close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Louisiana Cookin' - May 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
R E DFIS H C
REDFISH
COU
OU RTB
RTBO
OU
UII L LO N • C R I SPY CR
CRA
AB C
CA
AKES
KES • BEST NOLA P
PO’
O’ B OYS
Louisiana
Authentic Cajun & Creole Cuisine
2018
l
travel
issue
UPGRADE YOUR
crawfish boil
PAGE 53
May/June 2018 vol 21, issue 3
$5.99US $6.99CAN
06
Eat Like a Local
in Cajun Country
PAGE 33
0
74808 01055
4
DISPLAY UNTIL JUNE 26, 2018
contents
MAY/JUNE 2018 | VOLUME 21, ISSUE 3
21
first, you make a
roux.
7
Editor’s Letter
25
Beyond Po’ Boys
9
Spillin’ the Beans
2
by Paul A. Greenberg
9
Afield & Afl
Afloat
oat
Coastal Flavor
3
louisianacookin.com
23
Bountiful Blends
Light & Fresh
Tart and Zesty
Road Trippin’
In Season
Ripe and Ready
Louisiana Foodways
by Caitlin Watzke
27
Chef’s Table
Bywater Charmer
entrées
the main course
337 Down the Bayou
Explore the rich heritage of Lafourche Parish
39
Discover Acadiana
Eat, shop, and play in historic St. Landry Parish
73
by Caitlin Watzke
45
49
Avoyelles Adventure
Cajun and Creole flavors reign supreme in Marksville
Capitol Renaissance
Mid-City Baton Rouge is full of hidden gems
by Nora McGunnigle
53
Modern Crawfish
Crawfish Boil
6
Best of Louisiana
Update your next crawfish boil with fun sides
Our favorite specialty po’ boys in New Orleans
lagniappe
a little something extra
77
73
Sweets
Berry Bliss
Quick & Easy
Crispy Treat
751 Local Pantry
Spirit & Spice
85
By the Book
Culinary Odyssey
831 Cooking with Chefs to Watch
Crawfish Comfort
89
Swizzle Stick
Daiquiri Season
by Chris Hannah
75
9
93
95
97
Event Spotlight
Fairs, Festivals & Events
Recipe Index & Resources
Lagniappe
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
4
May/June 2018
Volume 21, Issue 3
EDITORIAL
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
MANAGING EDITOR Caitlin Watzke
RECIPE EDITOR Fran Jensen
SENIOR COPY EDITOR Rhonda Lee Lother
COPY EDITOR Meg Lundberg
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Paul A. Greenberg, Chris Hannah,
Nora McGunnigle
CREATIVE DIRECTOR/PHOTOGRAPHY
Mac Jamieson
SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHERS
John O’Hagan, Marcy Black Simpson
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Jim Bathie, William Dickey,
Stephanie Welbourne Steele
ASSISTANT PHOTOGRAPHER Caroline Smith
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER
Randy P. Schmidt
Daniel Schumacher
GROUP CREATIVE DIRECTOR
Deanna Rippy Gardner
ART DIRECTOR Amy Merk
ST YLISTS
Courtni Bodiford, Beth K. Seeley
FOOD ST YLISTS/RECIPE DEVELOPERS
Laura Crandall, Melissa Gray, Kathleen Kanen,
Vanessa Rocchio, Jade Sinacori, Elizabeth Stringer
ASSISTANT FOOD ST YLIST/RECIPE DEVELOPER
Anita Simpson Spain
RECIPE TESTER
Ashley Jones
CHEFS TO WATCH ADVISORY BOARD
Kristen Essig, Holly Goetting, Jefrey Hansell,
Chris Lusk, Colt Patin
SENIOR DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST
DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST
Delisa McDaniel
Clark Densmore
FOUNDERS
Romney K. and Charley Richard
D I G I TA L M E D I A
Tricia Wagner Williams
ASSISTANT ONLINE EDITOR Vicky Lewis
DIGITAL DESIGNER Stephanie Lambert
MARKETING DIRECTOR
A D M I N I S T R AT I V E
HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR
Judy Brown Lazenby
IT DIRECTOR Matthew Scott Holt
DEALER PROGRAM MANAGER Janice Ritter
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/EDITORIAL
Morgan Crawford
I N T E G R AT E D M A R K E T I N G S O LU T I O N S
ACCOUNT DIRECTORS
Katie Guasco [LA, MS]
Hagan Media/Katie Hagan [AL, FL]
Claire Bucalos [NC, VA, WV, DC, MD]
Kathy Gross [FL, GA, SC]
Liane Lane [AR, CO, NM, OK, TX]
Rhapsodic Media/Kathy Burke [IL, IN, IA, KS, MN, MO, NE, OH, WI]
DIRECT RESPONSE Hagan Media/Katie Hagan
MARKETING COORDINATOR Megan McIllwain
ADVERTISING PRODUCTION REPRESENTATIVE Kimberly Lewis
GRAPHIC DESIGNER Rachel Collins
For assistance with advertising, please call 888-411-8995.
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD/CEO
PRESIDENT/COO
Eric W. Hofman
EVP/CFO Mary P. Cummings
EVP/OPERATIONS & MANUFACTURING
VP/DIGITAL MEDIA
Greg Baugh
Jon Adamson
Phyllis Hofman DePiano
PRESIDENT/CCO
Brian Hart Hofman
VP/CULINARY & CUSTOM CONTENT
Brooke Michael Bell
VP/SHELTER CONTENT Cindy Smith Cooper
VP/ADMINISTRATION Lynn Lee Terry
EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING OFFICE
326 S. Broad St.,
New Orleans, LA 70119
Phone: (504) 648-2647
SUBSCRIPTIONS & CUSTOMER SERVICE
Louisiana Cookin’, P.O. Box 6201,
Harlan, IA 51593
Phone: (877) 538-8362
Email: LUCcustserv@cdsfulillment.com
louisianacookin.com
Louisiana Cookin’ ISSN 1096-4134 is published bimonthly by Hoffman Media, 1900 International Park Drive, Suite 50, Birmingham, AL 35243, 1.888.411.8995. Reproduction in part or in
whole is strictly prohibited without the written consent of Hoffman Media. Louisiana Cookin’ is a registered trademark of Hoffman Media. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: For the United States,
$25 per year, 6 issues; add $10 for postage in Canada; add $20 elsewhere. Single issues $5.99 available at newsstands and bookstores. Periodical Postage paid at Birmingham, Alabama,
and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES to Louisiana Cookin’, P.O. Box 6201, Harlan, IA 51593.
©2018 Hoffman Media, LLC. Printed in the USA.
E D I TO R’S
LETTER
BEYOND
PO’ BOYS
AS MUCH AS I LOVE a classic fried shrimp po’ boy (overstufed and
dressed with shredded lettuce, tomato, pickles, and mayonnaise), I love
that we’re living in a time when chefs and po’ boy artists are stretching
the concept even further. In researching the New Orleans’ Best Specialty
Po’ Boys story (page 61), I fell in love with some lavor combinations
that surprised me (particularly the massive Ray Ray—crispy fried
chicken topped with grilled ham and Swiss cheese—from Sammy’s
Food Service & Deli and the sweet and spicy Bang Bang Shrimp Banh
Mi from Banh Mi Boys in Metairie [pages 67 and 66, respectively]).
But we cannot live on po’ boys alone, can we? As much as I love the
buttery decadence of Liuzza’s by the Track’s BBQ Shrimp PoBoy (page
64), I need to take a break from the crusty sandwiches every now and
then. On nights when I’m looking to cook something a little lighter, I
will deinitely be turning to the Pickled Shrimp with Red Quinoa and
Couscous Salad (page 22) and the zippy Gazpacho Shooters (page 23).
Since crawish season still has some legs, I hope to get a few more
boils in before they disappear again. I hope you like our Modern
On the Cover
Citrus Spice Boiled
Crawfish
(recipe page 57)
photography by
mac jamieson
styling by
beth k. seeley
recipe development
and food styling by
jade sinacori
R E D F I S H C O U RTBO UI LLO N • CRIS PY CRAB CAK ES • BEST NO LA PO ’ BOYS
Louisiana
Authentic Cajun & Creole Cuisine
2018
travel
issue
UPGRADE YOUR
crawfish boil
PAGE 53
Eat Like a Local
in Cajun Country
PAGE 33
Crawish Boil as much as I do (page 53). It builds on classic Louisiana
crawish boil lavors and ills out the meal more than a traditional boil.
If anyone has a sweet tooth ater gorging on spicy crawish, a rustic
Blackberry and Almond Crostata, topped with
Whipped Creole Cream Cheese, is a great
way to inish of the party (page 72). EDITOR’S PICKS
D AY T R I P S
FROM NEW ORLEANS
HOUMAS HOUSE FONTAINEBLEAU
STATE PARK
Darrow
Mandeville
7
louisianacookin.com
AVERY ISLAND
Iberia Parish
SPILLIN’
T H E B E AN S
ROAD TRIPPIN’
by paul a. greenberg
MANY OF YOU MAY HAVE HEARD ME SAY
in past columns that if you’re looking for great road
trip ideas, look no further than Louisiana. This is the
one state where you can get a heavy dose of fascinating
history with a side of perfectly prepared Gulf seafood
and spicy barbecued shrimp. Yes, the economy is
looking up, but why spend more than you have to for a
great getaway? Stay in-state and celebrate spring.
That brings me to these four words: Great Balls of
Fire! If those words have some meaning for you, get
thee to the tiny town of Ferriday, where you can while
away an aternoon at the Delta Music Museum. Many
tales of Louisiana musicians like Jerry Lee Lewis, Fats
Domino, and Irma Thomas make for a fascinating
tour. And when you’re inished there, get directions to
Duck’s Nest II, an of-the-beaten path eatery with a
nondescript façade that belies the good old Louisiana
cookin’ inside. I suggest the Duck’s Nest Seafood
Platter, if only for the sheer volume of food—stufed
shrimp, catish, frog’s legs, fried oysters, stufed crab,
and gumbo.
FLAMINGO
A-GO-GO
DESTINATION DINING
As usual, I am itching to tell you about some great new
restaurants in Louisiana, but irst, since we’re already
Paul A. Greenberg is an inveterate local diner who has covered the New Orleans restaurant scene in regional and national publications for more than 25 years.
9
louisianacookin.com
LEA’S LUNCHROOM
THE RUBY
SLIPPER
CAFÉ
talking road trips, take a little journey to Lecompte
on a Sunday aternoon. That’s because only in tiny
Lecompte (population about 1,200) will you ind Lea’s
Lunchroom. On Sundays, Lea’s cooks up an authentic
Sunday dinner—fried chicken, baked turkey, baked
ham, homemade cornbread dressing, and pie (lots and
lots of pie)—but only until 4 p.m.! If there is a better
coconut pie on this earth, you’ll have to let me know,
and I’ll be hard to convince. Ms. Georgie and Mr. Lea
Johnson will greet you. Did we mention this place is
celebrating its 90th year in business? That is a lot of pie!
OPEN FOR BIZ
Because sometimes you just need a big old plate of
nachos at 1:30 in the morning, followed by a double
chocolate Kahlùa mousse torte, we scoped out the
recently opened Flamingo A-Go-Go restaurant and bar
in New Orleans. This colorful, lamingo-themed place
calls their signature cocktails “Flocktails,” which plays
itself out with concoctions like the Flamingo on a Wire:
Grey Goose L’Orange, orange juice, and elderlower
syrup with muddled blood oranges and blueberries.
They say it’s “locking awesome.” (Sorry, but I just could
not resist.) With its 7,000-square-foot patio, I have a
feeling this is going to be the late-night see-and-beseen place in NOLA.
New Orleans loves an architectural rebirth, so the
news that one of New Orleans’ favorite breakfast spots,
he Ruby Slipper Café, and its headquarters have
moved into an artfully renovated mid-20th-century
building in Mid-City is fantastic. Same great menu,
same lively staf, but new digs and new life for an old
structure. Now that is all good food news!
You may remember last year in March the Carriage
House Restaurant at Myrtles Plantation was
destroyed by ire. Well . . . I’m not one to gossip, and
you didn’t hear it from me, but word on the street is
that by fall, a new 100-seat restaurant will open there
with a wood-ire grill, focusing on Louisiana game and
locally grown produce. Speaking of road trips, Myrtles
Plantation has some truly beautiful suites. My favorite
is the Judge Clarke Woodruf Suite, not only because
it’s the biggest suite but because of its elegant antique
furnishings. The place is rumored to be haunted, and
you can book an evening tour—if you dare.
At press time, we were still awaiting the opening
of the much-anticipated Proud Mary 360° Grill in
Shreveport’s Red River District. Originally slated to
open in January, advance info promises “Louisianastyle cuisine with a Creole lair.” Yes, we’ve heard that
one before, but that description covers a lot of culinary
ground. What we do know so far has to do with oxtails,
po’ boys, smothered pork chops, and fried shrimp. They
had me at smothered pork. We will keep you posted on
this one.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
10
GOOD FOOD
AND
GOOD NEWS
Congratulations to Dong
Phuong Bakery in New
Orleans, recent recipient of
a James Beard Foundation
America’s Classics award.
The Vietnamese restaurant
and bakery received the
award in recognition of
having made a strong
impact on the culinary
community. I recognize
Dong Phuong for its tasty
pastries.
Thousands of people are
headed to this year’s New
Orleans Wine & Food
Experience, one of the
nation’s premier wine and
food annual events. The
event features two days
of Grand Tastings as well
as wine dinners, seminars,
parties, and more. Check
out nowfe.com for details.
You will love the
Louisiana Woman blog
(louisianawomanblog.com),
where a South Louisiana
native shares her favorite
recipes. I like the Pumpkin
Cheesecake with Pecan
Streusel, but I have not
been brave enough yet to
make it. Really tempting
recipes, beautiful photos,
and family stories make this
a compelling place to spend
some time.
CHEF CHAT: CHEF JOY WILSON
While we are on the subject of delicious discoveries, we caught up with Joy
Wilson, a.k.a. Joy the Baker, who just happens to be the baking doyenne of the
Bywater neighborhood of New Orleans.
Tell us a little bit about your business. Joy the Baker is a website and blog and
recipe resource that I’ve had for the last 10 years. Out of it, I have built a business
and authored three cookbooks: Joy the Baker Cookbook, Homemade Decadence,
and Over Easy. Here in New Orleans, I have a studio space called The Bakehouse,
where I host cooking classes and workshops.
What is the format of your cooking classes? I usually hold weekend classes in
the aternoon, intimate gatherings of up to a dozen people. It’s very hands-on and
generally runs three to four hours. We are in a converted shotgun double house,
where one side of the double is a completely open space with a large kitchen area
and dining table.
Do you use the space for other events? Yes, we are open for private events if
people want to gather as a group. Other than that, I use the space to photograph
and test recipes and to do my work.
How can people find out more about you and your work? I have two
websites. Joythebaker.com is where people can ind my 10 years’ worth of reliable
recipes. hebakehousenola.com is all about my studio and events and classes that
that take place here. I’m also on Instagram at @joythebaker.
NOW, THAT SHOULD KEEP YOU BUSY AND WELL FED UNTIL NEXT TIME.
REMEMBER: BUY LOCAL, EAT OUT OFTEN, AND CLEAN YOUR PLATE.
11
louisianacookin.com
ADVERTISING
WHAT’ S IN
SEASON
I N LOU ISI ANA
WITH JAZZ, ZYDECO, CAJUN, BLUES,
BRASS BAND, RAP, ROCKABILLY
AND ROCK ’N’ ROLL, YOU CAN FEEL
LOUISIANA’S PASSION FOR MUSIC.
L ouisiana T ravel.com | LouisianaSeafood.com
ADVERTISING
LOVE MUSIC? YOU CAN THANK
YOU’RE IN FOR A HAYRIDE
SHREVEPORT AND CENTRAL
s the original country and western music legends were getting their start,
Shreveport’s beautiful Municipal Auditorium was a must-play venue.
Known for the Louisiana Hayride radio program, the building was
frequented by the likes of Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley and Johnny Horton. For an
intimate listening environment with contemporary singer-songwriters, music
aicionados catch a show at the House Concert Series. And if Shreveport is
known for its country and western music, Ferriday, Louisiana, on the Mississippi
River is notable for its Delta blues, rockabilly and gospel heritage. A trip to its
Delta Music Museum and Arcade heater showcases the town’s musical
heritage (which includes locals Jerry Lee Lewis, Mickey Gilley and Jimmy
Swaggart—who also all happen to be cousins).
A
DEEP ROOTS
JAZZ
This music style was born in
New Orleans. From Jelly Roll Morton
and Louis Armstrong to Irma Thomas
and Aaron Neville, the Crescent City
has a wealth of history and talent.
DANCING IN THE STREETS
GREATER NEW ORLEANS
New Orleans will forever be the birthplace and home of nightly jazz parties.
From festivals to small clubs on Frenchmen Street (and throughout the French
Quarter), New Orleans is a music lover’s paradise. Institutions like Preservation
Hall, Kermit’s Treme Mother-in-Law Lounge and the Maple Leaf Bar pay
homage to the city’s musical contributions while infusing them with new life.
Each spring and fall, music festivals draw thousands of visitors to the New
Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, French Quarter Festival and the Bayou
Country Superfest. But beyond the clubs and lashy festivals, you’ll feel the
Louisiana passion for music on every street corner. From brass band second
lines to roving musicians, the music is everywhere.
CAJUN
Full of fiddles and accordions,
this music hearkens back to the
folk music of the French-Acadian
exiles who settled in the south
Louisiana bayous and prairies.
ZYDECO
Zydeco also relies heavily on fiddles
and accordions. This style is most
popular in southwest Louisiana and
was created by the area’s Creole
sharecroppers and farmers.
ADVERTISING
LOUISIANA
IF THESE WALLS
COULD TALK
SNUG HARBOR
BLUES IN THE CAPITAL
New Orleans
PLANTATION COUNTRY
FRED’S LOUNGE
Mamou
For the last 24 years, blues lovers have locked to Louisiana’s capital city each
spring for the Baton Rouge Blues Festival, but that’s just the beginning.
From tiny juke joints to polished concert halls and even in the streets, blues
music (and other Louisiana originals) are played and enjoyed with gusto.
While venues like the Varsity heatre (nestled near the LSU campus)
showcase a variety of traditional and contemporary acts, local favorites like
Teddy’s Juke Joint and he Blues Room are frequented by those in the
know for smoky rhythm and blues. And if wide-open spaces are your thing,
Live After Five will be your jam. The free concert series runs on Fridays in
the spring and fall at Galvez Plaza in Downtown Baton Rouge.
DEW DROP SOCIAL &
BENEVOLENT JAZZ HALL
Mandeville
LIBERTY THEATER
Eunice
PRESERVATION HALL
New Orleans
For more rockin’ venues, visit
LouisianaTravel.com.
PHENOMENAL FESTS
BATON ROUGE BLUES FESTIVAL
BATON ROUGE
APRIL
FESTIVALS ACADIENS ET CRÉOLES
LAFAYETTE
OCTOBER
THE ORIGINAL
SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
ZYDECO MUSIC FESTIVAL
OPELOUSAS
FESTIVAL INTERNATIONAL
DE LOUISIANE
LAFAYETTE
APRIL
FRENCH QUARTER FESTIVAL
NEW ORLEANS
APRIL
SEPTEMBER
For more information, visit
LouisianaTravel.com.
CAJUN STOMPING
GROUND
LAFAYETTE AND SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA
From the rolling prairies of Eunice to the
swamps and bayous around Lafayette, Cajun
music is woven into the cultural fabric of
southwest Louisiana. With washboards,
accordions and a whole lot of foot-stomping
soul, Cajun legends like Rockin’ Sidney,
Geno Delafose and Cliton Chenier capture
and distill the region’s spirit. A wide range
of venues, historical and recent, dot the
landscape, from the rustic Feed & Seed
and Blue Moon Saloon in Lafayette to
the Grand Opera House in Crowley. The
historic Liberty heater in Eunice began as
a vaudeville/movie theater in 1924 and now
serves as the venue for the live Rendez-Vous
des Cajuns radio show on Saturday nights.
ADVERTISING
BOILED, GRILLED & FRIED LOUISIANA
THE SECRET TO SUPERIOR SEAFOOD
early a third of the seafood landed in the U.S. comes from
Louisiana. The state’s nutrient-rich estuaries, fed by the
Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, create an environment
where delicious seafood thrives. These estuaries provide a
delicate balance of fresh and saltwater, which forms an ideal
habitat for microscopic organisms that make the base of the
marine food chain. The Bayou State’s warm, fertile waters are
particularly helpful to brown and white shrimp, so much so
that Louisiana shrimpers land almost 50 percent of shrimp
from the entire Gulf of Mexico (with an economic impact of
$1.3 billion). For more information about Louisiana shrimp,
visit LouisianaSeafood.com.
N
GREAT AMERICAN
SEAFOOD COOK-OFF
Each summer, chefs from throughout the country
converge upon New Orleans to compete for the title
of King or Queen of American Seafood. The Great
American Seafood Cook-Of was launched in 2004
by the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing
Board to help promote sustainable domestic seafood.
A panel of promotion and marketing nationally
renowned judges score each dish in categories
including composition, craftsmanship and flavor.
After the king or queen is crowned, the fun continues
with the Great American Seafood Cook-Of 4-H
Edition. Agricultural clubs from across the country
send their high school members to compete for their
own bragging rights. For more information, visit
GreatAmericanSeafoodCookof.com.
NEARLY ONE-THIRD
OF THE SEAFOOD LANDED IN THE U.S. COMES FROM LOUISIANA.
SEAFOOD FESTIVALS
NEW ORLEANS OYSTER FEST
NEW ORLEANS
JUNE
ARTS AND CRABS FEST
LAKE CHARLES
AUGUST
DELCAMBRE SHRIMP FESTIVAL
DELCAMBRE
AUGUST
LOUISIANA SHRIMP
& PETROLEUM FESTIVAL
MORGAN CITY
AUGUST
LOUISIANA SEAFOOD FESTIVAL
NEW ORLEANS
OCTOBER
FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT
LOUISIANATRAVEL.COM.
ADVERTISING
LOVES SHRIMP
CHEF CHAT
LYLE BROUSSARD
L’Auberge Casino Resort–Lake Charles
Chef Lyle’s
New Orleans-Style
Barbecue Shrimp
What makes Louisiana shrimp diferent?
The lavor. Period. And there’s a sense of pride
because you know where they’re from, and
you’re supporting local ishermen. We only
serve whole, head-on Louisiana shrimp.
What do you think are some of the best
ways to serve Louisiana shrimp?
BUYING THE BEST
Whether the shrimp are fresh or frozen, it’s always best to start
by checking the label so you can choose a domestic option. If
you can’t find the country of origin on the packaging or signage,
just ask. Fresh shrimp should smell like the sea and be free of
any black spots. If you have the option of buying whole, head-on
shrimp, keep in mind that the head comprises about half the
shrimp’s weight (so for 2 pounds of tails, you’d want 4 pounds of
whole shrimp). Once you’ve chosen your wild Louisiana shrimp,
make sure to keep them as cold as you can until it’s time to cook
them. (Don’t be shy: Ask your fishmonger for a bag of ice to
keep those tasty morsels cold until you get home.)
New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp is my
thing, but I also I like to make a smoked
shrimp dip, where we smoke them and then
blend them with cream cheese, lemon juice
and hot sauce.
If you could only eat one Louisiana shrimp
dish for the rest of your life, what would
it be?
That would be barbecue shrimp. It’s just the
perfect dish. It highlights the taste of the
shrimp, and it’s a signature Louisiana dish that
you probably couldn’t ind anywhere else in
the country.
ADVERTISING
SHRIMP RÉMOULADE
MAKES 6 CUPS
¼
¼
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
½
½
1. In a large bowl, combine mayonnaise
cup mayonnaise
tablespoons ketchup
tablespoons Creole mustard
tablespoon prepared horseradish
tablespoon sweet pickle relish
tablespoon minced shallot
teaspoon fresh lemon juice
teaspoon ground paprika
teaspoon garlic salt
For other delicious Louisiana
shrimp and seafood recipes,
visit LouisianaSeafood.com.
teaspoon crushed red pepper
teaspoon ground black pepper
pounds peeled and deveined
cooked medium shrimp, chilled
(tails removed)
Garnish: chopped fresh parsley
and next 10 ingredients. Whisk until
combined. Cover and refrigerate for at
least 2 hours.
2. Add shrimp to mayonnaise mixture,
and stir to combine. Cover and
refrigerate until serving. Garnish with
chopped parsley, if desired. Mixture can
be made up to 4 hours ahead.
DIY RÉMOULADE BAR
Shrimp rémoulade is traditionally
served over lettuce, but that’s just the
beginning! Treat guests at your next
party to a variety of creative options,
such as serving the shrimp on crostini, in
a pasta salad, stuffed in fresh vegetables
or on top of crispy fried green tomatoes.
AF I E L D & AF LOAT
COASTAL FLAVOR
WHEN CHEF ERIC COOK isn’t working in the kitchen at Tommy’s Cuisine in New Orleans, chances are he’s
ishing or hunting. Growing up, Eric would go ishing with his father, who turned their fresh catch into a delectable
meal at the end of the trip. One of Eric’s favorites was redish courtbouillon, a rich and spicy ish stew. Even when Eric
makes this dish today, the aroma overwhelms him with memories of time spent on the water with his dad. Redish
courtbouillon is oten made with ish illets, but in this version, Eric uses a whole ish for a more stunning presentation.
WHOLE REDFISH
COURTBOUILLON
MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS
Recipe courtesy of Chef Eric Cook,
Tommy’s Cuisine, New Orleans
1
(18- to 20-inch) redfish,
cleaned and scales removed
(3 to 4 pounds)
4 lemons, halved and charred
1 tablespoon kosher salt, plus
more to taste
1 tablespoon ground black pepper,
plus more to taste
1 tablespoon Creole seasoning,
plus more to taste
12 cups water, divided
8 Creole tomatoes
1 cup blended oil
3 stalks celery, chopped
1½ cups chopped white onion,
divided
2 green bell peppers, chopped
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1 bunch fresh parsley, chopped
½ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup tomato paste
4 cups seafood stock
1 crab, cleaned and halved
¼ cup unsalted butter
2 cups long-grain rice
Garnish: fresh parsley
2. In a medium stockpot, bring 8 cups
water to a boil. Using a paring knife,
make small slits in tomatoes, and gently
place in boiling water. Cook tomatoes
until skin at cuts begins to curl back.
Transfer tomatoes to an ice bath, and
let stand until cool. Peel tomatoes,
discarding skin; roughly chop.
3. In a large Dutch oven or stockpot,
heat oil until almost smoking. Add
celery, 1¼ cups onion, and bell pepper;
cook, stirring frequently, until onion
is translucent. Add garlic and parsley;
cook, stirring until garlic is toasted.
4. Sift flour into pot while stirring
with a wooden spoon. Add tomato
paste, and stir until tomato mixture is
caramelized and fragrant. If mixture
is getting dry, add a small amount of
seafood stock. Slowly add stock, crab,
and reserved tomatoes. Stir mixture,
and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat
to low; add reserved lemon hulls, and
season to taste with salt, pepper, and
Creole seasoning. Simmer, stirring
occasionally, until sauce reaches a
thick consistency.
5. In a medium stockpot, melt butter
over low heat. Add remaining ¼ cup
onion; cook until translucent. Add rice,
and stir until combined and glossy. Add
remaining 4 cups water; cover and
reduce heat to low. Cook until water is
absorbed and rice is tender, 20 to 30
minutes. Fluff with a fork, and keep
covered until ready to serve.
6. Preheat oven to 350°.
7. Bake redfish until flesh is tender
and flakes easily with a fork, about
45 minutes. Pour tomato sauce on
platter, and add fish, crab, and rice.
Garnish with lemon hulls and parsley,
if desired. Serve immediately. 1. Using a sharp knife, score fish
along both sides all the way to spinne.
Squeeze lemon juice over both sides
of fish. Reserve lemon hulls. Sprinkkle
inside and outside of fish with salt,
pepper, and Creole seasoning. Place
fish on a baking sheet, and refrigerate
until cooking.
uisiana Cookin
May/June 018
20
L I G H T & F R ES H
TART AND ZESTY
styling by courtni bodiford
SINCE SHRIMP ARE SO EASY TO COOK, they work perfectly in all kinds of dishes,
especially during the warm months of spring and summer. Here, we pickled tender Louisiana
shrimp to highlight their sweet lavor and served them with a blend of red quinoa and
couscous for some additional protein and iber. With minimal cooking time and a punch of
citrus lavor, this grain salad is a keeper you’ll come back to again and again.
PICKLED SHRIMP WITH RED
QUINOA AND COUSCOUS SALAD
MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS
2 teaspoons Creole seasoning
1½ teaspoons kosher salt, divided
1½ pounds peeled and deveined fresh shrimp
(tails left on)
¾ cup white wine vinegar
½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns
1 tablespoon mustard seeds
1 teaspoon sugar
½ teaspoon crushed red pepper
½ fennel bulb, thinly sliced
2 shallots, thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 lemons, sliced and seeded
¼ cup loosely packed fresh dill
Red Quinoa and Couscous Salad (recipe
follows)
Garnish: fennel fronds
1. Fill a large bowl with ice and water to create
an ice bath. Set aside.
2. Fill a large Dutch oven or stockpot halfway
full with water. Add Creole seasoning and
1 teaspoon salt, and bring to a boil over
medium-high heat. Add shrimp; cook until
just pink, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain shrimp.
Immediately transfer to ice water bath to stop
the cooking process. Drain shrimp.
3. In a medium bowl, whisk together vinegar,
21
louisianacookin.com
oil, peppercorns, mustard seeds, sugar, red
pepper, and remaining ½ teaspoon salt. In a
large resealable plastic bag, combine shrimp,
fennel, shallot, garlic, lemon slices, dill, and
vinegar mixture. Seal bag, and refrigerate for
at least 8 hours, turning occasionally.
4. Serve shrimp over a scoop of Red Quinoa
and Couscous Salad. Garnish with fennel
fronds, if desired.
