close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Hollywood Reporter – October 4, 2017 part 1

код для вставкиСкачать
HORROR IN LAS VEGAS
WHEN SPIELBERG TAUGHT DIRECTING
Are festival concerts forever changed?
50 years of AFI stories and storytellers
HUGH HEFNER TOM PETTY
1926-2017
1950-2017
October 4, 2017
STR EAMING
WARS
Can YouTube spin stars like
Demi Lovato (and Google’s
$86B) into a platform that
rivals Netflix, Amazon, Apple
and TV’s new power players?
• Who wins and loses in media’s
great pivot to video
• A TV exec’s warning to Silicon Valley
by john landgraf
From left: YouTube CEO
Susan Wojcicki, Lovato and
content head Susanne Daniels
were photographed in
Mountain View, California.
Issue No. 31, October 4, 2017
FEATURES
76
Streaming Wars
Can YouTube, the world’s
largest video site, compete
with Netflix, Amazon, Hulu,
Apple and the networks in
the original-content battle
raging across Hollywood?
86
Hugh Hefner, 1926-2017
The controversial
innovator, who died
Sept. 27 at 91, and his six
decades of Hollywood
parties at the Playboy
Mansion are remembered.
92
50 Creative Masters of
TV’s Golden Age
THR’s annual look at the
top showrunners with
the sharpest pens, the
wildest visions and, yeah,
the richest deals.
102 AFI Enters Middle Age
The American Film
Institute, now 50, has
taught David Lynch,
Patty Jenkins and scores
of others how to put
their dreams on a screen.
114 Reality TV’s Great
Risk-Taker
John de Mol, creator
of The Voice, Big Brother
and shows that reach
500 million global viewers,
is hungry for more.
ON THE COVER
From left: Susan Wojcicki, Demi Lovato
and Susanne Daniels were photographed
by Koury Angelo on July 20 at Google in
Mountain View, California. Hear
Lovato and Daniels reveal the worst social
media faux pas at THR.com/video.
86
Hefner was
photographed
for THR on Aug. 23,
2011, outside of
the Playboy Mansion
in Beverly Hills.
Photographed by Joe Pugliese
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
2
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
Issue No. 31, October 4, 2017
102
Patty Jenkins and
David Lynch were
photographed
Sept. 27 in the Louis
B. Mayer Library at
AFI Conservatory
in Los Angeles.
29
Fall TV’s Week
One Scorecard
Who’s winning
(Young Sheldon) and
who’s losing (sorry,
Megyn) after this
season’s premiere
week.
68
Why Everyone
Is Flocking to Italy
Europe without the
terrorism and shores
without the hurricanes,
the Boot contains
Quentin Tarantino’s
seafood spot in Rome,
George Clooney’s top
hotel in Venice and more.
ABOUT TOWN
REVIEWS
41
121 Blade Runner 2049
Next Big Thing:
Ana de Armas
The Cuban actress
raises her game
in Blade Runner 2049.
THE BUSINESS
57
Executive Suite:
Kevin Kay
The Viacom veteran
on the new Paramount
Network and the
morale hit from
Dauman vs. Redstone.
STYLE
64
What’s Your Hollywood
Jean Type?
Decoding the denim
worn by talent
and execs reveals eight
industry profiles.
41
De Armas was
photographed
Sept. 21 at Corinthia
Hotel London.
Erdem dress,
Delfina Delettrez ring.
Harrison Ford joins Ryan
Gosling in Denis Villeneuve’s
stylish but bloated sequel.
BACKLOT
127 Meet the Most
Powerful Women in
Global Television
25 female executives who
are rewriting the rules
of how people watch TV.
134 The Search for the Next
Thrones at MIPCOM
TV creators go highconcept to wow choosy
international buyers.
Showrunners Lisa Joy and
Bryan Fuller were photographed
Sept. 22 at City Market
South in downtown L.A.
SEE YOU IN 2 WEEKS
64
The next issue publishes Oct. 18. Keep up
with news, reviews and videos at THR.com
and via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
4
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
DSTLD High-Waisted
Ripped Mom Jeans
in Medium Vintage;
$95, dstld.com
92
JENKINS: AUSTIN HARGRAVE. DE ARMAS: NICOLE NODLAND. JOY: CORAL VON ZUMWALT. JEANS: COURTESY OF BRAND.
THE REPORT
NETFLIX
PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR
2017 THR POWER
SHOWRUNNER HONOREES
Matt and Ross Duffer
Aziz Ansari and Alan Yang
Robert Carlock and Tina Fey
Mitch Hurwitz
Gloria Calderon Kellett and Mike Royce
Jenji Kohan
Chuck Lorre
Peter Morgan
Mike Schur
ONES TO WATCH
Robia Rashid
Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch
Matthew Belloni
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
Alison Brower
Shanti Marlar
Tom Seeley
DEPUTY EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
DEPUTY EDITORIAL DIRECTOR,
DIGITAL MEDIA
Sudie Redmond
Stephen Galloway
Jennifer Laski
Jeanie Pyun
Peter Flax
Erik Hayden
EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR
EXECUTIVE EDITOR, FEATURES
PHOTO & VIDEO DIRECTOR
DEPUTY EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
NEWS DIRECTOR
EDITOR-AT-LARGE Kim Masters
FILM
FILM EDITOR Gregg Kilday • SENIOR FILM WRITERS Borys Kit,
Pamela McClintock, Tatiana Siegel • TECH EDITOR Carolyn Giardina
STAFF WRITER, FILM Mia Galuppo • CHIEF FILM CRITIC Todd McCarthy
CHIEF THEATER CRITIC David Rooney • INTERNATIONAL FILM EDITOR Deborah Young
TELEVISION
TELEVISION EDITOR Lacey Rose • CHIEF TELEVISION CRITIC Tim Goodman • TELEVISION CRITIC Daniel J. Fienberg
TELEVISION EDITOR, EAST COAST Marisa Guthrie • TELEVISION NEWS EDITOR Lesley Goldberg
SENIOR WRITER, TELEVISION Michael O’Connell • TELEVISION WRITERS Bryn Elise Sandberg, Kate Stanhope
MEDIA & POLITICS WRITER Jeremy Barr • STAFF REPORTER Brian Porreca
SENIOR EDITOR Benjamin Svetkey • SENIOR EDITOR, COPY Mike Barnes
REVIEWS EDITOR Jon Frosch • FASHION & BEAUTY DIRECTOR Carol McColgin
AWARDS EDITOR Rebecca Ford • REAL ESTATE & CITY EDITOR Peter Kiefer
SENIOR WRITERS Seth Abramovitch, Gary Baum, Scott Johnson
SENIOR AWARDS ANALYST Scott Feinberg • SENIOR EDITOR, EVENTS Ramona Saviss
SENIOR REPORTER Rebecca Sun • INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS EDITOR Georg Szalai
WEST COAST BUSINESS EDITOR Paul Bond • SENIOR EDITOR, NEW YORK Eriq Gardner
BOOKS EDITOR Andy Lewis • STAFF WRITER Chris Gardner
STAFF WRITER, DIGITAL MEDIA Natalie Jarvey • STAFF REPORTER Ashley Cullins
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Lindsay Flans • ASSISTANT STYLE EDITOR Jane Carlson
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Kendal McAlpin • ASSISTANT TO THE EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Beno Akram
RHONDA RICHFORD
AND SCOTT
ROXBOROUGH
will cover the MIPCOM
international TV
market in Cannes from
Oct. 16 to 19.
MARISA GUTHRIE
will moderate THR’s
annual Women in Global
Entertainment Power
Lunch at MIPCOM on
Oct. 16 at the Majestic
Hotel in Cannes.
COPY
ASSOCIATE MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer H. Levin
DEPUTY COPY CHIEF Darah Head • SENIOR COPY EDITORS Cheryl Cheng, Lisa de los Reyes
ART
DESIGN DIRECTOR Peter B. Cury
ART DIRECTOR Kelsey Stefanson • ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTORS Nicholas Brawley,
Christopher Hawkins, Fah Sakharet • SENIOR DESIGNER Jen Cienfuegos
SENIOR ART PRODUCTION MANAGER Michelle Mondragon
ART PRODUCTION ASSOCIATE Amanda Tannen • PRODUCTION ARTIST BJ Samuels • JUNIOR PRODUCTION ARTIST Ashley Bradley
PHOTO & VIDEO
DEPUTY PHOTO DIRECTOR Carrie Smith
PHOTO EDITORS Chelsea Archer, Lisa Dragani, Michelle Stark • SENIOR PHOTO PRODUCER Kate Pappa
ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITORS Tristan Cassel, Jared Rosenthal • PHOTO RESEARCHER Megan Downie
PHOTO & VIDEO ASSISTANT Kayla Landrum • PHOTO EDITOR-AT-LARGE Jenny Sargent
DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION, VIDEO Stephanie Fischette
SENIOR VIDEO PRODUCERS Marya Gullo, Victoria McKillop, Laela Zadeh • VIDEO PRODUCER Natalie Heltzel
YOUTUBE CHANNEL MANAGER Jason Al-Samarrie • WEB VIDEO CONTENT MANAGER April Salud
RIGHTS & CLEARANCES MANAGER Travis Gollaher • LEAD VIDEO EDITOR Victor Klaus • VIDEO EDITOR/MOTION GRAPHICS ARTIST Darin Eaton
JUNIOR VIDEO EDITOR Nebiyu Dingetu • VIDEO PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Dustin Hattier
THR.COM
DEPUTY EDITOR Kimberly Nordyke
ASSIGNMENT EDITOR Jennifer Konerman • STYLE & FASHION NEWS DIRECTOR Booth Moore
SENIOR EDITOR Hilary Lewis • EAST COAST DIGITAL LEAD EDITOR Jackie Strause
SENIOR REPORTER Ryan Parker • EDITOR, HEAT VISION Aaron Couch • INTERNATIONAL EDITOR Abid Rahman
DEPUTY STYLE EDITOR Stephanie Chan • ASSOCIATE EDITORS Lauren Huff, Meena Jang,
Ashley Lee • ASSOCIATE STYLE EDITOR Samantha Reed • COPY CHIEF Pete Keeley
SENIOR PHOTO EDITOR, DIGITAL Christina Pompa-Kwok • PHOTO EDITORS Mike Jianu, Ben Park
DIGITAL CONTENT EDITOR, VIDEO Annie Howard • SENIOR MANAGER, SOCIAL MEDIA Jennifer Liles
SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Sarah Gidick • MANAGER, SOCIAL MEDIA Christina Schoellkopf
SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR Natalya Jaime • ASSISTANT EDITORS Patrick Shanley, Arlene Washington
INTERNATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL NEWS EDITOR Kevin Cassidy
EUROPE BUREAU CHIEF Scott Roxborough • ASIA BUREAU CHIEF Patrick Brzeski • CANADA BUREAU CHIEF Etan Vlessing
CORRESPONDENTS Agustin Mango ARGENTINA • Pip Bulbeck AUSTRALIA • Rhonda Richford FRANCE
Karen Chu HONG KONG • Ariston Anderson ITALY • Nyay Bhushan INDIA • Gavin J. Blair JAPAN • Lee Hyo-won KOREA
John Hecht MEXICO • Nick Holdsworth, Vladimir Koslov RUSSIA • Pamela Rolfe SPAIN • Alex Ritman U.K.
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar • Jonathan Handel • Austin Hargrave • Bill Higgins • Wesley Mann
Miller Mobley • Gavin Polone • Joe Pugliese • Ramona Rosales • Michael Wolff
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
6
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
CHRIS GARDNER
and THR will receive
the ALS Association’s
Golden Spotlight Award
at the Champions
for Care and a Cure
Celebration on Dec. 2
for the magazine’s
coverage of publicist
Nanci Ryder’s
battle with the
neurodegenerative
illness.
SONY PICTURES TELEVISION
CONGRATULATES OUR 2017 HOLLYWOOD REPORTER
POWER SHOWRU N N ERS HONOR EES
THE GOLDBERGS
©2017 Sony Pictures Television Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Adam F. Goldberg
BETTER CALL SAUL ONE DAY AT A TIME
Peter Gould
Vince Gilligan
Gloria Calderon Kellett
Mike Royce
OUTLANDER
THE CROWN
Ronald D. Moore
Peter Morgan
ONES TO WATCH: Robia Rashid – ATYPICAL
Lynne Segall
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/GROUP PUBLISHER
Elisabeth Deutschman
Victoria Gold
Randi Windt
VICE PRESIDENT, TELEVISION & MEDIA
VICE PRESIDENT, ENTERTAINMENT
VICE PRESIDENT, BRAND PARTNERSHIPS
Alison Smith-Pleiser
Alexandra von Bargen
MANAGING DIRECTOR, INTERNATIONAL SALES
MANAGING DIRECTOR, LUXURY
ADVERTISING
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, INDEPENDENT FILM & TALENT Debra Fink
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, TELEVISION Scott Perry
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LUXURY REAL ESTATE & REGIONAL SHELTER Sue Chrispell
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, BRAND PARTNERSHIPS Hillary Gilmore • DIRECTOR, SPONSORSHIP & WEST COAST CONSUMER SALES Karbis Dokuzyan
DIRECTOR, LUXURY PARTNERSHIPS Pauline L’Herbette • DIRECTORS, BRAND PARTNERSHIPS Jackie Horn,
Gabrielle Koenig, Amy Jo Lagermeier, Justine Matthews • MANAGING DIRECTOR, MUSIC Aki Kaneko
DIRECTOR, EAST COAST SALES Joe Maimone • MANAGER, BRAND PARTNERSHIPS Jamie Davidson • SENIOR ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Lori Copeland
DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Cathy Field • BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Sabrina Yaghoubzadeh
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Ashley Lyle • SALES COORDINATORS Mitchell Brown, Katie Pope, Andrea Rico, Kendall Stempel
ACCOUNT DIRECTOR, ASIA Ivy Lam • INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Tommaso Campione
ACCOUNT DIRECTOR, NEW ZEALAND & AUSTRALIA Lisa Cruse
DIGITAL MEDIA
GENERAL MANAGER, VIDEO Michael Palmer
VICE PRESIDENT, PRODUCT Nathan McGowan • VICE PRESIDENT, DIGITAL REVENUE OPERATIONS Gina Perino
DIRECTOR, PRODUCT Reed Hallstrom • INTERACTIVE ART DIRECTOR Rett Alcott • SENIOR DESIGNER Andrew Elder
DESIGNER Ady Chng • EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MUSIC STRATEGY & BRANDED CONTENT Alyssa Convertini
DIRECTOR, ADVERTISING OPERATIONS & AUDIENCE REVENUE Daniel Eberle • DIRECTOR OF PARTNERSHIPS Shira Brown
MANAGER, BRANDED CONTENT Ryan Katon • AD OPERATIONS ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR Cheryl Kampanis
SENIOR AD OPERATIONS MANAGERS Ninash Delgado, Maureen Vanterpool • AD OPERATIONS MANAGER Samantha Turpen
DIRECTOR, ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT Shameka Frank • SENIOR MANAGER, ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT Renee Giardina
SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER, FILM & ENTERTAINMENT Greg Johnson • DIGITAL ACCOUNT MANAGERS Sarah Seo, Casey Shulman, Mallory Somerset
ASSOCIATE ACCOUNT MANAGERS Allie Hedlund, Chelsea Sageer, Tal Zaiet • ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, ANALYTICS Katherine Shaoul
SALES ANALYTICS SPECIALIST Lauren Kim • VIDEO ANALYTICS SPECIALIST Stephanie Kurse
EDITORIAL ANALYST Kelsey Weekman • SEO SPECIALIST Matt Albrecht • ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, SOCIAL MEDIA Stephanie Apessos
SOCIAL MARKETING MANAGER Dervla O’Brien • QA ENGINEER Robert MacCracken
MARKETING
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, INTEGRATED MARKETING Kellie Pean
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, STRATEGY Anjali Raja • DIRECTOR, INTEGRATED MARKETING Laura Lorenz
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, BRAND MARKETING Erika Cespedes • DIRECTOR, TELEVISION DEVELOPMENT Joanna Zwickel
MANAGERS, STRATEGY Ross Figlerski, Jonathan Holguin
STRATEGY EXECUTION MANAGERS Briana Berg, Kwasi Boadi • MARKETING DESIGN MANAGER Kim Grasing
MARKETING COORDINATORS Steven Huizar, Sarah Lombard, Claire McMahon
BRAND MARKETING COORDINATOR Erica Daul • EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT/MARKETING COORDINATOR Matthew Baum
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CONFERENCES & EVENTS Curtis Thompson • ASSOCIATE MANAGER, EVENT MARKETING Anush Yemenidjian
LICENSING
VICE PRESIDENT, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT & LICENSING Andrew Min
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS & LICENSING Anuja Maheshka • DIRECTOR, LICENSING & MARKETING Amy Steinfeldt Ulmann
MAGAZINE REPRINTS Wright’s Media (877) 652-5295, email PGM@wrightsmedia.com
OPERATIONS
GROUP FINANCE DIRECTOR David Aimone
FINANCE DIRECTOR Jerry Ruiz • HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR Alexandra Aguilar • EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, GROUP PRODUCTION Kelly Jones
DEPUTY PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Mary Bradley • PRODUCTION MANAGER Maya Eslami • SENIOR DESIGNER Suzanne Rush
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT & CIRCULATION Katie Fillingame • SENIOR MANAGER, EMAIL MARKETING & CIRCULATION Meredith Kahn
PROCUREMENT MANAGER Linda Lum • IMAGING MANAGER Brian Gaughen • IMAGING SPECIALIST Michael Sullivan
HEADQUARTERS
5700 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 500 • Los Angeles, CA 90036
PHONE (323) 525-2000 • EDITORIAL EMAIL THRnews@thr.com • ADVERTISING (323) 525-2013
New York 340 Madison Ave., 6th floor, New York, N.Y. 10173
PHONE (212) 493-4200 • FAX (646) 654-5637 • NEW YORK SALES OFFICE (212) 493-4193
SUBSCRIPTIONS
U.S. (866) 525-2150 • OUTSIDE U.S. (845) 267-4192 • hollywoodreporter.com/subscribe
John Amato
PRESIDENT
Severin Andrieu-Delille
Gary Bannett
Stephen Blackwell
Dana Miller
Jim Thompson
CHIEF TECHNOLOGY
OFFICER
CHIEF FINANCIAL
OFFICER
CHIEF STRATEGY
OFFICER
CHIEF MARKETING
OFFICER
CHIEF AUDIENCE
OFFICER
Barbara Grieninger
Julian Holguin
Michele Singer
Angela Vitacco
VICE PRESIDENT,
FINANCE
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT,
BRAND PARTNERSHIPS
GENERAL COUNSEL
VICE PRESIDENT,
HUMAN RESOURCES
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
8
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
TO ALL OUR TALENTED AND CREATIVE SHOWRUNNERS ON THE
2017 THR POWER SHOWRUNNERS LIST
DAVID E. KELLEY | BIG LITTLE LIES
DAVID BENIOFF AND D.B. WEISS | GAME OF THRONES
PRENTICE PENNY AND ISSA RAE | INSECURE
JAY AND MARK DUPLASS | ROOM 104
MARTI NOXON | SHARP OBJECTS
MIKE JUDGE AND ALEC BERG | SILICON VALLEY
DAVID MANDEL | VEEP
LISA JOY AND JONATHAN NOLAN | WESTWORLD
®
®
®
®
/VTL)V_6MÄJL0UJ(SSYPNO[ZYLZLY]LK/)6 ®HUKYLSH[LKJOHUULSZHUKZLY]PJLTHYRZHYL[OLWYVWLY[`VM/VTL)V_6MÄJL0UJ(SSYPNO[ZYLZLY]LK
An extraordinary year
for our scripted drama
A Kudos production for Sky Atlantic
Written and created by Rowan Joffe
A Kudos production in association with
Thriker Films for the BBC
An extraordinary year
for our scripted drama
Screen Australia and Network Ten present in association with Create NSW
a Lingo Pictures production in association with Endemol Shine Australia
Create NSW
Arts, Screen & Culture
Season 3 – A Kudos production in association with
Shine France Films for Sky Atlantic
An extraordinary year
for our scripted drama
A Caryn Mandabach Productions and Tiger Aspect
Productions for BBC Two
TROY
FALL OF A CITY
A Wild Mercury production in association
with Kudos for BBC and Netflix
An extraordinary year
for our scripted drama
Based on the novel by Ildefonso Falcones
A Diagonal TV, Catedral del Mar Producciones A.I.E. and Televisió de Catalunya
production for Atresmedia Televisión, Televisió de Catalunya and Netflix
CATEDRAL DEL MAR
PRODUCCIONES AIE
An Endemol Shine Israel production for Reshet
An extraordinary year
for our scripted drama
A Kudos and Parti Production for BBC Two
A Kudos production in association with Wild Mercury
for Channel 4 and AMC
An extraordinary year
for our scripted drama
Season 1 – A Kudos production for Channel 4
Season 2 – A Hootenanny production in association with Kudos for Channel 4
Cave Bear Productions and Tiger Aspect Productions
for Sky 1 and NOW TV
An extraordinary year
for our scripted drama
A Bandit Television Production for Sky 1
A Tiger Aspect Drama production for ITV
An extraordinary year
for our scripted drama
A House of Tomorrow production for Netflix
A Rainmark Films Ltd production for ITV Encore
An extraordinary year
for our scripted drama
A Seven Studios Pty Ltd production for Foxtel
An Endemol Shine Banks Production
for Network Ten Australia
The Re ort
↑ Television
Premiere Week
Highs, lows and Megyn’s
NBC debacle p. 30
Film
Behind the Headlines
IPO for STX?
A struggling studio’s new
strategy p. 32
Heat Index
Jimmy Kimmel
ABC’s late-night host
parlays emotional political
monologues into yearover-year ratings gains for
premiere week.
Above: Concertgoers came to one another’s aid at the Route 91 Harvest music festival as bullets rained down from
the nearby Mandalay Bay (top right); country music star Aldean (right) was onstage when the attack began.
Are Music Festivals Forever
Changed by a ‘Random Act of Evil’?
KELLY: NATHAN CONGLETON/NBC. KELLY: ABC/RANDY HOLMES. CRUISE: DONNA WARD/WIREIMAGE. LOEB: DAVID LIVINGSTON/GETTY IMAGES. SHOOTING: ETHAN MILLER/GETTY IMAGES. HOTEL: DAVID BECKER/GETTY
IMAGES. ALDEAN: MINDY SMALL/FILMMAGIC. POLICE: AP PHOTO/JOHN LOCHER. SHUCK: ANNIE TRITT/COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. RECORDS. CORSON: RONALD CADIZ/COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. RECORDS.
Tom Cruise
His American Made opens
to a soft $16.8 million and
third place, the latest sign of
Cruise’s waning star power
after June’s The Mummy and
2016’s Jack Reacher sequel.
With 59 dead and more than 500 injured in Las Vegas, the worst mass shooting in U.S. history
leaves lives destroyed and the $10 billion concert industry grappling with a terrifying new reality:
‘You could not have taken any [safety] measures’ BY JASON LATHAM AND RYAN PARKER
A
Aaron Bay-Schuck &
Tom Corson (right)
The veteran music execs are
named co-chairmen and
COOs of Warner Music Group,
the first major move made by
WMG’s new CEO of recorded
music, Max Lousada.
Jeph Loeb
The creator of ABC’s Inhumans
— the worst-reviewed show of
the fall, according to Metacritic
— suffers an awful premiere
for a Marvel-branded series
(a 0.9 in the 18-to-49 demo).
Showbiz Stocks
$13.75 (+7%)
TIME INC. (TIME)
The publisher launches
“People Perks,” a $60 annual
subscription to People that
comes with discounts from
partners like Barnes & Noble.
$58.55 (-3%)
CBS (CBS)
“Any decline in NFL
viewership related to the
national anthem debate may
negatively affect” CBS,
writes a JPMorgan analyst.
Police
responded
to the
shooting,
which lasted
about
15 minutes.
n out-of-town wife
and 3-year-old daughter
forced Adam Steck to
cancel plans to attend the Route
91 Harvest music festival Oct. 1
with his cousin. No big deal,
thought the veteran Las Vegas
show producer, until his phone
lit up just after 10 p.m. “I got a
text from my company manager
at Thunder From Down Under,
and I called my cousin as he was
walking in,” recalls Steck. “I could
actually hear bullets rattling off
through his phone, people running down the street. It was just
absolute mayhem.”
His cousin escaped unharmed.
Steck, who also produces Boyz II
Men’s show at The Mirage and Mike
Tyson’s Undisputed at MGM Grand,
spent the next several hours calling artists, friends and family as
TV and social media spread word
that Stephen Paddock, perched
on the 32nd floor of the nearby
Mandalay Bay hotel, was firing
relentlessly with 23 rifles and
automatic weapons at the 22,000
festivalgoers enjoying a set by
country star Jason Aldean. By the
time Paddock, 64, was discovered
dead in his hotel room from a
self-inflicted gunshot, 59 people
were dead and 527 injured in the
worst mass shooting in modern
U.S. history.
The tragedy has left the closeknit Las Vegas entertainment
community reeling, just as many
in the global live music industry are questioning the future
of large-scale outdoor festivals
in major cities (like Austin City
Limits, beginning Oct. 7) or
even in remote locations (like
Coachella). “Can we stop this?”
asks Jon Loba, exec vp at BBR
Music Group, Aldean’s label. “To
the credit of most major promoters, all of our management
team and our staff, they prepare
the best that they possibly could
for security threats, [but] you
can’t protect everyone at every
moment. It’s an absolute tragedy.”
Adds Loba: “Do I think it will
stop artists wanting to perform?
No. Will it stop listeners wanting to have that experience? No.
Especially not in this genre.”
Steck, who began his career producing outdoor music events in
Iowa, agrees: “You could not have
taken any [safety] measures — it
was a total random act of evil.”
But where does that terrifying
fact leave the concert industry, a
$9.6 billion business in the U.S. in
2016 that is projected to grow to
$9.9 billion in 2017? The illusion
of safety at an indoor music venue
was shattered by the Paris rock
club attack of November 2016
and the May terrorist bombing
of an Ariana Grande concert in
Manchester, U.K. Now an outdoor festival was hit by a brutal
attack. What about other aspects
of live entertainment, including
sports, theme parks or even live
theater in places like New York’s
Central Park? “This is a new order
of magnitude — automatic weapons,” adds Miami Beach Police
Chief Don Oates, who in 2012 led
the investigation into the Aurora,
Sept. 25-Oct. 2
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
29
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
The Report
Behind the Headlines
Colorado, movie theater shooting. “It is as if each new person
wants to be bigger and more
grandioso than the one before, so
it’s absolutely perverse.” Oates
predicts Las Vegas and other
police departments will now
adjust their tactics when securing
outdoor venues, just as adjustments were made after gunman
James Holmes killed 12 people
and injured 70 during a screening
of The Dark Knight Rises. “What
buildings are in the line of sight,
within shooting distance, and
what security can be done on
those buildings prior to a concert” all will have to be taken into
account, he says.
Las Vegas, home to such resident artists as Elton John, Britney
Spears and Celine Dion, has been
aggressively courting live music
acts — and specifically outdoor
festivals — in recent years. Buoyed
by the likes of Life Is Beautiful,
Rock in Rio, the iHeartMusic
Festival and top moneymaker
Electric Daisy Carnival (an EDM
event that injected $1.3 billion
into the city’s economy in 2016),
the three-day Route 91 Harvest
was considered a key expansion to
country music fans. Insiders say
locals already are talking about
how to beef up security protocols
for the city to rebound. “Now
we’re going to have to assume this
scenario is a possibility,” says Las
Vegas performer Marc Savard, who
was staging his Comedy Hypnosis
show at Planet Hollywood when
the Strip went into lockdown
Oct. 1. “You can say, ‘Oh, my God,
this happened in my backyard,’
but honestly, I’m surprised that it
hasn’t happened before.”
Las Vegas has faced tragedy and
bounced back before. The MGM
Grand and Las Vegas Hilton fires
of the early 1980s — referenced
by native Jimmy Kimmel in a gutwrenching ABC monologue Oct. 2
— killed hundreds and led hotels
to implement some of the nation’s
strictest fire codes. The Sept.
11, 2001, terrorist attacks forced
changes at the city’s Strip-adjacent
McCarran Airport and upgrades
to its surveillance systems. More
recently, a 2015 incident in which
a woman steered her car onto a
crowded Strip sidewalk, killing
one person and injuring 34 others,
gave Clark County commissioners reason to install steel posts
strong enough to stop high-speed
vehicles on sections of Las Vegas
Boulevard. Notes Savard, “If the
tourists don’t feel safe, they’re not
going to come, and we have to send
a message to the rest of the world
that it’s safe to come to Las Vegas.”
Indeed, just 24 hours after the
shooting, business largely had
returned to normal on the Strip,
though several live productions,
Steck’s included, went dark for
the evening. “[We did it] just out
of respect for what happened,” he
explains. Cirque du Soliel shows
also were canceled for the night
but resumed. Savard, deciding
the show must go on, returned
to his V Theater stage at 10 p.m.
“Everyone mourns in different
ways, and some people mourn,
maybe, by disconnecting from
reality a little bit,” he says. “I can’t
go down to a hospital and contribute in the [emergency room]
because I’m not a surgeon — I can
only do what I can do.”
Adds Steck: “Look what happened in Orlando,” referencing
the 2016 Pulse Nightclub mass
shooting that killed 49. “It’s not
stopping people from going to
Orlando. I would actually predict a
massive Las Vegas benefit concert
[on the Strip]. Everybody’s going to
come here to show the world, ‘Hey,
we’re not afraid of anything.’ ”
TV Premiere Week: Megyn Stumbles, Sheldon Gets a Big Bang Boost
Megyn Kelly on
NBC’s Today
ABC’s Ten Days
in the Valley
Great
job!
Pretty
good.
ABC’s The
Good Doctor
Not great,
Bob!
NFL on
primetime
Fox News’
Hannity
remiere week ratings for the Big Four netP
works may have dropped 16 percent from
2016, but most broadcast networks got a surprise
silver lining with the arrival of several unquestionably big new series.
Put CBS’ Young Sheldon at the top of that list.
TV’s best comedy launch in six years, the Big Bang
Theory spinoff averaged 21.5 million live-plus-3 viewers and a 5.2
rating among adults 18-to-49 from
its Sept. 25 preview sampling. “We
did a very effective job of reaching
Kahl
the Big Bang audience,” says CBS
Entertainment president Kelly Kahl, looking ahead
to Sheldon’s official Nov. 2 premiere.
Military drama SEAL Team also gave CBS a
strong first outing, while ABC’s The Good Doctor
and NBC’s Will & Grace reboot fared especially
well — a fact that Kahl and other insiders credit
to “feel good” programming (a la NBC’s This Is
Us) resonating with viewers. That trend also could
help explain the failure of ABC’s Ten Days in the
Valley, a dark mystery starring Kyra Sedgwick,
which limped on to the schedule. (Sedgwick prophesied her lack of viewers in an interview, calling out
the network for not promoting it.)
Premiere week’s most humbling moment,
however, wasn’t even in primetime. Megyn Kelly,
taking a stab a “feel good” herself in Today’s third
hour, saw her daytime foray plagued by on-air
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
30
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
NBC’s
Will & Grace
CBS’ Young
Sheldon
flubs, harsh reviews and a 21 percent ratings
deficit behind competitor Kelly & Ryan. Former
Fox News colleague Sean Hannity, on the other
hand, bested MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow during
their first-week head-to-head at 9 p.m.
But as President Donald Trump tweets, so
goes the conversation. And the NFL again is
playing defense, with ratings for many primetime
matchups down, a fact the president blames on
player protests during the national anthem —
though NFL ratings, overall, are on par with 2016.
“The degradation of the ratings appears to have
stopped,” says Marc Ganis of marketing firm
Sportscorp, “but we’re not seeing them rebound
to where they were two years ago.”
KAHL: CLIFF LIPSON/CBS. KELLY: NATHAN CONGLETON/NBC. TEN: ABC/PAUL SARKIS. FOOTBALL: OTTO GREULE JR/GETTY IMAGES. WILL: CHRIS HASTON/NBC. GOOD: ABC/LIANE HENTSCHER. YOUNG: ROBERT VOETS/CBS.
Feel-good programming draws big numbers (welcome back, Will & Grace!), darker dramas struggle, Hannity
beats Maddow and the NFL holds steady as it plays defense amid the Donald Trump anthem blitz BY MICHAEL O’CONNELL
F X N E T W O R K S C O N G R AT U L AT E S O U R
FEARLESS SHOWRUNNERS
JOEL FIELDS & JOE WEISBERG
DONALD GLOVER
NOAH HAWLEY
NOAH HAWLEY
ONE TO WATCH: DAVE ANDRON
RYAN MURPHY & BRAD FALCHUK
The Report
Behind the Headlines
Bob Simonds’ decision to take his struggling studio public in
the pre-eminent Asia exchange strikes some as desperate,
but others see an opportunity to strengthen ties with China
BY PATRICK BRZESKI
W
ith China clamping
down on capital flow
into Hollywood —
and box-office disappointments
piling up — Bob Simonds’ STX
Entertainment Studio is looking to an unconventional IPO in
Hong Kong to stay liquid.
On Sept. 27, The Wall Street
Journal reported that STX is planning to raise around $500 million
in an initial public offering on
the Hong Kong stock exchange
in the first quarter of 2018, with
a valuation pegged at around
$3.5 billion.
Insiders say it’s about time that
the studio’s early private-equity
investors, which include TPG
Capital and China’s Hony Capital,
would be pushing for an exit.
And with Bad Moms ($184 million
worldwide) the sole blockbuster
among the studio’s 14 releases to
date, fundraising can be expected
to be a concern for the company.
Feds Put Social Media ‘Influencers’ on Notice
The FTC demands stars reveal sponsorship deals when peddling products online
tars who endorse brands on social media are on high
S
alert following a series of warning shots fired by the
FTC, and experts say it’s only a matter of time before the
Feds take action against a well-known personality to get
the rest of the industry’s attention.
Influencers earn their name by doing just that: influencing their millions of followers online. The agency is
cracking down on common Instagram post practices
like burying sponsorship disclosures in a string of
hashtags, saying only “thanks to” a company in a post
or merely tagging the brand. “A big part of the influencer economy, which has been booming, is based on
posts that likely violate the endorsement guidelines,”
says attorney Jesse Saivar, who reps both companies
and influencers. To avoid trouble, endorsers need to say
— where it’s easy to see — that they were paid to post or
given a product for free. Using “#Ad” can be enough.
The FTC in April sent 90 warning letters to individuals
and brands, including actress Ashley Benson, singer Ciara
and model Amber Rose. In September, it asked 21 of those
influencers to disclose any “material connection” with the
endorsed company and, if one exists, detail how they plan
to ensure fans understand that relationship.
“Celebrities are now in the crosshairs,” says top
advertising lawyer Jeffrey Greenbaum. “It’s a big red
flag to talent and their representatives that they
need to make sure these posts are being managed
properly.” — ASHLEY CULLINS
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
32
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
Left: Simonds. Above: STX’s The Foreigner,
starring Chan (left) and Brosnan, made
$22 million in China in its opening weekend.
But two years on, only one film —
STX’s 14th and most recent title,
the action thriller The Foreigner,
starring Jackie Chan and Pierce
Brosnan — has obtained a release
in China, opening to $22 million
in the Middle Kingdom (a U.S.
release is set for Oct. 13).
Many analysts are optimistic
about the company’s forthcoming slate, which includes Aaron
Sorkin’s potential awards contender Molly’s Game and a raft of
female-led comedies including
a Bad Moms sequel and I Feel Pretty
with Amy Schumer. None of those
titles look particularly Chinafriendly, however.
“It’s possible that the company
intends to better leverage its powerful lineup of Chinese partners
— which it has always said is part
of the strategy,” says Stan Rosen,
a professor at USC who specializes in the Chinese entertainment
industry. “But we have not seen
these plans yet.”
SIMONDS: GARY GERSHOFF/WIREIMAGE. FOREIGNER: CHRISTOPHER RAPHAEL/STX ENTERTAINMENT. ROSE: @AMBERROSE/INSTAGRAM.
Why a Hong Kong IPO
Adds Up for STX
Launched in 2014, STX, which
would not comment to THR for
this article, is said to be targeting the Hong Kong exchange to be
closer to its many local financial partners, which, along with
Hony, include tech giant Tencent
and Hong Kong telecom company PCCW, both of which took
minority positions in the studio
in 2016. But financial insiders say
the Los Angeles-based studio’s
unconventional choice of Hong
Kong is likely a matter of necessity
as much as preference. “The stock
exchanges in New York and mainland China require that a company
has cleared certain benchmarks
for profitability and growth over
a sustained period,” says one
China-based financial executive.
Given the studio’s patchy track
record and relentless expansion,
it’s unclear whether STX currently
could clear these hurdles.
By contrast, STX’s uniqueness in the Hong Kong market
— as a Hollywood entertainment
company endorsed by some of the
region’s biggest names — should
indeed deliver a higher valuation
than could be achieved elsewhere.
The studio became a trailblazer
in the Chinese market in 2015,
when it signed a landmark,
three-year slate financing deal
with influential Beijing-based
studio Huayi Brothers Media.
Warner Bros. Television Group
proudly congratulates our honorees for
The Hollywood Reporter ’s Power Showrunners and
Ones to Watch of 2017
Power Showrunners
Greg Berlanti
Ava DuVernay
Lisa Joy & Jonathan Nolan
I. Marlene King
Chuck Lorre
John Wells
One to Watch
Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa
and we salute all of our talented showrunners
The Report
Behind the Headlines
Broadcast TV
Cable TV
Domestic
International
Gross Cume % Chg Gross Cume
18-49
Live+3
Viewership
Live+3
Total
Kingsman: The Golden Circle FOX
16.9 66.6(2) -57 50.6*81 126.3 192.9
1.
The sequel narrowly won a tight three-way race
in North America while debuting to $16.1 million
in South Korea — Fox’s biggest opening of all
time there after local film The Wailing.
It WARNER BROS.
16.9 290.8(4) -43 37.6*64 264.8 555.6
2.
It powered the biggest September in history
at the North American box office, with revenue
reaching $709 million, nearly 15 percent
ahead of the previous record ($618 million).
Audience
Live+3
1.
Sunday Night Football NBC
6.3
17.6M
2.
Football Night in America 3 NBC
3.8
10.6M
3.
America’s Got Talent 1 NBC
3.6
16.8M
4.
America’s Got Talent 2 NBC
3.3
17.3M
5.
60 Minutes CBS
2.8
15.2M
6.
Big Brother CBS
2.6
7.8M
7.
Dancing With the Stars ABC
2.0
12.2M
2.
8.
The Good Place NBC
2.0
7.0M
3.
1.
The No. 1 cable launch of 2017 goes
out on a high note after averaging
3.8 million viewers for eight episodes.
The miniseries now seems likely to
be renewed as an anthology.
Before settling into its new Thursday
time slot, a special Sept. 20 premiere
of the Ted Danson comedy scores the
week’s top growth — seven-tenths
of a ratings point, a 54 percent jump.
3.
American Made UNIVERSAL
16.8 16.8(1) N/A 3.9*59 64.8
4.
The Lego Ninjago Movie WARNER BROS.
11.6 35.2(2) -43 10.7*56 22.9 58.1
5.
Flatliners SONY
6.6 6.6(1) N/A
3.1*21
3.1
81.6
9.7
9.
The Orville FOX
1.8
6.3M
Battle of the Sexes FOX SEARCHLIGHT
3.4 4.1(2) +563 N/A N/A 4.1
10. American
7.
American Assassin LIONSGATE/CBS FILMS
3.3 31.9(3) -47 3.4*63 17.4 49.3
11.
MasterChef 1 FOX
1.6
5.3M
8.
Home Again OPEN ROAD
1.7 25.1(4) -47 870K*8 4.1
29.2
12.
Football Night in America 2 NBC
1.5
4.8M
Til Death Do Us Part NOVUS
1.5 1.5(1) N/A N/A N/A
1.5
13.
Gotham FOX
1.5
34.8
14.
Saturday Night Football ABC
1.4
5.3M
20.6
15.
MasterChef 2 FOX
1.4
4.9M
9.
10. mother! PARAMOUNT
1.4
11.
16.3(3)
-56
4*39
18.5
Victoria & Abdul FOCUS FEATURES
1.1 1.3(2) +588 3.8*28 19.3
Stephen Frears’ awards contender, expanding
into a total of 77 cinemas, scored the best
screen average of the weekend for any film
playing in more than one theater, at $14,184.
Closer
Look
American Horror Story: Cult FX
4.6M
Fear the Walking Dead AMC
3.0M
4.
The Last Ship TNT
2.6M
5.
Chesapeake Shores HALLMARK
2.5M
6.
Greenleaf OWN
2.4M
7.
If Loving You Is Wrong OWN
2.3M
8.
South Park COMEDY CENTRAL
2.3M
9.
Outlander STARZ
2.2M
10. Ray
6.
1.7
The Sinner USA
4.7M
1.9M
Ninja Warrior NBC
6.7M
Donovan SHOWTIME
One to Watch
4.5M
World News Tonight ABC
For the first time in the 21 years since
Peter Jennings was at the anchor
desk, ABC’s evening news (with David
Muir) is the season’s most watched.
Flatliners DOA Among Remakes
A $6.6M debut is no match for horror reboots
Halloween
1978 $178.6M
2007 $75.3M
12.
A Question of Faith PURE FLIX
1.0 1.0(1) N/A N/A N/A
Stronger ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS
923K 3.2(2) -43 N/A N/A
1.0
13.
3.2
Friend Request ENTERTAINMENT STUDIOS
728K 3.4(2) -64 N/A N/A 3.4
Ellen Page couldn’t bring
Flatliners back to life.
A
Nightmare
on Elm
Street
1984 $64.9M
2010 $63.1M
Fright Night
1985 $62.4M
2011 $20.5M
Carrie
1976 $141.2M
2013 $40M
Poltergeist
1982 $231.6M
2015 $47.4M
14.
The Hitman’s Bodyguard LIONSGATE
679K 74.6(7) -58 1.4*27 97.6 172.2
Source: Box Office Mojo; domestic box office adjusted for inflation.
Broadcasters
Balk at Paying
O.J. to Talk
After nine years in jail,
Simpson seeks seven figures,
but traditional media
won’t bite BY MARISA GUTHRIE
Associates of O.J. Simpson have
been shopping his first post-prison
interview for weeks, numerous
sources tell THR. But the erstwhile
NFL great, who was released from
Lovelock Correctional Center
in Nevada a little after midnight on
Oct. 1, so far has no takers.
“It is treacherous,” says one TV
news veteran. Not with a “10-foot
pole,” says another.
In part that’s because those representing themselves as his
associates — and there are many
of them — are asking for a sevenfigure payout for an interview with
Simpson, who was acquitted in
the 1994 murders of Nicole Brown
and Ron Goldman but ended up
serving nine years for a botched
2007 robbery in Las Vegas. Sources
at ABC, CBS and NBC all stress
that they will not pay for a Simpson
interview, which would violate
news division standards. Multiple
large cable TV groups, including
A+E Networks and Discovery, also
have passed.
But the ethical thicket for media
companies goes beyond paying
Simpson, 70. The optics of even giving him a platform are likely to be
controversial. If an interview aired as
part of the lineup on a news program
like Today or 48 Hours, it would not
automatically lead to an advertiser
exodus. But, says one media buyer,
“if any anti-O.J. sentiment starts,
I could see people pulling away.”
Similarly, a Simpson special would
likely be a nonstarter for advertisers.
“From a news perspective, it’s probably a get,” notes media consultant
Bill Carroll. “From an advertiser’s
perspective, it’s something that
most, if not all, advertisers would
stay away from.”
15.
Box-office source: comScore; estimates in $ millions; ( )Weekends in release; *Territories. Broadcast source: Nielsen, live-plus-3, week of Sept. 18. Cable TV source: Nielsen, live-plus-3 scripted series, week of Sept. 18.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
34
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
SIMPSON: BROOKE KEAST/NEVADA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS VIA AP. GOOD: COLLEEN HAYES/NBC. WORLD: COURTESY OF ABC. SINNER: PETER KRAMER/USA NETWORK. FLATLINERS: MICHAEL
GIBSON/SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT. VICTORIA: PETER MOUNTAIN/FOCUS FEATURES. IT: BROOKE PALMER/WARNER BROS. KINGSMAN: COURTESY OF TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX.
Box Office
Simpson
signed
his release
papers
Oct. 1.
Congrats to
Mr. Kelley
from
Mr. Mercedes.
You’re killing it.
AT&T AUDIENCE® Network proudly congratulates
David E. Kelley,
recognized as one of The Hollywood Reporter’s
Power Showrunners of 2017.
The Report
7 Days of DEALS
Who’s inking on the dotted line this week
W H Y NBCU IS MOV ING HITS TO HU LU:
‘THEY DON’T FEEL THEY NEED NETFLIX’
↓ Universal
TV’s 30 Rock
(below)
moved to
Hulu on
Oct. 1;
Parenthood
will follow
in 2018.
In a landscape where networks such as CBS, HBO
and Showtime are hoarding their libraries to launch
their own over-the-top services, NBCUniversal
seems to be taking the opposite approach.
The Comcast-owned company has been steadily
moving its shows to Hulu, inking a massive SVOD
deal Sept. 27 to transplant 30 Rock and Parenthood
from their longtime home at Netflix. The pact comes
a week after Hulu became the exclusive streaming
destination of the original eight seasons of Will &
Grace, and four months after the two companies
struck a record-breaking deal in May for last season’s
breakout drama This Is Us (which is produced by 20th
Century Fox TV).
As part of the latest agreement, Hulu also
will pick up competition series Face Off, from
NBCU-owned cable network Syfy; U.K. reality show
Made in Chelsea; and Paul Reiser ’s new comedy
There’s … Johnny, which was originally set to premiere Aug. 24 on Seeso, the NBCU-owned comedy
streaming platform that the company announced
Aug. 9 would shutter by the end of the year. Johnny’s
debut on Hulu keeps it somewhat in the family,
given that NBCU owns a 30 percent stake in the
streamer (alongside Disney-ABC Television Group
and Fox Entertainment Group as well as Turner,
which has a 10 percent stake).
“The [Sept. 27] deal makes sense for NBCUniversal
given its equity stake in Hulu and its recent decision to pull the plug on its own SVOD service,”
eMarketer principal analyst Paul Verna tells THR. “It
makes sense also for Hulu because it’s still playing
catchup to Netflix and Amazon when it comes to
exclusive content.”
But why shift the libraries now, when Hulu has
been around for a decade? “The streaming ecosystem is well enough established that networks don’t
feel they need Netflix to the extent they used to,
so more of them are venturing off on their own,”
says Verna. “The dynamic is similar to the tensions
between music labels and Apple over the latter’s
iTunes store years ago, but TV and film content
owners now have more alternatives than their music
counterparts did.”
Hulu also is riding a high from beating Netflix
and Amazon to become the first streamer to win
an Emmy for best drama series, for The Handmaid’s
Tale. The Margaret Atwood adaptation, along with
the launch of an HBO add-on and the addition
of 7,500 episodes from HGTV, A&E, Fox and other
licensing partners, boosted Hulu’s average daily
subscriptions 98 percent since March. “Our goal is
for Hulu to be home to your favorite show, whether
it’s still on the air now or one you watched growing
up,” says Hulu vp content acquisitions Lisa Holme.
But Verna counters that the company will have to
come up with more hits to accompany Handmaid’s
Tale if it truly wants to pull closer to the market
leaders: “Deals for exclusive content, such as the one
between NBC and Hulu, increase the competitive
pressure, but the real determining factor in who
wins comes down to original content, not licenses
for what amount to reruns.” — REBECCA SUN
Williams
FILM
Michelle Williams (WME,
Brillstein, Bloom Hergott)
is in talks to join Tom Hardy
in Sony’s Venom.
Paramount has picked
up the movie rights to
the Sonic the Hedgehog
video game franchise
after Sony put its project
in turnaround.
Byron Allen Plots an Oscar Run for Hostiles
With its $50 million budget, Hostiles was the
Big
most expensive movie at
Deal
the Toronto film festival
market, a big factor in the
violent drama’s failure to
sell by TIFF’s Sept. 17 close.
But Scott Cooper’s Western
also was one of the best
reviewed, which is why, with
Allen
awards season glory in mind,
Byron Allen has beaten out such suitors
as Fox Searchlight, Annapurna and Netflix
to nab it for his Entertainment Studios.
The courtship began at the festival,
followed by a Sept. 22 screening for Allen at
CAA, which negotiated the deal with WME.
The aggressive upstart will give Hostiles an
Oscar-qualifying release in December,
followed by an expanded rollout in January.
Set in 1892, Hostiles stars Christian
Bale as an Army captain who reluctantly
escorts a dying Cheyenne war chief (Wes
Studi) and his family back home to tribal
lands. Making the perilous journey from
New Mexico to Montana, the former rivals
encounter a widow (Rosamund Pike)
whose family was murdered on the plains.
Together, they must overcome the punishing landscape, hostile Comanche and
vicious outliers encountered along the way.
Cooper, who previously directed Bale
in 2013’s Out of the Furnace, rewrote the
Hostiles script first penned by the late
Donald Stewart (who won an Oscar for cowriting 1982’s Missing) and produced the
film along with Ken Kao and Oscar-winning
Birdman producer John Lesher.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Hostiles marks the third acquisition for
Entertainment Studios out of the Toronto
market. The 47 Meters Down distributor
also nabbed the Jason Clarke starrer
Chappaquiddick, which will get an Oscarqualifying release in December, as well
as Keanu Reeves-led sci-fi pic Replicas.
Black-ish creator Kenya
Barris (CAA, Principato
Young, Morris Yorn) will
write Coming to America 2
for Paramount with Warm
Bodies director Jonathan
Levine set to helm.
— TATIANA SIEGEL
36
Bale stars
in Hostiles,
which
premiered at
Telluride on
Sept. 2 before
screening
at Toronto.
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
The Mindy Project’s
Ike Barinholtz (UTA,
Principato Young, Morris
Yorn) will star in and make
his feature directorial
debut with thriller The Oath
for QC Entertainment.
Lucifer showrunner Joe
Henderson (CAA, Hirsch
Wallerstein) will pen
ROCK: NBC/PHOTOFEST. HOSTILES: COURTESY OF TIFF. WILLIAMS: VENTURELLI/WIREIMAGE. ALLEN: JEFFREY MAYER/WIREIMAGE.
Deal
of the
Week
The Report
Deals
$
20.3M
James Murdoch’s annual
compensation in his first fiscal year
Big
Number as 21st Century Fox CEO, falling
$6.1 million from the prior term.
Villeneuve
Mitchell
Redd
new shows to its daytime
lineup: Outnumbered with
Sandra Smith and The Daily
Briefing With Dana Perino.
Beyonce (Corcoran) has
sold a condo in Manhattan’s
Hot
Lot
Midtown East for $9.95 million.
The 44th-floor corner unit
at One Beacon Court covers
2,669 square feet, with three bedrooms, a chef’s
kitchen and floor-to-ceilings windows. The sale
comes a week after the singer and her husband,
Jay Z, paid $26 million for an East Hamptons home
and a month after they picked up a 30,000-squarefoot Bel Air estate for $88 million.
Dylan Baker (Innovative,
Viking) is joining
the seventh season of
Showtime’s Homeland.
Richie
Lionsgate’s reboot of the
1986 kids sci-fi adventure
film Flight of the Navigator.
adaptation of Japan’s Your
Name for Paramount and
J.J. Abrams’ Bad Robot.
Phil Lord and Chris Miller
(UTA, Ziffren Brittenham)
will direct the adaptation
of The Martian writer Andy
Weir’s upcoming book
Artemis for Fox.
Dee Rees (WME, Frankfurt
Kurnit) will direct an
adaptation of Joan Didion’s
political thriller The Last
Thing He Wanted for The
Fyzz Facility.
Iron Man writers Matt
Holloway and Art Marcum
(CAA, Grandview, Mark D.
Bisgeier) are writing a Men
in Black spinoff for Sony.
Kathy Bates (ICM), Justin
Theroux (CAA, Lighthouse,
Felker Toczek) and
Sam Waterston (Gersh,
Industry) will join Felicity
Jones in Participant’s On
the Basis of Sex.
Denis Villeneuve (CAA,
Canada’s Claude Girard)
is in talks to helm
Sony’s long-delayed
Cleopatra movie.
Jude Law (WME, the
U.K.’s Julian Belfrage,
Jackoway Tyerman)
is in talks to join Blake
Lively in the spy thriller
The Rhythm Section.
Arrival writer Eric
Heisserer (WME, Art/
Work, Jackoway Tyerman)
will pen a live-action
Bleecker Street has picked
up the Rachel McAdams
and Rachel Weisz starrer
Disobedience for the U.S.
TELEVISION
Jerrod Carmichael (UTA,
Ziffren Brittenham) has
inked a two-year overall
deal with 20th Century
Fox Television.
Pretty Little Liars grad
Shay Mitchell (APA,
David Dean, Grubman
Shire) will star in Liars
creator I. Marlene King’s
soap adaptation of Sara
Shepard’s The Heiresses
for ABC.
Miguel Sapochnik
(WME, the U.K.’s Casarotto
Ramsay, Sloane Offer)
and David Nutter (WME,
Jackoway Tyerman) will
direct episodes of Game
of Thrones along with
creators David Benioff and
D.B. Weiss.
Lionel Richie (CAA) will
join Katy Perry and Luke
Bryan as a judge for ABC’s
American Idol reboot.
Meghan Trainor (CAA)
will exec produce and
provide original music for
ABC’s girl group drama
Broken Record.
30 Minutes or Less
scribe Michael Diliberti
(UTA, Morris Yorn) will
pen The Nice Girls,
Fox’s female-led reboot
of The Nice Guys.
Chris Redd (ICM,
Principato Young, Schreck
Rose), Heidi Gardner
(TalentWorks, Odenkirk
Provisio) and Luke Null
(UTA) have joined the 43rd
season of Saturday Night
Live as featured players.
Friday Night Lights
producers Patrick
Massett and John Zinman
(WME, Industry, Hansen
Jacobson) have inked an
overall deal with Skydance
Television.
Diablo Cody (WME,
MXN, McKuin Frankel)
has sold an hourlong
drama about an ex-cop,
titled Two Nights, to Fox.
NBC has set animated
Halloween special
The David S. Pumpkins
Halloween Special based
on the popular Tom Hanks
SNL sketch.
NBC has renewed freshman
comedy Marlon. … CBS has
handed out a full season
order to Young Sheldon. …
Fox News has added two
DIGITAL
Jon Hamm (CAA,
Forward, Sloane Offer) is
joining Amazon and BBC
Studios’ Neil Gaiman and
Terry Pratchett adaptation
Good Omens.
Danny Glover (ICM,
Principal) has joined
Hulu’s horror comedy
adaptation Locke & Key.
Marlon Wayans (UTA,
3 Arts, Morris Yorn)
has set a stand-up special
with Netflix.
Designated Survivor actress
Natascha McElhone
(Paradigm, U.K.’s Artists
Partnership, Myman
Greenspan) will star opposite Sean Penn in Beau
Willimon’s Hulu space
drama The First.
Hulu has picked up the
U.S. SVOD rights to ABC’s
TGIF block, including
Boy Meets World and
Home Improvement.
Netflix has picked up
off-network streaming rights to CBS drama
Madam Secretary.
Rights Available! Hot new books with Hollywood appeal
Rep
Sheet
New Girl’s Lamorne
Morris has left Gersh
for UTA .
Bobby Moynihan has
signed with 42West.
The Mermaid co-writer
Lu Zhengyu has signed
with WME, as have The
Defiant Ones co-writer
Doug Pray and Beast
helmer Michael Pearce.
Kodachrome cinematographer Alan Poon
has signed with Gersh .
Ballers staff writer
Chloe Domont has signed
with Verve.
THEATER
Jason Mraz (Paradigm,
Goldring Hertz) has signed
up for a 10-week run in the
Broadway musical Waitress.
AGENCIES
CAA is spinning off its
entertainment marketing
division into a yet-tobe-named company
owned by private equity
fund Stagwell Media.
REAL ESTATE
Netflix content chief
Ted Sarandos has
picked up a Malibu
home along the Encinal
Bluffs for $20 million.
BY ANDY LEWIS AND TATIANA SIEGEL
The Cuban Affair (SIMON & SCHUSTER, SEPT. 19)
Uncommon Type (KNOPF, OCT. 17)
BY Nelson DeMille AGENCY ICM Partners
BY Tom Hanks AGENCY CAA
Set in Key West and Havana, the novelist’s latest debuted at
No. 1 on The New York Times and USA Today best-seller lists. Fidel
Castro’s death in November 2016 hasn’t dampened this thriller
about $60 million hidden in Cuba before the revolution.
The two-time Oscar winner’s first collection of short fiction has
all the charm and wit one expects from the beloved actor and
typewriter enthusiast, plus well-drawn, interesting characters.
The book has shown up on every fall “must read” list.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
38
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
BOOK: COURTESY OF SIMON & SCHUSTER. RICHIE: NICHOLAS HUNT/GETTY IMAGES FRAGRANCE FOUNDATION. REES: MATT WINKELMEYER/GETTY IMAGES FOR SUNDANCE. VILLENEUVE: KARWAI TANG/
WIREIMAGE. MITCHELL: JAMIE MCCARTHY/ GETTY IMAGES FOR REFINERY29. REDD: GARY GERSHOFF/WIREIMAGE. APARTMENT: ISLA HARVEY/SPLASH NEWS. MORRIS: JOHN SHEARER/WIREIMAGE.
Rees
WE PROUDLY CELEBRATE OUR SHOWRUNNERS
FOR THEIR CREATIVE VISION AND INFLUENTIAL WORK.
©2017 CBS Corporation
© UNIVERSAL STUDIOS
About Town
People, Places, Preoccupations
N E X T BIG T HIN G
Ana de Armas
The Cuban actress raises her game in
Denis Villeneuve’s Blade Runner 2049
By Rebecca Ford
Styling by Leith Clark
Vivetta dress
B
HAIR BY JON CHAPMAN AT CAROL HAYES MANAGEMENT, MAKEUP BY MARY WILES AT THE WALL GROUP.
“My life and career
have been a big
improvisation,” says
de Armas, who was
photographed Sept. 21
at Corinthia Hotel
in London. “I am not a
person who plans
things in advance.”
lade Runner 2049, the sequel to
Ridley Scott’s iconic 1982 sci-fi epic,
has been a top-secret endeavor since
the beginning. In fact, when Ana
de Armas first read for the role of Joi, the Cuban
actress wasn’t given the film’s script but rather
a scene from the 2014 sci-fi flick Ex Machina.
And two weeks ahead of Blade Runner’s Oct. 6
opening (via Warner Bros.), de Armas still
won’t reveal much about her character: “She is
anything you want her to be.”
What is known is that Joi is LAPD Officer
K’s (Ryan Gosling) love interest in the film,
helmed by Arrival director Denis Villeneuve
(and produced by Scott). It’s also de Armas’
most high-profile role yet, following turns in
the horror film Knock Knock with Keanu
Reeves, the boxing drama Hands of Stone and
Todd Phillips’ War Dogs. “The sets were incredible. You would walk in at 6 in the morning,
and we were really living in Blade Runner,” she
says of the $150 million-plus project, which
shot for five months in Budapest. “[Denis] was
determined to make it feel as real as possible.
He wanted the actors to focus on each other’s
eyes, not tennis balls.”
Raised in Havana, de Armas studied at the
National Theater School of Cuba before moving
at 18 to Spain, where she starred in several
TV series. She speaks English confidently now,
but she didn’t learn it until she made the move
to L.A. in 2014: “I don’t like feeling stuck,
like I’m not going anywhere. I wanted more.”
She visits Havana when
she can (her parents still
live there) and hopes
VITAL STATS
to return more often, even
AGE 29
as her Hollywood career
BORN Havana
blooms (next up: action
BIG BREAK
thriller Three Seconds with
2015 horror film
Knock Knock
Rosamund Pike). “I want
REPS
to be there more because
CAA, Impression
there’s a lot happening,
Entertainment, Kuranda
and Cuba is changing,” she
Management (Spain)
says. “It’s my roots. It’s
my home.”
Photographed by Nicole Nodland
41
About Town
People, Places,
Preoccupations
GUEST COLUMN
A TRANS WRITER
BRINGING LGBTQ+
TRUTH TO KIDS TV
The Anti-Cops Cop Show
By Shadi Petosky
Dan Abrams’ real-time A&E police docuseries Live PD has earned soaring
ratings for its ‘transparency’ amid Black Lives Matter By Kate Stanhope
Why has Live PD resonated with audiences?
With Cops, you’re taping the greatest moments
and creating a highlight reel. You know how
it’s going to end, to some degree. There’s
going to be some wild moment and a person’s
going to get arrested. What we’re showing
is real, real. It gives people a better sense of
Live PD’s
brief tape
delay allows
editing
of sensitive
content
such as
domestic
incidents
that involve
children.
↑ Host Abrams (left) guides the audience between feeds from
six cities per episode and interviews experts about the action.
what police deal with on a more regular basis.
It’s the equivalent of a ride-along. A crude
example is that a couple of times someone
who’s been detained or arrested has decided
to urinate in the police car, and you know
who ends up cleaning it? The police officer.
What role has social media played?
[People on social media] have actually helped
with information. There have been times
when we haven’t seen something, the officers
didn’t see something, but people watching on
TV have a different angle. They see someone
has thrown drugs out and they tweet about it.
The police department then sees the tweets
and goes back and finds the drugs.
How has the show impacted the conversation
around police brutality and Black Lives Matter?
Live PD is an extension, to some degree, of
body cameras. There’s an argument to be
made that the public has a right to see how the
people that they’re paying to engage and lead
law enforcement are doing their jobs. You have
people who love law enforcement who are
watching [the show] in one way, and people
who distrust law enforcement potentially
watching it in another way. But I think that’s
all a good thing. If body cameras and our cameras lead to better policing, that’s great.
‘WE DON’T HAVE TO TALK TRUMP 24/7’
Presidential tantrums have provided copious fodder (and
ratings gold) for late-night hosts from CBS’ Stephen Colbert
to Comedy Central’s Trevor Noah. But BET’s weekly The
Rundown With Robin Thede, premiering Oct. 12, won’t rely so heavily on
POTUS. “Black people have been through way worse than Trump,”
says Thede (who declines to reveal her age). “So I don’t need
to be so alarmist as other people.” Not that she plans to
pull punches with Trump. Her Chris Rock-produced show
— “we want it to feel like a news party” — targets a black
audience but welcomes anyone who’s “woke,” she adds. “It’s
Rock
going to be funny as fuck.” — LESLEY GOLDBERG
Late
Night
← “I don’t want people to tune in just because I’m a black woman,” says Thede.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
42
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
↓ Danger &
Eggs
co-creator
Petosky
is the only
out trans
showrunner
in animation.
was distrustful of the sparkly
eyes on the kids show story
editor. He couldn’t wait to get
into the writers room and talk about
our childhoods. “The best is when we
get into the stories of our past; it’s
like therapy. Fun!” I was sure I’d be
the transgender fun killer in the room.
He’d beam about the
time he found 50 frogs
and named them all! I’d
tell the adorable story
of being captured in
Petosky
the woods, my seventhgrade classmates holding saw blades
over me: “Keep perfectly still or we
cut you.” Nostalgia isn’t always easy
for me or many of my LGBTQ+ peers.
Kids animation thrives on nostalgia — I learned that working on Yo
Gabba Gabba! But when my show,
Danger & Eggs, got the series
Oct. 11 is
National
Coming Out
Day
order from Amazon, I asked our
writers to take a different path, to
treat the writing more like speculative social fiction. I didn’t realize that
writing about LGBTQ+ kids (our show
includes trans youth, gay dads and
other queer characters) and their
freedoms of tomorrow would begin to
heal my own traumatic childhood.
We even did a Pride episode in the
show’s Midwestern-style city, with
rainbow flags and the whole thing.
Amazon didn’t blink an eye at doing
a story about this real thing that
real people really do (kids are way
into rainbows, BTW), and I’ve seen
incredible responses: “I wish I had
something like this when I was a kid.
My life would be …” Different. Better.
What I and my LGBTQ+ peers want
isn’t so odd — just some sparklyeyed nostalgia of our own.
LIVE: COURTESY OF A&E (2). PETOSKY: TODD WILLIAMSON/GETTY IMAGES FOR AMAZON STUDIOS. DANGER: COURTESY OF AMAZON STUDIOS. ROCK: SHAREIF ZIYADAT/GETTY IMAGES. THEDE: BENNETT RAGLIN/GETTY IMAGES.
No one was clamoring for another
Cops. But in October 2016, three
Q&A
years into the Black Lives Matter
movement, A&E’s promise of
“transparency” and “clarity” with Live PD,
which follows police from across the country
in real time, resonated. The docuseries’ disturbing, sometimes dull but always authentic
look at law enforcement (three-hour episodes
air twice weekly) has scored, with ratings
surging 136 percent since its debut, hitting
2.5 million viewers in July; the network has
ordered 300 more hours. “I don’t know that
we expected it would be quite this successful,”
says host Dan Abrams, who spoke with THR
ahead of the second cycle’s Oct. 6 premiere.
I
About Town
Yes, I Did Say That!
Quotes
A look at who’s saying what in entertainment
Compiled by Seth Abramovitch
“Thanks for your
VOTE of confidence!”
OPRAH WINFREY
The media mogul and new 60 Minutes
correspondent, retweeting an article that dubs
her “Democrats’ best hope for 2020.”
BETTE MIDLER
The actress, tweeting her
thoughts on the Sept. 27 death
of the Playboy founder.
“I called up the
producers and said,
‘Why don’t we
see if we can get …
um … uh … Ryan?
Ryan Gosling.’ ”
“You’re going
straight to hell.”
LIN-MANUEL MIRANDA
The Hamilton creator, responding
on Twitter after President Trump
tweeted that the mayor of Hurricane
Maria-ravaged San Juan showed
“poor leadership” and that the people
of Puerto Rico “want everything
to be done for them.”
HARRISON FORD
The actor, momentarily forgetting the
name of his Blade Runner 2049
co-star during an appearance on
The Graham Norton Show.
“For the ways
my work was used
to divide people
rather than bring
us together, I ask
forgiveness
and I will work
to do better.”
“It seems altogether
natural because we
have one very
important thing in
common — we were
both born and
raised in Brooklyn.”
MARK ZUCKERBERG
RUTH BADER GINSBURG
The Supreme Court justice, telling
Charlie Rose that she’s aware
her “Notorious R.B.G.” nickname is an
homage to rapper Notorious B.I.G.
The Facebook founder, in a
Yom Kippur post seeking to atone
for the ways fake news on his
platform may have played a role
in the 2016 election.
MEGYN
HAS
A VERY
BAD
WEEK
Megyn Kelly Today had a bumpy debut. Guest Jane
Fonda called Megyn Kelly’s plastic surgery questions
“weird,” while Debra Messing publicly expressed
“regret” over appearing on the show. By week’s end,
the host was sarcastically noting, “I’ve just been
so delighted at the media response.”
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
DARRELL HAMMOND
The former Saturday Night
Live castmember, telling
The Washington Post about his
reaction to learning that Alec
Baldwin would be stepping in as
Donald Trump, whom Hammond
had played since the mid-1990s.
44
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
“To James Cameron
-STOP dissing
WW: You poor soul.
Perhaps you
do not understand
the character.”
LYNDA CARTER
TV’s Wonder Woman, blasting the
director on Facebook for his
continued criticisms of the superhero
in a THR story. “Your thuggish jabs
at a brilliant director, Patty Jenkins,
are ill advised,” Carter added.
WINFREY: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES. MIRANDA: SHANNON FINNEY/GETTY IMAGES. ZUCKERBERG: JEFF CHIU/AP PHOTO. CARTER: PAUL MORIGI/WIREIMAGE. KELLY: NATHAN CONGLETON/NBC.
“Why lionize
Hugh Hefner, a pig,
a pornographer
& a predator too? I
once went to the
‘mansion’ in ’68 and
got the clap walking
thru the door.”
“I just started
crying. In front of
everyone. I
couldn’t believe it.
I was in shock,
and I stayed in shock
for a long time.”
Petty and Bogdanovich in
New York in November 2007.
om was an American
original, kind of like Gary
Cooper. I didn’t detect
influences from anybody. He was
the Miracle of Gainesville — the
sweetest guy. I met him over the
making of Runnin’ Down a Dream,
a documentary about his life. We
had a mutual friend who recommended me for the directing job.
He asked if I was interested, and
I always say yes. Then I called my
ex-wife and said, “Remind me who
Tom Petty is. Is he a folk singer?”
So Tom and I met at Geoffrey’s in
Malibu, talked for four hours
and agreed to do it. We ended up
spending two years on that film.
At one point the picture was running over five hours, and Tom said,
“It’s getting a little long.” And I
said, “I’m sure you know this, but
if we’ve got the audience on our
wavelength, it doesn’t matter how
long it is. And if we don’t, it doesn’t
matter how short it is.” It ended up
being four hours and 19 minutes.
One of the more surprising things
I learned was how rough his father
had been on him. Child abuse. We
didn’t get into that until I’d known
him awhile. Another thing that
amazed me was how fast he could
write. Tom could sit down and
write a song in five minutes. He
also had this incredible sense of
integrity. I once told him I liked a
song of his called “Magnolia,”
but he seemed ambivalent because
he’d written it on commission.
That took away some of its integrity. I saw him play just the other
day at his penultimate concert at
the Bowl. He was as great as ever.
Tribute
Tom Petty
1950-2017
He sold 80 million albums, spun out dozens of hits (‘Free Fallin’,’ ‘American Girl’),
influenced generations over his 40-year career and appeared in Runnin’ Down a Dream,
a 2007 documentary about his life and his band The Heartbreakers. Now, director
Peter Bogdanovich remembers the ‘American original,’ who died Oct. 2 at age 66
1
3
2
4
— AS TOLD TO BILL HIGGINS
1 Petty during a bus tour in 1981. 2 With King
of the Hill creator Mike Judge — Petty
voiced a recurring character — and co-star
Brittany Murphy. “The most unassuming
rock star you could ever hope to meet,” says
Judge. 3 Performing on SNL in 1991. 4 With
Bob Dylan at 1985’s Farm Aid.
46
PETTY: JOE PUGLIESE. BOGDANOVICH: DAVID X PRUTTING/PATRICK MCMULLAN VIA GETTY IMAGES. BED: GEORGE ROSE/GETTY IMAGES. JUDGE: RAY MICKSHAW/WIREIMAGE. SATURDAY: ALAN SINGER/NBCU PHOTO BANK. DYLAN: DEBORAH FEINGOLD/GETTY IMAGES.
T
WE PROUDLY CONGRATULATE
THE AMERICAN
FILM INSTITUTE
ON THEIR
50TH ANNIVERSARY
About Town
Party
Crawler
The Red Carpet
Spielberg
Los Angeles, Sept. 26
2
Rita Wilson and
Tom Hanks
3
Jim Gianopulos
(left) and Jeffrey
Katzenberg
1
4
Edgar Ramirez
From left: Kate Capshaw,
Steven Spielberg
and Jessica Capshaw
5
6
Martin Short (left)
and Josh Gad
7
Holly Hunter
Jamie Bell and
Kate Mara
THR’s Awards Season Kickoff
Los Angeles, Sept. 26
If anyone can draw the
who’s who in Hollywood,
it’s Steven Spielberg (1).
Indeed, Tom Hanks (2), Vin
Diesel, Martin Short (5),
Kate Mara (7) and Quincy
Jones were just a few of
the industry luminaries who
came out to Paramount’s
Lansing Theater for a
sushi supper followed by
the premiere of HBO’s
two-and-a-half-hour documentary Spielberg.
American Masters producer Susan Lacy made
the film with the prolific
auteur’s cooperation, marking the first time Spielberg
has ever taken part in a
project that put his process
in front of the camera.
“He’s never participated
in a film about him. He’s
never participated in a book
about him. So for him to
commit to this was really a
journey of self-exploration,”
Lacy told THR. Spielberg,
whose Pentagon Papers
film The Post hopes to
be an awards contender,
explained why now is the
time to put his past work
in focus. “I make movies
and work a lot, and I look
forward all the time,” he
said. “This forced me
to look back. I got a good
hard look at it, and I was
very proud of a lot of what
I looked back upon — and
other things I wasn’t as
proud of, but I think it was a
very honest accounting of
the body of work … so far.”
— ALEX CRAMER
THR Toasts
Awards Season
8
From left: Fox Searchlight’s
Michelle Hooper, Matthew
Belloni and Nancy Utley
9
Chris Libby (left)
and Lee Ginsberg
10
Warner Bros.’ Blair Rich
(left) and Lisa Taback
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
48
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
The Hollywood Reporter’s
annual kickoff to Oscar
season saw studio execs
(Sony Classics’ Michael
Barker and Tom Bernard;
Fox Searchlight’s Nancy
Utley (8)), publicists,
filmmakers and reporters
gather on the rooftop
of Sunset Boulevard’s new
Jeremy Hotel to dish on
must-see films, red carpet
looks and all things awards.
Editorial director Matthew
Belloni (8) and publisher
Lynne Segall detailed the
brand’s coverage plan
and gave a shout-out to
newly appointed awards
editor Rebecca Ford.
— MIA GALUPPO
SPIELBERG: JEFFREY MAYER/WIREIMAGE. SHORT, GIANOPULOS, RAMIREZ: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES. HANKS, MARA: JEFF KRAVITZ/FILMMAGIC. HUNTER: RICH FURY/GETTY IMAGES. BELLONI, LIBBY, RICH: TODD WILLIAMSON/GETTY IMAGES.
Spotlight on
Spielberg
About Town
The Money
in Music
The Red Carpet
2
From left:
Steves Rodriguez,
Pat Wheeler,
Andrew Meyer and
Kayli Dang
1
Donald Passman (right)
and son Josh Passman
THR’s Business
Managers
Breakfast
Beverly Hills, Sept. 27
5
Lloyd Balbier (left)
and Evan Bell
At THR’s seventh annual
Business Managers
Breakfast honoring the
financial advisers who
keep Hollywood talents
in the black, editorial
director Matthew Belloni
and prolific music attorney
Donald Passman (1)
discussed everything from
artists’ revenue sources
to copyright concerns.
During the keynote Q&A
at the Beverly Wilshire’s
CUT, Passman noted
that music sales were
up in 2016 for the first
time since the 1990s — a
positive sign for the future
impact of streaming on
artists. His caveats: The
technology is still in its
“awkward adolescence,”
and established artists
(including his clients
Taylor Swift and Adele)
still are making most of
their money from touring,
sponsorships and songwriting. The talk was
introduced by Martha
Henderson (3) of City
National Bank, which
returned as the presenting sponsor of the event,
where an Ermenegildo
Zegna suit was raffled off.
