
assessed, treated and monitored.
Based on Bridge Street in the
city centre, it operates on Friday
and Saturday nights between 8pm
and 8am and is run by nurses from
the University Hospital of Wales.
The ATC’s stated goal is to divert as
many drunk people as possible away
from A&E, allowing other patients
who have more urgent needs to be
treated safely and more quickly.
In December 2015 alone, almost
150 people were treated at the
centre, which is also manned by a
paramedic and a police officer.
An academic evaluation carried
out in 2013 concluded that the
service made the city centre safer
at night – as well as cutting waiting
times for ambulances at peak times.
frankly selfish when ambulance
paramedics and A&E nurses have to
be diverted to looking after revellers
who have overindulged and who just
need somewhere to safely sleep it
off,” Mr Stevens said.
“NHS doesn’t stand for ‘National
Hangover Service’, but in the run-up
to Christmas, having been out with
ambulance crews on night shifts in
London and the West Midlands, I’ve
seen how paramedics and A&Es are
being called on to deal with drunk
and often aggressive people.” North
West Ambulance Service (NWAS)
said yesterday it answered 4,111
emergency calls and attended 3,178
incidents on Christmas Day alone.
“This Christmas has been one of our
busiest and there are no indications
that activity is going to reduce as we
head towards New Year’s Eve – our
busiest day.”
The National Institute for
Health Research is also currently
examining whether drunk tanks or
other alcohol management services
should be rolled out more widely.
Bristol launched Britain’s first
mobile drunk tank – called the
Alcohol Recovery Centre – three
years ago as a joint venture between
the police, ambulance service
and hospitals.
In Newcastle, a “safe haven”
service is operated by paramedics
and police officers on Friday
and Saturday nights over the
Christmas period.
Schools should consider making
uniforms gender-neutral rather
than forcing girls to wear skirts and
boys to wear trousers, the Scottish
Government has said.
Responding to a campaign led
by a 15-year-old girl, Jess Insall, a
spokesman said ministers had agreed
that boys and girls “should be treated
equally” when it came to uniforms.
The development comes after
Jess (inset) had a motion passed in
favour of the move at the Scottish
Liberal Democrats’ party conference
this year. She argued that allowing
children of either gender to choose
whether they wanted to wear
trousers or skirts was a “sensible”
move that should ultimately be rolled
out across the UK.
Scotland’s 32 local councils are
responsible for school uniform
policy, but Jess said that
ministers should act
to create a coherent
n ation al p olic y
on the issue. “It
isn’t saying that
everyone has to
wear the same
uniform – it’s saying
that whatever the
uniform is, there can’t
be any difference between
genders,” she told i.
“Instead of saying boys have to
wear trousers and girls have to wear
skirts, schools can say pupils can
choose between skirts or trousers.
“It’s not about dictating the way
anyone dresses. ‘Gender-neutral’ can
be quite an alienating term, but all it
really means is not treating people
differently because of their gender.”
A Scottish Government
spokesman said: “Ministers are clear
that girls and boys should be treated
equally and schools should ensure
suitable school clothing is worn.”
In September, Parson Street
Primary School in Bristol announced
a gender-neutral uniform policy to
encourage a “culture of acceptance”.
POLICE
SCOTLAND
Barmaid killed near her
home on Christmas Eve
Climbers rescued after forgetting map
By Katie Grant
A young barmaid was killed in a
park just a few hundred metres from
home on Christmas Eve.
Murder detectives are investigating the death of Iuliana Tudos
after the body of the 22-year-old was
discovered in Finsbury Park, north
London, on Wednesday afternoon.
Ms Tudos, who police say was of
Russian and Greek origin, was last
been seen by friends in Camden at
8pm on Christmas Eve. She was due
to meet them at a friend’s home in
Enfield, north-east London, that
evening before spending Christmas
Day there, but never arrived.
A post-mortem examination last
night revealed she died from a stab
wound in the abdomen and head injury, according to police, who said
her next of kin had been informed.
An area of the park was cordoned
off last night and there appeared to
be articles of clothing scattered on
the grass. Ms Tudos, who also used
the name Julie, was from Moscow
By Conor Riordan
Iuliana Tudos had been due to meet
friends METROPOLITAN POLICE/PA
and worked at the World’s End pub
in Camden, north London.
Investigators want to hear from
“anyone who saw anything suspicious in Finsbury Park over the
Christmas period”.
Three climbers had to be rescued
from a mountain after forgetting
to bring a map.
The party from Merseyside
set off from the Cairngorm ski
centre near Aviemore but could
not find their way back after
reaching the plateau due to the
blizzard conditions.
Eight members of the
Cairngorm Mountain Rescue
Team (CMRT) went to their
aid after the alarm was raised
on Wednesday. CMRT leader
Willie Anderson said: “They
were climbing a ridge in the
Cairngorms, and managed that
okay, but they had forgotten to
take the map out of the car.
“Normally it’s a straightforward
run – if they had brought it with
them they would have been fine.”
The volunteer rescuers used a
tracked vehicle to scale part of the
range before making their way
on foot. After five hours battling
through poor visibility and
snow, the team found the party
at around 3,500ft (1,066m) and
returned them to safety.
NEWS
6
PEOPLE
Alexandra
pub
managers
Mick Dore
and his wife
Sarah with
Mariusz
and the
recovered
cash
Social media reunites man with lost bonus
By Katie Grant
A Polish man who accidentally
left his Christmas bonus in a pub
has been reunited with the cash.
When a member of staff at
The Alexandra pub in
Wimbledon, south-west London,
found an envelope containing
hundreds of pounds beneath a
chair last week, managers Sarah
and Mick Dore launched an
online appeal to find its owner.
The only clue that they had
was the name “Mariusz” on
the envelope.
After posting a photo to
Facebook with the name
concealed, and millions of
people sharing the message on
social media, the couple wrote:
“If this person can tell me which
bar it was in, what the name on
the front is and how much cash
[is] in there... they can come and
get it.”
Mariusz, who had returned
home for Christmas and does
not use social media, was alerted
to the campaign by his son.
He was able to confirm which
chair he had sat on and the
amount in the envelope.
A relieved Mariusz left a
“hefty tip” for the bartender
who found the money.
POLITICS
MASSIVE
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Security
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Surge in populism
‘puts democracy
at risk in Europe’
By Gavin Cordon
Europe has seen a surge in support
for “populist” political parties which
threatens to destabilise democracy
across the continent, a report by
Tony Blair’s think-tank has warned.
The survey by the former prime
minister’s Institute for Global
Change found the share of the vote
won by populist parties from both
the right and left has almost trebled
since 2000 – rising from 8.5 per cent
to 24.1 per cent.
Over the same period, it said the
number of European countries with
populist parties participating in government has doubled from seven
to 14 – creating an unprecedented
“populist belt” from the Baltic to the
Aegean.
It warned that the trend looked set
to continue unless mainstream parties were able to find a way to counter
the populists’ appeal.
The report defines as populist
those parties and politicians which
“claim to represent the true will of
a unified people against domestic
elites, foreign migrants, or ethnic, religious or sexual minorities”.
It said they are often characterised by “inflammatory” attacks on
independent institutions such as the
media or the judiciary and support
for highly restrictive immigration
controls and protectionist economic
policies. They are strongest in eastern Europe, holding power in seven
countries – Bosnia, Bulgaria, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland,
Serbia and Slovakia.
“Parties like Poland’s Law and Justice party and Hungary’s Fidesz tend
to emphasise a nationalism based on
soil, blood or culture; take a hard line
against immigration; and have, especially in Poland and Hungary, quickly
started to dismantle key democratic
institutions like the free media and
an independent judiciary,” the report
said.
“Working largely within the letter of the law, and drawing on widespread popular support, they have
destroyed many of the institutions
that are needed to safeguard democratic institutions over the long-run.”
The report’s co-author, Yascha
Mounk, said: “The huge transformation we are seeing in European
politics is long term, driven by issues
such as economic insecurity; a rebellion against immigration and the notion of a multi-ethnic society; and the
ease with which extreme voices can
make themselves heard in an age of
social media.”
BREXIT
Storage
Baskets
FROM
50p
Garden
Tools
FROM
£
2
UP TO 50% OFF. WHILE STOCK LASTS!
Davis denies he is being sidelined
By Dean Kirby
D a v i d D a v i s ’s B r e x i t
department denied that
he had been sidelined
in talks on Britain’s
future – claiming
that Brussels was
trying to undermine
the G overnment’s
negotiating position.
Mr Davies (inset) is
the lead negotiator in the
Brexit talks, which are due
to resume next year.
The Department for Exiting
the European Union (DExEU) has
blamed troublemaking by Brussels
for a media report that Mr Davis
had been “sidelined” in favour of
O l l y Ro b b i n s , a s e n i o r
Whitehall official. Sources
in Brussels denied
involvement with the
reports.
A s p o ke s m a n fo r
the DExEU said: “This
characterisation of the
negotiations is wholly and
wilfully inaccurate.
“The Brexit Secretary
meets with his counterpart,
Michel Barnier, at regular intervals
to oversee the negotiations.”
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7
STEVE PARSONS/PA
HEALTH
Saving the British fry-up:
new nitrite-free bacon
reduces the risk of cancer
By Tom Bawden
SCIENCE CORRESPONDENT
Food experts have welcomed a
major breakthrough in the British
fry-up after scientists developed a
new technique to reduce the risk of
bacon giving you cancer.
The new bacon will be made without using nitrites – a key ingredient
in meat processing, which gives
the product its flavour, texture and
smell but poses a cancer risk.
It will be the first nitrite-free
bacon to be sold in the UK and paves
the way for other types of processed
meats to be produced in a similar
way – using a mix of natural Mediterranean fruit and spice extracts
in place of the nitrite chemicals normally used as preservatives. The
Northern Irish company behind
the bacon, Finnebrogue, says the
product – which i can report tastes
the same as traditional rashers, although a little bit more expensive
– represents the “biggest breakthrough to
the British breakfast
for a generation”.
Experts are also
optimistic about the
new bacon, which
will be available in
supermarkets from
January. Professor
Chris Elliott, who ran
the Government’s investigation into
the 2013 horsemeat scandal, said it
was “a very welcome development”.
“Finnebrogue have used a combination of innovation and natural
Explainer What are nitrites and why are they used?
Nitrites are chemicals widely used
as preservatives in processed meats.
They are the active ingredient used
as food additives to extend shelf life,
give protection against the deadly
bacterium Clostridium botulinum and
to give the meat its flavour, texture
and pink colour.
Processed meats include ham,
bacon, salami, chorizo, frankfurters
and corned beef. Non-processed
meats include leg of lamb, shoulder
of pork, beef steak, turkey and liver.
Without nitrites – or the newly
created alternative secret formula
of fruit and spice extracts – bacon
slices would look and taste just
like thin slices of pork, with about a
quarter of the shelf life.
People usually process food
either to improve its flavour and
succulence or to extend its life, with
nitrites traditionally proving a vital
ingredient. Techniques include
smoking meat, which adds colour
and helps to preserve it because the
smoke contains tars and chemicals
that stop bugs from growing. Drying
meat also stops germs growing and
salting can help to preserve it.
fruit and spice extracts to come up
with a bacon that is made without
the need for added nitrites,” added
Prof Elliott, who chairs the Institute
for Global Food Security at Queen’s
University Belfast.
“Nitro-containing
compounds, used in
the manufacture of
traditional bacons,
are known to cause
the formation of
chemicals that have
negative health impacts,” he said.
Eating two rashers
of normal bacon a day increases the
risk of contracting bowel cancer by
18 per cent, according to the World
Health Organisation, which puts the
food in the same danger category as
smoking and asbestos.
The organisation has estimated
that 34,000 bowel and colon cancer
deaths per year worldwide are directly attributable to diets high in
processed meats. Meat still poses
a cancer risk, even without nitrites,
but the danger is sharply reduced,
scientists say.
Neil Parish MP, chairman of the
House of Commons Environment,
Food and Rural Affairs select committee, welcomed the product,
which will be marketed as Naked
Bacon. “Making bacon without nitrites – and reducing the risk in the
full English breakfast – is a remarkable feat of food technology and a brilliant British success story,” he said.
ROYAL FAMILY
SOCIETY
Meghan Markle’s sister hits
back over Harry’s claim
Apologetic Tesco
to make amends
for rotten turkeys
By Tony Jones
Meghan Markle’s half-sister has
reacted strongly to claims by Prince
Harry that his relatives are the
family his fiancée “never had”.
Harry’s comments about Ms
Markle’s family life came when he
guest-edited BBC Radio 4’s Today
programme on Wednesday,
and was asked about his
bride-to-be’s experience
meeting the Royal
Family over Christmas.
T h e Prince tol d
Today presenter Sarah
Montague: “She’s done
an absolutely amazing
job. She’s getting in there
and it’s the family I suppose
that she’s never had.”
But her half-sister Samantha
Markle, also known as Samantha
Grant, tweeted: “Actually she has a
large family who were always there
with her and for her. Our household
was very normal and when dad and
Doria divorced, we all made it so it
was like she had two houses. No one
was estranged.”
In the past Samantha Markle has
criticised her half-sibling via Twitter
about her lifestyle website The Tig,
which the actress has since ended.
But she has denied a rift, calling
Harry’s fiancée “absolutely
lovely”, “very strong” and
“very graceful”.
Ms Markle’s halfsister also tweeted:
“Meg’s family (our
family) is complete
with sister, brother,
aunts, uncles, cousins,
and the glue of our
family, our amazing
completely self-sacrificing
father. She always had this
family. Marrying merely extends it.”
The actress’s mother is Doria
Ragland, who met her father,
Thomas Markle, while working on
a television production set. They
divorced when Ms Markle was six.
By Josie Clarke
Tesco is refunding and
compensating customers who
complained that the turkey they
bought for Christmas dinner was
“rotten” or “gone off”.
The supermarket’s social
media feeds were bombarded
by customers who claimed the
centrepiece of their festive meal
was either inedible or had made
people ill. Tesco has apologised,
and said it was giving a refund
to those affected and offering a
goodwill gesture.
It said complaints made up
a small proportion of the more
than half a million turkeys it sold
leading up to Christmas.
A spokesman said: “We will
get in touch with each customer
so we can investigate how these
instances may have happened.”
The Food Standards Agency
said there was no evidence yet of
a supply chain problem.
Dragons form a more orderly Kew
A workman (inset) holds one of the
80 painted dragons which are being
replaced on the Great Pagoda
at the Royal Botanic
Gardens in Kew, southwest London.
The 163ft-tall
landmark (above)
is in the midst of a
£4.5m conservation
project which will
see it returned to its
18th-century splendour
and re-opened to the public
permanently next year.
The octagonal, 10-storey tower
was designed by the architect
Sir William Chambers
and completed in
1762, adorned with
80 “iridescent”
wooden dragons.
The work is being
carried out by the
heritage charity
Historic Royal
Palaces with support
from Sanpower Group,
the Chinese firm which
owns House of Fraser.
HEALTH
Patients ‘must not waste GPs’ time’
By Ella Pickover
Patients have been urged to take
three simple steps before booking a
GP appointment to help family doctors cope with soaring demand.
The Royal College of GPs (RCGP)
are urging the public to take up
the “three before GP” mantra,
asking them to first see whether
their problem could be dealt with
through self-care, seeking help from
reputable online resources or getting
assistance from a pharmacist.
The call comes as GP leaders
said there are not enough family
doctors working in England and that
practices are closing at an “alarming
rate”. Pledges to increase the GP
workforce by 5,000 by 2021 are in
“jeopardy”, according to Professor
Helen Stokes-Lampard, chairwoman
of the RCGP.
She said GPs “really feel the pinch”
over the winter period. “Of course,
for many things, you’ll still be phoning the GP and that’s fine,” she said.
“But if just 10 per cent of people
didn’t come and see their GP, but did
one of those three things, that would
make a huge difference. It would give
us the capacity to deal with those who
really need our help at a difficult time
for the whole NHS.”
NEWS
8
NATIONAL ARCHIVES
ROYAL FAMILY
Rescue plan for the Queen
after her ‘annus horribilis’
John Major wanted show of support for the monarchy
By Cahal Milmo
CHIEF REPORTER
John Major persuaded his cabinet to
ride to the rescue of the Royal Family
by rushing out an announcement that
the Queen was to pay income tax,
following what she described as her
annus horribilis.
Previously unseen official
files, released from the
National Archives and
made public for the first
time yesterday, reveal
that the then prime
minister decided there
was an urgent need to
voice public support for
the sovereign days after a
devastating fire at Windsor Castle on
20 November 1992 had rounded off a
year of royal ill-fortune.
The blaze followed the public
breakdowns of the marriages of
Prince Charles and Princess Diana
and the Duke and Duchess of York, as
well as the Princess Royal’s divorce
from her husband, Captain Mark
Phillips. The suggestion that the
estimated £60m repair bill arising
from the fire would have to be met
from public funds prompted a media
outcry. The Queen (inset) famously
gave a speech four days after the
disaster, in which she declared 1992
to be her annus horribilis, adding that
it was “not a year on which I shall look
back with undiluted pleasure”.
In a rare insight into
dealings between ministers
and Buckingham Palace,
a memo of a Cabinet
meeting reveals that Mr
Major told colleagues that
some months previously
the Queen had approached
him to “consider arrangements
by which she could pay the equivalent
of income tax on her private income”.
Prince Charles made a similar offer.
Mr Major said “recent unjustified
media criticism” of the Queen’s
exemption from income tax had
persuaded him to bring forward an
announcement that she would pay
into the public purse.
The meeting’s minutes show
that Mr Major, who railed against
“intrusive and intolerable” media
coverage after a succession of lurid
stories about royal marriages,
wanted effectively to launch a
campaign to shore up public support
for the House of Windsor.
Among the 190 files retained by the
Government from the latest release
of nearly 500 files are dossiers on the
marriages of both Prince Charles
and the Duke of York, alongside
documents about the Lockerbie
bombing and the basing of US cruise
missiles in the UK.
Also retained are a number of files
covering European policy, including
the creation of the euro.
The Cabinet Office denied that files
were being deliberately withheld.
A spokesman said last night: “We
have to ensure files are properly
reviewed and prepared... so they
do not harm national security or
relations with other countries
or disclose sensitive personal
information of living individuals.”
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9
WHITEHALL
Thatcher ministers jostled
for chauffeur-driven Jags
By Cahal Milmo
Firefighters tackle the blaze at
Windsor Castle on 20 November
1992. Four days later, the Queen
said it was contributory factor in
what had been an ‘annus horribilis’
AFP/GETTY
From Europe to the poll tax, senior
members of Margaret Thatcher’s
last government were well versed in
the arts of infighting. But few issues
seem to have brought out political
sharp elbows more effectively than
the matter of who was allowed a
ministerial Jaguar.
Documents held in the National
Archives lay bare the jostling for
position among the holders of the
highest offices of state for the right
to be chauffeured in an official
Jaguar – and avoid the indignity of
being transported in a Rover.
A No 10 file reveals that some
members of Mrs Thatcher’s cabinet
in 1989, among them the Chancellor,
Nigel Lawson, and Deputy Prime
Minister, Geoffrey Howe, privately
approached Downing Street and
pleaded their cases to be driven
about in a stately Jaguar.
Protocol dictated that, with the
exception of the Prime Minister and
the Home, Foreign, Defence and
Northern Ireland Secretaries (who
all received Jaguars), all cabinet
ministers were to be allocated
Margaret Thatcher was asked if Sir
Geoffrey Howe could keep his Jaguar
a Rover 827 – the then recently
unveiled pride of the ill-fated car
manufacturer’s range – to support
the British brand. But a number of
ministers, including Tory big beast
William Whitelaw, deftly deployed
their political creativity – from
pleas on behalf of the eminence of
their office to a lack of leg room in
the spurned Rovers – to ensure they
obtained the limo of their choice.
In September 1989, when John
Major replaced Sir Geoffrey Howe
as Foreign Secretary and the
latter was appointed Leader of the
Commons, Sir Geoffrey appealed
to Mrs Thatcher to be allowed to
DIPLOMACY
POLITICS
No pandering to
pandas: Thatcher
refused US trip
with ‘love omens’
How Maggie ‘handbagged’ Major
after handing over keys to No 10
By Cahal Milmo
Margaret Thatcher delivered an
extraordinary “handbagging” to
John Major over his handling of the
economy just weeks after she had
anointed him as her successor.
A record of a private meeting
between Mr Major (inset) and his
predecessor shows how rapidly
relations soured between the pair as
the former Prime Minister warned
him that he was in danger of making
a “Churchillian” error which could
push the country into recession.
Mrs Thatcher had previously
made clear that she regarded her
former Chancellor and Foreign
Secretary as the best custodian of
her legacy. But when he scrapped
her “poll tax” and spoke of the
It was at first blush a perfect
photo opportunity. Margaret
Thatcher would step down from a
Concorde airliner in Washington
and hand over her gift – a male
panda on a mission of love.
Similar tactics had worked for
decades for Chinese leaders, who
had become famously adept at
so-called “panda diplomacy” by
gifting the universally adored
bamboo-munching
beasts to further their
geopolitical goals.
But, according to
documents released
by the National
Archives, Mrs
Thatcher was having
none of it.
The Iron Lady
responded to the proposal
in January 1981 from London
Zoo, which had struck a deal
with the Smithsonian Institution
in Washington to lend its male
panda Chia-Chia for mating, by
declaring she did not believe
politicians and the creatures
made good “love omens”.
The scheme was the brainchild
of Lord Zuckerman, president of
the then cash-strapped Zoological
Society of London, who spied
an opportunity for some muchneeded publicity.
By Cahal Milmo
need for a more “compassionate”
Conservatism, relations took a turn
for the worse.
In an attempt to clear the air, Mr
Major invited Mrs Thatcher, who
had resigned in November 1990,
to a meeting at his rooms in
the Commons in January
1991. The former prime
minister told Mr Major
that “excessively high”
interest rates were
risking a recession and
comparing his policy
to Winston Churchill’s
decision as Chancellor in
1925 to return Britain to the
gold standard. The move led to
deflation, mass unemployment and
the General Strike.
The official minute noted: “Mrs
keep his ministerial Jaguar. Officials
advised the Prime Minister there
had been precedents in favour of
Sir Geoffrey, including the fact
she had agreed the previous year
that, “because of his seniority” Mr
Lawson, should be allowed a handme-down Jag previously used by the
Speaker of the Commons.
The memo added: “You allowed
the Secretary of State for Wales
to have a Jaguar because it would
make the regular journeys by road
between London and Cardiff more
comfortable – he had been ill.
“Lord Whitelaw as Lord President
also had a Jaguar. Looking back at
the files, it seems he was also given a
Jaguar on grounds of comfort – the
Rover was judged to have been a
little too small for him, particularly
on the long run to Cumbria.”
Mrs Thatcher appears to have
been willing to indulge such
ministerial vanity, noting on the
memo: “What is the price difference?
If none, I see no problem.”
The trade minister, Alan Clark,
who was independently wealthy,
spurned the Rover and insisted that
he would supply his own Jaguar.
Thatcher said conditions on the
economy were very tough. She
believed there was a danger of
repeating Churchill’s historic error.”
Mr Major appears to have bridled
at the complaint, responding
that the situation was “not
remotely comparable”.
Unbowed, Mrs Thatcher went on
‘Just cheese and biscuits’
to criticise the decision to abandon
Major’s modest menu
the poll tax – officially known as the
As prime minister, John Major
Community Charge.
bristled at being described as
The meeting would appear to
the “grey man” of British
have done much to set the tone of
politics. But at least as far
fractious future relations between
as in-flight meals were
the pair as Mrs Thatcher proved a
concerned, his aversion to disruptive influence, in particular on
unnecessary excitement the issue of Europe.
was genuine. A proposed
Discussing plans for the 1992
menu for an RAF flight to general election, Conservative
a Commonwealth heads
Party chairman Chris Patten wrote:
of government conference
“I understand Margaret’s entourage
in 1991 included pâté maison are letting it be known that if she
to start and a main course of
were not invited to the final rally
chicken metropole. When asked if
she would be ‘hurt’... inviting her
the menu suited him, he replied: “As
to a rally at the beginning of the
long as there’s soup and cheese and
campaign, as we are proposing, will
biscuits, I’ll be all right.”
get around this difficulty.”
ENVIRONMENT
Response to Chernobyl nuclear disaster proved chaotic
By Gavin Cordon
Whitehall was plunged into chaos
by the Chernobyl disaster as the
radioactive fallout started arriving
in the UK during a bank holiday
weekend, according to newly
released official files.
The catastrophic explosion at the
Soviet nuclear reactor on 26 April
1986 was the world’s worst nuclear
accident – releasing radioactive
plumes high into the atmosphere.
However, it took a week before the
first signs of increased radioactivity
levels were detected in the UK – just
as officials were packing up for the
long May bank holiday weekend.
With Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher on an official visit to
Japan, the immediate response
was little short of shambolic, the
government files released by the
National Archives at Kew suggest.
The Chernobyl nuclear plant in
Ukraine after the 1986 explosion AP
Phone lines were overwhelmed,
advice issued to calm public fears
only inflamed them, and officials had
no contingency plan for dealing with
such an incident. In a moment of
pure “farce” during a radio interview,
the environment minister, William
Waldegrave, mistakenly gave out the
phone number for the Department
of the Environment drivers’ pool
instead of Whitehall’s technical
information centre.
10
NEWS
NATIONAL ARCHIVES
NORTHERN IRELAND
THE TROUBLES
Adams was forming
peace plan as early
as 1987, file shows
Sinn Féin chief
‘set up SAS
ambush on IRA’
By Ed Carty
Gerry Adams was said to have been
working on a peace strategy in early
1987, state papers have revealed.
The Sinn Féin president was said
to have privately believed that the
IRA campaign would not succeed
and terrorism was hampering his
attempts to win support for the
party at the ballot box.
The report was released under
the 30-year rule from the foreign
ministry in Dublin. Mr Adams’
view had been passed on to a
diplomat by Catholic Bishop Cahal
Daly, who was also said to have
spoken with “some vehemence
of Adams’ deviousness and
fundamental untrustworthiness”.
The confidential report compiled
by officials, dated 4 February 1987,
said: “The Bishop has picked up
a rumour that Gerry Adams is
currently trying to put together a
set of proposals which would enable
the Provisional IRA to call a halt to
their paramilitary campaign.
“He has reached the view the
‘armed struggle’ is getting nowhere,
that it has become a political liability
to Sinn Féin, and that as long as it
continues there is little chance
he will be able to realise his own
political ambitions.
“What he is believed to be working
on is some form of ‘declaration of
intent’ to withdraw, with however
long a timescale, on the part of the
British Government.
“If he managed to negotiate
something of this kind, the
Provisional IRA would be able to lay
down their arms without much loss
of face, claiming they had achieved
the breakthrough towards which all
their efforts had been directed.”
Father Alec Reid, a Belfast priest
who died in 2013, also wrote a letter
to the then Taoiseach, Charles
Haughey, in May 1987 setting out Mr
Adams’ terms for an IRA ceasefire.
It would be another seven years
before that cessation arrived.
At the time the IRA was importing
large batches of weapons, including
from Libya. One such arsenal,
including two tonnes of the plastic
By Ed Carty
The Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams
was working for a ceasefire seven
years before it happened PA
explosive Semtex, was on board
the Eksund when it was seized in a
French port in late 1987.
The file also contains a report
on a meeting between Mr Adams
and Belfast lawyer PJ McGrory, in
which Mr Adams indicated that he
privately disapproved of “individual
IRA atrocities” but would never say
so in public. Mr Adams reportedly
said: “The Army Council gives me
only so much leeway.” However Mr
McGrory added his opinion that
Mr Adams had wide Republican
support and the IRA council would
eventually do what he wanted.
Gerry Adams was rumoured to
have set up a notorious IRA gang for
ambush by the SAS as they tried to
blow up a police station in May 1987,
newly released files reveal.
Eight members of the IRA’s East
Tyrone Brigade were shot dead after
they loaded a 200lb bomb on to a
stolen digger and smashed through
the gates of the RUC barracks in
Loughgall, Co Armagh. British
special forces ambushed the group,
killing them all, and an innocent
bystander, Anthony Hughes.
Declassified documents in Dublin
revealed that ballistic tests on the
recovered IRA weapons showed
they were used in 40-50 murders,
including every republican killing in
Fermanagh and Tyrone in 1987.
The rumour about Mr Adams was
passed on to Ireland’s Department
of Foreign Affairs by respected
cleric Father Denis Faul about
three months after the Loughgall
operation. The priest said the theory
was that “the IRA team were set up
by Gerry Adams himself”. Fr Faul
said he was “intrigued” by the theory.
Mr Adams declined to comment
on the claims but Sinn Fein described
them as “utter nonsense”.
MILITARY
Official wanted Army checkpoint ad
By Michael McHugh
A senior official in the British
Government considered
selling advertising space
on a military checkpoint
on the Irish border, newly
released files show.
The official said: “An
imaginative way could be
found to smarten up and
decorate security structures
in a way that would not be out
of keeping with their function but
would at the same time produce
a pleasingly aesthetic effect
on travellers. A large sign
saying ‘Welcome to the
Killeen checkpoint’ would
be a good start.”
They also wondered
whether advertising
space might not be sold
on the observation tower,
which overlooked the Belfast
to Dublin road in the town.
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11
SOCIETY
Facebook and
Twitter warned
over inquiry
into fake news
By Thomas Hornall
Facebook and Twitter could face
parliamentary sanctions if they continue to hinder MPs investigating allegations of Russian interference in
the EU referendum it was reported
last night.
Damian Collins, chair of the Commons Culture, Media and Sport
select committee, which is looking
into so-called “fake news”, has given
the companies until 18 January to
hand over information requested
about Russian misinformation
campaigns on their platforms. He
described their first response as
“completely inadequate.”
“There has to be a way of scrutinising the procedures that companies
such as Facebook put in place to help
them identify known sources of disinformation, particularly when it’s politically motivated and coming from
another country,” Mr Collins said.
MPs registered their anger and
dissatisfaction earlier this month
at the companies failure to comply
with the committee’s requests for
evidence. Mr Collins warned there
had to be some form of sanction
against the companies if they ignored requests to act or police their
sites effectively.
The sanctions threat
comes as a leading academic warned social
media companies were
at risk of being told to
“open up or break up”
next year as fears about
fake news approached boiling point.
“It may well be that this is the
beginning of the end for these firms,”
said Dr Damian Tambini, director of
the media policy project at the London School of Economics (LSE).
The days of social networks enjoy-
Emirates has
ordered 142
Airbus A380s,
with just over 100
already in service
Public school will teach
how to spot fake news
With fake news now a common
concern, there is growing debate
about whether children should be
learning how to separate fact from
fiction in the modern world.
At one private school, plans are
already being drawn up to teach
pupils how to think critically about
the information they are bombarded
with each day.
Brighton College, a co-educational
fee-paying school in East Sussex, said
its 2018 programme would feature
the words of figures from Aristotle
to Donald Trump to encourage
youngsters to question and consider
the news stories they read.
The school’s deputy headmistress,
Leah Hamblett, said: ““If you’re going
to read something, don’t necessarily
think it’s true because it has come
through social media.”
ing an ability to shift public opinion,
while remaining largely free of the liabilities publishers face, may be numbered, he said.
“These companies have to face up
to the fact they’re coming up against
existential problems in liberal
democracies,” he added.
“They should at least
clarify the principles behind how their algorithms
rank news, because when
they tweak it they effectively become something
between an editor and a censor, particularly given their
monopoly position.
They have enjoyed the ability to
use our data, our content, our innovation, to create huge businesses and
we have given them a shield from a lot
of the risks.
GETTY IMAGES
BUSINESS
Is Airbus about to pull plug
on world’s biggest airliner?
By Tim Hepher
Airbus is reportedly drawing up
contingency plans to phase out
production of the world’s largest
airliner, the A380 superjumbo,
if it fails to win a key order from
Emirates airlines of Dubai.
The moment of truth for the
slow-selling airliner looms after
just 10 years in service and leaves
one of Europe’s most visible
international symbols hanging
by a thread, despite a major
airline investment in new cabins
unveiled this month.
“If there is no Emirates deal,
Airbus will start the process
of ending A380 production,” a
source said yesterday.
A supplier added that such a
move was logical because of weak
demand. Airbus and Emirates
declined to comment.
Any shutdown is expected
to be gradual, allowing the
European aerospace group to
produce orders it has in hand,
mainly from Emirates. Airbus
has enough orders to last until
early next decade at current
production rates.
The A380 was developed at a
cost of €11bn (£9.74bn) to carry
500 people and challenge the
reign of the Boeing 747. But
demand has fallen as airlines opt
for smaller models, which are
easier to fill and cheaper to run.
Emirates, however, has been a
strong believer in the A380 and is
easily the largest customer with
total orders of 142 aircraft.
Talks between Airbus and
Emirates over a new order for 36
aircraft worth $16bn broke down
at the Dubai Airshow last month.
Negotiations are said to have
resumed, but there are no visible
signs that a deal is imminent.
Although airlines such as
British Airways have expressed
interest in the A380, Airbus is
reluctant to keep factories open
without the certainty that the
Emirates order would provide.
Emirates wants a guarantee
that Airbus will keep production
going for a decade to protect its
investment. REUTERS
EMPLOYMENT
Across
Apple boss enjoys 47% pay
rise and £66m in shares
By Ravender Sembhy
The chief executive of Apple, Tim
Cook, has seen his pay increase by
47 per cent to $12.8m (£9.5m) after
the tech company’s performance
was better than expected.
Mr Cook’s salary and bonus
for 2016 was $8.75m. This year’s
package consists of $3m in salary
and $9.3m in bonuses and add-ons.
He also reaped the benefits of a
generous shares award, banking
$89.2m (£66.3m) of Apple’s stock
as part of a compensation package
agree d wh e n M r C ook was
appointed chief executive in 2011.
The bumper award is linked to
Apple’s share price performance
versus its S&P 500 peers and comes
after the company beat its annual
sales and income targets.
The tech firm’s net sales and
operating income for 2017 was
$229.2bn and $61.3bn respectively,
while its share price rose 36.7 per
cent in 2017. Apple sold more than
46.6 million iPhone handsets in the
last quarter, up from 45.5 million in
the comparable period in 2016.
1
Florence’s great
family doctor has
one (6)
3
Unusual praise for
Iran in the past (6)
4
The Earl of Wessex
waded awkwardly
around river (6)
Down
Tim Cook was paid £9.5m GETTY
The company also recorded a
3 per cent increase in iPhone sales,
indicating a steady start for the
iPhone 8 model, which went on sale
in September.
No 2214
Solution, page 57
1
Maybe weekly food
item for bird (6)
2
Linda’s getting
drunk in Ibiza,
perhaps (6)
NEWS
NEWS
2-34
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
35-47
TV
42-43
BUSINESS SPORT
50-51
55-64
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
13
SCIENCE
Stem cells ‘in HIV immunity breakthrough’
By Katie Grant
Genetically engineered stem
cells could be used to develop a
“safe, lifelong immunity to HIV”,
researchers have suggested.
Antiviral drugs can suppress the
amount of HIV in the body to nearly
undetectable levels, but only an effective immune response can eradicate the virus.
Scientists in the US claim to have
engineered blood-forming stem
cells to carry genes to make cells
capable of detecting and destroying HIV-infected cells. Not only did
these engineered cells destroy the jack” interactions between HIV and
CD4 cells, a type of white blood
infected cells, they persisted
cell. When the CD4 on the
for more than two years,
CAR molecule binds to
suggesting the potential
HIV, other regions of
to create long-term immunity from the virus
the CAR molecule
that causes Aids,
instruct it to kill the
years
in
which
the
according to the reHIV-infected cell, acengineered
cording to the study,
searchers from the
HIV-killing cells
universities of Calipublished
in the jourwere produced
fornia, Washington
nal PLOS Pathogens.
without any
and Maine.
T h e re s e a rc h e rs
adverse effects
Experimenting on
found that, in the monpig-tailed macaques, the
keys, modification of the
research team used a chimeric
blood-forming stem cells resultantigen receptor (CAR) gene to “hi- ed in more than two years of stable
2
production of CAR-expressing cells
without any adverse effects.
Furthermore, the cells were widely distributed throughout the lymphoid tissues and gastrointestinal
tract, major sites for HIV replication
and persistence in infected people.
The study is the first to show that
blood-forming stem cells can be
modified with a CAR therapy that
can safely develop in the bone marrow, mature and become functional
immune cells throughout the body,
the researchers said.
This could lead to the development of an approach allowing for
safe, lifelong immunity to HIV, they
added. The team suggested that
such an approach would likely work
best when performed in combination with other treatments, such as
antiretroviral therapy.
The new HIV therapy
could reduce infected
individuals’ dependence on
antiviral medications, lower
treatment costs, and potentially
eradicate HIV from its hiding
places in the body.
TELEVISION
NATURE
‘Good Morning Britain’ is
the show we most love…
to complain about
Gardens at risk
from aggressive
plant disease
By Finlay Greig
ITV’s Good Morning Britain
breakfast show was the most
complained about television
programme in the UK last year.
The programme, fronted
by Piers Morgan, Susanna
Reid, Kate Garraway and Ben
Shepherd, featured twice in the
top 10 most complained about TV
broadcasts, according to Ofcom,
the communications watchdog.
An interview with “gay
cure therapist” Dr Michael
Davidson, broadcast on the show
in September, topped the list
with the watchdog receiving
1,142 complaints. Dr Davidson
described homosexuality as a
“sin” and “a socially constructed
concept”. During the interview,
Morgan called his views
“bigoted” and “claptrap”.
His appearance came only a
day after Morgan confronted
trans model Munroe Bergdorf for
her views on white supremacist
marches in Charlottesville.
After an avalanche of
complaints, the programme
asked its viewers whether
controversial interviews should
be featured at all.
A further interview broadcast
on the breakfast show in June
was also strongly criticised.
It featured the provocative
right-wing figure Tommy
Robinson, co-founder of The
English Defence League, making
inflammatory comments about
the Koran. Morgan labelled
Robinson “a bigoted lunatic”. The
episode attracted 176 complaints.
The polarising figure of
Morgan in particular has
resulted in some stars refusing to
appear on the show. Earlier this
year, the actor Ewan McGregor
dropped out at the last minute
citing his opposition to some of
the host’s views.
Good Morning Britain has
a daily average audience of
640,000 compared to the BBC’s
morning show average audience
of 1.5 million people.
Ofcom said all complaints from
the public are assessed against
the Broadcasting Code and the
number of complaints received is
not an indication of how serious
an issue was.
By Emily Beament
Two episodes of ‘Good Morning Britain, presented by Piers Morgan and
Susanna Reid, featured in the top 10 of shows receiving the most complaints
COURTS
SCIENCE
Aldi stabbing suspect’s
family tell of ‘sorrow’
By Dean Kirby
NORTHERN CORRESPONDENT
The family of a man accused of stabbing to death Aldi supermarket
worker Jodie Wilsher have said no
words can convey their sorrow.
Neville Hord’s family issued a
statement via his lawyers ahead
of his court appearance at Leeds
Crown Court yesterday, saying they
were still trying to understand the
UK gardens are at risk from a “game
changing” disease which could
spread to this country and hit plants
from lavender to cherry trees, horticulture experts have warned.
The bacterial pest Xylellafastidiosa,
which restricts water movement in
plants and results in their eventual
death, has caused widespread
problems on the continent, wiping
out entire groves of ancient olive
trees in Italy.
It could arrive in the UK on
imported plants, threatening
traditional British gardens, the Royal
Horticultural Society (RHS) said.
Unlike most pests and diseases
which target specific plants, Xylella
can hit more than 350 different types
of plant, with garden favourites such
as lavender, hebe, rosemary and
flowering cherry at high risk.
Gardeners and the horticulture
industry should “future-proof ”
gardens by purchasing plants that
are UK-sourced and grown, and
maintaining varied planting in
gardens.
RHS head of plant health Gerard
Clover warned it was probably only a
matter of time before the pest, which
is originally from North and South
America, spreads to the UK.
attack. Customers pinned down
a suspect after Jodie Willsher, 30 (pictured with her
husband Malcolm), was
attacked at an Aldi store
in Skipton, North Yorkshire, a week ago.
The statement read:
“Neville’s family wish to
express our sincere condolences to Jodie’s family at
what should have been a time of joy
and happiness for them. No words
can convey our sorrow for this tragic
turn of events.”
Mr Hord, 44, was remanded in
custody at Leeds Crown Court yesterday by the Recorder of Leeds,
Judge Peter Collier QC.
In a hearing lasting just
under 10 minutes, Mr
Hord spoke only to confirm his full name, date
of birth and British
nationality. The case
was adjourned until 26
January when Mr Hord,
of no fixed address, will attend Bradford Crown Court
for a plea hearing.
Lobsters ‘could be fed on jellyfish’
By Paul Ward
Jellyfish could be a “huge” food
source for one of the North Sea’s
most commercially important
catches, scientists have said after
filming a Norway lobster feasting on
the species usually considered a pest.
A t e a m f r o m H e r i o t -Wa t t
University in Edinburgh was
surprised to find lobster scaring
off other marine life in order to eat
defrosted jellyfish carcasses which
had been attached to an underwater
camera and lowered into a fjord.
The experiment was designed to
find out which deep-water species
were most attracted by a jellyfish
dinner, with hagfish and amphipods
expected to be interested. But it was
the Norway lobster, also known as
scampi or langoustine, that was most
keen, scaring away other scavengers
and eating half of the jellyfish.
Although the experiment took
place in Norway, the scientists are
confident that lobsters in UK waters
will have a similar appetite. The
Norway lobster is worth £80m to the
Scottish fishing industry.
CHRISTMAS APPEAL
NEWS
2-34
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
35-47
CHARITY
Access to healthy meals during
holidays makes a big difference
By Richard Vaughan
EDUCATION CORRESPONDENT
2017 Christmas Appeal
What donations can do
The i Christmas Appeal aims to
raise £100,000 to help the charity
Magic Breakfast give hungry pupils
a healthy, nutritious breakfast. Each
meal costs just 22p.
For just £1, you would give a child a
healthy breakfast for four days.
For £3, you would provide a healthy
breakfast for more than two weeks.
For £5, you would pay for 22
breakfasts, equal to a month’s worth.
For £10, 45 breakfasts would be
paid for – more than two months’
worth. For £25, you would provide
more than 100, enough for six months.
For £50, you would provide at least
220 – more than a whole year’s worth.
behaviour spikes. We get children
absolutely playing up.
“We have loads of fun activities in
the last week of term but, despite
In tomorrow’s
isport
that, during that time we see
behaviour spike because the kids
don’t want to go home. It’s a real
problem,” she added.
“It’s because they really don’t know
what is going to come up, so they
become very anxious about it.”
i has teamed up with Magic
Breakfast as part of its charity
appeal to raise £100,000 to provide
half a million healthy breakfasts to
hungry children.
Emma Tamblingson, head of
community affairs at Morgan Stanley,
said provision of healthy holiday
meals can make a big difference to
children in straitened circumstances.
“Our programmes start every
morning during the holidays from
9.30am until 12pm where the families
can come in and have the breakfast
provided by Magic Breakfast,”
she said.
“It means the children have a
safe place to play, and we can put on
courses for the parents. We work in
four schools in Poplar and one school
in Glasgow.
“The children are also given
backpacks with food, including fruit
and healthy cereals, to ensure they
have some healthy food at home.”
Magic Breakfast provides Morgan
Stanley with the breakfasts that
are given out to the children at the
holiday clubs.
Secondary schools in Wales are
being encouraged to apply for
Magic Breakfast clubs, as free
breakfasts are only given to
primary-aged pupils.
Wales has been providing breakfasts since 2004 to any primary
school that requests them, and
has been hailed as one of the
Welsh Government’s flagship
education policies.
But the policy does not stretch
to the secondary sector, which
Magic Breakfast has shown can be
transformed by the introduction of
healthy daily breakfasts.
The charity, which is being
supported by i as part of its
Christmas appeal to raise £100,000
to provide more than 500,000
breakfasts, has called on secondary
schools in need to consider applying.
Magic Breakfast already operates in England and Scotland, and
is working to establish how many
children and schools need its help in
Wales and Northern Ireland. Longterm, it intends to provide breakfast
at school for children across the UK.
Magic Breakfast general manager
Alex Cunningham said: “If we can
15
Kirsty Williams AM says children
perform better at school after a
nutritious breakfast
show there is need for our breakfast
clubs in Wales then we have a strong
case to expand our work and help
these schools.”
In Wales, around 60,000 primary
pupils have a free breakfast at school
on each school day.
Kirsty Williams, the cabinet
secretary for education in the Welsh
Government, said: “A free, healthy
and nutritious breakfast is surely the
best way to start the day.
“Evidence has shown us that this
means better behaviour, better
concentration and contributes to a
child’s health and wellbeing.”
Richard Vaughan
NO CHILD
TOO HUNGRY
TO LEARN
Christmas
Appeal
22p provides a hungry schoolchild with a healthy Magic Breakfast so
they can concentrate in their important morning lessons and do well at school.
£25 provides over 100 breakfasts, £50 provides over 220 breakfasts
£100 provides over 450 breakfasts. Thank you for your support.
Pleasemakeyourcheque/postalorderpayableto MagicBreakfast
£50
£100
Iprefertogive£
£25
IencloseachequemadepayabletoMagicBreakfast
IwouldliketopaybyVisa/CAFCard/MaestroCard/Switch/Maestro
Cardnumber:
Validfrom:
(CVV)
/
Expirydate:
/
Issueno.(Maestroonly):
Signature: _____________________________________________________ Date:_____________________
Nameasitappearsoncard:_______________________________________________________________
Address:____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________ Postcode:_____________________
Email:_______________________________________________________________________________________
Telephone:__________________________________________________________________________________
Increaseyourdonationby25pinevery£1youdonatewithGiftAid
Bytickingthisbox,IconfirmIamaUKtaxpayerandwantMagicBreakfasttoGiftAidall
donations I’vemadeforthelastfouryearsandanydonationsImakeinthefutureuntilInotify
youotherwise.IunderstandthatifIpaylessIncomeTaxand/orCapitalGainsTax inanytaxyear
thantheamountofGiftAidclaimedonallmydonations,itismyresponsibilitytopayanydifference
✂
MARTIN HUNTER
PLUS 2018
sports
calendar
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
50-51
55-64
Club together Secondary schools urged to apply
Bagels served at
breakfast clubs can
ensure children
are ready to learn
With schools having broken up for
the Christmas period, children are
suffering from “holiday hunger”,
often leaving them without access to
healthy breakfasts or lunches.
For a small but significant
proportion of children, the food
provided by their schools can be the
only nutritious meal they receive for
an entire day.
When schools close for the
holidays, at whatever time of year, it
means children in some of the most
challenging environments can often
go without a proper meal.
As such, Magic Breakfast has
teamed up with financial services
company Morgan Stanley in schools
in east London and Glasgow to
ensure children can access a healthy
meal throughout the holidays.
School staff have spoken of how
pupils from the most deprived
backgrounds can start to become
more “anxious” as the end of term
draws nearer and the children know
they are less likely to be fed.
Um a ra n i Nat h a n , p a re n t a l
engagement lead at The Willow
Primary School in north London, said
holiday hunger was a “massive issue”.
“We can pinpoint it,” Ms Nathan
said. “The last week of term [poor]
TV
42-43
2017 sports
quiz of the year
Test your
knowledge of
the past 12
months
Thankyou so much for
donating to Magic Breakfast
and helping us to ensure
that no schoolchild in the UK
starts lessons too hungry to
learn. We wouldlove to keep
you in touch with our news
and events. If you would like
to receive our newsletters
by email, please tick the
following box and make
sure you have supplied your
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TheOpinionMatrix
COMMENT FROM HOME & ABROAD
POLICE
REFORM
HOSPITAL
PARKING
MICHAEL
HESELTINE
EMMANUEL
MACRON
SAUDI
ARABIA
ALAN
PARTRIDGE
Time to
overhaul
the force
Charges are
wrong, wrong,
wrong
Tory grandee
speaks out
on EU
French
problems
below surface
Crown Prince
should watch
his step
A comic
creation that’s
here to stay
The Times
Daily Mirror
Daily Mail
Irish Times
Financial Times
The Arts Desk
Large-scale and radical
reform needs to be on
the table. All Britain’s
police forces should
take heed of the Met’s
latest embarrassment.
Last year’s HMICFRS
[inspectors’] report
was so horrifying it
produced alarm that
the Met was sitting on
a second Rotherham
scandal. This suspicion
alone is a shocking
indictment of an
institution in need
of change.
(Editorial)
The NHS is free at
the point of access.
Whatever your
circumstances, you
should not have to pay
for treatment. Hospital
parking charges make
a mockery of this
concept. There are
concerns that free
parking would be
abused, but surely it is
not beyond the wit of
bosses to monitor car
parks? (Editorial)
Possibly it is to
Lord Heseltine’s
credit that he would
rather jeopardise his
country house with its
arboretum than suffer
the torments of leaving
the EU. But is he being
fair to the rest of us? I
don’t think so.
(Stephen Glover)
Macron has
marginalised
extremists. A recent
study shows that,
while the French
reserve judgement
until they see the
results of his policies,
their confidence in the
future is growing.
(Lara Marlowe)
Mohammed bin
Salman has dynastic
politics in his blood.
He thinks, with his
closeness to Mr Trump
and his family, he has
a hand of aces. More
likely, he is holding
jokers. (David Gardner)
Alan Partridge has
always reflected the
times and moved
with them. His Little
England views and
social anxieties make
him more relevant than
ever; we’ll be seeing
that dead-eyed grin for
many years to come.
(Owen Richards)
Daily Telegraph
New YorkTimes
Lord Heseltine
has allowed his
pro-European passion
to get the better of his
anti-left judgement.
It is not necessary to
be in the EU to be a
vibrant, free-market
economy. One thing
that we know would
bankrupt the country,
because Lord Heseltine
has told us, is a leftwing government.
(Editorial)
A few weeks ago,
journalist Rokhaya
Diallo, who is black,
was included on a list
of staff members of the
French Digital Council.
Days later, the
government dismissed
Ms Diallo. Mr Macron
has tried to project the
image of an inclusive
leader. This highlights
the need in France
for an open debate on
racism. (Editorial)
The Sun
Frontline officers are
doing their best — but
there is a leadership
issue at the top. A
Royal Commission
will fix this. The status
quo cannot continue.
(Editorial)
Daily Express
Hospitals are places
where people are at
their most vulnerable,
and they need to be
treated with special
care. This extends to
the circumstances
surrounding their
visit. The NHS does not
exist to make money.
(Editorial)
Quote of
the day
Al Jazeera
MbS might be
encouraging a
“cohabitation of the
traditional and the
modern”, but it’s the
worst elements of
both that he’s bringing
together. As long as
artists have no space
to challenge the
dystopian vision of
the future offered by
him, the Middle East
will remain mired
in authoritarianism,
poverty and violence.
(Mark LeVine)
The Guardian
You have to be a real
comedy nerd to care
too much about the
process. It’s fashionable
to compare him to
Farage or Clarkson,
but Partridge is more
human. As Coogan puts
it: “There’s something
about Alan that
wants to aspire to be
something better than
he is, but he doesn’t
quite know what that
is.” (Emine Saner)
LifeInBrief
LIL PEEP RAPPER
I do like a drink.
I’ve never taken
any drugs – I’ve
never been
interested – but
I love British
pubs. I like the
camaraderie
Sir Tom Jones
The singer tells
‘Radio Times’ about
his virtues and vices
Like many creative suburban misfits,
Gustav Åhr, who died aged 21, didn’t
get on with a lot of people in his town.
He spent much of his teenage years
alone in his bedroom, listening to rap
and punk records – and ever more
obscure acts he sourced in far corners
of the internet.
Åhr, better known by his stage name
Lil Peep, was born in Pennsylvania and
grew up in Long Island, New York, the
son of two Harvard graduates.
Although Åhr achieved good grades,
he rarely turned up to his lessons
at Long Beach High School in Lido
Beach. At the age of 17, he moved to Los
Angeles in pursuit of a career in music.
Under his new moniker, Lil Peep,
he released his first mixtape in
2015, following this with an EP called
Feelz and another mixtape, Live Forever,
in the same year. He released his debut
album, Come Over When You’re Sober
Pt. 1, shortly before his death. Music
came easily to Peep. “It takes me like
five minutes to make a whole song,”
he said in an interview with The Fader
magazine in February.
Peep’s self-styled and memorable
aesthetic opened doors for him. He
had started getting tattoos at the
age of 14 and gained Instagram fame
for his distinctive look. He received
catwalk invitations to Paris and Milan
fashion weeks and was photographed
by Mario Testino. His notorious face
tattoos featured the legend “Get cake,
die young” along his hairline, as well as
“Crybaby,” the name of one of his songs,
above his eye.
Along with many other artists linked
to the Soundcloud rap movement, Peep
wrote songs for depressed teens with
frank, emotional lyrics about mental
illness. His 2016 track “OMFG” contains
the line: “I used to wanna kill myself /
Came up, still wanna kill myself / My
life is goin’ nowhere / I want everyone
to know that I don’t care.” When asked
about the song in January, Peep told
Pitchfork: “I have a chemical imbalance
in my brain. I suffer from depression
and some days I wake up and I’m like, I
wish I didn’t wake up.”
In a flurry of Instagram posts ahead
of his final show, Lil Peep posted a
photo of himself with an unidentified
substance broken into pieces on his
tongue. He filmed himself dropping
bars of the anti-anxiety drug Xanax
into his mouth. In November, he was
found unresponsive in his tour bus
ahead of a show in Tucson, Arizona.
According to a toxicology report,
he died of an overdose as a result of
“combined toxic effects of fentanyl and
alprazolam [Xanax]”. It said that the
manner of death was accidental.
On 2 December, Lil Peep’s face was
projected onto the House Of Commons
at midnight while on the same day his
family and friends paid tribute to him
at a service in Long Beach, California.
The world-renowned DJ and
producer Diplo tweeted: “Peep had so
much more to do… he was constantly
inspiring me.” The rapper Post Malone
added: “Your music changed the world
and it’ll never be the same.”
THE INDEPENDENT
Born 1 November 1996
Died 15 November 2017
Lily Fletcher
18
@theipaper
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@
Reflections
on relativity
Your
View
TEXTS, TWEETS
AND EMAILS
readers that the
Government does
need to share some
information with other
states confidentially,
in order to foster
closer commercial and
diplomatic relations.
The Government
publishes clear
guidelines on how we
share information, which
the arrangements for the
UK-US trade working
group strictly adhere to.
Our approach is agreed
with the US and reflects
usual practices.
As with the previous
UK-US working groups,
future meetings will be
well-publicised, and I
welcome all scrutiny
that ensures we secure
a mutually beneficial
economic trading
arrangement with
the US.
DR LIAM FOX
INTERNATIONAL
TRADE SECRETARY
After reading Alan
Burdick’s excellent piece
“Where Did That Year
Go?” (i, 28 December), I
was reminded of Albert
Einstein’s response
when asked to explain
his Theory of Relativity:
“Put your hand on a hot
stove for a minute, and
it seems like an hour. Sit
with a pretty girl for an
hour, and it seems like a
minute. That’s relativity.”
Happy new year!
DAVID HUGHES
BATH
We welcome
scrutiny
It is completely
misleading to suggest
we have demanded “total
secrecy” in trade talks
with the United States
(i, 21 December).
It will not surprise
_
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Voters don’t fit
into neat boxes
Don’t scrap the
chequebook
Whilst I recognise the
central premise in David
Goodhart’s article on the
split in British society
(My View, 28 December),
I am uncomfortable
with his definition of
“Anywheres” as the
“educated” group.
Perhaps I am a victim
of the outrage culture
which i highlighted
elsewhere in the same
edition, but the
implication is that
“Somewheres” (of
which I would appear
to be a member) are
not educated. Perhaps
a better definition
would have been those
currently in education or
employed by that sector?
RICHARD WESTWOOD
STAFFORD
I am absolutely in
agreement with Eleanor
Doughty about the
merits of the chequebook
(i, 28 December).
While I make many
payments and purchases
online, there are still
some retailers and
other institutions
that are happy to be
paid by cheque. I view
the maintenance of
a chequebook as part
of my “brain training”
throughout the year.
Just as cash has
remained a physical
entity despite the growth
of contactless payments,
long may the use of
cheques continue.
IAN MORGAN
MALVERN LINK,
WORCESTERSHIRE
I was hugely confused
by David Goodhart’s
article which suggested
“Somewhere” people
voted Brexit because
they value “stability”and
are “parochial”.
And “Anywhere”
people who generally
went to university, got
professional jobs, and
were therefore less
affected by austerity,
voted for what came to
be seen as anti-austerity
in the June election.
Surely it would be
the other way round?
There would be many
who voted for Brexit and
also for anti-austerity
in June. Beware of
classifying voters by
putting them into
tidy boxes!
JOHN FINAN
LOUTH, LINCOLNSHIRE
Burns didn’t
write NYE song
Celebration
showed class
I was impressed by the
calm and restrained way
in which Alastair Cook
celebrated his century,
despite suffering from
poor batting form for
some time. He would
have had every right to
Albert Einstein once gave a more tongue-in-cheek
explanation of his theory of relativity AFP/GETTY
celebrate wildly, but
chose not to. Compare
this to the crass, oafish
antics of David Warner
the day before. Could
Mr Warner be related
to Boris Johnson, by
any chance?
PETER HENDERSON
WORTHING,
WEST SUSSEX
Mrs Brown a
right turn-off
Like Rob Barratt, I don’t
find Mrs Brown’s Boys
funny (Your View, 28
December). My solution
is not to watch it.
DAVID HOOD
BEWDLEY,
WORCESTERSHIRE
i was wrong
Blurred boundaries
In the “World
Flashpoints” graphic on
pages 22-3 of our Review
of the Year yesterday we
highlighted Myanmar
but the country outlined
was neighbouring
Thailand. We apologise
for the error.
According to your report
(i, 28 December) about
“Auld Lang Syne”, “more
than half do not know
Scottish bard Robert
Burns wrote the words”.
Perhaps that is
because he didn’t. It
is a traditional song,
versions of which go
back to the 15th century.
Burns never claimed
to have written “Auld
Lang Syne” – “I took it
down from an old man’s
singing,” he wrote in 1793.
Burns believed the
song had never appeared
before in print, unaware
that poet Allan Ramsay’s
version was published
in the 1720s – decades
before Burns was born.
KEVIN HAWKINS
KNARESBOROUGH,
NORTH YORKSHIRE
MORE COMMENT oninews.co.uk
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‘I think men like
to be looked after.
Is that sexist?’
Sue Johnston on the pressures to
settle down and how she doesn’t
know the rules anymore
The best deals
on fizz for New
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19
i@inews.co.uk
Twitter: @jess_barrett
Executives
snarling at
Kirstie’s
‘darling’
Rage over
Bono’s ‘girly
music’ jibe
Just when you thought 2017
was all out of crazy, U2
frontman, Bono, has decided
to announce that he thinks
music is too “girly” these days,
and that men have no musical
outlet for their anger.
Speaking to Rolling Stone
Bono (inset) said: “I think music
has gotten very girly. And there
are some good things about
that, but hip-hop is the only
place for young male anger
at the moment – and that’s
not good.”
He continued: “In the end,
what is rock and roll? Rage is at
the heart of it.”
There are so many things
wrong with this ill-informed,
sexist, misogynistic sentence
that I think the
best thing
to do is toss
it onto the
heaving dung
heap of 2017
dimwittery.
To
think
that he
won an
honorary
award
at US
The pool of offensive words
and phrases which we are
leaving behind in 2017 now
appears to include “darling”.
Kirstie Allsopp has revealed
she was told to tone down her
use of the word on Channel 4’s
popular property series
Location, Location, Location over
fears the term was bordering
on sexual harassment.
Allsopp called the
decision “ridiculous”, adding
that it “belittles” genuine
sexual harassment in
the workplace.
Clinton joke ‘missed the mark’
Glamour
magazine’s
Women of
the Year
awards
earlier this
year. At
least he
won’t be
invited
back.
Round-Up
Quoteof
theday
“You’d have to
take a crowbar
and a spatula
and a forklift to
get me out of the
house now.”
I know how
you feel,
Drew
Barrymore.
Vanity Fair has apologised for a video
it posted on Twitter which suggested
the 2016 Democratic presidential
candidate Hillary Clinton should take
up knitting in the New Year.
The video, entitled “Six New Year’s
Resolutions for Hillary Clinton”, also
suggested putting away her voodoo
doll of former FBI boss James Comey.
The video added: “Take up a new
Houndsoflove
“It’s all about animals at
the moment, we have to
concentrate on
them. Her tigers
are old, my
dog Scratchy
is old. It’s not
about us;
we have to
get through
this period,
basically, of aged
animals.” Chris Packham
says he won’t marry
long-term girlfriend
Charlotte Corney while his
poodle is still alive.
hobby... Volunteer work, knitting,
improv comedy - literally anything
that will keep you from running again.”
Actress Patricia Arquette
responded with a succinct: “Hey stop
telling women what the f**k they
should do or can do.”
A spokeswoman for Vanity Fair said:
“It was an attempt at humour and we
regret that it missed the mark.”
Whocansay?
“Xmas is always good fun. Well, not
always. Not every single second.
Regenerating is not completely
good fun. But you know
what? Even though it
can be a little bit icky
(like really bad flu)
it has always, always
turned out to be good
for Doctor Who.”
Peter Capaldi in a
letter to a young
‘Doctor Who’ fan
who was worried
about seeing his
favourite actor
leave the BBC
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Near misses and howlers are the pitfalls of our job
GRAMMAR
Jeff
Robson
I
f you’ve noticed the absence of
a Pedants’ Corner column this
week, rest assured that it will, as
the BBC announcers used to say,
“return in the new year”.
Of course, our readers haven’t let
the festive season stop them writing
in to point out where they feel we’ve
gone wrong. I’ve been taken to task
on British history, whether or not
“air molecules” technically exist
and the fact that the new Bishop of
London should be styled a Dame.
I’ve also been confronted with
some uniquely Christmas-themed
queries from reporters that even
the most comprehensive style book
doesn’t cover (“should we say “on
Christmas Day” or “on Monday” in
stories from India and Vietnam).
In the spirit of reflection that
marks the “twixmas” period, I’d like
to reassure readers of our diligence
by sharing some of the quirkier
“near misses” of the year.
Getting a daily newspaper to
press involves processing around
60,000 words on an average day.
That’s the equivalent of receiving
The Great Gatsby and a few of F Scott
Fitzgerald’s short stories for good
measure in first draft stage.
Then rendering them fit
for publication in eight
hours. And providing
suitable illustrations
every few pages.
As well as the odd
graph comparing the
characters’ alcohol
consumption against
the national average and
an explanatory sidebar on
exactly how Gatsby acquired his
wealth, of course.
It’s inevitable that in all those
words there will be misspellings,
instances of improvable grammar
and things which need to be
checked by contacting the original
author. Most of the spelling and
grammar errors are simple, though
occasionally a Freudian slip can
almost sound preferable to the
correct version. A story about the
Abominable Snowman’s existence
being disproved said the creature
was rumoured to “inhibit” the
mountains of Nepal and Tibet. Well,
something so fierce probably would.
Occasionally the pressure to
condense a lot of information into
a story results in some bizarre
grammar and syntax. A piece on
the Dixons Carphone company
said the merger which created it
was designed to create a company
“selling phones to fridges”, a task
probably beyond even the most
gifted sales person.
Names continue to be the
journalist’s nightmare. The
advent of a new season of
Game of Thrones always
creates an additional
headache, but there
is a right and a wrong
way to spell Daenerys
Targaryen (left).
Ironically, one story got
the character’s name
right but missed the final
“e” from the actress who
plays her, Emilia Clarke.
An added problem can be
metaphors which have come to have
an association opposite to their
original meaning. The story of King
Canute has him proving he cannot
command the waves as a rebuff to
sycophantic courtiers who compare
his powers to God’s, but time has
twisted it into a parable of hubris.
Not in the newspaper style books,
however – if only because this is the
mistake readers will always identify.
I trust this has given some idea
of the challenges we face – and
the efforts we make to ensure our
stories respect the English language
and use it as clearly and accurately
as possible.
SOCIETY
what lies half-forgotten in the past.
There’s a reason why things like
the WI, gardening craft groups
and calligraphy have flourished
in recent years. And what is the
wildly popular Tough Mudder if
not a grown-up version of team
cross-country?
This isn’t about wallowing in
nostalgia, but in reconnecting with
things that we lost along the way. At
this time of year, my Instagram feed
is filled with evidence of people who
have reconnected with the joy of
singing in choirs. The delight that I
got from ordering my SNES Mini this
summer was just as heartfelt as when
I played its ancestor in the 1990s.
It’s the same with books. Before
Christmas, a Twitter reading
of Susan Cooper’s The Dark is
Rising had thousands of people
rediscovering an old favourite. In
March next year, Lucy Mangan’s
book Bookworm: A Memoir of
Childhood Reading will examine the
books many of us first encountered
as young readers, and what they
continue to add to our lives.
Three years ago, some friends and
I decided to set up a book club where
we would read the Jilly Cooper
novels we’d loved as teenagers
with the same academic rigour of a
“literary” club. It has given us untold
joy: not least because, in November,
we were invited to lunch at her
house. We do not need to add “new”
just for the sake of it. The New Year
begins, but we carry on. It’s worth
bringing the best bits of the past
with us.
Kat
Brown
Move on by
reconnecting
with the past
E
very January, we’re cajoled
into trying new diets,
exercise plans and to
generally evolve into a brand
spanking new iteration of ourselves,
like we’re luxury Pokèmon.
Over the past few years, my
friends and I have tried the
Sirtfood diet, bought Nutribullets
and gratitude journals, and run
marathons. While all of these things
were briefly successful, few of them
have brought lasting joy.
Last year, I decided to pick up a
childhood obsession, horse riding.
As soon as I had got into the rhythm
of lessons and riding out, I was
as hooked as I was when I was a
Saturday stable girl. It’s helped me
with my anxieties, and reconnected
me with something that, it turns out,
I wasn’t ready to leave.
We are told that to be our best
self, we need to do something new.
In fact, it’s often a question of finding
Twitter: @katbrown
NEWS
NEWS
2-34
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35-47
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TV
42-43
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29 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
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21
RELIGION
Bishop attacks Trump’s
evangelical US supporters
By Dean Kirby
NORTHERN CORRESPONDENT
Duran Duran were among the acts on the first ‘NOW That’s What I Call Music’ compilation (below, top) in 1983 GETTY
Now that’s what I call a
chart-topping milestone…
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
It’s the compilation series that has
been the soundtrack to every pop
trend since the 1980s and sold 250
million copies. In 2018, NOW That’s
What I Call Music! will celebrate
its 100th hit-packed edition with a
series of live concerts and a public
appeal to assemble the ultimate
greatest hits album.
Launched in 1983 by Virgin boss
Richard Branson as a bargainpriced double LP featuring smash
hits from artists including
Duran Duran and Culture
Club, the NOW brand will
reach its landmark in July.
The average UK
household owns more
than four NOW albums. A
total of 120 million records
have been sold here over 35
years, with a further 130 million
sold worldwide.
NOW’s quarterly mission to
deliver all the latest chart-toppers
means it has thrived through every
change in music consumption,
from vinyl to CD, through minidisc to digital downloads. In 2017,
NOW released 18 albums, selling 3.2
million copies and outperforming
Ed Sheeran. NOW 98, released in
November, has already sold more
than 500,000 copies on its own.
Peter Duckworth, the joint
managing director of the NOW
Factfile
A piece of pop history
n The NOW name
originated from
a poster Richard
Branson found in a
Notting Hill shop,
depicting a singing
chicken and a pig
exclaiming “Now
that’s what I call music!
c!”..
n Robbie Williams is the mostfeatured artist with 30
siingles, followed by
Rihanna
with 27.
R
n Now! 44, released in
11999, is the biggestsselling, with sales of
more than 2.3 million.
m
n A new TV channel,
N
NOW
90s, launches
this
t week to sit
alongside an 80s channel which has
an audience of two million.
n Now! vinyl editions
ceased in 1996, but LPss
are back on the shelvess.
n The last Now!
cassette release was
No 64, in 2006.
n Local versions of
Now! albums have
been released in
Egypt, Russia and the Philippines.
n Now! computer games have been
released for platforms ranging from
the Commodore 64 to the Wii.
brand, which is owned by Sony
and Universal Music, told i: “NOW
100 next July will be a landmark
moment
in popular culture.
mo
“We are planning live
events
like a NOW 80s
e
concert,
other themed shows
c
and
a television specials. We’re
planning
to re-release NOW 1
p
with
w a special edition called
Now
N That’s What I Call NOW!
which
will have one track
w
from
every NOW album. The
fr
question is how do we choose the
best 100 songs in NOW history?
Should we ask the public?”
While 2018 will have an outbreak
of NOW-stalgia, a NOW app has
secured the brand’s future in a
music world where album sales
have slumped as fans compile their
own playlists on Spotify and Apple
Music. Mr Duckworth added: “We
are getting up to 30 million track
streams a week. When there are 30
million tracks available on Spotify,
ha
having
a trusted curator is
e
even
more important.
“ N OW h a s a c r o s s g
generational appeal. Parents
w
who grew up with it choose
oour albums for car journeys
w
with their kids.”
NOW depends upon star
n ames licensing their hits.
T
Taylor Swift and Rihanna
are the only big names who are
reluctant to allow their recent
singles on an album.
A senior Church of England
bishop has criticised conservative
evangelical Christians in the US who
blindly support Donald Trump.
The Bishop of Liverpool, the
Right Reverend Paul Bayes, said
Christians who backed Mr
Trumpcouldnotjustifytheir
Christian faith. He said
“self-styled evangelicals”
r i s ke d b r i n g i n g t h e
word evangelical into
disrepute and there was no
justification for contradicting
God’s teaching to protect the
poor and weak.
“Some of the things that have
been said by religious leaders
seem to collude with a system that
marginalises the poor, a system
which builds walls instead of bridges,
a system which says people on
the margins of society should be
excluded, a system which says we’re
not welcoming people any more into
our country,” he told The Guardian.
“Whenever people say those
kinds of things, they need to be able
to justify that they’re saying those
things as Christians, and I do
not believe it’s justifiable.”
The bishop (inset) said
he regretted that “people
who call themselves
evangelical in the US
seem to be uncritically
accepting” positions taken
by Mr Trump and his allies.
While the cleric’s comments
were attacked in the US, he won
support on social media in the UK.
During his election campaign,
Mr Trump set up the Evangelical
Executive Advisory Board to connect
with Christian voters.
IPA_2017-12-25_Thei-South-Fri_20x3 (2)_Omega RT
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TELEVISION
Lancashire rules out return to Corrie’s cobbles
By Joe Nerssessian
Sarah Lancashire has ruled
out ever returning to
Coronation Street.
The Happy Valley actress
(inset) played Raquel
Wolstenhulme in the ITV soap
in the 1990s but she claims that
the show has changed.
Asked if she had ever
been asked to return to
the cobbles, she said:
“No... The show I was
in doesn’t exist any
more. Now to the next
question: ‘Would you
ever go back?’ No.”
Lancashire was
speaking ahead of her role
in the Channel 4 drama
Kiri, in which she plays
Miriam, a social care
worker caught up in a
child abduction case.
The Bafta-winning
actress, 53, said she
was excited to be
working at a time when
drama was valued.
Omega Holidays cannot be held responsible for the non-appearance of a particular actor/actress; no refunds will be given
in this event. Whilst we always try to ensure that parties are seated together, very occasionally, it may be necessary for
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NEWS
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42-43
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29 DECEMBER 2017
23
AFGHANISTAN
SYRIA
Dozens killed in Isis suicide attack
on Shia cultural centre in Kabul
Child evacuees
may be used
as bargaining
chips, UN warns
By Tom Embury-Dennis
and Lizzie Dearden
By Sarah Dadouch
Isis has claimed responsibility for a
coordinated bomb attack on a Shia
cultural centre in the Afghan capital
Kabul, according to its propaganda
channel Amaq.
Afghan officials say at least 41
people died and 30 people were
injured in the attack yesterday
morning.
According to Amaq, three bombs
were detonated before a militant
in a suicide vest stormed the
Tibian Social and Cultural Centre.
The attack occurred during a panel
discussion on the 38th anniversary
of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.
Many of the victims were students,
according to witnesses.
The blast reportedly ripped apart
the offices of the neighbouring
Afghan Voice news agency. Amaq
said any deaths of journalists were
accidental.
S aye d A b b a s H u s s a i n i , a
journalist at the news agency, said
there appeared to have been more
than one explosion, following an
initial blast at the entrance to the
compound. He said one reporter had
been killed and one injured.
Photographs sent by witnesses
showed what appeared to be serious
damage at the site, in a heavily
Shia Muslim area in the west of the
capital, and a number of dead and
wounded people on the ground.
The International Committee of
the Red Cross (ICRC) resumed
evacuations of critically ill people
from Syria’s biggest remaining
siege yesterday, after bringing some
individuals out of the area near the
capital, Damascus, on Wednesday.
The evacuation, which started
on Tuesday after a deal between
Damascus and a rebel faction,
involved letting some patients leave
rebel-held eastern Ghouta in return
for insurgents releasing detainees.
International aid agencies voiced
concern about the terms of the deal.
UN humanitarian adviser Jan
Egeland told the BBC: “It is a not a
good agreement if they exchange sick
children for detainees – that means
children become bargaining chips in
some tug of war.”
Valerie Petitpierre, the ICRC’s
operations co-ordinator for the
region, said it continued to insist
that humanitarian action should not
be used as a bargaining chip. Last
month, the United Nations called
on world powers to help arrange the
medical evacuation of 500 people,
including 167 children, from eastern
Ghouta, dubbing it a “humanitarian
emergency”.
The agency estimates that 400,000
civilians have been under siege in
eastern Ghouta by President Bashar
al-Assad’s forces.
The enclave is a densely populated
pocket of satellite towns and farms
and the only major rebel stronghold
near Damascus. The military has
steadily defeated pockets of armed
rebellion in western Syria over the
past year, with the help of Russian air
power and Iranian-backed militias.
According to a report
this month by Reporters
without Borders, Afghanistan
is one of the world’s most
dangerous countries for
media workers.
IN BEIRUT
Thirty people were injured in the attack, which also ripped apart the offices of the Afghan Voice news agency GETTY
Taliban spokesman Zabihullah
Mujahid issued a statement on
Twitter earlier denying involvement
B i raj Pat n a i k , A m n e s ty
I n t e r n a t i o n a l ’s S o u t h A s i a
director, said: “This gruesome
attack underscores the dangers
faced by Afghan civilians. In one
of the deadliest years on record,
journalists and other civilians
continue to be ruthlessly targeted
by armed groups.
“With the Afghan capital hit
once again, no one can credibly
claim that Kabul is safe. The
European governments who insist
on this dangerous fiction by forcibly
returning Afghans are putting their
lives in danger.”
John R Bass, US ambassador
to Afghanistan, said: “I strongly
condemn today’s horrific and
indiscriminate attack on civilians.
“On behalf of all my colleagues,
I extend sincere and heartfelt
condolences to the families and
friends of the victims. We remain
confident the Afghan government
and people, supported by their
friends and partners, will defeat
those behind these terrible acts.”
Military officials have identified
Afghanistan as one of several hubs
for Isis following the loss of its selfdeclared “caliphate” in Syria and
Iraq. THE INDEPENDENT
REUTERS
UNITED STATES
WHITE HOUSE
PEOPLE
Republican loses last-ditch
attempt to overturn defeat
Singer accuses
former Trump aide
of sexual assault
Hero sheriff tells how he
saved boy from frozen pond
By Lolita C Baldor
By Michelle Price
IN WASHINGTON
IN UTAH
A singer and potential
congressional candidate says
she has filed a sexual assault
complaint against President
Donald Trump’s former campaign
manager for hitting her twice on
her buttocks during a Washington
gathering in November.
Joy Villa, a Trump backer who
wore a “Make America Great
Again” dress at the Grammys this
year, said she plans to meet with
detectives in Washington next
week about the complaint against
Corey Lewandowski.
Ms Villa said she was initially
reluctant to come forward but
said she called police after a friend
who witnessed the incident spoke
about it publicly. AP
A Utah sheriff’s deputy said he was
desperate and numb from the cold
as he punched and stomped his way
into a frozen pond on Christmas
Day to pull out an eight-year-old boy
who had fallen through the ice while
chasing his dog.
With cuts on his forearms,
Washington County officer Aaron
Thompson said that rescuers believe the child was in the water for
about 30 minutes until he rescued
him. “I couldn’t feel anything. I
didn’t notice anything when I was
doing it,” he said. “I knew that time
was of the essence. I had a very
short window to get that child out
of the water.”
Sheriff ’s Lieutenant David
Crouse said the boy had been taken
By Andrew Buncombe
IN NEW YORK
Alabama election officials have officially declared Democrat Doug Jones
the winner of a special Senate election held earlier this month.
Mr Jones defeated Republican Roy Moore (inset) by
about 22,000 votes on 12
December and pulled off
the first Democratic Senate victory in Alabama for
25 years. Mr Moore’s campaign was overshadowed by
accusations of sexual misconduct involving teenage girls that
occurred decades ago.
He refused to concede the race
and filed a last-ditch legal action yesterday claiming there were voting
irregularities that needed to be investigated and eventually a new election
run. A judge rejected his claims and
denied his attempt to stop officials
making his defeat official. Alabama
state officials also said they found no
evidence of fraud.
“This is not a Republican or Democrat issue, as election integrity
should matter to everyone,”
Mr Moore said when he
announced the lawsuit,
claiming he had affidavits
from three “national election integrity experts”.
His filing also
called for the establishment of a fraud investigation and for a new election.
Mr Jones, the victor, filed a counter
motion asking a judge to dismiss Mr
Moore’s complaint. Attorney Joe
Espy wrote that Mr Moore has no
legal ground for asking the court to
block Mr Jones’ win. THE INDEPENDENT
to hospital in Salt Lake City but
he did not have further details on
his condition.
The boy fell through the ice in
New Harmony, north of St George.
After arriving at the scene, Mr
Thompson, who had served on
a search and rescue dive team,
punched and stomped through the
ice to reach the boy after a woman
reported seeing his hand flailing.
The deputy stomped to break
through the ice and work his way
deeper, pounding with his hands
and fists. “As the ice got thicker, I
couldn’t break it with my arms and
my fists anymore, so I had to jump
up on top of the ice, putting my
weight on it, and then pound on it to
get it to break,” he said.
Mr Thompson, praised by
Sheriff Cory Pulsipher as a “hero”,
was treated for hypothermia. AP
24
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CRYPTIC CROSSWORD
No 2150 BY NESTOR
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B U T T R
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ME N A C
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AUSTRALIA
Daughter of
charity boss
gets donated
gig tickets
By Rebecca Jones
Image: Ian Dickin
A Salvation Army centre in Australia
has promised to reimburse the cost
of seven tickets to a Paul McCartney
concert intended for homeless recipients after two were given to the
daughter of the boss of the charity’s
centre in Melbourne.
The tickets were donated by Victoria resident Chris McDonald,
who spent much of his youth sleeping rough and said he wanted to
“give people something unusual for
themselves”.
The Salvation Army centre that
received the tickets initially gave all
seven away. However, two were returned on the day of the concert at
AAMI Park in Melbourne on 5 December. With the centre unable to
find anyone to take them, the decision
was taken to give them to Ash Nottle, the daughter of Salvation Army
manager Major Brendan Nottle, and
her partner.
However, the pair were seen by Mr
McDonald, who said he spotted two
“well-dressed” people in the seats
he had bought and donated. He then
searched the Salvation Army’s Facebook page, which revealed the couple’s identities.
Speaking to Victoria’s The Age, Mr
McDonald said he was disappointed
at the decision. “Obviously, this was
not the spirit of my donation and I feel
very upset by this,” he said.
Major Nottle admitted that the
centre had “got it wrong”. However
he suggested that concert tickets
were not the best donation to a homeless shelter. He said: “When you’re
working with homeless people – to
be blunt, do homeless people need
tickets to Paul McCartney or do they
need a roof over their heads? I think
the answer’s pretty obvious.”
NEWS
2-34
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VOICES
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BUSINESS SPORT
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Bosnian
Muslims
charged over
war crimes
Dissenters detained
and papers shut
down in Turkey
An acclaimed investigative reporter
has been ejected from court during
his defence speech and more media
outlets purged by presidential decree in Turkey, in an escalation of the
crackdown since the attempted coup
on 15 July 2016.
“The government treats every citizen who does not agree with them as
terrorists,” journalist Ahmet Sik told
an Istanbul court on Monday, in a trial
of 18 staffers from the newspaper
Cumhuriyet on charges of aiding outlawed groups. Judge Abdurrahman
Orkun Dag silenced him after two
minutes, saying his defence was
political and inadmissible.
On Sunday, emergency
decree 695 shut down
two newspapers, seven
associations, seven foundations and a private
company, and dismissed
2,756 public sector workers. A further decree
awarded immunity to civilians who defended the government against the attempted coup,
leading the Turkish Bar Associations
president Metin Feylzioglu to warn
the decree could lead to vigilantism.
In its end-of-year round-up, Reporters Without Borders identified
Turkey as the world’s biggest jailer of
journalists per capita. According to
PEN International, 152 writers, journalists and media workers are currently in prison, more than 250 have
been arrested since July 2016 and 183
media outlets have been shut down.
Overall in Turkey, at least 150,000
25
BOSNIAHERZEGOVINA
WORLD FOCUS
By Joshua Neicho
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
people have been dismissed from
their posts since the coup attempt, including nearly a quarter of all judges.
Mr Sik and his co-defendants are
charged with spreading propaganda
for groups including the outlawed
Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) and
the so-called Gulenist Terrorist Organisation (FETO). FETO refers to
supporters of the exiled cleric Fethullah Gulen, who has been accused of
instigating the coup.
Rights groups point out the irony
of these charges, given Cumhuriyet’s
history of criticising Islamist and
separatist groups. Mr Sik is a longstanding critic of the Gulen movement, previously imprisoned for a
book investigating the cleric’s
influence.
Mr Sik will have been
in custody for a year on
Saturday; Cumhuriyet
editor-in-chief Murat
Sabuncu and chairman
of the board Akin Atalay
will have served nearly 14
months. “Ahmet was not insulting anyone, he was not shouting,” Mr Sik’s lawyer Can Atalay tells
i about his client’s court appearance.
“We shouldn’t keep talking as if we
had rule of law any more.
“Without real commitment, these
journalists will not get released,” says
Erol Onderoglu, a Reporters Without
Borders representative on trial himself for expressing solidarity with a
Kurdish newspaper.
Priority applications have been
admitted by the European Court
of Human Rights in the cases of 10
Turkish journalists.
By Daria Sito-Sucic
IN SARAJEVO
George Weah, right, took 61.5 per cent of the vote REUTERS
LIBERIA
Footballer Weah
wins presidential
election
By Oz Katerji
Former football star George Weah
has been announced as the winner
of the Liberian presidential election, beating his rival, Vice President Joseph Boakai.
Mr Weah, 51, the only African
footballer to have won the Fifa
World Player of the Year award, in
1995, got 61.5 per cent of the vote,
based on 98.1 per cent of ballots
cast, the election commission said
late yesterday. Mr Boakai was on
38.5 per cent.
Mr Weah had been widely tipped
to win the election, which was beset
by delays. Prior to the announcement of the results, unofficial tallies
by media outlets had consistently
shown Mr Weah, a former Monaco,
AC Milan, Manchester City and
Paris Saint-Germain player, ahead
in the second-round run-off vote,
which is meant to herald the first
democratic transition of power in
Liberia since 1944.
The announcement by commission chairman Jerome Korkoyah
means Mr Weah will succeed outgoing president and Nobel Peace
Prize winner Ellen Johnson Sirleaf
next month.
Sarajevo prosecutors have indicted
14 Bosnian Muslim wartime army officers and soldiers for alleged murder,
torture and persecution of Bosnian
Serb civilians around Konjic during
the country’s 1990s war.
Ten of the indicted men are
already in detention, the Sarajevo
state prosecutor’s office said in a
statement yesterday.
“Fourteen defendants are accused
of war crimes including murder of
several dozen Serb civilians, torture,
robbery and persecution of nearly
the whole Serb population from the
Konjic area.”
Four Bosnian Serb army officers
have also been charged for alleged
genocide against Muslims who were
fleeing Srebrenica after it fell into
Serb hands in July 1995.
Bosnian Serbs, Bosniak Muslims
and Croats alike committed war
crimes during Bosnia’s 1992-95
conflict, though the majority of those
convicted by local and international
war crimes courts have been Serbs.
The war began in 1992 when
Bosnian Serb forces, in response to a
Muslim-Croat vote for independence
from Serbian-led federal Yugoslavia,
attacked cities and towns aiming to
carve out an ethnically pure Serb
state.
Bosniaks joined forces with
Croats in regions where they were
in a majority, such as Konjic, from
which they persecuted S erb
inhabitants, but they later fought
each other.
More than 100,000 were killed and
about two million driven from their
homes during the war. REUTERS
JAPAN
Parents held after daughter, imprisoned for 15 years, freezes to death
IN TOKYO
A couple have been arrested after
their 33-year-old daughter froze to
death in a tiny room where they had
confined her for years because they
believed she had a form of mental illness that made her violent.
Osaka police said Airi Kakimoto’s
body was found in a state of extreme
malnutrition after her parents reported the death on Saturday. She
was 4ft 9in tall and weighed just
In tomorrow’s
three stone. Police said Yasutaka
Kakimoto, 55, and Yukari Kakimoto, 53, confessed that they fed their
daughter once a day and kept her in
a 32sq ft room for at least 15 years.
“Our daughter was mentally ill and,
from age 16 or 17, she became violent,
so we kept her inside the room,” police quoted her parents as saying.
People with mental and physical
disabilities and their families can
still suffer stigma in Japan despite
some changes in public attitudes.
The parents found their daugh-
ter’s body on 18 December but they
reported the death on Saturday.
“We wanted to be together with our
daughter,” police quoted them as
saying. Police said the couple were
arrested on suspicion of illegally disposing of a body. REUTERS
One-minute Wijuko
How to play Place 1 – 9 once
in the grid, obeying the sums
between pairs of squares
12
James Norton turns in an explosive
performance in the New Year’s
must-see show. Gerard Gilbert on McMafia
9
8
16
7
8
12
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
By Kaori Kaneko
26
NEWS
REVIEW
OF THE
YEAR
PART 3
THOSE WHO DIED
ALEXANDER CHANCELLOR
The man credited with
transforming Conservative
magazine The Spectator died,
aged 77, in January.
LORD SNOWDON
The Earl of Snowdon, husband
of the late Princess Margaret,
died in February, aged 86.
A successful photographer and
filmmaker, he also coxed the
Cambridge University boat in
the 1950 Boat Race.
SIR GERALD KAUFMAN
The Labour MP became the Father
of the House of Commons in 2015,
before he died in February, at the
age of 86.
SIR NICHOLAS MOSLEY
He was the son of Sir Oswald
Mosley, former leader of the British
Union of Fascists, and his first wife,
Lady Cynthia. A half-brother of
Max Mosley, he became a successful
author, his last book being
published in 2014. He died aged 93.
LADY HEYHOE FLINT
She captained the England
ladies’ cricket squad from
1966 to 1978, and played in the
team for 22 years. She was the
first female cricketer to hit a
six in a Test match.
JILL SAWARD
She became a campaigner on issues
relating to sexual violence after
an attack at her family home
in Ealing in 1986. She died in
Wolverhampton in January, a week
before her 52nd birthday.
TAM DALYELL
Sir Thomas Dalyell of the Binns,
better known as Tam, was a
Scottish Labour MP for more
than 40 years, before his death in
January, aged 84.
CLARE HOLLINGWORTH
The English journalist was the
first correspondent to report the
outbreak of the Second World War,
for The Daily Telegraph. She died in
January, aged 105.
SIR JOHN HURT
The Naked Civil Servant and
Elephant Man actor died in January,
aged 77. He was described by
director David Lynch as “simply the
greatest actor in the world”.
RUPERT CORNWELL
The award-winning veteran foreign
correspondent, formerly of The
Independent, died at the age of 71.
He was described in an obituary as
having “understated genius”.
MARTIN McGUINNESS
The former Sinn Féin politician
and one of the main architects of
the Good Friday agreement died in
Derry in March, aged 66.
TIM PIGOTT-SMITH
The actor was best known
for his performance as
Ronald Merrick in the
1984 production of The
Jewel in the Crown. He died
in April aged 70.
JOHN NOAKES
The television personality
who co-presented Blue
Peter in the 1960s and
1970s died in May, aged
83. He was the children’s
programme’s longestserving presenter.
SIR ROGER MOORE
The English actor
best known for playing
James Bond in seven
films died in Switzerland
in May from cancer.
CHUCK BERRY
The American singer and
rock’n’roll pioneer was one
of the first musicians to be
inducted into the Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame. He died in
March aged 90.
MICHAEL BOND
The celebrated children’s author,
best known for Paddington, died in
London aged 91, not far from the
station that bore his bear’s name.
LADY MOUNTBATTEN
OF BURMA
The Queen’s third cousin
was the daughter of Earl
Mountbatten of Burma, who
was murdered by the IRA
in 1979. Lady Mountbatten
survived the incident, and
she died in June
at the age
of 93.
PETER SALLIS
The English actor, best known for
his performance as Cleggy in Last of
the Summer Wine, died in June, aged
96, the only actor to appear in all
295 episodes of the sitcom.
HELEN DUNMORE
The poet and children’s author,
a fellow of the Royal Society of
Literature and winner of the Orange
prize for A Spell of Winter, died from
cancer in June, aged 64.
ROSEMARY ANNE SISSON
The English television writer and
novelist was described by the
dramatist Ian Curteis as “the Miss
Marple of British playwriting”
for her work including Upstairs
Downstairs, The Irish RM and The
Bretts. She died in July aged 93.
IAN BRADY
One of the two Moors
Murderers, with Myra
Hindley, he died in May aged
79 at a high security prison in
Merseyside. His ashes were
disposed of at sea in October.
NEWS
2-34
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
35-47
TV
42-43
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
50-51
55-64
CAROL LEE SCOTT
27
KEITH CHEGWIN
The actress who played the
much-loved television character
Grotbags on the eponymous ITV
show died in July at the age of 74.
GLEN CAMPBELL
The country singer, known for
classics such as “Wichita Lineman”
and “Galveston”, died in August,
aged 81, from Alzheimer’s.
DUKE OF BEAUFORT
David Somerset, the English
landowner and aristocrat whose
family home Badminton House is
home to the international horse
trials, died in August, aged 89.
LADY CUDLIPP
LADY LUCAN
The estranged wife of the
seventh Earl of Lucan, who
went missing after allegedly
murdering his children’s
nanny in 1974, died in
Belgravaia in September, at
the age of 80.
Jodi Cudlipp, who was the wife of
former Daily Mirror editor Hugh
Cudlipp, died in August at the age of
97. A journalist in her own right, she
edited both Woman’s Illustrated and
Woman’s Mirror.
KEITH BARRON
The television actor who starred
in a huge array of programmes
including Upstairs, Downstairs,
The Odd Man and Duty Free, died in
November, at the age of 83.
LIZ MacKEAN
The BBC journalist, who died
in August, was best known for
her work on an exposé of
Jimmy Savile as a paedophile,
controversially pulled from
Newsnight in December 2011. She
later won a London Press Club
award for her work on the story.
HUGH HEFNER
The founder of Playboy magazine
died in September, aged 91, after
a long life serving the world’s
bunny fantasies.
PIERRE BERGÉ
TARA
PALMER-TOMKINSON
The British socialite died,
aged 45, in February. Her
sister, Santa Montefiore,
remembered her as
“vibrant, smiley, funny,
exuberant, mischievous”.
The French co-founder of the
fashion house Yves Saint Laurent
died aged 86, six months after
he married architect
Madison Cox.
SI NEWHOUSE
ANITA PALLENBERG
The actress and model – a
1960s “It Girl” – died in June.
Pallenberg, often credited
as the muse of the Rolling
Stones, had three children
with guitarist Keith Richards.
JEREMY HUTCHINSON QC
CHARLES MANSON
The American criminal and
cult leader died, aged 83, in
California in late November.
DAPHNE CARUANA GALIZIA
The Maltese journalist was killed in
a car bomb attack, aged 53.
DANIELLE DARRIEUX
The French actress, a star of
black and white films,
died in October, at the
age of 100.
JOY
LOFTHOUSE
SIR BRUCE
FORSYTH
The
broadcasting
legend,
whose career
spanned more
than 75 years,
died aged 89 in
August following a
succession of illnesses.
It was nice seeing
you, Bruce.
The chairman of international
magazine publisher Condé Nast,
Samuel Irving Newhouse died in
October at the age of 89. His cousin
Jonathan retains control of the
family business.
FATS DOMINO
Antoine Dominique “Fats” Domino
from New Orleans was a pioneer
of rock’n’roll music, who, in his
lifetime, sold more than 65 million
records. He died in Louisiana in
October aged 89.
proposal the second time, on the
grounds that her father would not
allow her to marry a teetotaller.
The Second
World War
pilot died in
November,
aged 94. She
was part of a
group of female
pilots known as the
Attagirls.
PAMELA POWELL
The wife of Conservative politician
Enoch Powell died in
November, aged 91. She
only accepted her
would-be husband’s
LIZ DAWN
The actress
was best known
for her role as
Vera Duckworth
in the soap opera
Coronation Street.
She died in September at
the age of 77.
Lord Hutchinson was an Oxfordeducated barrister whose
most famous case was
the Lady Chatterley
trial in 1960. Upon his
death in November,
aged 102, he had been
the oldest life peer in
the Lords.
RODNEY BEWES
The actor and writer
died in November, aged
79. His best-known part was Bob
Ferris in the BBC sitcom The Likely
Lads, which ran for two years in the
1960s, and its 1970s sequel.
JANA NOVOTNA
The Wimbledon tennis champion
in 1998 died in November, aged 49,
from cancer.
MALCOLM YOUNG
The Scottish musician who, with
his brother Angus, was a member
of the hard rock
band AC/DC died
in November aged
64, having lived
with dementia for
several years.
ANTONIO CARLUCCIO
The Italian chef died in November,
following a fall at home. His
restaurant chain opened in 1999.
JIMMY HOOD
He was a Labour MP for almost
30 years and a trade union official
during the 1984-85 miners’ strike.
He died aged 69 in December.
CHRISTINE KEELER
The model who became
entwined in the 1963
Profumo Affair died
this month, aged 75.
Her son, Seymour
Platt, said that
“she earned her
place in British
history but at a huge
personal price”.
JEAN WOODROFFE
She was a lady-in-waiting to the
then Princess Elizabeth and the
Queen after the Coronation. She
died this month, aged 94.
DAVID CASSIDY
The teenage heart-throb, actor and
pop star died this month, having
lived with dementia.
JOHNNY HALLYDAY
The singer, known for popularising
rock’n’roll in France, died this
month, aged 74.
KING MICHAEL OF ROMANIA
Michael I, who was King of
Romania twice, died this month
aged 96. He abdicated in 1947.
ANNETTE PAGE
The English ballerina
was a principal dancer
with the Royal Ballet,
and married to fellow
dancer Ronald Hynd.
MAX CLIFFORD
The celebrity
publicist,
convicted of
historical
sexual offences,
died in prison this
month, aged 74.
28
NEWS
THE WEIRDER
STATE OF THE NATION
O
n 31 May, YouGov
released a controversial
opinion poll that
correctly predicted the
general election would
lead to a hung parliament. Polling
isn’t always so serious, of course.
Other things that surveys revealed
in 2017 include:
l
British people overwhelmingly
prefer dogs to cats.
l
68 per cent of people in the UK
have their washing machines in
the kitchen, compared with only
9 per cent in the US.
l
35 per cent of Brits think they
could outrun a Tyrannosaurus
rex*
l
Eight per cent of Brits and
seven per cent of Americans
worry about people posting
hurtful things about them online,
compared to 34 per cent of
French people.
l
60 per cent of Brits make
rectangular sandwiches while 28
per cent make triangular ones.
l
A quarter of young Brits got
sunburnt during the heatwave in
the first weekend of April.
l
Harry Potter fans think the
celebrity most likely to be in
Slytherin is Donald Trump;
Marry Berry in Hufflepuff; David
Attenborough in Ravenclaw; and,
slightly unimaginatively, Daniel
Radcliffe the one most likely to be
in Gryffindor.
l
Only 5 per cent of 18- to 24-yearolds think it’s fashionable to wear
muddy jeans
Statistics show Brits prefer
pooches, even French bulldogs, to
owning a cat PA
l
Brits are equally split on whether
or not to flush the toilet if they go
in the middle of the night.
l
23 per cent of people think the
1980s was the best decade for
music and 22 per cent think it was
the 1960s, while only 4 per cent
think it was the 2000s and 2 per
cent think it’s been the 2010s.
* They’re probably right. Scientists
concluded this year that the average
T. rex top speed was about 1mph
faster than the average human
top speed, so the speedier runners
among us could have outpaced
them. In fact, the T. rex couldn’t run
at all. New computer modelling of
their movement has revealed that if
they’d tried to, their legs would have
snapped under their own weight.
Research has shown
that Tyrannosaurus rex
may not have fared well
in a 100m dash GETTY
THE YEAR OF FAKES – AND FAKE FAKES
P
eople who thought they’d
been responsibly buying
fake fur in British shops
found they had actually
been purchasing fake
fake fur – in other words, real fur.
Sky News bought items labelled as
artificial fur from multiple shops,
and found the fibres came from
such animals as rabbits, foxes,
raccoons and cats. One father told
the BBC, “You don’t want a raccoon
pom-pom on your daughter’s head.”
Fake fake food was also found
this year. People in Nigeria were
warned to be careful after police
seized 2.5 tonnes of artificial rice
made of plastic. Similar stories
cropped up elsewhere in Africa,
and in India news reports said
more than 30 people had been
arrested for selling plastic rice and
eggs. However, all this news of fake
food was itself fake. There is such a
thing as “plastic rice”, but it’s used
in shipping and has never found
its way into the food chain. For one
thing, so-called fake rice is more
expensive than real rice.
One real fake that made the
news was an entire US embassy in
Accra, Ghana. Late last year, news
broke that for 10 years Ghana had
had two US embassies – one real
and one fake. The fake, complete
with a United States flag outside,
was a money-making scam which
sold a range of false ID documents,
fake visas and fraudulently
obtained real visas. Possible
giveaways included the fact that
the “embassy’”was in a shabby twostorey building with a corrugated
iron roof, and that it was staffed by
Turkish people pretending to be
Americans. The organised crime
ring that ran it even advertised it
on billboards across West Africa.
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SIDE OF 2017
April’s heatwave caught out
many UK residents, with
a quarter of young Brits
getting sunburnt GETTY
TWELVE
MONTHS OF
COCK-UPS
By James Harkin, Andrew Hunter Murray,
Anna Ptaszynski and Dan Schreiber
WHAT WE’VE LEARNED
The biggest blunders
have included:
Australia was loaned an
irreplaceable collection of
18th-century flowers from a
Paris museum.
COCK-UP: Owing to a paperwork
error, Australia’s biosecurity
officers incinerated them on
arrival.
A new Polar Fox Military Combat
Work Desert Boot was released.
COCK-UP: The boot had to be
withdrawn when a customer
discovered that the footprints it
left included a swastika pattern.
A Canadian politician sent a
reply-to-all email to 100 civil
servants concerning local
infrastructure.
COCK-UP: The message he sent
contained nothing but a picture
of a naked woman with her legs
spread.
X-rated TV channel Babestation
advertised a live sex chatline with
an 098 prefix for viewers to call.
COCK-UP: Many Irish viewers
forgot to use the international
dialling code when calling, and as a
result inundated the residents of
the small Irish town of Westport
in County Mayo, whose numbers
began with 098 as well, with sexy
late-night phone calls.
Japanese government officials
held a press conference to warn
the public about a deadly tick,
bringing a live one along with
them for the media to see.
COCK-UP: The officials dropped
the tick during the press call and
were unable to find it. They were
forced to spray the room with
insecticide and leave it overnight.
FA
KE
The exterior of the fake US embassy in Accra, Ghana US DEPT OF STATE
S
cience made
great leaps
forward this
year, but here
are some of the
more quirky or unlikely
discoveries:
l
A shrimp whose claw
makes a noise so loud it
can kill other fish.
l
Larvae of the greater
wax moth eat plastic.
l
Eating yogurt can cure
depression in mice.
l
People who swear often
are more honest than
those who don’t.
l
Dogs’ favourite music
genre is reggae.
l
Chimpanzees have no
interest in music at all.
l
A new organ in our
bodies, the mesentery,
holds our intestine in
shape.
l
Elephants poo six times
faster than dogs.
l
Twelve new cloud types.
l
Humans’ oldest known
ancestor didn’t have an
anus.
l
Being “liked” on
Facebook doesn’t make
you happier.
Main: Homomutatis was one of the new types of cloud
Above: greater wax moth larvae feast on plastic PA
l
Male great tits build
their homes next to
birds with similar
personalities.
l
The first new antibiotic
was found since 1987.
l
Ants navigate by the
sun, and rescue their
wounded.
l
Internet withdrawal
increases blood
pressure.
l
Bees can be taught to
play football.
l
Some beetles disguise
themselves as ants’
bottoms.
l
An extinct turkey the
size of a kangaroo.
l
A continent just off the
coast of New Zealand.
l
467 million hectares
of previously
unreported
forest.
l
98 per cent of
British people
think they’re in
the nicest 50 per cent.
l
l
Bees have astonishing learning capabilities and when
shown how to score a goal can replicate it IIDA LOKOLA/QMUL
Five species of truffle,
one of which has been
named after Oreos
because of its sweet
smell.
Tyrannosaurus rex had
no lips.
l
A parasite can control
fish from inside their
eyeballs.
l
3.6m more Adélie
penguins.
This is an edited excerpt
from ‘The Book of the
Year: The weirder
side of 2017’ by the
‘No Such Thing As A
Fish’ podcast team
(£12.99, Random
House Books),
out now
30
NEWS
David
Walliams’s
children’s
book
‘Bad Dad’
topped the
Christmas
charts
WHERE WE
WENT
MEDIA
The decision by Rupert Murdoch
(below) to sell the Fox film studio
and most of his entertainment assets to Disney in a $66bn (£50bn)
deal marked the end of an era.
The downsizing reflected a
new reality: the Murdoch clan no
longer has deep enough pockets
to compete with Netflix, Amazon
or other digital titans which now
control direct access to consumers
via video streaming. The deal
took some of the political sting
out of Fox’s vexed bid to take
control of Sky, currently being
examined by the Competition and
Markets Authority.
The BBC came under scrutiny
with the departure of head of news
James Harding, tired of “pedalling
into the wind” and promising to set
up a news venture with
its own “clear point of
view”. His successor,
Fran Unsworth,
must negotiate
job cuts and
position the BBC
as an authoritative
corrective to
“fake news”, even if
that means calling out
falsehoods generated by politicians
during Brexit discussions.
Despite on-screen successes
such as Blue Planet II (top) and Line
of Duty, the BBC was engulfed by a
gender pay gap row after it emerged
than only a third of its top earners
are female and the top seven are all
male. Director-general Tony Hall
announced sweeping reviews as
high-profile personalities such as
Clare Balding demanded urgent
action. Frontline female news
and radio presenters will be the
first beneficiaries.
Channel 4, fighting off
government plans to move its
HQ out of London, celebrated the
success of The Great British Bake
Off, poached from the BBC for
£75m and rejuvenated with a new
presenting line-up.
The music industry celebrated
a streaming-inspired return to
profitability by embracing grime.
Stormzy took the awards for his
debut album Gang Signs & Prayer
while Ed Sheeran forced the Official
Charts Company to change its rules
after songs from his 2.5m-selling ÷
(Divide) album flooded the
Adam Sherwin
singles chart.
This summer was the busiest in
British aviation history, with more
than three quarter of a million
flights taking to the skies – a five
per cent increase on 2016.
The pressure on the tourism
industry was almost tangible:
there were protests in Barcelona
and Venice, the island of Skye
called for help with overcrowding,
and there were queues
causing congestion in airports
across Europe.
An insuppressible appetite
for travel is now starting to rock
the industry’s foundations, too,
with a shortage of pilots causing
turbulence for several airlines.
In spite of the weak pound and
two terrorist attacks on popular
beachside destinations, we
continued to head south in 2017.
Spain remains the top holiday
destination for Britons and it has
enjoyed – though some might
say suffered – record numbers
of tourist arrivals this year, with
Britain still its biggest market.
July saw a 10 per cent rise in
visitor numbers in Spain from
the previous year – a staggering
10.5 million arrivals. And even
after the high-profile attacks
in Barcelona and Cambrils,
Catalonia remains the UK’s top
tourist destination within Spain.
Perhaps less surprisingly,
domestic tourism has received
a Brexit boost. Abta, the travel
association, reports growth in
holidays at home and predicts
that more than two-thirds of
people in the UK will plan at least
one staycation in 2018.
Visit Britain revealed that
we spent £10.1bn on domestic
holidays from January to August,
up 5 per cent on last year.
Meanwhile, Visit Scotland
confirmed that many of the
country’s top attractions had
record numbers of visitors.
CHRIS
JACKSON/PA
D
WHAT WE READ
avid Walliams enjoyed
a lucrative year in 2017,
with sales of his latest
title, Bad Dad, exceeding 60,000 in one week
alone. Published in November, the
tale of a boy trying to break his father out of prison topped the Christmas book charts, according to the
trade publication, The Bookseller.
Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver
shifted more than 59,000 copies of
his recipe book 5 Ingredients
in the week before
Christmas. Despite
coming second to
Walliams in the
Christmas charts,
Oliver was poised to
be the best-selling
author of the year
with 700,000 copies of 5
Ingredients sold compared
to 568,000 copies of Bad Dad.
The Man Booker Prize
was awarded in October to
George Saunders (inset) for his
experimental first novel, Lincoln in
the Bardo. The author became the
second American in two years to
scoop the award.
E L James returned with the
second instalment in her new Fifty
Shades of Grey series, told from
Christian Grey’s perspective.
Darker shot to the top of the book
charts upon its release but failed
to match the success achieved by
James’s previous offerings.
According to Amazon’s 2017
consumer trends report, more than
half of its top 10 best-sellers this
year were cook books.
Fitness coach Joe Wicks
featured twice in the top 10,
with Lean in 15 at number
three (behind Oliver’s 5
Ingredients at number
one), and Cooking for
Family and Friends
at number six. First
published in 2011, Yuval
Noah Harari’s popular nonfiction title Sapiens enjoyed
continued success this year and
took second place on Amazon’s list.
Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls
– an anthology by Elena Favilli and
Francesca Cavallo which features
100 stories about female role
models – had mass appeal too.
Katie Grant
Sophie Lam
A
WHAT WE WATCHED ON TV
dystopian view of the
world and the rights
of women became the
unlikely television hit
of 2017. Margaret
Atwood’s The Handmaid’s
Tale on Channel 4 was a
tense thriller and horror
story of a future world
where fertility rates have
dropped and women are
subjugated, with those
still fertile conscripted
as handmaids for the
ruling elite.
In a year in which
civil and women’s
rights made headlines,
no more so than with
the Harvey Weinstein
revelations and Donald
Trump’s US presidency, Atwood’s
totalitarian and misogynistic
regime of Gilead looked
frighteningly real.
The role of women was also
brought to the fore by Netflix’s
historical series The Crown
(starring Claire Foy, pictured),
documenting the Queen’s reign
during the 1950s and 1960s.
Nicole Kidman’s transition
to the small screen saw her
star in two of the hits of
the year – Big Little Lies
and Top of the Lake. Back
for another helping was
the BBC’s Blue Planet II.
New technology revealed
previously unseen
wonders of the watery
world with Sir David
Attenborough’s narration steering
a steady course through it all.
Tom Hardy enhanced his
reputation as a sex symbol playing
James Delaney in the BBC’s
Georgian period drama Taboo.
The BBC’s Strictly Come
Dancing finally secured Saturday
night dominance over ITV’s
The X Factor topping 11 million
viewers in the ratings war almost
every week.
David Lynch’s unsettling world
of Twin Peaks made an unsettling
but successful return 25 years
on in 2017 on Sky Atlantic. And
the penultimate series of Game of
Thrones on the same channel did
not disappoint its fans, even with a
series of script leaks.
Sally Guyoncourt
When tech
returned to a
simpler past
Nostalgia is a strange thing,
especially when it’s applied to
technology, given that the point
of tech is to improve on the past.
But there was no shortage of
nostalgia technology in 2017.
It included the resurrection of
NEWS
2-34
the iconic early mobile phone the
Nokia 3310, reborn with a colour
screen and tiny circular buttons
for texting.
For £50 it promised a full month
of battery life on a single charge
(I found it was actually closer to
a week) and a return to a simpler
time – although in the event, texting
was a nightmare and the phone’s
2.5G internet connection was
barely usable.
Given how reliant one becomes
on smartphones for navigation,
entertainment and practicalities,
the sheer inconvenience of giving
up these things far outweighed
any smugness that could be gained
from using a phone for its original
purpose: making phone calls.
Meanwhile Polaroid resurrected
its OneStep camera from the early
1990s. The new model cost £109.99,
but the true expense is in its film:
a whopping £14.99 to £18.99 for
eight shots. Just as in years gone
by, there’s no room for error when
each picture is worth around £2.30.
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Rather than simply pointing and
pressing, much more thought had
to go into lighting and composition.
Nintendo’s SNES Classic Mini
was perhaps the most cynical
example of nostalgia mania,
but also the most fun. There’s
something bonkers about paying
£79.99 for an emulation of a
console first released in 1990 (you
can’t even plug cartridges in, all the
games are inbuilt), but the games
are compelling.
Rhiannon Williams
Ryan Gosling as K in ‘Bladerunner 2049’ STEPHEN VAUGHAN/ALCON
D
WHAT WE SAW AT
THE CINEMA
anny Boyle’s T2 Trainspotting kicked-off a year
that turned out to be big
for sequels. It returned
21 years on from the
original film to revisit the lives of
anti-heroes Renton, Sick Boy, Spud
and Begbie as they faced middle-age
and the demons of their past.
Blade Runner was given a
millennial makeover in Blade
Runner 2049 with Harrison Ford
reprising his role of Rick Deckard
from the 1982 hit and Ryan Gosling
taking the story to a new generation
of movie fans.
His co-star in the original Star
Wars film, Mark Hamill, also
returned to former glories at the
end of the year in Star Wars: The
Last Jedi. The latest in the sci-fi saga
was met with critical acclaim and
became the eighth-highest grossing
film of 2017.
Paddington Bear made a return
to the silver screen in Paddington
2, giving Hugh Grant the chance to
shine as the cravat-wearing villain
Phoenix Buchanan.
Musicals saw a renaissance
with the award-winning film La La
Land released at the start of the
year. The song-and-dance routine
starring Gosling (again) and Emma
Stone eschewed the traditional girl
meets boy, fall in love, live happily
ever after Hollywood trope but was
essentially a love letter to LA.
Dunkirk, Moonlight and
Manchester by the Sea were much
grittier offerings but no less
entertaining for it. All three enjoyed
critical and box office success
despite their bleak themes (military
catastrophe, excruciating comingof-age, and love, loss and grief).
Striking a lighter note, Wonder
Woman, starring Gal Gadot as the
Princess of the Amazons, and the
second outing of the irreverent
Marvel comic book offering
Guardians of the Galaxy proved to be
solid box office successes.
The music for Disney’s Beauty and
the Beast had already triumphed at
the Oscars in 1991 with an animated
version of the film. It proved
unsurprisingly popular again and
the film was the biggest grossing
film of 2017, showcasing Emma
Watson’s post-Harry Potter talents.
Sally Guyoncourt
In tomorrow’s
Education
Society
Food
Environment
Health
Science
Rescue
Courts
Good news from 2017 - a Special report
32
NEWS
EAST AFRICA
D
‘Spectre of
famine looms
if rains don’t
arrive soon’
Short-term aid can do only so
much when farmers are battling
climate change. By Rob Hastings
Funeralcare
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ecember is always
dry in Somaliland. An
average of just 1mm
of rain falls in the
East African country
throughout these 31 days. But
farmers and their families are
used to the conditions at this time
of year.
It’s when the skies remain
stubbornly empty in April, when
the first wet season of the year
is supposed to have arrived, that
they realise they’re in trouble.
After enduring a three-year
drought, the worst in living
memory, they’re now being
warned by climate analysts
that further torment is on the
unforgiving horizon next year
as the effects of global warming
continue to take hold.
Rains are forecast to be poor
again, leading scientists with the
Famine Early Warning Systems
Network to warn that more than
35 million people across East
Africa and Yemen are likely to
require humanitarian assistance
by May 2018.
Famine was largely held off this
year thanks to the international
humanitarian response, but can it
be prevented again?
When i reported from the
makeshift camps of Somaliland
in the summer, meeting nomadic
farmers who had lost their entire
herds of animals, the effects of the
drought were in stark evidence.
People living in shelters outside
the village of Dhabarmamac, after
seeing their animals die of hunger
and thirst, smiled with gratitude
at aid deliveries of bags of rice and
flour that would keep them alive,
at least in the short term.
But we found things were worse
in Fadhigab, a remote camp where
500 families had congregated but
where only enough supplies for
200 was arriving – leading to six
children dying of malnutrition in
the weeks before our visit.
Across Somaliland and Somalia,
874,000 people have been forced
from their lands and their homes
to live like this, while others have
also been badly affected in Kenya,
Ethiopia and South Sudan.
“Most of the displaced families
have not yet been able to return
to their homes, farms and
pastures,” said Mike Noyes, head
of humanitarian response at the
British charity Action Aid. “The
food crisis has not gone away.”
Saleh Saeed, chief executive
Alice Jones
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Midsomer
Murders
Muno Aweys Maealin and
her eight-month-old child
Abdrrahuran Abdirisaaq, who
had severe malnutrition DEC
of the Disasters Emergency
Committee (DEC), visited
aid projects in the Puntland
region of Somalia in September.
“Throughout my trip I was
repeatedly told that despite all
the hard work, the situation is on
a knife edge and the spectre of
famine is looming if the rains do
not arrive in the coming months,”
he said afterwards. “Even with
the rains, millions will remain in
desperate need.”
A study published in the journal
Science last week warned that
global warming will drive more
people in conditions like these to
become “climate refugees” and
travel to Europe.
Researchers examined
Y
ou can keep your
Mindhunter, your True
Detective and your
Line of Duty, there is
only one high-octane,
blood-soaked, intrigue-drenched
detective series for me.
Other shows may be
cooler, moodier and with
a more complex cop at
the centre, but do they
feature murder by giant
wheel of cheese? Death by
tumble dryer? Bludgeoning
by slide projector?
Of course they don’t, because
they are not Midsomer Murders, a
show so magnificently strange that
it can segue seamlessly from a man
being squashed to a bloody pulp
on his own front lawn by a replica
asylum applications in the EU
between 2000 and 2014 from
103 countries around the world.
They found that applications
rose the more a refugee’s country
of origin’s average temperature
diverged from 20°C, the optimum
temperature for growing crops.
Mustafa Ahmed Mohammed,
Action Aid’s emergency
co-ordinator in Somaliland, said
families in the camps are hoping
that a change in the country’s
government after elections last
month will result in a long-term
rescue plan.
“Some of them want to go back
to their area and rear livestock
again,” he said. “But some say they
don’t want to go back because
Roman trebuchet to a thinly
written side plot about a funny dog.
This is the unique DNA of
Midsomer Murders – a series that
mixes a gorgeous bucolic English
village setting with the murky
depths of criminal depravity
and a relentlessly boring
running storyline about
the hero policeman’s
relentlessly boring
family. His family has
to be boring, you see,
because nothing else
about the show is.
As soon as Inspector Barnaby
sits down to a long-planned fun
family picnic/Sunday roast/walk in
the woods, the telephone rings and,
Sir, someone’s been found with a
trident in their chest again.
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FRANCE
Will Britain keep
its love for fine
wine after Brexit?
Champagne exporters have little to toast.
By Danica Kirka and Angela Charlton
How you helped
i
i
drought will kill their animals
again, so they need an alternative
and want to go to the major towns
to start working there. But they do
not have land or a house there. It’s
difficult and that’s why they want
assistance from the government.”
International aid does go
towards paying for resilience
projects such as dams, helping
farmers make the most of the rain
they get to prepare for dryer times
ahead. But in harsh conditions
much of it has to be spent on the
most urgent short-term help – and
aid workers on the ground are
worried that funds are drying up.
Donations to the DEC’s East
Africa appeal have topped £64m
this year. Food parcels and
The body count per episode is so
high it’s a wonder there is anyone
left alive in Midsomer Mallow,
Newton Magna or Badger’s Drift,
but live on they do, coming up with
ever more gruesome ways to bump
each other off – more often than not
(spoiler alert) because they are a
long-lost relative who has returned
to Causton county to take revenge
for a slight in a former life.
True, there is something
aesthetically pleasing about the
slow, slow burn of a Scandi noir
where it takes 21 episodes to find
out the strange family friend did it,
but there is something gratifying,
too, about an episode of Midsomer,
where, within two hours, a whole,
mad, world – annual pet show,
New Age commune, international
vouchers have been provided to
350,000 people, while more than
170,000 received cash to buy food
and other basic items.
This complemented hundreds
of millions spent by the UK’s
Department for International
Development – helping to prevent
a catastrophic loss of life. But
British officials concede that
without sustained recovery there
is “a real risk of famine and mass
mortality in the region in 2018”.
Penny Mordaunt, the
International Development
Secretary, told i: “UK aid led the
way in 2017 in responding quickly
to the drought across East Africa
to prevent famine in the region and
saving millions of lives.
Neil Dudgeon as Inspector Barnaby
at the scene of yet another murder
in Midsomer BENTLEY PRODUCTIONS
“We know the outlook for 2018
is bleak, as poor rains continue
to threaten crops and livestock,
leaving families in desperate
need of food, water and shelter.
UK aid is already on the ground
meeting those needs, delivering
life-saving support.
“We’re also helping the most
vulnerable prepare for and cope
better with the natural hazards
that cause suffering and drive
people to make treacherous
journeys in search of a better
life. Making communities more
resilient to climate shock is
the only way we will break this
vicious cycle of drought and
humanitarian crises.”
actionaid.org.uk
cycling race – has been created,
half of the protagonists have been
killed off, the perpetrator caught
(usually in a last-minute dash) and
the whole sordid mystery tied up
in time for tea with the relentlessly
boring family.
While Inspector Barnaby is
the solid heart of the show, he is
really there to let the guest stars
– Orlando Bloom, Olivia Colman
(inset) and Peter Capaldi are just
some of the names to pop up –
wail, rage and grimace through
their daft lines and even dafter
motivations. Everyone seems to
be having a really good time. Just
as I am, watching them. I’ve never
missed an episode.
Twitter: @alicevjones
F
rederic Berthelot has 20
acres of vines on the slopes
above his tiny village in
France’s Champagne
region. His vineyard is
distinguishable from others in the
area by the tiny rose bushes planted
at the base of each vine – they serve
as a bellwether for parasites. But as
Britain and the EU crawl through
a protracted divorce, Berthelot has
more to worry about than bugs.
His century-old brand, Roger
Barnier, decided to start exporting
to Britain for the first time just as
the country voted to leave the EU.
The pound immediately plunged,
making imported wine more
expensive in Britain. Eighteen
months later, Berthelot and his
British trading partner are still
waiting to find out what rules will
govern future trade. “We are in a
period of transition, of uncertainty,”
he says. “There are worries.”
While British and EU officials
trumpeted their success in
reaching a deal before Christmas on
preliminary Brexit issues such as
the rights of citizens in each other’s
territories and the status of Britain’s
physical border with the Republic
of Ireland, the future relationship
between the two sides remains in
limbo. It may be another year before
any concrete decisions are reached
on trade.
That is likely to take a toll on
economic growth and jobs because
businesses will delay investment as
they wait to see what the final deal
looks like. Britain’s economy has
already slowed markedly this year
amid the Brexit uncertainty. At the
start of the year, it was the fastestgrowing economy in the Group of
Seven industrialised democracies.
Now it is the slowest.
Wine drinkers have been among
the first to feel the effects on the
cost of their favourite bottles. The
French wine industry’s export
federation said exports fell 0.8 per
cent in 2016, with this year’s figures
yet to be released. Belt-tightening is
expected to increase in 2018. And if
tariffs are introduced after Brexit,
consumers are likely to cut back on
luxury spending as rising inflation
reduces disposable income.
According to a study recently
published in the Journal of Wine
Economics, the price of a bottle of
wine could increase by 22 per cent
by 2025 in the event of a hard Brexit.
The researchers anticipated that
this could mean a 28 per cent drop
in UK wine consumption. Britain
Berthelot is confident that
sales will eventually improve
as he is in a quality-price
ratio that’s doing well.
Frederic Berthelot started exporting
to Britain just after the Brexit vote AP
is the world’s fourth-biggest wine
consumer, behind the US, Germany
and France. Retail sales of wine in
the UK reached almost 1.1 billion
litres last year, the vast majority
of it imported. And at this time
of year, supermarkets offer loss
leader discounts to take advantage
of increased demand over the
Christmas and New Year period.
Berthelot, whose Roger
Barnier brand is named after
his grandfather, partnered with
entrepreneur Richard Ellison to
take advantage of this UK market,
exporting his champagne to
Britain for the first time. Although
shipments have been disappointing
so far, he is playing the long game.
Wearing only a sweater and neck
scarf against the December cold, the
54-year-old is quietly passionate and
proud of his product. The business
has been in his family for five
generations. His oldest vines, from
1910 and 1915, survived both world
wars and a bug that damaged other
vines in the region in the late 19th
and early 20th centuries. The house
supplied Champagne to the French
presidential palace under Nicolas
Sarkozy and François Hollande.
A thank you card from the palace
hangs among award certificates.
He’s confident that sales will
eventually improve as he is in a
quality-price ratio that’s doing well
globally. “Well, at least I hope I’m not
wrong,” he says with a laugh.
The visiting Ellison and Berthelot
clink glasses as they discuss their
partnership, agreeing on one thing:
whatever havoc Brexit may yet
cause for the industry, the British
will always drink Champagne.
“Champagne is part of the
lifeblood of the Brits really, part of
what bonds us to France,” Ellison
says. “We drank it for centuries. So
why stop now?” AP
34
NEWS
Panorama
Around the
world in
10 stories
GERMANY
JAPAN
North Korean
boat captain on
theft charges
By Mari Yamaguchi
IN TOKYO
Japanese authorities have
reportedly indicted the North
Korean captain of a boat
that drifted to its coast on
charges of stealing nearly 40
items including a generator,
Saudi-led air strikes ‘killed
109 civilians in 10 days’
By Tom Miles
IN GENEVA
IRAN
Prisoners flee
Protests against
through window price increases
Four detainees have escaped
from a Berlin prison, the city
government has said.
The men apparently escaped
via a car workshop on the
grounds of Plotzensee prison,
the city’s justice ministry said.
They smashed through a
window that was reinforced
with a concrete bar.
It is not immediately clear
when the escape occurred and
the ministry said it was looking
into how it happened.
Officials are giving no details
on the four men or why they
were in prison. AP
YEMEN
Iran’s semi-official ISNA news
agency says people have been detained following protests over price
hikes for basic goods.
The report quotes the governor of
the north-eastern city of Mashhad,
Mohammad Rahim Norouzian, as
saying police arrested a number
of people who intended to destroy
public property during the
illegal gathering.
It was not immediately clear how
many people took part in the protest,
but accounts on Iranian social
media suggested as many as several
thousand people in at least three
other cities held similar rallies. AP
a television, solar panels and
equipment for a lighthouse from
an uninhabited island.
The captain and nine crew
members on the dilapidated boat
were rescued near a tiny island
off Hokkaido, northern Japan,
in late November. Police said
they arrested the captain and
two crew members earlier this
month on suspicion of stealing
the items worth about £37,000
from a barn on the island.
Yesterday, prosecutors
charged the captain with theft,
meaning he will stand trial in
Japan. AP
A Saudi-led coalition fighting in
Yemen has killed 109 civilians in air
strikes in the past 10 days, including
54 at a crowded market and 14 members of one family in a farm, the senior UN official in the country said.
The UN’s resident coordinator,
Jamie McGoldrick, called the fighting “futile” and “absurd”, an unusually direct criticism of the war in
which the coalition, backed by the
US, Britain and others, is fighting the
Iran-allied Houthi armed movement.
Citing initial reports from the UN
human rights office, a statement by
Mosul
For nearly two-and-a-half
miles along the western bank
of the Tigris, hardly a single
building is intact. The warren
of streets of Mosul’s Old City
is a crumpled landscape of
broken concrete and metal.
Every acre is weighed down
by more than 3,000 tons of
rubble, much of it laced with
explosives and unexploded
ordnance. It will take years
to haul away the wreckage,
and this is just one corner of
the destruction.
The Iraqi military and
US-led coalition succeeded
in uprooting Isis across
the country, but the cost is
incalculable. Three years
of war devastated much of
northern and western Iraq.
The few high buildings of
six or seven stories have been
blasted hollow, reduced to
concrete frames. Shopping
centres and office buildings are
pancaked slabs.
Almost all that is left of the
850-year-old al-Nuri mosque,
blown up by Isis fighters as
they fled, is the stump of its
famed minaret.
At the southern end of the
district, the arcades of stonearched storefronts in the
historic bazaars that once sold
spices, cloth and household
goods are charred and gutted.
Eaves that once shaded
shoppers look like they were
hurled into the air to land
as mangled metal scattered
across the cityscape. AP
Susannah George and Lori Hinnant
Mr McGoldrick said air strikes hit
a crowded market in the Al Hayma
suburb of Attazziah in Taiz governorate on Tuesday, killing 54 people and
Hungry
for a
food fight
Revellers take part in
a mock battle in the
south-eastern Spanish
town of Ibi. In this
200-year-old festival,
Els Enfarinats (those
covered in flour) dress
in military garb and
stage a coup d’etat as
they battle using flour,
eggs and firecrackers
to celebrate the Day
of the Innocents on
December 28. AFP/
GETTY
UNITED STATES
Basketball players weren’t thieves, admits airline
American Airlines has apologised
to two basketball players from the
Memphis Grizzlies minor league
team who were sent off a plane in Dallas after a flight attendant wrongfully
accused them of stealing blankets.
Airline spokesman Joshua Freed
said Marquis Teague and Trahson
Burrell boarded the flight on Sunday
from Dallas-Fort Worth International
Airport to Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
Two first-class passengers gave
the players their blankets as they
headed to their seats. But a flight
attendant accused them of theft
and the players were asked to leave
the plane following an argument. An
airline manager apologised and they
travelled in first class on a later flight.
“We take pride in bringing people
together, and we know that on this
flight we let some of our customers
down,” Mr Freed said. “Our team is
reviewing what happened and will be
reaching out to them.” AP
TURKEY
SOUTH AFRICA
ITALY
US lifts all visa
restrictions
Court to rule on PM appeals for
Zuma scandal
calm election
The US embassy in Ankara
lifted all restrictions on its visa
services yesterday, after Turkey
gave high-level assurances about
its treatment of US embassy
personnel detained in October.
The diplomatic row started
after US citizens were arrested
during a state of emergency.
The embassy said that the
US continued to have “serious
concerns about the allegations
against its employees”. REUTERS
South Africa’s highest court was due
to rule today on an attempt to compel
parliament to begin impeachment
proceedings against President Jacob
Zuma over a scandal related to statefunded upgrades to his private home.
Mr Zuma has faced widespread
public demands to step down
as president of Africa’s most
industrialised economy before a
general election in 2019, and such
proceedings could increase pressure
on him to quit. REUTERS
By David Warren
Postcard
From...
A charity’s destroyed storage facility
after an air strike in Hodeidah GETTY
injuring 32. Eight of the dead and six
of the injured were children, according to the reports.
On the same day, an air strike on a
farm in the Attohayta district of Hodeidah governorate killed 14 people,
and air strikes elsewhere killed a further 41 civilians and injured 43 over
the past 10 days.
“These incidents prove the complete disregard for human life that all
parties continue to show in this absurd war that has only resulted in the
destruction of the country and the
incommensurate suffering of its people, who are being punished as part
of a futile military campaign by both
sides,” said Mr McGoldrick. REUTERS
Paolo Gentiloni, Italy’s prime
minister, says it would be in Italy’s
best interest “to limit as much
as possible the diffusion of fear”
during the campaign for elections
in the coming months.
Mr Gentiloni, in his year-end
news conference yesterday, said
that while the world was full
of risks, “the more we have an
election campaign that veers from
the easy sale of fear, the better it
will be for the country”. AP
29.12.2017
FR DAY
Film
Music
Comedy
Theatre
GoingOut
Staying In
Television
Books
Welcome
to the future
Let i be your guide to the best
films, books, television, music
and much more to come in
the cultural year ahead
FR DAY
36
ROUND-UP
Your guide to the best of the arts in
.FILM .
By Geoffrey Macnab
Early Man
Aardman goes prehistoric in Nick
Park’s latest animated feature,
set in both the Stone Age and the
Bronze Age. Expect lots of Wallace
and Gromit-style humour in this
tale of toothsome caveman Dug
(voiced by Eddie Redmayne) and
his heroic efforts to save his tribe.
Released 26 Jan
A Star is Born
It’s a film that has been remade
several times: we’ve had Janet
Gaynor, Judy Garland and Barbra
Streisand as the up-and-coming
star. Now, in a role originally
earmarked for Beyoncé, Lady Gaga
plays the young country singer
taken in hand by a craggy oldtimer (played by Bradley Cooper.)
Cooper also directs the film, which
is produced by Clint Eastwood and
features original songs by Gaga.
Released 18 May
White Boy Rick
Yann Demange, the brilliant
director of thriller ’71, which was
set in Belfast in the early 1970s,
makes his first American movie.
Produced by Darren Aronofsky,
it’s a hardboiled, Detroit-set crime
drama, based on the true story
of Richard Wershe Jr, one of the
FBI’s youngest-ever informants
in the 1980s, who was also a drugs
dealer. Newcomer Richie Merritt
plays the title role, with Matthew
McConaughey as his father.
Released 31 Aug
Mary, Queen Of Scots
It’s strange to think that it’s now
20 years since Working Title’s
Elizabeth made a star of Cate
Blanchett. This new film, directed
by the Donmar Warehouse’s Josie
Rourke and scripted by Beau
Willimon (the House Of Cards
showrunner) promises to be
another lavish and stirring affair.
It has an intriguing cast. The very
fast-rising Saoirse Ronan plays
the ill-fated Mary, Margot Robbie
takes on Blanchett’s old
role as Elizabeth, David
Tennant is the dour
John Knox, while
Jack Lowden plays
Mary’s husband,
Lord Darnley.
Released 14 Sep
Peterloo
As ever, advance
details about Mike
Leigh’s latest are
skimpy. It’s about the
Peterloo massacre in Manchester,
which took place 200 years ago
when armed cavalry attacked a
rally of thousands of peaceful,
pro-democracy reformers. The
film, starring Maxine Peake and
Rory Kinnear, isn’t Leigh’s first
19th-century costume drama,
but it promises to be far darker in
tone than his wonderfully goodhumoured Gilbert and Sullivan
movie, Topsy-Turvy.
Autumn release‘
Widows
It’s now almost five years since
Steve McQueen’s triumph with
12 Years A Slave. He is back with a
very different film, an adaptation
of Lynda La Plante’s Widows
scripted by Gillian Flynn (Gone
Girl.) It’s a heist story about a group
of women who take over a job
when their armed robber husbands
are killed during a bungled raid.
McQueen is too idiosyncratic a
director to make a genre movie, so
there are bound to be twists and
surprises aplenty.
Released Nov
Bergman Island
The brilliant French director Mia
Hansen-Love is one of the first
non-Swedish film-makers to be
allowed on to work on Faro, the
Baltic Sea island where Ingmar
Bergman lived for many years.
Her cast includes Greta Gerwig
and Mia Wasikowska and the
film (if it is completed
in time to be seen in
2018) ought to make
a fitting tribute
to Bergman in
the year of the
centenary of
his birth.
Winter release
Mary Poppins
Returns
The sound of it is
something quite atrocious, but
this belated sequel to the 1964 film
has a cameo from Dick Van Dyke.
Critics will be very interested to
Clockwise from top Aardman’s
‘Early Man’; Zadie Smith releases
a collection of essays; Katherine
Parkinson in Theatr Clwyd’s ‘Home,
I’m Darling’; Bradley Cooper and
Lady Gaga in ‘A Star is Born’
Previous page Netflix adapts the
cyberpunk novel ‘Altered Carbon’
see how hard he has been working
on his cockney accent over the past
half-century. Emily Blunt steps
into Julie Andrews’ shoes as the
world’s favourite nanny.
Released 21 Dec
THEATRE .
By Alice Jones
The Birthday Party
It has been 60 years since Harold
Pinter’s landscape-changing
comedy of menace made its
debut at the Arts Theatre in
Cambridge. Now Ian Rickson has
gathered a formidable cast for this
anniversary revival, including
Zoë Wanamaker as the boarding
house owner, Toby Jones as her
sole lodger and Stephen Mangan
and Tom Vaughan-Lawlor as the
enigmatic strangers Goldberg and
McCann. Pearl Mackie also stars.
9 Jan-4 Apr, Harold Pinter Theatre,
London
Macbeth
Christopher Eccleston
and Niamh Cusack star
as the power-crazed
couple in Polly Findlay’s
contemporary take at
the RSC, while at the
National Theatre,
Rory Kinnear and
Anne-Marie
Duff are
directed by
Rufus Norris.
13 Mar-18 Sep,
Royal Shakespeare
Theatre, Stratfordupon-Avon; 26
Feb-12 May,
National Theatre,
London
Happy Days
Maxine
Peake’s fruitful
relationship with the Royal
Exchange continues with this
revival of Samuel Beckett’s moving
monologue by a woman who is
buried to her waist in a mound of
earth. A new play by Peake, Queens
of the Coal Age – about women
workers at the Parkside Colliery
pit – follows the run.
25 May-23 Jun, Royal Exchange,
Manchester
Home, I’m Darling
Theatr Clwyd is one to watch
in 2018. In April, it stages
the premiere of The
Assassination of Katie
Hopkins, a new
musical by Chris
Bush and Matt
Winkworth. And
in June, Laura
Wade, playwright
of Posh, premieres
her latest,
starring Katherine
Parkinson as a
wannabe domestic
goddess. It transfers to
the National Theatre in July.
25 Jun-14 Jul, Theatr Clwyd, Mold
Company
Stephen Sondheim’s musical
about a religiously single
thirtysomething man has
been reimagined with
a female lead for the
first time. Rosalie
Craig stars as “Bobbi”,
with Patti LuPone as Joanne.
Marianne Elliott directs.
26 Sep-22 Dec, Gielgud
Theatre, London
A Very Very Very
Dark Matter
It’s a good year for
fans of Martin
McDonagh’s twisted
storytelling. His new
film, Three Billboards
Outside Ebbing, Missouri, opens
this month and in October, the
writer of The Pillowman and
Hangmen debuts this play at
Nicholas Hytner’s Bridge Theatre.
Jim Broadbent stars as Hans
Christian Andersen, the writer of
children’s tales with a very, very,
very dark secret in his attic.
10 Oct-29 Dec, Bridge Theatre,
London
BOOKS.
By Anita Sethi
Feel Free by
Zadie Smith
“My hope is for
a reader who,
like the author,
often wonders
how free she
really is,” writes
Zadie Smith in
the foreword to
this engrossing
collection of essays.
The author of White
Teeth and On Beauty covers
an eclectic array of topics, from
Brexit to Beyoncé, with her
trademark wit and wisdom.
Hamish Hamilton, Feb
Happiness by Aminatta Forna
Foxes prowl through the pages
of Forna’s fine new novel, in
which friendship is forged after a
serendipitous encounter. Jean, an
American studying urban foxes,
and Attila, a Ghanaian psychiatrist,
together search for a missing
person in London. Exquisitely
explores trauma, immigration and
the underbelly of a metropolis.
Bloomsbury, Apr
Circe by Madeline Miller
Greek myth is fertile fictional
terrain for Miller, who won the
Orange Prize with her debut,
38
ROUND-UP
FR DAY
Anni Albers
Thought the Bauhaus was all about
equality? Think again. Anni Albers
was among the female students
excluded from the painting
department. Pushed toward
weaving, she made the medium
her own. Albers’ status as a
pioneering figure was recognised
with a 1949 exhibition at MoMA,
New York, celebrating her
“imaginative and experimental”
textile works. This sizeable
retrospective picks up the thread.
11 Oct-27 Jan 2019,
Tate Modern, London
.CLASSICAL & OPERA .
By Michael Church
‘Genesis Suite’
This extraordinary interpretation
of the first book of the Bible
consists of seven movements each
written by a different composer.
It was conceived in 1943 by the
composer Nathaniel Shilkret, who
wanted it to reflect the horrors
of war. The composers he roped
in included Schoenberg and
Stravinsky. Simon Rattle will
conduct the LSO in what should
be a remarkable event.
13 Jan, Barbican, London
Clockwise from main Flight of the Conchords will tour the UK for the first time in seven years; ‘Madama Butterfly’; Linder’s ‘The House of Fame’
Continued from page 37
version, was a daring choice: he’s
much stronger on plotless works
than story ballets. Will the gamble
pay off? With designs by John
Macfarlane, the production
should look good.
17 May-21 Jun, Royal Opera House,
London
Xenos, Akram Khan Company
Khan, a magnificent dancer, has
announced that this will be his last
full-length solo show. He
plays a colonial soldier
in the trenches of
the First World
War, evoking shell
shock, the myth
of Prometheus,
and a moment
of drastic
technological,
political and
human change.
29 May-9 Jun, Sadler’s
Wells, London
.COMEDY .
By Alice Jones
Sarah Millican
Funny, frank and frequently
filthy. The stand-up’s new tour
promises to cover topics as varied
as bra-fittings, rescue men and the
right way to eat a biscuit.
13 Jan, Dukes Theatre, Lancaster,
then touring to 6 Dec
Joe Lycett
Already a firm favourite on
television thanks to his likeable
comic combination of waspish
and silly, Lycett is embarking
on a whopping 93-date tour. As
with previous shows, there will
be anecdotes, gossip and daft
Powerpoint-assisted pranks.
13 Feb, Bristol Old Vic, then touring
to 30 Nov
Flight of the Conchords
It’s business time. The Grammy
award-winning duo, Jemaine
Clement and Bret McKenzie will
perform songs – including, surely,
“The Most Beautiful Girl” and
“Leggy Blonde” – as well as new
material in their first UK tour for
seven years. 5-7 Mar, Guildhall,
Portsmouth, then touring
to 3 Apr
Maria Bamford
A rare UK
appearance for
the squeakyvoiced star of
Lady Dynamite.
Expect jokes
about depression,
anxiety and her
dysfunctional family.
One of the best around.
22-23 Mar, Leicester Square
Theatre, London
The League of Gentlemen
After their triumphant return
to the BBC at Christmas,
Reece Shearsmith, Steve
Pemberton, Mark Gatiss and
Jeremy Dyson are taking the
residents of Royston Vasey on
the road. The League began
life as a dark and twisted
live sketch show 20 years
ago, so this is a chance
for Tubbs and Edward,
Geoff Tipps, Stella
and more to go to
back to their roots.
25-26 Aug, Empire,
Sunderland, then
touring to 29 Sep
.VISUAL ARTS .
By Hettie Judah
Anthony McCall:
Solid Light Works
Projected through smoke in
dark rooms, Anthony McCall’s
sculptures formed of moving
beams of light seem almost
tangible. Inside the installation
space, visitors become points
of resistance to the light, adding
spectral presence to the work.
16 Feb-3 Jun, Hepworth Wakefield
The House of Fame:
Curated by Linder
Part retrospective, part kinship
jamboree, this celebration of
British artist Linder is set to be
a riotous exchange between art,
fashion, music and architecture.
First entering the “house of fame”
when her photo collage was used
on the cover of the Buzzcocks’
1977 single “Orgasm Addict”,
Linder’s recent collaborations
have included experiments with
tapestry weaving, dance works
with Northern Ballet, and fashion
collections with Richard Nicoll.
24 Mar-17 Jun, Nottingham
Contemporary
Glasgow International
Festival of Visual Art
As a biased ex-resident, I do love
Glasgow’s International Festival:
fiercely worldly and on point, but
not so sprawling that it paralyses
you with fear of missing out. This
year, that means solo exhibitions
by Mark Leckey, Lubaina Himid
and Urs Fischer; commissions
from Kapwani Kiwanga and Tai
Shani; a group show exploring
ideas of the cyborg and artificial
intelligence; and dozens of
pop-ups and studio openings.
20 Apr-7 May
Pierre Huyghe
Pierre Huyghe’s massive
excavated environment at
Skulptur Projekte Münster
featured chimera peacocks,
genetically modified fish, and
incubating HeLa cancer cells,
making it arguably the most
talked-about artwork of this year.
For 2018, Huyghe is turning his
attention to
the Serpentine
Gallery. Expect
thought-provoking
engagement with
the systems
underpinning the
environment,
and mysteries
that tease
the brain.
3 Oct-Jan
2019,
Serpentine
Gallery,
London
‘Madama Butterfly’
Tim Albery’s emotionally direct
production of Puccini’s classic
returns, with the French soprano
Anne Sophie Duprels reprising
the role of Cio-Cio-San. When
she first sang the role, the
Independent’s critic enthused that
“it would be hard to imagine
a more committed rendering”.
19 Jan-22 Mar, Leeds Grand Theatre
‘La forza del destino’
Directed by Welsh National
Opera boss David Pountney, this
production marks the start of a
Verdi trilogy in swashbuckling
style, with what Pountney and his
colleagues call a “Verdi machine”
for the set: three interlocking
frames which can create different
shapes, according to the demands
of each opera. Welsh tenor Gwyn
Hughes Jones will sing the role of
Don Alvaro, with Mary Elizabeth
Williams as Leonora.
2-17 Feb, Wales Millennium
Centre, Cardiff
Iolanthe
Continuing its policy of lightening
up, the English National Opera
is now presenting that Gilbert
& Sullivan jewel which pits the
House of Lords against an army
of fairies and sends up British
political life in a way still relevant.
Cal McCrystal is the director,
with Samantha Price in the title
role and premier farceur Andrew
Shore as the Lord Chancellor.
13 Feb-7 Apr, Coliseum, London
Lessons in Love and Violence
From George Benjamin, Martin
Crimp and Katie Mitchell – the
composer-librettist-director trio
who gave us Written on Skin –
comes a new opera drawing on
the conventions of Elizabethan
drama. Forced to choose between
love and political expediency, a
king divides both his family and
his country; the stellar cast is
led by Stephane Degout and the
redoubtable Barbara Hannigan.
From 10 May, Royal Opera
House, London
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
TELEVISION
FR DAY
THIS WEEK’S
1
BLACK MIRROR
FROM TODAY, NETFLIX
Back for a fourth series, its
second on Netflix, the anthology
series opens with “Crocodile”,
an episode that continues
writer Charlie Brooker’s cutting
exploration of our fixation
with technology. It’s the near
future, and our memories are
no longer private. “Memories
can be subjective,” Kiran Sonia
Sawar’s character says. “They
may not be totally accurate, and
they’re often emotional.” Andrea
Riseborough co-stars.
2
TIM VINE TRAVELS THROUGH
TIME CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
TONIGHT 7.30PM, BBC1
The master of the pun plays
an antiques dealer who goes
back in time to Tudor England
to try to find a silver lion, and
ends up bringing Christmas to
the court of Henry VIII when
he’s mistaken for a jester. Stars
Emma Bunton as Anne Boleyn,
Sally Phillips as Catherine of
Aragon and features a guest
appearance from the Reverend
Richard Coles.
Tento
watch
Chosen by
Jessica Barrett
in to get his kestrels wet. Yes,
you read that right.
4
DELICIOUS
TONIGHT 9PM, SKY1
Dawn French and Emilia Fox
return as the hotel owners
at loggerheads. After a
rollercoaster first few months,
their business is finally booming.
But just because Penrose is
doing well, it doesn’t mean that
Gina (French) and Sam (Fox)
3
VIC & BOB’S BIG NIGHT OUT
TONIGHT 9PM, BBC2
Big Night Out was the
first television show ever
commissioned from Vic Reeves
and Bob Mortimer, in 1990.
Now they’re returning with
this one-off Christmas special,
before a new series begins
early next year. Shot in a studio
in front of a live audience it
features the usual Reeves and
Mortimer nonsense; there are
songs, sketches and a guest
appearance from old sidekick
Matt Lucas. Idris Elba also pops
Clockwise from top Tom
Courtenay stars as Grandpa in
a David Walliams adaptation; Tim
Vine and Emma Bunton go back
in time; ‘Black Mirror’ returns
are quite best friends yet. The
arrival of Gina’s estranged
father and a new chef are about
to upset their delicate truce.
5
A CHRISTMAS CAROL GOES
WRONG SAT 7.10PM, BBC1
A comic adaptation of Charles
Dickens’ famous tale, with
a difference. This isn’t your
typically polished BBC
production; it has been hijacked
by the Cornley Polytechnic
Drama Society, the team behind
last year’s Peter Pan Goes Wrong,
and that can only mean disaster.
Starring Derek Jacobi and
Diana Rigg.
6
GRANDPA’S GREAT ESCAPE
NEW YEAR’S DAY 6.55PM,
BBC1
An adaptation of another of
David Walliams’ children’s
books. It’s the story of Jack
and his grandfather, a Second
World War pilot, played by Tom
Courtenay, who is now suffering
from Alzheimer’s. After
Grandpa is moved into
an old people’s home, it
becomes clear that
the manager
Miss Dandy
(Jennifer
Saunders)
is up to
no good,
and Jack
plots his
escape.
7
MCMAFIA
NEW YEAR’S DAY
9PM, BBC1
Described as the
new Night Manager,
this glamorous
gangster thriller
stars James Norton as Alex
Godman, whose family head
one of the biggest criminal
organisations in Russia. He
has tried to cut ties with the
operation, becoming a hedge
fund manager in London. But
a personal tragedy spurs him to
dive back into the criminal life
in order to protect his family.
Based on the 2008 book of
the same name by journalist
Misha Glenny, expect Mexican
cartels, Pakistani drug lords and
Balkan smugglers.
8
HARRY HILL’S TEA TIME
TUES 8.30PM, SKY1
Only Harry Hill could be
responsible for this, one of
the most chaotic and surreal
programmes on television. It’s
a second series for Tea Time
and this time Hill has invited
Twiggy, Gregg Wallace, Sir
Trevor McDonald and Jessie
Wallace to join him. Not one of
them knows quite what they’re
letting themselves in for: in
the first episode, McDonald
is asked to make sausages,
while later in the series Jessie
Wallace performs songs from La
La Land and Gregg Wallace sees
his MasterChef catchphrases
mashed up into a trippy pop
tune. Weirdly unmissable.
9
PRINCE: LAST YEAR OF
A LEGEND TUES 10PM,
CHANNEL 4
A documentary which looks at
the final 12 months of Prince’s
life, leading up to his tragic,
sudden death in April 2016. This
came as the singer was moving
into a hugely creative chapter of
his already extraordinary life. As
well as interviews with political
commentator and friend Van
Jones, former girlfriend Andy
Allo and singer-songwriter Eryn
Allen Kane, the film includes
footage of a secret gig Prince
performed at the White House,
and his final concert tour in the
US before he died.
10
DERRY GIRLS
THURS 10PM, CHANNEL 4
The Troubles in Northern
Ireland provide the setting
for this new coming-of-age
comedy by acclaimed
writer Lisa McGee, who
was behind Being Human
and London Irish. She
mines
her own
teenage
experiences
in Derry for
the eightpart series,
beginning
with the
first day
of a new
school
term.
40
FILM
FR DAY
and very precise about every
aspect of her life.
United States v Molly Bloom is
the court case at the centre of the
movie. It’s a sledgehammer against
a nut, and, having been busted by
the FBI for running an illegal gambling operation, Molly herself is
betting heavily on the favourite.
The conceit is that Molly is looking in on her own life, offering sassy
commentary on it at the same time
as fighting the case. Just as when
running the card games, she sees
every angle. She is as alert to her
own vanity and delusions as she
is to everyone else’s. What makes
her such a refreshing character is
her lack of self-pity and her refusal
to make excuses.
Molly’s Game is based on a true
story. Sorkin throws in continual
references to Arthur Miller’s The
Crucible, inviting us to view Molly
as a contemporary equivalent to
By the final reel,
Molly has been
turned into a Joan
of Arc-like martyr
Poker face
Jessica Chastain as
the driven Molly
Bloom (far left)
Filmof
theweek
Chastain
and Sorkin
prove a pair
of aces
MOLLY’S GAME (15)
HHHHH
Aaron Sorkin, 140 mins, starring:
Jessica Chastain, Idris Elba, Kevin
Costner, Michael Cera, Chris O’Dowd
Reviews by Geoffrey Macnab
Jessica Chastain was in cyclonic
groove earlier this year as the relentless, pill-popping Washington
lobbyist in Miss Sloane. Here, she
is the equally driven heroine Molly
Bloom. Molly is a former Winter
Olympics hopeful who earned
fame and wealth but then courted
notoriety and disgrace by hosting
high-stakes poker games for Hollywood stars, hedge fund managers and Russian mobsters.
The film marks the directorial
debut of Aaron Sorkin (writer of
The Social Network, Moneyball,
The West Wing etc). Its main recommendation, aside from the
brilliance of Chastain, is Sorkin’s
ingeniously crafted screenplay.
Biopics and courtroom dramas invariably take us through
their subjects’ lives in rigidly
chronological fashion or mechanically present arguments for
prosecution and defence. Sorkin’s
approach is very different. He
jumps into Molly’s story headfirst,
leaps back and forth in time, and
gives her a voiceover to fill us in
quickly on details.
Molly is a caustic-tongued highachiever who is good at figures
the women killed as witches at the
Salem trials. She encounters sexism at every stage of her life. Prey
to the “unfair whims of men”, she
is put on trial, not them.
The press write about her as if
she is poker’s equivalent to Hollywood madam Heidi Fleiss. In fact,
she is discreet, hard-working,
enterprising and rigorously and
aggressively honest.
The film transcends its subject
matter. It’s not just a story about
a former vodka waitress and office assistant who organised highstakes card games for the rich and
famous. By the final reel, Molly
Bloom has been transformed
into a Joan of Arc-like martyr, albeit one who speaks and behaves
like Katharine Hepburn in an old
screwball comedy. This could
have seemed absurd and trite, and
slipped into sanctimoniousness.
Instead, thanks to Sorkin’s witty
screenplay and Chastain’s blazing performance, it never loses
its momentum or its fatalistic
humour. THE INDEPENDENT
ALSOSHOWING
SANCTUARY (15)
HHHHH
Len Collin, 88 mins, starring: Kieran
Coppinger, Charlene Kelly, Robert
Doherty, Patrick Becker, Valerie Egan
It’s a sad reflection on the
narrow-mindedness of UK
cinemas that so few have been
prepared to book Len Collin’s
funny, big-hearted and affecting
new comedy-drama. The film
follows a group of characters with
“intellectual disabilities” on a day
out to the cinema in Galway with
their hapless but well-meaning
young care worker Tom (Robert
Doherty). During the trip, with
Tom’s connivance, Larry, who
has Down’s, and epileptic Sophie
arrange a tryst in a hotel room.
“You never think of them like
that, with urges,” the receptionist
observes of the would-be lovers,
oblivious to how callous she
sounds. The film has been
credited with changing a law
in Ireland which until recently
made it illegal for those with
intellectual disabilities to have
sexual relationships.
Christian O’Reilly’s screenplay
combines elements of feel-good
drama with harsher insights
into the lives of the protagonists.
They’re all yearning to escape the
strictures of their supervisors,
who, however well-meaning, treat
them as if they are dolts.
A couple of men sneak to the
pub for a few pints. Two friends
roam around the local shopping
centre. Another couple enjoy a
stolen kiss in the back row of the
cinema. Tom, the care worker, is
like someone trying to herd cats.
The production values
are modest and some of the
dialogue is clunky. The film,
though, has a wonderful strain of
blarney and whimsical humour
about it, and the cast give
memorable performances.
The film-makers extract plenty
of humour from jokes about
condoms and hangovers, scenes
of raucous singing on the bus and
karaoke in the shopping centre,
and from the sequences of Tom
wandering forlornly round,
trying to reassemble the party.
The tone feels benign at first.
Then we begin to learn more
about what these people have
endured in the past – sexual
abuse and bullying, and boredom
at mindless tasks they’re forced
to perform in the workshop. Just
when we expect the film will
provide a cosy, upbeat ending, we
are reminded in brutal fashion of
the challenges the protagonists
face on a daily basis.
PERSONA (15)
HHHHH
Ingmar Bergman, 83 mins, starring:
Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann,
Margaretha Krook, Gunnar
Björnstrand, Jörgen Lindström
2018 is the centenary of Ingmar
Bergman’s birth and the year
is being marked all over the
world with tributes to the great
Swedish director. There will be
stage plays, operas, exhibitions,
remakes of some of his old films,
documentaries about him and
new dramas inspired by him.
The tributes begin with this
re-release of one of his most
experimental, confrontational
and idiosyncratic features.
In the film, a breezy young
nurse, Sister Alma (Bibi
Andersson), is assigned to look
after the brilliant but troubled
classical actress Elisabet Vogler
(Liv Ullmann), who has become
catatonic. This is a two-hander,
a very intense psycho-drama,
superbly played by its leads.
Alma is “interested” in film
and theatre but seldom goes.
She loves to chatter. Elisabet is
hyper-sensitive and registers
everything. The dynamic
between the two women
continually changes. At times, it’s
as if Elizabet, who is doing all the
listening, is Alma’s therapist and
is tending her rather than vice
versa. The more time the women
spend together, the more they
begin to mirror one another – but
the more the hostility between
them rises too.
Persona has been accused of
being pretentious and obscure
but it remains one of its director’s
most celebrated films – and one
of his most provocative.
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
Film
Matrix
WHAT CRITICS
ARE SAYING
ABOUT THE
NEW RELEASES
The ‘Gone Girl’ femme fatale
drawn to courageous women
Rosamund Pike talks to Geoffrey Macnab about playing a hard-nosed
frontierswoman, the pioneering Marie Curie and the war reporter Marie Colvin
MOLLY’S GAME (15)
“A sharply judged edit stitches
together three timelines, shaping
Molly as a complex, razor-sharp
character in a world dominated by
entitled mansplainers.”
Time Out
“It’s a role that demands a wise
head, a combative streak, precision
comic timing and an occasional
air of vulnerability. Chastain nails
every single requirement.”
Radio Times
SANCTUARY (15)
“The film covers, with humour and
real feeling, how, as a response to
abuse scandals, it was illegal for
people with special needs to have
sex unless married.”
Sunday Independent (Ireland)
“Don’t be fooled by the
knockabout humour. There’s
darkness and gravity lurking
in the material, regarding
autonomy and independence.”
The Irish Times
PERSONA (15)
“The film is rich in poetic
intimations of subconscious
longings and despairs, and it is
likely to move one more deeply
as poetry than as thought.”
The New York Times
“Clearly reflecting Bergman’s
despondency at an increasingly
turbulent world, this is a
devastating treatise on moral
and intellectual impotence.”
Empire
T
here is a harrowing
moment early on in
her new film, Hostiles,
in which Rosamund
Pike’s character, Rosalie Quaid, a frontierswoman out
west, has to bury her own children. They’ve been massacred by
Comanche warriors. Deeply traumatised, she digs into the ground
with her bare hands.
Pike, likely to be in awards contention for her searing performance, acknowledges that even
speaking about the scene makes
her feel a tightness “in the pit of
my stomach”.
The 38-year-old British actress
is utterly convincing as the griefstricken, deranged mother. She
read much to research the role,
reeling off the names of writers
who have dealt with the sudden
death of children, among them
Joan Didion (who wrote about the
loss of her daughter in her book
Blue Nights).
The burial wasn’t a scene she
could shoot in a take and then
enjoy a chat with the crew afterwards. She immersed herself in
the role. Her devastation seems
frighteningly real.
I put it to Pike that when you
take a role in a western, you expect
to ride on horseback, shoot guns
and enjoy the great outdoors. She
responds that there was at least
“some of that”. They were filming
in beautiful locations in New Mexico and Colorado. On the day they
shot the Comanche ambush, there
was plenty of racing around as if
Some women can
feel underqualified
for roles in the film
industry due to a
lack of confidence
they were kids playing at cowboys.
However, Hostiles is a sombre and
introspective film in which death
looms large.
Writer-director Scott Cooper
went out of his way to be respectful to Native American culture.
There was a Cheyenne chief who
held prayer ceremonies and blessings on set and even more cynical
crew members found themselves
moved by their experiences.
When asked about spirituality,
the chief said: “Remember we are
not humans having a spiritual experience. We are spirits having a
temporary human experience.”
Not that Hostiles skimps on
the violence. The Comanches are
shown as being especially cruel in
the way they torture and kill their
enemies. Pike points to the “ambiguity” in the film; the questions
of whether Christian Bale’s character, the embittered US army
Hot shot
Rosamund Pike
as Rosalie Quaid
in ‘Hostiles’
GETTY
captain Joseph J Blocker, can renounce his violent past and what
will happen to the Native American child plucked from his own
culture and last seen dressed in a
Little Lord Fauntelroy suit, about
to board a train heading east.
Pike is midway through shooting a biopic, A Private War, in
Jordan, in which she stars as the
courageous war reporter Marie
Colvin. Colvin, who died in Syria
in 2012, was on the front line from
Chechnya and Sri Lanka to the
Middle East. Pike is entirely
committed to portraying
Colvin as accurately as
possible. She has read
her work intensively, listened to recordings of
her and researched her
life exhaustively.
“I’m very conscious
that her loss is a very
recent memory to
those who are closest
to her. I take the responsibility of playing
her very seriously. She
is probably the most
distinctive real person I’ve played. She’s
inimitable – her look,
her characteristics,
her voice, her mannerisms, her tenacity, the way she
held a gaze, she
way she laughed,
the way she inter-
viewed, the way she responded to
her subjects.”
After Colvin, Pike will play
another Marie, Madame Curie,
in Radioactive, a film to be directed by Marjane Satrapi, the
Iranian-born author and director
of Persepolis. This, she explains,
isn’t a straight biopic, but a love
story intended to be both playful
and provocative.
Pike took the role partly because of her enthusiasm for working with the effervescent Satrapi,
whom she describes as brilliant and funny, and partly
because of her fascination
with Curie herself, whom
she describes as a real-life
Wonder Woman. Pike is
preparing this role as assiduously as she did her
part in Hostiles, taking a crash course
in science as well as
steeping herself in
the details of Curie’s
life, down to the very
last particle.
“I am drawn to
courageous women,”
she declares of her
recent choice of
films. Characters
such as Colvin or the
fictional Quaid have
integrity and bravery.
In other words, they’re
the polar opposite of
the scheming, femme
fatale she played in David Fincher’s thriller, Gone Girl, which won
her Oscar and Bafta nominations.
The recent roles are very different, too, from her parts in comedies such as The World’s End and
What We Did On Our Holiday or
costume pieces such as Pride and
Prejudice or The Libertine.
Thanks to Gone Girl, Pike is on
the A-list or near it – a star who
can carry a movie and whose
name reassures the financiers –
yet she has made very few films
directed by women. There was A
United Kingdom with Amma Asante and now the Satrapi film.
I ask about the lack of women
in key creative roles in the film industry. “Some women can feel underqualified due to a general lack
of confidence, whereas in fact they
are uniquely qualified,” she responds. “I have worked with three
female first assistant directors –
on Hostiles, Gone Girl and a short
film, The Human Voice, and all have
been exceptional. We should all
support one another more.”
She is beginning to think about
producing her own films and taking more control of the projects in
which she appears. In the meantime, her laser-like focus is entirely on Marie Colvin. There are five
days of solid filming ahead, and
no time to be waylaid by anything
else. THE INDEPENDENT
‘Hostiles’ is released on 5 January
41
Television Friday 29 December
CRITIC’S
CHOICE
GERARD GILBERT
PICK OF THE DAY
===
Eric, Ernie & Me
Tim Vine Travels Through
Time Christmas Special
9pm, BBC4
It’s 1969 and Ernie Wise (Neil
Maskell) has been offered a job
on Basil Brush. “They think we’re
finished,” he tells Eric Morecambe
(Mark Bonnar), their manager’s
solution being to team them up with
Ken Dodd’s gag writer Eddie Braben.
Stephen Tompkinson plays Braben
(far left), the Liverpudlian ex-market
trader who would reinvent the duo
as “Eric and Ernie” and author the
famed Christmas TV specials, in an
enjoyable drama about the birth of
the “golden triangle” and how the
grind pushed the perfectionist
Braben to exhaustion. Eric & Ernie’s
Home Movies, in which family watch
the duo’s recently unearthed home
movies, is at 8pm on BBC2.
7.30pm, BBC1
Former Not Going Out star Tim Vine’s
time-travel comedy was piloted a
few months ago but returns at a
time of year that fits it like a glove:
the panto season. This time the
relentlessly punning quipmeister
heads back to the court of King
Henry VIII, and a bit of enjoyable
nonsense featuring Emma Bunton
as Anne Boleyn and Sally Phillips
as Catherine of Aragon.
to promote her recently concluded
BBC1 drama Love, Lies And Records.
The duo, meanwhile, look at the pros
and cons of pre-prepared baby food.
===
Vic & Bob’s Big Night Out
9pm, BBC2
Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer
resurrect their cult TV show from
the early 1990s, spoofing First Dates
in a hectic half-hour peppered with
their trademark surrealism and
almost as many puns as Tim Vine.
“I spent two years in a squat,” says
Vic. “Then I stood up.”
===
Jamie And Jimmy’s
Friday Night Feast
===
8pm, Channel 4
Ashley Jensen makes her way to
Southend Pier, although it’s a bit late
9pm, Sky One
The return of Sky One’s mostwatched original drama of 2016,
Delicious
6.35 MasterChef: The
Professionals (R) (S). 7.35
FILM: G-Force (Hoyt
Yeatman 2009) (S). 8.55
The Big Family Cooking
Showdown (R) (S). 9.55
Nadiya’s British Food
Adventure (R) (S). 10.55
Puerto Rico – Island Of
Enchantment: Natural
World (R) (S). 11.55
FILM: Three Coins In The
Fountain (Jean Negulesco
1954) (S). 1.35 Nature’s
Weirdest Events (R) (S).
2.05 The World’s Most
Extraordinary Homes
(R) (S). 3.05 Inside The
Factory (R) (S). 4.05 FILM:
The Desert Fox (Henry
Hathaway 1951) (S). 5.30
Thailand: Earth’s Tropical
Paradise (R) (S).
6.00 Good Morning
Britain (S). 8.30 Lorraine
(S). 9.25 Best Walks
With A View With Julia
Bradbury (R) (S). 9.50
FILM: Everything Or
Nothing: The Untold Story
Of 007 (Stevan Riley
2012) Documentary about
the making of the James
Bond films (S). 11.45 Bond
Girls Are Forever (R) (S).
12.45 ITV News; Weather
(S). 12.55 ITV Regional
News; Weather (S). 1.00
Midsomer Murders (R) (S).
3.00 Tenable (R) (S). 4.00
Tipping Point (R) (S). 5.00
The Chase (R) (S).
7.05 FILM: Black Nativity
(Kasi Lemmons 2013)
Musical, starring Jacob
Latimore (S). 8.50 Lego
Masters (R) (S). 9.50 The
Simpsons (R) (S). 10.20 The
Simpsons (R) (S). 10.50
The Simpsons (R) (S). 11.15
FILM: Hotel For Dogs (Thor
Freudenthal 2009) Family
comedy, starring Emma
Roberts and Jake T Austin
(S). 1.20 FILM: Cutthroat
Island (Renny Harlin 1995)
Swashbuckling adventure,
starring Geena Davis (S).
3.40 Four Rooms With
Sarah Beeny (S). 4.45
Channel 4 News (S). 5.00
The Simpsons (R) (S). 5.30
The Simpsons (R) (S).
6.30 BBC News At
Six; Weather (S).
6.45 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.30 Christmas
University
Challenge 2017
(S).
6.00 Paul O’Grady:
For The Love Of
Dogs (R) (S).
6.30 Regional News;
Weather (S).
6.45 ITV News;
Weather (S).
6.00 Hollyoaks Tom
celebrates his
birthday at The
Loft (S).
7pm
7.00 Celebrity
Mastermind (S).
7.30 Tim Vine
Travels Through
Time Christmas
Special (S).
7.00 Morecambe &
Wise: Leading
Ladies Female
stars who
appeared on the
comedy duo’s
shows (R) (S).
7.00 Emmerdale
The Dingles
get ready (S).
7.30 Coronation
Street Roy begs
Carla not to go
to Devon (S).
7.00 Travel Man: 48
Hours In Hong
Kong Richard
Ayoade and Jon
Hamm visit
Hong Kong
(R) (S).
7.00 Winter In
Yorkshire
Cameras follow
grey seal pups
at Ravenscar
beach (R) (S).
7.00 Lucy Worsley:
Mozart’s
London
Odyssey The
composer’s
adventures in
London (R) (S).
8pm
8.00 EastEnders
Mick decides
whether he is
part of Aidan’s
gang (S).
8.30 Would I Lie To
You? (S).
8.00 Eric & Ernie’s
Home Movies
Morecambe and
Wise’s personal
film archive (S).
8.00 FILM: Harry
Potter And The
Half-Blood
Prince (David
Yates 2009)
Fantasy (S).
8.00 Jamie And
Jimmy’s Friday
Night Feast
Ashley Jensen
makes authentic
Umbrian
pasta (S).
8.00 World’s
Strongest Man
2017 Action
from the
third heat in
Botswana (S).
8.00 Top Of The Pops:
1984 Lenny
Henry reviews
the hits of the
year (R) (S).
9.00 BBC News (S).
9.10 Regional News;
Weather (S).
9.15 FILM: Gone Girl
(David Fincher
2014) Premiere.
Thriller (S).
9.00 Vic & Bob’s
Big Night Out
Slapstick
laughs (S).
9.30 Live At The
Apollo Last in
the series (S).
9.00 8 Out Of 10
Cats Does
Countdown
Christmas
Special With
Catherine
Tate (S).
9.00 Victoria Wood
By Her Friends
Profile of the
writer and
comedian (S).
9.00 Eric, Ernie & Me
Biopic of Eddie
Braben, the
writer behind
Morecambe
and Wise’s
successes (S).
10.00Gogglebox 2017
Highlights from
the most recent
series (R) (S).
10.00Victoria Wood:
Live 1997 A
performance
by the late
comedian (R) (S).
10.00Elvis: The
Rebirth Of
The King Elvis
Presley’s Las
Vegas period (S).
Daytime
6.00 Breakfast (S). 9.00
FILM: Monsters Vs Aliens
(Rob Letterman, Conrad
Vernon 2009) (S). 10.25
Shaun The Sheep: The
Farmer’s Llamas (R) (S).
10.55 FILM: Kung Fu
Panda 2 (Jennifer Yuh
2011) (S). 12.15 Bargain
Hunt (R) (S). 12.45 BBC
News At One; Weather
(S). 1.00 BBC Regional
News; Weather (S). 1.10
Father Brown (R) (S). 1.55
Revolting Rhymes (R)
(S). 2.25 FILM: Up (Peter
Docter, Bob Peterson
2009) (S). 3.50 Room On
The Broom (R). 4.20 FILM:
Brave (Mark Andrews,
Brenda Chapman, Steve
Purcell 2012) (S). 5.45
Pointless (R) (S).
6pm
9pm
10.00Frankie Boyle’s
2017 New Year
World Order (S).
10.30 QI XL With
Jason Manford
and Holly
Walsh (S).
10.50 ITV News;
Weather (S).
11.40 Michael
McIntyre’s Big
Christmas Show
A festive special
(R) (S).
11.15 FILM: The
Great Gatsby
(Baz Luhrmann
2013) Period
drama, starring
Leonardo
DiCaprio (S).
11.09 ITV Regional
Weather (S).
11.10 Tina & Bobby
Tina learns
Bobby is having
an affair. Last in
the series (R) (S).
12.50 BBC News (S).
1.25 Sign Zone: Doctor
Who (R) (S). 2.25 FILM: Sign
Zone: Cinderella (Kenneth
Branagh 2015) Romantic
fantasy, starring Lily
James (S). 4.20 This Is BBC
Two (S).
12.10 Bear’s Mission With
Rob Brydon (R) (S). 1.05
Jackpot247 3.00 100 Year
Old Drivers (R) (S). 3.50 ITV
Nightscreen
10pm
11pm
Late
12.05 FILM: I Give It A Year
(2013). 1.55 FILM: The River
Wild (1994). 3.50 Kitchen
Nightmares USA 4.35
Four In A Bed 5.00 Jamie’s
Christmas 5.15 FILM:
The Three Musketeers
(1973) (S).
6.00 Milkshake! 9.00 FILM:
Arthur 2: On The Rocks
(Bud Yorkin 1988) Comedy
sequel, starring Dudley
Moore (S). 11.10 FILM:
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels
(Frank Oz 1988) Comedy,
starring Michael Caine
and Steve Martin (S).
1.20 FILM: Labyrinth (Jim
Henson 1986) Fantasy
adventure, starring
Jennifer Connelly and
David Bowie (S). 3.20 FILM:
Look Who’s Talking (Amy
Heckerling 1989) Comedy,
starring Kirstie Alley (S).
5.10 FILM: Footloose
(Herbert Ross 1984)
Drama, starring Kevin
Bacon (S).
===
Frankie Boyle’s 2017
New Year World Order
10pm, BBC2
Considerably softened from
his more brutal stand-up and
controversial Mock The Week days,
the Glasgow comedian is still more
acerbic than most as, in the absence
of Charlie Brooker’s Wipe, the field
is left clear for Boyle to look back
in something akin to anger.
Emma Bunton and Tim
Vine in Tudor England
7.30pm, BBC1
Ashley Jensen shows
off her culinary skills
in ‘Jamie And Jimmy’s
Friday Night Feast’
8pm, Channel 4
12.00 SuperCasino (S).
3.05 Love/Hate (R) (S). 4.00
Winter In Alaska (R) (S).
4.45 House Doctor (R) (S).
5.10 House Busters (R) (S).
5.35 Wildlife SOS (R) (S).
Dan Sefton’s tale of four generations
of women running a Cornish
hotel-restaurant following the death
of owner Leo (Iain Glen, returning
in spectral form). Dawn French,
Emilia Fox and Sheila Hancock star.
It’s now one year on and Gina
(French) is left reeling when two
men from her past reappear.
6.00 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World
Records (R) (S). 7.15 Mr
Bean (R). 7.40 Mr Bean
(R). 8.10 Britain’s Got
Talent: Stephen’s Top 10
Unbelievable Talents (R)
(S). 9.10 Planet’s Got Talent
(R) (S). 9.45 Emmerdale (R)
(S). 10.50 Hairspray Live!
(R) (S). 1.15 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold (R) (S). 1.45
Emmerdale (R) (S). 2.50
Catchphrase: Celebrity
Special (R) (S). 3.50 FILM:
Peter Pan (PJ Hogan 2003)
Fantasy adventure, with
Jeremy Sumpter (S). 5.55
FILM: A Bug’s Life (John
Lasseter, Andrew Stanton
1998) Animation, with the
voices of Dave Foley and
Kevin Spacey (S).
Bob Mortimer and Vic
Reeves’ ‘Big Night Out’
9pm, BBC2
6.30 FILM: Battleship
(Peter Berg
2012) Sci-fi
adventure,
starring Taylor
Kitsch (S).
8.00 FILM: Skyfall
(Sam Mendes
2012) James
Bond thriller,
starring Daniel
Craig (S).
9.00 FILM: Salt
(Phillip Noyce
2010) Action
thriller, starring
Angelina Jolie
(S).
10.50 Family Guy
Peter gets
fired from the
brewery (R) (S).
11.00 Sings Elvis
Artists
including Cliff
Richard and
John Cale cover
songs by Elvis
Presley (R) (S).
11.00 FILM:
Predator (John
McTiernan 1987)
Sci-fi thriller,
starring Arnold
Schwarzenegger
(S).
11.20 Family Guy
Brian posts an
offensive tweet
that goes viral
(R) (S).
11.45 Family Guy
(R) (S).
12.00 Top Of The Pops:
1984 (R) (S). 12.55 Top Of
The Pops 1984: Big Hits (R)
(S). 2.00 Top Of The Pops:
The Story Of 1984 (R) (S).
3.00 Elvis: The Rebirth Of
The King (R) (S). 4.00 Close
1.05 FILM: AVP: Alien
Vs Predator (Paul WS
Anderson 2004) Sci-fi
thriller, starring Sanaa
Lathan (S). 3.10 Close
12.20 Family Guy 12.45
American Dad! 1.40
Keith Lemon Show 2.35
Through The Keyhole 3.30
Educating Joey Essex 4.15
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records 5.35
2Awesome
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
===
Elvis: The Rebirth Of The King
10pm, BBC4
The widely accepted Elvis narrative
holds that the Vegas period from
1969 until Presley’s death in 1977
was the nadir of his career, with an
increasingly bloated figure in a naff
white jumpsuit belting out tired
standards, the grind eventually
killing him. This excellent revisionist
documentary argues instead that
these were the glory years, with
Elvis at a career zenith as the most
emotional interpreter of the
American songbook. The story
begins with the King increasingly
disillusioned by the mediocre
movies that were taking up his time,
his return to live performance
beginning when (strange but true)
he took LSD with his hairdresser.
FILM
CHOICE
LAURENCE PHELAN
FILM OF THE DAY
===
Gone Girl
Up
9.15pm, BBC1
(David Fincher, 2014)
Fincher’s adaptation of the tricksy
Gillian Flynn page-turner is part
portrait of a marriage in crisis, part
vicious battle-of-the-sexes comedy,
part satire of prurient US news
media, and part rehashing of old noir
archetypes. Nick (Ben Affleck, left) and
Amy (Rosamund Pike) were once a
glittering and in-love couple in New
York who have landed in the doldrums
of small-town Missouri and marital
overfamiliarity. When Amy goes
missing, suspicion naturally falls on
Nick. The whole thing is a con trick
– but a well-practised one, such that
we can admire the lengths to which
the film-makers go to deceive us,
and fully enjoy being duped.
2.25pm, BBC1
(Pete Docter, Bob Peterson, 2009)
The unlikely hero of this funny,
moving Pixar film is a crotchety
old widower, who attaches enough
balloons to the home that he and his
wife had made for it to float up and
away, to a colourful jungle they’d
dreamed of visiting together.
===
The Magnificent Seven
5.10pm, Sky Cinema Action
(John Sturges, 1960)
Akira Kurosawa’s The Seven Samurai
remade as a traditional Western, with
Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles
Bronson et al as the gunslingers hired
to protect a village from raids by Eli
Wallach and his marauding banditos.
Radio
BBC Radio 1
6.00 Rising Damp (R) (S).
6.25 On The Buses (R) (S).
6.50 Agatha Christie’s
Marple (R) (S). 8.40 FILM:
Carry On Abroad (Gerald
Thomas 1972) Comedy,
starring Sid James. 10.25
FILM: Willy Wonka And
The Chocolate Factory
(Mel Stuart 1971) Musical
fantasy, with Gene Wilder
(S). 12.30 The History Of
Mr Polly (R) (S). 2.25 FILM:
Carry On Follow That
Camel (Gerald Thomas
1967) Comedy, with Jim
Dale (S). 4.20 FILM: Up
Pompeii (Bob Kellett 1971)
Comedy based on the
television series, starring
Frankie Howerd (S).
6.00 Hollyoaks (R) (S). 6.30
Charmed (R) (S). 7.25 Prep
& Landing (R) (S). 7.55
Prep & Landing: Naughty
Vs Nice (R) (S). 8.25 FILM:
The Rugrats Movie (Igor
Kovalyov, Norton Virgien
1999) Animated comedy,
with the voice of Elizabeth
Daily (S). 10.00 FILM:
Diary Of A Wimpy Kid:
Rodrick Rules (David
Bowers 2011) Children’s
comedy sequel, starring
Zachary Gordon (S). 12.00
The Big Bang Theory (R)
(S). 2.00 How I Met Your
Mother (R) (S). 3.00 The Big
Bang Theory: Big Bang A-Z
(R) (S). 5.00 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 5.30 The Goldbergs
(R) (S).
8.55 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (R) (S). 10.00
FILM: Carry On Constable
(Gerald Thomas 1960)
Comedy, starring Sid
James (S). 11.50 A Place
In The Sun (R) (S). 12.20 A
Place In The Sun: Winter
Sun (R) (S). 1.25 Four In A
Bed (R) (S). 2.00 Four In A
Bed (R) (S). 2.30 Four In A
Bed (R) (S). 3.00 Four In A
Bed (R) (S). 3.35 Four In A
Bed (R) (S). 4.05 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 4.40 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 5.10
Come Dine With Me (R)
(S). 5.45 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S).
6.00 Futurama (R) (S).
6.30 Futurama (R) (S).
7.00 Futurama (R) (S).
7.30 The Simpsons (R) (S).
8.00 The Simpsons (R) (S).
8.30 The Simpsons (R) (S).
9.00 The Simpsons (R) (S).
9.30 Modern Family (R)
(S). 10.00 Modern Family
(R) (S). 10.30 Modern
Family (R) (S). 11.00 David
Attenborough’s Galapagos
(R) (S). 12.00 Hawaii Five-0
(R) (S). 1.00 Fungus The
Bogeyman (R) (S). 2.30
Fungus The Bogeyman (R)
(S). 3.30 Modern Family (R)
(S). 4.00 Modern Family (R)
(S). 4.30 The Simpsons (R)
(S). 5.00 Futurama (R) (S).
5.30 Futurama (R) (S).
6.00 Without A Trace (R)
(S). 7.00 Without A Trace
(R) (S). 8.00 Without A
Trace (R) (S). 9.00 Without
A Trace (R) (S). 10.00
Without A Trace (R) (S).
11.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
12.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
1.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
2.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
3.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
4.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
5.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
6.00 Agatha
Christie’s
Marple
A murderer
strikes in a
peaceful village
(R) (S).
6.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.30 The Big Bang
Theory The
boys take up
fencing (R) (S).
6.20 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S).
6.55 The World’s
Most Expensive
Food Luxury
food suppliers
(R) (S).
6.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.30 The Simpsons
Mr Burns
crosses paths
with a hip-hop
mogul (R) (S).
6.00 David
Attenborough’s
Galapagos The
broadcaster
explores
the Pacific
archipelago (R).
7.30 The Simpsons
Lisa tries to
save her school
radio station
(R) (S).
7.00 David
Attenborough’s
Galapagos
The unique
species that live
in the isolated
habitat (R) (S).
7.00 Hollyoaks Darcy
promises Toby
a holiday of a
lifetime (S).
7.30 We’re Going
On A Bear
Hunt (R) (S).
8.00 Endeavour A
2000-year-old
body provides
fresh clues in a
missing persons
case. Last in the
series (R) (S).
8.00 The Secret Life
Of The Zoo
At Christmas
Ten keepers
help a massive
reticulated
python (R) (S).
8.00 The Simpsons
New series.
8.30 Modern Family
Jay makes a
Thanksgiving
toast.
8.00 David
Attenborough’s
Galapagos The
differences
between the 19
islands (R) (S).
9.00 FILM: The
Hunger Games:
Catching
Fire (Francis
Lawrence 2013)
Sci-fi adventure
sequel (S).
9.00 FILM: The Green
Mile (Frank
Darabont 1999)
Supernatural
drama, starring
Tom Hanks (S).
9.00 Delicious New
series. Return
of the drama,
starring Dawn
French and
Emilia Fox.
9.00 Game Of
Thrones The
day of King
Joffrey’s
wedding to
Margaery Tyrell
arrives (R) (S).
10.00Music Legends
We Lost
A celebration
of musicians
who have died
since December
2016 (S).
10.15 Game Of
Thrones Dontos
spirits Sansa
out of King’s
Landing (R) (S).
11.30 A League Of
Their Own: US
Road Trip 2.0
Jamie, Jack and
Andrew race
across New
York City (R) (S).
11.30 Game Of
Thrones Jaime
has a mission
for Brienne
(R) (S).
12.30 A League Of Their
Own: Special (R) (S). 1.00
The Russell Howard Hour
(R) (S). 2.00 Micky Flanagan
Thinking Aloud (R) (S). 3.00
The Force: Manchester (R)
(S). 4.00 Monkeys (R) (S).
5.00 Galapagos (R) (S).
12.40 Big Little Lies (R) (S).
1.40 Big Little Lies (R) (S).
2.40 Without A Trace (R)
(S). 3.30 Richard E Grant’s
Hotel Secrets (R) (S). 4.20
Richard E Grant’s Hotel
Secrets (R) (S).
11.50 The Big
Bang Theory
Sheldon invites
a famous
physicist to
the flat (R) (S).
12.00 Lewis (R) (S). 2.05
The History Of Mr Polly (R)
(S). 3.40 Sherlock Holmes:
The Last Vampyre (R) (S).
5.30 ITV3 Nightscreen
12.25 The Big Bang Theory
(R) (S). 12.50 Rude Tube (R)
(S). 2.55 Tattoo Fixers (R)
(S). 3.50 2 Broke Girls (R)
(S). 4.15 Rude(ish) Tube (R)
(S). 4.40 Charmed (R) (S).
5.20 Rules Of Engagement
(R) (S).
12.45 FILM: The Other
Boleyn Girl (Justin
Chadwick 2008) Historical
drama, starring Natalie
Portman and Scarlett
Johansson (S). 2.55 Best
Laid Plans (R) (S). 3.55
Close
BBC Radio 1Xtra
6am Nick Bright 10.00 Seani B
1pm Reece Parkinson 4.00 Sian
Anderson 7.00 Seani B 9.00
Semtex 11.00 Sir Spyro 1am
Kan D Man And DJ Limelight
4.00 Diplo And Friends
BBC Radio 2
8.00 The Crystal
Maze: Celebrity
Special Action
game show,
hosted by
Richard Ayoade
(R) (S).
10.00Lewis The
prime suspect
in a teenager’s
rape is
murdered (R) (S).
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast
Show With Scott And Chris
10.00 Adele Roberts 1pm
Jordon North 7.00 Annie Mac
9.00 Pete Tong 11.00 Danny
Howard 1am B.Traits 4.00
Radio 1’s Essential Mix
6.30am Sara Cox 9.30
Trevor Nelson 12noon
Jeremy Vine 2.00 Radio 2 In
Concert 3.00 Craig Charles
5.00 Johnnie Walker Meets
Albert Hammond 7.00 Tony
Blackburn’s Golden Hour.
Popular music from the past
50 years. 8.00 Michael Ball
And Alfie Boe In Concert. A
recording of Michael Ball
and Alfie Boe in concert in
Glasgow. 10.00 Sounds Of
The 80s. Featuring Madonna,
The Human League, Freeez,
Kenny Loggins and Dead or
Alive. 12mdn’t Anneka Rice:
The Happening 2.00 Radio 2’s
Funky Soul Playlist 3.00 Radio
2 Playlist: New To 2 4.00 Radio
2 Playlist: 21st Century Songs
5.00 Huey On Saturday
BBC Radio 3
6.30am Breakfast. With Petroc
Trelawny. 9.00 Essential
Classics. With Rob Cowan.
12noon Composer Of The
Week: Cole Porter. Further
triumphs are clouded by
personal tragedies. 1.00
News 1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime
Concert. Ian Skelly presents
highlights of the Schubertiade.
2.00 Afternoon Concert.
Jonathan Swain concludes his
“Best Of 2017” week from the
BBC performing groups. 5.00
Words And Music. Detectivethemed pieces, with readings
by Hayley Atwell and Mark
Strong. 6.15 New Generation
Artists. The latest members
of the New Generation Artists
heard in their debut recordings.
7.30 BBC Proms 2017. A tribute
to Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy
Gillespie in their centenary
year. 9.40 BBC Proms 2017.
The Britten Sinfonia performs
Passages by Ravi Shankar and
Philip Glass. 11.00 World On 3.
Kathryn Tickell with a night of
folk music live from Sheffield.
1am Through The Night. John
Shea presents.
BBC Radio 4
6am Today 9.00 Desert Island
Discs 9.45 Book Of The Week:
Adventures Of A Young
Naturalist 10.00 Woman’s
Hour 11.00 I’m Stuck In Here
11.30 David Sedaris: The
Santaland Diaries 12noon
News 12.04 Home Front
12.15 You And Yours 1.00 The
World At One 1.45 Radio 4’s
Pen Pals 2.00 The Archers 2.15
Drama: Saving The Blue 3.00
Gardeners’ Question Time
43
ON DEMAND
Black Mirror
Netflix
The return of Charlie Brooker’s
dystopian anthology skewering
our technological obsessions.
How To Get Away
With Murder
Netflix
Shonda Rhimes’s US drama
with Viola Davis.
Two Doors Down
BBC iPlayer
The festive visit to Glasgow
suburbia sees Beth and Eric’s
quiet Christmas interrupted.
3.45 Short Works 4.00 Last
Word 4.30 A Good Read 4.55
The Listening Project 5.00 PM
5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock
News 6.15 Little Lifetimes.
Doon Mackichan stars in Jenny
Eclair’s comic monologue.
6.30 Dead Ringers. Comedy
impressions. 7.00 The Archers.
Lynda is on top form. 7.15 Front
Row. Arts programme. 7.45
Incredible Women. By Jeremy
Front. 8.00 Correspondents’
Look Ahead. BBC reporters give
their predictions for 2018. 8.50
A Point Of View. Reflections
on a topical issue. 9.00 Home
Front Omnibus. Parts 31-35. By
Katie Hims. 10.00 The World
Tonight. News round-up. 10.45
Book At Bedtime: How To Stop
Time. By Matt Haig. 11.00 Late
Night Woman’s Hour. Lively
conversation. 11.30 Anansi
Boys. By Neil Gaiman. 11.55
The Listening Project. Two
female canons consider how
they should dress. 12mdn’t
News And Weather 12.15 Bone
Stories 12.30 Book Of The
Week: Adventures Of A Young
Naturalist 12.48 Shipping
Forecast 1.00 As BBC World
Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast
5.30 News Briefing 5.43 Prayer
For The Day 5.45 IPM
Of Friendship 2.30 Dombey
And Son 2.45 The Pantomime
Life Of Joseph Grimaldi 3.00
Night And Day 4.00 The Motion
Show 4.30 After Henry 5.00
The Leopard In Autumn 5.30
Just William – Live! 6.00 Good
Omens 6.30 Soul Music 7.00
I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again
7.30 Albert And Me 8.00 A Case
For Paul Temple 8.30 Beatrix
Potter’s Favourite Tale 9.00
Ballet Stories 9.15 The Fairy
Godmother 10.00 Comedy
Club: It’s David O’Doherty Time
10.30 Comedy Club: Mark
Thomas: Bravo Figaro 11.30
Comedy Club: Life: An Idiot’s
Guide 12mdn’t Good Omens
12.30 Soul Music 1.00 A Case
For Paul Temple 1.30 Beatrix
Potter’s Favourite Tale 2.00
The Diary Of A Provincial Lady
2.15 Five Hundred Years Of
Friendship 2.30 Dombey And
Son 2.45 The Pantomime Life
Of Joseph Grimaldi 3.00 Night
And Day 4.00 The Motion
Show 4.30 After Henry 5.00
The Leopard In Autumn 5.30
Just William – Live!
BBC 5 Live
7.30am Today 9.45 Daily
Service 12.01pm Shipping
Forecast 5.54 Shipping
Forecast 11.00 Test Match
Special 12.58am Test Match
Special 5.30 Test Match Special
7am Ashes Breakfast 10.00
5 Live Daily With Chris
Warburton 1pm The Friday
Sports Panel 2.00 Kermode
And Mayo’s Film Review: Best
Of 2017 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5
Live Sport: The Friday Football
Social. A look ahead to the
weekend’s action. 10.00 Sam
Walker 1am Up All Night 5.00
When Michael Met Johnny
BBC Radio 4 Extra
BBC 6 Music
6am A Case For Paul Temple
6.30 Beatrix Potter’s Favourite
Tale 7.00 The Leopard In
Autumn 7.30 Just William –
Live! 8.00 I’m Sorry I’ll Read
That Again 8.30 Albert And Me
9.00 The Motion Show 9.30
After Henry 10.00 Night And
Day 11.00 Ballet Stories 11.15
The Fairy Godmother 12noon
I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again
12.30 Albert And Me 1.00 A
Case For Paul Temple 1.30
Beatrix Potter’s Favourite Tale
2.00 The Diary Of A Provincial
Lady 2.15 Five Hundred Years
7am Jon Hillcock 10.00
Mary Ann Hobbs 1pm Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Huey Morgan
7.00 Iggy Pop 9.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 12mdn’t Nemone’s
Electric Ladyland 2.00 6 Music
Classic Concert 3.00 6 Music
Live Hour 4.00 Lost Clubs With
Gemma Cairney 5.00 Chris
Hawkins
BBC Radio 4 LW
Pick
ofthe
day
Johnnie Walker
Meets Albert
Hammond
5pm, BBC Radio 2
The DJ is joined
in discussion by
guitarist, singersongwriter and
record producer
Albert Hammond
(above), who
reminisces about
his career to date.
Classic FM
6am More Music Breakfast
10.00 John Brunning 2pm Jane
Jones 5.00 Sam Pittis 7.00
Smooth Classics At Seven 8.00
The Full Works Concert 10.00
Smooth Classics 1am Bob
Jones 4.00 Katie Breathwick
Absolute Radio
6am Ben Burrell 10.00 Claire
Sturgess 2pm Andy Bush 6.00
Absolute 80s With Martyn Lee
10.00 The Songs They Tried
To Ban With Pete Donaldson
11.00 Chris Martin 4am
George Godfrey
Heart
6am Jamie And Emma
9.00 Toby Anstis 1pm Matt
Wilkinson 4.00 JK And Lucy
7.00 Club Classics 9.00
Annaliese 1am James Merritt
TalkSPORT
6am The Alan Brazil Sports
Breakfast 10.00 Lynsey
Hipgrave, Perry Groves And
Bob Mills 1pm Danny Kelly
And Simon Jordan 4.00 Adrian
Durham And Darren Gough
7.00 Kick-off 10.00 The Two
Mikes 1am Extra Time With
Tom Latchem
FR DAY
44
AGENDA
What’sontoday...
Visual Arts
GLUCK: ART AND IDENTITY
Brighton Museum
This exhibition explores the life
and work of the 20th century
trailblazer of gender fluidity,
who mixed with the Newlyn
School and adopted the name
Gluck, creating a masculine
identity incorporating men’s
tailoring, barber-cut short hair
and a mannish demeanour. As
well as portraits, landscapes
and flower paintings, the show
includes clothing, accessories,
photographs, press cuttings and
personal ephemera. (brighton
museums.org.uk) to 11 Mar
RACHEL WHITEREAD
Tate Britain, London SW1
A welcome retrospective of the
first woman to win the Turner
Prize, in 1993, the same year she
made her most famous piece,
House, a life-sized cast of the
interior of a condemned terraced
house in London’s East End. The
show brings together
well-known works such as
Untitled (100 Spaces) 1995
and Untitled (Staircase) 2001
alongside new pieces that have
never been previously exhibited,
while a new concrete sculpture,
Chicken Shed 2017, sits on the
lawn outside. (020 7887 8888)
to 21 Jan
JOHN PIPER
Tate, Liverpool
The hugely influential John Piper
(1903-1992) drew inspiration from
Britain’s landscape, its buildings
and its monuments – and was a
pivotal figure in the development
of abstract art in Britain. As
such, his work here – across a
range of disciplines – is placed
alongside the likes of Alexander
Calder and Pablo Picasso.
(0151 702 7400) to 18 Mar
PAULA REGO: THE BOY WHO
LOVED THE SEA AND OTHER
STORIES
Jerwood Gallery, Hastings
At the heart of this show, the
first major exhibition of new
work by Paula Rego in a UK
public art gallery for a decade, is
a set of paintings, drawings and
sculptures inspired by a 2005
story by Hélia Correia, “The Boy
Who Loved the Sea”.
(01424 728377) to 7 Jan
ED RUSCHA
Scottish National Gallery of Modern
Art, Edinburgh
Ed Ruscha has lived and worked
in Los Angeles for most of 60
years and the city has been
his constant inspiration, both
directly in his photographs,
and less directly but also more
pointedly, in his paintings.
This free show of more than 60
artworks from the Artists Rooms
collection includes photographic
series, paintings and drawings
dating from the early 1960s to the
2000s. (0131 624 6200) to 29 Apr
Comedy
JEFF GARLIN
Soho Theatre, London W1
Jeff Garlin takes a break from
being hectored as Larry David’s
manager in Curb Your Enthusiasm
by hopping across the pond for
some crowd-pleasing stand-up.
(020 7478 0100) to Sat
JOEL DOMMETT
Civic Hall, Wolverhampton
Supremely entertaining
stand-up about disastrous
online dating, school assemblies –
and Dommett’s stint chewing
on animal nether regions
in the celebrity jungle.
(0870 320 7000) tonight
WYNDHAM LEWIS: LIFE, ART, WAR
IWM North, Manchester
The largest UK retrospective of
Wyndham Lewis’s work to date
marks the 60th anniversary of
his death and the centenary of
his commission as an official war
artist in 1917, featuring more than
160 artworks, books, journals
and pamphlets. A radical force
in 20th-century British art and
literature, Lewis was a brilliant
draughtsman, innovative writer
and satirist, and leader of
Britain’s only avant-garde
art movement, Vorticism.
(0161 836 4000) to 1 Jan
MARC BRENNER
Pick
ofthe
day
SPENCER JONES
Soho Theatre, London W1
The Audition is ostensibly
about Spencer Jones trying out
for a Steven Spielberg robot
movie, but expect something
a little more off-beam than
that – namely, supremely dorky
clowning and brilliantly daft prop
comedy. (020 7478 0100) to Sat
NATALIE PALAMIDES
Soho Theatre, London W1
This year’s Edinburgh
Best Newcomer brings her
extraordinary Laid – in which
FR DAY
46
BOOKS
The idealist with a hidden skeleton
THIS IS HOW IT ENDS
Eva Dolan
(Raven Books, £12.99)
Review by Sarah Hughes
I
ncreasingly if you want to
read fiction that reflects the
world in which we are living,
your best bet is to pick up
a crime novel. From longestablished practitioners such as
Ian Rankin to rising stars such as
Eva Dolan, the best modern crime
novels both delve deep into our
darkest impulses and examine
bigger questions about the way
we live our lives. Dolan, in particular, excels at presenting knotty,
addictive tales that also force the
reader to think more widely about
the way in which society treats its
most vulnerable members.
Her previous four novels, which
follow detective pairing DI Dushan Zigic and DS Mel Ferreira and
their work in the Peterborough
Hate Crimes Unit, have covered
everything from violent crimes
against trans women to rising tensions about immigration. They are
richly imagined, cleverly plotted
and socially aware stories, which
will also have you turning the
pages well into the small hours.
This – her first stand-alone book
and the novel that her publishers
hope will propel her onto the
crime fiction A-list – has a wonderfully prescient premise. Ella
is a young, attractive and highly
visible campaigner for housing
rights. On the night of her greatest triumph – a party to celebrate
her upcoming book about gentrification and a successful Kickstarter campaign raising money
for a homeless shelter – she calls
her friend Molly away from the
festivities in a soon-to-be redeveloped tower block to one of the
building’s abandoned flats and
asks for her help disposing with
a body. Whose? And why?
“Of course it was an accident,”
Molly thinks. “Ella is a peaceful
girl, too small and too smart for
violence. He’ll have had a fit or
a stroke, the result of some obscure hidden condition, the kind
that occasionally cuts down the
young without warning. Or he’ll
have taken something that got
the better of his system. Either
way, a stumble, an unlucky fall
against the tiles. An accident, just
like Ella says.”
But was it? As the story
progresses, so the older Molly,
herself a protest veteran with an
activist history stretching back to
the heady days of Greenham Common, finds herself beginning to
doubt Ella’s story. Is there more to
this photogenic young protester
Body of evidence Eva Dolan slowly reveals the truth behind the corpse that Ella needs to bury MARK VESSEY
than the socially concerned face
she presents to the world? Why
did she befriend Molly? What
does she really want from the
campaign to protect the inhabitants of Castle Rise? And who exactly was the dead man to her?
Dolan keeps the tension rising
as she expertly juggles two distinct voices and timelines. While
Molly’s story plays out in the
present, from the moment Ella
asks for her help with the body
to the bleak and brilliant conclusion, Ella’s unspools backwards,
from her desperate call to Molly
through her frustrations as a
young blogger trying to make
her name (“he knew it annoyed
her how so much of the press had
been focused on her youth and her
looks… although according to the
trolls who targeted her day and
night, she was ‘too gross to get
raped’”) to the dark past she has
hidden from her friends.
Occasionally the tricksiness of
having Ella’s timeline unfold backwards threatens to derail the main
plot, but Dolan is a master of pace
and it’s fascinating to watch the
real Ella slowly emerge.
Ultimately, this smart, deftly
told story resonates so strongly
because of the complex, claustrophobic relationship at its heart:
like Molly, we are drawn inexorably to Ella’s flame, unable to step
away even when it might burn.
ALSORELEASED
CHRONICLES OF
A LIQUID SOCIETY
Umberto Eco
(Harvill Secker, £18.99)
This book was published in Italy
under the title Papé Satàn Aleppe
in the same year as Umberto Eco
died, in 2016. The original title
(the English one is the subtitle
in the Italian) refers to a very
ambiguous line in Dante that no
one really understands.
Eco’s last novel, Numero Zero,
seemed to me to be a return to
the form of The Name Of The Rose
and Foucault’s Pendulum, after
a number of works which might
charitably be described as frolics
of his own. His novelistic career
had always run in tandem with
his academic, non-fiction and
journalistic work. But the reader
can only leave this volume with
a sense of frustration.
The book announces at the
outset that it is a compilation
of various columns which
Eco wrote fortnightly for the
magazine L’Espresso. Gleefully
and shamelessly, he refers to
them as “jottings”, “short notes”
and “digressions on ideas come
Top5
Books
to mind”. Now, had I been sitting,
once every 14 days, with an
espresso and L’Espresso, I would
probably have found much of
the material interesting and
provocative. But a column is not
the same as a book. And a lot
of columns put together do not
make a book.
Eco had at least tried to
arrange them in some semblance
of order, and included a rather
faint-hearted apology for
repetitions. But take page 147 in a
piece on female philosophers: as
well as the well-known Hypatia of
Alexandria he mentions “Diotima
the Socratic, Arete of Cyrene,
Nicarete of Megara, Hipparchia
the Cynic, Theodora the
Peripatetic (in the philosophical
sense of the word), Leontia the
Epicurean and Themistoclea
the Pythagorean”. Skip forward
to page 153 and in a piece called
“Husbands of unknown wives”,
we read about “Diotima the
Socratic, Arete of Cyrene,
Nicarete of Megara, Hipparchia
the Cynic” etc. Will this do, Ed?
Oh, and a few pages later we have
another piece on Hypatia.
While one might laud Eco’s
championing of relatively little-
known female philosophers,
his tendency to refer to them
as girls rather than women and
to make frequent analogies
to prostitution, and a kind of
salacious bass note in many of
these off-cuts, rather undermine
the feminist credentials.
Eco structured the book
around topics. There are five
pieces on mobile phones and
13 on the internet. Both make
him grumpy. There are five on
conspiracy theories in which
he says conspiracy theories
are foolish.
Eco knows a lot of things, but
few of them deeply. When he
turns to politics, he is blasé and
enraged at the same time. His
essays on religion are pretty
anodyne; yes, it would be nice
if more young people knew the
biblical stories and no, having a
new Crusade is not a good idea.
Well, blow me down.
This is a regrettable book. It
taints the memory of how good
those first novels, and the final
one, were. Eco comes across
almost like Stephen Fry – a sort
of intellectual that we all want to
like but secretly find infuriating.
Stuart Kelly
1. 5 Ingredients – Quick & Easy Food Jamie Oliver (Michael Joseph)
2. Private Eye Annual 2017 Ian Hislop (Private Eye)
3. Bletchley Park Brainteasers Sinclair McKay (Headline)
4. Bad Dad David Walliams (HarperCollins)
5. Blue Planet II James Honeyborne & Mark Brownlow (BBC/Random House)
WOMEN AND POWER:
A MANIFESTO
Mary Beard
(Profile, £7.99)
THE ROBIN:
A BIOGRAPHY
Stephen Moss
(Square Peg, £10.99)
This slim volume gathers two
speeches given by Mary Beard
about the ways in which women’s
exclusion from power has been
hardwired into Western culture
at least as far back as Roman and
Greek times, and what can be
done to address this dysfunction.
Examples are not exactly
thin on the ground. Typical, for
instance, is the moment in The
Odyssey where Penelope, head
of the household in her husband
Odysseus’s long absence, is
rudely silenced by her son
Telemachus, who comes into his
birthright – the right to assertive
speech – in the very act of
suppressing his mother’s voice.
In the second speech, Beard
turns to what needs to change,
and how. Some women have
achieved influence by apeing the
manners of men, as Margaret
Thatcher did. But Beard argues
that radical rethinking is needed.
The roots of misogyny go deep,
and we are far from eradicating
them. The meme which saw the
face of Hillary Clinton applied
to the severed head of Medusa
shows that the violent imaging
of the punishment women
“deserve” for daring to speak out,
remains darkly pervasive.
There are six million robins in the
UK, but at this time of the year
they feel even more ubiquitous
than usual. As Stephen Moss
explains in this thoughtful
mash-up of natural and cultural
history, the birds first started
finding their way on to Christmas
cards in the 1840s. Moss divides
his book into the months of
the year, describing how their
behaviour changes with the
seasons, while also exploring “the
cultural and historical ‘robin’”.
Dan Brotzel
James Cann
Roger Cox
SOURDOUGH
Robin Sloan
(Atlantic, £12.99)
Robin Sloan, author of the
similarly quirky Mr Penumbra’s
24-Hour Bookstore, tells a story of
San Francisco-based techie Lois
Clary, who takes possession of a
mysterious sourdough starter
when her foodie immigrant
neighbours have to depart the
US at short notice. The culture
has a life of its own and begins to
push back, leading this whimsical
novel into sci-fi territory and
towards a bizarre conclusion.
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
The
final
frontier
SPY OF THE FIRST PERSON
Sam Shepard
(Alfred A Knopf, £13 )
Review by Alasdair Lees
T
he Pulitzer-winning
playwright Sam
Shepard died of complications from motor
neurone disease in July,
leaving behind a formidable legacy of nearly 50 plays which often
put forward unwaveringly bleak
critiques of American ideals.
From the late 1970s, he also
had a parallel career as a character actor in the classical mould,
from his Oscar-nominated performance as the astronaut Chuck
Yeager in 1983’s The Right Stuff
to his autocratic patriarch in the
Netflix family melodrama Bloodline. He also wrote novels, short
stories and screenplays for films
such as Wim Wenders’s haunting
Paris, Texas.
He was working on another
novel right up to his death, writing by hand then dictating into a
tape recorder with the help of his
daughter and sisters.
COFFEE
TABLE
CHOICE
Images of New
York often
focus on its
cityscapes, but
the metropolis
is encircled by
rivers, bays and
to the far east,
the Atlantic
Ocean. Living on
Jamaica Bay, the
photographer
Susannah Ray
depicts the
intersections of
the city, where
land meets
water in her
book, ‘New York
Waterways’
(Hoxton Mini
Press, £17.95) .
Inspired by the
poetry of Walt
Whitman, these
scenes reflect
the shifting
seasonal moods
of the Big Apple.
Pictured right:
‘A Train, Jamaica
Bay, Queens’.
American pastoral Sam Shepard looks at his country in an elegiac light AP
Friend and former girlfriend
Patti Smith helped him edit the
final manuscript. Clocking in at
just over 80 pages, Spy of the First
Person is clearly partly autobiographical, narrated by a man in
his later years being treated for
a crippling illness. Sitting in a
rocking chair on the porch of his
house in southern California’s
Colorado desert and being cared
for by his family, he looks back
over his life and reflects on a
changing America. All the while,
a younger man in a property
opposite watches him, fascinated
by his enigmatic neighbour.
Spy of the First Person captivates in its distillation of many of
Shepard’s enduring themes: the
death of America’s frontier, identity and loneliness.
The old man reflects that in the
surrounding desert, “there used
to be orchards as far as the eye
can see”. But even in his parents’
era, such a landscape had turned
to “black plastic blowing from
barbed wire” and “dead pigeons in
the road”. In a time when migrant
workers added to local colour
rather than constituting a threat,
even his sick mother, who had
immigrated illegally from England, faced deportation for lacking
the right papers. Where do any of
us really come from, he muses.
Amid the conflicted nostalgia,
the old man confesses to a secret
criminal past and a deranged act
of violence. Memory is for him
“like a scab… that you pick at”.
From his position across the
road, the younger man sees “big
bad birds” swooping around the
older man’s house, and reflects
on “the progressive nature of
things… things run down”.
There’s foreboding amid the
wistfulness, but it’s tempting to
read this novella as Shepard looking at America in an elegiac light.
There’s a wonderful reference to
an organisation called the Shriners, a branch of the Masons where
“guys from the Midwest” dress
up as Arabs, “full of Arab pride”
– a baffling but wonderful concept
which goes to the heart of America’s strangeness.
Spy of the First Person ends with
the old man going for a tequilafuelled meal at a Mexican restaurant with his family – “the menu
had a logo of a lighthouse. Lonely
illuminated.” Amid a “cacophony
of voices”, they talk Trump, “the
country in a Mexican stand-off”.
Shepard illuminates loneliness
beautifully in this slight but rich
and moving final work. In the final
lines, the old man sees “the moon
getting bigger and brighter… two
sons and their father, everyone
trailing behind”. Shepard’s valedictory message is one of hope.
THE INDEPENDENT
ONEMINUTE
WITH…
Marcel Theroux,
novelist
Where are you now and
what can you see?
I’m sitting at my desk, staring at
the roofs of houses. Somewhere
off to the north-east, I can see the
cluster of trees around Tooting
Lido, beckoning me to leave my
work and go swimming instead.
What are you currently reading?
I’m reading The Case of Charles
Dexter Ward by HP Lovecraft.
He was weird, and undeniably
a racist, yet vast swathes of
popular culture, from Stephen
King to The Matrix and Stranger
Things, owe him a huge debt.
Who is your favourite author
and why do you admire her/him?
For all his flaws, I still find myself
returning most often to the
Argentine writer Jorge Luis
Borges. I love the brevity of his
work, the way it shamelessly
mixes genres – horror, detective
fiction, science-fiction. He’s seen
as literary, but there’s a lot of
mischief in his writing. He loved
books – silly books, difficult
books, philosophical books, books
in Old English, poetry – with an
ardent, fan-boy enthusiasm that
is an antidote to the reverential
view of literature as something
Big and Serious and Good For
You, like cod liver oil.
Describe the room where
you usually write…
It’s a tiny attic space, full
of tottering piles of books,
with a repurposed table as a
desk, a filing cabinet and the
aforementioned view.
Which fictional character
most resembles you?
I wish it were Tigger, but it’s
probably Eeyore.
Who is your hero/heroine
from outside literature?
I’m full of admiration for so
many people, but anyone who’s
devoted themselves to teaching
or nursing is a hero to me. I
see them caring for others in a
practical way, without ego or
grandstanding – perhaps without
any sense that what they do
is amazing.
‘The Secret Books’ by Marcel
Theroux is out now (Faber, £12.99)
47
48
In association with
Homes & Design
The leading platform for home
renovation and design, providing people
with everything they need to improve
their homes from start to finish
W
ho remembers the coloured bathroom suites
of the 1970s and 80s,
with their luxurious
deep-pile toilet lid covers and accompanying decorative looroll holders?
It’s easy to look back with a sense of
incredulity at the era that brought us
peach-coloured and burgundy basins,
but it’s a good reminder that a peek into
the smallest room in the house can offer
a fascinating snapshot into the lifestyles
and fashions of an era.
Which is why it’s so interesting to
take a look at which colours, layouts and
features are top of the nation’s wish list
today, and to ponder what conclusions
future generations will draw from the
way we design this little room.
With a community of more than
40 million unique monthly users and
more than 1.5 million active home
professionals, Houzz has unique insights into how people are designing
their homes.
We questioned 1,700 UK homeowners who are planning, are in the
midst of, or have recently completed a
bathroom renovation to find out what
Brits are getting up to in the bathroom
right now.
Connecting you now
Have you ever sent an email from the
bath? Before you scoff, a surprising
number of people said they had caught
up on correspondence from the smallest room. When quizzed, 52 per cent of
homeowners confessed to using their
mobile in the bathroom, with email the
most popular reason for doing so.
Accessing social media was hot on
its heels, with homeowners confessing
to tweeting and Instagramming from
the comfort of their bathrooms (mirror selfies, perhaps?) followed, in third
place, by using phones to play music.
When you look at the breakdown
of those mobile-happy homeowners,
though, the age divide becomes more
apparent, with 79 per cent of millennials (those aged 25-34) admitting to
using their phone in the bathroom,
compared with a more modest 31 per
cent of over-55s saying they do so.
Splashing the cash
The average bathroom spend last
year was £5,600, but there was quite a
marked difference in the amount spent
across the generations. Millennials kept
a closer eye on the pennies, with the average cost of a bathroom coming in at
£3,500, while Generation X (aged 35-54)
had more money to spare, forking out
an average of £6,100.
The over-55s hit the middle ground
with an average spend of £5,700.
Renovation drivers
The reasons for updating a bathroom
fell neatly into three main camps: a
How to love
your liquid
assets
It’s the most private room in the
house and can be the most luxurious.
Which design tips for the bathroom
are the hottest of the new year?
third of people said it was because they
purchased their home recently and
wanted to make it their own; another
third admitted it was because they
could no longer stand the old bathroom, and a final third said it was because an old bathroom deteriorated or
broke down.
Interestingly, there was a fairly even
split across all of these three reasons,
with the exception of the millennials, 60
per cent of whom said the motivating
factor for changing their bathroom
was that they had bought their
home recently and wanted to
put their stamp on it.
Sharing is caring
Choosing a new bath? When
deciding on the size and type
of tub, the top feature was a
surprisingly social one: 22 per
cent of people buying a bath
specified there had to be room for
two. A non-slip floor and grab bars
were the second and third, rather
more practical, requests.
Rainfall showers lead the way
Among those who splashed out on a
new shower, more than 70 per cent
invested in a large waterfall
shower head, and this choice
NEWS
2-34
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
35-47
Left, a Jura bath; below, a Single Outlet
digital shower, starting at £560;
Pitch Bluetooth mirror, £410, all from the
Pure Bathroom Collection ROB SMALLEY
TV
42-43
BUSINESS SPORT
50-51
55-64
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
49
Fivetoview
Taunton
CUNNINGHAM COURT,
TA1
Price: £168,500
They say: This beautiful
top-floor apartment is
in excellent condition,
and includes two double
bedrooms with an en
suite to the master, a
spacious open-plan
kitchen and lounge/
diner, a large bathroom
and allocated off-road
parking.
Call:0121 721 9601
MASSINGHAM PARK, TA2
Price: £200,000
They say: A stunning
property which boasts
three reception rooms,
off-street parking, and a
great location with easy
access to Taunton town
centre. It includes a study/
playroom, lounge/dining
room, kitchen and three
good-sized bedrooms
as well as a beautifully
landscaped garden.
Call: 01823 760908
PRIORSWOOD, TA2
Price: £359,995
They say: A new-build
four-bedroom home
that is perfect for
entertaining. It includes
an impressive entrance
hall, open-plan kitchen/
family room, separate
dining room, study and
a utility room plus four
bedrooms – with an en
suite to the master –
and a family bathroom.
Call:01823 760732
Some 22
per cent of
bath buyers
wanted room
for two in it
was consistently popular across all age
ranges, from millennials to the over-55s.
The joy of singing in the shower
shows no signs of fading – 15 per cent
of renovators even chose showerheads
with built-in speakers – and a corner
design was the most popular type of
shower installed.
Nearly three-quarters of all home-
Geometrical grey tiles; left, a bronze duck feet vanity mirror
owners who upgraded their showers
plumped for a larger model – and the
over-55s led the way in requesting this.
Playing it safe
If you had to guess the most popular bathroom colour, what would you
choose? Blue? Aqua? Grey? Would it
surprise you to learn that the colour
chosen most frequently across the
board, for walls, worktops and cabinets,
was white? Grey was the second most
popular shade, proving perhaps that
we’re collectively cautious when decorating this space.
When it comes to flooring, most people also chose grey, with practical beige
the second most popular choice.
We’re also a little reluctant to test
out some of the more futuristic toilet
designs – only 10 per cent of new toilets
have high-tech features. It seems we’re
still wary of motion-activated seats.
Regrets? I’ve had a few
Finally, when homeowners were asked
for the top three features they regretted not installing in their bathrooms,
they were, in descending order: underfloor heating, a sound system and
an illuminated mirror. They may be
worth considering before you start
your renovation.
WATERLEAZE, TA2
Price: £335,000
They say: This lovely
four-bedroom property
is positioned in an everpopular location to the
north-east of Taunton.
Generously proportioned
throughout, it includes a
spacious breakfast kitchen,
separate dining room,
four bedrooms with an en
suite to the master and a
family bathroom.
Call: 01823 760726
CHEDDON ROAD, TA2
Price: £350,000
They say: On the
northern fringes of
Taunton, this threedouble bedroom, two
reception room character
property has some
majestic period features
with contemporary
accommodation. It
has landscaped and
private rear gardens and
off-road parking.
Call:01823 429046
In association with
Business
Business Editor Elizabeth Anderson
+4420 7361 5718
business@inews.co.uk
TECHNOLOGY
Apple and Amazon in talks
to set up in Saudi Arabia
By Katie Paul
Apple and Amazon are in licensing
discussions with Riyadh on investing
in Saudi Arabia, two sources told Reuters, as Crown Prince Mohammed
bin Salman pushes to give the conservative kingdom a high-tech look.
A third source confirmed that
Apple was in talks with the Saudi
Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA).
Both companies already sell products in Saudi Arabia via third parties
but they and other global technology giants have yet to establish a
direct presence.
Amazon’s discussions are being led
by cloud computing division Amazon
Web Services, which would introduce
stiff competition in a market currently dominated by smaller local providers such as STC and Mobily.
Riyadh has been easing regulatory
impediments for the past two years,
including limits on foreign ownership
which had long kept investors away,
since falling crude prices highlighted
the need to diversify its oil-dependent
economy. Luring Apple and Amazon
would further Prince Mohammed’s
reform plans and raise the companies’ profile in a young and relatively affluent market, which already
boasts some of the highest internet
and smartphone use in the world.
While Saudi Arabia’s plans call
The sovereign wealth
fund chaired by Prince
Mohammed bin Salman invested
$3.5bn in Uber in 2016 – the
largest single investment ever
made in a public company.
for attracting foreign investment
broadly across sectors, officials have
courted Silicon Valley players especially strongly over the past two
years to complement their high-tech
ambitions. Prince Mohammed is an
avowed technophile and has styled
himself a “disrupter” in the model
of Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg and
Bill Gates.
About 70 per cent of the Saudi population is aged under 30 and frequent
users of social media.
A licensing agreement for Apple
stores with SAGIA is expected by
February next year, with an initial retail store targeted for 2019, said two
sources familiar with the discussions.
Amazon’s talks are in earlier stages
and no specific date has been set for
investment plans, they said.
Apple already holds second place
in the Saudi mobile phone market
Reports suggest Apple could open its
first store in Riyadh in 2019 GETTY
behind Samsung, according to the
market researcher Euromonitor.
Amazon acquired the Dubai-based
online retailer Souq.com earlier in
2017, opening access for Amazon retail goods to be sold in the kingdom.
Both companies declined to comment, while SAGIA was not immediately available to answer questions
about the discussions. REUTERS
RETAIL
Co-op to
sell locally
brewed beer
across UK
China is looking
to attract more
investment in Beijing’s
central business district
LINTAO ZHANG/GETTY
By Alan Jones
Quote of
the day
CHINA
Beijing waives taxes if foreign firms reinvest
By Rebecca Jones
Managed well,
automation could
help create a
future of shared
economic plenty
Mathew Lawrence
Senior research fellow at
the Institute for Public
Policy Research
Chinese authorities have announced
they will temporarily exempt foreign
firms from paying income tax on
profits if they re-invest them into the
country, in a bid to stop foreign firms
shifting their operations out of China.
Analysts say a tax cut proposed
by the US President Donald Trump,
which could lead to a repatriation of
earnings by US firms, poses a challenge to China’s bid to lure foreign
investment. On its website, China’s
finance ministry said the move will
help “promote growth of foreign investment, improve quality of foreign
investment and encourage overseas
investors to continuously expand
their investment in China”.
The temporary exemption on provisional income tax is retroactive
from 1 January, which means firms
that have already paid taxes this year
will be refunded.
But foreign firms must meet several conditions to be eligible for the
exemption, the statement said.
These include making direct investment into sectors encouraged
by the Chinese government while
investments must be transferred directly to investee companies.
China’s standard corporate
tax rate is 25 per cent although it
gives firms leeway to make profit deductions when they make
charitable donations.
Last week, the US Senate approved a reduction in corporation
tax to 21 per cent, down from 35 per
cent. REUTERS
The Co-op is extending a programme
of buying local beer following a pilot
in Yorkshire and is set to complete
a UK-wide roll-out in the coming
weeks, with the prospect of tapping
into sales of around five million pints.
Almost 200 smaller suppliers will
benefit from the move, which is in
line with the Co-op’s policy of backing British products.
Derby’s Dancing Duck brewery
is one of the biggest beneficiaries,
bagging the Co-op’s largest order to
date. The award-winning brewery
employs eight people, and will supply the Co-op with three of its ales:
Ay Up, 22 and Dark Drake – a beer
that has previously won the accolade
of Champion Winter Beer of Britain.
Fierce Brewery of Aberdeen,
which won Breakthrough Brewery of
the Year at this year’s Scottish Beer
Awards, will supply Co-op’s stores
with three ales: Easy Shift, Day Shift
and Moose Mousse. Louise Grant, of
Fierce Brewery, said: “We are delighted to be working with the Co-op. Its
support for local producers fits well
with our ethos of sourcing locally.”
Hucknall-based Lincoln Green
Brewing Co will supply the community retailer’s food stores in Nottinghamshire with its ales.
Jake Woods, Co-op beer buyer,
said: “Locally produced ale is an exciting category. We see significant
potential for continued sustainable
growth, and we are delighted to support and champion these beers which
are brewed with pride and passion to
deliver consistently great quality and
taste.” PA
NEWS
2-34
Stock markets hit
26-year high
Managers plan to
cost cuts in 2018
Japanese industrial production
and retail sales grew sharply in
November as unemployment
fell to a 24-month low and stock
markets surged to a 26-year
high, marking the strongest
growth period in a decade. The
surprisingly strong growth
has raised expectations that
the Bank of Japan will begin
tightening its monetary policy.
A survey of over 1,000 business
managers by the Chartered
Management Institute has
found that most businesses
would focus on cutting costs in
2018, rather than investment,
as most expect a “tough” 2018.
Just one in three managers
expect the economy to grow
next year. Many are struggling
to recruit skilled workers.
EMPLOYMENT
INSURANCE
Average salary
passes £32,500
Aegon to sell US
unit to Scor
Advertised salaries increased
in 2017 and now average more
than £32,500, according to job
site Adzuna. The firm saw a
1.2 per cent rise in wages for
new employees in the year to
November. The biggest salaries
were in London, at more than
£42,700, while the lowest were in
Scotland, at just under £30,000.
Dutch insurer Aegon is to sell
part of the remaining stake it
holds in US life insurance unit
Transamerica to France-based
property and life reinsurer Scor
following an earlier deal in 2011.
Transamerica life subsidiaries
will reinsure $750m (£560m)
of liabilities to Scor under the
terms of the deal.
BRAZIL
FINANCE
Keppel lawyer cut
deal in US inquiry
Global investors
eye Europe
A former lawyer at Singapore
infrastructure group Keppel,
Jeffery Chow, agreed a deal
to help a US investigation of
the firm for bribing Brazilian
officials to win contracts
with a state oil firm, US court
documents have shown. Chow
admitted drafting contracts.
Investors were most bullish
on Europe in December, as
confidence in the US and Asia
waned. The State Street Global
Investor Confidence Index
measured a 16-point rise in
sentiment toward Europe as
the US and Asian indices fell 6.2
and 2.8 points respectively.
BANKING
RBS investors in
governance revolt
More than 100 Royal Bank of
Scotland investors are calling
for a review of its shareholder
engagement practices. UK
investor group ShareSoc was
due to deliver a proposed
resolution today ahead of RBS’s
annual general meeting in May.
CONSUMER
Inflation boosts
supermarkets
Soaring food price inflation
is expected to have boosted
supermarket sales over the
festive period. City analysts
predict all big grocery groups
will book growth in like-for-like
seasonal sales when they report
to the market in coming weeks.
FTSE 100 up 2.2 at 7622.9
Company
Price
Chg
High
3i Group
Admiral
Anglo Amer
Antofagasta
AB Foods
Ashtead Group
AstraZeneca
Aviva
BAE Systems
Barclays
Barratt Dev
BHP Billiton
BP
BAT
Berkeley Grp Hldgs
British Land
BT
Bunzl
Burberry
Carnival
Centrica
Coca-Cola HBC
Compass
CRH
Croda Intl
DCC
Diageo
Direct Line Ins
Easyjet
Experian
Fresnillo
G4S
GKN
Glencore
GSK
Halma
Hammerson
907.5
1959.0
1537.5
992.5
2833.0
1969.0
4998.5
501.0
568.5
203.4
648.5
1499.5
518.6
4955.5
4235.0
685.5
267.4
2058.0
1790.0
4890.0
138.0
2414.0
1577.0
2663.0
4405.0
7460.0
2694.5
376.1
1441.0
1619.0
1390.0
260.5
317.1
385.4
1310.0
1256.0
542.5
-2.5
+4.0
+13.5
+8.0
-2.0
+6.0
+53.0
+1.0
-0.5
+0.8
-2.0
+13.5
-0.1
-49.5
+21.0
+2.5
-6.9
+9.0
-2.0
+11.0
+0.6
+5.0
+5.0
—
+9.0
+20.0
+9.0
+1.3
—
-3.0
-7.0
-1.5
+2.1
+2.3
-0.5
-14.0
+3.0
975.0
2184.0
1548.5
1071.0
3387.0
2118.0
5520.0
570.5
682.5
244.4
705.5
1518.5
529.0
5643.6
4246.6
688.5
400.7
2472.0
2024.0
5435.0
236.9
2682.0
1765.9
3342.0
4420.0
7595.0
2706.0
411.3
1468.0
1708.0
1746.0
342.6
379.3
388.2
1724.5
1341.0
52338.0
Low
678.0
1680.0
950.1
672.5
2335.0
1476.0
4136.5
467.3
533.5
177.3
6.3
1103.0
436.9
4064.0
2774.0
574.6
242.2
2009.0
1439.0
4082.0
119.7
1705.0
1424.8
27.0
3143.0
5985.0
2075.0
328.4
906.4
1428.0
1112.0
228.2
3.0
270.0
1270.0
879.5
493.5
Company
Price
Chg
High
Hargrve Lans
HSBC Hldgs
IAG
Imperial Brands
Informa
IntCont Htls
Intertek
ITV
Johnson Matth
Just Eat
Kingfisher
Land Secs
Legal & Gen
Lloyds Bk Gp
Lon Stock Ex
Marks&Spen
Mediclinic Intl
Micro Focus Intl
Mondi
Morrison (Wm)
National Grid
Next
NMC Health
Old Mutual
PaddyPwrBetfair
Pearson
Persimmon
Prudential
Randgold Res
Reckitt Ben
RELX
Rentokil Initial
Rio Tinto
Rolls-Royce
RBS
Shell A
Shell B
1785.0
762.4
648.0
3133.5
725.5
4715.0
5145.0
164.4
3091.0
760.0
344.5
1007.0
271.0
67.6
3748.0
316.3
643.5
2473.0
1913.0
219.2
870.0
4543.0
2839.0
224.9
8810.0
733.0
2739.0
1882.0
7260.0
6816.0
1735.0
313.3
3858.0
846.5
276.2
2461.0
2486.5
+4.0
-1.2
-0.5
+8.5
+0.5
-1.0
-5.0
+0.4
+7.0
-5.0
+2.2
+8.0
+0.8
-0.2
+2.0
+0.1
+5.5
-8.0
+10.0
+2.6
+2.4
+8.0
-64.0
-2.9
+70.0
+0.5
+8.0
-2.5
-10.0
+16.0
+3.0
-1.2
+58.5
-3.0
+0.4
-2.5
-1.0
1791.0
773.2
679.8
3956.5
773.0
4752.0
5470.0
221.8
3511.0
827.0
369.8
1217.1
279.9
73.6
4069.0
397.8
890.2
2887.8
2145.0
254.4
1174.3
5355.0
3211.0
230.5
8945.0
825.0
2901.0
1933.5
8255.0
8110.4
1784.0
338.8
4226.6
994.5
290.5
2516.3
2580.5
Markets
FTSE 100
7622.9
+2.2
FTSE 250
20642.3
+2.3
FTSE All Share
4190.3
+1.8
FTSE Eurofirst300
1530.9
Dow Jones *
24804.9
S&P 500 *
2684.2
Nasdaq *
6947.5
DAX
12979.9
CAC 40
5339.4
Hang Seng
29863.7
+266.1
Nikkei
22784.0
-127.2
-4.9
+30.6
+1.6
+8.2
-90.1
Low
1204.0
518.2
437.8
3013.0
480.0
3656.0
3370.0
142.8
2681.0
495.1
285.3
912.0
231.6
61.8
2807.0
296.3
495.4
26.8
1619.0
205.0
859.3
3565.0
1500.0
184.2
6572.5
552.0
1728.0
1524.0
5885.0
6299.0
1397.0
216.7
2882.5
635.0
213.4
1982.5
2037.0
Company
Price
Chg
High
RSA Insur
Sage
Sainsbury(J)
Schroders
Scot Mort Inv Tst
Segro
Severn Trent
Shire
Sky
Smith&Neph
Smith (DS)
Smiths Gp
Smurfit Kappa Grp
SSE
Stan Chart
Standard Life Aber
St James Place
Taylor Wimpey
Tesco
TUI AG
Unilever
United Utilities
Vodafone
Whitbread
Ferguson
Worldpay Group
WPP
625.0
790.0
241.9
3520.0
447.1
581.0
2153.0
3880.0
1003.0
1284.0
512.0
1493.0
2476.0
1300.0
773.8
431.0
1216.0
207.0
208.4
1530.0
4124.0
821.5
234.3
3962.0
5355.0
422.8
1351.0
-1.0
-4.5
+1.1
+10.0
-0.3
+2.0
+16.0
-14.0
+3.0
-2.0
-3.5
+1.0
+1.0
-2.0
+1.4
-2.3
+6.0
-0.1
-0.7
+2.0
-10.5
+1.5
+0.1
+2.0
+30.0
-1.2
+10.0
672.5
820.0
283.6
3548.0
469.5
583.0
2575.0
5067.0
1028.5
1442.0
565.0
1685.0
2493.0
1578.0
860.0
448.6
1245.0
208.6
215.2
1540.0
4557.5
1078.0
237.4
4333.0
5582.9
439.3
1928.1
Low
556.2
595.0
222.4
2885.0
318.0
424.5
2041.5
3435.5
822.5
1143.0
5.3
1396.0
1712.7
1284.2
649.8
336.5
988.0
151.4
165.3
934.4
3173.5
764.5
186.5
3499.9
4427.0
262.0
1238.5
For enquiries call +44 (0)20 7825 8300
+$0.12
ECONOMY
$66.42
JAPAN
The day at
a glance
$1,293.6
Airlines shouldn’t be allowed
to use computer models to
justify higher fares, according
to the head of Germany’s federal
cartel office. Commenting on
Lufthansa’s claims that higher
prices following the collapse of
Air Berlin were automatically
generated, Andreas Mundt said
that “such algorithms aren’t
written by God in the heavens.”
+ $6.95
The number of mortgage
approvals for house purhcases
stood at 39,507 in November –
the lowest number since August
2016, according to figures from
UK Finance. Remortgages
surged significantly, however,
up 24 per cent from November
2016 to 33,670 as the Bank of
England raised interest rates
for the first time in a decade.
The
Business
Matrix
+ 0.51c
Airlines told to
stop hiking fares
51
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
50-51
55-64
$1.3450
New mortgages
hit 15-month low
TV
42-43
– 0.12c
AVIATION
FRiDAY
35-47
€1.1246
PROPERTY
VOICES
16-20
-29.4
EURO/
POUND
DOLLAR/
POUND
GOLD
Per troy ounce,
London pm fix
OIL
Brent crude,
per barrel
ieat
Games&Puzzles
daily recipe
One-pot cod with peppers,
tomatoes and potatoes
Kakuro
Zygolex® In i every day
How to play Fill the white squares so that the total in each
across or down run of cells matches the total at the start
of that run. You must use the numbers from 1-9 only and
cannot repeat a number in a run. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Find the missing words by following the RHYME, LETTERS and MEANING links
– eg, a word that rhymes with ‘cheek’, has one letter different from ‘pear’ and
has the same meaning as mountain, would be ‘peak’. Full rules at zygolex.com.
Solution, page 57
RHYME LETTERS
10
LOT
8
33
23
24
15
18
4
19
PERMIT
RODENT
3
BOTCH
22
22
22
21
CHAT
10
9
17
4
3
CATCH
7
SU FI
PP SH
ER
17
10
17
5
19
Jigsawdoku
8
6 9
7
3
SUITE
TINDER
7
4
8
9
7
9
1
4
2
3
Killer Sudoku No 1171
How to play Each row, column and 3 by 3 box must contain
each number (1 to 9) only once. The sum of all numbers
contained in a dotted area must match the number printed
in its top-left corner. No number can appear more than
once in a dotted area. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
11
3
14
9
10
9
9
17
6
10
9
13
8
13
9
7
20
12
✂
9
5
6
13
17
10
16
10
6
14
> 2
∧
2 <
∨
<
3 <
∧
∧
>
∧
<
∨
∨
<
How to play Find all the mines in the grid. Numbers in certain squares indicate how
many mines there are in the neighbouring squares, including diagonally touching
squares. Mines cannot be placed in squares with numbers. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
1
14
9
13
MEANING
Minesweeper
Recipe from waitrose.com
INQ IS TOR
MEDICATE
LETTERS
Futoshiki
How to play
Place the numbers
from 1-5 exactly
once in each row
and column. The
greater than and
less than signs
(‘>’ and ‘<’) indicate
where one cell is
greater/less than
the adjacent
cell indicated.
Solution:
minurl.co.uk/i
2
5
STOMP
3 4
2 5
20
5
SORE
RHYME
13
LAMP
5
6
How to play Place the numbers 1-9 once in each row, column
and bold-lined jigsaw region. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
18
5
6
PANDA
10
4
6
LOOK
SERVES 6
The country’s
best barred
crossword
every Saturday
FAMILY
4
3
5
4
PUZZLES
3
6
9
8
CLAP
5
9
6
Melt the butter in a wide pan, add the
potatoes and season. Turn the potatoes
in the butter, then cover and cook over
a medium heat for 10 minutes, stirring
occasionally, until semi-soft and golden.
Turn up the heat and add one
tablespoon of oil, then the garlic and 1⁄2
the rosemary. Sizzle for one minute, then
stir in the peppers, tomato purée, canned
tomatoes and capers. Simmer for five
minutes, until the potatoes are cooked.
Check the seasoning, adding a pinch of
sugar, if liked. Don’t worry if the sauce
looks too dry at this point as the fish will
release some liquid while it cooks.
Season the fish, scatter with the
remaining rosemary, then nestle into the
pan. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes, or
until the fish is cooked. Add lemon juice
and a drizzle more oil before serving.
3
11
10
1 tbsp unsalted butter
400g charlotte potatoes, cut into
bite‑sized chunks
1 tbsp olive oil, plus a drizzle
more to serve
2 garlic cloves, finely sliced
2 rosemary sprigs, leaves picked and
chopped
85g red peppers from a jar, drained
and sliced
1 tbsp tomato purée
395g can cherry tomatoes
1 tbsp nonpareille capers
4 pieces skinless cod or other chunky
white fish fillets, about 150g each
1⁄2 lemon, cut into wedges, plus a
squeeze of juice
MEANING
30
2
3
2
3
3
4
1 1
0
1
2
5
5
3
3
0
1
1
1
2
0
0
1 1
2
3
0 0
1 2 2
2 3
0
2
1 1
3
1 1 2
1
2
1
1
3
1
2
3 3
3
1
3 2
2
1 0 1
1
2
2
NEWS
2-34
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
35-47
TV
42-43
Maths Puzzle
Codeword No 1892
How to play Fill the empty squares with
numbers that will make the across and
down calculations produce the results
shown in the grey squares. Each numeral
from 1 to 9 must only appear once. The
calculations should be performed from
left to right and top to bottom, rather than
in strict mathematical order.
How to play The numbers in the grid correspond to the letters of the alphabet.
Solve the puzzle and fill in the letters in the key as you discover them.
Three letters are provided to give you a start. The solution will be printed in
tomorrow’s paper, the solution to yesterday’s codeword is on page 57.
14
17
+
-
x
18
-
-
x
+
+
-16
7
28
0
44
+
x
x
-
1
9
11
14
10
25
4
21
8
24
24
10
20
5
7
19
21
9
17
14
25
10
15
24
14
8
10
12
3
12
19
20
24
25
14
22
26
10
26
19
26
26
11
11
12
25
8
25
13
10
8
22
24
10
13
21
8
5
8
15
16
24
24
24
8
25
4
17
14
12
22
19
25
25
23
16
25
12
22
21
24
25
10
Word
Ladder
26
22
25
8
17
22
12
26
19
2
HULL
18
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
X
WARM
19
11
Z
How to play
Convert the word
at the top of the
ladder into the
word at the bottom
of it, using only
the four rungs
in between. On
each rung, you
must put a valid
four-letter word
that is identical
to the word above
it, apart from a
one-letter change.
There may be more
than one way of
achieving this.
SILK
L
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Need a little help getting started? Then call for up to four extra clue letters on
0901 292 5204. Calls cost £1 plus your telephone company’s network access charge
(if you are having trouble with the phone service, call the helpline: 0333 202 3390).
Or text THEI CLUE to 85100 to receive your clues. Texts cost £1 plus your
standard network charge (if you are having trouble with the text service, call the
helpline: 0333 335 3351). Clues change each day at midnight.
4
33
DOWN
2 Emotional
eruption (8)
3 Requirements (5)
4 Instructed (7)
5 Damp and chilly (4)
6 Cheap,
commonplace
(1,4,1,5)
7 Crossroads
feature (3,8)
11 Status (8)
13 Intercept (4,3)
16 Exhaust (3,2)
17 Open-air
swimming-pool (4)
1
2
3
4
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Stuck on the concise crossword?
For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3590.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble
accessing this number, please call our helpdesk
on 0333 202 3390.
ALL NEW CODEWORDS!
The i Book of Codewords
Featuring 100 brand new
codewords.
Available on Amazon
for £4.99.
See inews.co.uk/codeword
Other i books include:
Mixed Puzzles Vol 2 (inews.co.uk/puzzle2),
Crosswords (inews.co.uk/crossword)
and Sudokus (inews.co.uk/sudoku)
5
7
8
DOME
16
19
20
Maths Puzzle,
Word Ladder, Word
Wheel, Kakuro,
Minesweeper,
ABC Logic, Killer
Sudoku, Futoshiki,
Codeword,
Jigsawduko and
Wijuko created by
Clarity Media.
For more
puzzles,
see clarity-media.
co.uk
Terms &
Conditions
17
18
idoku Exclusive to i
How to play Each numeral from 1 to 9 must
appear (once only) in the squares forming the
red letter i. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
1
5 3 8 9
4
5
5
3
8
2 1
6
5
9 7
1
2
7 6 9 3
9
4
5
21
Solution to yesterday’s Concise Crossword
ACROSS 1 Hype, 3 Laces (High places), 8 Piccolo, 9 Adorn, 10 Cayenne pepper, 11 Incite,
13 Thrown, 16 Indefatigable, 19 Anvil, 20 Failure, 21 Risky, 22 Debt.
DOWN 1 Hypocritical, 2 Picky, 3 Looker, 4 Crate, 5 Scorpio, 6 Bonnet, 7 Infringement,
12 Cadaver, 14 Haggis, 15 Stuffy, 17 Folks, 18 Brute.
Today’s other puzzles Cryptic Crossword, page 24;
Five-Clue Cryptic, page 11; One-Minute Wijuko, page 25
Puzzle solutions See page 57 and minurl.co.uk/i
1
8 5
7
3
6 5
8
8 9
3
6
1
2
2 6
4
5 2
5 4
7
1
2 5
9 8
3
7
Monday: Easier
Concise Crossword No 2214
ACROSS
1 Ripped (4)
4 Short form of
Edward (3)
8 Deal with (6,2)
9 Armoured
vehicle (4)
10 The Great Bear (4,5)
12 Respiratory
disorder (6)
14 Nakedness (6)
15 Military
command (5,4)
18 Wine (Informal) (4)
19 Abstruse (8)
20 Lout (3)
21 Boy attendant (4)
53
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
Sudoku Harder
1
x
-
19
12
49
-
8
14
+
+
+
1
-4
+
14
22
20
x
10
21
22
x
x
12
12
Harder
11
25
25
Easier
1
25
6
BUSINESS SPORT
50-51
55-64
By using i’s text
services, you are
agreeing to receive
occasional SMS
messages from
Johnston Press
PLC. You will not
be charged for
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by texting STOP
to the originating
number. SMS
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are provided by BBA
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5AD, helpline: 0333
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services on this
page are provided
by Spoke AL10
9NA, helpline: 0333
202 3390, and by
Advanced Telecom
Services, EC1M
4BH. Helpline: 0330
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ABC Logic
How to play Place the letters
A, B and C exactly once in each row and
column. Each row and column has two
blank cells. The letters at the edge of a row/
column indicate which of the letters is the
first/last to appear in that row/column.
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
A
B
C
A
C
C
C
B
A
A
B
B
A
A
Word Wheel
This is an open-ended puzzle. How many
words of three or more letters, each
including the letter at centre of the wheel,
can you make from this diagram? We’ve
found 28, including one nine-letter word.
Can you do better?
L
A
O
Y
D
U
E
P
T
NEWS
2-34
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
35-47
TV
42-43
i FRIDAY
29 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
50-51
55-64
i racing
top
tips
Sizing John’s
failure muddies
Festival waters
By Jon Freeman
RACING EDITOR
The Cheltenham Gold Cup picture
became as clear as mud after three
of its ante-post principals, including the favourite and reigning
champion, Sizing John, bombed
out in yesterday’s Leopardstown
Christmas Chase.
The Grade One was instead a
wonderful triumph for owners
Gigginstown Stud with Road To Respect leading home a one-two-three
(and five and six for good measure) in the familiar maroon and
white colours.
Sizing John was struggling
some way out and trailed home a
well-beaten seventh – he was later
reported by the vet to be “clinically abnormal”. Blood tests will be ran
on the horse to assess whether he is
suffering from an infection.
Yorkhill patently failed to stay the
three miles and was another flop,
while Djakadam, in the frame in the
last three Gold Cups, was pulled up.
The bookies took more than a
moment to take it all in, but then were
agreed that, as far as Cheltenham is
concerned, the biggest winner was
Might Bite, who wasn’t even running.
The King George VI Chase hero is
the new favourite at a best-priced 4-1
with Sizing John pushed out to 8-1.
Road To Respect, who won a handicap at last year’s Festival, has been
cut to 10-1 and his jockey Sean Flanagan is confident that Noel Meade’s
DONCASTER
3.40
1.30
SUNBETS CHASE (NOVICES’ LIMITED HANDICAP)
(CLASS 3) £10,000 added 2m
2.05
SUNBETS NOVICES’ HURDLE (CLASS 4)
£6,000 added 2m 3f
1
2
3
1
31P1-3 COPAIN DE CLASSE (D)(BF) P Nicholls 5 11 8.......S Twiston-Davies 4
2
23F-21 ROBBING THE PREY (D) J M Jefferson 6 11 7 .......B Hughes 5
3
-12113 AZZURI (D)(BF) D Skelton 5 11 5....................................H Skelton T 6
4
2-P465 MASTER OF VERSE (D) Miss V Williams 8 10 10.. C Deutsch (3) H 7
5
51-253 RAMONEX (D) Richard Hobson 6 10 10..............................D Cook 8
- 5 declared 9
BETTING: 2-1 Robbing The Prey, 11-4 Copain De Classe, 10-3 Azzuri, 9-2
10
Master Of Verse, 10-1 Ramonex.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
5-31
/1-P39
1/19-4
12760
35
2-6
DON’T ASK W Greatrex 4 11 5.............................................. G Sheehan
ALLMYOWN P Kirby 6 10 12............................................T Dowson (3)
BLACK OP (C) T R George 6 10 12.......................................... N Fehily
CHATO A King 5 10 12..........................................................W Hutchinson
DEBACLE J Eustace 4 10 12........................................................J Quinlan
EUXTON LANE O Sherwood 5 10 12 .................................... L Aspell
FROZEN FLAME Jonjo O’Neill 4 10 12.....................K Moore (3)
HIGH JINX T Easterby 9 10 12 .................................................B Hughes
130-2 KING OF REALMS I Williams 5 10 12...................T Scudamore
55-294 SOME AMBITION C Longsdon 4 10 12 .................A Coleman T
0P THE LAST OF THEM Tom Lacey 5 10 12...........................A Johns
143-65 TOOSEY T Symonds 6 10 12.......................................Jamie Moore T
- 12 declared BETTING: 9-4 Black Op, 3-1 King Of Realms, 4-1 High Jinx, 6-1 Don’t Ask,
8-1 Chato, 14-1 Euxton Lane, 16-1 Frozen Flame, 20-1 others.
2.40
1
2
3
4
SUNBETS YORKSHIRE SILVER VASE MARES’ CHASE
(LISTED) (CLASS 1) £50,000 added 2m 4f 115yds
1114-2
1-2F13
33-223
3-4147
ANTARTICA DE THAIX P Nicholls 7 11 2........ S Twiston-Davies T
RENE’S GIRL (D) D Skelton 7 10 12...................................H Skelton
SONG SAA T R George 7 10 12....................................... A P Heskin T
GOT AWAY O Sherwood 4 10 6 ................................................. L Aspell
- 4 declared BETTING: 7-4 Rene’s Girl, 2-1 Antartica De Thaix, 9-4 Got Away, 10-1
Song Saa.
3.10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
SUNBETS HANDICAP HURDLE (CLASS 3)
£9,000 added 3m
-311F4
22-014
11124P
343368
11F6-8
121533
3/5514-4431
14/FFF
53-575
SAM RED (D) D Skelton 6 11 12 ..................................H Skelton B,T
OH LAND ABLOOM N King 7 11 10......................................H Teal (7)
TERRY THE FISH Jonjo O’Neill 5 11 10.................A Coleman C
NAUTICAL NITWIT (D) P Kirby 8 11 7....................T Dowson (3)
ANOTHER BILL N Richards 7 11 7...................................C O’Farrell
BLAIRS COVE D Skelton 5 11 4 ..........Bridget Andrews (3) T
WICKED SPICE (CD) N Richards 8 10 13..............Craig Nichol
MUTHABIR (C)(D) R Phillips 7 10 12.................................I Popham
CAPOTE (D) Jonjo O’Neill 9 10 11............................. K Moore (3) B
ALLBARNONE G Hanmer 9 10 7 .....................James Bowen (5)
- 10 declared BETTING: 9-2 Blairs Cove, 5-1 Capote, 6-1 Muthabir, Another Bill, 7-1
Sam Red, 8-1 Terry The Fish, Oh Land Abloom, Wicked Spice, 16-1 others.
BEST BET
Copain De Classe
(1.30pm, Doncaster)
Promising start over fences
at Ascot last month and ready
to win.
six-year-old, wearing blinkers for the
first time yesterday, can make his
presence felt on the biggest stage.
“He obviously handles the Cheltenham track,” said the rider. “There
was no hiding place out there today,
they went a good, true pace, but he
settled well.”
Apple’s Jade, another Gigginstown star, wore down Supasundae in
the last few strides of the Christmas
Hurdle, but celebrations were toned
right down as it became apparent
that Nichols Canyon had sustained
a fatal shoulder injury when taking
an early fall.
SUNBETS HANDICAP CHASE (CLASS 3)
£10,000 added 3m
GONALSTON CLOUD (CD) N Kent 10 11 12............A Wedge C
DRUMLEE SUNSET (D)(BF) T R George 7 11 12......C Gethings (3)
GINGILI (D) J Farrelly 7 11 11..............................................N Fehily T,V
ZEROESHADESOFGREY (CD) N King 8 11 8 ..... T Whelan B
SILVER TASSIE (D) M Hammond 9 11 8.......... Joe Colliver T
STEEL SUMMIT (CD) David Dennis 8 11 7..................... L Aspell
CUSHEEN BRIDGE C Pogson 9 11 5.............................A Pogson T
GANBEI (D1) M W Easterby 11 11 5..................... H Bannister T
BEGGARS CROSS (CD) Jonjo O’Neill 7 11 2A Coleman C,T
TWOJAYSLAD (D) I Williams 8 10 6.....................Will Kennedy
- 10 declared BETTING: 3-1 Gingili, 7-2 Drumlee Sunset, 6-1 Twojayslad, 8-1 others.
PIGSBACK.COM MAIDEN HURDLE (CLASS )
11,966 added 2m 4f
34323
2/1/P5839
3/5-3
4F1-4
9B
12
1-4F
15-32F
7
ALL GOOD THINGS J Nash 5 11 12............................. R A Doyle (5)
BALLYWARD (CD) W P Mullins 5 11 12..................P Townend
CAPTAIN COMMANDER Thomas J Farrell 5 11 12.......R C Colgan T
CHEROKEE BILL N Meade 6 11 12..........................S W Flanagan
DICEY O’REILLY H de Bromhead 5 11 12 ...Dylan Robinson (5) T
GEMMATTYMOLL Mrs J Harrington 5 11 12.......M P Walsh
MASSEY’S WOOD (BF) A Fleming 5 11 12...............D O’Regan
MORTAL Joseph P O’Brien 5 11 12 ..........................D N Russell T
SOMEDAY (C) Mrs J Harrington 5 11 12...................R M Power
SONOWYOUNO E J O’Grady 5 11 12........................B J Geraghty
- 10 declared BETTING: 6-4 Ballyward, 5-1 Someday, Mortal, 6-1 others.
1.20
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
WILLIS TOWERS WATSON IRISH EBF MARES HURDLE
(GRADE 3) (CLASS 1) 34,188 added 2m 4f
4-6551
1124-F
451213
233141
1/13-3
11P-21
61-F23
-21223
1-6
FORGE MEADOW Mrs J Harrington 5 11 7..........R M Power
LET’S DANCE (CD)(BF) W P Mullins 5 11 7.........P Townend
DAWN SHADOW (D) Mrs D Love 5 11 2......Rachael Blackmore
GRACEMOUNT Sean Doyle 6 10 13 .........................M P Walsh H
KARALEE (BF) W P Mullins 6 10 13............................D J Mullins
LADY BUTTONS (D) P Kirby (UK) 7 10 13..........................A Nicol
MARY FRANCES Martin Hassett 5 10 13.......S W Flanagan
POLAR PRESENT (D) S Fahey 6 10 13 .......................D Meyler C
MEGA MINDY A Fleming 4 10 9..........................................D O’Regan
- 9 declared BETTING: 4-6 Let’s Dance, 7-2 Karalee, 13-2 Lady Buttons, Forge
Meadow, 16-1 others.
1.55
1
2
3
4
5
6
F1P8-1
36-121
2124-1
531P-1
7-1031
113112
NEVILLE HOTELS NOVICE CHASE (GRADE 1) (CLASS 1)
72,650 added 3m
BON PAPA W P Mullins 6 11 10 ..................................B J Geraghty
JURY DUTY G Elliott 6 11 10..................................................R M Power
MONALEE (D) H de Bromhead 6 11 10....................D N Russell
MOSSBACK G Elliott 5 11 10......................................................D Meyler
MOULIN A VENT (D) N Meade 5 11 10................S W Flanagan
RATHVINDEN W P Mullins 9 11 10.............................P Townend
Tough and versatile, Nichols
Canyon is the only horse ever to
have beaten the great Faugheen (at
Punchestown in 2015) and he was on
his A game again when winning the
Stayers’ Hurdle at Cheltenham last
March, his eighth career Grade One.
This was Apple’s Jade’s first try at
three miles and she appeared to stay
the trip well enough. Trainer Gordon Elliott has been adamant that
she would bid to retain her Mares’
Hurdle crown at Cheltenham, but he
must be wondering now about taking on the boys in the far more prestigious and valuable Stayers’ Hurdle.
7
8
9
ONE TO WATCH
Bapaume was going well
until running out of steam on
his first try over three miles
at Leopardstown.
Today, all eyes will be on Faugheen
in the Ryanair Hurdle. He looked
every bit as good as ever at Punchestown when returning from his lay-off,
but his supporters will want to see a
similar display against vastly inferior
opposition in the wake of reigning
Champion Hurdler Buveir D’Air’s
straightforward dismissal of The
New One at Kempton on Boxing Day.
850-22 THEBARROWMAN (D) A Keatley 7 11 10..............R Loughran
GUINNESS FLAT RACE (CLASS )
7-1121 SHATTERED LOVE (D) G Elliott 6 11 3..................M P Walsh T
9,829 added 2m
45-114 DINARIA DES OBEAUX G Elliott 4 10 8................D O’Regan T
1
F1-1 MINELLA ENCORE (D) W P Mullins 5 12 0 ......Mr P W Mullins
- 9 declared F-12 DALY TIGER (D) N Meade 4 11 11..........................Ms N Carberry
BETTING: 10-11 Monalee, 5-1 Rathvinden, 6-1 Jury Duty, 10-1 Bon Papa, 2
3
1 THE GUNNER MURPHY Joseph P O’Brien 4 11 11.....Mr D O’Connor T
12-1 Mossback, Shattered Love, 14-1 others.
4
4 REACH UP J Ryan 4 11 4 ..............................................Mr J C Barry (5)
FORM VERDICT
5
83 HOLLOW CREST J Nash 4 10 11.................................Ms K Walsh H
MONALEE chased home Penhill in the Albert Bartlett last season and
- 5 declared made a pleasing start to his fencing career when striking over 2m4f at BETTING: 11-8 Minella Encore, 7-4 The Gunner Murphy, 3-1 Daly Tiger,
Punchestown last month. There could be immediate improvement in 12-1 Reach Up, 14-1 Hollow Crest.
the pipeline now he tackles 3m. Jury Duty kept on well to score over
an extended 2m6f from Shattered Love at Punchestown last time and
could battle it out for the minor money with Rathvinden, who lost little
in defeat when second behind Death Duty at Fairyhouse latest.
3.35
LIMERICK
LEOPARDSTOWN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
NEXT BEST
Black Op
(2.05pm, Doncaster)
Decent bumper horse and
expected to make a name for
himself over hurdles.
Jockey Sean Flanagan, aboard Road To Respect, celebrates their
Leopardstown Christmas Chase win yesterday PA
1220-8
222P-2
2121P1
23P-56
13P-65
3311/P
5PP-33
7711-8
F3-104
/1PP2-
12.50
55
2.30
RYANAIR HURDLE (GRADE 1) (CLASS 1) 85,470 added
2m
2.10
GUINNESS NOVICE HURDLE (GRADE 2) (CLASS 1)
38,034 added 3m
FABULOUS SAGA (D) W P Mullins 5 11 6.......D E Mullins T
CAMPEADOR (D) G Elliott 5 11 10..................B J Geraghty H,T
BURREN LIFE G Elliott 5 11 3................................... K M Donoghue
CILAOS EMERY (D) W P Mullins 5 11 10.........D J Mullins H
MINELLA FAIR (C) N Meade 6 11 3...........Jonathan Moore T
FAUGHEEN (CD) W P Mullins 9 11 10 ......................P Townend
DELTA WORK G Elliott 4 10 12............................... B J Cooper H,T
MICK JAZZ (D) G Elliott 6 11 10................................. D N Russell H
AINSI VA LA VIE (C) W P Mullins 7 10 10......................B Hayes
THE GAME CHANGER (D)(BF) G Elliott 8 11 10...... S W Flanagan T
- 5 declared - 5 declared BETTING: 11-10 Fabulous Saga, 9-4 Ainsi Va La Vie, 5-1 Minella Fair, 6-1
BETTING: 2-9 Faugheen, 6-1 Cilaos Emery, 12-1 Campeador, 20-1 Mick Delta Work, 10-1 Burren Life.
Jazz, 66-1 The Game Changer.
1
2
3
4
5
F/F-1F
1251-4
1211/1
231-35
0211P4
1
2
3
4
5
SOUTHWELL
FORM VERDICT
Willie Mullins has won five of the last seven runnings of this race and his
FAUGHEEN, who was having his first start since winning the 2016 Irish
Champion Hurdle when landing the Morgiana on his recent comeback, is
tough to oppose. Cilaos Emery drops back in trip after coming up short in
the Hatton’s Grace and appears the main danger on these terms. In truth,
however, he’s not expected to put up much resistance to his stablemate,
who is rated 19lb superior to him on official figures. Gordon Elliott’s trio
Campeador, Mick Jazz and The Game Changer would also be surprise winners.
3.05
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
TOP OIL IRISH EBF NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE (81130) (CLASS ) 25,641 added 2m 4f
23-611
212222
14
/22-21
42-045
P38-41
512
201211
7-1324
211654
0-234
1/375
4-1P20
4-1217
-653P6
211231
5-1312
/221-1
1-2133
11131
MIDNIGHT STROLL (D) Robert Tyner 5 11 10..P T Enright
MISCHIEVIOUS MAX Joseph P O’Brien 4 11 9......S Shortall (3)
DEOR J E Kiely 6 11 8.............................................Rachael Blackmore
MIND’S EYE H de Bromhead 5 11 8 ............................D N Russell
AGENT BORU T Gibney 6 11 6...................................P E Corbett (3)
GAME OF WAR H de Bromhead 5 11 6.....Dylan Robinson (5)
TEMPLEMORE DREAM (D) A Fleming 4 11 5........D O’Regan
LET’S TWIST AGAIN Joseph P O’Brien 5 11 4M P Walsh B,T
LESLEY DAWN Mrs J Harrington 4 11 2............R M Power H
SLIPPERY SERPENT E J O’Grady 6 10 13.............P Townend
SETTIMO MILANESE M F Morris 5 10 12 ................ A Ring (3)
MIRACLE IN MEDINAH G Elliott 6 10 11...........B J Geraghty
SNUGSBOROUGH HALL (D) L P Cusack 6 10 9D J Mullins
DARKEST FLYER N Meade 5 10 5...........................S W Flanagan
GOOD TO FLOW P A Fahy 7 10 3..........................C Leonard (7) B
- 15 declared BETTING: 9-2 Mind’s Eye, 5-1 Midnight Stroll, 11-2 Let’s Twist Again,
13-2 Game Of War, 7-1 Mischievious Max, 10-1 others.
1.50
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
BETWAY STAYER’S HANDICAP (CLASS 5)
£4,500 added 2m 102yds
354116
946004
-32550
-13386
549673
286444
288944
7-1628
VERCINGETORIX (D)(BF) I Jardine 6 10 0..... J Gormley (5) C 4
SONG OF LOVE S A Harris 5 9 12 ............................D Costello C 3
KATIE GALE (CD) M Appleby 7 9 5..................................A Mullen 7
DEEP RESOLVE (C) Sally Haynes 6 9 4.................B A Curtis 5
WORDINESS (D) P Evans 9 9 4.................................... Fran Berry 2
RULER OF THE NILE (CD) Robert Stephens 5 9 3..C Shepherd (3) 1
SERENITY NOW (C) B Ellison 9 9 3.....................S Donohoe C 8
KOHINOOR DIAMOND (BF) Sir M Prescott 3 8 11 L Morris B 6
- 8 declared BETTING: 10-3 Vercingetorix, 4-1 Kohinoor Diamond, 11-2 Deep Resolve,
6-1 Wordiness, Serenity Now, 7-1 Ruler Of The Nile, 8-1 others.
2.25
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
BETWAY DASH HANDICAP (CLASS 4)
£7,250 added 5f
411133
999161
115106
556460
736209
633084
344044
553362
FOOLAAD (D) S Bowring 6 9 12............................... R Winston T 6
CAPTAIN LARS (CD) D Shaw 8 9 12(6ex).......Nicola Currie (7) V 4
PIAZON (CD) J Butler 6 9 11..................Rossa Ryan (7) B,E,H 8
BROTHER TIGER (D) D C Griffiths 8 9 7............Fran Berry 1
MIDNIGHT MACCHIATO D Brown 4 9 5 ......................T Eaves 5
CROSSE FIRE (CD) S Dixon 5 9 2.................................K O’Neill V 2
PENNY DREADFUL (D) S Dixon 5 8 11 ..................L Morris B 3
RED STRIPES (C)(D) Mrs L Williamson 5 8 7A Mullen B 7
- 8 declared BETTING: 11-4 Captain Lars, 7-2 Foolaad, 6-1 Piazon, 7-1 Crosse Fire, 8-1
Penny Dreadful, Red Stripes, Brother Tiger, 12-1 Midnight Macchiato.
Results service
CATTERICK
Going: Good to soft-good in places
12.30 1. ENOLA GAY (A Coleman) 15-8 fav; 2.
Teescomponents Lad9-4; 3. Swashbuckle5-2.
12 ran. 11/4l, nk. (Miss V Williams). Tote: £2.70;
£1.20, £1.20, £1.20. Exacta: £7.00. Trifecta:
£14.60. CSF: £6.33.
1.05 1. PADDLING (F O’Toole) 4-1; 2. Frankie
Ballou 17-2; 3. Reverse The Charge 33-1. 9 ran.
3-1 fav Cup Of Ambition (Fell). 14l, 11/4l. (M
Hammond). Tote: £4.60; £1.80, £1.90, £9.90.
Exacta: £37.80. Tricast: £970.34. Trifecta:
£518.10. CSF: £36.88.
1.35 1. SHALAMZAR (Miss Becky Smith)
12-1; 2. Roman Numeral 10-1; 3. Calypso
Delegator 25-1. 12 ran. 3-1 fav Hartside
(Fell). 11/4l, 1l. (M Hammond). Tote: £11.60;
£3.40, £2.60, £11.00. Exacta: £117.20. Tricast:
£2940.39. Trifecta: £2628.70. CSF: £125.95.
NR: Discoverie.
2.05 1. LAKE FIELD (D Bass) 4-9 fav; 2.
Manwell 10-1; 4 ran. 6l. (K Bailey). Tote:
£1.40; Exacta: £3.10. Trifecta: £4.80. CSF:
£5.05. NR: Ramonex.
2.40 1. ATTENTION PLEASE (R Day) 4-1;
2. More Madness 18-1; 3. Captain Mowbray
10-1. 9 ran. 3-1 fav Red Danaher (5th). nk,
11/2l. (Mrs R Dobbin). Tote: £5.40; £1.90,
£4.20, £2.00. Exacta: £63.20. Tricast: £655.46.
Trifecta: £453.90. CSF: £60.34.
3.15 1. TRIOPAS (C Gethings) 2-1; 2. American
Life 5-2; 3. Durbanville 15-8 fav. 7 ran. shd, 9l.
(Tom Lacey). Tote: £2.30; £1.60, £1.50. Exacta:
£6.70. Trifecta: £12.40. CSF: £7.18.
Placepot: £94.00. Quadpot: £35.10.
Place 6: £237.17. Place 5: £217.15.
LEICESTER
Abandoned due to Snow and Ice.
LINGFIELD
Going: Standard
11.40 1. BERTIE MOON (Keelan Baker) 4-1;
2. Ceyhan 5-4 fav; 3. Awesome Rock 40-1. 8
ran. 23/4l, 4l. (M Appleby). Tote: £4.30; £1.50,
£1.10, £3.70. Exacta: £11.90. Trifecta: £75.40.
CSF: £9.55.
12.10 1. MUHAJJAL (Rossa Ryan) 3-1 fav;
2. Masquerade Bling 7-1; 3. The Special One
4-1. 9 ran. nk, 11/4l. (G Peckham). Tote: £4.30;
£1.70, £2.40, £1.40. Exacta: £26.00. Tricast:
£85.42. Trifecta: £150.20. CSF: £24.99. NR:
Frozen Lake.
12.45 1. UBLA (William Cox) 10-1; 2. Captain
Pugwash 7-4 fav; 3. Haraz 8-1. 9 ran. 1/2l,
3
/4l. (Miss G Kelleway). Tote: £13.70; £3.90,
£1.10, £2.50. Exacta: £39.90. Tricast: £152.31.
Trifecta: £265.30. CSF: £27.62.
1.15 1. MAVERICK OFFICER (S Donohoe)
14-1; 2. Ode To Autumn 11-8 fav; 3. Zalshah
9-4. 10 ran. 3/4l, nk. (D M Simcock). Tote:
£15.30; £3.40, £1.10, £1.60. Exacta: £49.20.
Trifecta: £126.80. CSF: £33.52. NR: Toshima.
1.45 1. ROYAL RESERVE (K Shoemark) 10-1;
2. Rydan 11-2; 3. Island Brave 7-2. 7 ran.
11-10 fav Captain Navarre (4th). shd, shd. (D
O’Meara). Tote: £7.70; £3.60, £2.10. Exacta:
£30.10. Tricast: £222.41. Trifecta: £148.50.
CSF: £59.00. NR: Echo Brava.
2.20 1. SWISS VINNARE (Nicola Currie) 4-1;
2. Paradise Lake 10-11 fav; 3. Deliberator
5-2. 9 ran. 31/4l, 3/4l. (P McEntee). Tote: £4.80;
£1.10, £1.10, £1.30. Exacta: £10.90. Trifecta:
£17.50. CSF: £8.63.
2.55 1. BEZOS (Rossa Ryan) 5-1; 2. Corazon
Espinado 13-8 fav; 3. Isoletta 8-1. 12 ran. 2l,
21/4l. (R Hannon). Tote: £5.00; £1.60, £1.60,
£2.60. Exacta: £16.60. Tricast: £70.04. Trifecta: £67.10. CSF: £13.63.
3.30 1. ART NOUVELLE (A Kirby) 9-2; 2. Juan
Horsepower 7-1; 3. Hamish Mcgonagain 5-2
fav. 9 ran. 1l, 3/4l. (Joseph P O’Brien (IRE) ).
Tote: £4.80; £1.60, £2.30, £1.40. Exacta: £43.10.
Tricast: £97.24. Trifecta: £140.00. CSF: £36.56.
Jackpot: Not won, pool of £3,832.22 carried
over to Southwell.
Placepot: £19.70. Quadpot: £7.00.
Place 6: £38.83. Place 5: £23.94.
56
SPORT
CRICKET: THE ASHES
Brilliant Cook
stirs new life into
series to prove
all is not lost
AUSTRALIA
ENGLAND
Cook 244 no, Root 61, Broad 56
327 Melbourne scoreboard
491-9
By Jonathan Liew
AT THE MELBOURNE CRICKET GROUND
MELBOURNE (Day 3 of 5): England are leading Australia by 164 runs with one first-innings wicket in hand
Australia won toss
AUSTRALIA — First Innings 327 (Warner 103, Smith
76, S E Marsh 61, Broad 4-51)
ENGLAND — First Innings 192-2
First Innings Continued
Runs 6s 4s Bls Min
A N Cook not out
244 0 27 409 636
*J E Root c Lyon b Cummins
61 0 7 133 193
D J Malan lbw b Hazlewood
14 0 3 43
46
†J M Bairstow c Paine b Lyon
22 0 3 39
41
M M Ali c S E Marsh b Lyon
20 1 2 14
14
C R Woakes c Paine b Cummins 26 0 3 62
92
T K Curran c Paine b Hazlewood 4 0 1 15
21
S C J Broad c Khawaja b Cummins 56 1 8 63
87
J M Anderson not out
0 0 0 15
24
Extras (b4 lb5 nb3)
12
Total(for 9, 144 overs)
491
Fall: 1-35, 2-80, 3-218, 4-246, 5-279, 6-307, 7-366, 8-373,
9-473.
Bowling: J R Hazlewood 30-5-95-3, J M Bird 30-5-1080, N M Lyon 42-9-109-3, P J Cummins 29-1-117-3, M R
Marsh 12-1-42-0, S P D Smith 1-0-11-0.
Umpires: H D P K Dharmasena and S Ravi.
The seagulls were flocking as
evening fell. And towards the northern end of the MCG, where the thousands of England fans had gathered,
the beer and the songs were in full
flow. First they serenaded Alastair
Cook well past his double-century.
Then they taunted Jackson Bird, already well into three figures.
Most of all, though, they simply
basked in the sheer, delirious pleas- between 4-0 and 3-1, between 5-0
ure of being there: three-nil down, and 3-2, is more than semantic. The
yes, but finally, something worth purgative blood-letting that follows
seeing. Finally, something to write whitewashes has the potential to
home about. Finally, something to end eras, traumatise captains, recheer the folks back home: sleepily route careers. The autopsy of this
stirring in their beds, absentmind- series will be tough and thorough,
edly reaching for their phones to and rightly so. But I challenge you
check the score, rubbing their eyes to walk into that England dressing
to make sure they had seen it right. room, full of sweat and satisfaction,
Yes, you did see it right. Yes, Eng- and tell them it didn’t matter.
land really did batter Australia all
The irony is that until the game
over the park. Yes, Cook and Stu- broke in the final session and Engart Broad really did put on 100 in land finally pulled clear, this re18 overs in a weapons-grade ninth- mained a delicately poised Test
wicket partnership. Yes,
match, with England’s
Cook really did bat all day,
small advantage balfinish 244 not out and pass
anced against Australia’s
Cook’s
Brian Lara in the all-time innings had
psychological edge. Even
Test runs list. And at the a mastery of
as Broad walked to the
end of a dreamily perfect
crease, England led by just
concentration
day for England, they led
46. That’s half-an-hour of
by 164, a position from and
David Warner. Surely Josh
which they should really judgement. It Hazlewood and Pat Cumwin, and at the very least is a lesson Joe mins would blow out the
avert the 5-0 whitewash Root is yet to England tail and be ahead
that has been on every- learn
by stumps.
one’s lips since about day
But curiously, the exfour at Brisbane.
pected lower-order colYou will hear certain people lapse never came. Broad made a
grousing that none of this really half-century of immense courage,
mattered, because the series is al- braving the early hits, looking not
ready over. Under no circumstanc- merely to survive but to score.
es listen to them. Cricket is cricket, Cook’s innings was a masterpiece
the Ashes is the Ashes, and interna- of concentration and judgement, of
tional sport is international sport, picking the right ball to leave, the
and when it is played with this sort right ball to defend, the right ball
of skill and courage it leaves the sort to hit. It is a lesson his successor
of memories that will last long after as captain is yet to learn. Joe Root
the score is forgotten.
could have batted all day too, but he
Besides, for many the difference lasted less than an hour.
It was a classic Cook innings in so
many ways. But one thing we have
Top 10 Test runscorers
rarely seen him do is bat with the
tail. This was only the second time
1 S Tendulkar (India) 15,921 runs
he had batted with Broad.
2 R Ponting (Australia) 13,378
The pitch is still excellent. Steve
3 J Kallis (South Africa) 13,289
Smith still has to bat. But England
4 R Dravid (India) 13,288
were well on top, and as Cook left
5 K Sangakkara (Sri Lanka) 12,400
the field the whole ground rose to
6 A Cook (England) 11,956
acclaim one of the great Test innings
7 B Lara (West Indies) 11,953
by an Englishman in Australia. The
8 S Chanderpaul (West Indies) 11,867 series is dead. But in a strange way,
9 M Jayawardene (Sri Lanka) 11,814
for England it has never felt more
10 A Border (Australia) 11,174
alive. THE INDEPENDENT
Ashes briefing: Day three
Alastair Cook’s record-breaking double-century kept England in control
of the fourth Ashes Test at the MCG.
Cook (244 not out) had a best of
just 37 in his previous 10 innings, but
resumed on day three with his 32nd
Test hundred already in the book.
What followed was remarkable, especially during a ninth-wicket stand
of exactly 100 with Stuart Broad (56),
as he made up entirely for the fragility of several team-mates.
England’s all-time record runscorer beat Wally Hammond’s previous
ground-record 200 for a compatriot,
and then surpassed Viv Richards’ best
of 209 from any overseas batsman
here. He was also given another life
by opposition captain Steve Smith,
who – after dropping him on 66 on
Wednesday – grassed another yesterday (below) with Cook on 153.
For England, the bottom line of 491
for 9 and a first-innings advantage
of 164 were riches indeed after their
captain Joe Root (61) and others had
briefly invited Australia back into
the contest.
Feast or famine
Cook’s brilliant innings followed a
fallow sequence of just 144 runs in
his previous 10 Test innings – dating
back to his 243 in the day-night Test
against West Indies at Edgbaston
more than four months ago.
England’s all-time record runscorer has been no stranger throughout
his career to peaks and troughs but
has proved over and over again that,
once he gets in, he is not easy to
get out.
Shot of the day
Cook supplied plenty of prime candidates in an often atypically fluent
and stylish innings. But his straightdrive off Jackson Bird to bring up his
double-century – and surpass Hammond’s record knock – had to take
pride of place.
Manic Moeen
Little has gone right for Moeen Ali on
this tour and his frantic 20 off 14 balls
appeared to be the culmination of an
increasingly frazzled approach.
His bizarre cameo was not what
England needed, as they tried to ensure a first-innings lead, and the hapless poke to cover which concluded
his brief stay means Nathan Lyon has
dismissed his opposite number every
time he has bowled to him this winter.
Stat of the day
After his failure to convert
another 50 into three figures,
Root’s percentage success rate in that
task is way below that of his global
rivals – 30 behind top-of-the-league
Virat Kohli and 23 short of his Ashes
opposite number Smith.
27
NEWS
2-34
Australia’s Jackson
Bird tries to stop a shot
from England’s double
centurion Alastair
Cook at the MCG
yesterday REUTERS
VOICES
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29 DECEMBER 2017
57
The Upshot
Tim Wigmore
Sports stars found their political
voice in 2017 – just not in Britain
T
Puzzle solutions
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ZYGOLEX
SILK
HARM
SILO
HART
SOLO
HURT
SOLE
HURL
DOLE
HULL
DOME
LEFT TO RIGHT:
let; rat; batch;
clan; set; ran; sex;
flex; fled; gender;
tread; gander;
stamp; tender;
treat
5-CLUE CROSSWORD
Across: 1 Medic-1, 3 Persia*, 4 Edwa-R-d*
Down: 1 Mag-pie, 2 Island*
WORD WHEEL
OTHER WORDS adult, aloud, deputy, dual, due, duel, duet,
duly, duo, dupe, duty, laud, layout, loud, lout, ludo, lute, out,
outlay, outplay, pout, pouted, put, tau, update, upload, you
YESTERDAY’S CODEWORD 1891
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
14
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F
BASKETBALL
BBL CHAMPIONSHIP: Plymouth Raiders
83 Worcester Wolves 86.
DARTS
PDC WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS,
ALEXANDRA PALACE, LONDON: 3rd rd:
D Webster (GB) bt A Alcinas (Sp) 4-0; D
Van den Bergh (Bel) bt M Suljovic (Aut)
4-0; R Cross (GB) bt J Henderson (GB)
4-1 ; J Lewis (GB) bt J Richardson (GB)
4-1; P Taylor (GB) bt K Brown (GB) 4-0.
TODAY’S FIXTURES
(Football 7.45pm unless stated)
FOOTBALL
THE SKY BET CHAMPIONSHIP
Cardiff v Preston North End.................................
Millwall v QPR...................................................................
SKY BET LEAGUE ONE
Doncaster v Rochdale.................................................
Wigan v Charlton............................................................
SKY BET LEAGUE TWO
Morecambe v Yeovil.....................................................
LADBROKES SCOTTISH CH’SHIP
St Mirren v Dundee Utd............................................
BASKETBALL
BBL CHAMPIONSHIP: Glasgow v
London, Leicester v Leeds, Manchester
v Cheshire, Sheffield v Newcastle,
Worcester v Surrey.
CRICKET
4TH TEST—FINAL DAY OF FIVE: Australia
v England (Melbourne, 11.30pm).
NINE-LETTER WORD outplayed
G K P E V
PREMIER LEAGUE
Crystal Palace (0)... 2 Arsenal (1) ...................3
Townsend 50
Mustafi 25
Tomkins 89
Sanchez 62, 66
L O
I
10
11
12
13
23
24
25
26
Y
J Q M
U X W C D R T A H N B Z
S
DARTS
PDC WORLD DARTS CHAMPIONSHIPS
(Alexandra Palace, London).
ICE HOCKEY
ELITE LEAGUE: Belfast v Edinburgh.
RUGBY UNION
AVIVA PREMIERSHIP (7.45): Bath v
Wasps.
GREENE KING IPA CHAMPIONSHIP
(7.45): Doncaster v Yorkshire,
Nottingham v London Scottish.
his was the year when
“stick to sport” died.
Sport could once be
perceived, however
naively, as a safe space
inoculated from the outside world,
an enclave from political activity.
Now, it is on the front line of politics.
“Republicans buy sneakers
too,” Michael Jordan said, perhaps
apocryphally. It was the distillation
of a worldview in which sport knew
its place – and athletes recognised
that being seen as political brought
huge commercial risks and, in all
likelihood, a loss in earnings.
Increasingly such thinking seems
as distant as the era in which it took
place – the Golden Age of the 1990s,
the years between the end of the
Cold War and 9/11, the years when,
to many, global society seemed to
be progressing inexorably.
Now, in the US and beyond, sport
and politics seem more intertwined
than ever. You can see it in how
athletes kneeling during the
national anthem, in protest against
racism in the US, has become
ubiquitous in the National Football
League and other sports – and even
extended to German football.
You can see it in former France
World Cup winner Lilian Thuram’s
indefatigable campaign against
racism. And you can see it in skier
Lindsey Vonn declaring that she will
compete in the Winter Olympics “to
represent the people of the United
States, not the president”.
Even governing bodies have
become political. While the NFL
has ostracised Colin Kaepernick
for having the temerity to challenge
racism, the National Basketball
Association has supported its
players in challenging Trump. In
Australia, the governing bodies for
Aussie Rules football and cricket
both endorsed same-sex marriage
before this year’s postal vote.
There is one notable exception
to this trend: the United Kingdom,
where athletes don’t seem to
have got the memo that sport is
newly politicised. Sam Allardyce’s
outrage at the reliance of people
on food banks last week was a
notable exception, but – on Brexit,
austerity, and gender and racial
inequality – athletes have preferred
to keep well away from politics.
In the UK, “sport traditionally
has had a self-consciously apolitical
culture,” says Stephen Wagg,
a professor at Leeds Beckett
University – a contrast with, say,
how the West Indies cricket team
and their skipper Viv Richards
once embraced their wider
significance in the empowerment of
black people around the world.
The very individualism and
dedication necessary to become
an elite sportsperson can leave
little time for critical thinking
about the society around them.
Colin Kaepernick takes a knee in protest during the US national anthem GETTY
Athletes have also been deterred
from protesting by their governing
bodies, who have been historically
disproportionately white, male,
educated and conservative.
“There’s a very real sense that
sportspeople are not free to do
what they want with their voices or
their bodies,” Wagg says. “They are
beholden to their governing bodies,
their employers and their sponsors.”
Perhaps there is also a certain
placid strand to British people,
which eschews conflict. And
perhaps athletes here have also
been slow to accept just what
power they do have. “In Britain
we tend to underestimate the
Black sports stars in
the UK have been accepted
because they have shied
away from politics
importance of the symbols of
nation,” believes Kehinde Andrews,
an associate professor in sociology
at Birmingham City University.
Demographics might also
deter some minority groups from
protesting. In the NFL, 70 per
cent of players are black, and the
figure is even higher in the NBA –
rendering it less likely that athletes
will fear being repudiated by teammates if they protest.
In the UK, “there is not a large
enough black population to support
players,” says Andrews. “Black
sports stars have been accepted
because they have shied away from
politics… Alienate the mainstream
and it’s career suicide plain and
simple. So sports stars tend to stay
quiet.” If this is indeed the case, it
says far more about sports fans in
the UK – or, at least, the perception
of supporters – than the athletes
themselves. Yet even silence is
political: unfairly or not, it is viewed
as tacit acceptance.
Silence from sports stars may
unwittingly allow deep-rooted
problems in society to remain
unaddressed. For instance, John
Amaechi, the English basketball
player who became the first
NBA star to come out as gay in
2007, last year said that he was
in contact with gay Premier
League footballers who feared the
treatment they would receive if
they came out.
In the UK today, there are 4,000
professional footballers; not a single
one is openly gay. According to
David Haigh, a former managing
director of Leeds United, there are
over 20 gay players who are “afraid”
to come out. It is hardly outlandish
to suggest that greater denunciation
of homophobia within sport may
encourage players to come out.
Deplorable regimes have long
recognised the potency of sport to
support their own nefarious ends.
Yet, at its best, sport can also trigger
positive change in society.
“You’ll never know how easy
you made it for me to do my job by
what you did on the baseball field,”
Martin Luther King told pioneering
black players during the Civil Rights
struggle in the 1960s. Fifty years
on, this power has been embraced
by athletes once again. It might
be 2018, or it might be later – but
the politicisation of sport will soon
become widespread in the UK too.
58
SPORT
BOXING
Joshua-Parker
fight ‘closer’
after purse
split is agreed
By Luke Brown
Heavyweight world title holders
Anthony Joshua and Joseph Parker have moved a step closer to a
unification fight in the spring after
finally agreeing on a purse split.
The pair’s representatives have
been locked in negotiations over
how the two sides would split the
tens of millions of pounds the fight
is expected to generate. But both
parties have now agreed on a deal
where Parker, the WBO belt holder, will receive between 30 to 35
per cent of the fight purse.
That leaves over 60 per cent for
Joshua, the WBA, IBF and IBO
heavyweight champion, and it
is understood that his promoter
Eddie Hearn has sent a contract
to Parker’s co-promoter David
Higgins, who is expected to fly to
London next week.
“We’re really, really close,” Higgins said. “This fight has never
been closer. And we’re a lot closer
to a deal now because we’ve had
a major breakthrough, which is
that the two camps have formally
agreed on the split.”
Negotiations between the two
camps have been protracted and
occasionally fractious, with Parker’s promotional team initially demanding 40 per cent of the purse,
but Hearn only offering a small
fraction of that figure.
Parker’s promotional company
also staged a bizarre press conference in his home city of Auckland,
New Zealand, during which they
showed a compilation video of
Joshua being knocked down.
But the camps have since resolved their differences, with
progress being made after both
Duco and Matchroom relaxed
their demands slightly.
There are a still a number of
details that need to be resolved
ahead of any formal announcement, including the date – expected to be between March 31 and
April 28 – and venue.
Hearn has previously said a return to the Principality Stadium in
Cardiff is the most likely destination for the fight. THE INDEPENDENT
Anthony Joshua will get up to
65 per cent of the fight purse
Countdown to 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang
The world has
been warned:
Britain is taking
these Games
very seriously
Largest-ever Team GB, backed by a former cycling guru, are targeting five
medals. And, writes Kevin Garside, they’re not worried about nuclear war
F
ebruary cannot come soon
sending its biggest delegation yet to
enough. The return of
a Winter Olympics, 60-plus athletes
the Champions League?
targeting a historic high of five
The Six Nations? Mere
medals. That might not sound much
bagatelles. Bend ze knees,
but in the context of 26 medals from
we’re off to PyeongChang
22 Games it constitutes a
for 17 glorious days of
heap and would improve
I
a
m
sliding, skating, curling
our best haul by 20
confident
and big air acrobatics,
per cent.
also known as the Winter this will be
It gets better. Some of
Olympics.
that predicted bullion is
our most
Despite the proximity
expected to come on snow.
successful
of the Dear Leader just
Olympics ever. The slopestyle snowboard
60 miles to the north,
bronze claimed by Jenny
We have five
the British Olympic
Jones in Sochi was the first
athletes with in an Alpine discipline for
Association insist they
medal
chances
were more concerned
Team GB, and might be
about the safety of our
designated year zero for a
athletes at the summer
nation aiming to become a
games two years ago in Rio than they top five nation in the Alpine events.
are about the nuclear preening of an
As mad as that seems, it is
inscrutable North Korean despot.
the vision of the British Ski and
Which is a comfort since Britain is Snowboard performance director
Short track
speed skaters
(from left)
Elise Christie,
Charlotte
Gilmartin,
Kathryn
Thomson,
Josh
Cheetham
and Farrell
Treacy,
along with
(above) Katie
Ormerod are
medal hopes
GETTY
Dan Hunt, who was appointed 15
huge step forward in the traditional
months ago to bring to bear the
alpine sports.”
organisational expertise he deployed
In PyeongChang, Katie Ormerod
with huge success as head of
hopes to emulate Jones in the
women’s track cycling.
snowboard slopestyle, Katie
“I’m confident this will
Summerhayes is among
be our most successful
the medal hopes in
Winter Olympics ever,”
slopestyle skiing,
said Hunt. “We feel
while Dave Ryding in
we have five to seven
slalom and Andrew
Total
medals
won
by
athletes with medals
Musgrave in the cross
Great Britain from
opportunities.” By
country event have
22 editions of the
the end of the next
shown
solid medal
Winter Olympics
Olympic cycle in
potential.
Beijing, Hunt expects
Already this winter,
the programme to really
British athletes have
start delivering, and within
scored podium successes,
12 years we might begin to push our
including world champion short
summer athletes in scale.
track skater Elise Christie, Brad
“That’s the plan. We have already
Hall’s four-man bob team, Omerod,
made progress and with the
Summerhayes, Musgrave, both
programmes we have in place there
women’s and men’s curling teams
is no reason why we can’t take a
and, despite struggling for form,
defending skeleton gold medallist
Lizzie Yarnold.
The final pieces of the $2.4 billion
project was signed off a fortnight
ago with the completion of the
athletes’ accommodation in the
Olympic Village, which formally
opens on 1 February, nine days
before the opening ceremony.
After the IOC finally brought the
Russian federation to justice over
the state sponsored doping exposed
in Sochi, PyeongChang marks a
fresh start of sorts for the Olympic
movement, a chance to reboot in
virgin territory for the winter games
and for Britain to show it is finally
getting serious about snow sports.
26
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FOOTBALL
What I learned about the
game after becoming a ref
Glenn
Moore
‘O
oh goody, a referee’s
replica kit, just what
I wanted,” said no
one, ever, surely, as
they unwrapped their
presents. But there it was, under the
tree, along with a shiny new whistle
and red and yellow cards. At an age
when I should know better, I have
taken up refereeing, inspired – somewhat indirectly – by Prince Philip.
To explain, the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme (DofE),
founded in 1956 and participated in
by around 400,000 young people
every year, includes a section on developing a new ‘practical and social
skill’. Learning to be a referee counts
and my son opted for it. As someone
who watches football professionally,
coaches at grassroots level, and has
occasionally had to take the whistle,
it seemed a good idea to follow suit.
So one frosty morning, I found myself in a clubhouse in rural Surrey.
There were 24 of us. Tim Lawrence,
Surrey FA’s Referee Development
Officer, Barry Rowland, another
veteran official who was assisting
him, and 22 students. There were
20 teenage boys, one teenage girl,
and me. This appears to be a common gender mix while the age ratio
was, in part, because we were on
the mini-soccer referees course, for
matches involving children
under-10, playing up to seven-a-side.
This is, understandably, more
attractive to teenagers than reffing
adults, especially those youngsters
who don’t have pictures of Mike
Dean on their bedroom wall. On
this particular course, motivation
became clear as Tim asked people
three matches before returning next
why they were there. When ‘Duke of
month for an evening’s assessment
Edinburgh’ was mentioned a forest
and reflection. The emphasis is on
of hands shot up.
learning on the job, with a variety of
Mini-soccer has several commonmethods to improve retention rates.
sense adaptations to the laws (eg, opStarting this young, teenagers
ponents retreat to the halfway line to could – with dedication, talent and
encourage teams to pass out
a thick skin – progress to the
from the back rather than
professional game. It is
just have the biggest kid
debatable how many of
welly it), and a differthose doing it for DofE
ent emphasis. You are
will stick at it, but
there to educate the
even if they do not the
What an amateur
players – especially
experience of being
referee
might
on such matters as
in the middle should
be
paid
for
taking
how to take a throwmake them more
charge of a
in – as well as control
tolerant of referees.
local adults
them. Any disciplinary
Besides,
the DofE elematch
problems are likely to
ment is unusually high on
come not from players, but
my course – other motivafrom parents and coaches.
tions include the desire to ref at a
The course itself is brief: two
higher level than playing ability will
mornings, each split into theory and
achieve, and hard cash. Mini-soccer
practice sessions, plus an
refs get £10-17 a match,
online safeguarding course
which is considerably
Any
with an FA DBS (criminal
higher than the £4.05p-andisciplinary
records check) required
hour minimum wage for
problems
for over-16s. We learn
under-18s.
positioning, signals, mini- are likely
Course costs vary: in
soccer’s unique aspects,
Surrey it is £100, but soon
to come not
and procedures at set plays from players, pays for itself with time
such as the kick-off and a
in the middle. Around 25
penalty. We all take turns in but from
per cent go on to take the
parents
and
the middle during a match
upgrade to 11-a-side, which
coaches
between ourselves.
is £50 extra, two more
At one point Tim plays
matches and more coursethe bad coach – a swearwork, but refereeing adults
free version of Ray Winstone in
is worth £30-40, even on the parks.
the Respect video – and then offers
The money is less of an attraction
advice on how to deal with such
for adults, most of whom whistle
miscreants. Refereeing proves more because they enjoy it. So, when pondifficult than some expect. Parents
dering New Year’s resolutions, how
may be surprised, but assertiveness
about adding “be nice to referees”,
does not come naturally to most
especially the kids who will make
teenagers and the need to concenmistakes – just like the players they
trate all the time – and remember
are officiating. Remember, refs may
the various signals – is demanding.
be flawed, but without them – withThen we are sent out to referee
out us – there is no game.
£40
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29 DECEMBER 2017
59
SCOTLAND
Murty shies away from
running Celtic down
By Andy Newport
Graeme Murty admits he is
wary of “winding up” Celtic
but reckons his Rangers side
are capable of beating the
Hoops tomorrow.
The new Ibrox
manager (right) did
his best to shy away
from questions about
the league leaders’
current form ahead
of this weekend’s
Parkhead showdown.
Brendan Rodgers’ men
recently saw their 69-game
unbeaten run halted by Hearts
and have already dropped more
points this term than they
spilled in the whole of last year’s
campaign.
But Murty was in no mood
to add his name to the list of
pundits who have argued Celtic
have slipped back from the high
standards they set last season.
“We’ve always got a point to
prove against Celtic, not just
this game,” he said. “It’s
the Old Firm derby – it’s
one of the biggest and
best games in the
world – so any time
that game comes
around we have to be
at our top level.
“The last thing I want
to do is give Celtic any
motivation by telling them
they’re dropping off a level and
really winding them up.
“What I’d like to say is that
we know that when we perform
properly we can give anyone
a game.”
CHAMPIONSHIP
Cardiff look to make up
ground after two defeats
By Sports Staff
Cardiff will look to get their
promotion challenge back on track
when they face in-form Preston
North End tonight.
The Bluebirds have lost ground
on Championship leaders Wolves
and been overtaken by Bristol City
after back-to-back losses against
Bolton and Fulham.
But they have the chance to move
back above City, who play Wolves
tomorrow, by beating Preston, and
manager Neil Warnock will not
countenance any negativity.
“When you look at the money that
some clubs have spent, I think we
can be incredibly proud of where we
find ourselves going into January.
I don’t think anybody expected us
to be in the position we are,” he said.
“I thought we were unlucky at
Bolton with the penalty decision,
having dominated the game, and
then Fulham were just a bit better
than us the other day.
“Preston were very physical up
there, so we know what to expect.
“They’re probably the form team
in the division at the moment and
we’re probably towards the bottom,
on the back of a couple of defeats.”
Preston go into the match on the
back of draws with Nottingham
Forest and Barnsley, and manager
Alex Neil has challenged his side to
score more goals.
They are the lowest scorers among the leading 14 teams,
having managed just 27 goals in
24 matches.
LEAGUE ONE
‘Disastrous’ Meire to step
down from Charlton role
By James Benge
A group of referees enjoy a laugh before heading off to take charge of Sunday League matches GETTY
Charlton chief executive Katrien
Meire is to stand down at the end
of the month amid takeover talks
at the Valley.
Belgian lawyer Meire
(right) joined the
club in 2014 but has
proven to be a hugely
unpopular leader
among fans during
her tenure, in which
time Charlton have
slipped out of the
Championship.
Owner Roland Duchatelet
confirmed he would not hire a
replacement as he continues
his attempts to sell the club he
purchased at the start of 2014.
“It is with regret that the
board of directors accepted
Katrien’s resignation earlier this
month,” Duchatelet said. “I want
to thank Katrien for her loyal
service and commitment.”
Duchatelet has not attended
a Charlton match since 2014,
meaning Meire has often
been the public face
of the regime. Her
relationship with
supporters has been
at best frosty.
Rick Everitt, editor
of fanzine Voice of the
Valley, said: “We are
delighted she is leaving
the club. She has been a
disastrous and inadequate chief
executive who has contributed to
the downfall of the club over the
last four years. It’s in everyone’s
best interests that she leaves.”
EVENING STANDARD
60
SPORT
FOOTBALL
The
Fan
Matrix
ARSENAL
Arsène Wenger has
come out and said that
contract talks with
Jack Wilshere are slow
because of the financial aspect.
You’d expect JW to be reasonable
given the way we’ve allowed him
to resurrect his career, to some
extent, at our expense.
BOURNEMOUTH
EDITED BY JAMES MARINER
PREMIER LEAGUE
I would like to see us
have a go. Went to
Chelsea with little
enthusiasm as I knew
exactly how the game would go
– brave rearguard action finally
broken and no attacking response.
At least against Liverpool we
created some decent chances.
The Optimist (North Stand Chat)
CRYSTAL PALACE
Jon Moss is our referee
against Man City. For
the record, I don’t think
Moss is crooked; he’s just
a very poor referee who is so out
of shape that he’s never up with
the play and will struggle to make
decisions while sucking wind into
his busted lungs.
BURNLEY
Heaton will spend time
on the bench but is one
of the country’s best, and
club captain. Pope is good
with crosses, more so than Tom,
but I find Tom’s decision-making
far superior and he makes fewer
mistakes. Because of Pope’s form,
we can sell him for a high price.
claretrobo1 (Up The Clarets!)
EVERTON
Great effort from Dan
Gosling (left) in the last
match. I thought he
looked very busy against
West Ham United and wanted
to be involved. Two goals in
December alreadys, so hope this
continues through to the new
year. Bring on the Toffees.
Peterjclements (Up The Cherries)
CHELSEA
Shawcross injured,
Martins Indi injured,
Zouma can’t play for
obvious reasons... their
best defenders are out and that
should be too much for a defensive
team like Stoke. I hope we start
more offensively from minute one
and get a solid, huge win – 5-0.
Pendergast (The Shed End)
HUDDERSFIELD TOWN
Ray in Houston (Holmesdale.net)
Bournemouth are one
of those pain in the
rear-end teams; you
never know when you
have them beat. They have some
quick players and will be coming
at us with pace, so it will probably
be a case of shutting up shop and
trying to catch them out on the
counter. Cels (Grand Old Team)
LEICESTER CITY
LIVERPOOL
MANCHESTER CITY
jezthered82 (Liverpool FC Forum)
Corky (Blue Moon)
Liverpool are an
inconsistent team
with a great front
line. When we travel
to Anfield tomorrow we should
be playing our best team and
our front line can terrify their
defence. I predict 3-4 Leicester
win in a Christmastime classic.
FIF (Foxes Talk)
MANCHESTER UNITED
It’s hard to motivate
a player/team when
you’re not fighting
for the title. You can
see how the heads of
some of our players have dropped
already: Lukaku, Rashford,
Pogba, they’re just not giving 100
per cent. Suedesi (Red Cafe)
STOKE CITY
Chelsea away tomorrow.
I must admit I don’t have
a great feeling about
this fixture! It may be
the best we can hope
for is not to sustain any serious
psychological damage ahead
of the crucial home game with
Newcastle two days later.
You feel so sorry for Rhian
Brewster. Why should he,
or anyone of any origin,
have to put up with this?
He’s done well talking about it
but Uefa, Fifa etc still do nothing.
They might not be able to fine
Spartak, but how about they insist
on some education for these kids?
NEWCASTLE UNITED
Mitro’s been banned
an insane amount
compared to goals
scored; he is a massive
liability. I don’t like Shelvey
either, rather he was replaced too.
Mitrovic is slow and has a terrible
shot, probably on a par with
Joselu. Jaiston (Toon Forum)
SWANSEA CITY
Wagner has said before,
it’s about what you do in
training. If you impress
him, you’ll earn your
chance. If you don’t, you won’t.
Palmer might be fit but, like
Sabiri, isn’t impressing as much
as others. Doesn’t mean there’s
any fallout or attitude problem.
Captainslapper ( Down At The Mac)
Vincent Kompany has
18 months left on his
contract and no one
else will pay that much,
given his record since 2014, so he
is bound to stay here until 2019.
He will end up on telly as he will
get more money doing that, it is a
no-brainer.
SOUTHAMPTON
Mauricio Pellegrino is
on such thin ice that one
leg has already shot into
the water below. A loss at
Manchester United is a formality,
but a defeat at home to Crystal
Palace on Tuesday would be the
end of him – surely...
Nick Roberts
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR
Gods (Oatcake Fanzine)
Would love to say
I’m happy with this
appointment but I’m
not. I’ll give Carvalhal
a chance but to me this
seems like an appointment that’s
preparing for the Championship
next season. It’s not an
appointment I can get excited
about. James Morton
WATFORD
WEST BROMWICH ALBION
WEST HAM UNITED
adamw1109 (Westbrom.com)
smuts (Knees Up Mother Brown)
We are better when
we start with the
pace of Gray or
Richie, then bring on
a battering ram to
finish the job. We are less efficient
when we start with a battering
ram. Aberystwyth_Hornet
Carlos Carvalhal
has been given
the Swansea
reins until
the end of the
season PA
Mrs Bergkamp (Arsenal Mania)
What supporters
are saying
about your club
BRIGHTON & HOVE
SWANSEA CITY
I really like Rondon and
have always supported
him, but it’s about time
he steps up and starts
scoring. I hope he proves
all his critics wrong but it’s getting
a bit of an habit now.
This team, given its still
relative youth, needs
another two or three years
to fully realise its ambition
– to determine whether,
at its full flower in a new ground,
with the core players at their
peak, it can ascend to the top of
England, Europe, or both.
Paul Maslin (The Fighting Cock)
Not convinced Reece is
going to make it, but an
odd decision to sell, if
true. No money being put
in, so it’s get funds where we can.
Sullivan Jr has to be kept in 1,700
quid loafers and crystal panthers.
Carvalhal promises
to play – not buy –
Swans out of trouble
By Ben Burrows
Carlos Carvalhal has pledged to
get Swansea out of trouble without
resorting to lavish spending after
being appointed manager until the
end of the season.
Carvalhal left Sheffied Wednesday
by mutual consent on Christmas Eve
after two and a half years at Hillsborough, in which he twice took the Owls
into the Championship play-offs.
Swansea have been looking for
a new manager since sacking Paul
Clement on 20 December with the
team rooted to the bottom of the
Premier League table.
Despite the Swans’ dire league
position, Carvalhal claims the forthcoming January transfer window is
not high on his list of priorities.
“I did not talk money with the
chairman, usually I don’t deal with
the money, it is my romantic side
talking,” he said in his introductory
press conference yesterday. “I deal
with footballers then, if we need, try
to say which players we need. I will
try and choose them but the money
is not what I want to talk about, I am
allergic to money.”
Carvalhal has been handed the
reins until the end of the campaign
and insists his future at the club isn’t
dependent on whether he keeps the
Welsh side up or not.
“I prefer to stay one year, check
if the chairman, fans, players are
happy with me, and after see the next
step,” he added. “I don’t want to stay
in a club that the people is not happy
with me.
“I don’t have a problem with my
future. It is not a contract that puts
someone at a club. It’s the day by day,
you prove to the fans, the media.
“If you sign a contract and the people are not happy with you, you will be
out. I have a big self-confidence in me
and my fans.” THE INDEPENDENT
SHEFFIELD WEDNESDAY
McClaren in talks to take reins
By Chris Holt
Sheffield Wednesday chairman Dejphon Chansiri has spoken to former
England manager Steve McClaren
with a view to him potentially
taking up the manager’s job
at Hillsborough.
McClaren (right) left
his advisory role at Israeli side Maccabi Tel
Aviv yesterday to “pursue other interests” according to the club’s chief
executive Ben Mansford,
and it is believed that the
56-year-old has already been in
talks with Chansiri about the vacant
post at Wednesday.
McClaren told Macabbi Tel Aviv’s
website upon his departure: “It’s
with much regret I have to return
to England and leave my role
at Maccabi Tel Aviv. I would
like to thank so many
people for making my
time at Maccabi such a
wonderful experience.”
Mansford said in the
same statement that McClaren’s role was always
based on the proviso that he
would leave if an opportunity
arose to return to management.
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61
LIVERPOOL
Klopp defends
record price Reds
paid for Van Dijk
still a Southampton player. We don’t
make the prices, the market does.
Jürgen Klopp has told Liverpool fans Liverpool supporters should forget
to forget about Virgil van Dijk’s world about the price. We only talk about
record transfer fee.
the player and what he can bring in:
The Dutchman will join the Reds the quality, the mentality, the characon 1 January after an agreement was ter. That is why we are really happy
finally reached with Southabout it.”
ampton following protractVan Dijk handed in a
ed negotiations.
transfer request in the
The £75m price tag
summer in the hope
eclipses the £53m
of forcing through
Manchester City paid
a move to Anfield,
Liverpool
smashed
Tottenham for Kyle
only for a deal to fall
the world-record fee
Walker in the summer,
through when Southpaid for a defender
making the Van Dijk
ampton
accused the
with the signing of
the most expensive
Reds of an illegal apVirgil van Dijk
defender in history. But
proach for the player.
Klopp says the first thing
The 26-year-old’s form
Liverpool supporters should
has suffered as a result but
do is put that record-breaking outlay Klopp has backed his new recruit to
to the back of their minds.
hit the ground running at Liverpool.
“Quality. That’s why we got him,
“Virgil hasn’t had the best first
that’s why we were interested in half to the season at Southampton,”
him,” the German said, when asked Klopp added. “He was out injured for
what the central defender will bring a long time and we all know about the
to his side. “It’s quite difficult at the things that happened last summer.
moment because technically he’s
“He needs to adapt to our style of
‘Uefa just brushed it
under the carpet’
» Continued from back page
By Ben Burrows
£75m
Virgil van Dijk will join Liverpool
when the transfer window opens
play. It’s a completely different game,
but we are sure he will do it.”
Southampton manager Mauricio Pellegrino, meanwhile, hopes to
recruit at least two new players with
the money. “We have been talking
about the couple of targets that we’ve
got,” Pellegrino said.
“Maybe we change one player for
two players, or three players, with
this money and this has to be the
positive target. We have to analyse
this situation and this is good personally for him and will be positive
if we reinvest in our good targets for
the future.” THE INDEPENDENT
and told him. I told Steven
[Gerrard, the coach] what
had happened and we made a
complaint there.”
Liverpool reported the alleged
incident to Uefa after the game.
Spartak captain Leonid
Mironov is the player
accused of that abuse,
but he denies the
allegations and
Brewster is waiting
to find out a date for
a Uefa disciplinary
hearing.
Brewster, who won
the Golden Boot at the
Under-17 World Cup in
India, also claims he was called
the same name in a European
Under-17 Championship against
Ukraine in May and while
playing against Sevilla for
Liverpool’s Under-19s.
In the Under-17s World Cup
final – in which England beat
Spain 5-2 – Brewster (above)
said Wolves midfielder Morgan
Gibbs-White was the target of
vile racist abuse.
“Something happened in the
box,” Brewster said. “As Morgan
was running away, he [a Spain
player] called him a monkey. It
was a goal-kick and I was getting
into position.
“‘Morgan,’ I said, ‘did you hear
that?’ He said: ‘Yeah, yeah, I
thought I was the only one.’”
And Brewster admitted
the impact that such
racist abuse has on him.
“On the day it
happens, that night
my head won’t be
there. I just want to
be left alone,” he said.
“I want to be by myself
and left to think. The
next day I’ll still be thinking
about it.
“I don’t think Uefa takes this
thing seriously. They don’t really
care. That is how it feels anyway,
like it has been brushed under
the carpet.”
Uefa has been asked for
comment. In its rules the
governing body says anyone
found guilty of racist abuse
faces a suspension of at least
10 matches.
62
SPORT
FOOTBALL
PREMIER LEAGUE
Sanchez brace
brings Palace’s
unbeaten run
to abrupt halt
CRYSTAL PALACE
Townsend 49, Tomkins 89
2
ARSENAL
Mustafi 25, Sanchez 62, 66
3
By Jack Pitt-Brooke
Crystal Palace
Speroni
Kelly
AT SELHURST PARK
Remember Alexis Sanchez? The
punchy Chilean with the burst of
pace and the gift for scoring goals
no one else could see? He has drifted
away from his best self this season,
seemingly distracted, disaffected
and counting down the games before
he can leave Arsenal – whether that
is next month for money, or in the
summer for free.
But here at Selhurst Park, in the
bitter cold and quite out of the blue,
he gave a ferocious reminder of who
he is, what he can do and how good he
can be. No one was expecting it at 1-1,
with Arsenal having just conceded
an equaliser to Andros Townsend,
and wondering how to get back into
the game. Then Sanchez smashed in
his first goal, stabbed in his second
and, four minutes later, Arsenal were
3-1 up and moving level on points
with Tottenham. James Tomkins
nodded in a consolation but Arsenal
hung on for the win.
It was Sanchez’s first brace for
more than seven months, his best
moment of a season in which he
had only scored six goals before
last night.
Arsène Wenger had promised
beforehand that his days playing
three centre-backs were over and
that Arsenal were now an attacking, assertive back-four team again.
But Wenger reached back for the
security of his back three, dropping
Alex Iwobi to give Calum Chambers
his first Premier League start for
16 months.
It was a cautious move from
The
Sport
Matrix
The stories you
need to know
Tomkins
Dann
Schlupp
Cabaye Milivojevic
Townsend
LoftusCheek
Zaha
Benteke
Lacazette
Sanchez
Ozil
Wilshere
Xhaka
Kolasinac
Bellerin
Koscielny
Mustafi
Chambers
Cech
Arsenal
Substitutions: Crystal Palace McArthur (Cabaye, 53),
Sako (Loftus-Cheek, 70), Fosu-Mensah (Kelly, 80).
Arsenal Coquelin (Lacazette, 75), Maitland-Niles
(Xhaka, 87).
Booked: Crystal Palace Zaha; Arsenal Chambers.
Man of the match Wilshere.
Match rating 7/10.
Possession: Crystal Palace 35% Arsenal 65%.
Attempts on target: Crystal Palace 2 Arsenal 9.
Referee M Oliver (Northumberland).
Attendance 25,762.
Wenger, unusually so from a man
who said his dream would only be
to play with one defender because
Arsenal, quite naturally, dominated
possession against a Palace team
limited to fast breaks forward and
hopeful shots from long distance.
The task for Arsenal was to pick
their way through Palace’s two rigid
banks of four. It took some time, in
the cold, for them to find the rhythm
of their passing, but Palace never did
much to disrupt them either. One
sharp move ended with Scott Dann
blocking Granit Xhaka’s shot but
soon enough Arsenal were ahead,
FOOTBALL
Irish to tempt O’Neill
with six-year deal
Northern Ireland are set to offer
Michael O’Neill a six-year contract
to continue as Northern Ireland
boss until 2024. The Irish Football
Association is planning further talks
with O’Neill when they meet again
in the new year. The 48-year-old,
who has also been linked with the
Scotland manager’s job, helped his
country qualify for Euro 2016 and
only missed out on a place in next
year’s World Cup after a narrow
play-off defeat to Switzerland.
benefiting from just having enough
bodies in the box together.
Jeffrey Schlupp tried to head out
Mesut Özil’s free-kick but the ball
came back to Alexandre Lacazette
on the right-hand side of the box. Julian Speroni managed to palm away
his curled shot, but only into the path
of Shkodran Mustafi, sharp enough
to slide the ball past Martin Kelly
and in.
Afterwards, Mustafi said: “It is difficult when you come to places like
this. You have to adapt to their game,
especially when you go don’t have
the ball. We did well.
“It would take too long to explain
to you the difference between a back
four and back three. You have to
cover different areas, so it is important to concentrate. It is a strength to
be able to play two systems.”
Arsenal had plenty of openings
after that to score a crucial second
goal but it never quite
with a stepover and darted
broke for them. Twice
down to the deadball line.
Özil got on the end
He crossed – too easof Sanchez passes,
ily – with his left and
but the first time
Townsend popped up,
Palace had not lost
Speroni saved, the
unmarked inside the
in eight Premier
second Kelly forced
box, to put the finish
League matches
him off the ball. This
into
the bottom corner.
before last night,
since defeat at
inefficiency is ArseThis was the moTottenham
nal’s current curse
ment – back to square one
and it cost them just
and with the momentum
four minutes after the reagainst them – that Arsenal
start, as they conceded a
needed one of their senior
painfully preventable
players to seize the game
equaliser.
back. And there is no
Schlupp knocked
one better to do that
a pass down the left
than Sanchez.
Shkodran Mustafi
to Zaha, running
His first goal, putting
scored his second
into the corner with
Arsenal back in the
Arsenal goal of the
nowhere to go. But
lead, was all about
season, to add to one
he spun sharply, conpower and audacity.
against Spurs
in November
fronting Chambers,
Lacazette held up the ball
who did not get tight
just inside the box, teeing
enough. Zaha made space
up Sanchez to drive the ball
8
2
TENNIS
Nadal cancels Brisbane plans
World No 1 Rafael Nadal’s knee
injury has forced him to pull
out of the season-opening
Brisbane International.
The Spaniard (right)
was due to play in
the Mubadala World
Tennis Championship
in the United Arab
Emirates this weekend
but pulled out earlier
this week. He has now
cancelled his plans to play in
Brisbane.
Meanwhile, Novak Djokovic will
take on Spain’s Roberto Bautista
Agut in his comeback match in
Abu Dhabi today.
Bautista Agut, ranked
No 22 in the world,
defeated young Russian
Andrey Rublev 7-5, 6-2 in
the quarter-finals of the
exhibition tournament.
Djokovic has not played a
match since his quarter-final
exit at Wimbledon because of an
elbow injury.
FOOTBALL
Baggies set to swoop
for striker Ings
West Bromwich Albion have made
Liverpool’s Danny Ings one of their
top targets for January as Alan
Pardew tries to save his side from
relegation. The Baggies are yet to
win under Pardew and the former
Crystal Palace manager believes
they need more goals in the team if
they are to have a chance of survival.
West Ham and Newcastle are also
aware that Liverpool will likely let
the 25-year-old leave in January and
could also make a move.
NEWS
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29 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
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63
MANCHESTER CITY
You can’t defend your way past
slick City – so why not have a go?
Kevin
Garside
CHIEF SPORTS
CORRESPONDENT
M
Shkodran
Mustafi (left)
scores from a
tight angle to
put Arsenal in
front GETTY
in the most direct way possible into
goal: through Tomkins’ legs, past
Speroni’s outstretched glove and into
the bottom corner of the net.
His second, four minutes later,
was about foresight and precision.
Wilshere had the ball in the centre
circle, so Sanchez sprinted in behind,
trusting his team-mate to find him.
Sure enough, the pass was perfect,
and Sanchez took it on his right thigh
and touched it into the net.
It was the introduction of Bakary
Sako, of all people, who almost got
Palace back into the game. He gave
them an extra presence up front,
curling one shot over and then having another deflected just wide. From
Townsend’s corner, Tomkins rose in
the box and nodded the ball in. That
gave Palace four added minutes to
make it 3-3 but Arsenal, having let
one lead slip, were not going to do
it again. THE INDEPENDENT
FOOTBALL
Montella to take
charge at Sevilla
Former AC Milan coach Vincenzo
Montella has agreed to take over at
Sevilla. The ex-Italy international
will sign a contract today to become
Sevilla head coach until June 2019.
Montella was sacked by Milan in
November following a poor run
of results. The Italian will take
over from Eduardo Berizzo, who
lost his job as head coach almost a
month after undergoing surgery for
prostate cancer, with Sevilla fifth in
La Liga.
Premier League table
Man City
Man United
Chelsea
Liverpool
Tottenham
Arsenal
Burnley
Leicester
Everton
Watford
Hudd’field
Brighton
Stoke
So’ton
Newcastle
C Palace
West Ham
B’mouth
West Brom
Swansea
P
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
W
19
13
13
10
11
11
9
7
7
7
6
5
5
4
5
4
4
4
2
3
D
1
4
3
8
4
4
6
6
6
4
5
6
5
7
3
6
6
5
9
4
L
0
3
4
2
5
5
5
7
7
9
9
9
10
9
12
10
10
11
9
13
F
61
43
34
46
39
37
18
30
24
29
18
15
23
20
19
18
22
18
14
11
A Pts
12 58
16 43
14 42
23 38
20 37
25 37
17 33
30 27
30 27
35 25
32 23
25 21
41 20
30 19
30 18
32 18
38 18
31 17
27 15
31 13
anchester City’s
unprecedented
supremacy has created an unfortunate
paradox: matches
involving the best team in the
Premier League have become a
turn-off. After another one-way
trammelling to three points, the
coach that presents football as art,
Pep Guardiola, bemoaned the difficulty of engaging opponents who
don’t want to play. We hear you,
Pep. Watching one team relentlessly pound another is not easy
either. Jamie Carragher tore into
the defensive attitudes of City’s
Premier League opponents during
his half-time address at St James’
Park, branding as ‘a joke’ the kind
of crushing negativity employed
by Newcastle United, City’s 18th
straight league victims.
This was the home team, and not
just any team. This was Newcastle,
host to a tradition centred on the
escapades of marauding No 9s, of
Jackie Milburn, Hughie Gallacher,
Malcolm ‘Supermac’ Macdonald,
Alan Shearer. Milburn would have
sooner signed for Sunderland than
kneel in front of the Gallowgate
like this.
78
NEWCASTLE UNITED
Diamé defends parking the bus and shifts
focus to must-win clash against Brighton
By Damian Spellman
Mohamed Diamé has defended
Newcastle’s game plan against Manchester City and insisted it nearly
paid off.
Magpies manager Rafael Benitez
was criticised by television pundit
Gary Neville, who described his
team’s first-half display against the
runaway Premier League leaders
on Wednesday as “embarrassing”,
while former skipper Alan Shearer
labelled them a Championship side
RUGBY UNION
Worcester lock quits for NFL dream
Worcester Warriors lock Christian
Scotland-Williamson has
turned his back on rugby
union to try to start a
career in American
football, after the
Premiership club
agreed to release him
from his contract.
The 24-year-old will
be heading out to Florida
to work with NFL coaches
over the next few months,
in the hope of earning a place on
City’s work is done before a ball
cannot defend your way to a posiis kicked, the initiative gifted to the
tive outcome against City. It does
league leaders by supine opnot work.
ponents who communiWhen Newcastle vencate the message that
tured across the halfway
they are not good
line in the final 15
enough to compete
minutes the match
on equal terms by
became a contest at
Percentage
of
lining up on the
last and, under prespossession that
edge of their own
sure, City were not
Manchester City
box and refusing
the slick adventurers
enjoyed
against
to budge.
they had been. MisNewcastle
In 19 out of 20 fixtakes were made in the
tures this season the
hurly-burly of returned
tactic has led to defeat for
fire. It is too late to resurrect
City’s opponents, yet still they
the title race since a 15-point lead
raise the white flag in the hope of at
has sucked the drama out of the
least keeping a clean sheet. Have
season, but surely there is room for
they not been paying attention? You a little dynamic tension in matches.
City’s magnificent team deserves
at least that kind of challenge, that
kind of respect. Perhaps the most
incredible aspect of this wholesale
bus-parking tactic is the acceptance of fans who buy into the idea
that their team does not have the
stock to challenge City.
What happened to romance, to
having a go for goodness’ sake?
Without that there is no game, no
contest, and ultimately no interest.
Next stop Crystal Palace. What
an opportunity for manager Roy
Hodgson to restate his credentials
as a frontline coach, to reclaim a
little of the reputation battered in
the service of England. And what
Pep Guardiola’s side were only
better place than the Coliseum for
rattled after Newcastle attacked
a team to get gladiatorial with City?
an NFL team roster for the 2018
season. Scotland-Williamson (left)
said: “I’d like to thank everyone
at Sixways for all the support
over the years. I appreciate
everything they have done
for me.
“[But] This is a once-ina-lifetime opportunity for
me and one that I simply
can’t turn down.
“I’m incredibly excited about
testing myself and trying to get on
the team roster at an NFL club.”
in desperate need of reinforcement.
However, Diamé was adamant that
the intention was to frustrate freescoring City until late in the game
and then attempt to cash in on it, although Raheem Sterling’s first-half
strike ultimately proved decisive.
He said: “We knew it would not
be easy, but the team tried to work
hard. We had a game plan, we stuck
with the game plan and we were unlucky to concede the goal in the first
half. But the team worked hard. It
is difficult – this team has won the
RUGBY LEAGUE
McCormack ends
reign as Scots coach
Steve McCormack has stepped
down as Scotland coach after 14
years in charge. The 43-year-old
took the job at the start of 2004
and went on to guide Scotland to
their first win at a World Cup and
a quarter-final berth in the same
competition. The highlight of
McCormack’s tenure will surely be
scaling the heights of fourth in the
world rankings in 2016 – achieved, in
part, thanks to a thrilling draw with
New Zealand in Workington.
respect of all the Premier League
teams and every team defends a lot
against them. We tried our best.
“We saw at the end that with the
fans pushing, we could have got
maybe something. That was the
game plan. Unluckily, we conceded
this goal and it was harder.
“Now we have to take all the positive things we did and try to win
against Brighton [tomorrow].
“The fans are behind us and we
are confident of winning this game.
We definitely need the three points.”
Sport on tv
T20 cricket: Perth v Melbourne
BT Sport 2, 8am
Skiing: World Cup
Eurosport, 9.15am
Darts: PDC World Championship
Sky Sports Arena, 7pm
Rugby Union: Bath v Wasps
BT Sport 1, 7pm
Football: St Mirren v Dundee Utd
BT Sport 2, 7.30pm
Football: Cardiff City v Preston NE
Sky Sports Football, 7.30pm
Cricket: The Ashes
BT Sport 1, 11pm
Sanchez at the double...
...but Eagles make Gunners battle for win
» Crystal Palace 2 Arsenal 3, p62-63
Sport
Cook: I
was close
to being
dropped
By Jonathan Liew
IN MELBOURNE
Alastair Cook admitted he
feared his England place was
in danger until his double
century in the fourth Ashes
Test at the MCG.
Cook, who finished the
third day unbeaten on 244,
has never been dropped by
England in Test cricket, and
has played 149 consecutive
Test matches since 2006, the
year of his debut.
But amid his poor recent
run of form, he said: “They
would have been entitled to
[drop me]. Just because I
literally hadn’t scored a run
since Edgbaston. Two West
Indies games, three here and
some warm-up games.
“I always feel I’ve got the
backing of the selectors, but
you’ve still got to deliver the
goods. And I hadn’t done
that. It was frustrating.”
For all the runs he has
scored, the records he has
broken, did he ever doubt
himself ? “Yeah, 100 per
cent. I’ve doubted myself for
12 years. I’ll probably continue to doubt myself. The
longer it goes, the harder
it becomes. That’s why I’m
quite proud of going to the
well again and delivering a
performance like that.
“It’s a shame that it’s three
or four weeks too late. I’ll
have to live with that for
a long time. It’s a strange
sport, and probably why it
drives you mad.”
29.12.17
P59
FOOTBALL
Ref justice: What
our man learned
when he picked
up a whistle
P58
England opener
Alastair Cook
acknowledges the
crowd at the end of
day three of the fourth
Ashes Test, after his
unbeaten 244 at the
MCG PA
WINTER OLYMPICS
Watch out world,
Team GB are
taking these
Games seriously
» Day three report, p56-57
Liverpool starlet reveals
shocking racial abuse
By Matt Butler
P57
TIM WIGMORE
This was the year
that sport went
political – except
here in Britain
England’s Under-17 World Cupwinning striker Rhian Brewster has
revealed he has been the target of, or
witness to, sickening racial abuse on
the field no fewer than seven times
– including one alleged incident in
the final of the global tournament he
helped win in October.
Brewster, who plays his club football for Liverpool but is still to make
his professional debut, says he has
been targeted during games, with
five of the alleged incidents in the
last seven months.
And he says Uefa, Europe’s governing body, “doesn’t take [racism]
seriously”.
One incident which he detailed
was during a game against Spartak
Moscow in the Uefa Youth League
tie at Tranmere’s Prenton Park
three weeks ago.
“I got fouled,” the 17-year-old told
The Guardian, recalling the Spartak
incident. “I was on the floor and I
had the ball in my hands. One of their
players started saying stuff in Russian to the ref. I said: ‘It’s a foul, man,
what you playing at?’
“I was still sitting down. Then
their player leaned over me, right
down to my face and said: ‘Suck my
d**k, you n****r, you n***r.’
“I jumped to my feet and the ref
came running over because obviously he realised something had
been said. He [the referee] said to
me he couldn’t do anything because
he hadn’t heard it and ‘the only thing
I can do is report it’.
“I said: ‘Come on, then – let’s go
and report it.’ He started doing
something else and I said: ‘No, now.’
We went over to the fourth official
» Continued on p61
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