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The i Newspaper – March 06, 2018

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S H O R T L I S T E D
–
N E W S PA P E R
O F
T H E
The inclusive Oscars?
Y E A R
Jenny Eclair
The real genius
in the White
House
l Maisie’s big night l V for Oldman
P15
Where next for
British cycling?
P5
P54
Renegade
Russian spy
‘poisoned’
on UK street
TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
Number 2,271
News.co.uk
» One of Britain’s
most important
double agents found
critically ill near
shopping centre
» Police scramble to identify
Doughnut
economics
The woman
who will make
you rethink
our world
P30
i@inews.co.uk
@theipaper
theipaper theipaper
mysterious substance
» Echoes of Litvinenko will
further strain Moscow ties
Thrilling
United
comeback
takes points
at Palace
Patrick
Cockburn
reports
from
Syria
P50
P22
PLUS SPEAKERS FOR SCHOOLS
P6
P13
I TV GUIDE
May pledges to end
rough sleeping
P4
FA chief’s Nazi gaffe
P56
P28
I SIMON KELNER
P18
I PUZZLES
P44
The
News
Matrix
POLICE
How is Harry
going from
Styles to
fashionista?
See p.17
The day at
a glance
TUESDAY
6
MARCH
Quote of the day
GENERAL GEORGE
PATTON
SOCIETY
HEALTH
JUSTICE
COURTS
Flu patients filled
5,000 beds a day
Gang members face
high-security jails
‘Troubled’ teenager
in unsuitable unit
Plans to convert shipping containers
to make accommodation for the
homeless have been approved by
councillors in Wrexham. Plans for
four containers converted to create
temporary accomodation including
a double bedroom, kitchen, toilet
and shower room were passed
unanimously yesterday.
Patients with flu or norovirus could
fill 10 hospitals, the head of the NHS
in England has said. Simon Stevens
said the illnesses have put “real
pressure” on the health service over
the winter. Five thousand beds a
day have been needed to care for
people with these conditions – the
equivalent of 10 acute hospitals.
Prisoners with gang links could be
transferred into higher-security jails
under plans to cut off the influence
of criminal kingpins. Justice
Secretary, David Gauke, is looking at
a change to rules on where inmates
are held in an effort to halt the flow
of contraband including drugs and
mobile phones.
A “troubled” 16-year-old girl will
have to wait more than a month
before she can be admitted into a
secure accommodation unit because
of the lack of placements available,
a court has heard. The teenager,
who cannot be identified for legal
reasons, is currently being housed in
an unsuitable unit in Wales.
UNITED STATES
A Democrat who helped overturn
assault weapon bans before being
ousted as Ohio’s attorney general
has said he “was in the pocket of the
National Rifle Association (NRA)”
to protect his political career and
now regrets it. Marc Dann urged
elected officials to live by their
principles in future.
Efforts to reduce gender stereotyping continue
apace but divides between women and men can
still be seen in our purchasing patterns. Women
in the UK, for example, are far more likely than
men to decide what clothes to buy for themselves,
whereas men tend to be more open to "guidance",
figures show. And men are still more likely to
take the decision on what car to buy.
SOCIETY
Holding
the purse
strings
Percentage of people surveyed saying they personally make
purchasing decisions in the following categories, by gender.
Female
Male
Birthdays
Anniversaries
Friday 6 March 1970
The Government unveils
an indefinite ban on the
importation of domestic
pets following the death
from rabies of a dog called
Sessan in Newmarket. The
animal was imported from
Pakistan and freed from
quarantine in November.
Subscribe to i at
i-subscription.co.uk
i
91%
The List
The ailments that
stop us travelling
One third of UK holidaymakers
say they struggle to get travel
insurance, with 60 per cent of this
group reporting that this is due to
a pre-existing medical condition, a
poll has found. These are the preexisting medical conditions that
most commonly restrict travel,
according to the survey.
Previously diagnosed with cancer
Diabetes
High or low blood pressure
Chronic pain
People who take prescribed
medication
Previously suffered a heart attack
High cholesterol and taking statins
Arthritis
Asthma
Angina
POLL: CO-OP TRAVEL INSURANCE
Clothing, shoes, accessories
67%
34%
56%
Toys & baby products
69%
Furniture & household goods
39%
65%
A man has been arrested in Los
Angeles for stealing Frances
McDormand’s Oscars statuette after
the Academy Awards. Terry Bryant,
47, was arrested on Sunday night
on suspicion of “grand theft”. Police
say the Oscar was allegedly stolen
during the Governors Ball after the
awards ceremony. PAGE 5
Property
58%
60%
65%
67%
£
Media (video, music, games)
67%
Finance & insurance,
telecommunications &
electricity provider
42%
58%
index
Consumer electronics
Cars, motorcycles, bicycles
SOURCE: STATISTA GLOBAL CONSUMER SURVEY 2018
Newspapers support recycling
The recycled content of UK
newspapers in 2015 was 71%
McDormand’s Oscar
stolen within hours
44%
Household appliances
78%
Crossword.............22
TV & Radio...........28
Nature.......................32
Business.................40
Puzzles.....................44
Weather...................47
China’s defence budget will rise
by 8.1 per cent to 1.1 trillion yuan
(£130bn) this year as it prepares to
launch its second aircraft carrier,
integrate stealth fighters into its
air force and utilise missiles able
to attack targets at vast distances.
China has the world’s second-largest
defence budget after the US.
UNITED STATES
Daily consumer goods
23%
CHINA
2018 defence budget
increases to £130bn
82%
65%
73%
Kiki Dee, singer, 71;
Shaquille O’Neal, retired
basketball player, 46;
David Gilmour, musician,
72; Alan Davies, comedian,
52; Guy Garvey (below),
singer, 44
A new head of counter-terrorism
policing in the UK has been
appointed, Scotland Yard said.
Neil Basu will become head of the
Metropolitan Police Specialist
Operations unit when Assistant
Commissioner Mark Rowley retires
later this month.
Shipping containers
will house homeless
Ex-attorney general
was ‘in NRA’s pocket’
The object of war is not
to die for your country
but to make the other
bastard die for his
Scotland Yard names
terrorism specialist
ZIMBABWE
Mugabe supporter
forms new party
A former army brigadier who quit
Zimbabwe’s ruling party in protest
at the removal of Robert Mugabe
has formed a new political party.
Ambrose Mutinhiri met Mr Mugabe
before announcing he had formed
the National Patriotic Front. Mr
Mutinhiri resigned from parliament
last week.
©Published by Johnston Publications Limited, 2 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0PU, and printed at
Trinity Mirror Printing, St Albans Road, Watford; Hollinwood Avenue, Oldham; and Cardonald Park,
Glasgow. Also printed at Carn Web, Carn Industrial Estate, Portadown. Back issues available from Historic
Newspapers, 0844 770 7684. Tuesday 6 March 2018. Registered as a newspaper with the Post Office.
Select journalism in i is copyright
independent.co.uk and copyright
Evening Standard, beyond those
accredited as such.
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
3
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
ThePage3Profile
EDUCATION
NATHAN SPARLING,
ADOPTION LAW CAMPAIGNER
Library pioneer wins
Book Trust award
Michael Day
A teacher who resurrected a school
library and encouraged families
to write a poetry book has won an
award for inspiring young readers.
Eileen Littlewood, headteacher
at Forthview Primary School in
Edinburgh, has received the Scottish
Book Trust’s Learning Professional
Award. The library had been closed
before Ms Littlewood took up her
post and she secured more than
£10,000 of funding to re-establish it.
Back to the
future for Italy
TRAVEL
Rail commuters
‘taken’ to Australia
Rail passengers recovering from
a week of freezing temperatures
were taken on a trip to a warmer
climate as they returned to work
yesterday. Commuters travelling
from Oxford to London were handed
virtual reality headsets, which
transported them to Australia. The
gadgets enabled Chiltern Railways
passengers to swim with whale
sharks and cycle in a nature reserve.
UNITED STATES
2,600 speeding cases
at one court session
A Rhode Island court was flooded
with people contesting speeding
tickets yesterday after a new schoolzone speed camera resulted in 12,000
tickets in 33 days. More than 2,600
cases were for hearing at Providence
Municipal Court. Many of them
were dismissed because of errors
such as some summons saying the
speed limit was 30mph and others
declaring it to be 20mph.
Family matters?
Nathan Sparling is 27 but just because
he’s an adult, it doesn’t mean he’s
too old to have someone to call “Dad”.
Mr Sparling wants his stepfather
to be allowed to officially adopt
him, but under UK law this is not
currently possible.
Why not?
Current laws permit people only
up to the age of 18 to be adopted. Mr
Sparling, a political adviser, is calling
for Scottish family law to be updated
to permit the adoption of adults such
as himself. He says many people are
not aware what the law says about the
issue until it’s too late.
How long have the pair known
each other?
More than half his life. Nathan was
13 when he met Brian Sparling
(both pictured with Mrs Sparling). “He
married my mum when I was 16
and I feel like we have had the bond
of father and son for 14 years,” the
younger Sparling said in an interview
with BBC Scotland. “I’ll never call
another man dad,” Nathan added.
Was it an immediate bond?
Pretty much. “From the second or
third time I met him I was going along
to the football with him,” Nathan
recalled. “I became a season ticket
holder at Dunfermline and really just
enjoyed spending time with him.”
Nathan now has young twin brothers,
aged four, and feels it is important to
“formalise” his bond with Brian.
What greater compliment...
“Having never grown up with a father
and then having a man come into my
life who treated me as his own, I was
brought into the family very much
as a son, and a grandson, that has
led me to know the love of another
parent,” Nathan said. “It’s about the
legal recognition of a relationship. I
don’t have a father’s name on my birth
certificate. I want it to be seen in the
eyes of the law that he is my dad.”
Katie Grant
FRANCE
€90 fine for on-street
sexual harassment
French interior minister Gerard
Collomb is ready to introduce a €90
fine (£80) for street harassment and
sexist comments. Mr Collomb said it
will be law within months, though he
did not say how it would be enforced.
The fine will cover “comments,
behaviour or pressure of a sexist
or sexual character” that are
degrading, humiliating, intimidating,
hostile or offensive.
Letter from the
Foreign Editor
i@inews.co.uk
In the 1970 and 1980s Italy, one
of Europe’s – and the world’s –
richest and most blessed nations,
was gripped by a strange paranoia
and found itself at the epicentre
of the Cold War’s proxy battles
in Europe. Bombs and bullets
flew in all directions, launched by
Red Brigade terrorists and their
shadow neo-fascist adversaries.
These were the Years of Lead (Gli
Anni di Piombo).
After the unrelenting grimness,
Silvio Berlusconi turned up in
1994, like a leader from another
planet – or at least someone from
the other side of the Atlantic –
and bought the electorate with a
promises of business know-how
and trash TV. Twenty-four years
later, the same Berlusconi, Mafia
friend and tax fraud, still wants to
run Italy. However, Italian voters
rejected him and his Forza Italia
party on Sunday.
Pessimists in Italy fear
something worse is waiting. If
the anti-immigrant Lega, led by
oafish xenophobe Matteo Salvini,
is able to form a government, will
the old left-right street battles
and simmering violence in Italy’s
polarised political landscape be
unleashed again?
Standing between them and
a role in government is the Five
Star Movement, a group of antiestablishment political neophytes,
which inspires little confidence
with its capricious, on-the-hoof
economic policy-making.
Out of this political car wreck
Italy must somehow form
a functioning government.
Hopefully, this will suppress the
worst excesses of the far-right
and keep the speculators from
attacking one of the eurozone’s
weakest links – and crucially,
one of its biggest economies.
Italy’s problems (low growth and
productivity, nepotism and failure
to exploit the new information
revolution) seem as far from
resolution as ever.
Is there a ray of light? Perhaps.
If recent history has taught us
anything, this remarkable country
tends to be as adept as getting out
of ridiculous scrapes as it is in
landing in them.
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4
NEWS
POLITICS
PEOPLE
Turnbull reveals
he has cancer
By Pascale Hughes
The former BBC Breakfast host Bill
Turnbull has revealed he was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the end
of last year.
The Classic FM host, 62, said he
“can’t plan beyond 12 years” because
the cancer has spread to the bone.
He went to went to see a doctor only when long-term aches and
pains which he had put down to “old
age” were no longer being alleviated
with pills.
Turnbull, who left the BBC in 2016,
told Radio Times he hopes going public will encourage other people to get
tested. “Maybe if I’d got it earlier and
stopped it at the prostate, I’d be in a
much better state,” he said.
Turnbull said of being diagnosed:
“All of a sudden you’re in this dark
chasm. That first moment is a real
shell shock You can’t remember the
precise words, you just remember
the hammer blow.”
Theresa May
wants disused
shops turned
into homes FRANK
AUGUSTEIN/PA
May promises to eliminate ‘shame’
of rough sleeping within a decade
By Richard Vaughan
12
m O
on n
th ly
co a
nt
ra
ct
Theresa May described the growing
issue of homelessness in the UK as
a “source of national shame” as she
pledged to eliminate rough sleeping
within the next decade.
The Prime Minister used a major
speech on the housing system to
highlight the plight suffered by those
“forced” to live on the streets.
Speaking in central London yesterday, Mrs May said that just as
Grenfell Tower shone the spotlight
on the failings of the housing sector,
the recent deaths of rough sleepers
“have reminded us of the plight of
those forced to live on the streets”.
“In 2018, in one of the world’s
largest, strongest economies,
nobody should be without a roof
over their head,” she said. “This isn’t
just a British problem – in recent
years homelessness has risen across
Europe – but it is source of national
shame nonetheless.”
The Conservatives have promised
to cut the number of people sleeping
rough in half by 2022, and to eliminate the problem altogether by 2027.
On Sunday, the housing minister
Heather Wheeler said she would
resign if she failed to deliver on her
party’s manifesto pledges.
Mrs May used her speech to warn
developers she would “not rule out
any options” to tackle delays in home
building, as she said there were
“perverse incentives” around the
bonuses paid to bosses.
Irish border US-Canada held up as example
Theresa May told MPs that the
Government was looking at the
customs arrangements between
the US and Canada as a potential
solution to the Irish border issue
post-Brexit.
The Prime Minister said there
would be no return to a hard border
between the Republic and Northern
Ireland, and dismissed suggestions
of a similar boundary in the Irish Sea.
She said: “There are many exam-
ples of different arrangements
for customs around the rest of the
world. Indeed we are looking at
those, including for example the
border between the United States
and Canada.”
When it was later pointed out
that there were “armed customs
guards” between Canada and the
US, Mrs May said the Government
was looking at arrangements “in a
number of countries”.
NHS
As part of the shake-up, the Prime
Minister suggested disused shops
could be converted to homes, and
demanded an increased density of
homes in urban areas.
Tory peer Lord Porter, chairman
of the Local Government Association, criticised the plans and called
for councils to be given the power to
build their own housing.
“The Government must back
calls, including from the Treasury
Select Committee, for council borrowing and investment freedoms to
spark a renaissance in house building by local government,” he said.
Labour’s shadow housing secretary John Healey said: “We’ve heard
hand-wringing on housing from
Theresa May before, but there’s
nothing new here.
“After eight years of failure, it’s
clear this government has got no
plan to fix the housing crisis.”
IT glitch affects
44,000 patients
By Katie Grant
Medical records of tens of thousands
of NHS patients are believed to
have been affected by an IT glitch
that resulted in the loss of some of
their data.
GPs will be forced to review the
records of more than 44,000 records
across 2,500 GP practices in England
following the error, which led to the
loss of vaccination information and
pathology results.
The data loss, reported in the industry publication, Pulse, occurred
when patients registered at clinics
using one of two particular IT systems – SystmOne or EMIS -– moved
to practices that used an alternative
system and then returned back to a
SystmOne or EMIS clinic.
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NEWS
2-27
EQUALITY
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
Oscars in brief
EDUCATION
Use contracts to
ensure gender and
racial diversity,
urges McDormand
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
“I have two words to leave with
you tonight, ladies and gentlemen: inclusion rider,” said Frances
McDormand, after the Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri star
won the Best Actress award.
But the “rider” – a clause that an
actor insists on in their contract that
requires cast and crew on a film to
meet a certain level of diversity – will
only work for A-list stars who have
McDormand’s influence, film industry experts warned.
The phrase was coined in a 2016
TED talk in 2016 by Stacy Smith,
founder of the Annenberg Inclusion
Initiative at the University of Southern California.
Her analysis of 800 films made between 2007 and 2015 found that less
than a third of all speaking roles were
given to girls or women.
“An equity rider by an A-lister
in their contract can stipulate that
those roles reflect the world in which
we actually live,” said Dr Smith,
proposing a fast-track method to increase the representation of women
and minorities on screen.
However, Simon Albury, head
of the Campaign for Broadcasting
Equality, warned: “You need to be in
a pretty powerful position as talent to
insist on an inclusion rider. It is the
broadcasters who should be insisting
on and practising inclusion – especially the publicly-funded BBC.”
Deborah Williams, CEO of Creative Diversity Network, which
monitors the progress of UK broadcasters towards better representation, said: “The rider is a good idea
– but how does it work across groups
beyond gender? It has to complement
other initiatives the British Film
Institute and UK broadcasters
are implementing.”
Ms Williams added that individual
beneficiaries of a rider, who had the
skills but might lack experience on a
film set, could feel under additional
pressure to perform, resulting in a
“hostile work environment”.
A clause committing the BBC
to diversity on and off-screen has
been written into its latest charter.
The BFI Film Fund will only back
films which meet its diversity criteria, which include “the representation and recognition of specific
groups on screen”.
CRIME
Best Actress gong
thief arrested
A man has been arrested for
stealing Frances McDormand’s
Best Actress Oscar after Sunday
night’s Academy Awards.
The star picked up the
coveted gong for her towering
performance as a grieving
mother in Three Billboards
Outside Ebbing, Missouri.
But the statuette was
allegedly stolen during the glitzy
Governors Ball after-party.
Officer Rosario Herrera, a
spokeswoman for Los Angeles
police, said Terry Bryant was
arrested on Sunday night on
suspicion of felony grand theft.
The officer said Mr Bryant had
a ticket for the event.
CAMPAIGN
Watson’s tattoo
misses the point
Chris Overton and Rachel Shenton flank Maisie Sly, six, the profoundly deaf
star of ‘The Silent Child’ at the Academy Awards KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/GETTY
British winner signs Oscar
speech for deaf girl star
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
Frances McDormand used her acceptance speech to encourage the use of
‘inclusion’ clauses in actors’ contracts KEVIN WINTER/GETTY
Maisie Sly, a profoundly deaf sixyear-old from Swindon, celebrated
an Oscar win when The Silent Child, in
which she stars, won the Live Short
Action film category.
Designed to promote the use of
British Sign Language in schools, the
film was written by former Hollyoaks
actress Rachel Shenton, who also
appears, and was directed by her
fiancé Chris Overton.
“I made a promise to our six-yearold lead actress that I would sign this
speech,” Shenton said while accepting the statuette, adding: “My hands
are shaking a little bit so I apologise.”
Maisie was in the audience when
the winner was announced. Overton
told BBC Radio 5 Live: “When we
won I could see her jumping up and
down and that was surreal.”
Ms Shenton added: “She held the
Oscar, she said it was very heavy, she
had her photograph taken with it and
then said she wanted to go back and
see her brothers and sisters, so she’s
keeping it real.”
The £10,000 film, which depicts
Maisie’s character Libby in a world
of isolation until she bonds with a
signing social worker, will now be
screened for MPs at Parliament in
May. Ms Shenton told the i in January
that she hopes to turn the short into
a full-length feature. “I’m working on
the script. People want to see what
happens next,” she said.
PEOPLE
Oldman praises America for ‘wonderful gifts’ it has given him
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
Gary Oldman told his 98-year-old
mother to “get the kettle on” during an emotional acceptance speech
after winning the Best Actor Oscar
for his role playing Winston Churchill
in The Darkest Hour.
The British actor, 59, accepting his
first Oscar, said: “I would like to salute
Sir Winston Churchill, who has been
marvellous company in what can be
described as a fantastic journey.”
The actor donned a fat suit and endured four hours of having prosthetics applied each day to emulate the
war leader’s jowls and imposing gait.
Oldman continued: “I would like to
thank my mother who is older than
the Oscar – she is 99 years young
next birthday and she is watching
the ceremony from the comfort of
her sofa.
“I want to say thank you mother
for your love and support, and get the
kettle on. I’m bringing Oscar.”
Although Oldman referenced his
5
‘I’m bringing Oscar home’: Gary
Oldman won Best Actor REUTERS
South London upbringing, he reserved his praise for his adopted
home. “I’ve lived in America for the
longest time and I’m deeply grateful
to the loves and the friendships I have
made and the wonderful gifts it has
given me. My home, my livelihood, my
family and now Oscar,” he said.
Broadcaster Piers Morgan criticised Oldman, saying: “He basically stood there and was like, ‘I’m
so grateful to America’. Wait, it was
this country that empowered you,
Gary Oldman.”
Emma Watson has shown off her
new Time’s Up tattoo – complete
with grammatical error.
The Beauty and The Beast star,
27, was pictured at the postOscars party in a black sleeveless
dress that showed off a missing
apostrophe on her right arm.
@JosieThomas4 wrote on
Twitter: “I love you but I pray
that tattoo isn’t real.”
But @fairyth0ughts wrote:
“Imagine Emma Watson getting
a tattoo to celebrate a brilliant
movement and the only thing
people can talk about is the fact
an apostrophe was missed.”
It is not known if the tattoo is
temporary or permanent.
SPEECH
Gone in 30 seconds
wins a jet ski
Mark Bridges, who won the
Oscar for Best Costume Design
for the film Phantom Thread, also
won a second trophy.
He won a Kawasaki jet ski
presented by the host, Jimmy
Kimmel, for delivering the
shortest acceptance speech.
It was the second Academy
Award for Bridges, who also won
Best Costume Design in 2012 for
The Artist.
He has also worked on films
such as Boogie Nights, The Italian
Job, The Fighter, Silver Linings
Playbook, Captain Phillips and
Fifty Shades of Grey.
His winning speech was timed
at 30 seconds.
6
NEWS
COVER STORY
Sergei Skripal speaks to his lawyer in a Moscow courtroom in 2006 AP
Russian spy
critically ill
after being
‘poisoned’
in Salisbury
By Cahal Milmo
CHIEF REPORTER
A former Russian intelligence officer
who spied for Britain was last night
critically ill in hospital after possibly
being poisoned.
Sergei Skripal, 66, was one of
the most important British double
agents in Moscow and was brought
to the UK in a spy swap in 2010.
He was found collapsed along with
a woman in her thirties in a shopping
centre in the cathedral city of Salisbury on Sunday afternoon.
Emergency services who attended
the scene initially suspected a link
to the potent opioid fentanyl, a drug
increasingly used by drug addicts.
But the identification last night of
Mr Skripal as one of the casualties represented a dramatic shift in
events – bringing immediate echoes of the murder by poisoning in
2006 of Russian intelligence officer
Alexander Litvinenko.
Wiltshire Police said tests to
identify the substance to which Mr
Skripal and his companion had been
exposed were continuing and it was
not established whether a crime had
taken place. The pair were found with
no visible injuries in the Maltings
shopping centre at 4.15pm on Sunday and were last night critically ill in
intensive care. Mr Skripal is believed
to have been conscious when he was
discovered but his companion was
unconscious and was flown by air
ambulance for emergency treatment.
Temporary Assistant Chief Constable Craig Holden said: “The pair,
who we believe are known to each
other, did not have any visible injuries. They are currently being
treated for suspected exposure to
an unknown substance. Both are
currently in a critical condition in
intensive care.”
Firefighters in protective clothing were called to the scene of the
collapse, where one of the casualties had been sick. The material
was taken away in several layers of
protective material.
More 12 hours after the admission
of the pair, the casualty unit at Salisbury District Hospital was closed
for several hours while an area was
decontaminated by firefighters and
a specialist public health team.
Emergency workers dressed in
forensic suits could be seen working behind screens.
The poisoning of Mr Litvinenko
in a hotel in Mayfair, central London, with the radioactive isotope
polonium caused a major public
health emergency with several
premises and even a British Airway
aircraft subjected to searches and
decontamination.
Mr Skripal, who was a colonel
in the GRU Russian military intelligence service, was sentenced to
13 years’ imprisonment in 2006 for
spying for MI6. He was released in
a spies’ exchange in 2010.
1990: Sergei Skripal, a Russian
military intelligence colonel, starts
passing the identities of Russian
intelligence agents working
undercover in Europe to MI6.
2006: Mr Skripal is jailed in Moscow
for 13 years in for spying for Britain.
2010: Mr Skripal comes to the UK in
a high-profile “spy swap”.
Sunday 4 March 2018, 4.15pm:
Wiltshire Police are told a man
in his sixties and a woman in her
thirties are unconscious on a bench
in The Maltings shopping centre in
Salisbury. They are taken to Salisbury
District Hospital intensive care unit,
5pm: Police arrive at MrSkripal’s
home in Salisbury.
Monday 5 March, 1pm: A major
incident is declared at Salisbury
hospital. The Accident & Emergency
unit is closed for several hours.
7pm: Wiltshire Police say the pair are
known to each other. Public Health
England says its specialists will join
the investigation.
Analysis
Profile Sergei Skripal
Throughout the 1990s, Colonel
Sergei Skripal led a double life as
a Russian intelligence officer by
combining his military duties with
the wholesale passing of Moscow’s
secrets to his handlers in MI6.
Precise details of when Mr
Skripal began working for the Secret
Intelligence Service are unknown
but following the collapse of the
Soviet Union he began providing the
names of Russian agents operating
across Europe to London.
He was eventually tried in 2006,
Russian military prosecutors
claimed he had been paid $100,000
for his services.
The Russians acknowledged he
had caused significant damage to
Moscow’s espionage operations.
In Britain, the intelligence
supplied by Mr Skripal was
highly prized – as an asset he was
considered second only to Oleg
Gordievsky, the KGB colonel who
Timeline From Moscow to a Wiltshire hospital
defected in 1985 and was later
decorated by the Queen.
In 2010, the FBI scored a major
coup by uncovering a network of 11
Russian “illegals” sent under deep
cover to live as Americans.
In an episode straight from the
Cold War, Mr Skripal, who had been
serving his term in Siberia, and
three other Anglo-US spies were
exchanged for group. The handover
took place at Vienna airport.
Mr Skripal and the three others
included in the swap deal were
released only after they formally
admitted their guilt and were then
pardoned by then Russian president
Dmitry Medvedev.
Among those released were Igor
Sutyagin, a Russian arms researcher
and scientist who had protested
his innocence. Dr Sutyagin is
now attached to the Royal United
Services Institute think-tank
in London.
Anglo-Russian relations deteriorating
Richard Vaughan
R
elations between Russia and the UK are as
frosty as the Siberian
winds that blew here
last week. Indeed, just
before Christmas, Russia’s foreign
minister Sergei Lavrov said as
much when he told his UK counterpart Boris Johnson relations
between Westminster and the
Kremlin are at a “very low point”.
Vladimir Putin last week
flaunted his bulging arsenal of
“menacing” superweapons, as he
warned that the West would need
to reckon with a freshly armed
and heavily bolstered Russia.
His posturing comes against a
backdrop of increasing concerns
across Europe that Moscow has
been meddling in recent elections.
Clear evidence was found of
Russian interference in German,
US and Danish elections, while
Mr Johnson stated that attempts
to tamper in recent British
elections, including the EU
referendum, were “unsuccessful”.
Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart
Peach, the chief of the defence
staff, recently raised fears of
Russia’s capability to sever UK
communications. Should this
latest death turn out to be a
copycat of the assassination of
former KGB officer Alexander
Litvinenko, poisoned with
polonium, then Anglo-Russian
relations will be at rock bottom.
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
On 23 November he died. He had
been poisoned with Polonium-210,
which was thought to have been
administered in his tea.
In an interview on 11 November
he said he had been looking into the
assassination of Russian journalist
Anna Politkovskaya.
It was alleged Mr Litvinenko was
also investigating Spanish links to
the Russian mafia and had planned
to fly to Spain with Mr Lugovoi.
The director of public
prosecutions announced in May
2007 he was recommending Mr
Lugovoi be charged with murder.
The CPS also requested the
extradition of Mr Kovtun. Russian
officials refused. Russia, Mr
Lugovoi and Mr Kovtun denied any
responsibility for the death.
Mr Lugovoi is now a Russian
politician and deputy of the state
Duma. Mr Kovtun is a businessman
in Moscow.
An investigator
at the Maltings
shopping centre in
Salisbury yesterday
SOLENT NEWS
Other suspicious cases Russian connections
Businessman Scot Young
claimed he was being targeted by
Russian hitmen after a Moscow
property deal.
It was later claimed the
52-year-old was the ninth in a circle
of friends and business associates to
die in suspicious circumstances.
He died in 2014 after falling from
the window of a central London flat.
Three of Young’s close friends
and business partners, Paul Castle,
Robbie Curtis and Johnny Elichaoff,
all died in apparent suicides before
Young died. They were added
to files allegedly kept by
US spies documenting
possible Russian-related
assassinations.
The files reportedly
named two British lawyers
as possible victims of
Russian hits. Stephen Moss
died of a sudden heart attack in
2003 aged 46, and Stephen Curtis
died in a helicopter crash in 2004.
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
7
RUSSIA
History Litvinenko case
The news that an ex-Russian spy
was hospitalised through exposure
to an “unknown substance” has
echoes of the 2006 case of former
spy Alexander Litvinenko.
An inquiry into Mr Litvinenko’s
death concluded his murder was
“probably” approved by President
Vladimir Putin in part due to
personal “antagonism” between
the pair.
Mr Litvinenko, 43, had been an
officer with the FSB, the successor
to the KGB, but he fled to Britain
in 2000. He became a critic of the
Kremlin and went on to become
a British citizen in 2006. It later
emerged the married father of one
was being paid by MI6.
On 1 November 2006 Mr
Litvinenko took tea with Andrei
Lugovoi and Dmitri Kovtun, who
was also a former Russian agent, at
a central London hotel. He fell ill and
was admitted to hospital (pictured).
IQ
30-39
In 2008, Russian oligarch Boris
Berezovsky’s business partner,
Badri Patarkatsishvili,
died after an apparent
heart attack, as did their
acquaintance Yuri Golubev
who died in 2007.
In 2012 the Russian
whistleblower Alexander
Perepilichnyy died in Surrey
in 2012. In 2013 Berezovsky (inset),
was found dead in his bathroom. An
open verdict was returned.
MPs warned Vladimir Putin’s actions were the start of a new Cold War AP
UK ‘must match what
Putin is doing’
By Jane Clinton
The UK needs to “wake up” to
Vladimir Putin’s “hostile intent”, the
Commons was told yesterday - with
MPs warning of a second Cold War.
Gavin Williamson (inset), the Defence Secretary, warned MPs the UK
needs to “match” what Putin is
doing with Russian forces.
“Putin has made it clear
he has hostile intent towards this country,” he
said. “We’ve been seeing
the build-up of his forces
across the Eastern front...
we have to wake up to that
threat and respond to it.
He added that this can be
achieved “not just through nuclear
weapons but also through conventional armed forces... our continuous
at-sea nuclear deterrent is absolutely
integral to maintaining the peace”.
Mr Williamson said Russia’s “hostile and aggressive posture” towards
the UK, the United States and allies
had been developing for some time
and that Russian activity in the north
Atlantic had experienced a “10-fold
increase over the last few years”.
“Do we sit submissively by... or
do we make it clear we’re not willing to stand up to bullying?” he said.
His warning came after Labour MP
Barry Sheerman challenged him to
make clear what was being done to
protect Britain in the wake of Mr
Putin’s recent boast of “invincible”
nuclear weapons.
Mr Sheerman said: “Surely the
Secretary of State knows that what
Mr Putin announced a few days ago
was basically a new Cold War. And it’s
not just cyber warfare, it’s every
kind of warfare, at a time
when Europe seems to be
fragmenting. What are we
going to do about all this?”
Plaid Cymru MP
Jonathan Edwards echoed Mr Sheerman, warning the world was “sliding
needlessly into a second
Cold War”.
Last week Mr Putin, announced
new weapons including a cruise
missile that can “reach anywhere in
the world”. He challenged the West
to “take account of a new reality”,
comments Theresa May and Donald
Trump deemed “irresponsible”.
In November, Theresa May
said the UK would “do
what is necessary to protect
ourselves” from Russian cyber
attacks. She urged Mr Putin
to retreat from attempts to
“weaponise information”.
NEWS
NEWS
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VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
9
UTILITIES
Big thaw leaves thousands without water
By Aine Fox
Thousands of homes across the UK
face water supply problems after a
thaw led to burst water mains and
leaks. About 13,000 homes are still
without water in Kent and Sussex
while thousands of properties in
Wales and 5,000 homes in London
also have no supply. Parts of the Midlands, south-west England and Scotland are also hit.
Water industry regulator Ofwat
yesterday criticised the water firms
saying their performance had “fallen
well short”.
Suppliers across the country say
teams are working to fix damaged
pipes that have left customers with
no supply or low pressure.
In Wales, about 4,500 customers
are without water, Welsh Water said.
The company, which said it was fixing 200 leaks a day, warned the problems are “likely to continue over the
next few days.”
Yorkshire Water, United Utilities,
Affinity Water, Anglian Water and
Bristol Water also said they were
dealing with problems.
Severn Trent said there had been
a near 4,000 per cent increase in
burst pipe reports. They praised carmaker Jaguar Land Rover for agreeing to stop production in order to
supply water to homes and schools.
South West Water said it has an
“unprecedented number of burst
water mains” and warned some customers in Devon and Cornwall that,
although water can be used, there is
a “noticeable taste”.
Ofwat chief executive Rachel
Fletcher said customers had been
left “high and dry” because of the
water firms’ support and communication. “Water companies
have been warned time and again
they need to be better at planning
ahead to deal with these sorts of
situations. While the recent severe
freeze and thaw have undoubtedly
had an impact on pipes and infrastructure, this weather was forecast in advance.”
In London, customers said they
could not register supply problems
as Thames Water’s helpline was
unavailable.
Scottish Water said weather and
road conditions presented challenges to getting engineers to leaks.
Many parts of the UK were
continuing to recover from
the effects of Storm Emma, with
more than 100 schools in Wales
still shut due to snow.
WEATHER
NATURE
Snowbound
Cumbria gets
RAF lifeline
Dead sea life
litters beaches
after cold snap
By Alexander Britton
By Tom Bawden
ENVIRONMENT CORRESPONDENT
The RAF was called in to take emergency supplies to “extremely isolated” parts of Cumbria after severe
weather wreaked havoc.
The county council said areas including Fellside, South Stainmore
and Alston had been cut off for five
days – and would remain so for another 48 hours – after heavy snowfall and
slow progress in clearing the roads.
A Chinook helicopter dropped supplies, including food, coal, wood and
electrical heaters, during the operation yesterday morning.
Stewart Young, leader of Cumbria
County Council, said: “We have some
communities who have now been
stranded for five days and we have to
do all we can to ensure that they are
safe and well. The depth of snow and
the challenging nature of the terrain
is making progress on clearing roads
exceptionally slow. It will be at least
48 hours before we reach many more
of these communities hence the need
to bring in military assistance and we
are very grateful for their help.”
Weather, page 47
The RAF used a
Chinook helicopter
to deliver supplies
in Cumbria OWEN
HUMPHREYS/PA
TRANSPORT
MPs urged to query weather payments to train firms
By Alan Jones
A union leader has urged MPs to
query in Parliament how much
money train companies have been
given to compensate for problems
caused by the bad weather.
The Rail, Maritime and Transport
union (RMT) criticised the system
under which Network Rail will have
to pay out to private rail companies.
General secretary Mick Cash said:
“The whole racket on our railways
was rigged from the off by the Tories
so that the profits are privatised and
the risks are carried by the public.”
A spokesman for the Rail Delivery
Group said: “These payments are
overseen by the rail regulator which
says that they keep costs down for
taxpayers and farepayers, and they
are completely separate from the
money customers rightly receive
for delays.
“The payments compensate
train operators for lost revenue
when fewer people travel due
to disruption.”
Business, page 42
Thousands of shellfish and other
marine animals were washed up on
UK beaches as the “Beast from the
East” took a heavy toll on sea life.
Beaches on the Holderness coast
in Yorkshire were reportedly ankledeep in crabs, starfish, mussels and
lobsters, most of which are now dead.
Lobsters fared best as locals gathered survivors into buckets ready to
put them back in the sea when the
weather improves.
The three degree drop in sea temperature last week caused animals
to hunker down and reduce their
activity levels, said Bex Lynam, of the
Yorkshire Wildlife Trust.
“They became dislodged by large
waves and washed ashore when the
rough weather kicked in,” she said.
Dolphins and larger animals are
more mobile and can save themselves
by swimming away, Ms Lynam added.
A visitor to Ramsgate beach, Lara
Maiklem, said; “There were starfish
as far as the eye could see”.
Similar scenes were reported on
Hunstanton beach in Norfolk.
10
NEWS
ITALY
GERMANY
League and Five
Star Movement
vie for right to
lead the nation
Merkel eager to
make up for six
lost months
By Frances D’Emilio
T h e l e ad e r o f I t a l y ’s a n t i establishment Five Star Movement
(M5S), Luigi Di Maio, said the party’s
strong showing throughout Italy
means that it should run the next
government, following Sunday’s
inconclusive general election.
Mr Di Maio spoke less than an
hour after the head of the antiimmigrant League made the same
claim on the part of the centre-right
coalition, which collectively has
more votes than the Five Stars.
The assertions underline the difficulties that President Sergio Mattarella will have in choosing someone
to form a government, as neither of
the blocs has enough to govern alone.
As they vied for power former
Italian prime minister Matteo Renzi
resigned yesterday as leader of the
Democratic Party (PD) after the
bruising defeat that saw his party
take less than 20 per cent of the vote.
It was the PD’s worst result since its
creation in 2007, despite it presiding
over a modest economic recovery.
Mr Di Maio said that “we are a
political force that represents the
entire nation”, saying the vote was
“post-ideological.
“It goes beyond the left and the
By Kirsten Grieshaber
IN BERLIN
right” and instead turned on themes
such as immigration and work.
Votes were still being counted yesterday and there was no definitive
breakdown of parliamentary seats.
But M5S appeared to have tripled
the number of parliamentarians
over the last election in 2013.
Meanwhile, the leader of Italy’s
right-wing eurosceptic League said
his party’s surge at the voting booths
was due to its economic proposals,
not just its anti-immigration stance.
Matteo Salvini said the migrant
issue was just “one problem” facing
Italy and that the League has clear
ideas on how to resolve that, in
reference to the EU’s inability to
help Italy handle the migrants who
have flooded into the country.
Five Star
Movement leader
Luigi Di Maio has
seen his party
triple its seats AP
Possible scenarios Italy’s new government
The first would be a populist
government led by the Five Star
Movement (M5S) and supported
by anti-immigrant Lega (formerly
Northern League), whose leader
Matteo Salvini who would
have to dump his erstwhile ally
Silvio Berlusconi.
The second, less likely scenario is a
centre-right government led by Mr
Salvini with a clustering of support
from any defecting members from
M5S and the centre-left Democratic
Party (PD).
Or M5S in combination with the
PD. While more reassuring for the
markets, the PD, which has governed
since 2013, has been the main target
of M5S’s vitriol. But the two parties’
bitter enmity makes this unlikely.
An all-in government. M5M, the
PD and the main centre-right parties
joining together in the best interest
of the country is another option. The
lifespan of such an administration
would probably be about a year.
The other scenarios are caretaker
government and fresh elections,
possibly under a new law designed
to produce a solid majority.
The result is a radically
different political map, with
voters picking the Five Star
Movement (M5S) which easily
beat the governing Partito
Democratico (PD) to become
Italy’s single largest party with
31 per cent of seats in the upper
house of parliament.
And it gave Matteo Salvini’s
right-wing and anti-immigrant
Lega (League) the upper hand
over a diminished Berlusconi
in the three-party centre-right
coalition – which won the most
votes, but not enough to govern.
“These results show that
everyone will need to come talk
to us,” crowed Alessandro Di
Battista of M5S soon after the
polls shut. Final numbers are due
this afternoon.
Along with M5S, Salvini was
the big winner and can now
position himself as the leader of
Italy’s centre-right. The Lega took
18 per cent of seats in the upper
house, compared to 13.9 per cent
for Berlusconi’s Forza Italia.
Together, the Lega and M5S
garnered 49 per cent of seats,
in a resounding slap of protest
against a status quo of slow
economic growth, immigration
and 11 per cent unemployment.
The governing left-wing PD
was the big loser, with its share
of parliamentary seats falling to
19 per cent.
Italy had a hung parliament in
2013, and coalition governments
are the norm. But the task
awaiting Italy’s president, Sergio
Mattarella, who must now steer
Italy’s divided political groupings
towards forming a workable
majority, will test the 77-yearold’s proverbial calm.
That’s because the plan in
the event of a hung parliament
was to form a “large coalition”
government supported by both
Renzi’s PD and a Berlusconi-led
centre right. But that option
has now been thrown out of the
window by voters themselves.
The PD and Forza Italia together
don’t have the numbers to govern
together as they did briefly after
the 2013 election.
It is clear that the Five Star
Movement now becomes a
pivotal player in forming the
next government, and has said
it is open to coalition talks with
a partner who agrees on its
political programme. But since
the PD and Lega don’t want to be
a junior partner to M5S’s leader
Luigi Di Maio, it is unclear who Di
Maio could govern with.
“These election results, if
they are confirmed, clearly
change the political scenario,
creating a new situation posing
problems for all the parties
across the board,” said Stefano
Folli, political commentator
at Rome daily La Repubblica.
“I don’t see the shape of a new
government at this point.”
Talks between the parties to
form a government could drag on
for weeks. The new parliament
sits on 24 March. The current
government remains in place
until then.
The situation is unlikely to
ignite the same fears of financial
instability that followed the 2013
election due to Italy’s high debt
levels, second only to Greece in
the EU, analysts said. For one
thing, the European Central
Bank’s bond-buying policy has
effectively set up a firewall
around Italy.
Analysis
Populists now
a pivotal force
in forming
new coalition
Jennifer Clark
IN MILAN
I
taly’s general election
result suggests populism
in Europe is not on the
wane but live and kicking,
after a surge is support
for anti-establishment groups
crushed the old centre-left and
centre-right parties – but left the
country looking less governable
than ever.
The one clear message from
the electorate was to tell former
prime ministers Matteo Renzi
and Silvio Berlusconi to go home.
Although the final count had
yet to be declared yesterday
afternoon, it was clear that the
poll failed to produce a clear
winner; none of the parties or
coalitions won enough votes
to govern alone.
Silvio Berlusconi proved a divisive
figure during the campaign AP
German Chancellor Angela Merkel
yesterday welcomed the Social Democrats’ vote in favour of a new ruling
coalition and said “it’s important that
as government we start quickly with
our work”.
Ms Merkel spoke to reporters in
Berlin a day after the centre-left
Social Democrats voted overwhelmingly to remain in a coalition with Ms
Merkel’s conservatives, giving her
the support needed to secure a fourth
term as German leader.
Parliament is expected to meet
on 14 March to re-elect Ms Merkel
(inset) as chancellor,
ending the longest
time Germany has
been without a
new government
after
an
election in its
post-war history.
“A l m o s t s i x
months after election day, the people
in Germany have the right
that something is happening and that
we implement what we have said we
would do,” Ms Merkel said.
“Every day we see, every day we
hear that Europe is needed and that a
strong, united voice of Germany and
France and other member countries
is needed,” she added.
In a veiled reference to the United
States under President Donald
Trump, Ms Merkel also cited the
threat of protectionism as well as
trade competition with China and
the war in Syria as challenges the
European Union must face. AP
AUSTRALIA
Cardinal faces
testimony from
abuse accusers
By Judith Vonberg
The most senior Catholic Church
leader to be charged with sexual
abuse has appeared in an Australian
court for a hearing that will determine whether he will face a full trial
by jury.
Cardinal George Pell, 76, faced testimony from his alleged victims, who
spoke to the Melbourne court via
video link.
No details of the complainants or
the crimes, described by police as historical sexual assault offences, have
yet been released to the public.
Testimonies given during the hearing will remain secret.
Cardinal Pell, Pope Francis’ former
finance minister and former archbishop of Sydney, was charged last
June with sexually abusing multiple
people in his home state of Victoria.
The Cardinal denies all allegations
and has said that he intends to return to the Vatican once the criminal
charges are resolved. INDEPENDENT
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
11
PEOPLE
Inventor of wind-up radio,
Trevor Baylis, dies at 80
By Henry Vaughan
The inventor of the wind-up radio,
Trevor Baylis, has died aged 80. He
is believed to have died of natural
causes in his home on Eel Pie Island, south-west London, yesterday morning.
David Bunting, who runs his
company, Trevor Baylis Brands,
said he had been ill for a long time
and had no living relatives. Mr
Baylis, who was appointed CBE for
services to intellectual property
in 2015, had suffered from Crohn’s
disease, Mr Bunting added.
Scotland Yard said his death is
not being treated as suspicious.
Mr Baylis developed the wind-up
radio in 1992 for people who do not
have access to electricity or batteries. He was appointed OBE in 1997.
He was well known for championing the rights of inventors and
was often outspoken about intellectual property rights.
Paying tribute to his colleague,
Mr Bunting said: “He made an
enormous difference as the sole
inventor in this company and did
a tremendous amount to publicise
[the wind-up radios’] role and the
importance of the inventions.”
Speaking of Mr Baylis’s CBE for
his work with the patent office, he
added: “He was always held in very
high regard by them.”
Trevor Bayliss with his OBE and his wind-up radio, in 1997 PA
Sham radio Business rivals took profits
Trevor Baylis received almost none
of the profits from his wind-up
radio because others took advantage of patent laws to sell versions
of his invention.
He was well known for championing the rights of inventors and
was often outspoken about intellectual property rights.
He set up the Trevor Baylis
Foundation to “promote, support
and encourage” the activity of
inventors and engineers”, and
created Trevor Baylis Brands PLC
which provides inventors with
professional partnership and services to help establish the originality
of their ideas, to patent them, and
to get their products off the work
bench and into consumers hands.
He campaigned to make theft
of intellectual property a “whitecollar crime”.
Among his other inventions was
a shoe that recharged the wearer’s
mobile phone as they walked..
CHARITIES
Sex abuse by aid workers reported to watchdog
By Sam Lister
Sexual abuse of children by aid
workers is among the concerns in a
batch of 80 cases of alleged wrongdoing reported to a watchdog in
the past three weeks.
Charities have told the Charity
Commission about a wave of current and historical “serious” cases
of people being harmed or put at
risk of harm.
The reports, made since 12 Feb-
ruary, span 26 organisations and
include allegations or incidents of
sexual abuse of staff, volunteers and beneficiaries,
including children, the
commission said.
Seven of the organisations came forward
with cases that have
been reported since
April 2017.
Penny Mordaunt (inset),
the International Development
Secretary, said it was a “wake-up
call” for the sector and warned it
must act to restore its credibility with the public.
Speaking at a safeguarding summit in
central London, Ms
Mo rd a u n t wa r n e d
predators exploiting
the aid sector there is
“no hiding place”. “We will
find you, we will bring you to
justice. Your time is up,” she said.
LAW
Across
No 2271
Solution, page 48
1
Note a sign of injury
in motor sport (6)
3
Acknowledges place
for hanging’s no
good (6)
4
Tennis player
sounding more
calm (6)
Down
1
We travel around
with bananas in
small numbers (6)
2
Body of water that
could be erased (3,3)
‘Naive’ church
let in abusers
By Jack Hardy
Sexual abuse thrived in the Anglican Church due to clerical
naivety and an “excessive emphasis” on forgiving predators,
the Independent Inquiry into
Child Sexual Abuse has heard.
Public hearings are taking
place this week and Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby
will give evidence.
He was criticised by the
head of the inquiry for breaching confidentiality by telling a
journalist he would appear.
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EDUCATION
CONSUMER
‘You can choose
to be successful,’
£2bn Asos chief
tells students
Modernise
or fail,
retailers
warned
By Chris Green
SCOTLAND EDITOR
Brian McBride is standing in the
middle of a school assembly hall
in Glasgow holding a microphone,
surrounded by pupils. “How much
does your business make?” one asks.
There are audible gasps as he replies:
“About £2bn.”
The 62-year-old Asos chairman
has just finished a talk at Smithycroft
Secondary School in Riddrie organised by Speakers for Schools, telling
pupils how he rose from humble beginnings to become head of one of the
UK’s most successful fashion stores.
Mr McBride is one of more than
30 leading figures from business,
technology and the arts who will be
speaking at schools across the UK
this month, with the aim of inspiring
the next generation to follow in their
footsteps. As official media partner, i
has been given exclusive access to the
talks.
Founded by journalist Robert Peston in 2011, Speakers for Schools aims
to “level the playing field” for state
Mr McBride said his aim in
taking part in Speakers for
Schools was to show pupils there
is “more than one path” in life. “I
think hopefully they can relate a
bit to me being one of them – the
fact that I’ve lived here.”
By Chris Green
SPEAKERS
FOR
SCHOOLS
school pupils by giving them access
to leading figures from across the
UK – many of whom were themselves
state-educated.
Mr McBride grew up only a mile
away from Smithycroft and was one
of eight children, living in council
houses in different parts of Glasgow
throughout his childhood. He later attended Glasgow University and credits his father, a science teacher, for
instilling in him the value of learning.
Yet success in life, he tells the pupils, is “more about attitude than
ability” and qualifications are not
“the be-all and end-all”. Beginning his
career as a door-to-door photocopier
salesman for Xerox, he later worked
for computer giants IBM and Dell
and then the phone firm T-Mobile.
In 2006 he landed a job as head of
Amazon in the UK, leaving in 2011
when he was diagnosed with cancer.
He is now effectively self-employed,
dividing his time between Asos and
other executive positions.
“I think you can choose to be successful,” Mr McBride tells the pupils,
before paraphrasing Thomas Jefferson: “Nothing can stop somebody
with the right attitude – and nothing
can help someone with the wrong attitude. I think it’s very true.”
13
Asos chief executive Brian McBride, speaking at Smithycroft Secondary School
as part of Speakers For Schools MARTIN HUNTER
Programme notes Aims and ambitions
Speakers for Schools was set up to
improve opportunities for stateeducated children. As part of the
scheme, 30 leaders from business,
culture, politics and technology have
agreed to address children in schools
over the next two months.
The programme of talks in schools
across the country is entitled “What
skills will young people need for work
in 2030?” and is highlighted on social
media under the tag #Skills2030.
Speakers will offer motivational
insights and illustrate how it is
possible to rise from humble
beginnings to the top of their sectors.
Among them will be Dr Doug Gurr,
UK country manager at Amazon,
Sir Richard Lambert, chairman of
the British Museum, and Baroness
Martha Lane Fox, founder of
Lastminute.com.
To help children from state schools
get better access to work experience
opportunities, Speakers for Schools
has launched a new programme
called S4SNextGen, putting top
companies in touch with pupils
who may otherwise never have such
an opportunity.
Struggling high street retailers
must “read the writing on the
wall” and modernise if they hope
to survive, the head of one of the
UK’s most successful online clothing stores has said.
Brian McBride, the chairman of
Asos, described the closure of numerous stores over the past few
years as a “Darwinian process”
which was “weeding out the average and the mediocre”.
Speaking to i as the Speakers for Schools project got under
way, the businessman predicted
bricks-and-mortar shops would
never be completely replaced by
online alternatives, but that only
the best would last.
“When you see the people that
went by the wayside – HMV, Woolworths, BHS, Comet – these were
very average, very ordinary stores
that didn’t have the power of either Amazon or the big supermarkets on price,” Mr McBride said.
“They just became mid-sized,
‘me-too’ chains. That is not going
to survive.
“There are still some great
stores out there – Selfridges, Harrods, John Lewis . A lot of people’s
favourite shops are giving customers what they want in terms of the
range and how they treat them
and how they talk to them. That
will survive.”
He added the rise of online
shopping was “inexorable” and
predicted the e-commerce proportion of Britain’s total retail
spend could soon be 40 per cent.
ENVIRONMENT
Head of Met Office resigns after review of ‘governance arrangements’
By Tom Bawden
ENVIRONMENT CORRESPONDENT
The head of the Met Office has resigned following an investigation
into the weather forecaster by an
independent audit committee.
Rob Varley is thought to have left
after an intervention by a top civil
servant following a review of its “governance arrangements and management controls”.
The Department for Business, Energy and Industry and the Met Office
refused to comment further on the
reasons for Mr Varley’s departure.
Nick Jobling, Mr Varley’s deputy,
will take over until a permanent replacement is found.
Last month the Met Office
stopped providing most of the BBC’s
weather information after 95 years;
the broadcaster switched to a cheaper, private supplier. It still provides
the BBC’s severe weather warnings.
“We used to pride ourselves on
being the best weather and climate
service in the world. Now we think
of ourselves as the best in the galaxy,” Mr Varley said in an interview
last month.
The Met Office gets around 85 per
cent of its £230m annual funding
from public sector contracts. Other
big clients include civil and military
aviation, the Environment Agency
and transport.
The organisation gets its data
from 16 radar and 330 monitoring
stations in the UK, plus 19 satellites.
On Saturday, in your
Guy Barter’s seasonal
gardening jobs
Get ahead with your flower
and vegetable sowing
Plus
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COMMENT FROM HOME AND ABROAD
HOUSING
CRISIS
TRUMP
TRADE ROW
NORTHERN
IRELAND
CYCLING AND
DOPING
ITALIAN
ELECTIONS
OSCARS
2018
Britain is
revealed as
an outlier
The President
is at least
consistent
Problems
aren’t down
to Brexit
Calls for
Brailsford
to resign
Taking a step
back from
Europe
McDormand’s
speech won
the night
The Times
The Daily Telegraph
Daily Express
EveningStandard
The Spectator
CNN
Knightsbridge has
overtaken Monaco in
rental levels. Wealthy,
crowded Switzerland
has falling house prices
and lower rents. Most
things people buy
have become more
affordable. The cost of
building a house has
fallen. Yet the price
you pay has gone up
and up.
(Matt Ridley)
In the long run, trade
wars harm everyone.
In Britain, where our
imminent departure
from the EU has
triggered interest
in free global trade,
the impact would be
considerable. America
is a crucial market for
Britain’s steel industry.
(Editorial)
There are, of course,
deep divisions in
Northern Ireland, as
I know only too well,
having been born in
Belfast and grown
up there at the peak
of the Troubles. But
those problems are
nothing to do with
Brexit. They stem
from the reality of two
different traditions
and allegiances.
(Leo McKinstry)
Team Sky was built on
a preachy reputation
for “zero tolerance”.
But it turns out that in
practice this was not
as simple a concept as
it sounds. There have
been widespread calls
for manager Sir Dave
Brailsford to go; it is
very hard to see how he
can hold on.
(Dan Jones)
Italy now faces the
prospect of a highly
tortuous period
of trying to cobble
together a workable
coalition government
which the Italians did
not vote for. Italy has
had four unelected
prime ministers since
2011. It will now get
its fifth.
(Nicholas Farrell)
CyclingNews
Bloomberg
Things haven’t changed
dramatically yet. Yes,
Get Out received the
first Oscar for best
original screenplay
awarded to a writer
of colour. And Mexico
may have been as big a
winner as any movie.
But we’re still waiting
for the first African
American best director
and the second woman
best director.
(Gene Seymour)
It’s a measure of how
far Dave Brailsford’s
star has fallen that,
after almost two years
of evidence, few within
the British sporting
establishment will be
that shocked by the
report’s wording.
Now Sky has to decide
if its sponsorship is
still sustainable.
(Jeremy Whittle)
Germany and
France can react in
two ways. They can
pause the process of
further integration.
Alternatively, they can
treat Italy as a problem
child, steam ahead
with their preferred
solution and then ask
whoever is in Rome
to sign up.
(Ferdinando Giugliano)
Daily Mirror
We need actions
not words from a
government who
must take some
blame for Britain’s
rise in homelessness
and unaffordable
rents. Putting
people in temporary
accommodation will
not solve the problem.
(Editorial)
Quote of
the day
Lance
Armstrong
hangs over
the sport like
Banquo’s
ghost
James O’Brien
The LBC presenter
on doping in cycling
MarketWatch
Nothing about Trump’s
views on trade should
shock us. He has been
consistent on one
issue dating back to
the 1980s. And that’s
his opposition to free
trade: his belief that
international trade is
a zero-sum-game, and
that only countries
with trade surpluses
are winners.
(Caroline Baum)
Belfast Newsletter
The DUP made a dog’s
dinner of key moments
in the negotiation
process. They’ve
always known a final
deal – if there was to be
one – was dependent
on an Irish Language
Act That’s why an ILA
was discussed in detail.
(Alex Kane)
New Statesman
It was Frances
McDormand’s
acceptance speech
that made it all special
rather than merely
noteworthy. She was
the winner not only
of the Best Actress
prize but the whole
damn evening.
(Ryan Gilbey)
LifeInBrief
SIR ROGER BANNISTER ATHLETE AND NEUROLOGIST
Sir Roger Bannister, who has died
aged 88, gave sport one of its most
cherished moments by running the
first sub-four-minute mile, made
medical breakthroughs as a neurologist
and served as the first chairman of the
Sports Council.
He is best remembered for his feat
in Oxford in 1954 when at the age of
25 he conquered a challenge widely
regarded at the time as beyond the limit
of human endurance by running a mile
in three minutes and 59.4 seconds.
Bannister, though, was prouder
of his Commonwealth Games gold
medal, while he viewed his academic
achievements in neurology as greater
than his exploits on the track.
Born in Harrow in London, Bannister
competed at the Helsinki Olympics in
1952 with hopes of a medal, but finished
fourth over 1500 metres, despite
clocking a then British record.
While a medical student at Oxford
University, Bannister turned his
attention to becoming the first man to
run the mile in under four minutes.
Bannister was supported at the
university’s Iffley Road cinder track in
the race that would make his name by
pacemakers Sir Christopher Chataway
and Chris Brasher, the trio racing for
the Amateur Athletic Association
against Oxford University.
Brasher led them through the first
quarter mile in 57.3 and halfway in 1:58.
Chataway moved to the front and kept
up the pace.
With little more than half a lap
remaining Bannister burst past
Chataway and kicked for the line, using
the last of his energy to run through
it before falling into the arms of his
friend, the Rev Nicholas Stacey.
The result came from stadium
announcer Norris McWhirter, who
said: “Result of event eight: one mile.
First, R G Bannister in a time which,
subject to ratification, is a new track
record, British native record, British
all-comers record, European record,
Commonwealth record and world
record – three minutes, ...” The crowd’s
roars drowned out the rest of the time.
Bannister lost the record to John
Landy 46 days later and never got it
back. But he exacted revenge in August
that year when he beat his great rival to
Commonwealth gold in Vancouver. He
came home in 3:58.8, his personal best.
Bannister also won 1500m gold that
year at the European Championships in
Berne before hanging up his spikes to
focus on his medical career.
He trained as a neurologist and said
there was a “gentle irony” when he was
diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease
in 2011.
Bannister, who was knighted in 1975,
also served as chairman of the Sports
Council between 1971 and 1974.
He campaigned against drugs in
sport and was responsible for helping
develop the first tests for anabolic
steroids. He also fought for increased
funding for sports centres.
Bannister is survived by his wife
Moyra, whom he married in 1955,
his sons Clive and Thurstan and his
daughters Erin and Charlotte.
Born 23 March 1929
Died 3 March 2018
Guy Aspin
NEWS
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15
MyView
JennyEclair
Melania deserves her ‘Einstein’ visa
The Bond-esque First Lady may yet save us all
F
ollowing the horrific
high-school shooting
in Florida a couple
of weeks ago, there
was inevitably a great
deal of talk on social
media about access to guns in the
States. In among all the despair
and frustration and without
undermining the awfulness of
the whole terrible situation, one
tweet made me smile. It was from
the artist @MHRashman who
simply wrote: “No one in America
should have a gun. Except Melania.
Melania can have a gun.”
And I bet Melania does have
a gun – I bet she has a Colt 45
which she keeps in her underwear
drawer. It will nestle, a cold, metal
thing, among oyster-coloured
satin teddies and slippery wisps of
lacy thongs.
I find Melania endlessly
fascinating. No American First
Lady has ever looked so much like a
Russian spy. She belongs in a Bond
film, one of those early Seventies
ones. I can see her wearing a big
fur hat and not much else, running
her manicured talons through
Sean Connery’s abundant chest
hair before kissing him with her
poisonous glossy lips. Cut to
Bond writhing in agony, a look of
stunned betrayal in his bewildered
brown eyes.
Anyway, Melania has been in the
news again over the past week and
this time people are questioning
how the eight-foot Slovenian
model managed to gain access to
American citizenship via the EB-1,
also known as the “Einstein visa”.
The “Einstein visa” is a sort of
Willy Wonka-ish prize-winning
gold entry ticket normally reserved
for foreign Pulitzer Prize winners,
uberboffins, Oscar-winning actors
and Olympic medallists that
allows the recipient to jump the
immigration queue. Basically you
have to be the very best in your
field to qualify for one of these
special visas, and it seems even
supermodels can apply.
If I’m allowed to be pedantic
here: when Melania was granted
an EB-1 in 2001, she wasn’t actually
a “supermodel”; she was more
of a “jobbing model”. Those of us
who struggle to make it right to
the top of our professional tree
know exactly what this means:
it means that one minute you’re
auditioning for an hilarious German
lager commercial which will pay
your mortgage for a year (which
you don’t get) and the next you’re
performing in the foyer of an arts
More than meets
the eye: First Lady
Melania Trump
and her husband,
Donald GETTY
centre because not enough people
have turned up to warrant putting
out the chairs in the main hall.
But before this gets personal,
let’s get back to Melania and why
she deserved to be one of only five
Slovenians awarded “Einstein”
status 17 years ago.
For starters, it’s a welldocumented fact that First Lady
Trump speaks five languages,
(some of them apparently fluently).
She also studied Design and
Architecture, and we all know
how long it takes to graduate as
an architect: seven years. Melania
lasted one, before bailing out and
turning her hand, bum and tits to
swimwear modelling.
And who can blame her? She did
at least put her design background
to good use, by creating a range
of jewellery for the television
shopping channel QVC; after all,
not all top-notch designers have to
create something that will benefit
the world. OK, so The Bill Gates
Foundation may have helped design
a machine that converts sewer
sludge into clean drinking water
for some of the millions of people
around the world who don’t have
access to safe drinking water, but
who’s to say that providing a cheap
pair of sparkly zircon earrings for
I believe she is
biding her time
and that we will
see Melania,
the silent
assassin, turn
the millions of women out there
who can’t afford real diamonds isn’t
equally important?
Apparently testimonials from
the great and good can speed up
the EB-1 process and although the
details of Melania’s application
have never been published, it’s
pretty obvious that Donald Trump
might have had a pudgy hand in it.
Who better to attest to Melania’s
supermodel skills than her
boyfriend at the time?
For those wondering what
constitutes a supermodel skill, it
will definitely include the ability to
look smoking hot in a string bikini
while “strutting” (us mere mortals
“walk”, supermodels “strut”) in a
pair of shoes that have very fine
knitting needles for heels.
But I refuse to believe that there
isn’t more to Melania than all
this. Deep down, I believe that she
has other talents and that at the
moment she’s just biding her time,
watching and waiting until the day
Donald Trump pushes it too far.
Then we will see Melania, the silent
assassin, turn.
In my head, the day the hotdoglimbed Slovenian beauty cracks, she
will wrap those endless pins around
Donald’s big fat sweaty neck and
just keep wrapping them.
Then, smiling and quite possibly
flicking through a copy of Vogue
at the same time, she will start
squeezing with those thighs that
have launched a million squats, until
Donald begs for mercy and Melania
might let him live, on certain
conditions, which begin with him
resigning.
Go, Melania, go.
THE INDEPENDENT
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Your
View
TWEETS
AND EMAILS
American
pies
Catching up on
blockchain
I read with interest a
piece by James Ball on
the plan for the US to
import “Scotch whisky”
and “Cornish pasties”
into the UK – how
appalling (i, 5 March).
In the States they
openly flout the law
and offer for instance
US-made “Parmesan”
(not “Parmesan-style”
cheese) and Californian
sparkling wine marketed
as “Champagne”. As for
Scotch whisky, the clue is
in the word Scotch – how
can Americans call it
that when it’s not made
in Scotland?
Obviously, people with
any sense wouldn’t buy
such products in the UK
but it’s worrying.
(Having said the
above, they do some
great food in the States
– for example, the
best barbecued ribs in
the world.)
RORY CASHIN
WORTHING
A quick search for blockchain start-ups in the UK
and Russia shows that
the ratio (of legitimate
startups) is about 100:1
in favour of Russia.
If we pride ourselves
on being a cyber hub and
aim to prosper beyond
Brexit, we need to start
taking this technology
seriously and nurturing
UK-based development
in this sector, instead of
bashing the red herring
that is bitcoin.
R DAVIES
SENNYBRIDGE,
POWYS
I nearly choked on
my American IPA
beer (brewed in
Wolverhampton) when
I read that we might
be forced to buy
Cornish pasties and
Cumberland sausages
from the US.
DAVID TAYLOR
KENDAL
Please note that the
photo on the front of
today’s i (5 March) does
not show a Cornish pasty.
A genuine Cornish pasty
is crimped at the side,
as shown on page 7,
never across the centre.
That is why protected
status is granted and
must remain.
CAROL HONEY
TUNBRIDGE WELLS
The five-minute
mile woman
Rob Hastings reminds us
that history will always
remember the first man
to run a four-minute
mile, and rightly so (i,
5 March)!
Perhaps it is about
time that history is
just a little kinder to
the memory of the first
woman to run a fiveminute mile. Both were
achieved in May 1954,
and at the time both were
considered significant
time barriers. Diane
Leather’s achievement
will never be held in
the same regard as
Sir Roger Bannister’s,
but it was pioneering,
and could claim a little
more recognition.
TED REDFORD
SUTTON COLDFIELD,
WEST MIDLANDS
Other opinions
on these pages
Having voted for but
not being a member of
Labour, I must respond
to Bob Readman calling
the current Labour party,
Traditional
Cornish pasties
are crimped at
the side, not the
centre GETTY
news (the prospect of
American imitations
of traditional foods,
Putin’s all-too successful
attempts to destabilise
the West and Theresa
May’s admission that
Brexit would leave us all
worse off) it raised my
spirits to read of
Rebecca Armstrong’s
stoic trials with smelly
cheese on a commuter
train (i, 5 March).
In future, I shall try
to look more kindly on
people attempting to
convey Stinking Bishop
by public transport.
WILL FULLER
LEWES, EAST SUSSEX
The next
Hillsborough?
and I infer its members
and those who voted for
it, a “mob of left-wing
extremists” (Your View,
5 March). To tar all with
the same brush is the
same as calling all Leave
voters racist xenophobes.
Both statements
are unfounded,
unjustifiable nonsense.
With the nation
divided as it is, I do
hope in reading the i Mr
Readman gains a better
understanding of those
who hold different views
to himself.
PETER PATCHING
EVESHAM,
WORCESTERSHIRE
Housing isn’t
the problem
There isn’t a “housing
crisis”, there’s a
population crisis. The
problem is demand, not
supply. Not surprising
when we know that we
have had an increase in
population of more than
5 million people in the
last decade, partly as a
result of net migration.
Instead of bullying
local councils with unrealistic housing targets,
the Government should
be putting maximum
effort into achieving zero
net migration in order
to stabilise the population level which, in
turn, would mean more
affordable homes
available as a result of
less demand.
D ROBERTS
HASTINGS,
EAST SUSSEX
The Lib Dems’
student outlook
The plight of the Liberal
Democrats (i, 5 March)
seems to be, in part, the
result of some intrinsic
belief that the UK is large
enough to accept the
entire global population
in addition to everyone
in the EU.
This is not a flippant
remark – they do seem to
retain a sort of students’
union outlook, as if they
never departed their
former university halls
of residence, never
entered a real world,
and thus remain within
a fairy tale utopia where
the streets of Britain
can provide gold to the
entire globe providing
we create open doors to
all and sundry.
ABIGAIL WEST
PAIGNTON, DEVON
Cheesy but
uplifting
After reading this
morning’s depressing
Nine months on from
the disaster of Grenfell
Tower, am I not alone in
thinking that things
have gone very quiet
on this matter?
As far as I am aware,
many victims of the fire
are still living in hotel
and hostel accommodation and not being
provided with the help
they require and deserve.
As a Londoner, I still
get very upset about
it and I am worried
that people who were
responsible for this
avoidable tragedy will
never be held to account.
We do not want a repeat
of Hillsborough, when it
took 29 years for victims
to achieve justice.
SUSAN ROWBERRY
DUNS, WARWICKSHIRE
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ARTS
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IN TOM
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The Tate
Modern’s
unmissable
new Picasso
exhibition
FOOD & DRINK
VITAMINS
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*UK’s No1 women’s vitamin brand. Nielsen GB ScanTrack
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The #MeToo
foodies
Meet a new
generation of
female chefs
shrugging off
sexism in
restaurant
kitchens
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By Jessica Barrett and Laura Martin
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Twitter: @jess_barrett
Del Rey gets
all vocal over
Webber’s ‘Evita’
Gucci’s just wild about Harry
From boybander to actor to model…
now Harry Styles has been revealed
as the face of Gucci’s new tailoredclothing campaign.
The former One Directioner –
sorry, we don’t think they are coming
out of that “hiatus” any time soon
- was posted ruffling a rather cute
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
dog on Gucci’s official Instagram on
Sunday evening, swiftly followed by
a picture of half of his head under a
fish’n’chip shop sign in St Albans.
We have yet to see the final images,
but rest assured it’ll be Styles in a
slightly chintzy suit, working that
Brit-chap look to the max.
Andrew Lloyd Webber is hardly a person
you’d describe as at the cutting edge of
cool, but he’s just been given a shot of
cultural kudos, thanks to sultry
chanteuse Lana Del Rey.
The “Video Games” singer
appears on an album of his
greatest hits, Unmasked:
The Platinum Collection,
released to coincide with
the composer’s 70th birthday
this month.
Del Rey – real name Lizzie
Grant – tackles “You Must Love Me”
from Evita, and somewhat surprisingly,
she cites him as a major influence on her
work. She said: “Andrew has been one of
my primary inspirations in music, so to
do a cover of one of his songs is a dream. I
especially love this particular song, “You
Must Love Me”, because of how unique
the melody is.
“I’ve been incredibly inspired by
all of Andrew’s work from Phantom
of the Opera to Evita.”
J.Lo misses the
Oscars to help
deprived youth
While all of Hollywood gathered for
a big knees-up on Sunday, singer
and sometime actress Jennifer
Lopez shunned the Oscars for far
more philanthropic matters. Namely,
Project Destined, which teaches
financial literacy to young
people in deprived
neighbourhoods.
Lopez and her
boyfriend, Alex
Rodriguez,
attended an event
in Harlem, New
York, that saw young
trainees pitch their
ideas to a panel and she
said: “It’s a game changer
for anyone to be a part of this
programme. I am proud to be a part
of it, of letting these kids know that
anything is possible.”
Nice to see a celebrity step
out of a night of ego-massaging
to pay it forward to the next
generation instead.
18
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Please include a contact address with all correspondence
Freedom of speech is becoming freedom to distort
MEDIA
Yasmin
AlibhaiBrown
A
ccording to a report,
“Media and Populism in
Britain” (commissioned
by the think tank Demos),
Britons across the political divide
want to see a range of views
expressed in the media.
But scratch the surface and you
will find that voters want their side
to get more air time and space in the
papers. Most of them probably think
opposing views are too prevalent.
Assuming I am not falling prey to
the same effect, it seems clear to me
that the right dominates political
discourse and cunningly diverts
attention by claiming the liberal left
is too powerful, particularly at the
BBC and Channel 4. Norman Tebbit
never stops moaning that the BBC
is full of anti-Tory, red lefties. For
Boris Johnson and his ilk, these
Red hot iPhone 8.
UK’s lowest monthly price
with no upfront cost.
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accusations are like a blood sport.
George Osborne, when he was
Chancellor, pushed the same line.
Journalists such as Peter Hitchens
and Rod Liddle – who, incidentally,
was editor of the BBC’s Today
programme – keep up the pressure.
The EU referendum brought in
other right-wing players, Ukip in
particular. Nigel Farage has
been on Question Time
more than 30 times.
Pre-emptive political
thuggery gets results.
The BBC is now in
a groove: bias against
the left and Remainers
seems the norm.
Perhaps it fears for its
survival. Consider last
week’s Any Questions on BBC
Radio 4. Fraser Nelson, editor of
the Spectator, was joined by Brendan
O’Neill, who writes for the Spectator.
Both are sharp and persuasive. But
did we have to have two adamant
Brexiters from the same right-wing
publication? With a Labour Brexiter,
Barry Gardiner? The only woman,
Remainer Tory Anna Soubry (inset),
had to take on the three blokes
single-handedly.
On the big BBC political
programmes, right-wing press
reviewers are preferred. So affirms
Ivor Gaber, a well-respected
professor of journalism. This
indicates “where the BBC’s political
staff believe the current centre of
KELNER’S VIEW
Simon
Kelner
FA trips up with
political football
“W
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e don’t want political
symbols in football,”
said Martin Glenn,
the chief executive
of the Football Association. Quite
right, Martin. A game as honourable,
as ethically unimpeachable, as
morally upstanding, and as honest
and innocent as professional
football cannot be sullied by politics.
This bastion of decency must be
protected at all costs against the
sort of incursion from the real world
that makes people think there are
matters of importance beyond
whether Arsene Wenger is sacked.
And we are grateful to Mr Glenn
for explaining what constitutes a
“political symbol”. He said: “...things
that are going to be highly divisive
and that could be strong religious
symbols – it could be the Star of
David, it could be the hammer
and sickle, it could be a swastika,
anything like Robert Mugabe on
your shirt.” Yes, that’s what he said.
The man who runs our national
game employed the best Joycean
stream of consciousness technique
to say this to a collection of his
political balance to lie”, he argues.
More businessmen get invited on
to the programmes than do trades
union members; toffs get on more
than plebs; anti-immigration voices
rule the waves.
Most newspapers are open about
their political positions. Two support
Labour, three – including this paper
– are non-aligned and the
rest are unshakeably
right-wing. Some of
the best and most
successful are on that
side. I write for some
of them. My objections
are not ideological,
but about objectivity
and inclusion, missing
truths and diversity.
As the state can’t control
the privately-owned press,
public service broadcasters must
provide alternative facts and fairer
representation. Instead, they follow
and favour conservative or populist
newspapers. The unholy alliance
creates particular impressions
which shape opinions. This is why
Britons overestimate the number of
migrants in the UK and swallow lies
about the EU.
Freedom of speech is becoming
freedom to distort and exclude. It
makes citizens vulnerable to fakery.
That is bad news for our industry –
and for democracy.
Twitter: @y_alibhai
international peers. He was making
clear his association’s position
regarding the wearing of a yellow
ribbon by the Manchester City
manager Pep Guardiola in support
of jailed political prisoners in his
native Catalonia, but, in so doing, Mr
Glenn got the FA into just the sort of
hot water he was seeking to avoid.
Equating the Star of David to the
swastika was bad enough. But the
objection of right-thinking people
would be on much more than taste
grounds. The Star of David, the last
time I looked, is a national emblem.
It’s there in the flag of Israel. When
Mr Glenn sees the Israeli national
team, does he think they are a bunch
of political activists?
Of course Guardiola’s yellow
ribbon is a political symbol. And
what’s wrong with that? Guardiola
is a cultured, rounded individual
who has strong beliefs outside
football. What would have happened
if a Premier League manager had
sported a Me Too badge in support
of women? That’s a political symbol,
for sure, but one the FA almost
certainly wouldn’t outlaw.
But no one here really cares one
way or the other about Catalan
independence. Mr Glenn gives the
game away when he says that a lot
of Spaniards are “pissed off” about
Guardiola’s protest. Of course they
are. He opposes their policies, and
they oppose him. That’s what politics
is. It is difficult to see what the FA
is trying to protect by banning
Guardiola’s gesture. Football’s
purity? Surely, it’s a bit late for that.
Sport, page 56
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i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
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19
ARCHAEOLOGY
NATURE
Oxford reveals
its 800-year-old
drinking culture
Fossilised chick
shows how early
birds evolved
By David Keys
Archaeologists have been unearthing
clues to daily life at Oxford University
seven centuries ago.
In one of Britain’s largest urban excavations, investigators have found
writing equipment, refectory cutlery
and even ceramic beer mugs that
were used by students and teachers
in the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries.
They have also discovered what Oxford’s medieval scholars were eating:
a wide range of food including beef,
lamb, goose, salmon, trout and eggs.
For the first time for many centuries, archaeologists were able to see
substantial parts of one of the university’s greatest medieval teaching
institutions – Greyfriars, established
by the Franciscan order in 1224.
The operation – directed by Ben
Ford of the heritage consultancy
Oxford Archaeology – has yielded
well-preserved quills, styluses and
even parchment prickers (the special needles used to rough out page
layouts on parchment manuscripts).
The archaeologists have unearthed oil lamps, a rare medieval
By Lewis Smith
The fossil remains of a chick born
when dinosaurs ruled the Earth is
providing scientists with a window
into how some of the first birds lived.
It dates back 127 million years and
being smaller than the little finger on
the average human hand is one of the
smallest avian fossils found from the
Mesozoic Era.
The baby bird, from a group of prehistoric birds called enantiornithes,
would have weighed just three ounces. It died soon after birth, according
to a paper in Nature Communications.
Luis Chiappe, of the LA Museum
of Natural History and one of the
researchers who studied it with
colleagues from the University of
Manchester, said: “It is amazing to
realise how many of the features we
see among living birds had already
been developed more than 100 million
years ago.”
pencil made of pure lead, bronze book
marks, special scissors to cut vellum
and a very rare brass clasp from a
large 13th-century book.
The friars provided copies of syllabus books for their students to use.
It demonstrates how teaching was
becoming more systematised and
more professional.
The excavation has yielded a small
ceramic container that had held
Spanish mercury, which the friars
may well have used for alchemical experiments, mercury-assisted
metal gilding – or for trying to
treat leprosy.
Archaeological evidence suggests
that student life in medieval Oxford
probably had at least as large a drink
component as it does today.
The excavation has produced fragments of hundreds of medieval beer
mugs and bits of several large Spanish amphorae (probably used to import wine).
The archaeologists also found
fragments of hundreds of jugs used
to serve liquid refreshments in the
friary’s great refectory.
FOOD
Hard cheese...
festival has none
THE INDEPENDENT
By Serina Sandhu
SCIENCE
Laser technique can separate liquids
By Conor Riordan
Scientists have developed a technique to separate two liquids in a
mixture using a laser.
Researchers from the University of
Glasgow came up with the method to
help with the production of crystals
used in computers, phones, drugs,
paints, light bulbs and solar cells.
There is no way to fully control the
crystallisation process, which can
lead to costly problems during the
manufacturing stage.
But the new approach uses a
laser to harness fluctuations and to
drive the system towards a phase
separated state.
Professor Klaas Wynne, who
developed the technique, said: “It’s a
bit like making a cup of tea and then
using a laser to suck the milk out. It
may seem counter-intuitive but it’s all
within the laws of physics.”
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leather-and-fur-free collection
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but organisers later admitted
the bad weather meant “a few
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we are disappointed that a larger
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i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
21
PeoPle
s
pi
pk
i
’ j
mi i
Issy Sanderson, president-elect
of the York Ainsty Rotary Club,
in York Minster’s North Transept
yesterday. A production line was
set up there for the club’s DaysforGirls project volunteers
to produce and pack feminine
hygiene kits for girls and women
in remote communities in
developing countries PA
b Izz l
PolItIcs
yki ff i i
p
NORTHERN CORRESPONDENT
growth. “The determination to overInfighting Plans stalled
come previous obstacles to securing
an agreement bringing benefits to
Devolution plans dreamed up by the our communities, our region and
former chancellor George Osborne
the country is evident,” it says. “This
as part of his Northern Powerhouse
proposal is the culmination of poambitions have been on hold
litical and geographic collaboration
in much of Yorkshire.
across Yorkshire at a scale and with
Councils in West and
a degree of consensus unprecedentNorth Yorkshire have
ed in recent times.”
been at loggerheads
A spokesman for the Ministry of
over which areas should Housing, Communities and Local
have greater powers.
Government said: “We have always
Former prime minister
said that we would welcome disDavid Cameron joked
cussions on any widely supported
in 2015: “We just thought
proposal for a greater Yorkshire devpeople in Yorkshire hated
olution deal provided the Sheffield
everyone else, we didn’t realise
City Region deal was not threatened
they hated each other so much.”
and the proposal clearly relates to a
Sheffield pressed ahead with its
sensible economic geography. Parliaown £900m South Yorkshire deal,
ment had already legislated in part
which was signed in 2015. Barnsley
for the Sheffield City Region deal inand Doncaster, however, officially
cluding legislating for the election of
backed the One Yorkshire proposal.
a South Yorkshire Mayor.”
60
p
The leaders of 18 out of 20 Yorkshire
councils have submitted a “concrete
proposal” for a major devolution
deal that they hope will turn the
historic county into a 21st-century
regional powerhouse.
In the One Yorkshire proposal,
cities including Leeds, York and
Hull end long-standing rivalries and
show a united front in the fight to
create new powers for the county.
Sheffield and Rotherham have
failed to sign up to the proposed deal.
An election for a South Yorkshire
mayor as part of the Conservatives’
devolution agenda is set to take place
in May.
A letter has been sent to Sajid
Javid (inset), the Communities Secretary, after he agreed to read a detailed proposal. It calls for an urgent
meeting with government officials
so the proposal can be “taken forward swiftly”. The letter, also sent
to Theresa May and Philip Hammond, adds: “We believe with your
Government’s support, we can
seal an historic devolution
agreement with the potential to double the size of
our economy.”
The 10-page submission says the deal is
central to a drive to
“unleash the full economic potential” of the
region, which they say has
an “economy twice the size
of Wales and a population the
same as Scotland”. The proposal
would create a “single mayoral combined authority” for Yorkshire by
May 2020.
It says the deal could create
200,000 jobs and £12bn of economic
Lena Dunham
and Laurie
Simmons
on working
together
IntervIew
P31
i ee offe
mk i i i
Hve o cop of i elivee FrEE fo 6 weeks
Sign up now. Visi delivermynewspaper.com fi picipig ewsge e o.
friday
26 january 2018
Number 2,238
Good diet ‘does not
offset damage
from too much salt’
b J
i ck
Having a healthy diet fails to offset
the effects of eating larger amounts
of salt, research has found.
Scientists from Imperial College
London found those who ate higher
amounts of salt had higher blood
pressure, no matter how healthy
their overall diet.
Their findings suggest people
should monitor their salt intake, and
food manufacturers should lower the
salt content in their products.
High blood pressure affects more
than one in four adults in the UK,
and increases the risk of a number of
conditions including heart attacks
and stroke.
I n s I d e P e t e r c a r e y ● g e o r g e f o r d ● J e n n y e c l a I r ● d J tay l o r
shaPPI KhorsandI ● PatrIcK cocKburn ● alIce Jones ● sImon calder
Q ua l i t y, c o n c i s e – t h e f
Family
affair
health
the crown
In
80p
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Who’s next
in line toIn travel
play
the holidays
Best
prince?
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nterview
in France
for 2018
P57
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My first
panic attack
Alan
Rusbridger
Confessions
of a hoarder
P37
P17
Number 2,239
b d
Ki
The son of a woman suffering from
Alzheimer’s has praised Sainsbury’s
for keeping his mother in a job as a
grocery picker despite her illness.
Doron Salomon, 29, thanked the
supermarket for the accommodations it made for his mother – whose
identity the family wish to keep private – at work despite her condition.
This included changing her hours,
organising regular welfare meetings
with her husband and creating a new
role for her in the store.
Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in late
2013, Mr Salomon’s mother, now 61,
had already been working for Sainsbury’s for 18 months when she was
made aware of her illness.
Despite a medical exam rendering
her unemployable in October 2017,
the supermarket chain kept her on
for a further five months and she
completed her final day on Saturday.
Mr Salomon, from London, described the supermarket as handling
the situation with “sensitivity, kindness and care”.
“Sometimes I would arrive early
when I was going to pick her up from
work. I would watch her across the
shop and I could see how happy she
was working there.”
Saturday & Sunday
27 - 28 January 2018
Splendid
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S
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22
NEWS
SYRIA
SYRIA
The Ghouta blockade will make life
unbearable for the sick and vulnerable
Convoy
‘plundered’
by Assad
officials
Siege is reminiscent
of horrors in East
Aleppo, reports
Patrick Cockburn
in Qamishli, Syria
S
ieges are a merciless
business, never more so
than in Syria. As a Red
Cross aid convoy entered
Eastern Ghouta yesterday,
the World Health Organisation said
that Syrian government security
had forced the removal from its
trucks of “all trauma kits, surgical,
dialysis sessions and insulin”.
About 70 per cent of the medical
supplies being sent were rejected,
according to a WHO official.
There is something disgustingly
mean and vicious in targeting those
who will die without dialysis or
insulin. Depriving the sick of their
last hope of life illuminates in the
grimmest of ways how the siege
of Eastern Ghouta, as in the other
sieges that have been such a feature
of the wars in Syria and Iraq, put
unbearable pressure on the weak
and the vulnerable.
The aid convoy had already
been cut back in size from food
for a month for 70,000 to 27,500
people, though there is meant to
be a second convoy in a few days.
Even if this is not again depleted
by government security forces, it is
far too little for the 393,000 people
Syrian Red Crescent volunteers hand out supplies in Ghouta yesterday
estimated to be in this besieged
eastern part of Damascus, though
the chaos is such that nobody
knows the true figure.
The siege is following much the
same course as that of East Aleppo
in 2016. The Syrian government is
determined to retake the rebel-held
zone by indiscriminate shelling and
bombing combined with cutting
off all supplies of food, fuel and
medicine. It is making a ground
assault that is crumbling the edges
of the beleaguered enclave. The aim
of the multiple assaults is to chop
the area into smaller pieces that
can be dealt with separately.
What should now be done to
limit civilian casualties in Eastern
Ghouta? As in East Aleppo, the
fall of the enclave is inevitable
and anything that prolongs the
battle there will only lead to more
dead and disabled. Humanitarian
corridors are needed, but these
are not much good without UN
monitors ensuring the ceasefire
is real.
Most of the discussion is about
what should happen to the civilians,
but the outcome of these sieges is
invariably determined negotiations
between the besiegers and the
armed opposition defenders, who,
in the case of Eastern Ghouta, are
said to number 10,000 fighters. In
past sieges, these have been given
the choice of an amnesty of some
description or evacuation with light
weapons to a rebel stronghold,
almost invariably Idlib in the northwest of Syria.
Where foreign powers could do
most good is by preventing such
sieges starting in the first place.
Once besieger and besieged are
locked in unequal combat there
is little the outside world can do
about it, aside from a general
wringing of hands.
It so happens that the makings of
another Eastern Ghouta is under
way in northern Syria, though
with little of the publicity given to
the situation in Damascus. The
Turkish army and its Arab militia
allies are surrounding the
Kurdish enclave of Afrin.
A few days ago. Turkish
shelling and bombing
had killed 204 civilians,
61 of them children
according to authorities
in Afrin.
The Kurds say they will
fight to the end and quite
certainly mean it. The only outlet
not held by the Turks or their allies
is through a road held by the Syrian
government, which might be closed
at any time. The impending siege of
Afrin is likely to be as bad in terms
of human suffering as anything we
have seen in the Syrian civil war
but, unlike Eastern Ghouta, there
may still be time act to avert it.
THE INDEPENDENT
CRYPTIC CROSSWORD
No 2207 BY RAICH
1
2
3
6
The Assad regime has plundered
vital aid supplies designed for Eastern Ghouta, which it has devastated
with barrel bombs.
Aid trucks reached the area yesterday for the first time since the start of
one of the war’s deadliest assaults,
but the government stripped some
medical supplies from the convoy.
The Russian-backed Syrian army
has captured more than a third
of Eastern Ghouta in recent days,
threatening to slice the last major
rebel-held area near the capital in
two, despite Western accusations of violating a ceasefire.
The United Nations
says 400,000 people are
trapped inside the besieged enclave, and were
already running out of
food and medical supplies
before the assault began
with intense air strikes two
weeks ago.
A senior UN official accompanying
the convoy said he was “not happy”
to hear loud shelling near the crossing point into Eastern Ghouta despite
an agreement that the aid would be
delivered in safety.
The UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 45
people were killed and 190 injured
yesterday. REUTERS
4
5
8
10
12
16
21
IN BEIRUT
7
9
11
By Angus McDowall
13
17
22
14
15
18
19
28
29
23
24
Solution to yesterday’s Cryptic
H E R B A L
L
U
E
F A C T O T U
T
T
S
GE N E ROS
U
R E P A R T E
X
T
P A T H A N
M E
A
S P UN
K A
A
A
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S P R E A D
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U
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T R I MA R A
CH EM I S T S
O P M R
M OR P H A N
P
N O N
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RU S T
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M T M
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S T A T U S
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25
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26
27
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A boy looks at a 3D installation of
a cat at Dubai Canvas in Dubai. The
annual event at La Mer takes place
during the first week of March.
It features 3D art murals and
installations all around the area
showcasing a variety of different
art forms, including graffiti
spaghetti, object art, inflatable art
and tape art. REUTERS
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
23
CANADA
ARGENTINA
Village defeats
oil giant in court
fight over water
Grain prices
soar as drought
hits corn crop
By Jane Dalton
Cool for cats at Dubai Canvas
IQ
30-39
Residents of a Quebec village have
defeated an oil and gas giant in a fight
to protect their water.
After a four-year legal wrangle
over a C$1m (£557,000) lawsuit, a
judge has finally ruled in favour of the
town of Ristigouche Sud-Est and its
population of 157.
Half of the residents’ legal fees
could be reimbursed by the Montrealbased exploration giant Gastem.
Mayor François Boulay said: “I
can’t hide – this is a sweet moment.”
The dispute began in 2011 when the
province of Quebec granted Gastem
drilling permits to search for oil and
gas in the eastern region, and construction began on a drilling platform
in the township.
But Ristigouche Sud-Est residents
worried the drilling would affect their
water supplies, and the town council
passed a bylaw in 2013 that set out a
2km (1.2-mile) no-drill zone around
its water supply.
Gastem issued a lawsuit in August
2013 that claimed the bylaw was illegal. The company’s initial C$1.5m
claim for damages was later reduced
to C$984,676 – still more than three
times the town’s annual budget.
In Quebec’s Superior Court, Justice Nicole Tremblay ruled the company should have tried to have the
bylaw annulled before seeking any
compensation.
In her 16-page ruling, she said that,
contrary to what Gastem argued, the
council was not pressured into passing the bylaw by environmentalists or
forceful residents.
The judge said a municipality
had the right to protect its territory
based on the precautionary principle,
and the town was within its rights to
apply its own bylaw.
She ordered Gastem to reimburse
half of the legal fees residents had
incurred, and an additional $10,000
to cover the fees for the public relations company the town hired.
THE INDEPENDENT
By Tom Polansek
IN CHIVILCOY
The worst drought in decades
is sending grain prices soaring
and forcing major crop processors
to crush fewer oilseeds into
livestock feed.
The water shortage in
Venezuela, the world’s third
largest exporter of corn and soya
beans, combined with separate
instances of drought also
threatening crops in the
US and South Africa,
is eating into global
reserves and
prompting buyers
to accelerate
purchases.
In the rural
Argentine town of
Chivilcoy, farmer
Bernardo Romano’s
soybean and corn plants
stand at only half their typical
height, starved of rain.
“This is going to have a very big
impact on the regional economy,”
he said, adding that farmers were
praying for rain to mitigate more
losses. REUTERS
24
NEWS
Panorama
Around the
world in
10 stories
FRANCE
IRAN
Art helps
soothe tense
Tehran talks
By John Irish
IN TEHRAN
After a day of tough talking,
France’s foreign minister and
one of Iran’s vice presidents
ambled through the halls of the
National Museum of Iran in
Tehran to admire a collection
Moscow woos Islamabad
as US influence wanes
By Drazen Jorgic
IN ISLAMABAD
TURKEY
Carlos the Jackal Plea to release
back on trial
Greek soldiers
The Venezuelan terrorist
known as Carlos the Jackal is
back on trial for a 1974 attack
on a Paris shopping arcade,
which killed two people and
injured 34.
A court convicted Carlos,
68, last year of the attack
and handed him his third
life sentence. He denies any
involvement and is appealing
against the conviction.
Carlos – real name Ilich
Ramirez Sanchez – also has
convictions for pro-Palestinian
attacks and the murder of two
police officers. AP
PAKISTAN
The lawyers for two Greek soldiers
arrested in Turkey have formally
requested their release from custody.
The two were arrested last week
for allegedly entering a Turkish
military zone and on suspicion of
attempted espionage.
Greece said the two soldiers
accidentally strayed into Turkey
during a patrol of the Greek-Turkish
border due to bad weather. The
development has added to strained
ties between the Nato allies.
Lawyers filed a demand for their
release with the court in the northwestern Turkish city of Edirne
yesterday. AP
of artworks on loan from the
Louvre in Paris.
Relations between Iran and
France have grown fraught of
late, rattled by the uncertain
future of the Iran nuclear accord
and French concerns over
Tehran’s ballistic missile tests.
“In the turbulent ocean
of international diplomacy,
cultural diplomacy is a beacon
we must keep alight,” French
foreign minister Yves Le Drian
said. The Louvre exhibition in
Tehran is the first by a major
Western cultural institution.
REUTERS
As American influence in Islamabad
wanes, Pakistan’s former adversary
Russia is building military, diplomatic
and economic ties that could upend
historic alliances in the region and
open up a fast-growing gas market
for Moscow’s energy companies.
Russia’s embrace of Pakistan
comes at a time when relations
between the US and its historical
ally are unravelling over the war
in Afghanistan, a remarkable
turnaround from the 1980s, when
Pakistan helped funnel weapons
and US spies across the border
Boston
Leading Democrat senator
Elizabeth Warren is hoping
to defuse an issue that has
dogged her for years – her
undocumented claims of
Native American heritage
– ahead of a possible run for
president in 2020.
Last month, Ms Warren
addressed the National
Congress of American Indians,
trying to cast her family’s
story in the larger context
of challenges facing native
peoples. The prominent
Democrat has also met
tribal leaders, signed on to
legislation supported by Native
American activists, and called
on President Donald Trump
to nominate a director for the
Indian Health Service.
The push is in part a
rebuttal to Trump, who has
repeatedly referred to Warren
as “Pocahontas” to discredit
her by calling into question her
claims of heritage.
“Every time someone brings
up my family’s story, I’m going
to use it to lift up the story
of your families and your
communities,” Ms Warren told
the Washington event.
Many Native Americans
have welcomed Ms
Warren’s advocacy.
Cheryl AndrewsMaltais, chairwoman of the
Wampanoag Tribe of Gay
Head (Aquinnah), introduced
Warren at the gathering as “a
formidable force and an Indian
country ally”. AP
Steve LeBlanc
to assist Afghan fighters battling
Soviet troops.
Energy deals and growing military
cooperation promise to spark life into
Roofers
in at
Versailles
Workers begin the first
day of renovations on
the roof of the Royal
Chapel of the Palace of
Versailles yesterday.
Construction of the
chapel was completed
in 1710,towards the
end of the reign of
Louis XIV. The king
attended daily Mass
in the chapel, which
was designed by Jules
Hardouin-Mansart.
AFP/GETTY
PHILIPPINES
Chief Justice faces expulsion from Supreme Court
The Philippine government’s legal
counsel has asked the Supreme
Court to expel the chief justice for
allegedly not declaring her assets, in
a new attempt to remove the nation’s
judicial leader.
The House, which is dominated by
President Rodrigo Duterte’s allies, is
expected to impeach Chief Justice
Maria Lourdes Sereno later this
month based on several allegations,
including her failure to file her annual
statements of assets and liabilities as
required by law.
Ms Sereno’s spokesman said she
has not committed any wrongdoing.
International human rights groups
and local critics have accused Mr Duterte of drifting toward authoritarianism after declaring martial law in
the south.
He has overseen a drug war
marked by thousands of killings of
mostly poor suspects and has publicly threatened his opponents. AP
UAE
EGYPT
UNITED STATES
Ban on Turkish
TV soap operas
Warm reception Tent space for $21
for Saudi heir
in New York home
The Arab world’s largest private
broadcaster has been ordered
to stop airing Turkish television
programmes, it said yesterday, as
tensions rise between Ankara and
some Arab states.
Turkish soap operas are a big
hit across the Middle East but the
blanket ban came into effect at
Dubai-based MBC Group, which is
controlled by Saudi businessman
Waleed al-Ibrahim and other
Saudi investors. REUTERS
Egypt gave a warm welcome to
Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin
Salman as he visited the Suez Canal
on the second day of his three-day
visit to the country.
Posters featuring Prince Salman’s
face alongside that of President
Abdel-Fattah al-Sissi are lining the
major roads of central Cairo.
Egypt seeks investments from oilrich Saudi Arabia to help develop an
international transport, logistics and
production hub in the capital. AP
By Jim Gomez
Postcard
From...
Khurram
Dastgir
Khan,
Pakistan’s
defence
minister,
spoke of
opening a
door to the
future
the Russia-Pakistan relationship. “It
is an opening,” Khurram Dastgir
Khan, Pakistan’s defence minister,
said. “Both countries have to work
through the past to open the door to
the future.”
The closer diplomatic ties have so
far focused on Afghanistan.
Both Russia and Pakistan are
alarmed by the presence of Isis
fighters inside Afghanistan, with
Moscow concerned the group could
spread towards central Asia and
closer to home.
Pa k i s t a n’s p r i m e m i n i s t e r
Shahid Khaqan Abbasi said:
“It’s a relationship that will grow
substantially in the future.” REUTERS
New York City officials say they
have shut down an establishment
in the borough of Queens that was
operating as an illegal hotel and
offering tents in a back garden at a
rate of $21 (£15) per night.
The Queens home was hit with
a partial vacate order after being
deemed “imminently perilous to
life”. The Mayor’s Office of Special
Enforcement found 27 mattresses
crammed into two floors during
an inspection on 21 February. AP
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
25
VIETNAM
NORTH KOREA
US aircraft carrier
makes first visit
since end of war
Peace talks are
on the menu for
Kim Jong-un
By Minh Nguyen
IN DANANG
A US navy aircraft carrier arrived
in Vietnam yesterday for the first
time since the end of the Vietnam
War, underscoring the growing ties
between the former foes.
The nuclear-powered USS Carl
Vinson could be seen from the cliff
tops just outside the central city of
Danang, where the 103,000-tonne
carrier and two other US ships
began a five-day visit.
“The visit marks an enormously
significant milestone in our bilateral
relations and demonstrates US support for a strong, prosperous and
independent Vietnam,” said Daniel
Kritenbrink, the US ambassador to
Vietnam. “Through hard work, mutual respect and continuing to address the past while we work toward
a better future, we have gone from
former enemies to close partners.”
The arrival of the Vinson marks
the biggest US military presence in
Vietnam since 1975 – but it also illustrates Hanoi’s complex and evolving
relationship with Beijing over the
disputed South China Sea as China
announced its largest rise in defence
spending in three years.
Vietnamese envoys had been
working for months to ease the concerns of their Chinese neighbour
By Christine Kim
IN SEOUL
US naval officers aboard the USS Carl Vinson in Danang bay HAU DINH/AP
over the visit and the prospect of
broader security cooperation between Hanoi and Washington.
US carriers frequently cross
the South China Sea and are now
routinely shadowed by Chinese
naval vessels.
China’s rapid construction
TURKEY
GERMANY
American embassy alert
as four Isis suspects held
Merkel says no
‘gender-neutral’
anthem needed
By Suzan Fraser
IN ANKARA
Turkish police detained four Isis
suspects as part of an investigation
into a possible attack on the US
embassy in Ankara, the country’s
state-run news agency reported yesterday.
The arrests came as
the embassy was closed
over an “unspecified security threat”.
The Anadolu Agency
said police detained four
Iraqi nationals in connection with the embasy threat
against the embassy. Two were
detained at a security check on a
highway linking the Black Sea city
of Samsun to Ankara. Two others
were detained in Samsun by police
acting on information they provided, the report said.
One-minute Wijuko
How to play Place 1 – 9 once
in the grid, obeying the sums
between pairs of squares
7
By Michelle Martin
IN BERLIN
Chancellor Angela Merkel
does not want Germany’s
national anthem to be changed
her spokesman said, after a
member of the chancellor’s
Social Democrat (SPD) coalition
partner said words such as
“fatherland” and “brotherland”
should be made gender neutral.
Kristin Rose-Moehring,
the equality commissioner,
suggested getting rid of malespecific references in the
“Song of Germany”.
She had proposed replacing
“fatherland” in the anthem
with “homeland” and ditching
“brotherly with heart and hand”
in favour of “courageously with
heart and hand”.
This Saturday, in your
9
12
7
16
Security was high outside the
US embassy, yesterday, and police
searched pedestrians before allowing them to enter the street where
the embassy is located.
The US embassy said on its web
page late on Sunday that the
mission would be closed
due to a security threat,
and urged US citizens
to avoid the embassy
as well as areas with
large crowds. It also
advised citizens to
“keep a low profile.”
today but would not
provide visa services or
services to US citizens.
Turkey’s deputy prime minister
Bekir Bozdag (inset) said the US
embassy had shared intelligence
with Turkey’s intelligence and
security authorities, leading to
“important results”.
8
12
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
More puzzles
Pages 4445
and build-up of the land it holds
in the disputed Spratly Islands region has alarmed Vietnam and other
regional governments as it seeks to
enforce its claims to much of the
disputed waterway, through which
some $3trn (£2.2trn0 in trade passes
each year. REUTERS
A South Korean delegation met
North Korean leader Kim Jong-un
for dinner yesterday, after arriving
in Pyongyang on a visit aimed at
encouraging North Korea and the
United States to talk.
Both nations have expressed a
willingness to talk, but North Korea
has refused to give up its nuclear
weapons programme as demanded
by the US as a starting point.
North Korea has made no secret of
its pursuit of a nuclear-tipped missile
capable of reaching the mainland US
in defiance of UN Security Council
resolutions, seeing it as a deterrent
against what it calls US hostility. It is
also concerned about joint US-South
Korea military exercises, which it
sees as preparation for war. REUTERS
How to take better
holiday photos
Professional tips from
composition to content
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26
FOOD
Can ready
meals ever
rival home
cooking?
They’re often seen as the sign of a
bad diet. Now supermarket cooks
are responding. By Ellen Manning
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W
e might not be
proud of it, but in
Britain we all eat
one ready meal
every week on
average – twice as many as the
French and six times as many as
the Spanish. In fact, nearly half
of all the ready meals eaten in
Europe are consumed in the UK.
In the face of frequent news
studies warning that we should cut
down on the amount of processed
food we eat over dietary concerns
and links to increased cancer risk,
manufacturers have been forced to
look closely at nutritional content,
taking action to reduce salts,
sugars and saturated fats.
But they must also try to
keep them as tasty as possible –
especially for more discerning
diners who may want convenience
but not at the expense of quality.
Instead of opting for a cheap
frozen choice, many consumers
are picking “premium” chilled
dishes, according to research by
The Grocer.
That creates a challenge for
people like Austin Wheeler,
the product developer behind
Sainsbury’s latest ready meal
range, the Supper Club. “We saw
quite a big growth coming from
people wanting great quality
meals,” he says. “Another growth
was the negativity towards
ready meals and how we would
break that. We saw that as a
big opportunity.”
Wheeler and his team came up
with a range of six meals based on
people’s traditional favourites –
including beef stew and dumplings
and meatballs and pasta – using
higher quality ingredients such
as Italian Montepulciano red
wine and freshly made pasta in
the lasagne, and award-winning
Barber’s vintage cheddar in the
mac and cheese.
They’re also designed to be
“reassuringly imperfect”, he says,
to get away from the processed
feel. That means a fish pie with
mashed potato that is forked by
hand, not piped by a machine and
big chunky croutons on the mac
and cheese.
The team show me how to make
their red Thai curry – chopping,
dicing, layering and cooking, using
what I’m assured is exactly the
same method used in Sainsbury’s
production kitchen.
That’s all well and good, you
might say, but what about the
Another
View
Emma
Mathews
I’m a good
tenant but
landlords
won’t rent
to me
meals we pick off the supermarket
shelves? You could be forgiven
for wondering what additives are
included to guarantee freshness
and shelf life. But Wheeler insists
there is no “trick or secret” beyond
using the best possible ingredients
and optimum production methods.
Their meals are cooked so that
they reach a core temperature
of at least 70°C throughout for
two minutes, then transferred
to a separate area where they
are packed, sealed and stored
in a fridge at 5°C before being
distributed to stores.
“There’s a bit of a misnomer
around the ready meal,” Wheeler
argues. “It is a fallacy that these
are unhealthy dishes.” Like most
food packaging, the Supper Club
uses the traffic light system to
show you exactly what you’re
eating – and though they are not all
greens, they are still healthier than
many other premium ready meals.
“We wanted to offer authenticity,”
Wheeler says. “For example we
use a mature cheddar rather than
a mild one, which means the recipe
doesn’t require as much but still
delivers on flavour.”
Nicola Temple, the author of
Best Before: The Evolution and
Future of Processed Food, agrees
we should not view all ready
meals in the same light, nor think
that making a dish ourselves is
automatically better. Some ready
meals deliver way more than the
recommended daily allowance of
calories, she says – but so too do
plenty of our home-cooked meals.
“It’s just the same as if you’re
cooking something from scratch –
not all recipes in a recipe book are
going to be healthy. If you’re going
to choose ready meals, you should
be as discerning as in choosing any
other food. You can’t just expect
it to be a perfectly balanced meal,
you need to look and make sure
W
messages from agents featuring
the line “The landlord has decided
they do not wish to consider your
application”, are daily occurrences
for me and many others across the
country. Yet I have a guarantor
and can provide a reference from
my current agents, who can testify
I have never been in arrears. I have
even offered to pay extra up front.
Today’s lettings show four
suitable properties. One is way
outside my budget, another states:
“Sorry, no pets, DSS or smokers”
and a third stipulates they will
not consider children. The fourth
appears ideal so I call the agents.
“Sorry, this landlord will not let to
people on housing benefit, it’s just
his personal preference,” I’m told.
The main reason landlords
hat makes a good
tenant? Someone
who is clean, will
carry out basic
maintenance,
keeps honest communication with
the landlord and pays the rent on
time. They also have a good credit
score, no criminal background and
a faultless rental history.
I tick all these boxes, so why do
42 per cent of landlords have a
ban on people like me? Because I
receive housing benefit.
As a single mother working as
a freelance journalist during
school hours, I do not make
enough to pay the bills. So I
rely on housing benefit to help
pay the rent.
Listings saying “No DSS” and
NEWS
2-27
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27
ENVIRONMENT
Plenty more fish
in the sea, say
the ‘Filey Few’
Sea trout ‘netters’ are fighting to preserve
their livelihoods, writes Mike Warner
T
Fine dining? Sainsbury’s range
of Supper Club ready meals are
based on traditional favourites
The critics’ choices
A few of the healthiest ready meals
around, selected by Women’s Health:
Sainsbury’s “My
Goodness!”Courgetti Basil Kale Pesto
Tesco “Beautifully Balanced” Red
Thai Chicken Curry
Waitrose “LoveLife” Mushroom &
Aubergine Ragu
And some of the tastiest – winners
at The Grocer’s awards last year:
M&S Taste Singapore Chargrilled
Chicken & King Prawn Laksa
Morrisons “A Taste of Brazil”
Coconut Chicken Curry
M&S Scottish Lochmuir 2 Salmon
Paupiettes with Butternut Squash
& Mascarpone
gave for refusing to let to housing
benefit claimants when surveyed
by housing charity Shelter
was because of “stories they
had heard from the media and
other landlords”.
In my last house, my neighbours
were both in employment yet
their children broke fences, threw
nappies into my garden and
urinated on their shed. When
they left, the landlord had to foot
the bill for thousands of pounds
worth of damage.
This same landlord was
disappointed to see me, a housing
benefit claimant, leave, and has
pledged to find me a house if I ever
move back to the area.
Yet prospective landlords do
not care to ask for my references,
it contains what you want. For
example, you wouldn’t expect a
mac and cheese meal to provide
you with your daily greens.”
That responsibility applies to
choosing which ready meals you
eat as well as how often you eat
them, says Helen Bond of the
British Dietetic Association. “They
are not all bad, but you have to be
mindful of what you’re choosing
and know how that meal fits within
your calorie allowance for the day,
or whether or not you can use a
ready meal once in a while and add
to it. You have got to become a bit of
a detective really, knowing what’s
high in fat, what’s high in sugars,
and what’s high in salt, choosing
healthier ones if possible.”
She argues it is “always better
to cook from scratch”, but says
ready meals “do have a role
to play and there have been
real advances to improve the
nutritional content. I think the
problem is that when people rely
on them constantly, they lose touch
with home cooking.”
Is it still generally a case of can’t
cook, won’t cook? Temple thinks
that cries of “I don’t have time”
are often an easy get-out. “We all
love to talk about how busy we
are,” she says. “But if you look at
how much time people spend on
social media and watching TV, I
think we need to be realistic about
how we use our time. That means
saying not necessarily ‘We are too
busy to cook’, but ‘We would prefer
not to cook’.”
Wheeler, meanwhile, isn’t giving
up. He’s already thinking of ways
he could expand his new range and
is on a mission to help get rid of the
negative stereotype surrounding
the ready meal.
“The biggest accolade I could
bring to the ready meal is to change
that whole perception. I would love
to see that,” he says.
preferring to trust the Benefits
Street stereotype.
It’s not just landlords. Some
letting agents have a blanket
ban on dealing with housing
benefit claimants. This legal
discrimination means certain
towns are blacklisted for
low-income households, children
are unable to live in the same
area as their school friends and
families are becoming trapped in
unsuitable housing because larger
properties are unobtainable.
Discrimination in housing
only applies if you are treated
unfairly due to the “protected
characteristics” in the Equality Act
2010. These include race, age and
disability but not class or income.
Rosie Keogh recently won
compensation, on the grounds of
sex discrimination, from a letting
agent who refused to consider her
as a tenant. Keogh is also a single,
working mother who receives
benefits. Whilst classism or benefit
discrimination isn’t illegal, sex
discrimination is. In this case, the
discrimination indirectly affected a
single woman.
Housing benefit recipients are
trapped in a cycle of rejection.
We are not asking for special
treatment, only to be given
equal consideration .
Listings saying
‘No DSS’ are a
daily occurrence
he fishermen of Filey
Brigg have long been
catching sea trout, but
it is another species that
sometimes gets caught
in their nets that is causing them to
fear for their livelihoods.
The fishermen in this part of
North Yorkshire have come under
increasing pressure not to catch
salmon, a wild species that swims
with the trout. Having once been
a lucrative and seasonal by-catch,
recent changes to licences will
mean that all salmon must now be
released at sea.
Rex Harrison, a fisherman,
explains that this in itself is not a
problem for the “Filey Few,” as they
are not their main quarry – and
with recent adaptations to their
gear, virtually all salmon that end
up in their nets can be released alive
unharmed. The average salmon
catch for all the boats in the last 10
years was just 157 fish, compared
with nearly 5,000 sea trout.
“We fish with very traditional
gear from our small dinghies or
cobles, the design of which has
not really changed much over the
years,” Harrison says. “Also, in
order to comply with the terms of
our yearly renewable licence, we’re
only allowed to fish from Monday
to Friday, from April to August,
and then only between the hours of
6am and 5pm.
“The sea trout we’re targeting
start running from late April
onwards and are our single most
important catch. Stock numbers
are very healthy and because
of improvements in net design,
with a bigger mesh size and the
way we operate, no juveniles are
ever landed and that means true
selectivity at source.”
Improvements in catch selection
and by-catch reduction are not
enough, however, to stem the
tide of opposition that the men
are facing. A vocal angling lobby
argues that this handful of
seasonal netsmen are depriving
them of stock for the many
rivers, tributaries and associated
spawning grounds that get fished
day in, day out throughout the
salmon fishing season, often from
February to October.
It’s therefore unclear whether
this small band of sea fishermen
will be able to continue with their
way of life, which could have a socioeconomic impact for the town. “If
we’re forced out of business, then a
light will be extinguished, never to be
relit,” Harrison warns. “Even though
we only number six now compared
with the 14 that used to exist, our
importance to the incomes of
countless local businesses, through
just being a tourist attraction, is
unquestionable.”
Kevin Hollinrake, the local Tory
MP who is supporting their case,
says that once the fishermen’s
licences expire it is the Environment
Agency’s intention not to renew
them. This is true for all the netters
from the Humber to the Tyne, a
slowly diminishing band with little
voice and the odds heavily stacked
against them.
“We must find a solution, even
if there ends up being a compromise,”
he says. “It’s not just the fishermen
that will suffer here, it will impact
across the whole community.
“Tourism plays a crucial part in
the local economy of this coastline
and visitors flock to these historic
fishing ports just to breathe in the
atmosphere, soak up the history
and buy local produce. Once the
fishermen go, you end up with an
imbalance which will directly affect
the region’s prosperity.”
Harrison is worried that an
ignorance of the facts could
spell disaster for this close-knit
community. “If the salmon and sea
trout were in decline, I could accept
it,” he adds. “But they’re not, far
from it. The Environment Agency
surveys have shown that all the
way up the North Sea coast catch
numbers have either increased or
remained static for the last 10 years.
There are fish there to catch.
“We fish seasonally and now
with the lightest touch on the
environment you could imagine.
I want my grandchildren to be able
to fish here in the same way as I’ve
always done, but right now that
looks increasingly unlikely.”
The salmon
fishermen
of Filey
on Cobble
Landing in
Yorkshire
RICHARD
PONTER
Television Tuesday 6 March
CRITIC’S
CHOICE
GERARD GILBERT
PICK OF THE DAY
The Great Celebrity Bake Off
For Stand Up To Cancer
8pm, Channel 4
Martin Kemp, Bill Turnbull and
Roisin Conaty aren’t exactly the
A-list names that used to grace the
charity edition of The Great British
Bake Off when it was on BBC1 and in
aid of Sport Relief, but, with Harry
Hill thrown into the mix, they form a
merry quartet – inventive too
when it comes to a showstopper
that requires them to make a 3D
biscuit scene. Hill opts for a fantasy
desert-island scene featuring
Camilla Parker Bowles, while Kemp
recreates the day he played at Live
Aid. Needless to add, Prue Leith and
Paul Hollywood do the judging while
Noel Fielding and Sandi Toksvig
patrol the tent.
===
Back In Time For Tea
8pm, BBC2
“It’s basically my childhood home”,
remarks Sara Cox on entering the
Ellis house as reconfigured for the
1980s. The girls are more excited by
Pot Noodles than dad Jon’s secondhand Triumph Dolomite, but the
family is in for a rough ride during
the Thatcher decade – mum Lesley’s
dinner-lady job being outsourced
and Jon joining the epoch-changing
miners’ strike of 1984-85.
===
Amazing Hotels: Life Beyond
The Lobby
9pm, BBC2
Giles Coren and Monica Galetti check
into the most altitudinous five-star
resort in the Middle East – built,
oddly, by the Omani military for their
pension fund. It sits on the edge of a
canyon and contains 34 swimming
pools to preserve the modesty of
female bathers.
===
Seven Year Switch
9.15pm, Channel 4
This new cross between Wife Swap
and Love Island is full of dubious
ideas about long-term relationships
while, along with Channel 4’s Married
At First Sight, it signals yet another
death-knell for the seriousness of
wedding vows. To explain: four young
couples facing difficulties in their
marriages decamp to a Thai island
resort and exchange partners for a
fortnight “to question themselves and
their old relationships”. Oh, and their
luxury villas contain only one double
6.00 Caught Red Handed
(R) (S). 6.30 Coast And
Country Auctions (R) (S).
7.15 Wanted Down Under
Revisited (R) (S). 8.00 Sign
Zone: Celebrity Antiques
Road Trip (R) (S). 9.00
Victoria Derbyshire (S).
11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
(S). 12.00 Daily Politics (S).
1.00 The Super League
Show (S). 1.45 Plan It,
Build It (R) (S). 2.15 Yes
Chef (R) (S). 3.00 A Place
To Call Home (R) (S). 3.50
Pilgrimage With Simon
Reeve (R) (S). 4.50 More
Creatures Great And Small
(R) (S). 5.20 Flog It! (R) (S).
6.00 Good Morning
Britain (S). 8.30 Lorraine
(S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (S). 10.30 This
Morning (S). 12.30 Loose
Women (S). 1.30 ITV News;
Weather (S). 1.55 ITV
Regional News; Weather
(S). 2.00 James Martin’s
American Adventure (S).
3.00 Tenable (S). 3.59 ITV
Regional Weather (S). 4.00
Tipping Point (S). 5.00 The
Chase (S).
6.00 Countdown (R)
(S). 6.45 3rd Rock From
The Sun (R) (S). 7.10 3rd
Rock From The Sun
(R) (S). 7.35 Everybody
Loves Raymond (R) (S).
8.00 Everybody Loves
Raymond (R) (S). 8.30
Frasier (R) (S). 9.00 Frasier
(R) (S). 10.00 Ramsay’s
Kitchen Nightmares USA
(R) (S). 11.00 Undercover
Boss USA (R) (S). 12.00
Channel 4 News Summary
(S). 12.05 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 1.05 Posh
Pawnbrokers (R) (S). 2.10
Countdown (S). 3.00 A
Place In The Sun: Summer
Sun (R) (S). 4.00 A New Life
In The Sun (S). 5.00 Four In
A Bed (R) (S). 5.30 Extreme
Cake Makers (R) (S).
6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The
Wright Stuff (S). 11.15
Can’t Pay? We’ll Take
It Away (R) (S). 12.05
Access (S). 12.10 5 News
Lunchtime (S). 12.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors (R)
(S). 1.15 Home And Away
(S). 1.45 Neighbours (S).
2.15 NCIS: Hit & Run (R)
(S). 3.15 FILM: Bond Of
Silence (Peter Werner
2010) Drama, starring
Kim Raver (S). 5.00
5 News At 5 (S). 5.30
Neighbours (R) (S).
6.00 BBC News At
Six; Weather (S).
6.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.00 Eggheads Quiz
show (R) (S).
6.30 Great British
Railway
Journeys Goes
To Ireland (R) (S).
6.00 ITV Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.30 ITV News;
Weather (S).
6.00 The Simpsons
A miraculous
tree appears in
the Simpsons’
garden (R) (S).
6.30 Hollyoaks (S).
6.00 Home And
Away Robbo is
desperate to
convince Tori
he is a changed
man (R) (S).
6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 The One Show
Live chat and
topical reports
(S).
7.30 EastEnders (S).
7.00 Saving Lives At
Sea The story
of the volunteer
lifeboat crews
and lifeguards
of the RNLI (R)
(S).
7.00 Emmerdale (S).
7.30 100 Year Old
Driving School
A 91-year-old
woman takes a
mature driving
test (S).
7.00 Channel 4 News
(S).
7.00 Loch Lomond: A
Year In The Wild
(R) (S).
8.00 Holby City
Gaskell fights to
protect his trial
and save his
patient (S).
8.00 Back In Time
For Tea The
Ellises sample
life in the 1980s
and 1990s (S).
8.00 What Would
Your Kid Do?
Parents guess
what their
children will do
in entertaining
situations (S).
8.00 The Great
Celebrity Bake
Off For Stand
Up To Cancer
With Harry
Hill and Martin
Kemp (S).
9pm
9.00 Shetland Perez
and Tosh are
warned to
stay away
from Mathias
Soderland (S).
9.00 Amazing Hotels:
Life Beyond The
Lobby (S).
9.00 100 Years
Younger In
21 Days The
celebrities face
a liquid diet and
a two-hour trek
up a mountain.
10pm
10.00BBC News At
Ten (S).
10.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
10.45 This Country
New series (S).
10.00Mum Cathy
is having a
barbecue (S).
10.25 The
Archiveologists
(S).
10.30 Newsnight (S).
11.15 The Gap Year
Paedophile
How a gap
year student
became one of
Britain’s worst
paedophiles (S).
12.20 BBC News (S).
Daytime
6.00 Breakfast (S). 9.15
Murder, Mystery And My
Family (S). 10.00 Homes
Under The Hammer (S).
11.00 Wanted Down
Under Revisited (S). 11.45
Caught Red Handed (S).
12.15 Bargain Hunt (R) (S).
1.00 BBC News At One;
Weather (S). 1.30 BBC
Regional News; Weather
(S). 1.45 Doctors (S). 2.15
Shakespeare & Hathaway
– Private Investigators
(S). 3.00 Escape To The
Country (S). 3.45 Coast
And Country Auctions (S).
4.30 Antiques Road Trip
(R) (S). 5.15 Pointless (R) (S).
6pm
7pm
8pm
11pm
Late
bed. There’s a therapist on site to give
it all a veneer of respectability, but the
really gob-smacking aspect is the way
these people are so willing to share
their most intimate marital problems
in the first place. It surely can’t have
just been for a free holiday.
===
Mum
10pm, BBC2
It’s June now, and Cathy (Lesley
Manville) throws a barbecue.
Derek (Ross Boatman) brings his
heavily pierced teenage daughter
while the dependably misanthropic
Reg (Karl Johnson) wonders aloud
why Derek went and had kids (“Of
all the people to make more of, why
Derek?”). Outside in the garden,
Michael, Derek and Jason bond
around the barbie with a
Lesley goes ‘Back In
Time For Tea’
8pm, BBC2
6.00 The Planet’s Funniest
Animals (R) (S). 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 6.45
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 7.10
Dress To Impress (R) (S).
7.55 Emmerdale (R) (S).
8.20 Coronation Street
(R) (S). 8.50 Coronation
Street (R) (S). 9.25 The
Ellen DeGeneres Show
(R) (S). 10.15 Who’s Doing
The Dishes? (R) (S). 11.10
Dress To Impress (R) (S).
12.15 Emmerdale (R) (S).
12.50 Coronation Street
(R) (S). 1.15 Coronation
Street (R) (S). 1.45 The
Ellen DeGeneres Show (S).
2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show
(R) (S). 4.55 Judge Rinder
(R) (S).
Monica and Giles visit
some ‘Amazing Hotels’
9pm, BBC2
6.00 Take Me Out
A gamekeeper,
a bus driver, a
magician and a
student look for
love (R) (S).
7.00 Beyond 100
Days News and
analysis from
Washington DC
and London (S).
7.30 Sea City (R) (S).
7.05 FILM: Moonrise
Kingdom (Wes
Anderson 2012)
Comedy drama,
with Bruce
Willis and
Edward Norton.
7.00 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold
(R) (S).
7.30 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold
Harry Hill
narrates (R) (S).
8.00 Secrets Of The
National Trust
With Alan
Titchmarsh (S).
8.00 Immortal Egypt
With Joann
Fletcher (R) (S).
8.55 Unbroken
Interview
Special With
Angelina
Jolie and Jack
O’Connell.
8.00 Two And A Half
Men Walden is
reunited with a
former business
partner (R) (S).
8.30 Two And A Half
Men (R) (S).
9.15 Seven Year
Switch New
series. Four
couples try
to save their
relationships (S).
9.00 Wild Britain
Revealing the
hidden lives
of the UK’s
familiar and
more unusual
animals (S).
9.00 David Starkey’s
Magna Carta (R)
(S).
9.00 FILM: Unbroken
(Angelina Jolie
2014) Second
World War
drama, starring
Jack O’Connell
(S).
9.00 FILM: The
Expendables
(Sylvester
Stallone 2010)
Action thriller,
with Sylvester
Stallone (S).
10.00ITV News At Ten
(S).
10.30 ITV Regional
News (S).
10.45 The Cruise:
Voyage To
Alaska (R) (S).
10.25 Gogglebox
Reviews include
Saturday Night
Takeaway
and Celebrity
Haunted
Mansion (R) (S).
10.00Elizabeth: Our
Queen The
monarch’s
life through
the 1970s and
1980s (S).
10.00Byzantium: A
Tale Of Three
Cities The
transformation
of Istanbul
in the 20th
century (R) (S).
11.15 The World’s
Most
Extraordinary
Homes (R) (S).
11.15 Benidorm Billy
and Sheron
celebrate their
25th wedding
anniversary
with a holiday
(R) (S).
11.25 Before We Die
Hanna and
Bjorn decide
to break off the
investigation
and bring
Christian in (S).
11.05 The Yorkshire
Steam Railway:
All Aboard Life
on the North
Yorkshire Moors
Railway (R) (S).
11.00 Dreaming The
Impossible:
Unbuilt Britain
Last in the
series (R) (S).
11.40 FILM: Seven
Psychopaths
(Martin
McDonagh 2012)
Comedy thriller,
starring Colin
Farrell (S).
11.05 Family Guy
Brian has a
brush with
death (R) (S).
11.30 Family Guy (R)
(S).
12.15 Sign Zone:
Weinstein: The Inside
Story (R) (S). 1.15 Sign
Zone: Generation Gifted
(R) (S). 2.15 Sign Zone:
Royal Recipes (R) (S). 3.00
This Is BBC Two (S).
12.10 Jackpot247 3.00
Loose Women (R). 3.50
ITV Nightscreen 5.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (R) (S).
12.35 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (R) (S).
1.25 World Of Weird (R) (S).
2.20 The Supervet (R) (S).
3.15 The Question Jury (R)
(S). 4.10 Coast Vs Country
(R) (S). 5.05 Location,
Location, Location (R) (S).
12.05 Weather Terror:
Tornado Hell (R) (S). 1.00
SuperCasino 3.10 Cowboy
Builders (R) (S). 4.00 Witch
Hunt: A Century Of Murder
(R) (S). 4.45 House Doctor
(R) (S). 5.10 Nick’s Quest (R)
(S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R) (S).
12.00 Two Types: The Faces
Of Britain (R) (S). 1.00 Top
Of The Pops: 1982 (R) (S).
2.00 Fabric Of Britain (R)
(S). 3.00 Becoming A Lied
Singer: Thomas Quasthoff
And The Art Of German
Song (R) (S). 4.00 Close
1.50 FILM: How I Live
Now (Kevin Macdonald
2013) Apocalyptic thriller,
starring Saoirse Ronan (S).
4.00 Close
12.00 American Dad! (R)
(S). 12.55 Two And A Half
Men (R) (S). 1.50 Totally
Bonkers Guinness World
Records (R) (S). 2.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 2.30
Teleshopping
Gemma and Tony are
among those baring
all as they take part in
‘Seven Year Switch’
9.15pm, Channel 4
NEWS
2-27
conversation about their favourite
sexual positions. It’s horribly hilarious
and writer Stefan Golaszewski is
some sort of genius.
LAURENCE PHELAN
===
This Country
FILM
CHOICE
10.45pm, BBC1
And after Mum (see above), lovers
of good comedy can pause for 15
minutes before submerging back
into the lives of Cotswolds cousins
Kerry and Kurtan (real siblings
Daisy May and Charlie Cooper in
the second series of their brilliant
mockumentary that has been
available on online for a couple
of weeks now). Kerry has turned a
new leaf and is trying to give back
to the community, while Kurtan
has a new girlfriend – having
exhausted Tinder.
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
FILM OF THE DAY
===
7.05pm, Film4
(Wes Anderson, 2012)
Anderson’s idiosyncratic entry in
the lovers-on-the-run genre is set
in New England in 1965, steeped in
oddly remembered nostalgia, and pits
two wilful, reckless nonconformists
against straight society. The twist
is that the runaways, Suzy and Sam
(Kara Hayward and Jared Gilman, left)
are only 12 years old. What’s sweet is
that their love for each other is no less
real because of it. As ever, Anderson
is on the side of the childlike, and
it’s the adults in the film – Sam’s
scoutmaster (Edward Norton), Suzy’s
parents (Frances McDormand and Bill
Murray) and the town’s police chief
(Bruce Willis) – who have the most to
learn about living and loving.
9pm, ITV2
(Sylvester Stallone, 2010)
When the steroid-pumped action
cinema he favours became an
anachronism, Stallone resorted to
stunt casting. Jason Statham, Jet Li,
Dolph Lundgren and Mickey Rourke
join him as mercenaries on a mission
in Latin America.
Moonrise Kingdom
The Expendables
===
How I Live Now
1.50am, Film4
(Kevin Macdonald, 2013)
This moody adaptation of a YA novel
imagines life for some lovelorn
teenage cousins (Saoirse Ronan;
George MacKay; Tom Holland) after
terrorists drop a nuclear bomb on
London, and all adults turn evil.
Radio
BBC Radio 1
6.00 Classic Coronation
Street (R) (S). 6.25 Classic
Coronation Street (R)
(S). 6.50 Heartbeat (R) (S).
7.55 The Royal (R) (S). 8.55
Judge Judy (R) (S). 9.25
Judge Judy (R) (S). 9.50
Judge Judy (R) (S). 10.20
Inspector Morse (R) (S).
12.35 The Royal (R) (S).
1.35 Heartbeat (R) (S).
2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (R) (S). 3.15 Classic
Coronation Street (R)
(S). 3.45 On The Buses (R)
(S). 4.20 On The Buses
(R) (S). 4.50 You’re Only
Young Twice (R) (S). 5.25
Rising Damp (R) (S). 5.55
Heartbeat (R) (S).
7.00 Murder, She
Wrote A lawyer
is murdered (R)
(S).
8.00 Midsomer
Murders The
maid of honour
is stabbed at a
baron’s wedding
(R) (S).
6.00 Hollyoaks (R) (S). 6.30
Hollyoaks (R) (S). 7.00
Rude(ish) Tube (R) (S). 7.30
How I Met Your Mother
(R) (S). 8.00 Baby Daddy
(R) (S). 9.00 Melissa & Joey
(R) (S). 10.00 How I Met
Your Mother (R) (S). 11.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (R) (S).
11.30 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(R) (S). 12.00 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 12.30 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 1.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S). 1.30 The Big
Bang Theory (R) (S). 2.00
Melissa & Joey (R) (S). 2.30
Melissa & Joey (R) (S). 3.00
Baby Daddy (R) (S). 3.30
Baby Daddy (R) (S). 4.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (R) (S).
4.30 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(R) (S). 5.00 The Goldbergs
(R) (S).
8.55 Food Unwrapped (R)
(S). 9.30 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (R) (S). 10.30 A
Place In The Sun: Winter
Sun (R) (S). 11.30 Four In
A Bed (R) (S). 12.05 Four
In A Bed (R) (S). 12.35 Four
In A Bed (R) (S). 1.05 Four
In A Bed (R) (S). 1.40 Four
In A Bed (R) (S). 2.10 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 2.40
Come Dine With Me (R)
(S). 3.10 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 3.45 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 4.15 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 4.50
A Place In The Sun: Winter
Sun (R) (S). 5.55 Walks
With My Dog (R) (S).
6.00 Monkey Life (R)
(S). 6.30 Monkey Life (R)
(S). 7.00 RSPCA Animal
Rescue (R) (S). 7.30 RSPCA
Animal Rescue (R) (S). 8.00
Send In The Dogs Australia
(R) (S). 8.30 Send In The
Dogs Australia (R) (S). 9.00
Road Wars (R) (S). 10.00
Warehouse 13 (R) (S). 11.00
Forever (R) (S). 12.00 NCIS:
Los Angeles (R) (S). 1.00
Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S). 2.00
Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S). 3.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (R) (S).
4.00 Stargate SG-1 (R) (S).
5.00 The Simpsons (R).
5.30 Futurama (R) (S).
6.00 Richard E Grant’s
Hotel Secrets (R) (S). 7.00
Richard E Grant’s Hotel
Secrets (R) (S). 8.00 The
British (R) (S). 9.00 The
West Wing (R) (S). 10.00
The West Wing (R) (S).
11.00 House (R) (S). 12.00
House (R) (S). 1.00 Without
A Trace (R) (S). 2.00 Blue
Bloods (R) (S). 3.00 The
West Wing (R) (S). 4.00
The West Wing (R) (S). 5.00
House (R) (S).
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast
Show With Nick Grimshaw
10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00
Greg James 5.45 Newsbeat
6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th With Charlie
Sloth 11.00 Huw Stephens 1am
Annie Nightingale 3.00 Radio 1
Comedy – Ed & Lauren Get On
4.00 Radio 1’s Early Breakfast
Show With Adele Roberts
BBC Radio 1Xtra
6am Dotty 10.00 Ace 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Yasmin Evans
4.00 MistaJam 5.45 Newsbeat
6.00 MistaJam 7.00 DJ Target
9.02 The 8th With Charlie Sloth
11.00 Jamz Supernova 1am
Annie Nightingale Presents
3.00 1Xtra Mixes 4.00 Jamz
Supernova
BBC Radio 2
6.00 The Big Bang
Theory Kripke
plays a prank on
Sheldon (R) (S).
6.30 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.55 The Supervet
Noel Fitzpatrick
treats a shihtzu cross for its
deformed front
legs (R) (S).
6.00 Futurama (R)
(S).
6.30 The Simpsons
Homer takes the
family to New
York (R) (S).
6.00 House A patient
mimics the
personalities of
others (R) (S).
7.00 Hollyoaks (S).
7.30 My Hotter Half
A Birmingham
duo are among
the couples
taking part (S).
7.55 Grand Designs
A family
that built an
oak-framed
hexagonal
house (R) (S).
7.00 The Simpsons
Principal
Skinner is
exposed as an
imposter (R) (S).
7.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
7.00 CSI: Crime
Scene
Investigation
A plane
passenger dies
mysteriously (R)
(S).
8.00 The Flash
A hostage
situation gives
Ralph the
chance to prove
himself (S).
8.00 In Too Deep:
The Race To
Save The Final
Frontier
8.00 The Big
Bang Theory
Leonard’s car is
stolen (R) (S).
8.30 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
i
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
9.00 Tattoo Fixers
Alice waves her
magic wand for
real-life witch
Kamila (S).
9.00 Dunkirk: The
New Evidence
The famous
Second World
War evacuation
of Allied
soldiers (R) (S).
9.00 The Blacklist
Red takes action
when a good
friend is framed
for a crime.
9.00 Here And Now
Audrey finds
herself thrown
into the media
spotlight (S).
10.00Scott & Bailey
Janet moves a
step closer to
tracking down
Veronica’s killer
(R) (S).
10.00Naked
Attraction
Contenders
Mark and Justin
each select their
dates (R) (S).
10.00Churchill’s
Girl The life
of Pamela
Harriman (R) (S).
10.00The Late Late
Show With
James Corden:
Best Of The
Week Chat and
entertainment
show.
10.10 Divorce Frances
has to deal
with Lila’s bad
attitude (S).
10.45 Crashing New
series.
11.00 Scott & Bailey
Rachel narrowly
avoids being
run over by a
car (R) (S).
11.05 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
11.35 The Big
Bang Theory
Amy hosts a
Christmas Eve
dinner (R) (S).
11.05 24 Hours In
A&E A girl is
treated after
being hit by a
car and knocked
under a bus (R)
(S).
11.00 The Force:
Essex Officers
investigate a
burglary in
Basildon (R) (S).
11.20 Save Me
Thriller, starring
Lennie James
(R).
12.05 A Touch Of Frost (R)
(S). 2.05 ITV3 Nightscreen
2.30 Teleshopping
12.00 First Dates (R) (S).
1.05 Tattoo Fixers (R) (S).
2.10 Naked Attraction (R)
(S). 3.05 Rude Tube (R) (S).
3.55 Rude Tube (R) (S). 4.20
The Goldbergs (R) (S). 4.40
How I Met Your Mother
(R) (S).
12.10 8 Out Of 10 Cats
Does Countdown (R) (S).
1.15 The Good Fight (R) (S).
2.15 24 Hours In A&E (R)
(S). 3.15 8 Out Of 10 Cats (R)
(S). 3.55 Close
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme
World (R) (S). 1.00 Brit
Cops: Frontline Crime UK
(R) (S). 2.00 Most Shocking
(R) (S). 3.00 The Force:
Essex (R) (S). 4.00 It’s Me
Or The Dog (R) (S). 5.00
Futurama (R) (S).
12.20 Gomorrah (R) (S).
1.20 Gomorrah (R) (S). 2.20
Billions (R) (S). 3.30 Girls
(R) (S). 4.05 The West Wing
(R) (S). 5.00 The West Wing
(R) (S).
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken
Bruce 12noon Jeremy Vine
2.00 Steve Wright In The
Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo
7.00 Jamie Cullum 8.00 Jo
Whiley 10.00 Bill Kenwright’s
Golden Years 11.00 Nigel
Ogden: The Organist Entertains
12mdn’t Sounds Of The 80s
2.00 Radio 2’s Folk Playlist 3.00
Radio 2 Playlist: 90s Hits 4.00
Radio 2 Playlist: Wednesday
Workout 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
BBC Radio 3
6.30am Breakfast. With
Georgia Mann. 9.00 Essential
Classics. 12noon Composer
Of The Week: Rachel Portman.
1.00 News 1.02 Radio 3
Lunchtime Concert. 2.00
Afternoon Concert. 5.00 In
Tune. 7.00 In Tune Mixtape.
7.30 Radio 3 In Concert. 10.00
Free Thinking. Philip Dodd
talks to author Arundhati Roy.
10.45 The Essay: Minds At War.
Journalist Lyse Doucet reflects
on novelist Edith Wharton’s
reportage from wartime
France. 11.00 Late Junction.
Verity Sharp features AGF,
Ani DiFranco, and ArtZoyd.
12.30am Through The Night.
With Jonathan Swain.
BBC Radio 4
6am Today 9.00 The Life
Scientific 9.30 One To One
9.45 An Alternative History
Of Art 10.00 Woman’s Hour
11.00 Aftermath 11.30 The
Art Of Now: No Singing No
Movement 12noon News
12.04 Home Front 12.15 Call
You And Yours 12.57 Weather
1.00 The World At One 1.45
Political Thinking With Nick
Robinson 2.00 The Archers
2.15 Drama: The Unforgiven
3.00 Short Cuts 3.30 Costing
The Earth 4.00 Law In Action
4.30 A Good Read 5.00 PM
5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock
News 6.30 Sara Pascoe: The
Modern Monkey. The comedian
examines territory. 7.00 The
Archers. Philip has a confession
to make. 7.15 Front Row. Arts
programme. 7.45 The Citadel.
By AJ Cronin. Dramatised by
Christopher Reason. 8.00 File
On 4. The disappearance of
TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
29
ON DEMAND
Flint Town
Netflix
Sharp docu-series riding with
the police in Flint, Michigan.
UnREAL
Amazon Prime
Deliciously catty satire on
reality TV dating shows.
The £1 Houses: Britain’s
Cheapest Street
All4
A fascinating social
experiment in which aspiring
homeowners buy derelict
houses in Liverpool for a quid.
thousands of Bitcoins from
an exchange. 8.40 In Touch.
News for people who are
blind or partially sighted. 9.00
Inside Health. Dr Mark Porter
separates medical fact from
fiction. 9.30 The Life Scientific.
Jim Al-Khalili talks to Clare
Grey about batteries that could
power the future. 10.00 The
World Tonight. With Ritula
Shah. 10.45 Book At Bedtime:
The Long Drop. By Denise
Mina. 11.00 Tim Key’s Late
Night Poetry Programme. 11.30
Today In Parliament. Political
news, presented by Sean
Curran. 12mdn’t News And
Weather 12.30 An Alternative
History Of Art 12.48 Shipping
Forecast 1.00 As BBC World
Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast
5.30 News Briefing 5.43 Prayer
For The Day 5.45 Farming
Today 5.58 Tweet Of The Day
BBC Radio 4 LW
8.30am Yesterday In
Parliament 9.45 Daily Service
12.01pm Shipping Forecast
5.54 Shipping Forecast 9.45
Test Match Special 1am Test
Match Special
BBC Radio 4 Extra
6am Burnt 6.30 International
Women’s Day On 4 Extra
7.00 Stockport, So Good
They Named It Once 7.30
Sara Pascoe: The Modern
Monkey 8.00 Doddy’s Comic
Cuts 8.30 The Men From The
Ministry 9.00 The Now Show
9.30 Turf Wars 10.00 Happy
Jack 11.00 Winston Graham
Short Stories 11.15 The Old
Ladies At The Zoo 12noon
Doddy’s Comic Cuts 12.30 The
Men From The Ministry 1.00
Burnt 1.30 Her Story Made
History 2.00 A Delicate Truth
2.15 Grimm Thoughts 2.30
The Old Curiosity Shop 2.45
A Confession 3.00 Happy Jack
4.00 Jest A Minute 4.30 Such
Rotten Luck 5.00 Stockport,
So Good They Named It
Once 5.30 Sara Pascoe: The
Modern Monkey 6.00 The
Interplanetary Notes Of
Ambassador B 6.15 Five Ghost
Stories 6.30 And The Academy
Award Goes To 7.00 Doddy’s
Pick
ofthe
day
Nigel Ogden:
The Organist
Entertains
11pm, BBC Radio 2
Ogden (above)
indulges in a spot
of nostalgia as
he revisits the
first ever edition
of The Organist
Entertains, which
was broadcast on
11 June 1969.
Comic Cuts 7.30 The Men
From The Ministry 8.00 Burnt
8.30 Her Story Made History
9.00 Winston Graham Short
Stories 9.15 The Old Ladies
At The Zoo 10.00 Comedy
Club: Sara Pascoe: The Modern
Monkey 10.30 Comedy Club:
Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The
Nation 10.55 Comedy Club: The
Comedy Club Interview 11.00
Comedy Club: Warhorses Of
Letters 11.15 Comedy Club:
Poets’ Tree 11.30 Comedy
Club: The Mel And Sue Thing
12mdn’t The Interplanetary
Notes Of Ambassador B 12.15
Five Ghost Stories 12.30 And
The Academy Award Goes To
1.00 Burnt 1.30 Her Story
Made History 2.00 A Delicate
Truth 2.15 Grimm Thoughts
2.30 The Old Curiosity Shop
2.45 A Confession 3.00 Happy
Jack 4.00 Jest A Minute
4.30 Such Rotten Luck 5.00
Stockport, So Good They
Named It Once 5.30 Sara
Pascoe: The Modern Monkey
BBC 5 Live
6am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00
The Emma Barnett Show With
Anna Foster 1pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00
5 Live Sport 7.45 5 Live Sport:
Champions League Football
2017-18 10.30 Adrian Goldberg
1am Up All Night 5.00 Morning
Reports 5.15 Wake Up To
Money
BBC 6 Music
7am Shaun Keaveny 10.00
Lauren Laverne 1pm Mark
Radcliffe 4.00 Steve Lamacq
7.00 Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon
Coe 12mdn’t 6 Music
Recommends With Tom
Ravenscroft 1.00 The First
Time With REM 2.00 The
Upsetter – Lee “Scratch” Perry
In His Own Words 2.30 6
Music Live Hour 3.30 6 Music’s
Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
6am More Music Breakfast
9.00 John Suchet 1pm AnneMarie Minhall 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics
At Seven 8.00 The Full Works
Concert. Jane Jones pays
tribute to the Simon Bolivar
Symphony Orchestra of
Venezuela. 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1am Sam Pittis
Absolute Radio
6am Christian O’Connell’s
Breakfast Show 10.00 Leona
Graham 1pm Andy Bush 4.00
Dave Berry 7.00 Danielle Perry
10.00 Pete Donaldson 1am
Chris Martin
Heart
6am Jamie And Emma
9.00 Toby Anstis 1pm Matt
Wilkinson 4.00 JK And Lucy
7.00 Sian Welby 10.00 Kat
Shoob 1am Simon Beale 4.00
Jenni Falconer
TalkSPORT
6am The Alan Brazil Sports
Breakfast 10.00 Jim White
1pm Hawksbee And Baker 4.00
Adrian Durham And Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00
Sports Bar 1am Extra Time
With Adam Catterall
Live well,
grow less
Arts
Life on the edge
A photography exhibition
examines communities
outside the norm
Page 36
Nature
Orchidding about
How a walk with his
parents led to Jon Dunn
devoting his life to orchids
Page 32
To save the
planet, we
need to stop
obsessing
about growth
and GDP, the
influential
‘renegade
economist’
Kate Raworth
tells Kate
Hughes
I
n a week’s time, the Chancellor of the Exchequer will stand
up and tell the nation how our
economy is moving forward.
In his Spring Statement – essentially a mini-Budget intended to
deal purely with long-term issues –
Philip Hammond will use universally
recognised terms and measures like
‘fiscal policy’ and ‘GDP’ while bidding to convince his peers, us voters,
investors and industry leaders that
we are thriving.
He will, just like his counterparts
around the world always do, deliver a
speech envisioning a rosy long-term
future of economic expansion into
unlimited space for the UK. Hammond’s unspoken message will be
clear: that our position as a country,
for businesses and consumers, is
safe, secure and sustainable.
It will be detailed, painfully dull,
steeped in traditional economic theory, and, if you believe some of the most
influential minds in modern economics, could prove ultimately fatal.
A new breed of thinkers is warning
that if we don’t finally acknowledge
that economies consuming and trading vast and ever-increasing quantities of goods around the planet
ultimately rely on a finite source of,
well, everything, we’ll have no future
to thrive in.
The problem is hundreds of years
of economic thinking means we automatically associate security and
success with relentless growth, both
in everyday life and in the financial
and economic foundation that modern life depends on. We are taught
that we need more money,
more things, more everything. If we reach a
plateau of any kind it
is akin to failure.
Most dangerous,
all the models for
that endless growth
used by our politicians, business leaders and economics
professors ignore one
simple truth: it all comes
from natural resources, which
are finite and/or will harm the planet
if over-used.
The delusion is so widespread
that the most basic model in the
textbooks handed out on day one of
every introductory economics class
on the planet ignores that fact completely, as well as growing inequality.
Why? Probably because there hasn’t
really been a decent alternative view.
Finding a balance
One of those fighting to get us all to
rethink everything we thought we
knew is self-styled ‘renegade economist’ Kate Raworth.
“I looked back on my career and
realised I had spent almost 20 years
working in villages in Zanzibar, at
the United Nations, at Oxfam, working on issues trying to bring out
things that were invisible in
mainstream economics,”
says the University of
Oxford academic, citing
examples from climate
change and its social
justice impact to unpaid care work.
Raworth is the author
of Doughnut Economics,
acclaimed as one of the best
business books of the past year
by the Financial Times and Forbes for
its radical arguments on how the
way we live could be made fairer and
more sustainable – such as a universal basic income, a global tax system
aimed at redistributing wealth, and
greater recognition for the value and
demands of unpaid work.
“When I looked back at my economic textbooks, or when I sit in
on economics lectures, I am struck
that the students are still being
taught the same diagrams, the same
very narrow mindset as a starting
point more than 25 years later, even
though so much in the world has
changed,” she says.
“The challenges of the 21st century are unprecedented and last century’s economic theories were never
written to take them on. The economists who created them would be astounded that we were drawing from
their models drawn up 100 years ago
and concepts created 200 years ago.
It’s time for a rewrite. Today’s economy students know it.”
In fact, economics students
around the world have become so
disillusioned by the models they are
being taught that there have been
protests. But don’t make the mistake of thinking that this movement
to change the aspirations of every society on the planet is simply the latenight student halls chat of the naïve
and restless.
Raworth is on the leading edge of
this movement. And her model for
the future, her manifesto for the 21stcentury economist as the driving
force behind fundamental sustainable change, is being taken seriously
by some of the biggest players.
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
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30-39
Author Kate Raworth
(left) argues that
the Earth has finite
resources and we
need to balance our
consumption GETTY
THE AIMS OF DOUGHNUT
ECONOMICS EXPLAINED
rely, above all, on convincing those
furthest from the abstract world of
economic theory – the millions of us
getting on with life – that change can
provide a secure, safe, “prosperous”
space for ourselves and our families.
So how do you alter the way people think when it comes to how and
what they consume, as well as the
way their businesses work – people
who have more immediate things
to worry about, like what changes
Hammond might make to their tax
credits, child benefit, pension or
property price?
“I’m only reflecting what people
are already doing. Much of the new
economy is being created first by
practice and then by theories following it,” Raworth says.
“I’m struck by the number of people who have never studied economics and say that this model makes
sense to them, that they’ve always
wondered why economies have to
grow forever. It almost makes more
intuitive sense to them than it does
to those who have studied economics, or work in the finance sector or
in government and whose whole day
is structured within the old logic.
“If you consider the kind of
economy it is trying to describe, it
makes sense. People want to live in
a community, where neighbours collaborate, where their kids are safe,
where the environment is healthy,
where their energy comes from a
solar panel on the roof so they’re
not paying bills and their walls
are well insulated, where their job
Climate
change
Food
AL
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Networks
SH
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AT
IV
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Peace
& Justice
Social Political
equity voice
E AN
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Education
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Bio loss
N
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Income
& work
Housing
Gender
equality
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Chemi
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pollut
Health
Energy
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Water
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JUST SPACE FOR
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HU
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LOGICAL CEILING
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O
By Kate Raworth
unprecedented one: to
bring all of humanity into
that safe and just space.
The Doughnut’s
inner ring – its social
foundation – sets out the
basics of life on which
no one should be left
falling short. These 12
basics include: sufficient
food; clean water and
decent sanitation; access
to energy and clean
cooking facilities; access
to education and to
healthcare; a minimum
income and decent work;
and access to networks
of information and
to networks of social
support.
Furthermore, it calls
for achieving these with
gender equality, social
equity, political voice, and
peace and justice.
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
31
It’s time for a
rewrite of theories.
Today’s economy
students know it
Even the Chinese government,
once infamous for pursuing doubledigit annual growth, has revised
down its targets – and government
officials have cited Raworth’s model.
So what is this brave new world
view that just might save us all? It’s
a doughnut. Obviously.
“I drew this diagram of a doughnut, never intending to rewrite economic theory, I just like drawing
diagrams and I wanted to draw a
clear, simple picture of what 21stcentury prosperity would look like.
“It begged the question of what
economic mindset would enable us
to meet the needs of all within the
needs of the planet.”
Raworth is careful to make clear
that her approach is based on the
work of many people across a range
of disciplines, and that she’s keen for
others to build upon it – creating a
more diverse view for the future.
“John Maynard Keynes said it is
not the new ideas that are difficult,
it’s escaping from the old ones,” she
says. “When you look back at old
economic theories you can’t help but
notice that they’re all by rich, white,
mostly English-speaking men.
“There is a consequence to who
creates theories, from the things
they notice and don’t notice. Anyone
presenting ideas has a responsibility to recognise they’re coming from
somewhere and to be honest about
the particular world their ideas are
coming from.”
Shifting attitudes so ingrained
that they are subconscious must
What exactly is the
Doughnut? It’s a
radically new compass
for guiding humanity
this century. Below its
social foundation lie
shortfalls in human wellbeing, faced by those
who lack life’s essentials
such as food, education
and housing. Beyond
the ecological ceiling
lies an overshoot of
pressure on Earth’s lifegiving systems, such as
through climate change,
ocean acidification and
chemical pollution.
But between these
two lies a sweet spot –
shaped unmistakably
like a doughnut – that
is both an ecologically
safe and socially just
space for humanity. the
21st-century task is an
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
is secure because it is rooted in
the community.”
Raworth isn’t without her critics,
of course. Some environmentalists
warn it doesn’t go far enough, others
that she doesn’t adequately deal with
major components of the modern
global economy such as non-renewable natural resources.
The detail in the doughnut
There’s also the question of development. Isn’t this a privileged view for
those inhabiting soaring spires or
glass towers in western economies?
“We should all be pursuing prosperity,” she asserts. “But that’s different from endless GDP growth.
In mainstream economics, endless
growth is implicit in the way everyone talks about success. In nature,
nothing grows forever..
“Ethiopia and Cambodia are two
of the fastest growing countries
with 7 to 10 per cent growth in GDP.
They need that growth to invest in
education, housing, health, energy.
These economies need to translate
that growth into wellbeing for all
people rather than seeing the rising inequality that some fast growing countries have. Other countries
like Japan and France have very flat
growth. I don’t think we want to say
that should be the end of growth. We
shouldn’t be fixated on whether GDP
is going up or down. Today, we have
economies with extreme levels of inequality – in the UK and elsewhere
– and which are deeply degenerative, running down the living world
in which we live.
“We need to transform our economies and the dynamics of how they
work so they become regenerative
within the cycles of the living world
and distributive of opportunity and
the ownership of wealth. That’s not
going to happen if growth just stops.
“What we need is a transformation away from the reliance on endless growth. That’s the 21st-century
journey. And it’s a big shift.”
A growing number of the most
powerful individuals and organisations in the world are taking note.
Raworth has been approached for
advice by everyone from British
politicians and international business leaders to Swedish town planners looking for new ways to design
a city district.
Frustratingly, but unsurprisingly,
she won’t be drawn on the details of
implementing that shift. She offers
few specific policies that she believes
Hammond should adopt next week,
for example. But then she’s an economist. Her gaze is fixed on the horizon
more than the ground.
‘Doughnut Economics: Seven
Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century
Economist’ by Kate Raworth (£9.99,
Random House Business)
32
Nature
The orchids are all right
A childhood fascination
with some of Britain’s most
alluring flowers became a
lifetime obsession thanks
to one springtime walk,
recalls JonDunn
T
he hill was steep and came
at the end of our family
walk out of Curry Rivel,
across the sheep-pared
field that surrounded the
Monument, along the damp flank
of the saturated Levels and thence
back up to the village. It was early
April, at the back of a wet and interminable winter, and the walk had
been muddy. My dad was in a hurry
to get back to the fireside, and my
mum to our allotment, where there
was digging and work to do. Red Hill
was all that stood between us and an
afternoon of predictable family life.
I was lagging behind my parents
as we tackled the incline, scraping
thick wedges of Somerset mud onto
the tarmac from the soles of my
boots. I longed to stay down on the
Levels, to see what wildlife I could
find. The bubbling calls of curlews
were receding as I headed reluctantly homewards.
It was at that moment when everything changed forever.
My mum was calling me from
somewhere out of sight, and my
head must have lifted in response to
her impatient summons. There, high
on the grassy bank that rose steeply
above the lane, was a lone purple
flower. Heedless of the brambles
that laced the grass, I scrambled up
to it – I knew what I thought it was
or, rather, what I dearly wanted it to
be. This, surely, was my first orchid.
Nobody shared my love of the
natural world – certainly none of my
peers, and definitely neither of my
parents. I think they were always
slightly bemused it was all I cared
about. I found people baffling and
school relentless – endless weeks
of petty restrictions, rules and incomprehensible lessons. Whatever
I could discover in the countryside
around our small house, I wanted
to identify, to learn everything there
was to know about it and, occasionally, to take home with me to marvel
at some more. This was tolerated in
some instances – half a blackbird
eggshell on my bedroom windowsill
was fine – and less so on other occasions: for example, my plans to keep
slow-worms in my bedroom foundered in their infancy.
My reference materials in those
early days were meagre – three volumes of the Observer’s series, covering butterflies, birds and wildflowers.
I devoured their pages, eager to see
every species they contained.
During our first summer in Curry
Rivel, it was the butterflies first and
foremost that caught my eye. I suddenly found butterflies wherever I
looked. Our garden, so sterile and
tame, at least had flaming small tortoiseshells and velvety peacocks on
the buddleias, but once I started to
explore beyond the village limits, I
found countless treasures.
I wandered hills shimmering with common blues, sought
chocolate-brown and burnt-orange
gatekeepers defending stretches of
hedgerows frosted with pink and
white dog roses, and chased the
fleet, saffron-clouded yellows that
eluded my every attempt to catch
them racing through fields of red
and white clover. In autumn, while
I stole apples, pears and plums in
abandoned orchards, drunken red
admirals feasted at my feet on fermenting windfalls carved hollow by
drowsy wasps.
As autumn washed into winter,
the water in the rhynes that bound
the Levels rose inexorably. Soon vast
silver sheets covered the fields below
the village as far as the eye could see.
I became more aware of birds – the
Levels pulsed with wildfowl, while
snipe exploded in front of my feet
as I picked my way through sodden
meadows. My usual routes through
the fields were often rendered impassable by water, and more than
once I relied on the kindness of farmers to lift me over swollen rhynes in
the bucket of their diggers. Our garden, meanwhile, briefly hosted redwings, impossibly exotic thrushes
for one who had only noticed blackbirds and song thrushes hitherto.
School and the short winter daylight meant my wanderings were
severely curtailed, and I returned
to the Observer’s Book of Wildflowers
for inspiration on the dark evenings
while my parents watched the news
and I lay on the rug in front of our
wood fire. I yearned for summer and
the return of the butterflies. Before
Nobody shared my
love of the natural
world – certainly none
of my peers
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
33
This Saturday, in your
money
business
Saving for the next
generation:
The most
tax-efficient
way to save
for your
grandchild
they could come, there would be
flowers as the world sparked into life
once more.
I had no idea how scant the coverage of Britain’s wildflowers was
in the poor little Observer’s guide.
These modest books were my bibles,
and I took communion from their
pages. My fervour was reserved for
one family alone that winter – I read
the descriptions of the orchids over
and over again, and tried to find out
more about them at our local library.
I took what little I could glean
home with me, like a special pebble
brought back from the beach and set
on a shelf to be admired daily. Now
I knew what our orchids were: part
of a vast plant family that ran into
thousands of species, they had simple leaves but marvellously complex
flowers comprised of three sepals
and three petals, with one of those
petals usually radically different
from its fellows. Looking at illustrations in books, I found them utterly
glamorous, so improbable and unlikely to be found in the waterlogged
countryside around our little house.
I longed to see one – nothing else
would do.
When the moment came, on the
sides of Red Hill, it had an intensity
that I remember vividly to this day.
Indeed, even now when I see a new
species of orchid, I get a sense of the
hypersaturated perception of reality
that gripped me that afternoon when
I knelt beside this keenly anticipated
plant. The leaves were dark, glossy
green, and heavily blotched with
deep, bruised markings, like leopard spots that had run in the wash.
But it was the flower that captured
me – held proudly above the leaves
by a thick, fleshy stem, the individual
blooms were delicate, curving sculptures of a rich, royal purple with a
clarity and intensity of colour quite
unlike any flower I’d ever seen before. I felt breathless.
In the years to come, I would meet
a woman who, in that first moment
of our eyes locking, I would know
with utter certainty was the one, the
person I would love with all my soul,
no matter what. I felt blessed and
scared all at once. But I knew that
feeling from a long time ago – I had
felt that physical, visceral impact
when I saw my first orchid on the
side of a Somerset hill high above
the Levels.
My parents had retraced their
steps by that point, and were loudly
demanding I stop looking at flowers
and come back down to the lane to
walk home with them. There was,
of course, only one thing I could do
under the circumstances, torn between the bonds of parental loyalty
and the consuming beauty of my first
orchid. I picked it.
With hindsight, I’m not proud of
that. At the time, however, it seemed
like the sensible thing to do. I thrust
the flower into my jacket pocket and
scrambled back down to the lane.
Now I couldn’t wait to get home – I
wanted to study my treasure in
more detail before I consigned it to
be pressed between some sheets of
newspaper and a pile of my dad’s
Dick Francis hardbacks.
Today, sitting in my crofthouse in
Shetland while the wind smears rain
on the salt-encrusted windows and
the day fades, I still have that first
early purple orchid. It is a brittle,
sad shadow of the beautiful flower
it once was on a spring afternoon
in Somerset. While the colour may
have faded in the intervening years,
the love that ignited that day never
did. I had been lost to orchids, and
this was going to be a lifelong affair.
This is an edited excerpt from ‘Orchid
Summer: In Search of the Wildest
Flowers of the British Isles’ by Jon
Dunn (£18.99, Bloomsbury), released
on Thursday
8 da
half-boys
from onard
ly
£899pp
Some of the flowers
which feature in the
book: from left, greenwinged orchid; Bee
Orchid var chlorantha;
early marsh orchid;
Violet Helleborine var
rosea; and, bottom left,
Fly x Bee orchid hybrid
Dubrovnik, Montenegro
& the Dalmatian Coast
Departures up to October 2018
from a selection of regional airports
Your tour includes...
✓ Guided tour of Dubrovnik the ‘Pearl of the Adriatic’
✓ Visit to Krka National Park and its series of stunning waterfalls and lakes
✓ Visit to Mostar, with its iconic bridge
✓ Tour of beautiful, unspoilt Montenegro with visits to the UNESCO-listed
towns of Perast and Kotor
✓ Guided tour of Split including entrance to the Emperor Diocletian’s
monumental palace, one of the greatest of ancient Roman structures
✓ Visit to medieval Trogir, one of Dalmatia’s most seductive old ports
✓ Tour the Dalmatian coastline, studded with Venetian influenced villages
✓ Return flights from a selection of regional airports, plus all hotel transfers
✓ Seven nights’ four-star hotel accommodation, with breakfast and dinner
✓ The services of our experienced and
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Prices are based on two people sharing and are correct at time of print. Single
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conditions of Riviera Travel, ABTA V4744 ATOL 3430 protected. Subject to
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For more information or to book,
please call: 01283 523447
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Arts
Outside
the
BOX
A new photography exhibition
at the Barbican celebrates
people living beyond
mainstream society. Is it art or
voyeurism, asks Hettie Judah
If you’re
staying
in...
BOOKS
Fathers and
Sons
BY HOWARD CUNNELL
Howard Cunnell
tells us about his
child: “I need to
tell her I’m not
her blood father.”
He skips back
in time to his
own childhood.
A day at the
beach. He grew up without a
father. And the child whose
blood father he isn’t, isn’t a
girl. She, now he, is trans. A
superb book about a man, his
emotions, his family, a father
who disappeared and a son
who appeared.
STREAMING
Paddington
2
CERTIFICATE PG,
101 MINS
An
unabashedly
wholesome
and crowdpleasing sequel. Ben
Whishaw voices the bear
while Hugh Grant steals the
show as the hammy villain.
On Amazon Video now and
DVD from 12 March.
A
nother Kind of Life:
P h o t o g ra p h y o n t h e
Margins walks a tricky
line. The exhibition’s
underlying appeal
is its transgressive
associations: photography from the
last 60 years evoking life beyond the
confines of mainstream society.
For some – be they hippy communities
in the Soviet Union photographed by
Igor Palmin, Danny Lyons’s bikers,
or the American survivalists tracked
down by Alec Soth – life on the margins
is a choice. For the Ukrainian homeless
documented by Boris Mikhailov, or the
teenage runaways driven to prostitution
and drug addiction photographed by
Mary Ellen Mark and Jim Goldberg,
however, precarious existence beyond
the law is the result of forces beyond
their control.
Are we voyeurs, in wanting to
look at these photographs? Is it
a thrill, to explore life beyond the
conservative dictates of society? Are
we transgressing by proxy? I would say
in some cases we are.
The enduring popularity of Larry
Clark’s 1971 Tulsa series, documenting
his contemporaries’ descent into
hard drug use and violence in 1960s
suburbia, rests in part on its unflinching
depiction of sex and heroin addiction.
Tulsa was photographed by Clark
from the position of participant, but his
career-long fascination with teenage
subcultures and explicit depiction of
their sex and drug-taking in movies
such as Kids (1995) have attracted
accusations of exploitation and
voyeurism. Clark may be behind the
camera, but in wanting to look at his
photographs and watch his films, where
does that position us?
Mary Ellen Mark’s photographs of
teenagers on the streets of Seattle,
while still unflinching, have little of
Clark’s prurience. They are profoundly
upsetting, documenting young teens
whose childhood has been ripped
away, still clinging fervently to fraying
ragdolls with one hand as they chug
cigarettes with the other. The picture of
a girl who looks perhaps 12 or 13 years
old being felt-up by the middle-aged
“ferret man” from the funfair chilled me
to the marrow.
Boris Mikhailov’s photographs of
homeless and desperately poor women
and men in Kharkov, Ukraine, occupy
a very different but no less disturbing
universe from Mark’s adolescent
runaways. The series shown here
presents a “wedding”, with the bride
and groom, in many photos, stripped
down to their boots and underpants.
Theirs is an atmosphere of hysteric,
manic jubilation that might at any
moment trip into misery as they
perform for the camera.
Mikhailov pays the subject of his
photographs, so one might argue they
play an active role in the way they are
presented to public view. The photographer says that it is important to document lives that otherwise go overlooked,
and to do so unsqueamishly, with the
humanising emotion of the everyday.
They are difficult photographs, nonetheless, offering details – such as the
stained, damp crotch of the woman’s
underpants – that are disquietingly intimate. There are knotty questions here
about consent and how to interpret it,
particularly in relation to mental health
and intoxication. Mikhailov is not the
only photographer in this show who
knowingly walks a fine line between art
and exploitation.
Yet, in some instances, the presence of
a camera itself permits the performance
of identity otherwise impossible within
the confines of a repressive society. The
transgender prostitutes photographed
at an underground brothel by Paz
Errázuriz in 1980s Chile are not passive
There are
knotty questions here
about consent
and how to interpret it
subjects. Instead they perform for
her, impeccably coiffed and made
up, lounging and pouting, offering
themselves as they wish to be seen, but
cannot present themselves in public.
Another set of photographs, grouped
under the title Casa Susanna, were
taken by the clientele of private resorts
for male to female cross-dressers in
upstate New York in the 1950s and 60s.
While these were taken for private
circulation – the set of 400 anonymous
photographs was discovered at a flea
market – the Casa Susanna pictures
again display the camera’s role in
constructing fantasies of the self.
Within the controlled environment of a
still, front-on view, every styling, posing
and lighting trick is deployed to confect
a vision of an alternate identity.
ThelowerflooroftheBarbican’sgallery
has been redesigned as interlinked black
boxes, a reminder that the camera itself
is a site – a three-dimensional space that
in name shares a common root with the
word “chamber”. Here each dark-walled
chamber is the site for a different kind
of image making, in all senses. Danny
Lyon’s saddle-eye view of the Chicago
“Outlaws” motorcycle gang in the 1960s
are foundational to our received image
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
Work by Seiji Kurata (left and below
right), Philippe Chancel (bottom) and
Mary Ellen Mark (below left)
MARK PEARSON, ZEN FOTO GALLERY, JAPAN;
MELANIE RIO FLUENCY, ROME; HOWARD
GREENBERG GALLERY NEW YORK
of the biker: from the studded, skulland-crossbones embellished jackets, to
the long hair and unkempt beards, and
excitement of life on the open roads.
Lyon’s documentation of his time with
the bike gang inspired the movie Easy
Rider (1969). Equally influential are
Bruce Davidson’s 1950s photos of a
teenage street gang in Brooklyn, who
with their greasy pompadours and
insouciant cool provided a template
for elegant delinquency over the last
half-century.
From Diane Arbus to Dayanita Singh,
Another Kind of Life shows the work of
artists using photography as a medium
rather than of documentary reportage,
constantly inviting the question of
what is and isn’t shown and why. Given
the number of photographers here
portraying gang life, for example, there
is very little suggestion of violence. Seiji
Kurata shows fights and subsequent
arrests on the streets of Tokyo, as well
as the rise of right-wing social factions in
the 1970s, but few other photographers
– at least as shown here – illustrate why
these various groups were so feared.
It’s a shock when the flash of a knife
appears in one of Chris Steele-Perkins’s
pictures of third-wave revival Teddy
boys in the 1970s.
There is also the question of
how a beautiful image or dramatic
composition might influence our
reading of its subject. Pieter Hugo’s
series on hyena handlers in Nigeria are
so strikingly staged that one might think
them doctored: glamorous, muscular
men in bold costumes positioned in
dynamic landscapes in the company of
muzzled hyenas held on heavy chains.
The excitement of the images stands
apart from the complex ambiguities of
the men’s outlawed social status, seen
both as entertainers and criminals.
One of the most strikingly beautiful
pictures in the exhibition uses its own
romantic power to disquieting ends.
Alec Soth’s Broken Manual explores
the lives of American men who have
removed themselves from society,
becoming, for whatever reason,
latterday hermits living in solitude in
the wilderness. One large-format colour
photograph shows a lean man standing
naked in a stony stream in an Edenic
natural setting. Shaven-headed, tanned
to the waist and milky white below
it, his expression is quizzical. Only in
approaching the photograph do you
make out the stick-and-poke swastika
tattoo on his upper arm.
Dayanita Singh’s 30-year friendship
with Mona Ahmed, a eunuch living in
New Delhi, is represented here through
both a fixed camera film of Ahmed,
elderly, listening to her favourite
song, and the collaborative photobook
Myself Mona Ahmed. Singh first met
Ahmed on assignment for The Times
in 1989, but rather than publish the
commissioned report on New Delhi’s
eunuch community, handed her
negatives to Ahmed and told her editor
they had been damaged and couldn’t
be used. In an exhibition that time
and again raises the question of what
should and shouldn’t be photographed,
it’s a reminder that sometimes the most
difficult – and powerful – decision is not
what to show, but what not to show.
‘Another Kind of Life: Photography on
the Margins’, Barbican Art Gallery,
London, to 27 May (020 7638 8891)
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
37
Last night’s
g
television
MARK BUTLER
Four hours of drama
ended in red herrings
and an anti-climax
» Collateral BBC2, 9pm
I
f anything summed up
the deflating finale to the
fascinating but flawed BBC
thriller Collateral last night,
it was the actions of John Simm’s
idealistic Labour MP.
Forced to decide between
his career and his conscience,
the stage was set for this
grandstanding politician to deliver
fiery defiance, or a cynical sell-out.
In the end, he didn’t even turn up
for a crucial parliamentary vote –
sacking it off for a date with his new
girlfriend instead.
In a funny way, Collateral seemed
to pride itself on that sense of anticlimax. This was a rather bleak,
unsatisfying and empty conclusion.
But maybe that was the point.
Four hours of screen-time ago, a
compelling conundrum was posed:
why had a humble pizza delivery
man been murdered? And why
did so many social and political
institutions seem connected to it?
In many ways, this central mystery
was ultimately undersold. Which
turned out – bizarrely – to be
simultaneously one of the drama’s
biggest strengths and weaknesses.
This was no formulaic crime
procedural. It became less a
simple murder mystery and more
a sprawling exploration of various
flawed characters and their tangled
lives, albeit one viewed largely
through the prism of the upper
and middle classes.
Perhaps writer David Hare was
attempting a commentary on the
Plot-wise, the police
investigation came
together in rather
convenient fashion
way in which countless lives are
affected by a handful of wealthy,
influential people, and how power
structures keep us in our place.
Hence the old-boy connections
between the secret service agent
and the journalist; cynical detective
Bilk referring to the “educated
club”; and PTSD sufferer Sandrine
being abused, manipulated and
eventually discarded.
There were some barbs aimed
at immigration policy, certainly.
From Mona giving birth with a
border security guard present, to
the confrontation between Simm’s
David and his party leader.
“The free market comes with
free movement of people – you can’t
have one without the other,” he
told her. “A dynamic economy isn’t
going to happen in ‘fortress Britain’
‘Collateral’ was about more than
Carey Mulligan’s Kip THE FORGE
– what are we going to do for the
next 300 years, live behind walls?”
Sandrine’s confrontation with
her rapist’s wife also underscored
timely themes of misogyny and
sexual abuse, along with the mental
scars many soldiers who have
seen action bear. Jeany Spark was
fantastic in the role.
The acting was solid throughout,
a proper ensemble effort. Collateral
certainly deserves credit for not
just putting the entire drama on
Carey Mulligan’s shoulders.
Plot-wise, however, the police
investigation came together in
rather convenient fashion, the
pieces falling into place as much
by luck as design.
Collateral’s initial episodes set
up a huge number of tantalising
possibilities – but these largely
amounted to red herrings.
There have been some odd
writing choices too, not least
the obsession with Kip’s athletic
backstory (something to do with
bouncing back from failure,
perhaps?), and in this final episode
we even got a discussion of the
merits of Turkish arthouse cinema
during a police interrogation.
The worst villains got off
largely scot-free, and there was
surprisingly little tension in what
could and possibly should have
been a nail-biter of a climax.
Collateral was also guilty of
an whiff of cliché with the old
“one life ends, another begins”
moment – while Kip’s approach to
a gun-wielding suspect left a lot to
be desired. Much like Simm’s MP,
the detective was trying to do some
good. But their efforts amounted to
nothing in the end.
Twitter: @MarkPButler
38
Arts
Arts
reviews
The Trinity Boys’
Choir performing
with Puck, played by
Miltos Yerolemou
ROBERT WORKMAN
OPERA
A Midsummer Night’s Dream
COLISEUM, LONDON
HHHHH
ENO had two fine house
productions to choose between
for their revival of Britten’s A
Midsummer Night’s Dream.
They could have chosen
Christopher Alden’s provocative
version set in an all-boys school
THEATRE
Smile Upon Us,
Lord
BARBICAN, LONDON
HHHHH
The Vakhtangov State Academic
Theatre of Russia performed an
unforgettable version of Uncle
Vanya in 2012. The boldness is
evident again in this production
directed by their Lithuanian
artistic director, Rimas Tuminas,
It is a moving adaptation, full of
good jokes, of two novels by his
compatriot, Grigory Kanovich,
about the parlous fortunes of poor
Jews in Eastern Europe at the
start of the 20th century.
It is a dreamy, ruminative
road-trip, interrupted by
increasingly surreal setbacks.
Efraim Dudak (a magnetically
grumpy Sergei Makovetsky) is a
cussed old stone-cutter whose
son has been arrested for the
assassination of the governor of
Vilnius. With bad grace, Efraim
sets off with a couple old friends.
This ill-assorted trio muse on
life, death, children and the whole
damn thing. The greatness of the
show, which ends with a chilling
brilliance, steals up on you
gradually. This is food for the soul.
PAUL TAYLOR
THE INDEPENDENT
in the Fifties, in which Oberon
and Tytania are teachers, the
Mechanicals work on-site, and the
lovers are sixth-formers, while
the lusted-after Changeling Boy
acquires an unsettling dimension.
It was probably this latter
element that persuaded ENO to
play safe – or at least safer, given
that Britten’s paedophilia can
never be entirely glossed over
– and go for the production by
Robert Carsen, which is unalloyed
fun from start to finish.
For this, Michael Levine has
designed a world of morphing and
POP
THE INDEPENDENT
Efficient and
professional:
Kelly Jones and
Richard Jones of the
Stereophonics
Stereophonics
HYDRO, GLASGOW
HHHHH
There’s a relentlessness about
the Stereophonics both on stage
and in their career. Now 26 years
on from the point when singer
and guitarist Kelly Jones, bassist
Richard Jones and their original
drummer, the late Stuart Cable,
started playing together in their
home town of Cwmaman, the
current version of the band’s
energy for what they do and the
enthusiasm of their fans roars
on unabated.
In efficient, professional
fashion, the never entirely
fashionable but always
dependable Stereophonics have
battered out 10 albums, only one
of which has landed outside the
UK top 10.
This means they’ve built a back
catalogue which allows them to
largely fill a two-hour set with
tracks which even casual fans will
be familiar with, from the wistful
“Maybe Tomorrow” to the catchy
if lyrically slim “More Life in a
Tramp’s Vest” and “Mr Writer” to a
charged closing trio of their most
emotive signature hits, “Local Boy
in the Photograph”, “A Thousand
Trees” and “The Bartender and the
Thief” (although the appearance
flying double beds, among which
the characters get confused, then
lost, then driven mad, before
their eventual restoration to
sanity. The treble fairies – clad
in Hockney green and mauve,
like everything else on stage –
perform well-drilled tricks led by
Puck (Miltos Yerolemu), a comic
Caliban whose charisma powers
the entire show.
The tussle between Oberon and
Tytania over the boy they both
desire is largely played down;
the particular strength of this
production lies in the way the
third act, with its play within a
play, takes off into high fantasy,
with the lighting becoming a
virtuoso performance in itself.
Christopher Ainslie’s Oberon is
cleanly sung but under-projected;
Soraya Mafi’s vivid Tytania has
the right imperiousness, and
her wooing of Joshua Bloom’s
splendidly-sung Bottom is
wickedly suggestive. Eleanor
Dennis’s spitfire Helena ensures
that the weather in the parallel
relationships of the young lovers
– Clare Pressland, David Webb,
and Matthew Durkan being the
others – changes vigorously from
calm to storm and back again.
It takes some time before the
Mechanicals catch fire, but when
they do their comic timing is
perfect: Bloom, Graeme Danby,
Simon Butteriss, Timothy
Robinson, Robert Murray, and
Jonathan Lemalu all emerge as
farceurs to the manner born.
Alexander Soddy conducts with
a lovely sensitivity to Britten’s
effects; this opera contained his
most magical blend of voices and
instruments, and its Balinese
echoes are rendered here with
persuasive delicacy.
To 15 March (020 7845 9300)
MICHAEL CHURCH
JO HALE/GETTY
VISUAL ARTS
Bomberg
LAING ART GALLERY,
NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
The gallery marks the 60th
anniversary of David Bomberg’s
death, illustrating the
development in the artist’s own
work as well as his achievement
within British Modernism through
more than 60 works representing
all significant periods of his
career, including his times at the
Slade as part of the “Crisis of
Brilliance” generation and his role
as a war artist in both World Wars.
(0191 278 1611) to 28 May
Ocean Liners: Speed & Style
V&A, LONDON SW7
This exhibition, the most
comprehensive ever about
international ocean liners, is
bookended by two ships: Brunel’s
groundbreaking Great Eastern of
1859, which transformed ocean
travel, and the Queen Elizabeth
II of 1969, which brought the era
of great ocean-going passenger
shipping to a close. Between
these two vessels a whole
transport culture is on display.
(020 7942 2000) to 17 Jun
FILM
The Nile Hilton Incident
15, TARIK SALEH, 111 MINS
Corruption seeps into every
pore of Egyptian society in Tarik
Saleh’s impressive political
thriller, set in 2011 on the eve of
the Arab Spring and taking its
inspiration from Roman Polanski’s
Chinatown. It manages the
feat of remaining a moody and
atmospheric private eye-style
mystery while offering more
insight into the final days of
Mubarak’s presidency than
any didactic, self-righteous
documentary could ever manage.
Limited release
A Fantastic Woman
15, SEBASTIÁN LELIO, 104 MINS
The transgender heroine of this
rousing Chilean melodrama fully
lives up to the film’s title. Marina
(Daniela Vega) is a wonderfully
complex, defiant and passionate
character who, over a few
tempestuous days, experiences
joy and sudden bereavement –
and then fights with admirable
tenacity to be allowed to grieve
properly for her loved one.
Limited release
Lady Bird
15, GRETA GERWIG, 94 MINS
of a chorus of Motorhead’s “Ace of
Spades” amid the last may have
been trying too hard).
With the Hydro apparently
as full as it gets and the odd
arena-scale trick employed – a
breakout set on a satellite stage,
stripped-back acoustic tracks
from Jones, the Spinal Tap-ish
appearance of Scots drummer
Jamie Morrison on a kit ascending
from the ground during “Mr
and Mrs Smith” – the real
enjoyment came from the
ebullient efficiency with which
the now-quintet played and the
enduring power in Jones’ bluesflavoured vocal.
After all this time there’s clearly
a lot of nostalgia to their appeal
but they bridge the gap between
their glory days and the present
better than most.
Touring to 16 March
(stereophonics.com)
DAVID POLLOCK
This comedy-drama about a
teenager (Saoirse Ronan) growing
up on the wrong side of the tracks
in Sacramento in the early 2000s
is one of the best American
coming-of-age films since Barry
Levinson’s Diner. Written and
directed by Greta Gerwig, it offers
an utterly winning mix of humour,
poignance and sharp-eyed social
observation. Limited release
I, Tonya
15, CRAIG GILLESPIE, 119 MINS
Margot Robbie stars in this
comedy-drama purporting to
tell the story of figure skater
Tonya Harding and her role in the
hammer attack on her main rival,
Nancy Kerrigan, in the run-up
NEWS
2-27
Arts
agenda
THE CULTURAL HIGHLIGHTS
YOU HAVE TO SEE
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
army of Waves-watchers to
mass regardless as the 1975’s
mates tour. Gorilla, Manchester
(gigsandtours.com) tonight;
Garage, London N5 (ticketweb.
co.uk) Wed; Thekla, Bristol
(ticketweb.co.uk) Thur
DANCE
Ballet British Columbia
VARIOUS VENUES
to the 1994 Winter Olympics. At
times, the film comes close to
caricaturing Harding, but Robbie
has such passion and drive that
she transcends the film’s more
garishly cartoonish elements.
Nationwide release
The Shape of Water
GUILLERMO DEL TORO, 120 MINS
A cross between a Cold War
thriller and a Disney-style fairy
tale, albeit one with its share of
sex and gore. Sally Hawkins stars
as a young mute woman who
works as a cleaner at a mysterious
government laboratory in
the early 60s and is so utterly
captivating here that even
the strange, scaly, Amazonian
creature that is being kept in
top secret at the lab falls for her.
Nationwide release
TALKS & POETRY
Joanna Cannon
VARIOUS VENUES
The author of the best-selling
The Trouble with Goats and Sheep
discusses her new novel, Three
Things About Elsie. Waterstones,
Norwich (0843 290 8519) tonight
7pm; Waterstones, Nottingham
(0843 290 8525) Wed 6.30pm
Gary Younge
RON COOKE HUB, UNIVERSITY OF YORK
In his latest book, Another Day
in the Death of America, the
writer tells the stories of 10
youngsters who were killed in the
US by gunfire on one random,
unremarkable day, 23 November
2013. He talks about the book here.
(01904 620784) tonight 6.30pm
POP
Elbow
VARIOUS VENUES
Bury’s foremost empaths return
with hearts and art on their
sleeves, this time offering epic
and intimate man-hugs to the
arenas on a tour to accompany
the recently released Best Of.
Marvellous support comes
from John Grant. First Direct
Arena, Leeds (seetickets.com)
tonight; 02 Arena, London SE10
(seetickets.com) Wed
D’Angelo
EVENTIM APOLLO, LONDON W6
After the 14-year wait between
Voodoo in 2000 and Black Messiah
in 2014, the US soul-funk giant
just can’t stop himself. Barely
three years on from his last tour,
D’Angelo brings his experi-soul
excavations back to London for
a one-off show. Steady on, there.
(eventim.co.uk) tonight
Pale Waves
VARIOUS VENUES
While critics fret over the divide
between their goth chic and
pop instincts, expect a growing
This adventurous Canadian
company dance three works
by female choreographers:
the romantic Solo Echo by the
marvellous Crystal Pite, Sharon
Eyal’s Bill and 16+ a room by
artistic director Emily Molnar,
inspired by Jeanette Winterson
and Emily Dickinson. Sadler’s
Wells, London EC1 (020 7863 8000)
tonight and Wed; Brighton Dome
(01273 709 709) Fri
Russell Maliphant
Company
PRINT ROOM AT THE CORONET,
LONDON W11
An intimate programme by this
sleek, subtle choreographer,
known for his fluid, sculptural
choreography and innovative use
of light. Includes a new duet for
Maliphant and Dana Fouras.
(020 3642 6606) to 17 Mar
THEATRE
IQ
30-39
The Sound of Music
KING’S THEATRE, SOUTHSEA
Bill Kenwright’s touring
production of Rodgers and
Hammerstein’s gloriously upbeat
1959 musical, with Lucy O’Byrne
as junior nun-turned-governess
Maria. (023 92828282) to Sat
Beautiful: the Carole King
Musical
EMPIRE THEATRE, SUNDERLAND
Bronté Barbé stars in Marc
Bruni’s touring production of
the Carole King tribute musical.
This journey through the
world of pop, beginning in 1958,
tells a gripping human story.
(beautifulmusical.co.uk) to Sat
First
Chance
Opening
this week
TALKS & POETRY
StAnza
VARIOUS VENUES, ST ANDREWS
The annual poetry festival includes
Douglas Dunn, Daljit Nagra,
Liz Lochhead and Gillian Allnutt.
(01592 611101) opens Wed
DANCE
Candoco Dance Company
WORLD MUSIC
SADLER’S WELLS, LONDON EC1
Raghu Dixit Project
VARIOUS VENUES
The music of the eclectic Indian
band from Bangalore is rooted in
Indian folk traditions and culture
but has a contemporary, global
sound. Colston Hall, Bristol (0117
203 4040) tonight; The Brook,
Southampton (023 8055 5366)
Wed; Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury
(01227 787787) Fri
Including Yasmeen Godder’s Face In.
(020 7863 8000) opens Fri
VISUAL ARTS
Another India
MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND
ANTHROPOLOGY, CAMBRIDGE
An exploration of the heritage of
India’s indigenous communities.
(maa.cam.ac.uk) opens Thur
Travel Offer
7 Nigh
ts
fr
Mary Stuart
om
389
DUKE OF YORK’S, LONDON WC2
£
A revival of Robert Icke’s
extraordinarily gripping,
edge-of-your-seat Almeida
staging of Schiller’s great play,
with Juliet Stevenson and Lia
Williams, dressed in identical
outfits, flipping a coin at the
beginning of each performance to
decide who plays Elizabeth I and
who plays Mary. It’s a remarkably
satisfying achievement.
(0845 505 8500) to 31 Mar
If you only see
one thing today
39
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
FOUR-STAR
ALL-INCLUSIVE
pp
MAJORCA
Pay just a deposit today
The four-star Hotel Best Delta is located next to the Maioris Golf Course in the Cabo
Blanco area of Majorca which is close to Arenal and Playa de Palma. It has a large sun
terrace, pretty gardens and two large outdoor swimming pools to relax by plus an
HELEN MAYBANKS
indoor heated pool, Jacuzzi, sauna and gym.
THEATRE
Strangers on a Train
GRAND OPERA HOUSE, YORK
An effective and taut adaptation of the Patricia Highsmith novel/Hitchcock film. It’s exceptionally well
cast, with Chris Harper chilling as Bruno, a man with no discernible ethos beyond complete self-regard,
and John Middleton delivering a calmly astute Arthur Gerard, a retired private investigator who turns out
to be not quite the plodding buffoon that Bruno takes him for. (atgtickets.com) to Sat
Prices Include:
! Return flights with luggage from various
London airports.
! East Midlands, Birmingham and Bristol
available at a supplement – call for
prices.
! 7 nights’ four-star accommodation
! Daily breakfast, lunch and evening
meals
! All Inclusive drinks
Departures
April
Prices from
£389
May
£429
June
£509
September
£429
October
£409
For more information or to book, please call:
01244 957 863
Quote Code: IPAS0503
or visit: www.selecttravelbreaks.co.uk/ipaper
OPENING TIMES: Mon - Fri 9am-9pm / Sat 9am-5.30pm / Sunday 10am-6pm
Calls cost 5ppm from a BT landline. You may also be charged a connection fee. Mobile and other providers’ charges may vary. Please note online bookings do not include transfers,
luggage or tours. The above package holidays are fulfilled by Select Travel Breaks, ATOL number 3973 (Global Travel Group Ltd), whose booking conditions apply. The image used is for
illustration purposes only. Prices “from” act as an indication only and are pp based on 2 sharing a room, subject to availability. Offers do not include transfers unless stated. Local country
hotel taxes are payable locally and not included. Luggage allowance may vary, please check at the time of booking. All Inclusive drinks normally consist of locally produced alcoholic and
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at any time. Travel restrictions, conditions and credit/debit card surcharges apply. Please ask at the time of booking for full details. When it’s gone, it’s gone. * Full balance is due 14 weeks
prior to departure.
Business
Business Editor Elizabeth Anderson
+4420 7361 5718
business@inews.co.uk
ECONOMY
Services sector growth is
bright spot amid gloom
By Ben Woods
Britain’s economic growth will
struggle to pick up pace in the first
quarter of 2018 despite services
sector output unexpectedly reaching
a four-month high in February,
economists believe.
With a reading above 50 indicating
growth, the IHS Markit/CIPS UK
Services purchasing managers’ index
(PMI) hit 54.5 last month, up from 53
in January and above economists’
expectations of 53.2.
Despite a brighter performance
from services, economists expect the
UK economy to grow by 0.4 per cent
for the first three months of this year,
in line with the final quarter of 2017.
The services sector was bolstered
by easing cost pressures and the
fastest jump in new work since May
last year.
The update comes after the manufacturing industry drifted to an
eight-month low in February, while
the construction sector unexpectedly rebounded but remained under
pressure from weak confidence and
political uncertainty.
Chris Williamson, IHS Markit’s
chief business economist, said the
services sector boost keeps a May
interest rate rise from the Bank of
England “very much in play”.
He said: “The service sector
overtook manufacturing as the
The service sector in the
UK accounts for around
80 per cent of growth, though
analysts fear growth will slow in
the first quarter of 2018 after last
week’s bad weather.
fastest growing part of the economy
for only the second time since the
referendum in February, thanks to
the combination of the largest rise in
services activity for four months and
waning growth of factory output.
“With the construction sector also
pulling out of the stagnation seen
in January, the economy as a whole
picked up some momentum again
in February, despite the slowing
in manufacturing.”
The services sector has been
grappling with stinging costs,
prompted by higher input prices
caused by sterling’s slump since the
Brexit vote.
However, businesses found some
respite last month, as input price
inflation rolled back to its lowest level
since August 2016.
While conditions and performance
have improved, companies still felt
The economy is only expected to grow
by 0.4 per cent in three months GETTY
gloomier about the year ahead in
February compared to January.
Howard Arch er, EY I TE M
Club’s chief economic adviser, said:
“Demand for consumer services
remains pressurised by squeezed
purchasing power.
“February PMI’s suggest to us
that growth in the first quarter of
2018 is likely to match the 0.4 per
cent quarter-on-quarter expansion
achieved in the fourth quarter of 2017.”
AUTOMOTIVE
Slump in
new car
registrations
in February
By Josie Cox
Quote of
the day
We expect
lengthy
negotiations after
these elections,
which may lead
to increased
volatility of
Italian assets
Matteo Ramenghi
The senior investor at
UBS in Italy urges caution
after the hung parliament
The 30
Second
Briefing
AIRBUS
Airbus may have to begin stockpiling
parts in its warehouses because
of continuing uncertainty
around Brexit.
“We spend £5bn a year on the UK
supply chain,” Airbus UK’s senior
vice-president Katherine Bennett
told Radio 4’s Today programme
yesterday morning. “It is really
important the parts don’t get held up
in wareh
houses.””
How could Brexit affect the
supply chain?
If frictionless borders aren’t secured
during Brexit talks, hold-ups at
ports such as Dover could become
“a critical issue”, Ms Bennett said,
because of the firm’s “just in time”
supply chain.
What’s a “just in time” supply chain?
Such supply chains cut costs by
reducing the amount of materials a
firm holds in stock, so delays to any
one component being transported
to Airbus’s bases at Filton, near
Bristol, and Broughton in North
Wales could be disastrous. “We need
conditions right for us; we just don’t
need
d these burd
dens,”” Ms Bennettt
said, while also intimating that postBrexit supply chain difficulties “may
make Airbus think differently” about
where it based itself.
Are there any other factors which
could affect jobs at Airbus?
Airbus put out a statement
yesterday outlining its decision
to meet with the European Works
Council tomorrow, following
reports that up to 3,600 jobs in the
UK, France, Spain and Germany
could be affected by cuts in
production rates of its A380 and
A400M planes. However, Airbus
said it was “disturbed” by leaks and
“excessive reporting” about job fears.
The UK market for new cars dropped
again in February, particularly hit by
a slump in demand for diesel vehicles,
the industry’s main trade body said.
According to the Society of
Motor Manufacturers and Traders
(SMMT), 80,805 new cars were
registered last month, representing
a 2.8 per cent decline on the
same period in 2017. February is
traditionally a slow month for the car
market ahead of the March numberplate change.
Demand for petrol and
alternatively fuelled vehicles (AVFs)
– such as hybrids and electric cars –
rose by 14.4 per cent and 7.2 per cent
respectively in February. But that
wasn’t enough to offset a 23.5 per cent
slump in registrations of new diesel
cars. The trade body said that the
diesel decline was “disappointing”,
especially considering that the latest
low-emission diesel vehicles can help
address air-quality issues.
So far in 2018, the UK’s new car
market has now declined by 5.1 per
cent. Registrations by business,
private and fleet buyers are down by
29.8 per cent, 7.1 per cent and 2.1 per
cent respectively.
“Although the new car market
has dipped, it remains at a good
level despite the drop in demand for
diesel,” said SMMT chief executive
Mike Hawes. He also said that
consumers should be reassured
“that the latest cars are the cleanest
in history and can help address
air quality issues”. He added he is
expecting further softening in the
March figure.THE INDEPENDENT
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
EMPLOYMENT
Britain lags behind rivals
in reducing gender pay gap
By Josie Cox
Women across the UK would
collectively be paid £90bn more
every year if it weren’t for the gender
pay gap, new research has revealed.
A report published by professional
services firm PwC yesterday also
shows that the UK’s progress towards
empowering women in the workplace
has been much more sluggish than
other developed nations.
Citing figures from the
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),
PwC says that the UK has slipped
from 14th spot last year to 15th
this year in a ranking of 33 OECD
countries based on five indicators of
female economic empowerment.
Although labour market conditions
for women have improved, Britain
has been outpaced by better
performances from OECD members
such as Poland. Iceland, Sweden and
Norway take the top three spots in
the OECD ranking.
The authors of the report found
that the gender pay gap across
the UK is now at 17 per cent. That
chasm, they say, would be reduced
by increasing government spending
on family benefits and childcare,
e n co u rag i n g g re at e r fe m a l e
entrepreneurship and giving women
more opportunities to take on higherpaid and higher-skilled roles.
Women in the UK are £90bn worse off because of the gender pay gap GETTY
“While great progress is being
made in some areas, sustained
business action is needed to ensure
that these gains continue,” PwC
economist Yong Jing Teow said.
By UK region, London has made
the slowest progress in closing the
gap since 2000, from 22 per cent to
19 per cent. But women in the capital
would also be likely to be the greatest
beneficiaries of a complete closing
of the gender pay gap, driven by a 31
per cent pay gap across the country’s
financial services and insurance
companies, many of which are based
in London.
Northern Ireland has reduced its
pay gap from 22 per cent to just six
per cent – which is now the lowest of
all the regions. THE INDEPENDENT
With a month until the 5
April deadline, just over
1,000 of the 9,000 firms required
to publish breakdowns of their
gender pay gaps have done so.
Annuities firms gain as life expectancy drops
Slowing gains in life expectancy in
the UK are expected to boost profits
at insurance companies when results
are reported this week.
Data from the Continuous
Mortality Investigation show that
Outlook
JAMES
MOORE
To ease austerity,
young people
need to vote
“T
he age of tax cuts for
baby boomers is over,”
Lord Willetts has told
wealthy members of
that generation, who
have become accustomed to being
the Government’s favoured children.
The Conservative peer and chair
of the Resolution Foundation said
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
ENERGY
Investment in
doldrums as
investors
steer clear
By Tom Nicholson
INSURANCE
By Tom Nicholson
IQ
30-39
gains slowed significantly between
2011 and 2017. Life expectancy at 65
dropped by 10 months to 22.1 years
for men and by 12 months to 24
years for women, with heart disease
and doubling rates of mortality
from dementia between 2001 and
2015 blamed.
Insurers specialising in annuities
are expected to benefit: Standard
Life Aberdeen reported a £79m rise
in profits in late February, while
Just Group is predicted to jump by
£44m when it unveils its results next
week and Legal & General stands to
increase profits by more than £300m.
the spiralling cost of health and social
care threatens to put the equivalent
of 15p on the basic rate of income tax
for working age adults. “Is that kind of
tax really the legacy we – a generation
who own half the nation’s wealth –
want to bequeath our children and
grandchildren?” he asked.
No one with a conscience would say
“yes”. But then, his is the generation
that served up Brexit, perhaps the
biggest kick to the guts by one group
of people to another we’ve seen
outside of starting wars.
The Conservative Party placed the
burden of austerity chiefly upon the
young while protecting benefits for
the old, who duly delivered for them
as they always have. Many respond
to this type of argument by declaring
that this is only right because they
have “paid in” and should get their
share. But they haven’t.
They are poised to receive a
bumper 20 per cent more in support
than they will have contributed in
taxes over their lives. Hence the
prospect of eye-popping tax bills
falling upon their offspring and their
offspring’s offspring, which would
be immoral even had the latter not
seen a scythe applied to the support
offered to them, to their economic
prospects, to their wages.
I should say here that there many
baby boomers who, like Lord Willetts,
see this as a problem, are infuriated
by the unfairness meted out to the
Po
oliticians know that
turnout is highest among the
oldest. It is this that serves to
stymie reform
young and oppose Brexit too. Those
people might see the solution he
proposes as a sensible one: he argues
that the balance should be redressed
by taxing the wealth of those who can
afford to pay via reform of council
and inheritance tax. This would
target what has been built up by
Foreign investors are sidestepping
the British energy industry and
thereby putting back much-needed
modernisation work because of
Brexit wrangling and political
uncertainty, according to leading
industry figures.
T heresa M ay’s pro mi se to
intervene with a price cap on
energy bills, which could damage
profits, plus the Labour Party’s
pro-nationalisation stance and
the ongoing uncertainty as to the
UK’s status in the EU’s tariff-free
internal energy market after Brexit
are combining to produce a chilling
effect on investment, with traders in
the United States particularly wary.
“US investors are
now warning there
a r e t o o m a ny
uncertainties,”
John Pettigrew,
the
chief
exe c u t i ve o f
the National
Grid, told
t h e Fi n a n c i a l
Times. “A lot of
infrastructure needs
to be built in the UK over
the next few years. Post-Brexit, it
is important that [investment] is
coming in.”
Mr Pettigrew’s comments were
backed by the Energy Networks
Associations, which warned that
uncertainty meant higher capital
costs and ultimately a cost to billpaying households.
A report by the Industrial Strategy
Commission published late last year
suggested that the UK needs to
replace much of its nuclear-powered
electricity-generating capacity as a
matter of urgency. The report said
that 7.7 gigawatts of the 8.9 gigawatts
of electricity generating capacity
currently in operation in the UK
must be retired by 2030.
wealthier homeowners through the
Ponzi scheme of rising house prices.
I should declare here that I would be
among those affected through being
a home owner on the edge of London.
Trouble is, whenever anyone in
power moots reforming property
taxes – the Liberal Democrats have
long been proponents of it – the
squealing can be heard from Land’s
End to John O’Groats and beyond.
Politicians know which side their
bread is buttered. They also know
turnout is highest amongst the
oldest. It is this that serves to stymie
reform despite the looming fiscal
crisis forecast by Lord Willetts,
whom it should be noted kicked the
young with tuition fee rises when he
was universities minister.
The young really need to learn to
vote. Perhaps the equivalent of 15p
on the basic rate of income tax on top
of everything else will rile them up
sufficiently to do that.
THE INDEPENDENT
41
From the
business
pages
Lions’ tour a tonic
for the economy
The New Zealand Herald
New Zealand’s economy was
boosted by NZ$194m (£101m)
and the city of Whangarei
earned NZ$6.2m in a single
day last summer thanks to the
British and Irish Lions tour. An
analysis by PwC showed that
on average each visitor spent
NZ$222 on the day the British
and Irish Lions played their tour
opener against New Zealand
Provincial Barbarians at the
city’s Toll Stadium.
Airbnb trend forces
locals from Madrid
El Pais
Tourist accommodation has
helped push rental prices in the
centre of Madrid up 38 per cent
since 2014, according to analysis
by El Pais. One in five homes in
the Sol area is listed on Airbnb,
and in one in 10 homes in the
centre of the city is listed. As
the number of available rentals
dropped by 7.3 per cent during
2016, locals say they are being
forced out of the city.
Vietnam urged to
close trade gap
Bangladesh Daily Star
Bangladeshi businesses are
pushing for more Vietnamese
investment to close the two
countries’ trade gap. In 2017,
Bangladesh exported $66.44m
(£48m) of goods to Vietnam and
imported $417m. “We will ask
for Vietnamese investment here
so that the trade balance can
be narrowed,” the Federation
of Chambers of Commerce and
Industry said.
Middle America is
squeezed middle
USA Today
Growing income inequality
and a shrinking middle class
are hidden by superficially
encouraging US economic
figures. Montana is the state
with the greatest decline in
middle-class income over
the past decade, followed by
Louisiana, Wisconsin, Michigan
and Indiana. In five of the 10
states with the largest declines,
the proportion of employment
in manufacturing was above the
US national average.
42
BUSINESS
The
Business
Matrix
The day at
a glance
FTSE 100 up 46.1 at 7116.0
3i Group
Admiral
Anglo Amer
Antofagasta
AB Foods
Ashtead Group
AstraZeneca
Aviva
BAE Systems
Barclays
Barratt Dev
BHP Billiton
BP
BAT
Berkeley Grp Hldgs
British Land
BT
Bunzl
Burberry
Carnival
Centrica
Coca-Cola HBC
Compass
CRH
Croda Intl
DCC
Diageo
Direct Line Ins
Easyjet
Evraz
Experian
Fresnillo
G4S
GKN
Glencore
GSK
Halma
922.0
1864.5
1693.2
862.8
2590.0
2029.0
4800.0
501.0
572.4
207.2
539.4
1437.0
470.1
4221.0
3788.0
635.0
238.4
1963.0
1650.5
4644.0
142.1
2385.0
1525.5
2461.0
4449.0
6595.0
2402.0
377.7
1597.5
437.1
1516.0
1207.5
256.5
425.9
364.8
1308.8
1183.0
+16.0
+19.5
+5.6
+20.2
-17.0
+30.5
+64.0
+3.5
-3.6
+1.9
+7.0
+24.4
+6.0
+1.0
+23.0
+7.4
+2.1
+13.0
+16.0
+23.0
+0.7
+21.0
+1.5
+62.0
-7.0
+80.0
+20.5
+3.9
+20.5
-7.2
-4.5
+10.0
+2.2
+5.9
+0.3
+18.8
+17.0
975.0
2184.0
1870.0
1071.0
3387.0
2185.0
5520.0
570.5
682.5
235.3
705.5
1662.4
536.2
5643.6
4270.0
695.0
349.2
2472.0
2024.0
5435.0
227.7
2682.0
1765.9
2955.0
4646.1
7762.5
2735.5
411.3
1698.7
461.4
1708.0
1746.0
342.6
449.5
416.9
1724.5
1341.0
Low
691.5
1753.0
950.1
11.1
2476.0
1476.0
4260.0
482.2
533.5
177.3
6.3
1103.0
436.9
4064.0
2886.0
587.0
224.3
1918.5
1481.5
4381.0
119.7
1903.0
1396.5
27.0
3461.0
6490.0
2186.5
332.3
936.0
169.8
1428.0
1174.0
247.8
3.0
270.0
1235.2
956.5
Company
Price
Chg
High
Hammerson
Hargrve Lans
HSBC Hldgs
IAG
Imperial Brands
Informa
IntCont Htls
Intertek
ITV
Johnson Matth
Just Eat
Kingfisher
Land Secs
Legal & Gen
Lloyds Bk Gp
Lon Stock Ex
Marks&Spen
Mediclinic Intl
Micro Focus Intl
Mondi
Morrison (Wm)
National Grid
Next
NMC Health
Old Mutual
PaddyPwrBetfair
Pearson
Persimmon
Prudential
Randgold Res
Reckitt Ben
RELX
Rentokil Initial
Rio Tinto
Rolls-Royce
RBS
Shell A
455.1
1683.0
702.0
614.0
2580.5
704.4
4490.0
4868.0
155.0
3067.0
851.8
347.1
921.4
256.5
67.0
3881.0
288.2
570.0
2023.0
1906.0
225.5
749.7
4732.0
3334.0
249.2
8260.0
728.6
2642.0
1797.5
5946.0
5665.0
1472.5
261.0
3695.0
819.4
261.6
2267.0
+7.2
+26.0
-3.0
-1.0
-3.5
+6.8
+36.0
-5.0
+1.1
+37.0
+2.8
-0.7
+8.4
+3.1
—
+44.0
+1.5
-4.4
+35.0
-5.0
+2.8
+10.5
+52.0
+2.0
+3.2
-35.0
+9.8
+58.0
+7.0
+6.0
-25.0
+5.0
-11.5
+56.5
+2.0
+4.0
+17.5
52338.0
1935.0
798.6
680.6
3956.5
773.0
4944.0
5470.0
221.8
3511.0
906.0
369.8
1217.1
279.9
73.6
4114.0
397.8
890.2
2970.5
2145.0
254.4
1174.3
5355.0
3548.0
258.5
8967.0
773.0
2901.0
1992.5
8255.0
8110.4
1784.0
338.8
4226.6
994.5
304.2
2579.5
Low
440.2
1258.0
618.0
516.0
2569.0
624.5
3656.0
3547.0
142.8
2681.0
496.1
285.3
911.4
241.7
61.8
2995.0
282.0
495.4
26.8
1684.0
205.0
733.0
3565.0
1726.0
184.2
6572.5
563.0
2046.0
1612.1
5760.0
5621.0
1399.0
235.5
2882.5
733.5
221.8
1982.5
+180.5
+27.5
FTSE Eurofirst300
1452.1
Dow Jones *
24783.5
+14.9
S&P 500 *
2717.3
Nasdaq *
7325.0
DAX
12090.9
CAC 40
5167.2
Hang Seng
29886.4
-697.1
Nikkei
21042.1
-139.6
+245.4
+26.0
+67.2
+177.2
+30.6
EURO/
POUND
DOLLAR/
POUND
+0.87¢
19567.0
3927.2
$1.3854
FTSE 250
FTSE All Share
+46.1
+0.56¢
7116.0
€1.1236
Markets
FTSE 100
Company
Price
Chg
High
Shell B
RSA Insur
Sage
Sainsbury(J)
Schroders
Scot Mort Inv Tst
Segro
Severn Trent
Shire
Sky
Smith&Neph
Smith (DS)
Smiths Gp
Smurfit Kappa Grp
SSE
Stan Chart
Standard Life Aber
St James Place
Taylor Wimpey
Tesco
TUI AG
Unilever
United Utilities
Vodafone
Whitbread
Ferguson
WPP
2292.0
615.0
673.4
252.9
3368.0
457.0
582.8
1735.5
3228.0
1355.0
1289.0
478.8
1568.0
2542.0
1215.5
775.1
362.3
1121.5
187.5
204.0
1506.5
3759.5
674.4
202.3
3797.0
5134.0
1260.0
+12.5
+1.6
+11.4
-0.1
+21.0
+5.8
+10.6
+13.5
+22.5
-18.5
+25.0
+19.0
+15.5
+112.0
+1.5
-4.9
-3.9
+13.0
+1.4
+2.0
-11.5
+47.0
+11.6
+3.3
-2.0
+36.0
-6.0
2617.0
672.5
825.2
339.9
3784.0
478.4
595.7
2575.0
5067.0
1378.0
1442.0
565.0
1697.0
2662.0
1554.0
864.2
448.6
1279.5
211.9
217.1
1687.9
4557.5
1078.0
239.7
4333.0
5722.0
1829.0
Low
2037.0
568.5
613.0
222.4
3002.0
347.4
444.3
1664.0
2940.5
11.4
1173.0
5.3
1442.0
1712.7
1176.5
678.8
339.7
1008.0
173.0
165.3
934.4
3678.5
648.6
197.4
3499.9
4427.0
1185.7
For enquiries call +44 (0)20 7825 8300
GOLD
Per troy ounce,
London pm fix
+$1.62
High
$65.79
Chg
+$2.35
Price
$1,320.4
Company
OIL
Brent crude,
per barrel
TRANSPORT
EQUALITY
Union questions
weather subsidies
Mining group’s
gender pay gap
MPs are being urged to raise
in Parliament how much
compensation train firms have
received for the weather-related
transport chaos. Rail, Maritime
and Transport union general
secretary Mick Cash said:
“How much [has] the taxpayer
shovelled in to the pockets of
private train companies during
the adverse weather?”
Anglo American has revealed
it pays female employees half
of what it pays men in the UK,
as the pay of Mark Cutifani, the
mining group’s chief executive,
rocketed more than 65 per
cent to £6.7m last year. The
company’s annual report shows
that among its 258 UK staff, the
median hourly pay gap between
men and women is 49 per cent.
RESULTS
TRADE
Addison Lee posts
pre-tax loss
Harleys and Levis
at risk of tariffs
Taxi firm Addison Lee swung
to a loss last year. The group
posted a pre-tax loss of £20.8m
in the year to August 2017,
compared to a profit of £10.5m
in 2016. Addison put the fall
down to “intense long-term
investment”, acquisition
integration and reorganisation,
which culminated in £18.6m
of exceptionals.
Bourbon, Harley-Davidson
motorbikes and Levi jeans could
have tariffs or taxes added
to them, according to Cecilia
Malmström, the European
commissioner for trade.
The EU is looking at retaliatory
tariffs on US imports after
Donald Trump announced
plans to add tariffs to steel and
aluminium imports.
EMPLOYMENT
FINANCE
Apprenticeship
target a doubt
Ban and fine for
Libor trader
The Government remains
committed to creating three
million apprenticeships by
2020 despite a survey of 1,640
managers finding almost half
doubt the target will be reached.
A similar number polled by
the Chartered Management
Institute said the UK needs
greater investment in skills.
The City watchdog has fined
a former Deutsche Bank
trader £180,000 and banned
him from financial activity for
manipulating Libor interest
rates. The Financial Conduct
Authority sanctioned Guillaume
Adolph, who worked at the
German lender as a short-term
interest rate derivatives trader.
OUTSOURCING
RETAIL
Interserve plans
further job cuts
AMT Coffee gets
Fair Tax mark
Troubled government
contractor Interserve will cut
another 1,000 jobs in an attempt
to avoid bankruptcy, having
already cut 500 staff in the last
quarter. The outsourcer has a
net debt of more than £600m
and hopes to persuade lenders
to provide emergency finance.
AMT Coffee is the first coffee
retailer to be accredited with
a Fair Tax mark, showing it is
transparent in its payment of
corporation tax. It joins other
accredited firms, including the
Co-op and Lush Cosmetics,
which provide information on
economic activity and taxes.
the
markets
TOM NICHOLSON
After looking fairly turgid
throughout last week, the FTSE
100 bounced back to close up
46 points or 0.65 per cent at
7,115.98. Rentokil Initial fell
the furthest on the FTSE 100,
losing 4.2 per cent to close
at 261, while Smurfit Kappa
Group was the biggest climber,
up 112 points or 4.61 per cent
to 2,542.
***
In Italy, the FTSE MIB closed 0.4
per cent down at 21,819, a good
recovery from a morning sell-off.
The DAX was cheered by Angela
Merkel’s coalition deal, ending up
1.5 per cent.
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
43
Have you noticed the
Trinity Mirror wants older you get the more
to rebrand as Reach light you need to read?
MEDIA
By Adam Sherwin
The publisher of the Daily
Mirror, Trinity Mirror, provoked an online backlash after
announcing it is to change its
name to Reach, following the
completion of its deal to buy
Richard Desmond’s Express
and Star newspapers.
Trinity said the name
change, which follows the
company’s costly admission
that it turned a blind eye
to phone-hacking, “more
accurately reflects the
evolution of the company”.
But sceptics questioned
wh e t h e r i t wo u l d j o i n
Consignia and Accenture
among the ranks of the most
embarrassing corporate
rebranding exercises.
Simon Fox, chief executive
of Trinity Mirror, said:
“Through our content we
reach millions of people every
day. Our reach extends across
multiple platforms in both
print and digital and across
the cities and communities
that we serve. We think this is
a name which better reflects
what we do and what our ambitions are.” Shareholders will
vote to approve the change.
Some Twitter users said
the name brought to mind
S Club 7’s hit song “Reach”.
Others were more critical:
“‘l’ll continue saying I used
to work for Trinity Mirror
rather than ‘Reach’ because it
sounds like a drama workshop
for underprivileged kids,”
one wrote. Communications
consultant Chris Shaw suggested the name was dreamt
up by an “idiot branding
consultant”. Polly Curtis,
Huffington Post editor-inchief, called the new branding “terrible”. But media
commentator Roy Greenslade
said it was “inspired”.
The rebrand temporarily
overshadowed the company’s
report of a £90m (13 per
cent) fall in group revenue to
£632m last year. But Mr Fox’s
pay soared by 19 per cent to
£893,000 last year.
Pre-tax profits
grew from £76.5m
to £81.9m in 2017, while
revenue fell 12.6 per cent
to £623.2m.
By the time you reach 60
your eyes need 3 TIMES
as much light to see
clearly as they did
when you
were 20.
Introducing
the Serious
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Light.
As you age, less ligh
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strugglee without the right amount and type of light.
Conventional reaading lights just aren’t powerful enough and
provide a poor quality of light. Our top of the range High
Definition Ligght has been specially designed to closely mirror
the same spectrum of light waves as daylight. It’s this that gives
it its superb clarrity and colour rendition transforming your
ability to read in comfort once more.
Geneva
goes
electric
The 88th Geneva International
Motor Show begins on
Thursday with top-end
supercars on show alongside
major new electric models
Public Notices
INTERNATIONAL BID Nº 004/GAL/2018
The Head of the Brazilian Aeronautical Commission in Europe
(“CABE”), hereby notifies, to whom it may concern, that the
Logistics Support Group, located at Estrada do Galeão, n.
3300 – Ilha do Governador 21941-352 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ Brazil, shall carry out a international bidding of type Lowest Price
at regime of indirect execution and global price, for provision of
services of logistics support by: Acquisition of a heavy aircraft,
Boeing 767-300ER, with logistic and MLU support for the aircraft
and its equipment for a period of thirty-six (36) months, as per
Announcement.
The meeting to receive the envelopes shall be held on April 3rd,
2018 at 10:00 am (Brasilia’s time) at Meeting Room of the
Logistics Support Group, located at Estrada do Galeão, n.
3300 – Ilha do Governador 21941-352 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ Brazil.
The Bid Announcement and any additional information regarding
this Bid may be obtained from the Logistics Support Group, at
the address mentioned above, from Monday through Friday,
between 08:30 and 15:30 (Brasilia’s time), or at the Email
licitacoes.gal@fab.mil.br
Col ANDRÉ LUÍS GOMES MONTEIRO
Head of BACE
from Jaguar, Audi, MercedesBenz and Volkswagen. The
Volvo XC40 (above) was named
as the European Car of the year
ahead of the show GETTY
daily money
Mortgage customers at a Big Six lender
who choose the lowest-rate two-year fixed
deal will end up paying £390 more than for
a product with a higher rate but lower fees,
according to mortgage brokers Trussle.
The difference rises to £649 for Barclays
customers and £577 with Santander.
***
No running water after the bad weather?
The minimum compensation for time
without water is £20 for the first 24 hours
and £10 for each further 24-hour period. If
the payment doesn’t arrive automatically,
you can claim within three months.
***
Barclaycard’s Platinum Balance Transfer
credit card now offers 36 months interestfree for balance transfers and six months
interest-free on purchases (it is 19.9 per
cent APR thereafter).
See the
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Special Offer
Purchase a Serious
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QUOTE PROMOTION
CODE 5232. WHEN
ORDERING ONLINE
ENTER 5232 AT
THE CHECKOUT.
For advice or to request a brochure
Call Free 0800 085 1088
or visit seriousreaders.com/5232
ieat
Games&Puzzles
daily recipe
Chicken and leek pie
Kakuro
Zygolex® In i every day
How to play Fill the white squares so that the total in each
across or down run of cells matches the total at the start
of that run. You must use the numbers from 1-9 only and
cannot repeat a number in a run. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Find the missing words by following the RHYME, LETTERS and MEANING links
– eg, a word that rhymes with ‘cheek’, has one letter different from ‘pear’ and
has the same meaning as mountain, would be ‘peak’. Full rules at zygolex.com.
Solution, page 48
RHYME LETTERS
11
LEAK
5
29
29
24
11
6
10
18
KEEP
MUSTY
4
SNOOPING
12
19
23
6
4
6
DEFYING
W W IN
AR T
M ER
ER
13
11
16
24
5
6
SERVES 4
6
6
1 2
8
2
4
Killer Sudoku No 1228
How to play Each row, column and 3 by 3 box must contain
each number (1 to 9) only once. The sum of all numbers
contained in a dotted area must match the number printed
in its top-left corner. No number can appear more than
once in a dotted area. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
16
11
12
7
16
8
12
14
9
11
10
20
∧
3
> 3
<
1
7
9
2
3
3
0
0
12
14
1
9
1
2
3
3
7
1
6
4
4
3
0
1
2
1
4
4 2
2
3 1 2
0
1 0
0
1
15
∨
2
∨
3
4 2
15
>
∧
1 2
4
20
∨
1
10
3
✂
∨
<
How to play Find all the mines in the grid. Numbers in certain squares indicate how
many mines there are in the neighbouring squares, including diagonally touching
squares. Mines cannot be placed in squares with numbers. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
8
6
8
5
∨
0
31
MEANING
Minesweeper
10
4
6
12
LETTERS
∨
How to play
Place the numbers
from 1-5 exactly
once in each row
and column. The
greater than and
less than signs
(‘>’ and ‘<’) indicate
where one cell is
greater/less than
the adjacent
cell indicated.
Solution:
minurl.co.uk/i
3
9
SWEET
Futoshiki
5
1
PEARS
CHUM
RHYME
8
3
PANDER
7
4
5 9
9
CURL
5
YONDER
How to play Place the numbers 1-9 once in each row, column
and bold-lined jigsaw region. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
6
3
6
Jigsawdoku
2
1 3
4
9
4
5
REDUCE
SHRINE
7
STROLL
4
5
4
11
14
5
24
6
Tomorrow
Quick chicken and chorizo pies
WALL
6
12
12
Recipe taken from waitrose.com
5
17
30
Preheat the oven to 200ºC, gas mark 6.
Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a frying
pan and fry the bacon and thyme for 1 to
2 minutes. Add the leeks and fry gently
for 10 minutes, then set aside.
In the same pan, heat the remaining oil
and fry the chicken for 10 minutes; add
the leeks and season to taste. Stir in the
flour and cook for 1 minute. Gradually
blend in the stock and bring to the boil,
then simmer for 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in
the crème fraîche and chestnuts and
transfer to an ovenproof dish, about
25cm square.
Roll out the pastry to the same
dimension as the dish and place on
top, tucking the edges inside the dish.
Brush with beaten egg. Bake for 30 to 35
minutes or until golden.
VALE
4
17
17
2tbsp oil
2 rashers smoked streaky bacon, cut into
1cm slices
1tbsp chopped thyme
4 leeks, trimmed, washed and sliced
(about 1kg)
400g chicken breast (cut into chunks)
25g plain flour
500ml hot chicken stock
2tbsp crème fraîche
100g whole chestnuts, crumbled
375g pack all butter puff pastry
1 medium egg, beaten
MEANING
14
2
1
0
1 1
1
2
14
4
1
1
3
0
1
2
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
Maths Puzzle
Codeword No 1949
How to play Fill the empty squares with
numbers that will make the across and
down calculations produce the results
shown in the grey squares. Each numeral
from 1 to 9 must only appear once. The
calculations should be performed from
left to right and top to bottom, rather than
in strict mathematical order.
How to play The numbers in the grid correspond to the letters of the alphabet.
Solve the puzzle and fill in the letters in the key as you discover them.
Three letters are provided to give you a start. The solution will be printed in
tomorrow’s paper, the solution to yesterday’s codeword is on page 48.
9
Easier
-
9
÷
x
+
x
x
+
20
8
36
20
19
26
6
14
19
96
11
9
9
x
2
x
+
15
+
+
+
-
7
6
16
3
21
10
2
6
17
4
18
19
22
23
9
14
14
14
10
3
3
26
20
15
9
9
12
21
26
3
9
18
7
20
17
21
3
14
6
19
15
11
19
6
5
14
FISH
5
17
1
17
14
14
3
9
9
15
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Need a little help getting started? Then call for up to four extra clue letters on
0901 292 5204. Calls cost £1 plus your telephone company’s network access charge
(if you are having trouble with the phone service, call the helpline: 0333 202 3390).
Or text THEI CLUE to 85100 to receive your clues. Texts cost £1 plus your
standard network charge (if you are having trouble with the text service, call the
helpline: 0333 335 3351). Clues change each day at midnight.
19
DOWN
1 Short-lived
insects (8)
2 Unwell (3)
3 Argument (7)
4 Nomadic (9)
5 Sinful (4)
6 Reference line (4)
10 Enthusiastic (9)
11 Prehistoric era (5,3)
13 Ruler (7)
16 Gaming stake (4)
17 Too (4)
20 Lyric poem (3)
1
2
3
ALL NEW CROSSWORDS!
The i Book of Crosswords
Featuring 100 brand
new concise crosswords.
Available on Amazon
for £4.99.
See inews.co.uk/crossword
Other i books include:
Mixed Puzzles Vol 2 (inews.co.uk/puzzles2),
Codewords (inews.co.uk/codeword)
and Sudokus (inews.co.uk/sudoku)
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
15
Stuck on the concise crossword?
For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3590.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble
accessing this number, please call our helpdesk
on 0333 202 3390.
4
14
16
19
21
20
22
Solution to yesterday’s Concise Crossword
ACROSS 1 Junk, 4 Shun (Junction), 9 Cellulose, 10 Ice, 11 Abbreviations, 12 Chisel,
14 Magnum, 17 Callisthenics, 20 Rug, 21 Hoi polloi, 22 Slur, 23 Ewer.
DOWN 2 Ukulele, 3 Kaolin, 4 Sweat, 5 Unicorn, 6 Scratchcard, 7 Glib, 8 Pessimistic,
13 Illegal, 15 Awesome, 16 Strive, 18 Ichor, 19 Idle.
Today’s other puzzles Cryptic Crossword, page 22;
Five-Clue Cryptic, page 11; One-Minute Wijuko, page 25
Puzzle solutions See page 48 and minurl.co.uk/i
5
6
7
5 7 1
5 6
7
8
4
9
7 3
2 4 9
2
4
8
8
5
1
3 7
8
9 8
3
YOUR
3 1
3 8
5
7
4
5
7 4
5
6
8
7
1 4
7
9
5
6 1 8
Tomorrow: Harder
DIGS
Maths Puzzle,
Word Ladder, Word
Wheel, Kakuro,
Minesweeper,
ABC Logic, Killer
Sudoku, Futoshiki,
Codeword,
Jigsawduko and
Wijuko created by
Clarity Media.
For more
puzzles,
see clarity-media.
co.uk
Terms &
Conditions
17
18
1
CLAW
Concise Crossword No 2271
ACROSS
1 Post (4)
3 Quantity of
paper (5)
7 Word blindness (8)
8 Eye part (4)
9 British journalism,
figuratively (5,6)
12 Dressing-down (6)
14 Attached
building (4-2)
15 Large and
ungainly (11)
18 Run away (4)
19 Reasonable (8)
21 External (5)
22 In this place (4)
3
18
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
8
How to play Each numeral from 1 to 9 must
appear (once only) in the squares forming the
red letter i. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
8 1 2
9
3
1
idoku Exclusive to i
Sudoku Easier
19
17
T O
How to play
Convert the word
at the top of the
ladder into the
word at the bottom
of it, using only
the four rungs
in between. On
each rung, you
must put a valid
four-letter word
that is identical
to the word above
it, apart from a
one-letter change.
There may be more
than one way of
achieving this.
17
8
S
9
9
18
17
7
17
12
9
5
17
1
19
17
20
5
20
24
+
+
5
17
9
9
18
26
45
+
6
9
22
13
+
18
21
26
Harder
29
3
11
3
11
25
6
x
14
17
1
32
5
17
20
x
x
18
11
5
-1
17
Word
Ladder
45
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
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ABC Logic
How to play Place the letters
A, B and C exactly once in each row and
column. Each row and column has two
blank cells. The letters at the edge of a row/
column indicate which of the letters is the
first/last to appear in that row/column.
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
B
C
B
A
B
C
A
A
C
A
B
C
C
A
Word Wheel
This is an open-ended puzzle. How many
words of three or more letters, each
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Can you do better?
D
N
C
I
T
E
O
C
E
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47
Weather
48
SPORT
i racing
Arkle fancy
Sceau Royal
ruled out of
Cheltenham
By Jon Freeman
RACING EDITOR
Next Tuesday’s eagerly anticipated
Arkle Trophy Chase lost a little of
its lustre when Sceau Royal was
ruled out yesterday following a
training setback.
Sceau Royal became a serious
contender for the two-miler when
romping home in the Grade One
Henry VIII Chase at Sandown in December and, along with Saint Calvados, formed a potent local challenge
to the exciting young Irish
raiders Footpad and
Petite Mouchoir.
“It’s just a little niggle, but it’s
enough to stop us
preparing him for
Cheltenham,” said
his trainer Alan
King (left).
The news has had an
inevitable impact on the
Arkle betting with favourite Footpad,
who had been weak in the market following rumours he might run instead
in the JLT Chase on Thursday, shortening once more to 11-8.
This unfortunate scenario will
surely be repeated in the coming
days – it is the same every year – as
last-minute injuries undo months of
preparation and hard work and shatter Festival dreams.
Yesterday’s jumps racing respite
was brief, this afternoon’s Newcastle
and Exeter fixtures both abandoned
as thaws caused waterlogging and
unsafe ground. But Kelso received
some good news from the BHA,
which gave the go-ahead for their
spring fixture, postponed last Saturday, to be run instead next Sunday.
top
tips
BEST BET
Archimedes
(2.20pm, Southwell)
Much improved after breathing
surgery and looks good for
another course win.
NEXT BEST
Mister Music
(4.20pm, Southwell)
Rejuvenated by this surface and
could easily complete a hat-trick.
ANTE-POST
Nicky Henderson’s smart novice
Whatswrongwithyou is 6-1
favourite for Saturday’s Imperial
Cup at Sandown.
SOUTHWELL
GOING:STANDARD
BETWAY CHELTENHAM FIRST & LAST RACE LOSERS
MONEYBACK HANDICAP (CLASS 5) £7,021 added 5f
113222 SOMETHING LUCKY (8) (CD)(BF) M Appleby 6 10 0......................
..........................................................................................................................A Rawlinson V 3
4-4402 CROSSE FIRE (21) (CD) S Dixon 6 9 12.............................L Morris 4
-51514 ARCHIMEDES (12) (CD) D C Griffiths 5 9 12............................................
......................................................................................................Josephine Gordon C,T 7
09-647 FOXY BOY (18) (D) Rebecca Bastiman 4 9 11....Phil Dennis (3) 5
-66335 RUN WITH PRIDE (18) D Shaw 8 9 10...........................P Mathers 6
21237- SOCIALITES RED (241) (D)(BF) S Dixon 5 9 5....P J McDonald C 8
-31222 SIR HECTOR (11) (D) C Wallis 3 9 4..................................W Carson 2
74090- PORT LAIRGE (J70) M Chapman 8 9 0.............................J Haynes 1
- 8 declared -
2.20
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Minimum weight: 10st 0lb. True handicap weights: Port Lairge 8st 4lb.
BETTING: 9-4 Something Lucky, 4-1 Sir Hector, 9-2 Crosse Fire, 5-1
Archimedes, 7-1 Run With Pride, 10-1 Foxy Boy, 12-1 Socialites Red, 50-1
Port Lairge.
3.20
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
2-5154
66U226
67-257
42-311
6734-0
5506-3
889398
BETWAY CASINO HANDICAP (CLASS 5) £7,021 added
1m 6f
SAMTU (12) (CD) Mrs M Fife 7 9 12.................................J Haynes T 5
BRIGADOON (12) (CD) M Appleby 11 9 9 ............A Rawlinson 2
THE RESDEV WAY (J3) P Kirby 5 9 8.................... P J McDonald 1
COUSIN KHEE (2) (CD) H Morrison 11 9 11(6ex)....T Ladd (7) B 6
WORDINESS (49) (D) P Evans 10 9 1................................. Doubtful 7
KATIE GALE (21) (CD) R Brisland 8 9 0............................ L Morris 3
MONZINO (12) (C) M Chapman 10 8 7..............Phil Dennis (3) 4
- 7 declared -
Minimum weight: 8st 7lb. True handicap weights: Monzino 7st 11lb.
BETTING: 5-6 Cousin Khee, 4-1 Katie Gale, 6-1 Samtu, 15-2 Brigadoon,
10-1 The Resdev Way, 66-1 Monzino.
4.20
SUNBETS.CO.UK HANDICAP (CLASS 4) £10,000 added
1m
1
548-11 MISTER MUSIC (21) (C)(D) A Carroll 9 9 8.............A Beech (7) 3
2
5-5469 PEARL SPECTRE (11) (CD) P McEntee 7 9 8..Nicola Currie (5) 10
3
25789- TRADING PUNCHES (130) D Brown 4 9 7...................A Mullen 6
4
488-59 STORM KING (10) (C)(D) D C Griffiths 9 9 6. Fran Berry C 9
5
21-591 MONSIEUR JIMMY (33) (CD) D Carroll 6 9 5...Ger O’Neill (7) 4
6
711147 SOOQAAN (14) (CD) A Brittain 7 9 1.................................... C Hardie 8
7
690-64 ZEFFERINO (15) M Botti 4 9 1........................................G Malune (7) 1
8
31-128 ZAEEM (33) (C)(D) I Furtado 9 9 1.........................P J McDonald 11
9
61-164 SPUN GOLD (33) (CD)(BF) C Fellowes 4 9 0....P Mulrennan B,T 2
10 00127- BOOTS AND SPURS (115) (CD)(BF) S Dixon 9 8 11... L Morris V 5
11 212-22 CHAUCER’S TALE (32) (BF) M W Easterby 4 8 7................................
.............................................................................................................................Nathan Evans 7
- 11 declared Minimum weight: 8st 7lb. True handicap weights: Chaucer’s Tale 8st 6lb.
BETTING: 9-2 Mister Music, 5-1 Monsieur Jimmy, 6-1 Spun Gold, 7-1
Chaucer’s Tale, 8-1 Boots And Spurs, Sooqaan, 10-1 Trading Punches,
Zaeem, 12-1 others.
Results service
KEMPTON Going: Standard to slow
2.00 (2m nh flat): GRAPEVINE (N De Boinville 4-1) 1; Diablo De Rouhet
(14-1) 2; Hillcrest Fire (7-1) 3. Brahms De Clermont 9-4F. 8 ran. 1/2l,
31/4l. (N Henderson).
2.30 (2m2f nh flat): SIR IVAN (N Fehily 7-2) 1; Tommy Silver (2-9F) 2; Its
A Sting (25-1) 3. 5 ran. 3/4l, 41/2l. (H Fry).
3.00 (2m mdn nh flat): GIVING BACK (W Hutchinson 4-1) 1; Moody Maggie (5-1) 2;
Oriental Flame (12-1) 3. Rose To Fame 10-3F. 12 ran. shd, 11/4l. (A King).
3.30 (2m nh flat): CHESTERFIELD (D Sansom 5-1) 1; Zubayr (5-6F) 2;
Figeac (66-1) 3. 7 ran. 2l, 31/4l. (J W Mullins).
4.00 (2m2f nh flat): ONEFORTHEROADTOM (N Fehily 2-1F) 1; Diamond
Guy (11-2) 2; Peggies Venture (5-2) 3. 8 ran. 11/2l, 1/2l. (H Fry).
4.30 (2m2f nh flat): GENERAL GINGER (N Fehily 11-1) 1; Peculiar Places
(5-1) 2; Mercian King (40-1) 3. Peter The Mayo Man 8-11F. 7 ran. 11/2l,
5l. (H Fry).
5.00 (2m nh flat): VOLPONE JELOIS (A Thorne 10-1) 1; Shall We Go
Now (8-1) 2; Land League (20-1) 3. Chelsea Flyer 6-4F. 10 ran. 41/2l,
41/2l. (P Nicholls).
Jackpot: Not won, pool of £12,271.04 carried over. Placepot: £59.40.
Quadpot: £13.20.
LINGFIELD Going: Heavy; AW standard
2.10 (2m nh flat): DAZIBAO (A Tinkler 10-1) 1; Balli Martine (16-1) 2;
Skyline (4-7F) 3. 8 ran. 2l, 41/2l. (G Baker). NR: Dazibao.
2.40 (2m3f110yds mdn hdle): KUPATANA (J McGrath 8-15F) 1; Pull
Together (7-4) 2; It’s Got Legs (8-1) 3. 5 ran. 3l, 41/2l. (N Henderson).
3.10 (2m nov ch): MAESTRO ROYAL (J McGrath 2-5F) 1; Georgieshore
(20-1) 2; 3 ran. 48l. (N Henderson).
3.45 (2m3f110yds h’cap hdle): LANDIN (J McGrath 11-4F) 1; Remiluc
(3-1) 2; Never Equalled (7-1) 3. 6 ran. 4l, 8l. (J W Mullins).
4.15 (2m7f110yds h’cap ch): ALBERTO’S DREAM (A Johns 13-8F) 1; Black
Narcissus (13-2) 2; Touch Screen (8-1) 3. 7 ran. 5l, 13l. (Tom Lacey). NR:
Hansupfordetroit.
4.50 (2m7f h’cap hdle): PRAY FOR A RAINBOW (R T Dunne 3-1) 1; Brother
Norphin (11-4F) 2; Burgess Dream (3-1) 3. 6 ran. 21/4l, 21/2l. (S Drinkwater).
5.20 (2m h’cap ch): FINNEGAN’S GARDEN (J Bowen 5-2JF) 1; Vicenzo Mio
(5-2JF) 2; Pembroke House (11-4) 3. 5 ran. 3l, 6l. (Miss Z Davison).
Placepot: £9.60. Quadpot: £8.60.
SOUTHWELL Going: Soft-heavy in places
2.20 (2m4f62yds h’cap ch): SKIPPING ON (P Cowley 11-4CF) 1; Skint
(6-1) 2; Mondo Cane (11-4CF) 3. Good Man Hughie 11-4CF. 5 ran. 13/4l,
14l. (Laura Morgan). NR: Heavenly Promise.
2.50 (1m7f153yds h’cap nov ch): MINELLA VOUCHER (A Wedge 3-1) 1;
Peppay Le Pugh (9-4F) 2; One Style (5-1) 3. Zamparelli (7-1) 3. 6 ran.
2l, 9l, dht. (A Dunn).
3.20 (2m7f209yds h’cap ch): CALL CARLO (C Deutsch 9-4) 1; Cougar’s Gold (118F) 2; Royals And Rebels (10-3) 3. 4 ran. 7l, 3/4l. (Miss V Williams).
3.55 (2m7f209yds nov hdle): GOOD MAN PAT (T Bellamy 5-6F) 1; Molly
The Dolly (5-4) 2; Haasab (14-1) 3. 4 ran. 2l, 49l. (A King).
4.25 (2m7f209yds h’cap hdle): TOMKEVI (B Hughes 85-40F) 1; Corlay
(7-2) 2; Sartene’s Son (9-2) 3. 6 ran. 6l, 33/4l. (Rebecca Menzies). NR:
Riddlestown.
5.00 (2m4f62yds h’cap nov hdle): BRYNMAWR (P Brennan 3-1F) 1; Rainy Day
Dylan (5-1) 2; Ardmayle (7-2) 3. 7 ran. 7l, 31/4l. (C Tizzard). NR: Tarrona.
5.30 (1m7f153yds h’cap hdle): QUEEN OF THE WIND (T Scudamore 7-1)
1; Malpreedy (20-1) 2; Hermanus (4-1) 3. Northern Girl 7-2JF, Theatre
Act 7-2JF. 8 ran. 21/2l, 10l. (C Tizzard).
Placepot: £141.30. Quadpot: £26.30.
WOLVERHAMPTON Going: Standard
5.45 (7f36yds h’cap): NARALSAIF (P Mathers 9-2) 1; Delilah Park (11-4F)
2; Met By Moonlight (9-1) 3. 11 ran. 33/4l, hd. (D Shaw).
6.15 (1m142yds): BARNABY BROOK (Elisha Whittington 3-1) 1; Captain
Cat (4-5F) 2; Mehdi (14-1) 3. 6 ran. 11/4l, 2l. (T Dascombe). NR: Energia
Flavio.
6.45 (1m1f104yds h’cap): BEEPEECEE (Finley Marsh 3-1) 1; Let Me In (33-1) 2;
John Caesar (14-1) 3. American Patrol 11-8F. 9 ran. 4l, 23/4l. (R Hughes).
7.15 (1m1f104yds h’cap): SUNSHINEANDBUBBLES (J Fanning 15-8F)
1; Cat Royale (10-1) 2; Optima Petamus (8-1) 3. 8 ran. 8l, 21/4l. (Jennie
Candlish). NR: Gone With The Wind.
7.45 (1m4f51yds h’cap): MOUNT TAHAN (S Gray 13-2) 1; Celestial
Spheres (11-8F) 2; Al Hamdany (3-1) 3. 7 ran. 1/2l, nk. (K Ryan).
8.15 (6f20yds nov): KION (D Costello 5-2) 1; Black Sails (8-15F) 2; Swiss
Belle (13-2) 3. 6 ran. 3/4l, 6l. (J Osborne).
8.45 (6f20yds h’cap): BERNIE’S BOY (A Kirby 2-1F) 1; Major Crispies
(14-1) 2; Madrinho (9-2) 3. 9 ran. nk, 1/2l. (P McEntee). NRs: Anonymous
John, Pulsating. Placepot: £24.90. Quadpot: £13.20.
RUGBY UNION: SIX NATIONS
‘Annoyed’ Jones
is early riser as he
looks for answers
to Scots defeat
would be dead. [But] I have thoughts
about what we have got to fix and how
to fix it.
“So I go into the office and start
sending texts and emails to various
RUGBY UNION
CORRESPONDENT
staff members saying, ‘What do you
Eddie Jones has been sending texts think of this?’ I don’t really care when
and emails to his coaching colleagues they reply, I find that’s the best time
before dawn, such has been the an- to think. If you ask any coach who has
noyance of England’s boss at last coached at a high level, they would
week’s loss to Scotland in the Six say the same.”
Nations Championship.
Wasps’ back Elliot Daly is in line
Jones will take his team
for a recall, with Dylan Hartto France this Saturday
ley continuing to start as
knowing another defeat
captain, but fit-again
would almost certainly
Harlequins prop Kyle
end England’s hopes
Sinckler and Exeter
of ret ai n in g t hei r
b ac k- r owe r S a m
Points
lead
at
champions’ title, with
Simmonds may be
the top of the Six
Ireland top of the Six
disappointed when
Nations table that
Nations table by five
Jones
names his team
Ireland have over
points, and only two
for Paris on Thursday.
second-placed
rounds left to play.
And the Australian
England
“Last night, I woke up at
says he has been “tough”
4am,” said Jones yesterday,
with his players since the
as he delivered a message that not
25-13 reverse in Edinburgh.
even the regular midfield pairing of
“You want the players to be solvGeorge Ford and Owen Farrell was ing the problems themselves but no
indispensable if a different combina- team is perfect,” Jones said. “There’s
tion was deemed likely to work better an old story about this coach who had
against the French.
a bucket of water in his office and he
“I can’t sleep because it annoys would say, ‘Come here, son, put your
me losing a game [to Scotland] that hand in this bucket.’ Your hand crewe shouldn’t have lost. I don’t have ates a hole and as soon as your hand
anxiety – I have coached for 20 years comes out, the hole is filled in. No one
and if I was anxious for 20 years I is indispensable; the players under-
Even George Ford
and Owen Farrell
cannot be sure of
their places after
England’s defeat by
Scotland GETTY
Hugh
Godwin
5
I can’t sleep
because it
annoys me losing
a game that we
shouldn’t have
lost. [But] I have
thoughts about
what we have
got to fix
SCOTLAND
Blair hints at changes to winning
ing ten players to his 40-man squad
for their last two matches of the Six
Nations away in Ireland and Italy.
Edinburgh openside John Hardie
returns to the Scotland set-up for
the first time since he served a threemonth ban for gross misconduct
after an internal SRU investigation
into what was widely reported to be
surrounding cocaine use. Lock Richie
By Duncan Smith
Assistant coach Mike Blair has hinted that Scotland could make changes
to the starting team and squad who
became Calcutta Cup heroes last
month when they face Ireland in Dublin on Saturday.
Head coach Gregor Townsend has
boosted his options yesterday by add-
Puzzle solutions
7
-
9
-
÷
2
x
3
+
x
8
x
5
+
20
-
36
2
-
7
+
6
-
1
29
96
5-CLUE CROSSWORD
9
45
+
+
+
5
3
x
+
8
32
x
4
+
x
x
1
x
3
-1
6
7
+
+
10
4
8
19
YESTERDAY’S CODEWORD 1948
1
2
14
15
3
4
5
6
7
8
16
17
18
19
20
21
H X R A U N B
P
I
J
K F C O G V
ZYGOLEX
Across: 1 N-a-scar,
3 (G)allows,
4 Serena (serener)
Down: 1 No.-mad-s,
2 Red Sea*
FISH
YOUR
FIST
DOUR
FIAT
DOER
FLAT
DOES
9
10
11
12
13
FLAW
DOGS
22
23
24
25
26
CLAW
DIGS
T Q M E
Z
L D S W Y
LEFT TO RIGHT: leap; stale; spying; walk; spring; stalk; thing; item; stem;
think; gem; shrink; pearl; ponder; gum
John Hardie returns
from three-month ban
WORD WHEEL
NINE-LETTER WORD
conceited
OTHER WORDS cede,
cent, cite, cited, code,
coined, concede, conceit,
cone, coned, deceit,
decent, deco, den,
denote, dent, dice, die,
diet, dine, doe, done,
dote, edict, edit, encode,
end, entice, enticed, eon,
ice, iced, nee, need, net,
nice, niece, node, note,
noted, notice, noticed,
ode, once, one, tee, teed,
teen, ten, tend, tide,
tie, tied, toe, toed, tone,
toned
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
49
The Upshot
Tim Wigmore
ANSWERING SPORT’S OVERLOOKED QUESTIONS
Bannister proved you can achieve
anything if you put you mind to it
“T
stand that. They have got to play and
perform so who is at 10 and 12 will be
done on who we feel is the best for
that game.
“There is very heavy rain forecast
for Friday and Saturday, we all know
Stade de France has a heavy pitch anyway, so we could pick a team to play
a slogathon. France’s mindset is that
this is their grand final. They can have
a great Six Nations or a poor Six Na-
tions depending on this game.” Jones
also insisted he had put his unsavoury
jockeying by Scots at a Manchester
train station last week behind him:
“As a coach, you either get abuse or
advice or slaps on the back.
“The one thing I’ve learnt is I
should get two dogs, because then I’ll
always have two friends. I’ve got one
dog and I’m looking for another one
at the moment.”
formula for Ireland clash
Gray, wings Byron McGuigan and
Lee Jones, centre Alex Dunbar and
front-rowers Fraser Brown, Darryl
Marfo and Zander Fagerson also return from injury.
Young Glasgow scrum-half George
Horne receives a first full Scotland
call-up and Edinburgh back-rower
Magnus Bradbury is recalled.
“We’ve been able to bring guys into
our squad and create options,” said
Blair. “You will have tactics for certain opponents, certain players will
fit that. So it might be that you end up
playing the same team. But, if there
are ways we feel we can manipulate
Ireland with different personnel, we
would do that.
“We wouldn’t just keep the same
team because they’ve won.”
Results Service
FOOTBALL
PREMIER LEAGUE
Crystal Pal (1)........ 2 Man Utd (0)................3
Townsend 11
Smalling 55
Van Aanholt 48
Lukaku 76
Matic 90
P W D L F A Pts
Man City
29 25 3 1 83 20 78
Man Utd
29 19 5 5 56 22 62
Liverpool
29 17 9 3 67 32 60
Tottenham
29 17 7 5 55 24 58
Chelsea
29 16 5 8 50 26 53
Arsenal
29 13 6 10 52 41 45
Burnley
29 10 10 9 24 26 40
Leicester
29 9 10 10 41 42 37
Watford
29 10 6 13 39 47 36
Brighton
29 8 10 11 28 38 34
Everton
29 9 7 13 33 49 34
Bournemouth 29 8 9 12 34 44 33
Swansea
29 8 6 15 25 42 30
West Ham
29 7 9 13 36 54 30
Huddersfield 29 8 6 15 25 50 30
Newcastle
29 7 8 14 27 40 29
Southampton 29 5 13 11 29 41 28
Crystal Palace 29 6 9 14 27 46 27
Stoke
29 6 9 14 28 54 27
West Brom 29 3 11 15 22 43 20
CRICKET
FIRST TEST
Australia v South Africa, Durban:
Australia 351 (110.4 overs; M R Marsh
96; K A Maharaj 5-123) & 227 (74.4
overs; C T Bancroft 53; K A Maharaj
4-102). South Africa 162 (51.4 overs;
A B de Villiers 71no; M A Starc 5-34)
& 298 (92.4 overs; A K Markram 143).
Australia won by 118 runs.
TODAY’S FIXTURES
(7.45pm unless stated)
SKY BET CHAMPIONSHIP
Birmingham v Middlesbrough...................
Burton v Brentford..............................................
Cardiff v Barnsley .................................................
Fulham v Sheffield Utd.....................................
Hull v Millwall ..........................................................
Norwich v Nottingham Forest...................
Preston North End v Bristol City............
QPR v Derby................................................................
Reading v Bolton (8).............................................
Sheffield Wednesday v Ipswich ...............
Sunderland v Aston Villa................................
SKY BET LEAGUE ONE: Walsall v
Rochdale.
SKY BET LEAGUE TWO: Accrington
v Morecambe, Mansfield v Lincoln
City, Newport Co v Forest Green,
Cheltenham v Notts County.
CHECKATRADE TROPHY—Semifinal: Shrewsbury v Yeovil.
LADBROKES LEAGUE ONE: Alloa v
Arbroath.
FOOTBALL
UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE
ROUND OF 16 SECOND LEG
Liverpool (5) v Porto (0).....................................
Paris SG (1) v Real Madrid (3)........................
CRICKET
FOURTH ODI: New Zealand v
England (Dunedin, 10pm).
INTERNATIONAL T20 SERIES: Sri
Lanka v India (Colombo, 1.30pm).
GOLF
WGC - MEXICO CHAMPIONSHIP,
MEXICO CITY, Final Round: 268 P
Mickelson (US) 69 68 65 66 (Mickelson won play-off at first hole);
J Thomas (US) 72 70 62 64; 269 T
Hatton (GB) 70 68 64 67; R CabreraBello (Sp) 66 67 69 67.
he four-minute mile
is a brick wall, and
I shan’t attempt it
again.” So said John
Landy in April 1954.
Landy had run the mile in 4min 2sec
on six occasions.
On a chilly early evening at Iffley
Road, Oxford on May 6 1954, Roger
Bannister ran the mile in 3:59.4 –
and ran through that brick wall.
Forty-six days later, Landy – he
who had once declared that “the
four-minute mile is beyond my
capabilities” – broke it too. In his
first attempt after Bannister’s
record, in Turku, Finland, Landy
ran the mile in 3:57.9 – not merely
breaking the four-minute mile but
shattering Bannister’s record too,
which thereby became at once
ephemeral and eternal.
Today, more than 1,000 runners
have completed a four-minute
mile. Breaking the four-minute
mile has become as devalued as
a Zimbabwean dollar during the
Robert Mugabe years.
“Après moi, le déluge,” Bannister
predicted in the moments
immediately after his triumph. He
Steph Curry is a keen proponent of using strobe glasses to train the brain GETTY
recognised that there was nothing
physiologically unique about him:
In the coming years, perhaps
The power of the brain is such
other runners would emulate him
the greatest improvements in
that it may even be possible to trick
now they knew the four-minute
sport will be found in the brain. In
it into producing performances
mile was possible. It stands as a
the 2006 World Cup, the average
athletes previously considered
case study in the extraordinary
ball contact time for a German
beyond their physical limits. A
power of the mind in sport.
footballer was 2.9sec. By the 2014
recent experiment brought a group
Bannister himself knew as
World Cup, which Germany won,
of cyclists together to cycle on
much. Even in the amateur days of
the average ball contact time for
stationary bikes, with an avatar
athletics – he never earned a penny
a German player was just 0.9sec
in front of them, that showed how
in prize money – Bannister used
– an improvement of 66%, driven
they fared against their previous
two friends as pacemakers when
by increased emphasis on player’s
personal best on the 4,000km
he broke the four-minute mile; only
cognitive development, as Amit
time trial. Almost all the cyclists
when he came to run the last of
Katwala notes in The Athletic Brain. beat their previous bests. Except,
the four laps at Iffley Road was he
Most sportsmen are near the
the avatars were lying: they were
alone. When Landy repeatedly ran
physical limits of how much they
set two per cent better than their
4:02, he did so alone at the
can train. The cognitive
previous personal bests, and the
front of the pack, without
limits - the time they
cyclists were still able to beat the
Teams
pace-setters. When he
spend improving
mark. This suggests that, as the
broke Bannister’s record,
authors of the paper noted, cyclists
recognise that their decision-make
he had Chris Chataway, one those who
processes - remains
operate with reserves which “can
of Bannister’s pace-setters, achieve the
relatively untapped.
be accessed after deception.”
for company at the start of
Devotedly investing
The benefits of cognitive training
extraordinary in their brains helps
the race.
could be even greater in other
will
not
do
so
The need for targets to
set many elite athletes
sports. A survey by Timothy
by harnessing apart from the rest.
overcome is wired deeply
Olds of the University of South
the power of
into human beings. Think
Steph Curry, the
Australia found that, of 50 sports,
of the motivation of losing the body alone NBA most valuable
cycling was among the three
weight to hit a target, and
player in both 2015
sports in which psychology made
how much harder it is to
and 2016, uses strobe
the least impact. The three sports
maintain that weight after. Even
glasses in practice to train his
in which psychology made the
donors are more generous when
brain. Leading NFL quarterbacks,
greatest difference were cricket,
a charity is near a fund-raising
including Tom Brady and Matt
gymnastics, and tennis.
target.
Ryan, are devotees of cognitive
As professional sports teams
In sport, targets inform what
training. Brady famously watches
strive for any tool to push them
is considered possible and what
every single play he was involved
on to new heights, so they are
athletes aim for. “When you start
in twice after a season finishes,
increasingly investing in cognitive
running,” the leading physiologist
always seeking improvement; Ryan improvement tools. They
Tim Noakes says in Ed Caesar’s
uses NeuroTracker, a 3D mental
recognise that those who achieve
fine book Two Hours, “you know
training program now used by
the extraordinary and impossible,
what the world record is, so you
Manchester United too. Players
like Bannister on that early
don’t have to run ten minutes faster at PSV Eindhoven’s academy now
evening in Oxford 64 years ago, will
than the world record. Your whole
shoot space aliens on handheld
not do so by harnessing the power
focus is to run one second faster
devices to improve their decisionof the athletic body alone. They
than the world record. That’s what
making on the pitch, as The New
must also harness the power of the
your brain is keyed in on.”
York Times reported last year.
mind.
50
SPORT
ATHLETICS
FOOTBALL
Muir camp
question
credibility
of Dibaba
By Hugo Lowell
The coach of Laura Muir has
questioned the credibility of the
gold medallist in the women’s
1,500 and 3,000m at the World
Indoor Championships, over
her connections to a high-profile
trainer arrested for administering banned drugs.
Genzebe Dibaba of Ethiopia,
who completed the middledistance double on Saturday
night, has come under scrutiny
after her trainer, Jama Aden, was
found with EPO when Spanish
officers raided his hotel during a
training camp in June 2016.
Local media at the time also
reported that police saw Aden
put plastic bags of used needles
into bins outside his hotel, though
he claimed they had been for
“injections that I use for myself”
and that he had not violated any
anti-doping rules.
The investigation into Aden is
ongoing, and Dibaba has continued to run at major championships since the arrest. That has
caused some angst among her
opponents, with Muir
saying on Sunday
she had no relationship with
Dibaba.
Asked whether she had even
spoken to the
Ethiopian, Muir
(left) replied: “No,
not really.” She was
reluctant to say why the
two maintained no contact, and
looked at her coach Andy Young
for support when pressed further
on the issue. “Her association with
a certain coach is not particularly
healthy for the sport,” Young said
with laudable frankness.
Young suggested it was not only
him and Muir that were perturbed
by the continued presence of
Dibaba at major championships,
pointing to the sulky looks displayed by the 1,500m bronze medallist on the podium as evidence.
During the medal ceremony for
the 1,500m, Sifan Hassan of the
Netherlands, who finished third
after being reeled in by Muir in the
closing stages, pouted on the podium in a show dismissed as disappointment. Young disagreed: “We
saw Hasan at the stairs, she was
lovely, it was all great. I don’t think
she was expressing disappointment. I think she was expressing
her contempt for the gold medallist and her associations.”
IAAF chief executive
Olivier Gers has quit
after 18 months in the role.
Gers, who will continue for the
next three months, said he was
leaving because of issues with
the “commercial strategy”.
Matic delivers
knockout blow
for United but it’s
cruel on Palace
CRYSTAL PALACE
Townsend 11, Van Aanholt 48
MANCHESTER UNITED
Smalling 55, Lukaku 76, Matic 90
2
3
Kevin
Garside
AT SELHURST PARK
Like a heavyweight on the ropes,
Nemanja Matic gave it one last swing
of his left peg and Palace went over
like a sack of potatoes. The blow
proved unanswerable, giving United
the lead for the first time just as the
announcer was informing the crowd
there would be three minutes of
added time. Cruel does not do it.
It was all United in the second half.
It had to be because they did not
appear in the first. In this lop-sided
season of one-team dominance it appeared United had called off the chase
homespun club to celebrate. The prematch exhibition of Kayla the eagle
was more exciting than the Premier
League’s Sunday “special” between
Manchester City and Chelsea at the
Etihad and for those who subscribe
to the decorative deployment of
womankind, the Palace cheerleaders
remain a model of fan engagement.
United have plundered Palace in
the Premier League years. No team
has a worse record against another
than Palace; L14 D3. Ouch. This was
therefore not a fixture of which Palace expected much, and freed from
the onerous responsibility to win, the
for second place. Palace, adhering to home team gave it a crack, testing
first principles; pass, move, tackle, the United defence with quick balls
chase, that sort of mundane thing, whipped in enthusiastically.
were one up after 11 minutes and two
And would you know it, Palace
to the good three minutes into the were duly rewarded with an early
second half.
goal. Andros Townsend cannot claim
United were that odd jumble of to practice this in training, but he
disjointed parts, expensive stran- didn’t seem to mind as his left-foot
gers, flapping about carelessly
shot looped past David De Gea off
in search of some kind of
the chest of Victor Lindelof.
connectivity, and finding
It was a classic amnone. Only when it got
bush. United had barely
properly desperate,
strung a pass together
losing to a team in the
and were a yard short
relegation zone who
all over the pitch. PerThe number of
had not won since the
haps the big number
Palace wins over
middle of January did
on Saturday at home
Manchester United
in
their
18
Premier
they jump to it.
to Liverpool had enLeague meetings
The introduction of
tered their heads preMarcus Rashford at the
maturely. Only Alexis
break helped no end, and
Sanchez looked like he had
the transformation of a hitherto
his boots on the correct feet in
moribund Romelu Lukaku, scorer of an embarrassingly sloppy start.
the equaliser, was a hefty benefit.
With Anthony Martial absent
The visit of United to south Lon- through injury there was too little
don is still something for the Palace width and the poverty of United’s
purists to welcome. And for the vis- midfield tempted Sanchez ever
iting fan there is plenty about this deeper to try to influence events.
0
Meanwhile, Palace zipped through
the gears as if they were the team
pursuing a Champions League
agenda.
For 88 minutes against Spurs, Palace maintained parity. United did
not seem aware of this. And United
do not have a Harry Kane at centre forward. Too often in the first
Crystal Palace
Hennessey
WanBissaka
Kelly
Tomkins
Van
Aanholt
Townsend Milivojevic McArthurSchlupp
Sorloth
Benteke
Sanchez
Pogba
Young
Lukaku
Matic
Smalling
Lingard
McTominay
Lindelof Valencia
De Gea
Manchester United
Subs: Crystal Palace Riedewald (Schlupp, 80);
Manchester United Rashford (McTominay, 45), Shaw
(Young, 67), Mata (Valencia, 67). Booked: Crystal Palace
Townsend; Manchester United McTominay, Young,
Matic
Man of the Match Matic. Rating 8/10.
Possession: Crystal Palace 31% Manchester United
69%. Attempts on target: Crystal Palace 4 Manchester
United 8.
Referee N Swarbrick (Preston).
Attendance 25,840.
NEWS
2-27
ITALY
Astori culpable
homicide case
will be opened
By Sports Staff
Matic’s late wonder
goal completes
United’s comeback
REUTERS
half Lukaku was second to the ball,
caught on his heels. It is not a question of effort, but nous. He simply
does not inuit space with his back to
goal well enough.
Mind you, he was not on his own in
failing to leave any kind of imprint.
Paul Pogba was again too casual and
wasteful. When that creative outlet
fails there is not enough experience
in Scott McTominay or pace in Matic
to inject the required urgency. Palace
kept their shape and ran like the blazes. And that was more than enough at
the break.
Jose Mourinho responded by withdrawing the overmatched McTominay for Rashford and pinned him
immediately to his familiar station
on the left. But it was Palace’s leftsided raider Patrick van Aanholt who
started the half with a wallop, snapping the net with a sharp finish after
a quickly-taken free-kick.
Mourinho showed his displeasure at the haste with which Palace
restarted. That’s the game Jose. In
the lingua franca of that most robust
son of Manchester, Gary Neville, it’s
called being “at it”. Matic, who commited the foul, most certainly wasn’t.
Palace did not have to be particularly good. Ordinary was enough,
until out of the blue United nicked
one back, Chris Smalling, unmarked
in the Palace box, converting Antonio
Valencia’s cross after Palace failed to
clear a corner. With 25 minutes left
Mourinho remembered that Luke
Shaw once played left back and sent
him on to replace Ashley Young.
More of a surprise was the departure
of Valencia for Juan Mata. Method or
madness? Time would tell.
Prosecutors have opened a culpable homicide case over the death of
Fiorentina captain Davide Astori
(below).
The 31-year-old Italy defender was
found dead in his hotel room in Udine
on Sunday, hours before his team
were due to face Udinese in a Serie
A fixture.
A post mortem will be performed
today with Astori’s funeral being held
at the Basilica of Santa Croce in Florence on Thursday morning, Fiorentina announced in a statement.
Initial reports suggested Astori’s
death may have been the result of a
cardiac arrest.
The chief prosecutor
in Udine, Antonio De
Nicolo, said yesterday that a culpable homicide case
would be opened,
but that it was a
formality at this
stage and that “no
one has a responsibility for anything”.
He added in quotes
published by Italian news
agency ANSA: “An inquiry has
been opened for culpable homicide
against persons unknown. It is a duty
to ascertain if the death of Astori
came about through tragic fatality
or if someone could have foreseen
something.
“At this moment no one has
responsibility for anything which
would seem to us to amount to something. It permits us to individualise
responsibility if there is any.”
ANSA reported that investigators
believed Astori had died of natural
causes. All of Sunday’s Serie A games
were postponed as a result and tributes poured in for the player, who
won 14 caps for Italy.
FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION
Guardiola
accepts charge
over ribbon
» Continued from back page
is a Jewish religious symbol of
immense importance to Jews worldwide. To put it in the same bracket as
the swastika and Robert Mugabe is
offensive and inappropriate.”
Glenn was trying to explain why
the FA were refusing to allow Guardiola to wear the yellow ribbon during
games when he said: “It could be the
Star of David, it could the hammer
and sickle, it could be a swastika,
anything like Robert Mugabe on
your shirt, these are the things we
don’t want.”
Guardiola yesterday accepted
an FA charge of breaching their kit
and advertising regulations and is
likely to face a fine when punishment is decided by an independent
commission.
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
51
SamCunningham
FOOTBALL CORRESPONDENT
England players’ struggle for
game time is a big concern
W
here are all England’s
players? If they could
stand up and make
themselves known
to the general public, it would be
greatly appreciated.
Four months before England
kick off their World Cup
campaign against Tunisia in
Volgograd, you’d like to think
they were leading the Premier
League’s top clubs in a title
challenge, forging into the latter
stages of the Champions League
and the FA Cup, perhaps already
having played an integral role in a
League Cup triumph. The reality:
England’s players largely aren’t,
well, playing.
Joe Hart, with 75 caps to his
name, is England manager
Southgate’s preferred
goalkeeper, but is behind Adrian
at West Ham. John Stones
and Gary Cahill would be the
strongest centre-back pairing,
if they were playing regularly
for their clubs. Stones has not
started for Manchester City in
the Premier League for six weeks
and, despite a strong start to
the season, has slipped behind
Vincent Kompany and Nicolas
Otamendi after dropping out of
the side due to injury. Cahill has
not been trusted by manager
Antonio Conte since Chelsea
capitulated against Watford a
month ago. Both were unused
substitutes again in City’s win
against Chelsea on Sunday.
A fit Danny Rose is arguably
England’s first-choice at leftback. He has not started in the
Premier League since Boxing
Day. Since then, his only firstteam football has come in three
FA Cup games; one against
League Two Newport County
and two against League One
Rochdale. In total, he has made 14
appearances this season, two of
them for England and only four of
them in the Premier League.
So of England’s most likely
back five, four are barely kicking
a football, four months before
the World Cup begins. Rightback Kyle Walker is the anomaly,
making City’s right-back position
his own amidst tough competition
and playing 46 times for club
and country this season. He will
be feeling justified for deciding
to leave Spurs in that £45m deal
last summer.
In fact, bar a Spurs core of
Harry Kane, Dele Alli and Eric
Dier, none of England’s most
likely picks for Russia are playing
regularly at their clubs.
Arsenal’s Jack Wilshere has
reemerged as a serious England
contender, but injuries are
always lurking and he cannot be
Danny Rose, left, has only played three times for Tottenham this year GETTY
relied upon. Raheem Sterling
has had a sensational season at
City, improved immeasurably
under Pep Guardiola, but is
another struggling with injury.
Ruben Loftus-Cheek stood out in
England’s last friendlies, but has
been out since Christmas.
At Liverpool, Jordan
Henderson, Alex OxladeChamberlain and Adam
Lallana are all in and out of
Jürgen Klopp’s side. OxladeChamberlain appears to be
relishing the central role he was
denied at Arsenal, but is often on
the bench. Lallana, recovering
from injury, is no way near the
influence he once was.
At Manchester United, Jesse
Possible England WC team
Pickford (29)
Stones (14)
Cahill (17)
Maguire (29)
Walker (27)
Rose (5)
Dier (28)
Alli (27)
Sterling
Rashford (13)
Kane (27)
Figure is number of Premier League starts
this season (Statistics supplied by Opta)
Lingard’s last two goals have
come from the bench. He is
a player who has repeatedly
impressed this season, but is still
not guaranteed to start under
manager Jose Mourinho.
Marcus Rashford has not
started a Premier League
game since Boxing Day and
Mourinho made it clear that he
So of England’s most
likely back five, four are
barely kicking a football.
Kyle Walker is the anomaly
is uninterested in the impact his
decisions have on the England
national team. Why would he be?
Why would any of the managers
in charge of the top six? They have
no affiliation to England and their
livelihood relies upon success and
silverware. There are no bonus
clauses in contracts for how many
of their players are picked by
Southgate, no fee if England win
the World Cup.
“It’s up to Gareth Southgate,”
Mourinho said of Rashford
yesterday. “If he trusts him, he
selects him. It doesn’t matter if
he plays or if he doesn’t play for
Manchester United.”
For Southgate, it does matter.
And, unfortunately for England’s
manager, he will have to put a lot
of faith in players who are in a
similar position to Manchester
United’s young forward.
Statisticians Opta have
calculated that the percentage
of English players in the Premier
League has, very fractionally,
increased from the past two
seasons. Until last night, 169 of
the 497 players to feature in the
top-flight were English. That 34
per cent is up from 33.8 per cent
last season and 33.5 per cent the
year before. Compare that to the
Premier League’s inception in
1992, when 390 of the 544 players
were English – 71.7 per cent of the
league – it is an alarming slump.
So close to a major tournament,
does anyone really have any clue
who should start for England?
Southgate has used 31 players
in his last six games and while
trial and chances should be
encouraged, so should having an
idea of a strongest team.
Those 31 players have started
an average of only 65.3 per cent of
their respective club’s Premier
League games this season.
England’s players used to be the
top club’s stalwarts. Now they
often have to make do with a place
on the bench.
52
SPORT
FOOTBALL
CHAMPIONS LEAGUE
W
hen Tottenham
trudged
disconsolately
off the pitch at
Manchester City’s
Etihad Stadium in December, they
looked ill-prepared for a Champions
League showdown with Juventus.
Mauricio Pochettino’s side were
thoroughly outclassed in the 4-1
defeat, with right-back Kieran
Trippier enduring a particularly
chastening evening against Leroy
Sané, repeatedly being beaten one
on one, inside and out. There was
some surprise Pochettino declined
to substitute the struggling England
international and introduce the
pacier Serge Aurier instead.
“I’m one of those guys who’s
honest and it obviously wasn’t the
best day for me,” says Trippier
frankly. “City were unbelievable
that day.” At the time, few
Tottenham supporters would have
relished the prospect of seeing the
dizzy defender up against Juventus’
Brazilian winger Douglas Costa.
Yet a few months on, the picture
is rather different. Spurs are
undefeated in their 17 matches since
that trip to the Etihad and Trippier
has similarly recovered well from
his ordeal in Manchester.
The 27-year-old started all three
of the back-to-back Premier League
clashes against Manchester United,
Liverpool and Arsenal – lining up
against Alexis Sanchez, Sadio Mané
and Henrikh Mkhitaryan – and he
more than held his own as Spurs
kept two clean sheets while banking
seven points. He was one of the star
performers in last Wednesday’s 6-1
FA Cup victory over Rochdale.
Pochettino opted for Aurier when
Spurs travelled to Turin for the
first leg of their Champions League
last-16 duel with Juventus.
However, the Ivorian produced
an error-strewn display, conceding
a brainless penalty after fouling the
dangerous Costa from behind and
then picking up a booking which
ruled him out of the second leg.
Trippier is set to start his first
Champions League knockout tie
tomorrow night, attempting to
shackle Costa as Spurs go into
their home leg, having drawn 2-2 in
Italy. He may be getting his place by
default, but believes he has earned learn,” says Trippier. “I’m still quite
it. And he feels his Sane experience young so I’m willing to learn from
as helped him to improve.
the manager or from players. Since
“I made quite a few mistakes that I’ve been here, I think I’ve matured
day against City and you can only as a player, and working for this
Trippier says he has a healthy
relationship with his rival, as he did
with Kyle Walker. “Walks and I had
different abilities and it’s the same
with Serge,” he says. “If he plays or
I play, like it was when Walks was
here, we’re always encouraging
each other.”
Tottenham have been underdogs
for the majority of their Champions
League campaign, since they were
placed in a group alongside Real
Madrid and Borussia Dortmund.
They were up against it when
they fell 2-0 behind against
Juventus in Turin. But, after
fighting back and scoring two away
goals, they are on top in the tie. It is
a relatively new situation for them
and, as Harry Kane points out, it
comes with a new pressure.
“We probably weren’t the
favourites before but people are
looking at us after that performance
at Juventus and saying we should
go through now,” he says. “We’ve
got to cope with that and see how
we come through it. They’re still
one of the best teams in Europe.
They’ve probably been in this
situation before and they’ve got
very experienced players. We’re not
getting carried away.
“We know we played well out
there and on another day we could
have won, but they’ll feel they could
play better as well. We know it’s a
big game. Champions League nights
are what we all want to be involved
in, and this is a chance to get into
the quarter-finals.
“There’ll be a bit more added
from where you went wrong, look
pressure and maybe more nerves,
at what you could have done better,
but that’s why we play football.
and that’s what I did. I watched
“We’re in great form and have
the game back a couple of times.
played against a lot of great teams
We spoke about it as players
recently and done well. It’s
as well. I’ve had a lot of
important we carry that
games since then to
on. Going through would
build my confidence
give us a lot more
back up. It was
confidence.” A goalless
good that I got the
90 minutes would
Caps won by Kieran
three games under
secure Spurs’ place
Trippier, having
my belt against
in the last eight, as
made his England
United, Liverpool
would a 1-1 draw, but
debut
last
year
and Arsenal to build
Kane says they have no
my momentum.”
intention of sitting back.
Pochettino has
“The way we play and the
picked Trippier and
way the manager sets us
Aurier in alternate matches
up in every game, we’re always
for the last month, giving the pair
on the front foot, always pressing,
four starts each. And, although
always playing attacking football,”
the Argentinian has no selection
he says. “We know they need to
dilemma tomorrow, he will have
score but we can’t go into the game
to decide who faces Chelsea and
with any negative thoughts. We’ve
City in April. Whatever happens,
got to try and win.”
Savaging by
Sané taught
Trippier a
timely lesson
Spurs full-back
is back to
his best and
ready to stop
Juventus in
their tracks. By
Ben Pearce
Kieran Trippier has
come on leaps and
bounds since his
struggle against
Leroy Sané (left)
GETTY
Players
have off days
and I had an
off day in that
game... all you
can do is take
lessons from
where you
went wrong
manager, his man management
is unbelievable.
“Players have off days and I had
an off day in that game. All you can
do is look back and take lessons
3
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
Liverpool
Karius
Alexander- Matip Van Dijk Robertson
Arnold
Milner
Mané
Henderson
Firmino
Can
Lallana
Tiquinho
Brahimi
Otavinho
Herrera
Dalot
Corona
Oliveira
Marcano
Felipe
Pereira
Sa
Porto
Possible teams for tonight’s match at Anfield
Kick-off 7.45pm;
TV 7pm (BT Sport 3).
Referee F Zwayer (Ger)
Adam Lallana (front) is in line for a
rare start for Liverpool against Porto
at Anfield tonight GETTY
Klopp to resist
full-scale rotation
for dead rubber
By Mark Critchley
Jürgen Klopp is yet to decide whether to rest Mohamed Salah tonight,
despite Liverpool’s five-goal advantage in the second leg of their Champions League last-16 knockout tie
against Porto. Salah has missed just
two matches in 2018 but has shown
little sign of fatigue, scoring his 32nd
goal of the season in Saturday’s 2-0
win over Newcastle.
After the 5-0 victory at the Estadio
do Dragao three weeks ago, Liverpool’s passage to the quarter-finals
tonight is all-but assured, meaning
Klopp has an opportunity to rest
players ahead of Saturday’s Premier
League trip to Manchester United.
The Liverpool manager is likely
to give opportunities to a handful of
fringe players, but ruled out “real
rotation” and suggested Salah could
start. “We had players who played
with knocks, ankle injury and stuff
like that,” Klopp said. “So if I said
it was good to give [Salah] a break,
and he has to play because two others cannot, or if I say it is important
to play him and then leave him out,
then what?
“These things are good for him,
both ways. They are playing Saturday to Saturday and there is rhythm
in that as well, so we could say that
is OK, do we need a Tuesday game
for the rhythm? I’m not sure. I don’t
think there is a 100 per cent answer.”
Klopp added: “I knew immediately
after the final whistle in Porto this
game will be a challenge, because
of all the circumstances and all the
questions. If we had drawn the game
0-0, it would be a fantastic result, or
1-1 even better, we would not be asked
if we will rest, if we will change.
“People say it is not important – no
it is unbelievably important. This is
Liverpool it is a home game, we want
to win the game. That is it, for that we
will have a really strong team to win
the game.”
One player who could be granted
a rare start is Adam Lallana, whose
time on the pitch this season has
been hampered by injury.
The 29-year-old missed the first
three months of the season with a
thigh problem and setbacks have
limited him to two starts.
Last season, Lallana was one
of Liverpool’s most impressive
performers. Klopp believes he is close
to playing regularly again, though
tonight’s game may be too soon for
him. “The time will come for him 100
per cent. Whether it is tomorrow,
I don’t know,” added Klopp.
THE INDEPENDENT
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
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6 MARCH 2018
53
Alves ready to grab
opportunity to shoot
down old rivals Real
history and eliminate the
holders of the title.
Paris St Germain’s Dani Alves
“We could have had a better
wants to “send a message to
result in the first leg. We were
Europe” by ending Real Madrid’s superior in the game and had the
Champions League defence.
better chances. It made us think
The former Barcelona fullwe can knock them out.
back is used to high“There is no greater
profile clashes with
motivation. We are
Los Blancos and is
going to try to knock
It’s an
relishing the challenge opportunity
out a strong opponent
of turning around a 3-1 to change the
and send a message
first-leg deficit.
to Europe.
course of our
Adrien Rabiot’s
“We have to start
history. We
opener in Madrid
the match with this
were superior mentality. We have to
was cancelled out by
Cristiano Ronaldo’s
believe and we have to
in the first
double and a Marcelo
do it.”
leg and had
strike to give Real the
Coach Unai Emery
better
chances
advantage, but the away
echoed his player’s
goal gives them hope
thoughts, claiming: “I
with a 2-0 win at the Parc des
want to see the best Real because
Princes sufficient to progress.
I think we can beat them.
Alves (right) told psg.fr: “It’s a
“It is a unique
challenge for us, an opportunity
moment, a big
to change the course of our
chance to take
a step forward
in front of our
Paris Saint-Germain
supporters.”
Kylian
Mbappé and
Areola
Marquinhos
returned to
Berchiche Kimpembe Silva
Alves
training on Sunday
and Javier Pastore
followed
suit yesterday, meaning
Diarra
Rabiot
Verratti
Neymar is PSG’s only absentee.
Angel Di Maria will continue
to deputise for the Brazilian
Di Maria
Mbappé
Cavani
and has the chance to add to his
resurgence in form since the new
year.
Ronaldo
Real have doubts over
midfielders Toni Kroos and
Bale
Isco
Benzema
Luka Modric. Despite a recent
improvement in form, coach
Casemiro
Modric
Zinedine Zidane’s future at the
club may still depend on further
Carvajal Varane
Ramos Marcelo
European success.
He told his club’s website: “We
Navas
are focussed and ready to play.
Starting with the scoreboard
Real Madrid
in your favour means nothing.
We must be ready for the
Poss teams for tonight’s match at the Parc des Princes
Kick-off 7.45pm;
TV 7pm (BT Sport 2)
unexpected. We are used to
Referee F Brych (Ger)
the pressure.”
By Sports Staff
54
SPORT
DRUGS IN SPORT
Comment
Report reveals Sky’s flawed ethos
Kevin
Garside
CHIEF SPORTS
CORRESPONDENT
The severed heads of those cycling
knights, Sir Bradley Wiggins and
Sir Dave Brailsford, are paraded
virtually outside the Houses
of Parliament, skewered by a
Parliamentary report that leaves
them with nowhere to ride.
The conclusions of the Digital,
Culture, Media and Sport
Committee in its “Combating
Doping In Sport” inquiry have no
legal force but they arrive at the
point of a moral spear so sharp
the wounds might be considered
terminal.
The pristine Team Sky ethos
propagated by Brailsford is
shown to be one more victim of an
insatiable desire for success that
drove them the wrong side of the
ethical line on which the project was
predicated.
The report makes clear that
though Team Sky acted within
the regulations as defined by
the World Anti-Doping Agency,
medical treatments that would
otherwise be banned were used, in
the committee’s view, to enhance
performance and not to treat a
condition.
Team Sky and Sir Bradley
vehemently disagree, of course.
“I find it so sad that accusations
can be made, where people can be
accused of things they have never
done which are then regarded as
facts. I strongly refute the claim
that any drug was used without
medical need. I hope to have my say
in the next few days and put my side
across.”
Of course, you do, Bradley. Yet
the defence of legitimacy is hard to
maintain after damning testimony
by Wiggins’ favourite Team Sky
general Shane Sutton exposed
what the committee saw as the
abuse of the Therapeutic Use
Exemption (TUE) mechanism for
what it was; a device to increase
athletic performance and not treat
a medical condition.
Thus the starting point for Team
Sky, the report claimed, became not
how best to treat a legitimate health
The
Sport
Matrix
The stories you
need to know
issue but how to conjure a medical
condition as the pretext to get the
performance gains desired. The
need for speed rather than the need
for treatment was the unethical
premise exposed.
The descent into questionable
practice was first exposed by
Russian hackers in 2016, who
revealed how Wiggins had obtained
a TUE before three races, including
the 2012 Tour de France, for a
drug called triamcinolone used in
RUGBY LEAGUE
Wolves ban fans
after flare incident
Warrington have issued banning
orders to four supporters following
crowd trouble at last month’s Super
League clash at Widnes. Smoke
bombs were set off in the away end
while a flare was thrown on to the
pitch after the Wolves’ 18-10 victory.
“One male has received a life ban
from all Warrington home and
away fixtures following on from a
previous offence,” a statement read.
“A further three males have received
two-year bans until 2020.”
the treatment of asthma. That it
contained a powerful corticosteroid,
a substance which boosts the
power-to-weight ratio of the rider
and which had a history of use in the
sport, was just co-incidence, users
argue.
This was followed by the
infamous “Jiffy Bag” episode, a
package received at the Team
Sky bus during a race in France
in 2011 that allegedly containing
triamcinolone. The role played by
the key agents including Wiggins,
Brailsford and the team doctor
Richard Freeman in denial of this
was subsequently investigated by
UK Anti-Doping, a process which
informed much of the DCMS
The need for speed
rather than the need for
treatment was the
unethical premise exposed
TENNIS
Edmund takes Murray’s No 1 crown
Andy Murray’s near 12-year reign as
British No 1 has come to an end,
with Kyle Edmund taking
over the mantle.
The ATP rankings
show Edmund (right)
at a career high of 24
while Murray slips
to 29.
It is the first time
since 10 July 2006, when
a 19-year-old Murray
overtook Greg Rusedski
after reaching the fourth round of
Wimbledon, that the Scot has not
been at No 1. Murray’s fall is the
result of the hip injury that
has sidelined him since
Wimbledon last summer,
for which he underwent
surgery in January.
Edmund described his
elevation as “humbling”,
adding: “As proud as I am,
I would have been much
happier had Andy stayed
healthy and occupied his place at
the very top where he belongs.”
committee report. The failure of
Dr Freeman to speak on the record
about any of this stuff to any agency
is deeply troubling for Wiggins and
others who insist on pleading their
ethical justifications.
The absence of a rudimentary
paper trail that would identify the
contents of the Jiffy bag, claimed by
Brailsford in the early information
trail to be a decongestant available
over the counter in France, jars
with the broad methodology
FOOTBALL
Clubs may vote on
VAR at next meeting
The Premier League will discuss
the possible introduction of Video
Assistant Referees at its next
meeting with clubs in April. The
use of VAR, which was on Saturday
unanimously agreed by football’s
lawmakers, will be on the agenda
of the London meeting. Whether
there is a vote on the introduction of
the technology remains to be seen.
The VAR trials in the FA Cup and
Carabao Cup have been criticised
for how long decisions take.
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
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28-29
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48-56
i TUESDAY
6 MARCH 2018
55
and means Brailsford now has to go
Team Sky rider Sir
Bradley Wiggins
with Sir Dave
Brailsford GETTY
What the report said - and reaction it it
Key findings from DCMS’s 54-page
report ‘Combatting Doping In
Sport’:
* Bradley Wiggins and Team Sky
are accused by MPs of using drugs
to ‘enhance performance’ and not
just for medical need.
* The report states the medicine
used by Wiggins – the powerful
corticosteroid triamcinolone –
was used to ‘improve his power to
weight ratio’ ahead of his historic
win in the 2012 Tour de France.
* While the use of triamcinolone
with permission through a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) is not
illegal, the committee accuses
Team Sky of breaching an ‘ethical
line’.
* A ‘respected source’ told the committee Wiggins had used the drug
‘beyond the requirement for any
TUE’ . Wiggins maintains he used
triamcinolone to treat asthma
* The committee’s report says the
source told them Wiggins and a
‘smaller group of riders’ trained
separately from the team in 2012
and were ‘all using corticosteroids
out of competition to lean down in
preparation for the major races’.
What was in the Jiffy bag?
The report was unable to prove or
disprove whether Wiggins had been
given an injection of triamcinolone
at the end of the 2011 Criterium
de Dauphine. Wiggins says he was
given legal decongestant Fluimucil
but there is no way to prove this
because Team Sky doctor Richard
Freeman did not follow protocol
and share his records with col-
espoused by a team focused on
details. Freeman resigned from
his position at Team Sky before
any disciplinary action could take
place but is under investigation by
the General Medical Council for his
role in the mysterious acquisition
of testosterone patches by Team
Sky in 2011. Freeman and Team
Sky claim this was the result of an
administrative error by the supplier
and deny any wrongdoing.
Team Sky also refuted the tone
and the substance of the report.
The committee is wrong, they wail,
in its findings and we are wrong
in our assumptions that Wiggins
and Brailsford are anything other
than upstanding paragons of clean
sport who would not dream of
taking advantage of a convenient
regulation.
What Team Sky cannot deny
or control is how we feel about
the report. That it appears in line
with sentiment about a sport long
RUGBY LEAGUE
CRICKET
Prop Watts facing
ban for headbutt
Hull prop Liam Watts is facing a
three-match ban for the headbutt
which earned him a fourth red card
in under 12 months. Watts was sent
off after the clash with Warrington
front rower Dom Crosby during
Hull’s 21-12 Super League win on
Friday night. The Rugby Football
League’s match review panel
deemed it a grade C offence and
Watts has until 11am today to accept
the three-match penalty notice or
face a disciplinary hearing.
leagues. This was a mistake compounded by the chaotic state of the
medical storeroom he used at British Cycling’s base in Manchester
and then losing his laptop while on
holiday in Greece. The committee
noted that it has already been established – that Wiggins was given
TUEs for triamcinolone before the
2011 and 2012 Tours de France and
2013 Giro d’Italia. The report says
‘we do not believe there is reliable
evidence that it was Fluimucil’.
Responses to the report
Wiggins said he finds it ‘so sad that
accusations can be made, where
people can be accused of things
they have never done which are
then regarded as facts’ and that he
‘strongly refutes the claim that any
drug was used without medical
need’.
Team Sky said: ‘We strongly refute
this allegation (and) we are surprised and disappointed that the
committee has chosen to present
an anonymous and potentially malicious claim in this way, without
presenting any evidence or giving
us an opportunity to respond. This
is unfair both to the Team and to
the riders in question.’
British Cycling chief executive
Julie Harrington said it welcomed
the report, calling it ‘thorough and
timely’ and adding on the Team
Sky situation: ‘Never again will
we allow a situation to develop
whereby our independence as the
national governing body is called
into question because of our relationship with a professional team.’
Evan Bartlett
on abuse and short on contrition
is a huge problem for Wiggins
and Brailsford. You never know,
it might even prompt Sir Dave to
consider his position. I’m sure he
could present his resignation in a
way that is not directly linked to the
report’s conclusion. This team has
done nothing wrong, but I accept
mistakes were made, etc. Something
that might allow him to slip quietly
out the door and give the sport if not
his team a chance to cycle on.
ICC probe Warner-De Kock row
Footage of a heated off-the-field
altercation involving David Warner
and Quinton de Kock overshadowed
Australia’s 118-run victory over
South Africa in the first Test.
The tourists required just 22 balls
to snare the last Proteas wicket on
the final morning,
but the talk around
Durban was of the
CCTV video which
emerged showing
Warner and De
Kock involved in an
angry exchange outside the dressing
rooms at Kingsmead during the
tea interval on day four and the
Australian vice-captain being
restrained by team-mates.
The row is being investigated by
the International Cricket Council,
who are looking into
an incident involving
Nathan Lyon, who
dropped a ball on
batsman AB de
Villiers after he was
run out on day four.
‘Our rules about tramadol
and corticoids are clear’
» Continued from back page
watchdog for cycling, which began
in 2007, three years before Team
Sky’s creation. Legeay said the
controversy around cycling’s No
1 squad was “unsettling” for other
top teams, who almost all have commercial sponsors.
Sky have consistently refused to
join the MPCC, which has called on
the World Anti-Doping Agency to
ban corticosteroids – at the heart of
the latest scandal – and tramadol.
The latter is a controversial painkiller two former Sky riders, Josh
Edmondson and Jonathan TiernanLocke, have discussed using unethically in races while on the team, in
interviews with the BBC.
Under the MPCC rules, which
are stricter than normal regulations, riders may not use tramadol
during races, use cortisone even
with a therapeutic use exemption or participate in any race for
eight days after being treated with
corticosteroids.
“Everybody understands there
can be problems, but the question
is how you react to them. Our rules
about tramadol and corticoids are
very clear,” Legeay said.
The MPs report claimed that
certain members of Team Sky used
corticosteroids to enhance performance by a weight-loss program
prior to the 2012 Tour. The British
squad, who have had a policy of zero
tolerance to drug use since their
inception in 2010, have strongly
denied this and have insisted they
have drastically improved their
medical practices since then.
Legeay believes it would now
be an “exceptionally strong sign”
if Team Sky and British Cycling
joined the MPCC. He says he has
sent “lots of emails to Dave Brailsford, telling them they can set a
strong example, you’re the biggest
team in the world.”
Coe: I failed to read emails
on Russian doping scandal
By Evan Bartlett
Lord Coe has hit back at claims he
deliberately misled MPs about his
knowledge of the scale of the Russian doping scandal which rocked
athletics in 2015.
Coe (right) appeared
before the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
(DCMS) select committee in December
that year shortly after
he had taken over as
president of the International Association of
Athletics Federations.
In the report released yesterday, the DCMS accused Coe of
underplaying his knowledge of the
scandal in a bid to protect his sport
GOLF
Mickelson becomes
oldest winner at 47
Five-time major winner Phil
Mickelson defeated Justin Thomas
in a play-off in the WGC-Mexico
Championship to claim his first
victory since the 2013 Open.
Mickelson parred the first extra
hole to become, at the age of 47,
the oldest winner of a World Golf
Championship event and secure
his 43rd title. He said: “I can’t put
into words how much this means to
me.” Tyrell Hatton missed out on the
play-off after a bogey on the 18th.
but Coe claims he simply did not
read his emails.
Former London Marathon director Dave Bedford says he phoned
Coe in August 2014 to tell him about
senior IAAF officials planning to
hush up a Russian doping case
in return for large sums of
money and followed that
conversation up with an
email outlining the plot.
Wr i t i n g i n t h e
Evening Standard yesterday, Coe said: “I’ve
read the DCMS committee report on combatting
doping in sport, and what it
comes down to is whether I’m
a reader of emails or not.
“The truth is I’m not an assiduous reader of emails.”
Sport on tv
Basketball: Horizon Championship
BT Sport/ESN, 5pm & midnight
Football: PSG v Real Madrid
BT Sport 2, 7pm
Football: Liverpool v Porto
BT Sport 3, 7pm
Football: Shrewsbury v Yeovil
Sky Sports Football, 7.30pm
Cricket: New Zealand v England
Sky Sports Cricket, 9.30pm
Basketball: Summit Champ’ship
BT Sport/ESPN, 7pm
Basketball: Thunder v Rockets
BT Sport 1, 1am [tomorrow]
Glenn sorry
for comparing
Star of David
with swastika
By Sam Cunningham
FOOTBALL CORRESPONDENT
Football Association chief executive
Martin Glenn has apologised for likening the Star of David to the swastika. Glenn made the “ill judged”
comment when explaining why
the governing body were punishing Manchester City manager Pep
Guardiola for wearing a yellow ribbon, a symbol which supports Catalan independence. “I would like to
apologise for any offence caused by
the examples I gave when referring
to political and religious symbols in
football, specifically in reference to
the Star of David, which is a hugely
important symbol to Jewish people
all over the world,” Glenn said.
“I will be speaking with the Jewish
Leadership Council and to Kick It
Out to personally apologise.” Jewish
Leadership Council chief executive
Simon Johnson had criticised Glenn
for his comments and lodged a complaint with the FA. “I have no problem with the FA clarifying Rule Four
and specifying that all religious
symbols are prohibited on a kit, if
that is the case,” Johnson said. “In
explaining that decision, the chief
executive’s examples are ill-judged
and in poor taste. The Star of David
» Continued on p51
Sport
Matic magic
United battle
back from two
down to win
at Palace
06.03.18
» Match report, p50-51
P52
FOOTBALL
Trippier back
to his best after
his runaround
by super Sané
Nemanja Matic (right)
celebrates after scoring
the winner for Manchester
United last night GETTY
P50
ATHLETICS
Muir camp
unhappy at
gold medallist’s
doping links
Wiggins: It’s a smear, we
did not cross ethical line
Briton’s denial comes as campaigner says situation is ‘a tragedy for the sport’
By Alasdair Fotheringham
P48
RUGBY UNION
Jones still
‘annoyed’ at
England’s Scots
capitulation
Sir Bradley Wiggins has launched
an impassioned response to an
MPs report which claims Team Sky
“crossed an ethical line” by using
drugs that are allowed under antidoping rules to enhance performance
instead of just for medical purposes.
Sir Bradley said he “100 per cent” did
not cheat and added that someone
was attempting to “smear me”.
However his claims come against
the backdrop of enormous criticism
of Wiggins and Team Sky from
across the world of cycling, with
the president of the Movement for
Credible Cycling (MPCC) calling
Team Sky’s predicament a “tragedy
for the sport”.
Talking to the BBC’s sports editor Dan Roan last night, Wiggins restated his innocence in stark terms.
“Not at any time in my career did we
cross the ethical line,” Wiggins said.
“I refute that 100 per cent. This is
malicious, this is someone trying to
smear me.”
Wiggins, who became the first
Briton to win the Tour de France,
in 2012, claimed he is the subject
of a “witch hunt”, that his children
“get a hammering at school” which
is “disgusting to witness”, and that
it is “a living hell”. He added: “I am
having to deal with the fall-out. I am
left in the middle trying to pick up
the pieces.”
However Roger Legeay, the president of the MPCC, responding to
the report, told i yesterday: “Of
course it’s a tragedy. for the sport”.
Eighteen teams, including seven
from cycling’s top league, the WorldTour, belong to MPCC, an unofficial
but widely respected anti-doping
» Continued on p55
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