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2018-04-01 Town and Country PH

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NARCISO
Nicola Gallizia
pentalight.it
G/F and Mezzanine floor, Clipp Center 11th
Philippines, T +632 8691059 F +632 8191
Avenue corner, 39th Street, Fort Bonifacio Global City, 1634 Taguig City,
1433 M +63 9988880880 E sales@gmphils.com.ph
Ph. Marco Mussi
batteria ricaricabile
rechargeable battery
Tailored
SPACES
It’s our private sanctuaries that deserve
a touch of luxury the most.
TOWN&COUNTRYPROMOTION
A XOR Cit terio
A XOR S t arck Organic
I
t does not always have to take floorto-ceiling windows and panoramic
views to bring the luxury hotel
experience into our bathrooms. AXOR,
with its award-winning mixers, showers
and bathroom accessories, shows us
how to achieve luxury and elegance in
our private spaces without needing to
undertake major renovations.
UNIQUE CHOICES
It’s not just about the materials, but in
the way they are used. Unique designs
give the space its character. Be it in
bathtubs, showers, or mixers, it pays to
be specific in the finishes, features, and
choice of designer.
A XOR S t arck V
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brass finish
DESIGNER PIECES
A XOR Montreux
AXOR works closely with worldrenowned designers to create
exceptional products, each one a
work of art. Bath mixers, faucets,
and shower heads are designed
in collaboration with renowned
designers such as Philippe Starck,
Patricia Urquiola, Antonio Citterio,
and Jean-Marie Massaud. Together
with Axor, they have set the bar for
bathroom design, making the brand
the trailblazer in this important sector
of the home.
LUXURY IS PERSONAL
Spending for your comfort is a true
mark of luxury. Personalize your
sanctuary down to the finest detail.
Whether you want it nature-inspired,
minimalist, or playful, AXOR
continually redefines aesthetics, water
design and functionality to fit one’s
taste. Treat bathrooms as a sort of
personal oasis the way it should be.
A XOR Urquiol a
FOR
PER
AXO
acces
desig
line w
The
objects of beauty, they also
achieve perfection in terms
of function, fulfilling their purpose with
elegance and eiciency.
The AXOR collections offer an array
of unique and sustainable solutions to
create personalized bathrooms of the
highest aesthetic and technological
standards. Axor is exclusively distributed
by Kuysen. For more information, visit
the Hansgrohe Flagship Showroom at the
Eton Residences Greenbelt, Legazpi St.,
Legazpi Village, Makati and Kuysen Main
Showroom, E.Rodriguez Sr., Avenue,
Quezon City or visit axor-design.com
T& C
74
A PR IL 2018
E S TA B L I S H E D 1 8 4 6
86
56
66 D OW N T O E A RT H
A conversation with the
globetrotting Sandra Soriano
reveals a true modern swan whose
passions lie in food policy and
adventure travel.
82
By Pierra Calasanz
Labrador
FEATURES
74 T & C TA S T E M A K E R S
50 A DAY W I T H E L B E RT
CUENCA AND LIZA
ILARDE
Restaurateur Elbert Cuenca and
fashion editor Liza Ilarde on
celebrating their 20th wedding
anniversary, guilty pleasures, and
what makes them click.
78
Meet arts patron Trickie Lopa,
interior designer C. Mark Wilson,
and entrepreneur Karen Santos, who
are inspiring excitement and making
waves in their respective industries.
By Pierre A. Calasanz
86
54 S T R A N G E R T H I N G S
Those bold enough to buck the
rules are the ones who define our
aspirations, in style and beyond.
Spring’s collections pay welldeserved homage to eccentrics past.
EDITOR’S LETTER...............12
CONTRIBUTORS.................14
SOURCEBOOK..................92
S TA R S A N D S I G N S . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4
INVALUABLE...............95
GIVING ..........................96
By Lisa Vreeland
APRIL 2018
T&C
6
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
COMMON
D E N O M I NAT O R S
Handsome prince meets beautiful
non-princess? Not so long ago it
might have been the end of the fairy
tale. Why Europe’s royal houses
finally decided to let love rule.
By Michael Joseph Gross
T& C
A PR IL 2018
24
E S TA B L I S H E D 1 8 4 6
BRIGHT THINGS
35 WATCHES
Chopard’s Fairmined collection;
Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Reverso One
Duetto.
26
LOOKING GLASS
37 SKINCARE
D E PA R T M E N T S
La Mer’s Genaissance line.
OUT & ABOUT
16
38 MAKEUP
Meet the boys and girls of Tom
Ford Beauty,
CULTURE TOP TEN
“Bruce Conner: OUT OF
BODY” at Bellas Artes Outpost;
Artinformal opens its new branch
at The Alley at Karrivin Plaza; the
highly anticipated Art in the Park;
Manila FAME; and more.
39 BEAUTY NEWS
36
La Prairie’s Platinum Rare Cellular
Night Elixir.
SOCIAL NETWO RK
40 PARTIES
22 WINE
Elmer Borlongan’s landmark
exhibit, “An Extraordinary Eye
for the Ordinary”; CH Carolina
Herrera arrives in Manila; Gianna
Montinola and Vicky RotorHilado launch their second book;
and more.
The best of Tuscan wine from
Marchesi Mazzei.
24 DINING
Wolfgang’s Steakhouse opens its
second branch in Manila.
26 CARS
A look at the second-generation
Audi Q5.
46 WEDDINGS
Rebecca Reyes Disini weds Michael
Nepomuceno Alimurung.
28 BOOKS
Stylish new coffee-table books.
30
STYLE SPY
30 FASHION NEWS
48 MANNERS & MISDEMEANORS
In a world where even gold-digging
isn’t what it used to be, what’s a
modern mooch to do?
Rafé New York’s latest minaudiere
collection.
By Marshall Heyman
32 MUST HAVE
Tod’s spring/summer 2018 lineup.
LIFE AT TS BEST
TASTEMAKERS:
TRICKIE LOPA
KAREN SANTOS
C MARKWILSON
33 MEN
Outdoor clothing staples from Aigle.
SANDRA
SORIANO
DOWNTO
EARTH
34 MODERN SWAN
The Lucerne Group’s May Yao on
her favorite accessories.
94
APRIL 2018
HIGH STEAKS
WOLFGANG’S AT
THE PODIUM
ECCENTRIC
FASHION
Ć 746-2+
COLLECTIONS
MODERN
MOOCHERS
A DAY
WITH
ELBERT
CUENCA
AND LIZA
ILARDE
Sandra Soriano in
Louis Vuitton
LOVE RULES
WHEN ROYALSWED
COMMONERS
T&C
8
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
ON OUR COVER:
SANDRA SORIANO
PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOSEPH
PASCUAL. STYLED BY CAROLE
CUASAY-TAGLE. MAKEUP BY
APPLE FARA-ON. HAIR BY JAN
EDROSOLAN. ART DIRECTION BY
JP MENESES. LOUIS VUITTON
DRESS, GREENBELT 4, 756.0637;
LOUISVUITTON.COM
$
!
#!%" !
YVETTE P. FERNANDEZ
Editor in Chief
Executive Editor ALICIA COLBY SY
Art Director JOHN PATRICK MENESES
Associate Editor PIERRE IÑAKI A. CALASANZ
Managing Editor MANICA C. TIGLAO
Fashion and Beauty Editor CAROLE CUASAY-TAGLE
Digital Assistant Managing Editor NICOLE LIMOS
Digital Senior Staffwriter HANNAH LAZATIN
Digital Staffwriter PAOLO CHUA
Digital Assistant Art Director SANDY ARANAS
Contributing Writers MARIA MILAGROS G. AGUSTINES, CHRISTA DELA CRUZ,
DEVI DE VEYRA, PIERRA CALASANZ LABRADOR, RACHELLE F. MEDINA, CLIFFORD OLANDAY
Contributing Photographers PATRICK DIOKNO, JOJO GLORIA, PAU GUEVARRA, KAI HUANG,
TOTO LABRADOR, PATRICK MARTIRES, WILLIAM ONG, JOSEPH PASCUAL, DIX PEREZ, PAOLO PINEDA, IAN SANTOS
President and Chief Operating Officer LISA GOKONGWEI-CHENG
Publisher EDNA TANCONGCO-BELLEZA
Editorial Directors MYRZA SISON, JO-ANN MAGLIPON
Group Publisher ANNE CHRISTINE ONGTECO-SANDEJAS
Group Brand Publisher ICHI APOSTOL-ACOSTA
Associate Publisher PATRICIA PUENTEVELLA
StoryLabs Managing Editor DALE DE JESUS
StoryLabs Editorial Assistant ERIKA LAGUNZAD
StoryLabs Art Directors BOIZEI MALICDEM, EHLORIE GARCIA, LEIA GUTIERREZ
StoryLabs Web Designer JOUIE ULANGCA
Group Advertising Director FLORENCE G. BIENVENIDO
Deputy Advertising Director REGIE UY
Group Advertising Manager JUNN DE LAS ALAS
Key Specialist KNELLE ROSARIO
Senior Account Executives MELINDA KITANE, LEN MANALO,
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Circulation Manager - GMA NOREEN PELIGRO
Assistant Manager for Export, Online Distribution, Subscription and Direct Sales ULYSSIS JAVIER
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JENNIFER TOLENTINO, MELROSE TAMBOONG, MAY ANN AYUSTE
Junior Sales Representatives JOHN LAKHI CELSO, JULIE DUNN BANTAN
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Technical Operations Officer MARK RENN CALUAG
Web Operations Manager DENNISON KO
Online Advertising Sales Manager MAAN CHIPECO-DE GUZMAN
Senior Marketing Associates JEREMIAH CONSTANTINO, ANNA DOMINIQUE SANVICTORES
Junior Marketing Associates MARY JOYCE MONTINOLA, MA. JENNIFER DAYO
Media Relations Associates NICOLE ANGELA DAVID, JENSINE BOLINAO
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Visual Merchandiser MYCHAEL IVAN LIM
IS and Administrative Director MAGS CASTRO
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Digital Imaging UNITED GRAPHIC EXPRESSION CORPORATION
Printer THE HOUSE PRINTERS CORPORATION
TOWN&COUNTRY (PHILIPPINES)
is published by Summit Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved. © 2007 by Summit Publishing.
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TOWN&COUNTRY (USA)
EDITOR IN CHIEF STELLENE VOLANDES
TOWN&COUNTRY (UNITED KINGDOM)
EDITOR IN CHIEF JUSTINE PICARDIE
HEARST MAGAZINES INTERNATIONAL
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT/GENERAL MANAGER AND MANAGING DIRECTOR, ASIA & RUSSIA SIMON HORNE
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT/EDITORIAL AND BRAND DIRECTOR KIM ST. CLAIR BODDEN
EXECUTIVE EDITOR ELEONORE MARCHAND
FASHION AND ENTERTAINMENT DIRECTOR KRISTEN INGERSOLL
APRIL 2018
T&C
10
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
T& C
E DI TOR’ S L E T T E R
CLASS ACT
From left: Yvette at
the graduation rites at
Columbia University in
1993; dressed in color
with Christian Louboutin.
NO IFS OR BUTS
I
t’s been 25 years this month since I finished
my master’s degree in Journalism. Our class
Facebook page has been on fire with old
photographs and shared memories. Has it really
been a quarter of a century since we stayed up
all night finishing assignments at Pulitzer Hall?
I specifically remember how a riend of mine
showed me how we could communicate with
other students in other cities around the world
via computer on what she called the World Wide Web.
Why call when you can e-mail each other? she had asked.
But why e-mail when I can just call? I replied.
Because it’s ree, she said.
I couldn’t understand then how long distance communication
could ever be ree. I was making AT&T hundreds of dollars
richer every month by phoning home for just a few minutes on
Sundays.
Sometimes I wonder what would’ve happened if I had
pursued a career in hard news. When I was young and idealistic,
I’d planned on becoming an investigative news reporter or a
foreign correspondent, doing exposés or heading to war zones,
changing lives.
But instead, I edit a luxury lifestyle magazine. We do
investigative reports on skincare products and treatments. We
attend parties that are minefields of gossip. he biggest danger
in recent memory was avoiding getting trampled on by a
spooked horse at our cover shoot.
If. But. But no. No more ifs or buts. Life is good.
It’s been eight years this month since I moved home rom
New York. I’m no longer the same person I was when I was
there. I’ve become more outgoing and outspoken here than I
ever was over there. Maybe it’s the nature of my job. Or maybe
it’s age. Or maybe it’s because I’m back in my comfort zone
with people I’ve known my whole life.
I was looking through my closet recently and realized it also
looks very diferent rom the way it looked a few years ago.
While it used to be a row of black, there are now splashes of
color here and there. Mostly reds and dark pinks, and some
purples and navy blues. Color makes me happy.
I guess tastes change over time, depending on one’s moods,
one’s circles of riends, one’s chapters in life.
Welcome to our annual Fashion and Tastemakers issue.
It's one of our most popular issues because we feature people
who are confident enough to march to the beat of their own
drums, not feeling the need to conform to the norm. In doing
so, they have developed their own artistic flair and elan, which
to us is oh, so very attractive. And it is their trailblazing quality
that leads to a following, which eventually makes them no
longer unique because others want to be like them (isn’t that
ironic?), which pushes them to reinvent themselves again.
On our cover, spirited Sandra Soriano. We had originally
planned a feature on her in a previous issue, but ater meeting
her and getting to know more about her, we were delighted to
photograph her a second time for our cover. Ah, to be young
and to have the world at one’s feet.
Life is good.
YVETTE.FERNANDEZ
@SUMMITMEDIA.COM.PH
visit us online at townandcountry.ph | Follow us on INSTAGRAM @townandcountryph | Like us on FACEBOOK facebook.com/townandcountryph | Follow us on TWITTER @towncountryph
APRIL 2018
T&C
12
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
T& C
CONTR IBUTOR S
PIERRA CALASANZ LABRADOR
“I loved Sandra Soriano’s casual yet radiant vibe, and how she spoke so passionately about food politics, green living, and
her bucket list travel destinations,” says
Labrador, who profiled this month’s cover
subject in “DOWN TO EARTH.” A columnist for the
Manila Bulletin, Labrador’s second book
of poetry, Dear Universe, will be published
this summer. “It took a lot of courage
to self-publish The Heartbreak Diaries,
my first volume of poetry, and that leap
of faith eventually led to an offer by
Anvil to publish my next book,” she says.
“Moral of the story: Just put it out there
into the universe.”
LISA VREELAND
“I was thrilled to be asked to write on
one of my favorite subjects,” says
Vreeland, a documentary filmmaker
and granddaughter-in-law of Diana. She
describes some of the 20th century’s
great eccentrics in “STRANGER THINGS” . “They
were forward thinkers in many interesting ways, but their personal style
and fashion choices are also attractive
to me.”
MICHAEL JOSEPH GROSS
“People often underestimate the
personal connection that exists
between monarchs and subjects,”
says Gross, who writes about the rise
in romantic unions between royals
and nonroyals in “COMMON DENOMINATORS” .
“The new wave of marriages between
them deepens this connection.”
C L I F F O R D O L A N D AY
In “ MA G I C A L T H I N K I N G, ” Olanday talks to
New York-based Filipino designer Rafe
Totengco about his 2018 resort collection. A regular contributor to T&C’s
Style Spy pages, Olanday is the senior
fashion editor at Esquiremag.ph. His
definition of style? “It’s that sweet spot
between how you want to dress and
what you want to project to the world,”
says Olanday. “It’s also about being
timeless and timely.”
APRIL 2018
T&C
14
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
MARSHALL HEYMAN
Reporting on the new
tricks and trends in oldfashioned social climbing
for “THAT’S WHAT FRIENDS ARE
F O R ” caused Heyman, a veteran social observer who
writes for numerous publications, to suddenly “pay
much closer attention to
the behavior of the people
around me. And my own.”
‘
^ ^ ^ R \ S[ \ Y H M PSPW PU V J V T
O U T & AB O U T
CULTURE, LEISURE, AND OTHER PURSUITS
C U LT U R E T O P T E N
ACROSS THE UNIVERSE
Clockwise from left: Bruce
Conner, TRIXIE ANXIOUSLY
AWAITS CRIME, January 20,
1978; EASTER MORNING,
Suzanne Mowat; a frame
from CROSSROADS; EASTER
MORNING, Leaves; a frame from
BREAKAWAY, featuring Toni Basil.
Edited by Pierre A. Calasanz
1
BRUCE
ALMIGHTY
otoriously wary of
attention rom media
and art world personalities,
the American multidisciplinary artist Bruce
Conner (1933-2008) must
be turning in his grave in
the wake of a monumental
exhibition, “Bruce Conner: It’s
All True”—the first complete
retrospective that surveys
Conner’s prodigious output.
Ater its premiere at
the New York Museum of
Modern Art in 2016, the
exhibition traveled to San
Francisco’s Museum of
Modern Art and Museo
Nacional Centro de Arte Reina
Sofía in Madrid, revealing to
this generation why Conner is
widely regarded as one of the
post-war era’s most influential
artists.
Two hundred pieces
are on show including
paintings, drawings, collages,
photograms, and photos
alongside his films.
Our part of the world
gets a glimpse of Conner’s
genius with Bellas Artes
Projects’ staging of the artist’s
first major exhibition in
Southeast Asia. he show,
“Conner: Out of Body,” had a
two-part opening: At Bellas
Artes Outpost in Makati in
February and at Bellas Artes
Projects’ campus in Bagac,
Bataan, in March.
At Bellas Artes Outpost
in Makati, a sampling of the
artist’s range includes two
films: BREAKAWAY, the
artist’s masterpiece rom
1966 that features singer
Toni Basil, considered by
some as a progenitor of pop
music videos, and EASTER
MORNING, Conner’s last
video work before his death.
Visitors to the show will
also get to see the artist’s
MANDALA lithographs,
a few of his ANGEL
photograms and INKBLOT
drawings along with felt-tip
pen drawings, as well as some
of the FALLEN LEAVES scroll
collages. Viewers can experience
the full force of the
APRIL 2018
artist’s 36-minute film,
CROSSROADS, by trekking
to Las Casas Filipinas de
Acuzar in Bataan. Inside
the grand volumes of an
unfinished marble church,
Conner’s film—created
rom archival footage of the
nuclear tests conducted at
the Bikini Atoll in 1946—is
projected against a wall.
According to Bellas Artes
Projects’ artistic director, Diana
Campbell Betancourt, “he
whole idea for this show began
with Bataan—given the iconic
nature of CROSSROADS and
the talk about reviving the
nuclear power plant in the
province, as well as recent
nuclear threats rom North
Korea which made this work
especially timely to show in
Bataan, given its World War
II history.”
T&C
16
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
“CROSSROADS needs
to be shown large-scale,”
Betancourt (who also curated
the show) further explains.
“he church has a very high
ceiling. Also, you can’t tell
if the building is coming
down or being built up;
that ambiguity of space and
time adds to the impact of
Conner’s film.”
Bellas Artes Projects
founder Jam Acuzar was
immediately drawn to
Conner’s film. “I fantasized
about showing this work
inside the church since I first
saw it in 2015,” Acuzar says.
“CROSSROADS resonated
so strongly to me as it
reminded me of the Bataan
Nuclear Power Plant and the
incredible cloud formations
in Bagac. Although he has
already passed away, his
work is so timeless and has
many strong connections
with current issues in
politics, media, and society.”
Ongoing until June 3 at Bellas
Artes Outpost in Makati
and Las Casas Filipinas de
Acuzar in Bagac, Bataan.
bellasartesprojects.org.
DEVI DE VEYRA
I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y K O H N G A L L E R Y, L O S A N G E L E S , C O N N E R F A M I LY T R U S T, S A N
FRANCISCO, AND ARTIST’S RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK
N
OUT&ABOUT
C U LT U R E T O P T E N
2
REVAMPED
and REVITALIZED
PHOTOGRAPHS BY WILLIAM ONG
W
hile planning for
the opening of
Artinformal’s Makati branch,
gallerist Tina Fernandez
decided on a rebrand
which involved tweaking
the logo, revamping the
original Greenhills gallery’s
interiors, conceptualizing
the new branch’s design, and
redefining her programs.
Fernandez assembled a stellar
team of creatives to help her
realize her vision.
he revamp started with
the logo, now with lowercase
fonts to echo the gallery’s
relaxed character; two dots
provide a visual anchor
that alludes to the two sites.
Architects Sonny Sunga and
Arnold Austria updated the
Greenhills gallery (now called
AI1), opening the spaces
out ront to make it more
welcoming.
he Makati outpost, or
AI2, proved to be a bit of
a challenge. Formerly an
oice, Sunga and Arnold had
to prepare the site to fit the
usual gallery requirements.
he design also had to
conform to Fernandez’s
straightforward mandate for
the interiors to be simple,
where, according to her, “art
is the star.”
Sunga and Austria gutted
the entire space, stripping
of the wooden planks and
knocking down dividers to
make expansive plains for
displaying art. he architects
nodded to its heritage by
expressing its industrial
character while also adding
resh gestures, such as the
metal railings and mesh,
cement flooring.
Fernandez called on WE
Design’s Mark Wilson and
Nikki Escalona Tayag for
AI1’s lighting requirements.
“he intention was to support
the architectural design of the
architects and the aspirations
PLEASED TO MEET YOU
Inside the new AI2,
designed by architects
Sonny Sunga and Arnold
Austria, with lighting by
Mark Wilson and Nikki
Escalona Tayag of WE
Design.
featuring five sconces made
out of dinner plates and
water glasses, quintessential
components of any space
where food and conversation
take place.”
AI1 and AI2 may have
a similar look and feel,
but Fernandez decided to
diferentiate their programs
so that visitors can have a
unique experience. “For AI1,
I wanted a strong concept in
order to draw the viewers.
I’m working with curators
who will choose the artists.
his makes it more exciting
because the viewers will be
presented with angles and
ideas that will make them
look at the exhibition in its
entirety, not only at each
artist’s work individually.
For AI2, I choose the artists
for solo exhibitions that will
show viewers their current
body of work and how these
are presented in the context
of an exhibition.”
Ater opening in February
with a three-woman show,
featuring works by Brisa
Amir, Tosha Albor, and
Christina Dy, AI2’s follows up
with a three-man exhibition,
running rom April 21 to
May 19, headlined by Juan
Alcazaren, Angel Ulama,
and Costantino Zicarelli. he
Alley at Karrivin Plaza, 2316
Chino Roces Avenue Extension,
Makati; 725. 8518. D.D.V.
of Tina Fernandez,” Wilson
explained, “but of course we
applied our usual signature,
which is lighting design with
high visual comfort and style,
including attenuating the
perimeters of the space so
that proportion and volumes
are accentuated.“
Special attention was
paid to spaces devoted to
entertaining. he open
backroom flows to a cozy
lounge area replete with
a bar. he ground floor’s
dining space was, according
to Wilson, a salute to AI1’s
kitchen. “I suggested this
because the volume of
this space recalled, to my
mind, the spatial volume
of the kitchen at the
old Artinformal, where
everybody liked to congregate
and hang out. he essence
of that homage is a wall
APRIL 2018
T&C
17
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
OUT&ABOUT
C U LT U R E T O P T E N
3
ART FOR
EVERYONE
T
here’s just no rest for artists and art
enthusiasts in Metro Manila as the
art scene in the city gets busier, bigger,
and better each year. Ater a brief respite
following Art Fair Philippines 2018, Art in
the Park is slated to take place on April 15 at
the Jaime Velasquez Park in Salcedo Village,
the afordable art fair’s home for the past 12
years.
Also organized by the formidable
Philippine Art Events trio of Dindin
Araneta, Trickie Lopa, and Lisa Periquet,
the more laid-back Art in the Park is held
for the benefit of Museum Foundation of
the Philippines. hough entrance is ree
of charge, it would be diicult to resist
purchasing anything, since items are pegged
at afordable prices, thanks to a price cap
given to all exhibitors: nothing more than
P50,000, with bargains begging to be
discovered and found.
his year’s fair features over 50 galleries,
art collectives, independent art spaces, and
even student organizations. Multimedia
artist Tekla Tamoria is the fair’s featured
artist, with her paper installations expected
to adorn the park’s trees. his variety in the
festival’s participation ensures that displayed
THE PARK IS YOURS
Scenes from previous
editions of Art in the Park.
pieces will be of diferent styles, making sure
that there’s something for everyone. If you’re
looking for a diferent kind of weekend
day out, mark your calendars. April 15, rom
10 a.m. to 10 p.m., at the Jaime Velasquez
Park, Salcedo Village, Makati; facebook.com/
artintheparkph. CHRISTA DELA CRUZ
4
FIT TO PRINT
o raise awareness and inspire others to learn more about
an oten overlooked art form, the School of Design and
Arts of the De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde mounts “By
Hand: Rediscovering the Art of Printmaking,” now running at
the school’s 12th Floor Gallery. hrough the show, visitors gain
insight into the history of printmaking (always closely linked
to engraving, one of the oldest art forms), as well as the myriad
techniques developed over the ages. Taking the theme Land, Sea
and the Exchange of Ideas, the show features prints by artists
representing three studios: Michael Kempson (Cicada Press
of the University of New South Wales in Sydney); Kitikong
Tilokwattanotai (Chiangmai Art on Paper Studios, hailand),
and Benjie T. Cabrera (Association of Pinoy Printmakers). Also
taking part in the show are faculty and students of the school’s
Design Foundation Program, showcasing works created on
campus. During the duration of the show, various printmaking
professionals will hold court at a studio adjacent to the gallery,
demonstrating the finer points of their art. he prints produced
will become part of the exhibit and will later be available for
purchase. All proceeds will benefit the SDA Scholarship Fund.
Ongoing until April 14; De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde, Pablo
Ocampo Street, Malate, Manila; 230.5100 ext. 3849; campusart@
benilde.edu.ph.
LIMITED SERIES
From top: Holes in the
Land, by Judy Watson;
Untitled, by Kitikong
Tilokwattanotai.
T&C
18
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
COURTESY PHILIPPINE ART EVENTS (3) AND SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND ARTS (4)
T
OUT&ABOUT
C U LT U R E T O P T E N
5
PRIDE: IN
THE NAME
OF LOVE
PHOTOGRAPH BY JOAN MARCUS, COURTESY MICHAEL CASSEL
GROUP (5); COURTESY MANILA FAME (6)
T
he Lion King, one of the great decade-defining films of the
1990s, comes to life onstage as the Michael Cassel Group
and Concertus Manila present its musical adaptation for a
seven-week run at he heatre at Solaire. Since its Broadway
premiere two decades ago, the Tony Award-winning musical
by Roger Allers and Irene Mecchi has been seen by more
than 90 million people in 24 productions around the world.
Indeed, Elton John’s music and Tim Rice’s lyrics have stood
the test of time (and medium, easily making the jump rom
film to theater).
he ongoing international tour features artists who have
performed in previous he Lion King productions, including
Ntsepa Pitjeng (as Rafiki), Mthokozisi Emkay Khanyile (as
Mufasa), Antony Lawrence (as Scar), Andre Jewson (as Zazu),
and Jamie McGregor and Pierre Van Heerden (as Timon and
Pumbaa). Joining them are six actors rom the Philippines:
Julien Joshua Dolor, Pablo Palacpac, and Juan Tiongson share
the role of Young Simba; and Sheena Bentoy, Uma Martin,
and Felicity Napuli alternate in the role of Young Nala.
Eagle-eyed fans of the film may notice a few changes in the
musical. For one, the role of Rafiki gets a gender switch and is
now female. here are also additions to the storyline, such as
Mufasa’s parenting technique and Nala’s exile rom the Pride
Lands. hese additions, thankfully, leave more room for new
songs to be incorporated, all done by the original composers,
John and Rice. Ater Manila, the production goes on tour
in Singapore, Korea, Taiwan, and South Arica. Ongoing
until May 6, he heatre at Solaire, Solaire Resort and Casino, 1
Aseana Avenue, Parañaque; tickets available through Ticketworld,
891.999, ticketworld.com.ph; facebook.com/ConcertusManila. C.D.C.
READY TO WOW
Get a glimpse of the latest
designs and trends at
Manila FAME.
6
I
n the age of Instagram, young design talents
are easily discovered, their careers catapulted
rom out of nowhere. But in the retail industry,
trade shows are still important to local and foreign
buyers—they have to see and touch the products,
and more importantly, forge relationships with the
manufacturers and designers.
Other exhibits may have come and gone, but
there will always be Manila FAME (Furniture and
Apparel Manufacturers Exchange), the country’s
longest-running bi-annual trade show. Aside rom
being a laboratory of sorts for designers’ concepts
for the past 35 years, FAME is currently focusing
on regional artisans (there is a Mindanao Pavilion,
dedicated to the crats of the region), as well as
special design projects that collaborate with smallto-medium-scale enterprises.
FAME isn’t without its seasonal challenges, and
its most recent controversy was its “showcasing” of
Whang-od, the celebrated Kalinga tattoo artist, at its
October 2017 show. he public quickly compared it to
the exploitation of Filipinos at the St. Louis World’s
Fair in 1904. CITEM’s executive director Clayton
Tugonon made a statement that Whang-od was in
perfectly good health, and that they had brought her
to Manila to support her in her nomination for the
National Living Treasures Award.
he April 2018 edition of FAME will feature
exciting projects, such as the Design Commune,
where German product specialist Detlef Klatt and
Filipino designer Tes Pasola will collaborate with
five manufacturing companies rom Bacolod to
create a richly layered and tightly curated exhibit
of the objects. April 19 to 21, World Trade Center, Gil
Puyat Avenue Extension corner Diosdado Macapagal
Boulevard, Pasay; manilafame.com. RACHELLE F. MEDINA
IN THE LION’S DEN
Nala and Simba in The Lion King.
APRIL 2018
BEST IN
SHOW
T&C
19
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
OUT&ABOUT
C U LT U R E T O P T E N
TOP BRASS
Trumpeteer Raymond
de Leon is the
featured artist
in the Philippine
Philharmonic
Orchestra’s inal
concert of the season.
8
7
TOOTING HORNS
T
he Philippine Philharmonic Orchestra’s performance season concludes this month
with a concert featuring the award-winning trumpet player Raymond de Leon.
A graduate of the University of Santo Tomas Conservatory of Music, the 31-yearold musician was a three-time first-prize winner of the National Music Competition
for Young Artists. While at university, he received the prestigious Benavides Award
twice for International Excellence in Music. Ater moving to the United States 10
years ago, he joined the 56th Army Band of the U.S. Army, serving for three years.
In 2011, de Leon took further studies at Pacific Lutheran University, where he earned
his bachelor’s degree in music, specializing in trumpet performance. Now based in
Tacoma, Washington, De Leon is feted during his regular visits to the Philippines,
giving memorable concerts with the PPO as well as conducting master classes for the
instrument; expect no less during this latest visit. Conducted by maestro Yoshikazu
Fukumura, the evening’s program includes “he Walk to the Paradise Garden,” by
Frederick Delius (1862-1934), the popular Trumpet Concerto in E Flat, by Franz
Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), and El Sombrero de Tres Picos (he hree Cornered Hat),
by Manuel de Falla (1876-1946). April 13, 8 p.m., Tanghalang Nicanor Abelardo, Cultural
Center of the Philippines, Pasay; 832.1125; tickets available through Ticketworld, 891.9999,
ticketworld.com.ph; culturalcenter.gov.ph.
THICKER
THAN WATER
W
APRIL 2018
C O U R T E S Y C U LT U R A L C E N T E R O F T H E P H I L I P P I N E S ( 7 ) , R E P E R T O R Y P H I L I P P I N E S ( 8 )
e all know how crazy families can be, but
Arsenic and Old Lace, being staged this month
by Repertory Philippines, takes it up a notch (and
more). An American dark comedy written by
playwright Joseph Kesselring in 1939, it revolves
around the Brewsters, a family descended rom the
first English Puritan settlers, who have since spiraled
into a clan of insane homicidal maniacs. Considered
the best and most successful of Kesselring’s 12
original plays, it played on Broadway rom 1941 to
1944, closing ater more than 1,400 performances.
In Arsenic and Old Lace, Mortimer Brewster is a
newly engaged drama critic at a local publication. His
seemingly ordinary life turns upside down when he
visits his family in Brooklyn and learns all about the
skeletons that should have stayed in the closet. He
meets his two spinster aunts who lace their homemade
wine with arsenic to murder lonely old men, his
brother who thinks he is heodore Roosevelt, and
another brother who had his face changed to resemble
a horror-film actor. How will Emily, Mortimer’s
fiancée, react to all the Brewster family’s quirks?
Directed by Jamie Wilson, this REP production
features Joy Virata, Jay Valencia Glorioso, Jeremy
Domingo, Nelsito Gomez, Sheikh Abraham,
Barbara Jance, Robbie Guevara, Gabe Mercado,
Steven Conde, Dingdong Rosales, and Luis
Marcelo. April 6 to 29. Onstage heater, Greenbelt 1,
Paseo de Roxas Street, Makati City; tickets available
through Ticketworld, 891.9999, ticketworld.com.ph;
repertoryphilippines.ph. C.D.C.
T&C
20
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
OUT&ABOUT
C U LT U R E T O P T E N
10
LAUGH
A LOT
A
cclaimed as one of the best comedies of all
time, Monty Python and the Holy Grail serves as
the inspiration for a loosely based stage adaptation,
Monty Python’s Spamalot, opening this month at the
Globe Auditorium in Taguig. hough the musical
features a nearly identical set of characters rom the
critically acclaimed film and incorporates a number
of unforgettable scenes, Spamalot takes the quest
for the Holy Grail much further than in the movie.
King Arthur leads the action accompanied by his
loyal knights: Sir Lancelot, the Homicidally Brave;
Sir Robin, the Not-Quite-So-Brave-as-Sir-Lancelot;
Sir Dennis Galahad, the Dashingly Handsome;
and Sir Bedevere, the Strangely Flatulent. Pay
attention or you might miss a gag cast member, Sir
Not-Appearing-in-this-Show. Of course, the show
wouldn’t be complete without the appearances of
the mysterious Lady of the Lake, the hysterical
Knights who say Ni, and the psychotic Black Knight.
he original stage version of Spamalot, which
featured lyrics and book by Monty Python member
Eric Idle with music co-written by John Du Prez,
opened in Chicago in 2004. It made it to Broadway
the following year, winning three Tony Awards. he
Philippine run, presented by Upstart Productions,
is directed by Joel Trinidad and Nicky Triviño. April
13, 14, 15, 20, and 22, Globe Auditorium, Maybank
Performing Arts Theater, Bonifacio Global City;
tickets available through Ticketworld, 891.9999,
ticketworld.com.ph.
SMOOTH OPERATORS
From top: Jamie Cullum;
Lauryn Hill; and the Brand
New Heavies perform in
Singapore this month.
9
JAZZ
BECAUSE
COURTESY SING JAZZ (9) AND UPSTART PRODUCTIONS (10)
N
ow on its fith year, the Singapore International Jazz
Festival takes place early this month at the Marina Bay
Sands with a superb lineup of jazz, hip-hop, and R&B artists
rom all over the world. he city resort venue is all set to
welcome more than 20,000 fans over three days and nights,
with the promise of 30 hours of live music rom at least a
dozen main acts. Concerts will take place on two stages, dubbed
the Main Stage and the Late Show. Kicking of the weekend’s
festivities on April 6 is the Austrian electro-swing musician
and DJ Marcus Füreder, better known by his stage name, Parov
Stelar, performing on the Main Stage. he following night, fivetime Grammy winner Lalah Hathaway will demonstrate why
her vocal contributions are highly sought ater by the hottest
acts in music today, rom Pharrell Williams to Kendrick Lamar.
Jamie Cullum, arguably the UK’s most popular jazz artist, is
back to perform in the Lion City, the memories of his sold-out
show at the inaugural SING JAZZ still resh among the lucky
attendees. On Sunday, previous members of the popular Spanish
rumba group Gypsy Kings present their new band, House of
the Gypsies; the highly acclaimed British group Brand New
Heavies is also featured on the bill. Over at the Late Show stage,
easily the most anticipated performer will be the American
singer-songwriter Lauryn Hill. Fans of the former Fugees singer
will know that this year marks the 20th anniversary of her
solo album, he Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, which earned five
Grammys. Other acts to catch include the Jazz Association SG
Orchestra, led by Jeremy Monteiro; and Incognito, featuring
Omar and Leee John. April 6 to 8, Marina Bay Sands, Singapore;
for tickets, log on to marinabaysands.com/ticketing and apactix.com;
facebook.com/singjazzfestival.
APRIL 2018
T&C
21
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
OUT&ABOUT
WINE
MARCHESI MAZZEI
SIX HUNDRED YEARS OF EXPERIENCE HAS GIVEN THE MAZZEI
FAMILY THE UPPER HAND IN TUSCAN WINE MAKING.
COURTESY MAZZEI
By Alicia Colby Sy
APRIL 2018
T&C
22
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
OUT&ABOUT
WINE
REAL VISION
Clockwise: A Mazzei
vineyard; a few of its
esteemed bottles; the
Mazzei family.
F
or over six centuries, and with its
lineage spanning 24 generations,
Marchesi Mazzei has been one of
most respected names in Italian wine.
With vineyards in Chianti and Maremma
in Tuscany, and in Sicily, the family traces
its wine producing roots back to the 14th
century, when ancestor Ser Lapo Mazzei,
a government notary, first used the term
Chianti in an official document to denote
a particular region of wine production.
Since then, Ser Lapo has been known as the
“Father” of the beloved sangiovese-made
wine, Chianti Classico, and the Mazzei
family one of its finest producers.
Founded in 1435, Castello di Fonterutoli
in the Chianti region is the family’s flagship
estate. he large 650-hectare hamlet set just
outside Castellina dedicates 117 hectares to
grape-producing vineyards for winemaking.
hese vineyards have been further organized
into five zones of 120 single parcels and are
planted with 36 biotypes of Sangiovese along
with merlot, cabernet sauvignon, colorino,
and malvasia nera. It is here at Castello di
Fonterutoli where several of the family’s
iconic wines are produced, including the
estate Chianti Classico Gran Selezion, Ser
Lapo Chianti Classico Riserva, Fonterutoli
Chianti i Classico, and the pioneering Super
Tuscan, Siepi.
Underneath the Castello estate is the
10,000-square-meter, state-of-the-art
winery designed by family member and
architect, Agnese Mazzei. Built over four
years into the rocky hillside, the winery
prides itself in using sustainable energy
sources and is equipped with a gravitational
flow delivery system that manages the
movement of grapes to juice to wine in the
vinification process, eliminating the need
for any electrical pumping. At the very
bottom of the structure, 15 meters below
the surface, lies the barrel cellar where the
wines are aged and stored. Both the cellar’s
temperature and humidity are naturally
controlled by five water streams that
flow through its rock walls and therefore
dispenses the need for any air-conditioning.
With approximately 350,000 bottles
produced each year, the elegant and spicy
Fonterutoli Chianti Classico is aged 12
months and is a perfect accompaniment
for grilled meats and dark pasta sauces.
The Gran Selizione DOCG, a blend of
92 percent Sangiovese and 8 percent
Malvasia Nera and Colorio, is aged
for 20 months in French oak barrels
and is characterized by a balance of
fruit, tannins, and minerality. It is a
well-structured and complex wine that
can be easily paired with game, stews,
truffles, and aged cheese.
P IL 2018
Also of note is the estate’s special bottling
called Philip. A full-bodied wine made rom
100 percent cabernet sauvignon grapes rom
both the Chianti and Maremma vineyards,
this wine is dedicated to Filippo Mazzei, one
of the more illustrious Mazzei ancestors.
In the mid-1700s, Filippo, a viticulturist
and wine merchant, met American patriot
Benjamin Franklin while traveling through
London and soon made riends with fellow
wine enthusiast Thomas Jefferson. It was
Jefferson who convinced Mazzei to move
to Virginia to plant grapes rom the Mazzei
Tuscan cuttings. Jeferson gave Mazzei 193
acres of the Jeferson estate in Monticello
and in partnership with both Jeferson and
George Washington, Mazzei founded the
Virginia Wine Company.
In addition to his contribution to
American winemaking, Filippo is also
credited with being an ally of the American
Revolution’s patriots. “he great doctrine ‘All
men are created equal,’ incorporated into
the Declaration of Independence by homas
Jeferson, was paraphrased rom the writing
of Philip Mazzei, an Italian-born patriot…a
close friend of Jefferson’s,” wrote John F.
Kennedy in his book, A Nation of Immigrants.
Proclaimed by Italian culinary
organization Gambero Rosso “as one of
the 50 wines that changed Italy’s wine
style,” Mazzei’s super Tuscan, Siepi, is a
blend of sangiovese and merlot grown on
the best, more mature parcels of the estate’s
vineyards. he exact proportion of the blend
is determined annually and is dependent on
how the ruit manages against the elements
throughout the season. First made in the
early ’80s, Mazzei believed that merlot’s
richness and roundness would complement
Sangiovese’s acidity. The wine is aged in
French barrels made rom Allier oak while
the duration of the aging is determined rom
vintage to vintage. A wine with great aging
potential, bottles of Siepi should hold well
over 20 years and pair nicely with highly
flavorful and textured dishes. Premium Wine
Exchange, Alegria Alta Building, 2294 Chino
Roces Extension, Makati; 812.3823.
N T R Y. P H
GRAND VISION
Clockwise: Marvin Agustin; the
signature Porterhouse steak
and New York cheesecake at
Wolfgang’s Steakhouse.
OUT&ABOUT
DINING
HIGH STEAKS
WHILE RAYMUND MAGDALUYO
AND MARVIN AGUSTIN MAY BE
RELATIVE NEWCOMERS TO THE
LOCAL STEAKHOUSE SCENE, THIS IS
DEFINITELY NOT THEIR FIRST RODEO.
M
arvin Agustin’s smile and
Raymund Magdaluyo’s
enthusiasm could sell anything
to anyone at least once, but ater decade
and a half in the food business, and
with a roster of successful restaurants
under each of their belts, this duo has
proven that there is much more to them
than just a few good ideas. Yes, there is
earnestness—a lot of it—but beyond that
there is perseverance, passion, acumen,
and above all, true grit.
he two, who have been business
partners with riend and fellow food
entrepreneur Ricky Laudico since 2005
in the popular Sumo Sam group of
Japanese restaurants, have formed a
second corporation, Excello Restaurant
Management Group, with Leina Bolinas,
that will concentrate on bringing in
international concepts to the country.
To date, it has launched Wolfgang’s
Steakhouse rom New York and Gen
Korean BBQ, rom Los Angeles, with a
third concept set to open soon.
While both Agustin and Magdaluyo
each have large stakes in other food
businesses (Magdaluyo is the president of
the Red Crab Group and Agustin owns
several food carts and ranchises, and
is a partner in Tai Koo HK Roast), the
two are dedicated to growing Excello’s
global platform. his year, Wolfgang’s
Steakhouse, which first opened in Manila
in 2016 at Newport Mall, is in the midst
of an expansion, having recently opened
its second branch at he Podium in
Mandaluyong and a third planned for
Bonifacio Global City this summer.
“Our Wolfgang’s partners are very
active in the day-to-day operations as
this is a joint venture and not just a
ranchise,” says Agustin. “Our general
manager reports to them directly and
brings to the surface all problems,
challenges within the operations, to
both of us. To be honest, this brand is
easy to manage. he menu is very simple
APRIL 2018
T&C
24
and straightforward—it’s New York
comfort food.” As with any steakhouse,
the source of the meat is vital and
Wolfgang’s international network and
expertise in sourcing and logistics have
proven invaluable. “Our meat is aged for
28 days onsite,” continues Agustin. “It
is chilled but never rozen and flown to
Manila regularly.”
With the Philippine restaurant scene
moving faster than most can keep up
with, Agustin says that understanding
the behavior and sophistication of their
diners is what keeps them ahead of the
game. “Millennials are very important to
the growth of our business and we take
notice of that. hey like their food and
value for money is paramount to them.
hey want fun, they want beautiful
settings, and they do enjoy their dining
experience, but in the end, it must be
of good value or they will spend their
money elsewhere. With all of our
establishments, we make sure we ofer
just that. hese days to keep competitive
you can’t just ofer ‘good enough.’ hat
doesn’t work anymore and that’s a good
thing. It challenges us. It excites us!”
Newport Mall, Resorts World Manila,
Pasay, 511.7009; he Podium, 8 ADB Ave,
Ortigas Center, Mandaluyong, 505.6272.
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
COURTESY WOLFGANG'S STEAKHOUSE (STEAK)
By Alicia Colby Sy
Po r t r a i t b y Pa t r i c k M a r t i r e s
OUT&ABOUT
CARS
JUMP THE Q
The all-new Q5’s
streamlined shape gives
it a drag coeficient of just
0.3, superb for an SUV;
ample room for three
adults in the rear. Opposite:
The dash features the Audi
Virtual Cockpit and an 8.3”
infotainment screen; views
of the air suspension and
all-wheel drive system.
OUT&ABOUT
CARS
HIGH FIVE
THE SECONDGENERATION Q5,
AUDI’S BEST-SELLING
LUXURY COMPACT
SUV, IS HERE.
By Pierre A. Calasanz
COURTESY AUDI/PGA CARS
W
hen it was introduced a decade
ago, the first generation
Audi Q5 hit all the right
spots. It sported great looks, performed
well on the road, and earned its stripes
as a near-perfect mixed-use vehicle. Built
with flexibility in mind—you could seat
five adults comfortably and still have a
lot of luggage space in the boot—the Q5
proved to be a goldmine for the German
automaker, which has since sold more than
1.6 million units in more than a hundred
countries over the world.
Ater receiving a few cosmetic tweaks
a few years ago to keep up with younger
rivals, the Q5 has been completely
redesigned “rom the wheels up,” as
they say in motoring circles. he second
generation Q5 is bigger yet lighter, faster
and stronger, and packed with the latest
technology. Among its most touted features
is the updated Quattro system with Ultra
technology, a development that can make
the SUV see into the future, in a matter of
speaking, but we’ll get to that later.
Redesigning a well-loved vehicle is a
daunting proposition, so Audi did the right
thing by keeping the basic configuration
while making noticable improvements. It’s
at the ront where the changes are most
pronounced: the grille is now enclosed
in a hexagon shape, and its vertical slats
have been replaced by horizontal ones.
Much like the horizontal stripes fashion
illusion, this new arrangement makes the
car seem a little wider—in this case it’s
a good thing. Combined with slimmer
angled headlights, which make the SUV
seem like it is squinting, this aggressive face
underlines the Q5’s sporty looks. From the
side, the silhouette is enhanced with a more
noticeable fold line that runs the entire
length of the car. Size-wise, the new Q5
is bigger than its predecessor, but not by
much, about an inch longer and about two
inches wider. Inside, however, it feels much
larger. It probably has to do with how
the roof pillars are substantially thinner,
making the cabin seem more spacious.
he slimmer pillars have an added benefit:
better driving visibility all around.
Another thing best appreciated rom
the driver’s seat is the improved layout
of the dashboard. Audi’s Virtual Cockpit
displays graphic information on a 12.3inch screen, with a choice of two views:
“classic” with its round speed and rev
counters with red needles, and the more
modern setting with digital readouts.
Also on the dash is the multi-media
interface which ofers easy connectivity
with your smartphone. hrough this
feature, you can display your phone
apps, such as navigational tools, on the
8.3-inch screen on the center console. If
you’d rather be listening to music, the
Q5 is equipped with a topnotch Bang &
Olufsen sound system.
Living up to its motto of Vorsprung
durch Technik, meaning “Advancement
through Technology,” Audi has packed
this SUV with a host of technological
THE QUATTRO
ALL-WHEEL-DRIVE
SYSTEM IS WHAT
CEMENTED AUDI’S
REPUTATION IN THE
INDUSTRY, AND
WITH THIS UPDATE,
IT’S LITERALLY
LOOKING INTO
THE FUTURE.
marvels, among the most impressive is
the previously mentioned Quattro with
Ultra technology. he Quattro all-wheeldrive system is what cemented Audi’s
reputation in the industry, and with this
update, it’s literally looking into the future.
Simply explained, a processor analyzes
your driving and the road conditions
then it predicts your power or torque
requirements 500 milliseconds in advance.
When it senses that you need more
traction, Ultra activates the four-wheeldrive system in just 200 milliseconds (that’s
two-tenths of a second). When it senses
that extra torque is no longer needed, it
immediately disengages the rear axle rom
the engine and the rear wheels no longer
receive power, saving you precious fuel.
he new Q5 also introduces adaptive air
suspension, where you can vary your ride
height by five levels. Set it higher for better
handling on poorly maintained roads or
when you think you might scrape on a
badly designed road hump. Adjust it to
the lowest setting once you’re home, and
getting our things out of the trunk is much
easier. High technology in cars, what’s not
to love? Audi Philippines, 727.0381 to 85.
OUT&ABOUT
BOOKS
HEAVY HITS
WHAT’S ON
YOUR COFFEE
TABLE? LET THESE
REMARKABLE
MONOGRAPHS
PROMPT AN
UPDATE.
B y M a n i c a C . Ti g l a o
HAUTE BOHEMIANS, BY MIGUEL
FLORES-VIANNA (VENDOME PRESS)
Flores-Vianna, an Argentineborn writer, editor, and
photographer, travels far and
wide to capture 20 stunning
homes in destinations such
as Tangier, Milan, and
London. he personal spaces
of a grand mix of creatives
make an appearance, rom
artist Alexander Twombly’s
farmhouse-slash-studio in
Italy to magazine editor
Mariane McEvoy’s cottage
on Hudson River. In FloresVianna’s own words, “All the
houses in these pages are
poetry.” Available at National
Book Store.
VOGUE LIVING: COUNTRY, CITY,
COAST (KNOPF)
Featuring an impressive
round-up of subjects, this
Traina at their residences,
photographed beautifully
by François Halard, Oberto
Gili, and Bruce Weber, among
others. Available at National
Book Store.
volume compiled by Vogue
editor Chloe Malle contains
a rare and exhaustive
collection of homes of some
of the world’s most intriguing
tastemakers. Writers including
Hamish Bowles, Plum Sykes,
and Joan Juliet Buck profile
the likes of Dries Van Noten,
Lauren and Andres Santo
Domingo, Stella McCartney,
and Alexa and Trevor
APRIL 2018
CHAMPAGNE: THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE
TO THE WINES, PRODUCERS, AND
TERROIRS OF THE ICONIC REGION, BY
PETER LIEM (TEN SPEED PRESS)
No matter the season or
T&C
28
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
HOUSES THAT WE DREAMT OF: THE
INTERIORS OF DELPHINE AND REED
KRAKOFF (RIZZOLI)
hese days we oten hear of
Reed Krakof, appointed chief
artistic oicer at Tifany &
Co. in 2017. But long-time
followers of Krakof know
that apart rom establishing
a name in fashion, he’s also
managed to earn a stellar
reputation for his interior
design work alongside
Delphine, his equally
respected wife who is the
founder of Pamplemousse
Design. Together the couple
have accomplished a number
of stunning luxurious
residential projects, some
of which are shown in this
volume for the first time,
with commentary rom a few
of the couple’s close riends,
including Martha Stewart
and Tory Burch. Available at
National Book Store.
COURTESY VENDOME PRESS, RIZZOLI, AND NATIONAL BOOK STORE
occasion, you’ll find that it’s
best to always have a bottle
of bubbly on hand—and this
substantial guide makes for
a great companion. Liem,
a wine writer and founder
of ChampagneGuide.net,
demonstrates his expertise
with essays on the history
and evolution of the region
as well as descriptions of
its growers and vintners.
This boxed set also comes
with maps of seven vintage
vineyards illustrated by
Louis Larmat. Available at
National Book Store.
S T Y L E S PY
AN EYE ON LIVING AND DRESSING WELL
RAFÉ NEW YORK’S CLEVER
MINAUDIERES ARE THE FRUIT
OF MEMORY, INSPIRATION,
AND NATURE.
By Clifford Olanday
APRIL 2018
T&C
30
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
P H O T O G R A P H E D BY M I C H A E L G I R M A N ; M O D E L E D BY S O P H I E S U M N E R ; C L O T H I N G BY T R A CY R E E S E ; H A I R A N D M A K E U P BY A K I H I S A YA M A G U C H I
MAGICAL
THINKING
I
t was the French jewelers Van Cleef
and Arpels who first introduced
the minaudiere, a fancy evening
clutch whose main characteristics are
that it usually appears as a geometric
fantasia and, more importantly, is
carried by hand, without the use of a
strap. A traditional shoulder bag or your
voluminous satchel might ruin the lines
of a slinky column or a full-on princess
gown, whereas a hand-held minaudiere
maintains the integrity of a dress’ design
and allows it to shine.
So even if your minaudiere were to
present an embroidered scene of a pink
flamingo amid a tropical habitat of blue
skies and lush flowers, it would still be
a sensible match to a flower-covered
Tracy Reese number. he bag held in
hand is a highlight, a punctuation to the
statement-making outfit.
Such vivid creations are made by the
New York-based Filipino designer Rafe
Totengco, who, staying true to tradition,
continues to make clutches that evoke
fancies, whether it is a face of a jungle
tiger rendered in mother-of-pearl shell,
or a Rem Koolhaas-designed building
made in miniature.
his season, he puts together a vision
rom a pastiche of favorite things.
“Spring/summer ’18 was a melange of
images rom Slim Aaron’s book, A Place
in the Sun, Yves Saint Laurent’s muse
Loulou de la Falaise, a Fauvist painting by
Andre Derain titled Madame Matisse au
Kimono, Victor Vasarely’s geometric art,
and a recent trip to Holbox in Mexico
to see the flamingos in their natural
habitat,” he says.
And how the many and seemingly
disparate references become united
under one collection would be the magic
of Totengco. Inspiration is central to the
designer, who looks for it always (“here
is no start and end”) and, having been in
the fashion industry for more than two
decades, knows how to parlay it into
something that works. “If I can view
my collection with a few glances and be
able to know what it’s all about then I’ve
succeeded,” he says. “hese days you only
have a few seconds to catch someone’s
attention so it should be impactful and
memorable.”
Certainly, a blue-, pink-, or orangeplumed bird is eye-catching as well
as the perfect messenger for what
Totengco wants to express: the joy of
the sun and the fun and play that come
with it. “I chose a flamingo, a cockatoo,
and a macaw because visually they
S T Y L E S PY
FA S H I O N N E W S
“BEAUTY IS IN THE EYE
OF THE BEHOLDER, SO IF
PEOPLE SEE A FILIPINO
MOTIF IN MY DESIGNS,
I HAVE NO ISSUE WITH
THAT. IT’S ALL OPEN FOR
INTERPRETATION.”
SUNNY AMALGAM
Sophie Sumner models
pieces from Rafé New York’s
new, tropical-inspired
collection.
APRIL 2018
T&C
31
immediately transport you to a tropical
paradise,” he explains. “I’ve always
loved tropical birds. I used to have a
green parrot growing up, and he was
such a smart and funny creature with
tons of personality.”
hreading together the story of
spring and summer, the return of life,
is really “second nature for me due to
my upbringing in the tropics,” says
Totengco. he designer is familiar
with the wonderful warm elements
that signal the season such as straw,
shell, and snakeskin, all things he
loves working with and materials
that can be found in the Philippines;
however, Totengco stresses, he doesn’t
“consciously inject a Filipino motif in
my work.” Nevertheless, it is present
in the homespun textures and island
spirit that some of the bags evoke (one
embroidered flower looks very much like
the gumamela). “Beauty is in the eye of
the beholder, so if people see a Filipino
motif in my designs I have no issue with
that. It’s all open for interpretation. I
suppose it’s unavoidable, because what I
do comes rom my heart and I’m proud
of my heritage,” he says.
Having said that, the minaudieres
of Rafé New York are most certainly
global and, well, social, too. In these
days of social media, Totengco does not
have to imagine what kind of woman
carries his handcrated bags. “She tags
me on Instagram: where she is and
what she’s wearing. It’s amazing, and it
validates that I’m doing something that
she loves and wears!” he says. “I’ve seen
my minaudieres worn with jeans and a
leather jacket, a summer dress, and an
evening gown. It really depends on the
woman’s personal style.”
And isn’t that the goal: to have
your magical creations, woven rom
memories and made rom the harvest of
nature, used in the real world. Creation
does not exist in a vacuum. A painting
needs to be seen, a gourmet dish
consumed, and a minaudiere clasped
by the hand on some wonderful night
in order to truly exist. Rafé New York is
available at Rustan’s.
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
S T Y L E S PY
MUST HAVE
EASY DOES IT
Bags, shoes, accessories,
and eyewear from Tod’s
spring/summer 2018
collection, Greenbelt 4,
757.6292.
SOFT FOCUS
TOD’S SPRING/SUMMER 2018
COLLECTION CAPTURES
MODERN FEMININITY IN
POLISHED TAILORING MIXED
WITH EASY SILHOUETTES.
MODEL: BARBARA GODOY FOR MERCATOR
B y C a r o l e C u a s a y - Ta g l e
P h o t o g r a p h s b y Pa t r i c k D i o k n o
APRIL 2018
T&C
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
S T Y L E S PY
MEN
RAIN IN THE
SUMMERTIME
SPLASH PROOF
Clockwise: The Aigle
lagship store in Uptown
Mall; boots at the Aigle
factory; enjoying the
Aigle lifestyle; inside the
lagship; waterproof jacket
and parka.
YOU’RE ALWAYS READY
FOR THE GREAT
OUTDOORS—AND
MANILA’S UNPREDICTABLE
WEATHER—WITH AIGLE.
By Pierre A. Calasanz
COURTESY AIGLE
T
he relationship isn’t obvious,
but there’s a historical link
between the common road
tire and the trendy rubber boot
rom French outdoor lifestyle
brand Aigle. In 1844, ater
years of experimenting
with various materials
and chemicals, Charles
Goodyear perfected
vulcanization, a process
by which natural rubber
acquired more strength,
durability, and flexibility
while eliminating its
inherent sticky, tacky
feel. A few years later,
a fellow American by
the name of Hiram
Hutchinson met
Goodyear, and in
1850, obtained a license
to use the vulcanization process. He
wasn’t interested in manufacturing tires,
though, he was interested in making
rubber boots; to this end, he founded
Compagnie du Caoutchouc Souple in
1853, shortly ater migrating to France.
Among the company’s first patented
products was a waterproof protective
boot called A l’Aigle, which means “to
the eagle,” an homage to the American
eagle and clearly a nod to the founder’s
roots. It was this boot that eventually
gave the company the name by which we
know it today.
Hutchinson’s original goal was to
provide France’s large rural population,
especially its agricultural workers, safe
and reliable footwear; in this aspect he
succeeded beyond all expectations. By
some accounts, his factory in Montargis
was producing nearly 14,000 pairs a day,
all by hand. Despite the mass production,
quality has always been important to the
company. To this day, Aigle’s bootmakers
at the current factory in Chatellerault,
France, undergo rigorous
training, taking up to
two years to master
the 60 steps required to
produce a single boot.
More than a hundred and sixty years
on, Aigle is still best known for its
sturdy yet comfortable boots (which
have transcended their original purpose
to become an unexpected fashion
staple), but has also developed a range of
products for sports and leisure including
sneakers, hiking and hunting boots, polo
shirts, jackets, and parkas. Uptown Mall,
Ayala Malls Vertis North, he Podium,
SM Mall of Asia; 541.8730; @AiglePH on
Instagram.
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
S T Y L E S PY
MODERN SWAN
MAY YAO
THE MARATHON
ENTHUSIAST
AND MARKETING
EXECUTIVE AT
THE LUCERNE
GROUP ON HER
SIGNATURE
ACCESSORIES.
P r o d u c e d b y C a r o l e C u a s a y - Ta g l e
Photograph by Kai Huang
FA VORITE THINGS
Froom left: Rolex Oyster Perpetual
watch, Bonifacio High Street
Central, 556.9824; Pandora Wish
rings, Greenbelt 5, 509.1718.
been training for marathons,
so I always wear a watch to
track my progress. HOW MANY
WATCHES DO YOU OWN? Eight. I
sometimes like borrowing
my dad’s watches, like his
Panerai, because they have
large faces. WHICH ONE IS YOUR
FAVORITE? My favorite is the
Rolex I got as my graduation
gift. It has a purple face,
which is my favorite color.
Plus there’s an engraved
message at the back from
my parents. This reminds
wisely—my family does not
like being late. he practice
of wearing a watch every
day has really disciplined me
to plan out my day and use
my time eiciently. I’ve also
APRIL 2018
T&C
34
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
me how my parents worked
hard and cared for me so
much. HOW DO YOU WEAR THEM?
When I choose my watches,
I want them to have
different characteristics and
complement my choice of
clothes. I change watches for
different occasions. A watch
is not just a gadget that tells
time, to me it’s also a fashion
statement. Just as clothes
reflect one’s personality,
watches may say something
about a person.
MAKEUP BY HANNA PECHON. HAIR BY PATTY INOJALES
WHAT KEEPS YOU BUSY? Two years
ago, I graduated with an
Arts Management degree
rom the Lasalle College of
the Arts in Singapore. I now
help with the family business
handling Baccarat Crystal
and Steinway&Sons. Even
though I’ve entered the retail
industry, I am still immersed
in the arts. he level of
cratsmanship that goes
into shaping and carving
the crystal and pianos are
incredible. Precision is key
in making these quality
products. WHAT ELSE ARE YOU
INTO? I like to exercise so I
take spinning and boxing
classes. Right now, my
family is into running
marathons. We’ve done two
full marathons together so
far and we’re doing another
one in Tokyo. HOW WOULD YOU
DEFINE LUXURY? Luxury can
be tangible or intangible
but with an emotional and
sentimental value to the
person. HOW DO YOU ACCESSORIZE?
I love wearing watches
and jewelry. I have a new
obsession with my wishbone
ring that I bought at Pandora
recently. It’s very simple but
it makes me happy. I wear it
everywhere I go. WHAT'S YOUR
IDEA OF A TIMELESS LOOK? When
you can mix and match the
same pieces throughout the
years. I like accenting an
outfit with jewelry or a bag.
THE BEST WAY TO TRACK THE TIME?
Definitely a watch. Growing
up in a family involved in the
watch industry has taught
me to manage my time
BRIGHT THINGS
ALL MANNER OF JEWELRY
BLAZING A TRAIL
CHOPARD LEADS THE WAY FOR ETHICAL LUXURY.
B y M a n i c a C . Ti g l a o
COURTESY CHOPARD
I
n a time when consumers
are better educated and more
conscious of what they spend
their money on, the concept of
sustainability is one that’s become
frequently discussed. One of the
first watchmakers to take a step
in the right direction is Chopard,
which launches a 250-piece limited
series of its prized L.U.C model. he
L.U.C. XPS Twist QF Fairmined
edition not only carries the Fleurier
Quality Foundation certification, it
also spearheads the use of Fairmined
gold, a move that stems from the
long-term project between Chopard
APRIL 2018
T&C
35
and the South American NGO
Alliance for Responsible Mining
that began in 2013. he Fairmined
label carried by this collection
means that the gold is extracted
responsibly by the community of
miners involved—and that the
miners are, in turn, compensated
fairly. So when it doesn’t seem
plausible to consume less, consider
that it can at least be possible to
consume better. Greenbelt 5, 707.9881.
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
BRIGHT THINGS
WAT C H E S
FLASH DANCE
The Jaeger-LeCoultre
Reverso One Duetto
features a distinct lozenge
pattern on its 18-karat pink
gold bracelet strap.
BOLD
MOVES
ELEGANCE AND
FEMININITY MEET
IN THE NEW THE
NEW REVERSO ONE
DUETTO.
By Clifford Olanday
APRIL 2018
T&C
36
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
COURTESY LUCERNE
A
rt Deco, the style that set the world ablaze in the
1920s, was created to subvert the traditional notions
of elegance. It championed the clean and simple,
manifesting in straight lines, geometric shapes, and modern
forms and materials (Bakelite, anyone?). In women’s clothing,
looser shapes, lots of fabrics, and non-existent waistlines,
complemented by bobbed hair under a cloche hat were all the
rage. In other words, less rou-rou but still chi-chi: expensive,
sophisticated, and, yes, daring.
Because of this movement, the style that debuted at the
International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial
Arts in Paris in 1925 has remained popular over 90 years later.
We still see it in furniture and architecture, but also in many
popular precious objects, such as the Reverso designed by
watchmaker Jaeger-LeCoultre.
One could argue that the timepiece with two faces, a design
element that was created to protect the watch dials of polo
players, is most faithful to the Art Deco style because of its
genius switcheroo trick, as well as its singular form: a sliver of
a rectangle ramed by three fluted lines, known as gadroons, on
the top and bottom of the watch case. he Reverso One Duetto
jewelry watch, in particular, pushes the envelope even further,
upping its dose of elegance and femininity with an 18-karat
pink gold version. Jaeger-LeCoulture’s master jewelers were
up to the task of creating this new model, and they did not
disappoint: On its reverse pink gold dial, brilliant-cut diamonds
create a graphic lozenge pattern. Not to be outdone, a motherof-pearl ront dial is further embellished with hand-drawn
Arabic numerals.
he Reverso One Duetto is an exquisite piece that can be
worn during the day with a pair of jeans, or dressed up in the
evenings. With more than 400 diamonds embellishing the
watch, it could be the most dazzling statement piece that you’ll
ever need. Greenbelt 5, 728.0094.
LOOKING GLASS
BEAUTY, HEALTH, AND WELLNESS
EYES
HAVE IT
GENAISSANCE DE LA MER
DELIVERS A NEW WAVE
OF MIRACLE AND BROTH
CREATIONS THAT CAN
TRANSFORM YOUR SKIN.
B y C a r o l e C u a s a y - Ta g l e
T
he Holy Grail of beauty is no longer the git of the surgeon’s knife. Today, good skincare
habits and a healthy diet can keep skin rejuvenated. For countless women, using a moisturizer
has become a natural part of their everyday routine. To specifically target the delicate areas
around the eyes, La Mer introduces its latest breakthrough, the Eye and Expression cream. Applied
gently around the eyes and expression areas, it repairs and recharges ragile skin, plumping it instantly
to leave you looking like you got a few more hours of sleep. It comes with a tool for acupressure
massage and application—a sensory experience with cooling efects. With a combination of La Mer’s
patented Crystal Miracle Broth and emollients, the Infused Lotion nourishes without the discomfort
or downtime of invasive and cosmetic treatments. It efectively fades fine lines, accelerates natural
collagen and elastin for that youthful appearance. Moments ater application, your skin appears
to be healthier and firmer. It leaves your face feeling sot and supple. Apply on the décolleté as well
because your neck too deserves the same immaculate complexion. Exclusively available at Rustan’s
Makati, Shangri-La Plaza, and Alabang.
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
LOOKING GLASS
MAKEUP
ă ă
TOM FORD’S
BOYS & GIRLS
COLLECTION—
COMPOSED OF
100 LIPSTICKS
INSPIRED BY 50
MEN AND 50
WOMEN IN HIS
LIFE—IS NOW
AVAILABLE IN
MANILA.
By Nicole Limos
favorite rom the Boys line,
a pearly light plum that’s not
too warm and not too cool,
making it the plum for most
skin shades. If you’re looking
for a red shade, try Warren
(inspired by Warren Bufett),
a bright brick to make you
feel like a billionaire. he Girls
are equally cool, featuring
feminine palettes in sheer and
full-coverage formulas. Grace
is a favorite, a full-coverage
red-orange that’s named ater
Grace Coddington, and Kyra,
metallic to sheer, glossy, and
ultra-creamy. Interestingly,
the 100 mini-sized lipsticks
are named ater the designer’s
closest riends.
Meet Jake, for instance,
inspired by actor Jake
Gyllenhaal, a shimmery pink
you can wear for daily looks.
here’s also the bestselling
Drake, named ater the
rapper, which is a metallic
plum whose buildable texture
can take you rom day to
night. Collin is another
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
IN GOOD COMPANY
From top: The Tom Ford Beauty Boys
& Girls collection features names
such as Julian, Logan, Ashton, Dakota,
Naomi, and Greta.
a creamy ’90s brown that also
works like a lip balm with
deep moisturizing benefits.
With a hundred wonderful
options, know that you don’t
have to commit to just one
Boy… or Girl. Tom Ford
boutique, Rustan’s Makati,
813.3739.
COURTESY ESTEE LAUDER
W
hen Tom
Ford Beauty
launched in the
Philippines late last year, its
50 Boys arrived ahead of the
Girls. his year, the collection
is completed with six new
additions to the original 50
Lips & Boys (in TF’s signature
mahogany case) and 50
sensuous lipsticks for the
Girls line, cased in ivory.
he collection has every
possible texture and finish,
rom matte, creamy, and
LOOKING GLASS
BEAUTY NEWS
UNDER THE
COVER OF
DARKNESS
LA PRAIRIE’S NEW
PLATINUM RARE
CELLULAR NIGHT
ELIXIR WORKS ITS
MAGIC AS YOU SLEEP.
to its signature age-defying Cellular
Complex, first created in the 1930s at
La Prairie’s laboratories in ClarensMontreau, Switzerland.
La Prairie’s scientists believe in the
renewing power of the night. hey
studied the vital functions of nutrition,
respiration, detoxication and immunity
in developing the new elixir, which
removes impurities, helps the skin
breathe, infuses nutrients, and boosts its
self-defense mechanisms.
he next morning, ater hours of
deep slumber, we awoke to tighter,
more radiant skin, with visibly reduced
wrinkles and imperfections. I confidently
went out and about makeup ree for the
rest of the week. P61,750/20 ml bottle,
Rustan’s Makati, 813.3739.
B y Y v e t t e Fe r n a n d e z
COURTESY LA PRAIRIE
M
om and I recently enjoyed
an overnight sleepover at
the Shangri-La at the Fort
to experience first-hand La Prairie’s
most luxurious and most rejuvenating
creation yet.
Ater a wonderful dinner and a
hot bath, we tucked ourselves in bed
and surrendered ourselves to the
experienced hands of La Prairie’s
estheticians for a decadent facial using
the Platinum Rare Cellular line.
The new ultra-premium collection
adds the Advanced Platinum Complex
APRIL 2018
T&C
39
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
S O C I A L N E T WO R K
PEOPLE, PLACES, AND PARTIES
E d i t e d b y M a n i c a C . Ti g l a o
Virgie Ramos
BenCab and Annie Sarthou
Romeo Lee
Boots Herrera and Deanna Ongpin-Recto
Jay Yao
APRIL 2018
Evelyn Forbes
Ambeth Ocampo
T&C
40
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
Gino Gonzales
S O C I A L N E T WO R K
PARTIES
Hetty Que
Joseph and Stephanie
Coyiuto with Paulino Que
Jaime Laya, Wig Tysmans,
and Tintin Babao
Ramon Orlina
Kim Atienza
Jonathan and Stella Que with
Karen and Richie Lerma
Joven Cuanang
Plet Bolipata and Elmer Borlongan
ART
TURNING
SILVER
Photographs by Ian Santos
R
ecent T&C cover subject
Elmer Borlongan marked a
career milestone with “An
Extraordinary Eye for the Ordinary”
at the Metropolitan Museum of
Manila. Curated by historian and
academic Ambeth Ocampo, the
exhibit featured more than 200 of
Borlongan’s works rom 1979 through
2015. Borlongan mounted his first
solo exhibition at Boston Gallery in
1993 and received the CCP hirteen
Artists Award in 1994. he landmark
show chronicled Borlongan’s evolution
as an artist, rom his years under the
tutelage of artist and teacher Fernando
Sena, to his time with the Salingpusa
group, and his move to idyllic
Zambales with his wife, fellow artist
Plet Bolipata.
Princess and Jon Russell
Louie and Liza Bate
APRIL 2018
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41
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
S O C I A L N E T WO R K
PARTIES
Heart Escudero, Audrey Tan
Zubiri, and Tricia Centenera
Bob Miller and Ito Curata
Tootsy Echauz Angara
Arlene Cu
Carlos and Soia Alvarez
Ria Prieto
Mariana Zobel Aboitiz and Lizzie Zobel
STYLE
Maria Gomez Acebo, Esperanza Padilla, and
Maria Jose Carrasco
Stephanie Kienle Gonzalez
MODERN
GLAMOUR
S
Flora Siasat and Grace Ang
Fortune Ledesma
APRIL 2018
Alejandro Martin
T&C
42
ince the founding of the House
of Herrera in 1981, fashion
designer Carolina Herrera has
enjoyed a consistent fan base and
the privilege of dressing a number
of high-profile personalities, among
them former first ladies Michelle
Obama and Jackie Onassis Kennedy.
he anticipated arrival of CH
Carolina Herrera in Manila, which
now enjoys a prime location within
Greenbelt 5, was feted with a stylish
afair and fashion show befitting the
fashion house’s heritage.
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
S O C I A L N E T WO R K
PARTIES
Vicky Rotor Hilado
Daniel Romero Salas and
Johnny Montinola
Anton Montinola
Ana Ugarte
Gianna Montinola
BOOKS
RULE
OF LAW
Wynn Wynn Ong
Mon Paterno
Bianca Romero Salas and
Lourdes Montinola
Photographs by Jojo Gloria
L
Maricris Olbes
Bianca Rotor Hilado
APRIL 2018
Gina Aboitiz
T&C
43
awyers Gianna Reyes Montinola
and Victoria Rotor-Hilado
have teamed up once again to
launch Laws for Life 2, the follow-up
to their hit first book, Laws for Life,
at National Book Store in Glorietta.
Both published by Anvil, the Laws for
Life series is a handy and indispensable
guide to understanding the Philippine
legal system and its oten intimidating
bureaucratic processes. Montinola is
vice president for corporate afairs
at Far Eastern University, while
Rotor-Hilado is a consultant and solo
practitioner of law.
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
S O C I A L N E T WO R K
PARTIES
Nedy Tantoco
Carla Buan, Marion Kohchet-Chua,
Margarita Locsin, and Vivian Yuchengco
Dina Tantoco and Anya Cajucom
Wick Veloso
Mario Katigbak
Frannie Jacinto
Rico and Nena Tantoco
LAUNCH
Kris Werner, Ailea Zialcita, and Mike Miranda
Gigi Montinola
TRAVEL
LIGHT
H
Margarita Forés
David Celdran
APRIL 2018
Bruce Peoples
T&C
44
SBC recently launched its
newly upgraded HSBC
Premier Mastercard at a VIP
event held at Ascott Ballroom. Hosted
by Wick Veloso, HSBC Philippines
CEO, and Kris Werner, head of the
retail bank and wealth management
division, the intimate dinner prepared
by chef Margarita Forés also toasted
the partnership between HSBC and
the Rustan Group of Companies.
Designed especially for its jet-set
Premier clients, the new card includes
access to exclusive shopping promos
and airport lounge privileges.
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
INJAP IS BEST
KNOWN FOR BEING
THE MAN BEHIND
MANG INASAL ,
ONE OF THE MOST
SUCCESSFUL FILIPINO
BRANDS IN MODERN
BU
Life Principles
by Injap Sia
With a foreword
by Jollibee Foods
Corp. founder and
chairman, Tony
Tan Caktiong
newsstands, supermarkets, and convenience stores for P295
@SummitBooks
@summit.books
S O C I A L N E T WO R K
WEDDINGS
REBECCA REYES
DISINI weds MICHAEL
NEPOMUCENO
ALIMURUNG
REBECCA, A PÂTISSIER,
AND MIKE, THE DEAN
OF THE COLLEGE OF
BUSINESS AT ASSUMPTION
COLLEGE, RECENTLY TIED
THE KNOT AT SANTUARIO
DE SAN ANTONIO.
E d i t e d b y M a n i c a C . Ti g l a o
Photographs by Caliber King
o f Pa t D y P h o t o g r a p h y
TELL US HOW YOU MET. It was at the
birthday of a common friend in 2011.
Immediately after that, I relocated
to Bangkok, while Mike moved to
Boston. As fate would have it, we
both moved back to the Philippines
in 2014. He asked me out, but I
didn’t hear from him for five weeks.
I later found out he had flown
to Europe on holiday. When he
returned, a friend of his mentioned
that I was moving to Paris for a year.
He didn’t waste time then and asked
me out again. We endured a longdistance relationship. WHAT DO YOU
APPRECIATE MOST ABOUT EACH OTHER? Mike’s
intelligence, patience, and kindness
led me to believe in love once again.
More importantly, he has a very
good relationship with my daughter,
Natalia. He says he appreciates my
thoughtfulness, sensitivity, and
loving nature. We complement each
other. HOW DID HE PROPOSE? He insisted
on flying to Paris before our planned
cruise around Europe, which didn’t
make sense to me at the time. He
had made it a point to propose in my
favorite city, which made it all the
more special. WHAT MADE YOUR WEDDING
UNFORGETTABLE? Mike and I love the
fact that we were able to pay for
our own wedding, and many of our
friends contributed to making our
big day special—my sister Maureen
Teichert generously made the gowns
for our entourage, my brother Dean
Alfar hosted our reception, Penk
Ching made our wedding cake,
and harpist Jane Banta played our
music. WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FORWARD
TO IN THIS NEW CHAPTER IN YOUR LIVES? On
our first honeymoon we went to
Croatia, Bosnia, the Netherlands,
and Germany. On our second
honeymoon we went to South
Africa. Cliché as it may sound, we
look forward to seeing more of the
world with each other.
APRIL 2018
T&C
46
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
S O C I A L N E T WO R K
WEDDINGS
Jess Disini and Rebecca
Disini Alimurung
Carlo Lopez. JJ Disini, Enrique Lopez,
Daniel Teichert, and Johnny Disini
Len Cabili, Teresa Ruino, Paten Todd, Patricia
Chiang, Marga Blake, Joanna Lopez, Maureen
Teichert, Caren Grey, and Patricia Dekeling
Jess and Monjierra Disini,
Rebecca and Mike Alimurung,
and Myrna and Vic Alimurung
Benjamin and Peachie Alimurung
Nini Licaros and Tita Trillo
Standing: Carlo Lopez,
Robbie and Angela
Dinglasan, Bacchus
Ledesma, and Simon
Villalon. Seated: Ana
David, Ninay Ledesma,
Rina Villalon, and
Tina Lagdameo
Christian Pobre, Jay Estoya, Gustavo do Canto Lopes,
Gael Alimurung, Mike Alimurung, Ivan Jakovljevic,
Ray Alimurung, Takashi Fujimoto, and Ronald Cruz
APRIL 2018
T&C
47
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
MANNERS&
MISDEMEANORS
THE BIG DIG
The Talented
Mr. Ripley
portrayed the
phenomenon of
friend-digging
at its most
murderous.
BEST PRACTICES
IN A WORLD WHERE EVEN GOLD-DIGGING ISN’T WHAT
IT USED TO BE, WHAT’S A MODERN MOOCH TO DO?
By Marshall Heyman
APRIL 2018
T&C
48
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
ALAMY
THAT’S WHAT
FRIENDS ARE FOR
MANNERS&
MISDEMEANORS
B
ack when people still read books
i n s t e a d o f b i n g e - wa t ch i n g
Netflix, Edith Wharton’s he House
of Mirth was a cautionary tale for the
aspiring social climber. Pity poor Lily
Bart, who tried too hard to find a wealthy
and eligible suitor and ended up—spoiler
alert!—in even worse shape than simply
penniless and alone.
It’s likely a few stragglers with stars
in their eyes still scheme with the intention of finding a rich husband or wife. But
the repercussions of marrying solely for
money don’t always play out so well, and
the truth is it’s overkill. Why chain yourself to an otherwise unappealing spouse
when private jet rides, unending stays in
that Lyford Cay guest cottage, hundreds
of thousands of Instagram followers, or
almost any other modern-day status symbol is attainable via a strategic riendship?
“You don’t come to New York to look
at butterflies,” says one fashion publicist
who married a man in the travel industry not for love but for access to international first class tickets. “You come with
a goal. It’s very business-driven.” Meaning it’s all about your network.
In turn, gold-digging, that classic
pastime, has begat “riend-digging”—using your closest circle
to get ahead.
Social climbing in this manner has been around for centuries. hink of John Jacob Astor,
Truman Capote, Madonna, or
even Donald Trump. “You’re
either on the Z list or the D, moving to C
or B or A,” says R. Couri Hay, a publicist
hired by social figures to make names for
themselves in New York. “Wherever you
start, you’re moving up with well-placed
appearances, well- written notes, and
memorable conversations.”
Or by getting tips from The Social
Climber’s Bible, which the writer Dirk
Wittenborn published with his niece
Jazz Johnson as a parody. One section
discusses how our Pilgrim forefathers
“would have starved to death had they
not shamelessly sucked up to the Indians and invited them to cater that first
hanksgiving.” Wittenborn says he was
astounded to learn that many readers
use it as an instruction manual. Tips
range from investing in art or films to
get closer to the right kinds of people, to
how exactly to behave at a cocktail party.
However, readers of diferent ages take
diferent meanings rom the book.
“I’m rom a generation that wanted our
lives to be a French movie, but I see a lot
fewer people these days looking to have
an afair. It’s not a very romantic time,”
Wittenborn says. “he goal now is to make
their lives seem more fabulous than they
are, and they go into the exchange that
way. here’s not a lot of guile anymore.”
Especially now that it’s easier than ever
to seem more extraordinary than you
might be. Friend-digging has become so
widespread because, in the social media
age, it earns dividends. Instagram means
there are benefits, both social and financial, to appearing to have a fabulous life—
beyond, you know, actually having one.
“People realize you can monetize social
cachet,” says one movie executive who
has worked her way into many a Golden
Globes party as a plus-one but who also
has a Hamptons house to ofer in return.
“Look at Hannah Bronfman. I made fun of
her when she was posting all this stuf”—
i.e., selfies anywhere and everywhere—
“but now she’s making a lot of money.”
he executive believes that it’s all about
aligning yourself with the right people not
just in real life but also virtually. A stylist
can get endorsements and deals by showing off her celebrity friends and clients,
parties. If someone wants to be a riend,
they should invite me out for a cup of coffee.”
A simple iced latte at Via Quadronno,
though, can lead to a lifetime of fielding
requests from a relentless mooch. Hay,
the publicist, believes that social climbing hasn’t changed much over the years.
Certainly, having money to donate to
well-regarded and fashionable causes
helps, but some less expensive tricks of the
trade include finding an older, established
mentor; sending subtle gits; making wellplaced appearances; and mastering the art
of sparkling conversation.
“People still expect you to be clever and
witty and smart and savvy and current
while staying away rom religion and politics,” Hay says. “But it’s such a crowded
space. It’s harder and harder to stand out.”
Of course, there’s having money, and
then there’s having access. “Once you get
the McMansion, you’re going to feel hollow unless you have all the tinsel on it,”
Wittenborn says, meaning that the quest
for status doesn’t end with things. Over the
summer, in St.-Tropez, one globe-trotting
socialite who has maneuvered
her way onto many a private jet
watched as a blonde New Yorker
made it onto a mutual friend’s
yacht without an invitation several days running. The blonde
took photos of the scene and
posted them on social media as
soon as she got on the boat.
“She has her own money—it’s
not that,” says the globe-trotter. It’s about
being in the right place at the right time
with the right people. And if they can’t
get there on their own, some strivers will
invite popular houseguests to stay with
them in the hopes of tagging along to the
happening party when they themselves
haven’t been invited. If Instagramming
rom an exclusive event is the new social
currency, some people will get it by any
means necesssary.
But perhaps friend-digging is just a
term that surfaces when you simply don’t
like the people you’re hanging out with.
“If I had a billion dollars, I’d be happy to
have my riends travel with me,” says the
globetrotter. “Wouldn’t you?”
Another New York–based socialite
echoes that idea, observing that sometimes those who seem like riend-diggers
to outsiders are really just people you happen to enjoy having around. “You don’t
look at it as if they’re using you. You look
at it as, ‘I don’t want to be lonely,’ ” says the
socialite. “If you’re a billionaire, you have a
lot of empty houses to fill.” «
“YOU DON’T COME TO
NEW YORK TO LOOK AT
BUTTERFLIES—YOU COME
WITH A GOAL. IT’S VERY
BUSINESS-DRIVEN.”
for instance. “Then you become part of
the squad.”
he fact that it’s so easy nowadays to
connect with the people you aspire to
befriend—via e-mail, Instagram tags,
direct Twitter messages—means the targets of riend-digging are more suspicious
than ever.
“I get outreach every day on social
media for connections, for favors, for
jewelry,” says one popular and successful
jewelry designer. “It gives people who are
strangers the feeling that they can be intimate with people they aren’t.”
“No question the internet makes it
easier to find people,” says Jean Shafirof,
a philanthropist and the subject of a 2017
New York Times profile headlined “Climbing the Socialite Ladder, One Gala at a
Time.” Now that she has arguably made
a successful ascent, Shafirof herself oten
receives e-mails rom people she does not
know requesting invitations to parties.
“I’ll certainly google them and find out
what they’re about,” she says. “But you
don’t do that. You don’t invite yourself to
APRIL 2018
T&C
49
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
A DAY W I T H
GROOMING BY PATRICK ALCOBER FOR MAKE UP FOR EVER AND KHEN FOR CREATIONS BY LOURD
A TOWN&COUNTRY LIFE
ON LIZA: COMME ÇI
TOP AND RING, POWER
PLANT MALL
APRIL 2018
T&C
50
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
A TOWN&COUNTRY LIFE
and Bulgari BLV Pour
Homme.
L: I love the smell of my dog
after he’s had a bath. I find
it so relaxing.
ELBERT
CUENCA and
LIZA ILARDE
WHAT’S ON YOUR SHOPPING
WISHLIST?
E: A Vespa scooter (waiting
for wife approval).
ELBERT, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF STEAK ROOM
CONCEPTS, AND LIZA, FASHION AND BEAUTY
EDITOR AT MANILA BULLETIN, CHAT WITH
MANICA C. TIGLAO ABOUT MEMORABLE
MEALS, THEIR HOPES FOR MANILA, AND
CELEBRATING THEIR 20TH ANNIVERSARY.
P r o d u c e d b y C a r o l e C u a s a y - Ta g l e
P h o t o g r a p h s b y D i x Pe r e z
WHAT TIME DID YOU WAKE UP TODAY?
ELBERT: 5:30 a.m. to bike.
LIZA: Early! It’s my birthday
today and I’m leaving for
Germany.
WHAT’S THE FIRST THING YOU DO
WHEN YOU WAKE UP?
E: I prepare my breakfast—
an espresso and a pastry.
L: Hug the dog. Then the
husband! My morning
ritual starts with oil pulling,
which takes 20 minutes.
I have to have breakfast
even if it’s just coffee and
a croissant. But always
coffee—black.
HOW DO YOU APPROACH DRESSING
FOR THE DAY?
E: It really all depends on
the day’s schedule and what
I’ll be doing, both morning
and evening. I try to dress
just once, although the
occasional dressy evening
affair will prompt me to
bring a change of clothes.
L: I’m not one of those
people who plans her outfit
the night before. It depends
on my mood, where I’m
going, what I’ll be doing,
and if I’m feeling fat!
FAVORITE THING ABOUT YOUR JOB?
E: My job doesn’t have a
not trendy. Oftentimes I
don’t even bother fitting.
Ultimately, it’s Paul Smith
that’s my favorite. If I could
afford it, I’d probably be
in head-to-toe Paul Smith
every day.
L: I don’t have a favorite, I
like them all.
regular schedule. Every day
is different and I deal with
different people.
L: Traveling to new
destinations to do fashion
shoots or interview
interesting people.
LEAST FAVORITE THING ABOUT YOUR
JOB?
E: Going through traffic
when moving between
restaurant outlets.
L: Deadlines!
SHOES?
E: Right now, I’m liking
Bata, but I really prefer to
be wearing a pair of Adidas
Ultra Boosts.
L: In the last couple of years,
I’ve been wearing heels less,
and flats more. Lately, I love
mules.
YOU BOTH PLAY A PART IN SHAPING
MANILA CULTURE. WHAT IS YOUR
HOPE FOR THE RESPECTIVE
INDUSTRIES THAT YOU WORK IN, AND
FOR MANILA?
E: I really wish for Metro
Manila to be identified a
dining destination. We need
to do what we can to elevate
the standards and develop
our palates.
L: They say print is dead, so
I want to produce content
that will engage readers and
make them want to pick
up the paper every Friday,
when my section comes out.
FAVORITE CLOTHING LABELS AND
WHY?
E: Uniqlo because it is the
easiest way to shop, and
the clothes are basic and
APRIL 2018
T&C
51
FAVORITE DESIGNERS AND SHOPS?
E: Paul Smith.
L: Whenever I’m abroad,
I make it a point to enter
COS, Gucci, Target, and
Ikea. I don’t necessarily buy
anything, I just like to look.
HOW DO YOU STAY IN SHAPE?
E: I bike at least 300 km a
month.
L: Brisk walking for 30
minutes every morning by
the bay.
DREAM DINNER GUESTS?
E: Anthony Bourdain,
Thomas Keller, Jenson
Button, Jony Ive.
L: Family members who have
sadly passed away. How I
would love to catch up with
them.
ENTERTAINING STAPLES?
E: Music, and it has to be
soft dinner jazz.
L: A case each of red and
white wine!
WATCH?
E: Series 3 Apple watch.
L: I don’t like wearing a
watch, but I have a Fitbit,
which I always forget to
wear.
DESCRIBE YOUR HOME.
E: Eclectic and high tech.
Cozy and functional.
L: My sister once said that
it’s decorated the way I
dress—that means eclectic
pieces that I love and don’t
necessarily go together.
It’s definitely not “interior
designed.”
DO YOU HAVE A SIGNATURE
ACCESSORY?
E: My leather man-bag
which I collaborated with
Fino Leatherware to design.
L: Not really an accessory,
but people know me for my
prints.
WHAT MAGAZINES AND WEBSITES DO
YOU READ REGULARLY?
E: Lucky Peach magazine, and
a lot of Facebook.
L: I read Vogue, Harper’s
Bazaar, and Domino. Online,
Business of Fashion and
WWD.
FAVORITE SCENT?
E: Clinique Happy for Men
WHAT BOOKS ARE ON YOUR COFFEE
TABLE?
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
A TOWN&COUNTRY LIFE
WHAT DO YOU THINK MAKES
YOU TWO CLICK?
LIZA: MORE THAN JUST
LOVING EACH OTHER, WE
GENUINELY LIKE EACH
OTHER. WE LIKE TO HANG
OUT TOGETHER, JUST THE
TWO OF US.
L: More than just loving
each other, we genuinely
like each other. We like to
hang out together, just the
two of us.
SIGNATURE DRINK?
E: Anything with alcohol.
L: Champagne.
WHAT WOULD YOUR LAST MEAL ON
EARTH BE?
E&L: A steak.
L: Rare Bird of Fashion:
The Irreverent Iris Apfel,
Fashionable Filipinas: An
Evolution of the Philippine
National Dress in Photographs
1860-1960, Kate Spade New
York: Things We Love, and
Pattern, by Orla Kiely.
E: None of the above are
mine.
WHAT MUSIC IS ON YOUR PLAYLIST?
A lot of Steely Dan.
NAME ONE POSITIVE THING THAT
HAPPENED TODAY.
E: I woke up.
L: I got a birthday upgrade
on my Emirates flight!
FAVORITE RESTAURANTS?
E: Per Se for the experience,
Le Bernardin for the food,
and, of course, Elbert’s Steak
Room.
WHERE ARE YOU TRAVELING TO THIS
YEAR?
E: We are going to Siargao.
We’ve never been there.
MOST MEMORABLE MEAL?
E: Per Se in New York
with Liza. I remember the
experience, but I forget
what we ate.
YOU JUST MARKED YOUR 20TH
ANNIVERSARY. HOW DID YOU
CELEBRATE?
We had a free-flowing party
with our friends at Elbert’s
Riedel Room on a Saturday,
and a quiet intimate dinner
on Sunday with close
friends and relatives.
WHAT DO YOU DO AND WHERE DO YOU
GO TO UNWIND?
We have a relaxing dinner at
Elbert’s Steak Room, or just
put up our feet and pour
ourselves a drink at home.
CAUSES YOU ARE PASSIONATE
ABOUT?
E: Orphaned kids.
L: The environment. I was
green before it became a
thing. Even if we don’t have
any kids, I think about
what kind of world we’ll be
leaving future generations.
ANY GIFTS FOR EACH OTHER?
E: We don’t normally give
each other gits, but for my
flight back rom Germany,
Elbert told me he’d pay for my
upgrade on the A380—it was
my first time on that plane!
IN ONE WORD, DESCRIBE THE LAST 20
YEARS TOGETHER.
E: Epic.
L: Fun.
FAVORITE MEMORY OF BEING
TOGETHER?
You’re asking the impossible.
WHAT’S YOUR IDEA OF A PERFECT
DAY?
E: Having accomplished at
least three major things.
L: Being on a beach with
family, breathing in the
fresh air, and just drinking
and chatting all day.
WHAT DO YOU THINK MAKES YOU TWO
CLICK?
E: We’re both Aquarians.
APRIL 2018
GUILTY PLEASURES?
E: KFC.
T&C
52
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
L: Munching on Doritos or
Cheetos instead of having a
proper dinner.
BIGGEST CHALLENGE YOU’VE HAD TO
OVERCOME?
E: Losing my business and having
no means of income ater.
BEST DECISION EVER MADE?
E: Marrying Liza.
BIGGEST MISTAKE OF YOUR LIFE?
E: Not marrying her sooner.
PET PEEVES?
E: “Sir, do you have a smaller
bill?”
L: When people don’t use a
perfectly functioning flush
in a public restroom.
BEST PIECE OF ADVICE RECEIVED?
E: “Stay hungry. Stay
foolish.”—Steve Jobs.
VALUES YOU APPRECIATE MOST IN A
PARTNER?
E: I appreciate that she is
grounded and therefore
keeps me grounded as well.
L: Being trustworthy.
WHAT TIME ARE YOU GOING TO
SLEEP?
E: Hopefully before 10 p.m., so
that I can get up early to bike.
More oten than not, I’ll be in
bed past midnight.
L: Definitely not before
midnight!
WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO DREAM
ABOUT?
E: A better world, where
everyone is happy.
L: Our plans for 2018 and
beyond.
A TOWN&COUNTRY LIFE
ON LIZA: COMME ÇI
DRESS AND CUFF, POWER
PLANT MALL
APRIL 2018
T&C
53
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
T H E C U LT U R E O F S T Y L E
THOSE BOLD ENOUGH
TO BUCK THE RULES ARE
THE ONES WHO DEFINE
OUR ASPIRATIONS. THE
SPRING COLLECTIONS
PAY WELL-DESERVED
HOMAGE TO
ECCENTRICS PAST.
By Lisa Vreeland
APRIL 2018
T&C
54
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
T H E C U LT U R E O F S T Y L E
LY N N G I L B E R T ( V R E E L A N D ) ; C O U R T E S Y T O M M Y H I L F I G E R ( G A I N S B O U R G ) ; M I A M I F I L M F E S T I VA L ( A P F E L ) ; D E M E Y E R ( C A S A T I ) ; G U I L L E R M O K A H L O ( K A H L O ) ; I Q O N S .
COM (PAIGGI); BARON/GETTY IMAGES (SITWELL); DAIGO OLIVA (SMITH); DAVID LEES/GETTY IMAGES (GUGGENNHEIM)
I
n the past several years
I have managed to make
a full-time job out of
examining the singular
visions and particularities
of some of the world’s
most fascinating eccenDiana Vreeland
trics. First on my list was Diana
Vreeland, my husband’s grandmother, who became the subject of my first film and book,
Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel. Diana was the ultimate
eccentric: rule-bending and individualistic in both aesthetics and mentality. Though I relish
Charlotte
wearing some of her old cashmere
Gainsbourg
sweaters—and am delighted to
see her continually referenced on
runways—what captivates me
most about her are the fabulous
(if sometimes slightly dubious)
stories she loved to tell.
Diana claimed, for instance,
that when she was a small child
she was one of the last people to
see the Mona Lisa before it was stolen from the Louvre, in
1911. She also liked to say that she was present during the
Night of the Long Knives in 1934, the evening Hitler purged
the Nazi party of anyone he felt was disloyal to him. She may
or may not have been everything she professed to be, but she
was never, ever boring.
Neither was Peggy Guggenheim, another glorious demonstration that eccentricity is a matter of both style and substance. In researching my second
film, Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict,
I learned just how much independence and bravery it took for Guggenheim to step away from her
very traditional roots and move at
the age of 20 to Paris, where she
was famously photographed by
Man Ray in Poiret dresses, became
part of the milieu of the Surreal- Iris Apfel
ist artists, and ultimately set out
on the path to becoming a world
famous patron. In her later years
she amassed a collection of artworks that has made history, and
she did it all in massive butterflyshaped sunglasses, surrounded by
an army of Lhasa Apsos.
Most recently I completed
Luisa Casati
work on Love, Cecil, a book and
film about the photographer and
stage designer Cecil Beaton, a man who worshipped creativity, who saw it as the ne plus
ultra of humanity. But he won’t
be my last subject—my list of
beloved eccentrics is long. There
is Lee Miller, the model, muse,
and lover of Man Ray. Her style
still inspires people today, and
stories about her are legendary:
In 1945 she was a war corresponFrida Kahlo
dent, and while she was traveling
APRIL 2018
through war-torn Europe with
the allied forces, the unit she was
with found Hitler’s apartment
in Munich. Craving a bath, she
supposedly jumped into the Führer’s personal tub and had a longoverdue soak. Then there was the
visually dramatic Luisa Casati,
who was known to take her pet
Nancy Cunard
ocelot for walks while wearing
only her fur coat and a face fully made up, including her signature kohl-lidded eyes.
Other favorites include the statuesque Edith Sitwell, who
stood six feet tall in brocade and
turbans and jewels and was also a
Anna Piaggi
literary icon unafraid to spar with
her male critics. And the prolific
designer Elsa Schiaparelli, who
combined fashion and art to startling effect and whose eponymous
couture house was recently resurrected, amid great anticipation.
Marie-Laure de Noailles was
the epicenter of the avant-garde in
Edith Sitwell
early-20th-century Paris, a bawdy
and daring muse and a patron to
the most important artists. Anna
Piaggi, whom I had the pleasure of
knowing, used her exuberant idiosyncrasies—including blue hair
and colorful makeup—to draw
people into the often forbidding
world of fashion. And of course
there is Patti Smith, who manages
to be a poet, a singer, a visual artist, and
Patti Smith
a writer, all while maintaining her status as a punk icon.
While the very point of all of these
people is that there is no one else like
any of them, they clearly share certain
things—namely, passion and strength
of character. They took risks, they
made choices. They embraced the
tension between high and low culture, excess and decadence, minimalism and maximalism. Some were
great beauties, and others were
Peggy Guggenheim
jolies laides, but all lived life on
their own terms, even when that
meant flouting society’s edicts
and expectations.
And it is because of them and
their ilk that our boundaries,
behavioral as well as aesthetic,
continue to expand, as does our
definition of beauty. They have
paved the way for a broader acceptance, and it is our responsibility
and privilege to carry forth the spirit that such eccentrics
bestow upon us. As Beaton said, “Be daring, be different, be
impractical, be anything that will assert integrity of purpose
and imaginative vision against the play-it-safers, the creatures
of the commonplace, the slaves of the ordinary.” «
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
T H E C U LT U R E O F S T Y L E
“I ALWAYS DID
WHAT I
WANTED AND
NEVER CARED
WHAT ANYONE
THOUGHT.
WOMEN’S LIB?
I WAS A
LIBERATED
WOMAN LONG
BEFORE THERE
WAS A NAME
FOR IT.”
— Peg g y G ug ge n he i m
P h o t o g r a p h s b y M a x Va d u k u l
Styled by Nicoletta Santoro
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
ON ANNA CLEVELAND: M A R C
J A C O B S GOWN, GLOVES, AND
STOLE, MARCJACOBS.COM;
STEPHEN JONES FOR
M A R C J A C O B S TURBAN,
MARCJACOBS.COM; PA U L
A N D R E W SHOES,
PAULANDREW.COM; O S C A R
H E Y M A N BROOCHES (ON
TURBAN, BRACELETS, AND
RINGS, OSCARHEYMAN.COM
T H E C U LT U R E O F S T Y L E
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
T H E C U LT U R E O F S T Y L E
ABOVE, ON LAURA LOVE: P R A DA
DRESS, SHIRT, PANTS, SOCKS, AND
SHOES, GREENBELT 4, 757.6298;
T I F FA N Y & C O . EARRINGS, RUSTAN’S
MAKATI, 817.8101; J E N N I F E R
F I S H E R CHAIN AND CHARMS,
JENNIFERFISHERJEWELRY.COM. OPPOSITE,
ON ANNA CLEVELAND: C A R O L I N A
H E R R E R A DRESS, GREENBELT 5;
E R M A N N O S C E R V I N O GLOVES,
ERMANNOSCERVINO.IT;
L U G A N O D I A M O N D S CUFFS,
LUGANODIAMONDS.COM; L O U I S
V U I T TO N RINGS, GREENBELT 4,
756.0637; S T R I V E C T I N POWERLIFT
INSTANT TIGHTENING MASK, RUSTAN’S
MAKATI, 813.3739
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
T H E C U LT U R E O F S T Y L E
ON LAURA LOVE: LOUI S
V UI T TON SHIRT, VEST,
SHORTS, AND RINGS,
GREENBELT 4, 756.0637; A N A
K H O U R I EARRINGS,
ANAKHOURI.COM;
Y EP REM EAR CUFF,
YEPREMJEWELLERY.COM
ON ELLA RICHARDS:
B OT T E G A V E N E TA DRESS
AND SHOES, GREENBELT 4,
757.6293
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
APRIL 2018
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61
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
T H E C U LT U R E O F S T Y L E
ON MARINA TESTINO: RA LP H LA U R EN
C O L L E C T I O N BLOUSE AND SKIRT,
RALPHALUREN.COM; M A RI A
L A R OS A SOCKS, MARIALAROSA.IT;
R O G E R V I V I ER SHOES, ROGERVIVIER.COM;
O S C A R H EY M A N EARRINGS
AND PANSY BROOCH, OSCARHEYMAN.COM;
F R E D LEI G H TO N BROOCHES,
FREDLEIGHTON.COM
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
ON ANNA CLEVELAND: DRIES VA N
NOTEN EMBELLISHED MESH TOP AND
EARRING, DRIESVANNOTED.BE;
MIC HA EL KORS C OLLECT IO N
JACKET, BLOUSE, AND SKIRT, POWER
PLANT MALL, 890.8705; TA B IT H A
SIMMONS SHOES, TABITHASIMMONS.COM;
LOUIS V UITTON RINGS, GREENBELT 4,
756.0637; FA BERGE CANE, FABERGE.COM
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
ON LAURA LOVE: S A I N T
LA UREN T BY A N T H O N Y
VA C C A RELLO DRESS, HOT
PANTS, AND SHOES,
SHANGRI-LA PLAZA EAST
WING, 956.3435;
D E GRI S O G O N O EARRINGS,
DEGRISOGONO.COM
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
T H E C U LT U R E O F S T Y L E
ON ELLA RICHARDS: MA RNI COAT,
DRESS, AND SHOES, UNIVERS, ONE
ROCKWELL, 553.6811;
B UC C ELLATI EARRINGS,
BUCCELLATI.COM; DIOR FIN E
JEW ELRY RINGS, DIOR.COM;
MAYBELLINE TOTAL TEMPTATION
MASCARA, AT LEADING DEPARTMENT
STORES
Hair by Didier Malige. Makeup by Chris Colbeck using
Chanel Palette Essentielle at Art Department. Nails by
Kelly B. using Dior Vernis. Set design by Jeffrey Miller at the
Magnet Agency. Choreography by Alexandra Berger.
Produced by Kranky Produktions. Tailoring by
Yasmine Ozelli for Lars Nord. Location courtesy
Maison Margiela USA. Casting by Steven Brown.
DOWN TO
AFTER LIVING ABROAD SINCE HER
TEENAGE YEARS, GLOBETROTTER
AND GREEN LIVING ADVOCATE
SANDRA SORIANO IS CHANNELING
HER TALENTS INTO THE
FAMILY FARM BACK HOME.
By Pierra Calasanz Labrador
P h o t o g r a p h s b y J o s e p h Pa s c u a l
S t y l e d b y C a r o l e C u a s a y - Ta g l e
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
O EARTH
LOUIS VUITTON DRESS, BRACELET,
AND EARRINGS, GREENBELT 4,
756.0637; SANDRA’S OWN HEELS
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
ON THE COVER
I
led her back to Manila, where she’s now taken a more active role
on her father’s dairy farm, Hacienda Macalauan in Laguna, as well
as its Virgin Coconut Oil division. “When I was really young, I
remember it was a place to go for the weekend. We had chickens
and ducks and pigs and sheep—I once tried to keep a baby sheep
[as a pet]. hat didn’t go so well,” she chuckles. “here were—
and still are—a lot of ruit trees; in santol season, my grandma
turns them into jam for us. hen, there’s the garden where my
mom (Menchu Menchaca Soriano) grows her plants. It’s really
beautiful.” Over the years, the family streamlined operations, and
focused on its (cash) cows; what was once a pet project nearly 20
years ago is now a full-time operation. Its dairy products—resh
milk, yoghurt, cheese—are available in most groceries, just look
for three cows on the label. Its VCO is made mainly for export,
but its local brand, Coco Boost, can be found at holistic stores like
ECHOstore and Holy Carabao.
“Part of what we’re trying to do is to make a more premium
product, yet at the same time, to make it more accessible and
affordable. And in making healthy, better food for people, its
not just about producing a cleaner product with less additives,
it’s also taking care of the environment that impacts the food.”
Sandra’s eyes sparkle when she talks about how the team cares
for the animals on the farm, rom growing their own high-quality
feeds, to showering the cows six times a day to regulate their
temperature. “If they’re healthy, there will be the right amount of
fat, the right amount of protein, the right amount of things in the
milk….” And, putting it in terms we can appreciate, she adds: “If
the milk doesn’t have the right protein, it’s not going to roth in
your cofee, you know?”
Sandra describes a regular week as fairly typical: In the
mornings, she meditates (“I use an amazing app called Headspace,”
she says), works out, and walks Hibiki, her beloved Shiba Inu,
before heading to the Makati oice or the farm when needed. At
least twice a week she heads to Manila Polo Club to ride in the
’m not quite sure how to do this,” Maria Alexandra
“Sandra” Soriano says, by way of introduction. We are
sitting by the window at a café, Sandra resh rom a
workout at the nearby gym, still sporting sweats and
a bare-faced glow that belies her 32 years. Typically
private and unassuming, she assures us that her
lifestyle is “not very exciting,” but we beg to disagree
as she opens up about her passion for food policy, her mindfully
minimalist lifestyle, and thirst for adventure.
Sandra first let the nest at the age of 12 to attend boarding school
at Santa Catalina in Monterey. “I liked it; it was very ‘California,’
in many ways, and religious without being… [dogmatic]; world
religion as opposed to just Catholicism.” For college, she attended
the University of Pennsylvania, where she majored in History
and minored in Communications, then moved to New York and
worked at Ogilvy, doing branding and advertising. When an
opportunity presented itself, she moved to London. “New York is
supposed to be a big city, but I find London a thousand times more
international and cosmopolitan. hough I don’t have immediate
family there, many of my riends rom diferent stages of my life
are there; I consider it my second home.”
When she first moved to London, she worked for a small film
finance company, before pursuing a graduate degree in Food
Policy at the Centre of Food Policy at City University. “When I
say food, everyone thinks restaurants,” Sandra says. Instead, her
lifelong delight in food has led her to “further studying the much
larger political, cultural, health, and environmental implications
of the global food industry.” Ater graduating, she worked on
several start-up projects, including an urban farming program, a
food waste campaign, and an edible schoolyard initiative. “I hope
to continue to work on greater environmental advocacy, improving
sustainable food policy, and enhancing public health, by making
better quality food more accessible.”
Making better quality food more accessible is what eventually
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
LOUIS VUITTON VEST, RING,
BRACELET, AND EARRINGS,
GREENBELT 4, 756.0637;
SANDRA’S OWN HEELS.
OPPOSITE: LOUIS VUITTON
DRESS, GREENBELT 4,
756.0637
SANDRA WEARS HER OWN
CLOTHES.
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
NIELS ELGAARD LARSEN (SVALBARD)
AT HER PEAK
Clockwise from left: On a
recent trip to Nepal, Sandra
visited the Dhawlagiri
range, Kathmandu, the
village of Ghandaki, and a
school in Pokhara.
evening when it’s cooler. She’s in bed by
9 p.m. (“I like my sleep, and I like waking
up early, when it’s still cool and quiet”)—
no wonder she has such flawless skin.
“Weekends, I’ll try to go to our farm or
out of town with riends. I feel like it’s
such a busy, hectic city that it’s nice to
venture out for the weekends.
“The Philippines has some really
beautiful islands; Amanpulo is always
amazing; El Nido is really beautiful, with
a diferent kind of landscape… Tubbataha
was an incredible, incredible experience.
To see how rich the Philippines really is
in terms of its marine wildlife—that was
really special.” Sandra also loves hiking,
and says that there are a number of spots
just over an hour away where you’ll
discover beautiful trails and falls. “In
Rizal, there’s this sort of mountain rope
course [Masungi Georeserve]; basically,
you’re hiking through the canopy of this
rainforest, so it’s a diferent viewpoint.
You see we have so much greenery, and
there are so many animals; you sit and
listen for a while and you can hear so
many birds, see so many diferent things
flying,” she marvels.
Sandra shares that growing up, she
and her family spent a lot of time in Beaver Creek, Colorado, a mountain range
where she learned to appreciate skiing,
mountain biking, river rafting, and fly
fishing. On the eve of her 30th birthday
she reached the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro. The year before that, Sandra
rode through the Mongolian steppe, participating in traditional nomadic life and
WHAT’S ON SANDRA’S
TRAVEL BUCKET LIST?
U Z B E K I S T A N “he cities of Bukhara,
Samarkand, Khiva, and Tashkent were
once major trading posts along the
Silk Road and have remained relatively
isolated, ofering a beautiful window
into Central Asia’s past.”
E T H I O P I A “From the rock hewn
churches of Lalibela, the Indian and
Portuguese walled city Gondar, to the
stunning Semien Mountain Range,
this diverse African country has a
unique landscape, culture, and history
that I don’t want to miss.”
S V A L B A R D “Ever since I read the
Golden Compass, I have been fascinated
by this Norwegian arctic island,
known for its remote rugged tundra
that shelters polar bears, reindeer, and
artic foxes.”
Svalbard
APRIL 2018
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connecting with remote reindeer herding
tribes. “I saw some of the most spectacular plants and animals on both journeys,
and loved the humbling experience of having to survive in very raw environments,”
she says. Other experiences she describes
as unforgettable were road trips to Marfa,
Texas; Roden Crater, Arizona; and Inhotim, Brazil. “They’ve given me a much
deeper understanding and appreciation for
the works, the artists, and the larger communities that helped create such beautiful
and compelling experiences.”
Sandra just got back from a trip to
Naoshima, a three-island enclave in
the Seto Inland Sea, Japan, which she
describes as a “magical, spiritual place”
that is home to breathtaking museums,
art installations, and architecture. As a
voracious reader, she’s now devouring the
book on the place. “It’s kind of nice ater
you’ve seen it and experienced it to then
read about the artists and what they were
trying to convey in their work.”
One thing Sandra misses about
London is the variety of healthier food
choices available. “You go to a restaurant
and there will be a lot more options
that aren’t necessarily designed for
vegetarians, they will just always ofer a
side of vegetables, for example.” hough
she doesn’t deprive herself of anything,
she is trying to cut down on animal
products and sugar. he food geek that
she is, she’s also conscious of eating not
just for pleasure, but for wellness. “It’s
just being conscious about what you’re
eating and how you’re feeling; knowing
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
ON THE COVER
FASHION MUST-HAVES
MY LIGHTWEIGHT LINGUA
F R A N C A statement sweater for the
plane! he vintage cashmere is really
sot and the hand-embroidered ’90s
hip-hop lyrics bring back the best
memories.
AT L E A S T O N E PA I R O F
S N E A K E R S for the gym or to explore
a city on foot. Either my black-soled
mesh Nikes which are super light and
ideal for packing, or my rust-gold
Golden Goose pair that are dressier
and go with almost anything.
A S W I M S U I T is essential for the
beach, winter hot tub, and any spa
or steam room. On my last trip, I
bought a high-waisted Solid and
Striped bikini—it fits really well and
I love the green stripes with lemon
yellow print.
Since I put them on, the stack of
B R A S S B R A C E L E T S by Natalya
Lagdameo have not let my wrist.
I don’t have to worry about taking
special care, or keeping them safe
when I am traveling.
YOLKE STRETCH SILK PYJAMAS
I relax as soon as I put them on and
are the best for a good night’s sleep.
LIVING IN THE
PRESENT
Sandra lounges at home
with her dog, Hibiki.
your body and what it needs. Use food as medicine.”
Learning all about food and the additives in it has also made
her vigilant about beauty products. “I’m more conscious about
what I wash my hair with, or what I put on my skin. Like food, I
look for something that’s less processed, that has fewer chemicals.
I’m a big believer in less is more; you don’t need 10-step cleansers
for your face.” She’s mindful about the Triclosan in toothpaste,
the aluminum in deodorant, the sulfates in shampoo, even toxic
ragrances. “here are a lot of really harmful chemicals in a lot of
everyday things. hey are like hormone disruptors; so when you’re
dieting and trying to lose weight and you can’t seem to, a lot of it is
your perfume, your makeup, your face wash—again, your health is
in everything.” So what brands does she trust? “Tata Harper—it’s
one of the few that started this whole plant/botanicals and using
fewer chemicals in its skincare products. But there are actually
so many now.” She also raves about their farm’s own coconut oil,
which she likes to use as a massage oil, food supplement, and is
for oil-pulling too, if she had the patience for it. “It’s cleaner, it’s
simpler, it’s one ingredient, and it’s organic.”
Her “less is more” philosophy also extends to her wardrobe,
which consists mainly of simple, clean lines, and occasional
prints. “I love Céline, Etro…more minimalist and utilitarian—
but not athleisure,” she adds quickly, lest we mistake her
APRIL 2018
workout gear for a style statement. She’s so unfussy that her
earrings are actually screwed in. “I had to get my passport renewed
and they asked me to take them of, and I literally had to ask, ‘Do
you have pliers?’” She does enjoy dressing up though, and misses
changing things up for four seasons. “Coats and vests and hats and
boots,” she gushes dreamily.
Is she back for good? “For the moment. But while I’m here, I
want to spend time being here. Connecting and reconnecting,
spending time with family, with my life here.”
his summer, she’s looking forward to joining a medical mission
of the Andres Soriano Foundation. “It’S a very small foundation
that basically helps livelihood programs in the Cuyo islands, which
includes Amanpulo. Because they’re so remote, the foundation
does a lot to empower them by giving them livelihood. Every year,
about 20 to 25 doctors go rom island to island, and it’s basically
the only time they have access to professional healthcare. It’s really
interesting to see all these diferent communities and spend time
with them.” Ultimately, she aims to help build the family business and
make a diference through food. “More than just providing something
that people eat, [we hope to] impact the way people think about their
food, think about their environment, and also how they feel—if
they’re eating healthier food, they’re less likely to get sick, and they
feel better.” «
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
LOUIS VUITTON DRESS AND
EARRINGS, GREENBELT 4,
756.0637. OPPOSITE: HER
OWN CLOTHES.
M a k e u p b y A p p l e Fa r a - o n f o r M . A . C
Hair by Jan Edrosolan
APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
TRICKIE
LOPA
CURIOSITY AND OPENNESS ARE CRUCIAL TO
DEVELOPING TASTE, IN ART AND OTHER MATTERS,
ACCORDING TO THIS STYLISH ART COLLECTOR.
By Pierre A. Calasanz
P h o t o g r a p h s b y To t o L a b r a d o r
L
ater this month, the latest edition
of Art in the Park gets underway
at the Jaime Velasquez Park in
Makati. Billed as the country’s
most significant afordable art fair, it’s a pet
project of Trickie’s, one of the driving forces
behind Philippine Art Events Incorporated,
with her partners Dindin Araneta and Lisa
Ongpin Periquet. In the past decade, this
powerful trio has worked behind the scenes
to influence the way we view, interact with,
appreciate, and purchase art. hen, in a few
months, the second edition of their latest
baby, he Nonesuch: Fine Collectibles and
Rarities, will take place, and before you
know it, it’ll be time for the icing on the
cake, Art Fair Philippines 2019. Can you
imagine how things would be if Trickie had
stayed in the fashion retail industry?
Before becoming a force in art circles,
Trickie was involved in fashion, helping run
Orange Juice (a division of Joanna Ongpin
Duarte’s Big & Small Company) involved in
clothing for children and pre-teens, “doing
everything from design to running the
stores,” she says. It was her life rom 1998
to 2011; you could say fashion was her big
first love.
A Management Economics graduate of
the Ateneo de Manila University, Trickie’s
initial plunge into the art world was in
London, where her doctor husband Randy
was doing his fellowship in the mid-1990s.
“My interest was sparked by living there,”
she says, recalling those days with fondness.
“I went on a year-long museum-visiting
bender, and I also took short courses in
art history at the Victoria and Albert
Museum.” At around the same time she met
Lisa—Joanna’s sister—who also happened
to be living in London. Perhaps sensing
Trickie’s growing obsession with art, Lisa
invited her to join the Museum Foundation
of the Philippines, an ofer which Trickie
considered when she returned to Manila.
During her stint as the board secretary,
Trickie helped dream up Art in the Park.
“We needed to raise funds, and the fundraising activities were always concerts. I
said ‘I’ll be damned if I have to sell another
ticket,’” she recalls, laughing. “We needed
a project for the second anniversary of
the Salcedo Market, which the Museum
Foundation set up, and so that whole thing
happened.” While all of this was going on,
Trickie was still in fashion retail, but she
had begun to realize something: “he art
scene was the hobby, the main job was
Orange Juice; and now, the hobby was
becoming the job.”
The dust would start to settle on her
constant battle with her priorities in 2011,
when the Big & Small Company was sold.
There was a year-long transition period
where she stayed on as a consultant to
the new owners; during this time that
she co-founded Philippine Art Events, and
started planning for the inaugural Art Fair
Philippines. A highly stressful time, it was,
in the end, highly rewarding.
Six editions later, Art Fair Philippines still
sets the bar for local art events and remains
highly challenging to produce, Trickie says,
taking at least 10 months to conceptualize
and prepare for. Her group’s latest, the
Nonesuch, might not be on the same scale,
APRIL 2018
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but Trickie believes there’s a lot of potential.
Moving away from contemporary art to
focus on native crafts and art forms, the
Nonesuch reawakened a latent interest of
hers. “I’ve always been interested in tribal
art. The reason I decided not to pursue
it is that I didn’t know where to turn for
scholarship on particular types of Philippine
art. I wasn’t knowledgeable enough to start
collecting seriously. Early in my collecting
days, I was exposed to the contemporary
art scene, and it was easier to get into that
in depth. Because of Art in the Park, I got to
know the artists, I got to know the galleries.
It was easy to talk to an artist, get to know
what his art is all about.”
By organizing the Nonesuch, Trickie
learned that a similar vein could be tapped,
from a separate circle. “It’s a different
cast of characters. I realized that there is
so much knowledge available. So I started
looking, got exposed to it more, and I got
interested in tribal art again.”
Even after about a dozen years of
serious collecting, Trickie says she’s still
learning. Asked about how she develops
her eye, she says, “One must always possess
curiosity and openness—to new places,
new experiences, new people—in order
to keep elevating one’s senses. The most
curious people turn out the most engaging,
they don’t get stuck in their comfort zones,
and thus, become ever more interesting.”
Continuing this train of thought, she
quotes the famous art collector, Charles
Saatchi. “‘he more you like art, the more
art you like.’ So the more you see things,
the more you train your eye.”
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
TA S T E M A K E R
COOL AND CULTURED
Trickie in her own
Jacquemus blouse, MM6
Maison Margiela pants,
and Isabel Marant shoes.
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
TA S T E M A K E R
ARTY EXISTENCE
Clockwise from left: Plates and goblets
by Jon and Tessy Pettyjohn; a few art
books; artwork by Yasmin Sison with
objects by Geraldine Javier, Ronald
Ventura, Patricia Eustaquio, and Mariano
Ching on the table and a Jose Tence Ruiz
sculpture on the side; her favorite area
at home, with a newly acquired bulul; a
collection of tribal masks.
SOURCE OF INSPIRATION
If you mean what makes
me carry on day-to-day, that
would be my family, of course!
But I find that an elegantly
turned phrase, wonderful art,
and walking around a city for
the first time do make me feel
good to be alive.
GREATEST PROFESSIONAL INFLUENCE
I’m not sure if this counts, but
working closely with Lisa and
Dindin, whether sounding
them of on new ideas or
trying to convince them to
go with something I feel
strongly about, have brought
me further than I thought
possible in terms of achieving
my own personal goals for
our projects.
MOST ADMIRED DESIGNERS
In terms of fashion, I think I
would have to go with Calvin
Klein: clean lines, elegant
silhouettes, timeless cuts.
I enjoy the spaces created
by Axel Vervoordt for his
ainity to both the visual
and decorative arts. Lately,
I’ve been following the work
of Ashley Hicks. I’m not
quite sure if I get him yet,
but I do enjoy seeing the
objects he puts together, like
his totems.
WAYS TO DISCOVER NEW THINGS
Making full use of my
subscription to the New York
Times, and whatever the
digital equivalent is of reading
it rom cover to cover: news,
art, style, books, travel, what
don’t they cover?
THINGS ON YOUR WORK DESK
Just my laptop. I work rom
anywhere.
MOST USED TOOL IN YOUR LINE OF WORK
My laptop and iPad—how
lucky that we live in an age
when one has the opportunity
to view art online, 24/7.
YOUR IDEA OF THE PERFECT HOME?
Walls filled with art and a
cozy chair to curl up with my
Kindle.
FAVORITE PART OF YOUR HOUSE?
Right now it would have to be
the corner of the den where I
can enjoy my bululs.
FAVORITE STORES
Online, there’s Farfetch or
Matches. For local brick and
mortar establishments, there’s
LCP and Aphro.
STYLE ICONS
Currently, I would have to say
Victoria Beckham: unfussy, solid
colors, the cut of her clothes
carry the day. here’s also Wallis,
the Duchess of Windsor, whose
outfits look as chic today as they
did 80 years ago when she stole
a king’s heart.
DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE
Usually spare, with a pop of
detail that’s slightly of-kilter. I
like dressing rom the feet up.
SOMETHING YOU’D NEVER LEAVE
HOME WITHOUT
A piece of statement jewelry,
nothing fancy: my stack of
bangles, a cocktail ring, or
a pair of dangling earrings.
hey don’t have to be
anything of high value, just
something to seal an outfit.
FAVORITE WEBSITE
My guilty pleasure is a site
called the Royal Order of
Sartorial Splendor. I have
a fascination for European
Royal History (I can tell
you the names of all the
grandchildren of the Queen
of Denmark and name all
the English sovereigns since
William the Conqueror) and
this site satisfies my interest
in both fashion and royalty.
FASHION OR DESIGN TREND YOU WISH
WOULD GO AWAY
he pajama look, maybe
because I’m not partial to
small floral prints.
WHO DO YOU FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM?
Aside rom all the major
museums and galleries in
the world and superstar
artists like Ai Wei Wei,
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
Olafur Eliasson, and Takashi
Murakami, I also enjoy the
posts of fashion personalities
like Suzy Menkes, Elizabeth
TNT, and theLSD.
FAVORITE PHONE APP
Yelp.
FAVORITE PART OF MANILA YOU’D
BRING GUESTS
Depends on the guests, but
I usually get requests to go
around the galleries and
museums.
FAVORITE CITY TO VISIT
In the past year, I suppose
that it’s been New York.
But I actually prefer to visit
somewhere I’ve never been
before.
TA S T E M A K E R
FAVORITE URBAN HOTEL
he Pottinger in Hong Kong:
Low-key luxe and in such a
great location.
TRAVEL MUST-HAVES
White sneakers, a cross-body
bag that can go rom day to
night, and Google Maps.
VACATION SPOT
Not any one particular place.
he best vacations entail
discovering something new,
immersing in history, and
seeing good art.
PLACE YOU’VE NEVER BEEN, BUT
WOULD MOST LIKE TO VISIT
Ghent, to see Jan van Eyck’s
altarpiece.
WAY TO REJUVENATE
Getting on the treadmill to
release those endorphins.
FITNESS REGIMEN
An almost daily run, weights,
and I’ve just gotten into yoga.
WORDS TO LIVE BY
To quote Jon Bon Jovi:
It’s my life,
It’s now or never,
I ain’t gonna live forever
I just want to live while I’m alive
GUILTY PLEASURES
Aside rom my favorite
website, reading the Daily
Mail and chocolate.
FAVORITE PLACE TO CELEBRATE
Special occasions have been
marked with family dinners
at home, catered by Kai or
Cibo.
WHAT’S CURRENTLY ON YOUR MUSIC
PLAYLIST?
Music I can run to: Bruno Mars
and he Killers are the best for
getting me through that last K.
DRINK/COCKTAIL OF CHOICE
Gin and tonic, vodka on
the rocks, or some white
Burgundy.
FAVORITE ACTOR OF ALL TIME
George Clooney!
MOST TREASURED POSSESSION
How can I not answer my
husband and kids and not be
judged?
DREAM DINNER GUESTS
Ai Wei Wei, Roberta Smith
(the art critic of the New
York Times), mega gallerist
David Zwirner, and Raf
Simons. Obviously, if this
ever happens, I’m as good as
invisible.
FAVORITE CULTURAL EXPERIENCE
I’ve had some pretty
spectacular ones recently: the
mind-blowing Anselm Kiefer
Retrospective at he Royal
Academy in London in 2014
and a major Hieronymous
Bosch show at he Prado
to celebrate the 500th
anniversary of his death.
here was also Doris Salcedo
at the Guggenheim in 2015—
political commentary done
with such elegance.
Two years ago, my daughter
and I visited Granada, and
ater touring the Alhambra,
I went to the Capilla Real
WRITER OR BOOK
Jane Austen, Persuasion.
FILM
Merchant and Ivory’s Room
With a View.
FAVORITE FORM OF ENTERTAINMENT
Spending the day in a museum
and doing gallery hops, not to
mention checking out major
art fairs.
ALL THAT GLITTERS
Clockwise from right: A child’s
tamborin necklace; Michelline
Syjuco cuff; malachite, silver,
and jade mask; an array of
vintage Filipino earrings;
T’boli brass bracelets.
where they’ve kept intact
the prayer room of Isabella
of Castile. Remember that
she lived in the 16th century,
so the liturgical objects and
paintings, particularly those
of Rogier van der Weyden
and Boticelli, were, even then,
already priceless antiques. Too
bad you couldn’t take photos!
FAVORITE MUSEUMS/ART GALLERIES
Too many to mention! But
David Zwirner has three
spaces in Chelsea, and always
worth a look-see. Last summer,
I spent a very enjoyable day
at the Dia:Beacon, a two-hour
train ride rom Grand Central
Terminal. On the way, you
enjoy glorious views of the
Hudson. his former Nabisco
factory now houses the
museum complex of works by
significant minimalists rom
the 1970s: Walter de Maria,
Dan Flavin, Joseph Beuys.
FAVORITE WORKS OF ART
From the past year: James
Turrell’s Breathing Light at
LACMA and teamLab’s Crows
are Chased and the Chasing
Crows are Destined to be Chased
as Well, Blossoming on Collision
at the Mori Art Museum.
FAVORITE ARTISTS
Tough one to answer, but I
would have to go with Vermeer,
Balthus, Joseph Cornell, and the
Chapman Brothers.
ONE THING FEW PEOPLE KNOW
ABOUT YOU
I’m a history geek, with
special focus on the Kennedys
and English history,
particularly the Regency
period.
YOUNG ARTISTS WE SHOULD KEEP
OUR EYES ON?
here’s Cian Dayrit, who is
currently featured at the New
Museum’s Triennial. Don’t
expect him to produce objects
that one can collect, though.
He leans more towards
research-based projects
with a nod to his interest
in anthropology that don’t
shrink rom socio-political
statements. I also like Ian
Fabro, for drawings amplified
with texture via staple wire
and dressmaker pins.
FAVORITE DISH
Siomai.
MUST-HAVE ITEM ON YOUR DINNER
TABLE
Veggies.
DESSERT
Green tea?
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
C. MARK
WILSON
THE INTERIOR AND LIGHTING DESIGNER REVEALS
WHAT GETS HIS CREATIVE JUICES GOING AND
UNVEILS HIS LATEST PURSUITS.
By Pierre A. Calasanz
P h o t o g r a p h s b y To t o L a b r a d o r
F
or C. Mark Wilson, a childhood
Christmas present turned out to be
a git that just keeps giving. When
he was 13, he received a camera;
over the holidays, spent with his cousins at
the ancestral family home, Mark could not
put the camera down: “I just photographed
and photographed the house and its many
details. It was a beaux-arts house, maybe by
Juan Arellano or Andres Luna. It made me
fall in love with architecture, photography,
and composition at the same time.”
Later, when he went to Harvard to
pursue a degree in Art History, specializing
in Western Art, he took photography as a
minor. here he learned valuable lessons that
he still makes use of today, as the creative
director for Wilson Escalona Design, a firm
specializing in light-centric interiors and
architecture. “My professors always said
to use the four edges of the camera as your
frame, so when you are shooting ‘in the
moment,’ you are already composing. You
don't want to do a lot of cropping aterward,
you want to immediately develop an eye for
form or silhouette composition, using your
frame,” says Mark. “When I’m designing
spaces, I’m always raming. I like to attenuate
perimeter—the center to periphery—
which comes back to that lesson. How do
you design edges to make the spaces appear
larger than they are? There are a lot of
parallels. All those lessons are fundamental
to design and art.”
After graduating from college, Mark
joined Knoll International, the firm famous
for producing midcentury furniture, for a
year in New York, before deciding to come
home to study architecture at the University
of the Philippines. he politically tumultuous
mid-1980s scuppered those plans. “It was
difficult to get to school and classes were
sporadic, so ater a year I moved into other
fields. My parents really wanted me to get an
MBA, so I did, at IESE in Barcelona, partly
so I could enjoy that city and see the Gaudi
buildings,” he smiles.
Ater earning his MBA, Mark’s education
continued a few years later in California,
where he took Interior Design at the highly
regarded Santa Monica College. He was on
his way to earning a master’s degree at the
Pratt Institute when he had a change of
plans: “I decided I needed a niche. Although
it was a really good course at Pratt, I needed
a specialty. So I did the two-year MFA
in Lighting Design at Parsons the New
School,” he explains. It was there that he
met his partner at his design firm, architect
Nikki Escalona-Tayag. “We got along like a
house on fire. We started working together
in student orgs, and I love her as a business
partner. We do diferent things really well.”
Bellas Artes Outpost, the art space of
Jam Acuzar in Karrivin Plaza, is a recent
example of the team’s work, where they
conceptualized everything from space
planning to surface design, rom lighting to
furniture. Mark’s interest in that last aspect,
furniture, was influenced by his brief stay
at Knoll, and further stoked by visits to the
showrooms of legendary antique dealers Kit
Roxas and Ramon Villegas. here, he fell in
love with Filipino furniture; in his mind,
the best examples are often undervalued
and underappreciated: “they are handmade,
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made in small quantities, versus mass
produced and industrial.” For select clients,
Mark sources antiques and gives them
new life through meticulous refinishing,
“taking something that’s varnished and
dark and then turning it into something
beautiful,” he says. “I’m not capable of
doing carpentry, but I have very good
finishers. They bleach and expose the
wood, putting it in a state where the wood
just feels like velvet. It’s about tactility,
surface, and form. People love unique,
one-of-a-kind things that you can’t really
find anymore. he pieces I refinish can be
combined in an eclectic way in modern
homes, and they just lit up the room.”
Antiques of another sort have led to
Mark’s latest passion. After purchasing a
collection of anting-anting—traditional
Philippine amulets—a light bulb went of
in his head. “I thought about recasting them
and covering them in diferent finishes, silver
and gold, and combine them with stones
and pearls,” he shares. his project reflects
Mark’s passion of putting together old
things in a new way, much like his interior
design projects, always done in good taste.
On that subject, Mark has this to say:
“My definition of good taste is taken rom
Vaclav Havel’s, which is it is about sensitivity
to others. Sensitivity to the way you present
yourself to the world, consideration, and
always trying to put your best foot forward.
So, that comes into a design point of view
as how you express yourself, or wish to be
expressed, in your environment. Not flashy,
a lot of understatement, and attention to
quality and detail.”
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
TA S T E M A K E R
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
TA S T E M A K E R
shaded on the west and south.
It has rooms that multi-task
so that the building does not
have to be overly large. It has
one TV or none, so the family
can spend more time together.
It is built of sustainably
sourced materials, so that
there are no toxic elements
to afect the health of the
family—especially the health
of young children who are
much more sensitive to the
environment than adults.
GREATEST PROFESSIONAL INFLUENCE
AND SOURCES OF INSPIRATION
Ramon Villegas has been
on my mind at lot lately,
because he helped train my
eye to understand Filipino
objects and furniture, and I
am looking at a lot of Filipino
things again. Federico de
Vera for his command of
juxtaposition, insistence on the
finest in cratsmanship, and
his artful all-black interiors.
Pepito Albert for his deep
understanding of point of
view and his genius with
apparel. Alred Weineke for
quality architectural design
and execution; he has really
raised the bar for high-end
residential architecture in
Manila. All these men have
been very generous mentors
to me, happily sharing their
expertise and knowledge.
And, my children, Claudio
and Isabel—they keep me
optimistic about the world!
loved his work for 30 years,
and seeing these buildings
recently reairms to me
how important he is. As far
as current designers go, I am
closely following the careers
of Tomas Heatherwick, Bjarke
Ingels, and David Adjaye.
FAVORITE PROJECT YOU’VE DESIGNED
I don’t know if it’s my favorite,
but Outpost in Karrivin Plaza
was a gesamtkunstwerk–not
oten is a designer asked to do
that—rom the architectural
layout to the decoration of the
walls and floors, to the design
of the furniture and custom
lighting fixtures—we did it
all and had so much fun. And
I gained a dear riend in the
process, Jam Acuzar.
WAYS TO DISCOVER NEW PRODUCTS/
DESIGNERS/TRENDS
he new is all around us;
sources of inspiration are all
around us. he most important
thing is to strive to train our
eyes to discern, and develop
a critical way of seeing—this
is a life-long project, a way to
keep our optics resh. Travel is
important, abroad of course,
but also within the country
itself.
MOST ADMIRED ARCHITECTS AND
DESIGNERS
Louis Khan’s Parliament
Building in Dhaka blew me
away; I visited it in February.
Some buildings have a moral
quality; that is a preeminent
example. I saw Khan’s Kimball
Museum in Dallas; it moved
me to tears—the elegant
attenuated proportions, the
tight materials palette, the
rhythm of arches within
rectilinear volumes. I have
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IDEA OF THE PERFECT HOME
he perfect home in the
Philippines has natural light
and air, with windows that
open up to the north, and are
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
FAVORITE PART OF MANILA TO SHOW
GUESTS
Right now I would bring
foreign guests to Elmer
Borlongan’s retrospective at
the Metropolitan Museum,
and to Carlos Celdran’s Manila
Biennale in Intramuros. Dinner
at Sala Bistro in Greenbelt,
to dispel the impression that
Manila has no trees.
COUNTRYSIDE HOTEL OR RESORT
I had a wonderful few days
at Fundacion Pacita Abad
in Batanes last year. he
vegetables, mostly grown
outside the scenic windows
of the restaurant, are organic
and plentiful. he menu is a
combination of Ivatan and
more cosmopolitan fare. So
you can eat really well there
and feel healthy, not fat, when
you leave. You do a lot of
COURTESY C. MARK WILSON (WORKSHOP)
SOFT EXPOSURE
Mark and an assistant
reinishing antique
furniture at Mark’s
workshop in Parañaque.
MOST TREASURED PIECE OF
FURNITURE?
I have an early 19th-century
all-balayong round table
rom Bohol that I bought in
Cebu in the early 1990s. he
dealer told me it came rom
the family of the local Bohol
hero, Francisco Dagohoy.
Balayong always makes my
heart melt, and the one of this
table is very dark chocolate.
It feels like silk when you run
your hands on the surfaces
of it. hat’s one thing people
don’t realize about furniture:
it’s as much about the physical
feel of it as about the way it
looks. Touch it!
TA S T E M A K E R
walking and hiking in very
resh air. here are 360-degree
views of nature everywhere,
and the local culture is
fascinating.
PLACES YOU’VE NEVER BEEN, BUT
WOULD MOST LIKE TO VISIT
Berlin to take in the local
creative scene. Dornach to see
Rudolf Steiner’s Gotheanum,
the world’s first pouredconcrete building.
CAREFULLY CURATED
Mark’s home features a mix of
the old and the new. Clockwise: A
sarimanok from the 1960s and an
aged mirror; a collection of skull
rings and coral housed in a narra
root; a painting by Redd Nakpil,
the Patient Christ sculpture and a
Filipino Art Nouveau cabinet; Pier
Castiglioni’s Taccia lamp atop
a reproduction bulol table from
Baguio; a Thai Buddha, balayong
sculpture, and molave lamp lank
the armchair in Mark’s room; his
chest of drawers in the bedroom.
WAY TO REJUVENATE
Contact with nature.
Swimming. Meditation: for me
it’s Zazen.
GREATEST HOPE FOR THE FUTURE
I truly hope for world peace
and for a sustainable future for
our children. World politics
seem so bleak now, but we must
fight against induration, and
inwardly strive to hold a vision
of peace and sustainability.
FAVORITE FILM
Recently I really enjoyed Call
Me By Your Name, mostly for
Timothée Chalamet’s body
language; the way he used
his body to communicate
awakening desire was
fascinating to watch. And I
loved the father’s airmative
monologue towards the end:
really feel our feelings, don’t
deaden them–that keeps us
alive and resh.
CURRENT MUSIC PLAYLIST
I think he Weeknd is genius.
DEFINE TASTE
Taste is how what you present
to the world afects the world.
Does it ofend? Is it too loud?
Does it demand attention?
Or does it seek to fit within a
context, aiming for appropriate
self-expression?
here is tasteful behavior and
there are tasteful physical
things, such as, in my field:
interiors, lighting, objects. he
two are related. he physical
environment is an expression of
our characters.
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
KAREN
SANTOS
IN WHATEVER FIELD SHE HAS ENTERED,
ENTREPRENEUR KAREN SANTOS IS
DRIVEN BY HER PASSIONS.
E
very so often, the universe
sends Karen Santos a sign, and
everything else just seems to fall
into place. Best known these days
for Kassa, her brand that sells fine linens
and table accessories, Karen now also
offers fine furniture—everything from
Louis XVI-style chairs to midcentury
collectibles, rom 18th-century mirrors to
Napoléon III pieces—brought in rom a
network of antique dealers abroad. his
month, Karen, who has been dubbed
by riends as a “lifestyle provider,” gives
her clients a peek into her new, partially
completed showroom where she will have
her fourth sale of treasured pieces.
Pinning down the perfect location
wasn’t too diicult, as usual. “I was at a
dinner—it was my birthday—and I just
mentioned to a riend that I was looking
for a space, and he said he had a property
in the area I had in mind and he was
willing to rent it out. I thought to myself,
wow, this is just too easy,” she laughs.
With the new showroom, Karen is
back in the retail business, something
she’s been flirting with since selling
her knitwear business, Kashieca, to the
Suyen Group 14 years ago. Founded in
1988, Kashieca was named after Karen
and her sisters Shiela and Camille. “At
the time, the Ayalas had just opened
Park Square One and they wanted my
mom, who was in the knitwear business,
to open a shop. I had just come back
from Italy, where I learned more about
maglieria, knitwear, so my sisters and I
decided to do it,” recalls Karen.
Ater more than a decade, it was time
to move on, she reflects, adding that
she has no regrets. Before the sale was
finalized, Karen was already dipping
her hands into another pie, distributing
natural stone flooring. “I had a friend
rom Indonesia living in the Philippines,
and her family had a quarry back home.
She asked if I could help her bring in
stone, and that was it.”
Soon enough, the need to express
herself creatively coupled with other
circumstances pushed Karen to start
Kassa. “For linens, I was so rustrated by
not being able to find the right printed
tablecloths. I couldn’t get the right size
or a certain length. It was such a pain.
Someone pushed me to make them myself,
and I did. I wanted to go back to working
with fabric and colors and being creative
again, without having the pressure of
meeting a certain price point. When you
want linens, it’s a luxury. I do it at a certain
price point because I give people the best
product and the best quality,” she says.
It’s the same idea with her luxe
furniture finds, her latest venture fuelled
by a deep personal interest. “It all started
because I wanted to fix my flat. So I
went on a trip and met a few dealers. I
thought, ‘What heck, I want it all but
how am I going to bring all of it back?’”
The logistics seemed difficult, but she
didn’t give up on the idea. Karen showed
snaps of the items available to her
interior designer riends who agreed to
order some pieces through her. Soon she
had enough orders to load three-fourths
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of a shipping container; the rest Karen
filled up with furniture for herself.
he first Kassa furniture pop-up took
place in October 2016, and so far each
one has been successful, close to selling
out. Sometimes, Karen acknowledges, her
instincts have been wrong. “Of course,
I think I’ve made some mistakes with
my purchases, and I’m sure that there
will be some more, but I do believe that
every piece will find a home,” she says
confidently. One of those “mistakes”
cost her a tidy sum. There was a chair
that was being passed up at her popups, despite being reasonably priced. She
eventually found a buyer, but ater the
sale was agreed, she learned the shocking
truth. “We determined it was an original
Pierre Jeanneret, worth, according to
another dealer, 10 times the price. I was
sitting on a goldmine, but I didn't know
it. Obviously, the one who sold it to me
originally didn’t know it too. It’s a lesson
learned, I didn’t do enough research.”
But why was the piece ignored in
the first place? Maybe the answer to
questions like this all comes down to
personal taste. Karen diplomatically
skirts around the issue. “Taste is an
expression of yourself, and who am
I to judge?” she says. “It’s in the eye
of the beholder.” Looking around her
eclectically furnished living room,
awash in muted pink tones, Karen lets
out a hearty laugh. “Designers who like
black and gray might come around and
say, who does this woman think she is,
giving advice?”
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
MAKEUP BY PATRICK ALCOBER
By Pierre A. Calasanz
Photographs by Kai Huang
TA S T E M A K E R
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
TA S T E M A K E R
SOURCE OF INSPIRATION “he eye
has to travel,” Diana Vreeland
famously said. In my case my
eye has been traveling all my
life—to the places I go, to the
museums I have visited, to the
magazines, books, and blogs
I read.
GREATEST PROFESSIONAL INFLUENCE
My mother. She taught me
the value of work.
FAVORITE ITEM YOU’VE DESIGNED I
love the table linens I design.
I don’t have a favorite, I love
them all.
MOST ADMIRED DESIGNER If
I were to choose one, it
would the late Jaya Ibrahim.
Indonesian in origin with no
degree in design, he trained
under Anouska Hempel.
Jaya’s interior design was
about balance and harmony,
Western and Asian. He later
returned to Indonesia and
designed the Legian in Bali,
Amanjiwo in Borobudur, and
the Dharmawangsa in Jakarta;
to date, they are my favorites
among his work.
WAYS TO DISCOVER NEW DESIGN
TRENDS Going to fairs and
seeing what is out there,
chatting with my dealers,
following people on Instagram.
THINGS ON YOUR WORK DESK At
any given moment I can have
fabrics, natural stone samples,
THE MAIN EVENT
Le Bernardaud Limoges
plates, Vetrerie di Empoli
and Waterford glasses,
Lalique salad plates, J.
Perez cutlery, and Kassa
tablecloth and handembroidered toucan
napkins and doily; Karen’s
favorite cocktail rings and
fragrance with her Fitbit.
catalogues, a calculator, and
of course my computer and
iPhone.
YOUR IDEA OF THE PERFECT HOME?
One that generates good
energy.
shop would be my store Kassa.
WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER A MUSTHAVE ITEM IN ANY HOME? You can
never go wrong with a good
set of table linens.
STYLE ICONS My choices perhaps
reflect my age, but their style
has always been timeless: Anna
Wintour, Carolina Herrera,
and Donna Karan.
FAVORITE STORES Selridges in
London, Bon Marche in Paris,
and the Dries van Noten store
in Paris not just for the clothes
but also for the beautiful
interiors done by Gert
Voorjans. But my ultimate
FAVORITE PART OF YOUR HOUSE?
My room.
MOST TREASURED PIECE OF
FURNITURE? All my furniture is
special to me; each one has a
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purpose and a story.
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE Ageappropriate!
SOMETHING YOU’D NEVER LEAVE
HOME WITHOUT? Blue jeans and
a black dress. I always throw
TA S T E M A K E R
them in my luggage whether I
end up wearing them or not.
FAVORITE WEBSITES Habitually
Chic and he Business of
Fashion.
FAVORITE PHONE/TABLET APP? With
the traic in Manila, I can’t
live without Waze, and for
my immediate news updates, I
turn to Huington Post.
FAVORITE PART OF MANILA? WHERE
WOULD YOU BRING FOREIGN GUESTS?
I would send them to take
part in a tour of Manila led by
Carlos Celdran!
FAVORITE CITY TO VISIT London.
FAVORITE URBAN HOTEL L’Hotel in
Paris, Oscar Wilde’s last home,
remodeled by Jacques Garcia.
COUNTRYSIDE HOTEL OR RESORT
Amanjiwo in Yogyakarta
designed by Jaya Ibrahim.
TRAVEL MUST-HAVES An open
mind and a sense of adventure.
VACATION SPOT To be honest, I
am so happy to just be in my
room!
PLACE YOU’VE NEVER BEEN, BUT
WOULD MOST LIKE TO VISIT I would
love to see Arica one day.
WAY TO REJUVENATE Sleep and
more sleep!
FITNESS REGIMEN A brisk walk
with Spotify. Having said that,
I must get back to my Pilates.
HAPPIEST MOMENTS When my eye
is traveling.
table of women interior
designers with Elsie de Wolfe,
the woman who invented
interior decoration as a
profession, as guest of honor,
with the likes of Anouska
Hempel, India Mahdavi,
Muriel Brandolini, Kelly
Hoppen, Kelly Wearstler
would be fantastic, but alas
that would be impossible.
WORDS TO LIVE BY Everything in
moderation, nothing in excess.
GUILTY PLEASURE Home-made
chicharon rom a dear riend’s
kitchen!
FAVORITE CHEF My cook, whom
I trained.
FAVORITE DISH Oh, lots! But
I must say that ater a trip
my comfort food is a homecooked adobo with boiled rice.
MUST-HAVE ITEM ON YOUR DINNER
TABLE Tablecloth or placemats,
but definitely cloth napkins—
no paper, please!
FAVORITE PLACE TO CELEBRATE I
think a celebration at home is
always special.
DESSERT Sans rival.
WRITER OR BOOK I just finished
Belgravia, by Julian Fellowes,
and am now reading Madame
de Pompadour, Mistress of
France, by Christine Pevitt
Algrant.
DRINK OF CHOICE Apparently,
vodka has less sugar so I have
been drinking that lately;
otherwise a good bottle of
wine would make me happy.
DREAM DINNER GUESTS A dinner
FILM My all-time favorite
romantic comedies are When
Harry Met Sally and Bridget
Jones’s Diary and my all-time
romantic drama is he Way
We Were.
IN LIVING COLOR
Clockwise from top: David
Hicks wallpaper on Karen’s
faux bamboo-bordered
bookshelf, housing books,
a celadon vase, and
sterling silver birds; a Louis
XV-style chandelier above
her dining table; a vintage
1970s brass lower lamp;
19th-century Jules Moigniez
sculpture and a 1970s lamp
with a tinalak shade.
APRIL 2018
FAVORITE FORM OF ENTERTAINMENT
At the moment, watching
Netflix! When I travel,
museums are a must. My
favorites are the Sir John
Soane’s Museum in London,
the former home of the 19thcentury architect, which
he designed himself and
which houses his collection
of world-class art, antiques,
and drawings; the Wallace
Collection at Hertford House,
London, where my interest in
18th-century French furniture,
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paintings, and porcelain was
brought to the fore. What
I love about these types of
museums is that it gives one a
peep into the way people lived.
WHAT’S CURRENTLY ON YOUR MUSIC
PLAYLIST? My workout mix,
SparkPeople’s Cardio Mix,
and 2018 Dance Workout
Music, to keep me going
when I brisk walk.
FAVORITE ACTOR OF ALL TIME Meryl
Streep.
FAVORITE WORK OF ART To
choose one is hard, though I
remember very vividly at the
very impressionable age of 15,
I was at the National Gallery
in London. I was studying the
paintings of the Renaissance
period and exhausted with
information overload rom
my tutor, I decided to rest and
sit down in ront of Monet’s
Water-Lily Pond and felt a sense
of tranquility.
COMM
DENOMINA
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
ON
R OYA L PA I N S
HANDSOME
PRINCE MEETS
BEAUTIFUL
NON-PRINCESS?
NOT SO LONG
AGO IT MIGHT
HAVE BEEN
THE END OFTHE
FAIRYTALE.
WHY EUROPE’S
ROYAL HOUSES
FINALLY
DECIDEDTO
LET LOVE RULE.
DANNY LAWSON/PA IMAGES/GETTY
IMAGES (MARKLE AND HARRY)
By Michael Joseph Gross
M AT C H P O I N T
Meghan Markle
and Prince Harry
at the 2017
Invictus Games
in Toronto, two
months before
they announced
their engagement.
I . W H E N H A R A L D M E T S O N JA
Born on the Fourth of July 1937, at the Red Cross Clinic in Oslo,
Sonja Haraldsen grew up to become a lovely 16-year-old, and one
day she went to watch a boat race. One of the spectators, a boy
her age, Harald Glücksburg, saw Sonja and was lovestruck. He
tried to get the girl’s attention; she ignored him.
Or so goes one story of the day Harald met Sonja. Another
has the two meeting at a dinner party when they were 22 and
falling so crash-bang in love that even if Harald had not been
crown prince of Norway and Sonja had not been the daughter of
the owners of a women’s clothing store, their instant, mutual, and
lasting passion might still have been called a fairytale romance.
Fairytale romance also requires riction in the form of antagonists or obstacles: wicked stepmothers, thickets of thorns. In this
story Harald’s father served that function. King Olav V did not
want his son to marry a commoner. He wanted Harald to make
a sensible match, as the king himself had done with a girl rom
the royal family next door, Princess Märtha of Sweden (who was
also his first cousin).
TORS
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R OYA L PA I N S
lifestyle blogger with an avid social media presence replete with
hashtags and emojis. When their relationship began, in the fall of
2016, old proscriptions were triggered in force, but Harry would
have none of it. Just one month ater the couple were first seen
together in public, Kensington Palace issued a statement on the
prince’s behalf: “His girlfriend…
has been subject to a wave of abuse
and harassment,” which involved
(among much else) a “smear on the
ront page of a national newspaper;
the racial undertones of comment
pieces; and the outright sexism and
racism of social media trolls.” Movingly, the statement avowed that
the prince “knows commentators
will say this is ‘the price she has to
pay’ and that ‘this is all part of the
game.’ He strongly disagrees. his is
not a game—it is her life and his.” That was valor. Which raised
some questions: Might there be
more at stake in their relationship
than the happiness of two people?
What might this match between
Meghan and Harry mean for society at large?
The Universal Declaration of
Human Rights does not mention
the reedom of a prince to woo in
peace. he Kensington Palace statement, however, almost implied that
it should. he statement could even
be read to posit that the courtship of the prince and the actress
was more democratic than the
world outside that relationship. (In
the privacy of love they were equals.
Only when certain outsiders told
the story was she considered less
than.) Could that be true? Do royal
families endow their members with
more democratic dignities—are
they able to accept human diversity
with greater ease—than the rest of
the human family does?
If so, what are the consequences
for
the rest of us? In an era of
R O YA L F L U S H
unprecedented wealth for a few
When Crown Prince Harald
married nonroyal Sonja
and restricted social mobility for
Haraldsen in 1968, many
the rest, Markle represents a fanwondered if the Norwegian
tasy so extreme it might be called
monarchy would survive.
existential
immigration.
But even that fantasy is not
During Prince William
entirely
a
game.
his
is
actually
a serious question:
and Kate Middleton’s
Has the world changed, so that marrying a prince
engagement, the British
press referred to her as
(or a princess) is the surest way of being treated like
“Commoner Kate.”
a whole person? And if so, how did that happen?
II. DUTY & DESIRE
Like moves on a chessboard,
marriages between members of
Europe’s dynasties were, for centuries, made to establish an advantage in the continent’s balance
of power. Some royals did marry
nonroyals—a practice known as
morganatic marriage—while others wished to but were prevented
by law or taboo.
In 1936, ater King Edward VIII
decided to marry the American
divorcée Wallis Simpson, he abdicated the throne to avoid a constitutional crisis. The scandal put
pressure on British royals to lead
exemplary lives, and when Edward’s
niece, Princess Margaret, fell in
love with RAF Group Captain
Peter Townsend, who was divorced,
opposition in Parliament in 1955
forced her to make an excruciating, public renunciation. To marry
Townsend would have meant surrendering her royal rights, duties,
and income. Even five years later,
when Margaret wed the photographer Anthony Armstrong-Jones,
some of Europe’s monarchs did
not attend the ceremony. As an
observer later explained, “Princesses married princes, not common photographers.”
The restrictions on royal marriage based on social status were
slow to erode. In 2011, Prince William married Catherine Middleton, whose parents met while they
were working for British Airways
(she as a flight attendant, he as a
dispatcher). he Middletons, who
now run an online party retailer, also have some
family wealth and no mean pedigrees themselves;
nonetheless, it was the first time a woman without
aristocratic lineage had married an heir to the British
throne in more than 350 years.
But if you tried to imagine a royal romance that
violated every taboo—concerning class, race, religion, gender
roles, commercialism, and discretion—you probably would still
not have the audacity to imagine the engagement of Prince Harry
and Meghan Markle, an American television actress who is
divorced, Catholic, and of mixed race, in addition to being a committed political activist and a sometime clothing designer and
APRIL 2018
I I I . T RU E RO M A N C E
Over the past 50 years it has ceased to be exceptional—it has
gradually become the norm—for European royalty to marry
commoners. (Of the heirs apparent to the 10 surviving hereditary
European monarchies, Prince Alois of Liechtenstein is the only
one who chose a mate of even approximately equal social rank:
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R E G I N A L D D AV I S / R E X / S H U T T E R S T O C K ( H A R A L D A N D S O N J A ) ; S A M I R H U S S E I N / G E T T Y I M A G E S ( M I D D L E T O N A N D W I L L I A M ) . O P P O S I T E : J O H N F R O S T N E W S P A P E R S / A L A M Y ( B U L L E T I N , E X T R A , C H I C A G O D A I LY T R I B U N E ) ;
B E T T M A N N / G E T T Y I M A G E S ( D U K E A N D D U C H E S S O F W I N D S O R W I T H D O G S ) ; C E C I L B E A T O N / C A M E R A P R E S S / R E D U X ( P R I N C E S S M A R G A R E T A N D F A M I LY ) ; R E X / S H U T T E R S T O C K ( B L A C K - A N D - W H I T E O F D U K E A N D D U C H E S S O F W I N D S O R )
By law the heir to Norway’s throne could not marry without
the sovereign’s permission. Olav’s disapproval, however, was less
determined than Harald’s devotion. For nine long years Harald
and Sonja waited, and dated, and at last love conquered. he king
pronounced his blessing. Harald and Sonja married. When Olav
died and Harald was crowned, in
1991, the queen of his heart became
queen of his land.
D AY I N C O U R T
In 1936, King Edward VIII
abdicated the British
throne to marry the
American divorcée Wallis
Simpson ( left ). Princess
Margaret wed Anthony
Armstrong-Jones ( right )
in 1960, after ending
a romance with Peter
Townsend, a divorcé.
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
the Wittelsbach duchess Sophie, Princess of Bavaria.) he story
I V. T H E C O M M O N E R S
of how, in just two generations, nonroyals were welcomed into Fred flew to Australia to watch the 2000 Olympics. He walked
nearly all of Europe’s royal families follows a pattern common into a bar, the Slip Inn, in Sydney. “Fred rom Denmark” was
to many stories of social integration. A sequence of private, how he introduced himself that night to a young woman rom
human choices—in this case, the
Tasmania, Mary Donaldson. Much
choice to pursue romantic love—
later Mary would reveal that in the
gains symbolic importance when
months that followed Fred seduced
those choices are made public, and
her with long, handwritten letters.
that enables more such choices to
In one he quoted Kierkegaard: “To
be made. Love begets love. And as
risk something is to lose one’s footis true of many of the most dignihold for a moment. Not to risk is
to lose oneself.”
fying reforms of modern society,
The next year Fred—that is,
this one started in Scandinavia. Frederik, crown prince of DenIn Kristiansand, Norway, in the
summer of 1999, “a single mother
mark, Count of Monpezat, Order
whose son was fathered by a
of the Elephant, Order of the Dandrug dealer” (as one newspaper
nebrog—stood up as best man at
would later refer to her) went to
Haakon’s wedding. Aterward, at
a concert, where she met a man.
the banquet, Haakon spoke rom
The woman, Mette-Marit Tjeshis heart to Mette-Marit: “I don’t
think I have ever been so weak or
sem Høiby, had a three-year-old
so strong as I am when I am with
son named Marius. She did not
you. I don’t think I have been so
have a college degree and she had
full of love as I am when I’m with
never held a prestigious job. She
you. From today you are no longer
was pretty, she was sweet, and she
just my riend, my girlriend, and
liked to have fun, which sometimes
my fiancée. Today we have marinvolved illegal substances. he man she met at the concert
ried and you have become Norwas Haakon, crown prince of Norway’s crown princess. I’m looking
forward to working side by side
way—King Harald and Queen Sonwith you, and with Marius. I canja’s son—and Haakon fell in love
not promise life will be without
with Mette-Marit the way Harald
problems and easy, but it will be
had fallen in love with Sonja: headeventful and strong.”
long, all at once, and the-hell-withBy the time Haakon and Metteyou-if-you-don’t-like-it. By May of
Marit attended Frederik and
the following year the crown prince
Mary’s wedding, in 2004, matches
had publicly declared his love for a
between royals and commoners
woman who by traditional stanwere becoming joyful symbols of
dards could not have been more
hope for a better life. “Every time
unsuitable.
a person’s dreams come true, the
Haakon’s choice had conseworld becomes a better place for
quences. In Norway approval ratus all. Your marriage is a gift to
ings for the monarchy were low. In
the people of Australia,” declared
neighboring countries conservatives
one Sydney newspaper. It was a
were concerned. One Copenhagen
git to the Danish monarchy, too:
historian made this analysis: “It may
N O R T H S TA R S
Approval ratings surged to 82 perbe that Mette-Marit is the biggest
Crown Prince Haakon of
Norway followed in his
threat to the Danish monarchy for
cent the following year.
father’s footsteps by
many centuries. When the media
In the first decade of the 21st
becomes tough in Norway and Sweden, a ront line marrying a nonroyal,
century, matches between commoners and royals
Mette-Marit Tjessem Høiby,
will open up against the Danish royal family rom the in 2001. Three years later were made all across Europe. Like airplanes speednorth.” But if skepticism and insurrection were conta- his best man, Crown
ing past circles of latitude, royal loves crossed social
boundaries abruptly, embracing the vulgar—in the
gious—well, so was love. Haakon had a riend, a few Prince Frederik of
sense of that word’s Latin root, vulgaris, the common
years older, by the name of Fred. Handsome, smart, Denmark, wed Mary
adventurous Fred had studied at Harvard before he Donaldson, an Australian. people. he more flawed the match (compared with
traditional ideal royal mates), it sometimes seemed,
became a naval pilot and special operations officer.
Fred went trekking in Mongolia. Fred drove a team of sled dogs the more attractive it was.
Haakon’s older sister, Princess Märtha Louise, lost her royal
4,000 miles across Greenland. Fred also dated a lot of women,
and no one thought he was in much danger of settling down. But income when she married an artist, the Norwegian writer Ari
Fred was, surely, moved to consider his own position when he Behn, who was best known for a short story collection titled Sad
saw what had happened to Haakon. And it may or may not have as Hell. (he couple divorced last year.) he Prince of Orange,
been a coincidence that sparks flew in Fred’s life the very same Crown Prince Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands, married
month that Haakon commenced cohabitation with Mette-Marit. Máxima Zorreguieta, an Argentinian whose father was a governAPRIL 2018
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J E N S H A R T M A N N / R E X / S H U T T E R S T O C K ( P R I N C E A N D P R I N C E S S O F N O R WA Y ) ; M A R K S T E WA R T / C A M E R A P R E S S / R E D U X ( R OYA L F A M I LY O F D E N M A R K ) ; M E D I A P U N C H / R E X / S H U T T E R S T O C K ( M A R K L E )
R OYA L PA I N S
R OYA L PA I N S
Frederik, which created an atmosphere in which almost anything
became possible—even an American TV star in a wedding dress
waving rom the balcony of Buckingham Palace.
At a time when a crisis of legitimacy attends the very concept of authority, these couplings
have strengthened bonds between
sovereigns and subjects. he marriage of Prince Harry and Meghan
Markle, like all the status-discordant pairings described here, will
have one main political efect. he
coming of the commoners inoculates European monarchies against
that form of government’s greatest
contemporary vulnerability: popular resentment based on perception
of unjust advantage.
However thorny their pasts,
all these commoners appear to be
worthy of luck—the extraordinary luck of winning the existential immigration lottery, on top of
the more common luck of romantic love. One of the most striking
things about this chapter in the
history of royal marriage is how
sturdy the matches have proved to
be—maybe because they’re unsuitable, not in spite of it. hese loves
began with the embrace of imperfection; the reasons for their durability and popularity may not be
much more complicated than that.
In 2017, when King Harald
and Queen Sonja both turned 80,
polls in Norway indicated that
81 percent of Norwegians supported the monarchy. In 2018 the
couple—and the rest of the country—will celebrate 50 years of
marriage. Deep inside one of the
mailbags full of cards and letters
that will be delivered to the palace in Oslo, perhaps the ladies-inwaiting will find one postmarked
London, with Kensington Palace as
the return address. In the last in-depth interview
Meghan Markle gave before she
began dating Harry (it was published in Good Housekeeping), she
said she liked to write handwritten notes, which she called “a lost
art form.” In that interview, as in
the last one before her betrothal (in Vanity Fair last summer),
she recalled struggling to earn a living in her early days as an
actress. She said that she learned calligraphy and made extra
money by writing names and addresses in beautiful script on
other people’s wedding invitations. She did not say, but it is
hard not to imagine, that from time to time her hand got tired
and she would pause to daydream for a minute, imagining the
loves of those brides and grooms, hoping that such happiness
one day might be hers. «
ment minister in that country’s violent, corrupt military regime.
(Willem-Alexander’s mother Queen Beatrix allowed the match on
condition that Máxima’s father not attend the wedding.) In Spain,
Crown Prince Felipe de Todos los Santos announced his engagement to Letizia Ortiz Rocasolano, a
divorced TV news broadcaster who
has had multiple plastic surgeries.
Sweden’s Princess Victoria—the
heir to the throne—started dating her personal trainer, Daniel
Westling, in secret; then she married him.
And that’s only a partial list.
“Human afection will always cross
boundaries; designing rules it must
adhere to will never work,” wrote one
English newspaper columnist after
Haakon’s wedding to Mette-Marit.
“Modern Britain is a place where
being rom a dysfunctional or ‘diferent’ background does not prevent you
rom leading a happy, fulfilled life. It’s
time for another royal wedding, and
my feeling is that Camilla’s would give
more real people real hope than any
fairytale wedding ever could.” When
it happened, that prediction came
true. he public came to love Camilla
Parker Bowles, in part because she
and Prince Charles persevered in
their love in spite of life’s whole mess.
Mette-Marit has a past that, it
seems, will never go away. Compromising photographs from her wild
days were published. Her alcoholic
father married a stripper half his age.
Yet she and Haakon built a family;
in addition to Marius they have two
children of their own, whose arrival
the country greeted with celebration. heir firstborn, Princess Ingrid
Alexandra, is Norway’s heir apparent. She will someday be the country’s first female monarch since the
15th century. By coincidence MetteMarit also played an important symbolic role in the darkest moment in
Norway’s recent history—when her
stepbrother was killed in the mass
shooting by Anders Breivik in 2011.
Her loss made Mette-Marit a symbol of the people’s solidarity with
the monarchy. he next year she put
her penchant for risk-taking—even
heedlessness—to virtuous use. On behalf of a gay palace employee
who had trouble getting a visa, she secretly traveled to India to care
for his newborn twins, born to a surrogate mother. here she spent
several days incognito with the babies in a medical center, where the
staf assumed she was a nanny.
THE COMING OF
THE COMMONERS
INOCULATES
EUROPEAN
MONARCHIES FROM
THEIR GREATEST
VULNERABILITY:
POPULAR
RESENTMENT.
V. A ROYA L W E D D I N G , S P R I N G 2 0 1 8
What would have happened if Harald and Sonja hadn’t fallen in
love? hey set an example for Haakon, who set an example for
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APRIL 2018
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T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
S TA R S & S I G N S
HOROSCOPE READINGS FOR THE MONTH AHEAD
By Katharine Merlin
ARIES
If you can agree to
disagree with others
near the 4th, you’ll be
able to find solutions
for charged issues after
Mercury turns direct
on the 15th. You’re feeling driven and revved
up, and there really is
a great deal you can
accomplish. Jupiter’s
presence in Scorpio
accents the importance of research and
detective work, and
whatever occurs near
the 25th will challenge
you not to take no for
an answer but to persist and stick to your
plans and convictions.
a happier phase on
the 24th.
BIRTHSTONE:
DIAMOND
TIFFANY & CO. YELLOW
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MAKATI, 817.8101
CAPRICORN
DECEMBER 22–JANUARY 20
With aggressive Mars
in your birth sign,
your tendency to go
on the attack could
stir up issues—especially at home. Others
may not agree with
your agenda, but April
is a time when riendships and creative
ventures will lit your
spirits and your prospects. Changes in your
personal life are going
to set you on a new
path near the 16th, and
whatever occurs at
month’s end opens up
new worlds.
TAURUS
AQUARIUS
APRIL 21–MAY 21
he good news is
that Venus in your
sign sweetens the
tricky planetary mix
this month, so dare
to hope for the best.
And although some
personal and
professional issues
may be keeping
you awake at night,
what you should
focus on are your
contacts and connections. he last
few days of the
month ofer opportunities to reach
new understandings
and establish the
kind of rapport you
have hoped for.
GEMINI
MAY 22–JUNE 21
If others seem particularly irritable
this month, try not
to go there yourself.
With Mercury out
of sync until the 15th,
issues—particularly
financial ones—won’t
find easy solutions. At
least the new Moon
of the 16th sheds light
on confusing predicaments involving
riends and associates,
and with Saturn turning direct on the 18th,
you’ll begin to see
what steps you need
JANUARY 21–FEBRUARY 19
to take to get on a
more secure path.
CANCER
JUNE 22–JULY 22
Partners and associates aren’t seeing
eye to eye with you
as April kicks of,
and their intractable
behavior is bound to
get on your nerves.
Focus on developments near the 7th:
With the new Moon
of the 16th happening at the zenith of
your chart, this is
the right time for
startups and new
plans—despite what
others may think.
Your social life, at
least, promises to be
a delightful diversion.
LEO
JULY 23–AUGUST 23
You appear to be
caught up in debates
that aren’t likely to
be easily resolved.
While your travel
angle is brightly
illumined by the Sun
attract more attention all around.
until the 20th, and
distant spots may
beckon, you also
seem to be focused
on projects that are
intensely engrossing. Ater the 15th
you’ll be able to get a
firmer grasp on your
afairs, and the emotionally charged full
Moon of the 30th is
about strengthening
ties that bind.
LIBRA
SEPTEMBER 24–OCTOBER 23
Someone appears to
be giving you a hard
time this month,
and as much as
you prefer to avoid
discord, it won’t be
possible. Brutally
rank discussions
are the only way
to clear up charged
issues, but fortunate
aspects throughout
April involving your
ruler, Venus, indicate
that you’ll be able to
gain the upper hand.
Whatever occurs
near the 17th indicates that you’re on
the right track and
your fortunes are on
the rise.
VIRGO
AUGUST 24–SEPTEMBER 23
Whatever occurs
near the 4th, your
aspects indicate that
the best course is to
reserve judgment.
With Jupiter now in
the most mentally
acute angle of your
chart, your outlook is
expanding, and you’re
right to explore new
angles and possibilities. he new Moon
of the 16th is a signal
to focus on joint
ventures and new
arrangements, and
with Venus on the
rise you’ll begin to
APRIL 2018
SCORPIO
OCTOBER 24–NOVEMBER 22
With blissful Venus
beautifully aspected
in your relationship
angle, you, more than
others, should be able
to dodge the bullets
T&C
94
when nasty planetary
configurations arise
near the 5th and the
11th. Work-related
choices won’t become
clear until ater the
15th, and some kind
of uncertainty will
lit of once Saturn
changes direction
on the 18th. Agreements reached near
the 29th are worth a
celebration.
You seem to be
grappling with hard
choices and fighting
with yourself as April
kicks of. Whatever
reservations you may
have, take as much
time as you need
to finally decide. With
Venus at the nadir
of your chart, close
relationships are going
to be in the stellar
spotlight in the best
possible way. It’s all
about following your
heart right now and
not letting negative
thoughts sabotage
your interests.
SAGITTARIUS
PISCES
NOVEMBER 23–DECEMBER 21
FEBRUARY 20–MARCH 20
Be ready to rethink
projects early this
month, as unforeseen complexities
will throw you of
course unless you
take the time to
scrutinize details.
You do have promising aspects, though,
and they’re all about
being a diplomat
and winning others over with logic.
Startups you initiate
near the 16th will
prove inspiring and
successful, and close
relationships enter
Your plans may be in
a bit of a tailspin as
April gets underway. If
riends and associates
are behaving badly,
blame it on Mars and
Saturn and try to steer
clear. Making conciliatory gestures near
the 7th will turn the
tide, and though the
clouds won’t entirely
lit, you’ll get encouraging signals that all
will come right in the
end. Any agreements
reached near the 29th
will prove highly
beneficial.
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
COURTESY TIFFANY & CO.
MARCH 21–APRIL 20
T& C
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PAT T E R N R E C O G N I T I O N
Match FACTOR C
SPREADING THE JOY
OF A PERFECT PRINT.
P h o t o g r a p h b y D o n Pe n n y
oordinating walls and upholstery is a
venerable tradition. Louis XIV did it by
the acre at Versailles; French heiress and novelist Louise de Vilmorin, who wrote Madame
de…, famously did it in a blue floral to the
drawing room of her château. This year
S t y l e d b y Wi ll K a h n
APRIL 2018
T&C
95
fashion designers are giving their collections
the same treatment. It’s a tightrope walk,
though. Too much and it feels matchy, too
little and an opportunity is lost. As Robert
Rauschenberg said, “Having to be diferent
is the same trap as having to be the same.” «
Home Market Editor: Sarah Bray
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
GIVING
NEW
PERSPECTIVES
LATCH HOPES TO INCREASE
AWARENESS OF THE BENEFITS OF
BREASTFEEDING TO PARENTS ALL
OVER THE PHILIPPINES.
B y M i l ag ro s G. Au g u st i ne s
B
uding Aquino-Dee
was a new mother
living in Canada
when she was introduced to
a tremendous breastfeeding
support system. “I was
so moved by my own
breastfeeding experience
there that I decided to get
certified as a breastfeeding
counselor,” Dee says. In 2006,
she and her family moved
back to Manila, where she
quickly saw that there was
a void in breastfeeding
support. Curious, Dee
began volunteering with
existing advocacy groups. “I
reconnected with some of my
components and kindred
spirits to help her begin her
advocacy. With the support
of eight other co-founders
and institutions such as
he Medical City, LATCH,
or Lactation Attachment
Training Counseling and
Help, was born.
hrough the organization’s
lactation education
riends rom high school and
college, and now they were
moms too, and doctors, chefs,
‘mompreneurs,’ and corporate
executives. We all had the
same desire to form a group
that could help bring back the
breastfeeding culture through
quality lactation education
and peer counseling.” Dee
finally found the exact
APRIL 2018
T&C
96
T O W N A N D C O U N T R Y. P H
classes, peer counseling,
and campaigns toward
normalizing breastfeeding,
LATCH provides platforms
for fellow moms to “be able
to pay things forward and
help other mothers as well.
You not only get support and
learn about breastfeeding,
you also have an opportunity
to do meaningful work and
concretely make a diference
in families’ lives,” Dee says.
She continues, “We
select projects that reflect
our core values, which are
quite progressive and nontraditional. We believe in
collaboration and in working
with various agencies,
companies, and institutions,
and approaching advocacy
matters in creative ways,
ofering resh perspectives
on how to communicate the
heart and soul of the cause.”
While LATCH also hopes
to grow its membership, its
focus remains on quality
over quantity. “We attract
service leaders who sincerely
want to make a diference
in their own circles of
influence. LATCH has grown
and branched out, slowly
but surely. Each branch in
Manila, Cebu, Davao, and
Los Baños is autonomous,
but we are all united in
focusing on the principles
of what makes the advocacy
important, crucial, and
relevant. When you advocate
breastfeeding, it’s a tri-chord
of promotion, protection,
and support. Each area holds
its weight and not one is
more important than the
other.” For more information
on how you can support the
advocacy, log on to facebook.
com/groups/latchmoms.
COURTESY LATCH
NURSING SQUAD
LATCH has conducted
outreach activities,
breastfeeding initiatives,
and educational sessions
in Manila, Laguna, Davao,
and Cebu.
YOUR IMPECCABLE GUIDE
TO EXCEPTIONAL PERSONALITIES
& MUST-SEE PLACES.
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