close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

2018-04-01 Breakfast

код для вставкиСкачать
8c
hef
s.
ing
redi
ents.
Th e
l
t
a
t im
f
f
O
k
o
o
C
e
8
U
real food. real stories.
3 ways. The re
s
u
l
t
s
ins
i
d
e
!
feB - Mar 2018
PHP 120.00
Guest List
Chef Kalel
Chan
EDITOR IN CHIEF
Alexis Kim Paola Selom Cuizon
ASSISTANT ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Trish Dumlao
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS
Arrah Balucating, Muriel Dizon
LAYOUT ARTIST
Kit Singson
CREATIVE TRAINEE
With his
passion for
innovative
kitchen flairs,
Kalel certainly
knows the way to
his diner’s heart. He
had somehow mastered how
to capture the palette of his
Raintree Restaurants regulars.
In this issue, he is setting the
bar high with his tamarindincorporated dishes that is
perfect for any time of the day.
Chef Niño
Laus
It still holds true
that the name
Niño Laus is
synonymous
to the word
‘reinvention’. And
for a great 13 years,
Ninyo Fusion Cuisine has been a
concrete manifestation of it. Now,
his savvy for innovation is tested
once again as he curates an
amazing three-course meal with
dishes full-on nori which, to no
surprise, are all stupefying.
Karlo Cadang
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
Ena Torreda
DIGITAL MARKETING STRATEGIST
Carla Arroyo
DIGITAL MARKETING ASSOCIATE
Kiel Vasquez
CIRCULATION MANAGER
Christoper Cajucom
CIRCULATION ASSISTANT
Elnie De Leon
JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT
Gladys Gumapac
RECIPE DEVELOPER
Chef Mac Flaviano
Chef Chris
de Jesus
He has helmed
homey
delectable
heritage cuisine
under his
passion project
turned restaurant,
Provenciano. Today, his cozy
hearty reimaginings of local
fares returns this issue with his
timely renditions of dishes that
make use of one of our locally
abundant crops. Enter the sweet
potato in all its glory. His threecourse meal utilizes different
kinds of kamote that will leave
tongues wagging.
CONTRIBUTORS
Timothy Diao, Justin de Jesus, Dang
Futalan, Pam Musni, Tricia Quintero,
Bert Santos
SPECIAL THANKS TO
Jasmine Bernales, Prof. Kevin Carpio,
Chef Jack Flores, Chef Raul Forés, Chef
Carlos Franco, Heather Mahi, Cel Reyes,
Queenee Villar
SPECIAL THANKS TO
25 Seeds, Tasteless Food Group
Chef Robby
Goco
A passionate
soul who
believes that
food is more
than just what
we take in; but
also about what
we leave behind, Chef Robby
Goco goes beyond great
tasting fares. His sustainablefriendly approach is indeed a
notable feat. And this he is keen
to share with us again on his
cunning three-tiered take on
the avocado.
Dang Futalan
ON THE COVER
Recipe by Sau del Rosario
Photography by Bert Santos
2
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
A digital nomad
and a gym
enthusiast,
Dang spends
her time either
on her laptop or
at the gym. She
self-studies about
slipped discs and food macros,
plays the guitar, and writes about
anything under the sun.
Chef Kristine
Lotilla
The only rose
among the
thorn of chefs
that make up
The Tasteless
Food Group,
Kristine never ceases to prove
her wit and artistry. This issue,
she takes the challenge to whip
up a three-course delight with
everything coconut. Witness
how she creates mouthwatering dishes with much
grace and finesse.
Chef Noel
Mauricio
As part and
parcel of the
brilliant minds
that comprise
The Tasteless
Food Group,
Noel’s creativity
knows no bounds. Proof of this
is how he rose up to the ultimate
challenge of making sriracha
work for an appetizer, a main dish,
and a dessert. Flip through these
pages to see the feisty delightful
masterpieces he came up with.
Chef Thirdy
Dolatre
After countless
travels abroad,
and braving
the unknown
to gain what it
takes to become an
extraordinary chef, Thirdy is one
who lives for gastronomy and all
its wonders. This issue, he proves
his prowess as he takes the dare
to concoct three bacon dishes
good as a starter, a main, and a
sweet dish you can easily recreate
at home.
editor’s note
T
wo Thousand and
Twelve—the year
we introduced
Breakfast magazine. It was
a February celebration at
Enderun. I vividly recall
the joy it was to work with
Ms. Judy Ann Santos, who
graced the cover. Having
her was a good headstart
for us. The media launch
also featured five esteemed
chefs who co-introduced
the title. One of which was
Chef Sau, who up until
today, we continue to work
with on certain projects.
My gratefulness to Chef
Sau extends beyond words.
His loyalty and friendship
has mounted Breakfast
to be what it is today. It
was also the same issue
that brought me to meet
Mr. Spanky Enriquez. His
hospitality helped us get
acquainted with the best
food and the best people
in the industry. Thank you
for everything!
Three—the number
of people who started
Breakfast magazine.
To Sam and Paola, I
will forever hold our
glory days of trial and
error, agreements and
disagreements, late nights
and early mornings as one
of the most sensational
years since Breakfast
came to be. Thank you for
jumpstarting your career
journey with Breakfast
magazine. I wouldn’t have
had it differently.
Thirteen—this is how
much our family has
grown. All the days each
of you have spent in the
office fighting deadlines,
meeting goals, and
thinking ahead has proved
how well we co-existed
with the changes around
us, good and bad. You are
all appreciated.
Thirty Eight—the
last issue number; also
the issue you are holding
now. As I write this,
I only think of how
grateful we all are for
each one who has kept us
off of the shelves.
One—the number of
people I needed to believe
in this magazine. Six
steady years of growth and
a handful of learning and
unlearning experiences
has taught me that our
dreams, as imaginable as
they may be, start with
just one person and that
is you. If there are tough
times, know that there
will be tougher ones. It is
when we choose to believe
in ourselves that difficult
things become obsolete.
We close this issue with
excitement for better and
bigger things for AKME
Publishing. Our online
titles, breakfastmag.com
and asiafoodnews.com, will
continue to bring you
relevant food content. This,
too, marks the beginning
of our journey in the digital
world. I hope you continue
to share the same demeanor
with us online.
From the bottom of our
hearts, thank you for the
unwavering support!
Cheers!
Alexis
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
3
Table of Contents
real food
6 Avocado
W h i l e t h e av o c a d o h a s
a l way s b e e n a r o u n d ,
m a n y h av e y e t t o
discover its true
blue potential in the
k i t c h e n . N o w, t h e b a l l
is in your court to
w h i p u p s o m e s e r i o u s ly
good grub from this
w o n d e r f r u i t.
u n d e r s ta n d w h y. I t ’ s s w e e t,
n u t t y f l av o r c a n t r u ly m a k e a
d i s h m o r e h e av e n ly. S o h e r e ’ s
s o m e 3 - c o u r s e c o c o n u t- i n f u s e d
r e c i p e s t h at ’ l l s o o t h e a l l y o u r
c o c o c r av i n g s .
12 Bacon
23 Nori
It’s time to go wild and
indulge in everything
b a c o n ! T h e c r i s p y,
s a lt y, a n d fat t y
ingredient might be
considered sinful,
b u t t h i s c u lt- fav o r i t e
i n g r e d i e n t c a n t r u ly
make everything
better. See how!
18 Coconut
Nuts for anything with
c o c o n u t ? W e d e f i n i t e ly
4
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
pretty solid recipes to
b a c k o u r c a s e u p.
C o n t r a r y t o p o p u l a r b e l i e f, n o r i
can go beyond the sushi. Truth
i s , i t c a n a c t u a l ly c o m e i n h a n d y
for perking up your meals. Here
a r e s o m e m o u t h wat e r i n g r e c i p e s
t h at ’ l l m a k e y o u a l way s k e e p a
s t o c k i n y o u r p a n t r y.
28 Sriracha
Would you believe us if we tell
y o u t h at s r i r a c h a g o e s w e l l
on everything? From salads to
roasts to yes, even desserts!
And here we’ve rounded up some
33 Sweet Potato
L o c a l ly k n o w n a s
t h e ‘ k a m o t e ’, t h i s
ingredien t has pl ay ed
a huge part to our
a nces t ors’ way of l ife.
Now it’s time to revisit
what was and recreate
t he days of ol d wi t h
some delectable
modern twists.
38 Tamarind
Here’s one tale you've
got to remember when
doing magic in the
kitchen. The tamarind,
l o c a l ly k n o w n a s t h e
‘s a mpa l oc’ m ay no t be
in season for the whole
year but we show you
how competent it is as
an ingredient for most
m e a l s o f t h e d a y.
Table of Contents
real stories
4 4 Man of
the Hour
Much has been written
about Chef Sau del
Rosario over the years–
his dri v e, his passion
f o r t r av e l , h i s a c c l a i m e d
p u r s u i t s . B u t w h i l e i t m ay
be tempting to harp on
his successes, not many
w o u l d wa n t t o d w e l l o n
t h e c h a l l e n g e s t h at p u s h
it behind the scenes. This
is sue, we sat wi t h t he
cel ebr at ed chef t o spe ak
about the trials he had
undergone throughout
his career, as well as
t he l es sons he’s taken
from them.
54 Brand Talk
We sit down with Chef
William Mahi as he
introduces the concept of
“ f u n d i n i n g ” a n d c r e at e s
an authentic eclectic
e x p e r i e n c e t h at a d d s
t o M a n i l a’ s f i n e r o s t e r
o f d e g u s tat i o n - c e n t r i c
66 Gastronomy
Confidential
dining. This issue, we give you
an exclusive behind the scenes
l o o k at w h at m a k e s 210 D e g r e e s
Kitchen + Drinkery tick.
62 Essays
We are living in a world
of exciting times in our
gastronomic scene. Left and
r i g h t, n e w c u i s i n e s a n d i d e a s
p e r v a d e t h e m a r k e t, m u c h t o
t h e c o n s u m e r s ’ d e l i g h t, a n d
e s p e c i a l ly w i t h t h e r i s e o f
adven t urous e at ers. T his is
what drove us t o e xpl ore t wo
t h i n g s . F i r s t, t h e s a f e t y a n d
precau t ions one mus t take
h e e d w i t h t h e w i d e ly a c c e p t e d
t rend of e at ing r aw se af ood
dishes. Then, we delve into the
spec t rum of t he cre at ivi t y t hat
goes wi t hin a pl at e as we l ook
i n t o t h e m i n d s o f M a n i l a’ s t o p t iered res taur an t s.
T h e o n ly c o n s t a n t t h i n g
in the world is change
and art is a living
t e s t a m e n t o f i t. I n t h i s
issue, we scoop all the
know-hows about nontraditional sushi with
Sushi Nori. We show you
how they transformed
a classic food into a
quirk y one that oozes
with youthful charm.
Wi t h t hese innovat ions
in sushi making, it can
e a s i ly f i t a n y b o d y ’ s
f a s t- p a c e d l i f e s t y l e !
72 Food Trip
With the local
res taur ant scene
flourishing more than
ever, a number of
es tablishment s seek
to make a difference.
This issue, we round
up a list who dare to
defy the classics, and
i s t r u ly w o r t h y o f
at tention.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
5
v
A
o
d
a
oc
ur
ast
nP
es
0
v
a
r
B
re e
FG
o
Co sus
n
Go
e
By de J tala
B
o tin
a
r
C
es
ef Jus rvin
ur
CH
by Hy by o Ma s
ast
P
S
AP KS T
IPE
le
een
REC ToGR HAN erna T Gr
T
A
o
B
L
H
e
N
P
CIA Min
TIo
SPE Jas LoCA
D
N
AN T o
SHo
Green Pastures is located at G/F Net Park, 5th
Avenue, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig City. For
inquiries, contact (+63) 926 0630 930.
ReaL FOOD: avocado
AVOCADO HUMMUS
AND AVOCADO GREENS
Preparation time: 25 minutes
Cooking time: 10 minutes
Serves 6 to 8
Ingredients
FOR THE CILANTRO LIME DRESSING
• 2 teaspoons lime juice
• ¼ cup distilled white vinegar
• 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
• ½ cup honey
• 2 tablespoons shallots, finely chopped
• 1 tablespoon cilantro, finely chopped
• 1 ½ cups sunflower oil
• 2 teaspoons salt (adjust if needed)
• 1 teaspoon pepper (adjust if needed)
FOR THE GREENS
• 1 head romaine, chopped into
bite-sized pieces
• 1 cup kale, chopped into bite-sized pieces
• 1 cup arugula, chopped into
bite-sized pieces
• 2 cups Lollo Verde, chopped into
bite-sized pieces
• 1 whole avocado, diced
• ¼ cup corn kernels
• ¼ cup red onion, thinly sliced
• ¼ cup grapes or cherry tomato
•
•
•
60 grams roast chicken meat
½ cup tortilla chips
1 tablespoon sunflower seeds
FOR THE HUMMUS
• 300 grams boiled or canned
chickpeas, drained
• 2 avocados (500 grams each)
• 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
• ½ cup tahini paste
• 3 teaspoons lemon juice
• ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
• salt and pepper, to taste
TO ASSEMBLE
• ½ cup avocado hummus
• ¼ piece fresh avocado, thinly sliced
• 1 tablespoon chickpeas, boiled
• 1 teaspoon sunflower seeds
• 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
• pinch of flakey sea salt
• pinch of fresh cilantro, chopped
Procedure
FOR THE AVOCADO HUMMUS
1. Combine chickpeas, avocados, and
garlic in a food processor. Pulse
until well-blended.
2. Add tahini paste, lemon juice, extra
virgin olive oil, salt, and black
pepper. Turn on food processor
and pulse until smooth and
well-combined. Taste and adjust
seasoning with salt and pepper.
Place in chiller for about an hour
before serving.
3. To assemble, spread avocado
hummus on the bottom of the
plate. Top with fanned avocado
slices, chickpeas, and sunf lower
seeds. Drizzle with olive oil and
sprinkle some f lakey sea salt, then
garnish with fresh cilantro. Serve
per plate.
FOR THE AVOCADO GREENS
1. For the dressing, mix all ingredients
until well-combined. Place in chiller.
2. Combine romaine, kale, Lollo
Verde, and arugula in a mixing
bowl. Dress with cilantro lime
dressing. Place on a serving plate
then top the ingredients on top of
the greens. Drizzle with cilantro
lime dressing before serving.
Chef ’s Note: You may use a mortar and
pestle if a food processor is not present.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
7
ReaL FOOD: avocado
8
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
ReaL FOOD: avocado
AVOCADO WRAP
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 5 minutes
Serves 1
Ingredients
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 piece pita bread
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon extra
virgin olive oil
½ piece avocado
(about 100 grams)
5 pieces cherry tomatoes,
cut in half
5-8 pieces sundried tomato,
roughly chopped
½ teaspoon garlic, minced
½ teaspoon cilantro, chopped
½ teaspoon mint, chopped
•
•
1 teaspoon sunflower seeds
1-2 tablespoons feta
cheese, crumbled
FOR THE SIDE DISH
•
•
•
•
•
•
½ piece avocado, diced
1 teaspoon lime zest
1 tablespoon lime juice
1 tablespoon extra
virgin olive oil
salt and pepper, to taste
pinch of cilantro
Procedure
1.
2.
Heat pita bread on a sauté
pan or on a griddle. Brush
with olive oil and season
with dried oregano.
Remove from heat
and arrange the other
ingredients on top of
the pita bread. Wrap the
pita bread with foil or
3.
4.
parchment paper then
set aside.
Combine avocado, lime
zest, olive oil, lime juice,
salt, and pepper. Mix
until well-combined.
Place wrap on a plate.
Serve with side then
garnish with cilantro.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
9
ReaL FOOD: avocado
HOMEMADE
AVOCADO
FROYO
Preparation time: 5 minutes
Cooking time: 4-6 hours
Serves 4 to 6
10
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
Ingredients
Procedure
•
•
•
•
•
•
1.
400 grams avocado, frozen
2 cups Greek yogurt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup honey
1 tablespoon lime zest
½ teaspoon salt
TO ASSEMBLE
• 3-4 scoops avocado froyo
• ¼ piece avocado slices
• 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
• pinch of flakey sea salt
• 1 teaspoon lime zest
2.
3.
Combine frozen avocado, Greek
yogurt, vanilla extract, honey, lime
zest, and salt in a blender. Blend
until smooth.
Place it in a container and put it
in the freezer. Freeze for about 4
hours. Check and mix every hour to
prevent ice crystals from forming.
Scoop avocado froyo in desired
glass, garnish with avocado, olive
oil, salt, and lime zest.
Refinery is located at Promenade,
Greenhills Shopping Center, Ortigas
Avenue, San Juan; with a branch
at Rockwell Center, Makati. For
inquiries, contact (02) 781-0344.
m
o
H
e
g
T
h
n
i
e
g
n
B
i
a
r
c
B
RECIPES by CHef tHirdy dolatre oF refinery
PHoToGRAPHy by Justin de Jesus
SHoT oN LoCATIoN AT refinery AT GreenHills
on
ReaL FOOD: Bacon
BACON AND
CORN CHOWDER
Preparation time: 5-10 minutes
Cooking time: 15-20 minutes
Serves 4
Ingredients
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1/8 cup butter
4 pieces bacon, cut
to lardons
1 piece white onion, diced
½ cup all purpose f lour
½ liter full cream milk
½ liter vegetable stock
120 grams potatoes, diced
•
•
•
•
•
Procedure
1.
2.
3.
In a pot, melt butter over
low heat. Add in the
bacon and render all the
fat slowly on low heat.
Add in the white
onions and sweat until
translucent, then add in
the all purpose f lour.
Mix well until it turns
lightly brown.
Slowly add in the
full cream milk and
vegetable stock. Whisk
continuously until the
4.
5.
6.
1 piece Japanese corn,
removed from cob
salt, to taste
pinch of black
peppercorn, cracked
toasted baguette, optional
dash of white truff le
oil, optional
liquid incorporates well
with the flour.
After mixing, add in the
diced potatoes and Japanese
corn. Simmer for 20
minutes or until it reaches a
thick soup consistency.
Season with salt and freshly
cracked black pepper.
To serve, you may opt to
put a dash of white truffle
oil and a slice of toasted
baguette on the side.
Serve hot.
ReaL FOOD: Bacon
14
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
ReaL FOOD: Bacon
“TOCINO” BACON, BIBINGKA
PANCAKES, AND EGGS
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 15 minutes
Ingredients
Procedure
•
•
1.
1 piece bacon, thick-cut
1-2 pieces egg
FOR THE TOCINO GLAZE
• 1 cup brown sugar
• 1 tablespoon soy sauce
• 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
• ¼ cup pineapple juice
• 1 teaspoon black pepper, cracked
FOR THE BIBINGKA BATTER
• ½ cup unsalted butter, softened
• 1 pound sweet rice flour
• 2 ½ cups white sugar
• 1 teaspoon baking powder
• 3 cups full cream milk
• 5 pieces medium eggs
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• 1 cup desiccated coconut
TO ASSEMBLE
• banana leaves, cut to squares
• 1 slice salted duck egg
2.
3.
4.
5.
Serves 2
To make the tocino glaze,
heat brown sugar in a pan
until it dissolves. Using a
bowl, combine soy sauce, rice
vinegar, pineapple juice, and
black pepper. Add to the pan.
Let the mixture reduce over
medium heat until it becomes
a sticky glaze.