— ASHLEY CULLINS
4
3
Martha
Henderson
6
Jonathan Drubner
(left) and Jeff Bacon
Warren Grant
Curb Your Enthusiasm
New York, Sept. 27
8
J.B.
Smoove
7
Susie Essman
and Larry David
9
10
From left: Cheryl Hines,
husband Robert F. Kennedy
Jr. and Keegan-Michael Key
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Jeff Garlin (left)
and Ira Glass
50
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
After a six-year hiatus, Larry David (7)
revived his Curb Your
Enthusiasm alter ego
for the comedy’s longawaited ninth season.
HBO feted its most
famous curmudgeon by
premiering two episodes of the new run at
the SVA Theater in
Manhattan’s Chelsea.
Before the screening, a
voiceover from the star
implored attendees not
to spoil anything (he also
thanked them for “keeping the hand-shaking
to a minimum”). “Thanks
for coming — actually,
you should be the one
thanking me,” David
intoned. “Do you have
something better to do
on a Wednesday night?”
After the screening —
greeted with big laughs
and applause — David and
co-stars Jeff Garlin (10),
Cheryl Hines (9), Susie
Essman (7) and J.B.
Smoove (8), among
others, celebrated at
TAO Downtown.
— JACKIE STRAUSE
PASSMAN, MEYER, HENDERSON, GRANT, BELL: EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES. BACON: TODD WILLIAMSON/GETTY IMAGES. DAVID, HINES, GARLIN: DAVE ALLOCCA/STARPIX. SMOOVE: MIKE PONT/FILMMAGIC.
Curb Comes
Around Again
NETFLIX
PROUDLY CONGRATULATES THE
AMERICAN
FILM INSTITUE
ON THEIR
50TH ANNIVERSARY
About Town
“My neck can
bench-press more
than yours.”
Heard Around Hollywood
Power
Dining
DiCaprio
Vergara
Bale is bulking up his neck — and nothing else — to match his heavier-set body for the role.
Rambling Reporter
By Chris Gardner
Christian Bale’s Secret Dick Cheney Workout
At September’s Toronto International Film Festival, Christian Bale,
43, said he packed on the pounds by eating pies to play Dick Cheney in
Adam McKay’s drama Backseat for Annapurna Pictures. But THR has
learned that the Oscar winner famous for his physical transformations
(2011’s The Fighter landed him best supporting actor) isn’t completely
ignoring his fitness. Word is, before the film, now shooting, started
production, he had been hitting an L.A. gym several times a week to
work out with a well-known trainer — but only from the neck up. The
source says Bale has been focused on neck exercises while ignoring
anything below to achieve Cheney’s shoulders-up profile. (Bale also
dyed his eyebrows to play the onetime vice president.) Backseat —
co-starring Sam Rockwell as George W. Bush and Amy Adams as Lynne
Cheney — marks a reteaming for Bale and McKay after The Big Short.
Bale’s rep did not provide a comment.
Robin Williams Was a Joke
Thief, Says Comedy Tell-All
Budd Friedman — the legend in
the stand-up comedy scene who
founded New York’s and L.A.’s
The Improv — has teamed with
author Tripp Whitesell for an oral
history of his comedy club. The
tome will give insiders plenty to
wag their tongues about, including Jimmy Fallon bombing when
he attempted to do an Andy
Kaufman-style set. Longtime L.A.
Improv emcee Bruce Smirnoff
dishes about Johnny Carson getting drunk in the audience and
having to drive the late-night
host home while he made out
with a woman who “couldn’t
have been more than 18” in the
backseat. Equally controversial,
Richard Lewis accuses the late
Robin Williams of stealing jokes.
“Some comics hated him for it,”
Doherty
Friedman with Oprah Winfrey and Williams.
When Dick Wolf Hosts a
Getaway Retreat
It doesn’t look like any crimes
were committed at Law &
Order guru Dick Wolf ’s Maine
estate, where he hosted a
small tribe of industry intimates.
A photo on Instagram that
appeared the weekend of Sept. 23
shows members of Wolf’s inner
circle — WME’s Rick Rosen and
Marc Korman, attorney Cliff
Gilbert-Lurie, Wolf Films executives Peter Jankowski and Arthur
Forney (both of whom are executive producers on all Wolf shows)
— enjoying an outdoors jaunt
in Seal Harbor at the creator’s
picturesque seaside mansion.
The guests were said to be indulging in a part-work/part-fun
getaway that included hikes in
nearby Acadia National Park.
Wolf’s rep declined comment.
Another ’90s Reboot That
Isn’t Happening
Shannen Doherty will soon be seen
on TV Land’s new version of 1988’s
dark comedy feature Heathers in
a role that’s being closely guarded,
but Charmed fans shouldn’t count
on that WB series being magically brought back to life. “It’s not
happening,” Doherty, 46, tells
THR. “It would be far too soon,
but I also don’t think you need the
original cast for a reboot. I know
our fans really want us back,
but we were basically a reboot of
Practical Magic. Now it should
just rest.” As for Doherty, her
cancer is in remission, and she’s
ready not to rest. “I want more,”
she says of acting work. “Heathers
is just the start. Cancer has
brought a different aspect to me
as a person, and I want to show
that in my work.”
Got tips? Email rambling@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
52
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
HO T
Leonardo DiCaprio
sat with Al Pacino
at Tower Bar. Ryan
Murphy was nearby.
… Jon Hamm lunched
with Brian Grazer at
The Palm. Larry King
also was there. …
Meg Whitman and
Jeffrey Katzenberg
had breakfast at Art’s
Deli. … Sofia Vergara
checked out TAO L.A.
… Writer Ed Decter
was at Larchmont’s
Le Pain Quotidien.
… Dana Walden had
dinner at Toscana.
Julie Andrews was
also in. … Producers
Rick Solomon and Hal
Lieberman stopped
by Terroni on Beverly. …
Eva Longoria popped
into The Highlight
Room. ... David Unger
had dinner at The
Polo Lounge.
NEW
AU R
REST
ANT
The Mighty
The Quick Pitch
Odys + Penelope’s
Karen and Quinn
Hatfield have taken the
DNA of what works at
their casual Mid-City
spot The Sycamore
Kitchen to downtown
L.A. with this sister
concept, which leans on
smart, handmade pastas. Obligatory order:
the fennel sausage and
porchetta sammie.
The Inside Dish
The Mighty shares an
intersection with two
of the city’s most frequently utilized filming
locations, the former
Cathedral of Saint
Vibiana and Caltrans’
futuristic District 7
headquarters. 108 W.
2nd St. — GARY BAUM
GYM, SHIRT: ISTOCK. BALE: PAUL BEST/GETTY IMAGES. DICAPRIO: TIBRINA HOBSON/WIREIMAGE. VERGARA: DESIREE NAVARRO/WIREIMAGE. MIGHTY: ORIANA KOREN. DOHERTY: AMANDA EDWARDS/WIREIMAGE. WINFREY: COURTESY OF BUDD FRIEDMAN.
says Lewis. “But I wasn’t one of
them.” And when David Letterman
arrived at the Hollywood outpost
in the early ’80s to do a set —
intended to be unannounced but
Smirnoff had let the cat out of
the bag — the Late Night host saw
the crowds and bolted: “Dave just
walked out of the club, got back in
his truck and drove away.”
Warner Bros. Entertainment
warmly congratulates the
AMERICAN
FILM INSTITUTE
for preserving and promoting
motion pictures for
50 YEARS
©2017 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved.
About Town
2
Mileposts
“the ghostess with
the mostess” on
television’s Topper,
died Sept. 27. She
was 94.
S.I. Newhouse Jr.,
the owner of Conde
Nast who greatly
influenced the success of The New Yorker,
Vogue, Vanity Fair,
Architectural Digest
and other magazines,
died Oct. 1 at his
home in Manhattan.
He was 89.
1 Shah and
Eisenberg
2 Brungardt
and Couch
3 Mia Isabel
1
Hitched, Hatched, Hired
Inside the industry’s celebrations and news
Weddings
Kosha Shah, an executive in UTA’s ventures
division, married
Adam Eisenberg, vp
acquisitions at Bolour
Associates, on Sept. 3
at the Royal Oaks
Ranch in Santa Ynez
in front of 235 guests.
The couple, who
became engaged over
Labor Day weekend in
2016, honeymooned
in Bora Bora. The
newlyweds will both
take Shah as a middle
name and share
Eisenberg as their
last name.
THR Heat Vision
editor Aaron Couch
wed Anna Brungardt,
a Ph.D. candidate
in Germanic languages at UCLA,
on Sept. 16 at the
Uptown Theater
in Kansas City,
Missouri, in front
of 130 guests. The
couple will honeymoon in Indonesia.
Pilgrim Media
Group scripted
executive Jamie
Fleischman married
EditStock CEO Misha
Tenenbaum on Sept. 3
at the Andaz West
Hollywood. The couple honeymooned
on the Amalfi Coast
of Italy.
Births
Angelica McDaniel,
executive vp daytime programs and
syndicated program
development for
CBS Entertainment
and CBS Television
Distribution, and her
husband, actor-comedian Brian McDaniel,
welcomed daughter
Mia Isabel on Sept. 24
at Providence Little
Company of Mary
Medical Center in
Torrance, California.
Congrats
MSG promoted
Josephine Vaccarello
to senior vp Sept. 25.
Conde Nast
Entertainment
named David Lopez
vp branded content video Sept. 27.
Faye Penn was
appointed vp editorial for Lifetime on
Sept. 27.
strategy and enterprises, will manage
on an interim basis.
BET Networks tapped
Connie Orlando
as executive vp head
of programming
Sept. 29.
English actor who
starred in the BBC
sitcom Till Death Us
Do Part in the 1960s
and 1970s, died
Sept. 25. He was 85.
Deaths
stepped down
as president and
CEO of Epix on
Sept. 29. Monty
Sarhan, executive
vp programming,
Anne Jeffreys, the
Monty Hall
The co-creator of
Let’s Make a Deal,
who died Sept. 30
at 96 in his
Beverly Hills home,
is remembered by
Wayne Brady, the
current host
of the legendary
game show
54
actress who starred
on General Hospital
for 20 years and
opposite her husband
Robert Sterling as
n this business, you’re lucky
to meet a legend, and even
luckier still to work with and
learn from one. I miss Monty
like everyone connected to Let’s
Make a Deal, but I can smile
because he got to see his baby fly
again. Getting the Monty “Seal of
Approval” is one of the greatest
honors I’ve received in my career
so far. He was the perfect mix
of gentleman, joker and teacher.
Thank you for the love, Monty.
Paul Rodriguez,
a respected film
and TV sound
executive, died
Sept. 24 from cardiac
arrest after a brief
hospitalization. He
was 65.
I
To submit, send email to hhh@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Jeffreys
Mark Greenberg
1921-2017
nalist and author
who collaborated on
autobiographies
with Esther Williams,
Natalie Cole, Patti
LuPone, Dan Rather
and others, died
Sept. 26 in Los
Angeles. He was 76.
Tony Booth, the
Comedy Central
appointed Lucy
Robinson to head its
London-based
programming team
Sept. 26.
Orlando
Digby Diehl, a jour-
O C T OBE R 4 2017
Hall (pictured here in 1968) co-created
Let’s Make a Deal in 1963. Inset: Brady.
EISENBERG: MARISSA MAHARAJ. MCDANIEL: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. COUCH: JSI PHOTOGRAPHY. JEFFREYS: PHOTOFEST. DEAL: ABC PHOTO ARCHIVES/ABC VIA GETTY IMAGES. BRADY: STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE. ORLANDO: COURTESY OF BET.
3
SON Y PIC TURES ENTERTA INMENT
Salutes the
AMERICAN FILM
INSTITUTE
on 50 years of celebrating and preserving
the art of film in America
www.sonypictures.com
© 2017 Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
salutes
on their 50th Anniversary
The Business
Executive Suite
Kevin Kay
The Viacom veteran on
plans for the new Paramount
Network, Kevin Costner’s
massive salary and the morale
hit from Dauman vs. Redstone
By Lesley Goldberg
GROOMING BY SU HAN AT DEW BEAUTY AGENCY.
I
n the wake of a famously
messy stretch at Viacom,
23-year company veteran
Kevin Kay has emerged as
one of new CEO Bob Bakish’s
top lieutenants. A straighttalking executive, Kay, 63, has
been handed the keys to two more
cable networks (TV Land and
CMT) and tasked with rebranding male-skewing Spike — home
to breakout Lip Sync Battle and
mixed martial arts — as a general entertainment channel with
the synergistic name Paramount
Network. The Jan. 18 changeover will be accompanied by a
fresh batch of high-end originals, including miniseries Waco,
with Taylor Kitsch and Michael
↑ If Kay, photographed Sept. 5 at his office in Hollywood, weren’t running networks, the avid baseball
fan says he’d like to coach a minor league team: “What would be more fun than that?”
Shannon; and Taylor Sheridan
drama Yellowstone, starring Kevin
Costner. If all goes as the New
York native plans, Paramount
Network, which reaches 83 million homes, will be part of the
same prestige conversation as FX
and AMC in a matter of years.
At the same time, Kay, who
began his career holding cue cards
at Saturday Night Live, is realistic
about the challenges facing him,
including skinnier cable bundles.
Asked to pinpoint the biggest,
he says: “Distribution, without a
doubt.” He’s also quick to admit
it’s tough running a suite of cable
networks at a time when rivals
RÉSUMÉ
CURRENT TITLE
President, Spike
(soon to be Paramount
Network), TV Land,
CMT Group of Networks
PREVIOUS JOB
President, Spike
BIG HIT
Lip Sync Battle,
which enjoyed the
highest-rated premiere
in Spike’s history
and has since spawned
a kid-centric spinoff,
Lip Sync Battle Shorties.
What has been the biggest change
at Viacom under Bob Bakish?
Photographed by Michele Thomas
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
57
from Netflix to Apple appear
to have bottomless pockets and
enormous ambition.
On a sunny September morning, the married father of three
sat down in his Hollywood
office for his first wide-ranging
interview since the Viacom
reorganization. He spoke about
the decision to reinvent a network that’s had success (and
$316 million in cash flow, per
SNL Kagan) and what it was like
to work through the very public
legal battle between former CEO
Philippe Dauman and Viacom
owner Sumner Redstone.
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
The Business
You’re launching with a lot of
programming produced by outside
studios. Is that a concern?
Executive Suite
I don’t think we can take a heavyhanded position right now because
we need product and we need talent to want to work here. I do want
to own content. We’re working
hard with Paramount TV to create
the model for us to be in business
together. We’re developing [spy
drama] Velvet from [Lone Star creator] Kyle Killen with them.
1
The synergy that was never
there before. There’s cooperation now between [Paramount
film chief] Jim Gianopulos,
me, [Paramount Network/TV
Land head of development] Keith
Cox and [Paramount TV head]
Amy Powell. The walls are broken
down, the silos are gone and
everybody is working toward a
common goal [now].
2
3
4
What was it like as your top bosses
were facing each other in court?
Distracting. A lot of time was
spent talking about rumors, and
that’s not productive when you
want to make shows. I’m happy
it’s over.
What’s your pitch to creatives?
You can go take that crazy SVOD
money, but don’t you want people
to have a conversation about your
show? If you look at shows like
Game of Thrones, each week people
have a conversation about them.
That’s our model. The other part:
Don’t you want to help us launch
a new network?
Kevin Costner is making $500,000
per episode for Yellowstone. How
do you justify that?
The statement we wanted to make
was that we’re open for business
and we’re willing to pay top-tier
actors whatever their quotes are.
It sends a message and that’s what
we want to do.
1 Kay performed “All I Do Is Win”
as part of a Lip Sync Battle
parody with Viacom CFO Wade
Davis. 2 Art in Kay’s office.
3 Kay was key to MMA’s early
development. 4 David Letterman
signed a photo of himself playing
softball with Kay (and the CBS
News team) at Yankee Stadium.
5 An original Yankee Stadium
sign for the avid fan.
5
We want to be 50-50 male-female
with an 18-to-49 demo. In the
Viacom world, you have networks
that have specific audiences —
MTV with millennials, Comedy
Central with comedy, BET is
focused on African-Americans
and Nickelodeon is a kids and
family brand — so the goal is to
have “general entertainment” as
part of the portfolio.
What has been your hardest day?
When Bob and I had a conversation about me rebranding Spike. I
rebranded TNN as Spike [in 2003],
and a lot of people didn’t make the
cut. Changing a brand is difficult,
especially in a world where you’re
shutting down networks.
Does the average TV viewer know
what the Paramount brand is?
They do. The first thing we did
was talk to consumers. They
think of a movie studio, quality,
cinematography, great characters, great stories. The Godfather,
Mission: Impossible, Transformers.
Of all the brands, why Spike?
Because the TV Land affiliate
agreements would never allow
it and they also don’t have full
HD penetration. The one thing
that stood between Spike and
getting to general entertainment was its name. Spike was too
well-branded — we did too good
a job of saying, “This is for men.”
What are the changes you’ll make?
The average Spike viewer is 43.
If we can be in the early 40s,
it helps set us apart from some
of the other networks that are
in the family. We’re more upscale
as we move away from all that
police programming that was
on Spike. You’ll still see Cops, but
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
you won’t see the same volume
of it. We’re looking at bringing
over some high-quality sitcoms for daytime, and you’ll see
more movies.
With Younger’s success at TV
Land, how tempted are you
to move that to the Paramount
Network?
It’s worth considering, but it’s
also dangerous to say, “Let’s take
Younger off TV Land and put it on
in a place that people don’t know
about yet even though it may have
bigger distribution.” TV Land
needs Younger. We’re focused on
[creator] Darren Star’s next show,
which takes place in Paris. That
could be a big Paramount Network
show. It’s a half-hour dramedy
about a young American girl who
wants to change her life. She goes
to Paris for a life-changing experience and ends up staying. There’s
a bit of Carrie Bradshaw in it that
draws on what Star didn’t get to do
in Paris on Sex and the City. We’ll
either pilot or go straight to series
on that.
58
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
How do you assess the challenges
at TV Land and CMT?
TV Land makes a lot of money on
a diet of mostly acquired comedies shared internally with some
others, and the cost of programming isn’t that expensive. So
I’m not worried about TV Land
at all. CMT is seeing this resurgence because of Nashville, but it
admittedly has some distribution issues. It’s got some carriage
problems that we also had on
Spike. The longer-term play for
CMT is to be strategic about
how we can use CMT and build
a business there that’s not just
about linear TV. Is there a concert
business there? Is there more of
a music play with CMT? Is there
some other partner that we want
to think about for CMT strategically? We have a lot of work to do.
In an a la carte future, do those
niche networks survive?
I think so. You look at the balance sheet, and they all make a
lot of money. Nobody wants those
networks to go anywhere. You
have to find the efficiencies and
think about how you invest in
those versus how you invest in the
flagships. CMT was going down a
path of lots of scripted programming because they had Nashville,
and they could not really afford
it. So, we’re keeping Nashville and
moving into nonscripted, where
we can develop quicker and maybe
have some hits and definitely be
more efficient financially.
Let’s end on a lighter note. In a
network exec edition of Lip Sync
Battle, who would you challenge
and what would you sing?
I would do “All I Do Is Win” [by DJ
Khaled] because I’m unbelievably
competitive, and I’d take on [FX’s]
John Landgraf.
City National
Congratulates
®
THE AMERICAN FILM INSTITUTE
50 YEARS OF PRESERVING AND
ENHANCING AMERICAN FILM
The way up® for the entertainment industry.
City National Bank is a subsidiary of Royal Bank of Canada.
CNB.COM
CNB MEMBER FDIC
6722.01
The Business
A Message for Silicon Valley:
Brands Matter, Even in Television
FX’s chief responds to Wall Street’s ‘irrational exuberance’ over platforms like Netflix and Apple
with a prediction that the future of content will reward artists, not algorithms By John Landgraf
W
ho owns the future?
This is the question
at the heart of every
stock market. In the competition for delivery of the goods and
services that make up the vast
majority of the American economy, platforms like Google and
Amazon are currently at war with
brands like Mercedes-Benz, Nike
and even HBO and FX over the
answer to this question. In some forms
of retail, the writing
is on the wall and
the platforms have
Landgraf
already won. In other
segments, such as luxury cars
and designer clothes, the future
still seems to favor brands. Apple
sits on both sides of this conflict
as the world’s dominant luxury
personal computer brand and a
leading internet platform. Maybe
that’s why it is the most valuable
corporation on earth.
Perhaps storytellers don’t need
to care as much about the future
as executives and investors do.
After all, isn’t it possible that
technology will enable storytellers to connect directly to their
audience without the need for
anyone to share the programming decisions or the profit in
between? Don’t bet on it. As
long as goods and services have
existed, a substantial share of the
authority and profit generated
from getting those goods into the
hands of the end user has gone
to businesses, agents and governments who sit in the middle.
Which is why the internet wants
us to believe it is just a benign,
frictionless ramp between consumers and producers. Pay no
attention to the unprecedented
concentration of profits and
power in Silicon Valley — that’s
just a generous tip we consumers
have all donated as a thanks to
technology companies altruistically creating a consumer and
information utopia.
A hundred years ago, most
people in America bought what
they needed from small, familyowned businesses — say, a corner
butcher shop, a local bakery and
a small general store. There were
a few recognizable brands, but
shoppers didn’t especially need
brands to guide their purchases
when there were a limited number
of choices and you could squeeze
today’s fresh melon or place next
Sunday’s new felt hat right on
your own head in a neighborhood
store. Retailers, however, wanted
to compete by giving consumers
more choices and lower prices. So
along came grocery stores, then
supermarkets, then Walmart.
Sears became one of the largest
companies in America by bringing the “department store” to the
masses. Thus, we had a proliferation of both location-based
brands (like Sears and Kroger)
and the regional or national
sub-brands inside these stores to
help guide consumers through a
bewildering array of choices.
Illustration by Matt Collins
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
60
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
Location-based brands
were also a thing in television.
A broadcast network was a
national location-based brand
(“Channel 2”) distributed through
a series of local affiliate stations. And consumers were once
thrilled to have three of these networks, plus even PBS for us nerds!
As abundance and choice
grew, brands became the largest
single engine of profit in the U.S.
economy. Create a great product
that people love, and you could
sell it beyond your town, city or
even state. Once consumers knew
how good it was, they would look
for that brand everywhere they
went and buy it for the rest of their
lives. That legacy is still with us.
Most retail commerce still happens in physical stores, and the
largest segment of television
usage — by a large margin — still
remains within linear channels.
Of course, over time, the notion
of brand as a solemn commitment
to quality began to fray around
the edges (profit and quality can
be tough bedfellows). Too often
“brand” became synonymous
with a great package rather than
a great product inside. On TV,
three networks became four, then
five, then six, then hundreds of
cable channels cropped up, both
basic and premium. And if you
ran a channel, you could program
the cheapest programming that
generated the biggest ratings.
Then you could add even more
commercials. It was a simple
equation, and it is just so hard for
short-term thinkers to resist killing the golden goose.
Of course, not every brand did
this. Many of the brands that
continued as beacons of extraordinary quality still are going
strong. Steve Jobs insisted that
the products made and marketed under the Apple brand be
“insanely great,” and Apple is now
the most valuable brand on earth.
Jobs’ mission statement was, in
principle, no different than NBC
legend Grant Tinker’s — “First
be best, then be first.” Television,
remarkably, got a lot better as
competition grew fiercer. That
LANDGRAF: CHARLEY GALLAY/GETTY IMAGES FOR VANITY FAIR.
Guest Column
CHEERS TO A
GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY
Congratulations on your remarkable contributions
to this treasured art form. We’re proud to be the
Official Airline of AFI.
EDUCATING TODAY'S AUDIENCES
AND TOMORROW'S ARTISTS
American Airlines and the Flight Symbol logo are marks of American Airlines, Inc. © 2017 American Airlines, Inc. All rights reserved.
The Business
continues today, and the best
thing to come of the “Peak TV” era
is the increase in diverse voices
who finally have the chance to
have their stories heard.
But, alas, even when you do
own the future, the future doesn’t
stay owned. Now there is a group
of giant companies in Silicon
Valley that have a very different
idea about how to guide viewers
to television programs as well as
everything else — and who will
make a handsome profit in the
process. In the internet’s vision of
the future, most brands become
irrelevant. What consumers (or
viewers) will need to steer them
toward nirvana are the seamless
utility and recommendations of
a platform. For many types of
products, this prediction may be
true. And so, very quickly, platform-based internet companies
have become the most profitable
and powerful enterprises. The
biggest ones are now more valuable than the largest banks and
oil companies. If you ask me,
Google could give the Catholic
Church at its height of power a
run for its money … and without the inconvenience of those
10 pesky commandments.
And so, just as many stores and
brands have become irrelevant, so
will many channels. When we had
to watch a show at a scheduled
time or miss it entirely, you bet
we knew exactly which channel it
was on and when. Now viewers,
who often don’t have to go to a
physical store, also don’t have to
FX’s American Horror Story (left) and Fargo are from one brand and available on many platforms.
Starz, BET, Nat Geo and numerous cable networks for a great
new original series, as well as
Netflix or Hulu. And most U.S.
TV viewers still seem eager to go
to ABC, CBS, The CW, Fox, NBC
and PBS. The legacy of these
brands will be hard to completely
erase, and in many ways, as the
streaming ecosystem develops,
they actually will get better. I’m
absolutely thrilled FX can begin
to use a subscription streaming
model that will allow our brand
to be more fully expressed than it
could ever be through a channel. This ideal — that a TV brand
should be a complete box set
of every great current and past
series it has ever programmed —
was pioneered by HBO.
And as much as I’d bet the big
streaming television platforms
are here to stay, I’m dubious that
their various recommendation
engines can fully supplant the
need for brands. For one thing,
I am getting tired of the way
internet platforms think they
know me, either personally or as
a member of the fake news and
clickbait-addicted masses. And as
skeptical as I am that an algorithm will ever figure out what
few shows my wife and I will enjoy
watching together, I’m almost
certain that it will never figure
out what I don’t know I might love
Disney vs. Netflix: Profits Don’t Mean Dominance
As Netflix races past 100 million subscribers, Wall Street has rewarded the streamer with
a skyrocketing stock price despite low net income. Meanwhile, Disney, with estimated profits
of $9.1 billion this year and a diversified revenue stream, is valued at about half as much
Estimated total
revenue in 2017
$55.1B
Estimated net
income in 2017
Disney
Netflix
Current stock price
per share
Stock multiplier
by earnings
$177.01
222x
$9.1B
$99.90
$11.6B
17x
$561M
Source: MoffettNathanson, Disney numbers for 12 months ending Sept. 30; Netflix for 12 months ending Dec. 31; stock price on Oct. 2.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
62
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
tomorrow. To answer a question
like that, you have to truly put
the artist first. Not the data. Not
the money. Not the plan for world
domination. The artist.
I’ll bet, given the excruciating
paradox of choice viewers now are
facing, that the really good legacy
brands based on channels will
continue to have value and meaning to consumers. Streaming
platforms will too, unless they get
so bogged down with the pursuit
of shock-and-awe levels of volume
that they can’t maintain a consistent quality.
So who owns the future of
television, brands or platforms?
Well, if you think viewers want
their television “good enough,”
bet it all on platforms with their
cheap pricing, vast libraries
and data-driven algorithms. On
the other hand, if you think many
viewers want their television
“insanely great,” cast a vote for
brands to still make a meaningful
contribution, even as platforms
add their share. I personally think
the answer is “both/and,” which
means we are facing a likely
stalemate in which platforms and
brands both have value and, despite
their natural antagonism, will
have to learn to happily co-exist
(just like I’m certain will happen any day between red and blue
America). Unfortunately, unlike
the tiny political divide in our
country, the current competitive
and philosophical divide between
traditional media companies and
Silicon Valley will not be settled
anytime soon.
One final word of advice: Any
time anyone (including me)
tells you that the world will be
a perfect place and that you will
finally be free, if only you will
vote for him, embrace his platform or revere his brand, be very
skeptical. In my experience, The
Who got it exactly right when
they sang, “Meet the new boss,
same as the old boss.”
AMERICAN: FRANK OCKENFELS/FX. FARGO: CHRIS LARGE/FX.
access a channel to get TV programming, so they don’t have to
care when the program is scheduled to air.
Currently, Wall Street is placing bets that platforms will own
the future of everything, including TV. This is reflected in the
radically disparate valuations
(relative to profits) of traditional
media companies versus internet media companies. Disney
stock trades at 17 times earnings. Netflix stock trades at 222.
Projected 2017 net revenue for
Disney is $9.1 billion, and it’s
$561 million for Netflix. I suspect
that Wall Street is partially right
about the bright future value of
platforms, although with a huge
dose of irrational exuberance.
I do think platforms are very useful tools. I’m an Amazon Prime
member. I subscribe to Netflix
and Hulu, and they have great
user interfaces and some excellent original programs. But what
truly distinguishes all three of
these services is the utility of their
vast libraries of acquired content, which also is a part of what
makes each a platform, even if
it has a “house brand,” too. But
this giant scale also can make
it hard to find one great story to
watch amid the tens of thousands available. Still, I don’t think
anyone can argue that these new
platforms haven’t used their
unrestrained access to capital to
innovate brilliantly around technology and the consumer media
model to create value for viewers.
On the other hand, I think Wall
Street is wrong about the bets
it is not placing on the future of
the strongest TV brands. People
still go to HBO, Showtime, AMC,
Guest Column
SAG-AFTRA salutes the
American Film Institute
for its 50-year
commitment to the
past, present and future
of American cinema.
SAGAFTRA.org
Style
Fashion
What’s Your Hollywood Jean Type?
Decoding the designer denim worn by the town’s top talent and execs
reveals eight distinct industry insider profiles By Alexandra Cheney
for the
TAT ED
U N DERSRO
HE
s
Joe’s Jean
for the
M U LT I- D
E
TA L EN T
McGuire D
Affleck
enim
for the
McCaffrey
MAN
EV ERYas
on
Buck M
Pratt
for the
R EA LIT Y
STA R
Good Amer
ican
KARDASHIAN: JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC. MCCAFFREY:
JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE. PRATT: SAMIR HUSSEIN/
WIREIMAGE. AFFLECK: MIKE MARSLAND/WIREIMAGE.
DELEVINGNE: VICTOR CHAVEZ/GETTY IMAGES. RHIMES:
EMMA MCLNTYRE/GETTY IMAGES. LAWRENCE: WALTER
MCBRIDE/FILMMAGIC. MILLER: AXELLE/BAUER-GRIFFIN/
FILMMAGIC. JEANS: COURTESY OF BRANDS (8).
Kardashian
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
64
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
THE REALITY STAR:
Good American
LABEL LOVERS Chrissy Teigen,
the Kardashians, top
Hollywood hairstylist Jen Atkin
HOT PAIR The Good Legs
jean, with grommet accents
and sizing up to 24; $179,
goodamerican.com. “They
cater to women of all shapes
and sizes,” says Atkin of the
label co-founded by Khloe
Kardashian and Emma Grede
that made $1 million on its
first day of sales, marking the
largest denim launch ever.
THE MULTITALENTED:
McGuire Denim
LABEL LOVERS Jennifer
Lopez, Zoe Saldana,
HBO vp drama programming
Kathleen McCaffrey
HOT PAIR The Ibiza in a
weathered wash called
Talamanca; $268, at select
Anthropologie stores.
“McGuire makes a jean that’s
professional but still rad,”
says McCaffrey, who works
with both executives and
creative talent. “I’ll leave the
suits to the agents.”
cuffed slim jeans and a white
T-shirt,” says writer Jordan
Roberts (Big Hero 6).
“On adventurous days, with
a gray T-shirt.”
THE
UNDERSTATED HERO:
Joe’s Jeans
LABEL LOVERS Chris and
THE EVERYMAN:
Buck Mason
LABEL LOVERS Chris Pratt,
Patrick Dempsey, Will &
Grace producer David Kohan
HOT PAIR 12-Month Rinse jeans;
$175, buckmason.com. “Last
summer, while directing a
film, I took a page from Steve
Jobs’ playbook and wore the
same thing every day. My
uniform was Buck Mason’s
Liam Hemsworth, Cade
Hudson, Ben Affleck
HOT PAIR The Brixton Straight
+ Narrow in Diggie wash;
$188, joesjeans.com. Andrew
Weitz, ex-WME agent and
founder of style consultancy
The Weitz Effect, likes that the
men’s styles are “very clean,
without a lot of stitching.” Adds
THE LEADING LADY:
Mother Denim
in Light Vintage wash; $95,
dstld.com. Says Powell, “It’s
luxury-grade denim crafted
from sustainable fabrics,
offered at wildly attractive
prices [from $75 to $105].”
THE POWER
PRODUCER:
Parker Smith
LABEL LOVERS Shonda Rhimes,
LABEL LOVERS Jennifer
Extra’s Sharon Levin
Lawrence, Kerry Washington,
Leslie Mann
HOT PAIR High-waisted Looker
in Not Rough Enough wash;
$238, motherdenim.com.
Says Mann, “They’re great
butt jeans.”
HOT PAIR The Bombshell
THE ECO-LOVER:
DSTLD
Crop in Tower wash; $198,
parkersmith.com. “I’m
obsessed — they look good,
are comfortable and come in
every cut and wash,” Rhimes
tells THR. “Parker Smith
knows that a great booty is
a terrible thing to hide.”
THE COOL MOM:
Re/Done
LABEL LOVERS January
Jones, Sienna Miller,
Michelle Monaghan
HOT PAIR The Crawford, part
of a new collaboration
with Cindy Crawford; $328,
shopredone.com. “They’re
mom jeans that don’t look
like mom jeans!” says writer
Natalie Krinsky. “It’s
sustainable denim from an
iconic brand [Levi’s].”
LABEL LOVERS Cara
Delevingne, CAA Ventures’
business development
executive Kaitlyn Powell
HOT PAIR Skinny jeans
for the
V
ECO -LO
LD
ER
DST
for the
L E A DI NG
L A DY
Mother Den
CAA agent Hudson: “After
wearing a suit and tie all
day, there’s nothing I enjoy
more than putting on my
Joe’s — especially being from
Texas, where denim is king.
They just fit and feel better
[than other jeans].”
for the
P OW ERER
R
P O DUC h
im
Delevingne
it
Parker Sm
Lawrence
for the
O
CO OL M
one
M
Re/D
Miller
Rhimes
Style
Real Estate
2
3
1 Larchmont Boulevard.
2 This home in nearby Windsor
Square lists for $11 million
with The Agency’s Billy Rose.
3 Larchmont Bungalow
closed after eight years of
defying local business rules.
1
ver since Julius LaBonte developed Los Angeles’
price of a 2,300-square-foot Larchmont Village home is
Larchmont Village during the 1920s, the four-block
$1.5 million, according to neighborhood real estate agency
stretch near Paramount Pictures has been cherLoveland Carr — modest compared with the many grand
ished — and fiercely defended — as a slice of Mayberry
homes in surrounding Hancock Park and Windsor Square
wedged between Koreatown and Hollywood. But with
but up nearly 25 percent from three years ago).
the death in July of LaBonte’s only heir, Charlotte Lipson,
Many business owners are chafing at the rules, which
resulted in the closure in August of the popular Larchmont
who owned more property along Larchmont than anyone,
Bungalow. Albert Mizrahi, another prominent
there is concern that the star-friendly neighborhood,
where Dave Navarro and Showtime’s David Nevins own
neighborhood landlord, operated the restaurant as a sit-down spot (as opposed to takeout)
homes, can’t stem the tide of modernity for much longer.
in defiance of the Q Conditions, which cap
“It’s a big question,” says John Welborne, who owns and
the number of full-service restaurants at 10
runs the community newspaper, Larchmont Chronicle,
Nevins
— an effort to keep businesses along the strip
of the fate of the 250 feet of street frontage Lipson owned,
local and diverse. It took the City Attorney’s office eight
all on the village’s most trafficked (and contentious) block
years to compel the Mizrahi family to close the Bungalow
between 1st Street and Beverly Boulevard. For decades,
(Albert died Aug. 12, 2016).
Lipson, who died the day after her 100th birthday, carried
out her father’s wishes by supporting “neighborhoodSteve Vernetti, who opened his eponymous Italian eatery
servicing” retail and providing small businesses like
south of Beverly in 2015, calls the restrictions “extremely
Chevalier’s Books and Larchmont Barber Shop with space
wasteful” and “grossly out of date,” adding, “The street
at what most believe are rents well below market. But
cannot be sustained by just counting on local revenue. The
that hasn’t kept surrounding rents from soaring. Space
world doesn’t work that way.”
along Larchmont now leases for between $8 and $10 per
The Larchmont Business Improvement District,
square foot, one of L.A.’s highest
which represents property ownretail rates. (THR’s calls to Lipson’s
ers like Vernetti, hopes to strike
lawyers were not returned.)
a truce between commerce and
A longtime resident, Welborne in
character. “Larchmont is still
the 1990s helped craft Larchmont’s
a village with a small-town charQ Conditions, zoning rules that
acter,” says BID spokesperson
specify acceptable width and height
Heather Duffy Boylston. “But we
of storefronts and place a cap on
have to balance that with the
certain types of businesses. These
reality that there are very sophisrestrictions have helped drive
ticated shoppers and diners who
up residential prices (the median
live in the area.”
Larchmont Boulevard in 1977.
E
Judy Greer
Casual (Hulu) and
I’m Sorry (truTV)
Tig Notaro
(Amazon’s One
Mississippi)
bought this
newly remodeled
3,100-square-foot
five-bedroom
via listing agents
Anne Loveland and
Sue Carr.
On the Market
533 N. ARDEN BLVD.
This Spanish-style
home, listed for
$2.6 million by Brad
Holmes, has a pool
and an in-law unit
above the garage.
643 N. GOWER ST.
Redfin’s Laura
Salgues has the
$1.7 million listing on
this three-bedroom,
three-bathroom
contemporary.
Larchmont
Village
Larchmont Wine & Cheese
“There is a line out the door at the
sandwich counter for a reason. This
shop is one of the reasons I moved here.”
223 N. Larchmont Blvd.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
66
Larchmont Beauty Center
LEKfit
“They have everything and don’t mind
if you just want to play with products
for an hour, which, duh, I always do.”
208 N. Larchmont Blvd.
“We jump up and down on trampolines
to loud music, dance and laugh our
butts off in Lauren Kleban’s classes.”
615 S. Arden Blvd.
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
PRADO: ERICA BROWN. WINDSOR: THE AGENCY. NEVINS: TODD WILLIAMSON/GETTY IMAGES. BOULEVARD: HOLLYWOODPHOTOGRAPHS.COM. WINE: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. GREER: FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES. BEACHWOOD:
JEFFREY ONG/POSTRAIN PRODUCTIONS/COURTESY OF LOVELAND CARR PROPERTIES. NOTARO: JB LACROIX/WIREIMAGE. ARDEN: COURTESY OF BRAD HOLMES GROUP. GOWER: MARTIN CLARK/COURTESY OF REDFIN.
Larchmont Village business owners are fighting L.A.’s zoning rules for the
future of a small-town street in the shadow of Paramount Pictures By Peter Kiefer
◄
$2 . 47M
526 N. BEACHWOOD DRIVE
Battle for the Mayberry of Hollywood
GOOD
IN MY
HOOD
Just Sold
Style
1
Travel
‘If You Want to Drink Wine
With Young Italian Filmmakers,
You Will Find Them Here’
Europe without the terrorism and beaches without the hurricanes, the Boot now boasts everything
from Tarantino’s seafood spot in Rome to Clooney’s top hotel in Venice and more By Beth Landman
ith Google hosting
its summer camp for
billionaires in Sicily
(Prince Harry attended, and
Elton John and Lenny Kravitz
performed) and David Geffen
entertaining Bob Iger, Oprah
Winfrey and Barry Diller aboard
his Portofino-bound yacht, Italy
is proving to be an unparalleled
draw for Hollywood heavies and
tech moguls. Indeed, Italia may
seem like one of the few safe
options as the State Department
issues travel warnings highlighting other parts of Europe
due to terrorism and hurricanes
continue to slam the Caribbean.
This fall, as tourists thinned
and truffles came in season,
Julia Roberts headed to Italy, The
Rolling Stones played in Lucca, and
Sting and Trudie Styler hosted a
cocktail block party at their villa
in Tuscany. “Italy is my favorite
country,” says Terry George, who
directed Oscar-nominated Hotel
Rwanda. “We did music for the
film there and found a wonderful
combination of great food, style,
W
culture and eccentric, fun people.”
Producer Mark Canton agrees:
“Dennis Hopper first brought me
to Italy — the filmmakers are
legendary, food is the best, people
are better and the fashion great.”
(All room rates fluctuate and are
approximate, but the exchange
rate is excellent.)
Getting there
and meals like tarragon shrimp
and squid in lobster sauce from
chefs Daniel Boulud and Michel
Roth. Emirates,
which offers deals,
has a direct flight
from JFK to Milan,
with a shower in first
Arnett
class and car service
to and from the airport as well as
from the airport to your hotel.
Will Arnett calls Blade’s Bounce
helicopter service — which takes
travelers from New York City to
JFK or Newark in five minutes,
or from DTLA, Santa Monica or
Malibu to LAX in 10 — a “game
changer.” Patrick Whitesell’s wife,
Laura Sanchez, prefers it to Uber,
which “could take two hours
in traffic.”
Instead of Alitalia, many opt for
Air France (flights stop in Paris
en route to Italy from LAX; from
$9,402, first-class round trip),
with new, fully mattressed suites,
complimentary black pajamas, a
24-inch HD screen, cocktails from
the head bartender at Paris’ Ritz
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Getting around
High-speed trains are remarkably comfortable, and getting
from Florence to Rome, for example, takes less than an hour and
a half. “Italo is the newer, more
stylish private train company,
offering better service and internet than the state-run company,”
says luxury tour operator Dino
Triantafillou, who arranged part
of Katy Perry’s July visit.
Helicopter service Hoverfly provides speedy travel in Italy, and
in Venice, Triantafillou books the
Moa luxury limo boat, with “freeflowing champagne for VIPs.”
68
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
1 The Rosewood at Castiglion del
Bosco in Tuscany, with its 17th
and 18th century farmhouse villas
and a rare 18-hole private course,
is where Paul McCartney marked
his 70th birthday. 2 Lounge at
Hotel Lungarno. 3 In addition to
Dan Brown, Orlando Bloom
vacationed at Villa Mangiacane.
4 Ischia’s Regina Isabella. 5 Villa
Meravigliosa at Borgo Egnazia
in Puglia, where Madonna rode a
white horse into her birthday
party in August and Netflix film
head Scott Stuber has stayed.
Jet owners, take note: Ampugnano, a private airport in
Tuscany, “opened this year and is
closer than Grosetto — fantastic service,’’ says Sienna Charles
travel expert Jaclyn Sienna India.
Where to stay, what to do
VENICE George Clooney is such
a frequent visitor to Cipriani
(Giudecca, 10; from $902), which
has one of the City of Water’s
8
2
3
6
7
ROSEWOOD: MATTEO CARASSALE. LUNGARNO: JANOS GRAPOW. MANGIACANE, FOUR, PACIFICO, BORGO, REGINA, AMAN:
COURTESY OF SUBJECT. ARNETT: EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES. SHER: JASON KEMPIN/GETTY IMAGES FOR MTV.
4
few pools, canal views and
private docks, that he created
two drinks with the bartender;
Steven Spielberg, Harrison Ford
and Uma Thurman have been
guests. “I stayed there when we
shot Contagion,” says Activision
Blizzard Studios’ Stacey Sher.
“Gwyneth Paltrow liked their
tomato sauce so much, she got the
recipe. She had just started Goop,
and she posted it.” Clooney threw
his wedding reception, attended
by Matt Damon, Bill Murray and
Emily Blunt, at
onetime palazzo
Aman Venice (Calle
Tiepolo Baiamonte,
1364; from $2,173),
Sher
which features ornate
fireplaces and soaring frescoed
ceilings amid sleek design.
Former owners “the count and
countess” still live on the top
floor, says Destination Happiness
travel guru Melissa Schwartz
6 Four Seasons Hotel in
Florence. 7 Tamal de chocolate
at Pacifico restaurant in Rome’s
Palazzo Dama. 8 A terrace
view at Aman Venice. “This was
the noble family’s house,”
says travel expert Schwartz.
5
(201-314-3633), who adds that the
hotel has a secret entrance with
“access to the Rialto Bridge and its
fabulous market.’’ The hotel’s new
restaurant with garden is “very
private, and each room has a different mood,” says India.
Natalie Portman, Salma Hayek
and Yoko Ono managed to find
off-the-beaten-track Antiche
Carampane (Rio Tera de le
Carampane, 1911), one of Venice’s
oldest family-run trattorias
whose grilled octopus and
pasta with spider crab stand
out. At Centrale (Calle Piscina de
Frezzaria, 1659/B), a supper club
in a 15th century palazzo, the
menu comes on an iPad; Spike
Lee has been spotted here. Be
sure to stroll through the Peggy
Guggenheim Museum (Dorsoduro,
701-704), says producer and manager Jane Rose, currently in Italy
with The Rolling Stones: “I’m in
love with the collection.”
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
ROME Jay McInerney recommends
the intimate La Posta Vecchia
(Palo Laziale, Ladispoli; from
$386). “It’s just outside Rome, on
the sea and close to the airport,
so it’s perfect if you are leaving on
a cruise or flight,” he says. Hotel
Eden (Via Ludovisi, 49) has been
freshly renovated to include walkin rain showers in its suites. “We
put top Hollywood producers”
in the Bellavista Suite ($1,600),
which has spectacular city views,
says India (she also recommends
Hotel de Ricci, Via della Barchetta,
14; from $446), because “our
Hollywood clients can take over
the hotel”). In April, director
George stayed at contemporary
classic De Russie (Via del Babuino,
9; from $857). “They even helped
me find a butcher,” he says. “The
first time I was there, the Ocean’s
Twelve crew had taken the whole
roof and top floor.” Former family
home Palazzo Dama (Lungotevere
69
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
Arnaldo da Brescia, 2; from $415)
is popular with Oscar-nominated
scribe Richard LaGravenese: “It
has a courtyard bar with magnificent architecture, a perfect place
to meet friends for cocktails.’’
The Americans producer Joel
Fields reports that his family
starts the day at Tazza d’Oro
cafe: “You get your daily shot of
espresso in a cloud of shaved
ice and whipped cream.” A new
branch of the London restaurant
Zuma opened last spring
(Via della Fontanella di Borghese,
48), says concierge company
Quintessentially’s Benjamin Le
Hay, who adds, “restaurants in
Rome can feel stodgy, but this
modern place has taken off with
our clientele.” Quentin Tarantino
and Jamie Foxx are patrons of
longtime treasure Pierluigi
(Piazza de’Ricci, 144), which specializes in seafood straight from
the ports. LaGravenese says about
L’Antico Porto (Via Federico Cesi,
36): “You feel like you are walking
into someone’s home; it has the
most incredible spaghetti vongole.
We had a raw fish antipasto that
was insane.”
For culture, “Il Kino (Via
Perugia, 34) boasts an outdoor
cinema showing classic and
experimental movies and half a
dozen truly great food stands,’’
says Paul Haggis. “If you want to
drink wine with young Italian
filmmakers, you will find them
[here].” He adds that Jerry
Thomas Speakeasy (Vicolo Cellini,
30) “is my favorite bar, where the
cocktails are made from ridiculously fresh ingredients. You can
try using my name to get in, but
it probably won’t work.’’ Fields
loves the Pantheon, which “looks
like another old Roman building,
but inside is one of the most aweinspiring rooms in the world.”
TUSCANY During the shooting
of 2016’s Inferno, Dan Brown and
Tom Hanks rented the extremely
private Villa Mangiacane (Via
Faltignano 4; from $222), built in
the 15th century with views of
Florence and an indoor pool for
rainy days. Once the historic castle of director Luchino Visconti,
the 4,200-foot Castello di Casole
(Localita Querceto, Casole D’Elsa;
from $650) has been transformed into an oasis complete
with a pool on a hill overlooking
Style
Travel
1 Rome’s Hotel
Eden of the
Dorchester includes
rooms that were
once home to Ingrid
Bergman and John F.
Kennedy as well
as this Villa Medici
Presidential Suite.
2 Tuscany’s Castello
del Nero Hotel &
Spa. 3 Sunset dining
at Hotel Caesar
Augustus, located at
one of Anacapri’s
highest elevations.
1
a valley of vineyards, a spa and
three restaurants (farms with
spectacular homes are available
for purchase starting at $6.5 million). According to India, top
producers book the master suite
deluxe with private pool at Hotel
Il Pellicano (Localita Sbarcatello;
from $503), perched on a coastal
cliff: “During the day, they take a
boat out to Isla di Giglio for lunch
and swimming.” Canton says
he and Amanda Seyfried stayed
at Hotel Adler Thermae (Str.
Di Bagno Vignoni, 1; from $317)
on a shoot: “It’s in the middle
of nowhere and a very serious
spa with thermal baths.’’ James
Cameron, Justin Bieber and Pink
are all fans of Michelin-starred
Castello del Nero Hotel & Spa (Str.
Spicciano, 7; from $529), which
uses indigenous ingredients in
its therapies.
In bordering Umbria, new multimillion-dollar villas have just
been unveiled to buy or rent out
from Castello di Recchio (Fattoria
di Reschio, Lisciano Niccone;
$5,900). “They are incredibly well
designed,” says India. “Umbria
is picturesque like Tuscany but
wilder and less manicured.”
ISCHIA Canton, who has chaired
the Ischia Film Festival for the
last decade, says of Regina Isabella
(1 Lacco Ameno; from $232): “This
is the single most extraordinary hotel; I’ve brought so many
friends and colleagues here. We
watch movies in an amphitheater on the sea. One night, Sting,
Andrea Bocelli and Zucchero
started singing impromptu.” The
on-site restaurant, Indaco, is
3
Michelin starred, and the island’s
2,500-year-old spa offers medical
checkups and Botox treatments
along with hot springs and mud
wraps. “The actors come by
speedboat, yacht or helicopter,’’
says Pascal Vicedomini, who runs
the fest. “This summer, everyone
went to St. Tropez for Leonardo
DiCaprio’s party but came right
back till the Venice Festival.’’
CAPRI Jennifer Aniston is among
those who love the easy-in-andout harbor location of wellness
beachfront hotel JK Place (Via
Tragara, 8; from $658), which
provides a Mercedes
or golf cart to zip
guests into town
and a 24/7 concierge.
At no-kids-allowed
Beyonce
Scalianatella (Via
Tragara, 8; from $411), Tony
Bennett sits by the pool and
sketches. Says Le Hay of the Hotel
Caesar Augustus (Via Giuseppe
Orlandi, 4; from $423): “Most
starlets and members of Egypt’s
royal family flock to this exceedingly refined hotel.’’ A trip to
the blue grotto can be moving,
as one guide confides: “When
Mariah Carey got to the grotto,
she started to cry and we saw her
human side.” Aurora restaurant
(Fuorlovado, 18) is known for its
thin-crust pizza and sightings
of Beyonce. “On Aug. 30, Giorgio
Armani was at the next table
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
celebrating his birthday,’’ says
Schwartz, adding that she saw
Valentino at the Terrace at Grand
Hotel Quisisana (Via Camerelle,
2). Christie Brinkley loves Da
Paolino (Via Palazzo a Mare, 11)
for the “best mozzarella, and you
sit under fragrant lemon trees.”
POSITANO/AMALFI COAST The former home of Franco Zeffirelli was
transformed in 2016 into Villa Tre
Ville (Via Arienzo, 30; from $872).
Have the hotel arrange for a boat
to take you to the privately owned
islands of Li Galli for secluded
swimming, suggests Andrew
Saffir, founder of NYC’s Cinema
Society; the “scenery is so idyllic,
you’ll want to pinch yourself.”
Hollywood favorite Le Sirenuse
(Via Cristoforo Colombo, 30;
from $825), frequented by Reese
Witherspoon and CAA’s Jim Toth,
has added an open-air bar called
Franco’s. “It’s very happening,’’
says Schwartz. Geffen, Winfrey,
Diller and Diane von Furstenberg
pulled up to Lo Scoglio restaurant just west of Positano (Piazza
delle Sirene, 15); a menu highlight
is sea urchin and clams. Design
aficionados love the Ceramiche
Cosmolena store in Ravello:
“One of Hollywood’s leading
ladies made a special trip to this
ultimate ceramic store,’’ reports
Ovation Travel’s Judy Stein.
SARDINIA Regarding Cala di Volpe
(Costa Smeralda, Porto Cervo;
70
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
from $412), “Michael Jordan was
there Aug. 24 doing photos with
everyone,” but stars “who want to
hide away go to their sister property, Patrizza” (Costa Smeralda;
from $397), says Schwartz about
the hotel with private pools, villas
carved into the mountainside
and a helipad. For unique dining,
Ristorante Giagoni in Piazza San
Pantaleo (Piazza Della Chiesa,
6) is “a five-star restaurant on
the mountain, a hidden gem,”
says Schwartz. “It’s in an artisan town, and you have to know
about it.”
MILAN “We just sent a major
actress from L.A. to this newly
upgraded hotel, and she was
extremely happy,” says Le Hay of
Hotel Townhouse Galleria Milano
(Via Silvio Pellico; from $845),
which sports a private entrance.
“If someone wants special lychees
in a drink at 2 a.m., they will
come up with them.’’ Insiders
seek out the upscale power dining of Ristorante Cracco (Via
Victor Hugo, 4). “The chef is a rock
star; it’s a moment in Milanese
culinary history,” notes Le Hay.
FLORENCE At the family-friendly
Four Seasons (Borgo Pinto, 99),
insiders “favor the private garden suite with floor-to-ceiling
windows in the heart of the city’s
park, with an exclusive view
of the Duomo” (from $986), says
Genuine Access travel specialist
Gen Hershey. Its Michelin-starred
restaurant, Il Palagio, can prepare
a picnic on the property. And the
just-refurbished, low-key Hotel
Lungarno (Borgo S. Jacopo, 14;
from $686) contains Picasso and
Cocteau artwork and two floors
privatized for VIPs. Eat at Enoteca
Pinchiorri (Via Ghibellina, 87),
suggests Le Hay: “People fly in to
have a meal at this gastronomic
temple, but getting them in can
be a challenge.’’
EDEN: NIALL CLUTTON. CASTELLO: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. CAESAR: ALESSANDRA FARINELLI. BEYONCE: DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES.
2
We Proudly Represent These
SUPREMELY TALENTED
SHOWRUNNERS
Recognized by The Hollywood Reporter
SARAH-VIOLET BLISS
JAY DUPLASS
MARK DUPLASS
VINCE GILLIGAN
AARON KORSH
CHRISTOPHER LLOYD
BRUCE MILLER
ROBIA RASHID
SHONDA RHIMES
CHARLES ROGERS
Style
Cheat Sheet to
Europe’s Fall
Fashion Weeks
Collections are paying homage, while the sci-fi sequel is being deemed a must-see:
‘I will be out there on opening day,’ says Opening Ceremony’s Humberto Leon By Booth Moore
hirty-five years after Blade Runner hit the big
screen, Blade Runner 2049, opening Oct. 6,
is the most hotly anticipated fashion film of
the year. The retro-futuristic costumes from the
original — designed by Michael Kaplan and Charles
Knode, on sets conceptualized by visual futurist
Syd Mead — blended 1940s noir and 1980s punk,
creating a gritty-glam aesthetic that still influences
fashion today. Pierre Hardy’s fall Replicante shoe
collection incorporates futuristic shapes and colorblocking, while Raf Simons’ spring 2018 menswear
collection at New York Fashion Week was a rain-gear
and replicant homage in Manhattan’s Chinatown.
Blade Runner 2049 costume designer Renee April
(Arrival, Rise of the Planet of the Apes) admits the pressure was on, saying that director Denis Villeneuve
wanted her to “hint at the same world but push
it further. In the first film, it was raining and dark,
but now it’s raining and snowing and toxic and
brutal.” This led April to focus on protective outerwear, including the coat with an exaggerated collar
that is blade runner Ryan Gosling’s signature piece:
T
↑ From left: The sequel’s Gosling with Joi, played by Ana de Armas;
Hardy Replicante shoe; costume sketch for Joi; and a Simons homage.
“It’s cotton that we laminated and painted over. It’s
indestructible. Sometimes we made things and they
would be too beautiful, so we sent them out to be
destroyed. There is not a lot of beauty in this world.”
Jared Leto may be a fashion flamboyant in real
life, but in the film, the replicant creator’s look is
more cybermonk, she says. “He has 50 of the same
kimono-like garment. He’s the Steve Jobs of this
world.” Mariette, a streetwalker who recalls Daryl
Hannah’s character Pris in the original, is edgier,
wearing a manga-inspired pink plastic and fur coat.
Instead of power shoulders for 2049’s Sean Youngtype character — Luv, played by Sylvia Hoeks — “she
wears very simple lines,” says April. “That’s all for the
story. Sometimes in sci-fi films, the costumes take
up too much space. Here, there’s no fluff.”
Asked if the film’s style will translate to runways,
she says she’s not sure: “When I saw the Raf Simons
collection, it was so strange. Who wants to wear fur
and plastic at the same time in real life?”
Resurrection of an Iconic Costume Designer
→ An architect of classic Hollywood glamour is about to get a second life. On Oct. 10, Adrian
Original will be relaunched with 30 pieces, including evening gowns (below; from $1,900).
Besides creating iconic onscreen looks for The Wizard of Oz’s Judy Garland, The Philadelphia
Story’s Katharine Hepburn and Mata Hari’s Greta Garbo (left), Gilbert Adrian was a fashion
force whose Beverly Hills salon, opened in 1942, outfitted Garbo, Norma
Shearer and Adrian’s wife, Janet Gaynor. “It’s rare in the U.S. to have a
brand with this much legacy,” says founder Kate Silverman, whose family,
with the blessing of the designer’s son Robin Adrian, is bankrolling the
line. Adds brand consultant John Favreau, who is working on the launch:
“We fully expect to be on the awards show red carpet this season.”
For more Hollywood fashion news, go to PretaReporter.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
72
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
The Firths on Milan’s green carpet.
he spring 2018 runway shows in
T Paris, London and Milan that
wrapped Oct. 4 featured several needto-know innovations for Hollywood:
THE NEW GREEN CARPET In Milan, Livia
Firth (wife of Colin) brought stardust
to sustainable fashion, hosting the first
Green Carpet Fashion Awards at La
Scala opera house Sept. 25. “This is the
Oscars of fashion,” the eco-activist
said in praising the artisanal approach
of winners Ermenegildo Zegna and
Brunello Cucinelli to a crowd including
Dakota Johnson, Zoe Saldana, Lauren
Hutton and Giorgio Armani.
FRENCH TRANSPARENCY A new law
passed during Paris Fashion Week had
media types buzzing (beyond rumors
that Lena Dunham is taking over
Glamour, which her rep denied): Any
photoshopped images of models made
to appear thicker or thinner must be
labeled as “photographie retouchee”
(“retouched photograph”). American
photo agency Getty Images no longer
will accept shots that have digitally
altered models’ body shapes.
YABBA DABBA DO! If you notice on the
red carpet in coming months that the
bottoms of skirts and dresses look like
they were gnawed by saber-toothed
tigers, blame it on the Paris runways.
Fashion insiders are calling it the
“Flintstones hem,” as seen at Balmain
and Yves Saint Laurent.
Ragged hems at Saint Laurent.
SIMONS: JP YIM/GETTY IMAGES. SHOE: COURTESY OF PIERRE HARDY. FIRTH: JACOPO RAULE/GETTY IMAGES. LAURENT: ESTROP/GETTY IMAGES. ADRIAN: EVAN MILLER.
GARBO: METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER/PHOTOFEST. BLADE: STEPHEN VAUGHAN/WARNER BROS. SKETCH: COURTESY OF WARNER BROS.
Blade Runner’s a Hit —
on the Fashion Runways
PROUDLY
CONGRATULATES
OUR 2017 POWER SHOWRUNNERS
VINCE GILLIGAN
& PETER GOULD
SCOTT M. GIMPLE
© 2017 AMC Network Entertainment LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Thank You
AFI BOARD OF TRUSTEES
AFI BOARD OF TRUSTEES
CHAIR
Ì
Sir Howard Stringer
AFI BOARD OF DIRECTORS
CHAIR
Robert A. Daly
Rulemaker, Inc.
Michael Lynton
Snap Inc.
Gabrielle Carteris
SAG-AFTRA
Ì
AFI BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Nancy Fisher
VICE CHAIRS
Jack Gao
Wanda Cultural
Industry Group
Ì
Jon Avnet
Brooklyn Films
Ì
Richard Frank
Ì
Marshall Herskovitz
The Bedford Falls Company
Ì
Tom Pollock
The Montecito
Picture Company
Ì
Edward Zwick
The Bedford Falls Company
TRUSTEES
Brad Anderson
AFI National Council
Neal Baer
Baer Bones, Inc.
Ì
Jeanine Basinger
Wesleyan University
Halle Berry
Ì
Gary Birkenbeuel
Ernst & Young LLP
Roger Birnbaum
Cave 76 Productions
Ì
Bryan Lourd
Creative Artists Agency
James L. Brooks
Gracie Films
Christopher J. Dodd
Motion Picture Association
of America
Ì
Richard Brandt
Eva Longoria
Jim Breyer
Breyer Capital
Lori McCreary
Revelations Entertainment
Ron Meyer
NBCUniversal
Dr. Carla D. Hayden
Library of Congress
Jim Moffatt
Deloitte Touche
Tohmatsu Limited
William Wang
VIZIO
Leslie Moonves
CBS Corporation
Hayma Washington
Television Academy
Edward James Olmos
Kazuo Hirai
Sony Corporation
Cecilia DeMille Presley
Cecil B. DeMille Foundation
Ì
Gene F. Jankowski
Jankowski Communication
System, Inc.
Kathleen Kennedy
Lucasfilm Ltd.
Scott Keogh
Audi of America, Inc.
Ì
FOUNDING DIRECTOR
Ì
George Stevens, Jr.
PRESIDENT EMERITA
Kevin Reilly
Turner Entertainment
Jean Picker Firstenberg
Shonda Rhimes
Shondaland
PRESIDENT & CEO
Jay Roach
Everyman Pictures
Rich Ross
Discovery Channel
Ì
Ì
Bob Gazzale
HONORARY TRUSTEE
Diane Keaton
Ì
Debra L. Lee
BET Networks
Jill Sackler
Dame Jillian &
Dr. Arthur M. Sackler
Foundation for the Arts
Sciences and Humanities
Lori Lee
AT&T Inc.
Josh Sapan
AMC Networks Inc.
Donna Langley
Universal Pictures
Steven Spielberg
Amblin Partners
Ì
Frederick S. Pierce
The Frederick S. Pierce Co.
Ì
Stacey Snider
20th Century Fox
Todd Wagner
2929 Entertainment
John Hendricks
Discovery Communications
Alan Horn
Walt Disney Studios
Chris Silbermann
ICM Partners
Kevin Tsujihara
Warner Bros.
Jonathan Miller
Advancit Capital
Jim Gianopulos
Paramount Pictures
Ted Sarandos
Netflix
Ì
AFI Board of Directors
Thank You
AFI TRUSTEES EMERITI
AFI CHAIRS EMERITI
Gregory Peck
Roger L. Stevens
Charlton Heston
Richard Brandt
Bonita Granville Wrather
Gene F. Jankowski
Frederick S. Pierce
Tom Pollock
Jon Avnet
John F. Cooke
AFI TRUSTEES EMERITI
Amy Pascal
Vivian Sobchack
James Kimsey
Charles Peebler Jr.
T.G. Solomon
Patricia Kingsley
Arthur Penn
Aaron Spelling
Richard Gallop
Arthur Knight
William L. Pereira
Michael Spindler
Helen Stansbury
Steven Broidy
Ava Fries
Francis Keppel
David Brown
Charles Fries
Dan Burke
Michael Fuchs
John Calley
Mark Canton
Emanuel Gerard
Howard W. Koch
Eleanor Perry
George Chasen
Dolly Gillin
Barbara Kopple
Ted Perry
Dawn Steel
Alfred A. Checchi
Ina Ginsburg
John Korty
Daniel Petrie
Charles A. Steinberg
Peter Chernin
Marvin Goldman
Alan Ladd Jr.
Dan Petrie Jr.
Bunny Stivers
Henry Cisneros
Samuel Goldwyn Jr.
Melvin R. Laird
Barbara Phillips
Harriet Stuart
Martha Coolidge
Douglas Gomery
Sherry Lansing
Arnold Picker
Gordon Stulberg
Joan Ganz Cooney
Mark Goodson
Mary W. Lawrence
David Picker
Robert Sturm
Karen Cooper
Larry Gordon
Richard Leacock
Frank Pierson
Donald Sutherland
Peggy Cooper Cafritz
Edward Grebow
Warren Lieberfarb
Henry Plitt
Anne Sweeney
Francis Ford Coppola
J. Ronald Green
Jack Lemmon
Sidney Poitier
Barbara Tannenbaum
Berle Adams
Bruce Corwin
David Greenblatt
Joseph E. Levine
Tony Ponturo
Daniel Taradash
Merv Adelson
Sherill Corwin
Brad Grey
Suzanne Lloyd
Frank Price
Brandon Tartikoff
Chris Albrecht
John Costello
Philip Guarascio
Peter Lund
Michael Pulitzer
Liener Temerlin
Shana Alexander
Cathy Coughlin
Peter Guber
David Lynch
David Puttnam
Anthony Thomopoulos
Debbie Allen
John Culkin
Andre Guttfreund
Shirley MacLaine
Joan Ransohoff
William. F. Thompson
Herbert Allen
Massimo d'Amore
Dee Dee Halleck
John W. Macy Jr.
Robert Rehme
Grant Tinker
Joel Resnick
Helene Tobias
Gil Amelio
William Daniels
John Hancock
David Mallery
Maya Angelou
Martin S. Davis
Sidney Harman
Frank Mancuso
David Rips
Thomas Tull
John Antioco
Suzanne de Passe
Salah M. Hassanein
Brad Martin
Victoria Riskin
Cicely Tyson
John DiBiaggio
Larry Herbert
Marsha Mason
Jeff Robinov
Robert Wagner
Anna Bing Arnold
Lisa Arpey
Barry Diller
D. Heriard Dubreuil
Richard Masur
Henry C. Rogers
Richard Walsh
Elizabeth Ashley
Garth Drabinsky
Alan Hirschfield
David Matalon
Wayne Rogers
John Warnock
Ted Ashley
Bill Duke
Dustin Hoffman
Guy McElwaine
Kelly Rose
John Wells
Norbert T. Auerbach
Tracey Edmonds
Ken Howard
Donald H. McGannon
Frank Rosenfelt
Peter Werner
Paris Barclay
Michael Eisner
Dawn Hudson
Harry McPherson
Paul Roth
Richard J. Whalen
Sidney Barlow
William Ellinghaus
Gale Anne Hurd
Barry Meyer
Tom Rothman
Roy B. White
Ting Barrow
Ari Emanuel
Robert Iger
Edward H. Meyer
Lois Saffian
James A. Wiatt
Patricia Barry
Ed Emshwiller
Cheryl Boone Isaacs
Bernard Meyerson
T.W. Sarnoff
Billy Dee Williams
Joan Barton
Roger Enrico
Alan Jacobs
Ronald W. Miller
Andrew Sarris
Irwin Winkler
Scott Sassa
Robert Wise
Katherine J. Bayne
Robert Evans
Leo Jaffe
Walter Mirisch
Warren Beatty
Raymond Fielding
Jon Jashni
Carole Mitchell
Franklin J. Schaffner
David Wolper
David Begelman
Freddie Fields
Deane F. Johnson
Phil Molyneux
Arthur Schlesinger Jr.
Bob Wright
Bob Bennett
Robert L. Fitzpatrick
Robert Johnson
Wendi Murdoch
John A. Schneider
Michael Wright
Charles Benton
Christopher Forman
Larry Jordan
Janet Murray
George Seaton
Frank Yablans
Jeff Berg
Michael Forman
Vernon E. Jordan Jr.
Michael Nesmith
Daniel Selznick
Alex Yemenidjian
Allen Bernstein
Richard Fox
Marvin Josephson
Mace Neufeld
John Shaffner
Bud Yorkin
James Billington
Stephen O. Frankfurt
Fay Kanin
Paul Newman
Robert Shaye
Paul Ziffren
Richard L. Bloch
M.J. Frankovich
Lawrence Kasdan
Rick Nicita
Jack Shea
Fred Zinneman
Daniel J. Boorstin
A. Alan Friedberg
Jeffrey Katzenberg
Richard Orear
Marc Shmuger
Jeff Zucker
Todd Bradley
William Friedkin
Jerry Katzman
Michael S. Ovitz
Fred Silverman
Hart (left), star of YouTube series What
the Fit?, with Kyncl at Brandcast on May 4.
There’s certainly not room for half-hearted
programming plays in 2017. With nearly 500
scripted series expected this year, breaking
through all that clutter isn’t easy. A common
refrain as these new buyers take meetings is
that each is looking for its Game of Thrones
— an all-audience, brand-defining megahit.
What that means for each platform is starting to come into focus. While Apple has been
on the hunt for a big-budget drama from the
likes of A-list creators Ryan Murphy or Vince
Gilligan, Facebook is taking a more measured approach — saving Nicole Byers’ MTV
comedy *Loosely Exactly Nicole from cancellation and ordering low-budget series from
such longtime partners as BuzzFeed and
Refinery29.
Where does all this leave YouTube, the site
that launched the streaming age in 2005 with
user-generated cat videos but now wants to
be taken seriously as a prestige subscription
destination? During a recent visit with THR at
Google’s Mountain View campus in Northern
California, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki laid
out her multipronged offensive: a slate of
ad-supported unscripted originals from such
names as Demi Lovato (see sidebar), Ryan
Seacrest and Ellen DeGeneres, coupled with a
scripted push for YouTube Red that combines
2
1
3
1 Macchio (left) and Zabka announced Cobra Kai at the TCA Summer Press Tour.
2 The cast of Step Up: High Water. 3 Rhett & Link star in the Red series Buddy System.
4 This Is Everything: Gigi Gorgeous premiered in January at Sundance.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
78
O C T OBE R 4, 2017
PREVIOUS SPREAD, PROP STYLING BY MAT GIBILISCO AT AUBRI BALK. LOVATO HAIR BY AHN CO TRAHN AT TRACEY MATTINGLY, MAKEUP BY JILL POWELL AT DEW BEAUTY AGENCY. WOJCICKI
HAIR AND MAKEUP BY CASSIE CHAPMAN. DANIELS HAIR AND MAKEUP BY ERICA CAMARENA AT AUBRI BALK. THIS SPREAD, HART: NOAM GALAI/FILMMAGIC FOR YOUTUBE. MACCHIO:
FREDERICK M. BROWN/GETTY IMAGES. GORGEOUS: GARY GRIFFIN/COURTESY OF SUNDANCE. STEP: COURTESY OF YOUTUBE ORIGINALS. RHETT: COURTESY OF MYTHICAL ENTERTAINMENT.
Days before Morgan Spurlock debuted his
anticipated Super Size Me sequel at the
Toronto Film Festival, the documentary
already was drawing buyer interest. Netflix
made a play for Spurlock’s poultry industry exposé, per sources. Hulu and CNN also
were said to be in the mix, but a surprising
distributor quickly rose to the top: YouTube.
The lights had just dimmed on Super Size
Me 2: Holy Chicken’s Sept. 8 world premiere
when THR reported that the streamer would
pay $3.5 million for the documentary, committing to a theatrical release and a hefty
marketing spend. “YouTube made the most
sense for what I wanted to accomplish with
this film,” says Spurlock, who is said to have
left millions on the table to work with the
Google-owned video hub and its 1.5 billion
monthly viewers. “You don’t make movies to
sit on a shelf and collect dust. You want them
to actually be enjoyed by as many people
as you can. And their plan is to make this a
noisy partnership.”
Indeed, when Super Size Me 2 debuts on
YouTube Red, the company’s $10-a-month
streaming service, in 2018 after a run in
theaters (a distribution partner hasn’t been
chosen yet), it will front a small but growing
slate of films — among them a documentary
from rapper Warren G and a special starring
Katy Perry — that YouTube global head of
original content Susanne Daniels is hoping
will help turn the world’s biggest repository
for web video into an arbiter of taste and
culture, a player in both the Oscar and Emmy
races. “I want the movies that we’re buying to
be buzzy and have something provocative to
say,” says Daniels, a career television executive
who joined YouTube in 2015 to lead its original
content push. “It’s easier to support films the
right way when they have a really loud and
strong point of view.”
That YouTube execs were trolling Toronto
for the next big indie hit says a lot about the
rise of streaming video services over the past
few years. An arms race among cash-rich new
players — led by Netflix and Amazon and now
including Hulu, Apple, Facebook and, yes,
YouTube — has electrified the content business as legacy distribution models continue
to fracture (see the 25-year low in box-office
attendance this summer). The shift is redrawing the hierarchy of the television industry,
where all five broadcast networks saw a
decline in total viewers last season while the
streamers committed about $20 billion to
programming delivered without a cable subscription. This summer, Apple poached Sony
TV’s top execs Zack Van Amburg and Jamie
Erlicht to help it spend $1 billion making the
kinds of shows (The Crown, Breaking Bad) that
they once sold to networks. Netflix snapped
up uber-producer Shonda Rhimes from
ABC with an estimated $100 million deal.
And Facebook announced its new video
destination along with deals with dozens of
production and publishing companies.
If there’s one thing that Netflix’s House of
Cards, Amazon’s Transparent and Hulu’s drama
series Emmy winner The Handmaid’s Tale have
shown, it’s that it only takes one big hit to
earn Hollywood’s respect and, in many cases,
a subscriber’s credit card information. “If you
can offer talent the same level of fame and
exposure and pay them the same — if not more
— than they get elsewhere, you can get access
to anybody,” says BTIG media analyst Richard
Greenfield. “There are no barriers anymore.”
Perhaps, but for every Netflix or Hulu,
there is an Xbox Entertainment Studios or a
Yahoo Screen or an Intel Media, all of which
were scrapped after pricey launches. Even
YouTube has been here before with its shortlived initiative to offer as much as $5 million
up front to everyone from Ashton Kutcher to
Jay Z to create their own “channels.” But the
latest investments have the Hollywood talent
community salivating. “The commitment of
resources seems to indicate that this is a longterm game,” says Joe Cohen, co-head of CAA’s
TV department. “It’s the most exciting time
we’ve been in because of how much opportunity there is.”
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
1
Размер файла
87 490 Кб
Теги
The Hollywood Reporter, journal
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа