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The i Newspaper – January 22, 2018

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Andy who?
England too
fast for Australia
plus all the
weekend’s
football action
Kyle Edmund
emerges as
our great
tennis hope
p
P53
60
As women march
against Trump
ALSO IN SPORT
Kim Sengupta on
the greatest threat
to the President
P26
QUA L I T Y, C O N C I S E – T H E F U T U R E O F I N D E PE N D E N T JOU R NA L I S M
Revealed:
how UK
aids ivory
Britain at risk
from Russian
cyber attack,
warns head
of Army
P5
Macron spells
out price of a
‘special deal’
for Britain
P6
»
Flood and ice
warnings after
temperatures
plummet
»
MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
»
P11
Number 2,234
i investigation
News.co.uk
reveals
‘shocking’ lack
of disabled
housing
i@inews.co.uk
@theipaper
theipaper theipaper
INSIDE REBECCA ARMSTRONG
The Times
© 2017 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.
P13
SPECIAL REPORT – P4 & 5
P18
I ANDY STREET
Radio Times
P20
Empire
I TV & RADIO GUIDE
Total Film
Total Film
O UT N OW ON BLU -R AY™,
DVD & DIG ITAL D OWNLOAD
✦1998, Best Supporting Actress, Shakespeare in Love. “Academy Award®”is the registered tradmark and service mark of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
P28
I MEDIA
P39
The
News
Matrix
CONSUMER
Why are Ed
Sheeran and his
girlfriend Cherry
Seaborn’s cats
‘chuffed’?
See p.17
The day at
a glance
IMMIGRATION
MONDAY
22
JANUARY
Quote of the day
Advice is what we ask for
when we already know the
answer but wish we didn’t
ERICA JONG
ENVIRONMENT
Grenfell fire leads to
product recall group
The Government has set up a
body to help monitor product
safety, after warnings following the
Grenfell Tower tragedy. The Office
for Product Safety and Standards
will help manage large-scale
product recalls and identify risks
to consumers.
TELEVISION
WEALTH
Home Office defends Lloyd’s to stop
detention payouts
investing in coal
‘Big Brother’ faces
axe after 18 years
Rich get richer but
poorest see no rise
The Home Office has paid out
more than £21m to migrants who
were unlawfully detained, new
figures reveal. Shadow immigration
minister Afzal Khan said the payouts
raised “serious questions”. The
Home Office said later court rulings
did not mean the original decision
had been “taken in bad faith”.
Lloyd’s of London plans to stop
investing in coal companies because
of the link with climate change.
Inga Beale, chief executive at the
insurance market, said: “In areas of
our portfolio where we can directly
influence investment decisions we
will avoid investing in companies
that are involved mainly in coal.”
The Big Brother and Celebrity Big
Brother TV shows are reportedly to
be axed by Channel 5 after 18 years.
According to a report they will be
taken off air at the end of 2018 due to
poor ratings. The channel’s contract
with the shows’ production company,
Endemol, ends later this year and is
not expected to be renewed.
Growing inequality resulted in 82
per cent of new global wealth going
to the richest 1 per cent last year,
while the poorest half of the world
saw prosperity flatline, Oxfam
claims. Of the $9.2trn(£7.3trn)
increase in wealth, $7.6trn went to 75
million people, while 3.7 billion saw
no increase. PAGE 25
JAMAICA
LITERATURE
POLICE
First edition Biggles
book up for auction
Football fan ‘urinated Tourists warned to
in goalkeeper’s bottle’ stay in their resorts
Arrest warning for
exiled Puigdemont
SPAIN
A first edition of the original Biggles
(Captain James Bigglesworth) book
is to be auctioned. Published in 1932,
The Camels Are Coming was the first
of almost 100 books by William Earle
Johns, who usually wrote as W E
Johns. Keys Fine Art Auctioneers
in Aylsham, Norfolk, is giving a
pre-sale estimate of £500 to £600.
A Middlesbrough football fan has
been arrested for allegedly urinating
in the opposition team goalkeeper’s
water bottle. The man faces a court
appearance following the alleged
incident at Queens Park Rangers’
ground. Video on social media
showed a man throwing a bottle on
to the pitch behind the QPR goal.
Spain’s state prosecution service will
seek the arrest of the former Catalan
President Carles Puigdemont if he
travels from Belgium to Denmark
today to attend a debate he is billed
as being the host of. Mr Puigdemont
fled to Brussels after his regional
government declared independence
in October last year.
British tourists in Jamaica are
being urged to stay in the confines
of their resort due to a military
crackdown on violent crime on the
island. Holidaymakers in the popular
destination of Montego Bay were
warned to limit any activity outside
of their resorts, especially at night,
due to gang activity.
Birthdays
Jazzy Jeff, DJ/producer,
53; Jonathan Woodgate,
football coach, 38; Nigel
Benn, former boxer, 54;
Linda Blair (below), actress,
59; Andrew Roachford,
singer, 53
MONEY
The List
Children’s
spending
Children aged seven to 15 years old kept a two-week diary of spending money
they received as pocket money, gifts, or through jobs. On average they spend
£12.40 a week. This increased with age. A 15 year-old spent more than three
times as much as a seven-year-old.
Councils with most
substandard bridges
Age and spend (2015-2017)*
7
Anniversaries
Tuesday 22 January 1980
An outspoken critic of
the Soviet Union, nuclear
physicist Dr Andrei
Sakharov, is ordered into
internal exile. Officials in
Moscow were angered by
an interview he gave US
television the week before,
in which he called for
the withdrawal of Soviet
troops from Afghanistan.
Nearly 3,500 council-maintained
bridges across the UK are
substandard. More than 2,000
need improvement works, but
straitened town hall budgets
mean that only 14 per cent are due
for improvement, the RAC has
warned. These authorities have
the highest number of inadequate
bridges:
1. Devon (below) 249
2. Somerset 168
3. Essex 160
4. Cornwall 144
5. Suffolk 128
6. Northumberland 123
7. Lancashire 104
8. Wigan 100
9. Cumbria 70
10. Gloucestershire 69
Subscribe to i at
i-subscription.co.uk
Books
Girls 7-15 30p
10
£9
Boys 7-15 15p
15
£8.50
£20.20 13-15-year-olds £17.30
£11
£11
12
Girls 7-15 10p
7-9-year-olds
£11.40 10-12-year-olds £10.60
£12
13
14
Boys
£7.50
£9
Computer game
s
and software
Boys 7-15 £1.10
£15
£25
Frequently purchased items
Toys and games
Ice cream
Fizzy drinks (bought at least one
Bought at least one
in a fortnight
Bought at least one
in a fortnight
56% of boys and
38% of
girls aged 7-15
7-to-9-year-olds
75% of
13-to-15-year-olds
Newspapers support recycling
The recycled content of UK
newspapers in 2015 was 71%
£8
11
Differences in items
bought by gender
Weekly spend
Girls
9
drink within a 2-week period)
index
Crossword.............20
TV & Radio...........28
Arts..............................34
Business..................38
Puzzles.....................42
Weather...................45
8
Girls v boys
£7
90p
Average
weekly
spend
Aged 7-9
27%
22%
Aged 10-12
4%
Aged 13-15
5%
15%
Aged 7-9
Aged 13-15
* Three years of data, (FYE 2015, 2016, 2017) not adjusted for inflation.
©Published by Johnston Publications Limited, 2 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0PU, and printed at
Trinity Mirror Printing, St Albans Road, Watford; Hollinwood Avenue, Oldham; and Cardonald Park,
Glasgow. Also printed at Carn Web, Carn Industrial Estate, Portadown. Back issues available from Historic
Newspapers, 0844 770 7684. Monday 22 January 2018. Registered as a newspaper with the Post Office.
SOURCE: ONS
Select journalism in i is copyright
independent.co.uk and copyright
Evening Standard, beyond those
accredited as such.
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
3
ThePage3Profile
UNITED STATES
ICE MAIDENS, FIRST ALL-FEMALE TEAM TO CROSS
ANTARCTICA USING ONLY MUSCLE POWER
Golf fills a quarter
of Trump’s time
Oliver Duff
Donald Trump has visited a golf
club on around one-quarter of the
days he has been President. The US
leader has spent time at a course or
resort on 91 of 364 days, according to
White House schedules and pooled
press reports. US officials often say
that Mr Trump uses the sport for
diplomacy purposes.
Fat, balding bus driver
seeks others…
TELEVISION
‘Geordie Shore’
awash with alcohol
Almost 80 per cent of scenes in
MTV’s reality show Geordie Shore
contain alcohol content or alcohol
use, a study has found. Researchers
from Bath and Nottingham
universities want more to be done to
protect young viewers from alcohol
imagery, including a potential review
of age classification policy.
Who’s behind the masks?
Six exhausted and elated women
have reached the finish line in their
epic expedition, having crossed
17,000km of snow and ice on a
62-day trek across the Antarctic.
They’re the first all-female team
to make the journey using muscle
power alone.
Was it all plain sailing?
Battling temperatures as low as
-40C, winds of 60mph and dragging
sleds weighing up to 80kg, the
British Army team used skis to
navigate a landscape riven with deep
crevasses. Major Nics Wetherill
said they had been “lucky with the
weather” and had been relatively
trouble-free. “I’m glad to say that
everyone has all their 10 fingers, 10
toes, two ears and one nose,” said
Major Wetherill, who organised
the trip with fellow Medical Corps
doctor Major Natalie Taylor.
Who did they get to go with them?
The doctors took 250 applicants
to Norway and put them through
their paces in freezing conditions,
before selecting the Antarctic team,
which included reservist Major
Sandy Hennis of the Royal Signals,
Captain Zanna Baker and Lieutenant
Jenni Stephenson, both of the Royal
Artillery, and Honourable Artillery
Company reservist Lance Sergeant
Sophie Montagne.
Why put yourself through that?
Lance Sergeant Montagne described
reaching the South Pole as the
fulfilment of a “lifelong dream”,
but there was more than personal
achievement at stake. The history
of polar exploration is dominated by
men and Major Sandy Hennis said: “I
really want to inspire other women
to get out there and do things they
wouldn’t normally be doing, or think
would be possible.”
They must be sick of the sight of
snow by now?
While happy to be heading home
to their loved ones at the end of the
long trek, the realisation of their
biggest challenge took a while to
sink in. “We can’t really believe it is
over,” Capt Baker said shortly after
reaching the finish line at Hercules
Inlet. Major Taylor said she had
tried to “imprint this beautiful
landscape in my mind”, adding: “We
have called it home for close to two
months now and I will, in a strange
way, miss it a lot.”
How have they been received?
The Countess of Wessex said they
were “an amazing and inspirational
team of women” and told them to
“never underestimate what you
have done”. Defence Secretary
Gavin Williamson congratulated
the “heroic Ice Maidens” on “their
formidable and trailblazing trek”,
adding: “They are an inspiration to
us all and are role models to young
people across the country.”
William McLennan
SWITZERLAND
Alpine village cut
off for second time
A village near the Matterhorn peak
is again cut off to road and rail
traffic after fresh snowfall renewed
the danger of avalanches. The
Matterhorn Gotthard railway said
that land access to the Alpine resort
of Zermatt would be closed to at
least noon today, but that helicopters
were still taking people in and out.
LEBANON
Five-fold increase in
female MPs sought
Lebanon is campaigning to get at
least five times more women elected
to parliament this spring in a first
vote for 10 years. Despite a relatively
free press, diverse religious groups
and women in prominent positions
in business and the media, Lebanon
ranks low when it comes to female
representation in politics.
Letter from
the Editor
i@inews.co.uk
I was entertained to hear from so
many of you in response to Friday’s
Letter from the Editor, about who i’s
readers are and where you come from.
Graham Haines from north
of Inverness asks for a little
more information about his own
demographic, specifically, in his words:
“Fat, balding, ex-tabloid-reading bus
drivers from the north of Scotland.”
Graham, I’ll consult our research
team and come back to you with
the statistical breakdown for your
particular community. I guarantee
you’ll be in good company.
He adds: “I read a quality but haven’t
always – I cut my teeth when I was
a youngster on my dad’s Sun and
Mirror. I should also point out that
I am an English immigrant… just to
give your researchers the start of a
heavy migraine.”
Word reaches me that Colin Firth
has been seen picking up i. He joins
other readers such as Theresa May,
Jeremy Corbyn and Elizabeth Hurley
(who especially likes the puzzles).
This latest development is almost
as exciting as the episode of Silent
Witness when Jack, clinging to life
in hospital after being attacked by
some wrong’un, was rejuvenated
by reading a copy of i that someone
had thoughtfully left on his bedside
table. I am obliged to add that the
medicinal properties of i still require
phase-two trials.
Northern Ireland’s Jarron Kelly
writes: “I am a former Guardian app
reader but am now attracted toi for
its depth of world news and general
international focus. I also like the
connection between readers and the
editorial, with updates on how the
paper is doing and what its plans may
be.” He suggests promoting i more in
universities and schools.
Please keep ’em coming.
Do you belong to a more specific
segmentation of i’s readership
than Graham?
Til tomorrow.
Twitter: @olyduff
4
NEWS
NATURE
Online trading puts
pressure on Britain
to ban all ivory sales
More than 20,000 elephants are killed every year
to supply a flourishing international market
EXCLUSIVE
By Cahal Milmo
CHIEF REPORTER
Illegal ivory is being openly traded
on internet auction and social
media sites in Britain as criminals
“launder” poached elephant
tusk products by selling online,
conservation experts have warned.
Dozens of items carved from
elephant tusks are being offered
for sale online daily by sellers based
in countries including Britain as
organised crime gangs target the
remaining markets where ivory can
still be sold legally as antique.
The introduction by China this
month of a complete ban on all
ivory sales has increased pressure
on Britain and other EU countries
to bring in their own blanket
prohibition to prevent existing
legitimate commercial trade being
used as a smokescreen for poached
ivory. The Government has said it
expects to bring forward such a ban
later this year.
Researchers have found evidence
that in the meantime the illegal
trade – part of a global illicit wildlife
trade worth up to $26.5bn (£19.6bn)
– is flourishing. More than 20,000
elephants a year are still being
slaughtered by poachers in Africa.
A study by the University of Kent
found that barely any ivory or other
illegal wildlife products are being
sold via the so-called “darknet”,
where there is a flourishing criminal
market in drugs and firearms.
Instead, the researchers found
that ivory is being sold openly on
conventional auction sites, including
eBay. Traders are exploiting
complex rules which are meant to
restrict the trade in Britain to pre1947 “antiques” but can act as a
cover for the sale of items fashioned
from poached elephant tusks.
Despite perfecting a prototype
software system which can pinpoint
potentially illegal ivory with 93
per cent accuracy, the University
of Kent team has been told by law
enforcement agencies and wildlife
protection groups that they cannot
afford to fund its deployment on the
front line. As a result, campaigners
and researchers have warned that
sellers of illegal ivory are trading
with a worrying degree of impunity
on the “surface” web, often by
misdescribing recent ivory as
antique. In some cases, sellers have
been found trying to sell “raw” or
whole elephant tusks.
Dr David Roberts, a conservation
scientist at the University of
Kent and co-author of the study
Antique laws
The 1947 rule
The fight against illegal ivory
poaching has long taken place
against a complex backdrop of laws,
permits and licences that seek to
enforce bans on the illegal trade and
regulate the remaining legal trade.
In Britain, the legal trade is subject
to one key date: 1947. The law states
that any ivory acquired before that
year is deemed “antique” and can
therefore be sold legally.
The date is an accident of a
sobering aspect of scientific
endeavour. Testing of nuclear
weapons in the 1940s and 50s
means that any creature, including
elephants, alive after 1947 has
elevated levels of the substance
carbon-14 in its body. Carbon dating
can, therefore, be used to discern
whether ivory is “antique”. But the
test costs about £350 per item.
Cahal Milmo
into illegally traded wildlife, said:
“The surface web is being used by
criminals because they have found
they can trade there for the most
part with impunity. Unlike those
selling drugs or guns, they don’t feel
they have to move to the darknet.
“Whatisfrustratingisthattackling
this online trade does not seem to be
a priority. It falls between boots-onthe-ground enforcement against
poaching in Africa and reduction
of demand in South-East Asia. We
have had enforcement agencies and
campaign groups say they would
like to have our software as an
enforcement tool but they don’t have
the funding to progress it further.”
Rather than blatantly advertising
In Britain, carved ivory may still be
sold as ‘antique’, depending on when
it was made GETTY
items as “elephant ivory”, online
traders use alternative keywords
recognised by buyers, at least some
of whom are likely to know that they
may be purchasing illicit items.
Using these keywords, i was
able to find four potentially illegal
elephant ivory figures for sale on
eBay, which has a policy of not
allowing the sale of any elephant
ivory products. Three of the items,
which experts confirmed were
genuine ivory, were being offered
by UK-based sellers while another
was being sold in the US, which last
year brought in its own blanket ban
on all ivory sales. i has agreed not to
disclose the search terms used by
the ivory sellers.
The trade highlights the difficulty
in distinguishing between legal
antique ivory and products which
are advertised as antique but are in
reality recently poached ivory. The
only reliable method of telling the
age of ivory – carbon dating – costs
around £400 per test.
EBay has been one of the
leading advocates of a total ban on
commercial ivory sales in the EU
and has trained staff how to pinpoint
items. It said it removed more than
25,000 listings for illegal wildlife
goods last year after working with
the International Fund for Animal
Welfare (IFAW), a conservation body.
“We work with conservation
groups including IFAW and go
beyond legal requirements to
restrict the sale of ivory products
on our marketplace. The eBay Trust
and Safety team scours the site each
day to take action on any items of
concern, for example when an item
is listed maliciously,” eBay said.
Conservationists warn that
Britain and EU countries find
themselves as potential conduits
for illegal ivory because they are
currently the largest exporters of
legal ivory products. A total of 2,242
elephant tusks and more than 44,000
ivory products were legally exported
from the EU in the decade to 2015 –
and Britain, which granted licences
for 36,000 items between 2010 and
2015, is by far the largest supplier.
Will Travers, co-founder of the
Born Free wildlife charity, said:
“The presence of this large legal
trade in ivory products to, within
and from the EU stimulates global
demand and provides poachers
and traffickers with a mechanism
by which illegal ivory from recently
killed elephants can be laundered
into the trade.”
Britain will host an international
conference in October on measures
to curb the illegal wildlife trade.
Major trafficking routes of large-scale African
Source
Transit
Consumption
Spain
UAE
Nigeria
Cameroon
Togo
Information based
on cases of 117 illegal
ivory seizures larger
than 500kg
Dem. Rep.
Congo
Kenya
Tanzania
Zanzibar
Malawi
Represents
approximately
208 tons of ivory
Equivalent to
31,571 elephant tusks
Mozambique
South Africa
Poaching at monitored sites in Africa2011
84%
84%
West Africa
90%
90%
Central
59%
East Africa
51%
South Africa
CASE STUDY
Elephant tusks and rhino
horns for sale on Instagram
By Cahal Milmo
The use of the open internet
by British wildlife criminals
to sell their wares is shown
by the case of Abbas Allawi,
a businessman who took to
Instagram to sell items including
elephant tusks.
The 52-year-old was arrested
when officers using dogs specially
trained to detect rhino horn
found a stash of illegal parts from
endangered species worth up to
£2m in his attic.
Allawi (pictured right) had been
trying to sell two elephant tusks,
three rhino horns and four hippo
teeth on the social media site for
“cash only” at a rate of £60,000
per kilogram.
Under legislation introduced in
NEWS
2-27
consignments of ivory 2000-2015
Japan
China
Laos
Thailand
Hong
Kong
Taiwan
Vietnam
Philippines
Sri Lanka
Malaysia
Singapore
10 Asian countries with the most ivory seized
Total weight of seizures in pounds by country or region (1980-2011)
14,900
177,00
18,800
19,000
23,500
29,000
40,500
45,500
47,100
India
Singapore
Malaysia
Japan
Philippines
Vietnam
Taiwan
Hong Kong
Thailand
China
90,600
Global ivory exports by number of items
2010-2015
36,135
9,824
UK
8,627
US
1997, it is illegal in Britain to sell
items such as elephant ivory and
rhino horns – and detectives
found evidence that
Allawi, who was jailed
for 14 months in
November, knew
he was dealing in
illicit material.
In online
messages
to potential
purchasers, Allawi,
from Watford,
Hertfordshire,
described his offerings as
“banned things”.
6,978
6,538
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
HISTORY
DEFENCE
Colonial era
shaped UK’s
legal trade in
animal parts
UK would struggle
to match Russia,
warns Army chief
By Cahal Milmo
By Kim Sengupta
Britain’s colonial legacy helps to
put it in a unique – and increasingly
unenviable – position as the world’s
largest exporter of legal ivory.
Hundreds of thousands of items
brought into Britain during the days
of empire, and then throughout the
post-war period because of close
links with former colonies in Africa
and Asia, mean the UK is awash with
ivory often described as “antique”.
The London-based Environmental
Investigation Agency (EIA) revealed
last year that Britain issued export
licences for more than 36,000 legal
ivory items between 2010 and 2015.
The figure is more than three times
that of next largest exporter, the
United States, with 9,824 licences.
Britain was also by far
the largest exporter
to China and Hong
Kong, with 13,056
items destined
for the country
and the former
British colony,
which until
they announced
their own bans on
all ivory trade were
also among the main
destinations for illegal,
poached ivory.
The bans in the Far East (China
introduced its prohibition this month
and Hong Kong, home to the world’s
largest ivory retail market, is due
to follow by 2022) leave Britain and
other European countries in the
position of being the only remaining
sizeable traders to still allow a
commercial ivory trade.
The EIA’s executive director, Mary
Rice (inset), said: “As well as fuelling
demand for ivory, the UK’s legal
trade provides opportunities for the
laundering of illegal ivory, both within
the country and internationally.”
Britain is expected to announce
its own ban on the commercial ivory
trade, subject to a small number of
exceptions, later this year.
Britain risks being vulnerable
to enemy action, including
cyber attacks, unless adequate
resources are urgently devoted to
the nation’s defence, the head of
the British Army will warn today.
Pointing to conventional
threats, General Sir Nick Carter
will stress that Vladimir Putin’s
Russia has built an aggressive
military force which this “country
would struggle to match”.
He will describe how the
Kremlin has been ready to use its
advanced capabilities in conflicts
in Syria and Ukraine. The Chief of
the General Staff will also warn of
clandestine cyber offensives from
abroad which can affect not only
public institutions, but the lives of
ordinary people in the UK.
General Carter’s address,
at the Royal United Services
Institute, comes at a time when
the Government has come under
criticism from politicians and
former senior military officers for
cutting back on defence spending.
Simultaneously, Russia has
been blamed for cyber warfare on
the West, with claims of the US
and European elections, as well
as the Brexit referendum, being
targeted. Just two months ago,
Theresa May publicly accused
Russia of being behind cyber
attacks on the West.
The Kremlin has showed its
military prowess in the battlefield
in Syria, and General Carter said
it has also kept up sabre-rattling
in Europe with simulated attacks.
“Our ability to pre - empt
or respond to threats will be
eroded if we don’t keep up
Elephant tusks are unloaded at a
dock in London in preparation for
an auction in 1937 KEYSTONE/GETTY
5
Gen Sir Nick Carter said Britain
faced threats on its doorstep
with our adversaries. Statebased competition is now being
employed in more novel and
increasingly integrated ways and
we must be ready to deal with
them,” General Carter will say.
“The threats we face are not
thousands of miles away but are
now on Europe’s doorstep – we
have seen how cyber warfare can
be both waged on the battlefield
and to disrupt normal people’s
lives – we in the UK are not
immune from that.
“We must take notice of what is
going on around us or our ability
to take action will be massively
constrained. Speed of decision
making, speed of deployment and
modern capability are essential
if we wish to provide a realistic
deterrence. The time to address
these threats is now – we cannot
afford to sit back.”
Last month, the head of the
Armed Forces, Air Chief Marshal
Sir Stuart Peach, warned that
Russia posed a threat to Britain’s
internet access and trade because
under-sea communication cables
were vulnerable to its navy.
THE INDEPENDENT
POLITICS
Ukip leader Bolton loses
vote of no confidence
By Sam Lister
ItalySOURCE: ENVIRONMENTAL
SwitzerlandINVESTIGATION
INVE Zimbabwe
TI ATI N A
AGENCY
EN Y
The weight of the two elephant
tusks alone was 40kg.
Detective Constable
Christopher Jones, of
the Metropolitan
Police Wildlife Crime
Unit, said: “A world
without iconic
species such as
rhinos and elephants
would be a sad place.
“Police are the
last line of defence for
some of these beautiful
creatures but we will seek
to prosecute anyone found to
be trading illegally.”
IQ
30-37
The ruling committee of the
UK Independence Party (Ukip)
unanimously backed a vote of no
confidence in its leader, Henry
Bolton, yesterday.
Party members will now be
given a vote on whether the
former Army officer, 54,
should remain in post.
Before the meeting
o f U k i p’s n at i o n a l
executive, Mr Bolton
insisted he would not quit
and said forcing him out
would probably mean the end
of the party because a contest to
replace him “would be financially
almost unviable for the party”.
A spokesman for Ukip said:
“The committee took the decision
to hold a vote of no confidence in
the leadership of Henry Bolton.
The vote was carried unanimously,
with the exception of the leader.
This decision will automatically
trigger an emergency general
meeting, to allow the membership
of Ukip the democratic
opportunity to decide to
endorse or reject that vote
of no confidence.”
An emergency general
meeting must be staged
within 28 days. Party
members will be told
when and where in the
next 10 days.
Mr Bolton (inset) faced
calls to quit following his affair
with Jo Marney, a 25-year-old
model who was revealed to have
made offensive comments about
Meghan Markle and black people.
The couple are no longer together.
6
NEWS
EUROPE
Macron spells out price of
a ‘special deal’ for Britain
By Richard Vaughan
Emmanuel Macron has said Britain
could be offered a “special” trade
deal with the EU after Brexit, but
warned it would come at a price.
The French President spelt out
that Britain would not have full
access to the single market unless it
agreed to all of the rules that came
with it, something Theresa May has
ruled out.
Last week Mr Macron issued his
strongest warning yet that Brussels
would not allow British “hypocrisy”
in seeking to keep the economic
benefits of EU membership after
leaving the bloc.
But when asked during an
interview shown yesterday on
the BBC’s The Andrew Marr Show
whether Britain could have a
bespoke deal with the EU, he
said it would be possible, but
with “preconditions”.
He said: “Sure, but… this special
way should be consistent with the
preservation of the single market
and our collective interests.
“And you should understand that
you cannot, by definition, have the
full access to the single market if you
don’t tick the box.” He added: “So it’s
something perhaps between this full
access and a trade agreement.”
A future relationship would be
“less deep” than the status quo, Mr
Macron warned.
“The deepest possible
relationship is being a member of
the European Union. So you have
to be realistic, and be fair with
people – as you decided to leave and
not be part of the single market,
that’s a function of the nature of the
negotiation,” he said.
“You can have some deeper
relations than some others.
For instance, we have a deeper
relationship with Norway than
the one we have with Canada.
So it depends on the outcome of
the negotiations.
“But for sure – except if you
change your mind – you will not be
part of the single market, as you will
not be part of the European Union.”
Mr Macron reiterated the
EU’s line that there could be no
“cherry-picking” when it came to
membership of the single market,
which comes with the so-called four
pillars, namely free movement of
goods, services, capital and people.
“There should be no cherrypicking in the single market because
that’s a dismantling of the single
market,” he said.
“As soon as you decide not to join
the [EU] preconditions, it’s not a
full access.
“What is important is to not make
people believe that it is possible to
[have your cake and eat it].”
The 40-year-old said it was a
“mistake” for the UK to hold a
“yes/no” referendum in 2016, and
admitted that the French people
would “probably” have voted to
leave under a similar choice.
“You always take a risk when you
ask in a referendum yes or no on a
very complicated subject,” he said.
Mr Macron said allowing
the UK’s financial services sector access to the EU was
“not feasible” without all of the
single-market requirements.
However, there was no need to
“unplug” the City from the EU.
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
7
LABOUR
I don’t have to
apologise for
McVey remarks,
says McDonnell
By Richard Vaughan
Emmanuel
Macron (left)
speaks to Andrew
Marr during the
interview PA
DIPLOMACY
May will meet Trump
at Davos to repair
‘special relationship’
By Richard Vaughan
Theresa May is due to hold “clear the
air” talks with Donald Trump during
a last-minute meeting at the World
Economic Forum in Davos this week.
The two leaders will meet at the
event in the Swiss Alps for the first
time since their relationship took
a nosedive after a series of public
disagreements.
Downing Street and the White
House each confirmed the meeting
would take place, which comes
after the US President pulled out
of plans to visit the UK next month
for the opening of the new American
embassy in London. The President
said the visit was ditched because of
the location of the embassy, adding it
was a “bad deal”.
Mrs May will hope to press the
reset button on the relationship,
which started nearly a year ago with
the pair holding hands.
The Prime Minister was the first
world leader to visit Mr Trump at the
White House following his election,
and even offered to hold a state visit
for the New York tycoon.
But Mrs May has been under
pressure to take an increasingly
critical line with the billionaire, who
provoked outcry after he retweeted
racist and Islamophobic videos by the
far-right group Britain First.
In November, the Prime Minister’s
spokesman said the President
was “wrong” for tweeting the
inflammatory videos.
But in a highly unusual move,
Mr Trump attacked Mrs May via
Twitter, telling her to not “focus on
me, focus on the destructive radical
Islamic terrorism that is taking place
within the United Kingdom”.
Mr Trump further antagonised
No 10 by officially recognising
Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, pledging
to move the US embassy to the city
on the border of the West Bank. Mrs
May criticised the decision, saying it
was “unhelpful in terms of prospects
for peace in the region”.
Downing Street is eager to repair
the “special relationship” with
Washington, particularly as the UK
Government wants to forge a free
trade deal with the US once it leaves
the EU.
Meanwhile Boris Johnson is due to
meet the US Secretary of State, Rex
Tillerson, this week at the opening
of the US embassy in Battersea,
south London. Ahead of the visit,
the Foreign Secretary commented
on the controversy over Mr Trump’s
cancelled visit to Britain.
Mr Johnson pointed out that
President Trump had visited
several countries, including France,
Germany, Japan and China. It was
time for Labour to end their “Spartist
agitations”, he said.
Jo h n M c D o n n e l l h a s aga i n
refused to apologise for repeating
comments he made calling for
Cabinet minister Esther McVey to
be “lynched”.
The Shadow Chancellor (inset)
was recorded during an event in
2014, in which he said people in
Liverpool were using the violent
language about Ms McVey, who
was employment minister
at the time.
M r M c D o n n e l l ’s
comments resurfaced
after the Tory MP
was promoted to
Work and Pensions
Secretary this month,
with Commons leader
Andrea Leadsom
branding them “truly evil”.
Appearing at a comedy
night organised by the Stop the
War Coalition on Remembrance
Sunday 2014, Mr McDonnell
quoted an activist who had shouted
that instead of sacking Ms McVey,
Labour should be “lynching
the bastard”.
But the Labour frontbencher
insisted he was quoting other people
so he has nothing to apologise for.
He told BBC One’s The Andrew
Marr Show: “ I ’m s u r p r i s e d
at Andrea. I like her, she’s a
good woman.”
Mr McDonnell said he had
not been quoting the comments
approvingly. “It was a stand-up
thing and I was saying, look, this is
how rough politics is up there.”
The Shadow Chancellor said he
had previously “refuted completely”
t h e accu s at i o n s wh e n M Ps
“misinterpreted it” and insisted he
did “not wish harm to anybody”.
Asked if he would apologise to Ms
McVey, he replied: “It is for those
people who made that statement if
they wish to make that apology.”
Ms Leadsom last
week condemned Mr
McDonnell, saying:
“This is truly evil.
Utterly disgusting.
The laughter about
launching a campaign
against Esther McVey
and the guffaws about
killing her. Seriously?
Is this Jeremy Corbyn’s
kinder, gentler politics?”
James Cleverly, deputy chairman
of the Conservative Party, criticised
Mr McDonnell’s decision not to
apologise for the “sickening abuse”
Ian Birrell, page 15
Mr Marr asked Mr
McDonnell if he wanted
him to play the audio of the
comments. “You don’t need to, I
know exactly what was on it,” he
replied. The producers took the
decision not to play the audio.
ECONOMY
Carillion to cost taxpayers
a ‘significant amount’
By Harriet Line
Ministers do not have a “full
estimate” of how much the collapse
of construction services company
Carillion will cost the taxpayer, Liz
Truss has said.
The Chief Secretary
to the Treasury said it
would be “completely
wrong” to speculate,
but admitted it would
be a “significant
amount of money”.
“At the moment
we don’t have a full
estimate… We’ve been
working to make sure
public services keep going,
that’s of course our most important
priority,” she told ITV’s Peston
on Sunday.
“There’s a lot of investigatory
work to do in terms of what the
directors knew and when they knew
it, but also making sure that we can
move those contracts on.
“It’s right that that’s our priority
– making sure things work – but of
course we will be doing a sort of
post review of understanding
what the total costs are.”
Ms Truss (left) was
later challenged on
wh e t h e r s h e wa s
being “economical
with the truth”
about the cost of the
collapse, and said:
“There’s a difference
between the cost that
the administrator finds
and what the impact will be on
public spending and public services.
“What I’m talking about is the
cost to the taxpayer… and where
we can find savings and efficiencies
which I am constantly looking for.”
Theresa May said directors would not
be allowed to put pensions at risk PA
BUSINESS
PM pledges
fines in wake
of corporate
scandal
By Sam Lister
Huge fines will be imposed on
irresponsible company bosses
who “line their own pockets”,
Theresa May has said.
The Prime Minister will outline
plans in the coming weeks to crack
down on “abuse” of the system
by business chiefs following the
Carillion scandal.
Proposals include giving the
pensions regulator specific
powers to issue punitive fines on
company directors in cases of
clear wrongdoing, according to
The Observer.
Mrs May revived the pledge she
made on taking power to prioritise
“ordinary working people” rather
than the “privileged few”.
Several former executives at
failed outsourcing giant Carillion
received significant pay and perks
packages before it collapsed.
The PM told the newspaper
“tough new rules” will be
introduced to tackle the
behaviour of “executives who
try to line their own pockets by
putting their workers’ pensions at
risk – an unacceptable abuse that
we will end”.
She added: “Too often we’ve
seen top executives reaping big
bonuses for recklessly putting
short-term profit ahead of longterm success. Our best businesses
know that is not a responsible
way to run a business and those
who do so will be forced to
explain themselves.”
She paid tribute to the
“invention, innovation and
creativity” of private enterprise,
but said executives have to “play
by the same rules” as workers if
the free-market economy is to
be maintained.
Her comments come after a
Tory former minister accused
Mrs May on Twitter of timidity
and a lack of ambition. Nick Boles
warned the Prime Minister it
was “time to raise your game”
and claimed her government
“constantly disappoints”.
8
NEWS
BREXIT
Bottle stations: fruit juice tycoon
attacks boss of Wetherspoon pubs
By Ravender Sembhy
A co-founder of the drinks brand
Innocent has launched a scathing
attack on the Brexit-backing
boss of JD Wetherspoon,
accusing him of selling
out Britain’s economy for
“cheap Chardonnay”.
Richard Reed (right)
said that Tim Martin,
chairman of the pubs
chain, had helped to “junk”
the UK economy.
As part of a stark warning on
the impact that leaving the European
Union is having on business
investment, Mr Reed said: “Brexit is
unhelpful; no one I know is saying it’s
a good thing.
“That guy from Wetherspoon [Mr
Martin] is talking about how
it means he can buy cheap
Chardonnay from the New
World, but I don’t think
that’s a reason to junk a
country’s economy.”
Mr Martin has been an
outspoken proponent of
Britain’s divorce from the
EU, repeating stock exchange
announcements and extolling the
virtues of Brexit.
He wants Britain to crash out
of the EU without a deal and fall
back on World Trade Organisation
rules, allowing the UK to “follow
free trade champions like New
Zealand, Australia”.
“Richard is being melodramatic,”
Mr Martin said in response.
“Wetherspoon will benefit from
leaving the EU, but so will everyone
else in the country. History shows
that democracy and prosperity
are closely aligned, and the EU is
becoming more undemocratic.”
Mr Reed and his co-founders,
Adam Balon and Jon Wright, sold
Innocent to Coca-Cola in 2013 for a
reported £320m.
POLITICS
Mitchell ‘smelt a rat’ at sting meeting set up by Channel 4
By Sam Lister
A former Cabinet minister
caught up in a media sting has
indicated that he involved British
intelligence agencies because he
feared he was being targeted by
foreign spies.
Andrew Mitchell is one of
three former senior ministers,
along with Andrew Lansley
and Peter Lilley, who have
denied wrongdoing following
an investigation by Channel 4’s
Dispatches team into Brexit
lobbying. The programme,
“Politicians for Hire: Cashing
in on Brexit”, is scheduled to
air today. Mr Mitchell, a former
international development
minister, said he “smelt a rat”
within minutes of arriving at the
October meeting that he was the
“target of a sting”.
Pigeon fanciers flock together
Pigeons are displayed for sale
at the annual two-day pigeon
fanciers’ show in the Winter
Gardens in Blackpool yesterday.
More than 2,000 birds were
displayed at the show, run by the
Royal Pigeon Racing Association.
The gathering is one of the largest
in the world, regularly attracting
25,000 visitors, and the profits are
donated to a variety of charities.
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
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NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
9
TECHNOLOGY
PEOPLE
Tractor beams
breakthrough
pulls fantasy
closer to reality
Natalie Portman
tells marchers of
the tyranny of
‘sexual terrorism’
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
The predictions of generations of
science-fiction writers have moved
a step closer to becoming a reality
after scientists unveiled a tractor
beam that could pave the way for
people to levitate.
Engineers at the University of
Bristol have tested the world’s most
powerful acoustic tractor beam,
which can invisibly ensnare and
levitate objects.
Tractor beams, the rays that
can grab and lift humans and large
objects, including entire spaceships,
have long been a staple of sci-fi
classics, such as Star Trek and Star
Wars. For the first time, the scientists
have shown it is possible to trap
objects larger than the wavelength
of sound in an acoustic tractor beam.
The discovery opens the door to
the manipulation of drug capsules
or micro-surgical implements within
the body. It also makes the levitation
of human beings a possibility.
Working with ultrasonic waves at
a pitch of 40kHz, a similar pitch to
that which only bats can hear, the
researchers held a two-centimetre
polystyrene sphere in the tractor
beam. This sphere measures over
two acoustic wavelengths in size and
is the largest yet trapped in a tractor
beam. The research suggests that in
the future much larger objects could
be levitated in this way.
Researchers previously thought
acoustic tractor beams were
fundamentally limited to levitating
tiny objects as all the previous
attempts to trap particles larger than
the wavelength had been unstable,
with objects spinning uncontrollably.
The new approach, published in
Physical Review Letters, uses rapidly
fluctuating acoustic vortices, which
are similar to tornadoes of sound,
By Kerri-Ann Roper
Natalie Portman has spoken of
how an environment of “sexual
terrorism” as a teenager led
to her covering up her body
and “inhibiting her expression
and her work”.
The Oscar-winning actress,
36, joined other Hollywood stars
on stage in Los Angeles to share
their experiences during one
of the many Women’s Marches
held across America on the
anniversary of Donald Trump’s
inauguration as US President.
Recalling her role in the 1994
film Léon: The Professional, she
said: “I excitedly opened my first
fan mail to read a rape fantasy a
man had written.”
The Star Wars actress added
that a local radio station had
later started a countdown
to her 18th birthday, adding:
“Euphemistically [it was] the date
that I would be legal to sleep with.
“Movie reviewers talked about
my budding breasts. I understood
very quickly, even as a 13-year-old,
that if I were to express myself
sexually I would feel unsafe and
that men would feel entitled to
discuss and objectify my body, to
my great discomfort.”
A sci-fi staple
From Spock to Han Solo
n Tractor beams were first described
by sci-fi author E E Smith in his novel
Spacehounds of IPC, serialised in
Amazing Stories magazine in 1931.
n The USS Enterprise had to break
free from a tractor beam tugging it
towards a hostile craft in the first Star
Trek episode, in 1966. The Enterprise
used its own beam to neutralise alien
vessels in future episodes.
n Captain Kirk and Spock were kitted
out with levitation boots, equipped
with booster rockets in the heel, which
could lift the weight of three humans.
n In Star Wars, the Death Star
battlestation had 768 tractor beam
generators to guide ships into the
hangars. Han Solo’s Millennium Falcon
was caught by a beam and sucked
towards the Death Star.
n Dr Evil planned to use a tractor
beam to crash an asteroid into the
Earth, causing a torrential flood,
in spy spoof film Austin Powers in
Goldmember (2002).
made of a twister-like structure with
loud sound surrounding a silent core.
The working tractor beam can
move heavier objects made of
different materials, operating both
in air or water, without damaging the
trapped objects.
The Bristol team has uploaded
a step-by-step YouTube guide so
people can build their own portable
tractor beam, using spare parts, for
just £70.
Dr Asier Marzo, the paper’s lead
author, said: “Acoustic researchers
had been frustrated by the size limit
for years, so it’s satisfying to find a
way to overcome it.
“I think it opens the door to many
new applications.”
Actress Natalie Portman told a Women’s March crowd in Los Angeles of her
discomfort, as a 13-year-old, at her body being discussed GETTY
World News, page 26
MOTORING
Drivers take advantage of police absence
By Neil Lancefield
Nearly two-thirds of motorists think
they can get away with careless
driving because of a perceived lack
of police on the roads, a poll shows.
Sixty-five per cent believe they
are unlikely to be pulled over
for offences such as “tailgating”
someone in front or hogging the
middle lane on a motorway, the AA
survey of 19,500 drivers reveals.
More than half (55 per cent)
believe they will not be stopped for
driving a dangerous vehicle, while
54 per cent think they will escape
prosecution if they use a hand-held
mobile phone.
Edmund King, the AA president,
described the findings as “worrying”
and called for “more cops in cars”.
The study found that more than
two in five drivers (43 per cent) think
the police have no visible presence
on motorways. This increases to 65
per cent for local roads.
Only 45 per cent of respondents
believe Highways England traffic
officers should be given more
powers, and just a third (32 per cent)
want police community support
officers to assist with road policing.
The number of roads police
officers fell by nearly a third between
2007 and 2017, recent Freedom of
Information requests revealed.
SOCIETY
Across
Apple and Malala link up
to widen education access
1
Things reminiscent
of City gardens (6)
3
Labour MP with a
Bed and Breakfast
that’s too much (6)
4
Fox consumed until
now (2,4)
By David Phelan
Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala
Yousafzai and tech giant Apple have
joined forces in a plan to bring education to 100,000 girls in Africa and
the Middle East.
The world’s biggest technology
firm will help the Malala Fund to
deliver primary education to girls
who cannot currently access education in countries including Afghanistan, Pakistan, Lebanon, Turkey
and Nigeria. Apple CEO Tim Cook
joined the 20-year-old women’s
rights campaigner in Lebanon at the
weekend to launch the partnership.
Ms Yousafzai said Apple will support the Malala Fund’s Gulmakai
Network, a group of “education
champions” helping girls to access
education. “Many of the champions
who are supporting them are using
technology and finding new ways
to make it easier for girls to have
access to education whether it’s
Malala Yousafzai plans to help
100,000 girls GETTY
e-learning or getting Stem [science,
technology, engineering and maths]
skills,” she said.
Mr Cook said: “The core of it is an
overriding belief in equality and that
education is the great equaliser.”
THE INDEPENDENT
Down
No 2234
Solution, page 47
1
Rambling harangue
beginning with
some hesitation (6)
2
French philosopher
right in the middle
of revolutionary
times (6)
10
NEWS
TAXATION
Concentrix victims given £14 compensation
By Sam Lister
Tax credit claimants who suffered as
the result of a botched outsourcing
plan have been paid just £14 each
in compensation.
Concentrixadjustedorterminated
108,000 cases of claimants’ tax
credits – nearly a third of which were
overturned at appeal. HM Revenue
and Customs (HMRC) ended its deal
with the contractor after a series of
problems were revealed by i. The
Labour MP Frank Field called the
company a “recruiting sergeant for
food banks”.
Records released in Parliament
showed that HMRC had paid a
total of £18,035 to 1,271 people.
The shadow policing minister
Louise Haigh, who requested the
information, said the amount was
“pitiful and insulting”. She added:
“Concentrix walked off the job with
£32m of taxpayers’ money in their
pockets. Yet now we learn that the
average amount people can expect in
compensation is less than £15. That’s
a pitiful amount and it is simply
insulting to the victims.
“The company caused real
damage to people’s lives and was
proven to be wrong in 87 per cent
of cases that went to appeal. I can’t
think of many cases where such
terrible failure has been rewarded
so well, and in such stark contrast to
the treatment of the victims.
“The Concentrix and Carillion
scandals have shown that too often
the bosses walk off with a payout
while we pay for their mistakes, and
the victims are left struggling.
“Tory privatisation of our public
services has been a disaster, and
it’s about time ministers started
learning the lessons.”
Concentrix, a US firm
hired to root out tax credit
cheats, was accused of “a brutal
and disrespectful approach” in a
Commons motion in 2016.
PEOPLE
Fergie sues for £40m
over newspaper sting
By William McLennan
The Duchess of York believes a
cash-for-access sting by a tabloid
newspaper has unfairly cost her
£40m in lost earnings, according to a
claim lodged at the High Court.
She said she was tricked into
offering to introduce an undercover
reporter to her ex-husband Prince
Andrew for a £500,000 fee,
leading to reputational damage
that led future business deals
to collapse.
The Duchess (inset),
popularly known as
“Fergie”, was secretly
filmed by the defunct News
of the World in a Mayfair
apartment in 2010. She
told a reporter: “I can
open any door you want.”
Legal papers, seen
by the Mail on Sunday,
reveal the financial
affairs of the Duchess,
with ventures including
film deals, high finance
and publishing. She
claims the story led
her to scrap plans to
release a “higher end”
book series, entitled
Madame Pantaloon.
The Duchess said
that she had a series
of multimillion-pound
contracts that fell through due to the
“international humiliation” caused by
the sting. Among the collapsed deals
were two animations, called Sofi on
Safari and Fergie’s Farm, which, she
said, were due to earn her £22m over
seven years.
The papers claim she was also due
to earn £8.6m endorsing vitamins and
dietary supplements for Windmill
Health Products, but the US firm
pulled out of the deal after the
story broke in 2010.
She separated from Prince
Andrew in 1992 and the couple
divorced four years later.
The News of the World
closed following the phone
hacking scandal in 2011,
but the Duchess is
seeking damages
from its parent
c o m p a ny, Ru p e r t
M u r d o c h’s N e w s
Group Newspapers,
publisher of The Sun.
The group said the
Duchess had stated
t h a t “c o m m e r c i a l
favours and inside
information could be
bought from a member
of the Royal Family …
provided the price was
right and the money
went to her and not the
Duke of York”.
SOCIETY
Blue badge parking scheme to be
extended to the ‘hidden disabled’
By Neil Lancefield
People with hidden disabilities
could soon be entitled to blue badge
parking permits under plans by the
Department for Transport (DfT).
The proposals are meant to make
it easier for people with conditions
such as autism to travel to work,
socialise and access shops and
services in England. It is hoped the
move, which would be the biggest
change to the blue badge scheme
since it was introduced in 1970, would
help to create parity in the treatment
of physical and mental health.
The DfT said councils have
different interpretations of existing
rules with only some recognising
hidden disabilities.
The new policy is designed to
provide “clear and consistent”
guidelines, officials said.
Around 2.4 million disabled people
in England have a blue badge. This
enables them to park free of charge
in pay and display bays and for up to
three hours on yellow lines.
Around three out of four blue
badge holders say they would go out
less often if they did not have one,
according to the DfT.
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
11
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
EMERGENCY
Two skiers rescued after
night lost on mountain
By William McLennan
Dog walkers brave the elements in Whitley Bay, Tyne and Wear, yesterday, after the coldest night in nearly two years PA
Two skiers have been airlifted to
safety from the side of a mountain
in Scotland after surviving a night
without shelter at 3,000ft.
The pair, who had gone offpiste, called Police Scotland
on Friday evening to
report they were stuck
at Bidean nam Bain in
Glencoe. A mountain
rescue team were
dispatched, but had to
call off the search when
b l i z z a rd s h a m p e re d
their progress.
After spending the night
exposed to the elements, the pair
were spotted by a Coastguard
rescue helicopter, which had set off
from Inverness at first light. The
Coastguard said they were “found in
a precarious position, next to a steep
drop, before being winched onto the
helicopter” at around 8.30am on
Saturday morning. The pair were
taken to Fort William, where they
were treated by paramedics.
The Coastguard warned visitors
to the mountain not to “put
yourself in any unnecessary
danger,” adding: “UK
mountains should not
be underestimated as
they can be unforgiving
for even the most
experienced people.
“Severe weather
condition could mean a
change in your environment
within minutes and navigation
could be difficult.”
Glencoe Mountain Rescue Team
said “serious conditions” had lead
to “some hard decisions being
made on a call out lasting through
the night”.
WEATHER
Flood alerts after Britain
plunges into deep freeze
Insurance
with bags more
By William McLennan
Homeowners across the west of
Britain have been warned their
properties are at risk of flooding
as milder conditions cause snow to
melt and heavy rains to sweep in.
Homes were evacuated and
roads blocked in Devon, and flood
warnings were in place across the
South West, Northern Ireland
and parts of Wales and the West
Midlands yesterday evening.
The Met Office predicts that rain
will continue to fall in the South
West through this morning; clear
skies are expected this afternoon,
while rivers will remain at risk
of bursting their banks because
“water catchments are already
quite saturated”, according to the
Environment Agency.
Ice warnings were also in place
this morning throughout the
Midlands, the North and Scotland.
Temperatures fell to minus
13.5°C in the Highland village of
Dalwhinnie in the early hours
yesterday, the coldest temperature
recorded in the UK since 14
February 2016. Glasgow Airport
Get
£50
of Co-op
Elizabeth
Lewin, 10, in a
snow tunnel
near Newby
Head Farm in
the Yorkshire
Dales
National Park
Food vouchers
with a new car or home
combined policy
Ts & Cs apply.*
Home relates to combined
buildings and contents only.
When new customers buy
directly from Co-op Insurance.
Offer ends 31/05/18.
PA
was temporarily closed so the
runway could be cleared following
heavy snow. Tulloch Bridge in
the Highlands had around 30cm
of snow.
Marco Petagna, a forecaster
at the Met Office, said a northwesterly wind, which had delivered
the bitter temperatures, was giving
way to an westerly, bringing milder
conditions and rain clouds.
Parts of Northern Ireland were
at risk of flooding last night due
to “milder temperatures, rain and
snow melt”, he said.
Explaining the sudden cold snap
that affected much of the North
West and led to heavy snowfall
across Scotland, Mr Petagna said:
“It was unusually cold for the North
West because we have cold air from
Greenland and some from Canada,
which has made its way across the
Atlantic. It was the fact that the
snow was lying on the ground that
made it particularly cold last night.”
Devon and Cornwall Police
said heavy rainfall had caused
landslides, flooding and road
damage, with some routes left
impassable. Officers evacuated
h o m e s i n I l f ra c o m b e a n d
Barnstaple, but said there had been
no casualties.
Weather, page 45
Car Insurance
from as little as
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for combined buildings and contents policies
Apr 17 - Sep 17. Excludes optional extras.
call 0800 083 0642
call 0800 083 0656
By William Mclennan
An eight-year-old girl who was
stabbed to death has been named
as Mylee Billingham.
West Midlands Police said
she died in hospital shortly after
being found seriously injured
in Brownhills, near Walsall,
on Saturday. A post-mortem
examination is scheduled to take
place today. A 54-year-old man
has been arrested and is in a
critical condition in hospital with a
stomach wound.
West Midlands Police said it
was treating the stabbing as a
“domestic incident” and would be
questioning the man in due course.
Detective Inspector Jim Colclough,
who is leading the investigation,
said yesterday: “We are still at
the early stages of understanding
exactly what happened and why
– but I can confirm we are
not looking for anyone else in
connection with this.”
coop.co.uk/insurance
*£50 Co-op Food vouchers available to new customers who buy a home combined buildings and contents insurance policy or a car insurance
policy directly from Co-op Insurance from 18/12/2017 to 31/05/2018. Policies must start on or before 29/06/2018. Your policy must be
in force for a minimum of 30 days. Young Driver Insurance, Ecoinsurance and policies from cashback sites or price comparison sites are
excluded. Vouchers will arrive within 75 days of your policy start date. Vouchers accepted in Co-op Group Food stores and participating
independent co-operatives. For full Ts&Cs visit coop.co.uk/bagsmore. Promoter: Co-op Insurance. Car insurance is normally available to
customers aged 17 - 75 years old. Calls may be monitored or recorded for security and training purposes. Applicants for insurance are subject
to normal underwriting criteria. Co-op Insurance is a trading name of CIS General Insurance Limited; registered in England and Wales under
company number 29999R. Registered office: CIS Building, Miller Street, Manchester M60 OAL.
12
NEWS
TECHNOLOGY
HEALTH
‘Too easy’ for bullies and extremists
to thrive on social media, say users
Concerns after
death of seventh
Bristol student
By Richard Vaughan
By Sam Lister
An overwhelming majority of people believe social media companies
do not do enough to tackle bullying,
illegal activities or the spread of extremist content on their sites, a major
survey has found.
By contrast, trust in so-called traditional media, defined as broadcasters and publishers, increased to 61
per cent – the highest level reached
since 2012.
Most people think companies such
as Facebook and Twitter are not regulated enough (64 per cent) and lack
transparency (63 per cent), according to the Edelman Trust Barometer.
Just over half (57 per cent) believe social media companies take
advantage of users’ loneliness and
62 per cent believe they are selling
people’s data without their knowlNearly 39 per cent of
people back Brexit,
43 per cent oppose it and 12 per
cent say they do not care either
way, according to the research.
edge. The survey also showed seven
in 10 people believe these companies
do not do enough to stop illegal or unethical behaviour on their platforms,
prevent the sharing of extremist content or do enough to prevent bullying.
Around one third (34 per cent) do
not think social media is a force for
good in society.
Facebook, Twitter and other online giants have faced criticism from
MPs over the way they deal with offensive or extreme content and the
Government has warned they face
penalties if they refuse to tighten
their controls.
Ed Williams, chief executive officer
of Edelman UK, said: “After a flood of
negative headlines in 2017, it’s time
these companies sat up and listened.
“The public want action on key
issues related to online protection,
and to see their concerns addressed
through better regulation. Failure to
act risks further erosion of trust and
therefore public support.”
The wide-ranging study also found
trust in government is still languishing at just 36 per cent, the same as in
2017, and 40 per cent believe it abuses
its power more than any other pillar
of society.
EDUCATION CORRESPONDENT
People think social media firms
‘take advantage of loneliness’ PA
Case study
‘People who had never met him were abusing him’
FELIX ALEXANDER, 17,
from Worcester.
After years of online bullying,
the teenage Felix Alexander
took his own life.
His mother, Lucy, said that
what had started as playground
taunting had become “cruel and
overwhelming” when Felix’s
tormentors took to social media.
Felix, from Worcester,
had been the subject of “vile,
anonymous conversations”,
she said.
“People who had never even
met Felix were abusing him on
social media.
“It just ate away at him inside,
I think, but I had no idea of the
depth of his despair at all,” his
mother added.
His parents had attempted
to prevent access to all social
media when they saw the distress
it was causing, but said it “just
isolated him further”.
A Canadian law undergraduate has
become the seventh student to take
his own life at the University of Bristol in the past 18 months.
Justin Cheng, a third-year law student, was found dead on the evening
of 12 January away from the city.
Police said they believed he took his
own life.
Mr Cheng’s death is the second this
academic year, following the apparent suicide of James Thomson, 20, a
second-year maths undergraduate
who was found hanged at his home in
Bristol in October.
Five other Bristol University students took their own lives during the
2016-17 academic year.
The death of Mr Cheng will increase concerns about the rise of
mental health problems on campuses.
Mark Ames, director of student
services at the university, said: “It is
immensely distressing for members
of our university community to learn
that one of our students has died. We
know that this will be especially difficult for those who knew and studied
with Justin.”
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
13
SOCIETY
Thousands of disabled people languishing in
unsuitable housing, i investigation reveals
COUNCILS
By Chris Green
SCOTLAND EDITOR
Many disabled people
cannot access whole areas
of their houses due to steps or a
lack of adaptations, forcing them
to call out social workers who are
already overstretched.
Almost 10,000 disabled people in
Scotland are stuck in unsuitable
council houses, with some still on
waiting lists despite requesting a
move decades ago, an investigation
by i has revealed.
One disabled person in Stirling a more suitable new-build property.
In Glasgow alone 1,979 disabled
has been waiting for a more suitable council house for almost half people have requested a move, with
a century, having first requested a backlogs also being reported in other
change of property in 1969. In Moray, parts of the country.
Figures published by the Scota disabled person has been waiting
since 1978, while in East Dunbarton- tish Government show that between
shire someone has been on the coun- 2008 and 2016, only 1,427 of 132,994
newly built houses were decil’s waiting list since 1989.
signed for wheelchair users
The figures, described
– or just over 1 per cent.
as “very, very shocking”
Grant Carson, direcby disability charities,
tor of employment and
were obtained through
housing services at the
Freedom of InformaGlasgow Centre for
tion requests to all
The number of
Inclusive Living, said
32 of Scotland’s local
years one disabled
the size of the waiting
authorities. The 26 reresident has been
waiting to be
lists was “not surprissponses show that 9,714
rehoused
ing” because of the lack
disabled people are on
of accessible homes.
council waiting lists havThe charity is calling for
ing requested a move to a
the Scottish Government to set a
more suitable property, such as a
specific target for accessible housing
ground-floor flat.
The issue was recently highlighted within its existing aim of building at
by the case of Tanveer Hussein, 18, least 50,000 affordable homes across
who was still living in a top-floor flat the country by 2021.
“It’s a mystery to me why they’ve
in Govanhill, Glasgow, 11 years after
not done more,” he said. “The bottom
his family applied to move.
The teenager, who uses a wheel- line is there is a chronic shortage of
chair, had to be helped up 41 stairs to accessible accommodation in Scotreach his front door. After a petition land. The Government has failed to
was launched, his family was offered do anything about it. I would describe
it as systemic failure.”
Marianne Scobie, deputy CEO of
Waiting lists Worst areas the Glasgow Disability Alliance, said
the figures were shocking but that
Council
Number of disabled it was “not uncommon” for disabled
people waiting people to be living in homes they
1. Glasgow City
1,979 could not get in and out of unaided.
2. Midlothian
910
“If the Government wants more
3. North Ayrshire
909 disabled people to be working and
4. Dundee City
681 taking part in society, the starting
5. Argyll and Bute
599 point is to be in a house that meets
6. West Lothian
508 your needs,” she said.
7. East Dunbartonshire
499
Housing Minister Kevin Stewart
8. Edinburgh City
491 said: “We want disabled people in
9. Moray
487 Scotland to have access to homes
10. Falkirk
385 built or adapted to enable them to
participate as full and equal citizens.
Dumfries & Galloway, East Ayrshire,
Our Disability Delivery Plan sets out
Inverclyde, Perth & Kinross, Scottish Borders
a number of housing-related commitand Fife did not provide figures
ments that support this ambition.”
The applicant
Demand is
‘outstripping
supply’
By Chris Green
49
Mary Juszczak
relies on her
sister Anne
(top) to help
her upstairs
‘Her legs are bent because
she’s been on a chair so long’
MARY JUSZCZAK, 59, lives with her
sister, Anne, daughter and grandson
in Cadder, north of Glasgow.
With severe arthritis,
fibromyalgia and a heart
condition Ms Juszczak is unable
to get in or out of the house or
upstairs without assistance.
She has to sleep in a chair in the
living room. Her family started
applying to housing providers for
a more suitable home seven years
ago. “There are 15 steps coming
into the front of the house,” her
sister, Anne, says. “I need my
brother or my nephews to be there
to get her out.
“Her legs are starting to become
permanently bent because she’s
been on a chair in the living room
for so long.
“We were told that we would be
offered a new house within two
years, but we’re still waiting and
nothing has come up.”
Scotland’s councils have defended
the size of their housing lists and
the length of time some people
spend waiting, pointing out that
the demand for properties is “far
outstripping supply”.
Cosla, the umbrella body representing the country’s 32 local authorities, said its members were
“working tirelessly” to meet the
Scottish Government’s target of
building 50,000 affordable homes
by 2021.
“Scotland’s councils are committed to ensuring those people
living with a disability, mobility issues and the elderly are appropriately housed,” a spokesman said.
In Moray, where at least one disabled person has been waiting to
move since 1978, the council said
it currently had more than 3,500
applicants, with each assessed according to need.
“Circumstances and needs
of applicants can change while
they’re on the waiting list, and
their position on the list will
change to reflect this,” a spokesman for Moray Council said.
“We’re making progress with our
new-build programme.”
Stirling Council, which says at
least one disabled person has been
on its waiting list since 1969, said
the delay may have been caused
by the applicant’s complicated
housing needs.
Thomas Glen, deputy chief executive at East Dunbartonshire
Council, said some of the people
identified as disabled on its housing list may already be in appropriate housing. One disabled person
in the area has been on the waiting
list since 1989, but Mr Glen said
they had only identified as disabled in 2007 and had turned down
one offer of a property.
This Saturday, in your
Author interview: Peter Carey
The number of massacres against
indigenous Australians is enormous
PLUS What we’re reading this week
14
@theipaper
facebook.com/theipaper
i@inews.co.uk
Please include a contact address with all correspondence
TheOpinionMatrix
COMMENT FROM HOME & ABROAD
COLLAPSE OF
CARILLION
LABOUR
MODERATES
MACRON GIFT
CHARMS MAY
SHAME OF
LONELY UK
TRUMP, ONE
YEAR ON
THE BIRTHDAY
PARTY
Private
sector faces
new crisis
Fifty MPs
could be
replaced
Tapestry loan
stitches close
alliance
Loneliness
minister
appointed
President’s
unsettled
term report
Glowing
reviews for
Pinter revival
The Observer
TheSunday Times
The Washington
Post
The Stage
Why do so many
leftists turn into
pocket Robespierres?
Surely the cries
of treachery are
premature when
Corbyn isn’t even close
to implementing his
programme? But there
is method in their
madness. It is a case of
sticking it to the enemy
(the perfidious soft left)
before it can rat on his
socialist experiment.
(Sarah Baxter)
TheSunday
Telegraph
The Sun on Sunday
The Government
cannot continue to
ignore these failings,
nor can the Labour
Party simply promise
to nationalise
everything. The debate
about our capitalism
can only deepen.
For the ordinary
Briton, the sooner it
is resolved the better.
(Will Hutton)
Sunday Mirror
Governments,
including my own,
failed to enforce
proper accountability
for the taxpayer’s
interests in blind
pursuit of outsourcing,
driven by ideology
where private
provision and
competition is far
better for delivery.
(John Prescott)
Mrs May’s
performance with Mr
Macron at their love-in
could actually, maybe
accidentally, be to the
point. This is all about
appearances. What
everybody wants is
a Brexit with as little
loss of face as possible.
Smile prettily for the
cameras, say whatever
you have to say - and
get the hell out of
there. (Janet Daley)
Mail on Sunday
TheIndependent
Time to end the …
fantastical conceit
that the continued
presence of the
modernisers serves
any purpose other
than to legitimise and
enable the excesses of
the Corbynites.
(Dan Hodges)
Perhaps all Macron
was doing was being
polite to his host
before adopting a hard
line in the next stage of
talks… But his words do
suggest a willingness
to negotiate, and
that is all May needs.
(John Rentoul)
Quote of
the day
Loneliness is a
problem for our
society, there’s no
doubt about it. But
let’s not just delegate
solving that problem
to the Government –
we’ve all got a role to
play. (Karren Brady)
Sunday Express
The background to
last week’s decision
makes for distinctly
depressing reading.
Research shows a
shocking nine million
of us live in isolation
and, staggeringly,
200,000 elderly go
weeks without talking
to a relative or friend.
If this has shamed
you into calling or,
even better, seeing
an elderly relative
or friend... good.
(Nick Ferrari)
Far from being the
exclusive saviour of his
imagining, President
Trump is exceptionally
ill-suited to the
task of fixing our
fractured politics. He
has no perspective,
no patience and no
knowledge of what
that might take.
(Ruth Marcus)
Fox News
President Trump must
commit himself to
consistently cooperate
across party lines and
work on behalf of all
Americans… If he does,
his accomplishments
can defend Republican
seats in the November
mid-term elections
and enhance chances
for GOP victories in
2020. (Douglas ESchoen)
While all of the
performances are
strong, Toby Jones
stands out. He’s a
magnetic stage actor –
the man can even make
the act of eating a bowl
of soggy cornflakes
compelling. The last
scene, in which Stanley
is led away to an
unknown fate, while life
winds on as before, is
particularly unnerving.
(Natasha Tripney)
WhatsOnStage
The Birthday Party
was a flop when it
was first performed,
closing after eight
performances. Yet in
the succeeding years it
has increasingly come
to feel as if it sums up
the history of the 20th
century in a single
room. (Sarah Crompton)
LifeInBrief
SUE GRAFTON CRIME NOVELIST
Anger,
intelligence,
humour,
proficiency
with glitter:
women are
so good
at making
protest signs!
Katherine Ryan
The comedian loved
London’s Women’s
March placards
“I want to be the king of American
mysteries,” Sue Grafton said in 1992.
“Not the queen, please. I want to be
the king.”
Grafton, who has died aged 77, wrote
the “Alphabet” mysteries, featuring
Southern California detective Kinsey
Millhone, which sold millions of copies
worldwide. A is for Alibi, published
in 1982, was the first of her series
of alphabetically titled novels. She
reached the 25th letter of the alphabet
with her final book, Y is for Yesterday,
last August.
After publishing two novels in the
1960s, Grafton later wrote screenplays
before breaking through in the 1980s
with her mystery books, which became
instant best-sellers. Her experience as
a screenwriter and studio office worker
gave her such a strong distaste for the
ways of Hollywood that she refused to
allow any of her Kinsey Millhone books
to be made into films or television
productions. The books, published in
dozens of languages, earned Grafton
a large and devoted readership,
particularly among women.
“I’ve come to believe,” critic Patrick
Anderson wrote in The Washington
Post in 2005, “that she is not only the
most talented woman writing crime
fiction today but also that, regardless of
gender, her Millhone books are among
the five or six best series any American
has ever written.”
Sue Taylor Grafton was born in
Louisville, at the outset of the Second
World War. Her father was a lawyer
who wrote mystery novels, her
mother a chemistry teacher. Both
were alcoholics.
“Every morning,” Grafton wrote in a
2013 memoir, Kinsey and Me, “my father
downed two jiggers of whiskey and
went to the office. My mother, similarly
fortified, went to sleep on the couch.
From the age of five onward, I was left
to raise myself, which I did as well as
I could, having had no formal training
in parenthood.”
Grafton first married at 18. She had
two children and was divorced before
she graduated from the University of
Louisville in 1961.
Her first two novels were set in
Appalachia, one of which, The LollyMadonna War, was made into a 1973
film starring Rod Steiger and Jeff
Bridges. Grafton’s second marriage
ended in protracted divorce and
custody proceedings that, she later said,
helped her devise methods of murder
for her novels.
“We all think about murdering
another person on occasions,” she said
in 2013. “What matters is not acting on
that impulse. I’m lucky to have fictional
characters to do it for me.”
Survivors include her husband
of more than 40 years, philosophy
professor Steve Humphrey of
Santa Barbara.
Grafton was one book away from
completing the final Kinsey Millhone
instalment, which would have been
called Z is for Zero.
“As far as we in the family are
concerned,” her daughter wrote on
Grafton’s official website, “the alphabet
now ends at Y.” THE INDEPENDENT
Born 24 April 1940
Died 28 December 2017
Matt Schudel
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
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28-29
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30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
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i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
15
MyView
IanBirrell
Preaching to
the converted:
Jeremy Corbyn
speaking during a
Momentum rally in
Manchester GETTY
The malign forces behind Corbyn
Watching John McDonnell on TV reveals Labour’s problem
T
he contrast could
not have been more
striking. First up on
The Andrew Marr
Show on BBC One
was French President
Emmanuel Macron, answering his
questions in fluent English with
more directness and poise than
we almost ever see from British
politicians in their native tongue.
Typical was his admission that
France would “probably” have
the same referendum result on
European Union membership as
our own, such was the impact of
globalisation. He described his
political philosophy as “efficiency,
humanity and authority”, any one of
which we would take with gratitude
in our contorted domestic politics.
Then came John McDonnell
(below, far right), the Shadow
chancellor, with his trademark
sinister smiles, slippery talk and
savage factionalism clad in a
shiny dark suit. First he praised
Macron (right) for straight
talking. Then he pretended to
be a stout defender of the City
of London, despite decades in
politics opposing its core
philosophy. He posed as a
man of integrity, batting
away questions about
personal hypocrisy
over opposing private
finance initiative deals
except in his own
constituency. Then he
dissembled over his
“lynching the bastard” comments
about Tory minister Esther McVey,
an issue that exposes the real face of
what his leader defines as “kinder,
gentler politics”.
As ever, the Shadow Chancellor
dodged attempts to define his
party’s shameful stance on Brexit
with vague talk of reform and
negotiation. Yet perhaps the most
significant section of the interview
was when asked about a Centre for
Policy Studies report that Labour’s
plans for renationalisation would
add £176bn to the national debt –
effectively costing every British
family £6,500. McDonnell brushed
this aside, saying the think-tank
was virtually a branch of the Tory
Party. Fair enough. But when
his own party talks in airy terms
about Parliament setting a price
on substantial state takeovers and
compares massive public spending
to a family mortgage, this was at
least an attempt to put a price
tag on Labour’s core plans.
I am no fan of McDonnell,
his leader Jeremy Corbyn
or their largely regressive
policies based on reheated
Seventies socialism. I
used to cover Corbyn
on a local paper
at the start of my
journalism career
and have seen
how their far-left
faction undermined
Labour for more
than three decades.
Spare no
sympathy for
the moderates.
They have been
out-fought and
out-thought
They are the mirror image of selfish
obsessives on the hard right who
wrecked the Tory party and led to
the disaster of Brexit. The Shadow
chancellor exemplifies the malign
forces lurking behind Corbyn. And
the Labour leader himself is ever
more reminiscent of Chance the
gardener in the satirical book and
film Being There, who wins over
Washington after his simplistic
statements about tending plants
and changing seasons are taken for
profound political wisdom.
The party should – as reviled
former leader Tony Blair so kindly
pointed out – be way ahead in the
polls as a bumbling Tory Prime
Minister struggles with Brexit and
revives the nasty party. Regardless
of this failure to woo moderate
voters, however, it is equally obvious
that Corbyn and Co are wildly
popular with some parts of the
electorate, have built impressive
membership, display smart political
duplicity and are winning the fight
for Labour’s soul. They are backed
by a revived far left, which has been
turbocharged by social media amid
incendiary culture wars, as they
ride waves of fury over economic
and political failure seen again last
week with Carillion’s crash. And
they have brought new people
into politics.
It is easy to forget that
Momentum, the grass roots
campaign group for Corbyn, was
formed just three years ago after
his successful leadership campaign.
Now Jon Lansman, a long-standing
soulmate of the Labour leader who
heads the group after so long on
the Marxist fringes, has landed
on the party’s national executive.
Two other allies joined him last
week as the hard left sealed its
takeover in a result that opens
up prospects for a purge of party
officials, moderate MPs and centrist
councillors. Already there is vague
talk of a 50-strong hit-list of MPs
facing deselection.
Yet spare no sympathy for the
moderates. They have been
out-fought and out-thought,
failing to keep the far left at
bay unlike more pugnacious
predecessors, despite
having a majority in
the parliamentary
party. At best, this
shows that they are
lousy politicians. At
worst, it exposes
them as cowards
who failed to stand
up for their policies
or principles. They signed motions
of no confidence in Corbyn, spoke
of rebellion, yet were then stunned
into submission when Corbyn
surged to “only” 56 seats behind the
Tories at last year’s election. They
rally behind a leader in public whom
they whisper privately would be a
disastrous prime minister, putting
blinkered tribalism before their
beliefs or their nation. They do not
deserve to be spared the cull.
You might feel shards of
sympathy for politicians trapped
by fast-changing circumstances.
But these trembling moderates
no longer represent the new force
flying the Labour flag. If they had
any dignity they would form a new
political grouping rather than
supinely backing Corbyn as they
await execution and indulge their
party’s collaboration with Boris and
the Brexiteers, just as moderate
Tories might conceivably soon face
similar dilemmas. This might even
hasten the search for a centrist
British saviour like Macron.
But if enlarged local parties in
a mass membership party have
lurched leftwards, democracy
dictates their right to pick new
people to represent them if
unconvinced by current
standard-bearers.
Call it populism, call it
Stalinist purging, but
this is the brutal reality
of politics.
i@inews.co.uk
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TEXTS, TWEETS
AND EMAILS
Bien joué,
Mr Macron
I think most of us who
watched Andrew Marr
on Sunday would have
been impressed with
France’s President.
He was eloquent,
logical, sympathetic,
empathetic, respectful,
civilised, and his English
was impeccable.
If you compare his
behaviour with that
of Monsieur Farage,
one can understand
why (almost) half of
us relate more to our
European neighbours.
Merci Mr Macron.
IAN BUCKLEY
HEXHAM,
NORTHUMBERLAND
Why do we always
underestimate our
negotiating strength
with the EU? We should
turn President Macron’s
comments around and
say that the EU can
have unrestricted trade
with the UK but it will
cost them.
BOB ROPER
KNARESBOROUGH,
NORTH YORKSHIRE
We need more
GF tolerance
Sloppy logic by Eve
Simmons (i, 20 January)
that gluten-free foods
contain more fat and
sugar than non-glutenfree foods, so are a fad
and not healthy. She
misses the point.
As someone who has
benefited a great deal
from stopping eating
wheat-based bread,
I contend that going
without gluten helps
some people.
If you try something
and it works you are not
stupid or gullible, as she
suggests, to continue
with it.
Ms Simmons – please
influence the producers
of gluten-free food to
reduce fat and sugar
content to the levels of
non-gluten-free food, or
below that, rather than
sneering at those of us
who have found relief
IN TOMORROW’S
Share to save
WWF and the race to
protect the natural
world via social media
I was incensed by the
comments made by Eve
Simmons. Diagnosed
as having IBS about 30
years ago I suffered
in silence (not always)
until a dietitian
colleague suggested a
gluten-free diet. My life
was transformed.
Does she think we
enjoy the diet? I cannot
tell you how it feels to
watch my husband slice a
crusty loaf of bread fresh
from the bakers; glutenfree bread is awful.
JACKIE LOW
DEBENHAM, SUFFOLK
our compensation forms
are unclear and that
we hold our customers
in “contempt” are
without foundation. Our
compensation processes
are straightforward, and
we process 99 per cent
of valid claims within 15
working days.
Ultimately, it’s about
customer choice. And
while we regret any
customer choosing to
fly with another airline,
we hope our continued
improvements, on-time
flights and the lowest
air fares in Europe will
once again persuade Ms
Norton to re-join the
129 million people who
will choose to fly with
Ryanair this year.
KENNY JACOBS
CHIEF MARKETING
OFFICER, RYANAIR
Johnson has a
point on Trump
The power of
the brand
Boris Johnson makes a
powerful case (inews.
co.uk, 21 January). After
all, President Xi was
invited to Britain, and
came. We cannot restrict
visits to people who are
likeable. But we should
still speak out against
the things that Donald
Trump, or anyone else
for that matter, says that
are beyond the pale.
JOHN DAKIN
VIA FACEBOOK
David Baddiel cites the
problems of reliance
on branded content for
writers (i, 20 January).
What does he think of the
use of branded writers?
On p26, Tom Hanks is
shown as the top-selling
author of short stories
last year.
HELEN JOHNSON
LOUGHBOROUGH,
LEICESTERSHIRE
from painful symptoms
by cutting down on
gluten and substituting,
where necessary, with
gluten-free.
MAGGIE DEACON
VIA EMAIL
Holiday deals
deal cruel blow
I am glad Oliver Duff
is “heading to page 69
searching for last minute
deals”, (i, 20 January). I
wish I could do the same.
I have bought i since it
launched, but tend to
avoid the Travel section
and the Arts pages as
they make me feel sad,
envious, resentful, and at
times angry.
I used to dream of
things I would do when
I retired. My bucket
list included seeing
Beethoven’s 9th live,
and Aida, but it will
never happen.
I live in a town where
the buses stop running
at 6.30pm and have
a pension that does
not run to trips to the
theatre. So, Mr Duff,
I do hope you find a
holiday, and enjoy it, but
remember that there are
many people like me who
have not had a holiday for
many years.
Yours enviously,
MAGGIE HAYO
KETTERING,
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE
Cross-Channel
bridge dilemma
On which side of the
road would cars drive on
Boris’s bridge?
PATTI JONES
VIA EMAIL
Better value
than Charles
As the Queen ages,
we need a proper
debate on the future
of the monarchy. I am
the same age as Prince
Charles, who last year
was supported by £2.2m
of taxpayers’ money –
more than I have earned
in my entire working life.
Let’s not be fooled by
those who claim having
a royal family brings in
tourists and their money.
Is there any shortage of
tourists in republican
Italy or France?
STEWART J BROWN
LARGS,
NORTH AYRSHIRE
A response
from Ryanair
Siobhan Norton’s article
of 17 January, “The
no-fair airline: why I’m
giving up Ryanair for
good” contains a number
of false claims regarding
Ryanair and our policies.
Firstly, thank you for
highlighting Ryanair’s
incredibly low fares.
However, all fares
include all taxes and
charges. Any additional
optional services and
products are just that
– entirely optional.
“Hundreds of people”
have not been “duped” by
our new baggage policy.
We first announced
these changes in August
2017 and delayed their
introduction until
mid-January to allow
our customers time
to get used to these
changes. Indeed, this has
been our most flagged
policy change.
Michael O’Leary is
the chief executive
of the airline, not
the Ryanair “owner”,
and one of several
million shareholders.
There was no “mass
exodus of unhappy staff
to Norwegian”. We have
more than enough pilots
(over 4,200) and hired
over 1,100 new pilots in
2017 alone.
Finally, the claim that
Weighing on
the mind
I quite often see the term
“metric tonne”in your
pages. There is no such
thing. A tonne is a metric
unit of weight (or mass,
for pedants) equal to
1,000kg. It’s just a tonne.
You wouldn’t measure
length in “metric metres”
or volume in “metric
litres”, would you?
TREVOR ROBERTS
LONDON
MORE COMMENT oninews.co.uk
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ARTS
Andreas
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with a sense
of scale
with relation to inaccuracy or intrusion, please
write to The Editor, i, 2 Derry Street, London,
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PUZZLES
Pages of games
and puzzles
including the
fiendish Zygolex
CAME
AIR
3
CAPRICORN
4
4
TOTE
4
ESCAPED
4
NEWS
2-27
People
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
By Jessica Barrett
Knightley
in a state
of tux for
‘Colette’
World’s
a kinder
place,
says
Whishaw
The Sundance Film Festival is
the negotiation ground for all
new independent films looking for
distribution deals: the first major
agreement at this year’s event was for
Keira Knightley’s Colette.
A seven-figure deal was signed for
the period biopic in which Knightley
plays the French novelist
Gabrielle Colette
opposite Dominic
West as her
husband Henry
Gauthier-Villars,
who initially
published
Colette’s novels
under his
own name.
Knightley
was in Utah
to promote
the film this
weekend,
attending
its first
screening
on Saturday
night in
a tuxedo.
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
17
i@inews.co.uk
Twitter: @jess_barrett
Actor Ben Whishaw says he feels as if the
world has become a less homophobic place
in the past five years.
“I’ve felt a big change. When I did
Hamlet, when I was first in the public
eye, certainly there was no one my
age who was an actor and out as gay.
And if you mentioned it to people it
was a bit like: ‘Maybe don’t talk about
that.’ Or: ‘I hope you’ve got a
good agent.’ But I also recognise it was me
as well. I hadn’t dealt with it, so I can’t blame
it on the world.”
Whishaw, 37, who will soon appear
in the BBC drama A Very British
Scandal, declined to comment on his
personal life and his sexuality until
2013. He told The Observer, “It seemed
like not necessarily a good idea to be
honest about it at that point.”
Red hot iPhone 8.
UK’s lowest monthly price.
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Perfect: Sheeran to marry Cherry
Ed Sheeran is engaged to his
girlfriend, Cherry Seaborn – the
woman he describes as the only
“constant” in his life.
The 26-year-old announced that he
had “got myself a fiancée”, adding “our
cats are chuffed as well”.
Last year the singer praised
Seaborn, who he has reportedly been
dating since 2015, for nursing him
back to health after he was involved in
a bicycle accident.
“It’s awesome meeting famous
people. But that’s not life,” Sheeran
said. “One day this will end. And
I know the one person that’s going
to remain constant is Cherry.”
Adele sings the praises of women
She guards her privacy jealously
despite her worldwide fame, but
Adele abandoned her low profile
when she attended the Women’s
March in Los Angeles at the weekend.
She was there with friends
Cameron Diaz and Jennifer
Lawrence, and commented that the
most influential people in her life
have all been women. “I am obsessed
with all the women in my life. I adore
them and need them more and more
every day,” she wrote on Instagram.
“I am so grateful to be a woman, I
wouldn’t change it for the world.
From just £27 a month
I hope I’m not only defined by my
gender though. I hope I’m defined by
my input to the world, my ability to
love and to have empathy.”
World, page 26
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18
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Please include a contact address with all correspondence
Thanks for not making a meal of the wheelchair
IN SICKNESS & IN HEALTH
Rebecca
Armstrong
In 2014, Rebecca’s husband Nick
was hit by a car and seriously injured.
Here, in one of a series of columns,
she writes about the aftermath of
his accident
D
espite a plan to go for a
meal there soon after Nick
moved to his current care
home, we hadn’t actually
eaten in the local Indian restaurant.
Nevertheless, I was always greeted
with a friendly “Hello Rebecca! How
are you? How is your husband?”
whenever I went in. Although we’ve
massively cut back on takeaways in
the past year-and-a-bit, having an
Indian five minutes’ away was too
tempting to eschew entirely.
It also meant, which is probably
why the staff know me by name, that
I could sit for a bit while waiting for
my order drinking a bottle of Cobra
(large) and having a chat. “Oh yes,
it was very busy there tonight,” I’d
tell Nick sometimes, when I’d been
enjoying sitting on the banquette in
the entrance, drinking my second
bottle of Cobra (large), watching the
customers coming in for dinner.
Some of the staff came down from
London to work there – they, like me,
getting used to the dark village night
that contrasted so much with the
bright lights of the capital.
“When are you going to bring
your husband here?” They’d ask me.
“Soon,” I’d say, knowing that he’d
love the place, with its nightclub
lighting and well-stocked bar, but
also aware that when Nick comes
across something new, he falls head
first into obsession. Once we’d
crossed the threshold together,
I knew he’d be expecting a walletbusting weekly visit. But I kept it
in my back pocket, a future treat to
be brought into play when the right
time arose.
And so it came to pass, after our
plans for a Saturday night in the
bungalow were thwarted (the care
agency had failed to provide any
carers, for the second night in a
week), that I drew out the trump
card. “Sod it, let’s go and have a
slap-up meal,” I said. “You’re going
to love it.”
I wrestled his chair over the
front step into a happier place. Our
HATFIELD’S VIEW
Stefano
Hatfield
How can I
mend my
broken sleep?
I
flick on the iPhone to check if I’ve
overslept: 2:40am – damn, not
again! Then, it’s 3.30, 4.55, 6.10…
Did I sleep in between?
No idea. What I do know is
I must force myself out
of bed at my most tired,
just when I feel I could
sleep, belatedly. I rise
with a mounting dread
that will be familiar to the
thousands who do not sleep
regularly through the night.
I’ve never been that person.
OK, there was a blurry time after
my ex and I decided foolishly to have
daughters within a year of each
other. My memory may never have
been the same again.
It is one of life’s great good
fortunes to have the ability to sleep
through, no matter what. I used to
be able to retire with a doorstep
sandwich and a mug of espresso; eat,
drink, read and conk out.
waiters were charming, the food
was delicious and the drinks flowed.
Nick was beaming and topped off
his night by ordering an ice-cream
that was served in a plastic penguin.
After a brandy (for him, which went
down rather swiftly) and a Bailey’s
for the lady, we returned to the care
home a happier pair than set out.
As predicted, the restaurant –
Jumeira in Kent, do visit if you’re
ever in the area – has become Nick’s
new happy place. We went again
last week and this time the manager
rolled out not the red carpet, but
the portable wheelchair ramp. “We
bought it for you,” one of the waiters
told us later. Although Nick’s chair
took a few bumps from passing
servers – something that not too
long ago would have caused him to
roar in fury – we had another lovely
evening. Nick had an ice-cream that
came served in another plastic bird
(not sure which kind, but, like its
brother, now has pride of place on
his shelves).
The proximity, the food and the
avian-themed dessert options mean
that it was always going to be a
hit when we finally went there to
eat. But the kindness of the staff –
“Hello Rebecca! Hello Nick!” – and
the feeling that we’re welcome,
wheelchair or not, is what will keep
us going back.
Twitter: @rebeccaj
That was then. In my fifties, I can
still close my eyes and go straight
off, but I find it virtually impossible
to sleep through: an increasingly
regular call of nature is a new
factor, but the greater concern
is what yogis call chitta vritti, the
mind chatter or “monkey mind”
of thoughts cluttering our minds.
Mostly it’s worries: family, health,
money, work, relationships … But
it’s difficult to pinpoint, particularly
when it’s unclear if I’m in a waking
or dream state, rerunning incidents
from the long-lost past.
I’ve read Arianna Huffington,
founder of the HuffPost website
and author of Thrive, who has
championed the importance of
sleep ever since collapsing with
exhaustion. I understand how sleep
deprivation affects everything
from a suppressed immune system
(why some people always get
colds) to hypertension: a
lessened ability to process
stress. I’ve tried to banish
electronics, keeping the
phone and its “blue light”
away from the bedside
table. I’ve darkened the
room and often fallen asleep
with a book in my hand. But
it’s not the falling asleep – it’s the
waking up in the middle of the night.
Deprivation is making me even
more irritable; it is affecting my
memory and decision-making,
leaving me fuzzy and drowsy in
the afternoon. From lavender to
chamomile I’m open to it all – any
suggestions to help me banish that
chitta vritti.
Twitter: @stefanohat
NEWS
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
19
PEOPLE
Maisie looks to
trade sword for
treading boards
By Laura Harding
Game of Thrones star Maisie Williams
has said she would like to swap her
sword for the stage when the hit fantasy series comes to an end.
The actress, who shot to fame as
Arya Stark in the TV show, said she
is hoping to tread the boards to test
herself as a performer.
Speaking ahead of the release
of her first foray into voice work in
Aardman Animations’ Early Man,
she said: “I want to just jump at all
opportunities and I’ve been lucky
that so far I’ve had a lot of different
opportunities presented to me.
“After doing this and really working on my voice, I would love to do
theatre – and I think that would further progress my skill set as an actor.
“I think I owe it to myself to just
keep pushing myself. It would be a
waste to not jump at everything.”
The ‘Game of
Thrones’ star wants
to ‘keep pushing
myself’ ALBERTO E
RODRIGUEZ/GETTY
SCIENCE
Hair dye and submarines
topped prophetic wish list
By David Levesley
The scientist Robert Boyle created
a “prophetic wish list” when he
helped set up the Royal Society, the
world’s first scientific institution,
350 years ago.
Boyle, best known for his work
on the behaviour of gases, was one
of the founders of the Royal Society
of London for the Improvement of
Natural Knowledge in 1660.
Boyle’s handwritten “wish list”,
found in his personal papers donated to the Royal Society after his
death in 1691, made a series of 24
predictions – a remarkable number
of which have come true.
The list, which includes the
invention of flight, scuba diving
and submarines, painkillers and
psychedelic drugs, is part of a new
exhibition to celebrate the society’s
350th anniversary.
“Nowadays we take these ideas
entirely for granted but in the
17th century this was prophetic.
This was an age that still believed
in magic, which had just come out
of the bloodiest civil war imagina-
Robert Boyle hoped scientists
would invent painkillers and flying
machines WELLCOME COLLECTION
ble and was divided by religion,”
a spokesman for the Royal Society said. “It is remarkable that this
wish list is still relevant today.”
Ocean navigation was predicted
with the “practicable and certain
way of finding Longitudes”, as
well as sleeping tablets, artificial
stimulants and antidepressants,
with “potent druggs [sic] to alter
or Exalt Imagination, Waking,
Memory and other functions and
appease pain, procure innocent
sleep, harmless dreams etc”.
Genetically modified crops were
also anticipated, with Boyle writing
of “the Acceleration of the Production of things out of Seed”. He also
foresaw the advent of engine-propelled ships – “a ship to saile with
all winds” as well as lightweight
body armour – “making Armor
light and extremely hard”.
Top of his list were predictions
for the “Prolongation of Life”
and the “Recovery of Youth, or at
least some of the Marks of it, as
new Teeth, new Hair colour’d as
in youth.”
Boyle also anticipated the work
of fellow scientist Thomas Edison
and electric lightbulbs when he included in his list the desire for “perpetual light.”
One of Boyle’s more
unusual predictions
was that of scratch and sniff
technology. In his wish list
Boyle described the concept
of “Varnishes perfumable
by Rubbing”.
CULTURE
Orchestra to ‘reimagine’ Smiths anthems
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
The Smiths’ bedroom anthems will
be reimagined for the concert hall
by an award-winning classical orchestra and three members of the
legendary Manchester band.
Songs including “How Soon Is
Now?” and “Girlfriend In a Coma”
will be performed in orchestral
style by the Manchester Camerata Orchestra along with Smiths’
drummer Mike Joyce and bassist
Andy Rourke. Craig Gannon, the
band’s additional guitarist, will also
appear at the Classically Smiths
concerts this summer. Morrissey,
who has resisted any reunion since
the band split in 1987, will not be
involved. Guitarist Johnny Marr is
also not expected to take part.
The “nostalgic” concerts will
combine musical arrangements
and imagery to “reimagine the enduringly powerful sounds of the
seminal Manchester band”.
NEWS
20
Another
View
Andy
Street
Heartland of
industry is still
innovative
B
irmingham’s industrial
expansion in the 18th
century was special. We
had a creative and highly
skilled workforce, which
was constantly developing new
inventions, improving products and
processes, and driving productivity.
It’s no different now. The
entrepreneurs of today are using
digital technology to innovate and,
just like their predecessors, they are
on a mission to improve our lives.
However, for all the spirit and will
of today’s entrepreneurs, the odds
have been stacked against them.
It is now accepted that too many
of England’s opportunities have
been concentrated in our capital.
With devolution, and important
initiatives like the potential
relocation of Channel 4, we have the
opportunity to change this.
In my role as Mayor of the West
Midlands, I am striving to ensure
that the region is recognised as
being at the forefront of digital
innovation. That means growing
and focusing the adult skills budget
on courses such as computer
science, engineering, and design. It
means supporting new approaches
to skills training, such as digital
apprenticeships, digital boot
camps and online learning. And,
as I have found throughout my
career that giving young people the
opportunity to meet and learn from
those successful in their field can be
priceless, I have launched a Mayor’s
Mentors programme for people
starting out in their careers.
The second task is to encourage
more start-ups to be born here, or
come to the West Midlands. The
third is to put digital technology
8 days
from on
l
£ 1 , 3 9 9 pp y
Andy Street’s Urban Challenge is a
competition for tech start-ups in
Birmingham and the West Midlands
at the heart of everything we do in
local government.
This for me is where things can
get really exciting. Together, we
face a number of great challenges
as a country around health,
employment and housing. In an
ageing society we must ask what
role does technology have in
ensuring our elderly citizens can
live happy, independent and fulfilled
lives, for as long as possible.
Technology can help transform
our policy solutions. Take Cera – a
Technology can
help dementia
sufferers and
their carers
start-up that not only matches
people with qualified carers, but
helps the elderly to manage their
lives independently, helping them to
find a taxi firm, or order food.
In the West Midlands we have
Memrica, which uses technology
to help dementia sufferers and
their carers. Then there’s Echo,
which makes it easier for people to
manage their long-term illnesses
themselves, with an app that orders
medication to their door, and helps
remind people to take medication
and complete their course. Or
Worktaster, which is helping young
people to develop their skills and
gain permanent employment
by making it much easier for
students, employers and teachers
to co-ordinate work experience
opportunities. And there’s Calipsa,
which is developing ways to make
our cities cleaner by improving
air quality.
I want more of these sorts of
companies to come to the West
Midlands. I’ve launched Urban
Challenge, a competition for
technology start-ups.
We want to hear from people
with ideas on how we can address
critical challenges in the West
Midlands: wellbeing, housing, youth
unemployment and skills, and
digital citizenship. If successful,
start-ups will win a prize package
worth over £20,000, a guaranteed
three-month pilot with the West
Midlands Combined Authority,
plus support in developing the
proposition, pitch and sales
strategy. I’ll be working closely
with the winners, who I will meet
with monthly. They’ll also be given
working space in my office for the
duration of the pilot.
By putting the West Midlands
at the forefront of digital
innovation, we can once again
show how this special region is
using the latest technology to
transform the country.
To apply for Urban Challenge,
visit urbanchallenge.io
CRYPTIC CROSSWORD
No 2170 BY POINS
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The Adriatic Coast
by Yacht
Departures from May to October 2018
Your cruise includes...
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The services of our experienced and insightful
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Holidays organised by and are subject to the booking conditions of Riviera Travel,
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offered subject to availability. ABTA V4744 ATOL 3430 protected. Per person prices
based on two sharing a twin cabin. Single cabins and optional insurance available at
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costs may apply. Prices correct as of 10-01-18.
Stuck on the cryptic crossword? For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3580. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble accessing this number, please call our helpdesk on 0333 202 3390.
For more information or to book,
please call: 01283 523447
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NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
21
TRADE
Growing calls for Teesside
to be given free-port status
By Dean Kirby
NORTHERN CORRESPONDENT
Leading business figures in the
North East of England are urging
Philip Hammond to create a
free port in the region to boost
foreign trade and attract investment
after Brexit.
Fifty companies have signed
a letter by Ben Houchen, the
Conservative mayor of the Tees
Valley, calling on the Chancellor
to grant the area free-port status.
Global companies with bases in the
region, including Hitachi Rail, Sirius
Minerals, Liberty Steel and Quorn
Foods, have backed the campaign.
All of these are, in one form or
another, supported by the region’s
versatile Teesport.
Free ports allow the free trade
of goods and can help to attract
investment and create jobs. They
sit outside a nation’s customs area
and make it easier for companies
to import components and export
goods, but they are discouraged
by the European Union.
Mr Houchen said: “When we leave
the EU, Britain will find itself with
more freedoms than at any time
in almost half a century. Whether
people voted leave or remain, we
Making Teesport a free-trade zone would attract investment GETTY
Free-trade zones How they work
Free ports are areas that fall outside
of a nation’s customs regulations,
where goods can be imported
without paying duties or taxes.
Also known as “free-trade zones”,
there are around 3,500 worldwide.
They are used as redistribution
and manufacturing hubs, where
components are imported and
combined into a finished product
ready for export. Companies are
then charged taxes and import
duties when the products arrive at
their destination market.
There are none in the UK, thanks
in part to the EU Customs Union. In
contrast, there are more than 250
such zones in the US, employing
420,000 people.
The palm-shaped Jebel Ali in
Dubai is a free port and accounts for
20 per cent of foreign investment
in the United Arab Emirates,
employing 135,000 people.
JUSTICE
Jerry Hopkinson, the
boss of PD Ports, which
operates Teesport on the River
Tees, said free-port status would
help to attract investment and
develop sustainable industries.
need to look to the future and at
the opportunities. Free-port status
would be transformational. Not only
would we become an international
magnet for business wanting to set
up here, it’ll also mean more jobs.
“Our industrial roots, current
businesses and future plans
for the world-class South Tees
Development Corporation site
mark us out as a manufacturing
powerhouse. So as we take back
control of our trade policy, I want to
capitalise on these new freedoms to
ensure we’re best placed to benefit
from all that Brexit brings.”
A study carried out in 2016 for the
Centre for Policy Studies by Rishi
Sunak, the Tory MP for Richmond
in North Yorkshire, found that free
ports could create more than 86,000
jobs nationwide.
The bid has won cross-party
support, with Simon Clarke, the
Tory MP for Middlesbrough South
and East Cleveland, and Labour’s
Anna Turley, the MP for Redcar,
backing the mayor’s campaign.
Paul Booth, the chairman of
the Tees Valley Local Enterprise
Partnership, said: “The local
business community is eager to
see this become reality. It would
rewrite the rule book on what could
be achieved in terms of growth.
We need new solutions for a new
era and evidence points to free
ports being a successful way of
supporting our local businesses and
puts Tees Valley in a strong position
to capitalise post-Brexit.”
PEOPLE
Time for a wash and brush up
An aquarist at the Sea Life centre
in London cleans the green sea
turtles in the ocean tank, during
the annual “count and clean”.
Each year, staff check the
overall health and wellbeing of
the attraction’s marine stock
and experts carefully count
all of the fish in the aquarium.
JONATHAN BRADY/PA
MUSIC
Police database of 20 million Grand National
Zombies and Kinks bassist
hero
loses
photos
mugshots to be investigated in car park fire
Jim Rodford dies aged 76
By Rob Merrick
Ministers face a parliamentary
inquiry over the storing by police of 20
million photographs of people’s faces
– including many not convicted of any
crime – after a senior MP warned the
practice raises “fundamental civil
liberty issues”.
A Commons committee is poised
to launch the inquiry after
running out of a patience with
the Government, which has failed
to act on the controversy almost six
years after it was ruled unlawful by
the High Court.
The court warned of the “risk
of stigmatisation of those entitled
to the presumption of innocence”,
adding that it would be particularly
harmful in the cases of children.
But the Home Office urged forces to
carry on retaining the facial images,
promising new laws would follow. At
least 20 million images are stored –
up to one-third of the UK population.
Norman Lamb, chairman of the
Commons Science and Technology
Committee, has said it is ready to
step in and investigate.
Condemning the situation as
“intolerable”, Mr Lamb said the
database includes images of “people
who have not been charged with
any crime, or people who have been
exonerated”.
The Home Office was asked to
respond to Mr Lamb’s criticisms and
the probable inquiry, but declined.
THE INDEPENDENT
By Eleanor Barlow
By Joe Nerssessian
Jockey Bob Champion lost a
lifetime of photographs in a major
fire at a car park, he has revealed.
His car was one of 1,400 vehicles
destroyed in the blaze at a
multistorey car park in Liverpool
on New Year’s Eve.
Champion, 69, had the
photographs in the car ready
to take to his publisher for his
forthcoming autobiography.
He has appealed to followers on
Facebook to help replace some of
the pictures.
Champion won the Grand
National in 1981 on Aldaniti,
two years after being diagnosed
with cancer.
The Zombies’ bassist Jim Rodford
has died at the age of 76, just days
after his final performance.
The musician (inset), whose
career spanned six decades
and included 18 years
with The Kinks, died on
Saturday after falling
down stairs at his home in
St Albans, his cousin Rod
Argent, the keyboard player
and leader of The Zombies,
confirmed yesterday.
Rodford had just returned home
to England after completing a
tour of Florida with The Zombies,
making his final stage appearance
on 14 January. Argent paid tribute
to his cousin, writing on the band’s
Facebook page: “It is with deep
sadness that I learned my dear
cousin and lifelong friend, Jim
Rodford, died... after a fall on the
stairs. Jim was not only a
magnificent bass player,
but also from the first
inextricably bound to the
story of The Zombies.”
Argent also highlighted
Rodford’s commitment to
the music scene in St Albans,
where he had lived all his life,
playing with family members in The
Rodford Files.
Rodford had been working on
his autobiography at the time of his
death. He is survived by his wife of
56 years, Jean.
22
NEWS
AFGHANISTAN
EYEWITNESS
‘Don’t leave
anyone alive,
they were
shouting’
By Akram Walizada
IN KABUL
A man tries to escape
from a balcony at the
Intercontinental Hotel
OMAR SOBHANI/REUTERS
Taliban fighters murder guests in
13-hour gun battle at Kabul hotel
interior ministry spokesman Najib
Danish said. Ten people were
injured, including six security forces.
Eleven of the 14 foreigners killed
were employees of KamAir, a private
Afghan airline. Some of its flights
yesterday were disrupted because
of the attack. Six of the dead were
Ukrainian nationals.
Two Venezuelan pilots for
KamAir were also among the dead.
Luis Figuera said his brother-in-law,
Adelsis Ramos, was killed along with
Pablo Chiossone. Both bodies were
identified by another Venezuelan
pilot at a Kabul hospital.
A citizen from Kazakhstan
was among the dead at the hotel,
according to a spokesman for the
Kazakh foreign ministry.
Four Afghan nationals were
among the victims. They included
As day broke yesterday, thick
clouds of black smoke could be
seen pouring from the building, an
imposing 1960s structure set on a
hilltop and heavily protected, like
most public buildings in Kabul.
The Intercontinental is one
of two main luxury hotels in
the city and had been due to
host an information technology
conference. More than 100 IT
managers and engineers were on
site when the attack took place,
said Ahmad Waheed, an official at
the telecommunications ministry.
As Special Forces troops
manoeuvred around the site,
several armoured US military
vehicles with heavy machine guns
could be seen close to the hotel,
along with Afghan police units.
Hotel manager Ahmad Haris
Nayab, who escaped unhurt, said
the attackers had got into the
main part of the hotel through
a kitchen before going through
the building, with many guests
trapped in their rooms.
“When the sixth floor caught
fire, my roommate told me, either
burn or escape,” said Mohammad
Musa, who was in his room on the
top floor when he heard gunfire.
“I got a bed sheet and tied it to
the balcony. I tried to come down
but I was heavy and my arms
were not strong enough. I fell and
injured my shoulder and leg.”
Abdul Rahman Naseri was
in the hall of the hotel when he
saw four insurgents dressed in
army uniforms.
“They were shouting in Pashto,
‘Don’t leave any of them alive,
good or bad,’” Mr Naseri said.
“I ran to my room on the second
floor. I opened the window and
tried to get out using a tree but the
branch broke and I fell. I hurt my
back and broke a leg.”
The raid came just days after a
US embassy warning of possible
attacks on hotels in Kabul.
Waheed Poyan, the country’s newly
appointed consul general to Karachi,
Pakistan, and Ahmad Farzan, an
employee of the High Peace Council,
created to facilitate peace talks
between the Afghan government
and the Taliban and other opposition
groups. Also killed was a telecoms
official from Farah province.
Security officials confirmed that
34 provincial officials were at the
hotel for a conference organised by
the telecommunication ministry.
Fire broke out in the six-storey
hotel as fighting raged. Explosions
could be heard throughout the
stand-off. Live TV footage showed
people trying to escape through windows and from upper floors as black
smoke poured from the building.
The interior ministry said a private company had taken over hotel
security about three weeks ago. Mr
Danish said an initial investigation
showed that six insurgents entered
the hotel from the northern side and
stormed its kitchen.
A hotel insider might have helped
the attackers to gain entrance, Mr
Danish said, adding that the inquiry
was continuing.
An interior ministry statement
blamed the Haqqani network, a
group affiliated with the Taliban,
which claimed a previous attack on
the hotel in 2011.
IRAQ
One-minute Wijuko
JORDAN
Death sentence for Isis convert
How to play Place 1 – 9 once
in the grid, obeying the sums
between pairs of squares
King tells Pence of Jerusalem fears
By Rahim Faiez
IN KABUL
Afghan security forces said last night
they had killed the last of six Taliban
militants to end an overnight siege at
Kabul’s Intercontinental Hotel that
left at least 18 people dead, including
14 foreigners.
Some of the 150 guests fled the gun
battle and fire sparked by the assault
by shimmying down bedsheets from
the upper floors.
The militants, who wore suicide
vests, pinned security forces down
for more than 13 hours after the
attack began on Saturday evening.
The gunmen roamed hotel hallways
targeting foreigners and Afghan
officials. The more than 150 people
who were rescued or managed
to escape included 41 foreigners,
By Caroline Mortimer
An Iraqi court has sentenced a
German woman to death after she
ran away to join Isis. The court in
Baghdad convicted the unnamed
woman of “providing logistical
support and assistance to the
terrorist group to commit crimes”,
and has ordered her execution.
The spokesman of the Supreme
Judicial Council said the woman
acknowledged joining Isis after
travelling to Syria and then to
Iraq with her two daughters. Both
daughters later married militants.
The woman is believed to have
been living in the Mannheim region
of Germany when she travelled
to Syria, but is reportedly of
Moroccan descent.
She is believed to have been
among a number of women who
were captured after the battle
of Mosul in July 2017, when Iraqi
forces pushed Isis out of its
second city.
She now faces hanging but can
still appeal against her sentence.
THE INDEPENDENT
Afghanistan’s President
Ashraf Ghani ordered
an investigation into the attack
and warned that militant
groups were being helped by
neighbouring countries.
By Suleiman Al-Khalidi
IN AMMAN
6
7
7
13
14
15
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Jordan’s King Abdullah voiced
concern yesterday over a
decision by Washington
to recognise Jerusalem
as Israel’s capital, saying
East Jerusalem had to
be the capital of a future
Palestinian state.
In talks with US Vice
President Mike Pence, the
king (inset) said the only solution
to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict was
REUTERS
a two-state one. “The US decision on
Jerusalem... does not come as a result
of a comprehensive settlement of the
Palestinian-Israeli conflict.”
Jordan lost East
Jerusalem and the West
Bank to Israel during the
Arab-Israeli war in 1967.
Jordanian officials are
worried the move could
trigger violence in the
Palestinian territories and
spill over into Jordan, where
many people are descendants of
Palestinian refugees. REUTERS
NEWS
2-27
SOUTH KOREA
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
23
SPORT
North and South to join forces at Winter Games
By Hyung-Jin Kim
IN SEOUL
The International Olympic
Committee is allowing 22 North
Korean athletes to take part in the
upcoming Winter Games.
Among the 22 are 12 women
who will join South Korea’s female
hockey team what will be the first
unified Olympic team. The North
Koreans will also compete in
North Korean
singer Hyon
Song-wol arrives
at Gangneung
Art Centre AP
Kim’s favourite crosses border
By Hyung-Jin Kim
IN SEOUL
The frontwoman of a hugely popular
North Korean girl band crossed
the border yesterday to check on
preparations for performances by an
art troupe that she leads during next
month’s Winter Olympics.
Hyon Song-wol didn’t speak to
reporters before boarding an express
train at Seoul’s railway station for the
eastern city of Gangneung, where her
art troupe is to perform.
She is the leader of Pyongyang’s
all-female Moranbong Band, which
was hand-picked by the country’s
leader, Kim Jong-un.
Hyonhasbeenthesubjectofintense
media attention since she attended
talks between the two countries
that struck an agreement on the
140-member Samjiyon art troupe’s
two performances.
Under the deal, the Samjiyon group
will play folk songs and classics that
are well-known to both Koreas and
fit in with the theme of unification. AP
UNITED STATES
Shutdown leads to
Trump’s ‘nuclear
option’ threat
By Jon Sharman
Donald Trump yesterday threatened
Democrats with a “nuclear option”
following the US government
shutdown, saying senators should
move to a vote by simple majority to
force through new spending.
The President tweeted: “Great
to see how hard Republicans are
fighting for our Military and Safety
at the Border. The Dems just want
illegal immigrants to pour into our
nation unchecked. If stalemate
continues, Republicans should go to
51% (Nuclear Option) and vote on
real, long term budget, no C.R.’s!”
The so-called nuclear option
means changing Senate voting
rules to bypass a filibuster by the
minority party.
Harry Reid, a
Democrat, was
the first to use it in
2013 when he was
the Senate Majority
Leader, to overcome
Republican resistance
to staff appointments
by Barack Obama. The
voting threshold was
lowered from 60 to 51 for
executive and judicial
appointments below the level of the
Supreme Court.
The shutdown came into effect at
midnight on Friday after senators
failed to pass a new federal spending
bill. Only essential services such as
law enforcement will function until
the impasse is solved, and thousands
of federal workers will go unpaid.
Democrats sought to attach
protections for undocumented
migrants brought to the US as
children – the “Dreamers” – to the
spending bill, but Republicans,
including Mr Trump, opposed it.
Consequently, the Democrats largely
voted against the funding extension.
About 700,000 dreamers were
previously protected by the Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals
programme. Mr Trump
ended the Obama-era
scheme and has said he
wants to put its protections
into law with other
immigration measures,
including his promised
border wall.
Disaster relief provision
and more money for opioid
treatment were also among
the Democrats’ demands.
THE INDEPENDENT
figure skating, short track speed
skating, Alpine skiing and crosscountry skiing.
At h l e t e s f ro m b o t h
countries will march
under a single “unification
flag” (inset), depicting
the peninsula, during
the opening ceremony in
PyeongChang.
T he thaw i n re lation s
between the two regions began
when North Korea’s President, Kim
Jong-un, suddenly expressed
his willingness to improve
ties and send a delegation
to the Olympics.
Critics dismissed
his overture as a tactic
t o w e a ke n U S - l e d
sanctions in response to
North Korea’s advancing
nuclear and missile
programmes. AP
24
NEWS
Panorama
Around the
world in
10 stories
IN AZAZ, SYRIA
MYANMAR
Island volcano
erupts again
Soldiers jailed for
civilian deaths
A volcano in Papua New Guinea
erupted again yesterday,
sending plumes of steam and
ash into the air.
Thousands of people have
been evacuated from islands
surrounding Kadovar Island
off the South Pacific nation’s
north coast since the volcano
there began erupting on 5
January. Experts warned last
week that seismic activity
meant that a major eruption
could be imminent.
Papua New Guinea sits on the
Ring of Fire, a line of seismic
faults encircling the Pacific.
A military tribunal has sentenced six
soldiers to 10 years in prison, with
hard labour, for killing three civilians
in war-torn Kachin state.
The Kachin state police office
said the tribunal handed down the
sentence after finding the soldiers
guilty of killing three ethnic Kachin
civilians in September.
Min Zaw, a Kachin state police
officer, said the six confessed
during the hearing that they were
responsible for the killings.
Kachin is home to an ethnic rebel
army that has been fighting the
Myanmar military for more than
seven years. AP
Revolutionary
Guard told to cut
ties to economy
By John Gambrell
IN DUBAI
Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah
Ali Khamenei, has ordered
the Revolutionary Guard to
loosen its hold on the economy,
the country’s defence minister
said, raising the possibility that
Turkish troops advance on
Kurds after bombardment
By Dominic Evans
PAPUA NEW GUINEA
IRAN
SYRIA
the paramilitary organisation
might privatise some of its
vast holdings.
The comments this weekend
by General Amir Hatami appear
to be a trial balloon to test public
reaction to the idea, long pushed
by President Hassan Rouhani, a
relative moderate.
But whether the
Revolutionary Guard will agree
to the idea remains unclear.
The organisation, tasked with
defending the country’s Islamic
system, is estimated to control
about a third of the country’s
entire economy.
Turkish ground forces advanced
into northern Syria’s Afrin region
yesterday after launching artillery
and air strikes on a US-backed
Kurdish militia it aims to sweep from
its border.
The Syrian-Kurdish YPG militia,
supported by the United States
but seen as a terrorist organisation
by Turkey, said it had repulsed the
Turkish forces and their allies after
fierce clashes.
Turkish artillery fire and air strikes
continued to hit villages, the YPG
said, and battles raged to the north
Malta’s capital Valletta
kicks off its year as the
European Capital of
Culture with a display
of aerobatic dancers
under the direction
of Spanish theatrical
company La Fura dels
Baus performing “The
Rise of the Tritons”
DARRIN ZAMMIT LUPI/
REUTERS
YEMEN
Aden-based ministers set first budget since 2014
Yemen has announced its first budget
since the country descended into
armed conflict in 2014, in a sign that
the Saudi-backed government seeks
to get a handle on a chaotic economy
as millions face starvation.
Yemen has been divided by nearly
three years of civil war between
the internationally recognised
government of President Abd-Rabbu
Mansour Hadi, backed by northern
neighbour Saudi Arabia, and the
Iran-aligned Houthis.
Based in the port of Aden, Mr
Hadi’s government controls the
central bank there but has struggled
to enforce order in southern and
eastern parts of Yemen that it
controls, or eject the Houthis from
lands they run around the capital,
Sanaa. Prime Minister Ahmed bin
Daghr said: “It’s an austerity budget.
It includes salaries for the military
and civilians in 12 provinces.” REUTERS
DRC
INDIA
CZECH REPUBLIC
IN ADEN
Belgrade
After traversing several
countries en route to the West,
Najibullah, a former policeman
from Kholm in Afghanistan,
his pregnant wife and four
children got stuck in Serbia.
Now they spend their days
in a drab refugee camp in
Krnjaca, an industrial area
of Belgrade, hoping they will
ultimately move to Germany
where 30-year-old Najibullah
has relatives.
If they get their wish, they
would join more than a million
other migrants who have
arrived in Germany since
2015, when Chancellor Angela
Merkel offered sanctuary to
those fleeing war and poverty.
Najibullah’s eight-year-old
daughter, Sonya, has started
school and has learnt Serbian.
“It is not bad here, I am going
to school, I have good friends,
they invite me to parties... ”
Sonya said.
In a prefabricated hut, built
by the communist Yugoslavia
for single factory workers,
Marwan Ahman, an ethnic
Kurd from the Iraqi city of
Kirkuk complained about the
bland, canned food served to
his family of four.
“I want to go to Germany
to make a good future for
my children and my family,”
he said in Kurdish through
an interpreter.
“Look at this room – it has
bunk beds and nothing else;
this is not a good place for a
family,” he added. REUTERS
Aleksandar Vasovic
and west of the city of Afrin against
Turkish forces and their Syrian
rebel allies, said Birusk Hasaka, the
YPG spokesman in Afrin.
Valletta’s
a cultural
climber
By Mohammed Ghobari
Postcard
From...
Turkey has angered the US by
targeting its Kurdish allies REUTERS
Turkey opened a new front in the
nearly seven-year-old Syrian war on
Saturday when, under what Ankara
has called Operation Olive Branch,
Turkish artillery and air strikes
pounded YPG positions in Afrin.
Turkey is targeting the US-backed
fighters at a time when ties with ally
Washington appear close to breaking
point. Turkey sees the YPG as an
extension of the outlawed Kurdistan
Workers’ Party (PKK), which has
conducted a deadly three-decade
insurgency in Turkey’s mainly
Kurdish south-east.
The US is backing the YPG in
Syria, seeing it as an effective partner
in the fight against Isis. REUTERS
Five dead during
Firecracker
anti-Kabila protests blaze kills 17
Prague hotel fire
death toll rises
Police have used tear gas and
gunfire to disperse thousands of
anti-government demonstrators,
leaving five people dead and
injuring more than 33 in the
Democratic Republic of the Congo.
The protesters want President
Joseph Kabila to step down, the
United Nations said. Catholic
churches and activists had called
for peaceful demonstrations in
Kinshasa, Goma, Lubumbashi and
other cities yesterday. AP
Officials say the death toll in a
hotel fire in downtown Prague has
risen to four, after two of those
injured died in a hospital.
Two people died at the scene
at the Eurostars David hotel on
Saturday evening. Police say they
were a man from Germany and a
woman from South Korea.
Nine others, including people
from the Netherlands, Turkey and
France, were treated in hospital
for their injuries. AP
Seventeen people have died after a
fire broke out at a warehouse on the
outskirts of Delhi.
The blaze happened in a building
used to store firecrackers, a fire
service department official said,
adding that rescue operations
were continuing.
Last month, 14 people were killed
in a fire that swept through a rooftop
restaurant in Mumbai. Most of the
victims were women who had been
attending a birthday party. REUTERS
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
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BUSINESS SPORT
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i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
25
FRANCE
GERMANY
End of the nouvelle
era as world’s first
celebrity chef dies
SPD votes
to negotiate
coalition
with Merkel
By Tony Paterson
IN BERLIN
Bocuse had an insatiable appetite for
food and sex, writes Rob Hastings
T
o judge solely by a sign
on the door of his famous
restaurant’s kitchen –
“Silence, we’re cooking”
– you could be forgiven
for thinking Paul Bocuse was a strict
chef who lived by the rules.
Yet this was a man reputed, in
his younger days, to have placed a
human skull inside a pot of stock as a
retaliatory prank on a bullying head
chef. Not only did Bocuse speak
openly about having two mistresses,
their likenesses appeared on life-size
murals inside the same restaurant
where his wife, Raymonde, helped
keep things in order. As for his trade,
the world’s first celebrity chef will be
remembered for leading the nouvelle
cuisine revolution that changed
French cooking and the way people
everywhere think what constitutes
good food: quick, light and fresh.
That his death, aged 91, was
announced on Saturday by France’s
interior minister, no less, was a
reflection of Bocuse’s excellence
with a hob and an oven. His
hometown restaurant in Lyon has
held the maximum three Michelin
stars since 1965, a world record.
Minister Gérard Collomb also
paid tribute to the chef’s “art of
living”: Bocuse was renowned for his
warmth, charisma and hedonism.
And though his old-fashioned sexism
and polyamorous family life may
have killed his career in another age
and another country, it seems only to
have bolstered his reputation.
Interviewed by the US magazine
People in 1976, the year after he was
awarded the Légion d’Honneur, the
unashamed self-publicist adopted
the third person: “Bocuse wouldn’t
be Bocuse without his women.”
His earliest serious training as
a chef came under the tutelage of
Eugénie Brazier, the first woman to
win three Michelin stars. Yet in that
same article he said: “I would rather
have a pretty woman in my bed
than behind a stove in a restaurant.
I prefer my women to smell of Dior
and Chanel than of cooking fat…
Women are good cooks, but they are
not good chefs.”
It was in 2005 that Bocuse
revealed in his book, The Sacred Fire,
that he effectively had “three wives”.
Besides his spouse Raymonde, there
were long-term mistresses Raymone
Carlut, the former director of a
medical clinic and mother of his chef
son Jerome, and Patricia Zizza, a
communications professional.
I prefer my women to
smell of Dior than of cooking
fat… Women are good cooks,
but they are not good chefs
Paul Bocuse in his kitchen at L’Auberge de Pont de Collonges, in 2012. The Lyon
restaurant has held three Michelin stars since 1965 AFP/GETTY IMAGES
His insatiable appetite for “food
and sex” stemmed from the trauma
of his experiences in the Second
World War, according to Eve-Marie
Zizza-Lalu, the daughter of his
younger mistress.
He worked in the canteen and
slaughterhouse of a Vichy youth
camp until he joined the French
Liberation Army. It was while
serving under General Charles de
Gaulle that he saw several Nazi
soldiers being killed and, in Alsace,
was seriously injured himself,
shot either in the leg or the chest
depending which account you read.
In peacetime he worked with
Brazier before beginning an eightyear stint under the chef who would
shape his career, Fernand Point. It
was through Point’s inspiration that
Bocuse became a key figure in the
development of nouvelle cuisine.
This new style defined dishes that
could be cooked speedily, with
the freshest possible ingredients
unadorned by powerful sauces.
Bocuse, by now establishing his
reputation at his Auberge du Pont
de Collonges restaurant, was not
the only chef to adopt this style.
But according to legend, the term
nouvelle cuisine was first adopted
to describe the menu created
by Bocuse for the first flight of
Concorde in 1969.
It takes quite a chef to change the
world with airline food.
SOCIETY
Richest 1 per cent hoover up bulk of new global wealth
By Kalyeena Makortoff
Growing inequality resulted in 82 per
cent of new global wealth going to
the richest 1 per cent last year, while
the prosperity of the poorest half
flatlined, an Oxfam report has shown.
It means that of the £7.3trn
increase in global wealth
between July 2016 and June 2017,
£6trn went to 75 million people, while
the bottom 3.7 billion had no increase.
The trend resulted in the sharpest
increase in the number of billionaires
ever recorded, to 2,043, with one
created every two days, according to
Oxfam’s report, published ahead of
the annual World Economic Forum of
global political and business leaders
in the Swiss ski resort of Davos.
The wealth of those billionaires
increased by £550bn over 12 months,
it added.
Mark Goldring, chief executive of
Oxfam GB, said the statistics signal
that “something is very wrong with
the global economy”.
“The concentration of extreme
wealth is not a sign of a thriving
economy but a symptom of a system
that is failing the millions of people on
poverty wages who make our clothes
and grow our food.”
He said change was essential if
work was to be a “genuine route out
of poverty”.
Chancellor Angela Merkel was
on course to form a new grand
coalition government last night
after the Social Democrats (SPD)
narrowly agreed to begin talks
aimed at forming a ruling alliance
with her conservatives, in a vote
that ended months of political
deadlock over the issue.
But the more than 600 SPD
delegates attending an emergency
conference in Bonn approved
entering coalition talks with
Ms Merkel’s conservatives by a
majority so narrow that the show
of hands had to be counted.
The party’s leader, Martin
Schulz, declared that the only
alternative was to hold another
general election – a choice which
he rejected.
Earlier, critics headed by the
JUSO or “young socialist” wing of
the party spoke in favour of going
into opposition to enable
the party to re-find
its roots and its
socialist identity.
Mr Schulz
revealed during
the congress
that he had
spoken by
telephone with
French President
Emanuel Macron
on Saturday. He told the
meeting Mr Macron backed a new
German “grand coalition” and had
said he feared that the extreme
right could come to power in
Germany if its government did
not work with France in support
of Europe.
If the SPD eventually agrees
to form a coalition with Ms
Merkel (above), Germany could
have its third “grand coalition”
government since 2005 in place by
Easter. Yesterday’s vote put an end
to months of uncertainty caused
by last September’s inconclusive
general election which allowed
the far-right populist Alternative
for Germany party (AfD) to enter
the national parliament for the
first time.