In a separate pan or grill pan,
sear the thick-cut bacon. After
searing the bacon, add in the
tocino glaze and simmer the
bacon until it is completely
coated with the glaze.
In a mixing bowl, add in all
ingredients of the Bibingka
batter. Line a small round cast
iron pan with banana leaves.
Add in 1 cup of Bibingka
batter and a slice of salted duck
egg on top.
Bake inside a 350ºF oven for 15
minutes, or until a toothpick
inserted in the center comes
out clean.
Serve it with eggs, cooked by
your choice.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
15
ReaL FOOD: Bacon
STICKY BACON
ENSAYMADA
BUNS
Cooking time: 10-15 minutes
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Serves 2
16
Ingredients
Procedure
•
1.
•
•
•
1 piece bacon, thick-cut,
cut to lardon pieces
1 piece store-brought
ensaymada
1/8 cup cashews, chopped
scoop of ice cream, optional
FOR THE STICKY SYRUP
• ¼ cup butter
• ¼ cup brown sugar
• 2 tablespoons light
corn syrup
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
2.
To make the sticky
syrup, add in all
ingredients in a small
pan. Dissolve brown
sugar over low heat, or
until it reaches a pancake
syrup consistency. Cool
down and set aside.
In a separate pan, add
bacon lardons and
render the fat over
low heat until bacon
becomes crispy.Set aside.
TO ASSEMBLE
1. Heat up ensaymada
inside the oven for
2 minutes.
2. Drizzle with sticky
syrup on top.
3. Add in the toasted bacon
lardons on top.
4. Sprinkle with
chopped cashews.
5. Serve with a scoop
of ice cream.
Crazy for Coco
RECIPES by CHef Kristine lotilla
oF tHe tasteless food GrouP
PHoToGRAPHy by Justin de Jesus
SHoT oN LoCATIoN AT Hole in tHe wall
Hole In the Wall is located at Century
City Mall, Makati City. For inquiries,
contact (02) 886-3056.
ReaL FOOD: Coconut
BEER BATTER
SHRIMP WITH PIñA
COLADA DIP
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 5-10 minutes
Serves 4
Ingredients
FOR THE DIP
• 1/3 cup pineapple bits
with juice
• ½ cup coconut cream
• ½ cup sour cream
• 1 tablespoon sugar
•
•
•
•
•
•
FOR THE SHRIMPS
• ½ cup cornstarch
•
½ cup rice flour
½ cup flour
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking soda
1 can beer
400 grams shrimp, shelled
and deveined
¾ cup flour
Procedure
FOR THE DIP
1. For the piña colada
sauce, puree pineapple
bits in a blender.
2. In a bowl, mix coconut
cream, sour cream,
sugar, and pineapple
puree until wellcombined.
FOR THE SHRIMPS
1. Mix cornstarch, rice
f lour, ½ cup f lour,
salt, and baking soda
together. Add beer to
the dry mixture while
2.
3.
4.
mixing thoroughly to
eliminate large lumps
Preheat oil for deep
frying to 175ºC. Dust
the shrimp first in ¾
cup f lour then into the
beer batter mixture.
Carefully lower the
battered shrimp onto
hot oil. Cook until
golden brown and
transfer directly over
some kitchen paper to
avoid excess oil.
Serve with piña
colada dip.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
19
ReaL FOOD: Coconut
COCONUT
ALFREDO
CHICKEN PASTA
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 20 minutes
Serves 4
Ingredients
•
•
•
•
•
400 grams
fettuccine noodles
200 grams
chicken breast
salt and pepper, to taste
½ cup butter, salted
1 teaspoon garlic
•
•
•
•
•
8 ounces cream cheese
2 cups coconut milk
6 ounces
parmesan cheese
pinch of salt
2 tablespoons butter
Procedure
1.
2.
3.
20
Bring a large pot of
water to boil and
salt generously.
Add pasta and
boil according
to the package
directions until al
dente. Strain and
toss it with a bit of
olive oil to avoid
the noodles from
sticking.
Slice chicken breast
into ¼-inch thick
strips. Season with
salt and pepper.
In a skillet, melt 2
tablespoons butter.
Once melted, raise
heat to medium high
and cook chicken
until browned and
fully cooked through.
In the same pot
where the chicken
4.
5.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
was cooked, melt
remaining ½ cup
butter and cook with
chopped garlic. Add
cream cheese in
and stir with a wire
whisk until smooth.
Add coconut milk
slowly whisking
to smooth out
the lumps.
Stir in parmesan
cheese and salt.
Remove from heat
when sauce reaches
desired consistency.
If the sauce becomes
too thick, thin out
with milk until
desired consistency.
Toss pasta and
chicken in the sauce
and mix thoroughly.
Garnish with
parsley.
ReaL FOOD: Coconut
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
21
ReaL FOOD: Coconut
COCONUT CARAMEL
CREAM PUFFS
Preparation time: 1 hour
Baking time: 30 minutes
Serves 10 to 20
Ingredients
FOR THE COCONUT CREAM PUFF
• ½ cup salted butter
• ½ cup water
• ½ cup coconut milk
• 4 eggs
• desiccated coconut, for garnish
• ¾ cup flour
FOR THE COCONUT PASTRY CREAM
• 2 cups coconut milk
• ¼ cup white sugar
•
•
•
•
•
2 egg yolks
1 whole egg
¼ cup cornstarch
¼ cup white sugar
2 tablespoons salted butter
FOR THE COCONUT CARAMEL
• 2/3 cup canned coconut
• 2/3 cup coconut sugar
• pinch of salt
• 1 tablespoon cornstarch
Procedure
FOR THE COCONUT
CREAM PUFF
1. Preheat oven to 375ºF. Melt
butter, water, and coconut milk
to a rolling boil.
2. Stir in flour and stir vigorously
over low heat until mixture
does not stick on the sides of
the pan. Remove from heat and
cool for a couple of minutes.
3. Beat in eggs one at a time with
the mixture until it is smooth
and velvety.
4. Pipe mixture onto a baking
sheet lined with a silicon mat or
parchment paper and dust with
desiccated coconut. Bake until
dry for about 20-25 minutes
(depending on the size).
5. Cool cream puffs before filling.
3.
When the mixture comes to a
boil and thickens, remove from
the heat. Stir in butter until it
is completely blended in. Pour
into a heat-proof container
and place a piece of plastic
wrap directly on the surface to
prevent a skin from forming.
Chill before using.
FOR THE COCONUT CARAMEL
1. In saucepan, warm up coconut
milk, coconut sugar, sea salt,
and cornstarch.
2. Bring boil and remove
from heat. Cool down
before serving.
FOR THE COCONUT
PASTRY CREAM
1. In a medium bowl, whisk
together egg yolks and
whole eggs. Stir in ¼ cup
sugar and cornstarch to the
eggs until smooth.
2. When milk and sugar boils,
drizzle it into the bowl with the
eggs in a stream while mixing
so that you don't cook the eggs.
Return the mixture to the
saucepan, and slowly bring to a
boil, stirring constantly so the
eggs don't curdle.
22
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
Ninyo Fusion Cuisine is
located at 66 Esteban
Abada St, Loyola Heights,
Quezon City. For inquiries,
contact (02) 426-0301.
Nori Nirvana
RECIPES by CHef niño laus oF ninyo fusion Cuisine
PHoToGRAPHy by Justin de Jesus
SHoT oN LoCATIoN AT ninyo fusion Cuisine
ReaL FOOD: nori
NORI-CRUSTED RED
MULLET, UDON WITH
CHORIZO AND TUNA ROE,
UMAMI BROTH
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Serves 1
Cooking time: 15 minutes
Ingredients
•
•
•
•
1 piece red mullet, cleaned
and filleted
tempura flour (follow package
instructions)
½ cup flour, for dredging
1 sheet toasted nori
FOR THE SPICE RUB
• 8 grams garlic powder
• 8 grams paprika
• 8 grams togarashi
• 16 grams brown sugar
FOR THE UDON NOODLES
• 60 grams udon, cooked
•
•
•
•
•
1 tablespoon chorizo bilbao
1 teaspoon garlic
1 tablespoon olive oil
15 grams tuna roe
1 wedge lemon
FOR THE DASHI STOCK
• 30 grams dashi kombu
• ½ cup bonito flakes
• 1 liter water
FOR THE UMAMI BROTH
• 2 tablespoons dashi stock
• 1 tablespoon sushi vinegar
• salt and pepper, to taste
Procedure
1.
2.
3.
4.
24
For the nori crust, roll the nori
sheet like a cigar and seal by
dabbing some water. Using
kitchen scissors, cut thin circles
from end to end.
In a small bowl, combine
all spice rub ingredients and
mix thoroughly.
Using a heated sauté pan, render
chorizo bilbao then add olive oil.
Sauté garlic then add the tuna
roe. Add udon and season with
lemon, salt, and pepper to taste.
To make the dashi stock, add
water into an unheated saucepan.
Add the kombu and let it soak for
about 30 minutes until soft. Heat
saucepan and let it boil. Once
boiled, remove the kombu and
prevent the stock from becoming
bitter. Add bonito flakes into the
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
5.
saucepan and bring back to boil.
Remove from heat and allow to
cool. Strain the dashi broth.
Using a small saucepan, combine
all ingredients together. Let it
cool until it starts to simmer,
making sure not to boil. Turn off
heat and set aside.
TO ASSEMBLE
1. Rub fish with spice rub.
2. Dredge the fish in flour, and dip
in tempura flour mix, then coat
in nori crust.
3. Heat oil in a deep fryer. Deep fry
the fish until cooked. Set aside.
4. In a bowl, place cooked udon
noodles in the center, then top it
with the nori-crusted red mullet
fish. Drizzle umami broth on the
side. Serve hot.
