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Highlights for Children - May 2018

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MAY 2018
8
Highlights.com
m
WHO EATS
Page 26
Snore
Master
Page 8
h
t
n
o
M
s
i
h
T
n
u
F
A
Messy
Maze
Carly has decided
to do some spring
cleaning. Can you
help her get to the
laundry basket?
4 Ways
to Lift
Your Mood
By Beverly J. Letchworth
1 . Close your eyes and
take deep, slow breaths
to relax.
2. Wear something that
ies
Red popp
se d
u
n
e
are oft
bol to
as a s y m
soldiers
r
e
re m e m b
acrif ices
and the s
e.
they mak
makes you smile—fun
socks, a colorful scarf,
big pins or buttons, or
just cheerful colors!
Answer on page 38.
3. Pep it up. Jog, play a
to
Pho
y
er
on
a spot where you can be
alone for a few minutes
each day to daydream
and enjoy the peace.
38 .
each of these 10
another place in this magazine?
er
ge
Find the
Can you find
Pictures pictur
es at
A ns w
pa
red craf t foam. Hold
Cut a f lower from
ke
e f lower’s center. Po
a black button to th
ck
ba
e
ick through th
a green chenille st
e
read it through th
of the f lower and th
e
it back through th
buttonholes. Poke
.
em
st
e
th
d around
f lower. Twist the en
ppies.
Fill a vase with po
4. Find some quiet time. Pick
My
st
Memorial Day
Poppy Bouquet
sport, do jumping jacks,
ride your bike, or take
a walk.
Tongue Twister
Will really wanted
red raspberries.
Dear Reader
MAY 2018 • VOLUME 73 • NUMBER 5 • ISSUE NO. 799
By Christine French Cully
Editor in Chief
Founded in 1946 by Garry C. Myers, Ph.D.,
and Caroline Clark Myers
Editor in Chief: Christine French Cully
Vice President, Magazine Group Editorial: Jamie Bryant
Creative Director: Marie O’Neill
Editor: Judy Burke
Art Director: Patrick Greenish, Jr.
Senior Editor: Joëlle Dujardin
Associate Editor: Linda K. Rose
Assistant Editors: Patty Courtright, Allison Kane
Crafts and Activities Editor: Lisa Glover
Copy Editor: Joan Prevete Hyman
Senior Production Artist: Dave Justice
Production Assistant: Susan Shadle Erb
Contributing Science Editor: Andrew Boyles
Editorial Offices: 803 Church Street, Honesdale, PA 18431-1895.
E-mail: eds@highlights.com.
To submit manuscripts, go to Highlights.submittable.com.
(Writers younger than 16: please use the postal address above.)
CEO: Kent S. Johnson
Vice President, International: Andy Shafran
Senior Editor, International: Julie Stoehr
Business Offices: 1800 Watermark Drive,
P.O. Box 269, Columbus, OH 43216-0269.
Copyright © 2018, Highlights for Children, Inc.
All rights reserved.
HIGHLIGHTS FOR CHILDREN is published monthly.
Cover price: $4.95
ISSN 0018-165X (print); ISSN 2330-6920 (online)
Printed by LSC Communications, Glasgow, KY.
Designed for home and classroom use.
Periodical postage paid at Columbus, Ohio;
Toronto, Ontario; and at additional mailing offices.
U.S. Postmaster: Send address changes to Highlights for Children,
P.O. Box 6038, Harlan, IA 51593-1538. Canada Post: Publications
Mail Agreement No. 40065670. Return undeliverable Canadian
addresses to P.O. Box 99 Stn. Main, Milton, ON L9T 9Z9.
Sometimes we make our list of customer names and addresses
available to carefully screened companies whose products and
services might be of interest to you. We never provide children’s
names. If you do not wish to receive these mailings, please contact
us and include your account number.
To order, make a payment, change your address,
or for other customer-service needs, such as changing
your contact preference, please contact us:
• Online: www.Highlights.com
• Call: 1-800-255-9517
• Write: P.O. Box 5878, Harlan, IA 51593-1378
As part of our mission to help make the world
a better place for the children of today and
tomorrow, Highlights is committed to
T S:
PARE Nchild is
making responsible business decisions
r
u
o
y
that will protect our natural resources
If
dy
ite rea
and reduce our environmental impact.
not qu ghts, call
hli
for Hig witch to
AWARDS Highlights has been
to s
t
given awards by The Association
ive ™ a
High F ime.
t
of Educational Publishers, The
any
Education Center, LLC, Family Choice
Awards, Freedoms Foundation, Graphic Arts
Association, iParenting Media, Magazine Design and Production,
National Association for Gifted Children, National Conference of
Christians and Jews, National Parenting Center, National Safety
Council, Parents’ Choice, Parent’s Guide to Children’s Media
Awards, and Printing Industry Association. HighlightsKids.com
is a participant in the Kids Privacy Safe Harbor program of the
Children’s Advertising Review Unit (CARU) of the Council of Better
Business Bureaus.
We’re
Listening!
The world can seem like a very
noisy place sometimes. You might
wonder if your voice is ever heard,
especially if you’re a kid.
At Highlights, we think that listening to kids is important.
After all, if you want to serve kids, it helps to understand them.
And who better to help with that than the experts on kids—
you! That’s why we created the State of the Kid survey.
In this survey, we ask kids about things that affect them in
their lives. Over 10 years of polling, we’ve learned a lot about
your thoughts, dreams, and worries. When we share what we
learn with other people who care about kids, we spark great
conversations about the fun and challenges of being a kid.
We can’t do it without you, of course!
I hope you will take our 2018 State of
the Kid survey on HighlightsKids.com.
This year, we are asking about the
people you admire most, the people
you turn to first when you are feeling
troubled, what you like most about
yourself, and more.
2018
We’re listening!
Your friend,
Write to me!
Christine@Highlights.com
This magazine of wholesome fun
is dedicated to helping children grow in basic skills and knowledge,
creativeness, in ability to think and reason, in
sensitivity to others, in high ideals and worthy ways of living—for
®
children are the world’s most important people .
in
May
VOLUME 73 • NUMBER 5 • ISSUE NO. 799
Dear Highlights,
—Mason, California
Go for
a Ride!
How exciting, Mason! We hope these tips help.
1Ask friends
and family
members about
the types of pets
they’ve had.
2Consider how
much space you
have for a pet and
how much time you
have to care for it.
3Head to the
library or talk to
a veterinarian to
learn about the care
different pets need.
May is National
Bike Month.
16
22
36
6
7
8
14
Under the Rainbow
Sunshine after rain makes
the world new again.
Hidden Pictures®
Puzzle
Paddling pals.
15
The Timbertoes®
The family spots an eagle.
Jokes
A duck walks into
a costume store.
Snore Master 3000
16
What wacky product
would you invent?
Saving the Daisies
What will Taylor do about
the trampled daisies?
10
11
12
Goofus and Gallant®
Gallant helps a new student.
Gallant Challenge
Leave some stone surprises
in your neighborhood.
18
Crafts
A robot bank, a Mother’s
Day banner, and more.
20
My Sci
Spreading
Kindness, Rock
by Rock
Nature’s light show and
a colorful experiment.
Meet kid painters and
play a rock-hunting game.
T. rex could
BITE DOW
with a forc N
e like
the weigh
t of a
pickup tru
ck—
with a com
pact
car on top
!
26
Breakfast Around
the World
What kids eat in India, New
Zealand, China, Zimbabwe,
Sweden, Israel, and Chile.
32
Nature Watch
Get to know the
pronghorn.
34
22
Discovering
Tyrannosaurus rex
What scientists know.
24
25
See drawings and poems
by creative kids.
36
Paws and Think
Appreciating butterflies.
38
39
Riddles
Why are fish bad
at basketball?
BrainPlay
Why do we wear socks?
40
Ask Arizona®
Copycat troubles.
The Retake
Andy blanks on his
geography test.
Salsa Steps
Get the tortilla chips ready!
Your Own Pages
42
Dear Highlights
Kateri wants to start a
neighborhood play.
43
Picture Puzzler
Welcome to Meowtown!
MAY 2018
5
Under the
Rainbow
By Robert Schechter
Art by Larisa Lauber
Under the rainbow,
on top of the ground—
that’s where the puddles
we splash in are found.
That’s where the petals
are sparkling with drops,
after the downpour
and thundering stop.
Way up above now
the sun’s broken through,
brilliant as always,
the sky again blue.
Don’t you just love it?
The cloudburst, and then
sunshine and rainbows,
the world new again?
6
MAY 2018
The
Timbertoes
The family took a long hike.
®
By Rich Wallace • Art by Ron Zalme
Mabel spotted an eagle.
They hiked all morning.
Look how
high it is!
Lunchtime was rest time.
How much
farther?
We’re near
the top.
Soon they reached a clearing.
Now we’re the
ones up high!
Snore Master
3000
Do you wake up tired?
When you get out of bed,
does it seem as if your
“get-up-and-go” has
gotten up and left?
By Jeffrey B. Fuerst
Art by Keith Frawley
The problem may be
that you’re having trouble
falling asleep. Nodding off
on the bus ride to school
doesn’t count.
8
MAY 2018
What you need
is the Snore Master 3000!
This amazing machine is
guaranteed to send you to
slumberland in minutes. Just
imagine: no more restless
tossing and turning!
And it’s so easy
to operate! Simply flip the
switch, and the Snore Master
3000 pumps floating Z’ s into
your room. Watch the Z’ s dance
around and around and . . .
around . . .
. . . and . . . mmm
. . . ahh
Z-Z-Z
So order the
Snore Master 3000 today.
If you act now, we’ll send
you a free bonus gift! This
sheep-silhouette attachment
is perfect for counting
sheep.
Huh? What was
I saying? I must have
dozed off.
Oh, right!
See how quickly the
Snore Master 3000
works?
Do you have
an idea for a
wacky product?
Come up with an “ad”
for it,
and draw a picture if yo
u’d
like. Include your name
, age,
and address. Mail to
Wack y Ads
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
Goaonfd us
Gallant
There’s some of Goofus and Gallant in us all.
When the Gallant shines through, we show our best self.
®
“Sure, I can help
you find your bus,”
says Gallant.
“Why are you asking
me? Keep looking, you’ll
find it,” says Goofus.
“I’m having trouble
concentrating. May I
read in the library?”
asks Gallant.
“It’s so loud in here,
I can’t concentrate!”
yells Goofus.
YOUR Goofus and Gallant Moments
“I felt like Goofus when I
“I felt like Gallant when
wouldn’t do my piano practice
when my mom told me to.”
I helped make my brother
happy!”
Micaela, Age 10, Illinois
10
MAY 2018
Davis, Age 8, Tennessee
Art by Leslie Harrington.
Ask fo
r
permis
sion b
efore
setting
out ro
(Some
cks.
places
don’t a
them.)
llow
Avoid
puttin
them i
g
n gras
sy area
where
s
they c
ould
damag
e lawn
mowe
rs.
GALLANT CHALLENGE!
s
e
s
i
r
p
r
u
S
e
n
o
t
S
P
erhaps you’ve seen them in your
neighborhood—small stones with inspiring
words written on them, tucked among
f lowers, on a windowsill, or in the nook of
a tree. The Kindness Rocks Project has
become popular around the world. All you
need to take part are paints or a paint pen,
a rock, and a kind thought.
The idea began with Megan Murphy,
a coach, writer, and mom who lives in
Massachusetts. When she’d find beach
glass or heart-shaped rocks on her walks
along the shore, the small treasures
would remind her of her mom and dad,
and she’d instantly feel happy. She began
thinking about the other people walking
along the beach. How could she boost
their spirits too?
On a whim, Megan wrote
messages on a few rocks,
then left them on the
Meet
sand. A friend found
kid painters
one and texted
ckand play a ro
Megan to say that
e!
m
a
hunting g
finding it had made
See pages
her day. The project
20–21.
grew from there.
Photos by Susan Shadle Erb.
Make Someone’s Day
Grab a few rocks and a paint pen or
two. Can you think of someone in your life
who would love to find a happy surprise?
Or maybe you’d like to leave a message
for someone waiting at a bus stop, playing
in a park, or hiking along a trail. Write
notes on the stones, place them where
someone will be pleased to see them,
and then smile, knowing that you
just might make someone’s day!
Share Your Photos
Did you write messages on rocks and
leave them for others to find?
We’d love to see them. Please
include your name, age, and
address, and mail a drawing or
photo of your rock to
Stone Surprises
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
In a future issue, we’ll publish
a few drawings and photos
from kids.
MY SC
Red light comes from
oxygen atoms that are
even higher and thinner
(more spread out from
one another).
Green light comes from
atoms of oxygen gas
more than 60 miles
above Earth’s surface.
Night Lights
By Ken Croswell, Ph.D.
Some nights, the sky puts on a spectacular
light show. High in the air, glowing colors seem
to hover and dance.
The glow, or aurora (uh-ROAR-uh), is called the
“northern lights” when it’s over the Northern
Hemisphere (or the “southern lights” over the
Southern Hemisphere). It happens when tiny
particles called electrons hit the air high above
Earth, giving energy to the gas atoms and
molecules there. The gas gets rid of that extra
energy by giving off light of different colors.
When we get hurt,
why do we feel pain?
Candace DeWitt
Age 12 • Kansas
When nerve endings in your body detect
possible damage somewhere, they send messages
to your brain, which produces the feeling or
sensation of pain. If you were to step on hot sand
with bare feet, nerve endings would send a speedy
signal along pathways through the spinal cord to
the brain, telling it that your feet were being hurt.
12
MAY 2018
Unlike the aurora, these lights are
not natural. They’re city lights
bright enough to be seen from
the International Space Station
(where this photo was taken).
You’d sense
pain and would
react to the
signal almost
immediately to
protect your feet.
If you didn’t get
that pain signal, you wouldn’t be alerted to the
problem, and your feet could get seriously injured.
Pain can be an important, protective alarm signal
letting you know that something is hurting you.
By Dougal Dixon
Art by Robert Squier
Shingopana
SHEEN-go-PAH-nah
“wide neck” (in Kiswahili, an
official language of Tanzania)
Shingopana was a small
titanosaur. It was more
like South American
titanosaurs than like
other known titanosaurs
of Africa. Scientists think
that its ancestors were
able to roam both Africa
and South America
when the two
continents were
still joined as a
single landmass.
Flowing
Colors
Pour a one-inch layer of
cooking oil into a tall, clear
glass. Fill the glass to near
the rim with water. Watch
as the oil and water separate
into layers. Then add a few
drops of food coloring to
the top of the oil. Watch
what happens over the next
few minutes.
Why do the oil and water
separate? And why don’t the
droplets of food coloring
spread and color the oil as
they do in the water? Think
of your own best answer.
Then read our explanation
on page 38.
Narrow lower
jaw like many
South American
titanosaurs had
Thick neck
Cow-sized body
WHERE:
Tanzania
HOW LONG:
20 feet
WHAT IT ATE:
Plants
WHEN:
100 million years ago
252
Triassic
201
Jurassic
145
66
Cretaceous
MAY 2018
Present
Cenozoic
13
Want ae?
challeng
Yaks in Kayaks
5
k page 1
Fold bac the
e
to hid
clues.
picture
By Gary LaCoste
In this big picture, find the glove, comb, wedge of lemon, bottle, bowl, kite, piece of popcorn, coat hanger,
musical note, banana, drinking straw, toothbrush, heart, ruler, hammer, fishhook, carrot, crown, and shoe.
14
MAY 2018
Check out our Hidden Pictures app!
Picture Clues
comb
glove
kite
wedge of
lemon
bottle
bowl
coat
hanger
piece of
popcorn
musical
note
JOKES
“Knock, knock.”
“Who’s there?”
“Isabele.”
“Isabele who?”
l?
“Isabele operationa
I only see a broken
one.”
Noah Weinsaft, New York
A daisy was growing
underneath a tree.
Daisy: Flower you feeling, tree?
Tree: I’m vine.
Clara Bruno, Illinois
banana
toothbrush
drinking
straw
A book never written:
How the Recycling Bin Works
by M.T. Mee.
Delilah Goldstein, California
Foal: May I have another apple?
Horse: Absolutely not! Do you
think apples grow on trees?
heart
ruler
hammer
fishhook
crown
carrot
shoe
BONUS
Can you also find
the slice of pizza,
bell, boomerang,
and needle?
Answers on HighlightsKids.com.
Amaya Martinez, Colorado
A duck walks into a costume
store. He buys a magician
costume and a mustache.
Cashier: How would you like
to pay?
Duck: Put it on my bill.
Connor, Ohio
A chef was teaching a class of
comedians to crack an egg.
Chef: If your egg doesn’t crack,
crack it up by telling it a joke!
Grace Kiernan, Maine
Make us laugh!
Send a joke or riddle, along with your
name, age, and address, to
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
A Clover
Thought
A bee is in the clover
flitting from bloom to bloom.
On buzzy wings
she dips and drinks,
and once or twice
I bet she thinks
it would be nice
if we had clover
all over.
—Toby Speed
MAY 2018
15
Saving
The cow took off,
tearing through
the daisies and
across the yard.
s
e
i
s
i
Da
the
By Melissa Dawn Pittaway
Art by Christina Larkins
Taylor opened her sleepy eyes and
looked out the window at the foggy field
below. “NO!” she cried, now fully
awake. Buttermilk the cow was in
Mama’s daisy patch.
I must have forgotten to latch the gate
last night, Taylor thought as she pulled
a sweatshirt over her head. Mama was
planning to sell daisy bouquets at the
fair next week. But Buttermilk was
eating the f lowers.
Taylor hurried outside and grabbed
the lead rope hanging on the porch.
“Why can’t you stay in the field?” she
called to Buttermilk as she headed
across the yard to the daisy patch.
Buttermilk stood nipping
tender f lowers off their stems.
When I grow up, I’ll be an
artist and paint pictures all
day, Taylor thought. I’ll never
own a cow. Too much trouble.
16
MAY 2018
Just as Taylor was about to snap the
lead rope onto Buttermilk’s collar, the
family dog, Red, rounded the corner of
the house. The cow couldn’t stand Red.
Buttermilk took off, tearing through
the daisies and across the yard. She
finally ran through the open gate and
into the field.
“Thank goodness!” Taylor said as she
closed the gate and secured the latch.
She turned to look at the f lower
garden. Most of the daisies were either
eaten or trampled.
“I forgot to
latch the gate.”
Taylor had to make it up
to her mother.
Mama came out of the house. “What’s
going on?” she asked. She looked sadly
at her garden.
“I forgot to latch the gate,” Taylor
said. “I’m so sorry.”
“I know you are.” Mama sighed and
gave Taylor a hug. “You learned an
important lesson today.”
Taylor’s heart was heavy as she went
back into the house. She had to think
of a way to make it up to her mother.
A painting on the wall caught Taylor’s
eye. “That’s it,” she whispered.
Taylor raced upstairs. She grabbed
her art supplies and sat down at her
desk, looking out the window at the
remaining daisies below. As her
brush moved smoothly across the
paper, daisies came alive.
Taylor made one painting after
another. The next morning, Taylor
painted more. By the end of the week,
she had two dozen paintings.
The morning of the fair, Dad loaded
daisy bouquets into the van. “That’s
half the number I usually have, but it’s
still worth taking them,” Mama said.
“Mama,” said Taylor, “I have a
surprise for you upstairs.”
Mama smiled. “Really? Let’s see it.”
When they reached Taylor’s bedroom,
Taylor opened the door. Daisy paintings
were everywhere, bright and cheerful
in the morning light.
“Wow,” said Mama.
“Do you think anyone will buy them?”
Taylor asked.
Mama smiled. “Oh, sweetie, yes.
I’m sure they will.”
“Do you
think anyone
will buy
them?”
Crafts
Make This
Game Next
Month!
Robot Bank
By Elle Vee
1. For the body, cover a tissue box with
cardstock, leaving half of the tissue opening
uncovered. (This will be the back.)
2. For arms and legs, cover four short
cardboard tubes with cardstock. Ask
an adult to help you cut holes in the body
and a coin slot in the top of the robot.
Insert the tubes into the holes.
3. From cardstock, cut out hands, feet,
a face, buttons, and a belly. Glue them on.
Add craft gems for eyes.
4. Cut out a cardstock f lap to cover the
opening in the back. Tape the top edge
to the robot. Add Velcro dots to hold
the bottom edge closed.
5. Insert coins and bills in the slot. To get
money out, open the f lap in the back.
Bouquet
Banner
for Mom
By April Theis
1. From cardstock, cut out
f lowers, leaves, three
triangle shapes, and the
letters M , O, and M .
18
MAY 2018
2. Decorate them
with glitter glue,
craft gems, and
markers.
3. Glue a letter and a
bouquet to each triangle.
Tape them onto a long
piece of ribbon.
Craft samples by Buff McAllister. Photos by Guy Cali Associates, Inc.,
except robot-bank background by iStock/didecs, tabletop by
iStock/forrest9; photos on octopus frame by iStock/kali9.
Octo-Photo Buddy
By April Theis
1. Cut an octopus head
from thin cardboard.
Cover it with poster
board. Add wiggle eyes.
2. Cut eight arms and a hat
from poster board. Glue
them onto the head.
3. Add details with
markers.
4. Tape a paper clip to the
back of each arm. Slide
photos into the clips.
Add a ribbon hanger.
Open the Lock
A Game for 2 Players
By April Theis
1. Cover a box with cardstock.
2. Cut out a handle and a keyhole from
cardstock. Glue them to the box.
3. Cut a 15-inch-long strip from cardstock.
Use a marker to divide the strip into six
squares. Write “Start” at one end. Place
the other end under the lock.
4. Cut out two keys from cardstock. Write
“Odd” on one and “Even” on the other.
5. Cover two pennies with cardstock.
Write “1” and “2” on one and “3” and
“4” on the other.
TO PLAY: Each player places
a key on the “Start” square. The
first player rolls both pennies, then
adds up the numbers. If the sum
matches the player’s key (odd
or even), then he or she
moves one space. If not,
then that player does not
move, and the next player
takes a turn. The first player
to reach the lock wins.
CRAFT CHALLENGE! Make a
Memorial Day wreath using markers,
ribbon, and a paper plate.
MAY 2018
19
Spreading Kindness,
Hannah
and
Harry
Rock by
Rock
Kids love
creating, sharing,
and finding these
painted treasures.
By Susan Shadle Erb
“Mom! I found one! I found a rock!”
I heard those words again and again
last summer as I sat on the porch of
my home, which faces a park in the
small town where I live.
“It’s a fun
family activity.”
The Kindness Rocks Project, which
was started a few years ago by a mom in
Massachusetts (see page 11), has spread
around the world. Kids, families, and
adults of all ages are taking part—
painting rocks, hiding rocks, and finding
20
MAY 2018
painted rocks all over the place. Some
post photos of the rocks on social media,
and others simply move the rocks for
someone else to find. Some take the
rocks home and then replace them with
new ones that they create and hide.
Nine-year-old twins Harry and
Hannah DeVrieze have painted
hundreds of rocks with their parents.
Photos by Susan Shadle Erb, except photo of Ben and Luke by Judy Tuman
Burinsky and some individual rock photos by Guy Cali Associates, Inc.
Kadyn and Jayce
Most evenings, the family
and their small dog walk
around with a wagon full
of rocks that they hide as
they walk.
“It’s a fun family
activity,” Hannah says.
“We will do it in the
winter too,” Harry adds.
Ben Burinsky, age nine,
and his brother, Luke,
age seven, were visiting
relatives when they found
their first painted rock
in a park. They were
so excited that they went home and
painted their own rocks, then hid them
for others to find.
“My boys loved finding the rock
in the park, especially since it was a
superhero,” their mother, Judy Burinsky,
says. “I love how something so small
can bring a smile to my children’s faces.
In return, they learn the value of
giving back to others.”
Kadyn Kinney, age nine, and his
Ben
and
Luke
Can you f in
d
10 painted
rocks hidde
n
throughout
this issue?
Answ
ers on
p a ge 38 .
seven-year-old brother, Jayce,
have also painted many
rocks. They love to hide rocks
and hunt for rocks with their
mom and dad. When their
grandmother visited,
they gave her painted
rocks to take home
and hide in the
Florida town where
she lives.
When asked how
many rocks he has
painted so far, Jayce
says, “Trust me! I’ve
painted way more
than 30.”
DISCOVERING
Tyrannosaurus rex
Scientists have hunted down clues to how T. rex lived.
By Andy Boyles,
Contributing Science Editor
Art by Robert Squier
Sense of Smell
The brain area for
smell was big. T. rex
had a hunter’s nose.
“The Better to
See You With”
Eye sockets faced forward,
like a lion’s or tiger’s.
Who takes the biggest bite
of dinosaur fame? Answer:
Tyrannosaurus rex, the
“tyrant lizard king” from
the end of the dinosaur age,
66 million years ago.
In 1902, fossil hunter
Barnum Brown found
enough bones from one T. rex
in Montana to show its huge
size and meat-eating teeth.
Since then, scientists have
turned up more than 50
specimens. The biggest and
most complete skeleton is
42-foot-long “Sue.” It’s named
after Susan Hendrickson,
who found it in South
Dakota in 1990.
Some meat-eating
dinosaurs were bigger than
North America’s T. rex.
For example, Spinosaurus
(Africa) and Giganotosaurus
(South America) were
discovered years later. Still,
T. rex had the widest jaws,
the strongest teeth, and,
let’s face it, the coolest name.
“Even if it’s not the
largest, Tyrannosaurus is
one of the most impressive,”
says Dr. Thomas Holtz of the
University of Maryland.
Dr. Holtz helped Highlights
round up scientists’ biggest
T. rex discoveries during
the past 116 years.
22
MAY 2018
Crushing Teeth
“These are not
cutting teeth,”
says Dr. Holtz.
“These are
pulverizing,
crushing,
piercing teeth.”
Give T. rex
a Hand!
For years, T. rex’s
hand bones were
missing. In 1988 and
1990, new discoveries
showed that the
carnivore had only
two fingers.
Mighty Little Arms
Over the years, many
skeletons have shown that
T. rex had tiny arms for
its size. Scientists are not
sure how they were used.
No Feathers?
“Seesaw” rex
“Tripod” rex stood upright for years. In
the 1970s, scientists saw that T. rex stood
and moved like a giant bird. In today’s
displays, the meat eater stands with the
back and tail parallel to the ground.
A scientist once called the dinosaurs
“10,000-pound walking teeter-totters,”
or seesaws.
Stiff Spine
and Tail
Long, thick
tendons made the
backbone rigid.
Tailbones locked
together, forming
a straight tail.
Imprints in rocks
show that small
T. rex relatives had
feathers. T. rex might
have had feathers
when it was young,
but imprints show
adults had scaly skin.
All Grown Up
Growth rings (like tree
rings) in bones show
T. rex was fully grown
by about age 20 and
could live to be 28
years old.
“Tripod” rex
The first skeleton included only one-eighth of the bones.
Scientists thought each dinosaur must have stood and
moved like some type of modern mammal, so they made T. rex
stand like a kangaroo, in a tripod stance with its tail dragging.
Small Arms
Too Heavy to Run?
T. rex’s legs were built
for speed, but the
dinosaur was too heavy
to run. It might have run
when it was young, then
walked fast as an adult.
Photo by Classic Image/Alamy Stock Photo.
Scientists thought the
arm bones were too
small for T. rex. Were
they really bones from
a smaller dinosaur?
“How
Many
Fingers
Am I
Holding
Up?”
At first,
scientists
thought
T. rex
had three
fingers, like
its relative
Allosaurus.
How Many Bones?
Scientists didn’t know how long to make the
dinosaur. They gave it an extra 12 feet of tail!
Salsa
Steps
Ask a
n
t o h e adu lt
lp wit
h
a n yt h
i
n
g
sharp
or h o
t.
Try these recipes for
salsa that’s sweet,
corny, or spicy.
For each recipe, start with:
1 2
/ cup
diced
tomato
1 2
/ cup
diced
sweet
bell pepper
1 tablespoon
lime juice
1 4
/ cup
diced
red onion
1 tablespoon
chopped
cilantro or
parsley
1 2
/
teaspoon
sea
salt
1
teaspoon
olive oil
Then . . .
Sweeten It!
Make It Corny!
/ cup
diced
mango
/4 cup
crushed
pineapple,
drained
24
1 2
/ cup
corn
kernels
1
finely diced
garlic
clove
1
1
teaspoon
white
balsamic
vinegar
MAY 2018
Puree with:
Gently mix in:
Stir in:
1 2
Spice It Up!
1 2
/ cup
black beans,
drained
1 2
/ cup
roastedtomato
puree
1 2
/
cup
diced
avocado
1 teaspoon
diced jalapeño
pepper
For more
zing, add a
few drops of
hot sauce.
1
finely diced
garlic
clove
2 teaspoons
diced jalapeño
pepper
Then stir in:
1 2
/ cup peeled and diced
cucumber
A Butterfly Conservatory
Why do some people
create butterfly gardens?
Why might people like to
visit them?
How is this place like a
zoo? How is it different?
Why might touching a
butterfly be harmful to it?
Where else in nature do you see
the kinds of colors you see on
butterfly wings?
Art by David Coulson.
d
n
s
w
a
a
P
Think
Well, hi!
MAY 2018
O
O
UN
RL
D
B
T
AR
26
K
F
A
A
S
E
R
D T HE W
All around the globe, kids begin their day
with a meal. What that meal looks like
often depends on the tastes and traditions
of their country. Maybe these breakfasts
will inspire you to put something new
on your morning menu!
New Zealand
has one of the
s in
earliest time zone
kids there
the world. While
ast on
are eating breakf
wai‘i
Tuesday, kids in Ha
ing
might be just finish
up their first
Monday meal.
New
Zealand
By Jillian Sullivan
Indy and Sonny’s
breakfast is typical for
New Zealand: WeetBix and fruit (kiwifruit
this time) and toast
with Marmite, a salty
spread made with
yeast extract. Because
the family doesn’t eat
dairy, there is almond milk on the
Weet-Bix and coconut oil on the toast.
On the weekends, Indy and Sonny’s dad
serves mushrooms and avocado on toast
for everyone. (Sonny loves mushrooms.) Or
their mum makes Indy’s favorite: buckwheat
pancakes, bananas, and maple syrup.
But this is a school day, so it’s cereal and
toast. “I like the kiwifruit. It’s so fresh,” Indy
says. “And the Weet-Bix is munchy.”
Sonny says sometimes he has jam on his
toast. “But Marmite is my favorite.”
Art page 26 by iStock/glorgos245. Photos by the authors, except page 26
(pancakes and fruit) by iStock/samael334; pages 28–29 (bottom) Samuel Kingston.
Globes by Map Resources Premier International.
kiwi
Weet-Bix
Marmite
on toast
Continued on next page
Continued from pa
China
By Amy Jiang
On weekdays, Zixuan’s
breakfast is bread and milk.
But on weekends, Zixuan
has a big breakfast. During
the Dragon Boat Festival, a
special occasion, he helps
his mother make zongzi.
Zongzi are pyramid-shaped
dumplings made of sticky
rice wrapped in bamboo or
reed leaves. At the center
of the dumplings are
different stuffings—red
dates, red-bean paste,
meat, or chestnuts. Zixuan
likes the red dates best.
Because zongzi take such
a long time to prepare,
though, Zixuan prefers
making pancakes. “They’re
easy to cook and very
yummy!” he says.
custard
tart
oranges
and
bananas
celery with
peanuts
zongzi
pancakes
sambar
coconut
chutney
dosas
idlis
poori
28
MAY 2018
Greek
yogurt
Israel
cottage
cheese
challah
bread
orange jam
By Liat Savin Ben Shoshan
Breakfast in Israel
usually includes fresh
vegetables, such as
tomatoes and cucumbers
cut into small pieces, as
well as tahini (a sesame
paste) and olives, an
influence of the local
Arab culture. Dairy
products, like Greek
feta cheese or cottage
cheese, and scrambled
eggs are also part of
the meal. Because it’s
Saturday, Yoelli is eating
tahini
cucumbers,
tomatoes, and
feta cheese
challah, a sweet soft
bread baked only on
Fridays, for the Jewish
Sabbath. Yoelli says
that challah is his
y Jeyanthi Manokaran
Kiara and Inba, who live in South
India, get a wholesome start to their
day. Because rice grows well there,
they have idlis (steamed rice
dumplings) and dosas (rice pancakes
made with the same batter).
olives
favorite part of
breakfast—and it
reminds him that
there is no school
today.
“Mmm! Crispy dosas!” says Kiara.
The idlis and dosas go well with sambar
(lentil soup) and coconut chutney.
Coconuts are plentiful in South India.
Another breakfast option is poori (deepfried Indian wheat bread), more common
in North India where wheat is grown.
Kiara and Inba wash all of this down with
milk. “I love milk!” says Inba with a smile.
Continued on next page
Continued from page 29
coffee or
tea with
milk and
sugar
peanut
spread
sweet
atoes
bread
Zimbabwe
By Cecil Dzwowa
For Victor of Zimbabwe, the typical
breakfast always includes tea or coffee
mixed with milk and a couple of
teaspoons of sugar.
While most Zimbabwean kids have
their tea or coffee with sliced bread and
jam, margarine, or peanut spread, Victor
adds a rural touch to his first meal by
including one or two boiled sweet
potatoes. “They stay in the stomach
much longer, they have a natural sweet
taste, and you can easily grow them in
your backya
backyard garden,” he says.
On the weekends, when
Victor is not rushing to
school, toasted bread and
fried eggs are often added
to th
he menu. But, for
Victor, it doesn’t
m
matter what day or
o
occasion it is. “Sweet
potatoes will always
have to be on that
brreakfast table.”
boiled
egg
knäckebröd
cucumber
cheese
Swed
By Tiffany Aln
Many kids in Sweden, like Nils and
Signe, eat either a thick sour milk
called fil or plain yogurt with cereal,
seeds, berries, or bananas sprinkled
on top. Another popular breakfast
food is a hard, thin flatbread called
knäckebröd (ka-neck-e-brud). This
has been served on breakfast tables
in Sweden since the 1500s. It was
Chile
By Mariah Leontopoulou-Cochran
sourdough
bread
fil
butter
originally baked with a hole in the
middle so it could be stored on
hooks to eat later in the year. Nils
eats his knäckebröd with cottage
cheese and cucumber, but it is also
common to eat it with butter,
cheese, and tomatoes.
Sourdough bread is another great
choice. But of everything on the
breakfast table, hard-boiled eggs
with salt are Nils’s and Signe’s
favorite. Well, that and milk with
cinnamon. So good!
For Isabella, who lives in C
,
breakfast usually means toasted
marraquetas (crunchy rolls),
hallullas (biscuits), or white toast
with melted cheese along with
some fruit and juice. Sometimes
she puts jam on her bread. “Then
it’s like I’m eating dessert for
breakfast!” she says.
Even though her first meal
changes a little from day to day, it
always contains some form of bread.
That’s because bread is inexpensive
and can be used in a lot of ways.
“Bread is a huge part of our culture,”
says Isabella’s cousin Flo. “We
are taught to eat it from a very
young age.”
jam
toasted
bread
and
cheese
fruit
cheese
MAY 2018
31
Nature
Watch
HORNS,
NOT
ANTLERS
Pronghorn
As its name shows,
the pronghorn has
horns, not antlers.
What’s the
difference?
By Peter Friederici
DID YOU KNOW? The
pronghorn is well suited to its
grassland home in the central and
midwestern United States. Even
when eating with its head down,
a pronghorn is likely to see a
predator approaching. That’s
because its eyes are on the sides
of its head and stick out a bit. Its
vision is sharp, too, and can spot
motion a mile away.
HORNS ARE
w On bovids, such as
bison and goats
w On many males
and females
When a predator—often a wolf
or coyote—does get close, a
pronghorn herd relies on speed to
escape. Pronghorn are the fastest
land animals in North America,
sprinting at 60 miles per hour and
running at 40 miles per hour. What
makes them so fast? Short upper
legs and long lower legs give them
long strides without great effort.
And their bodies excel at moving
oxygen from lungs to muscles.
The pronghorn is built for speed!
w Permanently
attached
w Keratin (a protein in
nails and hair) over
a bone core
w Often curved, usually
with one point
ANTLERS ARE
EYE SE E
The pronghorn has a big field of view. Without
turning its head, it can see most of the way around
itself. Humans can see just over halfway around.
Pronghorn’s
field of view
w Usually on just males
TRY THIS: Hold your hands straight out in front
of you. Slowly move them out to the sides without
turning your head. How far back on each side can
you still see your hands?
32
MAY 2018
w On members of the
deer family, such as
moose and elk
w Shed yearly
w Bone
Human’s
field of view
w Branch-like, and can
have many points
Animal
Squares
By Teresa A. DiNicola
Following the rules, can
you find nine animal
names in the box? The
first one has been done
for you (COW).
BONUS!
Find all nin
e
animals in
the scene.
RULES
• You can start on any square.
• For each name, every letter that
follows must be connected to
the one before, either vertically,
horizontally, or diagonally.
• Do not use the same letter square
more than once in the same word.
O C A E
W R T B
L E G I
Answers on page 38.
Peter’s Piggy Bank
Peter
P
emptied his piggy bank, spilling out all the quarters,
dimes,
d
nickels, and pennies. When he added up the coins, they
to
otaled $1.23. Peter noticed that he had the same number of
each type of coin. How many of each coin did Peter have?
Answer on page 38.
MAY 2018
33
Your Own
Pages
Fenris Dexter
Age 8 • New Hampshire
Bikes
Horns honk.
here.
Bikes take you everyw
They roll like the wind
And get you there.
n be blue.
Mine is red, yours ca
We’ll all love our bikes
The same way I do.
Gavin Shields
Age 7 • Nevada
Israel Treat
Age 10 • Minnesota
Inspired by the paintings
of Piet Mondrian
Christian Hellyer
Age 9 • Pennsylvania
The Boy in the Rain
Alison Rimes
Age 11 • New York
There was a young boy in Maine
who loved to play in the rain.
And up he jumped,
fell on his rump,
same.
and got up and laughed all the
Matthew Foster
Age 11 • Georgia
Ice Pops
Pineapple, mango, peach
never out of reach.
Sweet and sour to the 10th power.
Perfect for the beach.
Grace Ferguson
Age 10 • North Carolina
Steam Locomotive
34
MAY 2018
Micah Thompson
Age 8 • Texas
Firefly
Bees vs. Bears
There is honey
s.
And honey brings bear
y
ne
Bees guard the ho
share.
’Cause the bears don’t
There are f lowers
es.
And f lowers bring be
ney
ho
e
And that leaves th
.
For the bears to seize
Lighting up in the night.
Blinking softly, oh so bright.
Try to catch them, if you can.
Gently holding in my hands.
Evie Chapman
Age 5 • Maryland
George Tang
Age 9 • Rhode Island
Kansas Prairie
up
clouds, f loating
The f luffy white
e
ht as cotton in th
so high, are as lig
s sky.
brilliant K ansa
lowers bloom
The elegant sunf
ar
e distance you he
in the fall. In th
call.
a meadowlark’s
The Watercolo
r
Jellyfish
Abby Wood
Age 7 • South
Carolin
a
Moon
Moon up above
Oh, what a pity,
It’s over the city.
It’s time for bed.
Pull up your blankets,
Rest your head.
Now, go to sleep.
Who said it’s made of cheese?
by little
rabbit with chub
You may find a
rows
d find some spar
cheeks. You coul
beaks.
with stubby little
lo used to but no
W here the buffa
, K ansas prairie,
longer roam, oh
that I call home.
you’re the place
Kaitlyn Keller
Age 12 • Kansas
Amy Kuo
Age 13 • California
Sophie Conklin
Age 6 • Alabama
Share Your
Creative Work
When the sun is low
in the sky, I
rest my head on
the table and
start dreaming.
Perry Sloan
Age 6 • New York
We’d love to see it!
Art must be on unlined paper.
Poems must have fewer than
75 words. All submissions
must be created by you.
Justin Okerblom
Age 4 • Washington
We cannot
return your
work, so you
might want to
keep a copy.
Include your name, age,
and address. Mail to
Your Own Pages
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
The
Retake
By Chris Low
Art by Mike Boldt
“N
ew Jersey is eating
Pennsylvania, and Ohio is
a chicken nugget,” Andy
whispered to himself.
Hunched over his desk,
Andy ran his finger over a
blank United States map. On
each state was a number, and
on a separate paper, Andy had
written the numbers 1–50. After
20 minutes, the numbers were
all he had to show for his work.
“OK, and Utah is the washing
machine. No, Montana is the
washing machine. Or North
Dakota? Gah! They’re all
washing machines!”
Mr. Crane looked up from his
desk. “Everything OK, Andy?”
Andy hadn’t realized his
confusion was so obvious. He
felt his face get hot and he set
his pencil down in defeat.
It wasn’t the first time Andy
had blanked during a test. No
matter how hard he studied,
nothing seemed to stay in his
brain for long. Memory tricks
helped a little, and after five
nights of poring over an old
paper map laid out on his
bedroom f loor, Andy had even
started to feel a glimmer of hope.
“Time’s up!” Mr. Crane started
collecting answer sheets. “You’ll
get these back later today. Come
see me if you need to retake it.”
Andy quickly shoved his
36
MAY 2018
blank test into the pile. He
wanted to forget about it, but
his brain seemed to forget only
the things it was supposed
to remember.
It wasn’t the
first time Andy had
blanked during a test.
“Ugh. Utah was the washing
machine!” Andy said, staring at
a map during lunch.
Andy’s friend Aaron shrugged.
“You only need a 70 to pass.”
“Yeah, well it’s hard to get
a 70 when you hand in a blank
sheet of paper,” Andy said.
“You really turned it in
blank?” said Aaron. “What about
the chicken nuggets and stuff ?”
Andy shook his head. “It helps
a little, but why bother writing
down three states?”
Aaron popped a grape into his
mouth. “Well, Mr. Crane will let
you retake it tomorrow.”
“Great. Maybe by tomorrow
I’ll remember four states.”
Andy was the only one
standing at Mr. Crane’s desk
after school. Apparently
everyone else had done fine.
“I’m sorry,” Andy said quickly.
“For what?” Mr. Crane asked.
“Um, for not trying, I guess?”
“Andy,” Mr. Crane said, “I saw
you. I think you were trying.
Weren’t you?”
“I guess,” Andy admitted. It
was easier to fail when people
thought you hadn’t tried. But
this teacher wasn’t fooled.
Mr. Crane motioned toward
the back wall. “Do you have time
to help me straighten up a bit?”
Andy wasn’t in a hurry to
walk home and tell his mom
about the latest f lop. “Yeah,
sure,” he said as he walked to
As he stepped back to take in
his work, Andy felt a sudden jolt
of confidence. He looked down to
see Montana on top of the pile,
and the words leaped to the
front of his mind.
An old man with a beard.
He slapped the Montana
magnet on the map.
Michigan is a mitten!
Was he really ready?
There was only one
way to find out.
the back of the room. He picked
up a pile of magnets, each with
the name of a state on it. On the
wall hung a large magnetic
map—part of a review game
the class had been playing.
Andy almost tossed the
magnets into a box, but
something was bothering him.
He shuff led through the pile.
“There,” Andy said as he stuck
the Utah magnet into place.
“And while I’m at it . . .” He
pulled out New Jersey and
Pennsylvania and placed them
on the map.
Connecticut connects
New York and Rhode Island!
Ohio—is still a chicken
nugget.
Andy barely noticed that Mr.
Crane had gotten up from his
desk. “Does it help to move the
pieces around while you think
of all those great phrases you
memorized?” Mr. Crane asked.
Andy shrugged. “Um, yeah,
I guess it does.”
“Well, I think it’s a fine way
to practice. How about you come
back here tomorrow and run
through it again?”
The next day after school,
Andy stopped by Mr. Crane’s
room and took another shot at
the map. He felt more confident
than ever. Something about
combining memory tricks with
moving the pieces around on
the board made everything
f low. For the first time, Andy
felt as if the things he’d been
studying were sticking in
his brain.
When he was done, Andy
stopped at Mr. Crane’s desk.
“So, I guess I’ll see you
tomorrow for the retake.”
Mr. Crane nodded toward
the map. “How about right now?
You look ready to me. Just
promise you won’t peek at your
masterpiece back there.”
Andy hesitated. Was he
really ready? There was only
one way to find out.
“An 88? Andy, that’s great!”
Andy’s mom squeezed his arm
as she looked over the test at
home. “So what’s your secret?”
“Mr. Crane says I might
learn better by being active.
I think he’s right!”
After the retake, Andy felt as
if he could tackle anything. He
was already thinking about how
to make a clay model for the
frog anatomy quiz on Friday.
“Well,” said his mom, “I’m
glad you’ve found something
that works for you. We’d better
hang this test on the fridge!”
“Actually,” said Andy,
“this one’s going on the
washing machine.”
S
L
E
D
RI D
page 33
Animal Squares
Answers
Here are the animal names we
found: cow, crow, cat, bat, bear,
rat, crab, owl, tiger.
Where did the sheep go
on vacation?
1
page 2
Madi Heller, Maine
Fun This Month
A Messy Maze
y sleep
Why did the little bo
r?
lie
de
on the chan
Mystery Photo
Bike pedal.
page 12
My Sci
Flowing Colors—Water is denser,
or heavier, than oil, so water sinks
to the bottom of the glass. Water
molecules are “polar” (more
positively charged at one end and
more negatively charged at the
other), but oil molecules are not.
Polar molecules are attracted to
other polar molecules, but they
don’t mix well with nonpolar
molecules. So the water and
oil separate.
Like water, food coloring is
polar. (In fact, it is made of foodcoloring molecules dissolved in
water.) So the dense, watery foodcoloring drops do not mix with the
oil. Instead, they fall to the bottom
of the oil layer. When they push
through the oil-water boundary,
they mix with the water below.
Which mythical creature always
wants to be in the spotlight?
3
Peter’s Piggy Bank
Peter had 3 quarters, 3 dimes,
3 nickels, and 3 pennies.
page 43
Hamilton Southerland, New York
r bring two
Why did the golfe
the tournament?
pairs of pants to
ecticut
Sophia Saldamar
Picture Puzzler
Catrick will cross the bridge six times.
5
4
co, Conn
Who leads
orchestra
at the zoo?
the
Joe Minnick, Minnesota
Why can’t pirates say
their ABCs?
6
Isabelle Rohrer, Ohio
page 21
Page 39
Hidden Roc
Page 6
Page 22
Page 15
Page 37
Page 18
Page 34
Back
Page
Page
Cover
17
43
7
What did the alpaca
say
to the suitcase?
MAY 2018
Gavin, Missouri
9
8
cries a lot?
Which dinosaur
nia
lif
Hyebin Choi, Ca
or
Answers: 1. The Baahamas. 2. He was a light
sleeper. 3. The centaur of attention. 4. In case
he got a hole in one. 5. The boa conductor.
6. They get stuck at C. 7. They don’t like getting
close to the net. 8. “Alpaca you up!”
9. The Cry-ceratops.
Illustration credits: Page 2: Kevin Zimmer; 12: Laura Logan; 15: Rich Powell; 33: Animal Squares by Barry Gott,
Peter’s Piggy Bank by Joey Ellis; 39: Erin Mauterer, except numbers 5 and 0 by iStock/Zerbor. Photo credits:
Page 2: iStock/Bespaly; 3: Gina Lenz; 4: (bicyclists) iStock/Getty Images Plus/Spotmatik; 4–5: (dinosaur) Getty
Images Plus/E+/DavidHCoder; 11: (grass) iStock/Getty Images Plus/Nirian; 12: ESA/NASA; 13: Guy Cali
Associates, Inc.; 15: Mindy Fawver/Alamy Stock Photo; 24: (tortilla chips, bowl of salsa, corn kernel, black bean)
Guy Cali Associates, Inc., (bell pepper) iStock/jerryhat, (tomato) iStock/Dimitris66, (red onions) iStock/Natikka,
(lime and cilantro) iStock/rimglow, (saltshaker) iStock/chengyuzheng, (bottle of olive oil) iStock/tanuha2001,
(pineapple) iStock/cscredon, (bottle of balsamic vinegar) iStock/Savany, (mango) iStock/4nadia, (garlic) iStock/
Getty Images Plus/chengyuzheng, (avocado) iStock/Maksym Narodenko, (jalapeño pepper) iStock/bazza1960,
(tomato puree) iStock/robynmac, (hot sauce) iStock/dlerick, (cucumber) iStock/CQYoung; 32: (pronghorn) iStock/
Jens_Lambert_Photography, (horn) iStock/Difydave, (antler) iStock/GrLb71; 39: (vegetable owl) iStock/serg78,
(bonsai tree) iStock /rodho, (striped socks) iStock /ktaylorg, (hot-air balloon) iStock /ElementalImaging,
(submarine) iStock/Nerthuz, (football) iStock/EHStock, (kids) iStock/Anna_Om, (girl) iStock/SolStock. Photos of
10 Kindness Rocks hidden throughout this issue by Guy Cali Associates, Inc.
Why are fish bad
at basketball?
Olivia Alderman, Pennsylvania
Covers: For the Win! by Macky Pamintuan; What’s
W
Wrong?® by Josh Cleland
38
2
Mehrish, Bahrain
Why do
we wear
socks?
These
veggies
are a
hoot!
ST
AR
T
bra Take
in
on your
ah
ike
!
What are some
things from nature
that people bring
indoors?
is
hink le?
t
u
o
b
do y t vegeta
t
a
Wh nnies
u
the f
If you could travel
through time to any
moment in your life,
would you?
?
Who is the
most uplifting
person you
know?
DOH!
When you make a
mistake, how do you
usually react?
hot-air
balloon
or a
On w
h
kind at
s of
thing
peop s do
their le sign
nam
es?
Which parts of your
day are the most
memorable? Why?
What three
questions
can you
answer
truthfully
by saying
Would you
rather ride
in a
submarine?
WHY?
Would
you
like to
be on
TV?
If yes,
doing
what?
THE
END
MAY 2018
39
Ask
izona
®
Little Copycat
By Lissa Rovetch • Art by Amanda Morley
Dear Annoyed,
I understand exactly what
you mean. Around the time my
little sister, Indi, turned six, she
started copying my every move!
“What are you guys doing?”
she asked my friend Mareya and
me one Saturday morning.
“We’re making bracelets,”
Mareya said, pointing to a
photo in the craft pages of
her magazine.
Indi plopped down next to us at
the table. “May I make one too?”
“Um . . .” I paused.
“Sure!” Mareya said.
Indi squeezed in so close to
me that I could hardly see what
I was doing.
“Can you give me a little more
room?” I asked. “You’re blocking
me from the beads.”
“I’m just trying to see what
40
MAY 2018
you’re doing,” she answered.
“Well, you don’t need to
see exactly what I’m doing,”
I told her. “You can make your
own design.”
“I am!” she said. Except she
was using the same colors of
beads and string and everything
that I was using.
“Hey, ’Zona, I brought my
guitar,” said Mareya after we’d
finished the bracelets. “Want to
get your maracas and we can
make up songs for our band?”
“Excellent idea!” I said.
“Let’s go to the backyard where
we can have some privacy.”
When Indi didn’t say
anything, I thought she must
have gotten the clue. But
10 minutes later, guess who
showed up.
“Sorry it took me so long, but
I couldn’t find my tambourine,”
said Indi. “It was in the basket
that Charlie was sleeping in.
Isn’t that so funny?”
“Maybe your kitty secretly
wishes he could play the
tambourine.” Mareya laughed.
Indi giggled. “Maybe we
should invite Charlie to be in
our band!”
Indi seemed to
copy my every
move!
“Our band?” I said. “Since
when is this our band? You’re
constantly following me, and
I’m tired of it.”
As soon as those words came
out of my mouth, I wished I’d
never said them. First, Indi got
a super-surprised look. Then,
her eyes started filling up with
tears, and before I could say
another word, she ran away.
I groaned. “I definitely did not
mean for those words to come
out of my mouth.”
“Yeah,” said Mareya. “You
were pretty harsh.”
“Can you give me a
little more room?”
“It’s just that sometimes I feel
like I have a shadow that doesn’t
belong to me!”
“Well, since I don’t have a
younger sister or brother, I can’t
really put myself in your shoes,”
said Mareya. “But I always
thought it’d be cool to have
someone look up to me the way
Indi looks up to you.”
“I guess I never really
thought of it like that.” I shook
my head. “I’m feeling terrible
about what I said.”
Mareya and I talked it over
and came up with a plan we
hoped would help.
“Hi, Indi!” I said, in my
best squeaky kitty-cat voice.
(I was holding Charlie in front
of my face, pretending he was
talking.) “Your sister says
she’s really sorry for the way
she acted. I want to play the
tambourine in your band, but
I’m not great at holding it with
my paws, so I’m hoping you can
maybe, um, give me a hand.”
Luckily, Indi smiled a little,
and with a bit more convincing
from Charlie, she agreed.
So, dear Annoyed, here’s
what Mareya helped me to
figure out. It’s worth trying
to change the way you see the
situation. If you keep in mind
that your brother acts like
It’s worth trying to
change the way you
see the situation.
your shadow because he looks
up to you, then you might be
less bothered by his behavior.
No matter what, he deserves
to be treated with patience and
kindness. (I still wish I’d been
a lot kinder to Indi that day.)
And when you and your
brother are getting along, you
could mention in a friendly way
that you’d like some time alone
with your friends once in a while.
I’ve had that conversation with
Indi, and because she knows she
is welcome at other times, she’s
actually OK with it.
Ciao for now,
Arizona
“Your sister told me
she was really sorry.”
Dear
Highlights
I have to use
an inhaler.
I think someone
will laugh at me.
Laney, Montana
If people laugh, it’s likely
that they do not understand
how your inhaler works.
You might explain that your
inhaler is doing the very
important job of delivering medicine to your lungs. It’s an
incredible device! Perhaps the more you explain about the
importance of your inhaler, the less likely people will be to
misunderstand or make fun.
If people laugh even after you’ve explained what your
inhaler does, do your best to ignore them. Remember, you are
acting responsibly by taking care of your lungs to stay healthy.
That’s nothing to feel embarrassed about.
My foster brother
doesn’t play with me
when he says he will.
What should I do?
Darian, Indiana
Perhaps it will help to talk
to your brother during a time
when the two of you are getting
along well. You might tell him
that you like spending time
with him, and you feel sad
when he doesn’t play with you
after he says he will. The two of
you might decide to schedule
times to play together. You
could even write down your
schedule on a calendar and
put it somewhere you and your
brother can see it every day.
42
MAY 2018
I love doing plays. I would
like to start a play in
my neighborhood, but
I don’t know how. Any
suggestions?
Kateri, Washington
What a fun idea! You
might start by talking to your
neighborhood friends to see
who would like to participate.
Remember, not everyone needs
to be an actor. A successful play
also needs people to make sets,
design costumes, coordinate
music or special effects, and
so on. Let people choose how
they’d like to be involved.
Next, work together to
choose a story or script to
perform. Some plays have a
detailed script. Others have
only a loose story, which allows
the actors to make things up
as they go along. You can also
discuss where and when you’ll
rehearse. You might wish to talk
to your parents about your idea
too. They may have some good
suggestions for you.
Write to us!
Please include your name, age,
and full address. Mail to
Dear Highlights
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
Or e-mail us at Letters@Highlights.com.
Art by Keith Frawley.
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e
l
z
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z
P
Picture
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Art by Pat L
lans to
e order he p
th
in
s
d
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a
is err
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rote down h
ross the bri
c
w
e
e
h
H
l
.
il
d
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a
s
e
e
h
y tim
a busy day a
e, how man
s
u
o
h
is
Catrick has
h
m
he starts fro
do them. If
!
BONmUanS
y
How
fish toys can you
find in the scene?
Answers on pa
ge 38.
What’s
Wrong?
®
Which things in this
picture are silly?
It’s up to you!
Visit our website!
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