RED QUINOA AND COUSCOUS SALAD
MAKES ABOUT 5 CUPS
2½
½
1
1
1
1
cups water, divided
cup red quinoa
cup couscous
tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
tablespoon fresh lemon juice
teaspoon kosher salt
1. In a large saucepan, bring 1 cup water to
a boil over medium-high heat. Add quinoa;
reduce heat to medium-low. Cover and
simmer until quinoa is tender and water has
been absorbed, 15 to 20 minutes.
2. In another large saucepan, bring remaining
1½ cups water to a boil over medium-high
heat. Add couscous; remove from heat. Cover
and let stand until couscous is just tender and
water has been absorbed, 5 to 7 minutes.
3. In a large bowl, combine quinoa and
couscous. Add oil, lemon juice, and salt,
stirring to combine.
I N S E ASO N
RIPE AND READY
styling by courtni bodiford
AS LOUISIANA STARTS TO HEAT UP in late spring, colorful tomatoes pop up at
farmers’ markets throughout the state. We oten ind that the lavor of these ripe, juicy beauties
shines best when they are treated simply. This season, we created two quick appetizers to help
you make the most of your tomatoes: a refreshing gazpacho and an easily assembled crostini.
GAZPACHO SHOOTERS
1. In the container of a blender or the work
MAKES ABOUT 4 CUPS
bowl of a food processor, place tomatoes, bell
pepper, cucumber, onion, ⅓ cup water, lime
juice, oil, salt, cumin, coriander, and garlic
powder; process, in batches if necessary, until
smooth. Strain mixture through a fine-mesh
sieve, discarding solids. Taste and adjust
seasonings, if necessary. Cover and refrigerate
for at least 2 hours.
2. Stir gazpacho well before serving. Garnish
with grape tomatoes and cucumber, if desired.
2
pounds yellow tomatoes, cored, seeded,
and chopped
1 medium yellow bell pepper, cored,
seeded, and chopped
½ English cucumber, peeled, seeded, and
chopped
⅓ cup chopped sweet yellow onion
⅓ cup water
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1½ teaspoons kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground cumin
¼ teaspoon ground coriander
¼ teaspoon garlic powder
Garnish: sliced grape tomatoes, diced
English cucumber
TOMATO SALAD CROSTINI
MAKES ABOUT 40
1
1
6
avocado, peeled, pitted, and diced
teaspoon fresh lemon juice
plum tomatoes, cored, seeded,
and diced
¾ teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1 cup diced cooked shrimp
⅓ cup diced red onion
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
1 (8-ounce) package goat cheese, softened
Crostini, to serve
Garnish: chopped fresh parsley
1. In a small bowl, toss together avocado and
lemon juice. Set aside.
2. Place tomatoes in a medium bowl, and
sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon salt. Add shrimp,
onion, vinegar, oil, pepper, and remaining
½ teaspoon salt, stirring to combine. Gently
stir in avocado mixture.
3. Spread goat cheese on crostini. Top with
tomato mixture. Garnish with parsley, if
desired. Serve immediately.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
24
FO O D WAYS
BOUNTIFUL
BLENDS
by caitlin watzke
THE OLD-WORLD LIQUEUR THAT BECAME INTERTWINED WITH CAJUN AND CREOLE CULTURE
RATAFIA, A FRUIT-INFUSED BRANDY
LIQUEUR, has long been popular among Cajun and
blackberries, muscadines, and persimmons.
“I can certainly say that New Orleans was the perfect
place not only to preserve but reinvent rataia,” says Chef
Creole families in Louisiana, but the history of this sweet
John Folse, noting that access to seasonal ingredients in
beverage dates back even further than the settling of the
the woods and swamplands played a signiicant role in
Bayou State to the Middle Ages in Europe. The word
rataia’s popularity here.
rataia comes from the Latin phrase rata iat, which
he Picayune’s Creole Cook Book (Andrews McMeel
translates to “let it be ratiied.” It is commonly believed
Publishing, 2013), which dates to 1901, states, “Our
that the term can be traced back hundreds of years to a
Louisiana fruits are very juicy, and therefore no other
toast traditionally given at the end of Catholic marriage
liquor than good French brandy is or should ever be used
ceremonies with a sweet liqueur.
in preparing a fruit Rataia.” Recipes for rataia call for
he Oxford Companion to Food (Oxford University
fruit to be steeped in brandy for one
Press, 1999) deines rataia as “a cordial
month before adding simple syrup,
or a brandy-based liqueur lavoured
“I CAN CERTAINLY SAY
iltering, and bottling in pint bottles.
with almonds, peach, cherry, or apricot
THAT
NEW
ORLEANS
WAS
Chef Folse’s memories of rataia
kernels, or sot fruits.” European
THE PERFECT PLACE
stretch back to his childhood, when he
and Mediterranean wine-producing
remembers shaking black cherry trees
countries—including France, Spain,
NOT ONLY TO PRESERVE
and illing buckets with blackberries
and Italy—each have their own version
BUT REINVENT RATAFIA.”
to make rataias for Christmas. As the
of the sweet liqueur. In France, rataia
—CHEF JOHN FOLSE
rataia-making process took six months,
is a combination of the letover juice of
summer was the perfect time to make it
Champagne grapes and brandy. Spanish
so that it would be ready for the holidays.
rataia is made by mashing various fruits, herbs, and
“I remember coming back from Midnight Mass as
spices in alcohol. England even created a version of rataia
a child, and before the meal, everybody got a little bitty
with sloe gin, the red liqueur made with the tart berries of
shot glass of rataia in whatever lavors we had made that
the sloe plant.
year, and it became to me an expression of Christmas. I
With Louisiana’s French and Spanish heritage,
couldn’t think of Christmas without rataia, even today,”
it should come as no surprise that rataia caught on
Chef Folse says.
here. Brandy came to Louisiana through the Port of
When Chef Folse opened Restaurant R’evolution, he
New Orleans, and with the accessibility of wild fruit
made rataia a major part of the cocktail program. It is
throughout the southern part of the state, rataia became
part of the restaurant’s signature cocktail, the Belle Epoque
a popular drink among Cajun and Creole families. Nearly
(along with bourbon and sparkling wine), and is also
every Cajun family made black cherry bounce and other
available as a digestif. varieties from the abundance of fresh fruit, including
25
louisianacookin.com
Ratafia was a part of Chef John Folse’s
holiday celebrations growing up. Now,
he bottles it at Restaurant R’evolution,
where he also displays his collection of
culinary antiques.
C H E F’S TAB L E
BYWATER
CHARMER
photography by caroline smith
AT THE RECENTLY OPENED PALOMA CAFE in New
Orleans’ Bywater neighborhood, chefs Danny Alas and Justin
Rodriguez are turning out creative, Latin American-inspired
fare in a comfortable, laid-back setting. he café is a venture
from Revelator Cofee Company, which started in New Orleans
and quickly grew throughout the South and New England.
Danny, who is originally from Venezuela, grew up in Miami,
while Justin, whose family is from the Dominican Republic,
grew up in New Jersey. he two met in culinary school in
Miami and worked with Nina Compton there for several years
before moving to North Carolina. When Nina decided to open
Compère Lapin in New Orleans, she contacted Danny to help
with the pastry program, and Danny convinced Nina to hire
Justin, too.
“Justin and I are a kind of like a duo, so we work together
wherever we go,” Danny says. “So when Nina gave me the ofer,
I took it upon myself to make it a priority that if we were going
to move here, we were going to do it together.”
Chefs Justin Rodriguez (left) and Danny Alas
Paloma Cafe
800 Louisa St. • New Orleans
504.304.3062 • palomanola.com
27
louisianacookin.com
GAMBAS AL AJILLO
CHORIZO BISCUIT
BERENICE
COCKTAIL
he two ran a pop-up called Melao, where they turned
out empanadas, before Revelator brought them on board.
he dishes at Paloma Cafe, many of which are inspired by
foods Danny and Justin loved growing up, have a decidedly
Latin American inluence with a touch of Southern lair.
For instance, the pair adds a twist on the traditional
sausage biscuit by using chorizo, a Spanish pork sausage,
instead. Justin says that while Latin American food is their
main inluence, “We didn’t want to limit ourselves to one
speciic country or cuisine.”
In addition to biscuits, the breakfast menu at Paloma
also includes items like breakfast tacos and a shakshuka
with sofrito, a red sauce popular in Latin American cuisine.
At lunch, you can eat yucca fries with garlic cilantro aioli,
fried chicken with beet and potato salad, and a roasted
pork sandwich. On the dinner menu, you’ll ind Gambas
al Ajillo (garlic shrimp) and mojo-roasted pork over fried
green plantains.
29
louisianacookin.com
With Danny’s and Justin’s backgrounds working in
pastry, the dessert menu is a highlight, featuring churros
with spiced chocolate sauce and Justin’s legendary lan.
he duo’s famous empanadas and other sweet and savory
treats anchor the pastry counter.
Paloma serves Revelator’s cofee in espressos, rotating
cold brew drinks, and a selection of pour over beverages.
Additionally, the restaurant features a variety of teas and
a full bar with beer, wine, and handcrated cocktails,
including the Paloma Slushie (a frozen tequila drink with
grapefruit) and Green Tomato Bloody (customizable with
vodka, tequila, or gin).
None of the dishes on Paloma’s menu are more
than $14, making the café an afordable option where
customers can stop in for a cup of cofee and a pastry or
hang out with friends over dinner and drinks. Danny and
Justin plan to update the menu seasonally while keeping
dishes that customers have grown to love. BREAKFAST TACOS
5
dishes
to try
GAMBAS AL AJILLO
(GARLIC SHRIMP)
CHORIZO BISCUIT
POLLO FRITO
(FRIED CHICKEN)
CHURROS
FRESHER
THAN
)
)
FRESH
To learn more about Gulf seafood
and the wshermen who harvest it, visit
LafayetteTravel.com/GulfSeafood.
ouisiana shrimp are probably the most ubiquitous bounty found
in the coastal waters of our state. Shrimp lend themselves
to countless preparations, and we savor them with a variety of
yavor prowles. They cook quickly, are easy to store, and are at home
in every dining occasion, from backyard boils to formal dinners.
L
There’s really only one requirement to cooking
great shrimp: The shrimp simply must be as
fresh as you can possibly Ƃnd them.
Beginning in May and tapering down in July, the season yields
literal boatloads of shrimp making their way to the marketplace.
They’re caught in trawls in nearshore waters by wshermen like Lance
Nacio. He’s been wshing shrimp out of Montegut, Louisiana, since
1997. He began with a boat, the Anna Marie, using the same method
many shrimpers still use today.
In 2006, Nacio made a bold move. He converted the Anna
Marie into a fully integrated processing boat. This means that the
shrimp are caught, chilled, frozen, and packaged on board the
boat, mere minutes after they are caught. Nacio’s freezer isn’t like
those used on land. It’s a plate freezer that reaches temperatures as
cold as 40 degrees below zero.
Nacio’s shrimp packages are slim and wide compared to the
traditional block. Shrimp are pre-chilled and then placed on the plate
freezer only an inch or two thick. They freeze very rapidly and are
packed in slim boxes on board. There’s no extra water added either,
so there is some space between the shrimp in the package. This
makes the thawing process much faster, as well, resulting in thawed
shrimp of impeccable quality. When a cook thaws Nacio’s shrimp,
the seafood is chemical free and tastes like it was just caught.
Nacio sees himself as a steward of the waters that provide his
living and way of life. He’s added a second boat to his operation,
the Marrissa Jolie, and he says he is in it for the long haul. He wants
to see our coastal bounty survive for future generations.
For more Gulf seafood recipes, visit
LafayetteTravel.com/Recipes.
GULF SHRIMP WITH STIRFRIED KALE AND ONIONS
Recipe compliments of Jeremy Conner
MAKES 2 SERVINGS
1 tablespoon olive oil
12 large whole Gulf shrimp,
peeled and deveined
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 clove fresh garlic, minced
1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped
1 tablespoon green onions, sliced
Stir-Fried Kale and Onions
(recipe follows)
1. In a cast-iron skillet, heat oil over
medium heat.
2. Season shrimp with salt and pepper.
Sear shrimp in skillet, carefully turning
when they are halfway done.
3. When the shrimp are almost completely
cooked, add garlic, parsley, and green
onions, stirring gently. Remove from heat.
4. Divide Stir-Fried Kale and Onions
between two plates. Top each with half
the shrimp. Serve immediately.
STIR-FRIED KALE AND ONIONS
2
1
2
1
tablespoons olive oil
small onion, thinly sliced
cloves fresh garlic, minced
bunch fresh kale, stemmed
and torn into bite-size pieces
Salt and pepper, to taste
1. In a large skillet or wok, heat oil
over high heat.
2. Add onion, and sauté until tender,
about 5 to 6 minutes. Add garlic, and
sauté for 10 seconds more. Add kale,
and sauté until kale begins to wilt.
Season with salt and pepper. Remove
from heat. Serve warm with shrimp.
DOWN THE
BAYOU
EXPERIENCE AUTHENTIC CAJUN FLAVORS AND FOLKWAYS IN
LAFOURCHE PARISH. WITH ROADSIDE PO’ BOY STANDS AND FINE-DINING
RESTAURANTS, LAFOURCHE IS FULL OF FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY.
L
ike many areas of southeast Louisiana, Lafourche Parish—
which is about an hour’s drive southwest from New
Orleans—is centered around the Mississippi River. As you
go “down the bayou” and explore the area’s rich heritage, you will
ind not only the kinds of lavors and hospitality Louisiana is best
known for, but a variety of experiences that capture the Cajun joie
de vivre.
With the catish of Bayou des Allemands, fertile citrus groves,
rolling sugarcane ields, and cattle ranches, Lafourche Parish has
been feeding Louisiana since its settlement in the 1700s. Tightly
knit communities of ishermen still troll the bayous, lakes, and Gulf
of Mexico, pulling in a catch that includes crawish, shrimp, and
the myriad of delicacies for which the Bayou State is best known.
As you travel up and down the bayou—which is how people
travel here—you will ind butcher shops, locals’ haunts, ine dining,
top-notch cultural institutions, and one of the country’s premier
culinary institutes, the Chef John Folse Culinary Institute at Nicholls
State University.
33
louisianacookin.com
Located in the Mississippi River Delta, Lafourche
Parish is home to a thriving seafood industry.
FREMIN’S
QUICK BITES
& TREATS
The po’ boy may have been invented in New
Orleans, but there are a few exceptional
examples of the sandwich to be found while
you’re traveling through Lafourche Parish.
Chef Jean-Paul Bourgeois, a Thibodaux
native and Chef John Folse Culinary Institute
graduate who now runs Blue Smoke in New
York City, cites Blake’s Deli as an essential
Cajun Country one-stop shop. It specializes
in overstufed po’ boys—including fried
shrimp, boudin, and the Blake’s Special (roast
beef, smoked ham, and Swiss cheese)—but
does so connected to both a gas station and
a casino.
Down the bayou in Larose, folks driving
toward Grand Isle and Port Fourchon
will ind Harry’s Po-Boys. This roadside
restaurant, complete with picnic tables, ofers
amply stufed po’ boys with fried shrimp,
and a gravy-soaked roast beef po’ boy that
will require just about as many napkins as
you can ind (which is to say that it is nearly
perfect in every way).
Before heading back up the bayou, save
room for dessert at Cajun Pecan House. This
old-fashioned pie shop and confectionery
primarily sells pralines and pecan pies
(regular and chocolate) but also has a range
of sweets that includes fudge and traditional
Cajun glazed pecans (known as pecan gralé).
During Carnival season, Cajun Pecan House
sells magniicent king cakes (which they also
ship around the country).
LOCAL FLAVORS
Fresh local seafood abounds throughout
Lafourche Parish, and there are numerous
restaurants serving up colorful renditions
of classic Louisiana dishes alongside unique
creations.
In 1968, Spahr’s Seafood Restaurant
opened in Des Allemands serving Cajun
classics and plates packed with crunchy
fried seafood. Spahr’s has expanded to three
35
louisianacookin.com
1
1. Fried Green Tomatoes with crab rémoulade from Spahr’s Seafood
Restaurant 2 and 3. Harry’s Po-Boys 4. Frank’s Lounge 5. Alzina’s
6. Cajun Pecan House
2
3
LAFOURCHE
O F F T H E E AT E N PAT H
Starting this spring, visitors can experience the flavors of Bayou Lafourche by traveling the Cajun Bayou
Food Trail. This guide to locals’ favorites includes tasty spots from around the parish, ranging from finedining options to out-of-the way diners and quintessential food festivals as the trail winds its way down the
bayou. For more information about the food trail, visit lacajunbayou.com.
5
6
4
locations—Des Allemands, Thibodaux,
and Galliano—and continues to delight
customers with their thin-fried catish,
seafood gumbo, and rightly famous Bloody
Mary. For another tasty version of the Bloody
Mary, locals lock to Frank’s Lounge in Des
Allemands.
A few blocks from Spahr’s in downtown
Thibodaux, Fremin’s Restaurant sells
upscale Creole and Italian-inluenced dishes
from Executive Chef Kevin Templet that
relect the area’s multicultural past. Located
in a 19th-century drugstore, Fremin’s is
perhaps best known for its Chargrilled
Oysters, Red Fish Belle River, and Crawish
Tortellini Carbonara.
Cinclare Southern Bistro is a newcomer
to the Thibodaux dining scene. The upscale
casual restaurant opened in early 2016
and serves a menu that jumps from local
favorites—including a Crawish Tart and
an Alligator and Andouille Cheesecake—to
steakhouse favorites like a wagyu hanger
steak topped with bordelaise sauce that
would not be out of place in New Orleans.
Similarly, the Cinclare Burger, which comes
topped with whiskey onions, Swiss cheese,
and fried shallots, is not to be missed.
For an entirely diferent and wonderfully
authentic dining experience, intrepid diners
call on Alzina Toups. This charming, dyedin-the-wool Cajun chef runs Alzina’s, a
reservations-only restaurant in a former
welding shop down the bayou from
Thibodaux in the small town of Galliano.
Meals at Alzina’s are a rustic afair where
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
36
1. Shrimp boat on
the bayou 2. Center
for Traditional
Louisiana Boat
Building & Museum
3. Thibodeauxville Fall
Festival
2
1
diners serve themselves a variety of classic
Cajun dishes—including gumbos, Spicy
Smothered Shrimp, Crabmeat Lasagna, and
Black-Eyed Pea Jambalaya. Her silky Tarte à la
Bouille—Cajun custard pie with a sweet cookie
crust—is a perfect ending to the meal.
Bayou Lafourche has also beneited from
the rat of brewery and distillery openings
that have swept the Bayou State. The Mudbug
Brewery taproom, near downtown Thibodaux,
ofers a variety of beer styles that highlight
local lavors (don’t miss the King Cake Ale and
Café au Lait Stout). Across the bayou, DonnerPeltier Distillers ofers distillery tours with
tastings of their sugarcane Rougaroux Rums
and rice-based Oryza Vodka and Gin.
FAMILY FUN
ON THE BAYOU
In addition to the area’s culinary oferings, the
Cajun Bayou has plenty of options for family
fun. he Bayou Country Children’s Museum in
Thibodaux is packed with hands-on exhibits that
illustrate diferent aspects of Cajun life. Children
aged 2 to 12 can play on a full-size sugarcane
harvester, explore a two-story oil platform, and
EVENTS
MAY 3–6
THIBODAUX FIREMEN’S FAIR
iremensfair.com
37
louisianacookin.com
OCTOBER 25–28
FRENCH FOOD FESTIVAL
bayoucivicclub.org
NOVEMBER 10
THIBODEAUXVILLE
FALL FESTIVAL
facebook.com/thibodeauxville
LAFOURCHE
even toss beads from a Mardi Gras loat.
Down the bayou in Lockport, the Bayou
Lafourche Folklife & Heritage Museum
features a variety of rotating art exhibits
alongside a permanent collection of artifacts
illustrating early life along Bayou Lafourche.
Dotting the bayou as it heads toward the
Gulf of Mexico are a number of ancient live
oak trees, some of which may have greeted
the irst European settlers when they arrived
in the 18th century. For commentary about
these trees’ history, visit the Lafourche
Live Oak Tour (liveoaktour.com), and for a
closer look, the National Parks Service ofers
guided boat tours (for groups of 8 to 20) each
spring and fall from the dock at the Wetlands
Acadian Cultural Center in Thibodaux.
Speaking of boats, there is nothing quite
like the thrill of zipping through swamps
and bayous. Fast-paced airboat tours (one
area operator is Airboat Tours by Arthur
Matherne) and swamp tours are the ultimate
way to experience the lora and fauna of
Louisiana’s tropical wetlands, and spring and
summer are some of the best times to spot
large gators. GET THERE
Lafourche Parish is about one hour southwest of New Orleans, which has the nearest international airport.
3
CAPITOL
RENAISSANCE
by nora mcgunnigle
MID-CITY BATON ROUGE IS SEEING A CULINARY REVIVAL, WITH BOTH ESTABLISHED
RESTAURANTS AND NEWCOMERS OFFERING EXCELLENT DINING OPTIONS
G
one are the days when pawn shops and fast food
chains dominated Government Street, Mid-City
Baton Rouge’s main drag. They’re still there,
providing some local color, but a culinary revolution is
well under way, and now Government Street and Jeferson
Highway are illed with hidden and not-so-hidden gems.
“Every block on the street has some sort of new project,”
Tiger Deaux-nuts founder Jef Herman says, adding
that collaborations between neighboring restaurants are
becoming common.
Curbside Burger celebrated its irst anniversary last
fall by working with local restaurants to create unique
sandwiches. The Tiger D crispy chicken sandwich used
glazed doughnut buns from Tiger Deaux-nuts, and Gov’t
Taco founder Jay Ducote created the Gov’t Burger with
lavors like cofee- and ancho chili-rubbed beef, Chihuahua
cheese, poblano pico, and tortilla strips.
Food hall White Star Market has energized the entire
area, and entrepreneurs have been looking to Government
Street and Mid-City with fresh ideas for feeding Baton
Rouge’s hungry masses.
39
louisianacookin.com
OLD-SCHOOL
That’s not to say Mid-City hasn’t had its quality food venues
over the years. Local Italian food lovers have known for
decades the best lasagna is at Anthony’s Italian Deli,
a small deli/restaurant with red-and-white checkered
tablecloths and lots of regulars. Monjunis Italian Café &
Grocery is another longtime favorite tucked in the corner
of a strip mall on Jeferson Highway, serving pasta with
award-winning sauce with meatballs.
In the same plaza, Brew Ha-Ha has served up cofee,
espresso drinks, and snacks for nearly 15 years but is best
known for its many lavors of cake balls—spheres of cake
batter of varying sizes and lavors, dipped in icing.
Around the corner on Government Street, Tiger
Deaux-nuts serves fresh, creative doughnuts of the highest
handmade quality, but is also becoming well-known for
its sandwiches and burritos. Highly recommended: the
Strawberry Cream Cheese Deaux-nut and the boudin
breakfast sandwich.
For a slightly fancier experience, try Bistro Byronz,
which is great for lunch, dinner, and happy hour. Grab a
DOE’S
E AT P L A C E
2
3
1
lunch plate special like the Chicken & Parmesan Dumplings
and have a half-size lunchtime “Petite Sipz” cocktail, your
choice of Petite Mojito, Petite Mimosa, Petite Bloody Mari,
or Petite Vodka Freeze Sno-Ball.
Exactly 1 mile down Government Street from Bistro
Byronz is Doe’s Eat Place, a cozy steakhouse well-known
for its Mississippi Delta-style hot tamales for decades. The
family recipe goes back to 1941, and they’re a must-try
along with one of their two-pound Porterhouse steaks.
Don’t overlook the cocktail program—there are some great
seasonal and classic drinks on the menu.
Up your home culinary game with an assist from
Red Stick Spice Company, across Jeferson Highway
from Monjunis and Brew Ha-Ha. They’ve got every spice
imaginable, along with special spice blends and rubs,
infused olive oils, and an extensive tea selection.
For nightlife, the Radio Bar provides creative
cocktails, a well-selected beer list, bar games, DJs, and a
dog-friendly patio area. It’s open late and ofers free food
on Sundays.
41
louisianacookin.com
NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK
Over the past year or two, the Mid-City energy has leveled
up with fresh options. Check out Cajun fare and delectable
sweet and savory pies from Elsie’s Plate & Pie, prepared
meats and sides to-go from Twine, a burger food truck
gone brick-and-mortar with Curbside Burgers, and
Neapolitan-style pizzas and a cool bar at Rocca Pizzeria.
You could eat yourself silly with new food options within
a mile radius of Government Street. A few suggestions:
potato and rosemary pizza from Rocca; the Tiger Tailgate
burger from Curbside, with whipped cream cheese, bacon
jam, and fried jalapeños; skillet apple pie made to order (à
la mode, of course) at Elsie’s; and Twine’s Foie Gras Burger.
Around the corner on Jeferson Highway, lunch joint
MJ’s Café is a vegetarian restaurant under new, veganforward management located in what looks like an
abandoned antiques shop near Red Stick Spice Company.
The homemade soups of the day steal the show and change
frequently—try the Tom Kha, the Curried Carrot Lentil, or
the Potato. The vegan enchilada special is a winner as well.
BATON ROUGE
1. Panini-pressed muffuletta from
Anthony’s Italian Deli 2. Bistro
Byronz dining room 3. Curbside
Burgers 4. Rocca Pizzeria
5. Magna Carrot taco from Gov’t
Taco 6. Products from Twine
4
5
WHITE STAR
MARKET
This high-end food hall occupies the
ground loor of a larger mixed-use
development encompassing an entire
city block of Government Street. The irst
food vendor to sign up was local chef and
food personality Jay Ducote’s Gov’t Taco.
Jay lauds the concept for both vendors
and customers. “It allows for culinary
entrepreneurship,” he says. “It’s a food
outlet without the inancial risks and
burdens of a full-service restaurant.”
Besides the creative lavors on a tortilla
from Gov’t Taco, Jolie Pearl Oyster Bar
has opened Jolie @ The Market at White
Star, and Rêve Cofee Roasters from
6 Lafayette, Michael Mangham’s Southern
Plate, Fete au Fete, Chow Yum Phat, The
Big Squeezy, Dat’z Italian, and Mouton
have opened up shop as well.
White Star Market is the vanguard of
development on Government Street, with
the city’s municipal “road diet” making the
area more pedestrian- and bike-friendly.
The Electric Depot redevelopment project
will add more living space to the area,
and older properties like the Government
Village Shopping Center and the Hotel
Lincoln have been purchased and will be
fully updated. GET THERE
Several major airlines offer jet service to the
Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport. Baton
Rouge is about one hour west of New Orleans,
and about four hours east of Houston, Texas.
Nora McGunnigle lives, eats, and drinks in New Orleans. Her work, some of which is online at nolabeerblog.com, discusses food, beer, travel, and
culture in New Orleans and the Gulf South.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
42
D I S C OV E R
ACADIANA
by caitlin watzke
IMMERSE YOURSELF IN CAJUN AND CREOLE CULTURE IN ST. LANDRY PARISH,
WHERE THE DELECTABLE CUISINE, FOOT-TAPPING MUSIC, AND BEAUTIFUL SCENERY
PROVIDE THE BACKDROP FOR UNFORGETTABLE EXPERIENCES
V
isitors to St. Landry Parish will ind stunning
landscapes, world-famous cuisine, lively music,
and enthralling history throughout its 12 cities
and towns. Bordered on the east by the Atchafalaya River,
the primarily rural and agricultural parish in south central
Louisiana is a cultural crossroads where residents celebrate
the enduring Cajun and Creole traditions that shaped their
communities. The Acadiana region’s rich history is evident
all across the parish in its language (Cajun French is still
spoken here), Cajun and zydeco music, and down-home
restaurants and shops where you can ind some of the
best boudin, gumbo, and seafood anywhere in the state.
Majestic oaks, scenic waterways, and Cajun prairie paint
a picturesque landscape perfect for outdoor adventures.
43
louisianacookin.com
The Little Big Cup in Arnaudville offers
customers a taste of authentic Cajun cuisine.
GRAND COTEAU
1
2
DINE & DRINK
St. Landry Parish is a hotbed of culinary talent, with Cajun
and Creole culture inluencing cuisine at every turn. At Little
Big Cup in Arnaudville, Kevin Robin and Sanjay Maharaj
have created an oasis where Cajun food and good times
abound. Enjoy a picturesque meal on the outdoor deck with
Cajun classics like chicken and sausage gumbo or creative
dishes like the Cajun Kevin Po Boy and Famous Crab Stack.
Also not to be missed is the Boucherie Brunch on Sunday
(Crème Brûlée French Toast, anyone?).
For an outstanding meal, look no further than Steamboat
Warehouse, located on the banks of Bayou Courtableau
in Washington. At the dinner-only restaurant, Chef Jason
Huguet serves up steaks and seafood dishes, including his
signature sotshell crab dishes.
Enjoy traditional Cajun fare and daily plate lunches at
Crawish House & Grill in Opelousas. The menu features
seafood dishes, boiled crawish, and po’ boys (the Cajun Girl
Poboy is a seafood lover’s dream, with crabmeat, crawish,
and shrimp).
While crat beers are the focus at Bayou Teche Brewing,
the Arnaudville brewery and tap room oten hosts culinary
events. Its Louisiana-inspired beers are crated to complement
the lavors of Cajun and Creole cuisine.
Get your cofee ix at Java Square Café in Opelousas, an
outpost of Lafayette-based Rêve Cofee Roasters. The fullservice cofee shop serves espresso drinks, including lattes
and cappuccinos, as well as blended and iced cofee drinks.
45
louisianacookin.com
3
ST. LANDRY
BOUDIN & CRACKLIN’S
4
1. Little Big Cup 2. Java Square Café 3. Crawfish House
& Grill 4. Fresh cracklin’s from Bourque’s Super Store
5. Kartchner’s specialty seasoning blend
5
No trip to St. Landry Parish would be complete without
stopping for a bite of boudin. The Cajun pork and rice
sausage is so revered here that the parish has designated its
own Boudin Trail to help visitors locate more than 20 spots to
get their boudin ix (and a variety of other regional specialty
items, including cracklin’s and smoked sausages).
On the eastern side of the parish, Kartchner’s in Krotz
Springs and Cannatella’s in Melville are two of your best
bets for top-notch boudin. Kartchner’s is also known for its
cracklin’s and specialty meats, while Cannatella’s makes a
mean mufuletta and spectacular Italian sausage.
Traveling west along Highway 190 from Krotz Springs,
you’ll ind Bourque’s Super Store, which is just as popular
for its boudin and award-winning cracklin’s as it is for its
special Jalapeño Sausage Cheese Bread. Take home a jar of its
pickled quail eggs (a Cajun delicacy).
With three locations in Acadiana, Billy’s Boudin &
Cracklin’ makes some of the region’s most-loved boudin.
Steamed boudin, smoked boudin, crawish boudin,
and pepper jack boudin balls are just a glimpse of the
mouthwatering oferings. Champagne’s Marche, a grocery
in the small town of Leonville, is known for its boudin, and if
you happen to be in the area during Carnival season, pick up
one of its freshly baked king cakes.
Meat lovers will delight in Eunice Superette &
Slaughterhouse, opened more than 50 years ago as both a
grocery and meat supplier. At the Superette’s retail center
in downtown Eunice, you’ll ind rich boudin links, hot
cracklin’s, and a wide variety of specialty meat products.
DID YOU KNOW?
St. Landry is home to six cultural districts, which are designated
areas where state tax is waived on original artworks. Visit Arnaudville,
Eunice, Grand Coteau, Opelousas, Sunset, and Washington to
browse unique pieces from local artists.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
46
1 and 2. Local pottery and freshly baked blackberry sweet dough pies
from The Kitchen Shop 3 and 4. Petite Rouge Antiques 5. Live music
at Lakeview Park & Beach 6. Memorabilia at Steamboat Warehouse
1
2
3
ARTS & ANTIQUES
4
In the quaint town of Grand Coteau, sweet dough pies are
a specialty, and you’ll ind some of the best at he Kitchen
Shop. With scores of books, wine, gourmet foods, and more,
this eclectic shop is a treasure trove for kitchen enthusiasts.
Aterward, stop in down the street at Petite Rouge Antiques
& Estate Sales, housed in a classic Acadian cottage. The
store carries furniture, vintage jewelry, herbs, tea blends,
aromatherapy products, and more.
he Old Schoolhouse Antique Mall opens every Friday,
Saturday, and Sunday in the nearby town of Washington. In
addition to antiques, collectibles, vintage clothing, and jewelry,
the mall also features a café that serves up home-cooked
meals and gourmet sandwiches. At NUNU Arts and Culture
Collective in Arnaudville, you can interact with artists, peruse
local art and products, and attend classes, workshops, and
music performances.
Spice up your cooking with a seasoning blend from Targil
Seasoning & Butcher Supplies in Opelousas. The store
specializes in spices and their own blends and also ofers a line
of cake supplies and cake decorating classes.
ST. LANDRY
E X P L OR E T H E OU T DOO R S
St. Landry Parish is part of the Atchafalaya National Heritage Area,
which provides endless opportunities to take in the splendor of the
area’s natural wonders. Paddle Bayou Teche, bird-watch in the Sherburne Wildlife Management Area, go on a swamp tour, or take the
family camping at Lakeview Park and Beach in Eunice.
GROOVE TO THE BEAT
5
6
Music is at the heart of Acadiana’s cultural heritage, bringing
the community together to dance and have a good time. Listen
to the sounds of Cajun, swamp pop, and zydeco music along
the Zydeco-Cajun Prairie Scenic Byway, a series of three
loops winding through St. Landry and neighboring parishes
Acadia and Evangeline.
Weekends are quite the event with live music sessions. At
the Prairie Acadian Cultural Center in Eunice, not only can
you learn about Louisiana’s Acadian settlers through exhibits
and workshops, but you can also pass a good time doing the
Cajun two-step. Every Saturday at 2:45 p.m., the center hosts a
Cajun music session and dance lesson.
On Saturday nights, the Rendez-vous des Cajuns live radio
and TV show takes over the adjacent Liberty heater for an
evening of live music, storytelling, and dancing in a 1920s
vaudeville and movie house. Although the show is primarily
presented in Cajun French, plenty of English is spoken so that
everyone can follow along.
Every Saturday morning at the Savoy Music Center, an
Acadian accordion factory in Eunice, musicians get together
for an acoustic jam session. Admission is free. On the irst
Sunday of the month, Arnaudville music shop Tom’s Fiddle
and Bow opens at 12:45 p.m. for its JAMbalaya Acoustic Music
Jam. There is no charge to participate or listen. EVENTS
MAY 24–26
KROTZ SPRINGS
SPORTSMEN’S
HERITAGE FESTIVAL
kssportsmensheritagefestival.com
JULY 7
LEBEAU ZYDECO
FESTIVAL
lebeauzydecofestival.com
OCTOBER 27
SWEET DOUGH
PIE FESTIVAL
sweetdoughgc.com
NOVEMBER 9–11
PORT BARRE
CRACKLIN FESTIVAL
cracklinfest.com
NOVEMBER 2–4
HOLY GHOST
CREOLE FESTIVAL
BAZAAR
holyghostcreolefestival.com
For more festivals and events,
visit cajuntravel.com.
GET THERE
St. Landry Parish
is approximately
20 minutes north of
Lafayette, one hour
west of Baton Rouge,
and just over two hours
west of New Orleans.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
48
AVOYELLES
A DV E N T URE
AN EXCITING RANGE OF CASUAL AND HIGH-END RESTAURANTS WITH CAJUN AND
CREOLE FLAIR AWAITS VISITORS TO CENTRAL LOUISIANA’S AVOYELLES PARISH
voyelles Parish has long been known as
a sportsman’s paradise, with abundant
wildlife, scenic waterways, and a prosperous
agriculture industry, but one would be remiss to
overlook the incredible dining options in this parish
in central Louisiana. Avoyelles Parish was named ater
the Avoyels Indians, but the parish also celebrates its
French Creole heritage, which has had a major impact
on the food scene there. Food lovers will ind both
casual and high-end dining with Creole and Cajun lair.
EAT LIKE A LOCAL
At Broken Wheel Brewery, longtime friends
Jonathan Knoll and Chris Pahl produce handcrated
beers that pay homage to the local culture. The
brewery is named ater the story of Marksville’s
founding, and each brew’s name has a story behind it.
The Páchafa Pale Ale is named ater a half-man, halfhorse boogey man that Marksville natives grew up
fearing, while the AP IPA honors Avoyelles Parish.
The brewery is part of Fresh Catch Bistreaux, which
Jonathan opened in 2009. The restaurant turns out
classic Cajun fare alongside Broken Wheel’s crat
49
louisianacookin.com
brews. The menu features everything from crab
cakes and seafood platters to crawish étoufée and
fun specials.
Whether you stop in for lunch or dinner, Brown
Bag Gourmet is an excellent choice for fresh cuisine
with local and global lair from owner and executive
chef Trent Bonnette. A selection of delectable salads
and sandwiches, including Shrimp & Crab Stufed
Avocado and Sot Shell Crab Poor Boy, anchors
the lunch menu. The dinner menu features creative
appetizers and entrées, such as Pan Seared Redish
and the Louisiana Beef Burger with blue cheese,
bacon jam, and caramelized onion (a local favorite).
Maglieaux’s Downtown Grille opened last
spring in Marksville with a similar menu and many
of the same signature items from its sister restaurant,
Maglieaux’s on the Cane, in Natchitoches. The
restaurant serves a mix of Creole and Italian cuisine,
including an outstanding Hen & Andouille Gumbo.
Seafood Cannelloni and Lasagna Pappardelle
highlight Italian lavors, while the Fish Pontchartrain
and Crabmeat Stufed Portobello Mushroom with
Grilled Shrimp showcase Louisiana lavors.
BROWN BAG GOURMET
Pork Belly’s Bar & Grill recently
opened in Marksville with a menu
of pork-centric entrées and seafood
favorites. You can’t go wrong with their
Cracklin’ Crusted Pork Chop or Cane
Glazed Pork Belly.
For down-home seafood dishes, check
out Rocky’s Tail and Shells in Bunkie and
Bernard’s Cajun Sea-Fry Restaurant in
Cottonport. Rocky’s ofers an extensive
menu of seafood dishes, with everything
from boiled crawish and fried shrimp
po’ boys to grilled redish and Shrimp
and Andouille Pasta. Bernard’s is known
for its po’ boys, fried seafood, and boiled
crawish, when in season.
UP THE ANTE
At Paragon Casino Resort, you’ll
ind fantastic dining options alongside
gaming, live entertainment, and luxury
accommodations. The casino ofers seven
diferent restaurants that run the gamut
from ine dining to casual fare. For a fancy
dinner, Legends Steakhouse features a
variety of prime steak and seafood dishes,
including a bone-in ribeye, boudinstufed pork chop, and blackened redish.
For a more relaxed atmosphere, Big
Daddy E’s Cajun Grill and Oyster Bar
and Roxy’s Diner are both solid choices.
Seafood takes center stage at Big Daddy
E’s, with tantalizing appetizers like
Firecracker Shrimp and Alligator Nuggets
and mouthwatering mains like boiled
shrimp and Catish Avoyelles. Roxy’s
Diner is open 24/7 and ofers a menu of
comfort food favorites, including Chicken
Fried Steak and Seafood Gumbo
The Market Place Bufet features a
vast selection of exciting options and
special menus throughout the week.
Locals know that it’s the place to be on
Sunday nights, when the bufet has a
cochon de lait theme, with whole roast
pig, boudin, cracklin’s, and sausages.
51
louisianacookin.com
1
2
3
AV O Y E L L E S
ON THE ROAD
4
1. Maglieaux’s Champagne Shrimp 2. Legends Steakhouse at Paragon Casino Resort
3. Salmon Oscar at Legends Steakhouse 4. Dining room at Fresh Catch Bistreaux
5. Meat counter at Juneau’s Cajun Meats 6. Crab Cakes at Fresh Catch Bistreaux
Marksville and the surrounding areas
have lots of goodies you’ll want to pick
up before heading home, so make
sure to bring an ice chest—and your
appetite. If you’ve ever been to the
New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival,
chances are you’ve tasted or at least
heard of the legendary crawish bread
sold by Panaroma Foods. The cheesy
crowd favorite is made and sold
locally in Marksville, and it is available
precooked and frozen at the bakery.
You’ll also want to snag Panaroma’s
sausage and jalapeño bread while
you’re there.
Boudin and cracklin’s are available
at specialty meat markets and stores
throughout Avoyelles Parish. At
Juneau’s Cajun Meats, directly
across from the casino, you’ll ind hot
boudin, juicy cracklin’s, and crispy
boudin balls. The shop also ofers a
variety of frozen meats and sausage to
ill your ice chest. In the nearby town
of Cottonport, T-Jim’s Grocery and
Market is known for its fresh pork
sausage and stufed gogs as well as its
cracklin’s and boudin. GET THERE
Avoyelles Parish is located in Central
Louisiana. It is approximately
three hours northwest of New Orleans,
fewer than two hours northwest of Baton
Rouge, and one hour north of Lafayette.
5
6
EVENTS
MAY 10–13
COCHON DE LAIT FESTIVAL
cochondelaitfestival.com
JUNE 7–9
LOUISIANA
CORN FESTIVAL
bunkiechamber.net/lacornfest
JULY 4
AVOYELLES ARTS &
MUSIC FESTIVAL
facebook.com/Avoyelles.artscouncil
For more festivals and events, visit travelavoyelles.com.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
52
MODERN
BOIL
UPDATE YOUR CRAWFISH BOIL WITH
FRESH FLAVORS AND TASTY SIDES
recipe development and food styling by jade sinacori
C
rawish boils are one of the best parts of springtime
in Louisiana. There is nothing better than aternoons
spent with family and friends gathered around
newspaper-draped tables piled with steaming mudbugs
and spicy i xin’s. This year, we took an updated approach to
the classic boil with some fun additions, including whole
artichokes and sweet potatoes, and a few exciting sides.
SHELL BEACH COCKTAIL
P. 57
CITRUS SPICE
BOILED CRAWFISH
MAKES ABOUT 4 SERVINGS
4
¼
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1½
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
3
gallons water
cup kosher salt
tablespoon pink peppercorns
tablespoon dried juniper berries
tablespoon coriander seeds
tablespoon fennel seeds
tablespoon dried dill
teaspoon mustard seeds
tablespoons cayenne pepper
tablespoons crushed red pepper
tablespoons paprika
tablespoons dried marjoram
tablespoons ground nutmeg
tablespoon anise
tablespoon chili powder
tablespoon onion powder
tablespoon dry mustard
tablespoon lemon pepper
tablespoon dried oregano
pounds fresh artichokes
pounds baby sweet potatoes,
quartered
3 heads garlic, unpeeled
5 lemons, halved
8 ears corn, shucked and halved
1 pound smoked andouille sausage,
cut into 1-inch pieces
30 pounds live crawfish
Creole Dipping Sauce (recipe follows)
5. In batches, add crawfish to water
and boil for 3 minutes, covered. Turn
off heat and let stand, covered, for 10
minutes. Drain well, reserving water.
Return water to a boil, and repeat
with remaining crawfish. Serve with
Creole Dipping Sauce.
CREOLE DIPPING SAUCE
MAKES ABOUT 1¼ CUPS
1
¼
½
½
½
cup mayonnaise
cup Creole mustard
teaspoon kosher salt
teaspoon coarse ground black
pepper
teaspoon smoked paprika
1. In a medium bowl, whisk together
all ingredients until smooth. Cover
and refrigerate until ready to serve.
SHELL BEACH COCKTAIL
4 gallons water and salt to a boil over
high heat.
2. In a spice grinder, grind together
peppercorns, juniper berries,
coriander seeds, fennel seeds, dill, and
mustard seeds.
3. In a medium bowl, whisk together
spice mixture, cayenne, red pepper,
paprika, marjoram, nutmeg, anise,
chili powder, onion powder, dry
mustard, lemon pepper, and oregano;
add mixture to boiling water.
4. Add artichokes; cover and boil
for 25 to 35 minutes. Add sweet
potatoes, garlic, and lemons; boil until
sweet potatoes are tender, 10 to 12
minutes. Add corn and sausage; boil
for 8 minutes. Remove vegetables
and sausage from boiling water, and
keep warm.
57
louisianacookin.com
tablespoon orange zest
teaspoons lime zest
teaspoons lemon zest
whole star anise
1. In a large bowl, combine all
ingredients. Divide mixture between
2 (32-ounce) wide-mouth Mason
jars. Seal tightly, and refrigerate for
2 weeks.
2. Strain infused rum into an
airtight container, discarding solids.
Refrigerate for up to 1 month.
GARLICKY HERB ROLLS
MAKES 16
2
½
1
1
½
1
(16-ounce) bags deli pizza dough
cup unsalted butter
tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
teaspoon minced garlic
teaspoon chopped fresh sage
tablespoon flaked sea salt
MAKES 8 SERVINGS
1. Preheat oven to 375°. Spray
2 cups sparkling wine, chilled
1½ cups Pineapple-Ginger Rum,
chilled (recipe follows)
2 ounces blood orange bitters
Garnish: candied pineapple, fresh
rosemary sprigs, orange peel,
lime peel
1. In a large pitcher, combine
1. In a 40-quart stockpot, bring
1
2
2
6
sparkling wine, Pineapple-Ginger
Rum, and bitters. Serve over ice.
Garnish with candied pineapple,
rosemary, and citrus peels, if desired.
PINEAPPLE-GINGER RUM
MAKES ABOUT 8 SERVINGS
8 ounces cubed fresh pineapple
2½ cups white rum
¾ cup roughly chopped fresh
ginger
an 8-inch square baking dish with
baking spray with flour.
2. On a lightly floured surface, divide
dough into 16 pieces. Roll each piece
into a ball, and place, smooth side up,
in prepared pan. Bake for 15 minutes.
3. In a small skillet, melt butter over
medium heat. Add thyme, garlic,
and sage; cook until fragrant, about
3 minutes. Transfer to a heatproof bowl.
4. Brush a generous amount of
garlic-herb butter onto rolls, and
sprinkle with sea salt. Cover with
foil, and bake 5 to 10 minutes more.
Serve warm.
RICE SALAD
MAKES ABOUT 5 CUPS
3
1
1
2½
¼
cups water
cup long-grain rice
tablespoon kosher salt, divided
cups pecans, roughly chopped
cup plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin
olive oil, divided
1 cup diced yellow onion
1 cup thinly sliced celery
1 cup shelled edamame
½ cup thinly sliced green onion
3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
3 tablespoons chopped fresh
parsley
¼ teaspoon coarse ground black
pepper
½ cup diced red bell pepper
1 tablespoon Steen’s Cane Vinegar
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
Garnish: chopped fresh mint,
chopped fresh parsley
1. In a medium saucepan with a tightfitting lid, combine 3 cups water,
rice, and ½ tablespoon salt. Bring
to a boil over medium-high heat,
stirring occasionally. Reduce heat,
and simmer, covered, until water is
absorbed, 15 to 20 minutes. Remove
from heat, and let cool for 5 minutes.
Strain into a colander, and rinse with
cool water. Spread rice onto a rimmed
baking sheet, and let stand until cool.
2. Preheat oven to 350°. Line a
rimmed baking sheet with parchment
paper. Place pecans on prepared pan.
Bake until toasted, 5 to 8 minutes.
Let cool on a wire rack.
3. In a medium saucepan, heat
1 tablespoon oil over medium heat.
Add yellow onion and celery; cook,
stirring frequently, until fragrant
and translucent, about 3 minutes.
Add edamame, green onion, mint,
parsley, black pepper, and remaining
½ tablespoon salt; cook for 2 minutes,
stirring constantly. Remove from
heat, and transfer to a large bowl.
Stir in bell pepper, rice, and pecans.
4. In a small bowl, whisk together
vinegar, lemon juice, and remaining
¼ cup oil. Pour over rice mixture.
Using 2 forks, fluff rice. Garnish with
mint and parsley, if desired. Serve
immediately.
SPICY GRILLED ANDOUILLE
SAUSAGE AND PINEAPPLE
SKEWERS
1. Preheat grill to medium-high heat
(350° to 400°).
2. In a medium sauté pan, heat oil
MAKES 18
2
¼
⅛
2
1½
tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
cup thinly sliced jalapeño
teaspoon smoked paprika
tablespoons fresh lime juice
cups (1-inch-cubed) fresh
pineapple
12 ounces andouille sausage, cut
into 1-inch slices
½ cup (1-inch-pieces) red onion
18 wooden cocktail skewers, soaked
in water for 30 minutes
over medium heat. Add jalapeño and
paprika; cook until fragrant, about
3 minutes. Remove from heat, and
transfer to a heatproof bowl; stir in
lime juice.
3. Thread jalapeño, pineapple,
sausage, and onion onto skewers.
Brush with jalapeño mixture. Grill
for 3 minutes per side. Serve
immediately. Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
60
Mahony’s
LOUISIANA’S
BEST
PO’ BOY
HEAVEN
7 of New Orleans’
Best Specialty Po’ boys
F
or nearly a century now, the po’ boy has been
a delicious symbol of New Orleans’ cuisine.
It is widely thought that the term “po’ boy”
was coined by brothers Bennie and Clovis Martin,
who fed striking streetcar drivers at their restaurant
in New Orleans in 1929. Whenever they saw one of
the striking men come in, they’d say, “Here comes
another poor boy.”
Traditionally, the iconic sandwich is made with
laky, airy French bread made at local bakeries
(most notably Leidenheimer and John Gendusa),
although many restaurants opt for Vietnamese-style
baguettes. Most po’ boys are served “dressed”—that
is, with mayonnaise, lettuce, tomatoes, and pickles.
Roast beef and fried seafood are two of the most
classic illings (and with good reason), but these days,
there is a whole new wave of inventive new creations
throughout the city. In addition to those classic
standbys, you’ll ind sandwiches stufed with fried
chicken and ham, shrimp rémoulade and fried green
tomatoes, and slow-roasted duck, to name a few.
We set out in search of the best specialty
po’ boys around New Orleans and found some
truly impressive and tempting sandwiches at
neighborhood joints and an upscale eatery. The
next time you have a hankering for a po’ boy, get
your napkins ready and dig in to one of these
extraordinary sandwiches.
7
· OF LOUISIANA S' BEST ·
PO’ BOYS
BANH MI BOYS
5001 Airline Dr., Suite B
Metairie
504.510.5360
bmbmetairie.com
BOUCHERIE
1506 S. Carrollton Ave.
New Orleans
504.862.5514
boucherie-nola.com
CRABBY JACK’S
428 Jefferson Hwy.
New Orleans
504.833.2722
crabbyjacksnola.com
LIUZZA’S
BY THE TRACK
1518 N. Lopez St.
New Orleans
504.218.7888
liuzzasnola.com
MAHONY’S PO-BOYS
& SEAFOOD
3454 Magazine St.
New Orleans
504.899.3374
mahonyspoboys.com
SAMMY’S FOOD
SERVICE & DELI
3000 Elysian Fields Ave.
New Orleans
504.947.0675
sammysfood.com
SEERSUCKER
RESTAURANT &
CATERING
938 Hancock St.
Gretna
504.702.8040
seersuckercatering.com
UPTOWN FUNK
C
lassic New Orleans po’ boys and
comfort food favorites anchor
the menu at Mahony’s Po-Boys
& Seafood. Nestled along a quaint, treelined portion of Magazine Street, the
neighborhood po’ boy shop opened nearly
a decade ago with a menu of scratch-made
dishes.
In addition to po’ boys, Mahony’s also
serves up New Orleans classics, such as
seafood gumbo, red beans and rice, and
crawish étoufée. The restaurant also ofers
a limited brunch menu on Saturday and
Sunday.
While Mahony’s is known for its fried
seafood po’ boys, including fried shrimp
and oyster, it has a substantial menu of
creative versions, like the Shrimp Remi. The
sandwich is served on Leidenheimer loaves,
which are delivered fresh every morning,
stufed with fried or grilled jumbo Gulf
shrimp, fried green tomatoes, rémoulade
sauce, and lettuce. Don’t forget to add a side
order of Mahony’s thinly sliced onion rings,
which are piled into a miniature mountain
and lightly salted.
WINNING TICKET
L
iuzza’s by the Track has long been
a local favorite for traditional New
Orleans cuisine. Situated around the
corner from the Fair Grounds Race Course in
New Orleans, this old-school neighborhood
joint is popular among horseracing fans and
visitors to the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage
Festival.
The restaurant takes pride in using
ingredients made and sourced from local
suppliers. The menu includes traditional po’
boys and seafood plates, but Liuzza’s by the
Track has become well-known for its spicy
gumbo and a number of specialty po’ boys,
including Garlic Oyster, Breathtaking Beef,
and the restaurant’s signature dish, the BBQ
Shrimp PoBoy.
This decadent creation is the type of
sandwich you’ll need a fork and knife to
eat. It features tender shrimp swimming
in a buttery, peppery New Orleans-style
barbecue sauce, all stufed into a hollowedout pistolette and served with a steak knife
for easy eating.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
64
SOUTHERN COMFORT
A
t Seersucker Restaurant & Catering, a casual
lunchtime spot in Gretna, you’ll ind an extensive
menu of specialty po’ boys and comforting classics
to whet your appetite. Owners Jonathan Hostetler and Blayne
Bergeron opened the restaurant three years ago, a few months
ater they started their catering operation.
Seersucker integrates local ingredients whenever possible.
The bread is from Hi Do Bakery in Terrytown, while the hot
sausage is made by Schexnayder’s Acadian Foods in Kenner.
65
louisianacookin.com
The menu consists of daily hot lunches, platters, and
traditional po’ boys, but the specialty po’ boy section is not to
be missed. In addition to the Shrimp Remoulade Po’Boy and
3 Little Pigs (hot sausage, ham, bacon, and American cheese),
the Surf N’ Turf Po’Boy is one of Seersucker’s most-ordered
menu items. The sandwich brings together the best of two
worlds with a combination of thinly sliced roast beef and
golden fried shrimp bathed in luscious brown gravy and
dressed with the traditional ixings.
METAIRIE MARVEL
N
LOW AND SLOW
ew Orleans is oten described as a melting pot of cultures, and this is
especially evident in the cuisine. There is amazing Vietnamese food
almost everywhere you turn in New Orleans, both conventional and
creative. Banh Mi Boys, which was opened by Peter Nguyen in 2016 in Metairie,
skirts the line between the two, with a menu that features Vietnamese fare like
shrimp spring rolls and banh mi (Vietnamese po’ boys) and New Orleans-style
po’ boys, including an outstanding oysters Rockefeller version.
Banh mi are typically served on baguettes dressed with butter or mayonnaise,
cilantro, sliced jalapeños, cucumbers, and pickled vegetables. Fillings range from
grilled pork and pork pâté to lemongrass chicken and meatballs.
At Banh Mi Boys, you’ll ind all the traditional illings, plus a few exciting
specials. The Bang Bang Shrimp Banh Mi is a customer favorite, featuring fried
Gulf shrimp tossed in a sweet Thai chili glaze, stufed into a Dong Phuong
baguette and dressed with the classic garnishes.
L
ocally
sourced,
Southerninspired food is the name of the
game at Boucherie, the upscale
casual bistro from 2014 Chef to Watch
Nathanial Zimet and business partner
James Denio. As its name implies,
Boucherie celebrates Southern and
Louisiana culture through its menu of
smoked, cured, and aged meats, which
are prepared in-house. The restaurant,
situated along the Carrollton Avenue
streetcar line, features local, seasonal
ingredients when available.
The lunch and dinner menus are
both made up of creative small and
large plates, including the Blackened
Shrimp & Grit Cake with Warm
House Cured Bacon Vinaigrette and
the Smoked Wagyu Beef Brisket with
Garlicky Parmesan Fries. Additionally,
the lunch menu also showcases a
selection of sandwiches, including the
12-Hour Roasted Wagyu Beef Po’boy
served on banh mi from Dong Phuong
out of New Orleans East. Debris-style
beef is drizzled with horseradish cream
and pickled red onions, both of which
balance out the richness of the meat
with a bit of zest and tang.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
66
GENTILLY GEM
J
ust of Interstate 610 in Gentilly, Sammy’s Food Service &
Deli is a hot spot for hearty breakfast plates and overlowing
po’ boys. Sammy and Gina Schloegel started Sammy’s in
the early 1990s, and in the years since it opened, Sammy’s has
earned a reputation for its good food and generous portions.
The breakfast menu features breakfast plates, omelettes, and
pancakes, while the lunch menu consists of seafood plates,
salads, burgers, and a variety of traditional and specialty po’
boys. Sammy’s has become known for its po’ boys, which are
illed to the brim with your choice of seafood or meat.
Some of Sammy’s po’ boys have taken home top honors at
the Oak Street Po-Boy Festival. The Ray Ray, which has won
in the past for Best Specialty Non-Seafood Po-Boy and Best
Poultry, is a sight to behold. This colossal masterpiece is made
up of fried chicken breast topped with grilled ham, melted
Swiss cheese, and a pile of lettuce, tomato, and pickles.
LOCAL FLAVOR
C
rabby Jack’s is a little ways of the
beaten path from New Orleans’
most iconic sightseeing locations,
but this funky po’ boy shop is worth the
trip. Crabby Jack’s is wildly popular among
locals for its overstufed po’ boys as well as
plate lunches and the same famous fried
chicken from its sister restaurant JacquesImo’s Cafe.
The counter-service lunch spot from Chef
Jacques Leonardi specializes in po’ boys,
which come in two sizes: regular (an 8-inch
loaf) and “king” (12 inches). The menu
includes both traditional and specialty po’
boys. Shrimp & Tasso Pasta, Blackened
Gulf Fish, and Shrimp Creole with Rice are
highlights of the plate lunch menu.
As far as Crabby Jack’s specialty po’ boys
go, the Slow Roasted Duck is a customer
favorite. The sloppy sandwich resembles a
traditional roast beef po’ boy in appearance,
with duck pulled into strands and doused
in rich gravy, but instead of the classic
toppings, this po’ boy is topped with a
hety serving of coleslaw. Napkins are a
requirement. 67
louisianacookin.com
Sammy’s Food Service
& Deli
SAVOR THE BOUNTY
OF THE BAYOU IN
ST. TAMMANY
LUMP CRABMEAT
AND BRIE SOUP
MAKES 1 GALLON
COURTESY EXECUTIVE CHEF KIM KRINGLIE,
THE DAKOTA RESTAURANT,
COVINGTON, LOUISIANA
2
2
1
1
3
1
2
2
1
2
½
3
/4
2
8
1
1
1
1
pounds fresh Louisiana blue crab
ounces olive oil
medium yellow onion, diced
medium carrot, diced
ribs celery, diced
clove garlic, minced
bay leaves
ounces brandy
cup white wine
quarts water
cup unsalted butter
cup flour
quarts heavy whipping cream
ounces Brie cheese
teaspoon white pepper
teaspoon cayenne pepper
teaspoon salt
pound jumbo lump crabmeat
1. Using a meat mallet or hammer, crack open
crab shells until meat is exposed. In a 1-gallon
stockpot, heat olive oil; add cracked crabs and
sauté for 5 minutes. Add onion, carrot, celery,
garlic and bay leaves; continue to sauté for
5 minutes.
2. Add brandy, white wine and 2 quarts water;
bring to simmer over medium heat and cook
for 45 minutes. Using a skimmer, remove crab
and vegetables from stock and discard.
3. In a small sauté skillet, melt butter and
blend in flour until smooth and creamy;
simmer over low heat for one minute. Add
mixture to stock using a wire whisk until
roux is dissolved. Add heavy cream and
simmer for 10 minutes.
4. Remove outside rind from Brie and discard,
cut cheese into 1-inch cubes and add to stock,
stirring constantly until cheese melts completely.
Season soup with white pepper, cayenne and
salt. Strain soup through a fine mesh sieve; add
jumbo lump crabmeat and serve.
ADVERTISING
When Chef Kim has guests visiting him on the
Northshore, he likes to take them strolling down Water
Street in Madisonville or Lakeshore Drive in Mandeville
for a scenic walk along the water. Browsing the City of
Covington’s numerous shops and art galleries is also on
the must-do list. The superb quality of life is one of the
things he treasures most about living in St. Tammany.
An ideal Sunday? A lazy day spent on his boat,
motoring down the Tchefuncte River, an area known
for maritime recreation.
The Dakota Restaurant
Covington, Louisiana
thedakotarestaurant.com
CHEF KIM KRINGLIE
On his favorite things about living on Louisiana’s Northshore:
Here on the Northshore, forty minutes from the
French Quarter in New Orleans, we sometimes
gauge the season by the most abundant seafood.
Come fall, it’s briny, raw oysters. Spring means
crawfish. And summer in St. Tammany Parish
means crabs. Lots and lots of beautiful, fat and
sassy boiled crabs.
For decades, Chef Kim Kringlie from The
Dakota Restaurant in Covington has been serving
up his signature creation, a rich and creamy Lump
Crabmeat and Brie Soup. Made with succulent
crabs plucked right from the waters of Lake
Pontchartrain, it’s a soup worth celebrating.
ST. TAMMANY
CRAB
FESTIVAL
FOR MORE INFORMATION ON
ST. TAMMANY PARISH, VISITࠈ
LOUISIANANORTHSHORE.COM
• September 15-16, 2018—Slidell, Louisiana
• The St. Tammany Crab Festival celebrates the cantankerous crustacean
with a huge two-day party in Slidell’s Heritage Park. The joyous
celebration of food and culture has nonstop live music, a classic car show,
boat rides, kids’ games and activities, and, of course, crabs galore!
• For more information, visit: sttammanycrabfestival.com.
S W E E TS
BERRY
BLISS
BLACKBERRIES ARE A TREAT THAT WE LOOK FORWARD TO in late spring, when the plump berries
are perfect for tucking into every imaginable kind of dessert. This season, we’ll be making this Blackberry and
Almond Crostata on repeat to help make the most of the season’s bounty. And that Whipped Creole Cream Cheese?
Absolutely decadent.
BLACKBERRY AND ALMOND
CROSTATA
MAKES 6 TO 8 SERVINGS
3
tablespoons firmly packed light
brown sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
3 teaspoons sliced almonds,
divided
½ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
3½ cups fresh blackberries
1½ teaspoons fresh lemon juice
½ (14.1-ounce) package
refrigerated piecrusts
1 large egg
1 tablespoon water
1 teaspoon turbinado sugar
Whipped Creole Cream Cheese
(recipe follows)
1. Preheat oven to 375°. Line a baking
sheet with parchment paper.
2. In a small bowl, combine brown
WHIPPED CREOLE CREAM CHEESE
sugar, cornstarch, 2 teaspoons
almonds, and pumpkin pie spice. In a
large bowl, toss together blackberries
and lemon juice. Sprinkle brown sugar
mixture over blackberries, gently
tossing to coat well.
3. Unroll piecrust on prepared pan.
Spread blackberry mixture onto
dough, leaving a 2-inch border. Fold
dough up and over filling, letting
dough drape over itself at each fold.
4. In a small bowl, whisk together
egg and 1 tablespoon water. Using a
pastry brush, brush dough with egg
wash, and sprinkle with turbinado
sugar. Sprinkle remaining 1 teaspoon
almonds over crostata.
5. Bake until golden brown, about
30 minutes. Let cool for 40 to
45 minutes before serving. Serve with
Whipped Creole Cream Cheese.
MAKES ABOUT 1¼ CUPS
½
⅓
3
2
cup heavy whipping cream
cup Creole cream cheese*, well
stirred
tablespoons confectioners’ sugar,
sifted
teaspoons grated lemon zest
1. In a medium bowl, beat cream
and cream cheese with a mixer at
medium-high speed until soft peaks
form. Reduce mixer speed to medium.
Add confectioners’ sugar and zest,
and beat until stiff peaks almost
form, 30 to 45 seconds. Cover and
refrigerate for up to 2 hours. *Mascarpone cheese may be substituted.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
72
Q U I C K & E ASY
CRISPY TREAT
recipe development and food styling by anita simpson spain
AS SUMMER SETS IN, we always look forward to an
abundance of fresh blue crabs. Each year, we jump at the
chance to igure out new ways to feast on luscious crabmeat,
with its light lavor and sweetness that make any dish more
appealing. These Crispy Crab Cakes come together in no time
at all for a simple treat you’ll be craving all summer long.
CRISPY CRAB CAKES
MAKES 4 SERVINGS
⅓
1
¼
2
1
½
½
cup mayonnaise
large egg
cup chopped green onion
teaspoons Creole mustard
teaspoon Worcestershire
sauce
teaspoon Creole seasoning
teaspoon hot sauce
1
pound jumbo lump crabmeat,
drained and picked free of
shell
½ cup saltine cracker crumbs
Canola or vegetable oil, for frying
Mixed greens, tartar sauce, and
lemon wedges, to serve
1. In a large bowl, whisk together mayonnaise,
egg, green onion, mustard, Worcestershire,
Creole seasoning, and hot sauce. Gently stir in
crabmeat and cracker crumbs until combined.
Divide mixture into 8 portions, and shape each
portion into a 1½-inch-thick patty; slightly
flatten. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.
2. In a large skillet, pour oil to depth of ¼ inch,
and heat over medium heat until a deep-fry
thermometer registers 350°.
3. Working in batches, fry crab cakes until
golden brown and beginning to crisp, about
4 minutes. Using a fish spatula, turn cakes, and
cook 3 to 4 minutes more. Add more oil between
batches, if necessary, to maintain depth. Remove
from oil, and let drain on a wire rack. Serve
immediately over a bed of mixed greens with
tartar sauce and lemon wedges.
73
louisianacookin.com
LO CAL PAN T RY
SPIRIT & SPICE
LOCAL BARTENDERS ARE BRINGING FRESHLY BREWED GINGER BEER TO THE MASSES
WITH THE MOSCOW MULE’S recent surge in
popularity, ginger beer has also seen a boom. The spicy,
nonalcoholic beverage is a key component of the classic
cocktail served in a copper mug, and now, a group of
bartenders is bringing high-quality, locally made ginger
beer to New Orleans with Huhu’s Ginger Brew.
Huhu’s was developed in New Orleans by a bartender
who made ginger beer at home and distributed it to bars
around the city. When he decided to move back to his
hometown of Seattle, he sold his original ginger beer
recipe and equipment to Benton Bourgeois, Danielle
Hammett Bourgeois, Matthew Gardner, and Sarah
Pearson, who now operate a company called Brass City
Shrub & Soda. Currently, Huhu’s Ginger Brew is the
only product the company distributes, but it has more
products in development, including pineapple and
strawberry shrubs.
Huhu’s Ginger Brew contains just four ingredients:
ginger, lemon, sugar, and water. Compared to other
ginger beers that are on the market, Huhu’s packs a
spicier punch of ginger and has a considerably lower
sugar content (8 grams per 12-ounce serving). The
lemon adds a touch of tartness to the beverage.
“We hand-juice the ginger and lemon,” Danielle says.
“Everything that we put into our product is fresh. And
we’re using actual, real ginger juice, and a good bit of
it. . . .The heat and the spice really come through.”
In New Orleans, you can ind Huhu’s Ginger Brew on
drat at bars and restaurants all over town, from MidCity to Uptown to the French Quarter. The company
also recently started bottling the product.
75
louisianacookin.com
While bartenders around the city use the ginger
beer for classic applications like Moscow mules, they
are also using it in more creative ways. At Curio in the
French Quarter, bartenders mix it with tequila, bay leaf
peppercorn syrup, and lemon juice for the Cocktail
Coronado. As bartenders, Sarah and Danielle recognize
that customers are trending toward simpler cocktails
with easy-to-recognize ingredients. Danielle prefers
Huhu’s Ginger Brew in a Dark ’n’ Stormy, while Sarah
enjoys it in Moscow mules; but they emphasize that it’s
equally delicious on its own or with a variety of liquors.
“With our ginger beer, people have the opportunity
to have a really good, handcrated drink, but all you have
to do is just add the ginger beer and your spirit of choice,
and—boom—there you go,” Sarah says.
WHERE TO FIND IT
In Ne w O r l e a n s
ON TAP
The Avenue Pub
Bakery Bar
The Bulldog Mid-City
Curio
Twelve Mile Limit
BOTTLED
504 Craft Beer Reserve
TRY IT OUT
Turn the page for a Pimm’s
Cooler recipe featuring
this ginger beer.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
76
PIMM’S COOLER
MAKES 1 SERVING
4
2
fresh mint leaves
fresh strawberries, hulled and
halved
2 ounces Pimm’s No. 1 liqueur
2 teaspoons fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon agave nectar
4 slices English cucumber
3 ounces ginger beer*
Garnish: cucumber slice, strawberry
slice, mint
77
louisianacookin.com
1. Fill a Collins glass with ice.
2. In a cocktail shaker, muddle
mint and strawberries. Add Pimm’s
No. 1, lime juice, agave nectar, and
cucumber slices. Add ice. Cover
and shake until very cold. Strain
into prepared glass, and top with
ginger beer. Garnish with cucumber,
strawberry, and mint, if desired. *We used Huhu’s Ginger Brew.
BY T H E BO O K
CULINARY
ODYSSEY
FOOD OFTEN TELLS A STORY about who we are and where we come
“ TO ME [FOOD TASTES THE
BEST] WHEN IT GIVES YOU
SOMETHING TO REFLECT
—ALON SHAYA
BACK ON.”
ISRAELI COUSCOUS
from. For Alon Shaya, food has been a powerful force throughout his life, shaping
some of his earliest memories and inspiring his path to culinary stardom.
In his debut cookbook, Shaya: An Odyssey of Food, My Journey Back
to Israel (Alfred A. Knopf, 2018), Alon takes readers through his culinary
journey from his childhood in Israel and in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to his
apprenticeship in Italy to his work in New Orleans and all the moments in
between. More than a cookbook, it is a collection of short stories about his life,
with recipes inspired by those stories.
“I’ve always wanted to compile my life story with food in one central place,”
he says. “For me, food has always been that kind of connector between all of
the moments in my life.”
Each chapter represents a diferent period in his life, giving a glimpse
into the experiences and cuisines that shaped Alon into the chef he is today.
Recipes like Hungarian Paprikash and Peach and Mascarpone Hamantashen
are inspired by his upbringing, while Blackberry Torta della Nonna represents
a memory from his time in Italy. He adds his own spin on New Orleans dishes
and ingredients with dishes like Roasted Speckled Trout with Tahini and Pine
Nuts and Za’atar Fried Chicken.
Alon’s memories are described in such detail that the reader can practically
smell the lutenitsa (roasted peppers and eggplants) his Israeli grandmother
made during visits to Philadelphia or taste the salami that inspired him to learn
the art of charcuterie while apprenticing in the Italian Alps. He hopes that his
stories will inspire readers to relect back on moments in their lives that have
been touched by food and cook one of his recipes or a meaningful dish of
their own.
PAN-FRIED
WHOLE FISH
WITH BROWN
BUTTER
ZA’ATAR FRIED CHICKEN
ROASTED SPECKLED TROUT
WITH TAHINI AND PINE NUTS
MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS
Adapted from Shaya: An Odyssey of
Food, My Journey Back to Israel by
Alon Shaya (Alfred A. Knopf, 2018)
1
½
¼
1¼
3
tablespoon fresh lemon juice
clove garlic, crushed
cup raw tahini
teaspoons kosher salt, divided
tablespoons ice water, plus more
as needed
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil,
divided
1½ to 2 pounds skinless trout fillets
2 teaspoons sesame seeds
1 teaspoon ground coriander
¼ cup seafood stock
¼ cup pine nuts, toasted
5 to 6 fresh mint leaves, chopped
1 tablespoon lightly packed fresh
cilantro leaves, chopped
1 tablespoon lightly packed fresh
parsley leaves, chopped
Lemon slices, to serve
1. In a nonreactive bowl, combine lemon juice and garlic. Let stand for at
least 20 minutes.
2. Preheat oven to 400°.
3. Strain lemon juice through a fine-mesh sieve, discarding solids. In a large
bowl, beat lemon juice, tahini, and ¼ teaspoon salt with a mixer at medium
speed until combined. (Mixture will have a smooth, thick consistency.)
Slowly add 3 tablespoons ice water, and beat at high speed until smooth.
(Mixture may seize or look curdled, but will eventually smooth out to a thick
mousse. If it doesn’t, add more water, ½ tablespoon at a time.) Set aside.
4. Spread 2 tablespoons oil onto a rimmed baking sheet. Arrange fillets
side by side on prepared pan, and drizzle with remaining 2 tablespoons oil.
Sprinkle with sesame seeds, coriander, and remaining 1 teaspoon salt.
5. Roast until fish is opaque and flakes easily with a fork, 8 to 10 minutes.
Gently transfer fish to a serving plate.
6. In a small saucepan, whisk together tahini mixture and stock. Cook over
low heat just until sauce is warm. Pour tahini sauce over fish. Serve with pine
nuts, mint, cilantro, parsley, and lemon slices. Serve immediately.
CO O K I N G W I T H
C H E FS TO WATC H
CRAWFISH
COMFORT
photography by caroline smith
WHEN BOB IACOVONE was named
a Chef to Watch in 2005, he was running
the kitchen at one of the hottest restaurants
in New Orleans, Cuvée (which has since
closed). Since then, his priorities have
changed a bit. Bob let Cuvée to be a stayat-home dad, but the itch to get back in
the kitchen was always there. He knew that
when he got back into the game, he wanted
it to it into his new lifestyle.
Now at Iacovone Kitchen, the graband-go business he and his wife, Joanna,
recently opened on Freret Street in New
Orleans, the focus is providing busy
families with quick, satisfying meals that
don’t break the bank. Each day, Bob ofers
diferent meat, seafood, and vegetarian
entrées with sides. The business is still
evolving, and he recently added a menu
of hot pressed po’ boys and grain bowls to
feed students from nearby universities.
One item Bob features oten on
his grab-and-go menu is potpie. For
something diferent to do with letover
crawish tails and ixings from a boil,
these Crawish Boil Potpies feature all
the spicy lavors we love in a comforting
one-pot dish. Instead of presenting it like
a traditional potpie with a top crust, Bob
opted to go with a deconstructed version
that showcases all of the elements of the
dish. We recently sat down with Bob to
catch up on Iacovone Kitchen and get the
lowdown on this showstopping potpie.
83
louisianacookin.com
Q
Let’s change gears and talk about the dish: your
Crawfish Boil Potpies. It’s a comfort food, and when
I’m sitting down to a fast meal, it’s a one-pot dish, so I
wanted to bring all the lavors of a Louisiana boil to a
simple dish.
Q
What sort of techniques are you using in this
dish? Basically what you’re doing is saving tails ater a
crawish boil and making a stock with crawish shells.
You’re making a stock with that and thickening it with
a dark roux, cooking it down, adding a little of this
and that, recooking, and poaching everything.
Q
When you’re making your stock, is there anything
special you do with it? I just put a lot of love and
time into it, really.
Q
The potpie you prepared for us today is topped
with chicken skin cracklin’s. How would you
describe chicken skin cracklin’s? How would you
recommend making them at home? We roast a lot
of chickens here to make our chicken salad, and I save
all the skins. Basically, you can deep-fry them or you
can shallow-fry them until they’re crispy, take them
out, and put a little bit of Creole spice on top.
Q With the creamy sauce and crispy chicken, you’ve
got a lot of diferent flavors and textures in this
potpie. I think that’s so important to have sweet with
salty or spicy with sweet, and then with the texture—
crispy, creamy, that kind of thing. I think more
textures and more lavors add so much to any dish.
Q When a home cook is making this, what sort of
tips would you give them to make it a little bit
easier? Have roux on hand at all times. I usually have
three diferent rouxs on hand at all times. Whenever
I’m making roux, I’m making a big batch so that it’ll
last. It’ll be around long ater I’m gone. You can leave
it out at room temperature. As long the oil’s covering
the lour, you’re OK.
Louisiana Cookin’ | May/June 2018
84
“ [CRAWFISH PIE] IS A COMFORT FOOD,
AND WHEN I’M SITTING DOWN TO A
FAST MEAL, IT’S A ONE-POT DISH, SO
I WANTED TO BRING ALL THE FLAVORS
OF A LOUISIANA BOIL TO A SIMPLE DISH.”
—CHEF BOB IACOVONE
CRAWFISH BOIL POTPIES
MAKES 4
¼ cup oil
¼ cup all-purpose flour
Crawfish Boil Stock (recipe follows)
3 tablespoons Worcestershire
sauce
Juice of 2 lemons
1½ tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
thyme, divided
1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 medium artichokes, trimmed
and outer leaves removed
6 red bliss potatoes, sliced ¼ inch
thick
1 (16-ounce) package cooked
crawfish tails
2 cups fresh corn kernels
1 cup heavy whipping cream
4 (6-inch) baked piecrusts
¼ cup unsalted butter
Garnish: chicken skin cracklin’s
1. In a medium cast-iron skillet, heat
oil over medium-low heat. Whisk in
flour; cook, stirring constantly, until
a chocolate-colored roux forms.
Remove from heat, and set aside.
85
louisianacookin.com
2. In a large stockpot, bring Crawfish
Boil Stock, Worcestershire, lemon
juice, salt, 1 tablespoon thyme,
Tabasco, black pepper, and cayenne
to a simmer; simmer for 45 minutes.
3. Add artichokes, and cook for
13 minutes. Add potatoes, and cook
for 7 minutes. Remove artichokes and
potatoes. Peel artichokes, remove
chokes, and quarter hearts.
4. Thicken stock with reserved roux,
and simmer for 25 minutes, skimming
often. Adjust seasoning, if desired.
Keep warm.
5. In a large saucepan, place crawfish,
corn, and reserved artichokes and
potatoes. Add cream and enough
sauce to barely cover. Bring to a
simmer over medium heat; cook until
potatoes are just tender.
6. Remove crawfish, potatoes, and
artichokes from sauce, and arrange
in prepared crusts.
7. To sauce, add butter and remaining
1 tablespoon thyme; bring to a
simmer. Pour sauce over crawfish,
potatoes, and artichokes. Garnish
with cracklin’s, if desired. Serve
immediately.
Note: For 12 appetizer portions, use
3-inch premade pie shells.
CRAWFISH BOIL STOCK
MAKES ABOUT 5 CUPS
¼
2
3
½
3
1
1
2
cup vegetable oil
white onions, roughly chopped
pounds crawfish shells
bunch celery, roughly chopped
green bell peppers, seeded and
roughly chopped
cup tomato paste
cup white wine
tablespoons Zatarain’s Crawfish,
Shrimp & Crab Boil
1. In a large stockpot, heat oil over
medium-low heat. Add onion, and
cook until opaque. Add crawfish
shells, celery, bell pepper, and
tomato paste; cook, stirring
constantly, until caramelized. Stir in
wine, and cook for 2 to 3 minutes,
scraping browned bits from bottom
of pot with a wooden spoon. Add
water to cover and crawfish boil
seasoning; bring to a boil over high
heat. Reduce heat, and simmer for
1 hour. Strain into a large container,
discarding solids.
ER !
D Y
R A
O OD
T
Souhern
BISCUIT
S
& uick Breads
With recipes for angel biscuits,
cathead biscuits, drop biscuits,
and classic buttermilk biscuits,
this 136-page cookbook is full of
recipes that elevate this beloved
Southern quick bread.
3 EASY WAYS TO ORDER
Enter or mention discount code LUCB18C
Hoffman Media Store
P.O. Box 6302 • Harlan, IA 51593
800-361-8059
hoffmanmediastore.com/biscuits
Louisiana
H EART OF THE
C AJUN P RAIRIE
JOIE DE VIVRE—A LITTLE JOY OF LIVING
ACADIA PARISH TOURIST COMMISSION
877.783.2109
aptc@bellsouth.net
www.acadiatourism.org
May 9-12, 2018
46TH Frog Festival
206 Frog Festival Drive
Gossen Memorial Park, Rayne, LA 70578
337.334.2332 | raynefrogfestival@gmail.com
October 6-7, 2018
24TH Germanfest
@Grounds of St. Leo Catholic Church in Roberts Cove
Rayne, LA 70578
337.334.8354 | info@robertscovegermanfest.com
www.robertscovegermanfest.com
S W I Z Z L E ST I C K
DAIQUIRI
SEASON
by chris hannah | photography by randy p. schmidt
BEFORE THERE WERE BLENDERS, crazy
lavors, or bright colors, the traditional daiquiri was a
simple shaken drink of rum (white or aged), freshly
squeezed lime juice, and some sugar syrup to smooth
out the edges.
Both the daiquiri and the frozen daiquiri were
invented in Cuba. The classic hand-shaken version is
from a mining town called Daiquirí, and the frozen
version began at El Floridita in Havana. Daiquiris
also have a long history in New Orleans. I’d go so far
as to say that no other American city can claim that
the daiquiri means more to their town than it does to
New Orleans.
I’ve been to both spots and have made both
iterations in their respective birthplaces. To get a
irsthand experience, I went with an American group
of cantineros to the iron mines near Santiago. There,
American mining engineer Jennings Cox allegedly
created the daiquiri. He then took the concoction
by train to nearby Daiquirí Beach (hence the name).
Although those mines are no longer in use, we made
a pilgrimage to the remote locale. There is still a
train platform there, and we made daiquiris on it to
commemorate the place from which the drink traveled
to that fateful beach. It was truly inspirational.
El Floridita, the historic Havana bar and restaurant
that was one of Ernest Hemingway’s favorite haunts, is
notable because it was the irst bar to use a blender to
make slushy cocktails, and Caribbean lifestyle brought
the drink to New Orleans as a form of relief from the
heat. From there, New Orleans got so crazy for frozen
drinks that I’ve embarrassed myself in the past by
attempting to be a frozen drinks bartender. It’s a lot
harder than I thought it would be.
Purists would scof at adding anything to a
traditional daiquiri, but we don’t take ourselves too
seriously at the French 75 Bar. That is why we made this
hand-shaken strawberry daiquiri—because strawberries
are in season, and daiquiris are always in season.
Resident Bartender Chris Hannah is the head bartender for
Arnaud’s French 75 Bar and a 2017 James Beard Foundation
award winner.
89
louisianacookin.com
STRAWBERRY DAIQUIRI
MAKES 1 SERVING
1½
1½
¾
½
½
strawberries, hulled and halved
ounces light rum
ounce fresh lime juice
ounce aged rum
ounce Simple Syrup (recipe follows)
1. In a mixing glass, muddle strawberries. Add
light rum, lime juice, aged rum, and Simple
Syrup. Add ice. Cover and shake until cold.
Double strain into a chilled cocktail glass.
SIMPLE SYRUP
MAKES ABOUT 1½ CUPS
1
1
cup sugar
cup water
1. In a small saucepan, bring sugar and 1 cup
water to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer,
stirring frequently, until sugar is dissolved.
Let cool to room temperature before using.
Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to
1 month.
EVENT
S P OT L I G H T
EVENTS
Creole Tomato Festival
New Orleans, June 9–10
A highlight of Louisiana summers, Creole tomatoes are
those that are grown in the Bayou State’s rich alluvial soil,
which gives them a delightfully sweet lavor. Each year
during the second weekend in June, the French Market
Creole Tomato Festival celebrates the seasonal crop with
two days full of festivities.
Throughout the event, visitors will have the
opportunity to purchase ripe Creole tomatoes from local
growers and try dishes featuring the sweet crop. Last year,
vendors included The Original Pierre Maspero’s, which
took home the award for the most traditional dish with
their Fried Green Tomatoes with Shrimp Rémoulade, and
Crêpes à la Cart, which won the award for most creative
dish with their caprese crêpe, illed with fresh mozzarella,
91
louisianacookin.com
Creole tomatoes, and basil. Awards are also given out for
the best Bloody Marys, which are available for purchase
throughout the weekend.
The festival always features live music performances
on multiple stages and fun activities for festivalgoers
of all ages. At the Louisiana Cookin’ Culinary Stage, we
will be hosting two full days of cooking demonstrations
from local chefs, who will prepare dishes using Creole
tomatoes, and Creole tomato eating contests for adults
and kids. For more information and to view a schedule of
events, visit frenchmarket.org.
FAI RS , F EST I VALS
& E V E N TS
M AY
April 27–May 6 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival New Orleans | 504.410.4100
nojazzfest.com
3–13
Louisiana Pirate Festival Lake Charles | 337.436.5508
louisianapiratefestival.com
4–5
MayFest Leesville | 800.349.6287
vernonparish.org/mayfest
4–6
Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival Breaux Bridge | 337.332.6655
bbcrawfest.com
10–12
Frog Festival Rayne | 337.334.2332
raynefrogfestival.com
10–13
Cochon de Lait Festival Mansura
cochondelaitfestival.com
11–13
El Festival Español de Nueva Iberia New Iberia
newiberiaspanishfestival.com
17–19
Starks Mayhaw Festival Starks
mayhawfest.com
18–20
Mid-City Bayou Boogaloo New Orleans
thebayouboogaloo.com
24–27
Mudbug Madness Shreveport | 318.226.5641
mudbugmadness.com
23–27
New Orleans Wine & Food Experience New Orleans | 504.655.5158
nowfe.com
25–27
New Orleans Greek Festival New Orleans | 504.282.0259
greekfestnola.com
26
Slidell Jazz and Blues Festival Slidell
slidelljazzandblues.com
JUNE
1–3
Walker Percy Weekend St. Francisville | 225.635.4224
walkerpercyweekend.org
1–3
Bon Mangé Festival Gheens
gheensbonmange.weebly.com
2–3
Oyster Festival New Orleans
nolaoysterfest.org
7–9
Louisiana Corn Festival Bunkie | 318.346.2575
bunkiechamber.net/lacornfest
9–10
Creole Tomato Festival New Orleans | 504.636.6400
frenchmarket.org
15–17
Tangi Taste Fest Amite | 985.222.9269
tangitastefest.net
22–23
Louisiana Peach Fest Ruston | 800.392.9032
louisianapeachfestival.org
23
Gulf Coast Shrimp & Jazz Festival Lake Charles | 337.309.2712
visitlakecharles.org
23–24
Louisiana Cajun-Zydeco Festival New Orleans | 504.558.6100
jazzandheritage.org/cajun-zydeco
29–30
Beauregard Watermelon Festival DeRidder | 337.463.5534
beauregardwatermelonfestival.com
93
louisianacookin.com
BellaCopper
Solid Copper Heat
Difusers &
Defroster Plates
∙ Even heating - no hot spots!
∙ Fantastic as a defroster plate!
∙ hey really work—copper
conducts heat better!
∙ A full ⅛th-inch-thick
∙ Since 2002
www.BellaCopper.com
805.218.3241
DOWNLOAD
APP TODAY!
Issues
Special Issues
My Library
NEW FEATURES:
ORGANIZED BY ISSUES
READ IN MOBILE
& SPECIAL ISSUES
RESPONSIVE VIEW
SHARE ACROSS
SOCIAL MEDIA
KEYWORD
&
ARTICLE SEARCH
louisianacookin.com/digital
Now on
INDEX &
R ESO U RC ES
Recipe Index
Appetizers
Garlicky Herb Rolls, 57
Gazpacho Shooters, 23
Spicy Grilled Andouille Sausage and
Pineapple Skewers, 60
Tomato Salad Crostini, 23
RICE SALAD
page 60
Beverages
Pimm’s Cooler, 77
Shell Beach Cocktail, 57
Strawberry Daiquiri, 90
Desserts
Blackberry and Almond Crostata, 72
Sauces, Seasonings, and Condiments
Crawfish Boil Stock, 85
Creole Dipping Sauce, 57
Pineapple-Ginger Rum, 57
Whipped Creole Cream Cheese, 72
Seafood
Citrus Spice Boiled Crawfish, 57
Crawfish Boil Potpies, 85
Crispy Crab Cakes, 73
Pickled Shrimp with Red Quinoa and
Couscous Salad, 21
Roasted Speckled Trout with Tahini and
Pine Nuts, 82
Whole Redfish Courtbouillon, 20
Vegetables and Side Dishes
Rice Salad, 60
Red Quinoa and Couscous Salad, 21
BLACKBERRY AND
ALMOND CROSTATA
page 72
RESOURCES
Spillin’ the Beans: Pages 9-11:
Photography courtesy of Flamingo
A-Go-Go (page 9), The Ruby Slipper
Café (page 10), and Joy Wilson
(page 11).
Down the Bayou: Pages 33-38:
Photography courtesy of Louisiana’s
Cajun Bayou (page 37) and Peter
Bello Photography (page 38).
Capitol Renaissance: Pages 39-42:
Photography courtesy of Brent Pack
(Bistro Byronz, page 51), Mike Buck
(Curbside Burgers, page 51), Shelbi
Rainey (Rocca Pizzeria, page 52),
95
louisianacookin.com
Jordan Hefler Photography (Gov’t
Taco, page 52), and Twine (page 52).
Discover Acadiana: Pages 43-48:
Photography courtesy of St. Landry
Tourist Commission (Little Big Cup
and Crawfish House & Grill, page
45; Lakeview Park and Beach and
Steamboat Warehouse, page 48).
Local Pantry: Pages 75-77:
Photography courtesy of Brass City
Shrub & Soda (page 76).
By the Book: Page 81: Photography
from Shaya: An Odyssey of Food,
My Journey Back to Israel (Alfred A.
Knopf, 2018).
L AG N IAP P E
NEW ORLEANS IS TURNING 300 in
2018, and the city has several exciting events
planned to commemorate the occasion.
Whether you enjoy the classic cuisine or spend
an aternoon in Jackson Square, there is no
shortage of ways to join in the celebration.
Visit 2018nola.com to ind out more about the
Tricentennial. CRAWFISH BOIL
Louisiana style
Our seafood boil is a unique blend of spices that will enhance
any food you might throw in a pot of boiling water. With a Cajun
flavor like no other and less sodium than most, Slap Ya Mama
Cajun Seafood Boil is something to behold.
ADDING A LITTLE SPICE TO LIFE SINCE 2001
slapyamama.com | 800.485.5217
#slapyamama
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
7
Размер файла
13 947 Кб
Теги
Louisiana Cookin', journal
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа