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QUA L I T Y, C O N C I S E – T H E F U T U R E O F I N D E PE N D E N T JOU R NA L I S M
FR DAY
+ TEN TO WATCH ON TV
Brett
Anderson
interview
Don’t be evil?
Google in
military tech row
Neil Young
and Daryl
Hannah on
their new
film
+ FACEBOOK
INVE STIGATE D
OVE R DATA LEAK
P5
FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
Number 2,298
Sweet homes
es
P44
I will not
talk to
Russia
» Yulia Skripal says her strength is
growing daily and she may soon be
released from hospital – but rejects
Russian request for interview
» It is ‘beyond reasonable doubt’
that Moscow was behind nerve
agent attack, says UK
» ‘Sergei is fine’: Russian TV plays
unverified tape of alleged phone call
between Yulia and her cousin
P9
i@inews.co.uk
@theipaper
theipaper theipaper
Brain
power
Cells do grow
back again
Armed intruder
who died was
already wanted
by police
Britain’s biggest
union has
30% gender
pay gap
Brothers
and sisters
The truth about
siblings
P4
P7
P10
P28
PLUS MARK STEEL ON ANTI-SEMITISM
P22
I PATRICK COCKBURN ON SYRIA AFTER ISIS
P26
I PUZZLES
P52
The
News
Matrix
POLICE
What ancient
vehicle has
Russell Crowe
put up for
auction?
See p.11
The day at
a glance
AUCTION
FRIDAY
6
APRIL
Quote of the day
I take my wife everywhere,
but she keeps finding
her way back
HENNY YOUNGMAN
Force ‘sorry’ over
delay in teen search
CRIME
A police force has apologised for
delaying a search for a murdered
teenager for four hours because of
staff shortages. Greater Manchester
Police delayed the hunt for Ellen
Higginbottom, 18, thirteen times
after her father reported her missing
in June. She was later found dead.
MUSIC
HEALTH
Heathrow escalators Banned from having
under the hammer
pets after cat cruelty
Kenny Rogers calls
off his farewell tour
Rail commuters are
invited to try yoga
Equipment ranging from baggage
carousels to check-in desks are
going under the hammer as the
entire contents of Heathrow
Airport’s Terminal 1 are sold. Among
lots up for grabs at the auction
later this month are 15 escalators,
1950s artwork and more than 2,000
security cameras.
A couple who kept 73 cats in
“terrible conditions” at their home
in Cornwall have been banned from
keeping animals for life. Penelope
O’Dell, 71, and David O’Dell, 70,
from Looe, were responsible for
“completely incompetent care”,
Bodmin magistrates heard an
RSPCA worker testify.
Country music star Kenny Rogers
has cancelled the remaining dates on
his farewell tour due to ill health. His
appearance at Blackpool’s Livewire
Festival in August has been called
off. The 79-year-old US singer was
told by doctors to step back from
performing in order to recuperate
after “a series of health challenges”.
A yoga class has been held on a train
to combat phone “zombies”. Chiltern
Railways carried out the exercise
on a journey from Birmingham
to London after partnering with
mental health charity Mind.
Passengers were invited to join in
the class and take part in activities
such as adult colouring. PAGE 8
FARMING
ITALY
POLAND
TURKEY
Jersey Royal season Horseback herding
smashed by weather may be protected
Politicians’ bonuses
to go to charities
Four staff shot dead
after ‘college row’
The Jersey Royal season is at least
three weeks late this year after
frosts and high rainfall delayed the
planting of the spring crop. Jersey
normally exports around 30,000
tonnes of the potatoes to the UK
each season, but producers say the
figure could be up to 20 per cent
lower this year.
Politicians salaries will be reduced
and bonuses recently paid to
ministers will be given to charity in
Poland. The head of the country’s
ruling party Jaroslaw Kaczynski
announced the measures after an
opinion poll showed a 12-point drop
in support for his right-wing Law
and Justice party.
A research assistant shot and killed
four staff members at a university
in central Turkey over an apparent
row with the dean. Volkan Bayar
turned up at his office in Osmangazi
University in Eskisehir yesterday
and later killed a deputy dean, a
secretary and two teaching staff
before he was arrested.
Italy has applied to have the
traditional practice of herding
livestock along ancient migration
routes added to Unesco’s list
of intangible cultural heritage.
Horseback herders drive sheep
and cattle along the centuries-old
routes. Italy’s bid has been backed
by Greece and Austria.
Birthdays
Myleene Klass, presenter,
40; Rory Bremner,
impressionist, 57; Gina
Yashere (below), comedian,
44; Louie Spence, dancer,
49; Gordon Giltrap,
guitarist, 70; Paul Rudd,
actor, 49
Anniversaries
Sunday 6 April 1975
A plane carrying 99
Vietnamese orphans and
chartered by a British
newspaper lands at
Heathrow. The children
were accompanied by
British doctors and nurses
on the 18-hour flight from
Saigon, where they had
been living in care homes.
ENERGY
The List
Our favourite
drinking buddies
Prince Harry is the person
Britons would most like to go
for a drink with, a poll suggests.
Theresa May came last in lottery
website Multilotto’s survey, which
supposedly revealed the public
figures that people would most
like to socialise with:
1 Prince Harry (below)
2 Adele
3 Stephen Fry
4 Robbie Williams
5 James Corden
6 Olly Murs
7 Joanna Lumley
8 Harry Styles
9 Kate Winslet
10 Russell Brand
Growth
on 2016
Investment in renewable energy
China
57%
$126.1bn
US
$40.5bn
Japan
$13.4bn
India
of last year’s
total investment*
in renewable energy of
$280.2bn
went into solar power
* excluding investment in large
hydro power
Investment by sector
Subscribe to i at
i-subscription.co.uk
Solar energy dominated global investment in new power generation
like never before in 2017, research shows. Latest figures show the world
installed a record 98 gigawatts of new solar capacity, far more than the
net additions of any other technology — renewable, fossil fuel or nuclear.
Here comes
the sun
-8%
98
gigawatts
$10.4bn
Australia
$8.5bn
UK
$7.6bn
Brazil
$6.0bn
Mexico
$6.0bn
Sweden
the amount
of new solar
capacity installed
around the world
in 2017
Wind
Biomass/
Waste-to-energy
Small
Hydro
$161bn
$107bn
$5bn
$3bn
-35%
147%
-65%
$160.8
0
8%
b
billion
the amount invested
in solar power in 2017
$3.7bn
Solar
-28%
-20%
$10.9bn
Germany
30%
810%
127%
Biofuels
Geothermal
Marine
$2bn
$2bn
$0.2bn
index
Crossword.............22
TV & Radio...........38
Homes......................44
Business.................48
Puzzles.....................52
Weather...................55
SOURCE: UN ENVIRONMENT; BLOOMBERG NEW ENERGY FINANCE
Newspapers support recycling
The recycled content of UK
newspapers in 2015 was 71%
©Published by Johnston Publications Limited, 2 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0PU, and printed at
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Glasgow. Also printed at Carn Web, Carn Industrial Estate, Portadown. Back issues available from Historic
Newspapers, 0844 770 7684. Friday 6 April 2018. Registered as a newspaper with the Post Office.
Select journalism in i is copyright
independent.co.uk and copyright
Evening Standard, beyond those
accredited as such.
NEWS
2-30
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
38-39
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
ThePage3Profile
GERMANY
Letter from the Editor
SKEPTA,
GRIME ARTIST… AND CHIEFTAIN
Hitler’s portrait of his
lover up for auction
i@inews.co.uk
Rising up through the ranks?
The British grime star Skepta has been
made a chieftain in his parents’ home state
of Ogun in Nigeria. Skepta shared a video
expressing his thanks for the title.
An oil painting by Adolf Hitler
depicting a former lover will go
under the hammer in Nuremberg
next week with an asking price
of €60,000 (£52,500). The work,
signed “A. Hitler, 1916”, depicts
Charlotte Lobjoie, a Frenchwoman
he met during the First World War,
according to experts.
Is he big outside of Britain?
Yes. While enjoying critical acclaim
and commercial success in the UK – the
35-year-old was nominated for three
2017 Brit Awards: best male British
solo artist, best breakthrough
act and best album, for
Konnichiwa – he has also
been making a name
for himself in Nigeria,
performing at festivals
and shows.
UNITED STATES
Cyclist sacked over
Trump insult sues
A cyclist who lost her job after
making an obscene gesture at
Donald Trump’s motorcade is suing
her former employer. Juli Briskman,
of Virginia, claims in the lawsuit that
government contractor Akima LLC
violated state employment law as
well as her right to free speech when
it sacked her in November last year.
What is this new accolade
in aid of?
The title he’s been given
is for “entertainers in
all forms”, according to
Busayo Akogun, a BBC
reporter based in Lagos.
Chieftain titles are given
in recognition of a positive
contribution to community
wellbeing, she said.
FRANCE
Restaurant doggy
bag for all diners
MPs in France are trying to change
dining culture by imposing a
compulsory doggy bag rule on
restaurants so that customers can
take their leftovers home. The aim is
to make the practice more familiar
with native restaurant-goers and
halve the amount of food waste the
country produces by 2025.
Did he have an acceptance speech?
Skepta, whose real name is
Joseph Junior Adenuga, said he was
“honoured” to be given the title (inset).
“Thank you to the Baale, Chiefs of Odo
Aje and King for presenting me with my
Chieftaincy title today,” he wrote. “I am
honoured and will continue to put time
and love into Nigeria, especially the
community of Odo Aje.” He added: “Love...
mum, dad and everybody in attendance
for an unforgettable day. Big love, Joseph
Olaitan Adenuga Jnr - Chief Amuludun
Of Odo Aje.”
UNITED STATES
Governor gives offer
that can’t be refused
Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner
has donated his collection of The
Godfather author Mario Puzo’s
papers to his alma mater, Dartmouth
College. The New Hampshire school
said it was “an offer they couldn’t
refuse”. The 50 boxes include draft
manuscripts and correspondence
from the novelist and screenwriter.
Has he received any comparable UK titles?
Skepta hinted last year that he turned
down an MBE, which would have part of
the Queen’s birthday honours. He made
the claim in the track “Hypocrisy”, which
includes the line: “The MBE got rejected/I’m
not trying to be accepted.”
12
m O
on n
th ly
co a
nt
ra
ct
Katie Grant
3
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
Oliver Duff
i readers keen on defence
The arrest of pensioner Richard OsbornBrooks on suspicion of murder, after the
death of an armed burglar at his house on
Wednesday, has reopened the national
debate about the rights of homeowners to
defend themselves against intruders.
Predictably, in your correspondence,
there is a great deal of sympathy for
Mr Osborn-Brooks, 78, and his wife.
Do not burgle i’s readers, particularly
those in the north of England.
“One night, when I was tidying up in the
kitchen and my young children were in the
sitting room, a burglar came in through
the back door,” writes Sue Atkinson, from
Chester. “I instinctively picked up the kitchen
scissors from the worktop to defend us all,
and he wisely left.”
One i reader a couple of counties away,
who provides his name and address and
asks not to be identified, writes: “I am an
84-year-old retired police officer and I sleep
with a fishing knife under my pillow and
am prepared to use it to protect my life and
property. When I was in the police service,
I was paid to protect the life and property
of others. Surely I should now be able to
protect my own?”
John Salter, from Consett, County
Durham, chips in: “I agree with Oliver Duff
– but only partially. It should be made very
clear that anyone entering someone else’s
property without permission puts their
own life at risk.”
Rob Baldock, of Friskney, Lincolnshire,
adds: “Does anyone remember David
Cameron’s idea for a ‘big society’? The theme
was based on us all taking responsibility for
things around us. Being recently burgled, I
requested the police allow me five minutes
alone with the burglar.” I assume that Mr
Baldock’s wish was not granted.
Public support for Mr Osborn-Brooks,
who has been bailed, was growing yesterday,
with offers of financial help, thousands of
messages of goodwill, and flowers sent to
his home in south London – where they
made it as far as the police cordon.
For the sake of Mr Osborn-Brooks and his
family, and the safety of other members of
the public, we wish the police haste in their
investigation and in their efforts to capture
the second burglar.
Twitter: @olyduff
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4
NEWS
SPORT
From hole-in-one joy to
agony in one mistimed step
By Kevin Garside
Few manage to hit a hole-in-one
at Augusta, the hallowed home of
the Masters. Among the acacias
and azaleas, the world’s greatest
golfers gather each year to try
and tame a course known for its
beauty and savagery.
For Tony Finau, watched by
his wife and four children in
his debut Masters, the moment
came during a par-3 contest held
on the eve of the tournament
proper. After watching his ball
roll across the green into the
hole, Finau set off at a gallop.
Then he turned back towards
the tee and continued to run
backwards, his arms raised. A
step later and the 28-year-old
American lay on the ground, his
ankle twisted, his pride dented,
and his tournament surely over.
It appeared all he would be left
with was the large crystal bowl
awarded to those who manage
a hole-in-one at Augusta, and
memories of few delirious steps
before disaster on Wednesday.
But yesterday, he went on to
play and astonishingly was in the
lead after 13 holes. On his return
it was unlikely anyone would
spare him the round of drinks all
golfers are expected to buy when
they secure a hole-in-one.
Even if he doesn’t win this
weekend, few will forget the
Finau fall at the seventh.
Sport, pages 58-59
SCIENCE
HEALTH
Elderly brains ‘continue to make
as many neurons as young people’
By Chris Raynes
Elderly people grow as many new
brain cells as teenagers, according
to a study which counters previous
theories that neurons stop developing after adolescence.
Healthy men and women continue
to produce new neurons throughout
life, suggesting older people remain
more cognitively and emotionally intact than previously believed,
researchers found.
For decades, it was thought that
adult brains were hard-wired and
unable to form new cells. But a Columbia University study found older
people continued to produce neurons in the hippocampus – a part
of the brain important for memory,
emotion and cognition – at a similar
rate to young people.
Researchers examined the brains
of 28 previously healthy people who
died suddenly between the age of 14
and 79. “We found that older people
have similar ability to make thousands of hippocampal new neurons
from progenitor cells as younger
people do,” said the study’s lead author Maura Boldrini, associate professor of neurobiology at Columbia.
“We also found equivalent volumes
of the hippocampus across ages.”
Scientists said the
Columbia University
findings were promising
and could be helpful in
developing new treatments for
neurological conditions such as
Alzheimer’s disease.
Earlier studies
has suggested
that adults do
not develop
new neurons
The ability to generate new hippocampal cells, a process known as
neurogenesis, declines with age in
rodents and primates.
Declining production of neurons and shrinkage of parts of the
brain which help form new episodic
memories were believed to occur in
ageing humans as well, explaining
why younger people generally find it
easier to learn skills and languages.
But the Columbia University
study found there were similar numbers of newly formed cells in old and
young brains.
However, the researchers also
noted fewer blood vessels and connections between cells in the older
brains, which Dr Boldrini said “may
be linked to compromised cognitiveemotional resilience” in the elderly.
The findings, published in the
journal Cell Stem Cell, have already
sparked a hot debate coming as they
do just a month after a University
of California, San Francisco, study
suggested adults do not develop
new neurons.
Shawn Sorrells and Mercedes
Paredes, who co-authored that research, said: “For now, we do not
think this new study challenges
our conclusions. If neurogenesis
continues in the adult human hippocampus, it is an extremely rare
phenomenon.” THE INDEPENDENT
POLICE
EDUCATION
Newborn girl found dead in woods
One million learn Welsh via app
By Pat Hurst
Police have appealed to the mother
of a newborn baby girl found dead
in woodland to contact them.
The child was found by a dog
walker on Wednesday morning in
Roch Valley Woods, in Heywood,
Greater Manchester.
A post-mortem examination was
inconclusive and more tests are
being carried out to determine the
cause of death.
Detective Constable Kelly Bragg,
of Greater Manchester Police, said
last night: “Sadly, the baby had died,
and our main priority at this time
is the well-being of the baby girl’s
mother, as she may be in need of urgent medical attention.
“If you are the baby’s mother, I
would ask you to get in touch, either
directly to me or ask a family member or friend you can trust to contact me on your behalf, and we will
do everything we can to help you.”
By Karl McDonald
More than a million people are now
learning Welsh through the language app Duolingo.
This is almost double the number
of people who said they could speak
Welsh in the 2011 census – 562,000.
The course, which teaches Welsh
to English speakers, has been put
together by volunteers since 2015.
It’s available via the Duolingo app,
which has more than 200 million
users worldwide. The Welsh course
now attracts a thousand new users a
week, according to the company.
“Reaching one million Welsh
learners is an incredible milestone,
especially given the fact that two
years ago, the Welsh government announced its goal to reach one million
speakers by 2050,” said Duolingo’s
community specialist Myra Awodey.
“Even before we began developing
our Welsh course, we saw quite a lot
of demand for the language.”
Company-sponsored pages
promoting e-cigarettes were found
on the social media site GETTY
Facebook is
being used to
sell tobacco
By Rhiannon Williams
Facebook’s anti-tobacco policies
are being side-stepped by
sponsored posts to sell products
including cigars and e-cigarettes,
a study has found.
While the social network
restricts adverts promoting the
sale or use of “tobacco products
and related paraphernalia”, the
study uncovered 108 companysponsored pages for cigars,
e-cigarettes, hookah tobacco and
smokeless tobacco, more than
half of which featured “shop now”
buttons for purchasing.
The study, published in The
BMJ Tobacco Control, highlights
loopholes within Facebook’s
tobacco policies, said lead author
Robert Jackler, MD, professor
and chair of otolaryngology
– head and neck surgery and
principal investigator of Stanford
Research into the Impact of
Tobacco Advertising.
“Clearly, there are a lot of
policies with the laudable intent
of keeping tobacco promotion and
sales out of Facebook,” he said.
Facebook’s advertising
guidelines, which apply to paid
advert and commercial content,
prohibit the use of phrases
such as: “Buy cigarettes and
e-cigarettes here today”, but 58
of the brand-sponsored pages
carried purchase links, with 71
featuring sales promotion.
NEWS
2-30
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
38-39
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
TECHNOLOGY
5
Comment
Google’s military project goes
against core values, warn staff
Fancy a job at
top of big tech?
Think again
By Rhiannon Williams
Rhiannon Williams
TECHNOLOGY CORRESPONDENT
Origins of ethical motto
Google workers have signed a letter calling on the company’s chief
executive to pull the plug on a
military project they fear could be
used in warfare with “potentially
lethal outcomes”.
More than 3,000 employees signed
the letter addressed to Sundar Pichai
opposing Project Maven, which analyses data captured by US government drones to identify surrounding
objects and relay the results to the
US Department of Defence.
“This plan will irreparably damage
Google’s brand and its ability to compete for talent. Amid growing fears
of biased and weaponised AI, Google
is already struggling to keep the public’s trust,” the letter, seen by The New
York Times, read.
The signatories asked Mr Pichai
to cancel the project and draw up a
policy declaring that neither Google
or its contractors will build warfare
“Don’t be evil” is Google’s unofficial
motto, as instituted by founders
Sergey Brin and Larry Page, and is
still cited in the company’s Code of
Conduct as a guiding principle.
Not doing evil extends beyond
providing unbiased access to information to “doing the right thing
more generally – following the law,
acting honourably, and treating
co-workers with respect”. Former
chief executive Eric Schmidt
initially thought it was “the stupidest rule ever”, before recognising
its value as an ethical arbiter.
Project Maven uses deep
learning artificial intelligence technology to identify
objects of interest from moving
or still imagery, according to the
US Department of Defence.
Project Maven will use data captured
by US government drones to increase
the ability of weapon systems to
detect objects GETTY
technology, adding: “We believe that
Google should not be in the business
of war.” They added: “We cannot outsource the moral responsibility of our
technologies to third parties. Google’s stated values make this clear:
Every one of our users is trusting
us. Never jeopardise that. Ever. This
contract puts Google’s reputation at
risk and stands in direct opposition
to our core values.”
Diane Greene, a Google board
member, recently assured employees that the technology would not
be used to operate or fly drones, or
launch weapons, the signatories said.
“While this eliminates a narrow set of
direct applications, the technology is
being built for the military and, once
it’s delivered, it could easily be used to
assist in these tasks,” they continued.
“The argument that other firms,
like Microsoft and Amazon, are also
participating doesn’t make this any
less risky for Google. Google’s unique
history, its motto ‘Don’t Be Evil’, and
its direct reach into the lives of billions of users set it apart.”
The US Department of Defence
said the plan was for people and computers to work “symbiotically” to increase the ability of weapon systems
to detect objects.
to the Information Commissioner
to “ensure that their investigation
into Cambridge Analytica is
forging ahead”.
Facebook is being investigated by the Information Commissioner’s
Office as part of its probe
into the use of personal
data for political purposes. A day after the social
media company said 87 million people – including nearly
1.1 million Britons – could have
seen their profile information “improperly” shared with Cambridge
Analytica, Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said the body was
investigating how the
data was collected and
shared with the political research group.
She said the ICO was
also conducting a “broader investigation” into how
social media platforms were
used in political campaigning”.
LEGAL
Hancock to meet Facebook
over ‘unacceptable’ risk
By Rhiannon Williams
Culture Secretary Matt Hancock is
to meet with Facebook next Wednesday and will “seek further assurances
that UK users’ data won’t be misused
in future”, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has said.
Mr Hancock said: “I’ll be meeting Facebook next week. I expect it
to explain why they put the data of
more than a million of our citizens
at risk. This is unacceptable, and
they must demonstrate this won’t
happen again.”
Mr Hancock has also spoken
TECHNOLOGY
CORRESPONDENT
Who’d want to be a billionaire?
While a job as head of one of
the world’s most powerful
companies may have been one
of the most attractive prospects
around just a few short weeks
ago, some of tech’s most
powerful figures are facing ever
mounting challenges, as the
public and even their employees
start to turn on them.
The past few weeks must
be among the most testing
of young Mark Zuckerberg’s
career. Aged just 23 when he
made his first billion off the
back of Facebook, a decade later
he’s floundering to deal with
the fallout of the Cambridge
Analytica data scandal, which
has undermined trust in the
social network.
Across Silicon Valley, more
than 3,000 Google staff signed
a letter to their chief executive
Sundar Pichai, requesting he
axe a controversial AI project
they fear could be used in
warfare with “potentially
lethal outcomes”.
“Amid growing fears of biased
and weaponised AI, Google is
already struggling to keep the
public’s trust,” the signatories
wrote, urging Mr Pichai to
withdraw the firm from “the
business of war”.
Public trust is a very fragile
thing. Once lost, entire business
empires can fall. For an
industry as ruthless as tech,
you need only look to Nokia,
AOL, Palm, BlackBerry and
Yahoo to see firms that once
appeared unassailable, but can
easily be replaced. The tide is
turning on Big Tech, and woe
betide the corporation that fails
to heed the danger, or worse,
thinks it’s too big to fail.
NEWS
6
HEALTH
Scarlet fever cases hit
highest level since 1982
By Jennifer Cockerell
Parents are being warned to look
out for signs of scarlet fever in their
children, with more cases of the illness reported this year than any year
since 1982, health officials said.
The first signs of scarlet fever can
include flu-like symptoms, including
a high temperature of 38°C or above
and swollen neck glands. A rash,
which looks like sunburn, usually
appears a few days later.
Official figures from Public Health
England (PHE) show that there were
more than 15,500 cases reported in
the first three months of the year
– twice as many as last year.
There were 1,624 cases in the most
recent week, up to 1 April, with a
spike of 2,105 cases the week before.
The latest Health Protection
Report also showed 11,982 cases of
Those with scarlet fever
are advised to stay at
home until at least 24 hours after
starting antibiotic treatment to
avoid spreading it to others.
scarlet fever were reported from
mid-September to March, compared
with an average of 4,480 for the same
period over the past five years.
Those thought to have it should
contact their GP, as early treatment
with antibiotics can help reduce the
risk of complications such as pneumonia and the spread of the infection.
Nick Phin, the deputy director of
National Infection Service at PHE,
said: “While it is not uncommon to
see a rise in cases of scarlet fever at
this time of year, the numbers we
have seen this year have not been
seen since 1982.
“We are monitoring the situation
and have worked with NHS Choices
to raise awareness of the signs and
symptoms of scarlet fever, the importance of good hand hygiene, and also
to encourage parents to contact their
GP for assessment if they think their
child might have scarlet fever.”
HEALTH
Traffic pollution linked to asthma
By Paul Gallagher
HEALTH CORRESPONDENT
Long-term exposure to heavy
traffic significantly increases the
risk of asthma attacks, according
to a study that strengthens
evidence on the link between the
condition and long-term exposure
to pollution.
More than 600 adults took part
in the research, published in the
European Respiratory Journal,
including 240 with asthma who
had respiratory symptoms,
asthma attacks or increased
medication in the previous year.
Among the findings by French
researchers was an association
between long-term traffic
exposure and concentration of
8-isoprostane, which is exhaled
in the breath and can increase
the production of mucus causing
airway muscles to contract
making it difficult to breathe.
‘Don’t believe all that crap’
The Prince of Wales swore when
asked about claims that he takes
his own toilet seat when he travels
abroad. Prince Charles was
interviewed on a Brisbane radio
station during a seven-day tour
of Australia with the Duchess
of Cornwall. He replied: “My
own what?” He added: “Oh, don’t
believe all that crap.” The rumour
was published in a new biography
by Tom Bower. STEVE PARSONS/PA
We’ve given a warm welcome to
1,
,
current account switchers
One million people have switched their current account to the Halifax
since the current account switch service was introduced in September 2013
One million switchers, based on Halifax internal switch data since the current account switch service launched in September 2013. Halifax is a division of Bank of Scotland plc. Registered in Scotland No. SC327000. Registered Office: The Mound, Edinburgh EH1 1YZ. Bank of Scotland plc
is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority under registration number 169628. All information correct at March 2018.
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CRIME
REACTION
Intruder who died after stabbing
was wanted for separate burglary
Pensioner
deserves a
medal, say
supporters
By Paul Gallagher
and David Connett
7
By Paul Gallagher
An intruder killed during a burglary
at a pensioner’s home was wanted
for questioning by police in connection with a separate burglary of a
pensioner.
Police named the dead man as
Henry Vincent (below), 37, from
Orpington, Kent. He died after
being stabbed during a raid on the
home of Richard Osborn-Brooks,
78, in Hither Green, south-east
London, on Wednesday.
The arrest of Mr OsbornBrooks, on suspicion of
murder, sparked anger
among his neighbours.
He was released on bail
pending further inquiries,
the Metropolitan Police
said yesterday.
The dead man was named and
pictured in January by Kent Police
investigating a distraction burglary
when jewellery and valuables were
stolen from a man in his 70s.
Detectives named Vincent and
another man identified as Billy
Jeeves in connection with the crime.
They said yesterday their appeal
was ongoing. He was also on Kent
police’s “most wanted” list in 2013
in connection with a burglary in
Gravesend, according to reports.
On Wednesday, Mr OsbornBrooks was at home with his wife
Maureen, 76, when two intruders
entered their home. One man,
armed with a screwdriver, forced
Mr Osborn-Brooks into the kitchen
while another searched the house.
A struggle ensued in the kitchen
and the intruder was stabbed. He is
believed to have fled the house before
collapsing in a nearby street. Police
An online fundraising
campaign had raised
more than £1,000 for the bailed
pensioner. Organisers said the
money would be spent on his
legal fees or else improving
security on his home.
Forensic officers at
the scene in Hither
Green, south-east
London PA
said a post-mortem examination
established that the man died from a
single stab wound to the chest.
The second suspect in the burglary fled the scene, with police now
appealing to find him.
Detective Chief Inspector Simon
Harding said: “I would like to speak
with anyone who has information
regarding the outstanding suspect
from the burglary, believed to be a
white male; he may have told someone what happened at the address.
It is possible he fled the scene in a
vehicle, possibly a white van.”
Mr Osborn-Brooks was a manager
for the RAC in Croydon before
retiring about 26 years ago.
Other home-defence cases
The trial of farmer Tony Martin who
shot dead a 16-year-old burglar,
Fred Barras, at his Norfolk farm
in 1999, is the most controversial
home defence case. Martin was
convicted of murder, later reduced
to manslaughter, and served three
years in prison.
In 2009, Munir Hussain, a
Buckinghamshire businessman,
and his brother Tokeer were jailed
after he returned home to find three
intruders had tied up his family.
The pair chased one burglar, Walid
Saleem, and Munir hit him so hard
with a cricket bat that he inflicted
permanent brain damage. Munir
received a 30-month sentence and
Tokeer 39 months. Saleem was given
a two-year supervision order.
Andy Ferrie used a legally
held shotgun to defend himself
and his wife during a raid at their
Leicestershire farm in 2012, and
was not prosecuted. Jailing burglars
Joshua O’Gorman and Daniel Mansell
for four years, a judge said: “If you
burgle a house in the country where
the householder owns a legally held
shotgun, that is the chance you take.”
Supporters of arrested pensioner
Mr Osborn-Brooks said yesterday he
deserved “a medal” and supported his
right to defend the neighbourhood.
The businessman and former
Dragons’ Den star Duncan Bannatyne
tweeted yesterday: “Arrested? He
should get a medal.”
The 78-year-old’s alleged actions
were also backed by his neighbours.
One long-term resident of South Park
Crescent, who asked not to be named,
said while she recognised him she did
not know him.
She said: “He does deserve a
medal. You cannot break into people’s
houses. [I’ve heard] he’s a carer, this
is a pensioner that has worked all his
life who wants to live and die quietly.
“I lived in America, if this was in
America this wouldn’t be a
big issue.”
Adam Lake, who
lives near the
scene, said he
did not feel safe
from crime and
that Mr OsbornBrooks was “just
protecting himself”.
He said: “He doesn’t
deserve to be punished
for defending himself, and the
neighbours that I’ve spoken to all
agree that the priority needs to be
to support him after everything
that he’s been through. He was just
protecting himself after all.”
Other neighbours described him
as a “traditional English gentleman”,
with one, Nick Myatt saying: “I saw
him a few times. He’s a lovely old man
and he cares for his wife.”
Flowers addressed to Mr OsbornBrooks’s home were yesterday
delivered to the police cordon on
South Park Crescent by a courier.
A local councillor said that Mr
Osborn-Brooks was one of several
residents who donated money
to build security gates in an effort
to reduce crime, particularly
drug dealing.
PEOPLE
SOCIETY
Eric Bristow, five times world
darts champion, dies aged 60
Hired help ‘used by one in three’
By Katie Grant
The former world darts champion
Eric Bristow died of a heart attack
yesterday at the age of 60, the sport’s
UK governing body said last night.
Bristow, who held the title five
times between 1980 and 1986,
also won five World Masters titles
in what the Professional Darts
Corporation (PDC) described as an
“outstanding” career.
He was inducted into the PDC’s
Hall of Fame in 2005 alongside his
great rival John Lowe, and since
retiring from competition at the end
of 2007 he had remained a popular
figure on the exhibition circuit.
Bristow, who was nicknamed
“The Crafty Cockney”, having been
born in Hackney, east London, also
worked as a television pundit. He
was created MBE for his services to
sport in 1989.
Bristow won more than 70
professional titles in a career that
made him arguably the sport’s
first superstar player. The PDC
chairman, Barry Hearn, led the
tributes last night, saying: “Eric
By Alan Jones
Eric Bristow was created MBE for
his services to sport in 1989
will always be a legend in the world
of darts and British sport. He was
a tremendous player and a huge
character. Even after his retirement,
fans would travel for miles to meet
him and see him play.”
Bristow is survived by his ex-wife
Jane, children Louise and James,
and his partner Becky Gadd.
One in three people now pays for
help with childminding, cleaning,
gardening, window cleaning
and other jobs, a survey
has shown.
Research by Privilege
Insurance found that
the amount of money
being spent on hired
help ranges from £11
in Norwich to £150 in
Nottingham.
A survey of 2,000 adults
revealed that 6 per cent had a
house cleaner, while 2 per cent
paid to have their oven cleaned.
Almost half of households in
Newcastle upon Tyne had a hired
help, compared with one in five
in Bristol. Christian Mendes,
head of Privilege home
insurance, said: “Modern
life is busier than ever,
and everyone feels like
they are working harder
for longer.”
Research by cleaning
site Helpling.com in 2017
showed that around four
in 10 25- to 34-year-olds were
employing a cleaner, with most of
the demand coming from those in
one- or two-bedroom flats. This
was up from one in three in 2015.
8
NEWS
SOCIETY
SCIENCE
Pensions to go up
as minimum rate
contribution rises
Hunt goes on for
the truth about
dark matter
By Vicky Shaw
Workplace pension savers will see
their minimum contributions increase from today, as the next stage
in boosting retirement incomes gets
under way.
Minimum pension contribution
rates will rise under automatic enrolment, which started in 2012 to kickstart a new savings culture, amid
fears that people were not putting
aside enough for their old age.
Rates will rise to a combined 5 per
cent, with a minimum of 2 per cent
from the employer and the remaining
3 per cent from staff. Previously, the
Sir Steve Webb, a former
pensions minister who
is now director of policy at the
mutual insurer Royal London,
said the increase in contributions
was “a vital next step” towards
saving for later life.
minimum contribution rate was 2 per
cent, comprising 1 per cent each from
employee and employer.
In April 2019, the rate will increase
to 8 per cent, with a minimum of 3 per
cent from the employer, leaving a 5
per cent minimum staff contribution.
Guy Opperman, the Minister for
Pensions and Financial Inclusion, said:
“One million employers have played a
crucial role by complying with automatic enrolment duties, helping us
get more than nine million people into
a workplace pension, so they can prepare for a more financially secure retirement. Now, we mark the next stage
in boosting the retirement incomes of
workers across the nation.”
According to calculations from
Aviva, savers on average earnings
could see their pension pots quadruple as auto-enrolment cranks up.
Alistair McQueen, the head of
savings and retirement at Aviva, said
that the increases in savings will have
a significant impact on retirement
fortunes for millions of savers.
By Sally Wardle
Be mindful of the gap
A yoga class has been held on a
train to combat “phone zombies”.
Chiltern Railways carried
out the exercise on a train from
Birmingham to London after
partnering with the mental health
charity Mind. Passengers were
invited to join in, and to take part
in other mindfulness activities
such as adult colouring. PA
Scientists are back in the dark over
what dark matter could be, after
new observations cast doubt on a
previous breakthrough.
Researchers thought they were
one step closer to identifying the
mysterious substance three years
ago when they noticed a galaxy in a
cluster had become separated from
the dark matter surrounding it.
The discovery, by astronomers led
by Durham University, suggested
that the substance was interacting
with other dark matter through
forces other than gravity.
However, data from more recent
observations has revealed the
location of otherwise invisible dark
matter, showing that it did not
separate from its galaxy after all.
Around 27 per cent of the universe
is dark matter, which cannot be seen,
while normal matter such as planets
and stars makes up about 5 per cent.
Lead author Dr Richard Massey,
from Durham University’s Centre for
Extragalactic Astronomy, said: “The
search for dark matter is frustrating,
but that’s science. Meanwhile, the
hunt goes on.”
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9
DIPLOMACY
Britain is
playing with
fire, Russia
tells UN
By Katie Grant and Harriet Line
Britain is “playing with fire” and “will
be sorry” for claiming Vladimir Putin
was probably behind the nerve agent
attack on Sergei Skripal and his
daughter Yulia in Salisbury, Russia
has declared.
Tensions ran high at an emergency
UN Security Council meeting to discuss the poisoning of the former spy
and his daughter held at Russia’s
request yesterday evening. Vasily
Nebenzya, Russia’s ambassador to
The Russian ambassador the UN, hit out at the UK GovernAlexander Yakovenko ment during the stand-off in New
repeats Moscow’s denials of York, branding the accusation “abculpability for the attack PA surd” and poured scorn on the value
of British intelligence.
“Couldn’t you come up with a better fake story?” Mr Nebenzya said.
“We all know what the worth of
British intelligence information is
based on the experience of Tony
Blair,” he said, a reference to the
former PM’s claim Iraq had weapons
of mass destruction. “You’re playing
with fire, and you’ll be sorry.”
The UK’s ambassador, Karen
Pierce, said Britain would take no lectures “from a country that... has done
said there were “a lot of suspicions” so much to block the proper investiin relation to a string of deaths of gation of chemical weapons in Syria”.
Russian citizens in the UK over the Russia’s offer to help investigate the
case was like an arsonist “trying to
past decade.
Boris Johnson responded by investigate his own fire”.
Security minister Ben Wallace
accusing Russia of a “disinformation
campaign”. The Foreign Secretary said it was beyond reasonable doubt
tweeted: “The world will see through that Russia was behind the Salisbury
attack. Mr Wallace said the investhis shameless cynicism.”
tigation’s “roads lead to Russia” as
Britain seeks to maintain diplomatic
pressure on Moscow over the incident. Russian officials pointed to the
“lies by Tony Blair” over the 2003
war in Iraq as they criticised the inwas claimed, made the call in
telligence about the attack.
which she said “everyone’s health
Mr Wallace told BBC Radio 4’s
is fine, everything is fixable” and
Today that comparisons to the flawed
that her father was “resting”.
intelligence on weapons of mass
The recording was broadcast
destruction in Iraq were not valid.
by Rossiya-1 and shortly
“There’s no missing nerve agent no
afterwards the Metropolitan
one can find – it was used in Salisbury,
Police released a statement from we had three people seriously ill, two
Ms Skripal. In the recording, she
obviously remain in hospital in critical
said she would be discharging
condition, and there is no doubt that
herself from hospital soon.
we have found nerve agent,” he said.
Poisoned spy’s daughter refuses to
meet Russian diplomats in hospital
By Nigel Morris
POLITICAL EDITOR
Yulia Skripal has rebuffed
demands by Russian
diplomats to visit her in
hospital in Salisbury as
relations between London
and Moscow deteriorate.
In her first statement
s i n ce sh e rega i n e d
consciousness, Ms Skripal
(inset) said her strength is
growing daily following the nerve
agent attack which left her and her
father, Sergei, in intensive care.
Ms Skripal thanked staff
at Salisbury District
Hospital, as well as “the people
of Salisbury that came to my
aid when my father and I were
incapacitated”. She described
events as “disorientating”.
The poisoning has led to the
worst diplomatic crisis between
the West and Russia since the Cold
War as Moscow rejected
Britain’s charges that it
was to blame. Shortly
after Ms Skripal came
out of her coma, Russia’s
embassy in London
demanded access to her.
But a Foreign Office
spokesman said last night:
“We have conveyed to Ms
Skripal the Russian Embassy’s
offer of consular assistance. Ms
Skripal is now able to choose if and
when to take up this offer, but to date
she has not done so.”
In her statement Ms Skripal, 33,
said: “I woke up over a week ago
now and am glad to say my strength
is growing daily. I am grateful
for the interest in me and for the
many messages of goodwill I have
received.”
Her words were released by the
Metropolitan Police, indicating that
she is co-operating with counterterrorism specialists over her
suspected poisoning with the nerve
agent Novichok.
Russia’s ambassador to the UK,
Alexander Yakovenko, yesterday
repeated Moscow’s denial of
responsibility for the attack. He also
RUSSIA
State channel plays ‘Yulia’ recording
By Samuel Osborne
Russian state television has
broadcast an alleged recording in
which it claims Yulia Skripal tells
a cousin that her father Sergei is
“getting better”.
The unverified transcript
supposedly details a conversation
between Ms Skripal and her
cousin Viktoria. Ms Skripal, it
HOUSING
POLITICS
Rogue landlords targeted
Police ‘must investigate anti-Semitic abuse’
By Jon Vale
A crackdown on rogue landlords
comes into effect today, with
measures including banning orders
and a national database of offenders.
Landlords found guilty of housing
or immigration offences will be
added to the database, so that local
councils can share information
about them.
Those with convictions for leasing
overcrowded properties, flouting
fire and gas safety laws or issuing
unlawful evictions will also be
added to the list. Heather Wheeler,
a housing minister, said: “I am
committed to making sure people
who are renting are living in safe and
good-quality properties.
“That’s why we’re cracking down
on the small minority of landlords
that are renting out unsafe and
substandard accommodation.
“Landlords should be in no doubt
that they must provide decent
homes or face the consequences.”
The reforms are being delivered
through the Housing and Planning
Act 2016.
By Sam Lister
A group of peers has called on
Scotland Yard to investigate online
anti-Semitic abuse by supporters of
Jeremy Corbyn.
The cross-party letter to the
Metropolitan Police Commissioner,
Cressida Dick, highlights
“unambiguous” examples of hate
speech on Facebook groups set up to
back the Labour leader.
Lord Sugar, who quit Labour
three years ago, said Mr Corbyn
was “dangerous” and insisted it
was the Opposition leader’s job “to
stop inciting this type of rubbish”.
“I am happy to put my name
to this letter,” he told the
Daily Express. “If I didn’t
know better, I would say
Corbyn has deliberately
aggravated the situation
by associating himself
with known haters.”
Lord Sugar (inset) also
posted an “ode to Jeremy
Corbyn” on Twitter and called
on MPs and peers to “grow a pair
and get him OUT”.
The letter to the Met was drafted
by Lord Polak, honorary president
of the Conservative Friends of
Israel, and was backed by 10
other peers.
The letter states:
“In one such example,
the member of the
Supporting Jeremy
Corbyn and John
McDonnell Facebook
group said ‘Adolph [sic],
you should have finished the
job’. This is a clear and unambiguous
example of hate speech.”
10
NEWS
ENVIRONMENT
EQUALITY
Britain’s biggest
union has 30%
gender pay gap
By Caitlin Morrison
Around 1,500 organisations failed to
report gender pay gap data by the
deadline of midnight on Wednesday,
according to the Equality and Human
Rights Commission (ECHR).
Unite, the UK’s largest
union, missed the deadline,
and filed its results yesterday. The union, which
describes itself as being
“at the forefront of the
trade union campaign
to achieve equal pay”, revealed its female employees’
median hourly pay was 29.6 per
cent lower than that of male workers.
In reporting gender pay, firms with
more than 250 staff have to publish
data on the average difference between male and female employees.
Meanwhile, a handful of employers have already filed figures for
the 2018-19 financial year, including
the Conservative Party’s campaign
headquarters, which has reported a
gender pay gap in favour of women of
15.7 per cent.
ECHR boss Rebecca Hilsenrath
said 1,557 firms missed the deadline.
She said the ECHR was pleased with
the rate of reporting. But she added:
“It’s the law, it’s not an option.”
Early analysis shows that 78 per
cent of firms reported that they pay
men more than women, while 8 per
cent reported no median gap and 14
per cent reported a gap that favours
The UK company with
the largest gender pay
gap in favour of men is Millwall
Holdings Plc, the parent company
of Millwall FC. Its median hourly
pay gap is 80 per cent.
Eco-friendly
coffee capsules
created by the
Eden Project
By Katie Grant
How to get a 0% pay gap
Despite being dismissed by BBC
Newsnight’s business editor Helen
Thomas as “statistically impossible”,
48 companies have reported a
0 per cent gender pay gap.
One is Triangle
Wholefoods Ltd, the
company behind Suma,
which produces ethical,
eco-friendly foods. How
did they manage it?
Emma Robinson, brand
team co-ordinator at Suma,
tells i: “Everyone gets paid the
same, regardless of the job you do.
Some people work in the canteen for
a day, then go out driving, then do
sales, all in one week. We can only do
that because of the equal pay. There’s
never been any negotiation over
pay gaps behind closed doors, and
we all vote on wage rises between
ourselves.” Sophie Wilkinson
women. On Wednesday, the equalities
minister, Baroness Williams (inset),
said the ECHR had “powers to make
[firms] produce an action plan about
complying. If they don’t comply, there
is recourse to the courts and also
fines. There will be pressure on them
if they don’t comply,” she added.
The ECHR said it will write to employers who have failed to produce
the relevant information on 9 April
and give them 28 days to report. If
they fail to meet the extended deadline, they face legal action.
A spokesman for the Institute for
Fiscal Studies said: “The gender wage
gap has barely fallen over the past 15
years and greater understanding of
its determinants are needed. As ever,
however, the statistics are limited.”
Star throws book at race issue
Alesha Dixon, the singer and
television presenter, launched
her debut novel at the Science
Museum yesterday.
The ‘Britain’s Got Talent’ judge
has written a children’s story
called ‘Lightning Girl’ about a
mixed-race schoolgirl with superpowers called Aurora Beam. Dixon
said: “I didn’t set out to make a
statement about race in the book.
But I’d be fibbing if I said it wasn’t
a factor. My heroine wants to be a
normal girl and is in denial.” PA
THE INDEPENDENT
The Eden Project has developed a
range of coffee capsules which, the
organisation says, will break down
into simple raw materials in a domestic compost heap in a matter
of weeks.
The range consists of four organically grown coffees – Colombian,
Guatemalan, Costa Rican and Italian Espresso decaffeinated – and is
being hailed by the Cornwall-based
educational charity as a “world first”.
Once lauded for giving latte
lovers the opportunity to
enjoy premium quality
coffee at home, singleserve coffee pods
have experienced a
fall from grace, with
critics pointing to
the amount of waste
they create.
Almost 200 million
capsules are bought in
the UK each year, according to
Kantar World Panel, but they are
not generally accepted for recycling,
and typically contain aluminium and
plastic, meaning that they are not
biodegradable and, more often than
not, are destined for landfill.
In 2016, Germany’s second-largest
city, Hamburg, banned single-use
coffee pods from government-run
buildings, including offices, schools
and universities.
“These portion packs cause unnecessary resource consumption
and waste generation, and often contain polluting aluminium,” the city’s
environment and energy department said.
Nespresso, part of the Swiss multinational Nestlé, is perhaps the
brand most closely associated with
coffee pods. Last year it introduced
a recycling scheme, inviting customers to post empty pods back to
the company.
POLITICS
MUSIC
Parties ‘must publish
candidate gender gap’
Stars swap ‘he’ and ‘she’ for gay album
By Nigel Morris
POLITICAL EDITOR
Political parties have been challenged to come clean over their own
“gender gaps” in their choice of
election candidates.
With the deadline for
large companies to reveal
their gender pay gaps having passed, the Electoral
Reform Society (ERS)
called on the Government
to “look closer to home”.
It is pressing for legislation
requiring parties to provide details
of candidates’ backgrounds to come
into force. Currently, just 32 per cent
of MPs and 33 per cent of councillors
in the United Kingdom are women.
Jess Garland (inset), director of policy
and research at the ERS, said: “It is
time UK parties tackled the inequality in their own backyards.
“We’ve seen businesses play
their part. Now government
and political parties must
play theirs in showing
their diversity figures.
Much like the gender pay
gap, political inequality is
holding back progress in
this country.”
Under the Equality Act, parties are obliged to publish the demographic make-up of their election
candidates. The requirement is already in statute but needs enacting.
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
Bob Dylan, Kesha and St Vincent
have switched the pronouns on
popular love songs to create a
new soundtrack to accompany
LGBTQ weddings.
The six-song album, Universal
Love, released digitally, features
Dylan’s re-working of “She’s
Funny That Way” into “He’s
Funny That Way”, singing
lines such as “I got a man crazy
for me”.
Rob Kaplan, the compilation
producer, said of Dylan’s
involvement: “It wasn’t just, ‘Yes,
I’ll do this’, it was, ‘Hey, I have an
idea for a song’.”
Grammy-winning singer St
Vincent reworked The Crystals’
Bob Dylan recorded ‘He’s funny that
way’ for the compilation AP
“Then He Kissed Me” to “Then
She Kissed Me” on the album.
Kesha, a longtime supporter of
equal rights for LGBTQ people,
closes the album with “I Need
A Woman To Love”, a spin-off
of Janis Joplin’s “I Need A Man
To Love”.
The mini-album was funded
by MGM Resorts International
to create wedding songs for
same-sex couples who tie the
knot at its hotels.
Same-sex weddings account
for almost 30 per cent of the
ceremonies performed at the
company’s 15 Las Vegas hotels.
The publishers of the songs all
gave their approval.
Death Cab for Cutie singer Ben
Gibbard switches the Beatles’
“And I Love Her” to “And I Love
Him”. Kele Okereke of Bloc Party
turns The Temptations’ “My
Girl” into “My Guy”.
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11
PEOPLE
Crowe sells his chariot in ‘divorce auction’
By Florence Snead
Russell Crowe is set to auction off
hundreds of his possessions – including props from the Oscar-winning
film Gladiator – to get a “positive” out
of the end of his marriage to Danielle
Spencer.
The auction, Russell
Crowe: The Art of Divorce, is described by
Sotheby’s Australia as a “selection
of major works” from the actor’s
private collection. Items go on
sale tomorrow. A total of 227
lots will go under the hammer, including paintings,
guitars and props from
Crowe’s movies.
For fans of the 2000
film Gladiator – for which
Crowe won the Best Actor
Oscar – lots include two life-size
horse props and a fully functioning
replica of a Roman chariot used for
the film.
In an interview with Good
Morning Britain, Crowe
(inset) said of the divorce:
“I was looking for a way
to bounce that into something more positive so this
is what I came up with. It
was after a couple of vodkas
in the middle of the desert.”
Russell
Crowe’s
chariot will
go under the
hammer
HEALTH
By Josie Clarke
A tax on unhealthy drink or food, such
as the soft drinks levy, would encourage almost half of Britons to cut back
on the products, a survey suggests.
As the sugar tax comes into effect
today, analysts Mintel found it
is likely to have an effect on
47 per cent of consumers,
with that figure rising
to 53 per cent of 16- to
34-year-olds. Regionally,
Londoners (53 per cent)
are the most likely to be
deterred by a tax, dropping
to 38 per cent in Scotland.
More than half of Britons (56 per
cent) say they would cut down on unhealthy products if there were tighter
restrictions on junk food advertising.
Just 11 per cent say they strive to
eat healthily all the time, although
the proportion of those who try to eat
well most of the time has risen four
percentage points to 52 per cent over
the past two years.
Mintel associate director of food
and drink, Emma Clifford, said:
“Although Britons have ingrained
healthy eating intentions and have
upped their efforts to cut down on
their sugar intake, the majority of
British adults are overweight or
obese and Britain is ranked the sixth
fattest nation in the world.”
The research found low sugar content was the most important factor
consumers look for in healthy food,
Three-quarters of
consumers say clear
nutritional information on
packaging would encourage them
to cut down on unhealthy food.
Toby Campion and Laurie Ogden, poets
Junk food nation?
Tax us thin, urge
British public
Fizzy pop
Tesco started reducing sugar in its
soft drinks in 2011 and all 251 of its
own-label products that would have
been affected by the levy have been
reformulated to below 5g
per 100ml.
Asda and Morrisons
have reformulated all
their own-label soft
drinks and now fall
under the threshold.
Of Britain’s “Big Four”
supermarket chains,
only Sainsbury’s has not
reformulated its entire range.
A spokeswoman said the chain
wanted to give customers “choice”.
named as the top consideration by 52
per cent of shoppers, ahead of five-aday claims (48 per cent) and low fat
content (45 per cent).
Ms Clifford said: “A war is
being waged against sugar by the
Government and the media. This
sustained attack over a number of
years has had a big impact on how
consumers view this now-demonised
ingredient, and what they think constitutes healthy food. It’s encouraging that Britons are making more of
an effort to eat more healthily,
though they continue to enjoy permissible indulgences.
“However, there is potential for
this trend to be undermined by consumers’ incomes being squeezed,
together with the perception that
healthy food is expensive. Nevertheless, there are still opportunities for
retailers to provide more shopper
support in making healthier and
price-savvy choices.”
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CRIME
‘Young people are slaughtered every
day’ – father of stabbing victim
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
13
EDUCATION
By John Dunne
The father of London’s latest knife
crime victim demanded that the
“bloodshed must stop”, saying his son
was just cycling to meet friends when
he was fatally stabbed on Wednesday.
Israel Ogunsola, 18, who was studying computer programming, was
described by his father Dele as “academically brilliant”.
Speaking at the family home close
to the scene in Homerton, east London, Mr Ogunsola, 55, a customer
services administrator, said: “My
son was a well brought-up boy who
respected everyone and was liked by
all and sundry. The bloodshed must
stop. London’s streets are so dangerous. Young people are being slaughtered every day.
“If it means bringing back more
stop-and-search, then so be it. We
have to tackle this problem and the
Government needs to do more.”
His son, known as Izzy, was one of
two men who died in separate attacks
a mile apart in east London in recent
days. The injured teenager was found
by police officers in Link Street,
Homerton, at 8pm. He was given first
aid by an off-duty paramedic but pronounced dead at the scene 25 minutes
Tory London Assembly
Member Shaun Bailey
accused Mr Khan of “dodging the
issue” by claiming it was about
police cuts. “It isn’t. It’s about
police activity.”
Cambridge admits fewest students
from poor backgrounds GETTY
Cambridge
University
is the ‘most
unequal’
By Eleanor Busby
Israel Ogunsola,
18, was stabbed
to death in
Homerton, east
London, on
Wednesday PA
later. Two boys aged 17 have been arrested on suspicion of murder.
Hours earlier, a man, 53, suffered a fatal head injury after being
“punched” to the floor outside a betting shop in Clapton. Witnesses said
the victim was a regular customer at
Betfred in Upper Clapton Road.
The victim is believed to have had
an argument with another man before the attack. His attacker fled after
the brawl just before 4.30pm.
The deaths come amid fears of a
surge in violence in London. There
have been 55 killings in the capital
this year and stabbings are at their
highest rate since 2010-11.
Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said
the rising number of murders was
“heartbreaking” and criticised the
Government for cuts to the policing
budget, which he said had fallen by
£700m in the past seven years.
On Tuesday, Stella Creasy, the MP
for Walthamstow, urged Theresa May
to intervene and posted a letter on social media she had sent to Home Secretary Amber Rudd on Wednesday.
POLITICS
MPs ask: where’s London’s Mayor?
By Nigel Morris
The London Mayor, Sadiq
Khan, has been accused by
MPs of taking too low a
profile during the recent
spate of knife and gun
crime in the capital.
Tottenham MP David
Lammy said he had not
heard from Mr Khan (inset)
– or Home Secretary Amber
Rudd – despite four of the killings
taking place in his constituency.
Mr Lammy said: “I’ve not had a
phone call from the Home Secretary,
I’ve not had a phone call from
the Mayor.”
Iain Duncan Smith
claimed the Mayor was
“missing in action”. “My
question is, where has he
been?” the former Tory
cabinet member asked.
Mr Khan has admitted
that he was yet to meet any
of the bereaved families of recent
murder victims.
The Mayor has repeatedly attacked the Government for imposing
cuts on London’s policing budget, as
well as reducing spending on youth
centres and mental health.
A spokesman for Mr Khan said:
“The Mayor is shocked and angered
by the violent deaths on the streets of
London this year.
“The police are doing everything
they can to catch those responsible and patrols have already been
stepped up and extra stop-andsearch powers are in place.”
POLICE
Murder victim’s
search delayed
for four hours
By Eleanor Barlow
Greater Manchester Police (GMP)
has apologised after a search for
a murdered teenager was delayed
by four hours because there were
no available officers.
Ellen Higginbottom, 18, was
reported missing at about 7pm on
16 June last year. Her body was
found at Orrell Water Park in
Wigan the following morning.
Mark Buckley, 52, was jailed
for a minimum of 31 years for her
murder. The Independent Office
for Police Conduct found a lack
of resources at GMP led to the
search being delayed 13 times.
Assistant Chief Constable Chris
Sykes said cuts left the force
with 2,000 fewer officers, but he
added: “The delay in being able
to allocate officers clearly caused
extra stress and worry to her
family and friends. For this, we
can only apologise.”
Cambridge is the most unequal
university in Britain for admitting
students from different economic
backgrounds, research suggests.
A report, published by the
Higher Education Policy Institute
(HEPI), ranked the University of
Hull as the best performing institution for admitting a balanced
intake of rich and poor students.
Some of the country’s most
prestigious universities – such as
St Andrew’s, Bristol, Durham and
Aberdeen – were also placed in the
bottom 10 of the table. Oxford was
fourth worst.
The rankings are based on data
which divides neighbourhoods
into five economic groups and the
proportion of young people making it to university. The University
of Hull takes almost exactly a fifth
of its students from each group.
Nick Hillman, director of HEPI,
said: “This analysis reveals which
universities reflect wider society
best, and those which have further
to travel.”
He added: “Tackling the challenge is fraught with problems.
“The biggest obstacle is probably a fear among parts of society
that have historically dominated
our most selective universities
that they could be squeezed out.”
Of the top 10 most unequal institutions, Russell Group universities accounted for seven places.
On widening participation, Iain
Martin, Anglia Ruskin University
vice chancellor and report author,
said: “It remains that we do not
have an educational level playing
field.” THE INDEPENDENT
Tomorrow, in your
Spring bike rides for all
the family
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TRANSPORT
‘Once in a generation’ chance to renew North
By Dean Kirby
NORTHERN CORRESPONDENT
Leaders in the North of England
have heralded a new era for
transport investment as ministers
handed over new powers to bridge
the economic divide with London.
Transport for the North (TfN) has
become England’s first sub-national
transport body as officials hailed a
“once in a generation opportunity”
to shape the region’s transport
infrastructure.
The move, which comes amid
Transport minister
Jo Johnson said the move
signalled the Government’s
“unwavering commitment” to
giving the “great towns and cities
of the North far greater influence
over transport investment”.
a campaign for more transport
cash by Northern leaders, means
the region’s transport strategy
will be formally considered by the
Transport Secretary, Chris Grayling
(inset). The body will be able to fund
organisations to deliver projects
such as smart-ticketing, work
with local authorities to
fund road schemes and
be consulted on rail
franchises.
But the partnership
of 19 local authorities
and business leaders
will lack Transport
for London’s ability to
raise capital.
John Cridland, the TfN
chairman, said: “For the first time,
recommendations on what and
where transport investment is
needed will be agreed by the people
that live and work in the North,
allowing us to speak with a united
voice to central government. It’s a
watershed moment for devolution
a n d a o n ce - i n - a - ge n e rat i o n
opportunity to deliver significant
improvements in the North’s
transport network.”
Politicians and business leaders
from across the North gathered
in Leeds last year to call
fo r m o r e t ra n s p o r t
investment in the region.
In Ja n u a r y, T f N
unveiled a draft 30year plan for delivering
a £100bn boost to the
North’s economy with
proposals to improve
road and rail links.
Henri Murison, the director
of the Northern Powerhouse
Partnership, said yesterday that
TfN’s statutory powers marked a
“step change in investment”.
“This could be a game-changer
for the North,” he added.
Analysis
Plans are on track, but can’t
compete with London funds
Dean Kirby
T
ransport for the North’s
new statutory footing
means the region can
speak with a unified voice
on an issue which more than any
other lays bare England’s NorthSouth divide.
It is welcome news in a region
where it still takes longer to travel
from Liverpool to Hull by train
than a journey by Eurostar from
London to Paris.
TfN’s new status means it
becomes a statutory partner to
the Department for Transport
and its recommendations must
be considered by the Government
when transport decisions are
being taken about the North.
Its work will include developing
a strategic transport plan,
co-ordinating smart-ticketing
and having a voice in road and rail
investment decisions.
But it will not have the same
revenue raising and borrowing
powers as Transport for London
– an outcome that led to Lord
Prescott calling TfN’s statutory
status “a bloody fraud”.
CRIME
Brazilian
war effort
revealed
Doctor had
‘bad guys’
hit list and
guns stash
The Royal Ballet’s
Brazilian principal
dancer, Thiago Soares,
previews ‘The Art of
Diplomacy: Brazilian
Modernism Painted
for War’ in London.
The exhibition,
which opens today
at the Sala Brasil
Arts Centre in the
Brazilian Embassy,
reveals the hidden
story of Brazilian
artists’ contribution to
Britain’s war effort.
Running until 22
June, it features works
by 20 of Brazil’s finest
Modernist artists,
including Candido
Portinari, Emiliano Di
Cavalcanti and Roberto
Burle-Marx. GETTY
By Chris Green
SCOTLAND EDITOR
A former casualty unit doctor who
stockpiled an arsenal of weapons and
made an “assassination list” of colleagues he blamed for his dismissal
has been jailed for 12 years.
Dr Martin Watt, 62, was found
with three Skorpion sub-machine
guns, two Valtro pistols and 1,500 live
bullets at his house in Cumbernauld,
North Lanarkshire, last year.
The former NHS consultant had
also made a list of staff at nearby
Monklands Hospital he believed were
responsible for getting him sacked in
2012, labelling it “bad guys”.
Watt, whose marriage broke down
around the same time as he lost his
job, was found guilty of possessing
firearms with intent to endanger
life last month. The former doctor
bought his stash of decommissioned
weapons legally from the Czech Republic, before reassembling them in
his home workshop.
The Crown Office said he had
“a clear plan in place to carry out a
dreadful event”, after Glasgow’s High
Court heard he had carried out shooting practice to improve his marksmanship. When police searched his
home following a tip-off, they found
that he had also researched the best
routes to the addresses of some of the
people on his list and noted their car
licence numberplates.
Watt insisted that he had no intention of actually carrying out an attack
using the weapons, claiming he had
simply been trying to make himself
feel better by compiling the list.
Judge Lady Stacey told Watt: “I
take the view you represent a danger
to members of the public.”
SOCIETY
Bid to crack down on 4,000
caravans on illegal sites
By Sam Lister
Powers to tackle illegal Traveller
camps are being reviewed after
nearly 4,000 caravans were found
on unauthorised sites.
The Housing minister, Dominic
Raab, insisted most Travellers were
“decent and law-abiding” people but
said the Government was concerned
about sites that broke the law.
About 3,700 caravans, 16 per cent
of the total, were on unauthorised
sites, according to the Ministry of
Housing, Communities and Local
Government. It said they could
cause significant distress for local
communities with concerns raised
about fly-tipping and noise.
Living on unauthorised sites
could harm Travellers’ health and
education, the department added.
Mr Raab said: “The vast majority
of the travelling community are
decent and law-abiding people.
“ B u t we a re p a r t i c u l a rl y
concerned about illegal Traveller
encampments, and some of the
anti-social behaviour they can
give rise to.”
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TheOpinionMatrix
COMMENT FROM HOME AND ABROAD
SALISBURY
ATTACK
BORIS
JOHNSON
THE FUTURE
OF FRANCE
KNIFE
CRIME
TRUMP vs
AMAZON
IS ‘HIGNFY’
TOO SEXIST?
Whodunnit?
We still don’t
really know
The Foreign
Secretary is
unsackable
Macron is
confounding
his public
Scotland Yard
has questions
to answer
President has
big business
on the brain
MP Dorries
complains
about show
The Sun
Daily Mirror
The Guardian
The Economist
The New Yorker
Daily Mail
Jeremy Corbyn wants
“proof”. What, exactly?
A confession signed
by Putin in blood?
We doubt even that
would satisfy him.
Our government
has led an admirably
robust international
response. It must get
on the front foot again.
(Editorial)
Boris Johnson is a
liability that the UK
cannot afford as
Foreign Secretary.
Theresa May is too
weak to sack Johnson,
but there is no doubt
the Cabinet blunderer
is a worrying national
embarrassment.
(Editorial)
TheTimes
Theresa May cannot
dismiss Boris
Johnson for fear of
collateral damage.
And so Johnson (who
journalists call “Boris”)
continues to hold
sway at an austerityravaged Foreign Office
– which, once lauded
as proof of British
“superiority”, now
merely exhibits
its decline.
(George Eaton)
There are all too many
people in the West
who will be diverted on
the matter of Russian
culpability. They all
need to understand
something. Russia
is not playing their
game. Russia’s policy
is to pursue its own
interests and to use
the West’s self-doubts
against it.
(David Aaronovitch)
Quote of
the day
Drugs are
prolific. It’s
like Deliveroo.
They’re as
prolific as
ordering a pizza.
You can get them
on Snapchat
David Lammy
The Labour MP takes
stock of London’s
crime rates
New Statesman
Many resent what they
see as social arrogance
from President
Emmanuel Macron and
the young technocrats
surrounding him.
It’s not enough to be
certain you are right, if
the citizens don’t see
and feel it that way.
And, right now, too
many of them don’t.
(Pierre Haski)
London’s newish chief
of police, Cressida Dick,
wants knife crime to be
regarded as a publichealth issue, making it
a priority for the health
service and councils as
well as the police. Such
measures will come
too late for Tanesha
Melbourne-Blake, who
died on 2 April.
(Editorial)
The Spectator
EveningStandard
France has embarked
upon a war of
attrition – and of
vision. The France
Macron envisages is a
“start-up nation” – he
wants to reposition
Paris as a post-Brexit
paradise. It’s a vision
that horrifies millions
who don’t want France
to change.
(Gavin Mortimer)
When my daughter
was a teenager, she
went around in a
group. Almost every
time they went out
someone had an
iPhone stolen.
None of them ever
contacted the police
– it just didn’t occur
to them that the
police could help.
(Penelope Gibbs)
Donald Trump’s
targeting of Amazon
cannot be seen as
separate from his
effort to undermine
confidence in the press
and exert revenge
on reporting he does
not like. The idea of a
President using the
government to settle
scores is something
out of an autocracy.
(Sheelah Kolhatkar)
USA Today
Government did not
stop industrial giants
of the 19th century
on the grounds that
they were hurting
craft guilds. Trump
should not coddle
Amazon’s competitors,
who are more likely to
be retail chains than
“mom-and-pop” shops.
(Editorial)
If producers are
looking to balance their
panellists [on Have I
Got News for You], they
should forget about
gender and venture
out of their bubble to
find guests who don’t
replicate their own
political views. I’m sure
they’ll find there are
plenty of women out
there who will be able
to cope just fine.
(Julia Hartley-Brewer)
Daily Telegraph
Paul Merton and Ian
Hislop are extremely
good. That can make the
other panellists look a
bit pedestrian. Unfair?
Yes. But you have been
given the privilege of
appearing on prime
time telly. You are there
to make people laugh.
(Quentin Letts)
LifeInBrief
WINNIE MADIKIZELA-MANDELA POLITICIAN
Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, who
has died aged 81, was the former wife
of Nelson Mandela and for decades
one of South Africa’s most prominent
and polarising figures. Long after
her divorce from the country’s first
democratically elected president,
Madikizela-Mandela was still called the
Mother of the Nation.
Nomzamo Winifred Zanyiwe
Madikizela was born in a remote part
of South Africa called Pondoland in
1936. Her father, Columbus, was a
schoolteacher. Soon after MadikizelaMandela obtained a social-work
degree from the Jan Hofmeyr School in
Johannesburg, she met Mandela.
Their first date was lunch at an
Indian restaurant near Mandela’s law
office. Sixteen years her senior, he
was amused by her inability to eat the
spicy curry. “Politicians are not lovers,”
she told the South African television
show Carte Blanche in 1992, recalling
their early days together. Yet the two
developed what others described as a
passionate relationship.
Less than a year after their first
date, Nelson showed Winnie the house
of a dressmaker and told her that
she should get fitted. He asked how
many bridesmaids she would like to
have, Madikizela-Mandela recalled in
her autobiography. “That’s how I was
told I was getting married to him!”
Madikizela-Mandela said. “I asked: ‘What
time?’ I was madly in love with him.”
The couple struggled against
apartheid as the regime imposed ever
more oppressive laws. MadikizelaMandela’s first incarceration came in
1958, when she joined mass protests
against laws that limited black women’s
mobility. She continued to battle the
legal system for the rest of her life.
When Nelson Mandela left prison in
1990, his wife was there, one hand in
her husband’s, the other held aloft in a
fist. But the marriage did not last.
When he emerged after 27 years
inside, he said, the woman he once
called his “darling” had changed. She
was blatant in her infidelity, he added,
and cold. “I was the loneliest man
during the time I stayed with her,”
he said. A judge granted the divorce,
despite Madikizela-Mandela’s protests.
In 1998, the country’s Truth and
Reconciliation Commission, chaired by
Archbishop Desmond Tutu, condemned
her for human rights violations after
evidence from 30 witnesses. In the late
2000s, she emerged again as one of
the country’s most popular politicians.
South Africa’s young people continued
to call her their hero, and government
officials said the African National
Congress party would “never turn its
back on Winnie”. “Without condoning
her misdemeanours, we must
acknowledge that she is a victim, she
is damaged and hurt,” said the future
South African President Kgalema
Motlanthe, who at the time was the
ANC’s secretary-general.
“When someone is subjected to the
kind of consistent persecution and
harassment she suffered from the
apartheid system, something is bound
to snap. We understand that and will
always be there for her.”
THE WASHINGTON POST
Born 26 September 1936
Died 2 April 2018
Stephanie Hanes
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MyView
WillTanner
It’s no longer just the economy, stupid
Voters around Britain did not want more of the same
D
uring the 1992 US
presidential race, the
Democratic Party
strategist James
Carville hung a sign
on the wall of Bill
Clinton’s campaign headquarters in
Little Rock, Arkansas, and chalked
a reminder to staff: “The economy,
stupid.” In the quarter of a century
since, the straightforward message
has become one of the iron laws of
political campaigning: the economy
trumps all other voter concerns.
That law was broken in June 2016
when the British people voted to
leave the European Union. At the
time, the economic case against
leaving was strong: newspapers
carried the Bank of England’s
threats of recession, the Treasury’s
warnings of mass unemployment
and business leaders predicting
weaker investment.
Yet people ignored the experts
and voted for Brexit, and did so
in largest numbers where the
economic risks were supposedly
greatest – in places such as
Tyneside, Plymouth and Boston.
According to the latest polls, the
same places would overwhelmingly
do so again in the event of a
second referendum, undeterred
by economic uncertainty and the
possibility – officially set out in the
government impact assessments –
of being less well off than they might
have been.
Why? Not because voters were
misled, as some believe, or because
they were foolish, as others infer.
But because of another maxim
that Carville wrote on the same
chalkboard in Little Rock, but
which is often forgotten from
electoral folklore. It read: “Change,
not more of the same.”
Britain’s regional voters did
not want more of the same. Their
narrow pecuniary interest was
completely outweighed by the broad
opportunity to upend the liberal
political and economic consensus
– a chance to hold accountable a
system which had poorly served
Britain’s regional economies and
favoured its capital for decades.
A cursory glance at economic
statistics reveals why. In terms of
growth, London’s economic output
is now nearly double that of the UK
average, and is projected to grow
quicker than any other region for
the next decade. In the past five
years, the capital has attracted
more foreign direct investment
projects than all other regions,
excluding the South East of
England, combined – equivalent to
Anti-capitalist protesters,
misappropriating James
Carville’s 1992 slogan,
march to a UN climate
conference in Copenhagen
MIGUEL VILLAGRAN/GETTY
nine times the number garnered by
the South West.
A similar story is true for
household wealth. Between
2006 and 2014, average property
wealth of households, minus their
mortgage debt, fell by 51 per cent
in the North East of England but
rose by 49 per cent in London,
even as ownership rates moved
in similar directions. Today, 10
times as many of the richest tenth
of households live in London as
they do in the North East. Similar
imbalances can be found in the
formulae that distribute public
funding for schools, policing and
local government.
Every indication is that these
structural rifts will grow over the
coming decade, as automation and
globalisation hollow out low-skilled
labour markets and concentrate
wealth in global cities. To fix them,
the Government must deliver
from all sides – a proper industrial
strategy, a radical new skills
framework and serious housing
market reform are just the start.
Alongside this, the Government
should replace European economic
funding post-Brexit with a new
investment framework that is
unapologetic about helping areas
that have been left behind.
Progress
means taking the
referendum at
face value and
not ignoring the
protest within
With the right uplift in fibre
broadband and incentives for
translational research and venture
capital, Leeds could be a global
hub for medical technology. The
same is true of Leicester for the
UK space industry, or Belfast for
cyber security. People still baulk at
the thought of picking winners, but
governments have been doing it
with London for decades.
Progress will also require taking
the referendum result at face
value, and not ignoring the protest
contained within. This is what the
Prime Minister recognised when
she spoke on the steps of Downing
Street in the weeks that followed,
and what the Conservative Party
failed to articulate during last year’s
general election.
It is what those who seek to
overturn the referendum, or null
its result through the forthcoming
customs union vote in Parliament
continue to ignore. Indeed, it is what
politicians who want to reheat the
failed ideological programmes of
the socialist left and the libertarian
right cannot comprehend.
The Brexit result has exposed the
iron laws of politics as brittle and
those that cling to them as foolish.
Voters, especially those in regional
towns with most at stake from the
decision, did not vote to become
poorer. They voted against more of
the same. Given how their fortunes
have fared over recent decades, why
shouldn’t they?
Will Tanner was an adviser to
Theresa May from 2014-17 and
deputy head of the policy unit during
her first year in 10 Downing Street
Twitter: @will_tanner
i@inews.co.uk
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@
Your
View
TWEETS
AND EMAILS
The right to
defend a home
We had an intruder a few
months ago. I was just
putting out an empty
milk bottle first thing on
a Sunday morning when
he popped out from the
side of our house into
our front garden and
started walking towards
me. I tried to ask him
what he was doing but
my mouth went dry and
I could hardly get the
words out.
I tried to call up to my
husband ,who was still
in bed, but my voice was
really weak. The man
approached me when
I again asked him what
he was doing, but I then
went into our house and
shut the door quickly as
I suddenly felt faint with
the fear.
It took me a couple of
days to calm down and
feel right again. I’m just
trying to point out that
the effect of the shock
can drastically affect
the way you behave and
it may be impossible to
think or act rationally.
SARAH GALL
ROCHDALE
Modernising
King’s dream
The Washington Post
(Opinion Matrix, 5 April)
understates Martin
Luther King’s Dream.
The “dream” certainly
belongs now to all
of us, but it can be
enjoyed only as it is
shared by all people,
not just by “all men”.
DOROTHY SPENCE
APPLEBY, CUMBRIA
Rise in crimes
of violence
I was brought up in
Glasgow at around the
time of the book No Mean
City. Glasgow has been
blighted with adverse
publicity ever since,
However, the title should
now be passed over to
London with the amount
of stabbings and killings
there. Glasgow was badly
treated at the time, and
still suffers. London
should accept the title.
V McBREARTY
TROON,
SOUTH AYRSHIRE
takes two more steps
to find the seventh row,
starting with the sixth
row by adding 1 + 4,
4 + 6, 6 + 4, 4 + 1 and
putting a 1 at the
beginning and end, giving
1, 5, 10, 10, 5, 1.
One more similar
calculation and you have
row seven.
MIKE RATH
BARNSTAPLE, DEVON
Printers must
lower prices
I was not surprised
by the news that the
passport contract has
not been awarded to the
British company because
it is more expensive. A
village in Shropshire has
its monthly newsletter
(for a few hundred
residents) printed in
Germany because it is
cheaper to email it there
and have it posted back.
Isn’t it time that British
printing companies
reviewed their costs?
HILARY SAWYER
WITNEY, OXFORDSHIRE
Sin taxes, yes…
stealth taxes, no
I am all for sin taxes on
unhealthy products,
but they should not be
used as stealth taxes.
Surely the balance
should be addressed by
subsidising items such
as fresh fruit, vegetables,
water, nuts and the like
to make them more
affordable to promote a
healthier diet?
STEVE DUNN
NORTH SHIELDS,
NORTH TYNESIDE
I can’t Adam
and Eve it
Further to recent
thoughts about belly
buttons, I was reminded
of my mum’s riddle from
childhood: “If Adam was
the first person on Earth,
who pushed his pram?”
IAN DUCKWORTH
HORNDEAN,
HAMPSHIRE
Indiana Joan?
What about Lara?
Jessica Barrett (People,
5 April) asks if we need
a female Indiana Jones.
Haven’t we already got
one – Lara Croft in
Tomb Raider?
NIK LEVER
Sonic boom
and bust
Reader Gareth Thomas
disagrees with i’s review
of Diana Morgan in the
comedy ‘Cunk on Britain’
Religion can be
source of jokes
John Beaumont (Your
View, 5 April) complains
that i wrongly lauds Irish
comedian Dave Allen
for mocking aspects of
Catholicism. He says
that you wouldn’t mock
other religions. That is
not the point. Jewish
comedians relentlessly
laugh at themselves
and their culture, as do
members of other faiths
and communities.
i might give a positive
review of one of these
comedians for being
funny, or say that the
audience loved the show.
How is that a problem?
JOANNE SOROKA
EDINBURGH
‘Cunk on
Britain’ was
claptrap
I must strongly disagree
with Sean O’Grady’s
review of Cunk on Britain
(4 April). His comparison
of this character to Ali
G was way off the mark.
The episode was an overlong, dated skit from an
early 1980s sketch show:
immature and puerile.
I cannot believe for
one minute that Robert
Peston and the like were
naive enough in this
media-aware age to fall
for this claptrap – they
were in on the “joke”.
GARETH THOMAS
SKETTY, SWANSEA
I don’t drink
to distraction
I was saddened and
annoyed to read Lizzi
Sandell’s “Am I drinking
to distraction – or to
destruction?” (i, 5 April).
Saddened to know
that it breaks her heart
to imagine a life of
weddings where she
won’t drink.
We have just returned
from our son’s wedding
to his Indian wife in
Assam. It was a three-day
affair and there was no
alcohol. It was full of fun,
laughter, dancing and
affection. We didn’t
need alcohol and had
some of the happiest
days of our lives.
I was annoyed by Lizzi
falling into the simplistic
cliché of speaking on
behalf of all of Britain
when she said we drink
to commiserate and
celebrate, or because
we’re stressed, jubilant,
awkward or bored.
I and many others, I’m
sure, drink our beer, wine
or spirits because we
actually enjoy the taste.
KEN HOLLAND
TEIGNMOUTH, DEVON
Pascal’s triangle
explained
I was quite surprised by
your Page 3 profile of
Jonathan Noble (4 April).
There will, I expect, be
many people who are
well aware of Pascal’s
Triangle, and I would
suggest that it is a classic
lack of awareness of
those who work in the
media of the depths
of mathematics that
makes such an idea
newsworthy.
An interesting point
about the first few rows
of Pascal’s triangle is that
they represent powers
of 11, e.g. 110 = 1, 111 =11,
112 = 121, 113 = 1331,
114 = 14641.
From there on, it just
Your Science
Correspondent Tom
Bawden reports on by
Nasa’s development
of the new supersonic
X-Plane (i, 4 April), and
states that a sonic boom
is created by the plane’s
engines. This is incorrect.
The shockwave that
produces the distinctive
double boom is created
by the plane’s nose and
leading edge of its wings.
The engines have no part
to play other than driving
the plane faster than the
speed of sound. In fact,
when flying faster than
sound the engine noise is
left behind.
JOHN AVERY
A cross word
about clues
In the Jumbo General
Knowledge Crossword
(iWeekend, 24-25 March),
the clue 24 across states:
“Viral disease of parrots
that can be passed on
to humans.” The answer
given is psittacosis – but
psittacosis is not caused
by a virus but rather by
Chlamydia psittaci, which
is a bacterium.
VICTOR SLOAN, MD
VICE-PRESIDENT,
IMMUNOLOGY PATIENT
VALUE UNIT,
UCB BIOSCIENCES
MORE COMMENT oninews.co.uk
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IN MONDAY’S
TRAVEL
LIFE
Mum’s the word
Sophie Elkan’s book
‘The Girls’ Guide to
Growing Up Great’
Ré of light
Affordable
stays on one of
France’s most
chic islands
ART
Under the knife
Avant-garde artist
Linder takes over
Chatsworth with
lashings of Elvis
and snakes
NEWS
2-30
People
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
By Jessica Barrett
TV
38-39
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
i@inews.co.uk
Twitter: @jess_barrett
Harris
went on the
Rampage
just for fun
Arctic Monkeys
return to play
Former chart-toppers Arctic Monkeys
have revealed the name and release date of
their hotly anticipated sixth album – their
first record in five years. The Sheffield
rockers, who went on hiatus in 2014, said
Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino would be
released on 11 May.
The album, produced by frequent
collaborator James Ford and the band’s
frontman Alex Turner (right), was recorded
in Los Angeles, Paris and London.
The tracklisting includes the songs “Star
Treatment”, “American Sports”, “Golden
Trunks” and the whimsical “The World’s
First Ever Monster Truck Front Flip”.
Arctic Monkeys, who won seven Brit
Awards, took a break after releasing the
2013 album AM and its accompanying tour,
which ran until November 2014.
Naomie Harris is far more at
home making independent
films, such as the 2016
Oscar winner Moonlight, but
everyone has to pay the bills.
The British actress (below)
explains that she took a role
in the new sci-fi blockbuster
Rampage, alongside one of
Hollywood’s most bankable
stars – Dwayne “The Rock”
Johnson – because she wanted
to break out of the art house
movie stereotype.
“I absolutely loved the script.
It’s rare to see a film like this
infused with so much heart,”
said Harris.
She added that when she
accepted the part she was
in the middle of promoting
Moonlight and “was being
perceived as the character I
played in that film”.
She said: “I always like to
play completely different
characters to surprise
myself and have a varied
body of work… I wanted to do
something fun and playful and
light-hearted.”
Tatum-Dewan is the perfect split
The celebrity-split statement has
become an art form in recent years.
Channing Tatum and his wife,
Jenna Dewan, are the latest A-list
couple to carefully word their
declaration of independence.
Announcing that they had split
after nine years of marriage,
Tatum and Dewan, both 37,
decided to give the “conscious
uncouplers” Chris Martin and
Gwyneth Paltrow a run for
their money in the pretentious
stakes. They claimed they had
“lovingly chosen to separate as
Round-Up
Numberoftheday
100
Number of hours
that Justin Bieber
has spent getting
a tattoo across his
entire chest.
a couple” in order to “take some space
and help each other live the most
joyous, fulfilled lives as possible”.
Less joyous, however, are reports
in the US that the pair actually split
because of Tatum’s reluctance to
spend time at the family home.
However, Dewan clarified that
rumours of Tatum’s drinking and
flirting were not the reason for
their separation
She added: “The reason our
statement was so positive
[was] because that’s the reality
of the situation.”
Lifenotes
“Don’t let the hungry ghosts rob
you of your gifts. You
are pure potential.
I want to go to the
f**king Moon, so
I’m playing an
astronaut next.
Any objections? I
mean astronauts
don’t come from
Burton on Trent, do they?”
Paddy Considine silences his haters
in one fell swoop.
19
20
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Football’s offensive ‘yid’ chants verge on being hate crimes
KELNER’S VIEW
Simon
Kelner
I
am grateful to i reader Mick
Devine, from Ringwood in
Hampshire, who suggested on
our letters page yesterday that,
in the light of what is going on in
the Labour Party at the moment,
I should turn my attention instead
towards the problem of antiSemitism in football, “particularly
London clubs”. I can try to be more
specific. What Mr Devine wants to
highlight, I assume, is the question
of Tottenham Hotspur’s historic
affiliation to the Jewish faith, and
how rival supporters use that
cultural connection to taunt them.
It centres on the use of the
word “yid”, which is irrefutably,
undeniably, categorically a
derogatory and racist word, and
which, if used in public discourse,
would result in a criminal charge.
But it’s how Tottenham supporters
describe themselves. “Yid Army”
is what the hardcore fans, very few
of whom are actually Jewish, sing
proudly at the ground. The Israeli
flag is waved on the terraces.
Tottenham, it’s true, have a
significant support among north
London’s Jewish community, but
in my – admittedly anecdotal
– experience, no more
so than Arsenal.
Both clubs have had
well-known Jewish
chairmen in recent
years. Both have
famous Jewish fans.
But no matter. It’s
the Spurs followers who,
crudely, have used the
perception that they are the
Jewish people’s favoured club as
a badge of identity. They are, in their
own words, yids, using the term
ill-advisedly as a football, rather
than religious, identifier.
As a Jew myself, I find this
offensive. But is it a hate crime?
I’d find that charge hard to stick.
Of the many chants I hear at
football grounds (and sometimes,
to my shame, take part in) that are
off-colour, and sometimes vicious,
it’s not the worst. It’s only when it is
appropriated by the supporters of
Tottenham’s deadly rivals – Chelsea
(inset) and West Ham, principally
– and used as a term of abuse that it
becomes a different thing.
Chelsea fans sing a song about
one of their players, who they take
to their hearts because “he hates
yids”. I am sure the player himself is
embarrassed, but even I, as someone
not overly sensitised to antiSemitism, find this objectionable,
and certainly actionable. Once there
is a race hate aspect to a mindless
terrace chant, football’s authorities,
who have done much to curb
racism in the game, and
the clubs themselves,
must apply heavy
sanctions, and treat
this in the same way
they would if bananas
were thrown at a black
player. I am not sure
this happens.
Sectarian songs are
not a new thing in our
national game and, in addressing
Mr Devine’s point, I believe that
anti-Semitism in football is largely
a localised problem, which doesn’t
extend much beyond the extremities
of the London Underground map.
It is horrible, and shocking, to
hear, and not just for a Jewish
person. Football grounds are not
the hate-filled, violent environments
they used to be, but neither are
they genteel and well-mannered.
And nor should they be. Football
matters to people. And football fans
can be abused for who they support,
rather than for what they are, or for
a religion to which they purport to
belong. It’s when the two lines get
blurred that the trouble starts.
SOCIETY
her departure be such a bad thing?
Wintour is a formidable figure, and
would be snapped up elsewhere in
an instant.
More importantly, fresh blood
would get a look-in on the most
respected fashion magazine in
the world. Here, London sets
an example: the much talkedabout “posh girl exodus” from
Vogue House, Condé Nast’s UK
headquarters, was pre-empted by
the instalment of Edward Enninful
as the first male – and first black
– editor of British Vogue last year.
This was the antidote the magazine
needed after years of being criticised
for being not inclusive enough.
Some of Enninful’s changes have
been subtle: new fonts and a splash
of politics. Less subtle has been his
commitment to diversity. He writes
in the editor’s letter of his latest
issue, out this week: “As a new mood
begins to take hold – one that will
only enrich and enliven creativity in
fashion – I also believe that the time
has come for us to look forward. In
short, it is a moment for Vogue to do
what it has always done best: to offer
a bold vision of what the future can
– and should – look like.” Indeed.
Vogue, at times, didn’t feel
relevant enough to young people
from different backgrounds,
especially since, alongside
Instagram, it is the only window
some have in to the industry.
It does now – in time, it will do so
even more. And you know how that
happened? Change.
Serina
Sandhu
The fashion
world needs
to change
S
omeone recently said to me
that fashion is about change.
Sounds obvious, doesn’t it? It’s
a £66bn industry in the UK, so
there must be something changing to
keep people buying into it.
But in many ways there hasn’t
been enough change in fashion.
Fashion weeks are still dominated
by the same major brands, and the
same photographers have been
behind the lens for decades, with
the same models in front. It’s not a
bad thing, per se – these names keep
returning because they’re talented,
and it takes a rhino hide to weather
the competition. But sometimes it
feels as if chumminess within an old
guard is prioritised over progress.
Rumours that US Vogue’s editorin-chief, Dame Anna Wintour, might
be stepping down after 30 years
in the role have been swirling, but
have, of course, been denied by
the publication. Some say Vogue is
unimaginable without her. But would
Twitter: @serinasandhu1
NEWS
NEWS
2-30
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
38-39
BUSINESS SPORT
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i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
21
MUSIC
CONSUMER
By Adam Sherwin
Shop until you
trot: Aldi offers
budget horse
riding lessons
Bronze award for breakthrough
artists helps to mend slipped discs
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
The music industry is relaunching its
platinum, gold and silver disc sales
awardswithanewbronzecertification
for “breakthrough” artists.
The coveted discs, first handed out
to top-selling artists in 1973, will be
rebranded as Brit-certified awards.
The rise of streaming, which
helped the music business revive
after physical sales collapsed, means
fewer albums are reaching the sales
threshold to qualify for a disc award.
A single must sell 600,000 copies
or equivalent streams to earn a
platinum disc whilst an album has
to pass the 300,000 sales mark. The
industry body BPI said the thresholds
(gold – 400,000 singles/100,000
albums; silver – 200,000/60,000) will
be kept under review to keep pace
with the streaming age.
However, a new breakthrough
award will be created to recognise
new and emerging artists when they
pass the 30,000 sales mark. The BPI
said that this award, which might
benefit independent artists on their
debut release, would be a bronze disc.
The first singles to qualify for a
Brit-certified award include Stormzy
ft MNEK’s “Blinded by Your Grace
Part 2”, which goes platinum, and
Camila Cabello’s “Never Be the
Same”, which goes gold.
Private Investigations – The Best Of
Dire Straits and Mark Knopfler will
have 3 x platinum status conferred
upon it.
Geoff Taylor, chief executive of
the BPI and the Brit Awards, said:
“The BPI’s platinum, gold and silver
Awardsarecherishedasaniconicpart
of British music’s heritage and the
official mark of a record’s popularity.
Given that the Brits are the biggest
platform for musical success in the
UK, it makes sense for the BPI to
bring its official sales awards under
the Brits banner.”
Streaming, dominated by Spotify
and Apple Music, has encouraged
listeners to cherry-pick singles at the
expense of albums, meaning more
single tracks are achieving sales
By Katie Grant
Camila Cabello’s
single ‘Never Be
The Same’ has
gone gold
awards. Album sales have fallen from
a peak of 163 million in 2004 to 135
million last year.
Sir Cliff Richard is believed to
have the most UK certifications, with
more than 70 disc awards across a
60-year recording career which has
so far generated 67 top 10 singles.
The US record industry includes
video streams in its sales awards, a
change the BPI has yet to approve.
The new disc awards will be
announced each Friday, alongside the
Official Charts, via the Brits’ official
social media accounts.
More than 14,000 sales
milestone awards have
been issued by the BPI since 1973.
Record companies must pay for
each disc, which features a
unique BPI hologram, on behalf of
their artist.
Top of the pops Highlights of a golden era
Biggest sellers
Single “Candle In The Wind ’97” by
Elton John (inset) - (9 x platinum)
Album Greatest Hits by Queen
(20 x platinum)
Soundtrack Dirty Dancing
(10 x platinum)
Compilation Now That’s
What I Call Music 44
(7 x platinum)
First album certified
silver Red Rose
Speedway by Wings
First album certified gold Goodbye
Yellow Brick Road by Elton John
First album certified platinum
Singles 1969-1973 by The Carpenters
First 2 x platinum album Bat
Out Of Hell by Meatloaf
First 5 x platinum album Greatest
Hits by Queen
First 10 x platinum album Brothers
In Arms by Dire Straits ‘
First album certified on streams
alone Life Of Pablo by Kanye West
The first album to go
platinum with a new
Brit Certified Award will
be Starboy, which was
released in 2016 by
the Canadian R ’n’ B
singer The Weeknd.
The latest disc
certifications include Amy
Winehouse’s 2006 album Back to
Black, which has now achieved the
13 x platinum milestone, denoting
3.9 million units sold.
George Ezra’s new album Staying
at Tamara’s, the fastest-selling artist
album of 2018, has attained silver
status (60,000) in its first week.
A supermarket is not typically the
first place budding equestrians
will seek help in learning to ride,
but that hasn’t deterred Aldi from
encouraging people to saddle up.
The budget grocer has
partnered with two riding schools
and has announced it is launching
cut-price lessons in a bid to make
the sport more accessible to those
on lower incomes.
Horse owners typically incur
annual maintenance costs of
between £3,000 and £10,000,
figures from the price comparison
site MoneySuperMarket show.
Nearly one-fifth of riders are
forced to hang up their reins
due to the cost, according to the
British Equestrian Trade
Association.
To boost wider
involvement, Aldi
is offering old
and new riders
a 30 per cent
discount on
lessons as part
of its “Rein It
In” campaign.
Children and
adults are being
encouraged to sign up for the
30-minute riding lessons,
which are being offered at
Summerhouse Equestrian
in Cheltenham, and Parbold
Equestrian in Lancashire.
The lessons will be available
to buy from 8 April for a limited
time. Budding enthusiasts will
be taught how to mount and
dismount, develop balance and
control and how to direct a horse
to walk, trot, canter and halt.
Nicola Bennett, an equestrian
coach, said horse riding was
beginning to lose its “elitist” tag.
“Historically, it has been seen by
many as an expensive hobby,” she
said, welcoming Aldi’s initiative
as a way to encourage people of all
ages to “come and have a go”.
HERITAGE
NATURE
Georgian party house to
get Lottery makeover
Skilful lemurs ‘gain popularity’
By Dean Kirby
NORTHERN CORRESPONDENT
A Georgian “house of banter” has
been given a £3.7m restoration grant
by the National Lottery.
Seaton Delaval Hall in
Northumberland, which is
maintained by the National Trust,
has been described as an 18thcentury party house.
The Baroque stately home was
once the venue for the Delaval
family’s lavish balls, elaborate
practical jokes and spectacular
plays. Guests of the larger-thanlife family – who were among the
most outrageous of all Georgian
partygoers – would awake to find
their rooms turned upside down and
the furniture fixed to the ceiling.
A mechanical bed would also
give way to drop its occupant into
a bath of freezing water, and walls
would disappear just as guests were
undressing.
The hall, built by Sir John
Vanbrugh, the architect of Blenheim
Palace, was damaged in the 19th
century and parts fell into disrepair.
By Katie Grant
Seaton Delaval Hall originally had
fake walls that would disappear just
as guests were undressing
In 2009, it was acquired by the
National Trust, which has been
carrying out crucial repairs. The
£3.7m grant will allow further urgent
conservation works on the roof,
basement and circular staircase.
Cleverlemursmakemorefriendsthan
their less gifted counterparts,
research suggests.
Lemurs enjoy greater
popularity when others in
their community witness
their problem-solving
prowess, according to
researchers at Princeton
University in the US.
This could be true for
humans as well as for our primate
cousins, the team suggested in a
paper in the journal Current Biology.
Previous studies have shown that
primates learn skills more rapidly by
observing others. This experiment
demonstrates that lemurs with a new
skill became more popular the
more they practised it.
The team observed
how lemurs which had
succeeded in a task were
treated by their fellows,
tracking “affiliative
behaviours”, such as
grooming. “It is a pretty
striking pattern that the
[successful] lemurs received lots
of grooming without providing more
grooming to others,” said one of the
paper’s authors, Dr Ipek Kulahci.
22
NEWS
Another
View
Mark
Steel
Keep calm,
don’t carry
on like this
A
s if he wasn’t
anti-Semitic enough,
now he’s gone further.
It was revealed that
Jeremy Corbyn dislikes
Jews so much he spent Passover
with a group that’s critical of Israel,
and the only concession the group
made to Jews is that they’re Jewish,
and they broke bread and said a
prayer to Elijah’s cup. If this is the
way to tell if someone’s anti-Semitic,
the problem is worse than we
realised. Every week thousands of
anti-Semites perform anti-Semitic
activities, such as observing
the Sabbath and attending Bar
Mitzvahs, and it’s time we stopped
tolerating this, by shouting into
synagogues “stop offending Jews,
you racists”.
Labour MP John Woodcock said
Corbyn’s presence at the Seder
was “deliberately baiting the
mainstream Jewish community”.
You can see what he means, because
it was outrageous for Corbyn to
celebrate Passover with Jews who
support Labour. The event Corbyn
attended got even worse, according
to revelations in the Daily Mail’s
Corbyn Passover pullout section,
which included the line – possibly
the most magnificent sentence
ever written in newspapers –
“Extraordinary details emerged
of the event, at which attendees
shouted ‘f*** capitalism’ as a plate
of beetroot from Mr Corbyn’s
allotment was raised in the air.”
What a way to bait a mainstream
community. This was clearly a
reference to the passage in the
Torah that teaches “The Lord said
unto Moses: ‘Beware Pharaoh,
for he shall seek vengeance upon
Don’t stop
loving life.
Retired plumber and Scottish
bodybuilding grandad Jimmy
Bennie, 74, was named Over-70s
Natural Bodybuilding World
Champion in Miami in 2013,
and he’s still going strong.
Of course, you don’t have to go to
those lengths to make the most of
life – but with Co-op Funeralcare
you can plan and pay for your
funeral in advance.
Our fully guaranteed funeral plans
start at just £2,845† and cover all
third party fees.* Not every funeral
plan provider will promise this and
some will only pay a contribution
towards them. We don’t agree
with this, because we believe in
doing right by you and your loved
ones, which is why our funeral
plans cover these costs, so they
truly are ‘fully guaranteed’, giving
you and your family complete
peace of mind.
Right, funeral sorted, let’s get
back to loving life.
thee. He shall grow a beard and
nationalise the Red Sea so ye may
not split it into separate bits, and
grow a crop of beetroot within his
allotment and verily wave it above
his head, and ye will know him for
he shall shout ‘f***eth capitalism’.”
If you were cynical you might
wonder whether some people are
using this issue as a way to attack
Corbyn. But that doesn’t mean
there isn’t a genuine problem, of the
left ignoring anti-Semitism.
This suggests the situation
requires a little nuance, and luckily
much of this debate took place
on Twitter and Facebook, both
known for encouraging evenhanded arguments. So the sort of
balanced replies from some Labour
supporters, to examples of
anti-Semitism within their party,
were “How DARE you raise the
issue of just ONE councillor denying
the Holocaust when you DON’T
EVEN MENTION the cuts to the
BUS SERVICE in STOCKPORT
which is the REAL ISSUE!!!!”
The mural that initiated the
controversy obviously portrays
Jews as grasping old men amassing
money while controlling the world,
It’s outrageous
for Corbyn to be
with Jews who
support Labour
Jeremy Corbyn has been criticised by
members of the Jewish community
so maybe the people who don’t see
that as anti-Semitic thought “I just
adored the delightful pastel shades
of the hooked noses and crooked
fingers, and the delicate brush
strokes of the money the Jews are
drooling over”.
Some people who say they are
supporters of Corbyn still insist
there’s no issue of anti-Semitism on
the left, and it’s all a “Tory smear”,
CRYPTIC CROSSWORD
No 2234 BY ALCHEMI
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Solution to yesterday’s Cryptic
S H
A
A R
D
C L
I
I N
E
I S
AG
R
R A
S
OS
H
F O
P
A P
E
A L E R
A M
P UN I
D N
T AWD
£2
£
29
995
95
£2,995
£2,845†
quote code
JP1817
Funeralcare #TheCoopWay
Pop into your local Co-op Funeralcare,
call 0800 088 4859 or visit coop.co.uk/jp150
* As prices and availability vary across the UK, Co-op burial plans do not include the cost of
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3
9
£150 off
† Price based on £150 discount taken from the offline price of a Simple Funeral Plan at
£2,995. Discount is only valid on funeral plans purchased between 4 March 2018 and 30
April 2018. The promotional code for this advert is JP1817. Co-op Members will not be able
to earn their membership reward when purchasing a funeral plan using this promotional
code. Full terms and conditions can be found at
www.coop.co.uk/johnstonpress
although Corbyn, along with
John McDonnell and Momentum,
accepts that there is a problem.
Presumably their argument is
“Now Corbyn is joining in with the
anti-Corbyn witch-hunt, which
shows we can’t trust Corbyn
because he attacks Corbyn, proving
Corbyn is an anti-Corbyn arse!”
Parts of the left promoted the jazz
musician Gilad Atzmon, who stated
we should “take seriously” the idea
that “Jews are trying to take over
the world”. To be fair, an argument
that the race trying to take over the
world is the one that came nearest
to being systematically wiped out,
is setting yourself quite a task,
especially as a saxophone solo.
So be thankful for calm
responses, insist everyone is entirely
right or wrong, and anyone who
raises beetroot too high is banned
from everything. THE INDEPENDENT
NOR T H BOU
O O A
F
Y S
B A R E F O
T
I
L
I
E RUN
E X C E
U
S
C
E
MYO T H E RC
N
O
OR S CH E
F L
O O N
T
T S
L UNCH B
S
L
E
E
T I V E
A L L I
N G D
A
R I N E S S W I
ND
O
O T
K
S S
A
H
A
M
O
M
E
N
T
Stuck on the cryptic crossword? For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3580. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble accessing this number, please call our helpdesk on 0333 202 3390.
Full terms and conditions can be found on page 53
R
Y
X
D
S
NEWS
2-30
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
38-39
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
23
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
CHINA
Beijing challenges Trump on trade tariff plans
By Michael Martina
IN BEIJING
Beijing said it would escalate its fight
with Donald Trump over his plan
for anti-China tariffs by launching a
legal challenge against Washington’s
proposed trade duties on more than
a thousand Chinese products.
China’s commerce ministry said
yesterday that it had started a World
Trade Organisation (WTO) dispute
resolution procedure over US tariffs
on its imports of steel and aluminum.
The US measures were not for
maintaining national security, as
Washington has said, but rather
were in aid of trade protectionism,
the ministry claimed. Beijing says
that Washington is the aggressor and is spurring
global protectionism.
However, China’s
trading partners have
complained for years
that it abuses WTO
rules, and practises unfair industrial policies
at home that lock foreign
companies out of crucial sectors with the intent of creating domestic champions. China, under Xi
Jinping (inset), has repeatedly said it
will open up sectors such as financial
services, including promises to the
Trump administration last
year it would give “full and
prompt market access”
to US payment network
operators.
But, despite a 2012
WTO ruling that China
was di scri min ati ng
against foreign payment
card companies, no US firm
has yet been granted a licence.
Mr Trump has previously said
he will no longer let China take
advantage of the US on trade, and
bipartisan support has been building
in Washington to address what are
seen as Chinese abuses.
The Chinese move to open a
WTO case came despite efforts by
White House officials to ease fears
of a looming trade war. Beijing said
the US’s proposed tariffs, on 1,300
products unveiled earlier this week,
represented a “serious violation” of
global trading rules as they discriminated against Chinese goods.
China’s ambassador to the US,
Cui Tiankai, said Beijing preferred
to resolve the trade dispute through
Global financial markets
rallied amid hopes the
two sides would resolve their
differences. London’s FTSE
100 rose by 2.4 per cent, Japan’s
Nikkei was up 1.5 per cent and
Wall Street trading recovered.
negotiations, but state media
declared China never surrendered
to external pressure and would
prevail in any tit-for-tat on trade.
Panorama, page 30
INDIA
Emmanuel
Macron visits a
hospital that offers
early diagnosis of
autism AFP/GETTY
Bollywood star
Khan jailed
for ‘poaching’
rare antelope
By Shilpa Jamkhandikar
IN DELHI
One of Bollywood’s most popular
stars, Salman Khan, was jailed for
five years for poaching yesterday.
Khan, 52, was found guilty of
violating wildlife laws by killing a
blackbuck in Rajasthan in 1998.
His lawyer, Anand Desai, said he
would appeal against the sentence.
The case was brought by members of
a community known as the Bishnoi,
who revere antelopes.
Four other accused Bollywood
actors – Saif Ali Khan, Neelam, Tabu
and Sonali Bendre – were acquitted
by the court in Jodhpur.
Some actors came out in Khan’s
support. “I feel this is too harsh. I do
hope he gets the relief he deserves,”
Arjun Rampal said.
Khan has a history of run-ins
with the law. In 2015, Bombay High
Court overturned his conviction in
a hit-and-run case in which he was
accused of running over a group of
people sleeping on the pavement.
Last year, another court in Jodhpur
acquitted Khan in a separate
poaching case. REUTERS
FRANCE
Macron’s plan to bolster
autism treatment leaves
parents unimpressed
By Sylvie Corbet
IN ROUEN
The French President, Emmanuel
Macron, unveiled a long-awaited,
£260m plan to treat autism
yesterday in a country lagging
behind other nations in providing
basic education and care for people
with autism spectrum disorder.
Families and specialists say that
the plan is unlikely to take the giant
steps needed to catch up with the US
and other European countries.
Despite France’s lauded public
healthcare system, awareness
of autism and related disorders
is low. Only about 20 per cent of
children with autism in France go
to school, while many adults remain
undiagnosed. Families who can
afford it go to neighbouring Belgium
or cross the Atlantic to get better
treatment and care, according to a
report by France’s Court of Auditors.
“You can’t imagine the level of
suffering and anger of the families,”
said Daniele Langloys, president of
Strike Unions take aim
A stand-off between the French
government and the unions could
turn into a national confrontation
against President Emmanuel
Macron’s reforms, a longtime leader of the labour
movement has warned.
The clash is over
reform of the SNCF
state rail company, with
two-day strikes set to
take place every five
days for three months.
Union opposition is
increasingly aligning, said
Jean-Claude Mailly, the head
of union Force Ouvriere. “The social
atmosphere is changing. It’s like
when the air gets a bit too dry, the
slightest spark can set off a fire,” he
said. REUTERS
the Autisme France association. Ms
Langloys listed outdated therapy
practices, lack of trained medical
staff and teachers, and an “obstacle
course” to gain access to school, care
and employment.
Mr Macron visited a hospital unit
in Rouen that specialises in early
diagnosis, and is an example
of what France wants
to develop nationwide.
Currently, diagnosis in
France takes 18 months
on average.
Mr Macron unveiled
a plan focusing on better
diagnosis and improving
education options for
children with autism. “You will
save enormous amounts of money
if you manage to register a child of
two very early in a programme that
will enable him to be kept in school
normally,” he said. AP
One-minute Wijuko
How to play Place 1 – 9 once in the
grid, obeying the sums between
pairs of squares
5
7
11
9
16
15
13
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
More puzzles
Pages 52-53
26
NEWS
SYRIA
Trump aims to
pull troops out
by November
By Josh Lederman
IN WASHINGTON
The US troop withdrawal from Syria
could take place within six months,
with Donald Trump seeking to capitalise on a foreign policy “victory”
ahead of US midterm elections.
US officials say the President is
determined to remove US troops
as soon as the last remaining Isis
fighters can be vanquished, ideally
before November’s elections in the
House and Senate.
Regardless of exactly when
the troops leave, with no military
presence to ensure security for
American personnel, operations
to clear land mines, restore basic
services like water and electricity,
and create political conditions
needed to resolve Syria’s civil war
would be impossible.
US troops are
supporting
Kurdish YPG
fighters in Syria
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P
resident Donald Trump
has seemingly decided to
keep US forces in Syria
for a limited period,
ending speculation
about an immediate US pull-out
fuelled by Mr Trump himself.
He agreed at a National Security
Council meeting that the 2,000
US troops backed by massive US
airpower should stay in Syria,
where they support the Syrian
Kurds in the east of the country.
A senior administration official
explained this week: “We’re not
going to immediately withdraw,
but neither is the President
willing to back a long-term
commitment.” He added that
Mr Trump wanted to ensure the
defeat of Isis and would like other
countries to help stabilise Syria.
The White House said later that
its mission to eradicate Isis in
Syria “is coming to a rapid end”.
In recent weeks, Mr Trump has
been at odds with the Pentagon in
promising a swift US withdrawal
just as senior generals were
reiterating their commitment
to stand by the Syrian Kurdish
forces, the People’s Protection
Units (YPG). These hold between
25 and 30 per cent of Syria and
are the only US ally in the country.
The self-proclaimed “Islamic
State” has lost almost all its
territory, but is reverting to
guerrilla warfare in parts of
eastern Syria. Its fighters
have been emboldened by the
withdrawal of YPG forces which
have shifted focus to confront
the Turkish-led invasion of the
Kurdish enclave of Afrin in
northern Syria.
The leaders of Turkey, Russia
and Iran held a summit in
Ankara on Wednesday to try to
find common ground on the
future of Syria, where
they all have forces.
Their agendas differ
radically: Russia
and Iran support
President Bashar
al-Assad (inset),
while Turkey wants
him removed.
The one big aim
uniting the Turkish
President Recep Tayyip
Erdogan, the Russian President
Vladimir Putin and the Iranian
President Hassan Rouhani is
that they all want US forces out
of Syria, though their motives
differ. Mr Putin and Mr Rouhani
want Mr Assad’s forces to extend
their control to the east and north,
while Turkey wants to destroy
the Kurdish quasi-state, known as
The one big aim
uniting Turkey, Russia
and Iran is that they all
want US forces out of Syria
Rojava by the Syrian Kurds, which
grew up east of the Euphrates
during the war against Isis.
If the limited number of US
ground troops were pulled out of
Syria along with – most crucially –
the YPG’s ability to call in massive
US air strikes, then the YPG
would be unable to stop a Turkish
invasion across the long SyrianTurkish border. The north Syrian
plain is flat and could not be
defended against Turkish tanks
backed by air strikes.
In a joint statement released
at the end of their summit, Mr
Putin, Mr Rouhani and Mr
Erdogan said they “rejected all
attempts to create new realities
on the ground under the pretext
of combating terrorism”. This
is a clear reference to the US.
They said they were committed
to Syria’s unity, but this is not
preventing them intervening by
using local proxies and allies.
No Syrian parties attended the
Ankara summit, the second in a
series of three with the next to be
held in Tehran.
Mr Rouhani called on Turkey
to hand over Afrin to the Syrian
army, something that is unlikely to
happen. Russia is eager to cement
its new alliance with Turkey, but
at the same time is committed
to Mr Assad whom it has just
helped to retake almost all of
Eastern Ghouta on the outskirts
of Damascus. It was the Russian
willingness to allow Turkey to
use its air force in Afrin, which
had previously been defended by
Russian aircraft, that opened the
door for the Turkish invasion on
20 January and the capture of
Afrin city two months later.
The Russian-Turkish-Iranian
alliance looks opportunistic
and temporary, but it might
have a longer life than some
commentators expect. Iran
badly needs diplomatic allies and
commercial partners if Mr Trump
effectively withdraws the US
from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal
on 12 May, when he once again
has to certify Iranian compliance,
something has said he will not do.
Turkey needs Russian support
or neutrality if it is to broaden its
intervention against the Kurds
in northern Syria. Mr Putin
probably gave a green light to
the Turkish invasion of
Afrin in order to fuel
the US-Turkish
confrontation as the
US tries to protect
its Kurdish allies
and Turkey seeks
to destroy them.
The three countries
meeting in Ankara
pledged to stabilise Syria
and this, to some extent,
they can do because Isis has been
eliminated as a territorial state,
though not as a guerrilla force.
It will be hoping that differences
among its enemies will enable it to
strengthen itself once again.
Mr Assad will soon control all
of Damascus, Aleppo and the
most highly populated areas in
Syria.He will also hope from the
fact that, while the Syrian Kurds
do not like his government, they
prefer it to the prospect of being
over-run by the Turkish army and
its Sunni Arab auxiliaries.
THE INDEPENDENT
NEWS
2-30
VOICES
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31-43
TV
38-39
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i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
PHILIPPINES
Duterte closes ‘cesspool’ holiday
island to return it to ‘past glory’
By Simon Calder
One of Asia’s most popular holiday
destinations has been closed by
presidential decree, forcing tourists to
cancel flights and businesses to seek
alternatives after the tropical island
of Boracay was branded a “cesspool”.
The decision by Philippine
President Rodrigo Duterte to shut
the holiday hotspot prompted
airlines to cut flights yesterday, as
hotels prepared for cancellations
and businesses appeared resigned
to a move the government said was
“non-negotiable”.
Mr Duterte announced the move
over the island, which is about 200
miles south of the capital Manila,
after saying the turquoise waters
smelled of “shit” because raw sewage
was ending up in the sea .
One British resident described
Boracay, which is four miles long and
less than a mile wide, as “the jewel in
the crown” of Filipino tourism. “Along
Bulabog Beach, all the hotels have
been given notice that they cannot be
closer than 30 metres from the high
water mark,” they added.
Mr Duterte has ordered the
closure for six months in an effort to
rescue from ruin a once idyllic island
that drew two million tourists and
generated almost a billion pounds in
revenue last year.
D o m e s t i c a i rl i n e s o f fe r e d
customers full refunds or flights
elsewhere, but said they would still
operate a limited number of flights
to Boracay’s gateways, Caticlan
The head of Japan’s sumo association was forced to apologise after two
women were asked to get out of the
ring as they attempted to revive a
mayor who had collapsed.
In sumo tradition, the ring is considered sacred and women are prohibited from entering. But when
Ryozo Tatami, the 67-year-old mayor
of Maizuru, in northern Kyoto, col-
‘Lula’ loses fight
to remain free
during appeal
By Peter Prengaman
Former president Luiz Inacio
“Lula” da Silva will remain in jail
while he appeals against a corruption conviction, Brazil’s highest
court has ruled.
The Supreme Federal Tribunal voted to deny his request to
remain free while he fights the
12-year jail sentence, in a case that
he argues was nothing more than
a ploy to keep him from standing
in October’s presidential election.
Despite the conviction, he leads all
opinion polls for the election. The
decision means he will probably
be jailed next week.
Within minutes of the decision,
da Silva’s Workers’ Party, which
held Brazil’s presidency from
2003 to 2016, tweeted: “The Brazilian people have the right to vote
for Lula, the candidate of hope.
The Workers’ Party will defend
this candidacy on the streets and
in every court.” AP
Tourists enjoy a
beach in Boracay,
which will shut
down for six
months AFP/GETTY
and Kalibo, to serve residents, who
number about 50,000.
The government made it clear
that it was ready to take a temporary
hit on tourism. “We have to
swallow the bitter pill if we wish to
sustain and protect the island of
Boracay,” said Frederick Alegre,
the assistant tourism secretary. “It
is a temporary setback but we will
recover the glory days of Boracay.”
In recent years, growing numbers
of Asian visitors, particularly from
China, have strained the resources
of beach resorts in countries like
the Philippines and Thailand. Since
February, Philippine officials have
been inspecting the island, recording
a catalogue of construction permit
breaches. THE INDEPENDENT
SAUDI ARABIA
The impact on hotels and
resorts has yet to be fully
assessed. Boracay, one of 7,300
islands in the archipelago nation,
hosts more than 1,800 businesses,
including global hotel chains such
as Shangri-La and Movenpick and
local operators.
Women responding to mayor’s collapse told to leave sumo ring
IN TOYKO
BRAZIL
IN RIO DE JANEIRO
JAPAN
By Mari Yamaguchi
27
lapsed during a ring-top speech, the
women, believed to be medical experts, rushed in and performed first
aid as several male sumo officials surrounding the mayor looked on.
When two more women rose to
the ring trying to join the first-aid effort, announcements demanded the
women get out of the ring. “Ladies,
please get off the ring,” a sumo referee said, determinedly. “Only gentlemen go up.”
Footage of the incident triggered
outrage, with many criticising sumo
officials, saying they were
choosing tradition over life.
Sumo chief Nobuyoshi
Hakkaku called the announcement inappropriate, thanking the women
for working to save the
mayor. He said: “It was an
inappropriate response in
a life-threatening situation.”
The mayor, who had an acute
cerebral haemorrhage, survived and
was in a stable condition yesterday
after receiving emergency surgery, city officials said.
Footage was shown
on major Japanese networks. “It is important
to protect tradition,
but the way it excludes
women perhaps is out of
step with the times, that’s
how I feel as a woman,” said
Yurika Mita, a newscaster on a
Fuji Television Network talk show. AP
‘Black Panther’
first film shown
in 35 years
By Lisa Richwine
IN RIYADH
Saudi Arabia’s first cinema in
more than 35 years will open
in Riyadh this month, after
authorities agreed to open 40
theatres in the next five years.
Cinemas will not be
segregated by gender like
most other public places in the
deeply conservative kingdom,
and the first screening will
be Marvel’s superhero movie
Black Panther. Saudi Arabia
had some cinemas in the 1970s
but its clerics closed them,
reflecting rising Islamist
influence in the Arab region.
In 2017, the government said
it would lift the ban as part of
Crown Prince Mohammed bin
Salman’s reforms. REUTERS
Tomorrow in your
‘Have I Got News For You’ and the eternal
problem of women on panel shows
PLUS
Why TV
Baftas are
heading in
the right
direction
28
NEWS
FAMILY
Debunking the
sibling myth
Psychologist Lucy Maddox (an only child) says
it’s time to ditch the stereotypes about birth order
W
hen I tell people I’m
an only child I feel
they do well not to
flinch. There’s often
a raised eyebrow, an
“Oh”, followed by a pause.
Only children have a bad rep –
we’re supposed to be spoilt and bad
at sharing. We’re not the only ones
to suffer from a stereotype: younger
children are supposed to be used to
getting their own way, older ones are
supposed to be serious and sensitive,
and middle ones – they’re supposed
to have got a raw deal all round
and have a chip on their shoulder.
There are positive flip sides to these
stereotypes too: only children are
seen as independent, older siblings
as good leaders, young children
as more playful and fun, middle
children as more adaptable…
The temptation to think we
can predict personality from
sibling status is huge. Like a weird
circumstantial horoscope, we think
we know a certain amount from
someone’s position in their family.
Do we, though? There’s no doubt
that sibling relationships, or lack
of them, are personally important.
Many of the dramas of childhood are
related to our family relationships
– our experiences were affected by
who else was at home.
I remember playing alone very
happily for hours, absorbed in a
doll’s house my dad had made me.
I also remember games I played
with the three siblings of a family
who lived near me. We played Robin
Hood, we searched for toadstools,
we made a water slide in the garden.
The solitary games I played differed
from the games I played with them.
My friends with siblings recall
their own memories, not always
what I would predict. A younger
brother recalls playing on his own
a lot because his brother was so
much older, but also remembers
scraps over sharing toys. Often
people remember the family roles
they were given: the clever one; the
silly one – labels that can stick. Most
of us think our status in relation
to siblings had an impact on the
development of our personality.
And yet, the evidence doesn’t
back the stereotypes up. Some
studies suggest there are consistent
differences related to birth order,
but many other studies and largescale meta-analyses suggest there
are not.
One example of a sibling study
which does show differences
between older and younger siblings
comes from the early 1980s.
Researchers videotaped 73 seven-to
eight-year-olds interacting with
a sibling in co-operative, neutral
and competitive situations. The
study found that first-born seven-to
eight-year-olds were more likely
to be teaching their siblings and
praising them, while those who
were the younger sibling tended
to show more self-deprecation and
joyful behaviour. The younger ones
seemed to have more fun. Those
with a sibling who was closer in age
to them showed more aggressive
behaviour than those with a larger
age gap. The authors of this study
concluded that children’s experience
of their sibling relationship varies
systematically due to structural
MEDIA
A political loser, but a
podcast success story
Ed Miliband’s second act has won
him major plaudits. By Chris Burn
F
ollowing a chastening
general election defeat in
2015, Ed Miliband stepped
down as Labour leader
with a promise that he
would continue fighting for the
ideas he believed could change the
country for the better.
It is fair to say that nobody,
including the Doncaster North
MP himself, expected that, less
than three years later, perhaps his
most effective vehicle for doing so
would be a podcast. For the past
six months, Miliband and radio
presenter Geoff Lloyd have been
meeting up every week to record
episodes of Reasons to be Cheerful,
a light-hearted look at big political
ideas with special guests exploring
how best to tackle issues such as
the gender pay gap, prison overcrowding and homelessness. The
show has a regular audience of
around 80,000 people and it was
recently named Podcast of the Year
NEWS
2-30
Sibling ‘roles’ often
disappear outside the
family contex; below
Lucy Maddox as a child
factors such as whether they are
older or younger and how close in
age they are.
Other studies look at whether
birth order has an effect that
reaches outside the sibling
context, and can show
very different results.
One from the 1980s,
by Cecile Ernst and
Jules Angst, asked
7,582 young adults to
complete personality
questionnaires. They
found no significant
differences in traits
between first-borns and
second-borns in families
who had two children. In
families of three or more children
there was only one significant
difference: last-borns were
significantly lower on a measure
of masculinity.
Ernst and Angst also reviewed
more than 35 years of sibling
by the Broadcasting Press Guild.
Miliband, who has more than
750,000 followers on Twitter, says
podcasting is part of the way the
internet has revolutionised the way
politicians can communicate their
ideas and beliefs. He says they are
keen for the show to encompass a
wide range of views. “We are not
trying to be BBC Balham but we are
trying to appeal across the political
spectrum and try not to make it
party political,” he says.
Following their victory at the
Broadcasting Press Guild awards
last month, Miliband posted a
wry message thanking Lloyd “and
obviously the British people for their
decision in 2015” for making the
award possible.
He is too experienced to answer
when asked if he is happier now
than he would have been as Prime
Minister, but laughingly admits he
“probably wouldn’t be podcasting” if
he was in Downing Street. However,
it seems clear Miliband is relishing
research. They noticed that most
studies that looked for differences
in personality related to birth order
showed no significant differences.
One type of study that did tend to
yield results suggesting differences
was when the people who
were answering the
questions were other
family members. When
parents were asked
to describe their
children they tended
to describe their firstborns as serious and
responsible, and their
later-borns as cheerful
and independent. Ernst
and Angst came up with an
explanation: maybe there are sibling
differences in behaviour, but maybe
these differences occur around the
way parents treat children.
Other large-scale studies
with thousands of participants
support this idea. Straightforward
Ed Miliband is relishing the freedom
to explore big ideas in the podcast
the greater freedom he has to speak
his mind than he had when he was
trying to convince voters he was the
man to lead the country.
“I was incredibly disappointed
to lose the general election but you
move on,” he says. “You get one life
and there is no point brooding. As I
said in my resignation speech, there
are others ways to encourage the
ideas I care about.”
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
associations of birth order and
personality traits are not found, and,
if they ever are, it is often in studies
where another family member
responds, or where the questions
are about the participants’ traits in
relation to their siblings’ traits.
Judith Rich Harris, a psychologist
based in the US, thinks that we do
develop patterns of behaviour in
our families, but these patterns do
not necessarily transfer to other
situations. Just because someone is
used to being the voice of authority
at home doesn’t mean they will
automatically become a leader
at school. Rich Harris thinks our
persistent beliefs about the effects
of sibling order come from our own
lived experiences with our families,
not from the research evidence. She
sees the effects of siblings as being
specifically related to our own family
context, and also thinks that we can
leave these behaviours and feelings
behind when we leave home (except
perhaps from when we return
at Christmas).
Eileen Kennedy Moore, a clinical
psychologist with an interest in
friendships, adds that the effect
of having a sibling depends on
the relationship you have with
them. “A good older sibling can
definitely help children play in a
more sophisticated way,” she said.
“Like doing imaginative play in a
more interesting way… And giving
them games or rules, or even just
understanding how other people
react. On the other hand, there are
plenty of siblings who train their
siblings in bad behaviour.”
Kennedy Moore doesn’t see being
an only child as necessarily being a
radically different experience either.
“Many singletons have sibling-like
relationships, with either cousins or
close friends of the family.”
Whatever our family situation
when we were growing up, it does
have an effect on us, of course it
does, but it isn’t as clear-cut as
being able to predict what older or
younger siblings will be like when
they are adult. It is more subtle and
complex than that and, to my mind,
also much more interesting.
‘Blueprint: How Our Childhoods Make
Us Who We Are’ by Lucy Maddox
(£14.99 Little, Brown) is out now
Miliband says doing the show has
also given him greater optimism
for the future. “Speaking to our
guests, you realise that if you look at
any problem from homelessness to
crime, there is a solution out there,”
he says. “With homelessness, we
talked to this guy from Finland last
week about a scheme called Housing
First, where homeless people are
offered stable housing instead of
temporary accommodation. They
are closing their shelters as a result.
It has made me optimistic.
“Even for someone who lost the
general election, I think I have
always felt more optimistic than
some people. I feel like people are
hungry for change. With Trump
and Brexit, whatever your stance on
them, it spoke to people who wanted
something different and wanted
change to happen.”
Ed Miliband and Geoff Lloyd are
hosting a live episode at Sheffield City
Hall on 27 April. Festivalofdebate.com
TV
38-39
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
29
SOCIETY
Going the
distance in
Glasgow
The city’s longest-serving taxi driver
tells Ian Marland about life on the road
G
lasgow’s longestserving taxi driver
says he has no plans
to retire. Robert
McLaughlin, 79, has
been driving cabs in the Scottish
city for 58 years.
Pushing on for a million miles
travelled around the city’s streets
ferrying people to their work,
rest and play, he still works one
day a week and the occasional
Sunday shift for Glasgow Taxis.
Robert’s career has been so long
it almost reads like a social history
of the city.
“Glasgow has changed
dramatically over my time in the
trade,” says Robert.
“It’s a very nice city to look at
now, whereas in my day the Clyde
was still heavy engineering. The
river was busy. Glasgow was a dirty
old town, but it’s not so dirty now.”
Robert has defied his age to
carry on the job he loves. He
recently passed his medical to
allow him to carry on driving.
The guys who work the
trade now are working
harder than I, or my
generation, ever worked
But Robert says taxi driving
is not the job it was when he came
into it in 1960. He says it is now a
much tougher environment for
younger drivers to make a living.
“The guys working in the trade
at the moment are working a lot
harder than I, or my generation,
ever worked,” says Robert, who
lives in Mount Florida.
“We were going home at one in
the morning, with the night shift
over. I did 25 years of night shift.
“The younger guys now are still
working till four in the morning,
and sometimes later.”
He says: “When I came into the
trade there was only three doors on
the car, it was the old [Austin] FX3
… no heaters, nothing at all, just the
bare essentials.
“Did it start, did it go? Yes. Was
there a meter on it? Yes. And away
you go to work.”
Glasgow had a reputation
as a tough, ‘No Mean City’, but
Robert says his experience was
far from the stereotype. He says
of Glasgow passengers over the
years: “There’s a lot of shouting
and bawling but very, very seldom
does it get serious. I’ve got enough
fingers on one hand to tell you the
number of times I’ve had to get
myself out of a tight spot.”
According to Robert, what
makes competition harder now
is the proliferation of private
Robert has been driving taxis in
Glasgow for 58 years and has no
plans to retire
hire cars. When he started as a
young man, there were 852 taxis
in Glasgow for a city in excess
of a million people. Now there’s
1,429 hackney carriages, for half a
million people.
The industry has changed
in other ways too – noticeably
the silence of the airwaves with
the demise of radio operators.
Robert says: “We don’t have voice
anymore – it’s all screen. It’s all
become hi-tech.
“The trade used to be very good
because you were listening to a bit
of crack over the air. If you were
quiet and you were driving along,
somebody would be on to the
controller about something.
“And there would be a bit of chitchat, a bit of banter, you know. It
was good. It’s just a screen now. ”
Robert says the difference
between the business when he set
out and how it is now is like “night
and day”. He says the change in
licensing laws was the big factor in
shaping the taxi profession.
“You really never noticed the
change until it happened.
“It was a gradual change, and
the thing that started it off was
the licensing trade getting longer
hours, that was the start of it.
“The youngsters started to
see that they didn’t need to get a
drink and be out on the street for
11 o’clock, they were now going to
pubs and clubs and special events
when you could have a drink.
“They are going out socialising
now, when my generation were
going home after socialising.”
Speaking on behalf of the
Glasgow Taxis executive
committee, director Jack Ferguson
says: “All our drivers share a love
for this great city, and its people.
We’d like to thank Robert for his
years of serving Glasgow.”
30
NEWS
Panorama
Around the
world in
10 stories
IN BERLIN
KENYA
Iraq irrigation
funding agreed
Officer jailed for
fatal shooting
The Iraqi Prime Minister
Haider al-Abadi has sought
support in Japan to restore
peace and prosperity in his
country. Mr Al-Abadi co-hosted
a meeting in Tokyo with his
Japanese counterpart Shinzo
Abe to discuss ways to improve
public safety in his country.
Mr Abe announced a 35bn
yen (£233m) loan for irrigation
projects in Iraq during talks.
Japanese officials said the
conference was aimed at
helping Iraq establish a system
to eliminate weapons held by
many civilians.
A police officer convicted of murdering a man in 2013 he had suspected
of stealing a mobile phone has been
jailed for 15 years
Last month, Titus Musila was convicted of shooting Kenneth Mwangi
three times in the head instead of
arresting him. Kenyan police face
frequent accusations of extrajudicial killings from civilians and
rights groups, but officers are rarely
charged and almost never convicted.
“This should serve as a warning
for unlawful use of firearms by police
officers against the members of the
public,” High Court Justice James
Wakiaga said. REUTERS
Protesters march
to support Zuma
at High Court
By Joe Brock
IN DURBAN
Thousands of supporters of
former South African President
Jacob Zuma are expected to
march to the Durban High Court
today, where Mr Zuma will face
corruption charges.
Merkel to visit Trump as
EU trade deal nears end
By Tony Paterson
JAPAN
SOUTH AFRICA
GERMANY
Mr Zuma plans to challenge
a decision to prosecute him on
16 charges, including fraud,
racketeering, corruption and
money laundering, that stem
from a decades-old £1.8bn
arms deal. The case, which is
to be heard in Mr Zuma’s home
province of KwaZulu-Natal, on
the eastern coast, is a dramatic
development on a continent
where leaders rarely face their
accusers in court.
Religious organisations and
pro-Zuma groups will protest
what they say is a politically
motivated witch-hunt. REUTERS
Angela Merkel will fly to Washington to visit Donald Trump later this
month in an attempt to avert a looming trade war between America and
the European Union over threatened
US import duties on EU steel and aluminium exports.
The planned meeting, which has
still to be confirmed by Ms Merkel’s
office, follows the US imposition of
punitive import duties on Chinese
products. The Merkel-Trump meeting, reported by Germany’s Bild
newspaper, will take place just before
the EU’s current exemption from
Harare
Laughter has replaced
fear in Zimbabwe as the
dramatic events leading to the
resignation of Robert Mugabe
are already playing out on
stage. Crowds packed a theatre
in the capital, Harare, as Mr
Mugabe and his wife, Grace,
were openly mocked.
Mr Mugabe has become a
target of ridicule, a far cry
from the reverence and dread
he once induced. Some in
the audience choked with
laughter at the depiction
of former first lady Grace
Mugabe, long unpopular
for her sharp temper and
shopping expeditions as the
country crumbled during her
husband’s 37 years in power.
The new play opened with
a restless Grace, brought to
life by 27-year-old Caroline
Magenga, preparing a speech
for a political rally in which she
plans “to bury Mnangagwa”,
a reference to a former
presidential confidante,
Emmerson Mnangagwa, who
took power in November.
Mixing real and imagined
events, the 90-minute play has
scenes that were unthinkable
in Zimbabwe months ago. They
include Grace Mugabe helping
the president’s male cabinet
ministers to escape disguised
as women. Meanwhile, the
elderly Robert Mugabe is
depicted as struggling to walk,
sleeping in between important
negotiations and eventually
agreeing to resign. AP
Farai Mutsaka
US duties is due to expire on 1 May.
Ms Merkel has threatened a tough
response to any eventual imposition
of US import duties on EU goods.
Sprinkle
of hope in
holey row
Anton Schuurmans
waters flowers after
planting them in an
unrepaired pothole
to draw attention to
the bad state of public
roads in Brussels.
Officials said the
problem has worsened
amid freezing weather.
The stunt in
Brussels to highlight
the pothole problem
is being repeated
elsewhere. REUTERS
SIERRA LEONE
President faces legal challenge to election result
The losing candidate in Sierra
Leone’s presidential election, Samura
Kamara, has said voting was marred
by fraud and he plans to launch a
legal challenge.
Opposition candidate for the
People’s Party and former military
junta leader Julius Maada Bio won
the election on Wednesday with 51.81
per cent of votes and was sworn in
hours later in a Freetown hotel.
“Those results do not reflect
the many concerns raised about
massive ballot-stuffing, over-voting,
fraudulent voter registers and other
electoral irregularities,” Mr Kamara
said. “We are challenging the results
and we will be taking legal action.”
The comments from the candidate
of the former ruling All People’s
Congress follow a tense but mostly
peaceful campaign to replace
outgoing President Ernest Bai
Koroma. REUTERS
TURKEY
ITALY
GEORGIA
80 arrested over
failed 2016 coup
Centre-left party Roof collapse
rejects coalition kills six miners
Turkey’s intelligence agency
has arrested at least 80 Turkish
nationals wanted for their alleged
links to the 2016 failed coup, in
operations in 18 countries.
The most recent incident saw
Turkey secretly arrange the
deportation of six men from
Kosovo accused of backing the
plot. Ankara has arrested more
than 38,000 people so far over
the failed coup and sacked some
110,000 public servants. AP
Italy’s centre-left Democratic Party
(PD) plans to remain in opposition in
the new parliament and not join any
coalition government, the party’s acting secretary Maurizio Martina said.
“The negative election result does
not allow us to formulate government
solutions that include us,” he said. In
last month’s election, a centre-right
alliance including the League and
Forza Italia won the most seats, followed by the 5-Star Movement, with
the PD a distant third. REUTERS
By Umaru Fofana
IN FREETOWN
Postcard
From...
Angela Merkel is seeking to exempt
the EU from US import duties
Her forthcoming visit is seen as an
attempt to sustain the process of
EU-US trade dialogue and exempt
the EU from US trade barriers.
The two leaders will also discuss
the issue of Germany’s contributions
to the Nato alliance. Mr Trump has
already demanded that Germany pay
more. Ms Merkel has committed Germany to reaching the Nato funding
target of two per cent of GDP by 2024.
The visit will also take place before
Mr Trump’s deadline of 12 May to
improve a deal to curb Iran’s nuclear
programme. Mr Trump wants the
other signatories, including France ,
the UK and Germany, to agree a more
stringent follow-up deal with Iran.
Six miners were killed and
three injured when the roof of
a coal mine in western Georgia
collapsed, the country’s interior
ministry said.
The ministry said the accident
happened at the Mindeli mine
in Tkibuli, 124 miles west of
the capital Tbilisi. The mine is
operated by Sakhnakhshiri, a
Georgian company. Ten miners
have died at the mine in different
accidents since 2011. REUTERS
06.04.2018
FR DAY
Film
Music
Comedy
Theatre
GoingOut
Staying In
Television
Books
‘I’ve never
been one for
nostalgia’
Brett Anderson tells Nick Duerden
why he’s looking to the future, even as
he publishes his childhood memoir
and Suede re-release their debut
album on its 25th anniversary
FR DAY
32
MUSIC
THE
= PLAYLIST=
What we’re listening
to right now
DANNY HOWARD
ALL THAT DANCIN’
After hearing it on BBC
Radio 1’s new The Rave Lounge
last weekend, we’ve been
listening to the British DJ’s latest
acid house single on repeat.
CARDI B
BARTIER CARDI
The hip-hop sensation’s debut
album Invasion of Privacy is
almost ready, and now she’s
shared the video for a previously
released single in which she
displays a bit of old-school
Hollywood glitz and glamour.
ANNA BURCH
WITH YOU EVERY DAY
The Detroit indie-rocker released
her debut album Quit the Curse
earlier this year. Check out the
woozy track and its new video.
LEON BRIDGES
BET AIN’T WORTH THE HAND
Good Thing, the follow-up to
2015’s uber-soulful Coming Home,
is almost upon us. The fairy
tale-like video for Bridges’ latest
single gives the track a whole
new meaning.
CHVRCHES
NEVER SAY DIE
The Scottish electronic trio’s
new track (from upcoming album
Love Is Dead, out on 25 May) is
perhaps their heaviest track yet.
And we love it.
Early swagger
Anderson (front)
with (clockwise from
top left) his Suede
bandmates Simon
Gilbert, Mat Osman
and Bernard Butler
in 1993 PAT POPE
MØ
NOSTALGIA
After her huge sold-out show
at the O2 Brixton Academy
earlier this week, the Danish
superstar’s new single is a great
listen – sublime, ephemeral,
mainstream electro.
PETAL
BETTER THAN YOU
Pennsylvania’s Petal, led by
Kiley Lotz, showcase a defiantly
rock’n’roll sound on their new
track. Their forthcoming album,
Magic Gone, is out on 15 June.
MELODY’S ECHO CHAMBER
BREATHE IN, BREATHE OUT
This psychedelic indie-pop track
will feature on the new album
from Melody Prochet (below),
Bon Voyage, which is out on
15 June. Stream it today.
Giles Bidder
D
ressed less for the
conditions outside,
where it is snowing
and freezing, and
more for rarefied
style, Brett Anderson steps into a
central London bookshop looking
like the archetypal 1960s British
gent. The coat is long, dark and
impeccably tailored, the trousers
narrow pipe cleaners, the shoes
surely Italian leather. All that is
missing to complete the picture
is an umbrella hooked within the
crease of his elbow. No matter, for
at 50, he is as elegant as, at 25, he
was leery and louche. It is quite
the transformation.
Anderson makes for intriguing company. Almost everything
he says is delivered with arched
eyebrow and slightly patronising
stare. The impression he gives of
not suffering fools makes me feel
the fool with every question I dare
put his way.
He is here to talk about his new
memoir, Coal Black Mornings, and
also the 25th anniversary edition
of his band Suede’s eponymous
debut album. But, he tells me,
“I’ve never been one for nostalgia.
I can only look back over 25 years
if I’m looking forward, too.”
To this end, he points out that
Suede remain very much in the
present tense. They reformed in
2010 in some style, and there is
convincing argument to suggest
that 2013’s Bloodsports is among
their strongest work. They will release a new album later this year.
Is it any good? His left eyebrow becomes a crescent moon. “I think it
is, yes,” he says.
Repairing downstairs, where
there is coffee and a heater, Anderson keeps the coat on, but removes
his scarf, folding it neatly alongside a pile of his books which, later,
he will sign. His fingernails, I notice, are perfectly manicured.
There are many reasons why
Coal Black Mornings proves unexpectedly fascinating. It could
have gone one way – the obvious
rock memoir – but Anderson has
very deliberately steered it quite
another, offering a portrait of the
artist as a young man.
In the early 1990s, he was a towering figure on the British music
scene’s periphery: vigorously
anti-establishment, wantonly
narcotic, sexually ambiguous and
unashamedly ambitious. He was
to that era what David Bowie had
been to the 1970s. If any singer of
his vintage was destined to burn
out young in pursuit of immortality, it was him.
But Anderson didn’t die. He
merely grew older and more reflective. Written with the benefit
of such hindsight, Coal Black
Mornings is a pronouncedly gentle
book, almost coy, skirting around
all the big, eventful stuff of Suede
at their combustible peak, and
instead pursuing the notes in the
margin. It focuses on his early
I had no interest
in salacious gossip.
I couldn’t have slept
at night if I’d just
slagged people off
years in a humdrum commuter
town: a tiny council house, oiks
for neighbours, parents who were
wilfully bohemian and inspired
him to spread his wings. When he
wasn’t driving a taxi to make ends
meet, his melancholic father was
expounding on his love of Wagner,
Elgar and Liszt; his mother made
soup from foraged nettles.
The memoir, which runs to 209
pages, ends just as Suede are gathering momentum. Consequently,
there is no recollection of fame
and subsequent infamy, barely any
mention of drugs (and there were
a lot), and even when he deals with
the blistering acrimony between
him and former Suede guitarist Bernard Butler, and a broken
heart dealt to him by ex-girlfriend
and Elastica singer Justine Frischmann – who left him for Blur’s
Damon Albarn, whom he refuses
to name in the book – he does so
with timidity, as if afraid of fully
reopening old wounds.
There is, he insists, good reason for this. “I had no interest in
writing a salacious, gossipy book
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
I wanted to do this
for my son, so that he
knew who I was, who
I had been. So I had to
write it with care
about the fringes of the music
industry, and I couldn’t have slept
at night if I had spent those 209
pages simply slagging people off.
When you come across books like
that – books which, incidentally,
I rarely bother to read – I always
feel it betrays a lack of substance.”
Another reason is that he wrote
it for his young son. Children, he
believes, don’t want to read accounts of how messy their parents’ lives were before they came
along. “Having a kid drags up all
these feelings of being a link in
the chain, and I had a desire to
do something for him, so that he
knew who I was, who I had been.
So I had to write it with… care.”
If it is difficult to write about
the beginnings of being in a band,
for the simple reason that this is a
story that has been told 100 times
before, Anderson nevertheless
does it with a convincing flourish.
The frustrations of living beneath your means make for some
of the most powerful sections
of the book, and when he finally
arrives in London, the sense of
what’s about to come is palpable.
It is a shame he didn’t make it a
meatier book, and offer up his version of what might well have been
the 1990s’ most compelling music
story, but it does do what all good
rock memoirs do, and prompts the
reader to revisit the music.
Suede, the album, released in
1993, rescued the UK from what
was then in the grip of Nirvana’s
grunge hangover, and unwittingly
invented Britpop, its success ushering in an ultimately dispiriting
conga line of acts attempting a
similar swagger. It felt vital and
thrilling, and dangerous in a way
that music doesn’t seem to manage any more. Today, he calls it a
“flawed” album, but agrees that it
captured the period. “It was a very
exciting time to be making music,
and to be at the forefront of what
was, for a time at least, something
that felt important, and new.”
Careful not to wax lyrical about
a bygone era, he pulls himself up
short to remind me that the album’s re-release is the record company’s idea, not his. “I like writing
new music, not wallowing in what
was.” But, I suggest, isn’t the writing of a memoir to coincide with
its reappraisal just that – wallowing – and encouraging the rest of
us to do likewise?
He allows me the courtesy of
one of his concessionary smiles.
“I suppose it is, yes. And I did
learn that looking back can be
valuable, in all sorts of ways. You
can learn from it, grow. I suppose that’s why I wrote the book.
I wanted it to stand as a testament to youth, but also as a piece
of literature. It’s about childhood,
and dreams, and what happens to
those dreams as you grow up.”
‘Coal Black Mornings’ is published
by Little, Brown (£16.99). ‘Suede’,
the album, is out now
ALBUMREVIEWS
HINDS
I Don’t Run
KALI UCHIS
Isolation
Download: New
for You, The Club,
Rookie, Soberland,
Finally Floating
Download: Feel Like
a Fool, Miami, After the
Storm, Tyrant
HHHHH
HHHHH
Two years ago, Hinds emerged
out of Madrid’s grunge scene.
Their debut made them one
of the most successful femalefronted indie bands to come from
Spain – and they’ve come a long
way since. While Hinds’ struggles
were previously masked in
metaphors, I Don’t Run is literal:
the band are facing their flaws
head on. The group still relies
on carefree melodies and jangly
surf pop to accompany their lilts
of frustration. Tracks such as
“New for You” and “Rookie” focus
on upbeat melodies and hooky
choruses while “Soberland”
encapsulates the realisation of
needing to kick a bad habit.
Kali Uchis isn’t easily defined.
Since her 2012 mixtape Drunken
Babble, she’s been fusing reggae,
jazz and early R&B. And her
palette has only expanded
since: Here, opener “Body
Language” transports listeners
into Uchis’s lush bossa nova
fantasy, but she quickly shifts
gears on the psychedelic reggae
track “Miami”, preaching
independence. The singer also
pays homage to her Latin roots
on the dancehall and reggaetontinged “Nuestro Planeta,”
but quickly moves into sultry
neo-soul territory on “Feel Like a
Fool”. It’s hard to nail down who
she is – and that’s how she likes it.
EELS
The Deconstruction
KYLIE MINOGUE
Golden
Download: Premonition,
The Epiphany, Today
is the Day, In Our
Cathedral
Download: Golden,
Shelby ’68, L.O.V.E.,
Music’s Too Sad
Without You
The second Eels album, ElectroShock Blues, defined Mark
Everett’s mode of redemptive
reactions to a growing list of
personal tragedies. Twenty years
on, its producer Mickey Petracia
has returned for this soft prayer
of a record. The title track sets
the scene, suggesting fracture
and pain as strengthening
preludes to growth. The
Deconstruction Orchestra
and Choir angelically murmur
beneath the lovers’ commitment
of “Premonition”, while “The
Epiphany” floats on dreamy
cellos as breath-sharpening new
experiences beat nostalgia. A
record that offers sepulchral
sanctuary from life’s assaults.
The influence of producer
Nathan Chapman, who helped
steer Taylor Swift’s march from
country-pop princess to global
pop queen, is clear here. When
the country twang of the first 30
seconds gives way to a whoosh of
dance-pop, the hybrid hoedown
has begun. Vinyl crackles and
acoustic guitar squeaks nod
to “authenticity”. Minogue
abandons the cyber-pop vocal
sheen of 2014’s Kiss Me Once for a
more exposed version of her thin
voice, especially on the cracked
country twang of “Radio On”.
When her voice finds immortal
liberty in the spin of a disco ball
on “L.O.V.E.”, you remember why
she has survived.
METAMORPHOSES FOR A
CAVAILLÉ-COLL ORGAN
Sophie Rétaux
BROKEN RECORDS
What We Might Know
Ilana Kaplan
Album
ofthe
week
HHHHH
Battle-hardened Sean Moore, Nicky Wire and James Dean Bradfield
Manics have lost
none of their fight
MANIC STREET PREACHERS
Resistance is Futile
HHHHH
Download: Dylan and Caitlin,
Liverpool Revisited, Distant Colours,
People Give In, The Left Behind
A
s if anyone would
expect the Manics
to “mellow” this far
into their career.
The Welsh rockers
return on their 13th album with
as much fire in their bellies as
they did on their debut.
These songs don’t just glimmer,
they shine: James Dean Bradfield
remains a resplendent frontman,
belting out Nicky Wire’s lyrics
with a crusader’s zeal.
Opener “People Give In” is
all Elbow-esque theatricism:
sprightly strings, a chime and the
thrum of a double bass. It signals
the first instance of a recurring
theme on this record, which is
the band’s tendency to contradict
themselves via their song titles. It
sounds like a defeatist statement,
yet there’s an irrepressible sense
of hope in everything they do.
There are occasional
lulls in the effectiveness of
Wire’s songwriting – or the
instrumentation drowns out
the intricacies – but the passion
of Bradfield’s delivery and the
band’s performance never wanes.
The crashing drums that close
“Distant Colours” is euphoric,
while “Hold Me Like a Heaven”
is Brat Pack movie romanticism;
you can’t help but picture Molly
Ringwald and Judd Nelson at the
end of The Breakfast Club.
Elsewhere, they remain
as fervently political as ever:
“Broken Algorithms” is
particularly ferocious, an urgent
guitar riff driving Bradfield to
new heights as he sings of “the
heap of broken images… that
can’t be fixed”, the mood one of
an impending uprising against
the status quo.
“Vivian” uses an affecting
sample that recalls childhood
wind-up toys, fuelling the song’s
tone of nostalgia, before Bradfield
confirms in the opening lyrics
that it is, in fact, the click of a
camera. His voice is longing as he
calls out the name.
“Liverpool Revisited”,
meanwhile, is a poignant tribute
to the victims of the Hillsborough
disaster: “I think of the 96, as the
tears fall down on me,” Bradfield
sings, honouring not just the
victims, but their families who
fought for justice.
Resistance Is Futile isn’t the
Manics exploring particularly
new territory; if anything, as
they note at points on the album,
sometimes it seems as though
little has changed and they’ve
found themselves reiterating
messages they first sent over
20 years ago. But really, it’s
incredibly comforting to know
that they’ll keep on fighting.
THE INDEPENDENT
Roisin O’Connor
Ilana Kaplan
HHHHH
Nick Hasted
HHHHH
Download: Vision
fugitives Op22, Danse
des mirlitons, String
Quartet No8
This compilation of organ
transcriptions is a mixed bag.
Part of that is to do with the
limited tonal variety of the
Cavaillé-Coll organ in the
Cathedral of Saint-Omer;
other issues relate to music
that doesn’t respond to organ
transcription. What works? The
delicacies of Prokofiev’s “Vision
fugitives Op22” are deliciously
reinterpreted by Sophie Rétaux
in her own wistful arrangements.
She plays Reginald GossCustard’s well-worn transcription
of Tchaikovsky’s “Danse des
Mirlitons” with gorgeous fluty
charm, while Rachmaninov’s
Prelude in C sharp minor works
a treat as a rousing finale.
Ken Walton
Nick Hasted
HHHHH
Download: They Won’t
Ever Leave Us Alone,
Let the Right One In,
So Free
The underrated Edinburgh
ensemble Broken Records have
never sounded better than on
this freewheeling fourth album.
The aim was to write a collection
to be enjoyed on the open road,
and they waste no time hitting
the accelerator with “They Won’t
Ever Leave Us Alone” and “Let
The Right One In”, two pumping,
propulsive, rootsy pop-rock
numbers suffused with the spirit
of Springsteen. Elsewhere on
the album, they sound like a fullthrottle Keane or The Killers,
thanks to frontman Jamie
Sutherland’s soulful vocals,
but are just as strong on the
occasional slower number, such
as soaring torch song “So Free”.
Fiona Shepherd
33
34
FILM
FR DAY
A Quiet Place starts on “Day
89,” about three months after the
apocalyptic alien invasion. The
Abbott family – rugged patriarch
Lee (played by Krasinski himself),
his wife Evelyn (Emily Blunt, his
wife in real life, too) and their kids
– are seen in a supermarket in an
abandoned town. One of the children has a dangerous fascination
with a toy spaceship. He wants
to put the batteries in it and play
with it. If he does so, the creatures
are bound to hear the noise.
The story flashes forward to
Day 472. By then, the Abbotts are
living in a farmhouse on the edge
of the woods. They’ve set up elaborate lights and decoys to protect
themselves from the monsters.
The boldest conceit is that characters have to communicate for
most of the time in sign language.
This allows for silent movie-style
shots in which the characters
The film is low
key and nuanced: it
makes us cares about
the characters
Speak of the devil
John Krasinski’s
Lee Abbott and his
children keep an
eye out for aliens
Filmof
theweek
Silence is
golden in
innovative
horror
A QUIET PLACE (15)
HHHHH
John Krasinski, 90 mins, starring:
John Krasinski, Emily Blunt, Noah Jupe,
Millicent Simmonds, Cade Woodward
Reviews by Geoffrey Macnab
“Stay silent, stay alive” is the only
advice the American people are
given on how to survive in John
Krasinski’s ingenious, extremely
well-crafted new horror film.
Deadly creatures roam the land.
Mouldering newspaper clippings
reveal that the US army has been
defeated. The government can no
longer protect its citizens. Electricity is down. Towns and cities
are deserted.
The creatures, though, can’t
see. They rely on their powers of
hearing to identify their prey. If
you don’t step too loudly, you may
be able to keep out of their grasp.
In an era of wearisome poltergeist movies and torture porn,
A Quiet Place is a refreshingly
pared-down and original affair.
Krasinski relies on editing, sound
effects and off-screen action to
crank up the tension. We do see
the creatures from time to time,
sometimes in extreme close-up.
They are grotesque, like bigger
versions of the succubus that exploded out of John Hurt in Alien.
However, the most terrifying moments come when the humans are
waiting for them to appear.
try to convey their feelings with
looks and gestures, while the
screeching, rumbling Marco Beltrami score plays a crucial role in
heightening the sense of dread.
In its more improbable moments, the film risks seeming like
one of those far-fetched M Night
Shyamalan stories in which coincidences and freakish incidents
pile up so high that credibility is
soon lost. Thankfully, Krasinski
looks as much to Hitchcock thrillers as to Shyamalan’s overcooked
yarns. He knows just how to put
the audience on edge.
A Quiet Place includes plenty
of blood and Cronenberg-style
body horror, but Krasinski combines the more lurid moments
with character-based drama.
His approach is low-key and nuanced: he makes us care about
the characters. This ensures that
in even its noisiest, most outlandish moments, when the creatures
are on the rampage, A Quiet Place
remains an absorbing drama.
THE INDEPENDENT
ALSOSHOWING
WONDERSTRUCK (PG)
DEATH WISH (15)
120 BPM (15)
Todd Haynes, 116 mins, starring:
Oakes Fegley, Julianne Moore,
Michelle Williams
Eli Roth, 107 mins, stars: Bruce Willis,
Camila Morrone, Elisabeth Shue
Robin Campillo, 143 mins, starring:
Nahuel Pérez Biscayart, Arnaud Valois,
Adèle Haenel, Antoine Reinartz
HHHHH
Todd Haynes’s film, adapted
from the young adult novel
by Brian Selznick, deals with
bereavement, sudden deafness
and the abandonment issues
that cloud the lives of its young
protagonists. It has one of those
plots so reliant on coincidence
that you’re half-surprised when
the unexpected doesn’t happen.
It stands as an advertisement
for Haynes’s chameleon-like
qualities as a director, his ability
to change storytelling styles and
his visual imagination, but there
is also a mawkishness not found
in any of his other movies. It has
its grace notes but there aren’t
quite enough of them.
HHHHH
It’s more than 30 years since
Michael Winner’s original Death
Wish unleashed Charles Bronson
as a taciturn vigilante killer. The
New York-set film provoked a
furore with what many perceived
as its glib approach to violence.
Eli Roth’s lacklustre new
version is set in Chicago, named
by the FBI in 2012 as the “murder
capital” of the US. Early on, there
are hints that the film will at least
touch on the socio-economic
causes of the violence.
Soon, though, this turns into
a routine vigilante movie, more
interested in cheap thrills than
in moral dilemmas. Winner’s
original film seems nuanced and
sophisticated by comparison.
HHHHH
Aids activists in this film know
that time is very short. At their
meetings, they don’t bother
with clapping speeches. Instead,
they click their fingers. That
way, they convey their approval
without interrupting the speaker
and thereby wasting precious
moments. Every member
of the group Act Up accepts
being viewed by a hostile and
indifferent public as HIV-positive.
The wonder of this film, set
in Paris in the early 1990s, is the
sure-footed way it combines
polemics and historical
reconstructions with melodrama.
Director Robin Campillo
focuses on the stories of a handful
of the activists. It is an ensemble
drama but Sean (Nahuel Pérez
Biscayart) is the most prominent
character. In his mid-twenties,
he is a volatile and impassioned
figure. In the course of the film,
we see his body giving up on him
as the disease takes hold – but
Campillo refuses to portray him
just as a victim.
For all the heady excitement
of Act Up’s protests, Campillo
doesn’t indulge in false
romanticism, as it becomes
painfully apparent that the
activists are relatively powerless.
GHOST STORIES (15)
HHHHH
Jeremy Dyson, Andy Nyman,
97 mins, starring: Andy Nyman, Paul
Whitehouse, Martin Freeman
A few jokes about car insurance
and mobile phone providers
aside, this is a deadly serious
attempt to chill us to the bone.
It just about succeeds.
Early on, viewers are likely to
share the same scepticism about
the paranormal as the film’s main
character, Professor Goodman
(Andy Nyman), who is presented
with three stories that defy
rational explanation.
The film is adapted from
the stage play by Nyman and
co-writer/director, Jeremy
Dyson. It starts slowly but the
terror levels quickly rise.
Ghost Stories isn’t very
profound. It doesn’t try to explain
the nature of evil. Nyman and
Dyson just want to give us some
cinematic shock treatment.
This is the screen equivalent of
a ghost train ride at a fairground.
The scarier it gets, the more fun
it becomes.
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
Film
Matrix
WHAT CRITICS
ARE SAYING
ABOUT THE
NEW RELEASES
‘If you take it too seriously,
you miss the point’
Daryl Hannah and Neil Young talk to Chris Mugan about old technology and
the secret message at the heart of their new film, a hazy western musical
A QUIET PLACE (15)
“What is most satisfying here is
not just the frights that punctuate
the family’s existence, but the
empathy that builds up and how
moved we are by their plight.”
The List
“This may be a sci-fi fantasy
about giant man-eating bugs,
but it’s grounded in human
facts and folly. Little here is safe.
Nothing is predictable.”
New York Daily News
WONDERSTRUCK (PG)
“Strikes a curious emotional tone,
alternating between suspense and
quiet wistfulness, with sudden
surges of operatic intensity as the
two timelines begin to connect.”
Slate
“Wonderstruck fails to convince,
so intent is Haynes on slotting
each coincidence into place. The
result is exquisitely detailed, but
lacking the breath of life.”
The New Yorker
120 BPM (15)
“There are more informative
chronicles of the era, and more
accessible ones, too. But there’s
something transcendently
beautiful in Campillo’s vision.”
Entertainment Weekly
“Exposes the electricity of living in
that time for the gay community,
where amid apathy and outright
hate from the outside world, an
unbreakable bond was formed.”
Village Voice
A
couple of years into
his eighth decade,
Neil Young continues
to surprise with his
remorseless productivity and unexpected detours.
Alongside a steady stream of albums, there has been his electric
car, the Pono hi-res audio player
and an extensive archive project.
Now comes a starring role in a
feature film of sorts written and
directed by the rock veteran’s
girlfriend, actress Daryl Hannah.
Premiered earlier this year at
South by Southwest and acquired
by Netflix, Paradox is a surreal,
whimsical cowboy tale, with
Young bossing a gang of outlaws
in some post-apocalyptic wilderness, supposedly prospecting for
treasure, but mainly shooting the
breeze in a stoned fashion surrounded by stunning landscapes.
Paradox is also a freewheeling
non-concert movie based around
impromptu jams involving Young
and his backing band Promise of
the Real, rocking out on a practice
stage in a marquee, at a festival and
strumming around a campfire.
Famed for roles in Blade Runner
and Splash, Hannah has moved behind the camera on occasion, most
successfully with 1993 short The
Last Supper, a winner at the Berlin Film Festival. She is, though,
wary of calling this her debut feature. “It adds a certain onus on it
in terms of it as my calling card
or establishing my identity as a
film-maker,” she explains. “I have
projects I have been writing and
There wasn’t a
lot of pot smoking
on set, but we want
people to relax and
have a good time
developing to be proper narrative
films, but this one was a spontaneous venture that popped out of
nowhere. The timing and the opportunity were right.”
Paradox came together in autumn 2016 after Hannah had finished filming Netflix’s sci-fi drama
Sense8, while Young and his crew
were based for a few days in Hannah’s native Rockies, where she
grew up and still has a home.
Young and his band were acclimatising at altitude before a gig
in Telluride, Colorado, beginning
a short tour that culminated in a
set at Californian festival Desert
Trip. Hannah took the opportunity to film rehearsals with a
simple script to feed them and
further opportunities to perform.
“I decided to have them languishing in some sort of time-loop
purgatory; the story came out of
those constraints.”
Home on the range
Young croons his
way through the
film by Hannah
(below) GETTY
Hannah had already shot promo
videos of the band, while Young is
a master of can-do attitude, having directed his own concert movies and even bizarre 80s comedy
Human Highway under his pseudonym Bernard Shakey.
“Daryl lives for film, studies it
and wanted to make one,” he says.
“She had an idea about a circus
tent that travelled around with
people living in it, so I said
we’re putting up a tent right
here, why don’t you figure
out something?”
Hannah shaped fictional characters around the
band similar to their
own, “caricatures of
how people see them”,
including her beau as
The Man in the Black
Hat. “People find him
really intimidating,
but we know him as
this guy with a heart
of gold.” She even
tempts Young into his
first dog-sled ride. “I’m
Canadian, you know
how it is,” he laughs. “It
didn’t seem to be hard.”
As well as directing
and writing, Hannah shot
her own footage and even
sourced outfits from charity
shops. “There was very little work [for me] to do, other
than be myself, couple of
lines here and there,” Young
recalls. “I didn’t worry about
what she was doing, because I
knew it was going to be good. I
don’t know how many people
know how brilliant she is. Probably more of them are concerned
about what she looks like than
what’s going on in her mind.”
Some of Hannah’s footage came
from a Super 8 camera, suggesting a shared sympathy for vintage
technology with Young, who last
year auctioned some of his
classic cars and model railway kit.
“Both of us see the degradation happening in the
digital age,” says Young.
“We see how quality has
been watered down and
how irresponsible the
tech companies are.
The art form of recorded sound is a shadow of
its former self.”
For Hannah, the irony
is that she believes current HD technology provides too much clarity.
“[It is] hyper-focused,
with no beauty or soft
edges. It looks like a
c h e e s y s o a p - o p e ra
video and makes the acting
look bad.”
Another bond the couple
share is environmental and
political activism – the pair
were arrested in 2014 at a protest against the controversial
Keystone pipeline. This provides a subtext to a film that
is far from didactic. The treasure
the boys seek is not gold, but artefacts from a past technological
age: travel alarm clocks, computer keyboards and the like.
When Young robs a bank, it
turns out to be a seed bank, while
footage of the band jamming
morphs into scenes from Young
and his band’s performance at
Desert Trip, where they throw
bags of seeds into the audience,
protesting against a state ban on
movement of organic seeds across
county lines, seen as benefiting
corporations such as Young’s regular bête noire, Monsanto. “The
seeds in our movie are real seeds
and the enemy seeds are GMO
[genetically modified],” he says.
“Just like real music is our friend.”
A PR claimed that Hannah described Paradox as “more pot than
plot”. It is a joke, Hannah says, but
an apt one – a steer as to how we
should approach the venture.
“There wasn’t a lot of pot smoking
on set, but we want people to relax
and have a good time. This is not a
film you’re supposed to over-intellectualise. There are some serious
points, but if you take it too seriously, you miss the point.”
That, apparently, is just one of
several paradoxes that give the
film its name. Or as Young says in
the film, we should: “Smoke a beer
or sip a joint”. THE INDEPENDENT
‘Paradox’ is viewable on Netflix.
The soundtrack is available now
35
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TI123
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
TELEVISION
37
FR DAY
1
MY NEXT GUEST NEEDS
NO INTRODUCTION WITH
DAVID LETTERMAN: JAY-Z
FROM TODAY, NETFLIX
Continuing his trend of inviting
only the most auspicious of
guests to join him on stage,
Letterman welcomes rapper
Jay-Z – real name Shawn
Carter – to the set to talk about
his life, his career and what it’s
like being married to the most
famous woman in the world.
2
BRITAIN’S MOST
HISTORIC TOWNS
SUN 8PM, CHANNEL 4
Key periods in British history
are told through its individual
towns and cities as Professor
Alice Roberts explores how
people might have lived in
each period. Over the course
of the series, she takes a crash
course in 19th-century female
etiquette in Belfast and learns
about Tudor justice in Norwich.
The series starts in Chester,
where Roberts explores its
Roman roots.
THIS WEEK’S
Tento
watch
Chosen by
Jessica Barrett
4
SEX ROBOTS AND US
FROM SUN, BBC3 ON IPLAYER
James Young became
“part cyborg” as part of an
experiment in which he was
fitted with a bespoke, high-tech
prosthetic arm inspired by Metal
Gear Solid, one of the world’s
best-selling computer games.
Young now travels across the
5
FAMALAM
FROM MON, BBC3 ON IPLAYER
This sketch show arrived last
autumn as part of the BBC’s
experiment with 12 different
comedy pilots. Its success
meant it was commissioned for
a full series, which is available
today on iPlayer, before coming
to BBC2 later in the year.
Look out for Nigerian
philanthropist Prince
Alyusi, Croydon’s
leading voodoo doctor
Professor Lofuko,
misunderstood
superhero
Eclipse and
chicken-loving
schoolboy
Fat Sam.
6
PLEBS
MON 10PM,
ITV2
3
ORDEAL BY INNOCENCE
SUN 9PM, BBC1
The second episode of the BBC’s
Agatha Christie adaptation,
which centres on the devious
Phillip, Rachel Argyll’s sonin-law (played by Matthew
Goode). Philip’s cruelty means
he becomes a suspect in his
mother-in-law’s murder, though
as he has a broken back, it’s
pointed out, surely there’s no
way he could be responsible?
Also starring Bill Nighy and
Eleanor Tomlinson.
world to meet the makers and
users of sex robots, who have
plans for a Westworld future
where sexbots live among us.
Clockwise from top ‘Plebs’;
Christopher Eccleston as Greg
with Kerri Quinn as his girlfriend
Brenna in ‘Come Home’; Diane
Morgan as Philomena Cunk
The sitcom
returns for a
fourth series
with a new
regular cast
member,
Jonathan
Pointing.
He replaces
Joel Fry, who
played Stylax.
Pointing, who plays
happy-go-lucky
builder Jason,
isn’t the only
new arrival.
Aisling Bea, Ellie Taylor and
Made in Chelsea’s Ollie Locke
all make appearances, as does
Robert Lindsay.
7
GREG DAVIES: YOU
MAGNIFICENT BEAST
FROM TUES, NETFLIX
The British comic and star of
Man Down and The Inbetweeners,
brings his latest stand-up tour –
his first in four years – to Netflix.
Made up of musings and mad
remarks from his late father,
who died three years ago, and
even madder remarks from
his mother (who is still alive),
Davies’s show
culminates
in a musical
tribute.
8
COME HOME
TUES 9PM, BBC1
The final episode of this threepart drama, from the makers
of Happy Valley, finds Greg
(Christopher Eccleston) and
Marie (Paula Malcomson)
preparing to face off in a
dramatic court case. The jump
between past and present
finally brings us closer to
understanding why Marie left
Greg and their children, while
the custody battle makes them
question the decisions that
they’ve made.
9
CUNK ON BRITAIN
TUES 10PM, BBC2
Philomena Cunk’s personal
odyssey, encapsulated by
her “standing in front of old
buildings saying things into the
camera” continues. This week
she covers the ground from
Henry VIII to Lord Nelson.
10
MASTERCHEF:
THE FINALS
WEDS 8PM, BBC1
It’s been an intensive
few weeks for Masterchef
viewers, following the
various knock-out stages.
Now we’ve made it to
the final week, as four
remaining finalists fly to
Peru for a series of testing
challenges. In Lima they
meet chef Gaston Acurio,
who takes them to a local
fish market, before working
a busy lunch service at Virgilio
Martinez’s Central, named the
fourth best restaurant in the
world last year.
Television Friday 6 April
CRITIC’S
CHOICE
GERARD GILBERT
PICK OF THE DAY
===
9pm, BBC2
Tony Grisoni’s adaptation of China
Miéville’s fantasy novel is a police
procedural set in a grungy, rainswept alternative reality that’s a mix
of George Orwell, Philip K Dick and
Soviet chic – but not as derivative
as that sounds. The idea is that two
cities exist side by side with an
invisible border that citizens can’t
cross. Except that a murder victim
seems to have done just that – which
comprises the latest case for David
Morrissey’s Inspector Tyador Borlu
(all the names are like this). Lara
Pulver plays Borlu’s partner,
Katrynia, Mandeep Dillon is his
sidekick Lizbyet and there’s a
pathologist who dresses like Tom
Waits in his barfly period.
7.30pm, BBC4
If you caught Tuesday night’s
documentary celebrating 40 years
of this biennial competition, you
will understand what a brilliant
springboard it is into the world of
professional classical music. Here,
1998 winner Alison Balsom joins
Josie d’Arby to review the five strings
finalists waiting to perform in the
Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s
brand-new concert hall.
The City & The City
BBC Young Musician 2018
===
I Don’t Like Mondays
8pm, Channel 4
Alan Carr hosts a new game show in
which one lucky participant wins a
year’s salary – and gets to resign on
the spot (presumably university
6.00 The Simpsons
Three festive
shorts (R) (S).
6.30 Hollyoaks Ellie
attempts to
cheer up Alfie
(R) (S).
6.00 Home And Away
Jasmine finds
her stalker in
her caravan (R)
(S).
6.30 5 News Tonight
(S).
7.00 Emmerdale
Laurel faces an
emotional day
(S).
7.30 Coronation
Street (S).
7.00 Channel 4 News
(S).
7pm
7.00 The One Show
Live chat (S).
7.30 Sounds Like
Friday Night
New series.
With music by
Little Mix (S).
7.00 The Gadget
Show The team
puts the latest
outdoor gadgets
to the test (S).
8pm
8.00 EastEnders
The day of the
E20 reopening
arrives (S).
8.30 Room 101 The
best bits. Last in
the series (S).
8.00 Love Your
Garden A Hull
garden (S).
8.30 Coronation
Street Jude
begs Mary to
keep a secret (S).
8.00 I Don’t Like
Mondays New
series. Comedy
game show,
hosted by Alan
Carr (S).
8.00 Britain’s Great
Cathedrals With
Tony Robinson
The history of
Canterbury
Cathedral (S).
9pm
9.00 MasterChef
The last of the
semi-finals (S).
9.30 Have I Got News
For You New
series (S).
9.00 The City &
The City New
series. Detective
thriller,
starring David
Morrissey (S).
9.00 Lethal Weapon
Riggs and
Murtaugh are
thrown into
the world of
counterfeit
money (S).
9.00 Gogglebox The
households’
opinions
on recent
television (S).
9.00 Jane McDonald
& Friends With
guests Tony
Hadley and
Shayne Ward.
Last in the
series (S).
9.00 Forever Young
– How Rock ’n’
Roll Grew Up
How rock stars
have coped with
growing old (R)
(S).
10pm
10.00BBC News (S).
10.25 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
10.35 The Graham
Norton Show
New series (S).
10.00Episodes The
video of Matt’s
escapade with
the girl in the
box goes viral
(S).
10.30 Newsnight (S).
10.00ITV News (S).
10.30 Regional News
(S).
10.45 FILM: Hellboy
II: The Golden
Army (2008) (S).
10.00Lee And Dean
Sitcom (S).
10.35 8 Out Of 10 Cats
With Jordan
Stephens, Ayda
Field and Dane
Baptiste (R) (S).
10.00Will & Grace
Jack is unhappy
with Will (S).
10.35 Greatest Ever
Celebrity Wind
Ups (R) (S).
10.00Billy Fury: The
Sound Of Fury
The story of
the Liverpoolborn performer
(R) (S).
11.25 Today At The
Games Action
from day two of
the Games (S).
11.55 Commonwealth
Games 2018
Live action (S).
11.05 Front Row Late
New series (S).
11.35 The
Assassination Of
Gianni Versace:
American
Crime Story (R).
11.20 Rob Beckett’s
Playing For
Time Video
games from the
late 1990s (S).
11.50 Rude Tube (R)
(S).
11.35 Lip Sync Battle
UK: Joey Essex
Vs Louie Spence
Hosted by
Melanie Brown
and Professor
Green (S).
4.00 Commonwealth
Games 2018 (S).
12.25 Sign Zone: Rehab:
Addicted Lives (R) (S). 1.45
Sign Zone: Civilisations
(R) (S). 2.45 Sign Zone: The
Assassination Of Gianni
Versace: American Crime
Story (R) (S). 3.35 BBC
News (S).
12.45 FILM: Lawless (2012)
(S). 2.45 Kiss Me First (R)
(S). 3.40 Electric Dreams:
Kill All Others (R) (S). 4.35
The Question Jury (R) (S).
5.30 Streetmate (R) (S).
5.55 Kirstie’s Fill Your
House For Free (R) (S).
12.00 SuperCasino (S).
3.10 GPs: Behind Closed
Doors (R) (S). 4.00 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors (R)
(S). 4.45 House Doctor (R)
(S). 5.10 Great Scientists
(R) (S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS
(R) (S).
Daytime
6.00 BBC News At
Six; Weather (S).
6.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.45 Football:
Women’s
World Cup
Qualification
England vs
Wales. Kick-off
is at 7pm (S).
9.30pm, BBC1
Extraordinarily, this is Jeremy
Paxman’s first ever hosting gig
on HIGNFY, the former Newsnight
inquisitor having stayed clear of
current affairs since his retirement
– unless you count his nomination
of David Cameron in a recent
episode of Room 101. He’ll be great,
not requiring cue cards for his
political knowledge and unafraid
to spar with Hislop and Merton.
6.00 ITV Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.30 ITV News;
Weather (S).
Late
6.00 Good Morning
Britain (S). 8.30 Lorraine
(S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (R) (S). 10.30 This
Morning (S). 12.30 Loose
Women (S). 1.30 ITV News;
Weather (S). 1.55 ITV
Regional News; Weather
(S). 2.00 Judge Rinder (S).
3.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal
(R) (S). 4.00 Tipping Point
(S). 5.00 The Chase (S).
Have I Got News For You
6.00 Milkshake! 9.15
The Wright Stuff 11.15
Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It
Away! (R) (S). 12.10 5 News
Lunchtime (S). 12.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors (R)
(S). 1.15 Home And Away
(S). 1.45 Neighbours (S).
2.15 NCIS (R) (S). 3.15 FILM:
A Father’s Guilty Secret
(RD Braunstein 2016)
Thriller, starring Willa
Ford (S). 5.00 5 News At 5
(S). 5.30 Neighbours (R) (S).
11pm
6.00 Commonwealth
Games 2018 Live
artistic gymnastics
coverage on day two
in Queensland (S). 9.15
Oxford Street Revealed
(R) (S). 10.00 Homes
Under The Hammer (R)
(S). 11.00 Street Auction
(R) (S). 11.45 Claimed
And Shamed (S). 12.15
Bargain Hunt (R) (S). 1.00
Commonwealth Games
2018 (S). 5.15 Put Your
Money Where Your Mouth
Is (R) (S). 5.45 Golf: The
Masters Highlights (S).
===
6.00 Countdown (R)
(S). 6.45 3rd Rock From
The Sun (R) (S). 7.10 3rd
Rock From The Sun
(R) (S). 7.35 Everybody
Loves Raymond (R) (S).
8.00 Everybody Loves
Raymond (R) (S). 8.30
Frasier (R) (S). 9.00 Frasier
(R) (S). 9.30 Frasier (R) (S).
10.00 Ramsay’s Hotel Hell
(R) (S). 10.50 The Simpsons
(R) (S). 11.20 The Simpsons
(R) (S). 11.50 Channel 4
News Summary (S). 11.55
Formula 1 Bahrain Grand
Prix Practice 1 Live (S).
2.10 Countdown (S). 3.00
A Place In The Sun: Winter
Sun (R) (S). 4.00 A New
Life In The Sun (R) (S). 5.00
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 5.30
Star Boot Sale (S).
6pm
6.00 Breakfast (S). 9.15
Commonwealth Games
2018 Continued live
swimming and track
cycling coverage on day
two (S). 1.00 BBC News
At One; Weather (S). 1.30
BBC Regional News;
Weather (S). 1.45 Moving
On (R) (S). 2.30 Escape To
The Continent (R) (S). 3.30
Money For Nothing (S).
4.15 Flog It! (R) (S). 5.15
Pointless (S).
vice-chancellors and male BBC
presenters were ineligible).
Unavailable for preview, but Carr is
apparently assisted by a “celebrity
executive board,” while there’s also
time for Amanda Holden to fulfil a
dream by becoming a stuntwoman.
12.50 Jackpot247 3.00
Take On The Twisters (R)
(S). 3.50 ITV Nightscreen
The guest panelists are Josh
Widdicombe and Steph McGovern.
===
Episodes
10pm, BBC2
“You realise that when I die, this is
what I’m going to be remembered
for,” Matt LeBlanc tells Sean and
Beverly (Stephen Mangan and
Tamsin Greig) after the video of his
tryst goes viral. Meanwhile, the
couple endure a disastrous casting
session with the bombastic, now
wheelchair-bound Anthony Powner
Smith (Rufus Jones).
===
Lee And Dean
10pm, Channel 4
After the events at last week’s
engagement party, Dean (Mark
Alan Carr presents
‘I Don’t Like Mondays’
8pm, Channel 4
Emily Blunt discusses
her new horror film
A Quiet Place on ‘The
Graham Norton Show’
10.35pm, BBC1
7.00 World News
Today (S).
7.30 BBC Young
Musician 2018
New series.
The five strings
finalists (S).
6.00 The Planet’s Funniest
Animals (R). 6.15 Totally
Bonkers Guinness World
Records (R) (S). 7.05 Who’s
Doing The Dishes? (R)
(S). 7.55 Emmerdale (R)
(S). 8.50 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records
(R) (S). 9.05 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (R) (S).
9.55 FILM: Around The
World In 80 Days (Frank
Coraci 2004) (S). 12.15
Emmerdale (R) (S). 12.45
Emmerdale (R) (S). 1.15
You’ve Been Framed!
Gold (R) (S). 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (R) (S).
2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show
(R) (S). 3.40 The Jeremy
Kyle Show (R) (S). 4.50
Judge Rinder (R) (S). 5.50
Take Me Out (R) (S).
Jeremy Paxman hosts
‘Have I Got News For You’
9.30pm, BBC1
6.45 FILM: Back To
The Future
(Robert
Zemeckis 1985)
Sci-fi comedy
adventure (S).
7.00 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold
Comical clips,
narrated by
Harry Hill (R) (S).
8.00 Two And A Half
Men (R) (S).
8.30 Two And A Half
Men Walden
tries to spice up
his relationship
with Zoey (R) (S).
9.00 FILM: Four
Weddings
And A Funeral
(Mike Newell
1994) Romantic
comedy, with
Hugh Grant (S).
9.00 FILM: American
Pie (Paul Weitz
1999) Comingof-age comedy,
with Jason
Biggs (S).
11.30 It’s Only Rock
’n’ Roll: Rock
’n’ Roll At The
BBC Including
performances
by Jerry Lee
Lewis (R) (S).
11.20 FILM: Bullet
To The Head
(Walter Hill
2012) Action
thriller, starring
Sylvester
Stallone (S).
11.00 Family Guy (R)
(S).
11.30 Family Guy (R)
(S).
11.55 American Dad!
(R) (S).
12.30 Guitar Heroes On
Later With Jools Holland
(R) (S). 1.30 Forever Young
– How Rock ’n’ Roll Grew
Up (R) (S). 2.30 Billy Fury:
The Sound Of Fury (R) (S).
3.55 Close
1.05 FILM: Machete
(Robert Rodriguez, Ethan
Maniquis 2010) Action
thriller, starring Danny
Trejo (S). 3.15 Close
12.25 American Dad! (R)
(S). 12.55 Two And A Half
Men (R) (S). 1.25 Two And
A Half Men (R) (S). 1.50
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 2.20
Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2
Nightscreen
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
O’Sullivan) is still pretending to
date the stalker-ish Mrs BryceD’Souza (Anna Morris, brilliant),
and the couple find themselves
on an awkward double-date with
Lee and Nicky. “A fun little girl”
is how Mrs B describes Nikki.
“The girl next door, although not
next door to where I live”.
FILM
CHOICE
LAURENCE PHELAN
===
The Graham Norton Show
10.35pm, BBC1
After a short break, Norton returns
with married couple Emily Blunt
and John Krasinski, she careful not
to say anything disparaging about
Donald Trump and together plugging
their first joint movie, A Quiet Place.
Also on the sofa are an Avengerspromoting Tom Holland and Kylie
Minogue, who also performs.
FILM OF THE DAY
===
9pm, 5STAR
(David Ayer, 2014)
“History is violent,” says US Army
tank commander Don “Wardaddy”
Collier (Brad Pitt) in one of this
Second World War movie’s few quiet
moments. And he’s not kidding: Fury
is brutal. It’s set in the spring of
1945, when the Allies are painfully
inching towards Berlin, and its
characters are damaged or deadened
by what they’ve seen and done. It
doesn’t have much plot, but exists in
an endless nightmarish present,
where every option is reduced to kill
or be killed. It isn’t entertaining,
exactly, but it is intensely, joltingly
visceral, and if we are going to tell
ourselves war stories, then this is
probably what they should look like.
9pm, Film4
(Mike Newell, 1994)
Neatly structured, well-written
and charmingly performed, this is
still the gold standard of British
romcoms. Hugh Grant was never
more endearing, while an appealing
gang of supporting characters make
it all seem well-rounded.
Fury
Four Weddings And A Funeral
===
Ted Bundy
10pm, 5USA
(Matthew Bright, 2002)
One of a few pro-capital punishment
movies, this chronicle of the crimes
of the first man to be called a serial
killer is a gruelling study in the
banality of evil. His capture and
execution come as a relief.
Radio
BBC Radio 1
6.00 Classic Coronation
Street (R). 6.25 Classic
Coronation Street (R).
6.50 Heartbeat (R) (S). 7.55
The Royal (R) (S). 9.00
Judge Judy (R) (S). 9.25
Judge Judy (R) (S). 9.50
Judge Judy (R) (S). 10.20
Inspector Morse (R) (S).
12.35 The Royal (R) (S).
1.35 Heartbeat (R) (S). 2.40
Classic Coronation Street
(R). 3.15 Classic Coronation
Street (R). 3.45 Judge Judy
(R) (S). 4.10 FILM: Carry
On Henry (Gerald Thomas
1971) Comedy, starring Sid
James (S). 5.55 Heartbeat
(R) (S).
6.00 Hollyoaks (R) (S). 6.30
Hollyoaks (R) (S). 7.00
Rules Of Engagement (R)
(S). 8.00 How I Met Your
Mother (R) (S). 9.00 New
Girl (R) (S). 9.30 New Girl
(R) (S). 10.00 2 Broke Girls
(R) (S). 11.00 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (R) (S). 12.00
The Goldbergs (R) (S). 12.30
The Goldbergs (R) (S). 1.00
The Big Bang Theory (R) (S).
1.30 The Big Bang Theory
(R) (S). 2.00 How I Met
Your Mother (R) (S). 2.30
How I Met Your Mother (R)
(S). 3.00 New Girl (R) (S).
3.30 New Girl (R) (S). 4.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (R) (S).
4.30 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(R) (S). 5.00 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 5.30 The Goldbergs
(R) (S).
8.55 A Place In The Sun:
Home Or Away (R) (S).
10.00 A Place In The Sun:
Home Or Away (R) (S).
11.05 Four In A Bed (R) (S).
11.35 Four In A Bed (R) (S).
12.10 Four In A Bed (R) (S).
12.40 Four In A Bed (R)
(S). 1.15 Four In A Bed (R)
(S). 1.55 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 2.25 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 2.55 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 3.25
Come Dine With Me (R) (S).
3.55 Formula 1 Bahrain
Grand Prix Practice 2 Live
Further coverage from
the second round of the
season (S). 5.35 Car SOS
(R) (S).
7.00 Murder, She
Wrote A killer
stalks a college
campus (R) (S).
6.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.30 The Big Bang
Theory Wil
Wheaton
returns (R) (S).
6.40 Jamie’s Comfort
Food (R) (S).
6.55 The Secret Life
Of The Zoo
A chimp arrives
at Chester Zoo
(R) (S).
6.00 Futurama
(R) (S).
6.30 The Simpsons
Bart is sent
to a juvenile
detention
centre (R) (S).
6.00 House The antisocial doctor
and his team
treat a drug
dealer (R) (S).
8.00 Agatha
Christie’s
Marple A Ouija
board predicts
a murder.
Geraldine
McEwan stars
7.00 Hollyoaks Ste
and Leela clash
over Tegan (S).
7.30 Extreme Cake
Makers A lifesized dress cake
(R) (S).
7.55 Grand Designs
Converting a
water tower
into a home (R)
(S).
7.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
7.30 The Simpsons
Marge and
Homer go on a
honeymoon (R)
(S).
7.00 CSI: Crime
Scene
Investigation
A real-estate
entrepreneur is
poisoned (R) (S).
8.00 The Simpsons
Marge forces
everyone to go
to a bookshop.
8.30 Modern Family
Mitchell throws
a party.
8.00 Blue Bloods
Jamie and Eddie
ask Erin to drop
the charges
against a local
hero (R).
9.00 Rough Justice
A nurse is
found dead in
the mortuary,
covered in
clown make-up.
In Flemish (S).
9.00 Karl Pilkington:
The Moaning
Of Life Karl
Pilkington
considers the
point of art (R)
(S).
9.00 Game Of
Thrones Jon
Snow finds
himself on trial
at Castle Black
(R) (S).
10.0024 Hours In
A&E A 22-yearold is rushed
in with stab
wounds to his
face and arm
(R) (S).
10.00The Late Late
Show With
James Corden:
Best Of The
Week Highlights
of the talk show
(R).
10.15 Game Of
Thrones The
day of King
Joffrey’s
wedding to
Margaery Tyrell
arrives (R) (S).
11.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
11.30 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
11.55 First Dates (R)
(S).
11.05 24 Hours In
A&E Patients
who have
injured
themselves
through work or
play (R) (S).
11.00 A League Of
Their Own
James Corden
hosts the sports
quiz (R) (S).
11.30 Game Of
Thrones Dontos
spirits Sansa
out of King’s
Landing (R) (S).
1.00 Tattoo Fixers (R) (S).
2.05 Gogglebox (R) (S). 3.00
Rude Tube (R) (S). 3.50
Rude Tube (R) (S). 4.15
Rules Of Engagement
(R) (S). 4.35 Rules Of
Engagement (R) (S).
12.10 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (R) (S).
1.10 24 Hours In A&E (R)
(S). 2.15 24 Hours In A&E
(R) (S). 3.15 8 Out Of 10 Cats
(R) (S). 3.55 Close
12.00 Football’s Funniest
Moments (R) (S). 1.00 In
The Long Run (R). 1.30 Brit
Cops: War On Crime (R) (S).
2.20 Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S).
3.10 Warehouse 13 (R) (S).
4.00 The Real A&E (R) (S).
(R) (S).
10.00The Syndicate
Drama about
a group of
lottery winners,
starring
Timothy Spall
(R) (S).
11.05 Killer Women
With Piers
Morgan A
Florida woman
convicted for
her part in the
murder of a
man (R) (S).
12.10 Rising Damp
Forever (R) (S). 2.05 FILM:
Rising Damp (Joe McGrath
1980) 3.45 Million Dollar
Princesses (R) (S). 4.35
Murder, She Wrote (R) (S).
5.25 Judge Judy (R) (S). 5.50
ITV3 Nightscreen
6.00 Fish Town (R) (S).
7.00 The Guest Wing (R)
(S). 8.00 Storm City (R) (S).
9.00 The West Wing (R)
(S). 10.00 The West Wing
(R) (S). 11.00 House (R) (S).
12.00 House (R) (S). 1.00
Without A Trace (R) (S).
2.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
3.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
4.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
5.00 House (R) (S).
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast
Show With Nick Grimshaw
10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills
4.00 The Official Chart With
MistaJam 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
BBC Radio 1’s Dance Anthems
With MistaJam 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 Kolsch 11.00 Danny
Howard 1am B.Traits 4.00
Radio 1’s Essential Mix
BBC Radio 1Xtra
6am Dotty 10.00 Seani B
12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00
Yasmin Evans 4.00 Sian
Anderson 5.45 Newsbeat
6.00 Sian Anderson 7.00 DJ
Charlesy 9.00 Semtex 11.00
Sir Spyro 1am Kan D Man And
DJ Limelight 4.00 Diplo And
Friends
BBC Radio 2
8.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
8.30 The Big Bang
Theory Amy
struggles to
answer Sheldon’s
proposal (R) (S).
9.00 FILM: The
Watch (Akiva
Schaffer 2012)
Sci-fi comedy,
starring Ben
Stiller (S).
6.00 Supergirl (R) (S). 7.00
Supergirl (R) (S). 8.00
Futurama (R) (S). 8.30
Modern Family (R) (S). 9.00
Modern Family (R) (S). 9.30
The Simpsons (R) (S). 10.00
The Simpsons (R) (S). 10.30
The Simpsons (R) (S). 11.00
Warehouse 13 (R) (S). 12.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (R) (S).
1.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S).
2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S).
3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(R) (S). 4.00 Stargate SG-1
(R) (S). 5.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S). 5.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
12.45 The Sopranos (R) (S).
1.50 The Sopranos (R) (S).
2.50 Crashing (R) (S). 3.25
Crashing (R) (S). 4.00 The
West Wing (R) (S). 5.00 The
West Wing (R) (S).
6.30am Sara Cox 9.30 Ken
Bruce 12noon Jeremy Vine
2.00 Steve Wright In The
Afternoon 5.00 Mary Portas
7.00 Tony Blackburn’s Golden
Hour 8.00 Friday Night Is
Music Night 10.00 Sounds Of
The 80s 12mdn’t Anneka Rice:
The Happening 2.00 Radio 2’s
Funky Soul Playlist 3.00 Radio
2 Playlist: New To 2 4.00 Radio
2 Playlist: 21st Century Songs
5.00 Huey On Saturday
BBC Radio 3
6.30am Breakfast. Petroc
Trelawny. 9.00 Essential
Classics. Ian Skelly presents
a selection of classical
music. 12noon Composer
Of The Week: Schumann.
Donald McLeod completes
his examination of music
from Schumann’s Dusseldorf
years. 1.00 News 1.02 Radio
3 Lunchtime Concert. Three
String Quartets perform a
selection of works from the
New Town Concert series. 2.00
Afternoon Concert. The NDR
Elbphilharmonie Orchestra in
music by Alberto Ginastera.
4.30 BBC Young Musician
2018. Performances from the
annual contest. 5.00 In Tune.
With he National Youth Folk
Ensemble and jazz singer Kurt
Elling. 7.00 In Tune Mixtape. An
eclectic non-stop mix of music.
7.30 Radio 3 In Concert. The
RLPO plays Wagner, Elgar and
Schumann. 10.00 The Verb.
Aelebrating the centenary of
the poet WS Graham. 10.45 The
Essay: The Book That Changed
Me. Inua Ellams reflects on
Terry Pratchett’s comic novel
Pyramids. 11.00 Music Planet.
New series. Featuring Eliades
Ochoa in session. 1am Through
The Night
BBC Radio 4
6am Today 9.15 The Reunion
9.45 Book Of The Week:
Factfulness 10.00 Woman’s
Hour 11.00 Up Close And
Personal 11.30 When The Dog
Dies 12noon News 12.04 Home
Front 12.15 You And Yours
12.56 Weather 1.00 The World
At One 1.45 Voices Of The First
World War 2.00 The Archers
2.15 Drama: Love Me Tender
39
ON DEMAND
My Next Guest Needs
No Introduction
Netflix
David Letterman is probably
right about that with his next
guest – Jay-Z.
My Dad, The Peace
Deal And Me
BBC iPlayer
Patrick Kielty crosses Northern
Ireland on the 20th anniversary
of the Good Friday Agreement.
Save Me
Now TV/Sky Box Sets
Lennie James’s drama is a must.
3.00 Gardeners’ Question
Time 3.45 Short Works 4.00
Last Word 4.30 Feedback 4.55
The Listening Project 5.00
PM 5.57 Weather 6.00 Six
O’Clock News 6.30 The Now
Show. With guest comedians
Ellie Taylor and Ola. Last in the
series. 7.00 The Archers. Brian
puts on a show. 7.15 Front Row.
Arts and culture programme.
7.45 A Book Of Middle Eastern
Food. Dramatised by Anjum
Malik. Last in the series. 8.00
Any Questions? Topical
discussion from Bakewell in
Derbyshire. 8.50 A Point Of
View. China and the retreat
of liberal values. 9.00 Home
Front Omnibus. Parts 21-25. By
Katie Hims. 10.00 The World
Tonight. With Chris Mason.
10.45 Book At Bedtime: Rabbit
Is Rich. By John Updike. 11.00
Great Lives. Jim Moir, aka Vic
Reeves, chooses the life of Don
van Vliet – Captain Beefheart.
11.30 Ramblings. Clare Balding
walks through the Peak District
with comedian Ed Byrne. 11.55
The Listening Project. A man
recalls the conversations he
had with his father. 12mdn’t
News And Weather 12.30 Book
Of The Week: Factfulness 12.48
Shipping 1.00 As BBC World
Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast
5.30 News Briefing 5.43 Prayer
For The Day 5.45 IPM
BBC Radio 4 LW
9.45am Daily Service 12.01pm
Shipping Forecast 5.54
Shipping Forecast
BBC Radio 4 Extra
6am Brother Cadfael: The
Virgin In The Ice 6.30 Arvon
Turns 40 7.00 The Stanley
Baxter Playhouse 7.30 In And
Out Of The Kitchen 8.00 I’m
Sorry I’ll Read That Again
8.30 Brothers In Law 9.00 The
Motion Show 9.30 Kathmandu
Or Bust 10.00 Anna Karenina
11.00 Podcast Radio Hour
12noon I’m Sorry I’ll Read
That Again 12.30 Brothers In
Law 1.00 Brother Cadfael: The
Virgin In The Ice 1.30 Arvon
Turns 40 2.00 The Essex
Serpent 2.15 Disability: A New
Pick
ofthe
day
Friday Night Is
Music Night
8pm, BBC Radio 2
To mark the
Royal Air Force’s
100th birthday,
Ken Bruce, Carol
Vorderman (above)
and Dan Snow
celebrate a century
of British military
aviation at the
Royal Albert Hall.
History 2.30 The Old Curiosity
Shop 2.45 On Her Majesty’s
Secret Service 3.00 Anna
Karenina 4.00 The Motion
Show 4.30 Kathmandu Or
Bust 5.00 The Stanley Baxter
Playhouse 5.30 In And Out Of
The Kitchen 6.00 Hothouse
6.30 Mastertapes 7.00 I’m
Sorry I’ll Read That Again 7.30
Brothers In Law 8.00 Brother
Cadfael: The Virgin In The
Ice 8.30 Arvon Turns 40 9.00
Podcast Radio Hour 10.00
Comedy Club: In And Out Of
The Kitchen 10.30 The Show
What You Wrote 11.00 Kevin
Eldon Will See You Now 11.30
A Look Back At The Nineties
12mdn’t Hothouse 12.30
Mastertapes 1.00 Brother
Cadfael: The Virgin In The Ice
1.30 Arvon Turns 40 2.00 The
Essex Serpent 2.15 Disability:
A New History 2.30 The Old
Curiosity Shop 2.45 On Her
Majesty’s Secret Service
3.00 Anna Karenina 4.00 The
Motion Show 4.30 Kathmandu
Or Bust 5.00 The Stanley
Baxter Playhouse 5.30 In And
Out Of The Kitchen
BBC 5 Live
6am Breakfast 10.00 Chiles On
Friday 1pm The Friday Sports
Panel 2.00 Kermode And
Mayo’s Film Review 4.00 5 Live
Drive 7.00 The Friday Football
Social 9.00 5 Live Golf: The
Masters 10.00 Stephen Nolan
1am Up All Night 5.00 5 Live
Boxing With Costello & Bunce
5.30 Under The Weather
BBC 6 Music
7am Shaun Keaveny 10.00
Tom Ravenscroft 1pm Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq
7.00 Cillian Murphy 9.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 12mdn’t Nemone’s
Electric Ladyland 2.00 6 Music
Classic Concert 3.00 6 Music
Live Hour 4.00 Sound And
Vision 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
6am More Music Breakfast
9.00 Nicholas Owen 1pm
Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth
Classics At Seven 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. A tribute to the
work of Patrick Doyle. 10.00
Smooth Classics 1am Katie
Breathwick 4.00 Jane Jones
Absolute Radio
6am Christian O’Connell’s
Show 10.00 Sarah Champion
1pm Andy Bush 4.00 Dave
Berry 7.00 Absolute 80s With
Claire Sturgess 10.00 Sarah
Champion 4am Ben Burrell
Heart
6am Jamie And Rochelle
9.00 Toby Anstis 1pm Matt
Wilkinson 4.00 JK And Lucy
7.00 Club Classics 10.00 Lilah
Parsons 1am James Stewart
TalkSPORT
6am The Alan Brazil Sports
Breakfast 10.00 Jim White,
Perry Groves And Bob Mills
1pm Hawksbee And Jacobs
4.00 Adrian Durham And
Darren Gough 7.00 The Season
Ticket With Danny Kelly 10.00
The Two Mikes 1am Extra Time
With Tom Latchem
FR DAY
40
AGENDA
What’sontoday...
Visual Arts
ANTHONY MCCALL:
SOLID LIGHT WORKS
Hepworth, Wakefield
Anthony McCall is best known
for large-scale, immersive
sculptural light installations
that incorporate the visitor and
invite them to become active
participants. This is the first
major UK exhibition of his art in
more than a decade, exploring all
facets of his work and including
the British premieres of three
“solid light” installations. Entry is
free. (01924 247360) to 3 Jun
ELIZABETH FRIEDLANDER
Ditchling Museum of Art & Craft
A survey of the artist, designer
and typographer Elizabeth
Friedlander (1903-1984), who
escaped to London from Nazi
Germany in the 30s and is
best known for her Penguin
book covers and the Elizabeth
typeface. The exhibition touches
on her work with a British black
propaganda unit in the Second
World War and features many
rarely seen pieces, including
type designs, wood engravings,
decorative book papers, maps
and commercial pieces.
(01273 844744) to 29 Apr
DRAWN IN COLOUR:
DEGAS FROM THE BURRELL
National Gallery, London WC2
Edgar Degas was set apart from
his Impressionist colleagues by
both his distaste for painting
outdoors and his late-career
preference for pastel over oil.
Examples of his pastels, plus the
occasional oil, lent by the Burrell
Collection in Glasgow, make up
the bulk of this show. Initially the
8 da
half-boys
from onard
ly
£899pp
galleries seem gloomy because
of the low light needed to protect
these fragile pictures, but
slowly Degas’ riot of colour sings
from the walls, making for a
quietly breathtaking show.
(020 7747 2885) to 7 May
GEORGE SHAW:
MY BACK TO NATURE
Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art
Gallery, Exeter
Artists can be broken by the
weight of being the National
Gallery’s associate artist, but
George Shaw responded to this
trickiest of commissions better
than any participant yet. His
new paintings teem with his
passion for the great art he had
the fortune to immerse himself
in at the National, alongside
an inescapable need to apply
it to his personal history. This
touring exhibition of the work
he produced in the role travels
around the country until late
2018. (01392 265 858) to Sun
CHINA’S FIRST EMPEROR AND
THE TERRACOTTA WARRIORS
World Museum, Liverpool
Objects from the discovery in
1974 of the underground army
of life-sized terracotta warriors
guarding the tomb of China’s
First Emperor, Qin Shi Huang,
form the centre of this exhibition,
which includes pieces that have
never been on show in the UK
before, excavated over the past
40 years from the Imperial
Mausoleum and selected tombs.
(liverpoolmuseums.org.uk) to 28 Oct
Talks
THE LAUGHARNE WEEKEND
Various venues
On the bill in the literary sessions
at this weekend festival are
Magnus Mills, Mike Brearley,
David Soul, Cosey Fanni
Tutti, Jess Phillips, Jake
Arnott, Tibor Fischer, Joe
Dunthorne and Stella Duffy.
(thelaugharneweekend.com) to Sun
JOHN CONNOLLY
Waterstones, Nottingham
The crime writer discusses
his 16th Charlie Parker novel,
The Woman in the Woods, which
begins when the semi-preserved
body of a young Jewish woman is
discovered buried in the woods.
(0843 290 8525) tonight 7pm
SARAH VAUGHAN
Waterstones, Roman Gate, Exeter
In the thriller Anatomy of a
Scandal, a high-profile marriage
unravels when the husband is
accused of a crime. The writer
talks about the book here.
(01392 423044) tonight 6.30pm
Comedy
JOE LYCETT
Wyvern Theatre, Swindon
Cheeky badinage, daft tales
and hopefully further prank
exchanges with powerful people
and companies, as the comedian
gets going with a tour of I’m About
to Lose Control and I Think Joe
Lycett. (01793 524481) tonight
PHILL JUPITUS
Theatre Royal, Wakefield
Freed from the demand for TV
panel show quick quips, Phill
Jupitus is in a storytelling mood
in Juplicity, reflecting on his
upbringing in a pub – and his
formative years as a punk-poet
support act for Billy Bragg.
(01924 211311) tonight
DANE BAPTISTE
Glee, Birmingham
Dane Baptiste’s smart, funny
patter won him a spot on the
Edinburgh best newcomer
shortlist a few years back,
and his latest, G.O.D. (Gold. Oil.
Drugs.), is a brisk, confident
dissection of wealth and power.
(0871 472 0400) tonight
SARAH MILLICAN
Tyne Theatre, Newcastle-upon-Tyne
The softly spoken, sharply
tongued Geordie shows who’s in
charge on her latest mammoth
tour, Control Enthusiast.
(0844 2491 000) to Sun
Dance
COPPÉLIA
Sunderland Empire
Birmingham Royal Ballet
dance one of ballet’s bounciest
classics, with quarrelling
village lovers, mechanical
dolls and a lilting Delibes score.
(0844 871 3022) to Sat
INNOCENCE
Carnegie Hall, Dunfermline
Scottish Dance Theatre’s
playroom performance invites
children and their adults to
experience William Blake’s
imagination, with live music,
dance and animal noises.
(01383 602 302) today 1pm
BERNSTEIN CENTENARY
Royal Opera House, London WC2
The Royal Ballet are in fine form
for the birthday celebrations for
PAMELA RAITH
Malta Uncovered
Pick
ofthe
day
Departures up to October 2018
Your tour includes...
✓ Guided tour of historic Valletta, city of the Knights of Malta and a baroque
masterpiece, including a visit to the Malta Experience
✓ Tour of the unspoilt island of Gozo
✓ Guided tour of the ancient capital; atmospheric Mdina
✓ Guided tour of Rabat plus a visit to St Paul’s Catacombs, burial place of
early Christians
✓ Visit to the Neolithic temples of Ggantija and Tarxien, claimed to be amongst
the world’s oldest free-standing structures, pre-dating pyramids, plus a visit to
the picturesque fishing port of Marsaxlokk, accompanied by a local guide
✓ Return flights from a selection of airports, plus all hotel transfers
✓ Seven nights in a choice of four-star superior and four-star accommodation
including all local taxes, with breakfast and dinner
✓ The services of our experienced and insightful
tour manager throughout
Prices are based on two people sharing and are correct at time of print. Single
supplements may apply. This holiday is operated by and subject to booking
conditions of Riviera Travel, ABTA V4744 ATOL 3430 protected. Subject to
availability. Additional entrance cost may apply. Images used in conjunction with
Riviera Travel. For further information please write to Riviera Travel, New Manor,
328 Wetmore Road, Burton upon Trent, Staffs, DE14 1SP.
For more information or to book,
please call: 01283 523447
www.ipariviera.co.uk
ABTA No. V4744
THEATRE
CATHY
Soho Theatre, London W1
More than 50 years after Ken Loach’s Cathy Come Home, Ali Taylor’s play, which draws on real-life
experience to imagine how a modern Cathy would fare, reminds us that the state of housing is still a very
sore issue. The piece, commissioned by Cardboard Citizens, the company that makes theatre with and for
homeless people, is a crusading piece and does not pretend to be even-handed but the opposition, though
presented as cold, is never caricatured. (020 7478 0100) to 14 Apr
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
composer Leonard Bernstein.
New works by Wayne McGregor
and Christopher Wheeldon
show off the company’s terrific
dancers. (020 7304 4000) tonight
MATTHEW BOURNE’S
HIGHLAND FLING
Theatre Royal, Glasgow
Scottish Ballet dance Bourne’s
“Romantic wee ballet”,
which brings the sprites and
Highlanders of La Sylphide to
the Scotland of Trainspotting.
Expect feral sylphs and sharp
designs from Lez Brotherston.
(0844 871 7647) to Sat
World Music
LONDON AFRICAN GOSPEL CHOIR:
GRACELAND
Nell’s Jazz & Blues Club, London W14
The Choir perform their own
powerful twist on Paul Simon’s
Grammy-winning Graceland
album, released 32 years ago.
(020 7792 1200) tonight
Folk & Roots
THE GIGSPANNER BIG BAND
Pavilion, Hailsham
Teaming up with popular duo
Phillip Henry and Hannah
Martin, fiddle maestro Peter
Knight’s Gigspanner make hay
of their recent excellent albums,
Layers of Ages and The Wife of
Urban Law. (01323 841414) tonight
JOSIENNE CLARKE AND
BEN WALKER
Colston Hall, Bristol
The duo, touring with Samantha
Whates in support (with whom
Clarke runs the excellent sideproject PicaPica), perform tracks
from their haunting new album
of original songs, Seedlings All.
(0117 203 4040) tonight
Pop
GOAT GIRL
Rough Trade East, London E1
Stumbling out of the same
Brixton pub scene that coughed
up Shame, Goat Girl launch their
self-titled debut album. Like
Siouxsie with a student-sized
hangover, pseudonymous singer
Clottie Cream presides over
grubby post-punk broadsides
and spaghetti-country earworms
with imperious assurance.
(roughtrade.com) tonight
SUNFLOWER BEAN
Koko, London NW1
As all three members hit the
giddy age of 22, Brooklyn’s
Sunflower Bean mature nicely on
their second album. Twentytwo in
Blue is a full-blossom beauty, its
retro touchstones (dream-pop,
Fleetwood Mac-ish folk-rock,
strutting glam-rock and more)
kept fresh and tight under
singer Julia Cumming’s lead.
(wegottickets.com) Fri
SHAME
Magnet, Liverpool
Like fellow south Londoners
Goat Girl, Shame give guitarrock renewed bite on their
tangy debut album. Seething
and brawling, Songs of Praise
brims with righteous melees
of cacophonous post-punk and
spiky provocations, spat out by
frontman Charlie Steen with
intent to agitate, not capitulate.
(gigsandtours.com) tonight
PUBLIC SERVICE BROADCASTING
+ JANE WEAVER
Academy, Bournemouth
After 2015’s The Race for Space,
the dapper electro-pop troupers
redirect to earthier matters for
their latest high-concept wheeze.
The history of Welsh mining
is chipped away at on Every
Valley, an album of heart, art
and political fire. Manchester’s
cosmic explorer Jane Weaver
supports. (axs.com) tonight
Groundbreaking
women to the fore
This year’s Leeds International Festival will focus on
female pioneers, from astronaut Helen Sharman to
punk rocker Viv Albertine. Louise Rhind-Tutt reports
Classical
MASS
Royal Festival Hall, London SE1
Marin Alsop conducts two
performances of Leonard
Bernstein’s genre-busting musictheatre piece, featuring more
than 400 amateur musicians
and performers, including
members of the Chineke! Junior
Orchestra and the National Youth
Orchestra of Great Britain, plus
Tony Award-winning Brazilian
baritone Paulo Szot as the
conflicted Celebrant. (020 3879
9555) tonight and Sat 7.30pm
Theatre
THE YORK REALIST
Sheffield Crucible
A pitch-perfect, impeccably
acted production by Robert
Hastie, of Peter Gill’s beautiful
2002 play, a convincing gay love
story in which it is the conflicting
aspirations of the lovers rather
than societal prejudice that
drives the two men apart. Ben
Batt’s George runs bracingly
against gay stereotype, while
Jonathan Bailey is a more uptight
John. (0114 249 6000) to Sat
OLD FOOLS
Southwark Playhouse, London SE1
The especially cruel element
of Tristan Bernays’ one-hour
play on dementia is that
it understands how much
memories constitute romance.
On the face of it, it’s a simple
boy-meets-girl yarn about
musician Tom and linguist
Vivian, but with this unhappy
twist: Tom will eventually
remember none of it.
Frances Grey and Mark
Arends are spectacularly
genuine as the central pair.
(020 7407 0234) to Sat
SUMMER AND SMOKE
Almeida Theatre, London N1
Young actor Patsy Ferran is a
genuine marvel, as hilarious
as she is heart-breaking, in
Tennessee Williams’s rarely
performed 1948 play, as a dutiful
minister’s daughter who’s so
nervous she’s prone to panic
attacks. Rebecca Frecknall’s
production has a ballsy
confidence in its non-naturalistic
approach, rescuing Williams’
play from polite fussiness,
but there’s also delicacy and
precision. (020 7359 4404) to Sat
Sound of silence
Haley Fohr of
Circuit des Yeux
will perform a new
soundtrack to the
silent film ‘Salomé’
L
eeds International Festival, now in its second
year, celebrates local
creativity and international culture. This
year’s programme has an array of
original performances and world
premieres spanning music, interactive media, moving image and
fashion, with 52 events featuring
44 speakers over 15 days.
Some of the most topical events
address our ever-changing relationship with technology. “Tim
Berners-Lee said technology is for
everyone, and he was right,” says
Natasha Sayce-Zelem, director of
the festival’s tech strand. “It surrounds us at every moment of our
lives. It’s frankly impossible now
to disconnect from it.”
To that end, neuroscientist Dr
Jack Lewis and BT’s head of customer insight and futures Dr Nicola Millard will help navigate the
balancing act of connection and
time offline in “Disconnected”.
Delving into the history of sex
and technology, a “Sex, Love and
Artificial Intelligence” event sees
Dr Kate Devlin debating how intelligent technology needs to be
before we award it empathy. Can
a robot consent?
While technology should be for
everyone, women are still woefully
under-represented in the sector –
something the festival is attempting to rectify. “We need a diverse
workforce to shape its direction
so it meets all of our needs,” believes Sayce-Zelem. “Currently
just 17 per cent of those working in
technology in the UK are female.
Visible role models are crucial in
conquering issues with diversity
and inclusion. More than a third
of the festival’s science and tech
speakers are female for the second
year,” she adds. “Representation
really does matter.”
An all- day “Empowering
Women with Science & Tech”
conference aims to inspire the
next generation of women in Stem
by showcasing internationally acclaimed female role models from a
diverse range of sectors.
Addressing the concept that
technology innovations must mirror the concerns of the audience
they are aimed at, June Sarpong
will chair an all-female panel of
speakers including online estate
agency founder Sarah Beeny, neuroscientist Dr Sophie Scott, computer programmer Linda Liukas
and American policy analyst Dr
Pippa Malmgren.
Meanwhile, an event with another female role model – “Astronaut Wanted, No Experience
Necessary” – will look at space
travel past, present and future
with Britain’s first astronaut,
More than a
third of the festival’s
speakers on science
and technology
are women
Helen Sharman OBE.
On 18 May 1991, the food chemist from Sheffield became the first
Briton to go to space, and the first
woman to visit the Russian space
station Mir. This unlikely career
progression was instigated by a
radio advertisement, which said,
simply: “Astronaut wanted. No experience necessary”. From more
than 13,000 applicants, Sharman
was selected.
Music events include an “in conversation” with singer-songwriter
Viv Albertine, best known as the
guitarist in ground-breaking
avant-garde girl group The Slits,
who will be navigating her journey
from genre-defining punk through
to life today.
An Opera North Project sees
Circuit des Yeux’s Haley Fohr performing a newly commissioned
soundtrack to the startlingly seductive and scandalous 1923 silent
movie Salomé.
And encompassing music, film,
cabaret and club culture, anarchic
art party Juicebox celebrates the
rich history of queer culture and
Leeds as the birthplace of performance art.
It’s an eclectic line-up for this
young festival, which aims to inspire communities by bringing
people together and promoting
the discovery and exchange of new
ideas. No experience necessary.
Leeds International Festival
runs from 28 April to 12 May
(leedsinternationalfestival.com)
41
FR DAY
42
BOOKS
Double, double, toil and trouble
MACBETH
Jo Nesbo
(Vintage, £20)
Review by Stuart Kelly
T
he concept of the Hogarth Shakespeare series
was strong: get modern authors to revisit,
revise and rewrite the
plays of the Bard. But between
concept and execution there can
be something of a gap. There have
been some successes – notably
Hagseed, Margaret Atwood’s take
on The Tempest, which was both
a retelling and a commentary on
the play – and some valiant efforts.
With Jo Nesbo’s engagement with
Macbeth, we can now see the first
failure. I doubt I will read a more
pointless book this year.
At the beginning we have Macbeth as the head of the Swat team
of a police force. Banquo is the
older copper who fostered him;
Inspector Duff, who was in an
orphanage alongside Macbeth, is
head of the narco unit. “Hecate”
and the “Norse Riders” are vying
for control of the drugs market,
and “Hecate” wants his drug –
street-name “brew” – to hold the
monopoly in the bleak town.
Chief Commissioner Duncan
has been cautious if uncorrupted,
and Hecate sees a way to propel
Macbeth to the top job. Macbeth
is in a relationship with “Lady”,
the owner of a local casino with a
sharp sense of business acumen.
There is a kind of pleasure in
wondering how Nesbo will deal
with the play’s most famous scenes
– Birnam Wood, the gate-keeper,
the sleepwalking, the prophecy
that Macbeth cannot be killed by
a man born of woman and so forth.
In every instance the answer is
badly; sometimes stupidly, often
crassly, frequently redundantly.
Macbeth is the shortest of the
great tragedies, yet Nesbo’s clocks
in at a bloated 500 pages. Some of
it is determined by Shakespearean scholarship that is nearly
100 years old. In 1933, LC Knights
published a famous essay entitled
“How many children had Lady
Macbeth?” His conclusion is that
it is a non-question. Yet films
like Justin Kurzel’s 2015 version
of the play and this travesty are
obsessed by the childlessness of
the Macbeths. Here it is nastily
linked in with a kind of persistent,
low-level misogyny: a building is
at one point described as being
like “a decrepit, over-made-up
whore”. Duff is having a shabby
affair. Lady, apart from having
been a sex worker, has committed infanticide. It all leaves a very
tawdry taste.
No heirs Nesbo, like the 2015 film starring Michael Fassbender (above), focuses on the Macbeths’ childlessness AP
The book’s, ahem, expansion on
Shakespeare – who was not bad in
his own way, I would venture – is
perplexing. It is set in an unnamed
and perpetually rainy city, with a
vexed relationship to Capitol. The
casino is called the Inverness and
there is a nearby rural district
called Fife. Other characters and
places have names which seem
rather off-key in this context.
There are streets called Doheney
and a hospital called St Jordi. The
mayor is called Tourtell and a psychiatrist Alsaker. The intention
may have been to be ambiguous,
but it comes across as slapdash
and ill-considered.
All of this might have been excusable had the prose not been
quite so execrable. One pities the
translator. There is nary a page
without a cliché and an astounding amount of repetition. It sometimes reads as if it were dictated
rather than written.
Take this as an exemplar of
its leaden nature: “The rays of
sunshine had found a break in
the clouds and were now angled
through the grimy windows of
the chief commissioner’s office
and fell on his desk, on his photo
of Lady, on the calendar showing
it was a Tuesday, on the drawing
of the Gatling gun and, sitting in
front of Macbeth’s desk, the polished, shiny pate of the lean, sinewy officer.” Ye gods.
ALSORELEASED
THE TRICK TO TIME
Kit de Waal
(Viking, £12.99)
Kit de Waal is more than just
a successful novelist with an
internationally best-selling
and Costa First Novel Award
shortlisted novel under her
belt. She famously used the
advance she received for her
debut to set up a creative
writing scholarship for aspiring
writers from disadvantaged
backgrounds, for whom
she has also since become a
powerful voice.
The success of My Name is
Leon, the story of a biracial
boy navigating the foster care
system in 1980s Birmingham,
was always going to be a hard act
to follow, but her second novel,
which has already won a place
on the Women’s Prize for Fiction
longlist, does an admirable job.
“There’s a trick to time,”
Mona’s Dadda tells his young
daughter. “You can make it
expand or you can make it
contract. Make it shorter
or make it longer.” This is
Top5
Books
something Mona carries
with her throughout her life,
passing the secret on to others:
“You can make the most of what
you have,” she tells women in
need of her help.
It’s also a neat way of
describing the structure of the
novel itself. It is ostensibly set in
the present day in an unnamed
southern English seaside town
where the now 60-year-old Mona
has made her home for the past
two decades. But folded into
events in the present are Mona’s
recollections of the past, which,
once set loose, swell and unfurl:
her childhood in Ireland, the
early death of her mother, and
life thereafter with her beloved
father; then the years she spends
in Birmingham in the early 1970s,
where she moves to look for
work, falls in love (with a young
Irishman named William) and
gets married.
These episodes set in the city
are the strongest in the book,
perhaps not surprising since De
Waal herself, who was born to
an Irish mother and a Caribbean
father, grew up among the Irish
community in Birmingham in the
1960 and 1970s.
The 1974 Birmingham pub
bombings loom large, and De
Waal details the anti-Irish
sentiment that runs high in the
aftermath: William is the victim
of an unprovoked attack, and his
aunts are called “Irish bitches” by
policemen when they approach
them for help in tracking down
their then-Awol nephew.
This broader historical and
national tragedy is entwined with
a personal one that afflicts the
young married couple: Mona is
delivered of a stillborn baby, the
treatment of which is barbaric
by today’s standards. “Listen,
you have to be quiet, you have
to be,” a kindly nurse begs the
grief-stricken new mother. “If you
keep screaming, they send for a
psychiatrist and they come and
give you a drug to put you out.”
Here, De Waal’s social
commentary is both enlightening
and moving – though her
attempts to tie up loose ends
between the past and the present
culminate in a denouement that
feels slightly too rushed and
contrived to do justice to the
tragic tenderness of story that
precedes it. THE INDEPENDENT
1. Classic Mary Berry (BBC Books)
2. Lose Weight for Good Tom Kerridge (Absolute Press)
3. Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 2
Lucy Scholes
Elena Favilli & Francesca Cavallo (Timbuktu Labs)
4. 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos Jordan B Peterson (Allen Lane)
5. Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls Elena Favilli & Francesca Cavallo (Particular)
THE SHADOW KILLER
Arnaldur Indridason
(Harvill Secker, £14.99)
The sequel to last year’s superb
The Shadow District reunites
sensitive Canadian military
policeman Thorson and
experienced Icelandic detective
Flovent in Second World War
Reykjavik. Their second case
involves the death of a salesman,
executed with a Colt 45, and the
hunt for his missing colleague –
who not only was at school with
the victim but is also the son of
a notorious Nazi sympathiser.
As the two cops quiz liars,
Indridason paints a picture of an
island in turmoil. The occupying
British forces are now making
way for the Americans who,
to younger women at least,
appear far more attractive than
any homegrown talent. The
ensuing conflict between soldiers
and civilians, good-time girls
and killjoys, provides a vivid
backdrop to a disturbing case of
calculated cruelty that highlights
the dangers of hero worship.
More Icelandic writers than
ever are being translated into
English, among them Yrsa
Sigurdadottir, Lilja Sigurdadottir
and Ragnar Jonasson. All
three are worth reading, but
Indridason remains the king of
the ice castle. EVENING STANDARD
Mark Sanderson
SAL
Mick Kitson
(Canongate, £12.99)
Sal, who is on the run from the
drab, chaotic lives of her alcoholic
mother and her drug-dealing
partner, steps into another world
in Scotland’s last wilderness.
Armed with her Bear Grylls
knife, YouTube education on the
wild, and SAS Survival Guide, Sal
tries to come up with a blueprint
for her family’s survival. Along
the way she has to find out if she
is as adept at escaping life’s traps
as she is at setting snares in the
woods. A soul-stirring read.
Derek Watson
TALES OF
TWO LONDONS
Ed. Claire Armitstead
(OR Books, £13)
This collection gathers
together poetry, reportage
and fiction by Ali Smith, Helen
Simpson, Iain Sinclair and others
to reveal the British capital in
all its mixed-race, mixed-up
glory. London’s eating habits
are explored, along with the
Tudorbethan architecture of
Neasden, model boat sailing in
Victoria Park and a rubbishsorting plant in Dartford run
by cut-throat Albanians.
Ian Thomson
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
Crime
and the
Kremlin
THE VORY: RUSSIA’S SUPER MAFIA
Mark Galeotti
(Yale, £20)
Review by Simon
Sebag Montefiore
T
his book could not be
more relevant: it explains some aspects
of the sinister events
that have tainted the
streets of London and Salisbury,
and the politically inspired hackings in America and Europe, while
illuminating the naivety of those
who try to suggest such actions
might be criminal rather than
state operations.
It’s a history of the vory – Russia’s criminal potentates. Starting
in the 18th century with Vanka
Kain, the gangster who became a
police chief of Empress Elizaveta,
it continues up to today: Crimea,
Ukraine, hacking – all enterprises
in which the modern state uses
criminals to do its work.
“The modern Russian state
is much stronger than in the
1990s,” writes Mark Galeotti, the
pre-eminent expert on Russian
mafia, but it functions as a “mobilisation state”, in which the
Into the underworld Lenin (left) and Stalin commissioned robberies AFP
Kremlin demands services from
the media, hackers, businessmen
or criminals.
Galeotti has the cautious authority of a scholar. He defines
the Russian criminal and political worlds, with their shared cult
of authority and constant threat
of violence. In the process, we
encounter at least one assassination per page; gobsmacking tales
of criminal cruelty; flayings, beheadings and state corruption;
fantastical graveyards of vulgar
gangster tombs; colourfully inked
art in the form of coded body tattoos; and a delicious array of criminal “klychki” (nicknames): Alex
the Bull, Ivan the Gypsy, Kolya
Karate, The Deathless, IcecreamSeller, The Beheader, Superkiller.
Today’s structure really developed in the early 20th century when Lenin, an intellectual
nobleman, commandeered “the
brigands’ world” to provide the
ruthless amorality and murderous force for his very moral revolution. He commissioned young
Stalin to launch a spree of rackets,
bank robberies and piracy to fund
the Bolsheviks. After 1917, when
Lenin formed their secret police,
the Cheka, later the NKVD, these
organs consciously promoted
ex-criminals.
There have always been vory,
but the Bolsheviks promoted the
brigands in power, Vory v Zakone,
whom they placed in charge of the
Gulag camps of political prisoners. This worked until the 1950s,
when the criminal collaborators
known as the “suki” (bitches) and
the diehard thieves, led by traditional vory who despised serving
the state, fought a savage conflict
for power, the wonderfully named
Bitches War. The Bitches won!
The old vory became the more
ruthless “avtoritet” (authority).
There was never a single mafia,
but many groups, particularly
the “highlanders” – the Georgians
and Chechens – now concentrated
under Putin’s client leader, Kadryov, in autonomous Chechnya.
After 1999, Putin restored state
control over the criminals. Moving off the streets, the criminals
are always at the cutting edge of
technology, so that they now offer
hacking and money laundering
services as much as the old wet
work and drug smuggling.
This brilliant, gripping, rich,
important book is at once a truecrime chronicle, a work of scholarship, an anthropological study,
a political history of the fused
underworld and upper echelons
of Russian power – and essential
reading today. EVENING STANDARD
Simon Sebag Montefiore is the
author of ‘Young Stalin’, ‘The
Romanovs’ and ‘Red Sky at Noon’
COFFEE
TABLE
CHOICE
ONEMINUTE
WITH…
Michael Rosen,
children’s author
Where are you now and
what can you see?
I’m in the kitchen and I can see
some black-and-white Italian
photographs from the 1970s on
the wall. My wife bought them in
a second-hand shop and they’re
kind of photorealism, of people
walking through the streets. The
city is a wonderful place, and I
like the blur of people being busy.
What are you currently reading?
Cressida Cowell’s The Wizards of
Once and her picture book Emily
Brown and the Thing because I’m
interviewing her in her studio.
I’m doing some homework.
Who is your favourite author
and why do you admire her/him?
William Shakespeare, because
there’s thought in action and
you see several views of the
same thing, so it’s very dynamic
to watch and listen to. When I
perform my poems and stories
to children, I’m fascinated by
trying to present things so that
I’m inside the story and outside
of it at the same time. It’s a
technique more or less invented
by Shakespeare.
Describe the room where
you usually write…
I write anywhere but quite often
I find myself in the kitchen, on my
laptop. I hot-desk with plates.
Which fictional character
most resembles you?
As a boy, the boy in Emil and the
Detectives. He tries to do right
then, when it all goes wrong, he
feels grateful that he’s got help
from others, but he’s slightly to
one side of them. I had that sense
at school: there was something
different about our family – my
parents were Jewish communists
and there weren’t that many
around in Pinner at the time.
Who is your hero/heroine
from outside literature?
There are few more dispiriting sights than an empty playground – rusty roundabouts, eerily creaking swings and so on. But as seen through
Carine Thévenau’s lens, they become something other-wordly, almost magical. For ‘Seasonal Abandonment of Imaginary Worlds’ (Editions,
£30, editions-publishing.com), the photographer travelled around the Shiga region in the south of Japan shooting play spaces that were either
derelict or simply neglected because of the cold weather. The snowy surroundings and fading paintwork look dreamily nostalgic, but they’re
also a quiet comment on economic shifts and the country’s ageing population. Pictured: ‘Playground 4’.
Martin Luther King Jr. It’s so
easy to forget the level of violence
and abuse and the place that the
civil rights movement came from,
and then he produced a work of
art, his speech “I Have a Dream”,
which is like an incredible
beacon of light.
The world premiere of ‘Chocolate
Cake’, based on Michael Rosen’s
poem, is at Polka Theatre, London,
from 7 Apr-13 May (020 8543 4888)
43
44
Homes & Design
The Band of Builders
donates its skills
MARK COVENTRY
I
t sounds too good to be true. A
group of skilled tradespeople
spending eight days working
round-the-clock to transform
the home of a sick little girl –
for no fee whatsoever. It wasn’t for
a TV show, and it wasn’t a one-off.
The project was for Carl Jenkins,
whose two-year-old daughter,
Sadie, has spent roughly half of her
life in hospital.
A tracheotomy means that
Sadie has a tube to help her
breathe and has to sleep in a
makeshift bedroom in the family’s
front room. Simple things such as
not having a downstairs lavatory
created problems, with her
parents or carers having to leave
her to go upstairs.
That’s where the efforts of a
group of tradesmen and women
known as Band of Builders (BoB)
came in. Sending the family away
to Center Parcs, they descended
on their home in Hoddesdon,
Hertfordshire. In just over a
weektheyinstalledanew
downstairs bathroom,
redecorated using
state - of-the -art
materials to
cause minimal
irritation to
Sadie’s respiratory
system, and
transformed the
garden into a safe
place for her and older
sister Isla, four, to play.
The project isn’t the first for
BoB. The organisation was born in
2016 when founder Addam Smith,
a landscaper from Lincoln, wanted
to help friend and employee
Keith Ellick following a cancer
Built with
love
It started with a builder who wanted to help a friend.
Now, Band of Builders are a crack team of tradespeople
changing the lives of those in need. By EllenManning
diagnosis. His original plan was
a new fence, but when he shared
his shock and sadness at his
friend’s situation on a
Facebook group for
tradespeople, he
was stunned by the
offers of help and
s u p p o r t , m a ny
from people he
didn’t know. The
result was a group
of those strangers
spending a week
renovating Keith’s home
for him and his family.
“It was something about helping
one of their own that seemed to
really hit home,” says Addam.
“They didn’t think twice about
giving up a few day’s work to help.”
Addam went on to raise money
Band of Builders
was born when
Addam Smith
helped his friend
and employee
Keith Ellick (far
left); Sadie (right)
is benefiting
from the group’s
latest venture
DARREN K
HARESIGN;
TIM WINCH
for Keith’s funeral in March 2017 –
and to buy the council-owned home
for his family. Reluctant to walk
away from such unprecedented
kindness, Addam wanted to
harness the spirit Keith’s project
had inspired to help others.
The group designed a range of
workwear to raise funds and soon
found themselves involved in more
projects linked to tradespeople
in need.
Addam also won a prize from
builders’ merchant Jewson last
year, which resulted in the group
being given £50,000 on account
with the company to spend on
materials for projects. Other firms
often donate items; that’s where
the plaster for Sadie’s renovation
came from.
In 2017, BoB helped to build a
sensory garden for a special school
in Lichfield, Staffordshire, and
also installed a summer house for
fellow tradesman Dan McIntosh,
who had been diagnosed with a
terminal brain tumour.
So what is it that tempts people
to give up a day’s wages, often
more, to help a complete stranger?
Sadie’s father Carl, a plasterer
by trade, knows because before
receiving help from the group he
had worked on a project himself.
“Addam’s first post about Keith
resonated with me because I knew
we were going to go through the
stuff we’re going through with
Sadie. Of course it’s amazing that
people will give up their time for
nothing, but then you think: what’s
a couple of days’ money to change
someone’s life?”
Painter and decorator Jen
Gardner agrees. The 34-year-old,
NEWS
2-30
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
38-39
Fivetoview
from Stevenage, Hertfordshire, spent
eight days at Carl’s house despite
being a single parent running her
own business. “If I had all the money
in the world I would do this stuff
every day,” she says.
As well as helping others, it’s
the camaraderie that comes with
working so closely together towards
a common goal, says carpenter Gavin
Pickwell, who has been involved in
three projects so far. Gavin, 29, from
Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, says that
while everyone shares a common
goal, most have their own personal
reasons to get involved.
For him, it was the death of his
uncle from cancer. After working on
something so special, it can be hard to
return to the day job, he admits. “You
haven’t got that kind of bond. The
people you work with are colleagues,
but the people you do a project with
are your friends.”
The bond and friendship many
of them speak of may surprise
some who have a certain view
of tradespeople.
“Yes, there’s a bit of a front in the
construction industry,” says Gavin.
“But I think behind the scenes when
builders go home it’s very different.”
That other side is something Band
of Builders tries to support, setting
up its own Facebook group where
tradespeople can share their lows
as well as their highs and help each
other when times get tough.
“Everyone has got their own
personal problems and while people
sometimes find it hard to talk, on BoB
everyone opens up,” says Jen.
VOICES
16-20
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
45
Margate
AVENUE GARDENS, CLIFTONVILLE, CT9
Price: £514,995
What they say: This family home has four
bedrooms and two large reception rooms. To
the rear is a well-established 60ft enclosed
garden with patio. Tel: 01843 306002.
GARRARD AVENUE, CT9
Price: £325,000
What they say: This 1930s three-bedroom home
provides open-plan living, with a huge kitchen/
diner. It even has large garden buildings, wellsuited for a home office. Tel: 01843 306016.
MADEIRA ROAD, CT9
Price: £375,000
What they say: This six-bedroom link-detached
property boasts space and character. It has a
beautiful entrance hallway with doors through
to a spacious lounge/diner. Tel: 01843 606170.
Before and after: Band of Builders built a summer house for Dan
McIntosh, who had been diagnosed with a brain tumour TIM WINCH
It’s that support and sense of
camaraderie that seems to be the key
to Band of Builders’ success. “At the
end of the day we’re just an ordinary
bunch of guys and girls,” says Addam.
“What we do is about trying to make
a bit of a difference to people’s lives
when they need it most.”
bandofbuilders.com
The people
you work with
are colleagues,
but the people
you do a project
with are your
friends
NORTHDOWN WAY, CT9
Price: £380,000
What they say: This three-bedroom bungalow
in a quiet location has a large south-facing
garden. The open-plan kitchen/diner is fitted
with modern appliances. Tel: 01843 606090.
CANTERBURY ROAD, CT9
Price: £175,000
What they say: A two-bedroom property with
a welcoming porch, which leads to a open-plan
lounge/kitchen. It is close to shops and rail links
to London St Pancras. Tel: 01843 606090.
In association with
PRICES FROM £175,000 - £700,000
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NEWS
2-30
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
38-39
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
Homes and Design
T
Doing up
the dream
A RENOVATION DIARY
Ben Alden-Falconer
I’m wondering
which wallpaper
to save and
which to ditch
he vintage wallpaper
in every room gives
the house a very
distinct vibe: bright
1970s yellow in one
room, dark red roses and gold
in another, deep blue flowers in
the attic and brown and yellow
geometric shapes in the kitchen. I
love its retro feel, but much of it is
ripped in places or worse for wear.
I had been intending to keep it in
some rooms – part of the house’s
legacy – but since the burst pipe,
much of what I was planning
to keep is wrinkled from water
damage and looks tatty. With the
plumber and electricians coming
in the next few weeks to install
new lights, sockets and radiators,
it is make-or-break time: which
wallpaper am I going to keep?
The correct order to decorate
the house would be to get the
walls finished and painted, sand
the floors, and then think about
installing the radiators. I might not
plumb in all the radiators straight
away, to make decorating easier,
but I need to start warming up the
house, which is still wet from the
leak and showing signs of mould.
So, while not ideal, I am going to
have to follow a different logic.
I am still attached to the bright
yellow wallpaper in the first floor
room, and it wasn’t too affected by
the burst pipe. It definitely makes
a statement. Yellow and brown
flowers with a few water stains
aren’t really what most design
47
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
While some of the wallpaper
designs possess an element of
vintage retro charm, others are a
lost cause
magazines feature, but I think I
could make it work; a buttercupcoloured sofa, a 1960s light, and an
artfully placed copy of Charlotte
Perkins Gilman’s book The Yellow
Wallpaper. As we were clearing
out piles of stuff, we found a photo
of the previous owner as Miss
Westgate in 1967, standing with
the wallpaper behind her – so we
Brown flowers
with water stains
aren’t featured in
design mags
know for sure it was in situ then.
The deep blue flowery wallpaper
in the attic is more likeable – not a
million miles from the maximalist
patterns that House Of Hackney is
helping bring back into fashion, or
even some of the William Morris
designs that keep being revived.
Sadly, though, it is badly ripped.
Armed with a basic Screwfix
steamer, I begin peeling off
the layers.
There is a wall papered with the
same pattern by the front door, in
the small room my dad calls The
Vestibule – not a word I previously
knew. I am keen not to lose every
trace of it, so I will keep it here
– and perhaps paint the whole
room in a dark colour and add a
Moroccan light.
Finally, there is the “breakfast
room”, with its bohemian red
roses and rich gold. It is a bit
shadowy in there, with a yellowing
ceiling from the previous owner’s
cigarette smoke adding to the
decadent effect. On visiting the
house for the first time, a musician
friend asked if they could do a
photoshoot in there.
Sometimes the place can feel
rather creepy, too. When an
electrician was doing some initial
scouting work, he found a weird
old painting of a baby crying in the
basement. He had to bring it up
and hang it in the room because he
didn’t like it looking at him. I’m not
sure I’ll keep it there in the future.
In the remaining rooms, there is
nothing to debate; the wallpaper
is heavily stained or ripped and
not that nice in the first place, so
it falls under the onslaught of the
steamer. With four rooms already
stripped, I’ll be back next weekend
with renewed motivation. I just
hope that I won’t regret what
has gone.
Follow Ben’s renovation
progress on Instagram
@Margate_renovation_ipaper
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Business
Business Editor Elizabeth Anderson
+4420 7361 5718
business@inews.co.uk
MOTORING
Drop in demand for diesels
drives down new car sales
By Neil Lancefield
The new car market continues to decline as demand for diesel vehicles
plummets, industry figures show.
Preliminary figures for March
show that new car registrations
fell by around 15.6 per cent yearon-year, according to the Society of
Motor Manufacturers and Traders
(SMMT). This was driven by a fall of
just over 37 per cent in the number of
new diesel cars bought.
Registrations of petrol cars rose by
A recent landmark ruling
decided that German cities
could ban diesel vehicles from
some areas. There are plans to
ban the sale of all conventional
diesel and petrol cars by 2040.
almost 1 per cent, while demand for matched by equivalent rises in sales
alternatively fuelled vehicles such as of petrol and electrified cars, he said.
hybrids and pure electrics increased
“Buyers don’t believe that petrol or
by around 5.7 per cent. The overall electrified cars can deliver the permarket fell by approximately 12
formance or economy benefits
per cent in the first quarter
they need, and so they are
of the year. The SMMT
holding on to older vehihad predicted a “softencles for longer,” he said.
ing” of new car sales
“That evidence would
last month as March
suggest, once again,
Year-on-year fall
2017 saw a record
that the G overn in
number
of
new
high for registrations
ment would do well to
diesel
cars
bought
due to many motorclarify its position on
in March, according
ists buying cars before
diesels
and to stimuto the latest figures
changes to vehicle exlate people into buying
from the SMMT
cise duty came into effect.
newer, cleaner cars.”
But Jim Holder, editorial
He said the sales figures
director of What Car? magazine,
were “not that negative” as it was
said low consumer confidence and still the fourth-best March on record.
uncertainty around the future of
All new diesels have been subdiesel vehicles “continue to have an jected to a one-band increase in the
impact”. It is “pertinent” that the first-year vehicle excise duty rate
ongoing drop in diesel sales was not since Sunday. Justin Benson, head of
37%
The figures follow a record year for
new car sales in March 2017 REUTERS
automotive at auditors KPMG UK,
said: “Much like businesses, consumers are currently in the wait-and-see
camp wanting certainty around the
economic environment.
“Brexit, concerns over inflation
above earnings growth and the Bank
of England’s hints that they will raise
interest rates in the near future are
all causing consumers to hold back.
“If you are in the market for a new
car, you should drive a hard bargain.”
PROPERTY
Hammerson
talks tough
about rival’s
bid for Intu
By Ravender Sembhy
Quote of
the day
The process
will result in
a summary
conviction and
unlimited fines
set by the court
Rebecca Hilsenrath
The chief executive of
the Equality and Human
Rights Commission on
companies that don’t
comply with the
requirement to publish
their gender pay gap
The 30
Second
Briefing
HERVÉ
FALCIANI
The former employee of HSBC’s
Swiss private bank, who was
convicted of industrial espionage by
Swiss authorities, has been arrested
in Spain.
Hervé Falciani was given a five-year
prison sentence in his absence after
leaking clients’ tax information.
He says he is a whistle-blower
who wanted to help governments to
crack down on tax evaders.
What did governments do with the
information he leaked?
Authorities in France, Austria,
Belgium, Spain, Argentina, the UK
and the US launched investigations
based on it. The highest court in
Switzerland rejected a French
request for help in a case, saying
that the information was stolen and
therefore inadmissable.
sentenced him in 2015. France does
not usually extradite its citizens.
Learning he was due to make a
speech in Madrid, Spanish police
acted on an international detention
and extradition order from the
Swiss authorities, according to
Spain’s interior ministry.
Falciani was previously detained
in Spain in 2012, but its High Court
ruled against his extradition as the
charges he faced were not crimes
under Spanish law.
How long has Falciani been wanted
in Switzerland?
The French citizen fled Geneva
for France in 2009 after HSBC
discovered the leak and put him
under investigation. The Swiss court
Why do the Swiss authorities say he
leaked the data?
They concluded he aimed to profit
from it and showed criminal
behaviour in his attempt to sell it to
a third party.
Hammerson will not finalise its
£3.4bn tie-up with Intu as it awaits
clarity on a takeover approach from
European rival Klépierre.
The shopping centre company
said that while Klépierre’s position
“remains unclear”, the board does
“not intend to finalise shareholder
documents in relation to the
proposed acquisition of Intu”.
Hammerson has branded
Klépierre’s £4.88bn cash-and-shares
offer as “wholly inadequate” and
“entirely opportunistic”, but the
French firm has until 16 April to “put
up or shut up” with a formal offer.
The firm would prefer to press
ahead with an all-share takeover of
Intu, which would create Britain’s
biggest property company, with
£21bn worth of assets across Europe.
Intu operates the Trafford Centre
in Manchester, while Hammerson
owns the Bicester Village and Brent
Cross shopping centres.
Hammerson also shed some light
on first-quarter trading, pointing
to a combination of severe weather
and subdued consumer confidence
weighing on UK retail sales, which
were down 2 per cent.
However, it said that its shopping
centres outperformed the market,
with Bicester Village delivering a
double-digit increase in the period.
Footfall at Hammerson’s centres
was up 0.5 per cent over the quarter
and up 5 per cent during Easter.
The group also flagged a £3.5m
hit to net rental income from retail
restructurings and administrations
such as Toys R Us and New Look.
NEWS
2-30
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TELECOMS
Treasury nets £1.36bn from
sale of 4G and 5G airwaves
By Caitlin Morrison
Ofcom has raised £1.36bn from its
auction of mobile airwaves for 4G
and future 5G services, the regulator
has announced.
The communications watchdog
auctioned off airwaves in two frequency bands: 2.3GHz (gigahertz),
usable by current mobile phones for
4G service, and 3.4GHz, which is one
for the bands earmarked for 5G service in the future.
Vodafone had the biggest win, taking 50MHz (megahertz) of 5G spectrum, paying £378.2m for its share.
EE won 40MHz of 5G spectrum
at a cost of £302.6m, and Hutchison,
owner of the Three network, took
20MHz of 5G, costing £151.3m.
Meanwhile, Telefonica, which
owns O2, won all 40MHz of 2.3GHz
spectrum, used for 4G, at a cost
of £205.9m. The Spanish group
also paid £317.7m for 40MHz of
5G spectrum.
The total £1.36bn raised will be
paid to the Treasury.
Airspan Spectrum Holdings,
which is backed by Japan’s SoftBank,
also took part in the auction process,
but did not win any spectrum.
“This is good news for everyone
who uses their mobile phone to access the internet,” said Ofcom’s spectrum group director, Philip Marnick.
“As a nation we’re using ever more
mobile data on smartphones and
mobile devices. Releasing these airwaves will make it quicker and easier
to get online on the move. It will also
allow companies to prepare for 5G
mobile, paving the way for a range of
smart, connected devices.”
EE and Three went to the High
Court last year to challenge Ofcom’s
plans to cap the amount of mobile
spectrum that any operator can own
at 37 per cent, EE arguing it was too
restrictive and Three claiming it was
too generous. Both lost their cases.
Ofcom will now move to the assignment stage, which is the last bidding
stage of the auction. THE INDEPENDENT
5G would greatly improve
speeds on phones and
tablets, supporting the transfer
of more data with fewer delays.
But it is not expected to roll out
widely to mobiles before 2020.
GAMBLING
High rollers’ absence hits Rank profits hard
By Ravender Sembhy
Shares in Mecca Bingo owner Rank
Group have tumbled after the firm
warned about profits.
The group, which also owns the
Grosvenor Casinos chain, blamed
weaker than expected visits that
were “compounded” by cold weather.
Rank said underperformance at
Grosvenor stemmed from a “negative
contribution” from its usually big
spending “VIP players”.
In a trading update which covers
the 13 weeks to 1 April, the firm
recorded a 2 per cent fall in like-forlike sales. Mecca Bingo’s revenue fell
by 2 per cent, Grosvenor’s venues
revenues fell by 9 per cent, although
digital revenue grew by 17 per cent.
As a result, the firm’s management
now expects full-year profits in
the range of £76m to £78m, below
analysts’ consensus of £83m.
Outlook
SIMON
ENGLISH
Trump’s tariff
war with China
is so predictable
P
redicting is difficult,
especially for the future,
goes the saying. When it
comes to economics, you
can say that two times.
One way you’ve got a chance
of being right is to look at what
p ro fe s s i o n a l e co n o m i s t s a re
predicting, and bet the other way.
Mecca Bingo’s revenue fell by 2 per cent in the 13 weeks to April HAVAS
And so to the Donald Trump “tariff
war” with China and apocalyptic
analysis from the pros.
“Economists have known for
hundreds of years that protectionism
is bad for growth,” warns Jan Dehn, of
Ashmore Group, though economists
are certainly protective of who gets
to call themselves an economist.
As for what they have known for
hundreds of years, well, what they
don’t know always turns out to be
more significant than what they do.
The Queen gets this, asking the
London School of Economics in 2008
why none of the experts saw the
credit crunch coming.
D e h n co n t i n u e s : “ T r u m p’s
unilateral imposition of tariffs
mirrors the start of the breakdown
in trade relations and growing
isolationism which characterised the
aftermath of the 1929 Crash and the
Great Depression.”
Blimey – it’s going to be the end of
the world.
Oxford Economics isn’t quite
predicting that, but warns “the
risks of escalation are clear”. One
newspaper had the China trade
war ending in an actual war – that’s
excitable, I’d venture.
What has the man himself got to
say? Trump tweets “trade wars are
good and easy to win”.
America isn’t a normal country.
When it comes to debts that it is
never going to reduce, trade or
Th
he FT reported that
Beiijing has threatened to
impose tariffs on $50bn of US
imports, as if that were a lot
its own currency, it is vastly more
powerful than anywhere else, and it’s
in no one’s interests for it to be poorer.
Economists think that any tariffs
are inefficient.
The profession is silent on what
happens if country A imposes a tariff
on country B’s steel and country
TV
38-39
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
ECONOMY
Service sector
takes a hit
during March
cold snap
By Caitlin Morrison
Activity in the UK services sector
has fallen to its lowest level since the
Brexit vote, thanks in large part to
bad weather.
The latest IHS Markit purchasing managers’ index (PMI) for services business activity dropped from
54.5 in February to 51.7 last month,
the weakest performance since July
2016. The pound dropped against
the dollar when the numbers were
released, tumbling by around 0.3 per
cent to $1.404, before recovering to
hover around $1.406.
Survey respondents “noted that
snow disruption and unusually bad
weather conditions in March had
been a key factor holding
back business activity growth”. The
UK was brought
to a nearstandstill
several times
Quarterly GDP
throughout
growth indicated
the month
by the data,
according to
as the “Beast
economists
from the East”
brought strong
winds and heavy snow
to most parts of the country.
There were also reports that
heightened economic uncertainty
continued to act as a brake on growth,
according to the research.
IHS Markit’s chief business economist, Chris Williamson, said the data
signalled a quarterly GDP growth of
just under 0.3 per cent, down from
0.4 per cent in the fourth quarter of
2017, with the rate slowing to as little
as 0.15 per cent in March.
Mr Williamson added that inflationary pressure heightened again
last month, and said consumer price
inflation could “remain stubbornly
high in coming months”, adding
weight to arguments for an interest
rate hike in the coming months.
0.3%
THE INDEPENDENT
B then decides that intellectual
property theft is no longer worth the
effort, so stops doing it – and the tariff
gets removed. The tariff has worked.
The FT reported yesterday that
Beijing has threatened to impose
tariffs on $50bn of US imports, as if
that were a lot. For a country with a
GDP of about $19trn, it is neither here
nor there.
So how about this as a more
likely outcome: politicians do what
politicians do: they grandstand.
Economists do what economists do
and act as if this grandstanding were
real, and issue dire warnings.
Then it settles down. China
remembers it needs Americans to
keep buying its goods and comes to
behave more like a WTO member
(no intellectual property theft, no
steel dumping).
And at that point Trump declares
victory, and the tariffs are withdrawn.
Life – and trade – carries on.
EVENING STANDARD
49
From the
business
pages
Retirement villages
trial new fee plan
The Sydney
Morning Herald
Lendlease is breaking ranks
with the other big retirement
village operators to introduce
payment options with no exit
fees. Lendlease, Aveo and
Stockland – the three biggest
operators of retirement villages
– have traditionally asked
residents to pay less up front
but the operator claws back a
hefty “deferred management
fee” when they leave.
Finance minister
cancels UK visit
The Times of India
Indian finance minister Arun
Jaitley is unwell and has
cancelled a visit to London
next week for annual economic
talks, according to government
officials. Mr Jaitley was due
to meet Chancellor Philip
Hammond at the India-UK
economic dialogue and deliver
a talk on “Looking Ahead to
2022: India’s Global Vision” at
Chatham House.
Jasmax chief quits
as firm cuts staff
NZ Herald
New Zealand’s biggest
architectural firm, Jasmax, is
laying off staff and its managing
partner has resigned. It is tightlipped about the reasons behind
the cuts, but they come at a
boom time for the construction
sector. Jasmax is behind some of
New Zealand’s biggest building
projects, including Wellington’s
Te Papa museum and Lambton
Square Shopping Centre.
Sony boosts Thai
phone production
Bangkok Post
Sony wants to increase
its production of flagship
smartphones in Thailand,
aiming to increase its market
share in the premium segment.
Until now, Sony’s smartphone
parts have been made in
China and Thailand, but the
Sony Xperia XZ2 is the first
model fully made in Thailand’s
Bangkradi plant. Sony’s
mobile sales manager Satoshi
Mekata said Thailand was a
“strategic location”.
50
BUSINESS
The
Business
Matrix
The day at
a glance
FTSE 100 up 165.5 at 7199.5
3i Group
Admiral
Anglo Amer
Antofagasta
AB Foods
Ashtead Group
AstraZeneca
Aviva
BAE Systems
Barclays
Barratt Dev
BHP Billiton
BP
BAT
Berkeley Grp Hldgs
British Land
BT
Bunzl
Burberry
Carnival
Centrica
Coca-Cola HBC
Compass
CRH
Croda Intl
DCC
Diageo
Direct Line Ins
Easyjet
Evraz
Experian
Ferguson
Fresnillo
G4S
GKN
Glencore
GSK
880.2
1855.0
1644.8
930.8
2509.0
1974.5
5007.0
487.7
596.8
212.2
544.0
1410.0
499.8
4286.0
3858.0
653.2
232.2
2076.0
1704.5
4642.0
141.2
2662.0
1481.5
2438.0
4641.0
6520.0
2495.0
348.1
1641.5
450.4
1544.5
5298.0
1258.5
250.7
424.1
358.8
1420.0
+27.2
-0.5
+57.0
+29.0
+14.0
+63.5
+140.0
-14.7
+19.8
+4.8
+16.6
+36.2
+18.0
+73.5
+73.0
+8.4
+6.2
+6.0
-0.5
+85.0
+1.5
+35.0
+35.0
+67.0
+157.0
+25.0
+65.0
-38.5
+66.5
+23.3
+36.5
+92.0
+4.5
+7.7
-4.4
+13.8
+24.6
975.0
2184.0
1870.0
1071.0
3387.0
2185.0
5520.0
550.0
682.5
225.5
705.5
1662.4
536.2
5643.6
4270.0
695.0
318.0
2472.0
2024.0
5435.0
220.1
2682.0
1765.9
2955.0
4668.0
7762.5
2735.5
411.3
1698.7
462.6
1708.0
5722.0
1746.0
342.6
463.2
416.9
1724.5
Low
735.0
1766.0
950.1
11.1
2386.0
1476.0
4260.0
482.2
533.5
177.3
6.3
1103.0
436.9
3775.0
3031.0
589.0
216.4
1918.5
1481.5
4452.0
119.7
2047.0
1396.5
27.0
3461.0
6445.0
2186.5
337.6
1009.0
169.8
1428.0
4427.0
1150.5
233.8
3.0
270.0
1179.4
Company
Price
Chg
High
Halma
Hargrve Lans
HSBC Hldgs
IAG
Imperial Brands
Informa
IntCont Htls
Intertek
ITV
Johnson Matth
Just Eat
Kingfisher
Land Secs
Legal & Gen
Lloyds Bk Gp
Lon Stock Ex
Marks&Spen
Mediclinic Intl
Micro Focus Intl
Mondi
Morrison (Wm)
National Grid
Next
NMC Health
Old Mutual
PaddyPwrBetfair
Pearson
Persimmon
Prudential
Randgold Res
Reckitt Ben
RELX
Rentokil Initial
Rio Tinto
Rolls-Royce
RBS
Shell A
1175.0
1664.0
673.7
614.4
2529.5
714.0
4325.0
4651.0
146.2
3151.0
685.2
296.3
952.1
260.9
66.2
4152.0
274.0
572.4
1094.0
1921.5
224.8
824.1
4820.0
3430.0
235.2
6995.0
733.0
2620.0
1794.0
5572.0
6202.0
1517.0
275.0
3645.5
864.6
262.7
2333.5
+29.0
+34.5
+11.6
+10.2
+23.5
+4.2
+86.0
+97.0
+3.8
+131.0
-9.0
+5.4
+5.1
+4.4
+1.0
+132.0
+7.5
+16.4
+89.0
+72.5
+6.4
+21.3
+48.0
+92.0
+1.0
-70.0
-9.8
+62.0
+44.0
-142.0
+152.0
+45.0
+7.1
+107.5
+26.6
+5.2
+84.5
1341.0
1935.0
798.6
680.6
3956.5
773.0
4944.0
5470.0
220.2
3511.0
906.0
369.8
1217.1
279.9
73.6
4206.0
397.8
890.2
2970.5
2145.0
254.4
1174.3
5355.0
3558.0
259.6
8967.0
775.8
2901.0
1992.5
8255.0
8110.4
1784.0
338.8
4226.6
994.5
304.2
2579.5
Low
1003.0
1258.0
618.0
516.0
2301.0
631.0
3656.0
3919.0
141.0
2681.0
544.0
285.3
900.2
241.7
61.8
3160.0
262.3
495.4
26.8
1684.0
203.3
733.0
3565.0
1764.4
184.2
6027.4
563.0
2069.9
1612.1
5546.0
4973.4
1399.0
238.2
2882.5
766.3
221.8
1982.5
19576.2
+311.9
FTSE All Share
3961.3
+84.7
FTSE Eurofirst300
1475.0
Dow Jones *
24534.5
+35.7
S&P 500 *
2666.6
Nasdaq *
7090.6
DAX
12305.2
+347.3
CAC 40
5276.7
+134.9
Hang Seng
29518.7
Nikkei
21645.4
+270.2
+21.9
+48.5
+325.9
EURO/
POUND
DOLLAR/
POUND
– 0.88¢
FTSE 250
$1.399
+165.5
– 0.11¢
7199.5
€1.144
Markets
FTSE 100
Company
Price
Chg
High
Shell B
Royal Mail
RSA Insur
Sage
Sainsbury(J)
Schroders
Scot Mort Inv Tst
Segro
Severn Trent
Shire
Sky
Smith&Neph
Smith (DS)
Smiths Gp
Smurfit Kappa Grp
SSE
Stan Chart
Standard Life Aber
St James Place
Taylor Wimpey
Tesco
TUI AG
Unilever
United Utilities
Vodafone
Whitbread
WPP
2373.0
552.6
643.0
654.6
244.1
3203.0
436.6
616.4
1858.0
3707.0
1314.0
1314.5
476.9
1493.0
3048.0
1275.0
720.1
363.8
1059.5
187.5
202.9
1535.5
4030.5
708.4
203.7
3685.0
1138.5
+91.0
+10.6
+9.6
+14.6
+6.9
+52.0
+16.0
+12.0
+11.0
+107.0
-2.5
+15.5
+11.3
+19.0
+46.0
+9.5
+19.3
+9.3
-11.0
+2.0
+2.1
+15.0
+66.0
+2.4
+6.4
+68.0
+43.5
2617.0
575.0
672.5
825.2
339.9
3784.0
479.2
626.2
2575.0
5021.0
1378.0
1442.0
565.0
1697.0
3254.0
1554.0
864.2
448.6
1279.5
211.9
217.3
1687.9
4557.5
1078.0
239.7
4333.0
1762.0
Low
2037.0
367.8
568.5
621.0
222.4
3032.0
361.1
454.9
1664.0
2940.5
11.4
1173.0
5.3
1354.0
1712.7
1176.5
678.8
349.0
1008.0
173.0
165.3
934.4
3678.5
648.6
190.1
3499.9
1074.0
For enquiries call +44 (0)20 7825 8300
GOLD
Per troy ounce,
London pm fix
+ $0.83
High
$68.47
Chg
– $9.13
Price
$1,325.2
Company
OIL
Brent crude,
per barrel
CONSTRUCTION
REVENUE
Battersea boss
quits after decade
Loss-maker HSS
in ‘solid U-turn’
Rob Tincknell, chief executive
of the Battersea Power Station
Development Company, has
stepped down, bringing an end
to his 10-year tenure. Deputy
chief executive Simon Murphy
will take the helm from 1 May.
The company is currently
transforming its Grade II listed
building into apartments,retail
and leisure units, and offices.
Losses at tool hire group HSS
widened last year but the firm
insisted that a turnaround
strategy was beginning to bear
fruit. The company booked a
full-year pre-tax loss of £85.2m
in the year to 31 December,
compared with a £17.4m loss in
2016. Revenue dipped 1.9 per
cent to £335.8m – but HSS said
trading in 2018 has been “solid”.
TECHNOLOGY
HOUSING
Rivals compete to
buy software firm
Barclays to offer
‘green mortgages’
Trading software firm Fidessa
has revealed the rival suitors
looking to gatecrash Temenos
Group’s £1.4bn takeover
approach. The group says ION
Investment Group and SS&C
Technologies Holdings are the
two companies eyeing swoops.
ION is offering £38.297 per
share – a 5 per cent premium on
the Temenos Group’s bid.
Barclays is to offer home
owners “green mortgages” from
next week, with lower interest
rates for people who choose
to buy an energy-efficient
new-build home. The Barclays
Green Home Mortgage will
be available to those who are
buying an energy efficiencyrated home from an initial
group of five house builders.
BANKING
RETAIL
RBS ‘ring-fencing’
its retail business
Aldi spends £57m
to expand its HQ
Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS)
has said the ring-fencing of its
retail banking operations will
begin on 30 April. It means the
lender is the latest to formally
transfer its retail customers
to a separate unit as part of
new UK regulations meant to
protect consumer cash from
investment banking risks.
Fast-growing discount
supermarket Aldi is investing
£57m to expand its head office
site in Warwickshire. It said the
move would support its rapid
UK expansion. It has 700 stores
and is aiming to increase this to
1,000 by 2022. The retailer more
than doubled its market share
in the last eight years.
DRINKS
FINANCIAL
Buyers ‘are eyeing
up Conviviality’
Investors ‘should
know fund value’
Conviviality’s retail arm
has collapsed, but the firm’s
administrators insisted talks
with potential buyers are still
ongoing. The jobs of at least 600
of Conviviality’s staff hang in the
balance without a deal, rising
to around 2,000 jobs when
including franchise employees.
Asset managers must assess
each year how much value for
money they offer investors, the
Financial Conduct Authority
(FCA) said yesterday. The FCA
said that from September 2019
there would be a requirement to
make an annual assessment of
value out of duty to investors.
the
markets
The FTSE 100 jumped 165.49
points to 7.199.5. Its biggest risers
were Micro Focus International,
up 89p at 1,094p; Evraz, up 23.3p at
450.4p; Johnson Matthey, up 131p
at 3,151p; and easyJet, up 66.5p at
1,641.5p. The biggest fallers were
Direct Line Insurance Group,
down 38.5p at 348.1p; Aviva,
down 14.7p at 487.7p; Randgold
Resources, down 142p at 5,572p;
and Pearson, down 9.8p at 733p.
***
On the currency markets, sterling
dropped against the US dollar,
falling by 0.8 per cent to $1.399 .
Against the euro, it was down by
0.1 per cent to €1.144.
51
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
APPRENTICESHIPS
Training levy must ‘work
harder’ to use £1bn funds
By Alan Jones
More than £1.28bn of money paid
into the Government’s Apprenticeship Levy is “languishing” in accounts, it has been claimed.
Companies have paid in more
than £1.39bn since the levy was
launched a year ago today, but only
withdrawn £108m, according to
The Open University.
A Freedom of Information request revealed that more than
£1.28bn was in National Apprenticeship accounts.
Under the levy system, employers in England with an annual
wage bill of at least £3m have to pay
0.5 per cent of staff costs into a
fund topped up by the Government
to finance training.
The Government has set a target
of three million people starting apprenticeships by 2020.
The number of new starts has
been falling, and business groups
have called for the levy system to
be reformed.
The Open University said a year
was not a long time considering it
can take up to nine months
to set up an apprenticeship programme. According to market
research for the report, almost a third
of business leaders
who have accessed
apprenticeship funding said the process was
more time-consuming
than they expected.
David Willett, corporate director at The Open University, said:
“While it’s encouraging that the
majority of business leaders agree
with the levy in principle, it’s clear
that adjustments are needed to
make the levy work harder for
employers. The lack of flexibility
needs to be urgently addressed to
ensure that organisations get value
for money, and we think that modular apprenticeships, which allow
organisations to develop tailormade programmes that fit their
specific needs, could be an
attractive solution.”
Petra Wilton (inset),
director of strategy at
the Chartered Management Institute,
said: “Small businesses are a big piece
in the puzzle of how
to boost the number of
apprentices, and how to
make the levy work for all.
“The current set-up certainly favours larger employers.”
Most organisations that
pay the levy agree with it
in principle, but more than two
in five would like to see some
changes, according to the report.
In tomorrow’s
money
business
Diary of
a fraud
victim
How I
was
tricked
out of
£10,000
7 days
from on
ly
£919pp
Istanbul, Ephesus & Troy
Departures in September and October 2018
Your tour includes...
Klass celebrates turning 40 with new range
Myleene Klass has launched her latest fashion
collection for Littlewoods.com. It also marks the
model, TV presenter and singer’s 40th birthday.
Klass has worked with Littlewoods.com since
2012 when she was named as its style ambassador.
daily
money
Secure Trust Bank has upped the
rate on its five-year fixed-rate
bond to 2.65 per cent yearly. Savers
can invest from £1,000 up to £1m.
Additions are permitted within
Littlewoods.com is part of Shop Direct, which
also runs Very.co.uk and VeryExclusive.co.uk, and
recently appointed a new chief executive, Henry
Birch. In the company’s latest annual report, it
recorded a £4.6m profit before tax.
30 days of opening the account, but
early access to funds is not allowed.
The deal is open to people aged 18
or over and can be run online or
over the phone.
***
West Bromwich Building Society
has reduced the rate on its
two-year fixed-rate mortgage in
what Moneyfacts calls a “highly
competitive” deal. It is now priced
at 3.39 per cent to 31 May, 2020. It
is open to first- and second-time
buyers who want to borrow from
£40,000 at 95 per cent loan-tovalue. Scotland is not included in
the building society’s lending area.
***
RBS staff will provide training
on how to thwart scammers to a
million people across the UK by
2020. The Friends Against Scams
training can be done in branch or
online and is open to customers
and non-customers who want help
in spotting scams.
✓ Three nights stay in Istanbul, one of the world’s oldest cities
✓ Walking tour of Istanbul, including the Blue Mosque, the Galata Bridge across
the Golden Horn, the spice market and the Grand Bazaar
✓ Guided tour the extraordinary Topkapi Palace, political centre of the Ottoman Empire
✓ Visit Hagia Sophia, for a thousand years Christendom’s greatest church, subsequently
one of Islam’s greatest Mosques, now a fascinating museum
✓ Follow in the footsteps of St Paul and St John in Ephesus, the Eastern
Mediterranean’s greatest ancient Roman city
✓ Visit the mountainside site reputed to be the house of the Virgin Mary
✓ Guided tour of the remarkable and little-visited Acropolis of Pergamon
✓ See the remains of Homer’s Troy, one of history’s most legendary cities
✓ Cross the Straits of the Dardanelles visiting the poignant Commonwealth cemeteries
of Gallipoli and Anzac Cove from one of WW1’s most tragic campaigns
✓ Return flights from a selection of regional airports with hotel transfers
✓ Stay in hand-picked four-star hotels inclusive of all local taxes,
plus daily breakfast and three dinners
✓ The services of our experienced
tour manager
Prices are based on two people sharing and are correct at time of print. Single
supplements may apply. This holiday is operated by and subject to booking
conditions of Riviera Travel, ABTA V4744 ATOL 3430 protected. Subject to
availability. Additional entrance cost may apply. Images used in conjunction with
Riviera Travel. For further information please write to Riviera Travel, New Manor,
328 Wetmore Road, Burton upon Trent, Staffs, DE14 1SP.
For more information or to book,
please call: 01283 523447
www.ipariviera.co.uk
ABTA No. V4744
ieat
Games&Puzzles
daily recipe
Smoked salmon, dill
and lemon linguine
Kakuro
Zygolex® In i every day
How to play Fill the white squares so that the total in each
across or down run of cells matches the total at the start
of that run. You must use the numbers from 1-9 only and
cannot repeat a number in a run. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Find the missing words by following the RHYME, LETTERS and MEANING links
– eg, a word that rhymes with ‘cheek’, has one letter different from ‘pear’ and
has the same meaning as mountain, would be ‘peak’. Full rules at zygolex.com.
Solution, page 56
RHYME LETTERS
18
DETECT
4
24
19
22
4
23
3
24
BEST
31
6
24
4
CRETE
20
11
16
24
5
10
7 1
4 5
1
2 9 7
3
8
4
5
5
2
6
Killer Sudoku No 1255
How to play Each row, column and 3 by 3 box must contain
each number (1 to 9) only once. The sum of all numbers
contained in a dotted area must match the number printed
in its top-left corner. No number can appear more than
once in a dotted area. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
19
11
12
4
16
13
11
7
9
12
8
✂
11
0
11
10
>
2
11
∨
> 2 <
2
∧
3
2
1
1 1
0
0
1 0
0 1
1
3
3 2
3
1
3
4
5
7
0
3
2
2
11
∨
∧
1 2
0
1
2 0
12
7
4
MEANING
∨
<
4 >
∨
∨
1
8
8
∧
0 0
1
24
17
LETTERS
How to play Find all the mines in the grid. Numbers in certain squares indicate how
many mines there are in the neighbouring squares, including diagonally touching
squares. Mines cannot be placed in squares with numbers. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
1
9
15
SIRE
Minesweeper
8
12
8
10
13
19
JOINT
How to play
Place the numbers
from 1-5 exactly
once in each row
and column. The
greater than and
less than signs
(‘>’ and ‘<’) indicate
where one cell is
greater/less than
the adjacent
cell indicated.
Solution:
minurl.co.uk/i
8
9
AIRCRAFT
Futoshiki
3
3
4
KITE
RHYME
8
6
SANE
WAIST
How to play Place the numbers 1-9 once in each row, column
and bold-lined jigsaw region. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
13
5
4
Jigsawdoku
12
4
4
GREATEST
8
FETCH
4
TOAST
SERVES 2
In Monday’s i
No-stir spring risotto
6
4
3
10
20 T
M AK
IN E S
UT
ES
5
6
24
Recipe from waitrose.com
BRINK
5
9
16
Heat the oil in a large frying pan and
gently sauté the fennel with a pinch of
salt for 10 to 12 minutes until softened
and just starting to turn golden.
Bring a separate large pan of salted
water to the boil, add the linguine and
simmer for nine minutes. Just before
draining, scoop out and reserve a
large mug of the cooking water, then
drain the pasta.
Add the lemon zest and one
tablespoon of juice, the soft cheese and
100ml of cooking water to the fennel,
stirring to combine over a high heat.
Take it off the heat, toss the linguine
through the sauce, then stir through the
salmon, dill and any reserved fennel
fronds. Divide between plates, season
with black pepper and serve immediately.
6
29
30
1tbsp olive oil
1 fennel bulb (about 160g),
hard core removed, finely diced
and any fronds reserved
150g linguine
½ lemon, zest and juice
75g reduced-fat soft cheese
100g pack oak-smoked salmon,
cut into strips
Handful chopped dill
PRONG
BOX
8
13
POWERFUL
3
9
12
MEANING
18
2
3
2
2
1
3
1
3
3
1
3
0
2
2 2 3
2
3
4 3
1
1
1
NEWS
2-30
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
38-39
Maths Puzzle
Codeword No 1976
How to play Fill the empty squares with
numbers that will make the across and
down calculations produce the results
shown in the grey squares. Each numeral
from 1 to 9 must only appear once. The
calculations should be performed from
left to right and top to bottom, rather than
in strict mathematical order.
How to play The numbers in the grid correspond to the letters of the alphabet.
Solve the puzzle and fill in the letters in the key as you discover them.
Three letters are provided to give you a start. The solution will be printed in
tomorrow’s paper, the solution to yesterday’s codeword is on page 56.
x
+
x
+
+
+
14
20
6
x
-
16
-3
56
x
26
8
26
-
+
+
÷
÷
41
14
6
12
26
20
14
14
17
19
21
14
12
25
12
13
16
12
11
15
17
24
26
17
8
13
15
14
22
14
6
2
15
12
20
6
21
11
9
11
14
14
22
12
15
12
14
8
13
12
26
11
15
15
22
7
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
9
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
P
Need a little help getting started? Then call for up to four extra clue letters on
0901 292 5204. Calls cost £1 plus your telephone company’s network access charge
(if you are having trouble with the phone service, call the helpline: 0333 202 3390).
Or text THEI CLUE to 85100 to receive your clues. Texts cost £1 plus your
standard network charge (if you are having trouble with the text service, call the
helpline: 0333 335 3351). Clues change each day at midnight.
59
BELT
DOWN
1 Excessively
sweet (10)
2 Permit (5)
4 Distinctive spirit (5)
5 Young cats (7)
6 Standing (6)
7 Hold-up (5)
9 Soft fruit (10)
13 Affectedly selfimportant (7)
15 Insect (6)
16 Scatter (5)
18 Lift up (5)
19 Warehouse (5)
Stuck on the concise crossword?
For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3590.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble
accessing this number, please call our helpdesk
on 0333 202 3390.
OUT NOW!
The i Book of Codewords Vol 2
Our second book of
codewords features
100 brand new puzzles.
Available on Amazon
for £4.99. See
minurl.co.uk/codewordsvol2
Other i books include:
Mixed Puzzles Vol 2 (inews.co.uk/puzzle2),
Crosswords (inews.co.uk/crossword)
and Sudokus (inews.co.uk/sudoku)
1
2
3
6
4
5
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
15
17
18
19
20
21
22
Solution to yesterday’s Concise Crossword
ACROSS 1 Numb, 3 Bird (Numbered), 7 Tendril, 8 Cape, 9 Pair, 10 Nearly,
12 Accident-prone, 14 Blouse, 15 Palm, 17 King, 18 Crimson, 19 Foal, 20 Bear.
DOWN 1 Nuthatch, 2 Minor, 3 Buckler, 4 Rope, 5 Orange juice, 6 Clear the air,
11 One-liner, 13 Illegal, 15 Piste, 16 Silo.
Today’s other puzzles Cryptic Crossword, page 22;
Five-Clue Cryptic, page 15; One-Minute Wijuko, page 23
Puzzle solutions See page 56 and minurl.co.uk/i
4
3
1 7
5
4
3
2
3
9
3
8
9
8 4 2
8 3
4
8
2
7 1
8 3 6
5
7
7
7
5
1 4 3
Monday: Easier
FURY
Maths Puzzle,
Word Ladder, Word
Wheel, Kakuro,
Minesweeper,
ABC Logic, Killer
Sudoku, Futoshiki,
Codeword,
Jigsawduko and
Wijuko created by
Clarity Media.
Terms &
Conditions
16
7
8 3 9
8
TEST
For more
puzzles,
see clarity-media.
co.uk
13
2
6
6
Concise Crossword No 2298
ACROSS
1 Duration (4)
3 Ship’s floors (5)
8 Be in command
(Slang) (4,3,5)
10 Chop with an
axe (3)
11 Short-lived (9)
12 Rest (6)
14 Japanese female
companion (6)
17 Dividend of a
fraction (9)
19 Society girl (3)
20 Lurid romantic
novel (Informal)
(6,6)
21 Wedding
attendant (5)
22 Remain (4)
5
9 4
9
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
9
7
4
14
8
3
-
3
7
6
4 1 2
14
10
D
How to play Each numeral from 1 to 9 must
appear (once only) in the squares forming the
red letter i. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Sudoku Harder
17
2
S
idoku Exclusive to i
FIRM
1
14
How to play
Convert the word
at the top of the
ladder into the
word at the bottom
of it, using only
the four rungs
in between. On
each rung, you
must put a valid
four-letter word
that is identical
to the word above
it, apart from a
one-letter change.
There may be more
than one way of
achieving this.
26
15
21
24
4
20
10
3
2
8
8
26
26
17
22
15
26
2
7
1
7
18
12
25
16
24
10
21
7
11
5
15
21
23
17
x
+
4
22
25
8
11
21
12
÷
x
22
8
14
10
Harder
x
26
6
-
2
24
3
+
+
-
1
14
21
25
Easier
90
22
Word
Ladder
53
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
By using i’s text
services, you are
agreeing to receive
occasional SMS
messages from
Johnston Press
PLC. You will not
be charged for
receiving these
messages and may
opt out at any time
by texting STOP
to the originating
number. SMS
services on this page
are provided by BBA
Digital Ltd, KT18
5AD, helpline: 0333
335 3351. Phone
services on this
page are provided
by Spoke AL10
9NA, helpline: 0333
202 3390, and by
Advanced Telecom
Services, EC1M
4BH. Helpline: 0330
333 6946.
ABC Logic
How to play Place the letters
A, B and C exactly once in each row and
column. Each row and column has two
blank cells. The letters at the edge of a row/
column indicate which of the letters is the
first/last to appear in that row/column.
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
C
A
B
C
B
C
A
A
C
B
C
A
B
A
Word Wheel
This is an open-ended puzzle. How many
words of three or more letters, each
including the letter at centre of the wheel,
can you make from this diagram? We’ve
found 32, including one nine-letter word.
Can you do better?
I
E
N
W
T
R
E
V
I
UK ‘MUST INSULATE 25
MILLION HOMES’
BBC NEWS
28TH FEBRUARY 2017
“A report to Parliament says 25 million existing homes will not
meet the insulation standards required by mid-century.”
BEFORE
AFTER
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vat free
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CALL FOR DETAILS
55
Weather
56
SPORT
i racing
Aintree sun will
only be bad
news for Frost
By Jon Freeman
RACING EDITOR
With all the rain we’ve had, resulting in a turf racing wash-out on four
consecutive days this week, there
have been concerns about the state
of the ground for the Grand National,
only eight days away. So news that
the word “heavy” has been taken
out of the official going description
will be largely welcomed, though soft
ground at Aintree is not exactly a
walk in the park.
There will be a few, like Neil King
and Bryony Frost (below), the trainer
and rider of mudlark Milansbar (another step closer to making the final
40 following As De Mee’s defection),
who will not complain if
it starts tipping down
again, whose idea of
perfect conditions
will be just this side
of abandoned.
But the majority do not want that
and will be relieved
that spring is springing at last. Though still
dramatic whatever the circumstances, a Grand National finish
in deep ground is not the prettiest
sight with a handful or less making
it home and taking getting on for two
minutes longer to do so than they
would on a decent surface.
The numbers of horses who put
in a clear round on the last four
occasions the race was run on proper
heavy ground were four (when Ben
Nevis won in 1980), six (Miinnehoma,
1994), six (Earth Summit, 1998) and
two (Red Marauder, 2001 – two more
remounted to finish that year, but
that’s no longer allowed). A promised drier spell increases hope that
the Aintree going will be acceptable
for everyone on the big day, although
there’s a lot of drying out to do on
Merseyside, as everywhere else.
top
tips
BEST BET
Illtellmema
(3.10, Fontwell)
Point-to-point winner,
encouraging runner-up on
hurdles debut here last month.
NEXT BEST
Finisher
(6.40, Chelmsford)
Improved effort from the front
last time and similar tactics here
can bring first win.
ANTE-POST
Gold Cup third Anibale Fly has
been a Grand National punt this
week and he’s now 12-1.
CHELMSFORD
GOING:STANDARD
TOTEQUADPOT RACES 3 TO 6 HANDICAP (CLASS 3)
£15,000 added 1m 2f
1
589515 FIRE FIGHTING (CD) M Johnston 7 9 12.............................A Kirby 5
2
21602- OASIS CHARM (D) C Appleby 4 9 7..................................W Buick C 2
3
1-2521 MARATHA S C Williams 4 9 5............................... P J McDonald T 1
4
/7819- MUTAMADED (D) Mrs R Carr 5 9 3 .................................J Garritty 3
5
11127- SWILLY SUNSET (D) A Carson 5 9 1................................W Carson 4
6
69550- RAY’S THE MONEY C Mann 4 8 8........................................F Norton 6
7
5-1278 ROCK ICON J Hughes 5 8 7....................................................................J Fahy 7
- 7 declared BETTING: 11-10 Oasis Charm, 3-1 Maratha, 9-2 Fire Fighting, 12-1 Swilly
Sunset, 16-1 Mutamaded, Ray’s The Money, 25-1 Rock Icon.
7.10
FORM VERDICT
FIRE FIGHTING won narrowly at Lingfield a couple of weeks ago and he
was far from disgraced when finishing fifth in the Rosebery Handicap
at Kempton on Saturday. A reproduction of either of those efforts today
would make the veteran hard to beat. Oasis Charm contested some
high-class handicaps as a three-year-old and he has a good chance this
evening, while Maratha is another to consider.
FONTWELL
GOING:HEAVY-SOFT IN PLACES
GEOFF SMITH 65TH BIRTHDAY HANDICAP CHASE
(CLASS 4) £8,511 added 3m 2f
1
2-341U LEO LUNA (CD) G L Moore 9 12 7 ........................Jamie Moore T,V
2
-143P1 WIZARDS BRIDGE (CD) C Tizzard 9 12 6..................H Cobden B
3
53P124 CRANK EM UP David Dennis 7 11 12...........................A Coleman B
4
P22956 BEARS RAILS (C) C Tizzard 8 11 11.......................T Scudamore B
5
73R2P1 MORNEY WING C Mann 9 11 8 ....................................P Brennan B,T
- 5 declared BETTING: 9-4 Morney Wing, 5-2 Wizards Bridge, 3-1 Leo Luna, 11-2 Crank
Em Up, 8-1 Bears Rails.
CALL STAR SPORTS ON 08000 521321 NOVICES’
HURDLE (CLASS 4) £6,300 added 2m 3f
1
6U4231 LARRY (C) G L Moore 5 11 8 ........................................... Jamie Moore T
2
9F8 CAPPAWAY E Williams 5 11 1.......................................................A Wedge
3 6802U2 DUKE OF KILCORRAL N Mulholland 5 11 1.....................N Fehily
4
0-9966 HALLY’S KITCHEN Mrs F M Shaw 6 10 8...........Mr M Legg (5)
5
P-P212 ILLTELLMEMA Miss S Smith 6 10 8......................J Sherwood (3)
6
P4 JUDGE JUDY Mrs L Hill 5 10 8 ....................................................T Cannon
7
44 LIGHTLY SQUEEZE P Hide 4 10 8........................R McLernon H,C
8
8U SUNSET SKYE Mrs L Richards 5 10 8.................. A Glassonbury
- 8 declared BETTING: 6-5 Duke Of Kilcorral, 13-8 Larry, 11-2 Illtellmema, 20-1 Sunset
Skye, Lightly Squeeze, 33-1 Hally’s Kitchen, Judge Judy, Cappaway.
EXCLUSIVE OFFERS FOR DAY VISITS AT BUTLINS.COM
HANDICAP CHASE (CLASS 4) £8,511 added 2m 2f
1
381U11 CLONDAW WESTIE (CD) Mrs L Hill 7 12 1(5ex)...................................
..............................................................................................................................A Coleman C,T
2
437-21 ATLANTIC ROLLER (CD) C Gordon 11 11 12......T Cannon C,T
3
4U7122 LE COEUR NET A Honeyball 6 11 5.......................................N Fehily T
- 3 declared BETTING: 6-5 Clondaw Westie, 5-4 Atlantic Roller, 5-1 Le Coeur Net.
VISIT STAR SPORTS IN MAYFAIR, LONDON HANDICAP
HURDLE (CLASS 4) £7,749 added 2m 6f
1
44P6/5 KINGS LAD (C) C Tizzard 11 11 12..................................J Bowen (3) T
2
11-12P PRESENT TIMES E Williams 7 11 10......................................A Wedge
3
5311P5 CAMRON DE CHAILLAC N Hawke 6 11 8 ........Sean Houlihan (5) V
4
446-12 DEEBAJ (D) G L Moore 6 11 8...........................................Joshua Moore
5 U75P03 HIT THE HIGHWAY C Gordon 9 11 8 ..............................T Cannon T
6
3368/3 ROBINSSON O Sherwood 8 11 5...................................T Garner (3) C
7
51/366 MIGHTY VIC Miss S Smith 10 11 3......................J Sherwood (3) T
8
0/7P34 NORSE LEGEND C Tizzard 7 11 2 .......................................H Cobden C
9
-55118 OCCASIONALLY YOURS (C) A Blackmore 14 11 1.............................
...................................................................................................................Miss T Worsley (7)
10 70-793 GREAT TEMPO D Pipe 5 10 12 .....................................T Scudamore C
11 F/24-6 NORMAN THE RED J Long 8 10 12..................................M Batchelor
- 11 declared BETTING: 4-1 Deebaj, 5-1 Great Tempo, 6-1 Robinsson, 13-2 Present
Times, Norse Legend, 15-2 Hit The Highway, 10-1 Kings Lad, 12-1 others.
2.35
3.10
3.40
RUGBY UNION
Sarries will play it safe with
Vunipola return from injury
as a reassurance to the three-time
Premiership winners there was no
reason to worry in connection with
this week’s revelation he was buying
out the 50 per cent ownership held by
South African investors.
And while Sarries’ elimination
from the European Cup they had
won for the past two seasons was a
big blow, there is an immediate upside as it frees up a rest weekend later
this month, when the European semifinals will be played.
Vunipola could return against Bath
on 15 April or be given another fortnight’s recuperation before launching his latest comeback, following a
series of major injuries since 2016,
in one of the last two regular-season
Premiership games at London Irish
on 29 April and at home to Gloucester
a week later.
In the Premiership table, secondplaced Sarries have a six-point buffer
to Leicester in fifth, and confidence
is high they will gain the necessary
points to secure a top-four finish, and
possibly a home draw in the top two.
Vunipola’s elder brother and fellow Saracens and England forward,
Mako, described everything at the
club is now geared towards regaining
the Premiership crown they won in
2011, 2015 and 2016.
“We are just being extra cautious
with him,” Mako said of his brother.
“His arm has healed well, everything
has gone well now. But with us not
being in the European semi-final,
and only four league games left, they
trust him enough that, yes, they want
him to have match fitness, but they’d
rather him not come back and get injured again.” THE INDEPENDENT
By Hugh Godwin
RUGBY UNION CORRESPONDENT
Saracens are playing it safe with Billy
Vunipola, as they prime their mighty
England No 8 for an assault on the
end-of-season Premiership play-offs.
Vunipola has been out with a broken arm since the middle of January
and although the injury has “healed
well”, he will not be picked to face
Northampton Saints away this Saturday, and the way Sarries’ schedule
is panning out means it may make
sense for the talismanic 25-year-old
to sit out the following week’s home
match with Bath too.
Saracens are regrouping on and
off the field after Sunday’s European
Cup loss to Leinster in Dublin, and
club chairman Nigel Wray made his
customary weekly visit to the training ground in St Albans yesterday
Billy Vunipola’s
broken arm has
‘healed well’ but he
will not be rushed back
into action GETTY
4.15
LINGFIELD
GOING:STANDARD
TRAINER TED POWELL MEMORIAL HANDICAP (CLASS
4) £9,750 added 5f
1
87-774 ZAC BROWN (C)(D) C Wallis 7 9 7................................W Carson T 3
2
462-44 ARZAAK (D) C Dwyer 4 9 5...............................................S De Sousa B 6
3
20-413 JUST THAT LORD (D) M Attwater 5 9 3 ..........................L Morris 1
4
451-63 SEPTEMBER ISSUE (D) Miss G Kelleway 5 9 1......... Aaron Jones (3) C 4
5
2-8134 PEARL ACCLAIM (D) D C Griffiths 8 8 10.....T Marquand C 7
6
1207-2 SUWAAN (D) Mrs R Carr 4 8 8.............................................B McHugh 2
7
514551 ARCHIMEDES (D) D C Griffiths 5 8 8(6ex)............ D Allan C,T 5
- 7 declared BETTING: 3-1 Just That Lord, 4-1 Arzaak, 9-2 Suwaan, 5-1 Zac Brown, 7-1
September Issue, 8-1 Pearl Acclaim, Archimedes.
DOWNLOAD THE APP AT 188BET HANDICAP (CLASS 4)
£9,750 added 7f
1
217534 POET’S SOCIETY (D) M Johnston 4 9 9.................... J Fanning 11
2
0-8134 SEA FOX (C)(D) P Evans 4 9 9..................................................J F Egan 10
3
44717- BERKSHIRE BOY (D) A Balding 4 9 9........................R Hornby B 3
4
23037- SIX STRINGS Eve J-Houghton 4 9 8 ..................................C Bishop 2
5
31362- BLACK BESS (CD) J Boyle 5 9 7......................................... P Cosgrave 7
6
727-59 BINT DANDY (CD) C Dwyer 7 9 5 ...............................S De Sousa B 6
7
153129 ARNARSON (D) E Dunlop 4 9 5..................................... Doubtful C 12
8
61252- PEPITA (D) R Hannon 4 9 4.............................................................S Levey 5
9
2104-9 INTENSE STYLE (D) J L Eyre 6 9 1................. Jane Elliott (5) V 4
10 6216-8 ZEBULON Mrs R Carr 4 9 0......................................................J Garritty 9
11 -52595 MEDICI BANCHIERE K Burke 4 8 13................... R Kingscote V 8
12 -46043 SIEGE OF BOSTON (D) D C Griffiths 5 8 12..........Doubtful T 1
- 12 declared BETTING: 5-1 Six Strings, 11-2 Poet’s Society, Black Bess, 6-1 Berkshire
Boy, 13-2 Sea Fox, 7-1 Pepita, 15-2 Bint Dandy, 10-1 others.
Placepot: £427.20. Quadpot:
CHELMSFORD CITY
£146.30.
Going: Standard
Place 6: £257.38. Place 5: £211.16.
5.45 1. DANCING BRAVE BEAR (S
WOLVERHAMPTON
Donohoe) 4-7 fav; 2. Astolat 14-1; 3.
Going: Standard
Trump Alexander 7-2. 9 ran. 1l, 11/4l.
(E Vaughan).
2.10 1. LA FORTUNA (C Bishop)
6.15 1. STEEL HELMET (Josephine
9-2; 2. Stopdworldnletmeof 14-1;
Gordon) 10-1; 2. Sharp Operator
3. Culloden 9-2. 10 ran. 4-1 fav
9-2; 3. Tilsworth Lukey 9-2. 8 ran.
Mighty Zip (10th). 1/2l, 1/2l. (C Wallis).
9-4 fav The Juggler (6th). hd, 11/2l.
2.40 1. MIDSUMMER KNIGHT
(Harriet Bethell).
(Ben Curtis) 13-8 fav; 2. Arden
6.45 1. SHANGHAI SILVER (C
Pulse 6-1; 3. Flying Sparkle 7-4. 6
Shepherd) 20-1; 2. Full Suit 9-1;
ran. 1l, hd. (K Burke).
3. Keir Hardie 4-1. 5 ran. 1-3 fav
3.15 1. CALDER PRINCE (P Pilley)
Great Order (4th). 41/2l, 13/4l. (C Hills).
2-1 fav; 2. Dougan 7-2; 3. Hee Haw
7.15 1. EXTRA MILE (O Murphy)
10-1. 7 ran. 6l, 2l. (T Dascombe).
10-3; 2. Everything For You 8-1; 3.
3.45 1. MOUILLE POINT (T MarTom’s Rock 3-1 fav. 8 ran. 21/4l, 1l.
quand) 11-1; 2. Sunshineandbub(S bin Suroor).
bles 5-2 jt-fav; 3. Voi 11-4. 6 ran.
7.45 1. POET’S PRINCE (F Norton)
5-2 jt-fav Champagne Pink (4th).
11-10 fav; 2. Battle Lines 4-1; 3.
shd, 11/4l. (R Hannon).
Blackheath 11-4. 4 ran. 41/2l, 11/2l.
4.20 1. COOPERESS (Hollie Doyle)
(M Johnston).
12-1; 2. Buonarotti Boy 5-1; 3. Ber8.15 1. SUMMERGHAND (Daniel
lusca 11-10 fav. 4 ran. 3/4l, 11/4l. (D
Tudhope) 7-2 cofav; 2. Merhoob 5-1;
Burchell).
3. Upavon 8-1. 9 ran. 7-2 cofav Dark
4.50 1. VOLEVO LUI (M Monaghan)
Side Dream (5th), 7-2 cofav Related
5-1; 2. We Know 9-1; 3. Baghdad 6-4
(8th). hd, 11/4l. (D O’Meara).
fav. 6 ran. 11/4l, nk. (M Botti).
8.45 1. SONG OF LOVE (C Bennett)
5.20 1. GAINSAY (R Hornby) 33-1;
16-1; 2. Marshall Aid 7-2; 3. Kerre
2. Christmas Night 8-1; 3. Foxy Lady
12-1. 7 ran. 13-8 fav City Dreamer
5-2 fav. 11 ran. hd, 1l. (J Portman).
(4th). 1/2l, 1/2l. (S A Harris).
Placepot: £81,874.10. Quadpot:
Jackpot: Not won, pool of
£2,582.30.
£19,291.46 carried over to LingPlace 6: £1,449.47. Place 5: £607.25.
field.
3.55
4.30
Results service
EUROPA LEAGUE QUARTER-FINAL,
FIRST-LEG
Arsenal (4) ..................4 CSKA Moscow (1)..1
Ramsey 9, 28
Golovin 15
Lacazette 23 (pen), 35
Atletico Madrid (2)..2 Sporting (0).............0
Koke 1
Griezmann 40
Lazio (1) ..........................4 R B Salzburg (1)....2
Lulic 8
Berisha 30 (pen)
Parolo 49
Minamino 71
Felipe Anderson 74
Immobile 76
RB Leipzig (1)............1 Marseille (0)...........0
Werner 45
COMMONWEALTH GAMES
Gold Coast, Australia
GYMNASTICS
Men’s Team Final: 1 England
258.950pts, 2 Canada 248.650, 3
Scotland 240.975.
SWIMMING
Men’s: 200m Breaststroke Final: 1 J
Wilby (Eng) 2m 08.05s, 2 R Murdoch
(Sco) 2:08.32, 3 M Wilson (Aus) 2:08.64.
200m Freestyle Final: 1 T Hamer
(Eng) 1m 55.88s (WR), 2 L Schluter
(Aus) 1:56.23, 3 D Fox (Aus) 1:58.26.
Women’s 400m Individual Medeley
Final: 1 A Willmott (Eng) 4m 34.90s,
2 H Miley (Sco) 4:35.16, 3 B Evans
(Aus) 4:38.23.
S7 50m Butterfly Final: 1 E Robinson
(Eng) 35.72s, 2 S Mehain (Can) 37.69, 3
T Routliffe (Can) 37.85.
TRACK CYCLING
Men’s: B&VI 1000m Time Trial Final:
1 N Fachie (Sco) 1m 00.065s, 2 J Ball
(Wal) 1:00.900, 3 B Henderson (Aus)
1:01.512.
4000m Team Pursuit Gold Medal
Race: 1 Australia 3m 49.804s (WR), 2
England 3:55.310.
Team Sprint Final Gold Medal Race:
1 New Zealand 42.877s, 2 England
43.547.
Women’s B&VI Sprint Final: 1 S
Thornhill (Eng) 2 J Gallagher (Aus) 2-0.
Team Sprint Bronze Medal Race: 3
England 33.893 , 4 Wales 34.415.
TRIATHLON
Men’s Final: 1 H Schoeman (SA) 52m
31s, 2 J Birtwhistle (Aus) 52:38, 3 M
Austin (Sco) 52:44.
Women’s Final: 1 F Duffy (Berm) 56m
50s, 2 J Learmonth (Eng) 57:33, 3 J
Brown (Can) 57:38.
DARTS
UNIBET PREMIER LEAGUE, Liverpool, England: S Whitlock (Aus) bt G
Price (GB) 7-3; M Smith (GB) bt R van
Barneveld (Neth) 7-0; R Cross (GB) bt
G Anderson (GB) 7-5 M van Gerwen
(Neth) bt M Suljovic (Aut) 7-4.
Puzzle solutions
4
FIXTURES
FOOTBALL
THE SKY BET CHAMPIONSHIP
Cardiff v Wolverhampton (7.45)..................
RUGBY LEAGUE
BETFRED SUPER LEAGUE (7.45): St
Helens v Hull.
RUGBY UNION
AVIVA PREM (7.45): Sale v Wasps.
GUINNESS PRO14 (7.35): Edinburgh v
Ulster, Ospreys v Connacht.
GREENE KING IPA CHAMPIONSHIP
(7.45): Nottingham v Bristol.
5
x
1
+
3
+
-
7
-
2
-
+
x
8
÷
90
FIRM
TEST
FILM
BEST
FILL
BUST
FELL
BUSY
FELT
BURY
BELT
FURY
-
2
1
7
41
x
+
÷
5
-3
56
8
÷
3
6
x
16
x
x
6
+
14
6
20
+
9
+
SNOOKER
CHINA OPEN, Beijing, 3rd rd: M
Selby (Eng) bt L Haotian (Chin) 6-1; J
Lisowski (Eng) bt G Wilson (Eng) 6-2;
N Robertson (Aus) bt Z Yuelong (Chin)
6-1; T Ford (Eng) bt L Honghao (Chin)
6-2; S Bingham (Eng) bt G Dott (Sco)
6-2; M Williams (Wal) bt M Allen (N
Ire) 6-5; K Wilson (Eng) bt D Junhui
(Chin) 6-5; B Hawkins (Eng) bt C
Yupeng (Chin) 6-5.
TENNIS
WTA VOLVO CAR OPEN, CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA: 3rd round:
B Pera (US) bt S Errani (It) 6-3 2-6
6-4; (7) M KEYS (US) bt C Giorgi (It)
6-4 6-3; (5) J GOERGES (Ger) bt (10)
N OSAKA (Japan) 7-6 (7-4) 6-3; (3)
D KASATKINA (Rus) bt (13) I BEGU
(Rom) 6-2 6-1; (8) A SEVASTOVA (Lat)
bt (9) A BARTY (Aus) 6-3 6-4;
x
+
9
14
+
4
4
9
59
ZYGOLEX
LEFT TO RIGHT:
detest; strong;
crate; bring; hate;
string; haze; laze;
lace; mist; place;
most; plane;
wrist; site
5-CLUE CROSSWORD
Across: 1 Seldom*, 3 ves’-tal, 4 Op.-tout
Down: 1 SilVIo* (numeral), 2 Mer-L-ot*
WORD WHEEL
NINE-LETTER WORD interview
OTHER WORDS enter, entire, ever, inert, inter,
invert, ire, nerve, never, newer, rein, renew,
rent, review, rite, riven, rivet, tern, tier, tinier,
tire, tree, veer, viewer, weir, were, winter, wire,
wren, writ, write
YESTERDAY’S CODEWORD 1975
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
L
F
Z R D W O E X V S Y Q
C P B
J
A U
I
T K M N H G
NEWS
2-30
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
TV
38-39
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
57
SWIMMING
GYMNASTICS
Willmott and Wilby
stun the Scots to claim
victory in the pool
By Matt McGeehan
IN THE GOLD COAST
England men’s gymnastics team – consisting of (from left to right) Max Whitlock, Nile Wilson, Courtney Tulloch, James
Hall and Dominick Cunningham – after securing their country’s first gold medal of the Commonwealth Games AP
Whitlock keeps
eyes on prize and
grabs gold again
By Mark Staniforth
IN THE GOLD COAST
Resisting the temptation to watch
his team-mates establish an almost unassailable lead, Max Whitlock duly staged a triumphant late
entrance to confirm England’s
first gymnastics gold medal of the
Commonwealt Games.
The double Olympic champion
is notorious for not watching his
rivals during competition, and his
self-absorption even stretches to
shutting out his closest allies in
order to focus on delivering his best
possible routine.
Whitlock’s isolation paid dividends as he went on produce his expected top-scoring routines on the
floor and pommel apparatus to confirm the men’s team title alongside
Nile Wilson, James Hall, Courtney
Tulloch and Dominick Cunningham.
Whitlock said: “It’s annoying because I really want to watch them
but I also want to do my best job for
the team and that is the way it has
always worked best for me.
“It’s just something I have always
done and it has been successful and
in the end that contributes to the
team success.”
E n gl a n d t o t a l l e d 2 5 8 .95 0,
comfortably ahead of second-placed
Canada on 248.650, with the Scotland team of Frank Baines, Hamish
Carter, Kelvin Cham, Dan Purvis
and David Weir taking bronze with
240.975. Keen to build on his stun-
ning double Olympic success in Rio,
Whitlock has temporarily ditched
his all-around aspirations and is
currently focused on increasing the
difficulty levels on his favoured two
pieces of apparatus.
In truth, he was not required to
stretch himself too much, the hard
work having already been done by
Wilson and Hall, who qualified in first
and second places respectively for the
men’s all-around final later this week.
Wilson, the Olympic high bar
bronze medallist, shrugged off a
wrist injury to score highest on that
piece of apparatus as well as the high
bar, while Hall scored consistently
across the board to trail his teammate by less than two points.
In stark contrast to Whitlock, Wilson had whooped and smiled his way
through his routines, cheered by a
sizeable contingent of fans he has
gleaned from his successful series of
online gymnastics blogs.
“There were a few ‘Wilsonators’
in the crowd and it feels amazing to
have created something like this,”
said the Leeds-based Wilson. “I’m
a vlogger as well as a gymnast now.
Video creation is something I’ve
been doing since I was young and noone has seen the years of graft it has
taken to get it to where it is today.”
FORMULA ONE
IN BAHRAIN
Lewis Hamilton has put his Formula
One future on hold as he waits for the
sport’s owners to deliver their plans
for the future. Liberty Media, the
American conglomerate which is in
its second year at the helm of F1, will
present its long-term vision to the
teams here in Bahrain today.
Liberty is determined to reduce
costs, make the sport more competitive and introduce a simpler
version of the complex engine which
was introduced in 2014. Mercedes,
winners of the past four driver and
team championships, and Ferrari,
expressed grievances over Liberty’s
first proposal with the latter threatening to walk away from the sport.
Hamilton is in the last season of
his three-year deal and, along with
Mercedes, had expressed hope of
completing his new £120million
contract before the curtain raiser
in Australia two weeks ago. But the
33-year-old Englishman says he will
delay finalising terms until the outcome of today’s summit.
He said: “There is an announcement to be made and it is interesting
to hear what is happening as I am an
integral part of it. It will be great to
know how [Liberty’s vision] is going
to sit for us. Maybe it affects the driver market, maybe it doesn’t, but that
is what I am interested to know.
“It comes at a good time as
I haven’t put pen to paper. It is
important we take our time because
you should never rush anything.”
Aimee Willmott (above) and James
Wilby (below) celebrate after being
awarded their gold medals
it in me if I just swam the race a little
bit better.
“It was just believing in myself.
Since moving to Stirling, [coach]
Steve Tigg has been reinforcing that
and it’s been so nice to move there
and get the enjoyment back.”
Miley said: “I gave it my all and I
was so close to winning.”
James Guy finished with bronze
as Australia’s Mack Horton won the
men’s 400m freestyle.
It was Bath-based Guy’s final international 400m freestyle event, as
he will now reduce his programme.
Guy was sick following the effort,
but is confident for the remaining
six events here. “My main goal for
400 was to try to sneak a medal and
that’s what I’ve done. I got a cheeky
bronze,” he said.
TRIATHLON
Brownlee brothers fail to shine
as Austin takes shock bronze
By Nick Mashiter
Hamilton puts brakes on ahead of summit
By Phillip Duncan
Two English underdogs with Scottish ties shocked favourites from
north of the boarder as Aimee Willmott and James Wilby took Commonwealth Games gold yesterday.
Willmott, based in Stirling,
claimed women’s 400metres individual medley gold ahead of Hannah Miley, who was denied a third
straight title in the event.
And Wilby, born in Glasgow, came
from behind to win the men’s 200m
breaststroke ahead of Ross Murdoch, the champion four years ago.
Murdoch was the underdog
behind Glasgow 2014 poster boy
Michael Jamieson, upsetting the
odds, but was on the receiving end
this time.
Wilby surged down the final 25m
to overhaul the Scot and claim gold
0.27sec ahead of Murdoch.
Loughborough-based Wilby was in
tears after failing to qualify from the
heats at last year’s World Championships in Budapest and he showed little emotion after his victory.
“I was just soaking it all in. This is
just all relief,” he added. “This year
I got really mean with myself and
thought, ‘Right, I’ve got to start making a move and put everything right.’”
Murdoch rued his final length, describing it as “dire”, but insisted he
could not be too disappointed. “I was
dying there in that last 25,” he added.
Willmott finished finished 0.26sec
ahead of Miley, who won gold at Delhi
2010 and Glasgow 2014.
The 25-year-old from Middlesbrough credited her win to a move
from London for Stirling.
Willmott said: “I finish second
pretty much every time, and I have
raced against Hannah so many times
and last time [at Glasgow 2014] I was
second. I knew this time I could have
IN THE GOLD COAST
The Brownlee brothers suffered
a bad day at the office as
neither athlete made the
podium in the triathlon
in the Gold Coast.
Defending champion
Alistair (right),
nursing a calf injury,
trailed in 10th.
Jonny, who also had
an injury interrupted
build-up, finished seventh as
South Africa’s Henri Schoeman
claimed gold with Australia’s
Jacob Birtwhistle second and
Scotland’s Marc Austin claiming
bronze. Alistair said: “I knew
I was going to struggle on the
run and I was downplaying my
chances. I’ve only run a handful
of times in the last month or so.”
Jonny added: “It was
pretty terrible today. I
dived in and felt pretty
weak on the swim and
then I’m normally one
of the strongest on the
bike but I didn’t feel
great.
“Then I started
running and thought ‘oh
dear, I’m in trouble here.’”
A delighted Austin said: “It’s
way beyond what I’ve done
before but I knew I was capable
of it. I thought, ‘I could beat the
Brownlees here’.”
58
SPORT
GOLF: THE MASTERS
Woods grinds
it out as return
becomes real
labour of love
Tough opening round for the former
champ but Stenson makes statement
Kevin
Garside
AT
AUGUSTA NATIONAL
Early leaderboard
US unless stated; par = 72
69 H Stenson (Swe), A Hadwin
Welcome to the 82nd Masters Tour(Can), P Reed, C Hoffman
nament, a field of Tiger Woods plus
70 B Wiesberger (Aut), Z Johnson,
86. That is how Augusta National
M Leishman (Aus)
chairman Fred Ridley might have
71 S Kodaira (Japan), V Singh (Fiji)
begun his opening remarks beside
72 K Stanley, T Fleetwood (Eng),
the old oak tree as the sun burned off
F Molinari (It)
the early morning dew.
73 H Matsuyama (Japan), D
Those crammed around the first
Berger, T Woods, T Potter Jr, B
tee to watch Jack Nicklaus and Gary
Harman, B Grace (SA), J Dufner, P
Player knock ceremonial balls down
Perez, B Watson
the first at 8:13am would have to wait
74 M Kaymer (Ger), B DeChama further two-and-a-half hours for
beau, W Bryan, J M Olazabal (Sp),
Woods to walk among them, and it
P Casey (Eng), J Thomas, A Cook,
would be worth it since the morning’s
R Moore
featured group would indeed yield
one of the day’s leading contenders.
Come on down Marc Leish- erred on the side of caution with the
man, the unassuming Aussie from pin positions, some on the opening
Warrnambool, who, the 15th hole day being downright evil. Back right
aside, plotted a remarkably smooth at the first, front right at the third,
passage through the Woods carnival back left at the sixth, tight to the
alongside the equally sanguine Eng- front at the seventh, and so on. Nolishman, Tommy Fleetwood.
one would be getting after Augusta
Leishman led all the way until National this day.
he pumped his second in the
Woods stole one against par
water at said 15th. Not
at the short par-four third
quite Sergio Garcia bad
with a delicate chip
but the double bogey
to six feet then slid a
was an ugly blot on a
downhiller into the
beautiful card and
centre of the cup for
The record number
dropped him one off
his birdie. He would
of
strokes
Sergio
the early pace set
give that straight
Garcia took at
by clubhouse leader
back at the par-three
the par-5 15th
Henrik Stenson,
fourth,
however, after
yesterday
whose 69 stood on its
finding sand off the tee,
head the idea he can’t
and was out of position
score around here.
again at the fifth costing
After a steady start the day
him a second consecutive
evolved into an almighty
bogey.
grind for the game’s
Meanwhile, Leishreturning superhero,
man went about his
scrambling like the
thing as if he was
blazes to keep his card
playing with his
Age of the oldest
respectable before late
mates in the Sunday
player in the field,
Sandy Lyle
birdies at the 14th and
medal. Successive
16th brought him right
birdies at the second
back into the picture.
and third were conThe first tee at the Massolidated with another
ters is an ordeal even for
at the seventh to stretch
ceremonial boys Nicklaus and
the lead to three under par.
Player, of whom absolutely nothing And when he did get himself into
was expected. Both did a better job difficulty at the sixth and the ninth
than Woods, mind, keeping their after poor tee shots, he fashioned the
balls on the carpet.
necessary recoveries.
Woods pulled a conservative three
Woods was again in trouble around
wood straight into the pine nee- Amen Corner, carving his approach
dles. This being Woods he took the into the crowd off pine needles at the
Tiger line and bent one like Beck- 11th and into Rae’s Creek at the 12th
ham around the trees to the front to post consecutive bogeys.
edge, from where he escaped with
The par-five 13th was also a strugan opening par. The officials, as per, gle after running out of fairway
13
60
Tiger Woods did not have the best of
starts and had to play his second shot
at the first hole from off the fairway;
while Henrik Stenson (below) lines
up a putt at the 16th REUTERS (2)
I didn’t score as well as I
played – I need to play the
par-fives better but
it’s awesome to be back
and finding an awkward lie in the
trees. His second cannoned into the
patrons again but he still had a putt
for birdie, which agonisingly refused
to drop.
Leishman, who must wish he
could play with Woods every day,
rolled in his fourth birdie easy as you
like at 13, as did Tommy Fleetwood to
return to one over par.
The element that separated
Woods from the rest was always that
iron psyche. Few put their troubles
behind them like this bloke. Any disappointment he felt at missing out
on the birdie at 13 were erased with a
long one drilled at the 14th.
The second at 16th was a conventional affair leaving Woods optimistic about his prospects. “I didn’t
score as well as I played,” Woods
said. “It’s a good, solid start. I need to
play the par-fives better.
“As of now I’m only five back. It’s
a bunched leaderboard. I feel good.
This course can take it out of you.
The only level shots are the tee shots.
It tests you. But it is awesome to be
back.”
As Woods signed for his card the
raft of stellar afternoon starters
were making their acquaintance
with the tournament. Rory McIlroy
opened with a birdie and stood one
under after eight holes, a stroke behind Jordan Spieth, who eagled the
eighth to reach two under par.
With three holes to play, 1988
champion Sandy Lyle, at 60 the oldest player in the field, stood at level
par after an eagle three at the 15th,
just the 10 shots fewer than it took
Finau’s hole-in-one agony, page 4
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38-39
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i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
59
The Upshot
Tim Wigmore
Forget a new striker – cheapest way
to score more is to practise set pieces
“C
Garcia sets Masters record
with 13 shots on single hole
By Kevin Garside
It is safe to say the Green Jacket
will not be his this year. Defending
champion Sergio Garcia ran up the
biggest score at one hole in Masters
history, taking 13 strokes to complete
the 15th hole.
Ordinarily viewed as
a birdie hole, Garcia
turned it into an octuple
bogey nightmare, yes
that’s eight shots over
the hole’s par-5 rating.
A year ago, Garcia
(right) eagled the very
same hole on the last day
en route to his dramatic
play-off victory over Justin Rose.
This was equally arresting, if
infinitely more ghoulish with Garcia
finding the water that protects the
front of the green a total of five times
to drop from two over par to 10 over.
Incredibly, Garcia put the trauma
behind him to birdie the next hole.
That’s what champions are made of.
Boston fireman Matt Parziale, who
qualified as the US mid-amateur
champion, also endured a torrid first
round, posting a nine-over par 81.
As you might expect of an individual who puts his life at risk as a matter of routine, Parziale, who had his
firefighting father on the bag, maintained a commendable sense of
perspective.
“We played bad rounds before, so it’s just another bad
round is what it is, which is
frustrating,” he said. “But
we have been here before. It’s not the end of the
world. We’re going to wake
up tomorrow, hopefully.”
English amateur Harry Ellis
propped up the field with a 14-overpar 86, which included one treble
bogey and three doubles.
Vijay Singh enjoyed the other side
of the Masters experience carding a
one-under-par 71, 18 years after he
won the tournament. The 55-yearold birdied the first and twice held the
lead at three under par before dropping shots at the 14th and the last.
ould you imagine a
company that spends
10 per cent of their
time on where 35 per
cent of their revenue
comes from? That’s what happens
in football.”
Rasmus Ankersen, Brentford’s
co-director of football and the chairman at FC Midtjylland, believes he
has identified one of the sport’s
great inefficiencies: the lack of time
and care paid to set pieces.
Ankersen knows what investing
properly in set pieces can achieve.
In 2014-15, FC Midtjylland won the
Danish league for the first time in
their history. They scored three goals
every four games from set pieces.
Set pieces – goals from corners and
free-kicks, but excluding penalties – accounted for 45 per cent of
Midtjylland’s total goals. Across the
professional game as a whole, they
only accountfor30per cent.Set piece
prowess won Midtjylland the title.
The same was true for Chelsea
in the Premier League last year.
Chelsea scored 15 more goals from
set pieces than they conceded;
Manchester City, who came third,
only scored two more than they conceded, as Ted Knutson from Stats
Bomb has shown. The net difference
between the two clubs was greater
than Chelsea’s overall superior goal
difference, of 11.
The puzzle is that more teams do
not recognise the worth of set pieces.
There is a certain snobbery involved.
Ankersen said recently: “People in
football tend to feel that a set piece
goal is not worth as much as a normal goal, which is obviously romance
and bulls**t.” More deeply ingrained,
perhaps, is the sense that success in
set pieces owes more to luck rather
than skill, and so isn’t worth practising much: a similar belief to England’s
traditional approach to penalties.
Set pieces are “up there with the
biggest on-field inefficiencies,” says
Omar Chaudhuri, head of football
intelligence at 21st Club. His research
has found that the difference between
an elite and average team at set pieces – both when attacking and defending – is typically six-seven points a
year. Knutson has found that, as FC
Midtjylland show, clubs can improve
their output from 0.3 goals per game
from set pieces to 0.75: a boost of over
15 extra goals per season.
Set piece proficiency has long
been a hallmark of many clubs who
have over-performed their budget: Bolton Wanderers under Sam
Allardyce, Stoke under Tony Pulis
and – at a higher level – Atletico Madrid under Diego Simeone. Wimbledon’s Crazy Gang beat Liverpool in
the 1988 FA Cup final with a header
from a free-kick.
In an age of financial determinism,
set pieces are one area cash does not
always get better results. “There’s
no real relationship between open
Brighton’s Markus Suttner takes a free-kick against Chelsea in December GETTY
play goal difference and set piece
conversion,” Chaudhuri explains.
As such, set pieces represent a huge
opportunity for poorer teams. “Poor
quality teams can still be elite set
piece teams.”
This is a seminal finding. It suggests that, rather than upgrading
your striker, a more cost-effective
way to score more goals is to train the
entire team to be better at set pieces.
FC Midtjylland’s proficiency in set
pieces was due to relentless training.
“Most teams maybe spend a maximum 10 minutes training set pieces
every week,” Ankersen has said. “It
doesn’t make sense.” Midtjylland use
analytics to work out the most effec-
Most teams maybe spend
a maximum 10 minutes
training set pieces every
week. It doesn’t make sense
tive set piece routines, and have a
“set piece lounge” where players
analyse video clips and stats.
Brentford, following a similar emphasis on exploiting the game’s inefficiencies, employ a specialist set
piece coach. Given the physiological
limits on how much professional
footballers can train, clubs have
aeons of unused time when, rather
than sending their players home to
play on their Xboxes, they could be
engaged in thinking about how to
use set pieces more effectively.
There remains a huge amount
of low-hanging fruit in set pieces.
Perhaps most basic of all is “screening the keeper”: putting attacking
players in the opposition’s defensive
wall, so as to prevent the goalkeeper
from getting a clear sight of the ball
until the ball has passed the wall.
And yet many clubs still consistently fail to even take this simple step.
Knutson recounts consulting for a
professional club, who had a poor
output from set pieces and didn’t
screen the keeper. A year later, the
team still didn’t do so.
In recent years, Sheffield United
have also shown what investing in
set pieces can achieve. Rather than
invariably curl the ball into the box,
they have developed an elaborate
array of routines from corners and
free-kicks, as the website Training
Ground Guru has explained.
Via stealthy and surprise passes,
often to players pulling away from
the defensive wall at an opportune
time, Sheffield United are regularly
able to convert free-kicks from outside the box into one-on-one chances against the goalkeeper.
It is the sort of routine that too
few professional teams seem to
complete, let alone spend hours – on
both the training ground and the
video room – honing. And it works:
Sheffield United won League One
last season and are only a point off
the Championship play-offs.
In the current Premier League
just seven points separate 12th
place from 18th. Over the course
of a season, prioritising set pieces
– through elite specialist coaches,
video analysis and meticulous
preparation in training – may be the
cheapest way to get the extra points
that could prevent relegation, and
losing £60million. If set pieces are
the greatest inefficiency in football
on the pitch, then they may also be
the greatest opportunity, too.
60
SPORT
Football
CHAMPIONS LEAGUE
Liverpool charged
after supporters’
attack on City bus
ing flares and smoke bombs, and a
replacement vehicle had to be found
Liverpool have been charged by for City’s trip home.
Uefa after Manchester City’s team
Getting off the bus in the area
bus was pelted with bottles and cans under the Main Stand, City manag­
before their Champions League er Pep Guardiola gave the thumbs
match at Anfield. Disciplinary pro­ up to stewards and said sarcastical­
ceedings regarding the setting­off ly in Spanish “thanks for protecting
of fireworks, throwing of
us” and then “shame”.
objects, acts of damage
Merseyside Police have
W
hat
and crowd disturbances
appealed for anyone with
will be dealt with by Uefa’s should
video footage to send it to
control, ethics and disci­ have been a
them at team.incident@
plinary board on 31 May. celebratory
merseyside.police.uk or
Despite the incidents
contact Crimestoppers.
taking place in streets sur­ event for
“We worked very closely
rounding Anfield, Uefa’s thousands
with both clubs to plan for
regulations state “host was spoiled
last night before agree­
clubs and national asso­ by a number
ing the route of the buses
ciations are responsible of people
to ensure the teams and
for order and security
public were safe before
both inside and around the
the match,” said Match
stadium before, during and after Commander Superintendent Paul
matches”.
White.
City coach Manel Estiarte posted
“Two officers sustained cuts and
footage from inside the bus which swelling – one was struck by an ob­
shows numerous objects hitting the ject and another suffered glass cut
coach to highlight what he called the injuries. It is pleasing to hear that
“unacceptable” behaviour of fans.
nobody else was seriously injured.
At least one window was smashed What should have been a celebra­
on the journey through streets filled tory event for thousands of people
with thousands of fans, some throw­ was spoiled by a number of peo­
ple who threw bottles, cans and
pyrotechnics.
“Their actions will not be toler­
ated by Merseyside Police and we
will do everything in our power to
find those responsible and put them
before the courts.”
The focus will now shift to the
Etihad Stadium next Tuesday, and
the plans which are in place to avoid
any repeat. Liverpool, who issued a
statement of apology on Wednes­
day, will not say whether they will
take extra steps to ensure the safe­
ty of their coach and players for the
second leg, but it is understood they
The City bus is engulfed by smoke
are likely to have talks on the matter
from flares and smoke bombs
before the match.
By Carl Markham
MANCHESTER CITY
‘Everything is possible’,
says a defiant De Bruyne
By Carl Markham
Manchester City midfielder Kevin
De Bruyne believes it is not an im­
possible task to overturn their
3­0 deficit to Liverpool at
the Etihad on Tuesday.
Before then, City
could win the Premier
League, at home to
Manchester United
on Saturday.
“We know it’s going
to be difficult. We need
to focus on Saturday and
then we will try everything in
our power to get a result against
Liverpool,” the Belgium midfielder
(above) said. “They are going to be
the big favourites but I think we
have played a lot of games where it
was possible to score three goals so
why not? Obviously they have a big
advantage. It’s not impossible, it’s
difficult. You never know. The way
this team plays, everything is
possible. But it’s going to
need something special.”
Liverpool’s players
were spurred on by the
atmosphere at Anfield
on Wednesday, and De
Bruyne is hoping his side
will experience similar
backing from their fans. “It
would be nice,” he added. “It’s dif­
ficult because the circumstances
are different but we will be up for
it. Probably they got a lot of inspira­
tion from their fans.”
Roberto Firmino
(left) celebrates
after Mohamed
Salah opened the
scoring at Anfield on
Wednesday night
GETTY IMAGES
In Firmino, Klopp
inherited a man
perfectly suited
to his system
Firmino is one of very
few players capable of
harrying City into conceding
such a haphazard goal
Firmino first galloped through the
centre of the City defence, turned
Nicolas Otamendi inside out and
tested Ederson with an improvised
snapshot, then recovered in time to
dispossess Kyle Walker and tee up
Mohamed Salah to score.
Combining natural agility and
stamina with a waspish, buzzing
movement without the ball, Firmino
is one of very few players capable
of harrying the Premier League
champions­elect into conceding
such a haphazard goal.
With Firmino in the team,
Liverpool’s opponents seem to be
on the back foot from the off. When
faced with his relentless harassment
other players appear to suffer from
While that might be an
exaggerated caricature of Firmino
a form of stasis.
– with 23 goals and 11 assists
For all we know, Walker
in all competitions this
is still frozen in time
season, he’s a cultured
in front of the Kop,
leg agonisingly
attacker as much as
he is a free­roaming
outstretched towards
tackle obsessive – his
a ball which was never
Goals for Roberto
tirelessness in the
really his to control.
Firmino this season
centre of Liverpool’s
Having left
so far – he managed
front three has been
some sections of
just 12 in both
2016-17 and
at the heart of their
the commentariat
2015-16
burgeoning season.
nonplussed when he
signed from Hoffenheim
His work rate was
exemplified by the Reds’
on the back of a relatively
opener against Manchester City
modest final season in the
on Wednesday evening where
Bundesliga, Firmino was hailed
If ever a player was born to gegenpress,
it is Liverpool’s Brazilian striker, writes
Will Magee after Anfield masterclass
A
fter Liverpool’s swash­
buckling 4­3 home win
over Manchester City
in January, Roberto
Firmino’s stats went viral.
More tackles won than any
other Premier League forward;
more tackles than the majority of
Liverpool defenders; more tackles
and interceptions combined than
any other player in his position.
The broad brushstrokes of raw
data painted 26­year­old Firmino as
the ultimate Jürgen Klopp disciple,
a sparkle­toothed, slick­haired
gegenpressing zealot with a fanatical
devotion to the high press.
23
NEWS
2-30
ENGLAND WOMEN
Neville taps into
Ferguson spirit
for motivation
By John Skilbeck
Phil Neville has told his squad
they must show the same desire
for success as Manchester
United’s great teams of the Sir
Alex Ferguson era.
The Lionesses face Wales in
their fourth World Cup qualifier
today, when a crowd of more
than 25,000 is expected in
Southampton.
“If you want to be
a top, top player
you’ve got to
be able to play
Saturday,
Wednesday,
Saturday,
Wednesday
for your club,
and then go away
with England and
produce it at the top
level,” Neville (above) said.
“And if anyone doesn’t want
that, then please you shouldn’t
be playing for England, because
I want players with the top
mentality who say, ‘I’m going to
go out there and train every day
and I’m going to play in these big
games and have the robustness
and toughness.’
“That’s what I learnt playing at
Manchester United.”
SUNDERLAND
mainly as a creative talent when he
first arrived in England.
Criticised for his relatively low
goal output – he scored roughly one
in four in his first two seasons with
Liverpool – the fact that he has both
upped his creativity this season
and grown into his role as Klopp’s
first line of defence is testament
to his versatility and hunger for
self-improvement.
Though the stat heads noted
his penchant for tackling and ball
recoveries when he signed for
Brendan Rodgers’ side in 2015, few
would now deny that Firmino is one
of the foremost ball-winning counterattackers in Europe and a natural
adept when it comes to the highintensity game of Rodgers’ successor.
Utilised as a wide man for
the last few months of Rodgers’
waning tenure, in a way which
didn’t necessarily maximise his
influence, Firmino could not have
been luckier in Liverpool’s choice
of a replacement in that he is so
suited to Klopp’s demanding, frontfoot football and has been given his
chance to thrive centrally as a result.
Likewise, with Liverpool firm
favourites to progress to the semifinals of the Champions League
after a characteristically dynamic
performance from Firmino,
Klopp must feel blessed to have
inherited a player with an intuitive
understanding of attack-as-defence
and defence-as-attack.
If a man can be born to
gegenpress, perhaps Roberto
Firmino is that man.
Coleman wants
to stay – even in
League One
By Damian Spellman
Chris Coleman wants to remain
Sunderland manager even if the
club are relegated to League One.
The Black Cats are one place off
the bottom of the Championship,
eight points from safety with six
games remaining, but the man
who guided Wales
to the Euro 2016
semi-finals sees
his future at
the Stadium of
Light.
Ahead of
tomorrow’s
trip to Leeds,
Coleman (right)
said: “It’s not
about the division
we are in, it’s about who
owns the club and what the plan
is. It won’t be because I’m saying
I don’t want to be here, not at all.
I wanted to manage Sunderland
whichever league. It will be what
is the future, who is the owner and
what are the plans for the club?
“Am I in the plans? Am I not?
The answer to where my future
is, is with someone else. I don’t
know where we will be yet or who
will be with me or who will be here
full stop. I hope to God I am here. I
want to be here.”
VOICES
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The
Fan
Matrix
One of (few) joys this
season has been the
managers we’ve seen
off – getting Koeman
the boot was a highlight. Shame
we missed Hughes at Stoke but
great to see him floundering
again at this week’s opponents
Southampton. Enjoy the Championship, Sparky! George Bond
BOURNEMOUTH
EDITED BY JAMES MARINER
PREMIER LEAGUE
The club might
sometimes be
deliberately obtuse
with injury prognosis.
This has happened numerous
times and with the expertise that
they possess do we really believe
that? I don’t have a problem with
it, why help the opposition out?
Kazenga <3 (North Stand Chat)
CRYSTAL PALACE
Last Saturday the world
saw every Palace fan’s
frustration with Benteke
and his inability to hit
the target. Twenty big chances
missed out of 22 is a key reason
why we are where we are, and
with no other striker to replace
him we have to hope chances fall
elsewhere this week. Ollie Potts
LEICESTER CITY
61
ARSENAL
What supporters
are saying
about your club
BRIGHTON & HOVE
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
BURNLEY
Wow, what a decision the
manager has – pull Pope
(above) and damage his
World Cup chances or keep
Tom on the bench and damage his
own and probably last Cup chance.
Dyche, I am sure, will probably
only be thinking about Burnley,
but who knows what is best for us?
Thanks to Defoe’s late
equaliser against Watford,
we’re still level on points
with them. We need a win
against Palace today to guarantee
safety. Let’s hope we can get in
front this time instead of coming
from behind. We’ll miss Stanislas
and Smith and have to watch
Zaha. Emily Victoria
CHELSEA
clarethead (Up the Clarets!)
Amazingly, West Ham,
that team with the riots
in the stadium and a
captain tackling fans,
have won more games in 2018
than us, the champions. After last
week’s utter shambles, the least
we deserve is a solid win and.
who knows, if Liverpool or Spurs
capitulate... Charlie Gould
EVERTON
HUDDERSFIELD TOWN
Liverpool supporters
are like a cult – they
won’t accept any
blame or culpability for
anything. They hate every team
that has success, and think they’re
the only team allowed to win
trophies; been same for years with
us, Forest, United, Chelsea and
now City. Lob (Grand Old Team)
LIVERPOOL
Not holding on to a
valuable point against
Newcastle was bitterly
disappointing. Our
performances have been very
flat and negative over the past
few (vital) games. We need to go
back to our pressing style against
Brighton and go after the game.
Olly Diamond
MANCHESTER CITY
Russell sprout (Foxes Talk)
Special nights don’t
come round often like
Wednesday’s, but boy
do we make the most of
them. We knew we’d have to make
Anfield a fortress, but little did
we think we’d be carrying this
lead into next week. Still back our
reserves to roll over the Blues this
weekend. Elliott Charles
MANCHESTER UNITED
NEWCASTLE UNITED
my sombrero (Toon Forum)
I’m currently stuck in
the second stage of grief
– anger – with relegation
becoming an ever larger
probability. Complacency, and
arrogance, as well as pure and
utter negligence from boardroom
level down to the players, have led
us to this. Nick Roberts
STOKE CITY
SWANSEA CITY
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR
Nye Williams
A numbers game this week.
28 years. Twenty. Eight. 28!
Finally the run is at an end
and we could finally leave
the Bridge of sighs with a
victory that was oh so sweet and
oh so deserved. On to another
away day, at Stoke – our last four
against them have ended in wins
of 4-0, 4-0, 4-0 and 5-1. Rachel Lowe
WATFORD
WEST BROMWICH ALBION
WEST HAM UNITED
Chairman is giving
us free beer or water
tomorrow. Not
knocking, but the beer
is due to go out of date, that’s
why they give it away; like other
seasons, offering a gift gets them
brownie points, and keeps us
onside until ticket prices increase.
Liverpool showed
the blueprint to beat
all-conquering City.
Pace, power, passion
– not qualities I would
associate with this United. The
derby gives us a chance to delay
City’s title, hope the lads watched
at Anfield.Gabriel Counsell
Left thinking when will
this run of bad luck
end? Easter Sunday’s
performance was solid
but still lacked scoring
poise; a shame that the result was
decided by refereeing decisions.
We need points from in-form
Tottenham. Personally I think we
will get Kane’d… Hugo Parrott
Bournemouth’s late goal
means we still need a
couple of points to be safe
but having Hughes and
Kiko back and fit is great news.
Surely now we can make a decent
fist of our last six games – having
lost the lot last season. Paul Cohen
I’d rather Pardew’d left
after we played WBA.
Too far gone to recover,
but new managers have
a positive impact. Certain three
points if he was still there, not
sure now. Was banking on this to
make us safe. Somebody’s pinched
Normally a sacked
manager might mean
a reaction and a tough
game for the next side
they face. But got the
feeling that West Bromwich
Albion are on the beach, probably
in Spain. Easy win for us
tomorrow... probably...maybe.
Apparently Pardew was
sacked when the players
were on a day off. So he
didn’t say goodbye to
them. Do you think he’s got the
guts to go back and say goodbye?
I don’t think he’s got it in him to do
so. liverbaggie (Westbrom.com)
Manchester United
tomorrow – this was the
more important game
to me last Sunday and it
still is now. We will never get the
chance to rub their noses in it like
this again. Champions League;
we’ll get a few chances over the
next few years.
Mike N (Blue Moon)
SOUTHAMPTON
The win against Saints
has finally eased the
relegation worries – for
now. And with Chelsea’s
season imploding, we might as
well go for it at the Bridge on
Sunday, rather than Moyes’ usual
10 men behind the ball. Joe Light
62
Football
EUROPA LEAGUE
Sport
Ramsey does
star turn as
Arsenal run
the show
Arsenal were at least fully vibrant,
even if their stadium was not. Their
movement up front caused a lot of
problems for CSKA from the off, alCSKA MOSCOW
though it’s difficult to quantify how
Golovin 15
1
much of that was down to the fact the
Russian backline – and seemingly immortal Igor Akinfeev, Aleksei BereBy Miguel Delaney
zutski, Sergei Ignashevich and Vasili
AT THE EMIRATES
Berezutski – have a combined age of
108. All of them played in CSKA’s vicArsenal may be virtually certain to tory in the final of this competition
miss out on the top four, but they are back in 2005, when it was still called
even surer to make the last four of the the Uefa Cup.
Europa League after an easy quartet
It took nine minutes for Arsenal
of goals in their quarter-final
to find sufficient space to punwin over a miserable CSKA
ish them, as an attack came
Moscow. The second leg
back out to Hector Belin Russia next week
lerin on the right.
looks a formality, just
The Spanish interas this game was.
national perceptively
Combined age of
Arsène Wenger’s side
cut the ball back beCSKA’s goalkeeper
won with two goals
hind the mass of bodand back three
each from Alexandre
ies rather than play
Lacazette and the exit into them, where
cellent Aaron Ramsey,
Ramsey was waiting.
but it should have been
With no-one within yards
about 8-1. That’s what the
of him, the Welsh midfielder
performance felt like. That’s how
powered the ball into the roof of
easy this was for Arsenal, who had the net. It was a fine goal, but there
Mesut Özil absolutely purring.
was better to come, especially from
The only blemishes were an injury Ramsey.
to Henrikh Mkhitaryan, who had to
There was momentarily worse
go off, and the many empty spots in to come for Arsenal, mind. Minutes
the crowd. That will no doubt change after the goal, Laurent Koscielny
for what looks a locked-in semi-final got in a collision with Aleksandr
later this month, and that against a Golovin, for the referee to award a
side that will surely be much better free-kick just outside Petr Cech’s
than an utterly supine CSKA.
box. Golovin stood up himself and
ARSENAL
Ramsey 9, 28 Lacazette pen 23, 35
06.04.18
P58-59
GOLF
Woods’ labour of
love on his return
FOOTBALL
P60-61
Why Firmino is
perfect for Klopp
4
108
promptly – and precisely – curled
it into the top corner. CSKA had an
away goal, and could swiftly have had
another. Ahmed Musa, who did seem
to regularly try to exploit Shkodran
Mustafi’s vulnerability to pace, got in
behind only to fire his shot wide.
Arsenal were sufficiently jolted.
Özil immediately went on a run that
brought a wild unnecessary swing
from Georgi Schennikov, and a penalty. Lacazette easily scored. Emboldened by the assurance of going
back into the lead, Arsenal began to
properly enjoy themselves.
They started a move that resembled a game of heads and volleys rather than actual football, and ended
with the kind of nonchalant finish
you would see in a playground. The
NEWS
2-30
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
31-43
Arsenal
Cech
Bellerin
Mustafi Koscielny Monreal
Mkhitaryan Ramsey
Xhaka
Wilshere
Ozil
Lacazette
Wernbloom
Kuchaev
Akinfeev
CSKA Moscow
Substitutions: Arsenal Iwobi (Mkhitaryan, 61), Elneny
(Wilshere, 74), Welbeck (Lacazette, 74); CSKA Moscow
Vitinho (Dzagoev, 65), Milanov (Natcho, 74), Khosonov
(Musa, 83)
Booked: Arsenal Xhaka, Bellerin; CSKA Moscow
Dzagoev, Musa, Shchennikov, Akinfeev.
Man of the match Ramsey.
Match rating 7/10.
Possession: Arsenal 55% CSKA Moscow 45%.
Attempts on target: Arsenal 9 CSKA Moscow 4.
Referee P Kralovec (Cz Rep).
Aaron Ramsey’s nonchalant flick
while facing away from goal was the
pick of the bunch last night AP
but really all of Arsenal players were
lining up for chances. Özil seemed
particularly determined to score, but
could only go close with his first few
efforts, and could not yet match the
divine precision he showed in the assist for Ramsey’s flick.
It was remarkable at that point
to think a side as bad as CSKA had
made it as far as the quarter-finals.
Arsenal could only play what was in
front of them, and were duly enjoying that. Musa wasn’t quite troubling
Mustafi in the same way by that point,
because the home side just had too
much of the ball. One response from
CSKA was too much in a challenge,
and that led to Mkhitaryan having
to go off. It didn’t suppress Arsenal’s
sense of self-expression. They were
just toying with CSKA.
Neither Ramsey nor Lacazette
could get their hat-trick, temporarily
leaving Arsenal susceptible to what
would have been a sucker-punch
away goal. It didn’t come.
The many missed shots did not
matter, and it feels like the second leg in Moscow won’t either.
THE INDEPENDENT
ROUND-UP
Koke and Griezmann put Atletico in control
By James Mariner
Atletico Madrid will take a
two-goal lead to Portugal for next
week’s second leg after beating
Sporting Lisbon 2-0 at the Estadio
Metropolitano. The Spanish side,
winners of the competition in 2010
and 2012, took the lead after 22
seconds when Sporting’s former
Liverpool defender Sebastian
Coates passed straight to ex-Chelsea
forward Diego Costa who slipped in
Koke, who beat Rui Patrício in the
visitors’ goal.
Having scored 13 in their four
Europa League matches since
dropping down from the Champions
League before Christmas, Antoine
Griezmann kept Atletico on the goal
trail, doubling the home side’s lead
with five minutes of the first half
remaining. The French forward
took advantage of another Sporting
Antoine Griezmann celebrates after
putting Atletico two ahead last night
error, after Jérémy Mathieu failing
to control, to score his eighth in 11
games.
Lazio also head into the second
leg with a two-goal lead after
beating Red Bull Salzburg 4-2 at the
Stadio Olimpico – becoming the
The
Sport
Matrix
TENNIS
The stories you
need to know
63
Shock losses for
Konta and Kvitova
Johanna Konta’s poor form
continued after a shock straightsets defeat to world No 219 Fanny
Stollar in the second round of the
Volvo Car Open in Charleston.
Sixth seed Konta, who had a bye
in the first round, lost 3-6, 4-6
to the 19-year-old Hungarian
qualifier. Also falling to a surprise
defeat was second seed Petra
Kvitova who, after making a
strong start, was beaten 1-6, 6-1,
6-3 by Kristyna Pliskova.
Dzagoev
Natcho
A Berezutski V Berezutski Ignashevich
ball was swerved into Ramsey, and he
flicked it over Akinfeev while facing
away from goal.
It was glorious, and soon got glutenous. Lacazette scored an incisive
fourth before half-time, and Arsenal
were taking every opportunity to go
for an indulgent touch.
The French striker and Ramsey
were now in a race to get a hat-trick,
i FRIDAY
6 APRIL 2018
Musa
Golovin
Shchennikov
BUSINESS SPORT
48-51
56-63
TV
38-39
first team to beat the Austrian side
since August. Lazio went ahead
after eight minutes when Senad
Lulic converted Dusan Basta’s ball.
Salzburg, finalists 24 years ago,
put Borussia Dortmund out in the
previous round were handed a route
back when Basta caught Munas
Dabbur to concede a penalty. Valon
Berisha struck down the middle.
Marco Parolo backheeled the
home side ahead early in the second
period only for Salzburg to pull level
again through Takumi Minamino.
Late goals from Felipe Anderson and
Ciro Immobile, his seventh of the
competition this season, gave Lazio
the win.
In the remaining quarter-final,
Red Bull Leipzig earned a 1-0 win
over Marseilles, Timo Werner
cutting in from the right before
finding the net in the final minute of
the first half.
FOOTBALL
CRICKET
England U-17 hosts
start against Israel
Warner accepts his
ball-tampering ban
Hosts England will face
Israel, Italy and Switzerland
at the Under-17 European
Championship next month. Steve
Cooper’s side will take part in the
Group A curtain-raiser against
Israel at Chesterfield on 4 May,
with the final, at Rotherham’s
New York Stadium, taking place
nine days later. The Republic of
Ireland are grouped with
Bosnia and Herzegovina,
Denmark and Belgium.
David Warner has accepted the
12-month ban handed out by
Cricket Australia. The former
Australia vice-captain was
regarded as the ringleader in the
ball-tampering scandal from last
month’s third Test against South
Africa at Cape Town. Warner
said on Twitter yesterday: “I am
truly sorry for my actions and
will now do everything I can to be
a better person, team-mate and
role model.”
COMMONWEALTH GAMES
Six of the best
puts England
at head of
medal table
England enjoyed a strong start
to the Commonwealth Games,
finishing the first day with six
golds, three silver and three
bronze. Jessica Learmouth
(below) opened the floodgates
with the team’s first medal in
the Gold Coast – a silver in the
women’s triathlon.
Double Olympic title winner
Max Whitlock took gold again,
in men’s team gymnastics
alongside Nile Wilson,
James Hall, Courtney
Tulloch and Dominick
Cunningham.
That gymnastics
success was preceded
by track cyclist Sophie
Thornhill and pilot
Helen Scott (top right)
taking gold in the blind and
visually impaired (B&VI) sprint.
Aimee Willmott and James
TENNIS
Nadal returns to
lead Spain’s charge
World No 1 Rafael Nadal returns
to actiontoday as Spain bid to
reach the Davis Cup semi-finals.
Nadal, 30, has been sidelined
since a hip injury forced him to
withdraw from the Australian
Open in January. Spain host
Germany and the 16-time Grand
Slam winner will face Philipp
Kohlschreiber after David Ferrer
takes on Alexander Zverev.
Wilby took surprise golds in the
pool, beating Scottish favourites
Hannah Miley and Ross Murdoch
in the women’s 400m individual
medley and the men’s 200m
breaststroke, respectively.
Further gold medals
for swimmers Eleanor
Robinson – in the S6
50 fly – and S14 200
free winner Thomas
Hamer swelled
England’s tally to six
and ensured they ended
day one at the top of the
medal table ahead of Australia,
who finished with five.
» Whitlock strikes gold again, p57
Sport on tv
Commonwealth Games
BBC One, 9.15am
Formula One: Bahrain GP practice
ITV4, 12.55pm; More4, 3.55pm
Rugby Union: Sale v Wasps
BT Sport 1, 7pm
Football: Cardiff v Wolves
Sky Sports Football, 7pm
Golf: The Masters
Sky Sports Golf, 7pm
Rugby League: St Helens v Hull FC
Sky Sports Arena, 7.30pm
By Rail
By Coach
1
Nights in hotel
2
Patan
Jaipur
1
3
2
Ranthambore
Delhi
1
Agra
Fatehpur Sikri
INDIA
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