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Canadian Geographic – May 2018

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SPECIAL SECTION
THE BEST OF
ECO
TRAVEL
cangeotravel.ca
#cangeotravel
Sp r in g / Summ er 2018
HELI-HIKING
IN EASTERN B.C.
Exploring the
Antarctic
Peninsula
ORLANDO, CANADA’S BEST NEW
CRAFT BEERS, EXPERT ADVICE
& MUCH MORE!
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ADVENTURE IN
NEWFOUNDLAND
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CARIBBEAN FUN
IN GUADELOUPE
A few hundred kilometres
to see a few billion light years.
Seems like a fair trade.
The new 2018 Subaru Outback has what you need to get where
you’re going. With Symmetrical Full-Time All-Wheel Drive, car-like
handling, loads of cargo space, and the ground clearance of an SUV,
you could say the sky’s the limit. SubaruDarkSky.ca
Vehicle shown solely for purposes of illustration, and may not be equipped exactly as shown.
Navigation system is only available on select trim levels. See Subaru.ca for more details.
CONTENTS
Spring/
Summer
2018
COVER: JAVIER FRUTOS/CAN GEO. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: ALISON SLATTERY/TWO FOOD PHOTOGRAPHERS; JAVIER FRUTOS/CAN GEO; GUADELOUPE TOURISM; IRA MEYER/ONE OCEAN EXPEDITIONS; NEWFOUNDLAND TOURISM
FEATURES
38 Schwartz’s or Lester’s?
Challah grilled cheese or
gefilte fish club sandwich?
Massafan cookies or
chocolate babka French toast?
The old classics and classy
newcomers behind Montreal’s
Jewish food scene renaissance
By Alex Hutchinson
46 One heli of a hike
Climb every mountain, ford every
stream. In eastern B.C.’s Cariboo
Mountains, however, it helps to
start with a helicopter.
By Doug O’Neill
with photography by Javier Frutos
54 Glorious Guadeloupe
Take a visual tour of the sun-soaked
Caribbean nation with familiar
Gallic flavours and a welcoming
Creole culture all its own
38
By Harry Wilson
60 Antarctic impressions
Artist David McEown on
Antarctica’s ‘fantastical’ lure,
penguins and painting in the cold
Art by David McEown
Interview by Harry Wilson
66 Fish, forage and feast
Why Newfoundland is the new ‘it’
destination for foodie travellers
46
By Sarah Brown
66
On the cover: Hiking in British Columbia’s Cariboo Mountains
54
60
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
3
77
78
Manitoba
46
22
Vancouver
6
Japan
38
Cariboo
Mountains
20
Montreal
24
Toronto
26
Scottsdale
28
50
Scrabster
Newfoundland
80
Meløy
82
Paris
Saint Andrews
17
San Antonio
34
Orlando
Dubai
58
Guadeloupe
79
Perth
Wayfinder
Turn to the pages marked on this
map to see a few of the places that
we’ll take you to in this issue.
10 Postcard
Route 132, Percé, Que.
12 Window seat
A bird’s-eye view of Ottawa
14 In a snap
Sharing Can Geo Travel
via Instagram
75 Concierge
Insider advice from our
travel expert
77 Best of the best
Our picks of the top eco-travel
experiences, sustainable food,
green gear and more
82 Souvenir
Print of the Hôtel Cluny, Paris
4
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
28
34
DEPARTURES
17 Escapes & Adventures
32 Gear & Tech
Orlando’s all about Disney, right?
The must-have hiking gear
Wrong. Discover what the city has to
for spring and summer
offer for families and solo travellers
34 Stays & Ways
beyond the Magic Kingdom.
The Fairmont Château
20 Cities & Sights
Frontenac celebrates 125
Get trendy in Toronto’s Riverside
years, a new pod hotel in
neighbourhood, find renewal in
Whistler, B.C., Emirates
San Antonio’s Pearl District, go
Airline’s in-flight food,
seaside in Saint Andrews, N.B., live
circumnavigating Canada by
like a local on Vancouver’s Main
ship and train, and the Twitter
Street, and let the pros plan your
review of the Andaz Ottawa
weekend in Scottsdale, Ariz.
ByWard Market hotel.
30 Food & Drink
Canada’s best new craft beers
LEFT TO RIGHT: CINDY KOHLER; EXPERIENCE SCOTTSDALE; FAIRMONT HOTELS & RESORTS. MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO
24
44
Antarctica
LISTEN
WITNESS
SAVOR
EMBRACE
TASTE
THE OKANAGAN
TASTING ROOM, WINE CLUB, WINERY & VINEYARD
www.deserthills.ca
250.498.6664
4078 Black Sage Rd, Oliver, BC V0H 1T0
DIGITAL
For even more travel stories, reviews,
guides and videos visit cangeotravel.ca
SCOTTISH SOJOURNS
DIGITAL ISSUE
PADDLE PLAY
HIDDEN JAPAN
Take Canadian Geographic Travel
wherever you go, while also
accessing bonus videos and photos
with the digital issue for tablets.
cangeotravel.ca/digital
Love canoeing, but not up for a
wilderness expedition? Paddle part
or all of the Canadian Canoe Route,
which leads from Peterborough,
Ont., to Ottawa and has plenty of
historic sites and foodie delights
along the way. Explore the route at
cangeotravel.ca/ss18/canoe.
From cycling through Edo-period
towns to following in the footsteps
of samurai on sun-dappled hiking
trails, Japan’s rich history is best
explored outdoors. Read about
three active ways to discover the
country beyond Tokyo and Kyoto at
cangeotravel.ca/ss18/japan.
6
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: TANYA KIRNISHNI; CHLOE BERGE; DESTINATION ONTARIO
Windswept seaside retreats,
medieval castles and great golf are
all within easy reach of Edinburgh
thanks to Scotland’s extensive rail
network. See our picks for five
towns worth exploring, all within an
hour’s train ride of the capital at
cangeotravel.ca/ss18/scotland.
To the Energetic Explorers - the bold, brave and daring. To those who leap at the chance to make each day more
invigorating than the last. This is your Island. A breathtaking destination, filled with wandering trails, endless beaches
and unique experiences everywhere you look. Pack your gear and your curiosity. Come find Prince Edward Island.
Book your Prince Edward Island vacation today at ExplorePEI.com
RUN. SPLASH. PUTT. DANCE. DINE.
Whatever you’re searching for, you’ll find it here. One amazing Island. Endless possibilities.
Air Canada takes you there with the most flights to Charlottetown. Book now at aircanada.com/PEI or contact your travel agent.
DISPATCH
EDITOR Harry Wilson
MANAGING EDITOR Nick Walker
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Michela Rosano
DIGITAL EDITOR Alexandra Pope
TRAVEL BRAND MANAGER Andrew Lovesey
COPY EDITOR/FACT CHECKER Kiley Bell
PROOFREADER Judy Yelon
DIRECTOR, BRAND AND CREATIVE Javier Frutos
CARTOGRAPHER Chris Brackley
GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jenny Chew
PRODUCTION DESIGNER Tahini Moitra
CONTRACT DESIGNER Kathryn Barqueiro
PHOTO RESEARCHER Geneviève Taylor
COLOUR TECHNICIAN Glenn Campbell
PHOTOGRAPHERS-IN-RESIDENCE
Daisy Gilardini, Michelle Valberg
DIRECTOR, CIRCULATION AND PRODUCTION
NEWSSTAND CONSULTANT Scott Bullock
Nathalie Cuerrier
PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER John G. Geiger
CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER AND PUBLISHER Gilles Gagnier
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC
DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Mike Elston
NEW MEDIA MANAGER Paul Politis
Bigger and better
Y
VICE-PRESIDENT, FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION Catherine Frame
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE/ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE CLERK Lydia Blackman
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Sandra Smith
RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE COORDINATOR Diane Séguin
Valerie Hall Daigle
(416) 360-4151 ext. 380, halldaigle@canadiangeographic.ca
DIRECTOR OF SALES
ou’re holding Canada’s newest and oldest travel magazine.
Allow me to explain.
About six months ago, we embarked on redesigning
Canadian Geographic Travel. The exercise wasn’t as simple,
however, as evolving our print magazine. In this day and age, any
media organization has to create content across multiple platforms
(pardon the industry jargon), so we reimagined the entire Canadian
Geographic Travel brand. In addition to introducing a dedicated
website (cangeotravel.ca) and social media accounts on Facebook
(facebook.com/cangeotravel), Instagram (@cangeotravel) and Twitter
(@CanGeo_Travel), we’ve redeveloped this magazine into a slicker,
larger, biannual publication with stories that have a renewed focus on
high-end travel, adventures and escapes, cities, food and drink, gear and
technology, and accommodations. And that’s not the only thing about it
that’s new; my colleague Harry Wilson, Canadian Geographic’s deputy
editor, will oversee it as editor.
It is, in essence, a brand-new incarnation of the travel magazine our
publisher, The Royal Canadian Geographical Society, launched in 2006.
But it also builds on the RCGS’s dedication to travel, which has existed
since its inception in 1929. In fact, we recently learned that the Society
likely launched its Canadian Geographical Journal, the predecessor of
Canadian Geographic, on the back of a magazine it purchased, Canadian
Travel (pictured above right). That publication was founded in 1917.
And it fit perfectly with the Society’s mission to make Canada better
known to Canadians and the world. We think there could be no better
way to celebrate a new century in the travel business than by renewing
our dedication to it. Join us for the journey.
—Aaron Kylie,
Editor-in-chief, Canadian Geographic
To comment, please email editor@cangeotravel.ca or visit
cangeotravel.ca. For inside details on the magazine, follow us
(@CanGeoTravel).
(@CanGeo_Travel) and
on
8
Aaron Kylie
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
ADVENTURES Lisa Duncan Brown
(888) 445-0052, brown@canadiangeographic.ca
SALES AND MARKETING INTERN
Jackie Paszyn
SUBSCRIPTIONS AND ALL CUSTOMER SERVICE INQUIRIES
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three years), plus applicable taxes. For addresses in the United States,
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EDITORIAL OFFICE
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Canadian Geographic Travel is published by Canadian Geographic
Enterprises on behalf of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society.
ISSN 0706-2168. No part of this publication may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any
means, without the prior written consent of the publisher or a licence
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Return undeliverable items to Canadian Geographic Travel, P.O. Box
923, Stn. Main, Markham, ON L3P 0B8
Date of issue: April 2018 Copyright ©2018. All rights reserved.
Canadian Geographic Travel is a member of Magazines Canada, The Canadian
Marketing Association and Vividata. Circulation audited by the Alliance for
Audited Media. Canadian Geographic Travel and design are registered trademarks. ® Marque déposée.PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT #40065618,
REGISTRATION #9654, CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL, 1155 Lola Street,
Suite 200, Ottawa, ON K1K 4C1 Canadian Geographic Travel (ISSN No: 07062168, USPS No: 22573) Published two times a year (March/April and
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POSTMASTER: send address changes to Canadian Geographic Travel, 701
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WE HAVE LOTS OF GREAT
STORIES WAITING TO BE DANCED.
PLAN YOUR GETAWAY.
VISIT GOHAWAII.COM
#LETHAWAIIHAPPEN
PERCÉ, QUEBEC / BY NICK WALKER
The Gaspésie’s famed Route 132 never veers far from
the Gulf of St. Lawrence, but arriving in Percé, Que., on
the peninsula’s eastern tip, is certainly among its most
awe-inspiring turns. The village lies across from monumental Percé Rock and Bonaventure Island, home to a
vast and easily visited northern gannet seabird colony.
10
#CANGEOTRAVEL VOLUME 1, 2018
POSTCARD
WINDOW SEAT
OTTAWA / ALEN PALANDER
“I took this shot while flying over the Ottawa River
with Héli-Tremblant,” says Alen Palander. “I loved
being able to see our capital from this perspective.”
Share your best travel shots with us on
(@CanGeo_Travel)
(@cangeotravel) using #cangeotravel.
and
12
#CANGEOTRAVEL VOLUME 1, 2018
First Nations
Created in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Métis Nation,
the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation and Indspire
Assembly of First Nations
Inuit
Created in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Métis Nation,
the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation and Indspire
Introduction by
Natan Obed, President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami
Métis
Created in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Métis Nation,
the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation and Indspire
Created in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Métis Nation,
the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation and Indspire
Introduction by
President, Clément Chartier
The Royal Canadian Geographical Society is honoured to present the
Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada, a groundbreaking and ambitious
new educational resource. This four-book set shares the stories,
perspectives and history of the Indigenous Peoples of Canada.
The RCGS has partnered with the Assembly of First Nations,
Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Métis National Council, the National
Centre for Truth and Reconciliation and Indspire to ensure that
Indigenous voices are heard and understood. This collection of
unique maps and rich narratives offers an opportunity for Canadian
classrooms to take an important step on the road to reconciliation.
Introduction by
Director, Ry Moran, NCTR
Focusing on Indigenous teachings, mappings, and Truth and Reconciliation.
Available for order
SPRING 2018
For more details visit
CANGEO.CA
IN A SNAP
Sharing your travels on Instagram
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:
Daisy Gilardini @daisygilardini
King penguin, South Georgia Island
Thomas Hall @tomhallca
Technicolour flags, Sayulita, Mexico
Vaibhav Pandey @pandey.vaibhav
Dynjandi waterfall, Iceland
Gregory George @followsummertravels
The view from the Empire State Building
André Audet @andreaudet
White-tailed deer, near Hirtles Beach, N.S.
Javier Frutos @javiers_wonderplanet
Esplanade Riel pedestrian bridge, Winnipeg
Shane Kalyn @4elementphotos
The Nine Arches Bridge, Ella, Sri Lanka
Find us @cangeotravel and
share your best photos with us by
using the hashtag #cangeotravel.
14
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
churchillwild.com
Thick-billed Murres (Guillemots) diving offshore Nunavut
TALLURUTIUP IMANGA
What is Talluruptiup Imanga?
In the future, it will be Canada’s largest marine conservation area, located offshore Nunavut.
Working together has sustained people of the North for generations. The designation of this
diverse marine area is a testament to that spirit of collaboration.
Today we congratulate the Qikiqtani Inuit Association, the Governments of Canada and Nunavut,
and all organizations that contributed to the recently announced final boundary agreement for
the area. Shell’s contribution of 860,000 hectares of offshore rights to the Nature Conservancy
of Canada last year helped enable conservation of this wider marine protected area.
Explore more: www.shell.ca/conservation
DEPARTURES
O RLA N D O
ONE DESTINATION, TWO WAYS
I
T MAY BE the domain that Disney built, but there’s far more to Orlando than Mickey and the
gang. Here’s a rundown of the best places beyond the Magic Kingdom for families and solo
travellers to get animated about.
WITH THE KIDS
ON YOUR OWN
EAT Hungry children aren’t happy children, but no one
EAT A trip to the American South isn’t complete without
by Heather Greenwood Davis
wants to sacrifice fun for dull meals. Spots such as Café Tu
Tu Tango, where artists create among diners’ tables, and the
Toothsome Chocolate Emporium & Savory Feast Kitchen
(don’t worry — it serves sky-high milkshakes and vegetables)
at Universal Orlando Resort’s CityWalk theme park keep the
smiles going. cafetututango.com; universalorlando.com
COCA-COLA ORLANDO EYE
STAY Parent of a Legomaniac? Then watch them go gaga for
a night at the LEGOLAND Resort Hotel, where four themed
room options — Pirate, Adventure, Kingdom and LEGO
Friends — await. With Master Model Builders on site, an
in-room scavenger hunt and nightly LEGO-building competitions, kids will be as happy at the hotel as they are at the
theme park. legoland.com/florida
PLAY The Andretti Indoor Karting and Games centre off-
ers everything from electric go-carting to a ropes course,
while at the I-Drive 360 complex, divided family interests
are all satisfied with attractions such as the 122-metre-high
Coca-Cola Orlando Eye observation wheel (above), the Sea
by Michela Rosano
indulging in comfort-food classics, and at Soco in downtown Orlando, you’ll get a contemporary spin on standards
such as fried oysters (crisped in cornmeal and served with a
pickled green tomato relish) and meatloaf (grilled and piled
atop lobster mashed potatoes). The comfort-food trend turns
Italian at Prato, in the nearby city of Winter Park. Here,
handcrafted cocktails such as the cetriolo (organic cucumber
vodka, lime, white cranberry and basil) complement seasonally inspired dishes such as decadent braised lamb on
creamy polenta. socothorntonpark.com; prato-wp.com
STAY It teems with families during spring and summer
vacations, but in the low season (late spring, fall and early
winter), the Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress resort, which is
on Disney World’s doorstep, turns into a quiet retreat for
couples wanting to take advantage of the lagoon-style pool,
four golf courses and a Marilyn Monroe-inspired spa. For
an artsy downtown escape, try the Grand Bohemian Hotel,
which has its own art gallery and live music.
grandcypress.regency.hyatt.com; grandbohemianhotel.com
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
17
PLAY Pick up the pace and zip across Lake Bryan on a
Jet Ski rented from Buena Vista Watersports. Back on dry
land and 30 kilometres west of Orlando, climb up into a
five-metre-high and 12-metre-long monster truck (ABOVE) at
Showcase of Citrus, where you bump through citrus groves,
splash through swampland and watch for wildlife such as
alligators and watusi. bvwatersports.com; showcaseofcitrus.
THE MUST-DO
FOR EVERYONE
Yes, Universal Studios has Harry Potter, but it’s more
than that. The park does a great job of marrying adult
nostalgia with kid-friendly themes — The Simpsons
for the adults, roller coasters and the Volcano Bay
waterpark (left) for the tweens, and Dr. Seuss for the
littlest ones — which means it’s the kind of place that
makes the whole family happy. universalorlando.com
Protected
FOR ALL WEATHER CONDITIONS
© 2018 WeatherTech Canada
For the full line of automotive accessories visit
WeatherTech.ca or call 888.905.6287
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: MICHELA ROSANO/CAN GEO; UNIVERSAL ORLANDO RESORT; SEA LIFE AQUARIUM
Escapes & Adventures
DEPARTURES
Life Aquarium (LEFT) and
the Skeletons: Museum of Osteology, which
showcases the bones
of creatures great and
small. Outdoor enthusiasts looking for thrills
shouldn’t miss an airboat ride at Wild Florida or the tandem hang-gliding experience at Wallaby Ranch. andrettikarting.com; i-drive360.com;
wildfloridairboats.com; wallaby.com
WE’VE GOT SOMETHING SPECIAL.
NATURALLY, WE WANT TO PROTECT IT.
WE’RE PROUD TO SUPPORT
Cities & Sights
THE CITY SCENE
RIVERSIDE
A
rching above the steel truss of Toronto’s Queen Street Viaduct are the words “This river I
step in is not the river I stand in.” Installed in 1996 by local artist Eldon Garnet and inspired
by the philosophy of Heraclitus, it’s a meditation on constant change that could also serve as a
sort of autobiography for Riverside, the neighbourhood immediately east of the southern end
of the Don River.
The historically working-class enclave has long held a kind of gritty appeal, but a recent explosion
of restaurants, shops and art galleries has brought trendy new life to Queen East. Hop the 501
streetcar from downtown and take an after-dark prowl to these east-side hot spots.
—Alexandra Pope
BROADVIEW HOTEL,
106 Broadview Ave. 
This former down-at-heel strip club has
been transformed into a chic 58-room
boutique hotel that’s emblematic of
Riverside’s hip new identity. Hit the openair rooftop bar for drinks, small plates
and a killer view of the city’s skyline.
THE OPERA HOUSE,
735 Queen St. E. 
Rock out in one of the most special live
music venues in a city that’s filled with
storied concert halls. Built in 1909 as a
vaudeville theatre, in more recent decades it
has hosted the likes of Nirvana and Eminem.
Take a look inside the Broadview Hotel
at cangeotravel.ca/ss18/broadview.
20
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
RUBY WATCHCO,
730 Queen St. E. 
Chef Lynn Crawford, a former Food
Network star, serves simple, delicious
fare in a cosy brasserie-inspired
setting. The prix fixe menu changes
nightly, so show up and allow yourself
to be surprised, or see the week’s
offerings at rubywatchco.ca.
BOXCAR SOCIAL,
4 Boulton Ave. 
The Riverside location of the
popular local coffee chain
also boasts an extensive wine
and whisky list, making it
the perfect spot for weekdayevening hangs.
TINY RECORD SHOP,
804 Queen St. E. 
Heard something you liked
at the Opera House? Drop
by the Tiny Record Shop
and pick up a souvenir of
your visit to Riverside.
KATHRYN BARQUEIRO/CAN GEO
DEPARTURES
TORONTO’S TRENDIEST DISTRICT
Lifetime
Being in Antarctica is like being on
experience ‘ another planet that’s just all nature.
’
#8
IAN
GEOGR
AP
H
I
oc
on
e
s
OCIET Y
lifetimeexperience.cangeo.ca
on
and book your own lifetime experience at
AD
LS
Learn more about One Ocean
Expeditions’ incredible range of voyages
AN
CA
LC
— Daisy Gilardini
Photographer and guide
with One Ocean Expeditions
since 2010
e a n ex p e di
ti
DAISY GILARDINI/ONE OCEAN EXPEDITIONS
As a member of the International League of Conservation
Photographers, that’s important to me. My main goal is to
enhance the experience of the guests, of course, but it’s also
a chance to create ambassadors for conservation. Yes, I can
help you take better pictures,
but then you go out and show
the world what we have in
Antarctica and what we risk losing if we don’t protect it.
THE ROYA
I’ve done more
than 70 expeditions to
Antarctica, and people always ask me why I keep returning.
There isn’t one specific thing that pulls me back, because
I’ve come to realize that every time I go, something different
is going to happen. You leave without any idea of what that
could be — seeing an amazing iceberg, having an encounter
with an elephant seal, getting a glimpse of an emperor penguin — and it’s that sense of going into the unknown that
makes the whole experience so worthwhile.
I say “unknown” because being in Antarctica is like being
on another planet that’s just all nature. When you’re there,
it’s as if creation happened and then everything just stopped.
And because internet access is limited, you’re almost totally
cut off, which forces you to be in the moment and connect
with nature. As a photographer on these journeys, I work
long days, which is physically demanding, but spiritually, my
mind gets so much energy from the experience.
One of the great things about One Ocean is that they
always include space for scientists and researchers onboard.
Cities & Sights
THE LOCAL LIFE
ON MAIN STREET
“
W
hen Vancouverites say ‘Let’s meet on Main,’ ” says Dee Hon, a journalist who’s lived and
worked in the city for 20 years, “we’re not talking about the part of the street that passes
downtown attractions such as Chinatown and Science World; we’re talking about the rapidly
gentrifying multicultural stretch farther south that teems with one-off restaurants, boutiques,
breweries and markets. Outsiders might call it Vancouver’s coolest neighbourhood, but I call it
home.” Here are Hon’s insider tips on how to live like a local on Main Street.
SIP, SNACK You can’t shake your
umbrella on Main without hitting
someone’s latte, but most are worth
spilling to have a Chemex-brewed Ethiopian Kochere from Matchstick Coffee
Roasters (4807 Main St.) instead. Get
your sugar hit via new-school artisanal
donuts at Cartems Donuterie (2190
Main St.) or destroy your diet with the
out-of-this-world apple tarts at L’Atelier
Pâtisserie (260 Fifth Ave.), which I’m
convinced is a portal to the old-world
charms of Provence hidden beside an
appliance warehouse.
CHILLED DRINKS Main has many
bars best ignored for the local product
you can find along its Brewery Creek
area. The neighbourhood’s namesake
breweries from the 1890s are long
gone, but craft beer makers Main Street
Brewing Co. (261 E. Seventh Ave.),
33 Acres Brewing Co. (15 W. Eighth Ave.),
and Brassneck Brewery (2148 Main St.)
are reviving that heritage.
Sip your Schwarzbier in nearby
Dude Chilling Park (Brunswick Street
and Seventh Avenue), which has become the neighbourhood’s de facto
backyard and draws road-tripping,
van-dwelling, neo-bohemians from
across the continent. Neither public
drinking laws nor dog-leash bylaws
see much enforcement, but my neighbours would prefer the vibe remains
relaxed, not rowdy.
OUTDOORS, INDOORS Tumble
over faux concrete at Origins Parkour
(2655 Main St.) or scale plastic rock at
Cliffhanger Climbing Gym (670 Industrial Ave.) and The Hive Bouldering
Gym (520 Industrial Ave.). Climbers
gather at the artificial boulder at Riley
22
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
Clockwise from ABOVE: Main Street local
Dee Hon at Brassneck Brewery; the delectable
croissants at L’Atelier Pâtisserie; Hon climbs
the artificial boulder at Riley Park.
Park (Ontario Street and 33rd Avenue)
on summer nights when the gyms are
too sweaty.
EAT You can find affordable, fresh,
inventive and international cuisines all
along Main, but Bob Likes Thai Food
(3755 Main St.) puts all those elements
together, encapsulating the best of the
street’s dining scene.
ANDI MCLEISH/CAN GEO
DEPARTURES
VANCOUVER
The Royal Canadian Geographical Society is honoured
to present this volume as part of a four-book set,
sharing the stories, perspectives and history
of the Indigenous Peoples of Canada.
‘
Mapping our spaces, in both contemporary
and historical practice, protects Indigenous
peoples from imperial erasure.
’
— ADAM GAUDRY,
Métis scholar and professor at the University of Alberta
Cities & Sights
THE TOP 5
BEST OF SA I NT ANDREWS
I
t started out as a quintessentially prim and proper late-18th-century Loyalist settlement
on the shore of Passamaquoddy Bay, but today Saint Andrews, N.B., is arguably Canada’s
prettiest — and most interesting — seaside resort town. Here are five must-not-miss experiences
that will give you the full flavour of everything this genteel gem has to offer.
—Harry Wilson
1
STAY IN STYLE
The Algonquin Resort
Nothing beats staying at the grand old
dame of New Brunswick hotels — and
the 129-year-old Algonquin, lavishly
refurbished to the tune of $30 million
and reopened in 2014, is worth every
penny. Whether you’re lazing in a kingsize bed with a cool bay breeze washing
over you, sluicing down oysters and
stout in Braxton’s Restaurant & Bar or
playing the province’s best golf course,
that rarified sense of being somewhere
quite grand never leaves you. Indulge in
it while you can. algonquinresort.com
2
GARDEN OF DELIGHTS
Kingsbrae Garden
Kingsbrae’s beguiling 11 hectares
include a dozen gardens-within-a-garden
(among them the Sculpture Garden
and the Scents and Sensitivity Garden)
and Pericles — the name
the garden gave to its
Wollemi pine tree,
one of the oldest
and rarest tree
species in the world.
kingsbraegarden.com
5
ART IT UP
Sunbury Shores
The Sunbury Shores Arts and Nature
Centre is one of the best places in town
to appreciate “the connection between
art and nature,” the centre’s raison
d’être. Explore that link by summoning
your muse and signing up for a course
in painting or drawing, to name but two
options. sunburyshores.org
See more of these and other Saint Andrews
attractions at cangeotravel.ca/ss18/saintandrews.
24
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
3
FANTASTIC FOOD
Niger Reef Tea House
David Peterson’s restaurant offers
not only respite from the summertime buzz of nearby downtown
Saint Andrews but remarkable
food and views of Passamaquoddy
Bay, too. Tuck into classics such
as seafood chowder or pray that
Peterson has prepped his delectably smoky, fall-off-the-bone
barbecue beef ribs as a special.
nigerreefteahouse.com
4
OCEAN EDUCATION
Fundy Discovery Aquarium
Go for the underwater acrobatics of
harbour seals Loki and Snorkel, stay
for the captivating exhibits at this small
but excellent aquarium, part of the
Huntsman Marine
Science Centre,
the oldest permanent research
facility of its
kind in Canada.
huntsmanmarine.ca
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: GARRY KAN/ALGONQUIN RESORT; TOURISM NEW BRUNSWICK; FINLEY FOTOGRAPHY; CINDY KOHLER
DEPARTURES
NEW BRUNSWICK
Cities & Sights
THE ESSENTIAL ITINERARY
SCOTTSDA LE
DEPARTURES
ARIZONA
FRIDAY
STOCK UP | 4 p.m.
Borrow a bike from one of
three bike-share programs
in town and cruise the Arizona Canal Trail across the
Phoenix-Scottsdale border
to La Grande Orange. Grab
a fresh-squeezed juice and
personal pizza before
returning to Old Town.
lagrandeorangegrocery.com
rightfully famed for its
Arizona-heavy wine list.
fnbrestaurant.com
HIT THE TOWN | 10 p.m.
Start at Dierks Bentley’s Whiskey Row (try the Ole Smoky
Peach moonshine) before
wandering on to Boondocks
Patio & Grill and beyond.
dierkswhiskeyrow.com;
boondocksaz.com
WHERE
TO STAY
Splurge and spend your Scottsdale sojourn in the
epitome of luxury at The Phoenician, (ABOVE and INSET)
a sophisticated resort at the base of Camelback Mountain that offers on-site experiences such as sunset
helicopter tours and mixology courses.
thephoenician.com
Trolley to your next stop.
scottsdalemuseumwest.org
ART ATTACK | 3 p.m.
Home to more than 150
galleries, no trip to Scottsdale is complete without a
self-guided art walk in Old
Town — or a stop at the
Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art. smoca.org
SATURDAY
RISE AND CLIMB | 6 a.m.
Order early room service before departing for Camelback
Mountain’s scenic Cholla
Trail. Pack plenty of water and
leave enough time to catch
the spectacular sunrise.
WINE AND DINE | 7 p.m.
Enticing epicurean
experiences await at chef
Charleen Badman’s farmto-table FnB, which is also
26
WILD, WILD WEST | Noon
Immerse yourself in history at
Western Spirit: Scottsdale’s
Museum of the West. Afterward, catch the free Old Town
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
TACO TIME | 6:30 p.m.
Tuck into pork-shoulder
tacos, green chile duck
confit or a side of chipotle
grits (and wash it all down
with a couple of tequilas)
at The Mission, where chef
Matt Carter runs one of Old
Town’s best restaurants.
themissionaz.com
SUNDAY
BYE-BYE BRUNCH | 10 a.m.
Treat yourself to a brunch
you will likely never forget at
Virtù HONEST CRAFT, chef
Gio Osso’s superb restaurant housed in the Bespoke
Inn, Scottsdale’s only luxury
B&B. virtuscottsdale.com;
bespokeinn.com
You’ve sorted Scottsdale — now
discover five cool things to do
in the nearby city of Mesa at
cangeotravel.ca/ss18/mesa.
TOP AND INSET: THE PHOENICIAN; BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: DAYVID LEMMON FOR
EXPERIENCE SCOTTSDALE; AN PHAM FOR EXPERIENCE SCOTTSDALE; BESPOKE INN
S
cottsdale’s Old Town — a.k.a. downtown — is the heart of this
charming city of approximately 247,000, which more than makes
up for its size (and the presence of Arizona’s capital, Phoenix, nearby)
with an incredible array of cuisine, a burgeoning art-and-design
scene and plenty of outdoor adventure. Here’s the essential itinerary
for the destination that should be on everyone’s radar.
—Andrew Lovesey
Take
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Cities & Sights
THE NOW NEIGHBOURHOOD
TH E PEARL DISTRICT
O
nce home to the largest brewery
complex in Texas, the Pearl District has over the last decade emerged
as a revitalized neighbourhood that
should be on any San Antonio visitor’s
must-see list. Scattered throughout
its nine hectares of restaurants, shops
and activity-filled public spaces are
reminders of its industrial past, from
the brewery relics incorporated into
its fountains and planters to the lobby
chandelier made of old beer-labelling
equipment in its exquisitely designed
crown jewel (and former brewhouse),
the boutique Hotel Emma.
Features such as these make the Pearl
a feast for the eyes, but the real draw for
many has more to do with their belly.
There are no fewer than 24 places to eat
and drink — charcuterie at Cured, roasted quail at The Granary, Tokyo shoyu
ramen at Tenko Ramen and the elixirlike cocktails at Blue Box Bar among
them — and that doesn’t include the 45plus vendors at Pearl’s weekend farmers
market, where you can buy everything
from local wines and raw honey to handmade empanadas.
The retail therapy continues at Pearl’s
shops. Pick up one of Caroline Matthews’
handmade guayabera shirts at Dos Carolinas, size up a canvas for your living room
at Lawrence Markey’s art gallery or treat
yourself (or someone else) to one of the
simple yet stunning pieces of jewelry at
The Tiny Finch.
—Jenn Fast
Clockwise from TOP LEFT: The beet, avocado
and citrus salad at Cured; the courtyard of
the Hotel Emma, once the Pearl Brewery’s
brewhouse; the scene at the weekend farmers
market; a trio takes an evening wander among
the neighbourhood’s shops and restaurants;
a Hermione cocktail at the Blue Box Bar.
See more photos of San Antonio and read
about Jenn Fast’s adventures in the city at
cangeotravel.ca/ss18/sanantonio.
28
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
TOP LEFT AND RIGHT, AND BOTTOM RIGHT: JENN FAST; MIDDLE: SCOTT MARTIN; BOTTOM LEFT: JAIME MONZON/SAN ANTONIO CURRENT
DEPARTURES
SAN ANTONIO
Quebec’s Far North
NUNAVIK
kNF4
Live an Authentic Inuit Adventure!
For more information and your free copy of the Nunavik Official Tourist Guide:
NUNAVIK TOURISM
1-819-964-2876 • 1-855-NUNAVIK
WWW.NUNAVIK-TOURISM.COM
NEW BREWS
W
ith fresh brewing talent setting up shop in Canadian cities and towns every year (we’re up to
around 800 craft breweries, microbreweries and brew pubs nationwide), this golden age for
hopheads is showing no signs of going flat. And while it’s admittedly tough to keep up with every
creative twist and top-notch take on staple suds, we’ve quaffed our share in an effort to round up
the eight new and noteworthy beers featured here, all worth keeping in mind for future travels.
—Nick Walker
1
2
3
4
5
1 YUKON HOLIDAY KÖLSCH |
4 WHEAT BURST |
A pale German Kölsch-style ale that plays
on the film title Roman Holiday (Gregory
Peck and Audrey Hepburn even appear
on the label). Bracing but lightly hopped,
it’s perfect for warm summer evenings.
A crisp wheat ale with a taste as bright
as the Prairies — and a real fun side. It’s a
split between a delicately citrusy wheat
beer and a hoppy IPA, but backed up by
tropical notes of pineapple and guava.
2 NECTAROUS DRY-HOPPED
SOUR | Four Winds, Delta, B.C.
5 TIGER MILK |
Proof that sours aren’t just for beer
snobs. With a delightful citrusy tartness
We’re certain the only reason Waller
Yukon Brewing, Whitehorse
balanced by bushels of peach and nectarine flavours, this is arguably the best
sour brewed in Canada in recent years.
3 LONG JOHNS SALTED
CARAMEL ALE | Alley Kat
Brewing, Edmonton
Light, creamy and perfectly restrained in
its use of caramel, vanilla and sea salt, this
ale is also brewed eco-consciously. Alley
Kat relies on clean energy, recycles water
and turns spent grain into livestock feed.
30
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
Black Bridge
Brewery, Swift Current, Sask.
Brewing, Ottawa
Waller Street
Street hasn’t won a Canadian or international medal yet is that their beers are
too convention-defying for rigid award
categories. All of their brews are knockouts, but our new favourite is Tiger Milk,
a rich and creamy white stout made with
fresh-roasted cocoa nibs and coconut.
6 PIVOT IMPERIAL IPA |
Picaroons, Fredericton, N.B.
There are a dozen delicious iterations of
Picaroons’ new “interactive” Pivot Imperial IPA. The Canadian barley and toasted
6
7
8
wheat foundation stays the same, but the
hops change with every round. By-thebatch info is at picaroons.ca/pivot.
7 GOSE IPA DU BARACHOIS |
Pit Caribou, Anse-à-Beaufils, Que.
German gose-style beers are traditionally a bit sour, seasoned with coriander
and salt, but perhaps something like the
Gaspé’s “barachois” (sandbars forming
small coastal lagoons) this hopped-up
and tasty one is chock full of life.
8 LIESSE TABLE BEER |
2 Crows Brewing Co., Halifax
Opened in 2017, 2 Crows’ beers are
already Maritime craft scene standouts.
Their Liesse Table Beer, which verges
into Belgian territory, is refreshing and
smooth, with a late hint of spice and a
big taste for 3.5 per cent ABV.
Did we miss your favourite new craft
brew? Let us know @CanGeo_Travel.
CHRISTIAN LALONDE (PHOTOLUXSTUDIO.COM/COMMERCIAL)/CAN GEO
Food & Drink
DEPARTURES
THE TASTING ROOM
Presented by
Canadian students increase their energy awareness
while educating the nation.
DON’T FORGET TO TURN
OFF THE LIGHTS!
In 2017, kids across Canada saved over
91,000 kWh of energy and went
3,500 hours without power
through the Classroom Energy Diet Challenge!
Tips to help conserve energy at home:
Turn the lights off
Unplug/power down electronics
Wear a sweater instead of
turning up the heat
facebook.com/cangeo
@energy_lit
#ThinkCreateDo
#energydiet
For more information visit www.energydiet.ca
HIT THE TRAILS
S
pring or summer, serious trailblazers and weekend
roamers can wind up at the mercy of mountain
weather whims if they’re not layered up and equipped
with the right stuff. Thankfully, the companies featured
here are constantly introducing new technologies to
make gear lighter, more breathable and strong enough
to stand up to just about anything that crosses your path.
—Michela Rosano
1
2
3
1 Women’s Hydrofoil Jacket
A multi-purpose jacket is a must for serious hikers. This waterproof nylon offering
has underarm zips for ventilation and an
adjustable hood with a reinforced brim,
and packs small. $159, mec.ca
2 Women’s Micro Fleece Jacket
Stay warm on spring mornings or at
high altitudes with this zip-up made
of super-soft and breathable premium
Italian Pontetorto fleece. $85, mec.ca
3 Women’s Solar Chill
Long Sleeve Shirt
Hot treks with little shade require
serious sun protection. Up the ante
with this UPF 50, moisture-wicking
long sleeve. $59.99, columbia.com
4 Merino Wool Knit Toque
Exceptionally soft, regulates body
temperature and keeps its shape
even when it’s balled up inside your
backpack (a keeper for hikes in chilly
spring winds). $45, tilley.com
5 Travel Light Daypack
This slim 15-litre pack is water-resistant, feather-light and perfect for quick
treks into the wild, although the adjustable sternum strap and removable
back pad translate to long-term
comfort. $44, mec.ca
6 Women’s Constantia Pant
For technical climbs or treks through
the bush, grab these abrasion-resistant
pants constructed with breathable,
stretch-woven fabric. $95, mec.ca
32
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
4
5
7
6
8
9
7 Serengeti Sport
Linosa Sunglasses
With a durable polymer and rubber
frame, these shades are ultra-light, but
won’t get crunched in your backpack.
$250, serengeti-eyewear.com
8 Garmin eTrex 20x GPS
Stay on the trail with this water-resistant GPS unit, which boasts 25 hours
of battery life, 3.7 GB of internal memory and a large high-res display that’s
easy to read even on the brightest of
days. $269.99, garmin.com
9 Women’s Terradora
Waterproof Mid Hikers
There’s nothing worse than wet feet,
so these hikers were designed to keep
you dry and comfy with a waterproof,
breathable membrane, a close fit and
cushioned ankle support.
$175, keenfootwear.com
Check out more great hiking gear for men
and women at cangeotravel.ca/ss18/gear.
CHRISTIAN LALONDE (PHOTOLUXSTUDIO.COM/COMMERCIAL)/CAN GEO
Gear & Tech
DEPARTURES
THE ULTIMATE GEAR
‘
The Royal Canadian Geographical Society is honoured
to present this volume as part of a four-book set,
sharing the stories, perspectives and history
of the Indigenous Peoples of Canada.
Nunannguaq is the Inuit word for map. It means
“representation of land.” Like other peoples around the
world, we have always carried maps in our minds.
’
— MICHAEL KUSUGAK,
Acclaimed children’s author and Inuit storyteller
HAPPY 125 TH
CHÂTEAU FRONTENAC!
IT HAS HOSTED kings and queens,
actors and aviators, princesses and
presidents. But the biggest bash at
Quebec’s iconic Fairmont Le Château
Frontenac is happening in 2018, which
marks the hotel’s 125th anniversary. A
series of commemorative events are
planned throughout the year, including
the unveiling of new heritage suites,
free birthday cake on July 1, a culinary
event in August that will pair 11 First
Nations chefs with 11 star Quebec City
chefs to explore traditional Quebec
cuisine, and a gala ball on Dec. 18.
fairmont.com/frontenac-quebec
THE PERCENTAGE of Canadians willing
to pay extra for enhanced in-flight food
on long-haul flights, according to the results of a late-2017
survey conducted by Emirates Airline. That result should please
Emirates, which operates a 24-hour kitchen in Dubai that sees
1,200 chefs create 12,450 recipes, focusing on authentic local
cuisine, to service 590 daily flights. Read more about Emirates’
Dubai kitchen at cangeotravel.ca/ss18/emiratesfood.
34
WHY NOT see Canada all at once? One
Ocean Expeditions has teamed up with
Via Rail and Fairmont Hotels to offer an
exclusive coast-to-coast-to-coast adventure
this summer. The 56-day voyage begins in
Louisbourg, N.S., on July 24 and combines
four of One Ocean’s most popular Canadian
cruises with four scenic rail journeys,
interspersed with stays at five luxurious
Fairmont properties. View the full itinerary at
oneoceanexpeditions.com.
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
POD PLACE
CANADA’S FIRST “pod hotel,”
boasting 88 five-squaremetre sleeping pods, will
open in Whistler, B.C., this
summer. Inspired by Japan’s
famous capsule hotels, the
Pangea Pod Hotel is aimed
at travellers looking for the
affordability of a hostel and
the privacy and prime location
of a boutique hotel. Each unit
has a bed, shelving units, a cabinet
for valuables, a reading lamp, a
mirror and a fan. pangeapod.com
ANDAZ OTTAWA
You won’t feel
homesick visiting
Canada’s capital
if you stay @ AndazOttawa.
Nods to Canadian geography
and culture are everywhere,
from curated artwork on guest
floors to handcrafted cocktails
@feastandrevel, giving this chic
ByWard Market property an
unshakeable sense of place.
—@ XelaEpop
The w
revie
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: FAIRMONT HOTELS & RESORTS;
PANGEA POD HOTEL; ALEXANDRA POPE/CAN GEO; VIA RAIL
49% CIRCUMNAVIGATING
CANADA
Stays & Ways
DEPARTURES
THE TRAVEL NEWS
CHRISTMAS IN
ANTARCTICA
Experience the ultimate ‘White Christmas’
with John Geiger, CEO of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society
20  30 DECEMBER, 2018 | RCGS RESOLUTE
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38
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: LEE BROWN/ALAMY/ALL CANADA PHOTOS; GEORGES ALEXANDAR; ALISON SLATTERY/TWO FOOD PHOTOGRAPHERS; KATHERINE ROMANOW; ALISON SLATTERY/TWO FOOD PHOTOGRAPHERS; KAROLINA JEZ
SCHWARTZ’S
OR LESTER’S?
CHALLAH GRILLED CHEESE
OR GEFILTE FISH CLUB?
MASSAFAN COOKIES
OR CHOCOLATE BABKA
FRENCH TOAST?
Whether it’s the old classics or classy newcomers,
you’re spoiled for choice when it comes to Montreal’s
Jewish food scene
BY ALEX HUTCHINSON
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
39
40
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
I’m at the epicentre of traditional Jewish Montreal, the legendary heartland
of bagels and smoked meat and — in
spirit, at least — Leonard Cohen. Since
the poet and songwriter died in November 2016, dutiful pilgrims have been
retracing the steps between his favourite haunts, such as the Main Deli Steak
House on St-Laurent. (“He sat right
there,” the waitress informs me, gesturing toward the front, when I pop in for
a pickled-tongue sandwich that evening.
“Second booth on the right.”) It’s a circuit that, these days, draws more tourists
and Toronto expats than Montreal Jews,
who’ve mostly moved on to other parts
of the city and beyond. The rich history
of the neighbourhood is important, says
Moses, whose museum opened in a former garment factory on St-Laurent in
2016. But it’s not the whole story. Jewish
Montreal, he says, is in the midst of a
renaissance that’s as diverse and vigorous as the community’s heyday a century ago — and as delicious, too.
THE FIRST JEWS arrived in Montreal in
the 1760s, shortly after the British conquest. But the wave of Eastern European
immigration that begat Schwartz’s Montreal Hebrew Delicatessen and Mordecai
Richler started in the late 1800s. Between
1901 and 1931, Quebec’s Jewish population mushroomed from 7,000 to 60,000,
and Yiddish became Montreal’s third
most spoken language. The community settled along St-Laurent, then known
as “the Main,” which was the de facto
dividing line between the French in the
eastern part of the city and the English in
the west. As we wander down the street,
Moses points out reminders of its past:
The Star of David engraved alongside
the city’s old official flag on an ornate
building once occupied by a Yiddish
newspaper; the incongruously elegant
porno theatre that, when it opened more
than a century ago, showcased Yiddish
vaudeville acts.
It’s in this neighbourhood — the
Plateau Mont-Royal and nearby Mile
End — that the great rivalries of Jewish
Montreal linger on. Fairmount or
St-Viateur? I squeezed into both places
and scarfed down bagels freshly yanked
just moments earlier from the woodfired oven, savouring the distinctively
sweet chewiness. Montreal-style bagels,
unlike their New York City cousins, have
egg in the batter and are parboiled in
honey-sweetened water — and they need
to be fresh. I came away a St-Viateur
convert, and with a new understanding
of why the city’s expats rush straight to
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: TOURISME MONTRÉAL/MARIE DESCHENE; TOURISME MONTRÉAL/MADORE, DAPHNÉ CARON; KAROLINA JEZ; © ALICE GAO/COMMISSION CANADIENNE DU TOURISME. MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO
W
andering along a
narrow back alley
behind Saint-Urbain
Street, peering over
the rusty fences,
it is surprisingly
easy to slip back a century — to hear the
clang of feet racing up and down the
spiral metal staircases between coldwater flats that once housed a dozen
people rather than two or three McGill
students; to feel the bite of winter seeping into the unheated rooms; to imagine the pungent aroma of condensed
humanity, frying garlic, and ... well ...
what is that smell, anyway?
“Pickles,” says Zev Moses, a slim and
earnest 34-year-old with horn-rimmed
glasses. The backyard we’re peeping into, he explains, is where Esther
Witenoff — now better remembered as
Mrs. Whyte, the eponym of Canada’s
largest pickle producer — started brining
her pickles in casks from Seagram’s distillery in the 1930s. Moses, the director of
the nearby Museum of Jewish Montreal,
digs into his satchel and pulls out a handful of doggy-bagged Mrs. Whyte’s to pass
around. “Straight from the cask,” he says,
“never been in a bottle.” The burst of
crisp, tangy dill in my mouth completes
the feeling of sensory time travel.
JEWISH MONTREAL
Clockwise from opposite top: A mural
of Leonard Cohen, who was a Montreal
native and a regular at the Main Deli Steak
House on St-Laurent; a member of the
city’s Hasidic Jewish community; the Shah
Special at Arthurs Nosh Bar; a freshly baked
bagel from the St-Viateur Bagel shop.
‘IF YOU’RE COMFORTABLE,’
THE CASHIER ASSURED ME AS I HEADED FOR THE DOOR,
‘THE SMOKED MEAT IS COMFORTABLE.’
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
41
Alex Hutchinson ( @sweatscience)
is a National Magazine Award-winning
journalist whose work appears in
Outside, the New York Times and
The New Yorker.
“If you’re comfortable,” the cashier
assured me as I headed for the door, “the
smoked meat is comfortable.”
Simard’s tour also wound past some
even more stubborn and idiosyncratic holdouts, including Wilensky’s Light
Lunch, a diner just down the street from
Fairmount Bagel where, in every respect
that matters, it’s still 1932. The decor is
the same; the wooden stools at the counter are the same; and the Wilensky Special,
invented by the current owners’ father,
Moe, is still a slab of beef salami and slab
of beef baloney wrapped in a bun with a
swipe of mustard then grill-pressed into
the shape of an English muffin. OK,
the price has changed — but $4.09 still
seems like a Depression-era bargain, and
with a hand-jerked egg cream soda and
half-sour pickle on the side, it’s a darn
good lunch. “There were tons of these
places in the old days,” Sharon Wilensky
says, but it’s their dogged adherence to
the past that has allowed Wilensky’s to
survive — which means that, just like the
old days, the Special always comes with
mustard and can never be cut in two.
THE MENU AT FLETCHERS
INCLUDES NEW TWISTS ON
EASTERN EUROPEAN CLASSICS,
SUCH AS GEFILTE FISH TACOS.
42
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
Lester’s Deli, which has been in
business for almost 70 years and
remains a classic destination for
connoisseurs of Montreal’s famous
smoked meat sandwich.
“People come in,” she says, “and they
want the same thing they had as a kid,
when they came in with their dad.”
OF COURSE, as delicious as the illusion
might be, it isn’t really 1932 anymore.
In the years since the Second World
War, Montreal’s Jewish community
has continued to evolve, with a significant influx of French-speaking Sephardic Jews from North Africa and the
growth of a vibrant Hasidic community. At Fletchers, the culinary space in
the Museum of Jewish Montreal, the
menu includes new twists on Eastern
European classics, such as gefilte fish
tacos; but it also has a Moroccan-style
salad, and massafan cookies, an ethereal mash-up of almond flour, cardamom
and rosewater that is eaten by Iraqi
Jews during Passover. “Our goal is to
introduce people to the diversity of Jewish food,” says Kat Romanow, a Jewish
food historian and the director of food
programming at the museum.
The truth is that many of St-Laurent’s
iconic establishments are now Jewish
in name only. St-Viateur Bagel has been
owned by an Italian family since the
GEORGES ALEXANDAR
their bagelry of choice when they return.
“When there’s a holiday in Ontario,
it’s crazy here,” says Saul Restrepo,
who started working at St-Viateur as a
16-year-old in 1981. “People come, and
they don’t order a half-dozen — they
order five dozen, six dozen.”
The great deli debate — Schwartz’s
or Bens — was effectively settled when
Bens closed in 2006 after 98 years in
business. Montreal-style smoked meat,
as journalist David Sax explained in
his 2009 book Save the Deli, is basically a cross between pastrami and corned
beef: a brisket that is spiced according
to various family recipes brought over
mostly from Romania a century ago,
pickled for a week, smoked, and then
served in a gravity-defying heap on
seedless rye with mustard. Schwartz’s
is the biggest name remaining, but other iconic haunts such as the Main Deli
Steak House and, a little farther afield
in Outremont, Lester’s Deli offer their
own subtle variations. “Lester’s is a little creamier than Schwartz’s, and it’s
cut with the grain instead of against it,”
explains Mélissa Simard, who has been
guiding culinary safaris through Jewish
Montreal for three years through her
company, ’Round Table Tours. I tried
smoked meat sandwiches at all three
places, and hoovered them all down
with gusto. But it was from Lester’s that
I chose to buy a few vacuum-sealed bags
to bring back to Toronto with me on the
train — no refrigeration or ice required:
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Adolf Hitler’s name, one of 13 million
cast in Germany’s 1932 election — feels
all too topical today.
But the place that feels most like the
modern incarnation of the bustling delis
of pre-war St-Laurent is a few kilometres
southeast of the library, near the Lachine
Canal. St-Henri isn’t a Jewish enclave, but
it’s an edgy, growing hot spot and where
husband-and-wife team Alex Cohen and
Raegan Steinberg chose to open Arthurs
Nosh Bar in 2016, a tribute to Steinberg’s
father that’s been billed as the first new
Jewish restaurant in Montreal in years.
As at Fletchers, the menu draws on the
past without dwelling there: prune jam
and fried onions top the old-school liver
toast, and the eggs are scrambled with
kale. On a Friday at lunchtime, the lineup for a table stretches out the door, and
the clamour inside has none of the faintly
anthropological vibe you sometimes pick
up from the crowd of tourists dutifully
checking out Schwartz’s.
That’s not to say you should abandon
the classics. The previous evening, I’d
headed to Moishes, the storied steakhouse
on St-Laurent where Leonard Cohen’s
AT CHESKIE’S HEIMISHE BAKERY,
MEN IN DARK COATS WITH DANGLING SIDE-CURLS LINE UP
WITH NEIGHBOURHOOD FOODIES FOR A REVELATORY
BITE OF CHOCOLATE BABKA.
44
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
Alex Cohen (left) and Raegan
Steinberg, the husband-and-wife
team behind Arthurs Nosh Bar, where
the menu features modern twists on
the classics of Jewish cuisine.
family gathered after his burial. These
days, a nine-storey mural of Cohen’s face,
fedora’d and faintly amused, gazes down
on the restaurant from a neighbouring
building. Lenny Lighter, a 65-year-old
whose father, Moishe, according to lore,
won the restaurant in a poker game from
the original owner in 1938, was having
his own dinner a few tables away. The
year was shaping up to be the restaurant’s
busiest ever, he told us. The rib steak was
bursting with flavour; the chopped liver
was rich and smooth; the karnatzlach, a
Romanian sausage, was suitably earthy.
You could easily imagine Cohen, with his
usual lamb chops and Bordeaux in front
of him, jotting down verses in one of the
restaurant’s darker corners.
The traditions of Jewish Montreal,
in other words, are as vibrant and captivating as ever. But back at Arthurs, by
the time you push aside your schnitzel sandwich and move on to a plate
of syrniki — cottage cheese pancakes
drenched in maple syrup — you’ll be
ready to start adding some new tradtions to the circuit.
Read more about the great Montreal-style
bagel rivalry and discover what makes the city’s
bagels so special at cangeotravel.ca/ss18/bagel.
KAROLINA JEZ
mid-’90s; Schwartz’s is owned by a consortium that includes Céline Dion. But
newer businesses that reflect the city’s
changing Jewish population are springing up. At Cheskie’s Heimishe Bakery, a
bustling Hasidic business in Mile End,
men in dark coats with dangling sidecurls line up with neighbourhood foodies
for a revelatory bite of Cheskie’s chocolate babka. Then there’s the hip, industrial vibe of Hof Kelsten, where owner
and Montrealer Jeff Finkelstein — who
trained as a chef at famous restaurants
such as El Bulli in Spain — serves up
bialys and latkes alongside the lovingly
crafted bread he distributes to top restaurants around the city.
To find the present-day heart of Montreal’s 90,000-strong Jewish community,
though, you need to leave the Plateau
behind and head southwest. On the other side of the mountain, in the Côte-desNeiges neighbourhood, the Segal Centre
for Performing Arts still hosts live Yiddish theatre. Across the road, the Jewish
Public Library’s multilingual collection
reflects the diversity of the community:
Russian-language books, in particular, are
borrowed over and over until they literally fall apart. There’s a boisterous musical storytime taking place in one of the
rooms when I drop in, and the archives
in the basement is showing off treasures
ranging from a 1481 edition of Josephus’s
Antiquities of the Jews to letters between a
local Jewish community leader and Jackie Robinson, who played for the Montreal Royals in 1946. The building that the
library is in also houses various Jewish
community organizations as well as the
Montreal Holocaust Museum, whose
focus on the missed warnings of the
decades preceding the war — one display features a ballot with a bold X beside
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46
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
ONE HELI
OF A HIKE
BRITISH COLUMBIA’S REMOTE CARIBOO MOUNTAINS ARE ONE OF THE
HARDEST-TO-REACH WILDERNESS AREAS IN CANADA — UNLESS, OF
COURSE, YOU’RE A KEEN HIKER WITH ACCESS TO A HELICOPTER
By DOUG O’NEILL
with photography by JAVIER FRUTOS
YOU’RE A HELIHUDDLE VIRGIN,
I CAN TELL,” laughs
veteran mountain guide John Mellis, who
catches my nervous twitch as I and nine
other hikers crouch shoulder-to-shoulder
within a couple metres of the roaring
Bell 212 helicopter, its rotors cutting the
alpine air above our heads and kicking
up dust into our squinting eyes. The
deafening engine and flying dust are at
odds with the peaceful mountain scenery
that surrounds the helipad at Cariboos
Lodge, a remote luxury property located
on the southern banks of the Canoe River,
about 25 kilometres west of Valemount,
B.C. The lodge is one of several operated
by CMH Heli-Skiing & Summer
Adventures, which is relaunching its
summer heli-hiking program in 2018.
I’m here for a test hike.
Mellis, who is also the area manager for Cariboos Lodge, reiterates
the safety instructions he and pilot
Jens Gessner shared with our group
at the breakfast table that morning.
“The closer you are to the helicopter,
the safer you are. The tips of the wings
can dip down, especially on uneven
ground — trust me, you don’t want
to be there. Stay away from the rear of
the helicopter and always approach the
aircraft in a crouching position — and
hang onto your hat. If your toque goes
flying, let it fly. Do not run after it.” At
which point my favourite toque goes
flying. I do not run after it.
We’re about to fly into the Premier Range, a group of mountains in
east-central British Columbia that are
part of the Cariboo Mountains range,
which itself forms the northern end of
the Columbia Mountains and contains
some of the highest and seldomestseen — much less hiked — peaks in the
country. Bounded by the Fraser, Thomp-
son and Raush rivers, many of the Premier Range’s mountains that are more
than 3,048 metres high are named in
honour of late Canadian prime ministers (Mount Sir Wilfrid Laurier, at 3,516
metres, is the highest), but you don’t
think politics when you’re here — you
think playground. With towering spires
of ice and rock, mammoth glaciers,
snow-covered mountains, rolling meadows, pristine alpine lakes and waterfalls
spilling from 1,000-metre-high cliffs,
the Cariboo and Premier ranges are a
backcountry hiker’s dream destination.
And getting to them by helicopter is an
experience like no other, as Mellis reminds us.
“And when you exit after we land,”
Mellis yells, “just go to the appointed safe
spot and crouch. Do not rush away from
the helicopter until I give the go ahead.
Follow our advice and we’ll save your
arse out here.”
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
47
Clockwise from ABOVE: Hikers traverse
a ridge in the Premier Range; the North
Canoe Glacier; the helicopter makes its
descent at Cariboos Lodge; the Cariboos
Lodge, the base camp for hiking in the
Cariboo and Premier mountain ranges.
PREVIOUS PAGE: Hikers wait for the
helicopter after hiking the Adventure Trail.
THE BELL 212 gently lifts off under
Gessner’s deft manoeuvring, soaring
upward through the Canoe River valley
until the lodge looks minuscule behind
us. Gessner, who learned to fly helicopters during his military training in
Germany, has chauffeured hikers and
skiers to remote mountain settings
for more than 20 years. “Flying in the
mountains is a three-dimensional experience,” he explains. “You have to
acquire knowledge of the mountains,
learn to read the cloud activity of this
particular region — which is so different from the flat landscape where I
first learned to fly — and understand
high and low pressures that can change
quickly. And I need to have a good feel
for the safest places to land hikers.”
48
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
Mellis, riding shotgun in the cockpit beside Gessner, suddenly points directly ahead: North Canoe Glacier. It’s
colossal. Our flying fishbowl of hikers
morphs into a crew of high-altitude
paparazzi. We’re so in awe of the towering formation in front of us that we
don’t notice Gessner has started to descend. There’s nothing like your first
mountain drop-off to appreciate the
skill of a helicopter pilot as they land a
bulky machine on an area the size of a
condo balcony.
Gessner deposits us on a boulder-strewn ledge called the Ninth Hole,
a scraggly mess of moss-covered schist
rock and quartz overlooking the striated glacier. Just across the expanse of
ice and rock is Little Matterhorn peak,
which Mellis estimates to be about
2,500 metres high.
There are no trail markers in this wilderness setting, so we put our trust in
Mellis, who follows his instinct and his
memories, formed during almost 25
years of hiking and skiing throughout
the Cariboos. We trek up an incline, skipping over rocks and puddles, then angle
Doug O’Neill ( @dougoneill), the
former executive editor of Canadian
Living, now writes regularly about
travel, the outdoors and food. Javier
Frutos ( @javiers_wonderplanet) is
Canadian Geographic Travel’s
creative director.
HELI-HIKING
C
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N
C
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R
U
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M
C
K
Y
IA
A
TA R I B B
IN O
S O
5
16
Valemount
CARIBOOS
LODGE
Jasper
M
A L B E R TA
O
M
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U
N
N
T
A
IN
TA
S
S
IN
B R I T I S H
C O L UM BI A
U
93
Lake Louise
0
100 km
Banff
MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO; 2017 SENTINEL-2 IMAGE: ESA
1
Calgary
westward through a meadow splashed
with red, yellow, purple and white alpine
flowers. It’s difficult to concentrate on
where I’m putting my feet when there’s
so much to look at. In the distance, I can
see the snow-capped peaks of Mount
Carpé and Mount Withers.
Two hours into our first hike and most
of us are visibly sweating. “Let’s lose some
layers,” suggests Mellis, his voice carrying over the strong wind that’s kicked up.
(We’ve already witnessed the power of his
lungs at breakfast when he demonstrated
his master yodelling skills). “When I was
a young fellow growing up in Vancouver, I wasn’t a good student,” he tells us.
“I was forever skipping school to spend
the day exploring the North Shore Mountains. I’m at home in the outdoors.”
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
49
50
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
HELI-HIKING
Clockwise from LEFT: Mellis leads a group of hikers past the Zillmer
Glacier in an area known as Upper Zillmer; a morning mist shrouds the
trees near Cariboos Lodge; Mellis at a spot known as the Ninth Hole,
which overlooks the North Canoe Glacier.
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
51
Clockwise from RIGHT: Pilot Jens Gessner, who got his helicopter training in
the German military, eyes the terrain for a place to land; a hiker pauses to rest
and take in the sight of the North Canoe Glacier; hikers move along a trail well
used by mountain goats as the helicopter lifts off.
While he may not have been a good
student, Mellis proves his teaching chops
each time we stop during our three-hour
morning hike. “Watermelon,” he announces, pointing to a patch of slightly
pinkish snow. “Smell it? It’s called watermelon snow, or sometimes snow algae.
It contains a red pigment that makes the
snow pink. And it does smell like watermelon. Just don’t eat it — it’ll give you the
runs.” An hour later we stop to rest by a
tarn, a glacier-formed cirque filled with
mountain water. Mellis kneels down and
scoops up a handful of black mud. “Minerals. Goats instinctively return to this
watering hole year after year to get their
fix of mineral-rich water. Helps build
strong bones.”
THE FOLLOWING DAY we’re treated to a series of heli-bumps — quick,
15-minute rides that lift us from peak
52
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
to peak. At Zillmer Canyon, also known
as the Tropics of the Cariboos, the views
are spectacular. About 500 metres below
our makeshift landing pad is the turquoise water of Zillmer Creek; in another direction, a series of nameless waterfalls adorn sheer cliffs. There are jagged
ridgelines, huge outcrops of quartz and
alpine meadows thick with heather. But
Mellis is eager to show us something he
has not seen, or hiked on, in almost 10
years: The Adventure Trail.
The steep route is only a few kilometres long, but part of it involves
climbing a smooth rock face that most
of us are only able to scale because of
the metal rungs Mellis pounded into
the granite 15 years ago. It’s a workout,
but it’s also thrilling to know that I’m
walking where no human has set foot
in a decade.
Not bad for a day’s hike.
HELI-HIKING
PLANNING YOUR
MOUNTAIN GETAWAY
CANADIAN MOUNTAIN HOLIDAYS has summer
heli-hiking programs at three backcountry lodges,
each of which offers luxury accommodations,
private spa treatments, morning yoga and gourmet
meals. Some hiking equipment is provided. For
more information on each of the lodges listed
below, visit cmhsummer.com.
CMH CARIBOOS LODGE
The lodge’s 27 rooms come with Instagrammable
views of mountains, glaciers and wildlife. Get a
pre-hike workout on the property’s climbing wall
or in its bouldering cave, or rest with a drink by
the fire in the lounge, home to post-dinner nightly
jam sessions. Two-, three- and five-day heli-hiking
packages are available in July and August.
CMH BUGABOOS LODGE
This 32-room lodge in the Bugaboos mountain
range in southeast British Columbia embodies backcountry luxury with its rooftop hot tub,
steam room and spa. Guides lead hikers along
ridges in the Purcell Mountains and through
flower-filled alpine meadows. Three- and six-day
heli-hiking packages are available from July to
early September.
CMH BOBBIE BURNS LODGE
The 26-room Bobbie Burns boasts the largest
wine cellar of all the CMH remote properties,
as well as the option for guests to spend part of
their time at the Bugaboos Lodge. Hiking through
remote areas of the Purcell Mountains rewards
guests with incredible scenery, including views of
the Conrad Glacier. Three- and six-day heli-hiking
trips are available between from July through the
first week of September.
See more of Javier Frutos’s spectacular photos
of heli-hiking in the Cariboo and Premier mountain
ranges at cangeotravel.ca/ss18/cariboo.
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
53
GUADELOUPE
54
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
Glorious
Guadeloupe
TAKE A VISUAL TOUR OF THE SUN-SOAKED
CARIBBEAN NATION WITH A FAMILIAR GALLIC
FLAVOUR AND A WELCOMING CREOLE
CULTURE ALL ITS OWN
BY HARRY WILSON
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
55
GUADELOUPE
P
ass on Provence, banish
thoughts of Biarritz and let go
of Languedoc because France’s
best seaside holiday isn’t in
Europe — it’s in the Caribbean.
Geography-savvy francophiles
might already be familiar with
Guadeloupe, a group of five islands in the Lesser Antilles chain that comprise
one of France’s four overseas départements, but
with big shot surf-sand-and-sun players such as
Jamaica, Cuba and Bahamas nearby, North Americans have often overlooked this tropical outpost
as a holiday destination.
But they shouldn’t, because in addition to Gallic
comforts — fine wines, delectable cheeses, charming boulangeries-pâtisseries and stylish shops, to
name but a few — they’ll find a rich Creole culture, intimate luxury resorts and some of the best
outdoor adventures in the region.
From shopping for rum in Pointe-à-Pitre’s bustling seafront Marché de la Darse to scuba diving
in the spectacular Cousteau Marine Reserve to trekking through the lush forest of Guadeloupe National Park to swim beneath the shimmering Ecrevisses
Falls, here’s a visual showcase of the best experiences this island paradise has to offer.
56
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
0
GrandeTe r r e
Pigeon
Islands
Ecrevisses
Falls GUADELOUPE
NATIONAL
PARK
La Désirade
Pointe-à-Pitre
Petite-Terre
GUADELOUPE
HA
COUSTEAU
MARINE
RESERVE
BasseTe r r e
20 km
BA
PREVIOUS SPREAD: FYLETTO/ISTOCK. THIS SPREAD, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JLAZOUPHOTO/THINKSTOCK; DESHOTELSETDESILES.COM/
LA CRÉOLE BEACH HÔTEL & SPA; TRADEWINDS; GUADELOUPE TOURISM; GUADELOUPE TOURISM. MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO
GUADELOUPE
M
Marie
Galante
AS
CUBA
Clockwise from TOP: An oceanview
massage at La Créole Beach Hotel &
Spa, Grande-Terre; a sign beckons thirsty
travellers on Terre-de-Haut, Les Saintes; Îlet
du Gosier, off Grande-Terre’s south coast;
Ecrevisses Falls, in Guadeloupe National
Park; the beach at Pain de Sucre mountain,
Terre-de-Haut. PREVIOUS PAGES: Sunrise at
Anse Champagne, Grande-Terre.
GUADELOUPE
Les Saintes
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
57
Clockwise from ABOVE: The pool at Le
Relais du Moulin, Grande-Terre; scuba
divers explore the waters of the Cousteau
Marine Reserve around the Pigeon
Islands; a rum vendor at Marché de la
Darse, a seafront market in Pointe-à-Pitre.
Whether it’s homemade rum or queen
conch stew, learn how to eat and drink like a
local at cangeotravel.ca/ss18/guadeloupe.
58
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: MILCALK; GUADELOUPE TOURISM/JEAN-MARC LECERF - OCEANDIMAGES.COM/ANDERS NIELSEN;
UNIVERSAL IMAGES GROUP NORTH AMERICA LLC/DEAGOSTINI/ALAMY/ALL CANADA PHOTOS
GUADELOUPE
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ANTARCTIC
IMPRESSI
60
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
ONS
Artist David McEown on the Antarctic’s ‘fantastical’
lure, having king penguins critique his work and
why he lets his paint flash-freeze
ART BY DAVID MCEOWN
INTERVIEW BY HARRY WILSON
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
61
T
HERE ARE MULTIPLE ways to
see David McEown.
You could make an appointment to meet the acclaimed
Canadian watercolourist and see his
paintings in his Vancouver or Richmond Hill, Ont., home studio. Or you
could attend one of his workshops. Perhaps you might catch him at a presentation or an exhibition opening.
But the best way to see McEown (maybe the only way you should see him because everything else pales in comparison) is when he’s seated at his easel in the
world’s last great wilderness: Antarctica.
McEown has worked in the region
for 25 years, spending the last eight exclusively as an artist-in-residence with
One Ocean Expeditions. Here, he discusses his work in the Antarctic and the
once-in-a-lifetime experiences it offers.
ON THE ART OF GETTING
PEOPLE TO “SEE”
It’s funny. I’ll be out on deck looking and
painting, and passengers will say, “What
are you looking at?” And I’ll say, “Well,
what do you see?” At first, many of them
will say there’s nothing out there, but
it doesn’t take long for the colours and
62
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
ON THE POWER OF
WATERCOLOUR
I like that watercolour reflects that you’re
in a region where you’re dealing with
vapour, ice and light shining off the sea.
Watercolour has this ability to quickly define a very sharp edge and a really wet,
soft edge — of a cloud, say, cutting off the
top of a mountain.
So there’s an immediacy
to it, but it’s also a contem‘IT DOESN’T
plative medium. You put
TAKE LONG FOR
ON THE ARTISTIC
your mark down and what
CHALLENGES AND
you see is what you get;
THE COLOURS
OPPORTUNITIES
there’s no ability to correct
AND FORMS OF
OF THE ANTARCTIC
that kind of thing, which
LANDSCAPE
ANTARCTICA TO HIT you have when you work
It’s nice to not have to deal
in a medium such as oil,
with the darned trees, for THEM, AND THAT’S which always tempts me to
one thing. I think artists
WHAT I WANT THEM mess around too much. It
love to go there because
requires a lot of attention
TO NOTICE.’
there’s not so much clutto get that first mark right,
ter — you’re dealing with
and I find I slip into a sort
pure form. Yes, it’s sometimes hard to of timelessness when I’m painting.
get that sense of scale, but the simplicAnd it’s fun, too, because you can let
ity of the shapes really takes you back the environment influence the paintto the basic elements of art. It’s a great ing. Passengers will watch with great
opportunity to practise composition, amusement as I sit out on the deck and
to go back to being a beginner, even if incorporate splashes of water from the
you’re an experienced artist.
Drake Passage into a painting, or work
forms of Antarctica to hit them, and that’s
what I want them to notice. What colour
is that iceberg, really? Look at its incredible tones. Look at that mountain and
really examine its shape, follow its lines.
I’m getting people to see those things but
I’m also getting them to interact with the
landscape. By slowing down and painting the shapes, light and colour, you get
an enhanced awareness of
where you are.
h ia
ut rg
So Geo
a
t
i
ANTARCTICA
li
ng
a
AN
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W
CTIC
CIRCLE
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el
a
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TA R
-
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S h eI c e e
lf
Dra
ke
Pa s
sag
d
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e
S
c
S o
e
ea
I s l Fa l k
an lan
ds d
Oc
One
TIN A
C H I
L E
ditions sa
i
ea
GEN
pe
ar
AR
n
Ex
South
Pole
Ross
Ice S helf
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s s
S e a
DAISY GILARDINI/DAISYGILARDINI.COM; MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/ CAN GEO
in sub-zero temperatures and watch my
paint flash-freeze so I can create an image with ice crystals on it.
ON WILDLIFE ENCOUNTERS
I’ll set up my easel and wait quite a
while to understand the dynamics of
the beach, because you don’t want to be
in a spot where animals normally pass
through. They’re not really habituated
to people, so they’re curious, but not
usually aggressive or territorial. I’ve
had king penguins come up, take a
look at the palette and canvas and move
on — “Nothing much interesting to
see here,” they seem to be saying! I’ve
had an elephant seal pup get a little too
close and start nudging my easel, looking for milk or something. We never
approach the animals, of course, but
encounters like this happen, and when
they do, it’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience for many passengers to have that
sort of innocence right in front of them.
Clockwise from OPPOSITE: Penguins
on the march in Antarctic Shoreline,
Brown Bluff, Antarctic Peninsula; the view
from McEown’s easel, Cuverville Island;
Elephant Seal Pup, South Georgia Island.
PREVIOUS PAGES: McEown overlooks the
St. Andrew’s Bay king penguin colony,
South Georgia Island.
ON HIS FAVOURITE PLACE
TO PAINT IN THE ANTARCTIC
Petermann Island, just south of the Lemaire Channel on the Antarctic Peninsula. The views of dramatic Booth Island
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
63
and the continent rising out of the ocean
provide endless compositional inspiration and reflections that are often amplified by masses of icebergs moving or
grounded by the tides. Petermann is an
important nesting site for birds, including changing populations of different
penguin species scientists have studied
for decades. In just one painting session, I observed gentoo, chinstrap and
Adélie penguins while blue-eyed shags
flew nervously overhead, reacting to a
leopard seal hauled out on shore nearby.
ON THE ANTARCTIC AS A RESET
We’re all humbled by the polar regions,
and I always think of being there as a
chance to reset my senses — to clean my
palette, so to speak. Being in Antarctica
wipes the slate clean of our preconceptions of our ordinary lives because we’re
experiencing an otherworldly, almost
fantastical place that we’re not used to. I
remember being a bit overwhelmed and
anxious about missing something on
my first few journeys, because you can’t
help but want to take it all in. But now I
tell people that the quality of what they
see is more important than the quantity.
Quality, gratitude and humility — that’s
why we go to Antarctica.
David McEown (davidmceown.com) lives
in Vancouver and Richmond Hill, Ont.
Harry Wilson ( @MrWilsonH) is the
editor of Canadian Geographic Travel.
Set sail for Antarctica!
One Ocean Expeditions is offering
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For more information on these
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64
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
DAISY GILARDINI/DAISYGILARDINI.COM; MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/ CAN GEO
ANTARCTICA
Clockwise from TOP: Lemaire Channel Sunset; Sleeping Giant,
Paradise Harbour; McEown painting aboard a One Ocean
Expeditions ship at Point Wild on Elephant Island; Orca Hunt, one
of McEown’s most recent works, is based on a sketch the artist
began on a recent One Ocean Expeditions journey. The artist and
passengers watched a pod of orca hunting a leopard seal on a small
ice floe just north of the Lemaire Channel. “The whales swam toward
their prey, and created a wave to destabilize the ice and knock the
seal off,” says McEown. “The seal survived and the orca moved on.”;
After the Storm, near Brown Bluff on the Antarctic Sound; Courting
n.2, on the sea ice near Snow Hill Island, Antarctic Peninsula.
Watch a video of David McEown painting Antarctic wildlife and read
about his favourite paintings at cangeotravel.ca/ss18/antarctica.
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
65
NEWFOUNDLAND
66
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
FISH,
FORAGE,
FEAST
Newfoundland’s food
scene is having a
moment, and local
entrepreneurs are
capitalizing with
specialized tours
that offer an insider’s
perspective on what
makes the Rock so tasty
BY SARAH BROWN
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
67
NEWFOUNDLAND
Clockwise from ABOVE: A picnic
scene on Gros Morne National Park’s
Coastal Trail, a regular stop for Taste
of Gros Morne tours; Four Seasons
Tours’ Darren Park cooks mussels on a
Bay of Islands beach; dining alfresco
with Taste of Gros Morne at Lobster
Cove; Charlie Payne in The Hunky
Dory, his Woody Point folk-art shop.
PREVIOUS PAGES: Foraged chanterelle
mushrooms; fishing boats at Quidi
Vidi in St. John’s.
What’s Park’s secret?
‘The sweetness of the sea.’
His recipe: fresh mussels
boiled in seawater.
That simple; that good.
68
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
“
Y
OU KNOW EVERY Newfoundlander loves a moose …” says
Wayne Parsons, pausing just a
fraction of a second for comedic effect,
“… when it’s up to its arse in gravy!”
The crowd roars and Parsons, who’s
providing commentary on a guided catamaran tour of Bonne Bay in western
Newfoundland, continues on with a
monologue that takes in everything from
fishing quotas to the region’s ecology to
the secret to preparing the perfect Jiggs’
dinner — a Newfoundland classic consisting of salt beef boiled together with
potatoes, carrots, cabbage or turnip.
It’s obvious he loves this land
around Gros Morne National Park, but
his observations about its landscape
and inhabitants remain unpretentious
and hilariously on point.
This deep pride for their home is
something Newfoundlanders have always
had, but it has only recently taken root in
a new segment of the island’s tourism
industry — one that’s showcasing its cuisine to the rest of the world.
Many credit celebrity chef Jeremy
Charles, he of the revered Raymonds in
St. John’s, for the ever-increasing influx
of committed locavores eager to experi-
ence the province’s traditional ingredients. Having his establishments recognized twice in the “best new restaurants”
issue of enRoute magazine has resulted
in national fame for Charles, while also
helping spawn a wider appreciation for
the island’s food and drink scene.
To experience the real Newfoundland,
travellers are getting down and dirty,
learning about the history of the fishery
as they jig for cod and about traditional
canning techniques and simple recipes
as they forage for berries that they’ll later
make into jams and wild chanterelles that
will soon become the best-ever mushrooms on toast.
DARREN PARK OF Four Seasons Tours
personifies the new movement. A proud
Newfoundlander who has never left
the island, this quiet local celebrity has
toured and fed renowned chefs, a global
array of film crews and hundreds of casual vacationers looking for an authentic
taste of the Rock. His summer chariot
of choice is an orange and green dory
handcrafted by a retired fisherman.
As the dory pulls out of Cox’s Cove
just north of Corner Brook and into the
Bay of Islands — the water’s a touch
NEWFOUNDLAND
Bonne Bay Inn
Taste of
Gros Morne
The Old Loft
NORTHWEST
Gros Morne
National Park
0
Bonne Bay
Bay of Islands
150 km
Norris Point
Woody Point
Cox's Cove
Corner Brook
ST. JOHN'S
WEST
“loppy” today, Park warns — a bald
eagle appears, soaring lazily overhead
before alighting on top of a tall fir on
the shoreline. It can spot the dory from
kilometres away and knows there’s the
possibility of swooping in to grab a
fish as it’s thrown back. (An increasing
number of Park’s tours are geared to
photographers eager to capture eagles
in their viewfinders.)
Cast, let the line hit bottom, reel it
up five turns, give it a tug. Success is
instant. Within a half hour, the crew
of four has reeled in three cod, a couple of ocean perch and a nasty looking
sculpin. At this time of year, it’s only
open season for cod on the weekends,
so back they go. No worries, though, as
Park has a cooler full of cod in the back
of the dory and, when we tire of fishing,
we head across the cove to his summer
cabin for a classic beach boil-up.
Within minutes, a driftwood fire
is burning brightly, a pot of mussels
steaming on the grill. Ready almost
Sarah Brown ( @OtownBrown) is
the former editor of Ottawa Magazine
and now writes its “City Bites” column.
instantly, they are, quite simply,
divine. What’s his secret? “The
sweetness of the sea,” says
Park. His recipe: fresh mussels boiled in seawater.
That simple; that good.
Then it’s into his homey cabin for pan-fried
cod, a plate of smoked
Atlantic salmon made by
one of Park’s friends and a
swoon-worthy cod au gratin
made by his wife, Anita, with fresh
potatoes from their garden. A professional recipe developer on the tour begs
for her secrets.
Fresh cinnamon rolls complete the
feast. And all the while, there is Park
telling his fish tales, making every
guest feel at home. “The smiles tell the
story,” he says. “Being out on the water
and helping someone catch their first
fish — that’s what it’s about.”
Four Seasons Tours
Madison's, Marble Inn Resort
Quidi Vidi Brewing Company
Mallard Cottage
The Inn by Mallard Cottage
Raymonds
Cod Sounds
North Head Trail
The Merchant Tavern
AFTER A DAY on the water with Park,
the Marble Inn Resort just east of Corner
Brook offers up luxury accommodations
on the Humber River and a casual-fine
dining menu at Madison’s, where the
culinary chemistry involves using local
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
69
E A S T
PREVIOUS SPREAD AND BOTTOM RIGHT: NEWFOUNDLAND TOURISM. OPPOSITE PAGE: TASTE OF GROS MORNE. THIS PAGE, TOP AND MIDDLE: SARAH BROWN; MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO
Avondale
NEWFOUNDLAND
RIGHT: Lori McCarthy, who owns
‘Years ago, if you could
get stuff from far away
you thought it was fancy.
Now we’re finally
appreciating local.’
and seasonal ingredients to produce
inspired takes on traditional Newfoundland cuisine. So, think scallops, but with
a grenadine reduction and apple salad;
think Codroy Valley lamb, but braised
as a masala and served with sumac spinach; think mussels from the island’s west
coast, but dished up with spicy Nduja
sausage. Then think about saving room
for the honey and whiskey mousse.
Meanwhile, at the nearby seaside
communities of Norris Point and Woody
Point, husband-and-wife team Ian and
Rebecca Stone tempt food-focused travellers with insider access to the best of
local restaurants through their Taste of
Gros Morne tours.
Part of a new wave of food entrepreneurs, they revel in “letting people know
where the good places to eat are.” A typical tour is intimate, maxing out at eight
people who Rebecca guides through
three or four restaurants, highlighting
appetizers at one, a main at another, perhaps a dessert at the third. The dishes
are resolutely homegrown — delectable lobster dumplings at the Bonne Bay
Inn’s Blue Ocean Dining Room, say, or
a massive slab of fresh pan-fried cod at
super casual The Old Loft Restaurant.
“Years ago, if you could get stuff from far
away you thought it was fancy,” she says.
“Now we’re finally appreciating local.”
“I HAVE A PASSION for making
things from scratch — to be perfectly honest, I’ve gone a little cracked
70
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
on it!” Over on Newfoundland’s east
coast the foodie trend is just as hot
and Lori McCarthy of Cod Sounds is
a whirlwind of energy. Both earnest
and joyful, she’s a true devotee of local
foraging and a passionate advocate for
traditional knowledge and recipes.
She’s also a savvy entrepreneur,
building a brilliant business that sees
her leading beachside foraging and
picnic tours in the summer and classes
such as fireside cookery and hare hunting in the winter via her Cod Sounds
cookery school.
In her spare time, she’s out scouring
nearby beaches for fresh ingredients on
behalf of the city’s top chefs — pretty
sprigs of oyster plant for salads, some
spicy sea rocket to pair with fish, intense
Scotch lovage and aromatic sweet gale,
some bright green gutweed to dry and
sprinkle in fresh butter. Her encyclopedic knowledge of these ingredients
is self-taught, something she dived into
with gusto less than a decade ago, combining book learning with knowledge
gleaned from her mother’s and grandmother’s generations.
As McCarthy wanders through a
meadow and toward the beach on her
Forage & Fire tour in nearby Avondale,
collecting bags in hand, tour participants realize they’ll never again tackle
a hiking trail in quite the same way.
Where before one might have appreciated this blanket thing called “nature,”
now eyes scan for dewberries, blue-
LEFT: COURTESY BONNE BAY INN; RIGHT: NEWFOUNDLAND TOURISM
and operates the St. John’s-based
culinary excursion company Cod
Sounds, forages for chanterelle
mushrooms. BELOW: A dish of
hazelnut-crusted cod at the Bonne
Bay Inn’s Blue Ocean Dining Room.
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Now eyes scan for dewberries,
blueberries, raspberries,
bakeapples, rosehips and,
if lucky, an undiscovered
patch of chanterelles.
berries, raspberries, bakeapples, rosehips and, if lucky, an undiscovered patch
of chanterelles hidden under a downed
tree. On a driftwood-strewn beach, there
are wild peas and dandelions and edible
seaweeds galore. It’s all good fun, with
McCarthy keeping up a steady chatter
about the land’s bounty and the importance of using traditional ingredients to
give Newfoundland cuisine a real sense
of place.
McCarthy’s mother, Shirley, waits
at the end of the beach, a pot of water on the boil. The open-air feast she
and Lori have prepared showcases all
that’s making Newfoundland Canada’s
food-scene darling. There’s rhubarb tea
(into which goes wild mint and rose
petals picked by the beach). Fresh garden carrots are cooked lightly over the
fire, paired with dill and homemade
butter, followed by a platter of McCarthy’s own moose salami with newly
pickled bakeapples and beets. Fresh
scallops are sliced thin and placed on a
hot rock so they’re cooked just around
the edges, dusted with dehydrated scallop roe and salt. There are skewers of
moose, from an animal harvested in
last year’s hunt. To finish off, a simple
partridgeberry dessert loaf. It is, quite
simply, the best picnic ever.
QUIDI VIDI COOL
WHERE TO EAT AND STAY IN ST. JOHN’S HOTTEST NEIGHBOURHOOD
When in St. John’s, dedicated followers of renowned chef Jeremy Charles make their
way to Raymonds or The Merchant Tavern, revelling in his terroir-driven Newfoundland
cuisine. But when asked where he likes to go for a bite, Charles invariably mentions
Mallard Cottage (left), an equally intriguing destination in Quidi Vidi, a neighbourhood at the edge of the city.
Helmed by Top Chef Canada favourite Todd Perrin, Mallard Cottage is a bustling
hangout housed in a restored late-18th-century fishing cottage. Hipsters rub shoulders with businessmen, all enjoying Perrin’s updated play on classic recipes, the
menu changing daily and posted on the restaurant’s Instagram account.
Those in the know stay in Quidi Vidi for a night or two, settling at The Inn by Mallard
Cottage, eight rustic-chic rooms housed in two heritage houses down the road from the
restaurant. Just steps from the scenic harbour and the Quidi Vidi Brewing Company
(there are daily tours), the inn is also right on the edge of the North Head Trail with its
stunning coastal views. Bonus: Mallard Cottage’s pastry chefs deliver a breakfast basket
of fresh-baked goods and tea or coffee to your door to start each day.
72
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
TOP: CAROLYN JANES; BOTTOM: COURTESY EMILY EVANS AND PHIL MALONEY
Lori McCarthy uses a fire-heated stone to
dish out diver scallops, which are topped
with preserved scallop roe and served
with seaweed butter, during one of her
Foraging & Fire cookery workshops.
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‘
The Royal Canadian Geographical Society is honoured
to present this volume as part of a four-book set,
sharing the stories, perspectives and history
of the Indigenous Peoples of Canada.
This atlas brings together voices from First Nations, Métis, and Inuit
communities, representing the diversity of intellect and profundity
of tragedy, comedy and triumph in Indigenous communities from
Tkaronto to Tuktoyaktuk and Victoria to Val-d’Or.
’
— JULIAN BRAVE NOISECAT,
Member of the Canim Lake Band Tsq’escen and an award-winning writer
THE CONCIERGE
TORONTO FOOD and DRINK
HELLO, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, and welcome to the first instalment of The Concierge, the
column that answers your travel questions with the same poise, savvy and dedication that I
brought to bear during my 37-year career as head concierge at London’s Saint Christopher
Hotel. No, no — not that dodgy one in Piccadilly. The other one. In Knightsbridge. Obviously.
Anyway, very good of you to have made it this far. I say that because I had suggested to
the editor that the concierge is accustomed to being up at the front — the better to serve the
guests, you see — but he rather rudely told me, “Magazines don’t have lobbies — you’re at the
back of the book.”
Thankfully, my guest this issue has not only restored my faith in Canadians’ politeness, she
has actually made me want to visit Toronto, where I now understand there’s some remarkably fine
food and drink to be had. Without further ado, then, here’s the charming Carolina Avaria, chef
concierge at Toronto’s Four Seasons Hotel, on the city’s best eating and drinking experiences.
ALO RESTAURANT. ILLUSTRATION: KERRY HODGSON/CAN GEO
WHAT ARE TORONTO’S
BEST FOOD-AND-DRINK
EXPERIENCES RIGHT NOW?
The first has to be restaurant
tasting tables or bars. You might
have to dig a little bit deeper into
your pocket, but it’s worth it because you’re typically right at the
kitchen’s edge and being served
by the chefs themselves. And as
a former theatre manager, I can
tell you that it’s an entertainment
experience. The second is
culinary-and-drinking walking
tours, which are great because
you’re not confined to one experience or even neighbourhood. Ask
a savvy concierge to make sure
you get sent to the right tour company, though, because you want
to be entertained. What you don’t
want is a situation where you have
some sommelier that talks on and
on and on, while you’re like, “You
had me at ‘The grape…’ ”!
Seasons and run by chef Rob
Gentile. Both places are simply
phenomenal. For drink tours,
Drink Toronto really stands out;
they do cool neighbourhoods
such as Kensington Market and
Queen Street West. The Culinary
Adventure Co. is also great.
SO WHERE SHOULD ONE
MAKE A RESERVATION?
IF YOU HAD A FEW HOURS TO
EAT AND DRINK AFTER WORK,
WHERE WOULD YOU GO?
For tasting tables, I’m a massive
fan of Alo (ABOVE), which is probably the best restaurant in Canada
right now, thanks to chef Patrick
Kriss. I also love Buca Yorkdale,
which is right here by the Four
great bar inside. Then I would walk
over to Bar Mercurio and have one
of the best pizzas in town.
SOUNDS DELIGHTFUL! AND
YOU HAD ME AT “BRITISH
GASTRO PUB,” BY THE WAY.
I’d stay here in Yorkville, of course!
First I’d go for a glass of crisp Sauvignon Blanc at The Oxley, a British
gastro pub that has a great front
and back patio in summer, and a
Glad to help! After all, as one of
my former service instructors often
used to say, you can give people
back their money, but you can’t
give them back their time.
Got a travel question for The
Concierge? He’s ready to help.
Tweet him @CanGeo_Travel and
use the hashtag #CGTConcierge.
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
75
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BEST BEST
of the
ECO-TRAVEL EDITION
| ESCAPES & ADVENTURES | FOOD & DRINK | CITIES & SIGHTS | STAYS & WAYS | GEAR & TECH
Our picks for the top eco-travel experiences
ESCAPES & ADVENTURES
GANGLER’S NORTH SEAL RIVER LODGE Despite all the signs of foot traffic
on the “Central Esker” in northwestern Manitoba, Brian Kotak believes he and I
are likely the first people to walk here in hundreds, maybe thousands, of years.
Kotak, the resident biologist at nearby Gangler’s North Seal River Lodge, located
about 100 kilometres from the Nunavut border, guides me along the sandy ridge
formed by retreating glaciers 8,000 years ago — one of the lodge’s new eco-adventures. Accessed via float plane, the trek is made easy by a well-worn game trail
dotted with numerous moose, caribou, wolf and bear tracks. Wildlife, as well as
northern lights viewing, mountain biking, kayaking and fishing, are all on offer, but
exploring the geology, species and Indigenous history of the region’s 13 globally
important and geologically rare eskers is the highlight. “To us, it’s a jewel of Manitoba,” explains lodge proprietor Ken Gangler. “There’s really nothing else like it.”
Read more about Gangler’s eco-adventures at cangeotravel.ca/ss18/eskers.
—Aaron Kylie
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
77
MUKTUK ADVENTURES It’s all about the Alaskan huskies
at this Yukon dogsledding outfitter, located on an off-grid,
primarily solar-powered ranch outside Whitehorse. Summer
and fall are for hiking, canoeing the Takhini River and joining
the dogs for training runs, but now’s also the time to plan
for a winter expedition, when you can spend hours, days or
weeks on the trails. muktuk.com
TOURISME MANAWAN The Atikamekw First Nation
welcomes visitors to Manawan, a community on the shores
of Lac Métabeskéga, four hours north of Montreal in the
Lanaudière region. An ancient foundation of hospitality and
reverence for the land are at the heart of activities such as
canoe trips, beaver dam tours and traditional music workshops. Nights are spent under the stars in a lakeside teepee
or at the Auberge Manawan. voyageamerindiens.com
FOOD & DRINK
TINHORN CREEK
VINEYARDS Ten years ago,
this Okanagan Valley, B.C.,
vineyard became Canada’s
first carbon-neutral winery.
That’s praiseworthy enough,
but while you sample its
Cabernet Franc and other
splendid Oldfield Reserve
vintages (BELOW), which
like any of Tinhorn Creek’s
wines evoke the terroir of the
sage-covered desert region,
you can also rest assured that
no rattlesnakes were harmed
in its making. Perhaps that’s
not your typical vino-drinking
concern, but Tinhorn Creek
has set up some admirable
ecological programs, restoring native plant species and
using snake barrier fencing
and relocation to protect the
endemic western rattlesnake
and other species.
tinhorn.com
RESTAURANT MANITOBA
“We wanted a taste of the
forest in our plates, a taste
of nature in our glasses,
wood, rock, wind.” That’s
what the word “Manitoba”
conjured for the founders
of this delightful restaurant
(ABOVE, RIGHT), which contrary
to its name is in Montreal’s
78
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
hip Mile End neighbourhood. A cosy, rustic-chic
slice of Quebec nature,
Manitoba’s fare is a mix of
local, organic and wild (from
mushrooms and seaweed
to duck, deer and seal) and
much of the wine list is natural and biodynamic.
restaurantmanitoba.com
CAPTAIN’S GALLEY Head to
tiny Scrabster, on Scotland’s
northern coast, for a taste of
the North Sea. Everything at
the Captain’s Galley is fresh
and delectable, seasonal and
wild-caught by local fishers.
Owners Jim and Mary Cowie
use and recycle everything,
right down to the fish and
shellfish scraps, which they
use for stock or boil down
into nutritious dog food for
local dog homes.
captainsgalley.co.uk
PREVIOUS PAGE: AARON KYLIE/CAN GEO. THIS PAGE, FROM TOP: MAPLE LEAF ADVENTURES; PHILIPPE RICHELET; LIONEL TRUDEL PHOTOGRAPHY/TINHORN CREEK VINYARDS.
OPPOSITE, FROM TOP: GEOFF FITZGERALD /EVERGREEN BRICK WORKS; VANDUSEN BOTANICAL GARDEN; AIR CANADA
BEST
of the
MAPLE LEAF ADVENTURES This British Columbiabased small-ship cruise company sails coastlines where
you’re more likely to spot a grizzly bear meandering through
the forest than you are a road. The crews of the Maple Leaf
(a sailing ship), Swell (a tugboat) and Cascadia (a catamaran,
launching summer 2018, RIGHT) pride themselves on probing
the archipelagos, fiords and rainforests of the region with
minimal environmental impact. mapleleafadventures.com
BEST
ESCAPES & ADVENTURES
CITIES & SIGHTS
EVERGREEN BRICK WORKS For
almost a century, the brick works and
its clay quarry on Toronto’s Lower Don
River (RIGHT) turned out the city’s red
building blocks. It was abandoned for
decades before Evergreen (an organization with the mission of inspiring
green cities) took over in 2010, trees
and wildflowers were planted in the
clay-pit ravines, nature trails were
blazed and the site’s crumbling factory
buildings were rehabilitated. Today,
the site is not only a world-renowned
greenspace but also a wild sanctuary
in the city and an impressive homage
to industrial history.
The Saturday farmers market is
a Toronto staple and the city’s larg-
est, and in spring 2018, the nearly
5,000-square-metre kiln building will
reopen as a carbon-neutral complex
that will showcase green urban innovation projects from around the world.
evergreen.ca/brickworks
VANDUSEN BOTANICAL GARDEN
This 22-hectare retreat in the middle
of Vancouver is home to more than
7,500 plant species, a 3,000-cedar
Elizabethan hedge maze and a plethora
of urban wildlife, but its undulating
visitor centre (LEFT) is still a showstealer. Designed in the shape of
orchid petals, the net-zero energy and
water facility has won international
sustainability awards, in part for its
plant-covered “living roofs” and rooftop rainwater collection and redistribution. vandusengarden.org
GOING DRIVERLESS IN PERTH
One of the world’s first fully autonomous electric buses completed a test
year on the streets of Perth, Australia,
in late 2017, having carried 5,000 passengers a collective 6,000 kilometres by
November. Now the Western Australian
capital has joined Paris in the first trials
of a small fleet of autonomous electric
cars, which will operate much like
driverless (though chaperoned) Ubers.
Would you hop in?
STAYS & WAYS
LE GERMAIN CHARLEVOIX HOTEL & SPA In a family
of boutique hotels founded with eco-responsibility in mind,
this sibling still stands out. Surrounded by the rural beauty
of the Charlevoix region, a short walk to the St. Lawrence
River and the artsy town of Baie-Saint-Paul, Que., Le Germain
Charlevoix is an elegant architectural feat and a tribute to
its environment — all spaces are stylishly adorned with the
materials, fixtures and art of local suppliers, artisans and artists. And did we mention it relies on geothermal energy and a
stormwater reclamation system, and tends vegetable gardens,
beehives and livestock? (The nearby highland cattle, sheep,
ducks and chickens are wildly popular with hotel guests.)
legermainhotels.com/charlevoix
AIR CANADA Next time you buckle into an Air Canada jet,
fly easy knowing that the nation’s biggest and busiest carrier
earned the 2018 Eco-Airline of the Year award at the Annual Airline Industry Achievement Awards for its gains in fuel efficiency
(emissions have been cut by 40 per cent since 1990), leading
the industry in bio-fuel development and a hangar’s-worth of
other environmental programs. aircanada.com
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
79
BEST
of the
SVART Look to Norway for the future of Arctic accommodation. Announced in 2018 by the architects at Oslo-based
Snøhetta, the sensational “Svart” (RIGHT) is a circular,
energypositive hotel planned for the foot of the Svartisen
glacier in Meløy, where it will be suspended by wooden poles
anchored into the bed of Holandsfjorden fiord. Svart will be
the first energy-positive hotel built north of the Arctic Circle:
not only will it consume a mere 15 per cent of the energy of a
traditional hotel, its solar-panel-sheathed roof will also allow
it to generate its own energy. With construction set to begin
in early 2019 and doors opening in 2021, our only question is,
when can Canada have one? snohetta.com/projects
GEAR & TECH
TENTREE Whether a
hoody (RIGHT), a tank or a
dress, every piece of tentree
clothing is made from hemp,
organic cotton, coconut and
other sustainable materials
and comes with a code for
tracking where in the world
the company will plant
another 10 trees. Founded
in Regina and later moved
to Vancouver, tentree is up
to more than 19.5 million
indigenous trees planted
in six countries, including
Madagascar, which was 80
per cent deforested in recent
decades. tentree.ca
JUTA SHOES Comfy, lightweight and casual, espa-
80
drilles are made for exploring
cities on foot. East London’s
Juta Shoes make theirs (LEFT)
from environmentally friendly
jute fibre soles finished with
vulcanized rubber, as well
as offcuts from local leather
shops that would otherwise
end up in a landfill. They also
recruit and train unemployed
local women to make the
shoes, and pay them the
London Living Wage (about
$18 per hour) to do so.
jutashoes.com
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
UNITED & FREE Skincare
need not fall by the wayside
because you’re adventuring.
United & Free’s plant-based
products (BELOW) can be found
in a few cities across Canada,
but you’ll have the most luck
in Vancouver. Brother and sister team Brandon and Kaleena Morrison’s excellent face
and body lotions, cleansers,
shampoos and body washes
are all-natural and gender
neutral. unitedandfree.com
THIS PAGE, FROM TOP: SNØHETTA PLOMPMOZES; KALEN EMSLEY/TENTREE; JUTA SHOES; UNITED & FREE. OPPOSITE, FROM TOP: YOLK USA INC.; PATAGONIA
BEST
STAYS & WAYS
ULTIMATE
CANADIAN
PHOTOS
HANNAH KEIVER
SOLAR PAPER Charge your
phone, tablet, GoPro and
other small electronics while
stretched out on a tropical
beach, eating alfresco in
Rome or hiking the Rockies
using Yolk’s new Solar Paper
solar charger. As the name
implies, it’s remarkably compact — the thinnest available,
actually — as well as durable,
water-resistant and just plain
sexy. yolkstation.com
CANGEO.CA/INSTAGRAM
PATAGONIA BLACK HOLE
WHEELED DUFFEL BAG
Simple, hard-wearing and
water-repellent, roomy yet
designed to meet carry-on
requirements, the Black Hole
Wheeled Duffel Bag is a minimalist’s dream and will be a
dependable travel companion
for years. Plus, it’s made by
Patagonia, which is all about
ethical sourcing and labour
practices, cutting down on microfibre pollution and general
environmental responsibility.
patagonia.com
SEE CANADA through the eyes of 150 Instagrammers! In
this second edition of Ultimate Canadian Instagram Photos,
embark on a stunning journey from coast to coast to coast
and discover the country’s wildlife, cities, parks, weather
and iconic landmarks. Whether these scenes are instantly
recognizable or get you dreaming of new adventures, we
think you’ll be inspired to join
our Instagram community and
share your corner of Canada
with Canadians and the world!
#ShareCanGeo
@CanGeo
SOUVENIR
.
PRINT OF THE HÔTEL CLUNY
PARIS, FRANCE
82
#CANGEOTRAVEL SPRING/SUMMER 2018
ter alongside the ghosts of these literary legends. I
often write in their favourite cafés seeking inspiration at least, and spectral visitation at best. I’ve
found the former but, regrettably, never the latter.
We bought this print in a tiny shop not far from
Les Deux Magots, one of Hemingway’s preferred
haunts. The Hotel Cluny in the sketch is now a
wonderful museum. In the too-long intervals
between trips to the City of Lights, I often find
myself absorbed in this print. It sustains my connection to Paris and to the literary giants who lived
and loved there nearly 100 years ago.
—Terry Fallis
A two-time winner of the Stephen Leacock Medal
for Humour, Terry Fallis ( @TerryFallis) is the
author of six national bestselling novels.
What’s your favourite travel souvenir? Tell us the story
(@CanGeo_Travel) and
(@cangeotravel).
behind it on
PETER POWER/CAN GEO
F
or many writers, certain places in certain times
hold literary magic — San Francisco in the
1950s, Canada in the 1960s, New York in almost
any period. In my writerly heart, Paris of the 1920s
occupies a very special place. For a good chunk of
my life as a novelist, I’ve been fascinated by the expats who formed what Gertrude Stein called the
“lost generation” in postwar Paris. Hemingway, in
particular, seized my interest many years ago and
still has not let go. As a charter member of the “why
use six words when 12 will do” school of prose, I’m
not a big fan of Hemingway’s spare writing, but I’m
endlessly curious about his life, especially his years
as a young, poor, struggling writer in Paris.
Toronto, where I live, looks much different today than it did in the 1920s. But Paris still appears
nearly the same as a century ago when Hemingway,
Fitzgerald, Morley Callaghan, James Joyce, Ezra
Pound and the rest of their crew wrote and drank in
the cafés of the Left Bank. My wife and I visit Paris
whenever we can, always staying in the Latin Quar-
N
EW
!
NEWFOUNDLAND
AND LABRADOR
GIANT FLOOR MAP
INCLUDES
EXPLORE THE UNIQUE geography, history
and beauty of Newfoundland and Labrador
on Canadian Geographic Education’s first
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This resource is now available free of charge
to all schools in Newfoundland and Labrador.
REQUEST IT TODAY
education.canadiangeographic.ca
10
CURRICULUMLINKED ACTIVITIES
AND PROPS
Stories
Make
the Best
Souvenirs
“When we got to Mazatlán there was so
much to do and we did it all. But the
best memories we have to share with
others are the times we spent doing
nothing at all.”
#SouvenirStories
Tell your Mazatlán story at www.SouvenirStories.com
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