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The Big Issue - April 02, 2018

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NO. 1301 APRIL 2-8 2018
A HAND UP NOT A HANDOUT
�50
EVERY MONDAY
S T R AT F O R D - U P O N - AV O N
THE TIMES
DAILY TELEGRAPH
-
JOHN
WEBSTER
TICKETS FROM �
BP �ti
t ckets for
16-25 year olds
Supported by BP
Image by H el
e en Mayba
a nks
GUARDIAN
WIN!
CONTENTS
27: GONE
T
TOO SOON
ON DVD
APRIL 2-8 2018 / NO. 1301
TURN
TO PAGE 44
T
Hello, my
name is
Raul.
Welcome to this edition of
The Big Issue. This week as
the Commonwealth Games
get under way we have some
helpful advice from the
psychologist who works with
Britain?s top divers on how to
channel anxiety
y on page 13.
I use music to relax me.
When my friends and I get
together we always listen
to music, normally rock,
but I like classical too.
On page 37 we look at
other ways that music
can help people get by
in life and how it can
be used to improve
society in general. And
you can read more of
my story
y on page 46.
INSIDE...
LETTER TO MY
YOUNGER SELF
Author Colm T骾b韓 on orange juice
and tennis with a younger man
Vendor photo: Martin Strivens
THE LEGACY
OF MLK
Fifty years after his death,
a new generation is taking
on the ?ght
COMMONWEALTH
Could the old club ?ll the Brexit
breach? All your queries answered
THE BIG ISSUE MANIFESTO
Cover Illustration: Helen Green
WE BELIEVE in a hand up, not a handout...
Which is why our sellers BUY every copy of the
magazine for �25 and sell it for �50.
WE BELIEVE in trade, not aid?
Which is why we ask you to ALWAYS take
your copy of the magazine. Our sellers are
working and need your custom.
WE BELIEVE poverty is indiscriminate?
Which is why we provide ANYONE whose life is
blighted by poverty with the opportunity to
earn a LEGITIMATE income.
WE BELIEVE in the right to citizenship?
Which is why The Big Issue Foundation, our
charitable arm, helps sellers tackle social and
?nancial exclusion.
THE BIG ISSUE / p3 / April 2-8 2018
WE BELIEVE in prevention?
Which is why Big Issue Invest ofers
backing and investments to social enterprises,
charities and businesses which deliver social
value to communities.
CORRESPONDENCE
Write to: The Big Issue, Second Floor, 43 Bath St, Glasgow, G2 1HW
Email: letters@bigissue.com
facebook.com/bigissueUK
bigissue.com
@bigissueuk
COMMENT OF THE WEEK
It?s a good morning
with Peter on his pitch
I just wanted to say a big thank you to Peter
Norman the Big Issue seller at Blackfriars. I?ve
stopped and chatted with him and bought The
Big Issue from him for the last ?ve years since I
started work near his pitch. Every day his
friendliness brightens my world. I work on
Good Morning Britain and he watches the show
and has much to say about it. So Piers and
Susanna wrote Peter notes to say ?hi and
Tracy not bleaker
In ?The writing?s on the wall?
[March 19-25], Vicky Carroll
discusses the new novel by
Jacqueline Wilson about her
creation, Tracy Beaker, a care
leaver, who is now an adult.
Vicky Carroll cites objections
that Wilson made Tracy a single
parent in a social housing ?at,
and the exasperation felt that
?the stereotype of an inevitable
bleak future was being
reinforced?.
But being a single parent and
living in social housing can be a
good outcome. Many single
mums and single dads do an
excellent job and maintaining a
social housing tenancy can be a
mark of success; it means bills
are being paid and Housing
Association rules are being
adhered to.
In fact Wilson has said that
Tracy ?is going to get her
happy ending?.
Jan Glynn, Bristol
Don?t blame God!
So sad to hear about Karl?s
crash injuries [News, March
26-April 1] and hope he makes
a full recovery.
Karl?s belief that God visited
him in his near-death
experience and the quoted
comments are rather unfair on
God. I?ve been a Christian since
age 37 and one thing I?ve learned
thanks for watching? which he was really
chufed with. ITV Studios is temporarily
moving its daytime production from our
present location on the South Bank to White
City, which means this week was the last
where I?ll see Peter every morning and I?ll
miss him very much.
Please pass on my thanks to him.
Nicolette Amette, email
is that God gets blamed for a lot
and not thanked enough.
As I write this it?s Holy
Week and Matthew?s Gospel
tells us that during Jesus?
cruci?xion the two criminals
cruci?ed either side of Jesus
both hurl insults at him.
Luke?s Gospel then records one
of the criminals changes his
mind and turns to Jesus
acknowledging that Jesus is
about to enter His Kingdom ?
quite a revelation. This
criminal becomes the ?rst
person to be told he will be in
paradise with Jesus.
My message to Karl and
everyone else this Christmas is
that God loves you, me and all
of us! Happy Easter.
Tim Hurrell, Exeter
Go your own way
I was very interested in the
Judaism article [March
26-April 1]. As humans, we can
see only part of the truth, and
Dave and Doreen?s three
children have found their own
way. Interesting that Reuven
?nds ultra-Orthodoxy an
anchor, while his parents ?feel
comfortable hardly attending?
their synagogue. See Millie?s
excellent letter in the previous
week?s issue where she gives a
?rst-rate explanation of the
Gospel. We have the
opportunity to co-operate
with God, and there are many
paths to doing this.
Juliet Chaplin, Sutton
Listen up!
Great piece by Lucy Anna
Scott, on listening to the city
[Pause, March 19-25]. So glad
The Big Issue publishes
thought-provoking things
like this.
J Woolf, London
A healthy alternative
During a time of increasing
bad-mouthing of homeopathy
in the media, it was cheering to
read John Bird?s column
[March 19-25]. I am
dumbfounded by the
Humanist Association?s
vitriolic condemnation of the
idea that the NHS should
THE BIG ISSUE / p4 / April 2-8 2018
@bigissue
support the Royal London
Hospital for Integrated
Medicine. Where does their
venom come from?
I am a great believer and
supporter of the NHS and over
the years have been a bene?ciary
of it. But there are times when an
alternative is needed. I have been
relieved of regular migraines by
having acupuncture. I have an
unstable back which is helped by
osteopathy. And over the last 30
years I have seen a homeopath
for conditions ranging from
bronchitis to irregular heartbeat
with excellent results.
It is more than a question of
?faith?. My ?rst visit to my
homeopath was not made in a
state of faith, just in desperation.
C Eatwell, London
@CofEDevon
Bishop Sarah the
new #BishopofLondon says
farewell to @BigissueAndrew
on @ExeterCathedral
Green before
heading up to
@dioceseof
london after
#Easter @
bishopSarahM
@BigIssue
@maryenglish
@BigIssue I buy Big
Issue, not only to help the
vendors, but to entertain
myself with sudoku. It?s
always so hard, but this
week?s one is harder because
there are 4 lines with no
number! You are so mean.....
@Cathy_Madge
Great to see Cardif
@BigIssue vendor Polly
Baggott?s story in the magazine
this week. I remember talking
to her during her ?rst week
as a vendor and I?m inspired
to see how she?s used it as a
springboard for the rest of her
life. #hope
THE EDITOR
Bravo Greening:
Opportunity must
be for everyone
The Big Issue takes
indie bookshops fight
to parliament
Photo: Louise Haywood-Schiefer
Paul McNamee is editor of The Big Issue
@pauldmcnamee paul.mcnamee@bigissue.com
Photos: Kevin Cowell
J
ustine Greening?s Social Mobility Pledge is a very good idea.
Yet it passed with little fanfare. This may be an accident of
timing. It was publicly birthed last week as all attention
trained on the countdown to Brexit. Not that this will derail or
deter the pledge. The desire to usher through genuine life chances
and to make social mobility mean something underpinned much of
Greening?s time as Education Secretary. When she was moved
aside in January?s reshule, the intention and plans were not stuck
in a drawer. Instead, they moved on with intent.
And so it was that last Wednesday Greening unveiled the plan.
The simple, and broad, intention is to allow kids from less well-of
areas to have the same life opportunities as their better-of peers. It
means if you?re talented and smart but the pathways to success are
blocked, the blocks will be removed.
Within this comes the pledge. It calls on employers to sign
something that says they will attempt to hire solely on talent,
rather than on name or school?s reputation. The pledge gets a little
complicated when it begins to explain how even though there will
be blind hiring (names as numbers so bias doesn?t sneak in) there
will at the same time be some weighting in favour of pupils from
underperforming schools. But there is momentum. A number of
big employers have already signed up, including ITV and Adidas.
And Greening, from Rotherham, is making the right noises about
targeting deprived areas in the north of England.
There are some legitimate concerns. How can a government
that introduced an austerity programme that clobbered the
poorest now shift gears to be all about the hand up? And where is
the money coming from to make this work effectively? Is this a
canny move by Greening to launch a leadership bid ? she clearly is
at odds with the way her party is being led and after Brexit is
started in March 2019, the jockeying for leader of the Tories could
begin again in earnest.
These are reasonable questions but should not cloud the inherently smart, good thinking behind the social mobility drive. Where
you?re born should not be an impediment to where you end up.
Over 20 years ago, my old mate Colin Murray and I, neither
from anything close to privileged backgrounds, decided to set up a
music magazine in Belfast. We had no money, no contacts and,
really, no clue. We had very early experience in journalism, and
that was that. We found out about grants and soft business
loans. We knocked doors. We played every card we could. And it felt
like there was opportunity in those days if you knew where to look
and how to ask. We took it and while we didn?t know it, we were
making ourselves socially mobile. The magazine, called Blank,
didn?t last long but I?m proud that all of us involved used it as a
springboard to better futures.
That opportunity feels as though it is closing down, that only
young people with family money behind them can take risks and
break through.
This is why Greening?s initiative is important. I don?t care what
party is driving it, though I can?t help but wonder why Labour
haven?t come up with something similar, because it?s the result that
is important.
Greening is inviting those of us who have enjoyed career success
to extend that ladder back and offer a hand up. While there are
?aws at present in it, we should relish this chance.
publishers, allowing the same
Lord John Bird has thrown his
access to tax breaks and exclusive
support behind independent
editions enjoyed by the big-hitters.
booksellers as they take their
Simon Key, of Wood Green?s Big
fight to level the playing field
with industry giants Amazon and Green Bookshop, became the
figurehead of the
Waterstones to
movement after
parliament.
outlining the plan
The Big Issue
on his blog in
founder teamed
January.
up with Arts
Baroness Gail
Council England
Rebuck, Random
CEO Darren
House Group
Henley to launch
chair and Labour
the Independent
peer, said: ?This is
Bookshops
Bird, centre, with Darren Henley (left) and very timely. The
Alliance in
Simon Key, are building a ?social Amazon?
role of bookshops
Westminster.
in isolated areas is so important for
Around 130 independent
bringing communities together.?
booksellers have joined forces to
For more on the alliance see
build a ?social Amazon? capable
John Bird?s column on page 11
of collectively bargaining with
THE BIG ISSUE / p6 / April 2-8 2018
GRAHAM?S A
HAPPY CAMPER!
WHAT?S HOT IN THE
BIGISSUESHOP.COM?
REDDENDI NECK TIE
Spice up your look while gi
children in Africa, India,
the Middle East or Latin
America the chance to lear
how to read and write for
a year. Each hand-designed
Reddendi silk tie is colourfu y
designed to show of the corner of the
earth that you are helping. �
ON BIGISSUE.COM
THIS WEEK
? Tracy Beaker?s back ? but her new
social-house-dwelling single
mum status has caused fury
Actor Michael Sheen
? why he?s acting against
high-cost lenders
How an employability
rity has a cheeky Nando?s
to thank for giving young people
a second chance
shifted gears by buying himself a �000
campervan with his Big Issue sales.
Graham, who was made homeless after
losing his job as a ?tter and welder in London in
2010, slept rough in Torquay throughout winter
after starting to sell the magazine outside the
town?s Waterstones store in October.
But the 58-year-old grafted to sell the
magazine six days a week to earn himself
enough cash to buy the Talbot Express motor
home in early March.
And the life-changing purchase came just in the nick of time ? as the
Beast from the East battered the UK with freezing temperatures and
extreme snowstorms shortly after.
?It was a lot better looking out at the snow
hrough the window than being out in it, that?s for
sure,? said Graham, who also thanked
Waterstones for supporting him with a �0
Christmas gift.
?I?ve been dreaming of getting one for ages
and the change in my life that it has brought has
been amazing. I?ve now got a place to sleep, a
shower and a stove and I?m a very lucky man.
I couldn?t have done it without The Big Issue.
I love it, especially the social
element of selling the
magazine, and I?ll be continuing to work 9-5
earning with The Big Issue to pay for tax and insurance and running the vehicle.
?This has changed my life.?
Steve Carter, Big Issue Devon and Cornwall team
leader, said: ?Graham?s an absolutely brilliant vendor,
an ideal vendor. He absolutely deserves this ? he has
worked his backside of for six days a week and he?s a
very happy man now.?
Law finally wakes up to
prevention message
The Homelessness Reduction Act promises
to be a key step in halting the rising rough
sleeping figures ? if local authorities can
foot the bill.
Coming into force in England and Wales
this week, the act brings a legal framework to a
plan that The Big Issue has been behind since
our ?rst issue way back in 1991 ? prevention.
The new plans require local authorities to
take on a legal duty to provide expert advice on
how to prevent homelessness to meet the needs
of groups most at risk, such as ex-prisoners, care
leavers and armed forces veterans.
THE BIG ISSUE / p7 / April 2-8 2018
There will also be a new duty to rough
sleepers with a pledge to work with them
for 56 days to help them ?nd secure
sustainable accommodation.
But with the government promising to
spend �.7m over three years in England to
bring in the new measures, it remains to be
seen whether councils have the resources to
make a diference.
Homelessness minister Heather Wheeler
said: ?This government is determined to help
the most vulnerable in our society and to break
the homelessness cycle once and for all.?
STREET ART
You can buy
prints of some
artworks featured in
Street Art through
bigissueshop.com
At least half of the profit
from each sale goes
to the artist.
BRIGHTON
STREET SCENE
BY PAUL BELLINGHAM
Paul is 56 and lives in temporary
accommodation in Brighton.
He has struggled with mental
health problems. ?My work is
partially spontaneous and partially
pre-planned,? he says. ?That is to
say I sometimes have a loose or
general idea at the beginning of
my process, maybe just a couple
of shapes or colours, with the hope
this will evolve into something
with more depth and texture.
Experimentation is vital in my work
to keep it alive and dynamic. I try
to be honest and to remember the
code of chance and experiment.?
PURPLE CLOUD
BY ANA NAGURNAJA
?Sufering from emotional abuse
in my family, I grew up a troubled
child and developed mental health
issues from a very young age,? says
Ana. ?That and my unusual outlook
on things led to being bullied at
school. Despite that, I stayed curious
about the world and culture, but
sometimes the external world would
get too much, so I would retreat
into my world of imagination.
Having no real friends, I was seeking
inspiration from books, art and nature.
Nowadays I?m trying to cope with life,
work and studies, trying to illustrate
the way I see the world through
my art: with a little more beauty,
kindness and freedom than it might
sometimes appear in reality.?
Street Art is created by people who are marginalised by issues like homelessness, disability and mental health conditions.
Contact streetlights@bigissue.com to see your art here.
THE BIG ISSUE / p8 / April 2-8 2018
DUCK
REVERSIBLE
BLANKET
This soft organic
baby blanket
is fantastic for
snuggling up.
�.90
EB MEDIUM BLUE CLIPPER
Hand crafted from recycled cement bags by
villagers in Cambodia. Perfect for travelling,
beaches, books, weekends and gyms. �.25
SWIM WITH WHALES TABLECLOTH
This collaborative design can take center stage at
any celebration this year on this beautiful 100%
cotton organic tablecloth. �.00
FROG T-SHIRT
The Frog character on this
charming organic baby t-shirt is
designed using vintage postal
materials �.90
FABRIC NECKLACE
Rolled paper beads some dipped in
gold with African fabric fastening. 100%
waste magazine paper. �.00
WITH A SOCIAL GIFT
PRICES RANGE FROM �.50-�.25 (PLUS P&P)
ROL DOG ORGANIC
T-SHIRT - NEON
Designed in collaboration with
homeless artist ROL (Ray of Light.
Profits go to C4WS
�.00
BALA SPORT
PLAY FAIRTRADE
FOOTBALL
he keenly priced Bala
Play is a quality and
durable machine
stitched (by hand)
leisure ball available in
blue and yellow or pink
and yellow. �.00
SHOP WITH A SOCIAL ECHO
www.bigissueshop.com
BEE FREE MUG
This mug features artwork created by a collaboration of talented
ARTHOUSE Meath artists. Fine
bone china. �.50
JOHN BIRD
Bookshops are a social
necessity that can?t
be allowed to die
W
hen I was commissioned by understanding are surely the strongest ways people the power of the book, you reduce the
emptiness that is sometimes filled with
a leading publisher, whose to stamp out anti-semitism.
To me, a town, village or city is empty anti-social outbursts.
emblem was a ?ightless bird
But my love of books predates reading.
andwhose?rstHQwasatthe without the power of a bookshop. The
end of the runway at London Airport, I power to turn a high street into something When, in an orphanage, I went to a local
wanted to call my commissioned book I, that holds a vast social echo. That, Christmas party, I won at musical chairs.
Bonaparte. It was the name given me in the through its increasing presence, will be full This meant I could put my hand into a large
World?sEnd,Chelseaattheageof15byBrain, of readings, discussions, and (at times) barrel of wrapped-up prizes. I rummaged
around and came up with what felt like a
a misspelt Brian, and I loved the historical nice cups of tea.
association.Alas,mywiserpublisherworried
Thatiswhywehaveto?ghtforbookshops. book. I took it back and would not unwrap it.
that people might think it was the life of a Every last one is precious to us, our quality When one of the nuns asked why I hadn?t
small, important Corsican ? rather than a of life, our literature, our public spaces and unwrapped it, I asked logically ?Well, I can?t
productofpoverty,crime,roughsleepingand communities. We have to do whatever is read, so why unwrap it?? She uncovered it
prisonwhohappenedtobeborn in the magic humanly possible. That is why ? from book for me, and against my wishes. Adults can be
period of the post-war
dumb sometimes.
world. And who was to
Book love got me
grow into usefulness
into printing. I?ve
printed books for all
throughthegoodoffices
ofstartingapublication
mannerofpeople.Ilove
called The Big Issue.
printingandlovebooks,
I did the book under
and have been asked to
the lamer title Some
join the Worshipful
Luck, and was pleased
Company of Stationers
a nd
Ne w s p a p er
toseethatifyouGoogle
Makers. I?ll join if
this title there is a
they?ll have me, and I
much better-known
author, a Californian,
will try and be useful to
who has also got a book
the trades.
with the same name. If
But back to bookI ever reproduce it, it
shops! I love ?em, old,
will be called I,
new, and realise that
Bonaparte because I
you have to be devoted
had such deep-seated
to knowledge and its
aggrandised feelings
spread to even consider
that I, probably like
openingoneorrunning
the original, believed I
one. Alas, FJ Ward?s of
the King?s Road is with
wasthegreatestperson
us no more. Nor is the
on earth.
From book thief to bookshop chamption, but John Bird never pinched from John Sandoe (above)
Penguin bookshop
I still sufer from a
Napoleonic complex and you will please thief to bookshop defender ? I am in love (that ?ightless bird) on the same stretch.
forgive me if you meet me and it all breaks withthenewinitiativecalledtheIndependent Truelove & Hanson is no longer in
out as I describe my plans to take over the Bookshop Alliance. And I was pleased to Knightsbridge. And all the little bookshops
world. But at least it got rid of my love of bring them to Parliament to launch their of my childhood are mostly gone. John
Sandoe of Chelsea still survives. I miss
Hitler, when I ? as an illiterate, post-war initiative last Thursday.
We must protect and proactively help the chats I had with Mr Sandoe, alas no
crime stat ? venerated and divested all of the
books about him from the King?s Road, thesecentresofsocialgood.Wemusttryand longer with us, in the Fifties, Sixties and
KnightsbridgeandEarl?sCourt.Whatapiece get communities to adopt them, for local Seventies. And I can put my hand on my
of social rubbish I was until, ?nally, in boys? authorities to see them as a plus in their heart, as I said to the late Mr Sandoe, and say
prison, I was allowed to practise my reading boroughs and cities, for publishers to see ?I never nicked of yer, sir! God?s truth.? And
and become literate, getting rid of my vile them as equals. And we must link this ?ght for it to be true.
racism. And then books and learning ? to the battles to save our libraries and also
Social-echoing bookshops are right up
through reading, and not from nicking them to enhance school campaigns to make all our streets; let?s hope, forever.
?becameamajorpartofmylife.Thefactthat more of our children literate.
There is no coincidence that, as a child John Bird is the founder and Editor in
I?m now a posh git is largely due to reading
and being obsessed by books; hence my love who couldn?t read and write, I got into Chief of The Big Issue. @johnbirdswords
of bookshops. For knowledge and trouble. It is no coincidence that, if you bring john.bird@bigissue.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p11 / April 2-8 2018
TOO SCARED TO
SLEEP TONIGHT
Sponsor a room and help give a homeless young person a place to feel safe.
Could you sponsor a room today?
When you do, you?ll be giving a
homeless young person a safe place
to sleep and the chance of building
a better future.
Tonight, thousands of homeless young
people who have no one to turn to, risk
being attacked or abused. It?s no wonder
13-year-old Jack was scared.
Jack became homeless when his
relationship with his family reached
breaking point.
so desperate to sleep but too petrified to
close his eyes, afraid that someone was
lurking in the shadows, waiting for him.
Can you imagine being too scared to even
close your eyes? Being desperately tired
and just wanting to sleep so it will all go
away, even for just a few hours?
Jack was eventually able to go home and
for a few years, things went well. Then,
when he was 16, Jack found himself
homeless again.
?I couldn?t cope with all the arguments.?
Jack then spent the next two years without
any permanent home. His mental health
began to deteriorate and his life was
rapidly spiralling out of control. Alone and
?It was October and very late one night when
I was asked to leave. I had nowhere to go so I vulnerable, Jack could so easily have been
walked around looking for somewhere to hide. yet another young victim of violent crime if
Centrepoint hadn?t given him a room.
I found a bench in the park but I couldn?t
sleep. It was so cold.?
Centrepoint supports more than 9,200
homeless young people each year across
Jack spent hours on that bench, shivering
the UK. By sponsoring a room for 40p a
in the cold. He had no sleeping bag, just
the clothes he?d left the house in. He was
day, you can give a young person like Jack
He was just 13 years old when he slept
rough for the first time.
a warm, safe place to stay ? where they
can start to rebuild their lives.
That?s � a month to provide a roof over
their heads ? plus practical and emotional
support to deal with the issues they face.
You?ll also be helping a young person
gain the skills they need to move on to
education, training and employment.
With help like yours, we gave Jack a safe
place to live and the support he needed to
rebuild his life. Jack now has a home of his
own and is back in touch with his family.
He also has a full-time job and a future to
look forward to.
It all started with a room at Centrepoint,
sponsored by someone like you.
Tonight thousands more homeless
young people will be too scared to
sleep. With your help, someone else
can find safety ? and the hope of
a brighter future ? at Centrepoint.
So please sponsor a room for �
a month today.
To donate visit Centrepoint.org.uk/JackAlone
Your donation will go towards funding Centrepoint?s vital work with young people all year round providing accommodation and support. We use models
and change the names of the young people we work with to protect their identity; however all stories are true and as told by the young person.
Registered Charity No 292411.
Illustration: Mitch Blunt
PAUSE
LAURA COSGROVE
How to get on board with anxiety
E
veryone has a domain
i n wh ich t hey ?re
trying to perform:
day-to-day work ,
being a mum, being a bus driver.
That?s your performance, so
look at strategies that can help
you be clear on the task and
remain focused.
Break your goal down into
clear steps. Sometimes when you
look at what you want to do or
what the end point is it can be
reallyoverwhelming.Oryoulook
at where you want to go and you
look at where you are now and
you can?t understand how to get
there. Breaking it down at least
gets you moving, even if you have
to stop and reassess later.
It?s about setting yourself up
in the best way for that time you
need to perform by doing simple
tasks.Itmeansonceyougetthere
you?ve ticked as many boxes as
you can and you?re as ready as
you could be in that moment.
Know what your triggers are
in terms of what affects your
performance. Are you someone strategies on resetting, regaining
who panics if you?re going to be focus and perspective.
Anxiety is not necessarily a
late? What can you do about
that? Imagine yourself there. bad thing. It is simply a response
Run through scenarios so you?re to a perceived threat. For some
a bit more prepared. Maybe people competition is a threat
you?re on your way to an exam so they?ll get anxious, for others
and traffic is bad, how am I going competition is fun so they?ll get
to manage that? If you know excited. It?s all about your
perception of the
you?ll be anxious
situation.
on the first day of a
Sometimes if
new job a strategy
you change your
to alleviate that is
frame or step back
to set up that
a bit the situation
scenario in your
isn?t as scary as
he ad s o w hen
you immediately
you?re actually
think it is. And if
there it ?s a bit
you have an
more familiar.
Laura Cosgrove
increased heart
The more you
is a performance
rate and sweaty
understand
psychologist for the
palms, that could
yourself and how
English Institute of
equally be exciteyou t y pica lly
Sport, working with
ment, fear, or a lot
respond,theeasier
GB Diving
of other emotions.
it is to pre-empt
Physiologically they
sit u at ion s t h at
might trigger anxiety, emotions are the same.
