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The i Newspaper – March 02, 2018

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S H O R T L I S T E D
–
N E W S PA P E R
O F
T H E
Cabinet clash over May’s new Brexit rules
PM will promise world’s most ambitious free trade deal
P4
Y E A R
FR DAY
INTERVIEWS WITH
Guy
Garvey
Susan
Sarandon
Bill
Bailey
Big freeze is
coldest for
27 years
Prince to visit
Palestinians
in diplomatic
first P5
FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
Number 2,268
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
Truth to power
British public
interest journalism
faces an
existential crisis
Patrick
Cockburn
in Syria
» Armed Forces called in after worst weather for a generation
P3
News.co.uk
» 10 dead as Siberian front collides with Atlantic storm ‘Emma’
P24
» Airports and roads closed for days to come, communities cut off
HHHHH
BBC’s
‘Civilisations’
– our verdict
» Met Office says –11C ‘feels-like’ temperature is lowest since 1991
» Nurses sleep on wards and 4x4 convoys deliver doctors to work
P7
PLUS THIS WEEK’S BEST BOOKS
★
★★★
5
★
The World’s
P44
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VOTED THE WOR LD’S LEADI NG ALL-I N C LUSIVE RESORTS
22 YEAR S I N A ROW AT THE WOR LD TRAVE L AWARDS
The
News
Matrix
HEALTH
What kind
of day-to-day
activity annoyed
one of this
actor’s co-stars?
See p.29
The day at
a glance
FRIDAY
2
MARCH
Quote of the day
He who hesitates is
a damned fool
MAE WEST
Birthdays
Rebel Wilson, actress, 38;
Jon Bon Jovi, singer, 56;
James Arthur, pop singer,
30; Method Man, rapper,
47; Daniel Craig (below),
actor, 50; Chris Martin,
singer, 41; Alexander
Armstrong, presenter/
comedian, 48
Anniversaries
Friday 2 March 1956
King Hussein of Jordan
sacks Lieutenant-General
John Bagot Glubb, the
British commander of
the 20,000-strong Arab
Legion, in what was seen
as an effort to strengthen
his own position within
the Arab world.
Subscribe to i at
i-subscription.co.uk
index
Crossword.............28
TV & Radio...........40
Books.........................44
Business.................46
Puzzles.....................50
Weather...................53
Bed shortages leave
A&E units in crisis
Emergency departments are out
of control because of the number
of hospital beds that have been
cut since 2010, the National Audit
Office says. A&E units have become
overloaded as the average number of
beds fell by 6,268 (5.8 per cent) over
the past eight years, it revealed.
ENVIRONMENT
HEALTH
RELIGION
NATURE
NHS a ‘significant
plastic polluter’
Arthritis treatment
can help diabetics
Festival challenges
Islamophobia
Seabird colony
officially rat-free
Pollution must be seen as a health
hazard as well as an environmental
issue, according to a report that
labels the NHS a “significant
polluter”. Prof Dame Sally Davies
also said the NHS is the biggest user
of single-use plastic bags in England
and responsible for an estimated
5 per cent of traffic at any one time.
A common rheumatoid arthritis
treatment may offer an effective
new therapy for lowering the blood
glucose levels of patients with type
2 diabetes, a study has found. The
anti-inflammatory drug leflunomide
lowered blood glucose levels and
reversed insulin resistance in mouse
models of type 2 diabetes.
The UK’s firstever festival dedicated
to Muslim culture, literature and
ideas is to take place later this year.
Billed as challenging Islamophobia
through exploring diversity within
Muslim cultures, MFest will feature
stand-up comedy, feminism within
Islam and a discussion around the
Grenfell Tower tragedy.
An island seabird colony has been
declared officially rat-free. A
four-year project has removed the
rodents from the Shiant Isles, a
cluster of islands five miles east of
the Isle of Lewis and Harris in the
Outer Hebrides. The islands form
one of the most important seabird
breeding colonies in Europe.
GERMANY
HEALTH
VATICAN
‘You can have hot
baths if pregnant’
Nuns’ life of drudgery Foreign ministry
exposed by Church
in cyber attack
No ‘smash and grab’
over land reforms
Pregnant women can exercise in
warm weather and use saunas
or hot baths without risking
the health of their unborn child,
according to research carried
out by the University of Exeter.
The advice contradicts current
recommendations that women
should avoid getting too hot.
A Vatican magazine has denounced
the widespread exploitation of
nuns for cheap or free labour in the
Catholic Church. Women, Church,
World described the drudgery of
nuns who “wake at dawn to prepare
breakfast, going to sleep once dinner
is served, the house is in order and
the laundry cleaned and ironed”.
South African President Cyril
Ramaphosa says the transfer of
some land from the country’s white
minority to the black majority will
be handled without damaging the
economy and that there will be “no
smash and grab”. Mr Ramaphosa
wants the transfer to be handled
through “dialogue”. PAGE 25
The German government was
marshalling its defences last night
against a powerful cyber attack that
MPs said had breached the foreign
ministry’s computer network and
whose origins officials admitted
were still unclear. A parliamentary
spokesman said security officials
were trying to maintain control.
Education is key to economic growth. New discoveries such as
MP3 and GPS technology would never have happened were it
not for PhD research. Countries are investing in their higher
education systems, and more people than ever before are
completing doctoral degrees.
EDUCATION
The List
British teenagers’
top role models
Teenagers are inspired more by
technology entrepreneurs such
as Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates
than they are by pop stars or
footballers. A study of British
14- to 18-year-olds found that
their top 10 most inspirational
role models included many from
the fields of science, technology,
engineering and maths:
1 Bill Gates, founder of
Microsoft, 28%
2 Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook
pioneer, 23%
3 Steve Jobs, Apple founder, 22%
4 Prof Brian Cox, scientist, 18%
5 Ed Sheeran, pop star, 17%
6 Tim Peake, British astronaut, and
Jessica Ennis, athlete, 14%
7 Zoella, video blogger, 12%
8 Jennifer Lawrence, actress,
and Beyoncé, singer, 11%
9 Jeff Bezos, Amazon founder, 10%
10 Kylie Jenner, model, and
David Beckham, former England
football captain, 9%
SOURCE: BAE SYSTEMS, ROYAL AIR FORCE
AND ROYAL NAVY
Newspapers support recycling
The recycled content of UK
newspapers in 2015 was 71%
SOUTH AFRICA
Just what the
doctor ordered
Countries with the most doctoral graduates in 2014
67,449
USA
28,147
GERMANY
25,020
UK
24,300
INDIA
16,039
JAPAN
13,729
FRANCE
12,931
SOUTH KOREA
10,889
SPAIN
10,678
ITALY
AUSTRALIA
CANADA
MEXICO
8,400
7,059
5,782
NETHERLANDS
4,528
TURKEY
4,516
PORTUGAL
4,008
SOURCE: OECD
©Published by Johnston Publications Limited, 2 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0PU, and printed at
Trinity Mirror Printing, St Albans Road, Watford; Hollinwood Avenue, Oldham; and Cardonald Park,
Glasgow. Also printed at Carn Web, Carn Industrial Estate, Portadown. Back issues available from Historic
Newspapers, 0844 770 7684. Friday 2 March 2018. Registered as a newspaper with the Post Office.
Select journalism in i is copyright
independent.co.uk and copyright
Evening Standard, beyond those
accredited as such.
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
3
Letter from
the Editor
ThePage3Profile
OLIVIA-HOPE KATOMPA, RUNAWAY BABY
Oliver Duff
i@inews.co.uk
Who’s this happy family?
The Katompas are happily reunited now,
but there was a close call when an Uber taxi
driver mistakenly drove away with sevenmonth-old Olivia-Hope asleep in the back
seat. The driver, not realising the baby girl
was strapped-in directly behind his seat,
collected two other separate fares before
the second alerted him the infant was there.
All this happened while her mother,
Elisabeth was separated from her daughter
for an hour.
The future of news
A mother’s nightmare...
Elisabeth, a nurse, and her sister strapped
Olivia-Hope safely into the back seat of the
minicab on the journey home from visiting
family late last Saturday night. When
the car pulled up outside their home in
Tottenham, north London, Elizabeth and her
sister got out. As they made their way to the
other side of the car to unstrap the sleeping
baby from her seat, the driver drove away,
oblivious to the fact the baby was in his car.
It must have been traumatic for
Olivia-Hope?
She slept throughout as her mum and
aunt ran down the street after the driver
screaming for him to stop. He didn’t hear
and carried on. The police were unable to
trace the driver from his first name and
Elisabeth didn’t realise she could contact
the driver via the Uber app. “The panic that
I was in… I was screaming and shouting and
what-not. I called the police because that
was the only thing I could think of,” she told
the Evening Standard.
NIGEL HOWARD
What did the driver do?
The first passenger failed to mention the
baby – presumably believing Olivia-Hope
was the driver’s daughter. After the second
passenger asked if he knew the baby was
there, the driver took the still-sleeping
Olivia-Hope to a police station, where she
was reunited with her very relieved mother.
An Uber spokesman said it was the first
time such an incident had happened. He
added: “We normally hear about drivers
finding mobile phones or keys in the back
seat of their car, but never a sleeping baby.
Valerie Browne
NORWAY
FRANCE
CINEMA
DENMARK
Trump’s Nobel Peace Macron on stage for
nomination is a fake ‘Peter and the Wolf’
Glittering night in
store at the Oscars
Country has twice as
many pigs as people
The Norwegian Nobel Committee,
which selects winners of the
Peace Prize, says someone using a
stolen identity has nominated US
President Donald Trump for the
award. Committee secretary Olav
Njolstad said it appears the same
person was responsible for forging
nominations in 2017, as well.
There will be half a million
Swarovski crystals on the Dolby
Theatre stage in Los Angeles on
Sunday for every year the Oscars
have been presented. That’s 45
million crystals in honour of Oscar’s
90th year. The design incorporates
various eras of film history and is
meant to evoke Hollywood glamour.
Pigs are hogging the market in
Europe as the largest livestock
category – and they outnumber
people in Denmark by more than
two to one. With an EU population
of 150 million, pigs far outnumber
bovines, the second-largest livestock
category at 89 million, according to
statistical agency Eurostat.
President Emmanuel Macron will
play the narrator’s role in Peter
and the Wolf at the Élysée Palace.
Mr Macron will perform with the
orchestra of the Republican Guard in
the piece written by Sergei Prokofiev
in 1936. The performance is for
children, sick youngsters and sons
and daughters of services personnel.
UNITED STATES
ENTERTAINMENT
UNITED STATES
Fighting bald eagles
rescued from river
‘Star Trek’ fans’ perk
is one to Klingon to
Students vote to stay
in Millionaires ‘club’
Two bald eagles with their talons
locked in fight have been rescued
from a river. Pennsylvania Game
Commission says a woman and her
11-year-old daughter saw the two
mature, male eagles floating along
the banks of the Susquehanna River
near Bloomsburg. The eagles were
likely fighting in the sky and fell.
Star Trek fans are being offered free
tickets to a concert based on the
films – if they order them in Klingon.
The Royal Albert Hall is presenting
Star Trek – In Concert and Star Trek
Beyond – In Concert in June. To
celebrate, it is giving away 10 tickets
to the screenings if people order in
the Star Trek language.
Students at a Massachusetts school
want to remain “Millionaires”. A poll
in Lenox Memorial Middle and High
School found that a majority wants
to keep the contentious nickname.
The moniker comes from wealthy
outsiders, called “cottagers,” who
built mansions between 1870 and
1900 and employed local people.
Britain’s public interest journalism
faces two existential threats. The
coming months will show whether
or not we, the public, care about
our ability to hold the powerful,
wicked and mendacious to account,
through honest reporting.
I promise you this: the debate
about “Leveson 2” or no Leveson 2
is a sideshow. (Report, page 11.)
On Leveson and press
regulation, I claim to speak with a
degree of independence. i did not
exist during the phone hacking
years. We, The Independent and the
Financial Times were instrumental
in following up the initial
investigation by The Guardian into
criminal behaviour by journalists
at several tabloid titles. Our
reporters doggedly exposed
wrongdoing; I was part of a team
that worked with victims, to tell
their tales and help to find justice.
Our i stands for independence.
No chief executive or billionaire
proprietor gets to read these
editorials before they go to print. I
care little for socialising with politicians or my peers. The ability to
report freely is imperative for
a healthy society. Freedom of
information is the first freedom,
since it is the means by which we
measure other freedoms.
So this first threat is to basic
reporting and investigations. Peers
have amended the Data Protection
Bill so that this newspaper, every
other national title, your local
paper and fearless publications
like Private Eye will have to pay the
costs of vexatious libel claimants,
even when we are vindicated in
court. Every major publisher (and
most are pillars of probity and
editorial excellence) has warned
against this madness. The price
paid would be extortionate.
It would damage our ability
to report freely, encouraging
baseless claims and unscrupulous
libel lawyers. Honest, fearless
journalism is needed to uncover
corporate wrongdoing, political
corruption and consumer abuse.
The second threat is graver still.
The two most powerful publishers
on Earth, Google and Facebook,
have created a socially destructive
news ecosystem in the UK that
imperils thousands of titles. This
includes small publishers vital
to the communities they serve,
as well as national newsrooms
needed to scrutinise the most
powerful interests. Digital
advertising revenue is siphoned
off by the tech giants with no
recompense for the “content”
shared. With every passing month
newspapers shutter their doors.
This is unsustainable, a crisis for
our democracy and society.
The Culture Secretary, Matt
Hancock, wants a solution, and has
announced a review into the future
sustainability of news publishers.
Without lasting change here,
Britain’s brilliant investigative
journalism will become an
anachronism, harming us all.
Twitter: @olyduff
4
NEWS
BREXIT
May to outline
her vision for
ambitious
free trade deal
By Nigel Morris
POLITICAL EDITOR
Theresa May will today vow to negotiate the world’s most ambitious
free trade deal as she lays out her
five key aims in talks over Britain’s future relationship with the
European Union, despite tensions
over the speech’s wording among
her Cabinet.
Her long-awaited speech on her
Brexit negotiating stance comes at
a point of growing frictions between
London and Brussels and as she
faces widening divisions at all levels
of her own party on the subject.
The Prime Minister will pledge
to work for a deal that brings
“our country back together”,
healing the rifts exposed by the
2016 referendum.
Mrs May will warn EU negotiators against pressing for an unreasonable agreement that would only
unravel after Brexit.
And she will make clear her continuing opposition to a “soft Brexit”
by confirming she does not support
future membership of a customs
union, and will set out a blueprint
under which Britain follows some
When European Council
President Donald Tusk
met Mrs May yesterday he
mocked her “so-called red
lines” on Brexit and warned of
“different points of view” still
blocking a deal.
Brussels regulations while diverging from others.
The speech’s final text was
agreed only after Cabinet clashes
over whether to make a “binding
commitment” to align with some
EU rules in such sectors as the
car industry.
Greg Clark, the Business Secretary, backed the move, but Brexit
Secretary David Davis warned it
could limit his freedom for manoeuvre in negotiations.
In a speech at the Mansion House
in London, Mrs May will tell the EU:
“I want the broadest and deepest
possible agreement – covering more
sectors and co-operating more fully
than any free trade agreement anywhere in the world today.
“I believe that is achievable because it is in the EU’s interests as
well as ours and because of our
unique starting point, where on
day one we both have the same laws
and rules.”
Her first test will be whether any
eventual agreement would “respect the result of the referendum”
by taking back control of Britain’s
borders, ending payments to Brussels and leaving the jurisdiction of
European judges.
Second, she will stress that the
new agreement must endure and
the two sides must not find “ourselves back at the negotiating table
because things have broken down”.
A deal will have to “protect people’s jobs and security” with Britain
and the EU working together to
“grow our economies”.
Theresa May
greets European
Council President
Donald Tusk
yesterday PA
EUROPE
Britain needs to get real, warns Barnier
By Andrew Woodcock
British politicians need to give up the
notion that they can avoid the tough
choices resulting from Brexit in
order to be able to strike a trade deal
“based on the foundation of realism”,
the EU’s chief negotiator has said.
Michel Barnier said that Brussels
was waiting to hear what Britain
wanted on issues including trade,
security and aviation. And he made
clear that the UK has still not put forward proposals for keeping the Irish
border open that might avoid the
need for the European Commission
“backstop option” – rejected out of
hand by Mrs May on Wednesday – of
effectively keeping Northern Ireland
in the customs union.
“If the UK has better ideas on how
to avoid a hard border while preserv-
ing the integrity of the single market,
we are ready to look at them in a very
constructive way,” he said.
Mr Barniersaid he hoped Mrs May’s
address today would “help us move
the negotiation forward by setting out
her vision of the future relationship”.
But he warned: “Any vision of the
future must take into account the fact
that the EU cannot and will not compromise on its founding principles.”
NEWS
2-32
EUROPE
Work to reverse
Brexit, urges Blair
By David Hughes and Arj Singh
Tony Blair has urged EU leaders to
work to stop Brexit, warning them
that the UK could act as a focus for
further disunity in the bloc if it leaves.
The former prime minister said
Brexit would damage the economies of both the UK and EU, as well
as weaken the bloc’s “standing and
power” on the world stage.
He called for reform, particularly
to deal with concerns on
immigration, as a way
of persuading voters
to reverse Brexit.
Mr Blair (inset)
said the economic
c o s t o f B r ex i t
would be “significant and painful”.
In a speech in Brussels, he warned: “Britain
out of Europe will ultimately
be a focal point of disunity, when the
requirement for unity is so manifest.
“No matter how we try, it will create a competitive pole to that of Europe, economically and politically to
the detriment of both of us.”
Brexit would be “a divorce that can
never mean a physical separation”,
he said, adding: “We are consigned
to cohabiting the same space, trying
to get along. But – and here is the supreme irony – with so much in common and still liking each other.”
LABOUR
Momentum
fights Unite for
key party role
By Arj Singh
T he fo u nd e r of th e
g ra s s r o o t s L a b o u r
movement Momentum
has triggered a
power struggle at the
top of the party by
challenging a union
official for the role of
general secretary.
Jon Lansman said he
was applying to “open up the
contest” and would use the position
at the top of Labour’s ruling executive
to strengthen the role of party
members. His decision to stand
against the veteran trade unionist
Jennie Formby, of Labour’s biggest
donor Unite, will be seen as evidence
that Momentum, which backs
Jeremy Corbyn, is gaining increasing
influence within Labour.
Mr Lansman (inset), a former
aide to Tony Benn, and Ms
Formby will battle to
replace the outgoing
general secretary Iain
McNicol. Mr Lansman
said: “In 2015, Jeremy
campaigned and won
backing for a new kind
of politics, for sweeping
away the old machine
politics. This means
building a broad, pluralist
Labour Party that encourages
open, transparent and inclusive
application processes for positions
such as general secretary.”
LOCAL GOVERNMENT
Rise in council tax ‘biggest for 14 years’
By David Hughes
Householders in England face the
steepest rise in council tax for 14
years, adding an extra £81 to their
annual bills, a survey has found.
The annual study by the Chartered
Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (Cipfa) said the planned
increases show the pressure councils
are under to make ends meet.
Average band D bills in England
are set to rise by 5.1 per cent from
£1,591 in 2017-18 to £1,672 in 2018-19.
In Wales, households face a £72 rise
from £1,420 to £1,492. The Ministry
of Housing, Communities and Local
Government insisted it recognised
the pressures on services but also the
“importance of keeping bills down”.
C i p fa c h i e f exe c u t i ve Ro b
Whiteman said: “This sharp rise
in council tax across the country
reflects the enormous financial
pressures many local authorities are
currently under.
“Local government has made by
far the biggest efficiencies in the public sector since 2010, but now it feels
like crunch time.”
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
5
DIPLOMACY
Prince William’s ‘historic’
visit to the Middle East
By Cahal Milmo
CHIEF REPORTER
Prince William is to become the
first member of the Royal Family
to make an official visit to Israel,
Jordan the Occupied Palestinian
Territories.
In a surprise move, Kensington
Pa l ace a n n o u n ce d t h at t h e
most politically sensitive visit
undertaken by the Duke of
Cambridge will take place this
summer. It will coincide with
the 70th anniversary of Israel’s
independence.
Although Israel has made a
number of formal invitations to the
royals over the years, none has been
accepted until now because of the
delicacy of the region’s politics and
Britain’s long-standing opposition
to illegal Israeli settlements in the
Occupied Palestinian Territories.
Members of the Royal Family have
previously visited Israel, including
Prince Charles, but the Duke of
Cambridge’s tour is at the request of
Theresa May’s Government and the
first “official” trip.
It is expected that the second-inline to the throne will travel alone
because the Duchess of Cambridge
is due to give birth to the couple’s
third child in April.
Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli
Prime Minister, described the
visit as “historic” and promised
the Duke would be received
with “enthusiasm”.
The news was also welcomed by
Palestinian President Mahmoud
Abbas. His office said it was an
important visit “which we hope will
contribute to strengthening ties
of friendship”.
In London, the Foreign Office
acknowledged that a royal visit to
Israel and the Occupied Palestinian
Prince William’s official visit will be
a first for the Royal Family GETTY
Territories had been “under
consideration for some time” and
was “delighted” it is to go ahead.
But the potential for the tour
by a senior figure from the onetime colonial ruler of Palestine to
heighten as much as salve tensions
in the region was underlined by
reactions from some on both sides.
Israeli commentators have
previously made clear their
irritation at repeated “royal snubs”
from British officialdom when
senior royals have been regular
visitors to neighbouring absolutist
regimes such as Saudi Arabia.
Pro-Palestinian campaigners
said they wanted to see Prince
William raise human rights issues.
Royal trips Unofficial engagements in region
Prince William will not be the
first royal to visit the Occupied
Palestinian Territories. In 2007, the
Duke of Gloucester, the Queen’s
cousin, visited an eye clinic there,
although this was not an official visit.
The Duke also made a visit
to Jerusalem in 2007 and the
Duke of Kent to Tel Aviv in 1998.
Prince Edward also carried out an
engagement in Jerusalem in 2007.
Prince Charles attending the funeral
of Shimon Peres in Israel in 2016 AP
Israel has also been visited by
royals. The Prince of Wales attended
the funerals of former Israeli prime
minister Yitzhak Rabin, who was
assassinated in 1995, and president
Shimon Peres, the veteran of Israeli
politics who died two years ago.
Both visits were considered to be
in a personal capacity rather than
as a formal representative of the UK
Government. But during his 2016
visit, Prince Charles underlined what
is doubtless the Royal Family’s most
poignant link with Israel.
The country is the resting place
of the heir to the throne’s paternal
grandmother, Princess Alice of
Greece, who is buried on the Mount
of Olives at the Church of St Mary
Magdalene. Prince Charles visited
the grave in 2016, as his father, the
Duke of Edinburgh, had done in 1994
when he travelled to Israel for a
ceremony honouring his mother for
saving Greek Jews during the Second
World War.
RUSSIA
Putin shows off ‘intercept-proof’ missile
By Vladmir Isachenko
IN MOSCOW
President Vladimir Putin prompted
fears of a new arms race yesterday
by claiming that the Russians had
developed ground-breaking nuclear
missiles that cannot be intercepted.
Experts said the technological
breakthrough, if true, could
dramatically increase the country’s
military capability, boost the
Kremlin’s global position and also
raise concerns in the West about a
newly assertive Russia.
In a state-of-the-nation speech,
Mr Putin said the Kremlin’s latest
armoury included a nuclearpowered cruise missile, a nuclearpowered underwater drone and a
new hypersonic missile that have no
equivalent elsewhere in the world.
He said the creation of the new
weapons made Nato’s US-led
missile defence “useless”, and
meant an effective end to what he
described as Western efforts to
stymie Russia’s development.
The Kremlin had to develop the
A test launch from an undisclosed
location in Russia AP
new weapons, he said, in response
to a US missile defence system
that threatened to undermine the
Russian nuclear deterrent. He
added that Washington had ignored
Moscow’s concerns. “No one has
listened to us,” he said. “You listen
to us now.”
Mr Putin is set to win another
six-year presidential term in the
election on 18 March. He said that
the nuclear-powered cruise missile
tested last autumn has a “practically
unlimited” range, high speed and
manoeuvrability, allowing it to
pierce any missile defence.
Jane’s, the defence consultancy,
noted that his statement “not only
signals strength to a domestic
Russian audience, but is a clear sign
to the US that Russia will continue
to modernise its nuclear forces to
ensure their credibility”. AP
Mary Dejevsky, page 22
6
NEWS
HEALTH
LEGAL
Woman who killed husband can
challenge murder conviction
By Heather Saul
Some members of the Papworth team worked for the entire 36 hours PA
Hospital sets transplant record
By Ella Pickover
A hospital is celebrating carrying out
five organ transplants in 36 hours.
The Royal Papworth Hospital said
the number of transplant operations
was “unprecedented”.
A team of more than 40 staff
performed the surgery between
Sunday afternoon and the early
hours of Tuesday.
It is believed to be a new record for
the Cambridgeshire hospital and is
equivalent to almost 5 per cent of its
annual transplants total.
The team, including five surgeons,
transplanted two hearts, two sets
of lungs and one single lung to five
patients on the organs waiting list.
At one point, three operating
theatres were simultaneously
running transplant surgery.
A woman who beat her husband to
death with a hammer after years of
emotional abuse has won a bid to
challenge her conviction for murder.
Georgina Challen, 63, who is
known as Sally, admitted killing
her husband Richard Challen, 61, in
2010. She denied murder, claiming
diminished responsibility, but was
jailed for life with a minimum of 22
years in June 2011. This sentence
was later reduced by four years.
Harriet Wistrich, Challen’s lawyer and co-founder of Justice for
Women, wants her conviction reduced to manslaughter, arguing
she snapped after enduring years of
psychological abuse.
A new law on coercive control
has been introduced since Challen’s
conviction and Ms Wistrich believes
her husband’s behaviour should be
taken into account. Coercive control
is defined as controlling behaviour
and psychological abuse. The prosecution case was that it was the
action of a jealous woman who suspected infidelity.
Challen’s son David, 30, who has
been campaigning for a retrial for
his mother, told Good Morning Britain yesterday that his father’s controlling and coercive behaviour was
present throughout her life.
“She would try to keep track of
phone records, print them out and
Lady Justice Rafferty
said: “We scrupulously
avoid expressing any view on any
outcome but we are persuaded that
leave to appeal should be granted.”
present them to him. He would drill
in the mantra: “You’re making it up
– you’re going crazy.” She caught
him in a brothel once, red-handed,
and it confirmed her beliefs.
“She said to me and my brother
once: ‘I honestly thought I was losing touch of reality. I questioned the
facts right in front of me’.”
Challen and her husband had
separated but had been attempting
to rekindle their relationship when
Challen, believing he had been having affairs, became enraged after
discovering he had phoned another
woman. She attacked him with a
hammer as he ate lunch at their
home in Surrey.
At the Court of Appeal, Challen
was granted leave to appeal against
her conviction by Lady Justice Rafferty, Mr Justice Stuart-Smith and
Mrs Justice Carr.
A host of
golden
daffodils
A visitor enjoys the
‘Garden of Light’ in
Paternoster Square,
London, yesterday. The
launch of Marie Curie’s
Great Daffodil Appeal,
the display consists
of 4,000 illuminated
daffodils, each
representing someone
that is affected by a
terminal illness the
charity will support
this month.
TO THE RESCUE!
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property buyers
Guaranteed Sale
No Hassle
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No Fees
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ENVIRONMENT
Newer diesel cars exceed pollution limit
By Tom Bawden
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Dozens of new diesel car models
launched by Opel-Vauxhall, Fiat
and other major manufacturers in
the past two years are producing
more nitrogen dioxide than the latest pollution standards allow.
An analysis of new car models
from Europe’s top-selling brands
in the run-up to new EU emissions
rules in September 2017 reveals
that half produce more nitrogen
dioxide than is now allowed.
Once a model has been approved
for launch the manufacturer may
go on producing and selling them,
even if the rules change, so models
launched before the new rules were
introduced are not legally breaching the limit, though they exceed it.
The 1.6 litre Fiat Tipo, which
was launched in the UK in 2016,
NOx New car emissions
New cars approved for sale in the EU
from April 2016 to September 2017
by nitrogen oxide emissions:
Fiat TIPO (below) 3.3x [current limit]
Renault Scenic Energy dCi 95 2.4x
Opel-Vauxhall Crossland X 2.3x
Opel-Vauxhall Granland X 2.3x
Nissan X-Trail 2.2x
Citroen C3 Aircross 2.1x
Citroen C4 Cactus 2.0x
Renault Captur dCi 110 1.9x
Renault Koleos dCi 175 4WD 1.9x
produces 3.3 times the current required limit.
Even though there is no legal
breach of air pollution, Greenpeace, which carried out the analysis, argues that people who bought
diesels in the recent past may be
surprised to find that some models
launched less than six months ago
are producing a lot of nitrogen dioxide and other nitrogen oxides.
Greenpeace said that car industry body SMMT misled customers
last April when it stated that the
latest diesel vehicles are “the cleanest in history – and light years away
from their older counterparts”.
An SMMT spokesman said: “The
new requirement did not come into
force until September 2017 for new
models brought to market from
that date. Their engineering development pre-dates this requirement
so the results are of no surprise.”
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
7
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
COVER STORY
ENERGY
A climber tackles
the frozen Kinder
Downfall at High
Peak in Derbyshire
MP: Carry
on cooking,
despite gas
supply fears
PETER BYRNE/PA
By Ravender Sembhy
Households have been told to
“carry on cooking” despite National Grid issuing a gas deficit
warning as fears mount that supplies could run empty – and energy
prices could skyrocket.
The power operator said the
warning was issued in response
to a series of “significant supply
losses resulting in a forecast endof-day supply deficit”.
Household supplies are not expected to be affected but shortages could hit industrial users as the
Grid attempts to balance supply
and demand today.
Energy minister Claire Perry
insisted that National
Grid was following “standard
procedure”
and said domestic supplies would
The estimated
not
be
current
affected.
shortfall of gas,
“ I h ave
in
cubic
metres
s p o ke n t o
National Grid
and we are in
constant contact to
monitor the gas supply throughout
this extreme weather,” she said.
“Carry on using your gas heating and cooking meals as normal.”
According to National Grid,
there could be a shortfall of as
much as 50 million cubic metres.
It said in a statement: “This is a
situation that we are always prepared for and a deficit warning is
part of our normal toolkit in extreme weather.”
Alex Neill, of Which?, said:
“Households will be worried about
any potential gas supply shortage
and whether this will push up the
price that many are already struggling to pay.”
50m
Armed Forces called in as UK faces
its worst weather in a generation
By Paul Gallagher and Jane Clinton
Britain’s Armed Forces were called
in last night to help stretched emergency services deal with some of the
worst weather seen in a generation.
At least three people died yesterday bringing the total dead to 10 since
the so-called “Beast from the East”
weather front hit Britain. Hundreds
of others had to be rescued.
Forecasters said conditions would
worsen overnight as the Siberian
weather front collided with Storm
Emma, bringing rare freezing rain.
A red weather warning was issued
for south-west England and South
Wales, meaning the conditions could
pose a risk to life.
The Met Office urged those in
affected areas to prepare for heavy
snow and strong winds, which will
bring “blizzard conditions” and “severe drifting”. A spokesman said the
conditions amounted to one of the
coldest spells since 1991 with “feelslike” temperatures as low as -11°C.
The Scottish Government said last
night that the military and emergency services would help to transport
staff to the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh and the Western General hospitals. The Ministry of Defence will
provide several 4x4 vehicles and drivers to transport around 200 clinical
and support staff to and from work.
It continues a heroic effort by NHS
staff to keep hospitals running, with
some nurses sleeping on wards to
ensure they can be at work, and one
Scottish surgeon reportedly walking
eight miles to work.
Warnings over coastal flooding
Flood warnings have been issued for
areas along the Cornwall coast and in
Dorset today.
The Environmental Agency
warned that flooding is possible this
morning from Lands End to Lizard
Bay in Cornwall, and until tomorrow
at Swanage Bay, Dorset.
The highest risk will be at high tide,
which will occur just before 5am,
The Met Office said the “feels-like”
temperature was the coldest it has
been since 1991.
The “feels-like” temperature
incorporates the predicted temperature, plus humidity and wind factors,
to predict what impact the weather
will have on our bodies.
Wind strips us of heat faster and
low humidity means sweat evaporates faster cooling us down more.
The forecaster calculates the
reading by combining the air temperature, relative humidity and the wind
strength at five feet (around the level
of a human face).
This makes it a better predictor of
the risks of frostbite or exposure.
Members of the public stopped to
give people lifts into hospitals, while
some companies offered the use of
their own vehicles and drivers.
The RAF in Lincolnshire also ferried staff to work. Several medical
trusts issued public appeals for people with 4x4 vehicles. North Bristol
NHS Trust was among them, posting on Twitter that it was “looking
for volunteers who drive vehicles
equipped for snow and ice” to help
bring people to and from work.
Meanwhile, the RAF was drafted
in to help relief efforts in snow-hit
Lincolnshire with 10 4x4 vehicles and
20 staff aiding emergency services.
Police said travel on most roads in the
county was “impossible”.
News, pages 8-9
POLICE
SOUTH COAST
By Barbara Speed
‘Feels like’ The whole story
though residents in Cornwall are
being warned to be cautious for three
hours either side of this time.
Gale force nine winds will batter
the seafront and large waves are also
likely, the agency warned.
Precautionary flood defences will
be used at several locations in Swanage Bay today and tomorrow.
Several flood warnings were in
place in Newcastle yesterday due to
high tides and strong winds.
Roads chaos leads to three deaths
By Paul Gallagher
Chaotic scenes on roads across the
country resulted in at least three
deaths yesterday.
In Cornwall, a seven-year-old girl
died after a car collided with a house.
The child, believed to be a pedestrian,
was fatally injured when the car hit the
house in Looe at about 2.30pm, Devon
and Cornwall Police said. The fatality
was confirmed to be weather-related.
Hampshire police said a 46-yearold man died after a collision involving a lorry and a van on the A34
yesterday morning. A 75-year-old
woman was found dead in a snowcovered street in Leeds around the
same time.
The unnamed pensioner was believed to have been in a confused
state before her death, and her body
was discovered partially obscured
by a car.
Deficit What caused it?
Perhaps surprisingly, the problems
haven’t been caused by demand.
The cold weather is hampering the
usual delivery mechanisms and
there isn’t enough gas to go around.
But, more broadly, the reasons
that we don’t have enough gas are
wide-ranging. Analysts say it is
the consequence of a whole set of
factors, some of which should have
been protected against already.
Jonathan Marshall, energy
analyst at the Energy and Climate
Intelligence Unit, said: “Behind
today’s gas deficit warning is
a “perfect storm” of unrelated
short-term issues – freezing
conditions, diminished Dutch
gas production due to earthquake
concerns, weather-related issues
curbing imports and a global gas
market in which supplies are
being diverted to Asia by
higher prices.”
8
NEWS
2
1
WEATHER
Warnings to remain in place over weekend
By Jane Clinton and Simon Calder
Large swathes of the nation were
bracing themselves last night to deal
with some of the most severe snowstorms ever seen as the Met Office
urged people to prepare for heavy
snow and strong easterly winds.
Met Office chief meteorologist
Paul Gundersen said freezing rain
may batter parts of south-west England and Wales overnight, potentially creating hazardous icy stretches
as rain droplets supercool and freeze
instantly upon hitting the ground.
The cold weather is expected to
continue today and into the weekend, with the chance of snow still
likely in some parts of the country.
There will be further blustery
showers in the North East, while
snow and ice is expected across
southern areas, with temperatures
likely to remain very cold.
Temperatures are expected to be
3-4°C in the West of Scotland, with
freezing conditions of –1°C likely in
the North, the South and Midlands.
“A North/South split will exist and
there is a chance the South could see
milder conditions into next week,”
said Steven Keates, from the Met
Office. “But, generally, the weather
will still remain pretty static for the
next two to three weeks.”
Amber weather warnings are in
place for the South West, Northern
Ireland and Scotland, meaning snow
is likely. Yellow warnings will remain
TRANSPORT
Drivers stranded
on M80 after
lorries jack-knife
Weather, page 53
PEOPLE
4
By Chris Green
Neighbours dig
in to ensure a
white wedding
By Tom Wilkinson
SCOTLAND EDITOR
Hundreds of motorists were
forced to spend Wednesday night
on the M80 in Scotland on after
two jack-knifed lorries blocked
the motorway, prompting sharp
criticism of haulage firms by
Nicola Sturgeon.
Cameras showed numerous
lorries defying an official red
warning that travel could pose
a “danger to life”. Ms Sturgeon
criticised road haulage firms
for continuing to send HGV
drivers on to roads despite the
warnings. Speaking during First
Minister’s Questions, the First
Minister said she wanted to send
a “blunt” message to transport
company bosses.
The Road Haulage Association
said the criticism was naive. RHA
chief executive Richard Burnett
said: “In many cases, particularly
in isolated areas, an HGV will
be the only vehicle with the
capability of getting through. The
drivers of these vehicles should
be applauded – not pilloried.”
Transport minister Humza
Yousaf said that operations
were ongoing to remove around
10 vehicles stuck on the M60
southbound carriageway.
in place over the weekend, with ice
expected across England, Scotland
and Wales. Air and rail passengers
face another day of disruption, while
the number of British travellers
stranded abroad approaches 50,000.
Rail companies, including Southeastern and Virgin Trains East
Coast, have advised customers not
to travel, or to allow extra time if
travel is necessary.
1 the runway at Leeds Bradford Airport; 2 the Fountain Gardens in Paisley,
Renfrewshire; 3 Isla Brown, 10, in Holyrood, Edinburgh; 4 the river Leven in
Balloch, West Dunbartonshire; 5 storm clouds over Dublin Bay GETTY; PA
5
It was a white wedding with a difference when up to 40 people
helped the couple defy the weather
and made sure the bride got to the
church more or less on time.
Drivers in 4x4s and a tractor with
a plough cleared the steep road outside St Cuthbert’s Church, Benfieldside, near Shotley Bridge, County
Durham, for the wedding of Rebecca McKenzie and Daniel Hodgson
on Wednesday.
People held shovels above their
heads as a guard of honour as they
left the church.
The outpouring of community
spirit followed a Facebook appeal
by the Rev Martin Jackson for volunteers to clear snow to the church.
Rev Jackson said: “There was so
much feeling for a young couple and
that this was ‘the’ day of their lives.”
Photographer Sarah Thew said:
“It was a lovely day, but obviously we
were up against the elements.”
She has set up a JustGiving page
hoping to raise £200 to cover the
cost of heating the church whose
heating system broke down before
the wedding.
Rev Jackson said it was 3C inside
the church before expensive, temporary heaters were brought in, warming it to a still chilly 6C.
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
9
3
PEOPLE
Woman in labour
stuck on A66 so
dad delivers baby
A woman went into labour on the
A66 before she and her husband,
who helped deliver their baby, could
reach hospital.
By the time paramedics reach the
couple on the road near Darlington
the baby had made her entrance
and was “happy and warm” despite
the severe weather. Andrew Waring was driving his wife, Daniella, to
hospital after setting off from their
home in Catterick, North Yorkshire,
but she went into labour while still
on the A66.
Mr Waring pulled over and barely
has time to dial 999 before he knelt
in the snow by the passenger door to
help his wife as she gave birth.
Lee Salmon, one of the paramedics to reach the family, told the
BBC: “Mum and dad had done a
sterling job. We didn’t actually have
to do a huge amount – it was a good
team effort.”
PEAK DISTRICT
MOTORING
Lorry driver’s
night to forget
Traffic jam? It was
a piece of cake...
A lorry driver has been rescued
from his stranded truck after
enduring a night on the Woodhead
Pass in the Peak District.
As well as coming to the aid of
the lorry driver stuck high on the
Sheffield to Manchester route, the
Woodhead Mountain Rescue Team
spent most of yesterday checking
dozens of abandoned cars on
Pennine roads.
Spokesman Paul Besley said the
trucker was close to the summit
of the pass near the turn-off to
Dunford Bridge in South Yorkshire.
“He was very cold and in need of
food and a drink.”
Stranded motorists were handed
cream cakes and doughnuts by a
bakery delivery driver.
John Gowing, who works for
high-street chain Greggs, handed
out pastries to drivers stuck on the
A1 in Northumberland.
Les Goff, 39, was stuck on his
way to Leeds from Edinburgh and
went to see if he could help. He
said: “I saw the Greggs guy at the
back with the tail-lift and he just
said, ‘Do you want some cakes?’
“He asked me to take some to the
other drivers and I walked down
with doughnuts, vanilla slices and
cakes, handing them out.”
By Lewis Smith
TRANSPORT
Rescued passengers rush for tea
By Conrad Landin
Hundreds of passengers were
rescued from a broken down train –
after a train carrying stranded rail
staff home ended up stuck behind it.
The TransPennine Express
servicefromGlasgowtoManchester
Airport was one of the only trains
running from the Scottish city on
Wednesday afternoon.
But the train ground to a halt
on the West Coast Mainline at
Abington, around 40 miles south
of Glasgow.
Passengers were only rescued
after an untimetabled Virgin Trains
special service conveying railway
workers from Carlisle to Glasgow
ended up behind it.
Rail workers erected a makeshift
bridge between the two trains, and
several hundred were taken on
board the Virgin Trains special.
The train soon became standing room only. There was then
a rush for the buffet when the
guard announced that the free
tea and coffee was subject to a
five-minute deadline.
10
NEWS
EDUCATION
TRANSPORT
Birth rate spike puts
pressure on places at
secondary school
Learner drivers
on motorway
from June
By Richard Vaughan
EDUCATION CORRESPONDENT
Tens of thousands of pupils have
missed out on their first choice of
secondary school amid a growing
squeeze on places.
In some parts of the country, up to
a third of children missed out on their
top school choice as local authorities
struggled to meet demand.
Secondaries are facing increasing pressure on places due to a spike
Schools Pupil numbers
Official figures show that the
total pupil numbers in England’s
secondary schools are expected to
grow by half a million over the next
eight years, with around 65,000
more youngsters expected to
join secondary schools this
autumn alone.
The Department for Education said
that 735,000 places have been created
across secondary and primary
schools since 2010.
in the birth rate in the early 2000s,
which is currently making its way
through the school system.
More than half a million 10- and
11-year-olds found which secondary
school they will be attending this
autumn yesterday, on what is commonly known as National Offer Day.
One of the areas worst affected
was London, where the proportion
of pupils securing their first choice of
school was down from 68 per cent to
66 per cent.
In boroughs such as Hammersmith and Fulham, only around half
secured their first choice.
In Birmingham, 71.42 per cent got
their first preference, meaning that
nearly three in 10 were given another
option. The council said that the proportion of Birmingham pupils getting
their first preference is up around 3
per cent on last year.
At the other end of the spectrum,
the survey indicates that in East
Riding of Yorkshire, around 97 per
cent of pupils got their first choice
of school, along with 96 per cent in
Barnsley and Hartlepool.
By Jane Clinton
Best of British on new 10p coins
The Union flag and King Arthur
are two of the Royal Mint’s 26 new
designs for the 10p piece that will
appear across the country as part
of the Great British Coin Hunt
collection. It consists of an A to Z
of what makes Britain great, from
the ‘Angel of the North’ to zebra
crossings. Other designs on the
“quintessentially British” coins
feature James Bond and the Loch
Ness Monster. PA
Learner drivers will be able to take
driving lessons on motorways in
England, Scotland and Wales for the
first time from 4 June.
Although any motorway lessons
will be voluntary it is hoped that the
move will make for better drivers and
improve motorway safety.
When the law changes, learner
drivers taking lessons on the motorway will need to be accompanied by
an approved driving instructor. The
car being driven will also have to be
fitted with dual controls.
Ultimately it will be up to the driving instructor to decide when they
feel a learner driver is competent
enough to tackle the motorway lessons. Trainee driving instructors will
not be allowed to take learner drivers
on the motorway.
At present, motorway lessons
can only be taken by those who have
passed their driving test. It is illegal for a learner driver to drive on a
motorway.
Despite the changes, motorway
driving is not being introduced to the
driving test Learner motorcyclists
will not be allowed on motorways.
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
MEDIA
Analysis
Government
abandons second
part of Leveson
press inquiry
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
The Culture Secretary has
announced that the Government is to
scrap the second part of the Leveson
Inquiry into press standards.
Matt Hancock told MPs that the
Government is “formally closing”
the inquiry, which published its
report into hacking six years
ago. Part II was due to
examine “unlawful action
by media organisations”
and relations between
journalists and police.
Mr Hancock (inset),
citing “seismic changes”
since 2012, said: “We do not
believe that reopening this
costly and time-consuming public
inquiry is the right way forward.”
He also promised that Section 40
of the Crime and Courts Act, which
Tom Watson, Labour
deputy leader, said the
move was a “bitter blow to the
victims of press intrusion”.
Jeremy Corbyn has committed
a future Labour government to
reopening Leveson.
would force media organisations
to pay the legal costs of libel cases
whether they won or lost, would not
be implemented. (Report, below.) Investigative journalists welcomed the
news, although cautioned that peers
were trying to reinstate the penalty
by amending the Data Protection Bill.
Sir Brian Leveson attacked the
decision to scrap the second part of
the inquiry, however, saying he
“fundamentally disagreed”
and that it broke a promise
made to the victims of
phone hacking.
In a letter to ministers,
he warned that “the
extent of wrongdoing
within News International
[owners of The Sun and News of
the World] has been far greater than
the inquiry was informed”. Further
details of hacking at Trinity Mirror
are still coming to light, he added.
H ac king vic tims h ad been
“promised” a further inquiry, which
could be resumed in a cost-effective
way and tackle wider issues, like
“fake news,” said Sir Brian. A sitting
judge, he ruled himself out of chairing
Part II due to his workload but said he
was willing to help a successor.
Mr Hancock said media regulation
needed to “respond to the challenges
Policy and the press Victims and industry react
News Media Association, trade body
for local and national newspapers
“We welcome the Government’s
announcement today that the
Leveson Inquiry will be
formally closed and that
it will seek to repeal
Section 40 of the Crime
and Courts Act. Both
would have disrupted
and destabilised the news
media industry.”
Gerry McCann, father of
missing child Madeleine and
hacking victim who won libel case
“The second part of the inquiry is vital
to investigate the corruption between
politicians, the press and police. This
Government has lost integrity when
it comes to policy affecting the press.”
Ian Murray, executive director of the
Society of Editors “It is important to
remember that there remain
threats to a free press in this
country – in particular, the
amendments posed to the
Data Protection Bill by the
House of Lords.”
Jacqui Hames (inset),
former ‘Crimewatch’
presenter and victim of press
intrusion “This government has
made a clear choice to side with the
unaccountable and unelected press
barons over the rights of ordinary
people in this country.”
11
Important
day in battle
over press
freedom
Adam Sherwin
I
The Leveson Inquiry spent 18 months investigating the culture, practices and
ethics of the press and a report was published in November 2012 PA
of today, not the challenges of
yesterday”. He said issues requiring
urgent attention are “the dramatic
and continued rise of social media,
whichislargelyunregulated,clickbait,
fake news, malicious disinformation
and online abuse, which threaten
high-quality journalism”.
The Hacked Off campaign for
press reform said victims of hacking
had been “betrayed”. Dr Evan Harris,
a director, said: “This is probably the
first time that a government has
overruled the views of the judicial
chair of a statutory inquiry by
cancelling an inquiry against his will.”
LEGAL
Battle over ‘chilling’ libel costs
By Adam Sherwin
Newspapers welcomed the Government’s decision to abandon a controversial measure which threatened
to “destroy” local newspapers and
silence investigative journalism.
Section 40 of the Crime and Courts
Act would have required newspapers
to pay both sides’ costs in a libel dispute – regardless of a lawsuit’s merit
– unless they signed up to a state-approved regulator. The threat of having
to pay both sides’ costs would have a
“chilling” effect on local newspapers,
critics warned, with many titles
reluctant to launch investigations into
powerful individuals, knowing that
they could face a crippling libel bill.
Peers are trying to reintroduce the
measure through an amendment to
the Data Protection Bill, however.
Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson says the measure will “destroy
the local press”, while supporters,
such as Hugh Grant argue it would
“provide ordinary citizens with access to justice”. News organisations
warn that investigations like the
“Panama Papers” would be impossible, since its wealthy targets could
issue a string of defamation suits.
t was a matter of when,
not if, the Government
would quietly abandon
Leveson Part II. Ministers
had no intention of dragging
newspapers through another
round of public bloodletting.
What began as a muchneeded cleaning out of the
stables after the excesses
exposed in the hacking scandal
has become a highly politicised
battle over press freedom.
On one side, Tom Watson,
Max Mosley and Hacked Off
want to bring the Daily Mail
and The Sun to heel, through a
binding system of state-backed
regulation, making papers
“accountable” to their critics.
Leveson II would be revived
under a Corbyn government.
On the other side, fighting
a rearguard action, are
publishers, resistant to any
perceived infringement on
press freedom, who believe
Ipso-backed self-regulation
is the way forward. Hacking
is history, they say, and the
real fight is for a sustainable
local and national news media
whilst Google and Facebook
eat their lunch.
A Leveson inquiry into
media ethics now takes place
every day on Twitter. But with
a rare public intervention
calling for his work to
continue, Sir Brian made it
harder for ministers to bat
away accusations that they
have caved in to press owners.
The Culture Secretary
Matt Hancock suggests that
democracy itself is at risk from
fake news sources, amplified
by social media. Local papers
would breathe a sigh of relief
over the pledge to repeal
Section 40 – although the
Government does not have
the parliamentary numbers
to make this happen any time
soon, and peers are trying to
reinstate it.
MEDIA
Editors of ‘Express’ and ‘Star’ step down after Trinity Mirror takeover
By Andy Johnson
Daily Express editor Hugh Whittow
and the Daily Star’s Dawn Neesom
are leaving the titles.
The moves come on the day Trinity Mirror, the publisher of the Daily
Mirror, announced that it had completed its acquisition of Northern
& Shell’s publishing assets, including the Star, Daily Express, and OK!
magazine. Trinity Mirror previously struck a £126.7m deal to buy
a string of titles from Richard Desmond’s media empire.
Trinity Mirror said that Mr
Whittow “has taken the decision
to retire”, while Daily Star editor in
chief Ms Neesom “will be leaving
the business to pursue a freelance
writing and broadcasting career”
and will remain as a columnist and
Dawn Neesom is to pursue a freelance
career while Hugh Whittow is retiring
interviewer. “We send both our very
best wishes for the future and our
thanks for the valuable contribution
they have made during their editorships,” it said.
Gary Jones, who has been editor of the Sunday Mirror and Sunday People since 2016, has been
appointed seven-day editor in chief
of the Express.
Martin Townsend remains in
his role as editor of the Sunday Express. Mr Jones will be succeeded
as Sunday Mirror and Sunday People
editor by Peter Willis, who moves
from the Daily Mirror.
Alison Phillips, who edited The
New Day, becomes Daily Mirror editor. Jon Clark has been appointed
seven-day editor in chief of the Daily
Star. Stuart James continues in his
role as Daily Star Sunday editor.
12
NEWS
SOCIETY
Titanic
work
of art
Why women form
stronger bonds
with gay men
By Tom Bawden
SCIENCE CORRESPONDENT
Women tend to form quicker, and
often stronger, bonds with gay men
because they find it easier to be
friendly without the worry that it
may be misconstrued as flirting.
Once a woman finds out that a
man is gay, she will feel much more
comfortable and free to be warm and
open – assuming she is not attracted
to the man herself, a study has found.
“The development of close,
opposite-sex friendships is
frequently impeded by men’s often
one-sided attraction to women,”
said lead author Eric Russell, of the
University of Texas at Arlington.
“In our study, once women
discovered they were interacting
with a gay man, they displayed more
intimate behaviour with him.”
The researchers conducted two
studies. The first, involving 153
heterosexual female college students,
confirmed that women perceived
themselves to be more comfortable
interacting with a gay man than a
straight man.
The second involved face-to-face
interactions between 66 heterosexual
women and homosexual and
heterosexual men. During these
meetings, the men were prompted to
describe their ideal partner.
In cases where the man indicated
he was gay, female participants were
generally willing to engage with him
on a more intimate level. They also
displayed more open body language.
The study, published in the journal
Psychological Science, did not look at
the friendship dynamics between
people of the same gender or of
straight men and gay women.
The findings were
especially true of more
physically attractive women, who
are wary of straight men wanting
more than a platonic relationship.
A skateboarder going
past an artwork
depicting shipyard
workers in Belfast
yesterday. The ‘Titanic’
workers mural is
by Ed Reynolds, an
artist who has created
various pieces of visual
art in the city. GETTY
EMPLOYMENT
Men ‘twice as likely to ask for a pay rise’
By Jane Clinton
Women in the UK are only half as
confident as men when it comes
to asking for a pay rise, according
to research.
With the deadline looming for UK
companies to report their gender
pay gap, research from Mintel re-
vealed that, on average, 42 per cent
of men feel confident about asking
for a pay rise, compared with just
22 per cent of women.
Women were not the only ones
who lacked confidence in the workplace. Those on temporary or flexible contracts were far less confident
than those on permanent contracts
to ask about time off for holiday,
with 63 per cent feeling confident,
compared with 80 per cent of permanent staff.
The research also revealed that
73 per cent of workers said they
often work when they are unwell,
while a third (33 per cent) said they
lacked the confidence to call in sick.
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13
Tomorrow, in your
Last minute Easter escapes
From Mallorca and Sicily
to M a l t a a n d s k i i n g
PLUS Simon Calder l Days out
ARTS
Squawking heads:
seagull sopranos
take on songbirds
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
With their shrill squawks and scavenging, seagulls are an aggressive
blight to some. But a composer aims
to change all that with a piece that
transforms the gulls’ shrieks into a
thing of beauty.
Queen Canute, created by Nuria
Bonet Filella, a PhD student at the
University of Plymouth’s Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music
Research, is designed to encourage
audiences to re-evaluate the birds.
Her composition will “demonstrate
the beauty of the birds and their song,
and to show the ways it can change
over the course of a year”. It premieres at the 2018 Peninsula Arts
Contemporary Music Festival, held
at the University this weekend.
Ms Filella’s research takes nature
as its inspiration. She uncovers musical structures within the environment and has even incorporated data
around climate change.
For Queen Canute, she spent many
hours recording the birds on the
waterfront in Plymouth. She will
combine those recordings and observations with the sound of a clarinet to
create a unique new duet.
Ms Nuria said: “Living in a coastal
city, seagulls are all around us and
a part of our way of life. But what if
you took a step back and listened for
changes during the day, or to see if
their song altered at different times
of the year?”
“That is what I hope my piece will
do, as well as reminding people that
seagulls are beautiful birds and a species we should celebrate more often.”
She added: “From a musical perspective, there is not much done in
terms of seagulls as composers have
always tended to focus more on songbirds. So I also hope it will give my
audience a different experience, and
a new perspective on a sound that for
many of them is an integral part of
their daily lives.”
Tony Whitehead, of the RSPB in
the South West, praised the seagull
song. He said: “It’s great to hear of a
work hoping to reveal the beauty of
these often much maligned birds.”
Other festival offerings
include Artibiotics,
Professor Eduardo Miranda’s
“musification” of DNA codes and
Reptile Rhythms, by Dr Duncan
Williams, which celebrates the
endangered gharial crocodiles.
Nuria Bonet Filella’s composition
will combine recordings of the
seagulls with a clarinet AFP/GETTY
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14
NEWS
TECHNOLOGY
UNITED STATES
Balsa wood ‘could be used in batteries’
By Jane Clinton
It is best known as a material used
in model aeroplanes but scientists
have devised a way to make balsa
wood react like a “wood carbon
sponge” which could be used in
rechargeable batteries.
After compressing the wood
and then heating it to 1,000°C to
turn it into carbon, researchers
discovered it had an electrical re-
sponse sensitivity that surpassed
most compressible carbon materials, according to the research
published in the journal Chem.
A slice of it was incorporated
into a sensor which could be attached to a human finger. This
process could be harnessed for
wearable fitness or health monitoring electronics.
It could also be incorporated
into water purification devices
and energy storage technologies,
such as supercapacitors and rechargeable batteries.
“Since this wood carbon sponge
is fabricated completely from natural wood... the source material is
exceptionally renewable and sustainable, as opposed to popular
options like carbon nanotubes or
graphene,” said co-senior author
Liangbing Hu, a nano-engineer at
the University of Maryland.
Trump branded
‘gun grabber’ over
firearms U-turn
By Tom Embury-Dennis
Donald Trump has sparked fury
among gun owners and conservatives after backing proposals to
tighten gun control laws.
The US President called for a
“beautiful” bill that would expand
background checks on gun
buyers, prevent mentally
ill people from accessing
firearms, and restrict
teenagers from buying assault weapons.
Democrat Jo e
Manchin and Republican Pat Toomey, who
were both at the White
House meeting, now
plan to reintroduce a failed
2013 bill that would impose
background checks for all commercial gun purchases.
But Mr Trump’s comments in the
hour-long televised meeting with
politicians put him at odds with the
Guns Retail restriction
The rift between corporate America
and the gun lobby is growing.
Retail heavyweights Walmart and
Dick’s Sporting Goods have taken
steps to restrict gun sales. That
follows moves by several other
major corporations, including
MetLife, Hertz and Delta Air
Lines, that have cut ties
with the National Rifle
Association following last
month’s school massacre
in Florida.
Dick’s said it will
immediately stop selling
assault-style rifles and ban
the sale of all guns to anyone
under 21. Walmart, the nation’s
largest retailer, followed by saying it
will no longer sell firearms to people
younger than 21. It had stopped
selling semi-automatic weapons in
2015. AP
AUSTRALIA
More than 57,000 weapons
handed in during amnesty
By Rod McGuirk
IN CANBERRA
More than 57,000 illegal firearms,
including machine guns and a rocket
launcher, have been handed in during an amnesty in Australia.
It marked the first time civilians
could hand in weapons without penalty since a lone gunman killed 35
people in the state of Tasmania in
1996, galvanising popular support for
tough national gun controls.
A virtual ban on private ownership of semi-automatic rifles and a
government-funded gun buyback cut
the size of the country’s civilian arsenal by almost a third.
The government and some gun policy analysts said they were surprised
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
15
Comment
Public support matters far more than the GOP
Andrew Buncombe
IN NEW YORK
I
Mr Trump at the
meeting, where he
argued for greater
gun control
GETTY IMAGES
National Rifle Association (NRA),
the gun lobbying organisation which
made record contributions to his
2016 presidential campaign.
Michael Hammond, lawyer for Gun
Owners of America, another gun
group with more than a million members, accused Mr Trump of becoming
the “gun-grabber-in-chief”.
“If he succeeds in doing everything
he talked about in the meeting, he
will far surpass Barack Obama as an
enemy of the Second Amendment,”
he said. After the meeting, far-right
news outlet Breitbart ran a headline reading: “Trump the Gun Grabber: Cedes Dems’ Wish List – Bump
Stocks, Buying Age, ‘Assault Weapons,’ Background Checks.”
Ben Sasse, a Republican senator
for Nebraska, condemned the President’s change of heart on gun control,
which comes in the wake of the school
shooting in Florida in which 17 people
were murdered.
“Strong leaders do not automatically agree with the last thing that
was said to them,” he said. “We have
the Second Amendment and due
process of law for a reason.
Jennifer Baker, a spokesperson for
the NRA, said: “While today’s meeting made for great TV, the gun-control proposals discussed would make
for bad policy that would not keep our
children safe.” THE INDEPENDENT
Analysis, page 27
by the number of weapons surrendered. Officials said the three-month
amnesty, which ended in September,
yielded 57,324 firearms, including
almost 2,500 semi-automatic and
fully-automatic guns – the rapid-fire
categories particularly targeted after
the 1996 Port Arthur massacre.
“It was a very, very good result,”
said law enforcement minister
Angus Taylor.
He declined to comment on whether the US and other countries should
follow Australia’s example following
the recent Florida high-school shooting in which 17 people died. AP
n the 14 months Donald
Trump has occupied the Oval
Office, he has frequently
acted in a way that has left
many in the Republican
Party horrified. He has taken
positions on trade and foreign
policy, Russia and protectionism
that have represented the stark
opposite of GOP orthodoxy.
This veteran of reality
television has never failed to
put on a good show. Depending
on one’s perspective, that show
has been in the form of a political
lion shaking up the Washington
establishment, or a impulsive
and praise-hungry narcissist,
overseeing a chaotic circus.
At the White House this week,
Trump managed combine the
two, putting on a blockbuster of a
show and angering Republicans
with comments on gun control.
Meeting with governors
and members of Congress,
the 71-year-old voiced a series
of ideas on gun regulation
that were at odds with many
in his party. He also told the
politicians they should not be
afraid of the powerful National
Rifle Association, the lobbying
organisation that spent $30m
(£22m) helping elect him. “I am
the biggest fan of the Second
Amendment. I am a big fan of the
NRA. I had lunch with [them]
on Sunday and I said, ‘It’s time,
we’re gonna stop this nonsense
this time’,” Trump said.
He also angered many, when,
speaking over Vice President
Mike Pence, who had been talking
about allowing local authorities
to remove weapons with due
process from people who were
mentally ill, Trump suggested
grabbing the guns first and
asking questions later.
“Or, Mike, take the firearms
first, and then go to court.
Because that’s another system,
because a lot of times, by the time
you go to court, it takes so long to
go to court to get the due process
procedures,” he said. “I like
taking the guns early, like in this
crazy man’s case that just took
place in Florida.”
Many conservatives accused
him of “betrayal”. But it seems
Trump senses the public outrage
following the shooting and the
passionate, eloquent demands
from the survivors. He may also
be aware a large majority of
Americans – if not necessarily
his core supporters – support
changes to gun regulations.
A poll last November by
Quinnipiac University, found 94
per cent of Americans believed
in background checks for all gun
purchases, 79 per cent believed
there should be a mandatory
waiting period for purchases,
64 per cent supported banning
assault-style weapons and 64 per
cent supported banning the sale
of magazines that carry more
than 10 rounds.
It is notable the measures
Trump has supported –
increasing the age requirement
for purchasing a rifle, better
background checks, more help
for the mentally ill and banning
bump stocks, a device that allows
someone to fire a rifle as if it
were a fully automatic weapon
– have the widest support and
would cost him the least political
capital. THE INDEPENDENT
ANNIE LENNOX
No.1 ALBUMS
DIVA + MEDUSA
OUT NOW
ON VINYL
WWW.ANNIELENNOX.COM
Despite angering many pro-gun
lobbyists, Donald Trump insisted he
was a a ‘big fan’ of the NRA REUTERS
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NEWS
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
Providers ‘must
be honest’ about
internet speeds
‘Civilisations’ may hold
no major revelations,
but it’s lovely to look at
BBC2
HHHHH
There is nothing the BBC
likes more than to describe its
new ventures as “landmark”.
Civilisations – a blockbuster,
budget-busting arts show about
the human impulse to create – is
the latest. The nine-part series is
a sequel of sorts to Sir Kenneth
Clark’s landmark 1969 series
Civilisation, which is now on
iPlayer, so viewers can watch the
old landmark show that inspired
the new landmark show.
In fact, it has more in common
with another landmark BBC
series, Planet Earth. There are
sweeping aerial shots of jungles,
crashing oceans and vermilion
sunrises, a lush orchestral
score by Tandis Jenhudson, and
fabulously shot close-ups, all
wrapped up in a velvety voiceover,
lightly muffled with awe.
“We are the art-making
17
CONSUMER
First Night
Civilisations
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
animal,” breathed Simon Schama
in the introduction to the first
episode. “And this is what we have
made.” Sir David Attenborough,
who commissioned the original
Civilisation as a way to promote
colour television, would approve.
Future episodes will be
presented by Mary Beard and
David Olusoga but Schama’s
opener investigated “The Second
Moment of Creation”. It focused
on those moments when humans
began to create things not purely
for sustenance or shelter but to be
seen – and, eventually, filmed with
a very expensive drone camera.
The plural in the title reflects
the fact that this series goes
beyond Clark’s trawl through
Europe. So Schama hopped from
Spain to South Africa, Greece
to Jordan, China to Mexico. The
episode opened in Palmyra, the
ancient city destroyed by Isis
soldiers. Their actions, said
Schama, were the very opposite
of civilisation – but it set the tone
By Josie Clarke
Simon Schama was an erudite host but the artefacts were the real stars BBC
for an hour exploring humanity,
creativity and posterity.
From there, the action whizzed
to South Africa’s Cape coast,
where a lump of red ochre crisscrossed with lines was held up
as the oldest deliberately etched
marks ever discovered. From
there, we moved to cave paintings,
including the extraordinary
37,000-year-old hand stencils of El
Castillo in Spain. “A long-distance
greeting,” as Schama put it.
Schama was an enthusiastic
and erudite host. The real stars,
though, were the artefacts, filmed
in loving close-up. The Venus of
Brassempouy, aged 25,000, was
a highlight – tiny, enigmatic and
beautiful. Equally striking was
the remarkable Greek sealstone
carving, discovered in 2015,
bearing Europe’s – possibly the
world’s – first fight scene.
Part travelogue, part Time
Team, with some art appreciation
thrown in, Civilisations is
no major revolution in arts
programming – but it’s lavish and
lovely to look at.
Alice Jones
Broadband providers will have to let
customers walk away penalty-free if
they take longer than a month to meet
their promised internet speeds, the
telecoms regulator has announced.
In future, providers will always
have to give a minimum guaranteed
speed to a potential customer at the
point of sale, Ofcom said.
If the speed drops below the
promised level, broadband suppliers
will have one month to improve
performance before they must let the
customer walk away penalty-free.
Currently, providers have an
unlimited amount of time to resolve
the problem before customers can
leave their contract if speeds fall
below a minimum guaranteed level.
The right to exit a contract penaltyfree will also apply for the first time
to landline and TV packages bought
together with broadband, meaning
customers will not be locked in to
a TV contract if their broadband
service falls short.
As an extra protection, providers
will have to give more realistic
peak-time speed information at the
point of sale.
18
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TheOpinionMatrix
COMMENT FROM HOME AND ABROAD
MAX
MOSLEY
SIR JOHN
MAJOR
MICHEL
BARNIER
HOPE
HICKS
GOOD FRIDAY
AGREEMENT
SURANNE
JONES ON TV
Press attack
could rewrite
history
Former PM
speaks his
mind
EU Brexit
chief in hot
water again
PR chief is
latest to leave
the House
Critical to
retain the
peace deal
‘Save Me’: new
drama is grim
but gripping
TheTimes
New Statesman
The Sun
New YorkMagazine
Financial Times
The Guardian
Daily Mail
TheSpectator
WashingtonPost
The Independent
His campaign against
the press seems to be
motivated by a belief
that bringing up the
past is “outrageous”.
If he had then made
an account of his past
beliefs, no one could
have reproached him.
He took the path of
obfuscation. This has
undone him.
(David Aaronovitch)
Daily Telegraph
What Major has
done is give voice to
something a lot of
pro-Remain MPs are
saying privately: which
is that they could “vote
down the deal” when
the Government’s
so-called “meaningful
vote” comes around.
(Stephen Bush)
Max Mosley is seeking
to use data protection
laws to require outlets
to remove archived
information deemed
by the applicant to
be inaccurate. Were
he to succeed, he
would be able to
remove reference
to this episode from
newspaper libraries.
(Editorial)
When he was Prime
Minister, Sir John
Major complained that
Margaret Thatcher
interfered in his
government after
leaving No 10. Now
he launches a fullthroated assault on
Theresa May’s Brexit
strategy, seemingly
impervious to how
disloyal he is being to
his party and leader.
(Editorial)
Quote of
the day
It should be clear
to everyone that
Michel Barnier must
be fired. We are told
by Brussels that
our Government’s
positions are
impossible. But
Barnier’s are far
more unworkable.
(Editorial)
Kristalina Georgieva
says she decided
to resign as a vice
president of the
European Commission
when she found out
that Barnier had been
put in charge of Brexit
talks. At the time,
this seemed baffling.
Now it makes sense.
Brexit is difficult, and
Barnier’s tactics are
making it far more so.
(Editorial)
Hope Hicks entered
American politics a
grinning 26-year-old
member of the public
relations team. She
exits from the West
Wing with a life
that’s bigger now
but, in painful ways,
much smaller than it
was; as transformed
as American
politics itself.
(Olivia Nuzzi)
What will fill the void
left by Hope? Or was
there even a Hope
there, in the first place?
She should have been
the last thing left in
this Pandora’s box.
There is supposed
to be something left
in the box after the
monsters fly out.
(Alexandra Petri)
Calls to abandon
the Good Friday
Agreement are doing
more to threaten
the British union
than anything
else. Disrupting or
dismantling it risks
imposing binary
solutions and
identities on one of the
four constituent parts
of the UK.
(Tom Tugendhat)
Allies insist the
Foreign Secretary
has been selectively
quoted over Northern
Ireland. But it will fuel
fears that Brexiteers
are so obsessed with
their project that
they are prepared to
sacrifice the Good
Friday Agreement.
(Andrew Grice)
Lennie James as writer
and star, Suranne
Jones as a desperate
mother, and a complex
mystery with a missing
child at the heart of
it – there are so many
elements of Save Me
(Sky Atlantic) that point
towards a Guaranteed
Quality TV Moment
that it would have been
shocking if it failed to
live up to expectations.
(Rebecca Nicholson)
The Arts Desk
Workrate of the Week
award goes to Lennie
James, who not only
stars in this drama but
wrote and produced it
as well. If you’re able to
withstand a whole lot
of grey with a layer of
grim on top, this might
be one for you.
(Adam Sweeting)
LifeInBrief
SIR BRIAN BAILEY FORMER DIRECTOR OF CHANNEL 4
My favourite
comment
I got, when
pitching a
sitcom: “We’ve
got a female
comedy
this year.”
Caitlin Moran
The journalist rails
against sexism in
TV production
“A born negotiator”, “the wisest counsel”
and “a true public servant” are just
some of the tributes that have been
paid to Sir Brian Bailey, who has died at
the age of 94.
Sir Brian, who lived at Taunton,
Somerset, was a former RAF navigator
who saw active service in the Second
World War. After the war, he spent
most of his professional life working as
a union official. He was district officer
for the National and Local Government
Officers’ Association (Nalgo) for 31
years from 1951.
Sir Brian also spent 13 years as
South West regional secretary of
the Trades Union Congress. Later, he
became one of the most influential
figures in television in the West
Country. He was the first chairman of
Television South West when it won the
ITV regional franchise from Westward
in 1980, a position he held until 1993.
He was also director of Channel 4
and served as its deputy chairman for
two years until 1991.
Sir Brian gave many years of his
life to public service, especially in the
field of health. He was the chairman
of the South Western Regional
Health Authority for seven years, and
served on the Government’s Health
Education Council.
He was a county councillor in
Somerset for nearly 20 years and
became leader of the Labour group on
the authority. He became a magistrate
in 1964 and was chairman of the
Taunton Deane magistrates’ bench for
five years from 1987.
He was created OBE in 1976,
received his knighthood in 1983 and
was appointed the deputy lieutenant of
Somerset in 1988.
Somerset’s current Lord Lieutenant,
Annie Maw, described Sir Brian as a
“fantastic public servant” who would
be sadly missed. She added: “The world
is a poorer place for his passing but his
memory will live on.
“It is my belief that you only truly die
when no one can remember you any
longer, and in Sir Brian’s case that will
be a very long time.”
Sir Brian was married for more than
50 years to Nina (née Saunders), who he
always said was his greatest support.
She died in 2010. They had two children
but one daughter, Sue, died in 2011.
He was passionate about classical
music. For two years, he served as
a trustee of the European Chamber
Orchestra, vice president of the
Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra
and patron of the Taunton Sinfonietta.
He was also the chairman of governors
of Dartington College of Arts for 11
years. He listed music as one of his
hobbies, alongside football, cricket, golf
and tennis – “watching, not playing”,
as he once said. Sir Brian is survived
by his other daughter, Lynne. and Sue’s
three children.
THE INDEPENDENT
Born 25 March 1923
Died 22 February 2018
Clinton Rogers
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MyView
StephenBush
We deserve better than witless debate
Muddled statements on race from Labour’s new equality adviser bode ill
T
he physicist Wolfgang
Pauli is credited with
coining the phrase “not
even wrong”: when
a scientific theory
was so thoroughly
mistaken that it couldn’t even be
said to be incorrect.
Something similar could be said
for Munroe Bergdorf, the woman
who became the first black trans
person to work as a L’Oreal model,
whose remarks on social media
are once again in the news after
becoming an adviser to the shadow
minister for women and equalities,
Dawn Butler.
One of her more inflammatory
statements was that the
suffragettes – the women who
campaigned for the right to vote at
the beginning of the 20th century –
were “white supremacists”. This is
one of those wearying statements
that sounds radical but is in fact
banal. The suffragettes were a
cross-partisan and cross-class
campaign (though only Labour
officially supported women’s
suffrage before the First World
War) and the nature of British
politics is that meant that some
of the women involved were, you
guessed it, white supremacists.
Many were cheerleaders for the
British Empire and some later
became out-and-out fascists.
It is not especially interesting
or worthwhile to point this out,
particularly as Bergdorf then went
on to claim only “white women”
received the vote in 1918. This is
not true: the right to vote in Britain
has never been restricted on the
grounds of race, but of property.
Some of the wealthy women who
received the vote in 1918 were
non-white.
As so often when someone in
British politics says something
exceptionally witless, Bergdorf was
talking about American politics,
and simply hadn’t bothered to
check whether the same applied
this side of the Atlantic.
The same muddled thinking
applied to another of Bergdorf’s
remarks: she claimed that “all white
people are racist”, another one of
those seemingly radical but actually
banal statements. All people are
racist: you, me, everyone. Every
day, we all make hundreds of snap
judgements based on race, accent,
style of dress, and a great number of
these judgements are unflattering
and many of them are flatly wrong.
The other day I was surprised
when I found out that a man I speak
to occasionally in the pub about
Munroe Bergdorf has caused controversy by saying suffragettes were ‘white supremacists’ GETTY
the misfortunes of Arsenal was a
graduate of Kings College London
and a City banker. The reason for
my shock? I’m ashamed to say it
was his thick Russian accent.
Our brains are hardwired to
make quick assessments, that in
the harsh and dangerous world
that we evolved from might have
When Munroe
Bergdorf says all
white people are
racist, she turns
people off
been wrong but prevented us from
meeting an untimely end at the
hands of a sabre-toothed tiger.
Now, however, that once-useful
instinct leads businesses to hire
someone in possession of a posh
accent and a confident manner over
a more qualified but less outwardly
impressive candidate, costing them
profits and by extension costing
everyone else a healthier economy.
Bergdorf’s mistake is the
introduction of the word “white”, as
if superior virtue and an immunity
to implicit bias were tendencies
that black people inherited along
with greater levels of melanin in
their skin.
But her critics are, for the most
part, “not even wrong” too. The
Conservatives are complaining
that it is offensive to describe the
Suffragettes as white supremacists.
One wonders to whom, exactly, as
the relevant women are all dead
and the statement is in many cases
true. Yesterday was World Book
Day and one can only hope that
Conservative HQ might have seen
fit to invest in a good history of the
early 20th-century.
That party, meanwhile, is angrily
protesting that it is simply not
true to say that all white people
are racist, not on the correct
basis that bias and prejudice is a
universal failing of all of us, but on
the grounds that it is simply not
true. Quite how they reconcile that
with Theresa May’s excellent work
in erecting new systems to combat
the implicit bias we all have is an
open question.
What Bergdorf and her
detractors have in common is
that neither of them are really
trying to win people over. When
Bergdorf says “all white people
are racist”, she turns off even
people who know that all people
are capable of, and regularly
engage in, racist behaviour. When
Conservative MPs claim that the
suffragettes were unimpeachable
paragons of good behaviour or that
somehow modern Brits have freed
themselves from the evolutionary
impulse to make snap judgements
about one another, they aren’t even
appealing to everyone who finds
Bergdorf’s remarks incendiary.
Neither side really wants to have
a big or interesting conversation
about racism and British history:
they just want to signal to “their
side” that they are sticking it to the
other lot, and the consequence is a
national conversation on race and
racism that is loud, uninformative
and thoroughly depressing to watch.
We all deserve a better debate from
our politicians than this.
Stephen Bush is special
correspondent at the ‘New
Statesman’
Twitter: @stephenkb
i@inews.co.uk
20
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Please include a contact address with all correspondence
@
Don’t blame
the referees
Your
View
TWEETS
AND EMAILS
Stephen Stokes (Your
View, 1 March) is
disingenuous towards
the lot of football
referees. They are in a
no-win situation. Players
cheat,. They fall over at
the slightest touch and
many are seen holding
their faces when there
has been no contact. The
only answer, I believe, is
greater sanctions. Send
the players off that cheat;
use video replays like
rugby if necessary and
ban them; but please don’t
keep castigating referees.
PETER BRYANT
CHURCHDOWN,
GLOUCESTERSHIRE
be supported by an
illuminating comparison.
The right to bear arms
is enshrined in the US
constitution so that
ordinary citizens can
rise up against the threat
of tyranny, either from
outside or internally.
Switzerland, too, has a
gun culture – every male
citizen is trained to bear
arms, and issued with a
weapon and ammunition. Guns are easily
available for anyone to
purchase, yet there are
no mass shootings in
Switzerland, which has
one of the lowest crime
rates in the world.
ROBERT BUNTING
CAMBRIDGE
Train for jobs,
not hobbies
Contrasting
countries
Deborah Orr’s discussion
of American attitudes
to guns (i, 1 March) can
I have three grandsons
over the age of 21.
At the age of 16, two
took apprenticeships
8 days
from on
l
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taking rare opportunities to experience
things together and also
recognised that not all
learning takes place
behind a school desk.
What a pity that state
school pupils and their
families do not have
the same chance to take
opportunities for extracurricular activities in
term time.
JANET DAWSON
WINDSOR, BERKSHIRE
Please stop
castigating referees,
they are in a no-win
sutuation GETTY
against the advice of
their teachers, and
both are now earning
good money, one as a
bricklayer and the other
as a heating engineer.
They were both
trained on the job with
day release at college,
were paid throughout
their apprenticeships
and don’t owe anything.
The other grandson
was encouraged to go
to university to study
sport sciences. The
carrot that was dangled
was membership of a
local golf club. The result
is that he now owes
money for a course that
was really training for a
hobby which only a small
number of students
are able to turn into a
profession. Isn’t it about
time that training from
the age of 16 should
lead to jobs rather than
hobbies or interests?
DAVID YOUNG
LANGLEY MOOR,
DURHAM
Eastern beast or
western pest?
Roger Baresel (Your
View, 1 March) mentions
a weather forecaster’s
use of the phrase
“pestering of snow”. How
appropriate. It occurred
to me that following
“the beast from the east”,
Storm Emma should
be nicknamed “the Pest
from the West”.
MATTHEW PLANT
CREWE, CHESHIRE
The reference to “the
Beast from the East”
reminds me of a quote
my father-in-law learnt
at school in the 1920s.
When the wind would
change to an easterly
direction in winter he
used say “the wind from
the east is neither good
for man nor beast”.
DANNY BUCKLEY
CARDIFF
Simon Kelner complains
about some schools in
I was really pleased to
read that the head of
Reigate Grammar School
encouraged parents
and pupils to take a
day off to have fun in
the snow together. He
has acknowledged the
importance of families
Reading about the
reduction in library
book loan stocks I was
left wondering whether
public libraries across
the UK and Ireland could
possibly take a leaf out
of the charity sector’s
book and start accepting
donations of good
quality books from
the public? This would
boost their loan range
and also benefit their
existing customers.
TRUDI DARGAN
GUNNISLAKE,
CORNWALL
And our other
proposal is...
You report (i, 1 March)
that Theresa May
has rejected the EU’s
proposals relating to
the island of Ireland.
If only there was
somebody within the UK
Government whose job
it was to come up with a
counter-proposal.
SIMON GAMBLE
BRIGHTON
MORE COMMENT oninews.co.uk
Our commitment
We take very seriously our responsibility to
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grateful to readers for pointing out any errors.
i adheres to the Independent Press Standards
Organisation (Ipso) code of practice. If you wish to
complain about our editorial coverage, especially
IN MONDAY’S
LIFE
Westminster closing
because of the snow. He
and his workmates, “who
live in various corners of
London, got to the office
at their usual time”.
Does he not realise
that, unlike him, most
teachers cannot afford
to live in central London,
but have to travel in.
Perhaps he missed
the news that there
were barely any trains
running and there was
chaos on the roads.
S SMITH
BEDFORDSHIRE
Lending books
to libraries
Hello from
the other side
How one man
left special
messages for
loved ones after
learning he was
terminally ill
with relation to inaccuracy or intrusion, please
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by email on inquiries@ipso.co.uk.
ARTS
Wilde times:
John Malkovich
‘I’m less
confrontational
and hot-tempered
than I used to be’
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2 March 2018
Skept-ical, Naomi? Not any longer
Twitter: @jess_barrett
While speculation abounded
online, 12 hours later, the cover of
GQ dropped, featuring – you guessed
it – Naomi and Skepta, topless and
nuzzling each other very intimately.
A quick call to GQ’s press office
informed us that we’ll need to wait
until tomorrow before their full
interview is released, leaving fans
hanging on yet again for public
confirmation of an epic love story.
Well played Naomi, well played.
family getting ready and said: “When
mum makes you go to school in the
snow (and your friends don’t go!)
#terriblemother.”
And there wasn’t even hot
chocolate en route. Nope,
instead it was a tasty snack of
chopped celery, peas and raw red
pepper for the Beckhams. Salad in
this weather? Now that is appalling.
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one of our beautiful stores for a down-to-earth chat.
I bet she looked
good on the
dancefloor
If music is the food of love, then
dancing must be the... well, you get the
idea. Alicia Vikander, 29, has revealed
that her first few encounters with her
now-husband Michael Fassbender, 40,
were purely dancefloor based.
The couple - who married in Ibiza
in October last year – first met at
the Toronto Film Festival in 2014
and apparently just let their feet do
the talking. “The first two times we
met, we didn’t chat, we only danced,”
Vikander said.
The pair have since relocated to
Lisbon, Portugal, and the Swedish
actress told Elle magazine that the
B-word is partly to blame for them
leaving the UK: “When I met my
husband three and a half years ago,
he had mentioned he’d been to Lisbon
and loved it, and I knew friends who
were moving out there.
“And that was a time when I was
21
By Jessica Barrett and Laura Martin
i@inews.co.uk
It’s a tough break for the Beckham
Snow
kids. While most of the UK’s
were out lobbing
joke for children
snowballs at each other, it
was business as usual for an
‘terrible unimpressed
Romeo, Cruz
Harper, as mum Victoria
mother’ and
insisted they went to school.
The popstar-turnedBeckham fashionista
posted videos of the
When you’ve been in the fashion
business as long as Naomi Campbell,
you know exactly how to hype an
audience up when rumours of a
relationship are circulating.
The legendary supermodel
dropped a little teaser of her
reported romance with grime star
Skepta on Wednesday night, when
she posted a picture of a naked
man and woman entwined, with a
question mark over the top.
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just starting to feel really at home in
London, but after Brexit I think I was
like: ‘Meh, you know what, I want to
stay in Europe’.”
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population...
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It’s a sad day when our rock stars stop behaving badly
KELNER’S VIEW
Simon
Kelner
K
eith Richards, now aged
74, may, at one time, have
said that he wanted to die
before he got old – but, in
the event, he just got old.
The Rolling Stone has had to
make some concessions to the
ageing process – he hasn’t had a
drink this year and just says no to
drugs these days – but his ability to
make trouble, keep a feud burning
and stay in the public eye has
not withered.
We do want our rock stars
to behave badly, and we like it
when they grow old disgracefully.
Richards, a hard-living, guitarthrowing hell-raiser has, merely
by hanging around long enough,
achieved the status of a much-loved
national figure. Thankfully, however,
he’s still capable of causing a stir.
He’s kept up hostilities with Elton
John for years, while his difficult
relationship with Mick Jagger has
been well documented. They’ve
performed together for more than
50 years and behave like brothers –
which, of course, means they fall out
in the way only brothers can (cf the
Gallaghers, of whom more later).
Richards gave an interview
recently in which he
suggested that it was
time Jagger had a
vasectomy. “Mick’s a
randy old bastard,”
he said. “It’s time for
the snip – you can’t be
a father at that age.”
(Jagger fathered his
eighth child last year at
the age of 73.)
Compared to some of the
hurtful things he has said about
Jagger in the past – calling him a
snob, for instance, and mocking the
size of his manhood – this was, it’s
fair to say, relatively small beer. But
Richards is obviously getting soft in
his old age. He went online to post a
fulsome apology to Jagger.
“I deeply regret the comments
I made about Mick... which were
completely out of line,” he wrote.
“I have, of course, apologised to him
in person.”
What’s going on? Has Richards
– whose public life has been
characterised by an absence of
compromise – succumbed to the
mores of the age? Don’t take a
position. Don’t speak your mind.
Don’t offend.
It’s a sad day if even Richards feels
obliged to keep his own counsel.
But then, it’s probably better than
drowning in the tide of bile that
emanates from Liam Gallagher who,
in maintaining the rancorous feud
with his brother Noel, adopts more
of a scorched earth policy.
In a recent interview, he
brought Noel’s wife,
Sara, and his child,
Anais, into the verbal
firing line, saying:
“I don’t give a f*** if
his missus gets a bit of
s*** on Twitter, or his
f***ing kid.”
The irresponsibility
of effectively endorsing the
trolling of two young women on
social media is one thing, but Liam,
with records to sell and gigs to
promote, was never going to back
down. In fact, he used social media
to turn up the invective, making a
vile comparison between Noel and
Sara and Fred and Rosemary West.
Liam Gallagher is still an angry
young man, even though he is nearer
50 than 40, and it may suit his
promotional purposes to maintain
this public shouting match.
One day, the Gallagher brothers
will make up – but by that time,
they’ll probably both be pensioners,
like Richards and Jagger. If Noel’s
expecting an apology, he may have to
wait until Liam is 74 to get it.
DIPLOMACY
gizmos, and it was apparent why.
Putin presented a virtual parade
of Russia’s latest military wizardry,
and seemed to be enjoying himself.
Russia, he said, now had a new
nuclear-powered cruise missile that
was unique in that it could beat any
missile defence system. Of course,
the audience lapped it up. The
whole display culminated in calls
from Putin for national unity and
lusty singing of the national anthem
(Soviet-era tune, post-Soviet words).
Putin was careful to stress his
defensive and peaceful intentions.
Russia would only use nuclear
weapons in response to a nuclear
attack. But the demand to be taken
seriously by the US superpower and
the sense of grievance that, in his
view, the West had exploited Russia’s
weakness after the collapse of the
Soviet Union were both there. This
demand to be treated as an equal,
on the basis of new military might,
could well set the tone for Putin’s
fourth presidential term.
It seems that relations between
Russia and the United States are not
as dire as they are often presented.
But a clash of some sort may already
have happened, with possibly dozens
of Russians killed last month in a US
air strike in northern Syria – and the
response on the Russian side was to
play it down. Whatever the truth of
this episode, the way it was handled
suggests there is no appetite in
either Moscow or Washington for a
war. We can but hope that this frame
of mind survives Russia’s election
later this month.
Mary
Dejevsky
Putin talks
weapons but
pulls punches
D
onald Trump was so
impressed by France’s
Bastille Day parade that he
recently called for a similar
military extravaganza to be staged
in Washington DC. He may now be
considering whether the venerable
US State of the Union address
might not need some radical
revision, too, after Vladimir Putin’s
pre-election tour de force took the
Russian President’s annual address
to a new level.
Putin’s two-hour speech was in
two distinct parts. The first was
electoral bread and butter – a
detailed blueprint for modernising
Russia, with an emphasis on social
policy and demographics – but it
is the second part that most of his
audience will remember.
This year’s speech had been
moved from the usual ornate
Kremlin venue to a Moscow
exhibition hall with all the latest
THE INDEPENDENT
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BOOKS
TELEVISION
Choose life?
It’s death for
one of Welsh’s
characters
Viewers offered more
choice as Sky and
Netflix join forces
By Brian Ferguson
By Adam Sherwin
Irvine Welsh will host a huge
warehouse party to launch
the final instalment of his
Trainspotting trilogy – in which
one of his characters will be
killed off.
The Scottish author will
join forces with the Edinburgh
International Book Festival
and arts collective Neu! Reekie!
to take over a former biscuit
factory in his native Leith for the
300-capacity event.
A host of special guests are
expected to perform, along
with Welsh, who will read
excerpts from the novel Dead
Men’s Trousers, which reunites
the Trainspotting characters
Renton, Begbie, Spud and Sick
Boy when they are in their fifties.
Welsh, who has hinted that
Dead Men’s Trousers could form
the basis for a film, will also be
interviewed about the book,
which fans will be able to buy five
days ahead of its publication.
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
Old-school ravers: Jonny Lee Miller as Simon ‘Sick Boy’ Williamson and Ewan
McGregor as Mark Renton in the 2017 film ‘T2 Trainspotting’ SONY RELEASING
The story unfolds after a
chance encounter between
Renton, now an “international
jetsetter” managing DJs, and
reinvented artist Begbie.
Welsh said: “The book will
be the last time the four main
characters are together. I’ve no
doubt that some might resurface
in any future books, but as a gang
they are sadly done.
“It’s great to basically end their
adventures where they started
off, right in Leith at the Biscuit
Factory. It’s very close to my
Auntie Betty’s old house, where
we would all assemble as kids
before going to Easter Road for
the football or the State Cinema
for the matinees.
“So Leith, and specifically that
part of it, plays a huge role in the
formation of those characters
who are now known all over the
world. Without sounding like a
nostalgic old radge, I’m delighted
to be heading back, and I expect,
nay crave, a wild night.”
Sky and Netflix have agreed a
landmark partnership which allows
viewers to watch shows such as The
Crown and Game of Thrones through
a single television subscription.
For the first time, Sky will
make Netflix available to new and
existing customers through a new
entertainment TV package.
Integrating the Netflix app into the
Sky Q platform means that viewers
will see shows such as Stranger Things
and Black Mirror alongside Sky’s
drama Britannia on their planners.
C us to me rs w il l “e nj oy the
simplicity of one monthly bill and easy
to use, integrated user interface,”
said the partners in a joint statement.
Sky believes that most customers
are happy to pay the £9.99 a-month
Netflix premium subscription
alongside its own offering, rather
than choose between the two.
Jeremy Darroch, the Sky chief
executive, said: “By placing Sky and
Netflix content side by side, along
with programmes from the likes of
HBO, Showtime, Fox and Disney,
we are making the entertainment
e x p e r i e n c e e v e n e a s i e r fo r
our customers.”
Reed Hastings, the boss of Netflix,
added: “With this innovative new
partnership and Netflix’s stellar line
up of original content from across the
world, Sky’s customers will be able to
seamlessly access and enjoy all the
best entertainment in one place.”
Netflix will be integrated into the
Sky service this year. Dani Warner, a
TV expert at uSwitch, said Sky was
bringing its flagship set-top box “in
line with other major providers, who
already offer the streaming service
as an app through their TV boxes”.
Those viewers with Sky+ HD boxes
will need to upgrade to Sky Q to take
advantage of the new bundle.
Sky agreed a deal with
BT last year to allow BT
subscribers to watch shows such as
Game of Thrones for the first time.
24
NEWS
SYRIA
Afrin braced for long and bloody siege
Kurdish chief predicts four more years of war. By Patrick Cockburn in Qamishli
T
he Turkish attack on
the Kurdish enclave of
Afrin in northern Syria
is likely to have the same
outcome as the Syrian
army siege of Eastern Ghouta,
destroying everything but failing
to capture the area, says a senior
Syrian Kurdish leader.
The official says it was inevitable
that Afrin would come under
siege, comparing it to Eastern
Ghouta where civilians have been
left without food or humanitarian
aid, adding that Afrin has a single
supply line controlled by the Syrian
government and the Russians
“but they could block the way at
any moment”.
Aldar Khalil, the co-chairman
of the Movement for a Democratic
Society, the Syrian- and Kurdishdominated organisation that
controls 30 per cent of Syria, also
predicted that the war in Syria may
last “another four years”.
Mr Khalil is adamant that the
Kurdish paramilitary forces, the
People’s Protection Units (YPG),
will fight to the end for Afrin city
and will never surrender. Given the
dedication and battle experience
of its combatants, who have been
fighting Isis since 2015, a prolonged
and bloody siege is in prospect.
The problem for the two million
Syrian Kurds, a persecuted and
marginalised minority before 2011,
is that the war between President
Bashar al-Assad and the armed
opposition has enabled them to
make great political and military
gains, which will be difficult to
retain. Syrian government forces
withdrew from most of the Kurdish
region in 2012 to concentrate on
defending strategically more
important areas. The YPG began
to advance, but came under attack
from Isis which tried to capture the
Kurdish city of Kobani. The siege
was broken by American air power
at the cost of the destruction of
70 per cent of the city.
Afrin has an estimated
population of about 400,000 which
is much the same as Eastern
Ghouta. So far, the Turkish advance
has been slow. In the past few days,
despite the UN Security Council
ISIS
Resurgent jihadists ‘have killed 170’
By Patrick Cockburn
Reports of the demise of Isis
appear to have been premature.
Aldar Khalil, the co-chairman
of the Movement for a Democratic
Society, says there are signs of a
resurgence by the Islamist group.
Its fighters took advantage of
the diversion of Kurdish forces to
face the Turkish invasion of Afrin
on 20 January to make attacks in
Deir Ezzor province in eastern
Syria. “It used to be we who were
attacking Isis, but now we are
losing fighters every day and
we have had 170 killed since the
start of the Turkish operation,”
said Mr Khalil.
Reports from the ground in
eastern Syria and from former
Isis strongholds in northern
Iraq confirm that the movement,
which appeared wholly defeated
a few months ago, is showing
signs of renewed activity.
resolution calling for a 30-day truce
in all of Syria, Turkish forces have
been taking the borders of Afrin.
There are air strikes every day,
but only once or twice a week on
Afrin city, though it is being hit by
artillery. This is likely to change as
the Turkish army and Arab militias
try to fight their way into urban
areas and suffer heavy casualties.
The lesson of the many sieges in
the wars in Syria and Iraq is that
bombers and artillery destroy
almost everything in order to clear
the way for their infantry. The
outlook for Afrin, which has so far
survived the seven-year war in
Syria untouched, looks grim.
Mr Khalil is sure that the next
great battle of the Syrian war will
be fought in Afrin. He does not think
that the Turks will attack the town
of Manbij further east, as they have
often threatened to do, because of
the US military presence.
He describes a Syrian political
landscape in which all the players
still believe they can be successful,
making his belief that the Syrian
war still has at least four more years
to run sound horribly convincing.
THE INDEPENDENT
NEWS
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25
EASTERN GHOUTA
SOUTH AFRICA
First civilians
evacuated from
rebel enclave
Land reform will be
no smash and grab,
insists Ramaphosa
By Bassem Mroue
IN BEIRUT
Members of the White
Helmets, a Syrian civil
defence group, carry
victims of an air strike
on Eastern Ghouta
yesterday AP
TV
40-41
Civilians have been evacuated from
the rebel-held area of Eastern Ghouta
in Syria for the first time since daily
“humanitarian pauses” began in the
area on Tuesday.
The Syrian Arab Red Crescent
confirmed that it had helped an
elderly Pakistani man and his wife to
leave on Wednesday.
But the five-hour daily pauses
in attacks on Eastern Ghouta, a
besieged suburb of the Syrian capital,
Damascus, were not enough to allow
meaningful aid to enter or for enough
civilians to be evacuated, a senior
United Nations official warned.
Jan Egeland also said that the UN
Security Council’s resolution calling
for a 30-day ceasefire had done little
to improve the situation for civilians
in Eastern Ghouta.
Mr Egeland’s comments came
after Moscow accused Syrian rebels
of shelling a humanitarian corridor
that the Russian military had set up
with Syrian government forces.
The UN and aid agencies have
criticised the unilateral arrangement,
saying it gave no guarantees of safety
for residents wishing to leave. AP
By Samuel Osborne
South Africa’s parliament has
backed a new law which would allow
land to be seized from white farmers
without paying them compensation.
Passed by amajority of 241 votes
to 83, the proposal to amend Section
25 of the country’s constitution
would allow expropriation of land
without any financial recompense
to its owners.
It was put forward by
the radical left-wing
Economic Freedom
Fighters (EFF) party,
whose leader Julius
M a l e m a t o l d M Ps :
“We must ensure that
we restore the dignity
of our people without
compensating the criminals
who stole our land.”
The ruling African National
Congress supported the motion. It
has promised reforms to address
racial disparities in land ownership
that persist more than two decades
after the end of apartheid.
South Africa’s new President,
Cyril Ramaphosa, said he would
speed up the transfer of land from
white to black owners following his
inauguration two weeks ago. But he
stressed that it must be conducted
in a manner which preserved food
production and security.
Speaking to the National Council
of Provinces, Mr Ramaphosa (inset)
said he wanted to hold talks on
the contentious topic to avoid
panic. But he said that he
aimed to resolve “once
and for all” the issue
of racial disparities in
property ownership in
the former colony.
He added: “There is no
need for any one of us to
panic and start beating war
drums. We are going to address
this and make sure we come up with
resolutions that resolve this once
and for all. This original sin that
was committed when our country
was colonised must be resolved in
a way that will take South Africa
forward.” THE INDEPENDENT
26
NEWS
UNITED STATES
Hats the
way to
do it
Russian thief ‘tried
to kill woman with
poisoned pudding’
Chinese soldiers wait
before taking part in
a welcome ceremony
yesterday at the Great
Hall of the People in
Beijing for King Tupou
VI of Tonga, who is on
a state visit to China.
By Tom McElroy
GREG BAKER/AFP/GETTY
ENTERTAINMENT
DiCaprio and Pitt on screen together for first time
By Jill Serjeant
IN LOS ANGELES
Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt are
to star in their first film together – a
Quentin Tarantino movie set in the
1960s hippy era at around the time of
the Charles Manson murders.
Once Upon a Time in Hollywood will
feature DiCaprio as the former star
of a Western television series and Pitt
as his long-serving stunt double.
“Both are struggling to make it in a
Hollywood that they do not recognise
anymore. But Rick [DiCaprio] has a
very famous next-door neighbour...
Sharon Tate,” said Sony Pictures,
which is releasing the film.
Tate, the pregnant actress wife
of the director Roman Polanski,
Choose your
ISA funds with
our experts’ help.
LET’S TALK HOW.
was murdered in 1969 by followers
of Manson, one of America’s most
notorious criminals.
Manson, 83, died in November last
year while serving a life sentence.
The movie is scheduled for release
on 9 August 2019, exactly 50 years
after Tate and four friends were
stabbed or shot dead by the so-called
“Manson Family”. REUTERS
A Russian woman attempted to
kill her lookalike with a poisoned
cheesecake before stealing her
passport and cash, prosecutors in
New York City have alleged.
“This is a bizarre and twisted
crime that could have resulted in
the death of a woman, whose only
fault was that she shared similar
features with the defendant,”
said Richard Brown, the district
attorney for the borough of Queens.
V i k t o r i a Na s y r o v a , f r o m
Brooklyn, was charged with
attempted murder, burglary and
assault following her arrest a year
ago. The 42-year-old has denied
forcing the woman to eat the
cheesecake and then arranging the
scene to mimic a suicide attempt.
In August 2016, Ms Nasyrova
visited the home of her alleged
victim, 35, bearing a gift of a
cheesecake, according to Mr
Brown. He added that both women
had dark hair, the same skin
complexion and spoke Russian.
“The woman ate the cheesecake,
fell ill and laid down,” Mr Brown
said. “Before passing out, the
woman’s last memory is of seeing
the defendant sitting beside her
inside her home.”
He added that the next day, a
friend found the victim unconscious
in bed, “dressed in lingerie with
pills scattered around her body as
if the woman had attempted to kill
herself”. The woman was treated
in hospital and when she returned
home she realised that her passport
and employment authorisation
card were missing, along with a gold
ring and cash.
Police had the dessert tested and
confirmed that it was laced with the
tranquilliser Phenazepam. The pills
contained the same drug.
Ms Nasyrova is also accused of
drugging and killing a woman in her
native country before fleeing to New
York. She denied those charges in a
CBS television interview. She faces
up to 25 years in prison if convicted
and is next in court on 25 May.
THE INDEPENDENT
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what you
invest
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Not sure which funds to hold in your ISA? Get some recommendations from our
experts to help you make your choice.
Our Select 50 is a short list of around 50 funds picked by our research specialists.
Or, if you’d like an even more focused selection, you could consider the three
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What’s more, if you open a 2017/18 ISA online by 31 March 2018, you’ll have
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For fund ideas to make the most of your ISA, visit fidelity.co.uk
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Investments ISAs Pensions
Issued by Financial Administration Services Limited, authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Fidelity, Fidelity International, their logos and F symbol are trademarks of FIL Limited. UKM0118/21333/CSO6800B/0318
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27
Analysis
An extraordinary 48
hours for White House
Kim Sengupta
T
Hope Hicks leaves the Capitol in Washington after being questioned by the House Intelligence Committee REUTERS
Trump left more isolated as
another trusted aide quits
By Zeke Miller
IN WASHINGTON
Hope Hicks, the White House
communications director who is
one of Donald Trump’s most trusted
and longest-serving aides, has
abruptly announced her resignation,
seemingly leaving the President
more isolated in the Oval Office.
The departure of Ms Hicks,
who worked as a one -woman
communications shop during
his election campaign, came as a
surprise to most in the White House
– and cast a pall over the West Wing
at a trying time for Mr Trump.
It leaves him increasingly without
the support of the familiar aides
who surrounded him during his
campaign, and is the latest in a
string of high-level departures in the
administration’s second year.
Ms Hicks, 29, had a seemingly
untouchable role and was often
viewed more as a surrogate daughter
than a member of staff. Perhaps
most importantly, she served as
the President’s glamorous shield,
always ready to provide “Mr Trump”
with a smiling dose of positive
reinforcement, and controlling
reporters’ access to him. She was the
fourth person to occupy the position
since the President was sworn in,
with the Trump White House setting
modern records for staff turnover.
Mr Trump praised Ms Hicks for
her work, saying he “will miss
having her by my side”. She
told Mr Trump of her
decision on Wednesday.
Ms Hicks, who
o cc u p i e d t h e d e s k
closest to the Oval
Office in the West
Wing, has been a central
participant in or witness
to nearly every milestone and
controversy of the Trump campaign
and presidency. The news came a day
after Ms Hicks was interviewed for
nine hours by the House Intelligence
Ms Hicks began her White
House tenure as director
of strategic communications — a
title that only partly captured
her more expansive role as the
gatekeeper to the President.
One-minute Wijuko
NEW ZEALAND
Teenager tried to kill the Queen
By Charlotte Greenfield
New Zealand’s intelligence agency
has confirmed for the first time that
a teenager tried to assassinate the
Queen during a visit to Dunedin in
1981. The news has triggered a police
investigation into how the incident
was handled.
Documents released by the New
Zealand Security Intelligence
Service (SIS) show that Christopher
Lewis, then 17, shot at the Queen as
she got out of her vehicle on the way
to a science fair in October 1981.
Committee, which is investigating
alleged Russian interference in the
2016 election and contact between Mr
Trump’s campaign and the Kremlin.
She admitted to the panel that she
had occasionally told “white lies” for
Mr Trump. But she said she had not
lied about anything relevant to
the Russia investigation.
She has also been
interviewed by special
counsel Robert
Mueller’s team about
her role in drafting
a statement about
Donald Trump Jnr’s 2016
meeting with Russians,
as the inquiry into Russian
interference in the 2016 election and
potential misdeeds moves ever closer
to the Oval Office.
Wishing Mr Trump (inset) and his
administration the “very best”, Ms
Hicks said: “There are no words to
adequately express my gratitude to
President Trump.”
News of her departure came just
a few days after senior adviser Jared
Kushner saw his security clearance
downgraded – limiting his access to
classified information. AP
“Lewis did indeed originally
intend to assassinate the Queen.
However, [he] did not have a suitable
vantage point from which to fire, nor
a sufficiently high-powered rifle for
the range from the target,” said a 1997
SIS memo declassified last month.
Lewis, who intelligence agents
called “severely disturbed”, was not
charged with attempted murder or
treason, adding to claims that the
incident was downplayed to prevent
embarrassment. He was charged
instead with unlawful possession and
discharge of a gun. THE INDEPENDENT
How to play Place 1 – 9 once
in the grid, obeying the sums
between pairs of squares
he focus this week has,
understandably, been
on Donald Trump’s
supposed volte-face on
gun control. We have to
wait to see whether his Damascene
conversion does actually result
in strong laws to try to curb the
annual American carnage.
But behind the scenes, the
investigations into the US
President’s Russian links continue
to gather momentum with a
rising level of fallouts. In an
extraordinary 48 hours, Hope
Hicks has resigned as the White
House communications director
after telling “white lies” on
behalf of Trump, the President’s
son-in-law, Jared Kushner,
has had his security clearance
downgraded, and Trump’s threats
to fire the Attorney General, Jeff
Sessions, have become part of
Robert Mueller’s inquiry,
It is, however, another
extension of Mueller’s net that
is likely to pile on more trouble
for Trump. The special counsel,
it has emerged, has started to
question witnesses to Trump’s
business activities in Russia
before he ran for the presidency,
and whether the Kremlin may
hold compromising material.
This kind of material, known in
Russia as kompromat, is normally
about money or sex. The salacious
accounts of sex in the dossier
produced by the former MI6 officer
Christopher Steele have been
regarded as unconvincing, even as
so many of the other claims made
have turned out to be true. Trump,
according to Steele’s report, hired
prostitutes to defile the bed in the
presidential suite at the Moscow
Ritz-Carlton, where the Obamas,
whom he hated, had slept.
No evidence has appeared to
back this up. However, the main
focus of the questioning over
Trump’s past Russian connections
has been about money, with the
13
9
11
10
5
9
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
More puzzles Pages 50-51
THE INDEPENDENT
FRANCE
Le Pen investigated for Isis tweets
By Harriet Agerholm
14
financing of the Miss Universe
contest of 2013 of particular
interest. Trump’s partners in
the project were the property
developers Aras Agalarov and his
son, Emin, who was also a pop star.
Their publicist, Rob Goldstone,
arranged the New York meeting
in June 2016 between Donald
Trump Jnr, Kushner and Trump’s
then campaign manager, Paul
Manafort, with a Russian lawyer,
Natalia Veslnitskaya, who had
offered “damaging information”
about Hillary Clinton. Manafort
has since been charged by Mueller
with conspiracy, money laundering
and lying about lobbying for a
foreign power.
The business dealings of
Kushner have also long been
under scrutiny, with the latest
account, in The Washington Post,
raising questions about whether
he is susceptible to blackmail
or manipulation by foreign
governments. Kushner has seen
allies and associates heading for
the exit as his troubles rise.
The White House has had an
astonishing number of departures,
with almost the entire senior
staff in place at the start of the
Trump presidency, with the
exception of Ivanka Trump and
Kushner, now gone. This list
includes Steve Bannon, Michael
Flynn, Katie Walsh, Sean Spicer,
Reince Priebus, Gary Cohn, Dina
Powell, Rick Dearborn and Keith
Schiller. There are now persistent
reports that General John Kelly,
the President’s National Security
Adviser, may not last much longer.
The added departure of his
communications chief, Hope Hicks,
is, according to Trump’s allies,
a bitter blow. Rob Astorino, a
long-term friend of the President,
described her as “one of the people
he really, really trusted. So with
her leaving, there is only a handful
left; he is going to feel like he is on
an island”.
Circling the water, as Trump sits
alone and isolated, is the shark that
he believes is out to get him, Robert
Mueller, the special counsel.
The leader of France’s far-right
Front National (FN) party,
Marine Le Pen, has been
place under formal
investigation over
tweets depicting
Isis propaganda
and violence.
Prosecutors said
they were examining
the alleged “distribution
of violent images”. If charged
and convicted, Ms Le Pen (inset)
could face three years in prison
and a €75,000 (£67,000) fine.
Prosecutors opened an inquiry
in December 2015 after
Ms Le Pen published
a series of graphic
social media posts,
including an image of
the decapitated body
of the US journalist
James Foley.
His parents said they
were “deeply disturbed”
by the use of the photograph
of their son for political gain.
28
NEWS
CRYPTIC CROSSWORD
No 2204 BY PUNK
1
2
3
4
9
5
6
7
8
Woman pays
$493 bill with
49,300 coins
10
11
By Maya Oppenheim
12
13
15
14
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
Solution to yesterday’s Cryptic
S EM I CO
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P E K I N E S
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UNITED STATES
23
Stuck on the cryptic crossword? For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3580.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network access charge. If you are having
trouble accessing this number, please call our helpdesk on 0333 202 3390.
Full terms and conditions can be found on page 53
A woman paid her $493 (£358)
water bill entirely in one-cent coins
to protest about rising costs.
Dana McCool shared an online
video of her walking into the water
department office in her home city
of Deltona, Florida, where she paid
with 49,300 coins.
It reportedly took staff more than
three hours to count them all.
Ms McCool said she decided to
perform the “peaceful protest”
against the company over the bill
after she encountered problems
in 2016 when she received several
bills as high as $700 for about six
months. The average domestic
water bill in the area is $40 (£29).
City officials informed her that
she had a water leak in her home.
In her video, she claimed that many
other residents had been unjustly
penalised for the same issue.
Deltona Water compensated Ms
McCool for nearly $1,000 after a
leak in her irrigation system was
discovered. However, she said she
still had to pay off her arrears and
other fees.
THE INDEPENDENT
REVEALED: THE VITAL DECISION FACING
BRITAIN’S AGEING POPULATION
Arranging a Power of Attorney before it’s too late is critical to avoiding
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Quoting ref: 5IPOA
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BUSINESS SPORT
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NATURE
By Tom Embury-Dennisy
The name “white rhino”
may be derived from a
mistranslation of the Dutch word
wijd (“wide” in English), referring to
the width of the rhino’s mouth.
Law changes ‘put
Amazon at risk
of deforestation’
concerned after discovering a
new infection“much deeper” than
one they tended in his right back
leg recently.
Sudan recovered from the initial
scare earlier this year, but is now
taking much longer to recover from
the second infection.
“Everything possible is being
done to help him regain his health,”
said a spokesman for the Ol Pejeta
Conservancy, which looks after
the 45-year-old rhino at its base
in Kenya. “We are very concerned
about him – he is extremely old for
a rhino and we do not want him to
suffer unnecessarily.”
Scientists are racing to develop
in-vitro fertilisation techniques that
might keep Sudan’s lineage alive,
By Hannah Mays
Wildlife ranger Zachariah Mutai with Sudan at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy AP
using eggs from the world’s last two
northern white rhino females, which
live at the same conservancy. The
females, a mother and daughter,
have medical conditions that prevent
them from conceiving naturally.
Fertility experts have taken three
eggs from three southern white
rhinos, a less rare breed, kept at
Longleat Safari Park in Wiltshire.
The nine eggs from the female
CINEMA
SCIENCE
By Lucy Mapstone
to beat the traffic
I could only talk to Day-Lewis Dubai looking to
in character, reveals actress self-drive pods
The female star of the Oscarnominated film Phantom Thread
has admitted that she found it
“difficult” to work with Sir Daniel
Day-Lewis because he remained in
character, even when not shooting.
Vicky Krieps, a Luxembourgborn actress, plays Alma Elson,
the love interest of Sir Daniel’s
character Reynolds Woodcock, a
fastidious fashion designer.
Krieps, 34, told the London
Evening Standard that, because
of his unwavering devotion to
method acting, she ended up
interacting with Sir Daniel, 60,
while they were both in character,
away from the cameras.
She said: “He stays in character
always, and between takes he
retreats to his green room. And
I found this difficult. All I got
was a screen of whispers... I was
thinking, ‘I cannot make a movie
like this’. One day, between takes,
I left my green room and said: ‘I
want to see Reynolds’.”
Krieps said she was told by
several crew members not to go
29
BRAZIL
Race to save lineage
of world’s last male
northern white rhino
T h e wo rl d ’s o n l y s u r v i v i n g
male northern white rhino “is
starting to show signs of ailing”,
conservationists have warned.
The animal, named Sudan,
became a global icon after park
rangers were forced to place him
under 24-hour armed guard to
protect him from poachers in 2015.
But vets treating Sudan are
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
By Tarek Fahmy
IN DUBAI
Sir Daniel Day-Lewis remained in
the role of a fashion designer GETTY
to see him, but she “kept walking”
because she had “had it up to here”.
She said: “Finally, I got to the door
of his green room and knocked. I
didn’t know what would happen.
Would I be screamed at?
“He opened the door and said,
‘Alma!’. And we had tea together
and a lovely conversation about
music and Virginia Woolf. From
then on, it became a regular thing;
we would meet between takes, in
character, and just... talk.”
Dubai has begun testing
autonomous transport pods in a
trial run that it hopes will help
to transform the Gulf’s trade
and tourism hub into one of the
world’s most futuristic cities.
Officials from Dubai’s Roads
and Transport Authority (RTA)
displayed two cube-shaped
vehicles on a main street in
the city yesterday. They are
built in Italy by the industrial
design comapny Next Future
Transportation. Passers-by
stopped to try out the six-seat
vehicles and question the Italian
engineers overseeing the test.
The RTA has allocated
£300,000 for development of
the vehicles and plans to use
them for public transport
under the city’s 2030 Dubai
Future Accelerators scheme,
which aims to use self-driven
vehicles for 25 per cent of daily
commuter journeys. REUTERS
Tomorrow, in your
James Martin’s
comfort food recipes
Tasty meals to warm you up
southern rhinos were transferred
to the Avantea laboratory in Italy,
where they will mature.
They will then be fertilised in the
lab using sperm from Sudan and
also from several deceased southern
rhinos to test the IVF procedure.
Conservationists hope that
the research will pave the way to
producing viable northern white
rhino embryos. THE INDEPENDENT
Brazil’s Amazon rainforest is under
renewed threat after the country’s
supreme court upheld major changes
to environmental laws.
The changes include an
amnesty programme that scraps
penalties for landowners who cut
trees down illegally in the past.
Environmentalists fear that this
could encourage illegal deforestation.
Nurit Bensusan, of the nongovernmental organisation Instituto
Socioambiental, said: “It creates the
impression that if you deforest today,
tomorrow you’ll be handed amnesty.”
But farmers said the changes gave
producers confidence to grow the
sector, which is key to the economy.
The Amazon, most of which lies in
Brazil, is the world’s largest tropical
rainforest and is vital to soaking up
carbon emissions. THE INDEPENDENT
30
NEWS
JUSTICE
‘Every jail is a furnace that
you must keep a lid on’
One of Britain’s few female prison governors, who has encountered
Myra Hindley and Charles Bronson, talks to Sarah Freeman
V
eronica Bird admits
that having spent her
childhood dreaming
of escaping the house
she shared with
nine brothers and sisters, it was
something of an irony that she only
found true freedom behind the
high walls of some of Britain’s most
notorious prisons.
It was a journey which would
feature encounters with the
Moors Murderer Myra Hindley
and Charles Bronson, the convict
dubbed “Britain’s most violent
prisoner”, and one which was all
the more remarkable given her
start in life.
At home, the Bird family barely
had enough money for food, and
during Veronica’s early years the
only thing which was certain was
her father’s violent temper. A miner
in Barnsley, he had never been the
same since suffering a massive head
injury during a rock fall at the pit.
“That was in 1933,” says Bird. “It
was 10 years before I was born and
who knows what he would have
been like had it not happened,
but I only remember him
as a brooding menace.”
While her childhood
was hard – she still
remembers the
humiliation and
disappointment at
not been able to take
part in the school sports
day because she had no
plimsolls to wear – it was
also what made her perfect
material for the prison service.
“I knew from an early age that
if I was going to have a better life
than the one my parents had lived
then I needed to get an education,”
says Bird, who became the first in
her family to secure a scholarship
at boarding school. “In the end, my
time at school was cut short because
my family decided that I was needed
at home, but it had given me a
glimpse of another world,
and it was one I wanted
to get back to.”
Initially acting as
an unpaid babysitter
for her elder sister’s
children, Bird, who
is now 75 and has just
published a memoir,
decided in 1968 to cut
her family ties. At the age of
21, she joined the police force in
Doncaster before soon moving on to
the prison service.
“There weren’t many women
working in prisons back then, but it
never struck me that it wasn’t a job
for me,” she recalls. “When I told
my boss that I was leaving the force
SOCIETY
Are we all guilty of
unconscious bias?
Finding a job was proving impossible,
then Ziyad Marar changed his name
M
y alter ego, Paul, made
his first appearance
in my life at the age of
10. My family had just
moved from Beirut to Purley in
south London, and during my first
year in a British primary school,
the teachers decided to call me by
my Christian middle name rather
than Ziyad. But Paul vanished soon
after that.
It was only in 1989 that Paul made
NEWS
2-32
Veronica Bird (inset) was
one of only a few women
working in British
prisons in the 1960s
DAN KITWOOD/GETTY
to train as a prison officer, his first
reaction was, ‘you’ll be back’.
“I could see why. After four
years in the police, I thought I
had seen and experienced life in
the raw, but when I was sent to
Holloway Prison in London early
on in my training, inside those four
walls opened my eyes to a much
darker world. Every day was lived
on a knife edge and even the most
peaceful of afternoons could be
shattered in the blink of an eye by
a vicious fight. Every prison is a
furnace that you have to keep a lid
on. But even though I was only a
trainee, I looked at how the prison
was run and thought there had to
be a better way.”
It was also at Holloway that Bird
came face to face with Hindley,
who was serving life for killing five
children with her lover and fellow
murderer, Ian Brady, in and around
Manchester between July 1963 and
October 1965. “There is plenty of
evidence to suggest that Hindley
enjoyed her notoriety,” says Bird,
“but when I first saw her I didn’t
recognise her and I always thought
it was wrong that we allowed
her to gain a cult status. She was
manipulative, certainly, but she
wasn’t a celebrity.”
Bird quickly climbed the ranks,
ending up as governor at both
Wakefield prison in West Yorkshire
and Armley jail in Leeds, and
her life was lived to a fairly strict
routine. By 6.50am, the day staff
would have checked in, and by 8am
the inmates would have been given
their breakfast and be back in their
cells. Before lunch, there would be
an hour in the exercise yard and
visiting time and tea, the cell doors
an unwelcome reappearance, when
I was attempting to get a job in
publishing after graduating from
university. I had written to more
than a hundred publishers and
was ignored or rejected by them
all, except for a single interview
for a job I didn’t get. Talking to my
father, he said the problem was my
first name and that I should switch
to my middle name.
I was shocked at the suggestion,
but pretty desperate by then
after eight miserable months
of applications while working
in the jackets, coats and suits
merchandising department at
Dorothy Perkins. So I swallowed
my pride and did so.
Paul did far better than Ziyad had
done. He made seven applications,
got four interviews – and was
offered a job. But at the same time,
I received an offer from Sage – the
company I still work at today –
having applied under my real first
name. I opted to go with them.
Looking back, I don’t know why
I was so shocked at my father’s
suggestion. I had seen enough
through his eyes, and received
enough insights from a psychology
degree, to realise that unconscious
bias is rife in human judgements.
This is why these days, as part of
the effort to combat prejudice,
many organisations anonymise
the names of applicants to help
ensure the employers cannot judge
unfairly based on such cues as a
non-Western name.
The research on unconscious
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
would be locked by 8.30pm. “When
I arrived as governor at Armley it
was one of the biggest prisons in
Europe,” says Bird.
“There were more than 1,000
male prisoners confined there,
many of them lifers and it was
a place where the likes of the
Yorkshire Ripper and IRA
bombers had passed through.
“I had been told it was in a mess
and as well as making it run like
clockwork, I was also charged
with reducing the number of
suicides. Looking in, people don’t
understand how much mental
health issues there are in a prison.
It was such a serious problem
at Armley that we had several
Samaritans training prisoners to
be what we called ‘listeners’.”
One inmate who needed no
introduction was Bronson.
Originally sentenced for armed
robbery, the former bare-knuckle
boxer was known as the prison
system’s most violent prisoner for
taking a succession of jail officers
hostage. “I had to visit him daily,”
says Bird, who is a petite 5ft 5in
tall. “He could never be allowed
out of his cell for fear of him taking
another hostage, so while I never
got close to him physically, I did get
to know him quite well.
“He was ever the gentleman with
me and a man of extraordinary
contrasts. In fact to me, Charlie
represented all that was wrong
with the prison service. As he said
himself, ‘I’m a nice guy. Sometimes
I lose all my senses and become
nasty. That doesn’t make me evil
– just confused’.”
Throughout her years behind
bars, Bird, who was created
OBE in 2000, was guided by one
philosophy. “I always told my staff,
‘treat the prisoners with respect
then they will treat you with
respect’,” she says. “Sometimes
they looked a little surprised, but
it always proved to be true – and
that’s what I am most proud of.
“I joined the service to help those
less fortunate than myself. I hope
that I helped give them a better life
one where hopelessness could be
replaced by hope and where despair
could be traded for confidence. It
was a privilege to be given a chance
to make a difference.”
‘Veronica’s Bird: Thirty-Five Years
Inside As A Female Prison Officer’
by Veronica Bird and Richard
Newman is out now (£8.99,
Clink Street Publishing)
bias makes particularly depressing
reading when you consider what it
tells you about how prone we are
to implicit stereotypes and dodgy
first impressions.
However much we convince
ourselves that we are fair-minded,
evidence suggests that we have
unconscious biases that colour
our perceptions of each other. And
because these are unconscious,
we have little capacity to do much
about it.
This is an edited
excerpt from ‘Judged:
The Value of Being
Misunderstood’
by Ziyad Marar,
which is out now
(Bloomsbury, £20)
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
Another
View
Mark
Steel
That clever
Farage knows
the truth
about global
warming
T
hree days before the snow,
the warnings started.
“Whatever you do, STAY
IN for AT LEAST A
YEAR. Do NOT answer
the door, as it will probably be a yeti.
Don’t go into the kitchen, as some
fridges are collaborating with the
weather and burping out Antarctic
blizzards, so you may be crushed to
death by your washing machine in
an avalanche.”
A reporter in Chelmsford for
Sky News said: “Behind me,
you can see how extreme these
weather conditions are, as the
water under this bridge has literally
turned into ice.”
It turns out the Beast from the
East has magic powers and can
transform water into a previously
unknown solid substance. Do NOT
try to cross this “ice” – not only
might you slip on it, but someone
might be curling on it and you could
trip over a broom.
Then the snow actually started,
so reporters told us: “The scenes
here are exactly the same as those
faced by the French army when
they retreated from Moscow. Every
zumba class in the area has been
cancelled until further notice,
and even Napoleon didn’t have to
put up with that.”
By tomorrow, The One Show will
warn us: “The best advice is to sit
absolutely still, and if you hear a
noise, call the Army.”
Then regional programmes will
ask us not to resort to cannibalism
unless it is “absolutely necessary”.
It used to be that Britain’s
transport stopped as soon as one
snowflake landed, but
now that isn’t panicky
enough – so this time
it stopped as soon
as we expected
snow. This shows
that we are
becoming more
philosophical as
a nation, because
we fear that you
can slide on ice that
hasn’t arrived yet.
Next winter,
Southern Rail will make
announcements that say:
“All services from Brighton are
cancelled until further notice. This
is due to an unexpected increase
in the concept of slipperiness.
After all, if we imagine an object
sliding, how can we be certain this
isn’t real? For what is ‘reality’? We
apologise for any inconvenience
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
31
caused to your journey.” Meanwhile,
newspapers have been explaining
the science behind the conditions,
with articles statings such things
as: “Since the universe began, it has
been expanding, and it is now so big
that it costs too much to heat, so it
has turned all of space into a giant
snowball, because of Europe.”
Yet, in most of Britain it is just
a bit cold, and there is a small
amount of snow. Millions take the
day off, because any healthy person
takes a day off if they can. But the
people who seem to enjoy the snow
most of all are those like Nigel
Farage. Because he used the cold
weather to prove that there is no
global warming.
He said: “Large parts of central
London have no salt on the roads.
Perhaps they are all so convinced by
global warming they never thought
any would be needed.”
He makes a good point, because
what all the climate change
scientists predicted is that every
hour the whole planet, everywhere,
will get a bit warmer, as if Earth is on
a hob like a pan of milk. It’s easy to
disprove, because at night it’s colder
than it was earlier in the day. So the
planet hasn’t got warmer at all – it
has got colder, which shows how
much scientists know.
This is the sort of commonsense
reasoning we should listen to, rather
than so-called “experts” on the
climate, whose only qualification
is they’ve spent their entire life
studying the climate.
There used to be more snow than
this. According to the Met Office,
in Merseyside there has been no
year since 1980 when there was as
much snow as there was every year
from 1960 to 1980. The trouble is
that statistics like that are hard to
grasp. But climate change scientists
Space has turned
into a giant
snowball, all
because of Europe
could prove that the planet is getting
warmer by measuring the amount of
panic when there is snow.
Before central heating, it was
calmly expected that whole rooms
would turn into ice, so if there was
a family member in there who had
dozed off, they would be encased
in the stuff and would not get out
until they had thawed out in April.
Now, when it only snows
once every few years,
the whole country
shrivels up and
cancels everything,
convinced the
snow is an evil
potion from the
East. Everyone
hurries to the
shops two days
before snow arrives
to buy a herd of
buffalo in case they
cannot get out of the
house for six months.
Climate change scientists just
need to show that Snow Panic
averaged 2.8 in 1965, but peaked
at 175.3 in 2017, and then even the
daftest climate change sceptic would
have to agree: the planet’s in trouble;
the evidence is overwhelming.
THE INDEPENDENT
32
NEWS
2-32
NEWS
Panorama
Around the
world in
10 stories
UNITED STATES
SOUTH KOREA
President rejects
Japan’s claims on
‘comfort women’
By Hannah Mays
IN SEOUL
South Korea’s President has
criticised Japan’s insistence that
the issue of Korean women who
were forced to provide sex for
Japanese troops in the Second
World War has been settled.
Thailand’s tourism authority said
yesterday that it “strongly opposes
any form of sex tourism” as it
prepared to welcome a record 37.5
million holidaymakers this year.
The statement was issued after
the tourism minister of The Gambia
reportedly told tourists last month
to go to Thailand for sex rather than
visit his West African country.
On Monday, Thai police arrested
10 Russians who were running a sextraining class for their compatriots
in the resort of Pattaya. Although
prostitution is illegal in Thailand, it is
tolerated, and brothels can be found
in most big cities. REUTERS
Speaking at a jail used to
hold Korean freedom fighters
during the colonial era, Moon
Jae-in said: “The issue of a crime
against humanity committed in
time of war cannot be closed
with just a word. A genuine
resolution of unfortunate history
is to remember it and learn a
lesson from it.”
So-called “comfort women”
provided sex for Japan’s military
in conditions akin to sexual
slavery. Many women taken to
frontline brothels were from
Korea, which was a Japanese
colony from 1910 to 1945.
Karachi
When British colonial rulers
hastily left southern Asia at
Pakistan’s painful birth in 1947,
the ensuing chaos and violence
meant that little attention was
paid to the architecture they
built or influenced in Pakistan’s
biggest city, Karachi.
More than 70 years later,
architectural gems have been
torn down and many are either
crumbling or under threat
from property developers
in the country’s commercial
capital, which is mushrooming
into a mega-city.
Researchers say that the
structures, weathered by
the salty air, open the door to
Karachi’s colonial scars. Many
of the original owners were
among millions of Muslim
and Hindu refugees who fled
their homes amid communal
and religious violence that
accompanied the end of British
rule in India in 1947 and the
creation of Pakistan.
“Every brick of the heritage
building narrates a story of
those who left in 1947,” said
Akthar Baloch, an author and
historian. “They built them
with love and affection. When
people like me feel bad looking
at the neglect of these heritage
sites, one wonders how the
families of the owners must
feel if they ever visit Karachi.”
But amid the new concrete,
remnants of the colonial
legacy can still be seen, often
recognisable by their state of
neglect. REUTERS
Syed Raza Hassan
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
Death toll rises to 31 after
quake hits remote villages
IN SYDNEY
THAILAND
TV
40-41
PAPUA NEW GUINEA
The death toll from the strongest
earthquake to hit Papua New Guinea’s
rugged interior in almost a century
has climbed to 31 and will probably
rise further, officials said yesterday,
as damage to roads, runways and
telephone lines slowed relief efforts.
Remote hamlets closest to the
epicentre of the 7.5-magnitude quake
in the Southern Highlands were
buried, killing 13 people, said James
Justin, a research officer at the
Ministry of Petroleum and Energy in
the capital, Port Moresby.
Most of the other confirmed
Entire villages in the mountainous
Southern Highlands were buried
fatalities were in or around the
provincial capital of Mendi and
the town of Tari, 25 miles from the
epicentre, where aftershocks are
still being felt and people have been
sleeping in their gardens because
they fear their homes may collapse.
“Tari is completely shut down,”
said Mark Mendai, the head of the
district’s development authority. “All
of the water tanks have been turned
over and at the moment people are
suffering a lack of fresh water, as all
the rivers are dirty.”
Damage assessment in the
mountainous Southern Highlands,
350 miles to the north-west of Port
Moresby, is still incomplete.
Australia has promised emergency
aid and despatched a military C-130
transport aircraft to assist with
aerial surveillance. REUTERS
Boxing
clever
for Purim
An ultra-Orthodox
Jewish child wears a
costume at the Purim
festival in the Israeli
city of Bnei Brak
yesterday. The holiday
commemorates the
Jews’ salvation from
genocide in ancient
Persia, as recounted
in the Book of Esther.
Other customs include
sending food parcels
and dressing up in
masks and costumes. AP
UGANDA
Security agencies on alert over mysterious deaths
Mysterious deaths of foreigners
and locals are stoking fears about
crime amid an ongoing feud among
Uganda’s security agencies.
Over the past month, four
Europeans have been found dead
in the East African country. Police
say that a Finn and a Swede, whose
bodies were discovered separately
in their hotel rooms in the capital,
Kampala, might have been murdered.
The third case is of a Belgian man
who reportedly killed himself. In the
fourth case, a German man is said to
have suffered a heart attack. Earlier
this week, a young local woman was
found dead on a road, the victim of
kidnappers who chopped off two of
her fingers and sent them to her family
in an effort to force them to pay $1m.
President Yoweri Museveni has
called for the collection of the “DNA
records of everybody” in an effort to
reduce the crime rate. AP
POLAND
AUSTRALIA
RUSSIA
By Rodney Muhumuza
IN KAMPALA
Postcard
From...
FRiDAY
33-45
By Tom Westbrook
California issues Sex tourists ‘not
storm warning welcome here’
Motorists were told to avoid
mountain roads in northern
California yesterday as
weather forecasters warned
that a winter storm would
bring heavy snowfall and
powerful winds.
A blizzard warning was
issued for parts of the Sierra
Nevada, where winds were
expected to gust up to 125mph
on ridges and some areas
looked set to receive 7ft of snow.
Predictions of heavy rain
in southern California this
weekend have heightened fears
of flash flooding. AP
VOICES
18-22
New bid to halt Putin ‘to cut ties
Holocaust law
comes into effect ‘orphan tourism’ with rights court’
A law that criminalises accusing
Poland of crimes committed
by Nazi Germany came into
effect yesterday.
Officials insist it will only apply
to people who speak “against the
facts” in blaming the Holocaust
on Poland. But it has caused a rift
with Israel, which fears its aim is
to repress research into killings of
Jews by Poles during the Second
World War. Poland denies such
killings ever took place. AP
Australia has launched a campaign
to stop “orphanage tourism”, which
advocacy groups say has been used
to exploit and traffic children in some
of the world’s poorest countries.
The United Nations and charities
including Save the Children have
warned that children in countries like
Cambodia have been taken from their
homes and placed in orphanages to
satisfy demand from tourists, many
of them Australian, who want to
spend time volunteering. REUTERS
Russia may withdraw from the
European Convention on Human
Rights and end co-operation
with the European Court of
Human Rights, the RIA news
agency reported yesterday, citing
unnamed government sources.
Vladimir Putin’s regime
was said to be considering
withdrawing from the
Strasbourg-based court because
many of its decisions ran counter
to Russia’s interests. REUTERS
02.03.2018
FR DAY
Film
Music
Comedy
Theatre
GoingOut
Staying In
Television
Books
I was told
that talking
about having
children
makes you
less sexy
Susan Sarandon was once warned that her acting career would be over by age 40. Now 71, she is
still commanding leading roles, but the industry has a long way to go, she tells Eddi Fiegel
“Y
ou have to choose to be
beautiful or smart,” says
Susan Sarandon, “If you’re
smart, you’re not very feminine. I don’t think I was
ever the most beautiful, so I got character
parts, which allowed me to survive.”
At 71, the star of Thelma and Louise, Dead Man Walking, The Witches of
Eastwick and the recent BBC drama
Feud: Bette and Joan has managed to
steer a narrow pathway where she has
been perceived as desirable while also
clearly possessing a brain.
The alarming notion that a woman
might be able to combine the two is pertinent not only to Hollywood and Sarandon’s
career but also to her latest project, Bombshell – The Hedy Lamarr Story. The documentary tells the story of the 1940s film
star, whose raven hair and dazzling blue
eyes garnered her the moniker of “the
most beautiful woman in the world”. She
was the star of numerous films, including
Algiers with matinée idol Charles Boyer
and Cecil B De Mille’s epic Samson and Delilah. But it was her beauty which took centre stage. Walt Disney used her face as the
model for Snow White, and she inspired
the original Batman comics’ Catwoman.
Her personal life kept gossip columnists
busy, with six husbands and affairs with
Spencer Tracy, Howard Hughes and a
young senator named John F Kennedy.
However, there was another aspect
to her life which was arguably at least
as captivating. Since she was a small
child, Lamarr, who was born Hedwig
Kiesler to assimilated Jewish parents in Vienna, had been fascinated
by engineering, spending hours dismantling and reassembling toys such as her
mechanical music box. After she heard the
news during the Second World War that a
British ship carrying evacuee children had
been torpedoed by a German submarine,
she became determined to prevent
such a tragedy happening again.
FR DAY
34
FILM
‘There just
aren’t that
many stories of
older women’
Continued from page 33
Her solution was a system
whereby a ship’s radio frequencies
are constantly shifted, thereby
making them undetectable and
unjammable – a concept which
subsequently became known as
“frequency hopping”.
She presented her idea to the
US Navy, but they swiftly decreed
it unusable and, as far as Lamarr
was aware, that was the end of it.
But by the mid-1950s, the Americans had returned to her idea
and began implementing it. Her
theory now underpins the secure
Wi-Fi, GPS and Bluetooth technology that we all use every day
– although Lamarr, who died in
2000, never received a penny.
The idea that a woman renowned for her beauty could have
invented something so groundbreaking was clearly too radical
a notion for many to contemplate
and for years, controversy raged
as to whether the invention was
merely one of Lamarr’s many
yarns about her life.
Bombshell is full of such stories,
and rather than merely presenting us with the usual sequence of
talking heads, we hear Lamarr’s
own voice captured in a series of
audio tapes recorded by a journalist from Forbes magazine in 1990.
The frequency hopping scenario, and the uncertainty behind
it, particularly appealed to Sarandon. “One of the reasons I was
interested in this story,” she says,
“was because it was so full of contradictions and our very limited
idea of what women can be.”
She was brought to the project
by the film’s producer, Adam Haggiag, a long-time friend, whose sister Alexandra Dean was the film’s
director and initiator. Sarandon
was keen to lend her name and
expertise to a project not only
about a woman, but also elegantly
directed by a woman.
“Telling womens’ stories,” she
tells me, “and showing women
who are the protagonists in their
own lives, is very, very important.
It’s really just making stories that
are more reflective of the world.”
Sarandon also identified with
Lamarr’s experience of sexism in
the industry. When she started
out in films in the early 1970s, she
says, “I was told you were done by
the time you’re 40 and you definitely shouldn’t talk about having
children, because that made you
less sexy.” She has three children,
two with Tim Robbins, one with
her first husband, Franco Amurri.
Fifty years on, the landscape
may have changed somewhat, but
this, believes Sarandon, is more
to do with a new generation of
women in Hollywood rather than
a change in attitude among men.
“I’m still working,” says Sarandon, “and there are tons of women
around my age working, and the
main reason is female producers
and female writers and directors
and people who are willing to try
to get money for a female-driven
story where all the characters are
not 22. Otherwise, there just aren’t
that many stories of older men and
women. I mean, there are stories
of older men, but they always have
30-year old girlfriends,” she laughs.
Even an actor of Sarandon’s
stature still falls prey to deeply
entrenched attitudes about what
kind of behaviour is considered
feminine. “When a male actor
asks questions [of a script] to do
a good job, he’s forgiven and seen
as being quite brilliant, but when
a woman asks a lot of questions,
especially to some male authority
figures, it can be quite annoying
to them,” she says, diplomatically
avoiding mentioning any names.
In 1997, the US military finally
acknowledged Lamarr’s key contribution to defence technology
and she is now widely credited
within the world of technology as
a pioneer. But while she may finally have been recognised for having
both beauty and brains, the recent
#MeToo and Time’s Up movements highlight that attitudes to
women both in Hollywood and beyond still need to change. Is there
an easy answer? No, but listening to women and their stories,
Sarandon believes, is a start.
“Time’s Up is not only about
violence against women,” she
says. “It’s also about listening to
all women in all kinds of jobs: our
sisters who are waitresses and
cleaning apartments and taking
care of our children, in all areas
where an imbalance of power has
led to vulnerability, where women
are physically threatened. In listening to everyone, the world will
be a healthier place.”
‘Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr
Story’ is released next Friday
Blazing star Lamarr never received true recognition for her invention
The most
bizarre
Cold War
caper
Filmof
theweek
RED SPARROW (15)
HHHHH
Francis Lawrence, 140 mins, starring:
Jennifer Lawrence, Joel Edgerton,
Jeremy Irons, Matthias Schoenaerts,
Charlotte Rampling, Mary-Louise
Parker, Joely Richardson
Reviews by Geoffrey Macnab
Jennifer Lawrence is put through
the wringer in this luridly
entertaining thriller. Her character, leading Bolshoi ballet dancer
turned Russian spy Dominika
Egorova, is told early on that her
“body belongs to the state”. This is
the excuse for her to be tortured,
sexually assaulted, beaten up,
stabbed and blackmailed. There
ALSOSHOWING
THE NILE HILTON INCIDENT (15)
HHHHH
Tarik Saleh, 111 mins, starring: Fares
Fares, Mari Malek, Yasser Ali Maher
It is 2011, the eve of the Arab
Spring. Chain-smoking police
officer Noredin Mostafa (Fares)
is on the take, like everyone else
in Cairo. Without bribery and
nepotism to oil it, this thriller
suggests, the Egyptian state
machinery would grind to a
halt. Then comes the moment a
Sudanese maid in a luxury hotel
witnesses a killing. Noredin’s
investigations lead him straight
to the heart of the ruling elite.
Saleh includes all the
ingredients of film noir – femmes
fatales, multiple plot twists,
incriminating photographic
negatives and gallows humour.
But one of the film’s most original
aspects is that it is looking at the
Mubarak regime from within.
This isn’t one of those rousing
tales about protesters in Tahrir
Square. It’s about someone who
works for the regime and has a
vested interest in seeing it stay
in power – offering more insight
into the final days of Mubarak’s
presidency than any didactic
documentary ever could.
A FANTASTIC WOMAN (15)
HHHHH
Sebastián Lelio, 104 mins, starring:
Daniela Vega, Francisco Reyes
The transgender heroine of
Chilean director Sebastián
Lelio’s rousing melodrama
fully lives up to the film’s title.
Marina (Vega) is a wonderfully
complex, defiant and passionate
character – and one who keeps
her poise and dignity in the most
trying circumstances.
She is a singer and waitress with
a much older boyfriend (Reyes.)
He’s a 57-year-old businessman
from a bourgeois background
who has a wife and grown-up
children, who simply can’t accept
that their father has taken up
with a woman like Marina.
A Fantastic Woman unfolds
over a few tempestuous days
in which Marina experiences
joy and sudden bereavement –
and then fights with admirable
tenacity to be allowed to grieve
properly for her loved one.
She endures every kind
of humiliation, yet remains
effortlessly classy.
Regardless of the story’s
sexual politics, Marina is the
type of movie heroine that any
audience will root for – one
reason that the film has secured
an Oscar nomination.
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
the Cold War isn’t over – it has
“shattered” into multiple miniconflicts. The West has grown
weak, “drunk on social media and
shopping”, and the Russkies are
looking to capitalise on our decadence. That’s why they are training up young men and women to
set honey traps for credulous and
sentimental American spies.
Much of the plot seems so farfetched that it comes as a surprise
to learn that Jason Matthews
(author of the novel on which
the film is based) was a CIA operative whose job was running
foreign agents.
Dominika and the other main
characters in the Moscow scenes
speak English with the kind of
heavy Russian accents you associate with Smersh agents. There’s
a very svelte and sinister-looking
Matthias Schoenaerts as Dominka’s spymaster uncle Ivan – he’s
The desire to
inflict as much pain
on Lawrence as
possible is perverse
Fractured identity
Jennifer Lawrence
is turned from
a ballerina into a
seductive spy
is something perverse about the
film-makers’ desire to inflict as
much pain on her as possible, as
if in resentment that she is one of
the highest-paid movie actresses
in the world.
Hollywood tends to offer two
kinds of spy movies. This can be
the bleakest of genres. Films such
as The Spy Who Came In From The
Cold or, more recently, Bridge Of
Spies are studies in betrayal, subterfuge and human weakness.
By contrast, James Bond-like
fantasies emphasise the action,
glamour, sex and foreign travel.
Red Sparrow sits between the two.
Its vision of contemporary Russia is both grim and cliché-laden.
We are told more than once that
Film
Matrix
the one who lures her into the espionage business, while Charlotte
Rampling is a Rosa Klebb-like
“matron” at the school for seduction where Dominika is enrolled
after her ballet career crashes to
a halt. (This is where spies go to
learn “how to love on command”.)
Certain scenes are surprisingly
graphic. We see Dominika sexually humiliating one fellow recruit
who has tried to attack her. There
is also some very unpleasant business involving garrotting and skin
flaying. The film-makers are delving into same very dark places at
the same time as they are making
an escapist and, at times, tonguein-cheek thriller.
Francis Lawrence keeps the
tempo high. He knows how to
generate suspense and how to
suggest horror without showing
it directly. Even so, the film seems
to be drawing on the worlds of
both George Smiley and of Austin
Powers – and that makes for as
bizarre a spy movie as you will see.
Raucous battle of wits
ultimately unravels
GAME NIGHT (15)
HHHHH
Jonathan Goldstein, John Francis Daley,
100 mins, starring: Rachel McAdams,
Jesse Plemons, Jason Bateman
This comedy-thriller is a hoot – at
least, to begin with. Max (Jason
Bateman) and Annie (Rachel McAdams) fall in love because they
share the same ultra-competitive
genes. Winning at parlour games
is no trivial pursuit for them. It’s
their very reason for existence.
Bateman and McAdams make
a delightful comic couple and put
across the gags with plenty of
zing and self-deprecating irony.
They’re very likeable protagonists. The problem is constructing
an entire feature film around characters who would surely function
much better in a sitcom.
This is where Max’s big brother,
Brooks (Kyle Chandler), comes
in. He has always been cleverer,
richer and more handsome than
Max. The stress of even thinking
about him affects the motility of
Max’s sperm and is seemingly the
reason why he and Annie haven’t
been able to have kids. Brooks
breezes back into town, immediately antagonises his brother and
takes the art of one-upmanship
to extreme levels by organising a
“game night” on a scale that Max
and his friends can’t match.
Brooks has organised for armed
kidnappers (or, at least, out-of-
work actors playing them) to
make off with one of the guests.
The challenge for the others is to
find the kidnap victim first. It’s at
this point the film slowly unravels.
Inevitably, the armed kidnappers
turn out to be real criminals.
Game Night offers plenty of incidental pleasures along the way.
Billy Magnussen is very funny as
Ryan, the dim-witted womaniser
who gets the wrong end of every
available stick. Sharon Horgan is
in enjoyably sarcastic groove as
Ryan’s Irish “date”, who is infinitely smarter than he is. Lamorne Morris and Kylie Bunbury are
good value, too, as the long-married couple Kevin and Michelle,
childhood sweethearts whose
relationship begins to fray when
Kevin discovers Michelle may
once have slept with a celebrity.
The characters are all vividly drawn, but the plotting is
so goofy it would barely pass
muster in an off-colour episode
of Scooby-Doo. Villainous thugs
emerge from where we least expect them. Wacky car chases and
plane crashes are thrown into the
story just to pep matters up. Subplots involving Fabergé eggs and
names on a witness protection
programme only serve to confuse
matters further. For all the charm
of the performances, the film spirals away into meaninglessness
and you yearn for the games to
end. THE INDEPENDENT
Game
changer
Rachel
McAdams
and Jason
Bateman
are drawn
into a
kidnapping
plot
REEL
= TALK=
LAURA MARTIN
‘Captain Marvel’
adds Brit interest
Marvel has signed up the British
actress Gemma Chan (above), of
Humans and Fresh Meat fame, to
play the part of geneticist and
spy Minn-Erva in Captain Marvel.
Chan said she is “very excited”
to star alongside Brie Larson,
who plays the lead in the
female-led superhero flick.
Antoine Fuqua says
hello to ‘Scarface’
Training Day and The Magnificent
Seven director Antoine Fuqua
(above) is discussing a remake
of Scarface, set in contemporary
LA. The 1984 rags-to-riches film
about the fictional drug lord Tony
Montana starred Al Pacino.
Queen Latifah to star
in inspirational film
Queen Latifah will play Make-AWish Foundation’s Toni Dubois
in Hope’s Wish, a weepy, real-life
story of a 12-year-old who made
it her mission to help children
live their ultimate wishes after
she herself was diagnosed with
a life-threatening illness.
THE INDEPENDENT
WHAT CRITICS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW RELEASES
RED SPARROW (15)
GAME NIGHT (15)
THE NILE HILTON INCIDENT (15)
A FANTASTIC WOMAN (15)
“A lavishly costumed thriller, it
carries itself along briskly enough,
but it’s never especially braintwisting or nerve-wracking.”
AV Club
“Fast and funny, filled with
memorable characters, and able to
balance slapstick and violence, this
frenetic farce is a comic gem.”
The Wrap
“You can feel the country’s
impending wave of frustration,
corruption, and paranoia
simmering beneath every scene.”
Entertainment Weekly
“This is an upsetting watch
at times, but it’s made
compelling by Vega’s dignified,
heartfelt performance.”
Empire
“Striking a sometimes uneasy
balance between trust-no-one
espionage and sensationalism, it
will leave few fully satisfied.”
The Hollywood Reporter
“Like a real-life game night, the
comedy may not leave a lasting
impression, but it’s plenty of fun
while it lasts.”
The Washington Post
“As doomed as Noredin’s actions
often seem, they’re tinged with
enough simmering humanity to
keep us caring.”
Los Angeles Times
“Vega’s performance, full of grace
and depth, keeps the film from
becoming something either too
campy or too sanctimonious.”
AP
‘Dora the Explorer’
gets summer release
A live-action movie of popular
kids’ cartoon Dora the Explorer
has been announced, due for
release next summer. Muppets
writer Nick Stoller and director
James Bobin (above) are aiming
for it to appeal to more than just
under-eights. The role of Dora
is still up for grabs.
35
FR DAY
36
MUSIC
We weren’t just
piggybacking Paul
McCartney, although
we definitely got the
best end of the deal
Rock on Garvey
(second left and
inset) with his
bandmates (from
left) Craig Potter,
Mark Potter and
Pete Turner
ANDREW WHITTON,
GETTY IMAGES
‘Love and kindness need to
be more abundant in society’
Guy Garvey talks to Duncan Seaman about Elbow’s non-stop year,
paying back a debt to The Beatles and taking on small-minded bigots
B
y Guy Garvey’s own
estimation, the past
12 months have been
“the craziest of years”.
“I toured the US and I
toured the UK and while that was
going on I got married and had a
baby and moved to London.”
Add in the “bloody marvellous”
honour of covering The Beatles’
“Golden Slumbers” for the John
Lewis Christmas commercial and
two top 10 albums – Little Fictions
and a Best Of compilation – and
the Elbow singer can justifiably
reflect that: “It’s been non-stop, it
really hasn’t paused for a second.”
Selling a lot of records was unexpected in an era when we’d been
led to believe that people don’t
buy records any more. “The way
that people consume music has
changed so much and it can be a
little daunting for a band that have
only ever been an ‘album band’.
It’s just really lovely that people
still want to hear our work.”
Where once he found the gestation period for Elbow albums so
slow that he put out a solo record
to fill the gap, Garvey has latterly
found himself mining a rich vein of
inspiration for the band he formed
with mates at Bury College more
than 20 years ago. “I still write
about the same things, you can’t
really change that, it moves slowly and it morphs, but I’m still the
same person with the same life
experiences, still working with the
same people,” he says.
Garvey credits Elbow’s guitarist Mark Potter with “predominantly” suggesting the list for the
Best Of. “Initially we were like: ‘Is
this the kind of thing you do at the
end of your career? Is it sending
the wrong message?’ But then,
it was; ‘Actually this could lead
new people to the music’ and off
the back of the John Lewis cover
it didn’t just lead people to our
music, it led people to The Beatles’
music. It was stunning how many
people had never heard the original, so it felt nice that we weren’t
just piggybacking Paul McCartney, we were giving something
back there – although we definitely got the best end of the deal.”
Little Fictions was the first
record Garvey and bandmates
Mark and Craig Potter and Pete
Turner had made without their
long-time drummer Richard
Jupp. The singer says the experience had been daunting at first.
“Richard had been in the band for
25 years. It was a bit shocking, at
first; even though it had been coming a long time, it was still a surprise. I don’t think any of us could
believe that he didn’t want to do
it any more. It’s fair enough that
he didn’t, he’d done it for a quarter of a century, but it was still
very shocking.
“We talked about it a lot when
we went up to Scotland to write
together. None of us could believe
it, because while we’re all very
much defined by being family men
these days, we’re also defined by
what we do as a band.
“It threw up new challenges and
the pieces of music we did in Scotland, which was literally the week
after he left the band, had a cold,
melancholy resignation to them–
‘Kindling’ was one of them, and
‘Head For Supplies’. Bowie had
just died, Jupp had gone and it’s
there in the music.”
For a lyricist who has never
shied from tackling political subjects, Garvey is concerned that
debate has become so closedminded in recent times. “Does it
worry me that the bigots
have found their voice?”
he asks. “Yeah, it
does, they should
shut the f**k up
and crawl back
under their rock.
It’s not progress,
division and
hatred. It takes
years to undo.
It’s the province of
the stupid and it’s a
bloody shame when
they do find their confidence every now and again.
“I don’t think that every element of what happened in America and what happened with
Brexit is small-mindedness. I
think it’s very much a vote of protest and it needs to be listened to.
It’s half the country, they’re not
all bigots. It’s like they’re dissatisfied and it’s a complaint about the
system, about constantly being
governed by a particular class.
But why should most people want
to be leader? It’s a shit job, you
have your whole life held up to
public scrutiny – that never used
to be the case, but in the past 30,
40 years, it has very much become the case, so it’s only people
who are really hard-faced who go
for the job.
“I’m not tarring everybody
with the same brush, but you do
hear the politics of kindness used
as a catchphrase here and there,
but love and kindness need to be
more abundant.
“We know what the most important issues are – the National
Health Service and the education
system. We need to pool our resources and be nice to one another. It’s really short-sighted to think
that you won’t be affected by it in
your lifetime, so why not try and
sort it out?
“That’s not me doing my Bono
bit,” he says, chuckling. “Everyone
realises that probably the way to
win the next election is to help the
NHS. It’s desperate.
“We shouldn’t really live in a
country where an old person is
afraid to go out in the snow because you don’t recover from
falls when you’re elderly and frail.
For someone who’s paid taxes all
their life not to be able to go to
the shops is disgusting. We need
to get business out of education,
we need to get business out of the
health service.”
On a happier note, Garvey very
much sounds like he’s enjoying
being a family man at the age of 43.
Married to “a wonderful woman”,
Detectorists star Rachael Stirling,
they now have a 10-month-old
son, Jack. “It’s overwhelming and
beautiful. I’ve already written
about it,” he says.
He’s also enjoying exploring
London. “Finding my feet somewhere at my age is fascinating,”
he explains. “I’m pretty obsessed
with the Tube. Where I used to see
claustrophobia and bad manners,
I now see a city full of hardworking people who all
move out of the way
for one another
to facilitate their
journeys in a silent ballet.”
Next on the
agenda is a UK
arena tour with
their friend, the
American singer
John Grant, who
sang on “Kindling”.
Garvey believes any Elbow
fans who haven’t heard Grant’s
music “will really connect with it.
He’s also very generous of spirit
with his audience, he makes them
laugh as well as playing them his
heartfelt music, and it’s a perfect
match. “And,” he adds, “he rocks a
good look, I like his style.”
Elbow are touring until
Wednesday (elbow.co.uk)
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
37
ALBUMREVIEWSByFionaShepherd
Mesmeric
Moby finds
his Zen
MOBY
Everything Was
Beautiful and
Nothing Hurt
HHHHH
Following two albums of punk
invective recorded with The Void
Pacific Choir – These Systems
Are Failing and More Fast Songs
About the Apocalypse – Moby
has learnt to stop worrying
and love the world, taking a
more holistic approach with
this trip-hop-influenced suite of
Zen electronica.
Everything Was Beautiful
and Nothing Hurt, titled after
Billy Pilgrim’s epitaph in Kurt
Vonnegut’s satirical masterpiece
Slaughterhouse-Five, comes for
you by stealth, pairing Moby’s
mutterings with soulful female
vocals to calming, comedown
LORI WATSON
Yarrow Acoustic Sessions
KOPATCHINSKAJA/LESCHENKO
Deux
Download: MetaGoth;
Howl at the Summit;
Spacewoman; Walking
with the Killer
Download: Yarrow
(A Charm); October
Song; Dowie Dens o
Yarrow
Download: Poulenc’s
Violin Sonata;
Bartok’s Sonata No2;
Ravel’s Tzigane
The culmination (so far) of
singer-fiddler Watson’s evolving
digital project, this is an
intriguing evocation of place and
associated state of mind through
imaginatively interpreted songs.
With unconventional, often
minimal, settings from producer,
bassist and keyboardist Duncan
Lyall, guitarist Steven Byrnes
and accordionist Fiona Black,
Watson’s voice shifts from
tremulous to sinewy, spinning its
spell right from the incantatory
“Yarrow (A Charm)”. She
gradually unleashes power in
the dialogue of “Flytin o Life an
Daith”, and in the sudden soaring
of “October Song”. There is
heartbreaking power and clarity,
too, in such traditional staples
as “Fine Flooers in the Valley”,
“Flooers of the Forest” and
“Dowie Dens o Yarrow”. Watson
has pulled off something special
with this spare masterpiece.
You’d expect nothing less than
explosive creativity from the
word go from the ultra-exuberant
Moldovan firebrand violinist
Patricia Kopatchinskaja; nor is
that expectation denied in this
duo release with pianist Polina
Leschenko, an equal in virtuosity
and charisma. They open with
Poulenc’s punchy 1940s’ Violin
Sonata, written during the
German occupation, and give
both blood-curdling ferocity and
sensuous bittersweetness in this
compelling performance. The
end journey is a sizzling coupling
of Bartók’s Sonata No2 and
Ravel’s hair-raising Tzigane. The
gypsy verve is teased out of both,
Kopatchinskaja’s playing of the
Bartók oozing colour and energy,
her Ravel raising the electric
charge. The only pause for breath
in this thrilling tour de force is
Leschenko’s whimsical execution
of Delibes’ Coppélia Waltz.
HHHHH
Albumof
theweek
Download: Like
a Motherless Child;
The Middle is Gone;
This Wild Darkness
THE BREEDERS
All Nerve
effect, like a less claustrophobic,
misanthropic Tricky.
Recent single “Like a
Motherless Child” is built around
the old spiritual lament of the
same title, while the ambient
blues of “A Dark Cloud is
Coming” is soothed by cool piano,
and stately synthesised strings
accompany his pessimistic
confessional “The Middle is
Gone”. The bpm increases a
touch on “The Sorrow Tree” but
the light, trippy dub rhythms are
as mesmeric as the rest of the
album. “This Wild Darkness”
even tugs at the hem of Leonard
Cohen’s garment, with Moby’s
semi-spoken lead backed by a
choir of female sirens, delivering
the gospel incantation “in this
darkness, please light my way”.
This is The Breeders’ first
album in a decade, for which
frontwoman Kim Deal has
reconvened the band’s Last
Splash line-up of bassist
Josephine Wiggs, drummer Jim
McPherson and her twin sister
Kelley Deal, with whom she
trades those signature off-kilter
harmonies, while delivering her
intoxicating lead vocals as either
a breathy, unsettling croon or in
tough, flinty punk doyenne mode.
This is a taut, abrasive album for
distrustful times. “MetaGoth”
harks back to label 4AD’s dark
gothic output through the 1980s,
“Howl at the Summit” is punk
doo-wop, while “Spacewoman”
sounds like a doom-mongering
Blondie. But things are never
darker than on “Walking with
the Killer”, where Deal adopts
the persona of a young murder
victim with a mix of innocence
and belated enlightenment: “I
didn’t know it was my time”.
HHHHH
HHHHH
Jim Gilchrist
Ken Walton
HOWE • WHITE • DOWNES • DAVISON • SHERWOOD
PERFORMING
SIDES 1 & 4 OF ‘TALES FROM TOPOGRAPHIC OCEANS’
PERFORMING SIDES 1 & 4 OF ‘TALES FROM TOPOGRAPHIC OCEANS’
AND
AND GREATEST
GREATEST HITS
HITS FROM
FROM THEIR
THEIR FIRST
FIRST FIFTY
FIFTY YEARS
YEARS
JUNE 2018
Fri 15 NOTTINGHAM Royal Concert Hall
Wed 27 SOUTHEND
Cliffs Pavilion
Pavilions
Thu 28 PLYMOUTH
Tue 13
Wed 14
Fri 16
Sat 17
Sun 18
Tue 20
Wed 21
Fri 23
24 & 25
MARCH 2018
BRISTOL Colston Hall
SHEFFIELD City Hall
GLASGOW SEC Armadillo
MANCHESTER Bridgewater Hall
GATESHEAD The Sage
BIRMINGHAM Symphony Hall
BRIGHTON Centre
LIVERPOOL Philharmonic Hall
LONDON Palladium
BookingsDirect.com
BOOKINGSDIRECT.COM
DonMcLean.com
ELVISCOSTELLO.COM
MONDAY 7 MAY
MANCHESTER BRIDGEWATER HALL
WEDNESDAY 9 MAY
LONDON PALLADIUM
THURSDAY 10 MAY
BIRMINGHAM SYMPHONY HALL
SUNDAY 13 MAY
LIVERPOOL PHILHARMONIC HALL
New Album
BOTANICAL GARDENS
released on BMG March 2018
BOOKINGSDIRECT.COM
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TI115
i
TELEVISION
FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
39
FR DAY
1
CHURCHILL’S SECRET AFFAIR
SUN 8PM, CHANNEL 4
THIS WEEK’S
Tento
watch
Channel 4 must be banking on
The Darkest Hour taking home
a few awards at the Oscars this
weekend, as they’ve clearly
timed this documentary for
anyone planning to fall down a
Churchill vortex after watching
the film. The programme
uncovers a different side to
the wartime PM, namely
a clandestine affair with
Doris Castlerosse, who also
happens to be the great-aunt of
supermodel Cara Delevingne.
The show examines the littleknown relationship between the
two in the 1930s and details what
impact on the country it might
have had.
layered plot, as the police make
arrests following the discovery
of video footage. Meanwhile
in Westminster, the rebel MP
David Mars has to face the
party leader.
2
4
THE OSCARS
MON 1.30AM,
SKY CINEMA OSCARS
All eyes turn to La La Land as
the movie industry spends the
night patting itself on the back.
It’s a strong year, with films
including Call Me By Your Name,
Lady Bird, The Darkest Hour and
Dunkirk and actors including
Frances McDormand, Saoirse
Ronan, Gary Oldman and Daniel
Kaluuya nominated. Here’s
hoping they’ve tripled and
quadruple-checked the winners
envelopes after last year’s fist-inmouth moment when the wrong
Best Film was read out. Shake
up a few espresso Martinis
and tune in from very early on
Monday for the live stream.
Chosen by
Laura Martin
ELECTRIC DREAMS: AUTOFAC
MON 10PM, CHANNEL 4
The latest in this dystopian
anthology features singer
Janelle Monáe. She plays a
human simulacrum of one of
those annoying online customer
service pop-up boxes, who tries
to appease a band of rebels
who want to stop an automated
3
COLLATERAL
MON 9PM, BBC2
It’s the final episode of this
big-name conspiracy thriller
about the chain of events that
took place following the murder
of a pizza delivery man. David
Hare’s script attempts to tie up
the ends of a complicated, multi-
Clockwise from top Krysten
Ritter returns as Jessica Jones;
Doris Castlerosse, Churchill’s
secret love; Indian archer
Deepika Kumari in ‘Ladies First’
factory from churning out goods
that are polluting their post-war
world. Will strike a chord with
anyone recently trapped on
an hour-long infuriating black
hole of a computer-generated
complaint call.
5
THE GREAT CELEBRITY
BAKE OFF FOR STAND UP TO
CANCER TUES 8PM, CHANNEL 4
GBBO survived its controversial
move from the BBC to Channel
4 last year, and happily, the
celebrity format of the show
has also remained intact. This
year, to raise money for Stand
Up To Cancer, there are five
shows, each with four famous
faces getting covered in flour
and stressing out about how the
oven works. First up, Harry Hill,
Martin Kemp, Roisin Conaty
and Bill Turnbull make a 3D
biscuit scene recreating the best
day of their lives.
6
SEVEN YEAR SWITCH
TUES 9.15PM, CHANNEL 4
“If your hands go on her arse,
you won’t have hands.” There
are ultimatums from the off in
this reality documentary about
four brave (or foolish) couples
on the brink of a break-up, who
agree to switch partners for
two weeks. The pseudo-science
programme-makers dub it a
“radical experiment” to see if
time spent with another person
can save a failing relationship.
It’s an interesting concept –
although why they’re flown to
Koh Samui in Thailand rather
than say, Butlins in Bognor
Regis is never really explained
– and to be a fly on the wall in
other people’s relationships
is fascinating. Expect tears
and confrontations – and
that’s before they realise
there’s only one bed in their
new accommodation...
7
CRUFTS EXTRA WITH
ALAN AND CLARE
WEDS 3PM, CHANNEL 4
Amid the ever-darkening
maelstrom that is the outside
world, sometimes you just want
to stare at a screen with some
lovely doggies on it. Thankfully,
Channel 4 has five days of very
good boys as it screens Crufts
from the NEC in Birmingham.
Alan Carr and Clare Balding
are on live presenting duties –
and with dogs involved, expect
inevitable chaos.
8
ONE BORN EVERY MINUTE
WEDS 9PM, CHANNEL 4
Depending on where you
stand, One Born Every Minute
is either an awe-inspiring
first-hand journey into the
miracle of life, or the greatest
contraception device of all
time. For this series, the awardwinning documentary moves
to Birmingham Women’s
Hospital to experience at close
range the emotional highs and
lows of what really happens
when a baby is born. We follow
three parents-to-be in the final
moments of their pregnancy
and labours that – spoiler – end
up nothing like their original
birthing plans.
9
MARVEL’S JESSICA JONES:
SEASON 2
FROM THURS, NETFLIX
With Marvel’s Black Panther
currently riding high at
the cinemas, comic-book
fanatics are in a golden age of
entertainment – even more
so now that Jessica Jones
returns for a second series.
The excellent Krysten Ritter
picks up the part of the feminist
superhero again, and attempts
to put her life back in order
after finally defeating Kilgrave.
However, a new case arrives that
causes her to dig deep into her
past and confront who she really
is. Shout out to the schedulers at
Netflix who timed the launch for
International Women’s Day, too.
10
LADIES FIRST
FROM THURS, NETFLIX
Another incredible female is
honoured by Netflix on the same
female-empowering day, but this
heroine is fully alive and kicking.
Deepika Kumari was born into
poverty on the roadside in rural
India, but rose to become the
world’s number one archer in
just three years. She describes
the gender inequality that is rife
in her homeland, the mental
and physical strain of
her sporting journey,
and how she and her
family faced becoming
social outcasts for her
refusing to be married
off at the age of 18. This
powerful documentary
follows the story of a
dedicated young woman,
who has always kept her
eyes on the target.
Television Friday 2 March
CRITIC’S
CHOICE
GERARD GILBERT
Tones, Drones And Arpeggios:
The Magic Of Minimalism
9pm, BBC4
Although minimalism is unlikely to
win over many Classic FM listeners,
this is a fascinating overview of what
presenter Charles Hazlewood calls
“the last great movement in classical
music”. What makes it doubly
interesting is that so many of the
pioneers – Terry Riley, Philip Glass,
Steve Reich and the shaman of this
sound, La Monte Young – are still
alive and willing to open their doors
to Hazelwood (left). “Repetition,
transcendence and technology,” he
says, is what characterises the music
that emerged out of 1950s San
Francisco and went on to influence
Mike Oldfield, Kraftwerk and The
Velvet Underground.
===
Live Athletics
5.50pm, BBC2
Gabby Logan introduces coverage
of the evening session from Arena
Birmingham, where Team GB’s Asha
Philip is in contention as the
women’s 60m, whose concludes
semi-finals and final will feature.
There’s also the final of the men’s
long jump and women’s shot put.
===
Room 101
8.30pm, BBC1
Phil Wang braves the boos to make
a case for nominating actor Tom
Hiddleston. “We already have
Eddie Redmayne and Benedict
Cumberbatch,” he says. “They all
serve the same purpose and two of
them are superfluous.” Stephen
Mangan likewise divides the
audience with his proposal for
binning The Archers, starting
with the opening music: “Not so
much a theme tune as an early
warning system”.
the dark forces around Dean House
and find out exactly what it is that
“the thin ones” are trying to tell her.
===
Rebecka Martinsson:
Arctic Murders
===
Requiem
9pm, BBC1
Kris Mrksa’s supernatural drama still
has three episodes left in which to
disappoint, but after tonight you can
make that two, because it’s still going
strong – and not without the odd
snatches of humour. (“How are you?”
Aussie Nick asks a hungover Matilda.
“Diabolical,” she replies, having
woken up with horned hieroglyphics
on her torso.) It’s mostly chills,
however, as our cellist heroine
decides that she needs to get close to
9pm, More4
Ida Engvoll’s prosecutor heroine has
one last case to clear up – a woman
run through with a pitchfork while
lying in bed (really, these rural types)
– before she must decide whether
to return to her metropolitan life in
Stockholm (which, of course, she
won’t; no spoiler there surely).
Anyone who’d prefer a Swedish
drama that doesn’t involve murder
and detection – or, at least, not
primarily – then the excellent
Thicker Than Water returns to All4
today (see On Demand).
6.00 Countdown (R)
(S). 6.45 3rd Rock From
The Sun (R) (S). 7.10 3rd
Rock From The Sun
(R) (S). 7.35 Everybody
Loves Raymond (R) (S).
8.00 Everybody Loves
Raymond (R) (S). 8.30
Frasier (R) (S). 9.35 Frasier
(R) (S). 10.05 Ramsay’s
Kitchen Nightmares USA
(R) (S). 11.00 Undercover
Boss USA (R) (S). 12.00
Channel 4 News Summary
(S). 12.05 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 1.05 Posh
Pawnbrokers (R) (S). 2.10
Countdown (S). 3.00 A
Place In The Sun: Summer
Sun (R) (S). 4.00 A New Life
In The Sun (S). 5.00 Four
In A Bed (S). 5.30 Extreme
Cake Makers (R) (S).
6.00 Milkshake! 9.15
The Wright Stuff 11.15
Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It
Away (R) (S). 12.10 5 News
Lunchtime (S). 12.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors (R)
(S). 1.15 Home And Away
(S). 1.45 Neighbours (S).
2.15 NCIS: Conspiracy To
Murder (R) (S). 3.15 FILM:
Brace For Impact (Michel
Poulette 2016) Thriller,
starring Kerry Condon (S).
5.00 5 News At 5 (S). 5.30
Neighbours (R) (S).
6.00 BBC News At
Six; Weather (S).
6.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.00 ITV Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.30 ITV News;
Weather (S).
6.00 The Simpsons
Homer and
Marge uncover
details of
Grampa’s past
(R) (S).
6.30 Hollyoaks (S).
6.00 Home And Away
Coco’s protest
forces a change
of policy at the
diner (R) (S).
6.30 5 News Tonight
(S).
7.00 Emmerdale
Pollard and
Faith make an
embarrassing
discovery (S).
7.30 Coronation
Street (S).
7.00 Channel 4 News
(S).
7pm
7.00 The One Show
Alex Jones and
Ore Oduba host
the final edition
of the week (S).
7.30 MasterChef (S).
7.00 Inside
Kensington
Palace Behind
the scenes
of the royal
residence (R) (S).
7.00 World News
Today; Weather
(S).
7.30 Top Of The Pops:
1985 Featuring
Katrina and the
Waves (R) (S).
6.15 FILM: Pride &
Prejudice (Joe
Wright 2005)
Period drama,
starring Keira
Knightley (S).
7.00 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold
Featuring a
child “squashed”
by a wardrobe
(R) (S).
8pm
8.00 EastEnders
The Carters are
left fearing the
repercussions
of their actions
(S).
8.30 Room 101 (S).
8.00 Love Your
Garden (S).
8.30 Coronation
Street (S).
8.00 Jamie And
Jimmy’s Friday
Night Feast
With guest
Scarlett Moffatt
(R) (S).
8.00 The Yorkshire
Steam Railway:
All Aboard New
series. Life
on the North
Yorkshire Moors
Railway (S).
8.00 John Denver:
Country
Boy The life
and legacy
of singersongwriter John
Denver (R) (S).
8.50 Carol Interview
Special With
Cate Blanchett,
Rooney Mara
and Todd
Haynes (R) (S).
8.00 Two And A Half
Men (R) (S).
8.30 Two And A Half
Men Walden
tries to spice up
his relationship
with Zoey (R) (S).
9pm
9.00 Requiem
Matilda begins
suffering
disturbing
blackouts (S).
9.00 Lethal Weapon
Riggs and
Murtaugh
investigate a
murder in a
hospital (S).
9.00 Gogglebox The
households’
opinions
on recent
television (S).
9.00 Cruising With
Jane McDonald
Last in the
series (S).
9.00 Tones, Drones
And Arpeggios:
The Magic Of
Minimalism
Part one of two
(S).
9.00 FILM: Gladiator
(Ridley Scott
2000) Oscarwinning Roman
epic, starring
Russell Crowe
(S).
9.00 Survival Of
The Fittest:
The Final The
show’s viewers
vote for their
winners. Last in
the series (S).
10pm
10.00BBC News At
Ten (S).
10.25 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
10.35 The Young
Offenders (S).
10.00QI Part two of
two. Highlights
from the O
series. Last in
the series (S).
10.30 Newsnight (S).
10.00ITV News At Ten
(S).
10.30 ITV Regional
News (S).
10.45 Piers Morgan’s
Life Stories (R)
(S).
10.00The Last Leg
With actress
Vicky McClure
and writer and
comedian Tom
Davis (S).
10.00Will & Grace
Jack runs over a
neighbour in his
car (S).
10.30 Jo Brand:
Secrets Of Her
Success (S).
10.00Synth Britannia
A history of
the early days
of British
synthpop (R) (S).
10.30 Celebrity Juice
With Caroline
Flack, Paddy
McGuinness
and Shayne
Ward (R) (S).
11.05 FILM: Blades
Of Glory (Josh
Gordon, Will
Speck 2007) Iceskating comedy,
starring Will
Ferrell (S).
11.05 The
Assassination
Of Gianni
Versace (R) (S).
11.55 FILM: A
Hijacking (2012)
Thriller (S).
11.45 Take Me
Out: 10th
Anniversary
Special The
men and
women switch
roles (R) (S).
11.05 Rude Tube Alex
Zane presents
clips including
a memorable
entrance into a
dance tent (S).
11.30 Jo Brand’s Cats
& Kittens (R) (S).
11.30 Synth Britannia
At The BBC A
compilation of
music from the
genre (R) (S).
11.20 Family Guy
Brian gets a
job at The New
Yorker (R) (S).
11.45 Family Guy
Peter sells Meg
to pay a debt (R).
12.35 BBC News (S).
1.35 Sign Zone: The
Sheriffs Are Coming (R)
(S). 2.35 Sign Zone: Julius
Caesar Revealed (R) (S).
3.35 Sign Zone: Royal
Recipes (R) (S). 4.15 This Is
BBC Two (S).
12.35 Jackpot247 3.00
Alphabetical (R) (S). 3.50
ITV Nightscreen
12.05 FILM: 30 Days Of
Night (David Slade 2007)
Horror, starring Josh
Hartnett (S). 2.10 Born To
Kill (R) (S). 3.05 Damned (R)
(S). 3.35 The Question Jury
(R) (S). 4.30 Four Rooms
With Sarah Beeny (R) (S).
12.15 SuperCasino (S). 3.10
The X-Files (R) (S). 4.00
GPs: Behind Closed Doors
(R) (S). 4.45 House Doctor
(R) (S). 5.10 Nick’s Quest (R)
(S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R) (S).
12.30 Top Of The Pops:
1985 (R) (S). 1.00 Lionel
Richie – Dancing On The
Ceiling (R) (S). 2.00 John
Denver: Country Boy (R)
(S). 3.00 Tones, Drones And
Arpeggios: The Magic Of
Minimalism (R). 4.00 Close
Daytime
6.00 Good Morning
Britain (S). 8.30 Lorraine
(S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (S). 10.30 This
Morning (S). 12.30 Loose
Women (S). 1.30 ITV News;
Weather (S). 1.55 ITV
Regional News; Weather
(S). 2.00 James Martin’s
American Adventure (S).
3.00 Tenable (S). 3.59 ITV
Regional Weather (S). 4.00
Tipping Point (S). 5.00 The
Chase (S).
6pm
11pm
Late
6.00 Breakfast (S). 9.15
Murder, Mystery And My
Family (S). 10.00 Homes
Under The Hammer (R)
(S). 11.00 Wanted Down
Under Revisited (S). 11.45
Caught Red Handed (S).
12.15 Bargain Hunt (R) (S).
1.00 BBC News At One;
Weather (S). 1.30 BBC
Regional News; Weather
(S). 1.45 Doctors (S). 2.15
Shakespeare & Hathaway
– Private Investigators
(S). 3.00 Escape To The
Country (S). 3.45 Get
Away For Winter (S). 4.30
Antiques Road Trip (R) (S).
5.15 Pointless (R) (S).
PICK OF THE DAY
6.00 Caught Red Handed
(R) (S). 6.30 Get Away For
Winter (R) (S). 7.15 Wanted
Down Under Revisited (R)
(S). 8.00 Sign Zone: Back In
Time For Tea (R) (S). 9.00
Live Athletics The World
Indoor Championships (S).
1.30 Daily Politics (S). 2.30
Coast (R) (S). 2.45 Yes Chef
(R) (S). 3.30 A Place To Call
Home (R) (S). 4.20 Greece
With Simon Reeve (R) (S).
5.20 Great British Railway
Journeys (R) (S). 5.50
Live Athletics The World
Indoor Championships (S).
Matilda starts to suffer
blackouts in ‘Requiem’
9pm, BBC1
Famous friends and
co-workers line up to
pay tribute in ‘Jo Brand:
Secrets Of Her Success’
10.30pm, Channel 5
6.00 The Planet’s Funniest
Animals (R) (S). 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 6.45
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S).
7.10 Dress To Impress
(R) (S). 7.55 Emmerdale
(R) (S). 8.55 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold (R) (S). 9.25
The Ellen DeGeneres Show
(R) (S). 10.15 Who’s Doing
The Dishes? (R) (S). 11.10
Dress To Impress (R) (S).
12.15 Emmerdale (R) (S).
1.15 You’ve Been Framed!
Gold (R) (S). 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (S). 2.35
The Jeremy Kyle Show
(R) (S). 3.40 The Jeremy
Kyle Show (R) (S). 4.50 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (R) (S).
5.50 Take Me Out (R) (S).
Holly Walsh lists her
peeves in ‘Room 101’
8.30pm, BBC1
12.00 FILM: Prevenge
(Alice Lowe 2016) Comedy
(S). 1.50 Prevenge
Interview Special (R) (S).
2.00 FILM: A Girl Walks
Home Alone At Night
(Ana Lily Amirpour 2014)
Horror (S). 4.00 Close
12.15 American Dad!
(R) (S). 12.40 American
Dad! (R) (S). 1.10 Two And
A Half Men (R) (S). 2.10
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 2.20
Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2
Nightscreen
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
===
QI
10pm, BBC2
Sandi Toksvig’s second series at the
helm of this evergreen panel show
draws to a close with some more
highlights and unseen clips.
FILM
CHOICE
LAURENCE PHELAN
===
Jo Brand: Secrets
Of Her Success
10.30pm, Channel 5
With Damned, the Channel 4
social-worker sitcom she has
co-written with Morwenna Banks
– a contributor here, along with
co-star Alan Davies – really coming
into its own with its current series,
this seems a good time for a spot of
Jo Brand appreciation. The clips
range from 1980s stand-up to
Getting On and beyond.
FILM OF THE DAY
===
8pm, Sky Cinema Select
(Bennett Miller, 2011)
It is one of the marks of the success
of this slick, entertaining film that no
prior knowledge of, or interest in, its
subjects – baseball and economics
– is needed. Brad Pitt (left) and Jonah
Hill are an unexpectedly successful
comedy double act. They play the
manager of the Oakland Athletics
baseball team and his assistant,
respectively, who had enormous
success during the 2002 season using
statistical analysis tools to assemble
a team of underdogs. It’s about smart,
fast-talking professionals with
unconventional methods – and was
co-scripted by The West Wing’s Aaron
Sorkin, adapting the non-fiction book
by Michael Lewis.
9pm, E4
(Paul Feig, 2013)
Sandra Bullock plays an uptight,
by-the-book FBI agent who is
partnered with Melissa McCarthy’s
loud-mouthed Boston cop. These are
stock characters in stock situations,
but the stars’ charisma and natural
comedy make up any shortfall.
Moneyball
The Heat
===
A Hijacking
11.55pm, BBC2
(Tobias Lindholm, 2012)
A gripping Danish hostage drama
about the hijacking of a cargo ship
by Somali pirates. No heroics, just
desperate men in grim conditions,
and a sober account of the protracted
negotiations that ensue.
Radio
BBC Radio 1
6.00 Classic Coronation
Street (R) (S). 6.25 Classic
Coronation Street (R) (S).
6.55 Heartbeat (R) (S). 7.55
The Royal (R) (S). 9.00
Judge Judy (R) (S). 9.25
Judge Judy (R) (S). 9.55
Judge Judy (R) (S). 10.20
Love Your Garden (R) (S).
11.25 Love Your Garden
(R) (S). 12.30 The Royal (R)
(S). 1.35 Heartbeat (R) (S).
2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (R) (S). 3.15 Classic
Coronation Street (R)
(S). 3.45 On The Buses (R)
(S). 4.20 On The Buses
(R) (S). 4.50 You’re Only
Young Twice (R) (S). 5.25
Rising Damp (R) (S). 5.55
Heartbeat (R) (S).
6.00 Hollyoaks (R) (S).
7.00 Coach Trip: Road To
Tenerife (R) (S). 7.30 How
I Met Your Mother (R) (S).
8.00 Baby Daddy (R) (S).
9.00 Melissa & Joey (R)
(S). 10.00 How I Met Your
Mother (R) (S). 10.30 How
I Met Your Mother (R) (S).
11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(R) (S). 11.30 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (R) (S). 12.00
The Goldbergs (R) (S). 1.00
The Big Bang Theory (R) (S).
1.30 The Big Bang Theory
(R) (S). 2.00 Melissa & Joey
(R) (S). 3.00 Baby Daddy (R)
(S). 3.30 Baby Daddy (R) (S).
4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(R) (S). 4.30 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (R) (S). 5.00 The
Goldbergs (R) (S). 5.30 The
Goldbergs (R) (S).
8.55 Food Unwrapped (R)
(S). 9.30 A Place In The
Sun: Winter Sun (R) (S).
10.30 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (R) (S). 11.30
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 12.05
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 12.35
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 1.05
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 1.35
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 2.10
Come Dine With Me (R)
(S). 2.40 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 3.10 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 3.45 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 4.15
Come Dine With Me (R) (S).
4.50 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (R) (S). 5.55 A
Place In The Sun: Winter
Sun (R) (S).
6.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.30 The Big Bang
Theory Sheldon
teaches Leonard
about American
football (R) (S).
6.55 The Supervet A
man brings in
his doberman,
which has a
diseased spinal
cord (R) (S).
6.00 Futurama
Bender tries
to become a
gourmet chef (R)
(S).
6.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.00 House The
medic struggles
to diagnose a
complex injury
without his
team (R) (S).
7.00 Murder, She
Wrote Jessica’s
reputation is
put on the line
(R) (S).
7.00 Hollyoaks (S).
7.30 Coach Trip – The
Finale: Road To
Tenerife The
winners are
announced. Last
in the series (S).
7.55 Grand Designs
A couple import
their house
from Germany
(R) (S).
7.00 The Simpsons
Marge has
a nervous
breakdown (R)
(S).
7.30 The Simpsons
(R).
7.00 CSI: Crime
Scene
Investigation
The skeleton
of a woman is
discovered (R)
(S).
8.00 Agatha
Christie’s
Marple A
colonel is found
dead (R) (S).
8.00 The Big
Bang Theory
Bernadette
shares some
news (R) (S).
8.30 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
8.00 The Simpsons
Lisa becomes
smitten with
a musician
named Brendan.
8.30 Modern Family
(R) (S).
8.00 Blue Bloods
Danny and Baez
investigate the
murder of a
single mother
(R) (S).
9.00 Rebecka
Martinsson:
Arctic Murders
Rebecka runs
her own inquiry
into the woman’s
murder (S).
9.00 Jamestown
Maria is framed
for a crime.
9.00 Game Of
Thrones Qhorin
gives Jon a
chance to prove
himself (R) (S).
10.0024 Hours In
A&E A young
man has a
severe reaction
to a recreational
drug (R) (S).
10.10 A League Of
Their Own With
Alan Shearer,
Jason Manford
and Frankie
Bridge (R) (S).
10.10 Game Of
Thrones Theon
embarks on a
hunt as he tries
to prove his
Ironborn status
(R) (S).
9.00 FILM: The Heat
(Paul Feig 2013)
Action comedy,
starring
Sandra Bullock
and Melissa
McCarthy (S).
10.00The Good
Karma Hospital
A medical
case becomes
personal for
Ram (R) (S).
6.00 Monkey Life (R)
(S). 6.30 Monkey Life (R)
(S). 7.00 RSPCA Animal
Rescue (R) (S). 7.30 RSPCA
Animal Rescue (R) (S). 8.00
Send In The Dogs (R) (S).
9.00 Road Wars (R) (S).
10.00 Warehouse 13 (R) (S).
11.00 Forever (R) (S). 12.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (R) (S).
1.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S).
2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S).
3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R)
(S). 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (R)
(S). 5.00 The Simpsons (R)
(S). 5.30 Futurama (R) (S).
6.00 Richard E Grant’s
Hotel Secrets (R) (S). 7.00
Urban Secrets (R) (S). 8.00
The Guest Wing (R) (S).
9.00 The West Wing (R)
(S). 10.00 The West Wing
(R) (S). 11.00 House (R) (S).
12.00 House (R) (S). 1.00
Without A Trace (R) (S).
2.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
3.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
4.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
5.00 House (R) (S).
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast
Show With Nick Grimshaw
10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 3.00
The Official Chart With Scott
Mills 4.00 Greg James & Adele
Roberts 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
Radio 1’s Dance Anthems With
Greg And Adele 7.00 Annie Mac
9.00 Pete Tong 11.00 Danny
Howard 1am B.Traits 4.00
Radio 1’s Essential Mix
BBC Radio 1Xtra
6am Dotty 10.00 Ace 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Yasmin Evans
4.00 Sian Anderson 5.45
Newsbeat 6.00 Sian Anderson
7.00 DJ Charlesy 9.00 Semtex
11.00 Sir Spyro 1am Kan D
Man And DJ Limelight 4.00
Diplo And Friends
BBC Radio 2
11.00 Secrets Of
Growing Old
Documentary
examining
the changing
attitudes to
“growing old” (R).
11.25 The Big Bang
Theory Leonard
and Penny
argue about
money (R) (S).
11.55 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
11.05 24 Hours In
A&E A 75-yearold man is
treated for a
stab wound (R)
(S).
11.05 Class Of ’92: Full
Time Following
Salford City
FC as it is
transformed
into a full-time
club (S).
11.25 Game Of
Thrones Robb
Stark discovers
he has been
betrayed by one
of his closest
friends (R) (S).
12.05 FILM: Captain Corelli’s
Mandolin (John Madden
2001) Drama, with Nicolas
Cage (S). 2.20 Life Of Crime
(R) (S). 3.15 On The Buses (R)
(S). 4.10 George And Mildred
(R) (S). 5.05 Judge Judy (R) (S).
5.50 ITV3 Nightscreen
12.20 First Dates (R) (S).
1.30 Celebs Go Dating (R)
(S). 2.30 Celebs Go Dating
(R) (S). 3.25 Timeless
(R) (S). 4.05 How I Met
Your Mother (R) (S). 4.30
Rude(ish) Tube (R) (S).
12.05 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (R) (S).
1.05 24 Hours In A&E (R)
(S). 2.10 The Good Fight (R)
(S). 3.15 8 Out Of 10 Cats (R)
(S). 3.55 Close
12.00 The Russell Howard
Hour (R) (S). 1.00 Brit
Cops: Frontline Crime UK
(R) (S). 2.00 Most Shocking
(R) (S). 3.00 The Blacklist:
Redemption (R) (S). 4.00
It’s Me Or The Dog (R) (S).
5.00 Futurama (R) (S).
12.35 Mosaic (R). 1.35
Billions (R) (S). 2.45 Dexter
(R). 4.00 The West Wing
(R) (S). 5.00 The West Wing
(R) (S).
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken
Bruce 12noon Jeremy Vine
2.00 Steve Wright In The
Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo
7.00 Tony Blackburn’s Golden
Hour 8.00 Friday Night Is
Music Night 10.00 Sounds Of
The 80s 12mdn’t Anneka Rice:
The Happening 2.00 Radio 2’s
Funky Soul Playlist 3.00 Radio
2 Playlist: New To 2 4.00 Radio
2 Playlist: 21st Century Songs
5.00 Huey On Saturday
BBC Radio 3
6.30am Breakfast. 9.00
Essential Classics. 12noon
Composer Of The Week:
Richard Strauss. 1.00 News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime
Concert. Britten and
Shostakovich from the 2017
Aldeburgh Festival. 2.00
Afternoon Concert. 5.00 In
Tune. With Sean Rafferty. 7.00
In Tune Mixtape. 7.30 Radio
3 In Concert. Adam Fischer
conducts the Orchestra of
the Age of Enlightenment in
Mozart and Haydn. 10.00 The
Verb. Sarah Hall, Hollie McNish
& Vanessa Kisuule, Ari Eldjarn,
and Rob Drummond. 10.45
The Essay: Are You Paying
Attention? 11.00 World On 3.
1am Through The Night.
BBC Radio 4
6am Today 9.00 Desert Island
Discs 9.45 Book Of The Week:
The Line Becomes A River
10.00 Woman’s Hour 11.00
Out Of The Ordinary 11.30 A
Charles Paris Mystery: Dead
Room Farce 12noon News
12.04 The Curious Cases Of
Rutherford & Fry 12.15 You
And Yours 12.56 Weather
1.00 The World At One 1.45
British Socialism: The Grand
Tour 2.00 The Archers 2.15
Drama: Playing Dead 3.00
Gardeners’ Question Time
3.45 Short Works 4.00 Last
Word 4.30 Feedback 4.55
The Listening Project 5.00
PM 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six
O’Clock News 6.30 The Now
Show. New series. A satirical
look through the week’s news.
7.00 The Archers. Brian takes
the blame. 7.15 Front Row.
With Morgan Quaintance.
7.45 Riot Girls: The Good
41
ON DEMAND
Thicker Than Water
Walter Presents/All4
Season two of the much-loved
dysfunctional-family drama.
Weinstein: The
Inside Story
BBC iPlayer
An unprecedented link-up
between Panorama and the
American Frontline.
This Country
BBC3/iPlayer
Deadpan cousins Kerry
and Kurtan share their
uneventful rural lives.
Terrorist. By Doris Lessing,
dramatised by Sarah Daniels.
Last in the series. 8.00 Any
Questions? Political debate and
discussion from Mersea Island
in Essex. 8.50 A Point Of View.
Reflections on a topical issue.
9.00 British Socialism: The
Grand Tour. Omnibus. Anne
McElvoy traces the emergence
of socialism in the UK. 10.00
The World Tonight. With
James Coomarasamy. 10.45
Book At Bedtime: A Portrait
Of The Artist As A Young
Man. By James Joyce. 11.00
A Good Read. Scientist Mark
Miodownik and food writer
Diana Henry discuss their
favourite books. 11.30 Today
In Parliament. Mark D’Arcy
reports from Westminster.
11.55 The Listening Project.
A woman suffering from
motor neurone disease
converses with her daughter.
12mdn’t News And Weather
12.30 Book Of The Week: The
Line Becomes A River 12.48
Shipping Forecast 1.00 As BBC
World Service 5.20 Shipping
Forecast 5.30 News Briefing
5.43 Prayer For The Day 5.45
IPM
BBC Radio 4 LW
8.31am Yesterday In
Parliament 9.45 Daily Service
12.01pm Shipping Forecast
5.54 Shipping Forecast
12.59am Test Match Special
5.30 Test Match Special
BBC Radio 4 Extra
6am Burnt 6.30 The Bard Of
Salford 7.00 Capital Gains 7.30
In And Out Of The Kitchen 8.00
I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again
8.30 Albert And Me 9.00 The
Motion Show 9.30 Kathmandu
Or Bust 10.00 Home Front
Omnibus 11.00 The Interview
11.15 One Thousand Days, One
Thousand Nights 12noon I’m
Sorry I’ll Read That Again 12.30
Albert And Me 1.00 Burnt
1.30 The Bard Of Salford 2.00
Short Stories By Oscar Wilde
2.15 A History Of The Future
2.30 Tales Of The City – The
Days Of Anna Madrigal 2.45 A
Confession 3.00 Home Front
Pick
ofthe
day
The Now Show
6.30pm,
BBC Radio 4
The only good
thing about the
end of a News Quiz
series is that it
heralds a returning
Now Show, in which
Hugh Dennis and
Steve Punt (above)
lampoon the week’s
main events.
Omnibus 4.00 The Motion
Show 4.30 Kathmandu Or
Bust 5.00 Capital Gains 5.30 In
And Out Of The Kitchen 6.00
A Glass Of Lemonade 6.30
Mastertapes 7.00 I’m Sorry I’ll
Read That Again 7.30 Albert
And Me 8.00 Burnt 8.30 The
Bard Of Salford 9.00 Podcast
Radio Hour 10.00 Comedy
Club: In And Out Of The Kitchen
10.30 Comedy Club: Ian D
Montfort Is: Unbelievable 11.00
Comedy Club: Listen Against
11.30 Comedy Club: Chain
Reaction 12mdn’t A Glass Of
Lemonade 12.30 Mastertapes
1.00 Burnt 1.30 The Bard Of
Salford 2.00 Short Stories By
Oscar Wilde 2.15 A History
Of The Future 2.30 Tales Of
The City – The Days Of Anna
Madrigal 2.45 A Confession
3.00 Home Front Omnibus
4.00 The Motion Show 4.30
Kathmandu Or Bust 5.00
Capital Gains 5.30 In And Out
Of The Kitchen
BBC 5 Live
6am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00
Chiles On Friday 1pm The
Friday Sports Panel 2.00
Kermode And Mayo’s Film
Review 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5
Live Sport: The Friday Football
Social 9.30 At Home With Colin
Murray 10.00 Stephen Nolan
1am Up All Night 5.00 5 Live
Boxing With Costello & Bunce
5.30 Fit & Fearless
BBC 6 Music
7am Nemone 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1pm Mark Radcliffe
4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Iggy
Pop 9.00 Tom Ravenscroft
12mdn’t Nemone’s Electric
Ladyland 2.00 6 Music Classic
Concert 3.00 6 Music Live
Hour 4.00 The First Time With
Ed O’Brien 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
6am More Music Breakfast
9.00 John Suchet 1pm AnneMarie Minhall 5.00 Classic
FM Drive 7.00 Smooth
Classics At Seven 8.00 The
Full Works Concert. A tribute
to the Gothenburg Symphony
Orchestra. 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1am Katie Breathwick
4.00 Jane Jones
Absolute Radio
6am Christian O’Connell’s
Breakfast Show 10.00 Leona
Graham 1pm Andy Bush 4.00
Dave Berry 7.00 Absolute 80s
With Claire Sturgess 10.00
Sarah Champion 4am Ben
Burrell
Heart
6am Jamie And Emma
9.00 Toby Anstis 1pm Matt
Wilkinson 4.00 JK And Lucy
7.00 Club Classics 10.00 Lilah
Parsons 1am James Stewart
TalkSPORT
6am The Alan Brazil Sports
Breakfast With Max Rushden
10.00 Jim White 1pm
Hawksbee And Delaney 4.00
Adrian Durham And Darren
Gough 7.00 The Season Ticket
With Danny Kelly And Laura
Woods 10.00 The Two Mikes
1am Extra Time With Tom
Latchem
FR DAY
42
AGENDA
What’sontoday...
found images. This selection
of drawings and prints from the
Artist Rooms holding features
intense images that engage
with the natural world.
Visual Arts
ANTHONY MCCALL:
SOLID LIGHT WORKS
Hepworth, Wakefield
Anthony McCall is best known
for his large-scale, immersive
sculptural light installations
that incorporate the visitor and
invite them to become active
participants in the work. This
is the first major UK exhibition
of his art in more than a decade,
exploring all facets of his work
and including the British
premieres of three “solid light”
installations. (01924 247360 ) 3 Jun
ELISABETH FRINK: SCULPTURE,
DRAWINGS, PRINTS
Bucks County Museum, Aylesbury
A free exhibition marking the
25th anniversary of Elisabeth
Frink’s death. Her devotion to
themes associated with nature,
including horses, heads, human
figures, animals and birds, are
explored through magnificent
bronze sculptures, prints and
drawings. (01296 331441) to 21 Apr
VIJA CELMINS
New Art Gallery, Walsall
The Latvian-American artist Vija
Celmins is part of a generation of
artists, in particular those based
in Los Angeles during the 60s,
who made work using
(01922 654400) to 6 May
DAVID MILNE: MODERN PAINTING
Dulwich Picture Gallery, London SE21
A major show of one of Canada’s
greatest modern painters, David
Milne, featuring oils alongside
watercolours, drawings and
photographs that demonstrate
how, through periods of intense
experimentation, often working
in solitude in the wild, the artist
developed an extraordinary
body of landscapes, fusing
influences from Monet, Matisse
and Cezanne into a modernist
language of his own
(020 8693 5254) to 7 May
CHARLES I: KING AND COLLECTOR
Royal Academy of Arts, London W1
Charles I helped build the nation’s
taste with his extraordinary
collection of art. He acquired
work by some of the greatest
artists, but much of it was sold off
and scattered around the world
when he was executed. This
exhibition is formed of more 100
items, from huge tapestries to
beautiful miniatures, including
pieces by Titian, Mantegna,
Holbein, Dürer, Van Dyck and
Rubens. (020 7300 8090) to 15 Apr
T-SHIRT: CULT, CULTURE,
SUBVERSION
Fashion and Textile Museum,
London SE1
A private collection of Vivienne
Westwood T-shirts from the
early days of Let It Rock, Sex
and Seditionaries, through
to the designer’s most recent
collections, Active Resistance
to Propaganda and Climate
Revolution, make up a central
installation of this exhibition,
which charts the multi-faceted
history of the T-shirt in the
20th century, in all its guises,
from men’s underclothes and
symbol of rock’n’roll rebellion,
through punk and politics,
to luxury fashion item.
(020 7407 8664) to 6 May
DAVID HAUGHTON IN ST JUST
Penlee Gallery and Museum, Penzance
David Haughton (1924-1991)
moved to west Cornwall in
1948, after dropping out of the
Slade School of Art, and came
across the mining town of St Just,
on the moors between Penzance
and St Ives, while on a cycle
ride. This exhibition of prints,
drawings and paintings shows
his lifetime love affair with the
town, to which he returned every
year for the next three decades.
(01736 363625) to 17 Mar
GEORGE SHAW:
MY BACK TO NATURE
Royal Albert Memorial Museum
& Art Gallery, Exeter
Artists can be broken by the
weight of being the National
Gallery’s associate artist, but
George Shaw responded to this
trickiest of commissions better
than any participant yet. His
new paintings teem with his
passion for the great art he had
the fortune to immerse himself
in at the National, alongside
an inescapable need to apply
it to his personal history. This
touring exhibition of the work
he produced in the role travels
around the country until late
2018. (01392 265 858) to 8 Apr
THOMAS BOCK
Ikon Gallery, Birmingham
The first UK exhibition dedicated
to the work of the Birminghamborn Thomas Bock, who was
transported to Van Diemen’s
Land (now Tasmania) for 14
years and pressed into work as a
convict artist, painting portraits
of captured bushrangers, before
and after they were executed.
This free show also includes his
series of portraits of Tasmanian
Aboriginal people, now
in the British Museum.
(0121 248 0708) to Sun
Comedy
HANNAH GADSBY
Soho Theatre, London W1
A chance (and perhaps your
final chance, given Hannah
Gadsby’s insistence that this
is her stand-up swan song) to
catch last year’s joint winner of
the Edinburgh Comedy Award
performing the confrontational,
patriarchy-smashing Nanette.
(020 7478 0100) to Sat
TIM VINE
Dorking Halls
Homemade props, daft ditties
and the most awful/brilliant
one-liners in the business, as
quick quipper Tim Vine hits
the road with Sunset Milk Idiot.
(01306 881717) tonight
DAVID BADDIEL
Lancaster Grand
After a West End residency
last year, David Baddiel hits the
road with his very affecting, very
funny My Family: Not the Sitcom,
about the frank realities of living
with his father’s dementia.
(01524 64695) tonight
Dance
SASHA WALTZ AND GUESTS
Sadler’s Wells, London EC1
The Berlin-based choreographer
takes the body as her subject in
Körper, piling up dancers into
squirming, composite creatures.
(020 7863 8000) to Sat
TANGO AFTER DARK
Peacock Theatre, London WC2
The new show from tango
star German Cornejo is danced
to music by Astor Piazzolla,
played live on stage.
(020 7863 8000) to 17 Mar
Pop
FIRST AID KIT
Roundhouse, London NW1
After much personal upheaval,
Sweden’s folk-country sister
act return for album number
four. The golden harmonies
remain, but the raptures
seem all the sweeter for the
lived-in heartaches behind them
on the lovely Ruins. (roundhouse.
org.uk) tonight
CASTLEMANIA: OH SEES
Troxy, London E1
Underground linchpin John
Dwyer’s shape-shifting, namechanging San Francisco garagepsych crew – more often spied
with a “Thee” in the moniker
– return with the expansive,
frenetic wig-outs of Orc. Supports
TRISTRAM KENTON
2018 ELECTRIC SUMMER
WITH VERY SPECIAL GUESTS*
Pick
ofthe
day
JUNE
THU 7 CANTERBURY THE SPITFIRE GROUND
THU 14 DONCASTER KEEPMOAT STADIUM
SAT 9 YEOVIL HUISH PARK*
SAT 16 BLACKPOOL BLOOMFIELD ROAD
SUN 10 CAMBRIDGE THE CAMBS GLASS STADIUM SUN 17 DARLINGTON MOWDEN PARK
TICKETS ON SALE NOW!
A-HA.COM
ticketmaster.co.uk — l hgtickets.com — axs.com
*support artists are Thompson Twins’ Tom Bailey and China Crisis
presented by
LIVE
and
by arrangement with
THEATRE
JUBILEE
Lyric Hammersmith, London W6
Chris Goode’s raucous, shrewd and freewheelingly rude reimagining of Derek Jarman’s cult movie, which,
40 years on, does more than pay tribute to the inherent theatricality in the film director’s apocalyptic vision,
updating the proceedings and blaming the ageing punk generation for not resisting the state- approved and
more pernicious forms of nihilism that lie behind many of our current woes. (020 8741 6850) to 10 Mar
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
at a Castle Face Records
showcase include true prog
believers Once and Future Band.
(eventim.co.uk) tonight
WILEY
Brixton Academy, London SW9
“Back with a Banger”, indeed.
Despite the release delays, Wiley
displayed all the bravado of a
man who knows he’s on form
with his 11th album. Here, grime’s
veteran ground-breaker gives
the fast-firing raps and hardhitting melodies of Godfather
the victory-lap treatment.
(gigsandtours.com) tonight
ELBOW + JOHN GRANT
SSE Hydro, Glasgow
Bury’s foremost empaths
return with hearts and art on
their sleeves, this time offering
epic and intimate man-hugs
to the arenas on a tour to
accompany the recently released
Best Of. Marvellous support
comes from John Grant,
dishing out anti-romantic
barbs in a plush baritone.
(ticketmaster.co.uk) tonight
Folk & Roots
SPIRO + LEVERET
Met, Bury
A stellar double header of two of
the finest instrumental groups in
the UK: the minimalist, systems
music-inspired restructuring
of folk tunes from Spiro; and
Leveret with their latest album,
Inventions, featuring their
first set of self-penned tunes.
(0161 761 2216) tonight
FURROW COLLECTIVE
Arlington Arts Centre, Newbury
Fresh from the studio where
they’ve been working on a new
record, the BBC Radio 2 Folk
Award-winning four-piece go
on a UK tour that will include
new music alongside songs and
ballads from previous albums
Wild Hog and At Our Next
Meeting. (01635 244246) tonight
SAM KELLY AND THE LOST BOYS
South Holland Centre, Spalding
Nominated for Best Group
at this year’s BBC Radio 2 Folk
Awards, Sam Kelly and his
seven-piece band embark on
a UK tour in support of the
excellent new album, Pretty
Peggy. (01775 764777) tonight
World Music
SEUN KUTI AND EGYPT 80
Electric Brixton, London SW2
Seun Kuti brings the mighty
Egypt 80 band to the UK for
shows of wild, funky Afrobeat
energy, compelling rhythms
and urgent social/political
messaging drawn from his
albums From Africa With Fury:
Rise and A Long Way to the
Beginning. (020 7274 2290) tonight
Theatre
PINOCCHIO
NT: Lyttelton, London SE1
This is the first time Disney
has given its blessing to a stage
version of the 1940 movie. John
Tiffany’s production is fairly
lavish, but it is beautifully
proportioned, always reminding
the audience that, at the heart
of the piece, there’s a simple
story about a wooden puppet’s
quest to be a real boy and find
the answer to the riddle of
what it is that unites people
and makes them human.
(020 7452 3000) to 10 Apr
THE GRINNING MAN
Trafalgar Studios, London SW1
A pared-back musical adaptation
of Victor Hugo’s 1869 novel,
L’Homme Qui Rit, devised at the
Bristol Old Vic by Tom Morris,
the director of War Horse, and
his creative team, starring Louis
Maskell as Grinpayne, who had
his face sadistically slashed from
ear to ear when he was a small
boy. Morris’s production unfolds
like a fevered, slightly bonkers
but luridly compelling fairy story.
The king of surreal
comedy gets personal
In his latest touring show, Bailey mines his own life for
subject matter for the first time in his 35-year career.
He tells Chris Bond why he finally decided to open up
Sit down and let
it all out… Bailey
reveals stories
from his 20 years
on the road
(0844 871 7632) to 14 Apr
LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT
Wyndham’s Theatre, London WC2
Richard Eyre’s revival of
Eugene O’Neill autobiographical
drama is shatteringly good.
After three and a half hours of
whisky-soaked recrimination
and morphine-fuelled denial,
you emerge drained but in that
state of elation to which only
true tragedy, confronted
searchingly and honesty, can
bring. Jeremy Irons plays
the actor-patriarch James,
while Lesley Manville gives a
scorchingly brilliant account
of the contradictions impelling
Mary, the morphine-addicted
mother. (0844 412 5120) to 7 Apr
MAMMA MIA!
Lyceum Theatre, Sheffield
The latest touring version of
Phyllida Lloyd’s production
of the great Abba tribute
musical looks as fast-moving
and brilliant as ever. As scripted
by Catherine Johnson, it’s the
absolute queen of jukebox shows,
and the one that demonstrates
just how it should be done.
(0114 249 6000) to 17 Mar
THE BAND
Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury
Writer Tim Firth’s musical
about Take That is an infectious
homage to the music of Britain’s
best-loved boy band and the
power of youthful friendship.
The on-stage action never takes
itself too seriously as it journeys
from 1990s suburban teenage
bedroom to the present day.
(thebandmusical.com) to Sat
MISS SAIGON
Mayflower Theatre, Southampton
Laurence Connor’s production
of Boublil and Schonberg’s great
sung-through drama from 1989
is a brilliant musical for our time
and a breathtakingly spectacular
and gripping piece of ensemble
theatre, which relocates the story
of Puccini’s 1903 opera, Madam
Butterfly, to 1970s Saigon during
the Vietnam War. Sooha Kim
gives a soul-stoppingly powerful
and poignant performance as
the Saigon bar-worker whose
passionate romance with a
US soldier ends in tragedy.
(02380 711811) to 17 Mar
H
e has been described
as looking like a Viking god caught in a
wind machine, and
has become a recognisable face thanks to his unique
blend of surreal comedy, stories
and musical interludes. For his
latest tour, though, Bill Bailey has
opted for a change of tack.
“I did a tour a few years ago
when I talked a bit about going
on holiday with my family, which I
hadn’t done before. I don’t tend to
mine my personal life for comedy,
but it seemed to go down quite
well. I realised I was missing an
opportunity for laughs.”
So with his new tour, Larks in
Transit, such revelations take
c e n t r e s t a ge .
Bailey says
the show
is a compendium
of tales
and anecdotes
drawn
from his past
20 years as a travelling comedian.
“It’s not about
rock’n’roll debauchery and
it’s not a confessional, it’s
more about
the odd situations comedy
has led me to,
such as presenting wildlife documentaries and being up a tree in
Borneo and thinking: ‘How did I
get here?’.”
Regular appearances on TV
shows such as QI and Never Mind
the Buzzcocks, on which he was a
team captain, have helped to make
Bailey a household name. But it’s
his live tours that established his
reputation as one of the UK’s most
creative comic talents.
Not that he was an instant hit.
The road to success was both
long and slow. He spent the early
1980s touring
with a Welsh experimental theatre troupe before
going on to form
a comedy double
act called The
Rubber Bishops.
It was only when
he started performing
solo in the
m i d -1 9 9 0 s t h at
his career gained
t rac t i o n . H e’s s i n c e
been an integral part of
comedy’s renaissance.
“Stand-up used to be a
fringe thing on TV, something
they found a space for late at
night. For a long time, it was
all about cabaret and variety,
but then stand-up had a resurgence and it has transformed
the scene.”
It’s not about
debauchery, it’s
more being up a tree
in Borneo, thinking:
how did I get here?
He puts this down to a growing
appetite for live performances.
“We crave a communal experience
that comedy can give us. There’s
something exhilarating about
being in a room where everyone is
laughing at the same joke.”
Bailey sees the role of the standup as part of a tradition that dates
back centuries. “I’m a modern incarnation of the troubadour, who
went to taverns and entertained
people with humorous poems and
poked fun at the local lord. It goes
all the way back to Chaucer. You’re
saying the things the audience
wants to voice.”
He still enjoys the frisson that
stand-up gives him. “JK Rowling
said one of the great fears of writing is the empty page, but it’s also
one of the thrills, and it’s the same
with comedy. You might never
write anything funny again, or you
could write the world’s greatest
joke. You just don’t know. That’s
what’s so compulsive about it.”
‘Bill Bailey: Larks in Transit’ is at
the O2 Apollo, Manchester, tonight
and tomorrow, then tours the UK
to 16 June (billbailey.co.uk)
43
FR DAY
44
BOOKS
The cultured poverty that made Suede
COAL BLACK MORNINGS
Brett Anderson
(Little, Brown, £16.99)
Review by Anna Van Praagh
B
rett Anderson didn’t
want to write “the usual
‘coke and gold discs’
rock memoir”, so he set
his beautifully crafted
autobiography at a time before his
band, Suede, became one of the
most important groups of the past
30 years. Founded in 1989, they
dominated the 1990s music scene
alongside Blur, Oasis and Pulp and
were widely credited with launching Britpop.
Instead, “hunched over the fossils” of his past, he tells the story of
his poverty-stricken childhood in
a council house in a “drab dormitory town” near Haywards Heath,
West Sussex, when he was “a
snotty, sniffy, slightly maudlin sort
of boy raised on salad cream and
milky tea and cheap meat” and
lived a life about as far from rock
stardom as it’s possible to get.
His mother was an art schooleducated seamstress, who decorated their tiny house at the edge
of an estate next to a dump with
her exquisite watercolours of the
Sussex countryside. His father,
a taxi driver, was obsessed with
Franz Liszt. In homage to another
of his heroes, TE Lawrence, he acquired full Arab robes and would
wear them around the house,
“dressed like Peter O’Toole’s double, cast adrift in some bitterly
ironic parallel universe”.
Anderson qualified for free
school meals, the house had no
central heating and food was
scarce. This combination of intellect, romanticism and grinding
poverty would later define Suede,
as they marked the angst-ridden
characters of an intellectual but
impoverished underclass. Their
music was “our ragged hymn, our
howl of frustration – a poem to
failure and loss and a paean to the
cheapened, indifferent Britain we
saw before us”.
At his “terrifying” comprehensive, Anderson became a
rapacious collector of music,
from Black Sabbath to Bowie.
He formed a band, started experimenting with drugs, moved
to Manchester, moved back again.
Then, in 1987, he enrolled at the
Bartlett architecture school at
UCL and met a student called
Justine Frischmann, with whom
he fell deeply in love, and a star
guitarist called Bernard Butler.
Together with bassist Mat
Osman, and with Anderson as the
frontman, they formed Suede and
so began the long, soulless journey
Heir apparent Brett Anderson’s mother was an art-educated seamstress, his father obsessed with Liszt AFP
hustling for a support slot on the
early 1990s indie circuit, midway
through which Frischmann lost
patience and left Anderson for
Blur’s lead singer, Damon Albarn.
Albarn’s name is never mentioned, amusingly, although Anderson is careful to point out that
it was he who noticed the graffiti
that would give Blur the title of
their best-selling album, Modern
Life is Rubbish.
This memoir is a thoughtprovoking meditation on how our
childhoods form the people we
become. Anderson also uses the
book to explain the beginnings of
what inspired Britpop and to vent
his frustration at how it became
“the laddish, jingoistic and frankly patronising interpretation that
would follow”.
Early on, he writes that “we
stumble through life leaving an
embarrassing, sticky trail”, but
by ending the story before Suede
even released their first single, he
avoids having to dish up any of
the really painful stuff – his bloodthirsty rivalry with Albarn, his
terrible rift with Butler and his
and Frischmann’s heartbreaking
descent into drug addiction. The
book is perfect as it is, but there’s
no question that a second volume
is needed. EVENING STANDARD
ALSORELEASED
THE LAST OF THE
GREENWOODS
Clare Morrall
(Sceptre, £18.99)
Two elderly, reclusive brothers,
the Greenwoods, live in
neighbouring railway carriages
in a field outside Bromsgrove.
They share bathroom and
kitchen facilities, yet have not
exchanged a word in decades.
One day, a letter arrives from
Canada, from a woman claiming
to be the sister they thought
had been murdered 50 years
ago. Meanwhile, the young
postwoman who delivers the
letter is battling her own demons,
while simultaneously helping to
revive an abandoned railway line
with the son of local gentry.
Clare Morrall’s latest novel has
all the ingredients of a gripping
read, and the story is told
through simple but compelling
prose. Zohra Dasgupta, the
postwoman, is the key to pulling
all of the threads together, after
she delivers the letter to the
Greenwoods. Intrigued by their
unique living arrangements,
she uncovers the story of their
Top5
Books
sister’s disappearance and the
subsequent identification of
her body from a neighbour, the
elderly Mr Troth.
When the letter writer
appears on the brothers’s
doorsteps, the Greenwoods are
forced to confront the past and
the rivalry which has dogged
them since their teenage years,
when they were both promising
tennis players.
The pair are united in their
uncertainty about the Canadian
woman and her identity. Is she
really their sister Debs, or is she
Debs’ apparently sinister friend,
Bev, who copied their sister’s
dress and appearance to a tee
– even, they discover, getting an
identical tattoo in the days before
the pair disappeared?
To begin with, the brothers,
just 10 months apart in age and
rivals in everything, including
an unorthodox romance with
an older girl, blur into one.
“It could have been either of
them,” the narrator explains
when describing the outcome
of a tennis final, documented
in a newspaper cutting of a
pre-match report. “They were
equally capable.”
Once their backstory is
explored, however, their
differing identities begin to
emerge. As does that of Zohra,
a young woman in her twenties,
who was once a bright and
popular student, but faced cyber
bullying in her last years at
school. A near-breakdown that
followed has left Zohra reluctant
to mix with anyone from her
teenage years except for her
friend Crispin, who has roped
her in to helping with his railway
restoration project.
Shortlisted for the Man
Booker Prize in 2003 for her
first novel, Astonishing Splashes
of Colour, Morrall has a knack
for unshowy storytelling and
captivating characters which
draw the reader in.
The book’s Midlands setting
is vivid, while the image of the
run-down train carriages – and
their past and present – is
captivating. The dramatic ending
materialises somewhat out of the
blue, and rather overshadows the
pivotal themes of the story, but
this remains an enjoyable and
accomplished novel.
1. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine Gail Honeyman (HarperCollins)
2. Tin Padraig Kenny (Chicken House)
3. Insidious Intent Val McDermid (Sphere)
4. The Last Tudor Philippa Gregory (Simon & Schuster)
5. M: Maxwell Knight, MI5’s Greatest Spymaster Henry Hemming (Arrow)
Jane Bradley
MISS BLAINE’S
PREFECT AND THE
GOLDEN SAMOVAR
Olga Wojtas
(Contraband, £8.99)
This “cosy crime” novel, inspired
by Muriel Spark’s The Prime
Of Miss Jean Brodie, begins in
19th-century Russia, where
librarian and time-traveller
Shona McMonagle has landed in
the middle of a grand party, and
is teaching reels to the guests.
It’s not until she is safely away
from the festivities and exploring
her new home that the reader
can draw breath and digest the
boldness of the opening.
Shona puzzles over how to
fulfil her mission – she has been
given no instructions, but is
sure that it must involve getting
Lidia Ivanovna married off to
the enigmatic Sasha despite the
interference of Lidia’s knittingobsessed Nanny. We then attend
another sumptuous party and
a Scottish high tea, both of
which come with a hefty dose of
Jane Austen stylings and Stella
Gibbons satirical wit.
The Spark homage is cleverly
done, but anyone looking for a
needling tone won’t find it. This is
light, fluffy, sweet and delightfully
insubstantial. As Jean Brodie
said: “For those who like that
sort of thing, that is the sort of
thing they like.”
Louise Fairbairn
THE SEVEN
DEATHS OF EVELYN
HARDCASTLE
Stuart Turton
(Raven Books, £14.99)
A man wakes terrified in a forest,
with no memory of who he is, the
sound of gunshot and a name on
his lips: Anna. What follows is an
Agatha Christie yarn tumbling
through the looking glass, as the
man is forced repeatedly to live
the day of a murder dressed up
not to look like one. Each time he
wakes in the body of a different
guest at a party from hell, tasked
with solving the murder to win
his release. Brilliantly plotted.
Emily Beamont
THE LAST
WILDERNESS
Neil Ansell
(Tinder Press, £18.99)
Neil Ansell set out to explore the
Rough Bounds of the Northwest
Highlands, making five solitary
walks. His cavalier approach to
orienteering means he frequently
ends up far from the beaten
track, meeting wildlife from
otters to eagles. The book is often
elegiac in tone, partly because
Ansell’s hearing is starting to fail,
so he is able to hear less and less
of the birdsong he loves, partly
because his health is failing, too.
Roger Cox
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
Behind
the Nazi
Games
BERLIN 1936
Oliver Hilmes (translated
by Jefferson Chase)
(Bodley Head, £16.99)
Review by Peter Carty
T
he “kiss attack” on
Adolf Hitler comes on
the penultimate day of
the 1936 Berlin Games.
An American tourist,
Carla de Vries, walks up to the
VIP box in the Olympic Stadium
and snaps a picture of the Führer,
before grabbing his head and kissing him on the cheek. Hitler looks
baffled but the audience applauds,
so he laughs and joins in.
The kiss is one of many vignettes
in Oliver Hilmes’ book. It is a compilation of news items, official reports and announcements, and
other public and private stories
that unfolded during the Games,
right down to weather forecasts.
The volume is sub-titled “Sixteen
Days in August”: Hilmes dedicates
a chapter to each day of the Games.
His selection of material juxtaposes Nazi propaganda about the
sporting extravaganza against
the persecution taking place away
from the public eye. Early on, for
Centre stage Hitler marches into Berlin’s Olympic arena HULTON ARCHIVE
example, is the story of a transvestite, Toni Kellner, who has been ill
for some time but does not want
to visit a doctor for fear of attracting the authorities’ attention. Kellner dies alone at home when an
artery ruptures.
Elsewhere, Erich Arendt, construction boss and Nazi party
member, goes on a drinking spree
which ends abruptly when he
starts shouting drunken abuse
about Hitler. Now he’s in prison.
Meanwhile, the Gestapo are interested in nightclub proprietor Leon
Dajou, their investigations fuelled
by suspicions he may be Jewish.
At the Games themselves, the
opening ceremony’s grandeur is
enhanced by a lone runner entering the stadium bearing a torch
which has been carried over in
relays from Greece. It never happened in ancient times, of course,
but this Nazi innovation makes
a fine dramatic contrast with
the massed ranks of spectators
throwing out fascist salutes.
The regime can’t control everything. Most famously, Jesse Owens
wins four gold medals and tramples racism into the track. When
Owens gains his third gold, the
American writer Thomas Wolfe
is watching and whoops so loudly
with delight that Hitler glares
over from his box. Leni Riefenstahl is busy recording the action
– these were the first Games to be
televised, as well as filmed – but
despite her status as Hitler’s favourite film-maker, she is roundly
booed by the crowds.
Hilmes’ narrative mosaic becomes mesmerising. He mimics
the way we absorb news and current affairs through myriad sources, and thereby lends his portrait
of the Games an immediacy that
is unsettling. This is due to the
strength of the illusion but it is
also because of a sense of mounting claustrophobia. It becomes
horribly clear that if you are from
a targeted minority group, you
need to get out of Berlin and Germany as fast as you can.
In Germany, Berlin 1936 has
been a best-seller. It is easy to
understand why it is compulsive
reading in a country where the
shadows of Nazism never recede,
but it has disconcerting resonances for a wider audience, too.
Like it or not, the 1936 Games
were emblematic of an era that is
uncomfortably close to our own.
The Nazis championed new technologies, and were pioneers of
corporate identity and branding:
all tools with worryingly greater
potential for abuse by authoritarian governments in this century
than the previous one.
More obviously, Berlin 1936 has
alarming similarities with Beijing
2008 and, no doubt, the Winter
Olympics of Beijing 2022. Hilmes reminds us that the Games
remain a public relations gift for
totalitarian regimes.
COFFEE
TABLE
CHOICE
ONEMINUTE
WITH…
Danny Wallace,
writer
Where are you now and
what can you see?
Beyond my laptop, I can see two
feet – mine – resting on a table.
That crazy bloke who does the
business reports is on CNN again.
There’s a wood-burning stove
to my left and I should really
clean the glass. Someone hasn’t
put their Lego away. And that
builder’s left a spanner.
What are you currently reading?
Noise: A Human History of Sound
and Listening by David Hendy.
It’s a book about noise. The
audiobook version is just 45
minutes of someone banging pots
and their neighbour screaming
at them from next door.
Who is your favourite author
and why do you admire her/him?
I’ll never lose the soft spot I have
for Sue Townsend, whose Adrian
Mole books made me realise
quite powerfully how much a few
well-chosen words, put in the
right order and just left on a page,
could make someone laugh out
loud years later.
Describe the room where
you usually write…
Usually, it’s just me, a computer
and a radio. Nothing more
distracting than that. You need
a good chair, you need a window
to glance out of and quick access
to tea, but get that sorted,
and congratulations, you’re
a best-selling author.
Which fictional character
most resembles you?
Thor, god of thunder.
Who is your hero/heroine
from outside literature?
It hardly feel as if the world needs another book of Beatles’ photographs, but Astrid Kirchherr’s collection has greater intimacy than most. She
was a talented art student and protégée of Reinhart Wolf living in Hamburg when she was introduced to the young Liverpudlian band. She soon
became the girlfriend of original bass guitarist Stuart Sutcliffe and ‘Astrid Kirchherr with The Beatles’ (Damiani, £22.50) documents a germane
period in their lives. From the famous 1960 images of the band dressed in leathers at a fairground, Kirchher captured their transition into sharp
suits and, after Sutcliffe’s sudden death, the grief of John Lennon, captured alone in the dark in a Hamburg attic studio.
Generally, anyone who stands
up to tyranny. Artistically, I’m
fascinated by the techniques
of Christopher Nolan. And
hopefully, I’ll soon be saying
Robert Mueller.
‘Hamish and the Baby Boom’
by Danny Wallace is out on
8 March (Simon & Schuster
Children’s, £6.99)
45
Business
Business Editor Elizabeth Anderson
+4420 7361 5718
business@inews.co.uk
PROPERTY
Mortgage approvals rise as
stamp duty cut takes effect
By Vicky Shaw
The number of mortgage approvals
being made to homebuyers jumped
to a six-month high in January, Bank
of England figures show.
There were 67,478 home loans
approved for house purchase,
marking the highest figure since
July 2017.
The Bank also said the annual
growth in consumer credit, which
includes credit cards, personal loans
and overdrafts, had slowed over the
past year, to 9.3 per cent in January.
Howard Archer, chief economic
adviser at EY Item Club, said the
rebound in mortgage approvals over
the month suggests there may have
been a hit to activity in December
as a knee-jerk reaction to the Bank
of England raising interest rates
in November.
He added: “It is also possible that
the cutting of stamp duty for firsttime buyers in the late-November
budget may have provided limited
support to mortgage approvals
in January.”
He also said the sharp rebound
in mortgage approvals probably
overstated the current strength of the
housing market, just as December’s
drop overstated the weakness of
housing market activity.
S eparate figures published
yesterday showed house prices
StepChange debt charity
said 620,000 people
contacted the charity for help last
year. Two fifths of the people it
advised said they struggle to keep
up with basic bills such as rent.
dipped for the first time in six months
in February.
A 0.3 per cent month-on-month
fall took the average UK house price
to £210,402, Nationwide Building
Society’s figures showed.
It was the first time since August
2017 that house prices had fallen
month on month.
The annual pace of house price
growth eased in February, after
an unexpected pick-up in January,
Nationwide said.
House prices were 2.2 per cent
higher than a year earlier.
Robert Gardner, Nationwide’s
chief economist, said: “Month-tomonth changes can be volatile, but
the slowdown is consistent with signs
of softening in the household sector
in recent months.”
He added that the squeeze on
household budgets, due to higher
Six-month high: 67,478 home loans
were approved in January GETTY
inflation, is likely to drag on housing
market activity this year. But
sustained low mortgage interest
rates and a lack of properties on
the market should help keep house
prices up.
The Centre for Economics and
Business Research forecasts the
Bank of England will raise interest
rates twice this year. The base rate
is currently 0.5 per cent, rising from
0.25 per cent in November.
INDUSTRY
Manufacturing
grew at a
‘snail’s pace’
in February
By Ben Chu
Quote of
the day
We are always on
the lookout for
experienced staff
who love serving
customers and
bring expertise in
technology
Seb James
Chief executive of Dixons
Carphone said he is
looking to take on some
Maplin employees
The 30
Second
Briefing
SPOTIFY
Another major tech flotation is
on the way, but Spotify is taking a
different approach.
Music streaming firm Spotify wants
to list directly on the New York
Stock Exchange. It means Spotify’s
existing shareholders will take
their shares directly to the market,
bypassing brokers. The company will
not issue new shares as it doesn’t
need to raise money.
How much will the shares be worth?
The company, which will trade
under the name SPOT, thinks its
shares could be worth as much
as $132.50. This would give it a
valuation of more than $23bn
(£17bn). But because the company is
not issuing any new shares, it hasn’t
specified a listing price.
Is it worth this much?
Spotify, which launched in 2008
and is available in around 60
countries, is the biggest music
streaming company in the world.
Revenue at the Stockholm-based
firm rose almost 40 per cent to
€4.09bn (£3.63bn) in 2017. However,
there is concern over how Spotify
intends to make money, as it made
a loss of €378m last year. “Spotify
comes with a strong brand, but for
investors the risks are amplified.
This is a company that hasn’t made
a profit yet and will face intense
pressure from competitors and
its suppliers,” said Laith Khalaf, an
analyst at Hargreaves Lansdown.
User numbers are growing.
Spotify has 71 million subscribers
globally that pay to use the service.
In the UK, a subscription costs £9.99
a month. Spotify also offers a free,
ad-supported service, and there are
around 90 million people signed up
to the free option.
The UK’s manufacturing sector
expanded at only a “snail’s pace” last
month, according to the latest survey
snapshot of the industry.
The latest Purchasing Managers’
Index (PMI) reading dipped to 55.2 in
the month, down from 55.3 previously
and the lowest in eight months.
Any reading above 50 signals
growth, but as recently as November
the PMI for the sector was 58.4, a
four-year high, as buoyant global
demand and the weaker pound since
the Brexit vote gave a lift to exports.
“The sector was not filled with
bonhomie in the second month of
the year. All sectors lost their drive
as manufacturing activity crawled
at a snail’s pace not seen for almost
a year,” said Duncan Brock of the
Chartered Institute of Procurement
& Supply, which sponsors the PMI.
Manufacturing accounts for about
10 per cent of UK GDP and was
growing particularly strongly in late
2017, according to official data.
The Office for National Statistics
estimates that output expanded
by 2.7 per cent in the second half of
last year alone.
Lee Hopley, chief economist at EEF,
the manufacturers’ organisation, said
companies are still feeling positive
about the year ahead.
“While the rate of expansion has
eased somewhat, the future still
looks bright. New order volumes are
holding up and business confidence is
still firm,” she said.
The UK manufacturing sector
directly employs 2.7 million people.
THE INDEPENDENT
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
RETAIL
Under-threat Carpetright
issues second profit warning
By Laura Onita
Carpetright has become the latest
High Street name under threat after
issuing its second profit warning
this year.
The ailing carpets and flooring
seller is understood to be a
considering a company voluntary
arrangement, which could lead to
store closures and job losses, in a bid
to turn the business around.
The company, which has 416 shops
in Britain, could cut its portfolio by as
much as 100 stores.
The news comes just days after
toys seller Toys R Us and Maplin,
purveyor of game consoles and tech
goods, fell into administration putting
5,500 jobs at risk. Italian restaurants
chain Prezzo is also planning to cut a
third of its 300 venues.
A string of retailers, including
Mothercare, House of Fraser and
Debenhams, have issued profits
warnings over the past couple
of months as they grapple with
changing shopping habits and a
consumer squeeze.
Carpetright said it will make a
“small underlying pre-tax loss” in the
year to 28 April, below its previous
target of £2m to £6m profits, as it
battles a “difficult” market.
The shares tumbled 22 per cent
to 60.3p.
It said same-store sales are on the
up, but are still in negative territory
Carpetright is
considering
store closures
and job losses PA
LA Times
and below expectations. Carpetright
is in talks with lenders to ensure it
stays on top of its loans. The banks
“currently remain fully supportive”.
Outlook
JIM
ARMITAGE
WPP needs more
agility to keep up
in this digital age
F
or a year or more, dark
whispers have been in
the air about WPP. Faced
with the rapid migration
of advertising space from
print and television to Facebook and
Google, Sir Martin Sorrell has been
buying up businesses across the
The company has also had to fend
off competition from rival Tapi, set up
by Martin Harris, the son of Carpetright’s founder. EVENING STANDARD
INVESTMENT
Sorrell: 2017 ‘not a pretty
year’ for WPP as sales drop
Shares in WPP dropped 8 per cent
yesterday after boss Sir Martin
Sorrell admitted 2017 was “not a
pretty year”, as he embarked on a
major shake-up of the world’s
biggest advertising agency.
In what was WPP’s
worst set of earnings
since the financial crisis,
net sales fell for the first
time since 2009 – down
almost 1 per cent for 2017.
Revenues are also expected
to remain under pressure in 2018
after a “slow start” to the year.
Chief executive Sir Martin Sorrell,
who founded the company in 1986,
said 2017 “was not a pretty year, with
flat like-for-like, top-line growth, and
operating margins and operating
profits also flat, or up marginally”.
Many major companies
From the
business
pages
Tough times for
Disney employees
ADVERTISING
By Holly Williams and Josie Cox
47
have recently cut back their
advertising spend.
Procter & Gamble, the owner
of Pampers, Pantene and Gillette,
announced last week that it plans
to cut $400m (£236m) from its
spend by 2021.
This slowdown in
advertising spend has
affected the whole
m a r k e t i n g s e c t o r,
with WPP rivals
such as Omnicom and
France’s Publicis Groupe
also posting lacklustre
sales growth.
“Facebook and Google have
been eating into WPP’s market
share as companies use different
routes to target their clients,” said
David Madden, a market analyst at
CMC Markets.
Shares in WPP fell 8.2 per cent to
1,280p. A year ago the shares were
trading at 1,918p. Mr Sorrell (inset)
yesterday defended his pay package
and insisted he has no plans to stand
down, despite being 73 and having a
young family.
“I’ll carry on as long as people will
have me,” he said.
He was paid £70m last year and
will receive £48m this year.
“My pay depends on performance.
If the value of the company rises I
do extremely well. The company is
where my wealth is,” he added.
The group reported a 5.4 per cent
rise in underlying pre-tax profits to
£2.1bn for 2017.
world in the hope of consolidating his
position. By being the biggest in the
market, his reasoning went, we will
win the juiciest accounts.
However, as the gossips had it,
WPP was failing to integrate these
new businesses and maximise their
value. Worse still, in digital 2018,
they warned, you win accounts by
being the most agile agency – not
the biggest.
Yesterday, WPP pretty much
admitted this to be true. At a time
when the world is staging a coordinated run of economic growth,
from France to Japan, WPP revenues
are flat. The company is the economic
bellwether no more.
Sorrell blames the private-equity
owners or activist shareholders
in big companies for ordering
managements to rein back on ad
spending. That’s probably true:
under-fire Unilever and Procter &
Gamble have been crimping spend.
But they are also changing what
they invest their marketing budgets
in – and not in a good way for WPP
and its big agency rivals. More
marketing spend is moving from
conventional ads to direct contact
with customers through apps.
Where brands do still run
conventional ads, it is increasingly
with Google and Facebook, which
offer direct media-buying products
and analytics that cut out the
middleman agencies.
WPP employs more than
200,000 people in around
100 countries. The group said that
it would be simplifying many of
its operations.
At a time of global growth,
WPP revenues are flat. The
company is the economic
bellwether no more
Sorrell’s remedies are absolutely
the right ones: integrate the group’s
businesses, cut costs and better sell
the group’s multitude of services to
its customers.
The challenge is whether he can
do it fast enough while remaining
Schroders:
targeting
wealthy works
By Simon English
Markets are rocky and there is
intense pressure on fund managers
to cut fees – but that has yet to hit
Schroders, the City firm that has
been around since 1804.
Funds under management rose
by £43bn to £390bn in 2017, sending
profits up 23 per cent to £760m.
With robot traders and
index trackers ever more
common, Schroders is targeting
wealthy clients, especially in
emerging markets.
Like rival Jupiter, it can claim it
is beating the markets often enough
to earn its higher fees. Schroders
said nearly 75 per cent of funds are
beating their benchmark.
The higher profits enabled it to
raise its dividend by 22 per cent to
113p. Shares in the company dropped
1.9 per cent yesterday to 3,385p.
relevant and nimble enough in an
ever-changing digital world.
***
Canny work by Sky to tie up with
Netflix on its Sky Q box. As the
Fox–Time Warner deal shows, the
unstoppable force of the Silicon Valley
show-makers is not worth trying to
compete against for broadcasters.
For Sky and BT, which already offers
Netflix to its customers, it’s all about
offering the best collection of content
as possible. I’d be amazed if both
broadcasters are not already talking
to Amazon about offering its shows to
their customers, too.
What’s less clear is how they will
compete with Silicon Valley in the
longer term. Already, on an Amazon
Fire TV Stick, you can seamlessly get
all Amazon and Netflix content.
Sky and BT have unique sports
rights. But how long will that last?
EVENING STANDARD
Only weeks after Walt Disney
Co reported better-thanexpected profit, a survey at the
company’s LA theme parks
has found that 73 per cent of
employees don’t earn enough to
pay for such expenses as rent,
food and petrol. The survey,
funded by labour groups, also
found 11 per cent of resort
employees have been homeless
or have not had a place of their
own in the last two years.
Getting into bed
with Airbnb
Mexico News Daily
The state of Guerrero is
hoping to boost tourism by
signing a deal with the online
hospitality service Airbnb.
While promoting destinations
within the state, it also provides
the state with a bit of new tax
revenue. The government
will charge a 3 per cent tax on
bookings, with which it expects
to generate 12 million pesos
(£463,000) a year.
‘Cyber Schengen’
zone proposed
Deutsche Welle
The Lithuanian President, Dalia
Grybauskaite, has called on EU
leaders to support the creation
of a “cyber Schengen”, modelled
on the area of free movement
of people within the EU, to
help battle online crime. The
first meeting of the EU
rapid-reaction force was
in Vilnius last month, with
about half of the 28 EU
governments participating.
Digital cameras
making comeback
The Asahi Shimbun
Digital camera manufacturers
are back in the picture as
they cash in on the growing
popularity of Instagram
and other social networking
services after losing ground to
smartphone cameras for many
years. The shipment volume
of digital cameras by Japanese
manufacturers rose for the first
time in seven years, up 3.3 per
cent to 24.98 million units in
2017, according to the Camera &
Imaging Products Association.
48
BUSINESS
The
Business
Matrix
The day at
a glance
FTSE 100 down 56.3 at 7175.6
685.5
1753.0
950.1
11.1
2476.0
1476.0
4260.0
482.2
533.5
177.3
6.3
1103.0
436.9
4064.0
2886.0
587.0
224.3
1918.5
1481.5
4381.0
119.7
1903.0
1396.5
27.0
3442.0
6575.0
2186.5
332.3
936.0
169.8
1428.0
1174.0
247.8
3.0
270.0
1235.2
956.5
Markets
FTSE 100
7175.6
FTSE 250
19551.7
FTSE All Share
3953.3
-56.3
-135.6
-28.3
FTSE Eurofirst300
1468.5
Dow Jones *
24861.2
-18.7
S&P 500 *
2699.3
Nasdaq *
7233.0
DAX
12190.9
CAC 40
5262.6
Hang Seng
31044.2
+199.5
Nikkei
21724.5
-343.8
-168.0
-14.6
-40.0
-244.9
High
Hammerson
Hargrve Lans
HSBC Hldgs
IAG
Imperial Brands
Informa
IntCont Htls
Intertek
ITV
Johnson Matth
Just Eat
Kingfisher
Land Secs
Legal & Gen
Lloyds Bk Gp
Lon Stock Ex
Marks&Spen
Mediclinic Intl
Micro Focus Intl
Mondi
Morrison (Wm)
National Grid
Next
NMC Health
Old Mutual
PaddyPwrBetfair
Pearson
Persimmon
Prudential
Randgold Res
Reckitt Ben
RELX
Rentokil Initial
Rio Tinto
Rolls-Royce
RBS
Shell A
445.8
1667.5
719.8
623.6
2603.5
694.6
4555.0
4854.0
155.4
3089.0
866.6
347.4
920.0
260.5
68.3
3942.0
291.1
587.6
2017.0
1840.0
225.5
743.4
4756.0
3386.0
254.8
8270.0
725.0
2583.0
1830.0
5766.0
5724.0
1480.0
263.1
3780.5
828.0
265.7
2291.5
-1.2
-58.0
+2.7
+9.0
-15.5
-0.8
-144.0
-59.0
-4.6
-46.0
-10.4
-10.5
-7.0
-2.1
-0.5
-86.0
-4.5
-4.2
-46.0
-62.0
-0.2
+3.2
-100.0
-48.0
-0.5
-170.0
-7.4
-18.0
-0.5
-82.0
-52.0
-13.0
-26.5
-145.5
-11.6
-2.0
-9.5
52338.0
1935.0
798.6
680.6
3956.5
773.0
4944.0
5470.0
221.8
3511.0
906.0
369.8
1217.1
279.9
73.6
4114.0
397.8
890.2
2970.5
2145.0
254.4
1174.3
5355.0
3548.0
258.5
8967.0
773.0
2901.0
1992.5
8255.0
8110.4
1784.0
338.8
4226.6
994.5
304.2
2579.5
Low
441.9
1258.0
618.0
516.0
2569.0
480.0
3656.0
3528.0
142.8
2681.0
496.1
285.3
912.0
241.7
61.8
2995.0
282.0
495.4
26.8
1684.0
205.0
733.0
3565.0
1726.0
184.2
6572.5
563.0
2046.0
1612.1
5760.0
5654.0
1399.0
235.5
2882.5
733.5
221.8
1982.5
EURO/
POUND
DOLLAR/
POUND
Company
Price
Chg
High
Shell B
RSA Insur
Sage
Sainsbury(J)
Schroders
Scot Mort Inv Tst
Segro
Severn Trent
Shire
Sky
Smith&Neph
Smith (DS)
Smiths Gp
Smurfit Kappa Grp
SSE
Stan Chart
Standard Life Aber
St James Place
Taylor Wimpey
Tesco
TUI AG
Unilever
United Utilities
Vodafone
Whitbread
Ferguson
WPP
2307.5
618.0
676.0
256.5
3385.0
450.4
571.0
1723.5
3222.0
1372.0
1277.0
468.8
1580.5
2484.0
1221.0
795.7
365.1
1129.0
184.8
208.6
1525.0
3710.5
673.8
202.3
3838.0
5140.0
1280.0
-13.5
-13.4
-16.6
-2.5
-64.0
-8.2
-0.6
+16.0
+113.0
+24.0
+8.5
-10.8
-17.0
-58.0
-4.0
-15.1
-3.0
-25.5
-1.1
-2.2
-19.5
-23.0
+7.6
-1.4
-45.0
-6.0
-114.0
2617.0
672.5
825.2
339.9
3784.0
478.4
595.7
2575.0
5067.0
1372.0
1442.0
565.0
1697.0
2662.0
1554.0
864.2
448.6
1279.5
211.9
217.1
1687.9
4557.5
1078.0
239.7
4333.0
5722.0
1928.1
Low
2037.0
568.5
613.0
222.4
3002.0
347.3
444.3
1664.0
2940.5
11.4
1173.0
5.3
1442.0
1712.7
1176.5
678.8
339.7
1008.0
173.0
165.3
934.4
3678.5
648.6
197.4
3499.9
4427.0
1185.7
For enquiries call +44 (0)20 7825 8300
–$1.61
975.0
2184.0
1870.0
1071.0
3387.0
2185.0
5520.0
570.5
682.5
235.3
705.5
1662.4
536.2
5643.6
4270.0
695.0
349.2
2472.0
2024.0
5435.0
227.7
2682.0
1765.9
2955.0
4646.1
7762.5
2735.5
411.3
1698.7
461.4
1708.0
1746.0
342.6
449.5
416.9
1724.5
1341.0
Chg
$64.09
-15.4
+38.5
-39.0
-12.6
-46.0
-80.0
-9.5
-1.0
+0.2
-2.2
-10.0
-26.4
-1.6
-24.0
-88.0
-1.0
+0.2
-19.0
+58.5
-57.0
-1.6
-17.0
-7.5
+43.0
-41.0
-60.0
-30.0
-4.2
-67.0
+21.1
-22.0
-30.0
-5.6
-2.8
-10.5
-2.8
-20.0
Price
–$9.54
924.2
1881.5
1741.6
857.4
2585.0
2034.0
4765.5
504.6
579.6
211.2
529.0
1457.8
473.6
4271.5
3766.0
627.0
240.0
1936.0
1592.0
4742.0
141.4
2368.0
1538.5
2445.0
4581.0
6575.0
2430.0
378.6
1612.0
448.2
1534.0
1189.5
256.8
435.0
375.9
1304.4
1185.0
Company
$1,310.6
3i Group
Admiral
Anglo Amer
Antofagasta
AB Foods
Ashtead Group
AstraZeneca
Aviva
BAE Systems
Barclays
Barratt Dev
BHP Billiton
BP
BAT
Berkeley Grp Hldgs
British Land
BT
Bunzl
Burberry
Carnival
Centrica
Coca-Cola HBC
Compass
CRH
Croda Intl
DCC
Diageo
Direct Line Ins
Easyjet
Evraz
Experian
Fresnillo
G4S
GKN
Glencore
GSK
Halma
Low
–0.37¢
High
$1.3753
Chg
–0.34¢
Price
€1.1257
Company
-57.9
GOLD
Per troy ounce,
London pm fix
OIL
Brent crude,
per barrel
PROPERTY
DEFENCE
Bovis profits fall
as claims rise
Cobham surges
back into black
Profits at Bovis Homes have
tumbled after the housebuilder
was stung by a string of costs,
including compensation
payouts for poor-quality homes.
The group posted a 26 per cent
fall in pre-tax profits, to £114m,
in 2017. It had to pay out £3.5m
in compensation to customers.
Meanwhile, revenue for 2017
dropped 3 per cent to £1bn.
Shares in defence and aerospace
firm Cobham surged after
swinging into the black with
bottom line pre-tax profits of
£66.9m in 2017, against losses of
£847.9m in 2016. Chief executive
David Lockwood said: “We have
completed an encouraging first
year of Cobham’s turnaround.”
Shares in the company rose 10
per cent to 125p.
CONSTRUCTION
TECHNOLOGY
MPs castigate
Carillion bosses
Games market
reaches new high
MPs launched a fresh attack
on bosses at Carillion, saying
there was a “wholly deficient”
corporate culture at the
collapsed construction giant.
The Work and Pensions and
Business Select Committees
said new evidence to their
joint inquiry into the demise of
the firm revealed “pervasive
institutional failings”.
The UK games market grew
12.4 per cent last year, to a
record £5.11bn. Trade body
UK Interactive Entertainment
said the industry is producing
“world-class content for an
ever-expanding audience”.
Console sales were up 30 per
cent to £659m, thanks to new
releases such as PS4 Pro, Xbox
One X and Nintendo Switch.
INSURANCE
TRANSPORT
Bumper figures
for Hastings
National Express
picks up speed
Car insurer Hastings posted a
39 per cent hike in operating
profits, to £184m, for 2017 as
customer numbers grew by
13 per cent to 2.6 million. The
group announced the figures as
it welcomed new chief executive
Toby van der Meer. Shares
dropped 12 per cent to 275p as it
said competition was intense.
National Express cheered a
bumper year for its businesses
in the US and Spain. Revenues
across the group climbed 6.1
per cent to £2.3bn, and pre-tax
profits accelerated by 11.1 per
cent to £200m. The transport
firm raised its dividend by 10
per cent to 9.25p per share. The
shares are worth around 362p.
SERVICES
ONLINE
Rentokil takes
currency hit
Zuckerberg sale
nets $500m
Outsourcing business Rentokil
spooked the City, despite a hike
in profits and revenues. Shares
fell 9 per cent, to 263p, after it
warned that currency volatility
will dent profits this year by
£10m to £15m. Pre-tax profit
for the year rose to £713m, from
£208.5m, on sales of £2.4bn.
Facebook founder and chief
executive Mark Zuckerberg
sold nearly $500m (£364m)
worth of stock last month to
fund his philanthropic ventures.
The Silicon Valley billionaire
has said he will donate 99 per
cent of his Facebook shares to
the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.
the
markets
It was another difficult day on
European stock markets yesterday.
Germany’s Dax sank 1.8 per cent
and the Cac 40 in France suffered a
1.1 per cent fall. In the UK, the FTSE
100 ended the day down 56 points
at 7,175.64 and the FTSE 250 shed
135.6 points to close at 19,551.70.
***
The biggest faller on the FTSE 100
was Rentokil, down more than
9 per cent to 263p. In second place
was WPP, which closed down
8 per cent to 1,280p after boss Sir
Martin Sorrell said 2017 had been
“a difficult year”.
Evraz was the biggest riser, up
5 per cent to 448.2p.
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
49
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
EMPLOYMENT
Tisci
moves to
Burberry
Apprenticeship
levy in firing line
as numbers drop
By Alan Jones
Riccardo Tisci, the former
creative director of
Givenchy, is to replace
Christopher Bailey at the
creative helm of Burberry.
Mr Bailey announced
in October that he would
be stepping down from
his role at Burberry after
17 years.
Mr Tisci (right) starts
on 12 March. He will
be working with chief
executive Marco Gobbetti,
who has been in the top role
since July last year.
It comes as luxury
brands struggle to
find their way in an
increasingly competitive
market. Shares in
Burberry rose four per
cent to 1,592p yesterday.
The Government is coming
under fresh pressure to reform
its apprenticeship levy, amid
warnings the policy is not
reaching its potential.
Since last April, employers
with a wage bill of more than
£3m have had to pay 0.5 per
cent of this expenditure.
The Local Government
Association yesterday called
for “significant changes” to the
levy. It said there have been
131,000 fewer apprenticeships
started in the seven months
since its introduction.
The association, which
represents 370 councils in
England and Wales, said
there had been complaints
from business groups that the
system was too complex.
Travel Offer
NLS3233856_v9_2018-02-26_Thei-South-Fri_20x3 (1)_Omega RT
TOURISM
Fall in visitors to London
attractions after attacks
By Ravender Sembhy
Merlin Entertainments, the owner
of Madame Tussauds and Alton
Towers, has laid bare the impact
of last summer’s terror attacks
in London.
In a trading update covering
2017, the group said it saw a 17 per
cent plunge in visitors to its London attractions – which include the
London Eye and the London Dungeons – after attacks took place
during its critical trading period.
This led to a 5 per cent fall in operating profit at Merlin’s Midway
division last year to £152m, with likefor-like revenue dipping 1.2 per cent.
The group said: “The attacks
led to a significant and immediate
decline in domestic visitation, with
international visitation falling from
the summer onwards. This resulted
in an estimated 17 per cent drop in
the London visitor attraction market over the key trading period.”
Merlin confirmed it will now
shift investment from Midway,
which includes Madame Tussauds
and Sea Life. It will redirect £100m
Merlin saw a fall in profits after
London terrorist attacks GETTY
of investment away from its attractions between 2018 and 2021,
putting the cash into developing
new hotels instead.
On a group level, the company
saw profits rise 4.8 per cent to
£271m in 2017, helped by a record
66 million visits to its attractions
around the world.
Revenue grew almost 12 per cent
to £1.59bn, and sales at Merlin’s
Legoland parks grew 4.7 per cent.
Shares in Merlin Entertain-
ments surged 9.4 per cent to
372p yesterday.
Chief executive Nick Varney
said: “A year that started well
with positive momentum in almost every part of the group was
ultimately defined by the unprecedented spate of terror attacks in
the UK and poor to extreme weather throughout the summer season
in Europe.
“Despite this, thanks to the efforts of our extraordinary team,
we have reported overall growth
in revenue, profit and cash flow,
welcoming 66 million visitors – our
highest on record.”
Martin Brown, an analyst at
Shore Capital Markets, said:
“Merlin’s attractions remain
firmly positioned to benefit
from the structural growth in
global tourism.”
Merlin recently
announced it is spending
£265m to open a Legoland theme
park in New York. It is expected
to open in 2020.
8 Days
by Air
£
from
699pp
Florence, Assisi
& the Highlights of Tuscany
Departing Friday 18 May
from Heathrow (LHR)
Price Includes...
Return flights to Rome incl. transfers
1 piece of hold luggage per person
7 nights DBB at the Hotel President or Grand Hotel Plaza, Chianciano
Terme
Excursions to Florence, Siena, San Gimignano, Assisi & Lake
daily
money
The deadline for spending £10
notes featuring Charles Darwin has
now passed. The new polymer note
featuring Jane Austen will now be
the only Bank of England £10 note
with legal tender status. Some
banks and building societies may
still accept paper £10 notes, but this
is at their own discretion.
The Bank of England will
continue to exchange Darwin £10
notes for the foreseeable future.
***
Women are still lagging behind
men when it comes to saving for
retirement, according to research.
Online pension planning tool
Pension Monster said just a third
of people who use its platform are
women. This lack of engagement
appears to correlate with their
pension pot sizes. Women
accumulate a pot of just £70,000,
on average, compared with
£192,000 for male users.
The data also suggested that
women with access to professional
financial advice have a significantly
bigger pot size, of around
£125,000, compared with those
earning a similar salary but who
are unadvised.
Trasimeno
Services of a rep and excursion guide
Prices correct at the time of publication, subject to fluctuation and availability. The final price will depend on
your chosen airport, airline and flight time. Air holiday operated by Omega Holidays under ATOL No.6081. Tours
offered subject to availability. Errors and omissions excepted. Prices shown are per person, based on two people
sharing a dbl/twin room. Single supplements apply.
For more information or to book, please call:
03300 130 051
Quote
IPRT
or visit: omegabreaks.com/RT
033 numbers are free within inclusive minutes packages
otherwise standard rates apply.
ieat
Games&Puzzles
daily recipe
Spring greens and spelt
risotto with thyme
Kakuro
Zygolex® In i every day
How to play Fill the white squares so that the total in each
across or down run of cells matches the total at the start
of that run. You must use the numbers from 1-9 only and
cannot repeat a number in a run. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Find the missing words by following the RHYME, LETTERS and MEANING links
– eg, a word that rhymes with ‘cheek’, has one letter different from ‘pear’ and
has the same meaning as mountain, would be ‘peak’. Full rules at zygolex.com.
Solution, page 57
RHYME LETTERS
17
COWER
16
24
24
6
3
24
17
12
TONER
BURST
5
RITE
8
29
15
24
6
5
MALICE
N
11
G
TR ETA
EA R
T IA
3
6
4
7
4
4
GATE
VE
15
4
HOOF
5
SERVES 2
4
4
SLAKE
Jigsawdoku
4
3
4
HORRIBLE
How to play Place the numbers 1-9 once in each row, column
and bold-lined jigsaw region. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
HONK
DROOP
VICE
RHYME
NOOSE
LETTERS
MEANING
5 8
Futoshiki
5
3
7
6
9 2 6
5 1
3
7
6 9
7
Killer Sudoku No 1225
How to play Each row, column and 3 by 3 box must contain
each number (1 to 9) only once. The sum of all numbers
contained in a dotted area must match the number printed
in its top-left corner. No number can appear more than
once in a dotted area. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
7
In tomorrow’s iWeekend
James Martin
7
15
13
10
3
11
20
15
29
6
11
5
12
4
12
16
10
14
14
10
10
14
∧
4 <
2
>
>
<
∨
∨
∨
> 2
2
1
0
9
3
2
3 3
3
1 0
3 2
3
1
2
0
12
1
0 1
0
11
11
∧
∧
How to play Find all the mines in the grid. Numbers in certain squares indicate how
many mines there are in the neighbouring squares, including diagonally touching
squares. Mines cannot be placed in squares with numbers. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
0
2
11
>
>
Minesweeper
14
3
12
7
18
2 <
How to play
Place the numbers
from 1-5 exactly
once in each row
and column. The
greater than and
less than signs
(‘>’ and ‘<’) indicate
where one cell is
greater/less than
the adjacent
cell indicated.
Solution:
minurl.co.uk/i
4
✂
PITCH
4
4
4
9
11
4
6
24
18
SWATCH
5
12
9
Recipe from riverford.co.uk
3
29
11
Melt the butter in a heavy-based pan and
fry the onion very gently for at least 10
minutes, stirring now and then, until soft
and translucent. Add the thyme and spelt
and stir for one minute.
Add the stock, season with salt
and pepper and simmer gently for
25 to 30 minutes, until the spelt is
tender and almost all the liquid has
absorbed (you don’t need to stir it as
much as risotto rice).
While the spelt is cooking, boil the
spring green leaves in a pan of lightly
salted water for six to eight minutes
until tender. Drain, plunge into a bowl of
very cold water, leave to cool, then drain
again. Squeeze out any excess liquid,
then finely shred the leaves.
Once the spelt is just tender, add
the spring greens and Parmesan and
stir for a minute to combine. Check the
seasoning before serving.
PUP
9
12
3
20g butter
1 large onion, finely chopped
(or use a leek)
2 good sprigs thyme or lemon thyme,
leaves only
150g pearled spelt, rinsed
600ml hot vegetable stock
300g spring greens, rib stalks cut out,
leaves left whole
50g Parmesan or vegetarian equivalent,
finely grated
Salt and pepper
MEANING
21
1
1
3 1
2
0 1
1
1
2
3 4
2
1
4
1
4 4 3
1
1
2
0
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
0 1
1
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
Maths Puzzle
Codeword No 1946
How to play Fill the empty squares with
numbers that will make the across and
down calculations produce the results
shown in the grey squares. Each numeral
from 1 to 9 must only appear once. The
calculations should be performed from
left to right and top to bottom, rather than
in strict mathematical order.
How to play The numbers in the grid correspond to the letters of the alphabet.
Solve the puzzle and fill in the letters in the key as you discover them.
Three letters are provided to give you a start. The solution will be printed in
tomorrow’s paper, the solution to yesterday’s codeword is on page 57.
19
Easier
-
8
x
x
x
+
9
-5
+
+
+
+
9
÷
+
33
23
6
22
14
11
-
÷
+
x
+
-
x
-
6
8
23
12
14
14
1
11
17
13
15
15
8
13
10
3
9
20
10
6
21
6
18
11
16
6
12
8
22
15
2
2
8
6
7
2
15
14
13
8
15
23
8
14
15
3
19
11
6
25
8
13
24
9
15
5
22
13
1
13
8
11
14
6
1
15
20
8
22
11
15
23
17
26
7
9
8
7
6
20
23
3
11
6
1
4
19
11
8
23
13
12
11
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
WASP
FOUR
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
x
Need a little help getting started? Then call for up to four extra clue letters on
0901 292 5204. Calls cost £1 plus your telephone company’s network access charge
(if you are having trouble with the phone service, call the helpline: 0333 202 3390).
Or text THEI CLUE to 85100 to receive your clues. Texts cost £1 plus your
standard network charge (if you are having trouble with the text service, call the
helpline: 0333 335 3351). Clues change each day at midnight.
6
14
DOWN
1 American sport (8)
2 Musical drama (5)
3 Small falcon (7)
4 Gape (4)
5 Extinct human (11)
6 White cheese (11)
9 Six-sided figure (7)
11 Drink mats (8)
13 Dry period (7)
17 Additional (5)
18 Resound (4)
Stuck on the concise crossword?
For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3590.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble
accessing this number, please call our helpdesk
on 0333 202 3390.
NEW THIS WEEK!
The i Book of Codewords Vol 2
Our second book of
codewords features
100 brand new puzzles.
Available on Amazon
for £4.99. See
minurl.co.uk/codewordsvol2
Other i books include:
Mixed Puzzles Vol 2 (inews.co.uk/puzzle2),
Crosswords (inews.co.uk/crossword)
and Sudokus (inews.co.uk/sudoku)
1
2
3
5
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
21
20
22
Solution to yesterday’s Concise Crossword
ACROSS 1 Stye, 4 Liszt (Stylist), 8 Antiques, 9 Roam, 10 Techno, 11 Pipe, 13 Victoria Cross,
16 Used, 18 Exhume, 20 Halo, 21 Airedale, 22 Depot, 23 Nice.
DOWN 2 Tank, 3 Eminent, 4 Lasso, 5 Scrap, 6 Trappist, 7 Gusher, 12 First aid, 14 Adhere,
15 Ramadan, 17 Droop, 18 Exact, 19 Bloc.
Today’s other puzzles Cryptic Crossword, page 28;
Five-Clue Cryptic, page 13; One-Minute Wijuko, page 27
Puzzle solutions See page 57 and minurl.co.uk/i
How to play Each numeral from 1 to 9 must
appear (once only) in the squares forming the
red letter i. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
5
2
4 8 6
8
6
9
5
7
4 9 2 3 8
5
8
7
7
9
4
1
7
8 3 2
7
7 6 4 5 2 9
8 5
3
1
1
3
7 1 4
5
4 9 2
6
4
1
2
7 9
7 4 8 5 3 2
Monday: Harder
WALL
Concise Crossword No 2268
ACROSS
1 Shout of
disapproval (3)
3 Sir ___, Arthurian
knight (3)
7 Become angry
(Informal) (3,3)
8 Oscillate (6)
10 Problems or
puzzles (Informal)
(5-7)
12 Cover (3)
14 Rub out (5)
15 Zodiac sign (3)
16 Infantry (4,8)
19 Fine brandy (6)
20 Cheerful (6)
21 Frequently
(Archaic) (3)
22 Beast of burden (3)
idoku Exclusive to i
Sudoku Easier
15
20
Y
HEED
11
8
M
How to play
Convert the word
at the top of the
ladder into the
word at the bottom
of it, using only
the four rungs
in between. On
each rung, you
must put a valid
four-letter word
that is identical
to the word above
it, apart from a
one-letter change.
There may be more
than one way of
achieving this.
13
15
O
-2
x
60
20
12
3
13
15
10
15
9
14
17
3
8
+
-24
6
1
12
Harder
8
10
15
Word
Ladder
51
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
Maths Puzzle,
Word Ladder, Word
Wheel, Kakuro,
Minesweeper,
ABC Logic, Killer
Sudoku, Futoshiki,
Codeword,
Jigsawduko and
Wijuko created by
Clarity Media.
For more
puzzles,
see clarity-media.
co.uk
Terms &
Conditions
By using i’s text
services, you are
agreeing to receive
occasional SMS
messages from
Johnston Press
PLC. You will not
be charged for
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messages and may
opt out at any time
by texting STOP
to the originating
number. SMS
services on this page
are provided by BBA
Digital Ltd, KT18
5AD, helpline: 0333
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services on this
page are provided
by Spoke AL10
9NA, helpline: 0333
202 3390, and by
Advanced Telecom
Services, EC1M
4BH. Helpline: 0330
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ABC Logic
How to play Place the letters
A, B and C exactly once in each row and
column. Each row and column has two
blank cells. The letters at the edge of a row/
column indicate which of the letters is the
first/last to appear in that row/column.
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
A
B
A
C
C
A
A
C
A
B
A
B
B
A
Word Wheel
This is an open-ended puzzle. How many
words of three or more letters, each
including the letter at centre of the wheel,
can you make from this diagram? We’ve
found 17, including one nine-letter word.
Can you do better?
C
B
A
K
L
I
M
A
L
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SPORT
i racing
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-64
Cold snap gives
Charbel chance
for run on Flat
By Jon Freeman
RACING EDITOR
top
tips
fourth in the Tingle Creek Chase last
month and connections are hoping
he may complete some unfinished
business with Altior 12 days from
now (though that’s not something
many would put money on).
All the Cheltenham entries and
weights have been published now
and with most bookies offering
money back on non-runners, it’s not
too soon to be sorting out fancies.
Here are four I’m thinking about
having a quid each-way on, all
at dirty big prices.
One of the ways the BHA responds
to extreme cold snaps these days
is to put on “Jumpers’ Bumpers”
meetings, a chance for National
Hunt horses to get some competitive action on the all-weather tracks
in Flat races they wouldn’t normally
be qualified for while the turf surfaces are buried under snow and ice.
They are especially useful
right now with Cheltenham just around the
corner and among
Scarlet Dragon
the handful of Fes(33-1, Supreme
tival entries taking
Novices’ Hurdle)
advantage of today’s
Getabird is supposed
Charbel’s odds for
Southwell fixture is
to be the first of sevthe Queen Mother
Charbel as he warms
eral
Irish bankers
Champion Chase at
up for a tilt at the
and he’s probably the
Cheltenham
Queen Mother Chamone you’d want to be on
pion Chase.
if your life depended on it.
Charbel was still just in
But there was much to
front and making a race of it with like about Alan King’s classy fiveAltior when falling at the second year-old’s first effort over hurdles
last fence in the Arkle Trophy last at Kempton last weekend. He was
March.
no match for Global Citizen, but he
Lightly-raced since, Charbel hint- jumped very well in the main and it
ed at a return to his best form when was a debut full of promise.
20-1
LINGFIELD
BEST BET
Nick Vedder
(2.30pm, Lingfield)
Two encouraging placed efforts
for new stable. First time
blinkers can give him the edge.
NEXT BEST
Shyron
(4.10pm, Lingfield)
Course specialist (four wins);
needs things to drop right, but
worth a chance.
Arthur’s Gift
(33-1, Pertemps Hurdle Final)
Optimism is based on one run in
particular; a strong late finish up
the hill to win a qualifier at the
course in December. He hasn’t run
quite as well since, but that was just
the sort of performance and attitude required for this stamina test.
Edwulf didn’t perhaps
get the credit he deserved
for beating triple Grade
One winner Outlander
Tombstone
(20-1, Brown’s Advisory Chase)
Doesn’t hold any secrets from the
handicapper, either, but tough and
consistent and looks the right type
for this after finishing on the heels of
the principals in a high-class novice
chase at Leopardstown last month.
Edwulf
(25-1, Gold Cup)
Quite understandably, everyone
was wrapped up in the details of this
chaser’s miraculous recovery from
near death when he won the Irish
Gold Cup at Leopardstown.
SOUTHWELL
1.45
2.30
2.15
4.45
3.05
ANTE-POST
Ben Pauling’s Oistrakh Le Noir
has been backed down to 12-1 for
the Fred Winter Hurdle.
Edwulf, pictured winning the Irish Gold Cup at Leopardstown in February, is
a good bet for the Cheltenham version later this month GETTY
2
9-2120 SWIFT APPROVAL (CD) S C Williams 6 8 10
GOING: STANDARD
O Murphy B 3
3
12142- TAKE THE HELM (CD) B Meehan 5 8 8................. E Greatrex 1
BACK OR LAY ON BETDAQ ‘JUMPERS’ BUMPER’ NH
4
21050- CONSTANTINO (D) R Fahey 5 8 7..........................P Hanagan B 4
32RED.COM HANDICAP (CLASS 5) £7,021 added 1m
FLAT RACE (CLASS 4) £5,000 added 2m
5
0-5217 POET’S SOCIETY (D) M Johnston 4 8 4.....................F Norton 5
6 91-430 SHYRON (CD) G Margarson 7 8 2......................Jane Elliott (5) 6 1
-72117 MAGIC DANCER (D) Kerry Lee 6 11 4........... R Patrick (5) C,T
1
2680-0 CHERBOURG (D) Dr J Scargill 6 9 8....................Hollie Doyle 8 BETTING: 5-2 Mitchum Swagger, 7-2 Take The Helm, 4-1 Swift Approval, 2
-57P11 OSKAR DENARIUS B Pauling 7 11 4........N De Boinville H,T
3
34 SWASHBUCKLE D McCain 5 11 4.......................................B Hughes
2
7-2235 POUR LA VICTOIRE (C)(D) A Carroll 8 9 7 ..G Downing C 4 5-1 Constantino, 6-1 Poet’s Society, 8-1 Shyron.
4
325 HAULANI (BF) B Ellison 4 10 10.............................................D Cook B
3
467-32 ASSANILKA (D) H Dunlop 4 9 6............................... E Greatrex C 7
FORM VERDICT
6P INVESTIGATION S A Harris 4 10 10.................................J Quinlan
4
83058- HEMINGWAY J Long 4 9 6.........................................P Bradley (5) 11 Mitchum Swagger has plenty of ability and, if running to his best, 5
5
058-86 BOLD PREDICTION (CD) Ed Walker 8 9 6................L Morris 9 would take take plenty of beating as he has proven himself to be a 6
254 ORTENZIA C Longsdon 4 10 3.........................Jonathan Burke T
53 SHINE BABY SHINE P Kirby 4 10 3 ..........................................A Nicol
6
8033-2 NICK VEDDER (D) M Wigham 4 9 5.........................F Norton B 1 Group horse in the past. However, he isn’t one fully to trust and, while 7
7
0084-8 SCOTTISH GLEN (CD) P Chamings 12 9 5...............H Crouch 6 he has changed yards, which could easily make a difference to his BETTING: 6-4 Swashbuckle, 2-1 Magic Dancer, 6-1 Haulani, 8-1 Ortenzia,
8
34/0- CARAMURU Miss N L-Beavis 4 9 5............................R Da Silva 5 form, preference goes to TAKE THE HELM. Brian Meehan’s gelding Oskar Denarius, 25-1 Shine Baby Shine, 50-1 Investigation.
9
20631/ SHIMBA HILLS (C)(D) Mrs L Hill 7 9 4....R Kingscote C,T 10 returns from a nine-month absence but deserved the break having ran
BETDAQ #CHANGINGFORTHEBETTOR ‘JUMPERS’
10 231-32 WICKER (D) J Chapple-Hyam 4 9 4..............P Mulrennan C 3 for a while last winter. Freshened up, he could feasibly find further
BUMPER’ NH FLAT RACE (CLASS 4) £5,000 added 2m
11 6626-8 SPIRIT OF SARWAN (C) Miss J Feilden 4 9 2..............Shelley improvement. Constantino has his quirks but is capable of going very
Birkett (3) 2
1
546909
BACK TO BALLOO (D) P Winks 12 11 4 .................... R Winks (5)
close if ready to roll after a 153-day absence.
BETTING: 3-1 Wicker, 7-2 Assanilka, 5-1 Nick Vedder, 6-1 Pour La
2
2F3-44 CHARBEL (D) K Bailey 7 11 4............................................................. D Bass
Victoire, 8-1 Bold Prediction, 12-1 others.
3 U553PU THE SOCIETY MAN M Chapman 11 11 4
32REDSPORT.COM HANDICAP (CLASS 5) 3YO
Miss Becky Smith (7)
10 FREE AT 32RED.COM NOVICE STAKES (CLASS 5)
£7,021 added 7f
4
P/2F44 TOMNGERRY (D) B Ellison 8 11 4.......................................B Hughes
£5,800 added 7f
1
32-2 JAZIRAT (BF) C Appleby 9 11...................................... James Doyle 1 BETTING: 1-4 Charbel, 3-1 Tomngerry, 33-1 Back To Balloo, 100-1 The
912-43 CRISTAL PALLAS CAT (D) R Ingram 9 7
1
712-34 ENVISAGING J Fanshawe 4 9 9 ................................ D Muscutt T 1 2
Society Man.
Rhiain Ingram (5) C 4
2
2-7486 MAAZEL (C) Miss J Feilden 4 9 9.....Shelley Birkett (3) C 4
BETDAQ EXCHANGE VIRTUALS ‘JUMPERS’ BUMPER’
236-8 ILLUSIONAL M Johnston 9 6.................................................F Norton 6
3
7/0-42 MICKEY (D) T Dascombe 5 9 9 .................................. P Pilley (3) C 2 3
NH FLAT RACE (CLASS 4) £5,000 added 2m
4390-2 GOLDEN FOOTSTEPS Ed Walker 9 6....................... O Murphy 5
4
OUSDEN M Attwater 4 9 2.........................................................L Morris 3 4
BETTING: 4-6 Mickey, 7-4 Envisaging, 12-1 Maazel, 20-1 Ousden.
5
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GOING: STANDARD
(PRECAUTIONARY INSPECTION 8AM)
55
2.45
3.35
5.15
3.20
4.10
But he didn’t perhaps get the form
credit he deserved for beating triple
Grade One winner Outlander on
one of his going days.
Instead Our Duke, rallying after
a bad blunder, was deemed to have
run the better Gold Cup trial. He
didn’t, though, make any ground on
Edwulf from the last fence – quite
the opposite in fact.
Our Duke has won since and
commands respect, but Edwulf is
about three times his price. Take
your pick.
6
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BORN IN THORNE I Furtado 5 10 9................... M Kendrick (5)
5
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GREY CHARLIE I Furtado 4 10 8 ..........................................T Whelan
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Grey Charlie, 14-1 Born In Thorne, 25-1 Multitalented, Lammturner,
Berry Poppins.
isport
In tomorrow’s
Lively comment from
Mark Radcliffe
Sam Cunningham
Kevin Garside
56
SPORT
CYCLING
Kenny wins silver
on return as men
claim world title
By Guy Aspin
IN APELDOORN
Laura Kenny helped Great Britain to
a silver medal in the women’s team
pursuit at the UCI Track Cycling
World Championships in Apeldoorn.
Twenty-four hours after husband
Jason won silver in the men’s
team sprint, four-time Olympic champion Laura –
joined by Katie Archibald,
Elinor Barker and Emily
Nelson – got the same result as the United States
retained their title.
In a topsy-turvy race,
the Americans surrendered
an early advantage only to come
on much too strong for Britain in
the finale.
These world championships are
Kenny’s first competitive event
since she gave birth to baby Albie six
months ago.
Archibald admitted there was disappointment at the result, moments
after watching the Britain win the
men’s team pursuit.
“If I was a pundit giving my review
of the race, I would say it was exciting we could challenge the way we
did but we wanted to win,” she said.
In the men’s team pursuit, Great
Britain claimed their first gold medal
of championships with victory
over Denmark.
Three-time Olympic
champion Ed Clancy
(left) anchored a youthful team alongside Kian
Emadi, Ethan Hayter
and Charlie Tanfield.
They won in a time
of three minutes 53.389
seconds, beating Denmark
by a little over one and a half seconds. While Clancy celebrated a
sixth world title, his team-mates
will be collecting their first
rainbow jerseys.
Clancy said: “It feels pretty epic to
be honest. I’m 33 next week. You take
every win you can get.”
Great Britain’s
women’s team
pursuit quartet
in the World
Championship
final GETTY
Back in December, Clancy had
highlighted these championships
as a real chance to claim another
world title, given Australia could
be forgiven for focusing on the
upcoming Commonwealth Games
on home turf.
He was correct as the defending
champions did not compete, but
Clancy insisted that did not make
the racing much easier.
“I always knew it was going to be
a big shit fight, it always is,” he said.
“The Danes are strong, the Kiwis
were maybe not what we expected
because they usually push us right
to the wire. I wouldn’t say it was a
lean year though, we had a to do a
3:53 in Apeldoorn – usually a slow
track - to win.
“It was another tough worlds. But
yes, the Australians are still the team
to beat and obviously it helps they’re
not here.”
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
By Hugo Lowell
AT BIRMINGHAM ARENA
IN WELLINGTON
Laura Muir grimaces as she finishes behind winner Genzebe Dibaba of Ethiopia
and silver medallist Sifan Hassan of the Netherlands REUTERS
as was the case at the outdoor world
titles in London last summer where
she came fourth and seventh in her
two events.
But yesterday, there was no trace
of the awkward stiffness that seemed
to characterise her efforts six months
before, and Muir ran a tactical race
with a fast finish that confirmed her
resolve to reach greater heights in
Birmingham.
Muir will have another medal
chance in the 1500m, with the heats
today ahead of tomorrow’s final.
The mood on the opening day of
Puzzle solutions
-
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HEED
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HERD
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HARD
FOIL
HARP
FAIL
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ZYGOLEX
LEFT TO RIGHT:
tower; pop; spite;
switch; spire;
swap; tire; flag;
swag; tile; loot;
slate; hoot; vile;
loop
5-CLUE CROSSWORD
Across: 1 Attire*, 3 (T)ending, 4 Tri-VI-a(l)
Down: 1 A-b-sent, 2 Enigma*
WORD WHEEL
NINE-LETTER WORD blackmail
OTHER WORDS aim, alkali, bail, bill, claim,
climb, ilk, ill, kill, lick, lilac, limb, mail, mica,
milk, mill
YESTERDAY’S CODEWORD 1945
1
2
3
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15
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D P E
I
5
J
18
L O K N Z
PREMIER LEAGUE
Arsenal (0)...................................0
Att 58,420
x
x
competition was less happy for Britain in the high jump events, with Morgan Lake finishing fourth, albeit with
a season’s best of 1.93m, and 2016
world indoor silver medallist Robbie Grabarz managing to come only
ninth in the men’s final with a jump of
2.25 – well below his best.
In a coup for Russia, Mariya Lasitskene and Danil Lysenko struck gold
in the high jump with efforts of 2.01m
and 2.36m respectively.
The pair were competing as neutrals after their country was banned
in 2015 for doping.
Results Service
+
-
x
8
14
9
+
7
12
÷
9
+
-
+
3
+
4
-5
iss once the Test squad assemble in
New Zealand later this month.
“That’s a decision we’ve not
Joe Root was as enthused as agreed yet,” said Root. “When we
anybody to speak about the in- get together as a group, me and
ternational return of Ben Stokes Trevor will discuss a few things but
following the all-rounder’s heroics that’s not been discussed yet.”
in this week’s second ODI in Mount
Root must have wondered what
Maunganui.
might have been when he saw
“It’s testament to just how good Stokes dominate proceedings so
a player he actually is, to have such emphatically against New Zealand
a period out of the game and come on Wednesday. If only he’d been
straight back and perform how he available for the Ashes, which Enghas,” said England’s Test captain. land lost 4-0, things might have
“It’s good to see him back playing, been different?
it really is.”
“There’s no point looking back
However, one question – will
at it like that,” says Root (left). “It
Stokes remain Root’s viceis what it is and I think the
captain when the twomost important thing is,
Test series here starts
in terms of Test cricket,
against New Zealand
we look forward to this
later this month? –
next series and make
struck a chord.
sure Ben can build moFo r a l l S t o ke s ’
mentum in this one-day
brilliance on Wednesseries and keep putting
day, when his unbeaten
in match-winning per63, two wickets and a
formances to give him
couple of run-outs in just his
confidence when he does come
second game back in five months back to red-ball cricket.”
inspired England to a series-levWas Root always confident
elling win, the fact is his problems Stokes would play some part
this winter have not been resolved, this winter despite his off-field
only parked.
problems?
Stokes has had plenty of time to
“Yes, I was always definitely
think about his part in the incident hopeful,” he said. “I think most imoutside a Bristol nightclub on 24 portant is the fact that now he is
September. He will face trial later back, for him I’m sure, to get a good
this year on a charge of affray.
start under his belt will give him a
But regardless of the
lot of confidence and it’s
outcome of the trial,
about moving forward
When we
Stokes still faces an internow and I think he’s done
nal disciplinary investiga- get together
that brilliantly.”
tion by the England and as a Test group
England’s return to
Wales Cricket Board at the we will discuss Wellington’s Cake Tin, in
conclusion of the legal pro- the issue of
the early hours of Sunday
ceedings, given he was on vice-captaincy morning UK time, gives
international duty on the
them a chance to seek
night in question follow- but we haven’t redemption at a venue
spoken
about
ing an ODI against West
where they were humiliit yet
Indies in Bristol.
ated by New Zealand and
As Stokes was left out
Sri Lanka during their
of the Ashes squad, James
shambolic 2015 World
Anderson, England’s most senior Cup campaign.
player, was appointed Root’s viceThis England team, though, are
captain in Australia earlier this a different beast, Root insisting: “I
winter, we all presumed on a tem- don’t think you can look at previous
porary basis.
games too much. It’s a very differHowever, Root, when asked if ent team now to the one that played
Stokes will return to the role, was in that World Cup. It’s a big game for
unable to confirm in the affirmative, us – 1-1 in the series, so it’d be great
insisting he will need to discuss the to carry the momentum forward
issue first with coach Trevor Bayl- from the last game.”
By Chris Stocks
Laura Muir launched Britain’s campaign at the World Indoor Championships in rousing fashion last
night after she claimed a well-fought
3,000m bronze to further cement her
claim as the next major force in middle-distance running.
Muir crossed the line in 8 minutes
45.78secs, a slow start becoming a
burning finish as the capacity crowd
at the Arena Birmingham willed on
the young Scot with gritted teeth and
steely gaze to claim her first medal at
global level.
Genzebe Dibaba of Ethiopia, the
pre-race favourite, defended her
crown from 2016 in 8:45.05, while Sifan
Hassan of the Netherlands edged
Muir out of silver medal position by a
tenth of a second. Her team-mate Eilish McColgan came 10th.
Muir said: “I was so hurting on the
last lap and I just had to dig deep. The
crowd were great and good on you
guys for coming out in this weather
as well.”
Muir proved she was a talented
athlete when she recorded victories
over both the 1500 and 3,000m at
the European Indoor Championships last year in Belgrade, but her
bronze here was clearly something of
a watershed occasion.
The 24-year-old veterinary student, who will miss the Comonwealth
Games because of her studies, has on
occasion struggled to produce her
best form in front of home crowds,
8
57
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
Root coy over
Stokes’ return to
vice captaincy
Bronze for
Muir to get GB
off the mark
at Indoors
-
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
CRICKET
ATHLETICS
7
TV
40-41
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
T R C H M Y U F
S Q B V A G W X
Man City (3)...................3
B Silva 15, D Silva 28
Sane 33
W D L
F
A Pts
24 3 1
82 20 75
18 5 5 53 20 59
16 9 3 65 32 57
16 7 5 53 24 55
16 5 7 50 25 53
13 6 9
51 39 45
9 10 9
22 25 37
9
9 10 40 41 36
9
7 12 32 47 34
9
6 13 38 47 33
8
8 12 33 43 32
7 10 11 26 37 31
7
9 12 35 50 30
8
6 14 25 48 30
7
8 13 27 38 29
5 12 11 29 41 27
6
9 13 25 43 27
7
6 15 21 41 27
6
8 14 28 54 26
3 11 14 22 42 20
P
Man City
28
Man Utd
28
Liverpool
28
Tottenham
28
Chelsea
28
Arsenal
28
Burnley
28
Leicester
28
Everton
28
Watford
28
Bournemth
28
Brighton
28
West Ham
28
Huddersfield 28
Newcastle
28
Southampton 28
Crystal Palace 28
Swansea
28
Stoke
28
West Brom
28
CRICKET
FIRST TEST MATCH
Australia v South Africa, Durban: Australia
225-5 (76.0 overs; S P D Smith 56, D A Warner
51). South Africa.
CYCLING
UCI TRACK WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS, APELDOORN, NETHERLANDS: Men’s Team Pursuit
Gold Medal Race: Great Britain 3m 53.389s bt
Denmark 3:55.232. Bronze Medal Race: Italy 3m
54.606s bt Germany 3:56.594. Men’s Scratch
Race Final: 1 Y Karaliok (Bela) 16mins 42secs, 2
M Scartezzini (It), 3 C Scotson (Aus), 12 C Latham
(GB). Men’s Keirin Final: 1 F Hernando Puertas
Zapata (Col) 10m 184s, 2 T Kawabata (Japan), 3 M
Levy (Ger), 5 J Carlin (GB). Women’s Team Pursuit: Gold Medal Race: USA 4mins 15.669secs bt
Great Britain 4:16.980. Bronze Medal race: Italy
4:20.202 bt Canada 4:23.216.
GOLF
TSHWANE OPEN, PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA:
First Round: (Gbr & Irl unless stated): 64 L De
Jager (SA); 65 F Aguilar (Chile); J Suri (US); T
Aiken (SA); 66 C Smit (SA); S Norris (SA); 67 R
Gouveia (Portugal); A Da Silva (Br); M Kieffer
(Ger); P Newcomb (US); S Jamieson; J Winther
(Den); C Bezuidenhout (SA); S Fernandez (Sp); C
Mivis (Bel); B Meyer (SA); G Coetzee (SA); R SciotSiegrist (Fr); J-H Choi (S Kor); D Van Tonder(SA); J
Senekal (SA); J Walters (SA); R Sterne (SA).
HSBC WOMEN’S WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, SENTOSA GOLF CLUB, SINGAPORE: First Round:
(USA unless stated): 65 J Song; 67 M Wie; EunHee Ji (S Kor); 68 C Choi (S Kor); M Sagstrom
(Swe); A Jutanugarn (Th); I Gee Chun (S Kor); S
Hyun Park (S Kor); B M. Henderson (Can); S Oh
(Aus); J Korda; D Kang; 69 M Alex; S Yeon Ryu (S
Kor); M Rim Lee (S Kor); J Eun Lee (S Kor).
SWIMMING
BRITISH SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS, EDINBURGH: Men’s 100m Freestyle Final: 1 Lewis
Burras 49.890secs, 2 David Cumberlidge 50.010,
3 Duncan William Scott 50.070. Women’s 100m
Butterfly Final: 1 Harriet Jones 58.850secs, 2
Alys Thomas 58.910, 3 Tain Bruce 58.920.
TENNIS
ATP DUBAI DUTY FREE TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS, DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: Men’s
Singles Quarter-finals: M Jaziri (Tun) bt S
Tsitsipas (Gr) 6-4 3-6 6-3; (3) R BAUTISTA AGUT
(Sp) bt B Coric (Croa) 7-6 (7-4) 6-4; (7) F KRAJINOVIC (Serb) bt E Donskoy (Rus) 6-1 6-2; (2) L
POUILLE (Fr) bt (8) Y SUGITA (Japan) 3-6 6-3 6-2.
FIXTURES
FOOTBALL
THE SKY BET CHAMPIONSHIP
Middlesbrough v Leeds.....................................................(7.45)
LADBROKES SCOTTISH CHAMPIONSHIP
Dundee Utd v St Mirren (postponed)
BASKETBALL
BBL CHAMPIONSHIP: Leeds v Surrey, Leicester
v Plymouth, Newcastle v Sheffield.
CRICKET
FIRST TEST—SECOND DAY OF FIVE: South
Africa v Australia (Durban, 08.00am).
ICE HOCKEY
ELITE LEAGUE: Cardiff v Manchester,
Nottingham v Dundee.
NETBALL
SUPERLEAGUE: Team Bath v Sirens.
RUGBY LEAGUE
BETFRED SUPER LEAGUE (7.45): Hull v
Warrington, Wigan v Widnes (8.0), Leeds v
Catalans Dragons (postponed).
RUGBY UNION
AVIVA PREMIERSHIP RUGBY Harlequins v
Bath (7.45).
GUINNESS PRO14: Southern Kings v Newport
Gwent D’gons (5.35), Postponed: Cardiff Blues v
Benetton Treviso, Edinburgh v Munster, Ulster
v Glasgow.
Ben Stokes
made an
emphatic
return to
the England
team with an
unbeaten 63
GETTY
58
SPORT
BOXING
FORMULA ONE
Brook: The
Spence fight
really hurt
me badly
Robert Kubica
drives the new
Williams car in
Barcelona this
week GETTY
By Declan Warrington
Kell Brook has revealed his regret
at remaining at welterweight for too
long but insists it will not stop him returning to his peak at 154lbs.
At the Sheffield Arena tomorrow,
the 31-year-old begins his permanent
move to the light-middleweight division, where he will fight Belarus’s
Sergey Rabchenko, best known for
ending the career of Brook’s one-time
stablemate Ryan Rhodes.
He does so after two consecutive
stoppage defeats, the first at
middleweight by Gennady Golovkin,
when he fractured his right eye
socket, and the second back at
welterweight, where he surrendered his IBF title to America’s Errol
Spence Jr and fractured his left.
The return to 147lbs from 160lbs
contributed to his struggles against
Spence after a career in which he
has consistently struggled to make
the former limit and long appeared a
natural light-middle.
“I regret the Spence fight,” said
Brook. “It was in Sheffield, we’d
sold a load of tickets and we were in
a football stadium [Bramall Lane].
But going from middleweight down
to welterweight was too much and it
drained me; I was a proud champion
and I never duck anyone.
“That really hurt me badly: it took
me a long time to get over that. I’ve
got a lot left in me. People are right to
question what I’ve got left and how I
am going to be after the injuries and
the defeats, but I believe I’m going
to be better with the bigger weight
which will bring the best out of me.
“The eye has healed very well. It’s
held up in sparring and I don’t think
about the eye injuries at all. I wouldn’t
be boxing if I wasn’t given the all clear
by the doctors; I wouldn’t put my
family or myself through that.”
Of the 32-year-old Rabchenko, who
was once trained by Ricky Hatton,
he added: “I didn’t want an easy fight
back. If I had done, I could’ve fallen
out of love with it, cut corners and not
reached the heights in training.
“Rabchenko is a dangerous guy;
he’s no mug and he can really bang.
I’ve sparred with him and if you were
to go on the sparring, it’s going to be a
hell of a fight.”
Kell Brook (left) and Sergey Rabchenko
fight in Sheffield tomorrow night
‘I have my limitations. My
problem is I was too honest’
of wealth over talent, though that
is perhaps a tad harsh on Sirotkin,
who, like Stroll, will always be
tainted by association to a wealthy
father, in his case a financier who
used his cash to help bail out
Sauber five seasons ago and pave
the way for his son’s elevation from
the junior ranks as a reserve driver.
Though the expected promotion
to the race team in 2015 did not
materialise after a move away
comfortable,” he said. “I think we
from the paid model at Sauber,
should stop. If I can jump in the
Sirotkin was subsequently signed
car and do the job that should be
by Renault as a reserve driver while
enough. I have my limitations,
at the same time contesting the
which I never hide. The problem is
Formula Two championship.
I was too honest with everyone and
As a rookie Sirotkin will attract
they keep asking the
plenty of attention this
same questions.
season, plus the added
I am
“I’m living a good
pressure of maintaining
period, enjoying my
hoping to give standards with Kubica
role and I’m hoping to
poised in the garage. For his
a positive
give a positive message message and
part Kubica continues to
and not the same story
see good in every outcome,
not
the
same
after many years. The
given how events might
last 12 months in my life story. No-one have transpired when the
have been very positive. expected me
emergency services cut him
No-one expected me to to get this
from the wreckage in 2011.
get this opportunity.”
“I admit I was hoping
opportunity
Kubica went head to
to get the drive but I see
head with Sirotkin
the wider angle,” Kubica
in Abu Dhabi last November
said. “Im 33. I was 21 when I was
with a deal of goodwill and
presented as reserve driver at
momentum behind him. While
BMW. I’m not 21 any more. There
he set the quickest time
were a lot of doubts but in the end
on the faster tyre,
last year’s test proved I’m able
the tyre-adjusted
to do a full race distance without
numbers thrown
problems. That gives me confidence.
up by Sirotkin
“I was surprised on my first day
persuaded
back in an F1 car in June last year
Williams that the
after six years away. The way I was
Russian deserved
driving was like nothing happened.
his shot.
When I’m driving I don’t think
Others saw the
about injures. You need to get on
move as a triumph
top of it and carry on your life.”
Robert Kubica, who returned to F1 after a life-changing crash,
is happy as Williams’ reserve driver, writes Kevin Garside
I
t turned out to be Robert
Kubica’s only day in the car,
which was arguably both good
and bad news for Williams
race drivers Lance Stroll and
Sergey Sirotkin. Good because they
would not have to contend with his
pace, bad because the feedback that
might make them quicker would
not be forthcoming.
Snow wiped out his second day
of running at this week’s Barcelona
test, which might have been to his
temporary benefit since it ended a
line of questioning that irks him and
that you fancy will get ever more
urgent as the year progresses.
Kubica ripped 58 laps out of the
afternoon session posting a time
almost four tenths quicker than
Sirotkin managed in the morning
and faster than Stroll on the same
soft tyres on Monday.
Inevitably this reopened the
debate about his viability for a race
seat and the Williams decision to
partner 22-year-old Sirotkin with
19-year-old Stroll ahead of Kubica
in what is F1’s youngest and most
inexperienced line-up.
About his times relative to his
team-mates’ Kubica, retained as
Williams’ reserve driver this year,
was diplomatic. “I have a different
job. The times are really irrelevant I
would say, especially in my position.
I’m here to help and try things.
“My job is not to set fastest
lap times, my job is to give best
feedback and to do this it’s my job to
see what is enough and how I have
to drive to be able to do it, which is
not easy. It’s a new situation, but I
think I’m pretty happy of how the
things are going.”
Kubica (below) is almost seven
years into his recovery after the
rally crash in Italy that left him
with permanent injuries to his left
leg and arm, parts of which were
removed. Last summer in Valencia
he made good his promise to come
back, jumping behind the wheel
of an F1 car. That led to a
142-lap stint in a Renault at the
Hungaroring in early August,
where he was fourth fastest in
the test.
He maintains the
physical limitations are
not an impediment and
argues the emphasis
should be on what
he can do not what
he can’t. “I’ve been
always comfortable.
It was only media
talks that I was not
NEWS
2-32
RUGBY UNION
These despicable
idiots are a disgrace,
says Scott Hastings
» Continued from back page
human being. I don’t consider myself any different from anyone else,
so for me to travel on public transport I thought was OK. But I’ll make
sure I won’t in future. It’s as simple
as that,” Jones said.
“I can’t because it was
shown on Sunday what
happens when I do.
That’s the world we
live in. I was massively
surprised. It wasn’t
comfortable.
“I never knock back
a request for a selfie
unless I’m racing to
somewhere. So I try and
do the right thing by the
fans, but if this happens then
you’ve got to have a look at your
own safety.”
When asked whether the abuse
was physical or verbal, Jones replied: “A bit of both. “It’s part of the
challenge. As an Australian coaching England, there were always
going to be challenges and that’s
just one of them,” he added.
Jones casts his experience in
the light of an interview given last
week by Scotland and British and
Irish Lions great Gavin Hastings,
while also referencing prop Simon
Berghan’s pre - Calcutta Cup
match claim that “everyone hates
England”.
“As a supporter of one of his opponents you just want to
rub his face in the dirt,”
said Hastings. Jones
believes that Hastings and Berghan
should have chosen
their words more
carefully.
However Hastings’ brother Scott
(left), another former
Scottish international,
joined the SRU in condemning the fans who had abused Jones.
“I am really upset about this,” he
tweeted. “These despicable idiots
are a disgrace. We need to find
them, name and shame them and
fine them for public disorder and
harassment.”
“I am really upset about this.
Disgusting behaviour from a bunch
of drunk idiots.”
Eddie Jones (centre) was abused on his way to Old Trafford on Sunday GETTY
Queen fat-shamed me – but
it is cool, insists Vunipola
By Evan Bartlett
Billy Vunipola has revealed that
he is “cool” about him and his
brother being fat-shamed by
the Queen.
The England No 8 was
visiting Buckingham
Palace alongside his
brot h e r, th e p rop
forward Mako, for a
reception celebrating
the Commonwealth last
month when the incident
took place.
“We were talking to her and I
shook her hand and she says: ‘I
keep hearing that rugby is differ-
ent nowadays; it’s faster, it’s more
powerful,’” Billy told BBC Radio 5
Live’s Rugby Union Weekly. “And I
was like: ‘Yeah it is.’ And she said:
‘I’m yet to be convinced.’ She
was like: ‘You look…’”
At that point Vunipola (left) imitates the
bemused expression
on the Queen’s face. “I
think she was calling
us fat – which is fair
enough,” he said shortly
after the incident.
Continuing the anecdote,
he added: “I just took it as I probably need to lose some weight. It’s
cool though.”
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
59
The Upshot
Tim Wigmore
The future of rugby union is
bright, global – and female
T
hink of rugby union
and the lingering image
remains of a conservative
sport revolving around
two distinct spheres:
the European core playing in the
Six Nations; and the Southern
Hemisphere powers of Australia,
New Zealand and South Africa. And
yet this image is increasingly dated,
as rugby expands its global footprint
and the sport morphs into a more
outward-looking and inclusive game.
Rugby is going through three
profound shifts which are
recalibrating the essence of the game.
The first is of format. As the
Six Nations’ enduring popularity
attests, 15-a-side remains the sport’s
dominant game. Yet rugby sevens,
which has been played since the 19th
century, is now more popular than
ever worldwide.
Sevens’ ascent is making rugby
more accessible, because of the lesser
demands of time, personnel, space
and expertise. Most importantly, the
growing embrace of sevens led to
rugby rejoining the Olympic Games
in 2016, after a 92-year absence.
Rugby’s second great shift,
turbocharged by the Olympics, is of
geography. World Rugby insiders
believe that rejoining the Games was
the most important event for the
sport’s globalisation since the World
Cup was launched in 1987.
Since 2009, when rugby was
accepted into the Games, more
than 20 countries have successfully
applied for solidarity funding
from the International Olympic
Committee, including Brazil and
the US. The sport has also received
at least £25m through national
Olympic committees since rejoining.
Yet at least as important as the
extra cash has been the greater
visibility. Olympic inclusion meant
rugby was on free-to-air TV for the
first time in countries including
the USA. It also led to rugby being
added to the school curriculum in
the US, Brazil, China, Russia and
parts of India.
Globalisation through rugby sevens
has been married to expansion of
the 15-a-side game. Since 1999, the
World Cup has featured 20 sides.
Japan’s seminal win over South
Africa in the 2015 World Cup – after
winning only one of their previous
24 games in World Cup history – was
a spectacular vindication for this
inclusive approach.
Awarding the 2019 World Cup to
Japan is another seminal moment
in the shift in rugby’s balance of
power. World Rugby is aggressively
targeting Asia, and hopes that the
World Cup’s legacy will be one million
new players, coaches and match
officials across the continent.
In 2016, World Rugby announced
an astounding agreement with
Alisports, a Chinese marketing group
which is investing $100m (£73m)
over 10 years in Chinese rugby. This
Kenya take on Colombia in the rugby sevens at the 2016 Rio Olympics GETTY
suggests that Olympic inclusion may
spectacular in the women’s game.
lead to Chinese big money entering
Participation has soared from
the sport, mirroring what is already
200,000 to 2.6 million since 2009,
happening in football.
and 29 per cent of all players are
The USA is being cultivated as
now female. In Africa, the number
a growth market too. While rugby
of female rugby players rose 50 per
union has its own concussion
cent between 2016 and 2017.
issues to address, the NFL’s
The women’s game is less
burgeoning head-injury
hierarchical than the men’s
crisis may be creating
sport and, as such, offers
an opportunity for
emerging nations
rugby, especially the
better prospects of
sevens format, to
progressing rapidly.
Women around
present itself as a
In the women’s sevens
the
world
who
play
safer contact sport.
at the Olympics,
rugby – up from just
The US is widely
Colombia – never
200,000 in 2009
expected to host
regarded as a rugby
the 2027 World
stronghold – were among
Cup. The sport is
the 12 competing nations;
also growing in Europe,
Spain reached the quarterincluding in the economic
finals, while Canada won
behemoths Germany
the bronze medal. In
and Russia, despite
April, women’s sevens
the Six Nations’
will make its debut in
refusal to expand
the Commonwealth
Rugby-playing
or countenance
Games.
nations in Africa –
promotion and
These unfinished
up from just six
relegation.
revolutions will
in 2002
This century,
transform rugby
Africa is expected to
for ever. They will
contribute 82 per cent of
democratise the sport,
the world’s total population
leading to the proportion
growth. As the continent grows,
of elite players from the sport’s
it will be increasingly important
traditional heartlands declining.
to sports. Today, 38 out of World
The sport’s economic dependence
Rugby’s 105 members are from
on its old powers will decline, too
Africa up from just six in 2002. The
– eventually, perhaps, leading to
sport was taught in 22,000 schools
World Rugby’s voting council, which
on the continent last year, up from
effectively still gives a veto to the
18,000 in 2016, with Kenya – where
sport’s eight historically dominant
sevens is particularly strong –
nations, evolving and sharing power
Mauritius, Nigeria and Namibia
around more equitably. In turn, this
among the nations enjoying the
could open up further new playing
strongest growth.
opportunities for those locked out
The third great shift – in many
of the Six Nations and the southern
ways a product of the first two – is
hemisphere’s Rugby Championship.
of gender. In 2017, more young
Perhaps the great unknown is
women played rugby for the first
whether the 15-a-side format can
time than men, the first year in
continue to manage globalisation
which this has been the case. Since
on its own terms. As sevens,
rugby’s return to the Olympics
turbocharged by Olympic funding,
was confirmed in 2009, overall
soars, World Rugby will have to
participation numbers have
guard against a split between formats
doubled, but the gains have been
of the sort that is befalling cricket.
2.6m
38
60
SPORT
FOOTBALL
PREMIER LEAGUE
FA CUP
Dyche dismisses
theory he dodged
Everton bullet
be successful. That is my focus.”
Burnley head into the contest
Burnley manager Sean Dyche in- without a win in their last 11 league
sists “there was no bullet to dodge” matches, having drawn 1-1 with
when Everton chose Sam Allardyce Southampton last week and lost 1-0
instead of him to be their manager.
to Swansea in their previous outing.
After the club sacked Ronald
Dyche said: “I questioned a few
Koeman in October, Dyche was one things that happened last week, and
of the favourites with bookmakers we were below par against Swanto become the Dutchman’s
sea, but other than that, in the
successor, a job Allardyce
run we’ve had, we’ve actusubsequently landed.
ally delivered some very
Burnley host Evergood performances.
ton tomorrow in Dy“We’ve done very well
che’s 250th match in
over the season but we
charge of his club, with
want to get back to winthe clubs lying seventh
ning ways, it’s simple.”
and ninth in the Premier
James Tarkowski could
League respectively.
make his return to competiEverton’s away form, in
tive action after missing
particular, has been unimfour games with a groin
This is my problem and is “certainly
pressive under Allardyce
and they trail Burnley by 250th game.
in the thinking” for Saturthree points. Reports have I’m still here, day, Dyche said.
already claimed Everton I still have
Tom Heaton has not
may not see Allardyce as a
made a competitive firstthe
fire
in
my
long-term option.
team appearance since
But when asked if he stomach to
dislocating his shoulder in
be
successful
felt he may have dodged
September, with Nick Pope
a bullet by not landing the here. That is
shining in the Burnley goal
Everton job, Dyche (above) my focus
in his absence.
said: “There was no bullet
Michael Keane is set to
to dodge. I was here, I said
make his first Turf Moor
I was going to be here, and I’m still appearance since leaving Burnley
here. It was an outside story. I’ve to join Everton last summer.
had a few of them, in the right way
“I’d be amazed if he got anything
actually, since I’ve been here.
other than a very good reception,”
“This is my 250th game. I’m still Dyche said when asked about
here, I’m still working hard, and I the defender.
still have the fire in my stomach to
“He was a fine player for Burnley.
be successful here and to continue We’ll enjoy having him back, albeit
to create an atmosphere and a for a fleeting day. He was terrific for
culture and environment that can us both on and off the pitch.”
By Phil Medlicott
FRANCE
Blow for PSG
as Neymar is
ruled out for
rest of season
was then disallowed after he paused
in his run-up. This was also after TierTottenham full-back Danny Rose has ney had consulted with VAR, which
described the Video Assistant Ref- Spurs manager Mauricio Pochettino
eree (VAR) as “complete nonsense”, later said was “embarrassing”.
as the backlash against the system
A confused Rose (below) later decontinued to grow after Tottenham’s scribed the series of decisions as
farcical 6-1 FA Cup replay
“very frustrating”, adding
victory over Rochdale.
that the confusion took
It was
What appeared to be a
some of the sheen away
perfectly legitimate open- interesting,
from a convincing
ing goal from Erik Lamela very
Spurs victory and
was ruled out for a minor frustrating
valiant performance
infringement by Fernando
from Rochdale, who
and
confusing
Llorente, after a twocurrently sit bottom
more
than
minute wait during which
of English football’s
anything.
It’s
fans in the stadium had litthird-tier.
tle idea what was going on. just complete
“It was inLucas Moura was then nonsense
teresting, very
denied a penalty after going
f r u s t rat i n g
down in the box under conand just
tact from Harrison McGahey – de- confusing more than
spite the incident being referred to a n y t h i n g,” R o s e
VAR – before Kieran Trippier was said. “That has just
awarded a spot-kick by VAR after ref- overshadowed a good
eree Paul Tierney initially awarded a performance by us and a good
free-kick. Son Heung-min’s penalty performance by Rochdale.
By Luke Brown
By Ed Malyon
Neymar’s season is over and the
Paris Saint-Germain forward is
already in his homeland ahead of
an operation that will rule him
out for three months.
The 26-year-old Brazilian
forward injured his foot during
Sunday’s Ligue 1 win over rivals
Marseille, but PSG coach Unai
Emery was still confident that
Neymar (above) had “a small
chance” of recovering in time
for the second leg of the club’s
Champions League knockout tie
with Real Madrid. But hopes of a
comeback in time for the last-16
clash, where the Parisians trail
3-1, have been dealt a huge blow
by the news that Neymar will not
play again this season.
Rose takes aim at
‘ridiculous’ VAR
after shambolic
night at Wembley
Neymar arrives in Brazil where he is
set to undergo surgery on his foot
The striker, who joined PSG
for a world record £200million
fee from Barcelona last August
and has scored 29 goals in
30 games this season, is set
to go under the knife in Belo
Horizonte tomorrow.
With June’s World Cup
approaching fast, Neymar will
face a race against time to be
fully fit for the finals in Russia.
THE INDEPENDENT
There is no word to describe it except
frustrating, even though we won 6-1.
But we managed to score six goals
and luckily we are not on the losing
side complaining about VAR.
“I just feel for Rochdale, some
of their players were saying that
it is their first time at Wembley
and that has now been completely
overshadowed.”
Rose said that the majority of the
frustration stemmed from the long
pauses in the game while Tierney
consulted VAR, although when asked
how he would improve the system he
admitted: “I honestly have no idea.”
“It’s just complete nonsense if
you ask me, waiting around and not
knowing what is going on,” he added.
“It’s ridiculous. Ridiculous.”
VAR is currently being trialled in
the FA Cup, as well as Italy’s Serie A,
Germany’s Bundesliga, the Portuguese league and other competitions
around the world.
But it is been involved in a series
of controversies, with former
Premier League referee Mark
Halsey criticising mistakes
in the application of the technology after Tottenham’s win,
which sets up a quarterfinal against Swansea.
When asked about
Lamela’s disallowed goal,
Halsey said: “It wasn’t a
clear and obvious error.
I thought it was a perfectly good goal. I don’t
know why it was referred [to the VAR]
in the first place.”
THE INDEPENDENT
NEWS
2-32
Referee Paul Tierney waits
for a VAR decision in the
FA Cup tie at Wembley on
Wednesday night AFP/GETTY
A night of VAR chaos...
Seven minutes Erik Lamela
scores. Paul Tierney consults
VAR before Fernando Llorente is
adjudged to have fouled Harrison
McGahey in the build-up.
22 Lucas Moura bursts into the
box and is blocked by McGahey.
Tierney initially waves play on,
then consults VAR for a minute;
no penalty awarded.
23 Heung-min Son gives Spurs
the lead from the edge of the box.
VAR is consulted to see if any
players were stood offside. The
original decision stands.
25 Kieran Trippier is fouled outside the box. A free-kick is awarded. VAR is then consulted and a
penalty is given instead.
29 Son scores the penalty. Tierney then blows his whistle and
consults VAR. Son is deemed to
have ‘feinted’ in his run-up. The
goal is overturned.
31 Rochdale’s Stephen Humphrys
scores an equaliser. There is another delay as VAR is consulted,
but the goal stands.
45 Lamela clatters into Callum
Camps on the stroke of half-time
and is shown a yellow card. Tierney then consults VAR to see
whether it should have been red.
The original decision stands.
47 Llorente scores with a chip. VAR
is consulted. Goal stands.
53 Llorente scores and again VAR
is consulted. Goal stands.
65 The 10th VAR-related delay
to the game comes after Tottenham’s fifth goal, Son’s second.
Goal stands. THE INDEPENDENT
Five problems with VAR
– and how to fix them
1Some of the anger experienced at
Wembley on Wednesday night was
Show fans the replays
because the spectacle had gone.
Fans were watching referee Paul
Tierney clutching his earpiece or
a giant message saying that a VAR
review was taking place, or indeed
the players complaining.
The solution appears quite simple.
Show the replay on the screens in
the stadium.
2While decisions for
infringements such as offside are
Use it only for objective decisions
decided by factors such as a line on
a pitch, it’s arguable that VAR only
produces more doubt and confusion
when it comes to fouls for, say,
tackles with excessive force.
These decisions are made by
subjective interpretation. Ideally,
they should be made by the person
in the middle alone and swiftly.
Opening the decision up to
another referee in the stands, only
creates more delays and debate.
3
There needs to be a degree of trust
Ensure referees are comfortable
with the system
in the system. It should be rolled out
only when referees say they are fully
comfortable operating with it.
Rugby union referee Nigel Owens
is a great example of one who
embraces the technology only when
he really needs it. The technology
should only be used if a referee is
unsure or has not seen a foul, not as
a safety blanket.
4
Cut down on the time taken to
make decisions
The speed of football, the
instantaneous nature of it, is what
sets it apart from other sports.
The beauty is that the highlights
are moments, they’re ephemeral.
Matches are won in joyous
snapshots that fans treasure. Don’t
take away that moment, unless a cut
and dry mistake has been made.
5
Once the decision is made, move on
Managers complaining about
refereeing decisions are so
commonplace they have long since
become a cliché.
For the good of a sport, it would be
best for all parties to recognise an
uncomfortable truth. If an official has
adjudged your player offside then
you should stop complaining and
accept it. While a manager may think
that he can point to a poor decision
and use the officials as a scapegoat
for a bad result, the focus should be
on the side’s poor performance in the
other 89 minutes.
Louis Dore
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
The
Fan
Matrix
Some fairly unnecessary
doom-mongering this
week – we’re certainly
not the only big club
made to look silly by City this
season. And now it’s March, when
we traditionally transform into
peak 90s Milan, so Brighton on
Sunday should see a return to
form. George Bond
BOURNEMOUTH
EDITED BY JAMES MARINER
PREMIER LEAGUE
If we beat Arsenal, are
we as good as safe? By
pure mathematics, no.
It’s also unlikely 34pts
will be sufficient. However with
visits of Huddersfield & Leicester,
Palace only having three fit players
and trips to out-of-sorts Everton
and Burnley, we feel confident.
61
ARSENAL
What supporters
are saying
about your club
BRIGHTON & HOVE
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
BURNLEY
If this weather carries on
into [today] I’d imagine
tomorrow’s game will be
off. Lunchtime kick-off so
not enough time to clear the snow,
and it’s about the fans too. If the
surrounding areas are bad, and
right now they are terrible, then it
won’t go ahead.
I am not someone who
boos, but back in the day
I would expect a manager
at h-t to use this crowd
reaction to gee up his side. Is it
so wrong for players to be sent a
message that what they have just
served up is not acceptable and
fans won’t just passively put up
with it? Garbo (Up The Cherries)
CHELSEA
Claretforever (Up The Clarets!)
Another Manchester
trip and probably
another loss. Apart
from our performance v
Barcelona, nothing has convinced
me we have anything necessary to
win. Not sure what Morata (above)
is offering and Conte’s utter refusal
to play our best player for 90 mins
continues to baffle. Charlie Gould
CRYSTAL PALACE
EVERTON
HUDDERSFIELD TOWN
LEICESTER CITY
LIVERPOOL
MANCHESTER CITY
Elliott Charles
chesterbells (Blue Moon)
MANCHESTER UNITED
NEWCASTLE UNITED
SOUTHAMPTON
Gabriel Counsell
Binning a 2-0 lead at
Bournemouth was
vintage Newcastle.
Then again, having
only lost two in their last nine
games (to Chelsea and Man Utd),
we are showing signs of sturdy
improvement. I wouldn’t rule out
an upset at Anfield. Harry Savill
STOKE CITY
SWANSEA CITY
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR
Bozza (North Stand Chat)
With Tomkins’ injury
that’s now 13, of which
at least seven would be
regulars. That being
said, so close to a fantastic result.
Not sure how many teams in
our position would keep the
goal difference down to just -1,
although going forward we were
abysmal. Ollie Potts
I just want to see the
most attacking line-up
possible and go for
the three points. We
were too easy to play against vs
Stoke but Bournemouth are more
attacking and will prob give us a
chance on the counter. Hopefully
see a bit more of Diabaté – has
looked decent. Md9 (Foxes Talk)
Palace away on
Monday kicks off a big
month, featuring the
visit of Liverpool next
Saturday, an FA Cup
quarter-final and a Champions
League last 16 second-leg. Did
someone say squeaky-bum time?
Stoke sit second from
bottom following the
draw with Leicester, a
good result in normal
circumstances but not
enough to build hope for survival.
The Potters have Southampton
in their sights. Our only hope of a
win requires a LOT of luck.
I don’t know one
Evertonian happy with
what is going on right
now. Club is a shambles
and Fat Sam is a joke. All he
does is pass blame on to players,
nothing due to his terrible tactics.
Away to Burnley next so prob 0-0
at best. Can I have a fast forward
button please? Marcus Bailey
Who’d have thought that
selling your best player
would make the team
better? Newcastle United
may prove to be a straightforward
fixture, but no Red wants to see
Rafa Benitez get relegated. He’ll
get a usual warm welcome this
weekend.
If we reach the
European semi-final I’d
say that the Brighton
game will be slotted
in on Wed 9 May, becoming our
last home game of season. There
are often extra “catch-up” games
slotted into the midweek before
the final Sunday of the season.
Sims is one of the few
offensive players we have
who genuinely drives at
the opposition to create
an opening. Naturally, Pellegrino
doesn’t play him enough. Please
just give him a start at home to
Stoke tomorrow to see what he
can really do… Nick Roberts
Hugo Parrott
Nye Williams
Resounding win in
snowy conditions in
the replay, although
Llorente’s hat-trick will
be overshadowed by the
controversy surrounding VAR.
Hoping Poch continues to rest
regulars at the weekend ahead
of next week’s vital tie with
Juventus. Charlie Taylor-Kroll
WATFORD
WEST BROMWICH ALBION
WEST HAM UNITED
It had to be Deeney to
get us out of trouble. Our
imperfect hero once again
rose to take us at least
temporarily away from the scrap.
Looking forward to this weekend,
it could be a taxi for Pardew if they
can’t get a result. Alex Keating
Forget jellyfish, we
forgot how to swim or
tread water at Brighton
last weekend. It’s
imperative we get a
home win this weekend against
West Ham United to avoid being
pulled under. Ayew – either one –
to provide the spark.
Such an important win
against West Brom. We
had the right attitude
throughout and it’s
encouraging to see us wanting
to fight for survival. A trip to
Wembley and a free hit v Spurs.
Not expected to get anything but
if we keep playing like we are, you
never know... Olly Diamond
Low-quality football, a
clueless manager and a
team with no interest.
The lack of discipline,
professionalism and passion from
players and manager has made
this the lowest point in recent
times for us fans. Mark Burns
Despite West Ham’s
form actually being half
decent recently, we’re
still only three points
off the drop zone. A repeat of
the 4-1 Boxing Day demolition of
Swansea last year is needed.
Joe Light
62
SPORT
FOOTBALL
PREMIER LEAGUE
Déjà vu of
doom as City
run Gunners
ragged again
ARSENAL
MANCHESTER CITY
B Silva 15, D Silva 28, Sane 33
0
Arsenal
Cech
3
By Sam Cunningham
Bellerin Mustafi
AT THE EMIRATES STADIUM
Arsenal’s ground staff tamed the
‘Beast from the East’, but there was
no stopping the Monster from Manchester mauling their players.
Twice in less than a week Manchester City have devoured Arsenal:
it was bloody, gory, gruesome. From
the way the home supporters stayed
away en masse in a clear statement
of the ill feeling toward their manager Arsène Wenger; to the way the
players conceded three goals in 18
first-half minutes; to the way they
were squished and squashed and
crumpled into an ugly mess. If Arsenal’s last two matches were made
into a film it would be banned everywhere, too horrific to watch. Arsenal
were already a wounded animal but
they ended the game with barely a
breath remaining.
There were genuine fears that the
match would be called off with heavy
snow burying the country, but Arsenal’s staff worked all day to clear
the Emirates Stadium surface. They
will have wished they had not bothered. City stalked in, trampled over
everything and left 16 points clear at
the top of the Premier League in Pep
Guardiola’s 100th game in charge. To
put this into perspective for Arsenal,
they are now closer to bottom club
West Bromwich Albion (25 points),
than they are to City (30 points).
The pitch lines were painted blue
in case of significant snowfall during
the game, so it looked a little bit like a
green ice hockey rink. The temperature matched it, too.
Koscielny Kolasinac
Ramsey
Mkhitaryan
Xhaka
Ozil
Welbeck
Aubameyang
Sane
Aguero
B Silva
D Silva Gundogan De Bruyne
Danilo
Otamendi Kompany
Walker
Ederson
Manchester City
Substitutions: Arsenal none; Manchester City
Zinchenko (Walker, 72), Toure (Aguero, 82), Jesus
(D Silva, 87).
Booked: Arsenal Kolasinac; Manchester City
Otamendi.
Man of the match Sane.
Match rating 7/10.
Possession: Arsenal 46% Manchester City 54%.
Attempts on target: Arsenal 5 Manchester City 5.
Referee A Marriner (West Midlands).
Attendance 58,420.
The stadium was half empty; or
half full, depending which way you
look at it. Right now, for Arsenal it
was definitely half empty. Whether
the fans were put off by the freezing
weather, or the annihilation by City
in the Carabao Cup final the previous Sunday, it was hard to say. But
City’s supporters had managed to
make the 200-mile journey and the
away section was packed. Make of
that what you will.
Arsenal continued their ludicrous
process of trying to spin the attend-
ance figures – despite pictorial and
video evidence, and witness testimony to how poorly attended it was
– announcing it was “sold out” before
kick-off and then the official “tickets
sold” figure being released as 58,420.
This is increasingly happening at
the Emirates, and you’d like to think
they could come up with some kind
of system to give the unused tickets
to local school kids or charities, but
it would be unfair to inflict this upon
anyone, especially the young and
vulnerable. They’re better off doing
something else. Watching Tottenham, perhaps.
Wenger wanted a reaction from
his players from the previous match.
Leroy Sane skipped past four of
them, including a wild, diving lunge
from Granit Xhaka, and rolled the
ball to Bernardo Silva, who took a
touch inside Sead Kolasinac and
curled it left-footed over the sprawling Petr Cech. Sane turned on the
left, ignoring the little resistance
from Shkodran Mustafi, passed into
Sergio Aguero who took out Arse-
nal’s entire back line with a ball to
David Silva who tucked it in. Then
Aguero broke, exchanged passes
with Kevin de Bruyne and squared
for Sane to steer the ball in. So this is
what Sunday would’ve been like, had
City actually played well.
“No matter how much you try to
lift the players, they need time for
grieving,” Wenger said ahead of the
match. Four days on and this was
way too soon. Arsenal were still hungover from the wake. Jack Wilshere,
Arsenal’s only player with any real
Arsène Wenger’s Arsenal appear to
have run out of ideas long ago
strengthen his case for staying on as
manager past the summer. Despite
starting the game with some
endeavour, threatening here and
there through Henrikh Mkhitaryan
and Aaron Ramsey, Arsenal’s
defensive dereliction was exposed
once again as City skipped and
danced their way through them.
Faced with the searing pace
of Leroy Sane, the clever feet of
Bernardo Silva and the imperious
forward play of Sergio Aguero
– so often Arsenal’s nemesis – a
defensive unit which long ago
ceased to function was completely
overrun. City sketched out the
sweeping team moves which
have served them so well this
season, but showed through their
Artistry of champions-elect is how
things used to be for poor Arsenal
Will
Magee
S
o soon after a game which
embodied the enormous
gulf between the two
sides, Manchester City’s
trip to face Arsenal at the
Emirates was always destined to be
an echo of the Carabao Cup final.
Just as Arsène Wenger’s side
were exposed for their complete
lack of competitive edge on Sunday,
so too did they approach this game
10 points off the top four and with
little chance of catching their rivals
for Champions League qualification.
Meanwhile, City kicked off with
most pundits, columnists and fans
conceding that they had won the
Premier League title in a de facto
sense months ago.
Unsurprisingly, the home fans’
enthusiasm for the fixture reflected
just how badly Arsenal were beaten
at the weekend. The white of the
giant cannon emblazoned across
the Emirates’ lower tier was clearly
visible for the duration of the match,
with clusters of empty red seats
spread about like clumped grit on
the slushy streets outside.
If defeat in the Carabao Cup
final left Wenger embarrassed
and embattled on all sides, this
performance did nothing to
NEWS
2-32
VOICES
18-22
FRiDAY
33-45
WEATHER
Leroy Sane
scores City’s
third against
Arsenal last
night GETTY
Snow chaos
forces fixture
cancellations
By Jack de Menezes
The ‘Beast from the East’ and Storm
Emma have wreaked havoc on British sport fixtures this week, with the
disruption set to continue into the
weekend as football, rugby union and
rugby league alter their plans to cope
with the widespread snowstorms
across the United Kingdom.
While the Premier League remains
relatively untroubled thus far, the
leagues below have suffered a swathe
of cancellations. Sheffield United’s
home match with Burton is the highest profile match to be postponed.
The Blades have been forced to call
off tomorrow’s Championship game
on safety grounds. Oxford’s League
One match with Fleetwood was
added to the list of postponements. In
League Two, Newport’s home game
with Accrington is off due to a frozen
pitch. In Scotland, nine of the weekend’s 15 scheduled matches across
four divisions had been called off.
Four of the six rugby Super League
fixtures have had to be postponed
and the weather has also taken its
toll on rugby union. Saracens’ trip
to Exeter has been postponed until
Sunday, while a number of PRO14 fixtures have had to be rearranged.
TV
40-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
55-64
The
Sport
Matrix
The stories you
need to know
FOOTBALL
i FRIDAY
2 MARCH 2018
63
FORMULA ONE
Vettel targeting
Hamilton’s crown
Sebastian Vettel has vowed
to end Ferrari’s decade-long
championship drought by
beating Lewis Hamilton to the
Formula One world title. Vettel,
who claimed the last of his four
successive titles in 2013, said:
“I want to make sure that I can
bring that championship back to
Maranello. That is our target.
Mercedes are the favourites, but
if we can be... closer than last
year, that will be great.”
RUGBY UNION
Monk and Strachan Erasmus is new
on Birmingham list Springboks coach
Garry Monk and Gordon
Strachan are in contention
to replace Steve Cotterill at
Birmingham. The club’s board
are looking at other options
and, should Birmingham lose
at Nottingham Forest in the
Championship tomorrow,
Cotterill looks set for the sack.
Should he leave, the Blues will be
looking for their third manager
of the season – four including
caretaker boss Lee Carsley.
Rassie Erasmus has been named
as the new South Africa coach.
Former Munster rugby director
Erasmus, who played in 36 Tests
for the Springboks, succeeds
Allister Coetzee. Coetzee was
dismissed last month following a
run of poor results and Erasmus,
45, will combine coaching duties
with his role as SA Rugby’s
director of rugby. Erasmus is set
to be in charge until the end of the
2023 Rugby World Cup.
Games called off
Last night
RUGBY LEAGUE
Super League
Hull KR v Castleford Tigers
DARTS
Premier League
Exeter
fight in the Carabao Cup final, was
missing with a slight ankle injury.
At the break, 12 men with pitchforks poked and prodded the pitch.
As though that was going to make any
difference. As if it couldn’t get any
worse, Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang
missed a penalty early in the second
half. Nicolas Otamendi clipped Henrikh Mkhitaryan’s heels to hand desperate Arsenal a chance to get back
into it. Their club-record £55million
signing placed the spot kick at a favourable height for City goalkeeper
Ederson to push wide. Some Arsenal
supporters started throwing snowballs on to the pitch. Why not? Others might’ve gone home early, but it
was hard to tell. City eased off in the
second half. Guardiola could have
told them at the break to conserve
their energy for Chelsea on Sunday.
It’s only Arsenal, after all.
City could conceivably win the
title against Manchester United at
the Etihad in early April. Arsenal’s
Champions League chances could
conceivably be over by then.
individual craftsmanship that they
have mastered all the arts of the
attacking game.
The sad thing is, Arsenal used to
play with this kind of artistry. Even
a few years ago, where they may
not have had consistency, they were
still capable of fantastic attacking
football on their day. Now, they look
not only unable to compete with
City’s quality but also with their
ideas and imagination.
When a team has run out
of ideas, something has gone
drastically wrong for them. Ask
Wenger to picture his ideal Arsenal
performance right now and one
suspects the mental image would
be shadowy and faint. The squad
is arguably more talented than
it was during the austerity era at
the Emirates, the players more
impressive on paper, but their
problems seem to have been
amplified tenfold and solutions feel
impossibly far away.
There is no team more qualified
to expose Arsenal’s failings than
Manchester City at the moment.
Masters of the counter-attack.
Accomplished passers. A side
moulded in the image of a man
hailed by many as a tactical
visionary. City are everything
Arsenal used to be.
This might have been an echo of
the Carabao Cup final, but it was
no less resounding a judgement on
Arsenal. They are facing the end of
an era, City the dawn of a new age.
Today
FOOTBALL
Scottish Championship
Dundee United v St Mirren
RUGBY LEAGUE
Super League
Leeds Rhinos v Catalans Dragons,
Wakefield Trinity v Huddersfield, St
Helens v Salford Red Devils
RUGBY UNION
Pro14
Cardiff Blues v Benetton, Edinburgh v
Munster, Ulster v Glasgow
Tomorrow
FOOTBALL
Championship
Sheffield United v Burton Albion
League One
Bradford v Portsmouth, Gillingham v
Rotherham, Oxford Utd v Fleetwood
League Two
Newport v Accrington
National League
Borehamwood v Macclesfield ,
Chester v Bromley, Ebbsfleet Utd v
Wrexham, Guiseley v Dagenham &
Redbridge, Halifax v Sutton Utd
Maidenhead Utd v Woking, Tranmere
v Gateshead
Scottish Premiership
St Johnstone v Hamilton
Scottish Championship
Dunfermline v Livingstone
RUGBY UNION
Premiership
Exeter v Saracens
Pro14
Scarlets v Leinster, Zebre v Ospreys
CRICKET
Warner and Smith hit fifties in Durbam
Captain Steve Smith (above) and opener David Warner scored halfcenturies as Australia reached 225 for 5 before bad light ended the
opening day of the first Test against South Africa. After winning the
toss in Durban, Australia quickly lost opener Cameron Bancroft (five)
and Usman Khawaja (14), before Warner and Smith steadied the ship.
Warner reached his half century off 72 balls before thick edging a
Vernon Philander ball straight to AB de Villiers. Smith was dismissed
by Keshav Maharaj for 56 and the tourists also lost Shaun Marsh to the
spinner for 40, before younger brother Mitchell Marsh (32 not out) and
Tim Paine (21 not out) regained control until bad light stopped play.
GOLF
Broken tooth no
barrier for Kang
American Danielle Kang
shrugged off the pain of a broken
tooth to hit a four-under-par
68 to lie three shots behind
leader Jennifer Song in the
opening round of the HSBC
Women’s World Championship in
Singapore. Kang somehow broke
a tooth while stretching prior
to her round and had to call a
dentist out to the driving range.
Sport on tv
Snooker: Welsh Open
Eurosport, 11.45am
Golf: Mexico World Championship
Sky Sports Golf, 5.15pm
Athletics: World Indoor Champs
BBC Two, 5.50pm
Rugby union: Harlequins v Bath
BT Sport 1, 7pm
Football: Middlesbrough v Leeds
Sky Sports Football, 7pm
Tennis: Acapulco Open
BT Sport 2, 10pm
Bernardo Silva
celebrates his goal
for Manchester
City last night
GETTY
Sport
02.03.18
P60
FOOTBALL
Rose takes aim
at ‘ridiculous’
VAR after
Wembley chaos
A class
apart
Silva shines as City thrash
sorry Arsenal for the
second time in four days
» Match report and analysis, p62-63
P58
FORMULA ONE
Kubica at peace
with his role
as Williams
reserve driver
Scotland slam ‘disgusting’ abuse aimed at Jones
By Duncan Bech
P57
CYCLING
Kenny earns
silver on return
as men win team
pursuit gold
Scottish Rugby has condemned
the abuse suffered by England
coach Eddie Jones at the hands of a
number of Scotland fans as “disgusting behaviour”.
Jones revealed on Wednesday
that he feared for his safety after
being targeted with verbal and
physical abuse while catching a
train from Edinburgh to Manchester on the morning after England’s
Calcutta Cup defeat at Murrayfield.
The Australian travelled
alone via standard class to
be a guest of Sir Alex Ferguson at Old Trafford for
Manchester United’s
Premier League game
against Chelsea on Sunday afternoon, before receiving similar treatment
on the final leg of his journey
from Manchester to London.
He has now resolved not to use
public transport again. “The disgusting behaviour of those involved does not represent
the values of our sport
or its fans,” a Scottish
Rugby statement read.
“The dignity Eddie
and the England team
showed on Saturday is in
stark contrast to this ugly
incident.”
Video footage shot in
Manchester and obtained by the
BBC’s Dan Roan shows Jones (left)
posing for selfies with Scotland
supporters, who then turn on him.
One calls him a “baldy ****” as he is
ushered into a car.
Following a separate incident, British Transport Police is investigating a report of verbal abuse against
Jones after officers were sent to meet
his train as it arrived into London
Euston on Sunday evening. “I’m a
» Continued on p59
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