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The i Newspaper – March 15, 2018

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S P E C I A L
E D I T I O N
A CELEBRATION OF THE LIFE OF STEPHEN HAWKING 1942 - 2018
Britain?s
master
of the
universe
?The greatest British
thinker since Newton?
by Science Journalist of the Year
Steve Connor
?An attempt to see
inside the mind of God?
by Carl Sagan
THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
PLUS
Number 2,279
Lord Rees, Baroness Greenfield
Cheltenham
pull-out guide
Racing tips
Pages 3, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 24
SEE CENTRE PAGES
Eddie Redmayne l Professor Brian Cox l International Space Station l The Vatican l United Nations
l A Brief History of Time explained l Hawking?s humour l Pop culture icon l Defying medical science
i@inews.co.uk
@theipaper
theipaper theipaper
Russia warns it will
hit back after May
expels diplomats
Deborah Orr:
it?s women?s
fault, again
Beware of the
mini-Beast ? deep
freeze forecast
Taxes must rise by
�bn to balance
books, warns IFS
P4
P21
P19
P40
PLUS BARCELONA vs CHELSEA
THE WORLD?S HAPPIEST NATIONS
P50
P33
I TRACEY THORN INTERVIEW P36 I SIX NATIONS RUGBY P46
I TRIBUTES TO JIM BOWEN P27 I TV GUIDE P34 I PUZZLES P44
The
News
Matrix
SCIENCE
Why are
Nordic people
literally on top
of the world?
See p.33
The day at
a glance
Anniversaries
Friday 15 March 1974
The architect John Poulson
is jailed for ?ve years for
corruption after being
found guilty of bribing
public ?gures to win
contracts. Leeds Crown
Court was told that the
63-year-old gave away
more than �0,000 in
suits, holidays and ?owers
to win contracts.
The UK is ?falling behind? with
several child health issues. Analysis
by the Nuf?eld Trust compared the
UK with 14 similar countries and
found that for both boys and girls life
expectancy has plateaued since 2011.
The study puts these statistics down
to low breastfeeding rates and high
levels of childhood obesity. PAGE 27
E-cigarettes have been found
to cause more harm than good.
Scientists at The Dartmouth
Institute for Health Policy found the
vape devices introduce teenagers
to smoking and they eventually use
conventional cigarettes. They only
lead to a small rise in adults who
successfully kick the habit. PAGE 7
Author Patrick Ness could score
the ?rst ever Carnegie Medal
hat-trick as his latest novel earned a
nomination for the oldest children?s
book award in the UK. A win for the
British-American writer?s Release
would make him the ?rst author to
secure three medals in the prize?s
81-year history.
COURTS
NATURE
ONLINE
PEOPLE
Facebook removes
Britain First pages
Late ?Corrie? actor?s
Judges reserve black Jersey beauty spots
collection for auction cab rapist decision
?ruined by benches?
Facebook has removed the pages
of Britain First and its leaders.
Facebook judged the videos and
photos were designed to incite
hatred against Muslims. It says the
decision to remove the pages was
made after Britain First had ignored
?nal warnings about the repeated
posting of such material. PAGE 28
The toy theatre collection of the
late Coronation Street actor Peter
Baldwin is up for auction. Baldwin,
who starred as Derek Wilton in the
TV soap, had a shop selling them in
London?s Covent Garden. The actor,
who died aged 82 in 2015, developed
the passion when his parents gave
him a Pollock?s toy theatre.
LIFESTYLE
The List
What drives people
to buy certain cars
Buying a car is a huge investment
and there are a lot of factors to
consider ahead of the purchase.
Data from Statista?s Global
Consumer Survey 2018 found
which car features are most
appealing to potential buyers.
Fuel efficiency ? 60 per cent
Safety ? 53 per cent
Suitability for everyday use
? 49 per cent
Low price ? 46 per cent
Quality and driving comfort
? 38 per cent
Design ? 35 per cent
Warranty and customer service
? 32 per cent
Spaciousness ? 31 per cent
Environmentally friendly
? 23 per cent
Subscribe to i at
i-subscription.co.uk
index
Crossword.............28
TV & Radio...........34
Arts..............................36
Weather...................39
Business.................40
Puzzles.....................44
Shining
cities
Victims of black cab rapist John
Worboys face a wait to see if they
have successfully challenged a
decision to release him from jail.
Three judges at the High Court in
London have reserved their ruling
to a later date. They also continued a
temporary bar preventing the serial
sex attacker?s release.
The chief executive of the National
Trust for Jersey, Charles Alluto, has
described Trust memorial benches as
?graveyards? that make visitors feel
awkward about sitting down. He said
areas of natural beauty are blighted
by benches and there is no room for
any more. Jersey National Trust will
refuse new benches in some areas.
The UK?s most attractive cities to live and work in have been ranked based on
cumulative scores over nine categories that address not only earnings and job
opportunities but the quality of life for a family. Royal Mail, working with the Centre
for Economics and Business Research investigated 12 cities, here?s how they scored.
H
aff ou
or sin
da g
bi
lit
y
Offi
ce
co
st
s
Birthdays
Lynda La Plante, writer,
75; Howard Devoto, singer,
66; Sir Philip Green,
businessman, 66; will.i.am,
singer/producer, 43;
Eva Longoria (below),
actress, 43
An improvement in cardiovascular
?tness in middle age could delay
or prevent people from developing
dementia. Researchers at the
University of Gothenburg found
women with high levels of physical
?tness at middle age are 90 per cent
less likely to develop dementia
later in life. PAGE 7
He
al
th
ca
re
THOMAS JONES
LITERATURE
Ness chases Carnegie
Medal hat-trick
C
se ult
rv ur
ic al
es
Friends may come and go,
but enemies accumulate
HEALTH
?Vaping leads to
cigarette smoking?
Ea
rn
in
gs
Quote of the day
SOCIETY
Life expectancy for
children ?plateaued?
Gr
ee
ns
pa
ce
MARCH
HEALTH
B
co usi
m ne
m ss
un
ity
15
A weak handshake could be an early
sign of a failing heart, scientists say.
An association has been found
between a limp grip and unwelcome
changes in heart structure and
function. Experts believe hand grip
could be used as a broad measure of
heart health. PAGE 7
Middle-age fitness
prevents dementia
J
op ob
po
rtu
ni
tie
s
Ed
ac u
c
ce a
ss tio
n
THURSDAY
Strength of grip can
show heart health
1: Edinburgh
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2: London
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3: Bristol
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4: Newcastle/
Gateshead
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5: Manchester
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6: Glasgow
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
8 8
8
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
Overall ranking
7: Leeds
8: Cardiff
8
8
5
5
6 6
7
9: Sheffield
9
10: Liverpool
10
10 10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
11: Belfast
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
12: Birmingham
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
SOURCE: ROYAL MAIL WORKING WITH CEBR
Newspapers support recycling
The recycled content of UK
newspapers in 2015 was 71%
㏄ublished by Johnston Publications Limited, 2 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0PU, and printed at
Trinity Mirror Printing, St Albans Road, Watford; Hollinwood Avenue, Oldham; and Cardonald Park,
Glasgow. Also printed at Carn Web, Carn Industrial Estate, Portadown. Back issues available from Historic
Newspapers, 0844 770 7684. Thursday 15 March 2018. Registered as a newspaper with the Post Of?ce.
Select journalism in i is copyright
independent.co.uk and copyright
Evening Standard, beyond those
accredited as such.
NEWS
2-33
VOICES
20-24
TV
34-35
ThePage3Profile
IQ
36-38
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
46-52
FRANCE
DAME GILLIAN LYNNE,
CHOREOGRAPHER
Oliver Duff
A French baker has been handed
what he thinks is an over-cooked
?3,000 (�650) ?ne for working too
hard. He fell foul of the Aube region?s
labour and employment authorities
by opening his bakery seven days a
week last summer. Shops are forced
to close on Sundays by a local law to
prevent ?unfair trading?.
Star man
POLAND
A new national holiday has been
approved to honour Poles who risked
their lives to save Jews during the
Holocaust, with 24 March to become
a day of remembrance. It now only
requires President Andrzej Duda?s
signature to become law. The bill
highlights those who were ?faithful
to the highest ethical values?.
UNITED STATES
War veterans learn
from works of Homer
Strike up the band!
The 92-year-old former ballet
dancer and groundbreaking
choreographer responsible for
the moves in Lloyd Webber?s Cats
and The Phantom of the Opera, has
directed more than 60 productions
in the West End and Broadway.
She has worked on many of
Lloyd Webber?s critically acclaimed
musicals, winning numerous
accolades including two Olivier
Awards for Cats in 1981 and a
Lifetime Achievement ?Special?
Olivier in 2013.
Lloyd Webber describes her as a
?pioneer of British musical theatre
and dance?.
Cat-apulted to stardom?
The New London Theatre owned by
Lloyd Webber since 1991 ? which
welcomes 450,000 people through
its doors every year ? was the home
of the original production of Cats.
?Gillie?s groundbreaking work
on Cats inspired and launched
countless careers in dance,? Lloyd
Webber said. He added: ?It is only
?tting that the theatre in which
she created Cats is named in
her honour.?
She could?ve danced all night?
The gracious Dame Lynne said she
was surprised by the honour and
praised Lloyd Webber in return.
?The minute I heard Andrew?s
music I fell in love with his ability
to channel deep emotion into a
single musical note,? she said. ?He
continues to inspire generation
after generation with his passion for
musical theatre and Great Britain
has bene?ted enormously from his
brilliance and his generosity.?
The name change expected to
formally take place later this year.
A group of military veterans at the
University of Vermont is studying
the works of the Greek poet Homer
to help them cope with the aftereffects of modern combat. In The
Iliad and The Odyssey, Homer writes
in detail familiar to modern soldiers
about the discipline of war and the
dif?culties many face afterwards.
ITALY
Elderly cannabis
user pardoned
An Italian pot-smoking pensioner
who had been growing marijuana
plants for medical use has received
a presidential pardon. President
Sergio Mattarella overruled a high
court judge who imposed a ?vemonth prison sentence and a ?800
?ne on the 67-year-old, who has HIV,
Florence Snead and Valerie Browne diabetes, hepatitis and liver failure.
3
Letter from
the Editor
Baker fined over
seven-day week
New national day
of remembrance
A class act?
Choreographer Gillian Lynne is to
become the ?rst woman to have a
London West End theatre named
after her. Composer Andrew Lloyd
Webber is to rename his New
London Theatre as the Gillian Lynne
theatre in her honour.
London?s playhouses have a longstanding history of being named
after men in recognition for their
contribution to British theatre,
including the John Gielgud, Harold
Pinter and Laurence Olivier venues
among many more.
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
i@inews.co.uk
It is rare that we dedicate a single
edition to one person. Recent examples
that leap to mind are Nelson Mandela
(December 2013) and David Bowie
(January 2016).
Some of the articles about Stephen
Hawking you read today were
commissioned back in 2012, then
updated. That may appear ghoulish, but
is standard practice across all media
organisations ? it is the best way to do
justice to eminent ?gures, and capture
their achievements.
We are proud today to publish the
astronomer Carl Sagan (his foreword
to the original 1988 edition of A Brief
History of Time) and a tribute by
Lord Rees.
In today?s paper we also remember
two of our colleagues who recently
died. At Tuesday night?s Press Awards,
our former science editor Steve Connor
won Science Journalist of the Year.
More details on page 23. And we open
today?s Stephen Hawking coverage
with a glorious appreciation by
Steve (pages 8-9).
As i readers will be aware, our
deputy arts editor Bernadette McNulty
died earlier this month while on holiday.
We publish Bernadette?s last article,
an interview with Tracey Thorn, on
page 36.
We are gathering contributions from
family, friends and colleagues for a
longer tribute article for Bernadette in
the near future.
Last month, Bernadette recorded
an interview with Radio 4 for a
documentary about bands and politics.
Producer Kevin Core says: ?She was
brilliant.? Bernadette?s family told the
BBC that they wanted her part in the
broadcast to go ahead.
The Art of Now: Band Politics will air at
11.30am next Thursday, 22 March.
6 Music presenter Chris Hawkins
looks at the trend for alternative bands
tackling politics, covering topics
like the NHS, refugees, austerity and
rail privatisation.
We?ll be listening.
Twitter: @olyduff
4
NEWS
DIPLOMACY
UK expels 23 ?Russian
spies? after Kremlin
ignores deadline
By Nigel Morris
POLITICAL EDITOR
The crisis in relations with Moscow
is escalating rapidly after Theresa
May announced the expulsion of
23 suspected Russian spies from
Britain in response to the Salisbury
nerve agent attack.
The Government is braced for
rapid reprisals as the Kremlin denounced the move as an ?unprecedentedly crude provocation?.
Moscow?s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said: ?We consider it categorically unacceptable and unworthy
that the British government, in its
unseemly political aims, further
seriously aggravated relations,
announcing a whole set of hostile
measures. Our response will not be
long in coming.?
Mrs May is seeking international support for Britain?s action
against Russia.
Porton Down research
centre in Wiltshire will
receive �m extra funding to
develop a Chemical Weapons
Defence Centre, Defence
Secretary Gavin Williamson
will announce today.
The United Nations security
council met last night to be briefed
on the poisoning and the attack
will be discussed by European
Union leaders at a Brussels summit
next week.
The Prime Minister set out
planned moves against Russia and
allies of President Vladimir Putin
in a Commons statement after the
Kremlin ignored her deadline to
provide a ?credible? explanation for
how the Soviet-era substance came
to be used in the attack.
She described the poisoning of the
UK response What will be done
Expulsions
Twenty-three Russian diplomats
suspected of spying have been given
their marching orders. They will
have to leave within one week. She
did not expel the ambassador.
Suspending top-level contacts
Senior British ministers and
of?cials will break off contact with
their Russian equivalents. The
invitation to its foreign minister,
Sergei Lavrov, to visit the UK is being
revoked. Mrs May con?rmed that no
ministers, of members of the Royal
Family, will travel to World Cup in
Russia.
Stopping people at the border
Immigration of?cers are to get the
power to detain people suspected of
?hostile state activity? as they arrive
in the UK.
Extra checks on travellers
Britain will increase the monitoring
of ?those travelling to the UK who
could be engaged in activity that
threatens the security of the UK?.
Magnitsky powers
The Government committed to
supporting a British version of the
US Magnitsky Act, which clamps
down on money laundering.
former spy Sergei Skripal and his
daughter Yulia as ?an unlawful use
of force by the Russian state against
the United Kingdom?.
In the largest mass expulsion of
diplomats since the Cold War, she
said 23 ?undeclared intelligence of?cers? at the Russian Embassy had
a week to leave Britain.
She told MPs that the mass expulsion will ?fundamentally degrade
Russian intelligence capability in
the UK for years to come?.
The Prime Minister insisted: ?If
they seek to rebuild it, we will prevent them from doing so.?
Vowing to ?harden our defences
against all forms of hostile state activity?, she announced new powers
to detain suspected spies as they
enter the country.
And she said the Government
would freeze Russian state assets
?wherever we have the evidence
that they may be used to threaten
the life or property of UK nationals
or residents?.
Mrs May announced the suspension of high-level contacts with
Russia, con?rming a boycott of the
World Cup by ministers and members of the Royal Family.
In her statement, Mrs May welcomed support from allies and
said Britain would be pushing for a
?robust international response? at
the UN.
?This was not just an act of attempted murder in Salisbury ?
nor just an act against the UK,?
she said.
?It is an affront to the prohibition
on the use of chemical weapons. And
it is an affront to the rules-based
system on which we and our international partners depend.?
REACTION
EU has ?common stance? on
Russian attack, says Merkel
By Marcin Goclowski
German Chancellor Angela Merkel
said yesterday the EU would present
a common stance over the nerve
agent attack.
?We take the ?ndings of the British
Government very seriously. I spoke
by telephone with Theresa May yesterday. We will present a common
European view here,? she said.
A French government spokesman said, however, it was too early
for Paris to decide on a response
and it would wait for ?definitive
conclusions?.
But Polish Prime Minister Mateusz
Morawiecki ?ercely condemned the
refusal of Russia, Poland?s former Soviet master, to address the UK?s questions regarding the case. Nato called
on Russia yesterday to give Britain
?complete disclosure?.
EU leaders are due to meet next
week and Ms Merkel said they would
take a position then. REUTERS
NEWS
2-33
VOICES
20-24
TV
34-35
IQ
36-38
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
46-52
POLITICS
Corbyn?s speech
hits wrong note
with colleagues
By Nigel Morris
POLITICAL EDITOR
Military personnel in
Gillingham yesterday
remove a vehicle connected
to the nerve agent attack in
Salisbury AFP/GETTY
DIPLOMACY
Russia: Britain prefers to
take path of confrontation
By Maria Kiselyova
IN MOSCOW
Russia?s Foreign Ministry yesterday accused Britain of choosing
confrontation over cooperation
with Russia when handling the case
of Sergei Skripal, a former Russian
double agent poisoned in Britain.
The ministry attacked Prime
Minister Theresa May?s decision
to expel 23 Russian diplomats from
Britain, among other measures, as
a ?agrant provocation, and promised a speedy response.
?It?s absolutely unacceptable &
unworthy of British Government
to seek to further seriously aggravate relations in pursuit of its
unseemly political ends, having
announced a whole series of hostile measures,incl. expulsion of 23
#Russian diplomats from #UK,?
the ministry tweeted. REUTERS
Tensions have resurfaced in Labour
ranks after Jeremy Corbyn questioned the evidence which led the
Prime Minister to blame Russia for
the Salisbury nerve agent attack.
The row over his response to
Theresa May?s package of sanctions
against the Kremlin was fuelled when
his spokesman linked the crisis to intelligence mistakes over weapons of
mass destruction in Iraq.
The Labour leader described the
poisoning as ?an appalling act of
violence?, but stopped short of directly accusing Vladimir Putin?s government of being behind it.
He urged Mrs May to put pressure on Russia to reveal details of its
chemical weapons programme and
asked whether a sample of the nerve
agent used in the attack had been
sent to Moscow.
As he went on to condemn ministers over cuts to the diplomatic service, he was heckled by Tory MPs in a
repeat of angry scenes in the Commons two days earlier.
Mr Corbyn also endured a succession of centrist Labour MPs
taking a swipe at him by offering
backing to the Prime Minister over
her approach.
Later, his spokesman, Seumas
Milne, said there was a ?problematic?
history over the use of intelligence by
politicians and left open the possibility of Russia being framed.
?The break-up of the Soviet state
led to all sorts of military material ending up in random hands,? he
added.
He hit back at MPs criticism of
Mr Corbyn?s response to Mrs May?s
statement. ?In these kinds of crises,
there are often initial reactions which
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
5
News in brief
RUSSIA
Ambassador ?lies
to British MPs?
A Labour MP has accused the
Russian ambassador of lying
to MPs, attempting to stop
parliamentary debates on Russia
and interfering in elections.
Chris Bryant told the
Commons it was time the
Government ?told him that we
will order our affairs in this
country?. Mr Bryant, a former
minister, said: ?Since he arrived
here seven years ago, Alexander
Yakovenko, he has repeatedly lied
to parliamentarians.?
INVESTIGATION
Novichok ?not
included in ban?
Jeremy Corbyn?s address angered
some members of his own party
aren?t necessarily later backed up by
reality of facts,? he said.
?He has been proved to make the
right call time and again, over the
last 15 to 20 years in particular, when
many others made the wrong calls
and some of those calls had disastrous consequences.?
His comments were called ?shocking? and ?outrageous? by Mrs May
when a Conservative MP raised them
in the Commons chamber.
Former frontbencher Chuka
Umunna said: ?Mr Milne?s comments do not represent the views of
the majority of our voters, members
or MPs.? Anna Turley MP tweeted:
?I?m afraid Seumas doesn?t speak for
my Labour or British values.?
Last night 16 Labour MPs
signed a motion saying
they ?unequivocally? accepted
the ?Russian state?s culpability?
for the attack, and fully supported
Mrs May?s statement.
The Soviet-designed nerve agent
Novichok, used to poison the
ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his
daughter Yulia, is not part of an
international ban on chemical
weapons, the head of a Russian
government agency has said.
Vladimir Uiba, of the Federal
Medical and Biological agency,
said Novichok did not fall
under the Chemical Weapons
Convention of 1997.
PEOPLE
Volunteers raise
funds for officer
People in Salisbury are rallying to
raise funds for police of?cer Nick
Bailey, who suffered injures as a
result of the nerve agent attack
last week.
A JustGiving page set up by
Katie Doherty has gathered 36
supporters and nearly �0 so
far. And at Wiltshire Council?s
Bourne Hill of?ce, a cake sale
took place to raise funds for
DS Bailey.
6
NEWS
SPORT
MEDIA
English football
fans warned over
?political tensions?
during World Cup
By Cahal Milmo
Football fans have been warned they
may face harassment at the World
Cup in Russia due to ?political tensions? created by the Salisbury poisonings and to avoid commenting
publicly about the stand-off between
London and Moscow.
In advice updated since the attack
on Sergei and Yulia Skripal, the Foreign Of?ce told travellers to Russia,
who will include thousands of England fans during the football tournament in June and July, to ?remain
vigilant? and avoid protests.
Of?cials, apparently anticipating
deteriorating relations between Britain and Russia, warned that people
should aware of the risk of ?anti-British sentiment or harassment? arising
from ?heightened political tensions?.
The warning was released shortly
after Prime Minister Theresa May
con?rmed that no Government ministers nor members of the Royal Family, in particular Football Association
president Prince William, will attend
the World Cup tournament.
Mrs May sidestepped calls from
MPs to request that Fifa, world
football?s governing body, consider
postponing the competition but said
she expected senior FA officials to
be ?considering their position? over
whether to attend.
The Prime Minister said: ?The
holding of sporting events and
The FA said yesterday:
?Our priority for all
England matches is to ensure
the safety and security of the
fans, players and staff. We
will take all travel guidance
from the Foreign and
Commonwealth Of?ce.?
the choice of venues for those
sporting events is a matter for the
sporting authorities.
?As regards to sporting authorities here in the United Kingdom, they
will have heard what I have said
today about the actions of the
Russian state.?
Mrs May also chose not to answer a
question about whether she would be
asking Britain?s Nato and European
Union allies to ban of?cial attendance
at the tournament.
The warnings to travellers could
further depress sales of World Cup
tickets to Britons, which had already
been hit by fears that Russian hooligans were planning to confront England fans during the summer.
As few as 10,000 people were
thought to have booked tickets at
the beginning of the year ? around
half the number that travelled to the
World Cup in Brazil in 2014.
Fifa revealed this week that England does not feature among the top
10 countries with the highest demand
for tickets and yesterday there was
still ?high availability? for the team?s
opening game against Tunisia.
The FA said it was continuing to
work closely with the Government
concerning its participation in the
World Cup.
Ofcom to
look at
Russian
broadcaster
By Kate Holton
Theresa May
has warned of
?anti-British
sentiment? in
Russia GETTY
UN debate Ambassadors trade insults
Relations between the UK and
Russia deteriorated further last
night as ambassadors for both
nations traded insults at the UN
Security Council meeting.
Russian ambassador to the UN
Vassily Nebenzia accused Britain
of trying to tarnish Russia without
providing a sample of the substance
used in the Salisbury attack so that a
joint investigation could take place.
?We demand that material proof
be provided of the allegedly found
Russian trace in this high-resonance
event. Without this, stating that
there is incontrovertible truth is
not something that we can take
into account.?
Referring to the ?ctional
detective, he compared the
Metropolitan Police?s investigation
to that of the hapless Inspector
Lestrade and said we could ?all
bene?t from having a Sherlock
Holmes with us today?.
In return, the UK?s ambassador
to the UN Jonathan Allen said there
was no requirement to provide a
sample of the chemical. And he ?red
back across the bows with President
Putin?s previous pledge that all
traitors would choke on the 30
pieces of silver they receive.
Britain?s media regulator is considering Theresa May?s statement on the
poisoning of a Russian double agent
before deciding whether the statefunded Russia Today (RT) should
face an investigation that could lead
to the revocation of its UK broadcasting licences.
Ofcom warned on Tuesday that
RT could lose its right to broadcast in
Britain if it failed a so-called ??t and
proper? test. It had said it would take
it into consideration if May blamed
Russia for the poisoning attack.
Russia?s foreign ministry has
warned British media will be expelled
if the UK shuts down RT.
?Not a single British media outlet
will work in our country if they shut
down Russia Today,? the news agency cited foreign ministry
spokeswoman Maria
Zakharova (inset)
as saying.
Mrs May told
parliament
yesterday she
believed Russia was behind
the attack that
left ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his
daughter, Yulia, in a critical condition.
?We are now considering the Prime
Minister?s update,? a spokesman
for Ofcom said. Mrs May was asked
about RT in parliament but said its
status remained a matter for the regulator and not the Government.
Russia has denied involvement in
the poisoning and RT has criticised
Ofcom?s position.
?We continue today, as ever, to provide a valuable alternative voice within the UK media environment and
we trust that Ofcom will recognise
this is the case and that nothing has
changed,? a spokesman for RT said.
RT is available in 100 countries
including in Britain where it broadcasts from London.
REUTERS
UNITED STATES
Sacked Secretary of State warns of Russia?s behaviour
By Linda Sieg
In an unprecedented parting shot,
the sacked US Secretary of State,
Rex Tillerson, has warned of Russia?s ?troubling behaviour and actions? ? and pointedly failed to thank
President Donald Trump or praise
any of his policies.
Mr Tillerson, who had taken a
hard line against the Kremlin over
the Salisbury spy poisoning scandal
just before he was ?red, emphasised
the need to rein in an increasingly
aggressive and troubling Russia.
Mr Trump has been accused of cosying up to Moscow and to have bene?tted from Russian interference in
the last US presidential election. Mr
Tillerson (inset) said: ?Much work
remains to respond to the troubling
behaviour and actions on the part of
the Russian government.
?Russia must assess carefully as to how its actions are
in the best interest of the
Russian people and of
the world more broadly.
Continuing on their
current trajectory is
likely to lead to greater
isolation on their part, a
situation which is not in
anyone?s interest.?
Reactions in the Middle East
on the ?ring of Mr Tillerson re?ect
the volatile divide between Iran,
where many fear his departure heralds the demise of the 2015 nuclear
deal, and Gulf Arab nations hoping
for a more hawkish US stance toward Tehran.
Iran?s daily Javan newspaper, believed to be close
to the hardline Revolutionary Guard, said that
replacing Mr Tillerson
with CIA director Mike
Pompeo signalled the
end of the nuclear deal.
Mr Trump?s appointment of Mr Pompeo places
an ardent foe of the deal in charge
of US diplomacy as the administra-
Blocking tactics
Republican US Senator Rand Paul
said yesterday he would ?do everything I can? to block Donald Trump?s
nomination of CIA director Mike
Pompeo to be secretary of state and
CIA deputy director Gina Haspel to
become the new director of the CIA.
He criticised both for supporting
the use of waterboarding and other
enhanced interrogation techniques.
But many in Congress have said
they are happy with Mr Pompeo?s
work at the agency, and expect he
will be con?rmed by the Senate as
the US? top diplomat. REUTERS
tion debates whether to withdraw
from the agreement. Mr Tillerson
had pushed Mr Trump to stick to
the deal.
Japan?s foreign minister said he
personally regretted the departure
of ?frank, trustworthy? Mr Tillerson ahead of a proposed summit
between Mr Trump and the North
Korean leader Kim Jong-un.
South Korea?s foreign minister
will visit the US as planned today, his
ministry said, to maintain ?strong
co-operation? with Washington regardless of the departure of Mr Tillerson. ?The US expressed its wish
for our foreign minister to visit as
planned,? it said. REUTERS
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HEALTH
High level of fitness could prevent dementia
Forty women met the criteria for a
?high? ?tness level, an average peak
Middle-aged women with high levels workload of 120 watts or higher,
of physical ?tness are nearly 90 per while 92 women were categorised
cent less likely to develop dementia as ?medium?.
than those who are just ?moderateA further 59 women recorded
ly? ?t, research suggests.
?low? fitness levels, meaning they
And when the ?ttest women
either had a peak workdo develop dementia, it hapload of 80 watts or less
pens on average 11 years
or had to have their
later ? at the age of 90
tests stopped due
rather than 79 ? comto high blood prespared with their modsure, chest pain or
Reduced likelihood
erately ?t counterparts.
other cardiovascuof highly ?t women
The findings, publar problems.
developing
lished in medical jourThe group was
dementia, according
to a study
nal Neurology, come
then tested for deafter scientists used an
mentia six times over
exercise test to measure the
the following 44 years,
cardiovascular ?tness of a group
during which time 44 develof women with an average age of 50. oped dementia.
The 191 women were asked to take
Scientists found that only five
a bicycle exercise test until they per cent of the highly ?t women dewere exhausted to measure their veloped dementia, compared with
peak cardiovascular capacity.
25 per cent of the moderately fit
By Florence Snead
88%
HEALTH
Strong handshake is ?healthy heart?
A limp handshake could be an
early sign of a failing heart,
according to new research.
Scientists at Queen Mary
University of London have
discovered that a weak grip can
be associated with changes in the
heart?s structure and function,
and could be used as a broad
measure of heart health.
Researchers analysed heart
scan images from almost 5,000
study participants, including
people with ?oppy and vice-like
handshakes. Hand-grip strength
was measured.
They found that a stronger
grip was associated with higher
volumes of blood being pumped
by the heart and healthier heart
muscle. The ?ndings appear in
the journal Public Library of
Science ONE.
and 32 per cent of those with low
?tness levels.
They concluded that the highly ?t
women were 88 per cent less likely
to develop dementia than those in
the next category down. Among
those who could not complete
the test, nearly half (45 per cent)
developed dementia.
The study?s author, Helena Horder,
By Paul Gallagher
HEALTH CORRESPONDENT
The study?s author, Helena
Horder, said: ?These ?ndings are exciting because it?s
possible that improving people?s
cardiovascular ?tness in middle
age could delay or even prevent
them from developing dementia.?
of the University of Gothenburg in
Sweden, said that meant improving people?s fitness in middle age
could potentially prevent the onset
of dementia.
But she added: ?This study does
not show cause and effect between
cardiovascular ?tness and dementia, it only shows an association.
?More research is needed to see
if improved fitness could have a
positive effect on the risk of dementia and also to look at when during a lifetime a high ?tness level is
most important.?
CONSUMER
Another
brick in
the wall
NHS chief
urges better
food labels
post-Brexit
Model maker, Kat
James, puts the
?nishing touches to the
Sydney Opera House,
Lego?s latest addition
to its Miniland attraction in Berkshire.
Nearly two million
bricks were used to
create the new models
in Miniland Explore
the World and Miniland USA, bringing the
total number of bricks
in Minilands around
the world to over
40 million.
By Tess de la Mare
The head of NHS England has called
on the Government to introduce
tougher food labelling post-Brexit
in a bid to tackle the UK?s growing
obesity crisis. Speaking at the Diabetes UK Conference in London, Simon
Stevens said that after Britain quits
the EU, the Government could no
longer claim its ?hands are tied? by
EU regulations.
Mr Stevens said much more action would be needed if the Government was going to meet its target of
cutting 20 per cent of added sugar in
children?s diets by 2020.
Obesity levels in the UK are rising
even faster than the US with 70 per
cent of the millennial generation predicted to be overweight or obese by
the time they are aged 35 to 45.
This ?gure compares with 50 per
cent of the baby-boomer generation
who were overweight or obese when
they reached the same age.
Mr Stevens said that new research
from Public Health England revealed
that 82 per cent of the population now
thought the Government should be
doing more to ensure manufacturers
develop low-calorie products.
He said that clearer calorie labelling could slash the nation?s sugar
intake by 12 per cent and said Brexit
could be a chance to tighten up labelling laws.
Mr Stevens said: ?One of the ?exibilities it would be good for the NHS
to see being given careful consideration would be whether we can use our
post-Brexit regulatory arrangements
to take a more assertive stance on
food labelling and other interventions that we know are going to help
cut obesity.?
STEVE PARSONS/PA
TECHNOLOGY
Vaping may do ?more harm
than good? for smokers? health
By Sally Guyoncourt
E-cigarettes may be doing more
harm than good according to a
study by US researchers.
Marketing claims that e-cigs help
adult smokers quit are exaggerated
and their bene?t is marginal, health
researchers found.
Professor Samir Soneji, of The
Dartmouth Institute for Health
Policy and Clinical Practice, warned
they could be facilitating young people taking up smoking to begin with,
bringing ?substantial harm to ado-
lescents and young adults once they
are introduced to nicotine.?
The findings, reported in the
journal PLOS One, recommended
greater governmental measures
to reduce the numbers of people
who vape. Prof Soneji said regulators needed to close gaps that make
e-cigarettes appealing to young
people ?by reducing the availability of kid-friendly ?avors (eg, fruitflavored e-cigarettes) and issuing
product standards that reduce the
level of known toxins and carcinogens in e-juice.?
Across
1
3
4
Bee hives can be so
unpleasant (6)
Discussing Asian
wages in capital
of Taiwan (6)
After call for silence
line of soldiers
became smaller (6)
Down
1
No 2279
2
Solution, page 47
Roman conspirator
getting public
transport vehicle
stuck around
groove in road (6)
Shakespearean
character, one
caught in northern
city (6)
8
NEWS
STEPHEN HAWKING: 1942-2018
APPRECIATION
?After my expectations were reduced
How did a curious little boy grow up to become
the greatest British thinker since Isaac Newton?
By Science Journalist of the Year Steve Connor
S
tephen Hawking managed
to transcend the divide
between scienti?c exoticism
and popular culture. He
was a giant among the
select band of late-20th-century
theoretical physicists contemplating
the origins and mysteries of the
Universe. But he also achieved
celebrity status, known more
for his motorised wheelchair
and computerised voice than his
esoteric theories of cosmology.
He will perhaps be remembered
best as the man with the brilliant
mind trapped in a broken body.
Since the age of 21, Hawking
had lived under the shadow of
motor neurone disease which
progressively paralysed his muscles
but which, unusually, did not kill him
within two years of diagnosis ? the
usual prognosis.
Neither did his medical condition
stop him from achieving personal
ful?lment and professional
brilliance. Against all the odds,
Hawking experienced the thrills
and spills of family life, with the joy
of three children and the pain of
two divorces. In addition, he made a
series of important discoveries in his
chosen ?eld of theoretical physics
and cosmology.
Despite his encroaching paralysis
and the loss of his voice in 1985,
Hawking managed to formulate
a number of important theories
concerning the properties of black
holes, the expansion of the Universe
and what can loosely be described as
deep insights into the beginning and
end of time.
On top of this, he wrote a bestselling science book, A Brief History
of Time, ?rst published in 1988.
Although famed for its dif?cult
and challenging subject matter,
the book laid the foundations for
Hawking?s wider appeal. This
extended to cameo appearances on
The Simpsons and Star Trek ? the only
guest to play himself (as a hologram)
? as well as several lucrative
television commercials.
Hawking later achieved
Hollywood star-status when
he was portrayed in an Oscarwinning performance by actor
Eddie Redmayne in The Theory
of Everything (2014), which
documented the real-life drama
of his life with amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis, a form of motor
neuron disease also known as Lou
Gehrig?s disease.
Redmayne was so good, Hawking
said: ?At times, I thought he was me.?
BORN TO BE A SCIENTIST
Stephen William Hawking was born
in Oxford on 8 January 1942, exactly
300 years after the death of Galileo,
a coincidence he found amusing,
although he later calculated that
about 200,000 other babies were
also born on the same day. Despite
being born in Oxford, his father, a
medical researcher, and mother
were living in London?s bohemian
Highgate, where Hawking was
sent to the progressive Byron
House School. One of his ?rst
memories was complaining to his
parents that he wasn?t learning
anything ? an early indication of
his thirst for knowledge, and low
boredom threshold.
Another early memory
was his boyhood
fascination with model
trains. ?I was always
very interested in how
things operated and used
to take them apart to see
how they worked, but I
was not so good at putting
them back together again. My
practical abilities never matched up
to my theoretical enquiries,? he later
recalled.
His family moved to St Albans
in 1950 and, when Hawking was
11, he was sent to the private St
Albans School next to the city?s
cathedral where he was, by his own
reckoning, an unexceptional pupil,
although his classmates called
him ?Einstein?.
Towards the end of his schooldays,
Hawking had decided he wanted
to study physics and mathematics.
The reason, he said, was that they
They never told me what
was wrong, but I guessed
enough to know it was pretty
bad, so I didn?t want to ask
offered ?the hope of understanding
where we came from and why we
were here?.
He went up to Oxford University,
where he did little work as an
undergraduate, but still managed
to scrape a ?rst after a viva voce
interview. Hawking later joked that
his examiners had asked him in the
interview about his plans. He said
he?d stay on at Oxford if he got a
second, and go to Cambridge if he
got a ?rst. ?They gave me a ?rst,?
he quipped.
Although he had wanted to do
a doctorate under Fred Hoyle,
the eminent cosmologist who was
working at Cambridge at that time,
Hawking had to make do with
Dennis Sciama, of whom he had
never heard.
Hawking later said it turned
out to be a lucky break as he
would inevitably have had to
defend Hoyle?s ?steady-state
theory? of the Universe rather
than embrace the concept of the
Big Bang ? a derogatory term
that Hoyle himself had coined to
describe a universe that had a
de?nite beginning.
ILLNESS
It was around this time, in 1963, that
Hawking received the devastating
news that he was suffering from
motor neurone disease.
Towards the end of his
undergraduate years, he had noticed
that his coordination, which was
never brilliant, was getting worse.
He could no longer row a sculling
boat properly and he fell
over several times for no
apparent reason.
During the
Christmas break of
1962, he tumbled
while ice-skating on a
lake in St Albans and
couldn?t get up again.
His mother arranged
for him to see a doctor
and after several weeks
of tests and procedures at St
Bartholomew?s Hospital in London
he became aware that something
very serious was wrong.
?They never actually told me what
was wrong, but I guessed enough to
know it was pretty bad, so I didn?t
want to ask,? Hawking later recalled
on his 70th birthday.
?In fact, the doctor who diagnosed
me washed his hands of me, and I
never saw him again. He felt there
was nothing that could be done. In
effect, my father became my doctor
and it was to him that I turned
for advice.?
He was only 21, and the thought
of dying within a couple of years of
a progressive neurological illness
?lled him with dread. There seemed
little point in continuing with his
PhD because he was not expected to
complete it. Understandably, he fell
into depression.
Yet something kept him going. On
New Year?s Day 1963, at a party in
St Albans, he had met a girl, Jane
Wilde, who was then in her gap
year before going up to university
in London. They became engaged
in 1964.
There was something to live for
and he realised that to support
himself and his new wife he needed
a job. His spirits were lifted, aided
by the realisation that his condition
was progressing more slowly than
expected while his PhD research
was beginning to bear fruit.
?After my expectations had been
reduced to zero, every new day
became a bonus and I began to
appreciate everything I did have.
Where there is life there is hope,?
he said.
His dreams at the time were
about grasping any opportunity that
life offered.
NEW BEGINNINGS
Hawking became immersed in one
the biggest issues of cosmology in
the early 1960s ? whether or not the
Universe had a beginning. Hoyle?s
Phenomenon A best seller for more than four years
A Brief History of Time proved a
publishing phenomenon.
It sold 11 million copies and was
on The Sunday Times best-seller
list for more than four years. It
may also have been considered
the book that was most often left
unread by its owners, but it?s impact
was undeniable.
The ?rst edition, published in
1988, carried an introduction by
legendary astronomer and science
author Carl Sagan, saying that
Hawking was a worthy successor
to Isaac Newton. Hawking was the
Lucasian Professor of Mathematics
at the University of Cambridge until
his retirement in 2009, a post held
by Newton from 1669 until 1702.
?I never expected A Brief
History of Time to do as well as it
did,? Hawking said in 2012. ?Not
everyone may have ?nished it, or
understood everything they read.
But they at least got the idea that
we live in a universe governed by
rational laws that we can discover
and understand.?
In his later career, one of the
rational laws that Hawking became
deeply associated with was
M-theory, which is an extension of
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to zero, every day became a bonus?
string theory and postulates the
existence of at least 11 dimensions
of space-time.
M-theory, named after the idea
of multidimensional membranes
in the fabric of space-time, is the
only uni?ed theory which has
all the properties that we think
the ?nal theory should have,
Hawking explained.
?M-theory predicts that a great
many universes were created
out of nothing. These multiple
universes can arise naturally from
physical law. Each universe has
many possible histories and many
possible states at later times, that is,
at times like the present, long after
their creation,? he said.
?Most of these states will be quite
unlike the universe we observe and
quite unsuitable for the existence
of any form of life. Only a few would
allow creatures like us to exist. Thus
our presence selects out from this
vast array only those universes that
are compatible with our existence.
?Although we are puny and insigni?cant on the scale of the Cosmos,
this makes us, in a sense, lords of
creation,? he added.
THE INDEPENDENT
steady-state universe was already
in trouble but it was effectively
killed off by the discovery in 1964 of
microwave background radiation
? the ?echo? of the Big Bang that
permeates all of space.
Hawking set about analysing a
rival theory to the Big Bang.
Some cosmologists had put
forward the idea that the Universe
was cycling from one state of
expansion to another state of
contraction. However, working with
the Oxford mathematician Roger
Penrose, Hawking showed that
there was a theoretical point where
space and time could indeed have
a beginning, or a ?singularity? and
that this conformed to Einstein?s
theory of general relativity rather
than contradicting it.
From 1970, Hawking applied
the same kind of logic about
singularities to black holes. He was
particularly interested in the ?event
horizon? of a black hole, the point
when light and all other matter are
swallowed up at its edge.
Hawking later described this
period in the early 1970s as a ?golden
age? in which he and his colleagues
solved most of the major problems in
black hole theory.
He later adapted quantum
theory ? the physics of the very
small ? to immense cosmological
structures such as black holes.
In doing so, he discovered the
possibility of radiation emissions
from near the event horizon of a
black hole. Until then, cosmologists
had not predicted any loss energy
or emissions from black holes.
These emissions became known
as Hawking radiation and their
discovery, he later said, was one of
his proudest achievements.
It was while he was writing A
Brief History of Time, in 1985, that
Hawking developed pneumonia
and needed an emergency
tracheostomy to save his life, but
which also meant that he lost his
voice. The only way he was able to
communicate now was to build up
words letter by letter by raising
his eyebrows when someone
pointed to the correct letter on a
spelling board.
However, a computer engineer
in California called Walt Woltosz,
heard about his plight and sent
him a program he had written that
allowed Hawking to write and speak
by selecting words from a series
of menus on a screen. Once he had
built up a sentence or two, he could
send them to a speech synthesiser to
be spoken.
From there on, the mind of
Hawking would be heard as a
mechanical voice, albeit with a
distinctive Americanised accent.
THE INDEPENDENT
Steve Connor was i?s former science
editor. He wrote his appreciation
of Professor Hawking before his
death, following a lengthy illness, in
November. This week he was, posthumously, named Science Reporter of
the Year at the British Press Awards
News, page 23
CAREER
Scientist who
became best-seller
and television star
By Tom Bawden
SCIENCE CORRESPONDENT
Professor Stephen Hawking died
peacefully at his home in Cambridge
- ending a life that encompassed
a succession of scientific breakthroughs and lasted half a century
longer than doctors expected when
they diagnosed him with motor
neurone disease.
The British physicist,
who is best known for his
work on black holes and
his best-selling book
A Brief History of Time,
died aged 76 early yesterday morning.
?We are deeply saddened
that our beloved father has
passed away. He was a great scientist and an extraordinary man whose
work and legacy will live on for many
years,? said his children ? Lucy, Robert and Tim ? in a statement.
?His courage and persistence with
his brilliance and humour inspired
people across the world. He once
said, ?It would not be much of a universe if it wasn?t home to the people
you love.? We will miss him forever.?
Hawking was diagnosed with
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a
rare form of motor neurone disease at just 22 and given only a few
years to live. He went on to live for
another 54 years, albeit relying on a
wheelchair to get around and communicating through a computerised
voice system.
Apart from his insights into how
the universe works, Hawking crossed into the mainstream through his books
a n d a p p e a ra n c e s i n
TV shows such as The
Simpsons, Red Dwarf and
The Big Bang Theory.
He was also immortalised in a film about his
life, The Theory of Everything,
in which he was played by Eddie
Redmayne.
Among his most significant discoveries was that black holes leak
energy and particles and eventually fade away to nothing ? a process
known as Hawking radiation.
Professor Brian Cox (inset), the
physicist and broadcaster, said that
in 1,000 years scientists will still be
talking about ?Hawking radiation?.
RELIGION
There?s some way to go before
we are in the position of God
By Steve Connor
SCIENCE JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR
Stephen Hawking was an atheist, but
he was not averse to invoking God.
One of the most memorable, and
contentious, phrases in A Brief History of Time was the sentence describing what it would be like if physicists
could formulate a universal ?theory
of everything? to unite all that they
knew about the Universe. If such
a theory could be found, Hawking
wrote, we would then surely know
the mind of God.
For some believers, this smacked
of arrogance. For nonbelievers, it
hinted at hypocrisy ? if God didn?t
exist, then why do we need to know
what?s on his mind?
Hawking later explained what
he meant when interviewed by
John Humphrys on Radio 4?s Today
programme. ?If we discovered the
complete set of laws, and understood why the universe existed, we
would be in the position of God. We
are making progress towards that
goal, but we still have some way to
go,? he said.
There were other occasions when
Hawking courted controversy. He
claimed that humans should travel
to other planets because of the environmental problems facing Earth;
that extra-terrestrial aliens could be
preparing to colonise our planet; and
that, after all his ruminations over
knowing the mind of God, there was
in fact no need for a God in order to
jump-start creation.
?Stephen Hawking is a remarkable person whom I?ve known for 40
years and for that reason any oracular statement he makes gets exaggerated publicity,? said his friend and
colleague Lord Rees of Ludlow (the
Astronomer Royal Martin Rees)
in 2010.
?I know Stephen Hawking well
enough to know that he has read very
little philosophy and even less theology, so I don?t think we should attach
any weight to his views on this topic,?
he added.
Like all scientists who stray into
subjects outside of their ?eld, Hawking showed that he is just as susceptible as anyone to exaggeration and
hyperbole. But within the esoteric
sphere of intellectual endeavour that
he made his own, he was, like Isaac
Newton before him, a true giant from
whose shoulders future generations
of scientists will see further.
THE INDEPENDENT
10
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STEPHEN HAWKING: 1942-2018
A cosmic spirit and an inspiration
?His contributions to science will be
used as long as there are scientists,
and there are many more scientists
because of him. He spoke about
the value and fragility of human
life and civilisation and greatly
enhanced both.?
Scientist and broadcaster
Professor Brian Cox
?Professor Stephen Hawking was
a brilliant and extraordinary mind
? one of the great scientists of his
generation. His courage, humour
and determination to get the most
from life was an inspiration. His
legacy will not be forgotten.?
Prime Minister Theresa May
?Stephen Hawking was a
cosmic force and an inspiration. He taught us the
mysteries of outer space
and the potential of our
inner selves. The United
Nations has lost a friend
and the world a strong
advocate of science for the
common good.?
Antonio Guterres (above), Secretary
General of the UN
?His theories unlocked a universe of
possibilities that we and the world
are exploring. May you keep ?ying
like Superman in microgravity, as
you said to astronauts on @Space_
Station in 2014.?
Nasa
?We have lost a colossal mind and
a wonderful spirit. Rest in peace,
Stephen Hawking.?
Inventor of the World Wide Web, Sir
Tim Berners-Lee
?We value the enormous
scienti?c contribution
he has made to quantum
cosmology and the
courage he had in
facing illness.?
The Vatican Observatory
?He inspired generations to
look beyond our own blue planet
and expand our understanding of
the universe. His personality and
genius will be sorely missed. My
thoughts are with his family.?
British astronaut Tim Peake (above)
?I feel lucky to have known Stephen
Hawking. His work is an inspiring
reminder of what human minds are
capable of.?
Microsoft founder Bill Gates
?Have fun out there among
the stars.?
Former US President
Barack Obama
?We have lost a truly
beautiful mind, an astonishing scientist and the
funniest man I have ever had
the pleasure to meet. My love
and thoughts are with his extraordinary family.?
Actor Eddie Redmayne, who starred
as Professor Hawking in ?The Theory
of Everything?
?Stephen Hawking inspired the
world with his determination to
explain the mysteries of the cosmos.
But he also showed breathtaking
courage to overcome life?s adversi-
ties and a burning passion to protect
our National Health Service. He will
be greatly missed.?
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.
?It was an honour to have him on
the #BigBangTheory. Thank you for
inspiring us and the world.?
Tribute from the producers of US
sitcom The Big Bang Theory, on which
Hawking guest starred several times
?What was unique about him was
that he had a marvellous ability
to see through all the clutter in
physics and to see what the essential
points are and that, of course, was a
great thing for going forward.?
Physicist James Hartle, whose work
with Professor Hawking led to
the Hartle-Hawking model
of the universe?s origins
?One of the bravest men
I ever met ? optimistic
and caring.?
Queen guitarist and astrophysicist Brian May
?His passing has left an intellectual vacuum in his wake. But
it?s not empty. Think of it as a
kind of vacuum energy permeating the fabric of spacetime that
de?es measure.?
Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson
?I feel so lucky to have known such a
truly great man whose profundity
was found both in his work and the
communication of that work. Both
in person and in books. He virtually
created the publishing genre of
popular science. A heroic feat to
bring the wondrous complexities of the universe to all
outside of specialists in
this ?eld.?
Actor Benedict Cumberbatch (pictured, below)
who played Professor
Hawking in the TV ?lm,
Hawking, in 2004
?Stephen Hawking?s historic
breakthroughs in science advanced
humanity?s understanding of the
universe even as the extraordinarily
courageous life he led inspired us
all. He will be greatly missed and
will never be forgotten.?
Former US Vice President Al Gore
?Stephen?s loss is a great one for
the college. Caius is Stephen ? they
have been intertwined for over 50
years. There is no doubt that Caius
played a very important part
in his life, from offering
him his ?rst opportunities as a research fellow,
keeping him on when
he needed support, and
?ying him back from
a conference when
he desperately needed
medical help.
?Caius is very proud of
having both the most famous
biologist of the late 20th and early
21st centuries, Francis Crick,
and the most famous physicist
of that period ? indeed the most
famous scientist since Einstein
? Stephen Hawking.?
Professor Sir Alan Fersht, the
Master of Gonville and Caius
College, who ?rst met Hawking in
1965 while a student at the college
Tribute
My fellow student who
became the most famous
scientist in the world
Martin Rees
S
oon after I enrolled as a
graduate student at the
University of Cambridge
in 1964, I encountered a
fellow student, two years
ahead of me in his studies; he was
unsteady on his feet and spoke
with great dif?culty. This was
Stephen Hawking.
I learnt that he had a
degenerative disease ?
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
? and might not live long enough
even to ?nish his PhD degree. But,
amazingly, he lived on for more
than 50 years. Mere survival
would have been a medical
marvel, but of course he didn?t
merely survive. He became the
most famous scientist in the
world ? acclaimed for his brilliant
researches, for his best-selling
books about space, time and the
cosmos and, above all, for his
triumph over adversity.
Within a few years of the onset
of his disease he was wheelchairbound, and his speech became an
indistinct croak that only those
who knew him could interpret.
But in other respects fortune
favoured him. He married a
college friend, Jane Wilde, who
provided a supportive home life
for him and their three children.
His scienti?c work went from
strength to strength: he quickly
came up with a succession of
insights into the nature of black
holes (then a very new idea) and
how our universe began. In 1974 he
was elected to the Royal Society,
Britain?s main scienti?c academy,
at the exceptionally early age of
just 32.
He was by then so frail that
most of us suspected he could
scale no further heights. But, for
When he became so frail
many suspected his career
could scale no further - but it
was just the beginning
Stephen, this was still just the
beginning. He worked in the same
building as I did. I would often
push his wheelchair into his of?ce,
and he would ask me to open
an abstruse book on quantum
theory ? the science of atoms,
not a subject that had hitherto
much interested him. He would
sit hunched motionless for hours;
he couldn?t even turn the pages
without help. I wondered what
was going through his mind, and
if his powers were failing. But
within a year he came up with his
best ever idea, encapsulated in an
equation that he says he wants on
his gravestone.
The great advances in science
generally involve discovering a
link between phenomena that
seemed hitherto conceptually
unconnected: for instance,
Isaac Newton realised that
the force making an apple fall
was the same as the force that
held the Moon and planets in
their orbits. Stephen?s ?eureka
moment? revealed a profound and
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Stephen Hawking at his Oxford graduation, when he
was already unsteady on his feet and spoke with great
dif?culty. He went on to marry college friend Jane Wilde,
who provided a supportive home life for him SWNS
unexpected link between gravity
and quantum theory which
predicted that black holes would
not be completely black, but
would radiate in a characteristic
way. This radiation is signi?cant
only for black holes much less
massive than stars ? and none of
these has been found. However,
?Hawking radiation? became
a hugely in?uential concept in
mathematical physics; indeed,
one of the main achievements of
string theory has been to ?rm
up and build on his idea. It is
remarkable that it is still the focus
of theoretical interest, a topic of
debate and controversy even 40
years after discovery.
Stephen was not awarded the
Nobel Prize because his idea was
not con?rmed by experiment.
But in 2012 he was one of the
?rst winners of the Milner Prize,
worth $3m (�1m), intended to
recognise theoretical work.
Cambridge was Stephen?s
base throughout his career
and he became a familiar
?gure in the city, navigating his
wheelchair around the streets
in the area. By the end of the
1970s he had advanced to one of
the most distinguished posts at
the university ? the Lucasian
Professorship of Mathematics,
once held by Newton. Stephen
held the chair with distinction for
30 years but reached the retiring
age in 2009, and after that held a
special research professorship.
He continued to seek new
links between the very large
(the cosmos) and the very small
(atoms and quantum theory) and
to gain deeper insights into the
very beginning of our universe,
addressing such questions as:
?Was our Big Bang the only one??
He always had an amazing ability
to ?gure things out in his head
but generally he worked with
colleagues who would write a
formula on a blackboard; he would
stare at it, and say what should
come next.
In 1987 Stephen contracted
pneumonia. He had to undergo
a tracheotomy, which removed
A ?ag ?ies at half mast over Gonville
and Caius College at the University of
Cambridge after Hawking?s death
Professor Stephen Hawking?s groundbreaking work earned him dozens of
accolades over his lifetime, but the
coveted Nobel Prize eluded him.
His discovery in 1974 that black
holes should emit radiation was
initially controversial as until then it
was widely accepted that nothing, not
even light, could escape their gravity.
His theory, dubbed ?Hawking Radiation?, was based on mathematical
concepts arising from quantum
mechanics, the branch of science
dealing with sub-atomic particles.
Hawking Radiation became widely
accepted, but it was never proven ? if
it had, it would almost certainly have
earned him the Nobel Prize.
In January 2016, Professor Hawking
gave a Reith Lecture broadcast on the
BBC in which he joked that his lack of
a Nobel Prize was ?a pity?.
After the discovery of the Higgs
boson in 2013, almost ?ve decades
after British physicist Peter Higgs
developed the theory in the 1960s,
Professor Hawking admitted he was
disappointed the so-called ?God
particle? had been found.
The discovery earned Professor
Higgs the Nobel Prize.
The Higgs boson is theorised to give
other particles mass, but Professor
Hawking said in a speech at London?s
Science Museum: ?Physics would be
far more interesting if it had not been
found,? because it would force scientists to develop alternative solutions
to the problem of mass.
He joked: ?I had a bet with Gordon
Kane of Michigan University that the
Higgs particle wouldn?t be found. The
Nobel Prize cost me $100.?
even the limited powers of speech
he then possessed. He was saved
by technology, but conversation
remained a struggle, and he
learnt to economise with words.
His comments were aphoristic
or oracular, but often infused
with wit. In later years he became
weaker, and his communication
? to his immense frustration
? became still slower. But his
mental powers never dimmed.
At the time of his tracheotomy
operation, he had a rough draft
of a book that he hoped would
describe his ideas to a wide
readership and earn something
for his two eldest children, Robert
and Lucy, who were then of
college age. On recovering from
pneumonia, he resumed work
with the help of an editor. When
the US edition of A Brief History
of Time appeared, the printers
had made errors (one picture was
upside down), and the publishers
tried to recall the stock. To their
amazement, all copies had already
been sold. It was the ?rst inkling
that the book was destined to have
huge success ? for years on bestseller lists around the world.
Stephen became an
international celebrity. His
later ideas appear, beautifully
illustrated, in other books such
as The Universe in a Nutshell and
The Grand Design. These were not
bought by quite as many people as
his ?rst book, but they are more
clearly written, and probably
more people got to the end of
them. He featured in numerous
television programmes; his
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lectures ?lled the Royal Albert
Hall in London, and similar
venues in the United States and
Japan. (In principle, machine
translation could now give him
an advantage over the rest of
us by converting his speech
into Japanese, Korean, or
other languages.) He lectured
at Bill Clinton?s White House;
he was back there again more
recently when President
Obama presented him with the
Presidential Medal of Freedom,
a very rare honour for any
foreigner.
His 60th-birthday celebrations
in January 2002 were a
memorable occasion for all of us.
Hundreds of leading scientists
came from all over the world to
honour and celebrate Stephen?s
discoveries, and to spend a week
discussing the latest theories on
space, time and the cosmos.
But the celebrations weren?t
just scienti?c ? that wouldn?t
have been Stephen?s style. There
were parties and dinners each
evening. He was surrounded by
his children and grandchildren.
A Marilyn Monroe lookalike cut
a huge birthday cake; a troupe
of can-can dancers performed;
there was music and singing. And
when the week?s events were all
over, he celebrated with a trip in
a hot-air balloon.
Stephen continued, even in
his sixties, to write technical
papers and to speak at premier
international conferences ?
doubly remarkable in a subject
such as maths, where even most
healthy researchers peak at an
early age.
Few thought that he would
survive to yet another milestone
? his 70th birthday. But he did,
and this too was marked by
an international gathering of
scientists, and also with some
razzmatazz: Richard Branson,
Daniel Craig and other celebrities
attended the celebration to mark
the beginning of the scientist?s
septuagenarian years.
Tragedy struck Stephen
Hawking when he was only 21
years of age. He was diagnosed
with a deadly disease and his
expectations in life dropped to
zero as a result. He said that
everything that happened after
that was a bonus. And what a
triumph his life was.
His name will live in the annals
of science; millions have had their
cosmic horizons widened by his
bestselling books; and even more,
around the world, have been
inspired by a unique example of
achievement against all the odds
? a manifestation of astonishing
willpower and determination.
Stephen insisted that he was
not another Einstein; none the
less, few, if any, have done more to
deepen our knowledge of gravity,
space and time.
A longer version of this article was
published in the ?New Statesman?.
on 16 January 2015. Parts of it also
featured in a tribute to Stephen
Hawking published in 2007.
Baron Rees of Ludlow, a former
president of the Royal Society and
the current Astronomer Royal, is
Emeritus Professor of Cosmology
and Astrophysics at the University of
Cambridge. THE INDEPENDENT
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11
MONARCHY
Queen to send
message to family
The Queen will send a message of
condolence to Stephen Hawking?s
family, Buckingham Palace said.
She met the physicist on
several occasions.
Professor Hawking and
his daughter, Lucy, were
introduced to the Queen in the
Music Room at Buckingham
Palace in 2006, at a ?grey power?
reception for those ?Serving
Beyond Sixty?.
Asked afterwards if he had
discussed his scienti?c theories
with the Queen, Professor
Hawking said: ?I think she has
other things to think about.?
Questioned about grey power,
he added: ?I think age doesn?t
matter. I don?t feel grey.?
CAMBRIDGE
Students pay
their respects to
?beautiful mind?
Hundreds of students in
Cambridge, Hawking?s home for
more than half a century, made
their way to Gonville & Caius
College to pay their respects in a
book of condolence that had been
opened in the Porters? Lodge.
It was the college where he
became a research fellow in
1965, three years after moving
to the city from Oxford to study
cosmology. Yesterday the ?ag
?ew at half mast.
?You were a true hero and an
inspiration to millions, including
me. Goodbye and thank you for
everything!? said Anais Voski, a
graduate student at Cambridge
University researching climate
change and peacebuilding.
She arrived wearing his 1988
best-selling book A Brief History
of Time as a shirt. ?I?d like to think
he would?ve gotten a kick out of
that,? she said.
Another message said: ?The
world mourns the loss of a truly
beautiful mind. May your legacy
live on forever.?
Knighthood No thank you
Professor Stephen Hawking rarely
shied away from the limelight or
international acclaim but there
was one honour he turned down ?
a knighthood.
It was revealed in 2008 that he
had been offered a knighthood
in the late 1990s almost a
decade after he had published
his bestseller A Brief History of
Time. However, he refused on
principle ? over the government?s
science funding. In particular, he
was critical of the merger of the
Particle Physics and Astronomy
Research Council and the Council
for the Central Laboratory of the
Research Councils.
He was made part of the Order
of the Companion of Honour in
1989 and appointed a CBE in 1982.
12
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STEPHEN HAWKING: 1942-2018
SCIENCE
Carl Sagan on Hawking:
A quest to see inside
the mind of God
The signi?cance of A Brief History of
Time was rarely better summarised
than in this introduction by the
US astrophysicist and author
Carl Sagan, which was published
only in the ?rst (1988) edition.
W
e go about our daily
lives understanding
almost nothing of
the world. We give
little thought to
the machinery that generates the
sunlight that makes life possible,
to the gravity that glues us to an
Earth that would otherwise send
us spinning off into space, or to the
atoms of which we are made and on
whose stability we fundamentally
depend. Except for children (who
don?t know enough not to ask the
important questions), few of us
spend much time wondering why
nature is the way it is; where the
cosmos came from, or whether it
was always here; if time will one
day ?ow backward and effects
precede causes; or whether there
are ultimate limits to what humans
can know. There are even children,
and I have met some of them, who
want to know what a black hole
looks like; what is the smallest piece
of matter; why we remember the
past and not the future; how it is, if
there was chaos early, that there is,
apparently, order today; and why
there is a universe.
In our society it is still customary
for parents and teachers to answer
most of these questions with a shrug,
or with an appeal to vaguely recalled
religious precepts. Some are
uncomfortable with issues like these,
because they so vividly expose the
limitations of human understanding.
But much of philosophy and science
has been driven by such enquiries.
An increasing number of adults
are willing to ask questions of this
sort, and occasionally they get some
astonishing answers. Equidistant
from the atoms and the stars, we
are expanding our exploratory
horizons to embrace both the very
small and the very large.
In the spring of 1974, about two
years before the Viking spacecraft
landed on Mars, I was at a meeting
in England sponsored by the Royal
A brief history of
?A Brief History of Time?
1988
date of ?rst publication
11 million
copies sold
237
weeks in the ?Sunday Times?
bestseller lists (a record)
147
weeks in the ?New York Times?
bestseller list
40
languages into which it has
been translated
272
pages in the latest edition
(Bantam Press, 2011)
Remember to look up at the stars and
not down at your feet. Try to make sense
of what you see and wonder about what
makes the universe exist. However
dif?cult life may seem there is always
something you can do and succeed at. It
matters that you don?t just give up
Society? to explore the question of
how to search for extra-terrestrial
life. During a coffee break I noticed
that a much larger meeting was
being held in an adjacent hall,
which out of curiosity I entered.
I soon realised that I was
witnessing an ancient rite, the
investiture of new fellows into
the Royal Society, one of the most
ancient scholarly organisations on
the planet. In the front row a young
man in a wheelchair was, very
slowly, signing his name in a book
that bore on its earliest pages the
signature of Isaac Newton. When at
last he ?nished, there was a stirring
ovation. Stephen Hawking was a
legend even then.
Hawking is now the Lucasian
Professor of Mathematics at
Cambridge University, a post once
held by Newton and later by P.A.M.
Dirac, two celebrated explorers of
the very large and the very small.
He is their worthy successor.
This, Hawking?s ?rst book for the
non-specialist, holds rewards of
many kinds for the lay audience.
As interesting as the book?s wideranging contents is the glimpse
it provides into the workings of
its author?s mind. In this book are
lucid revelations on the frontiers
of physics, astronomy, cosmology
and courage.
This is also a book about God...
or perhaps about the absence of
God. The word God ?lls these pages.
Hawking embarks on a quest to
answer Einstein?s famous question
about whether God had any choice
in creating the universe. Hawking is
attempting, as he explicitly states,
to understand the mind of God. And
this makes all the more unexpected
the conclusion of the effort, at least
so far: a universe with no edge in
space, no beginning or end in time,
and nothing for a Creator to do.
Copyright � 1988 Carl Sagan.
Introduction, by Carl Sagan, to A Brief
History of Time by Stephen Hawking.
Originally published in A Brief History of
Time. Reprinted with permission from
Democritus Properties, LLC. All rights
reserved this material cannot be further
circulated without written permission of
Democritus Properties, LLC
Life would
be tragic if
it weren?t
funny
Interview in ?The
New York Times?,
December 2004
Stephen Hawking
experiences zero gravity
during a Nasa ?ight in
2007 on a modi?ed jet
that ?ew a trajectory to
create the impression of
microgravity GETTY
LEGACY
The ?simple? equation that
sums up the great man?s life
By Andrew Griffin
Stephen Hawking was clear about
what he wanted on his gravestone ?
the equation central to his reputation
among scientists.
The equation contains within it
all of the most important elements
of Professor Hawking?s most important discovery. It expresses the idea
that would come to de?ne his work
for the rest of his life: that black holes
weren?t entirely black after all, and
instead emitted a glow that would
become known as Hawking radiation.
His breakthrough led to new ways
of understanding not only black holes
but how the universe grows and
changes over time. And much of it
can be expressed in just a few letters:
The S in the equation serves to calculate entropy: a complicated but signi?cant part of black holes, that can
be understood as a measure of how
much disorder is present in the system. Sometimes the letter is written
On the reason why the
universe exists: ?If we
?nd the answer to that,
it would be the ultimate
triumph of human reason
My expectations were
reduced to zero when
I was 21. Everything
since then has been a
bonus
The victim should
have the right to end
his life, if he wants. But
I think it would be a
great mistake
?A Brief History Of Time?,
published 1988.
Interview in ?The New York
Times?, December 2004
Quoted in ?People?s Daily Online?,
June 2006.
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Analysis
A popular science
book that inspired the
future stars of physics
By Tom Chivers
with a little ?BH? next to it, standing
for Professor Hawking and Jacob
Bekenstein, the other scientist who
did so much to help understand
black holes.
The rest gives the important
numbers required to calculate that
entropy. The h is the Planck constant, so important in quantum
mechanics; the G is Newton?s constant, used to understand gravity;
the A refers to the area of the event
horizon; the c is the speed of light,
made famous by Einstein; and the k
is Boltzmann?s constant, which is a
way of understanding how energy
relates to temperature.
Professor Hawking gave a simple
explanation of how he arrived at the
deceptively simple formula.
?In particular, I wondered, can
one have atoms in which the nucleus is a tiny primordial black hole,
formed in the early universe?? he
wrote in 2002, during the celebrations of his 60th birthday. ?To answer this, I studied how quantum
?elds would scatter off a black hole.
I was expecting that part of an incident wave would be absorbed, and
the remainder scattered.
?But to my great surprise, I found
there seemed to be emission from
the black hole. The emission was
exactly what was required to identify the area of the horizon with the
entropy of a black hole.
?I would like this simple formula to be on my tombstone.?
THE INDEPENDENT
The equation
This is the equation that Stephen
Hawking said he wanted engraved on
his tombstone.
S=
? Akc3
2hG
S = entropy
h = the Planck constant
G = Newton?s constant
A = area of event horizon
c = speed of light
k = Boltzmann?s constant
Einstein was wrong when he said, ?God
does not play dice?. Consideration of
black holes suggests, not only that God
does play dice, but that he sometimes
confuses us by throwing them where
they can?t be seen
The downside of my celebrity is
that I cannot go anywhere in the
world without being recognised.
It is not enough for me to wear
dark sunglasses and a wig. The
wheelchair gives me away
?The Nature Of Space And Time?, published 1996
Interview on Israeli TV, December 2006
A Brief History of Time, Stephen
Hawking?s most famous book, is
known as the book that everybody
bought but nobody read.
That?s partly true, but unfair.
Lots of people did buy it and not
read it. But it was a bit like the
Sex Pistols gig in 1976, where
there were only 40 people in the
audience but they all went on to
form famous bands. If you were
a teenager who bought A Brief
History and read it, there was
probably a good chance that
you would go on to do physics
at university.
?The number of students who
turn up and say Brief History was
the moment that they realised
physics was cool is still high,?
Jon Butterworth, a professor
of physics and astronomy at
UCL, says. ?Even though it was
published in 1988.?
Dr Tom Whyntie, a physicist at
the University of Oxford, agrees:
?It?d be interesting to go through
every Ucas statement from kids
applying for physics degrees, and
see how many times Brief History
gets mentioned. Most undergrads
today will have read it.?
What made it special, Dr
Whyntie says, is exactly what
made it the book that people
bought but didn?t read. ?It wasn?t
just the ?wow, wonderful isn?t this
great? stuff,? he said. ?Carl Sagan
had already done that. Brief
History made you think about the
theories and the mathematics.
?And it was hard! It was nice
that he never pretended that
it wasn?t. Too much science
engagement is ?science is
easy?, but it?s not. Calculating
the entropy of a black hole is
non-trivial maths. But it set the
challenge, so you thought, ?I?ve
got to study the maths and go to
university to get into it?. If you
work hard enough, you can do the
maths yourself.?
The book does two main
things. First, it took the state
of cosmology as a whole and
synthesised it, into a bitesized and comprehensible
We are just an advanced
breed of monkeys on a
minor planet of a very
average star. But we can
understand the universe.
That makes us something
very special
package. It explained Einstein?s
theory of relativity: that the
universe should be seen not
as three-dimensional space
evolving through time but a
four-dimensional thing called
spacetime, and that gravity
distorted this spacetime, so you
age more slowly if you?re on the
surface of the planet than if you?re
in an aeroplane.
It explained quantum
mechanics, the weird physics that
explains the tiny world of atoms
and electrons: that you can?t
know the position of a particle
and its speed at the same time. It
explained the past, and future,
of the universe, from the Big
Bang, through the ?erce ?cosmic
in?ation? of the early years of
the universe, to its likely deaths,
either by fading out or collapsing
and crunching.
?The details have changed
[since it was published],?
Professor Butterworth says. ?The
way we think about in?ation,
and the order of things after
the Big Bang ? we now know
the universe?s expansion is
accelerating, so we have this idea
of dark energy. But the big picture
would be pretty much the same.?
The other thing the book
does is present Hawking?s own
groundbreaking work into black
holes ? the baf?ing ?singularities?,
stars that have collapsed and
formed matter so dense that the
laws of physics break down.
They distort spacetime to, in
essence, rip it.
Hawking showed that black
holes give off, according to his
maths, a form of radiation, now
known as Hawking radiation.
? Professor Butterworth says:
?Hawking radiation connects
three areas of physics: general
relativity, quantum mechanics,
and thermodynamics and
information theory, where we still
don?t really know what?s going
on. The sign of a groundbreaking
physicist is when you connect
different specialities in physics,
and he made them all come
together in a really credible way.?
Brief History addressed all this,
without dumbing it down: it was
cutting-edge physics in a popular
science book.
I have lived with the prospect
of an early death for the last 49
years. I?m not afraid of death, but
I?m in no hurry to die. I have so
much I want to do ?rst
Interview in ?The Guardian?, May 2011
14
NEWS
Wise words to
inspire, uplift
?Ever since the dawn of civilisation,
people have craved for an understanding of the underlying order of
the world. Why is it as it is, and why
STEPHEN HAWKING: 1942-2018
it exists at all. But, even if we do ?nd
a complete theory of everything, it is
just a set of rules and equations.
?What is it that breathes ?re into
the equations, and makes a Universe
for them to describe? We live in a
Universe governed by rational laws
that we can discover and under-
stand. Look up at the stars and not
down at your feet. Try to make sense
of what you see, and wonder about
what makes the Universe exist. Be
curious. There ought to be something special about the boundary
conditions of the Universe, and
what can be more special than that
there is no boundary? And there
should be no boundary to human
endeavour. When Isaac Newton
saw an apple fall to the ground he
suddenly realised that it must be
the same force that holds together
the beautiful system of the Sun, the
planets and the comets.
HEALTH
Doctors amazed that scientist lived
so long with motor neurone disease
By Paul Gallagher
HEALTH CORRESPONDENT
Stephen Hawking was just 21 years
old when he was diagnosed with
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS),
a subtype of motor neurone disease,
and told he had two years to live.
No one really knows how Professor Hawking managed to defy the
odds and survive with the debilitating condition, also known as Lou
Gehrig?s disease, for more than half
a century.
S c i e n t i s t s we re u n i t e d i n
their astonishment at Professor
Hawking?s longevity.
?I am not aware of anyone else
who has survived with [ALS] as
long,? Nigel Leigh, a professor of
clinical neurology at King?s College
London, told the British Medical
Journal in 2002.
?What is unusual is not only the
length of time, but that the disease
seems to have burnt out. He appears
to be relatively stable? This kind of
stabilisation is extremely rare.?
Hawking?s age at diagnosis may
have made a difference: the disease,
which causes the progressive degeneration and death of the nerve cells
that control voluntary muscle movements, such as chewing, walking,
talking and eventually breathing, is
most commonly diagnosed in people
aged 55 to 75.
However, what is known for certain is that the progression of the
disease varies depending on the
MND What it affects
Motor Neurone disease (MND) kills
a third of people within a year and
more than half within two years of
diagnosis. It affects around 5,000
people in the UK, according to the
MND Association.
MND is the collective name for
a group of diseases that affect the
nerves in the brain and spinal cord
that control movement.
It can lead to people being unable
to move, talk, swallow and eventually breathe. There is no cure.
Four in ?ve sufferers will have
communication dif?culties. In the
US the umbrella term for MND is
ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis).
person. Although the average life
expectancy after a diagnosis of
ALS is about three years, about 20
per cent of people live for ?ve years,
10 per cent live 10 years and 5 per
cent live 20 years or more, after
their diagnosis.
People with ALS typically die from
respiratory failure, which occurs
when the nerve cells controlling the
breathing muscles stop working, or
from malnutrition and dehydration,
which can occur when the muscles
that control swallowing deteriorate.
Hawking himself said his work
granted him years that would not
have been available to others. ?I am
lucky to be working in theoretical
physics, one of the few areas in which
disability is not a serious handicap.?
SOCIETY
For MND patients, he was inspiring and ?slightly annoying?
By Andrew Knowlman
In our family, we called him ?Our Stevie?. You need some laughs when you
get motor neurone disease (MND).
?You might live as long as Stephen
Hawking,? well-meaning people have
said to me. Genius, massive inspiration, innovator in non-verbal communication, yes. Slightly annoying
to the average MND patient, yes.
One third die within twelve
months from diagnosis, the average
is two to three years. Then, there are
the statistical outliers.
In the three years since diagnosis,
I?ve lost the use of my legs, arms,
hands, voice, tongue and swallow. I
am a 50-year-old father of two children, aged 11 and 15. The untold story
is that of the partner. In our case, Jane
cared for me for the ?rst 18 months,
and has held the family together.
Daily life has to go on, all with the
knowledge that I will die at some
time in the not too distant future.
I encourage you to read Travelling
To Infinity: The True Story Behind
the Theory of Everything, written by
Jane Hawking, to whom Stephen
was married for 30 years. It?s a story
of immense personal sacri?ce.
She didn?t get many plaudits,
while her husband was being rightly
praised. So, our Stevie, thank you for
your life, rest in peace.
Andrew Knowlman is a children?s
author who was diagnosed with
MND in 2015
This gravity is the same force that
can draw us into a black hole, never
to return!
?The large hadron collider at
CERN, is the largest, most complex
machine in the world, possibly the
Universe. By smashing particles
together at enormous energies
it recreates the conditions of the
Big Bang. The recent discovery of
what looks like the Higgs particle,
is a triumph of human endeavour
and international collaboration. It
will change our perception of the
world and has the potential to offer
insights into a complete theory
of everything.
?The Paralympic Games is about
transforming our perception of the
world. We are all different, there
is no such thing as a standard or
run-of-the-mill human being, but
we share the same human spirit.
What is important is that we have
the ability to create. This creativity
can take many forms, from physical
achievement to theoretical physics.
However dif?cult life may seem,
there is always something you can
do and succeed at.
?The Games provide an opportunity for athletes to excel, to stretch
themselves and become outstanding in their ?eld. So let us together
celebrate excellence, friendship and
respect. Good luck to you all.?
Stephen Hawking, Paralympic
Opening Ceremony, London, 2012
POLITICS
Vocal champion
of NHS who
took on Hunt
By Paul Gallagher and Tom Bawden
Professor Stephen Hawking may
have won the nation?s hearts but he
was not one to shy away from controversial views or a confrontation ? especially where health was concerned.
He was a vocal champion of the
NHS who, in the ?nal months of his
life, battled with Health Secretary
Jeremy Hunt over the future of the
health service.
Less than two months ago a campaign group backed by the physicist
was granted permission to challenge
Mr Hunt (inset) in the High
Court over plans to
allow private companies to play a
greater role in
the service.
The scientist
had warned it was
an ?attack on the
fundamental principles of the NHS?.
Mr Hunt?s department
hit back at what it saw as ?irresponsible scaremongering?.
Professor Hawking also had strong
feelings about aliens and space colonisation. Last year, he said the human
race must start leaving Earth to avoid
being wiped out by over-population
and climate change.
He believed alien life would be a
threat to humankind and that arti?cial intelligence could also challenge
humans? existence.
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15 MARCH 2018
15
CULTURE
The theoretical
physicist who
became a star turn
for adoring fans
Cameos ranged from a BT advert
to ?The Simpsons?. By Will Dean
W
ith a dual role as
one of the planet?s
foremost scientists
and, arguably, its
most prominent
disabled ?gure, Stephen Hawking
saw himself referenced in ? and
taking part in ? some of popular
culture?s greatest hits.
Viewers witnessed him
appearing as his own hologram
in a 1993 episode of Star Trek: The
Next Generation, playing poker
with Einstein and Newton. ?The
uncertainty principle will not help
you now, Stephen,? says Einstein.
Hawking followed this with
cameos in the hit science-themed
sitcom The Big Bang Theory and
Matt Groening?s Futurama.
But it was Groening?s other show,
The Simpsons, that perhaps found
Hawking his biggest non-academic
audience. Notably, his ?rst cameo
in the 1999 episode ?They Saved
Lisa?s Brain?, where Hawking takes
on Spring?eld?s out-of-control
Mensa club before telling Homer:
?Your theory of a doughnut-shaped
universe is intriguing... I may have
to steal it.?
Typically of such a smart show,
that was no glib line but a veiled
reference to genuine theories that
the universe is toroidal (doughnut
shaped). Hawking went on to make
several other appearances on the
show he called ?the best thing on
American television?.
Hawking?s extraordinary life
repeatedly made it into the annals
of drama and documentary, too.
Revered ?lm-maker Errol Morris
(The Thin Blue Line, Tabloid) made
A Brief History of Time, a 1991
documentary ?lm based on both
the concepts addressed in the book
and Hawking?s life with a score by
Philip Glass. Roger Ebert called it
a ?rebuke? to the millions of people
who had started reading A Brief
History and not made their way
through it.
More recently, Eddie Redmayne
won 2015?s Best Actor Oscar (in
addition to a Bafta and a Golden
Globe) for his portrayal of Hawking
in The Theory of Everything.
Elsewhere, Hawking?s early life
as a brilliant, ill-disciplined student
and academic in Cambridge was
told in Hawking, a feature-length
Bafta-nominated BBC drama
written by Peter Moffat. Benedict
Cumberbatch played Hawking
during the period when he was
producing his early work on steadystate theory and his diagnosis
with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Cumberbatch later told The
Eddie Redmayne won an Oscar for portraying Stephen Hawking in the ?lm ?The Theory of Everything?
Guardian: ?Obviously, I would love
to have an email relationship with
him, but, then, what would those
conversations consist of? I am an
actor and he?s a nuclear physicist.?
The two did reunite in 2012,
however, to help launch Hawking?s
documentary series Grand Design,
with Cumberbatch sharing details
of his forthcoming Star Trek ?lm,
Into Darkness. And yesterday he
said, while paying tribute, that he
would miss their margaritas.
In 2012 he was the awesome
centrepiece of the opening
Stephen
Hawking found
his biggest
non-academic
audience when
he shared a beer
with Homer in
an episode of
?The Simpsons?
FOX
ceremony of the Paralympic Games
in London. His introductory words
included the exhortation: ?Look up
at the stars, and not down at your
feet. Try to make sense of what you
see, and wonder about what makes
the universe exist. Be curious.?
But Hawking wasn?t above
hawking things either. His 2012 Go
Compare adverts prompted wonder
at how an insurance comparison
site could convince him to sell
out, while in 2014 the bookmakers
Paddy Power hired him to calculate
a ?formula for the perfect penalty?
for the football World Cup.
Previously, though, in 1994
the physicist had appeared in
a splendid BT advertisement
proclaiming: ?Mankind?s greatest
achievements have come about by
talking and its greatest failures by
not talking. It doesn?t have to be like
this.? This ad moved David Gilmour
so much that he sampled Hawking?s
words for the track ?Keep Talking?
on Pink Floyd?s ?nal studio album,
1994?s Division Bell.
Although Hawking didn?t pick
Pink Floyd as one of his Desert
Island Discs, he plumped for The
Valkyrie, ?Please Please Me?,
Brahms, Beethoven, Mozart
and ?Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien?.
His taste for classical music was
re?ected in the interest that
composers showed in him.
The aforementioned Glass
used Hawking in his 1992 opera
The Voyage, while the German
composer Rolf Riehm premiered
a piece called ?Hawking? in Los
Angeles in 2011, inspired by a
photo of Hawking seated in front
of a starry night sky. Riehm told
the Los Angeles Times that the
scientist served as a ?metaphor for
the ceaseless extension of limits?.
(There were also reports of an
impending piece by Osvaldo Golijov,
commissioned by the New York
Metropolitan Opera and based on A
Brief History of Time, but it was later
called off.)
Hawking?s representation
? increased by his physical
appearance ? helped to ensure his
pro?le, like a black hole, could never
get smaller. He may be gone, but
thanks to The Simpsons, Pink Floyd,
Morris and others, his image will
remain. THE INDEPENDENT
HUMOUR
A brilliant mind that had a sense of fun and mischief
Hawking rarely
missed a chance
for a joke. By
Emily Chudy
and Lewis Smith
Stephen Hawking was renowned
for having one of the world?s
?nest scienti?c minds but he also
possessed a sharp and sometimes
acerbic wit. ?Life would be tragic if
it weren?t funny,? he once said.
Here are some of his most
humorous and spiky moments:
On Last Week Tonight
In 2014, Hawking appeared on the
show hosted by John Oliver who
asked: ?You?ve stated you believe
there could be an in?nite number of
parallel universes. Does that mean
that there is a universe out there
where I am smarter than you??
Hawking replied: ?Yes, and also a
universe where you?re funny.?
On people who believe in fate
The celebrity scientist rarely missed
the chance for a joke, once saying: ?I
have noticed that even people who
claim everything is predetermined
and that we can do nothing to change
it, look before they cross the road.?
Applying physics to popular
boy band One Direction
On people who boast about their IQ
He claimed not to know his IQ and
in 2004 said: ?People who boast
about their IQ are losers.?
In 2015, he appeared in holographic
form at the Sydney Opera House.
At the talk, Hawking reassured
One Direction fans after the band
split up. He told fans to pay close
attention to theoretical physics, as
it could come up with proof of an
alternative universe in which Zayn
Malik is still in the band.
A party for ?time travellers?
He once said: ?I?m throwing a party,
a welcome reception for future
time travellers, but I?m not letting
anyone know about it until after the
party has happened.?
No one showed up.
Appearing on Comic Relief
Professor Hawking appeared
on a comedy sketch for Comic
Relief, performing jokes with Little
Britain actor David Walliams, and
transforming into a giant CGI robot.
On ?Late Night with Conan O?Brien?
Hawking possessed both a brilliant
mind and a sharp, acerbic wit AP
Hawking phoned Jim Carrey to
discuss chatting about physics to
the audience. Hawking said: ?Their
pea brains cannot grasp the idea.?
16
NEWS
STEPHEN HAWKING: 1942-2018
OBITUARY
A brief history of
the scientist who
lit up the world
Stephen Hawking quite simply transformed our
understanding of the cosmos. By Marcus Chown
S
12
m O
on n
th ly
co a
nt
ra
ct
tephen Hawking was one
of the most imaginative
and in?uential physicists
of his generation yet he
never won the Nobel
Prize. He wrote a popular science
book that became a publishing
sensation but which is arguably
the least-read best-seller of all
time. He was cruelly con?ned to
a wheelchair by a disease that
progressively paralysed him yet
his mind ranged freely across the
immensities of the cosmos. These
are just some of the paradoxes of
what, by any standards, was an
extraordinary life.
Hawking?s fascination was with
cosmology, the science which
deals with the origin, evolution
and ultimate fate of the universe.
Einstein ? never one to think small
? had in 1917 applied his theory of
gravity to the biggest gravitating
system he could imagine: the whole
universe. Like Isaac Newton before
him, he was wedded to the idea of
a ?static? universe, in which the
stars and galaxies hung in space,
unchanging, for all time.
He therefore missed the message
in his own equations, which was
that the universe was inherently
restless and had to be in motion.
The ?steady state? theory,
championed by British astronomer
Fred Hoyle, was dealt a killer blow
by the discovery in 1965 of the
?cosmic background radiation?, the
?afterglow? of the big bang ?reball.
This was the scienti?c
background as Hawking embarked
on his post-PhD research and
made the ?rst of his remarkable
discoveries. The big question
was: was the Big Bang truly the
beginning of the universe? If
the expansion of the universe is
imagined running backwards like
a movie in reverse, the universe
shrinks ever smaller.
While working on such matters,
Hawking?s of?ce-mate, Brandon
Carter, happened to mention a talk
he had attended in London given
by a young mathematician called
Roger Penrose. It seemed Penrose
was using novel ?topological?
methods to investigate the
formation of a type of singularity,
one which formed at the heart
Hawking?s intention was
to attack the singularity of
the Big Bang using quantum
theory to lift the opaque
curtain that it dropped
of a ?black hole? ? the region of
grossly warped space-time left
behind when a dying star shrinks
catastrophically under its own
gravity. A black hole singularity
was a singularity in space rather
than time but it had much in
common with the singularity of
the Big Bang. Hawking contacted
Penrose and there began one of
the most fruitful collaborations in
20th-century physics.
Between 1965 and 1970, the
pair proved a range of powerful
?singularity theorems?. The
most important was that, under
a wide range of general and
highly plausible conditions, the
singularity in the Big Bang was
unavoidable. It formed no matter
how the backward-running movie
of the universe went. According to
Einstein?s theory at least, the Big
Bang must have been a singularity ?
a true beginning of the universe.
For his next trick, Hawking
turned his attention to black holes,
at that time still unfashionable; the
name was coined only in 1967 by
American physicist John Wheeler
and the ?rst candidate, Cygnus
X-1, was discovered in 1971 by the
Uhuru satellite. Along with other
physicists, he proved a range of
theorems about these cosmic
vacuum cleaners out of which
nothing, including light, could
escape. Most striking was the
discovery that, irrespective of what
the star that shrunk down to a black
hole looked like, the black hole that
formed was essentially identical.
It was characterised by just two
things ? its mass and how fast it
was spinning.
Hawking?s next and most famous
work built on the insight he and
Penrose had gleaned about the
Big Bang. The fact that Einstein?s
theory broke down did not mean
that the beginning of the universe
was forever beyond our scrutiny. It
simply meant that something better
than Einstein?s theory was required
in order for us to penetrate to this
remote time. That something else
was ?quantum theory?, the hugely
successful theory of atoms and
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Timeline
January 8, 1942 Born at Oxford,
England
1952-1959 Educated at St Albans
School
1959-1962 Scholar in Natural
Science at University College,
Oxford
1962 Final Honour School in
Natural Science, Physics, First
Class
1965 Became research Fellow
of Gonville and Caius College,
Cambridge
1969 Became fellow for DistincClockwise from main: Stephen
tion in Science, Gonville and
Hawking with sisters Mary
Caius College, Cambridge
and Phillipa; with his father,
1972 Became a research
Frank; with Nobel Prize winner assistant in the Institute of
Dorothy Hodgkin; at his wedding Astronomy, Cambridge
to Elaine Mason in 1995; being
1974 Elected a Fellow of the
honoured by the Pope; with
Royal Society
Barack Obama; and with the
1977 Appointed professor of
Queen SWNS/REUTERS/PA
Gravitational Physics, University
of Cambridge
1977 Made honorary Fellow,
University College, Oxford
1978 Awarded honorary
Doctorate of Science, University
of Oxford
1979 Published ?General Relativity: An Einstein Centenary
Survey?
1982 Made Commander of the
British Empire (CBE)
1988 Publishes ?A Brief History
Of Time?
2006 Awarded the Copley Medal
by the Royal Society
2009 Presidential Medal of
Freedom
2012 Appeared at the Paralympic
Games Opening Ceremony,
London
2017 Honorary Freedom of the
City of London
their constituents that had given us
lasers and computers and nuclear
reactors. The problem was that
no one knew how quantum theory
and Einstein?s theory of gravity
?tted together (in fact, unifying
them is, to this day, the outstanding
unsolved problem in physics).
Hawking?s intention was to
attack the singularity in the Big
Bang and at the centre of a black
hole, using quantum theory to
lift the opaque curtain that the
singularity effectively dropped
across our view. But that problem
was going to be a hard nut to crack.
So Hawking decided to practise on
an easier problem.
The singularity at the heart of
the black hole is actually cloaked
by a ?horizon?. This marks the
point of no return for matter falling
into a black hole; pass through
the horizon and you can never get
out again. It is the horizon which
astronomers think of when they
talk about the ?size? of a black hole.
Hawking quickly discovered
something remarkable ? and, to
physicists, scarcely believable ?
about the horizon. To appreciate
it, it is necessary to understand
what quantum theory says about
empty space. Far from being
empty, it is actually seething with
energy. Speci?cally, subatomic
particles and their antiparticles are
continually popping into existence
in pairs, something permitted
by the Heisenberg Uncertainty
Principle. Nature turns a blind eye
to these particles ? not bothering
RELATIONSHIPS
Women were always a mystery
Like the mathematics he grappled
with Stephen Hawking?s domestic
life was complicated.
And he readily admitted women
were an area of his life he found dif?cult to rationalise. Asked what he
thought most about during the day,
he said: ?Women. They are a complete mystery.?
He met his ?rst wife Jane Wilde,
while he was still a PhD student at
Cambridge University. They were
married in 1965, just two years after
he was diagnosed with a rare form of
motor neurone disease.
The couple have three children:
Robert, Lucy and Timothy.
But the pressures of his career
and disability took their toll. Jane
Hawking later said: ?The truth was,
there were four partners in our marriage. Stephen and me, motor neurone disease and physics.?
Hawking left Jane in February
1990 and set up home with one of his
nurses, Elaine Mason. The couple
wed in 1995, but the marriage was
dogged by rumours the nurse had
abused him.
Mason was never charged with
any crime, but after 11 year of marriage, the couple divorced in 2006.
about where the energy to create
them comes from ? just as long
as they meet and destroy, or
?annihilate?, each other very quickly.
But, as Hawking realised,
near the horizon of a black hole
something interesting happens.
There is the possibility that one of
the particles of a newly created pair
falls through the horizon into the
black hole. The remaining particle
has no partner to annihilate
with and ?ies away from the hole
along with countless others in
the same situation. Contrary
to all expectations, therefore,
black holes are not totally black.
They glow with emitted particles
? Hawking radiation.
The energy to make particles
of Hawking radiation comes from
the gravitational energy of the
black hole.
As it radiates Hawking radiation,
it gradually shrinks away. Starsized black holes have extremely
weak Hawking radiation but,
as a black hole gets smaller, the
radiation gets brighter until, ?nally,
the hole explodes in a blinding ?ash.
Hawking radiation has never been
detected in space and is not likely to
be any time soon because, for starsized black holes, it is very weak.
The signi?cance of Hawking?s
discovery was that, at the horizon
at a black hole, three of the great
theories of physics meet ? Einstein?s
By Sally Guyoncourt
theory of gravity, quantum theory,
and thermodynamics. A ?rst
tentative step had been made on the
road to uniting them ? the holy grail
of physics.
An extraordinary development in
Hawking?s career came in 1988, his
book A Brief History of Time. It was a
publishing phenomenon.
He became an international
phenomenon. What caught the
public imagination was the contrast
? the man paralysed in a wheelchair
whose mind wrestled with the
biggest mysteries of the universe.
What also impressed people
was his courage, his incredible
determination in the face of
adversity. He had three children. He
divorced Jane Wilde, then in 1995
married again ? his nurse, Elaine
Mason, the ex-wife of the man who
had given him his computer voice ?
then divorced again.
In 2006, he even ?ew on Nasa?s
KC-135A plane, the ?Vomit Comet?,
which simulates weightlessness,
and moved free of his wheelchair
for the ?rst time in decades.
THE INDEPENDENT
Marcus Chown is the author of
?What A Wonderful World: Life,
the Universe and Everything in a
Nutshell? (Faber & Faber).
Stephen William Hawking,
theoretical physicist: born 8
January 1942; married 1965 Jane
Wilde (divorced 1995, two sons,
one daughter), 1995 Elaine Mason
(divorced 2006); died 14 March 2018
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
17
Comment
Joyful defiance
with a hard
kernel of
seriousness
Matthew D?Ancona
H
e personi?ed a paradox
that tested the limits
of the imagination:
barely able to move,
yet intellectually
roaming across time and space
with grace and brilliance. Like
blind Homer and deaf Beethoven,
Professor Stephen Hawking
transcended incapacity to an
extent that became mythic.
His cerebral skip over
apparently insuperable obstacles
made him a hero to millions.
?I?m not afraid of death,? he
said, ?but I?m in no hurry to die. I
have so much I want to do ?rst.?
The subtext of everything he did
and said was: carpe diem.
Speci?cally, and more perhaps
than any ?gure in modern times,
he showed that disability ? even
in its most extreme form ?
need not be an impediment to
astonishing accomplishment;
indeed, it can be its spur.
In an age obsessed by
superheroes he made the
scholar?s gown as potent as any
comic book cape. The word ?icon?
has been debased by over-use
but ? as with Ali, Mandela and a
handful of others ? it was justly
applied to Hawking.
His combination of brilliance,
stoicism and a mischievous
sense of humour made him an
unexpected ?xture in popular
culture ? as likely to appear in
animated form on The Simpsons
as to feature on-screen in the
Monty Python ensemble?s reunion
shows in 2014. This puckish side of
his character nicely undermined
the stereotype of dour scientists,
sequestered in their laboratories.
For Hawking, the whole point was
to get out and about, to leverage
his celebrity to reach as many
people as possible.
Within that joyful de?ance there
was a hard kernel of seriousness.
True, most of his research was
intrinsically incomprehensible to
the overwhelming majority. His
work on black holes and the nature
of singularities ? one-dimensional
points that contain a colossal
mass in an in?nitely small space,
where gravity and density becomes
in?nite, and space-time curves
in?nitely ? tests many scientists,
let alone interested laymen.
Yet Hawking?s intention was
never to pretend that astrophysics
is easy. Instead, he encouraged the
public not to be frightened by the
challenge, and to join him on the
journey of discovery, conscious
that their imaginative reach
would necessarily exceed their
grasp. One can only guess how
many teenagers have decided to
pursue Stem subjects because of
his example. EVENING STANDARD
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19
WEATHER
SCHOOLS
Fresh Arctic air blast
set to bring another
?mini-Beast? to Britain
?Slave auction? held
for black classmate
By Florence Snead
A blast of freezing Arctic air could
result in temperatures plummeting
across the UK this weekend, with the
Met Of?ce warning of more snow and
?bitterly cold? conditions.
After what has been a relatively
warm, if wet, week for many,
forecasters have warned of a return
to ?much colder weather? with the
arrival of a ?mini-Beast from the
East?. The Met Office issued new
yellow warnings for snow and ice
in parts of eastern England and
Scotland from 5pm tomorrow.
The warning will remain in place
until Saturday morning, with a third
covering London and the south-east
of England throughout Sunday.
Forecasters said that snowfall
would become ?increasingly likely?
in eastern England as the weekend
progresses, with temperatures
expected to struggle to get above
freezing by Sunday.
A Met Of?ce spokeswoman, Nicky
Maxey, said there was potential for
further yellow warnings to be issued
and there was a chance of gale force
winds. However, the disruption is not
predicted to be on the same scale as
that experienced when the ?Beast
from the East? and Storm Emma
battered the UK last month.
Ms Maxey said: ?This system
doesn?t compare in any way to what
we had before. There is a chance
some places on Sunday may struggle
to get above freezing, so it is going
to be cold, but we are not talking
anywhere near what we had the
weekend before last.?
The alerts follow a previous rain
warning for the eastern region
of Northern Ireland, as strong
south-easterly winds heralded a
period of ?persistent, occasionally
heavy rain?.
Richard Leonard, the head of road
safety at Highways England, said
gritters would be out ?around the
clock? but urged drivers to consider
the road conditions as temperatures
dip. He said: ?Keep your distance and
reduce your speed.?
Weather, page 39
PC Dave Wardell said that his former police dog Finn saved his life PA
ANIMALS
Stabbed police dog collects award
By Owen Sheppard
A police dog which was stabbed
with a 10in knife while chasing
a robbery suspect received a
bravery award yesterday.
Finn, a German shepherd,
was slashed across the chest
while protecting his handler,
PC Dave Wardell, in Stevenage,
Hertfordshire, in October 2016.
Mr Wardell was knifed in the
hand but was saved from further
injury by Finn, who stopped the
teenage suspect and refused to
THE INDIAN
TAKEAWAY for
�
let go even as the youth plunged
the blade into his head. The
dog needed 30 stitches and PC
Wardell slept on a camp bed at
his side for almost a month as he
nursed Finn back to ?tness.
The pair were on duty again
within 11 weeks and continued
until Finn retired last year. Mr
Wardell said: ?Finn de?nitely
saved my life that night.?
Finn was awarded a PDSA
gold medal, the highest honour
for civilian animal bravery.
EVENING STANDARD
A school in Bath has been criticised
for refusing to expel pupils who
allegedly tied up and whipped a
black student as part of a ?mock
slave auction?.
At least seven white teenagers
chained a fellow pupil to a lamp
post and whipped him with sticks
and yelled racist abuse at him in
reference to the slave trade, the
Bath Chronicle reported. Police are
investigating the incident, which
took place in January. Parents
criticised the school for not
permanently excluding the pupils.
CONSUMER
Fish choices ?should
change after Brexit?
Consumers are being urged to move
from traditional ?sh favourites such
as cod and tuna to more unusual
options to help the seas and the UK
?shing industry.
The Marine Conservation
Society?s latest Good Fish Guide
recommends the best ?sh to eat
in terms of sustainability, with
new ?best choice? additions. The
post-Brexit top 10 includes North
Sea dab, Cornish hake, mackerel,
mussels, pollack and Dover sole.
2 MAINS
2 SIDES
�
WHY ORDER IN WHEN YOU
CAN TAKE HOME THE MOST
AUTHENTIC FLAVOURS
STRAIGHT FROM M&S
Offer runs Wednesday 14 March to Tuesday 20 March 2018. Subject to availability. Selected products and stores. Choose two mains and two sides from a selection for �. Products shown Butternut Squash Curry, Chicken Dopiaza,
Lamb Balti Pastries & Mushroom Rice. � Marks and Spencer plc.
20
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COMMENT FROM HOME AND ABROAD
RUSSIAN
SANCTIONS
TRUMP?S
WOMEN
REX
TILLERSON
LOOSE
CHANGE
PHILIP
HAMMOND
?THE RUTH
ELLIS FILES?
Time for
May to act
on Putin
New CIA
director a
smokescreen
Secretary of
State with
limited power
Don?t rush
coins away
just yet
Jury?s out on
Tiggerish
Chancellor
Last woman
hanged in UK
back on TV
New Statesman
Financial Times
The Times
Daily Telegraph
Financial sanctions
are available but the
last lot did nothing to
stay Russia?s hand. To
ratchet up the pressure
we will need allies, yet
Brexit has complicated
relations with Europe.
After roaring like a lion,
Mrs May must beware
bringing forth a mouse.
(Philip Johnston)
CNN
One approach could
be to sanction Russian
of?cials who are close
to Putin, preventing
them from travelling
to the United Kingdom.
This would get the
Kremlin?s attention,
as the UK is a second
home for much of
the Russian elite who
appreciate its rule of
law culture.
(Peter Bergen)
Toronto Star
Donald Trump does
not appoint women
unless they are linked
to those who helped
fund his presidential
campaign, who are
married to his allies
or are related to him.
New CIA Director
Gina Haspel made it
on her own. This is a
backhanded triumph
for feminism. Women
have their monsters
too but rarely have
they been so rewarded.
(Heather Mallick)
New YorkTimes
However many women
he chooses to promote
in his government,
Trump is no feminist.
Feminism is not about
counting women in
jobs. It?s about what the
President stands for.
(Mona Eltahawy)
Jess Phillips
The Labour MP sets
out her stall on how
to deal with Russian
aggression
Bloomberg
To cultivate allies
and address threats,
robust diplomatic
engagement is as
necessary as the
threat of military
force. Tillerson failed
to persuade his boss
of that. Pompeo must
succeed. (Editorial)
The suite of currency
units is becoming less
relevant. People are
turning away from not
just 1p coins, but all
notes and coins.
The symbol of the
1p can be guarded in
the Bank of England
museum, alongside
the farthing.
(Tony Yates)
The Sun
Shops will round up
every price. Charities
will miss out on a
fortune in spare
change. If too many
people do bin their
shrapnel, encourage all
shops to put collection
boxes at tills. But don?t
muck about with our
historic currency,
Mr Hammond. It?s
taking the p.
(Editorial)
Mr Hammond?s
statement was
another reminder
of how the Brexit
battle between the
Cabinet?s grown-ups
and adolescents
has drained the
government of
political energy and
ideas. As things stand,
making the best of it
adds up to nothing
more than avoiding the
worst of Brexit.
(Philip Stevens)
Daily Mirror
Chancellor Philip
Hammond had the fake
sincerity of a conman
selling sunshine on
a rainy day. The light
at the end of the
austerity tunnel is a
Brexit train about to
make it even worse.
(Editorial)
The Ruth Ellis case
still exerts such a grip
that one even started
to be drawn in by the
titbits dug up in Gillian
Pachter?s thorough
immersion in the case.
Pachter?s sympathy
towards Ellis was overt
when she declared:
?I?m worried about her
chances of a fair trial.?
(James Jackson)
Daily Mail
It wasted no time
retreading old ground.
The documentary
was far more
concerned with what
was missed by the
original investigation
? including evidence
that linked the murder
weapon to Ellis?s
second lover, ex-RAF
pilot Desmond Cussen.
(Christopher Stevens)
LifeInBrief
Quote of
the day
I have long
known that
standing up to
bullies is the
only answer
TheGuardian
No change in
personnel will alter
the unique chaos
of Donald Trump?s
foreign policy. New
Secretrary of States
Mike Pompeo appears
much more willing
than Tillerson to
toe Trump?s line ? a
dangerous prospect.
No matter how bad
things look, in Trump?s
administration, they
can always get worse.
(Michael H Fuchs)
JOHN BOYD MILLINER
Although she was born into nobility, the
late Diana, Princess of Wales, was not
fond of hats, except for a woolly one
she wore against the chill of winter or
skiing in the Alps. When the then Lady
Diana Spencer began dating Prince
Charles, her mother decided to smarten
her up and called in her own milliner,
the London-based John Boyd.
Boyd, who has died at the age of 92,
helped turn Diana into a standardbearer for fashion across the world. He
provided her with the pink tricorn hat
that she wore after her wedding and on
her way to her honeymoon ? one that
was later copied by milliners across the
world and credited with rebooting a
stagnant industry.
He preferred not to be photographed
in his own favourite hat, a replica of
Chairman Mao?s army-style cap.
?Diana frequently visited his shop but
preferred to be in his messy workroom
where the milliners were working on
the hats,? said Boyd?s prot間閑, Sarah
Marshall, who took over the business
two years ago. ?He was always very
discreet about his royal clientele, which
rewarded him with their loyalty.?
Boyd was the of?cial milliner to
Margaret Thatcher, and he went on to
?do a Princess Di? for Kate Middleton
when she married Prince William. His
byword was discretion. Queried in 1986
about hats he was making for Baroness
Thatcher and Princess Anne, he replied
drily: ?They have a brim.?
Boyd, a printer?s son, was born in
Edinburgh in 1925. The youngest of
seven siblings, he was closest to his
eldest sister, Jessie, a ballet dancer who
would later work in his hat shop and
whom he cared for until she died in
2014. Boyd served in the Royal Navy
and was aboard a minesweeper during
the Normandy invasion. When he
started off in the hat trade in post-war
England, rationing was still in force and
most women were still wearing handme-down hats from their mothers.
He was an apprentice with the
Danish-born Aage Thaarup, at the time
the most famous milliner in the UK,
before starting his own business in
1951, where he slept under his work
table while amassing royal clients.
One of his ?rst clients was Frances
Shand Kydd, Diana?s mother. Another
was a teenage Princess Anne, whose
image he helped turn from ?horsey? to
a fashion heroine in her own right. She
initially thought that fancy women?s
hats were square until Boyd regaled
her royal head with boaters, sombreros
and London businessmen bowlers.
Some of his hats are part of a
permanent collection in the Victoria
and Albert Museum in London. He also
started another business, Pamela?s,
which sold second-hand designer
dresses to women who could not afford
the originals. In 2014, the Queen made
Boyd a MBE for his services to fashion.
He never married.
?My ?rst hat was literally thrown
back at me by an outraged woman
in Chelsea,? he once said. ??You beast!?
she screamed. ?I?m looking for a new
husband, not trying to get rid of one.??
THE WASHINGTON POST
Born 5 April 1925
Died 20 February 2018
Phil Davison
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15 MARCH 2018
21
MyView
DeborahOrr
Yet again, it?s all women?s fault
Using Telford to blame women for men?s misbehaviour is predictable
C
aroline Lucas, the
Green Party?s lone MP,
was this week granted
an Urgent Question
about bullying and
harassment in the
Commons. She tabled it after a
Newsnight investigation suggested
that the private secretary of John
Bercow, the Speaker of the House,
had resigned and suffered post
traumatic stress disorder after
working in his of?ce. These are
bullying allegations, not sexual
harassment allegations.
Bercow chaired the Urgent
Question on Monday, although Lucas
had asked that a deputy speaker
should take his place, given that
he faced such allegations himself.
Lucas, the MP for Brighton Pavilion,
is pushing for a new independent
procedure to protect staff. In these
remarkable circumstances, it?s easy
to see her point.
Though not everyone ?nds
this easy. The political journalist
Andrew Neil let Twitter users
know what he thought of Lucas?s
priorities, writing: ?Wouldn?t
the appalling sexual abuse and
exploitation, including rape
and terrible violence, in Telford
involving hundreds of vulnerable
young women over a long period, as
impressively revealed by the Mirror,
be a more appropriate use of an
Urgent Question??
It is hard to know where to start
with such an absurd con?ation.
Apart from anything else, there
are 649 other MPs and 649 other
opportunities for Urgent Questions.
By singling out Lucas, Neil appears
to be unwittingly signalling that
he thinks it?s the job of women to
challenge predatory or aggressive
men, and that this should be done
by them in the way he thinks most
appropriate. Obviously, of course,
men who are very much unlike Neil
himself should be challenged by
women ?rst. Patriarchal, much?
Narcissistic, much? The lack of selfawareness is risible.
It?s important to note that Neil
is by no means the only one who
believes that it?s comparatively
wrong to challenge a toxic
culture in Westminster, or indeed
Hollywood. Joanna Williams,
writing for the reactionary website
Spiked, is ?rm in her belief that it
is wrong for relatively powerful
women to speak out about their
own experience, when vulnerable
girls go unheard.
?Celebrities and journalists
speaking for the #MeToo
movement talk of believing the
A rally in London
organised by the
Time?s Up campaign
movement against
sexual abuse GETTY
victim and helping other women
?nd a voice. But, tragically, as far
as working-class girls in Oxford,
Rochester, Newcastle and now
Telford are concerned, not all
women are equal.?
Let?s leave aside the fact that
#MeToo has existed for six
months, and that girls all over
Britain have been targeted by
criminal Asian gangs for several
decades. The fact remains that
you could look at Telford and
Westminster and conclude that
across society there?s a problem
with men who think female bodies
are theirs for the taking. Or you
could seize on Telford to slag off
those women who have recently
felt able to assert their right to
set the boundaries that protect
their own bodies. What on earth
compels people to defy all logic and
opt for the latter?
I?m at a loss to know for sure,
beyond pointing out that in both
cases one motivation is certainly
an antipathy towards the politically
correct left. Yet, it?s all being
done so opportunistically and
so badly. There?s no taboo on
discussing the shortcomings of
political correctness. This is done
constantly, after all, but seemingly
without purpose.
Yet, clearly, one problem with
political correctness is that it?s
schematic. It offers hierarchies
of victimhood that don?t allow
Being accused
of misogyny
just didn?t have
the same aura of
impermissibility
as racism
for complexity. Again and again,
in these many cases involving
Muslim grooming gangs and girls,
it is reported that people were
afraid of being accused of racism,
with gangs exploiting that fear
mercilessly. The girls had no such
power. Being accused of misogyny
just didn?t have the same aura
of impermissibility.
These girls weren?t able to say
that in many Islamic cultures it
is up to women to protect their
bodies from the attentions of men
by concealing them from the start
of puberty, and that it was not hard
for a man brought up to believe
this also to persuade himself that
girls who did not do so were fair
game. Why would it be hard, when
Western men and women continue
to suggest that a man has every
right to touch a handy knee?
Too much fear of being called
a racist and not enough fear of
being called a misogynist. That,
for me, was a clear element in the
unbalanced thinking that left girls
in the hands of sexually predatory
pathological men. I see irony in
the idea that blaming, in the most
lazy of ways, women with some
power to be heard will help any
girl facing a similarly ruthless and
exploitative criminal.
How can anyone begin to imagine
that a lobby journalist shrugging
her shoulders when an MP forces
unwanted sexual attention on her
is going to help any constituent who
comes to him complaining of the
same? All girls and women need to
know that they have an absolute
right to own their bodies, and to
expect their physical boundaries
to be unfailingly respected. Just as
importantly, all boys and men need
to know that too.
Twitter: @deborahjaneorr
i@inews.co.uk
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Gap that needs
to be filled
Your
View
TWEETS
AND EMAILS
The British Polio
Fellowship welcomes
the �0m spent making
Tottenham Court Road
Tube ?fully accessible
and step-free?; yet sadly,
those with mobility
issues still struggle to
access trains due to a
22cm gap between train
and platform. In the ?ght
for greater accessibility,
it is the little things that
represent the biggest gap
to progress.
Even ramps represent
a compromise and not
a solution. Requiring
multiple staff involvement, ramps hardly
give wheelchair users
independence.
Out of 270 Tube
stations in London, just
72 are accessible and
only 50 can claim to be
step-free. The British
Polio Fellowship has
been ?ghting for better
accessibility for those
who have had polio for
nearly 80 years.
This is not to say
progress has not been
made. Back in 1969, MP
Alf Morris introduced
a Bill that became the
Disabled Persons Act in
1970. This legislation,
the ?rst in the world to
recognise and give rights
to people with disabilities was a giant leap but
nearly 50 years later, it
is surely time to take the
steps necessary to close
the remaining gaps.
DAVID MITCHELL
NATIONAL CHAIRMAN,
BRITISH POLIO
FELLOWSHIP
Avoid plastic,
but harm trees?
Whose fault is it we are
using plastic bags? I can
remember many years
we were told to stop
Photo:Ahmad Baroudi/Save the Children
SEE THE CHILD.
NOT THE WAR.
FATIMA
DIDN?T DROP
ANY BOMBS
Fatima* is three years old and all she?s ever known is war.
Bombs forced her family to ?ee their home in Syria. Now
they?re struggling to survive in a temporary shelter.
�
Fatima has done nothing wrong: she?s just a child.
COULD PROVIDE
A FAMILY OF FIVE
IN SYRIA WITH FOOD FOR
ONE WEEK
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could give a family like Fatima?s enough rice and bread to get
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Initials
The RNLI is funded by
public donations. Charities
may suffer if copper coins
are scrapped GETTY
expelled, has given me
that same knot of fear.
JAN HUNTINGDON
CRICKLADE, WILTSHIRE
Nerve agent?s
hidden entry
While I appreciate the
point Gareth Davies
makes about airport
security (Your View,
14 March), we have to
consider the strong
possibility that the nerve
agent used against
Sergei Skripal and his
daughter arrived in this
country via diplomatic
baggage, and therefore
was not subject to any
security screening.
PETER MOYES
ROCHFORD, ESSEX
using paper bags because
too many trees were
being cut down. It seems
we can?t win.
RAY HELSON
BODMIN, CORNWALL
Mothers always
know best
Russell Pearse is not quite
correct when he states
that cucumber will not
last more than a few days
without being wrapped
in plastic (Your View, 14
March). My mother would
stand the cut surface in
a shallow bowl of water
in the larder and it would
keep for more than a
week. We can learn a lot
from our parents.
JOHN TURNER
WIRRAL
Small change
? but big money
these coins. I am certain
that, with all prices set
at a minimum of 5p or
10p levels, charities
will suffer.
JOHN EDSER
ALSAGER, CHESHIRE
Ground BBC?s
football squad
I?m not certain that
withdrawing the
English team from the
World Cup is a relevant
sanction ? they probably
won?t be there very long
anyway. One useful
action would be for the
BBC to announce that
it would no longer be
sending a team to Russia.
The pictures could
still be taken from the
Russian broadcasters,
but all the analysis would
I deal with boxes for the
RNLI and the amount of
1p and 2p coins I count
is considerable. One box
? emptied about every
six weeks ? regularly
produces �to �of
be done from the UK.
C SLIGHT
CWMBRAN,
MONMOUTHSHIRE
That knot of
fear returns
As a child during the
Second World War, I
remember vividly the
precautions taken to
keep ourselves safe,
the metal shelter-cumdining table in the living
room, the gas mask I
had to carry to school
and the knot of fear
I had in my stomach
whenever the sirens
sounded. The news over
the past few days, and
the Prime Minister?s
announcement today
that Russian diplomats
living here will be
Draining
whose swamp?
Is the sacking of Rex
Tillerson an example of
Trump carrying out his
intention of draining the
Washington swamp? If
so, does he realise that
this particular swamp is
of his own making?
C GOODALL
TENTERDEN, KENT
Unlikely
companions
A fond farewell to Ken
Dodd and Stephen
Hawking. An unlikely
partnership but I?m sure
they will have a lot to
learn from each other.
WENDY TURNER
HATFIELD,
HERTFORDSHIRE
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Will.i.am
Obama, power
and me
PLUS
Tilda Swinton
On playing a dog and
why we?re all
storytelling apes
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Awards success for journalists
Leading editors and correspondents stand to applaud the lifetime contribution of reporter Steve Connor
i?s former science editor, the late
Steve Connor, has been named
Science Journalist of the Year.
Connor was recognised by judges
at the Press Awards for his front
page story on i revealing the dawn
of genetically-modi?ed babies.
They hailed ?a genuine world
exclusive on a huge scienti?c
development? the story was
followed up by more than 1,000 news
publishers left trailing in his wake?.
They added: ?His winning
entry was the latest in a long
series of scoops from this worldclass investigative reporter. He is
uniquely talented at ?nding scoops
and at turning complex science into
brilliantly written stories. His death
is a huge loss for science journalism
and, if there were a lifetime
achievement award in this category,
he would win it.?
Connor died in November
after a long illness, following
four decades reporting for New
Scientist, the Telegra
h
aph,
The Independent, Sunday
Times and i. He rewrrote
the history of HIV and
a
broke major exclusiives
across science,
on developments
including the human
n
genome, climate
i editor Oliver Duff collects the posthumous award to Steve Connor. And right
(from top) Connor, Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, Stephen Bush and Kim Sengupta
change, the Higgs boson particle
and Crispr gene editing.
In team awards, i was shortlisted
for Newspaper of the Year and
inews.co.uk for News Website of the
Year. The Financial Times won best
newspaper and Buzzfeed best site.
?i has thrived under new
ownership,? judges said, ?as its
audience
di
grew in print and online.
There were th
hree primary
reason
ns for audience
growth: scoops,
new columnists and
p
product innovation
? sspeci?cally the
lau
unch of a popular
iweekend edition.
Great overall coverage and a top
product that continues to grow its
readership.?
In less than two years, judges
added, ?inews.co.uk has quickly
established itself as a home for
trusted reporting, investigations
and lively comment ? all
complemented by an enjoyable
user experience in a mobilefriendly format.?
Correspondents
Other i journalists were recognised
for the quality of their work.
Stephen Bush has been
highly commended in Political
Commentator of the Year, and Katy
Balls was also shortlisted. Judges
called Bush ?a wide-ranging and
imaginative commentator,
a bold and fresh voice in
British politics?. They
added: ?His column on
how Theresa May badly
misjudged the British love
of animals pre-empted
Michael Gove?s intervention in
policy, and culminated in the
announcement that there
would no longer be a vote on
repealing the hunting ban.?
Judges praised Katy
Balls? ?exclusive insight into
Number 10?.
Yasmin Alibhai-Brown has
been highly commended
for Columnist of the Year,
having won the award
last year. ?Always thoughtprovoking,? said judges, ?her
work covered the Royal Family,
British Muslims and popular
culture, typifying her
originality and bravery.?
Kim Sengupta has been
highly commended for
Foreign Reporter of the
Year, for his correspondence
published in i and the online
Independent. Judges praised his
?in-depth stories, excellent
contacts, breadth of topics and
quality of writing?. They added:
?Sengupta told of how British
security agent Christopher
Steele became so concerned
about the FBI?s inaction on
the infamous dossier that he
was working unpaid to bring
his brie?ng to the world?s
attention. A great read.?
i arts editor Alice Jones was
shortlisted for Critic of the
Year. She ?won high praise
from the judges?, according
to her citation. They
called her ?an original and
entertaining comedy critic?.
Football correspondent
Sam Cunningham was
recognised in the Sports
Journalist of the Year
shortlist for his work before
joining i. Judges praised his
?string of exclusives [which]
eventually led to the sacking
of England women?s coach
Mark Sampson?.
i?s Monday columnist
Ian Birrell was highly
commended for Feature
Writer of the Year for his work
for the Mail on Sunday. Judges
called him ?a master of his craft?
superb reporting with in-depth
analysis? his writing is etched
with sympathy?.
24
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Please include a contact address with all correspondence
How to boost productivity? Stop watching Disney films
EMPLOYMENT
Josie
Cox
P
hilip Hammond this week
drew on the cast of Winnie
the Pooh to illustrate his
sentiments about the state of
Brexit-bound Britain.
?I am at my most positively
Tigger-like,? he chirped as he
unveiled marginally higher growth
forecasts for this year and dismissed
his ?doom-and-gloom? Labour
colleagues as listless Eeyores ?
much to the delight of social media
GIF-makers.
Spreadsheet Phil?s optimism
unsurprisingly failed to infect
everyone. Against fresh forecasts
that the UK will be the worstperforming G20 economy this year,
some business leaders said that he
didn?t provide even so much as a
glimmer of light at the end of the
tunnel. I?d nonetheless argue that we
could all do with some more Tiggers
in the professional world: glass-halffull people who are fun down the pub.
Misplaced optimism which
morphs into full-blown naivety is a
certain recipe for disaster if you?re
the Chancellor of an arguably
ailing economy. But across Britain?s
average of?ce ?oor, managers and
employees of all shapes and
sizes would bene?t from
channelling their inner
chirpy feline a little
more frequently. A
stubborn productivity
crisis, a generation of
disenchanted, broke
millennials, and a
vast sub-section of the
working population that
seems to hate their jobs
shows just how much of a pickle
our grumpiness has landed us in.
Low morale is famously a poison for
staff retention, so what?s to be done?
Rather than launch a mass
operation to paint the working
population stripy and encourage
everyone to grow a tail, a new report
suggests that there?s a solution that
could actually be much simpler:
don?t watch cartoons.
Published this month by the
esteemed New York-based Academy
of Management, the study argues
that an overwhelming number of
Disney movies portray managers,
leaders and everyday work life in
a negative fashion which in turn
has blighted our perception of
professional life for almost eight
decades.
Professors Martyn Grif?n and
Nick Piper of Leeds University
and Professor Mark Learmonth
of Durham University analysed 56
feature-length animated Disney
?lms, starting with Snow White
and the Seven Dwarfs (inset) in 1937
and ?nishing with Moana,
which hit screens in
2016. They looked for
workplace themes,
such as manipulation
and deception
by managers or
overseers, and the
perils associated with
dangerous, dirty or
unful?lling work.
?Our research suggests
one of the most powerful cultural
in?uences in Western society,
Disney animated ?lms, have created
negative views about workplace
managers among generations
of children for nearly 80 years,?
Professor Grif?n said. ?While
common knowledge might suggest
new entrants to the workforce are
blank slates ready to be moulded by
their organisations, our research
shows managers and organisations
will need to take into account the
ideas about organisational life that
began as soon as they were old
enough to watch their ?rst
Disney movie.?
The academics could be on to
something. THE INDEPENDENT
PEOPLE
It wasn?t simply that Hawking
could give a clear exposition, but
that he did so with wit and in a way
that made you want to read more.
In delivering this goal, he served as
a role model to those of us who also
endeavour to disseminate the thrill
of science to a wider public.
Remarkable though these
achievements would be, they
are even more colossal when
appreciated against the backdrop
of the neurodegenerative disease
ALS from which he suffered. Since
neurodegeneration is my area of
research, the fact that Hawking was
a victim of this devastating condition
has a personal signi?cance. If ever I
had to question why I got out of bed
each morning, thinking of Hawking
would strengthen my resolve.
Although many neuroscientists
are trying every approach we can,
the slow cycle of nerve-cell death is
still unstoppable. To live each day
with this knowledge and yet soar
to such heights is surely the most
wonderful example of the apotheosis
of the human spirit and the sense
that for the rest of us, however
dif?cult life may seem there is always
something you can succeed at.
Few of us will be brilliant
physicists, witty and exciting
communicators, or be tested for
so long by such a cruel disease: but
Stephen Hawking will surely be
an enduring role model for us all,
whoever we are. THE INDEPENDENT
Susan
Greenfield
Hawking was
a role model
to all of us
M
any people far more
quali?ed than I am
will have already been
explaining and extolling
the seminal contribution of Stephen
Hawking to physics and astronomy.
That contribution fundamentally
changed our understanding of the
mechanics of black holes, as well as
in?uencing the ontological debate
between quantum mechanics and
general relativity.
But Hawking transcended the
con?nes of his subject not just to be
the most iconic scientist on Earth,
but to mean so much more to many
people. Beyond his intellect was a
passion for sharing the wonder of
science that he himself felt.
Far from the perception of science
popularisation as ?dumbing down?,
there is an increasing realisation
that it is the hallmark of a truly
brilliant scientist to explain complex
ideas in simple terms free of jargon.
Baroness Green?eld is a scientist
specialising in the physiology of
the brain
O5/Jun
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OLD TRAFFORD.
FOOTBALL STADIUM.
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26
NEWS
MONEY
2p or not 2p? Government U-turn in
space of 24 hours on copper coins
By Richard Vaughan
and Karl McDonald
Theresa May abandoned plans to
scrap copper coins just 24 hours
after the idea was put forward
by the Chancellor.
Philip Hammond outlined
proposals in his Spring Statement
on Tuesday suggesting that 1p and
2p coins could be axed as part of a
review into the future use of cash.
But in a quick about-turn
yesterday, Downing Street ruled out
the idea of getting rid of coppers in
the face of mounting public anger.
?There are no proposals to scrap
one- or two-pence coins in the
consultation,? the Prime Minister?s
spokesman said. ?The call for
evidence is simply intended to discarded, and of that, about 8 per
enable the Government to better cent the coins are thrown in the bin.
understand the role of cash and
To replace the coins that fall out of
digital payments in the economy.
circulation, the Royal Mint needed to
?One thing the Treasury
produce more than 500 million
was seeking views on was
1p and 2p coins each year, it
whether the current
added.
denominational mix
?From an economic
of coins meets the
perspective, having
public?s needs. From
l a r ge n u m b e r s o f
Percentage of 1p
and 2p coins that
the early reaction, it
denominations that
are used just once
looks as if it does.?
are not in demand,
before
being
put
The decision comes
saved by the public, or
in savings jars or
despite the Treasury
in long-term storage at
discarded
publishing a document on
cash processors rather
Tuesday spelling out that small
than used in circulation does
tender was no longer cost-effective.
not contribute to an ef?cient or costThe report revealed that 60 per effective cash cycle,? the report said.
cent of 1p and 2p coins are used only
In the wake of the announcement,
once before being saved in a jar or MPs had warned ditching copper
60
coins would hit charities and could
even affect seaside towns where
penny slot machines are still popular.
T h e N a t i o n a l Pe n s i o n e r s
Convention warned the move could
have a major impact on the elderly.
?What lies behind it might be a
drive towards digital transactions
which aren?t always suitable for some
older people,? a spokesman said.
?What we don?t want to see is a move
towards just one way of doing things.?
The news came as an analysis of
the Chancellor?s Spring Statement
by the Institute for Fiscal Studies
said tax rises of at least �bn a year
would be needed to balance the books
by the middle of the next decade.
Business, page 40
BREXIT
First ministers fail to agree with May on EU Withdrawal Bill
By Sam Lister and David Hughes
Brexit talks between Theresa May
and the ?rst ministers of Scotland
and Wales broke up yesterday
without agreement.
The Scottish First Minister,
Nicola Sturgeon, said that
the issues outstanding over
legislation that transposes EU law
into UK law once Britain leaves
were ?not insigni?cant?.
Lack of agreement from
Edinburgh and Cardiff would
not prevent the EU (Withdrawal)
Bill from passing, but forcing it
through without consent could
spark a constitutional crisis.
Speaking in Downing Street,
Ms Sturgeon said: ?There was
certainly an indication on all sides
that we want to reach agreement.?
?We can?t have our powers
restricted, or reduced, without
The Welsh First Minister, Carwyn Jones (centre left) sits next to his Scottish
counterpart Nicola Sturgeon (centre) at yesterday?s meeting GETTY
the consent of the Scottish
Parliament,? she told reporters.
?The issues that remain between
us are not insigni?cant, but
neither are they insurmountable.?
The Welsh First Minister,
Carwyn Jones, said: ?Progress
has been made but I am not yet
in a position to recommend to
the National Assembly that we
should give our consent to the
Withdrawal Bill.?
The row centres on where
devolved powers currently held
by Brussels will be exercised
once the UK quits the EU ? with
Mrs May stressing that the ?vast
majority? of returning EU powers
will go to Edinburgh and Cardiff.
However, the UK Government
argues that some powers must
come ?rst to Westminster so
common frameworks can be
established across the UK.
INQUIRY
Bercow to
step aside
as bullying
discussed
By Sam Lister
The House of Commons Speaker,
John Bercow, will step aside
during discussions about an
inquiry into the alleged bullying of
parliamentary staff.
Mr Bercow (inset) faced
criticism when he chaired a
debate about the treatment of
workers in the Commons despite
facing allegations about his own
conduct. The Speaker heads
a committee that will meet on
Monday to look at plans for a
?short, independently led? inquiry
into the claims, but will recuse
himself during the discussion.
Yesterday, MPs debated
claims made by BBC?s
Newsnight that women
officials responsible
fo r r u n n i n g t h e
business of the House
had been bullied.
It was alleged that
Mr Bercow shouted
at and undermined his
former private secretary,
Kate Emms, resulting in her being
signed off sick.
The Commons leader, Andrea
Leadsom, said the claims were a
?huge concern? and that everyone
in Parliament ?should be held to
the same high standards?.
James Duddridge, the Tory
MP for Rochford and Southend
East, asked whether it was
?appropriate? for the Speaker
to remain in his seat during the
debate ?when there are allegations
against him, which he is trying to
suppress using taxpayer?s money
through sending out letters
through Speaker?s Counsel?.
Mr Bercow denies the claims,
as have two MPs named, Labour?s
Paul Farrelly and a Conservative,
Mark Pritchard.
27
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
On Saturday, in your
In Money
How to buy travel insurance
Getting the best cover, and
how to check the small print
for hidden clauses
Jim Bowen
appears at the
Edinburgh
Fringe in 2008
with his show
?Look At What
You Could
Have Won?
GETTY
PEOPLE
Former ?Bullseye? host
Jim Bowen dies aged 80
By Sally Guyoncourt
The comedian and broadcaster
Jim Bowen, best known as the
presenter of the darts game show
Bullseye, has died at the age of 80.
The Lancashire-born star died
yesterday morning with his wife,
Phyllis, by his side. A family friend,
John Pleus, said: ?He passed away
very peacefully, Phyllis was with
him. We are all shedding a tear.?
Mr Pleus added that Bowen?s
death was not ?completely
unexpected? because the comedian
had been at The Royal Lancaster
In?rmary for several weeks.
Bowen, who had suffered two
strokes in the past, said in 2011
that he had learnt to ?appreciate all
things in life? as a result.
Last night, names from the
worlds of sport and entertainment
paid tribute to the former teacher-
turned-comedian. Ex-heavyweight
boxer Frank Bruno wrote on
Twitter: ?Jim Bowen RIP, great
comic. We worked together many
times had a lot of laughs together.
Jim and Ken Dodd ? a sad time for
the entertainment industry.?
Former darts world champion
Eric Bristow said: ?RIP Jim
Bowen, I did every year of Bullseye
and 10 Xmas shows and had 15 days
with him on the QE2. I played darts
in the afternoon and he played with
his band at night, We had some late
nights... great memories.?
Pad d y M c G u i n n e s s , wh o
appeared alongside Bowen in
an episode of Peter Kay?s sitcom
Phoenix Nights, said: ?It was a
pleasure to spend the day with him.?
B owe n , wh o g rew u p i n
Lancashire, trained as a teacher
after leaving Accrington Grammar
School and became a deputy
8 day
from ons
l
�9pp y
headteacher before his change of
career. He turned to comedy on
the club circuit in the 1960s after
seeing the late Ken Dodd perform.
Following a stint on the ITV
show The Comedians, he was picked
to be the host of Bullseye in 1981.
The show, which aired for 14
years and was watched by up to
12 million viewers, made Bowen
a household name and a cult hero
with catchphrases such as ?Super,
smashing, great? and ?Now look
what you could have won...?
Bowen played cameo
roles in programmes
such as Last of the Summer Wine,
Jonathan Creek and Phoenix
Nights. From 1999 to 2002, he
presented a morning show on
BBC Radio Lancashire
Sicily
Selected departures up to October 2018
SCIENCE
LITERATURE
Britain ?is falling behind
on child health issues?
Morpurgo rebuilds
?The Snowman?
By Paul Gallagher
HEALTH CORRESPONDENT
The UK has one of the worst
breastfeeding rates in the world
and is ?falling behind?
comparable countries
on several child health
issues, says a report.
Just over a third (34
per cent) of babies are
receiving breast milk at
six months, compared
with nearly two-thirds
(62.5 per cent) in Sweden.
Improvements in life expectancy
have stalled and UK children have
some of the highest levels of obesity.
In 2013, it was estimated that 26.1
per cent of boys and 29.2 per cent
of girls aged two to 19 years were
overweight or obese.
An analysis of UK child health
measures compared with 14
similar countries also found
improvements in infant and
neonatal mortality rates
have halted since 2013.
The
report,
published by the
Nuffield Trust health
think-tank and Royal
College of Paediatrics
and Child Health, found
i m p rove m e n t s i n l i fe
expectancy have plateaued since
2011. A boy born in the UK in 2015
can expect to live to 79 years but
a girl 83 years, the lowest of all
European comparable countries.
By Sally Guyoncourt
The much-loved children?s book
The Snowman is to get a new
lease of life thanks to author
Michael Morpurgo.
To mark the 40th anniversary
of the publication of Raymond
Briggs?s picture book, publisher
Penguin Random House will be
releasing a novel version by the
former Children?s Laureate.
Morpurgo said: ?It has been
an honour and a sheer joy to tell
again arguably one of the most
beloved books in the world.
?I have loved doing it, as I
hope you love reading it.
?It is different, but the same.?
The new novel will be aimed at
readers aged seven upwards.
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? Guided tour of Piazza Armerina?s Roman villa, once completely buried, now
remarkably preserved with stunning frescoes and ancient mosaics
? Visit to Mount Etna ? Europe?s largest active volcano
? Guided tour of Monreale?s medieval cathedral
? Visit to Siracusa ? one of the Ancient Greek empire?s richest cities
? Return travel from a selection of UK airports
? Seven nights dinner, bed & breakfast at quality four-star hotels
? Services of our experienced
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Prices are based on two people sharing and are correct at time of print. Single
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conditions of Riviera Travel, ABTA V4744 ATOL 3430 protected. Subject to
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ABTA No. V4744
28
NEWS
SOCIETY
TELEVISION
Britain?s segregated towns and cities
hope new cash can knock down walls
Foy paid less than
?well-known? Smith
Can ethnic divisions in places like Bradford be healed? Chris Burn reports
D
elroy Dacres thinks
very carefully before
answering whether
social integration has
improved in Bradford
since the city?s race riots in 2001.
?From my perspective,? he says after
a pause, ?I would have to say no.?
If anyone should be able to judge,
it?s Dacres. He is a former player and
manager of Campion AFC, a football
club with players from a wide
mixture of backgrounds, that helped
organise a special tournament to
rebuild relations just a month after
Asian and white youths clashed
on the city?s streets. That eruption
of racial violence saw a BMW
dealership burnt to the ground,
shops looted and around �m
damage caused. Almost 300 people
were arrested.
Seventeen years on, the poor state
of racial integration in Bradford ?
and many other places across the
country ? is under scrutiny once
more. The Yorkshire city has been
named by the Government as one of
?ve pilot areas for measures to help
bring communities closer together.
The �m plans announced in
a green paper yesterday include
boosting English language skills
by setting up ?conversation clubs?
and supporting councils to improve
provision of tuition. Schools where
pupils come from a single ethnic or
religious community will have to
Targets
Integration areas
Apart from Bradford, Waltham
Forest, Walsall, Blackburn and
Peterborough have been selected as
the Government?s integration areas.
Waltham Forest, in north-east
London, has the ?fth-largest Muslim
population in England.
The number of ethnic minority
residents in Walsall is now one in
four, with the largest increase in
people of an Asian background.
The 2011 census revealed that
31 per cent of the population of
Blackburn were from an ethnic
minority background.
In the period 2001-10, 24,166
migrants moved to Peterborough,
many from eastern Europe.
Getting people to interact with the wider society continues to be a problem
ensure they mix with children from
other backgrounds.
It follows a 2016 review by Dame
Louise Casey that showed Bradford
had one of the worst records in the
country for people being unable to
speak English and schools that were
effectively segregated by ethnicity.
The large population of Muslim
Pakistanis in Manningham, where
Campion AFC are based, saw it
named as one of the top 10 areas
in the country where a minority
faith or ethnic group made up the
majority of its population.
Dacres says the Government plan
contains some sensible ideas ? but
he sees the announcement of the
new funding as bitterly ironic.
In addition to his involvement
on the local football scene, he is a
director of Manningham Mill Sports
and Community Association. Before
the Financial Crisis it was running
dozens of weekly classes ? covering
everything from sewing to football
coaching, and even English lessons ?
but then funding was slashed.
?Because of Government
austerity, places where people could
CRYPTIC CROSSWORD
No 2215 BY NESTOR
turn up and get to know each other
are going to the wall,? he says. ?If
they give this new money to big
organisations like the university or
the council, then that might not get
to the heart of the problem... Things
have to be done locally.?
Susan Hinchcliffe, leader of
Bradford?s Labour-run local council
said yesterday: ?We are pleased
to be involved in the Integration
Strategy from the beginning... It?s in
all our best interests to make sure
that the whole district works well
together.?
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M O E
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26
Full terms and conditions can be found on page 45
Facebook has removed the
of?cial page of the far-right group
Britain First, along with those
of party leader Paul Golding and
deputy leader Jayda Fransen.
The social network said
it had taken action after the
administrators of the pages
repeatedly broke the site?s
community standards on hate
speech despite being issued
written ?nal warnings.
Theresa May welcomed
Facebook?s decision and the
Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan,
also praised the move.
?Britain First is a vile and hatefuelled group whose sole purpose
is to sow division,? he said.
6
7
8
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16
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24
27
28
Stuck on the cryptic crossword? For today?s solutions, call 0905 789 3580.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network access charge. If you are having
trouble accessing this number, please call our helpdesk on 0333 202 3390.
Facebook removes
Britain First page
20
Solution to yesterday?s Cryptic
R A C K E
M N
CH AMO I
U
T
C
TWE A K
A
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DOR A DO
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S P A N I A
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P
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COME D
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E X T R AO
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P L E A S E
ONLINE
10
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22
Miranda Hart has called for
change in the ?archaic? way
actors are paid after it emerged
Claire Foy earned less than Matt
Smith for her role in The Crown.
The creators of the Net?ix
drama admitted that Smith was
paid more for his portrayal of the
Duke of Edinburgh than Foy was
for her Golden Globe-winning
performance as the Queen.
The producers said Smith was
paid more as he had appeared
in a number of British dramas
including the BBC?s Wolf Hall.
Hart tweeted: ?The archaic
system that actors get paid more
because they are more well
known ... has got to change.?
25
NEWS
2-33
VOICES
20-24
TV
34-35
IQ
36-38
29
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
46-52
UNITED STATES
Students stage walkout against gun violence
By Gina Cherelus
IN NEW YORK
Students walked out of classrooms
across the US yesterday, waving
signs and chanting their demands
for tighter gun safety laws, joining
a movement spearheaded by survivors of the shooting spree at a
Florida high school last month.
Protestors in the #ENOUGH
National School Walkout stepped
outside for 17 minutes at 10am
in each time zone across the
country, commemorating the 17
students and staff killed at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School in
Parkland. The massacre was the
latest in a series of shootings in US
schools over nearly two decades.
Some pupils started early. At
Fiorello H LaGuardia High School
in New York City, crowds of
students poured on to the streets
of Manhattan, many dressed in
orange ? the colour of the guncontrol movement.
?Thoughts and prayers are not
enough? read one sign, referring
to the usual response many
lawmakers make after mass
shootings. At 10am, the students
sat down on the pavement, ?lling
half a city block, and fell silent.
In Parkland itself, thousands
of children filed slowly on to the
Stoneman Douglas school football
?eld, to the applause of families and
supporters beyond the fences, as
law enforcement of?cers looked on.
Ty Thompson, the school
principal, called for the ?biggest
group hug? and the students
around the 50-yard line obliged.
The walkouts came in a
burgeoning, grassroots movement
that grew out of the Parkland attack.
Some survivors have lobbied state
and federal lawmakers, and even
met President Donald Trump, to
call for new restrictions on gun
ownership,arightwhichisprotected
by the Second Amendment of the
US Constitution.
?We don?t feel safe in schools
anymore,? said Sarah Chatfield,
a 15-year-old high school student
from Maryland, who had joined
a crowd of hundreds protesting
outside the White House in
Washington DC. Some sat silent
with their backs turned.
?Trump is talking about arming
teachers with guns,? she said. ?That
is not a step in the right direction.?
Soon after, some of the pupils
began marching towards Capitol
Hill. ?Hey hey, ho ho, the NRA has
got to go!? they chanted, referring
to the powerful gun-rights
interest group, the National Ri?e
Association. REUTERS
Trump considering an
armed space force
Students gather at Washington Square Park in New York City yesterday GETTY
The Parkland survivors?
efforts helped to bring
about a tightening of Florida laws
last week, when the minimum age
for buying any kind of gun was
raised to 21 from 18.
On the move?
US POLITICS
We can help from
start to finish
Democrat claims election
victory on Republican turf
By Bill Barrow
A Democratic Party candidate has
claimed victory in an election in a
Republican stronghold which is
seen as a key indicator of Donald
Trump?s popularity.
But Conor Lamb?s Republican
rival, Rick Saccone, was just a
few hundred votes behind him
and refused to admit defeat in the
special election for Pennsylvania?s
18th Congressional District.
It was called when a veteran
Republican congressman, Tim
Murphy, who espoused strong
anti-abortion views, resigned amid
America should create its own
separate military space force,
President Donald Trump has
said in an offhand remark that
would change the course of US
space policy.
Mr Trump said at a San Diego
Marine Corps base that he?s
considering ?a space force?, having
noted that US national security
strategy ?recognises that space is a
war-?ghting domain, just like the
land, air and sea?.
Experts last night warned not
to expect Captain Kirk launching
photon torpedoes. This is more
about boosting reconnaissance
and cyber security than ?ghting
in orbit, said Sean O?Keefe, who
was Nasa administrator and
Navy secretary under President
George W. Bush. AP
revelations of an extramarital affair
in which he urged his mistress to
get a termination.
The contest has drawn national
attention as a barometer for the
mid-term elections in November,
when the Republican Party?s House
and Senate majorities are at risk.
Mr Lamb, a ?rst-time candidate
and US Marine Corps veteran, told
supporters that voters had directed
him to ?do your job? in Washington
and declared: ?Mission accepted.?
Earlier, Mr Saccone told his
backers: ?It?s not over yet, we?re
going to ?ght all the way.?
The results were extremely close
FIX
E
FEE D
GUAR
AN
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E
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Conveyancing
&
HomeBuyer and
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Conor Lamb insisted that he had the
backing of voters in Pennsylvania
and the Republicans were last night
considering calls for a recount.
M r L a m b?s s h ow i n g i n a
district that Mr Trump won by
20 points in the presidential race
is sure to stoke anxiety among
Republicans nationwide. AP
VATICAN
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Even a Pope gets photoshopped these days
By Nicole Winfield
IN VATICAN CITY
The Vatican admitted
yesterday that it
altered a photograph
sent to the media
of a letter from the
retired Pope Benedict
XVI about his
successor, Pope Francis.
The Vatican?s
communications of?ce
released the photo of the
letter on Monday on the eve
of Pope Francis?s ?veyear anniversary. The
letter was cited by
Monsignor Dario
Vigano, the Vatican?s
communications
chief, to rebut
critics who say that
Francis represents
a departure from the
doctrine-minded papacy
of Benedict (near left, with
Pope Francis). In the part of
the letter that was legible in
the photo, Benedict praised a
new book about the theology of
Pope Francis as evidence of the
?foolish prejudice? of critics.
The Vatican did not explain
why it altered the photo, other
than to say it never intended for
the full letter to be released.
The second page of the letter
was covered by a stack of
books, with just Benedict?s tiny
signature showing, to prove its
authenticity. AP
D
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30
NEWS
Panorama
Around the
world in
10 stories
IN SAN DIEGO
UNITED STATES
Merkel secures
fourth term
Norwegian wins
Alaska sled race
Germany?s parliament has
elected Angela Merkel for her
fourth term as Chancellor,
putting an end to nearly six
months of political drift in
Europe?s biggest economy.
Politicians voted by 364 by
315 yesterday to re-elect Ms
Merkel, who ran unopposed.
There were nine abstentions.
The coalition of Ms Merkel?s
conservative Christian
Democratic Union, its
Bavarian-based sister party
the Christian Social Union
and the centre-left Social
Democrats has 399 seats. AP
A Norwegian sled dog racer claimed
victory in the world?s most famous
competition after a gruelling dash
across Alaska, but earned tens of
thousands of dollars less than last
year?s leading musher at the struggling Iditarod event.
After nearly 1,000 miles, Joar
Ulsom came off the Bering Sea ice
just outside Nome and ran the last
few blocks. The 31-year-old, who took
the lead on Monday, became the third
person born outside the US to win
the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.
Mr Ulsom moved in 2011 from Norway to Willow, Alaska, the dog mushing capital of the US. AP
Kiwi diplomat
carpeted for
anti-Trump rant
By Nick Perry
IN WELLINGTON
New Zealand has censured its
second-highest ranking diplomat
in the US after she tweeted that
the Democratic Party needed to
get its act together for the next
election ?or we will all die?.
Trump views border wall
prototypes in California
By Julie Watson
GERMANY
NEW ZEALAND
UNITED STATES
Caroline Beresford, the deputy
head of mission in Washington
DC, later deleted the tweets.
New Zealand?s foreign affairs
ministry said that the posts did
not meet its code of conduct for
social media, which requires
diplomatic staff to maintain
political neutrality and take care
in expressing personal opinions.
Ms Beresford tweeted several
times last week disagreeing with
an opinion column on the political
website The Hill which said that
a 2020 Democratic ticket with
Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth
Warren could ?win big?. AP
Donald Trump inspected eight
towering prototypes for his longsought wall at the US border with
Mexico yesterday, but accused
California of putting ?the entire
nation at risk? by refusing to take
tough action against illegal migrants.
Mr Trump, on his first trip to
California as US President, said he
preferred a fully concrete wall because
it was hardest to climb, but he noted
that it needed to be see-through. He
said the ?rst thing he spotted driving
to the border were patched-up holes in
parts of the existing fence.
Iferouane
Tuaregs nomads in northern
Niger are hoping to draw
tourists back to the region
by putting their traditional
dances, music poetry and
camel races on display.
Despite concerns about
Islamic extremism throughout
the Sahel region in West
Africa, organisers recently
hosted more than 1,000
visitors to a cultural festival
in Iferouane, a village in
Niger?s far north.
?Without tourism, our youth
risks falling into idleness and
misery, and will join the wave
of migration to Europe,? said
Mohamed Houma, the mayor of
the town located about 250km
(155 miles) north of the central
city of Agadez.
The Air festival, considered
one of the most important
gatherings to celebrate the
culture of the Tuareg people,
has been held since 2001.
The gatherings celebrate the
culture of the semi-nomadic
Tuareg people. More than two
million Tuaregs live in the
Sahara Desert area, stretching
across Niger, Mali, Burkina
Faso, Algeria and Tunisia.
Niger?s Air region, with
oases, mountains and sand
dunes, has been a destination
for adventurous Western
tourists since the 1980s and the
visitors have been a ?nancial
boon for the region. But the
tourism has dwindled since the
Tuareg rebellion, which lasted
from 2007 to 2009. AP
Ludivine Laniepce
?We have a lousy wall over here
now, but at least it stops 90, 95 per
cent,? Mr Trump said. ?When we put
up the real wall, we?re going to stop
99 per cent. Maybe more than that.?
Landslide
clear-up
begins
Residents began
clearing up yesterday
after a landslide
triggered by ?oods
severely damaged a
dozen houses in the
Croatian town of
Hrvatska Kostajnica.
Several people
jumped out of
windows to escape, but
no one was badly hurt.
Some homes were
destroyed in minutes.
REUTERS
SRI LANKA
Social media ban imposed after violence to be lifted
Sri Lanka is expected to lift a ban
on social media this week, after it
blocked access last week to prevent
the spread of communal violence.
At least two people were killed
in clashes earlier this month when
Sinhalese Buddhists, angered by a
killing of a driver, attacked mosques
and Muslim-owned properties in
the central town of Kandy, a popular
tourist destination.
Some of the violence was instigated
by postings on Facebook threatening
more attacks on Muslims, according
to the government, which cut access
to Facebook, WhatsApp and Viber on
7 March.
Harin Fernando, the telecoms
minister, said that senior Facebook
company of?cials were expected to
visit Sri Lanka yesterday and the
government was likely to lift the ban
on both Facebook and WhatsApp
access. REUTERS
PAPUA NEW GUINEA
THAILAND
IRAN
Quake death toll
reaches 125
Tycoon charged Pakistan offered
over hunting
port opportunity
An earthquake in Papua New
Guinea last month killed at least
125 people and forced another
35,000 from their homes.
Police said major relief efforts
were still under way in the central
region, where the magnitude 7.5
quake struck on 26 February.
The region is remote and
undeveloped, and assessments
about the scale of the damage
and injuries have been slow to
?lter out. AP
Thai police filed further charges
yesterday against a billionaire construction tycoon accused of hunting endangered animals in a wildlife
sanctuary. The case has sparked public criticism of privileges enjoyed by
the country?s rich elite.
Officers charged Premchai Karnasuta and three others of bribery
and possession of guns and elephant
tusks over their hunting trip in February. The group have denied all
charges. AP
By Shihar Aneez
IN COLOMBO
Postcard
From...
The President described current US
border defences as ?lousy? REUTERS
His visit was greeted with peaceful
protests by demonstrators both
for and against his planned wall.
The trip came amid an escalating
battle between his administration
and the liberal state, which has
refused to help federal agents detain
immigrants in the US illegally.
The President renewed his
criticism of Democratic Governor
Jerry Brown, saying Tuesday that he
was presiding over sky-high tax rates
and that migrant sanctuary policies
?put the entire nation at risk?.
At a Beverly Hills park, a group
of pro-immigration demonstrators
chanted: ?Say it now, say it clear,
immigrants are welcome here.? AP
Iran?s foreign minister has
wrapped up a trip to Pakistan in
which he made a surprise offer
to let Islamabad take part in the
project to develop Iran?s Arabian
Sea port of Chabahar, which is
partly funded by Pakistan?s
arch-rival, India.
But Mohammad Javad Zarif
told Pakistan?s Geo TV that Iran
was open to participation in the
project by Pakistan and China,
which India views as rivals. AP
NEWS
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VOICES
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ITALY
I?ve got
my eye
on you
British bomb from
Second World War
disposed of at sea
An eye drawn by
the British street
artist My Dog
Sighs brightens
up a wall in
the Trastevere
district of
Rome yesterday.
The city will
tomorrow host
its ?rst Free Art
Friday, dedicated
to the global art
movement that
promotes freeto-view urban
art. AFP/GETTY
By Euan Hammond
UNITED STATES
Family ?heartbroken? after dog dies
in overhead locker on United flight
By Alexandra Richards
A family whose puppy died after
being stored in an overhead locker
on a United Airlines flight have
spoken of their heartbreak.
The US airline apologised for
the death of Kokito, a French
bulldog, and said it accepted ?full
responsibility? for the incident.
Devastated owners Catalina and
Brayan Castano said it had been
?non-stop tears? for the family since
their pet?s death on Monday.
Mr Castano told a news website in
Texas that his 11-year-old daughter
was ?heartbroken? and that his
fellow passengers had branded the
cabin crew ?murderers?.
Mrs Castano was ?ying on United
Airlines? ?ight 1284 from Houston to
Kokito, a French bulldog, died when
its pet carrier was placed in a locker
GREECE
Sales of repossessed homes
must end, demand protesters
By Costas Balta
IN ATHENS
Dozens of Greek protesters clashed
with police yesterday as they tried
to storm a notary?s office
to prevent an auction of
repossessed properties
u n d e r t h e co u n t r y ?s
international bailout.
The protesters, led
by the left-wing Popular
Unity party, chanted:
?No home in the hands
of bankers!? as they threw
eggs and rubbish at a line of police
guarding the of?ce?s entrance.
At least one protester was visibly
injured in the scuffles (inset), with
blood around his eye.
31
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
The auctions, a condition of
the bailouts Greece negotiated
with the European Union and the
International Monetary Fund,
have often been disrupted by leftist
activists who say they are
unfair and target the poor.
Notaries, who handle
the auctions, boycotted
them for months over
safety concerns, but
returned to work after the
government said it would
increase security. Online
auctions began in November.
Greek banks are saddled with
more than ?100bn (�.7bn) in bad
loans after years of ?nancial crisis,
mainly due to people?s inability to
repay mortages. REUTERS
New York City with her daughter,
her two-month old baby and Kokito
on Monday night.
The family initially placed the dog,
which was in a standard pet carrier,
beneath the seat in front before a
?ight attendant told them to move it
to the overhead compartment.
?The ?ight attendant demanded
that no, Kokito couldn?t be by
her feet ? that he had to go in the
overhead bin,? said Mr Castano.
He said that the family had ?own
with Kokito before and had never
been asked to store their pet in the
overhead locker.
Maggie Gremminge, a fellow
passenger who witnessed the
episode, wrote on social media: ?At
the end of the flight, the woman
found her dog deceased. She sat
in the aeroplane aisle on the floor
crying, and all of [the] surrounding
passengers were utterly stunned.?
She posted a photo of Mrs Castano
and her children.
United called the incident ?a
tragic accident that should never
have occurred, as pets should never
be placed in the overhead bin?.
A s p o ke s w o m a n , M a g g i e
Schmerin, added the airline was
investigating the incident and the
family had been refunded the cost
of their tickets, including the $125
(�) pet cabin fee.
it is not the first time United
has come under scrutiny for its
treatment of animals. Last year, it
was sued by the owners of a giant
rabbit that died on one of its ?ights.
EVENING STANDARD
A large British bomb from the
Second World War which was
accidentally dug up in an Italian
town has been moved to the sea
for disposal.
About 23,000 people in Fano
were evacuated on Tuesday night
as a precaution while the 227kg
bomb was taken away.
The port and airport were also
closed, with Mayor Massimo
Seri saying the measures were
needed because the removal
operation was ?dangerous?. The
bomb was discovered during
excavation work.
Italian army bomb disposal
experts said yesterday that it
would be detonated at sea after
a 144-hour wait. That is the time
required to see if the device
explodes on its own if its timedelayed trigger was accidentally
activated during the excavation.
The Italian navy took the bomb
to an area in the Adriatic outside
navigation routes.
The accidental unearthing
of Allied bombs happens
occasionally in Italy.
One-minute Wijuko
How to play Place 1 ? 9 once
in the grid, obeying the sums
between pairs of squares
13
15
5
11
9
10
5
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46-52
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
33
SOCIETY
MEXICO
By Euan Hammond
Actor blames
government
for human
rights abuses
Hygge and herrings reign as Nordic
peoples top the ?contented? table
Finns might have be a reputation
for being morose, but in reality they
are the most contented people in the
world, according the latest annual
global happiness table.
The concept of hygge ? a Danish
word for a mood of cosiness and
comfortable conviviality ?as well as
herrings, excellent social welfare
and knitted jumpers seem to work
wonders for the temperament of the
Nordic peoples, who dominate the
top of the table. Norway, Denmark
and Iceland complete the top
four, followed by Switzerland, the
Netherlands, Canada, New Zealand,
Sweden and Australia.
T h e U N ?s S u s t a i n a b l e
Development Solutions Network?s
2018 World Happiness Report ranks
156 countries according to their
scores for things such as GDP per
capita, social support, healthy life
expectancy, social freedom and
absence of corruption.
The UK is stuck at No 19, with
Britons getting slightly sadder
on average, despite the Office
for National Statistics reporting
earlier this year that national life
satisfaction had rise slightly since
the Brexit referendum. Economic
turbulence has, understandably,
frozen generosity and wealth in
Britain?s rating, with very little
change across the board.
Burundi, the Central African
Republic, South Sudan, Tanzania
and Yemen sit lowest in the table
because of volatile mixtures of war,
famine, corruption and poverty.
The report highlights how life
expectancies in the lowest countries
can be less than half of those in
the top 10. Elsewhere in Europe,
France?s mood has increased enough
for it to rise eight places to No 23,
while Germany is at No 15.
The French have enjoyed a big
By Stephanie Nebehay
IN GENEVA
Wish you were here: a
cross-country skier in
the Finnish region of
Lapland EXODUS TRAVELS
boost from an increased generosity
rating ?an area where they have
traditionally scored badly, ranking
lower in the category in last year?s
report than 154th-placed Burundi.
The US is at No 18 on the list,
falling four spots since last year, a
fall that the report?s editors attribute
to a ?worsening public health crisis
involving epidemics of obesity, opioid
addiction, and major depressive
disorder that are all remarkable by
global standards?.
Analyst Professor Jeffrey Sachs,
said: ?We obviously have a social
crisis in the US: more inequality, less
trust, less con?dence in government.
?The US is getting richer and
richer but not getting happier.?
The happiness index Highs and lows
THE TOP FIVE
Finland Residents say childcare,
good schools and free healthcare are
among the best things there.
Norway Its northern regions go
without daylight for months in
winter, but it scores high on health.
Denmark Danes enjoy life so much
they have a word, hygge, for the
feeling of togetherness with friends.
Iceland While happy, Icelanders are
among the world leaders in antidepressant consumption.
Switzerland Their happiness may be
knowing they have enough nuclear
fallout shelters for all.
THE BOTTOM FIVE
Burundi It is among the world?s
poorest nations and still reeling
from a 12-year civil war.
Central African Republic Despite
vast amounts of gold and diamonds,
it suffers from political corruption.
South Sudan It is still in the grip of a
?ve-year civil war in which at least
300,000 people have been killed.
Tanzania Despite tourism to
Kilimanjaro, Africa?s largest peak, it is
one of the world?s poorest countries.
Yemen A horri?c civil war and
famine make it one of the least
happy nations on the planet.
Crimes against humanity have been
committed in Mexico ?in the name
of security?, the actor Gael Garc韆
Bernal has told the United Nations
Human Rights Council.
Activists and UN investigators
have accused Mexican security forces
of murder, torture and involvement
in disappearances since the military
was sent to fight its powerful drug
cartels in 2007.
More than 100,000 have been
killed in drug-related violence in
the decade since, including 25,000
murders last year. Tens of thousands
have gone missing or been
foprmally classed
as ?disappeared?,
many abducted by
security forces,
activists say.
?The numbers
are growing; the
pain of families
is also growing,?
Garcia Bernal (inset),
the star of ?lms such as
The Motorcycle Diaries and Y
Tu Mama Tambien, said yesterday in
a speech to the Geneva-based forum.
Mexico is one of its 47 member states.
?As a result of the war against
narco-trafficking, the most serious
violations of human rights have been
committed, including crimes against
humanity, in the name of security,? he
added, saying that the international
community could not allow the
situation to continue.
Mexico?s government has said
it is committed to investigating
and punishing cases of human
rights abuses. It denies high-level
involvement in some of the more
egregious cases, such as 43 students
who went missing in 2014. REUTERS
SYRIA
UGANDA
PHILIPPINES
Al-Qaeda in retreat, but far
from a beaten force in Idlib
Men need to
discipline their
wives, claims MP
Duterte quits criminal
court over ?UN attacks?
By Elias Biryabarema
By Karen Lema
IN KAMPALA
IN MANILA
A male Ugandan MP has provoked
outrage among rights activists by
exhorting men to beat their wives
in order to discipline them, in
comments carried by a Ugandan
television channel.
Onesmus Twinamasiko?s
remarks followed a speech by
President Yoweri Museveni
on Women?s Day on 8 March
in which he condemned assaults
on women by husbands, referring
to them as cowardly.
?As a man, you need to
discipline your wife,? the MP told
the local station NTV Uganda in
an interview. REUTERS
The Philippines is to withdraw from
the International Criminal Court
because of what President Rodrigo
Duterte called ?outrageous? attacks
by UN of?cials and violations of due
process by the authority.
The decision marks a stunning
about-turn by Mr Duterte, who has
repeatedly dared the ICC to indict
him and said he was willing to ?rot
in jail? or go on trial to defend a war
on drugs that has killed thousands
of his own people.
The mercurial former mayor
had initially welcomed last month?s
announcement by the ICC of its
preliminary examination into a
By Bassem Mroue
IN BEIRUT
For the ?rst time since its meteoric
rise in 2012, al-Qaeda?s branch in
Syria is in retreat, battling rival
militant groups in the north
and fighting for survival
in a key foothold near the
capital, Damascus.
Over the past three
weeks, the extremist
group has been driven
from nearly all of Aleppo
province, losing dozens of
fighters in battles there and in
nearby Idlib province.
The fighting poses a major
challenge to the group, already
beset by infighting and a string
of assassinations that have taken
out some of its top leaders. Unlike
previous battles in which al-Qaedalinked fighters were able to crush
their opponents, the ?ghting has been
?erce, with the militants (inset)
losing dozens of villages.
The al- Qaeda-linked
coalition known as the
Levant Liberation
Committee is still one of
Syria?s most powerful
armed groups.
While the US-led
coalition and Syrian troops
have focused on driving Isis from
the country?s east, the al-Qaedalinked group has consolidated its
control over Idlib, where it remains
the strongest force. AP
complaint filed by a lawyer in the
Philippines accusing Mr Duterte
and senior officials of crimes
against humanity.
But in a 15-page statement,
issued on Tuesday, Mr Duterte
said he was withdrawing from the
ICC?s founding treaty, the Rome
Statute, because of ?baseless,
unprecedented and outrageous
attacks? by UN officials, as well
as actions by the ICC that he said
failed to follow due process and
presumption of innocence.
Mr Duterte?s chief critics said
the move was a U-turn that showed
the tough-talking leader was now in
panic mode. Amnesty International
called the withdrawal ?misguided?
and ?cowardly?. REUTERS
Television Thursday 15 March
CRITIC?S
CHOICE
GERARD GILBERT
PICK OF THE DAY
===
9pm, ITV
Between 22 March and 3 June last
year, Britain was hit by four terrorist
attacks: on Westminster Bridge
and at Borough Market in London;
at the Ariana Grande concert in
Manchester; and a car attack outside
Finsbury Park Mosque in north
London ? a revenge attack against
Muslims by a man in?uenced by
far-right propaganda. This
documentary from the makers of
Damilola: Our Loved Boy hears from
those caught up in the atrocities
and from the emergency services.
?I don?t remember hearing any bang,?
recalls one of those injured in
Manchester. ?Suddenly I was on the
?oor and couldn?t see properly?
I felt like I wanted to sleep.?
9pm, BBC1
Another cheerfully creaky farce from
Lee Mack and team as Lucy (Sally
Bretton) arranges a surprise
birthday treat for Lee ? a Crystal
Maze-style ?escape room? in which
customers decipher clues in order to
break free. ?It?s the worst lock-in
ever,? decides a thirsty Frank (Bobby
Ball), as he and Lucy?s parents, along
with Toby and Wendy (Hugh Dennis
and Abigail Cruttenden), suspect that
something more sinister is afoot.
Four Days That Shook Britain
Not Going Out
===
Civilisations
9pm, BBC2
Simon Schama is back, with a
characteristically impassioned
history of landscape art that ranges
from the Song dynasty in China and
Pieter Bruegel?s wintry scenes of
16th-century Flanders to ?the wellordered Arcadia? of Renaissance
Italy and Ansel Adams?s crisp
black-and-white photographs of
Yosemite National Park. Landscapes,
opines Schama, are ?rarely a
depiction of the way the world is but
as we would like it to be?.
===
My Baby?s Life: Who Decides?
9pm, Channel 4
Can it ever be right to let a baby die?
That?s the knotty dilemma at the
heart of this two-part documentary
following doctors at Southampton
Hospital, starting with the case of
young Mimi who has a heart defect
that is potentially ?xable. The
problem for Mimi?s parents and the
6.00 The Repair Shop (R)
(S). 6.30 Holding Back
The Years (R) (S). 7.15 The
Sheriffs Are Coming (R)
(S). 8.00 Sign Zone: Earth?s
Natural Wonders (R) (S).
9.00 Victoria Derbyshire
(S). 11.00 BBC Newsroom
Live (S). 12.00 Daily
Politics (S). 1.00 Two
Tribes (R) (S). 1.30 Yes Chef
(R) (S). 2.15 Your Home In
Their Hands (R) (S). 3.15
Planet Earth (R) (S). 4.15
Into The Wild With Gordon
Buchanan (R) (S). 5.15 Put
Your Money Where Your
Mouth Is (S).
6.00 Good Morning
Britain (S). 8.30 Lorraine
(S). 9.25 The Jeremy
Kyle Show (S). 10.30
This Morning (S). 12.30
ITV News; Weather
(S). 12.55 ITV Regional
News; Weather (S). 1.00
ITV Racing: Cheltenham
Festival Coverage of the
third day (S). 4.30 Britain?s
Best Walks With Julia
Bradbury (R) (S). 5.00 The
Chase (S).
6.15 3rd Rock From The
Sun (R) (S). 7.05 Everybody
Loves Raymond (R) (S).
7.30 Everybody Loves
Raymond (R) (S). 8.00
Winter Paralympics
Breakfast (S). 9.00 Frasier
(R) (S). 9.35 Frasier (R) (S).
10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (R) (S).
11.00 Undercover Boss
USA (R) (S). 12.00 Channel
4 News Summary (S).
12.05 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 1.05 Posh
Pawnbrokers (R) (S). 2.10
Countdown (S). 3.00 A
Place In The Sun: Home Or
Away (R) (S). 4.00 A New
Life In The Sun (S). 5.00
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 5.30
Extreme Cake Makers
(R) (S).
6.00 Milkshake! 9.15
The Wright Stuff 11.15
Can?t Pay? We?ll Take It
Away (R) (S). 12.10 5 News
Lunchtime (S). 12.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors (R)
(S). 1.10 Access (S). 1.15
Home And Away (S). 1.45
Neighbours (S). 2.20
NCIS: Naval Killer
(R) (S). 3.15 FILM:
Fatal Defense (John
Murlowski 2017)
Thriller, starring
Ashley Scott and
David Cade (S). 5.00
5 News At 5 (S). 5.30
Neighbours (R) (S).
6.00 BBC News At
Six; Weather (S).
6.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.00 Eggheads (R) (S).
6.30 The Repair Shop
A music box
damaged during
the Blitz (S).
6.00 ITV Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.30 ITV News;
Weather (S).
6.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.30 Hollyoaks
Nancy
confronts
Darren about
their problems.
6.00 Home And Away
Maggie is sent
to have a biopsy
(R) (S).
6.30 5 News Tonight
(S).
7.00 The One Show
With Matt
Baker and
Angellica Bell
(S).
7.30 EastEnders (S).
7.00 Saving Lives
At Sea The
Mumbles crew
are called in to
save a climber
in trouble (R) (S).
7.00 Emmerdale (S).
7.30 Undercover:
Rough Sleeper ?
Tonight (S).
7.00 Channel 4 News
(S).
7.30 Winter
Paralympics
Today A roundup of action
from day six (S).
8.00 MasterChef
Seven more
amateur cooks
are put to the
test (S).
8.00 Great
Continental
Railway
Journeys (S).
8.00 Emmerdale
Debbie ?nds
herself backed
into a corner (S).
8.30 The Cruise:
Voyage To
Alaska (S).
9pm
9.00 Not Going Out
Lucy arranges a
special surprise
for Lee?s
birthday (S).
9.30 Still Game (S).
9.00 Civilisations
Simon Schama
explores the
depiction of
nature in art (S).
10pm
10.00BBC News At
Ten (S).
10.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
10.45 Question Time
(S).
Daytime
6.00 Breakfast (S). 9.15
Holding Back The Years
(S). 10.00 Homes Under
The Hammer (S). 11.00 The
Sheriffs Are Coming (S).
11.45 Caught Red Handed
(R) (S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt
(R) (S). 1.00 BBC News At
One; Weather (S). 1.30 BBC
Regional News; Weather
(S). 1.45 Doctors (S). 2.15
A Place To Call Home
(S). 3.05 Escape To The
Country (S). 3.45 Coast
And Country Auctions (S).
4.30 Flog It! (R) (S). 5.15
Pointless (R) (S).
6pm
7pm
8pm
11pm
Late
hospital?s ethics committee is that
before she can have surgery, she will
have to spend years on life support.
===
The Good Fight
9pm, More4
Return of The Good Wife spin-off
starring the terri?c Christine
Baranski as Diane Lockhart, a white
lawyer in a predominantly black
Chicago law ?rm. The opening
episode takes place almost entirely
during the funeral of former partner
Carl Reddick (Lou Gossett Jnr).
===
The Ruth Ellis Files: A
Very British Crime Story
9pm, BBC4
The ?nal part of ?lm-maker Gillian
Pachter?s forensic (far more forensic
A forensic look at the
crimes of Ruth Ellis
9pm, BBC4
Christine Baranski is
back as Diane in ?The
Good Fight?, tonight
attending a funeral
9pm, More4
Simon Schama hosts
another ?Civilisations?
9pm, BBC2
7.00 The Secret
Life Of Kittens
Following cats
from birth to
12 months old.
Last in the
series (R) (S).
7.00 Beyond 100
Days News and
analysis from
Washington DC
and London (S).
7.30 Top Of The Pops:
1985 (R) (S).
6.35 FILM: We
Bought A Zoo
(Cameron
Crowe 2011)
Comedy drama,
starring Matt
Damon (S).
8.00 Location,
Location,
Location New
series (S).
8.00 Bargain-Loving
Brits In The Sun
Cabaret star
Mark ?lms a
video to play as
part of his show
(S).
8.00 The Brain: A
Secret History
The work of
researchers
studying
abnormal brain
activity (R) (S).
9.00 Four Days That
Shook Britain
The stories of
people affected
by last year?s
terror attacks in
Britain (S).
9.00 My Baby?s Life:
Who Decides?
Two-part
documentary
about children
on life support
(S).
9.00 Do The Right
Thing With
Eamonn & Ruth
(S).
9.00 The Ruth Ellis
Files: A Very
British Crime
Story Last in
the series (S).
10.00MOTD: The
Premier League
Show Magazine
programme
featuring news
and highlights.
10.30 Newsnight (S).
10.30 ITV News At
Ten; Weather
(S).
10.00The Job
Interview Aston
Martin recruits
a group leader
(S).
10.00Hunted And
Confronted:
Cowboys,
Crooks And
Chancers (S).
10.00Timeshift:
Crime &
Punishment
? The Story
Of Corporal
Punishment (R)
(S).
11.45 This Week The
past seven days
in politics (S).
11.15 Top Gear
Second-hand
sports cars are
put to the test
during a road
trip across
Japan (R) (S).
11.00 ITV Regional
News (S).
11.15 The Late Debate
(S).
11.45 Uefa Europa
League
Highlights (S).
11.00 Winter
Paralympics
Highlights The
best of the
action from
day six in
PyeongChang.
11.05 Police
Interceptors
Liam and his
dog Vader bring
down a ?eeing
suspect (R) (S).
12.35 BBC News (S).
12.15 Sign Zone:
MasterChef (R) (S). 12.45
Sign Zone: Nigel Slater?s
Middle East (R) (S). 1.45
This Is BBC Two (S).
12.45 Lethal Weapon
(R) (S). 1.30 Jackpot247
3.00 Undercover: Rough
Sleeper ? Tonight (R) (S).
3.25 ITV Nightscreen 5.05
The Jeremy Kyle Show
(R) (S).
12.20 Winter Paralympics
Live (S).
12.00 SuperCasino 3.10
Cowboy Builders (R)
(S). 4.00 World?s Most
Pampered Pets (R) (S). 4.45
House Doctor (R) (S). 5.10
House Busters (R) (S). 5.35
Wildlife SOS (R) (S).
6.00 The Planet?s Funniest
Animals (R) (S). 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 6.45
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 7.10
Who?s Doing The Dishes?
(R) (S). 7.55 Emmerdale (R)
(S). 8.20 Coronation Street
(R) (S). 8.55 Coronation
Street (R) (S). 9.25 The
Ellen DeGeneres Show
(R) (S). 10.15 The Bachelor
(R) (S). 12.05 Emmerdale
(R) (S). 12.35 Coronation
Street (R) (S). 1.05
Coronation Street (R) (S).
1.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show
(R) (S). 2.35 The Jeremy
Kyle Show (R) (S). 3.40 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (R) (S).
4.50 Judge Rinder (R) (S).
5.50 Take Me Out (R) (S).
7.00 You?ve Been
Framed! Gold
(R) (S).
7.30 You?ve Been
Framed! Gold
(R) (S).
8.00 Two And A Half
Men Kandi tries
to get back with
Alan (R) (S).
8.30 Two And A Half
Men (R) (S).
9.00 FILM: RoboCop
(Jose Padilha
2014) Sci-?
thriller remake,
starring Joel
Kinnaman (S).
9.00 FILM: The
Hangover Part
III (Todd Phillips
2013) Comedy
sequel, starring
Bradley Cooper
(S).
11.00 Blues America
Concluding
part, looking
at blues music
in the postwar
period (R) (S).
11.15 FILM: I,
Frankenstein
(Stuart Beattie
2014) Fantasy
adventure,
starring Aaron
Eckhart (S).
11.05 Family Guy Part
one of three.
Stewie tries to
be nice to the
family (R) (S).
11.35 Family Guy (R)
(S).
12.00 Top Of The Pops:
1985 (R) (S). 12.30 Tom
Jones At The BBC (R) (S).
1.30 The World?s Most
Photographed (R) (S). 2.00
The High Art Of The Low
Countries (R) (S).
1.00 FILM: The Fly (David
Cronenberg 1986) Horror
remake, starring Jeff
Goldblum (S). 3.00 Close
12.05 Family Guy (R) (S).
12.30 American Dad! (R)
(S). 1.00 American Dad! (R)
(S). 1.30 Two And A Half
Men (R) (S). 1.55 Two And
A Half Men (R) (S). 2.20
Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2
Nightscreen
NEWS
2-33
than anything allowed the real
Ruth Ellis) re-examination of the
notorious case focuses on the three
weeks leading up to Ellis?s execution
in 1955, and the last-minute
attempts to save her life even though
she herself was determined to die.
Ellis ?nally admitted she had an
accomplice, prompting a vain race
to stop the execution.
FILM
CHOICE
LAURENCE PHELAN
===
Still Game
9.30pm, BBC1
The Grim Reaper visits Craiglang as
Boabby (Gavin Mitchell) is persuaded
to have a lock-in at The Clansman to
mark the passing of the respected
undertaker. The funeral director?s
replacement is a creepy cove in a
top hat who gives the Glaswegian
codgers the collective willies.
VOICES
20-24
TV
34-35
IQ
36-38
FILM OF THE DAY
===
12.05am, Sky Cinema Select
(Sidney Lumet, 1975)
This seminal siege drama helped set
the anti-establishment tone of 1970s
American cinema, was one of the
?rst Hollywood ?lms to comment on
the unhealthy relationship between
criminals and news media, and one of
the ?rst with a bisexual protagonist
whose sexuality isn?t pathologised.
Al Pacino (left) is simply brilliant as
Sonny Wortzik: a tightly wound but
endearing amateur who we discover
is attempting his ?rst bank robbery
out of love rather than greed; and
who becomes a kind of folk hero for a
day when his plans go awry and the
Brooklyn bank is surrounded by cops,
news media, and passers-by enjoying
the spiralling human drama.
2.30pm, Film4
(Sidney Lumet 1957)
An ingenious, taut and compelling
single-room drama that reaf?rms
one?s faith in the civil legal system ?
though all it really shows is a jury can
be swayed if one of its members is as
charismatic as Henry Fonda.
Dog Day Afternoon
12 Angry Men
===
Desk Set
7.45pm, Talking Pictures
(Walter Lang, 1957)
In the last of their battle-of-the-sexes
comedies, Katharine Hepburn plays a
brainbox TV researcher and Spencer
Tracy plays a new ef?ciency expert
at her station. Enjoyable 1950s ?uff
by husband-and-wife writers Phoebe
and Henry Ephron.
Radio
BBC Radio 1
6.00 Classic Coronation
Street (R) (S). 6.25 Classic
Coronation Street (R)
(S). 6.55 Heartbeat (R) (S).
7.55 The Royal (R) (S). 8.55
Judge Judy (R) (S). 9.25
Judge Judy (R) (S). 9.50
Judge Judy (R) (S). 10.20
Inspector Morse (R) (S).
12.35 The Royal (R) (S).
1.35 Heartbeat (R) (S).
2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (R) (S). 3.15 Classic
Coronation Street (R) (S).
3.50 On The Buses (R) (S).
4.20 On The Buses (R) (S).
4.55 You?re Only Young
Twice (R) (S). 5.25 Rising
Damp (R) (S).
6.00 Hollyoaks (R) (S). 7.00
Couples Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 8.00 Baby Daddy
(R) (S). 9.00 Melissa & Joey
(R) (S). 10.00 How I Met
Your Mother (R) (S). 10.30
How I Met Your Mother
(R) (S). 11.00 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (R) (S). 11.30
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (R)
(S). 12.00 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 12.30 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 1.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S). 1.30 The Big
Bang Theory (R) (S). 2.00
How I Met Your Mother (R)
(S). 2.30 How I Met Your
Mother (R) (S). 3.00 New
Girl (R) (S). 3.30 New Girl
(R) (S). 4.00 Brooklyn NineNine (R) (S). 4.30 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (R) (S). 5.00 The
Goldbergs (R) (S).
8.55 Food Unwrapped (R)
(S). 9.30 A Place In The
Sun: Winter Sun (R) (S).
10.30 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (R) (S). 11.35
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 12.05
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 12.35
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 1.05
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 1.40
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 2.10
Come Dine With Me (R)
(S). 2.40 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 3.15 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 3.50 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 4.20
Come Dine With Me (R) (S).
4.50 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (R) (S). 5.55 A
Place In The Sun: Winter
Sun (R) (S).
6.00 The Big Bang
Theory Penny
gets drunk
and seduces
Leonard (R) (S).
6.30 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.55 The Supervet
Noel Fitzpatrick
treats a border
collie for a
suspicious lump
on its ankle (R)
(S).
6.00 Futurama Earth
is invaded by
aliens (R) (S).
6.30 The Simpsons
With the voice
of Lisa Kudrow
(R) (S).
6.00 House The
doctor helps
an artist with
distorted vision
(R) (S).
7.00 Murder, She
Wrote A
famous concert
pianist?s wife is
murdered (R) (S).
7.00 Hollyoaks (S).
7.30 My Hotter Half
A self-styled
Barbie takes on
her real-life Ken
to see who is
more dateable.
7.55 Grand Designs
Revisiting a
couple who
bought a peel
tower in the
Yorkshire Dales
(R) (S).
7.00 The Simpsons
Homer becomes
an inventor (R)
(S).
7.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
7.00 CSI: Crime
Scene
Investigation
A rape case
disturbs Sara (R)
(S).
8.00 Vera A
teenager?s body
is found in a
reservoir (R) (S).
8.00 The Big Bang
Theory (S).
8.30 Young Sheldon
The youngster
fears solid food
after choking on
a sausage (S).
8.00 Arrow A
disagreement
between Oliver
and Dinah puts
one of the team
in jeopardy.
8.00 Blue Bloods
An incident
at a church
tests Frank?s
diplomatic skills
(R) (S).
6.00 Heartbeat A
road accident
causes chaos (R)
(S).
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
46-52
6.00 Monkey Life (R). 6.30
Monkey Life (R). 7.00
RSPCA Animal Rescue (R)
(S). 7.30 RSPCA Animal
Rescue (R) (S). 8.00
Motorway Patrol (R). 8.30
Motorway Patrol (R). 9.00
Road Wars (R) (S). 10.00
Warehouse 13 (R) (S). 11.00
Forever (R) (S). 12.00 NCIS:
Los Angeles (R) (S). 1.00
Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S). 2.00
Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S). 3.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (R) (S).
4.00 Stargate SG-1 (R) (S).
5.00 The Simpsons (R) (S).
5.30 Futurama (R) (S).
6.00 Urban Secrets (R) (S).
7.00 Urban Secrets (R) (S).
8.00 Richard E Grant?s
Hotel Secrets (R) (S). 9.00
The West Wing (R) (S).
10.00 The West Wing (R)
(S). 11.00 House (R) (S).
12.00 House (R) (S). 1.00
Without A Trace (R) (S).
2.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
3.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
4.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
5.00 House (R) (S).
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast
Show With Nick Grimshaw
10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00
Greg James 5.45 Newsbeat
6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th With Charlie
Sloth 11.00 BBC Radio 1?s
Residency ? Artwork 12mdn?t
BBC Radio 1?s Residency ?
Tokimonsta 1.00 Toddla T 3.00
BBC Radio 1?s Residency ? TQD
4.00 Early Breakfast With
Jordan North
BBC Radio 1Xtra
6am Dotty 10.00 Reece
Parkinson 12.45pm Newsbeat
1.00 Yasmin Evans 4.00
MistaJam 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
MistaJam 7.00 Toddla T 9.02
The 8th With Charlie Sloth
11.00 Seani B 1am Toddla
T 3.00 1Xtra Playlists 4.00
Seani B
9.00 Brooklyn NineNine Jake must
pass an of?cial
evaluation (S).
9.30 Brooklyn NineNine (S).
9.00 The Good Fight
New series. An
unfortunate
event brings
the law ?rm
together (S).
9.00 Carpool
Karaoke Special
With Katy Perry
and Jennifer
Lopez (R) (S).
9.00 Britannia Rome
truly shows
the island of
Britannia how
it conducts its
business. Last in
the series.
10.00 Unforgotten
A body in a
suitcase unites
Cassie and
Sunny in another
cold case
investigation (R).
10.00Five Star Hotel
Lydia hosts a
raucous hen
party (S).
10.00999: What?s
Your
Emergency?
(R) (S).
10.00Jamestown
Rumours
circulate that
Samuel has
risen from his
grave (R) (S).
10.00Our Cartoon
President
10.35 Last Week
Tonight With
John Oliver (R).
11.00 Unforgotten
Cassie and
Sunny begin to
build a picture
of their murder
victim (R) (S).
11.05 The Big Bang
Theory Leonard
meets up with
the woman he
kissed (R) (S).
11.35 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
11.05 24 Hours In
A&E A man is
rushed in with
severe knife
wounds (R) (S).
12.05 DCI Banks (R) (S).
1.05 DCI Banks (R) (S). 2.00
ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30
Teleshopping
12.00 First Dates (R) (S).
1.05 Five Star Hotel (R) (S).
2.10 Tattoo Fixers (R) (S).
3.00 Timeless (R) (S). 3.45
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (R)
(S). 4.30 How I Met Your
Mother (R) (S). 4.50 How I
Met Your Mother (R) (S).
12.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (R) (S).
1.05 The Good Fight (R)
(S). 2.05 999: What?s Your
Emergency? (R) (S). 3.10 8
Out Of 10 Cats Uncut (R)
(S). 3.55 Close
11.00 The Force: Essex
Of?cers deal
with a woman
threatening to
kill herself (R)
(S).
11.10 Divorce Frances
?nds herself
inspired by an
unknown artist
(R).
11.45 Britannia (R).
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme
World (R) (S). 1.00 Brit
Cops: Rapid Response (R)
(S). 2.00 Most Shocking (R)
(S). 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(R) (S). 4.00 It?s Me Or The
Dog (R) (S). 5.00 Futurama
(R) (S).
12.45 Billions (R) (S). 1.55
Blue Bloods (R) (S). 2.55
Girls (R) (S). 3.30 Girls (R)
(S). 4.05 The West Wing (R)
(S). 5.00 The West Wing
(R) (S).
BBC Radio 2
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken
Bruce 12noon Jeremy Vine
2.00 Steve Wright In The
Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo
7.00 Bob Harris Country 8.00
Jo Whiley 10.00 The Radio 2
Arts Show With Anneka Rice
12mdn?t The Craig Charles
House Party 2.00 Radio 2?s
Tracks Of My Years Playlist
3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Have A
Great Weekend 4.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Feelgood Friday 5.00
Vanessa Feltz
BBC Radio 3
6.30am Breakfast. Presented
by Petroc Trelawny. 9.00
Essential Classics. 12noon
Composer Of The Week:
Haydn. 1.00 News 1.02 Radio
3 Lunchtime Concert. 2.00
Afternoon Concert. 5.00 In
Tune. Music and arts news.
7.00 In Tune Mixtape. 7.30
Radio 3 In Concert. The Hall�
and Mark Elder perform
Bach, Mendelssohn and
Shostakovich, live from
Manchester. 10.00 Free
Thinking Festival. The impact
of social media on the way
people behave. 10.45 The Essay:
New Generation Thinkers.
Eleanor Lybeck re?ects on the
women campaigners satirised
by Gilbert and Sullivan.
11.00 Late Junction. 12.30am
Through The Night.
ONDEMAND
The Truth About
Having A Baby
BBC iPlayer
Annie Price gives a frank
guide to motherhood.
Ricky Gervais: Humanity
Net?ix
The Of?ce creator?s most
self-revealing stand-up
performance to date.
Electric Dreams:
Safe And Sound
All4
Annalise Basso impresses in
this latest Philip K Dick fable.
Thing. 7.00 The Archers. Jim
is caught in the middle. 7.15
Front Row. Arts programme,
presented by John Wilson. 7.45
A Small Town Murder. By Scott
Cherry. 8.00 Law In Action.
8.30 The Bottom Line. 9.00
BBC Inside Science. 9.30 In Our
Time. 10.00 The World Tonight.
With Razia Iqbal. 10.45 Book At
Bedtime: The Long Drop. 11.00
It?s Jocelyn. 11.30 Today In
Parliament. 12mdn?t News And
Weather 12.30 An Alternative
History Of Art 12.48 Shipping
Forecast 1.00 As BBC World
Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast
5.30 News Brie?ng 5.43 Prayer
For The Day 5.45 Farming
Today 5.58 Tweet Of The Day
BBC Radio 4 LW
8.31am Yesterday In
Parliament 9.45 Daily Service
12.01pm Shipping Forecast
5.54 Shipping Forecast
BBC Radio 4 Extra
6am Sherlock Holmes With
Carleton Hobbs 6.30 In Search
Of Originality 7.00 Double
Income, No Kids Yet 7.30 The
Hitchhiker?s Guide To The
Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase 8.00
Marriage Lines 8.30 The Goon
Show 9.00 It?s Your Round
9.30 The Inimitable Jeeves
10.00 The Raj Quartet 11.00
Five Stories By Penelope
Fitzgerald 11.15 Behind Closed
Doors 12noon Marriage
Lines 12.30 The Goon Show
1.00 Sherlock Holmes With
Carleton Hobbs 1.30 In Search
Of Originality 2.00 A Delicate
Truth 2.15 Grimm Thoughts
2.30 The Old Curiosity Shop
2.45 Perilous Question ? The
Drama Of The Great Reform
Bill 1832 3.00 The Raj Quartet
4.00 It?s Your Round 4.30 The
Inimitable Jeeves 5.00 Double
Income, No Kids Yet 5.30 The
Hitchhiker?s Guide To The
Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase 6.00
Pattern Recognition 6.30 Great
Lives 7.00 Marriage Lines 7.30
The Goon Show 8.00 Sherlock
Holmes With Carleton Hobbs
8.30 In Search Of Originality
9.00 Five Stories By Penelope
Fitzgerald 9.15 Behind Closed
Doors 10.00 Comedy Club:
Pick
ofthe
day
BBC Radio 4
6am Today 9.00 In Our Time
9.45 An Alternative History Of
Art 10.00 Woman?s Hour 11.00
From Our Own Correspondent
11.30 The Art Of Now:
Dangerous Places 12noon
News 12.04 Home Front 12.15
You And Yours 12.57 Weather
1.00 The World At One 1.45
Horse Story 2.00 The Archers
2.15 Drama: School Drama
3.00 Ramblings 3.27 Radio 4
Appeal 3.30 Open Book 4.00
The Film Programme 4.30 BBC
Inside Science 5.00 PM 5.57
Weather 6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 The Hitchhiker?s Guide To
The Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase.
Dirk Maggs? adaptation of Eoin
Colfer?s novel And Another
35
The Hitchhiker?s Guide To
The Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase
10.30 Comedy Club: Newsjack
11.00 Comedy Club: Masala
FM 11.30 Comedy Club: The
Hudson And Pepperdine Show
12mdn?t Pattern Recognition
12.30 Great Lives 1.00 Sherlock
Holmes With Carleton Hobbs
1.30 In Search Of Originality
2.00 A Delicate Truth 2.15
Grimm Thoughts 2.30 The Old
Curiosity Shop 2.45 Perilous
Question ? The Drama Of The
Great Reform Bill 1832 3.00
The Raj Quartet 4.00 It?s Your
Round 4.30 The Inimitable
Jeeves 5.00 Double Income, No
Kids Yet 5.30 The Hitchhiker?s
Guide To The Galaxy:
Hexagonal Phase
BBC 5 Live
6am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00
The Emma Barnett Show
With Chloe Tilley 1pm The
Cheltenham Festival 4.00 5
Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport
7.30 5 Live Sport: 5 Live
Rugby 8.30 5 Live Sport 9.30
At Home With Colin Murray
10.00 Question Time Extra
Time 1am Up All Night 5.00
Morning Reports 5.15 Wake Up
To Money
BBC 6 Music
7am Shaun Keaveny 10.00
Lauren Laverne 1pm Mark
Radcliffe And Stuart Maconie
4.00 Tom Ravenscroft 6.00
Tom Ravenscroft?s Roundtable
7.00 Vic Galloway 9.00
Gideon Coe 12mdn?t 6 Music
Recommends With Steve
Lamacq 1.00 The Radiohead
Story 2.00 Higher And Higher
? The Life And Soul Of Jackie
Wilson 2.30 6 Music Live Hour
3.30 6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00
Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
6am More Music Breakfast
9.00 John Suchet 1pm Aled
Jones 5.00 Classic FM Drive
7.00 Smooth Classics At Seven
8.00 The Full Works Concert.
Catherine Bott celebrates
the music of the Royal
Concertgebouw Orchestra.
10.00 Smooth Classics 1am
Jane Jones
Absolute Radio
6am Christian O?Connell?s
Breakfast Show 10.00 Leona
Graham 1pm Andy Bush 4.00
Dave Berry 7.00 Danielle Perry
10.00 Pete Donaldson 1am
Chris Martin
Heart
Late Junction
11pm, BBC Radio 3
Nick Luscombe
presents an
eclectic selection
of musical styles
and cultures,
including this
week a mixtape
by Japanese
Shibuya-kei artist
and producer
Cornelius (above).
6am Jamie And Emma
9.00 Toby Anstis 1pm Matt
Wilkinson 4.00 JK And Lucy
7.00 Sian Welby 10.00 Kat
Shoob 1am Simon Beale 4.00
Jenni Falconer
TalkSPORT
6am The Alan Brazil Sports
Breakfast With Ally McCoist
10.00 Jim White, Ray Parlour
And Bob Mills 1pm Hawksbee
And Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham And Darren Gough
7.00 (Except Scotland) Kick-off
7.00 (Scotland) The Scottish
Football Show 10.00 Sports
Bar 1am Extra Time With
Adam Catterall
Arts
If you?re
staying
in...
BOOKS
Why I?m No
Longer Talking
to White People
About Race
BY RENI EDDO-LODGE
In 2014, EddoLodge wrote a
blog post. The
?rst line was:
?I?m no longer
engaging with
white people
on the topic of
race.? Lots of white people
don?t listen, she said. In this
book, she follows up the
post, showing us the history
and depth of racism, from
slavery to the present day.
DVD/BLU-RAY
A Bad Moms
Christmas
CERTIFICATE 15, 100 MINS
An unseasonal
release for
this raucous
comedy about
a group of
mothers
trying and
failing to host
the perfect Christmas.
Mila Kunis, Kathryn Hahn
and Kristen Bell star.
I demand
to be heard
In her last interview for i ,
Bernadette McNulty talked to
Tracey Thorn about writing
?feminist bangers?, stage fright
and the joy of the menopause
I
find Tracey Thorn at
her record company
office dunking chocolate
digestives into a mug of
tea. She is dressed in black
leather mini skirt, Lurex
jumper and bright trainers. At 55,
with her inky, serrated bob falling
over her eyes, she looks exactly as
she might have looked at any point
in the near four decades she has
been in the public eye.
She instantly offers me a
biscuit, which I can?t eat until
the end of the interview due
to nerves. I apologise for once
calling her Miss Marple in a
review of her 2015 book, Naked at
the Albert Hall. I meant it as the
highest compliment, praise for
the way she wrote about singing
with warmth and kindness
and yet with a forensic eye and
economical turn of phrase. Days
after the review was published,
I saw someone complaining to
Thorn on Twitter that I had
insulted her.
? O h n o, I t a ke i t a s a
compliment,? she says, laughing.
She jokingly describes her
new album, Record, as ?nine
feminist bangers?. While there
are some brilliant dancefloor
?llers on it, that underplays both
the musical and thematic nuance
she has woven into her best
solo record yet. The pairing of
Thorn?s sonorous, yearning voice
with producer Ewan Pearson?s
glittering, aerated synths is
reminiscent of her former band
Everything but the Girl?s classic
Nineties album, Walking Wounded.
This upbeat tone was, strangely
enough, inspired by the political
despair she felt in the aftermath
of Donald Trump?s election. ?I just
got into a mood that this would be
a good time to make a record, as
a response to the political misery
everywhere. I could feel I was
getting sucked in to that.
?So I thought what can I do? I?m
not an activist, I make records.
So that is what I did, partly to
make myself feel better but also to
contribute something positive to
the world.?
After attending the Women?s
March, she was so galvanised,
she returned to the studio and
wrote ?Sister?, a hypnotic, dubby,
nine-minute rallying call to
women?s collective power in the
face of bullying men, on which
she enlisted two members of
Warpaint and Corinne Bailey Rae.
?I wanted to write something
that was quite angry but also
positive. It?s important to express
mixed feelings, you can?t always
write things that are de?ant.?
A sense of female solidarity
and the desire not to adhere to
gender norms is a theme that
runs throughout Thorn?s work,
from the indie group The Marine
Girls, who had already signed a
record deal when Thorn started
at Hull University in 1982, to
her beautiful collaboration with
Massive Attack, ?Protection?,
where the lyrics ?ip from ?I?m a
girl and you?re a boy? to ?You?re a
girl and I?m a boy?.
?Punk and post-punk were all
quite political, feminism was in
the air. Even Bananarama were
wearing dungarees. There was
a normality to being a feminist
and you could be fun and cute
but not have to be overly sexual. I
have watched that change. I have
seen in music that the pressure
on women to be overtly sexual is
ever stronger.?
Tracey Thorn (right); with her
partner Ben Watt in the 90s
(above) EDWARD BISHOP
The first track on Record,
?Queen?, tries to imagine an
alternative life to the one in
which Thorn met Ben Watt, her
future husband and collaborator
in Everything but the Girl, in her
?rst year at university.
?It?s me looking back over my
career and thinking what would it
have been like if I hadn?t met Ben.
I honestly think I would have been
a librarian. While I was already
a working musician, he was the
ambitious one, determined to
make it in the music business. I
never loved being on tour. I found
it all quite hard.?
While they received massive
acclaim, she says she found the
laddish atmosphere of the 1990s
wearying. ?You couldn?t make a
fuss or you?d be called a prudeoran
old witch. I felt discombobulated
having gone through the 70s and
80s ? it felt like people didn?t care
about politics any more. It feels
like now we have come full circle.?
Thorn, 55, abandoned the
music industry and the live
performances she hated because
of stage fright when she had
her three children. Record has a
beautiful stripped-back lullaby,
?Go?, that evokes the ache and
pride of watching one?s children
grow up. Her eldest twin girls
recently left home.
?You start rediscovering
yourself after your children
leave. I have this distance now.
I deliberately didn?t write any
songs about being a mother when
I had my children because I didn?t
want to make music. I couldn?t
understand how you could turn
this incredibly domestic situation
into pop music. I wanted to be at
home. I was really happy just going
to the playground. I didn?t have
anything to say. Now I have the
distance and time and freedom.?
Rather than being nostalgic,
Thorn says she admires the way
her children and their generation
are navigating the world.
?Raising my children has been so
illuminating. My daughters were
in feminist club at school. Not
because of me, but because they
NEWS
2-33
VOICES
20-24
TV
34-35
wanted to. They have taught me
so much. And my son too. I can?t
stand these older women who
say younger women should just
put up with things because they
did. Young women have a totally
different experience today. We
need to listen to them.?
Watt and Thorn have not
worked together since 2000, a
move Thorn says has probably
helped their relationship. Watt
has since established a successful
record label and DJing career,
whileThorn,aswellasmakingfour
solo records, has also established
herself as an in-demand writer.
That writerly touch is evident not
just in the subject matter but in
the ?ne editing of the song titles
and lyrics on the album.
?I am a natural minimalist. I
love editing and crossing out. I
like to be as concise as possible. I
am not an overtly poetic writer ?
you?d have to search long and hard
to ?nd a simile. I?m not descriptive,
but being concise is useful in pop
songs. If I have a skill it is that I am
good at crafting concise phrases
that convey meaning.?
It makes her words powerful,
enhanced by her now lower voice,
In music the
pressure on women
to be overtly sexual
is ever stronger
which she says deepened after
going through the menopause,
another change she is embracing.
?It?s lovely when you sing and it?s a
bit different. When you have done
it for a long time it is a joy to have
something new to play with.?
She has no intention of
performing the album live. ?That?s
the other meaning of Record, that
this is it, the record of the music
I have made. This is where all the
craft went in. You just send it off,
put its hat and coat on and put
it out there. You abandon your
record to the public.?
Next, she will publish a book
about her youth and growing up
in the suburbs. ?Two hundred
years ago my ancestors moved
from Norfolk to London. My
parents moved out to the suburbs
but I always felt the city was in
my blood. I worry now that it is
becoming more sterile and empty,
with the emptying out of whole
areas like Knightsbridge. It?s very
JG Ballard.?
Thorn is determined, one way or
another, to make her voice heard.
?I have got that shy tendency but
I also have a steely core. Ben said
once that I was half wall?ower, half
freedom ?ghter. I have something
to say and I demand to be heard.
Women are claiming the right to
have that platform. Why should
we shut up??
And with that, she encourages
me to take that biscuit for the
journey home.
?Record? is out now on Merge.
Bernadette McNulty was Deputy
Arts Editor of i. She died while
on holiday in Oman earlier this
month. A tribute to her from
friends and colleagues will be
published soon.
IQ
36-38
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
46-52
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
37
Last night?s
g
television
BY ELISA BRAY
Tate becomes the
ultimate advocate for
the British bulldog
� Saving the British Bulldog BBC1, 9pm
� Damned Channel 4, 10pm
J
ust why is Catherine Tate
presenting this documentary
on the plight of the British
bulldog, you might wonder.
Early on in Saving the British
Bulldog, Tate reminds us that one of
her ?rst characters on her comedy
series The Catherine Tate Show was
a dog trainer. She is a dog lover,
too ? obvious from the way she
allows them to lick all over her face,
and from her beloved Twinkle, a
Chihuahua ? and she is passionate
about their welfare.
The poor British bulldog. Over
the past 15 years their numbers
have quadrupled and they are
being smuggled in from eastern
Europe long before the 12-week
restrictions. The squashy ?at
noses and squat bodies that we love
them for is terrible for their health,
causing breathing dif?culties and
spinal and joint problems.
Tate is horri?ed by our sel?sh,
damaging desire for these dogs to
look a certain way and sets off to
investigate what can be done to
eliminate their suffering. She meets
vets, the Kennel Club, dog owners,
geneticists, and the breeders
working hard to introduce
regulations to improve their health.
We learn that, ultimately, they face
extinction ? and the only solution,
according to scientists, might be
to add to their gene pool by crossbreeding them.
Tate takes on the role of
interrogating journalist and
dog defender when meeting the
As one dog owner
gushes about her love
of bulldogs we feel
Tate?s quiet outrage
Kennel Club?s Bill Lambert, whose
comment, ?You do have to consider
the health of dogs... but of course
we want them to look like we want
them to look so it?s a balancing
act for breeders?, nails the root of
these poor creatures? problems.
?That?s a very human, sel?shdriven thing,? Tate replies.
If anything will make you
outraged at their treatment, and
resolute that we should be choosing
pets not ravaged by health defects,
a shortened life expectancy,
and the likely need for surgery,
it is Tate?s dismay. She is their
ultimate advocate.
As one dog owner gushes about
her love of bulldogs and desire
to only ever own this breed, we
feel Tate?s quiet outrage. We are
fuelling the problem.
Catherine Tate is passionate about
bulldogs? welfare SHINE TV
?Everyone has their part to play,
the Kennel Club, the breeders,
the advertisers and we the puppybuying public, because unless
we start putting their health and
wellbeing above our desire, we may
be in danger of loving this dog to
extinction,? she states. And who
can argue with that?
Just when you think Damned
has tackled the darkest, grimmest
issues in society, as we near the end
of the six-part series, we see heroinaddled parents having their vomit
cleaned up by their angelic seven
year-old daughter, and a bathroom
so disgusting it makes social
worker Nitin gag.
It?s Nitin (Himesh Patel), from
Elm Heath Children?s Services,
whose brilliantly portrayed
awkwardness and non-way with
words breaks the tension. As does
the romance between Rose (Jo
Brand) and boss Denise?s brother
Dennis (Clive Mantle) and the
perfectly judged, quick-witted jokes
that this series does so well while
presenting the horrifying cases
that social workers deal with daily.
Take Rose, heading for the
addicts? home, asking colleagues,
?Want any drugs?? Or the father, in
response to whether his wife is still
high: ?Yeah, lucky girl?.
Then there?s the dad who,
it turns out, hasn?t just been doing
the odd line of cocaine (he blames
soft play), but has been high during
night feeds, and even the birth of
his child.
It should be the most depressing
viewing, but it?s not, thanks to
the tragicomic humour, warm
characters and a much-needed
sense of hope.
Twitter: @Elisabray
38
Kylie Minogue is back
with a new, country
and western, sound
GETTY
Arts
Arts
agenda
THE CULTURAL HIGHLIGHTS
YOU HAVE TO SEE
VISUAL ARTS
Pop! Art in a
Changing Britain
PALLANT HOUSE GALLERY,
CHICHESTER
How a generation of artists led
by Eduardo Paolozzi, Richard
Hamilton, Peter Blake and
Patrick Caul?eld in the 50s and
60s responded to social change,
challenging current thinking
about art and mass media and
questioning the traditional
division between high and low
art. (01243 774557) to 7 May
FILM
Sweet Country
15, WARWICK THORNTON, 113 MINS
Arts
Hamilton Morris gives a
performance of dignity and
wry fatalism in this Australian
western about an Aboriginal man
who has ?shot a white fella? and
knows he has no chance of a fair
trial. Nationwide release
reviews
TALKS & POETRY
POP
York Literature Festival
Kylie
VARIOUS VENUES
CAFE DE PARIS, LONDON
Although seemingly immune
to the ageing process, Kylie
of?cially turns 50 this year, and
her latest reinvention is a popular
one among singers of a certain
vintage: country and western.
The Aussie travelled to
Nashville to record forthcoming
album Golden, which she has
described as sounding like ?Dolly
Parton on the dance ?oor?. The
gaudy glamour of the Caf� de
Paris might seem like a strange
venue in which to unveil the
homespun charms of country
music. But Kylie?s take on the
genre is more Taylor Swift
than Tammy Wynette.
DANCE
Jane Eyre
GRAND THEATRE, LEEDS
HHHHH
There are 183,858 words in the
novel Jane Eyre (I didn?t count
them, a Bront� superfan did the
hard work). There isn?t a single
one in Northern Ballet?s version,
but every nuanced detail of the
original is there.
Choreographed by Cathy
Marston, Jane Eyre premiered a
couple of years ago. Back then
it was part of the company?s
mid-scale touring programme
which meant only audiences at
Doncaster?s Cast Theatre got to
see it in Yorkshire. Thankfully,
Appearing from the top of the
club?s spiral staircase, clad in
double denim, she began with the
record?s title track. Like many of
the songs on Golden, it?s melodic,
sincere and, unfortunately,
about as memorable as a
hypnosis session.
It?s not that Kylie lacks the voice
for country music ? a rousing
cover of Parton and Kenny
Rogers?s ?Islands In The Stream? is
a triumph ? it?s that she lacks the
material. ?Shelby ?68?, a song about
her dad?s car, is destined for the
musical scrap heap.
Some of the new songs stick.
The banjo and catch-all harmonies
of ?A Lifetime To Repair? create
a sound one could describe as
?Minogue & Sons?, while ?Dancing?
and ?Stop Me From Falling? were
already greeted like favourites.
Moreover, even when handling
mediocre material, Kylie is a
captivating performer who oozes
star quality. But the biggest cheers
were reserved for cover versions
and golden oldies, such as a
glorious acoustic reworking of
?Hand On Your Heart?.
The new ?Kylie and western?
material, by contrast, is for the
most part bland and forgettable.
Kylie tours the UK from 18
September to 8 October (kylie.com)
RICK PEARSON
Northern Ballet has done the
decent thing and brought it back to
Leeds and for another tour.
Marston?s masterstroke is
in ?nding a fresh way to tell
a familiar story and one that
unashamedly puts the female
characters centre stage.
Rochester is there too, brought
to life by a brooding Javier Torres,
but this is de?nitely and de?antly
Jane?s story, danced with beautiful
strength and vulnerability by
Dreda Blow.
More ?imsy adaptations might
have demoted Rochester?s insane
wife to a bit part, but not here.
Victoria Sibson?s Bertha is wild,
highly sexualised and a reminder
that Jane Eyre is not a simple love
story. While Marston packs an
emotional punch, there is light and
shade here, with Pippa Moore?s
desperate-to-please housekeeper
Mrs Fairfax and Rachael Gillespie?s
?ighty young Adele responsible
for creating much of the former.
Much praise, too, for Patrick
Kinmonth?s set design which is a
thing of beauty in its own right.
Designed as a series of foils, the
moors, painted in broad brush
strokes, capture Bront� country
perfectly.
Jane Eyre has been reimagined a
thousand times before, but maybe
never quite so perfectly as this
production by Northern Ballet.
See it while you can.
Touring to 9 June
(northernballet.com)
SARAH FREEMAN
Aye Write!
VARIOUS VENUES, GLASGOW
On the bill are Chris Bonington,
Peggy Seeger, Sayeeda Warsi,
Val McDermid and Jo Swinson.
(0141 353 8000) to 25 Mar
STROLLER HALL, MANCHESTER
Songs of personal and collective
crisis unfurl over jazzy, folksy
backdrops on the avant-pop
explorer?s introspective
Music for People in Trouble.
(gigsandtours.com) tonight
CLASSICAL
Hall� Orchestra and Choirs
BRIDGEWATER HALL, MANCHESTER
Mark Elder conducts
Shostakovich?s shattering Eighth
Symphony of 1943, prefaced by
Bach and Mendelssohn.
(0161 907 9000) tonight 7.30pm
JAZZ
Bristol Jazz and
Blues Festival
VARIOUS VENUES
At Colston Hall tonight, the
mighty Get the Blessing present
Bristopolis, while Tommy Smith
is at St George?s Hall. Friday
has Arun Ghosh and blues
guitarist Matt Scho?eld. (bristol
jazzandbluesfest.com) to Sun
THEATRE
Miss Saigon
MAYFLOWER THEATRE,
SOUTHAMPTON
Laurence Connor?s production
of Boublil and Schonberg?s great
sung-through drama from 1989.
(02380 711811) to Sat
If you only see
one thing today
EVENING STANDARD
CHRIS NASH
HHHHH
With sessions by Janina
Ramirez, Simon Jenkins, Leigh
Russell and Lucy Worsley. (york
literaturefestival.co.uk) to 26 Mar
POP
Susanne Sundf鴕
DANCE
Rambert
WATERSIDE THEATRE, AYLESBURY
The ?agship contemporary dance company offer a varied
programme on this tour, from the samba party of A Linha Curva
to Ben Duke?s extraordinary Goat, which faces current events
with courage, comedy and vulnerability. (0844 871 7607) to Sat
39
W th
Weather
Business
Business Editor Elizabeth Anderson
+4420 7361 5718
business@inews.co.uk
ECONOMY
Balancing the
books ?will
require tax rises
of �bn a year?
By David Hughes
Tax rises worth at least �bn a year
will be required if the Government is
to protect public spending and balance the books by the middle of the
next decade, a respected economic
think-tank has said.
Chancellor Philip Hammond used
his Spring Statement on Tuesday to
hint he will turn on the spending tap
in this autumn?s Budget after positive public ?nance ?gures pointed to
?light at the end of the tunnel? following years of austerity.
The Chancellor told MPs he had
shed his Eeyore image after the Of?ce for Budget Responsibility (OBR)
edged up growth projections for 2018
and forecast falls in government borrowing and national debt over the
coming years.
But in its analysis of the economic
challenges facing the country, the
Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) yesterday painted a bleaker image.
Responding to Mr Hammond?s
new-found optimism, the IFS chief
Paul Johnson said: ?Growth remains
depressed, among the worst in the
G20. And given the uncertainties
around Brexit there remains plenty
of risk on the downside.? He said
public debt is ?not really due to fall?
and Mr Hammond should be ?especially cautious about opening the
spending taps?.
But pressures on public services
were ?undeniable?, he added, with
many struggling in ways they were
not two or three years ago.
Just to avoid spending falling as a
fraction of national income beyond
2019-20, Mr Hammond would need to
?nd an additional �bn a year relative to current plans by 2022-23.
But if the Chancellor wants to
eliminate the deficit by the mid2020s he would need to fund an additional �bn through tax increases
or spending cuts by then.
?Put these two together and on
current forecasts just keeping spending constant as a fraction of national
income beyond 2019-20 and reaching budget balance by the mid-2020s
would require tax rises of �bn a
year,? Mr Johnson said.
The Resolution Foundation living
standards think-tank also said the
Chancellor will need better growth
or increased taxes if he is to stick to
his goal of eliminating the de?cit and
driving signi?cant reductions in debt
Philip Hammond delivered his ?rst Spring Statement yesterday PA
while ending the UK?s unprecedented
squeeze on public spending.
Torsten Bell, director of the Resolution Foundation, said: ?The end of
the tunnel is still a decade away.?
A Treasury spokesman said: ?Our
balanced approach has reduced the
deficit while also cutting taxes for
over 30 million people.?
Britain is becoming more
reliant on a small number
of high-earning taxpayers to
?nance public spending, the
IFS pointed out. This could
cause problems if high-paid jobs
relocate elsewhere.
Analysis
Ben Chu
T
The reality of the
economic and
?scal challenges
facing us ought
to be at the
very top of the
news agenda
Paul Johnson
The IFS director issues
a call to arms
he UK has been living
through the most
feeble and protracted
economic recovery in
modern British history, leaving
the average person on course to
be almost �000 worse off by
2022-23 relative to the pre-crisis
trend, according to a think tank.
The Institute for Fiscal Studies?
calculations have long said the
UK?s recovery from the 2008
crash has been the slowest since
the Great Depression in the 1930s.
But, analysing historic data on
UK GDP per capita, the institute
has shown that it was weaker even
than it had calculated.
In the 1930s depression, output
per person fell by 10 per cent.
Slower recovery than other recessions
Growth since start of recession
Quote of
the day
Growth in
economy
?slowest in
UK history?
30%
GDP per capita growth since the start of recessions
1980-81
20%
1973-74
10%
1990-91
1930-32
1920-21
2008-09
0%
-10%
4
8
12
16
20
24
28
Quarters since start of recession
32
36
SOURCE: ONS, IFS
In the 2008 recession, GDP per
capita fell by around 7 per cent.
Yet a decade after the 1920-21
recession, UK output per person
was more than 10 per cent higher
than before the crisis.
Today it is only 3 around per
cent higher than it was in 2008-09.
?The history matters,? said Paul
Johnson, the IFS?s director.
?It matters in part because
we should never stop reminding
ourselves what an astonishing
decade we have just lived through
and continue to live through.?
The UK has avoided the mass
unemployment that scarred the
1920s and indeed employment has
grown strongly since 2010. But the
chronic weakness of UK GDP and
productivity growth since 2008 is
the reason why average real wages
are still lower than a decade ago.
The IFS also produced
calculations showing that if the
pre-crisis trend of GDP per capita
growth had continued, national
income per person would today be
�900 higher this year.
By 2022-23, on current of?cial
projections, the ?nancial hit per
person will grow to �600.
?Dismal productivity growth,
dismal earnings growth and
dismal economic growth are not
just part of the history of the last
decade; they appear to be the new
normal,? said Mr Johnson.
The IFS?s analysis is sharply
at odds with the claims by the
Chancellor, Philip Hammond, who
said at the House of Commons
Despatch Box on Tuesday there is
?light at the end of the tunnel? for
the UK economy.
A number of explanations s
for the record weakness of the
UK economy since 2008 have
been offered.
Many have blamed premature
austerity by the previous
chancellor, George Osborne, for
suppressing aggregate demand
before the recovery was secured.
Others suspect a secular
slowdown in productivity growth,
as the rate of technological
advance across the advanced
world has fallen down over the
past 15 years.
Others have argued that of?cial
statistics are not capturing
advances in output related to the
digital economy.
Asked yesterday what the
IFS?s view was on which of these
explanations was likely to be
correct, Mr Johnson said it was
likely to be ?a combination of all of
those things?. THE INDEPENDENT
NEWS
2-33
VOICES
20-24
TV
34-35
SUPERMARKETS
Morrisons pulls off ?strong?
year as sales keep growing
By Holly Williams
Supermarket chain Morrisons has
cheered another ?strong? year after
ringing up a significant rise at the
tills in annual sales and pro?ts as its
turnaround gathers pace.
The Bradford-based chain posted
a 10 per cent rise in pre-tax pro?ts to
�4m for the year to the beginning
of February.
It came as like-for-like sales rose
almost 3 per cent over the year,
thanks to a rise in online takings.
It means sales at the supermarket
chain have grown for nine quarters
in a row.
Chief executive David Potts said:
?We have made good progress in
our turnaround.?
But he added the market remains
?very competitive? and said the group
would continue to prioritise offering
customers ?value for money?.
Morrisons also rewarded investors
with a 4p-a-share special dividend
payout, seeing the full year dividend
nearly double to 10.09p a share.
However, shares in Morrisons
dropped almost 5 per cent to 215.3p
yesterday as investors remain
cautious about the long-term future
of retailers.
Ken Odeluga, market analyst at
City Index, pointed out that concerns
remained over margins at the Big
Four players as they fight it out
Sales at
Morrisons
have grown
for nine
quarters in
a row GETTY
to compete with the discounters.
?The problem is they are not growing
as fast as upstarts Aldi and Lidl,
whose combined market share
continues to advance,? he said.
All the major supermarkets in the
UK have had to increase shop prices
as costs have risen since the pound?s
collapse following the Brexit vote.
While moderate in?ation can help
supermarkets boost their sales and
pro?t margins, it nevertheless also
poses a risk as it results in diminished
consumer spending power.
But Morrisons has been among the
strongest performers compared with
its peers over the past 12 months as
its bounceback under Mr Potts has
borne fruit. Christmas trading was
particularly strong, ?gures show.
Earlier this year Morrisons
axed 1,500 shop ?oor
workers as part of a restructuring
plan that will see more customer
service staff and fewer managers.
Google bans advertising for cryptocurrencies
Google is to crack down on adverts for
bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies
this year.
The internet firm is following
Facebook in banning any advertising
about cryptocurrency-related
Outlook
JAMES
MOORE
A burst of retail
sunlight amid the
pervasive gloom
I
s it too much to call it the
Morrisons miracle? Amid
a climate of seemingly all
pervasive gloom on Planet
R e t a i l , B r i t a i n ?s N o 4
supermarket chain provided a burst
of sunlight with its latest results.
They showed sales and profits
motoring ahead as debt declined.
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
46-52
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
RETAIL
All Toys R Us
stores to close
after failure to
find a buyer
By Ben Chapman
INTERNET
By Angela Jameson
IQ
36-38
content, including initial coin
offerings, wallets and trading advice.
Even companies with legitimate
cryptocurrency offerings will be
blocked from putting ads on Google?s
own and third-party sites from June.
Google, under ?re over extremist
content, is also restricting ads for
other risky financial products,
including binary options. ?We?ve
seen enough consumer harm or
potential for consumer harm that
[cryptocurrencies] is an area that
we want to approach with extreme
caution,? Scott Spencer , Google?s
director of sustainable ads, said.
There was even a special dividend
on top of the normal one to keep its
investors sweeter than the refined
sugar we?re not supposed to eat.
All this is quite something given
that there were very real questions
about whether this business could
survive when former Tesco man
David Potts took on what looked to
be one of the toughest jobs in retail
three years ago.
There are those who would now
point to Mr Potts as showing why it?s
necessary to pay top dollar to put the
right man into the CEO?s seat. The
flip side is that Morrisons paid his
predecessor Dalton Philips top dollar
to run the business into the ground.
There are a lot of struggling
retailers paying their bosses top
dollar to blame their problems on
Brexit, Britain?s torpid economy
and the falling real incomes the
Conservative Government has
delivered to its people for the past
11 straight months. That does make
life extremely difficult for them, it
is quite true. But Morrisons, which
operates in a cut-throat part of the
sector, has proven that you can still
do well if you happen to be, you know,
good at retail.
Most CEOs simply get theirs for
being average at it: They?re paid like
superstars for being journeymen. It?s
not just in retail that that happens.
If Mr Potts isn?t to join them he?s
going to have to live up to the lofty
Morrisons has proven
th
hat you can still do well
if you happen to be, you
know, good at retail
expectations he?s created, and
continue to deliver sales and market
share growth.
Was there just a hint of things
slowing a bit in his employer?s ?nal
quarter? The outlook statement was
resolutely optimistic, so there?s that.
But there still seems to be a degree
All 100 Toys R Us stores in the UK are
to close within six weeks, resulting
in the loss of 3,000 jobs, after the
administrator failed to ?nd a buyer
for the retail chain.
Toy s R Us co l l a p s e d i n t o
administration last month and
launched a nationwide closing-down
sale in a bid to bring in some cash and
appeal to a buyer.
The toy chain appointed
Moor?elds as administrators at the
end of February, but yesterday staff
were told that no buyer has been
found and that all stores will shut. It
is thought that Moor?elds will now
begin a six-week ?wind-down? of the
store estate.
Toys R Us is one
of a slew of high
street names to
have been hit
by a cocktail of
rising in?ation,
increasing
b u s i n e s s
rates, a hike in
minimum wages
and the surging
popularity of online
competitors such as Amazon.
Maplin also recently went into
administration and New Look
announced last week that it was
cutting hundreds of jobs.
Many of Toys R Us?s small stores
have proved relatively resilient in
recent years and the company?s
online performance has been
robust too.
But the bigger, warehouse-style
outlets which opened in the 1980s
and 90s, have become expensive to
run, placing a heavy burden on the
balance sheet.
It is not known which Toys
R Us stores will close first but
discounted items will still be available
until then.
THE INDEPENDENT
of scepticism out in the market.
Morrisons shares enjoy a reasonably
fancy rating ? higher than Tesco,
streets ahead of Sainsbury?s.
But their performance has been up
and down over the last year, without
ever really threatening to break out
of a range.
Mr Potts has proven to be a
canny operator. His Morrisons at
Amazon partnership has helped ?x
the weakness the business had with
the web. Another deal, to supply
McColls, the convenience chain, with
products under the revived Safeway
brand, also looks smart, and gives the
group some much needed exposure
to the convenience sector.
A couple more like those two would
be just the ticket. They are, however,
hard to ?nd.
What is in Morrisons? favour is that
it is still small enough to be ?eet of
foot, and perhaps more ?exible than
its rivals. And, of course, it has Mr
Potts. THE INDEPENDENT
41
From the
business
pages
Exports hit by EU
falls in interest
The Copenhagen Post
Danish exports are falling,
mostly as a consequence of
the fall in interest among
mainly EU countries such as
Germany and the UK. Exports
fell by 0.8 per cent during the
three months to 31 January
2018, when compared to the
same period a year earlier. The
?gures, reported by Danmarks
Statistik, show the food and
machinery sectors were hit
particularly hard.
Rise in property
investments
China Daily
China?s investment in property
expanded by an annualised
rate of 9.9 per cent in the ?rst
two months of this year, up
from 7 per cent in 2017. Total
investment in the ?rst two
months stood at 1.08trn yuan
(�.2bn). Residential housing
accounted for 68.1 per cent of the
total investment. The country
began construction on 177.46
million square metres of housing.
Economy creates
66,800 new jobs
The Irish Times
The Irish economy created
66,800 additional jobs last year,
bringing total employment to
2.2 million. This was the highest
level of employment seen in
the State since 2008. The
?gures, contained in the Central
Statistics Of?ce?s Labour Force
Survey, show employment
increased in 12 of the 14 economic
sectors. The unemployment rate
is at 14 per cent.
Brexit demand from
German companies
Deutsche Welle
German companies have
demanded that Britain agrees
by next week to an interim phase
for its exit from the EU. If no deal
is reached at an EU summit,
?rms must begin planning for a
worst-case ?hard Brexit?. The
Federation of German Industry
pointed out that negative effects
from the approach of Brexit were
already apparent, with Britain
dropping from second- to ?fthmost-important trade partner
for Germany last year.
42
BUSINESS
The
Business
Matrix
The day at
a glance
FTSE 100 down 6.1 at 7132.7
+7.6
+3.0
+57.8
+31.6
?
-14.5
-18.0
-1.2
-1.8
-2.3
-2.2
+8.0
-9.2
+68.0
+36.0
+0.4
-1.6
-13.0
+5.0
-44.0
-0.6
+8.0
-15.0
+30.0
-53.0
+25.0
+7.0
+1.0
+4.0
-2.1
-4.5
-11.5
+1.0
+7.7
+6.8
-7.4
-13.0
975.0
2184.0
1870.0
1071.0
3387.0
2185.0
5520.0
550.0
682.5
235.3
705.5
1662.4
536.2
5643.6
4270.0
695.0
337.1
2472.0
2024.0
5435.0
221.2
2682.0
1765.9
2955.0
4668.0
7762.5
2735.5
411.3
1698.7
462.6
1708.0
1746.0
342.6
449.5
416.9
1724.5
1341.0
694.0
1766.0
950.1
11.1
2476.0
1476.0
4260.0
482.2
533.5
177.3
6.3
1103.0
436.9
4064.0
2889.0
587.0
224.3
1918.5
1481.5
4437.0
119.7
1955.0
1396.5
27.0
3461.0
6490.0
2186.5
332.3
977.4
169.8
1428.0
1174.0
247.8
3.0
270.0
1235.2
956.5
Price
Chg
High
Hammerson
Hargrve Lans
HSBC Hldgs
IAG
Imperial Brands
Informa
IntCont Htls
Intertek
ITV
Johnson Matth
Just Eat
King?sher
Land Secs
Legal & Gen
Lloyds Bk Gp
Lon Stock Ex
Marks&Spen
Mediclinic Intl
Micro Focus Intl
Mondi
Morrison (Wm)
National Grid
Next
NMC Health
Old Mutual
PaddyPwrBetfair
Pearson
Persimmon
Prudential
Randgold Res
Reckitt Ben
RELX
Rentokil Initial
Rio Tinto
Rolls-Royce
RBS
Shell A
456.6
1700.0
690.3
632.4
2521.5
716.6
4527.0
4915.0
149.5
3140.0
763.2
347.9
917.3
258.2
66.7
3966.0
280.7
598.2
1973.5
1954.0
215.3
778.5
4840.0
3352.0
250.9
7780.0
766.0
2550.0
1918.0
6088.0
5649.0
1490.5
272.2
3717.0
903.0
257.7
2211.5
+1.0
-7.0
-7.5
+2.2
+27.5
+3.4
-33.0
-35.0
+0.4
-17.0
-11.8
-6.2
+4.1
+1.5
-0.2
+61.0
+1.8
-11.0
-3.5
+3.0
-11.0
+2.4
+36.0
-14.0
-4.8
+100.0
+4.6
+1.0
+92.5
+44.0
-16.0
-2.0
-1.4
+1.5
-0.4
-1.6
-21.0
52338.0
1935.0
798.6
680.6
3956.5
773.0
4944.0
5470.0
221.8
3511.0
906.0
369.8
1217.1
279.9
73.6
4114.0
397.8
890.2
2970.5
2145.0
254.4
1174.3
5355.0
3558.0
259.6
8967.0
773.0
2901.0
1992.5
8255.0
8110.4
1784.0
338.8
4226.6
994.5
304.2
2579.5
FTSE 250
19820.1
FTSE All Share
3943.6
-6.1
-43.1
-4.9
FTSE Euro?rst300
1466.1
Dow Jones *
24878.6
-2.1
S&P 500 *
2759.7
-5.6
Nasdaq *
7526.3
+15.3
+16.7
-128.5
DAX
12237.7
CAC 40
5233.4
Hang Seng
31435.0
-166.4
Nikkei
21777.3
-190.8
-9.4
+0.06�
7132.7
?1.1285
Markets
FTSE 100
EURO/
POUND
Low
440.2
1258.0
618.0
516.0
2483.0
624.5
3656.0
3826.0
142.8
2681.0
544.0
285.3
909.3
241.7
61.8
2995.0
274.3
495.4
26.8
1684.0
205.0
733.0
3565.0
1726.0
184.2
6572.5
563.0
2046.0
1612.1
5760.0
5608.0
1399.0
238.2
2882.5
733.5
221.8
1982.5
DOLLAR/
POUND
Company
Price
Chg
High
Shell B
RSA Insur
Sage
Sainsbury(J)
Schroders
Scot Mort Inv Tst
Segro
Severn Trent
Shire
Sky
Smith&Neph
Smith (DS)
Smiths Gp
Smur?t Kappa Grp
SSE
Stan Chart
Standard Life Aber
St James Place
Taylor Wimpey
Tesco
TUI AG
Unilever
United Utilities
Vodafone
Whitbread
Ferguson
WPP
2230.0
629.6
689.0
238.6
3394.0
472.0
607.4
1789.5
3145.0
1322.0
1321.0
497.0
1570.0
3134.0
1225.0
763.9
365.9
1122.0
185.0
210.3
1528.5
3820.5
700.8
202.4
3826.0
5248.0
1156.0
-22.5
?
-1.0
-3.0
-19.0
-0.6
+2.6
-8.0
+8.0
+3.0
-0.5
-3.0
-11.0
-20.0
+2.5
-13.1
-2.5
+9.0
-0.3
-0.7
+0.5
+17.0
+9.2
-0.5
-50.0
-60.0
-3.0
2617.0
672.5
825.2
339.9
3784.0
479.2
612.8
2575.0
5021.0
1378.0
1442.0
565.0
1697.0
3254.0
1554.0
864.2
448.6
1279.5
211.9
217.1
1687.9
4557.5
1078.0
239.7
4333.0
5722.0
1774.0
Low
2037.0
568.5
613.0
222.4
3002.0
350.5
447.4
1664.0
2940.5
11.4
1173.0
5.3
1442.0
1712.7
1176.5
678.8
339.7
1008.0
173.0
165.3
934.4
3678.5
648.6
197.4
3499.9
4427.0
1154.0
For enquiries call +44 (0)20 7825 8300
GOLD
Per troy ounce,
London pm ?x
?$0.23
905.6
1901.5
1789.4
946.2
2560.0
1985.0
4765.0
513.4
579.0
207.4
537.8
1444.6
464.8
4234.0
3881.0
637.2
225.5
2050.0
1654.0
4711.0
138.7
2528.0
1521.5
2466.0
4527.0
6845.0
2428.0
384.3
1633.5
442.1
1584.0
1216.0
255.0
437.7
383.6
1309.0
1187.0
Company
$64.48
3i Group
Admiral
Anglo Amer
Antofagasta
AB Foods
Ashtead Group
AstraZeneca
Aviva
BAE Systems
Barclays
Barratt Dev
BHP Billiton
BP
BAT
Berkeley Grp Hldgs
British Land
BT
Bunzl
Burberry
Carnival
Centrica
Coca-Cola HBC
Compass
CRH
Croda Intl
DCC
Diageo
Direct Line Ins
Easyjet
Evraz
Experian
Fresnillo
G4S
GKN
Glencore
GSK
Halma
Low
?$3.93
High
$1,323.8
Chg
?0.35�
Price
$1.3958
Company
OIL
Brent crude,
per barrel
RETAIL
SERVICES
US buyers help
raise adidas profit
Funeral services
to get a revamp
Sportswear maker adidas has
raised its pro?t forecast after
seeing an upturn at the tail-end
of last year. Revenue rose by 12
per cent to ?5.05bn (�48bn) as
US and Chinese buyers turned
to adidas and retro styles grew
in popularity. The German
company is predicting a strong
2018 in the US, where it is
taking market share from Nike.
Shares in funeral ?rm Dignity
bounced, despite the company
revealing lower than expected
take-up for its ?no frills? option.
Dignity also said it had called in
management consultants LEK
to help lead a revamp to ?ght off
increasing competition. Shares
jumped 15 per cent to 982p
yesterday. They have struggled
since the start of the year.
FASHION
CONSTRUCTION
Zara cuts cloth
to suit margins
Balfour Beatty on
road to recovery
Inditex, the owner of fashion
chain Zara, said pro?ts have
risen 7 per cent, but that its
margins are under signi?cant
pressure. The Spanish-based
retailer posted net pro?ts of
?3.37bn (�n) in the year
to 31 January on revenues of
�.49bn. All Inditex?s 88,000
staff will get a share of a total
?562m bonus pool.
Balfour Beatty announced
that pro?ts more than
doubled to �6m in 2017 as
its turnaround gathered pace.
The construction ?rm behind
Crossrail had previously posted
several years of losses. Chief
executive Leo Quinn said it had
only narrowly avoided the fate
of rival Carillion by reforming
its business.
ENGINEERING
RETAIL
Broadcom bows to
Trump pressure
Tax bill is less
than convivial
Broadcom has of?cially ended
its $117bn (�bn) takeover bid
for US chipmaker Qualcomm,
two days after President Donald
Trump intervened in the deal.
The Singaporean company
said that it was disappointed
as it withdrew its proposed
candidates for the board
at Qualcomm.
Bargain Booze owner
Conviviality has revealed that
it owes the taxman �m. The
?rm, which saw its shares
collapse last week following
a pro?t warning, said the bill
is due to be paid at the end
of March. Shares in the ?rm
were suspended ahead of
the announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
CONSUMER
Everyman profits
get star billing
Sales fall as US
growth slows
The Everyman cinema chain
said revenues rose 37 per
cent to �.6m in 2017, as the
operator expanded to 22 venues.
Pre-tax pro?ts climbed from
�0,000 to �6m. It is now
spending �2m on the redesign
of the Church Road cinema in
London?s Crystal Palace.
US retail sales fell for a
third consecutive month in
February as households cut
back on purchases of costly
items, pointing to a slowdown
in economic growth in the
?rst quarter. The Commerce
Department said retail sales
slipped 0.1 per cent last month.
the
markets
The FTSE 100 gave up gains to
?nish lower yesterday, closing
down or 6.09 points, at 7,132.69,
having spent most of the day in
positive territory. Analysts pointed
to the departure of Donald Trump?s
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
along with growing fears of a trade
war dragging down the Dow Jones,
which had a knock-on effect.
***
Morrisons was the index?s biggest
faller, shedding 4.9 per cent to
close at 215.3p. At the other end,
Prudential topped the FTSE 100
after announcing plans to break
up the business, with the shares up
5.07 per cent at 1,918p.
43
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
INSURANCE
Prudential breaks up
its global operations
By Michael Bow
Insurer Prudential unveiled a
dramatic break-up of its global
empire yesterday by announcing that
it would separate its UK unit, M&G
Prudential, and then turn itself into
a standalone Asian-focused company.
Britain?s biggest insurer ?
founded 170 years ago in
London ? will carve out
M & G P r u d e n t i a l by
listing separate shares
in the company on the
FTSE 100, ending years
of speculation that the
UK and international arms
would go their separate ways.
To fuel M&G?s standalone
prospects, a �bn annuity book
has also been sold to Rothesay Life,
freeing up around �n of capital.
Both businesses will remain
headquartered in London. Mike Wells
will stay head of the international
company and John Foley will lead
M&G Prudential. A new board will
be created to oversee the UK firm.
?London is one of the deepest and
best markets in the world and the
talent base is unparalleled. British
rule of law exports well to various
markets where we do business and
the governance standards help us in
foreign markets,? Mr Wells said.
He added that the move was
not about saving money but
instead a response to the
rapid growth and success
of M&G Prudential, which
merged last August.
Shares in Prudential
rose 5 per cent to
1,918p yesterday.
The mixture of the two
sides of the company has long
puzzled analysts and investors, given
the different customers and markets
served. Prudential Plc, worth �bn,
mainly sells to the booming Asian
middle class and retirees across
America; M&G Prudential, worth
�bn, sells policies and investments
to pensioners in the UK and Europe.
added, the same �000 investment in
the FTSE 100 would have produced
a return of �193 (averaging 4.6 per
cent annual growth).
The end of 1999 was when the
market was at a high, before the
dotcom bubble burst.
daily
money
***
ELIZABETH
ANDERSON
Data from investment company
Schroders have shown the
importance of dividends in boosting
investment returns over time.
For example, �000 invested
in the FTSE 100 on 31 December
1999 would have produced a return
of �4 by November 2017, the
equivalent of just 1.1 per cent growth
a year. But once dividends and the
power of compound interest are
Remortgaging levels surged to a nineyear high in January as homeowners
anticipated an interest rate rise could
be on the way.
There were 49,800 homeowner
remortgages completed in January
? nearly a ?fth more than in the same
month a year earlier, UK Finance said.
It was the highest monthly number
since the 51,300 in November 2008.
The Government said on Tuesday
that some 60,000 ?rst-time buyers
bene?ted from the stamp duty relief
announced at the Autumn Budget.
On Saturday,
in your
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?
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Farming
out
The farmers
diversifying
their crops
to ostrich
feathers
and wasabi
fields
ieat
Games&Puzzles
daily recipe
Chilli and lemongrass
chicken
Kakuro
Zygolex� In i every day
How to play Fill the white squares so that the total in each
across or down run of cells matches the total at the start
of that run. You must use the numbers from 1-9 only and
cannot repeat a number in a run. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Find the missing words by following the RHYME, LETTERS and MEANING links
? eg, a word that rhymes with ?cheek?, has one letter different from ?pear? and
has the same meaning as mountain, would be ?peak?. Full rules at zygolex.com.
Solution, page 47
RHYME LETTERS
17
27
9
18
24
10
12
6
SQUID
13
11
FARM
GRUNGE
CONCEALED
11
16
MEANING
11
29
3
DIE
18
21
6
ACCUSE
6
3
6
4
4
11
29
19
23
10
3
3
IMMERSE
21
6
T
M AK
IN E S
UT 2
ES 0
3
24
4
13
Jigsawdoku
Mix together the lemongrass, chilli, garlic
and soy sauce. Add half to the chicken
chunks and reserve the rest. Cover the
chicken and place in the refrigerator to
marinate for around 30 minutes.
Cook the rice as directed on the pack
for 10-11 minutes. Meanwhile, heat the
oil in a large wok or frying pan and add
the reserved marinade. Cook for a few
seconds then add the chicken.
Stir fry for 4-5 minutes until evenly
browned, add the broccoli, cooking for a
further minute. Add the stock and sugar
and simmer for a few minutes until the
stock has reduced and thickened.
Serve with cooked rice, sprinkling with
chopped coriander.
9 1
6
9
5
4
1
8
3
6
5
How to play Each row, column and 3 by 3 box must contain
each number (1 to 9) only once. The sum of all numbers
contained in a dotted area must match the number printed
in its top-left corner. No number can appear more than
once in a dotted area. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
15
Tomorrow
Haddock & Kale Kedgeree
9
15
15
6
5
10
9
9
14
19
17
6
5
13
9
7
?
16
8
10
14
15
11
9
16
>
?
>
?
4 >
?
>
0
1
3 1
1
2
2 3 3
3
3
2
2
3
4 3
1
5
4
5
0
0
2
4
3
0
2
2
2 2 1 1 2
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
7
13
2
3
1
12
17
?
<
How to play Find all the mines in the grid. Numbers in certain squares indicate how
many mines there are in the neighbouring squares, including diagonally touching
squares. Mines cannot be placed in squares with numbers. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
16
13
2
?
0
7
11
>
> 2
MEANING
Minesweeper
17
10
TAILS
WINDY
LETTERS
Futoshiki
Killer Sudoku No 1236
Recipe from aldi.co.uk
PUBLISH
How to play
Place the numbers
from 1-5 exactly
once in each row
and column. The
greater than and
less than signs
(?>? and ?<?) indicate
where one cell is
greater/less than
the adjacent
cell indicated.
Solution:
minurl.co.uk/i
8
5
KINDS
RHYME
5
7
LABOURS
5
STINT
How to play Place the numbers 1-9 once in each row, column
and bold-lined jigsaw region. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
8
3
7
5
3
DON
3 4
2
5
5
POT
SERVES 4
2 lemongrass stalks, ?nely chopped
1 small red chilli, seeded and ?nely
chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1tbsp light soy sauce
700g chicken thigh meat, cut into chunks
2tbsp sun?ower oil
1 large broccoli, broken into small ?orets
200ml chicken stock
2tbsp caster sugar
360g basmati rice
2tbsp fresh coriander, chopped, to
garnish
LARGE
5
5
30
3
6
1
2 3
1
2
3
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
NEWS
2-33
VOICES
20-24
TV
34-35
IQ
36-38
Maths Puzzle
Codeword No 1957
How to play Fill the empty squares with
numbers that will make the across and
down calculations produce the results
shown in the grey squares. Each numeral
from 1 to 9 must only appear once. The
calculations should be performed from
left to right and top to bottom, rather than
in strict mathematical order.
How to play The numbers in the grid correspond to the letters of the alphabet.
Solve the puzzle and ?ll in the letters in the key as you discover them.
Three letters are provided to give you a start. The solution will be printed in
tomorrow?s paper, the solution to yesterday?s codeword is on page 47.
5
Easier
x
+
x
x
x
-
6
-
-
5
41
3
12
11
25
25
20
13
5
1
3
3
x
+
-
+
+
x
-
5
11
20
2
11
26
1
26
10
1
5
24
10
2
2
18
11
25
7
5
2
13
13
20
9
14
13
7
5
2
1
7
3
2
8
8
24
13
22
6
18
21
1
23
12
1
17
25
11
20
19
1
5
2
7
26
1
11
13
11
5
20
14
1
5
20
20
26
2
20
11
7
26
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
OINK
DOWN
1 Beauty parlour (5)
2 Identifying
label (4,3)
3 Dutch cheese (4)
4 Type of
concrete (5-3)
5 Home (5)
6 Underwear
items (5,6)
7 Gramophone
needle (6)
12 Twoccer (8)
13 Foolishness (6)
14 Set apart (7)
16 Picture
surround (5)
18 Prestige (5)
19 Single entity (4)
1
2
NEW THIS WEEK!
The i Book of Concise
Crosswords Vol 2
Our second volume of
concise crosswords, featuring
100 brand new puzzles.
Available on Amazon for �99.
See
minurl.co.uk/crosswordsvol2
Other i books include:
Mixed Puzzles Vol 2 (inews.co.uk/puzzle2),
Codewords Vol 2 (minurl.co.uk/codewordsvol2)
and Sudokus (inews.co.uk/sudoku)
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
13
14
16
17
MUCH
19
20
21
22
Maths Puzzle,
Word Ladder, Word
Wheel, Kakuro,
Minesweeper,
ABC Logic, Killer
Sudoku, Futoshiki,
Codeword,
Jigsawduko and
Wijuko created by
Clarity Media.
Terms &
Conditions
18
23
Solution to yesterday?s Concise Crossword
ACROSS 1 Tab, 3 Low (Tableau), 7 Cobbler, 8 Geese, 9 See, 10 Innocuous, 12 Hammer drill,
15 Catatonic, 17 Via, 18 Nasty, 20 Eyesore, 21 Pie, 22 Yes.
DOWN 1 Table salt, 2 Belgium, 3 Logic, 4 Woe, 5 Front-runner, 6 Lens, 7 Cash, 11 Oblivious,
13 Rockery, 14 Fate, 15 Cane, 16 Thyme, 19 Sip.
Today?s other puzzles Cryptic Crossword, page 28;
Five-Clue Cryptic, page 7; One-Minute Wijuko, page 31
Puzzle solutions See page 47 and minurl.co.uk/i
4
3
6
5
8 6
9
7 2
8
3
6
8
6
3
2
7
3
5
4
1
5 9
7
4 2
8
3
6
Tomorrow: Easier
For more
puzzles,
see clarity-media.
co.uk
12
15
Stuck on the concise crossword?
For today?s solutions, call 0905 789 3590.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble
accessing this number, please call our helpdesk
on 0333 202 3390.
3
7
1
2 6 8
7
2
Concise Crossword No 2279
ACROSS
1 Transgressed (6)
4 Wander (4)
8 Back complaint (7)
9 Up above (5)
10 After deductions
(4)
11 OK (4,4)
13 Cheerful (2,4,7)
15 Subordinate (8)
17 Cutlery item (4)
20 Variety of beet (5)
21 Drinking vessel (7)
22 Ursine animal (4)
23 Emphasise (6)
2
6
2 8
9
7 1
2
7
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Need a little help getting started? Then call for up to four extra clue letters on
0901 292 5204. Calls cost �plus your telephone company?s network access charge
(if you are having trouble with the phone service, call the helpline: 0333 202 3390).
Or text THEI CLUE to 85100 to receive your clues. Texts cost �plus your
standard network charge (if you are having trouble with the text service, call the
helpline: 0333 335 3351). Clues change each day at midnight.
4
4 9 8
6
4
6
5
BOTH
3
10
3
2
8
Sudoku Harder
19
2
6
How to play Each numeral from 1 to 9 must
appear (once only) in the squares forming the
red letter i. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
25
11
X V
idoku Exclusive to i
MISS
20
8
H
How to play
Convert the word
at the top of the
ladder into the
word at the bottom
of it, using only
the four rungs
in between. On
each rung, you
must put a valid
four-letter word
that is identical
to the word above
it, apart from a
one-letter change.
There may be more
than one way of
achieving this.
16
2
2
11
1
+
-3
-6
15
26
2
1
-5
25
16
11
0
-
1
25
10
�
20
11
Harder
16
3
3
-
26
2
51
12
26
12
-
25
26
4
5 140
1
12
Word
Ladder
45
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
46-52
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ABC Logic
How to play Place the letters
A, B and C exactly once in each row and
column. Each row and column has two
blank cells. The letters at the edge of a row/
column indicate which of the letters is the
?rst/last to appear in that row/column.
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
A
A
A
C
B
B
C
C
A
A
C
B
B
C
Word Wheel
This is an open-ended puzzle. How many
words of three or more letters, each
including the letter at centre of the wheel,
can you make from this diagram? We?ve
found 17, including one nine-letter word.
Can you do better?
A
Y
N
N
A
E
O
N
C
46
SPORT
CRICKET
SIX NATIONS: IRELAND
Stokes? back
problem is
concern for
England
Stockdale takes
giant strides to
put Irish on brink
of Grand Slam
NEW ZEALAND XI
Blundell 131 ret,
Jamieson 101 ret
376
ENGLAND
Chris Stocks
IN HAMILTON
England may be forced to play
returning all-rounder Ben Stokes
as a specialist batsman in next
week?s first Test against New
Zealand in Auckland after he
was ruled out of the opening tour
game here with a back injury.
Stokes bowled 33 overs in the
recent ODIs against the Black
Caps but has not trained since
the final match of that series in
Christchurch on Saturday. The
26-year-old has not played a Test
match for six months having
been suspended for the
Ashes in Australia
this winter.
So it was far
from ideal when
he was ruled
Overs bowled by
out of the pinkBen Stokes in the
ball warm-up
recent ODI series
against New
match against
Zealand
a New Zealand
XI at Seddon Park
with what England
are playing down by describing as a minor back problem.
Given that Stokes has less than
48 hours to prove his ?tness before
the start of the second two-day
tour game, against the same opposition here tomorrow, England will
be reluctant to risk bowling him in
that match either and are likely to
play him as a specialist batsman.
That would leave Stokes seriously undercooked as a bowler
ahead of the opening day-night
Test against New Zealand at Eden
Park a week today.
Chris Woakes (hamstring),
Craig Overton (quad) and Mason
Crane (back) were also ruled out
of this ?rst tour match, although
all are set to feature this week.
England?s bowlers started
strongly yesterday and reduced the hosts to 30 for five,
before Tom Blundell and Kyle
Jamieson hit centuries as the
Kiwis ?nished on 376. James Anderson impressed with the ball,
taking four for 56.
33
Ben Stokes has a week to prove his
?tness to bowl in the ?rst Test
Size and ability of Ulster wing frightens
his opponents, writes Hugh Godwin
R
emember the barbs
Five/Six Nations best of eight
chucked at Joe Schmidt
tries, set by England?s Cyril Lowe
when Ireland?s head
in 1914 and equalled by Scotland?s
coach left Simon Zebo,
Ian Smith in 1925; both men are
the Munster back-three
regarded as greats of the game.
star who will be quitting his country
At 6ft 3in and 16 stones, Stockdale
for French club rugby this summer,
is one of rugby?s modern breed of
out of his Six Nations squad?
big backs, but he offers much more
Those barbs have quickly turned
than being just a dif?cult lump to
to bouquets in praise of Zebo?s
drag down.
exciting successor on the
He frightens attackers
wing, Jacob Stockdale of
when he defends out
Ulster, who by scoring
to in, or as part of a
two tries against Italy,
blitz. But he also has
Wales and Scotland
natural footballing
Record number of
in the current
ability, as former
tries
scored
by
an
Championship has
Ireland captain Brian
individual
in
one
equalled the record
O?Driscoll and coach
Five/Six Nations
for a single season
Eddie O?Sullivan
season
in the competition in
discussed in a recent Off
its current format, held
the Ball podcast. ?He can
by Will Greenwood, Shane
throw a beautifully-timed
Williams and Chris Ashton.
10-metre pass,? said O?Driscoll.
Some more of this against England
?And you can see, in the way
at Twickenham on Saturday, when
someone drops the ball on to their
Ireland are going for the Grand
foot, whether it?s comfortable or
Slam, and Stockdale?s ?ying feet and whether it?s a learnt skill. You can
beaming grin could be the lasting
tell it?s a natural skill with him.?
motif of the 2018 Six Nations.
O?Sullivan concurred, saying:
The 21-year-old from Ulster could
?You?ll rarely get somebody of his
even set his sights on the all-time
ability on the wing, because he?s
played full-back and centre as
well. Zebo could play wing or fullback, but we wouldn?t put Zebo
in the centre. Stockdale has that
football ability but he?s an incredibly
big man, and he?s quick; he?s got
everything at the moment.?
Size on the end of the
threequarter line has its advantages,
as the incomparable Jonah Lomu
made clear a generation ago.
ENGLAND
SCOTLAND
8
Townsend makes five
changes for trip to Rome
?No excuses and
I shouldn?t have
said what I did?
Grigg starts at inside centre in place
of Peter Horne.
Scotland coach Gregor Townsend
Tighthead Simon Berghan drops
may have changed a third of his team out of the squad as WP Nel makes
for the final NatWest Six Nations his ?rst start since breaking his arm
match against Italy in Rome but was against Samoa and Zander Fagerson
keen to emphasise it wasn?t an
is on the bench.
axe-wielding exercise.
?It?s partly because
After a fairly consistof who we are playent selection policy,
i n g aga i n s t ,? s a i d
Townsend has sprung
Townsend. ?Tommy
a few surprises folcoming back from
Richie Gray is poised
lowing the defeat in
injury is a boost. He
to
win
his
66th
cap
Dublin, omitting Edwo u l d h ave b e e n
from
the
bench
after
inburgh lock Grant
selected last week.
recovering from a
Gilchrist, who has been
There?s the availability
back injury
getting good reviews,
of quality players: Richie
from the 23 altogether.
has played two games [for
Tim Swinson is promoted to
Toulouse], so he comes on to
start alongside Jonny Gray, with
the bench. Zander has trained for
the latter?s brother, Richie, on the three weeks. It is the right time to
bench and in line for a 66th cap and bring them back.
?rst taste of Six Nations action this
?Winning would be progress. We
year after a back injury.
know it will be tough as Italy are at
Hooker Stuart McInally has been home and have shown they can be
one of Scotland?s star men but drops very good in parts of the game.?
(v Italy, 12.30pm Saturday, Rome) S Hogg,
to the bench and is replaced by fit- Scotland
T Seymour, H Jones, N Grigg, S Maitland, F Russell,
again Fraser Brown.
G Laidlaw, G Reid, F Brown, WP Nel, T Swinson,
J Gray, J Barclay (capt), H Watson, R Wilson.
Tommy Seymour returns to the Replacements
S McInally, J Bhatti, Z Fagerson,
wing after a back injury and Nick R Gray, D Denton, A Price, P Horne, B Kinghorn.
By Duncan Smith
� Continued from back page
Japan?s coach, and a heavy loss by the
country?s Under-20 team to Wales,
saying: ?I took over [Japan rugby in
2012] and within three months the
Japan under-20s team would play
the Wales under-20s team. So, Wales.
Who [here] knows Wales? Is there
any Welsh people here?
?So it?s this little shit place that?s
got three million people. Three million. Japan?s got how many ? 125 million. So Japan?s the size of this table
and that?s [pointing to a glass on the
table] Wales. Japan under-20s play
rugby from the age of 15, they virtually train every day. They don?t study.
So if you ever meet a rugby player,
you?ll know they?re a rugby player in
Japan because they?re not very well
educated... So Wales play Japan and
they beat them 125-0 and I thought
?this is a great job I?ve got?.?
England?s Rugby Football Union
issued a statement from Jones, saying: ?I apologise unreservedly for
any offence caused. No excuses and
England?s head coach Eddie Jones
has regularly stated he fancies
another big wing in his team ?
Anthony Watson is 6ft 2in, but more
than a stone lighter than Stockdale ?
while George North, Blair Kinghorn
and R閙y Grosso have shown up
well for Wales, Scotland and France.
The rigidity of Schmidt?s game
plan has helped Stockdale, if
we analyse his six tries to date:
England captain Dylan Hartley is still
a ?tness doubt for Saturday
I shouldn?t have said what I did. I?m
very sorry.? An RFU spokeswoman
added: ?Eddie has apologised for
his inappropriate remarks, and the
RFU is also very sorry for any offence caused and will apologise to the
IRFU [Irish Rugby Football Union]
and WRU [Welsh Rugby Union].?
Social media users were quick to
castigate Jones, and some highlighted the irony that he had complained
recently of ex-Scotland great Gavin
Hastings supposedly whipping up anti-English feeling before last month?s
Calcutta Cup match.
Meanwhile, Jones will delay
naming the England team until the
last possible minute, at 1pm today,
amid continuing doubts over the
?tness of captain Dylan Hartley and
wing Elliot Daly.
66
NEWS
2-33
Jacob Stockdale
evades Blair
Kinghorn
to score for
Ireland against
Scotland PA
clever close support for his side?s
seventh score versus Italy, then
an alert interception, hand-off
and 70-metre in-and-out sprint
for the eighth; against Wales,
Stockdale?s tries were the bookends
to Ireland?s 37-27 win: a pure wing?s
?nish on the short side of a ruck
and an added-time interception
from Gareth Anscombe. Against
Scotland, another pressure-based
interception put Ireland on the
scoreboard, and he followed this by
knowing when to keep his width for
his side?s crucial second try.
Stockdale has that football
ability but he?s an incredibly
big man, and he?s quick;
he?s got everything
Puzzle solutions
4
x
7
+
x
5 140
4
-
x
x
9
x
6
-
-
3
-
8
-
-
-
+
2
41
-
9
3
-
16
7
-5
+
x
6
-
8
5
0
1
-6
+
5
-3
6
10
ZYGOLEX
MISS
OINK
MASS
SINK
BASS
SICK
BATS
SUCK
BATH
SUCH
BOTH
MUCH
LEFT TO RIGHT:
hid; grange;
dip; charge; hip;
change; joint;
joins; coins; point;
coils; dot; toils;
print; winds
5-CLUE CROSSWORD
Across: 1 B-itchy, 3 Taipei (Thai pay),
4 Sh-rank
Down: 1 B-rut-us, 2 Yor-1-c.-k
WORD WHEEL
NINE-LETTER WORD annoyance
OTHER WORDS ace, acne, aeon, anyone,
aye, cane, canoe, cone, eon, neon, none,
ocean, once, one, yea, yen
YESTERDAY?S CODEWORD 1956
1
2
3
4
5
14
15
16
17
18
S Y B D
J
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
F A H M N Z G T
R O P E W K V U C X
I
TV
34-35
Stockdale, who has raced to an
impressive 10 tries in eight Tests
overall, was born in Lisburn and
went to Wallace High School in the
town. His father, Graham, is a prison
chaplain and former Presbyterian
minister, and granddad Ivan
brought a rugby ball to the infant
Jacob?s bedside. Both men played
for Ballyclare RFC, north of Belfast.
As a lad, Stockdale?s size came and
went, then came again.
He was comparatively big playing
mini- rugby in Ballynahinch, then
he had a second growth spurt ? a
foot in six months ? around his 16th
birthday. He played at full-back for
the Ireland Under-20s who brought
off a ?rst age-group win over New
Zealand in 2016, a few months before
the seniors did likewise in Chicago.
Those who have interviewed
Stockdale enjoy his mischief and
self-deprecating humour.
He does not mind telling the tale
of being in the fourth year at school
and having his shorts and boxers
pulled down as he was running
on the wing ? ?everything was on
show, it wasn?t a good experience!?
? and teasing his family in their
WhatsApp group when they were
waiting anxiously to see if he would
be chosen for Ireland?s summer tour
last June (he was picked and made
a try-scoring Test debut against
the USA).
?It?s bad news,? Stockdale wrote
? cue the expected commiserations
and better-luck-next-times. Then,
?it?s bad news because you?ll not
see me for three and a half weeks!?.
More recently, someone handed
Stockdale a camera, apparently for
a sel?e with this now famous sports
person. Except the camera?s owner
simply wanted Stockdale to snap
their family. ?Everyone at my table
burst into laughing,? he said. ?In
Northern Ireland everyone keeps
your feet on the ground.?
IQ
36-38
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
46-52
L Q
47
Results Service
French will be
no pushovers,
warns Tipuric
UEFA CHAMPIONS LGE ROUND OF 16 2ND LEG
Barcelona (2)......................... 3 Chelsea (0)..............................0
Messi 3, 63
Dembele 20
Agg: 4-1.
Besiktas (0)............................. 1 Bayern Munich (1)........... 3
Vagner Love 58
Thiago 18
Att: 36,885
Gonul 46 (og)
Agg: 1-8
Wagner 84
By Andrew Baldock
Justin Tipuric expects Wales to face
a France team ?getting better with
every game? in Cardiff on Saturday.
Victory for Wales, who have not
lost at home to France since 2010, is
likely to secure second place behind
champions Ireland in this season?s
Six Nations.
But Tipuric, who looks set to win
his 57th cap, believes they pose a considerable threat this time.
?When France gel and play well,
they are a very dif?cult side to beat,?
said the Ospreys ?anker (below).
?They are getting better with
every game. You know what you are
going to get with France.
They have got big
strong men who try
and get over the
gainline.
?If we can
stop their
go-forward, it
will make our life
a lot easier.?
Wales head coach
Warren Gatland is due
to name his starting lineup today. Skipper Alun Wyn Jones,
full-back Leigh Halfpenny, prop Rob
Evans and hooker Ken Owens are
among those who look set for recalls
but the fly-half position promises
to provide an interesting selection
discussion.
Gatland has used three different
starting 10s in the competition so
far ? Rhys Patchell, Dan Biggar and
Gareth Anscombe ? and his final
decision for the France clash will be
a fascinating one.
Fitzpatrick captures her third medal
Great Britain?s Menna Fitzpatrick
and her guide, Jennifer Kehoe,
secured their second silver ? and
third medal overall ? in the visually
impaired giant slalom event at the
PyeongChang Winter Paralympics.
Fitzpatrick and Kehoe made a
disappointing start to these Games,
failing to ?nish the downhill event on
Saturday, but they have gone on to
claim super-G bronze on Sunday and
now two silvers in as many days.
The pair matched their finish in Tuesday?s super-combined
event as they posted a time of 2min
28.34sec over their two runs. That
was 5.34sec slower than Henrieta
Farkasova and Natalia Subrtova
of Slovakia, who have won all four
events so far.
Kelly Gallagher and Gary Smith
came ?fth for their best ?nish so far,
and Millie Knight and Brett Wild
were seventh. Britain has now won
?ve medals at these Games.
Fitzpatrick (celebrating, far right)
said: ?It felt absolutely amazing: you
can really feel the acceleration from
your skis and your bodies driving you
forward. Jen was just going for it.?
Britain?s James Whitley came 11th
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
WALES
PARALYMPICS
+
2
51
-
1
5
�
VOICES
20-24
Menna Fitzpatrick and Jennifer Kehoe on their way to silver REUTERS
in the men?s standing giant slalom,
while Scott Meenagh was 16th in
the qualification runs of the men?s
cross-country skiing 1.1km sprint
sitting event.
In the wheelchair curling, the British team had a mixed day. Aileen Neilson?s rink bounced back from losing
both of their matches on Tuesday by
triumphing 8-3 against Germany.
But a 9-3 defeat by the United
States leaves Neilson and her teammates joint-fourth alongside Switzerland in the round-robin standings.
SKY BET LEAGUE ONE
Bradford (0)...........................0 Wigan (0)................................. 1
Jacobs 90
P
W
D L F
A Pts
Blackburn
37
22 10 5 70 35
76
Wigan
34
21
8
5 63 23
71
Shrewsbury
35
21
8
6 47 26
71
Rotherham
36 19
5 12 60 43
62
Scunthorpe
37
15 13 9 54 44 58
Peterborough 36
15 11 10 58 45
56
Plymouth
36
15
9 12 44 43
54
Charlton
35 14 9 12 44 46
51
Bristol Rovers 36
15
5 16 51 53 50
Bradford
35
15
5 15 48 52
50
Gillingham
36
12 13 11 42 40 49
Portsmouth
36
15 4 17 43 47
49
Southend
36
12 10 14 42 54 46
Blackpool
36
11 12 13 43 47
45
Walsall
37
11 11 15 47 54 44
Doncaster
36 10 13 13 43 44 43
Oxford Utd
35
11
9 15 50 53
42
Wimbledon
36
11
8 17 36 47
41
Oldham
35 10 10 15 50 60 40
Northampton 36 10 9 17 35 57
39
Fleetwood Tn 35 10 8 17 46 57
38
MK Dons
36
8
11 17 35 50
35
Rochdale
33
7
12 14 33 41
33
Bury
36
7
9 20 30 53
30
LADBROKES SCOTTISH LEAGUE ONE
Arbroath 1 Ayr 1.
BASKETBALL
NBA: Atlanta 107 Oklahoma City 119; Brooklyn
102 Toronto 116; Chicago 106 LA Clippers 112; LA
Lakers 112 Denver 103; New Orleans 119 Charlotte 115; NY Knicks 97 Dallas 110; Philadelphia
98 Indiana 101; Phoenix 107 Cleveland 129; San
Antonio 108 Orlando 72; Utah 110 Detroit 79;
Washington 111 Minnesota 116.
CRICKET
INTERNATIONAL TWENTY20 SERIES
India v Bangladesh, Colombo: India 176-3 (20.0
overs; R G Sharma 89). Bangladesh 159-6 (20.0
overs; Mushfiqur Rahim 72no). India won by 17
runs.
TOUR MATCH
New Zealand XI v England, Hamilton: New
Zealand XI 376 (90.0 overs; T A Blundell 131, K A
Jamieson 101; J M Anderson 4-56).
CYCLING
DANILITH NOKERE KOERSE, Elite Men: 1 F
Jakobsen (Neth) 4mins32.560secs, 2 A Capiot (Bel),
3 H Hofstetter (Fr), 4 R Jans (Bel), 5 A Fenn (GB)
all at same time.
HORSE RACING RESULTS
CHELTENHAM Going: Soft-heavy in places
1.30 1. SAMCRO (Jack Kennedy) 8-11 fav; 2. Black
Op 8-1; 3. Next Destination 4-1. 14 ran. 23/4l, 5l. (G
Elliott (IRE) ).
2.10 1. PRESENTING PERCY (D N Russell) 5-2 fav;
2. Monalee 10-3; 3. Elegant Escape 9-1. 10 ran. 7l,
7l. (P G Kelly (IRE) ).
2.50 1. BLEU BERRY (M P Walsh) 20-1; 2. Topofthegame 9-1; 3. Barra 16-1; 4. William Henry 8-1 jt-fav.
26 ran. 8-1 jt-fav Max Dynamite (22nd). nk, 11/4l, 11/4l.
(W P Mullins (IRE) ). NR: Project Bluebook.
3.30 1. ALTIOR (N De Boinville) evens fav; 2. Min
5-2; 3. God?s Own 40-1. 9 ran. 7l, 11l. (N Henderson).
4.10 1. TIGER ROLL (K M Donoghue) 7-1; 2. Urgent
De Gregaine 12-1; 3. The Last Samuri 11-4 fav; 4.
Auvergnat 10-1. 16 ran. 2l, 11l, 41/2l. (G Elliott (IRE) ).
4.50 1. VENEER OF CHARM (Jack Kennedy) 33-1;
2. Style De Garde 12-1; 3. Nube Negra 15-2 fav; 4.
Padleyourowncanoe 33-1. 22 ran. 3l, 1l, 23/4l. (G
Elliott (IRE) ).
5.30 1. RELEGATE (Ms K Walsh) 25-1; 2. Carefully
Selected 6-1; 3. Tornado Flyer 14-1; 4. Acey Milan
9-2 fav. 23 ran. nk, 31/4l, 13/4l. (W P Mullins (IRE) ).
NR: Herecomestheboom.
Jackpot: Not won, pool of �,107.38 carried over
to . Placepot: �.70. Quadpot: �.30.
Place 6: �.13. Place 5: �.18.
ICE HOCKEY
NHL: Arizona 4 LA Kings 3 (SO); Calgary 1
Edmonton 0; Carolina 4 Boston 6; Minnesota 1
Colorado 5; Montreal 4 Dallas 2; Nashville 3 Winnipeg 1; Tampa Bay 4 Ottawa 7.
TENNIS
BNP PARIBAS OPEN, INDIAN WELLS, CALIFORNIA: Men?s Singles Fourth round: (23) H CHUNG
(S Kor) bt (30) P CUEVAS (Uru) 6-1 6-3; B Coric
(Croa) bt T Harry Fritz (US) 6-2 6-7 (6-8) 6-4; (31)
P KOHLSCHREIBER (Ger) bt P Herbert (Fr) 6-4
7-6 (7-1).
Selected Men?s Third round: (28) F LOPEZ (Sp) bt
(8) J SOCK (US) 7-6 (8-6) 4-6 6-4; (18) S QUERREY
(US) bt Y Bhambri (India) 6-6 (4-7) 6-4 6-4; (6) J
MARTIN DEL POTRO (Arg) bt (29) D FERRER (Sp)
6-4 7-6 (7-3). Selected Women?s Fourth round:
(1) S HALEP (Rom) bt Q Wang (Chin) 7-5 6-1; (5) K
PLISKOVA (Cz Rep) bt A Anisimova (US) 6-1 7-6
(7-2); (8) V WILLIAMS (US) bt (21) A SEVASTOVA
(Lat) 7-6 (8-6) 6-4; (10) A KERBER (Ger) bt (7) C
GARCIA (Fr) 6-1 6-1; (20) D KASATKINA (Rus) bt
(2) C WOZNIACKI (Den) 6-4 7-5.
TODAY?S FIXTURES
(Football 7.45pm unless stated)
FOOTBALL
EUROPA LEAGUE ROUND OF 16 SECOND LEG
Arsenal (2) v AC Milan (0) (8.05) ....................................................
Athletic Bilbao (1) v Marseille (3) (6)..........................................
Dynamo Kiev (2) v Lazio (2) (6)........................................................
Lokomotiv Moscow (0) v A Madrid (3) (4).............................
Lyon (1) v CSKA Moscow (0) (8.05)..............................................
Plzen (0) v Sporting Lisbon (2) (6) ...............................................
RB Salzburg (2) v B Dortmund (1) (8.05)................................
Zenit St Petersburg (1) v RB Leipzig (2) (6) .........................
GOLF
USPGA TOUR ARNOLD PALMER INVITATIONAL
(Bay Hill Club & Lodge, Orlando, Florida).
BANK OF HOPE FOUNDERS CUP (Arizona).
RUGBY LEAGUE
BETFRED SUPER LGE (7.45): Huddersfield v Hull K R.
48
Football
SPORT
EUROPA LEAGUE
CHAMPIONS LEAGUE
Which Arsenal will turn up for a
game key to saving their season?
By Samuel Lovett
As a club whose up-and-down form
has become a feature of the Premier
League in recent years, it was unexpected for Arsenal to down AC
Milan in their own backyard.
After a run of four defeats, the
side put in a gritty, resolute performance at the San Siro.
It was the sort of display that, over
the years, has lifted the club out of
its self-inflicted malaise. Twelve
months ago Bayern Munich plunged
them into a state of hysteria, sparking Arsenal?s already combustible
fanbase into civil war. The FA Cup
win over Chelsea calmed the waters
and kept Ars鑞e Wenger in a job but
another crisis is never far away.
Which brings us to tonight?s
second-leg tie against AC Milan. In
a game which will either crush or
carry Wenger?s hopes of Champions
League football, which Arsenal will
show up?
Winning runs simply aren?t their
thing. Only once this season have
they won three consecutive games,
and that was last autumn. Having
followed their victory at the San Siro
with a routine win over Watford last
weekend, do they have the self-belief
and momentum to keep winning?
Wenger is hoping that his men
have turned a corner after their
recent setbacks. ?Consistency is a
sign of quality and that is the most
important quality for me,? he said.
?Sometimes when you have a neg-
Arsenal
Ospina
Bellerin
Ozil
Musta?
Koscielny
Wilshere
Xhaka
Ramsey
Monreal
Mkhitaryan
Welbeck
Possible XI for tonight?s second leg v AC Milan
Kick-off 8.05pm (at the Emirates)
TV BT Sport 2
Referee J Eriksson (Swe)
First leg AC Milan 0-2 Arsenal
Aaron Ramsey (right) says it?s vital
Arsenal get past AC Milan tonight
ative spirit it is dif?cult to get out.
That is why it was important for us
to turn the corner, especially when
you have three games in one week. If
you lose the ?rst one you have more
chances to lose the next one. It was
important to get out of that.?
The Europa League is Arsenal?s
last hope of a trophy this season.
Manchester United showed it was
possible last year and, after initially
dismissing it, the club is concentrating all its efforts on reaching the
?nal in Lyon and securing a spot in
next season?s Champions League.
Aaron Ramsey said: ?We needed
the result in Milan ? it was a tough
run for us. Sometimes these things
just happen. Hopefully we can
build on it and go from strength to
strength. It is a massive opportunity
for us, so it?s something we?ve got to
be prepared to give everything for to
try to achieve this. This game is very
important for us and our season.?
But Arsenal?s route to the final
is far from straightforward. ?You
look who is in there ? Milan, Dortmund, Atletico Madrid, Arsenal, all
the French teams,? Wenger added.
?You have many good teams in
there and this competition is maybe
this season at a higher level than
ever before.?
Faced with that calibre of opposition, Arsenal must pull up their
socks, dirty their hands and get
down to business. It?s either that
or yet another season of unful?lled
promises. THE INDEPENDENT
CONTINENTAL CUP
Dutch flair gives Gunners fifth cup win
ARSENAL
Miedema 36
MANCHESTER CITY
1
Kevin
Garside
0
CHIEF SPORTS
CORRESPONDENT
T
By Glenn Moore
AT ADAMS PARK
Three months after crossing the
globe to become manager of Arsenal,
Australian Joe Montemurro hoisted
his ?rst trophy last night. A solitary
goal by Vivianne Miedema, 36 minutes into the ?rst half, was enough to
dethrone holders Manchester City
and win Arsenal their fifth Continental Cup.
Ironically, Montemurro had been
coaching Australian women?s champions Melbourne City, an off-shoot
of Manchester City, before getting
the call from Arsenal. He thanked
?the City group for giving me the
opportunity I had at Melbourne?
but said the 12,000-mile switch had
been worth it.
?I am ecstatic to be here,? he said,
?privileged to be here. I love the
club, love the football. There was a
lot of emotion [watching the game],
a lot of ups and downs. We were in
control ?rst half, in the second half
we had to defend.?
?We were not good enough in the
Vivianne Miedema scores the only goal of the game for Arsenal last night GETTY
?rst half,? said City manager Nick
Cushing. ?We were too passive, we
gave Arsenal too much respect. But
I?m proud of their reaction after
half-time and how the players tried
and fought for their trophy, but we
left ourselves too much to do.?
Miedema scored the winner in the
?nal of Euro 2017 last summer and if
this chilly night at Wycombe was a
very different occasion to that heady
afternoon in Enschede, the Dutch
striker was keen to stress its value.
?To win this game is so important
for Arsenal.? She added, referencing the Euro win, ?that experience
helps, especially when you are 1-0
up with 10 minutes to go, I think you
saw that with [Dutch and Arsenal
team-mate] Danielle van de Donk.?
Arsenal needed all the experience
of their four Dutch Euro winners as
holders Manchester City put them
under siege in the second period.
The pace of Nikita Parris and substitute Claire Emslie stretched Arsenal but they held ?rm.
?We?ve now gone seven games
without copping a goal,? said Montemurro. ?That?s not just the back
four. The mid?eld three and the top
did well.? THE INDEPENDENT
his is where it began for
Jose Mourinho, sliding
down the Old Trafford
touchline in celebration
of Porto?s last-minute
winner, en route to Champions
League glory in the days when
parsimony paid; when keeping it
tight then springing an ambush was
the hot innovation.
That was 2004. Mourinho was as
fresh as paint and handsome with
it; a football matinee idol who had
us all in his gorgeous pocket. Now
he is just a lined, greying, miserable
bugger, an old git at the wheel of a
high-performance vehicle he has no
clue how to drive. His Champions
League motif, the thing that made
him special, was his twice, the last
time in 2010 when he orchestrated
the beating of the great Barcelona
with his Inter Milan side.
Since then he has failed three
times with Real Madrid, again with
Chelsea and now most depressingly
at United. Meanwhile across the
street his nemesis, Pep Guardiola,
is pioneering the latest technology:
a high-end motor so operationally
smooth, beautifully tuned and
blisteringly quick, little else on the
road can get anywhere near it. You
need a super licence to drive this
stunner and to get one of those
you have to be across the latest
developments.
Guardiola has been at Manchester
City the same length of time as
Mourinho at United. Yes he has
spent money, but so has Mourinho,
who in January went deeper than
City were prepared to delve for the
services of Alexis Sanchez. And how
has that worked out, Jose?
Guardiola has transformed
City, a team of expensively
assembled parts, into a connected
whole of formidable, maybe even
unprecedented scale. Money
didn?t make Raheem Sterling
an irresistible storm, Guardiola
did. Over in Salford Mourinho
ties the feet of Marcus Rashford,
devastating on the left, to the right
touchline. Masterful. Mind you this
is the bloke who thought Kevin De
Bruyne and Mo Salah were duds.
It is the failure of Mourinho to
mould United into a cohesive force
equal to the sum of its parts that
condemns him. He has had some
NEWS
2-33
VOICES
20-24
TV
34-35
United manager Jose
Mourinho?s route one
tactics to beat Liverpool
are 30 years out of date
REUTERS
Mourinho
called Wenger
a specialist in
failure, now he
is heading down
the same road...
successes in Ashley Young, Scott
McTominay and lately making a
centre-forward of Romelu Lukaku,
but in his uninspiring handling of
Anthony Martial, Luke Shaw and
Rashford ? Liverpool was his ?rst
start of 2018 ? and his reliance
on the idea of Marouane Fellaini
as indispensable, he reveals his
negative nature.
Mourinho famously labelled
Ars鑞e Wenger a specialist in
failure, hopelessly attached to the
stuff that moved the needle during
his ?rst decade at Arsenal. It might
just be, as absurd as it sounds to his
own ears, that Mourinho is heading
into the same siding, irrevocably
yoked to ancient dogma. In his
delusions, Mourinho can claim
to have the backing of the chief
executive, the board, his mates, the
waiters in the Lowry Hotel but it
won?t add up to a hill of beans once
the fans have rumbled him. And
judging by the dissent on social
media, the urgent chants at Old
Trafford of ?attack, attack, attack?,
they are quickly tiring of his schtick.
Louis van Gaal had just won the
FA Cup when he got wind of his
demise, and he thought the old pot
was evidence of progress. Mourinho
rolled out the trophy acquisition
argument to justify his methods
last year.
Jose Mourinho?s Champions League record since 2004
Club:
Porto
Chelsea
2003/04 04/05
Winner
05/06
06/07
Inter Milan
07/08 08/09
Opposition
Monaco
Final
09/10
Real Madrid
10/11
11/12
12/13
13/14
Manchester United
14/15
15/16
16/17
17/18
Bayern
Bayern
Liverpool
Atletico
Semi-final
Quarter-final
Barcelona
Liverpool
PSG
Round of 16
N/A
Dortmund
Barcelona
Man Utd
Sacked 20 Sep
Won
Europa
League
Sacked 17 Dec
Sevilla
IQ
36-38
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
46-52
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
49
?Baffling and ponderous? ?
pundits take aim at United
By Matt Butler
While Jose Mourinho tried to
spin Tuesday night?s Champions
League defeat by Sevilla as yet
another triumph for the Special
One, pundits and former players
begged to differ.
Mourinho said after the 2-1
loss at Old Trafford that defeat
when he is in attendance was
?nothing new?, boasting: ?I?ve
sat in this chair twice before
in the Champions League.
Paul Scholes described United?s
With Porto ? Manchester
performance as ?very bad?
United out. With Real Madrid ?
every game conservatively,?
Manchester United out.?
he said, before pointing to the
It was a strange explanation
underperformance of Alexis
of a dismal display of dour,
Sanchez as a symptom of the
defensive tactics ? beautifully
manager?s system.
dubbed ?the Troglodyte model?
Scholes? verdict was damning.
by the Spanish paper AS.
Mournho insisted: ?I did my
He said: ?He gave the ball away
best, the players did
so often and his manager
their best. We tried,
has to see that in the 10
Some
we lost ? and that
games he has played, he
[games]
they
is football.? But the
has not been good.?
get away with
manager?s case for
Scholes (above) added
it because
his side?s meek exit
that the conservative
did not wash with the
they get a win. approach has escaped
watching public and
Tonight, they a lot of criticism on
United?s ponderous
account of the fact
had nothing.
style against a limited
that they can grind out
Sevilla side drew sharp No energy, no victories.
fast start
criticism from two of
?Some [games]
their former players,
they get away with,
Rio Ferdinand and Paul Scholes. because they get a win,? he said.
Ferdinand said: ?The way
?Tonight, they had nothing.
[United] were set up at Old
No energy, no fast start. The
Trafford to counter-attack
performance was very bad.?
this Sevilla team was baf?ing.
Gary Lineker, the former
But also the players are the
England striker and Match of
the Day presenter, said: ?You
ones who set the tempo too.
[They were] far too slow and
can?t say Sevilla don?t deserve
cautious in possession and so
their victory. United?s gamepassive without it.? Scholes
plan was baf?ing: deep lying,
agreed. ?They approach
ponderous and negative.?
We let the low grade quality
and Crystal Palace. But those
of the League Cup and Europa
?eeting treats remained just
League pass at that point, since
that, ultimately subsumed by
there was a degree of goodwill
the mundane. The goals against
swilling about. Less so now. Not
Liverpool, as good as Rashford?s
when it is clear he is mired in old
?nishing was, resulted from long
mores and tactics.
punts from the keeper to a big
You can?t play the game the way
centre forward. That?s the route
he does and prosper in 2018; you
one theory of Charles Hughes,
can?t park the bus at An?eld or at
laughed out of coaching manuals
home to City; you can?t
30 years ago.
think a goalless draw
Graeme Souness
Y
o
u
can?t
away in Europe is still
was right. Mourinho
play
the
game
a good outcome when
got away with it against
the way he
teams are geared to an
Liverpool and warned
attacking philosophy
that as a strategy,
does and
that gets results on
a policy, a system,
prosper in
opponents? turf. Indeed
Mourinho?s defensive
2018;
you
can?t
that is where ties are
modelling, ceding
won: City, Liverpool, Real park the bus at possession and territory
Madrid and Juventus all An?eld or at
to the opposition, was
winning away from home home to City
ultimately unsustainable
in the last 16.
in big matches. He
Sevilla were the
probably wasn?t
team to pull and remain so in the
expecting the practice to unravel
quarter-?nals: a modest ensemble
at home to Sevilla. That it did loads
sitting ?fth in La Liga and boasting his argument with even greater
a 5-1 beating at the hands of Eibar.
force.
We are not talking Madrid and
Old Trafford was the start of
Barcelona here, nor even Atletico
things 14 years ago. Perhaps this
or Valencia.
is where it ends for Mourinho, no
I have tried my best to embrace
longer sliding but on his knees
Mourinho: pointed out the
nevertheless, a busted ?ush of a
good bits at Watford, Arsenal
football coach.
50
Football
SPORT
CHAMPIONS LEAGUE
Chelsea chase shadows as
BARCELONA
Messi 3, 63, Demb閘� 20
CHELSEA
Barcelona win 4-1 on aggregate
3
Barcelona
Ter Stegen
0
Sam
Cunningham
Roberto
Pique
Umtiti
Demb閘�
Rakitic Busquets Iniesta
Alba
AT THE NOU CAMP
The Nou Camp declared Lionel
Messi their King and the diminutive Argentinian reigned supreme
against Chelsea. Barcelona?s faithful
unfurled a message in English for
their visitors a few moments before
their Champions League last-16 second leg began last night: ?God save
the King? ? with a picture of Messi
in the middle. In his kingdom and in
front of his people, Messi played as
though he was on a higher plane.
Meanwhile, Prince Hazard
showed yet again how far away he
still is to succession, and who knows
if he will ever reach that level.
It?s getting to the point where it?s
unfair to put Messi on a football pitch
against other human beings.
He is that much better than everyone else, has that much greater understanding of the game, on and off
the ball, and can read it like no other.
If he were included in a game of the
gods, he would still be the standout
player, walking from the ethereal
?eld as man of the match, as he did
yet again last night.
Chelsea manager Antonio Conte
approached the game in the manner
supporters and pundits have been
crying out for him to do for ages:
set up with the intent to attack. The
Italian has been accused of crimes
against football for his defensive displays of late: the 1-1 draw with Barcelona in the ?rst leg at home and a
narrow defeat at Manchester City
in the Premier League. So he stuck
Olivier Giroud up top, freed Eden
Hazard from the frustrating role of
chasing down defenders ? and they
were behind after 128 seconds.
Having not scored in eight games
against Chelsea, Messi made it two
in two ? later three ? shaping to
cross from the right, then arrowing
the ball through goalkeeper Thibaut
Courtois?s legs. Even at 30 years old
he is still pushing boundaries: that
The
Sport
Matrix
The stories you
need to know
Messi
Hazard
Alonso
Suarez
Giroud
Kant�
Willian
Fabregas
Moses
Rudiger Christensen Azpilicueta
Courtois
Chelsea
Substitutions: Barcelona Paulinho (Iniesta, 56),
Gomes (Busquets, 61), Vidal (Demb閘�, 67); Chelsea
Morata (Giroud, 67), Zappacosta (Moses, 67), Pedro
(Hazard, 82).
Booked: Barcelona Roberto; Chelsea Willian, Giroud,
Alonso.
Man of the match Messi. Match rating 7/10.
Possession: Barcelona 53% Chelsea 47%.
Attempts on target: Barcelona 7 Chelsea 3.
Referee D Skomina (Slvn). Attendance 97,813.
Bayern Munich won 3-1
in Turkey last night to
complete a crushing 8-1
aggregate victory over Besiktas.
Quarter-?nalists
Barcelona, Bayern Munich,
Juventus, Liverpool, Manchester
City, Real Madrid, Roma, Sevilla.
Draw takes place 11am tomorrow;
ties to be played 3/4 and 10/11 April
strike ? at two minutes and eight seconds ? was the fastest of his career,
for club and country.
Experts will criticise Courtois for
conceding at his near post, but it
feels plain unfair when the man with
the ball was the incomparable forward. If he wants to place a ball between your legs, there is basically no
stopping him, even if he warns you in
advance. Just ask Courtois, who was
nutmegged again for Messi?s second.
There really is little Messi cannot
do and while he was unable to score
FOOTBALL
Carragher avoids
police charges
Jamie Carragher will not face
any charges over the spitting
incident that resulted in him being
suspended by Sky Sports for the
rest of the season. Police have
revealed that Andy Hughes, who
?lmed Carragher spitting from his
car after Saturday?s Manchester
United v Liverpool match, will
attend a driving improvement
course. Hughes, 42, from North
Wales told the Daily Mirror he has
since received death threats.
in his ?rst 10 games against English
sides in the Champions League,
he has since scored 20 in 18 games.
Although it is hard to tell whether
last night truly counted towards his
tally against English sides, given that
not one of the starting eleven on the
pitch for Chelsea was homegrown.
Messi?s contribution for Barcelona?s second goal was something else.
He tackled Cesc Fabregas ? showing
no mercy to his good friend ? and
strolled by Cesar Azpilicueta as
though he were taking the family for
a meander down Barcelona?s treelined La Rambla boulevard. Then,
as everyone looked one way, he saw
through three players to spot the run
of Ousmane Demb閘�, who scored
his first Barcelona goal since that
obscene �5.5m move from Borussia Dortmund last summer.
Two shots on targets, two goals, 20
minutes gone. Chelsea really could
have done with a tighter defence.
What was Conte thinking? Sometimes you can never win.
Before kick-off, Chelsea acciden-
FOOTBALL
Kane World Cup boost for England
Tottenham have announced
that they expect Harry Kane to
be sidelined for a month after
damaging lateral ligaments in his
right ankle, handing England a
welcome boost after fears he could
miss the World Cup later this year.
The striker (right) limped off
in Tottenham?s 4-1 victory over
Bournemouth on Sunday and Spurs
were unable to pinpoint the exact
problem as his ankle remained
swollen on Monday and Tuesday,
preventing a scan from taking place.
However, an improvement
yesterday meant that medics could
examine the injury and determine
how long the 24-year-old will be out.
The club are expecting their leading
scorer to return to training in four
weeks? time.
The England international has
been pictured in a protective boot
and on crutches since the injury
and will miss the national side?s
friendlies away to the Netherlands a
week tomorrow and against Italy at
Wembley the following Tuesday.
tally posted online a starting line-up
which included two Willians and no
Hazard. It was practically prophetic.
Considering the manner in which
he carried their attack almost alone
in the ?rst meeting ? hitting the post
twice and scoring Chelsea?s goal
with a fine low strike ? they probably wished two of the Brazilians
were available.
On the pitch, Hazard disappeared
? barely making an impact on such
an important occasion ? while Willian tried to run everywhere in his
NEWS
2-33
VOICES
20-24
TV
34-35
IQ
36-38
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
46-52
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
51
Messi reaches his century
Unlike United, at least Conte?s
side gave it a real go last night
Matt
Butler
A
Lionel Messi scores
Barcelona?s third goal
against Chelsea last
night REUTERS
t least Chelsea had
a go. They may not
have had much of a
chance against the 11
fantastic men in blue
and red stripes and the 90,000-odd
similarly-dressed fans producing a
febrile noise in the towering stands
above, but at least they tried.
It was refreshing to see, particularly after the stodge served
up by Manchester United in their
Anglo-Iberian tussle against Sevilla
on Tuesday.
Olivier Giroud goes for the spectacular at the Nou Camp last night REUTERS
But it is just that no matter how
much Chelsea went for it, you got the that bloke called Lionel Messi, no post for a vital away goal. Or in ansense there was something missing. doubt lacking a little sleep as he has other reality Giroud?s early opportuManager Antonio Conte, looking in- just returned from the birth of his nity may have ended up in the back
creasingly hangdog of late, is mak- third child, and when you are faced of the net and on the other side of
ing the best of what he has. Like a with such ruthless talent there are the mirror, Willian?s effort just after
man with the ability to make pass- times when you can merely applaud. the break might not have ricocheted
able tapas with little more than a tin
Then there is Andres Iniesta, with off the thigh of Samuel Umtiti. Or
of tuna in his larder, he has somehow his ageless face and pensioner?s hair- Alonso might not have been denied
conjured up something approaching line, on hand to administer one of his by Gerard Pique?s back.
a viable team for the latter stages of many tricks: a deft backheel here, a
Or ? and this is the one that will
the Champions League.
perfectly weighted pass really stick in Conte?s craw ? on anBut as he picked Olivier
there, coupled with a other night Thibaut Courtois may
When you few bouts of histrionics have closed his legs when faced by
Giroud at the spearhead
of his attack yesterday are faced
to hoodwink a referee. Messi closing in from an impossible
evening, he may have pined with Messi?s
He missed the first leg angle a mere two minutes into the
for something a little more ruthless
and his presence for the game. Coulda, shoulda, woulda.
exotic, a bit more high-end ? talent, there
first hour or so showed
Even after Messi scored his seclike a year ago, when he had are times
how much he makes ond goal of the night, Chelsea reDiego Costa at his disposal.
Barcelona rock from his fused to throw in the towel. Giroud
Because with N?Golo when you can mid?eld fulcrum.
still scampered after lost causes in
merely
Kant� and Cesc FabreBut even up against the hope he could somehow help his
gas running things in the applaud
such formidable oppo- side score three goals at the Nou
middle, and Eden Hazard
nents and, it bears re- Camp in the space of 20 minutes.
? freed of the false-nine
peating, foes who have Spoiler alert: he couldn?t.
shackles of last week ? and Willian no hesitation in crossing to the
But at least Chelsea can travel
in support up front, Giroud had dark side if it means gaining an ad- home with the satisfaction that they
no excuses.
vantage, Chelsea still refused to gave it a go. They tried. And Conte
He was installed as a true No 9 ? or succumb to the spells cast by the would have headed home wondering
indeed twice that, as he was wear- magicians of the Nou Camp.
what he could have made if he had
ing No 18 last night ? but the failure
But in the end all that they were some top-quality ingredients.
to take the chances on offer were left were what-ifs. In a parallel uniFor now, though, all he has to do
devastating.
verse Marcos Alonso?s ?rst-half free is get them back at the top table for
Of course, Chelsea were up against kick might have swung inside the next season.
team-mate?s absence. At two-down,
Chelsea still only needed two to
progress into the quarter-finals on
away goals and in the ?nal minute of
the ?rst half, Marcos Alonso hit the
right post with a skilfully struck 20yard free kick. The full-back was also
tugged back by Gerard Pique early
in the second for what looked a clear
penalty, not given. Conte was apoplectic. That was their chance, gone.
Then Messi scored the third ? his
100th Champions League goal. Not
content with humiliating Courtois
early on, he planted the ball through
the lanky Belgian?s legs once more,
this time from further out. The
feint in the build-up, as he threw
the three Chelsea players in front
of him one way then darted into the
box, was so subtle it could almost
not have happened; the finish was
perfect precision.
The game was over, Messi returned
to his throne. The stadium rose to its
feet, the season-high 97,813 crowd
worshipping their leader: All hail
Messi, all hail Messi, all hail Messi.
TENNIS
RUGBY UNION
GOLF
Bath delight at Roberts swoop
Garcia names baby
after Masters hole
Venus powers into
quarter-finals
Venus Williams continued her ?ne
form to reach the quarter-?nals of
the BNP Paribas Open in Indian
Wells, with a 7-6, 6-4 victory over
world No 20 Anastasija Sevastova.
She will now play Carla Suarez
Navarro, who beat Elina Svitolina
7-5, 6-3. Daria Kasatkina booked her
place in the last eight by stunning
world No 2 Caroline Wozniacki 6-4,
7-5. The Russian will face Angelique
Kerber, who crushed seventh seed
Caroline Garcia 6-1, 6-1.
Bath rugby director Todd
Blackadder has described
the capture of Wales
centre Jamie
Roberts as ?a really
signi?cant signing?.
Roberts (right), 31,
will join Bath at the
end of this season
from their Premiership
rivals Harlequins.
He has won 94 caps and
played in three Tests for the
British and Irish Lions. Roberts did
not make the cut for the Six Nations
squad and he last represented
Wales against New Zealand
four months ago.
Blackadder said: ?We
are delighted to bring
someone of his quality to
the club and I know he will
make an instant impact.
?He is hugely respected,
both on and off the ?eld, and
it is those qualities which make
this a really signi?cant signing for
the club.?
Masters champion Sergio Garcia
has named his baby daughter
Azalea ? after the hole at Augusta
National where he made a vital par
12 months ago to keep his victory
hopes alive. Garcia was two shots
behind Justin Rose when he drove
into some bushes on the par-?ve
13th and was forced to take a penalty
drop. However, the 38-year-old went
on to save par and beat Rose on the
?rst play-off hole to win his maiden
major title at the 74th attempt.
Sport on tv
Cricket: West Indies v Afghanistan
Sky Sports Cricket, 7.15am
Golf: Arnold Palmer Invitational
Sky Sports Golf, 11.30am
Racing: Cheltenham Festival
Channel 4, 1pm
Tennis: BNP Paribas Open
BT Sport 1, 4pm; Sky Sp?ts Mix, 8pm
Football: Arsenal v AC Milan
BT Sport, 7.30pm
Rugby League: Hudd??eld v Hull KR
Sky Sports Arena, 7.30pm
Winter Paralympics: Day seven
Channel 4, 12.20am [tomorrow]
CHELTENHAM
FESTIVAL
Champion Chase
glory for Altior
after Douvan falls
Walsh fears new
leg break just
days after return
Reports from Kevin Garside & Jon Freeman
On the centre pages
Sport
The king of pain
Messi nutmegs Courtois
twice to dump Chelsea
out of Champions League
� Reports & analysis, p50-51
15.03.18
P48
FOOTBALL
Mourinho is a
busted flush of
a football coach
KEVIN GARSIDE
Lionel Messi celebrates
scoring his second goal
last night. Below: He is
adored by the Nou Camp
crowd REUTERS; AP
P48
FOOTBALL
Arsenal claim
Continental
Cup triumph
over City
Jones apologises for calling Ireland ?scummy?
By Hugh Godwin
RUGBY UNION CORRESPONDENT
P46
RUGBY UNION
Stockdale has
Six Nations
try-scoring
record in sight
E d d i e Jo n e s h a s m a d e a n
?unreserved? apol0ogy after a video
emerged of the England rugby union
coach making derogatory comments about rival nations Ireland
and Wales.
Jones (right) referred to the Irish
as ?scummy? and Wales as a ?s**t
little place? during a motivational
talk on team management he gave
last year for the Mitsubishi Fuso
Truck and Bus Company, which
is part-owned by England Rugby
sponsors Mitsubishi.
The video had been online
since July 2017 but it was
forwarded to an Irish newspaper yesterday, three days
before Jones?s England take
on Grand Slam-chasing Ireland in the ?nal round of the
Six Nations Championship
at Twickenham on Saturday.
England have lost two matches in
the Six Nations, while the unbeaten Irish are now perhaps in possession of even more motivation
to turn over Jones?s team,
even if the words were
presumably meant by the
58-year-old Australian
to amuse or inform his
corporate audience.
?As a leader, your
prime responsibility is
to get the best out of your
team,? Jones says on stage in the
video on fuso-talks.com. ?We?re trying to do that with England at the
moment. So we?ve played 23 Tests,
we?ve only lost one Test to the scummy Irish. I?m still dirty about that
game. But we?ll get that back, don?t
worry. We?ve got them next year at
home. We?ll get ?em back.?
Earlier in his 19-minute speech,
Jones recalls his previous stint as
� Continued on p46
6
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For enquiries call +44 (0)20 7825 8300
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Per troy ounce,
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Company
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RETAIL
SERVICES
US buyers help
raise adidas profit
Funeral services
to get a revamp
Sportswear maker adidas has
raised its pro?t forecast after
seeing an upturn at the tail-end
of last year. Revenue rose by 12
per cent to ?5.05bn (�48bn) as
US and Chinese buyers turned
to adidas and retro styles grew
in popularity. The German
company is predicting a strong
2018 in the US, where it is
taking market share from Nike.
Shares in funeral ?rm Dignity
bounced, despite the company
revealing lower than expected
take-up for its ?no frills? option.
Dignity also said it had called in
management consultants LEK
to help lead a revamp to ?ght off
increasing competition. Shares
jumped 15 per cent to 982p
yesterday. They have struggled
since the start of the year.
FASHION
CONSTRUCTION
Zara cuts cloth
to suit margins
Balfour Beatty on
road to recovery
Inditex, the owner of fashion
chain Zara, said pro?ts have
risen 7 per cent, but that its
margins are under signi?cant
pressure. The Spanish-based
retailer posted net pro?ts of
?3.37bn (�n) in the year
to 31 January on revenues of
�.49bn. All Inditex?s 88,000
staff will get a share of a total
?562m bonus pool.
Balfour Beatty announced
that pro?ts more than
doubled to �6m in 2017 as
its turnaround gathered pace.
The construction ?rm behind
Crossrail had previously posted
several years of losses. Chief
executive Leo Quinn said it had
only narrowly avoided the fate
of rival Carillion by reforming
its business.
ENGINEERING
RETAIL
Broadcom bows to
Trump pressure
Tax bill is less
than convivial
Broadcom has of?cially ended
its $117bn (�bn) takeover bid
for US chipmaker Qualcomm,
two days after President Donald
Trump intervened in the deal.
The Singaporean company
said that it was disappointed
as it withdrew its proposed
candidates for the board
at Qualcomm.
Bargain Booze owner
Conviviality has revealed that
it owes the taxman �m. The
?rm, which saw its shares
collapse last week following
a pro?t warning, said the bill
is due to be paid at the end
of March. Shares in the ?rm
were suspended ahead of
the announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
CONSUMER
Everyman profits
get star billing
Sales fall as US
growth slows
The Everyman cinema chain
said revenues rose 37 per
cent to �.6m in 2017, as the
operator expanded to 22 venues.
Pre-tax pro?ts climbed from
�0,000 to �6m. It is now
spending �2m on the redesign
of the Church Road cinema in
London?s Crystal Palace.
US retail sales fell for a
third consecutive month in
February as households cut
back on purchases of costly
items, pointing to a slowdown
in economic growth in the
?rst quarter. The Commerce
Department said retail sales
slipped 0.1 per cent last month.
the
markets
The FTSE 100 gave up gains to
?nish lower yesterday, closing
down or 6.09 points, at 7,132.69,
having spent most of the day in
positive territory. Analysts pointed
to the departure of Donald Trump?s
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
along with growing fears of a trade
war dragging down the Dow Jones,
which had a knock-on effect.
***
Morrisons was the index?s biggest
faller, shedding 4.9 per cent to
close at 215.3p. At the other end,
Prudential topped the FTSE 100
after announcing plans to break
up the business, with the shares up
5.07 per cent at 1,918p.
43
i THURSDAY
15 MARCH 2018
INSURANCE
Prudential breaks up
its global operations
By Michael Bow
Insurer Prudential unveiled a
dramatic break-up of its global
empire yesterday by announcing that
it would separate its UK unit, M&G
Prudential, and then turn itself into
a standalone Asian-focused company.
Britain?s biggest insurer ?
founded 170 years ago in
London ? will carve out
M & G P r u d e n t i a l by
listing separate shares
in the company on the
FTSE 100, ending years
of speculation that the
UK and international arms
would go their separate ways.
To fuel M&G?s standalone
prospects, a �bn annuity book
has also been sold to Rothesay Life,
freeing up around �n of capital.
Both businesses will remain
headquartered in London. Mike Wells
will stay head of the international
company and John Foley will lead
M&G Prudential. A new board will
be created to oversee the UK firm.
?London is one of the deepest and
best markets in the world and the
talent base is unparalleled. British
rule of law exports well to various
markets where we do business and
the governance standards help us in
foreign markets,? Mr Wells said.
He added that the move was
not about saving money but
instead a response to the
rapid growth and success
of M&G Prudential, which
merged last August.
Shares in Prudential
rose 5 per cent to
1,918p yesterday.
T
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