ReaL FOOD: nori
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
25
ReaL FOOD: nori
SUSHI-STYLE TIGER PRAWN ROLL
Preparation time: 1 hour
Ingredients
Procedure
•
•
•
•
•
1.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
375 grams prawns
25mL all purpose cream
salt and pepper, to taste
olive oil
2 ½ tablespoons white
onion, minced
2 tablespoons garlic, minced
2 tablespoons red bell
pepper, chopped
2 ½ tablespoons
celery, chopped
1 tablespoon crab fat
3 ¼ grams crab meat
½ cup Japanese mayo
½ cup guacamole
12 pieces nori (8 whole,
4 cut in half)
2 teaspoons cilantro, chopped
½ piece lemon
2.
3.
Cooking time: 15 minutes
Clean, peel, and devein
prawns. In a food
processor, add prawns
and all purpose cream,
season with salt and
pepper. Blend into a
smooth paste.
Move prawn mixture
into a mixing bowl,
cover and chill for at
least 1 hour.
In a skillet, add olive oil.
Sauté in order: onion,
garlic, red bell pepper,
celery, crab fat. Sauté
for at least 5 minutes
then add coriander and
2 tablespoons Japanese
mayo. Season with
4.
5.
Serves 2 to 4
lemon, salt and pepper.
Set aside.
On the half nori sheets,
spread crab mixture
thinly on the lower
end. Start rolling
and seal with a dab
of water. Repeat the
process until all the
half nori sheets have
been rolled. Set aside.
Remove prawn mixture
from the chiller then
spread evenly on the
rough side surface of the
whole nori sheets. On
the lower end, spread
guacamole horizontally
and put a crab roll on
6.
top. Slowly roll like
sushi, making a bigger
roll and seal with a dab
of water. Repeat process
for all nori sheets. Set
aside in the chiller.
Cut prawn rolls
into sushi size and
dab it with Japanese
mayonnaise. Bake in a
preheated oven, 350ºF
for about 15 minutes.
Serve hot.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
27
ReaL FOOD: nori
JAPANESE
TOFU
CHEESECAKE
WITH NORI
CRUST
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 2 hours
Serves 10
Ingredients
Procedure
•
1.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
26
2 teaspoons
vanilla extract
125 grams
crushed graham
125 grams crushed
nori sheets
400 grams cream cheese
250 grams white sugar
2 pieces Japanese silken
tofu tube
100 grams soft
unsalted butter
2 pieces whole egg
1 pack sour cream
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
2.
3.
In a mixing bowl,
combine grahams, nori,
butter, and 50 grams
white sugar.
Mix thoroughly.
Line a pie mold with
aluminum foil. Transfer
the graham mixture to
form a thin crust (less
than half an inch in
height). Press firmly and
evenly. Set aside.
Using a paddle mixer,
combine cream cheese and
4.
5.
6.
200 grams white sugar.
Mix thoroughly.
Add silken tofu, sour cream,
whole egg, and vanilla
extract. Mix thoroughly.
Pour cheesecake mixture
into the crust, using the
bain-marie technique.
Bake in a preheated oven,
200ºF for 2 hours.
Editor’s Note: Bain-marie is the
French term for water bath, similar
with steam cooking.
a
h
c
a
m
e
r
i
h
r
y
S
Ma
i Ci o
au r
M
s
el
n o ro u P J e su
He f od G in de
C
City
by s f o J u s t
tury
n
S
e
E
s
,
y
IP
le
all, C quiries
R EC a s t e P H y b
eW
n
A
t
n Th y. For i
I
o F ToG R
e
l
t Ho kati Cit
a
PHo
n
tio e., Ma
loca
v
t on ayaan A 1-1230.
o
h
S
l
0
a
8
K
,
)
Mall act (02
t
con
ReaL FOOD: Sriracha
SWEET AND
SPICY SRIRACHA
WATERMELON SALAD
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Serves 4 to 5
Ingredients
FOR THE VINAIGRETTE
• 1 tablespoon Sriracha
• 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
• 1 tablespoon honey
• ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
• salt and pepper, to taste
FOR THE SALAD
• 4 cups seedless watermelon, cut in bite-sized cubes
• medium-sized red onion, finely sliced
• 1 cup mixed greens
• 1 handful squash seeds, roasted
• ¼ cup feta cheese
• small bunch of mint leaves
Procedure
FOR THE VINAIGRETTE
Using a spatula, mix all ingredients until uniformly
combined. Set aside. An easier way is to add all
the ingredients in a squeeze bottle and shake to
incorporate the vinaigrette.
FOR THE SALAD
Add the watermelon, finely sliced red onions, mixed
greens, and squash seeds into the bowl and crumble
over feta cheese. Finish by roughly tearing the mint
leaves over the salad. Serve with the vinaigrette.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
29
ReaL FOOD: Sriracha
ORANGE SRIRACHA
ROASTED CHICKEN
Marination time: 24 hours
Preparation time: 35 minutes
Cooking time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Serves 4
Ingredients
FOR THE BRINE
• 4 cups water
• 2 tablespoons orange juice
concentrate
• 4 tablespoons salt
• 2 tablespoons Sriracha
FOR THE ORANGE BUTTER
• ¼ cup unsalted butter, softened
• 1 tablespoon orange juice
concentrate
•
•
•
•
•
¼ cup olive oil
2 tablespoons Sriracha
2 tablespoons garlic
1 pinch thyme powder
1 orange zest
FOR THE ROASTED CHICKEN
• 1 whole chicken
• salt and pepper, to taste
• rosemary sprigs
• 1 Naval orange
Procedure
FOR THE BRINE
1. The secret to juicy roast
chicken is the brine. To
make the brine, simply
combine all ingredients
and mix until the salt has
dissolved with the mixture.
2. Brine the whole chicken in
the mixture overnight for
up to one day.
FOR THE ORANGE BUTTER
Using a spatula, mix all
ingredients until uniformly
combined. Set aside.
FOR THE ROASTED CHICKEN
1. Preheat the oven to 220°C.
2. Take out the brined chicken
30
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
3.
4.
and pat dry with a paper
towel. Generously massage
the Sriracha orange butter,
not only on the skin and
in the cavity of the chicken,
but also in between the
skin and the meat.
Season thoroughly with
salt and pepper.
Stuff the chicken cavity
with rosemary and a scored
orange. Tie the chicken
legs together using kitchen
twine to prepare it for
roasting.
Roast for an hour and a
half making sure to baste
every 30 minutes for crispy
f lavorful skin.
ReaL FOOD: Sriracha
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
31
ReaL FOOD: Sriracha
CHOCOLATE SRIRACHA TART
Preparation time: 45 minutes
Cooking time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Ingredients
Procedure
FOR THE CRUST
• 1 ½ cups graham
crackers, crushed
• ⅓ cup brown sugar
• 6 tablespoons butter, melted
• ½ teaspoon cinnamon
FOR THE GRAHAM CRUST
1. Mix crushed graham
crackers, sugar, melted
butter, and cinnamon
until well-blended.
Press mixture into your
tart molds.
2. Let crust set in cold for
at least 4 hours in the
refrigerator before using.
FOR THE FILLING
• 2 cups dark chocolate
• 1 cup heavy cream
• ¼ cup butter
• 1 tablespoon Sriracha
FOR THE WHIPPED CREAM
• ½ cup whipping cream
• 2 tablespoons white sugar
• 1 tablespoon Sriracha
32
FOR THE FILLING
1. In a heatproof bowl, place
dark chocolate pieces and
set aside.
2. In a saucepan, bring
cream and butter to a low
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
3.
4.
Setting time: 6 hours
boil and remove
from heat.
Pour hot cream on top
of the chocolate and mix
with a spatula. If it is
not completely melted,
you can heat in the
microwave for several
seconds until it achieves a
smooth consistency.
Pour on top of the
chilled crust and leave
in the refrigerator for at
least 2 hours.
FOR THE WHIPPED CREAM
1. Whip the whipping
Serves 10 to 12
2.
cream and sugar with a
whisk or with a kitchen
aid until stiff.
Carefully fold in the
Sriracha until wellcombined but still
maintaining the whipped
cream’s stiffness. Set
aside and place on top of
tarts after baking.
P
o
t
t
a
e
t
e
o
w
Rha
S
p
RECIPES by CHef CHris de Jesus oF ProvenCiano
PHoToGRAPHy by Justin de Jesus
SHoT oN LoCATIoN AT ProvenCiano
ies
sod
Provenciano is
located at 110
Maginhawa, Diliman,
Quezon City. For
inquiries, contact
(02) 922 2736
ReaL FOOD: Sweet Potato
34
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
ReaL FOOD: Sweet Potato
KAMOTE CROqUETTAS, VIGAN
LONGGANISA, AT KESO WITH
BAGOONG AIOLI
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 30 minutes
Serves 10
Ingredients
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
250 grams orange kamote
75 grams Vigan longganisa
1000 mL vegetable oil
25 grams flour
1 egg
50 grams bread crumbs
75 grams cheese
FOR THE BAGOONG
AIOLI SAUCE
• 40 grams mayonnaise
• 5 grams garic
• 1 teaspoon bagoong isda
• 1 teaspoon honey
• ½ teaspoon kalamansi juice
Procedure
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Ready and prepare water for
boiling the kamote. Clean and peel
kamote and cut into chunks. Add
into the boiling water until cooked.
Set aside to cool.
Mash the boiled kamote
when cooled.
Remove the longganisa’s skins
and cook in a pan. Set aside in a
strainer.
Prepare another pan for frying in
medium heat.
Prepare three small individual
bowls for the flour, beaten egg,
6.
7.
and breadcrumbs. One by one, put
the ball-shaped croquettas into
the bowls of flour, followed by the
egg, and then the breadcrumbs.
Carefully fry the breaded
croquettas in the frying pan until
golden brown.
Mix all the sauce ingredients to
prepare for the bagoong aioli sauce.
Assemble the fried croquettas with
the bagoong aioli on the side in a
ramekin. You can opt to garnish
with a dash of paprika or chopped
parsley before serving.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
35
ReaL FOOD: Sweet Potato
KAMOTE PICADILLO
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 45 minutes
Serves 2
Ingredients
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
100 grams beef sirloin
1 teaspoon oil
20 grams onion
5 grams garlic
30 grams tomatoes
1 teaspoon patis
1 chorizo de bilbao
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Procedure
1.
2.
3.
36
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
Slice the beef sirloin in
thin cuts and tenderize by
pounding. Set aside.
Prepare your casserole
in high heat. Add oil,
and one by one, cook the
sirloin until light brown
in color.
Sauté the meat with
onion, garlic, and
tomatoes in patis for
about 15 minutes. Then
4.
5.
2 cups beef stock
pinch of Spanish paprika
25 grams celery
100 grams kamote cubes
salt and pepper, to taste
50 grams Vermecelli noodles
75 grams cabbage
add chorizo and soup
stock. Cover the casserole
for 30 minutes.
Add paprika, celery, and
diced kamote. Cover
and cook for another
30 minutes.
Add salt and pepper
to taste alongside
Vermicelli noodles
and cabbage. Cook for
another 10 minutes.
ReaL FOOD: Sweet Potato
UBE YEMA BALLS
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 2 hours
Ingredients
Procedure
•
1.
•
•
•
•
100 grams ube,
mashed
1 can condensed milk
3 egg yolks
3 cups vanilla
50 grams white sugar
2.
3.
Serves 15
Prepare and wash ube
thoroughly until clean.
Prepare a pot with water
enough to submerge the
ube and cook until forktender. Peel, mash, and
set aside.
In a mixing bowl, mix
condensed milk with egg
yolks and vanilla.
Slowly mix the custard
4.
5.
mixture into a nonstick
pan in low heat.
Continuously stir the
mix with a wood or
silicon spatula until it
gets curdled.
Add the mashed ube into
the custard mixture. Mix
together slowly until the
concoction solidifies.
While warm, take
6.
a teaspoonful of the
mixture, shape into balls,
and set aside.
Prepare a small nonstick
pan enough to melt the
white sugar. Carefully
dip the ball-shaped
yema into the caramel
mixture. Allow to cool
in a nonstick tray or a
silicon mat.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
37
Tales Of
Tamarind
RECIPES by CHef Kalel CHan oF CHotto Matte
PHoToGRAPHy by Justin de Jesus
SHoT oN LoCATIoN AT CHotto Matte
SPECIAL THANKS To Gwen Cariño, MiCHele
MaGtoto AND CHEF franCes arellano
Chotto Matte is located at Ground Floor, Net
Park, 5th Avenue, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig
City. For inquiries, contact (02) 282 0442.
ReaL FOOD: Tamarind
SHRIMP LIME
CEVICHE
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Serves 2 to 3
Ingredients
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
8 pieces boiled
shrimp, cubed
½ cup cucumber, diced
1/3 white onion,
thinly sliced
¼ red onion, thinly sliced
½ pomelo, diced
4 pieces cherry tomatoes,
julienned
2 grams cilantro
3 grams green chili
FOR THE DRESSING
• ¼ cup fresh tamarind
• 2 tablespoons vinegar
• 1/8 teaspoon fresh
lemon squeeze
• 1 teaspoon fresh
lime squeeze
• ¼ teaspoon light soy sauce
• 1/8 teaspoon ginger, grated
• 1/8 teaspoon garlic, chopped
• 1 teaspoon mirin
• 2 teaspoons white sugar
• ¼ teaspoon salt
• A pinch of white pepper
Procedure
1.
2.
3.
4.
Combine all dressing ingredients into a bowl, stir until fully
mixed then set aside.
Place all ceviche ingredients into a bowl.
Slowly stir in the dressing. Make sure all ingredients are well
coated with dressing.
Serve chilled.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
39
ReaL FOOD: Tamarind
40
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
ReaL FOOD: Tamarind
SATE BABI
Cooking time: 20 minutes
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Ingredients
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 tablespoon soya oil
1 teaspoon garlic, chopped
500 grams pork belly
2 tablespoons peanut butter
1 cup fresh tamarind
330mL Sprite
2 tablespoons white sugar
pinch of white pepper
Serves 2 to 3
Procedure
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Heat oil in a pan then sauté garlic.
Add in pork together with all
remaining ingredients.
Let it simmer until pork becomes tender.
Set aside then let it cool.
Cut pork into cubes then skewer.
Grill for about 2 minutes.
Chef’s Note: Add water while simmering if the
sauce gets too thick.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
41
ReaL FOOD: Tamarind
TAMARIND CHILI FLAN
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Ingredients
Procedure
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
FOR THE
TAMARIND FLAN
1. Combine egg yolks,
evaporated milk,
condensed milk, and
tamarind syrup into
a bowl.
2. Gently stir mixture
in a circular motion
until well-mixed then
set aside.
3. In a small pan, make
caramelized sugar using
white sugar and water.
Simmer until thickened.
4. In a f lan molder
5 pieces egg yolks
1 cup evaporated milk
1 cup condensed milk
¼ cup tamarind syrup
pinch of calamansi zest
1 tablespoon white sugar
½ teaspoon water
FOR THE TAMARIND SYRUP
• ½ cup white sugar
• ½ cup water
• 80 grams fresh tamarind
FOR GARNISH
• ½ teaspoon rock salt
• 1 piece red chili, chopped
42
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
Cooking time: 20 minutes
5.
6.
Serves 6
or llanera, put in
caramelized sugar and
f lan mixture.
Cover it with foil then
slow steam for about 20
to 30 minutes.
Garnish with rock salt
and sliced red chili.
FOR THE SYRUP
1. Combine sugar and
water in a pot. Simmer
until sugar is fully
dissolved
2. Add fresh tamarind
then let it simmer over
3.
low heat until tamarind
gets soft and is well
incorporated into the
syrup. Turn off heat.
Strain mixture using
a fine strainer then let
it cool.
ReaL FOOD: man of the Hour
The Long
W ay H o m e
WoRDS by PaM Musni
PHoToGRAPHy by Karlo CadanG
SHoT oN LoCATIoN AT 25 seeds, anGeles, PaMPanGa
W
hen you enter 25 Seeds, there’s a certain quaintness in the
atmosphere. The kind that appears to tell you that you
belong here: take a seat, have a glass of water or something
to drink. You are home, the walls emanate, all in their well-polished
sheen and sunlit splendor. And for a moment, you forget that you are
in a restaurant—instead, you are back home, lounging in the living
room with some loved ones.
Right now, however, 25 Seeds serves as the venue for today’s
interview. I take a seat at one of the tables next to the windows, and
across from me sits Chef Sau himself, fresh from the kitchen. At
once relaxed and alert, he seems well at home with the surroundings,
sitting with the poise of someone who has gone through years of
fulfillment. And indeed, he has—with more than two decades’ worth
of culinary experience, his career seems to span various eras, each tied
to a period of his life.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
45
ReaL STORieS: man of the Hour
But while he has now
delved into his Angeleño
roots with his restaurant
concepts—among other
things—it wouldn’t be
strange to imagine it could’ve
gone otherwise, given the
various turns Chef Sau’s
career had taken and his
unorthodox approach to
things. And as we talk a little
more about his experiences,
there is one place that would
cement him as the Chef Sau
we know today: France.
PursuinG tHe dreaM
Shortly after the
eruption of Mt. Pinatubo
in 1991, Chef Sau and his
family migrated to the
States to avert the disaster.
However, even as they
were residing in Las Vegas,
Nevada at the time, his
sights were already on
other horizons. “France
was always the dream,” he
said. “I thought [to myself]
that [Las Vegas] was not a
good playground for me…
everyone wants to become
a good chef and have a
very good background in
French cuisine.”
Actually getting to
France, on the other
hand, was a combination
of serendipity and hard
work. Prior to moving to
the US, Chef Sau had been
working in Manila alongside
international chefs, where
he would get first-hand
lessons on certain cooking
techniques. “I always wanted
to learn from my chefs. It’s
something that the school
cannot teach you,” he said.
“I don’t come from a very
rich family, [so I could not
go] abroad and study in
different [culinary] schools,
so I thought [to myself]
that I would learn from
these European chefs, since
they had the chance to
live abroad, study in those
46
schools, and work with
Michelin-starred chefs.”
There was one chef in
particular he admired, having
learned from him the most.
“[During my stay in Manila],
I met a German chef named
Jan, and I really looked up
to him,” he said. “The way
he puts the food in the plate,
the way he talks, parang
everything is music to my
ears. Kahit pinapagalitan ako,
kahit ni-lalash out ako, it
sounded so beautiful. And I
was learning a lot from him.”
After moving to Nevada,
Chef Sau met with Chef Jan
again, where the opportunity
had presented itself. “He
said, ‘Hey, do you want to
go to France? Because I’ve
seen your gift for cooking
and your passion for it,’” said
Chef Sau. Upon hearing
this invitation, no second
thoughts came to his mind.
He agreed immediately.
“I said, ‘Yeah, that’s a
good opportunity to me.’
And that started it all.”
exPlorinG tHe world
He found himself in Nice,
France, with an introductory
period that could be deemed
bittersweet. “It wasn’t a bed
of roses. It was tough, just
like the movie Ratatouille—[I
would] get bullied, I would
cry, I would soak myself,
I would call my mom,” he
said. “But in the end, it’s
like [you’re] going through
military camp. You go
through the training, and
[the] people [around you]
want to make sure for the
best and the worst to come.”
And he did, eventually.
Taking the opportunity to
learn the language and study
further, Chef Sau would go
on to stay in France for 7
more years, noting it as some
of the most fulfilling in his
life. “I learned the ropes, I
learned from the masters, I
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
"It wasn't a bed of roses. It
was tough..."
worked in Michelin-starred
restaurants. I had a beautiful
life,” he said, with an air of
wistfulness. “I became more
refined, I became more
resilient, I became bolder, I
became more open to new
things. And because magisa lang ako sa France, I
became more independent.”
As for what had kept him
going through the hard
times, Chef Sau attributes
it to his positive outlook
on things. “I could’ve given
up easily, imagine that?
When people look at you
as an Asian guy, a Filipino
na walang alam, they see
you as a poor guy,” he said.
“But I am very persistent. I
dream big. And somehow, I
achieve my dreams.”
But, more importantly,
France had opened a whole
new realm of experience for
him, something he would
take along even after leaving.
“It was in France that all my
senses came alive,” he said.
This was particularly true
when it came to travel, an
important aspect when it
comes to Chef Sau’s creative
process. While he enjoyed
traveling prior to coming
to France, it was there that
his desire to see the world
had intensified. “I said [to
myself,] ‘This is just the first
step.’ I wanted to proceed, I
wanted to explore, I wanted
to be an expat, I wanted to
travel,” he said. “Parang,
ReaL STORieS: man of the Hour
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
47
ReaL STORieS: man of the Hour
when you’ve seen France,
you want to see the rest of
the world and what it can
offer you.”
And he’s traveled a lot
since then, having visited
over 40-45 cities total. For
him, after all, traveling is a
classroom—that is, as long
as you are willing to open
yourself up to it and the
pitfalls it may offer. “There
are some places I would go
back to. Others, never again.
"travel and
experIence
are a few
thIngs you
cannot buy."
But I have no regrets, because
travel and experience are a
few things you cannot buy,”
he said.
It’s also helped that
he’s got a taste for the
unconventional, not being
one to follow the norm.
When it comes to visiting
places, for instance, he cites
that he would rather head
to places like Tibet, Siem
Reap, or Dhaka, despite the
relative poverty that exists
in these areas. “When you
go out and see [these social
realities] from a distance,
you see what reality is,” he
noted. “Kasi kung dito ka
lang, you won’t see what’s
[really] going on.”
48
But it’s only through
immersing yourself through
these aspects of life that you
gain experience—a valuable
resource to Chef Sau. “And
that’s the beauty of it. I
always encourage students
to go abroad, to find their
[own] way, [and] to discover
and look around.”
CoMinG HoMe
Having spent a good
chunk of his life abroad
and a flair for discovery,
it seemed improbable to
pin Chef Sau down—more
so back in the Philippines.
He himself affirmed the
sentiment. “After having
lived abroad—Paris,
Singapore, Bangkok; these
are beautiful places—I
thought I wouldn’t come
back anymore,” he said.
“Wala pa [noon] yung
pagka-nationalist ko.” But
while it in was no part
due to a diminishing love
for Philippine cuisine, it
stemmed more from his
desire for beautiful cities.
After a while, however, the
urge to come back slowly
crept in, as he realized it
was back home where he
belonged. “Even if you
think that you’ve lived a
beautiful life as an expat
abroad, you’d want to come
back only because you
want to share [what you’ve
learned] and reconnect with
people,” he said.
It was more of a surprise
when he decided to return to
his Pampanga hometown, as
the death of both his parents
left an indelible mark on the
area. But much like his ticket
to France, the road home was
also steeped in serendipity. “I
went back to Pampanga with
some friends. Then I saw this
little house and said, ‘Hey,
that’s a cute house.’They said,
‘Do you want it?’” he recalled.
“And I said, ‘What would I
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
ReaL STORieS: man of the Hour
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
49
ReaL STORieS: man of the Hour
do with that house?” And
they said, ‘Don’t you think it’s
about time that you do some
Kapampangan food?’ Hindi
na siya naalis sa utak ko.”
Going back home turned
out to be the best thing that
ever happened in his life.
Aside from being able to
continue his advocacy for
local, sustainable cuisine
"the food
that we
create has
storIes to
tell. It's very
personal."
through his ingredients, Chef
Sau had the opportunity to
serve guests in his Pampanga
concepts, only to find out
they had already known each
other before. “[They] would
say, ‘Hey, we were neighbors
before, we were playmates,
we were classmates,’ or ‘I
was your yaya, I was your
teacher.’ And it brings back
memories,” he said. “That’s
the best part—reconnecting
with people.”
Food in particular
proved to be instrumental
in relating with the other
guests, being a powerful tool
when it comes to forging
connections. “When [I]
cook something, people
realize, ‘I know this food!
This is Imang Garding’s
recipe. Are you related to
this person?’ And I would
say, ‘Yeah, she’s my mom,’”
said Chef Sau. “So food is
very important. Because
50
the food that we create
has stories to tell. It’s very
personal.” If the pursuit for
good food, then, is what
started him on his journey,
it was also what had brought
him back home.
Indeed, one could say
that Chef Sau’s culinary
journey is one that had come
in full circle. But he’s not
taking it as a setback—on the
contrary, he looks at it as an
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
opportunity to give back, to
share what he had learned
with those who are willing.
“Just like a sponge, hungry
for water: you take it all in
until you’re full, and then
it’s time squeeze [it all out,]”
he said. He’s a firm believer
in giving back, after all; a
sentiment that forms the
backbone of his success and
his advocacies. And he’s still
constantly learning, whether
it’s through teaching or
through collaborating with
his chefs in the kitchen.
In terms of muses,
however, his sights have
now shifted elsewhere.
Today, he immerses himself
in the land where he had
grown up, reacquainting
himself with its intricacies.
Pampanga now serves as his
canvas. And Angeles City is
his museum.
ReaL STORieS: man of the Hour
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
51
ReaL STORieS: Cover Recipe
You can order the dish at 25
Seeds, 2/F Dycaico Ancestral
House, Barangay Sto. Rosario,
Angeles City, Pampanga
52
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
ReaL STORieS: Cover Recipe
RED SNAPPER SOUS
VIDE WITH COCONUT
TAMARIND AND
CAPER SAUCE
RECIPE by CHef sau del rosario
PHoToGRAPHy by Bert santos
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Serves 2 to 3
Ingredients
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 kilogram red snapper
(maya-maya), filleted and
cut into pieces
4 tablespoons red onion
bay leaf
cracked peppercorn
12 tablespoons extra
virgin oil
6 teaspoons garlic, minced
6 tablespoons coriander, sliced
6 tablespoons coconut cream
FOR THE SAUCE
• 4 tablespoons coconut oil
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 tablespoons onion, minced
4 tablespoons garlic, minced
4 tablespoons coriander
2 tablespoons ginger, minced
2 tablespoons lemongrass
6 pieces fresh tamarind
2 pieces red chili, chopped
½ cup white wine
2 cups fish stock
½ cup coconut milk
½ cup fresh cream
salt and pepper, to taste
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Procedure
1.
2.
3.
To make the stock, use head and bones of the
snapper. Simmer with water, red onion, bay leaf, and
peppercorn. Strain.
To sous vide the fillet, set the sous vide machine to 135ºC. In
a Ziploc plastic bag, add fish and the other ingredients. Seal.
When the water bath reaches the temperature, dip the plastic
with fish for an hour to cook. Set aside.
FOR THE SAUCE
1. In a pan, sauté the onion, garlic, coriander, ginger,
lemongrass, coconut oil, and olive oil.
2. Add tamarind and mix with the rest of the ingredients.
3. Add white wine until reduced to half. Add stock and simmer
for another 5-7 minutes.
4. Add creams and cook for another 5 minutes under low
temperature. When cooked strain and add the butter. Season.
5. Garnish and serve.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
53
DINING THE
210 D E G R E E S WAY
WoRDS by arraH BaluCatinG
PHoToGRAPHy by Karlo CadanG
SHoT oN LoCATIoN AT 210 deGrees KitCHen + drinKery, BGC
ReaL STORieS: Brand Talk
L
et’s set the record straight
once and for all: This is not
fine dining.
While naysayers would shake
their heads and click their tongues
at this revelation, this is the point
Chef William Mahi would like
to get across. Heather Mahi, his
wife and co-owner of 210 Degrees
Kitchen + Drinkery, echoes the
same sentiment, “We dare not put
ourselves in that category.” Instead,
what 210 Degrees aspires to exude is
“fun” dining. It’s what happens when
comfort food meets the mind of a
Michelin-starred chef.
Before William Mahi eventually
forged onto this territory, he found
his home as Chef de Cuisine in
The Tasting Room, after a series
of renowned stints from all over
the world from his hometown in
France to where he met the love of
his life in Shanghai. When we met
him then, he saw Manila as the next
it dining destination set to take the
world by storm.
Fast forward to 2018 and this has
never been more true—what with
the number of head-turning quality
establishments springing up like
daisies. And 210 Degrees is his first
contribution to the exciting culinary
renaissance taking place here.
Truth be told, this wasn’t
planned beforehand. The
opportunity fell, somehow by
chance, in the right time and the
right place. The chic bistro is the
culmination of Chef William’s
culinary journey. It’s his way of
transporting his slice of life—his
years growing up in France—and
presenting it to Manila as a true
blue introduction of himself.
Heather explains further, “The idea
is like when he welcomes someone
over to his house. This is what you
would see as a guest when you go to
his place. This is his personal taste,
what he likes to eat on his days off,
the things that he would personally
serve and sit down to eat together
with you.”
More than anything, this is a
passion project that seeks to speak
volumes of personal tales. Upon
entering, one would feel as if the
walls were about to speak and
ready to burst with stories. Every
inch of the space is bursting with
homey detail. There are mismatched
cutleries parlayed on every table,
and even the glasses have different
hues, almost as if you were invited
to dine on Mahi’s childhood home
from miles away. On one wall, a huge
portrait of Serge Gainsbourg would
be seen (as it turns out, he was a
very famous French public figure, a
singer who lived in ’85). On another,
a roadmap of the places of Chef
William’s gastronomical pursuits
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
55
ReaL STORieS: Brand Talk
would be displayed. All over the
place, there would be several
ingredients preserved neatly in jars
of vinegar—a homage to a way of
life from the defining era of France’s
past that was laden with war.
The food fares being served
are the pinnacle: 90 percent of
French techniques authentically
based on the French lifestyle.
The elegance and artistry of their
cuisine is definitely there, but
Chef William would repeatedly
reiterate his stance, “In our history,
since centuries ago, we have
been quite known for expressing
ourselves and showing that to the
world, and maybe this is where the
misconception comes from. Sure,
we use the finest products from
France. But this is not fine dining.”
56
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
"sure, we use the fInest products from
france. but thIs Is not fIne dInIng."
For starters, the menu covers a
variety of eclectic dishes as well as
comfort food favorites reimagined.
His signature 52-degree egg from
his Tasting Room days makes a
reincarnation here in the form
of The Egg, a luscious souplike concoction cooked at 48 °C,
and made even more delectable
with potato mousse, caramelized
onions, and bacon. His too-goodto-be-true rendition of foie gras
ReaL STORieS: Brand Talk
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
57
ReaL STORieS: Brand Talk
from a few years back also makes
an appearance, albeit modified
to be the fun quirky sister of its
previous mold—the infamous dish
with actual bits of popcorn. Then,
there’s the more casual laidback
counterparts, like the fried chicken
that everyone in town has been
raving about. Chef William
himself couldn’t believe that his
version of it would even make
waves, given that it’s definitely not
the expertise of a French-Basque
chef. He brings his trademark
plating with him here as well,
simplistic works of art that uphold
the experience of the plate.
58
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
Since its inception, there have
been many changes that took
place. A significant one would be
the restaurant’s branding, which
Heather explained, “With our
branding now, it’s very fluid. We
started out very fixed but the
ReaL STORieS: Brand Talk
"wIth our brandIng now,
It's very fluId."
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
59
ReaL STORieS: Brand Talk
yin and yang, balancing each other
harmoniously. Considering that
this is the first time they’ve really
worked together in their 10 years
of blissful romance, everything
has moved like clockwork. While
William handles the kitchen,
it’s Heather that serves as the
"I have a lot of
thIngs I would
lIke to do. I
don't want to
be defIned In
one lInear lIne.
I have a certaIn
knowledge In my
job and I want
to be able to put
that out."
market changes quickly. We change
with the times but we stick to the
overarching theme of elevating
comfort food.” The menu followed
suit with its timely addition of ala
carte items. The price range was
also created with price-quality
balance in mind, and the ability to
cut across income brackets (For
instance, you would be surprised
how their five course set menu
60
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
would be priced below 1,500 pesos—
an unusual pricing move).
A year in and 210 Degrees
Kitchen + Drinkery shows no signs
of slowing down. Indeed, it has
become a notable dining destination
in itself. Its success can be attributed
to many but if anything, it’s the fact
that William and Heather— the ever
dynamic husband and wife duo—run
a tight ship. They are each other’s
centerpiece, mediating the kitchen
and the service, and ensuring a
smooth flow on both ends.
At the end of the day, 210
Degrees not only signifies what
Chef William Mahi deems as the
perfect roasting temperature, it
becomes his transcendence from
the shackles of being pigeonholed
as a Michelin-starred chef with
only a singular expertise. This is
him showing the world he can
do so much more, “I have a lot of
things I would like to do. I don’t
want to be defined in one linear
line. I have a certain knowledge in
my job and I want to be able to put
that out,” he muses.
And if the constant clinking of
the mismatched glasses, the eager
scraping of cutleries against plates,
and the ‘community’ aspect to the
bistro that can be felt reverberating
underneath the dimmed lights are
any indication, 210 Degrees Kitchen
and Drinkery is well on its way to
the stars.
ReaL STORieS: essays
Crafting a Taste: How do Top
Manila Restaurants Curate
their Dishes?
WoRDS by triCia Quintero
PHoToGRAPHy by norMan lleses
ILLuSTRATIoN by tiMotHy diao
B
ehind every
spectacular
restaurant are
the chefs oozing with
culinary ingenuity—the
people responsible for the
dishes we can’t seem to
get enough of. Just how
are they able to come
up with their culinary
masterpieces? Here, we
take a closer look and
piqued into the minds of
the people behind three
of Manila’s most popular
restaurants—Chef Carlo
Franco of Tomatito, Chef
Jack Flores of Made Nice
Supper Club, and Chef
queenee Villar of Hey
Handsome.
GuidinG PrinCiPles
While the three chefs
have different approaches
on the tastes of their dishes,
they all underscored the
importance of having an
overarching mantra when
it comes to creation. These
mantras encompass what
their restaurants stand for
and serve as guidelines
to every member of their
kitchen to ensure that
every aspect forms a
cohesive experience for
their customers. For Chef
Carlo, it’s all about getting
out of your comfort zone,
“For Tomatito, it’s about
being adventurous, but
also following the line of
Spanish-Latin cuisine.” For
Made Nice Supper Club’s
Chef Jack, it’s imperative
to break some rules and be
different. Meanwhile, Hey
Handsome’s Chef queenee
says their number one
guiding principle before
putting something out on
the menu is that it has to
be liked by everyone on
the team.
Go Beyond
Coming up with
dishes is no easy task, and
sometimes, there will be
days when you don’t know
where to get your idea
from. Always remember
that there is a whole world
outside of the kitchen to
take inspiration from.
This may be in the form
of traveling—Peranakan
cuisine of Singapore was
the inspiration behind Hey
Handsome as Chef queenee
Villar attests to, “Traveling
helps you realize that
there’s a whole lot of other
cuisines out there.” It could
even be through the people
you meet while learning
from other cultures, as
Chef Jack Flores shares
when he spent some time
working in New York and
France prior to establishing
Made Nice Supper Club.
One can also come up with
dishes through completely
unrelated fields like
architecture—something
that inspired Chef Carlo
Franco when he created his
lego-shaped chocolate cake
way back. The Tomatito
chef says he seeks to finds
inspiration everywhere,
even from reading books
and magazines.
needs while coming out
with something new each
time. While they may have
their staple dishes, these
restaurants constantly
change their menu to
broaden their diners’ palate
and showcase everything
they have to offer.
There really is no
surprise then why Made
Nice Supper Club changes
their menu every three to
four months, Tomatito
gives a different take
on their salmon dishes
every week, and Hey
Handsome continues
to give their customers
something new to look
forward to. For instance,
for Chef Jack, Made Nice
Supper Club is all about
continuous evolution,
“We’re in a constant state
of development and we
embrace that.” Chef Carlo
says it’s important to play
with what you know first
then being creative from
there. For Chef queenee,
meanwhile, change is
necessary when something’s
not working out.
composed of talented cooks
who each have a distinct
style and expertise. In the
case of Tomatito, Chef Carlo
shared that there are some
who are knowledgeable
in Thai cuisine, others in
Singaporean flavors, and
of course the majority who
know the Filipino palate.
He deduces, “Our kitchen
is a team; it’s not only me.”
For Hey Handsome, Chef
queenee and partner Chef
Nicco Santos spearhead the
flavors most of the time
while their cooks show them
techniques to better harness
it. Chef queenee thinks
that “more heads are always
better than one (or two)”.
Meanwhile, the Made Nice
chefs each have their forte—
be it for pastas, proteins, or
desserts. As Chef Jack puts it,
they like to “play with each
other’s strengths.”
Crafting a dish—more
so a menu—is no easy task,
but these chefs showed that
there’s no magic in it, just
the right combination of
the things already existing
around you: vision, people,
and inspiration.
CollaBorate and
innovate
All these three
restaurants’ teams are
eMBraCe CHanGe
In the ever dynamic and
competitive food industry,
restaurants must always be
ready to adapt to customers’
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
63
ReaL STORieS: essays
R
Beneath The pleasures
of Eating Raw Seafood
WoRDS by danG futalan
PHoToGRAPHy by MiGuel naCianCeno
ILLuSTRATIoN by tiMotHy diao
SPECIAL THANKS To Professor Kevin CarPio
oF university of santo toMas
64
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
aw seafood
is a timeless
delicacy that
allures anyone with its
rawness—even putting
multicultural diversity on
its knees because of its
mouthwatering flavors.
During ancient times,
feudal lords demanded
their fish served as
fresh as possible.
Because of distance
and transportation
limitations, fish had
to be carried through
various runners and had
to travel for hours before
arriving at its destination.
This tedious process
causes the fish to lose
its freshness. To combat
such dilemma, cooks
have experimented with
various techniques. Thus,
resulting to the creation
of one of the most
common raw seafood
we know today: sushi—a
type of fermented fish
(or meat) prepared with
rice for the purpose of
preservation and can be
consumed without too
much processing.
Contrary to popular
belief, sushi did not
originate from Japan.
Historians believe that the
very first written record
of the existence of sushi
started with China’s Tang
Dynasty (618–907 CE)
where people with only
good economic status
could eat raw fish and
meat along with raw fruits
and vegetables. Sushi only
appeared in Japan in the
Heian Period (794–1185
CE) right after raw fish
had officially become a
delicacy in China.
Today, hundreds of
restaurants, stalls and
buffets offer raw seafood
as part of their menu. But
as the food scene matures
and experiences different
trends that come and go,
consumers have grown
from romanticizing what
ReaL STORieS: essays
is pleasurable to one’s
palette to emphasizing
the unobtrusive: is it safe
to eat?
“Nutrition-wise,
seafoods are rich in
protein, omega 3-fatty
acids, saturated fat,
iron, vitamin B and
mineral. The answer as
to whether it is safe to
eat or not lies on how it
is prepared. If the raw
seafood has undergone
the necessary procedures
within the standards of
an accelerated process
where fish are frozen
immediately. They are
caught and harvested
to preserve freshness
and texture. More
importantly, to kill any
potential parasites present.
However, studies show
that the ultimate method
to eliminate parasites and
microorganisms that have
contaminated seafood is
not freezing but cooking
or heating food at a
suitably high temperature.
The answer as to whether
it is safe to eat or not
lies on how it is prepared.
food sanitation and proper
preparation, then it would
be safe to eat,” explains
Kevin Carpio, Registered
Dietitian Nutritionist.
However, some
businesses prefer to
take out this criterion
to compromise for their
lack of resource which is
why taking note of the
precautions of eating raw
seafood is key to safety.
Sushi-grade should be in
one’s vocabulary when
it comes to raw seafood.
“Sushi-grade” refers to the
highest quality fish that
a particular store offers,
one that they feel most
confident to be served
raw. Also, it is best to eat
at reputable restaurants
who take pride in the
quality of their products
by getting high quality
seafoods from suppliers
that flash freeze fish—
Each raw seafood dish
is a do-or-die gamble
in every step of the
preparation process. If a
dish is mishandled at any
part of the course, Kevin
stresses that it becomes a
life-threatening carrier of
severe foodborne illnesses.
“For raw shellfish
lovers, it pays to
know about Vibrio
vulnificus and Vibrio
parahaemolyticus. Both of
these bacteria can cause
gastroenteritis, with
symptoms that include
severe vomiting, diarrhea,
abdominal cramps, fevers,
and chills.”
Roundworms are
also infamous in the raw
seafood industry. Anisakis
simplex is a roundworm
parasite found in fish and
shellfish. Once the parasite
enters the human body,
the host will feel a tingling
sensation during or after
eating the contaminated
seafood – a sign which
means that the worm is
moving in the affected
area, usually the mouth
or throat. If this parasite
reaches the stomach
or the small intestine,
surgery would be needed.
Symptoms of Anisakis
penetration include
nausea, vomiting, stomach
pain and diarrhea.
Liver flukes are no
stranger in the parasitehost relationship of
eating raw seafood. These
flatworm parasites use the
livers of infected humans
as their main habitat
where they feed on
blood. Symptoms would
include an enlarged liver,
gallbladder inflammation,
gallstones, bile duct
infection and may even
lead to liver cancer.
Aside from making
one’s body prone as a
habitat to parasites, eating
raw seafood increases the
risk of food poisoning with
symptoms including an
upset stomach, diarrhea,
nausea and vomiting.
Children, pregnant
women, the elderly, HIV
patients, and anyone with
a weak immune system
should avoid eating
raw seafood as they fall
under the “high-risk
individuals” category
and can be considered
as easier targets for the
aforementioned hazards.
People who take 'au
naturel' too literally when
it comes to consuming
raw seafood may expose
themselves to higher
risks. With all these
culinary innovations
where sky’s the limit, it
is crucial to know the
components of what we
eat and the risks of doing
so. At the end of the day,
savoring the pleasure of
flavor will always come
with a price.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
65
The
Contemporary
F l avo r s
of
Sushi
WoRDS by Muriel dizon
PHoToGRAPHy by Karlo CadanG
SHoT oN LoCATIoN AT susHi nori
SPECIAL THANKS To MilKa roMero AND vina saw
I
t was during the 8th century when the art of
making sushi became prevalent in Southeast
Asian countries. Years later, it eventually
reached south of China and Japan.Throughout
time, the Japanese have developed, popularized,
and even perfected the art which later became
essential to their cuisine.
Today, sushi can be considered one of the
most popular dishes around the world. This
issue, we sat down with the makers of Sushi
Nori, a new cult favorite when it comes to the
"on-the-go" food trend, and discovered the
ropes of their innovative ways of sushi-making.
REALSTORIES:GastronomyConfidential
with the idea of
serving sushi as a roll,
practitioners of the art
introduced a quirky way of
presenting it and called it
the ‘uramaki’ or the insideout roll. Compared to the
typical rolls, the urumaki is
made with rice placed on
the outer side of the roll
with the nori and filling on
the opposite side.
though uramaki is not
new to the table, sushi
nori experimented with a
variety of ingredients to
enrich its flavors.
b r e a k fa s t m a
bG
ra
ea
z iknfa
e |sD
tem
Ca
em
Ga
Bz
e iRn2017
e | a P- R
ja
i Ln-um
a aY
RY 2018
69
67
REALSTORIES:GastronomyConfidential
adapting the fastpaced lifestyle
of most people,
especially millennials,
sushi nori devised
a non-sit down way
of enjoying sushi by
recreating their own
temaki rolls.
68
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
REALSTORIES:GastronomyConfidential
this temaki roll is called
okonomiyaki. it is made
up of nori, teriyaki sauce,
tamago, kani, rice,
Japanese mayo, spring
onions, and bonito flakes.
Because the idea is for it
to be a take out sushi, they
designed the packaging to
consider hassle-free eating
for on-the-go customers.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
69
REALSTORIES:GastronomyConfidential
this uramaki is called
‘oMG’. it is one of their goto flavors made of salmon,
nori, tempura flakes, rice,
cucumber, ebiko, Japanese
mayo, and spring onions.
this uramaki is served with
salmon that’s blow-torched
on top!
70
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
REALSTORIES:GastronomyConfidential
while sushi nori isn’t
afraid to be a little
different, their menu
still offers traditional
sushi dishes such as
nigiri, maki, and sashimi,
served in a myriad of
flavors fit for everyone.
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
71
ReaL STORieS: Food Trip
o f f t h e wa l l :
WoRDS by trisH duMlao
U N C o N v E N T I o N A L R E S TA U R A N T
FINDS IN THE METRo
2
1 van GoGH is BiPolar
Embrace your imperfections and treat it as your
strength—is probably one way to describe how this
restaurant in Maginhawa started. If you’re wondering,
Jetro saw it apt to have Van Gogh’s bipolarity as a
theme for the restaurant as he was diagnosed to
have the same condition. A quaint place full of visual
treats, and where servers don’t exist. Expect a feast
that changes every time you visit, depending on the
owner’s mood, along with dishes that always promise
to leave you in better spirits.
2 PersePHone: a seasonal KitCHen
A place that took inspiration from the goddess who’s
the reason for the shift of seasons. Don’t be surprised
if their menu changes every now and then, as this
restaurant along Jupiter Street in Makati makes use
of seasonal ingredients and plays with market trends.
With its growing collection of recipes, one thing’s
probably for sure—Persephone is all about putting
your usual dishes up the ante. Case in point: try their
bowl of colorful bibimbapesque Tapsilog before it's
too late.
1
3
3 B.a.d. late niGHt BreaKfast Bar
Who said you can’t have breakfast for dinner?
In b.A.D., it’s all about breaking rules. breakfast
fares might be best eaten in the morning, but it’s
definitely not a bad idea to have it at any time of
day (or night) too. While usual breakfast tables are
bright and homely, this breakfast bar in bGC defies
the ordinary—it’s dark and dramatic, almost clublike. Their menu is extraordinary too, with familiar
breakfast dishes made with a twist. Take our word for
it and order the Chillaxilog or the Tapa Steak. It’s the
best bad decision we’ve made!
4
4 yuan Bistro
If you’re a fan of Asian fusion, then this restaurant
in Kapitolyo is perfect for you. And we’re not just
talking about the popular Japanese, Chinese, or Thai
creations we’ve all been acquainted to as they also
explore the less-tasted Asian flavors. Think India’s
chicken tikka masala, or Singapore’s laksa soup made
into a more thrilling dish. yuan bistro is also known
for their Do-It-yourself sushi set. How about creating
and indulging in your own sushi dreams? We couldn’t
think of a better experience than that.
5
5 Mr. roBoto
Voltes V, Mazinger Z, Gundam, and Voltron are only
few of the Japan-hailed robots that have become
inspiration to this fresh avant-garde-ish Japanese
restaurant in Alabang. From the brains of a millennial
duo, the place and concept might be considered
quirky, but the flavors and ingredients used still stay
true to what you can usually get in Japan. Mr. Roboto
has a wide array of Japanese fares you’d definitely
have a hard time choosing. be it sashimis, chirashis,
or donburis. Plus points for the retro vibes that’ll
make your heart beat for nostalgia!
7
6
Van Gogh is Bipolar 15 4-H Maginhawa Street, Sikatuna Village, Quezon City
Persephone: A Seasonal Kitchen 120 Jupiter Street, Bel-Air, Makati City
B . A .D. Late Night Breakfast Bar The Palace, 11th Avenue, BGC , Taguig City
Yuan Bistro Victoria Plaza,1 Brixton Street, Kapitolyo, Pasig City
Mr. Roboto G/F, ATC Corporate Center, Alabang, Muntinlupa City
The Filling Station 5012 P. Burgos Street, Poblacion, Makati City
Satchmi Café 2/F, Cinema Building, UP Town Center, Diliman, Quezon City
72
b r e a k fa s t m a G a z i n e | a P R i L - m aY 2018
6 tHe fillinG station
This 24-hour, neon-lit diner along Poblacion is
probably the best visual definition of what old school
is. A place that seems to have stopped the passage
of time, The Filling Station boasts its vast collection
of vintage items exhibited in all of its nooks and
crannies. From posters to knick-knacks straight from
the late 60’s, every corner is definitely IG-worthy. The
good news? Their food is just as stirring, it’d be hard
to choose what to get. but do try their milkshakes,
and feel like you’re one of Archie’s gang from the TV
series, Riverdale.
7 satCHMi Café
If you’re a café aficionado, you shouldn’t miss
dropping by Satchmi. besides getting your usual
coffee fix, this place will bring you back to the olden
days when vinyl records ruled the scene. Feel free to
browse, buy, and listen to your favorite songs—from
classic choices to contemporary. but don’t forget
to indulge in their food too; for starters, go with the
Lasagna Soup, and discover how visits to this café
will always be for the record.
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
2
Размер файла
19 763 Кб
Теги
journal, breakfast
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа