close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

2018-04-01 Travel+Leisure

код для вставкиСкачать
APRIL 2018
S P E C I A L F E A T U R E : T + L’ S G L O B A L S H O P P I N G G U I D E
Swing into Spring
THE BEST PLACES TO GO
THIS SEASON
Relaxing at
the Hamilton
Princess &
Beach Club in
Bermuda.
A PERFECT
WEEKEND IN
THE WILD
WONDERS OF
A FAMILY
TRIP TO
THE COOLEST
CITY IN
BERMUDA
ECUADOR
MONTANA
GERMANY
Effortless towing. Unbridled potential.
WELCOME TO THE ENTIRELY NEW EXPEDITION.
2018 Expedition shown.
We, the people
of the modern rodeo,
know a little something
about horsepower.
APRIL 2018
14 COUNTRIES
112,000+ MILES TRAVELED
22 WRITERS
36 PHOTOGRAPHERS
p. 74
London p. 40
Paris
p. 90
Glacier National
Park, Montana
p. 104
Palouse,
Washington
Kyoto
New York City
p. 19
Montgomery, Alabama
p. 74
Mexico City
p. 46
p. 46
Osaka
p. 82
Leipzig, Germany
p. 48, 74
p. 19
Denver
p. 19
Warsaw
p. 46, 74
p. 74
Dubai
p. 33
Bermuda
p. 26
Tokyo
Shanghai
p. 52
Belize
p. 19
Democratic Republic
of the Congo
p. 66
Quito, Ecuador
p. 74
Buenos Aires
12
19
DEPARTMENTS
FEATURES
EDITOR’S NOTE
THE VIEW FROM HERE
REASONS TO TRAVEL NOW
A millennials-only river
cruise, Denver’s hottest
street, and other tripworthy news and events.
26
33
40
2
46
Two new
hotels evoke Shanghai’s
imperial splendor and
cosmopolitan past.
48
FIRST LOOK
On the
ground in Bermuda,
where new hotels and
cultural experiences are
giving this friendly island
a second wind.
52
THE PRIMER
A writer returns
to Paris, a formative city
of her youth, only to find
traces of her earlier self
wherever she turns.
MEMORY
travelandleisure.com
57
SCRAPBOOK The bakers
behind the Brooklyn pie
shop Four & Twenty
Blackbirds document a
dessert tour of Japan.
Manhattan’s
once-colorless South
Street Seaport is
suddenly seriously cool.
66
Quito, where ancient
traditions mingle with
modern urbanism, is the
gateway to Ecuador’s
volcanoes, cloud forest,
and other wonders.
NEXT ACT
CHECKING IN A private
island, a resort village,
and a beachside spa
lead an upswing of new
properties in Belize.
Travel tips,
from fighting fraud
overseas to getting the
most out of in-flight
entertainment.
UPGRADE
74
82
SHOP THE WORLD Our
favorite store owners
on their favorite stores,
products worth flying
for, and guides to global
shopping destinations.
WHY GERMANY’S
90
AMERICAN BEAUTY
A rail journey to
Montana’s Glacier
National Park offers
a window onto the
changing West.
YOUR BEST SHOT
104 A spectacular vista
of the Palouse prairie
in southeastern
Washington,
photographed by T+L
reader Glenn Nagel.
MOST FASCINATING
CITY IS . . . LEIPZIG
Contemporary creatives
and tastemakers carry
on a deep-rooted local
tradition of breaking
the rules.
ON THE COVER
Mae van der Weide of Next
Model Management wears a
swimsuit by Faithfull the
Brand, at the Hamilton
Princess & Beach Club in
Bermuda. Photograph by
Cameron Hammond.
travelandleisure
travelandleisure
travelleisure
travelleisure
travelandleisure
travelleisure
travelandleisuremag
T+ L D I G I TA L
Weekend Wonder
Before the B&Bs book up
and the airfares soar, let
T+L help you get your
Memorial Day plans in
order with our Perfect
Three-Day Weekend guides.
From fishing in Virginia
Beach to urban exploration
in Seattle, we’ve got you
covered with compact
itineraries for every region.
tandl.me/3-day-weekend
Our shopping
guides uncover
gems like
Maison Fenyadi,
a colorful home
goods store
in Marrakesh,
Morocco.
Get Schooled
Have you ever wondered
what an airplane pilot looks
for when buying a suitcase?
Or which camera tripod is
preferred by top landscape
photographers? We have,
too. For our new Travel
Academy video series, we
check in with seasoned
adventurers and test-drive
trending gear to help you get
equipped for your next trip.
tandl.me/travelacademy
SHOP SMARTER
In this issue, we explore some of the world’s great shopping cities
with our favorite fashionable tastemakers (page 74). But the hunt for
offbeat boutiques and can’t-live-without-it products never ends.
Make tandl.me/shopping your year-round retail resource, with style
handbooks and city guides packed full of editor-curated shopping
itineraries. Plus: gadget reviews, scoops on big sales, and more intel.
SUBSCRIBE
4
DAILY
TRANSPORTER
Escape instantly
with gorgeous
photography
features that take
you to spectacular
destinations.
UPGRADE
Travel smarter
with need-toknow updates on
travel news and
trends, plus tips
and solutions
from T+L experts.
T+L TEN
An easy-to-read
digest of the
week’s biggest,
most popular
stories—so you can
be sure you don’t
miss the very best.
DEALS
Get exclusive
access to steeply
discounted
trips and travel
essentials, all
handpicked
by our editors.
JUST IN
Stay up-to-theminute with our
bulletin of the
latest stories and
images published
on traveland
leisure.com.
DESTINATION
OF THE WEEK
Take a virtual
deep dive into one
exceptional location
per week, with
guides, photos,
news, and more.
77
22
11
11
77
11
times/
WEEK
travelandleisure.com
times/
WEEK
time/
WEEK
time/
WEEK
times/
WEEK
time/
WEEK
F ROM L E F T: A LVA RO L E I VA; LE VI BR OW N
TANDL.ME/NEWSLETTERS
R E A D E R FAV O R I T E S
On Greene Street, in New York
City’s SoHo neighborhood, find
everything from high-end
fashion houses (Louis Vuitton,
YSL) to interior design shops
(Flos, Cite) and luxury concept
stores (the Webster, the Line).
Every year in our World’s Best Awards survey, we ask T+L readers to rate
hotels, airlines, destinations, and more. Cities are rated on a number of
characteristics, from the friendliness of the locals to the sightseeing. The
shopping scene is also considered—and here is how the cities stack up.
With its wide variety of boutiques, vintage shops, and flagship department
stores, New York led the pack this year. Planning a trip to the Big Apple?
Turn to page 74 for an insider’s shopping guide to NYC, plus tips on
eight other style-minded cities. For a full list of winners, go to
travelandleisure.com/worlds-best.
6
travelandleisure.com
New York
Tokyo
Dubai
Paris
Hong Kong
Singapore
Florence
Milan
San Miguel
de Allende,
Mexico
10 London
K I RA T UR N B UL L
BEST CITIES FOR SHOPPING
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
T+ L S P E C I A L S
CONTEST
Enter to Win a Stay
at Charleston’s
Wentworth Mansion
The annual Golden
Eagle Festival in the
Altai Mountains of
western Mongolia is
the highlight of a new
trekking tour.
This year, the five-star
hotel in a gracious 19thcentury residence is
celebrating 20 years
of Southern hospitality.
To mark the occasion,
Wentworth is giving
away a three-day stay,
plus meals, services,
and gifts, with a value
of more than $10,000.
To enter, share a photo
of your favorite travel
moment at tandl.me/
wentworth-mansion
by May 16.
OPERATION VACATION
8
Crooked Compass
Tour of Mongolia
Mansion Hotel & Spa at
Werribee Park, Australia
30 PERCENT OFF
30 PERCENT OFF
This rigorous 14-day trek through
Mongolia is centered on the annual
Golden Eagle Festival, during which
Kazakh hunters demonstrate their birds’
abilities through traditional games and
races. Other highlights include guided
tours of the petroglyphs at Baga Oigor;
a camel ride through the Khongor sand
dune; and a visit to Karakorum, the
ancient capital of the Mongol empire.
A professional photographer will lead
the expedition and offer expert tips
for getting your best shot. The Details:
30 percent off a 14-day trip across
Mongolia from October 3–16. Offer
includes private transportation on
guided tours, entrance fees, and flights
within Mongolia. Tours from $2,962 per
person; to book, visit crooked-compass.
com/tour/golden-eagle-festival.
You’d never guess this sprawling
bluestone mansion was just 20 miles
outside Melbourne. Surrounded by 10
acres of manicured gardens, the 91-room
estate could pass for an English country
manor. But while the exteriors are grand
and stately, the interiors are a study in
contemporary design, with modern art,
mirrored surfaces, and a neutral palette.
Explore the nearby zoo, winery, and polo
academy. Or ask the staff to arrange a
picnic in the gardens. Later, indulge in
a hot-stone massage at the full-service
spa. The Details: 30 percent off stays
through October 4. Offer includes
accommodation in a Heritage room,
dinner, and daily breakfast. Doubles
from $255; use code TRAVEL when
booking at lancemore.com.au/shop/
gift-package/mhs-wine-dine.
travelandleisure.com
NEW FROM T+L
Try the Peru Edition
of Travel + Leisure
Great Adventures
by Butterfield &
Robinson
Our editors teamed
up with active-travel
company Butterfield &
Robinson to design this
one-of-a-kind itinerary
through Peru. Over the
nine adventure-filled
days, you’ll experience
the culinary and cultural
pleasures of Lima
and Cuzco and the
archaeological wonders
of Machu Picchu and the
Sacred Valley, where
you’ll stay at the
Inkaterra Hacienda
Urubamba, selected for
T+L’s It List in 2016. For
more information, go
to tandl.me/butterfield.
Nine days from $7,995
per person.
F ROM L E F T: BAR C RO F T ME D I A V IA G E T TY IM AG ES ; P E TE R F RA N K E DWA R D S /RE D U X
At Travel + Leisure, our mission is to inspire readers to travel more—
so we launched Operation Vacation, a program of exclusive travel deals,
to encourage you to use all your vacation days. Whether you seek a heartpounding adventure or a pulse-slowing escape, you’ll find dozens of terrific
discounts on flights, hotels, cruises, and vacation packages at
travelandleisure.com/operationvacation.
EDITOR’S NOTE
@nathanlump
nathan@travelandleisure.com
12
travelandleisure.com
BR I AN D OB E N
HOSE WHO KNOW me know that I love to shop. And I especially love
to shop when I travel. There’s something about the extra sense of
discovery, and the thrill of finding things that feel more unusual or
special than what I could get at home, that makes it so much more
fun. At least once a year, I go somewhere specifically to shop—
Sweden has been my destination of choice in recent times—and
it’s a real marathon. I make an exhaustive list of the stores I want to
hit, plot them on a map, and plan a multiday itinerary that allows me
to visit them mostly on foot. Then I pound the pavement for two or three days straight, from
practically the minute the shops open to when they close, always discovering new places and
things along the way. I realize that this probably sounds a bit obsessive, which is why I tend
to do these trips on my own. Although I get a kick out of the intensity, there aren’t many
people I know who wouldn’t tire quickly of this form of shopping-as-endurance-sport.
While it might sound like just so much consumption, I believe that shopping can
be culturally meaningful. The things people make and how they make those things says
something about their values and their way of life. When the makers themselves are
physically present (as they often are in the kinds of stores I like best), they usually turn
out to be interesting people who want nothing more than to share their passion with you.
All of which contributes a meaningful backstory to the things you buy and helps you feel
connected to the places they come from. Shopping in stores and markets is interactive and
human, and I love that travel encourages me to reconnect with that particular pleasure—
for me, it’s a lot more satisfying than placing an order on a screen with a click.
We know that many of you are serious shoppers and,
like me, love to shop when you travel, so we hope you enjoy
this month’s global guide to shopping (page 74), a look at
some of the places and things that are most exciting to us
right now. If shopping isn’t so much your thing, never
fear—we’ve got lots more in this issue, including a whirl
through Ecuador (page 66), a stop in über-creative Leipzig,
Germany (page 82), a blissful weekend in Bermuda (page 33),
a trip to Montana’s Glacier National Park by train (page 90),
and more. Spring is on its way, and with it come more and
more opportunities to travel. We hope you find plenty
in here to stoke your wanderlust.
EDITOR IN CHIEF
BRAND SALES AND MARKETING
Nathan Lump
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, TRAVEL CATEGORY SALES AND LUXURY BRAND DEVELOPMENT
Jesse Ashlock
EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR Paul Martinez
EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR Laura Teusink
DIGITAL DIRECTOR Miles Stiverson PHOTO DIRECTOR Scott Hall
FEATURES DIRECTOR Flora Stubbs TRAVEL DIRECTOR Jacqueline Gifford
FASHION DIRECTOR Melissa Ventosa Martin
DEPUTY DIGITAL EDITOR Jessica Plautz
ARTICLES EDITOR Peter Terzian SENIOR EDITOR Sarah Bruning
WINE AND SPIRITS EDITOR Ray Isle FOOD AND TRAVEL EDITOR Lila Battis
DIGITAL NEWS REPORTER Talia Avakian
ASSOCIATE DIGITAL EDITOR Melanie Lieberman
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Siobhan Reid
ASSISTANT EDITORS John Scarpinato, Hannah Walhout
ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITORS Kim Duong, Richelle Szypulski
EDITORIAL OPERATIONS COORDINATOR Emma Stoneall
EDITOR AT LARGE David Amsden
SPECIAL CORRESPONDENTS Heidi Mitchell, Gisela Williams
INTERNATIONAL EDITOR Jack Livings
Vanessa Feimer Davis
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, BRAND MARKETING Keira Ford Schuler
SENIOR MANAGERS, BRAND MARKETING Antonia LoPresti-Giglio, Swathi Reddy
EVENTS DIRECTOR Penni Bonaldi
CONSUMER INSIGHT DIRECTOR Richard Zartarian
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Jay Meyer
VICE PRESIDENT, LUXURY BRAND SALES
ADVERTISING SALES
GROUP PRESIDENT
Karen Kovacs
DIGITAL STRATEGY
Thu Phan Rodriguez
CATEGORY SALES
Lauren Newman ENTERTAINMENT Ellie Duque
Kevin Martinez FINANCE Mike Schneider
HEALTH CARE Heidi Anderson HOME/INDUSTRY/GOVERNMENT/TOBACCO/GOLF Nate Stamos
TECHNOLOGY/TELECOMMUNICATIONS Scott Kelliher
TRAVEL Jay Meyer
BEAUTY
FASHION AND RETAIL
SALES OPERATIONS
CHIEF BUSINESS AND SALES OPERATIONS OFFICER
Pearl Collings
DIGITAL
ART
DESIGN DIRECTOR
Christine Bower-Wright ART DIRECTOR Marc Davila
Sam Jacobs, Chelsea Schiff
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT
Nicholas Butterworth
Mary Robnett
David Kukin, Mariah Tyler
ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Kira Turnbull
Lindsay Jerutis
Doug Parker
VICE PRESIDENT, VIDEO AND AUDIO OPS Andrew Weissman
VICE PRESIDENT, AUDIENCE STRATEGY AND DIGITAL OPS Pamela Russo
VICE PRESIDENT, PRODUCT Ben Ronne EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PRODUCT Maura Charles
SENIOR PRODUCT MANAGER Priscilla Tsang
PRODUCTION
CONSUMER MARKETING
SENIOR DESIGNERS
VICE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, AFFILIATE REVENUE AND STRATEGY
VICE PRESIDENT, DIGITAL DESIGN
PHOTO
PHOTO EDITOR
Skye Senterfeit
ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR
ASSOCIATE DIGITAL PHOTO EDITORS
Filomena Guzzardi
John Markic
ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION EDITOR Ashleigh Macdonald-Bennett
EDITORIAL PRODUCER Julia Warren
PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
PRODUCTION MANAGER
COPY AND RESEARCH
Kathy Roberson
Jenny Brown
ASSOCIATE RESEARCH EDITOR Jennifer Salerno
COPY AND RESEARCH CHIEF
DEPUTY COPY AND RESEARCH CHIEF
MEREDITH NATIONAL MEDIA GROUP
PRESIDENT
Jon Werther
VICE PRESIDENTS
COMMUNICATIONS
Doug Olson
PRESIDENT OF MEREDITH DIGITAL Stan Pavlovsky
PRESIDENT OF CONSUMER PRODUCTS Tom Witschi
CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER Michael Brownstein
CHIEF MARKETING AND DATA OFFICER Alysia Borsa
MARKETING AND INTEGRATED COMMUNICATIONS Nancy Weber
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Brad Elders
MEREDITH MAGAZINES PRESIDENT
CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER
Beth Gorry
Ann Marie Doherty, Yvonne Gerald, Eric Szegda, Melissa Mahoney
DIRECTORS Agnes Cronin, Jennifer Schiele, Beth Ifcher
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR Caroline Baron
SENIOR MARKETING MANAGERS Zak Carrazzone, Jennifer Flynn
SENIOR MANAGER BRAND STRATEGY Mackenzie Bower
MARKETING MANAGER Katie Pisano
ASSOCIATE MARKETING MANAGER, RETAIL Christine Symecko
ASSOCIATE MARKETING MANAGERS Sofia DiPersia, Christine Menchaca
MARKETING COORDINATOR Jess Berko
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT
VICE PRESIDENT
Dana Baxter
SENIOR MANAGER
Reid Myers
FINANCE
VICE PRESIDENT
Keith Strohmeier
David Hooks
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
FINANCE MANAGERS
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND DEPUTY GENERAL COUNSEL
ASSISTANT GENERAL COUNSEL Jane Halpern
Alan Murray
Nathan Lump
George Kimmerling
Abid Arshad, Catherine Keenan
LEGAL
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, LUXURY AND LIFESTYLE GROUP
OPERATIONS
EDITORIAL OPERATIONS AND FINANCE DIRECTOR
PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
Steven Weissman
Rosemarie Iazzetta SENIOR OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Carrie Mallie
James Flynn PRODUCTION MANAGER Elizabeth Mata
AD PRODUCTION SPECIALIST Kritanya Onzima Das
OPERATIONS MANAGER
MEREDITH CORPORATION
Tom Harty
Joe Ceryanec
CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER John Zieser
PRESIDENT, MEREDITH LOCAL MEDIA GROUP Paul Karpowicz
PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER
Stephen M. Lacy
Mell Meredith Frazier
GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES
Kurt Rao
Adam Days, Amanda Hanes, Hugues Hervouet, Rob Innes, Dan Lo,
Keith O’Sullivan, Rajeshwari Ramamoorthy, Pradip Tripathy
CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER
VICE PRESIDENTS
EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN
VICE CHAIRMAN
For all advertising inquiries, please e-mail advertising_contact@meredith.com.
EDITORIAL OFFICE 225 Liberty Street, New York, NY 10281, 212-522-1212. TRAVEL + LEISURE is a trademark of Time Inc. Affluent Media Group, registered in the U.S.
and other countries. Customer Service and Subscriptions For 24/7 service, please use our website, travelandleisure.com/customerservice. You can also call 800-8888728 (813-979-6625 for foreign subscribers) or write to Travel + Leisure at P.O. Box 62120, Tampa, FL 33662-2120. Occasionally, Travel + Leisure makes portions of
its magazine subscriber lists available to carefully screened companies that offer special products and services. Any subscriber who does not want to receive mailings
from third-party companies should contact the subscriber services department at 800-888-8728 or write to TCS, P.O. Box 62120, Tampa, FL 33662-2120. The magazine
assumes no responsibility for the safekeeping or return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, artwork, or other material. To order back issues, call 800-270-3053.
To order article reprints of 500 or more, call 212-221-9595. Printed in U.S.A.
16
travelandleisure.com
©2018 Crystal Cruises, LLC. Ships’ registry: The Bahamas and Malta.
THE WORLD’S MOST AWARDED
LUXURY CRUISE LINE
TM
By sea, river, land and air, we have redefined the way the world views luxury travel.
Call 877-465-5698 or your travel professional. CrystalCruises.com
O C E A N | R I V E R | YAC H T E X P E D I T I O N | P R I VAT E J E T J O U R N E Y S
YOUR
H
J
D
U
X
R
W
HQ
AN ALL-INCLUSIVE EXPERIENCE
ALL
INCLUDED
Kids stay free all year when you book a
family room category at the all-inclusive
Hard Rock Hotels. That means endless room
service, live entertainment, and beautiful
beaches without ever having to break the
bank. It’s all the makings of an epic vacation
in one beautiful location.
20% SERVICE FEES APPLY
For more information, visit hrhallinclusive.com
or call 888.762.5002
Two (2) children 12 and under stay free when sharing a room with one (1) full paying adult. Promotion applies to Signature Family Suite -2 Bdrm at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Punta Cana and Deluxe
Family - 2 Rooms Connecting at Hard Rock Hotel Riviera Maya & Hard Rock Hotel Vallarta. Not applicable at Hard Rock Hotel Cancun and Hard Rock Hotel Riviera Maya-Heaven Section. Booking Window:
Now - 30-Sep-2018 Travel Window: Now - 21-Dec-2018. Blackout dates apply. Child age MUST be notified at time of booking. Age reported MUST be accurate at time of travel. Proof of age will be
required upon check-in. In the event that age is incorrect, the difference in the rate will be charged upon check-in. Promotion is subject to change without prior notice. Combinable with the $1,800
Limitless Resort Credit Promotion.
APRIL 2018
REASONS
TO
T + L’ S M O N T H LY S E L E C T I O N O F T R I P - W O R T H Y P L A C E S , E X P E R I E N C E S , A N D E V E N T S .
An in-room library at
the newly opened Raffles
Europejski Warsaw.
N o.
1
C O URT ESY OF R AF F L ES EUR OP EJS K I WA R SAW
A new hotel
puts Warsaw
on the map.
The city once derided as
Kraków’s gloomy Soviet sister
has become Eastern Europe’s
next up-and-coming destination
with the addition of Raffles
Europejski Warsaw (raffles.
com; doubles from $290), a
stately, meticulously restored
1857 property located next to
the Presidential Palace in the
heart of the old town. Inside,
the design is something of
a love letter to the city: in the
lobby, art installations evoke
local landmarks and Poland’s
past, and a series of galleries
feature art and photos from the
hotel’s previous incarnations.
Upstairs, the 106 rooms and
suites—the largest you’ll find
travelandleisure.com
19
R E A S O N S T O T R AV E L N O W
Denver’s liveliest
street is about to get
even better.
Colorado’s capital has flowing
craft beer, mountain views, and a
Wild West undercurrent. You can
catch all that—plus the Ramble
Hotel, one of this spring’s most
exciting arrivals—on this stretch
of Larimer Street in the River
North Arts District (RiNo), within
walking distance of downtown.
— Eimear Lynch
1
RAMBLE HOTEL
This lavish 50-room
spot has not one
but four bars and
cafés by the crew
from New York
City’s Death & Co.—
and a pan-Latin
restaurant by Dana
Rodriguez, the chef
20
travelandleisure.com
4 OUR MUTUAL
FRIEND BREWING
TOPO DESIGNS
Move over,
Patagonia. This
Colorado upstart is
becoming the go-to
7
6
3
4
27th St.
1
THE POPULIST
The seasonal small
plates here pull from
an eclectic mix of
influences—the
tandoori chicken and
sunchoke agnolotti
are standouts.
thepopulistdenver.
com; entrées
$15–$25.
Spot this brewery
by the colorful
mural out front. This
is a favorite among
Denverites for the
house beers on tap,
like session ales
and barley wines.
omfbeer.com.
L ARIMER ST.
2
Warsaw Old
Town Market
Square.
6 OK HI The décor—
early Apple
computers and
Saved by the
Bell–style prints—
suggests kids these
days hanker for the
1980s. The stock
consists of candycolored beanies,
vintage apparel, and
splashy turntables.
fb.com/okhico.
From coffee to
ceviche, this food
hall has it all. Go for
cheese plates at
Culture, oysters at
Tammen’s, or a
flight of unusual ice
creams at High
Point Creamery.
denvercentral
market.com.
of nearby Work &
Class. theramble
hotel.com; doubles
from $267.
2
3 DENVER
CENTRAL MARKET
7
5
32nd St.
2
5 PUPIL Like
the eyeglasses
within, this shop
is thoughtful and
minimal. The brand’s
sunglasses, crafted
in Denver, make for
a stylish souvenir.
pupil.vision.
30th St.
N o.
outfitter for
outdoorsy types.
Stop by for a camp
blanket made in
collaboration with
Woolrich or to shop
the wall of brightly
colored packs.
topodesigns.com.
F ROM L E F T: LUCAS VA L LEC I L LO S/ VW PI C S / R E D U X ; A N D R E A B E H RE N D S; MOR GA N R ACHE L LE V Y
Right: Izzio Bakery at
Denver Central Market, on
Larimer Street. Below:
Coffee-rubbed pork with
semolina gnocchi, baby
artichokes, and blue grits,
at the Populist, in Denver.
25th St.
in Warsaw—are furnished
with bespoke pieces by local
craftspeople. Even the
bathrooms have a sense of
place: the marble paneling is
patterned after the city’s skyline.
The hotel offers a new entry
point to Warsaw’s surprisingly
cosmopolitan appeal. Start your
day with a cup of single-origin
coffee at Ministerstwo Kawy
(ministerstwokawy.pl) or Niezłe
Ziółko (fb.com/niezleziolko.
warszawa), cafés in the quirky
Plac Zbawiciela neighborhood.
Then take in some culture,
beginning with a visit to the
Warsaw Uprising Museum
(1944.pl), honoring the 1944
Polish-resistance-led
insurrection to drive out the
Nazis. Head next to Wilanów
Palace (wilanow-palac.pl), the
17th-century royal residence. At
the little-known Fotoplastikon
(fotoplastikonwarszawski.pl), a
stereoscope theater built in 1905
projects street scenes from
turn-of-the-century Warsaw in
3-D. For a more modern brand of
nostalgia, there’s the Neon
Museum (neonmuzeum.org),
which has floor-to-ceiling
displays of neon signs, colorful
relics of the Cold War.
Warsaw’s blossoming
culinary scene challenges the
notion that Poles eat only pierogi
and borscht. At new food courts
like Hala Gwardii (halagwardii.
pl) and Hala Koszyki (koszyki.
com), you can sample vegan
Palestinian dishes, Georgian
khinkali, Italian cheeses—and
yes, pierogi and borscht. Save
room for a nightcap at Kita
Koguta (kitakoguta.pl), where
mixologists conduct a brief
interview (“Gin or vodka?
Classic or experimental?”)
before making drinks to
individual tastes.
— Benjamin Kemper
ĒĠĝěęĪĜĬĠęĬ
ĬęģĝīıħĭĬĠĝĪĝ
ćĬƷīđġĥĨĤĝąĝĬĬĠĝāęĨġĬęĤčĦĝƥ
ĔĝĦĬĭĪĝƥěęĪĜĬħĝęĪĦĭĦĤġĥġĬĝĜ
ĜħĭĚĤĝĥġĤĝīħĦĝĮĝĪıĨĭĪěĠęīĝ
ĝĮĝĪıĜęıęĦĜĪĝĜĝĝĥĬĠħīĝĥġĤĝī
ĞħĪęĦıǎġğĠĬħĦęĦıęġĪĤġĦĝ
āĪĝĜġĬęĨĨĪħĮęĤĪĝĩĭġĪĝĜĐĝĜĝĝĥĥġĤĝīĞħĪĬĪęĮĝĤħĦęĦıęġĪĤġĦĝĚęīĝĜħĦęěĬĭęĤĬġěģĝĬĨĪġěĝęĬĬġĥĝħĞĨĭĪěĠęīĝčljĝĪĝĜĚıāęĨġĬęĤčĦĝĀęĦģÕēđÿÖČÿƣ! &āęĨġĬęĤčĦĝ
R E A S O N S T O T R AV E L N O W
A room on U by
Uniworld’s
millennial-friendly
ship, The B.
N o.
3
River cruising is getting a millennial-friendly makeover.
U BY UNIWORLD THE B
On the Joie de Vivre, 19th-century
George Goursat caricatures, silk wall
coverings, and jacquard textiles by
Sanderson transport travelers to a
bygone Paris.
An eye-catching matte-black exterior
and graphic print walls decorated with
monochrome portraits of celebrities
such as Britney Spears and The Weeknd
are ready-made for Instagram.
CUISINE
Traditional French fare—sole
meunière, beef bourguignon, cheeses
from Normandy—prevails, as do
formal dinners. And naturally, there’s
plenty of wine.
Trade breakfast for a leisurely brunch
with pressed juices, smoothies,
croissants, and savory dishes. Cruisers
can elbow up to communal tables as
they please.
Afternoons may be spent attending
a lecture on Impressionism or enjoying
afternoon tea. Come nightfall, the
onboard spa transforms into a glitzy
supper club playing French films.
Daylight hours are for mixology classes
and yoga on the top deck. In the evening,
join a drum circle, pajama party, or silent
disco in the rooftop Ice Bar. And don’t
miss the photo booth!
The Joie de Vivre sails along the Seine
from Paris, stopping in Giverny for
a bike tour to Monet’s gardens, Rouen for
the cathedral and golf, and the D-Day
beaches of Normandy. uniworld.com;
eight nights from $2,799.
The B traces the same route, but
shore excursions include more highenergy options. In the Giverny area,
you can skip Monet and go kayaking
or paragliding. ubyuniworld.com;
eight nights from $1,759.
ROUTE
DESIGN
UNIWORLD JOIE DE VIVRE
E N T E R TA I N M E N T
Most young travelers assume cruising’s not for them—but U by Uniworld, a line
exclusively for 21- to 45-year-olds, aims to change that. Can’t choose a camp? Here
are the differences between a voyage on Uniworld’s latest more traditional launch,
Joie de Vivre, and one Gen Y–geared ship, The B. — Melanie Lieberman
N o.
This book
shines a light
on the world’s
literary towns.
If you’re an ink-andpaper loyalist, Alex
Johnson’s Book Towns:
Forty-Five Paradises of
the Printed Word
(Frances Lincoln, $23),
out this month, will soon
be your favorite travel
guide. It’s a love letter to
reader havens around
the world, like Cuisery, in
France’s Burgundy
region (above), where a
monthly book market
and more than a dozen
bookstores saved the
town from ruin. Whether
your travels take you near
(Stillwater, Minnesota) or
far (Featherston, New
Zealand), chances are
there’s a literary utopia
within reach.
5
In Montgomery, Alabama, a new museum confronts the enduring impact of slavery.
The Legacy Museum (museumandmemorial.eji.org), which opens on April 26, explores how slavery has shaped
America, from the antebellum South to the modern prison system. This month marks 50 years since Martin
Luther King Jr.’s assassination, so it’s a fitting time to visit this or one of the other recently opened institutions
that honor the black liberation struggle, like the National Museum of African American History & Culture
(nmaahc.si.edu), in Washington, D.C., and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum (mcrm.mdah.ms.gov), in Jackson.
22
travelandleisure.com
C LOC KW IS E FR OM TO P LE FT : C O URT ESY OF U N I WORL D R I VE R C R U IS ES ; I MAG E B R O K E R /A L A M Y STO CK PHOTO ; CO U RTESY O F THE LEGACY M U S EU M
N o.
4
R E A S O N S T O T R AV E L N O W
N o.
6
VA N ESSA V IC K / TH E N EW YO RK TI MES
Gorilla trekking is taking off in
the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
With Rwandan permits now pricier than ever—an hour
with gorillas will run you $1,500—outfitters are doubling down
on their offerings in the more affordable DRC. The population of
mountain gorillas in Virunga National Park has quadrupled in
recent decades, the result of increased security and
environmental measures. Deeper Africa adds the Call of the
Congo itinerary (deeperafrica.com; eight days from $7,499)
to the park beginning in July, with stays on an island in Lake
Kivu and visits with a canine anti-poaching unit. Or book
a custom itinerary with Journeys by Design (journeysbydesign.
com; prices on request) that includes excursions to the
Nyiragongo Volcano’s lava lake and the Senkwekwe Center
gorilla orphanage. The 3,000-square-mile park is the continent’s
most biodiverse protected area, with ecosystems that range
from savannas to active volcanoes, so between gorilla treks
you can spot chimpanzees, okapi, and some of the 700-odd bird
species that make the park their home. — Jen Salerno
FIRST LOOK
Through the
Mists of Time
told, is leading
THE NEW CHINA, we’re
the world into the 21st
Above: Amanyangyun,
a new hotel outside
Shanghai, contains
ancient houses
and trees relocated
from a village
400 miles away.
26
travelandleisure.com
century, with its global infrastructure projects and planetary
investment portfolios. I visit the country frequently and find
the reality to be a little more complex. In fact, I’m often
struck by how much the past looms over the collective
imagination, and am left wondering how much of the
Cultural Revolution’s violent destruction of heritage has
yet to be truly reckoned with. Perhaps that’s one of the
reasons why, over the last 30 years or so, a movement to
reassemble bits and pieces of China’s shattered traditions
has been slowly gathering momentum. On a recent trip,
I was excited to witness this reappropriation of history
at play in a field where other cultures have long used it—
the design of hotels.
I visited two luxury properties that have taken
restoration to ambitious new heights: the Capella Shanghai,
Jian Ye Li (capellahotels.com; doubles from $627), which has
reimagined the European-Chinese architecture of the
1930s in a renovated residential complex in the French
Concession; and Amanyangyun (aman.com; doubles from
$825), where an entire centuriesold village has been relocated to
a rural suburb 17 miles outside
the city. The Capella sets out to
transport guests back to Shanghai’s
glamorous interwar heyday, while
Amanyangyun’s meticulously
restored Ming- and Qing-era villas
evoke an even more distant past.
Together, the hotels open up the idea
of a new kind of urban tourism—
one far removed from the plateglass modernity of Chinese cliché.
One of the first things to strike
me at Amanyangyun was the trees.
No fewer than 1,000 primeval
camphor trees grow around the
property, binding its modern
and ancient elements together
and offering a glimpse of the
Jingxia province village they
C O URTESY OF A M A N R ES ORTS
After a decades-long love affair with the future,
China is looking to the past for design inspiration.
LAWRENCE OSBORNE checks in to two new—
yet distinctly historic—Shanghai hotels.
1(:
) / $9 2 5 6
7+,6,6385(/($) 7($+286(&2//(&7,21
PREMIUM ORGANIC TEA. EXQUISITE INGREDIENTS. EXTRAORDINARY TASTE.
Also available in these flavors:
Sicilian Lemon & Honeysuckle • Wild Blackberry & Sage • Fuji Apple & Ginger
©2018 PURE LEAF, the PURE LEAF logo and the TEA HOUSE COLLECTION logo are registered trademarks of the Unilever Group of Companies used under license.
FIRST LOOK
FIVE NEW, MODERN
SHANGHAI HOTELS
In addition to the two
historic properties profiled
here, Shanghai has many
more hotels arriving on
the scene. From low-key
boutique openings to
grand projects by big,
international brands, here
is our pick of the best.
W SHANGHAI–THE BUND
The 374 rooms and suites in this
soaring glass skyscraper on the
North Bund are inspired by the
concept of haipai—an eclectic,
East-meets-West aesthetic
28
travelandleisure.com
native to Shanghai. Don’t miss
the view of Pudong and the
Oriental Pearl tower from the
terrace Wet Bar. wshanghaithe
bund.com; doubles from $315.
BELLAGIO SHANGHAI
Set on the banks of the central
Suzhou Creek, Bellagio’s first
property outside Las Vegas
features imports from the
flagship—like a restaurant from
Sin City chef Julian Serrano—
as well as Shanghai-specific
touches such as on-site
acupuncture and Chinese
Art Deco design motifs.
bellagioshanghai.com;
doubles from $395.
The reconstruction of the houses was
even more complex. Each of the 26
antique villas on the property consists
of more than 100,000 stones—all of
which had to be numbered
individually before the buildings
could be deconstructed and patiently
reassembled like matchstick ships,
with not a single stone out of place.
The effect is quite remarkable: the
structures feel as if they have been
here for centuries.
Stepping inside these transplanted
buildings, I was even more impressed.
Their lofty ceilings are lined with
elaborately carved wooden beams,
while those with studies have antique
desks worthy of a Confucian scholar.
Each house is arranged around a
serene central courtyard, where the
layers of enveloping stone ensure
minimal noise penetrates from the
outside. In addition to the traditional
houses, 13 of which are available to
guests, there’s a brand-new resort
wing with 24 suites spread along silent
corridors, left open to the elements
along one side. This decidedly modern
part of the property is arranged
around little ponds and water
channels that deliver an atmosphere
of monastic simplicity. At daybreak, as
a winter mist swept in and an outdoor
fire flickered in my private courtyard,
the clean, contemporary aesthetic
somehow enhanced the feeling of
being displaced from the present—
certainly the manic present of
MIDDLE HOUSE
Due to open in April, this
follow-up to the beloved House
Collective properties in Beijing,
Hong Kong, and Chengdu is
Swire Hotels’ first Shanghai
project. Located in the historic
Dazhongli neighborhood, the
hotel will have monochrome
interiors and a restaurant from
legendary New York chef Gray
Kunz. the-house-collective.com;
rates not available at press time.
BULGARI HOTEL SHANGHAI
Part of the Foster & Partners–
designed Suhe Creek
development, the property,
which opens later this spring, will
include a Chinese fine-dining
restaurant that will be housed
in the iconic 1916 Shanghai
Chamber of Commerce building.
bulgarihotels.com; rates not
available at press time.
SHANGHAI EDITION
Coming up this summer, the
latest property from the fastgrowing Edition brand will be
located in two towers minutes
from the Bund. The hotel will
have 145 sleek guest rooms and
nearly a dozen places to eat and
drink—including two rooftop
bars and a sprawling Cantonese
restaurant. editionhotels.com;
rates not available at press time.
C O URTESY OF A M A N R ES ORTS
Below: A living room
in one of the villas at
Amanyangyun—
each of which was
transported from
another location
and rebuilt using
100,000 carefully
numbered stones.
came from—now submerged underwater by a dam
project. Billionaire entrepreneur Ma Dadong, the CEO of
investment firm Shanghai Gu Shan and the Gu Yin real
estate group, brought them here from his home village,
more than 400 miles away, when a proposed reservoir
threatened to drown a centuries-old forest and the village
within it. The dam was completed in 2006, but not before
Ma had succeeded in transplanting the ancient trees, along
with 50 stone village houses, to the outskirts of Shanghai.
The trees were so large (some weighed 70 tons) that Ma
had to pay for the demolition of toll gates between Jingxia
and Shanghai so the trucks could get past. The transplanted
forest then had to be brought back to life in its new soil—a
process that took Aman’s team of gardeners several years.
FIRST LOOK
C O URT ESY OF T H E CA PE LL A S H A N G H A I (2 )
Above: The entrance
to Le Comptoir de
Pierre Gagnaire, the
French restaurant at
the new Capella
Shanghai, Jian Ye
Li hotel. Right: The
entrance to one of
the Capella’s
Shikumen Villas,
which are housed in
traditional 1930s
town houses.
modern-day Shanghai. This is a place where you can still
practice the ancient art of solitude.
The Capella Shanghai, by contrast, occupies a former
French housing complex called the Yian Ye Li estate, where
narrow, two-story linked houses—until recently occupied
by residential communities—are arranged along paved
lanes known as longtang. It’s an Art Deco–era village fully
resurrected within a Chinese metropolis—specifically, the
Xuhui historic district still popularly known as the French
Concession. This fully fledged city hotel is Capella’s first
foray into the Chinese market, and the company was
determined to make the property an original one. By and
large, I think it has succeeded.
The original buildings embody a blend of Western and
local architecture that first became popular in Shanghai
in the middle of the 19th century—and which eventually
characterized more than half of the city’s housing. Known
as “lane houses” (or lilong in Chinese), the buildings were
conceived around a strong communal ethos. Each has
imposing stone gates with a narrow yard or
garden inside; indoors, the design is very
similar to a Western town house.
The Yian Ye Li estate is the last remaining
complex of its kind left intact in Shanghai—
462,000 square feet of 1930s heritage now
turned into a hotel unlike any other in the
city. The Capella consists of 55 villas and 40
residences with interiors that are carefully
calibrated to match the theme of Shanghai
nostalgia, overlaying French design elements
with delicate touches of chinoiserie.
In other respects, the hotel feels more
up-to-date. The restaurant, franchised to
French chef Pierre Gagnaire, has a boatshaped bar set under gabled wooden rafters.
When I visited for dinner the atmosphere
was suitably decadent, the room filled with
Shanghai’s beautiful people—some of them
apparently clothed by the upscale tailors
currently housed in the hotel’s retail spaces.
In the basement, there’s now a high-tech spa,
a hydrotherapy tank, and a curious
meditation room encrusted with pink
salt. Behind the lanes, meanwhile,
there are secret gardens with floor
lanterns and long, bubbling pools,
which enable guests to retreat as far
from modern-day Shanghai as they
want to go.
My maisonette could not have
been more secluded, tucked away
in a private lane behind iron gates.
I thought about the workers who
lived here in the 30s, who lived
through the Japanese occupation
and the Revolution. There was no
trace of them now, but I still felt their
presence. In fact, at both Capella and
the Aman I felt shifted subtly back
into the past, though never in a way
that felt obvious or kitsch.
Could history be the new luxury
in China? As fragments of the nation’s
heritage become harder to find, their
value is certainly appreciating in
the eyes of a rising middle class.
Whether you choose to experience
this shift through a stay at the soulful,
contemplative Amanyangyun or a visit
to the charismatic Capella, to my mind
it represents nothing but good news
for the future of Chinese hotels.
Lawrence Osborne is a novelist
based in Bangkok.
travelandleisure.com
29
ADVERTISEMENT
TRAVEL + LEISURE’S
GREAT ADVENTURES
Journey into the Emerald Isle with Travel + Leisure and luxury travel
provider Butterfield & Robinson. Drive through Ireland’s spectacular
landscapes, learn to fly your own hawk at the oldest falconry school in
Ireland, and then lay your head to rest at a real-life castle (or three!).
Learn more at butterfield.com/TL-Great-Adventures
THE PRIMER
Bermuda, Back
in the Groove
Hoteliers and entrepreneurs are breathing fresh life into
this Atlantic island, where the cultural experiences
are just as spectacular as the pink sand and fresh lobster.
Jacqueline Gifford discovers its singular charms.
From left: Freshly
caught spiny lobster at
Wahoo’s Bistro & Patio,
a seafood restaurant
in St. George; Tobacco
Bay, a popular beach
for swimming in
St. George’s parish.
you so long to come to Bermuda?”
SO, WHAT took
My husband, Rob, and I were sitting
at the handsome wood-paneled bar of the Rosewood
Bermuda, and the bartender, Owen Lightbourne, was everso-politely calling us out. We’d just arrived at the palatial
resort, which sits a stone’s throw from sprawling estates
owned by people like Michael Bloomberg and Ross Perot.
There are four pools, a croquet lawn, and sweeping ocean
views. Our room wasn’t ready yet, so we were killing time
while our toddler, Bobby, happily ran between our seats.
The honest answer, we explained, was that we’d put
Bermuda off because it always seemed too close, too easy.
Before parenthood, our priorities were faraway and
exotic. Now a destination within easy reach—one with
beautiful beaches, no less—is salvation.
But you don’t have to be a parent to appreciate Bermuda’s
appeal. A fishhook-shaped archipelago with pink shores in
Photographs by Kira Turnbull
the middle of the Atlantic, it is quiet, beautiful,
and steeped in history. First inhabited by the
English in 1609, Bermuda was a trading hub for
hundreds of years. In the 20th century, it became
a vacation spot for the East Coast elite, who
would hop over to golf and tan and sip rum
swizzles at the Elbow Beach hotel, a mainstay
in the 60s and 70s. In later decades, as
development slowed and tourism took a back seat
to more lucrative industries, such as insurance
and banking, the glitterati decamped for the
scenier, sunnier Caribbean islands of Anguilla
and St. Bart’s. I still have to remind friends, many
of them savvy travelers, that this British overseas
territory is not in the Caribbean, but 650 miles
due east of North Carolina—with a similar
high season that runs May through September.
travelandleisure.com
33
THE PRIMER
In the past few years, though, Bermuda has
made a comeback, in part because it was the
location of the 2017 America’s Cup. The highprofile sailing regatta provided incentive for new
hotels to open and old hotels to spruce themselves
up. What’s more, couples are again choosing
Bermuda for an easy seaside escape, thanks to its
Zika-free beaches. More luxury resorts will be
opening in the next two years, along with a new
passenger terminal at the airport. As I discovered
during my visit, Bermudians are excited to
have their home back in the conversation again.
Here, the top reasons to visit right now.
At the Loren, we saw couples
staring out to sea, as if
hypnotized by the waves.
writing desks for a more streamlined aesthetic.
What hasn’t changed: the secluded, quarter-mile
beach. On a clear October day, we played with
Bobby in the sun-warmed waves to his endless
amusement (and ours). I didn’t need to fly to
Bali to find this level of joy.
Someone else does the driving.
The hotels are upping their game.
Before staying at the Rosewood, we checked in
to the Loren (thelorenhotel.com; doubles from
$550). “People tell me their parents used to come
here,” explained Stephen King, the hotel’s
developer, over coffee at the open-air restaurant.
When the British-born, New York–based
financier found a decaying property on Pink
Sand Beach, a quiet spot along the southern
shore, he saw potential in those sweeping
Atlantic views. So he tore down the old structure
and embarked on the island’s first new build in
nearly a decade. The Loren, he says, “shows what
Bermuda can be.” The 45 suites, with their warm
wood floors, crisp blue accents, and freestanding
tubs, are stylish and spacious, starting at
600 square feet. At the cliffside infinity pool, we
saw couples staring out to sea, as if hypnotized by
the waves crashing over the rocks. At first we felt
slightly out of place with Bobby, but the staff put
us at ease by spoiling him with fries and pizza.
Two luxury resorts, both from Marriott
International, are in the pipeline. The 79-room
Ritz-Carlton Reserve Hotel at Caroline Bay,
overlooking a secluded cove on the West End, will
open in 2019. The 122-room St. Regis Bermuda,
near the eastern town of St. George, will follow
in 2020. Meanwhile, older properties are shifting
away from British-colonial décor. Thanks to a
$100 million revamp, the 133-year-old Hamilton
Princess & Beach Club (thehamiltonprincess.com;
doubles from $379), a grand pink-and-white
building in the heart of the capital, Hamilton, now
doubles as a contemporary art museum, with
blue-chip pieces by the likes of Jeff Koons, Banksy,
and Ai Weiwei. Our suite even had a Warhol.
And this month, the Rosewood Bermuda
(rosewoodhotels.com; doubles from $728), a
92-room property in the tony enclave of Tucker’s
Point, unveils its new look. What was a formal
library is now a more casual bar, while the
rooms have lost their penny-tile bathrooms and
By law, tourists can’t rent cars in Bermuda. They
can, however, ride mopeds, which can be a hairraising experience, thanks to traic and twisty
roads. As of last year, there is also the Twizy,
an electric car outfitted with two cockpit-style
seats—fun, but it only works if you’re traveling
as a couple. I suggest the public bus or taxis, the
latter especially for the convenience factor. With
a toddler in tow, taxis, though not always the most
economical route, were our choice because we
could appreciate the surroundings and beach-hop
with ease. Bermuda’s winding rural roads, edged
Below: The Hamilton
Princess hotel displays
art throughout the
property, such as the
sculpture At This
Time, Companion
Series by Kaws.
Clockwise from
top left: Kristin White,
who offers historical
bike and walking
tours in the town of
St. George; the
lounge area at
the Loren; roasted
cauliflower at Marcus’,
a restaurant by
celebrity chef Marcus
Samuelsson in the
Hamilton Princess.
by centuries-old limestone walls, are beautiful.
I loved peering out at the immaculate, pastelcolored homes and the towering palmettos.
At night, I could hear tree frogs whistle.
You will talk to locals.
To explore Bermuda’s past, we started in
St. George. The island’s first permanent
settlement, dating back to 1612, has a champion
in Kristin White, a young entrepreneur who
offers bike excursions and “haunted history”
walking tours of the village. “I want other people
to get excited about our stories,” White said one
morning at the Tucker House. She just turned the
1752 building’s cellar into a concept store, Long
Story Short (longstoryshort.life), where customers
can browse for gifts (jewelry, books, head
scarves), rent bikes, and, of course, chat with her.
We walked the cobblestoned lanes, stopping
at the 1707 Bridge House, one of the oldest
buildings in St. George. White told us that the
house had once been owned by Bridger
Goodrich, a white Bermudian. After his death,
one of his female slaves, Philippa, won her
freedom from his son, after arguing in court
that Goodrich had promised it to her.
White’s tours are bookable through Winnow
(winnow.life), a new app that allows you to
arrange guided snorkel trips, paddleboarding
sessions through mangroves, even hands-on
beekeeping. “It’s a host in your pocket,”
said Alison Swan, who created the platform
with her friend, William West. Winnow’s most
popular outing is a cocktail hour in a Bermudian
home, something I was eager to test. “In the
heyday of the 50s and 60s, people would open
their houses all the time,” she explained. “We’re
trying to bring that graciousness back.” One
night, Swan took us to Shelly Bay, where we met
William’s parents, Jenny and Blake West, in a
house Blake had built himself. We talked politics,
there and at home, and raising kids. The Wests
didn’t know us from Adam, yet they happily
opened their doors (as they do for all Winnow
guests), and somehow, we all managed to make
conversation and learn from one another.
The seafood is superb.
When it comes to restaurants, Bermuda is not
Copenhagen or Tokyo. Nor does it pretend to
be. What it does well is seafood, simply cooked
and plated. One of our best meals was at Wahoo’s
Bistro & Patio (wahoos.bm; entrées $14–$42), a
casual restaurant in St. George that specializes
travelandleisure.com
35
©J&JCI 2017
Why Jennifer Garner never skips sunscreen,
even when it’s cold and rainy.
The sun is up there shining 365 days a year. Summer or winter, its UVA rays can pass through clouds, haze, even windows.
The more unprotected sun exposure you get, the greater your risk of developing skin cancer. In fact, 1 in 5 Americans will
develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Protection and early detection are the key to survival.
For sun safety tips and life-saving tools, like a free dermatologist skin cancer screening,
self-exam kit, and discounts on sunscreen products, go to ChooseSkinHealth.com
#ChooseSkinHealth
with participation from
THE PRIMER
I loved peering out at the immaculate,
pastel-colored homes
and the towering palmettos.
in spiny, clawless Bermuda lobster—sweeter
than Maine lobster, just as incredible with
drawn butter and fries.
There is fierce debate over who serves the best
fish sandwich. At Art Mels Spicy Dicy (9 St. Monica’s
Rd.; 441-295-3965; entrées $12–$23), a no-frills
storefront outside Hamilton, locals start lining
up at noon for sandwiches piled high with lightly
battered grouper or wahoo. Woodys Sports Bar &
Restaurant (1 Boaz Island; 441-234-6526; entrées
$18–$30), on the way to the Dockyard, has more
atmosphere (picnic tables, a Top 40 soundtrack)
and superior sauce. There is no debate about
the correct way to order a fish sandwich: always
on raisin bread, never on a plain bun.
For a family night, Village Pantry (villagepantry.
bm; entrées $18–$38), in the seaside town of
Flatts Village, is a winner. We ate fish tacos on the
patio while Bobby flirted with two older girls in
the yard next door. Ruby Murrys (yellowfin.bm;
entrées $15–$25), an Indian restaurant on a side
street in Hamilton, serves a wicked Goan coconut
fish curry. For a date night, visit Rosedon Hotel,
set in an early-20th-century residence, and eat at
one of the quiet patio tables at newcomer
Huckleberry (rosedon.com; entrées $25–$64). The
chef, Lucy Collins, who was born in Charleston,
South Carolina, serves divine Southern-style crab
cakes and tender, pasture-raised rack of lamb.
But the weather can change on a dime. When
it did, we headed for Hamilton, where the tidy
streets are lined with one-of-a-kind shops, many
in operation since the early 1900s. The Bermuda
Bookstore (bermudabookstore.com), on the
corner of Queen and Front, is crammed with best
sellers and lesser-known historical books about
the island. I grabbed (and devoured) Kiernan
Doherty’s Sea Venture, about Bermuda’s first
colonists. Just up Queen Street is Della Valle
Sandals (dvsandals.com), a shoe shop named for
its vivacious Italian proprietor. After he offered
us espressos, I got fitted for custom sandals made
of buttery soft leather in bright primary colors.
A more surprising find: the Masterworks
Museum of Bermuda Art (bermudamasterworks.
org), a collection of more than 1,800 pieces
inspired by the island. Set in the middle of
Bermuda’s 36-acre Botanical Gardens, it
includes marquee examples by Georgia O’Keeffe
and Winslow Homer. During our visit, the quiet
gallery showcased 119 contemporary sculptures,
paintings, and mixed-media compositions by
aspiring artists competing for the biannual
$10,000 Charman Prize. Not every example was
polished, but that didn’t matter. The exhibition
looked forward, toward a new generation of
creatives playing and testing and imagining
their home, for all the world to see.
Jacqueline Gifford is the travel director at
Travel + Leisure.
Rainy days can be fun.
When it was sunny, we spent hours outside,
watching from the infinity pool at the Princess
as yachts cruised into Hamilton or looking for
shells on the wide expanse of Elbow Beach.
From left: Visiting
a Bermudian home,
which travelers
can do through a
new app, Winnow;
St. George, a UNESCO
World Heritage site
where buildings
date back to the 17th
and 18th centuries.
travelandleisure.com
37
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY
FA R M T O T A B L E
S I N C E 17 7 5
Middle Fork Kitchen Bar
Farm-to-table dishes. Charming hole-in-the-wall diners.
Renowned chefs. Get a taste of Lexington, Kentucky’s
local flavor and plan a trip with curated guides just for
you at sharethelex.com.
MEMORY
I’ll Always
Have Paris
Twenty years after running away to the
City of Light, Tess Taylor returns
and finds shadows of her younger self.
speeding
WE WERE through Paris
after landing at Charles de Gaulle, and
my heart was beating fast. It had been
two decades since I’d been to the city. I
craned out the cab window hungrily.
I couldn’t wait to wander the Marais,
or shop on Boulevard de Sébastopol
for ham and eggs and white asparagus
to whip up into brunch. As my
husband and I made our way to the
attic apartment we had rented, I was
amazed at how sharply I recognized
the churches and alleyways, and how,
after a few hours, my rusty French
began to quicken on my tongue.
My reentry was also a homecoming.
When I was 19, I abruptly dropped out
of college and ran away to Paris. I left
the U.S. in January with little more
than a one-way ticket, six years of
public school French, and $700 to my
name. I couch-surfed a bit, first with
the baroness grandmother of a friend,
then with a distant acquaintance.
Finally, nearly broke, I checked into
a Protestant youth hostel in the Sixth
Arrondissement, renting a narrow
bunk that I shared with Elise, a
Scottish redhead. We ventured out
daily to look for work and mostly came
40
travelandleisure.com
Illustrations by Merijn Hos
,T9T'JWRZIFHTR
<- . 93 * > '&> '> 5 4 79 7 4>& 1 , 4 1 + (4 : 7 8 *
.9è8& 1<&>8 ' **3 + :3 94 ' *
& 1.99 1 * 4 + + (4 :7 8 *
MEMORY
back empty-handed. For breakfast,
the hostel put out long baguettes and
butter and strawberry jam, as well as
bowls of steaming milk and coffee.
Every day for weeks this was my only
full meal, and each morning it was a
delicious miracle—in memory, still
the best coffee I’ve ever had. Nights,
we raish hostel dwellers sometimes
slunk into the building’s basement,
a dark medieval cave where we lit
candles and drank cheap red wine.
Living in Paris was heady, a bit
stressful, and somewhat improbable.
But over the weeks, my French
improved. I landed a job as a translator
at the Hôtel Ritz Escoier École, where
I learned to cook poulet à l’estragon
and crumbly chestnut gâteau. A stageset life assembled around me. I’d while
away cold winter hours at Shakespeare
& Co., the legendary Left Bank
bookshop, reading poetry—Pound,
Baudelaire, Beckett, Stein. I made
friends with a Swedish watchmaker
and a Norman duke. Eventually, a
former boyfriend showed up, and we
rented a narrow apartment near St.
Eustache, on a white-cobblestoned
street I adored the second I saw it.
All the while I worked and read and
explored new quartiers. My walk to
the Ritz took me past the Louvre, and
I would pop in most afternoons using
my student card. On each visit I’d sit
with a single painting, teaching myself
to see what it was I loved in art. One day
it was a Neoclassical David; another
day a delicate, shadowy Vermeer.
It wasn’t all perfect—the boyfriend
and I fought, and money was
wildly tight. But it was remarkable,
absorbing this world week after week;
learning to joke in French, to taste
and wander like a proud flaneuse. By
the time I left in the summer, I had
cheap espadrilles, a short Jean Seberg
haircut, and a 1970s-style belted
blue leather coat I’d picked up at the
Marché aux Puces. I felt ready to face
down my adulthood.
42
travelandleisure.com
It is as if the city holds within its
knotty streets not only the ghosts of artists
and lovers, but your own ghost, too.
ast year I returned to give a
lecture about poetry to some
American students. I couldn’t help
glimpsing myself in them, recalling
my life in the city as a young would-be
poet. I’d turn a corner to see a flash of
my own self 20 years earlier, dashing
down an alley after art or bread. I
was taking in not just the Pompidou
but the memory of first entering the
Pompidou; running along the quays
below the Pont des Arts, I was also
running after my headstrong former
self. In the Jardin du Luxembourg I
had a vivid memory of sharing warm
ham crêpes on a cold evening with
Elise before heading to that hostel
basement to play guitars and flirt in
all the languages we knew. “The shape
of a city changes more quickly than
a mortal’s heart,” said Baudelaire in
a famous poem about Paris, but this
isn’t quite true. Paris, when you’ve
loved it, also seems to save a bit of you
waiting, unchanged, in its crevices. It
is as if the city holds within its knotty
streets not only the ghosts of artists
and lovers, but your own ghost, too.
This trip, we stayed in the Seventh,
in a tall crumbling building mere
L
blocks from the hostel I lived in decades
ago. One night my husband and I
slunk out to La Vénus Noire, another
venerable basement speakeasy, to
listen to jazz. Walking home that
evening, after passing the stone lions in
the fountains at the Place St.-Sulpice,
I led us back through a familiar alley, as
if toward my old hostel. I found the wall
now inscribed with “Le Bateau Ivre,”
Rimbaud’s poem about the seasickness
of travel and longing. I stopped to savor
it, dizzy between worlds.
The next day, I made a pilgrimage
to Shakespeare & Co. In the cluttered
stacks of a second-floor room was a
copy of the book of poems I’d recently
published. With wonder, I saluted
the brazen, wayward young woman
I’d been. Looking at the Seine that
night, I thought how the self is a series
of refractions, sticky with place.
The pieces flash back, like light on
the river. There are our hearts,
fluttering in the world, glittering,
waiting to be rediscovered.
Tess Taylor is a poet based in
California. Her most recent book is
Work & Days.
For some, it’s sitting down to the first five-star dinner of the trip, and being transported
by the rich, unexpected flavors awaiting you. For others, it’s sailing into an exotic,
remote port without another ship in sight. And for you, it’s the little things.
Discover your moment.
ENJOY THE FINEST CUISINE AT SE A™
ABOARD OUR INTIM ATE AND LUXURIOUS SHIPS.
C ALL 855- OCE ANIA ( 855- 623-26 42) | VISIT OCE ANIACRUISES.COM / TL
or CONTAC T YOUR TR AVEL AGENT
SCR APBOOK
1
2
Japan, One Bite
at a Time
On a recent dessert tour, the bakers behind the beloved
Brooklyn pie company Four & Twenty Blackbirds
gained new insight into a culture that prizes intention,
presentation, and optimal deliciousness.
FINDING HARMONY
Emily: We got these
ice creams 1 at
one of the many
stalls near the
Fushimi Inari shrine
in Kyoto. One is
black sesame, and
the other is yuzu.
We had a scoop
of hojicha as well,
a roasted green tea
with a hint of toasted
marshmallow.
Melissa: One thing
Japanese desserts
do well is balance.
Nothing is too sweet,
and ingredients that
might traditionally
be savory are used
to add nuance.
That’s something
we also try for
in our flavor profiles.
E: We loved the
temples in Kyoto,
like Kiyomizu-dera 2
(kiyomizudera.or.jp).
We hiked there from
where we were
staying, and there’s
a beautiful view
of the city. Kyoto is
a very sacred place,
both spiritually
and to Japanese
culture as a whole.
IT ALL STARTED WITH A MATCHA-CUSTARD PIE. While fine-tuning their
recipe, Emily and Melissa Elsen, the sister-sister duo behind
would eventually lead them all the way to Japan. “We met a woman
who knew the owner of Ippodo Tea, a 300-year-old family business in
Kyoto,” Emily says. “They produce a superfine, high-quality matcha,
and sourcing from them really improved our custard. That’s probably
what prompted everything.” That pie would end up connecting the
Elsens with more Japanese producers and, ultimately, the New York
Fair—a Big Apple–themed arts-and-culture festival at Osaka’s Hankyu
Department Store (hankyu-dept.co.jp). For the past two years, the sisters
have been the fair’s pie ambassadors, and last year they extended
their trip into a full-fledged dessert-research expedition. Their latest
project, a 10-seat bar and pie counter in Brooklyn’s Prospect Heights
neighborhood, channels the hyper-focused, hole-in-the-wall restaurant
culture they admired in Japan, where some restaurants only do ramen,
some only soba. The Elsens? They do pie. — Hannah Walhout
46
travelandleisure.com
C O URTESY OF FOU R & T WE N T Y B L AC KB IR D S
Four & Twenty Blackbirds (birdsblack.com) stumbled on a source that
HIDDEN TREASURES
E: We went to
Yamanashi, a day
trip from Tokyo, to
see Mount Fuji 3
and the surrounding
fruit-growing
region. There, we
visited the Haramo
winery (haramo.
com), which was
special since we
had no idea there
was wine making in
Japan. They’re
known for their
Koshu white wine,
and they served
a lunch of fresh
produce grown on
the property.
M: This Mount Fuji
cake 4 was so
3
cute. E: We bought
it at the mountain
base—it was angel
food with a dusting
of cocoa and
powdered sugar.
For Japanese
sweets, the way
things are crafted
and presented
is really important.
M: There’s always
a little special
something. We
found the
dedication to
quality incredible.
F ROM TOP : C O URTESY OF FOU R & T WE N T Y B L AC K B IR D S (5 ); PAOL A + MU RR AY /CO U RTESY O F FO U R & TW E NTY B L ACK B IR D S
5
4
AMERICAN PIE
E: We spent two
FOOD FOR THOUGHT
E: We were
interested in the
whole canon of
Japanese cookery,
and we saw that
the idea of people
cooking in front of
you is important. At
Nishiki Market 5 in
Kyoto (kyoto-nishiki.
or.jp), there’s vendor
after vendor selling
prepared foods—
yakitori, grilled
octopus—and stalls
with, say, every kind
of seaweed. I could
spend days there.
M: There’s a real
appreciation for
anything delicious.
I couldn’t choose
a favorite place.
Every time we ate,
it was yet another
amazing experience.
weeks in Osaka
baking more than
500 pies. We baked
all day long. People
watched us behind
the glass and lined
6
up—our saltedcaramel apple pie
is always the bestselling food item
at the festival!
M: Only a few places
in Japan bake pie,
and even then, it’s
presented as an
American product.
We would love to
open a shop there.
E: For now, we have
hojicha and blacksesame-custard
pies 6 on our menu,
and we’re thinking
about developing
other flavors we
loved, like salted
cherry blossom.
NEX T ACT
was more surprised
Bowne & Co.
Stationers, a print
shop in Manhattan’s
Seaport District;
Above right: A guest
room at the new Mr. C
Seaport hotel.
On the
Waterfront
With a sleek new hotel and reimagined Pier 17,
New York City’s once-snoozy South Street Seaport
is finally springing back to life. By Lila Battis
48
travelandleisure.com
learn that South Street Seaport—
a patch of land at Manhattan’s lower
end, right where the East River
widens into New York Harbor—
had become cool. For a generation,
suburban-mall mainstays dominated
its cobblestoned streets, giving locals
little reason to make a trip. Then last
year, developers launched a campaign
to infuse the area—redubbed Seaport
District NYC—with creative energy in
the form of buzzy chef residencies,
live music, and pop-up shops. The
evolution had begun years earlier,
after the area was badly damaged by
Hurricane Sandy in 2012. But by
mid 2017, there was little doubt:
Seaport, oddly enough, had become
Manhattan’s neighborhood to watch.
These days, smaller merchants
have mostly supplanted or outlived
the retail giants. Northern Grade
(northerngrade.com), a market of
American-made housewares and
apparel, opened a flagship in 2015, not
far from Farm Candy (farmcandyshop.
com), which sells small-batch pantry
products, and Bowne & Co. Stationers
(southstreetseaportmuseum.org), a
paper goods store and print
K I RA T UR N B UL L ( 2 )
NO ONE than New Yorkers to
From bonds to bullion, TD Ameritrade has the most
commission-free ETFs.
Whether you want to track the market or invest in a speciic sector, we have over
300 commission-free ETFs and a comprehensive screener tool to help you ind the
investments you want, whatever you think shines brightest.
Find yours at tdameritrade.com/etf
Carefully consider the investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses before
investing. A prospectus, obtained by calling 800-669-3900, contains this and other
important information. Read carefully before investing. TD Ameritrade, Inc., member
FINRA/SIPC. © 2018 TD Ameritrade.
SUMMER
ONLY N CAYMAN
A PERFECT BALANCE OF FOOD AND FUN.
Queen Elizabeth II Botanic Park, Grand Cayman
This summer consider the Cayman Islands the Kid’s Culinary Capital of the Caribbean as the islands welcome your family to explore and feast.
We’ve created menus and cooking classes that are kid-friendly. Enjoy fun activities such as interacting with playful stingrays or exploring
vibrant reefs in an actual submarine. This summer discover a vacation destination that lets everyone explore and have fun at their own pace.
STAY THREE NIGHTS AND GET THE 4TH NIGHT FREE
onlyincayman.com
Only valid at participating properties on new bookings made by June 30 for travel June 1 - Sep 7, 2018. Blackout dates may apply. See website for complete rules and restrictions.
NE X T ACT
Y CA
PITAL
CULIN
AR
C aribbean
F ROM L E F T KI R A TU RN BU L L; RAC HE L JOYC E
CULINARY EXPERIENCES
APPROVED BY KIDS
OF ALL AGES
studio operated by the South Street
Seaport Museum, an area fixture
since 1967. Clinton Hall (clintonhallny.
com), a laid-back beer garden with a
location nearby in the Financial
District, arrived last year, giving
the after-hours scene a jolt.
The neighborhood’s first boutique
lodging, the 66-room Mr. C Seaport
(mrcseaport.com; doubles from
$500), opens this April, in a
handsome Federal style brick
building that for years languished
as an unremarkable outpost of a
chain hotel. Now it bears a European
feel, reflecting the sensibilities of
designer Thomas Juul-Hansen
(best known for his interiors at
restaurants like Nougatine and
Perry Street) and the Italian
owners (brothers from the Cipriani
hospitality family). Rooms appear
luxurious yet subdued, with gray
velveteen accent walls, lacqueredteak trim, and marble-clad
bathrooms. Upon arrival, guests will
be escorted to the jewel-box lounge
for a cappuccino or cocktail while
they check in; upstairs, negronis
await in the mini-bars. It’s just a
block from the waterfront, so no
matter which room you book, you’re
guaranteed a picturesque view: the
Brooklyn Bridge from the upper
floors or the cobblestones
of Peck Slip from the lower.
Razing the old shopping mall at
Pier 17 will make room for a glassy
structure that will open later this
year with a rooftop event space and
new ventures by restaurateurs
David Chang and Jean-Georges
Bon Vivant Cooking Classes
Interactive culinary class for kids,
featuring local ingredients and recipes
geared towards healthier options.
From top: Northern Grade, a shop stocked with
made-in-the-U.S.A. clothing and housewares;
chicken sandwiches and fries at the Fulton
Street outpost of brewpub Clinton Hall.
Vongerichten. A branch of indie
bookstore McNally Jackson
(mcnallyjackson.com), a SoHo fixture
beloved by the fashionable set, will
move in nearby, as will the cultfavorite Milanese concept store
10 Corso Como (10corsocomo.com).
This flurry of development points
to a broader renaissance that’s
swept Lower Manhattan in the
years since 9/11. Once quiet after
Wall Street’s closing bell rang, the
area draws locals and tourists in
equal measure, whether they’re
seeking designer clothing at the
Oculus or epicurean treats from
Eataly. Now, at last, the revival feels
fully realized, and Seaport, a sliver
of waterfront nearly as old as the
city itself, is gleaming anew.
The Brasserie Culinary Tours
Get creative in the kitchen with freshlycaught fish and organic fruits, vegetables
and herbs straight from their garden.
Ambassadors in the Kitchen
at The Ritz-Carlton
An epicurean adventure for budding chefs,
creating local delicacies from ingredients
they pick themselves.
kidsculinarycapital.com
CHECKING IN
Belize, Three Ways
At Naia Resort & Spa,
treatments like salt
stone massages and
coconut scrubs are
delivered in five
overwater suites on a
secluded lagoon.
B E LI ZE HA S long been big with adventure travelers,
who come to dive the world’s second-longest barrier-reef
system, hike through Mayan ruins, and see wildlife in the
jungles of the interior. The only catch: upscale hotels were
always in short supply.
That’s changing. Last December, I visited three
sophisticated new properties—Coral Caye, Naia Resort &
Spa, and Mahogany Bay—that offer wellness experiences,
chic suites, and premium privacy. More are coming within
52
travelandleisure.com
the year, including the Samuel Amoia–designed Itz’ana
Resort & Residences in the bohemian beach village of
Placencia and Leonardo DiCaprio’s eco-friendly privateisland resort, Blackadore Caye.
Despite all the development, Belize still feels earthy
and untouched. The beaches on its more than 200 cays are
uncrowded, and the people, whose heritages include mestizo,
Mayan, Creole, and Garifuna, are warm. Choose among the
new hotels for the Belize experience that best suits you.
A L EX A N D R A AV IL A
The Central American country has always offered plenty of activities,
and now, Erin Riley discovers, there are even more luxe resorts to
match its pristine beaches and rain forest.
T I CK E T
PACK AG ES
O N
S A L E
A PR I L
24
T H
|
PA S S ES
NANT U C KE T FI LM FE S T IVAL .O R G
O N
S A LE
N OW
CHECKING IN
Private island
with its conch-shell-lined
walls and sand floors, is an
ideal refuge from the sun. My
butler, Rudy, delivered strong
mojitos (and stories about the
Coppolas) at the bar, while on
the adjacent thatched-roof dining
patio, my personal chef, Edwin,
served grilled seafood plates.
At night, I retreated to Coral
Cottage, one of the two rusticluxe bungalows where guests
sleep. What it lacked in airconditioning, it made up for
in beautiful breeze. Whether I
was snorkeling or just lounging
on one of the island’s many
hammocks, I found that Coral
Caye maximized the simple
pleasures of being by the sea.
Tropical village
Set on Belize’s largest island,
Ambergris Cay, this sprawling,
60-acre property feels like a
world unto itself. Part resort,
part small town, Mahogany
Bay Resort & Beach Club
(curiocollection3.hilton.com;
doubles from $369) has 205
cottages and villas dotted along
streets separated by canals. In
the town center, you’ll find a
yoga studio, an artisanal
chocolate shop, and a coffee
and rum bar. The Great House,
with its grand lobby, old-world
bar, and two restaurants, feels
like a scene-y country club. The
accommodations range from
small studios to sprawling twobedroom cottages, but all have
14-foot ceilings, island-style
décor, and rich Belizean woods.
When I wanted to experience
a little nightlife, the beach bars
and lively restaurants of
54
travelandleisure.com
Holistic retreat
Unlike other hotels in Placencia,
Naia Resort & Spa (naiaresort
andspa.com; doubles from $295)
emphasizes wellness. After
settling into my room, I made my
way through mangroves and
across bridges to reach the spa,
a six-acre complex with a yoga
studio, a café, and five treatment
rooms set over a lily-covered
lagoon. Treatments incorporate
native ingredients, like the
golden-clay detox and the
Mayan cacao-and-spice wrap.
The soothing atmosphere
extends to Naia’s 35 beach
houses and villas, many of which
come with ocean views. All have
warm wood paneling and
oversize rattan furniture. At
1981, the on-site restaurant,
I tried local dishes like conch
carpaccio and seafood-topped
dukunu, a Mayan tamale. Each
combined healthfulness and
flavor in a way that left me eager
to return for my next meal.
San Pedro were just a 10-minute
golf-cart drive away—though I
was always grateful to come
home to the peace and quiet of
the resort. A short boat trip got
me to other activities. I took a
tour of the Hol Chan Marine
Reserve, famous for its
stingrays and nurse sharks.
Mahogany’s private beach
club also has lovely overwater
cabanas, perfect for whiling
away an afternoon (or two).
F ROM TOP : C O URTESY OF C O PP OL A HI D E AWAYS ; A L EX A N D R A AV IL A ; C OU RT ESY OF M A HO GA NY BAY R ES O RT & B E ACH CLU B
After falling in love with
Belize in the 1980s, Francis
Ford Coppola opened the
Blancaneaux Lodge in the
jungles of the Cayo District
and the Turtle Inn along the
shores near Placencia. The
latest addition to his portfolio,
Coral Caye (thefamilycoppola
hideaways.com; cottages from
$1,435), sits on a two-acre,
palm-crowned atoll just 25
minutes by boat from Turtle
Inn. It’s perfect for a couple or
small family because you can
take over the whole place.
Until recently, Coppola
kept Coral Caye for his own
use, and it’s easy to see why.
The communal main house,
8'4;0++%'
-œ“i`ÀÞiÞiÃޓ«Ìœ“Àiˆiv¶
9JCVKU:KKFTC!:KKFTCKUCRTGUETKRVKQPG[GFTQRWUGFVQVTGCV
VJGUKIPUCPFU[ORVQOUQHFT[G[GFKUGCUG
+ORQTVCPV5CHGV[+PHQTOCVKQP
(KPFUQOGTGNKGHYKVJ:KKFTCŠ
NKƂVGITCUVQRJVJCNOKEUQNWVKQP
:KKFTCYCURTQXGPVQTGFWEGFT[G[G
U[ORVQOUD[VJGGPFQHHQWTYGGM
UVWFKGU+PQHVJQUGUVWFKGU:KKFTC
CNUQKORTQXGFUKIPUD[YGGM
+PFKXKFWCNTGUWNVUOC[XCT[
+H[QWTGHTGSWGPVN[WUKPICTVKƂEKCNVGCTU
CPFCTGUVKNNGZRGTKGPEKPIU[ORVQOU
DGPKEGVQ[QWTG[GUCPFEJCVYKVJ[QWT
G[GFQEVQTCDQWVFT[G[G
%JGEMQWV:KKFTCEQO
&QPQVWUG:KKFTCKH[QWCTGCNNGTIKEVQCP[QHKVUKPITGFKGPVU
5GGMOGFKECNECTGKOOGFKCVGN[KH[QWIGVCP[U[ORVQOUQHCP
CNNGTIKETGCEVKQP
6JGOQUVEQOOQPUKFGGHHGEVUQH:KKFTCKPENWFGG[GKTTKVCVKQP
FKUEQOHQTVQTDNWTTGFXKUKQPYJGPVJGFTQRUCTGCRRNKGFVQVJG
G[GUCPFCPWPWUWCNVCUVGUGPUCVKQP
6QJGNRCXQKFG[GKPLWT[QTEQPVCOKPCVKQPQHVJGUQNWVKQPFQ
PQVVQWEJVJGEQPVCKPGTVKRVQ[QWTG[GQTCP[UWTHCEG+H[QW
YGCTEQPVCEVNGPUGUTGOQXGVJGODGHQTGWUKPI:KKFTCCPFYCKV
CVNGCUVOKPWVGUDGHQTGRNCEKPIVJGODCEMKP[QWTG[GU
+VKUPQVMPQYPKH:KKFTCKUUCHGCPFGHHGEVKXGKPEJKNFTGPWPFGT
[GCTUQHCIG
2NGCUGUGGVJGHQNNQYKPIRCIGHQT$TKGH5WOOCT[QH
5CHGV[+PHQTOCVKQPCPFFKUEWUUYKVJ[QWTFQEVQT
8KUKV:KKFTCEQOHQT(WNN2TGUETKDKPI+PHQTOCVKQP
;QWCTGGPEQWTCIGFVQTGRQTVPGICVKXGUKFGGHHGEVUQH
RTGUETKRVKQPFTWIUVQVJG(&#8KUKVJVVRYYYHFCIQX
OGFYCVEJQTECNN(&#
^Óä£n-…ˆÀi1-˜V°]i݈˜}̜˜]ƂäÓ{Ó££‡nää‡nÓn‡Óänn°ƂÀˆ}…ÌÃÀiÃiÀÛi`°-,>˜`̅i-…ˆÀiœ}œ>Ài
ÌÀ>`i“>ÀŽÃœÀÀi}ˆÃÌiÀi`ÌÀ>`i“>ÀŽÃœv-…ˆÀi*…>À“>ViṎV>œ`ˆ˜}ÃÀi>˜`ˆ“ˆÌi`œÀˆÌÃ>vwˆ>Ìið>ÀŽÃ
`iÈ}˜>Ìi`Á>˜`Ò>ÀiœÜ˜i`LÞ-…ˆÀiœÀ>˜>vwˆ>Ìi`Vœ“«>˜Þ°-Î{ä{ää£É£n
7…>Ì>Ài̅i«œÃÈLiÈ`iivviVÌÜv8ˆˆ`À>¶
The most common side effects of Xiidra include eye irritation, discomfort, or
blurred vision when the drops are applied to the eyes, and an unusual taste
sensation (dysgeusia).
Seek medical care immediately if you get any symptoms of wheezing, difficulty
breathing, or swollen tongue.
These are not all the possible side effects of Xiidra. Tell your doctor if you have
any side effects that bother you. You may report side effects to the FDA at
1-800-FDA-1088.
2CVKGPV+PHQTOCVKQP
:KKFTCŠ
<;'FTWJ
:++&4#
NKƂVGITCUVQRJVJCNOKEUQNWVKQP
Àˆiv-Փ“>ÀÞ\ Read this information before
you start using Xiidra and each time you get a refill.
There may be new information. This information
does not take the place of talking to your doctor
about your medical condition or your treatment.
7…>̈Ã8ˆˆ`À>¶
Xiidra is a prescription eye drop solution used to treat the signs and symptoms
of dry eye disease. It is not known if Xiidra is safe and effective in children
under 17 years of age.
œ˜œÌÕÃi8ˆˆ`À>\
If you are allergic to lifitegrast or any of the other ingredients in Xiidra
(see “What are the ingredients in Xiidra?”)
7…>ÌŜՏ`Ìi“Þ`œV̜ÀLivœÀiÕȘ}8ˆˆ`À>¶
Before you use Xiidra, tell your doctor if you:
• are using any other eye drops
• wear contact lenses
• are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Xiidra will harm
your unborn baby.
• are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Xiidra passes into
your breast milk. Talk to your doctor about the best way to feed your baby if
you use Xiidra.
œÜŜՏ`ÕÃi8ˆˆ`À>¶
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist for additional instructions about the right way
to use Xiidra. Use Xiidra exactly as your doctor tells you.
• To help avoid eye injury or contamination of the solution, do not touch the
container tip to your eye or any surface.
• If you wear contact lenses, remove them before using Xiidra and wait for
at least 15 minutes before placing them back in your eyes.
• Use 1 drop of Xiidra in each eye, 2 times each day, about 12 hours apart.
• Use Xiidra right away after opening. Throw away the single use container
and any unused solution after you have applied the dose to both eyes. Do not
save any unused Xiidra for later.
i˜iÀ>ˆ˜vœÀ“>̈œ˜>LœÕÌ̅iÃ>vi>˜`ivviV̈ÛiÕÃiœv8ˆˆ`À>°
The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more, talk
about Xiidra with your health care provider or pharmacist. The FDA-approved
product labeling can be found at http://www.shirecontent.com/PI/PDFs/Xiidra_
USA_ENG.pdf or 1-800-828-2088. Do not use Xiidra for a condition for which
it was not prescribed. Do not give Xiidra to other people, even if they have the
same symptoms you have. It may harm them.
7…>Ì>Ài̅iˆ˜}Ài`ˆi˜ÌȘ8ˆˆ`À>¶
Active ingredient: lifitegrast
Inactive ingredients: sodium chloride, sodium phosphate dibasic anhydrous,
sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate, sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid
(to adjust pH) and water for injection.
Manufactured for: Shire US Inc., 300 Shire Way, Lexington, MA 02421
For more information, go to www.Xiidra.com or call 1-800-828-2088.
©2017 Shire US Inc. All rights reserved. SHIRE and the Shire Logo are trademarks or registered
trademarks of Shire Pharmaceutical Holdings Ireland Limited or its afiliates. Marks designated
®
and ™ are owned by Shire or an afiliated company
Patented: please see https://www.shire.com/legalnotice/product-patents Last Modiied: 12/2017 S34025
œÜŜՏ`Ã̜Ài8ˆˆ`À>¶
• Store Xiidra at room temperature between 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C).
• Store Xiidra in the original foil pouch to protect it from light.
• Do not open the Xiidra foil pouch until you are ready to use the eye drops.
• Return unused single use containers to their original foil pouch to protect from
excessive light exposure.
Keep Xiidra and all medicines out of the reach of children.
)'6:++&4#(14 9KVJVJG:KKFTCKKPUKFGTŠECTF[QWTƂTUVFC[
RTGUETKRVKQPKUHTGG6JGPRC[GXGT[OQPVJHQTCUNQPI
CU[QWVCMGKV
WRVQKPUCXKPIUGCEJOQPVJ
Iˆ}ˆLˆˆÌÞÀiÃÌÀˆV̈œ˜Ã>˜`Ã>ۈ˜}ψ“ˆÌÃ>««ÞÆ«Àœ}À>“ÃÕLiVÌ̜V…>˜}i°
œÌ>Û>ˆ>Li՘`iÀvi`iÀ>œÀÃÌ>Ìi«Àœ}À>“ð6ˆÃˆÌ݈ˆ`À>ˆˆ˜Ãˆ`iÀ°Vœ“vœÀ“œÀi`iÌ>ˆÃ°
^Óä£Ç-…ˆÀi1-˜V°]i݈˜}̜˜]ƂäÓ{Ó££‡nää‡nÓn‡Óänn
>ÀŽÃ`iÈ}˜>Ìi`Á>˜`Ò>ÀiœÜ˜i`LÞ-…ˆÀiœÀ>˜>vwˆ>Ìi`Vœ“«>˜Þ°-Σ™™näxÉ£Ç
APRIL 2018
E V E R Y T H I N G Y O U N E E D T O K N O W T O T R AV E L S M A R T E R
T R AV E L
U P D AT E
Most of Turkey,
including Istanbul, is
classified as a Tier 3
destination in the
State Department’s
new system. For
how to decode, see
the next page.
Safety in Numbers
MI C H A E L T UR E K / GA LL E RY STO C K
A major revamp of the U.S. State
Department’s cautionary system introduces
simplified terminology and a numerical
rating scale, taking the guesswork
out of interpreting the office’s travel advice.
Here’s how to navigate the changes.
By Sarah Bruning
Should you stay or should you go now?
Even some members of the State Department couldn’t
answer that question under the federal government’s old
advisory system. A yearlong analysis by the department’s
Bureau of Consular Affairs revealed that the previous
designations (warnings and alerts) often left travelers
confused, so in January, the department overhauled its
recommendation system for the first time in a decade.
Officials started by clarifying the language used
to distinguish between the baseline safety level of a
country or region and any short-term risk in the area.
“We’ve moved to a Travel Advisory for every country
and Antarctica,” explains Michelle Bernier-Toth, acting
deputy assistant secretary for Overseas Citizens
Services. Advisory pages, found on the department’s
travel hub (travel.state.gov), provide a general overview
of the on-the-ground situation in each country, plus
contact information for any local U.S. embassies.
travelandleisure.com
57
UPGR ADE
W H O ’ S G O T W H AT
What changed?
The State Department
now assigns every
country a number based
on the following colorcoded four-tier scale:
AIRLINE Southwest
SEATBACK SCREENS? No.
YOUR OPTIONS
Tier 1 (blue)
Exercise normal
precautions while
in the area.
On-demand live TV
(free) or videos using
your own device ($5)
USE Airtime Player
app (free).
K N OW
B E FO R E
YO U G O
AIRLINE United
SEATBACK SCREENS?
Tier 2 (yellow)
Travel with
increased caution.
Adjusting Your Screens
Tier 3 (orange)
Reconsider travel
to the destination.
Don’t count on a seatback screen to while away the time on your next
domestic flight. Why they’re disappearing, and how you’ll need to change
your trip preparations. By Talia Avakian
Tier 4 (red)
The State Department
strongly advises not
traveling there at all.
nce considered must-haves,
individual built-in video
consoles are now seen as
unnecessary by an increasing
number of U.S. carriers, many of
whom are eager to shed weight
from their planes and costs from
their bottom lines. The monitors
require seats to be bulkier, and
upgrading systems can cost
around $10,000 per seat.
With a majority of travelers
toting their own devices anyway,
it’s tough for companies to justify
the ongoing investment. “Our
research has shown that our
guests and most frequent
fliers prefer to use their own
high-quality devices to stay
entertained, as opposed to
seatback screens that often
become dated quickly,” says
Ann Johnson, a spokesperson
for Alaska Airlines. So while the
programming itself continues to
58
travelandleisure.com
AIRLINE American
SEATBACK SCREENS?
Depends on the plane.
YOUR OPTIONS Streaming
video and live TV on
some flights ($10 for
flights under two hours,
$18 for domestic flights
five to six hours long).
USE American Airlines’
app (free).
AIRLINE Delta
SEATBACK SCREENS?
Depends on the plane.
YOUR OPTIONS Streaming
video and live TV ($16
advance purchase for
24 hours in North
America, or $8 an hour
on most flights).
USE Gogo Entertainment
app (free).
P R E F L I G H T E N T E R TA I N M E N T C H E C K L I S T
RESEARCH
YOUR VIEWING
OPTIONS
Check the airline’s
website, which
often notes the
in-flight options
on specific routes.
If those details
are absent, note
the aircraft model
and search for
a rundown on
seatguru.com or
use your flight
number for a list
of amenities at
routehappy.com.
GET THE
RIGHT TOOL
Some airlines, like
United, American,
and Hawaiian, are
replacing screens
with entertainment
apps. Others (Delta,
Alaska) use Gogo
Entertainment—not
to be confused with
Gogo Wi-Fi, for
in-flight Internet.
Visit the App Store
or Google Play before
you leave home to
download Gogo
or your carrier’s app.
SOURCE
BACKUP CONTENT
BEFORE FLYING
In case of
unforeseen
circumstances
(last-minute
aircraft changes,
glitchy systems),
preload your device
with movies or TV
shows purchased or
rented from services
like Netflix ($8 per
month), Amazon
Prime ($13 per
month), or YouTube
Red ($10 per month).
AIRLINE JetBlue
SEATBACK SCREENS?
Yes, on all planes.
YOUR OPTIONS DirecTV
(free) and streaming
Amazon Prime video.
USE Their screens or
your device’s web
browser (free).
AIRLINE Alaska
SEATBACK SCREENS? No.
YOUR OPTIONS Streaming
video coming to Boeing
737s in spring 2018,
remainder of fleet by
early 2020 (prices TBA).
USE Gogo Entertainment
app (free).
I LLU ST RAT I ON BY A D R IA N JO HN S O N
If the risk for a city
or region differs from
the nation as a whole,
the advisory page will
note that, and include
details about the
specific risk. Mexico,
for instance, falls into
Tier 2 as a country, but
five Mexican states with
high crime levels are in
Tier 4. To add context,
the pages also
incorporate icons that
indicate the specific
risk (such as crime,
terrorism, a health
hazard, or a natural
disaster) driving the
rating, followed by a
brief explanation of
the situation.
The department
will reevaluate ratings
annually for Tiers 1 and
2 and every six months
for Tiers 3 and 4, unless
an imminent concern
arises. “How we assess
the threat level in a
country hasn’t changed,”
Bernier-Toth says. “It’s
how we describe those
conditions.” The State
Department will
continue to post any
temporary conditions
and emergency
situations, such as
demonstrations or
hazardous weather
events, on its site.
O
be a priority, providing a personal
monitor at every seat is not.
This October, Alaska will begin
removing screens from the Airbus
fleet it inherited in the merger
with Virgin America. Next year,
American Airlines will also
remove the screens from some
of its existing domestic narrowbody planes. Taking a more
gradual approach, Hawaiian and
United Airlines plan on nixing the
screens from new orders for some
domestic routes while keeping the
systems on some older planes.
Though not all airlines plan
on phasing out seatback screens—
JetBlue and Delta remain
committed—the trend is
widespread enough to warrant
due diligence before heading to
the airport. Find details on the
carriers’ plans at right, and use
the checklist below to make
sure you're ready.
Depends on the plane.
YOUR OPTIONS DirecTV
or videos using your
own device ($5 advance
purchase, $6 for
economy flights under
two hours, $8 for
economy flights
over two hours).
USE United Airlines’
app (free).
© 2018 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. GORE-TEX®, GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY®, SURROUND ®, GORE®
and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates. Injected version of outsole with N-INJECTECH ®
THINK ABOUT BANDEAU TOPS.
THINK ABOUT HOBO BAGS.
THINK ABOUT A BIGGER WARDROBE.
DON’T THINK ABOUT KEEPING
YOUR FEET COOL AND DRY.
DON’T THINK ABOUT GORE-TEX ® .
PRODUCTS
GORE-TEX® SURROUND ® FOOTWEAR.
All-around breathable and waterproof.
Nothing provides comfor t like GORE-TE X ® products.
The more we care about you, the less you think about us.
gore-tex.com/think
UPGR ADE
PAC K I N G T I P S
Feel at Home Anywhere
Modern travel doesn’t always lend itself to hygge, the in-vogue Danish lifestyle concept
generally defined as “coziness and comfortable conviviality.” But Kimpton Hotels’ New York
properties bring the Scandinavian ethos to guests with a just-launched service (starting at
$299 per night) that adds aromatherapy and other curated amenities to boost standard rooms’
hygge quotient. Esha Singhal, who helps manage the program, shares four simple pleasures
you can tote along to cultivate a sense of peace wherever you are. By Siobhan Reid
Shop our picks at tandl.me/hygge-products.
1
2
3
4
CALMING SCENTS
SOFT LIGHTING
MELLOW EXERCISE
A TOASTY BEVERAGE
Lavender and
lemongrass "go a
long way," says
Singhal. Compact
aromatherapy
diffusers, such as
the Pilgrim Teo ($80;
pilgrimcollection.
com), help create a
personalized setup.
When scouting
essential oils, look
for companies that
source unsprayed or
(ideally) certifiedorganic ingredients,
or that maintain
membership in the
National Association
for Holistic
Aromatherapy, to
ensure high quality.
An unpleasant
glare can squash
a good mood
surprisingly quickly.
“Hygge-friendly
lighting is warm
and subdued—the
opposite of the
harsh fluorescent
type you might
encounter,” Singhal
says. Since some
hotels ban open
flames, skip
candles in favor of a
multifunctional LED
lamp such as the
Classic Lumio
($200; hellolumio.
com), which folds
up to look like a
hardcover book.
Sure, sitting around
a roaring fire,
mulled wine in hand,
qualifies as hygge.
But holistic pursuits
(yoga, meditation)
“are a great, healthy
way to achieve a
state of calm,”
Singhal says. The
Headspace and
Buddhify apps (free;
Android, iOS) offer
guided mindfulness
practices, and
Lululemon’s
ultrathin Reversible
(Un) Mat ($48;
lululemon.com)
occupies minimal
space in your
carry-on.
“Hygge is about
taking pleasure in
ordinary moments,”
Singhal says. For
instant comfort,
she recommends
brewing herbal
tea, preferably
with ingredients
that soothe
common travel
ailments. Pack
chamomile
if sleep tends to
be elusive away
from home, or
peppermint from
Harney & Sons ($6
per tin; harney.com)
if you fall prey to
an upset stomach
on the road.
60
travelandleisure.com
BURNING
Q U EST I O N
What’s
legal to film
on your cell
phone at
the airport
and on
planes?
Whether you’re catching a
runway worker doing the
electric slide or witnessing
a fellow passenger fume at
desk agents, pause before
hitting record. Filming
surprising public moments
isn’t necessarily prohibited
by federal law, but that doesn’t
mean you won’t land in hot
water, since you’re almost
certainly filming someone
else. Booking a ticket means
you’re agreeing to follow an
airline’s terms of service.
Some carriers, like United
and Southwest, openly publish
their photography policies and
allow passengers to capture
“personal events,” such as
your own marriage proposal.
Others won’t discuss their
exact rules, citing security
reasons. The general
guideline? Get consent from
whomever you’re capturing
on video. Another rule:
anything that isn’t in public
view and could compromise
an airport or flight’s security
(think: X-ray monitors,
some safety operations) is
probably off-limits. So if you’re
shooting an Instagram story
of yourself as you snake your
way up the TSA Precheck
line and not impeding any
procedures, film on. But if you
want to post a YouTube vlog
showing a dustup between
your seatmate and a flight
attendant and one of them
hasn’t okayed it, there could
be consequences, such as
getting booted from the flight
before takeoff or detained by
security upon landing.
— John Scarpinato
C LOC KW IS E FR OM TO P: C OU RT ESY OF K IM PTO N H OT E L E V E N T I; C O U RT ESY O F HA R NE Y & S O NS ; CO U RTESY O F LU LU LE M O N; CO U RTESY O F LU M IO ; CO U RTESY O F PILG R IM CO LLECTIO N
A Premier onebedroom suite at
the Kimpton Eventi.
Tucking a soft
throw blanket in
your suitcase can
make your hotel
couch feel homier.
ADVERTISEMENT
SP R I N G
FOR
PR E T T Y
Show some extra bling this spring with
our exclusive 20% Off with code SPRING20*
REALSIMPLESTYLE.COM
*Offer ends 05.15.18
UPGR ADE
S EC U R I T Y
BRIEFING
Fighting
Fraud
Abroad
With data breaches regularly
making headlines, experts
share five ways to keep your
money and your identity safer
overseas. By Sarah Bruning
1
ACCESS WI-FI WISELY
“Using public networks in an
airport, café, or hotel can be
dangerous from a cybersecurity
standpoint, because they can
be easily hacked,” says Eva
Velasquez, president and CEO
of Identity Theft Resource
Center, who advises installing
a virtual private network (VPN)
on your mobile device. “It acts
like a private tunnel onto the
Internet and can help keep
hackers from monitoring your
activity.” A solid pick: NordVPN
($69 annually; Android, iOS),
which you log in to and activate
before hopping on Wi-Fi.
2
That little slip of paper might
seem innocent enough, but you’d
be surprised how many specifics
someone can glean from one.
“Housed within bar codes—easily
readable with a mobile app or
free website—is the traveler’s
frequent-flier number,” says
Paige Schaffer, who runs the
identity- and digital-protection
services global unit of Generali
Global Assistance. “A shrewd
person can use clues from the
traveler’s social media profiles
to answer security questions,
access their account, and cash
out affinity points,” she explains.
“Or even obtain passport
numbers, mailing and e-mail
addresses, and credit card
details.” Hang on to it and
destroy it when you get home.
62
travelandleisure.com
5
3
PARE DOWN
WHENEVER POSSIBLE
Before heading out for a day
of exploring, review the cards
and identifying documents in
your wallet and store any
nonessentials in your room’s
safe. Velasquez also advocates
writing down a list of items
you’re carrying on a trip, plus
the contact numbers for the
issuers, and keeping it in the
safe as an easy reference if
problems arise or you need
to report anything stolen.
4
INSPECT ATMS CAREFULLY
Ideally you’d always withdraw
money from a machine
attached to an actual bank,
since those tend to be well-lit
and under 24/7 surveillance.
Still, you can safeguard
yourself whenever and
wherever you need cash.
Scammers can install
surreptitious skimming devices
that capture your info when you
insert your card—and they have
become increasingly hard to
spot. “Look for structures on or
around the card reader,”
Schaffer says. If you see
anything suspicious, Schaffer
recommends giving it “a little
shake to make sure it’s fixed to
the machine and not an add-on.”
Another precaution: shield the
keypad when you’re typing your
PIN to combat inconspicuous
video recorders hidden by
criminals looking to score your
card number and access code.
CONVERT CURRENCY
STRATEGICALLY
Several options exist, depending
on your travel MO and your
aversion to risk. “Often you can
order currency from your bank by
phone or online and pick it up at
your local branch,” Schaffer says.
The convenience will typically
cost a bit extra, but the premium
may be worth considering if
you’re concerned about security
at your destination or just prefer
the convenience of having cash
on hand immediately upon
arrival. Alternatively, at most
international airports, you can find
a bank-affiliated ATM inside the
terminal that will usually be safe
and offer the best value since
withdrawals are based on
wholesale rates.
I LLU ST RAT I ON BY B E N SA N D E R S
KEEP YOUR BOARDING
PASS SECURE
An emerald glass
frog, a species
indigenous to the
Andes, spotted on a
night hike at Mashpi
Lodge, in Ecuador.
APRIL 2018
T H E WILD
WON DER S OF
ECUADOR
p. 66
T +L’S GLOBA L
GUIDE TO
SHOPPING
p. 74
T H E COOLEST
CIT Y IN
GERMANY
p. 82
A FA MILY
T R IP TO
M O N TA N A
P E T E R BOH L E R
p. 90
travelandleisure.com
65
THE
VIEW
FROM
HERE
Far from just a stopping-off point
on the way to the Galápagos,
mainland Ecuador is a place
of mystery and wonder—whether
you’re seeing it from the heart
of Quito or the cloud forests
of the Andes. By David Amsden
P H OTO G R A P H S BY P E T E R B O H L E R
A guest room at Mashpi Lodge,
an eco-resort in the cloud
forest of northern Ecuador.
Opposite: Looking down on the
forest canopy from Mashpi’s
new Dragonfly cable car.
travelandleisure.com
67
T
T HERE WAS A MOMENT, ON MY FIRST DAY IN QUITO, WHEN I LOST
the ability to breathe. At 9,350 feet above sea level, the
Ecuadorian capital is the world’s highest—an improbable city
where walking up a flight of stairs can put an ill-adapted pair
of lungs in a vise grip. But I was higher even than that. After
being driven through the blue-black of early morning to a
grassy airfield on the outskirts of town, I was in the cockpit of
a helicopter, rising to a hover just minutes after the sun had
broken the horizon, so overwhelmed by my first glimpse of
the landscape that I began involuntarily gasping as the pilot
maneuvered into a 360-degree turn.
Expanding from the pastel sprawl of this city of 2.6 million
was a primordial panorama that brought to mind computer
simulations of the big bang. Worlds that were not supposed to
coexist, at least in my understanding of the natural order, spread
before me in implausible harmony. The jagged, snowcapped
peaks of the Andes blurred into lush, tropical basins that glowed
an almost neon green. Goats and cattle grazed on cascading hills
of farmland that morphed into inhospitable lunar expanses.
There were glaciers and waterfalls, rocky gorges and velvety
highlands, tundras and rain forests, all crowned by pink-tinged
clouds that skimmed the earth like stretched cotton.
And then there were the volcanoes. The hour-long flight, a
new excursion by Metropolitan Touring, Ecuador’s oldest travel
outfit, followed part of the Avenue of Volcanoes—the majestic
string of summits south of Quito named in the 19th century by
68
travelandleisure.com
the German explorer Alexander von
Humboldt. They seemed to be everywhere,
these mysterious formations that rose
from valleys of green and gold to poke
through the clouds like breaching whales.
The pilot pointed out the craggy silhouette
of the long-dormant Chimborazo,
Ecuador’s tallest mountain at 20,458 feet.
Natives speak of it with particular
reverence, and for good reason: because
of its location on the equatorial bulge,
Chimborazo’s peak is the farthest
terrestrial point from the earth’s core
(as well as the closest one to the moon).
The pilot banked into a sharp,
swooping turn, and suddenly we were
following a river toward Cotopaxi, a
solitary marvel just shy of 20,000 feet
that is one of the world’s tallest active
volcanoes. We rose along Cotopaxi’s iceshrouded face to hover just above the
perfectly conical summit. Looking into
the crater, I felt a visceral sensation that
remained with me throughout my weeklong stay in Quito. There I was, still
technically within the boundaries of a
major city, yet consumed by the
unnerving impression that I was looking
directly into the soul of the planet.
Above, from left: Cotopaxi, one of
the world’s tallest active volcanoes,
as seen from a helicopter; a
Quechuan mother and child in
Quito’s Centro Histórico. Opposite:
Traditional Ecuadorian papiermâché masks for sale in Quito.
or some, Ecuador is less a country
than it is an idea about the world
before countries—or even before
mankind. It is best known for what lies
some 600 miles off its rugged Pacific
coastline: the Galápagos Islands, the
storied archipelago containing one of
the planet’s highest concentrations of
endemic species. Many travelers see Quito
as little more than a way station on a trip
to go see giant turtles and pink iguanas.
While neighboring capitals like Lima and
Bogotá have become increasingly popular,
Quito has remained something of a
question mark. From my helicopter tour
through my days wandering the city
streets—and during an excursion to a
place in the cloud forest that is, somehow,
F
still a part of greater Quito—I found a metropolis whose
intimacy belies its vastness. It is both humble and feral, a city
that accepts nature’s powers rather than trying to overcome
them. There are few destinations that still deliver the
intoxicating jolt of true discovery, but it is one.
I stayed in the Centro Histórico, a hilly, staggeringly
beautiful labyrinth that 40 years ago was designated unesco’s
first World Heritage city. My hotel, Casa Gangotena, was an
immaculately preserved Neoclassical mansion typical of the
area. Overlooking the Plaza San Francisco, one of the city’s
main squares, it had floors of Egyptian marble, a flower-filled
atrium, and opulent, high-ceilinged guest rooms.
After checking in, I roamed the delightfully cacophonous
urban center. Motorbikes slalomed through the catacomb-like
streets, dodging stray dogs, diesel buses, and rusted-out trucks
filled with freshly slaughtered chickens. On every corner
someone was selling something: fresh fruit, vegetables, quail
eggs, ice cream, braised pork, spit-roasted guinea pigs, chocolate,
and more varieties of corn and grain than I knew existed.
Even by Latin American standards, the density of churches
was astounding; around every bend there seemed to be another
weathered Gothic façade, Baroque spire, or intricately tiled
dome. During a flash thunderstorm—Quito’s weather changes
dramatically by the hour—I unknowingly took refuge inside
the most famous church in the city, La Iglesia de la Compañía de
Jesús, colloquially known as La Compañía. It’s an apt metaphor
The Quito skyline, with the
neo-Gothic Basílica del Voto
Nacional on the horizon,
from the terrace of the hotel
Casa Gangotena.
for a city that requires a bit of patience
to appreciate: the modest exterior opens
into a vaulted room painted entirely in
dazzling gold leaf.
Hungry, I ventured toward San Roque,
one of the oldest sections of the Centro
Histórico. It is home to the Mercado San
Francisco, a no-frills, fluorescent-lit
bazaar that has been in operation since
1897. Here, indigenous women in
embroidered skirts and men sporting
handmade cowboy hats squeezed between
fruit stands overflowing with mangoes,
passion fruit, and custard apples.
Butchers hawked cow’s feet and
miscellaneous innards. I made my way
to the food court in the rear, possibly the
best spot in town for sampling Ecuador’s
traditional cooking.
One stand specialized in stuffed potato
patties called llapingachos. Another
served encebollado, an oniony fish soup
that is a popular hangover cure. But what
about that goat stew simmering in a
cauldron over here, or that platter of
chicken and plantains over there? Since
almost everything was less than three
dollars (Ecuador has used the American
dollar since 2000, following a banking
crisis that destroyed the value of its
former currency, the sucre), I decided to
try everything, washing it all down with
a juice made from tamarillo, a tart
Andean fruit better known as tomate
de árbol, or “tomato of the tree.”
Returning to Casa Gangotena just
before dusk, I was grateful for the respite
from the fray: a horizontal recharge on
luscious bedding, an exquisite cocktail
made from chamomile-infused gin and
fermented sugarcane juice, which I
sipped in the cozy wood-paneled bar.
After taking in the sunset from the hotel’s
rooftop terrace, I ventured out of Quito’s
historic core for dinner.
Navigating the city beyond the Centro
Histórico can be a small adventure.
Though Quito has become safer, walking
at night is still frowned upon, so the
streets take on a slightly desolate cast
after dark. Taxis are really the only way
to get around—at least until next year,
when a 15-station metro system is set to
open. The taxi system, however, could
charitably be described as quirky:
licensed yellow cabs are indiscernible
from their fake counterparts, which
often charge double. Thankfully, the city
is so affordable that getting hoodwinked,
travelandleisure.com
71
as I did, means parting with only a few extra dollars.
From the window of my gypsy cab, the Centro Histórico’s
Spanish-colonial decadence gave way to what locals call
“the modern city”: a dense grid of concrete towers and wider
avenues illuminated by the dim yellow glow of the street
lamps. My destination was Laboratorio, a restaurant on a
residential block at the edge of La Floresta, the city’s bohemian
neighborhood. A loftlike room with poured-concrete floors
and polished-wood benches, Laboratorio is, as the name
suggests, a kind of experiment. Rather than offering a set
menu or even a consistent culinary experience, it hosts chefs
from Ecuador and beyond to showcase
their talents in pop-up restaurants that
stay open a few months at a time.
Laboratorio is the brainchild of Camilo
Kohn, an easygoing young Ecuadorian with
a fierce entrepreneurial streak. “The food
scene here was a bit stagnant,” he told me,
explaining how he came to open the place
three years ago after attending culinary
school in the United States. “The fanciest
restaurants were basically the same food
you could get on the street, but served on a
white tablecloth for ten times the price.”
Kohn was the chef for Laboratorio’s
first pop-up, Banh Mi, which introduced
Quiteños to the joys of the Vietnamese
sandwich. It was such a success
that Kohn turned it into a stand-alone
restaurant nearby. When I visited
Laboratorio, Rodolfo Reynoso, a chef
from Veracruz, Mexico, was helming the
latest pop-up, MX.593, which served a
menu featuring Mexican classics (pork
adobo tacos) with nods to Ecuadorian
cuisine (a gordita filled with llama meat).
The margaritas came in beakers.
Everything was as delicious as you’d find
in any trendy spot in a major global city.
“We’re trying to reclaim our heritage
in a new way,” Kohn told me. “Things that
are common in other places, like using
high-end ingredients in casual settings,
are still kind of foreign here. It’s exciting
to be able to push those trends and
introduce new ideas.” (Continued on page 96)
HOW TO VISIT ECUADOR, FROM QUITO
TO THE CLOUD FOREST
Give yourself about a week, divided evenly between the city and the wilderness, which can be easily combined with a second week in the Galápagos
Islands. Most restaurants and other businesses in Quito are closed on Sundays (and some on Mondays), so plan accordingly.
COLOMBIA
Mashpi Lodge
Galápagos
Islands
Pacific Ocean
Quito
ECUADOR
PERU
72
travelandleisure.com
GETTING THERE
American and Delta have direct
flights from Miami and Atlanta to
Mariscal Sucre International
Airport, which opened in 2013
just outside of Quito.
OPERATOR & LODGING
Metropolitan Touring
(metropolitan-touring.com),
Ecuador’s oldest travel outfit, put
together my fantastic itinerary,
which included its latest offering,
a helicopter flight along Ecuador’s
renowned Avenue of the
Volcanoes. The company also
owns both hotels where I stayed:
Casa Gangotena (casa
gangotena.com; doubles from
$450), a converted Neoclassical
mansion in Quito’s historic center,
and Mashpi Lodge (mashpilodge.
com; doubles from $1,098), a
bastion of Modernist luxury in the
cloud forest a few hours away.
Mashpi can arrange transfers to
and from central Quito.
EAT & DRINK
Banh Mi The city’s premier
destination for Southeast Asian
fare and well-made cocktails.
banhmi.ec; entrées $9–$16.
Bandido Brewing A hipster
hangout in the La Tola precinct of
the Centro Histórico serving craft
beer, artisanal pizza, and draft
kombucha. bandidobrewing.com.
Dios No Muere A sprawling café
spread across three stories of a
former monastery where you can
find both Ecuadorian dishes and
Cajun classics. cafediosnomuere.
com; entrées $5–$10.
Laboratorio At this chic spot in La
Floresta, different chefs showcase
their talents in residencies that last
several months. laboratorio.rest;
entrées $12–$14.
Mercado San Francisco Quito’s
oldest market is the best place to
sample traditional Ecuadorian
cuisine. Corner of Rocafuerte and
Chimborazo.—D.A.
The Healing Waterfall, the end point
of a popular hike from Mashpi Lodge,
in the foothills of the Ecuadorian
Andes. Opposite: Encebollado, or fish
soup, at the Mercado San Francisco
in Quito’s Centro Histórico.
LO
N
DO
ORK CITY
NEW Y
BU
74
travelandleisure.com
ENO
S AIRES
N
BUENOS AIRES
JEWELRY / Aracano
Illustrations by Michał Bednarski
TOKYO
KNIVES AND SCISSORS / Ubukeya
MEXICO CITY
TEXTILES / Onora
NEW YORK CITY
HOME DESIGN / Creel & Gow
BUENOS AIRES
L E AT H E R G O O D S / A r a n d u
NEW YORK CITY
FOOD / Clover Grocery
LONDON
H A B E R D A S H E RY / D r a k e ’s
NEW YORK CITY
C H I L D R E N ' S C LOT H I N G / Tr i c o F i e l d
Follow A-list style-setters on retail expeditions across London, New York City,
and Buenos Aires. Browse handcrafted surf boards on the Maine coast and
streamlined sneakers in Paris. Navigate Mexico City’s high-design
neighborhoods and Dubai’s largest mall. T+L's annual guide to the most
beguiling stores around the globe will lead you to brick-and-mortar bliss.
LONDON
ART SUPPLIES / L.Cornelissen & Son
BUENOS AIRES
ANTIQUES / Ricardo Paz
LONDON
BOOKS / Heywood Hill
DUBAI
FOOTWEAR / Level Shoes
I N S I D E R’S G U I D E
LAURE HERIARD DUBREUIL’S
NEW YORK CITY
Leave it to Laure
Heriard Dubreuil to get
New Yorkers to wear
color. The doyenne of
high fashion launched
the luxury emporium the Webster
in Miami in 2009, stocking playful
yet refined pieces from high-end
labels like Balenciaga and Chloé.
Last year Heriard Dubreuil
brought South Beach glamour to
New York City with the opening of
the store’s fifth outpost. Here, the
French-born entrepreneur shares
her secrets for scoring the best
home décor, streetwear, and
vintage finds across Manhattan
and Brooklyn.
SoHo/West Village/East Village
It’s two blocks from the Webster to
the Apartment by the Line (theline.
com), one of my favorite boutiques.
It’s well curated by my friend Vanessa
Traina, and I can always count on
leaving with a pair of Khaite jeans and
an assortment of Rodin face oils. I
have a four-year-old son, so Trico Field
(tricofield.net), a children’s clothing
store on West Broadway, is another
go-to. It carries things you can’t find
elsewhere: patchwork jeans, thickgauge sweaters, and T-shirts with
Left: Laure Heriard Dubreuil at the New York
City branch of the Webster. Below, from left:
Pointy Snout caviar at Clover Grocery, in
Greenwich Village; avian-themed décor at
Creel & Gow, on the Upper East Side; children’s
clothing at Trico Field, in SoHo.
76
travelandleisure.com
W O R T H F LY I N G F O R :
RETRO SNEAKERS IN PARIS
Imagine the classic Converse Jack Purcell tennis shoe designed by French
people—less bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, more sleek and subdued. Conceived
in 1936 by Georges Grimmeisen, the tennis-loving son of a Parisian rubber
manufacturer, the Spring Court canvas sneaker became a chic totem in the 1960s,
when John Lennon wore a pair on the cover of Abbey Road. Today it comes in both
high- and low-top versions and in a range of muted colors and fabrics, including
twill, Lurex, and goatskin, beginning at around $100.
Spring Courts are difficult to find in U.S. stores, and
there are fans who never visit Paris without a trip
to the company’s boutique, housed in the
Grimmeisens’ original rubber factory
in the Belleville neighborhood.
springcourt.com.
Polanco
1
2
3
Cuauhtemoc
4
5
6
Juarez
7
Chapultepec
Park
Roma
Norte
Condesa
SHOP THESE NEIGHBORHOODS
The Best Design
in Mexico City
surprising details like a funky trim or
paint splotches.
I like to break up a day of shopping
with a stop for juice or a salad
at Clover Grocery (clovergrocery.
com), an upscale sister market to
Café Clover in the West Village.
It feels like something you’d find
in Los Angeles—it sells truffled
honey and spiced popcorn. If I’m
in the East Village, I’ll stop at John
Derian Co. (johnderian.com) for
antiques, ceramics, candles, and
other beautiful gifts, then Metropolis
(metropolisvintageonline.com) for cool
vintage T-shirts and sweatshirts.
C O U RTESY OF S PR I N G C OU RT. OP P OS IT E : J ESS I CA A N TO L A
Flatiron/Murray Hill
Marlene Wetherell (marlenewetherell.
com) on West 25th Street is another of
my favorite vintage stores. You have
to dig, but I always turn up treasures
like an Yves Saint Laurent blazer or
a Gucci handbag. Dover Street Market
New York (newyork.doverstreetmarket.
com) on Lexington Avenue at East 30th
Street feels like a fashion funhouse.
It has ever-changing art installations
and an amazing collection of jewelry.
I never leave without having a slice of
lemon-polenta cake at Rose Bakery on
the ground floor.
Upper East Side
After that little pick-me-up, I’m ready
to head uptown to the Row (therow.
com) on East 71st Street. The highend clothing boutique is set inside
a glorious, three-story town house
and has the most incredible rotating
art collection. In addition to elegant,
impeccably cut pieces, it has a small
but strong vintage selection. From
there, I like to pop in to Creel & Gow
(creelandgow.com), a curiosity shop
between Park and Lexington Avenues.
My friend Jamie Creel is a world
traveler and avid collector, and I’ve
been fortunate to accompany him
on shopping trips to Mozambique,
Spain, and Egypt. I’m in awe of the
one-of-a-kind objects he turns up,
from ceramics and taxidermy to tiles
and precious stones.
Williamsburg
On the weekend, my family and
I like to go to Supreme Brooklyn
(supremenewyork.com). It’s the justopened sibling to the cult skater store
in Nolita. I browse the racks of elevated
streetwear with my husband—we
especially love the logo tees. And the
store has its own skateboard bowl,
which keeps my son entertained.
SPOTLIGHT: THE WEBSTER The six-story shop in SoHo blends New York glamour with
South Beach pizzazz (pink terrazzo floors, a life-size bronze flamingo). But it’s the surprising
mix of designer threads that captures the imagination. Yeezy sweatshirts are juxtaposed with
Lisa Marie Fernandez sundresses and Isa Arfen cropped floral trousers, while the Art Deco–
inspired shoe salon carries platform Vetements boots and Gucci pool slides. For the ultimate
VIP treatment, opt for a blowout at the fifth-floor David Mallett salon. thewebster.us.
Mexico City was named this year’s
World Design Capital, an award that
pays tribute to the ways architects and
urbanists have made the metropolis
user-friendly. A shopping itinerary
through the heart of the city—now
largely recovered from last year's
earthquake—reveals a vital community
of fashion and product designers.
1/Stendhal Store This cuttingedge streetwear shop highlights
up-and-coming Mexican labels. Look
for utilitarian menswear by the Pack
and cheeky T-shirts and totes by
Regards Coupables. Polanco;
stendhalstore.com.
2/Lago DF The shop has a rusticmodern aesthetic and features
clothing and homeware designers
from across Latin America. Polanco;
lagodf.com.
3/Onora Owners Maggie Galton
and Maria Eladia Hagerman work
with Mexican artisans to create
pillows from vintage fabrics,
lacquered-wood cutlery, and more.
Polanco; onoracasa.com.
4/Taxonomía This boutique inside
the Hotel Carlota presents ceramics,
jewelry, leather goods, and clothes
by forward-thinking local designers.
Cuauhtémoc; taxonomia.mx.
5/Utilitario Mexicano Classics of
Mexican design—such as enameled
pewter spoons for $5 and mortars and
pestles made from volcanic stone for
$12—line the walls of this inviting
shop. Juárez; utilitariomexicano.com.
6/Córdoba 25 This early-20thcentury town house encompasses two
clothing boutiques (one for men,
another for women), a contemporary
art gallery, and Casa Bosques Librería,
the city’s best store for art books.
Roma Norte; cordoba25.net.
7/Varón Designer Aaron Changpo’s
showroom features his bold, geometric
jewelry; pieces start at around $96.
Condesa; varonofficial.com.
I N S I D E R’S G U I D E
The creator of
niche fragrance line
Fueguia 1833, Julian
Bedel draws inspiration from
the sights and scents of his
home country of Argentina. His
collection includes such heady
perfumes as Pampa Húmeda, a
blend of clary sage, eucalyptus,
and oregano that evokes the wild
green Pampas. Bedel’s business
is based in Milan, but he was
born and raised in Buenos Aires,
where he now has a jewel box
of a store. Here, he shares the
artisans and shopkeepers—
some based around his boutique
in tony Recoleta, others in
neighboring districts—
who most excite him.
around the corner from my store.
Designer Martín Churba makes all of
his dresses, pants, and tops right at
his shop, so everything is artisanal
and small-scale. His colorful pieces
in the style of Japanese yukata
are incredible.
I love the smell of leather when I
walk into Arandu (arandu.com.ar), only
a few blocks away. It has everything
related to gaucho and polo culture,
like saddles, bridles, carpincho leather
vests made from the skin of the
capybara, brightly colored woven belts
once popular with the nobility, and
buckles fashioned from silver coins.
Marcelo Lucini of Airedelsur
(airedelsurboutique.com) combines
the traditional craftsmanship in silver
and stone from northern Argentina
with his own contemporary idea of
jewelry and tableware. He’s one of
the few people with real access to this
78
travelandleisure.com
SPOTLIGHT: FUEGUIA 1833 The Recoleta shop is lined with dark velvet
drapes and vintage engravings. A single long table displays Bedel’s creations,
including Halo Lunar—made of lavender, sandalwood, and amber—and Agua
Magnoliana, which draws from the Amazonian magnolia tree. The brand also has
branches in New York City, Milan, Zurich, and Tokyo. fueguia.com.
W O R T H F LY I N G F O R :
K IMONOS IN BERLIN
The city’s thrift-store scene is legendary, but if you don’t have the time for
a treasure hunt, Rianna Nektaria Kounou and Nina Knaudt have done the
work for you. For their clothing line, Rianna & Nina, the pair use rare,
exotically patterned silk textiles sourced from around the world to create
vintage-inspired coat and pant sets, kimonos, and tiered dresses; prices
start around $980. The collection can be found at Rianna in Berlin,
Kounou’s shop in the Mitte district, alongside vintage ready-to-wear,
jewelry, and accessories. riannainberlin.com.
YAD I D L EV Y
Recoleta
Tramando (tramando.com) is just
Clockwise from far left: Julian Bedel outside
Fueguia 1833, his Buenos Aires perfume shop;
arrow necklaces at Aracano, a jewelry boutique
in Recoleta; Paul French Gallery, in Palermo
Soho; rope lassos at Arandu, a store
specializing in leather goods.
SHOPPING SPREE
An Afternoon
at the Dubai Mall
In a city with more than 90 shopping
centers, one 5.9 million-square-foot
complex rises above the rest. The
Dubai Mall is the gateway to some of
the region’s top attractions, including
the Dubai Aquarium and the Burj
Khalifa tower. Only in town for a
layover? Here’s how to steer through
the 1,200 shops to find the best of
Emirati fashion.
Studio 8 Dubai-born entrepreneur
Sarah Belhasa’s sophisticated
boutique features Gulf-based fashion
houses, including Rubina K, known for
elegant ready-to-wear pieces as well
as trendy tunics and sundresses.
studio8.ae.
F ROM TOP : JAV IE R PIE R INI (3 ); A NK A BA R D E LE B E N
network of artisans. He shows his
work by appointment at his studio.
At Aracano (aracano.com), on the
other side of the Recoleta Cemetery,
my longtime friend Federico Alzaga
sells his sculptural, gold-and-silverplated jewelry out of his private
showroom, also by appointment. His
pendants are shaped like condors,
arrowheads, and snakes. I appreciate
his authenticity and his focus on a
single idea—he takes inspiration
from the Andes.
Palermo Soho
Paul French Gallery (pauldeco.com)
is the perfect place to pause while
roaming the city. Paul brings
together furniture, textiles, design
objects, art, and wines from local and
international producers. The shop
has the spirit of a home, the soul of
a gallery, and the heart of a bazaar.
Nearby is Ricardo Paz (ricardopaz.
com). Collected from all corners of
Argentina, Paz’s antique pieces speak
the universal language of simple
design and materials. They have
a rustic quality and showcase the
varieties of wood in this country.
Boutique Ayla Drawing its name
from the Arabic word for “moonlight,”
this shop is known for its one-of-a-kind
caftans and luxury evening wear
handpicked by owner Shaden
Bushnaq. Check out colorful dresses
by U.A.E.–based label Shaira.
boutiqueayla.com.
Ajmal Perfume In the Emirates,
entire families work with perfumers
to develop fragrances from oud, a
powerful scent originating in
agarwood. At Ajmal, you can buy oud
oil and design your own perfumes to
wear or use as home fragrances.
ajmalperfume.com.
Level Shoes This is the place to buy
high-end Arabian footwear by brands
like Tamashee, whose designs are
based on traditional na-aal sandals
and patterned with leaves and date
palms. levelshoes.com.
Al Fardan Jewellery Pearl diving
once flourished along the coast here.
This outpost of a firm founded by a
pearling family in 1954 showcases the
gem as well as diamond pieces and
watches. alfardanjewellery.com.
Port
Rashid
Dubai
Airport
San Telmo
Gabriel del Campo Anticuario
A look from
Rianna &
Nina’s
Spring/
Summer
2018
collection.
(427 Bethlem; 54-11-4307-6589) has a
vast collection of furniture, from
Jean-Michel Frank pieces to
reproductions of Roman marble
statues. Del Campo is a sublime
curator of the cambalache—the spirit
of the bazaar—that constitutes our
Porteño essence.
Dubai
Mall
Burj Khalifa
Dubai
Creek
Clockwise from right: Erdem Moralioğlu at his
London studio; a window display at Selfridge’s
department store, in the Mayfair neighborhood;
tableware at Momosan Shop, in Hackney;
Heywood Hill, a bookstore in Mayfair.
I N S I D E R’S G U I D E
ERDEM MORALIOĞLU’S
Erdem Moralioğlu was born in Montreal to a
Turkish father and an English mother. It’s no
surprise, then, that his floral-print fashions—
from the floor-length gowns beloved by Sienna
Miller, Claire Foy, and other actresses, to last
year’s capsule collection for H&M—pair the colorful abundance
of a Victorian garden with Arabian Nights allure. The designer
moved to London in 2000 to attend the Royal College of Art
and launched his namesake label five years later. His favorite
London shops reflect the same eclectic sensibility that informs
his craft: a passion for art and literature and an embrace of
both classic design and Midcentury Modernism.
80
travelandleisure.com
CA RO L SAC H S
LONDON
W O R T H F LY I N G F O R :
SUR FB OA R DS IN M A INE
The rocky New England shoreline isn’t your stereotypical surfing
mecca. But according to many, the best boards in America can be
found at a tiny shop in York, a block from the Atlantic Ocean. The
town is best known for the picture-perfect Nubble Lighthouse, but
since Mike LaVecchia founded Grain Surfboards in 2005, acolytes
from as far away as Australia have made the pilgrimage. “People
think of surfboards as disposable,” LaVecchia says. His boards
are anything but. Crafted from sustainable cedar, they can
outlast some foam counterparts by decades. At Grain, visitors
can test-drive premade boards at the beach before making a
selection; prices begin at $1,000. For a more hands-on
experience, sign up for a four-day workshop and learn how
to build your own board. grainsurfboards.com.
SHOP FOR ONE THING
A Tour of Tokyo’s
Single-Item Stores
Kaizen, the business philosophy of
continuous improvement that has led
Japan to excel at everything from
steaks to jeans, is on display in Tokyo’s
Chuo-ku ward, where a variety of
hyper-focused shops specialize in
one product—sometimes in a
multitude of forms and always
impeccably manufactured.
1/Itoya Over the 12 stories of its Ginza
emporium, Itoya carries every type of
paper imaginable. Entire floors are
dedicated to greeting cards, diaries,
postcards, and wrapping paper.
ito-ya.co.jp/ginza.
Hackney
Donlon Books (donlonbooks.com) is
very close to where I live, and has
a unique selection of fascinating
art and photography books. Conor
Donlon, the owner, is always going to
Japan and bringing back interesting
first editions. I recently bought a
kimono catalogue from the 1970s full
of little fabric swatches. Momosan
Shop (momosanshop.com) stocks
lovely objects and housewares, from
blown-glass vessels to locally made
ceramics. It’s the perfect place to find
a gift for someone. After a busy day, I
enjoy the roast chicken at Bistrotheque
(bistrotheque.com). It’s near Vyner
Street, which is where a lot of the best
modern art galleries are located. On a
Thursday night it’s packed with people
stopping by after an opening.
3/Globe Shop Tokyo This small
store specializes in globes, from
inflatable (and packable) versions,
for about $20, to the Diplomat—
illuminated, hand-finished, and priced
around $17,000. globe-shop.net.
4/Ubukeya A family-owned shop
that’s a shrine to tweezers, scissors,
and all things sharp. If you’re in the
market for something unlikely to make
it through airport security, such as a
kitchen knife (Ubukeya’s are prized
among New York City sushi chefs),
shipping is available. ubukeya.com.
5/Iwai Tsudura Ten A century ago,
there were more than 250 makers of
tsudura, the lacquered boxes used to
store kimonos, in Tokyo. Today there is
one. Ryoichi Iwai, who learned the craft
from his father, weaves each box
himself. Prices range from $86 to
$400. tsudura.com.
Nihonbashi
district
4
2
3
Imperial
Palace
1
Chuo-ku
SPOTLIGHT: ERDEM The fashion label’s flagship store at 70 South Audley Street in
Mayfair, which opened its doors in 2015, was designed by Moralioğlu’s fiancé, architect
Philip Joseph. A curving marble staircase unites the boutique’s two floors; works by
Hockney and Jean Cocteau are from Moralioğlu’s personal collection. But the true
showstoppers are the clothes: luxurious, inventive, appealingly exotic. erdem.com.
5
er
gem near the British Museum. It’s
been around since 1855. I draw all
of my designs, and I go there to
buy my sketchbooks, mechanical
and charcoal pencils, and watercolors
from a German paint supplier
called Schmincke.
Riv
wonderful mixture of new and vintage
books. It’s a stone’s throw from the
Erdem store, and I try to sneak in as
often as I can. The last time I was
there I bought a catalogue of David
Hockney drawings and a first-edition
Evelyn Waugh book.
Selfridges (selfridges.com) is a
London institution. It has everything
under one roof, from furniture to
luggage. And the most amazing food
hall. Drake’s (drakes.com) is my go-to
for clothing. It always has something
beautiful. I wear its tweed jackets
with a pair of slip-on Vans that my
fiancé bought me from Dover Street
Market (london.doverstreetmarket.
com) near Trafalgar Square, which
I admire for its incredible curation.
Also, on the top floor of Dover
Street is a branch of Labour & Wait
(labourandwait.co.uk), which carries
For art supplies, L. Cornelissen &
Son (cornelissen.com) is a hidden
da
C O U RTESY OF G RA I N SU RF B OAR D S
Mayfair/West End
Heywood Hill (heywoodhill.com) has a
Bloomsbury
2/Saruya Since 1704, the craftsmen
at Saruya have been carving the
humble toothpick from the wood of the
kuromoji tree. Don’t miss the painted
gift-box sets, which start at around
$17. nihonbashi-saruya.co.jp.
mi
I have so many things from Sigmar
(sigmarlondon.com). The owners, Nina
Hertig and Ebba Thott, collaborate
with the Viennese workshop of Carl
Aubock on some extraordinary pieces,
like a biomorphic ashtray. For the
Erdem flagship store I picked up a
wicker chair by Nanna Ditzel and a
bent-plywood chair by Alvar Aalto.
a fantastic collection of practical
household objects.
Reporting by Lila Battis,
Jacqueline Gifford, Samantha
Neugebauer, Siobhan Reid,
Jason Sheeler, Michael Snyder,
and Peter Terzian.
Su
Chelsea
Why
Germany’s
Most
Fascinating
City Is...
In the German metropolis where Bach wrote cantatas and Martin Luther
challenged the church, Jeff Chu finds a new generation of cultural provocateurs molding
this city into one of Germany’s most dynamic and welcoming destinations.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY ÉRIVER HIJANO
Leipzig, Germany, has a
surprising number of green
spaces, including ClaraZetkin-Park, which borders the
Elsterflutbett River. Opposite:
Barfußgässchen, a restaurant
row in the city center.
82
travelandleisure.com
all I saw were
stolid brick walls. But when I walked through the
entrance and into the heart of this massive
complex, which fills 25 acres in western Leipzig,
I began to sense its story. Stylish young Germans
bounced by on bikes, scarves fluttering in their
wake. They popped into and out of a café in
one building and a large art-supply store on the
ground floor of another, stocking up on fuel
for their creativity.
The Spinnerei has long been a place of
imagining and making things destined for homes
and bodies elsewhere. This was once central
Europe’s largest cotton mill, where, from the
late 19th century and into the early 20th,
hundreds of thousands of spindles produced
countless yards of thread. As industry faded
with the fortunes of East Germany, the buildings
emptied—until they were rediscovered by
a new generation of entrepreneurs.
Manfred Mülhaupt was one of the first to
recognize the Spinnerei’s potential. He arrived
in the early 1990s, squatting with starving-artist
friends in one of the Spinnerei’s many disused
buildings. They rode bikes up and down its wide
hallways, painted by day, then danced all night.
“The first two, three, four years, we didn’t pay
anything,” he said. “Nothing was happening,
so you had enough time to do your work. If you
had a party, everyone would come because
Leipzig had no bars. No nothing.”
Today, the Spinnerei once again thrums with
creative life. It houses shops, a restaurant, worldclass art galleries, even an art-house cinema.
Sunlight streams through the cast-iron casement
windows, illuminating the work of the dozens
of artists and designers who have ateliers here,
including carpenters, sculptors, porcelain
makers, and several painters of the famed New
Leipzig School. You can even stay in the Spinnerei.
84
travelandleisure.com
I L LU ST RAT IO N S BY LU K E C HO IC E
OUTSIDE THE SPINNEREI,
Clockwise from top
left: The Spinnerei,
a textile mill that
now houses galleries
and shops; Hotel
Paris Syndrom by
artist Jun Yang,
one of two bookable
guest suites that
double as installations at the Museum
of Contemporary
Art Leipzig; travelers
can navigate the
city using the
historic, affordable
tram system.
Mülhaupt has carved out a four-room guesthouse,
the Meisterzimmer, from rooms where he and
his friends once squatted. I delighted in the
numerous original details he has retained—
heavy doors, bathroom fixtures, and pieces of
furniture salvaged from the old factory.
Like the Spinnerei, Leipzig has found new
vigor. Twenty-five years ago, it, along with most
of the former German Democratic Republic,
was in economic shambles. Over the decade
after the fall of the Soviet Union, it lost
nearly half its population. Tens of thousands
of buildings sat empty, including massive
factories, gracious Art Nouveau villas,
and late-19th-century apartment houses
with Renaissance- and Gothic-style flourishes.
But Leipzig, the largest city in the eastern
state of Saxony, has grown faster than any other
in Germany, adding more than 100,000 residents
since 2000. (Its total population is now 570,000.)
Magnetism has downsides. Over the past
few years, the influx of artists and the city’s
affordability have led outsiders to proclaim
Leipzig “the new Berlin.” Many locals I talked
to found that insulting. Why was Berlin—
which is just over an hour away by high-speed
train—the measure of a German city’s worth?
Soon Leipzig had another, even worse nickname,
popularized by the mainstream media: “Hypezig,”
a sign of growing discomfort with and backlash
against its recent appeal.
This represents both Leipzig’s opportunity
and its risk. It became popular because it was so
unpopular. The city has a reputation for being
less insular and more welcoming than, say,
Munich or Berlin, but it doesn’t necessarily share
its secrets easily. “Leipzig is not really about
buildings or institutions,” Mülhaupt explained.
“It’s the people. It’s their ideas. It’s their
willingness to try something out.”
To visit Leipzig now is to experience an
urban work in progress, one that is less
of a rise and more of a resurrection. In this
city that fostered Bach, Mendelssohn, Goethe,
and Nietzsche, the centuries-old spirit of
experimentation and the enduring ethos of
possibility seem stronger than ever. Leipzig’s
driving force is hospitality—to new ideas,
to new creativity, to new people. And none of
To visit Leipzig now is to experience
an urban work in progress. Its
driving force is hospitality—to new ideas,
new creativity, and new people.
this is a departure from its rich history.
Indeed, it’s on that venerable foundation
that contemporary Leipzig is building
its modern magic.
L
E IP Z IG SIT S at a historic crossroads. In
the Middle Ages, it rose to prominence as a
trading hub at the intersection of the Via
Regia, a major east-west transcontinental route,
and the Via Imperii, a north-south thoroughfare.
“The main reason for Leipzig becoming
what it is today is its history,” said photographer
Jörg Dietrich, who makes panoramic photos
86
travelandleisure.com
of cityscapes. As we strolled the streets,
he deciphered the histories knit into the
surroundings for me. The picturesque, kayakfriendly canals? Part of an unfulfilled
19th-century plan to connect Leipzig’s landlocked
factories with Hamburg’s seaport, 250 miles
away. The necklace of lakes offering sailing and
sandy beaches just a half-hour’s bike ride from
Leipzig’s center? Open-pit coal mines,
deliberately flooded over the past 20 years to
transform the scars of the industrial past into
recreation areas. The Fockeberg, a verdant,
500-foot hill providing sweeping views? World
From far left:
Fashion designers
Eva Howitz and Frieder
Weissbach picnic with
Weissbach’s husband
on the Cospudener
See, a man-made
lake; a room at
Meisterzimmer, a
guesthouse in the
Spinnerei; patrons of
Das Japanische Haus,
a community center.
War II rubble—remnants of the Reich, piled
up and planted over to create a pastoral idyll.
Leipzig’s location also made it a nexus for
the spread of new technologies and ideas.
Its university, Germany’s second oldest, was
founded in 1409; Goethe and Nietzsche were both
alumni. The world’s first daily newspaper began
publication here in 1650. In the late 19th and
early 20th centuries, Leipzig became an industrial
giant—hence the Spinnerei—as well as a rail
hub; its central station is Europe’s largest
terminal. “Without this history, we wouldn’t have
these spaces,” Dietrich said.
Another era’s loss presaged this one’s gain.
Take the Museum of Contemporary Art Leipzig,
which, fittingly, puts stories of the past in
conversation with the art and social concerns
of the present day. Established after Germany’s
reunification, the museum occupies a lush citycenter estate that pairs a villa built for a scientist
in 1892 with a strikingly modern annex added
in 2004. Accessibility was drafted into the
architecture. The single-level annex has no stairs,
just a gently sloped ramp, and giant windows
on the side face the busy Karl-Tauchnitz-Straße.
“It’s a teaser. It says something to people outside.
It’s about transparency,” curator Julia Schäfer
told me. Until art was displayed in those
windows, some passers-by mistook the building
for a car dealership.
During my visit, the museum was preparing
for its spring 2018 exhibition, “Gaudiopolis,”
which uses the City of Joy, a utopian experiment
involving refugee orphans in 1940s Budapest,
as its springboard. It deploys art to ask what
compassion, democracy, and joy might look like
in our times. In the past, the museum has
commissioned work reflecting Leipzig’s
evolving social realities: a 2015 film by Viennese
artist Anna Witt focuses on a recent refugee
from Syria who came to live in Leipzig, as well
as one who fled East Germany in the 1980s.
“The point is not to put art on a pedestal
or to see it as a masterpiece,” Schäfer said.
“It’s to make connections.”
The curatorial staff also uses the space to
cultivate community. The museum sits across
the street from the famed Academy of Visual
Arts and engages students in collaborations. An
old stable houses a piano school. And in 2010
and 2012, two former studios were redecorated
by artists and converted into guest suites, making
this perhaps the only museum in the world
that doubles as an inn. “There’s no room service,”
Schäfer said. “But there’s art!”
is blooming,” composer
Robert Schumann wrote in 1840. He
described his adopted hometown of Leipzig
as a musical garden rivaling those of Europe’s
greatest cities. That musical tradition continues.
One need only wander the city to experience it.
In one afternoon, I heard: A busking violinist
G
ERM AN M USIC
who couldn’t have been more than 10 years old
playing a Bach gavotte on the busy Petersstraße,
a pedestrianized shopping street; a children’s
a cappella choir in the market square; a pianist
practicing scales—up and down, up and
down—in a residential neighborhood; and horns
blaring out of a fourth-floor window of the
conservatory founded by Mendelssohn in 1843.
In the mid 1700s, merchants and civic leaders
created a musical ensemble for their own
entertainment. Prior to that, nearly all European
orchestras had been assembled as amusements
for royalty or aristocracy; this one was for the
people, and its first venue was a tavern. Eventually,
the orchestra moved into the Gewandhaus—
the “garment house,” used by textile traders—
88
travelandleisure.com
and was renamed for that space in 1781.
Today, the Gewandhausorchester is one of
the world’s premier orchestras. It will mark
its 275th anniversary this year by welcoming
Latvian conducting dynamo Andris Nelsons
as its new Gewandhauskapellmeister. Its
radical accessibility endures. You can hear
Gewandhausorchester musicians perform nearly
every Saturday at 3 p.m. in central Leipzig’s
Thomaskirche, accompanying the church’s
famed boys’ choir. Admission is just $2.50.
J. S. Bach served as choir director here for
27 years. Fittingly, the Saturday programs
spotlight his work—a rare opportunity to hear
classical music performed in the space for which
it was written. One Saturday, I crammed myself
into a crowded pew in the Gothic sanctuary,
which has been largely unchanged for five
centuries. What history this space has witnessed:
on Pentecost Sunday in 1539, Martin Luther, who
had already been excommunicated from the
Roman Catholic Church, preached a sermon here.
As the first bars of a Bach motet filled the
space, tears came to my eyes, which surprised
me. I grew up playing Bach. But it took years
Clockwise from top
left: Visitors can rent
canoes to explore
Leipzig’s many
canals, including
Karl-Heine; a gallery
at the Museum of
Contemporary Art
Leipzig; “bondage,”
a dish at the
restaurant Falco that
includes veal tongue,
langoustine, and
wasabi ganache.
for rehearsal’s agony to mature into something
approaching appreciation, and I still summon
the anxiety more quickly than the joy.
The piece they were playing, based on the
149th Psalm’s opening lines, is called Singet
dem Herrn ein neues Lied: Sing to the Lord a new
song. It debuted in 1727, early in Bach’s tenure,
when he was still building his reputation. He
hadn’t even been the church’s first choice for the
job—or its second.
I imagined a bewigged Bach testing his new
composition on the congregation with hopeful
anticipation. I scanned the diverse crowd.
Afternoon light streamed through the stainedglass windows to dance on an elderly man’s
dampened cheeks. In front of him, a middleaged couple sat, hands interlaced, her head
tucked into his neck and shoulder. Two young
men, dressed more for a nightclub than a
church, stared at the ribbed ceiling.
The Gewandhausorchester musicians’
contracts require them to perform not only in
the symphony hall and the opera house but
also in the Thomaskirche. The experience feels
sacred to them, too. “You are playing this piece
composed by Bach where he may have written
it,” said Turkish-born violinist Kivanç Tire when
I met him and violist Tahlia Petrosian after
the concert. “Bach is our god!”
Entrepreneurial, not divine, inspiration led
Petrosian to launch a series of musical afterparties called Klassik Underground. She wanted
to give visiting soloists an opportunity to play
in a different setting, and stars including Joshua
Bell have accepted her invitation. Once every
month or so, soon after the symphony packs up
its instruments at the concert hall, some of the
musicians reconvene 20 yards away, in the
Moritzbastei. These ancient cellars, remnants
of Leipzig’s 16th-century fortifications, have
been converted into a cultural center.
Tickets are just $12, and the format is
decidedly experimental. For last June’s Klassik
Underground concert, soprano Christina
Landshamer sang a Bach cantata accompanied
by both Gewandhausorchester musicians
and images created by Leipzig-based painter
Tilo Baumgärtel, which were projected onto
the Moritzbastei’s walls and vaulted ceilings.
Petrosian uses technology to spread the
music’s reach; every show is recorded on video,
then posted online.
“There are lots of opportunities in Leipzig that
you wouldn’t have elsewhere. From that
standpoint, it doesn’t get better,” said Petrosian,
who is Australian. “In bigger cities, it would be
very diicult to do projects on the side—and you
wouldn’t be as revered as you are here.”
(Continued on page 98)
GERMANY
Leipzig
A CULTURAL TOUR OF LEIPZIG
Art and music lovers are spoiled for choice in this
thriving, progressive city, perfect for a three- or four-day visit.
GETTING THERE
EAT & DRINK
While there are no nonstop flights
from the U.S. to Leipzig/Halle
Airport, you can connect via
Frankfurt or Munich on Lufthansa
(lufthansa.com). Deutsche Bahn
(bahn.com) operates high-speed
nonstop train service from Berlin
that takes about 75 minutes.
Falco (falco-leipzig.de; tasting
menus from $55), in the Westin
Hotel, has several set menus
that range in price but all feature
Peter Maria Schnurr’s playful
contemporary European cuisine.
For something more casual,
Pekar (wir-sind-pekar.de; entrées
$7–$12) serves seasonally
driven small plates and pizzas.
For a drink, try Rudi (rudi-bar.de);
the selection of German gins
is excellent.
GETTING AROUND
The historic center is easily
walkable. To get to the Plagwitz
and Lindenau neighborhoods,
where most art galleries are
located, as well as East Leipzig,
home to the newest bars
and boutiques, I relied on the
efficient tram and bus network
(most rides cost $3 each;
a one-day pass is $9).
LODGING
I stayed at the discreet Luxury
Collection property Hotel
Fürstenhof Leipzig (hotel
fuerstenhofleipzig.com; doubles
from $187), Leipzig’s take on the
traditional European grande dame.
Built in the 1770s as a home for
a wealthy family, it was converted
into a hotel in the 1880s; everyone
from Marlene Dietrich to rockers
AC/DC has checked in. The
Meisterzimmer (meisterzimmer.
de; doubles from $112) is a fourapartment pensione carved out
of onetime industrial space
in the Spinnerei complex. The
apartments have soaring ceilings
and massive windows, but
beware, there are no curtains or
shades yet—I loved the light in
the afternoon, not so much in the
morning. You can also book one
of the two suites at the Museum
of Contemporary Art Leipzig
(gfzk.de; doubles from $149),
considered to be art installations
in the museum’s collection. One,
created by Chinese-Austrian artist
Jun Yang, explores themes of
counterfeiting and imitation; the
other, by Berlin-based American
artist Christine Hill, is inspired
by the motifs of a hardware store.
EXPERIENCES
Most Saturdays at 3 p.m.,
you can hear the famed
St. Thomas Boys Choir and
the Gewandhausorchester
performing a Bach cantata at the
Thomaskirche (thomaskirche.
org). In Plagwitz, the Spinnerei
(spinnerei.de) has numerous
galleries, shops, and a restaurant;
guided tours of the complex
are offered on Fridays and
Saturdays. The Klassik
Underground (klassikunder
ground.de) is where top classical
musicians perform after hours.
The Museum of Contemporary
Art includes works by Leipzigtrained painters such as Neo
Rauch but also Americans Sarah
Sze and Dan Peterman.
Leipzigers are rightly proud
of their parks. Rent a bike
from one of the many Nextbike
stations ($1 per 30 minutes,
capped at $11 for a full day).
A 30-minute ride south on
dedicated trails will bring you
to Nordstrand, the beach on
the northern shore of the
Cospudener See. A seven-mile
path circles the lake, and there
are restaurants both on the
beach and at the Pier 1 marina.
You can also rent a kayak ($7 an
hour or $44 a day) or a canoe
($12 an hour, $62 a day) at Leipzig
Harbor (Stadthafen). Go north
along the canals to Plagwitz,
or south via the Elsterflutbett to
the Cospudener See. — J.C.
The Empire Builder
crosses the Two Medicine
River, on the eastern edge
of Montana’s Glacier
National Park.
AMERICAN
BEAUTY
On a family trip to Montana’s Glacier
National Park—via the Empire
Builder, one of the country’s most
beloved long-distance train routes—
John Jeremiah Sullivan discovers
the grandeur of the rapidly changing
Western wilderness.
travelandleisure.com
91
Swiftcurrent Glacier,
as seen from a hiking
trail in Glacier
National Park.
rented a house in Montana for the summer
and invited my family and me to visit. In an
e-mail containing information on nearby airports they
wrote, “The train is also an option.” Amtrak has a line that
goes from Chicago to the Pacific Northwest, terminating in
either Portland or Seattle. It passes through Glacier
National Park, a few hours away from the house. There’s a
train station on the eastern edge of the park.
I wasn’t sure I had ever seen a real glacier. In Iceland
once, maybe? My doubt suggests how present I was for the
experience. This would certainly be my first sober-ish
glacier. Plus I love trains. Over the past four or five years
I’ve been taking the train back and forth between my home
in North Carolina and New York City. I get a sleeper. The
cost is less than a last-minute plane ticket. I board at Rocky
Mount, a country station, around 2 a.m., then immediately
lie down and read myself to sleep. An hour before I reach
New York, they wake me up to let me know breakfast is
ready. I sit over my coffee and eggs and watch the fields and
old brick buildings of northern New Jersey go by, and it
could be any decade of the past 150 years.
Amtrak’s name for the Chicago-to-Pacific-Northwest
line is the Empire Builder. When I looked it up on the Web,
I found a Reuters headline that read: “To see why Amtrak is
bleeding money, hop aboard its rumbling Midwestern
‘Empire Builder’ train.” That suggested a skeeviness that
appealed to me. If it’s retro travel you’re after, you have to
maintain a taste for skeeviness. But the accompanying
article turned out to be about how the line, which began
operating in 1929 as part of the Great Northern Railway, is
losing money despite increased ridership. In this way, the
Empire Builder is an emblem of the fading fortunes of
92
travelandleisure.com
P RE V IO US S P RE A D : J USTI N F RA N Z . T H IS PAG E : C HR I STOP H E R SI MP S ON
A
L I T T L E W H I L E AG O COL L EG E F R I ENDS
94
travelandleisure.com
GLACIER
NATIONAL PARK
Montana
North
Dakota
Minnesota
Lake
Superior
Portland
and Seattle
Michigan
Wisconsin
HOW TO TAKE THE TRAIN TO GLACIER NATIONAL PARK
Lake
Michigan
C H R ISTO PH E R S IM PS ON
GETTING THERE
Glacier National Park
is accessible by
Amtrak’s 2,206-mile
Empire Builder
route, which travels
between Chicago and
Seattle or Portland,
Oregon. A range of
cabin options
includes compact but
comfortable family
bedrooms that sleep
up to four. The dining
area serves such
satisfying dishes as
mussels in white wine
and steak béarnaise.
amtrak.com; one-way
sleeper car suites
from $260.
Lake Josephine,
one of the many
glacially carved
lakes in Glacier
National Park.
THE PARK
Occupying more than
1 million acres in the
northwestern corner
of Montana, Glacier
National Park is a
paradise of mountain
lakes, secluded
campgrounds, and
745 miles of hiking
trails. Disembark the
train between April
and October at East
Glacier Park Village,
the gateway town to
the park’s eastern
edge; the rest of the
year, the train stops
at Browning, a short
drive away. nps.gov;
high-season entrance
fees from $15.
LODGES
Three-story tree
trunks surround the
lobby of Glacier Park
Lodge (glacierpark
collection.com;
doubles from $159).
Built in 1913, the
hotel is charming and
well-maintained. An
hour north is St. Mary
Lodge & Resort
(glacierparkcollection.
com; doubles from
$119). In addition to
the busy, friendly
Great Bear Lodge—
which has a firstclass restaurant—
the property just
introduced 10
“tiny homes.”
ACTIVITIES
Glacier Park Boat
Company has been
sailing the area’s
many glacial lakes
since 1938. Its tour
of St. Mary Lake takes
passengers around
much-photographed
Wild Goose Island
while showing off the
panorama of
surrounding peaks.
Tack on a guided hike
to nearby Baring Falls
free of charge.
glacierparkboats.
com; adult fares
from $27.50.
— Hannah Walhout
American rail travel. An important early line
connecting the Midwest to the West, it tracks part
of the Lewis and Clark Trail. In its heyday, it
represented American, well, empire—not to
mention the idea that there was no better way of
viewing the country than from the comfort of a
rail car. It’s worth noting that the current
administration has proposed discontinuing
Amtrak’s long-distance routes, including the
Empire Builder. For this storied journey, the end
of the line could be near.
As we got ready to board in Chicago’s
Union Station, the first thing I noticed was
the Mennonites. Loads of them. They gathered
together, easily a dozen families, or possibly
one very large extended family. These were
Old Order Mennonites who wore the plain
homespun clothes of an 18th-century Central
European farmer—blues and blacks and whites,
hats and bonnets. They had calm, friendly
expressions. I found myself studying their faces
CHICAGO
Illinois
and translucent eyes. My rude staring did not
keep me from hissing at my two daughters
whenever I caught them looking. A crucial part
of parenthood is being okay with hypocrisy.
Amtrak calls the compartment we had the
Family Bedroom. Its design is truly ingenious.
It’s the size of a closet but it fit the four of us
comfortably, or at least comfortably enough that
we actually slept. Two of the four beds come
down from the walls, above the other two, like
the flaps of a cardboard box. During the day you
can push them up and use the bottom two as
couches. Card table, window. I won’t lie: it was
tight. After a few days you would start to lose
your mind. But for a few days? Much fun.
The train has two levels, like a double-decker
bus. On top are the observation and dining
areas. Two of us were generally up there while
the other two were in our compartment, making
the close quarters more doable. Invariably we
passed Mennonites on the
(Continued on page 100)
travelandleisure.com
95
(Ecuador, continued from page 72)
n my third morning in town, I
was greeted in the lobby of Casa
Gangotena by Klaus-Peter
Fielsch, a tall, affable Quito native who
works for Metropolitan Touring. He
had come to take me to Mashpi Lodge,
an upscale eco-hotel in the cloud forest
at the northwestern edge of Quito’s
expansive municipal boundary, which
runs far outside the central city. The
four-hour drive passed through the
same shape-shifting land I’d seen days
earlier from above. As we followed the
vertiginous mountain roads along the
spine of the Andes, deciduous trees
were replaced by towering palms and
the crisp, cool air turned swampy.
“And yet, technically speaking, we
are now traveling from summer to
winter!” Fielsch laughed as we
passed the Ciudad Mitad del Mundo,
where a vaguely Brutalist monument
on the equatorial line marks the center
of the world. (Constructed before GPS
technology, it is technically a few
degrees off the mark.) Paved roads
soon gave way to dirt. Suddenly,
Fielsch brought the van to a halt.
“Look!” he said in a shouted whisper. A
scarlet king snake was slithering off
the road into the forest. “Keep in mind
that you are still in Quito,” he told me.
Arriving at Mashpi was an
experience in itself, the muddy, axlerattling road opening up to a sleek
structure of sharp angles and soaring
glass walls that could have been
airlifted from the Hollywood Hills. The
hotel was developed by Roque Sevilla,
the preservation-minded former
mayor of Quito, on a 3,200-acre site
previously owned by a logging
company. It sits within one of the
world’s most biodiverse regions, the
Chocó rain forest, which snakes from
Panama through Colombia to northern
Ecuador. Since it opened six years ago,
Mashpi has played an integral role in
O
96
travelandleisure.com
raising the profile of Ecuador’s
mainland. “It will never be a Galapágossize economy—nothing will,” Fielsch
told me. “But, more and more, we have
visitors who want to do both.”
Mashpi doesn’t stint on luxury:
there’s a day spa, a bar with floor-toceiling windows onto the prodigious
vegetation outside, and a world-class
restaurant specializing in inventive
takes on the Ecuadorian staples I’d
sampled a few days earlier at the
Mercado San Francisco. Having such a
lavish base camp from which to explore
the wonders of the forest made the next
three days a sublime blur. Returning to
the lodge after long days spent traipsing
about in rubber boots never got old: the
warm towel waiting at the door, the hot
shower in the minimalist room, the
supple bed on which I sank nightly into
a deep slumber, the experience of
waking to the singsong of the many
species of birds that inhabit the forest.
One morning, I sat hypnotized on a
bench in the hummingbird garden
watching hundreds of birds dart about,
their iridescent wings flashing like
sparklers in the mist. Later I took a
hike that culminated with a revitalizing
dip in a waterfall. On another hike, I
discovered a family of toucans fighting
over plantains. At nightfall, guides led
guests on walks around the grounds,
showing them wildlife in the beams of
their flashlights. I saw neon-bright
frogs, a tarantula, an iguana, and a
lemon-colored vine snake resting on a
steroidal fern leaf.
After getting to know the forest
from the ground, I spent my final
morning at Mashpi seeing it from
above, riding the lodge’s recently
launched Dragonfly, an open-air cable
car that carries guests for more than a
mile above the tree canopy. Though
completed during the construction of
the hotel, its opening was delayed for
years because of bureaucratic
wrangling. The experience was a
lower-altitude version of the helicopter
ride—a chance to observe Ecuador’s
primeval landscape from the vantage
point of a pterodactyl.
hile wandering Quito’s streets
earlier in the week, I’d noticed
the many small shops devoted
to “ancestral medicine” that Quiteños
frequent to buy potions and undergo
W
healing treatments. I’d been too
intimidated to enter, but after my time
in the forest, I felt more acclimated
to the city’s strange fusion between
the civilized and natural worlds. So
on my last day in town, I stopped in
to one for an assessment of my soul.
The healer who ran the shop, a
wizened woman with a beaming
smile, looked me up and down before
declaring that I had some “dark
energy” that needed purging. Without
going into detail, suice it to say that
her diagnosis mirrored that of my
therapist’s. She led me to a nook that
could have been an interrogation
chamber—concrete walls, exposed
lightbulb dangling from a cord—and
told me to strip to my underwear.
As she rubbed my skin with a
mysterious bundle of herbs and
flowers, my whole body began to itch.
The main ingredient, it turned out,
was stinging nettle. Pointing at the
constellation of small bumps breaking
out on my arms, I voiced concern in
my pidgin Spanish. She was unfazed.
“Bueno!” she said, explaining, as best I
could decipher, that this was the dark
energy rising to the surface.
If so, there sure was a lot of it. By
the time I got dressed, my entire body
was a continuous welt from the neck
down, and I felt as if I were on fire.
Walking around in a daze, I began to
worry that my desire to savor Quito’s
authenticity was going to end in
anaphylactic shock. But within about
an hour the welts were gone, just as the
healer had promised. As for the dark
energy? For the rest of the day, and
long into my last night in the city, I
found myself bathed in a rare calm.
David Amsden is editor at large for
Travel + Leisure. He last wrote for the
magazine about Telluride, Colorado.
Content in this issue was produced
with assistance from Amanyangyun;
Bermuda Tourism Authority;
Capella Shanghai, Jian Ye Li; Casa
Gangotena; Coral Caye; Hamilton
Princess & Beach Club; Hotel
Fürstenhof Leipzig, a Luxury Collection
Hotel; The Loren; Mahogany Bay
Resort & Beach Club; Mashpi Lodge;
Metropolitan Touring; Naia Resort &
Spa; and Rosewood Bermuda.
(Leipzig, continued from page 89)
L
ATER THAT NIGHT, I visited Horns
Erben, a bar and music venue in
a converted distillery south of the
city center. Claudius Bruns, a writer
and cabaret singer who manages
Horns Erben and lives upstairs, was a
pioneer in reincarnating old industrial
spaces into new gathering places,
a practice that continues today in the
bars, restaurants, and clubs that are
constantly popping up across the city.
When Bruns moved in, much
of the Horns Erben space hadn’t been
updated since the early 20th century;
there were old toilets and ancient
heaters in the rooms. Today, the
woodwork gleams. Industrial-grade
carpets were stripped away, revealing
original floorboards. Behind a wall,
Bruns discovered an Art Deco door.
The building’s various closets and
crannies are still giving up artifacts
from Germany’s fraught last century:
Weimar-era glass bottles; a box of
cigarettes from the 1940s; and most
recently, a cache of 1970s East German
posters giving instructions for what to
do in an American nuclear attack.
Horns Erben’s rich past inspired
Bruns to stage a monthly improvtheater show in the upstairs bar. He
calls the genre “improvised history
theater.” The series riffs on a fictional
bar’s communal life through the
decades, beginning in 1920. Each show
examines three months of German
history. They’re now into the 1950s.
The wartime shows, Bruns told me,
were especially intense: “The actors
would say, ‘Willkommen! Heil Hitler!
I’m glad the Jews aren’t here
anymore.’ ” The audience was
unsettled. The performers strained to
stay in character. “It felt so weird in
this room, which is not a new room.
We assume in that time there were
some Nazis here. At the same time,
it’s history. It’s not strangling us.”
98
travelandleisure.com
In 2017 Bruns created another
improv show about fascists’
reemergence in contemporary
Germany. “We can’t pretend they’re
not there,” he said. Indeed: in
September, when Germans reelected
the centrist (and Leipzig University
alumna) Angela Merkel as chancellor,
they also sent far-right representatives
to the Reichstag for the first time since
the Nazi era. Here in Saxony, the
populist, anti-immigrant far right
garnered more than a quarter of the
vote. In some parts of the state, it
tallied 35 percent—more than
anywhere else in Germany. “It’s so
frightening,” Bruns says. “I thought
we had overcome.”
T CAN BE HARD to square such
xenophobic impulses with the
insistent testimony I heard from
locals, transplants, and visitors alike
that Leipzig is an uncommonly open
German city. One afternoon, I met
local fashion figures Eva Howitz and
Frieder Weissbach for drinks. Their
footwear and clothing designs,
bearing the Howitzweissbach label,
blend the region’s craft traditions—
shoemaking in nearby Weißenfels,
textile work from the village of
Jahnsdorf—with sculptural and
architectural forms taught in
Leipzig’s academies. Howitz and
Weissbach ignore the conventional
fashion-season calendar, and their
work, which has a particularly strong
following in Australia and Kuwait,
sits defiantly outside their industry’s
mainstream. In Leipzig, they feel free
of both the commercial pressures
of the larger fashion scene in Berlin
and the cultural conservatism of
surrounding Saxony. “Leipzig is a bit
of an island. We have a heterogeneity
you can feel,” Weissbach said, citing
the city’s inspirational mix of
students, artists, entrepreneurs, and
musicians. “You’re quickly a friend
when you come here,” Howitz added.
This is the Leipzig I encountered.
Such eagerness to please often
manifests in unconventional ways,
including at the table. Take Falco, the
only restaurant with two Michelin
stars in the former East Germany
outside Berlin. Chef Peter Maria
Schnurr does serve an elaborate,
$308 eight-course tasting menu,
I
which includes a knowingly
ostentatious dish-as-socialcommentary called “high roller”—
an assemblage that includes raw
scallops, Royal caviar, hazelnut oil,
and lovage. But the governing ethos
of the restaurant, which sits on the
Westin Hotel’s 27th floor and is
named for the falcons that nest
outside its windows, is decidedly
more egalitarian. It offers a more
modest $123 prix fixe and, in the
bar, a $55 one. If that’s still too dear,
“come spend 12 euros and have
dessert,” said Schnurr, an ebullient
character so determined to push
against fine dining’s conventions that
he once outfitted his servers in hoodies
and red Adidas tracksuit pants.
You’ll find a similarly hospitable
spirit on the other side of town at Das
Japanische Haus (“the Japanese
House”), a community center
established in 2011 by Fukuoka-born
architect Noriko Minkus. Many
buildings in Leipzig’s east remain
unrenovated. Graiti abounds.
Gentrification worries Minkus, but
rents are still affordable for spaces
like Das Japanische Haus.
The name understates Das
Japanische Haus’s mission: it gathers
people from all nations. At 4 p.m.
every Thursday and Saturday, dozens
meet to cook a communal meal.
(Come at 6 if you just want to eat.
There’s no set price; you pay what you
can afford. The Haus is supported by
donations and grants.) Minkus
showed me the sign-in sheet from the
most recent dinner. The attendees
listed their homelands: Germany and
Japan, of course, but also more than
30 other countries, including Syria,
the U.S., and Botswana.
“The concept is to cook and eat
together,” said Minkus, a relentlessly
cheerful figure. Not everyone
converses easily; the most common
language is English, not German.
The menu is usually vegan, to assuage
as many dietary concerns as possible.
“Everybody can cut vegetables.
Everybody gets hungry. Everybody
is welcome,” she said, echoing a nowfamiliar refrain. “Everybody.”
Jeff Chu has written for Fast Company
and is a frequent contributor to
Travel + Leisure.
(Montana, continued from page 95)
narrow staircases. They were
exceptionally polite about staircase
etiquette, backing up so the other
person could pass. And quiet. At
dinner, for instance, their tables were
so silent that I felt the need to control
my voice, so that I wouldn’t ruin their
dinners with my godless yakking.
But it wasn’t hard to keep the talk
down. I mean, the scenario was quite
dramatic. I was sitting there having a
not-disgusting steak and a notdisgusting bottle of wine, as the train
blasted through the prairie at high
speed. Through the windows I could
see the American sky opening up, the
horizon receding. My chest heaved.
We had put on nice clothes for the
meal. I looked around—others had
done the same. Everybody was
smiling. We were all invested in the
experience of this train ride, which
has something to do with a certain
vision of America. I tried not to
analyze it, knowing it would go poof
on inspection.
The train goes more than
2,200 miles, northwest through
Minneapolis and Fargo, North Dakota,
then west over the glacial plain, into
and across Montana. An epic journey,
but the land is not all pretty. On that
first evening, the train stopped
somewhere in southern Minnesota
for a smoke break. I asked the woman
from Amtrak who was in charge of
our car about the Mennonites. Were
there always so many? Not always
this many, she said, but there were
often a lot. They were ideal
passengers. The same could not be
said, she lamented, for some of the
fracking miners who rode the train
to and from the fields in the north.
And who were the Mennonites?
I asked her. Why did they ride this
train all the time? I don’t know why
I cared so much.
100
travelandleisure.com
She said they had communities
all along the line. Maybe they’d
settled in these areas to be close to the
train’s path? She wasn’t sure. The
Mennonites are a communal people.
Getting together, having reunions,
is crucial. If a family in a far-flung
community wants to build a house or
has just welcomed a baby and is about
to baptize it, their extended relations
in other towns come and stay for
weeks or a month. It wasn’t that they
were expected to or that they were
exceptionally generous. It was a
rhythm in their way of life.
s promised, there was a train
station called East Glacier Park
at the edge of the park, about 40
miles south of the Canadian border.
We disembarked. Directly in front of
us, surrounded by an expansive green
lawn, stood Glacier Park Lodge, where
we would spend the night. It hinted at
a cozy relationship between corporate
interests and the state. In fact,
Glacier’s very existence is due in no
small part to the efforts of the Great
Northern Railway, which built up the
original tourist infrastructure and
lobbied the government to establish
the national park. But I don’t mean
“cozy” in a bad way. The idea of a
major passenger train taking you
straight into a national park and
letting you out there and not trying
to sell you anything—I didn’t know
we did that in America.
There weren’t many people
climbing off with us. From childhood
I have associated national parks
with crowds and, consequently,
unpleasantness. But unlike at
Yellowstone or Yosemite, Glacier’s
attendance rates are quite low. We
were there for five days in summer
and we hardly waited in a line.
Family fun aside, we had come to
see glaciers. The next day we rented a
car at a counter in the general store
and drove an hour north. We checked
in to St. Mary Lodge and a little while
later took a boat trip on St. Mary Lake.
The wooden boat was something like
100 years old. The captain was a cute,
young kid, with curly blond hair like a
surfer. He knew his stuff, though. He
started talking about the hills around
us. It was surprising how many were
visibly scarred by something: fires,
A
blight, insects. Some of it was the
natural cycle of forests, he said, but
much was new and worrisome. We
could see the evidence, yet enough
undamaged vistas remained that he
could give a tour of nature’s beauty.
This gave me a sense of America’s
vastness, but also its fragility.
Soon, the captain said, we would
come in sight of a real glacier, Sexton
Glacier. It would be visible on a
mountainside. He told us a little
about what glaciers are. There were
snowfields all through the mountains
around us. I had sort of assumed we’d
been seeing glaciers the whole time.
But, as the captain explained, there are
real and technical differences between
a giant snowfield on a mountain and a
bona fide glacier. A glacier forms when
snow turns to ice through a process of
seasonal deposition and compaction.
As new layers of snow mount, the
lower layers change into a dense,
tightly packed ice called firn. After
many decades, the firn fuses into a
glacier, which then starts to spread
outward like a liquid. It moves slowly,
over eons, but as invincibly as a tidal
wave. Glaciers don’t just come and go,
in other words. They are part of the
earth’s long seasons, the ones that
last hundreds, or hundreds of
thousands, of years.
“It’s estimated,” the captain said,
“that the glaciers in Glacier National
Park will all be gone by about 2030.”
Murmuring stopped. Everyone
sat there stunned.
As in, about 15 years from now?
“That’s what the scientists say,”
the captain said.
I looked at my daughters, the backs
of their heads next to each other above
the back rest in front of us. This was
probably the only time they would see
glaciers in their own country. It is
deeply strange, to be living in the time
when all of this becomes real. Even
writing this, I want to tell myself to
cheer up and not put it so starkly, but
the facts are stark. In the 19th century
there were more than 100 glaciers in
the park. Today there are 25. It is
happening fast.
“2030?” came out of someone’s
mouth, equal parts incredulity
and concern.
“I know,” the young captain said.
We sailed around a curve in the
PROMOTION
ONBOARD
+ e ve nt s
+ promot ion s
+ of fe r s
VENICE FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL
JW MARRIOTT VENICE
RESORT & SPA, ITALY
MAY 3-6, 2018
TRAVEL + LEISURE’S
GREAT ADVENTURES
Travel + Leisure, in partnership with luxury
travel partner Butterfield & Robinson, is
thrilled to present our Great Adventure
series: Join us to explore Lima—the
culinary capital of South America—or
iconic Machu Pichu, with an immersive
experience that reveals the magic of Peru.
Join us for the inaugural Venice
Food & Wine Festival at the award-winning
JW Marriott Venice Resort & Spa. Savor
exclusive epicurean events showcasing the
finest Italian cuisine, wine and spirits, and
Veneto tradition. Immerse yourself in cooking
demos, interactive classes, and tastings—all
in the company of internationally celebrated
chefs and wine experts.
For more information and tickets,
visit jwvenicefoodandwine.com
#jwvenicefw #jwtreatment
To book your trip and learn more, visit
butterfield.com/TL-Great-Adventures
PRIVATE ACCESS FOR
WINE LOVERS
Joining is free and easy! Enter your email
address and zip code for Members Only
access to top local producers and
exclusively imported wines with preferred
pricing at up to 70% of retail. Benefits
include access to our Premier Concierge
team for any questions and wines are
shipped when you want them. Our Palate
Guarantee™ covers each bottle you buy. If
you don’t love it, we’ll credit you!
invino.com
T R AV E L A N D L E I S U R E .CO M / P R O M O/C H E C K- I N /
(Montana, continued from page 100)
lake, and the glacier came into view.
“This is Sexton Glacier,” the captain
said. We all turned and saw. It was not
an especially large glacier, but a thrill
ran through us anyhow. We were
spotting a white whale. It shone in
the blue air.
There is an interesting upside to
the retreat of the glaciers, if the end
of the world can be said to possess an
upside. The melting ice both reveals
artifacts and allows archaeologists
to reach dig sites that were once
impenetrable. One thing they are
learning is that prehistoric people
spent more time at high elevations
than had been assumed. The
Interdisciplinary Climate Change
Expedition from Central Wyoming
College has discovered that
11,000 years ago people made camps
on glaciers in the Rockies. The
evidence includes buffalo jumps,
arrowheads, and spear points. “There
wasn’t much to draw people up here
in terms of hunting or gathering or
foraging,” lead archaeologist Todd
Guenther told NPR. “And it appears
that people were coming up here to
see the glaciers. You know, to see
where the water comes from. Where
does the water spirit originate?”
I noticed that every time the captain
asked for questions, my five-year-old
daughter, Jane, would thrust up her
hand. But he never called on her. There
were plenty of adults with their hands
up, and she was small. I knew it was
making her mad. She’s a little copperhaired gymnast, and full of fire. Finally
I leaned forward and whispered over
her shoulder, “What is it you want to
ask?” She looked back and spoke to me
in her whisper, which is oddly close to
our standard conversational volume.
“You see that cloud up there?” she said,
pointing through the window at a giant
billowy white cloud perched on a
mountain peak. I nodded. “Do you see
the way that mountain is just sticking
into the cloud?”
“Yes,” I said. “Isn’t that amazing?”
“But is it normal?” she said. Of
course, she had never seen such a
thing. We are from beach country. The
mountains are so tall they stick into
the clouds? It was wonderful to see it
through her eyes. It so often is, with
102
travelandleisure.com
children. Mine have made me like
vacations, which in the past more
often caused me to long for death.
I told her I thought it was probably
normal, but that she would have to
ask the captain.
The boat got all the way to our
destination—a waterfall—and she
had still not been called on. I watched
her jump down from her bench with
her jaw set in an underbite. She meant
business. She ran forward to catch
him before the others could. From
the back of the boat I could see her
looking straight up into his eyes,
gesticulating like her mother does.
He had the kind of expression they
invented the word bemused for.
A few minutes later when I
rejoined Jane on land, I asked her
what the captain’s answer had been.
“He said ‘Yes’!” she said. And looked
at me like, Can you believe that?
he friends we had gone to visit
were staying in Paradise Valley.
It looked like a place you would
call Paradise Valley. Huge, green,
fertile. We ate pizza at an outdoor
hippie joint and drank local beers
and the children behaved, and I
kept looking at the sky. The West!
The next day everyone went rock
climbing, but I stayed behind. It
doesn’t take me many days on the
road to feel ragged and disassociated,
even when I’m happy. I wanted to
read and work and recover myself.
Nobody looked super-bummed when
I said I wasn’t coming. I’m not the
first guy you pick for your rockclimbing team.
Two hours later I woke with a
start. The sound that had woken me
T
didn’t stop. Instead it got louder.
It seemed like the world was suddenly
continuous thunder. I ran to the
little balcony porch and saw a
hailstorm of tremendous intensity.
The stones were the size of shooter
marbles, and there were so many that
they clumped together as they fell.
The ground turned white. I grabbed
my phone, to shoot a video for
everyone else. Then it hit me that
this same hail could be falling on
them too. I pictured Maria, my eldest,
who’d been unexpectedly excited to
climb that morning (she often shies
away from sports, preferring her
journal or phone), now dangling from
a rope on an exposed cliff, screaming,
pelted by hail. And then I looked up
and saw two vibrantly glowing
rainbows, one inside the other, so
bright and perfect that you could
follow them with your eye from
one end to the other. It seemed that
they should signal the end of the
hailstorm, but instead the hailstorm
roared and the rainbows blazed
simultaneously, ice and fire. I wanted
to shout, “Is this normal?”
When the others came back,
they said that they had indeed almost
been caught in the hailstorm, but got
off the rock in time. Everyone got
home safe, from the rock-climbing
and the train trip west, and my
children can tell their children that
when they were young, they saw an
American glacier.
John Jeremiah Sullivan is the author of
Pulphead, a collection of essays. He is
finishing a book called The Prime
Minister of Paradise, to be published
by Random House.
Travel + Leisure (ISSN 0041-2007). April 2018, Vol. 48, No. 4. Published monthly 12 times a year by Time Inc. Affluent Media
Group, a subsidiary of Time Inc. Time Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Meredith Corporation. Principal Office: 225 Liberty St.,
New York, NY 10281. TRAVEL + LEISURE is a registered trademark in the U.S. and other countries. Subscription: 12 issues,
$45.00; in Canada, $57.00 (publisher’s suggested price). Single copies $5.99. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and
additional mailing offices. Publications Mail Commercial Sales Agreement No. 40036840 (GST #129480364RT). Publications
Mail Agreement 40036840. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Travel + Leisure, P.O. Box 134, Stn. Main, Markham,
Ontario L3P 3J5. Printed in U.S.A. Copyright ©2018 Time Inc. Affluent Media Group. All rights reserved. Nothing may be
reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Member of the Alliance for Audited Media.
Subscriber Services, U.S. and Canada Direct all inquiries, address changes, subscription orders, etc., to Travel + Leisure,
P.O. Box 62120, Tampa, FL 33662-2120, or call 800-888-8728. Editorial Office, 225 Liberty St., New York, NY 10281; 212-522-1212.
Subscribers If the postal authorities alert us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless
we receive a corrected address within two years. Your bank may provide updates to the card information we have on file. You
may opt out of this service at any time. Postmaster Send change of address to: Travel + Leisure, P.O. Box 62120, Tampa,
FL 33662-2120. Occasionally, Travel + Leisure makes portions of its magazine subscriber lists available to carefully screened
companies that offer special products and services. Any subscriber who does not want to receive mailings from third-party
companies should contact the subscriber services department at 800-888-8728 or write
to TCS, P.O. Box 62120, Tampa, FL 33662-2120. The magazine assumes no responsibility
for the safekeeping or return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, artwork, or
other material. To order back issues, call 800-270-3053. To order article reprints
of 500 or more, call 212-221-9595.
ADVERTISEMENT
ESSENTIALS
Grand Canyon
See the Greatest National Parks of
America’s Southwest with Caravan
Bryce, Zion, Monument Valley
8-Days $1495 + tax & fees
Your Grand Canyon tour is fully
guided and includes all activities
with a great itinerary.
Visit Bryce Canyon, Zion, Sedona,
Monument Valley, Lake Powell,
and more—Spend four nights in
national park lodges—including
2-nts at Grand Canyon, and 2-nts
at Zion National Park.
Detailed itinerary at Caravan.com.
Call now for choice dates!
Join the smart shoppers and
experienced travelers who have
chosen Caravan since 1952.
Choose A Guided Tour + tax & fees
Guatemala w/ Tikal
Costa Rica
Panama Canal Tour
Nova Scotia & PEI
Canadian Rockies
Grand Canyon
California Coast
Mount Rushmore
New England
10 days
9 days
8 days
10 days
9 days
8 days
8 days
8 days
8 days
$1395
$1295
$1295
$1495
$1795
$1495
$1595
$1395
$1395
“Brilliant, Affordable Pricing ”
—Arthur Frommer, Travel Editor
FREE Brochure
Call Now 1-800-CARAVAN
Caravan. com
TO ADVERTISE, CONTACT MI INTEGRATED MEDIA AT 860.542.5180
YOUR BEST SHOT
“I GO ON AT LEAST ONE
LONG SOLO ROAD TRIP
EVERY YEAR.
Last year’s journey spanned
32 days and took me through 16 states, starting in Chicago and looping
through the Pacific Northwest and Southwest. I took this photograph
in the Palouse region in southeastern Washington, at the Steptoe Butte
lookout. From that vantage, at an elevation of higher than 3,500 feet, you
have an almost aerial view of the area’s rolling hills and wheat fields. I love
the color combination and how the land symbolizes bounty. It actually took
me three tries—two sunsets and one sunrise—to get a photo I was happy
with. You only have a 10-minute window to capture the light just right.”
— Reader Glenn Nagel on his photograph, shot with a Nikon D800, July 2017.
104
travelandleisure.com
Glenn Nagel was a
semifinalist in our 2017
photo contest. Submit
your best shots at
travelandleisure.com/
photos/photo-of-the-day
for the chance to be
featured on this page
in a future issue.
6WRULHV
0DNH
WKH%HVW
6RXYHQLUV
“When we got to Mazatlán there was so
much to do and we did it all. But the
best memories we have to share with
others are the times we spent doing
nothing at all.
#SouvenirStories
7HOO\RXU0D]DWO¢QVWRU\DWZZZ6RXYHQLU6WRULHVFRP
change begins here
You can reach almost any corner of the world aboard a Princess®
cruise, but you can also find something much more profound:
change. From relaxing on a white sand beach to connecting with the
rich culture of the Caribbean, Princess Cruises® takes you on a
quest for change that will make you come back new.®
princess.com
call 1.800.PRINCESS l contact your travel agent
AMERICAN EXPRESS® CARD MEMBERS: YOUR CRUISE REWARD AWAITS
Eligible American Express Card Members can use Membership Rewards® points to purchase an exclusive Reward Card
from Carnival Corporation—your gateway to unforgettable journeys. Redeem the Reward Card toward bookings on
V
Carnival Cruise Line, Holland America Line, Princess Cruises, Cunard, or Seabourn, or to enhance existing reservations with
special onboard services. Get yours at membershiprewards.com/carnival
©2018 Princess Cruise Lines, Ltd. Ships of Bermudan and British registry.
From Travel + Leisure, August 2017 © 2017 Time Inc. Aluent Media Group. Used under license. Travel + Leisure and Time Inc. Aluent Media Group are not ailiated with, and do not endorse products or services of, Licensee.
This prepaid Carnival Corporation Reward Card from American Express® may be used only for goods and services at: 1) participating establishments which accept American Express® Cards and operate under these Carnival Corporation Brands: Carnival Cruise Line, Princess Cruises, Holland America Line, Seabourn or Cunard, or 2) the corporate Carnival Café. For transactions made in U.S. dollars only. The Card cannot be used at ATMs. Not redeemable
for cash, except where required by law. Additional limitations may apply. See Cardholder Agreement for complete details. Visit www.americanexpress.com/carnivalterms for balance, and Cardholder Agreement. This Card is issued
by American Express Prepaid Card Management Corporation. Terms and Conditions for the Membership Rewards® program apply. Visit membershiprewards.com/terms or call 1-800-AXPEARN (297-3276) for more information.
Participating partners and available rewards are subject to change without notice. The value of Membership Rewards points varies according to how you choose to use them. To learn more, please go to membershiprewards.com/pointsinfo.
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
2
Размер файла
16 434 Кб
Теги
journal, Travel+Leisure
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа