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The i Newspaper – January 19, 2018

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QUA L I T Y, C O N C I S E – T H E F U T U R E O F I N D E PE N D E N T JOU R NA L I S M
ALSO IN
FR DAY
HHHHH
Our verdict
on ‘The Post’
PLUS
INTERVIEW
Spielberg and Hanks
Franz Ferdinand
Best TV, books & music
Green shoots
How our new
Northern Forest
will grow
P30
New entente
cordiale
FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
Number 2,232
» Diplomatic love-in lasts until
French President delivers a tough
message to the UK on Brexit
» Macron urges British public
to think again and overturn the
decision to leave Europe
» No full access to single market
unless Britain pays into EU budget
and accepts free movement
» New co-operation on Airbus,
French troops fighting Islamists in
Africa, and loan of Bayeux Tapestry
Team Trump
– after a year in
the White House
PLUS
Robert Fisk on
US foreign policy
P6
P26-29
i@inews.co.uk
@theipaper
theipaper theipaper
IN
Rail bailout
was ‘the biggest
waste of
public money’
Mark Steel
applauds Carillion,
a public-private
triumph for the ages
Stephen Bush
Mankind has
given up on
space travel
Ronaldinho to
St Mirren?
The madness of the
transfer window
P4
P25
P17
P60
TOMORROW TRAVEL – LATE DEALS FOR WINTER SUN I FOOD I BOOKS I PUZZLES PULL-OUT
The
News
Matrix
BREXIT
Why has a
‘historic
helmet’ left
tourism chiefs
fuming?
See p.25
The day at
a glance
FRIDAY
19
JANUARY
Quote of the day
There are people in the
world so hungry that God
cannot appear to them
except in the form of bread
MAHATMA GANDHI
Anniversaries
Wednesday 19 Jan 1983
Klaus Barbie, the Gestapo
chief in Lyons during the
Nazi occupation of France
in the Second World War,
is arrested in Bolivia for
crimes against humanity.
He sent thousands of Jews
and Resistance fighters to
concentration camps.
A security centre for the EU’s
Galileo satellite system is to be
moved from London to Spain
as a result of Brexit. Other EU
institutions leaving the UK as a
result of the referendum include the
European Banking Agency and the
European Medicines Agency.
ITALY
SWITZERLAND
TRANSPORT
ENVIRONMENT
Berlusconi ‘ready
to be leader again’
Forests ravaged
by Storm Eleanor
Devon leads the way
in unsafe bridges
Flooding ‘caused by
baskets in sewer’
Former prime minister Silvio
Berlusconi, 81, has said he is ready
to lead Italy if the European Court of
Human Rights scraps a ban on him
holding public office. He resigned in
2011 amid scandal but now leads a
centre-right coalition with the best
chance of forming a government
after elections due in March.
Storms in Swiss forests have
damaged almost a quarter of the
annual wood supply. In all, 1.3
million cubic metres of trees fell
during the first week of January.
The heavy winds, caused by Storm
Eleanor, were also responsible for
overturning train carriages and
causing landslides and avalanches.
The number of bridges considered
unfit to support the heaviest lorries
has risen by 7 per cent in the past
year. The RAC Foundation found
3,441 council-owned road bridges
were judged substandard in 201617. Devon has the most inadequate
bridges at 249, followed by Somerset
(168), Essex (160) and Cornwall (144).
Industrial-sized bread baskets
crammed into a sewer could have
caused serious flooding. Scottish
Water employees found 30 plastic
baskets when they opened a
manhole cover in Cardonald,
Glasgow, while carrying out flooding
checks in a cemetery. It took them
three hours to clear the items.
POLITICS
EQUALITY
EMPLOYMENT
RUSSIA
Gay couple sue over
‘hateful pamphlets’
Bigger jobless threat
for casual workers
Putin marks end of
Ashdown attacks
Nazi Leningrad siege ‘foolhardy’ Trump
A gay couple in the US is suing a
printing company which sent them
pamphlets with messages about
temptation and sin instead of the
wedding programmes they ordered.
Stephen Heasley and Andrew
Borg say they received pamphlets
with “hateful, discriminatory and
anti-gay” messages.
Casual workers are five times more
likely to become jobless than those
on permanent contracts, research
for the TUC has found. The study
of almost 20,000 people showed
that casual jobs were “rarely” a
stepping stone to something better
and were more likely to leave
workers unsatisfied.
Russian President Vladimir Putin is
attending events to commemorate
the 75th anniversary of Russia’s
breaking the Nazi siege of
Leningrad. The Red Army broke
the nearly 900-day blockade on 19
January 1943. Leningrad regained
its historic name of St Petersburg
after the 1991 Soviet collapse.
Birthdays
Dolly Parton, country
singer, 72; Mac Miller,
rapper, 26; Michael
Crawford, comedy actor,
76; Sir Simon Rattle,
conductor (below), 63; John
Bercow, politician, 55
EU satellite system
firm to leave UK
ENTERTAINMENT
The List
Crouch’s Robot
edges out Shearer
The UK’s top 10 football
celebrations, according to a poll of
1,000 adults, were:
1 Peter Crouch:
‘Robot’ (below right) 15%
2 Alan Shearer: One-Handed Salute
(below left): 10%
3 Stuart Pearce: ‘Air Fist Pump’ 9%
4 Steven Gerrard: Camera Kiss 8%
5 Roger Milla:
Corner Flag Dance 8%
6 Cristiano Ronaldo: The Leap
and Spread 8%
7 Robbie Keane: Cartwheel,
Forward Roll into Gun Fingers 7%
8 Jimmy Bullard: Teacher 7%
9 Colombian national team:
Salsa 5%
10 Paul Pogba: ‘Dab’ 5%
Source: Little Kickers
All the world’s
a (lucrative) stage
Former Liberal Democrat leader
Paddy Ashdown has launched a
fierce attack on Donald Trump and
stressed his party’s determination
to reverse Brexit. Lord Ashdown
told the Lords that the US President
was “all too frequently ignorant of
the facts, unpredictable, foolhardy
and reckless”.
Coldplay and Guns N' Roses have made it into the top 10 of
the Billboard list of highest-grossing tours of all time. With
both bands playing more than 100 shows on musical treks
across five continents, they have earned their enviable spots
at the top end of the rankings list, which dates back to 1990.
Top 10 Grossing Tours in Billboard Boxscore History*
Artist / Tour / Years / Gross
The Rolling
Stones
Coldplay
Guns N’ Roses
U2
A Bigger Bang
2005-2007
A Head Full Of
Dreams Tour
2016-17
£530m
£402m
£377m
Not In This
Lifetime...
2016-ongoing
Roger Waters
360 Tour
2009-2011
£342m
£331m
Cirque du
Soleil’s
Michael
Jackson
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i-subscription.co.uk
index
Crossword.............24
TV & Radio...........40
Property..................47
Business..................48
Puzzles.....................52
Weather...................55
The Wall Live
2010-2013
AC/DC
Madonna
U2
The Police
Black Ice Tour
2008-2010
Sticky & Sweet
2008-2009
Vertigo Tour
2005-2006
Reunion Tour
2007-2008
£318m
£294m
£280m
£261m
*FROM 1990 TO 17 JANUARY 2018
Newspapers support recycling
The recycled content of UK
newspapers in 2015 was 71%
©Published by Johnston Publications Limited, 2 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0PU, and printed at
Trinity Mirror Printing, St Albans Road, Watford; Hollinwood Avenue, Oldham; and Cardonald Park,
Glasgow. Also printed at Carn Web, Carn Industrial Estate, Portadown. Back issues available from Historic
Newspapers, 0844 770 7684. Friday 19 January 2018. Registered as a newspaper with the Post Office.
The Immortal
World Tour
2011-2014
£259m
SOURCE: BILLBOARD
Select journalism in i is copyright
independent.co.uk and copyright
Evening Standard, beyond those
accredited as such.
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
16-20
ThePage3Profile
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
MALAYSIA
NUS GHANI, HISTORY-MAKING MINISTER
On-loan pandas
have second cub
A giant panda cub has been born in a
Malaysian zoo, the second offspring
of a pair of giant pandas on loan from
China. Liang Liang and Xing Xing
arrived in Malaysia in 2014 as part
of China’s “panda diplomacy”, under
which countries friendly to Beijing
get a pair of the animals to help with
breeding and conservation.
ENERGY
Hot water from mine
will heat homes
Water from a disused mine which
has been warmed by the Earth will
be used to heat homes. The Welsh
Government said the “trailblazing”
scheme would use underground
mine water from the old Caerau
colliery, which closed in the late
1970s, to heat houses, a school and a
church at Caerau in the Llynfi Valley.
PEOPLE
Yawn. A boring old MP’s speech?
Quite the opposite. Nus Ghani
has made history by becoming
the first female Muslim minister
to speak from the House of
Commons despatch box. Recently
appointed a transport minister
in Theresa May’s reshuffle this
month, Ms Ghani has risen
through the ranks since becoming
an MP in 2015. Speaking in the
Commons yesterday, she spoke of
the Government’s commitment
to improving accessibility on the
rail network for disabled people.
Colleagues cheered her on as she
made history – it is a step that she
hopes will empower others from
all backgrounds to achieve their
ambitions too.
Pretty impressive.
There’s more. Not only is she
Britain’s first Muslim female
Tory MP, she was the first woman
to represent the constituency
of Wealden in East Sussex. The
daughter of immigrant Pakistani
parents, she was the first girl in
her family to get a full formal
education, gaining a degree from
Birmingham City University and
a masters at Leeds University.
She was given two new posts
in January, Parliamentary
Under-Secretary of State at the
Department for Transport and
Assistant Government Whip.
And before she was an MP?
She worked for charities Age
UK and Breakthrough Breast
Cancer as well as the BBC World
Service. In 2016, she worked with
Barnardo’s to lead an independent
inquiry into harmful sexual
behaviour in children and has
chaired parliamentary groups
looking at issues around sight
loss and ageing. The 45-year-old
is also a mother and is married to
Sky executive David Wheeldon.
She’s a bit of a social campaigner.
She feels strongly about
empowering women and helping
them succeed, whatever their
backgrounds. Last year, she led a
Bill demanding a ban on the term
“ honour killing”, suggesting the
phrase carries too much “baggage”
for something that is actually
“domestic violence”.
She has also been very vocal
about young people being
radicalised by extremists; has
shown support for the Tory
initiative to help all women
learn English, and has previously
criticised the full-face veil.
But she also finds time for
lighter activities, such as crowning
the young winner of the Wealden
Christmas Card Competition. She
has sat on committees supporting
the Armed Forces, and been
on both the Home and Foreign
Select Committees.
Alina Polianskaya
Pope performs first
marriage in flight
Pope Francis has celebrated the first
airborne papal wedding, marrying
two Chilean crew members on a
Latam Airlines flight from Santiago.
Paula Podest Ruiz married Carlos
Ciuffardi Ellorriaga in a civil service
in 2010 but were unable to follow it
up with a church ceremony because
an earthquake hit Chile. PAGE 15
GOVERNMENT
‘Unknown’ council
votes for new name
A council will spend £10,000
changing its name after more than
40 years because no one has heard
of it. From 1 April, Shepway District
Council will be known as Folkestone
and Hythe District Council. Council
leader David Monk said: “I regularly
meet people who, after 40 years, still
have no idea where Shepway is.”
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
3
Letter from the Editor
Oliver Duff
i@inews.co.uk
New i readers:
behind the numbers
i readers fall into three groups – united by
your openness to try a new daily paper at
some point in the past seven years.
1. Converts from other titles: The Times, The
Guardian and old print Independent; then the
Telegraph, Mirror, Mail in roughly that order,
and some Financial Times.
2. Lapsed newspaper readers, tempted back
into taking a daily paper by i.
3. New newspaper readers, who have often
been introduced to i by word of mouth, and
find that they like some combination of
quality journalism, brevity, good value, no axe
to grind, and breadth of coverage.
One in every seven i readers lives in the
Midlands, one in seven in the North-West of
England, one in seven in London, and one in
seven in the South / South-East.
Eight per cent of you come from each of the
following: Scotland (where i isn’t far off being
the largest quality title), Yorkshire, the East of
England, and the West Country.
Four per cent of i readers live in Wales,
about proportional to the population, with the
same number in the North-East of England.
It is a joy to hear from i readers, whether you
bring fulsome praise or scathing criticism.
The latter is most helpful, since it helps us to
constantly evolve and improve the paper.
Yesterday I heard from a new reader
in Bristol. “You should be experiencing a
stampede of former Guardian readers if
my reaction to their new format is typical,”
writes Derek Woodcock. “Your paper is
superior in layout, content and colour – a real
i-opener. News stories and a wide range of
subject matter are easy to find. An altogether
superior print package. After a lifetime
with The Guardian, I’m now an i subscriber.”
Welcome aboard. A heartening note, for
which thanks - although there is plenty we
can do better.
London i reader Gillian Bailey writes: “My
husband and I made a new year’s resolution
to guarantee harmony: in future we shall buy
two i papers, thus avoiding any queues for the
sport or the sudoku. A bargain at £1.20!”
****
Please join us tomorrow for our iweekend
edition, packed full of news, sport and culture,
leisurely reads, entertaining comment and
helpful advice, priced at just 80 pence.
Til then.
Twitter: @olyduff
4
NEWS
TRANSPORT
EMPLOYMENT
Ending the East Coast rail contract
‘hastened the collapse of Carillion’
Task force
set up to
protect jobs
and pay
By Richard Vaughan
Chris Grayling’s decision to terminate the East Coast rail contract was
the “worst abuse of public funds”
and quickened the demise of the
construction giant Carillion, Lord
Adonis has argued.
The Labour peer, who last month
quit as head of the Governmentbacked National Infrastructure Commission, said Whitehall sources had
informed him that the political fallout from using hundreds of millions
in public funds to end the contract
with Virgin Trains East Coast and
Stagecoach forced ministers to pull
the plug on their plans to keep Carillion afloat.
The attack by Lord Adonis comes
as private finance deals are under
intense public scrutiny following the
collapse of the construction giant this
week, which threatens 20,000 jobs in
the UK.
The Transport S ecretary
announced in November that a new
partnership would take over the East
Coast route in 2020, despite the consortium led by Sir Richard Branson’s
Virgin previously agreeing to pay the
Government £3.3bn to run the service until 2023.
But the Labour peer told i the decision to kill the contract meant that
the Government was forced to pull
support for Carillion. “Because of
Yesterday, Whitehall’s
spending watchdog, the
National Audit Office, warned
that the taxpayer will be forced
to hand over nearly £200bn
to contractors as part of PFI
contracts over the next 25 years.
The full cost of using public funds to end the contract with Virgin
Trains East Coast has been hidden, claims Lord Adonis (right) PA
the controversy of the East Coast rail
bailout was so great, I understand the
Chancellor reached the conclusion
that they couldn’t carry on propping
up Carillion because the political cost
was too great,” he said.
“Having started a policy of propping
it up, giving it contracts after it issued
its profit warnings, my information
is they suddenly decided on Friday
that there were not going to carry on
doing it. That’s what
caused Carillion to go into
immediate liquidation.”
Lord Adonis branded
the Transport Secretary’s
decision to end the East
Coast rail franchise contract
early as the “worst case of abuse of
public funds I have ever seen”.
The peer also claimed that Mr
Grayling “hid” the full cost of his de-
cision from the Treasury by burying
it in an announcement in November
on the reopening of rail lines closed in
the Beeching cuts in the 1960s.
“The basis on which they bailed out
the Virgin and Stagecoach consortium could well bring down the entire rail franchising system,” he said.
“Every other rail franchise operator
will demand exactly the same treatment. And of course it will be impossible, legally, to resist that.”
He added: “The cost of the East
Coast bailout might not just
be the hundreds of millions
for the East Coast itself,
but could run into billions
when the other loss-making rail franchises demand to renegotiate their
contracts.”
Lord Adonis laid the
blame at the door of the civil
servants for not standing up to Mr
Grayling, whom he described as a
“domineering character”. “There
have been serious failings,” he said.
POLITICS
Corbyn ‘will back second referendum on terms of Brexit deal’
By Richard Vaughan
Jeremy Corbyn will come out in support of another referendum on the
terms of a future Brexit deal by the
autumn, according to Lord Adonis.
The Labour leader will have
no other choice but to throw his
weight behind a second vote on the
agreement negotiated by the Conservatives ahead of March 2019, the
peer argued.
“I don’t think that Jeremy will be
able to support the Tory terms for
leaving. I just don’t think that is politically possible,” Lord Adonis told i.
“Jeremy hates with a passion voting with the Conservatives, and now
he is faced with voting with the Conservatives on the single biggest issue
facing the country, where the overwhelming majority of his members –
including his members in Momentum
– are pro-European and absolutely
don’t want to support the Tories,”
he added.
“I think the political situation that
he finds himself in makes it, in my
view, virtually impossible for him to
support the Conservative terms of
Brexit, and the logic of that is support
for a referendum.”
By Alan Jones
A task force involving businesses
and unions is being set up to support companies and workers
affected by the collapse of the construction firm Carillion, the Business Department has announced.
A department spokesman said
the move was aimed at supporting and monitoring the impact on
small businesses and workers.
The TUC will be part of the
task force, saying it will press
for the transfer of private sector
contracts to alternative providers, with jobs, pay and pensions
protected, a comprehensive support package for at-risk workers,
apprentices and small firms, and
protection for agency and zerohours workers on Carillion contracts to ensure they can recover
unpaid wages.
TUC general secretary Frances
O’Grady said: “Time is of the essence in dealing with this crisis.
We need urgent action to protect
jobs, pay and pensions.”
Earlier, Lloyds Bank announced
a £50m package of support to its
small business customers affected by the fallout from Carillion’s
liquidation.
Separately, the Nationwide
Building Society announced it will
take on 250 contractors who were
previously employed by Carillion
on its behalf. The contractors will
be employed directly by the building society, saving their jobs.
Nationwide said in a statement
that a further 1,500 staff are engaged by separate, third-party
suppliers who work on Nationwide contracts with Carillion.
Those suppliers will now have
their contracts directly with the
building society.
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
5
SCIENCE
Modern-day
humans have
lost acute
sense of smell
By Katie Grant
Royals make
up for lost time
Prince Harry and his fiancée Meghan
Markle arrived to huge cheers on their
first official visit to Wales yesterday.
The couple were an hour late after
their train from London to Cardiff
was delayed, but met the public at
Cardiff Castle before joining a Welsh
culture festival inside. They later
travelled to the Star Hub leisure
centre in Tremorfa to see how sport
helps disadvantaged children.
CHRIS JACKSON/GETTY
TECHNOLOGY
‘Robot scientist’ helps researchers
to make malaria breakthrough
By Ross Lydall
A robot using artificial intelligence has helped scientists discover an ingredient in toothpaste
with properties that could fight
drug-resistant malaria.
The “robot scientist”, called Eve,
is able to screen 10,000 compounds
a day – “learning” which work best
as testing progresses, and excluding
those known to harm humans.
Cambridge University researchers revealed that Eve had established that triclosan, an antibacterial
agent often found in toothpaste and
soap, inhibits the growth of a key
molecule in the malaria parasite.
Malaria, which is passed by mosquitos, kills more than 500,000 people
a year, mainly in Africa and SouthEast Asia.
Eve is the younger partner of
Adam, which in 2009 became the
first machine to independently discover new scientific knowledge.
The robots speed up the drug discovery process and make it more
economical – especially in fields such
as tropical diseases, where profits
can be too low to interest the pharmaceutical industry.
Professor Steve Oliver, of Cambridge University, said: “Eve exploits
its artificial intelligence to learn from
early successes in its screens and
selects compounds that have a high
probability of being active against
the chosen drug target. This reduces
the costs involved in drug screening,
and has the potential to improve the
lives of millions of people.”
The research, published in Scientific Reports, suggests triclosan
– which prevents the build-up of
plaque bacteria when used in toothpaste – will work on parasites in the
liver and in blood.
Lead author Dr Elizabeth Bilsland
said: “The discovery by our robot
‘colleague’ Eve that triclosan is ef-
fective against malaria targets offers hope that we may be able to use
it to develop a new drug. We know it
is a safe compound, and its ability to
target two points in the malaria parasite’s lifecycle means the parasite
will find it difficult to evolve resistance.” EVENING STANDARD
A number of medicines
are used to treat
malaria but the parasites are
becoming more resistant,
raising the spectre of the disease
becoming untreatable.
PROPERTY
Power station becomes UK’s priciest property sold
By Jonathan Prynn
Battersea Power Station, one of
the most familiar buildings on the
London skyline, is to be sold for a
record £1.6bn.
The proposed deal, announced
on the Malaysian stock exchange,
would make the Grade II* listed
former generator the most expensive building ever to change hands in
Britain, dwarfing the £1.3bn paid for
the “Walkie Talkie” City skyscraper
last year.
The complex transaction will
mean that ownership of the building
– but not the surrounding 42 acres of
land – is transferred from the Malaysian consortium that owns the development firm to two huge Malaysian
government-backed investors.
It comes after the costs of transforming the crumbling riverside
brick structure into an office, shops
Construction work takes place at
Battersea Power Station REUTERS
and apartments complex – including
Apple’s new London HQ – soared.
The huge technical challenge of
stripping out far more asbestos than
expected, combined with rising construction costs – much of it related to
chronic shortages of skilled workers
– have added to the bill.
The projected profit return on the
scheme had already been cut from
20 per cent to 8.2 per cent.
Developers insisted that the sale
would secure the building’s longterm financial footing, and guarantee that its restoration is completed.
EVENING STANDARD
Most modern humans tend to be
poorer at naming odours than colours because their ancestors made
the leap from hunter-gatherer to
farmer, a study has suggested.
Scientists conducted research
with two groups of people in the tropical rainforest of the Malay Peninsula:
the hunter-gatherer Semaq Beri and
the non-hunter-gatherer Semelai.
An earlier study showed that a different group of hunter-gatherers, the
Jahai people, found it as easy to name
odours as it did to name colours.
The new study found that the nonhunter-gatherer Semelai people
performed like English speakers,
and found it difficult to name odours,
while the Semaq Beri people behaved
like the Jahai and found it easy.
The results indicated that the
Semaq Beri people’s keen sense of
smell is related to their way of life.
“There has been a long-standing
consensus that ‘smell is the mute
sense, the one without words,’ and
decades of research with Englishspeaking participants seemed to
confirm this,” said Asifa Majid of Radboud University in the Netherlands.
The study, published in Current
Biology, suggests that the downgrading in importance of smells is a recent
consequence of cultural adaptation.
HEALTH
Over-65s worst
hit as flu death
toll rises to 120
By Paul Gallagher
HEALTH CORRESPONDENT
Deaths from flu this winter have
risen to 120, as figures reveal the UK
is in the grip of its worst flu season
since 2011.
GP visits in England with suspected cases rose by 42 per cent
compared with the previous week,
figures up to last Sunday show. The
Midlands and east of England had the
highest rates.
Figures in Wales, Scotland and
Northern Ireland have also risen.
Health experts warned that the over65s have been the worst affected.
Public Health England (PHE) said
there was an 11 per cent increase in
the flu hospitalisation rate, with 17
deaths adding to the total. But it also
reported an 8 per cent reduction in
the flu intensive care admission rate
and said “various indicators show the
rate of increase is slowing”.
Professor Paul Cosford, PHE medical director, said: “This is the most
significant flu season since the winter of 2010-11 and the preceding pandemic year of 2009, although it is not
an epidemic. We are currently seeing
a mix of flu types.”
6
NEWS
PARLIAMENT
MPs will be asked to ‘justify’ Westminster repairs
By Richard Wheeler
MPs must first decide whether they
can “afford to justify” repairs to the
Houses of Parliament before ensuring value for money, according to
Andrea Leadsom.
The Leader of the House of Commons insisted work is needed to
restore the Palace of Westminster,
although she said there must be
an “open discussion” among MPs
about how to approach this. Concerns over cost and public opinion
have dogged the project, with previous estimates ranging from around
£3.5bn to £7.1bn.
Ms Leadsom has tabled two
motions for debate on 31 January, with the first allowing MPs
to authorise essential repairs but
agreeing to review before the end
of the Parliament in 2022 the need
for “comprehensive works”.
The second would establish a
body to carry out an analysis of various aspects linked to the restoration work, including MPs and peers
either moving out or partially staying during the repairs, and seek to
push forward the process sooner.
Mrs Leadsom said the decision
included weighing up the palace’s
status as a “historic, national icon”
alongside the costs to taxpayers.
THE INDEPENDENT
COVER STORY
Macron warns UK:
keep payingEU if
you want to stay
in single market
By Hayden Smith
Emmanuel Macron has warned that
the UK will not receive single market
access unless it pays into the EU and
guarantees freedom of movement
after Brexit.
The warning came at a summit with
Theresa May which saw the French
President announce that the UK and
France are “making a new tapestry
together” as he agreed new cooperation on defence and migrants.
A news conference after the
meeting brought his strongest
warning yet that the EU would not
allow British “hypocrisy” in seeking
to keep the economic benefits of
membership after Brexit.
Insisting the priority would be to
“preserve” the single market, hesaid:
“The choice is on the British side, not
my side. If you want access to the
single market, including financial
services, be my guest. But you need
to contribute to the budget and
acknowledge European jurisdiction.”
The talks saw Mrs May commit
tens of millions of pounds to
strengthen UK border controls in
France, while Mr Macron confirmed
the loan of the Bayeux Tapestry.
A new treaty will enable the
improvement of security at Calais,
costing the UK around £45m. It
will allow an acceleration in the
processing of migrants seeking to
come to the UK via Calais, with a cut
of six months to one month for adults
and 25 days for children.
Mr Macron said the situation in
Calais was “not satisfactory”. But the
new treaty – called the Sandhurst
treaty – would allow him to fulfil his
2016 vow that after Brexit “migrants
will no longer be in Calais. We can
either manage the border together
or it will be a disastrous situation.”
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Ties that bind How they
plan to work together
Le Touquet border treaty
The treaty allows British border
checks to take place on French
soil. Prior to the summit, the UK
committed £45m to improve French
border security, which will go
towards fencing, CCTV and detection
technology in Calais and other ports
along the Channel. In 2016, more
than 56,000 attempts by individuals
to cross the Channel were stopped
at the UK’s Calais border controls.
The Prime Minister said the further
investment would make the UK’s
borders even more secure.
Counter-terrorism
For the first time, the heads of MI5,
MI6, GCHQ and France’s DGSE and
DGSI met to discuss how they can
work together to counter threats such
as the targeting of concert venues, as
happened in Manchester and Paris,
and terrorists using the internet as a
“safe space”. Officials said the agencies
looked at how they might increase
and enhance collaboration.
President Emmanuel
Macron reviews a guard of
honour at the Royal Military
Academy, Sandhurst, where
he and Mrs May forged a
deal on Calais migrants
Mrs May also said a multi-million
pound deal to build 36 passenger
aircraft for Emirates Airlines had
been signed by Airbus, which has
plants in both France and the UK.
The French President, making
his first visit to Britain in office,
was greeted at the Royal Military
Academy, Sandhurst, with a guard of
honour from the Coldstream Guards.
The choice of venue was appropriate
as the countries committed to closer
defence and security co-operation.
But Brexit loomed over the summit.
Mr Macron saying he regretted the
British decision, even if he respected
the will of the British people. Earlier,
an aide to the President had said
France would look “with kindness”
on the UK halting EU withdrawal.
Mrs May restated her call for a
deep and special partnership and
comprehensive trade agreement
with the EU after Brexit. “We
recognise that as we leave the EU we
will no longer be full members of the
single market,” she said. But it was in
the interests of both sides to have a
trade deal on goods and services.
Business, page 48
A new poll by Lord
Ashcroft suggests that
‘don’t know’ now outperforms
both Jeremy Corbyn and
Theresa May in answer to the
question “Who would make the
best Prime Minister?”
Joint armed forces
Britain will commit to participating in
Mr Macron’s “European intervention
initiative”, which officials do not
regard as a European army but a plan
to enhance co-ordination of existing
forces. The UK-France Combined
Joint Expeditionary Force will be
ready to deploy up to 10,000 troops
quickly and effectively by 2020.
LEISURE
Africa aid
Three RAF Chinook helicopters and
around 50 non-combat troops will be
deployed to Mali to provide logistical
support to French forces attempting
to stabilise the Sahel region of
Africa, where extremists have gained
a foothold.
How to usher in
a new era? Start
with pub lunch
Refugees
Britain discussed taking in a higher
proportion of child refugees from
France as part of its commitment to
resettle 480 unaccompanied children
under the Dubs scheme.
By Nicholas Cecil
Theresa May treated Emmanuel Macron to a pub lunch in a bid to usher
in a new Anglo-French relationship
after Brexit.
The Prime Minister invited the
French President to a Michelinstarred 17th century inn located in
a picturesque Berkshire village in
her constituency.
Their working lunch at the historic
Royal Oak in Littlefield Green, near
Maidenhead, was the opening course
to Mr Macron’s first official visit as
French President to Britain.
The pub was bought by broadcaster Sir Michael Parkinson and his son
Nick, re-opened in 2001, and has won
a series of awards including a Bib
Gourmand in 2008 and a Michelin
star in 2010. Sous chef Craig Johnston, 22, was crowned winner of MasterChef: The Professionals – one of Mrs
May’s favourite TV shows – last year.
The £65 tasting menu at the restaurant includes such dishes as
salad of sweet pickled beetroot, baby
onions, toasted quinoa and herbs;
shellfish ravioli; and shellfish bisque
– all paired with fine wines.
Desserts include baked chocolate
mousse, with honey ice cream.
Bayeux Tapestry
The 70m-long tapestry (below) that
depicts the 1066 Norman Conquest
of the Saxons will be put on display in
the British Museum in 2022. The two
leaders also committed to creating a
fund for exchanges between schools
and revitalising the Entente Cordiale
programme with new money for
students to study across the Channel.
Artificial Intelligence
The UK and France agreed closer
collaboration on research and
innovation in areas including
artificial intelligence, space and
climate change. The countries
will also work more closely on
civil nuclear decommissioning.
They also pledged to continue to a
strong trading relationship, stating
UK-French economic co-operation
was vital to “our shared prosperity”.
Richard Vaughan
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POLITICS
Statue saturation
scraps Thatcher
memorial plan
By Arj Singh
Proposals for a Margaret Thatcher
statue in Parliament Square look
set to be rejected despite a national
shortage of monuments to women.
Officials are concerned that there
are already too many monuments
in the area and say it fails to comply
with a principle which states that
no statues should be erected until
a decade after the subject’s death.
A document prepared for
Westminster Council’s planning
meeting next week stresses that
the area is a “monument saturation
zone” in which new statues are
not permitted unless there is an
“exceptionally good reason”.
The depiction of the former Tory
leader in state robes that do not
“reflect her role as prime minister”
and the existence of another statue
of her in the adjacent Houses of
Parliament mean there is no reason
to overturn the council’s policy
against new monuments in the area,
the document states.
Former prime minister Margaret
Thatcher, who died in 2013 GETTY
The statue of the late
prime minister, by
sculptor Douglas Jennings,
is said to show the Iron Lady
in a “resolute posture looking
towards Parliament with a
stern gaze”.
It also identifies concerns over
potential civil disobedience and
vandalism, given the ex-PM’s
divisive legacy.
Backers of the statue, who hoped
the £300,000 memorial to Britain’s
first female prime minister would
join such figures as Winston
Churchill and Mahatma Gandhi
in Parliament Square, have failed
to produce evidence of support
from the Thatcher family, the
report maintains.
Ivan Saxton, co-founder of the
Public Memorials Appeal Trust
which initially applied for a statue,
said in 2016 that there was “talk
that [Carol Thatcher, the ex-PM’s
daughter] didn’t like it because
it isn’t made of iron, but she
doesn’t mind that it’s not made of
iron – Carol’s upset that there’s
no handbag”.
Prime Minister Theresa May
said in July that the threat of
vandalism should not stop the
statue being erected.
In 2002, a protester decapitated
a £150,000 Italian marble statue
of Lady Thatcher on display at
London’s Guildhall Library.
The statue of Churchill has also
fallen victim to vandals, including
being defaced with graffiti.
DEFENCE
Warning shots fired over
aircraft carrier overspend
By Arj Singh
Ministers must deliver Britain’s
“hugely complex, costly” aircraft
carrier and jet programme on
budget or risk other defence projects being
jeopardised due to already “very strained”
finances, MPs
have warned.
The Carrier
Strike programme
incorporating two
Queen Elizabeth class
aircraft carriers (inset),
F-35 Lightning II jets and
a new radar system, Crowsnest,
leaves the Ministry of Defence
“exposed financially”, the Public
Accounts Committee (PAC) said.
Fluctuations in the value of the
pound, which plummeted against
the US dollar after the 2016 Brexit
vote, also risk adding “significant
cost pressure” as the jets are being
built by American aerospace firm
Lockheed Martin.
The warnings put pressure on
the Government, which is
already facing calls from
ex-defence ministers and
Tory backbenchers not
to make cuts elsewhere
in the armed forces.
The committee said
the ships and jets must
be deployed “fully and
flexibly” and be “future
proof”, in order to achieve
value for money.
The PAC also warned there must
not be a gap between the retiring of
Type 23 frigates, which defend the
carriers against submarines, and
new Type 26 ships entering service
in 2027 because it would limit the
use of the carriers.
8
NEWS
LEGAL
Legal battle: Noel Conway has won the
right to appeal court decision PA
Terminally ill man a step
closer to assisted dying
By Paul Gallagher
A terminally ill man who says he
feels “entombed” by motor neurone
disease has won the first stage of
his Court of Appeal challenge to an
earlier ruling on assisted dying.
Noel Conway, a 68-year-old retired
lecturer from Shrewsbury, is fighting
for the right for a “peaceful and
Ernest Ryder, sitting at the Court of
Appeal with Lord Justice Underhill,
granted permission for a full appeal.
Mr Conway said afterwards: “I
brought this case not only for myself
but on behalf of all terminally ill
people who believe they should have
the right to die on their own terms.
“Why should I have to endure
unbearable suffering and
the possibility of a traumatic,
drawn-out death when there is an
alternative that has been proven to
work elsewhere?”
dignified” death. When Mr Conway
has less than six months to live and
still has the mental capacity to make a
decision, he wants to be able to enlist
help from medical professionals to
bring about his death – which the law
currently prevents.
He previously asked the High
Court for the right but his case was
rejected in October last year. Sir
HEALTH
‘Test women over
30 for cancer
gene mutations’
By Paul Gallagher
HEALTH CORRESPONDENT
All women over 30 should be tested
for breast and ovarian cancer gene
mutations to help save lives and cut
costs, scientists suggest.
Researchers from Barts Cancer
Institute at Queen Mary University
of London (QMUL) said screening
the entire population rather than just
those at high-risk of carrying either a
brca1 or brca2 gene mutation would
be more cost effective and prevent
more of the cancers.
Actress Angelina Jolie has
previously revealed that she carries
the “faulty” brca1 gene, which sharply
increases the risk of developing
breast and ovarian cancer. In 2013
the actress had a preventative double
mastectomy to reduce her chances of
developing breast cancer.
Currently, genetic testing is offered
to women who have a known family
history of breast cancer. Only a
small proportion of breast cancers
are caused by faulty genes such as
mutations in brca1 or 2: out of every
100 women diagnosed with breast
cancer, only five to 10 will be down to
genetic faults like these.
Even so, researchers believe a
programme to test all women over
30 could result in up to 17,000 fewer
ovarian cancers and some 64,000
fewer breast cancers.
However, a leading breast cancer
charity said that although blanket
testing is a promising suggestion,
further research is needed into how
this could be delivered, and whether
women might want it, before health
experts can understand what impact
it could have for the NHS.
Fiona Hazell, director of policy
and engagement at Breast Cancer
Now, said: “While a very interesting
study, assumptions have been made
about what action women would
take if they discovered they carried
a genetic fault, which can be a very
difficult choice.
“Ultimately, we need a prevention
programme that looks at all factors
contributing to breast cancer risk,
and ensures that all women, whether
they carry a genetic mutation or not,
receive the information and support
they need [to avoid] breast cancer.”
Athena Lamnisos, of
cancer charity The
Eve Appeal, hailed the study,
published in the Journal of the
National Cancer Institute, as
promising and “an exciting step
forward in prevention”.
NHS
Preservation fund spent already
By Paul Gallagher
Almost £2bn of extra money aimed
at helping the health service balance
its books has instead been spent on
coping with existing pressures, a
report has revealed.
The National Audit Office warned
that “repeated short-term funding
boosts could turn into the new norm”
when funding with a long-term plan
would be more effective.
Clinical commissioning groups
and trusts are increasingly reliant on
one-off measures to deliver savings,
rather than recurrent savings that are
realisedeachyear,thereportsaid.The
NHS was given an additional £1.8bn
Sustainability and Transformation
Fund in 2016-17 ahead of the service
having to survive on significantly
less funding growth from this year
onwards. It was also intended to give
it stability to improve performance
and transform services to achieve a
sustainable health system.
The report said the redirection of
funds restricted the money available
for longer-term transformation,
which it said is essential for the NHS
to meet demand, drive efficiencies
and improve the service.
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9
CRIME
WELFARE
Maitlis fears man who has stalked
her for 20 years will never stop
Momentum
grows for
universal
basic income
By Eleanor Rose
Emily Maitlis has said she fears
the former university friend who
has stalked her for more than two
decades “will never stop”.
The BBC Newsnight presenter
also spoke about the criminal justice
system’s apparent inability to stop
her stalker, Edward Vines, 47, who
has refused to give up his pursuit of
her since they attended Cambridge
University together in 1989.
Maitlis called for a new approach to
treating stalkers in her first interview
since Vines was jailed for a further 45
months for breaching a restraining
order by writing to her from inside
jail. He was first convicted of
harassing Maitlis in 2002.
The presenter told BBC Radio 5
live’s Emma Barnett Show: “This has
literally been going on for 20 years.
It feels like sort of a chronic illness, a
particular space.
“It’s not that I ever believe it will
stop or he will stop, or the system
will manage to prevent it properly.”
It came after the Government
apologised “unreservedly” to Ms
Maitlis after Vines was able to write
to her from prison.
Vines, who has refused to give up
his pursuit of Maitlis, was sentenced
to a further 45 months in prison on
Tuesday for breaching two counts
of a restraining order. He was
previously jailed for three years in
September 2016 after breaching a
previous restraining order.
Ms Maitlis said the system failed
not only her but Vines, who she
believed was mentally ill.
“Whatever treatment he’s had
isn’t working as a cure and he is
By Ashley Cowburn
Emily Maitlis told BBC Radio 5 live that the criminal justice system had failed her and her stalker BBC/PA
obviously also a victim in this,”
she said. “He is unwell and has
wasted half his life. Stalking is a
weirdo glamorised term for what is
essentially mental ill-health.”
Telling how the stress of the
situation has turned her into a
“person who shouts at [her] kids for
the wrong thing”, she said the prison
authorities had not done enough.
It was “bizarre beyond belief ”
that Vines was able to contact
her from prison, she said. “It was
something that should never have
ENVIRONMENT
got through, but it is extraordinary
to think that a stalker behind
bars for corresponding can
then carry on corresponding.”
Individually, police have been “really
caring and helpful” but official
structures are fragmented when
it comes to dealing with victims,
she explained.
A spokesman for the Ministry of
Justice said of the letters sent by
Vine to Ms Maitlis: “We apologise
unreservedly for this error and for
the distress caused to the victim.
We have significantly strengthened
our monitoring procedures to
prevent incidents like this from
happening again.”
POLITICS
LEGAL
In the UK, stalking is
defined as repeated
and unwanted approaches or
attention that make you feel
harassed or threatened. Unlike
most crimes, stalking is made up
of multiple actions.
Ministers should consider implementing the radical policy of a universal basic income, according to a
report by a free-market think-tank.
The Adam Smith Institute claims
there is rising evidence for basic income and calls on governments across
the globe to experiment with the idea.
The concept involves radically
overhauling the welfare state and
ditching means-tested benefits in
favour of an unconditional flat rate of
payments to all citizens.
The right-wing think-tank claims
that current welfare systems are
“ill-suited” to adapt to challenges
presented by “automation and globalisation”, adding that a basic income is both politically feasible and
financially sustainable.
In a report ahead of the World
Economic Forum meeting in Davos
next week the organisation calls on
governments across the globe to
look at the policy as they “seek to address the risks posed by large-scale
changes to the labour market while
retaining the benefits of trade and
technological progress”.
In the new paper, authored by Otto
Lehto, the institute explores the rationale and current basic income experiments around the world adding
that trials in countries such as Canada, Finland, Uganda and Kenya highlight the growing interest in the idea.
Mr Lehto said: “We have increasing empirical evidence from global
field studies to corroborate the desirability of granting a modest, universal income floor.” THE INDEPENDENT
Plastic pollution on Orkney Tory youth tsar Reeves settles ‘News of the
backed brutality World’ phone-hacking case
island ‘as bad as in cities’
by police in riots
By Katie Grant
By Jan Colley
By Robin de Peyer
Biologists have discovered that the
volume of microplastic littering a
remote Scottish island matches
that in some of the UK’s most
industrialised waterways.
Microplastics are small plastic
particles less than 5mm in length,
with an estimated five trillion pieces
clogging the world’s oceans.
They can come from a variety of
sources, from cosmetics to large
plastic objects that slowly break
down in the sea.
Scientists from Heriot-Watt
University in Edinburgh and
Orkney Islands Council took more
than 100 sediment samples from 13
locations around the Scapa Flow
waterway in Orkney, and compared
them to samples from the River
Clyde and Firth of Forth.
The results showed that
microplastics were present in all
13 samples taken from Scapa Flow,
Dr Mark
Hartl said
that microplastics
were
found in
all 13 of the
sediment
samples
taken
despite its remoteness and Orkney’s
small population.
Dr Mark Hartl, of Heriot-Watt
University, said: “The fact that a
relatively remote island has similar
microplastic levels to some of the
UK’s most industrialised waterways
was unexpected, and points to the
ubiquitous nature of microplastics
in our water systems.”
A Conservative Party vicechairman reportedly backed
police brutality during the
London riots.
Ben Bradley, the MP for
Mansfield, was given the role of
Tory vice-chairman for youth by
Theresa May last week.
But the 28-year-old has faced
criticism for comments in blog
posts in the past, including one
suggesting benefit claimants
should have vasectomies.
During the riots in 2011, The
Times reported that Mr Bradley
wrote: “We need to come down
hard on these morons before
somebody gets killed!
“For once I think police
brutality should be encouraged!”
Mr Bradley, who was elected
last June, has apologised for his
“inappropriate” language.
A High Court case over alleged
phone-hacking at both The Sun and
the defunct News of the World has
been settled.
Comedian Vic Reeves (inset), who
brought the action in his real
name of Jim Moir, was one
of four individuals whose
claims against News
Group Newspapers
(NGN) were due to be
heard in London.
The others are
Coronation Street actor
Raj a n H a rk i s h i n d a s ,
who uses the name Jimmi
Harkishin, journalist and TV
presenter Kate Thornton and talent
manager Chris Herbert.
Their counsel, David Sherborne,
apologised to Mr Justice Mann for
any inconvenience caused by the
cases settling “right at the very last
minute”. No details of any damages
were given. The four alleged
they were the victims of unlawful
information-gathering by NGN,
resulting in 79 disputed articles.
Their lawyers also asserted the
practice was “widespread” in both
newspapers. NGN has always denied
hacking activity at The Sun.
Mr Sherborne said two
other claims – from the 10
out of which the four were
selected as “test” cases
– had also settled, while
there were up to 48 other
cases going to trial.
The judge expressed
concern that it was the
fourth trial in the longrunning litigation that had
been aborted.
He said that the latest settlement
meant that the opportunity for
exploring the allegations of wider
unlawful activity – which would have
provided a framework for future
cases – had gone.
10
NEWS
ENTERTAINMENT
NORTHERN IRELAND
Let the music
play: a big win
for small venues
UK ultimatum
in bid to restore
power sharing
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
Small music venues celebrated a
“seismic victory” yesterday after
ministers promised legislation
which will give noisy clubs statutory
protection from property developers.
Stars such as Ed Sheeran cut their
teeth in small clubs, but over the past
decade 35 per cent of music venues
across the UK have closed.
Sir Paul McCartney and Chrissie
Hynde backed a campaign to get
the “Agent of Change” principle
enshrined in law.
It means that the developer of
new flats takes responsibility for
soundproofing, to avoid the risk
of new neighbours complaining
about noise from an established
music venue.
Sajid Javid, the Secretary of
State for Housing, Communities
and Local Government, said the
Government would enact the plan in
its new national planning framework.
Developers will now have to take
account of the impact on pre-existing
businesses, such as music venues,
before going ahead with their plans.
Mr Javid said: “Music venues
play a vital role in our communities.
I have always thought it unfair that
the burden is on long-standing music
venues to solve noise issues when
property developers choose to build
nearby. I am pleased to finally have
an opportunity to right this wrong.”
Michael Dugher, the head of UK
Music, which campaigned for the
change, said: “This is a seismic
victory for all those who fought so
hard to safeguard the future of music
venues across the UK.
“Supporting grassroots venues is
key to maintaining the UK’s vibrant
and diverse music scene, as well as
ensuring we have the talent pipeline
to maintain Britain’s position as a
global force in music.”
Sir Paul said: “If we don’t support
music at this level, then the future of
music in general is in danger.”
By David Young
Stars including Sir Paul McCartney were among those backing the campaign
Take note Live music venues under threat
The future of Bristol’s floating
music venue Thekla (inset) is
under threat from plans for a
residential development nearby.
The 250-capacity Square in
Harlow, Essex, which hosted
Coldplay, Blur, and Muse, closed last
year after a planning dispute.
The Ministry of Sound nightclub
protested over a new block of flats
situated near it in London. The club
feared noise complaints could force
it to close, but the developer agreed
to install sound-proofed windows.
DRAMA
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And a network of live music
clubs in Womanby Street, Cardiff,
is under threat from residential
developments. Campaigners want
the responsibility to limit noise to
fall to the new developers.
Northern Ireland’s political leaders
have been given two weeks to
save power sharing after the UK
Government announced a final bid to
salvage the crisis-hit institutions.
The region’s Secretary of State,
Karen Bradley and Irish foreign
affairs minister Simon Coveney
have confirmed that cross-party
negotiations will begin next
Wednesday. Mrs Bradley said there
were still “significant difficulties
to overcome” but she believed a
resolution was possible.
The region has been without a
properly functioning power-sharing
executive for more than a year.
Sinn Fein’s participation in any
new talks had been in doubt, with the
party insisting it would not take part
if there was not a new dynamic.
The party’s Stormont leader,
Michelle O’Neill, confirmed Sinn Fein
would engage after holding a meeting
with Mrs Bradley at Stormont
yesterday morning.
“We are determined to find a
resolution that sees the institutions
restored and delivering rights for all
citizens,” she added.
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WEATHER
Villagers try to dig their
way out in Leadhills,
South Lanarkshire,
yesterday GETTY
Drivers warned of more snow and ice to come
By Katie Grant
Drivers were advised to exercise
caution as the Met Office issued
three yellow warnings, with snow
showers and ice expected across
parts of the UK overnight and today.
Snow showers were expected to
affect the north-west of the UK, the
agency said, though it was likely to
fall as sleet and hail near windward
coasts. It also warned that ice was
expected to form on untreated
roads, pavements and cycle paths
across parts of South East Scotland
and North East England, leaving
people at risk of slips and falls.
Drivers in Scotland, Wales and
western England are likely to face
delays today, while those using
public transport should expect some
cancellations, the forecaster said.
However, Police Scotland lowered
its advice level to stage two –
travel with caution – after there
was “minimal disruption” during
morning rush hour yesterday.
More than 200 motorists were
stranded for hours on the M74
in snowy conditions on Tuesday
night and into Wednesday morning.
The Scottish Transport Minister,
Humza Yousaf, thanked the public
for helping road teams with the
“difficult period” and advised people
to monitor travel updates and plan
journeys ahead.
He added: “While the amber
warning has passed, we still have
a yellow warning for snow and ice
in place for most of the country
through to tonight. There is still
POLICE
EUROPE
Escaped wolf is recaptured
Five die as gales
batter Continent
By Flora Thompson and
Helen Chandler-Wilde
A wolf which escaped from a
sanctuary was recaptured
alive and well after five
hours on the loose.
Torak, a 12-year-old
male, went missing
shortly before 8am from
its enclosure at the UK
Wolf Conservation Trust
in Beenham, Berkshire.
Initial reports suggested
high winds had blown down a
fence, but Teresa Palmer, founder
of the trust, later said someone had
deliberately set the animal free.
Nearby schools were put into
lockdown with children kept inside
and armed police went on standby,
but the wolf was tracked down and
coaxed into a trailer.
Ms Palmer said: “The
fact he went through a
field of sheep shows he
never would have been
a danger to the public.
He has had his moment
of freedom.”
The wildlife presenter
Anneka Svenska praised the
authorities for not shooting it dead,
as happened to a wolf which escaped
from the Cotswold Wildlife Park in
Oxfordshire last year.
2017 One of hottest years
Last year was the hottest on record
without the influence of an “El Nino”
weather pattern that helps to push
up global temperatures, according
to scientists.
Figures from a series of different
international analyses show that,
overall, 2017 was one of the three
hottest years on record, with
temperatures around 1.1C above
pre-industrial levels.
a need for motorists to exercise
caution on the roads as the weather
could well lead to some challenging
driving conditions – in particular
over higher routes, which may see
some heavy snowfall and a higher
risk of disruption.”
All schools in the Borders and the
Clydesdale area of South Lanakshire
remained shut yesterday while 13
schools and six nurseries in the
Highlands were also closed.
Weather, page 55
Across
1
One in order’s not
right, dash it! (6)
By Anthony Deutsch
3
Some require pasta
for a meal (6)
Three people were killed in the
Netherlands and two in Germany
yesterday as powerful winds
toppled trees, blew lorries off the
roads and led to the cancellation
of hundreds of flights.
In Amsterdam, Schiphol
Airport briefly suspended all
flights. German rail operator
Deutsche Bahn cancelled nearly
all long-distance services
because of the storms and said
significant disruptions were
expected again today. REUTERS
4
Herbal infusion
served in a stein
somehow (6)
Down
No 2232
Solution, page 57
1
Middle Eastern
capital city rebuilt
in new style not
including lake (6)
2
Conductor’s
plaything (6)
12
®
NEWS
N O M I N E E
SUPPORTING ACTOR
CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
“One of Ridley Scott’s
best films ”
HHHH
THE TIMES
HHHH
D A I LY T E L E G R A P H
“Gripping…Terrific ”
HHHH
The approaching menace
EMPIRE
Ash plumes are seen rising from
the volcano on Kadovar Island, on
Papua New Guinea in the South
Pacific. Seismic activity beneath
the volcano may mean a major
“Plummer isn’t merely good
in the role, but
compellingly brilliant ”
HHHH
DA I LY M A I L
eruption is imminent. Thousands of
people have already been evacuated
from islands surrounding the
volcano, which has been active for
two weeks. AP
ECONOMY
Family spending
back to levels not
seen since 2006
HHHH
THE INDEPENDENT
“Christopher Plummer
deserves a third
Oscar nomination”
®
HHHH
£497.10. Across the UK, households
spent an average of £79.70 a week
Household spending has returned to on transport in the 2016/17 financial
levels last seen before the economic year – a “highly significant” increase
downturn, official figures show.
of £5.40 in real terms when compared
Average weekly household spend- with the previous year, the ONS said.
ing rose to £554.20 in the 2016-17 fiTransport includes purchasing
nancial year, with transport
vehicles, running costs, and
being the top spending
services such as public
category at nearly £80,
transport and air fares.
according to data from
The ONS said that,
the Office for National
w i t h i n t h e s e c at Statistics (ONS).
egories, the highest
There is also
spending rise was on
Average weekly cost
evidence that famithe purchase of vehiof transport for
lies are forking out
cles. These included
UK households
m o r e o n p a c k a ge
cars bought outright
holidays abroad.
and cars bought on a hire
Commentators suggestloan purchase scheme,
ed that the figures showed
commonly referred to as Perfamilies largely “shrugged off” any sonal Contract Purchases.
immediate post-Brexit vote jitters.
Recreation and culture was the
After adjusting for inflation, week- second highest spending category,
ly household spending has not been accounting for £73.50 a week – a £5-athis high since the 2005-06 financial week increase in real terms.
year, the report said.
The increase was largely driven by
There is also a £200-a-week spend- an increase in spending on package
ing gap between households across holidays abroad, the ONS said.
the UK, reflecting varying incomes
and costs.
In 1957, average weekly
In London, households spend
household expenditure
£643.70 per week, while in the Northon tobacco made up 6 per cent of
east of England they spend £437, actotal spending – but by 2017 this
cording to figures covering the period
was down to 1 per cent, reflecting
2015 to 2017.
a decline in the popularity
In Scotland, the average houseof smoking.
hold spend is £492.30. In Wales, it is
£458.70 and in Northern Ireland, it is
By Vicky Shaw
T H E D A I LY E X P R E S S
HHHH
THE GUARDIAN
£80
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STRONG VIOLENCE, INJURY
DETAIL, THREAT, LANGUAGE
TRISTAR PICTURES and IMPERATIVE ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT A SCOTT FREE and REDRUM FILMS PRODUCTION A RIDLEY SCOTT FILM
MICHELLE WILLIAMS christopher plummer AND MARK WAHLBERG “ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD” ROMAIN DURIS MUSICBY DANIEL PEMBERTON
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BY DAN FRIEDKIN BRADLEY THOMAS QUENTIN CURTIS
BY CLAIRE SIMPSON
WRITTEN
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i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
13
HEALTH
HEALTH
Super-heated rooms of Bikram yoga
‘play no role in improving health’
Gluten-free
foods ‘not a
healthier
option’
By Cahal Milmo
Claims facing guru
CHIEF REPORTER
By Jennifer Cockerell
Bikram yoga, the trendy form of exercise performed in intense heat, is no
more effective at improving health
than when the same routines are carried out at room temperature, a study
has found.
US researchers found that the
technique, pioneered by controversial Indian-born guru Bikram
Choudhury, who recently filed for
bankruptcy amid a slew of sexual
assault claims, was successful at reducing symptoms that can lead to the
progression of heart disease.
But academics in Texas found
that the main selling point of Bikram
yoga – that it be conducted in a room
heated to 40°C – did not yield healthier outcomes than when the 26 poses
were performed without extra heat.
Bikram yoga has become popular worldwide with thousands of
people in 50 countries put through
their paces by 16,000 teachers. One
company offering training in the
technique was yesterday offering
a two-month residential teaching
course for £11,500.
Dr Stacey Hunter, the lead author
of the study and a physiologist at
Texas State University, said: “The
new finding from this investigation
was that the heated practice environment did not seem to play a role in
eliciting improvements in vascular
health with Bikram yoga.”
The research is the latest challenge
The findings are the latest challenge to the reputation of Bikram Choudhury,
pictured with ex-wife Rajashree, who divorced him in 2016 EVAN HURD/ALAMY
to the reputation of Mr Choudhury
and his multi-million pound business.
In November, Bikram Choudhury
Yoga Inc, the company set up by the
73-year-old to teach his technique,
filed for bankruptcy protection, with
debts of more than $16m (£11.5m).
The move came as the company
struggled to cope with the fallout
from a number of civil lawsuits alleging sexual harassment and serious
assault, including rape, against him,
including complaints from several
former employees.
Mr Choudhury, who has never
faced criminal charges, has repeat-
Rape Five women have alleged in civil
damages cases that they were raped
by Mr Choudhury. They include a
claim by a former student, Jill Lawler,
who alleges she was attacked while
attending a teacher training course.
Mr Choudhury has strongly denied all
claims of sexual assault and has never
faced criminal charges.
Cars and luxury goods It is alleged
that the guru built up a fleet of 44
luxury cars, including a Ferrari
and a Bentley, which were kept in
a warehouse in California. It is also
claimed that he owned a diamondencrusted watch worth $3m (£2.2m).
It is alleged he transferred ownership
of the collection to avoid paying
judgments against him.
‘Cultish’ Several former employees
have come forward with allegations
that Mr Choudhury encouraged
a “cultish” atmosphere in his
company and asked his workers to
massage him.
Debts When his company filed for
bankruptcy it had liabilities of $50m
(£36m) and assets of $1m (£720,000).
edly denied sexual assault. He left the
United States in May last year after
a warrant was issued for his arrest.
In an interview with CNN in 2015,
he said: “Women like me. Women love
me. So if I really wanted to involve
the women, I don’t have to assault
the women.”
TECHNOLOGY
iPhone owners to be allowed to turn off ‘slowdown’ feature
By Rhiannon Williams
TECHNOLOGY CORRESPONDENT
Apple’s chief executive has
confirmed iPhone owners will
soon be able to turn off the
controversial feature which slows
its devices apparently in an effort
to prolong their battery lives and
prevent random shutdowns.
Tim Cook (inset) defended
Apple, claiming that its actions
were “all in service of the user”.
He said users would soon be able
to disable the feature altogether
in a new software release from
next month.
The company confirmed in
December that it deliberately
slowed older iPhones as a means
of prolonging the life of devices
as their lithium-ion batteries
decayed. Its actions prompted
users to complain they had been
tricked into buying new phones
rather than replacing the battery.
iPhone software update iOS
10.2.1, which was first released
In tomorrow’s
Hot ticket: last-minute
deals for winter sun
around December 2016, slowed
the performance of the iPhone
6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone
6s, iPhone 6s Plus, and
iPhone SE as their
batteries aged to avoid
unexpected shutdowns,
a feature which was
later extended to the
iPhone 7 and iPhone 7
Plus in iOS 11.2.
“We will tell users in
future when we are reducing their
iPhone’s performance in order to
avoid unexpected restarts. If you
don’t want it, you can turn the
feature off,” said Mr Cook.
“We don’t recommend
it, because you never can
tell when something
is urgent.”
He added: “Our
actions were all in
service of the user – I
can’t stress that enough.
Maybe we should have been
clearer at a point in time, but our
actions were always the purest.”
Gluten-free foods are fattier and
more sugary than their glutencontaining equivalents, and are
generally more than twice as expensive, a study has found.
Researchers at the University
of Hertfordshire said it was clear
that gluten-free products offered
no nutritional advantage over
regular foods if you do not suffer
from an allergy, and were not a
healthier alternative.
They also found that glutenfree foods were 159 per cent
more expensive than their
regular counterparts.
After comparing more than
1,700 food products from Tesco,
Asda, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons
and Ocado, they found that, with
the exception of crackers, glutenfree foods contained more fat,
salt and sugar and also had lower
fibre and protein content than
their equivalents.
A gluten-free diet is the only
treatment option for people with
coeliac disease but many more
people in the UK and around the
world avoid gluten foods as it is
perceived to contribute towards
a healthy lifestyle. This has led to
a huge increase in sales of glutenfree foods in recent years.
However, there has been limited
research into the relative nutritional value of gluten-free foods,
the study’s authors said.
Researchers found the median
total fat contents for gluten-free
brown and white bread were
more than double those of regular
products, while the median cost
of gluten-free brown and white
bread and white and wholegrain
flour was more than four times the
price of their equivalents.
The study, published in the
Journal of Human Nutrition and
Dietetics, also found gluten-free
products had significantly lower
protein content than their regular
equivalents across nine out of 10
food categories.
Coeliac disease is caused by an
adverse reaction to gluten and affects around one in every 100 people in the UK.
Our commitment to value means that we match the prices of high street competitors (this excludes online-only or mail order businesses). Service conditions must be comparable. See our ‘Never Knowingly Undersold’ leaflet in our shops or online for details.
NEWS
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19 JANUARY 2018
15
REGULATION
Love is in
the air –
thanks to
the Pope
Defence company
investigated over
corruption claims
By Cahal Milmo
CHIEF REPORTER
A major defence company confirmed
yesterday that it is under criminal
investigation by the Serious Fraud
Office for allegations of bribery, corruption and money laundering.
Chemring Group, which last year
had revenues of £547m, said it had
referred itself to the SFO over two
“historic” contracts between one of
its subsidiaries and unnamed clients.
The defence and security company,
which manufactures products from
ammunition to electronic intercept
equipment, bought Dorset-based
Rolls-Royce struck
a £671m settlement
with the SFO last year after
it was investigated for the
use of middlemen to secure
contracts. Airbus is also under
investigation by the SFO.
company BDL Systems, which specialises in bomb disposal equipment,
in 2006.
It is understood that one of the allegations relates to a deal struck by
BDL before it was owned by Chemring, and a second contract in 2011,
by which time BDL was part of
Chemring Technology Solutions Ltd
(CTSL). The focus of the inquiry is on
intermediaries used by the company.
The SFO said: “The SFO confirms
it has opened a criminal investigation
into bribery, corruption and money
laundering arising from the conduct
of business by Chemring Group Plc
and CTSL, including any officers,
employees, agents and persons associated with them.”
Chemring said it took the allegations “extremely seriously” but said
the size of the relevant contracts was
not financially significant in the wider
context of the company’s activities.
After initially falling, Chemring
Group’s share price ended the day
three per cent higher.
Pope Francis achieved
a papal first yesterday:
witnessing the marriage
of two crew members on
a flight from Santiago to
Iquique in Chile. Paula
Podesta and Carlos
Ciuffardi told Francis they
were civilly married but
had been able to follow it
up with a church service
because their parish was
destroyed when a massive
earthquake hit Santiago
in 2010. REUTERS
AUSTRALIA
Drone makes history by rescuing two swimmers
By Byron Kaye
IN SYDNEY
A drone has rescued two swimmers
off an Australian beach in a world
first for the fast-developing technology that seems perfectly suited to
saving lives at sea, authorities said.
The rescue took place as lifesav-
ers at Lennox Head, a surfing beach
south of Brisbane, were preparing
for a training session on how to use
drones to pull swimmers to safety.
Practice turned into reality when
someone noticed that two men
swimming outside safety flags in a
10ft swell were in trouble.
Lifeguards launched the drone
and dropped a “rescue pod” into
the water, where it expanded so
the swimmers could grab it and
swim ashore.
“Never before has a drone fitted
with a flotation device been used
to rescue swimmers like this,” said
John Barilaro, the deputy premier of
New South Wales. REUTERS
NEWS
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17
MyView
StephenBush
Houston, I have a problem
Astronaut’s death poses big questions for the future of mankind
Giant leap for
mankind: Eugene
Cernan walking on
the Moon in 1972
NASA/AP
E
very time I hear about
the death of Eugene
Cernan, I feel sad. This
Chicago-born engineer
died just over a year
ago, but ever since then
people have been sharing the news
online as they learn of his demise.
Cernan’s death gets people
talking because he was the last
man to walk on the Moon – though
he was not the last surviving
astronaut to do so. Of the
12, five are still with us.
But Cernan (right)
was the last human
to stand on the
Moon, or, if you are
feeling optimistic, the
most recent.
One of the odder
facts about human
history is that we took the
best part of 2.8 million years
to get to the Moon in 1968 and yet
have not been back since 1972.
Since Cernan left the Moon, the
world has had its first female prime
minister, the US has had its first
black president, and Ireland has
had its first LGBT Taoiseach. But
the 12 lunar walkers are all white,
male, straight and American. The
march of progress stalled in nearEarth orbit in 1972.
Although humans still visit the
International Space Station and
we intermittently send probes to
Mars and further afield, human
exploration of space seems to be
stuck. In domestic terms, it’s as if
we peered out of our front door
a couple of times 46 years
ago and, since then, have
comforted ourselves
with watching the
world on television
while occasionally
sending an automated
camera as far as the
corner shop. And
whenever I’m reminded
of Cernan’s death, I feel sad
again: not because I knew him,
but for the whole human race.
Why do I feel that way? Well,
in part, it is because I grew up on
a diet of science-fiction. I wasn’t
particularly good at sports, but I
thrived in academic subjects, so
part of it was that I was drawn
to fictional universes in which
characters used their wits to solve
problems, rather than resorting to
their physical abilities. My heroes
were Susan Calvin, a fictional robot
psychologist in Isaac Asimov’s I
Robot, the various science officers
of the Star Trek universe and the
Doctor in Doctor Who.
As well as being all men, the
12 lunar walkers are as close to
physical perfection as you can
imagine: all in possession of
It’s as if we
peered out of
our front door
46 years ago and
since then have
watched the
world on TV
science degrees and at the peak
of physical fitness. We have fallen
behind, not only on sending the
best-of-the-best into space. In so
doing, the dream of space travel
for ordinary folk like me is just that
– a dream.
Cernan’s death is a reminder
that I will never go to the Moon, let
alone to another planet, or even see
the Earth from space with my own
eyes, and I feel, for a moment, as if
my heart might break.
Another aspect of the loss feeds
into my essential morbidity. If you
think about it, it is obvious that
a species that exists only on one
planet is heading for a fall. Sooner
or later, some cosmic event, some
disease, some war or some meteor,
is going to take us out. Unless,
that is, some of us are living on
a lunar colony or holidaying on
Mars, or have finally struck out
beyond our solar system to make
a life elsewhere. Space exploration
is common sense – like buying
life insurance.
The third reason that I feel sad
whenever I see that Cernan has
died is curiosity. What does it feel
like to stand on another world? That
is a question that no human may
ever be able to answer again.
But the last reason is that space
travel can and should be innately
optimistic – it should be exploration
for the sake that we simply
haven’t gone there yet. That it
can, hopefully, unite us in the
knowledge that we have more in
common than we realise: that it’s
a big universe and we should join
together to survive.
This is why it is endlessly sad that
we were only willing to pay to go
to the Moon during the space race,
when the overwhelming motive
was to beat the Russians to it. And
it’s why I hope against hope that
Eugene Cernan will not be the last
man to walk on the Moon.
Stephen Bush is a special
correspondent for the
‘New Statesman’
Twitter: @stephenkb
i@inews.co.uk
18
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Please include a contact address with all correspondence
@
EU wants to see
us punished
Your
View
TEXTS, TWEETS
AND EMAILS
In his column in
yesterday’s paper, James
Chapman suggested
that the “no deal is
better than a bad deal”
proposition should be
taken off the table. It
should, but only if the
EU stops demanding
large sums of money
for the so-called divorce
agreement, which is
clearly intended to
hobble the financial
position of the UK so
that it cannot be seen to
succeed for some time
post-Brexit.
JOHN FINAN
LOUTH, LINCOLNSHIRE
A two-for-one
experience?
In response to Peter
Wilshaw’s letter (Your
View, 18 January)
referring to the cost
of viewing the Bayeux
Tapestry, perhaps
English Heritage might
consider wrapping
it around the sarsen
stones at Stonehenge,
thus allowing us
a “two-for-one”
historical experience?
COLIN ANDREWS
SWANMORE,
HAMPSHIRE
then, but it destroyed
Ireland’s peaceful path
to home rule and led to
the long-running violent
Troubles of the 20th
century. The hypocrites
who brought down
Parnell have blood on
their cold, dead hands.
PHIL LEWIS
ROEHAMPTON,
SURREY
Never mind about waiting
until 2022 – go to Reading
Museum now to view the
magnificent, full-sized
replica of the Bayeux
Tapestry. The crowds will
be smaller, enabling you
to spend time with each
scene and appreciate the
history and the art.
PAMELA MORGAN
WAUNARLWYDD,
SWANSEA
Stick to glass,
it’s cleaner
Where the
fault lies
I saw the photograph of
Access your
pension savings.
For free.
Thanks to
our lowcost SIPP
Every child, wherever in the world they live, should be given an eye test GETTY
the “car overturned due
to icy conditions” (i, 18
January). Unfortunate,
but did the driver not have
something to do with it?
DAVID BROOK
WEST DIDSBURY,
MANCHESTER
Thanks for
the tip, Simon
Many thanks for Simon
Kelner’s tips in “don’t
complain – get even”
(Voices, 18 January). I was
being ignored by People’s
Ford so posted a negative
review on Google.
Within half an hour I
had received a phone call
and now my complaint is
being investigated.
It works!
DENNIS GITTINS
RUNCORN, CHESHIRE
Tell me this
isn’t true
With the Fidelity Self-Invested Personal Pension (SIPP) you can take the
income you want from your pension, whenever you want it – free of
charge. All you’ll pay are the fund managers’ ongoing charges and our
low-cost service fee (typically 0.35%, but just 0.2% for £250,000 or more).
■ No annual drawdown fees
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withdraw your money, consider transferring to us.
Please remember that the value of investments can go down as well
as up. SIPP eligibility depends on personal circumstances. You cannot
normally access money invested in a SIPP until the age of 55.
If your “10 polite
behaviours” list is true,
I despair. If we can’t be
bothered to say “please”
and “thank you” or give
up a seat to a more needy
person, we will lose our
sense of community
and society will be a
more inconsiderate and
stressful place. We need
more kind interaction,
not less. I, and I hope
the majority out there,
will continue to show
considerate behaviour
in both our actions and
our conversations.
DAVID FENTON
SHEFFIELD
I was appalled to read
“Never mind your
manners” in yesterday’s
i, which seems to sums
up the moral decline
in our self-obsessed
world. How can “please”
and “thank you” be
on the decline, along
with shaking hands on
greeting someone and
giving up a seat on public
transport? These are acts
of common courtesy.
One would hope that
the poll was conducted
with a small number of
people, with the majority
of the UK population
still maintaining some
degree of politeness.
PAUL DAVIES
NEWTON, SWANSEA
These eye tests
are essential
I empathise with Alastair
Campbell’s experience
trying to survive without
his glasses (i, 18 January).
At primary school, I
was given the cane for
copying answers from
the person sitting next to
me. After this happened
a few times, I lost my
composure and asked the
head teacher what did
he expect me to do, as I
could not read what was
on the blackboard.
It turned out that I
was seriously shortsighted. It set me back
educationally quite a few
years. The essential and
most important element
in all of this for any child,
wherever they live in
the world, is a series of
simple and easily applied
eye tests during their
formative years and
especially when they
start school.
JOHN F MARCHAM
LITTLE WENLOCK,
SHROPSHIRE
PC brigade can
be hyprocrites
Simon Kelner (Voices,
18 January) suggests
that Sir Winston
Churchill would not
survive in modern
politics in these days of
social media and mob
rule by the PC brigade.
That may be so, but
what about the fall of
Charles Stewart Parnell,
the Irish nationalist
leader and MP whose
career was destroyed by
an adultery scandal in
the 1880s?
It was a trivial disgrace
We keep hearing how
many staff are leaving
the NHS and joining the
private sector.
One way to redress
the cost of training their
replacements would
be for the private
company to reimburse
the NHS for the full cost
of the training required
for the personnel.
At the moment,
they get highly trained
staff at no cost.
JOYCE WOTHERSPOON
MORPETH,
NORTHUMBERLAND
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Lively weekend comment
from David Baddiel,
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and Patrick Cockburn
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I cannot believe anyone
would think it is alright
to burn plastic on a
domestic fire (Your View,
18 January). All sorts
of unpleasant chemicals
can be released into
the atmosphere.
Municipal waste
incinerators burn
at a much higher
temperature and are
therefore supposed to
reduce the level of toxins
entering the atmosphere.
Mr Worsley should
be buying glass bottles
which can be recycled
without harming the air
we breathe.
INGRID McLAUGHLIN
WETHERBY,
WEST YORKSHIRE
PLUS Emilia Fox and Ruby Wax
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It’s the
old style:
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memoir
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40-41
19
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
i@inews.co.uk
Twitter: @jess_barrett
The two remaining members of legendary
hip hop trio the Beastie Boys are to release
a memoir about their rise to fame.
Michael “Mike D” Diamond and
Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz
have been working on the
book since they signed
a publishing deal in
2013, shortly after
their bandmate
Adam “MCA” Yauch died of cancer. The
book, due out this autumn, will be “unlike
any other music book”, according to
Diamond (far eft). The 52-year-old
said: “In New York in the 1980s
you had all these incredible,
exciting music, art and film
[producers]. We just had
the good fortune of being
around all of it.”
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Kravitz Jnr lets love rule in Paris
The actress Zoë Kravitz (above), most
recently seen in the Emmy
Award-winning US drama Big
Little Lies, was in Paris for
the YSL Beauté Hotel party,
held on Wednesday night
as part of Paris Fashion
Week Menswear.
She spent much of the
evening at Place de la
Madeleine snuggled up to
boyfriend Karl Glusman, an
American actor. Other party guests
included the German-US model and
actress Diane Kruger (inset), American
rock singer Courtney Love and
Beckhams pay
the price for
a lot of bottle
David and Victoria Beckham
are worth a combined
£339m, yet David suggests
that the couple are on an
economy drive these days.
The footballer tells ES
magazine: “We used to be
very extravagant in what
we would buy each other.
But we’re obviously saving
the pennies now because we
have [too] many children to
be extravagant.”
It’s an unconvincing
French star Béatrice Dalle, who shot
to fame in the 1986 movie Betty Blue.
Kravitz, the 29-year-old
daughter of rocker Lenny
Kravitz and Lisa Bonet,
has recently confirmed
she will be returning
for a second season of
her hit HBO series. She
is expected to receive an
800 per cent pay rise for
reprising her role as Bonnie
Carlson, taking her salary to $3m.
Leading names Reese Witherspoon
and Nicole Kidman are said to have
negotiated $1m each per episode.
argument, however, because the
Beckhams clearly still
enjoy drinking lavish
bottles of wine on nights
out. The couple have
been flashing the
labels of bottles of
Screaming Eagle
(£2,750) and Château
Margaux Grand Vin
1995 (£716) on their
Instagram accounts.
David says he is
relieved that his wife’s
tastes have improved.
He adds: “She went
through a stage of
drinking a nice Blue
Nun and a little bit of
Lambrusco, but now
it’s changed.”
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Please include a contact address with all correspondence
Henry Bolton and Jo Marney deserve each other
KELNER’S VIEW
H
enry Bolton is, you have to
say, an unlikely looking sex
god. Even more, it would be
hard to find someone who
looks less like a political firebrand.
Slightly built, balding, neatly turned
out and nicely spoken, he would
easily fit the bill as a Home Counties
accountant, or the headmaster
of a secondary school in Newport
Pagnell. But appearances are
Simon
Kelner
deceptive, and it turns out that the
leader of Ukip is quite the Don Juan.
I don’t mean to sneer, but when
a married 54-year-old runs off with
a 25-year-old “glamour model”
and then says that, in the three
weeks they’ve been together, “I
haven’t been that happy in years”,
it’s hard not to. I don’t doubt the
strength of Mr Bolton’s feelings
for Jo Marney – and who are we to
WE’RE ALL ABOUT
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As a result of his public shaming,
Mr Bolton now faces a battle to retain
his leadership of Ukip at the party’s
national executive committee. But,
frankly, who cares? Ukip barely exists
as a political force any longer, and it is
of no real, wider consequence which
particular rat emerges from the sack.
No, I am much more interested
in the human tale of Henry and Jo
(left). Once her texts became
public, Mr Bolton said
that “the romantic side
of their relationship”
had ended. But in an
interview yesterday, in
which he talked of his
love for Ms Marney, he
suggested that they might
get back together. “There’s
far more depth to this,” he
said. “Put politics and political
views aside. Relationships aren’t
based on political views.”
What Mr Bolton is saying is that
a love affair sparked by their shared
opinions on immigration had turned
into something more serious. “Who
knows what the future will bring?”
he added. Indeed. It’s too glib to say
that, as a couple, they deserve each
other. But they do. Their moment
as public figures will soon be over,
and they will be left with a private
battle, if they so choose, to maintain
a relationship that transcends a
generation, and which is weighed
down by more baggage than a
Heathrow conveyor belt.
Good luck to them both.
POLITICS
decisions about anything else? If you
go for a walk in the long grass, you’ll
find other decisions that Parliament
has never taken. Heathrow has been
contentious for 20 years; a decision
about its third runway should have
been taken by Tony Blair, yet the
issue may outlive even Theresa
May’s premiership.
This question has plagued four
prime ministers, and none have
been bold enough to push the
issue to conclusion. Instead, they
have bowed to pressure from MPs
like Zac Goldsmith, who is more
interested in protecting his well-off
Richmond Park constituents than
in making sure that Britain is fit for
its future after Brexit. Ironically,
Goldsmith is one of the foremost
advocates of leaving the EU.
The Government used to talk
about its Long-Term Economic Plan,
but that never lasted more than a
couple of years. The 25-year plan for
the environment sounds grand, but
only until you realise that it takes an
oak tree 40 years to mature.
Brexit might require a 50-year
plan, but currently this doesn’t
seem to extend beyond next week.
If it is to succeed, we have to show
that we are open for business. This
is impossible while every major
infrastructure decision is put off.
Each time we delay a decision, we
make ourselves less internationally
attractive. Who wants to trade with
a country that can’t even make a
decision about an airport? If we’re
being laughed at, it’s no surprise.
Eleanor
Doughty
It’s no wonder
we’re such a
laughing stock
I
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judge the fitness of other people’s
relationships, anyway – but a liaison
that combusted over a discussion in
a pub about immigration, and has
since been subject to intense tabloid
scrutiny, will test the most devoted
of paramours.
Particularly when it turns out
that his girlfriend holds views that,
even for the man who leads Ukip,
are a little fruity. No sooner
had their relationship
become public than a
male friend (possibly a
former boyfriend) of
Ms Marney furnished
a national newspaper
with an exchange of
private texts between
the two in which she
was outed as a racist of a
quite serious stripe. So beyond
the pale were her remarks that her
membership of Ukip was instantly
suspended, and Mr Bolton faced
calls to resign.
I’m pretty sure that Mr Bolton
didn’t do much due diligence before
parading his new squeeze in front
of his party colleagues. When, these
days, do we ever meet someone for
the first time – particularly if we
have any romantic intentions
– without doing a trawl through that
person’s social media profile?
I’m not saying this might reveal
her as a “vile racist” (as per the
front-page headlines), but at least
Mr Bolton might not have been so
blindsided by Sunday’s exposure.
1999
374793
f you have ever visited the Palace
of Westminster, you will have a
good idea of how badly the loos
smell. Of how the paint is peeling.
Of how, beyond the opulence, are
buckets to catch drips, rodents
running amok and crumbling
brickwork. Yet MPs are choosing to
delay a much-needed refurbishment
of their workspace costing £3.9bn.
The feeling that the palace gives,
of being part of something bigger, is
priceless. But the cost of enjoying
that feeling for ever is not: the bill is
estimated at £7.1bn if MPs stay put.
When Big Ben was silenced
last August to allow vital work to
take place, one MP claimed that it
was tantamount to “switching off
democracy”. This poor judgement
makes one wonder. If MPs will not
make a decision on whether to
upgrade their own facilities, pieces
of which are literally rotting away
and falling on to people’s cars,
how can they be expected to make
Twitter: @brushingboots
NEWS
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
21
FRANCE
ENTERTAINMENT
Bardot criticises
‘hypocrisy’ of
#MeToo actresses
Amazon snaps
up show inspired
by ‘Cosmo’ editor
By Sam Blewett
Brigitte Bardot has dismissed actresses who have made claims of
sexual harassment in the #MeToo
movement as “hypocritical”.
The French film icon, who is no
stranger to controversy, claimed
women tease producers to get a role
and then invent harassment allegations to get attention.
Her remarks came after movie
star Catherine Deneuve apologised
to sex abuse victims after a backlash
over her support of a letter, signed
by 100 fellow Frenchwomen, saying
accusations since the Harvey Weinstein scandal had gone too far.
Bardot created a sensation
in 1957 with “And God
Created Woman”, which broke
taboos over nudity. It was a hit
in the UK but US cinemas were
prosecuted for showing it.
Bardot was asked in an interview
with French magazine Paris Match
what she thought of actresses denouncing sexual harassment.
“In the vast majority of cases they
are being hypocritical, ridiculous, uninteresting,” Bardot, 83, replied.
“There are many actresses who
flirt with producers in order to get
a role. Then, in order to be talked
about, they will say they have been
harassed. In reality, rather than benefiting them, it harms them.”
Bardot also said she was never herself a victim during her career, which
began in the 1950s, and said she instead enjoyed some of the behaviour
which many others would reject.
“Me, I was never the victim of
sexual harassment and I found it
charming when I was told that I was
beautiful or I had a nice little backside. This kind of compliment is nice.”
Bardot has been criticised in
the past for supporting the French
far-right party National Front and
in 2004 was convicted of inciting
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
Brigitte Bardot said many actresses ‘flirted with producers to get roles’ PA
racial hatred for her comments on
French Muslims in her book, A Cry
in the Silence.
Deneuve, 74, apologised on Monday to the victims of “odious” crimes
of sexual abuse, after she signed the
much-criticised letter, to Le Monde,
that claimed men are being unfairly
accused of misconduct.
The letter stated: “Rape is a crime,
but trying to seduce someone, even
persistently or cack-handedly, is
not – nor is men being gentlemanly a
macho attack.”
A new Amazon Prime drama series
about three young women working
for a top fashion magazine in New
York is inspired by the life of Britishborn journalist Joanna Coles.
Ms Coles, who became US editorin-chief of Cosmopolitan after quitting Fleet Street, is a producer on The
Bold Type.
The 10-part comedy-drama has
been compared to The Devil Wears
Prada, set in the cut-throat world
of US fashion, and Sex and the City.
It follows three twentysomething
women at Scarlet magazine, run by a
high-powered editor played by Melora Hardin. The rising generation of
Scarlet women “lean on one another
as they find their own voices in a sea
of intimidating leaders” and “explore
sexuality, identity, love and fashion”.
Yorkshire-born Ms Coles, now
chief content officer for Hearst Magazines, said she drew on “25 years
of anecdotes”.
Amazon, battling Netflix for subscribers, wants stories with “strong
female protagonists” after its successful The Marvelous Mrs Maisel.
NEWS
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
23
WORLD FOCUS
Carrier wars: the
battle for naval
supremacy in the
South China Sea
Tension between Beijing and its
neighbours is rising. By Kim Sengupta
J
apan used to have one of
the most powerful aircraft
carrier forces in the world,
with a fleet of six. The US
had seven, but the Imperial
Japanese Navy was close to taking
delivery of two more, gaining a
decisive strategic advantage, when
the Second World War broke out.
Four years later, the Japanese
carrier fleet was at the bottom
of the ocean, Emperor Hirohito
(inset) had signed the surrender
document and the Imperial
Navy was disbanded. The Japan
Maritime Self-Defence Force
was later formed, but with
strict defensive rules
of engagement.
It has now emerged
that Tokyo is planning
to convert some
of its Izumo-class
helicopter carriers
into aircraft carriers,
the country’s first in 80
years, making them capable
of using fixed-wing warplanes,
probably American F-35 stealth
fighters with vertical take-off and
landing capabilities.
There has been an immediate
reaction from China, with the
accusation that acquiring the
aircraft carriers and the fighters
would breach Article 9 of Japan’s
post-war constitution. “We urge
Japan to do more that may enhance
mutual trust and promote regional
peace and stability,” said a foreign
ministry spokesman.
But Beijing is also flexing its naval
muscles. While the Russian carrier
Admiral Kuznetsov was returning
home last year after duties in Syria,
her sister carrier Liaoning of the
Chinese People’s Liberation Navy
(formerly the Soviet vessel Varyag)
was on manoeuvres in its maiden
cruise in the South China Seas;
the scene of bitter dispute with
neighbouring countries.
The concern about conflicts
in the Far East have focused on
North Korea. But the longer-lasting
undercurrent of tension, which
may yet lead to hostilities, has been
around China and surrounding
states who view Beijing as trying
to spread its hegemony in
the South China Seas
by claiming strings of
islands and the waters
around them.
Throughout last
year, while Donald
Trump and Kim
Jong-un traded public
insults, Beijing has
been quietly building
up its military presence
on islands it has been building.
They are on seven new islands
China has created, with three
airfields in the Spratly Islands
chain. There has been a significant
construction drive.
Aerial photographs from
the Centre for Strategic and
International Studies (CSIS) in
Washington revealed facilities awash
with fortified shelters for warships
and artillery and hangars for aircraft
and radar. The most advanced base,
Fiery Cross Reef, has a 27-acre
hinterland of military buildings
including underground bunkers and
missile emplacement positions.
China has flexed its naval muscles, with its sole carrier, ‘Liaoning’ (right), on drills in the South China Sea AFP/GETTY
A few weeks before the news
of the Japanese carriers China
announced that it would launch
its second aircraft carrier in just
over two years, paving the way to
start the manufacture of a third.
Beijing declared a breakthrough
in aircraft technology which it
claimed was the most advanced
jet launch system in the world that
does not use nuclear power.
Around the same time that
Donald Trump toured the region,
the US Navy said it will hold joint
drills in the Western Pacific for the
first time in a decade with three
of its aircraft carriers: the USS
Ronald Reagan, USS Nimitz and USS
Theodore Roosevelt. Admiral Scott
Swift, commander of the US Pacific
Fleet, wanted to stress that: “This
exercise is a strong testament to
the US Pacific Fleet’s unique ability
and ironclad commitment to the
continued security and stability of
the region.”
But one significant reason
for Beijing to feel emboldened
has been Mr Trump’s threats to
pull US forces out of Japan and
South Korea unless there was
more money coming from Tokyo
and Seoul. There has also been
the marked reluctance of his
administration to buttress an
alliance of China’s neighbours.
Bonnie Glaser, East Asia
analyst at CSIS, pointed out: “The
coming to power of the Trump
administration has left other
countries in the region unsure of the
US, its credibility, its commitment;
they wonder where the South China
Seas fit in an ‘America First’ world.”
THE INDEPENDENT
ASIA
Former foes now find it useful to court Beijing
By Kim Sengupta
Faced with the unpredictability
of Donald Trump, some of China’s
former adversaries now accept they
must have more amicable relations
with the region’s largest nation.
Singapore, a staunch ally of the
West, agreed last September to Beijing’s request for greater military
co-operation. Countries such as the
Philippines, Japan, Australia, Vietnam and India (which now has two
aircraft carriers) are also discussing
defence co-operation.
Inaugurating the Shangri-La
Dialogue, the region’s main security forum last summer, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm
Turnbull pointed out: “In this brave
new world, we cannot really rely on
great powers to safeguard our interests. We have to take responsibility
for our own security and prosperity,
while recognising we are stronger
when sharing the burden of collec-
tive leadership with trusted friends
and partners.”
Robert Emerson, a security analyst, said: “The standoff between the
US and North Korea is obviously a
dramatic spectacle, with two loud
leaders providing headlines. What
is passing by relatively unnoticed is
the steady militarisation of the region by wealthy and technologically
capable states. That is where the
long-term dangers of conflict lie.”
THE INDEPENDENT
KAZAKHSTAN
One-minute Wijuko
SOUTH AFRICA
At least 52 killed in coach
blaze on road to Russia
How to play Place 1 – 9 once
in the grid, obeying the sums
between pairs of squares
Cape Town running out of water
By Mariya Gordeyeva
IN ALMATY
At least 52 people were killed
yesterday after a bus
caught fire in a remote
part of Kazakhstan.
The bus was travelling
from southern Kazakhstan to Kazan in southwest Russia.
The route is widely used
to transport Uzbek workers to
and from Russia, where they often
work on building sites.
Only five people managed to escape the burning vehicle after the
apparent accident at 10.30am local
time, the interior ministry
said. Senior government
officials are to investigate
the matter, it added.
Video footage posted
online showed the bus in
flames and emitting heavy
black smoke at the side of
the two-lane road.
Uzbekistan’s foreign ministry
said its embassy staff were on their
way to the area. REUTERS
By Lydia Smith
14
6
16
15
7
8
9
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
More puzzles
Pages 52-53
Cape Town may become the first
large city in the world to run out of
water, as officials warn there are
fewer than 90 days left before the
supply runs dry.
Mayor Patricia de Lille said residents had until 22 April before “day
zero”, when authorities have estimated the water supply will be finished if residents do not scale back
their usage.
Storage levels in dams serving
the coastal city dropped to below 30
per cent, but once the dams reach
13.5 per cent capacity, the municipal
supply will be turned off for all but
essential services, such as supplies
to hospitals.
Officials have introduced strict
limits for consumption, presently
capped at a daily 87 litres per person.
The crisis is the result of three
years of low rainfall and drought,
coupled with an increase in the city’s
population and a consequent rise in
water consumption.
Speaking to South Africa’s Times
newspaper, the head of Cape Town’s
water and sanitation department,
Peter Flower, said the prospect of the
water supply running out was “terrifying”. THE INDEPENDENT
24
NEWS
CRYPTIC CROSSWORD
No 2168 BY TYRUS
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Solution to yesterday’s Cryptic
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N S A N E
IRAQ
World Cup in
Russia will
be ‘attractive
target’ for Isis
By Ahmed Rasheed
IN BAGHDAD
The football World Cup to be held in
Russia in June and July will be
an “attractive target” for
Isis, given Russia’s role
in the territorial defeat
of the militant group,
the UK-based analysis
firm, IHS, has warned.
“A successful attack [in Russia] would
provide a tremendous
propaganda boost for the
Islamic State and its fighters and supporters, underlining the ongoing international threat
posed by the group, despite its territorial defeat,” the report said.
The participation of the national
teams of Saudi Arabia and Iran in the
tournament provided an even greater incentive for the group to target it.
Despite losing all territory in Iraq
and Syria by November last year,
the group claimed major attacks in
Istanbul, London, Manchester, Barcelona and Tehran, killing dozens
of civilians.
It targeted the Muslim holy city of
Medina, in Saudi Arabia, in 2016.
The Isis leader, Abu Bakr alBaghdadi (inset), is still on the run
following the collapse last year of the
caliphate he declared in 2014 over
parts of Syria and Iraq.
Attacks claimed by Isis rose
slightly in 2017, to more than 4,500,
but fatalities from the attacks
dropped by two-fifths compared with 2016, to about
6,500, the IHS said.
“As it came under
growing territorial
pressure, Isis transitioned back to insurgent operations,
conducting a higher
tempo of low intensity
violence against security
forces and non-state adversaries in areas newly recaptured from
the group,” said Matthew Henman,
head of IHS Jane’s Terrorism and Insurgency Centre, wrote in the report.
Russian authorities are already
under pressure to ensure this summer’s event is not marred by football
hooliganism. REUTERS
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NEWS
2-32
Another
View
Mark
Steel
It’s just as well
Carillion was
only feeding
the children
T
hat’s an argument settled.
For years, Conservatives
insisted anything run by
the state is inefficient and
full of waste, no longer
suited to the demands of the modern
world. Thankfully they got their way,
which is why almost everything is
now run by big businesses that are
wise and disciplined like Carillion.
Look at the speedy and efficient
way it has gone bankrupt – not like
the slow dreary financial collapse
you get when the state’s in charge.
Of course, safeguards need to
be put in place, which is why a
company such as Carillion was
only responsible for non-essential
and minor tasks, such as feeding
the country’s children and building
everything and drilling miles under
the ground to release billions of tons
of explosive gas.
The reason for involving business
in every part of society is that the
challenge of having to make a profit
liberates us from the stifling rules
of the state. For example, one of
Carillion’s jobs was providing school
dinners. And when you’re providing
meals, if you have to make money
from them, you’re bound to provide
a better service.
That’s why, if you invite someone
round to dinner, instead of doing it
the old-fashioned way by making
it and putting it on the table, you
should introduce a profit motive.
Buy a bulk order of pulped goat offal
and charge each guest nine quid,
and you’ll be congratulated for a
wonderfully modern evening.
Some people have accused
the board at Carillion of lacking
foresight, but this seems unfair,
because last year the board changed
their policy to protect executive
bonuses so they would still be paid
in the event of the company going
bankrupt. And that seems packed
full of foresight.
Board member Richard Howson
collected a £591,000 bonus last year,
which seems more than fair, because
he’s done an excellent job at raising
Carillion’s public profile. A couple of
years ago it was hardly in the news
at all, but now it’s everywhere.
The Conservatives and their
supporters have also stayed calm,
because they know it wouldn’t help
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
33-45
Board member Richard Howson
collected a £591,000 bonus last year
if they became hysterical. And this
is only fair, as they would be just
as understanding if something
publicly funded – such as a local
council or the BBC – went bankrupt
but still paid £591,000 bonuses to
its directors.
Instead they reserve their wrath
for more serious matters, which
is why tabloid articles proclaim:
“Salford Council bureaucrats have
wasted SEVEN POUNDS over nine
years on DIGESTIVE BISCUITS at
meetings, paid for by YOU – that’s
Buy a bulk order
of pulped goat
offal and charge
each guest £9
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
YOU, paying for THEM to run
around with gourmet biscuits like
the Sultan of Brunei.”
Some people try to blame the
Government for continuing to award
contracts to Carillion until recently.
But there was no sign of its financial
problems except for three little
“severe profit warnings”. But if you
stopped asking people to build you a
school every time they warned you
they were in severe financial trouble,
you’d never do anything.
It’s the same with the shipping
forecast. When they say there’s a
severe warning of a storm, the best
thing to do is carry on as normal and
float into the area they’re talking
about in a canoe.
The Government may have had
another clue that Carillion was
going wrong, because a hedge fund
was betting on the stock market that
they’d go bankrupt. But this is where
the Conservatives were smart:
instead of panicking and giving the
contracts to someone else, they
calmly took a £50,000 donation off
that hedge fund.
So Carillion’s troubles may have
cost the country a few million, but
they’ve already made £50,000 for
the Conservative Party, so it’s all
worked out for the best.
We just have to accept no one
could foresee that handing over the
country’s resources to a system
based on profit might lead to some
people being slightly greedy, or a bit
reckless. It really is a mystery.
THE INDEPENDENT
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
25
TRAVEL
Google spells
trouble for
tourism site
By Jessica Jones
IN MADRID
The northern Spanish city of
Santander unveiled its new tourist
website on Monday and was met
with a less than enthusiastic response – thanks to several glaring
errors by Google Translate.
The casco histórico (old town)
was translated as the “historic
helmet”, while the Centro Botín,
named after the family which own
Santander Bank, was translated as
the “Loot Centre”.
The mistakes were an embarrassment for the city’s tourism
chiefs, who were unveiling the new
website at Fitur, Spain’s biggest
tourism trade fair.
The site was criticised by the
Spanish Association of Translators, Proofreaders and Interpreters, who said that “literal
translations, without grammatical
sense, abound”.
Santander’s councillor for
tourism, Miriam Díaz, defended
the €6,000 (£5,300) website and
said professional translators
had not been used because of
“budget issues”.
26
NEWS
Twitter President has
us under his thumb
Trump has weaponised social media and uses it effectively
to communicate and control, writes Andrew Buncombe
F
requently, they appear
before it is even light. During the week, they drop as
people are making their
way to work, and elbowing
their way to the office. At the weekend, they pop up before people have
switched on their coffee machines.
And coffee helps.
Often the early morning tweets
are about something that President
Donald Trump has had on his mind
all night, though there is increasing
evidence that he is often inspired to
post after tuning in to his favourite,
fawning Fox News morning show
and feeling angry and persecuted.
They follow a pattern of both
subject matter and style – Crooked
Hillary Clinton (83 tweets since he
entered the White House), “fake
TRUMP’S
FIRST
YEAR
news” (183), or the vow to Make
America Great Again (104). They
are brash, petulant and aggressive,
containing claims that are often untrue. They are petty, mean-spirited.
They are like nothing we have ever
seen from an elected politician.
Yet Mr Trump’s tweets are remarkably effective. He joined Twitter in March 2009 and immediately
became a shrill presence, whom
people could ignore if they chose to.
But since he declared his intention
to run for the White House, and
then won the Republican nomination and presidency, it is hard, perhaps even irresponsible, to do so.
The media is frequently criticised for focusing too little on what
Mr Trump does and too much on
his tweets. But his Twitter feed,
which has 46.7m followers, is a
window not only into his thoughts
and psyche, but into the kind of
messages he wants to communicate
to his supporters. He often says it
is the most effective way to connect
with the country,.
“My use of social media is not
presidential,” Mr Trump said last
summer amid controversy triggered when he claimed a woman
television anchor had been “bleeding badly from a face-lift” when he
had seen her six months earlier.
“It’s modern-day presidential.” For
Mr Trump, social media is a battleground and he has weaponised
Twitter in a number of ways.
Experts say the 71-year-old has
made use of Twitter in a way that
has no equal among other political
leaders in the world.
George Lakoff, professor emeritus of University of California, Berkeley, and the author of Don’t Think
of an Elephant, is an expert on cognitive science and linguistics. He
has analysed Mr Trump’s tweets
and concluded: “Trump uses social
media as a weapon to control the
news cycle. It works like a charm.
His tweets are tactical rather than
substantive.” Mr Lakoff has even
created a template in which he
places the President’s tweets into
one of four categories – pre-emptive framing, diversion, deflection,
or else launching a trial balloon.
“He is as good as it gets [at using
social media],” said Mr Lakoff. “He
is not ranting, that is strategic.
Even when he is ranting,
it’s strategic.”
Mr Lakoff said the media had
allowed the President to dominate
the news agenda by failing to point
out what he is trying to divert
attention from. He said Mr Trump
was also good for ratings, which
meant his ubiquitousness suited
not only the White House but the
media chief executives.
Richard Perloff, professor of
communication and political science at Cleveland State University,
said Mr Trump’s use of Twitter
marked the culmination of two
decades of change in the way that
politicians communicate with the
public. That style has become more
personal, more instantaneous and
frequently less verifiable.
“There is no question he has
changed the nature of communication and been effective at reaching
his supporters,” he said. “But he has
been doubly effective because he
not only tweets, but the media then
writes about those tweets. And the
mainstream media – despite his
criticism of it – gives him a degree
of legitimacy.”
Mr Perloff said Mr Trump was
not an elegant tweeter. Indeed, we
know the President sometimes has
28
NEWS
Analysis
Crank in the Oval Office cannot
grasp basics about the Middle East
Robert
Fisk
T
here really is no point
any more in talking
about Donald Trump or
US foreign policy. They
do not exist. Indeed, the
Trump “presidency” is about as
real as “Palestine”. Both deserve
inverted commas, although
the first fantasy would clearly
represent white and largely
Christian Americans trying to
make their country great again at
the expense of lesser creatures,
while the second – which is not
even a state – obviously qualifies
as a Trump “s***hole country”; its
people are not exactly white, they
are largely Muslim and many seek
asylum from the enslavement of
the longest military occupation
of modern times. For Norway, of
course, read Israel.
So in the crazed mind of the
booby who thinks he’s running
the United States, there’s
not much point, surely, in
peace between a modern
and much loved ally and
the third-world people
forced to live in the
manure pits further east
and south. Jerusalem is
thus the capital of Israel,
the Oslo of the Middle East,
built on the “green hill far away” –
though in the hymn it is supposed
to be “without a city wall”.
In fact, to talk about Trump’s
Middle East, it’s necessary to
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enter a lunatic asylum. After
all, “Palestine” does not qualify
as a state and Israel, which
does, has not the slightest idea
where its eastern border lies
geographically. In the middle
of Jerusalem? Halfway
across the Palestinian
West Bank? Along the
entire length of the
Jordan river?
And what about
poor Gaza? When the
Israelis bombed the
place to bits in 20082009 (they did the same
again in 2012 and 2014),
they dropped munitions on the
Palestinian sewage system and
contaminated both drinking
water and the sea with… Oh
well, yes, of course, they turned
part of Gaza, quite literally, into
a s***hole.
Not even Jared Kushner, the
beloved son-in-law and real
estate magnate and dealmaker
supreme, can work out the
dimensions of this particular
Middle East property or,
for that matter, either part
of it. Since, along with the
US ambassador to Israel,
Kushner supports the Jewish
colonisation of the Arab West
Bank – and, believe me, there
are no s***holes on those hilltop
settlements – even he will not be
able to tell us exactly where the
eastern border of Israel runs, or
may run or will run, eternally
and forever and ever, Amen.
And that’s the problem, I fear,
for the crank in the Oval Office.
Much of the world is a land
of “vapours” – the kind that
supposedly affected your brain
(Trump might consult Caliban
about this) – and apparitions.
The Middle East, as we all
know, is a place of djinns,
ghosts, Crusaders, Saracens,
Apocalypses, 12th Imams and
Christ figures and bearded men
in caves.
But all of them have a
greater chance of appearing
or reappearing in the second
year of Trump’s “presidency”
than a peace between two
states whose physical
dimensions are way beyond the
comprehension of Jared and his
“Kushner Companies”.
The Arabs know all about the
power of soldiers. Remember
Colonel Nasser and Colonel
Gaddafi, Colonel Ali Abdullah
Saleh, Air Force Commander
Assad and Air Chief Marshal
Mubarak and former Second
Lieutenant Sadat and Field
Marshal al-Sisi?
Three were assassinated,
two died of heart attacks and
two more are joyfully still with
us. Of course, they all live or
lived in nations which Trump
would presumably categorise as
“s***hole countries”.
But at least they weren’t all
fantasists. THE INDEPENDENT
IMMIGRATION
What happened
to the wall? Chief
of Staff falls foul
of the President
By Jack Butler
Controversy over Donald Trump’s
planned Mexican border wall
turned to confusion yesterday as
the President contradicted statements made hours earlier by his
Chief of Staff, John Kelly.
Mr Kelly suggested that there had
been drastic changes to the original
plans set out during the 2017 election campaign.
According to Mr Kelly, the wall
would now cover under half of the
border. The remaining near 2,000km
(1,200 miles) would instead see improvements to the existing fences
between the two countries.
Ever since the wall plan was touted, senior US politicians, including
many Republicans, have dismissed
the idea as impractical, and prohibitively expensive.
Mr Kelly has said he believed
that Mr Trump had gone through
an evolutionary process during his
time in the White House. He had
also suggested, that contrary to Mr
Trump’s initial plans, Mexico would
not be paying for the wall.
Speaking to Fox News following
a meeting on Wednesday with the
Congressional Hispanic Caucus,
Mr Kelly said that both he and the
President were now looking at different ways to fund the wall, which
is estimated to cost $20bn (£14.4bn)
– towering over Mr Trump’s original estimated figure of $10-$12bn.
Mr Kelly even told the Hispanic
politicians that some of Mr Trump’s
immigration views during the campaign were “uninformed”, according to reports in The Washington
Post and The New York Times.
He elaborated in an interview
later with Fox News, saying that the
President’s views had “evolved”.
But in an apparent rebuke of Mr
Kelly, Mr Trump tweeted yesterday. “The Wall is the Wall, it has
never changed or evolved from the
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
29
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
POLICY
One year on: U-turns, roadblocks
and a slew of executive orders
Tax overhaul
is Trump’s only
historic legislative
result – so far.
By Jill Colvin
P
A young girl
watches a ‘Not
Walls’ protest in
Ciudad Juarez,
Mexico AFP/GETTY
TRUMP’S
FIRST
YEAR
first day I conceived of it.” He also
tweeted: “The Wall will be paid for,
directly or indirectly, or through
longer term reimbursement, by
Mexico.” He also said that the total
cost of $20bn was “peanuts” in
comparison to what Mexico makes
from the US.
Mexico’s foreign ministry reiterated that the country will not pay
for the construction of a wall along
the US southern border under any
circumstances, following the latest
Trump tweets.
The ministry also dismissed Mr
Trump’s assertion that Mexico was
“the No 1 most dangerous country
in the world”.
Some Democrats who met White
House chief of staff John Kelly on
Wednesday said Mr Kelly told them
parts of the border did not need a
wall – and that President Trump
did not know that when making his
campaign promises.
President Trump
tweeted yesterday
that some sections of the wall
would be “see-through”, and
added that the wall was never
supposed to be built where
there were natural barriers.
POTUS in numbers
39%
Donald Trump’s overall approval
rating, according to US pollster
Gallup. This is the lowest rating
for any US president since the end
of the Second World War. Barack
Obama’s rating was 50 per cent at
the end of his first year in office.
113
Number of bills Mr Trump has
signed into law. President Obama
signed 124 during his first year.
58
Executive orders signed by
President Trump – the highest in
any presidential year this century.
0
Number of state visits hosted by
President Trump.
14
Number of countries visited by
President Trump. His itinerary has
included China, Japan, Germany
and France, but not the UK. Mr
Obama visited 21, including the UK.
120
Number of days after becoming
President that Mr Trump visited
Saudi Arabia – his first foreign visit.
resident Donald Trump
boasts that he has
achieved more in his
first year in office than
any other president.
Even ardent Trump fans and his
most sycophantic supporters in
Congress would have difficulty
repeating those claims with a
straight face.
But while he has fallen short
on many key pledges and his
legislative record is meagre –
aside from a slew of executive
orders – Trump has followed
through on some of his most
striking, and divisive, campaign
promises: overhauling the
country’s tax system, uprooting
US foreign policy and upending
the lives of hundreds of
thousands of immigrants.
A year in, Trump is certainly
no closer to making Mexico pay
for a border wall than when he
made supporters swoon with that
promise at his campaign rallies.
He has run into legislative
roadblocks – from fellow
Republicans, no less – at big
moments, which is why the
Obama-era health law survives,
wounded but still insuring
millions. His own administration’s
sloppy start explains why none of
the laws he pledged to sign in his
first 100 days came to reality and
why most are still aspirational.
Nevertheless, Mr Trump
has nailed the tax overhaul,
his only historic legislative
accomplishment to date, won
confirmation of a conservative
Supreme Court justice and used
his executive powers to wrench
the US away from international
accords. He made good on his
promise to withdraw from
the Trans-Pacific Partnership
trade agreement and to reopen
the North American Free
Trade Agreement.
He promised aggressive – and
regressive – action on energy and
he delivered, to the delight of the
oil and mining industry, and to
the horror of environmentalists.
He announced his intention
to take the US out of the Paris
Agreement on climate change.
He gave swift approval to the
Keystone XL and Dakota Access
pipelines stalled by President
Barack Obama, moved to shrink
protected national monument
lands in Utah and Arizona,
and acted to lift restrictions on
mining coal and coastal drilling
for oil and natural gas.
More broadly, Mr Trump’s
“America First” ethic has been
reflected in his pressure on Nato
countries to step up their own
military spending, and in the
Muslim travel ban
Mr Trump has backed away from a
temporary ban on all non-US Muslims
entering the country, but has worked since
his first days in office on new restrictions for
tourists and immigrants. He has signed
executive orders that would have
made good on his anti-immigration promises had those orders
not been blocked by courts.
He has now succeeded in
banning the entry of citizens
from six Muslim-majority
countries and in severely curbing
refugee admissions. He has tried
to deny certain federal funds for cities
that refuse to co-operate with federal
immigration authorities. Mr Trump is
now in talks about money for the border
wall with Mexico and overhauling the legal
immigration system. AP
seeming drift from a diplomatic
tradition of promoting US
democratic values abroad.
Past presidents made common
cause with authoritarian figures,
and their promotion of values
could be cursory. But Mr Trump
has lavished praise on select
strongmen, from the
Philippines and China to
Russia and beyond.
Despite railing
against the Iran nuclear
deal, he has stepped
back from completely
removing US backing
for a deal regarded by his
Western allies as vital. He froze
the Obama-era rapprochement
with Cuba and moved forward
on recognising Jerusalem as the
capital of Israel, to the outrage of
the entire Arab world. AP
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In tomorrow’s
Gabby
Logan
How we
can get kids
to play
more sport
NEWS
Britain has less
woodland cover
than almost any
other European
nation AFP/GETTY
Plus
iracing
Who to back
this weekend
Travel Offer
Bob Green
ENVIRONMENT
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Root and branch
reform up North
Plans for a giant new Northern Forest will not
just cover rural areas, the trees are also coming
to our towns and cities, says Peter Fiennes
T
here seem to be fresh
forests cropping up
all over the place
these days. It is just
two months since the
Government was announcing
that Doddington Moor in
Northumberland would be the site
of England’s largest new woodland
for more than 30 years. Now that
project looks set to be dwarfed by
the Northern Forest – an ambitious
woodland creation scheme that
will stretch from Hull to Liverpool,
tracking the route of the M62 and
covering 25,000 hectares.
If you are imagining that one day
a great sea of trees will surge from
coast to coast, an unbroken green
canopy of wilderness and wolves,
then you should quickly shed
that image. This will be a forest in
the medieval sense, where there
will indeed be stretches of thick
woodland (the plan is to plant 50
million saplings), but it will also
incorporate farmland, moors,
parks, towns, villages and cities.
This is a chance to bring
woods and trees into the lives of
13 million people – and reconnect
a generation that has largely lost
touch with nature. Trees will
not just be planted on low-value
agricultural land, but also in
the streets of Leeds, Liverpool,
Manchester and Sheffield.
The forest is being run by
five existing Community Forest
Trusts and – at their head – the
Woodland Trust. The Government
has promised an initial £5.7m, but
the eventual cost will top £500m,
spread over 25 years. Funding
is being sought from private
donations, local government and
corporate sponsorship.
The plan, says Steve Marsh of
the Woodland Trust, is to build
on and connect what is already
there and “put the right trees in
the ground in the right places”.
Although, he adds: “What is
currently there is derisory.”
It is an important point. Britain
has less woodland cover than
almost any other European nation
(about 13 per cent against the EU
average of 35 per cent) and the
North of England is especially
barren (just 7.6 per cent).
What we regard as a natural
northern landscape is most often
the work of humans and their
sapling-stripping sheep. And
this is why, according to Marsh,
we are not talking about a Great
Southern Forest. The North’s
need is greater. John Everitt, the
chief executive of the National
Forest Company, has some useful
forest-creation insights. The first
trees of England’s 200-square mile
National Forest were planted 25
years ago in the Midlands – a part
of the country that was also once
bereft of woodland.
“When planting a new forest,
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
33-45
Tree’s a crowd
Three other new forests
Kielder Forest
Kielder is the largest man-made
forest in Britain. In the 1920s,
the newly formed Forestry
Commission was told to secure
the country’s timber needs, so
they blanketed 250 sq miles of
rare Northumberland moorland
with rows of conifers. Since then,
environmental and amenity
expectations have shifted. The
forest is now famous for its
dark skies, red squirrels and as a
possible site for the reintroduction
of the Eurasian Lynx.
The National Forest
England’s National Forest has
revitalised 200 square miles of
the Midlands, much of it old
mining land. It’s an example of
what we might see in the Northern
Forest: a leafy mix of villages,
towns, farmland, broadleaf woods
and commercial forestry. It has
also taken them 25 years to get to
this point.
The Heart of England Forest
The hard-living publisher Felix
Dennis founded the charity in
2003 for the creation of this
wondrous broadleaf forest
near the site of the longvanished Forest of Arden (this
is “Shakespeare” country). The
aim is to create a joined-up area
of woodland of 30,000 acres,
containing more than 10 million
trees (native broadleaves only).
there are technical and cultural
issues,” says Everitt. “You need
to get the vision right. Of course,
you must select the land carefully.
But it’s about much more than just
putting saplings in the ground – it’s
about getting ‘buy-in’.
“We organised countless public
meetings. Have you genuinely got
the support of communities and
landowners? You must offer support
to the landowners, because they are
going to be doing most of the work.
Farmers must become foresters.”
Long-term planning is vital.
In the National Forest, there are
bespoke grant schemes available
so that new housing always
comes with new woodland. “The
framework doesn’t cost anything,”
says Everitt. “And if you get it right,
the planning system delivers. The
developer pays!”
Everitt and Marsh both stress
the public benefits of the new
forests. As well as flood mitigation,
carbon capture, air and water
quality, recreation and biodiversity,
there are also the commercial
opportunities to be considered.
Andrew Heald, of the
Confederation of Forest Industries
(ConFor), is enthusiastic. “The
UK is the second-biggest importer
of forest products in the world,
worth more than £11bn last year,”
he says. “It is vital that these new
forests are sustainable not just
in environmental terms but also
economically. We can lower our
carbon footprint, make greater use
of sustainable timber in construction
and reduce timber miles.”
So, the new forest will be a mix
of native broadleaves and conifers,
amenity and industry. This may
disappoint British woodland
purists, but with climate chaos
disrupting woodland ecologies, and
new pests and diseases ravaging
our trees, there is debate over
what species are best suited to the
changing environment.
Stephen Coffey, head
forester at the Heart of England
Forest, is sticking to native trees
for now. But he says: “We’re going
to end up with a climate more
like Bordeaux in the next 50
years, and we may need to shift
the provenance of planting stock
further south to compensate.”
When planting, Coffey mimics
the random patterns of natural
woodland – with the introduction
of tracks about 15m (50ft) wide to
introduce more natural light.
Some species are more likely to
naturally regenerate than others –
currently alder, aspen, hawthorn,
You must select the land
carefully. It’s about much
more than just putting
saplings in the ground
willow, ash, birch and oak – but
Coffey says: “On a very small
number of our plantations, and
then only in parts, has the natural
regeneration been significant
enough for me the think that we
didn’t need to plant that field.”
In other words, what mix of
species ends up being planted in the
new Northern Forest – and where
– will depend on a shifting climate,
economic needs and local buy-in. It
will probably change over time.
The Woodland Trust is also
trying to think long-term and on a
landscape scale. The right trees will
be planted in the right places. Other
precious ecosystems will be left
alone. Corridors of nature will flow
into the cities. “Woodland creation
is habitat creation,” says Marsh.
Nor must we forget our existing
ancient woodland. “This is not a
binary thing,” he adds. “We need to
strengthen legislation around the
protection of ancient woodland and
we need to create new forests.”
Oliver Rackham, the doyenne of
woodland ecologists who died in
2015, put it best. ‘Tree planting is
not synonymous with conservation,”
he said. “It is an admission that
conservation has failed.”
An ancient woodland dating back
to at least the year 1600 is uniquely
rich, especially its soil, and it could
take centuries to recreate this
diversity from scratch.
We might also add that waving
through fracking in one part of
Yorkshire, while cheering on
the tree-planting in another, is
not a coherent environmental
strategy. It is hard to shake the
feeling that much of what is
now happening is thanks to the
dedicated lobbying and hard work
of some inspirational groups and
individuals, not the headlinegrabbers of central government.
Even so, it is surely wrong to
carp when the first sapling for the
Northern Forest will be snuggled
into the soil in Smithills Estate near
Bolton this March. In among all this
talk of grants and cost benefits, let’s
not forget what woodland wonders
could be waiting for us at the end of
this 25-year journey.
Peter Fiennes is the author of ‘Oak
and Ash and Thorn: the Ancient
Woods and New Forests of Britain’
(Oneworld Publications, £16.99)
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
31
CONSUMER
Painted laddies:
make-up for men
is boom industry
Cosmetics firms are exploiting a change
in gender norms, says Glen Jankowski
M
ale grooming is a
multibillion-pound
worldwide industry,
thanks to a growing
number of men
spending more on their appearance.
Face wash, moisturiser, pore strips
and hair removal products are now
commonly featured in many a man’s
bathroom cabinet – and now, also
make-up. Given that there is already
a male CoverGirl spokesmodel,
James Charles, whole beauty
sections in stores dedicated to men
and articles in men’s magazines
extolling the virtues of products
such as concealer, it seems likely
that 2018 will be the year when men’s
make-up goes mainstream.
Cosmetics companies have been
trying to sell to men for decades.
But the big challenge, as every
marketer knows, is getting men to
believe that make-up can be manly.
Some companies try to do this by
opting for more “manlier” names –
rebranding mascara to manscara,
eyeliner to guyliner, foundation to
tinted moisturiser. Others argue
that make-up gives men “masculine
benefits” by contouring a more
pronounced jaw line, by attracting
women, or by fixing so-called “skin
problems” (such as “patchy beards”
and “lifeless eyes”). Dedicated
site mensmake-up.co.uk offers
everything from bronzer to BB
cream, brow products to beard-filler
styling palettes.
Charlotte Libby, a senior beauty
analyst at research firm Mintel,
told the BBC last year that although
using make-up “will never be
for all men”, there’s “definitely a
growing audience”.
“To put it into context globally,
it accounts for less than 1 per cent
of the market. But the stigma
about men being well groomed
and enhancing their appearance
is falling away and cosmetics are
benefiting from that.”
One of the more effective ways
of getting men to buy make-up is
through male make-up vlogging.
In increasing numbers, men are
providing make-up tutorials via
YouTube and other vlogging sites.
More than half of 16-24-year-olds
watched a vlog in the past month.
Make-up is one of the most
popular vlogging topics – and vlogs
about make-up by male YouTubers
such as Patrick Starrr, James
Charles and Jeffree Star have more
than 6 million subscribers between
them. About 11 per cent are male and
almost 20 per cent under 17. It works
both ways – last year, Maybelline
used a male ambassador for the
first time, casting social media star
Manny Gutierrez in a mascara ad.
Make-up vlogging can be lucrative.
Top make-up vloggers earn tens of
thousands a pounds a month from
subscriptions alone, according to
socialblade.com, which tracks user
statistics for YouTube, Twitch,
Instagram and Twitter. And many
vloggers also bring out their own
brands and clothing lines.
For male make-up vloggers, this
comes a cost: more pressures on
men to look a certain (unachievable)
way. As the feminist Jean Kilbourne
said about the sexualisation of men’s
and women’s bodies in adverts:
“This isn’t the kind of gender
equality anyone was fighting for.”
Research shows that men today
are increasingly dissatisfied with
their bodies. Many have problematic
relationships with food and are
turning to protein shakes – and
even steroids. Popular magazines,
and dating and porn websites show
muscular lean, young men – who
nearly always have a full head of hair.
However, this research also shows
there is still a “gendered double
standard” – men have more “wiggle
room” about their appearance than
women. It is likely though that male
make-up will erase this double
standard of appearance – removing
this “wiggle room” and adding to
the pressures for men not only to be
muscular and tall, but also to have
no pores, wrinkles or skin blemishes.
So while male make-up may
represent a way in which men are
breaking out of gender norms, it also
results in added pressure for men
to look “perfect” – to have flawless
skin, strong eyebrows and sharp
cheekbones. And as women know,
make-up has a dark side – the more
you wear it, the more you believe you
could never be attractive without it.
Glen Jankowski is a senior lecturer in
critical psychology at Leeds Beckett
University. Read the full article online
at theconversation.com
While male make-up accounts for less
than 1 per cent of the global market, it
is a growing area GETTY
32
NEWS
2-32
NEWS
Panorama
Around the
world in
10 stories
India revives
missile deal
PM’s son-in-law
gets police role
Israel’s prime minister has said
that a $500m (£360m) Spike
anti-tank missile deal, shelved
by India, is back on the table.
Benjamin Netanyahu
tweeted that, following his
talks with Prime Minister
Narendra Modi, the Indian
government informed the
Israeli side that it was putting
the deal with Rafael Advanced
Defense Systems back on track.
“This is very important for
us and there will be many more
deals,” he addedd.
Press reports had said the
deal was off. AP
Cambodia’s Prime Minister, Hun
Sen, has appointed his son-in-law as
deputy national police chief in a bid
to consolidate his power ahead of an
election this year, critics claim.
Dy Vichea, who is married to
Hun Sen’s eldest daughter, was
promoted to the post on Tuesday.
His appointment comes as the nation
clamps down on critics, civil rights
groups and independent media.
“Prime Minister Hun Sen aims to
cementtotalcontrolovergovernment
and business, and appointing his sonin-law as deputy police chief is part
of that effort,” said Phil Robertson, of
Human Rights Watch. REUTERS
PHILIPPINES
Duterte’s tough
tactics win record
level of support
Public satisfaction with the
performance of President
Rodrigo Duterte’s government
rose in December to the highest
level on record since the 1980s.
His administration obtained
an “excellent” net satisfaction
rating of +70, a rise of 12 points
from September’s “very good”
level based on the December poll,
the Social Weather Stations said.
Political analyst Ramon
Casiple said the survey showed
Mr Duterte’s popularity
had not diminished, despite
international criticism of
his bloody war on drugs and
dreadful human rights record.
The figures mirrored Mr
Duterte’s trust rating, which
bounced back to “excellent” in
December, from “very high”
three months ago. REUTERS
Baghdad
Growing optimism in Iraq has
revived the country’s interest
in vintage cars.
When Iraqi forces drove Isis
militants out of eastern Mosul
a year ago, Nashwan Shakir
Mahmoud raced back to his
home, hoping that his red and
white 1955 Chevrolet coupe
had survived three years of
war and upheaval.
When he saw that it had only
suffered light damage from
a mortar shell that landed
nearby, he was overjoyed.
“I had an unspeakable
feeling – I sighed in relief when
saw it,” he said.
He spent 10 days carrying
out his own repairs and then
drove it all the way back
to Baghdad. “People were
stopping me in the streets to
take pictures and videos.”
Iraq’s vintage cars date
back to the period between the
discovery of oil in the 1920s
and the booming 1970s, when
the country was awash in
petroleum wealth and boasted
some of the finest roads in
the region.
Saad al-Nuaimi, 65, has
parked six vintage cars in
front of his coffee shop in
Baghdad’s northern Azamiyah
neighbourhood, including a
green and blue 1954 Chevrolet
Bel Airs and two Townson cars
from the mid-1960s.
“When you feel secure, you
have the guts to get money out
of your pocket to enjoy such
beauties,” he said. AP
Sinan Salaheddin
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
First post-Mugabe election
to be held in May or June
Zimbabwe’s president says elections
will be in May or June, as he faces
pressure at home and abroad to
deliver a credible vote to cement
his legitimacy.
President Emmerson Mnangagwa
took power from longtime ruler
Robert Mugabe with the military’s
help in November last year, and this
will be the first election without
Mugabe since Zimbabwe gained its
independence in 1980.
The state-run Herald newspaper
quoted Mr Mnangagwa, on a visit
to neighbouring Mozambique, as
President Mnangagwa said he would
ensure elections were ‘free and fair’
saying: “Zimbabwe is going for
elections in four to five months’ time.”
Western countries have insisted
on credible elections. The European
Union’s ambassador to Zimbabwe,
P h i l i p p e Va n D a m m e , t o l d
journalists last week that free and
fair elections would be a “huge step”
in defining the southern African
country’s re-engagement with the
international community.
The EU and the United States,
which still has sanctions against Mr
Mnangagwa for his past activities as a
senior Mugabe aide, are Zimbabwe’s
biggest donors.
“We will ensure that Zimbabwe
delivers free, credible, fair and
indisputable elections to ensure
Zimbabwe engages the world as
a qualified democratic state,” Mr
Mnangagwa said. AP
A blessing
for Little
Christmas
A Russian Orthodox
priest conducts a
blessing in front
of a church in the
Vysokopetrovsky
Monastery in
downtown Moscow
yesterday. Russia
celebrates the
Orthodox Epiphany,
also known as
Little Christmas,
today. GETTY
UNITED STATES
Alleged bomb plotters wanted Trump voters on jury
Three men accused of plotting to
bomb an apartment complex housing
Somali refugees in Kansas have no
legal basis to request that prospective jurors come from rural counties
where more residents voted for Donald Trump, a judge has ruled.
The men are accused of targeting
apartments and a mosque in Garden
City, in rural western Kansas. But
they are being tried 220 miles
away at the federal courthouse in
Wichita, where trials pull jurors from
surrounding, more urban counties.
The three defendants – Gavin
Wright, Patrick Stein and Curtis
Allen – argue the practice is
discriminatory because it excludes
western Kansas counties where more
rural, conservative residents live.
But US District Judge Eric
Melgren ruled that the demographic
differences would not violate the
men’s right to a jury trial before a
cross-section of the community. AP
SERBIA
RUSSIA
MACAU
By Roxana Hegeman
Postcard
From...
TV
40-41
ZIMBABWE
IN HARARE
CAMBODIA
IN MANILA
FRiDAY
33-45
By Farai Mutsaka
ISRAEL
By Enrico dela Cruz
VOICES
16-20
Australians held Chechen leader Dealer ‘in £4.4m
over cocaine find mocks activist casino theft’
Three Australians have been
arrested in Serbia over the
second-largest cocaine haul in
Australian law enforcement
history, police said yesterday.
Serbian police alleged that the
men arrested in a Belgrade hotel
foyer “are linked to” the discovery
of 1,280kg (1.4 tons) of cocaine that
were seized last April on a Chinese
freighter docked in Sydney.
The drug haul was worth
£300m, police said. AP
The leader of Russia’s republic of
Chechnya has derided international outrage about the arrest of a
rights campaigner.
Ramzan Kadyrov referred to Oyub
Titiyev as a “drug addict”.
Mr Titiyev, the head of Chechen
branch of the prominent Russian
rights group Memorial, was arrested
last week on drug possession
charges, which he rejects. Human
rights groups said his arrest was an
attempt to silence criticism. AP
Police in the world’s largest
gambling hub of Macau are
hunting for a dealer suspected
of stealing HK$48m (£4.4m)
of casino chips from the Wynn
Macau resort, authorities in the
Chinese-controlled territory said.
Casino thefts in the former
Portuguese colony, which rakes in
gambling revenue more than five
times that of the Las Vegas strip,
are rare, with most cases typically
involving employees. REUTERS
19.01.2018
FR DAY
Film
Music
Comedy
Theatre
GoingOut
Staying In
Television
Books
I’ve never
made a
movie
this fast
in my life
Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks
tell James Mottram why there
was no time to waste in getting
‘The Post’ – about White House
lies and attacks on the media in
the Nixon era – into cinemas
I
t’s not unusual for Steven
Spielberg to work on two
f i l m s s i m u l t a n e o u s l y.
H i s Ho l o c a u s t d ra m a
Schindler’s List and dinosaur
blockbuster Jurassic Park, for
example, both hit screens in 1993.
Likewise, Cold War tale Bridge of
Spies and Roald Dahl adaptation
The BFG were in cinemas within
six months of each other.
But his new film The Post is
another matter. It was shot and
finished inside nine months,
during the lengthy postproduction on his forthcoming
virtual-reality sci-fi drama Ready
Player One. “I’ve never made a
movie this fast in my life,” he says.
The need for speed was quite
simple: The Post is a film about the
past that talks about the present.
For a director who frequently
turns to history books – see
Munich, Amistad, Lincoln –
the results have never felt so
contemporary. The Post may
be set in the early 1970s, with
Richard Nixon in power and
America at war in Vietnam, but
lies, cover-ups and attacks on
the integrity of the media feel
uncannily familiar.
“I thought this was the right
time to talk about freedom of
the press, to celebrate the hard
work of journalism, how good
journalists hold themselves to
their own principles, in order
to tell the truth and be able to
back up that truth with facts,”
says Spielberg when we meet in
London. In this era of so-called
fake news, “We’re in the same
situation today,” the 71 year-old
says, comparing 1971 to now,
“only worse”.
Since Donald Trump became
President, American citizens are
now “listening to the news with
new ears”, he explains. “They
see the truth being labelled
‘fake’ or ‘alternative facts’ if it
doesn’t please those who are
calling it out. And I thought: this
is the time to tell this story, when
we can all become part of this
national conversation.”
He calls the film a strong
reminder “that the press serves
the governed, not the governors”.
It’s why The Post, which was
nominated for six Golden Globes
and looks a cert for the Oscar
race, is first and foremost a
film that explores the power of
investigative journalism.
Seen through the eyes of
The Washington Post’s
exe c u t i ve e d i t o r B e n
»
FR DAY
34
FILM
‘Nixon’s
biggest enemy
was himself,
his paranoia’
Continued from page 33
Bradlee (Tom Hanks) and its
socialite publisher Katharine
Graham (Meryl Streep), the film
zeroes in on Nixon’s war with the
US media after the Post’s rival,
The New York Times, obtains
the so-called Pentagon Papers,
detailing America’s catastrophic
participation in the Vietnam War.
The Nixon-led White House filed a
court injunction to gag the Times’
intended publication of these
damning classified documents,
causing consternation in editorial
rooms across the country.
To his credit, Spielberg doesn’t
approach his subject with the
same sledgehammer tactics
that Oliver Stone used in his
1995 film Nixon. “I didn’t make
this movie to demonise Nixon,”
he says. “[He] accomplished a
lot in his presidency. Nixon’s
biggest enemies were himself,
his paranoia, his wanting to be
accepted and his hatred of those
who would say anything critical
about him.”
The same could be said about
the current resident of the Oval
Office. Does Spielberg consider
Mr Trump in the same league as
Nixon? “No, not at all,” he says,
quietly. “Only history will be able
to write the full story.”
Nevertheless, his film has
evidently piqued the interest of
the White House. “I understand
that they requested a print,”
reveals Hanks. Would he consider
attending a screening there? “I
don’t think this administration
invites people to the White House
to watch movies.”
The actor puts an optimistic
spin on the events his fifth film for
Spielberg touches on. No, he’s not
worried about press freedoms in
2018. “Don’t mistake the present
for what the future could be,” he
says. “Action is going to come
about because of this.”
The Post has been recognised
as one of Spielberg’s more
female-centric films. He dubs it
a “feminist film” and he arguably
hasn’t done that since his 1985
take on Alice Walker’s The Color
Purple. The director says he first
became hooked by the story after
reading Katharine Graham’s
autobiography, Personal History.
Likewise, Streep admits that
playing Graham, operating in the
masculine world of 1970s news
journalism, was intriguing. “It
fell to a woman to hold the line
for press freedom at a time when
women were excluded from any
kind of leadership role in the
press,” she says.
Naturally, the treatment
of women in the workplace
brings to mind the #MeToo and
#TimesUp campaigns. “If our
movie has anything to do with
opening up that conversation,
I’m happy to have helped,” says
Spielberg. “This watershed
moment has to make permanent
change in our country, the way
men look at women, approach
women, treat women.”
The film also touches on the
bravery of whistle-blowers –
in this case, Daniel Ellsberg,
a former US military analyst
who was responsible for giving
the Pentagon Papers to The New
York Times. “He was releasing
information for the sole purpose
of bringing to a stop the Vietnam
War and the war crime of millions
of Vietnamese being killed,” says
Spielberg, who calls Ellsberg his
“hero”. The parallels with Edward
Snowden are clear.
Ellsberg’s role was initially
non-existent. “The first draft
I read, there was no Daniel
Ellsberg in the script,” Hanks
says. After he and Spielberg
met the real Ellsberg, his
anecdotes worked their way into
the script – notably boarding
a plane to tell the Secretary of
State, Robert McNamara, how
the Vietnam War was spiralling
out of control. “If you’re making
what I like to call ‘non-fiction
entertainment’,” says Hanks,
“authenticity is the key.”
Even for those with little
interest in US politics, the film
contains the joy of watching
Spielberg direct Streep for the
first time. Likewise, Hanks and
the actress – five Oscars between
them – share their first scenes
together. Hanks gulps. “I’m in awe
of Meryl Streep. I was afraid of
Meryl Streep. I did not know what
to say to Meryl Streep.”
Unlike Mr Trump, perhaps, who
tweeted that she was “over-rated”
following her critical speech of
him at last year’s Golden Globe
awards. Heaven knows what he’ll
call her once he sees The Post.
‘The Post’ opens in cinemas today
Inside scoop Spielberg, Hanks and Streep on the set of ‘The Post’
Filmof
theweek
A carnival
of souls in
the Mexican
afterlife
COCO (PG)
HHHHH
Lee Unkrich, Adrian Molina, 105 mins,
voiced by: Anthony Gonzalez, Gael
García Bernal, Benjamin Bratt
Reviews by Geoffrey Macnab
After the relative anti-climax of
Cars 3, Coco is another triumph
for Pixar, a film unlike any of its
predecessors – one that deals
with the unlikely subject of death
in a wondrously inventive and lifeaffirming way.
Animated features haven’t
ignoreddying(everyoneremembers
what happened to Bambi’s
mother), but no previous film has
foregrounded death in the way it
ALSOSHOWING
call from Joanna, threatening
him and his family if he doesn’t
complete the assignment.
The screenplay is a mish-mash
of Agatha Christie-like elements,
Strangers on a Train, North by
A financially stretched life
insurance salesmen who lives in Northwest, Tony Scott films and
the suburbs, Michael MacCauley runaway train movies. When the
(Liam Neeson) takes the same
plotting becomes too embroiled,
Collet-Serra lets off the brakes
commuter train into New York
every morning.
and allows the train to hurtle
When psychologist Joanna
toward oblivion unless Neeson
(Vera Famiga) turns up and
can slow matters down. The
makes Michael an unlikely
disappointment is that it quickly
business proposition, the film
shunts toward a dead end.
begins to unravel. If Michael
LOVER FOR A DAY (15)
carries out the task she has set
HHHHH
him before the train reaches
Philippe Garrel, 76 mins,
the end of the line, he will make
starring: Éric Caravaca,
a significant amount of money.
Esther Garrel, Louise Chevillotte
Michael must track down one
It’s refreshing that 50 years after
particular passenger who is
the heyday of French Nouvelle
using the alias “Prynne”. Every
Vague, French film-makers are
so often, Michael receives a
THE COMMUTER (15)
HHHHH
Jaume Collet-Serra, 104 mins,
starring: Liam Neeson, Vera Farmiga,
Patrick Wilson, Elizabeth McGovern
still making the same intimate
dramas about young love.
Jeanne is a young woman
distraught after splitting up
from her boyfriend. She seeks
refuge in the apartment of her
father, Gilles, a crumpled but
charismatic philosophy professor
who has recently taken up with
a much younger lover of his own,
the hedonistic and voluptuous
Ariane. The two women, initially
suspicious of one another, soon
form a strong bond.
Director Garrel probes away
at such subjects as romantic
longing and sexual jealousy in a
playful way. A wry female voiceover suggests that we shouldn’t
take their predicaments too
seriously, even if Jeanne is so
consumed with grief and self-pity
that she almost throws herself
out of a window at one stage.
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
Miguel has built himself a guitar
in secret and has taught himself to
play. He plans to defy the family’s
wishes and to compete in a talent
contest held every year on the
Day of the Dead. Miguel also has
a hidden shrine to legendary
Mexican crooner and movie star
Ernesto de la Cruz, who died in
1942, and whose best-known hit
was called “Remember Me”.
The conceit here is that humans
die twice – the first time when
they leave the Land of the Living
and the second (and final) time
when their friends and relatives
forget about them.
All the elements coalesce
perfectly. Directors Lee Unkrich
and Adrian Molina are telling
the story of a boy with a sense of
destiny.Theyarealsomakingafilm
about family and memory, and one
that celebrates Mexican culture. In
The dead, it
seems, are just
as hedonistic
as the living
Dead good
Pixar is back on
form with the
wondrously
inventive ‘Coco’
is here. The story unfolds during
the Day of the Dead celebrations in
Mexico. Much of it takes place in the
LandOfTheDead,withskeletonsas
the main characters.
The protagonist is Miguel
Rivera, a 12-year-old from a family
of humble shoemakers who
dreams of becoming a musician.
For reasons that baffle him, his
relatives go to extreme lengths to
stop him pursuing his ambition.
They keep a photograph of his
great-great-grandmother, her
daughter and a mysterious man
whose head has been cut out of
the picture, but who is holding
a guitar. The daughter, Coco, is
still alive but is now ancient. Her
memory is fast fading.
Film
Matrix
spite of the darkness of its themes,
the film has the antic goofiness
you expect from a cartoon. Much
of the clowning comes courtesy
of the slobbering street mutt,
Dante, who seems very dim-witted
but protects Miguel at his most
vulnerable moments.
The visual detail is often
astounding. The Land of the Dead
has its own transport system,
music venues and seething city
streets. The dead, it seems, are just
as hedonistic as the living. On the
Day of the Dead, deceased relatives
are allowed back briefly into the
land of the living, just as long as
they are remembered. Cemeteries
become sites for parties.
The humour is often as dry as
the bones of the skeletal heroes.
It’s only in the concluding part
that we begin to hear the familiar,
maudlin Disney-like observations
about nothing being more
important than family. Coco,
though, deals with death and
memory in a way that is both
graceful and profound.
THE INDEPENDENT
When the press took
on the White House
THE POST (12A)
HHHHH
Steven Spielberg, 116 mins, starring: Tom
Hanks, Meryl Streep, Alison Brie, Sarah
Paulson, Bruce Greenwood, Carrie Coon
The Post is an embroiled and
complicated story about how The
Washington Post came to publish
the Pentagon Papers, leaked documents revealing the US Government’s lies about the Vietnam War.
Much of it takes place in offices,
drawing rooms and dining rooms.
There are no chases, no fights, no
romantic subplots. Nonetheless,
this is a rousing thriller set to a
breakneck tempo.
The film manages the feat of
being both nostalgic and topical. Although it is set in the early
1970s, the references to a bullying
president trying to ride roughshod
over the media and to mislead the
American public have an obvious
contemporary resonance.
In the period in which the film
is set, bankers are questioning
the point of “serious” newspaper
journalism. “Quality and profitability go hand in hand,” heiress
and publisher Katherine Graham
(Meryl Streep with very big hair)
tries to tell the financiers planning
to take The Washington Post public.
They’re sceptical – and “skittish”
about having a woman in charge of
the company.
Tom Hanks gives an enjoyable performance that rekindles
memories of Jason Robards (All
the President’s Men) as the Post’s
editor, Ben Bradlee – a grumpy,
sardonic but idealistic figure who
loves the newspaper business.
“My God, the fun!” he exclaims as
the stakes are raised.
Streep’s Graham is the society
hostess type, part of the Washington elite and close friends with
many of the politicians the Post
is trying to investigate. She plays
the character in sly fashion, showing us just how cleverly Graham
outmanoeuvres the chauvinistic
bankers and politicians, who dismiss her on the basis of her gender.
Much of the newspaper work
shown here is banal – a case of following the “breadcrumbs” – yet
Steven Spielberg and his cinematographer Janusz Kaminski do
their best to make the newspaper
business seem cinematic. We get
the shots of pages being typeset
and giant printing presses inexorably cranking into gear. We see
bundles of newspapers being delivered at dawn. John Williams’
dramatic music makes moments
seem all the more fraught.
In the canon of the best recent
newspaper movies, The Post is the
equal of Spotlight – and may well
emulate its success at the Oscars.
It underlines Spielberg’s continuing ability to entertain us even as
he holds up a mirror to the less attractive side of American history
and politics. THE INDEPENDENT
REEL
= TALK=
JESSICA BARRETT
DiCaprio to star
in Manson movie
Leonardo DiCaprio will reunite
with director Quentin Tarantino
for a film set against the backdrop
of the Manson family murders.
DiCaprio will play a struggling
actor, Margot Robbie will play
Sharon Tate, and Tom Cruise and
Brad Pitt are in talks for roles.
‘Moonlight’ director
reveals new project
Oscar winner Barry Jenkins
(above) has been lured to the
action genre by the script for
Expatriate, a movie about a
hijacked plane. The film has been
co-written by actor Chadwick
Boseman, who will next be seen
on screen in Black Panther.
Happy ever
after again
Hold the front page Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep in ‘The Post’
WHAT CRITICS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW RELEASES
COCO (U)
THE POST (12A)
THE COMMUTER (15)
LOVER FOR A DAY (15)
“Pixar’s most musical and arguably
most magical film yet. If this is the
afterlife we’re all headed to, don’t
fear the reaper.”
Empire
“So on the nose for the political
moment that at times it almost
seems it might have been
produced by a marketing firm.”
The Atlantic
“Goes off the rails somewhat,
but the star gives it the ol’ Liam
Neeson, which Liam Neeson can
do better than anybody.
Chicago Tribune
“Lyrical and to the point, without
room for digression, yet still
containing a wealth of feeling
through the most economic means.”
Slant
“Pays loving tribute to Mexican
culture with animation that brims
over with visual pleasures, comic
energy and emotional wallop.”
Rolling Stone
“Spielberg cranks up the tension
magnificently and there are
flourishes enough, even if the
pay-off feels strangely flat.”
The List
“As the action escalates,
the train is the most realistic
performer, but you could
do a lot worse.”
Vulture
“With its monochrome stylings
and ennui, it might be the most
French film ever made, but there’s
no denying Garrel’s craft.”
Total Film
Disney’s live-action fairytale
Enchanted is getting a sequel:
Disenchanted. Giselle, the
cartoon princess who ends up
in modern-day New York, was
played by Amy Adams (above) in
the original, though she’s yet to
sign up for film number two.
Portman straps in
for astronaut drama
Natalie Portman is in talks to
take the lead role in Pale Blue
Dot, a tale about an astronaut
who spirals out of control after
a trip into space. It’s inspired by
the story of former Nasa officer
Lisa Marie Nowak, who was
arrested for attempting to kidnap
a romantic rival in 2007.
35
36
MUSIC
FR DAY
THE
= PLAYLIST=
What we’re listening
to right now
EL MORGAN AND THE DIVERS
DECORATIONS
The first single from the folk
band’s full-length debut has an
uplifting, cinematic sound, led by
strings and piano. Catch them on
tour across the UK in February.
TURNSTILE
MOON
A soulful punk-rock track from
the Baltimore hardcore band,
notorious for their wild live
performances. The song is taken
from their major-label debut on
Roadrunner, Time & Space,
which is out on 23 February.
JAY SOM
PIROUETTE
Following last year’s airy indie
album Everybody Works, Som is
now releasing two songs from the
demo process that didn’t make
it on to the album’s track listing.
This song, which dances from the
stereo, is one of her best yet.
FRANKIE COSMOS
JESSE
Signed to Sub Pop last year,
Frankie Cosmos, aka Greta
Kline, has released this synthy
indie-pop track from her
forthcoming album Vessel,
which is out on 30 March.
THE BREEDERS
ALL NERVE
This groovy tune is the
first official track from the
forthcoming full-length All Nerve
from the inimitable Seattle rock
band featuring twin sisters
Kim and Kelley Deal.
POPPY ACKROYD
PAPER
The instrumental opening track
from Ackroyd’s new album
Resolve is a meditative, absorbing
listen. The self-produced album
will come out on 2 February.
THE KILLERS
RUT
On the latest single from
Wonderful, Wonderful, Brandon
Flowers and co go on an
emotional journey in a song
inspired by Flowers’ wife’s PTSD.
JACK WHITE
CONNECTED BY LOVE
This rootsy, gutsy affair from
the songwriter (below) is the the
lead single from Boarding House
Reach, out on 23 March.
Giles Bidder
“F
or a while there
we didn’t exist,”
says bassist Bob
Hardy of the past
three years in the
life of his band, Franz Ferdinand.
Between the completion of the
FFS supergroup side project with
Sparks in 2015 and the release of
next month’s fifth album Always
Ascending, the group have been
through the most sustained
period of upheaval in their
decade-and-a-half existence. “At
the beginning of 2016, people
were offering us gigs and we were
like, ‘We literally can’t. We’re not
a band right now. We’re just a
hypothetical band’.”
“That’s funny,” says the group’s
singer Alex Kapranos, sitting
alongside Hardy in the dining
room of boutique Glasgow hotel
Abode, freshly poured cups of tea
on the spotless white tablecloth
between us. He’s warming to his
friend’s existential theme.
“Our band was theoretical to
start off with, and we kind of went
back to that imaginary state two
years ago. We had those sorts of
conversations that imaginary
bands have all over again. What
would this band do? What kind of
music is it going to make? I love
that stuff, it’s exciting.”
The reason for such selfexamination was the departure
of their former bandmate Nick
McCarthy, with whom – alongside
drummer Paul Thomson – they
formed Franz Ferdinand in 2002,
quickly becoming famous (and a
favourite of Kanye West) with the
‘For a while we were
an imaginary band’
With a fifth album imminent, Glaswegian indie rockers
Franz Ferdinand tell David Pollock how the loss of
one of their founding members led to three years of angst
– which was solved by a technology wizard over a curry
international hit “Take Me Out”
and their Mercury Prize-winning
debut in 2004.
Once the first flush of fame had
died down, the group maintained
a focused momentum as creators
of smart, literate, sonically
adventurous guitar pop for three
more albums, until the tour that
followed 2013’s Right Thoughts,
Right Words, Right Action proved
too much for McCarthy.
“He has a family, it was difficult
for him to go away on tour,” says
Kapranos. “We knew before we
went away with FFS [in 2015] that
he was leaving, so we could all
enjoy that tour together, because
he knew he’d be spending time
with his family after it.”
Hardy picks up: “It was obvious
towards the end of the Franz
tour in late 2014 that it was really
hard for him. We’d recorded the
FFS album before Christmas
that year and we were going to
work on some Franz stuff, and he
verbalised what we all knew, that
he just couldn’t go on the road as
intensely any more.”
Geography was also a factor,
with McCarthy the only member
of the band not resident in
Scotland; Hardy and Thomson
are both still in Glasgow, and
Kapranos is a short drive south
of the city in the Dumfriesshire
countryside, but McCarthy is
now based in London with his
wife, Manuela Gernedel. The
couple have been together since
they met at a youth club party
in their hometown in Bavaria 20
years ago, and moved to Glasgow
only on the recommendation
of a friend shortly before Franz
Ferdinand formed.
“He’s just trying to find a way
to make music and still pick
his kids up from school, you
know?” points out Kapranos,
mentioning McCarthy’s current
work as a soundtrack composer
and with Gernedel as Manuela,
who release their music on
the Lost Map label. “Although
thinking about it now, it was
actually a great gift from Nick to
leave the band.”
It sounds like a backhanded
compliment, but there was no
fall-out, no “creative differences”;
all are still friends. “It’s a major
thing to happen, he was a
founding member, a quarter of
the band,” explains Kapranos.
“But if you’re going to continue
from that situation, you have to
really want to do it. It makes you
consider why you’re doing it and
what you want to do.”
There was never any doubt
that the band would persevere.
“We were talking about the new
line-up and people who could
join the band, and we thought,
‘There’s that guy from California’,
and ‘Oh yeah, him from Australia,
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
Thinking about
it now, it was
actually a great
gift from Nick to
leave the band
Dancing to another tune
Bob Hardy, Alex Kapranos,
Paul Thomson, Julian
Corrie and Dino Bardot;
Kapranos on stage (below)
DAVID EDWARDS, GETTY
he’s really cool’. But we realised,
no – let’s go back to Glasgow.”
The band’s attention was
first drawn to Julian Corrie’s
work when School of Velocity,
the Nottingham-born, Glasgowbased producer’s third album
under his electronic alias
Miaoux Miaoux, was nominated
for the Scottish Album of the
Year Award at the same time
as FFS in 2016. Later that
summer, Kapranos attended
the premiere of the film Lost
in France – about the seminal
Glaswegian label Chemikal
Underground, which releases
Miaoux Miaoux’s music –
and members of the
label and Stuart
Braithwaite of
G l a s gow p o s t rockers Mogwai
re co m m e n d e d
Corrie to him.
“As soon as
Ju l i a n’s n a m e
came up I Googled
him and found an
interview with him,”
says Kapranos, “and the
things he was saying were all
the things we talk about: how
you can be most adventurous
within the parameters of a threeminute pop song.”
The band took him for a
curry at Mother India’s Café
in Glasgow, liked what he had
to say, then invited him to
Kapranos’s home studio. “We
played him some of the demos
and 20 minutes later he could
just play them on the piano,”
says Hardy. “We thought, OK,
this guy’s really amazing…”
“You just know instantly,
you can see the character of
it,” says Kapranos. “You know
when you go to a good play, and
the opening scene immediately
sets the mood and you’re in that
universe? Just the way the first
character walks on stage, the
set design, the atmosphere, the
hushed audience…” He clicks his
fingers. “That’s exactly what it
felt like. It was very exciting.”
Although Kapranos is quick
to point out that the melee of
influential sounds on which
Franz Ferdinand draw was never
conventional – from McCarthy’s
time in German jazz-rock
collective Embryo to Thomson’s
current side activities with
Glasgow’s mighty mutant disco
group Amor – their adoption of
electronics with Corrie in the
group has given them a new spin.
“The idea of being a live band
who play dance music was
always something we’d talked
about, but we really tried to
push it on this one,” says Hardy,
“because Julian’s first love is
techno and we weren’t scared to
embrace what he’s best at.”
Planned out painstakingly
in Kapranos’s studio, recorded
in six days at Rak in London
and completed with Cassius’s
Philippe Zdar in Paris (the
band love the versatility of his
productions, from Phoenix
to Cat Power to the Beastie
Boys), Always Ascending fuses
the edgy energy and dense,
suggestive lyricism of the band’s
early work with the refreshed,
contemporary sheen which
Corrie brings.
For this year’s lengthy live
tour they’ve also added guitarist
Dino Bardot (formerly of spiky
Glasgow indie group The 1990s
with Jackie McKeown, who
is also Thomson’s sometime
bandmate in The Yummy Fur),
and it will be intriguing to
hear how the stage show
represents a sound
which has been
richly resculpted.
“ G r e a t ! ”
says Kapranos
at mention of
that last word,
breaking off from
a sip of tea. “I’m so
glad you think that.
I’d love people to listen
to this record and go: ‘Oh
aye, that’s a Franz Ferdinand
record, but they’re doing
something totally different.’
That’s it. You want to keep your
identity, but you don’t want to
repeat yourself.”
‘Always Ascending’ is out on
9 February. Franz Ferdinand’s
UK tour begins at the Albert Hall,
Manchester, on 13 February
and runs to 25 February
(franzferdinand.com)
ALBUMREVIEWSByAndyGill
Tex-Mex
kings take a
break from
the border
CALEXICO
The Thread That
Keeps Us
Album
ofthe
week
HHHHH
Download: End Of The World With You;
Voices In The Field; Bridge To Nowhere;
Under The Wheels; Dead In The Water
Now expanded to a full-time
septet, Calexico display a
new resourcefulness and
determination on The Thread
That Keeps Us, which may be the
album that finally hoists this most
undervalued of American bands
to their rightful place alongside
the likes of R.E.M. and Wilco.
The intimacy and evocative
atmosphere of previous
releases has been retained, but
there’s a fresh, barnstorming
spirit brought by the team
FIRST AID KIT
Ruins
HHHHH
surrounding the core duo of Joey
Burns and John Convertino.
Where earlier releases
sometimes felt too meticulously
crafted, this one has the sound
of a proper band, its members
constantly egging each other
into uncertain territory.
Instead of their familiar border
stamping grounds of Arizona
and Mexico, Calexico recorded
The Thread That Keeps Us in a
ramshackle studio overlooking
the Pacific coastline, and it is
suffused with the spirit of endless
possibilities often triggered by
California dreaming.
TUNE-YARDS
I Can Feel You Creep
Into My Private Life
Hence, perhaps, the brief
instrumental interludes like
“Shortboard” and the Neil
Young-style guitar-noise abstract
“Spinball”, which are the sound of
open-ended oceanic daydreams.
Hence, too, the edgy, piercing
guitar lines twirling around each
other in songs such as “Voices
In The Field” and “End Of The
World With You”, which recall the
hippie heyday of Haight-Ashbury
staples like the Grateful Dead
and Quicksilver.
Not that Calexico’s Tex-Mex
roots are completely abandoned,
however. Jacob Valenzuela’s
trumpet brings a mariachi
poise to several songs, while
the cumbia beat and accordion
lend norteno elegance to “Flores
y Tamales”. And one of the
standout tracks, “Under The
Wheels”, has a nifty polka twitch
akin to Los Lobos, whose genius
for blending heritage with
contemporary concerns is also
emulated in a lyric uneasy about
political impotence: “Deep in the
war machine, always someone
else’s schemes.”
THE INDEPENDENT
STARCRAWLER
Starcrawler
HHHHH
Download: My Wild
Sweet Love; Rebel
Heart; It’s A Shame
HHHHH
The Soderberg sisters’ first
album in four years is aptly titled.
If 2014’s Stay Gold expressed a
desire for change, then Ruins
rakes through the rubble left by
those changes: both the sisters’
separations (subsequently
reconciled) and the collapse
of Klara’s relationship, which
arguably triggered her
departure. Songs such as “Rebel
Heart” and “Fireworks” are
fraught with regret over her
self-destructive tendencies.
“Ruins” itself confronts the
impossibility of trying to rebuild
what is irretrievable.
Expanded to a duo by bassist
Nate Brenner’s promotion
to full-time accomplice of
Merrill Garbus, Tune-Yards’
characteristically confrontational
approach acquires a new brusque
confidence on this fourth album.
Brenner’s sinuous basslines
lend a new strength to Garbus’s
jittery, staccato drum programs,
and allow her keening, highregister commentaries about
womanhood and “white
centrality” to float above
sometimes rickety assemblages
of samples, keyboards, ukulele
and reeds.
Ever since punk, rock occasionally
short-circuits back to basics.
LA’s hotly touted Starcrawler
are the latest incarnation of this
cyclical process. Produced by
Ryan Adams, this debut album
is awash in buzzsaw guitar riffs
and splashy cymbals, while
the wild-child vocals of Arrow
De Wilde channel the jaded
disdain of Courtney Love. It’s
a formula which works best
on “Love’s Gone Again”, which
has something of the elemental
primitivism of Pink Flag-era Wire
as it treats perverse carnal urges
to a dose of distortion.
THE RESIDENTS
The Third Reich ’n’ Roll
DANIEL TAYLOR AND
THE TRINITY CHOIR
The Path To Paradise
GLEN HANSARD
Between Two Shores
HHHHH
Download: Coast To
Coast; ABC-123; Now As
Then; Home; Hammer
Download: Love’s
Gone Again; I Love
LA; Tears
HHHHH
Download: Swastikas
On Parade; Hitler Was
A Vegetarian; Beyond
The Valley Of A Day In
The Life
HHHHH
Download: Miserere
Mei, Deus; Miserere;
Libera Nos; Magnificat
Download: Roll On
Slow; Why Woman;
Movin’ On; One Of Us
Will Lose
Released in 1976, and reissued
here with a plethora of outtakes,
live cuts and singles, The Third
Reich ’n’ Roll remains perhaps the
most stubbornly transgressive
album ever recorded. Its two
side-long suites, “Swastikas
On Parade” and “Hitler Was A
Vegetarian”, take a cudgel to
1960s pop, melting familiar hits
like “Land Of 1,000 Dances”,
“96 Tears”, “It’s My Party”
and “Telstar” into audaciously
discordant new forms that
have since, despite their atonal
abrasiveness, acquired a warm
familiarity all their own.
Daniel Taylor and The Trinity
Choir offer a small but impressive
survey of religious acappella
music which seeks to dissolve the
boundaries between old and new,
home and abroad, by including
Renaissance masterpieces by
Byrd, Tallis and Allegri, alongside
modern settings of traditional
texts by Arvo Pärt. Taylor seems
to be trying to restore, to the cold
stone surroundings of today’s
churches, something of the light
and colour which once dazzled
congregations. He does just that
with Byrd and Tallis’s separate
settings of the “Miserere”.
On his third solo outing, Glen
Hansard (the Oscar-winning
co-writer of the musical Once)
gives his Van Morrison influence
free rein, particularly on the
track “Movin’ On”, where his
guttural moans and 12-string
stylings irresistibly bring to
mind St Dominic’s Preview.
Elsewhere, Hansard’s sepia
R’n’B tones are underpinned
by brooding horns and organ
to lend a Southern deep-soul
ambience to “Why Woman”,
one of several songs here which
present him as biased plaintiff of
a broken relationship.
37
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i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
TELEVISION
39
FR DAY
THIS WEEK’S
1
HITS, HYPE & HUSTLE: AN
INSIDER’S GUIDE TO THE
MUSIC BUSINESS FRI 9PM, BBC4
Having spent more than 25
years in the business, agent
Emma Banks has worked
with some of the world’s most
famous artists, including Katy
Perry, Kanye West and Red
Hot Chili Peppers. She’s seen
first-hand the fine line between
success and failure. Here she
explores some of the factors for
success, including management,
promotion and pure star power.
Contributors include Motown’s
Martha Reeves, Blur’s Alex
James, record-producing
legend Clive Davis and Jane’s
Addiction’s Perry Farrell.
2
8 OUT OF 10 CATS
DOES COUNTDOWN
FRI 9PM, CHANNEL 4
Jimmy Carr hosts a new series
of the words and numbers
game. Jon Richardson and
Joe Wilkinson take on guest
captain Kevin Bridges and
Jessica Knappett. Punk poet
John Cooper Clarke is in
Dictionary Corner with
Susie Dent and Rachel Riley
is, as ever, in charge of
the boards.
Tento
watch
Chosen by
Jessica Barrett
police and close associates of
the drug lords.
4
GRACE AND FRANKIE
FROM TODAY, NETFLIX
Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin,
both of whom were nominated
for Outstanding Lead Actress
in a Comedy at the last Emmys,
reprise their roles for a fourth
series. They play two older
women dealing with the fall-out
3
DRUG LORDS
FROM TODAY, NETFLIX
A documentary series about the
most notorious drug bosses in
history, such as Pablo Escobar
and Frank Lucas, who was
played by Denzel Washington
in American Gangster. What
makes this different from the
average cartel chronicle is that
it’s told by the men and women
who were directly involved
in the cases themselves, both
of their husbands falling in
love with one another. Joining
the cast is Lisa Kudrow, who
worked with showrunner Marta
Kauffman on Friends.
5
FARGO
FROM SATURDAY, NETFLIX
If you missed it on Channel 4
last year, series three of the
acclaimed drama arrives on
Netflix. It’s worth a watch for
Ewan McGregor’s turn as two
brothers, which won him a
Golden Globe at this month’s
ceremony. He plays Emmit
and Ray Stussy, who are at one
another’s throats over a robbery
gone wrong, both of whom get
caught up in a double homicide
case. Co-starring David Thewlis,
Mary Elizabeth Winstead and
Michael Stuhlbarg.
6
CALL THE MIDWIFE
SUN 8PM, BBC1
The BBC loves Call the Midwife
so much that there are
Christmas specials and new
series ordered up until 2020.
This week marks the start of
the seventh series, the arrival of
Jenny Agutter as Sister Julienne
and the return of Vanessa
Redgrave, who has narrated the
show since it started in 2012.
7
THE STORY OF US SUN 9PM,
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Clockwise from top Lisa Kudrow
(far right) joins Lily Tomlin
and Jane Fonda in ‘Grace and
Frankie’; ‘Call the Midwife’
returns; Andrew Graham-Dixon
investigates an art theft
Morgan Freeman narrates
this all-encompassing
journey, which aims to
discover how people
from all cultures around
the world live their lives.
Each episode will explore a
different topic, including love,
belief, power, war and peace,
rebellion and freedom.
8
STACEY DOOLEY
INVESTIGATES: SECOND
CHANCE SEX OFFENDERS FROM
WEDNESDAY, BBC3 ON IPLAYER
In Florida, after paedophiles
have served their sentences,
they face legal restrictions
for life. Dooley explores the
debate that’s raging in the state
about these laws, whether they
genuinely protect children or
just make the public feel better.
She spends time with convicted
sex offenders
living in a
homeless
camp in
Miami and
an isolated
community
in the middle of, well, nowhere
– both consequences of
strict laws preventing them
from living fewer than
2,500ft from a place where
children congregate.
9
NATIONAL TELEVISION
AWARDS TUES 7.30PM, ITV
Dermot O’Leary presents the
23rd annual ceremony at the O2
in London, celebrating the best
of British television. Sheridan
Smith’s performance as Julie
Bushby in The Moorside sees
her up against Suranne Jones
as Doctor Foster in the Drama
Performance category, while
Graham Norton will receive
the Special Recognition award.
Can Ant and Dec win the TV
Presenter award for the 17th
year in a row? Probably.
10
STEALING VAN GOGH
WEDS 9PM, BBC2
It’s considered one of the
greatest art heists of the
21st century. In December
2002, two priceless and
historically important
paintings were stolen
from the Van Gogh
Museum in Amsterdam,
in a brutal and
audacious robbery
by experienced,
professional
thieves. But what
happened to the
masterpieces?
And what is their
use to criminals
who can never
sell or display
them on the open
market? Andrew
Graham-Dixon
investigates.
Television Friday 19 January
CRITIC’S
CHOICE
GERARD GILBERT
PICK OF THE DAY
===
Monty Don’s Paradise Gardens
Room 101
9pm, BBC2
The nation’s favourite gardener (well,
a close second to Alan Titchmarsh
maybe) is off on his travels, this
time to decode and celebrate
Islam’s paradise gardens. Collecting
air miles between Iran and India,
Morocco and Turkey, Monty Don
(left) begins in Spain, a country that
was Muslim for as long as it’s been
Catholic, taking in the Alhambra in
Granada and the design basics of the
paradise gardens, including (most
importantly) water, geometric
shapes and such exotic Arab imports
to Europe as oranges, dates,
pomegranates and rosemary. For the
desert peoples, these were not just
heavily scented heavens on Earth
but “a dream of an oasis”.
8.30pm, BBC1
Jeremy Paxman nominates David
Cameron (“the worst prime minister
since Lord North, who lost the
American colonies”) for eternal
damnation, while Sally Phillips
has nothing positive to say about
positive thinking, and The Last Leg’s
Alex Brooker disses tourist spots.
===
Would I Lie To You?
9pm, BBC1
Lee Mack is on fire as he claims that
the mystery guest is a friend whose
wife he impersonated in order to
fool his children, although Robert
“Judge” Rinder offers the more
intriguing suggestion that the same
man was his crush at school. The
other guests in a particularly strong
edition are Katherine Ryan, athlete
Denise Lewis and Richard Osman
– a man possibly even brainier than
his team captain, David Mitchell.
enough going for it to see fans of
Scandi-noir crime drama through to
the start of spring – even if at this
stage the glamorous lead character
is somewhat opaque.
===
===
Rebecka Martinsson:
Arctic Murders
Hits, Hype & Hustle:
An Insider’s Guide To
The Music Business
9pm, More4
Ida Engvoll plays the eponymous
hotshot Stockholm lawyer who
heads back to her rural hometown
above the Arctic Circle for the
funeral of a friend, a priest with a
knack for making enemies, and
begins to suspect that her
straightforward accidental death
might have in fact been murder. It’s
not the most original set-up, but this
new thriller series (based on the
crime novels of Asa Larsson) has
6.00 Flog It! Trade Secrets
(R) (S). 6.30 The Farmers’
Country Showdown (R)
(S). 7.15 Antiques Road
Trip (R) (S). 8.00 Sign
Zone: MasterChef: The
Professionals (R) (S). 9.00
Victoria Derbyshire (S).
11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
(S). 12.00 Daily Politics
(S). 1.00 Live Snooker:
The Masters Hazel Irvine
presents coverage of the
third quarter-final (S). 4.45
More Creatures Great
And Small (R) (S). 5.15 Flog
It! (R) (S).
6.00 Good Morning
Britain (S). 8.30 Lorraine
(S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (S). 10.30 This
Morning (S). 12.30 Loose
Women (S). 1.30 ITV News;
Weather (S). 1.55 ITV
Regional News; Weather
(S). 2.00 Judge Rinder
(S). 3.00 Dickinson’s Real
Deal (S). 3.59 ITV Regional
Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping
Point (S). 5.00 The Chase
(S).
6.20 3rd Rock From The
Sun (R) (S). 7.10 Everybody
Loves Raymond (R)
(S). 7.35 Everybody
Loves Raymond (R) (S).
8.00 Everybody Loves
Raymond (R) (S). 8.30
Frasier (R) (S). 9.00 Frasier
(R) (S). 9.35 Frasier (R) (S).
10.05 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (R) (S).
11.00 Sun, Sea And Selling
Houses (R) (S). 12.00
Channel 4 News Summary
(S). 12.05 Couples Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 1.05
Posh Pawn (R) (S). 2.10
Countdown (S). 3.00
Village Of The Year (S).
4.00 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (S). 5.00 Four
In A Bed (S). 5.30 Extreme
Cake Makers (S).
6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The
Wright Stuff 11.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors
(R) (S). 12.10 5 News
Lunchtime (S). 12.15 The
Hotel Inspector (R) (S). 1.10
Access (S). 1.15 Home And
Away (S). 1.45 Neighbours
(S). 2.15 NCIS (R) (S). 3.15
FILM: Deadly Pursuit (John
Murlowski 2015) Romantic
thriller, starring KC Clyde
(S). 5.00 5 News At 5 (S).
5.30 Neighbours (R) (S).
6.00 BBC News At
Six; Weather (S).
6.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.00 Eggheads Quiz
show, hosted by
Jeremy Vine (S).
6.30 Great British
Railway
Journeys Last
in the series (S).
6.00 ITV Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.30 ITV News;
Weather (S).
6.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.30 Hollyoaks
Mandy tries her
best to get Ella
back (S).
6.00 Home And Away
Justin is visited
by a stranger
who wants to
know where her
money is (R) (S).
6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 Live Snooker:
The Masters
Coverage
of the fourth
quarter-final (S).
7.00 Emmerdale
Graham puts
pressure on
Pollard (S).
7.30 Coronation
Street (S).
7.00 Channel 4 News
(S).
7pm
7.00 The One Show
Hosted by
Michael Ball
and Alex Jones
(S).
7.30 A Question Of
Sport (R) (S).
8pm
8.00 EastEnders
The Brannings
gather to say
goodbye to Abi
(S).
8.30 Room 101 (S).
8.00 Mastermind
Specialist
subjects include
the American
Civil War (S).
8.30 A Vicar’s Life (S).
8.00 River Monsters
A mystery sea
monster in a
remote lake in
Malaysia (S).
8.30 Coronation
Street (S).
9.00 Would I Lie
To You? With
Denise Lewis
and Katherine
Ryan (S).
9.30 Mrs Brown’s
Boys (R) (S).
9.00 Monty Don’s
Paradise
Gardens
Paradise
gardens in
Spain and
Morocco (S).
10.00BBC News At
Ten (S).
10.25 BBC Regional
News (S).
10.35 The Graham
Norton Show
(S).
Daytime
6.00 Breakfast (S). 9.15
Rip Off Britain: Holidays
(S). 10.00 Homes Under
The Hammer (R) (S). 11.00
Wanted Down Under
(S). 11.45 Close Calls:
On Camera (R) (S). 12.15
Bargain Hunt (S). 1.00 BBC
News At One; Weather
(S). 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather (S). 1.45
Doctors (S). 2.15 Father
Brown (R) (S). 3.00 Escape
To The Country (R) (S). 3.45
The Farmers’ Country
Showdown (S). 4.30
Antiques Road Trip (S).
5.15 Pointless (S).
6pm
9pm
10pm
11pm
Late
9pm, BBC4
The opening shot of this new series
about the teams of professionals
who can be the difference between
pop failure and success is of a young
Katy Perry singing in a Christian
gospel choir. The agent who guided
Perry to the top, Emma Banks,
presents this first programme of
three. Banks’ speciality is finding the
right live gigs for up-and-coming
artists, a service she has provided to
Emma Banks explains
how to hype musicians
9pm, BBC4
Sally Phillips reveals
why she can’t stand
the idea of positive
thinking on ‘Room 101’
8.30pm, BBC1
Ida Engvoll turns up a
murder in the Arctic
9pm, More4
7.00 The Wine Show
Matthew Goode
and James
Purefoy explore
a very unusual
wine cellar (S).
7.00 World News
Today; Weather
(S).
7.30 Top Of The Pops:
1985 Featuring
Prince and Amii
Stewart (R) (S).
6.25 FILM: The Book
Thief (Brian
Percival 2013)
Second World
War drama,
starring Sophie
Nelisse (S).
8.00 Jamie And
Jimmy’s Friday
Night Feast
With guests
Chris O’Dowd
and Dawn
O’Porter (S).
8.00 Costa Del
Celebrity
A visit to one
of Spain’s
top flamenco
venues (S).
8.00 The Good
Old Days
Performers
include Danny
La Rue, Duggie
Brown and
Keith Harris (R).
9.00 Lethal Weapon
Riggs and
Murtaugh
investigate
the death
of a plastic
surgeon (S).
9.00 8 Out Of 10
Cats Does
Countdown
New series (S).
9.00 Celebrity Big
Brother: Live
Eviction Emma
Willis returns
for the next
eviction show
(S).
9.00 Hits, Hype &
Hustle: An
Insider’s Guide
To The Music
Business New
series (S).
9.00 FILM: Idiocracy
(Mike Judge
2006) Scifi comedy,
starring Luke
Wilson (S).
10.00QI With Aisling
Bea, Russell
Brand and Noel
Fielding (S).
10.30 Newsnight (S).
10.00ITV News At
Ten; Weather
(S).
10.30 ITV Regional
News (S).
10.45 Through The
Keyhole (R) (S).
10.00Gogglebox:
Celebrity
Special For
SU2C Critiques
of popular and
topical television
shows (R) (S).
10.00Will & Grace (S).
10.30 Celebrity Big
Brother: Live
Eviction (S).
10.00Radio 2 In
Concert: Paloma
Faith Concert
performance
from the BBC
Radio Theatre,
central London.
10.40 FILM: Man
On Fire (Tony
Scott 2004)
Action thriller,
starring Denzel
Washington (S).
11.25 Witless (S).
11.55 Chinese Burn
One-off comedy
following the
escapades of
three Chinese
girls in London.
11.05 Snooker: The
Masters (S).
11.55 Snooker: The
Masters – Extra
The third and
fourth quarterfinals (S).
11.45 Take Me Out
Would-be
Romeos
from London,
Yorkshire and
Worcester
compete (R) (S).
11.20 First Dates
Hotel An
87-year-old
fitness fanatic
looks for love
(R) (S).
11.05 Celebrity Big
Brother’s Bit On
The Side Rylan
Clark-Neal
and his guests
discuss tonight’s
eviction (S).
11.00 Wild Boys: The
Story Of Duran
Duran (R) (S).
11.50 Top Of The Pops:
1985 Featuring
Prince and Amii
Stewart (R) (S).
12.25 BBC News (S).
1.55 Sign Zone: Trump
Voters: One Year On –
Panorama (R) (S). 2.25 Sign
Zone: Rome Unpacked (R)
(S). 3.25 Sign Zone: Inside
The Factory (R) (S). 4.25
This Is BBC Two (S).
12.45 Jackpot247 3.00
Alphabetical (R) (S). 3.50
ITV Nightscreen
12.20 FILM: Spring
Breakers (Harmony Korine
2012) (S). 2.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S). 2.50 Kiri (R) (S). 3.45
Grand Designs Australia (R)
(S). 4.40 Location, Location,
Location (R) (S). 5.35 Food
Unwrapped (R) (S).
12.00 SuperCasino (S).
3.10 Celebrity Big Brother:
The Eviction (R) (S). 4.25
Lip Sync Battle UK: Katie
Price Vs Ben Fogle (R) (S).
4.45 House Doctor (R) (S).
5.10 Wildlife SOS (R) (S).
5.35 Divine Designs (R) (S).
12.30 The Joy Of The Single
(R) (S). 1.30 Hits, Hype &
Hustle: An Insider’s Guide
To The Music Business (R)
(S). 2.30 Radio 2 In Concert:
Paloma Faith (R) (S). 3.30
Close
6.00 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records
(R) (S). 6.25 Totally
Bonkers Guinness World
Records (R) (S). 6.55 Dress
To Impress (R) (S). 7.45
Emmerdale (R) (S). 8.50
You’ve Been Framed!
Gold (R) (S). 9.25 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (R) (S).
10.10 Who’s Doing The
Dishes? (R) (S). 11.10 Dress
To Impress (R) (S). 12.10
Emmerdale (R) (S). 12.45
Emmerdale (R) (S). 1.15
You’ve Been Framed!
Gold (R) (S). 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (S). 2.35
The Jeremy Kyle Show
(R) (S). 3.40 The Jeremy
Kyle Show (R) (S). 4.50 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (R) (S).
5.50 Take Me Out (R) (S).
7.00 Totally You’ve
Been Framed!
Gold Comical
clips, narrated
by Harry Hill
(R) (S).
8.00 Two And A Half
Men Lyndsey
upsets Alan (S).
8.30 Superstore
Glenn tries to
come off as a
strict boss (S).
9.00 FILM: American
Pie (Paul Weitz
1999) Comingof-age comedy,
with Jason
Biggs (S).
11.00 Family Guy
(R) (S).
11.30 Family Guy
Civilisation is
destroyed in
a millennial
apocalypse (R).
1.30 FILM: Dragon (Peter
Chan 2011) Martial arts
thriller, starring Donnie
Yen (S). 3.35 Close
12.00 American Dad!
(R) (S). 12.55 Two And
A Half Men (R) (S). 1.25
Superstore (R) (S). 1.55
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 2.15
Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2
Nightscreen
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
the likes of Kanye West and the Red
Hot Chili Peppers, and is now using
to help grime artist Lady Leshurr
to find a wider audience. We also
meet legendary Motown A&R man
Mickey Stevenson and hear how Jeff
Buckley was promoted in tiny clubs.
FILM
CHOICE
LAURENCE PHELAN
===
Will & Grace
10pm, Channel 5
The first episode seemed to suggest
that the rebooted sitcom would be
little more than a vehicle for Trump
thumping, but fortunately, it’s
settled down now to its familiar
strengths – namely, the repartee
between the four leads. They are
joined by Harry Connick Jnr as
Grace’s ex-husband, bumping into
each other again when Grace (Debra
Messing) has a medical check-up.
FILM OF THE DAY
===
Spring Breakers
Idiocracy
12.20am, Channel 4
(Harmony Korine, 2012)
This avant-garde exploitation
movie about the behaviour of four
young women on their college
spring break features more sunshine,
drugs, guns, neon and naked flesh
than Scarface and Grand Theft Auto:
Vice City put together. The action
takes place in a woozy dream state,
in which the girls’ sense of moral
responsibility has melted away. It’s a
fugue; the narrative is non-linear
and looping, so that consequence no
longer follows action. Its moral
stance is inscrutable. It is a thrilling
evocation of what it must be like
to be young, beautiful and stupid,
living in the moment without a
thought for tomorrow.
9pm, Film4
(Mike Judge, 2006)
A cryogenics experiment goes
wrong and Luke Wilson, with his
average IQ, wakes up 500 years in
the future, by which time humanity
has degenerated and he finds himself
the cleverest man in America.
Brazil
11.45pm, Gold
(Terry Gilliam, 1985)
This surreal comic fantasy about the
life of an official in a malfunctioning
totalitarian bureaucracy had the
working title “1984½” when Terry
Gilliam and Tom Stoppard were
writing the screenplay. Jonathan
Pryce and Robert De Niro star.
BBC Radio 1
6.00 Classic Coronation
Street (R) (S). 6.25 Classic
Coronation Street (R)
(S). 6.50 Heartbeat (R)
(S). 7.55 The Royal (R) (S).
8.55 Judge Judy (R) (S).
9.25 Judge Judy (R) (S).
9.50 Judge Judy (R) (S).
10.20 The Darling Buds
Of May (R) (S). 11.30 The
Darling Buds Of May (R)
(S). 12.35 The Royal (R)
(S). 1.40 Heartbeat (R) (S).
2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (R) (S). 3.15 Classic
Coronation Street (R) (S).
3.50 On The Buses (R) (S).
4.20 On The Buses (R) (S).
4.55 Rising Damp (R) (S).
5.20 George And Mildred
(R) (S). 5.55 Heartbeat
(R) (S).
6.00 Hollyoaks (R) (S).
7.00 Coach Trip: Road
To Tenerife (R) (S). 7.30
Streetmate (R) (S). 8.00
Charmed (R) (S). 9.00
Melissa & Joey (R) (S).
10.00 Baby Daddy (R) (S).
11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(R) (S). 11.30 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (R) (S). 12.00
The Goldbergs (R) (S). 12.30
The Goldbergs (R) (S). 1.00
The Big Bang Theory (R) (S).
1.30 The Big Bang Theory
(R) (S). 2.00 Melissa & Joey
(R) (S). 2.30 Melissa & Joey
(R) (S). 3.00 Baby Daddy (R)
(S). 3.30 Baby Daddy (R) (S).
4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(R) (S). 4.30 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (R) (S). 5.00 The
Goldbergs (R) (S). 5.30 The
Goldbergs (R) (S).
8.55 Food Unwrapped (R)
(S). 9.30 A Place In The
Sun: Home Or Away (R) (S).
10.30 Four In A Bed (R) (S).
11.00 Four In A Bed (R) (S).
11.35 Four In A Bed (R) (S).
12.05 Four In A Bed (R) (S).
12.35 Four In A Bed (R) (S).
1.05 A Place In The Sun:
Home Or Away (R) (S). 2.10
A Place In The Sun: Home
Or Away (R) (S). 3.15 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 3.50
Come Dine With Me (R)
(S). 4.20 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 4.50 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 5.25 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 5.55
The Secret Life Of The Zoo
(R) (S).
6.00 The Dog Whisperer
(R) (S). 7.00 Monkey Life (R)
(S). 7.30 Monkey Life (R) (S).
8.00 Meerkat Manor (R)
(S). 8.30 Meerkat Manor (R)
(S). 9.00 Road Wars (R) (S).
10.00 Stargate Atlantis (R)
(S). 11.00 MacGyver (R) (S).
12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R)
(S). 1.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R)
(S). 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R)
(S). 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(R) (S). 4.00 Stargate SG-1
(R) (S). 5.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S). 5.30 Futurama
(R) (S).
6.00 The Guest Wing (R)
(S). 7.00 The Guest Wing (R)
(S). 8.00 Urban Secrets (R)
(S). 9.00 The West Wing (R)
(S). 10.00 The West Wing
(R) (S). 11.00 House (R) (S).
12.00 House (R) (S). 1.00
Without A Trace (R) (S).
2.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
3.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
4.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
5.00 House (R) (S).
6.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.30 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.55 The Supervet A
rescued bulldog
has problems
with all four
legs (R) (S).
6.00 Futurama
(R) (S).
6.30 The Simpsons
Bart’s mischief
causes Mrs
Krabappel to
get fired (R) (S).
6.00 House The
medics treat
a homeless
woman (R) (S).
7.55 Grand Designs
Creating a home
on the Isle of
Wight (R) (S).
7.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
7.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
7.00 CSI: Crime
Scene
Investigation
A face from the
past haunts
Keppler (R).
7.00 Murder, She
Wrote Jessica
investigates a
motel murder
(R) (S).
7.00 Hollyoaks (S).
7.30 Coach Trip:
Road To
Tenerife The
coach crosses
into Portugal (S).
8.00 Rosemary &
Thyme The
duo find an
abandoned baby
(R) (S).
8.00 The Crystal
Maze: Celebrity
Special Last in
the series (R) (S).
9.00 Rosemary
& Thyme A
tennis player is
discovered dead
in Spain (R) (S).
9.00 FILM: Abraham
Lincoln:
Vampire
Hunter (Timur
Bekmambetov
2012) Fantasy
thriller (S).
10.00Foyle’s War
A biological
warfare
experiment
goes wrong
(R) (S).
12.05 Gogglebox (R) (S).
1.15 Tattoo Fixers (R) (S).
2.20 The Crystal Maze:
Celebrity Special (R) (S).
3.10 Rude Tube (R) (S). 3.40
Celebs Go Dating (R) (S).
4.30 Charmed (R) (S).
BBC Radio 1Xtra
6am A.Dot 10.00 Ace 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Yasmin Evans
4.00 Sian Anderson 5.45
Newsbeat 6.00 Sian Anderson
7.00 Seani B 9.00 Semtex
11.00 Sir Spyro 1am Kan D
Man And DJ Limelight 4.00
Diplo And Friends
BBC Radio 2
8.00 The Simpsons
Another trio
of Halloween
stories.
8.30 Modern Family
9.00 Rebecka
Martinsson:
Arctic Murders
New series.
Thriller, starring
Ida Engvoll. In
Swedish (S).
9.00 Delicious Sam
and Gina tell
the family the
truth about
Adam. Last in
the series (S).
10.55 24 Hours
In A&E
A man with
schizophrenia
makes his
19th visit of
the year (R) (S).
10.00A League Of
Their Own With
Sam Allardyce,
Sarah Storey
and David
Walliams (R) (S).
8.00 Blue Bloods
Linda’s brother
Jimmy gets into
trouble with the
mob (R) (S).
9.00 FILM: American
Gangster
(Ridley Scott
2007) Drama,
starring Denzel
Washington (R).
12.00 24 Hours In A&E (R)
(S). 1.00 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (R) (S).
2.05 Grand Designs (R) (S).
3.05 8 Out Of 10 Cats (R)
(S). 3.50 Close
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme
World (R) (S). 1.00 Hawaii
Five-0 (R) (S). 2.00 Hawaii
Five-0 (R) (S). 3.00 The
Blacklist (R) (S). 4.00 Stop,
Search, Seize (R) (S). 5.00
The Dog Whisperer (R).
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken
Bruce 12noon Amol Rajan
2.00 Steve Wright In The
Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo
7.00 Tony Blackburn’s Golden
Hour 8.00 Friday Night Is
Music Night 10.00 Sounds Of
The 80s 12mdn’t Anneka Rice:
The Happening 2.00 Radio 2’s
Funky Soul Playlist 3.00 Radio
2 Playlist: New To 2 4.00 Radio
2 Playlist: 21st Century Songs
5.00 Huey On Saturday
BBC Radio 3
6.30am Breakfast. With
Clemency Burton-Hill. 9.00
Essential Classics. With Suzy
Klein. 12noon Composer
Of The Week: Beethoven.
Beethoven’s life and career in
a Vienna under threat from
Napoleon. 1.00 News 1.02
Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert.
Jamie Barton in Sibelius
and Marc-Andre Hamelin
in Feinberg and Beethoven.
2.00 Afternoon Concert. The
Lucerne Festival Strings and
flautist James Galway perform
Mozart and Sibelius. 5.00 In
Tune. Sean Rafferty’s guests
include Simon Trpceski.
7.00 In Tune Mixtape 7.30
Radio 3 In Concert. The BBC
NOW in works by Beethoven
and Huw Watkins. 10.00
The Verb. Writing and
performance showcase. 10.45
Transformations: Five Stories
From Ovid’s Metamorphoses
11.00 World On 3. Lopa Kothari
presents from Glasgow’s
Celtic Connections 2018. 1am
Through The Night
BBC Radio 4
11.00 The Russell
Howard
Hour Topical
comedy and
entertainment
show (R) (S).
11.10 The Big
Bang Theory
Sheldon’s
mother comes
to visit (R) (S).
11.40 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
12.10 FILM: Chicago (Rob
Marshall 2002) (S). 2.05
Love And Marriage (R) (S).
2.55 Inspector Morse (R)
(S). 4.45 Richard Wilson On
The Road (R) (S). 5.10 Judge
Judy (R) (S). 5.30 ITV3
Nightscreen
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast
Show With Nick Grimshaw
10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 The Matt
Edmondson Show 4.00 The
Official Chart With Greg
James 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
Radio 1’s Dance Anthems With
Greg James 7.00 Annie Mac
9.00 Pete Tong 11.00 Danny
Howard 1am Kolsch Sits In
For B.Traits 4.00 Radio 1’s
Essential Mix
12.00 Blue Bloods (R)
(S). 12.55 Dexter (R). 2.05
Banshee (R) (S). 3.05 Girls
(R) (S). 3.40 Girls (R) (S).
4.15 The West Wing (R) (S).
5.05 The West Wing (R) (S).
6am Today 9.00 Desert Island
Discs 9.45 Book Of The Week:
In Search Of Mary Shelley
10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00
Stories From The Royal
Collection 11.30 The Pale
Horse 12noon News 12.04
Niche Work If You Can Get
It 12.15 You And Yours 1.00
The World At One 1.45 Roger
Law: Art And Seoul 2.00 The
Archers 2.15 Drama: Stone 3.00
Gardeners’ Question Time 3.45
Short Works 4.00 Last Word
4.30 More Or Less 4.55 The
Listening Project 5.00 PM 5.57
ON DEMAND
Grace & Frankie
Netflix
Friends star Lisa Kudrow
joins Jane Fonda and Lily
Tomlin for the fourth season.
England’s
Forgotten Queen
===
Radio
41
BBC iPlayer
The fascinating and tragic
tale of Lady Jane Grey, who
reigned for just nine days.
School For Stammerers
ITV Hub
Documentary about people
finally finding their voices.
Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 The News Quiz. With
panellists Jeremy Hardy, Isabel
Hardman and Kerry Godliman.
7.00 The Archers 7.15 Front
Row. Arts programme. 7.45
How To Survive The Roman
Empire, By Pliny And Me.
By Hattie Naylor. Last in the
series. 8.00 Any Questions?
From Ceredigion Museum in
Aberystwyth, Ceredigion. 8.50
A Point Of View. Reflections on
a topical issue. 9.00 Conflict
And Co-operation: A History
Of Trade. Part two of two. An
exploration of the UK’s trading
past. 10.00 The World Tonight
10.45 Book At Bedtime: The
Vital Spark: A Far Cry From
Kensington. By Muriel Spark.
11.00 Great Lives. Justin
Marozzi proposes Greek
historian Herodotus. 11.30
Today In Parliament 11.55 The
Listening Project 12mdn’t
News And Weather 12.30 Book
Of The Week: In Search Of
Mary Shelley 12.48 Shipping
Forecast 1.00 As BBC World
Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast
5.30 News Briefing 5.43 Prayer
For The Day 5.45 IPM
BBC Radio 4 LW
8.31am Yesterday In
Parliament 9.00 Test Match
Special 9.45 Daily Service
10.00 Test Match Special
12.01pm Shipping Forecast
5.54 Shipping Forecast
BBC Radio 4 Extra
6am Agatha Raisin 6.30
The Ancient Novel 7.00 The
Leopard In Autumn 7.30 The
Break 8.00 I’m Sorry I’ll Read
That Again 8.30 Albert And
Me 9.00 Whispers 9.30 After
Henry 10.00 Strangers And
Brothers 11.00 Time 11.15
Sorry Boys You Failed The
Audition 12noon I’m Sorry
I’ll Read That Again 12.30
Albert And Me 1.00 Agatha
Raisin 1.30 The Ancient Novel
2.00 In Siberia 2.15 In Search
Of Ourselves: A History Of
Psychology And The Mind 2.30
Further Tales Of The City 2.45
Speaking For Themselves 3.00
Strangers And Brothers 4.00
Pick
ofthe
day
Kermode
And Mayo’s
Film Review
2pm, BBC 5 Live
Mark Kermode
and Simon Mayo
(above) give
their verdicts
on the week’s
movies, including
interviews with key
figures from the
world of cinema.
Whispers 4.30 After Henry
5.00 The Leopard In Autumn
5.30 The Break 6.00 Undone
6.30 Soul Music 7.00 I’m Sorry
I’ll Read That Again 7.30 Albert
And Me 8.00 Agatha Raisin
8.30 The Ancient Novel 9.00
Podcast Radio Hour 10.00
Comedy Club: The Break
10.30 Comedy Club: On The
Hour 10.55 Comedy Club:
The Comedy Club Interview
11.00 Comedy Club: I’ve Never
Seen Star Wars 11.30 Comedy
Club: Lucy Montgomery’s
Variety Pack 12mdn’t Undone
12.30 Soul Music 1.00 Agatha
Raisin 1.30 The Ancient Novel
2.00 In Siberia 2.15 In Search
Of Ourselves: A History Of
Psychology And The Mind 2.30
Further Tales Of The City 2.45
Speaking For Themselves 3.00
Strangers And Brothers 4.00
Whispers 4.30 After Henry
5.00 The Leopard In Autumn
5.30 The Break
BBC 5 Live
6am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00
Chiles On Friday 1pm The
Friday Sports Panel 2.00
Kermode And Mayo’s Film
Review 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5
Live Sport: The Friday Football
Social 10.00 Dotun Adebayo
1am Up All Night 5.00 5 Live
Boxing With Costello & Bunce
5.30 5 Live Sport: The Friday
Football Social
BBC 6 Music
7am Shaun Keaveny 10.00
Lauren Laverne 1pm Mark
Radcliffe And Stuart Maconie
4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Iggy
Pop 9.00 Tom Ravenscroft
12mdn’t Nemone’s Electric
Ladyland 2.00 6 Music Classic
Concert 3.00 6 Music Live
Hour 4.00 The First Time
With Josh Homme 5.00 Chris
Hawkins
Classic FM
6am More Music Breakfast
9.00 John Suchet 1pm AnneMarie Minhall 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics
At Seven 8.00 The Full Works
Concert. Catherine Bott
celebrates the work of film
composer John Williams. 10.00
Smooth Classics 1am Katie
Breathwick 4.00 Jane Jones
Absolute Radio
6am Christian O’Connell’s
Breakfast Show 10.00 Leona
Graham 1pm Andy Bush 4.00
Dave Berry 7.00 Absolute 80s
With Claire Sturgess 10.00
Sarah Champion 4am Jay
Lawrence
Heart
6am Jamie And Emma
9.00 Toby Anstis 1pm Matt
Wilkinson 4.00 JK And Lucy
7.00 Club Classics 10.00 Lilah
Parsons 1am James Stewart
TalkSPORT
6am The Alan Brazil Sports
Breakfast With Ally McCoist
10.00 Jim White, Perry Groves
And Bob Mills 1pm Hawksbee
And Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham And Darren Gough
7.00 Kick-off 10.00 The Two
Mikes 1am Extra Time With
Tom Latchem
FR DAY
42
AGENDA
What’sontoday...
Visual Arts
ROY LICHTENSTEIN
Tate, Liverpool
More than 20 works, drawn from
the Artist Rooms collection,
chart Roy Lichtenstein’s career,
from his early interest in
landscape to his pop paintings
influenced by comic strips and
advertising imagery. The free
display also presents a threescreen installation, his only
work with film, which was made
after spending two weeks at
Universal Studios in 1969.
(tate.org.uk) to 17 Jun
ROSE WYLIE: QUACK QUACK
Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London W2
Rose Wylie finds inspiration for
vibrant, large-scale canvases
in her daily encounters and
a variety of sources, from art
Travel Offer
history, cinema, comic books and
the natural world to news, verbal
anecdotes, celebrity stories and
sport. This free show includes
paintings dating from the late
1990s to the present day, some
of which have never previously
exhibited, including a new
group of works inspired by Hyde
Park and Kensington Gardens.
(020 7402 6075) to 11 Feb
RED STAR OVER RUSSIA:
A REVOLUTION IN VISUAL
CULTURE 1905-55
Tate Modern, London SE1
A mountain of visual memorabilia
from the February Revolution
to the death of Stalin, amassed
over decades by designer David
King, telling the story of how the
Soviet Union tried to create a
new visual identity in the service
of the revolution. Artists and
designers such as El Lissitzky
2 Days
by coach
only
£139
and Rodchenko put their talents
to the service of what they hoped
would become a transformative
collective endeavour.
Comedy
SARAH MILLICAN
Corby Cube
The softly spoken, sharply
tongued Geordie shows
who’s in charge on her latest
mammoth tour, Control
Enthusiast. (01536 470470) tonight
BIRMINGHAM ROYAL BALLET
Symphony Hall, Birmingham
In An Evening of Music and Dance,
the Royal Ballet Sinfonia share
the stage with the dancers for
symphonic and ballet favourites.
The dancing will include
excerpts from The Sleeping
Beauty and La Fille Mal Gardée.
(0121 780 3333) tonight
(020 7887 8888) to 18 Feb
SOFIE HAGEN
Colchester Arts Centre
GISELLE
Royal Opera House, London WC2
ELIZABETH FRIEDLANDER
Ditchling Museum of Art & Craft
Dead Baby Frog is another
cracking slice of unflinching
storytelling. It’s the tale of
being brought up in Denmark
under the shadow of a controlling,
former Nazi grandfather.
A tale of betrayal, ghosts
and love after death, Giselle is
the most enduring of Romantic
ballets. Marianela Nuñez and
Vadim Muntagirov dance tonight
in the opening performance of
this Royal Ballet production.
A survey of the artist, designer
and typographer Elizabeth
Friedlander (1903-1984), who
escaped to London from Nazi
Germany in the 30s and is
best known for her Penguin
book covers and the Elizabeth
typeface. The exhibition includes
rarely seen works, including
type designs, wood engravings,
decorative book papers, maps
and commercial pieces.
(01273 844744) to 29 Apr
WHEN WE WERE YOUNG
Scottish National Portrait Gallery,
Edinburgh
This display documenting the
experience and representation of
childhood uses photographs from
the gallery’s collection to explore
how the portrayal of children has
shifted over the past 170 years,
featuring daguerreotypes from
the 1840s to digital prints from
2017. (0131 624 6200) to 13 May
(01206 500900) tonight
(020 7304 4000) to 9 Mar
BUSH HALL PRESENTS
Bush Hall, London W12
Abandoman top the bill with
their incredible, improvised
hip-hop – but there’s no slack
anywhere else in the line-up:
sharp, mischievous Andrew
Maxwell takes aim at the issues
of the day, and Edinburgh
champ John Robins is here, too.
(bushhallmusic.co.uk) tonight
KATHERINE RYAN
Corn Exchange, King’s Lynn
Brimming over with zinging
put-downs, wise advice and a
wonderfully contradictory stance
on celebrity culture, Katherine
Ryan tours Glitter Room.
(01553 765565) tonight
Talks
Dance
LIV ULLMANN
BFI Southbank, London SE1
ENGLISH NATIONAL BALLET
London Coliseum, London WC2
As part of the three-month
centenary retrospective of
the Swedish film-maker
Ingmar Bergman, the
actress discusses her times
working with the director.
A generous double bill of Roland
Petit’s chic Le Jeune Homme et
la Mort, with casts including
guest star Ivan Vasiliev, and
August Bournonville’s entrancing
Romantic drama La Sylphide.
(020 7928 3232) tonight 6.30pm
(020 7845 9300) to Sat
Classical
BBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Barbican Hall, London EC2
Catalan conductor Josep Pons
helms concert performances
of two seminal Spanish theatre
works from 1915: Falla’s Gypsy
ballet Love the Magician
(featuring flamenco singer
Maria Toledo) and Granados’s
Goya-inspired opera Goyescas.
(020 7638 8891) tonight 7.30pm
Pop
PIGS PIGS PIGS PIGS
PIGS PIGS PIGS
Lexington, London N1
One pig isn’t enough for the
headliners of the second gig this
week from music website The
Quietus. For Newcastle’s sludgerock powerhouses, anything
worth doing is worth overdoing:
thus, the far reaches of the
15-minute wig-out will surely
be visited here, with maximum
hypnotic force and volume.
(wegottickets.com) tonight
BRINKHOFF-MOEGENBURG
Dancing On Ice
Pick
ofthe
day
The Live Tour
See your favourite celebrities and professional skaters,
along with judges including Torvill & Dean.
So much included
Luxury return coach travel • Local joining points
Tickets for the show • Half-board hotel accommodation
Why travel with us ?
• Low deposit from £45pp* • Over 100 years’ experience
• Over 200 destinations worldwide
• Flexible travel options
• Over 800 pick up points nationwide
• No
credit
card and
fee
Prices correct at the time of publication,
subject
to fluctuation
availability. The final price will
depend on your chosen airport, airline and flight time. Air holiday operated by Omega Holidays under
ATOL No.6081. Tours offered subject to availability. Errors and omissions excepted. Prices shown are
per person, based on two people sharing a dbl/twin room. Single supplements apply.
Call 01942 414897
For more information or to book, please call:
visit
shearings.com
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or visit your local travel agent
OMRT
Subject
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correct as of 11/01/18 and are based on 2 people sharing a standard
033 numbers
aresingle/room
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inclusivemay
minutes
double/
twin room,
supplements
apply. packages
otherwise
apply.
*Available
on standard
2 and 4 dayrates
break.
Please call for full holiday details. E&OE
THEATRE
HEDDA GABLER
Theatre Royal, Glasgow
Henrik Ibsen’s drama is one of the great portraits of a soul in crisis. Lizzy Watts stars in the title role, as a
passionate woman who rebels against the numbness of a stifling marriage, spots vulgarity unerringly yet
dreads the prospect of scandal. Ivo van Hove’s National Theatre staging sets out to make this frequently
performed play seem unfamiliar. (atgtickets.com) to Sat
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
MUSIC
PARAMORE
Manchester Arena
Trouble and intra-band strife
give way to fizzy catharsis for
Tennessee’s emo mainstays
on their fifth album. Hayley
Williams leads Paramore to
the arenas on the bouncing
back of After Laughter, where
springy grooves and funk-pop
moves offer ebullient release
from rivers of lyrical angst.
(gigsandtours.com) tonight
DAVID RAMIREZ
Broadcast, Glasgow
Fans of the National and
Springsteen (Darkness on the
Edge of Town vintage), check
in. Mexican-American singersongwriter David Ramirez
anatomises a divided nation
on the robust We’re Not Going
Anywhere, blurring the personal
and political in songs of great
heft and heart, fire and focus.
(seetickets.com) tonight
THIS IS THE KIT
ABC, Glasgow
Beloved of Guy Garvey and the
National, This Is the Kit spin
lovingly lateral alt-folk stylings
around the warm, winning vocals
of Bristol-raised, Paris-based
bandleader Kate Stables.
Vivid lyrics, buoyant
banjo-work, lively hooks and
wild sax breaks enrich Stables’
Kit-bag on Moonshine Freeze.
guitarist, producer and writer
Justin Adams, PIL guitarist Lu
Edmonds and Ben Mandelson
of 3 Mustaphas 3 – exploring the
open territory where Americana,
Middle Eastern, folk and Russian
all roam free. (020 7613 7498)
tonight
Folk & Roots
SWARB! IT SUITS HIM WELL: A
HOMAGE TO DAVE SWARBRICK
Ulverston Sports Club
Celebrating the music of
England’s finest folk fiddler, a
retinue comprising Canada’s
Jason Wilson Band, Martin
Carthy, John Kirkpatrick and
Simon Swarbrick – plus special
guests – raise a bow and a glass
and a voice to celebrate the great
man. (01229 582258) tonight
After featuring in yesterday’s
opening Celtic Connections
concert, the crack trio behind
the classic Before the Ruin
album, released 10 years ago,
continue their reunion, with
singer-songwriter Emily Barker
opening with songs from her
latest album, Sweet Kind of Blue.
(celticconnections.com) tonight
Theatre
Opera
SCHOOL OF ROCK
New London Theatre, London WC2
Baroque specialist Christian
Curnyn conducts John
Fulljames’s new in-the-round
staging of Monteverdi’s Homeric
homecoming drama, featuring
Roderick Williams as the errant
Ulysses and Christine Rice as his
faithful Penelope. (020 7304 4000)
tonight and Sun 7.30pm
MADAMA BUTTERFLY
Grand Theatre, Leeds
Anne Sophie Duprels stars as the
gullible geisha in Opera North’s
revival of Tim Albery’s typically
thoughtful staging of Puccini’s
culture-clash tragedy.
Martin Pickard conducts.
(0844 848 2720) tonight 7.30pm
Jazz
TRISH CLOWES
Riverhouse Barn, Walton-on-Thames
Saxophonist, composer and
former BBC Radio 3 New
Generation Artist Trish Clowes
moves from orchestral settings
to explore a small-group format
with music from last year’s My
Iris album, with a band featuring
guitarist Chris Montague,
keyboardist Ross Stanley and
drummer James Maddren.
(01932 253354) tonight
World Music
LES TRIABOLIQUES
Rich Mix, London E1
A rare chance to catch a highly
influential and distinctive trio
of English string players – ace
Norwegian pop sensation Sigrid has 100 million streams to
her name, played the Nobel Prize ceremony and has just
been crowned the winner of the BBC’s Sound of 2018. But
she’s not getting carried away, writes Jimi Famurewa
DREVER MCCUSKER WOOMBLE
AND EMILY BARKER
Old Fruitmarket, Glasgow
(celticconnections.com) tonight
THE RETURN OF ULYSSES
Roundhouse, London NW1
‘I can write about
stuff apart from guys’
The kids are more than all right
– in fact, they are an absolute joy
in this ridiculously entertaining
show, with music by Andrew
Lloyd Webber, adapted from
the 2003 movie and starring
Gary Trainor as a slacker
wannabe rocker who winds
up masquerading as a supply
teacher at a prep school. This
fable about the empowering force
of music crackles with mischief
and sly irreverence – and Lloyd
Webber has composed his most
confident score in a long while.
(0844 811 0052) to 13 Jan 2019
PINOCCHIO
NT: Lyttelton, London SE1
This is the first time Disney
has given its blessing to a stage
version of the 1940 movie. John
Tiffany’s production is fairly
lavish, but it is beautifully
proportioned, always reminding
the audience that, at the heart of
the piece, there’s a simple story
about a wooden puppet’s quest to
be a real boy and find the answer
to the riddle of what it is that
unites people and makes them
human. (020 7452 3000) to 10 Apr
TWELFTH NIGHT
Royal Shakespeare Theatre,
Stratford-upon-Avon
The RSC has gone all-out
on a sumptuous design that
positively drips with opulence,
in this updating of the most
bittersweet of Shakespeare’s
comedies to the Aesthetic
movement’s heyday of the 1890s.
Kara Tointon plays Olivia and
Adrian Edmondson is Malvolio
in Christopher Luscombe’s
confident, light-on its-feet
staging. (01789 403493) to 24 Feb
Norway calling
Sigrid is the first
BBC Sound Of...
winner from
outside the UK or
America PA
“I
found out on Monday. I
had a glass of wine,” says
Sigrid of her triumph in
the BBC Music’s Sound
of 2018 list of acts tipped
for greatness. “Very rock’n’roll.”
Despite this somewhat muted
victory party, the 21-year-old’s
Sound of… win is a big deal. Capping off a sharp trajectory that
has seen her go from newly signed
hopeful to more than 100 million
streams in less than 12 months, it
puts her in the company of former
winners Adele and Ellie Goulding.
She’s also, impressively, the first
winner in the poll’s 16-year history
not from America or the UK.
“When I was growing up, I didn’t
dare to dream about becoming a
musician, because I thought being
from Norway meant I was never
going to break anywhere else,” she
says. “We’re such a small country,
I thought it was impossible.”
Sigrid Raabe was born and
raised in the small coastal town
of Alesund. She is the youngest
daughter of an architect mother
and engineer father, who started
her early on a diet of Joni Mitchell,
Chet Baker and Neil Young. “My
parents encouraged me [musically] but I was thinking about
becoming a lawyer or a teacher, or
maybe going into human rights.”
An intervention from her musician brother changed that. With
an imminent show booked in their
hometown, he invited his then
16-year-old sister to join his band
on stage, with one stipulation: she
had to write her own song. She
concocted mellow Americana
numbers “Sun” and “Two Fish” in
just two weeks. “He gave me a gentle push,” she says. “I was so grateful, because the two songs I wrote
were played on national radio. It
meant quite a lot of attention.”
This ultimately led to a deal
with hip Norwegian label Petroleum and wider interest. But Sigrid
chose to hit pause on her burgeoning life as a musician and return to
school to finish sixth form. “I’m so
glad I didn’t go into the big music
industry until I was 19 or 20,” she
says. “It would have been a very
different story for me, I think.”
With its building, defiant chorus, her summer hit “Don’t Kill
My Vibe” is the sort of song Taylor
Swift or Katy Perry would kill for –
a synthesis of spiky R&B attitude
and catchy Scandi-pop polish.
It was inspired by a separate
writing session at which Sigrid
was dismissed and belittled by
older male musicians, hence the
lilting “You think you’re so important to me, don’t you?” refrain.
“My goal was to write a general
story about being patronised,” she
says. “Then I played the demo to
a couple of people and they were
like: ‘Oh, is this about your ex-
I was thinking
about becoming a
lawyer or a teacher,
or maybe going into
human rights
boyfriend?’ And I was like: ‘F**k
no! I can write about stuff apart
from guys.’ Just because I’m a girl
and it’s pop doesn’t mean I have to
write about love and heartbreak.”
By August 2016, a demo had
reached Island Records president
Darcus Beese, who, smitten by her
sound, led a retinue to Bergen to
win the sudden international war
for her signature.
The May 2017 release of the
four-track “Don’t Kill My Vibe”
EP, which also featured acoustic
heart-melter “Dynamite” and
clattering hits “Plot Twist” and
“Fake Friends”, preceded a wellreceived slot on the Park Stage
at Glastonbury. Soon, Sigrid had
a swelling fanbase of high-profile
admirers. Lorde included her in
a Spotify playlist of her favourite
songs and, in December, she was
invited to perform at the Nobel
Peace Prize ceremony in Oslo.
The video to her most recent
single, “Strangers”, already has
four million YouTube views. Now
she’s preparing to head to a remote island studio in Alesund to
record the beginnings of an album
she hopes to release this year.
“It’s beautiful, away from everything,” she says wistfully. “This
past year has been very centred
around me and I think it’s always
healthy to do other stuff. I try to
go into nature as much as possible.
It’s good to feel insignificant sometimes.” EVENING STANDARD
‘Strangers’ is out now. Sigrid tours
the UK from 12 March
43
FR DAY
44
BOOKS
Complicity and the killer nanny
LULLABY
Leïla Slimani
(Faber, £12.99)
Review by Sarah Hughes
T
here is always something slightly uncomfortable about books
that rip their plots from
the headlines, a sense
that we are thoughtlessly delving
into someone else’s private anguish. Thankfully, Leïla Slimani’s
Prix Goncourt-winning Lullaby,
which takes its inspiration from
a real-life case in New York in
2012, manages to rise above these
unpromising beginnings to tell a
taut tale of poverty and privilege,
motherhood and work, marital
tensions and unequal relationships, all underpinned by the terrible question: what could lead
someone to murder two children?
Lullaby begins with three simple, chilling sentences: “The baby
is dead. It only took a few seconds.
The doctor said he didn’t suffer.”
From there, Slimani relocates
the action to Paris, where Myriam, a French Moroccan lawyer
who has found her once-promising career stalled by the arrival
of her two children, lives with her
would-be music producer husband Paul. The ambitious, hard-
working Myriam soon finds that
the constraints of motherhood
chafe at her, and Slimani expertly
describes the claustrophobia of
being trapped with small children:
“With each passing day she felt
more and more desperate to go
out for a walk on her own. Sometimes she wanted to scream like a
lunatic on the street. They’re eating me alive, she would think.”
Enter nanny Louise, whose previous employers describe her as
“like a second mother to my boys”.
A middle-aged, white woman
from the French provinces (Myriam is determined not to hire a
North African nanny, for fear that
“a tacit complicity and familiarity
would grow between her and the
nanny”), Louise has worked as a
carer all her life.
She appears the perfect employee. Indeed, Slimani deliberately invokes Mary Poppins in the
heady early of Louise’s arrival:
she is the sort of nanny who not
only plays involved games with
the children, spinning fairy tales
out of thin air, but also cleans the
house and cooks the whole family
wonderful meals. “My nanny is a
miracle worker,” Myriam thinks.
Terribly, we already know that it’s
not quite as simple as that.
As Myriam relishes her return
to work, Louise embeds herself in
the home. But beneath the sweet
Janus-like Leila Slimani creates a Mary Poppins-esque character whose sweetness hides dark currents AFP/GETTY
front run darker currents. There
are hints of depression, lost children, hidden pasts and the grinding reality of Louise’s precarious
financial situation, which her
employees neither know nor ultimately care about.
It is here that Lullaby is at its
brutal best. Slimani has a keen
eye for the small ways in which
nannies are slighted and ignored,
and is smart, too, about the way
in which we celebrate the notion
of the perfect mother while condemning those, such as Myriam,
who refuse to sublimate themselves in their children’s desires.
Best of all, this is not a simple
“hand that rocks the cradle” horror story. Interestingly, in many
ways the book’s most dislikeable
character is the thoughtless Paul,
who never questions his right to
his career, presuming that someone, whether his wife or nanny,
will pick up the slack, while he
stays out late believing that the life
he had pre-children remains his.
Ultimately, Lullaby’s haunting
power comes from the fact that
Slimani empathises with her
adult characters while refusing to
let any of them off the hook: they
are all in some way complicit in
the children’s terrible deaths. As
an examination of what happens
when privilege, power and poverty intersect so personally, it is
hard to beat.
ALSORELEASED
FIRE ON ALL SIDES
James Rhodes
(Quercus, £16.99)
James Rhodes is a grungy,
erratic concert pianist who wants
to make classical music less
square. He has won a devoted
following for his chatty gigs,
where he sits at a Steinway in
Converse trainers and T-shirts,
interspersing his playing with
anecdotes about how “f**ked up”
Chopin was or how Bach “boned
groupies”. He’s not for the purist,
but the passion he brings to his
music can be electrifying.
However, most days, “I have
an urge to eviscerate myself”,
he writes in the follow-up to his
2014 memoir, Instrumental, in
which he detailed how he was
repeatedly raped by his gym
master at a London prep school
between the ages of six and 10.
His first wife tried to
prevent publication on the
grounds that their son might
be “psychologically harmed”,
by the graphic content but the
injunction was eventually lifted
by the Supreme Court. The
Top5
Books
decision was hailed as a victory
for survivors of abuse.
Here we find Rhodes, now 42,
still exhausted from the trial
and in the process of divorcing
his second wife. The book’s title
is taken from a stage direction
in Don Giovanni, as the Don is
dragged down to Hell – “fire on
all sides; earthquake” – because
it’s a “pretty perfect description
of how I feel about my life
the majority of the time”. He
smokes and goes without food
for large stretches of the day,
before cramming in two postperformance cheeseburgers. He
stockpiles 18 bars of unopened
soap in his bathroom cabinet
for safe measure and instals
encryption software on his
computer in case anyone should
hack into his real thoughts,
because “they’re too disturbing”.
Fire on All Sides is book about
music and mental health, a sort
of depressive journal written
over five months of touring. The
underlying structure comes from
the programme of music he’s
chosen for his gigs.
Shuffling from plane to hotel
room to concert hall and back to
his empty west London flat, he
wonders whether, by talking so
openly about his abuse, he is “a
monkey in some kind of victim
zoo”. But “it’s talk or die”.
Rhodes writes as he plays –
with power and intensity, owning
his flaws. He also swears like
a virtuoso. Less endearing are
his reductive attempts to make
classical music hip. And there’s
something icky about the way he
leers at pretty women, talking
of “hosing” them and doing “fun
things with my wiener”. Gross.
Yet the beginning and end of
the book contain some deeply
stirring accounts of depression.
Rhodes believes that “we are
all, to a greater or lesser extent,
splashing around in the same
paddling pool of crazy”.
Classical music may be his
means of survival, but he begins
to realise that he can’t rely solely
on the piano. “On occasion music
turns the volume up on the
actual feelings I’m experiencing
rather than changing their
direction”. The changes need
to be incremental but ongoing.
“Letting go of things that cause
me pain is a lifelong pursuit,”
he says. EVENING STANDARD
1. Fire and Fury Michael Wolff (Little, Brown)
2. Why We Sleep Matthew Walker (Penguin)
3. Midwinter Break Bernard MacLaverty (Vintage)
4. No Middle Name Lee Child (Bantam)
5. Lose Weight for Good Tom Kerridge (Absolute Press)
Johanna Thomas-Corr
A UNIVERSITY
EDUCATION
David Willetts
(OUP, £25)
This masterly exploration of
the modern higher education
institution, draws on Willetts’
experience as minister for
universities and science in the
Coalition government of 2010-15.
As Willetts observes,
online learning will increase
productivity in higher education,
as well as the number of students
that academics can reach in
real time or through recorded
lectures. Neuroscience and
information capture will also
enable institutions to analyse
what works and what helps
undergraduates to learn.
No less powerful is Willetts’s
analysis of what has gone
wrong in the teaching of 16- to
18-year-olds. He observes that
the pressure on teenagers to
perform flawlessly in A-levels can
make preparation for university
“joyless”, and also forces teens to
limit their options much too soon.
Most books on higher
education policy are dry, but this
is not among them. Willetts has
a pleasingly deep hinterland,
citing the wisdom of Ghostbusters,
the campus novels of Malcolm
Bradbury and Nabokov, and the
postmodern theory of Derrida.
EVENING STANDARD
Matthew D’Ancona
ROBICHEAUX: YOU
KNOW MY NAME
James Lee Burke
(Orion, £19.99)
Dipsomaniac detective Dave
Robicheaux’s second wife is
killed in a car crash. When the
other driver, a drunken lunk, is
found battered to death – while
Robicheaux is on a bender –
the lawman finds himself the
prime suspect. What follows
is a tangled tale of “ignorance,
greed, misogyny, cruelty, sexual
degradation, drug addiction and,
ultimately, collective indifference
toward the fate of people who
have neither power nor voice”.
Mark Sanderson
THREE THINGS
ABOUT ELSIE
Joanna Cannon
(Borough Press, £14.99)
Eighty-four-year-old Florence
has had a fall, and imagines who
will find her as she lays dying.
Florence keeps herself to herself,
apart from her inseparable best
friend Elsie. Then a face from
her distant past returns. But she
can’t put her finger on why, and
his name isn’t right. Can Flo work
through her tangled memories
and recall long-buried secrets
before her time runs out? Light
yet heartbreaking, a joy to read.
Rachel Howdle
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
Goth
girl
IN SEARCH OF MARY SHELLEY
Fiona Sampson
(Profile Books, £18.99)
Review by Barry Forshaw
D
oes Mary Shelley
need rescuing from
n e gl e c t? H a s t h e
young woman who
created the secondmost iconic figure in Gothic literature (after Bram Stoker’s
Dracula) really languished in the
shadow of her husband Percy
Bysshe Shelley, her friend Lord
Byron and her celebrated parents
Mary Wollstonecraft (author of
Vindication of the Rights of Woman)
and William Godwin?
The poet Fiona Sampson, author of this extremely readable
biography, considers that Mary
Shelley has been eclipsed of late,
but it might be argued that the
young woman who created Dr
Frankenstein and his monster
has more of a comprehensive
hold on the popular imagination
than others in her circle of family
and friends, not least for the fact
that she counterintuitively forged
a gruesome horror myth that
continues to inspire imitations.
Sampson, however, clearly thinks
that more attention should be
paid to her heroine, and attacks
A monster calls ‘Frankenstein’ creator Mary Shelley HULTON ARCHIVE
her proselytising task (in the bicentennial of the publication of
Frankenstein) with some panache.
As the daughter of a highachieving mother (one of the
founders of feminism) and a father
famous for his shocking rejection
of orthodox religion and equally
unconventional espousal of free
love, Mary had an iconoclastic
upbringing and possessed the
credentials necessary for success
in the literary field. But Sampson
points out that we know less about
her life after eloping with the poet
Shelley because of the loss of her
journals. And with the paucity of
material describing her inner life,
Sampson (as with earlier biographers of the writer) is obliged to
bring her own imaginative constructions into play.
While the famous ghost story
face-off at Villa Diodati – at which
Byron, the Shelleys and others
attempted to frighten each other
with tales of the macabre – has
been communicated to us by
several of the participants, it’s now
better known via the various film
versions of the gathering. In fact,
for generations of viewers, the face
of Mary Shelley was that of the
English actress Elsa Lanchester,
who played both the writer and
the electric-haired female monster
in James Whale’s film The Bride of
Frankenstein. That cinematic connection, in fact, makes the very
filmic “cutting” between scenes
employed in In Search of Mary Shelley very appropriate.
What Sampson has done is to
try to read the life of her subject
through Mary’s most famous
book, and it’s an approach that
bears fruit. For instance, Sampson notes that Mary was concerned with the fragility of the
human body. She suffered from a
condition of the arm, which at one
point was unnaturally swollen,
and issues of birth (including her
own miscarriages) were often in
her thoughts; not hard to see reflections of Victor Frankenstein’s
connection with both the giving of
life and the distortion of the body.
As for the popular conception
of Mary submerging her own life
in that of her husband, Sampson briskly disposes of this dated
image, pointing up her remarkable
individual achievements while not
ignoring the fact that certain constraints would have been placed on
her as a Victorian woman.
There is already a considerable body of literature concerning
Mary Shelley, so one might not
agree that her star has somewhat
dimmed. But Fiona Sampson’s
study manages to illuminate
her subject in prose that is both
insightful and elegant.
COFFEE
TABLE
CHOICE
ONEMINUTE
WITH…
Rebecca Stott,
author/academic
Where are you now and
what can you see?
I am sitting at one end of a
long table made from a slice of
polished cedar that I had made
for me from the proceeds of my
first book. It doubles as a dining
and writing table and has little
knots of black wood in the grain
that look like fossilised fishes.
What are you currently reading?
A memoir called Educated
by Tara Westover, about a
girl growing up in a Mormon
community in America, isolated
from the rest of the world and
not allowed to attend school. It’s
about how she broke out and
educated herself and ended up
with a Cambridge PhD.
Who is your favourite author
and why do you admire her/him?
I like so many different kinds
of books. But I think at the
moment it is probably George
Eliot, because she creates such
vivid communities of people
all interacting with each other,
and because she is interested in
the ways in which everyone is
connected in webs and networks.
© WILLIAM KLEIN; COURTESY HOWARD GREENBERG GALLERY, NEW YORK
Describe the room where
you usually write…
With its big green cross and shelves stocked with pills, lotions and potions, the pharmacy is not only an urban lifeline but also a frequent subject
for modern art. ‘PhotoRX: Pharmacy in Photography since 1850’ (Damiani, £35) gathers together work inspired by chemists’ shops, by artists
from William Eggleston to Irving Penn, and Damien Hirst to Taryn Simon. Above: William Klein’s ‘Venida and Drug Store, New York, 1955’.
I like writing in cafés and
libraries. I use wax ear plugs so
I can park myself pretty much
anywhere and disappear into
my writing for a few hours. I like
being in the thick of things but in
my own world at the same time.
Which fictional character
most resembles you?
I’d like to think it was a Jane
Austen character but it is
probably Alice in Wonderland.
The world still feels a bit upside
down to me, and I often feel how
strange and kooky everything is.
Who is your hero/heroine
from outside literature?
I am going to cheat and give
more than one – all the women
who blew the whistle on Harvey
Weinstein and the systemic abuse
of power in other institutions last
year. It takes guts to stand up and
“spill the beans”.
‘In the Days of Rain’ by Rebecca
Stott (Fourth Estate, £9.99) won
the 2017 Costa Biography Award
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TI105
NEWS
2-32
Homes & Design
Doing up
the dream
A RENOVATION DIARY
Ben Alden-Falconer
Carry on at your
convenience
– my efforts to
install a loo
Renovation weekends in Margate
have been basic so far: camping
out in the attic room, with one
working kitchen tap to serve
for everything from brushing
teeth to cleaning brushes. And,
somehow, I’ve muddled through
without a toilet.
Now, though, as winter
marches on, I can see my breath
as I curl up in a heavy-duty
sleeping bag that has often
proved too warm for camping
trips. The “conveniences” a few
yards away on the promenade
have closed for the season.
Even the Portaloo at the end
of the beach huts has finally
disappeared – along with most of
the huts themselves.
The house is just about
watertight, but a long way from
draughtproof. The dormer
windows in the top room have
an incredible view of crashing
waves as you look left down the
road, but after facing a century
of gales they now desperately
need repairing. I’ve been forced
to gaffer-tape the rattling panes
in the meantime, partly to stop
them falling out and partly to
stifle the breeze.
The only option for the past
few weeks has been to buy a
coffee nearby just to use the
facilities – not a sustainable
solution. So this week I called
time on the lack of loo, and
bought a basic £70 one from
Wickes to install temporarily.
The existing pedestal is a
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
47
Busted flush: The original
Victorian toilet and brass door
lock will be restored. Below left,
removing the rotting floorboards
Then I hear it;
the sound of water
splashing outside…
it doesn’t bode well
classic, but connected to bulging
lead piping and on the point of
collapsing through the rotten
floor under its own weight. I ask
the builder how hard it would
be to install a temporary loo.
Simple enough, he reckons: get
rid of the crumbling
floorboards, there’s
“plenty of meat in those
joists”, though he is a tad
busy at the moment juggling
several jobs and running a
restaurant! Why don’t we do it
ourselves? Just get a big piece of
structural ply down to take the
weight; easy.
Empowered with these
minimal technical instructions,
I set to work. Sparks fly as the
angle grinder dispenses with
three-inch, Heath-Robinson-
style piping emerging through
the floor from the Victorian
coal-fired boiler below. A junior
hacksaw reaches the parts where
the angle is just too awkward.
A huge sheet of plywood is
cut to size, laid and varnished.
Connecting the toilet itself is
surprisingly simple. Now, the
moment of truth: a first flush to
check for leaks… everything is
perfect. It’s worked! Then I hear
it; the sound of water splashing
outside… it doesn’t bode well.
I flush again, but this time rush
downstairs and out to the alley
in time to see water gushing
from a joint 10 feet up the
ancient cast-iron waste
pipe and pouring down
the side of the house
into the cellar windows.
The pipe is clearly
blocked and useless.
Given the limestone white
stains on the outside wall, it
looks like it has been that way,
unfixed, for years. No more loo
for another week then. Next
weekend I will be removing a
section of the old waste pipe and
trying to unblock it. Now, there’s
something to look forward to!
Follow Ben’s renovation
progress on Instagram
@Margate_renovation_ipaper
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Business
Business Editor Elizabeth Anderson
+4420 7361 5718
business@inews.co.uk
AVIATION
Emirates order worth £11bn
saves Airbus superjumbo
By Simon Calder and Rebecca Jones
The world’s biggest passenger plane
has been saved – at least for now.
Emirates, which already has more
than 100 Airbus A380s, has ordered
20 more, with options for a further 16.
At a ceremony in the airline’s
headquarters in Dubai, Sheikh
Ahmed bin Saeed al Maktoum,
chairman and chief executive of
Emirates, said: “The A380 has been a
success for Emirates. Our customers
love it, and we’ve been able to deploy
it on different missions across our
network, giving us flexibility of range
and passenger mix.”
The deal comes after months of
brinkmanship on both sides. The
A380 picked up no new orders last
year, and this week John Leahy, sales
chief for Airbus, said the production
line might have to be shut down.
French
Airbus
employs 15,000
people across 25
UK sites, spending
£5bn annually
with UK suppliers.
Its shares rose 0.7
per cent to €90.60
The Airbus A380
picked up no new
orders in 2017 AP
This potentially threatened jobs at
Airbus’s UK sites in Broughton and
Filton, where the wings for the Airbus
A380 – along with all other models –
are tested and manufactured. The
A380 also uses engines made by
British aerospace firm Rolls-Royce.
Emirates had been holding out
for guarantees about continuing
production. It has far more A380s
than any other airline, and has built
a huge network largely based on
the plane – including frequent daily
departures from Gatwick, Heathrow,
Birmingham and Manchester to
Dubai, with onward connections
across the globe. But uncertainty
about its secondhand value has
diminished interest in the aircraft
from other airlines.
Mr Leahy said: “This new order
underscores Airbus’s commitment to
produce the A380 at least for another
10 years. I’m personally convinced
more orders will follow Emirates’
example and that this great aircraft
will be built well into the 2030s.”
Airbus president Fabrice Bregier,
believes China is the most promising
market for the A380. He said: “We
need to convince the airlines that
they can increase their market
share and image by buying the
A380 and operating them from big
Chinese hubs.”
But Malcolm Ginsberg, editorin-chief of Business Travel News,
said: “Very few airlines can support
an A380 from an operational and
commercial point of view. But this
deal keeps the line going until Airbus
finds something else.”
Dubai Airport has about 80
SuperJumbo operations a day,
far more than any other airport.
Heathrow is second with around 24
per day. THE INDEPENDENT
RETAIL
Primark
boosts AB
Foods as
sugar slumps
By Josie Cox
Quote of
the day
The 30
Second
Briefing
To attach the
pension scheme
to the riskier part
of the bank seems
shocking. It’s hard
to believe they
had pensioners’
interests in mind
Steve Webb
Former pensions
minister on Barclays’
pension scheme plan
ROYAL MAIL
WORKERS
They’re not calling another
strike, are they?
Not yet. Yesterday the nationwide
postal service announced it is
“making progress” in talks with the
Communication Workers Union
(CWU) over pay and pensions after
it had threatened to strike before the
crucial Christmas season.
What kind of progress?
Moya Greene, the chief executive
of Royal Mail, said: “We have agreed
the fundamental principles on
some of the key issues and talks
are ongoing to finalise these and
other areas.” She added that the
firm believed it could settle on
an “affordable and sustainable”
solution with its employees.
So, can the company afford
to be generous?
Yesterday, the firm said that it saw
a 6 per cent rise in the number
of parcels handled year-on-year
in December while overall group
revenues rose 2 per cent for the
first nine months of 2017. Merrill
Lynch is predicting full-year
profits of £660m.
What does the CWU say?
Nothing new. However, the union
has taken a tough line in the
past, last year labelling Royal
Mail’s approach to pensions
“intellectually boring, morally
sickening and an insult to its
employees”. So they are unlikely to
accept any overly frugal proposals.
When will we hear more?
Typically, no news is good news
in union disputes and Royal Mail
seems to be striking a conciliatory
tone, with Ms Greene praising the
“hard work and dedication of our
people” in manageing to deliver
149 million parcels during the
month of December.
The owner of Primark has posted a
rise in group revenue for the 16 weeks
to 6 January, particularly helped by
a strong performance at the budget
fashion retail chain.
Associated British Foods said that
group revenue for the four-month
period had increased by 4 per cent at
constant currency rates and by 3 per
cent at actual exchange rates.
The firm said sales at Primark
were up by 7 per cent despite growth
being held back across Europe by
unseasonably warm weather in
October. However it added that
trading in the five weeks leading up
to Christmas was “robust” and that
Primark achieved record sales in the
week immediately before Christmas.
Primark has opened several new
stores across Germany in recent
months, as well as one in Charlton,
south-east London, and another
in Portugal. It also returned to the
redeveloped Westgate shopping
centre in Oxford and moved into
a larger store in Rotherham,
South Yorkshire.
Associated British Foods has a
diversified selection of businesses
under its name. Its sugar business
lagged in the four-month period,
with revenue from continuing
operations down 12 per cent at
constant currency rates.
It said that a revenue and profit
reduction greater than previously
forecast is expected for the full year,
largely as a result of “significantly
lower EU sugar prices”, which
adversely affected its UK and
Spanish businesses. THE INDEPENDENT
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
PROPERTY
CURRENCIES
Countrywide plunges as
housing crisis takes its toll
South Korea set
to shut down
cryptocurrency
exchanges
By Radhika Rukmangadhan and
Rebecca Jones
The UK’s largest estate agency,
Countrywide, said it expects an 8.8
per cent decline in full-year group
income after a disappointing fourth
quarter, sending its shares down 18.6
per cent yesterday – more than any
other UK listed company.
The company warned in November
that the market for housing
transactions was challenging and
would be down from 2016.
However, analysts Jefferies said
residential markets were even
more challenging last year than
Countrywide had anticipated.
“The compounding of changes in
external market conditions and the
internal operations have taken their
toll on Countrywide... changes will
take time to flow through to results,”
Jefferies said.
Shares of Countrywide lost
about 32 per cent of their value in
2017 while yesterday’s slide was
their worst single day since Britain’s
vote to leave the European Union
in June 2016.
Countrywide expects full-year
earnings to be £65m, 10 per cent
below Jefferies’ estimate, prompting
the brokerage to cut its price target
daily
money
By Dahee Kim and Cynthia Kim
Countrywide suffered
its worst single day
share price slide since
the Brexit vote GETTY
on the stock to £1.25p from £1.45p.
Income in the UK business is
expected to fall 17 per cent, to £205m,
for the year, with profit from London
expected to drop 10 per cent, the
company said.
In a separate report, the Royal
Chartered Institute of Surveyors
(RICS) found that the Government’s
stamp duty cut for first-time
buyers – announced in November’s
budget – has so far done little to
stimulate demand.
RICS said 86 per cent of surveyors
had reported no increase in firsttime buyer enquiries following the
changes, while 66 per cent did not
expect any pick-up as a result.
would be more than satisfied if we
had spare cash enough for a holiday
abroad, weekends away and day trips.
The majority of respondents said
they would spend extra cash on
friends and family to lift their mood.
can be spent at retailers including
Graze and Hellofresh. The firm says
1,000 verified steps earns 0.95 of a
Sweatcoin. Offers begin at 10 coins.
***
A new poll has revealed that Britons
would be happier if they were paid
just £508 more per month. Far from
lusting after million-pound homes
or fast cars, the research – conducted
by online investment platform
Wealthify – found 75 per cent of us
Outlook
KEN
DALY
Why the
high street can
prosper in 2018
I
t was the Austrian-American
economist Joseph Schumpeter
who argued that change is driven by “perennial gales of creative
destruction”. In modern society,
it is the innovators driving the winds
of change. Major disrupters are tearing through established industries
as innovative thought sparks trans-
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
A new healthy living rewards app,
Sweatcoin, has shot to the top of the
Apple downloads chart in the UK as
British consumers clamour to claim
rewards for getting out of bed.
Sweatcoin monitors your physical
activity through your smartphone or
Apple Watch, then assigns points that
formative processes that scorch what
went before. The retail industry is
no exception.
Throughout all the uncertainty
created by the UK’s vote to leave the
European Union, consumer confidence has remained largely unaffected. The widespread predictions
that bricks-and-mortar retail would
fall by the wayside and even collapse
entirely, have been proved wrong.
While a handful of our big retailers
are struggling to keep up, organisations large and small have shown a
huge capacity for innovation and an
extraordinary resilience. Far from
falling off a cliff, companies that have
embraced flexible business models
remain competitive.
What is clear, however, is that the
old retail model no longer works. We
are part of the change that affects
everything from how we consume
media and order food and taxis to the
way that we interact with each other.
In the past five years, developments
In November the
Government scrapped
stamp duty for first-time buyers
up to £300,000, representing a
potential cost saving of £5,000.
***
Vandalism costs British motorists
a reported £1.9bn per year, with the
average damage costing £661 to
repair per car, a new report from
insurer Churchill has revealed.
Police data showed vandalism,
including cars being keyed, dented,
graffitied and having windows
smashed, increased by 9.5 per cent
between 2016 and 2017.
in technology have changed how we
shop and how retailers sell, as well as
the roles of almost every employee
in the retail industry. The British
Retail Consortium (BRC) estimates
100,000 employees are now in jobs
that didn’t even exist five years ago.
New roles necessarily require new
skills and a large number of these
skills are highly technical, or otherwise require a large degree of digital
and scientific knowledge.
Faar from falling off a
cllifff, companies that have
embraced flexible business
models remain firmly rooted
Schumpeter was right when he
argued that change leads to creative
destruction. The question we are asking now is have we done enough? Retail is responding. We are innovating
constantly and the gales of creative
destruction have blown in new and
exciting possibilities. Omnichannel
S o u t h Ko r e a n p o l i c y m a ke rs
have joined the global chorus of
virtual-coin critics, saying Seoul is
considering shutting down domestic
virtual currency exchanges because
the new market exposes users to a
financial risks and crime.
Seoul’s tough stance comes
as policymakers from countries
including the United States and
Germany struggle to come up with
stricter regulation against money
laundering and other crimes.
Responding to questions in
parliament, South Korea’s head of the
Financial Services Commission said:
“[The government] is considering
either shutting down all
local virtual currency
exchanges or just
the ones which
have broken
The percentage
the law.”
that bitcoin – the
S e p a ra t e l y,
most popular
Bank of Korea
cryptocurrency
Governor Lee Ju– soared by
yeol told a news
in 2017
co n fe re n ce t h at
“cryptocurrency is not
a legal currency and isn’t being used
as such”.
Regulators around the world
are still debating how to address
risks posed by cryptocurrencies,
as bitcoin, the most popular
virtual currency, soared more than
1,700 per cent last year.
South Korea’s justice minister Park
Sang-ki said a bill was being prepared
to ban cryptocurrency trading,
which sparked strong reaction from
thousands of South Koreans who
signed a petition on the presidential
Blue House website to stop a ban.
The move also sent cryptocurrency
prices into turmoil, with the value
of bitcoin and ethereum – the two
largest cryptocurrencies – down
between around 15 and 16 per cent
since last Friday. REUTERS
1,700
offerings benefit both the online-only
and the omnichannel retail outlets as
digital has become critical to the customer journey. In the luxury market,
more than 70 per cent of purchases
now originate online.
Instead of dwelling on the doom
and gloom, or lamenting the changes
in the political and commercial landscape, we in the retail sector must remain optimistic and always mindful
of the customers we serve. If the sector is pessimistic, then we will only
guarantee a worst-case scenario.
We will do what all great companies and innovators have historically
done: see the opportunity in difficulty.
Already retail has moved quickly and
started to adapt. Already, many of us
have embraced change. It’s because
of our positive and flexible collective
mindset that I am hugely optimistic
for 2018.
Ken Daly is chief executive of online
retailer JML Direct
49
From the
business
pages
Posti haste to get a
delivery partner
Daily Finland
The national postal and
logistic services operator Posti
has floated a tender for mail
delivery services. Through this
tender, Posti is going to initiate
its first sourcing procedure for
the five-day delivery of letters in
the areas that are not covered
by its early-morning newspaper
delivery service. In Posti’s
view, increased co-operation in
sparsely populated areas will be
extremely positive.
Japan to increase
mineral imports
One Papua New Guinea
Japanese investments and
imports of Papua New Guinean
petroleum, mineral and
renewable resources were
set to increase. According to
Japan’s Ambassador to PNG
Satoshi Nakajima, the interest
in PNG imports and investment
by Japanese companies will
grow as the country continues
to advance its economy and
resource base.
Promise of better
banking for poor
Swazi Observer
Swaziland Prime Minister Dr
Barnabas Sibusiso Dlamini
has announced that the Micro
Finance Unit will be renamed
the Centre for Financial
Inclusion. Dr Dlamini said plans
include growing mobile money,
increasing the reach of banks,
ensuring risk management
products are available and
creating alternative channels to
serve the poor.
Unions split over
workers’ rights fears
Toronto Star
Unifor, Canada’s largest
private-sector union, is
splitting with the Canadian
Labour Congress (CLC). Unifor
national president Jerry Dias
and Quebec director Renaud
Gagné said the ClC had not been
supportive of their concerns
about US unions “trampling
on the rights” of workers.
Unifor said its board voted
unanimously on Tuesday to
discontinue its membership in
the CLC, effective immediately.
50
BUSINESS
NEWS
2-32
The
Business
Matrix
The day at
a glance
FTSE 100 down 24.5 at 7,701.0
Low
678.0
1680.0
950.1
11.1
2335.0
1476.0
4136.5
467.3
533.5
177.3
6.3
1103.0
436.9
4064.0
2774.0
574.6
242.2
1999.2
1543.0
4102.0
119.7
1782.0
1424.8
27.0
3300.3
6000.0
2137.5
328.4
906.4
169.8
1428.0
1231.0
241.7
3.0
270.0
1270.0
912.5
Company
Price
Chg
High
Hammerson
Hargrve Lans
HSBC Hldgs
IAG
Imperial Brands
Informa
IntCont Htls
Intertek
ITV
Johnson Matth
Just Eat
Kingfisher
Land Secs
Legal & Gen
Lloyds Bk Gp
Lon Stock Ex
Marks&Spen
Mediclinic Intl
Micro Focus Intl
Mondi
Morrison (Wm)
National Grid
Next
NMC Health
Old Mutual
PaddyPwrBetfair
Pearson
Persimmon
Prudential
Randgold Res
Reckitt Ben
RELX
Rentokil Initial
Rio Tinto
Rolls-Royce
RBS
Shell A
500.6
1919.5
788.3
647.8
3017.5
710.6
4804.0
5224.0
165.4
3255.0
795.0
344.0
993.0
277.4
70.9
3695.0
306.2
606.2
2158.0
1939.0
228.8
830.6
4980.0
3198.0
236.5
8410.0
679.2
2621.0
1979.5
7076.0
6793.0
1623.5
308.8
4009.5
883.4
297.3
2520.0
-8.6
+79.5
-4.5
-0.2
-55.0
+5.6
-11.0
-38.0
+0.1
+33.0
-8.0
+1.6
-12.6
+0.9
+0.5
+6.0
-1.2
-12.8
-17.0
+27.5
-0.1
-13.0
-22.0
+46.0
+1.7
+50.0
-5.8
+11.0
+2.0
-158.0
-7.0
-16.5
-1.2
+5.0
-16.6
+2.5
-3.5
52338.0
1927.5
798.6
680.6
3956.5
773.0
4848.0
5470.0
221.8
3511.0
827.0
369.8
1217.1
279.9
73.6
4069.0
397.8
890.2
2970.5
2145.0
254.4
1174.3
5355.0
3216.0
236.5
8967.0
773.0
2901.0
1985.1
8255.0
8110.4
1784.0
338.8
4226.6
994.5
303.0
2579.5
20665.0
FTSE All Share
4227.9
-104.3
-14.5
FTSE Eurofirst300
1568.0
Dow Jones *
26015.1
+3.3
S&P 500 *
2798.6
-4.0
Nasdaq *
7301.7
+3.4
DAX
13281.4
CAC 40
5494.8
Hang Seng
32121.9
+138.5
Nikkei
23763.4
-105.0
-100.5
+97.5
$1.3890
FTSE 250
-24.5
EURO/
POUND
DOLLAR/
POUND
+ 0.38¢
7701.0
€1.1343
Markets
FTSE 100
Low
493.1
1258.0
518.2
472.5
2986.5
480.0
3656.0
3383.0
142.8
2681.0
495.1
285.3
912.0
231.6
61.8
2937.0
296.3
495.4
26.8
1684.0
205.0
828.0
3565.0
1573.0
184.2
6572.5
552.0
1884.0
1524.0
6320.0
6299.0
1397.0
216.7
2882.5
658.5
214.8
1982.5
Company
Price
Chg
High
Shell B
RSA Insur
Sage
Sainsbury(J)
Schroders
Scot Mort Inv Tst
Segro
Severn Trent
Shire
Sky
Smith&Neph
Smith (DS)
Smiths Gp
Smurfit Kappa Grp
SSE
Stan Chart
Standard Life Aber
St James Place
Taylor Wimpey
Tesco
TUI AG
Unilever
United Utilities
Vodafone
Whitbread
Ferguson
WPP
2569.5
624.2
809.6
257.7
3705.0
466.0
576.0
2021.0
3452.5
1000.0
1230.5
514.6
1670.5
2566.0
1300.0
819.0
438.2
1256.5
196.7
209.7
1603.0
4020.0
771.2
226.0
3988.0
5624.0
1373.0
+1.0
+0.4
+8.0
+0.9
+30.0
+2.4
-2.8
-1.0
-47.5
-5.0
-16.5
+2.4
-14.5
-14.0
-42.0
-0.5
+4.2
+4.0
—
-2.3
+3.0
—
-3.0
-1.6
+133.0
-66.0
+9.5
2617.0
672.5
820.0
339.9
3705.0
471.8
590.8
2575.0
5067.0
1028.5
1442.0
565.0
1697.0
2604.0
1570.0
860.0
448.6
1263.0
211.9
217.1
1607.5
4557.5
1078.0
239.7
4333.0
5722.0
1928.1
Low
2037.0
556.2
595.0
222.4
2885.0
320.0
431.0
2002.0
3403.5
11.4
1143.0
5.3
1442.0
1712.7
1273.0
678.8
336.5
1008.0
164.6
165.3
934.4
3173.5
759.6
186.5
3499.9
4427.0
1238.5
For enquiries call +44 (0)20 7825 8300
+ $0.05
975.0
2184.0
1794.2
1071.0
3387.0
2168.0
5520.0
570.5
682.5
244.4
705.5
1662.4
536.2
5643.6
4270.0
695.0
387.4
2472.0
2024.0
5435.0
236.5
2682.0
1765.9
2955.0
4571.0
7762.5
2735.5
411.3
1551.0
390.3
1708.0
1746.0
342.6
449.5
413.0
1724.5
1341.0
$69.36
High
-8.6
-1.0
+5.8
-6.1
-102.0
-12.0
-10.0
+5.2
-6.0
+0.8
+3.2
-11.2
+0.2
-53.0
+20.0
-6.2
-2.0
-33.0
-30.5
-8.0
-1.4
+52.0
-16.5
-37.0
+17.0
+40.0
+1.0
+1.1
-2.0
+15.3
-16.5
-15.0
—
-2.6
+0.2
-6.0
+8.0
$1,330.1
Chg
941.4
1875.5
1760.8
998.4
2755.0
2134.0
4980.5
532.2
586.2
199.3
613.0
1595.8
516.5
4950.0
4149.0
679.2
267.0
2027.0
1588.5
4942.0
141.0
2412.0
1509.5
2624.0
4450.0
7635.0
2619.0
373.3
1513.0
388.4
1645.5
1375.0
288.0
445.0
407.2
1353.2
1315.0
– $4.12
Price
3i Group
Admiral
Anglo Amer
Antofagasta
AB Foods
Ashtead Group
AstraZeneca
Aviva
BAE Systems
Barclays
Barratt Dev
BHP Billiton
BP
BAT
Berkeley Grp Hldgs
British Land
BT
Bunzl
Burberry
Carnival
Centrica
Coca-Cola HBC
Compass
CRH
Croda Intl
DCC
Diageo
Direct Line Ins
Easyjet
Evraz
Experian
Fresnillo
G4S
GKN
Glencore
GSK
Halma
+ 0.62¢
Company
+0.8
GOLD
Per troy ounce,
London pm fix
OIL
Brent crude,
per barrel
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
TELECOMS
PROPERTY
CityFibre’s £40m
broadband plan
Money laundering
crackdown
Fibre broadband provider
CityFibre says it will invest
around £40m in building its
new gigabit-capable home-fibre
network in Milton Keynes, the
first roll-out in a plan to connect
around 12 cities and one million
premises with fast broadband
marketed by Vodafone. The two
announced their partnership in
November.
The Government will introduce
a public register that will compel
foreign companies that own
or buy property in the UK to
disclose their ultimate owners
in a bid to crack down on money
laundering. Since 2004, criminal
investigations have been
launched into more than £180m
of property suspected of being
linked to corruption.
M&A
RETAIL
Whitbread faces
Costa pressure
Kardashian boost
for Superdrug
Whitbread is facing pressure
from an activist investor to sell
its Costa Coffee brand as the
firm announced weak sales
in the run-up to Christmas.
Whitbread CEO Alison Brittain
said the board “remain entirely
open minded”. Shares were up
3.5 per cent to £39.88p yesterday.
Strong demand for beauty
advent calendars helped
Superdrug to notch up a 2.4 per
cent rise in sales over the four
weeks to 30 December, while
online sales surged 30 per cent.
Best-sellers included setting
spray make-up, for the “Kim
Kardashian look”.
CONSUMER
CONSTRUCTION
Nestlé introduces
a ‘ruby’ KitKat
Housebuilding
degree launched
Nestlé will launch a “ruby
chocolate” version of the KitKat
bar in Japan and South Korea
this month, becoming the first
consumer brand to market the
new chocolate variety. It said
the new bar “has a fresh berryfruity taste and characteristic
colour”. Ruby chocolate is made
from the ruby cocoa bean and
has no berry flavour added.
Redrow is launching the UK’s
first housebuilding degree as
part of its efforts to help tackle
the growing skills shortage
faced by the construction
industry. The first students
will start in September. The
programme is currently only
open to employees, but it
hopes to open out to other
housebuilders in the future.
WASTE
ECONOMY
Leon scraps
plastic straws
Campaign group’s
sustainable plan
Healthy fast-food retailer Leon
has become the latest to scrap
plastic straws in favour of paper
versions, while it is also making
all of its disposable cutlery
biodegradable. Company CEO
John Vincent said it will also
look to reduce its red meat
menu and expand its already
top-selling vegan offerings.
Campaign group Positive
Money has launched a report
into sustainable economic
growth. Criticising the pursuit
of limitless growth at the cost
of environmental destruction
and inequality, it recommends
reforms which could allow
governments to transition to
more sustainable models.
the
markets
The UK’s premier FTSE 100 index
racked up another day of losses
yesterday, with the index falling
0.3 per cent to 7,700 points. The
day’s loser was AB Foods, as the
company warned rising sugar
prices would hit profits this year.
The winner was online investment
platform Hargreaves Lansdown,
reflecting a wider rally in financial
stocks. Countrywide led losses in
the FTSE Small-Cap index, while
Stock Spirits had the best day.
***
The pound, in contrast, had
another strong session, rising 0.45
per cent against the dollar and a
marginal 0.07 per cent on the euro.
Own the brand new 2018 UK Gold
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Games&Puzzles
daily recipe
Chicken and mushroom risotto
Kakuro
Zygolex® In i every day
How to play Fill the white squares so that the total in each
across or down run of cells matches the total at the start
of that run. You must use the numbers from 1-9 only and
cannot repeat a number in a run. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Find the missing words by following the RHYME, LETTERS and MEANING links
– eg, a word that rhymes with ‘cheek’, has one letter different from ‘pear’ and
has the same meaning as mountain, would be ‘peak’. Full rules at zygolex.com.
Solution, page 57
RHYME LETTERS
19
PROHIBIT
10
20
18
24
11
7
4
23
MILAN
G
28
IN
LL
BLOCK
3
SCORCH
6
34
9
4
FI
3
CHAP
10
24
4
17
10
15
13
3
9
2
6 3
1 7
8
4
BLAB
4
9
2
5 1
2
7
How to play Each row, column and 3 by 3 box must contain
each number (1 to 9) only once. The sum of all numbers
contained in a dotted area must match the number printed
in its top-left corner. No number can appear more than
once in a dotted area. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
16
13
12
7
10
14
7
12
11
7
4
11
12
2
10
11
14
0
1
1
5
18
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2 4
10
2
5
1
1
1
2 1
2
2
1
1
1 2
1
1
2
0
1 2
13
10
<
2 <
∧
∨
1
1
2 1
6
16
4
2
0
18
17
17
16
∧
∧
How to play Find all the mines in the grid. Numbers in certain squares indicate how
many mines there are in the neighbouring squares, including diagonally touching
squares. Mines cannot be placed in squares with numbers. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
0
7
>
>
<
2
∨
Minesweeper
16
7
MEANING
< 4
∨
Killer Sudoku No 1189
UTTER
LETTERS
>
Futoshiki
How to play
Place the numbers
from 1-5 exactly
once in each row
and column. The
greater than and
less than signs
(‘>’ and ‘<’) indicate
where one cell is
greater/less than
the adjacent
cell indicated.
Solution:
minurl.co.uk/i
WREAK
CLIQUE
RHYME
6
12
5
JAW
15
RUIN
5
3
How to play Place the numbers 1-9 once in each row, column
and bold-lined jigsaw region. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
9
5
4
Jigsawdoku
1
3
4
SUPPORT
SHOP
✂
BUT
3
3
6
17
18
3
12
SERVES 4
In tomorrow’s iWeekend
Tom Kerridge
MUTE
4
7
9
Recipe from waitrose.com
4
28
17
Porcini mushrooms, with their earthy,
meaty flavour, make the perfect pairing
with tender chicken in this easy and
filling midweek meal.
Soak the mushrooms in hot water for
10 minutes, then drain. Meanwhile, heat
one tablespoon of the oil in a large, wide
saucepan over a medium heat, then add
the chicken and fry for about four to five
minutes until cooked through, with no
pink meat. Remove from the pan and set
aside. Add the remaining oil to the pan,
then add the shallots and fry for one to
two minutes until softened and just
beginning to colour.
Stir the stock pots into one litre of
boiling water. Add the garlic, thyme and
risotto rice to the pan and stir well for a
further minute, until the oil has coated
the grains of rice. Pour in the wine and
allow to bubble, then add a ladleful of the
stock. Reduce the heat and simmer for
10 minutes, continuing to add ladlefuls
of stock. Stir and allow each one to be
absorbed before adding another.
Add the mushrooms and cooked
chicken to the pan, and simmer for a
further six to eight minutes, stirring
and continuing to add extra stock as
necessary. When the risotto is creamy
and the rice is tender with a slight bite,
take the pan off the heat and stir in the
butter and cheese. Serve topped with a
little extra cheese and a good grinding of
black pepper. To really push the boat out,
top each portion with a little drizzle of
truffle oil and a handful of wild rocket.
CLOY
10
12
12
30g porcini mushrooms
2 tbsp olive oil
350g chicken breast mini fillets, halved
2 echalion shallots, very finely chopped
2 x 28g chicken stock pots
1 clove garlic, crushed
2 sprigs thyme, leaves picked
250g risotto rice
150ml dry white wine
Small knob of butter
50g Grana Padano or Parmigiano
Reggiano, grated, plus extra to serve
MEANING
14
2 3
2
3
3 4
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
4
2
3
2
1
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
40-41
Maths Puzzle
Codeword No 1910
How to play Fill the empty squares with
numbers that will make the across and
down calculations produce the results
shown in the grey squares. Each numeral
from 1 to 9 must only appear once. The
calculations should be performed from
left to right and top to bottom, rather than
in strict mathematical order.
How to play The numbers in the grid correspond to the letters of the alphabet.
Solve the puzzle and fill in the letters in the key as you discover them.
Three letters are provided to give you a start. The solution will be printed in
tomorrow’s paper, the solution to yesterday’s codeword is on page 57.
-
-
x
÷
+
-
-
1
-12
7
1
-1
-1
18
+
+
+
÷
78
+
x
28
+
6
8
2
1
4
11
19
1
7
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23
19
19
3
3
8
13
8
26
3
17
9
15
25
11
1
5
14
3
3
25
18
22
15
17
11
11
2
1
18
18
24
20
15
8
4
1
1
15
16
5
17
18
15
12
17
1
4
14
17
15
14
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14
20
20
8
14
15
21
18
3
3
3
25
14
20
19
19
2
8
19
26
15
16
1
8
3
18
3
17
18
14
Word
Ladder
15
16
3
25
14
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
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24
25
26
W
COOT
GODS
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
28
9
DOWN
1 Gift by will (6)
2 Colour (6)
3 London flood
defence (6,7)
4 Misery (3)
5 Dried grape (6)
6 Gruesome (8)
7 Heat-resistant
glass (5)
11 Highest point (8)
13 Stringed
instrument (5)
14 Overused
expression (6)
15 Posture (6)
16 Stretch (6)
20 Toothed
fastener (3)
1
2
3
ALL NEW CODEWORDS!
The i Book of Codewords
Featuring 100 brand new
codewords.
Available on Amazon
for £4.99.
See inews.co.uk/codeword
Other i books include:
Mixed Puzzles Vol 2 (inews.co.uk/puzzle2),
Crosswords (inews.co.uk/crossword)
and Sudokus (inews.co.uk/sudoku)
5
6
8
7
9
10
11
YAWN
13
14
15
18
19
20
22
Maths Puzzle,
Word Ladder, Word
Wheel, Kakuro,
Minesweeper,
ABC Logic, Killer
Sudoku, Futoshiki,
Codeword,
Jigsawduko and
Wijuko created by
Clarity Media.
For more
puzzles,
see clarity-media.
co.uk
12
17
Stuck on the concise crossword?
For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3590.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble
accessing this number, please call our helpdesk
on 0333 202 3390.
4
21
23
Solution to yesterday’s Concise Crossword
ACROSS 1 While, 4 Dyed (Wild-eyed), 9 Nicks, 10 Ethical, 11 Eminent, 12 Attic,
13 Weather report, 16 Ibsen, 18 Lawless, 20 Embargo, 21 Grace, 22 Suet, 23 Lingo.
DOWN 1 Wichita, 2 Issue, 3 Electoral roll, 5 Yacht, 6 Delicatessen, 7 Underwriters,
8 Phrase, 14 Hungry, 15 Oregano, 17 Sabre, 19 Wagon.
Today’s other puzzles Cryptic Crossword, page 24;
Five-Clue Cryptic, page 11; One-Minute Wijuko, page 23
Puzzle solutions See page 57 and minurl.co.uk/i
How to play Each numeral from 1 to 9 must
appear (once only) in the squares forming the
red letter i. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
4
5 2
3 7
4
2
6
6 7
2
5
9
2
9
7 3
8
9
5
6 2
4 6
5
1 2 3
9
6
6 8
4
7
6
3 5
7
5
8 7 9
3
9
1 4
8
2
5
16
1
6 1
5
7 3 2
Monday: Harder
Concise Crossword No 2232
ACROSS
1 Place (3)
3 Tall structures (6)
8 US ravine (5)
9 Useful facility (7)
10 Feeling of
emotional
settlement (7)
11 Group of lions (5)
12 Large group of jazz
musicians (3,4)
17 Muslim name for
God (5)
18 Vehicle excise
duty (4,3)
19 Whirlpool bath (7)
21 Jousting weapon (5)
22 Condiment (6)
23 Conclusion (3)
idoku Exclusive to i
D
Need a little help getting started? Then call for up to four extra clue letters on
0901 292 5204. Calls cost £1 plus your telephone company’s network access charge
(if you are having trouble with the phone service, call the helpline: 0333 202 3390).
Or text THEI CLUE to 85100 to receive your clues. Texts cost £1 plus your
standard network charge (if you are having trouble with the text service, call the
helpline: 0333 335 3351). Clues change each day at midnight.
53
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
Sudoku Easier
8
2
K
REAR
5
16
26
How to play
Convert the word
at the top of the
ladder into the
word at the bottom
of it, using only
the four rungs
in between. On
each rung, you
must put a valid
four-letter word
that is identical
to the word above
it, apart from a
one-letter change.
There may be more
than one way of
achieving this.
3
1
x
1
11
6
x
3
14
10
19
8
15
Harder
+
3
3
+
-
12
1
16
Easier
1
11
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
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ABC Logic
How to play Place the letters
A, B and C exactly once in each row and
column. Each row and column has two
blank cells. The letters at the edge of a row/
column indicate which of the letters is the
first/last to appear in that row/column.
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
C
C
A
B
C
A
C
A
B
C
B
A
A
Word Wheel
This is an open-ended puzzle. How many
words of three or more letters, each
including the letter at centre of the wheel,
can you make from this diagram? We’ve
found 15, including one nine-letter word.
Can you do better?
P
F
R
R
E
D
R
E
E
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56
SPORT
i racing
top
tips
Lingfield sprint
prepares Guest
for California
By Jon Freeman
RACING EDITOR
Richard Guest, exhausted but beaming blissfully, caked in Aintree mud,
is one of jump racing’s most memorable images. He had just won the
2001 Grand National aboard Red
Marauder, one of only two horses to
complete the course without mishap
in desperately testing conditions.
These days Guest is established
as a trainer of considerably faster
horses than his old plodding pal and
he’s now looking forward to another
big day in rather better weather as
he primes Udontdodou for an ambitious tilt at a $200,000 contest at
Santa Anita early next month.
Udontdodou (pronounced youdon’t-do-do-you) has developed into
a smart sprinter these past nine
months, hurtling up the ratings with
four wins, all at Chelmsford.
Guest thinks there is more still to
come, which there will need to be if
he is to defy his new mark of 102 in
today’s Betway Sprint Handicap at
Lingfield and then succeed in his
California quest.
BEST OF CHEPSTOW
2.10
DAILY RACING SPECIALS AT 188BET NOVICES’ CHASE
(CLASS 3) £12,700 added 3m
1
-32212 RAMSES DE TEILLEE (CD)(BF) D Pipe 6 11 4...................................
........................................................................................................................T Scudamore T
110-F2 IMPULSIVE STAR (D)(BF) N Mulholland 8 10 12.........................
...............................................................................................Mr S Waley-Cohen (3) C
3 55PP33 SUSSEX ROAD A Sadik 8 10 12.......................................L Edwards C
4
5-4592 RONS DREAM (D) P Bowen 8 10 5.............................Sean Bowen
- 4 declared BETTING: 6-4 Impulsive Star, 7-4 Rons Dream, 5-2 Ramses De Teillee,
25-1 Sussex Road.
2
2.45
IN PLAY BETTING AT 188BET MARES’ HANDICAP
HURDLE (CLASS 3) £11,000 added 2m 3f 100yds
12-063
10-1F3
346-31
2-2442
56P-UP
4-4122
CARNSPINDLE W Greatrex 6 11 12 ......................T Greatrex (7)
SKEWIFF E Williams 6 11 5...........................................M Bastyan (5)
NARANJA (D) J Snowden 6 11 0......................................... G Sheehan
LERICHI BELLE M Keighley 7 10 8 .............................R Johnson H
DRUMVIREDY Miss V Williams 9 10 8...............C Deutsch (3)
DAYTIME AHEAD R Hodges 7 10 8.............................N Scholfield
- 6 declared BETTING: 11-4 Naranja, 7-2 Skewiff, 4-1 Lerichi Belle, 9-2 Daytime Ahead,
5-1 Carnspindle, 10-1 Drumviredy.
FORM VERDICT
Handicap debutant SKEWIFF shades the verdict in a competitive event.
The six-year-old mare was only one and a quarter lengths behind
subsequent easy winner Majestic Moll when third in novice company
at Ludlow (fourth has also won since) and she potentially looks a fair bit
better than this opening mark of 117. Lingfield maiden scorer Naranja
and the lightly weighted Daytime Ahead are also expected to go well.
3.20
1
2
3
4
5
6
49-F23
-804P4
/1-356
P-9P11
5561-7
5P2-U8
PLAY ROULETTE AT 188BET HANDICAP CHASE (CLASS
4) £8,511 added 3m
BACK TO THE THATCH H Daly 6 11 12....................... R Johnson
CATCHING ON (D) Jonjo O’Neill 10 11 11...... Jonjo O’Neill (7) T
ALBEROBELLO (CD) Nicky Martin 10 11 8 ......M Griffiths T
GREYED A Dr R Newland 7 11 7(7ex)........ S Twiston-Davies
KINGSTON A Carroll 9 11 5......................................................L Edwards
PINE WARBLER Stuart Edmunds 9 11 5 ..............................................
.................................................................................................................C Gethings (3) C,T
NEXT BEST
Udontdodou
(2.30pm, Lingfield)
Richard Guest’s most
progressive sprinter, who could
be on his way to bigger and
better things.
Udontdodou (right) will run a $200,000 race at Santa Anita next month GETTY
Also US-bound soon is Toast Of
New York following his remarkable
winning return to action at Lingfield
after spending the best part of three
years not doing much at all, apart
from covering the occasional mare.
He’s been to America before, of
course, famously beaten by a nose
in the 2014 Breeders’ Cup Classic
at Santa Anita, but now the target
is the richest race on the planet: the
7
4-739P UMBERTO D’OLIVATE (C)(D) R Walford 10 11 3 ..........................
...................................................................................................................................James Best
221252 PADDY THE OSCAR (CD) Grace Harris 15 11 1.....C Ring (3)
-246P4 ONLY GORGEOUS (D) Mrs S Gardner 9 11 1 .....................................
...................................................................................................................Lucy Gardner (3)
10 3F-P45 WOOD YER (CD) N Twiston-Davies 12 10 12.....................................
......................................................................................................................... J Bargary (3) V
11 P-6923 ASTIGOS Lady S Brooke 11 10 0.....................Miss L Brooke (7)
- 11 declared BETTING: 15-8 Greyed A, 5-1 Back To The Thatch, 6-1 Paddy The Oscar,
8-1 Kingston, 10-1 Alberobello, 12-1 Wood Yer, Astigos, 14-1 Catching
On, 16-1 others.
8
9
BEST OF LINGFIELD
FORM VERDICT
Ramses De Teillee was an easy winner of a novice handicap chase over
C&D back in November. He was then far from disgraced when chasing
home a subsequent graded winner from 15lb higher in the ratings on
his sole subsequent start. That said, the six-year-old may struggle to
give 6lb to IMPULSIVE STAR, despite the fact the latter has yet to hit
top form over fences. The Neil Mullholland-trained eight-year-old was
a highly progressive hurdler last season (was sent off as favourite for
the Pertemps Final) and the first-time cheekpieces may bring about
some improvement in him. Rons Dream is the clear next best, while
Sussex Road is massively out of his depth.
1
2
3
4
5
6
BEST BET
Carnspindle
(2.45pm, Chepstow)
Running back into her best form;
the trip and ground are ideal.
2.00
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
712687781-1
28677/
3541-5
098127341-5
3680536444-
2.30
BETWAY SPRINT HANDICAP (CLASS 2) £19,000 added
6f
502027131-1
706960038-7
660879062-3
9221-5
KACHY (BF) T Dascombe 5 9 7....................................R Kingscote 9
UDONTDODOU (D) R C Guest 5 9 4 ..........................R Winston 3
MAGNUS MAXIMUS (D) R Brisland 7 8 12......Martin Harley 5
CERTIFICATE (C) C Dore 7 8 11................Nicola Currie (5) C 7
ZAC BROWN (CD) C Wallis 7 8 8...............................W Carson T 8
KASBAH (CD) Mrs A Perrett 6 8 7.............................. J Haynes V 1
HUMAN NATURE (C)(D)(BF) S C Williams 5 8 6..........................
...............................................................................................................Milly Naseb (7) T 2
8
83261- SHOW STEALER (CD) R Guest 5 8 4.......................M Dwyer C 6
9
4652-1 SHAMSAYA (D) S Crisford 4 8 2.......................................F Norton 4
- 9 declared BETTING: 3-1 Udontdodou, 10-3 Kachy, 5-1 Show Stealer, 11-2 Kasbah,
7-1 Shamsaya, 8-1 Human Nature, 16-1 Zac Brown, 20-1 Magnus
Maximus, 25-1 Certificate.
FORM VERDICT
Distance winner UDONTDODOU showed no ill effects of an absence
when making a winning return at Chelmsford 15 days ago - his
first outing since September. Richard Guest’s speedster is arguably
bordering on Listed class and should remain competitive now returned
to 6f. Kachy has the ability needed to make an impact in this grade but,
like smart front-runner Magnus Maximus, he is returning from a short
break. Perhaps last year’s winner Kasbah could build on a near miss off
this mark over C&D latest and emerge as the principal threat.
32RED.COM NOVICE STAKES (CLASS 5) 3YO £5,800
added 1m 2f
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
31-2 NATIVE APPEAL (BF) C Appleby 9 9........T Marquand C,T 1
CROSS SWORDS J Tate 9 2 ........................................Oisin Murphy 3
00- ICONIC BOY D Elsworth 9 2 ..........................................Hollie Doyle 6
9- MOOD FOR MISCHIEF Ed Walker 9 2...........................L Keniry 4
64- ROUNDABOUT KITTEN D Lanigan 9 2.................. S Donohoe 8
63-3 SHAKOUR J Gosden 9 2............................................................R Havlin T 2
76- TTMAB M Tompkins 9 2..............................................................J Haynes 5
7040-8 TEARDROP ISLAND P Evans 8 11 ..................M Cosham (3) V 7
- 8 declared BETTING: 5-4 Native Appeal, 9-4 Shakour, 7-1 Cross Swords, 8-1
Roundabout Kitten, 12-1 Teardrop Island, 25-1 Mood For Mischief, Iconic
Boy, 50-1 Ttmab.
BETWAY HANDICAP (CLASS 5) £7,021 added 1m 2f
JUMPING JACK C Gordon 4 9 9..........................................C Bishop 4
MISS MINUTY (CD) J Scott 6 9 8.................Jason Watson (7) 8
CAYUGA (CD) B Johnson 9 9 6 .............................C Shepherd (3) 6
COLOURFUL CAREER (CD) E Dunlop 4 9 3...........R Havlin 5
MUSIC MAJOR (CD) M Attwater 5 9 3.........Martin Harley 1
BAYSTON HILL (CD) M Usher 4 9 2..........Nicola Currie (5) 7
BUCKLAND BEAU (D) C Fellowes 7 9 1 ................S Donohoe 2
NATIVE FIGHTER (D) S Dow 4 9 0....................Oisin Murphy 3
- 8 declared BETTING: 9-4 Miss Minuty, 4-1 Music Major, 9-2 Colourful Career, 6-1
Bayston Hill, 8-1 Jumping Jack, 12-1 Native Fighter, Buckland Beau,
14-1 Cayuga.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
3.40
Pegasus World Cup ($1m to enter, a
$16m purse, $7m to the winner) at
Gulfstream Park, Florida, tomorrow
week.
Trainer Jamie Osborne
recognises the enormity of the task
facing the seven-year-old against
a high-class field that includes the
most recent Breeders’ Cup winner,
Gun Runner. So do the bookies, who
price him at 20-1.
BEST OF MUSSELBURGH
12.40
GERRY’S 50TH HANDICAP HURDLE (CLASS 4) £7,749
added 2m 3f
1
1P3-23 ALIZEE DE JANEIRO (CD) Miss L Russell 8 12 1...........................
.................................................................................................................... B Campbell (5) C
2
713-25 SPECTATOR T Vaughan 7 11 12...................................................A Johns
3 0-P5P4 GLINGERSIDE R M Smith 7 11 9........................................... H Brooke
4
7-9536 RED OCHRE C Grant 5 11 5.................................................C Bewley (3)
5
32 HAULANI B Ellison 4 11 1....................................................................D Cook
6
F-348 ROYAL MANDATE Rebecca Menzies 6 11 0..............T Kelly C
7
9-8979 PERMISSION GRANTED Mrs R Dobbin 6 10 12............................
................................................................................................................................Craig Nichol
8
721-11 MORNING WITH IVAN (C) S Corbett 8 10 12......J Corbett (5) T
9 060000 OROMO K Thornton (IRE) 5 10 7...................................A E Lynch T
- 9 declared BETTING: 11-4 Spectator, 7-2 Haulani, 5-1 Morning With Ivan, Alizee De
Janeiro, 10-1 Glingerside, 12-1 Oromo, 14-1 Royal Mandate, Red Ochre,
16-1 Permission Granted.
1.15
1
2
3
4
5
6
GERRY MCGLADERY 50TH BIRTHDAY HANDICAP
CHASE (CLASS 5) £7,463 added 3m
46-576
545-42
2-0711
-4P162
462742
VP22F1
SO SATISFIED (C) I Jardine 7 11 12 ........Ross Chapman (5) C
MISFITS (D) Miss L Russell 7 11 7................................Derek Fox T
ATTENTION PLEASE Mrs R Dobbin 8 11 6 .......... R Day (3) C
HAVANA JACK (D) L Kerr 8 11 6 ...................................................D Cook
MORE MADNESS (D) Julia Brooke 11 11 1 ............B Hughes C
SMILING JESSICA (CD) Rebecca Menzies 8 10 11.......................
....................................................................................................................G Cockburn (3) C
7
/U48-2 COURT PAINTER V Thompson 8 10 5..........Mr K Alexander (5)
8
-P1P5P CAPTAIN SHARPE (D) K Johnson 10 10 4..... H Reed (7) B,T
9
-P3048 UNDER THE RED SKY (D) K Johnson 11 10 1 .....C Bewley (3) B
10 34-653 DUTCH CANYON N Alexander 8 10 0 ........................................................
..............................................................................................Stephen Mulqueen (3) C
11 -5P546 NELLY LA RUE (D) V Thompson 11 10 0.................................................
................................................................................................. Mr Alex Chadwick (7) C
- 11 declared BETTING: 3-1 Attention Please, 7-2 Misfits, 9-2 Smiling Jessica, 5-1 More
Madness, 6-1 Havana Jack, 12-1 So Satisfied, 14-1 Under The Red Sky,
20-1 Dutch Canyon, 33-1 others.
2.20
ONE TO WATCH
Aubusson found one too
good at Ludlow yesterday,
but he’s not one to give up on
over fences.
Nevertheless, the Toast Of New
York team, encouraged by impressive home work and a trouble-free
preparation, are hugely excited at
the prospect.
GERRY MCGLADERY IS 50 HANDICAP HURDLE (CLASS
3) £11,400 added 2m
1
30-044 TRADITIONAL DANCER I Jardine 6 11 12..............................................
...........................................................................................................Ross Chapman (5) C
2
0F-571 ASUM (D) P Kirby 7 11 11........................................................... A Nicol H,T
3
63-213 TRESHNISH (D) Mrs S Smith 5 11 9........................................D Cook
4
P6331- MR KITE (CD) S Corbett 7 11 2.................................... J Corbett (5) T
5
-91293 MEADOWCROFT BOY (D) A Whillans 9 11 2......K Edgar (3)
6
111/2- STAGS LEAP Julia Brooke 11 10 13 ...............................H Brooke C
7
32 JE SUIS CHARLIE (BF) J J Quinn 4 10 9...................B Hughes C
- 7 declared BETTING: 5-2 Je Suis Charlie, 9-2 Treshnish, 5-1 Asum, Mr Kite, 6-1
Traditional Dancer, 8-1 Stags Leap, 10-1 Meadowcroft Boy.
FORM VERDICT
JE SUIS CHARLIE was touched off by under a length over track and
trip last time out but now switching to handicap company and fitted
with first-time cheekpieces, John Quinn’s four-year-old is given the
vote. Treshnish makes some appeal on his Newcastle victory on his
penultimate outing and could feasibly take a hand, while any money
for Mr Kite, who has been absent since scoring over C&D in March,
would be notable.
2.55
1
2
3
4
5
GERRY MCGLADERY 50 YEARS HANDICAP CHASE
(CLASS 4) £8,511 added 2m 4f
2312-3
612/62
22-852
5P7-93
7-F701
SWING HARD (C)(D) Mrs S Smith 10 12 0 .......................D Cook
TOMORROW’S LEGEND P Holmes 8 11 12......J Kington (3)
NEFYN BAY (D)(BF) D McCain 9 11 11.................B Hughes C,T
WINGS OF SMOKE (D) T Vaughan 13 11 10..............A Johns T
RANCHER LASS (C) K Thornton (IRE) 7 10 13.........................
.......................................................................................................................... A E Lynch T
6 4P5594 BOY’S ON TOUR Miss L Russell 6 10 11..................................................
................................................................................................... Stephen Mulqueen (3)
7
561623 RUNNING IN HEELS Rebecca Menzies 9 10 10 ......................
.............................................................................................................................T Kelly T,V
8
991560 ENDEAVOR (C) Mrs D Sayer 13 10 0...................Sean Quinlan
- 8 declared BETTING: 3-1 Nefyn Bay, 7-2 Swing Hard, 9-2 Tomorrow’s Legend, 6-1
Rancher Lass, Wings Of Smoke, 10-1 Running In Heels, 12-1 Boy’s On
Tour, 16-1 Endeavor.
3.30
HAPPY 50TH BIRTHDAY GERRY MCGLADERY
HANDICAP HURDLE (CLASS 4) £7,749 added 3m
1
-13441 JUMP FOR DOUGH (CD) Miss L Russell 7 11 12 .............................
.......................................................................................................................T Willmott (10)
2
328235 WALTZ DARLING (CD) G Boanas 10 11 10...........................................
....................................................................................................Miss Emma Todd (7) C
3
2746-7 TAP NIGHT (C) Miss L Russell 11 11 10...........B Campbell (5)
4
65-00 NIGHT COMES IN D Whillans 6 11 4................... C Whillans (3)
5
43-5P1 FRASER CANYON (CD) T Vaughan 6 10 13......... A Johns T,V
6
26-P10 CRUACHAN Mrs L Normile 9 10 12..............G Cockburn (3) C
7 54624U APACHEE PRINCE A Whillans 9 10 8....................K Edgar (3) T
- 7 declared BETTING: 9-4 Fraser Canyon, 5-2 Jump For Dough, 9-2 Apachee Prince,
8-1 Tap Night, Waltz Darling, 12-1 Cruachan, 14-1 Night Comes In.
Results service
CHELMSFORD CITY
Going: Standard
5.55 (6f h’cap): DESERT FOX (S W
Kelly 14-1) 1; Spare Parts (5-2F)
2; Lanjano (8-1) 3. 14 ran. 13/4l, ns.
(Mike Murphy).
6.30 (1m): LOYALTY (P Mathers
evs F) 1; Tatlisu (7-4) 2; Enigmatic
(7-2) 3. 3 ran. 31/2l, 11/2l. (D Shaw).
NR: Georgian Bay.
7.00 (1m2f h’cap): SURREY BLAZE
(L Keniry 10-11F) 1; Headwear (4-1)
2; Forricherforpoorer (4-1) 3. 6 ran.
23/4l, 11/2l. (J Tuite).
7.30 (1m2f h’cap): NONIOS (Martin
Harley 9-2) 1; Taqwaa (33-1) 2;
Shamrokh (5-1) 3. Wimpole
Hall 13-8F. 7 ran. 1/2l, 11/4l. (D M
Simcock).
8.00 (6f nov): VOLATILE (D
Costello 10-1) 1; Reiffa (2-5F) 2;
Global Pass (12-1) 3. 7 ran. 11/4l, 2l.
(J Osborne).
8.30 (6f h’cap): REEDANJAS (Rossa
Ryan 10-1) 1; Cool Breeze (2-1) 2;
Pulsating (evs F) 3. 5 ran. 1l, 11/4l.
(Miss G Kelleway). NRs: Bobby
Vee, Lady Cristal.
9.00
(1m6f
h’cap):
WITH
HINDSIGHT (William Cox 7-1)
1; Marshall Aid (11-8F) 2; Pour
L’amour (11-4) 3. 6 ran. hd, 9l. (S
Gollings).
Placepot: £162.30. Quadpot:
£35.60.
LUDLOW
Going: Hurdle: soft; chase: good
to soft-soft in places
1.00 (1m7f169yds nov hdle):
MELANGERIE (James Bowen
6-5F) 1; Passing Call (13-8) 2; Sin
Sin (33-1) 3. 15 ran. 31/2l, 15l. (N
Henderson). NR: Secret Escape.
1.30 (2m4f11yds nov ch): HAPPY
DIVA (R Patrick 11-10F) 1;
Midnight Target (12-1) 2; Shaama
Grise (9-4) 3. 4 ran. 9l, 12l. (Kerry
Lee).
2.00 (2m7f171yds h’cap ch):
ACTINPIECES (Miss G Andrews
3-1F) 1; Aubusson (7-2) 2; Sego
Success (5-1) 3. 7 ran. 4l, 21/2l.
(Mrs P Sly).
2.35 (2m5f55yds mdn hdle): CALL
ME SID (D Bass 100-1) 1; Lygon
Rock (5-2) 2; Luckime (12-1) 3.
Gortroe Joe 2-1F. 15 ran. 1/2l, 10l.
(Mrs J Mason).
3.10 (2m7f171yds ch): VIRAK (Mr
L Williams 10-11F) 1; Real Milan
(7-1) 2; Tugboat (66-1) 3. 6 ran. 6l,
13l. (P Nicholls). NR: Now Ben.
3.45 (2m7f174yds h’cap hdle):
CRUCIAL ROLE (A Tinkler 5-1) 1;
Gamain (15-8F) 2; Pennywell (6-1)
3. 11 ran. 13l, 11/4l. (H Daly).
4.20 (1m6f7yds nh flat): REBOUND
(A Tinkler 11-2) 1; Melekhov (4-1) 2;
Flash The Steel (13-8F) 3. 12 ran. 1l,
1l. (A Honeyball). NR: Nellemani.
Jackpot: £37,150.40, with
£26,162.30 carried over
Placepot: £28.80. Quadpot: £14.50.
SOUTHWELL
Going: Standard
12.20 (1m13yds h’cap): SOOQAAN
(C Hardie 11-2) 1; Outlaw Torn
(15-2) 2; General Tufto (6-1) 3. Bib
And Tucker 4-1F. 11 ran. nk, 5l.
(A Brittain).
12.50 (1m13yds h’cap): PORT SOIF
(P Mulrennan 20-1) 1; Ignacio
Zuloaga (7-1) 2; Mamnoon (4-1)
3. Sunshineandbubbles 13-8F. 10
ran. 21/4l, 11/4l. (Kenneth Slack).
1.20 (7f14yds h’cap): BEST
TAMAYUZ (K O’Neill 4-1) 1; Swot
(11-4F) 2; Canadian Royal (7-1) 3.
13 ran. hd, hd. (S Dixon). NR: Angel
Palanas.
1.50 (4f214yds mdn): KODI BEACH
(B A Curtis 8-1) 1; Decision Maker
(7-2) 2; Madame Ritz (33-1) 3.
Axe Cap 9-4F. 11 ran. 2l, 1l. (T D
Barron).
2.20 (6f16yds h’cap): HANDSOME
DUDE (B A Curtis 11-2) 1; Tricky
Dicky (11-4F) 2; Letmestopyouthere
(7-2) 3. 7 ran. 2l, 21/2l. (T D Barron).
2.55
(1m4f14yds
h’cap):
BROTHERLY COMPANY (P Makin
22-1) 1; Akkadian Empire (20-1) 2;
Luv U Whatever (15-8F) 3. 9 ran.
21/2l, 31/4l. (Miss J Foster).
3.30 (4f214yds h’cap): SOMETHING
LUCKY (A Rawlinson 13-8F)
1; Furni Factors (5-1) 2; Archie
Stevens (7-1) 3. 8 ran. 1l, 13/4l. (M
Appleby). NR: Dazeekha.
4.05 (1m3f23yds h’cap): STAR
ASCENDING (J Fanning 9-4) 1;
Leonard Thomas (8-1) 2; Red
Douglas (20-1) 3. Ochos Rios
15-8F. 13 ran. hd, 31/4l. (Jennie
Candlish). NR: Master Of Song.
Placepot: £191.40. Quadpot: £23.50.
WINCANTON
Going: Heavy
1.10 (2m4f35yds h’cap ch): THE
NIPPER (G Sheehan 6-4) 1;
Tacenda (8-15F) 2; 2 ran. 31/4l. (W
Greatrex).
1.40 (2m5f82yds h’cap hdle):
SAVOY COURT (G Sheehan 14-1)
1; Hatchet Jack (5-1) 2; Tea Time
Fred (28-1) 3. Contented 9-2F. 14
ran. 10l, 22l. (W Greatrex).
2.10 (3m2f162yds h’cap ch):
THEMANFROM
MINELLA
(Max
Kendrick
9-2JF)
1;
Blameitalonmyroots
(9-1)
2;
Dawson City (11-2) 3. Cyclop
9-2JF. 9 ran. 21/2l, 11/4l. (B Case).
NR: Twojayslad.
2.45 (2m4f35yds h’cap nov ch):
SPEEDALONG (N Scholfield 9-1)
1; Behind Time (7-2) 2; Triopas (evs
F) 3. 4 ran. 3/4l, 1/2l. (J Scott).
3.20 (1m7f65yds h’cap hdle):
SEA WALL (T Cannon 10-1) 1;
Show On The Road (evs F) 2; The
Brothers (20-1) 3. 7 ran. 11/4l, 31/4l.
(C Gordon).
3.55 (1m7f65yds nov hdle): JURBY
(L Aspell 13-8F) 1; Grand Sancy
(5-2) 2; Inaminna (6-1) 3. 12 ran.
21/4l, 21l. (O Sherwood). NRs:
Solstice Twilight, Stand By Me.
Placepot: £851.90. Quadpot: £41.10.
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
33-45
GOLF
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
57
CRICKET
Solid start from McIlroy as
Fleetwood surges into lead
career, in October, but reaped the nice in terms of being able to concenrewards of some hard work over the trate on things I needed to work on in
winter with an opening three-unmy game and health-wise.
der-par 69.
“I feel like I’m nearly the
Playing partner and Eumost prepared for a searopean No 1 Fleetwood
son that I’ve ever been,
carded a flawless 66
but it was nice to get
to share the lead with
back out there and it
Japan’s Hideto Taniwas a great pairing to
Pars in row by
hara, with the final
start off with.
Rory McIlroy at the
member of the mar“ To m my pl aye d
start of his opening
quee group, world No 1
very well and I was just
round yesterday
Dustin Johnson, strugtrying to hang onto his
gling to a 72.
coat-tails for most of the
“I was excited to get
round, so really pleased;
going,” McIlroy said. “The last
bogey-free 69 I can’t really
couple of months have been really complain.
“I started off with 11 pars and it
could have been a lot better than that
so I tried to stay as patient as possible. I was proud of myself the way I
hung in there. “
Fleetwood, whose victory 12
months ago set him on the way to
winning the Race to Dubai, carded
six birdies and hit all 18 greens
in regulation.
“[It was] very stress-free,” Fleetwood said. “I played really well from
start to finish and felt I did what you
need to do round this golf course,
which is drive it well. You can’t be too
greedy a lot of the time and my pace
putting was really good.
“It was just a really good ball-striking round and nice to start the year
off like that.”
Fleetwood was joined at the top
of the leaderboard late in the day
by Tanihara, with Ross Fisher, Thomas Pieters, Sam Brazel, Fabrizio
Zanotti and Bernd Wiesberger all on
five under.
By Phil Casey
Patience paid dividends for Rory
McIlroy as he enjoyed a promising
competitive comeback in the Abu
Dhabi HSBC Championship, where
defending champion Tommy Fleetwood shared the lead after day one.
McIlroy has a remarkable record
in Abu Dhabi, with four second-place
finishes, two thirds and a fifth in
his last eight starts, but missed last
year’s event with the rib injury which
disrupted his entire season.
The four-time major winner called
an early end to his winless campaign,
just the second of his professional
11
Rory McIlroy plays
out of a bunker
on the 10th hole
yesterday AP
Results service
Puzzle solutions
5
-
9
x
6
-
-
8
-
1
÷
-
7
-
+
+
REAR
GODS
ROAR
PODS
BOAR
PADS
BOOR
PAWS
BOOT
PAWN
COOT
YAWN
78
7
28
-
5
6
6
+
x
-
2
-1
18
+
1
÷
3
1
8
+
3
-1
+
2
1
x
+
+
-
-
4
9
-12
x
4
4
28
9
ZYGOLEX
LEFT TO RIGHT:
ban; clog; char;
mutt; bar; dog;
rod; rot; dot;
prod; speck; prop;
wreck; jab; speak
5-CLUE CROSSWORD
Across: 1 B(R)other, 3 re-past, 4 Tisane*
Down: 1 Beirut(L)*, 2 Rattle
WORD WHEEL
NINE-LETTER WORD preferred
OTHER WORDS deep, deeper, deer, defer, erred, fed, feed,
feeder, freed, peered, red, reed, reefed, referred
YESTERDAY’S CODEWORD 1909
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
F
Y R H W X S
Z
E
I
O L
J
T C D N Q G M B V A U K P
CYCLING
SANTOS TOUR DOWN UNDER: Stage 3 (Glenelg
- Victor Harbor - 120.5km): 1 E Viviani (It) QuickStep Floors 3hrs 04mins 40secs, 2 P Bauhaus
(Ger) Team Sunweb, 3 C Ewan (Aus) MitcheltonScott, 54 C Lawless (GB) Team Sky, 69 O Doull
(GB) Team Sky, 76 S Davies (GB) Dimension
Data all +same time. Overall: 1 C Ewan (Aus)
Mitchelton-Scott 10hrs 58mins 36secs, 2 E Viviani (It) Quick-Step Floors +10secs, 3 D Impey
(RSA) Mitchelton-Scott +14secs, 39 S Davies
(GB) Dimension Data +20 secs, 47 O Doull (GB)
Team Sky all +same time, 97 P Kennaugh (GB)
Bora-Hansgrohe +06mins 45secs, 100 C Lawless (GB) Team Sky +07mins 41secs.
GOLF
EUROPEAN ABU DHABI HSBC CHAMPIONSHIP, ABU DHABI GC, UAE: First Round (GB
& Ireland unless stated): 66 T Fleetwood; H
Tanihara (Japan); 67 R Fisher; F Zanotti (Par);
S Brazel (Aus); B Wiesberger (Aut); T Pieters
(Bel); 68 A Johnston; R Ramsay; M Ilonen (Fin);
C Pigem (Sp); O Fisher; S Gallacher; P Dunne; M
Fitzpatrick; R Sterne (SA).
SNOOKER
DAFABET MASTERS, ALEXANDRA PALACE:
Quarter-Finals: M Allen (N Ire) bt R O’Sullivan
(Eng) 6-1.
TENNIS
AUSTRALIAN OPEN, MELBOURNE: Men’s
Singles Second round: (5) D THIEM (Aut) bt
D Kudla (US) 6-7 (6-8) 3-6 6-3 6-2 6-3; (26) A
MANNARINO (Fr) bt J Vesely (Cz Rep) 6-3 7-6
(7-4) 5-7 6-3; M Marterer (Ger) bt F Verdasco
(Sp) 6-4 4-6 7-6 (7-5) 3-6 6-3; T Sandgren (US)
bt (9) S WAWRINKA (Swit) 6-2 6-1 6-4; (14) N
DJOKOVIC (Serb) bt G Monfils (Fr) 4-6 6-3 6-1
6-3; (21) A RAMOS-VINOLAS (Sp) bt T Smyczek
(US) 6-4 6-2 7-6 (7-2); H Chung (S Kor) bt D
Medvedev (Rus) 7-6 (7-4) 6-1 6-1; (4) A ZVEREV
(Ger) bt P Gojowczyk (Ger) 6-1 6-3 4-6 6-3; J
Benneteau (Fr) bt (7) D GOFFIN (Bel) 1-6 7-6 (75) 6-1 7-6 (7-4); (25) F FOGNINI (It) bt E Donskoy
(Rus) 2-6 6-3 6-4 6-1; (19) T BERDYCH (Cz Rep)
bt G Garcia-Lopez (Sp) 6-3 2-6 6-2 6-3; (12) J
MARTIN DEL POTRO (Arg) bt K Khachanov (Rus)
6-4 7-6 (7-4) 6-7 (0-7) 6-4; M Fucsovics (Hun)
bt (13) S QUERREY (US) 6-4 7-6 (8-6) 4-6 6-2; N
Kicker (Arg) bt L Lacko (Slovak) 6-2 7-5 1-6 7-5;
(29) R GASQUET (Fr) bt L Sonego (It) 6-2 6-2
6-3; (2) R FEDERER (Swit) bt J Struff (Ger) 6-4
6-4 7-6 (7-4).
Women’s Singles Second round: (1) S HALEP
(Rom) bt E Bouchard (Can) 6-2 6-2; L Davis
(US) bt A Petkovic (Ger) 4-6 6-0 6-0; (18) A
BARTY (Aus) bt C Giorgi (It) 5-7 6-4 6-1; N
Osaka (Japan) bt (16) E VESNINA (Rus) 7-6 (7-4)
6-2; B Pera (US) bt (9) J KONTA (GB) 6-4 7-5;
(20) B ZAHLAVOVA STRYCOVA (Cz Rep) bt L
Arruabarrena (Sp) 6-3 6-4; (29) L SAFAROVA (Cz
Rep) bt S Cirstea (Rom) 6-2 6-4; (6) K PLISKOVA
(Cz Rep) bt B Haddad Maia (Br) 6-1 6-1; S Hsieh
(Taipei) bt (3) G MUGURUZA (Sp) 7-6 (7-1) 6-4;
(26) A RADWANSKA (Pol) bt L Tsurenko (Ukr)
2-6 7-5 6-3; (21) A KERBER (Ger) bt D Vekic
(Croa) 6-4 6-1; M Sharapova (Rus) bt (14) A
SEVASTOVA (Lat) 6-1 7-6 (7-4); A Bogdan (Rom)
bt Y Putintseva (Kaz) 1-6 6-2 6-3; (17) M KEYS
(US) bt E Alexandrova (Rus) 6-0 6-1; A Sasnovich
(Bela) bt (28) M LUCIC-BARONI (Croa) 6-3 6-1;
(8) C GARCIA (Fr) bt M Vondrousova (Cz Rep)
6-7 (3-7) 6-2 8-6. Men’s Doubles First round: M
Daniell (NZ) & D INGLOT (GB) bt A Shamasdin
(Can) & N SKUPSKI (GB) 6-4 2-6 6-3; L Mayer
(Arg) & J Sousa (Portugal) bt J Cerretani (US)
& K SKUPSKI (GB) 7-6 (10-8) 7-5. Women’s
Doubles First round: (15) A ROSOLSKA (Pol) &
A SPEARS (US) bt A Cornet (Fr) & H WATSON
(GB) 6-2 5-7 6-4.
TODAY’S FIXTURES
FOOTBALL
THE SKY BET CHAMPIONSHIP
Derby v Bristol City (7.45pm) .....................................................
SKY BET LEAGUE TWO
Newport Co v Crawley (7.45pm)..............................................
THE WILLIAM HILL CUP FOURTH ROUND
Formartine United v Cove Rangers (8) ..............................
BASKETBALL
BBL CHAMPIONSHIP: Worcester v Manchester.
BBL TROPHY QUARTER-FINAL: Loughborough v
London, Newcastle v Sheffield.
CRICKET
SECOND ONE DAY INTERNATIONAL: Australia v
England (Brisbane, 3.20am).
TRIANGULAR TOURNAMENT: Bangladesh v Sri
Lanka (Mirpur, 6.00am).
ICE HOCKEY
ELITE LEAGUE: Belfast v Coventry.
RUGBY UNION
EUROPEAN CHALLENGE CUP POOL 3 (7.45):
Gloucester v Pau.
BRITISH & IRISH CUP POOL 1 (7.45): Munster
A v Ospreys PS. POOL 2 (7.45): Bristol v Cardiff
Blues PS. POOL 4 (7.0): Connacht A v Rotherham
Titans.
Trevor Bayliss (left) is delighted to have Ben Stokes back in the squad GETTY
Stokes’s court date
set for same day as
England comeback
one-day series, but Bayliss does not
expect any awkwardness when the
England all-rounder Ben Stokes 26-year-old checks back in.
is to appear in court on an affray
“I’m happy he’s been made availcharge on the same day he was sup- able, the players and coaches are
posed to be making his internation- looking forward to seeing him,”
al comeback in a Twenty20 match Bayliss said.
in New Zealand.
“He’s a very popular
Avon and Somerset
member of the team and
He’s a
Police confirmed that
the squad. I’m sure they’ll
Stokes is due at Bristol very popular
welcome him back with
Magistrates’ Court on member of
open arms.”
13 February to face the the team and
Bayliss explained the
charge, brought follow- the squad.
decision not to draft
ing an incident outside a I’m sure they
Stokes for the start of the
nightclub in the city last will welcome T20 series in Australia,
September.
it was down to the
him back with denying
Stokes would be
greater media circus he
open
arms
required to attend unless
might face Down Under.
his solicitors make a
Instead, he indicated it
request to the court to have the case was purely a sporting decision reput back to a new date and the court garding his match sharpness.
is satisfied with their argument
He also suggested a preparatory
enough to do so. The 26-year-old, stint in domestic cricket was in the
who missed the recent Ashes series offing. “Hopefully, we can get him
after being suspended from play- some cricket somewhere as part
ing for England, is accused of affray of his practice going into the New
alongside two other men.
Zealand leg. That’ll be up to him,”
Meanwhile, head coach Trevor Bayliss added.
Bayliss has no doubt Stokes will be
“We want him to be up and
welcomed back “with open arms” by running and ready to go.
the England squad when he returns.
“There’s a few legal things to
England lost the Ashes 4-0 while get through in the next week or so,
Stokes watched from afar and are 10 days, but then it’s about being
currently seeking revenge in the prepared to play.”
By Rory Dollard
SNOOKER
Ill O’Sullivan beaten in Masters
By Matt McGeehan
Defending champion and seventime winner Ronnie O’Sullivan
is out of the Masters after
losing 6-1 to Mark Allen
in the quarter-finals at
Alexandra Palace.
O’Sullivan (right)
won the first frame with
a break of 75, despite
calling a foul on himself
as he cued over a red to attempt a difficult black.
But that was as good as it got for
Sullivan as Allen responded to take
the second frame with a break of 65.
That was followed by breaks of
115, 85 and 81, which helped Allen
to a 5-1 lead. Both players missed
chances to take control of the
seventh frame, before Allen
grasped his opportunity to
claim a notable scalp and
his place in the semifinals of the tournament which concludes
on Sunday.
O’Sullivan, who has
been struggling with illness, said: “He deserved
his win. From my perspective, I can rest up now and get
ready for my next event. I had to
show up, if I was a football player I
would have missed this game.”
58
SPORT
RUGBY UNION
Mercer set for England fast-track but
coach Jones shrugs off injury crisis
By Hugh Godwin
RUGBY UNION CORRESPONDENT
The dismally familiar litany of injury
updates streaming in from England’s clubs had Eddie Jones reaching “version 26” of his national squad
before the head coach could finalise
the 35-man party to prepare for the
Six Nations championship.
They included eight uncapped players, among whom the Bath No 8 Zach
Mercer (below) had the previous denotion of “apprentice” removed from
his name, amid rising expectation
that last summer’s England Under-20
captain will see senior service for the
first time in the Six Nations opener
away to Italy on 4 February.
Jones said Mercer, Exeter’s Sam
Simmonds or possibly Chris Robshaw of Harlequins will be England’s
No 8 in the absence of the injured
Billy Vunipola and Nathan Hughes.
Overall, England will spend a week
in Portugal from Monday without 11
injured players, while several others are likely to spend more time off
their feet than on the training field.
And Jones only half-dismissed the
notion that the attritional schedule of
the English Premiership compared
with the supposedly easier regime
in the PRO14 was shredding his Six
Nations plans. “If I say [the likes of
Ireland] have an advantage, it’s an excuse, and we don’t have any excuses,”
said Jones. “We’ve got what we want,
we’ve done well with that system
and we will continue to do well
with it.”
Nevertheless, the
tale of the treatment table is undeniably acute for
England players
England in the
absent from
front and back
Eddie Jones’
rows.
squad through
Harlequins’
injury
flanker Robshaw is
struggling with a back
problem and Exeter prop
Alec Hepburn is recovering from a
head knock, so Jones expects both
to train only on the Friday on the
Algarve, while Mike Brown, who
currently has blurred vision after a
bang on the eye, may not even manage that, with Jones prescribing a
week of “sun, fish and recuperating”
for his favourite full-back.
“The first part of the camp will
be fairly untraditional for us,”
Jones admitted. “We’ll treat
it as a mini pre-season and we
won’t start the team training until Thursday and
Friday.”
The list of the missing comprises Tom
Curry, Elliot Daly,
Charlie Ewels, Piers
Francis, Ellis Genge,
Na t h a n H u gh e s ,
Matt Mullan, Beno
Obano, Semesa Rokoduguni, Will Spencer and Billy
Vunipola – with the lastnamed revealed by Jones
to be out for 12 weeks, and
therefore the entire Six Nations, after fracturing his
11
‘Does Smith
get paid big
money for
running
sideways?’
By Hugh Godwin
Eddie Jones refused to say England’s injuries made his job harder. ‘We don’t have any excuses,’ he said GETTY
England training squad for Italy match (Sun 4 Feb)
BACKS
Full-backs:
M Brown (Harlequins), N
Earle (Saracens), H Mallinder
(Northampton Saints), J May
(Leicester Tigers), D Solomona (Sale
Sharks), A Watson (Bath Rugby)
Inside backs:
D Care (Harlequins), O Farrell (Saracens), G Ford (Leicester), J Joseph
(Bath), A Lozowski (Saracens), J
Nowell, H Slade (both Exeter Chiefs),
B Te’o (Worcester Warriors), M Smith
(Harlequins), B Youngs (Leicester)
forearm in Saracens’ draw with
Ospreys last Saturday.
With no place yet for Manu Tuilagi, who is four matches into his
latest comeback from injury
and might have brought
gainline-busting power to
the midfield to augment
a lighter-than-normal
back row, Jones has
added Exeter’s Jack
Nowell – normally a
wing – to Jonathan
Joseph, Henry Slade
and Ben Te’o, who
hasn’t played since
October, as possible
outside centres.
“Jack is a great little wing,
we know that,” said Jones.
FORWARDS
Back five:
G Graham (Newcastle Falcons), N
Isiekwe, M Itoje, G Kruis (all Saracens), C Lawes (Northampton), J
Launchbury (Wasps), Z Mercer, S
Underhill (both Bath), C Robshaw
(Harlequins), S Simmonds (Exeter)
Front row:
L Boyce, K Sinckler (both Harlequins),
D Cole (Leicester), T Dunn (Bath),
J George, M Vunipola (both Saracens), D Hartley (Northampton), A
Hepburn, H Williams (both Exeter)
“Potentially he can play full-back
and if I can find out that he can play
13, he becomes a great squad player
for us.”
Genge, Mullan and Obano are
joined among the absent loosehead
props by Harlequins’ Joe Marler
who – like the Wasps flanker James
Haskell – will miss the first two Six
Nations matchesthrough suspension,
though both can train with England.
Discussing the possibility of one
of the uncapped pair of Hepburn or
Harlequins’ robust 21-year-old Lewis
With international rugby,
you have talent to come in
the room – and then once in,
it’s how much you want it
Boyce understudying Mako Vunipola in Italy, Jones’s eyes glinted as this
former hooker described the workload of a prop, although still it was
tempting to wonder whether the
standard uniform of a rugby coach
these days should be a white coat
with a stethoscope.
“We’re down to seventh or eighth at
loosehead,” said Jones. “Hepburn and
Boyce have both got the potential. But
you’ve got to remember with international rugby, you have talent to come
in the room and then once you get in
the room it’s how much you want it
and how much you’re prepared to put
in. There’s another 35 players in England who have got enough talent to
play international rugby. It’s whether
they’ve got the desire, that ability to
dig deep when it hurts.
“Look at loosehead props now,
what they’re required to do. It is
amazing. You’ve got Mako Vunipola,
he’s 125kgs, that’s big enough to be
a sumo wrestler. He makes 20 tackles a game, carries the ball 10 times,
cleans out 20 times, scrums 15 times,
lifts in the line-out 18 times. What
those guys do, compared to a prop
10 years ago, has increased at least
two-fold.
“So because of that, they’re in pain
the whole time. It’s hard work. So the
test is the mental part of it, whether
they can keep doing that. Whether
they can get off the floor quickly and
get back in the defensive line. It’s not
about talent.”
A running theme this season has
been Eddie Jones dousing the fires
of public interest in the teenaged
sensation Marcus Smith, even
though the England head coach
has demonstrated his underlying
admiration for the 18-year-old
Harlequins fly-half by naming
him in every training squad since
August, including the 35-man
party who will spend next week
in Portugal in preparation for the
Six Nations championship.
But yesterday Jones seized
on conjecture about the value
of Smith’s recently-signed
contract with Quins to criticise
a particular aspect of the
youngster’s game. i understands
Smith’s academy contract at
Harlequins was worth £25,000
which is standard fare in the
Premiership, but reports in some
quarters that the starting salary
now he has been put on a senior
deal would be £230,000 – the club
insist it is significantly lower
– have caught the
England coach’s
eye, and it was
certainly a
case of “alas
Smith”,
according to
Jones.
Asked what
Smith (right)
needed to do
earn a debut for
England, the Australian
who has just signed his own
contract extension reportedly
worth £750,000 per annum
including bonuses, said: “Shine
the boots better mate” – a reprise
of his previous refrain that Smith
should be satisfied with menial
tasks as an apprentice.
Then Jones added: “[He should]
run straight and tackle. It’s pretty
simple. He must get paid for
running sideways, does he? That
new contract – has it got some
clause in it for running sideways,
has it? Does he get money for
running sideways? Well, he
should. When he runs straight
and makes good tackles we’ll pick
him. He’ll get closer to a Test cap
when he starts running straight.”
Smith, who turns 19 on
Valentine’s Day, has made 18
appearances for Harlequins this
season – forced to a degree by an
injury to Demetri Catrakilis.
France’s Mathieu Bastareaud will play a part in
the build-up to the Six Nations
opener against Wales despite
being banned. He tweeted: “I will
continue to work hard and accompany friends this wk in Wales.”
NEWS
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TV
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The
Fan
Matrix
FOOTBALL
As Bournemouth
mounted more pressure
on Wenger, it was
another oft-derided
Arsenal stalwart who left this
week – genuine shame to see
Theo go but he wasn’t needed and
hopefully he’ll rediscover himself
at Everton. Lack of confidence for
Palace at home. George Bond
BOURNEMOUTH
EDITED BY JAMES MARINER
PREMIER LEAGUE
Klopp boosted by
return of Van Dijk
and Henderson
volved in full training, although in his
absence Andy Robertson has shown
Liverpool’s record signing, Virgil van impressive form, putting in arguably
Dijk, and captain, Jordan Henderson, his best display of his short Reds cahave returned to full training ahead reer against City at the weekend. The
of Monday’s trip to Swansea.
Spaniard may have to bide his time
Van Dijk missed last Sunday’s for a recall.
win over Manchester City,
Wales international Ben Woodwhich ended the Preburn also trained with the
mier League leaders’
squad as the likelihood of
30-match unbeaten
him going out on loan
league run, with a
subsides.
tight hamstring.
Former national team
Number of games
However, the Holcoach Chris Coleman
Jordan Henderson
land international,
was keen to take the
has missed since
a £75m arrival from
18-year-old to Champicking up an injury
Southampton at the
pionship Sunderland
last month
start the month, was
for the remainder of the
pictured back in trainseason but – with the Black
ing at Melwood yesterday
Cats rooted to the foot of
and is set to return to the startthe table and Philippe Coutinho’s
ing line-up in south Wales.
£142m sale to Barcelona freeing up
Manager Jürgen Klopp was also space in midfield – Woodburn is set
boosted by skipper Henderson’s re- to be retained.
turn. The England international has
The club have yet, however, to rebeen sidelined for almost a month ceive any acceptable offers for striker
since injuring a hamstring in the 3-3 Daniel Sturridge after Internazionale
draw at Arsenal on 22 December.
and Sevilla expressed their interest
Left-back Alberto Moreno, who about a possible loan deal. It is underhas been sidelined since 6 Decem- stood Sturridge favours the Spanish
ber with an ankle injury, was also in- club ahead of the Italians.
By Carl Markham
5
WATFORD
Club doctor claims he was
sacked for being English
By Matt Slater
Watford’s former head of medical Richard Collinge is taking the Premier
League club to an employment tribunal, claiming he was sacked because
he was English, not Italian.
The case, which the club have confirmed, will be heard at Watford Tribunal Hearing Centre in September.
Collinge left the Hertfordshire
club in September 2016 and it was
reported in the local media that this
was a result of Watford setting up a
new medical centre at their training
ground.
This meant, it was claimed, that
Collinge’s position was no longer
needed, with the club promoting
Italian Giorgio Gasparini to head of
physiotherapy and Dr Ian Hamilton
taking the newly-created role of head
of medicine.
Watford could not comment on the
details of the case but it is understood
they deny discriminating against
Collinge, who now works at the University of Hertfordshire.
59
ARSENAL
What supporters
are saying
about your club
Virgil van Dijk (left) trains at Melwood with his Liverpool team-mates GETTY
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
Eight changes at Wigan
- wondering what Eddie
was trying to achieve.
After beating Arsenal
this should’ve been easy but it
was deja vu as we were knocked
out by Wigan at the same stage in
2013 when they won the FA Cup. It
wasn’t Afobe’s night and it cost us.
Emily Victoria
BRIGHTON & HOVE
BURNLEY
CHELSEA
CRYSTAL PALACE
EVERTON
HUDDERSFIELD TOWN
Marcus Bailey
Olly Diamond
Whether it’s top six or
anyone else, Hughton
always seems keen
to impress what a
very difficult game it’s going to
be for us. I appreciate he’s being
“realistic”, but I wish he’d talk us
up a bit more, and talk about the
problems we can expect to cause
them. Easy 10 (North Stand Chat)
The run continues!
That’s now one loss in
12 and we march up
into 12th. Even more
astonishing is that we won at the
weekend without using a single
sub, showing how bare our squad
really is. Arsenal are there for the
taking this week – a point would
do nicely. Ollie Potts
LEICESTER CITY
Heaton (above) being
back in training is
fantastic news. Will be
interesting to see how
Pope’s performances are affected
over the next few weeks, knowing
he has some serious competition
again, and also how Dyche
re-introduces Heaton to the squad/
team. Goobs (Up The Clarets!)
Well that Spurs game
was a disaster... seemed
as if Koeman was back.
Now Theo has joined
hopefully this will add much
needed pace, of which he has in
abundance, that we are desperate
for. Our season is borderline over
now, with little left to play for.
LIVERPOOL
We have been nothing
if not consistent so
far in 2018, drawing
five in a row, including
three goalless draws – so I’m not
expecting fireworks at Brighton,
especially with our squad having
played extra time v Norwich and
with Pedro and Morata missing as
well. Charlie Gould
The display against
the Hammers
was thoroughly
disappointing. Put
simply: many errors equates to
many goals conceded. Looking
towards the coming fixtures that
await, a result away at Stoke is
vitally important for us.
MANCHESTER CITY
Arriba Los Zorros (Foxes Talk)
An unforgettable game at
Anfield. Keeper situation
is still a worry, although
it would be silly to be
negative. I can’t remember a
Liverpool team this exciting, let’s
just hope the Coutinho money
is spent sensibly. Hope we don’t
stumble against a Swansea short
of confidence. Nick Harrington
MANCHESTER UNITED
NEWCASTLE UNITED
SOUTHAMPTON
Gabriel Counsell
Sixty words can’t really
describe the mood on
Tyneside right now.
With the blue-sky
longing for a January takeover
and much-needed additions this
month ripped from our grasp, an
away fixture at Europe’s best is
untimely. Harry Savill
STOKE CITY
SWANSEA CITY
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR
Jury still out on Claude
Puel in home games
for me – we can lack
a cutting edge. I feel
more comfortable when we play
away, currently. Would like to
see him dispel doubts with a
commanding performance and
resounding win tomorrow.
It’s funny what you
can do with stats. An
impressive win v Stoke
and it’s not all doom
and gloom – unbeaten in the
league since City in December.
This must continue as we travel to
Burnley tomorrow.
Another rollercoaster
week in the Potteries
with Lambert emerging
from the shadows to
become Hughes’ successor. 3-0
at Old Trafford Monday was
predicted, however the Stokies
displayed glimmers of exciting
football. A must win this weekend!
Thomas Hearns (Blue Moon)
Pellegrino’s team talks
must be a joy to behold.
2-0 up against a dejected
Watford and we conspire
to spectacularly crumble – what
did he say to those players? Please
at least try to inspire them before
Spurs or it’ll be yet another Kane
bloodbath… Nick Roberts
Hugo Parrott
sainthelens (Planet Swans)
I can’t say I’m surprised
about our absence from
any transfer activity but,
just like every January, I’m
hoping for a deadline day Levystyle special. We are coming off
the back of a great win last week
but Southampton will be up for
it after a disappointing slip at
Watford. Charlie Taylor-Kroll
WATFORD
WEST BROMWICH ALBION
WEST HAM UNITED
Bottom of the form
table over the last 10 is
worrying. Still somehow
floating in the top half,
Watford have been stale since
November though a change in
system could bring us back to
form. Alex Keating
Not long back from [the
midweek Cup win over
Wolves], gotta say great
effort from the players,
even if we are struggling. Let’s
get a few thousand up to Notts
County – an old style ground,
lower league and all that. Plus we
may even win!
A defeat might be a good
thing because it’s hard
to stop complacency
creeping in, no matter
how hard the staff try to guard
against it. Disappointed in the
manner of the defeat; 4-3 flattered
us. Still, one bad day doesn’t mean
anything in our present context.
Still shocked to think
that Cyrille, my boyhood
hero, has died. Easy
to forget just how he,
Laurie and Brendan transcended
football. I found an old NME cover
with him on the front recently.
The Stroller (WestBrom.com)
After West Ham terrierised Huddersfield
Town on the road last
weekend, it’s time to
pop the Cherries this weekend. A
victory would have us dreaming
of Europe rather than relegation.
Arnie to bag another. Joe Light
60
SPORT
FOOTBALL
Planet Football
ARSENAL
Wenger offers Giroud
for Aubameyang
By Jack Pitt-Brooke
Arsène Wenger is ready to
offer forward Olivier Giroud to
Borussia Dortmund in an attempt
to find a deal for Pierre-Emerick
Aubameyang.
Arsenal are talking to
Dortmund about signing the
Gabonese international, for
whom Dortmund initially wanted
€70million (£61m). The Gunners
do not want to pay that much, so
have told Dortmund that they
would be willing to include the
France international as part of
any deal.
Giroud has been relegated to
a fringe role this season by
the arrival of Alexandre
Lacazette, and has only
started one Premier
League game.
Dortmund were one of
the teams who wanted
Giroud last summer –
along with Marseille,
Besiktas and Everton –
WEST HAM UNITED
but he stayed at the Emirates. Now
Arsenal want to use that interest
to persuade Dortmund to sell them
Aubameyang.
Wenger was asked about
the possibility of a GiroudAubameyang swap and gave
a cryptic answer, saying that
questions starting with the word
“if” can cover “many theories”, and
that “at the moment I cannot tell
you much more”.
But the Arsenal coach
was unusually open about
his own interest in
Aubameyang (left),
saying he had “nothing
to add” to reports and
that he would wait to
announce anything until
the deal was “over the
line”. Aubameyang,
meanwhile, has been
left out of the Dortmund
squad to face Hertha
Berlin tonight, with the
club saying he is “not fully
focused”. THE INDEPENDENT
TRANSFERS
Remember
the time
Ronaldinho
nearly joined
St Mirren?
STOKE CITY
Carroll’s move
to Chelsea off
after injury
Greek left-back
Stafylidis joins
Potters on loan
West Ham striker Andy Carroll
has an ankle injury and faces a
possible lengthy absence. The
forward has been linked with a
move to Chelsea, but now any
transfer in January appears to
be highly unlikely after a scan
revealed the severity of the injury.
Surgery is among the options
being considered and, if
29-year-old Carroll underwent
an operation, he would be out for
months rather than weeks.
Hammers manager David Moyes
attended Chelsea’s FA Cup match
with Norwich on Wednesday night,
apparently watching Blues and
Belgium striker Michy Batshuayi.
Stoke have
announced the
signing of Greece
left-back Kostas
Stafylidis on loan
from Augsburg
for the rest of the
season. The 24-year-old (above)
becomes Stoke’s second new
addition of the January window –
right-back Moritz Bauer having
joined from Rubin Kazan – and
the first since Paul Lambert was
named manager on Monday.
Stoke chief executive Tony
Scholes said: “Paul has been
impressed by what he has seen of
Kostas in action for Augsburg.”
HEARTS
BRIGHTON
Naismith to
bring ‘nous’
Hughton ready
for frantic finale
Steven Naismith has joined Hearts
on loan from Norwich City until the
end of the season.
The forward (below) could make
his debut in Sunday’s Scottish
Cup tie against Hibernian at
Tynecastle.
Manager Craig Levein said: “It’s
a coup to bring somebody in of
Steven’s quality.
He’ll bring a bit
of nous and be a
huge player in the
dressing room.”
Brighton manager Chris Hughton
is expecting another manic end
to the January transfer window.
Hughton has yet to add to his
squad since the turn of the year
despite having been searching for
a striker since the Seagulls were
promoted last May. A centre-half
also remains on Hughton’s wish list
this month.
“There are no updates at this
moment,” he said. “The business is
mostly done at the tail end of [the
window] more than the beginning.”
Transfer windows generate a special madness. Joe Sked
celebrates the unlikely deals that didn’t quite come off
D
uring the transfer window there are few things
more exhilarating than
seeing your team linked
with a player on the
rumour mill. There is always the
sense of “what could be”, whether
it’s complete fabrication or not.
Excitement reaches new levels when
the player is a genuine star – even if
that does make the eventual move
appear a bit less likely. Then, years
down the line, fans cannot help
musing over what might have been.
Imagine if some of these deals had
come off…
Robert Lewandowski to
Blackburn Rovers (2010)
Eyjafjallajokull caused widespread
disruption across Europe in 2010.
Eruptions from the Icelandic
volcano brought chaos to air travel,
and Barcelona even blamed it
for their defeat to Internazionale
in the Champions League semi-
finals. But one person, looking
honchos at the club. The Ibrox side
back on it now, who is incredibly
made an enticing offer, with it being
grateful for its intervention is
reported that they told the player
Robert Lewandowski. The Polish
he’d only have to play in European
striker was meant to travel
fixtures if he so wished.
to Lancashire to secure
Ronaldo opted for Serie A
a £2.5million transfer
and Milan rather than
to Sam Allardyce’s
Govan.
Rovers. He couldn’t
make it to England
Diego Maradona to
The fee Sheffield
and the deal fell
Sheffield United
United were
through. And
(1978)
unwilling to pay
Lewandowski ended
This
really should be
for Diego Maradona
up becoming one of
an apocryphal tale.
in 1978
Europe’s most feared
Yet it appears to be
strikers at Bayern
true. Very, very true. The
Munich, via Borussia
Blades manager at the time
Dortmund.
Harry Haslam was wowed by this
special 17-year-old when scouting in
Ronaldo to Rangers (1997)
Argentina. However, United were
Under David Murray, Rangers
reluctant to spend the reported
wanted to become a European
£200,000 on potential. They did
force. To help them do so they tried
not leave empty-handed, however.
to beat Inter to the signing of the
Another future Argentina manager
Brazilian from Barcelona after
Alejandro Sabella was signed instead,
Ronaldo’s dispute with the head
for £160,000.
£200k
NEWS
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CHELSEA
A delay in international clearance
prevented Ronaldinho from moving
to St Mirren – so they turned to
Stephen McPhee instead GETTY
World Cup saw the Dutchman sign
for Levante in Spain’s second tier.
Ronaldinho to St Mirren (2001)
The buck-toothed Brazilian
had earned a move to Paris
Saint-Germain following star
performances in his homeland for
boyhood club Gremio. However,
such was the nature of the deal,
Ronaldinho was effectively frozen
out by Gremio until his Paris switch.
In the meantime, PSG were keen
for him to keep fitness levels up
and adapt to Europe by making
a loan move. Which is where St
Mirren came in. Unfortunately a
hold-up regarding international
clearance persuaded St Mirren to
look elsewhere. They signed Stephen
McPhee instead.
Zinedine Zidane to Blackburn (1995)
“Why do you want to sign Zidane
when we have Tim Sherwood?”
Looking back the question seems
baffling. However, when Kenny
Dalglish suggested Rovers augment
the 1995 Premier League-winning
side with the Frenchman, he was
met with this response by the club’s
owner Jack Walker. In a way Walker
had a point. Zidane was just making
his way at Bordeaux, while Sherwood had captained Rovers to the
title. After helping Bordeaux reach
the Uefa Cup final, Zidane would
play for Juventus and Real Madrid –
and a few trophies. Sherwood is now
perhaps best known for his gilet.
Andres Iniesta to Rangers (2004)
Johan Cruyff to Leicester (1981)
In 1981, the Dutch legend
terminated his contract with
North American Soccer League
side Washington Diplomats, eager
to move back to Europe. This
prompted much interest around
the continent, with Cruyff just
keen to play football so he could
prove himself to Europe’s elite.
Jock Wallace earmarked
Cruyff as the leader for his
young Leicester City side.
And after negotiations, the
deal appeared to have been
completed, with the club all
but announcing his signing
for 11 games. However,
a turn like Cruyff had
performed against
Swedish defender Jan
Olsson in the 1974
Why do you
want to sign
Zidane when
we have Tim
Sherwood?
Alex McLeish inadvertently kickstarted Iniesta’s Barcelona career. In
need of a midfielder to fill a vacuum
created by Barry Ferguson’s move to
Blackburn, the Rangers boss had his
assistant Jan Wouters use his Dutch
contacts to enquire about potential
players available from Barcelona.
Barça coach Henk ten Cate
mentioned an 18-year-old Iniesta.
Within a matter of days of Rangers
showing an interest, Iniesta was
propelled into the Barça first team.
Yet the call actually started with an
enquiry about Lionel Messi, after
McLeish’s son had pestered his
dad about how good the Argentine
was on computer game Football
Manager. The approach was firmly
rebuffed.
‘Willian should
have been given
a penalty – but
Pedro dived’
By Matt McGeehan
Norwich defender Timm Klose has
admitted he fouled Willian in a decision which ignited Video Assistant
Referee controversy as Chelsea were
denied a penalty.
Chelsea survived a scare on
Wednesday night to advance in
the FA Cup, prevailing 5-3 on penalties after a chaotic replay at
Stamford Bridge.
Former England captain Alan
Shearer, working as a pundit for the
BBC, criticised the decision of match
referee Graham Scott not to consult
VAR Mike Jones over Klose’s challenge on Willian early in the first period of extra time. Shearer described
VAR as a “shambles”.
Klose afterwards conceded it
should have been a penalty, before
admonishing Chelsea’s players for
diving. Pedro and Alvaro Morata
were both sent off for two bookable
offences, with both players’ first yellow cards coming for diving.
Klose said: “The first one on Willian is a pen. I’m brutally honest
there. I think I caught him. On the
pitch, I was not sure because it happened so fast. When I saw it again afterwards I was like ‘ooh, that’s quite
close’. I guess you can give it.
“The second one was a dive, from
then on they pushed it too hard, went
down a little bit too easily.
“Of course VAR would help the referee sometimes in some situations,
but I’m not a big fan of it. Football is
all about these situations.
“We all remember [Diego] Maradona heading the ball with his hand
[against England in 1986] or Frank
Lampard against Germany [at the
2010 World Cup].
“Those are things in football you
need, it puts emotions on, you can
write about it, the TV stations have
something to talk about. I don’t know
if I like it.”
Willian had no doubts it should
have been a spot-kick – otherwise he
says he would have scored.
The Brazil playmaker said: “For
me it was a penalty, 100 per cent. It
was a little touch, but it was enough
for me to go down.”
Riyad Mahrez to St Mirren (2007)
The Algerian was a complete
unknown when he turned up in
Paisley on trial for the Buddies’
reserve side. He impressed
with seven goals in four
friendly matches,
according to the
player. Yet the
Scottish climate
claimed another
victim as he sought
a return to Paris.
“I’d had enough.
It drove me crazy,
Scotland. It was cold.
It was snowing and
everything – I was so
cold that one day I
faked an injury to go to
the dressing room,” he
has since said.
Timm Klose conceded he caught
Willian with a tackle on Wednesday
TV
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i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
61
Kevin
Garside
CHIEF SPORTS CORRESPONDENT
VAR isn’t the problem.
Players’ deception that
led to its introduction is
I
f only those retro aesthetes
offended by the recent
encroachment of video
assistant referees cared so
much about the damage
done to the fabric of the game by
diving shysters and managers who
sanction sharp practice with their
acceptance of it.
To be fair to the Chelsea
manager Antonio Conte on
Wednesday night, when he had
finished making the shape of a TV
monitor during his overwrought
remonstrations with the referee,
there was a whispered
expression of disapproval
of the heinous collapses
of Pedro and Alvaro
Morata against
Norwich – but only in
the context of being
caught red-handed by
VAR.
About the failure of the
VAR system to resolve the
penalty incident involving Willian
and Timm Klose in the match –
which may have negated the need
for extra time, had it been given
– Conte was adamant that the man
in the middle Graham Scott and
video ref Mike Jones should have
consulted with each other.
He might be right, but that is a
procedural issue which does not
undermine the innovation, and
besides is fundamentally not the
point.
The poison at the heart of the
game is not VAR but the diving,
simulation, deception or to give its
proper name, cheating, that in part
has necessitated its introduction.
Alan Shearer looked like he
needed sedation over the failure to
invoke VAR in the Willian incident,
which resulted in an outcome that
was at variance with his view.
Shearer believed Willian (above)
was indeed tackled unfairly by
Klose and was cataclysmic when
Jones failed to buzz his colleague in
the middle.
Determining the weight of
contact is not VAR’s strong suit.
Collisions are not easily unravelled
in slow motion, and therefore the
objectivity sought is not deliverable
in the same way as clearing up goalline confusion.
For a better understanding of
the force required to bring a man
to ground we are perhaps better
served by observing rugby, where
wingers manage to stay upright
with an opponent wrapped around
their waist and another bound to
their ankles.
Willian’s leg went to Klose’s to
initiate his collapse, not the reverse.
If he were striving to meet a ball
at the far post Willian would have
cleared the outstretched limb by
the height of a garden wall. Here he
knew what he was doing. He was
looking for the penalty.
It is always the referees who
get it in the neck for a perceived
mistake, not the players for the
rank dishonesty they perpetuate,
and the atmosphere of hate and
distrust they create. There are
worse examples than Willian’s,
and if there was a scintilla of right
on his side, it is the degrading
reprehension with which officials
are routinely treated that makes
mistakes inevitable.
Not that there was an error
in the case of Morata.
Christoff Zimmermann
had a hand on Morata’s
shoulder but had
removed it at the point
the Chelsea striker
initiated his downward
plunge. Even when
Zimmermann’s arm
was in contact there was
insufficient force to impact on
Morata’s movement. It was entirely
Morata’s own agency that took him
to ground.
Pedro’s craven contribution was
even more dubious, a crass stunt
that would shame him were he
capable of feeling that emotion.
Pedro’s crass stunt was
dubious. It would shame
him, were he capable of
feeling that emotion
We are in the early days of
VAR use. With the necessary
refinements its adoption will
meet with wider acceptance.
There will always be those who
mythologise the past with dewyeyed sentimentality, who see VAR
as a corruption of the purity of the
game, of which errors, they claim,
are a necessary part.
This romantic leaning towards
what was, an appeal to an imagined
utopia, the reluctance to let go of
old traditions, is a thread that runs
through time. But some ideas are
just too compelling to resist and
VAR is surely one.
Football could do worse than
follow the inclusive examples
of tennis, cricket and rugby by
connecting the audience to the
decision-making via a big screen
and audio link to the referee. Those
who yearn for the days when
we were instructed only by the
referee’s whistle, or lack of it, would
be better informed whether they
liked it or not.
Knowledge, like money and
beauty, is a tap you can never turn
off, bringing, we trust, acceptance
– even to the most inveterate
Luddites over time.
62
TENNIS
AUSTRALIAN OPEN
By Paul Newman
AT MELBOURNE PARK
Sport
19.01.18
To the names of Hsieh Su-wei and
Aleksandra Krunic we can add that
of Bernarda Pera. The 23-year-old
Croatian-born American knocked
Britain’s Johanna Konta out of the
Australian Open yesterday, her 6-4,
7-5 second-round victory completing an unlikely hat-trick of surprise
defeats for the world No 10.
Despite her glorious run to the
semi-finals at Wimbledon last summer, Konta has now lost to unsung
opponents in three of her last four
Grand Slam tournaments.
Following her first-round defeats
to Hsieh (world No 109) and Krunic
(world No 78) at last year’s French
and US Opens respectively, Konta
was beaten here by an opponent who
had never played a singles match at a
Grand Slam tournament before this
week.
Pera, the world No 123, was not
even in the draw after losing in the
final round of qualifying but was
given her chance as a ‘lucky loser’
following an injury withdrawal. Striking the ball with impressive power
and keeping her nerve at
the biggest moments,
the left-hander took
full advantage of
what Konta admitBernada Pera’s
ted was a belowworld ranking.
par display.
Johanna Konta’s
The 26-year-old
is No 10
Briton, who had
reached the semifinals and quarterfinals in her last two
appearances here, served poorly,
failed to strike the ball with her customary aggression and often seemed
surprised by the weight and speed of
Pera’s ground strokes.
Konta, who may drop a place or
two in the world rankings after the
tournament, paid a price for her lack
of competition over recent months.
Since August, she has won two
matches in a row only once, in
Brisbane a fortnight ago - when she
had to retire from her quarter-final
because of a hip injury.
She lost her last five matches of
2017 and, because of a foot problem,
had not played for three months
when she began her 2018 campaign.
“When you have that kind of match
fitness, you are able to come through
those difficulties that you find in
every match, every day that you play,”
Konta said afterwards.
“I just didn’t play great. It’s a part
of tennis. It’s a part of everyone’s career. There are always going to be
Konta
down
and out
British No 1 finds herself
on the wrong end of yet
another Grand Slam shock
123
P57
CRICKET
Stokes court date
clashes with
planned return
to England duty
P58
RUGBY UNION
Injury worries
‘no excuse’ for
England as Jones
picks his squad
P60
FOOTBALL
Ronaldinho to
St Mirren... and
other deals that
almost came off
The
Sport
Matrix
The stories you
need to know
days like this.” The Briton’s serve is
usually one of her biggest strengths
but on this occasion it lacked pace
and penetration. Pera had 17 break
points while Konta had only two.
“My serve definitely let me down
a little bit,” Konta admitted. “When
I’m not serving the way I want to,
I don’t think I’m putting as much
She played inspired.
Credit to her. She also stayed
calm and was methodical in
getting the job done
pressure on [my opponent] in their
service games.”
Pera, in contrast, played with all
the freedom you might expect of a
player who had nothing to lose. “I
didn’t put much pressure on myself,
so I think that helped,” she said afterwards. “I was able to stay calm.”
“S he playe d very i n spi red
throughout and I didn’t do enough at
the beginning when I had little windows to put my stamp on the match,”
Konta said. “I felt I didn’t quite get
enough into the match to be able to
get going a little bit.”
“She hits very clean and quite big
RUGBY UNION
Haskell: Ban tackle was a mistake
England flanker James Haskell
admitted he made a mistake
but was disappointed his
four-week ban will rule
him out of the opening
two rounds of the
Six Nations.
Haskell (right) was
sent off following a
dangerous tackle on
Harlequins centre Jamie
Roberts during his club
Wasps’ European Champions
Cup defeat last Sunday and is now
sidelined until 12 February. He
said: “It’s disappointing as I’ve
worked my way back into the
[England] squad.” On the
Roberts tackle, he added:
“From my point of view, it
was an accident... I’ve had
a pretty exemplary record
in terms of discipline stuff.
“A lot of professional
sportsmen and people don’t
admit they’re wrong, so I just
put my hand up and said, ‘listen,
I’ve made a mistake’.”
off both sides. She uses her leftiness
quite well. Credit to her. She also
stayed calm and was very methodical
in getting her end of the job done.”
Konta agreed that some of the results here this week – including her
own – confirmed her view that the
women’s game has great strength in
depth at the moment.
“Players rarely play the reputation
any more,” she added. “It’s anyone’s
game on any day.
“The rankings reflect a player’s
consistency and how well they are
able to come in week in, week out,
and play at that level, but they don’t
CRICKET
Plan to split county
game into three
A proposal to split the County
Championship into three divisions
of six teams apiece has been put
forward to the England and Wales
Cricket Board. Mark Arthur and
Martyn Moxon, respectively chief
executive and director of cricket at
Yorkshire, have submitted plans that
would bring an end to the current
two division structure. The set-up
has been criticised for a lack of
incentives for teams who are not
challenging at either end of the table.
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
48-50
56-63
i FRIDAY
19 JANUARY 2018
63
Edmund won’t let 40C heat cramp his style
By Paul Newman
For a pale-skinned Englishman, the
thought of playing a best-of-five-sets
match in temperatures of 40C
or more might be an intimidating prospect, but Kyle
Edmund has learned
how to cope with such
extreme conditions.
The world No 49 was
set to deal with the hottest weather of the tournament so far when he
faced Georgia’s Nikoloz Basilashvili, the world No 61, in the third
round of the Australian Open early
this morning.
Having suffered sunburn during
his opening match here against
Kevin Anderson on Monday after
failing to apply enough sunblock,
Edmund was reminded by his mother of the need to protect himself.
The 23-year-old Briton
has also suffered cramp in
hot weather in the past
but has worked hard
on his conditioning and
believes he is now better
equipped to handle such
conditions.
“It’s something you
get wiser about as you get
older,” Edmund (left) said. “You
know how to manage your body a bit
more and how your body works. You
have more belief that your body is
going to be fine.
“Nerves play a big part in cramp-
ing as well. It’s funny how the body
“One year I was here, they stopped
works with that. As you get older, matches because it got to 41 to 42
you are more experienced.
and they have that heat rule. But we
“You always get nerves,
were actually practising at
for sure. That’s just
that time.
It’s not so
normal. I’ve accepted that.
“It’s not so much tough
At the end of the day, it’s much playing playing in it. It’s the
just a tennis match. Once in it. It’s the
accumulation of hours
you get on court hitting accumulation which wears you down. It
balls, then it’s just sort of of hours which saps the energy out of you.”
auto-pilot.”
In his only previous
Edmund suffered in ex- wears you
meeting with Basilashtreme heat here two years down. It saps
vili before today, Edmund
ago, when he lost in the first the energy
overcame the Georgian
round to Damir Dzumhur out of you
in the first round of the
in five sets, having won two
French Open two years
of the first three.
ago.
“Physically I was breaking down,”
Edmund won 7-6, 6-7, 7-5, 6-1 after
Edmund recalled. “It’s always hot a gruelling contest that lasted nearly
here. You have to accept that.
three hours. THE INDEPENDENT
Muguruza out
after surprise
defeat to Hsieh
Conditions
leave players
‘just trying
to survive’
By Paul Newman
By Paul Newman
THE INDEPENDENT
Novak Djokovic was reported
to have requested an afternoon
rather than an evening slot for
his second-round encounter with
Gaël Monfils at the Australian
Open, but the former world No 1
might have later regretted it as
the temperatures approached
40C on a scorchingly hot day.
After his 4-6, 6-3, 6-1, 6-3
victory Djokovic described the
conditions as “brutal” and said
they were “right at the limit” in
terms of being a danger to health.
Djokovic, though, certainly
fared better than Monfils, who
faded quickly after the opening
set. “It was obvious that he was
not at his best,” said the Serbian.
“At times, we were both just
trying to get a little bit of extra
breath, a few seconds more, so
we could recover. We were also
getting into some long exchanges
and rallies.
“It was just one of these days
where you had to stay tough
mentally. Physically, it was
obvious that you just have to try
to hang in there.” Monfils said:
“I was dying on the court for 40
RUGBY LEAGUE
CRICKET
Johanna Konta
was beaten in
straight sets by
Bernarda Pera
GETTY IMAGES
guarantee that level every single
day.”
Although Konta said she had felt
comfortable here, she is looking
forward to more matches. She will
play next in the Fed Cup in Estonia
and then in the Qatar Open in Doha.
“I’m looking forward to just continuing to play,” she said. “I didn’t
play very much in the last six months
of last year, so I think I’m where I’m
meant to be right now in my level.
“I feel it is getting better with each
match that I’m playing. I’m figuring
things out and enjoying doing it.”
Toronto axe three
high-profile players
Promoted Toronto Wolfpack have
released three of their high-profile
players, including new signing Dave
Taylor, with the new Championship
season just two weeks away. Taylor,
a former Australia Test forward who
was signed from Canberra Raiders,
has left without playing a game,
along with prop Fuifui Moimoi and
front rower Ryan Bailey. The club,
who have been away on a training
camp in Portugal, did not reveal why
the players have been axed.
Gaël Monfils said the heat left him struggling to breathe yesterday REUTERS
minutes. It was tough to breathe.
It was the hardest [conditions] I
have played in.”
Germany’s Andrea Petkovic,
who was beaten 4-6, 6-0, 6-0 by
Lauren Davis, said she could
not think straight during her
match. “I was just trying to
survive,” she said. “I feel more
for the spectators. There are
a lot of elderly people who like
to watch the tennis, there are
kids, there are people who have
health issues.”
By the evening the
temperature had dropped a little,
though it was still 33C by the time
Roger Federer began the last
England’s young guns win again
England defeated Bangladesh by
seven wickets in their second
game of the Under-19s
World Cup in New
Zealand yesterday,
with captain Harry
Brook (right) scoring
a century
After thrashing
Namibia by eight
wickets in their opening
game, England again raced
to victory after restricting
Bangladesh to 175 all out in
Queenstown. Atif Hossain’s 63 from
85 balls helped pull Bangladesh
to a reasonable total. Seamer
Ethan Bamber and
all-rounder Euan Woods
both took three wickets.
After an early wobble at
49 for three, both Brook
(102 from 84 balls) and
Woods (48) were unbeaten
at the end as England – who
face Canada tomorrow in their
final group game – won with 123
balls to spare.
match of the evening in Rod Laver
Arena. The defending champion
beat Germany’s Jan-Lennard
Struff 6-4, 6-4, 7-6.
Federer’s Swiss colleague,
Stan Wawrinka, was beaten 6-2,
6-1, 6-4 by the American Tennys
Sandgren in the final match in
Margaret Court Arena.
Wawrinka, who had knee
surgery last summer and
only decided to play here 48
hours before the start of the
tournament, was in physical
difficulty from the start. He
clutched his knee regularly
and struggled with his
movement. THE INDEPENDENT
FOOTBALL
Dyche denies claims
that he eats worms
Burnley manager Sean Dyche has
laughed off a claim by a former
team-mate that he eats worms to
contribute to his gravel voice. The
claims were made by Danish striker
Soren Andersen, who played with
Dyche at Bristol City. Dyche said
that a training ground prank had
been lost in translation. “I also
smoke exhaust pipes. I have gravel
for breakfast. Those three combined
often are the things that keep this
voice sounding how it is,” Dyche said.
Wimbledon champion Garbine
Muguruza became the biggest
casualty of the Australian Open so
far when she was beaten by Hsieh
Su-wei in the second round.
The third seed (below) was unable
to deal with the unorthodox game
of Hsieh – the world No 88 – at
Melbourne Park and slumped to a
7-6, 6-2 defeat.
Maria Sharapova and Angelique
Kerber, champions here
in 2008 and 2016, will
meet in a heavyweight contest in
the third round
tomorrow after
winning their
matches in convincing fashion.
Sharapova beat
Anastasija Sevastova 6-1, 7-6, having lost
to the Latvian at last year’s
US Open.
Kerber celebrated her 30th birthday with a crushing 6-4, 6-1 victory
over Donna Vekic.
Simona Halep, the world No 1, enjoyed a quickfire 6-2, 6-2 victory over
Eugenie Bouchard, who held serve
only once in the match. Bouchard,
who beat Halep in the semi-finals
at Wimbledon in 2014, lost in just 65
minutes. THE INDEPENDENT
Sport on tv
ODI Cricket: Australia v England
BT Sport 1, until 11.15am
Tennis: Australian Open
Eurosport, until 1.30pm
Golf: Abu Dhabi Championship
Sky Sports Golf, 7am
Snooker: The Masters
BBC Two, 1pm
Golf: Careerbuilder Challenge
Sky Sports Golf, 4pm
Football: Derby v Bristol City
Sky Sports Football, 7pm
Rugby union: Gloucester v Pau
Sky Sports Action, 7pm
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