This Saturday, in your
A weekend break in
Ljubljana: where to go
and what to see
PLUS
Lima’s
dazzling
dining scene
l Days out l
Simon
Calder’s travel
clinic
26
NEWS
SOCIETY
Hollywood stars join women
on march across the world
By Elizabeth Segal
IN LOS ANGELES
In what was thought to be the
largest of the Women’s Marches
held across the US at the weekend,
tens of thousands of residents, and a
sprinkling Hollywood stars, poured
on to the streets of Los Angeles to
“resist” President Donald Trump.
“Ugh – Where Do I Even Begin?”
s a i d o n e p l ac a rd c a r r i e d at
Saturday’s rally. Anger about the US
government shutdown was palpable,
as was frustration with the Trump
administration’s policies, but the
protesters were also concerned about
sexual harassment and assault.
The main theme of the LA march,
#PowerToThePolls, encouraged
participants to think ahead to the midterm elections in November. Voter
registration booths and canvassers
dotted the route, while street vendors
hawked “pink pussy” hats, a symbol
of last year’s marches, and “Oprah
2020!” badges. There were also
handmade signs urging Americans to
“Veto the Cheeto!” – a reference to the
corn snack which is said to resemble
Mr Trump’s hair colour.
“Before Trump, I was content to
sit back and watch the government
just go by me,” demonstrator Heather
Tucci, told CNN. “Now I’m not.”
Activists gathered in more US
cities and in others across the world
yesterday for a second day of proests.
Rallies in Las Vegas, Seattle, Miami,
Phoenix, London, Paris and Berlin
coincided with the recent #MeToo
and Time’s Up movements against
sexual assault and harassment.
“Witnessing the recent rise of
the Time’s Up movement has been
profoundly inspiring,” the actress
Olivia Wilde said in LA on Saturday.
“We have shown them that hell hath
no fury like a woman underestimated.”
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ABTA No. V4744
The greatest threat
to Trump’s tenure
Special counsel Mueller is digging into Russian
money-laundering claims. By Kim Sengupta
D
onald Trump got to
the White House with
the intelligence and
security agencies
in the US playing a
significant role in his victory. Now
they are the ones who may yet
bring him down, ending one of the
most extraordinary presidencies
in American history.
The Democrats bitterly
complain that Hillary Clinton
could well have won had it not
been for James Comey. She was
riding high when the FBI director
reopened his investigation into
her email account, thus effectively
sabotaging her campaign,
while failing to reveal that an
investigation into links between
Mr Trump and Russia had been
going on for months.
Now Mr Comey is gone, fired
by Mr Trump for failing to end
the Russia inquiry. But three
separate investigations continue
on whether the President was
the “Muscovite Candidate” in the
election. The most critical of the
three is headed by special counsel
Robert Mueller, a former head
of the FBI who has expanded his
inquiry to looking at Mr Trump’s
murky business affairs.
The gathering storm is likely to
be even fiercer with the prospect of
Steve Bannon providing evidence.
He was involved in the discussions
to sack Mr Comey – an act being
examined by Mr Mueller’s team
as a possible obstruction of justice
– and the drafting of a misleading
statement, allegedly with Mr
Trump’s knowledge, about a
meeting held in the Trump Tower
between Jared Kushner (Mr
Trump’s adviser and son-in-law),
Donald Trump Jnr, the Trump
aide Paul Manafort and a Russian
lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya, who
had offered to provide damaging
information about Hillary Clinton.
Mr Bannon has described the
sacking of Mr Comey as “the
worst mistake in modern political
history”, opening the door, as
it did, for the appointment of a
special counsel with a wide array
of powers.
Mr Bannon was also remarkably
prescient about the parallel track
being taken by the special counsel.
“This is about money laundering.
Mueller chose [lawyer Andrew]
Weissmann and he is a money
laundering guy. Their path to
Trump goes right through Paul
Manafort, Don Junior and Jared
Kushner They’re going to crack
Don Junior like an egg on national
TV,” he claimed.
Those following the Mueller
investigation would agree with
Mr Bannon’s analysis. The view
gaining ground is that like Al
Capone, Mr Trump could go down
on money, as there is increasing
scrutiny of allegations that funds
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
27
JUSTICE
Worboys claims of reform
disputed by psychologist
Expert says courses taken by the black cab rapist to
back his parole case may not work. By Paul Bignell
Women and their supporters rally in Los Angeles (left) and
New York (above) on Saturday; protesters take to the streets
of London (below) and Berlin (bottom) yesterday ; GETTY; AP
from Russia were used by the
Trump Organisation.
The Andrew Weissmann Mr
Bannon mentions has joined
Mueller’s team. Nineteen years ago
as a prosecutor he cut a deal with
Felix Sater (aka Felix Sheferovsky),
a Russian-born criminal being
prosecuted for his role in a $40m
(£30m) organised crime scam
which targeted the elderly, some of
them Holocaust survivors.
Sater became an informer,
avoiding a possible prison sentence
of 20 years and a $5m fine (he paid
$25,000 instead) and went on to
provide information on Russia and
organised crime. Afterwards he
became a business associate of Mr
Trump, working for a property firm
called Bayrock in Trump Tower.
Bayrock went into partnership with
Mr Trump over a hotel project,
the Trump SoHo in New York.
Trump SoHo is now part of an
investigation into alleged Kazakh
money-laundering, with Sater
helping investigators.
Sater also had ambitious plans
to help Mr Trump win the US
election. He told Michael Cohen,
Mr Trump’s lawyer and a former
vice-president of the Trump
Organisation, that Vladimir
Putin would help Mr
Trump get to the White
House. “Our boy can
become president of the
Special counsel
Robert Mueller, a
former FBI chief
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
USA and we can engineer it… I will
get Putin on this programme and
we will get Trump elected.”
The importance of Russian
money to the Trump Organisation
is no great secret. Donald Trump
Jnr was saying as early as 2008
that “Russians make up a pretty
disproportionate cross-section of
a lot of our assets. We see a lot of
money pouring in from Russia.”
Seva Gunitsky, a professor of
politics at Toronto University who
had been tracking Mr Trump’s
Russia connection for more than
a decade, said: “This doesn’t start
with the election; it starts with
money from Russian oligarchs
pouring into Trump’s real-estate
and casino businesses. Trump has
been working with many of them
for years, well before he developed
any serious political ambitions.
And we’re not talking about small
change here; we’re talking about
hundreds of millions of dollars,
possibly even enough to keep
Trump out of another bankruptcy.”
Sir Richard Dearlove, the former
head of MI6, has stated: “What
lingers for Trump may be what
deals – on what terms – he did
after the financial crisis of 2008
to borrow Russian money when
others in the West apparently
would not lend to him.”
There is no respite from the
accusations and recriminations
as the investigations into
Russian meddling
continue to widen
and deepen.
THE INDEPENDENT
A
forensic psychologist
said he was “horrified”
to discover there to be
“almost no evidence”
for the effectiveness
of the prison sex offender courses
that black cab rapist John Worboys
would have undertaken to help
secure his release.
Worboys’ victims were dealt
a blow last week when the
Government said it would not
challenge the Parole Board’s
decision to release him. It is now
likely that some of the victims will
launch their own legal challenge.
Like many sex offenders,
Worboys, 60, was convicted of one
rape and five sexual assaults but
suspected of many more. He was
serving an indeterminate sentence
for public protection (IPP), which
meant he had no fixed release date.
To secure his release and
convince the Parole Board he was
no longer a danger to women, he
would have had to have undergone
one – but more likely several
– offender behaviour courses,
including the now discredited
and scrapped Core Sex Offender
Treatment Programme (SOTP), to
stand a chance of gaining parole.
But Dr Robert Forde, a recently
retired forensic psychologist who
has dealt with many dangerous sex
offenders, said he repeatedly raised
concerns over courses such as the
SOTP more than 15 years ago. He
claimed his protests fell on deaf ears
but that as a result he was subjected
to “harassment” and “persecution”
by authorities for raising the issues.
“I first thought these courses
would be good and recommended
a few people to do them. It was
only later I began to question the
evidence [for the courses] and
looked it up and was horrified
to be honest.
“I was horrified because there
appeared to be almost no evidence
at all. And what evidence there was,
didn’t seem to be very supportive.”
A study quietly released by the
Ministry of Justice (MoJ) last
year found the SOTP programme
was not only largely ineffective, it
actually led to more reoffending.
The idea at the core of the
programme, first approved in 1992
but updated in subsequent years,
and which cost more than £100m,
was to change offenders’ behaviour
by using psychological techniques
to change people’s thinking.
But the report found the group
treatment part of the programme
could actually “normalise” an
individual’s behaviour, and that even
contacts “associated with sexual
offending may be shared”.
There are currently 48 offender
behaviour courses listed on the
MoJ website – which still includes
the discredited SOTP – relating to
a variety of different offences, from
John Worboys has been cleared for
release after serving 10 years in jail
Treatment programmes
A serial killer’s view
Britain’s second-worst serial killer
Dennis Nilsen (below) has complained
that a sex offender course had taught
him “nothing”.
Writing in this month’s edition
of prison magazine Inside Time,
Nilsen, who was jailed for life after
murdering between 12 and 15 men,
complained he was ordered to attend
the now discredited Government’s
Sex Offender Treatment Programme
(SOTP), but branded it “useless”.
Nilsen, 72, who was jailed for life
in 1983, wrote: “Recently, an official
three-page printed notice was posted
on the wing board under the heading;
‘SOTP Research’, with the
sub-heading ‘An evaluation
of the prison SOTP Core
programme has shown
that it led to little or
no change in sexual or
non-sexual re-offending’.
“Well, this was a
conclusion most prisoners
had arrived at many years
ago… in my own case in 1994,
having completed the course then.
“After I finished the course I told the
‘tutors’ there was nothing revealed
to me over the six-month duration
of the course that I had not already
worked out for myself in prison on
remand before my trial in 1983.
“They were not best pleased at this
personal conclusion and deemed it
to be wrong… an official attitude that
has ruled their judgements on me
ever since.”
The scheme was scrapped in March
last year and replaced by two new
programmes - called Horizon and
Kaizen - where inmates are
no longer required to discuss their
own offences.
They blatantly weren’t
sorry in the slightest about
their actions and would
likely go out and offend again
sexual violence to domestic abuse
and anger management.
Courses such as Belief in Change
“encourages participants to think
about their personal faith and
spirituality and how this might
support their process of change”.
Providing these courses is
expensive. The Core SOTP costs
around £8,500 per person, whilst
the Rolling Sex Offender Treatment
Programme was almost £19,000 per
person – this is roughly £3,000 less
than the starting salary for a prison
officer in England and Wales.
One current serving prisoner
said he saw several prisoners
earnestly telling instructors during
offender behaviour courses they
were “reformed characters who
now understood the effect their
actions had had on their victims”,
but who would then “joke about the
nonsense they had cooked up to
pass the course.”
He said: “They blatantly weren’t
sorry in the slightest about their
actions and would likely go out and
offend again. The people running
these courses are often not as smart
as the people they are monitoring.”
An MoJ report in 2014 examining
one programme which had run for
some time – Family Man, run by the
Safe Ground organisation – found
it had no “statistically significant”
impact on offending rates.
Frances Crook, of the Howard
League for Penal Reform charity,
wrote recently: “Prisons are odd
places, not like real life in any way. I
tend to think that expecting
any behaviour courses
in prisons to prevent
future offending or to
work magic and turn
men with a history of
violence, aggression
and misogyny into
model citizens is just not
going to work.”
With a high UK reoffender
rate (nearly half of all adults
reconvicted with one year of
release), Dr Forde believes other
forms of treatment have had
much better success, such as
restorative justice, where victims
of crime communicate with
those responsible, as well as
educational and employmentrelated programmes.
A spokesman for the Ministry
of Justice said: “We are absolutely
committed to reducing reoffending
and addressing the needs of
those individuals convicted of a
sexual offence. We keep treatment
programmes under constant review
to reduce reoffending and protect
the public. The new programmes
for sex offenders which we have
introduced over the past two years,
Horizon and Kaizen, draw on the
latest international evidence on
effective treatment for this cohort
of offenders.”
Television Monday 22 January
CRITIC’S
CHOICE
GERARD GILBERT
PICK OF THE DAY
===
===
Silent Witness
Great American
Railroad Journeys
White Fright: Divided
Britain – Panorama
6.30pm, BBC2
Michael Portillo packs his suitcase
with his colourful wardrobe (those
red trousers, orange shirts and
custard-hued jackets are never likely
to make it to Project Runway) and
heads for New England and a new
train trip that will take him from
Boston to Toronto, aided by his
trusty copy of the 19th-century
Appleton’s Guidebook To The US And
Canada. Suggesting that he could be
a “Tory spy” as he visits a re-staging
of the Boston Tea Party, Portillo’s
stridently clear enunciation possibly
saves the day later when he visits an
oyster bar and asks the man opening
his bivalves: “Has anyone told you,
sir, that you are a great shucker.”
8.30pm, BBC1
Ten years after first visiting
Blackburn to reveal how it was
becoming increasingly segregated
along ethnic and religious lines,
Panorama returns to find the
Lancashire town even more divided.
As the UK becomes more diverse
and multicultural, why is social
segregation such a problem?
9pm, BBC1
With Britain’s “special relationship”
with the US on hold following
Donald Trump’s decision not to open
the new US Embassy in London,
forensics expert Dr Nikki Alexander
(Emilia Fox, left) and her team could
probably have relaxed somewhat
with their latest case. It involves the
murder of a US diplomat, seemingly
targeted by a motorcyclist and then
posed on a bench with his hand
tucked inside his jacket, and the
ensuing row over who has
jurisdiction for the case. And while
this turf war between the Met and
the FBI bubbles away, Alexander
embarks on her own special
relationship with the embassy’s
deputy chief of mission.
Birmingham. Surgeons here are
trialling a way of maximising the
number of donor organs that can be
safely re-used, while others are
testing an implantable microphone
that could help those with profound
hearing loss. Also gambling with the
latest techniques is William, who is
taking part in a prostate-cancer trial
in which the cells are attacked by a
genetically modified virus.
===
Next Of Kin
===
Surgeons: At The
Edge Of Life
9pm, BBC2
This fascinating series concludes
with a look at the more experimental
treatments being undertaken at the
Queen Elizabeth Hospital in
9pm, ITV
This smart terrorism thriller reaches
its midpoint with Mona (Archie
Panjabi) returning to the UK and,
despite her injuries sustained in
Lahore, determined to investigate
Danny’s suspected links with radical
Islam. And on the same subject...
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(R) (S). 6.30 The Farmers’
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(S). 7.15 Antiques Road
Trip (R) (S). 8.00 Sign
Zone: Antiques Roadshow
(R) (S). 9.00 Victoria
Derbyshire (S). 11.00 BBC
Newsroom Live (S). 12.00
Daily Politics (S). 1.00
Live Bowls: World Indoor
Championships Including
coverage of the men’s
pairs final (S). 4.45 Tennis:
Australian Open 2018 (S).
5.30 Flog It! (R) (S).
6.00 Good Morning
Britain (S). 8.30 Lorraine
(S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (S). 10.30 This
Morning (S). 12.30 Loose
Women (S). 1.30 ITV News;
Weather (S). 1.55 ITV
Regional News; Weather
(S). 2.00 Judge Rinder
(S). 3.00 Dickinson’s Real
Deal (S). 3.59 ITV Regional
Weather (S). 4.00 Tipping
Point (S). 5.00 The Chase
(S).
6.00 Countdown (R)
(S). 6.45 3rd Rock From
The Sun (R) (S). 7.10 3rd
Rock From The Sun
(R) (S). 7.35 Everybody
Loves Raymond (R) (S).
8.00 Everybody Loves
Raymond (R) (S). 8.30
Frasier (R) (S). 9.00 Frasier
(R) (S). 10.05 Ramsay’s
Kitchen Nightmares
USA (R) (S). 11.00 Sun,
Sea And Selling Houses
(R) (S). 12.00 Channel 4
News Summary (S). 12.05
Couples Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 1.05 Posh Pawn
(R) (S). 2.10 Countdown (S).
3.00 Village Of The Year (S).
4.00 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (S). 5.00 Four
In A Bed (S). 5.30 Extreme
Cake Makers (S).
6.00 Milkshake! 9.15
The Wright Stuff 11.15
Cowboy Builders (R) (S).
12.10 5 News Lunchtime
(S). 12.15 The Hotel
Inspector (R) (S). 1.05
Access (S). 1.15 Home And
Away (S). 1.45 Neighbours
(S). 2.15 NCIS (R) (S). 3.15
FILM: A Stranger With
My Kids (Chad Krowchuk
2017) Premiere. Thriller,
starring Ashley Scott (S).
5.00 5 News At 5 (S). 5.30
Neighbours (R) (S).
6.00 BBC News At
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6.30 BBC Regional
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6.00 Eggheads Quiz
show, hosted by
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6.30 Great American
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Journeys New
series (S).
6.00 ITV Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.30 ITV News;
Weather (S).
6.00 The Simpsons
Bart becomes
Nelson’s best
friend (R) (S).
6.30 Hollyoaks (S).
6.00 Home And
Away Mick’s
medication goes
missing (R) (S).
6.30 5 News Tonight
(S).
7pm
7.00 The One Show
Hosted by
Matt Baker and
Angela Scanlon
(S).
7.30 Inside Out (S).
7.00 Amazing Hotels:
Life Beyond
The Lobby Giles
Coren and
Monica Galetti
work at Giraffe
Manor (R) (S).
7.00 Emmerdale (S).
7.30 Coronation
Street Trouble
awaits Gary
when he follows
Bethany to
work (S).
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.30 Politicians For
Hire: Cashing
In On Brexit
– Channel 4
Dispatches (S).
7.00 Car Crash TV
Events caught
on film by
dashboardmounted
cameras (S).
7.00 Beyond 100
Days (S).
7.30 Egyptian
Journeys
With Dan
Cruickshank
(R) (S).
8pm
8.00 EastEnders (S).
8.30 White Fright:
Divided Britain
– Panorama
Racial
segregation in
Blackburn (S).
8.00 Only Connect
The Meeples
take on the
Inquisitors (S).
8.30 University
Challenge (S).
8.00 The Martin
Lewis Money
Show (S).
8.30 Coronation
Street Anna
awaits the jury’s
verdict (S).
8.00 How To Lose
Weight Well
People attempt
the most hyped
and written
about diets on
the market (S).
8.00 Police
Interceptors
Dog handler
Darren tries to
end a rooftop
stand-off (S).
8.00 Highlands:
Scotland’s Wild
Heart (R) (S).
9pm
9.00 Silent Witness
Part one of two.
An American
diplomat is shot
dead (S).
9.00 Surgeons: At
The Edge Of Life
A surgical team
attempts a new
kind of liver
transplant. Last
in the series (S).
9.00 Next Of Kin
Mona’s efforts
to get Danny to
safety have dire
consequences
(S).
9.00 The Undateables
A woman who
suffered a
major stroke
eight years ago
feels ready to
date again (S).
9.00 Celebrity Big
Brother The
housemates
continue their
on-camera
holiday (S).
9.00 The Queen
Mary: Greatest
Ocean Liner
Documentary
(R) (S).
9.00 FILM: Taken
2 (Olivier
Megaton 2012)
Action thriller
sequel, starring
Liam Neeson (S).
9.00 Family Guy
Brian and
Stewie stow
away on a train
(R) (S).
9.30 Family Guy (R)
(S).
10pm
10.00BBC News At
Ten (S).
10.30 BBC Regional
News (S).
10.45 Have I Got Old
News For You
(R) (S).
10.00Insert Name
Here Last in the
series (S).
10.30 Newsnight (S).
10.00ITV News At Ten
(S).
10.30 ITV Regional
News (S).
10.45 Britain’s
Favourite Dogs:
Top 100 (R) (S).
10.00First Dates
Hotel A
school science
technician and
an electrician
bond over
parenting (S).
10.00Extraordinary
People: 30
Inches Tall And
Turning 18 A
young woman
with dwarfism
(S).
10.00Hidden Killers
Of The Victorian
Home The
dangerous
products in
Victorian
homes (R) (S).
10.50 FILM: The Maze
Runner (Wes
Ball 2014) Sci-fi
adventure,
starring Dylan
O’Brien (S).
10.00American Dad!
Roger realises
he has a crush
on Hayley (R)
(S).
10.30 American Dad!
(R) (S).
11pm
11.15 New Tricks An
investigation
leaves Sasha
facing a moral
dilemma (R) (S).
11.15 Millionaires’
Ex-Wives Club
A glimpse into
the world of
high-profile
divorce cases
(R) (S).
11.05 Derry Girls The
girls prepare for
a big exam (R)
(S).
11.40 Hunted (R) (S).
11.05 Celebrity Big
Brother’s Bit On
The Side Rylan
Clark-Neal
presents the
CBB companion
show (S).
11.00 The Victorians
Jeremy Paxman
examines the
British Empire’s
power through
Victorian art (R)
(S).
12.15 The Graham Norton
Show (R) (S). 1.05 BBC
News (S).
12.15 Bowls: World Indoor
Championships Highlights
(S). 1.15 Sign Zone:
Countryfile (R) (S). 2.10
Sign Zone: Big Cats (R) (S).
3.10 This Is BBC Two (S).
12.40 SAS: Who Dares
Wins (R) (S). 1.30 The
Supervet (R) (S). 2.25 The
Lie Detective (R) (S). 3.10
Cabins In The Wild With
Dick Strawbridge (R) (S).
4.05 Location, Location,
Location (R) (S).
12.05 Celebrity Botched
Up Bodies (R) (S). 1.00
SuperCasino (S). 3.10
Secrets Of The National
Trust With Alan Titchmarsh
(R) (S). 4.00 Get Your Tatts
Out: Kavos Ink (R) (S). 4.45
House Doctor (R) (S).
12.00 Rule Britannia!
Music, Mischief And Morals
In The 18th Century (R) (S).
1.00 Top Of The Pops: 1981
(R) (S). 1.35 Top Of The Pops:
1981 (R) (S). 2.10 Highlands:
Scotland’s Wild Heart (R)
(S). 3.10 Close
Daytime
6.00 Breakfast (S). 9.15
Rip Off Britain: Holidays
(S). 10.00 Homes Under
The Hammer (R) (S). 11.00
Wanted Down Under
(S). 11.45 A1: Britain’s
Longest Road (S). 12.15
Bargain Hunt (S). 1.00 BBC
News At One; Weather
(S). 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather (S). 1.45
Doctors (S). 2.15 Father
Brown (R) (S). 3.00 Escape
To The Country (S). 3.45
The Farmers’ Country
Showdown (S). 4.30
Antiques Road Trip (S).
5.15 Pointless (S).
6pm
Late
1.00 Jackpot247 3.00 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (R) (S).
3.55 ITV Nightscreen 5.05
The Jeremy Kyle Show
(R) (S).
Archie Panjabi in the
drama ‘Next Of Kin’
9pm, ITV
Michael Portillo is back
on track in a new series
of ‘Great American
Railroad Journeys’
6.30pm, BBC2
6.00 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records
(R) (S). 6.25 Totally
Bonkers Guinness World
Records (R) (S). 6.55 Dress
To Impress (R) (S). 7.45
Emmerdale (R) (S). 8.20
Coronation Street (R) (S).
8.50 Coronation Street
(R) (S). 9.25 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (R) (S).
10.10 Who’s Doing The
Dishes? (R) (S). 11.10 Dress
To Impress (R) (S). 12.10
Emmerdale (R) (S). 12.45
Coronation Street (R) (S).
1.45 The Ellen DeGeneres
Show (S). 2.35 The Jeremy
Kyle Show (R) (S). 3.40
The Jeremy Kyle Show (R)
(S). 4.50 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (R) (S). 5.50 Take Me
Out (R) (S).
Darill looks for love in
‘First Dates Hotel’
10pm, Channel 4
6.55 FILM: The Way
Way Back (Nat
Faxon, Jim Rash
2013) Comedy
drama, starring
Liam James (S).
7.00 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold
Comical clips
(R) (S).
7.30 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold
(R) (S).
8.00 Two And A Half
Men (S).
8.30 Superstore
Jonah refuses to
sell guns in the
store (S).
11.00 Family Guy
Lois becomes a
theatre director
(R) (S).
11.30 The Cleveland
Show (R) (S).
1.00 FILM: Love &
Other Drugs (Edward
Zwick 2010) Romantic
comedy drama, with Jake
Gyllenhaal and Anne
Hathaway (S). 3.20 Close
12.00 The Cleveland Show
(R) (S). 12.30 Timewasters
(R) (S). 1.05 Two And A Half
Men (R) (S). 1.30 Superstore
(R) (S). 2.00 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records (R)
(S). 2.20 Teleshopping 5.50
ITV2 Nightscreen
NEWS
2-27
===
Active Shooter:
America Under Fire
9pm, Sky Atalantic
This documentary series examining
the mass shootings in America
continues with the 2015 attack
at a government building in San
Bernardino, California, in which 14
died and 22 others were seriously
injured at the hands of two internetradicalised Islamic terrorists.
FILM
CHOICE
LAURENCE PHELAN
===
First Dates Hotel
10pm, Channel 4
To end the night on a lighter note, it’s
all back to the swish Italian hotel.
Among the hopefuls are retired
psychic Marie, “daddy cool”
Londoner Darill and his date for
the night, Millie from Wales.
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
FILM OF THE DAY
===
Touch Of Evil
The Way Way Back
3pm, TCM
(Orson Welles, 1958)
Despite a troubled production
history, this vivid thriller provided a
fitting coda to the era of film noir,
and a worthy final entry in Orson
Welles’s films directing credits. He
gives a remarkable performance as
an alcoholic and corrupted cop in a
US border town. Charlton Heston
(left, with Welles) plays a Mexican
narcotics agent who takes him on;
Janet Leigh is Heston’s imperilled
new bride; Marlene Dietrich is
a brothel owner; Mercedes
McCambridge is the leather-clad
leader of a hopped-up lesbian biker
gang. Henry Mancini’s Mexican
rock’n’roll score and Welles’ loopy
camera angles intensify the mood.
6.55pm, Film4
(Nat Faxon, Jim Rash, 2013)
A coming-of-age comedy about a
14-year-old having to endure a hellish
summer holiday with his family. Toni
Collette and Steve Carell play his
mum and stepdad; Allison Janney is
hilarious as a friend of the family.
8.55 Food Unwrapped (R)
(S). 9.30 A Place In The
Sun: Home Or Away (R)
(S). 10.30 Four In A Bed (R)
(S). 11.00 Four In A Bed
(R) (S). 11.35 Four In A Bed
(R) (S). 12.05 Four In A Bed
(R) (S). 12.35 Four In A Bed
(R) (S). 1.05 A Place In The
Sun: Summer Sun (R) (S).
2.10 A Place In The Sun:
Summer Sun (R) (S). 3.15
Come Dine With Me (R)
(S). 3.50 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 4.20 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 4.50 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 5.25
Come Dine With Me (R) (S).
5.55 The Secret Life Of The
Zoo (R) (S).
6.00 The Dog Whisperer
(R) (S). 7.00 Monkey Life (R)
(S). 7.30 Monkey Life (R) (S).
8.00 Meerkat Manor (R) (S).
8.30 Meerkat Manor (R) (S).
9.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R)
(S). 10.00 Stargate Atlantis
(R) (S). 11.00 MacGyver
(R) (S). 12.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (R) (S). 1.00 Hawaii
Five-0 (R) (S). 2.00 Hawaii
Five-0 (R) (S). 3.00 NCIS:
Los Angeles (R) (S). 4.00
Stargate SG-1 (R) (S). 5.00
The Simpsons (R) (S). 5.30
Futurama (R) (S).
6.00 The Guest Wing (R)
(S). 7.00 Fish Town (R) (S).
8.00 Urban Secrets (R) (S).
9.00 The West Wing (R)
(S). 10.00 The West Wing
(R) (S). 11.00 House (R) (S).
12.00 House (R) (S). 1.00
Without A Trace (R) (S).
2.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
3.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
4.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
5.00 House (R) (S).
6.00 Heartbeat
Mason thwarts
a gang of saferobbers. With
James Gaddas
(R) (S).
6.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.30 The Big
Bang Theory
Bernadette goes
into labour (R)
(S).
6.55 The Supervet
A Staffordshire
bull terrier
suffers
complete
paralysis in its
back legs (R) (S).
6.00 Futurama Fry
unleashes an
acid-spewing
monster on the
world (R) (S).
6.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.00 House A
baseball player
breaks his arm
(R) (S).
7.00 Murder, She
Wrote The
plot of a novel
becomes reality
(R) (S).
7.00 Hollyoaks Darcy
makes her move
on Jack (S).
7.30 Coach Trip:
Road To
Tenerife (S).
7.55 Grand Designs
Restoring two
timber-framed
barns in Suffolk
(R) (S).
7.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
7.30 The Simpsons
Homer wins
$1million on
the lottery (R)
(S).
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation
Grissom
discovers
another
miniature crime
scene (R) (S).
8.00 David
Attenborough’s
Galapagos Last
in the series (R)
(S).
8.00 Blue Bloods
Jamie and Eddie
suspect foul
play when they
respond to a
distress call (R)
(S).
9.00 Car SOS Fuzz
Townshend
and Tim
Shaw restore
a Sunbeam
Alpine (S).
9.00 A League Of
Their Own With
John Barnes,
Amanda Holden
and Aisling Bea
(R) (S).
9.00 Active Shooter:
America Under
Fire The 2015
terrorist attack
at a government
building in San
Bernardino (S).
10.15 Gogglebox
Viewers’
opinions on The
Island With Bear
Grylls and (R) (S).
10.00The Lost Lotus:
Restoring A
Race Car Philip
Glenister and
Ant Anstead
restore a 1950s
Lotus Elite (R).
10.00FILM: Fearless
(Ronny Yu
2006) Factbased martial
arts adventure,
starring Jet Li
(S).
10.10 Real Time With
Bill Maher The
comedian and
guests discuss
the week’s
events (R).
11.15 The Big Bang
Theory Stuart
asks Amy out
on a date (R) (S).
11.45 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
11.05 24 Hours
In A&E A
16-year-old
is airlifted in
with suspected
spinal injuries
(R) (S).
12.10 Tattoo Fixers (R) (S).
1.20 Rude Tube (R) (S). 2.20
First Dates (R) (S). 3.15
Celebs Go Dating (R) (S).
4.05 Rude(ish) Tube (R)
(S). 4.25 How I Met Your
Mother (S). 4.50 How I Met
Your Mother (S).
12.05 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (R) (S).
1.05 Car SOS (R) (S). 2.10
Grand Designs (R) (S). 3.10
8 Out Of 10 Cats (R) (S).
3.50 Close
8.00 Lewis A
housewife is
found hanged
(R) (S).
10.00Foyle’s War A
woman is killed
in an explosion
(R) (S).
Netflix
The first two series of
Mackenzie Crook’s comedy.
10pm, ITV4
(Roger Donaldson, 2008)
The McGuffin in this retro crime
caper is a cache of compromising
photographs. MI5 would like to
retrieve it, and recruits a gang of
cockney likely lads to pull off a bank
heist. Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais
wrote the script; Jason Statham stars.
12.10 Inspector Morse (R)
(S). 2.10 ITV3 Nightscreen
2.30 Teleshopping
6am The Radio 1 Breakfast
Show With Nick Grimshaw
10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Dev 4.00 Greg
James 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
Greg James 7.00 Annie Mac
9.00 The 8th With Charlie Sloth
11.00 Huw Stephens 1am
Radio 1’s Drum & Bass Show
With Rene LaVice 3.00 Radio
1’s Specialist Chart With Phil
Taggart 4.00 Adele Roberts
BBC Radio 1Xtra
6am A.Dot 10.00 Ace 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Yasmin Evans
4.00 MistaJam 5.45 Newsbeat
6.00 MistaJam 7.00 DJ Target
9.02 The 8th With Charlie Sloth
11.00 Twin B 1am Radio 1’s
Drum & Bass Show With Rene
LaVice 3.00 1Xtra Mixes 4.00
Twin B
11.20 Hotspots Alex
Crawford goes
undercover
in one of the
world’s most
secretive
countries (R) (S).
12.10 Ross Kemp: Extreme
World (R) (S). 1.10 Hawaii
Five-0 (R) (S). 2.10 Hawaii
Five-0 (R) (S). 3.10 The
Blacklist (R) (S). 4.10 Stop,
Search, Seize (R) (S). 5.10
The Dog Whisperer (R).
12.20 Dexter (R). 1.25
Dexter (R). 2.30 Banshee
(R) (S). 3.30 Girls (R) (S).
4.10 The West Wing (R) (S).
5.05 The West Wing (R) (S).
Amazon Prime
Rachel Brosnahan recently won
a deserved Golden Globe as the
1950s Jewish housewife who
discovers a knack for comedy.
Detectorists
BBC Radio 2
8.00 FILM: The
Chronicles Of
Narnia: The
Voyage Of The
Dawn Treader
(Michael Apted
2010) (S).
ONDEMAND
The Marvelous Mrs Maisel
The Bank Job
BBC Radio 1
6.00 Hollyoaks (R) (S).
7.00 Coach Trip: Road To
Tenerife (R) (S). 7.30 All
Star Driving School (R) (S).
8.00 Baby Daddy (R) (S).
9.00 Melissa & Joey (R)
(S). 10.00 How I Met Your
Mother (S). 11.00 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (R) (S). 11.30
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (R)
(S). 12.00 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 12.30 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 1.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S). 1.30 The Big
Bang Theory (R) (S). 2.00
Melissa & Joey (R) (S). 3.00
Baby Daddy (R) (S). 3.30
Baby Daddy (R) (S). 4.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (R) (S).
4.30 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(R) (S). 5.00 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 5.30 The Goldbergs
(R) (S).
29
===
Radio
6.00 Classic Coronation
Street (R) (S). 6.25 Classic
Coronation Street (R)
(S). 6.55 Heartbeat (R)
(S). 7.55 The Royal (R) (S).
9.00 Judge Judy (R) (S).
9.30 Judge Judy (R) (S).
9.55 Judge Judy (R) (S).
10.20 The Darling Buds
Of May (R) (S). 11.25 The
Darling Buds Of May (R)
(S). 12.35 The Royal (R)
(S). 1.40 Heartbeat (R) (S).
2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (R) (S). 3.15 Classic
Coronation Street (R) (S).
3.50 On The Buses (R) (S).
4.20 On The Buses (R) (S).
4.55 Rising Damp (R) (S).
5.25 George And Mildred
(R) (S).
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken
Bruce 12noon Jeremy Vine
2.00 Steve Wright In The
Afternoon 5.00 Simon
Mayo 7.00 The Blues Show
With Paul Jones 8.00 Jo Whiley
10.00 Gary Osborne – Paul
Williams Special 11.00 The
Russell Davies Archive
12mdn’t Johnnie Walker’s
Sounds Of The 70s 2.00 Radio
2’s Jazz Playlist 3.00 Radio
2 Playlists: Great British
Songbook 4.00 Radio 2
Playlists: Hidden Treasures
5.00 Vanessa Feltz
BBC Radio 3
6.30am Breakfast. With
Clemency Burton-Hill. 9.00
Essential Classics. With guest
Joshua Bell. 12noon Composer
Of The Week: Lutoslawski. The
life and music of the Polish
composer. 1.00 News 1.02
Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
2.00 Afternoon Concert 5.00
In Tune 7.00 In Tune Mixtape.
An imaginative, eclectic mix of
music. 7.30 Radio 3 In Concert.
The BBC Scottish Symphony
Orchestra performs pieces by
Debussy, Mozart and Tippett.
10.00 Music Matters 10.45
The Essay: Forgetting 11.00
Jazz Now 12.30am Through
The Night
BBC Radio 4
6am Today 9.00 Start The
Week 9.45 Book Of The Week:
Reading Europe: Geert Mak’s
In Europe 10.00 Woman’s
Hour 11.00 The Untold
11.30 Tom Wrigglesworth’s
Hang-Ups 12noon News
12.04 Two Thousand Years
Of Puzzling 12.15 You And
Yours 12.57 Weather 1.00 The
World At One 1.45 Sweetness
And Desire: A Short History
Of Sugar 2.00 The Archers
2.15 Drama: 4/4 3.00 Round
Britain Quiz 3.30 The Food
Programme 4.00 It’s Just A
Joke, Comrade: 100 Years
Of Russian Satire 4.30 The
Infinite Monkey Cage 5.00 PM
5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock
News 6.30 The Museum Of
Curiosity. With Stephen K
Amos, Suze Kundu and Victoria
Hislop. 7.00 The Archers. Toby
LAST CHANCE
Life In The Snow
BBC iPlayer (Until 1pm 23 Jan)
Wildlife film featuring polar
bear cubs sliding down hills.
is overjoyed. 7.15 Front Row.
Arts programme. 7.45 The
Truth About Hawaii. By Oliver
Emanuel. 8.00 The Cameron
Years. Steve Richards explores
the record of the coalition
years. Last in the series.
8.30 Crossing Continents. A
mystery illness affecting child
migrants in Sweden. Last in the
series. 9.00 In Their Element.
The impact of the use and
abuse of lead on humanity. 9.30
Start The Week. With Andrew
Graham-Dixon, Leanda
de Lisle, Kelly Chorpening
and Don Thomp. 10.00 The
World Tonight. With Ritula
Shah. 10.45 Book At Bedtime:
Reading Europe – Turkey:
The Red-Haired Woman. By
Orhan Pamuk. 11.00 Word Of
Mouth. Michael Rosen and
Laura Wright start a new run
with hellos and greetings.
11.30 Today In Parliament. The
start of the week’s business in
Westminster. 12mdn’t News
And Weather 12.30 Book Of
The Week: Reading Europe:
Geert Mak’s In Europe 12.48
Shipping Forecast 1.00 As BBC
World Service 5.20 Shipping
Forecast 5.30 News Briefing
5.43 Prayer For The Day 5.45
Farming Today 5.58 Tweet Of
The Day
Strangers And Brothers 4.00
The 99p Challenge 4.30 The
Party Line 5.00 Millport 5.30
The Museum Of Curiosity
6.00 Undone 6.30 A Good
Read 7.00 Hancock’s Half Hour
7.30 Dad’s Army 8.00 Agatha
Raisin 8.30 Laugh Out Loud
9.00 Short Works: The World
Of Somerset Maugham 9.15
Sirens Of Fleet Street 10.00
Comedy Club: The Museum
Of Curiosity 10.30 Comedy
Club: Ross Noble Goes Global
11.00 Comedy Club: The News
Quiz Extra 11.45 Comedy
Club: Hearing With Hegley
12mdn’t Undone 12.30 A
Good Read 1.00 Agatha Raisin
1.30 Laugh Out Loud 2.00
The Girls Of Slender Means
2.15 In Search Of Ourselves: A
History Of Psychology And The
Mind 2.30 Tales Of The City:
Babycakes 2.45 Muriel Spark:
The Biography 3.00 Strangers
And Brothers 4.00 The 99p
Challenge 4.30 The Party
Line 5.00 Millport 5.30 The
Museum Of Curiosity
BBC 5 Live
9.45am Daily Service 12.01pm
Shipping Forecast 5.54
Shipping Forecast
6am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00
The Emma Barnett Show 1pm
Afternoon Edition 4.00 5 Live
Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport 8.00
5 Live Sport: Premier League
Football 2017-18 10.00 Flintoff,
Savage And The Ping Pong Guy
10.30 Phil Williams 1am Up All
Night 5.00 Morning Reports
5.15 Wake Up To Money
BBC Radio 4 Extra
BBC 6 Music
6am Agatha Raisin 6.30 Laugh
Out Loud 7.00 Millport 7.30
The Museum Of Curiosity
8.00 Hancock’s Half Hour
8.30 Dad’s Army 9.00 The 99p
Challenge 9.30 The Party Line
10.00 Strangers And Brothers
11.00 Short Works: The World
Of Somerset Maugham 11.15
Sirens Of Fleet Street 12noon
Hancock’s Half Hour 12.30
Dad’s Army 1.00 Agatha Raisin
1.30 Laugh Out Loud 2.00
The Girls Of Slender Means
2.15 In Search Of Ourselves:
A History Of Psychology And
The Mind 2.30 Tales Of The
City: Babycakes 2.45 Muriel
Spark: The Biography 3.00
7am Shaun Keaveny 10.00
Lauren Laverne 1pm
Mark Radcliffe 4.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 7.00 Marc Riley
9.00 Gideon Coe 12mdn’t 6
Music Recommends With
Lauren Laverne 1.00 The First
Time With Giorgio Moroder
2.00 The 100 Club 2.30 6
Music Live Hour 3.30 6 Music’s
Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
BBC Radio 4 LW
Pick
ofthe
day
Sweetness
And Desire:
A Short History
Of Sugar
1.45pm,
BBC Radio 4
Bee Wilson (above)
explores the
story of sugar,
a foodstuff that
has built empires
and given much
pleasure.
Classic FM
6am More Music Breakfast
9.00 John Suchet 1pm AnneMarie Minhall 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics
At Seven 8.00 The Full Works
Concert. Jane Jones turns
attention to the music of
Gustav Holst. 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1am Sam Pittis
Absolute Radio
6am Christian O’Connell’s
Breakfast Show 10.00
Leona Graham 1pm Andy
Bush 4.00 Dave Berry 7.00
Claire Sturgess 10.00 Pete
Donaldson 1am Chris Martin
Heart
6am Jamie And Emma
9.00 Toby Anstis 1pm Matt
Wilkinson 4.00 JK And Lucy
7.00 Sian Welby 10.00 Kat
Shoob 1am Simon Beale 4.00
Jenni Falconer
TalkSPORT
6am The Alan Brazil Sports
Breakfast With Joey Barton
10.00 Jim White 1pm
Hawksbee And Jacobs 4.00
Adrian Durham And Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00
Sports Bar 1am Extra Time
With Will Gavin
Hanging
out
Life
Applying yourself
How ageism can make
looking for work feel like a
full-time job
Page 33
Arts
Birthday bash
Can Zoë Wanamaker
and Toby Jones refresh a
Harold Pinter classic?
Page 36
Arts
The art of kings
How the collections of
Charles I and II changed
the taste of the nation
Page 34
Forget the Dubai
high-life and
venture into the
Hajar mountains.
Sally Newall found
plenty to get the
adrenaline flowing
I
had my Boris Johnson
moment a few hundred feet
up Jebel Jais. The UAE’s
highest peak is a rugged hunk
of a mountain. It has been
carved up by a smooth tarmac
road that winds its way to the top,
over 1,900m above sea level. The
route takes the daytrippers and
car nuts on what is effectively a
road to nowhere – albeit a very
picturesque road.
The peak is part of the Hajar
range, with its stark, rocky ridges
that appear anything from golden
blonde to cantaloupe, depending
on the time of day and Instagram
Chocks away!
A climber
prepares to
launch at the
start of the
300m zipline
NEDA CARRILLO
filter. I was in the northernmost
emirate, Ras al-Khaimah, known
as RAK, not to up my social media
game, but to have a go at Jebel
Jais’ via ferrata climbing route.
I’d been planning to try the muchtouted “world’s longest zipline”,
which had been due to open in
December. Bad weather has
delayed the build, and the date is
now set for early February.
The new zipline will trump “The
Monster”, a 2,200-metre line in
Puerto Rico. Its presence will
cement Ras al-Khaimah’s status
as the adventure capital of the
UAE, where visitors can escape
the bustle and bling of Dubai,
a 90-minute drive away, or the
urban sprawl of nearby RAK City,
and get closer to nature – whether
that’s on foot, bike, supercar or
hanging precariously from a
steel cable.
On my trip, people kept pointing
to the top of the mountain from
where the zipline will eventually
run. Punters will be able to zip
side by side, reaching speeds of
80mph.
That’s not to say there’s nothing
to do yet – there are currently
50m, 60m and 300m ziplines
as part of the strenuous via
ferrata. Meaning “iron road”
in Italian, these climbing paths
were first used in the Alps as a
way of accessing steep terrain to
get between villages and cattlegrazing spots. Today’s are often
geared towards visitors looking
for an adrenaline rush, with a
steel cable bolted to the rock, to
which you attach yourself with a
via ferrata kit – helmet, harness,
and carabiner hooks. In a cleverly
angled photo, it can make anyone
look like a skilled mountaineer but
really it’s a relatively safe way to
have a mountain adventure.
Our guides (three for a group of
eight – interestingly, more women
than men do the via ferrata) were
reassuringly strict on safety and
wellbeing, reminding us to stay
hydrated during our four hours
on the course. It may have been
winter, but the afternoon sun still
sapped energy. Savvy visitors opt
for the cooler morning session
where you’re mostly in the shade.
There are two carabiners to
secure you to the cable; we should
be clipped into at least one at all
times. If a rock came loose, we
were to shout to the person below,
who should not look up “under
any circumstances”. And while on
the two shorter ziplines we would
sail to the other side under our
NEWS
2-27
Before I’d had time to
think, I was moving in the
opposite direction of the
waiting instructor
The new zipline
should cement
Jebel Jais’ position
as an adventure
destination
own steam, the 300m one would
require grabbing a green loop
towards the end to make sure we
didn’t slide back into the middle.
The first ascent got quite high
very quickly, but with the guides
positioned at the front, middle and
back, anyone in need got a helping
hand. Led by Mohammed “Amdy”
Yunus, who trained with the
British Mountaineering Council,
they were world-class: chatting
and joking to help us feel at ease,
but with an innate sense of when
it was time to get serious or assist
anyone having a wobble.
As the path got steeper, with
only a cable between us and the
rock, it felt very close to nature.
On the mountain, goats are the
most likely spot, but elsewhere
in the desert there are camels,
donkeys, gazelles, wild cats and
foxes, as well as an abundance of
birds, from falcons to larks.
We walked for nearly two hours
before we got to the first zipline. I
did get a rush from flying through
the air, safe in the knowledge
that there was a guide to scoop
me up at the other end. I never
quite managed to forget that I was
pretty high up, though. We were
120m above the ground at the
highest point and looking down
at the fast-moving road below
turned my stomach.
The 300m zipline felt like a
different proposition to the other
two: not just five times the length,
but cantilevered 100m over the
road. Amdy prepped me for the
off, reminding me to grab the
green loop at the end to allow the
instructor on the other side to pull
me back on to the rock.
I’d expected a speedy run
but this was relatively slow –
something I was grateful for,
though it might disappoint those
looking for more of a rush. It
meant that I had time to take in
the surroundings and appreciate
the fresh mountain air and epic
scenery. I even tried putting
my arms out, like a kid playing
aeroplanes. Unfortunately,
in doing so, I forgot about the
warning in the briefing. I saw the
flash of green too late, reached for
it and missed.
Before I’d had time to think,
I was moving in the opposite
direction of the waiting instructor
andtherockthathadbeenlooming
larger was getting smaller. As they
had warned us, I didn’t stop until
I was halfway back across the
zipline where I jolted to a halt, the
cable trembling, me dangling in
mid-air like Boris Johnson during
the 2012 Olympics. Onlookers
quickly gathered to get a snap of
the via ferrata dunce. The cars
below tooted their horns.
I assumed that I’d be swiftly
winched to safety. No such luck;
my rescue would involve one of
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
Travel essentials
Getting there
Emirates flies direct to
Dubai from Heathrow,
Gatwick, Manchester
and Birmingham from
£293. From there, RAK
is a 45-minute drive or a
short flight (Emirates has
connecting flights).
Staying there
The Ritz-Carlton Al Wadi
Desert has doubles from
£355, full board.
More information
The Via Ferrata Ledge
Walk costs AED400 (£70)
per person, including all
equipment. There are two
daily trips from November
to May, and pick-up from
RAK City is possible. A bus
from downtown Dubai runs
to the city, with a change at
Sharjah. jebeljais.ae
IQ
30-37
the guys attaching himself to the
cable, going hand over hand to get
me, then clipping himself to me
to bring me back. As my knight
in shining climbing kit made his
way towards me painfully slowly,
I realised I was whimpering.
When he eventually hauled me
to the ledge, I’d never been so
glad to be back on firm ground.
“Sally, you’re so lucky, you got
to do it twice,” said Amdy. As I
walked off, wobbly-legged, back
to the starting point, I wondered
whether I was going to become a
meme in Ras al-Khaimah.
“You’ll have to come back to
do the world’s longest zipline
soon,” said Amdy, back at the
base. He pointed vaguely at the
road to nowhere, now bathed in
the pink-hued early evening light,
ready for its Instagram moment.
31
Travel
Unravelled
BY SIMON CALDER
Ryanair’s change of policy over cabin
bags and trumped-up insurance claims
for upset stomachs while on holiday
Q
I booked a flight six months
ago for a Ryanair flight next
month. I have just been told by
email that the baggage policy has
changed. I have asked Ryanair if I
can travel under the policy at the
time of booking, ie taking a free
large bag onboard. The answer was
no. But can the company change
the terms like this?
Jim R
Q
From 15 January, Ryanair
made a significant change
to its free luggage policy. The
allowance remains exactly the
same: one large bag, up to a
capacity of 40 litres (55 x 40 x
20cm), and a smaller bag no bigger
than 14 litres (35 x 20 x 20cm). You
take them through security in just
the same way. But Ryanair says the
larger bag will now be tagged at
the departure gate and go into the
hold — unless the passenger has
paid extra for priority boarding.
The airline says the policy will
benefit travellers thanks to more
punctual departures. For the past
year it’s warned passengers
that some have been
taking excessive
advantage of the
two-bag policy,
causing delays.
Ryanair says
the only way to
keep its planes
on time is to take
most bags away at
the gate.
I believe the airline
can happily proceed
with its new policy for
one simple reason: when you
bought the ticket you agreed to the
possibility that the bag would be
placed in the hold and you would
need to claim it from the carousel
on arrival. This has now changed
from a possibility to a certainty
(unless, of course, you choose to
pay extra), but I don’t see a clear
breach of contract.
The travel industry is
extremely concerned about
the rise in claims for gastric
illness on all-inclusive holidays.
The claims industry has moved
into this sector because, as the
claim arises abroad, legal costs are
not controlled and can be out of
all proportion.
In a case with an award for
£5,000 in damages, costs can
amount to £25,000. In 2016, the
projected total cost of claims to
the industry was estimated by the
travel association Abta to be in
excess of £240m — adding about
£10 to the cost of every holiday.
The problem is partly
one of the holiday
firms’ making: they
have paid out
too readily to
avoid expensive
legal battles.
But in recent
months they
have shown
a willingness
to defend
cases, resulting
in successful
prosecutions against
several people who sought
compensation fraudulently.
I’m not sure that there would
be any legal basis for a rule
that insists sickness must be
reported in resort. However, in
any court case when a holiday
firm is defending a claim, a failure
to notify an illness would be
regarded as a significant factor.
A
Hanging in there: a thrill seeker
gives the all clear while hanging on
the zipwire NEDA CARRILLO
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
I have followed your
story about people being
encouraged to put in false claims
on their return from holiday for
stomach upsets. I wonder why the
holiday companies don’t have a
clause which says “no claims will
be entertained unless reported to
the company rep/hotel at the time
they are unwell”?
Jude
A
THE INDEPENDENT
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NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
33
Life
When Jackie Martin
was ‘de-contracted’
by her employers, she
assumed she’d soon find
work again. But despite
decades of experience,
she is still looking
I
Looking for work is
a full-time job
can now identify every supermarket own-brand Jaffa cake
by taste alone. Put a plateful
next to me and I will Name
That Jaffa immediately. Morrison’s version comes out top for
flavour and texture but, really, I’m
not fussy. I just need an entire packet to get me through yet another
job application.
Since my employer de-contracted me in May without warning or
redundancy, I’ve applied for work
every day. “Application completion”
might well be added to the skills
list on my CV. This is what happens
when freelance status denies you
the relative comfort of a notice period: there is no safety net should your
employer call time, and in my case
this was after 17 years of continual
service for the same organisation. It
has quickly become apparent that,
despite what else is on my CV – two
undergraduate degrees, three postgrad degrees and a visiting professorship – I’m unemployable.
I’ve worked as a designer in
magazine publishing, broadcast
and post-production, and as a manager in branding, web and gaming.
I’ve worked in higher education as
an adviser, making and maintaining high-level industry contacts,
forecasting emergent skill sets and
helping shape future curricula and
graduate profiles. I’ve also worked
as a physical therapist with a firstclass BSc in health sciences, and
more recently I added an MA in
creative writing to my resumé.
I started out asking long-term industry associates if I could contribute something to their businesses
– at any level. My contacts were
sympathetic but, in the end, unforthcoming. I was also having the
same dream every night in which I
stand in front of an expectant com-
edy audience and remember I have
no material, so my confidence was
already wobbly.
I woke up, ignored my psyche
and cracked on. I sourced potential
employers in my area of expertise.
I wrote 36 customised letters. I
received two acknowledgements
which led to one phone call and
one meeting but no leads, let alone
takers. Then, agencies (media,
communications, medical, administrative)that were all brimming
with interest via email and phone,
but after filing my CV with them,
nothing transpired.
Next came job applications for
work within councils, charities and
NGOs, all carefully chosen within
specific sectors so my skills could
dovetail with their aims and needs.
No responses. I did, of course, follow these up with further emails to
which there were… no responses.
One application – to work for a
government agency in a temporary, fairly junior job – took nearly
three days to complete as I carefully shaped my skills into concise
paragraphs threaded with some
light and a sense of self. That’s not
bad at all, I thought, and uploaded
the application on a Sunday night
just before the deadline. I received
a rejection email the next morning.
Damn, that’s efficient, I thought. You
could have at least given me a whole
day of hope.
The weeks became months, my
bank balance continued to shrink,
panic undermined every small joy
from baking to cycling. I lowered
Jackie Martin has
applied for countless
jobs at various levels,
with no success
Th
he grief
process for
entry-level
job rejection
comes in three
phases: anger,
shame, relief
my expectations and began a round
of applications for a minimum-wage
job. These included the local leisure
centre, a coffee chain and a discount
supermarket. It was at this level of
application that a whole new world
of triage was revealed to me.
Casually-offered multiple-choice
questions (“Just give your best answer if none seems exactly right”)
are collated and profiled automatically to spit out whatever the code
deems to be an “Undesirable” by
checking answers against the “Desired” set. That’s got to be a good
thing, no? You get in line, get Venndiagrammed, and if you end up in
the centre, get the nod to move on
to stage two. It leads you to believe
there’s a very competent team making cool-headed, fair decisions on
the other side of your upload.
Many of the big-brand applications included a set of simplistic
scenario-based questions, devised
to secure an attitudinal profile. They
are supposed to determine how
you’d feel about staying late, being
under pressure, being in a team,
being singled out for praise. This allows for the discarding of applicants
very early on.
Waiting in a queue recently, I was
asked by a stranger to explain the
difference between grapes and blueberries. “In terms of taste, price, calories or aesthetic?” I queried. I like to
get the brief right. The man moved
away. Could this pedantry be why I
fail to be selected for interview? To
be sure that I wasn’t falling through
the cracks because of inflexibility, I
agreed on each form to work every
day, every shift, to change shifts at
short notice, to work part-time, fulltime, to be available immediately.
Did I now sound too desperate to
be considered?
The cyber-interview is a fast and
tidy way to narrow down the masses, perfect for when applicant to job
ratios are high. I quickly began to
attack the exercise like a newcomer
to cryptic crosswords. Learn the
formula and work it. It’s not as if the
“right” answers provide companies
with the right staff.
My lack of success began to reveal
a pattern. Counsellors describe the
grief process of bereavement in five
phases. For me, the grief process for
entry-level job rejection is in three:
anger, shame, relief. It ends with:
thank God I don’t have to do that
awful job.
So, here’s to being thrifty for quite
some time. I can knock up a meal
from pulses and a 25p tin of chopped
tomatoes, but I’m not prepared to
start using cheap face cream without a fight. Not at my age. Which
brings me to what I’ve concluded is
the most likely problem. I am 58. I
anticipate working until 70 because
the two pensions I took out 23 years
ago have turned out to be worth
next to nothing. But where exactly
can I work for the next 12 years?
The earliest birth year on the
gov.uk pension calculation page
is 1895. They’re expecting some
122-year-olds to go online and see
what they’re due. Registering my
details with several recruitment
sites, I found some in which the
birthdate range doesn’t go back
beyond the 1960s. They’re not expecting me. With no state pension
due to pass through my bony hands
until 2025, that’s a lot of lentils, not
to mention own-brand Jaffa cakes.
Arts
If you’re
staying
in...
BOOKS
Bad Dreams
BY TESSA HADLEY
In one of these
short stories a
girl called Jane
“was abducted
when she was
15, and nobody
noticed”. In
another, a
teacher has an affair with
a distant man. In a third,
a young girl has a strange
dream, gets up in the middle
of the night, and overturns
furniture in her parents’
sitting room. What links
these stories? They are
brilliant evocations of
female frustration.
DVD/BLU-RAY
A Ghost Story
CERTIFICATE 12, 92 MINS
A haunting
drama about
life and love
after death
in which
Oscar- winner
Casey Affleck
plays a ghost
in a flowing white sheet.
Rooney Mara is his widow.
The treasures
of the kings
O
n 14 August 1660,
Charles II, who had
returned from exile
on the Continent
and was restored to
the English throne,
issued a proclamation: those
citizens who had acquired articles
from the Royal Household in Oliver
Cromwell’s Commonwealth Sale
were to hand them back to the
Crown – and swiftly.
Following the execution of
Charles I in 1649, anything from his
pots and pans to rigid portraits of
his indistinguishable forebears had
gone into the swagbag of shoppers
with an eye for a bargain.
Some tradesmen had
accepted goods in lieu
of debts. Others,
like the painter Sir
Peter Lely, saw a
chance to furnish
their homes with
art from the royal
Collection. But
the loyal citizens
Henry Greenway, Alms
dish, c.1660-61
dutifully gave up their goods – at
some personal loss in the case of
Lely, who had bought eight works;
but as the new king’s portraitist-inchief-in-waiting, the sacrifice would
prove a sound investment.
Thus. in a matter of weeks,
something of the essence of
Charles I’s great collection was
reassembled. But beyond the
reach of the proclamation were
those prize pieces that had made
their way out of the country to
the serious collectors on the
Continent, notably the French
and Spanish courts, who were not
much interested in the dead king’s
bed linen but who were not
averse to a Raphael.
The proclamation
itself, plus works that
Charles II bought in
order to fill gaps left
by the irretrievable
masterpieces, are
now on show at the
Q ueen’s Gallery,
London. Charles II:
Art and Power is the
first of two exhibitions
that consider the lasting
impact of the two Charleses’
hunger for painting. The other
show, at the Royal Academy from
27 January, launches the RA’s
250th anniversary celebrations,
and pulls off an incredible feat: it
brings back to Britain for the first
time in 300 years some of Charles
I’s greatest acquisitions.
The pivotal moment was the trip
to Madrid in 1623 by the 22-year-old
prince who, since his older brother
died, would be crowned Charles
I. A match with the Infanta, the
sister of Philip IV of Spain, was on
offer, a bond that would be good for
both countries with their warring
history. The future king returned
to Britain not with a strategic
Spanish bride on his arm, however,
but with his eyes opened to the
magnificence of the Habsburg art
collection, the desire to emulate it
and his first stash of pictures.
There followed a shopping spree
that within two decades funnelled
into his London residences,
primarily, the cream of what was
in essence the European modern
art of his era. Of his 1,500 or so
purchases, the 400 most important
Titian , ‘The Supper at Emmaus’, c. 1534
Pieter Brueghel the Elder, ‘The Massacre of
the Innocents’, c.1565
NEWS
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VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
Far left, John Michael Wright,
‘Charles II’, c.1676
Opposite, Anthony van Dyck
(1599–1641), ‘Charles I in Three
Positions’, 1635–36
IQ
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i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
35
The weekend’s
television
JEFF ROBSON
Th
he future king
returned not with a
Spanish bride, but a
stash of pictures
Two shows in London bring
together the vast array of art
collected by Charles I and II,
which changed the nation’s
taste. By Claudia Pritchard
are accounted for, many now in
the national collections of other
countries, notably the Louvre and
the Prado. In an act of generosity
in the art world, which operates
above petty national politics, both
great institutions have loaned back
formidable works.
Outstanding among these are
four Titians, which would once have
hung in Charles I’s much extended
Whitehall Palace, of which only
Inigo Jones’s Banqueting House
remains. Fire swept through the
palace in 1698: had the Titians
not gone back overseas after
the Commonwealth Sale, they
would probably have gone up in
smoke. With the help of some artarchaeology, Per Rumberg, curator
of Charles I: King and Collector at
the Royal Academy, has been able
to imagine the dizzying experience
of visitors during the king’s lifetime
to his First Privy Lodging. From
the known position of doors and
windows, he is pretty confident
that in this room alone hung in the
region of a dozen or so paintings by
the Venetian master.
Titian would have amazed new
viewers, with his rich, heat-soaked
colours, the dynamic movement
of his models and his big narrative
themes. British art had been
hobbled by Henry VIII’s split
from the Roman Catholic church,
and its artistic lineage crippled
by iconoclasm. While their
counterparts on the Continent
were grappling with saints and
martyrs, sacrifices and classical
escapades, British
painters had been, for
the most part, dabbing
at the unremarkable.
But this landslide of
Titians put in front
of connoisseurs a
tumble of gods and
mortals, saints and
martyrs, heroes and
villains, and portraits that
showed not just woodenfaced worthies in wellrendered cloth, but real
psychological insight.
Even with great wealth
Roman, Aphrodite (‘The
Crouching Venus’), 2nd
century AD
and a relaxed attitude to debt,
Charles I was pushing the boat out:
he paid his own record-breaking
£2,000 for a Raphael when the
average man earned about £12
a year. Now in the Louvre, La
Perla does not travel; but on their
way to London from Paris are
masterpieces including Titian’s
The Supper at Emmaus (c 1534).
Other works are simply going down
the Mall: 90 of the Royal Academy’s
160 exhibits are from the Royal
Collection, among them several
Van Dycks.
Charles I had his lucky breaks,
too. When the court of Mantua in
northern Italy hit hard times and
had to sell the priceless Gonzaga
collection, his emissary was in
like a shot: the haul included The
Supper at Emmaus, Correggio’s The
Holy Family with St Jerome (c 1519),
and Tintoretto’s Esther Before
Abasuerus (c 1546).
In turn, when Charles II set
about filling the gaps in his late
father’s collection, he had had the
benefit of several years spent on
the Continent, falling for its often
superior art and craftsmanship.
He not only brought in more Italian
masterpieces, such as Veronese’s
dramatic Mystic Marriage of
St Catherine of Alexandria, but
extended his interests north.
Outstanding is Pieter Brueghel
the Elder’s Massacre of the
Innocents (c 1565-67), in which
the amendments of Brueghel the
Younger are fading with the years:
where once a slaughtered baby
was overpainted with some loaves
of bread or a turkey, the little
victims’ faces stare out once more,
as if emerging from the melting
snow. A goodly haul came from the
Netherlands: known as the Dutch
Gift, it was meant to keep the peace,
but the gunboats were afloat again
within a few years.
Arguably the biggest gift to the
nation was an injection into the
British art bloodstream, via Titian,
through Van Dyck and down to
Gainsborough, of a psychological
realism in portraiture and
technique in painting generally
that set new standards to aspire
to. What was needed by the middle
of the 18th century was an
institution at the heart of
the establishment that
would foster the highest
art. You could call it a
“royal academy”. And
they did.
‘Charles II: Art and
Power’, Queen’s
Gallery, London (0303
123 7301), until 13 May;
‘Charles I: King and
Collector’, Royal
Academy, London (020
7300 8090), 27 January to
15 April
The midwives are
back with their cosy
comfort blankets
» Call the Midwife BBC1, Sunday 8pm
» Obama: The President Who Inspired the World More4, Saturday 9pm
W
ith ratings of 10 million
for the Christmas
special, and new series
in the pipeline until
2020 at least, it’s fair to say Call the
Midwife is now one of the tentpoles
in the BBC’s drama schedules. As
it returned for a seventh outing
last night, it’s worth pondering just
what has made it such a success.
It’s undoubtedly well written, acted
and directed. But so are a host of
other prime-time feelgood dramas.
I’d say part of the appeal is that
there’s an earthiness to go along
with the sentimentality. Vanessa
Redgrave’s voiceover as the elderly
Jennifer Worth (whose memoirs
were the original inspiration
for the series) was as warm and
comforting as a hot water bottle.
But it introduced scenes of the
Great Freeze of 1963 which vividly
showed how tough life was then
for the residents of Poplar – and
the nuns and nurses shivering in
Nonnatus House.
The two main storylines also
didn’t stint on the grim realities
of birth and death in the far-fromswinging 60s. Nadine (Tamla
Kari) worked in a strip joint where
abortion or instant dismissal were
the options for mothers-to-be.
Meanwhile Stephen McGann’s
niceness-personified local GP was
treating Jewish matriarch Ruth
(Julie Legrand), dying of cancer
and facing eviction.
Of course, Nadine decided to
keep the baby, which brought her
Th
hanks to a skilful
script and atmospheric
direction, things never
got too twee or clunky
under the wing of the bicycling
angels – but there was certainly no
soft-focusing of her breach birth.
And across town heart-of-gold
battleaxe Nurse Crane (Linda
Bassett) was standing foursquare
against the ranks of officialdom,
archly observing that not letting
a woman who had arrived as a
refugee from 30s Germany die with
dignity made them no better than –
well, you know who.
That sense of a community still
imbued with a wartime spirit is
undoubtedly another part of the
series’ success. And thanks to
Heidi Thomas’s skilful script and
Syd Macartney’s atmospheric
direction, things never got too twee
or clunky.
A top-notch ensemble cast, with
female characters in all the major
Leonie Elliot as Lucille Anderson, a
Jamaican nurse, in ‘Call The Midwife’
roles, doesn’t hurt either. All the
backstories were kept ticking
along nicely. And the arrival of new
nurse Lucille Anderson (Leonie
Elliott) – finding the power cuts and
snowstorms very different from
Jamaica, but willing to muck in
straight away – will clearly be a key
future plotline. It’s not the darkest
or most ideas-driven drama
around, but if you’re after a classy
hour of comfort TV, your Sunday
evenings are now catered for.
The weekend that marked the
first anniversary of President
Trump’s inauguration gave us a
documentary that reflects the
equally strong interest in his
predecessor. Hot on the heels of
David Letterman’s interview for
Netflix and ahead of Greg Barker’s
film The Final Year, Obama: The
President Who Inspired the World
was a fascinating retelling of an
extraordinary story.
Despite the title, it resisted the
temptation to be a hagiography.
The failures and frustrations of
Obama’s two terms weren’t skated
over. But his achievement in
turning round an economy rocked
by a catastrophic financial crisis
was duly noted.
And the meat of the story was
how he got there in the first place.
Many of the interviewees admitted
they thought they’d never see
an African American president
in their lifetimes. That such an
assumption seemed perfectly
reasonable in 21st-century America
was telling in itself. And the single
shot of The Donald – face set in a
petulant glower as Obama wittily
mocked his “birther” claims at
a Washington dinner – was a
reminder that things will probably
get worse before they get better.
Twitter: @theipaper
36
Arts
Arts
reviews
Zoë Wanamaker
and Toby Jones star
in a ‘beautifully
considered’ Pinter
revival JOHAN PERSSON
THEATRE
The Birthday Party
HAROLD PINTER THEATRE, LONDON
HHHHH
It is nearly 60 years since the
London premiere of Pinter’s play
sent the critics into an orgy of
derision that closed the show in
a week (“What all this means only
Mr Pinter knows,” opined one
reviewer, “for his characters speak
in non-sequiturs, half-gibberish
and lunatic ravings”).
Ian Rickson marks the
anniversary with this starry,
meticulous, beautifully
considered revival which
demonstrates the play’s
undiminished power.
POP
DANCE
David Ramirez
English
National Ballet
ST PANCRAS OLD CHURCH, LONDON
HHHHH
“I don’t think I’ve ever opened a
set with a hopeful song,” quips
Americana artist David Ramirez
after “Find the Light”, which kicks
off a compelling set in front of
an intimate, attentive crowd that
includes his parents.
Ramirez, who has dual
American and Mexican heritage, is
blessed with an expressive voice
and a huge range that recalls both
Johnny Cash and The National’s
Matt Berninger. His latest album,
We’re Not Going Anywhere, is his
finest and most ambitious (and
political) yet. He wails and pleads
for more time to talk with his
long-distance English girlfriend
on “Telephone Lovers”, laments his
homeland on “Twins” and explains
the merits of Tuesday boozing on
the mournful “Time”.
His material, in general, could
be described as gloomy optimism,
but at certain points he really
does miss his full band; without
them, his emotive material lacks a
certain oomph.
But Ramirez still delivers a
droll, self-deprecating and totally
committed set.
BEN WALSH
THE INDEPENDENT
Rickson’s production first
establishes the bog-standard
normality of the seedy seaside
boarding house set-up before it
is infiltrated by the absurd in the
shape of two besuited, sinister
strangers who interrogate
and abduct its sole lodger, the
washed-up pianist, Stanley. With
wallpaper peeling at the seams
in the Quay Brothers’ design, this
run-down establishment exudes
musty decay, even at the height
of summer.
This is a production that
finds fresh colours in the play.
Zoë Wanamaker and Peter
Wight are superb as Meg and
Petey, who run the boarding
house, offering far more than
grotesque caricature. There’s
an undercurrent of wistfulness
in Meg’s prattling vacancy.
Wanamaker is very funny, but her
absent-mindedness seems to be
a way hiding from herself some
distant tragic hurt. A wrecked,
unshaven cherub in his pyjama
jacket, Toby Jones is excellent as
Stanley, who selfishly resents
and relies on Meg’s pampering
and who deflects his own fears by
ruthlessly stoking hers.
Stephen Mangan and
Tom Vaughan-Lawlor are an
impressive double-act as the
Jewish and Irish interlopers
from Kafka. Mangan is always
perhaps a shade funnier than
he is frightening but he brings
out to perfection the note of
bullying bonhomie and off-colour
insinuation in his character’s
idealised memories. He’s well
matched with Vaughan-Lawlor’s
combustible McCann, the
defrocked priest fighting to
control his taste for violence. This
pair are shown having their own
private crack-up before they cart
off Stanley to unspecified horrors.
Wight beautifully suggests
Petey’s decency and his terrible
shock when he realises that he has
been powerless to help.
A richly eloquent production
which is not to be missed.
To 14 April (0844 871 7622)
PAUL TAYLOR
THE INDEPENDENT
Tamara Rojo and Ivan
Vasiliev in ‘Le Jeune
Homme et la Mort’
LAURENT-LIOTARDO
COLISEUM, LONDON
HHHHH
English National Ballet’s
double bill is an evening of fatal
glamour. In Le Jeune Homme et
la Mort, Tamara Rojo’s Death
takes voluptuous pleasure in
tormenting Ivan Vasiliev’s
self-destructive artist.
La Sylphide is an airier view of
supernatural romance, but still
brings Aitor Arrieta’s superb
James to his doom.
With a libretto by Jean Cocteau
and choreography by Roland
Petit, the 1946 ballet Le Jeune
Homme et la Mort is a highly
theatrical mix of post-war
existentialism and chic. It has
an explosive star part for a
male dancer, all soaring jumps
and writhing gymnastics, and a
vampish figure of Death.
Vasiliev is a very starry guest
for this ballet, a rocket-powered
virtuoso who came to fame with
the Bolshoi. He has a muscular
ease in the twisting moves, and a
bounding jump: in one sequence,
he seems to lie face down in the
air, depression claiming him even
as he soars upwards.
Rojo, the company’s artistic
VISUAL ARTS
Drawn in Colour: Degas
from the Burrell
NATIONAL GALLERY, LONDON WC2
Examples of Edgar Degas’ pastels,
plus the occasional oil, lent by the
Burrell Collection in Glasgow,
make up the bulk of this show.
Initially the galleries seem
gloomy because of the low
light needed to protect these
fragile pictures, but slowly
Degas’ riot of colour sings
from the walls, making for a
quietly breathtaking free show.
(020 7747 2885) to 7 May
Modigliani
TATE MODERN, LONDON SE1
A fabulous exhibition of portraits
by the Italian-Jewish Amedeo
Modigliani, who arrived in Paris
in 1906 with a burning ambition
to be an artist. His works are
distributed through 10 galleries
with tact, sobriety, care and
delicacy – from the wonderful nine
sculptures that he made between
1911 and 1912 to the inexhaustibly
lovely paintings, with their
elongated noses, columnar necks
and unusual intensity of attack.
(020 7887 8888) to 2 Apr
Lubaina Himid:
Meticulous Observations
and Naming the Money
WALKER ART GALLERY, LIVERPOOL
This show by the 2017 Turner
Prize winner, Lubaina Himid,
features works selected by her
from the Arts Council Collection,
along with 20 figures from her
major installation Naming the
Money. The selected pieces
are all by women artists,
while at the centre of the
display is Himid’s 1987 series
of watercolour drawings,
Scenes from the Life of Toussaint
L’Overture, about the former slave
who led the Haitian revolution.
(0151 478 4199) to 18 Mar
Surrealism in Egypt:
Art et Liberté 19381948
TATE, LIVERPOOL
Paintings, photographs and
archival documents comprise a
fascinating exploration of how
surrealism thrived away from
its European proving ground.
The exhibition centres on the
politically engaged Art et Liberté
group, a collective of writers and
artists who lived and worked in
Cairo in the 1930s and 1940s.
(0151 702 7400) to 18 Mar
Winnie-the-Pooh:
Exploring a Classic
VICTORIA & ALBERT MUSEUM,
LONDON SW7
The ultimate feel-good show
for the devoted Pooh Bear fan,
telling the story behind the
creative partnership of writer
AA Milne and illustrator
EH Shepard through sketches,
letters, photographs, cartoons,
ceramics and fashion.
(020 7942 2000) to 8 Apr
director, moves with luscious
brightness as Death, lingering
over a high sweep of her leg or
stubbing out a cigarette with a
vicious pointe shoe. Together,
she and Vasiliev create a lurid,
sadomasochistic chemistry. She
walks all over him, and he leans
into it, waiting for the next kick.
He accepts Death like a fated
sleepwalker, while Rojo produces
a great Hammer Horror face
when she reveals herself as Death,
leading her victim away over
the rooftops. One quibble: on
opening night, the neon lights of
Paris were missing from Georges
Wakhévitch’s set.
ZOE ANDERSON
THE INDEPENDENT
FILM
The Post
12A, STEVEN SPIELBERG, 116 MINS
A complicated but entertaining
story about how The Washington
Post came to publish the Pentagon
Papers (leaked documents
NEWS
2-27
Arts
agenda
THE CULTURAL HIGHLIGHTS
YOU HAVE TO SEE
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
Alex Edelman
SOHO THEATRE, LONDON W1
A very welcome return to the
scene for smart young Boston
comic Alex Edelman, whose first
show, Millennial, bagged him the
Edinburgh Best Newcomer gong
in 2014. He debuts Just for Us here.
(020 7478 0100) to 3 Feb
FOLK & ROOTS
Celtic Connections
revealing the US government’s lies
about the Vietnam War), starring
Tom Hanks in an enjoyable
performance as the Post’s editor,
Ben Bradlee, and Meryl Streep as
the publisher, Katherine Graham.
Nationwide release
Darkest Hour
PG, JOE WRIGHT, 125 MINS
Gary Oldman, who won a
Golden Globe for his role, is in
phenomenal form in this drama
about Winston Churchill’s early
days as prime minister in May
1940. He doesn’t underplay at
all, but this is acting that moves
well beyond caricature and
mannerism. Director Joe Wright
shoots as if this is a film noir
and largely steers clear of
jingoism to craft a critical
celebration of British bulldog
spirit. Nationwide release
My Life Story
15, JULIEN TEMPLE AND
OWEN LEWIS, 96 MINS
This screen version of
Madness singer Suggs’ “stage”
autobiography is an eccentric,
wildly entertaining and very
inventive affair that combines
live performance and music hall
references with documentary
elements. Suggs is a wonderful
raconteur with a witty turn of
phrase who, amid the wisecracks,
deals frankly with troubling
elements in his family history.
Limited release
Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri
15, MARTIN McDONAGH, 115 MINS
Golden Globe winner Frances
McDormand stars as a cussed
gift shop owner whose daughter
was raped and murdered, in
a perverse, comic and tragic
revenge story in which all the
characters defy our often very
low expectations of them.
Martin McDonagh’s film is
a startling piece of work:
a blood-soaked shaggy dog
story that is also surprisingly
moving. Nationwide release
TALKS & POETRY
Molly Dineen
BAFTA, LONDON W1
Following a screening of her
new BBC film, Being Blacker, a
documentary about the reggaerecord shop owner and music
producer Blacker Dread, the
director takes part in a Q&A
session. (bafta.org) tonight 6.45pm
VARIOUS VENUES, GLASGOW
There’s a huge range of folk
music to catch – including Dougie
MaLean (Wed) and Lau (Thur) –
as well as contemporary classical
from Max Richter (tonight),
and Swedish greats Vasen (Fri).
(celticconnections.com) to 4 Feb
THEATRE
Guys and Dolls
ROYAL EXCHANGE, MANCHESTER
Director Michael Buffong has
moved the action uptown to
Harlem for Britain’s first all-black
production of the 1950 Broadway
classic, which brilliantly captures
the spirit of Damon Runyon’s
original New York wise-guy
street fables, with a talented
cast of actors, singers and
dancers serving up a glamorous
treat. Ashley Zhangazha and
Ray Fearon dominate as Sky
Masterson and Nathan Detroit.
(0161 833 9833) to 3 Feb
IQ
30-37
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
unfolding in real time over one
hour and 40 minutes. Sam
Troughton and Justine Mitchell
star as two people left together at
the end of a house-warming party.
(020 7395 5405) to 24 Mar
Glengarry Glen Ross
PLAYHOUSE THEATRE, LONDON WC2
Christian Slater is in cracking
form as Ricky Roma, the slickest
of salesmen in a hyper-macho
estate agent’s office in Chicago,
in Sam Yates’ revival of David
Mamet’s drama. Roma is an
amoral monster, out only to make
money, but Slater floats light as
cloud, his devious confidence
tricks never seeming manipulative
but instead sweetly conspiratorial.
(0844 871 7631) to 3 Feb
First
Chance
Opening
this week
THEATRE
The Importance of
Being Earnest
YVONNE ARNAUD THEATRE, GUILDFORD
Gwen Taylor and Susan Penhaligon
star in Oscar Wilde’s comedy.
(01483 44 00 00) opens Wed
COMEDY
Vault Festival
The Woman in White
THE VAULTS, LONDON SE1
CHARING CROSS THEATRE,
LONDON WC2
Among the early comedy picks at this
mixed-art festivals are sketchers
Thunderbards, Helen Duff and Fin
Taylor. (vaultfestival.com) opens Wed
The first revival of Andrew
Lloyd Webber’s sweeping 2004
adaptation of Wilkie Collins’s
Victorian classic, originally seen
in the West End. Newly revised
by Lloyd Webber and lyricist
David Zippel, it’s both looking and,
crucially, sounding very good.
(08444 930650) to 10 Feb
DANCE
Strictly Come Dancing Live!
METRO RADIO ARENA, NEWCASTLE
The BBC show takes to the stage.
(08444 999 955) opens Tue
8 days
from on
ly
£939pp
Beginning
COMEDY
Adam Riches
SOHO THEATRE, LONDON W1
The character comic presents
his latest show – and introduces
us to the head honcho of a sniper
school, a BMX stuntman (sans
BMX) and a fugitive cowboy.
(020 7478 0100) to 3 Feb
37
AMBASSADORS THEATRE,
LONDON WC2
Polly Findlay’s National Theatre
staging of David Eldridge’s new
play transfers to the West End.
This is a wry, funny and touching
meditation on the loneliness of the
singleton in the era of the dating
app, written with a real depth of
insight, humour, compassion and
a keen sense of the ridiculous,
If you only see
one thing today
Classic Greece
FILM
Coco
PG, LEE UNKRICH AND ADRIAN
MOLINA, 105 MINS
DISNEY/PIXAR
After the anti-climax of Cars
3, Coco is another triumph
for Pixar – a film that deals
with death and memory
in a wondrously inventive
and life-affirming way. The
conceit is that humans die
twice: first, when they leave
the Land of the Living, and
second, when their friends
and relatives forget about
them. Anthony Gonzalez
voices the main protagonist,
Miguel, a 12-year-old from
a family of humble shoe
makers who dreams of
becoming a musician.
Nationwide release
Departures from May to November 2018
Your tour includes...
Guided walking tour of the Parthenon and the Acropolis Museum
Guided tour of Olympia, birthplace of the Olympic Games
Guided tour of Delphi, home of the legendary Oracle
Browse through Athens’ famous flea market
Cross the engineering marvel that is the Corinth Canal
Stay in and explore Nafplion, one of the country’s most
charming seaside towns
Visit the site of ancient Mycenae, home of Agamemnon
Wonder at the perfect symmetry of the ancient theatre of Epidaurus
Optional trip to the classic Greek islands of Hydra and Spetses
Return scheduled flights
Stay in four-star and three-star accommodation,
with daily breakfast and two dinners
Services of our experienced tour manager
Holidays organised by and are subject to the booking conditions of Riviera Travel,
New Manor, 328 Wetmore Road, Burton On Trent, Staffordshire DE14 1SP and are
offered subject to availability. ABTA V4744 ATOL 3430 protected. Per person prices
based on two sharing a twin room. Single rooms and optional insurance available
at a supplement. Images used in conjunction with Riviera Travel. Additional
entrance costs may apply. Prices correct as of 17-01-18.
For more information or to book,
please call: 01283 523447
www.ipariviera.co.uk
ABTA No. V4744
Business
Business Editor Elizabeth Anderson
+4420 7361 5718
business@inews.co.uk
FOOD & DRINK
Young’s plans more growth
amid takeover speculation
By Ben Woods
Young’s Seafood is planning to cast
its net into the Chinese market as
speculation intensifies over a multi­
million­pound sale of the business.
Chief executive William Showalter
said the company was in talks
with potential partners over an
export push into the Asian nation
after expanding the brand across
supermarket shelves in America.
The food industry veteran refused
to be drawn on rumours suggesting
that Britain’s biggest seafood firm
could be snapped up by Princes’
Ja p a n e s e ow n e r, M i t s u b i s h i
Corporation. However, he said it
would not “take a huge leap of faith”
to expect the group’s private equity
backers to start looking at “strategic
alternatives” in the near future.
It comes as the Grimsby­based firm
ploughs forward with an American
expansion after partnering with
Pennsylvania­based frozen fish
supplier The Fishin’ Company to
bring its products to US retailers
such as Walmart.
Mr Showalter said: “We see China
as a big opportunity. As we speak,
we are exploring discussions with
partners in that market and we
would look to deploy a similar model
to the one that we are using in the
United States. Continental Europe is
probably next on our list.
Young’s, which employs
about 2,000 staff across
seven sites, is facing a critical
moment as it awaits clarity on
how Britain’s Brexit negotiations
will affect the fishing industry.
“When we sold our continental
European business to Nomad Foods
in November 2015 we committed
to them to not sell frozen branded
product into any of the markets
where our Findus business had
competed, but that prohibition
expires in November this year.
“It would be our desire to look
at opportunities in continental
Europe once we are able to freely
trade there.”
Sources told the Press Association
last month that Young’s owners
were working with the boutique
investment house Stamford Partners
on a potential exit.
The Grimsby­based food producer
was bought by Lion Capital, Bain
Capital and HPS Investment
Partners (UK) from CapVest in 2008,
as part of a £1.1bn takeover that
included the Findus brands.
The 30
Second
Briefing
Think-tank
calls for
audit of
PFI deals
By Alan Jones
Baroness Michelle Mone has made
her next move into tech.
The Scottish founder of lingerie
brand Ultimo has joined the board of
Ve Global, an advertising technology
company. Lady Mone said of the
move that, with her relationships
in retail, she saw the value of Ve
Global’s data for driving online sales
and personalising customers’ online
experience. Her other forays into
technology include investing in
WeShop, a comparison and rewards
platform for shoppers, and selling
luxury flats in Dubai through bitcoin.
Italy is not
known for its
governance.
Here, people say
what they mean
and mean what
they say
Simone Rossi
The new CEO of EDF
Energy, who is Italian
Lion broke up the operation in
2015, striking a £500m deal to sell
the European arm of Findus to Birds
Eye owner Nomad Foods, leaving it
with the Young’s operation in the UK.
Young’s, which has a history dating
back 200 years, recorded turnover of
£496.5m in 2016 and booked earnings
of £21.2m.
PUBLIC SERVICES
MICHELLE
MONE
Quote of
the day
William Showalter is pushing ahead
with expansion in the United States
The bitcoin thing seems like an
unusual move?
Yes, it was the first property
development to be sold using
the digital currency. Lady Mone
launched the venture with
her boyfriend, businessman
Douglas Barrowman. It includes
two apartment blocks and a
shopping centre. In September,
they announced that 150 of the
apartments could be bought with the
volatile currency.
Does that mean she’s given up on the
underwear business?
It seems not. A couple of weeks ago,
she said on Twitter that “Michelle
Mone Intimates” had been born. She
also has Michelle Mone Interiors
to her name, although last year she
sold her beauty business, UTan.
That sounds busy?
It certainly does, when you add her
position as a Conservative peer.
David Cameron appointed her to the
post in 2015. As entrepreneurship
tsar to Mr Cameron she was tasked
with compiling a review looking
at boosting enterprise in more
deprived communities, which was
published in March 2016.
The Government is being urged to
end its “love­in” with outsourcing
work to private firms amid claims of
“deep flaws” in many deals.
A report said outsourcing con­
tracts were poor value for money,
carried huge social costs and often
benefited overseas shareholders of
multinational companies.
The Smith Institute said that
in the wake of the collapse of con­
struction giant Carillion, public deliv­
ery of services should be the “norm”.
The think­tank said there should
be a comprehensive examination and
audit of all outsourced and Private Fi­
nance Initiative (PFI) deals.
Public sector outsourcing con­
tracts are currently valued at £100bn
a year, with a further £95bn of liabili­
ties, said the report.
There should be a new regulator to
scrutinise the contracting business,
to include directors’ pay, working
conditions, union recognition and tax
avoidance, it was suggested.
Despite the rapid growth of
outsourcing and PFI, the report
said there was a lack of reliable data
and a failure by the Government to
properly scrutinise deals.
Paul Hackett, director of the Smith
Institute, said: “As the Carillion
debacle shows, outsourcing and PFI
contracts have become part of the
DNA of government.
“This reliance on, and bias towards,
private firms for public services has
gone on for too long. We need a new
approach based on public service
values and community benefit rather
than private profiteering.”
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
Media
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
39
on
Monday
IAN BURRELL
Is the email newsletter the long-term
saviour of its paper parent?
T
he email inbox has
become the modern
equivalent of the
newsagent and offers
a daily treasure trove
of breaking news, analysis and
inside information.
How did that happen? This was
a medium corrupted by the spam
of Viagra-sellers, “phishing” frauds
from bogus Nigerian royalty and
other junk that turned most inboxes
into the electronic equivalent of a
harbour clogged with plastic waste.
Today the spam tide has been
turned and news publishers
see email as vital to building
a relationship with audiences.
In registering for a newsletter,
anonymous readers become
identifiable customers whose
interests can be understood.
Nick Hugh, chief executive
of the Telegraph Media Group,
has promised that by the end of
2018 his new “registration-first”
strategy will deliver three million
registered users, later rising to 10
million. Sign-ups are being partly
driven by The Daily Telegraph’s
free newsletters, ranging from
the weekday “City Finance”
to the bi-weekly “Expat”. The
data obtained is invaluable to its
advertisers and means readers can
be served with branded sales offers,
from travel tours to financial advice.
The Times operates a suite of
niche newsletters on themes as
diverse as Brexit, crosswords
and crime fiction. They have
helped the paper amass 2.5 million
registrations in 18 months.
In 2011, the Financial Times asked:
“Is this the end of email?’ in an
article highlighting the medium’s
“inefficiency” as a business tool.
Today, the FT serves its premium
subscriber base with a portfolio
of 43 email newsletters from
“Brussels Briefing” to “FT Swamp
Notes” (an insider’s guide to Donald
Trump’s administration).
Email didn’t die. Daily worldwide
traffic will grow to 246 billion
mails next year (from 205 billion
in 2015), according to research
company Radicati.
Among UK newsletters, politics
is the best served sector. The latest
offering is London Playbook, in
which American digital publisher
Politico brings to Westminster the
model that it used for microscopic
coverage of Brussels and
Washington. Its London author
Jack Blanchard produces a chatty
2,500-word briefing. It sets out the
political agenda in “Driving the
Day”, and the parliamentary diary
in “Today in Westminster”, while
incorporating everything from the
Jonathan Abrams of ‘Nuzzel’ says that the new platforms are ‘logical successors to getting a newspaper delivered, having a newsletter in your inbox’ GETTY
Westminster social scene to the
weather. It aims to be the essential
briefing document for MPs and civil
servants, meaning politics junkies
will want to read it too. Ryan Heath,
the Australian author of Brussels
Playbook (aka The Ryan), is viewed
by Eurocrats as a celebrity.
London Playbook drops in
your inbox just before 7am. An
hour later, timed to precede the
8.30am daily meeting in Downing
Street, subscribers to The
Times’s “Red Box” receive their
electronic missive. Its author,
Matt Chorley, has a personal style.
Writing last week on the politics
of modern students, he described
himself as a “great big thicko” for
not attending university. “Red
Box” has a clubby tone and its own
branded tea mugs. “The reason
newsletters have taken off is
because there’s so much online,” Mr
Chorley says of his digest.
“Red Box” showcases The Times’s
political coverage outside the
paywall and helps ensure articles
are read in Whitehall. The best
newsletters are more than a series
of headline links to online stories
and evoke a trust that justifies the
intrusion into your inbox.
Paul Waugh, author of HuffPost’s
excellent “The Waugh Zone”, is
one of the most distinct voices in
UK political journalism and has
been writing newsletters for seven
It aims to be the essential
years. He starts at 5.30am and
briiefing document for MPs
publishes to 21,000 subscribers at
and civil servants… politics
about 9am, before starting a full
junkies will want to read it too day as political editor. His analysis
is sparky, but non-partisan. “I’m
a full-time political journalist and
that’s what’s informing that email,”
he says. “My readers know I write
every word, every typo, every awful,
punning headline.”
Newsletters extend way beyond
mainstream publishers to niche
titles and bloggers who generate
them in their thousands on all
subjects from fashion to technology.
Such is their popularity that digital
entrepreneur Jonathan Abrams
has built Nuzzel as a platform for an
army of newsletter compilers. “It’s
in some ways a logical successor
to getting a newspaper on your
doorstep, having a newsletter just
Neews publishers see
newsletters as a way of
bringing audiences back to
their own sites
waiting for you in your inbox,”
he says.
It has been a long journey. Matt
Drudge’s huge Drudge Report
website began as a newsletter in
1995. That was before social media.
News publishers see newsletters
as a way of bringing audiences back
to their own sites, reducing reliance
on Twitter and Facebook, which
this week changed its algorithm to
the detriment of news outlets.
They will have been encouraged
by a new report from Deloitte
predicting that by 2020 half
of UK adults will take out
four news and entertainment
digital subscriptions.
The danger is that with so much
good content available free in
newsletters, readers might not feel
a need to subscribe at all.
Twitter: @iburrell
Looking for
ph FR
on E
e E*
ca
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Thei220118npd
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
The
Business
Matrix
The day at
a glance
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
41
EMPLOYMENT
FRAUD
Firefighters on
strike at Sellafield
Spotting a scam
proves not so easy
Firefighters at the Sellafield
nuclear site (left) in Cumbria
will stage a strike today in
an ongoing dispute over pay.
Members of the GMB union will
walk out for 12 hours from 6am.
Sellafield said there would be
emergency cover. The dispute
started last summer after the
union rejected a pay offer which
it said would be worth £4.30
a week.
Many people may be overconfident about their ability to
spot a scam, research suggests.
In a survey of more than 2,300
people by the Take Five to Stop
Fraud campaign, 80 per cent
said they could confidently
identify a text or email scam.
But in a separate “Too Smart
To Be Scammed?” quiz, of more
than 63,000 people tested, only
9 per cent scored full marks.
WHAT THE SUNDAY PAPERS SAID
* last week’s changes
FTSE 100 down 47.9 at 7730.8
-47.9
FTSE 250
20653.3
FTSE All Share
4240.5
-28.4
FTSE Eurofirst300
1575.7
+8.0
-206.0
Dow Jones *
25972.6
S&P 500 *
2802.6
+169.4
Nasdaq *
7320.3
DAX
13434.5
CAC 40
5526.5
Hang Seng
32254.9
+842.4
Nikkei
23808.1
+154.2
+16.4
+59.3
+189.4
+9.4
Chg
High
499.0
1928.0
788.4
658.4
3016.0
701.8
4928.0
5274.0
164.9
3252.0
801.8
336.1
990.2
276.2
71.5
3751.0
304.0
607.0
2154.0
1971.5
229.0
830.5
4898.0
3280.0
237.5
8450.0
688.0
2634.0
1981.0
7172.0
6913.0
1646.5
316.1
4016.5
892.8
297.3
2517.0
-17.2
+114.5
-3.3
-10.4
-144.0
-44.4
+148.0
+62.0
-3.0
+88.0
+3.4
-12.0
+15.8
+1.5
+1.0
+51.0
-5.2
+2.0
-124.0
+48.0
+0.9
-11.8
-92.0
+178.0
+8.7
-10.0
-35.0
-13.0
+7.5
-130.0
+111.0
-12.5
+5.1
-153.5
+32.0
-5.1
-56.5
52338.0
1935.0
798.6
680.6
3956.5
773.0
4944.0
5470.0
221.8
3511.0
827.0
369.8
1217.1
279.9
73.6
4069.0
397.8
890.2
2970.5
2145.0
254.4
1174.3
5355.0
3298.0
237.5
8967.0
773.0
2901.0
1992.5
8255.0
8110.4
1784.0
338.8
4226.6
994.5
303.0
2579.5
EURO/
POUND
Low
493.1
1258.0
518.2
472.5
2986.5
480.0
3656.0
3383.0
142.8
2681.0
495.1
285.3
912.0
231.6
61.8
2945.0
296.3
495.4
26.8
1684.0
205.0
827.2
3565.0
1577.0
184.2
6572.5
552.0
1884.0
1524.0
6320.0
6299.0
1397.0
216.7
2882.5
658.5
214.8
1982.5
DOLLAR/
POUND
Company
Price
Chg
High
Shell B
RSA Insur
Sage
Sainsbury(J)
Schroders
Scot Mort Inv Tst
Segro
Severn Trent
Shire
Sky
Smith&Neph
Smith (DS)
Smiths Gp
Smurfit Kappa Grp
SSE
Stan Chart
Standard Life Aber
St James Place
Taylor Wimpey
Tesco
TUI AG
Unilever
United Utilities
Vodafone
Whitbread
Ferguson
WPP
2560.0
626.2
818.6
258.0
3723.0
470.2
579.2
2024.0
3461.0
1002.0
1245.0
510.6
1673.5
2600.0
1291.0
819.0
437.7
1270.5
197.9
207.8
1631.5
4108.0
768.2
225.8
4005.0
5624.0
1383.5
-43.0
-0.8
+7.2
+5.3
+98.0
+2.2
+4.6
+9.0
-120.0
-8.0
-21.5
+7.6
+21.5
+66.0
-30.0
-14.0
-3.4
+28.0
+0.1
+2.9
+44.5
+124.0
+2.4
-3.5
+104.0
+144.0
+29.0
2617.0
672.5
824.0
339.9
3743.0
471.9
590.8
2575.0
5067.0
1028.5
1442.0
565.0
1697.0
2638.0
1554.0
860.0
448.6
1279.5
211.9
217.1
1631.5
4557.5
1078.0
239.7
4333.0
5722.0
1928.1
Low
2037.0
556.2
595.0
222.4
2885.0
320.0
431.0
2002.0
3403.5
11.4
1143.0
5.3
1442.0
1712.7
1273.0
678.8
336.5
1008.0
164.6
165.3
934.4
3173.5
759.6
186.5
3499.9
4427.0
1238.5
For enquiries call +44 (0)20 7825 8300
GOLD
Per troy ounce,
London pm fix
– $0.56
7730.8
Price
Hammerson
Hargrve Lans
HSBC Hldgs
IAG
Imperial Brands
Informa
IntCont Htls
Intertek
ITV
Johnson Matth
Just Eat
Kingfisher
Land Secs
Legal & Gen
Lloyds Bk Gp
Lon Stock Ex
Marks&Spen
Mediclinic Intl
Micro Focus Intl
Mondi
Morrison (Wm)
National Grid
Next
NMC Health
Old Mutual
PaddyPwrBetfair
Pearson
Persimmon
Prudential
Randgold Res
Reckitt Ben
RELX
Rentokil Initial
Rio Tinto
Rolls-Royce
RBS
Shell A
$68.63
Markets
FTSE 100
Company
$1,334.1
Low
678.0
1680.0
950.1
11.1
2335.0
1476.0
4136.5
467.3
533.5
177.3
6.3
1103.0
436.9
4064.0
2774.0
574.6
242.2
1999.2
1543.0
4102.0
119.7
1782.0
1424.8
27.0
3300.3
6000.0
2138.0
328.4
906.4
169.8
1428.0
1231.0
244.9
3.0
270.0
1270.0
912.5
+ $3.21
975.0
2184.0
1794.2
1071.0
3387.0
2168.0
5520.0
570.5
682.5
244.4
705.5
1662.4
536.2
5643.6
4270.0
695.0
387.4
2472.0
2024.0
5435.0
236.5
2682.0
1765.9
2955.0
4571.0
7762.5
2735.5
411.3
1587.0
397.0
1708.0
1746.0
342.6
449.5
413.0
1724.5
1341.0
+ 1.76¢
High
-16.6
-9.0
-12.2
-38.2
-75.0
+31.0
-89.0
+1.2
-2.0
+6.0
-6.0
-33.6
-24.9
+94.0
+96.0
+7.0
-10.8
-13.0
-194.5
-65.0
-4.1
+24.0
-23.5
-21.0
+125.0
-155.0
-19.5
+2.4
+55.0
+17.8
-8.5
-33.0
+4.4
+19.4
-0.4
+5.0
+43.0
$1.3864
Chg
934.0
1878.0
1756.0
993.8
2750.0
2136.0
5043.0
534.8
587.6
200.5
615.2
1613.8
509.9
5062.0
4221.0
680.0
264.1
2028.0
1596.5
4975.0
139.1
2424.0
1527.0
2683.0
4534.0
7545.0
2621.5
373.4
1584.5
392.8
1668.0
1403.5
291.3
439.4
407.1
1358.0
1330.0
+ 0.46¢
Price
3i Group
Admiral
Anglo Amer
Antofagasta
AB Foods
Ashtead Group
AstraZeneca
Aviva
BAE Systems
Barclays
Barratt Dev
BHP Billiton
BP
BAT
Berkeley Grp Hldgs
British Land
BT
Bunzl
Burberry
Carnival
Centrica
Coca-Cola HBC
Compass
CRH
Croda Intl
DCC
Diageo
Direct Line Ins
Easyjet
Evraz
Experian
Fresnillo
G4S
GKN
Glencore
GSK
Halma
€1.1329
Company
OIL
Brent crude,
per barrel
GKN bid faces UK
and US scrutiny
Lidl growth ‘hurts
local businesses’
A hostile takeover bid for FTSE
100 engineer GKN is set to
face government scrutiny from
both the UK and the US amid
concerns over national security.
GKN was the subject of an
uninvited £7.4bn approach by
Melrose, the listed turnaround
specialist, sparking concerns
about GKN’s work, particularly
in defence and aerospace.
Discount food retailer Lidl
has come under fire for an
“aggressive” expansion plan
that has left local businesses
struggling to find new premises.
Lidl and German supermaket
chain Aldi have already opened
hundreds of new stores across
the country, and together
they have plans for 350 more
premises in the next four years.
The Sunday Telegraph
The Mail on Sunday
Mirror close to
Express takeover
E&Y accused of
unlawful conduct
The owner of the Mirror
newspapers is closing in on a
takeover of the Daily Express,
valuing the rival publisher at
over £130m. Richard Desmond,
who owns the Express and the
Daily Star and would become
one of Trinity Mirror’s largest
shareholders, has been in talks
with Trinity for over a year.
Ernst & Young has been accused
of “unlawful, unprofessional
and unethical” conduct over its
relationship with a Dubai firm
that was allegedly involved in
money laundering and buying
gold from conflict zones. The
claims are made in filings in the
high court by lawyers for Amjad
Rihan, a former E&Y partner.
The Sunday Times
The Observer
THE WEEK AHEAD
Christmas trading
lifts Revolution
Asos margins and
sales in spotlight
Revolution Bars will deliver
its trading update today. It has
66 premises across the UK
and saw group sales up 16.2
per cent over the Christmas
trading period. Revolution, the
subject of a takeover battle last
year, expects half-year results
to December 31 to be in line
with expectations.
Online retailer Asos will
release its first-quarter trading
statement on Thursday.
Investors will be looking to see
if strong recent sales growth
continues. In its full-year
results, retail revenues rose
by 35 per cent. Margins have
remained stubbornly low as
Asos builds scale.
Pets at Home sales
under scrutiny
ONS will reveal
growth trend
A third-quarter trading
update from Pets at Home is
due tomorrow. The merits of
the group’s new price-cutting
strategy will be under scrutiny
following a period of declining
sales. Recent results have seen
like-for-like sales improve. But
it faces longer-term issues,
including online competition.
A preliminary estimate of
fourth-quarter gross domestic
product will be released by the
Office for National Statistics on
Friday. The economy grew by
0.4 per cent in the third quarter,
after 0.3 per cent in both the
first and second quarters.
Household spending rose 0.5
per cent in the third quarter.
ieat
Games&Puzzles
daily recipe
Puy lentil, Gorgonzola
and chicory salad
Kakuro
Zygolex® In i every day
How to play Fill the white squares so that the total in each
across or down run of cells matches the total at the start
of that run. You must use the numbers from 1-9 only and
cannot repeat a number in a run. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Find the missing words by following the RHYME, LETTERS and MEANING links
– eg, a word that rhymes with ‘cheek’, has one letter different from ‘pear’ and
has the same meaning as mountain, would be ‘peak’. Full rules at zygolex.com.
Solution, page 47
RHYME LETTERS
11
16
6
20
7
BOAT
4
16
6
27
RANT
27
SKETCH
4
ARROW
13
7
3
VE
M GE T
ON A
DA RIA
Y N
26
23
19
30
3
4
CHART
14
3
3
7
17
17
3
RHYME
6
Futoshiki
3
How to play
Place the numbers
from 1-5 exactly
once in each row
and column. The
greater than and
less than signs
(‘>’ and ‘<’) indicate
where one cell is
greater/less than
the adjacent
cell indicated.
Solution:
minurl.co.uk/i
1
7
3 2
1 4
9 5 8
11
14
8
8
16
8
11
15
15
8
11
13
14
3
24
16
10
12
✂
8
11
11
7
13
12
7
6
13
13
17
15
9
<
4
∨
MEANING
∧
∧
<
<
∨
>
∨
<
< 3
∨
2
How to play Find all the mines in the grid. Numbers in certain squares indicate how
many mines there are in the neighbouring squares, including diagonally touching
squares. Mines cannot be placed in squares with numbers. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
1
2
1 1
1 1
1
1 1
1
3 3
1
2 2
2
1 2
4
0
2
1
3 3 4
3
3
4
1 2 3
2 3
2
3
4
3
2
2 2 2
1
1
4
3
2 2 2 2
3
2
2
1
1
2 2
2
1 1
1 1 2
3 4
4
LETTERS
Minesweeper
0
1
14
TILL
>
Killer Sudoku No 1191
How to play Each row, column and 3 by 3 box must contain
each number (1 to 9) only once. The sum of all numbers
contained in a dotted area must match the number printed
in its top-left corner. No number can appear more than
once in a dotted area. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
CHILD
SLANT
FLAN
5
8 1
12
4
PLAY
4
7
6 8
4
UNTAMED
4
4
How to play Place the numbers 1-9 once in each row, column
and bold-lined jigsaw region. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
6
4
4
Jigsawdoku
16
3
3
CLIP
APPLAUD
Tomorrow
Courgette, black bean
and corn enchiladas
SHRUG
30
9
Recipe from lakeland.co.uk
4
3
20
11
Cook the lentils in a medium saucepan of
boiling water, uncovered, for 25 minutes
or until the lentils are tender. Then drain
them, rinse them under cold water and
drain well again.
Meanwhile, add the walnuts to a small
frying pan and stir them over a medium
heat until they are lightly toasted.
Transfer them to a chopping board to
cool slightly, then chop them coarsely.
Whisk the vinegar and oil in a large
serving bowl and season to taste with
salt and pepper. Add the radicchio,
chicory, tomatoes, parsley and lentils,
then toss gently to combine. Sprinkle
with walnuts and crumbled Gorgonzola.
Canned brown lentils can be used
in place of puy lentils to save time.
Radicchio and chicory have a bitter
flavour, so you can use baby cos lettuce if
you prefer. Use cherry tomatoes if baby
plum tomatoes are unavailable.
LOG
17
SERVES 4
100g puy lentils
75g walnuts
125ml sherry or red wine vinegar
125ml extra virgin olive oil
1 small radicchio (150g), leaves separated
2 large heads of chicory (250g),
leaves separated
180g baby plum tomatoes, halved
A large handful of fresh flat-leaf
parsley leaves
120g Gorgonzola cheese
4
4
4
4
TORE
4
18
16
MEANING
14
1
1
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
Maths Puzzle
Codeword No 1912
How to play Fill the empty squares with
numbers that will make the across and
down calculations produce the results
shown in the grey squares. Each numeral
from 1 to 9 must only appear once. The
calculations should be performed from
left to right and top to bottom, rather than
in strict mathematical order.
How to play The numbers in the grid correspond to the letters of the alphabet.
Solve the puzzle and fill in the letters in the key as you discover them.
Three letters are provided to give you a start. The solution will be printed in
tomorrow’s paper, the solution to Saturday’s codeword is on page 47
1
-
+
-
-9
+
-
+
1
18
x
6
9
60
6
23
14
20
4
9
+
-
31
x
+
x
x
12
-
1
+
-
1
22
8
12
1
1
17
25
20
16
25
2
1
2
3
4
14
15
16
17
J
17
5
1
5
10
11
13
21
13
11
4
20
1
20
8
22
17
17
1
26
15
25
13
3
25
10
25
9
15
17
11
10
Word
Ladder
How to play
Convert the word
at the top of the
ladder into the
word at the bottom
of it, using only
the four rungs
in between. On
each rung, you
must put a valid
four-letter word
that is identical
to the word above
it, apart from a
one-letter change.
There may be more
than one way of
achieving this.
ROAD
25
5
25
25
11
10
11
8
15
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
HUES
VOTE
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Need a little help getting started? Then call for up to four extra clue letters on
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Or text THEI CLUE to 85100 to receive your clues. Texts cost £1 plus your
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-12
216
DOWN
1
4
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
11
12
17
19
21
22
23
24
Feature of rugby (5)
Small green
vegetable (3)
Throw (5)
Comparison (7)
Everlasting (7)
Japanese poem (5)
Russian-made
automatic rifle (11)
Snag (5)
Experienced sailor
(Informal) (3,4)
In succession (7)
Great pain (5)
Age (3)
Change (5)
7
13
14
15
16
18
20
Endure (6)
Lift up (5)
Purplish-red (7)
Stipulation (7)
Refuge (6)
Come to
nothing (4,7)
Ready money (4)
Aerial (7)
US state (7)
In short supply (6)
Horse with
stamina (6)
Frozen rain (4)
Up above (5)
1
3
4
6
8
5
7
9
10
11
12
LULL
13
14
16
18
19
20
21
22
ALL NEW PUZZLES
23
24
The i Book of Puzzles Vol 2
Our second book of
mixed puzzles, including
codewords, word wheels,
crosswords, bridges, wijukos
and minesweepers, is
available now on Amazon for
£4.99. See inews.co.uk/puzzle2
Solution to Saturday’s Concise Crossword
ACROSS 1 App, 3 Laws (Applause), 7 Meek, 8 Thriving, 9 Shropshire, 11 Morsel, 13 Entire,
14 Fritillary, 17 Evensong, 18 Lore, 19 Flue, 20 Spa.
DOWN 1 Aversion, 2 Poker, 3 Leveret, 4 Wand, 5 Stipulation, 6 Archaeology, 10 Grey area,
12 Strange, 15 Atlas, 16 Evil.
Other i books include:
Codewords (inews.co.uk/codeword),
Crosswords (inews.co.uk/crossword)
and Sudokus (inews.co.uk/sudoku)
Maths Puzzle,
Word Ladder, Word
Wheel, Kakuro,
Minesweeper,
ABC Logic, Killer
Sudoku, Futoshiki,
Codeword,
Jigsawduko and
Wijuko created by
Clarity Media.
For more
puzzles,
see clarity-media.
co.uk
15
17
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Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble
accessing this number, please call our helpdesk
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2
Today’s other puzzles Cryptic Crossword, page 20;
Five-Clue Cryptic, page 9; One-Minute Wijuko, page 22
Puzzle solutions See page 47 and minurl.co.uk/i
How to play Each numeral from 1 to 9 must
appear (once only) in the squares forming the
red letter i. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
5
3
1
3
7
5
5
2
1
4 8 3
5
7
7
8
6
5 4
8
5
2
8
8
6
5
1
7 9
5
3
1
3 6
9
4
3
7
5
7
4
6 5
8
1
4
6
5 7
3
6
4
9
1
Tomorrow: Easier
Concise Crossword No 2234
ACROSS
idoku Exclusive to i
2 4
10
17
43
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
Sudoku Harder
16
25
5
I
13
6
10
12
25
19
13
5
17
26
17
25
15
25
25
10
4
5
18
1
4
8
21
5
4
x
-
8
11
7
L
21
14
26
17
8
5
16
17
24
19
20
25
17
14
15
9
11
Harder
x
25
20
÷
+
13
8
+
+
9
15
5
Easier
10
1
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
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Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
A
B
A
C
A
B
C
B
A
C
B
C
C
Word Wheel
This is an open-ended puzzle. How many
words of three or more letters, each
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46
SPORT
i racing
Murphy’s mob
look to rule at
Fakenham
By Jon Freeman
RACING EDITOR
NETBALL
FAKENHAM
1.55
1
2
3
4
5
6
RACING TO SCHOOL INSPIRING YOUNG MINDS
NOVICES’ HURDLE (CLASS 3) £10,000 added 2m 7f
3-201
2P42-3
0
P1/
2-9521
57U
RIO QUINTO (C) Olly Murphy 5 11 4.............................. R Johnson
EARLSHILL D Skelton 7 10 12............................................H Skelton T
HAY JAMES S A Harris 7 10 12.................................................... B Poste
PIRI MASSINI Olly Murphy 7 10 12........Fergus Gregory (7)
OSCAR STAR J Snowden 5 10 11....................................... G Sheehan
STRAWBERRY SPIRIT Miss Amy Murphy 5 10 5..J Quinlan
- 6 declared BETTING: 13-8 Oscar Star, 9-4 Earlshill, Rio Quinto, 12-1 Strawberry
Spirit, 20-1 Piri Massini, 150-1 Hay James.
FORM VERDICT
Olly Murphy hasn’t been hanging
about since taking out his trainers’
license last July.
The 26-year-old former assistant
to Irish champion-in-waiting, Gordon
Elliott, won with his first Flat runner, his first jumps runner and then
signed off a memorable 2017 by saddling Hunters Call to land a gamble in
a £150,000 handicap hurdle at Ascot.
He didn’t start 2018 with his shoelaces tied together, either – a hat-trick
on New Year’s Day – and the winners
have kept on coming.
Hugely ambitious, Murphy is
now holding back Hunters Call and
his raised (but still precious) rating for the County Hurdle at the
Cheltenham Festival in March, but
he has other talents to attend to in
the meantime, as he ploughs onwards
towards 50 plus winners in his first
jumps campaign.
It seems he’s having some sort
of belated Christmas party at
Fakenham this afternoon with lorry-loads bringing no fewer than 11
horses and their attendants across
from Warwickshire to contest the six
races, about as many as he has run in
the rest of January put together.
Four of these will be ridden by Richard Johnson, including Rio Quinto
in the Novices’ Hurdle. Murphy rates
this £130,000 purchase highly and
was thinking about running him in a
Grade Two after his wide-margin victory at Fakenham last month.
But the bigger tests can come
later; instead he returns to the sharp
Norfolk venue for presumably easier
pickings and he should prove too
strong for Southwell winner Oscar
Star.
top
tips
BEST BET
Halo Moon
(2.25pm, Fakenham)
Noel Fehily’s only booked ride;
encouraging return at Bangor
after long spell on the sidelines.
NEXT BEST
Rio Quinto
(1.55pm, Fakenham)
Can follow up his course win
before going on to better things.
ONE TO WATCH
Minella Daddy finished tired at
Ascot on his belated comeback,
but will be a different proposition
on better ground.
RIO QUINTO was an easy winner on his hurdles debut over 2m4f here
last month and that form is clearly the best on offer here. He must be
held in some regard having made his Rules debut in a Listed bumper
at Cheltenham in November. Earlshill is next on the list having made
the frame in his last two starts, while Oscar Star also warrants respect.
2.25
WENDLING HANDICAP CHASE (CLASS 3) £13,200
added 3m
1
116414 HOLLY BUSH HENRY P W Middleton 7 12 3.....................................
...................................................................................................................James Bowen (5)
2
2-P142 POPELYS GULL Mrs P Sly 6 11 12.......................... Kielan Woods
3
1P7/63 THE BOSS’S DREAM (D) N King 10 11 9.......................T Whelan
4
B111/7 HALO MOON (C) N Mulholland 10 11 8.......................N Fehily C
5
23P131 MORE THAN LUCK (C) Olly Murphy 7 11 0.....D England C,T
6 3-U73R MORNEY WING (CD) C Mann 9 10 13...............P Brennan C,T
- 6 declared BETTING: 9-4 Popelys Gull, 5-2 Holly Bush Henry, 4-1 More Than Luck,
13-2 Morney Wing, 8-1 Halo Moon, 10-1 The Boss’s Dream.
FORM VERDICT
HOLLY BUSH HENRY arrives here having won a Class 2 handicap over
hurdles at Sandown two starts ago before facing a tough task in a
similar event over fences at Kempton last time. The son of Yeats has
less on his plate here and can outclass his rivals. Popelys Gull bumped
into a useful rival when finishing second here last month and he could
prove to be the biggest threat to the selection. The Boss’s Dream and
More Than Luck are the pick of the remainder.
WOLVERHAMPTON
5.20
1
2
3
4
32RED.COM HANDICAP (CLASS 4) 3YO £8,550 added 5f
312-1
333110726-6
084-13
DESERT DOCTOR (CD) Ed Walker 9 8..........................L Keniry 1
BIG TIME MAYBE (CD) T Dascombe 9 8........ M Harley C,T 2
EMILIA JAMES (D) M Johnston 9 5..............................J Fanning 4
GIFT IN TIME (D) J Given 9 2...............................................B McHugh 3
- 4 declared BETTING: 11-10 Desert Doctor, 15-8 Big Time Maybe, 5-1 Gift In Time,
10-1 Emilia James.
FORM VERDICT
A select but competitive handicap in which a case can be made for all four.
DESERT DOCTOR shares top weight with the hat-trick seeking Big Time
Maybe, and he looks the one to be on given he won over C&D recently
with plenty up his sleeve and is still improving after just the four starts.
Big Time Maybe also has a win over track and trip to his name, while Gift
In Time is unexposed on the all-weather, and Emilia James is entitled to
have come on for her latest course exertions.
6.20
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
BETWAY HANDICAP (CLASS 4) £8,550 added 1m 4f
2391-7
6535-5
/77704482-1
218/5
967374/76-5
091137642-3
4552-7
55812-
ROYAL RESERVE (CD) D O’Meara 5 9 9........................A Kirby 5
START SEVEN (C) J Osborne 6 9 7............................D Costello 11
HAVANA BEAT A Carroll 8 9 6......................................G Downing 2
FLIGHT OF FANTASY (D) H Dunlop 4 9 4......... K O’Neill H 3
VALITOP S Durack 5 9 4............................................Oisin Murphy 10
BARYE (D) R Hughes 7 9 3................................................. S W Kelly C 4
MUSTAAQEEM R Fahey 6 9 3 .........................................P Hanagan 7
ISLAND BRAVE (CD) Mrs H Main 4 9 0.......P J McDonald 9
ZABEEL STAR (CD)(BF) K McLintock 6 8 11 .........L Keniry 6
BOSTONIAN S Lycett 8 8 10.............................Nicola Currie (5) 1
TAN ARABIQ (CD) M Appleby 5 8 7 ................................ L Morris 8
- 11 declared BETTING: 4-1 Flight Of Fantasy, 9-2 Royal Reserve, 5-1 Island Brave, 11-2
Zabeel Star, 8-1 Valitop, 10-1 Tan Arabiq, Mustaaqeem, 12-1 others.
FORM VERDICT
FLIGHT OF FANTASY beat Sonnetist, who may have offered the form
a timely boost in the previous race on this card, by five lengths at
Kempton earlier this month and this progressive filly can go in again
despite the 8lb rise. Island Brave knows his way around here and is
closely matched with the reopposing Royal Reserve on their meeting at
Lingfield last month. Zabeel Star is another expected to go well.
Racing results
CHELMSFORD CITY
Going: Standard
1.25 (7f mdn): VALE OF KENT
(J Fanning 6-4F) 1; I Was
Only Joking (8-1) 2; Michael
Corleone (7-4) 3. 7 ran. 41/2l,
11/4l. (M Johnston). NR:
Completion.
1.55 (7f h’cap): DUBAI WAVES
(E J Walsh 33-1) 1; Mr Potter
(4-1) 2; Shamlan (11-4F) 3. 8
ran. 1l, 3/4l. (A Newcombe). NRs:
Frozen Lake, Red Mohican.
2.25 (1m h’cap): COURIER (L
Morris 9-4) 1; Dose (3-1) 2;
Stosur (4-1) 3. Masquerade
Bling 2-1F. 4 ran. 11/2l, 2l. (M
Appleby). NR: Daisy Bere.
2.55 (1m2f h’cap): LAZARUS (J
Mitchell 4-1) 1; Buckland Beau
(3-1) 2; Hard Toffee (9-4F) 3. 8
ran. hd, 1l. (Miss Amy Murphy).
3.25 (1m5f66yds h’cap): NURSE
NIGHTINGALE (Oisin Murphy 9-4)
1; The Gay Cavalier (8-1) 2; Jack Bear
(2-1F) 3. 5 ran. 6l, 21/4l. (M Bell).
3.55 (5f h’cap): DYNAMO WALT (P
Mathers 4-1) 1; George Dryden
(7-2) 2; Zipedeedodah (20-1) 3.
Bahamian Heights 3-1F. 7 ran.
1
/2l, 3/4l. (D Shaw). NR: Swendab.
4.30 (6f h’cap): FAREEQ
(Jason Watson 5-1) 1; Secret
Memories (3-1F) 2; Firesnake
(8-1) 3. 9 ran. 3/4l, 11/2l. (C
Wallis). NR: Billyoakes.
Jackpot: Not won, pool of
£3,376.57 carried over. Placepot:
£220.30. Quadpot: £36.10.
NEWCASTLE
Abandoned due to snow and
further weather forecast
FONTWELL Going: Heavy
1.10 (2m1f162yds nov hdle):
LISP (W Hutchinson 1-6F)
1; Angel of Harlem (11-1) 2;
Airtight (5-1) 3. 7 ran. 7l, 13l.
(A King).
1.40 (2m3f104yds h’cap ch):
NATIVE ROBIN (N Scholfield 2-1F)
1; Jarlath (7-1) 2; Bramble Brook
(11-4) 3. 6 ran. 6l, 13/4l. (J Scott).
2.10 (2m5f164yds h’cap hdle):
FOURTH ACT (H Cobden
15-8F) 1; Theo’s Charm (2-1) 2;
I See You Well (13-2) 3. 5 ran.
41/2l, 10l. (C Tizzard).
2.40 (3m1f210yds h’cap ch):
MOUNT OLIVER (T Scudamore
11-2) 1; For Carmel (9-2F)
2; Goring One (7-1) 3. 11 ran.
7l, 41/2l. (N Mulholland). NR:
Mazurati.
3.10 (2m5f164yds nov hdle):
MELROSE BOY (N Fehily 1-10F)
1; Now Listen Here (20-1) 2; Boola
River (33-1) 3. 4 ran. 50l, 5l. (H Fry).
3.40 (2m1f165yds h’cap ch):
ATLANTIC ROLLER (James
Bowen 6-4F) 1; Keel Haul (11-4)
2; Gores Island (9-2) 3. 4 ran. 31/4l,
33l. (C Gordon). NR: Free World.
4.10 (1m5f159yds nh flat):
FONTSANTA (L Aspell 7-2) 1;
Bang On (14-1) 2; The Flying
Sofa (4-9F) 3. 6 ran. 1/2l, 3/4l.
(Miss E Lavelle). Placepot:
£22.50. Quadpot: £9.80.
England’s Ama Agbeze blocks a shot during her side’s victory over New Zealand on Saturday GETTY
England open Quad Series
with extra-time victory
By Sports Staff
England head into tonight’s match
against world champions Australia
on the back of a dramatic final-quarter fightback to beat New Zealand
64-57 at London’s Copper Box Arena
on Saturday night.
The home side, in their opening
match of the Quad Series, dominated physically early in the match but
were six goals adrift at the beginning
of the final quarter. However, they
rallied to finish 49-49 at the end of
normal time.
If Kadeen Corbin’s shot had gone
in, extra time would have been unnec-
What a fight
to the end, a win
in extra-time.
The crowd were
definitely our
eighth player
essary, but they held their nerve to
beat the Ferns, with Serena Guthrie
key to the victory.
Goal defence Ama Agbeze and goal
shoot Corbin said the 6,000-strong
crowd played a part in the victory –
England’s third over New Zealand in
the past six months.
Agbeze said: “The crowd were
electric – it was one of the best
crowds I’ve played in front of,” while
Corbin added: “What a fight to the
end, a win in extra time. I felt all the
energy on the court – [the crowd
were] definitely our eighth player.”
Australia opened their series with
a 54-50 win over South Africa.
Results Service
CRICKET
TRIANGULAR TOURNAMENT
Zimbabwe v Sri Lanka, Mirpur: Zimbabwe 198
(44.0 overs; B R M Taylor 56; N L T C Perera
4-33). Sri Lanka 202-5 (44.5 overs). Sri Lanka
(2pts) beat Zimbabwe by 5 wickets.
GOLF
THE ABU DHABI HSBC CHAMPIONSHIP: Final
Round: (Gbr & Irl unless stated, par 72): 266 T
Fleetwood 66 68 67 65; 268 R Fisher 67 67 65
69; 270 R McIlroy 69 66 65 70; M Fitzpatrick 68
70 63 69; 271 C Paisley 69 67 66 69; T Pieters
(Bel) 67 65 67 72; 272 A Levy (Fr) 69 65 70 68; 273
H Stenson (Swe) 70 68 70 65.
USPGA CHAMPIONS TOUR MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC CHAMPIONSHIP, HAWAII: Final Round:
(USA unless stated, par 72): 198 J Kelly 64 68
66; 199 C Montgomerie (GB) 65 65 69; 200 D
Toms67 66 67; 201 M Angel Jimenez (Sp) 70 65
66; 202 K Triplett 66 70 66.
SMBC SINGAPORE OPEN, SERAPONG COURSE,
SENTOSA GOLF CLUBLeading Final round
scores (Par 71) 270 S Garcia (Sp) 66 70 66 68; 275
S Kodaira (Japan) 66 72 66 71; S Norris (SA) 69 67
69 70; 276 J Janewattananond (Thai) 71 68 66 71;
D Boonma (Thai) 70 68 65 73; 277 S Crocker (US)
71 70 67 69; C Davis (Aus) 68 70 69 70.
NETBALL
INTERNATIONAL SERIES: England Roses 64
New Zealand 57.
WORLD CUP QUALIFIER: Northern Ireland 57
Wales 42, Scotland 52 Northern Ireland 31.
RUGBY UNION
EUROPEAN CHALLENGE CUP POOL 1
Enisei-STM (7).......................19 Newcastle (26)...............33
Enisei-STM: Tries: Giliberti, Sychev, Gachechiladze. Conversions: Budychenko (2). Newcastle:
Tries: M. Wilson, Radwan (3), Flood. Conversions: Flood (4). Att: 500.
Newport G (5).........................33 Bordeaux-B (3).............17
Newport Gwent D’gons: Tries: Dee, Hill, Hewitt,
Fairbrother, Howard. Conversions: Henson
(2), Jones (2). Bordeaux-Begles: Tries: Fuatai,
Gimbert. Conversions: Volavola, C. Schoeman.
Penalties: Volavola. Att: 4,017.
P W D L F
A
B Pts
Newcastle
6 6 0 0 229 122 4 28
Newport G
6 3 0 3 156 133 4 16
Bordeaux-B 6 3 0 3 190 178 4 16
Enisei-STM 6 0 0 6 91 233 1
1
POOL 2
Lyon (12)........................................18 Cardiff Blues (7) ..........21
Lyon: Tries: Cretin, Barassi. Conversions:
Beauxis. Penalties: Beauxis (2). Cardiff Blues:
Tries: L. Williams, Penalty, T. Williams. Conversions: J. Evans (3). Att: 9,218.
Toulouse (14)...........................28 Sale (7)....................................21
Toulouse: Tries: van Dyk, Roumieu, Marchand,
Kunatani. Conversions: Ntamack (3), van Dyk.
Sale: Tries: Yarde, L. James, Beaumont. Conversions: Addison (3). Att: 9,462.
P W D L F
A
B Pts
Cardiff Blues 6 5 0 1 99
95 1 21
Toulouse
6 2 1 3 117 120 4 14
Sale
6 2 1 3 110 102 2 12
Lyon
6 2 0 4 121 130 3 11
POOL 3
Zebre (19).....................................38 Agen (20).............................30
Zebre: Tries: Violi, Bisegni, Minozzi, Meyer. Conversions: Canna (3). Penalties: Canna (4). Agen:
Tries: L. Tolot, Conduche, Saurs. Conversions:
Verdu (2), Russell. Penalties: Verdu (3). Att: 2,000.
P W D L F
A
B Pts
Pau
6 6 0 0 207 125 5 29
Gloucester
6 4 0 2 253 139 5 21
Zebre
6 1 0 5 133 257 4
8
Agen
6 1 0 5 148 220 2
6
POOL 4
Krasny Yar (10)......................17 London Irish (7)...........24
Krasny Yar: Tries: Arhip, G. Tsnobiladze.
Conversions: Malaguradze, Apikotoa. Penalties:
Malaguradze. London Irish: Tries: M. Williams,
Fowlie (2), Loader. Conversions: Atkins (2). Att: 500.
Stade Francais (12) ...........17 Edinburgh (0)................10
Stade Francais: Tries: Alo-Emile, Danty, Parisse.
Conversions: Geraghty. Edinburgh: Tries:
Hoyland, Fife. Att: 8,454.
P W D L F
A
B Pts
Edinburgh
6 5 0 1 282
98 5 25
Stade Francais 6 3 0 3 151 166 5 17
London Irish 6 3 0 3 169 154 4 16
Krasny Yar
6 1 0 5 106 290 2
6
POOL 5
Connacht (36) ........................ 50 Oyonnax (14) .................14
Connacht: Tries: Adeolokun (3), Aki, O’Halloran,
Healy, Farrell, Penalty. Conversions: Ronaldson
(2), O’Halloran (3). Oyonnax: Tries: Muller, Ikpefan. Conversions: Fuertes, Hall. Att: 5,017.
Brive (14) .....................................33 Worcester (0)....................7
Brive: Tries: Koyamaibole (2), Masilevu,
Waqaniburotu, Burotu. Conversions: Germain
(4). Worcester: Tries: Howe. Conversions: Pennell. Att: 800.
P W D L F
A
B Pts
Connacht
6 5 1 0 225 102 4 26
Brive
6 3 0 3 161 162 5 17
Worcester
6 2 1 3 124 133 5 15
Oyonnax
6 1 0 5 102 215 0
4
GUINNESS PRO14
Cheetahs (24)...........................45 Southern Kings (17)24
Cheetahs: Tries: Lee (2), Cassiem, Nche, Mapimpi,
S. Venter. Conversions: F. Zeilinga (6). Penalties:
F. Zeilinga. Southern Kings: Tries: Vulindlu,
Ferreira, Burger. Conversions: Dukisa (2), van
der Westhuizen. Penalties: Dukisa. Att: 5,522.
TENNIS
AUSTRALIAN OPEN, MELBOURNE: Men’s
Fourth round: (1) R NADAL (Sp) bt (24) D SEBASTIAN SCHWARTZMAN (Arg) 6-3 6-7 (4-7)
6-3 6-3; (6) M CILIC (Croa) bt (10) P CARRENOBUSTA (Sp) 6-7 (2-7) 6-3 7-6 (7-0) 6-6 (7-3); (3)
G DIMITROV (Bul) bt (17) N KYRGIOS (Aus) 7-6
(7-3) 7-6 (7-4) 4-6 7-6 (7-4); K EDMUND (GB) bt A
Seppi (It) 6-7 (4-7) 7-5 6-2 6-3.
Women’s Fourth round: E Mertens (Bel) bt P Martic
(Croa) 7-6 (7-5) 7-5; (4) E SVITOLINA (Ukr) bt D Allertova (Cz Rep) 6-3 6-0; C Suarez Navarro (Sp) bt (32)
A KONTAVEIT (Est) 4-6 6-4 8-6; (2) C WOZNIACKI
(Den) bt (19) M RYBARIKOVA (Slovak) 6-3 6-0.
Men’s Doubles Third round: (11) J SEBASTIAN
CABAL (Col) & R FARAH (Col) bt L Paes (India) &
P Raja (India) 6-1 6-2; S Groth (Aus) & L Hewitt
(Aus) bt P Andujar (Sp) & A Ramos-Vinolas (Sp)
3-3 ret; (6) B BRYAN (US) & M BRYAN (US) bt
J Chardy (Fr) & F Martin (Fr) 6-7 (2-7) 7-6 (7-5)
6-3; (15) M MATKOWSKI (Pol) & A QURESHI
(Pak) bt R Albot (Mol) & H Chung (S Kor) w/o;
Women’s Doubles Third round: (4) L SAFAROVA
(Cz Rep) & B ZAHLAVOVA STRYCOVA (Cz Rep)
bt S Cirstea (Rom) & B Haddad Maia (Br) 2-6
6-0 6-4; (8) S HSIEH (Taipei) & S PENG (Chin) bt
(12) R ATAWO (US) & A GROENEFELD (Ger) 6-4
6-2; (10) I BEGU (Rom) & M NICULESCU (Rom)
bt N Kichenok (Ukr) & A Rodionova (Aus) 4-1 ret;
J Brady (US) & V King (US) bt (13) N MELICHAR
(US) & K PESCHKE (Cz Rep) 6-4 7-6 (7-5).
Mixed Doubles, Selected First round: (1) L CHAN
(Taipei) & J MURRAY (GB) bt A Klepac (Sloven)
& R Ram (US) 4-6 7-5 11-9.
FIXTURES
FOOTBALL
PREMIER LEAGUE
Swansea v Liverpool (8).................................................................
CRICKET
FIRST TWENTY20 INT’NAL: NEW ZEALAND V
PAKISTAN (Wellington, 3am).
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
CYCLING
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
47
GOLF
Sky told they should suspend
Froome ‘for sake of cycling’
the preliminary stage of assessing
what may have caused the test result.
Kidney malfunction – reported to be
Froome’s primary line of defence –
is thought to be only one of a
number of possible factors.
But UCI president David
Lappartient (right) said
he believed Team Sky’s
policy was damaging the
sport. “Of course, yes,” he
said. “When this happened
you could see the newspapers and the internet, that cycling was going back to its past.
“I saw one newspaper from Brittany and the first page was Froome.
This wasn’t a sports newspaper and
that was the same in many countries.
It’s bad for cycling but as I’ve said, we
also got be careful because Froome
has the opportunity to defend his
By Lawrence Ostlere
Pressure is building on Team Sky to
suspend Chris Froome from competitive racing until his salbutamol case
has been resolved.
Sky are still intent on Froome competing in May’s Giro d’Italia, despite
the finding of excessive levels of the
asthma drug in his system during the
2017 Vuelta a Espana.
Froome’s legal team are preparing to explain the findings to the official anti-doping service, but there is
no date in sight for the hearing and
it could drag on for many months.
Under the rules laid down by cycling’s
world governing body, the UCI, there
is no obligation on a team to suspend
a rider over an adverse analytical
finding (AAF).
It is understood the case is still in
Daryl Impey
finishes in
the pack in
Adelaide to
complete his
victory in the
Tour Down
Under
Puzzle solutions
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ROAD
VOTE
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POLL
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LOLL
HUES
LULL
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ZYGOLEX
LEFT TO RIGHT:
raft; draw; dart;
lug; daft; drag;
mad; sad; sag;
map; wilt; clap;
wild; plan; tilt
5-CLUE CROSSWORD
Across: 1 EC-hoes, 3 A-BB-OTT, 4 Tod-ate
Down: 1 Er-rant, 2 sa-Rt-re<
WORD WHEEL
NINE-LETTER WORD dejection
OTHER WORDS cede, cent, cite, cited, cod, code, coin,
coined, con, cone, coned, cot, deceit, decent, deco, dice, edict,
eject, ejection, encode, entice, enticed, ice, iced, icon, inject,
injected, nice, niece, notice, noticed, once, tic, tonic
SATURDAY’S CODEWORD 1911
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P X
L D O J
M R F K Z Q G V
I
Tommy Fleetwood takes a selfie with his trophy in Abu Dhabi GETTY
Stunning back nine
helps Fleetwood
retain Abu Dhabi title
By Sports Staff
Tommy Fleetwood admitted he had
been determined to retain his hunger after successfully defending the
Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship.
Fleetwood fired a final-round 65
to finish 22 under par, two shots
clear of fellow Englishman Ross
Fisher.
It was the 27-year-old’s fourth European Tour victory and came just
two months after he was crowned
the 2017 Race to Dubai champion.
“I’ve put in a lot of work, I wanted
to prepare for this year like I didn’t
win the Race to Dubai,” said Fleetwood who holed six birdies on the
back nine. “It was important to
come out and make sure I’m hungry. I wanted to do the right things,
and whenever you win it is validation that you can do it.
“My best golf is getting better
and better and my worse golf is getting better as well.”
Fleetwood’s victory could put
him in the top 10 of the world rankings for the first time when the new
list is published today.
Rory McIlroy closed with a 70
to share third place with Matthew
Fitzpatrick, two shots adrift of
Fisher. “My game’s in really good
shape and I saw some positive
signs,” McIlroy said.
VAR is another trick for TV and not for the fans
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position. However, this is bad for the
image of cycling.”
Lappartient said there was little
he or the UCI could do other than
support the Giro and Tour de
France organisers should
they elect to bar Froome.
“I can’t force them,”
he said of Sky’s position.
“With the rules they have
the right to race him. It’s
up to them to decide but if
he wins some races then it
could be bad if he’s sanctioned
after. That is why I think it would be
better for them to take off the pressure by having him not riding at the
moment.”
Tom Van Damme, president of the
UCI’s road commission, also called
on Sky to speed up the case. “Team
Sky and Chris Froome urgently need
to stand in front of a mirror,” he said.
“Moral responsibility lies with Team
Sky and Froome. The longer this
takes, the worse for cycling.”
Lappartient was speaking at the
Tour Down Under, which was won by
Daryl Impey, the 33-year-old South
African’s first general classification
win since the 2014 Tour of Alberta.
Impey finished the six-stage race
with the same time as home favourite Richie Porte but claimed the title
thanks to his three second-placed
stage finishes. “Coming in I didn’t expect to win the race, but sometimes
the stars line up,” Impey said.
Andre Greipel won the final stage, a
remarkable 18th win at the race for the
German, who edged out Caleb Ewan
and Peter Sagan in a sprint on the
streets of Adelaide. THE INDEPENDENT
A U Y H
W C N B
S
teppenwolf’s second
album, helpfully titled
The Second, is a masterclass in early virtual reality. If you listen with your
eyes closed, you can instantly be
transported to a late 1960s party,
complete with clinking glasses,
raucous, psychedelic blues rock,
laughter and even, on the laconic
“Don’t Step on the Grass, Sam”, a
police raid.
You can experience the entire
shindig without the need for a
time machine or velvet flares
– nor do you experience the
inevitable hangover. Of course
experiencing events by proxy has
come a long way since the heady
days of 1968. Far less effort and
imagination is needed. Indeed,
with a big enough television, a
loud enough speaker system and
an open window or two, you could
have pretended you were in the
stands next to Martin Tyler to
watch Southampton play Tottenham yesterday.
And you could argue that with
the advent of the video assistant
referees in last week’s FA Cup
Armchair
Fan
Matt Butler says
there’s nothing
like being there –
most of the time
replays, the viewer at home gets
even more bang for their buck
than the poor sap on the terrace.
We in our cosy houses get every
angle of a disputed decision,
while the dedicated fan who
schlepped out in the cold gets to
sit in seething ignorance, waiting
for a verdict on something they
may not have even seen in the
first place.
It is early days for the VAR,
let’s remember – but the way
it has begun feels like another
sign the viewer, rather than the
actual bum on stadium seat, is
more important. We may well ask
what the point of heading out to a
match is, when the alternative is
a comfortable chair, more information than we could ever need
spoon-fed to us and an easy walk
to the fridge.
And the answer would be that
no matter how many tricks TV
people throw at us (remember
live sport in 3D? Neither do we),
nothing beats watching a
sporting event from the
sidelines. I remember
my first time at Wimbledon and marvelling at how compact
Centre Court was
– and how loud the
notoriously polite
crowd could be. And I still
remember the cacophony
that made my ears ring during
my first football match in this
country: Leyton Orient v Crystal
Palace, if you’re curious. For
some events, though, following
the action virtually is a necessity.
Or at least highly preferable. Like
the 268-mile Spine Race, which
finished yesterday morning. Runners traversed the stunning environs of the Pennine Way through
foul weather on little sleep – and
we were able to follow their
progress via their GPS trackers
and the organisers’ frequent social media updates to feel in the
thick of the action.
The updates were varied,
from quick interviews with
grumpy runners to an insight
into volunteers waiting at
a hut in the wee small
hours. And the coverage gave a real feeling
for the seemingly
impossible conditions
for running, and the
grim doggedness of
the runners. The post
entitled “Ever wondered
what someone’s feet look like
after 268 miles?” was predictably
gruesome. The best bit was we
didn’t need to wait in a blizzard to
hear the women’s winner Carol
Morgan (above), who won after a
17-hour final push through snowdrifts, announce after getting her
medal: “I’m going in to sit down,
I don’t know what anyone else is
doing.” We could watch it all in
comfort.
48
SPORT
RUGBY UNION
Saracens sneak
in to fly English
flag in Europe
By Hugh Godwin
RUGBY UNION CORRESPONDENT
Quarter-final matches
Saracens continue to be England’s
standard-bearers in Europe, after
the Champions Cup holders qualified for this season’s quarter-finals
as the third of the best three pool
runners-up.
Saracens hammered Northampton 62-14 at Allianz Park on
Saturday to finish second behind Clermont Auvergne in Pool Two, and
they will be away to top seeds and
three-time former winners Leinster
in the last eight, having escaped
elimination yesterday when Ulster
lost at Wasps.
England’s fortunes have taken a
lurch for the worst from supplying
five clubs in the last eight two seasons ago, to two last year and just
one this time, but Saracens have
been a constant force, quarter-finalists for seven years in a row.
Some wondered whether a serious wobble
had set in at Saracens
when they were hammered 46-14 at home
to Clermont Auvergne
in the match delayed by
snow at Allianz Park on 11
December.
But director of rugby Mark McCall (right) stayed quietly resolute.
“Judge us in six weeks’ time,” said
the softly-spoken Ulsterman, believing they would earn the points
they needed in the last two rounds
away to Ospreys – it was a 15-15 draw
– and at home at Northampton.
Now Saracens can look forward
to a reprise of last season’s semifinal trip to the Aviva Stadium in
Dublin, except this venture across
the Irish Sea will be to face Leinster,
not Munster.
1 Leinster v Saracens
2 Scarlets v La Rochelle
3 Munster v Toulon
4 Clerment Auvergne v Racing 92
Wasps’ mighty effort
proves to be in vain
Semi-finals
Winner QF 1 v winner QF 2
Winner QF 3 v winner QF 4
But the rest of the weekend’s
round-six results confirmed this as
a bleak midwinter for the English
Premiership.
From the seven competing teams
among the 20 in the competition, six
have plunged out, with Exeter at the
centre of the biggest shock as the
Premiership champions and league
leaders fell to the previously winless
Glasgow at Scotstoun on Saturday.
Leicester and Harlequins were
already out before they lost
yesterday to Racing 92
and La Rochelle respectively, while Bath’s big
win away to Treviso
on Saturday was not
enough to put right the
twin horrors of failing to
pick up a bonus at home to
the Italians in round one and
the capitulation at home to Scarlets
in round five.
By contrast Wales are celebrating
a first quarter-finalist in six years
after Scarlets’ tumultuous win over
the three-times champions Toulon
in front of a crowd of more than
14,000 earned an attractive home
tie with tournament newcomers La
Rochelle.
And the seeding system means
if Saracens and Scarlets both get
through, they will meet in England
in the semi-finals.
Talking Points
WASPS
26
ULSTER
7
By Hugh Godwin
AT THE RICOH ARENA
Wasps’ director of rugby Dai Young
backed Premiership rivals Saracens
to “go all the way” in the European
Champions Cup after both teams in
a rain-lashed pool clash in Coventry
exited the competition.
Ulster were unable to back up their
win over La Rochelle in the previous
round of matches and got nowhere
Five takeaways from this weekend’s action
1
2
3
Big-hitter Wright will be fondly
remembered as a Melbourne star
Football League could find it has a big
decision to make on synthetic pitches
Borussia Dortmund’s best
player against Hertha Berlin
was a 17-year-old English kid.
Dortmund looked like they
were on their way to a
damaging defeat before
Shinji Kagawa stooped
at the back post to head
them level on 71 minutes.
That equaliser was set up by
Jadon Sancho (right), who
already looks an integral
member of the squad. They
wondered in commentary if he
might go to the World Cup. It
didn’t seem so inconceivable
on Friday night.
The Tour Down Under, the curtainraiser to the 2018 professional
cycling season, has been marked
by squabbles between riders
over the heat. Stage 3 was
shortened by 26km and stage
4 began an hour early to avoid
the worst of temperatures
around 48C in South Australia.
Without wishing to be too
alarmist, and with extreme
heat at the Australian Open
also a problem, one wonders
how long it will be before
climate change explicitly
begins to affect the
sporting calendar.
There seemed to be real sadness
when the Melbourne Stars
announced that Luke Wright
would not return to play for the
Big Bash franchise next season.
Wright (below), who missed the
game against the Sydney Thunder
with delayed concussion, will be
remembered as the Stars’ record
Big Bash run-scorer. It’s a mark of
cricket’s modern globalisation that
his greatest renown did not come
as a some-time England
one-day all-rounder,
but through a
series of white-hot
Australian winters.
There’s a curious kind of storm
brewing in the National League.
A 2-1 victory over Dagenham &
Redbridge, in front of BT Sport’s
cameras, left Sutton United third in
the table on Saturday evening, three
points behind leaders Macclesfield.
Bromley are five points and four
places back in seventh. The link
between them? They both play
on 3G pitches, which the Football
League won’t allow. And if they
decline promotion to keep those
pitches, they’ll be bumped
down into the sixth tier. It’s a
problem the Football League
could solve at a stroke.
The English teenager lighting up the
Bundesliga – a World Cup hint?
Cyclists and tennis players feeling
the burn as Australia swelters
4
near the victory that would have
earned them a first quarter-final appearance since 2014.
As for Wasps, their chance of
joining Saracens as England’s only
survivors in Europe’s last eight was
severely hampered before kick-off
when Maxime Machenaud kicked a
late penalty for Racing 92 to nick a
EDITED BY TEDDY CUTLER
5
Reports of Brady’s
handicap somewhat
exaggerated
Discourse about and
around US professional sport ate
itself last week. Again. Tom Brady
(above) hurt his hand some time
in the middle of the week. The
hand almost immediately attained
mythical status. Reports conflicted.
Had Brady broken a bone, sprained
something? Would he be forced to
miss, or be hampered during, last
night’s AFC Championship Game?
Turned out it was just stitches.
Brady was fine. You can imagine the
New England Patriots locker room
chuckling grimly at reports of their
great quarterback’s demise.
NEWS
2-27
Champions Cup results
POOL ONE
Wasps players celebrate
as Guy Thompson scores
their first try yesterday
GETTY IMAGES
YESTERDAY
La Rochelle (13) ...........................16 Harlequins (0)....................... 7
La Rochelle: Tries: Aguillon, Murimurivalu. Penalties:
Bales (2). Harlequins: Tries: Care. Cons: Smith.
Wasps (14) ....................................... 26 Ulster (7) .................................... 7
Wasps: Tries: Thompson, Cruse, le Roux, Cooper-Woolley. Cons: Cipriani (3). Ulster: Tries: Reidy. Cons: Cooney.
P
W D
L
F
A
B Pts
La Rochelle 6
4
0
2 156 121 4
20
Wasps
6
3
0
3 154 121 5
17
Ulster
6
4
0
2 132 118 1
17
Harlequins 6
1
0
5 106 188 3
7
POOL TWO
SATURDAY
Clermont Au (13).......................24 Ospreys (0)............................... 7
Clermont Auvergne: Tries: Abendanon, McAlister.
Cons: Parra. Penalties: Parra (3), Laidlaw. Ospreys:
Tries: Beck. Cons: Biggar. Att: 18,007.
Saracens (36)................................. 62 Northampton (14) ..........14
Saracens: Tries: M. Vunipola, Goode, Bosch, Wigglesworth, Koch, Maitland, Vailanu. Cons: Farrell (6).
Penalties: Farrell (5). Northampton: Tries: Reinach,
Tuitavake. Cons: Mallinder (2). Att: 10,000.
P
W D
L
F
A
B Pts
Clermont Au 6
5
0
1 165 104 2
22
Saracens
6
3
1
2 205 146 4
18
Ospreys
6
2
1
3 152 148 5
15
Northampton 6
1
0
5
115 239 2
6
POOL THREE
SATURDAY
Glasgow (7)...................................... 28 Exeter (7) ................................21
Glasgow: Tries: Hogg, Penalty, Seymour, M. Fagerson.
Cons: Russell (3), Allan. Exeter: Tries: S. Simmonds,
Armand, Whitten. Cons: Steenson (3). Att: 7,351.
Montpellier (14).........................14 Leinster (8) ...........................23
Montpellier: Tries: B. du Plessis, Camara. Cons: Cruden
(2). Leinster: Tries: R. Byrne, Henshaw, Cronin. Cons: R.
Byrne. Penalties: R. Byrne (2). Att: 8,250.
P
W D
L
F
A
B Pts
Leinster
6
6
0
0 176
93 3
27
Exeter
6
3
0
3 138 117 3
15
Montpellier 6
2
0
4 130 163 5
13
Glasgow
6
1
0
5 128 199 3
7
POOL FOUR
YESTERDAY
Leicester (9) ...................................20 Racing 92 (14) .....................23
Leicester: Tries: O’Connor. Penalties: G. Ford (5). Racing 92: Tries: Chavancy, Machenaud. Cons: Machenaud
(2). Penalties: Machenaud (3). Att: 18,165.
Munster (13)..................................48 Castres (3).................................3
Munster: Tries: Earls, Marshall, Penalty, Zebo, Wootton, Cronin. Cons: Keatley (4), Hanrahan (2). Penalties:
Keatley (2). Castres: Penalties: Kockott.
P
W D
L
F
A
B Pts
Munster
6
4
1
1 167
87 3
21
Racing 92
6
4
0
2 128 105 3
19
Castres
6
2
1
3
111 161 2
12
Leicester
6
1
0
5 118 171 3
7
POOL FIVE
SATURDAY
Benetton Treviso (7)............... 28 Bath (35) ..................................47
Benetton Treviso: Tries: Sperandio, Negri, Benvenuti,
Ioane. Cons: Allan (4). Bath: Tries: Dunn, Penalty, Banahan, Watson, Joseph, Mercer, Charteris. Cons: Burns (5),
Allinson. Att: 3,300.
Scarlets (27)....................................30 Toulon (21)............................ 27
Scarlets: Tries: Prydie, Parkes, D. Jones. Cons: D. Jones
(3). Penalties: D. Jones (2), Patchell. Toulon: Tries:
Vermeulen, Ashton. Cons: Belleau. Penalties: Belleau
(3), Trinh-Duc (2).
P
W D
L
F
A
B Pts
Scarlets
6
4
0
2 162 123 5
21
Toulon
6
4
0
2 159 125 3
19
Bath
6
4
0
2
151 121 2
18
Ben Treviso 6
0
0
6
97 200 4
4
win for the Parisian club at Leicester
earlier in the afternoon.
Despite nabbing the necessary
bonus-point win while denying Ulster anything, Wasps knew they also
needed either La Rochelle or Munster to lose, and that was where their
story ended – although by knocking
Ulster out they ushered Saracens
through.
Wasps put in an almighty effort in
an incessant downpour, a biting wind
and slippery pitch, but their downfall
had come earlier in the competition
when they bungled a possible win
away to Ulster, and more calamitously when they had leads of 21-0
and 28-12 at already-eliminated Harlequins nine days ago and still contrived to lose.
Young spoke afterwards of
Wasps’ lack of “game sense” that
had allowed the Quins result to
happen, while his Ulster counterpart Les Kiss was concerned at a
shortage of “ball toughness” and
“decision toughness”. Whichever
way you frame it, these teams remain a notch below consistent European achievers like Saracens and
Leinster.
Young added: “Without a shadow
of a doubt I believe Saracens are still
the team we’ve all got to chase. When
they’re all on the field, they’ve got five
British Lions in the pack. That takes
some beating.”
Up against the odds here, Wasps’
flankers Guy Thompson and Jack
Wasps
needed La
Rochelle or
Munster to
lose, but by
knocking
Ulster out
they kept
Saracens in
Willis proved there was vibrant
life without the suspended James
Haskell as they hurt Ulster consistently at the breakdown.
Thompson peeled off a line-out
maul to grab the opening try after
10 minutes, before Ulster lost Jacob
Stockdale to a leg injury, although
Kiss promised the big wing would be
fit for Ireland’s Six Nations Championship opener with France.
Ulster levelled with a try by Sean
Reidy on 23 minutes, in a typical example of Wasps’ sloppiness. Willie le
Roux fielded a box-kick from John
Cooney but the Springbok full-back
put Christian Wade in a difficult spot
with a rash pass, and Wade tossed
the ball straight to Ulster wing Louis
Ludik, who handed on to Reidy via
Darren Cave.
Le Roux’s skills were much more
evident in the lovely chip he dabbed
over the Ulster defence for Wasps’
second try, scored by hooker Tom
Cruse at the left corner.
With two conversions by Danny
Cipriani to one from John Cooney,
Wasps led 14-7 at half-time and they
stretched that with a brilliant try as
Cipriani’s lavish double miss-pass off
his left hand sent Le Roux aquaplaning over in the corner.
The bonus-point try with 55 minutes played was down to pure power
rugby from Wasps, as Kearnan Myall
and Joe Launchbury carried hard
after a line-out, and Jake CooperWoolley applied the finish.
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-37
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
FOOTBALL
Football results and tables
Lennon fumes
at ‘disrespect’
from Levein
after Cup defeat
PREMIER LEAGUE
Arsenal (4)....................4 Crystal Palace (0)..1
Monreal 6
Milivojevic 78
Iwobi 10
Koscielny 13
Lacazette 22
Att 59,386
Brighton (0) ................0 Chelsea (2)....................4
Hazard 3, 77
Willian 6
Moses 89
Att 30,600
Burnley (0)..................0 Man Utd (0).................1
Martial 54
Att 21,841
Everton (0)...................1 West Brom (1)..........1
Niasse 70
Rodriguez 7
Att 39,061
Leicester (1)................. 2 Watford (0).................0
Vardy 39 (pen)
Mahrez 90
Att 31,891
Man City (1)................. 3 Newcastle (0)............1
Aguero 34, 63 (pen), 83 Murphy 67
Att 54,452
Stoke (0)......................... 2 Huddersfield (0).....0
Allen 53
Diouf 69
Att 29,785
West Ham (0).............1 Bournemouth (0) .1
Hernandez 73
Fraser 71
Att 56,948
Yesterday
Southampton (1)....1 Tottenham (1)...........1
Sanchez 15 (og)
Kane 18
Att 31,361
P W D L F A Pts
Man City
24 21 2 1 70 18 65
Man Utd
24 16 5 3 49 16 53
Chelsea
24 15 5 4 45 16 50
Liverpool
23 13 8 2 54 28 47
Tottenham
24 13 6 5 47 22 45
Arsenal
24 12 6 6 45 31 42
Leicester
24 9 7 8 36 32 34
Burnley
24 9 7 8 19 21 34
Everton
24 7 7 10 26 39 28
Watford
24 7 5 12 33 44 26
West Ham
24 6 8 10 30 42 26
Bournemouth 24 6 7 11 25 36 25
Crystal Palace 24 6 7 11 22 37 25
Huddersfield 24 6 6 12 19 41 24
Newcastle
24 6 5 13 22 34 23
Brighton
24 5 8 11 17 33 23
Stoke
24 6 5 13 25 50 23
Southampton 24 4 10 10 24 35 22
West Brom
24 3 11 10 19 31 20
Swansea
23 4 5 14 14 35 17
By Will Jackson
Hibernian manager Neil Lennon
has branded Craig Levein “disrespectful” after the Hearts manager claimed natural order had been
restored in the Edinburgh derby.
Don Cowie scored the only goal
in a scrappy 1-0 win at Tynecastle
to put the Jambos in the hat for
the fifth round of the Scottish Cup.
It was a first win in nine in the
derby for Hearts – who historically have the better record in the
fixture – which led a relieved Levein to claim that he wanted to “restore the natural order of things”.
An angry Lennon (below) hit
back at his opposite number.
“What does that mean? Restoring natural order?” he said. “I
don’t understand what that is –
Hearts beating Hibs every time?
It’s just a crock of crap. I think it’s
a pretty poor statement to make
and disrespectful to the club, players and me. We have two games
to come so we will see if natural
order is restored then.
“It’s not good, I don’t know what
he means by that but they haven’t
won in nine, it’s my first defeat in
five and we should have won the
game here [last time when Oli
Shaw saw a legitimate goal not
given in a 0-0 draw].
“There’s a lack of humility in
that statement, I don’t think I’ve
ever made a statement like that.”
Meanwhile Celtic
are refreshed
and raring to go
again, claimed
James Forrest,
after the Hoops
returned from
a three-week
winter break to
dismiss Brechin
City 5-0 in the Scottish Cup.
Looking ahead to Celtic’s Premiership match against Partick
Thistle tomorrow, where Brendan
Rodgers’ league leaders will look
to go 11 points clear of Aberdeen,
Forrest stressed the importance
of the break in Dubai both mentally and physically.
He said: “The break was really
beneficial and being mentally refreshed is a big part of it.
“Every three days we’d have a
big game and that’s hard. We’re
back and ready for the remainder
of the season.”
Forrest opened the scoring
against Brechin. Scott Sinclair
added two, with Olivier Ntcham,
Dedryck Boyata and Odsonne Edouard adding the other goals.
Rangers’ Scottish Cup
fourth-round tie against
Fraserburgh due to take place
in Aberdeenshire yesterday
was postponed because of a
frozen pitch. The match has been
rearranged for 31 January.
49
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
THE SKY BET CHAMPIONSHIP
Aston Villa (3)............3 Barnsley (1)................1
Hogan 5, 7
Cavare 11
Hourihane 19
Att 31,869
Bolton (0)......................1 Ipswich (0)...................1
Madine 53
Garner 82
Att 13,870
Fulham (3) ....................6 Burton Alb (0)..........0
Rui Fonte 18, 38
Piazon 34
Sessegnon 72, 79
Kamara 88
Att 19,003
Leeds (0).........................3 Millwall (2)..................4
Lasogga 46, 62
O’Brien 18
Roofe 55
Gregory 42
Elliott 87
Wallace 90
Att 33,564
Norwich (0)..................1 Sheff Utd (1)................2
Ivo Pinto 70
Wilson 6
Donaldson 68
Att 26,486
Preston N E (1)..........1 Birmingham (0)......1
Davies 17
Gallagher 63
Att 13,529
QPR (0) ............................0 Middlesbrough (2) 3
Ayala 24
Friend 35
Traore 85
Att 14,182
Reading (0)...................0 Brentford (0) ............1
Vibe 74
Att 17,893
Sheff Wed (0)..............0 Cardiff (0).....................0
Att 23,277
Sunderland (1) .........1 Hull (0)............................0
Asoro 20
Att 27,437
Wolves (0).....................0 Nottm Forest (2)....2
Dowell 40
Osborn 43
Att 29,050
P W D L F A Pts
Wolves
28 19 5 4 50 22 62
Derby
28 15 8 5 44 23 53
Cardiff
28 15 6 7 40 25 51
Aston Villa
28 14 8 6 42 25 50
Bristol City
28 13 9 6 40 32 48
Sheff Utd
28 14 4 10 42 32 46
Fulham
28 12 9 7 46 34 45
Middlesboro 28 13 5 10 38 27 44
Brentford
28 11 10 7 42 35 43
Leeds
28 13 4 11 40 33 43
Preston N E
28 10 12 6 32 28 42
Ipswich
28 12 4 12 41 40 40
Norwich
28 10 7 11 28 33 37
Nottm Forest 28 11 2 15 35 43 35
Millwall
28 8 10 10 33 33 34
QPR
28 8 9 11 31 40 33
Sheff Wed
28 7 11 10 30 34 32
Reading
28 7 8 13 30 36 29
Barnsley
28 6 9 13 28 40 27
Bolton
28 6 8 14 26 46 26
Hull
28 5 10 13 39 45 25
Sunderland
28 5 10 13 30 47 25
Birmingham 28 6 6 16 16 39 24
Burton Albion 28 6 6 16 21 52 24
SKY BET LEAGUE ONE
AFC Wimbledon (0) .. 2 Blackpool (0) .................0
Bristol Rovers (0)..3 Bradford (1)................1
Charlton (1) .................3 Walsall (1)....................1
Fleetwood T (0)........1 Blackburn (1) ............2
Northampton (2).... 2 MK Dons (1).................1
Oxford Utd (1)............1 Bury (0)..........................2
Peterborough (0) ...3 Oldham (0)...................0
Plymouth (1) ..............1 Wigan (2).......................3
Rochdale ......................P Southend ................... P
Rotherham (0) ..........1 Portsmouth (0).......0
Scunthorpe (0).........1 Gillingham (1)...........3
Shrewsbury (1) ........ 2 Doncaster (0)............2
Wigan
Blackburn
Shrewsbury
Scunthorpe
Bradford
Charlton
Rotherham
Peterborough
Portsmouth
Oxford Utd
Gillingham
Doncaster
Fleetwood T
Bristol Rovers
Plymouth
Walsall
Blackpool
Northampton
Wimbledon
Southend
MK Dons
Oldham
Rochdale
Bury
P
27
27
27
28
28
28
28
28
28
29
28
28
28
28
29
27
29
29
27
28
28
29
26
28
W
18
16
16
14
15
13
13
12
13
10
9
9
10
11
9
8
8
9
8
8
7
7
4
5
D
6
7
7
8
3
7
5
7
3
8
10
9
6
3
8
9
9
5
7
7
9
8
10
5
L
3
4
4
6
10
8
10
9
12
11
9
10
12
14
12
10
12
15
12
13
12
14
12
18
F
53
50
36
39
44
37
46
46
34
44
32
32
39
39
31
34
34
27
24
32
29
40
26
21
A
13
25
20
26
39
33
36
37
32
43
31
31
43
44
38
38
40
49
31
47
40
53
37
43
Pts
60
55
55
50
48
46
44
43
42
38
37
36
36
36
35
33
33
32
31
31
30
29
22
20
SKY BET LEAGUE TWO
Accrington S (0)......3 Port Vale (2) ...............2
Barnet (1) ......................1 Lincoln City (0) .......1
Colchester (0)............1 Grimsby (1).................1
Coventry (2)................3 Swindon (1)................1
Crewe (1)........................ 2 Wycombe (0).............3
Forest Green (2) ......5 Cambridge Utd (2).2
Luton (0)........................1 Morecambe (0)........0
Mansfield (1) .............. 3 Cheltenham (1)........2
Notts County (0).....1 Exeter (2)......................2
Stevenage (0).............0 Carlisle (0)...................0
Yeovil (0)........................1 Chesterfield (0).......2
P W D L F A Pts
Luton
28 17 6 5 63 27 57
Notts County 28 14 9 5 47 30 51
Accrington S 27 15 4 8 47 32 49
Wycombe
28 14 7 7 52 38 49
Exeter
27 15 3 9 38 33 48
Coventry
28 14 5 9 31 20 47
Mansfield
28 12 11 5 41 31 47
Lincoln City
28 12 9 7 38 27 45
Newport Cnty 28 12 9 7 39 32 45
Swindon
27 14 2 11 40 37 44
Colchester
29 11 9 9 38 35 42
Carlisle
28 10 8 10 38 37 38
Cambridge Utd 28 10 8 10 27 36 38
Crawley Town 28 10 6 12 28 33 36
Stevenage
28 9 8 11 37 40 35
Grimsby
29 9 8 12 28 39 35
Cheltenham
29 9 7 13 39 44 34
Port Vale
29 9 5 15 32 39 32
Morecambe
28 7 8 13 27 38 29
Crewe
28 9 2 17 31 45 29
Yeovil
28 7 7 14 38 50 28
Chesterfield
29 7 6 16 30 52 27
Forest Green 28 7 5 16 31 50 26
Barnet
28 5 6 17 27 42 21
THE WILLIAM HILL SCOTTISH CUP
FOURTH ROUND
Aberdeen (3)...............4 St Mirren (1) ..............1
Rooney 8 (pen)
Reilly 25
Christie 18, 33
Att 9,848
Mackay-Steven 47
Albion .............................P St Johnstone ........... P
Postponed - due to frozen pitch.
Alloa (0) ..........................0 Dundee Utd (1).........2
Durnan 44
Lyng 62
Att 1,615
Ayr (1)...............................4 Arbroath (0)...............1
McDaid 9, 83
McCord 79
Shankland 58
Att 1,151
Moore 90
Celtic (2)..........................5 Brechin (0) ..................0
Forrest 2
Att 24,879
Sinclair 11
Ntcham 49
Boyata 56
Edouard 86
Dundee (0).................... 2 Inverness CT (1)......2
Leitch-Smith 47
Doran 16
O’Hara 64
Oakley 87
Att 3,507
Dunfermline (0)......1 Morton (1) ...................2
McManus 57
Oliver 24
Quitongo 85
Att 2,573
East Fife (0)..................0 Brora (1) ........................1
Att 685
Williamson 12
Kilmarnock (0) .........1 Ross County (0)......0
Erwin 88 (pen)
Att 3,595
Livingston ..................P Falkirk .......................... P
Postponed - due to frozen pitch.
Motherwell (2).......... 2 Hamilton (0)..............0
McMann 4 (og)
Att 4,725
Tanner 35 (pen)
Peterhead ...................P Dumbarton .............. P
Postponed - due to frozen pitch.
Queen of South (0) 1 Partick (1).....................2
Fergusson 55
Sammon 42, 81
Att 2,338
Yesterday
Fraserburgh ..............P Rangers ....................... P
Postponed - due to frozen pitch.
Hearts (0) ......................1 Hibernian (0) ............0
Cowie 87
Att 18,709
LADBROKES SCOTTISH LEAGUE ONE
Stranraer 1 Raith 0.
Leading Positions: 1 Raith P 21 pts
46, 2 Ayr (22-45), 3 Arbroath (20-33), 4
Stranraer (22-32), 5 Alloa (20-31), 6 East
Fife (22-27).
LADBROKES SCOTTISH LEAGUE TWO
Berwick P Elgin P; Montrose 1 Clyde 3;
Stenhousemuir P Cowdenbeath P; Stirling P Edinburgh City P.
Leading Positions: 1 Montrose P 22 pts
44, 2 Peterhead (19-43), 3 Stenhousemuir
(20-35), 4 Annan Athletic (21-31), 5 Stirling (19-30), 6 Elgin (20-30).
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE
AFC Fylde 6 Macclesfield 0; Aldershot
0 Ebbsfleet United 0; Boreham Wood 2
Dover 3; Chester FC 1 Gateshead 3; FC
Halifax P Leyton Orient P (Postponed due to a frozen pitch); Guiseley P Barrow
P (Postponed - due to unplayable pitch);
Hartlepool 0 Wrexham 2; Maidstone Utd
2 Eastleigh 3; Solihull Moors 3 Woking
0; Sutton Utd 2 Dag & Red 1; Torquay 0
Bromley 4; Tranmere 3 Maidenhead Utd 2.
Leading Positions: 1 Macclesfield P 30
pts 55, 2 Aldershot (30-52), 3 Sutton Utd
(30-52), 4 Wrexham (29-51), 5 Tranmere
(30-50), 6 Dover (30-48).
50
SPORT
FOOTBALL
ARSENAL 4-1 CRYSTAL PALACE
Premier League Saturday action
WEST HAM 1-1 BOURNEMOUTH
LEICESTER 2-0 WATFORD
Moyes: No ‘lucky dip’
on Portuguese pair
Silva sacked after
losing his focus
David Moyes has ruled out signing
Portuguese duo William Carvalho
and Joao Mario in the January
transfer window, and insisted
West Ham must instead focus on
clearing up their lengthy injury list.
Manuel Lanzini damaged
a hamstring against
Bournemouth and joins
Andy Carroll, Winston
Reid, Michail Antonio,
Jose Fonte and
Diafra Sakho on the
sidelines.
But Moyes said
he would not resort
to “a lucky dip”, and
discounted a move for
Sporting’s Carvalho (right)
– whom West Ham tried to sign
last summer – or bringing in Joao
Mario on loan from Internazionale.
“One was possibly a loan and
one would have been a transfer,
but I think Sporting are top of the
league at the moment so I would
have to say that would be a no,” he
said. In fact, Sporting are currently
second in Portugal’s Primeira Liga,
a point behind Porto.
Substitute Javier Hernandez
equalised two minutes after Ryan
Fraser had put Bournemouth
ahead. And Moyes reiterated
his desire to keep the
striker, who has been
linked with a move.
“Chicharito came on
and made a difference,”
Moyes said. “You don’t
play for Man United,
Real Madrid and Bayer
Leverkusen without
being a good player. Will he
definitely stay? I’d like to think
so, yeah. At the moment nobody’s
made an offer.”
The match was Bournemouth
boss Eddie Howe’s 100th in the
Premier League match as a
manager, and he admitted: “I feel
like a veteran.”
EVERTON 1-1 WEST BROM
BURNLEY 0-1 MAN UTD
Allardyce: We
deserved boos
for poor show
Martial hot on
the goal trail
for Mourinho
Everton had to come from behind
to salvage a point – their first since
Boxing Day – at home to secondbottom West Bromwich Albion.
And Sam Allardyce admitted:
“That has stopped the run of
defeats but it wasn’t very pretty.
“The booing at the end was well
deserved. West Brom’s goal an
under-11 team could have scored
against us, it was that poor.”
Theo Walcott marked his
Everton debut by laying on Oumar
Niasse’s equaliser.
However, the result was
overshadowed by a horrific double
fracture of the right leg suffered
by Everton midfielder James
McCarthy.
Anthony Martial’s
winner at Burnley
was his 11th goal
of the season
for Manchester
United – three
more than his
total last term – and his third in
successive league games.
And manager Jose Mourinho
said: “We know the talent. It’s
just about consistency, and not
just consistency in the goals he
scores but also consistency in the
way he plays overall. From last
season to this season [there has
been] a great improvement from
Anthony [above] and we need
that.”
BRIGHTON 0-4 CHELSEA
MAN CITY 3-1 NEWCASTLE
Hazard calls for
more ‘brilliance’
Pep aims for
perfect 10 wins
Eden Hazard and the muchmaligned Michy Batshuyai set up
Willian for Chelsea’s second goal
at Brighton in a blur of flicks and
tricks in the sixth minute at the
Amex Stadium.
And two-goal Hazard (below)
said: “The combination between
Michy, Willian
and me, and the
midfield, was
brilliant. We need
to do more like
this week after
week.”
Pep Guardiola is confident his
Manchester City players will keep
their focus as they stroll towards
the title.
After Sergio Aguero’s hat-trick
helped maintain City’s 12-point
lead at the top, Guardiola noted
that 10 wins from the final 14 games
would be enough for his side to be
crowned champions, whatever
happens in the chasing pack.
“I said to them, until fixture 24
we were the best team, but that
doesn’t count. It counts after
fixture 38,” Guardiola said.
» Continued from back page
instead, Watford were confident
Silva would continue to lead them in
the manner with which he had started and they were prepared to reassess his position in the summer. But
they were alarmed by the downturn,
especially after backing the 40-yearold heavily in the transfer market last
summer to the point they believed a
top-eight finish was possible.
“This has been a difficult decision
and one not taken lightly,” Watford
said in a statement. “The club is convinced the appointment of Silva was
the right one and had it not been for
the unwarranted approach by a Premier League rival for his services,
we would have continued to prosper
under his leadership.
“The catalyst for this decision is
that unwarranted approach, something which the board believes has
seen a significant deterioration in
both focus and results to the point
where the long-term future of Watford FC has been jeopardised. For
the security and success of the football club, the board believes it has to
make a change.”
Everton declined to comment.
Gracia said of his appointment:
“It is not easy arriving [at Watford]
in this moment. It is a big challenge.
But confidence is most important.”
STOKE 2-0 HUDDERSFIELD
Lambert keen
to keep Crouch
Stoke City manager Paul Lambert
has told Chelsea that Peter Crouch
is not for sale – but a deal for the
striker could yet materialise.
Chelsea manager Antonio Conte
is keen to sign a target man and
after a proposed move for West
Ham’s Andy Carroll was scuppered
by injury, the Italian has switched
his attention elsewhere.
Chief among his targets is 6ft 7in
forward Crouch, who turns 37 on
30 January and signed a contract
extension until 2019 with Stoke in
November. However, the former
England international is understood
to be keen for the deal to happen.
Lambert held talks with Crouch
this week, although the player’s
future was not discussed.
“I’ve no intention of letting him
go,” Lambert said. “He’s got a great
work ethic, knows the game really
well and an absolutely fantastic
professional the way he conducts
himself. That alone to a club is huge.”
Crouch has scored three goals
in 22 appearances for Stoke this
season but has made only eight
starts in the Premier League having
largely featured as a substitute.
Stoke beat Huddersfield 2-0 on
Saturday thanks to second-half goals
from Joe Allen and Mame Diouf.
THE INDEPENDENT
Sanchez exit can
help Arsenal
rediscover their
passing identity
W
here a door closes,
a window opens. It
may not always be
the most auspicious
of situations especially if you’re trying to move
heavy furniture out of the house but as Arsenal accustom themselves
to the Alexis Sanchez-shaped void
in their squad, they will be clinging
to that little morsel of wisdom, in the
hope that the departure of their star
player can prove an opportunity as
much as a burden.
Arsene Wenger put it as
eloquently as ever. “There is
always life,” he said, with the sort of
evangelical zeal that has seen him
through the good times, the bad
times and the worse times. “Arsenal
Football Club is 130 years old. Many
big players have left. Will it go a bit
less well? We will see. But there is
Jonathan
Liew
always life.” Wenger was, of course,
speaking from a position of modest
strength. Arsenal had just torn
apart Crystal Palace 4-1 and offered
the briefest of glimpses of a postSanchez future.
Alex Lacazette made his favourite
runs in between the left back
and centre-half. Mesut Ozil, Jack
Wilshere and Alex Iwobi wove
mesmerising triangles - it was a
slick attacking performance.
This, perhaps, is the salient point:
the departure of Sanchez from the
Arsenal front line may not always
make them a more potent attacking
threat. But it may just restore some
of the balance and harmony that
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51
LIVERPOOL
Alexandre
Lacazette scored
his ninth goal of
the season against
Palace GETTY
has characterised Wenger’s best
Arsenal sides. In short: the absence
of Sanchez may ultimately help
Arsenal rediscover their passing
identity.
The classic Wenger teams
were always based on precision,
possession and patience - the 20 or
30-pass moves that would end in a
tap-in, the surgical counter-attacks
in which every single pass was
weighted to perfection. What
Sanchez offered, by contrast,
was a sort of barrelling chaos:
a one-man hurricane that
could blow a defence to
bits.
Arsenal conceded
possession more than
any of its top-six
rivals. Nobody has
been more culpable
in this regard than
Sanchez (right), who
this season has been
dispossessed more often
(48
times), mis-controlled the ball more
often (64 times) and played more
loose passes (one every six minutes)
than any other Arsenal player.
Of course, when you are dealing
with a player of Sanchez’s gifts,
you put up with that kind of thing,
because he offers so much more. But
now he has gone, perhaps Arsenal
can rediscover a little of their old
fluidity. After all, if you have made
your identity as a passing team, then
shedding a player who loses the ball
on average 21 times a game may
not be the worst strategic move.
Could the club have done more
to keep him? “No,” Wenger said.
“We went as far as we could. Even
Manchester City moved out of it in
the end. That tells you we have no
chance.”
Perhaps Henrikh Mkhitaryan’s
biggest asset right now is that he
actually wants to be at Arsenal.
There is little doubt that Sanchez’s
presence was beginning to fracture
the squad towards the end. The
failure of team-mates to celebrate
a goal with him at Crystal Palace
last month - ironically, Sanchez’s
last great performance in an
Arsenal shirt - was just the most
visible emblem of the growing
estrangement. During the
1-1 draw at Southampton,
Wilshere angrily confronted
him about his wastefulness in
possession. Arsenal without
Sanchez may not necessarily be
a better side, but it is certainly
possible to envisage them being a
happier one. “We have the quality,
both technically and physically,”
Laurent Koscielny said after
their victory against Palace. “If
you work for your team-mates,
then you can win in the Premier
League.
“We have a strong squad that
does not only depend on one
player,” Wenger insisted. As
exceptional as he was, over
time Arsenal were increasingly
being forced to play Sanchez’s
game, rather the other way
around. THE INDEPENDENT
Klopp: We must become a club
good players don’t want to leave
By Mark Critchley
Having conceded defeat in their bid
to prevent Philippe Coutinho’s £142m
move to Barcelona earlier this month,
Liverpool could lose Emre Can for a
lot less when the midfielder’s contract
expires in the summer.
Can (right), who has attracted high-profile interest from
Juventus, is yet to agree to
renewed terms despite a
year and a half of talks.
Liverpool are thought
to be reluctant to set a
precedent by granting
the 24-year-old German a
buy-out clause. Even so, Can
has said he has yet to make a final
decision on his future and could yet
stay at Anfield.
“He is here in the moment and that
is the most important thing,” manager
Jürgen Klopp said. “We have to create
a situation where players want to stay.
We try to do that with the players we
want to keep.”
Free-scoring Liverpool are unbeaten in 18 games and visit bottom club
Swansea tonight fresh from ending
Premier League leaders Manchester
City’s long unbeaten record.
But Swansea manager Carlos
Carvalhal insists his side can
win a contest he has labelled
David versus Goliath.
“Surprises do happen
and we will be ready to
prepare a surprise,” Carvalhal said. “They have
strong points, but weak
points also. It is not a team
that wins 2-0, 3-0, 4-0.
“If a team scores four, let’s
see how they do it and what type
of dynamic they have. How can we
block them when they have the ball?
The best teams in the world have
very few weak points, but they do
have them.” THE INDEPENDENT
52
SPORT
FOOTBALL
Southampton
McCarthy
Soares
Ward-
Stephens
Hoedt
Bertrand
Romeu
Lemina
Hojbjerg
Tadic
Gabbiadini
Kane
Son
Sissoko
Alli
Dembele
Dier
Davies Vertonghen Sanchez
Aurier
Vorm
Tottenham Hotspur
Subs: Southampton Boufal (Hojberg, 65), Davis
(Lemina, 80) Obafemi (Gabbiadini, 82); Tottenham
Lamela, (Son Heung-min,70), Trippier (Aurier, 72),
Wanyama (Dembele, 85).
Booked: Southampton Stephens, Romeu; Tottenham
Trippier, Dembele, Sissoko.
Man of the match Bertrand.
Match rating 6/10.
Possession: Southampton 41% Tottenham 59%.
Attempts on target: Southampton 4 Tottenham 2.
Referee Kevin Friend (Bristol). Attendance 31,361.
Harry Kane equalised with a header
from Ben Davies’s corner REUTERS
Spurs frustrated by Saints as Kane
must wait for 100-goal milestone
SOUTHAMPTON
Sanchez og 15
1
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR
Kane 18
1
By Sam Cunningham
AT ST MARY’S STADIUM
Harry Kane is a mere mortal after
all. Into the last minute of Tottenham’s trip to Southampton with
the score level, the ball was worked
across the box to the England striker, to the left of goal but with a clear
view of it.
Kane has scored from this position
so many times it is second nature.
He pulled back his left foot, waited
a moment, steadied himself, sensed
the time was right; then dragged the
ball wide of the far post.
It is not what we have come to expect of the forward, so often Spurs’s
saviour but unable, this time, to
turn a poor draw against struggling
Southampton into a crucial three
points in their pursuit of the top four.
Kane’s equaliser earlier in the
match was the 99th Premier League
strike of the 24-year-old’s extraordinary career — his sixth goal in three
games, no less — but it should have
been 100 and it was the miss late on
which defined the game.
Admittedly, the pitch was heavy
from a day of soaking, and they can’t
all go in, but this result is why Spurs
are 20 points behind Manchester made by the cross. Dusan Tadic
City, and why they are two points played Ryan Bertrand down the left
behind fourth-place Liverpool, who and he burst clear of Serge Aurier to
have played a game less.
send in a low ball. Aurier is usually a
Spurs are adamant that they rapid full-back but was slow to react
will not sanction Kane’s
and got nowhere near his
sale even if they receive
Southampton countera world record offer in
part, allowing Bertrand
the summer. Underthat extra second to
standable, given his
pick his spot. Davgift of perfect timing,
inson Sanchez slid,
Harry Kane’s
a trait possessed by
stretching the enfirst half headed
few footballers. The
tirety of his lengthy
equaliser was his
goal was one of the
frame attempting to
99th goal in the
simpler ones Kane
cut the ball out, but he
Premier League
will score — measurwas only able to flick it
ing his run to meet Ben
towards his own net with
Davies’s right-hand corner,
a toenail and it brushed off
leaping, heading in from
the inside of the near post
four yards out — but it
on its way in, completely
came three minutes
wrong-footing Spurs
after they had fallen
goalkeeper Michel
behind and when
Vorm, in for the ill
Southampton
Southampton had
Hugo Lloris.
have not won in 11
started the better
Losing the France
Premier League
side. It put Mauricio
goalkeeper
was sigmatches - their
Pellegrino’s side back
nificant, but Tottenworst run since
in their place: 197 secham perhaps missed
1998
onds between conceding
Christian Eriksen, who
and drawing level. That
was also sick, even more.
kind of timing is priceless. It is
Tottenham’s attacking depth is
why you were just waiting for the up there with the best of them, but
ball to nestle the other side of the without the Dane they lack their
post with that chance late on.
usual fluidity, like a car engine low
Southampton’s opening goal on oil.
came after 15 minutes of a surprisMore of the responsibility was
ingly dominant opening period from thrust on Dele Alli, who is more than
a team who are cascading towards capable of dragging a side to victory,
the bottom. It was an own goal, but but it makes the job that bit harder,
99
11
especially when he was fouled at
any opportunity. Chop. Chop. Chop.
Sure enough if Alli was on the ball,
as he often was, a clip or a trip were
not far behind. The 21-year-old is
increasingly criticised for diving
but can you blame him when he is
expecting a kick at every turn?
This was a decent point for Southampton but their manager Pellegrino is fast running out of time. Next
in the league they face Brighton at
home and West Bromwich Albion
away and nerves are beginning to
shred on the south coast.
Southampton wanted Marco
Silva in the summer but he grew
impatient of waiting and opted for
Watford instead, but his availability
could hasten a decision on Pellegrino’s future. Pellegrino is proving no
less popular than Claude Puel, who
was sacked after Southampton’s
supporters turned on him despite a
largely successful season.
There is similar dismay at Pellegrino’s football, but no EFL Cup
Wembley final coming up, nor a solid
standing in the table.
How he could’ve done with substitute Michael Obafemi, a 17-yearold making his debut, converting in
the final few minutes, but he lashed
wide. How Spurs manager Mauricio
Pochettino could’ve done with Kane
converting, two minutes later, at the
other end.
» Premier League table, p49
Race for the
top four will go
down to the
wire, says Dier
By Sam Cunningham
Tottenham midfielder Eric Dier
insists that the race for the top
four will go down to the wire
after his side were held to a draw
against struggling Southampton.
Liverpool, fourth in the Premier
League, will move five points clear
of Spurs if they beat Swansea this
evening.
“The race for the top four is as
tight as it has ever been, it will be
exciting for the fans, for sure it
will go the final game,” Dier said.
Spurs face top-four rivals
Manchester United, Liverpool
and Arsenal in their next three
league games – a run of fixtures
that will play a significant part
in their Champions League
ambitions.
“It will be important for us,
important if we are going to
take points and win games,”
Tottenham manager Mauricio
Pochettino said.
“Sure we’re going to fight, if not
it will be difficult. We will try to
win games and be consistent and
at the end have the opportunity to
fight for the top four.”
But the Argentine conceded
that Tottenham were unable to
compete with their rivals when
it came to making signings in the
January transfer window to aid
their cause.
“It is not easy to add a player
who can help for three months,”
Pochettino said. “It is very
difficult. For some clubs it is
easier but it is not easy for us.”
Under-pressure Southampton
manager Mauricio Pellegrino
said: “In Argentina we say that
the job is the electric chair, it is
not easy to stay in the seat.”
He added: “The biggest risk in
football is to work in football. If
you don’t want to lose the game,
don’t play the game. I’ve played
football since I was 10.
“When you draw, you have to
win again, when you lose, you have
to win again, when you win, you
have to win again. Even when you
are the best, the first, Monday you
have to train to be the best again,
it’s never finished.”
Southampton manager Mauricio
Pellegrino compared football
management to an electric chair
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TENNIS: AUSTRALIAN OPEN
Edmund battles
fatigue and Seppi
to reach last eight
in Melbourne
Edmund in that his last three opponents have all been ranked outside the
world’s top 50, it should be rememThanks largely to Andy Murray – bered that he knocked out Kevin Anwith a little help from Johanna Konta derson, the world No 12 and last year’s
– Britain has been represented in the US Open runner-up, in the first round.
singles quarter-finals here at the AusSeppi, the world No 76, is a highly
tralian Open every year since 2010. experienced campaigner who has
With Murray absent this year fol- claimed plenty of big scalps in his
lowing hip surgery and Konta
time. A former top 20 player,
suffering an early exit, it
he was appearing in his 51st
seemed the run might
consecutive Grand Slam
end, but Kyle Edmund
tournament, though he
ensured a British
has never made it to a
presence in the last
quarter-final. While
Aces hit by Kyle
eight with another
the Italian has no
Edmund
in
his
spirited performance.
major weapons, he is a
victory
over
Recovering from
consistent ball-striker,
Andreas Seppi
a slow start, Edmund
as he demonstrated in
beat Andreas Seppi 6-7,
winning the first set.
7-5, 6-2, 6-3 as the world
It was clear early on that
No 49’s thumping forehands
Edmund was not physically
and bold serves, includfresh after his gruelling
ing 25 aces, battered the
five-set duel with Nikoloz
33-year-old Italian into
Basilashvili in the insubmission.
tense heat on Friday.
Edmund is a reHe was allowing balls
Years since a
served character who
he would normally
British man other
does not show much
have chased down to
than Andy Murray
emotion on court, but
sail past him and not
has
reached
the
at the end he leapt into
getting low enough on
Australian Open
the air in celebration.
his groundstrokes. But
quarter-finals
In earning a quarterthe mind was willing and
final showdown with Grigor
his serve helped him out of a
Dimitrov, Edmund became the
big hole when he faced five break
first British man other than Murray points in the eighth game.
to reach the last eight here since John
He took a medical time-out for
Lloyd in 1985. He is also the first Brit- treatment to his right shoulder at 5-6
ish man other than Murray to have and held serve to force a tie-break,
reached the singles quarter-finals at which was even until Edmund went
a Grand Slam tournament since Tim the wrong way with a forehand and
Henman made the semi-finals at the watched despairingly as Seppi landed
US Open in 2004.
a backhand winner. Edmund looked
If the draw has opened up for in big trouble when he dropped serve
Kyle Edmund leaps
for joy after his win
over Andreas Seppi
REUTERS
By Paul Newman
By Paul Newman and
Eleanor Crooks AT MELBOURNE PARK
25
33
early in the second set but the Yorkshireman responded with a go-forbroke attitude and got his reward
with an immediate break back.
It was to prove the turning point.
Seppi’s second serve was no match
for the Edmund forehand when the
23-year-old unleashed his big weapon at 5-6 and he took his second set
point as the Italian’s forehand hit the
top of the net and dropped wide.
Edmund made it five games in a
row with another break early in the
Wozniacki rediscovers confidence
after being so close to going home
By Paul Newman
The experience of going so close
to losing in the second round
of the Australian Open has had
a positive impact on Caroline
Wozniacki. The world No 2,
who saved two match points
and came from 5-1 down in the
deciding set to beat Jana Fett last
week, is through to the quarterfinals for the first time in six
years after a thumping 6-3, 6-0
victory yesterday over Slovakia’s
Magdalena Rybarikova.
“I think being almost out of
the tournament, you have
nothing to lose after that,”
Wozniacki said after securing a
last-eight clash with Spain’s Carla
Suarez Navarro. “You just go out
there and you enjoy yourself. I
played really well from being
down 5-1. Since then I’ve just
kept that going.”
Wozniacki was confident
enough to play a between-thelegs shot in the first set against
Rybarikova, although it did not
win her the point.
“If I may so myself,
I’m pretty proud of
that,” said Wozniacki
(right). “I’ve made a few
‘tweeners’ in practice,
but never before in
a match – and even in
practice I sometimes
make a fool of myself.”
The Dane, 27, could
return to the top of
the world rankings at
‘Every time I
step on court, I
believe I’ll win’
the end of this tournament for the
first time since 2012.
Suarez Navarro, 29, a former
top 10 player who is now world
No 39 after an injury-disrupted
2017, was pushed to the limit by
Anett Kontaveit before winning
4-6, 6-4, 8-6.
Estonian Kontaveit, 22,
appeared to be on the way to
her first appearance in the
last eight of a Grand Slam
event when she led by a set
and 4-1, and served for the
match at 5-4 in the final set.
Instead,SuarezNavarro
isinthequarter-finals
hereforthethirdtime.
Wozniackisaid:“I’m
expectingatough
fight.” THE INDEPENDENT
third set and crunched a forehand
winner to repeat the feat and take
the set.
Seppi needed treatment to his
shoulder during the fourth set but
resisted the Edmund pressure well
for his first three service games.
However, it seemed a matter of
when rather than if the British player
would break and so it proved in the
eighth game. Edmund pumped his
fist and confidently served out his
landmark victory. THE INDEPENDENT
Kyle Edmund was not making
any predictions about what
might happen but, after
reaching his first Grand Slam
quarter-final, the 23-year-old
Briton said he believed he had it
in him to win one of the sport’s
four great prizes.
“You have to believe it,”
Edmund said after his win over
Andreas Seppi had secured a
quarter-final meeting tomorrow
with Grigor Dimitrov.
“That’s why I’m in the
quarter-finals, because every
time I step on the court and I’m
playing, I believe I’m going to
win. So it’s no different now. I
have to believe I’m going to win
on Tuesday. I believe
in my game.”
Dimitrov
(right) reached
the quarterfinals with a
thrilling 7-6,
7-6, 4-6, 7-6
victory over
Nick Kyrgios.
Dimitrov,
the world No 3,
was a model of consistency
throughout, while Kyrgios hit
some extraordinary winners,
including 36 aces.
The excitement hit fever
pitch in the fourth set. At 3-4
Kyrgios was broken when he
missed an easy smash, but
in the following game it was
Dimitrov’s turn to wobble.
Kyrgios broke back with a
backhand winner down the line.
In the ensuing tie-break
Kyrgios netted a routine
forehand to give Dimitrov a
4-3 lead. When the Australian
served at 4-6, Dimitrov
converted his match point with
a wonderful forehand crosscourt pass. THE INDEPENDENT
Nadal labours to stay world No 1
By Paul Newman
Rafael Nadal still has much work to
do if he is to win his second Australian Open title but he guaranteed
yesterday that he will still be world
No 1 come the end of the fortnight.
Nadal (right) dropped his first
set of the tournament as he
laboured to a 6-3, 6-7, 6-3,
6-3 win over Argentina’s
Diego Schwartzman to
secure a quarter-final
with Marin Cilic.
And the 31-year-old
Spaniard said: “You
can’t expect easy matches when you’re playing in
big tournaments against good
players. I missed opportunities
in the second set, when I was up a
break three times. If you lose that
many chances you’re in trouble.”
Nadal said he could not recall
playing such a physically demand-
ing match since he beat Leonardo
Mayer in the third round en route to
his US Open title last year. “I prefer
to win in two hours than in four, but
to be honest moments like this help
you to be more confident in yourself,
in your body,” he said.
Defending champion Roger
Federer is the only man left
in the tournament who has
yet to drop a set.
Since Cilic won their
first meeting nine years
ago, he has taken only
one set from Nadal in
five defeats. However,
the Croatian world No 6 is
in good form, as he showed
yesterday in beating Pablo Carreno Busta of Spain 6-7, 6-3, 7-6, 7-6.
“Throughout my career I’ve
known that if I’m playing well, if I’m
at the top of my game, I can challenge most of the guys on the tour,”
Cilic said. THE INDEPENDENT
54
SPORT
CRICKET
ONE-DAY INTERNATIONAL
Australia’s pace pack can’t halt England
ENGLAND
Buttler 100no,
Woakes 53no
302-6
AUSTRALIA
Finch 62, Stoinis 56,
M Marsh 55; Wood 2-46
England win by 16 runs
286-6
By John Stern
AT SYDNEY CRICKET GROUND
After two chastening defeats, Steve
Smith returned with his bigger
mates to settle the dispute but even
the presence of the Ashes-winning
pace pack was not enough to stop
England taking an unassailable 3-0
lead in the one-day series.
It is England’s first one-day series
victory in Australia since 2007 and
the first ever in a bilateral series here
(their other triumphs have come in
tri-series). With 66 Ashes wickets
between them over the past two
months, Mitchell Starc, Pat Cummins and Josh Hazlewood had plenty
of firepower.
But their own waywardness –
13 wides in total – and England’s
confidence in this form of the game
delivered a hugely impressive 16run victory. The win belonged to Jos
Buttler and Chris Woakes, whose
remarkable seventh-wicket stand of
113 in only 11.5 overs propelled England’s total from serviceable into the
realm of seriously challenging.
Woakes then closed out the match
with a nerveless final over that included the key wicket of Marcus
Stoinis, the pugnacious all-rounder
whose innings of 56 took Australia
close but not close enough to their
target of 303. Having lost Liam
Plunkett to a hamstring injury only
eight balls into his spell, England’s
resilience and nous to win was
remarkable.
Buttler’s outstanding century was
not his only contribution. He also
took a vital catch to dismiss Smith
inches off the ground, controversially given out by the third umpire.
There appears to be no hole too
deep from which England’s one-day
batsmen can escape. When Moeen
Ali swung aimlessly at Mitch Marsh
and was bowled, England were 189
for 6 with only 10.5 overs left.
The pitch was trickier than might
have been predicted. Local knowledge said it was too dry – it has been
hot in Sydney this week – and consequently lacked pace and consistent
Jos Buttler helped guide England to
victory with a fearless century
bounce. England’s batsmen diagnosed their predicament well in the
most part, though Alex Hales, itching for a big shot, holed out tamely
to mid-on.
This was the slowest of Buttler’s
five one-day hundreds for England.
It took all of 83 balls – 83 balls! He has
only faced more balls in an ODI innings twice in his career, such is the
ridiculous way he churns through
the gears at the crease.
He was in earlier than he, or England, would have wanted but he is
never fazed. Joe Root was dismissed
for the first time in the series when
he chopped on for 27. His departure
rang alarm bells for England because he has been the consummate
finisher in the previous two matches.
Buttler and Eoin Morgan must be
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Morgan praises Buttler’s
brilliance as tourists
target a 5-0 whitewash
By John Stern
England’s Mark Wood
celebrates taking the
wicket of Australia
captain Steve Smith
REUTERS
Eoin Morgan considered
England’s 16-run victory the best
performance during his captaincy
tenure since the reboot of the
country’s one-day cricket after
the 2015 World Cup.
It was England’s first bilateral
series victory in Australia (at the
fourth attempt) and their first in
any one-day series here (others
have been in tri-series) since 2007.
Morgan, who was captain the
last time England played whiteball cricket in Australia during
the wretched 2015 World Cup,
Steve Smith was forced to deny
said: “Australia are a very strong
claims of ball tampering
line-up and this series had the
potential to exploit some of our
The on-field umpires indicated
weaknesses and cracks within the to third umpire Kumar
group. I thought we responded
Dharmasena that they thought
exceptionally well to that. With
the one-handed catch was clean
Liam [Plunkett] going down,
but Smith said: “It’s hard to
somebody else had to step up. As
overturn anything. If a fielder goes
a bowling unit and fielding unit,
up and celebrates they normally
we did give a lot more
get given out. I’d like the
than we normally do. I
third umpire to make
W
e
have
am so proud of everybody
the decision.” Smith was
in the team. Liam going
not questioning Buttler’s
seen Buttler
down was a hammer
integrity,
saying “he’s a
do that before
blow but Joe [Root] stood but against
pretty honest guy”, just
up and all the bowlers
the process.
contributed at different one of the best
Buttler himself said:
times. It was awesome.” sides in the
“I was pretty sure it
world, it is just was out and I think any
Morgan paid tribute
to Jos Buttler’s stunning great to watch wicketkeeper would tell
83-ball century that
you when they’ve got
launched England’s
their fingers under it.
faltering innings towards
They always look either
a more than respectable 302 for 6.
way on TV but for me it was out.”
Morgan said: “To have a guy with
Smith’s miserable night was
his capabilities and talent, we are
complete when he was forced
very privileged. We have seen him
to deny using lip balm to shine
do that before but against one of
the ball illegally after a video
the best sides in the world, it is
appeared on social media
great to watch.”
suggesting malpractice.
Buttler’s catch to dismiss
He said: “My lips are pretty dry.
Australia captain Steve Smith
It’s just the way I get some spit
on 45 was a game-changer and
into the side of my mouth and get
caused consternation among
it on to the ball. There’s nothing
Aussie players and public alike.
in it.” THE INDEPENDENT
the two calmest men in this super- left Woakes stranded. To add insult,
confident England team. Their Buttler hit the next ball from Hazlepartnership was patient until, in wood for six.
successive overs, they each hit a six
England plundered 42 from the
– England’s first of their innings. But final two overs with 24 coming from
Hazlewood took another key wicket a farcical penultimate over by Cumwhen Morgan nibbled at one
mins, which included a no-ball
outside off stump.
for a delivery over waist
Woakes is another
height and two ferocious
about whose blood
sixes by Buttler, one
pressure there is no
pulled and one clubbed
cause for concern. He
straight down the
Between them,
is the definition of the
ground.
Woakes and Buttler
unsung hero. FreshSome of Woakes’s
cracked
42
runs
faced with a sensible
shots were as outrafrom
England’s
haircut, he is on no
geous as Buttler’s such
final two overs
one’s billboards. But
as the clip for four off
for the second match in a
Starc in the final over folrow he produced an innings
lowed next ball by a hook for
of exceptional quality, only to be
six. And ever the team man, he
overshadowed by Buttler just as he pinched a single off the penultimate
was by Root’s impish all-round per- ball of the innings to leave Buttler
formance at Brisbane.
needing two for his hundred, which
Woakes should have been run out of course he reached. He rightly reby Smith, who had earlier dropped ceived a full, heartfelt ovation from
Morgan, after a mix-up with Buttler the SCG. THE INDEPENDENT
42
BUSINESS SPORT
38-41
46-56
i MONDAY
22 JANUARY 2018
The
Sport
Matrix
FOOTBALL
IQ
30-37
The stories you
need to know
55
Sanchez leaving
on a jet plane
Alexis Sanchez appeared to
confirm his move from Arsenal
to Manchester United is near
to completion when he posted a
video of him boarding a private
jet. Sanchez is about to become
United’s best-paid player with
a weekly salary reportedly of
£400,000. Henrikh Mkhitaryan
is to move in the opposite
direction, from Old Trafford to
the Emirates Stadium.
» Switch boosts Arsenal, p50
SKIING
SNOOKER
Ryding’s fast run
gives him ninth
Allen holds nerve
for Masters win
Briton Dave Ryding posted
the fastest time of the day in
the World Cup slalom event in
Kitzbuhel as he rallied after a
poor first run to finish ninth. He
was 25th after the first descent,
following an error, but his second
effort of 52.52 seconds took him
into the top 10. He has slipped to
10th in the World Cup standings,
down form eighth. Norway’s
Henrik Kristoffersen won in
1:48.49.
Mark Allen claimed his first
Masters victory with a 10-7 win
over Kyren Wilson. The pair, in
their first finals at the Alexandra
Palace tournament, were unable
to be separated in the early stages
of the match, going into the break
at 4-4. But Northern Irishman
Allen was buoyed by hitting the
first century of the final in the
12th frame to make it 7-5. Wilson
rallied, but Allen held his nerve to
close out victory.
FOOTBALL
Bloody Ronaldo helps Real to rout
Sydney Scoreboard
THIRD ONE DAY INTERNATIONAL
AUSTRALIA v ENGLAND
SYDNEY: England beat Australia by 16 runs
Australia won toss
ENGLAND
Runs 6s 4s Bls Min
J J Roy c Finch b Cummins
19 0 4 24 36
J M Bairstow b Zampa
39 0 2 57 88
A D Hales c Zampa b Stoinis
1 0 0 8 11
J E Root b Hazlewood
27 0
1 31 54
*E J G Morgan c Paine b Hazlewood 41
1 2 50 72
†J C Buttler not out
100 4 6 83 129
M M Ali b Marsh
6 0 0 12 11
C R Woakes not out
53 2 5 36 54
Extras (lb2 w13 nb1)
16
Total(for 6, 50 overs)
302
Fall: 1-38, 2-45, 3-90, 4-107, 5-172, 6-189.
Bowling: M A Starc 10-0-63-0, J R Hazlewood 10-0-58-2,
P J Cummins 10-1-67-1, M P Stoinis 8-0-43-1, A Zampa
9-0-55-1, M R Marsh 3-0-14-1.
AUSTRALIA
Runs 6s 4s Bls Min
A J Finch lbw b Rashid
62 3 3 53 83
D A Warner c Hales b Woakes
8 0 2 10 15
C L White c Buttler b Wood
17 0 3 25 22
*S P D Smith c Buttler b Wood
45 0
1 66 96
M R Marsh c Hales b Rashid
55 0 4 66 73
M P Stoinis c Sub b Woakes
56 2 3 43 69
†T D Paine not out
31 0
1 35 52
P J Cummins not out
1 0 0 2
1
Extras (b4 lb5 w2)
11
Total(for 6, 50 overs)
286
Fall: 1-24, 2-44, 3-113, 4-181, 5-210, 6-284.
Bowling: M A Wood 10-1-46-2, C R Woakes 10-0-57-2, L E
Plunkett 1.2-0-6-0, M M Ali 10-0-57-0, J E Root 8.4-0-60-0,
A U Rashid 10-0-51-2.
Umpires: H D P K Dharmasena and C B Gaffaney.
Cristiano Ronaldo was left bloodied as he scored a late double to help
Real Madrid end their winless La Liga run with a 7-1 rout of Deportivo
La Coruna. Ronaldo suffered a nasty cut to his head when he was caught
by defender Fabian Schar’s boot as he dived to headed home Real’s sixth
goal. Gareth Bale had earlier scored twice after Nacho had cancelled out
Adrian’s shock opener for the visitors, and Luka Modric added a fourth.
Ronaldo struck after 78 and 84 minutes before Nacho’s second.
RACING
Head-Maarek to
finish career
Multiple Classic-winning
racehorse trainer Criquette
Head-Maarek, famed for her
handling of dual Prix de l’Arc
de Triomphe winner Treve,
is to retire. Head-Maarek, 70,
will saddle her final horses on 1
February and she said: “I really
have had a fantastic life training. I
have been blessed.”
» Racing, p46
Sport on tv
Tennis: Australian Open
Eurosport, until 1.30pm
T20 Cricket: Renegades v Strikers
BT Sport 2, 8.30am
Indoor Bowls: World Champs
BBC Two, 1pm
Football: Swansea v Liverpool
Sky Sports Premier League, 7pm
Netball: England v Australia
Sky Sports Arena, 7.30pm
Football: Juventus v Genoa
BT Sport 1, 7.30pm
Move over Murray
Edmund emerges as
Britain’s new tennis hero
Australian Open, p53
Sport
22.01.18
P52
Buttler did it!
Batsman’s century
seals England series
win over Aussies
FOOTBALL
Kane makes it
99 league goals
– but Spurs rue
last-gasp miss
P48
RUGBY UNION
Saracens sneak
through but it’s
Euro heartache
for Wasps
REUTERS
» Reports, p54-55
Watford blame Everton
for having to sack Silva
Hornets move fast to hire former Malaga manager Gracia as his replacement
By Sam Cunningham
FOOTBALL CORRESPONDENT
P47
CYCLING
UCI chief puts
pressure on
Sky to suspend
Froome
Watford sacked manager Marco
Silva – and blamed Everton for
turning his head in their drawn-out
attempts to poach the Portuguese
earlier in the season.
The Hornets quickly announced
his replacement yesterday as former
Malaga and Rubin Kazan coach Javi
Gracia, but not before lambasting
the Merseyside club in a strong
statement for what they claim to be
their role in the dismissal of Silva.
Gracia, 47, has signed an 18month deal to replace him, but the
nature of Silva’s departure – deemed
necessary by poor results – has left
Watford frustrated.
i understands that many Watford
players were dismayed that Silva
was so desperate to leave them for
Everton 11 games into what started
as a hugely successful season. Wat- Watford lost eight of 13 games and
ford also believe that Silva lost focus plummeted to within five points of
after they fought hard and refused to the relegation zone.
let him leave.
Watford do not have a history of
Silva was one of the most sought- dismissing managers mid-season
after managers in the Premier and were reluctant to do so, but felt
League after leading Watford to they had no choice in light of the drafour wins and three draws before matic slump in form.
Everton attempted to prise him
After they had seen off Everaway to replace Ronald Koeman last ton, who appointed Sam Allardyce
October.
Since they made the approach, » Continued on p50
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