Anxiety itself is not a bad
or thoughts that affect your perfor ma nce a nd t hen have thing, so if the goal is to get rid of
THE BIG ISSUE / p13 / April 2-8 2018
anxiety, that?s probably not a
very practical goal. The goal
should be: can I function while
still being anxious?
If you get anxious, know that
you?ve done all the work and all
the training so when you get to
that situation, yes you may feel
anxious but that?s OK. Don?t get
anxious about being anxious,
continue on with the plan.
Be prepared. Have your bag
packed the night before, make
sure you?re organised, what
time?s the bus, what time?s
breakfast? When you?re a bit
anxious or a bit stressed, your
capacity to process information
decreases so if it?s very simple
it?s much easier to understand.
Maybe the first step is: I need
help, I can?t do this by myself,
whosehelpdoIneed?It?snotjust
about you, there is a support
team around you, whether
you?re an athlete or not.
The Commonwealth Games in the
Gold Coast open on April 4
Colm T骾b韓
Irish novelist, Brooklyn boy
THE BIG ISSUE / p14 / April 2-8 2018
IN 1971
THE YEAR
COLM T覫B蚇
TURNS 16?
The Doors singer Jim
Morrison dies at 27 /
Disney World opens in
Florida / A crush on a
stairway at the end of a
Rangers-Celtic match
at Ibrox Stadium kills 66
football supporters
LETTER TO MY YOUNGER SELF
Photos: main 〣rigitteLacombe / NYTIMES/Richard Bates; Joel Ryan/Invision/AP/REX/Shutterstock
M
y father died when I was 12.Forthe?rstthree When I played tennis, everyone was better than me too.
years of secondary school I was in the school I sent poems to the local newspaper and they never
wherehe?djustbeenteaching.Itwasonlyyears printed them. I read my friends? poems and I could see
later,whenIhadtogointotherapy,thatIrealised Ialways something about my own poems just wasn?t working.
chose to sit in seats where no one could sit beside me. I When I came back from Spain I started working as a
went right to the back of the class and sat on my own. I journalist but I still had this urge. I thought God, I?m one
stopped seeing my old friends. Basically, I cut myself of of those sad people who has the urge but not the talent.
for a couple of years. And no teacher noticed that this I started writing short stories but they got rejected too.
boy,who?djustlosthisdad,wassittingaloneandwalking I tried to write a novel but it took years for it to be
home alone every day. But no one then had a real accepted. The moment I found out it was accepted was
understanding of what a 12-year-old could feel. Or more agreatmoment?18monthslaterthe?rstpublishedcopy
to the point maybe, what a 12-year-old could not feel. I arrived in the post. And then I was a new man.
wish I ? or anyone around me ? had had some
I wouldn?t bring my 16-year-old self to
understandingofunexploredgrief.Ijusthadnoideawhat accompany me to the Oscars. He wouldn?t see much
showbiz [the film version of his novel Brooklyn got
was happening to me.
My older sister went of to school after my dad multiple nominations in 2015]. Have you ever seen a
died, so it was just me, my younger
novelist at the Oscars? You?re at the very
brother and my mother. We simply
very back. You don?t go through the main
didn?t talk about it. It wasn?t to be menentrance. There?s no red carpet. There?s
no carpet at all. I found it all very funny. I
tioned.Thehousewasbrie?yfullofpeople,
went in the side door but I wanted to say
then they all left. I missed him, but even
bigger than that, I just didn?t know what
hi to all the people I knew on the ?lm, like
to do with such a huge feeling of loss. None
Nick Hornby and Saoirse Ronan so I
waited in the foyer. But a man got on my
of us managed very well. If I could go back
in time I?d say to my mother, look, we have
case,saying,?Yousir,aregoinginsidenow.
to deal with this. Instead, I became obYouareblockingthewaysir.?Ileftbutthen
sessed with poetry. Yeats, Heaney, Sylvia
I sneaked back and he was right on me
again; ?I told you sir, you cannot wait
Plath... I must have been the only boy in
there.? Afterwards I went to the
Ireland reading ?You stand at the
Vanity Fair party but as I was going
blackboard daddy, in the picture I
in, Elton John was coming out. I
have of you? (Plath?s poem Daddy). I
nearly said something to him but I
started ?lling notebook after notebook with poems. Perhaps I?d have
thought,IknowallabouthimbutI?m
done that anyway. Maybe not. But
surethelastthingheneedsistoknow
the poetry held me together emoall about me. When I went in everytionally. And it still does.
one seemed to be making a fuss over
By the time I was 16 I was
some woman so I asked who she was.
outwardly quite a gregarious boy
It was Lady Gaga.
with lots of friends. A lot of my
If I could have one last
friends liked girls. And I enjoyed From top: College boyT骾b韓 aged 16; (l-r) with
conversation with anyone it would
talking to girls too. I must have Brooklyn?s screenplay writer Nick Hornby, star
be my father. I?d want to tell him
known that some of my friends were Saoirse Ronan and director John Crowley
everything that?s happened. I didn?t
get to have any of those grown-up
really, really interested in girls and
thought, well, I will be too when I meet the right one. It conversations and arguments, about the church ? my
took me a while to work that one out. You see, the whole father was a Catholic ? and about politics ? he was a
thing about gay desire is that, if you don?t know about it, Nationalist. And I?d like to tell him how much Ireland?s
youdon?tunderstandwhat?sgoingonat?rst.Imusthave changed.
I drifted into journalism. I drifted into Spain. I
been aware that I enjoyed any chance to see other boys
without their clothes on but still I didn?t quite realise. I drifted into America. I drifted back home. I never had a
was just compartmentalising my thoughts and not han- career plan. Right now I teach at Columbia University
dling them. I had no reference points. I mean, you heard in New York one semester a year. My boyfriend lives in
the word queer, but there weren?t any actual queers. It Los Angeles. He?s a very good swimmer but I can beat
him at tennis and he?s younger than me. You can?t know
was just like the word ghost.
When I was in college I did meet a boy who really what this means to me. After all these years. If he only
?aunted his sexuality. I avoided him like the plague knew the amount of work I?ve put into that forehand of
untilonedayIfoundmyselfsittingnexttohim.Heturned mine. Honestly, what a thing to tell that boy who sat alone
outtobeveryfunny.Andheturnedtomeandsaid,?You?re at the back of that Christian Brothers classroom in 1967:
one too aren?t you?? We started to go round together. But in 51 years? time, life will be wonderful... you?ll wake up
I still really didn?t know. Then I went to Barcelona and in the morning in California, with pomegranate trees
these two very good-looking boys started following me. outside your window. You?ll get your breakfast orange
I had many words in my lexicon, but cruise wasn?t one juice straight from the orange tree in the garden. You?ll
of them so I just thought, these lads couldn?t be nicer. go and play tennis with a younger, athletic, sporty man.
Then I went back to theirs and... that was very exciting. And you?ll win.
When I got to university there were a lot of people
writing poems and short stories and they were all House of Names by Colm T骾b韓 is out in paperback on April 5
much better than me. It?sbeenlikethatallalongreally. Interview: Jane Graham @janeannie
THE BIG ISSUE / p15 / April 2-8 2018
Photo: Afro American Newspapers/Gado/Getty Images
MARTIN LUTHER KING
MLK during a speech at a
Chicago Freedom Movement
rally in Soldier Field, Chicago,
Illinois, July 10, 1966
THE BIG ISSUE / p17 / April 2-8 2018
The city?s tourist economy has been
strengthened by the recently renovated
National Civil Rights Museum, which sits
on the site of the old Lorraine Motel, where
King was shot. It is an astonishing visitor
experience ? taking tourists on a journey
from slavery to the multiple conspiracy
theories that still surround King?s death
to this day. In a chilling end-sequence,
visitors queue to huddle into an old
rooming-house bathroom where the fatal
shot was fired from. The perspective down
to the motel balcony where King was
Promised Land, but that he would not be
with them to complete the journey. Such
was the powerful forewarnings in the
speech that many feared that when King
was killed, the journey would stall and that
the dream of civil rights would be ?a dream
deferred?. Those words had reverberated
around African-American culture for
decades since they were given life by one
of black America?s greatest playwrights,
Lorraine Hansberry. She had posed the
question in her award-winning play A
Raisin in the Sun, (1959), a title she had
A march in Memphis,
April 8 1968. King?s
widow Coretta is in
the centre in black
Photo: Robert Abbott Sengstacke/Getty Images
O
n April 4 1968 on a warm
spring evening a dream
died. A single shot from
a pump-action hunting
rifle hit Martin Luther King Jr in his right
cheek, breaking his jaw, bursting through
his vertebrae, and fatally damaging his
spinal cord. America?s most famous civil
rights activist slumped back on the
concrete balcony of the Lorraine Motel, the
victim of a sniper ? assumed to be the racist
criminal James Earl Ray. The shot not only
killed King but stigmatised Memphis in the
eyes of millions around the world. It is a
calumny that still lingers today.
At the time of King?s assassination
Memphis was a city struggling to emerge
from segregation, with impoverished
ghetto communities stretching deep into
the city?s Southside. Much has changed but
much has stayed the same. Today, Memphis
is the sixth poorest among America?s 100
largest cities, 66.1 per cent of residents live
in or at risk of poverty and in an area along
Crump Boulevard and South 4th Street, not
far from the home of Stax Records on East
McLemore Avenue, a third of children grow
up in a single-mother household, and
80 per cent of them live at or below the
poverty line.
King?s death unfairly cast Memphis as
a city of hate, and yet beneath the
dramatic headlines was a unique story of
racial integration. Music was Memphis?s
greatest love, and remarkably, it became
the crossroads where a new kind of racial
tolerance germinated. It was here in
Memphis that the diverse threads of rock
and soul came together. The city?s most
famous son, Elvis Presley, was part of a
generation of restless white teenagers that
grew up enthralled by black music. More
defiantly, Jim Stewart, the founder of Stax
Records, began his career as a hillbilly
fiddler from a Scottish country-dance band
and yet gave life to music steeped in the
ghetto. Stewart was a gnomish white bank
clerk who had to learn to love black music,
and who through the idiosyncrasies of time
and place built Stax Records on the back of
an unprecedented form of racial integration.
His studio band, Booker T and the MGs,
were a perfectly calibrated racial mix,
composed of two white musicians and
two black.
Today, Memphis has turned music
into a powerful driver of the local economy.
More than 11.5 million people visit the
city annually, heading for Graceland,
the Stax Museum and Sun Studios. Music
tourism is a $3.2bn industry supporting
over 35,000 jobs but while the money has
transformed once-dilapidated streets in
and around Beale Street, the legendary
home of the Blues, less has filtered
down to blighted inner-city communities.
MARTIN LUTHER KING
d
n
a
r
e
t
t
a
M
s
e
iv
L
k
c
la
B
?
the anti-gun movemenntces
a
n
o
s
e
r
l
fu
r
e
w
o
p
e
k
o
v
o
pr
of Memphis in 1968"
standing when he was shot makes the
visitor feel complicit in the killing. It is a
rare moment when a museum is more
powerfully realised than a feature film.
The dream that died in Memphis was
not the generalised American Dream, it
was the dream of emancipation. King had
articulated his vision the night before he
was shot, in his now historic Mountaintop
Speech. He delivered the resounding
oratory to the city?s striking sanitation
workers at the height of a biblical
thunderstorm when he chillingly
prophesised his own death. King told the
emotionally charged audience that he had
been to the mountaintop and had seen the
THE BIG ISSUE / p18 / April 2-8 2018
appropriated from the poem Harlem by
Langston Hughes. What happens to a dream
deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the
sun? Or fester like a sore ? And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and
sugar over ? like a syrupy sweet?
Today, among the leaders of Black Lives
Matter and teenage campaigners, enraged
by school killings, there is a powerful sense
of a dream deferred. A few days before his
death, Martin Luther King had made a
promise he never kept. He had phoned a
grieving mother called Lizzie Payne, who
lived near Beale Street in a labyrinthine
block of projects known as the Fowler
Homes. Payne?s son Larry had been shot
dead by a Memphis police officer in March
1968 after small-scale rioting on the fringes
of one of King?s earlier marches. Apparently,
the teenager had stolen a television set from
the smashed window of a department store.
Police pursued him to Fowler Homes,
trapping Payne in a basement. According
to the Memphis police department?s version
of events, Payne attacked an officer with a
knife and was shot in self-defence. Neither
the knife nor even the television set was
ever found and the only surviving evidence,
the dead boy?s clothing and the policeman?s
gun, were dumped in the Mississippi River
to conceal evidence. Enraged by the police?s
version of events, residents began a
campaign to clear Larry Payne?s name. This
was nearly 50 years before Black Lives
Matter was launched, but the movement
has not had to return to history for its
causes. They are currently campaigning on
behalf of Darrius Stewart, 19, who was shot
in the Hickory Hill neighbourhood of
Memphis, in July 2015, the victim of a white
police officer who allegedly mistook him
for someone else.
It is uncanny how Black Lives Matter
and the anti-gun movement March For Our
Lives provoke such powerful resonances
of Memphis in 1968. As recently as
March 24, students from campuses across
the city joined the nationwide campaign
against guns departing from Clayborn
The anti-gun March For
Our Lives in Memphis
on March 24 this year
Temple, one-time home of the city?s
striking sanitation workers, and gathering
at the Civil Rights Museum, where King?s
death is so powerfully evoked. The
questions they are asking today return full
circle to that fatal day in April 1968. How
could an escaped convict, using a false alias
and fake ID, walk into a gun shop and buy
a Remington hunting ri?e with crumpled
cash? How could he then drive undetected
from Alabama to Memphis and kill King?
Itisaquestionthatstillremainsunanswered
as America?s morbid fascination with
guns leaves yet another generation with a
dream deferred.
Stuart Cosgrove is the author of Memphis 68:
The Tragedy of Southern Soul
(Polygon, �.99)
@Detroit67Book
?DO I HAVE TO
TEACH YOU HOW
TO BE HUMAN??
Even in the struggle for equality some people are more equal
than others, says Tarana Burke ? the woman behind #MeToo
A recurring question that Tarana Burke
is asked by men is: Can you teach me
how I can do better?
??Do I have to teach you how to be
human?? is my usual answer. When a man
wants something from another man he
knows he can?t be disrespectful or insult
him. But when it comes to women that
awareness goes away completely,? she says.
When Tarana Burke was six years old,
she was raped by the son of her mother?s
best friend. ?For a long time I blamed
myself. I didn?t distrust men, I distrusted
myself. To others I could say ?it wasn?t your
fault? but I couldn?t say that to myself.?
Ten years ago, she used the words Me
Too in order to support young black girls
and the movement, transformed into a
hashtag, took on a life of its own in October
last year in the wake of the Weinstein
scandal and discourse around sexual abuse.
When Burke ?rst saw #MeToo trending
on Twitter she immediately panicked. ?I
thought all the work I had done the past 10
years would be overshadowed and that
people wouldn?t understand that it?s not just
about words,? she says, worried that people
were sharing their stories but without any
support. ?Imagine posting #MeToo and no
one likes your post or gives you a little heart
or says ?I hear you and I?m here for you?.
How would that make you feel? Or if
someone ridicules you or says ?I don?t
believe you, that didn?t happen to you???
Burke was living in Alabama when she
founded Just Be Inc, a non-pro?t
organisation where Me Too became a
phrase used to help victims of sexual
harassment and assault. When she later
moved to Philadelphia to lecture on the
topic, students were given a Post-It note
after workshops where they were asked to
write two things they learned, as well as the
phrase Me Too if they had also been the
victims of sexual assault.
?When we got home we saw how many
people had written Me Too. Almost
everyone. It was horrible and we weren?t
prepared for it,? Burke recalls.
At the office of Girls for Gender Equity
where she now works in Manhattan, Burke
started working full-time as the programme
director with a mission to create better
conditions for marginalised groups such as
people who are black, gay or trans. On one
of the walls hangs a frame containing two
questions: What will you accept? What will
you refuse?
In the United States she sees
#MeToo dividing black and white
people. She is saluted by the black
community but since many of the
women who have testi?ed in conjunction
with #MeToo are white, rich and good
looking, a lot of black people avoided the
hashtag, not using it to the same extent.
When Burke heard about the hashtag
#blackgirlstoo, she was hurt that black
people didn?t feel that #MeToo belongs
to them, despite the fact she was the one
behind it.
?I didn?t think we needed more hashtags.
The people with the strongest voices have
to invite the rest. Some of them understand
that, other people think that they can
speak for those who have no voice. But we
all have voices, some are just too loud for
the others to be heard.?
Courtesy of Faktum / INSP.ngo
Asylum, Migration and Integration Funding (AMIF) Programme 2014?2020
CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR PROJECTS UNDER THE ASYLUM,
MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION FUND (AMIF)
FOR THE INTEGRATION OF REFUGEES
The UK Responsible Authority is inviting proposals for projects to be supported through the Asylum, Migration and
Integration Fund (AMIF) for a period of up to 2 years. If funding is made available to the UK from the European
Union beyond 31 December 2020 there may be an option to extend the project for a further year.
Proposals are invited from Devolved Administrations, Local Authorities, Educational establishments, Voluntary
and Community Organisations and Public bodies. Applications will not be accepted from individuals.
We are looking for projects which deliver against the following Integration indicators as set out in the UK AMIF
National Programme:
?
?
?
?
Activities to assist in the integration of refugees at a national, local and regional level
Development of local, regional and national policy frameworks/measures/tools for the integration of
refugees
Develop, monitor and evaluate refugee integration policies in the UK.
This call for proposals is for those with refugee status, or with another form of humanitarian protection, and their
family members, in the UK.
Activities to be funded may include, but are not limited to:
?
?
?
?
?
ESOL/civic orientation
Additional support for teachers of refugee children
Mentoring
Creation of online support facilities
Employability skills
All successful projects will be monitored, evaluated and audited during their administration.
Eligible applications will be assessed against the following criteria:
?
?
?
?
?
Relevance
(I縁LHQF\
Effectiveness
Added value
Sustainability
A maximum �m is available to support projects under this Call for Proposals. The amount applied for must be
matched with 25% from non-EU sources.
Any organisation considering submitting an application must register their interest by emailing
$0,)FDOOIRU5HIXJHH,QWHJUDWLRQ#KRPHRI縁HJVLJRYXN
You will then be sent further information on
how to apply when the Call opens on Wednesday 11 April 2018.
The closing date for applications under this fund is 5pm on Wednesday 9 May 2018
street paper
Antonio Harris, who sells
says MLK?s
The Bridge in Memphis,
legacy burns within him
.
?I ha ve ao gredatrteh sm
"
I wa nt to d
Martin Luther King is my all-time favourite activist. these women and they have nowhere to go. If we had more
I love his message of peace and unity. He really cared jobs for the homeless, the homeless wouldn?t be robbing and
about poor people. And I hate that he died in Memphis. stealing. We need jobs and we need free shelters.
I think there are negatives to free shelters, because people
He was a great part of history, but I hate that he died
in Memphis.
maybe won?t do anything and they?ll just stay in the shelter
for free. So I see the pros and cons, but I think
My name is Antonio Harris. I am 36. And
we need them. The United States is the
I was born and raised in Memphis, Tennessee. WIN WHY
richest country in the world, and we need
I started selling The Bridge (a similar venture
WE CAN?T
T
to
t use that to progress.
to The Big Issue) because I wanted to interact
with people, with my brothers and sisters in WAIT
People don?t know this life. I always tell
Memphis.Iwashomeless,foraboutthree-and- BY MLK
people they need to spend one night on the
p
a-half months. I was living in the Memphis King?s 1964 bookk
sstreet. Have you ever spent a night on the
Union Mission, at bus stops; I lived at seven documents
sstreet? I?m sure you wouldn?t want to, it?s
diferent rooming houses. That time really the history of
terrible.
But I think everyone needs to do
t
showed me how important it is to help home- the civil rights
itt.Becausethen people will knowhowhard
less people. I learned how to give back to the struggle. Specially reissued
it is to be homeless.
community. In addition to The Bridge, I also to mark the anniversary of his
I have a dream. I want to do great things,
work with HOPE [Homeless Organizing for death, we?re giving away five
I want to help thehomeless and I want to bless
Peace and Equality].
otherpeople.ButIalsohaveotherdreams.I?ve
copies. Why We Can?t Wait,
Through my work with HOPE and The Penguin Classics, �99
always wanted to be a singer. I?ve always loved
Bridge, I have seen the reasons that cause
singing. I like everything, gospel, rock, espehomelessness. It?s crazy. We have so many Visit bigissue.com to enter
cially rock. My favourite band is probably
vacant buildings here, and so many people
Nirvana.DoyouknowNirvana?ButIalsolike
without homes. We really need to turn those vacant buildings classical music. I like Sinatra.
intohomesforthehomeless.It?slikethewholeworldisturned
I also want to be an actor. I?ve always wanted to be on The
upside down.
Young and the Restless, my favourite show. And it?s hard, man.
I don?t like our president. Not really. I?ve really only liked It?s hard being an actor, they have to memorise their lines and
two presidents: Clinton and Obama. I love Memphis, but we everything, but I think I could do it. So I want to be a singer,
have problems. We really need women?s shelters. There?s all an actor, and I want to impact people around the world.
THE BIG ISSUE / p21 / April 2-8 2018
An archaic hangover from our empire-building days, or an economic lifeboat in our
post-Brexit future? As athletes head to the Gold Coast for the Games, we ask what
exactly is the Commonwealth? Linford Andrews, a South African diplomat with the
secretariat (and major fan of acronyms) sets the record straight
THE BIG ISSUE / p22 / April 2-8 2018
TBI: What is the Commonwealth?
LA: The Commonwealth is an association of 53
member states and we work to build consensus
and understanding across our membership on a
number of important global issues. These can
vary from trade issues, countering violent
extremism, constitution reform, youth
empowerment or the protection of human
rights. Our resources are relatively small but
our strength lies in that we have access at the
highest levels of government.
Are you part of the government?s
Foreign and Commonwealth Office?
If I may clarify one thing, the Commonwealth
Secretariat is not to be confused with the FCO.
We are a fully independent agency. The UK is a
member of the Commonwealth ? one of 53
member states. We have our global headquarters
here in London and offices in Geneva and New
York, providing facilities to a number of small
states who are unable due to having their own
permanent missions at the UN.
How are you funded?
From member states. On occasion a member state
will provide extra resources for speci?c projects,
for example, election observation or CVE ?
countering violent extremism.
Any connection to the
Commonwealth Games?
The Commonwealth Games Federation is an
independent body that runs the Games. The
Secretary-General attends the opening, but
more importantly she will be at the
Commonwealth Sports Ministers Meeting
which is held in the margins of the Games. One
of the key areas of our work is what we call SDPs
? Sport for Development and Peace ? that?s
working in particular with young people to
foster positive interaction and empower
them to become positive in?uences in
their own communities.
So what does the
Commonwealth actually do?
The Commonwealth is involved in supporting
member states in things like removing trade
barriers and helping states to manage debt to
create prosperity. Each member state of the
Commonwealth has an equal voice on key issues
of common concern so we ofer a voice for small
states on the global stage. Another initiative is
the Office of Civil and Criminal Justice Reform,
or OCCJR, ofering a mechanism whereby
countries can access model laws, model
legislation in a whole range of diferent areas. All
our work, whether it?s trade, CVE, ensuring that
legal systems are just, fair and clear, or youth
empowerment are all about supporting our
member states in preventing con?icts.
THE BIG ISSUE / p23 / April 2-8 2018
With the UK leaving the EU, will our
relationship with Commonwealth
countries become more important?
One of the things the Commonwealth has is the
?Commonwealth advantage?. When it comes to
trade, it?s been proven that trade among
Commonwealth member states is
approximately 19 per cent cheaper than if
they?re trading externally with non-member
states. The work we do promotes interCommonwealth trade, working on the removal
of trade barriers. The African Continental Free
Trade protocol has been signed by 44 countries,
this in itself creates a lot of opportunities.
Nineteen African states are members of the
Commonwealth so there is a con?uence of
interests there.
Could Commonwealth membership
give the UK access to the African
free trade agreement?
As Britain negotiates going forward, it certainly
ofers a platform on which to build.
Could anyone join the
Commonwealth?
Any country can freely express its interest to do
so. There has been some interest expressed by
various countries, but they would need to take
the process forward. In many cases it hasn?t
been done for various reasons.
Some members have poor records
when it comes to human rights,
for example homosexuals could
be stoned to death in Brunei.
Can the Commonwealth help
introduce reforms?
Obviously there are some issues. There are
human rights issues, such as those involving
LGBT groups and the death penalty, where
there?s no consensus across the membership, but
what we do is we work closely with human rights
commissions in our member states to try and
build their capacity. It?s all behind-the-scenes
work to promote and advocate Commonwealth
values, and a slow-drip exercise. Hopefully over
time through our advocacy and in?uence we
could afect some key reforms. Nelson Mandela
once famously said, and it?s one of my favourite
quotes of his, that ?the Commonwealth makes
the world safe for diversity?.
South Africa was only welcomed back
into the Commonwealth in 1994 with
the election of Mandela. Did the
Commonwealth help end apartheid?
In the 1980s we had the Eminent Persons Group,
the EPG as it?s called, and the leaders of Nigeria
and Australia were involved in trying to
advocate positive change in South Africa. It is
partly their contribution that eventually led to
the changes that took place.
When there is Trump describing whole
parts of the world ? many of them
probably Commonwealth members ? as
?shithole countries? how is the role of
diplomacy changing?
Diplomacy has always been important, now
more than ever. Whatever leaders want to say,
y,
the myriad of global issues we are now facing,
whether climate change or cou
untering violent
extremism, you have to get leaaders around a
table to talk. But leaders shoulld also feel that
they can talk quietly behind th
he scenes as and
when it?s needed to resolve issues. Megaphone
diplomacy has a place but it do
oesn?t necessarily
achieve objectives. It isn?t whaat you say, it?s how
you say it. You can deliver diffi
fficult messaging,
you do it in such a way that you
u still have
someone on the other side of th
he table listening
to you. This is how you build in
n?uence.
Words: Steven MacKenzie @stevenmackenzie
THE BIG ISSUE / p24 / April 2-8 2018
THE COMMONWEALTH
IN NUMBERS
The 53 Commonwealth member
states are among the world?s largest,
smallest, richest and poorest countries
Commonwealth countries span
29,958,050 square km (11,566,870
sq miles), around 20 per cent of the
world?s land area
The population of the Commonwealth
is around 2.5 billion people ? nearly a
third of the world?s population
94%
94 per cent live in Asia and Africa
Photo: The Commonwealth Secretariat
The biggest is India with a population
of 1.3 billion, the smallest is Tuvalu
with a population of just under 11,000
The woman at the helm of the Commonwealth
The Queen may technically be Head of the Commonwealth,
but Dominican-born Patricia Scotland (seen here as The
Gambia was readmitted to the Commonwealth in 2013) is
the current Secretary-General. Scotland has held the position
since 2016, and leaders can serve a maximum of two fouryear terms.
CHOGM
Between April 16-20, leaders from around the Commonwealth will come to the UK for
CHOGM 2018. The Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting takes place every two
years to ?reaffirm common values, address shared global challenges and agree how to work to
create a better future for all our citizens?. High on this year?s agenda will be ocean governance
and ways to tackle cyber-crime.
Free trade agreements, freedom of movement ? sound familiar?
The Rt Hon Patricia Scotland (and Linford Andrews) travelled to Kenya last month for the
launch of thee African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) protocol. The deal could
potentially allow Commonwealth citizens to travel and trade across Africa. Kenyan President
Uhuru Kenyaatta tweeted: ?We have come to the realisation that we can grow together
and that it is common sense to unite for our betterment? We are realising we are stronger
together #Commonwealth?. Could trading in Africa ?ll the potential void of walking away
from the EU? What about that other EU hallmark?at the last CHOGM in 2015, it was
proposed thaat there should be freedom of movement for citizens of the UK, Australia, New
Zealand and Canada. This may come up on the agenda again this year.
31 members are classi?ed as small
states ? with a population of less than
1.5 million people
The UK is the ?fth largest country in
the Commonwealth population-wise
(after India, Pakistan, Nigeria
and Bangladesh)
In 2016 the combined GDP was over
$9 trillion (78 per cent from the
four largest economies ? UK, India,
Canada and Australia). The EU has a
GDP of around $20 trillion
Most members have a historical
tie with the UK, except
Rwanda and Mozambique
The newest member
is technically The
Gambia, which rejoined
in February after
withdrawing in 2013
220 employees work at
Commonwealth HQ in Marlborough
House on Pall Mall in London
Linford Andrews believes there?s a ?Commonwealth advantage?
THE BIG ISSUE / p25 / April 2-8 2018
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LEARN ABOU
THE ENLIGHTENMENT
BOOKS
FILM
INTERVEW
RADIO
MUSIC
View from an island page 28
120 Beats Per Minute page 31
Christian Cooke page 32
Radio 4?s renaissance page 35
Life-changing stuf page 37
EXHIBITION
TO HULL AND BACK
The ?rst solo exhibition by Richie Culver in his home town of Hull telescopes through his formative years in the city, celebrating ordinary, workingclass lives in the north of England. Culver experienced homelessness and long-term unemployment before one of his artworks was exhibited in the
Tate Modern leading to exhibitions around the world, and now back to Hull. In a sequence of paintings, Culver explores the complex relationship
between jobseeker and advisor played out every fortnight in their 20-minute ?therapy? sessions.
The exhibition, No One Knows Me Like Dawn From The Job Centre, runs at Humber Street Gallery, Hull until May 27
THE BIG ISSUE / p27 / April 2-8 2018
BOOKS
SO MANY ISLANDS
Restless natives
Nicholas Laughlin has never lived anywhere but Trinidad. But he?s discovered that, along with
many other islanders, the threshold of their horizons can bring an expansive worldview
THE BIG ISSUE / p28 / April 2-8 2018
Photo: North Wind Picture Archives / Alamy Stock Photo
A
n Island Is a World is the title of a up on the shelf. They are a restless bunch: unexpected places. Specific details may
novel by the late Trinidadian two thirds of them live elsewhere than their seem exotic, but the motives and anxieties,
writer Samuel Selvon, and a originalhomeislands,andsomearemultiple joys and fears we explore in our stories will
sentence that summarises migrants. The list of their names almost be vitally familiar to readers anywhere.
something essential about
Here you will find love poems
human geography: islands, large
and protest poems, tales of
or small, are indeed in some
childhood innocence and innocence lost, stories about
sense self-contained, worlds
leaving home and trying to go
untothemselves.Buttheverysea
that insulates and isolates is also
home again, about never having
the medium that connects one
left, or asking what home
island to every other island, and
means in the first place.
archipelagoes to continents.
It is strange how not strange
So Many Islands is a new
you may find it, the sense
anthology of 17 writers from
of affinity with someone
small island countries around
whose na me you f ind
the world, from the Pacific
unpronounceable, from a small
and Indian Oceans, the
place you?d never hope to pin
Mediterranean and the
down on a map.
Caribbean. They come from
?This is the real globalism,?
Niue and Grenada, Malta and
says Marlon James ? himself an
Kiribati, Bermuda and
islander, born and bred in
Singapore, and other countries
Jamaica ? ?a glorious cacophwith familiar and unfamiliar
ony that seeks no common
ground other than attitude.
names. They may be writing
from and about small places ?
Stories and poems that exist in
some smaller than others ? but
no other context than their
theirideasandthemestaketheir
own, characters who owe only
measure from the scale of world
to themselves, and writers who
histories. As Man Booker prizewrite with nothing hanging on
winner Marlon James puts it: ?It
their backs.?
takes a big mind, or at least a
Perhaps what the 17 writers
big worldview, to write from a
in So Many Islands have most
small space.?
deeply in common is an urge to
Smallislandcountrieswithin
contend with both the limits
the Commonwealth share a past
and the possibilities of a small
of colonial exploitation. One
place ? whether that means
legacy in the present is a body of El Dorado: Sir Walter Raleigh found a bounty of natural resources on Trinidad in 1595 cherishing the intimate territory of a familiar community
common political and social
concerns. Another legacy is English, a world makes a poem about origins and journeys or escaping into a more expansive realm
of the imagination.
language with manifold accents and a mul- and destinations.
I?m an islander myself, born and bred in
The shore that bounds every island is
titudinous vocabulary, a shared and diverse
tongue that allows these island writers to Trinidad,andI?veneverlivedanywhereelse. always a threshold. Looking outwards, the
speak to each other across oceans, and to I?m an eager traveller, especially to remote horizon may seem to draw nearer or
speaktous.Theirstories,theirinsights,their places,butI?veneverbeenawayfrommyown farther, depending on the weather. But
arguments, their jokes, their memories and home island for a longer stretch than six or there is always a horizon, and there are
theirquestionstravelfaronunceasingtides. sevenweeks.EverythingthatIamandthink always those ? sometimes writers, someTobelongtoanislandistolookoutwards, and believe is shaped by this biographical- times readers ? who accept the horizon?s
understandingthatthehorizonisnotsimply geographical fact.
challenge: to wonder, to
aboundarybetweenwhatisvisibleandwhat
Surrounded by the sea, an island can be
yearn, to begin a journey.
isinvisible,whatisknownandunknown,but a place of prodigies and exceptions and
a challenge: to imagine, to yearn, to leave, to rarities. Island cultures are as unique as
So Many Islands: Stories from
the Caribbean, Mediterranean,
search, to return.
island ecosystems. But our connections to
Indian and Pacific Oceans is out
The 17 contributors to So Many Islands the rest of the world are as obvious and irnow (Telegram, an imprint of
range from authors at the start of their resistible as the currents that swirl around
Saqi Books, �99)
careers to others with published books lined our shores, washing up unlikely flotsam in
READ MORE FROM...
DOUG JOHNSTONE
REVIEWS
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
THE ART OF LOSING CONTROL / SLEEPYHEAD
Science friction
TOP 5
POLICE PROCEDURALS
MATT JOHNSON
Doug Johnstone dives into two fascinating studies of the brain
and its response to states as diverse as euphoria and narcolepsy
T
THE CHOIRBOYS
Joseph Wambaugh
A groundbreaking novel
that shows a side to
policing normally hidden
from public eyes. It?s been my
favourite read for a very long time.
Illustration: Dom McKenzie
he mind is an endlessly
fascinating thing, and this
week we?re looking at a
couple of titles that delve
into the weirder corners of it, both of
them scienti?c books that originate
from the personal experiences of
their authors.
The Art of Losing Control by
academic and philosopher Jules Evans
is subtitled A Philosopher?s Search for
EcstaticExperience,andEvansdoesjust
that, looking at humanity?s history of
losing ourselves to something bigger.
Evans? Philosophy for Life, was a
rational look at modern philosophy, but
an incident on a mountain convinced
him that it missed out a large chunk of
human experience. After falling 30ft
and breaking his back, Evans
experienced something of an epiphanic
moment, leading him to examine the
topic in detail. And it?s fascinating stuf. In
modern western civilisation, any kind of
ecstaticexperiencehasbeenmoreorlesswritten
off as mental illness. Whether it?s religious
revelation, psychedelic drugs or communing
with nature, feeling part of something bigger
and outside yourself has generally been
frowned upon, and certainly hasn?t been taken
seriouslyinanyacademiccontext.
The Art of Losing Control addresses that
brilliantly. Evans is a natural storyteller and
his honesty about his own experience is
refreshing and disarming. He?s done his
research too, looking at ancient religion and
philosophy,socialmovementsthathaverelied
on ecstatic experience and more. He
examines all of this in the context of modern
philosophical thought without being
heavy-handed or dry, and he throws himself
into his research too.
The best moments in this book are
when Evans joins in with various groups
seeking rapture, enthusiasm, wonder or
ecstasy.Whetherit?sevangelicalChristianity,
intense meditation or partying with ageing
hippies, the author puts himself into the mix
and gives as clear a description of the indescribable as he can. And he doesn?t shy away
fromexaminingthedarksideeither.Whether
it?s extreme jihadists, Nazi Germany or
football violence, Evans looks at when
communal ecstatic experience turns bad,
when feeling part of something bigger means
attacking a communal enemy.
It?s refreshing to read such a smart book
that delivers on entertainment as well. Evans
takes his subject matter seriously but delivers
hisinvestigationsinanendlesslyamusingand
eye-opening manner.
More sombre in tone is Sleepyhead by
science journalist Henry Nicholls. The author
has sufered from narcolepsy and other sleep
disorders for two decades and this book is a
thoughtfulexaminationofthetopicthattakes
in personal experience, case studies,
scienti?c analysis and historical research.
Narcolepsy sees sufferers fall asleep
suddenly during the day and in some cases it
can be managed through a combination of
medication and therapy, but Nicholls argues
convincingly that not enough research has
been done into it and associated conditions.
He also looks at insomnia, sleep paralysis,
sleep apnoea and hypnagogic hallucination,
where suferers experience terrifying visions
just as they?re falling asleep or waking up. It?s
all thought-provoking, and Nicholls arranges
his materials expertly, blending the personal
and the scienti?c. But his frustrations at his
situation do lend the book a melancholic air.
Nevertheless, this is an important book about
an overlooked side of human experience.
Words: Doug Johnstone @doug_johnstone
The Art of Losing Control
by Jules Evans (Canongate, �99)
Sleepyhead
by Henry Nicholls
(Pro?le, �.99)
THE BIG ISSUE / p29 / April 2-8 2018
THE SEAGULL
Ann Cleeves
Many years ago, I was part
of a team looking into
police corruption. This
novel captures the challenges and
emotional issues such an investigation
raises in a way I have never read
before or since.
BLACK AND BLUE
Ian Rankin
The master! No collection
could be complete
without, at least, one entry
from Ian. I confess it was the title
that ?rst drew me to this book,
Considered a landmark in his career,
it was the ?rst Rebus novel to be
adapted for television.
DEADLY HARVEST
Michael Stanley
I?ve traced my family history
to Africa, as a result of
which the continent has
always held a fascination for me. I
heard Michael Stanley speak about the
story behind this book ? witch doctors,
muti and the trade in human organs
? and knew I had to read it. I wasn?t
disappointed.
DEAD MAN?S GRIP
Peter James
Nobody researches police
procedure more thoroughly
than Peter James. Set in
Brighton, this is the ?rst of his books
I read and it remains my favourite. ?I
want them to sufer, and I want them
dead,? is a ?rst-class strap line to what
is a gripping read.
Matt Johnson is a former officer
with the Metropolitan Police. End
Game is published on April 5
(Orenda Books, �99)
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READ MORE FROM...
EDWARD LAWRENSON
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
Heartstopping
Robin Campillo?s 120 Beats per Minute pulses with
the energy of a pioneering generation of Aids activists
R
obin Campillo?s 120 Beats per
Minute gets down to business
with striking briskness. We?re in
a lecture hall somewhere in
Paris, and a meeting involving a few score
young men and women is about to begin.
Rules are established by a no-nonsense
woman chairing the event: no clapping ?
because it impedes the ?ow of debate ? and
smoking is permitted (this is France after
all) but only in the hallway. Introductions
by new members to the group are curt, and
rattled of quickly.
The haste lends this early scene a buzzy
energy, but there?s a poignant undertow to
the rush. Set in Paris in the early 1990s, this
terrific drama is a large-canvas, richly
coloured docudrama about the early
members of the French branch of Act Up,
the Aids activism group. The title might
refer to the accelerated rhythm of a techno
track on a dancefloor or a heartbeat
pounding at a high tempo. In any event
mortality and hedonism are two big themes
here: 120 BPM is a portrait of young lives
experienced in a blur of urgency.
The French government saw Aids as a
disease of gay people, sex workers and drug
addicts, and its support for treatment ? as
this film vividly reminds us ? was
scandalously under-resourced. Many
hundreds were dying prematurely. ?We
don?t have time,? says one Act Up member
at the meeting. He?s referring to eforts to
force a drug company to release the results
of a promising breakthrough drug, but the
comment, of course, has wider resonance.
So as well as scenes from these lively immediacy. At one end of the argument is
meetings, Campillo chronicles the frontline Act Up president Thibault (Antoine
protests the Act Up activists stage to shake Reinartz), who moderates the impulses of
the establishment into action. They hurl activists with a politician?s guile; and at the
bags of fake blood at government other is Sean, calling for militant action
spokesmen; they invade
against the drug companies
the corporate offices of a
and government.
medical ?rm withholding
If we side more with
FINAL REEL
test results.
Sean?s perspective, that?s in
Sergio Leone, the Italian
Some of this has
no small part thanks to the
maestro behind the Spaghetti
echoes of the activism
livewire charisma that
Westerns of the 1960s, is
going on in the US and
Nahuel P閞ez Biscayart
showcased
rings to the role. He?s
elsewhere at the time, but
this month in
agnificent ? spiky,
it also connects to a
a season at
ronic, camp, ?erce ? and
uniquely French tradition
London?s BFI.
is relationship with the
of street demonstration
He?s a giant
ew Act Up member
? we hear an extract at
of modern
athan (Arnaud Valois) is
one point from text
cinema, and
written during the Paris
e tender heart of the ?lm
a restoration
Commune unrest in 1848.
ncluding a remarkably
of his 1964
At times this is protest
timate sex scene that
breakthrough
mbines a lesson in safe
envisioned as exquisite
film A Fistful
relations with breathy
theatrical spectacle: in a
of Dollars (with a young
sequence of quiet
eroticism). Sean?s energy is
Clint Eastwood) is getting a
devastation the movie
intoxicating, which only
nationwide release.
recreates the moment
makes his demise through
when Act Up activists laid
the disease ? staged with
their bodies in a Paris street, to simulate the sorrowful delicacy ? all the more
swathes of people already lost to Aids. Over heartbreaking. A big hit at last year?s
these sombre visuals Campillo plays the Cannes, this is terrifically agile and
opening refrain of Bronski Beat?s Smalltown affecting filmmaking: at the risk of
Boy, a heartrending distillation of the ?lm?s sounding worthy ? something this ?lm most
mix of exultant joy and deep lamentation. assuredly is not ? it?s a glorious tribute to a
Focussing on the leading ?gures in Act pioneering generation of Aids activists.
Up and their competing approaches, 120 120 BPM is in cinemas from April 6
BPM is an engrossing ensemble piece that
delineates the debates of the time with sharp Edward Lawrenson @EdwardLawrenson
THE BIG ISSUE / p31 / April 2-8 2018
?The biggest fear
is that the
work will die?
Last year?s big Agatha Christie TV adaptation was reshot after sexual
assault claims surfaced against its star. Christian Cooke stepped into
the breach. He and fellow actor Morven Christie tell Adrian Lobb how
they wrestled with a tangle of schedules to keep the production alive
A
glitzy small-screen version of an
Agatha Christie story, adapted by
screenwriter Sarah Phelps, has been
a ?xture of recent Christmas schedules on
BBC One. Last year was to be no diferent.
But after ?lming on Ordeal By Innocence
had ?nished the production was thrown
into turmoil when the ?rst of multiple
accusations of sexual assault against actor
Ed Westwick surfaced in November.
Actors including Bill Nighy, Anna
Chancellor, Poldark?s Eleanor Tomlinson,
The Crown?s Matthew Goode, Morven
Christie from The A Word, Alice Eve and
Luke Treadaway ? who played James
Bowen in A Street Cat Named Bob, had
moved on to their next projects.
The BBC eventually announced it was
pulling the three-part drama from its
prestigious Christmas schedule. Then came
con?rmation that, just as Ridley Scott?s
2017 ?lm All The Money In The World had
reshot scenes featuring Kevin Spacey with
Christopher Plummer in the lead role, so
Christian Cooke was to replace Westwick.
What it took was a logistical puzzle for
production company Mammoth Screen ?
reassembling as many of the original crew
as possible, arranging time of for actors by
now working on other films, television
series or plays to reshoot scenes ? this time
opposite Cooke in the key role of Mickey
Argyll, one of the ?ve adopted children of
murdered philanthropist Rachel Argyll.
?It was difficult because Alice Eve was
in LA, Anthony Boylee was in New York
rehearsing Harry Potter, Luke has
loads of things going on
n, Matthew is
doing his Witchess show [[A
Discovery of Witches, ffor Sky], Bill
Nighy is always in demand,?
says Cooke.
?Butwhenyouhave awillingness
from all the actorrs and other
Reshoots you sir: Christian Cooke
has slotted into the revamped
version of Ordeal By Innocence
THE BIG ISSUE / p32 / April 2-8 2018
production companies are generous with
their time, there are ways of making it work.?
For Morven Christie, who plays
housekeeper Kirsten Lindstrom in the
mystery, it was the best solution.
?The BBC made the only decision they
could legitimately make. My biggest thought
was that 100-plus people worked on this
production. Must everybody be punished for
the alleged behaviour of one person within it?
?The original shoot was really gruelling.
We worked really hard ? the actors less
than everybody else ? and the idea it
wou ld just disappea r was
devastating. There was so much
work in it. And so many incredible
women who worked on that
production. It was just: whatever it
takes to get this done now. And
Christian has done a brilliant job.?
Cooke has been in the
industry
since
childhood. But he
has never been cast
Photos: 〣BC and Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images
INTERVIEW
in such circumstances, or ?lmed with quite
such intensity.
?It was two-and-a-half weeks of just me,?
he says. ?The other actors were coming in for
a few days each.
?What I said to Sandra [Goldbacher,
director] is that I love the script and the part
isbrilliant,butIwanttobeabletodomyown
thing with it. I don?t want to be shoehorned
into pre-established blocking that you have
alreadydonewithanotheractor.Shewasvery
sensitive about that.
?For all the scenes that we had to fully
reshoot, I was able to do what I wanted with
it and interpret it my own way. That was very
important to me. It wasn?t talked about on
set, everyone was sensitive, but there was a
feeling that they were happy the work was
going to be seen. Because the biggest fear
when something like this happens is that the
work will die.?
That the drama hangs together is
testament to technical wizardry ? from
lighting, sound design, props and wardrobe
departments plus skillful editing to ensure
new footage ?ts seamlessly with what was
?lmedthepreviousyear.Cookeishopingthat
?guring out whodunit, rather than looking
for the joins between the two shoots, will be
the game of choice for viewers.
The resulting drama is dripping with its
own dark secrets. A family living in luxury,
but whose lies and betrayals lurk beneath
the veneer.
?Sarah Phelps has such a ?ery way of
attacking a script,? says Christie. ?Any
character could be the lead character ? she
gets right inside each one of them.
?And there are things about the story that
maketheparticularwaythishasbeentackled
quite potent.?
Themesofpower,ofabuse,ofdarksecrets
being exposed, return us to the current
conversations within the acting industry.
?I see the news as everybody else sees it.
I read it as everybody else does,? says Cooke.
?And it is clearly a positive thing that people make in order to stand up for that. A co-lead
who are abusing their power are being at the point that role came along is a huge
stopped or silenced and women feel opportunity that I need, right? Do I have to
walk away from it because they are willing
empowered to come out and speak up.
?But as long as people don?t think to have this big a disparity between us?
it is unique to the entertainment industry,
?Every time a woman speaks up for her
because it is not.?
pay, for sexual harassment,
For Christie, the
for sexism or inequality in
c onv er s at ion s
now
the workplace, it costs that
happening out in the open
woman something. It costs
are nothing new.
that woman people?s view of
?If you are me and you
her, that she is difficult or
havebeenhavingthesekind
demanding.?
of conversations for years
now, it is refreshing to see
In a shock twist at the end,
the context change and a
we turn to the subject of
shift in tone,? she says.
Bill Nighy.
?But on a personal level,
?So much fun. He is the
I have always been
coolest cat in town,?
irritatingly conscious of
according to Christie.
all of this stuf. Pay parity,
And Cooke is an even
the balance of roles.
bigger fan. ?I became a bit
?One of the jobs I did In the frame: Cooke and Christie were
obsessed with him, if I?m
quite recently was quite a determined to save the production
honest,? he says.
?He is such a lovely guy,
prominentonewherethere
was a pay inequality. The A Word was so charismatic, so talented, and so generous
negotiated before all this happened. But yes, andunpretentiousandunstarryandallthose
that was a conversation. It was not easy, but things. He is everything you want from an
wehaditanyway.Nowitwouldbeeasier.And older, successful actor.
?There were many times he was not in
I didn?t get to equality either. I got to about
10 per cent under.?
shot but was standing in reading his lines for
Will that change for future series?
me. I know a lot of big actors in the world that
?If there is a series three, I will not be would have a stand-in doing it. But he was
stepping on to set for a penny less than any determined to be there for me.
man in that production. End of.?
?And he has so many great stories, such
Christie continues: ?It is not necessarily great taste in music. I went home one night
thatthewillisn?tthere,it?sjustthattherehas andImusthavereadabout20articlesonBill
been a precedent set for such a long time Nighy. Then I had a day full of great, deep
where pay is based on historical quote rates conversations with him, thinking: ?You are
? and historically men have been paid just so efortlessly charming and cool.?
?They say don?t meet your heroes, but it
more than women. So this is never going
to get better unless you decide to pay us is nice when you meet people you admire
equally for doing an equal job. Somebody and they surpass your expectations.?
has to make the jump.
?The difficulty up until now, for me, Ordeal By Innocence airs on Sunday nights on
personally, has been the sacri?ces that I BBC One and iPlayer @adey70
THE BIG ISSUE / p33 / April 2-8 2018
Clean energy
is cheaper than
you think.
That?s why we?ve teamed up with the Big Clean
Switch for our Take The Power Back campaign.
With average savings of over �0 a year, we?re
making it easy to switch to planet-friendly electricity.
Better still, every switch raises money to support the
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Compare prices and switch in minutes at:
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RADIO
TV
READ MORE FROM...
ROBIN INCE
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
Frequency flyers
Photo: Lebrecht Music and Arts Photo Library / Alamy Stock Photo
Radio 4 is home to some of the most original shows you?ll hear right now
SOPHIE WILLAN
BRIDGET CHRISTIE
SARAH KENDALL
Guide to Normality,
on BBC Radio Four now
Utopia, available on
BBC iPlayer until April 6
Australian Trilogy, selected
shows available on BBC iPlayer
Sophie Willan?s Guide to Normality is
sharp, eccentric, provocative, but most of
all, it is perpetually funny. After listening
to it, I immediately listened to it again, to
see what I had missed and savour what I
had heard a second time. Her images are
wonderfully evocative. A baby is ?a large
human blob that looks very much like a
sad cabbage?.
Her grandmother looks like Morticia
Addams, meaning ?you?re not quite sure
if she?s a beauty or a crow?.
In the first far-too-brief episode,
Sophie explained her upbringing and
attitude to parents and parenting. She
was predominantly brought up by her
grandmother as her mother was a drug
addict. She describes this as a relief
rather than a curse as her mother was not
someone intended to be a parent.
With deft jokes and anecdotes, Sophie
bats away the prescribed notions of how
to be a family and bring up children. I
am in danger of giving too much away
as the excitement of listening to this
energy and imagination makes me want
to tell you everything in that ham-fisted
way that happens when you want to
share your delight. Her grandmother?s
refusal to eat cr鑝e br鹟閑 comes from
having no desire ?to eat the unborn
child of a depressed hen?. Sophie is one
of an increasing number of sharp and
intriguing voices on R4.
?My son said to me the other day, ?Your
pursuit of happiness is a futile and
worthless quest?. We are just meat and
hair like Iggy Pop,? says Bridget Christie
in her new apoplectic series of Utopia.
I should have written about this three
weeks ago, time to find this on iPlayer
is limited. Bridget both bolsters and
strips apart conceptions of the middle-
?Sophie is one
of an increasing
number of sharp
voices on R4?
class liberal elite, a group she has become
a member of due to her comedic success
and North London domestic situation.
Bridget is filled with righteous ire,
but also elevates it to such absurdity
that she maintains a position of
being both correct and preposterous.
Her dissection of this ridiculousness
means that you can both nod in
agreement while also realising that
you are absurd, too. It?s the ones that
don?t think they are absurd that
worry me most.
THE BIG ISSUE / p35 / April 2-8 2018
At Radio Awards time, two further
radio stars have been picking up
perspex obelisks and sprayed metal
plaques for their justly lauded work.
Sarah Kendall?s Australian Trilogy is
an act of enchantment. Each one a
perfectly structured story of humour,
humanity and sometimes revelatory
sadness. I know of one man who saw
her live performance of one of these
stories on six occasions and burst
into tears at the denouement
every time.
MARK STEEL
Mark Steel?s in Town,
available on YouTube
Mark Steel?s in Town is a showcase for
his relentless curiosity. Steel?s ability
to come up with a new half-hour show
on every town he visits, from Skipton to
Ventnor, is an illustration of an engaged
and highly curious mind.
I reckon the imagination and richness
in the variety of Radio 4 comedy output
at the moment shames the frequently
lacklustre TV comedy output, though just
as I say that, I see there is a new series of
This Country, so all is not lost.
@robinince
Around 3000 people are currently condemned to death in the
h^ D??? ???? ???? ????? ??? ???? ????? ??????? ????? ????
???????? ???? >????? ????????? ?? ???? Z?? ??? ?? ?????
??? ???????????? ???? ????????? ???? ????? ?????? ?? ??
?????? ????? ??? ?? ????? ? ??? D??? ???? ???? ????????? ??
?????? ??? ??????? ??? ???? ?????? ???? ???????? ??????????
??? ????? ???? ??????? ???? ??? ??????? ????? ?? ????? ???? ?????
of life.
,???? t????? ?? ? ????!???????????" ?????????? ???????????
??????? ??? ??? ??????? ?? ??????????? ????????? ?? ????
Z?? ??????? ?????!?????? ???? ?? ??? h<" ?? ???? ???????
???? ???? ????????? ??? ??? ??????????? ?? ???? ????? ???
?????????????? ?????????
In the words of a prisoner ?My penfriend, his wife and family
have been a blessing for many years. I thank them for walking
this journey with me.?
/? ??? ????? ???? ?? ???? ???? ????? ??????? ??? ???????????
?? ???????? ? ?????????" ?????? ???? ?? ^ ??
Human Writes,
? >???? '????" t???????" t??? z????" >^?? ?Z>"
?!???? humanwritesuk@yahoo.co.uk
or visit our website at www.humanwrites.org
MUSIC
READ MORE FROM...
CLAIRE JACKSON
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
OUT AND ABOUT
MONET SUPPLY
Monet & Architecture (April 9 to July 29,
Trafalgar Square, London; nationalgallery.
org.uk) is a self-explanatory collection of the
impressionist?s paintings of buildings. There
have been plenty of exhibitions of his work,
but this is a genuine ?rst ? collecting 75
of his paintings of cities like Paris, London
and Venice as well as of country villages
and coastal towns around Europe. A new
perspective on an artist more associated
with the bucolic.
A diferent kind of architecture is on show
at Egypt Uncovered: Belzoni & The Tomb
Of Pharaoh Seti I (until April 15, Holborn,
London; soane.org) . It marks the 200th
anniversary of the discovery of the tomb by
Belzoni, one of the leading Egyptologists of
the 1800s. The main draw is, of course, the
sarcophagus and you can see a 3D scan of
it alongside the broken lid and learn about
the ?sarcophagus parties? Belzoni held for
elite society to celebrate his discovery.
Ending this week is Living With Gods:
Peoples, Places & Worlds Beyond
(until April 8, Bloomsbury, London;
britishmuseum.org). Its focus is less on what
people across diferent cultures believe in
religious terms but rather how they
believe ? and the holy objects they have
accumulated over thousands of years.
Discarded Dreams (until May 13,
Canterbury; canterburymuseums.co.uk)
is an exhibition from Catching Lives, the
homeless shelter in
Canterbury, and the
art projects it runs as
part of a rehabilitation
programme. Here
homeless people
express their feelings
and experiences on
the streets through art.
Meanwhile, Pop! British & American
Art 1960-1975 (until June 3, Coventry;
theherbert.org) looks at the pop art
explosion in both the UK and the US where
names like Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein
and Peter Blake changed the parameters
of what art could mean in an age of mass
production, culture and consumption.
Eamonn Forde @Eamonn_Forde
Key change
Music as therapy is a powerful force that can transform lives
W
hat?s the ?rst image that comes
to mind when you think about
music? Perhaps it?s teenagers
listening to pop through tinny speakers on
a mobile phone, crowds swaying at a
festival or Prommers queueing round the
Royal Albert Hall. It could be a picture of
someone playing records, tapes, CDs or
tapping a laptop. If you?re lucky, you
might have fond memories of your own
music lessons ? and possibly less fond
recollections of scales practice. You may
attribute a particular artist to past events.
Some couples have a song that?s ?theirs?;
others ?nd solace in a break-up soundtrack.
For many, auditory stimulation evokes a
rainbow of emotions, and the creative
process involved in writing and performing
music makes it a powerful outlet.
For this reason, among others, music has
been shown to have therapeutic bene?ts.
(Therapeutic in the clinical sense, not
dancing on a table to Taylor Swift ?
although that can be good for wellbeing
too.) Music therapy is a well-established
psychological clinical intervention, which
is delivered by specially trained therapists
(registered with the Health and Care
Professions Council), to support people
who are sufering from illness or disability.
While this strand of care is globally
recognised, it doesn?t always get the
support it deserves. This is counterproductive, when we consider that sensible
investment could significantly reduce
impact on overstretched health systems.
The UK?s national Arts in Health
Conference and Showcase aims to change
this by raising awareness of the arts in
mainstream healthcare initiatives. The
second instalment of the conference takes
place on April 19 at Guildhall School of
Music & Drama, held in association with
THE BIG ISSUE / p37 / April 2-8 2018
that conservatoire and the College of
Medicine. Speakers include dancer,
presenter and arts advocate Darcey Bussell.
The day-long event will also feature
music involving home care residents.
If you work in health, attendance is
worth considering ? ?cost-efectiveness
perspectives? are promised, if senior execs
need persuading.
Another area where music is being used
with strategic purpose is the prison sector.
Despite tabloid depictions of inmates
ser ving their sentences glued to
PlayStations, for the majority of prisoners,
life behind bars is tough. Incarceration is
frequently the culmination of extended
periods of abuse, illness, homelessness and
lack of support networks. Music workshops
? delivered by organisations such as the
Irene Taylor Trust (ITT) ? are used to help
engage with prisoners. And far from being
a soft option, research has recognised the
long-term positive impact of such work: the
skills developed through ITT projects have
been shown to help people with negative
experiences of formal education to engage
in further training opportunities, thus
reducing the likelihood of reofending.
This work has recently been shared
internationally. Sara Lee, ITT?s inspiring
artistic director, has taken the charity?s
workshops stateside, working with the
Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Civic
Orchestra musicians to deliver projects
with young men in detention. One of the
recipients is the Illinois Youth Centre,
where 15 to 18-year-olds will be encouraged
to write and perform new music.
Music is fun ? but, if given the
opportunity, it can improve how society
functions too.
Claire Jackson @claireiswriting
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
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THE BIG ISSUE / p38 / April 2-8 2018
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To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
THE BIG ISSUE / p39 / April 2-8 2018
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
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THE BIG ISSUE / p40 / April 2-8 2018
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The Socialist Party
aims at building a moneyless world community based
on common ownership and democratic control with production solely
for use not profit. It opposes all leadership, all war.
for 3 FREE issues of our monthly Socialist Standard write to:
The Socialist Party (BI), 52 Clapham High Street. London SW4 7UN
www.worldsocialism.org.bi
Alone, lonely, yearning to love and
be loved by someone special?
Then let ?Friends1st? introduce you
to other Christians also looking to
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supportive membership service.
Call 0208 088 1910
crisisinmentalhealth.org
A patient's experience of
The Mental Health Act 1983
THE BIG ISSUE / p41 / April 2-8 2018
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
A WORLD OF HOPE
A BEAUTIFUL COLLECTION OF SONGS
CELEBRATING HOPE, LOVE, UNITY & LIFE
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?Quality of music aside, though, A World Of Hope
?? ?�??�??�? ?�?�襄� ?? ?�� ??� 棋??
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(constructively and positively) as the central
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Postcards For Peace aims to help end discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, disability, sexual orientation
�� ?�????? � �灞???? 毕??????� ???� ��??�� � ??阱???��?? 棋??邋? ?�??� �?? �?�?票�?????�
and create an environment in favour of equality and diversity. Registered Charity No. 1168645
THE BIG ISSUE / p42 / April 2-8 2018
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THE BIG ISSUE / p43 / April 2-8 2018
COMPETITION
FOUNDERS
John Bird and Gordon Roddick
Group chair
Nigel Kershaw
Managing director
Russell Blackman
EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION
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& Liam Geraghty
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WIN!
27 GONE TOO SOON ON DVD
Brian Jones, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison and Jimi Hendrix
all died at the age of 27 between 1969 and 1971. But it was
not until the death of Kurt Cobain in 1994 that the idea of
a ?27 Club? began to catch on in public perception, and was
reignited with the death of Amy Winehouse in 2011.
This group represent just a few of the many singers and musicians
who passed away at that age, and this ?lm looks at the phenomenon and tries to understand why these particular stars are so
mythologised and celebrated ? and why indeed their lives ended
when they did.
Through rare and unseen footage, along with interviews with
musicians, critics and music industry insiders as well as medical and
psychiatric experts, the ?lm investigates the lives, music, and
artistry of these lost icons, frozen in time at the age of 27.
In today?s world where drug addiction and mental health issues are
on the rise, this doc is sure to propel further debate as it ofers
further insight into the world of popular music and its many pitfalls.
For your chance to win one of five DVD copies simply
answer the question below:
Which grunge superstar died at the age of 27?
PPA Scotland
Consumer Magazine of The Year, 2017
Paul McNamee
British editor of the year 2016, BSME
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THE BIG ISSUE / p44 / April 2-8 2018
GAMES & PUZZLES
SUDOKU
SPOT THE BALL
A
B
C
There is just one simple rule
in sudoku: each row, column
and 3 x 3 box must contain
the numbers one to nine.
This is a logic puzzle and you
should not need to guess.
The solution will be revealed
next week.
D
E
F
ISSUE 1300 SOLUTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
To win The Mind Is Flat mark where you
(Last week?s
think the ball is, cut out and send to:
Spot the Ball
Spot the Ball (1301), 43 Bath St, Glasgow,
revealed:
Ipswich Town
G2 1HW, by April 10. Include name,
address, phone no. Enter by email: send grid v Newcastle
Utd (1975)
position (eg A1) to competitions@bigissue.com.
PRIZE CROSSWORD
1
2
4
3
10
9
13
11
12
14
13
15
15
17
16
15
20
20
19
18
20
19
21
7
9
8
12
6
5
CRYPTIC CLUES
Across
1. Shopkeeper
disinclined to get in
ground rice (8)
6. Prepare to ?re an old
mate (4)
8. Drives cattle (6)
9. Drilling can be so
monotonous (6)
10. Made a claim that
was upheld (10)
12. Gradually change
part of a revolver (6)
14. Maturing period in
German capital (6)
15. It clearly costs
nothing to worship
here (4,6)
19. It is harmful to remove
head and foot from
injured ?amingo (6)
20. Wave put into
one?s hair (6)
21. Embraced by a go-go
dancer, is very keen (4)
22. I?ll take away yours,
it?s deceptive (8)
22
To win a Chambers Dictionary, send completed crosswords (either cryptic or quick) to:
The Big Issue Crossword (1301), second floor, 43 Bath Street, Glasgow, G2 1HW by
April 10. Include your name, address and phone number.
Issue 1299 winner is S McCluskey from Wallyford
QUICK CLUES
Down
2. Dead on time?
Not now (4)
3. A bit of heat can
beseen in the
weather map (5)
4. Arouse feelings ?
almost brilliant (7)
5. Bionic man? (5)
6. Be anxious about ofer
for salt (7)
7. Paddling without getting
one?s feet wet (8)
11. Projecting part on the
other side to remain
in suspense (8)
13. Out of the wind the
self-seeking group is
looking lecherously (7)
14. Relating to Dawn or
Laura in disguise (7)
16. Language of part of
north India (5)
17. Difficult situations
encountered on a
golf course? (5)
18. Look noble (4)
Across
1. Sprinkled (8)
6. Lifting device (4)
8. Horse-drawn carriage (6)
9. Grating (6)
10. Behead (10)
12. Sharpness (6)
14. Passed an opinion (6)
15. Objective (10)
19. Typewriter roller (6)
20. Test (3,3)
21. Old Testament book (4)
22. Coagulating (8)
Down
2. Leg-pull (4)
3. Paddled (5)
4. Earthy, bawdy (7)
5. Unearth (3,2)
6. Composed of
segments (7)
7. Divided skirt (8)
11. Sentimentality (8)
13. Passivity (7)
14. Caretaker (7)
16. Icons (anag.) (5)
17. Staunch (5)
18. Be on ?re (4)
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
Issue 1300 solution
CRYPTIC: Across ? 1 Part payment; 7 Intercom; 8 Wrap; 9 Thor; 11 Mismatch; 13 Beefy; 14 Skull; 16 Emeritus; 18 Twig; 21 Lawn; 22 Anathema; 23 Needle match.
Down ? 1 Printable; 2 Ratio; 3 Peru; 4 Yeovil; 5 Newmarket; 6 Marc; 10 Reference; 12 Holograph; 15 Funnel; 17 Moat; 19 Wheat; 20 Stem.
QUICK: Across ? 1 Below stairs; 7 Banality; 8 Arid; 9 Lard; 11 Backward; 13 Girth; 14 Franc; 16 Muling; 18 Smog; 21 Bawl; 22 Pathogen; 23 Symmetrical.
Down ? 1 Bubblegum; 2 Loner; 3 Walk; 4 Titian; 5 Roadworks; 6 Bier; 10 Dutifully; 12 Decagonal; 15 Invade; 17 Upas; 19 Magic; 20 Char.
THE BIG ISSUE / p45 / April 2-8 2018
Photos: Action Images
MY PITCH
Vasile Raul Stefan, 20
WHSMITH, VICTORIA SQUARE, DROITWICH SPA
?I was impressed by how well The Big Issue
was going for my friend, so I tried it too?
ABOUT ME...
IF I WON THE LOTTERY
I would help poor people in
this country and I?d also go to
Romania and start a Romanian
Big Issue. But I?d be the boss.
MY HOBBIES
I love going to the gym. I run
and I also lift weights. I like using
Facebook as well to keep in touch
with my friends and family.
ON MY
PITCH?
I?m here Tuesday
to Sunday from
8.30am until 5pm
I
?ve been selling The Big
Issue for ?ve months. A
friend of mine has been
selling the magazine for two or
three years, and he told me he
was making a decent income
and enjoyed it more than
working in a factory because
he could choose his own
hours. He also said it was
good for developing sales
skills. I was impressed by how
well it was going for him so I
thought I?d like to try it too.
I have a good pitch here in
Droitwich and my customers
are very kind. They look out
for me, ofering me a cup of
cofee or something to eat, so I
try to help them if I can. Today
I helped an old lady into a
taxi with her shopping. I look
out for them because they
look out for me. If I?m not on
my pitch for a couple of days
they?re asking where I?ve been
and if I?m OK.
Selling the magazine has
helped me with my English.
Before I started I didn?t know
much of the language but now
it?s really improved. I like to
interact with customers and
socialise and all this is good
for learning the language.
I?ve been in the UK for two
years now. I came over with
my mother to earn money
because it was really difficult
to get work in Ialomita in
eastern Romania, which is
where I?m from. I worked in
construction but only from
time to time. Neighbours used
to ask me to help out with a
job and I would work for them.
But it was really hard to ?nd
enough of that type of work to
get by. I enjoy selling The Big
Issue much more.
THE BIG ISSUE / p46 / April 2-8 2018
My mother and I live in
Birmingham. My father had
to stay in Romania with my
grandparents because they?re
old and needed him to stay
and look after them. We miss
him a lot. I also left my dogs
behind with my father when
I came here. They?re German
shepherds called Rita and Max
and I?ve had them since I was
a very small child.
But I like it here in the
UK and for now I enjoy
selling The Big Issue. The
work is much better and I
enjoy interacting with my
customers. They really care
about me. Three ladies who
buy from me were watching
me having my picture taken
for this, waving and smiling.
Interview: Sarah Reid
Photo: Martin Strivens
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for example homosexuals could
be stoned to death in Brunei.
Can the Commonwealth help
introduce reforms?
Obviously there are some issues. There are
human rights issues, such as those involving
LGBT groups and the death penalty, where
there?s no consensus across the membership, but
what we do is we work closely with human rights
commissions in our member states to try and
build their capacity. It?s all behind-the-scenes
work to promote and advocate Commonwealth
values, and a slow-drip exercise. Hopefully over
time through our advocacy and in?uence we
could afect some key reforms. Nelson Mandela
once famously said, and it?s one of my favourite
quotes of his, that ?the Commonwealth makes
the world safe for diversity?.
South Africa was only welcomed back
into the Commonwealth in 1994 with
the election of Mandela. Did the
Commonwealth help end apartheid?
In the 1980s we had the Eminent Persons Group,
the EPG as it?s called, and the leaders of Nigeria
and Australia were involved in trying to
advocate positive change in South Africa. It is
partly their contribution that eventually led to
the changes that took place.
When there is Trump describing whole
parts of the world ? many of them
probably Commonwealth members ? as
?shithole countries? how is the role of
diplomacy changing?
Diplomacy has always been important, now
more than ever. Whatever leaders want to say,
y,
the myriad of global issues we are now facing,
whether climate change or cou
untering violent
extremism, you have to get leaaders around a
table to talk. But leaders shoulld also feel that
they can talk quietly behind th
he scenes as and
when it?s needed to resolve issues. Megaphone
diplomacy has a place but it do
oesn?t necessarily
achieve objectives. It isn?t whaat you say, it?s how
you say it. You can deliver diffi
fficult messaging,
you do it in such a way that you
u still have
someone on the other side of th
he table listening
to you. This is how you build in
n?uence.
Words: Steven MacKenzie @stevenmackenzie
THE BIG ISSUE / p24 / April 2-8 2018
THE COMMONWEALTH
IN NUMBERS
The 53 Commonwealth member
states are among the world?s largest,
smallest, richest and poorest countries
Commonwealth countries span
29,958,050 square km (11,566,870
sq miles), around 20 per cent of the
world?s land area
The population of the Commonwealth
is around 2.5 billion people ? nearly a
third of the world?s population
94%
94 per cent live in Asia and Africa
Photo: The Commonwealth Secretariat
The biggest is India with a population
of 1.3 billion, the smallest is Tuvalu
with a population of just under 11,000
The woman at the helm of the Commonwealth
The Queen may technically be Head of the Commonwealth,
but Dominican-born Patricia Scotland (seen here as The
Gambia was readmitted to the Commonwealth in 2013) is
the current Secretary-General. Scotland has held the position
since 2016, and leaders can serve a maximum of two fouryear terms.
CHOGM
Between April 16-20, leaders from around the Commonwealth will come to the UK for
CHOGM 2018. The Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting takes place every two
years to ?reaffirm common values, address shared global challenges and agree how to work to
create a better future for all our citizens?. High on this year?s agenda will be ocean governance
and ways to tackle cyber-crime.
Free trade agreements, freedom of movement ? sound familiar?
The Rt Hon Patricia Scotland (and Linford Andrews) travelled to Kenya last month for the
launch of thee African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) protocol. The deal could
potentially allow Commonwealth citizens to travel and trade across Africa. Kenyan President
Uhuru Kenyaatta tweeted: ?We have come to the realisation that we can grow together
and that it is common sense to unite for our betterment? We are realising we are stronger
together #Commonwealth?. Could trading in Africa ?ll the potential void of walking away
from the EU? What about that other EU hallmark?at the last CHOGM in 2015, it was
proposed thaat there should be freedom of movement for citizens of the UK, Australia, New
Zealand and Canada. This may come up on the agenda again this year.
31 members are classi?ed as small
states ? with a population of less than
1.5 million people
The UK is the ?fth largest country in
the Commonwealth population-wise
(after India, Pakistan, Nigeria
and Bangladesh)
In 2016 the combined GDP was over
$9 trillion (78 per cent from the
four largest economies ? UK, India,
Canada and Australia). The EU has a
GDP of around $20 trillion
Most members have a historical
tie with the UK, except
Rwanda and Mozambique
The newest member
is technically The
Gambia, which rejoined
in February after
withdrawing in 2013
220 employees work at
Commonwealth HQ in Marlborough
House on Pall Mall in London
Linford Andrews believes there?s a ?Commonwealth advantage?
THE BIG ISSUE / p25 / April 2-8 2018
IN PARTNERSHIP WITH
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Photography by
LEARN ABOU
THE ENLIGHTENMENT
BOOKS
FILM
INTERVEW
RADIO
MUSIC
View from an island page 28
120 Beats Per Minute page 31
Christian Cooke page 32
Radio 4?s renaissance page 35
Life-changing stuf page 37
EXHIBITION
TO HULL AND BACK
The ?rst solo exhibition by Richie Culver in his home town of Hull telescopes through his formative years in the city, celebrating ordinary, workingclass lives in the north of England. Culver experienced homelessness and long-term unemployment before one of his artworks was exhibited in the
Tate Modern leading to exhibitions around the world, and now back to Hull. In a sequence of paintings, Culver explores the complex relationship
between jobseeker and advisor played out every fortnight in their 20-minute ?therapy? sessions.
The exhibition, No One Knows Me Like Dawn From The Job Centre, runs at Humber Street Gallery, Hull until May 27
THE BIG ISSUE / p27 / April 2-8 2018
BOOKS
SO MANY ISLANDS
Restless natives
Nicholas Laughlin has never lived anywhere but Trinidad. But he?s discovered that, along with
many other islanders, the threshold of their horizons can bring an expansive worldview
THE BIG ISSUE / p28 / April 2-8 2018
Photo: North Wind Picture Archives / Alamy Stock Photo
A
n Island Is a World is the title of a up on the shelf. They are a restless bunch: unexpected places. Specific details may
novel by the late Trinidadian two thirds of them live elsewhere than their seem exotic, but the motives and anxieties,
writer Samuel Selvon, and a originalhomeislands,andsomearemultiple joys and fears we explore in our stories will
sentence that summarises migrants. The list of their names almost be vitally familiar to readers anywhere.
something essential about
Here you will find love poems
human geography: islands, large
and protest poems, tales of
or small, are indeed in some
childhood innocence and innocence lost, stories about
sense self-contained, worlds
leaving home and trying to go
untothemselves.Buttheverysea
that insulates and isolates is also
home again, about never having
the medium that connects one
left, or asking what home
island to every other island, and
means in the first place.
archipelagoes to continents.
It is strange how not strange
So Many Islands is a new
you may find it, the sense
anthology of 17 writers from
of affinity with someone
small island countries around
whose na me you f ind
the world, from the Pacific
unpronounceable, from a small
and Indian Oceans, the
place you?d never hope to pin
Mediterranean and the
down on a map.
Caribbean. They come from
?This is the real globalism,?
Niue and Grenada, Malta and
says Marlon James ? himself an
Kiribati, Bermuda and
islander, born and bred in
Singapore, and other countries
Jamaica ? ?a glorious cacophwith familiar and unfamiliar
ony that seeks no common
ground other than attitude.
names. They may be writing
from and about small places ?
Stories and poems that exist in
some smaller than others ? but
no other context than their
theirideasandthemestaketheir
own, characters who owe only
measure from the scale of world
to themselves, and writers who
histories. As Man Booker prizewrite with nothing hanging on
winner Marlon James puts it: ?It
their backs.?
takes a big mind, or at least a
Perhaps what the 17 writers
big worldview, to write from a
in So Many Islands have most
small space.?
deeply in common is an urge to
Smallislandcountrieswithin
contend with both the limits
the Commonwealth share a past
and the possibilities of a small
of colonial exploitation. One
place ? whether that means
legacy in the present is a body of El Dorado: Sir Walter Raleigh found a bounty of natural resources on Trinidad in 1595 cherishing the intimate territory of a familiar community
common political and social
concerns. 
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