close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Adweek - April 09, 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
APRIL 9,
2018
SHE
PERSISTED
PIONEERS OF
ADVERTISING SHARE
THEIR STORIES OF
STRUGGLE AND
SUCCESS.
Trailblazers (l. to r.): Tiffany R. Warren,
Constance Frazier, Keesha Jean-Baptiste,
Heide Gardner and Daisy Expósito-Ulla.
Apply
to attend
today
adweek.com/
brandweek
Will You Leave
Convention
Behind?
Come With Us.
PALM SPRINGS, CA
SEPT. 23-25, 2018
U
IN THIS ISSUE
APRIL 9, 2018 | VOL. LIX NO. 9
TOP STORY
12
FEATURE
SORRELL
SCANDAL
Pioneers of advertising
share their journey
to success.
WPP CHIEF UNDER INVESTIGATION FOR
‘MISCONDUCT.’ BY LINDSAY RITTENHOUSE
The board of WPP is currently investigating claims of “personal misconduct” made against CEO
Martin Sorrell, a company spokesperson confirmed in a statement. Project Associates—a Londonbased consultancy that “acts for Sir Martin Sorrell in his personal capacity”—later issued a statement
on his behalf. “I reject the allegation unreservedly but recognize that the Company has to investigate
it,” the statement read. “I understand that this process will be completed shortly.” Investors are
likely starting to consider who should really be at the helm of the world’s largest advertising holding
company, which includes Grey Group, Young & Rubicam and GroupM. “It’s a little difficult because we
don’t know what the specific allegations are,” Pivotal Research Group senior analyst Brian Wieser said.
“What I think investors will focus on is some broader implications around succession.”
7
TRENDING
Marketers are banking
on branded content.
10
AGENCY
TEASER
PGA TOUR
DATA POINTS
22
PERSPECTIVE
April showers bring the
Hunter Wellington Boot.
25
PORTRAIT
The Social Element
thrives on connection.
C O V E R : S A S H A M A S L O V; T H I S PAG E : S O R R E L A N D G O T L I E B : B L O O M B E R G V I A G E T T Y I M AG E S
Women use their phones
for far more than texting.
GroupM
BIG NUMBER
Longtime executive leader and former CEO Irwin
Gotlieb is stepping down as global chairman
at WPP media agency GroupM. Gotlieb, who is
transitioning to a senior advisory role at WPP,
served as GroupM’s CEO from its 2003 founding
until 2012, when he became global chairman.
“Irwin is a one-of-a-kind visionary, and his mark
on our company and the entire media business
is indelible,” said Kelly Clark, who has served as
global CEO for GroupM since 2016. “We’re glad
that he will still be available to us and our clients
in his new role.” —Erik Oster
87
MOOD BOARD
MILLION
FACEBOOK USERS
WERE AFFECTED
BY THE CAMBRIDGE
ANALYTICA
SCANDAL — FAR
MORE THAN THE
COMPANY LET ON.
The Week in Emojis
For the first time in two decades,
the PGA Tour will be rolling out a
comprehensive new advertising
campaign. Developed in conjunction
with L.A. shop Troika, the creative
will make its public debut tomorrow,
April 10, on TV as well as social
media platforms. Titled “Live Under
Par”—which will take the place of
the tour’s former tagline, “These
guys are good”—the campaign
will attempt to show the public
that the PGA Tour isn’t just about
a handful of famous players,
but the experiences of their fans
behind the ropes. Indeed, videos
shot by ordinary attendees will be
among the assets used. While the
campaign aims to reinvigorate golf’s
existing fan base, its added goal is
to help build a younger and more
diverse audience. For the full story,
head over to Adweek.com.
—Robert Klara
CHECK
IT !
M O U N TA I N D E W
N O R T H FAC E
G O O G L E A N D TA R G E T
A P R I L FO O L S ’ GAG WA S
R E A L LY J U S T A T E A S E F O R
T H E R E T U R N O F B A J A B L A S T.
AIMS TO FOCUS MORE
ON WOMEN IN ITS
ADVERTISING.
ISSUE THE FIRST VOICEA C T I VAT E D C O U P O N F O R
G O O G L E A S S I S T A N T.
UPFRONTS
The Biggest
Question
Marks
W H O W I L L A+ E N E T WO R K S
TA P T O R E P L A C E C EO
N A N CY D U B U C?
BUYERS WONDER
WHAT THE BIGGEST
MEDIA COMPANIES WILL
LOOK LIKE IN A YEAR.
BY JASON LYNCH
For several months, Scripps
Networks Interactive ad sales chief
Jon Steinlauf was preparing for his
annual upfront tour, while being
unsure of exactly when Discovery
Communications would officially
acquire his company. “So we built our
‘business as usual’ presentation,” he
recalled, “but we knew that somewhere
along the line, the deal could close, and
we could become Discovery overnight.”
That finally happened on March
6, leaving Steinlauf—who was named
chief U.S. advertising sales officer
of the combined company—with
just two weeks to pull together the
first of seven upfront events around
the country for what is now known
as Discovery Inc. Now, as buyers
assemble on Tuesday for the biggest
of those presentations in New
York’s Alice Tully Hall, they have
some pressing queries of their own;
namely, exactly how will these two
companies integrate their networks
and their ad sales teams?
But the confusion isn’t limited to
Discovery Inc., as major questions
linger around nearly every major
media company heading into this
upfront: When, if ever, will Turner’s
parent company Time Warner finally
close its deal with AT&T? At what
point will Disney absorb most of 21st
Century Fox, and what happens with
the leftover assets, tentatively known
as New Fox? Or will Comcast throw
a wrench in that deal with its own
4
These companies
are undergoing major
transformations.
AT W H AT P O I N T W I L L
DISNEY ABSORB MOST
O F 2 1 S T C E N T U RY
F OX? W I L L C O M CA S T
T RY T O T H R O W A
W R E N C H I N T O T H AT
D E A L W I T H A F OX
BID OF ITS OWN?
WILL CBS AND VIACOM,
WHICH DECIDED ONCE
AGAIN TO EXPLORE A
M E R G E R I N F E B R U A R Y,
F I N A L LY M A K E I T
T O T H E A LTA R ?
JON STEINL AUF,
CHIEF U.S.
ADVERTISING
SALES OFFICER,
DISCOVERY, INC.
DONNA SPECIALE,
PRESIDENT,
TURNER AD SALES
WHEN WILL TURNER’S
PARENT COMPANY
TIME WARNER
FINALLY CLOSE ITS
DEAL WITH AT&T?
H O W W I L L D I S C O V E RY
A N D S C R I P P S I N T E G R AT E
THEIR NET WORKS, AND
THEIR AD SALES TEAMS?
bid for Fox? Will CBS and Viacom,
which decided once again to explore
a merger in February, finally make
it to the altar? And whom will A+E
Networks tap to replace CEO Nancy
Dubuc, who announced her departure
last month just three days before the
company’s upfront presentation?
This has left buyers in a more
uncertain position than ever heading
into the upfront, as they contemplate
their strategies for companies that
could look radically different within
the next 12 months. “This year, the
dynamism of the market is unparalleled
relative to the change that we’ve seen
in years past. There are a lot of moving
pieces,” said David Cohen, president,
North America, Magna Global.
Then again, “change has been
happening every year for us,” said Donna
Speciale, president, Turner Ad Sales,
who noted that last year’s upfront
was overseen by new ad sales chiefs
at Disney-ABC, Fox Networks Group,
Discovery, AMC Networks and Viacom.
“This year, most of the heads are the
same. Now their companies are going
through this transformation. None of
this change is surprising to me because
we’ve all believed there was going to be
a consolidation. But did we think all of it
was going to happen in the same year?”
Buyers are keeping their calm for
now. Cohen said they have received
“a very clear timeline” from some of
the companies in play about when
deals could close and how they
could potentially impact the upfront.
“Everyone has been straightforward.”
Because Turner, Fox, Disney, CBS
and Viacom’s fates might not be
resolved for some time—and upfront
deals will be honored no matter how
things shake out—another buyer
suggests that the biggest upfront
challenge will be Discovery Inc.
Historically, Scripps was “always a
tough one to negotiate with, because
they negotiate from a position of
strength,” according to the buyer. But
with Discovery’s broader portfolio,
“we usually didn’t get killed on pricing,
and they usually did pretty well on
volume on the networks they needed
it on, and everyone walked away
happy. With Jon Steinlauf overseeing
all of it, what approach is he going to
take?” Steinlauf told Adweek that he
won’t finalize his upfront negotiation
strategy or how he’ll integrate
Discovery and Scripps’ ad sales teams
until after his seven upfront events
conclude on April 25 in Los Angeles.
Meanwhile, buyers agree that
they’re least concerned about
A+E’s vacant CEO position; Cohen
said a single individual impacts the
upfront far less than the “wholesale
structural changes” at the other
companies. “You could argue this will
be the biggest year of change in the
industry,” said Peter Olsen, evp of ad
sales for A+E Networks. “Our stuff
will look minor compared to some of
these other things.”
J A S O N LY N C H I S A D W E E K ’ S S E N I O R E D I T O R
FOR TELEVISION, COVERING TRENDS,
T E C H N O L O G Y, P E R S O N A L I T I E S A N D
P R O G R A M M I N G A C R O S S B R O A D C A S T, C A B L E
A N D S T R E A M I N G V I D E O . @ J A S O N LY N C H
APRIL 9, 2018 | ADWEEK
S P EC I A L E : J E R E M Y F R E E M A N / G E T T Y I M A G E S ; D U B U C : P H I L L I P FA R A O N E / G E T T Y I M A G E S
Upheaval
Leads to
Uncertainty
TRENDING
BRANDING
Fast-Casual’s New
Menu for Success
COURTING MILLENNIALS
ONE FEATURE AT A TIME
CRAZY STUNTS AND INSTA-WORTHY MENU ITEMS
ARE SOME OF CASUAL RESTAURANTS’ INNOVATIONS.
AS MILLENNIALS ABANDON CHAINS, HERE’S WHAT TGI FRIDAYS
AND OLIVE GARDEN ARE DOING TO KEEP UP. BY KATIE RICHARDS
asual restaurants are at a critical
breaking point. Consumers—
hello, millennials and Gen Z—
are increasingly fleeing legacy
chains, from Applebee’s to Olive
Garden, in favor of trendier,
tech-savvy, more health-conscious options.
Applebee’s announced plans to close between
60 and 80 eateries in 2018, citing a millennialdriven decline in foot traic as a major factor.
Sister brand IHOP announced plans to shutter
30 to 40 locations this year, too.
As a result, chains from TGI Fridays to
Bufalo Wild Wings are moving away from
their old, stale images and adopting an atmosphere that’s more fitting to younger consumers—craft cocktails, an Instagrammable
atmosphere with picturesque menu items and
broader to-go and mobile ordering services.
“Standing still is the detriment to casual
restaurant chains who don’t evolve with their
consumers,” explained Sara Bamossy, president and CSO, Pitch. That’s why, day in and day
out, legacy brands cook up new plans to court
younger guests. Olive Garden recently launched
an Insta-worthy Meatball Pizza Bowl, followed
by Red Lobster’s lobster and waffle combo; TGI
Fridays became the first national chain to put
the meatless Beyond Meat burger on its menu;
and IHOP and others are perfecting mobile
apps, optimizing for delivery and takeout.
IHOP didn’t rush its transformation, instead
taking time to perfect the delivery and to-go
process. In the words of the brand’s marketing
chief Brad Haley, being first when it comes to
innovation and evolution isn’t always the right
strategy. It’s about doing it best. “We wanted
to make sure we could deliver the food in a way
we knew our guests would want it. We spent a
lot of time working on our packaging,” Haley
explained. For any guests who order a pancake
combo from IHOP, it comes in a two-part package, with eggs, hash browns and bacon in one
compartment and pancakes in a separate vented
space. “That was one of those offline things we
needed to do to make sure the technology would
work as well as it possibly could,” he said.
Other brands are finding new ways to
incorporate technology and innovation into
the dining experience, citing tech as a vital
ADWEEK | APRIL 9, 2018
tool to court millennials.
TGI Fridays is currently piloting an AIdriven virtual bartender program in its Texas
restaurants. It’s a move the brand’s CIO, vp of
strategy and brand initiatives, Sherif Mityas,
said could appeal to both millennials and
boomers. Guests answer a series of questions
about their mood, likes and dislikes on an iPad
and the virtual bartender uses that information to concoct a personalized cocktail for the
guest that a real-life bartender then mixes.
“The buzz quality of that process is pretty
high,” Mityas said. TGI Fridays is using troves
of data to innovate in thoughtful ways. “To us,
the diferentiating point is taking technology
and making it useful even when our guests
are inside the four walls as well,” he added.
The question, though, is whether implementing some updated features here and
there will really be enough to save some of
these sinking establishments. “So many of
these brands are going to have a really hard
time because the core of what they stand for is
going to be hard to redefine,” Ted Nelson, CEO
of Mechanica, said. “Reinvention is the key.”
Some brands find changing their tone and
the way they speak to millennials and Gen Z
is an important step. IHOP’s marketing chief
noted that the company hired agency Droga5 to
help create a new, younger voice for the brand.
The work, which features two pilots who can’t
talk about anything other than pancakes as
they prepare for departure, “is much more likable, engaging and relatable in terms of personality and tone for the brand,” Haley said.
Experts say it’s crucial that no matter what
changes brands in the space make that they
do their best to not alienate existing customers. “That’s what Fridays did pretty well, but
you sort of have to really blow up the current
model to a certain degree. The challenge
there obviously is you then risk losing boomer
customers,” Nelson added.
If casual restaurant chains can pull this all
of, experts believe they may have a fighting
chance to stand up against the Shake Shacks
and Sweetgreens of the world.
K AT IE R I CH A R D S I S A S TA F F W R I T ER FO R A D W EEK S P EC I A L I Z IN G
IN B R A N D S A N D M A R K E T IN G T R EN D S . @K TJ R I CH A R D S
TGI FRIDAY’S AI BARTENDER
At TGI Fridays, guests have the chance to answer
a series of questions on a iPad. Then the AI-driven
bartender takes those answers and creates a
custom cocktail for guests to enjoy.
THE MEATBALL PIZZA BOWL
Olive Garden is on the hunt for an Instagramworthy menu item and the answer was an
extravagant, edible bowl made of pizza crust
and filled with cheese, meat and sauce.
IHOP ‘N GO
PACKAGING
IHOP knows younger
consumers want
to eat whenever,
wherever so the
brand has beefed
up its to-go mobile
ordering online and
through an app.
Additionally, the
team spent months
developing the IHOP
‘n Go packaging—an
interlocking set of
containers that keep
pancakes warm,
but not soggy, and
all other food items
warm on the go.
5
TRENDING
GDPR’S MOBILE
MARKETING MOMENT
NEW REGULATIONS COULD SET
BACK AD-TECH COMPANIES BY
YEARS. BY LAUREN JOHNSON
ast month, ad-tech company
Drawbridge shut down its mediabuying oice in Europe after it
was revealed that the firm’s data
practices that comb together mobile, desktop and tablet stats for
ad targeting would not work under the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (or GDPR) that go into place May 25.
According to experts, Drawbridge, whi h
did not respond to inquiries for this st
won’t be the only mobile company to s
from GDPR. The new regulations prom
to significantly shake up digital adver
ing by giving consumers the right to d
what data they fork over to a company
Violators of GDPR face significant fee
of 20 million Euros, or 4 percent of its
revenue, depending on which is more.
Unlike desktop advertising that’s
primarily built with one type of data
(known as cookies), mobile advertisin
layers multiple types of data including location, Wi-Fi and built-in IDs to
target ads. In other words, mobile advertising companies have more data t
clean up than desktop companies, and
GDPR risks setting mobile advertisin
advancements over the past few years
back significantly.
“There’s been a lot more attention paid to the industry on
the desktop side than the mobile
side—it might be that the impact
on mobile is even greater than it
is on desktop because the mobile
ecosystem is based around data and
targeting,” said Doug McPherson,
chief administrative oicer and general counsel at OpenX.
As marketers scramble to assemble
data teams and hire privacy experts to
spearhead GDPR, some experts anticip
that companies are not prepared to tackle the
barrage of stats and signals that mobile devices relay to ad networks and data companies.
Take location-based services that anonymously track a consumer’s location to help
marketers pinpoint where to serve ads. Such
firms could struggle to meet GDPR’s compliance requirements because “most of those
companies don’t have a direct relationship
with consumers and the consumer doesn’t
necessarily know that that data is being
collected—they might need to probably be
a bit more explicit and open in terms of the
consumer understanding how their data is
collected,” said Dan Wilson, head of data and
operations at Fetch.
Mobile apps are also loaded full of data
loopholes that consumers may not be aware of
and need to be addressed for GDPR, said Warren Zenna, founder and principal of Zenna
Consulting Group. If consumers consent for
an app to use their location after downloading
it, they also agree to share their location with
third-party data companies that the app’s
publisher works with. He added that phones’
built-in IDs are “like fingerprints” that track
every action that someone takes. “It’s an
extremely revealing amount of data that is
shown through an application and yes, I do
think without question that GDPR is going to
clamp on that data,” Zenna said.
U.S. companies will adhere to EU regulations most likely to avoid any possible swaps
of data, but American marketers can build in
controls within their apps to detect whether a
user is in Europe in order to turn of tracking
r, EMEA for
onsumers
ave through
ll dries up,
ore and more
get into your
ationship,”
t-in to sharing
lly using their
ore quid pro
umer on using
k, Fluid’s cocer.
ry—reach
ho have
ut that’s not
et Fahrland,
or years,
much data
sumers, but
elps them
r most
customers,”
said. “Maybe
lled scarcity
l then make
s] more ined in the data
they do have
start using it
more interting ways.”
L AUREN JOHNSON IS A SENIOR TECHNOLOGY EDITOR FOR
ADWEEK, WHERE SHE SPECIALIZES IN COVERING MOBILE,
S O C I A L P L AT F O R M S A N D E M E R G I N G T E C H . @ L A U R E N J O H N S O N
6
APRIL 9, 2018 | ADWEEK
D AV O R PAV E L I C / G E T T Y I M A G E S
DATA
TRENDING
MARKETING
Publishers’ Studios Offer
Alternatives to Marketers
ROBERT HANSON / GETTY IMAGES
COMPANIES ARE SHIFTING MORE
RESOURCES FROM TRADITIONAL
ADVERTISING TO BRANDED
CONTENT. BY ERIK OSTER
nce seen more as an addedvalue proposition for media
placements, publishers’
branded-content labs have
expanded to meet growing
client demand. Publishing
studios increasingly have become an appealing option for creatives at agencies that must
regularly churn out work for reviews and
struggle to retain talent.
Ark Advisors partner Ken Robinson, who
specializes in managing agency reviews and
talent searches, said that publishers’ inhouse marketing divisions are “becoming
more proactive in their prospecting eforts”
and winning more client-side assignments.
These creative teams are “packaging and
promoting themselves as viable ‘alternative’
resources, joining the list of other encroaching
factions fighting for a share of increasingly diminishing agency revenue,” added Robinson.
With the price of traditional display ads
“sinking, if not plummeting,” as content “gains
traction over pure advertising,” Rebecca Lieb,
founding partner and analyst at advisory firm
Kaleido Insights, said in-house content studios
are becoming an increasingly important part
of business for many publishers.
“It’s kind of a dogfight out there in terms of
who creates content. It’s all kind of up for grabs
out there and everybody wants a piece of that
pie,” she added. “Publishers are uniquely positioned to create content on behalf of advertisers because they are, in fact, content creators,”
while also able to leverage and repackage existing content to a built-in audience.
Publishers’ in-house content studios are
diferentiating themselves via unique data
sets, reputation, production capacity and
cultural cachet.
One such example is Cornerstone, the
agency associated with hip-hop-focused
publication The Fader. Cornerstone is
competing with agencies for clients and was
recently named AOR for Major League Soccer following a review. R/GA vet and chief
creative oicer Trevor Eld attributes the win
to Cornerstone and The Fader’s “connection
ADWEEK | APRIL 9, 2018
to culture on an authentic level.”
“If your mission is to insinuate your client’s brand with a message ... and you need to
use this fragmented media landscape,” Eld
added, “then a media shop” with a full-service in-house agency “in many ways is going
to be one of your best partners.”
Otto Bell, CCO of CNN’s Courageous
studio, said the goal isn’t to supplant agencies; his team routinely collaborates with
partners such as Grey on Volvo and Johannes Leonardo on MassMutual. Bell said
Courageous’ complete in-house production
capabilities lead to a “great level of personal
investment” from teams guiding the work
from creative development to postproduc-
on a traditional ad buy with 25 percent going
to branded content, “in the last year and a
half it’s almost reversed.”
Clients, who are finding dwindling results
from paid social, approach WP BrandStudio
to promote existing content. The team then
uses its proprietary RED advertising technology and Clavis data-targeting technology
to amplify that content on Washington Post’s
platforms—another aspect of its business
that has grown in the past year.
In a campaign for Harry’s Razors, WP
BrandStudio created a live event and other
content while also distributing a video created by GSD&M. T. Rowe Price also recently
turned to WP BrandStudio for a custom
finance podcast.
“They could have gone to their own agency,
they could have done it in-house, they could
have gone to a traditional podcast company,
but they came to us to execute it and promote
it,” Tsigrikes said. “That intimate knowledge
of the audience is something that an outside
agency is not going to be able to gather.”
As WP BrandStudio has grown, it has
‘That intimate
knowledge of
the audience
is something
that an outside
agency is not
going to be
able to gather.’
Paul Tsigrikes, vp of marketing,
The Washington Post BrandStudio
tion, providing a “great diferentiator” for
brands seeking custom content.
“It used to be about dipping a toe in,” Bell
added. “There are a lot more people wading
up to their waist now,” and this trend has resulted in rapid growth for Courageous. Bell,
who previously served as creative director for
Ogilvy’s OgilvyEntertainment studio, said
“there wasn’t much of an in-house ofering”
when he arrived at CNN less than three years
ago. But his team has since grown to a fulltime staf of 35.
The Washington Post’s BrandStudio has
also expanded. Paul Tsigrikes, vp of marketing, estimated that while “75 percent or so”
of such client revenue might have been spent
attracted talent from creative and brandedcontent agencies.
Cornerstone has also been more aggressively recruiting from agencies, attracting
talent from shops including AKQA, CP+B,
McCann, R/GA and Wieden + Kennedy.
“They felt they weren’t making work
that was really going to resonate in culture
as much as if they were at a place like The
Fader,” Eld said. “It’s the media shops that
are making the things that people pay attention to and that push the culture.”
ERIK OSTER I S A S TA F F W R I T ER FOR A DW EEK , W HER E HE C OV ERS
CR E AT I V E, MEDI A A ND S T R AT EGY AGENCIES . HE I S A F R EQUEN T
W R I T ER FOR A DW EEK ’S AGENCYS PY BLOG. @ER IK DO S T ER
7
VOICE
Elevate #MeToo
Voices Into a
Sustained Chorus
SIMPLY SPEAKING UP IS NOT ENOUGH.
LONG-TERM AND ACTION-BASED CHANGE IS
NEEDED AT AGENCIES. BY DANIELLE WILEY
I was 26 years old and living in Toledo,
Ohio. I had just landed my first big job,
running two of the biggest accounts
at an interactive agency. I was on my
first business trip to visit one of these
clients in North Carolina (a strategic
planning session for an overhaul
of its website), and I couldn’t have
been more excited to share all of my
thoughts and ideas.
The room was huge. The chairs
were set up in a U-shaped formation.
In attendance were about 25 men—
and me. I sat across the “U” from
our main client, the brand manager.
Every time I opened my mouth, he
would slowly and deliberately take a
magazine out of his briefcase, open it
up on his lap and pretend to read. As
if this blatant dismissal of my ideas
wasn’t enough, he also called my boss
8
upon our return to Toledo to let him
know he thought I was “uppity” and
requested that I keep my mouth shut
in future meetings.
This is just one of many stories
like this in my career. And as many of
us have known, but perhaps ignored
or pushed down, all women have
these stories. Both the #MeToo and
the #TimesUp movements have done
wonders to highlight ugly experiences
and treatment.
While there is tremendous import
to the sharing and amplification of
our stories, if nothing changes, we
have missed the mark. And while I
encourage us all to keep speaking up,
we need to also continue to remind the
powers that be that speaking up is no
longer enough.
Last year, I read a summary of a
knowledge. And we do this by
providing valuable opportunities
to female infl uencers who are
creating and amplifying the stellar
content that helps move the needle
for brands who want to reach this
valuable demographic.
We also do this by hiring full-time
employees who do amazing and
creative work, though they might have
gaps in their resume because they
took time off to raise children. We
provide flexible schedules and don’t
blink when kids pop into a video call
because they are home (again, OMG)
for a snow day.
We are certainly not the only agency
seeking to make real change. My
former colleague Caroline Dettman,
now chief creative and community
officer at Golin, recently launched a
new movement called #HaveHerBack.
What’s most exciting is that it moves
beyond just awareness and into action,
with concrete goals to “hire more
female creative directors in the hopes of
eventually doubling their representation;
to train employees on proper workplace
conduct; and to create a culture of
empowerment for all.”
I do think that progress has been
made, and many continue to do the
work, every day, to make a change. I
encourage those who are complacent
to take a long, hard look at their
agency cultures and set forth some
concrete goals of their own that will
move us toward a new world order.
Time is up for anything but progress.
Specs
Claim to fame
Danielle Wiley, CEO of Sway
Group, is recognized as an
industry leader in content
marketing, influencer marketing
and social media strategy. Prior
to founding Sway in 2001, one
of the first influencer marketing
agencies, Wiley ran social
strategy for Edelman’s
Chicago-based digital group.
Base San Francisco
Twitter @SwayGroup
APRIL 9, 2018 | ADWEEK
I L L U S T R AT I O N : I S T O C K P H O T O
OPINION
panel that took place at PRWeek’s
2017 Hall of Femme induction. At this
event, an all-male panel convened
to discuss the state of women in the
workplace. (You read that right.)
According to the article, Edelman
CEO Richard Edelman (full disclosure:
I used to work there) stated that if
women don’t feel their voices are
being heard in the corporate world,
they need to speak more loudly.
“I asked them [female employees],
‘How are we going to fix that?’”
Edelman said, adding, “’Either you’re
going to speak up, or I’m going to
have to hammer the guys.’ They said,
‘Hammer the guys first,’ and I said,
‘You speak up first.’”
I would argue that if women don’t
feel their voices are being heard,
they need their management teams
to figure out why and implement
changes to ensure it doesn’t continue
to happen.
Because without a clear directive
from the top, all of that “speaking up”
will yield nothing but frustration, lost
opportunities and status quo. And I
might point out that the directive to
“speak up” takes male management
off the hook and looks to women to fix
the problems at hand.
Women learn early on in their
careers that speaking up is not always
beneficial. A Yale University study
found that women who talk a lot are
viewed negatively by others, especially
if they hold positions of power. Not
only are they seen as domineering,
but significantly less competent and
suitable for leadership than males who
speak the same force and amount.
Institutional sexism has become
so ingrained in our workplaces and
society that for years it hasn’t even
made it onto the radar of many seniorranking and C-suite male executives.
Time is indeed up for that ignorance
and mismanagement.
Looking forward I encourage
everyone in senior roles at agencies to
take a long, hard look at how women
are both treated and compensated,
because not only are women
discouraged from speaking up, they
are also compensated at a fraction of
the salary of their male colleagues.
The PRWeek 2016 Salary Survey
reports that male PR executives earn
about $125,000 a year compared
to $80,000 a year for women, and
Marketing Week reports a 26 percent
gender gap among agency employees.
Almost seven years ago, I started
a business because I was tired of
how women were being treated in
the corporate world and I wanted
to make a difference. Our mission
is to empower women through
the elevation of their voices and
D ATA P O I N T S
Queens of the Phone Age
WOMEN ARE UTILIZING SCREENS IN COUNTLESS WAYS. BY SAMMY NICKALLS
As innovation in mobile changes how society operates, women are using their phones to assist them in practically every aspect of their lives, from consuming
news to budgeting to waking up in the morning. Almost half of women ages 18 to 34 check their phones as soon as they wake up, and another 36 percent check
them within five minutes. Screens have become so ingrained that over 60 percent of women own two or more mobile devices and use them on a daily basis.
“Our research shows the incredible degree to which smartphones are a millennial woman’s constant companion, a gateway to constantly connecting with her
passion points and increasingly becoming her mobile wallet,” said Rob McLoughlin, vp, PopSugar Insights. “Marketers need to lean into the disruption these
devices wield and deliver content and commerce offerings that seamlessly fit into her daily routine.”
Women’s
relationship
with screens
“My phone
is my...”
Women
Women 18-34
Women
Women 18-34
Camera
1/3
96%
97%
of women 18-34
have more than 50
selfies in their
phone’s photo
library.
Weatherman
Women
Women 18-34
89%
92%
Number of mobile
devices women own:
Women use
their phones for far
more than just texting
and calling
Calculator
None
1%
1%
88%
90%
1
37%
Alarm clock
46%
Navigator
2
50%
43%
82%
85%
84%
88%
Calendar
83%
88%
3
11%
10%
Cook meals
84%
88%
News
source
When women look at their phone
after waking up:
73%
79%
Media
pla
p yer
y
Wallet
25%
31%
72%
77%
77
%
Plan trips
Shop for
clothes
78%
82%
81%
84%
Work out
Manage
finances
70%
78%
61%
64%
Places women say their phone
is off-limits to them
Dinner table
36%
Family time
45%
Bathroom
Church
Bed
Within five
minutes
31%
36%
16%
Longer than
an hour
say their phone
is never off-limits
to them.
4%
1%
10
SOURCE: POPSUGAR
APRIL 9, 2018 | ADWEEK
INFOGRAPHIC: CARLOS MONTEIRO
Right
away
This is not
the start of
a movement.
We are already in one. We hope to bring light to the countless, nameless women
that have worked tirelessly, thanklessly, and independently toward equity without
recognition, long before Time Was Up. We want to express our gratitude for those
countless, nameless women and the sacrifices they’ve made for all of us, and we
will do them proud by continuing the movement they started.
C O V E R F E AT U R E
HER STORY
HOW THESE TRAILBLAZERS IN ADVERTISING FOUND THEIR VOICE.
In Chicago, San Francisco and New York, advertising’s pioneering women strolled into Adweek’s
photo shoot in a celebratory mood. After all, many of them knew each other back in the day. They’d risen
together and supported each other as they overcame difficult odds to be The First—the first female and
African-American chief executive at Starcom MediaVest Group, the first African American to serve as an IPG
company officer, the first to launch a multicultural marketing group at Young & Rubicam, the first woman to
become creative director at Leo Burnett and the first woman elected to its board, to name just a few.
“As a woman, as a Latina, who practiced a pioneering specialty, Hispanic marketing, it was a triple challenge,”
recalls Daisy Expósito-Ulla, who headed up Y&R’s The Bravo Group and is currently chairman, CEO of d expósito &
Partners. “Working at Y&R in 1980, no one knew what the heck I did. It was a challenge to prove to the corporation,
to my clients that this was a really good business opportunity. I persisted, and I was there for almost 25 years.”
Here, Adweek shares what Expósito-Ulla and several of these women called a “historic” moment in time—
not because they had stories to share, but because, as they say, now people are listening. —Lisa Granatstein
PICTURED (L-R): TIFFANY R. WARREN, CONSTANCE FRAZIER, KEESHA JEAN-BAPTISTE, HEIDE GARDNER AND DAISY EXPÓSITO-ULLA.
PHOTOGRAPHED AT ADWEEK’S HQ IN NYC BY SASHA MASLOV.
Cheryl Berman
The Determinator
Cheryl Berman’s drive is so well known that a 2004 Wall Street Journal ad called her the
“Determined Ms. Berman.” The former chairman and CCO of Leo Burnett in Chicago, Berman
believes she landed the top creative job at the agency because of her persistence. “I just wanted
to do it all,” she says. “I had a very healthy appetite.” Not that the ride was easy or smooth. “There
were obviously obstacles,” she notes, “but I was competitive, a hard worker and a good writer so I
think that helped me move up the ranks.” And she says, she always spoke up, especially when she
was excluded from meetings: “I was very upfront about it.” Clearly, it worked. Not only did Berman
work on some of the biggest brands in the world, including Coca-Cola, Kraft and McDonald’s,
during her three-decade career at Leo Burnett, but she became the first woman elected to the
agency’s board of directors. Looking back, says Berman, who founded Unbundled Creative in 2006,
“It was quite interesting to walk in that room and be the first woman with a bunch of guys who, you
know, I don’t think they even wanted me in that room. I think they felt they had to do it.” And that
she insists must change. “It’s not that you have to [be more inclusive], but you should want to do
this,” she says. “You should support it with all your enthusiasm and your energy because it’s going
to help you move forward, going to help the world move forward.” —Kristina Monllos
Daisy Expósito-Ulla
The Entrepreneur
Expósito-Ulla built her career by seizing opportunities when they presented
themselves—and when they didn’t, she created them. The award-winning
marketer entered the agency world in 1976 as a creative writer and
producer at Conill Advertising and worked closely with co-founder Alicia
Conill, who, she says, “empowered me and gave me the confidence to come
out of my shell.” In 1981, Expósito-Ulla became creative director for Y&R’s
The Bravo Group, where she led accounts including AT&T, Kraft, Mazda, the
U.S. Army, Sears and USPS. She was the first Latina to hold the cd role at
a major global agency and later rose within the ranks to become chairman
and CEO in 2001. Under her watch, Bravo went from a $1 million shop
responsible for producing marketing and communications programs aimed
at the U.S. Hispanic market to an umbrella group of multicultural agencies
at Y&R/WPP with half a billion dollars in annual billings. While ExpósitoUlla faced “twice as many obstacles being both a woman and a minority,”
she says that challenge “became the biggest opportunity of my career.” In
2006 she launched her own independent agency, d expósito & Partners.
Looking forward, she is optimistic. “Women have woken up,” she says. “We
have raised the level of consciousness and awareness.” —Erik Oster
B E R M A N : S AV E R I O T R U G L I A
‘Women
have woken
up. We have
raised the
level of
consciousness
and awareness.’
ADWEEK | APRIL 9, 2018
Constance
Cannon
Frazier
The Educator
Frazier, who is currently the American
Advertising Federation’s (AAF) chief
operating officer, has made her mark
championing diversity and inclusion
in advertising for over 30 years—
especially on the creative side. “I think
it would benefit the industry if we
had more women of color involved
in creating campaigns,” she says,
“because they might be able to bring
some insights to how women of color
like to be portrayed.” In addition to
her industry work, Frazier taught at
Howard University for over 12 years,
making her as much of an educator as
an activist. Her achievements during
14 years with AAF include increasing
corporate support of diversity
programs, doubling the number of
participants and financial support
for the Most Promising Multicultural
Students program and creating the
first-ever AAF student conference.
“The industry for many years has
tried to [attract] students of color,”
she says, “but those programs
basically focus on entry level … it’s
a matter of keeping them.” Frazier
has high hopes for the future,
saying, “One would think that if
any industry really can solve the
inclusion dilemma, it would be the
advertising industry.” —E.O.
‘One would
think that if
any industry
can solve
the inclusion
dilemma, it
would be the
advertising
industry.’
13
Heide Gardner
The Change Agent
Since the 1990s, Heide Gardner, IPG’s svp and chief diversity and inclusion officer, has been
at the forefront of countless movements that work to advance minorities in advertising. In
2000, as svp of diversity and strategic programs at AAF, she helped push former President
Bill Clinton to sign an executive order requiring all federal departments to compensate
minority-led agencies, based on fair market rates. In 1996, she founded the AAF’s Mosaic
Center on Multiculturalism, publisher of the seminal The Mosaic Principles, a guide for
improving diversity. Although Gardner says progress remains a challenge (according to
2017 Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 5.8 percent of women holding jobs in advertising and
public relations were black), she believes that movements like #MeToo (founded by activist
Tarana Burke) and Time’s Up Advertising demonstrate that we are entering into a period
of real and positive change. “We’ve created an environment where it’s OK to bring less
egregious behavior that derails careers and demoralizes people to someone’s attention,”
Gardner says. “Time’s Up Advertising is about women who are in power taking on the
responsibility to lead change with accountability. It’s not just about white women. It is
about women and men of color, LGBTQ talent.” —Lindsay Rittenhouse
‘Time’s Up Advertising is about
women who are in power taking
on the responsibility to lead change
with accountability. It’s not just about
white women. It is about women and
men of color, LGBTQ talent.’
Keesha Jean-Baptiste
The Mentor
Jean-Baptiste got her start in advertising when a friend referred her to
a program called MAIP (Minority Advertising Intern Program). “I was
scared,” she says. “I didn’t know whether I would get in, and I didn’t feel
like I’d be as prepared as others who had studied advertising longer.” But
the former broadcast journalism major’s fears were unfounded. Not only
did she earn a spot, she also scored an internship at Philadelphia’s Tierney
& Partners and went on to hold top marketing and HR roles at Digitas and
Wieden + Kennedy. Last year, Jean-Baptiste’s career came full circle as
she landed her current job as svp of talent, engagement and inclusion at
the 4A’s—the very group that launched MAIP 45 years ago. Her focus now
is to expose other young, aspiring advertising professionals to all available
industry access points. “I have mentored people informally for all my
career,” she says. “[I’m] constantly in pursuit of making my story known
so they know that what I achieved is possible for them too.” As a “darkerskinned black woman,” Jean-Baptiste says she has always been aware of
perceptions of her otherness. But she calls her time at Digitas a formative
one, adding, “I could see a future version of myself” in the agency’s
minority leaders. In her new role, she hopes to dispel the myth that a lack
of diversity stems from a lack of interest while helping the entire industry
develop a greater sense of empathy. “It’s about small, intentional, tightly
choreographed actions that move you forward every day,” she says. “We are
not as educated as we all need to be in other cultures.” —Patrick Coffee
14
M C C A N N A N D B E R M A N : S AV E R I O T R U G L I A ; W I L L I A M S : M A R C F I O R I T O
F E AT U R E
PICTURED
(L-R): CAROL
H. WILLIAMS,
CHERYL BERMAN
AND RENETTA
MCCANN
ADWEEK | APRIL 9, 2018
15
Linda Kaplan Thaler
The Independent
In 1997, Linda Kaplan Thaler and five women opened The Kaplan Thaler Group, on
the third floor of her family’s brownstone, as an escape from the male-dominated
agency world. “I didn’t want to be in cultures where I felt like there was this
endless alpha male attitude,” she says. Two years later, Thaler’s team ballooned
to 250 people and was racking up more than $1 billion in billings. Among the
groundbreaking and award-winning work coming out of her shop: the Aflac duck
and the “Yes, Yes, Yes” Clairol campaigns. Now retired, she was inducted into the
Advertising Hall of Fame in 2015. These days, Thaler spends much of her time
touring the country, giving motivational speeches to corporations. Reflecting on
the state of the industry today, she says: “There’s so much room for improvement
in every profession. I would like to see more and more women in leadership
positions. After all, we are seeing more women as our clients.” —Katie Richards
Shelly Lazarus
The Chairwoman
“Women have equal talent to men,” says Lazarus. “We don’t need
any remedial programs. We just need an even playing field.” Ogilvy
& Mather’s chairman emeritus has proven this over and over,
during a career that spans more than 40 years and saw her rise
through the ranks starting with president of O&M Direct North
America, then CEO and finally chairman. Recalling her early days
(she began on the client side at Clairol), Lazarus says that she often
found herself as the only woman in the room. “We would mostly
be working on products that were sold to women so there would
invariably come this moment in any meeting I was in, where the
whole table of men would turn to me and go, ‘Well Shelly, what
do women think?’ So, I was central to this whole proposition.” In
1996, when Lazarus succeeded former Ogilvy CEO Charlotte Beers,
she became one of the first women at a major agency to take the
reins from another woman. Her climb to the top spot at an agency
of Ogilvy’s size was considered so newsworthy that it became the
focal point of a 1997 New York Times article, questioning why there
were so few women at the top of major shops. —K.M.
‘Women have
equal talent
to men. We
don’t need
any remedial
programs.
We just need
an even
playing field.’
16
Renetta
McCann
The Support
System
A pioneer from the minute she landed
in “client services” at Leo Burnett in
1978, McCann rose quickly, becoming
the agency’s first African-American
vp and later CEO of Starcom
MediaVest Group Worldwide. To get
ahead as a woman, especially one of
color, meant having to brush off the
misogynist comments made by male
colleagues—like when top executives
would ask her younger, pregnant
self if she was having twins. “I would
growl and say, ‘No, I’m having one,’”
she recalls. “You just answered and
moved on. We didn’t get distracted
by things that were going to take our
eye off the ball.” Having lived through
the civil rights movement, McCann
says experiences like being barred
from entering Chicago’s South Shore
Country Club, where her white friends
were allowed to play, taught her
that the only thing she could focus
on while pursuing her career was
her own success. Currently, Publicis
Groupe’s chief inclusion experiences
officer, McCann says her trailblazing
days are behind her. “I think the
women who are in the industry now,
who have years to go in their careers,
have to find the kind of workplace
they want and the kind of workplace
they want for their daughters and
sons,” she offers. “For me, it’s about
supporting them.” —L.R.
‘We didn’t get
distracted by
things that
were going to
take our eye
off the ball.’
APRIL 9, 2018 | ADWEEK
F E AT U R E
Tiffany R. Warren
The Innovator
“I had many more opportunities as a black woman than my mother
or my grandmother, who worked in a tuna canning factory,” says
Warren, Omnicom’s svp, chief diversity oicer—which is why she feels
a special sense of responsibility every time she enters the oice. But
her advocacy work extends well beyond Omnicom. Eleven years ago,
while managing diversity programs at the 4A’s, Warren set out with
“few resources and lot of hubris to honor people of color in marketing
and media.” The result was Adcolor, which has since grown to become
the industry’s premier minority advocacy organization. “We weren’t
taught about multicultural change-makers in class,” she says, and
Adcolor seeks to counter that disparity by paying tribute to talent
at all levels, from rising stars to icons and agency executives who
“have stood up as allies.” Warren acknowledges the role that #MeToo
and Time’s Up Advertising have played in bringing the industry to
the precipice of change while noting that women of color have been
waiting “in the shadows” for decades. She adds, “We have this moment
to make changes across the board, not just in terms of gender.” —P.C.
‘We have this moment to make
changes across the board, not
just in terms of gender.’
Carol H. Williams
The Legend
M C C A N N : S AV E R I O T R U G L I A ; W I L L I A M S : M A R C F I O R I T O
Williams never planned to go into advertising. Growing up on
Chicago’s South Side during the 1960s, the legendary creative
director nursed twin passions for hippie culture and biochemistry.
But a 4A’s internship program landed her at Leo Burnett in 1971,
and three years later she helped make Secret the market’s top
antiperspirant on the strength of the still-running “Strong Enough
for a Man, but Made for a Woman” campaign. “If you don’t have a
seat at the table, find yourself a chair and pull it up to the table,” she
says—and that bold approach, combined with memorable work for
Pillsbury, KFC and Kimberly-Clark, helped her become the first
African-American woman named vp, creative director at any ad
agency in 1977. “Once you proved that you could produce brilliance
on an ongoing basis, the industry embraced you,” she says. In 1986,
Williams took an even greater risk in launching her eponymous
shop, which has since produced noteworthy campaigns for brands
like Allstate, General Motors and The Walt Disney Co. Last year,
Williams became only the second African-American woman
inducted into the Advertising Hall of Fame. While she calls most
diversity initiatives “PR talk,” she also sees potential for progress in
the intersection of #MeToo and the challenges that women of color
still face in both the ad industry and our culture at large. “It’s time to
rewrite the rules,” she says, “and that’s not a joke.” —P.C.
ADWEEK | APRIL 9, 2018
17
WHEN
#METOO
CAME TO
MADISON
AVENUE
THE AD INDUSTRY MOVES TO CONFRONT
A CULTURE OF CHRONIC HARASSMENT.
BY PATRICK COFFEE
18
I
t could be a line from a Hollywood
screenplay: “Come here, so I can rape
you in the bathroom.” But it comes from
the lawsuit Erin Johnson vs. Gustavo
Martinez, J. Walter Thompson and WPP.
Johnson, the now-former global head
of communications at JWT, alleged that Martinez, who was then its CEO, repeatedly harassed and undermined her and other staf
members. He initially denied the charges
but soon resigned—and weeks after Johnson’s claims went public in early 2016, a video
emerged in which he could be heard joking
about being “raped … and not in the nice way.”
The accusations rocked the agency founded in 1864 and raised broader questions about
sexism on Madison Avenue. Yet, while the
case made global headlines and dominated
cocktail conversations at Cannes, it did not
serve as the much-needed catalyst for change
in the industry.
“I remember us being disgusted,” says
one female agency president. “And then we
stopped talking about it.”
The rise of the #MeToo and Time’s Up
movements have prompted a national reckoning, but advertising has been particularly
slow to address the matter of sexual harassment. Though a number of powerful men
have lost their jobs in recent months, the industry is just beginning to seriously grapple
with a culture where those in positions of
power have been allowed to repeatedly abuse
their authority with little or no consequence.
A LONG AND
CHECKERED PAST
A closer look at the industry quickly reveals the
disturbing realities that women in advertising
have faced—and continue to face—over decades.
During one female account executive’s first
week at a new job 10 years ago, a male creative
director stood next to her in an elevator packed
with 20 colleagues. “You have a glow about
you,” he said. “Did you get fucked last night?”
She informed the head of accounts about the
incident, only to be told, “We’re a grab-ass kind
THE #METOO
TIMELINE
Starting in late 2017,
advertising finally got serious
about sexual harassment after
a series of escalating incidents
led many of the industry’s most
prominent women to declare
that the time is now.
MARCH 10, 2016
JWT head of
communications Erin
Johnson files suit against
the agency’s CEO, Gustavo
Martinez, accusing him
of sexual harassment and
discrimination. Martinez
resigns the following
week to be replaced
by Tamara Ingram.
APRIL 9, 2018 | ADWEEK
F E AT U R E
of group. We have fun; it’s what we do.”
In another discouragingly familiar story,
a woman who filed a harassment suit against
a male supervisor now says, “I wanted to
bring up charges against him so it would be
out in the public, [but] we settled for a small
amount of money out of court, and that was
it.” He went on to continue scoring top-level
jobs at major agencies.
Last fall, an account director at IPG’s Initiative accused a Dr Pepper employee of assaulting her. He was quickly fired, but she
later filed a lawsuit naming both client and
agency as defendants and claimed that she’d
been pulled of the account and efectively
forced to resign.
Advertising has never been a particularly
friendly business for women, but women of
color face an additional set of challenges.
“You have three jobs,” says Omnicom svp,
chief diversity oicer and Adcolor founder Tiffany R. Warren: “Being a woman; being a woman of color; and being an advocate to change a
system that, in some cases, is set up for you not
to succeed.” Industry veteran Carol Williams,
who became the first black woman from a creative agency elected to the Advertising Hall of
Fame last year, says the contributions of minorities often go overlooked, noting that the
#MeToo movement itself was created in 2006
by Tarana Burke for women of color who had
survived sexual violence.
One Hispanic executive says, “A big sociological concern is that we make women
and women of color feel like the product of a
movement rather than earning their place.”
CHANGE COMES
QUICKLY TO MADISON
Eighteen months after Johnson first filed her
suit, the industry started to take discrimination and sexual harassment allegations seriously. Beginning last December, a series of
big-name firms including CP+B, Droga5, Innocean, The Martin Agency, Wieden + Kennedy and Publicis either fired top executives
or placed them on leave after accusations,
lawsuits and past settlements came to light.
So why now? One female executive, who
like the majority of sources requested anonymity to speak, says, “It had to happen in
other industries first to feel like it was OK.”
Another points directly at the White House,
claiming conversations about gender and
power began to shift “the minute we put
into office a man who says he grabs women
by the vagina.”
One of the factors that makes advertising particularly ripe for discrimination and
harassment is its history as a creatively ori-
‘The industry was
designed as a boys’
club, and you were
invited in on their terms.’
—MICHELLE WONG, MANAGING
PARTNER, DAILEY ADVERTISING
ented and extremely hierarchical trade,
overwhelmingly led by men who have nearabsolute power over those below them. As
Dailey Advertising managing partner Michelle Wong puts it, “The industry was designed as a boys’ club, and you were invited in
on their terms.”
Insiders say high-stakes contracts, combined with the special reverence paid to creative leaders, create an environment that
facilitates abuse. One female agency veteran
argues that industry leaders have collectively
“turned blind eyes” to past ofenses by these
men for fear that “if we take them of the business, we will lose it.”
“I think [sexism] is baked into almost every
industry,” one female executive observes, “but
we in advertising sit on the precipice of risk in
order to be provocative.” In other words, agen-
cy leaders, especially creatives, are encouraged
to push and even ignore certain boundaries.
Recalling consecutive 15-hour days and nights
spent in hotel rooms working on pitches until
3 a.m., she says, “When you give people that
much room, there are too many in this world
who will take advantage of it.”
Among the eight-plus executives fired over
the past five months, all but one were CCOs.
Some of their departures came accompanied
by specific allegations of misconduct, but
most included only ambiguous statements
about maintaining safe work spaces.
“It’s time to stop tolerating the bullshit
of genius,” says one male chief creative oicer at a holding group agency. “For years, if
not forever, there was not only forgiveness
but support for the idea that creative minds
come from a unique, dark, damaging place.
They’ve been rewarded and even admired
for [bad behavior].”
And that, says this male CCO, has created
a toxic model for younger generations coming
into the industry. “In the past it hasn’t been
three strikes and you’re out,” he says. “It’s been
more like, you can strike out three times every
inning for nine innings and still keep playing.”
LEGAL BOUNDARIES
TO PROGRESS
Until now, there have been few incentives
for women to speak out. Many who put their
heads above the parapet have been blackballed, ostracized, or forced to settle as their
harassers continued to move up the industry
ladder. “Our expectation is that if you speak
up, nothing is going to happen,” says Dailey’s
Wong. “The same fear runs through every
woman: will this be damaging to my career
or my reputation?”
Former stafers at The Martin Agency say
their complaints to HR about CCO Joe Alexander were repeatedly ignored or dismissed
for years before he was ousted last December
over multiple sexual harassment allegations.
Alexander denied all accusations.
In a similar case, several veterans of another
OCT. 5, 2017
OCT. 30, 2017
DEC. 7, 2017
DEC. 22, 2017
JAN. 12, 2018
JAN. 24, 2018
The New York
Times publishes
an exposé
detailing decades
of harassment
by movie
mogul Harvey
Weinstein.
IPG CEO Michael
Roth issues an
all-staff memo
outlining a “zerotolerance policy
for all types of
harassment.”
IPG’s The Martin Agency fires
longtime chief creative officer
Joe Alexander. After Adweek
publishes an investigation
into his departure, the agency
acknowledges that his exit
followed multiple sexual
harassment complaints over
more than two decades.
Diet Madison
Avenue’s
Instagram account
goes live and
begins naming
men accused of
harassment.
Publicis Seattle fires
chief creative officer
Andrew Christou.
Adweek reveals that
the agency settled a
sexual harassment
claim filed against
him in 2015 for an
undisclosed sum.
Wieden + Kennedy
fires London partner
and chief strategy
officer Paul Colman,
issuing a statement
about “inappropriate
conduct” and
“corrective action.”
ADWEEK | APRIL 9, 2018
19
F E AT U R E
agency owned by a major holding company
say their onetime HR director presented
leadership with 15-20 individual complaints
ranging from sexist and homophobic jokes to
repeated instances of harassment by a single
executive. The claims, however, were reportedly met with aggressive pushback from the
all-male C-suite. Weeks later, the HR director was fired after less than nine months on
the job, and the complaints were never oicially filed or investigated.
“Most people do not see HR as an advocate,”
says a former agency HR director. “When it
came up, it was, ‘Just stay away from that guy.’”
In large part, that’s because the system is
designed to protect business at the expense of
individual employees.
“Until recently, this systemic problem
was kept in the shadows by a legal regime
that exacerbated the very power imbalances
that allow harassment to occur in the first
place,” says Ally Coll Steele, lawyer, gender
activist and founder of the advocacy group
The Purple Campaign.
One such barrier preventing women from
coming forward is the nondisclosure agreement. According to multiple sources with decades of shared industry experience, agencies
often require departing employees to sign
NDAs even if they have not filed complaints or
received any form of severance, ofering them
little recourse for redress.
“Women have little incentive to report
harassment even internally, which further
perpetuates a culture of silence, fueled by a legitimate fear of retaliation against those who
report misconduct,” says Steele, who left her
job at top law firm Boies Schiller Flexner last
year to co-found the organization after learning that her company had retained private investigators to target women accusing Harvey
Weinstein of harassment and assault. Underscoring this point, Steele cites a 2016 Equal
Employment Opportunity Commission study
that says 70 percent of women don’t report incidents of sexual harassment to a manager or
supervisor in the first place.
“In this way, systemic discrimination can
perpetuate at the workplace and employers
and individually named harassers can escape accountability in a public forum such
as our courts,” adds Jeanne Christensen, a
partner at law firm Wigdor LLP. Christensen
and her company have represented a number of plaintifs in high-profile harassment
cases, including the one news anchor Juliet
Huddy filed against former Fox News host
Bill O’Reilly in December.
Recent attempts at accountability within
the ad industry have come from outside the
legal system. The most visible whistleblow-
‘Until recently, this
systemic problem was
kept in the shadows
by a legal regime that
exacerbated the very
power imbalances that
allow harassment to
occur in the first place.’
—ALLY COLL STEELE, CO-FOUNDER,
THE PURPLE CAMPAIGN
er is Diet Madison Avenue, an anonymous
social media entity that describes itself as
an advocacy group consisting of more than
a dozen agency staffers.
DMA provides an imperfect solution to a
deep-set problem. Its practice of publicly airing unproven allegations against prominent
men has inspired heated debate, even among
the thousands of industry insiders who follow
the group. Anti-DMA accounts have popped
up, and several women working in production
wrote and signed a letter calling for an end to
its “unacceptable” campaign.
Yet almost all parties agree that DMA has,
in some respects, been an efective mechanism for forcing industry leaders to pay attention despite using questionable tactics.
THE TIME FOR
DIFFICULT CHOICES
In March, 180 female industry leaders
launched an initiative called Time’s Up Advertising nearly two years to the day after Erin Johnson filed her suit. The group’s agenda
includes proposing specific policy changes
to reform a culture that has too often led to
inequality, discrimination and abuse. At the
same time, its organizers are acutely aware
that many remain skeptical of its ability to
deliver on these bold promises. Its website
reads, “We don’t for a minute believe we
found all the answers.”
Most industry veterans believe internal
1-800 hotlines and “zero tolerance” statements are Band-Aids at best. True progress
requires the active participation of everyone,
including leaders who remain overwhelmingly white and male.
What’s next? While there have been encouraging signs of change, one executive predicts more conflict to come as those in power
push back against a “rising tide of other that is
truly threatening them.”
Johnson proves this point. During the two
years between her filing and last week’s news
that she and JWT had reached a settlement,
she was stripped of most responsibilities
while Gustavo Martinez, the man accused of
harassing her, taught business courses in Madrid and served as the self-described “country representative” for WPP Spain.
When her case finally ended last week,
some said it was about time.
And for many women in advertising, that
means time’s up.
Lindsay Rittenhouse contributed reporting.
JAN. 30, 2018
MARCH 8, 2018
MARCH 12, 2018
APRIL 3, 2018
APRIL 4, 2018
Droga5 places CCO Ted
Royer on leave and says it
has hired a firm to investigate
unspecified claims made
against him. He is officially
fired two days later as the
agency issues a statement
regarding the importance of
“a safe and inclusive working
environment.”
A former Innocean executive
sues the agency, accusing both
the shop and its chief creative
officer Eric Springer of sexual
harassment, discrimination and
wrongful termination. Springer
is placed on leave the following
week as the agency hires The 3
Percent Conference to undergo
its certification process.
A group of 180 female
executives from the
agency world launch
Times Up Advertising
with the goal of driving
new policies and other
initiatives to combat
harassment and inequality.
WPP confirms that
its board of directors
has appointed an
independent council
to investigate
claims of “personal
misconduct” by CEO
Martin Sorrell.
JWT announces
it has reached a
settlement with
Erin Johnson, who
resigns from her
position. Gustavo
Martinez remains
employed by WPP
in Spain.
20
APRIL 9, 2018 | ADWEEK
Pers
tive
ON THE ORIGINS OF BR ANDS AND THE PEOPLE WHO BUILD THEM
THE CROP
THE COLOR
The distinguishing
feature of the
Wellington is its
dramatic height to
the top of the calf—
useful for sloshing in
puddles, but also a
fashion statement.
Hunter introduced
colors in the postwar
years. It now offers
its rain boots in 16
hues, including ocean
blue, bright pink,
hunter green and
this yellow.
THE MATERIAL
Though many of
today’s brands make
their boots with
polyvinyl chloride,
a synthetic plastic,
Hunter still uses
vulcanized
matte rubber.
The Hunter
Wellington
«
HOW AN ENGLISH DUKE AND
THE INVENTION OF VULCANIZED
RUBBER GAVE US THE IDEAL
BOOT FOR APRIL SHOWERS.
BY ROBERT KLARA
P R E V I O U S PAG E : R AQ U E L B E AU C H A M P ; P R O P S T Y L I N G : D I A N N A M C D O U GA L L ; T H I S PAG E : 1 A N D S I D E B A R : C O U R T E S Y O F E V E R E T T E C O L L EC T I O N ; 2 , 3 , 4: H U N T E R B O O T S .C O M ; 5 . G E T T Y I M AG E S
When foreign heads of state visit the White House,
they tend to bring the sort of dull, diplomatic gifts
destined for museum storage rooms, like tea sets and
oil paintings. But a notable exception took place in July
2010, when David Cameron called on the Obamas with
something the first family could really use. Newspaper
reports said Samantha Cameron had gone shopping in
Notting Hill and picked up the items herself: a pink pair
for Malia and purple for Sasha.
The British Prime Minister had brought the kids
some Hunter boots.
At $150 a pair—cheap by diplomatic standards—
the expenditure likely pleased the Exchequer, and it
no doubt pleased the public, too. After all, among all
the U.K. exports cherished by us Yanks—Burberry
raincoats, Jaguars, Downton Abbey and so on—not one
is as stylish yet simultaneously utilitarian as a pair of
Hunter boots.
Make that a pair of Hunter original Wellington rain
boots. Specifics matter these days, as Hunter is a
swanky brand that makes everything from drawstring
coats to phone pouches; most recently, it collaborated
with Target on a capsule collection. But it all began
with those tall boots—so quintessentially British that
they carry not one but two royal warrants.
“In the rain boot category, the icon is the Hunter
boot,” said Will Kahn, fashion market and accessories
director for Town & Country magazine. “If they were
good enough for Princess Diana, they’re certainly
good enough for me.”
Hunter boots’ meandering climb to prominence
actually began two centuries ago. In 1817, Arthur
Wellesley, the first Duke of Wellington—and a man
who clearly didn’t like wardrobe changes—decided
he wanted a boot versatile enough to wear on the
battlefield, on the fox hunt and straight into the dining
room. Wellesley fancied the cut of the Hessian boot and
instructed his London shoemaker to make him a pair
out of calfskin leather.
Wellington would give the boots their colloquial
name, but it would take the efforts of two Americans to
bring them to global prominence. The first was Charles
Goodyear, whose 1844 development of vulcanization
made rubber soft, pliable and wearable. Next came
Henry Lee Norris, who arrived in Scotland in 1856,
erected a factory and began making Wellington rain
boots out of rubber. Two world wars brought in so
many orders from the British Army that few were the
Englishmen who hadn’t seen or worn the boots.
Following several name changes, Norris’ old
company became Hunter in the postwar years, then
began to add bright colors to the product line. Hunter
Green caught the eye of the royals—among them
Lady Diana Spencer, who in 1981 showed up for her
engagement photos wearing her pair of green “Wellies.”
Royal patronage wasn’t enough to keep Hunter
from sliding into insolvency in 2006. The boots might
have vanished were it not for—appropriately enough—a
summer shower. In 2005, two months’ worth of rain fell
on the Glastonbury Festival in mere hours. That’s when
the paparazzi spotted supermodel Kate Moss slogging
through the mud in short shorts and Wellington boots.
Thanks to the “Kate Moss Effect,” Hunter swiftly
recovered. Wellies appeared on the feet of everyone
from Naomi Campbell to Madonna.
Oh, and on David Cameron’s feet, too. Four
years after his White House visit, Cameron toured
flood-ravaged Somerset. He wore his hunter green
Wellingtons—though what made the papers was the
PM’s worry that his boots made him look “too posh.”
ADWEEK | APRIL 9, 2018
2
1
3
4
Fast
Facts
1956 Hunter
green debuts.
16 colors total
28 components
in each boot
1986 Queen
grants royal
warrant.
5
Marching orders Hunter Wellingtons take their
name from the first Duke of Wellington (1) who
brought calf-high leather boots into fashion in
the early 1800s. With the later perfection of
vulcanized rubber, the North British Rubber Co.
(2) resurrected the style, turning out millions of
boots in its factory (3) for the British Army and
everyday laborers. While Hunter is known for
many styles (4), its iconic boot is the Wellington,
which saw a surge in popularity after Kate Moss
wore hers at the Glastonbury Festival (5).
Windsor knot Prince Charles’ 1981
announcement that he would wed Diana
Spencer set the world abuzz, not least because
some whispered Diana was a “commoner”
(in fact, she wasn’t). But she would need a
makeover to suit her new role and, just before
the stylists descended, photographers captured
the natural Diana—in her cords, folksy sweater
and hunter green Wellingtons. She looked great
in them, as she would in everything else.
23
TA L E N T P O O L
Curriculum
Vitae
DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE
DEVELOPMENT
Director of creative
development, Omelet
2015-present
Paul Soter
Freelance
creator, Omelet
2012-2015
HE’S NOT JUST THE GUY
WHO SAYS ‘MEOW’ IN
SUPER TROOPERS—HE’S
A BRILLIANT ADMAN. BY
LINDSAY RITTENHOUSE
Writer and director,
Watching the Detectives
2007
Writer and actor,
Super Troopers
2000
Writer, Broken
Lizard comedy group
1990-present
Pro Tip
To aspiring creatives,
directors, writers,
Soter advised: “Have
confidence not just
in your creativity, but
give confidence to your
partners. It raises the
level of creativity
all around.”
How He
Got the Gig
24
scripted web series.
But make no mistake:
Soter isn’t replacing
entertainment with
advertising. He likened it
to the fictitious Dr. Henry
Jekyll and his alter ego,
Edward Hyde. “It’s cool
having a double life … it
keeps life actually incredibly
interesting,” Soter said,
taking a short breather to
chat amid a recent press tour
for Super Troopers 2 (which,
not by coincidence, hits
theaters on April 20).
Still, Soter never imagined
he’d be an adman until
someone at Omelet explained
the concept of branded
content, a term he’d never
heard before. “I asked him
if it would be weird if I sat
in on a meeting at Omelet
sometime,” he said.
From then on, he was
hooked. He came back, again
and again and again—until
Omelet’s creatives started
handing him scripts to
“touch up,” Soter explained.
“Eventually they were just
like, ‘Do you want to do
this?’” he said.
Now, when Omelet has
a project, Soter can either
choose to “hop on or off” it. In
the beginning, Soter felt more
comfortable leaving Omelet
to concentrate on his film
career, but now, “I don’t feel
like I can shut it off anymore,”
he said. “I’m very invested in
the company.”
Even when Soter took a
brief hiatus to write and film
Super Troopers 2 with his
comedy group, Broken Lizard,
he worked on projects for
Omelet during his downtime
on set. “What we’re doing at
Omelet is original comedy,”
Soter said. “We create these
crazy ideas. We make each
other laugh. And we come up
with really cool stuff. Omelet
is very unique and special.”
90-Day Plan
Soter said he enjoys
the balancing act he’s
created for himself
between entertainment
and advertising. “It’s
possible that there
would be a scenario
where I’d have to give
up [one] … but if I can
keep it up, I’d love to
keep it up,” he said.
APRIL 9, 2018 | ADWEEK
JORDAN MCARTHUR
You may know Paul Soter
as the cop in cult-comedy
classic Super Troopers
who says “meow” 10 times
during a routine highway
stop, but the writer, actor
and director has spent the
past five years as director of
creative development at Los
Angeles indie shop Omelet.
Soter’s creative vision is
responsible for some of the
shop’s best work, including a
Pokemon spot for Super Bowl
50; he regularly works with
big-name clients like AT&T,
Microsoft and Walmart, and
is behind “Scrambled,” the
agency’s hilarious original-
Soter got his start
in entertainment
while attending
Colgate University.
He said he and friends
started seeing young
screenwriters with
little resources getting
their films picked up
by Hollywood so they
thought, “Why can’t
we do that?” Voila:
Broken Lizard, then
called Charred
Goosebeak, was born.
PORTRAIT
Specs
Who Tamara Littleton (l.),
founder and CEO, and Ashley
Cooksley, CMO
What Social media agency
Where London
1 The “Cheetos Museum”
campaign lasted 10 weeks
and relied on user-generated
images. 2 Acceptance and
unity were the themes of
the “This Is Wholesome”
campaign for Honey Maid.
3 Snoop Dogg, Martha
Stewart and Kristen Schaal
were part of The Social
Element’s recent campaign
for T-Mobile.
1
2
AGENCY
The World Is Its Office
T H E S O C I A L E L E M E N T: K A T I E O ’ C O N N E L L
LONDON-BASED THE SOCIAL ELEMENT HAS BEEN GEEKING
OUT ONLINE FROM THE GET-GO. BY DAVID COHEN
Independent agency The Social Element may be based in London, but the world—and the
internet—is its oice. Founder and CEO Tamara Littleton worked on online communities with
the BBC before starting the company in her London garage 16 years ago with a £10,000 loan from
her parents. “We used to talk to each other on Internet Relay Chat,” said Littleton of the early days.
“We were complete geeks.” CMO and 10-year veteran Ashley Cooksley, who came from AOL, added
that “we were able to move into the social world because people didn’t really understand how to
connect” back then. That’s what made The Social Element stand out from the rest: “Connection is
at the center of everything we do,” Littleton said. Now, its 250-plus staf is spread across the globe
and has clients like Jack Daniel’s, HBO, Lego, Oreo and Toyota under its belt. Cooksley stressed
that the agency is “really passionate” about protecting the social community and its brands;
Littleton and co-founder and COO Kate Hartley launched simulated crisis company Polpeo five
years ago to train marketers’ social media teams how to respond to problems in real time.
ADWEEK | APRIL 9, 2018
3
25
H O WA R D S O C H U R E K / T H E L I F E I M AG E S C O L L EC T I O N /G E T T Y I M AG E S
LOOK BACK
1967
Mary Wells Lawrence
Wells Rich Greene chief executive Mary Wells Lawrence takes center stage at a pitch meeting in Detroit (with art director Stan
Dragoti on her right). Lawrence was the first female chief executive of a company listed on the New York Stock Exchange. Key clients
included IBM, Pan American World Airways and Procter & Gamble. The creative shop was best known for campaign classics such as
Alka-Seltzer’s “Plop Plop, Fizz Fizz” and “I Can’t Believe I Ate the Whole Thing” and “Flick Your Bic.” —Lisa Granatstein
Adweek (USPS 458870, ISSN 1549-9553) is published weekly: 34 times a year with 1 issue in December; 2 issues in July and August; 3 issues in January, February, March, April, May, June and November; and four issues in September and
October. Publisher is ADWEEK, LLC, 825 Eighth Avenue, 29th floor, New York, NY 10019, (212) 493-4100. Subscriptions are $249 for one year, $449 for two years. Canadian subscriptions are $299 per year. All other foreign subscriptions
are $349 (using air mail). Subscription inquiries: (844)-674-8161; outside the U.S.: (845) 450-5203. Registered as newspaper at the British Post Office. Canadian Publication Mail Agreement No. 41450540. Return undeliverable Canadian
addresses to: MSI, PO BOX 2600, Mississauga, On L4T OA8. Periodicals postage is paid in New York, NY, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send all UAA to CFS. Non-Postal and Military Facilities send address changes to ADWEEK,
PO Box 15, Congers, NY 10920-0015; Subscriptions@Adweek.com. Copyright 2018 ADWEEK, LLC. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. For reprints, please call Wright’s Media, (877) 652-5295, email licensingandreprints@adweek.com.
26
APRIL 9, 2018 | ADWEEK
THE CONFERENCE FOR BRANDS WORKING AT THE
INTERSECTION OF PROFIT AND PURPOSE
REGISTER TODAY!
“Creating Change in Changing Times”
³ conference.engageforgood.com
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
1
Размер файла
3 455 Кб
Теги
journal, adweek
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа