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Flight International - 10 April 2018

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Happy FIDAE
Latin American
spending under
spotlight while
industry?s main
players target
Santiago 10
Blue skies
One hundred
years since its
formation, how
Royal Air Force
chief perceives
next century 20
10-16 April 2018 Ready to fly?
Why quality is
key for carriers:
don?t miss our
Training and
Development
Guide 27
flightglobal.com
DELIVERY
Launching the
E2 generation
Embraer celebrates in style as best-ever
E-Jet heads for on-schedule service entry
ISSN 0 0 1 5 - 3 7 1 0
�80
1 5
9
770015 371303
NOMINATIONS
ARE NOW OPEN
Does your airline demonstrate excellence in
strategic thinking and leadership?
Be recognised. Award categories include Executive
Leadership, Sector Leadership, Low-cost Leadership,
Finance, Marketing, and Network Strategy.
Submit a free nomination now at
strategyawards.com
Sunday 15 July 2018
In Association With
|
Entry deadline: Friday 13 April 2018
#FABStrats
Prince Consort Rooms, HAC
Sponsored by
|
www.strategyawards.com
CONTENTS
Volume 193 Number 5631
10-16 APRIL 2018
NEWS
One hundred
years since its
formation, how
Royal Air Force
chief perceives
next century 20
10-16 April 2018
THIS WEEK
8 Boeing seeks peace as trade war looms.
GKN repeats warning after shareholders back
bid
9 KC-46A tankers prove boom capacity during
crucial tests
Ready to fly?
Why quality is
key for carriers:
don?t miss our
Training and
Development
Guide 27
flightglobal.com
FIDAE SHOW REPORT
10 Embraer sends reminder to Santiago
11 Saab displays strong support for Gripen E
cockpit updates
DELIVERY
Launching the
E2 generation
ISSN 0 0 1 5 - 3 7 1 0
�80
1 5
9
FIN_100418_301.indd 1
770015 371303
Embraer
Embraer celebrates in style as best-ever
E-Jet heads for on-schedule service entry
05/04/2018 10:16
COVER IMAGE
Embraer supplied this
shot of its first customer
E190-E2 taking off from
S鉶 Jos� dos Campos.
The regional twinjet will
enter revenue service in
Norway on 24 April P6
AIR TRANSPORT
12 SIA?s 787-10 brings capacity for change
13 MH17 missile could have evaded radar.
EASA bids to reinforce flight recorder
resilience
15 737 backlog rises with Jet follow-on.
ARJ21 crosswind testing a breeze
Flightblogger
NEWS FOCUS
16 More than simply a Boeing support act
20 Centenary milestone propels evolution of
Royal Air Force
BEHIND THE HEADLINES
Dominic Perry (pictured)
got up close to the first
Embraer E190-E2, as it was
delivered from Brazil to
launch user Wider鴈 in
Norway (P7). In Santiago,
Stephen Trimble attended
the FIDAE show (P10)
DEFENCE
18 Netherlands reveals plan for long-term
increase in defence spending.
Team Tempest eyes UCAS demonstrator
contract.
New divisions at Boeing as Caret pursues
change
19 Kuwait advances Super Hornet order
BUSINESS AVIATION
22 Business need attracts ANA to sector.
Embraer delivers Phenom 300E
23 Rising profits will drive fleet growth, FAA says.
Second PC-24 arrives as first example gets
down to爓ork
DATA VIEW
24 Demand springs back for carriers
AirTeamImages
Latin American
spending under
spotlight while
industry?s main
players target
Santiago 10
Blue skies
Chile contemplates acquiring C-27J Spartans P10
COVER STORY
6 A better E-Jet Embraer throws a party to
kick-start the E2 generation
FEATURES
27 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT
Digital flyers With demand for pilots at an
all-time high, airlines are facing two huge
challenges ? attracting enough candidates, and
adapting training to the computer age
28 Don?t read the manual Advances in airliners?
digital flightdeck technology has outpaced
evolution of pilot training, leaving the industry
scrambling for new ways to ensure aviators stay
in control
32 Skills generation For all its appeal, the
aerospace industry struggles to recruit talented
young people, so various UK institutions are
working together to build a modern, accessible
training system
REGULARS
5Comment
38 Straight & Level
39Letters
41Classified
43Jobs
47 Working Week
Sikorsky
Pilatus Aircraft, Aviation Images/REX/Shutterstock
Happy FIDAE
NEXT WEEK US ARMY
We look at the rotorcraft
renewal options for the US
Army ? including Sikorsky?s
innovative S-97 Raider
Pilatus Aircraft delivers second PC-24 P23. Training programmes for tomorrow?s digital flyers P27
Download the 2017 Commercial Engines Report
now with updated enhanced data and in-depth market analysis
flightglobal.com/commengines
CFM 2017 strip ad.indd 1
flightglobal.com
15/06/2017 08:52
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 3
19/07/2012 17:51
CONTENTS
Image of
the week
AirTeamImages posted this
striking shot of an American
Airlines 767-300ER on final
approach to Amsterdam on
31 March. Flight Fleets
Analyzer shows that the
twinjet ? N396AN ? was
first flown in 1999, and is
one of 22 examples of the
Boeing type currently in
service with the US carrier
AirTeamImages
View more great aviation
shots online and in our
weekly tablet edition:
flightglobal.com/
flight-international
The week in numbers
35%
Question of the week
Last week, we asked: Ultra-long-haul flights?
You said:
Flight Dashboard
Total votes:
On average, men earn 35% more than women at British
Airways, although the median earnings gap is smaller, at 10%
$313m
17h-plus of misery
915 votes
38%
32%
Boeing
Five-year, follow-on performance-based logistics contract
for Boeing, to support Canada?s fleet of CH-147F Chinooks
7.4
2,438
Flight Dashboard
Average age, in years, of lessor-owned fleets fell from 9.9 in
2013; the overall commercial fleet age averages 11-12 years
30%
Great for passengers
789 votes
Limited appeal
734 votes
This week, we ask: Embraer?s E2 prospects?
? Sales to soar ? Moderate success
? Depends on Boeing
Vote at flightglobal.com
FlightGlobal?s premium news and data service delivers breaking air transport stories with
profiles, schedules, and fleet, financial and traffic information flightglobal.com/dashboard
Download the Military
Simulator Census online now.
CAE ? Your worldwide training partner of choice
4 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
www.flightglobal.com/milisim
flightglobal.com
COMMENT
Fly with us: please
Demand for pilots and other skilled aviation professionals has never been greater, but the
industry struggles to attract young people to careers that captivated previous generations
s our special Training and Development Guide observes, the aviation enthusiasts who tend to run
the sector may struggle to understand that, nowadays,
hordes of talented young people are not beating down
the doors to land jobs in their industry. Recruitment is
a challenge, even for exotic, glamorous and desirable
jobs such as pilot, engineer or air traffic controller. And
the trends are not good.
First, entertain the notion ? however much a sacrilege ? that aviation is no longer so glamorous. People
today travel a lot, but unless they fly business- or firstclass, few will relish the prospect of time spent in airports or crowded metal tubes. Even the tiny cockpit
must look like an unattractive working environment.
Think Richard Burton, Blake?s Tours and Night of the
Iguana ? not Frank Sinatra and Come Fly With Me.
We must entertain the notion,
however much a sacrilege, that
aviation is no longer so glamorous
As these jobs become more like video games and less
like, well, flying, the competition from alternative career options looks increasingly attractive. Tom Cruise
and Top Gun was a long time ago; who would join the
military today to sit in a bunker monitoring a drone?
Today, air forces no longer pump out enough pilots.
This is a bigger training and recruitment problem than
the industry may recognise. The tail end of the cadre
who retired from Cold War duty to join commercial airlines is at or near retirement age. Their numbers are
dwindling, their excellent airmanship experience
being lost. Young recruits are, less and less, being mentored by such classically trained flyers, who may well
Moviestore Collection/REX/Shutterstock
A
Better by air?
have provided their inspiration to enter the cockpit.
On top of all that, industry demand is soaring as airlines and airports expand to handle ever more flights.
In short, aircraft have changed, the industry has
changed and the world has changed. Senior people in
aviation are still of an age to remember the glamorous
glory days. The young people they need to recruit,
though, are a different breed, steeped in an era that
teaches them to be wary and cynical. Work hard ? and
pay big money ? to train for a job that demands very
specific skills? That sounds not so much like a career
that ends with a generous pension, as a recipe for being
left with nowhere to go when the next technology revolution ? or the whim of a cost-cutting boss on a huge
salary and hefty bonus ? leaves you unemployed.
Aviation still offers exciting and glamorous work,
and some recruitment initiatives are showing results.
But it is no good pretending that the industry faces anything short of a crisis. ?
See Feature P27
Perfect harmony?
E
Stay up to date with the latest
news and analysis from the
commercial aviation sector:
flightglobal.com/dashboard
flightglobal.com
mbraer has, believe it or not, its own anthem. The
lyrics talk about how Brazil?s aerospace industry is
a vital part of defending the homeland: its blue sky, the
emerald green forests and the Amazon river.
What is absent, however, is any mention of a joint
venture with a counterpart from North America that
promises to entirely reshape the company.
Maybe he is adopting his poker face, but it is hard to
discern enormous enthusiasm for the discussions from
Embraer?s chief executive Paulo Cesar de Souza e Silva.
Although he notes the benefits for both parties, there
is a feeling that Embraer is exploring the possibility of an
alliance more because it has to, than because it wants to.
There will be benefits, of course: Boeing?s marketing
muscle and huge purchasing power would ensure supercharged growth. On the other side, the Seattle-based
airframer will be able to take advantage of Embraer?s
deep pool of engineering talent.
Souza e Silva believes the company will be able to
stand on its own if the Boeing talks are not consummated. Maybe, but facing a revitalised competitor in
Bombardier with the heft of Airbus behind it would be
significantly easier with a substantial ally.
Others in Embraer?s leadership team seem keener on a
new relationship with its friends in the north. Perhaps
Souza e Silva, as a proud Brazilian, feels that the anthem?s ideals are being diminished, however slightly. ?
See This Week P6
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 5
THIS WEEK
BRIEFING
CFM POWERS UP LION AIR LEAP CONTRACT
ENGINES Indonesian low-cost carrier Lion Air has finalised a
bumper $5.5 billion order for 380 CFM International Leap-1A
engines to power its Airbus A320neo and A321neo aircraft. The
deal, which finalises an agreement announced at the Singapore
air show in February 2016, adds to the 544 Leap-1B engines
purchased by Lion Air to power its Boeing 737 Max fleet. CFM
says the new transaction takes the combined value of orders to
$13.4 billion at list prices.
BLUE ANGELS TO REPLACE ?FAT ALBERT?
PURCHASE The US Navy plans to acquire an ex-UK Royal Air
Force Lockheed Martin C-130J to ?avoid a gap in logistical support of the Blue Angels flight demonstration squadron?. A
C-130T nicknamed ?Fat Albert? currently supports the team
and conducts its own demonstration, typically involving a highperformance take-off and short-field landing. A fatal KC-130T
crash last year prompted the US Marine Corps to ground all its
remaining examples of the type.
A321LR STRETCHES LEGS FROM SEYCHELLES
TESTING Airbus?s A321LR test aircraft arrived in Toulouse on
30 March after conducting the longest-distance flight so far in
its certification campaign, from the Seychelles. The twinjet landed after an almost 11h flight from the island of Mahe in the
Indian Ocean territory. The company?s flight-test engineers
have calculated that when factors including headwinds on the
route are taken into account, the aircraft effectively flew
4,700nm (8,700km).
AER CAP DEAL BOOSTS FREE SPIRIT
ACQUISITIONS Spirit Airlines has agreed to purchase by June
all 14 Airbus A319s that it currently leases from AerCap. The
Miramar, Florida-based carrier will acquire the narrowbodies ?
which were built between 2005 and 2007 ? for an aggregate
price of $258 million, according to a securities filing. The airline
currently owns 59 A320-family aircraft and leases 58, including
examples sourced via Air Lease, Avolon, Castlelake, DAE
Capital and GECAS, Flight Fleets Analyzer shows.
HOP ATR SUFFERS WING DAMAGE
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network and fleet information sign up at:
flightglobal.com/dashboard
DELIVERY DOMINIC PERRY S肙 JOS� DOS CAMPOS
Embraer throws a
party to kick-start
the E2 generation
Double milestone for ?almost clean-sheet? narrowbody,
as launch operator Wider鴈 welcomes its first jet aircraft
I
t was not a typical delivery ceremony. With orchestration by
Paulo Cesar de Souza e Silva,
Embraer?s chief executive, the
manufacturer?s employees first
began a synchronised dance,
complete with waving flags.
Then they were summoned forward to get nearer to the first
E190-E2. And come forward they
did: spilling from behind their
barriers to get close to the aircraft,
mobile phones held aloft to grab
selfies in front of the green and
white twinjet.
All the while, a visibly animated Souza e Silva stood on a central
stage, waving his arms, exhorting
the crowd to cheer more loudly.
That is not something you can imagine from either Tom Enders or
Dennis Muilenburg, the respective heads of Airbus and Boeing.
Quite what the executives from
Norwegian carrier Wider鴈 made
of this display of Brazilian exuberance is anyone?s guess; perhaps
this is what chief executive Stein
Nilsen was alluding to when he
mentioned ?cultural differences?
between the two businesses.
But in a day of aviation firsts ?
the inaugural E2-family delivery,
coupled with it being the first jetpowered aircraft for the operator
? such an extravagant display of
emotion can be forgiven.
For Embraer, the delivery was
an important milestone: Souza e
Silva describes it as a ?new chapter in the history of the company
and for commercial aviation?.
RIGHT ON SCHEDULE
Embraer launched the E-Jet E2
family at the 2013 Paris air show,
promising to hand over the first
aircraft in the ?first semester of
2018?. Five years later, the manufacturer did exactly as promised,
with the first aircraft due to depart for Norway on 9 April and to
enter revenue service between
Bergen and Troms� on 24 April.
Although the E2 series is frequently labelled as a ?re-engined? version of the original
E-Jet line, Souza e Silva is at
pains to point out that it is ?almost a clean-sheet design?. The
INCIDENT French investigation authority BEA has confirmed
that an undercarriage hatch was discovered to be missing on a
Hop ATR 42-500 that was badly damaged during a domestic
flight. The crew of the aircraft (F-GPYF) felt an impact during its
descent to Aurillac, following a service from Paris Orly on 25
March. Investigators say the root of the wing was damaged during the incident, and that a hatch from the left main-gear was
found to to be missing after the aircraft parked.
AFRICAN SHIFT FOR WEST ATLANTIC ATP
Dominic Perry/FlightGlobal
DISPOSAL Swedish freight operator West Atlantic has sold a
pair of British Aerospace ATP freighters to Kenyan company
Encomm, with the transaction also including the provision of
spare parts and training support. ?This transaction marks the
first step in reallocating our ATP aircraft portfolio into markets
and geographies that can capitalise in full on the benefits of this
efficient turboprop,? says West Atlantic aircraft management
vice-president Robert Drews.
Stein Nilsen (left) and Paulo Cesar de Souza e Silva at the ceremony
6 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
flightglobal.com
THIS WEEK
Boeing seeks peace
as trade war looms
This Week P8
Embraer
Staff at the S鉶 Jos� dos
Campos plant were out in
force to mark the occasion
most obvious change is its new
Pratt & Whitney PW1900G
geared turbofan engines, which
are considerably larger and heavier than the GE Aviation CF34s
they replace, but the airframer
has also developed a new highaspect-ratio wing ? the most efficient on any single-aisle ? a
smaller horizontal stabiliser and
a new trailing-link landing gear.
In the cockpit, full closed-loop
fly-by-wire controls have been introduced, while still retaining sufficient commonality with the E1
series that pilots can convert to the
new type after just 2.5 days.
All these changes contribute to
a fuel-burn improvement over
the previous-generation model of
17.3%. About 11% comes from
the new engines, the remainder
from the fly-by-wire controls and
extensive aerodynamic clean-up.
A revised cabin has also been
introduced, featuring overhead
bins that are 3in (7.62cm) deeper,
to accommodate a carry-on bag
for each passenger. Seats are arranged in a two-by-two layout ?
as on the E1 ? with capacity for
between 97-114 passengers, depending on the cabin density.
Wider鴈 has opted to carry 114
passengers using seats with a
29in pitch and 2� of recline.
The Norwegian airline was a
surprise choice for launch opera-
tor, given its long allegiance to
turboprop flying. But, says Embraer Commercial Aviation chief
executive John Slattery, its technical and maintenance capabilities, and experience of flying in
harsh conditions, means it is ideally suited to the role.
MORE ACTIVITY
?We do not anticipate any significant issues with the launch of
this aircraft. All that being said, to
have an airline with the rather
unique capabilities that Wider鴈
brings made them a perfect
launch customer,? Slattery says.
Although orders for the entire
E-Jet E2 family ? which also in-
TIE-UP
Airframer ?doesn?t need? Boeing deal, but both would benefit
Although Embraer had hoped
the focus of its 4 April handover
event would be on the delivery of
its first E2-family E-Jet, inevitably
the spectre of its ongoing talks
with Boeing about a possible tieup hovered over proceedings.
Paulo Cesar de Souza e Silva,
Embraer?s chief executive, declined to comment on the status
of the discussions, but believes
there will be substantial benefits
for both the Brazilian manufacturer and Boeing if the pair can
agree how to combine forces.
flightglobal.com
?We don?t need it to happen,?
says Souza e Silva. ?Embraer is in
a very good position now, with a
very strong balance sheet.
?However, when we look towards the future, given the [market] dynamics, and given that
every company would like to
grow, in order to have Embraer
grow faster, we would need a
move like this one [with Boeing].?
The two companies disclosed
in late 2017 that they were in
talks about a possible ?combination?, although few details have
emerged on the structure or
scope of any such tie-up.
Boeing would also benefit
from a closer union, says Souza e
Silva, who notes: ?It is a good
strategic move, given the capabilities that we have.?
A planned alliance between
Airbus and Bombardier, centred
on the latter?s CSeries programme, appears to have
prompted the talks between
Boeing and Embraer, with a successful conclusion now hinging on
Brazilian government approval. ?
cludes the E175 and E195 ? have
been slow in recent years (the
most recent was Wider鴈?s 2017
commitment for three) Slattery is
confident that Embraer will secure more deals this year.
?It is clear and evident to
璭veryone that there is a constant
throughput of airline chief executives visiting S鉶 Jos� [dos Campos] to see the E2,? he says.
?There has been a meaningful uptick in commercial activity, which
will culminate in d
璱scussions
closing in the coming quarters.?
For the airline?s part, Nilsen
says the carrier was ?extremely
proud? to be selected as launch
operator for the E190-E2.
?Working with Embraer has
been a pleasure ? they share
many of our values. We are impressed by the airplane, but most
of all we are impressed by the
people of Embraer,? he says.
Wider鴈 will receive its two
subsequent aircraft in May and
June, but while it also holds options covering an additional 12
jets, Nilsen is in no hurry to firm
those commitments.
?After the summer vacation we
will start thinking about the next
step,? he says. ?We are not converting [options] at the moment;
we have to keep focused on entry
into service. If we can find a good
position in the market in Norway
then I am sure we will move.? ?
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 7
THIS WEEK
For up-to-the-minute air transport news,
network and fleet information sign up at:
flightglobal.com/dashboard
DISPUTE STEPHEN TRIMBLE WASHINGTON DC
Boeing seeks peace as trade war looms
Seattle responds to threat of tariffs between USA and China, saying move would ?do harm to global aerospace industry?
oeing has responded to the
broiling prospect of a trade
war that threatens to engulf commercial aircraft produced in
China and the USA, releasing a
carefully-worded statement designed to highlight that neither
side has taken action.
The 4 April step came after US
President Donald Trump?s administration proposed a 25% tariff on
Chinese commercial aircraft the
previous day. Beijing responded
within 12h with a package of retaliatory tariffs, including taxes on
importing 737-800s.
?Boeing is confident that dialogue continues. While both governments have outlined positions
that could do harm to the global
aerospace industry, neither has
Boeing
B
Beijing?s carriers represent a key customer base for manufacturer?s 737 series, including the new Max 8
yet imposed these drastic measures,? the company says. ?We will
continue in our efforts to engage
both governments and build on
assurances by US and Chinese
leaders that productive talks are
ongoing. A strong and vibrant aerospace industry is important to
the economic prosperity and national security of both countries.?
The US proposals cast Boeing
in the awkward position of push-
PROGRAMME
Chinese-Russian widebody venture moves to select suppliers
A year-long joint concept definition phase launched on 27 March
will select the Tier 1 suppliers for
the Chinese-Russian CR929-600
widebody, the CRAIC joint venture announced on 30 March.
The new phase means China?s
Comac and Russia?s United Aircraft
(UAC) are expanding the scope of
supplier selection beyond engine
suppliers. GE Aviation and
璕olls-Royce are expected to sub-
mit bids by May for the 75,000lb
(333kN)-thrust turbofans planned
for the twin-engined widebody.
Meanwhile, CRAIC will begin
working with suppliers on defining
the requirements for major aircraft
systems including the landing
gear, environmental control system and avionics, UAC says.
CRAIC plans to send the rest of
the solicitations for all of the major
work packages on the CR929-600
by the end of the year, UAC says.
The supplier selection phase of
the programme should be completed by the end of 2019, it adds.
The CR929-600 represents a
Chinese/Russian response to the
Airbus A350-900 and Boeing
7-9 and -10. If introduced in the
2025-2028 timeframe as planned,
the aircraft would become the first
twin-engined widebody aircraft
produced by either country. ?
ing against trade restrictions only
a few months after championing
a defeated Trump administration
attempt to slap a nearly 300%
tariff on imports of the Bombardier CSeries.
In this round, Boeing?s fate may
again be decided by the US International Trade Commission (ITC).
The panel rejected the proposed
tariff on the CSeries, arguing that
the US airframer was not harmed
by an under-priced sale of CS100s
to Delta Air Lines.
On 15 May, the same ITC
panel will decide on the Trump
administration?s newly-unveiled
package of tariffs on more than
1,000 products, which includes
imports of large Chinese commercial aircraft, such as the
Comac ARJ21. ?
See Air Transport P15
TAKEOVER MICHAEL GUBISCH LONDON
GKN repeats warning after shareholders back bid
S
hareholders in GKN voted on
29 March to accept a take璷ver
offer from turnaround s� pecialist
Melrose Industries.
Melrose says that 52.43% of
shareholders voted in favour of
its revised offer, which valued
the UK aerostructures specialist
at �1 billion ($11.4 billion). In
January it had tabled an initial,
speculative bid that valued the
company at about �billion.
Chairman Christopher Miller
says Melrose is ?delighted and
grateful to have received support
from GKN shareholders for our
plan to create a UK industrial
powerhouse with a market capitalisation of over � billion and
a tremendous future?.
Melrose has ?made commitments as to investment in R&D,
skills and people,? Miller notes,
adding that GKN will be ?enter-
8 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
ing into very good hands?.
The GKN board has reiterated
its criticism that Melrose?s offer
?fundamentally undervalues?
the business. It warns that if the
shareholder acceptance reaches
75% and Melrose delists GKN,
shareholders could be left with ?a
minority interest in an unlisted
company? with the ?liquidity
and marketability of GKN shares
significantly reduced as a result?.
UK aerospace trade association
ADS has called on Melrose to
provide ?binding commitments?
to address ?concerns? raised by
GKN stakeholders ? including
the manufacturer?s largest customer, Airbus ? in response to the
takeover bid. ?This is a worrying
time for GKN, its employees,
pensioners, suppliers and customers,? ADS chief executive
Paul Everitt says. ?
flightglobal.com
THIS WEEK
Embraer sends
reminder to
Santiago
Show Report P10
PROGRAMME GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES
ACQUISITION
DAVID KAMINSKI-璏ORROW
LONDON
KC-46A tankers prove boom
capacity during crucial tests
A380 arrivals to
boost Hi Fly fleet
in luxury update
Pegasus hits fuel transfer objective in significant step towards full certification for Boeing
P
Boeing
B
oeing?s 767-based KC-46A
Pegasus aerial tanker programme has completed its fuel
on-load testing objective, by successfully transferring 66,200kg
(146,000lb) of fuel to another example via its centreline boom.
The fuel transfer took place
during a 3h, 40min-long flight on
an undisclosed date, Boeing says.
Both aircraft took off from and
landed at Boeing Field in Seattle,
Washington, and demonstrated a
maximum fuel offload rate of
4,540l (1,200gal) per minute.
The two-ship refuelling objective was another step toward receiving a supplemental type certificate from the US Federal
Aviation Administration, needed
by Boeing to modify the commercial 767-2C into a military tanker.
The KC-46A now has demonstrated the ability to receive fuel
from three tankers in the US Air
Force fleet, also including the
Boeing KC-135 and McDonnell
Offload was achieved between two examples at 4,540l per minute
Douglas KC-10. To date, the programme?s test aircraft have completed 2,700 flight hours and
made more than 2,500 boom and
hose-and-drogue contacts during
refuelling activities, also supporting transports and combat types
including the Boeing AV-8B, F/A18 and Lockheed Martin F-16.
Progress towards full FAA
璫ertification comes several weeks
after secretary of the air force
Heather Wilson criticised Boeing
for what she believed will be fur-
ther delivery delays of the aircraft.
The USAF had expected the company to deliver its first of an initial
18 production examples by the
end of 2017, and Wilson expects it
to miss a revised target during the
second quarter of this year.
Boeing says it has ?no greater
priority? than delivering the
璌C-135 replacement, but late last
month stopped short of guaranteeing a first delivery by mid-year.
The USAF expects to eventually
field 179 of the type. ?
L-39NG orders take off with Senegal
light-attack version, maintaining
also the full training capability.?
Its deal with Dakar also covers
the provision of training services
for pilots and maintainers,
plus爂round-support equipment,
spare parts and logistics support.
Once fielded, the combat-roled
L-39NGs will complement the
Katsuhiko Tokunaga/Aero Vodochody
ero Vodochody has secured
its first buyer for the
new-generation L-39NG, with
�
Senegal to acquire four armed
璭xamples from the Czech Republic manufacturer.
Confirming its selection on 4
April, Aero Vodochody said: ?The
order contains four aircraft in a
Dakar has ordered four armed aircraft in a light-attack configuration
flightglobal.com
?This acquisition has
been part of our
company?s plans for
a while. It is a very
proud moment for us?
Paulo Mirpuri
President, Hi Fly
PROCUREMENT CRAIG HOYLE LONDON
A
ortuguese long-haul wet-lease
specialist Hi Fly is to become
the latest operator of the Airbus
A380, with plans to take delivery
of the type around the middle of
this year.
Hi Fly had previously signalled that it was holding talks to
introduce a pair of A380s. The
carrier says the first Rolls-Royce
Trent 900-powered aircraft will
arrive in mid-2018, and will be
operated ?worldwide?, with a
471-seat configuration.
This includes 399 seats on the
main deck and 60 business- and
12 first-class seats on the upper
deck. This matches the configuration used by Singapore Airlines,
which started withdrawing its
older A380s last year.
Senegal air force?s on-order trio of
Embraer EMB-314 Super Tucano
armed turboprops. The service
currently lacks a fixed-wing
strike capability, Flight Fleets
Analyzer shows.
Hailing the first order for the
Williams International FJ44-4Mengined NG, Aero Vodochody
president Giuseppe Giordo says:
?Currently we also have two additional contracts in a very mature state of negotiation.?
Production deliveries are
scheduled to begin in 2020, with
Aero Vodochody having early
this year launched work on a preseries batch of four examples:
two flight-test articles, plus static
and fatigue test examples. ?
Hi Fly has yet to confirm the
serial number of its first example,
but has provided an illustration
of the A380 in the carrier?s livery,
which appears to include a Maltese registration. The company?s
Hi Fly Malta division is based on
the Mediterranean island.
The operator states that it will
employ the A380 with a ?truly
luxurious? interior, including a
Panasonic CX2 in-flight entertainment system.
?This acquisition has been part
of our company?s plans for a
while,? says company president
Paulo Mirpuri. ?It is a very proud
moment for Hi Fly.?
Flight Fleets Analyzer shows
that Hi Fly currently operates a
long-haul fleet including one
A330 and three A340s. ?
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 9
SHOW
REPORT
For insight and analysis of the latest developments in the defence sector, visit:
flightglobal.com/defence
FIDAE 2018
Stephen Trimble/FlightGlobal
A new wind is blowing in Latin America ? particularly in
Chile. A right-wing government took office in Santiago in
March, replacing a left-wing incumbent which had shown
little appetite for large military acquisitions. It is still too
early to gauge how a regional tilt towards the right might
influence procurement priorities. But the world?s biggest
military contractors returned for the 19th FIDAE air show
near the Chilean capital, hoping to learn how the region?s
political shift could influence a long list of neglected requirements. Show report by Stephen Trimble
PROCUREMENT
Embraer sends reminder to Santiago
KC-390 flies in as Brazilian airframer awaits decision of returning president Pi馿ra on Chile?s commitment to jet transport
KC-390 previously grounded by Embraer for several
months after an October 2017
flight-test mishap returned to the
spotlight as the star of the FIDAE
air show.
The tanker/transport made its
debut at the event eight years
after the Chilean government
committed to buy the aircraft.
Chilean president Sebasti醤
Pi馿ra, who took office for the
second time last month, was also
president in 2010 when his government committed to join the
KC-390 project as a customer.
But the KC-390 never became
an acquisition priority under the
previous Bachelet government,
and Pi馿ra?s current policy, only
a few weeks after his return to of-
Stephen Trimble/FlightGlobal
A
Brazilian company sent its first prototype for appearance at FIDAE
fice, is not yet known.
Speaking to FlightGlobal on
4燗pril, Gen Lorenzo Villal髇 Del
Fierro, chief of the general staff of
the Chilean air force, declined to
answer any questions about
fixed-wing procurements.
Although Chile was one of five
countries that committed to import the KC-390, so far only Portugal has moved forward with
plans to buy the jet-powered
type. Ten months ago, the Portuguese government opened negotiations with Embraer to buy five
examples, with an option for a
sixth, but talks remain ongoing,
says KC-390 programme director
Paulo Gast鉶 Silva.
Meanwhile, Embraer has a lot
of work still to do before it can
deliver the first productionstandard KC-390 by the end of
this year to the Brazilian air
force?s 11th Wing.
With only two flight test aircraft delivered, if Embraer is to
achieve full operational capability by 2019 it still has to conduct
?wet? refuelling missions, airdrop heavy cargo loads and validate the aircraft?s self-protection
systems, Gast鉶 Silva says. ?
REPLACEMENT
Leonardo offers light alternative
AirTeamImages
C
The Mexican air force is one Latin American operator of the C-27J
10 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
hile?s next military aircraft
purchase could be a light airlifter. The Chilean government
published a request for information for a light, fixed-wing transport to replace at least two different types now operated by its
army and air force, Eduardo
Munhos De Campos, marketing
and sales for Leonardo?s aircraft
division, tells FlightGlobal.
Leonardo, he says, responded
earlier this year with information
about its C-27J Spartan ? a twinengined cargo aircraft featuring
the same avionics and engines as
the Lockheed Martin C-130J.
If the procurement moves forward, Chile would replace Airbus Defence & Space C212s and
CN235s. The Chilean navy already operates the newer C295,
but Munhos de Campos points to
the C-27J?s growing fleet in the region, with Mexico and Peru now
operators of the type. ?
flightglobal.com
FIDAE 2018
SIA?s 787-10 brings
capacity for change
Air Transport P12
Show report
TECHNOLOGY
FIREFIGHTING
Swedish airframer will give future customers option to select AEL-developed equipment
A
voyages
Saab displays strong support Viking
south seeking
for Gripen E cockpit updates CL-415 orders
ide-area and head-up displays for the Saab Gripen
E/F will be offered to all customers of the single-engined fighter
as a potential cockpit upgrade,
says Mikael Franz閚, head of the
company?s Gripen Brazil business unit.
The Brazilian air force?s $5.4
billion order for 36 Gripen fighters includes several changes from
the Swedish air force version. Instead of three multifunction displays, the service selected a
19in爔�n wide-area touchscreen
from AEL Sistemas, an Elbit Systems subsidiary based in Brazil.
The latest version of both the
wide-area and head-up displays
are now in safety-of-flight testing
with Saab, according to AEL.
Saab
W
Brazil?s future fighters will feature locally-produced equipment
?We will make them available
for all Swedish air force customers,? Franz閚 says.
So far, the Gripen E has been
ordered only by Sweden and
export buyer Brazil. The latter?s
commitment includes eight twoseat F-model examples, which
Brazilian partner Embraer is responsible for designing.
The Brazilian fighter development programme is on track to
complete first flight of its lead
single-seat Gripen E in 2019, with
all 36 aircraft to be delivered
between 2021 and 2024. ?
ROTORCRAFT
Colombia wants more Black Hawks
despite its truce with FARC guerrillas
T
budget to continue acquiring this
aircraft,? said Gen Carlos Eduardo Bueno Vargas, speaking during a Sikorksy press conference at
the show on 4 April.
Colombian military and police
forces now operate 103 Black
Hawks, having received the first
Pacific Press via ZUMA Wire/REX/Shutterstock
he Colombian air force?s appetite for the Sikorsky UH-60
Black Hawk has not waned, five
months after the government in
Bogota signed an agreement ending a 50-year-old conflict with
FARC guerrilla fighters.
?I hope we will have enough
Nation?s police and air force have operated the UH-60 since 1988
flightglobal.com
example in 1988, including the
air force?s unique Arpia armed
gunship. The medium-lift aircraft
played a key role in the government?s campaign against FARC
personnel fighting across Colombia?s mountainous jungles.
FARC rebels referred to the
air force?s Black Hawk as ?the
Witch?, Vargas says, because of
its vertical-lift capabilities and
ability to arrive silently in unexpected places. ?I?m sure Colombia will continue to improve
these capabilities,? he adds.
Sikorsky plans to deliver six
more Black Hawks to the Latin
American region later this year.
A爁irst batch of three S-70i-model
Black Hawks ordered by the
Colombian air force will be delivered in August, followed by a
second round of deliveries in
October. ?
s the Chilean government
emerges as a potential customer, Calgary-based Viking Air
is within months of inducting the
first of 11 CL-415 enhanced aerial
firefighter (EAF) airframes into
modification, says executive vicepresident of sales and marketing
Rob Mauracher.
Bombardier closed production
of the family of amphibious water-bombers in 2015 and sold the
type certificate to Viking.
In 2017, Viking launched the
CL-415 EAF as a re-engined and
heavily updated version of the
CL-215 Series V, using 11 aircraft
purchased from the used market.
MODERN FEEL
In addition to replacing the
CL-215?s piston engines with
�
Pratt & Whitney Canada PW100
turboshafts, it also is upgrading
its avionics with a modern integrated flight deck, and replacing
obsolescent flight controls and
hydraulic and fuel systems.
The first CL-415 EAF is scheduled to be delivered to an unnamed launch customer in the
first quarter of 2020, Mauracher
tells FlightGlobal. The aircraft
also will be strengthened, to increase its maximum take-off
weight, he adds.
With the CL-415 EAF modifications set as a new baseline,
Viking continues to evaluate the
possibility of producing a new
aircraft with the same configuration, rebranded as the CL-515.
A� final decision on whether to
move forward with the CL-515 is
scheduled in the second half of
this year, Mauracher says.
Meanwhile, Viking is in discussions with Chilean military
and government officials about a
potential acquisition of aerial firefighting aircraft, Mauracher says.
The company is also in talks
with its armed forces about replacing an ageing fleet of de Havilland Canada Twin Otter Series
300 aircraft with new Viking
400s, he adds. ?
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 11
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FLEET AARON CHONG SINGAPORE & EDWARD RUSSELL NORTH CHARLESTON
SIA?s 787-10 brings capacity for change
Carrier planning to deploy longest Dreamliner variant on medium-haul routes into Australia and Japanese destinations
ingapore Airlines (SIA) on 3
April launched short-haul
proving runs with its first 787-10,
with initial flights to Bangkok
and Kuala Lumpur performed
just over a week after taking
delivery of Boeing?s longest
�
Dreamliner variant.
The carrier had accepted the
aircraft (9V-SCA) at the company?s North Charleston, South
Carolina final assembly facility
on 25 March, as the first of 49 onorder -10s. The twinjet is configured with 36 business-class seats
and 301 in economy.
?The intention for the aircraft
is medium-haul,? says chief executive Goh Choon Phong. SIA
will introduce the type on flights
to Japan?s Osaka Kansai on 3
May and to Perth, Australia, four
days later, FlightGlobal schedules data shows, replacing an
Airbus A330-300 and 777-200,
respectively.
Goh says the airline has no
plans for reconfiguring later deliveries for long-haul service,
adding that it has the flexibility to
convert its orders to either the -8
or -9 variants if required.
Singapore Airlines
S
Carrier?s first example of stretched twinjet received watercannon salute on arrival at Changi airport
?At this point in time, we have
the aircraft for longer haul,? he
says, referring to its current fleet
and orders for the A350-900 and
-900ULR, along with 787-9s at
subsidiary Scoot.
SIA?s current primary regional
type, the A330, flies sectors of up
to 3,250nm (6,010km) to Melbourne. This range encompasses
all of East Asia, the Indian subcontinent and much of Australia.
?There will probably be more
routes in Australia where we?ll
consider deploying this aircraft,?
Goh suggests, while noting that
Nagoya and Fukuoka will be the
next routes to be served by its
new Dreamliners.
?Japan is a hugely important
market for us, and the travellers
on our Japanese routes are very
discerning. I?m very sure they will
appreciate the new products that
we have on the plane. There will
be a capacity increase in Japanese
routes, and [they] are experiencing very high demand,? he adds.
CONFIGURATION FIRDAUS HASHIM SINGAPORE
Interior investment gives ?highly customised? class to cabin
layout, with each having aisle
璦ccess, and recline into a 76in
full-flat bed.
In economy, the Star Alliance
carrier is using the same Recaro
seat as installed on its newer and
soon-to-be-reconfigured Airbus
A380s, in a nine-abreast layout.
Its 787s also feature Panasonic
Avionics? eX3 inflight entertainment system, with in-flight wifi
connectivity provided by the
same company.
?The 787-10 is a very important addition to the SIA family,?
says chief executive Goh Choon
Phong. ?I have very good confidence that it will set a new level
of comfort for people who travel
on medium-haul [services], be-
12 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
cause the product we?re having
on the 787-10 is something that
is even better than what others
are deploying on the long-haul
[sectors]. I?m sure that it will be
something that our customers
would love to travel on.? ?
Singapore Airlines
Introduction of the Boeing
�7-10 by Singapore Airlines
(SIA) is being backed by the
璫arrier?s $350 million investment
in new regional cabin products
for its first 20 examples. The
璭nhancement was unveiled
shortly following the twinjet?s
arrival at Changi airport following a delivery flight from North
Charleston, South Carolina, via
Japan?s Osaka Kansai.
SIA has configured its -10 with
337 seats in two classes: 36 in
business and 301 in economy.
The carrier says its ?highly customised? new business-class
seats were developed exclusively
with Stelia Aerospace. They are
configured in a staggered 1-2-1
Business passengers have lie-flat
seats, all with access to an aisle
?All or most of the Japanese
points are destinations that we
intend to deploy the 787-10 [to]
progressively,? adds Goh. SIA
also currently serves Tokyo?s
Haneda and Narita airports, using
A350-900s and 777-300ERs.
The 787-10 represents an
18.2% increase in capacity from
the A330-300?s 285 seats, and a
4.3% rise from SIA?s high-density
777-200s, which have 323.
SIA is scheduled to receive
eight 787-10s by the end of this
year and another 11 in 2019, and
will return 11 A330s to lessors
through 2020, Fleets Analyzer
shows. It owns 18 777-200s, and
has not disclosed plans to remove
any of these over the period.
Boeing is eyeing additional
widebody sales opportunities
with its 787 family and developmental 777X in the Asia-Pacific
region, with airlines in Thailand
and Vietnam identified as potential near-term buyers.
Dinesh Keskar, senior vicepresident of sales for Asia-Pacific
and India, also notes that the company has seen ?tremendous? interest from airlines in Southeast
Asia that are keen to use the company?s proposed New Mid-market
Airplane for services to China.
Designed to fit between the 737
Max 10 and 787-8, the 220-270seat type could enter service in the
2024-2025 timeframe. ?
flightglobal.com
AIR TRANSPORT
ARJ21 testing
a breeze
Air Transport P15
REGULATION DAVID KAMINSKI-MORROW LONDON
EASA bids to reinforce flight recorder resilience
E
uropean safety regulators have
detailed certification proposals to improve the protection of
information from flight recorders.
The European Aviation Safety
Agency says premature depowering of cockpit-voice recorders has
resulted in loss of information
which might have been captured
if an alternate power source had
been installed.
EASA adds that some investi-
gations have found both the
cockpit-voice and flight-data recorders were fed from the same
electrical bus ? rendering both
recorders inoperative in the
event of bus failure.
The revision also intends to reduce the possibility that impact
sensors ? known as g-switches,
and designed to stop the recording ? might accidentally be activated by other events.
?Several safety investigation
bodies have reported reliability
issues with negative acceleration
sensors,? says EASA.
?In several occurrences involving high levels of airframe vibrations, some g-switches were triggered prematurely during the
occurrence and, therefore, the recording of voices or data stopped
before the end of the flight.?
EASA is proposing updating
certification specifications to ensure that g-switches are ?not used
as the sole means? to detect a
crash impact.
The recommendation involves
relying on the start-stop logic of
the recorder, instead of the use of
dedicated sensors.
EASA is also proposing provisions to accommodate installation of combination recorders as
well as deployable recorders. ?
INVESTIGATION DAVID KAMINSKI-MORROW LONDON
MH17 missile could have evaded radar
Display filters possibly limited visibility, says independent assessment on Russian data, as analysis considers theories
nternational investigators have
confirmed that a surface-to-air
missile fired at a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200ER could
have avoided detection on radar.
Such a weapon could have
simply been travelling too fast for
the surveillance processing capabilities of the civil radar station at
Ust-Donetsk, the analysis indicates. Ust-Donetsk is located in
the Rostov region of Russia.
The joint investigation team
looking into the destruction of
flight MH17 in July 2014 had enlisted two independent radar specialists to examine radar data
from the station supplied by Russian authorities.
No other aircraft were displayed on radar in the vicinity of
MH17 at the time of the event,
the analysis has found.
The five-nation investigation
team had previously concluded
that an Almaz-Antey 9M38 Buk
surface-to-air weapon had been
fired from a field near Pervomais-
REX/Shutterstock
I
The 777-200ER was brought down by a Buk surface-to-air weapon
kiy in eastern Ukraine, and destroyed the 777.
While no Buk missile can be detected on the Russian radar images
? a fact pointed out by the Russian
government, which has put forward alternative theories on the
loss of MH17 ? the analysis identified several reasons for its absence.
The Buk missile is capable of
speeds in excess of 1,400kt
(2,600km/h), and this supersonic
velocity is far beyond those typi-
cally being processed by civil
aviation surveillance systems.
?Display filters could limit the
visibility ? this is to avoid clutter
on the radar image,? the analysis
adds. ?The consequence is that,
therefore, a Buk cannot be seen.?
Russian authorities supplied
radar data in its original format, as
well as data converted to the
standard ?Asterix? format. Investigators believe there is ?no reason
to assume? that conversion result-
ed in the loss of any relevant information, but the analysis nevertheless covered both data sets.
?The findings by these radar
experts show that a Buk missile
could have been fired from the
firing location established by the
joint investigation team without
it being visible on the radar images,? the analysis states.
Investigators had sought data
from a second radar station, sited
at Baturinskaya, but none has
been supplied by Russia.
Dutch investigators are to examine the extent to which recommendations regarding overflight
of conflict zones have been implemented since the loss of MH17.
The Dutch Safety Board says it
wants to compile an inventory of
measures taken regarding airspace management and sharing
of threat information.
It also intends to examine airlines? risk-assessment strategies ?
and accountability ? when considering overflying conflict zones. ?
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AIR TRANSPORT
More than simply a
Boeing support act
News Focus P16
DELIVERY
Max 8 arrival boosts Kazakh aviation
Boeing
Kazakh carrier SCAT has taken delivery of its first Boeing 737
Max� one of six being introduced by the Central Asian airline.
Online tracking sites indicate that the -8 flew its first domestic services from Astana in early April. The re-engined narrowbody will
?raise the level of service in the company?, says SCAT president
Vladimir Denisov, and also provide ?new impetus? to Kazakh civil
aviation development. Flight Fleets Analyzer shows the carrier as
already operating seven 737-300/500/700s aged between 10 and
26 years. It has purchase rights on another five 737-8s.
VALIDATION FIRDAUS HASHIM SINGAPORE
FLEET AARON CHONG SINGAPORE
ARJ21 testing a breeze
C
omac?s ARJ21 regional jet has
completed crosswind validation testing in Iceland aimed at
widening its operational scope.
China?s ministry of industry
and information technology says
aircraft 104 completed the testing
on 26 March at Keflavik International airport.
The test activity involved six
take-offs and landings, under average crosswind conditions of
38.4kt (71km/h) and 34.9kt, re-
737 backlog rises
with Jet follow-on
spectively. The maximum verified crosswind was 48.7kt, exceeding the design target.
The Civil Aviation Administration of China had previously validated the aircraft at up to 22kt
during testing in China.
Comac has so far secured commitments for 453 ARJ21s, but
Flight Fleets Analyzer shows that
so far only four of the regional
twinjets are in service, all with
Chengdu Airlines. ?
Further 75 re-engined examples to bolster Indian carrier?s
operations, with deliveries planned for completion by 2023
I
AirTeamImages
Twinjet completed tests
exceeding its design target
ndian carrier Jet Airways has finalised a deal to buy an additional 75 Boeing 737 Max aircraft,
confirming the move in a brief
stock exchange disclosure.
The commitment is in addition to a previous order for a similar number of 737 Max 8s ? a
mix of firm orders and purchase
rights ? announced at the Dubai
air show in 2015. The airline has
provided no details about which
variant will be acquired under
the follow-on deal.
Flight Fleets Analyzer indicates that orders for 21 of Jet Airways? 737-8s were cancelled at
the end of 2017. Boeing?s orders
and deliveries data shows that at
the end of February the carrier?s
outstanding commitment for the
model stood at 54 aircraft.
Jet Airways chief executive
Vinay Dube had been looking to
complete a deal for 75 additional
narrowbody aircraft by the end of
March. ?It will be for the next five
years, so 2018 to 2023, to take delivery of all 150 aircraft. The first
Max aircraft will be delivered in
2018,? he said at the Dubai air
show last November.
Fleets Analyzer shows that Jet
Airways currently operates 72
737-800s, four -700s, four
-900ERs and two -900s. ?
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10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 15
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Air Canada
Aftermarket work
forms key part of
BGS strategy
STRATEGY STEPHEN TRIMBLE PLANO
More than simply a Boeing support act
Company has always set the bar high, but internal target for its services division will require unprecedented growth
A
daring and controversial
stretch goal to treble Boeing?s
services revenue within eight
years, in a market already crowded with the company?s customers
and suppliers, came out of a 2016
brainstorm session.
In the 1950s, Boeing soared to
the top of the industry after betting the company?s survival on
jet-powered commercial airliners, displacing larger American
rivals Douglas and Lockheed in
the process.
As chief executive Dennis
Muilenburg convened strategy
sessions in the year of Boeing?s
centenary in 2016, he sought out
similarly provocative moves that
could propel the company into
its second century.
?We set some pretty audacious
stretches [during those sessions
in 2016],? said Stan Deal, now
the head of Boeing Global Services (BGS), during a March interview in his new headquarters in
Plano, Texas.
In the two years that followed
those sessions, Boeing has made
several provocative moves, including standing up an avionics
business, partnering with auto-
motive supplier Adient to develop seats for airliners and, most recently, proposing a combination
with Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer. But the single most
controversial ? and ambitious ?
change Boeing has made concerns a stretch goal on services.
?There?s some bad
behaviour that?s
taking place in the
supply chain?
Stan Deal
Chief executive, Boeing Global Services
By 2016, Boeing already had
one of the largest services businesses in the market, but it was
split up as a support element to
two major business units, with
other key pieces, including Aviall
and Jeppesen, not fully integrated.
When the discussion turned to
the services market in Muilenburg?s sessions two years ago,
Boeing?s executives started with
setting a stretch goal for reaching
$50 billion in services revenue by
2025, Deal says.
?Then we looked at, what do
16 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
we think we need to do to obtain
it?? he recalls.
A few months later, in November 2016, Muilenburg announced
that Boeing would form BGS on
1燡uly 2017 by consolidating the
company?s balkanised services
offerings into a single business,
and setting an ?aspirational target? to reach $50 billion in annual revenue by 2025.
The depth of that financial
challenge became apparent a year
later, when Boeing revealed that
the size of its various services offerings within BGS amounted to
only $14 billion. To reach the aspirational target within eight
years, the company would have
to sustain an average compound
annual growth rate (CAGR)
of�.6%.
For comparison, Boeing?s revenues have risen from $64.3 billion in 2010 to $93.4 billion last
year: a 45% improvement. Measured by CAGR, however, the improvement seems more modest at
4.7%. Boeing must nearly quadruple that performance to achieve
the growth targets set for BGS
over a similar eight-year period.
?That?s pretty phenomenal
growth,? Deal agrees, when told
about the CAGR calculation.
?It is aspirational,? he adds.
?This is, in general, how you see
Dennis running The Boeing Company under his tenure. Let?s not
be afraid to set a stretch in order
to stimulate a different way of
thinking to go to the market.?
PRICING PROBLEM
The move has put Boeing in competition with some of its biggest
suppliers for aftermarket services, but Deal makes no apologies.
?There?s some bad behaviour
that?s taking place in the supply
chain on the sustainment side ?
exorbitant price increases on certain parts,? he says. ?Airlines
don?t like year-over-year price increases in the double-digit range.?
As Boeing consolidates more
aftermarket services under its
brand, it could wield the same
power to dictate prices on customers. But Deal dismisses that
possibility, noting that it still has
to sell airlines factory-built products before competing for aftermarket deals.
?We?re a supplier to our airlines
on both sides of the situation,
flightglobal.com
NEWS FOCUS
Netherlands reveals
plan for long-term
spending increase
Defence P18
whereas many of those suppliers
only have to sell once, and that?s
in the aftermarket,? Deal says.
Since standing up the business
on 1 July last year, BGS has
moved quickly into one new
market. The unit acquired a Boeing 777 to ?part-out?, or strip the
useable parts to sell to airlines at
a discount compared with factory-built spares, Deal says.
A less visible part of the business, Boeing already has one of the industry?s largest service operations
rational target? of $50 billion in
annual revenues remains part of
the plan. But the company has
softened the timeline for achieving that target. In November
2016, Muilenburg set the date as
2025, but now the company talks
about a five- to 10-year window.
The opportunities for growth
over that period are significant.
Boeing AnalytX, more than any
other division, represents the potential of BGS. The division has
recently surpassed $1 billion in
annual sales from a portfolio of
data services, including analysing fleet performance and reliability, as well as supply chain
and inventory optimisation. The
$1 billion annual sales total is im-
Boeing
Boeing Commercial Airplanes?
(BCA) headquarters is in Seattle,
Washington, and the defence
business is based in St Louis,
Missouri: each with a tempo for
making decisions on new investments measured in months. The
newly established BGS headquarters in Plano operates on a
different tempo. A leadership
team meets every two weeks to
make decisions about investment
in new products or new markets,
Deal says.
?We?re not making bets like a
new [737] Max, [New Mid-market Airplane] or new T-X [trainer]. These are much smaller investment bets: a software update,
a 737 converted freighter with a
two-year development cycle,? he
says. ?As we organised we came
forward with a much flatter organisation than our two businesses. It increases the velocity of decision-making. Speed in this
business is very important.?
As Boeing makes bets on new
investments, achieving the ?aspi-
Boeing
FASTER TEMPO
The AnalytX data division recently passed the $1 billion sales mark
flightglobal.com
?These are much
smaller investment
bets: a software
update, a 737
converted freighter?
Stan Deal
Chief executive, Boeing Global Services
pressive for a new business, but
BGS believes it can grow by an
order of magnitude over time,
Deal says.
Another option to drive
growth is the newly consolidated
Supply Chain Management
group, which accounts for the
largest share of the BGS unit?s
overall revenues. At the heart of
this is Aviall, the parts distribution company that Boeing acquired in 2006. Boeing does not
disclose Aviall?s annual revenues,
but confirms that overall sales
have grown more than 300%
over the last 12 years. In 2017
alone, Aviall revenues increased
by about 20%, Boeing says.
Aviall?s recent growth has been
fuelled partly by another of
Muilenburg?s strategic initiatives
with suppliers. In the first round
of the Partnership for Success
campaign that began in 2011,
Boeing focused on reducing supplier pricing across the board.
The second round of the campaign, which is ongoing, has
taken a broader approach, including encouraging suppliers to out-
source parts distribution on Boeing
commercial
aircraft
programmes to Aviall.
?When we negotiate now as
Boeing in Partnering for Success,
we?re negotiating as all three businesses ? not BCA or BDS [Boeing
Defense, Space & Security] only,?
Deal says. ?We?re putting into
trade with our suppliers every dimension of our business, as well
as they?re putting in trade every
dimension of their business.?
PARTS TOGETHER
To support further growth, Boeing plans to integrate its three
separate parts distribution units
? Aviall, BCA and BDS ? on to
the same SAP-based enterprise
resource planning (ERP) platform. Aviall adopted a SAP platform four years ago, and a similar
version was activated for BCA
last October. As with many transitions to an ERP platform, BCA
has struggled with the transition,
with deliveries of spare parts to
airlines getting delayed in some
cases.
?There are very few cases
where we have impacted customer operations,? says Richard Teza,
vice-president of business development and global product strategy for Aviall. ?There are cases
though where we?ve made it
more challenging than it needed
to be for our customers. We?re
working hard to get that back so
we make it a lot easier for our
customers to operate.? ?
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 17
DEFENCE
New divisions at
Boeing as Caret
pursues change
B
oeing has established two
new divisions within its
璂efense, Space & Security business, as part of an ongoing reorganisation effort initiated by chief
executive Leanne Caret.
The Commercial Derivative
Aircraft unit will be based in Seattle, Washington, and oversee
activities including the US Air
Force?s 767-derived KC-46A
tanker and 747-8I adaptation for
the Air Force One mission ? both
were previously within the noweliminated Development division ? plus the US Navy?s P-8 Poseidon variant of the 737.
Tim Peters, who is currently
head of Boeing?s flight test
璦ctivities and a former KC-46A
programme manager, will lead
the division.
Based in Huntsville, Alabama,
the Missile and Weapon Systems
division?s projects will include
the ground-based strategic deterrent and air-launched weapons
such as the Joint Direct Attack
Munition series, produced near
St Louis, Missouri.
Norm Tew will lead the
operation, moving from the
�
璸osition of head of engineering at
the previous Space and Missile
Systems unit. n
STRATEGY ANNO GRAVEMAKER ARNHEM
Netherlands reveals plan for
long-term spending increase
Updates to rotary-wing fleet and C-130H transports also included in funding proposal
T
he Netherlands has unveiled
a new long-term defence
plan, which includes additional
funding to boost its armed forces?
operational readiness.
Presented by recently appointed defence minister Ank Bijleveld-Schouten, the white paper
proposes annual spending of ?1.5
billion ($1.84 billion) ? or about
1.3% of gross domestic product.
The Hague has already made a
number of major procurement
commitments, including for the
Lockheed Martin F-35; it will
eventually operate a 37-strong
fleet of the conventional take-off
and landing A-model variant. Deliveries are due to begin next
year, with the final examples to
arrive in 2023.
To support the F-35 fleet, the
defence ministry intends to procure new tactical and strategic
air-to-surface munitions. Acquisition decisions for these are expected in 2019, with deliveries to
begin in 2023 and 2024, respectively, the white paper says.
The Netherlands has already
joined a multinational effort to
buy an eight-strong fleet of Airbus
Defence & Space A330 multi-role
Royal Norwegian Air Force
RESTRUCTURING
GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES
For insight and analysis of the latest
developments in the defence sector, visit:
flightglobal.com/defence
Nation?s KDC-10 tankers are to replaced by a pooled fleet of A330s
tanker transports, with access to
the pooled assets ? to be flown
from Eindhoven air base ? to replace its aged pair of McDonnell
Douglas KDC-10 tankers.
Meanwhile, the Royal Netherlands Air Force?s current four
Lockheed C-130H tactical transports will remain in service until
2031, the document says, but will
require a major update running
from 2022-2025. In addition, the
nation?s single Gulfstream GV
VIP transport will soldier on until
2022, with a replacement to be
identified two years earlier.
The Netherlands? rotary-wing
fleet is also to be updated, the
paper says. In 2020, the first of 14
new Boeing CH-47F Chinooks
will be delivered, replacing 11
aged D-model examples. Its six
current CH-47Fs will also be
raised to the newer standard.
Further updates for the nation?s Boeing AH-64D Apache
and NH Industries NH90 helicopters are envisaged in the early
and mid-2020s, respectively.
The paper also revives a
shelved plan to acquire General
Atomics Aeronautical Systems
MQ-9 Reaper unmanned air systems, with a first delivery in 2021.
Finally, the air force?s fleet of
13 Pilatus PC-7 basic trainers, in
service since 1989, will be replaced by 2026, the white paper
says, with the procurement process to start in 2020. n
INITIATIVE CRAIG HOYLE LONDON
Team Tempest eyes UCAS demonstrator contract
BAE Systems
T
Future activity could build on experience from Taranis programme
18 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
he UK Ministry of Defence
plans to conduct a future test
campaign using a low-cost unmanned combat air system
(UCAS) demonstrator, building
on lessons learned from previous
activities including its BAE Systems-led Taranis programme.
?This UCAS would see a significant reduction in its cost and
development time compared to
traditional combat air systems,
and a potential future requirement would include the develop-
ment and manufacture of the
proposed design, and the con�
duct of a limited flight-test programme,? says the MoD.
An industry day was staged for
interested parties on 13 March,
with BAE, Leonardo, MBDA and
Rolls-Royce forming ?Team Tempest? to pursue the opportunity.
The UK-only initiative will be
performed in addition to an existing Anglo-French future combat
air system activity involving BAE
and Dassault. n
flightglobal.com
DEFENCE
Centenary milestone
propels evolution of
Royal Air Force
News Focus P20
PROCUREMENT GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES
Kuwait advances Super Hornet order
Initial part of potentially $10.1 billion acquisition focuses on long-lead engineering to develop baseline configuration
oeing has been awarded an
initial contract worth almost
$1.17 billion linked to Kuwait?s
acquisition of 28 F/A-18E/F
Super燞ornets.
Outlined by the US Department of Defense on 30 March, the
deal is related to ?long-lead nonrecurring engineering to develop
a baseline configuration for the
production and delivery? of 22
single-seat E-model examples
and six two-seat Fs by 2022.
US State Department approval
for the proposed sale was first
granted in November 2016, at
which time the Gulf nation was
seeking the procurement of 28
multirole fighters, plus options
on another 12.
The US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) valued
the deal at a potential $10.1 billion, and noted that it would
?allow for greater inter璷perability
with US forces, providing benefits for training and possible future coalition operations in support of shared regional security
objectives?.
Kuwait currently operates Boeing?s legacy Hornet, with Flight
Fleets Analyzer recording it as
having 34 F/A-18C/Ds in use,
aged between 24 and 26 years.
An ongoing modernisation activity will also see it introduce 28
Eurofighter Typhoons, under a
deal co-ordinated with the Italian
government and Leonardo.
Placed via Washington?s Foreign Military Sales mechanism,
the new contract also will fund
the procurement of long-lead
items for the Super Hornet?s radar
warning receivers and airlaunched weapons, the DoD says.
US Navy
B
Gulf nation?s air force modernisation activity will include introducing 22 single-seat F/A-18Es by 2022
Having previously been threatened with a break in production
activities, Boeing?s Super Hornet
assembly line in St Louis, Missouri, has recently been buoyed
by a Congressional addition of
$739 million to provide the US
Navy with a further 10 units in
fiscal year 2018, boosting its total
commitment to 24 aircraft worth
$1.8 billion.
The company will begin producing the Super Hornet in an
enhanced Block III configuration
from around the end of this
decade.
REMOTE CONTROL
Meanwhile, the USN has for the
first time demonstrated the ability to remotely take control of
an� F/A-18E and land it on the
deck of the aircraft carrier USS
Abraham Lincoln.
Using the aircraft terminal
approach
remote
inceptor
(ATARI) system, landing signal
officers demonstrated remote piloting of the Super Hornet while
conducting carrier qualifications
and flight testing over a two-day
period in March. They also
performed touch-and-go manoeuvres.
The ATARI technology was developed at NAS Patuxent River,
Maryland, by the US Naval Air
Systems Command. It was initially tested on a Learjet in 2016,
performing shore-based low approaches. An undisclosed number of F/A-18s were fitted with
the system last year, before it was
deemed ready for trials at sea.
?There was some nervousness
because the sea state was so bad,?
says Lt John Marino, a carrier
suitability pilot from the service?s
Download the 2018
Wo r l d A i r Fo r c e s R e p o r t
Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 23. ?Back on the airfield, testing was benign,? he adds.
The system provides a potential method for recovering an unmanned air vehicle by using the
landing signal officer?s ability to
observe and fix glideslope and
line-up errors, the USN says. It is
not intended to be a primary
method for recovering manned
aircraft.
During the recent testing,
ATARI system operators controlled the Super Hornet using a
joystick, while a safety pilot sat in
the cockpit as a back-up. The
technology is capable of taking
over an aircraft from up to five
miles away.
System engineers plan to analyse the data collected from the
activity and make adjustments
prior to further at-sea testing. n
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
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10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 19
NEWS FOCUS
For insight and analysis of the latest
developments in the defence sector, visit:
flightglobal.com/defence
ANNIVERSARY CRAIG HOYLE LONDON
Centenary milestone propels
evolution of Royal Air Force
As it marks 100 operational years, service chief outlines plan for new-generation duties
T
he formal commemoration on
1 April of the Royal Air
Force?s centenary grabbed many
headlines in the UK and around
the world, as service officials
highlighted its proud heritage,
current diverse operational commitments and future ambitions.
Its status as the world?s oldest
independent air force dates back
to 1918, when the RAF was
璫reated in a move to counter the
threat posed by Zeppelin raids
that were being mounted by
璆ermany on the east coast of England. It also acted swiftly to help
quell its foe?s Spring Offensive on
the Western Front.
Current chief of the air staff Air
Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Hillier
notes that the service?s birth ? by a
combination of the army and navy?s air assets ? was by no means
universally welcomed. Indeed,
some argued that ?major organisa-
璱nstitutions to survive and flourish after war?.
?The founding members of the
RAF were pioneers, exploiting a
new environment and at the cutting-edge of innovation and the
technology of the day,? he says.
Now totalling about 35,000 regular and reserve staff, today?s RAF
is of a different scale to its peaktime posture of nearly 500 squadrons and almost one million personnel in 1943. But speaking
before a Royal Aeronautical Society audience in London on 27
March, Hillier said: ?The RAF
knows that its operating environment is all-pervasive, and its
breadth of capabilities fundamental to the success of any military
endeavour ? whether that be in
the air, on land or at sea.?
Pointing to its contemporary
commitments, he notes: ?We are
currently busier than we have
been for a least a generation, in the
middle of our most sustained period of high-intensity warfighting
operations since the Second
World War.? He cites a total of 13
operations being staged in 21
countries on five continents.
tional change in the middle of a
war would disrupt output?.
?That day in 1918, a vision
was brought to life: a vision that
air power was fundamentally
changing warfare,? Hillier says.
?The founding
members of the RAF
were pioneers, at
the cutting edge
of innovation?
Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Hillier
Chief of the air staff, Royal Air Force
And in addition to providing
a capability which would help
the allied powers win that conflict, he highlights the role
played by the service?s first leaders and personnel in establishing
a set of ?beliefs, ethos and
Crown Copyright
PRECISION EFFECT
Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Hillier wants RAF 100 to inspire nation
20 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
Operations against Daesh militants in Iraq and Syria conducted
over the past three-and-a-half
years have involved the use of
more than 3,700 precision-guided munitions, deployed by the
service?s Eurofighter Typhoon,
Panavia Tornado GR4 and remotely-piloted General Atomics
Aeronautical Systems MQ-9
Reaper forces.
Next year will bring the retirement of the RAF?s last Tornados,
after a service life spanning 36
years, and a remarkable record of
having been continuously deployed on operations since 1990.
Hillier describes the type as ?a
powerful demonstration of combat air power: flexibility, adapta-
bility and utility across the whole
spectrum of conflict?.
He also points to the importance of the service?s manned intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft fleet, noting
that in a 10-year service life, its
Shadow R1s ? mission-adapted
Beechcraft King Air 350CERs ?
have spent ?only a couple of
months not on operations?. Elements of its Raytheon Systems
Sentinel R1 airborne ground-surveillance force have also been
continuously deployed to the
Middle East for more than 1,000
days, and its Reapers have accumulated more than 100,000 flying hours since service entry.
Looking to the near future, he
points to an incoming fleet of
Boeing P-8A maritime patrol aircraft as key pending additions, in
the face of a ?growing submarine
threat? from Russia.
?The post-war consensus that
has provided the basis for rulesbased international order is being
challenged and undermined,? he
says of Moscow?s recent activities.
?We must respond, collectively
with our NATO partners, to counter hostile acts by Russia against
our country, interests and values.?
Examples include a � million ($14 million) investment to
reactivate an air-defence radar on
flightglobal.com
NEWS FOCUS
Business need
attracts ANA
to sector
Business Aviation P22
plex technology that gives me the
decisive edge, and I want mass.?
Referring to a perceived assumption of uncontested control
of the air during operations, Hillier says: ?The world is not only
changing ? it has changed. Our
strengths in the air have been seen
by our potential adversaries. We
need to get used to the idea that in
a future conflict, control of the air
will have to be fought for. That is
what makes the introduction of
the [Lockheed Martin] F-35 Lightning so important.?
the Shetland Islands to boost detection capabilities, and launching quick reaction alert-tasked
Typhoons on 42 occasions over
the past year, he says.
Hillier also points to the service?s rapid deployment capability, which was demonstrated in
the wake of Hurricane Irma,
which devastated parts of the
?Why can?t I have
better capability at
lower real-terms cost,
in an information
enabled air force??
Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Hillier
Chief of the air staff, Royal Air Force
Caribbean last year. The RAF
swiftly sent relief supplies and
personnel to the region, using assets including its Airbus Defence
& Space A400Ms, plus Airbus
Helicopters Puma HC2s operating in a support role.
?We have an outstanding record of responding quickly, successfully and in force to emerging
crises, deploying and sustaining
aircraft and support capabilities
at considerable range,? he notes.
Hillier ? whose background includes combat duty as a Tornado
flightglobal.com
GR4 pilot ? sees a long future for
manned aircraft, despite the
i�
ncreasing number of remotelypiloted air systems (RPAS) to be
fielded by the RAF.
?RPAS are one of the fastest
growing parts of our service,? he
notes, ?with [General Atomics?]
Protector coming.? To enter service from the middle of the next
decade, the Protector force will be
at least double the size of the UK?s
current Reaper operations.
With an eye on future capability, Hillier sees artificial intelligence, human-machine interface
enhancements, remote operations
and disruptive technologies as
having an increasing part to play
in the RAF?s activities.
Space is another focus area,
with the Ministry of Defence having recently invested �5 million
on the Carbonite-2 satellite: its
first with the ability to relay realtime video from low Earth orbit.
The system went from concept to
a January 2018 launch within just
eight months, he says, using commercial off-the-shelf equipment
produced by the UK?s Surrey Satellite Technology.
Pointing to the current strength
of the service ? which totals about
700 aircraft ? he notes: ?We are
璦lready at too low a level, with too
little resilience left. I want com-
Meanwhile, he is challenging the
defence industry to shorten development cycles and reduce costs.
?The Typhoon is brilliant, but it is
more than three decades since
conception,? he says. ?No longer
can we accept that better technology can only come at ever greater
cost. Why can?t I have better capability at lower real-terms cost, in
an information-enabled air force??
Hillier welcomes the UK government?s recent announcement
about releasing a new combat air
strategy around mid-year, and
points to the strengths of its defence industry.
?We are a powerful aviation
nation: we can do platforms,
propulsion, sensors, weapons
�
and information. It?s a vital industry for the UK,? he adds, noting that combat aircraft currently
account for about 85% of the nation?s defence exports.
The current programme to
?commemorate, celebrate and inspire? will peak with a main event
Crown Copyright
Tornado GR4 is due for
retirement in 2019, after a
service life of 36 years
Crown Copyright
MORE FOR LESS
and flypast over central London
on 10 July, along with exposure at
occasions including the same
month?s Royal International Air
Tattoo and Farnborough air show.
In addition, the RAF aims to engage with more than two million
students during 2018, which is
also the year of the engineer.
?Our focus has always been on
the future ? and the legacy of RAF
100 must be to build a launchpad
for flight into our second century,?
Hillier says. The service in 2017
experienced its best recruitment
year this decade, and with 2,700
aerospace apprentices, serves as
?a dynamic engine of social mobility, where everyone can fulfil
their full potential?.
Hillier says: ?Our strategy to deliver the next-generation air force
is simple: focus on our people,
璬eliver on operations, and grow
our frontline. We need to grow
capability ? people as well as
�
equipment ? to give us greater resilience to deal with consistently
high operational demand.
?We look forward to our second
century with pride in what we
have already achieved, and with
confidence about our future and
the enduring importance of air
and space power. We are transforming into a next-generation air
force, that recognises information
as its lifeblood, and is able to respond more rapidly and with ever-greater agility.?
Stating that his forebears would
be equally proud as the service enters its new era, he adds: ?The last
100 years has proven their beliefs
right, in every respect.? ?
Service swiftly sent relief supplies to Caribbean after Hurricane Irma
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 21
BUSINESS AVIATION
Keep up to date with business
aviation news and analysis at:
flightglobal.com/bizav
LAUNCH ELLIS TAYLOR PERTH
Business need attracts ANA to sector
Joint venture with Sojitz will offer passengers private, direct flights from Japan and connect with scheduled services
NA Holdings, parent company of Japanese carrier All
Nippon Airways, is making a
foray into the business aircraft
market, via a partnership with
local c� harter operator and trading
house Sojitz. ANA has also
signed a separate deal with
Honda A
� ircraft to introduce the
HA-420 HondaJet on its feeder
routes, particularly within the
Japanese market, the airline says.
ANA Business Jet is scheduled
to launch operations by the third
quarter. ANA owns a 51% stake
in the venture, with the rest held
by Sojitz. The Tokyo-headquartered company represents Bombardier and Boeing Business Jets
in the Japanese market, and operates a diverse fleet of aircraft for
charter, largely through partnerships with other operators.
ANA Business Jet will provide
onward travel in a private aircraft
to the carrier?s scheduled passengers arriving in Japan. The highend offering is also available to
customers connecting to ANA?s
scheduled services bound for
North America and Europe.
?ANA Business Jet will drastically shorten travel time and
allow passengers to travel in comfort and in privacy,? says Sojitz.
Clients can also use the service for
ad hoc charter flights, it adds.
POTENTIAL SALES
Meanwhile, ANA has signed a
memorandum of understanding
with Honda Aircraft, designed it
says to introduce Japanese business aircraft users and commercial airline customers to the
HondaJet. The companies have
not disclosed details of p
� otential
sales or leasing arrangements for
the light business jet, but say the
seven-seat aircraft will be used for
charter and 璮eeder flights.
Honda Aircraft will support
these operations, including
establishing a ground support
�
framework at various ANA transit locations. ?Through this strategic partnership and use of the
HondaJet, ANA will create new
demand to utilise business jets,
in particular for travelers of various Japanese entities who value
convenience and privacy in their
Honda Aircraft
A
Carrier also could employ HondaJets for charter and feeder flights
overseas travel,? says ANA
Holdings president and chief executive Shinya Katanozaka.
ANA?s move into the business
jet market comes around a year
after rival Japan Airlines partnered with Dassault Falcon
璖ervices, a subsidiary of Dassault
Aviation, to offer bespoke private
jet connections for passengers
from Paris to destinations in
瑼frica and Europe.
Flight Fleets Analyzer records
a global fleet of 79 HondaJets. The
USA is home to the largest inventory with 61 examples, followed
by the UK and Germany, with
three aircraft each.
The
Greensboro,
North
瑿arolina-based airframer is progressively ramping up production of the GE Honda Aero Engines HF120-powered type to
meet market demand. Deliveries
climbed from 23 units in 2016 to
more than 43 last year, and the
company expects a ?steady? increase in output in 2018. ?
HANDOVER KATE SARSFIELD LONDON
Embraer delivers new-generation Phenom 300E
S
rial number 448 came just over
five months after the launch of
the upgraded business jet ? the
second iteration of the nine-yearold Phenom 300 ? which secured
Embraer
outh A
璮rican businessman
and long-time Embraer customer John McCormick has taken
delivery of the first Phenom
300E. The handover of aircraft se-
Variant forms part of wider effort to enhance portfolio and lift sales
22 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
Brazilian, European and US validation in March.
The Phenom 300E ? short for
Enhanced ? features a redesigned
cabin, restyled and improved
seating designed by Embraer
Aero Seating Technologies in
Titusville, Florida, and a high�
end in-flight entertainment and
cabin management system supplied by Lufthansa Technik.
Embraer describes the Phenom
300 as the ?best-selling and mostdelivered light business jet for the
last six years?. Flight Fleets Analyzer records a global inventory
of nearly 450 examples.
The E-variant is one of a wave
of upgrades that Embraer is intro-
ducing across its business jet
range to bolster appeal and help
rekindle sales in the fragile and
competitive marketplace.
The airframer will shortly deliver its first Legacy 450s and 500s
with a reduced cabin altitude of
5,800ft ? 200ft lower than their
predecessors ? when flying at an
altitude of 45,000ft. The midsize
pair will also feature restyled passenger seats as standard from the
second quarter, says Embraer.
An upgraded version of the entry-level Phenom 100 was introduced in April 2017, featuring a
Garmin G3000 flightdeck and
higher-thrust Pratt & Whitney
Canada PW617F1-E engines. ?
flightglobal.com
Demand springs
back for carriers
Data View P24
BUSINESS AVIATION
MILESTONE KATE SARSFIELD LONDON
Second PC-24 arrives as first gets down to work
ilatus Aircraft has delivered
its second PC-24 to its US
dealer and maintenance provider
Western Aircraft. The handover
of aircraft serial number 102 ?
registration N224WA ? comes as
the first production example enters service with fractional ownership company PlaneSense.
Pilatus plans to deliver 23 of
the superlight business jets in
2018, from an order backlog of 84.
Western Aircraft says it has
seen strong demand for the
璓C-24, ?with more than a dozen
offers to buy the first aircraft?.
Despite this demand Western
plans to add aircraft 102 to its
own inventory, where it will be
used for ad hoc charter and, for
the coming year, as a company
demonstrator. ?This gives us the
ability to show the PC-24 to existing order holders, and also to
prospective customers who want
to get in on the next block of aircraft when Pilatus re-opens the
orderbook,? says Western?s vicepresident of sales and charter,
Phil Winters.
The manufacturer, headquartered in Stans, has not disclosed a
Western will employ aircraft 102
to support demonstrations
Pilatus Aircraft
P
timeframe for the next order
round ? but it could be as early as
the fourth quarter of this year.
PlaneSense, one of Pilatus?s
largest customers, has an order
for six PC-24s, but is keen to acquire additional aircraft to bolster
its fleet of 36 PC-12s. ?
MODIFICATION
KATE SARSFIELD LONDON
OUTLOOK KATE SARSFIELD LONDON
Rising corporate profits will
drive fleet growth, FAA says
Upgraded King
Air 350 secures
Canadian STC
U
Twenty-year forecast expects jets to outperform turboprops, with piston singles in decline
usiness jets are set to outperform all other certificated general aviation types in the USA
over the next 20 years, according
to a forecast published by the
Federal Aviation Administration.
It predicts that although the average annual growth rate for the
whole general aviation sector ?
which includes traditional business jets, turboprops, fixed-wing
piston aircraft and helicopters ?
will remain flat in the period to
2038, the business jet fleet will
grow at an average rate of 2.2%. It
expects the overall fleet and business jet totals to reach 214,100
and 22,200, respectively.
Turbine aircraft as a whole will
also perform better than pistonpowered types, the report says,
with the US inventory expected
to climb from 23,600 units in
2018 to more than 35,000 in 20
years ? an average annual increase of 2%.
Turboprops will grow by a
more modest 1.7% per year, with
the fleet forecast to total 12,600 in
2038, the report says.
The FAA?s upbeat prediction is
flightglobal.com
Gulfstream
B
Strengthening US economy is expected to support rise in demand
based on forecast growth in the
US economy and corporate profits ? key ingredients for a thriving
business aircraft market.
By contrast, the country?s fleet
of fixed-wing, certificated pistonsingles is expected to shrink over
the forecast period by 23,750 aircraft ? an average annual decline
of 0.9% ? with the FAA predicting an inventory of about 119,650
in 2038. The agency attributes
this gloomy outlook to ?pilot demographics, overall increasing
cost of aircraft ownership, coupled with new aircraft deliveries
not keeping pace with retirements of the ageing fleet?.
Hours flown by turbine business aircraft are expected to rise
from 7.2 million in 2018 to 11.6
million in 2038 ? or 2.4% a year
? thanks largely to the higher
business jet utilisation. ?
S engineering company and
aftermarket specialist Blackhawk Modifications has received
a Canadian supplemental type
certificate (STC) for its XP67A engine upgrade on the Beechcraft
King Air 350, and is preparing to
begin work on the first retrofit for
a local customer.
The upgrade replaces the
type?s 1,050shp (783kW) Pratt &
Whitney Canada PT6A-60A engines with 1,200shp PT6A-67As,
which boost the 350?s maximum
cruise speed by up to 40kt
(74km/h). The XP67A-powered
twin can also climb from sea
level to 35,000ft in 18min in hot
conditions, says Blackhawk ?
more than twice the rate of the
baseline model.
The upgrade package includes
five-blade composite propellers
from German manufacturer MT,
which Blackhawk says ?delivers
significant reductions in noise
and vibration levels, while improving overall performance?.
Jim Allmon, president and
chief executive of the Waco, Texas-based company, calls the upgraded model ?the fastest King
Air on the planet?. ?
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 23
DATA VIEW
Demand springs
back for carriers
Steady month saw Emirates cement its position as the A380?s largest customer, while
Hawaiian left the A330-800neo high and dry after switching its order to rival 787-9
GRAHAM DUNN & ANTOINE FAFARD
LONDON
New orders, February 2018
Emirates Airline
UPS Airlines
Bangkok Airways
UPS Airlines
TUI Travel
A380 20
747-8F 14
ATR 72-600
4
767-300F
4
737 Max
2
Source: Flight Fleets Analyzer
Note: Information for known customers only
24 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
TUI Travel made a commitment
for two 737 Max-series aircraft
Travel signed for two 737 Max-series aircraft.
New business for regional aircraft manufacturers included a follow-on order from
瑽angkok Airways for four ATR 72-600s, in
what was one of the few commercial deals disclosed during February?s Singapore air show.
Fleets Analyzer records the overall commercial order backlog as totalling 15,172
璦ircraft at the end of February: down 40 from
the previous month.
Meanwhile, our information shows that 97
aircraft were delivered to 60 operators during
the month ? an 18% decrease versus
February 2017. This extends a sluggish
�
璸eriod, following an exceptionally busy conclusion seen last December.
European carriers led the way with deliveries, receiving a combined 32 units. This was
followed by totals of 29 and 25, respectively,
for operators in the Asia-Pacific and North
America regions. Almost half of the global
璬eliveries were made to mainline operators.
In the widebody sector, Air Canada,
璑orwegian and United Airlines each took two
787s, while freight operator FedEx received a
pair of 767s.
Boeing
A
fter what was a slow start to 2018
for commercial orders, preliminary information from Flight
Fleets A
� nalyzer shows that 67
璦ircraft were added to production backlogs
during February, balanced against 12 cancellations and seven swaps.
Most notably, Emirates Airline confirmed
an order for 20 Airbus A380s, in what was
the first firm commitment for the widebody
type to be made in more than a year. The
Gulf c� arrier ? which is by some distance the
璴argest customer for the superjumbo ? had in
January signed a p
� reliminary deal for 20
璭xamples, plus 16 options.
Boeing?s 747-8 programme also received a
boost, with UPS Airlines ordering 14 Freighters, along with a further four 767-300Fs to
support its operations. An undisclosed
璫ustomer also placed an order for three 777s.
This activity meant February was the
璼econd busiest month of the previous 12 for
widebody deals, and also one of the highestprofile due to cancellations. Virgin Atlantic
finally dropped its long-dormant order for six
A380s ? a commitment dating back to 2001,
while the sole customer for the A330neo?s
-800 model, Hawaiian Airlines, axed its
璼ix-unit order, after signing a letter of intent to
instead acquire 787-9s.
In the narrowbody sector, orders were
璫onfirmed for 20 re-engined A320neos from
as-yet unannounced customers, while TUI
Emirates firmed an order
for 20 A380s, in what was
the first firm commitment
for the widebody type in
more than a year
Narrowbody deliveries included eight
737NGs for Ryanair, which has a backlog of
35 of the legacy model and 110 737 Max
200s. Delta Air Lines took four A321s and two
737-900s, while Southwest Airlines received
four 737-800s.
Shipments made to regional operators
comprised a pair of ATR 72 twin-turboprops
for Mexico?s Aeromar Airlines, plus an
璄mbraer 175 and an E190 that were received
by KLM Cityhopper.
Fleets Analyzer shows that the global inservice commercial fleet stood at slightly
more than 28,600 units at the end of February, of which more than 26,000 are deployed
in a passenger role. The remainder includes
freighters and combi types. ?
flightglobal.com
ORDERS & DELIVERIES
Commercial in-service fleet by
region
Commercial monthly net orders, February 2017-2018
Units
1,200
1,100
1,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
-100
7%
5%
5%
24%
28,626
Total
30%
29%
Source: Flight Fleets Analyzer
Feb-17 Mar-17 Apr-17 May-17 Jun-17 Jul-17 Aug-17 Sep-17 Oct-17 Nov-17 Dec-17 Jan-18 Feb-18
Source: Flight Fleets Analyzer
Narrowbody
Regional
Turboprop
Widebody
Asia-Pacific
8,603
North America
8,466
Europe
6,790
Latin America
2,025
Middle East
1,441
Africa
1,301
Commercial aircraft order backlog
by manufacturer
Commercial monthly deliveries, February 2017-2018
Units
300
3%
3%
3%
5%
38%
250
15,172
200
Total
150
48%
100
50
Source: Flight Fleets Analyzer
0
Feb-17 Mar-17 Apr-17 May-17 Jun-17 Jul-17 Aug-17 Sep-17 Oct-17 Nov-17 Dec-17 Jan-18 Feb-18
Source: Flight Fleets Analyzer
Narrowbody
Regional
Turboprop
Widebody
Airbus
7,215
Boeing
5,725
Comac
503
Bombardier
434
Embraer
429
Other
866
In focus: fleet evolution for leading countries
Fleet development for leading countries
Total fleet
Stored aircraft (%)
15,000
30
12,500
25
10,000
20
7,500
15
5,000
10
2,500
5
0
0
Mar-09
Mar-10
Mar-11
Mar-12
Mar-13
Mar-14
Mar-15
Mar-16
Mar-17
Mar-18
Source: Flight Fleets Analyzer
USA fleet
China fleet
China (stored fleet)
Canada (stored fleet)
Canada fleet
Russia fleet
Russia (stored fleet)
USA (stored fleet)
flightglobal.com
The USA, China, Canada and Russia are the
leading countries in terms of the volume of
aircraft in commercial operation. The rapid
growth of the fleet in China stands out, having
risen from 1,300 units in 2009 to almost 3,400
nine years later. The stored fleet in the country
has not exceeded 4% during this period.
The commercial fleet in the USA currently
stands at 8,325 units: roughly 200 fewer than
in 2009, due to restructuring, consolidation
and capacity discipline. The in-service total
for US airlines dipped below 8,000 units in
2014, but has since started climbing again.
In Canada, the fleet strength has increased,
from just over 1,000 in 2009 to more than
1,300 now. Economic challenges saw Russia?s
inventory fall below the 1,000-unit mark three
years ago, but its commercial fleet now stands
at a little over 1,100 aircraft. ?
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 25
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TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Special report
DIGITAL FLYERS
CONTENTS
28 Technology Keeping pace
32 Recruitment Raising the game
34 Profiles Directory
Aviation Images/REX/Shutterstock
With demand for pilots at an all-time high, airlines are facing
two huge challenges ? attracting enough candidates, and
adapting training to the expectations of the computer age
Flightdeck technology has advanced faster than accompanying crew training concepts ? and recruitment is also struggling to keep up
flightglobal.com
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 27
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Special report
Don?t read
the manual
Advances in airliners? digital flightdeck technology has
outpaced evolution of pilot training, leaving the industry
scrambling for new ways to ensure aviators stay in control
DAVID LEARMOUNT LONDON
K
eeping airline pilot training relevant while flightdeck technology
advances apace ? and as airspace
management demands ever greater
flight trajectory accuracy ? is a task that will
end only when airliners no longer have flightdecks.
The end of flightdecks, most experts agree,
is in the distant future ? even if the single-pilot flightdeck is looking feasible within the
next decade or so, starting with freighters. For
there has long been, and still is, a conservative belief among many senior figures in the
industry that traditional pilot skills, and less
tangible qualities such as airmanship, are immutable absolutes.
Certainly these basic qualities are still an
essential part of what makes a good pilot, but
aircraft have changed massively in recent
years, as has the airspace environment, the
means of navigation, and also that of traffic
separation and flow management. Expectations of safety standards are far higher than
they used to be, and young recruits to the piloting profession have been raised and educated in a different era.
For three decades after the first digital avionics and flight control systems began to be
introduced in the early 1980s, neither ab initio nor recurrent airline pilot training was
modified accordingly. As cockpit technology
continued its rapid advance, although accident rates were reducing, when they did
occur it was increasingly because the pilots
found themselves unable to cope when faced
with an unexpected occurrence that called for
independent decision-making.
Evidence that training philosophy and
technique has not prepared pilots well for today?s ?fourth-generation? cockpits has been
the elephant in the flight simulator for a long
time. The most obvious evidence is the distressingly regular incidence of loss of control
in flight (LOC-I) involving aircraft that were
28 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
actually controllable. As a statistic ? given the
number of flights that take place globally ?
LOC-I crashes do not represent a high risk,
but their regularity over the years since 2000
is unacceptable, and no-one at present can
claim confidently that they will not continue
to happen.
The very existence today of a European
Aviation Safety Agency advisory body called
the Airline Training Policy Group (ATPG) is
testimony to the fact that the ab initio pilot
training system frequently does not produce
the finished product airlines need, and that
more needs to be done to correct this.
The ATPG is made up of training experts
from the airlines, training industry, aircraft
manufacturers and EASA. They are addressing the fact that many pilots with commercial
pilot licences who present themselves for jobs
at airlines are just not good enough to fly today?s jet airliners safely. EasyJet puts the figure at up to 90% of applicants, while adding
that graduates from consolidated training
courses are usually good.
Smart flightdecks did not
lower the workload, they
changed it. It became less
physical and more cerebral
But even when those pilots who do pass
the airlines? acceptance tests get on to the line,
evidence from incidents, accidents and flight
data monitoring (FDM) suggests that recurrent training does not advance their knowledge and skills the way it should.
At many airlines, recurrent training is a
misnomer, because it is still more about recurrent checking than training. And since the reliability of today?s aircraft is such that it deprives crews of experience of dealing with
real failures or anomalies, recurrent training
is needed more than ever to advance pilot
knowledge, resilience and confidence.
Capt Chris Warton, director of customer
training in Europe for Bombardier Business
Aircraft, says his company no longer reports
on recurrent training sessions simply as pass
or fail; it grades individual performance. The
old pass/fail system did not encourage progress, Warton says, nor allow progress to be
accurately monitored.
ATTITUDE PROBLEM
Ryanair?s head of training, Capt Andy O?Shea,
who is on the ATPG, summarises what is missing in pilot graduates from the ab initio system.
He says they lack ? to a greater or lesser degree
? knowledge and understanding, flight path
flightglobal.com
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Digital technology
Airbus
With the A350, Airbus introduced
state-of-the-art digital flightdeck and
a bold new concept of type-rating
management skills, crew resource management ability, and what he calls ?maturity and
attitude?. The ATPG?s answer to the deficit is
effectively a course extension to the commercial pilot licence/instrument rating training
course, adding high quality multi-crew co-operation (MCC) and jet orientation courses
(JOC). Unlike off-the-peg MCC/JOC, this includes simulator instruction in the style of
line-oriented flight training, plus advanced
knowledge consolidation ground-school. The
result is a course dubbed the Airline Pilot Certificate Course, which Ryanair requires all of
its own new recruits to go爐hrough.
This is an admission that the present system, as designed, does not work well enough
flightglobal.com
for airlines which expect pilots with licences
to arrive on the line completely trained.
Although improving the effectiveness of
pilot ab initio and recurrent training has been
much discussed at forums such as the Royal
Aeronautical Society?s annual International
Flight Crew Training Conference (IFCTC)
over the past decade, until recently the focus
has continued to be directed at making ?better
pilots? in the traditional sense, and on reacting to the kind of accidents that continue to
happen, rather than on preparing pilots to be
experts in understanding and manipulating
the high-technology cockpit tools with which
they manage flights today.
But this year?s conference (25-26 Septem-
ber) plans to home in on the human interface
with technology, and on competency-based
training. As national aviation authorities
move towards ?performance-based regulation? rather than the traditional prescriptive
kind of rulemaking, it will also be taking a
look at training quality oversight.
Even aircraft with fourth-generation highly
automated flightdecks need pilots with traditional skills because, as the notorious example of Air France flight 447 (LOC-I over the
South Atlantic in June 2009) demonstrated,
the automation is programmed to trip out if
the system recognises it is receiving faulty
sensor data. And that will, inevitably, continue to happen from time to time.
??
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 29
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Special report
with what they saw as an opportunity to trim
pilot training cost.
As it became clear that LOC-I was here to
stay, one solution to it was seen as being
upset recovery training. Over the years, however, Airbus argued long and hard that it was
better to train pilots to prevent upsets than to
recover from them. Buried in the Airbus argument is the belief that the shortcomings in
skills and knowledge that allowed licensed
pilots to get the aircraft into an upset were
the real problem, not their failure to recover
from a situation they had played their part
in燾reating.
As the entry into service of the Airbus
A350 was approaching, the manufacturer?s
training policy experts engaged in a bold
programme of rethinking the way pilots
were prepared for the state-of-the-art digital
flightdeck on a new aircraft type. Airbus
called the new approach ?learning by discovery?, or learning by doing. Boeing has
adopted a similar approach and calls it ?active learning?.
This starts with the concept that nobody
nowadays reads a manual before operating a
new tablet, computer or smartphone. They
know what the device is designed to do, and
what they want to do with it, so they switch it
on and experiment to discover how this particular product can deliver the results
they爓ant.
JUST FLY IT
According to the new Airbus training philosophy, the crew are presented with a full-flight
simulator for the aircraft on which they are
going to do their type-rating course, and told
to ?fly? it. After all, the aircraft, however advanced, is an aircraft like any other, and it
will fly like any other. The pilots are told they
can work out for themselves how to start it,
taxi it, line up and take-off, but they are not
allowed to engage the autopilot or flight director. They are encouraged to find out how it
behaves in standard flight scenarios, and finally they land. This exercise also includes
?learning by failing?, by being permitted to
find out what does not work; this approach is
the diametric opposite of the ?don?t touch
any璽hing until you have learned all about
it?燼ttitude.
The psychology of this approach is sound.
The rules of aerodynamics have not been al-
AirTeamImages
?? So, for more than two decades now, the
commercial air transport industry has been
confronted with a dilemma regarding pilot
training policy, but it seems the changes
needed are still under development.
The advent of the digital flightdeck brought
with it improved avionics capability and reliability at the same time as higher design and
engineering standards reduced equipment
failure rates for airframe and engine hardware. The result was that accident figures reduced significantly.
Meanwhile, in the early days of digital
cockpits, the new smart flightdeck avionics
were marketed as lowering pilots? workload.
In fact they did not lower the workload, they
simply changed its nature. It became less
physical and more cerebral. It demanded
knowledge of the sophisticated flight management equipment and its capabilities, but it
did not take away the need for crew planning
and decision-making, and pilots still needed
to exercise trajectory management and monitoring skills.
Nevertheless, the combination of reduced
serious accident statistics and the illusion of
lower pilot workloads provided the airlines
Ryanair sees shortcomings ranging from basic skills to attitude, while EasyJet reckons 90% of applicants are not ready to fly a modern airliner
30 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
flightglobal.com
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
tered just because this is a state of the art flyby-wire machine. And after a couple of practical sessions flying the simulator, the
ground-school classes will feel more relevant
to the pilots, and the more traditional process
of learning details about the new type
can燽egin.
Pilots need to be re-introduced to the fact
that their complex machine, with all its automation, is just an aeroplane, and it still flies
like one. If a pilot loses sight of this basic fact,
the traditional ?get out of trouble? mantra that
tells pilots to ?aviate, navigate, and communicate ? in that order? does not mean very
much. These reminders need to be provided
not only when they begin their type-rating
training but also in their recurrent training.
Jacqui Suren, head of regulation and training development at L3 Commercial Training
Solutions, talks of new teaching/learning processes using virtual reality and ?gamification?
of the learning process, which she says relates
ground-school more closely to flying.
Regulators such as the US Federal Aviation
Administration and EASA have always
known that innovation brings risk as well as
reward, especially during the introduction of
new equipment or capabilities, but they also
acknowledge that technical advances tend to
bring net benefits. Modern flight instrument
and navigation displays may have a graphic
clarity that improves pilot situational awareness, but the flight management computers,
with their multiple capabilities, have also introduced the potential for mode confusion,
and flight management systems (FMS) can
take the pilot out of the cognitive loop by
being so accurate and reliable that his/her
critical faculties become comatose.
Training changes ? such as evidence- and
competency-based training ? designed to correct this situation, have only begun to be
adopted in the past three years or so, but at
least the process is beginning in some parts of
the air transport industry. There is, however,
a long way to go, and technology will still
keep advancing, so the training goalposts will
keep moving and the new instructional methodologies have to have flexibility built-in.
The principal change that is making recurrent training more relevant now is the gradual
adoption of evidence-based training (EBT).
Data provides the evidence of what pilots are
getting wrong ? or not getting quite right ?
whether through individual aircraft FDM, or
?big data? assembled by organisations such as
the International Air Transport Association.
The possession of this evidence enables airlines to identify where their training challenges lie as an operator, but also enables a fully
capable in-house training department to tailor
training to individual pilot needs.
In Europe, EBT will be fully implemented
as policy in early 2019 by EASA. The agenflightglobal.com
Sipa Press/REX/Shutterstock
Digital technology
Loss of Air France flight 447 showed that cockpit automation has not banished LOC-I risk
cy?s executive director, Patrick Ky, observes
that the capacity of this carefully mined data
to maximise the effectiveness of an EBT session works best when airlines carry out their
training in-house. This is so, he says, because
the specific lessons are naturally brought together with the airline?s own standard operating procedures.
Achieving this with the use of third party
training organisations is much more difficult,
he points out, suggesting that the full advantage that EBT should be able to deliver can
only be provided by third party trainers if
they work extremely closely with the airline.
Global third party training provider CAE
commented at the 2017 IFCTC that ?airlinefocussed? flight training provision is increasing as a proportion of the market, and generic
third party training is reducing. CAE points
out that an airline can provide a third-party
training supplier with FDM data so as to tailor
the training to the airline?s needs.
STAYING AHEAD
Ky insists that syllabus-based or generic
training is not adequate for the task when
flightdeck technology is advancing fast, and
when some risks are declining and others are
increasing. Pilot training now, he says, has to
be aimed at coping with identified risks, and
providing pilots with the knowledge and
skills to use cockpit technology to its best advantage. The old adage that the crew should
always be ahead of the aircraft contains the
implication that today?s pilots must now be
ahead of the FMS.
Asked whether, in these days of performance-based oversight, close training stand-
ards inspection by regulators still needs to be
exercised, Ky observes that airlines are always looking for training economies, and if
they start cutting corners ?it immediately
shows?. That sounds like a ?yes?.
Finally, Dr Georgina Fletcher, principal
consultant at analyst Frazer Nash, was given
the task of taking a look at training systems
from a UK perspective and making recommendations to ensure the maintenance of
quality pilot training. She presented her findings at the 2017 IFCTC, and recommended
that training quality would benefit if all parts
of the industry were to take ?collective ownership? of the task.
That means the end-user ? the airlines ?
should work closely with the Civil Aviation
Authority, flight training organisations, educational establishments and with what is now
the Department for Innovation, Universities
and Skills. There should, Fletcher says, be a
training needs analysis, and training policy
should be based on its findings.
Unfortunately, airline representation was
thin on the ground at the 2017 IFCTC, which
tends to validate Fletcher?s recommendation.
Now that EBT is to be formally implemented, and because there is a growing awareness
of the need to train and improve crews in
simulator sessions rather than just checking,
recurrent training has the potential to address
skill needs far better than it has been doing.
The product of ab initio flight training organisations, however, remains hugely variable and even the top quality still seems to fall
short of expectations. But that problem can
only be solved if the airlines will invest
in爄mprovement. ?
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 31
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Thomas Hanser/Boeing
Special report
Boeing?s ?active learning? philosophy grew from development of type conversion courses which recognise need for new instruction methods
Skills generation
For all its appeal, the aerospace industry struggles to recruit talented young people, so
various UK institutions are working together to build a modern, accessible training system
DAVID LEARMOUNT LONDON
D
ifficult though it may be for those in
the aerospace industry to comprehend, there is a real problem generating sufficient interest in aviation
careers to meet the demand for highly skilled
jobs such as engineers, pilots and air traffic
controllers. These professions demand extensive, high-level academic and practical training. Pilot training in particular requires a
huge upfront financial investment. Once the
students have gained their qualifications
there is plenty of competition for their skills
? newly qualified aeronautical engineers with
the right degree, for example, can easily be
poached by other industries.
A year ago, when launching a new training
32 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
centre near London Gatwick airport, Boeing
Flight Services observed that the industry
needed ?innovative solutions focused on educational outreach and career pipeline programmes to inspire the next generation of pilots, technicians, and cabin crew?. Boeing
adds: ?The growing diversity of aviation personnel will also require instructors to have
cross-cultural and cross-generational skills to
engage tomorrow?s workforce.?
Boeing makes clear that the digital sophistication of new aircraft and equipment poses
a training challenge, but the same technology
can also provide new learning and teaching
solutions. The manufacturer argues that the
complexity of the subject matter and the new
learning styles of today?s generation demand
new teaching methods, and it has been work-
ing steadily on designing a new approach:
?Our scenario-based approach for ?active
learning? was proven almost three years ago
on our 747-8 EASA [European Aviation Safety Agency] conversion [type-rating] course,
which previously did not exist.?
On a worldwide basis, Boeing is one of the
dream employers for those who want an aviation or aerospace career, and for that reason it
probably has less recruitment trouble than
others. So the fact that it admits it has to work
on a strategy for attracting the right people for
itself or for its customers hints at the challenge facing, say, a small, specialist aircraft
component supplier.
If a young person today has an interest in an
aviation career and queries one of the online
search engines, there are generic sites that proflightglobal.com
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Recruitment
flightglobal.com
The airline provided them with mentoring
for their degree work, which, as they describe
it, included reflective writing on all aspects
of their aviating job, including threat and
error爉anagement.
On the student engineer front, Tom Emms
set out into aviation from school by doing a
Level 3 City and Guilds course in aircraft engineering at Newcastle College. He is now
doing a BSc degree in Aircraft Engineering accredited by Kingston University, but he is carrying it out at KLM UK Engineering, based at
the new ASP International Aviation Academy, Norwich (IAA-N).
Witts? initiatives in bringing together educational institutions, central and local government and industry will result in the creation
of a series of international aviation academies
throughout the country. The first such unit to
go live is IAA-N, operating in partnership
with Norwich County Council, the New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership, KLM UK
Engineering, City College Norwich and the
University of East Anglia.
RAF CONNECTION
The next ASP academy ? Aaron Aviation
Academy ? has a strong connection to the
Royal Air Force. It will be up and running at
RAF Syerston in Nottinghamshire next year
as an RAF Air Cadets and ASP joint venture.
ASP?s Whittle Engineering Academy will
be set up at the RAF?s centre of engineering
excellence at RAF Cosford in Shropshire,
while Scotland will soon host the International Aviation Academy, Dundee, based at the
city?s airport.
ASP helped plan a � million ($16.8 million) aerospace and technology college to be
set up at Biggin Hill Airport, in partnership
with London South East colleges and funded
by the Greater London Authority. To be
known as the London Aerospace and Technology College (LATC) it is, however, not to
be an academy in the ASP style, but a traditional technical college that will produce
qualified engineers and mechanical, electronic and service technicians and ground crew.
London deputy mayor for planning, regeneration and skills, Jules Pipe, says: ?It?s vital
we tackle the skills gap in aviation, and the
LATC will help to keep London at the cutting
edge of aviation technology.?
The problems the aviation industry has
had with attracting well-educated people cannot be blamed on a lack visibility ? aviation is
highly visible. But it has come to be perceived
as unattainable for ordinary mortals. This has
not been helped by the airlines? inconsistency
in their recruiting policies in the last few decades, driven by nervous accountants. They
have less of an excuse for that now, given that
the industry has consolidated and matured in
its new form, margins are better and profits
are more reliable than they were through the
1980s and 1990s, and then the early 2000s
when the shock of 9/11 hurt them badly.
This year the RAF is celebrating its centenary, which will enhance its already-high visibility in the UK. Meanwhile the world?s taste
for air travel is growing, and the air freight industry is doing well. So the airlines had better
make sure they can recruit the trained staff
they will need while the good times roll. ?
EasyJet
vide some answers. The same sort of search
will yield plenty of offers from fight training
organisations and some technical colleges.
But cost is a serious factor and advice on finance, grants, apprenticeships, student loans
or tax relief is harder to come by.
Enter Simon Witts, founder of Aviation
Skills Partnership (ASP). Responsible a decade ago for setting up and running the Flybe
Training Academy at Exeter airport, Witts noticed at that time that there was poor co-ordination between UK education and training
institutions and the aviation industry. He believed they could all serve each other?s needs
much better than they were doing.
Witts set about a root-and-branch analysis
of the disparate elements, intending to bring
the enablers together and help them act more
like a system, making it easier and more attractive for those who wanted a career in aviation to prepare for it. His vision was of a system that would motivate youngsters from the
time they first recognised their interest in aviation at school, and maintain that enthusiasm
all the way through education and training
into their career.
In January at the Palace of Westminster,
Witts addressed an invited audience with an
interest in improving the quality and availability of technical skills related to aviation,
including members of parliament, business
leaders, educators, trainers and academics.
He explained: ?People have always had a fascination with aviation, but we rarely see that
interest and excitement translating into careers. There is a whole pool of talent out
there, but the onus is on us to make our industry accessible to the right people by providing
the right infrastructure at a local, regional, national and international level.?
ASP sets out to provide career training
pathways not just for engineers, pilots and air
traffic controllers, but for potential airport operations executives, airline operations and
crewing staff, cabin crew and airport ground
handling management.
An example of someone who benefited
from ASP co-ordination and advice is Anna
McGrady, now a first officer with EasyJet. In
2013 she set out from school intending to do a
science degree and then train as an airline
pilot. But through meeting Witts while investigating a flying training course at what was
then CTC Aviation (now L3 Commercial Aviation Solutions) she learned that she could
combine study for a BSc degree in Professional Aviation Pilot Practice (PAPP) with CTC?s
flying爐raining.
She and fellow student pilot Steven Hadley ? who was also focused on the same objective ? were the first two students to enrol
on the new PAPP BSc course. They graduated in 2017. By that time, they had been working on the line with EasyJet for two years.
EasyJet is among the airlines which have embraced innovation in attracting young engineers
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 33
BAINES SIMMONS
PROFILE
We are specialists in aviation regulations, compliance and safety management and partner with
the world?s leading civil and defence aviation organisations to improve safety performance.
Working across all sectors of aviation and with Competent Authorities around the globe, we
help to advance best practice, shape safety thinking and drive continuous improvement to the
management of safety through our consulting, training and outsourced services.
CONTACT
INFORMATION
Baines Simmons
Aviation Safety Centre,
Fairoaks Airport, Chobham, �
Surrey, GU24 8HU
Tel: +44 (0) 1276 859519
Email: Hello@bainessimmons.com
www.bainessimmons.com
Baines Simmons is an Air Partner plc company
Our passion for aviation safety is world-renowned. Whether you are an established operator,
regulator or an individual looking to advance your career, we promise to enhance your skills,
improve your knowledge and help you understand your role in improving aviation safety.
Call us today to find out how we can assist with your requirements.
HIGHLIGHTS
? 100+ specialist training courses available
in-company and at our Surrey based training Academy, UK
? Specialists in Safety Management, Safety
Leadership, Safety Culture and Human
Factors & Error Management
? Proven expertise in Regulatory Compliance
improvement and Approval Recovery
? Trusted advisors to EASA, 40+ Competent
Authorities, the EDA and the MAA
Extraordinary training for excellence in air safety
Our consultants are safety practitioners with enormous
breadth and depth of experience. Their knowledge and
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Comprehensive portfolio of professional aviation training
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Call our learning advisors now on +44 1276 859 519
or email training@bainessimmons.com
Visit www.bainessimmons.com/training
34 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
flightglobal.com
CAA INTERNATIONAL (UK CAA)
PROFILE
As part of the UK CAA International Group, CAAi is perfectly placed to provide relevant, bestin-class training to National Aviation Authorities and Industry across the globe.
Our training experts help aviation professionals achieve higher standards every day, delivering
practical regulatory training for a better, safer aviation world. Based on ICAO and EASA standards
as a minimum, our training covers all of aviation?s major disciplines, providing you with a wide
range of choices for training solutions.
CONTACT
INFORMATION
CAA International (UK CAA)
Civil Aviation Authority,
Aviation House, Gatwick Airport South,
RH6 0YR UK
Tel: +44 (0) 3300 224401
Email: training@caainternational.com
www.caainternational.com/training
Part of the UK CAA International Group
What?s more, every one of our courses is developed by UK CAA Regulators, so whether you train
with us in the UK, Malaysia, Singapore, UAE, Hong Kong or commission us to deliver in your
region, you?ll r� eceive an education that?s in a class of its own.
HIGHLIGHTS
? ISO 9001:2008 certified
? Courses developed by UK CAA
Regulators
? Based on EASA and ICAO Standards and
Recommended Practices
? EASA Virtual Academy Member
? e-Learning and Blended Learning courses
? Accredited provider of short courses by
British Accredited Council
? Tailored training programs available ?
Delivered in-company, anywhere
worldwide
Take off with
regulatory training
from the practising
UK CAA experts
London Gatwick | Kuala Lumpur | Singapore | Dubai | Hong Kong
A comprehensive portfolio of public access courses developed in
accordance with EASA and ICAO Standards and Recommended Practices,
designed to cover all aspects of aviation safety regulations, including:
? SMS and Risk Management, Just Culture and Root Cause Analysis
? Airworthiness (NDT Audit Oversight)
? EASA Approvals (Part 21, Part 145, Part 147 & Part M)
? Inspector Theory (Flight Ops, Cabin Safety, Dangerous Goods)
? Fatigue Risk Management Systems
? Accountable Manager (Aerodrome, Airworthiness, AOC)
? FSTD Operations & Qualification
? Human Factors in the Aviation Maintenance
? Introduction to International Air Law
To book now or for more information, please visit
www.caainternational.com/training or contact us:
+44 (0) 3300 224401 or training@caainternational.com
www.caainternational.com
Part of the UK CAA International Group
flightglobal.com
113867 CAAi_Half page 175x123.indd 1
Together for better aviation
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 35
27/02/2018 17:15
CAE
CONTACT INFORMATION
CAE ? 9 Global Locations
Phoenix, United States
Brussels, Belgium
Madrid, Spain
Oxford, United Kingdom
Gondia, India
Rae Bareli, India
Melbourne, Australia
Perth, Australia
Tamworth, Australia
www.cae.com/becomeapilot
PROFILE
CAE trains aspiring pilots through its network of aviation academies in
9 global locations. Depending on the location, a range of training programs are available including, Commercial Pilot License (CPL), Airline
Transport Pilot Licence (ATPL), and airline-mentored Multi-crew Pilot
Licence (MPL), all of which combine premier ground school courses
with high quality flying instruction.
No other organisation places more pilots with more airlines than CAE.
CAE has active cadet programs with easyJet, Ryanair, Cityjet, Volotea,
IndiGo and Jet Airways. Every year, one thousand new pilots graduate
from CAE. Our numerous relationships with airlines around the globe,
translates into more career opportunities for our students. CAE has a
dedicated team that provides pre-employment support, and advice
to enable our graduates to gain their first professional flying job.
CAE offers training programs that address the entire career life cycle
of a pilot from cadet to captain. As the training partner of choice of
many aircraft manufacturers and airlines, we offer innovative training
solutions to our customers, such as the XR Series Training Equipment
suite, including the CAE 7000XR Series full-flight simulator. With 50+
training locations worldwide, CAE has the world?s largest civil aviation
training network, providing training on the widest coverage of in-production and in-service aircraft models. In addition, we offer aviation
personnel sourcing services including recruitment of flight personnel
and leasing of pilots to airlines.
Backed by a 70-year record of industry firsts, we continue to help define global training standards with our innovative virtual-to-live training solutions to make flying safer. We have the broadest global
presence in the industry, with 8,500 employees, 160 sites and training
locations in over 35 countries. Each year, we train more than 120,000
pilots worldwide. www.cae.com
HIGHLIGHTS
? Largest cadet training network in the
world
? Modern fleet of EFIS ?glass cockpit?
璽raining aircraft including Piper, Cessna
and Diamond aircraft types
? Cadet training partnerships with some of
the world?s leading airlines, including,
36 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
easyJet, Japan Airlines, Jet Airways,
JetBlue, Jetstar Australia, IndiGo, Ryanair
and Volotea
? University partnership to offer aca璬emic
accreditation combined with pilot
training
? CAE training programmes span the entire
life cycle of a professional pilot, so we?re
able to provide you with the training you
require throughout your career, from cadet
to captain
? As the worldwide training partner of
choice, no other training provider places
more pilots with airlines than CAE
flightglobal.com
They?re waiting for new pilots.
What are you waiting for?
There?s never been a better time to become an airline pilot with CAE. Each year we
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Start your journey right, and right here.
Contact us today at www.cae.com/becomeapilot
Follow the global journeys of recent CAE graduates
on Instagram @caepilot and follow #caepilot
Your worldwide
training partner
of choice
STRAIGHT&LEVEL
From yuckspeak to tales of yore, send your offcuts to murdo.morrison@flightglobal.com
?Knocking on? I?m a lot Junker than you might think?
cricket team for the great job
they?ve done in raising
Australia?s profile this
weekend,? he remarked.
corrugated aluminium skin ?
the project team says it needed
to ?re-learn long-forgotten
construction techniques?.
Much of the aircraft was built
like the original, with
compromises in ?as few areas as
possible?. These included
installation of brakes on the taildragging aircraft, and hydraulic
shock absorbers rather than
bundled rubber bands on the
original landing-gear.
A 450hp Pratt & Whitney
R-985 Wasp Junior radial engine
was selected to have a ?reliable?
powerplant, replacing the
original 300hp BMW engine.
The pilots were unable to
draw on much experience for
the first flight. ?No pilots with F
13 experience remained who
could have informed us about
the F 13?s flying qualities,?
Junkers says. But the pilots were
reportedly ?surprised? about the
aircraft?s ?benign handling
characteristics?.
Metal maid
Nearly 100 years after the
Junkers F 13 took to the air,
German and Swiss aviation
enthusiasts plan to restart
production of the world?s first
all-metal aircraft.
A replica of the low-wing,
single-engine aircraft ? which
could accommodate four
passengers in its cabin and two
pilots in an open cockpit ? was
built in Switzerland by a team
around project initiator and
investor Dieter Morszeck, chief
executive of German luggage
manufacturer Rimowa.
The aircraft flew for the first
time in 2016 and was
certificated in January by Swiss
regulators. A company called
Junkers Flugzeugwerke is being
set up in D黚endorf to operate
the aircraft, with a plan to start
?small-scale production in
response to individual market
demand?. For the reconstruction
of the aircraft ? which features,
like many Junkers types, a
Eagle?s era
Action Press/REX/Shutterstock
Qantas boss Alan Joyce was the
guest of honour at the Aviation
Club in London just after flying
in from Perth on the flag carrier?s
first direct flight from Australia.
Asked in which part of the
Dreamliner he?d endured the
17h leg, he confessed he had
?travelled in business class, as
you?d expect?.
However, he is no stranger to
turning right. During his five
years as chief executive of
Qantas?s no-frills sister Jetstar ?
which offers flights of up to 12h
? he had only ever patronised
his own airline, he said, adding:
?I?ve done my penance.?
Meanwhile, if anyone thinks
17h in a metal tube is pushing
the limits of human endurance,
spare a thought for those who
travelled on the airline?s Double
Sunrise service during the last
two years of the Second World
War. Flown on a Consolidated
PBY Catalina, stripped of all
non-essential equipment,
between Crawley, near Perth,
and southern Ceylon (modern
Sri Lanka), the flight took up to
33h and helped maintain the
essential air link between
England and Australia. A total
of 271 operations took place
between 1943 and the end of the
war, with passengers being
awarded the Secret Order of the
Double Sunrise, named after the
two dawns the flight witnessed.
At another reception at
Australia House in London to
mark the nonstop service from
Perth, the Premier of Western
Australia, Mark McGowan,
pointed out that Australia had
been on the front of every
newspaper. ?I want to thank the
Junkers
Joyce?s choice
berth from Perth
Two long-gone names share the ramp at JFK in 1966
38 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
Nigel Thompson, ex-general
manager marketing and PA to
the chairman and managing
director, Harold Bamberg, writes
to remind us that 14 April marks
the 70th anniversary of the
formation of British Eagle.
Sadly, 2018 also marks 50
years since its bankruptcy in
November 1968. The airline
latterly operated Vickers
Viscounts and Bristol
Britannias, and was a victim,
among other things, of the UK?s
sterling devaluation that year.
The war effort
The Germans have strained
every nerve during the past
winter to hasten
production, and
are now able to
turn out
machines at a far faster rate
than has been the case at
any previous period of the
war, in spite of their
shortage of many materials.
Russians rejoice
The fact that both Berlin
and the Ruhr can now be
raided on the
same night is
very significant.
News of the
raids is said to have had a
very heartening effect on
the Russians, who have the
most intimate knowledge of
the cruelty of the enemy.
Under the bridge
An RAF Hunter flew
through Tower Bridge,
London, in a
down-river
direction just
after noon last
Friday, April 5. The Hunter,
carrying underwing tanks,
was glimpsed momentarily
from Flight?s offices seen
making a descending,
mushing turn until it was
lost to sight behind United
Africa House.
Nuclear fallout
Additional reductions in the
strength of the Royal Navy
may be the
prelude to the
removal of the
RAF?s nuclearstrike capability, if the MoD
decides not to replace the
WE 177 free-fall nuclear
bomb with another airlaunched nuclear system.
100-YEAR ARCHIVE
Every issue of Flight
from 1909 onwards
can be viewed online at
flightglobal.com/archive
flightglobal.com
LETTERS
flight.international@flightglobal.com
WINDOWS
We welcome your letters on any
aspect of the aerospace industry.
Please write to:
The Editor, Flight International,
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Or email:
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Letters without a full postal address supplied may not be published. Letters may
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Money a priority
over health
Qantas is to be congratulated for
setting a new record for a nonstop flight between Australia and
the UK ? 17h using a Boeing 787
(Flight International, 3-9 April).
But is this the future of long-
With Boeing considering a
New Mid-market Airplane, I
wonder if it is considering a
windowless aircraft, except
for the flightdeck.
Emirates, in its new cabin
interiors for the 777, has installed virtual windows in the
centre suites. The cost of
designing, constructing and
testing a fuselage with windows must be costly. Has
Emirates started a trend?
David Clemow
Auckland, New Zealand
Emirates? realistic alternative
haul flights using only twin-engined planes? I hope not.
In-flight shut-downs are becoming more common now, despite engine technology supposedly providing the means of
flying from A to B without C.
Aerospace
Big Data Series
Sept 2018 - Miami | Nov 2018 - London
Mar 2019 - Singapore
Emirates
Another view on cabin design
There is another issue at stake
here ? deep vein thrombosis.
I?m surprised the medical profession hasn?t raised concerns
that airlines are cramming their
passengers into a narrow tube on
long-haul flights in order to
make爉oney.
I speak from bitter experience
? a 10h haul to Vancouver on a
twin-jet with a Canadian leisure
airline, with only a baguette and
a cold drink for sustenance, and
little opportunity to get up and
stretch my legs. Never again
will I subject my body to such
treatment.
Virgin Atlantic was prudent in
retaining its four-engined Airbus
A340 as a replacement for the
Dreamliners, avoiding even
more燿isruption.
I recall a fantastic slogan
adopted by British Caledonian
back in the 1970s: ?We never forget you have a choice.? My
choice is a four-engined aircraft
with an airline that really knows
about customer service.
It?s really down to passengers
and tour operators in the end,
whether money takes priority
over health.
Peter Carey
Portchester, Hampshire, UK
Aerospace
Big Data Series
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Don?t miss out on:
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Join the conversation
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RECRUITMENT
Getting careers off the ground
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10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 43
RECRUITMENT
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44 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
flightglobal.com
RECRUITMENT
"("& (% 2!(" &((% 2"2%%&&2("&(2!!%
&&2!&! &%2(!" (% 2("%(% 22%2%2(&!2!&%& "! &(2"(&%
'/02)1*,0/-.+2&.+)1#0-*2-.+'0,.0
-.+'0,.021122HK$138,500 approximately US$17,756* per month
(*Based on exchange rate of HK$7.8 = US$1) (subject to fluctuation)
(.0*2"1/*11.0+2 Candidates should have (a) a current Airline Transport Pilot's Licence (ATPL) (Aeroplane)(See note 1) with not less than
5,000 hours air transport pilot-in-command experience, of which a significant proportion should be on civil transport aeroplanes, (b) recent
experience in civil aviation flight operations management and have been in current practice as a Training Captain (IRE/TRE) preferably on
A320, A321, A330, A340, B747-400 or B777 aircraft, and (c) with not less than 12 years' relevant experience.
Note 1 : A current ATPL (Aeroplane) should include a current Class One Medical Certificate. Applicants who do not have a current Class
One Medical Certificate may also apply; if selected, appointment will be subject to their obtaining of the requisite Class One Medical
Certificate.
Note 2 : Candidates should submit their application forms together with an Experience Resume by mail to the enquiry address on or before
the closing date for application. The Experience Resume can be downloaded from the Civil Aviation Department?s website.
(http://www.cad.gov.hk/english/recruitment.html)
0/1+2 The duties of Flight Operations Inspector Consultants include, but not limited to, the monitoring of the operational and management
standards of the holders of Air Operator?s Certificates, the appointment and supervision of type rating and instrument rating examiners
(IRE/TRE), and providing advice on flight operational matters to the Civil Aviation Department. The Consultants may be required to travel
extensively on duty and work irregular hours.
1*+2-2!))-/.01.02 The appointment will be on agreement, with vacation leave, of three years' resident service.
*/.121.1/0+2 The consultant fee is HK$138,500 (approximately US$17,756) per month. The fee will be adjusted in accordance with any
pay adjustment to civil servants in Hong Kong remunerated at a pay point on a civil service pay scale, the salary value of which is equivalent
to the consultant fee. The civil service salary adjustment may take the form of pay increase, pay freeze or pay reduction. Upon satisfactory
completion of the full contract period, the Consultant(s) will be granted a gratuity for the period of service. In addition, in compliance with the
Mandatory Provident Fund Schemes Ordinance, the Government will arrange to make contributions for the appointee to a registered
mandatory provident fund scheme (MPF scheme). The gratuity payable for the agreement will be the sum which, when added to the
Government?s contribution to the said MPF scheme, equals 15% of the total consultant fee drawn during the period of agreement. The
Consultants will be eligible for a housing benefit equivalent to the civil service Non-accountable Cash Allowance (NCA) subject to their meeting
the eligibility criteria of the scheme. The NCA is, currently at HK$33,830 (approximately US$4,337*) per month subject to periodic revision.
The terms of appointment and conditions of service to be offered are subject to the provisions prevailing at the time the offer of appointment
is made.
(./*2!$$*1++2,.$2 1'2%-2 Assistant Departmental Secretary (Personnel)2, Civil Aviation Department, Level 5, Office Building, Civil
Aviation Department Headquarters, 1 Tung Fai Road, Hong Kong International Airport, Lantau, Hong Kong S.A.R., People?s Republic of China.
(Fax.: (852) 2910 6399 or e-mail to <recruitment@cad.gov.hk>, or Telephone (852) 2910 6334 quoting reference CAD ADMD PR/5-25/59
(2018))
'-+/.2,012-2!))'/#,0/-.2 3 May 2018
flightglobal.com/jobs
1.1*,'2%-01+22
(a) Persons who are not permanent residents of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) may also apply for this vacancy but will
be appointed only when no suitable and qualified candidates who are permanent residents of the HKSAR are available.
(b) As an Equal Opportunities Employer, the Government is committed to eliminating discrimination in employment. The vacancy advertised
is open to all applicants meeting the basic entry requirement irrespective of their disability, sex, marital status, pregnancy, age, family status,
sexual orientation and race.
(c) Non-civil service Consultants are not posts on the civil service establishment. Candidates appointed are not on civil service terms of
appointment and conditions of service. Candidates appointed are not civil servants and will not be eligible for posting, promotion or transfer
to any posts in the Civil Service.
(d) The entry pay, terms of appointment and conditions of service to be offered are subject to the provisions prevailing at the time the offer
of appointment is made.
(e) Where a large number of candidates meet the specified entry requirements, the recruiting department may devise shortlisting criteria to
select the better qualified candidates for further processing. In these circumstances, only shortlisted candidates will be invited to attend
recruitment examination and/or interview.
(f) It is Government policy to place people with a disability in appropriate jobs wherever possible. If a disabled candidate meets the entry
requirements, he/she will be invited to attend the selection interview/written examination without being subject to any further shortlisting
criteria.
(g) Holders of academic qualifications other than those obtained from Hong Kong institutions/Hong Kong Examinations and Assessment
Authority may also apply but their qualifications will be subject to assessments on equivalence with the required entry qualifications. They
should submit copies of their official transcripts and certificates by mail to the above enquiry address.
(h) Towards the application deadline, our on-line system would likely be overloaded due to large volume of applications. To ensure timely
completion of your on-line application, it is advisable to submit the application as early as possible.
(i) Non-civil service vacancies information contained in this column is also available on the ?GovHK? on the Internet at http://www.gov.hk.
-2 0-2 !))'2 Application Forms [G.F. 340 (Rev. 3/2013)] can be downloaded from the Civil Service Bureau's web site
(http://www.csb.gov.hk). ,.$/$,01+2+02+0,012#'1,*'2012$10,/'+2-2)*-1++/-.,'2,'//#,0/-.2-
0,/.1$2-.2012,))'/#,0/-.2-*+2,.$
,00,#2012()1*/1.#12"1+1(See Note 2) Completed forms, together with the Experience Resume, should reach the above enquiry address
of the recruiting department on or before the closing date for application. On-line application can also be made through the Civil Service
Bureau's web site (http://www.csb.gov.hk). Candidates who apply online should submit 012()1*/1.#12"1+12/0/.2-.12112,01*
#'-+12-2,))'/#,0/-.2)1*/-$ to the above enquiry address, and the online application number should be quoted on the envelope and the
Experience Resume. &2#,.$/$,01+2,/'20-2)*-/$12012()1*/1.#12"1+1201/*2,))'/#,0/-.+2,2.-02
12#-.+/$1*1$ Applicants should
ensure that the correct address is clearly printed or written on the envelope and sufficient postage is affixed before posting so as to avoid
unsuccessful delivery of application. Any underpaid mail items will be returned or disposed of by the Hongkong Post. Applicants are
encouraged to provide their email addresses on the application forms. Candidates who are selected for interview will normally receive an
invitation (by email or by post) in about eight to ten weeks from the closing date for application. Those who are not invited for interview may
assume that their applications are unsuccessful. For enquiries, please call the telephone number indicated.
46 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
flightglobal.com
WORKING WEEK
WORK EXPERIENCE CAPT DOUGLAS VERISSIMO
Officer charts course to leading role
What inspired you to fly?
I grew up in a blue-collar house
in Massachusetts. As a kid, I
loved fast, noisy things. I remember building models of rockets,
aircraft and racing cars and imagined myself as a fighter pilot or
racing car driver. I didn?t have
the money to pursue the latter, so
chose a naval aviation career. I
had only travelled in an aircraft
three times before I entered flight
school. My first assignment was
with a strike fighter squadron
based in Lemoore, California,
that flew McDonnell Douglas
F/A-18 Hornets when they were
very new to the US Navy fleet.
When Saddam Hussein invaded
Kuwait in 1990 and the squadron
was embarked aboard the aircraft
carrier USS Independence, we
were ordered to head to the Middle East for Operation Desert
Shield. We were the first of the
American forces to arrive. But we
didn?t fly any combat missions
and left before the war started because Saddam stopped moving
south. Desert Storm didn?t start
until after my unit left the area
and coalition forces were on the
scene.
What have you flown, and from
where?
I?ve flown fighter jets throughout
my career ? both legacy Hornets
and Super Hornets. Over 30
years, I have operated from both
US coasts and travelled across
the world. I was lucky enough to
serve as a Blue Angels pilot for
three years. This experience led
me to be a better pilot than I ever
imagined as a child.
US Navy
? distinguished career flying fighters for the US Navy and prestigious Blue Angels display team taught Capt
A
Douglas Verissimo many vital lessons in preparation for commanding the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson
Stint on catapult crew showed the value of teamwork, says Verissimo
What has been the most
challenging assignment?
Of all the high points in my career, flying with the Blue Angels
was the most challenging. I didn?t
command the squadron, but it
still was my most challenging assignment. Flying at different
show sites in different weather
and in different formations was
incredibly demanding. There?s a
lot of responsibility that comes
with flying in that unit, but you
get through it by not quitting and
doing the right thing. It sounds
like a clich�, but it works.
How did you become a carrier
commander?
I was never fully certain I would
one day command one of our nation?s 11 aircraft carriers. But an
assignment as a catapult and arresting gear officer aboard the
USS John C Stennis earlier in my
career helped me realise that
naval aviation is more than just
flying jets off a flightdeck. It takes
a team working seamlessly together. This piqued my interest
in carrier operations and I
mapped out achievable goals, although some of it was good luck.
But when preparation meets
good luck, great things happen.
How large is your crew? What is
your current mission?
I command a crew of more than
3,000 sailors, who are responsible for operating and maintaining a nuclear-powered aircraft
carrier. The ship also supports an
additional 2,000 embarked personnel, who make up the air
wing and strike group leadership
staff whenever we operate at sea.
We have just completed an his-
toric port visit to Vietnam that
marked the first time a US carrier
has visited the country in more
than 40 years. We are on a scheduled deployment in the Western
Pacific working with international partners and maintaining regional peace and stability.
What is a typical day like?
I wake up as early as 06:00. Depending on the day, I conduct inspections or attend meetings before flight operations begin.
Flight operations can last late
into the night, and I usually
watch from the navigation
bridge. I am able to fly about once
or twice a week.
What?s the most difficult part of
your job?
One of the toughest parts of my
job as captain is holding crew
members accountable when they
don?t follow rules and standards
that exist to keep them safe and
fulfil our mission.
Any advice for aspiring military
aviators?
Don?t give up your dream. Stay
resilient and focused. If you want
to be a fighter pilot then pursue
that. But even if you run out of
luck, don?t give up. There are
great opportunities across the
military in many fields. n
Looking for a job in aerospace?
Check out our listings online at
flightglobal.com/jobs
If you would like to feature in
Working Week, or you know
someone who does, email
your pitch to kate.sarsfield@
flightglobal.com
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09/02/2017 12:28
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 47
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and innovation, L3?s multi-mission solutions and support keep our customers ahead of threats
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ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS
AEROSPACE SYSTEMS
COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
SENSOR SYSTEMS
ters. For
there has long been, and still is, a conservative belief among many senior figures in the
industry that traditional pilot skills, and less
tangible qualities such as airmanship, are immutable absolutes.
Certainly these basic qualities are still an
essential part of what makes a good pilot, but
aircraft have changed massively in recent
years, as has the airspace environment, the
means of navigation, and also that of traffic
separation and flow management. Expectations of safety standards are far higher than
they used to be, and young recruits to the piloting profession have been raised and educated in a different era.
For three decades after the first digital avionics and flight control systems began to be
introduced in the early 1980s, neither ab initio nor recurrent airline pilot training was
modified accordingly. As cockpit technology
continued its rapid advance, although accident rates were reducing, when they did
occur it was increasingly because the pilots
found themselves unable to cope when faced
with an unexpected occurrence that called for
independent decision-making.
Evidence that training philosophy and
technique has not prepared pilots well for today?s ?fourth-generation? cockpits has been
the elephant in the flight simulator for a long
time. The most obvious evidence is the distressingly regular incidence of loss of control
in flight (LOC-I) involving aircraft that were
28 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
actually controllable. As a statistic ? given the
number of flights that take place globally ?
LOC-I crashes do not represent a high risk,
but their regularity over the years since 2000
is unacceptable, and no-one at present can
claim confidently that they will not continue
to happen.
The very existence today of a European
Aviation Safety Agency advisory body called
the Airline Training Policy Group (ATPG) is
testimony to the fact that the ab initio pilot
training system frequently does not produce
the finished product airlines need, and that
more needs to be done to correct this.
The ATPG is made up of training experts
from the airlines, training industry, aircraft
manufacturers and EASA. They are addressing the fact that many pilots with commercial
pilot licences who present themselves for jobs
at airlines are just not good enough to fly today?s jet airliners safely. EasyJet puts the figure at up to 90% of applicants, while adding
that graduates from consolidated training
courses are usually good.
Smart flightdecks did not
lower the workload, they
changed it. It became less
physical and more cerebral
But even when those pilots who do pass
the airlines? acceptance tests get on to the line,
evidence from incidents, accidents and flight
data monitoring (FDM) suggests that recurrent training does not advance their knowledge and skills the way it should.
At many airlines, recurrent training is a
misnomer, because it is still more about recurrent checking than training. And since the reliability of today?s aircraft is such that it deprives crews of experience of dealing with
real failures or anomalies, recurrent training
is needed more than ever to advance pilot
knowledge, resilience and confidence.
Capt Chris Warton, director of customer
training in Europe for Bombardier Business
Aircraft, says his company no longer reports
on recurrent training sessions simply as pass
or fail; it grades individual performance. The
old pass/fail system did not encourage progress, Warton says, nor allow progress to be
accurately monitored.
ATTITUDE PROBLEM
Ryanair?s head of training, Capt Andy O?Shea,
who is on the ATPG, summarises what is missing in pilot graduates from the ab initio system.
He says they lack ? to a greater or lesser degree
? knowledge and understanding, flight path
flightglobal.com
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Digital technology
Airbus
With the A350, Airbus introduced
state-of-the-art digital flightdeck and
a bold new concept of type-rating
management skills, crew resource management ability, and what he calls ?maturity and
attitude?. The ATPG?s answer to the deficit is
effectively a course extension to the commercial pilot licence/instrument rating training
course, adding high quality multi-crew co-operation (MCC) and jet orientation courses
(JOC). Unlike off-the-peg MCC/JOC, this includes simulator instruction in the style of
line-oriented flight training, plus advanced
knowledge consolidation ground-school. The
result is a course dubbed the Airline Pilot Certificate Course, which Ryanair requires all of
its own new recruits to go爐hrough.
This is an admission that the present system, as designed, does not work well enough
flightglobal.com
for airlines which expect pilots with licences
to arrive on the line completely trained.
Although improving the effectiveness of
pilot ab initio and recurrent training has been
much discussed at forums such as the Royal
Aeronautical Society?s annual International
Flight Crew Training Conference (IFCTC)
over the past decade, until recently the focus
has continued to be directed at making ?better
pilots? in the traditional sense, and on reacting to the kind of accidents that continue to
happen, rather than on preparing pilots to be
experts in understanding and manipulating
the high-technology cockpit tools with which
they manage flights today.
But this year?s conference (25-26 Septem-
ber) plans to home in on the human interface
with technology, and on competency-based
training. As national aviation authorities
move towards ?performance-based regulation? rather than the traditional prescriptive
kind of rulemaking, it will also be taking a
look at training quality oversight.
Even aircraft with fourth-generation highly
automated flightdecks need pilots with traditional skills because, as the notorious example of Air France flight 447 (LOC-I over the
South Atlantic in June 2009) demonstrated,
the automation is programmed to trip out if
the system recognises it is receiving faulty
sensor data. And that will, inevitably, continue to happen from time to time.
??
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 29
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Special report
with what they saw as an opportunity to trim
pilot training cost.
As it became clear that LOC-I was here to
stay, one solution to it was seen as being
upset recovery training. Over the years, however, Airbus argued long and hard that it was
better to train pilots to prevent upsets than to
recover from them. Buried in the Airbus argument is the belief that the shortcomings in
skills and knowledge that allowed licensed
pilots to get the aircraft into an upset were
the real problem, not their failure to recover
from a situation they had played their part
in燾reating.
As the entry into service of the Airbus
A350 was approaching, the manufacturer?s
training policy experts engaged in a bold
programme of rethinking the way pilots
were prepared for the state-of-the-art digital
flightdeck on a new aircraft type. Airbus
called the new approach ?learning by discovery?, or learning by doing. Boeing has
adopted a similar approach and calls it ?active learning?.
This starts with the concept that nobody
nowadays reads a manual before operating a
new tablet, computer or smartphone. They
know what the device is designed to do, and
what they want to do with it, so they switch it
on and experiment to discover how this particular product can deliver the results
they爓ant.
JUST FLY IT
According to the new Airbus training philosophy, the crew are presented with a full-flight
simulator for the aircraft on which they are
going to do their type-rating course, and told
to ?fly? it. After all, the aircraft, however advanced, is an aircraft like any other, and it
will fly like any other. The pilots are told they
can work out for themselves how to start it,
taxi it, line up and take-off, but they are not
allowed to engage the autopilot or flight director. They are encouraged to find out how it
behaves in standard flight scenarios, and finally they land. This exercise also includes
?learning by failing?, by being permitted to
find out what does not work; this approach is
the diametric opposite of the ?don?t touch
any璽hing until you have learned all about
it?燼ttitude.
The psychology of this approach is sound.
The rules of aerodynamics have not been al-
AirTeamImages
?? So, for more than two decades now, the
commercial air transport industry has been
confronted with a dilemma regarding pilot
training policy, but it seems the changes
needed are still under development.
The advent of the digital flightdeck brought
with it improved avionics capability and reliability at the same time as higher design and
engineering standards reduced equipment
failure rates for airframe and engine hardware. The result was that accident figures reduced significantly.
Meanwhile, in the early days of digital
cockpits, the new smart flightdeck avionics
were marketed as lowering pilots? workload.
In fact they did not lower the workload, they
simply changed its nature. It became less
physical and more cerebral. It demanded
knowledge of the sophisticated flight management equipment and its capabilities, but it
did not take away the need for crew planning
and decision-making, and pilots still needed
to exercise trajectory management and monitoring skills.
Nevertheless, the combination of reduced
serious accident statistics and the illusion of
lower pilot workloads provided the airlines
Ryanair sees shortcomings ranging from basic skills to attitude, while EasyJet reckons 90% of applicants are not ready to fly a modern airliner
30 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
flightglobal.com
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
tered just because this is a state of the art flyby-wire machine. And after a couple of practical sessions flying the simulator, the
ground-school classes will feel more relevant
to the pilots, and the more traditional process
of learning details about the new type
can燽egin.
Pilots need to be re-introduced to the fact
that their complex machine, with all its automation, is just an aeroplane, and it still flies
like one. If a pilot loses sight of this basic fact,
the traditional ?get out of trouble? mantra that
tells pilots to ?aviate, navigate, and communicate ? in that order? does not mean very
much. These reminders need to be provided
not only when they begin their type-rating
training but also in their recurrent training.
Jacqui Suren, head of regulation and training development at L3 Commercial Training
Solutions, talks of new teaching/learning processes using virtual reality and ?gamification?
of the learning process, which she says relates
ground-school more closely to flying.
Regulators such as the US Federal Aviation
Administration and EASA have always
known that innovation brings risk as well as
reward, especially during the introduction of
new equipment or capabilities, but they also
acknowledge that technical advances tend to
bring net benefits. Modern flight instrument
and navigation displays may have a graphic
clarity that improves pilot situational awareness, but the flight management computers,
with their multiple capabilities, have also introduced the potential for mode confusion,
and flight management systems (FMS) can
take the pilot out of the cognitive loop by
being so accurate and reliable that his/her
critical faculties become comatose.
Training changes ? such as evidence- and
competency-based training ? designed to correct this situation, have only begun to be
adopted in the past three years or so, but at
least the process is beginning in some parts of
the air transport industry. There is, however,
a long way to go, and technology will still
keep advancing, so the training goalposts will
keep moving and the new instructional methodologies have to have flexibility built-in.
The principal change that is making recurrent training more relevant now is the gradual
adoption of evidence-based training (EBT).
Data provides the evidence of what pilots are
getting wrong ? or not getting quite right ?
whether through individual aircraft FDM, or
?big data? assembled by organisations such as
the International Air Transport Association.
The possession of this evidence enables airlines to identify where their training challenges lie as an operator, but also enables a fully
capable in-house training department to tailor
training to individual pilot needs.
In Europe, EBT will be fully implemented
as policy in early 2019 by EASA. The agenflightglobal.com
Sipa Press/REX/Shutterstock
Digital technology
Loss of Air France flight 447 showed that cockpit automation has not banished LOC-I risk
cy?s executive director, Patrick Ky, observes
that the capacity of this carefully mined data
to maximise the effectiveness of an EBT session works best when airlines carry out their
training in-house. This is so, he says, because
the specific lessons are naturally brought together with the airline?s own standard operating procedures.
Achieving this with the use of third party
training organisations is much more difficult,
he points out, suggesting that the full advantage that EBT should be able to deliver can
only be provided by third party trainers if
they work extremely closely with the airline.
Global third party training provider CAE
commented at the 2017 IFCTC that ?airlinefocussed? flight training provision is increasing as a proportion of the market, and generic
third party training is reducing. CAE points
out that an airline can provide a third-party
training supplier with FDM data so as to tailor
the training to the airline?s needs.
STAYING AHEAD
Ky insists that syllabus-based or generic
training is not adequate for the task when
flightdeck technology is advancing fast, and
when some risks are declining and others are
increasing. Pilot training now, he says, has to
be aimed at coping with identified risks, and
providing pilots with the knowledge and
skills to use cockpit technology to its best advantage. The old adage that the crew should
always be ahead of the aircraft contains the
implication that today?s pilots must now be
ahead of the FMS.
Asked whether, in these days of performance-based oversight, close training stand-
ards inspection by regulators still needs to be
exercised, Ky observes that airlines are always looking for training economies, and if
they start cutting corners ?it immediately
shows?. That sounds like a ?yes?.
Finally, Dr Georgina Fletcher, principal
consultant at analyst Frazer Nash, was given
the task of taking a look at training systems
from a UK perspective and making recommendations to ensure the maintenance of
quality pilot training. She presented her findings at the 2017 IFCTC, and recommended
that training quality would benefit if all parts
of the industry were to take ?collective ownership? of the task.
That means the end-user ? the airlines ?
should work closely with the Civil Aviation
Authority, flight training organisations, educational establishments and with what is now
the Department for Innovation, Universities
and Skills. There should, Fletcher says, be a
training needs analysis, and training policy
should be based on its findings.
Unfortunately, airline representation was
thin on the ground at the 2017 IFCTC, which
tends to validate Fletcher?s recommendation.
Now that EBT is to be formally implemented, and because there is a growing awareness
of the need to train and improve crews in
simulator sessions rather than just checking,
recurrent training has the potential to address
skill needs far better than it has been doing.
The product of ab initio flight training organisations, however, remains hugely variable and even the top quality still seems to fall
short of expectations. But that problem can
only be solved if the airlines will invest
in爄mprovement. ?
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 31
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Thomas Hanser/Boeing
Special report
Boeing?s ?active learning? philosophy grew from development of type conversion courses which recognise need for new instruction methods
Skills generation
For all its appeal, the aerospace industry struggles to recruit talented young people, so
various UK institutions are working together to build a modern, accessible training system
DAVID LEARMOUNT LONDON
D
ifficult though it may be for those in
the aerospace industry to comprehend, there is a real problem generating sufficient interest in aviation
careers to meet the demand for highly skilled
jobs such as engineers, pilots and air traffic
controllers. These professions demand extensive, high-level academic and practical training. Pilot training in particular requires a
huge upfront financial investment. Once the
students have gained their qualifications
there is plenty of competition for their skills
? newly qualified aeronautical engineers with
the right degree, for example, can easily be
poached by other industries.
A year ago, when launching a new training
32 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
centre near London Gatwick airport, Boeing
Flight Services observed that the industry
needed ?innovative solutions focused on educational outreach and career pipeline programmes to inspire the next generation of pilots, technicians, and cabin crew?. Boeing
adds: ?The growing diversity of aviation personnel will also require instructors to have
cross-cultural and cross-generational skills to
engage tomorrow?s workforce.?
Boeing makes clear that the digital sophistication of new aircraft and equipment poses
a training challenge, but the same technology
can also provide new learning and teaching
solutions. The manufacturer argues that the
complexity of the subject matter and the new
learning styles of today?s generation demand
new teaching methods, and it has been work-
ing steadily on designing a new approach:
?Our scenario-based approach for ?active
learning? was proven almost three years ago
on our 747-8 EASA [European Aviation Safety Agency] conversion [type-rating] course,
which previously did not exist.?
On a worldwide basis, Boeing is one of the
dream employers for those who want an aviation or aerospace career, and for that reason it
probably has less recruitment trouble than
others. So the fact that it admits it has to work
on a strategy for attracting the right people for
itself or for its customers hints at the challenge facing, say, a small, specialist aircraft
component supplier.
If a young person today has an interest in an
aviation career and queries one of the online
search engines, there are generic sites that proflightglobal.com
TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Recruitment
flightglobal.com
The airline provided them with mentoring
for their degree work, which, as they describe
it, included reflective writing on all aspects
of their aviating job, including threat and
error爉anagement.
On the student engineer front, Tom Emms
set out into aviation from school by doing a
Level 3 City and Guilds course in aircraft engineering at Newcastle College. He is now
doing a BSc degree in Aircraft Engineering accredited by Kingston University, but he is carrying it out at KLM UK Engineering, based at
the new ASP International Aviation Academy, Norwich (IAA-N).
Witts? initiatives in bringing together educational institutions, central and local government and industry will result in the creation
of a series of international aviation academies
throughout the country. The first such unit to
go live is IAA-N, operating in partnership
with Norwich County Council, the New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership, KLM UK
Engineering, City College Norwich and the
University of East Anglia.
RAF CONNECTION
The next ASP academy ? Aaron Aviation
Academy ? has a strong connection to the
Royal Air Force. It will be up and running at
RAF Syerston in Nottinghamshire next year
as an RAF Air Cadets and ASP joint venture.
ASP?s Whittle Engineering Academy will
be set up at the RAF?s centre of engineering
excellence at RAF Cosford in Shropshire,
while Scotland will soon host the International Aviation Academy, Dundee, based at the
city?s airport.
ASP helped plan a � million ($16.8 million) aerospace and technology college to be
set up at Biggin Hill Airport, in partnership
with London South East colleges and funded
by the Greater London Authority. To be
known as the London Aerospace and Technology College (LATC) it is, however, not to
be an academy in the ASP style, but a traditional technical college that will produce
qualified engineers and mechanical, electronic and service technicians and ground crew.
London deputy mayor for planning, regeneration and skills, Jules Pipe, says: ?It?s vital
we tackle the skills gap in aviation, and the
LATC will help to keep London at the cutting
edge of aviation technology.?
The problems the aviation industry has
had with attracting well-educated people cannot be blamed on a lack visibility ? aviation is
highly visible. But it has come to be perceived
as unattainable for ordinary mortals. This has
not been helped by the airlines? inconsistency
in their recruiting policies in the last few decades, driven by nervous accountants. They
have less of an excuse for that now, given that
the industry has consolidated and matured in
its new form, margins are better and profits
are more reliable than they were through the
1980s and 1990s, and then the early 2000s
when the shock of 9/11 hurt them badly.
This year the RAF is celebrating its centenary, which will enhance its already-high visibility in the UK. Meanwhile the world?s taste
for air travel is growing, and the air freight industry is doing well. So the airlines had better
make sure they can recruit the trained staff
they will need while the good times roll. ?
EasyJet
vide some answers. The same sort of search
will yield plenty of offers from fight training
organisations and some technical colleges.
But cost is a serious factor and advice on finance, grants, apprenticeships, student loans
or tax relief is harder to come by.
Enter Simon Witts, founder of Aviation
Skills Partnership (ASP). Responsible a decade ago for setting up and running the Flybe
Training Academy at Exeter airport, Witts noticed at that time that there was poor co-ordination between UK education and training
institutions and the aviation industry. He believed they could all serve each other?s needs
much better than they were doing.
Witts set about a root-and-branch analysis
of the disparate elements, intending to bring
the enablers together and help them act more
like a system, making it easier and more attractive for those who wanted a career in aviation to prepare for it. His vision was of a system that would motivate youngsters from the
time they first recognised their interest in aviation at school, and maintain that enthusiasm
all the way through education and training
into their career.
In January at the Palace of Westminster,
Witts addressed an invited audience with an
interest in improving the quality and availability of technical skills related to aviation,
including members of parliament, business
leaders, educators, trainers and academics.
He explained: ?People have always had a fascination with aviation, but we rarely see that
interest and excitement translating into careers. There is a whole pool of talent out
there, but the onus is on us to make our industry accessible to the right people by providing
the right infrastructure at a local, regional, national and international level.?
ASP sets out to provide career training
pathways not just for engineers, pilots and air
traffic controllers, but for potential airport operations executives, airline operations and
crewing staff, cabin crew and airport ground
handling management.
An example of someone who benefited
from ASP co-ordination and advice is Anna
McGrady, now a first officer with EasyJet. In
2013 she set out from school intending to do a
science degree and then train as an airline
pilot. But through meeting Witts while investigating a flying training course at what was
then CTC Aviation (now L3 Commercial Aviation Solutions) she learned that she could
combine study for a BSc degree in Professional Aviation Pilot Practice (PAPP) with CTC?s
flying爐raining.
She and fellow student pilot Steven Hadley ? who was also focused on the same objective ? were the first two students to enrol
on the new PAPP BSc course. They graduated in 2017. By that time, they had been working on the line with EasyJet for two years.
EasyJet is among the airlines which have embraced innovation in attracting young engineers
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 33
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34 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
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CAA INTERNATIONAL (UK CAA)
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As part of the UK CAA International Group, CAAi is perfectly placed to provide relevant, bestin-class training to National Aviation Authorities and Industry across the globe.
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113867 CAAi_Half page 175x123.indd 1
Together for better aviation
10-16 April 2018 | Flight International | 35
27/02/2018 17:15
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36 | Flight International | 10-16 April 2018
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