close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Boston Globe – April 02, 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
abcde
Monday, April 2, 2018
A troubling junction of alcohol, science
Researchers say NIH undercut funding
as institute made a deal with industry
By Sharon Begley
coholism, he said, “I knew we were
in trouble.”
He never imagined, however,
that at the 2015 meeting, the director, George Koob, would leap
out of his seat and scream at the
scientists after their PowerPoint
presentation on research that the
agency had eagerly funded on the
association between alcohol mar-
STAT
It’s rare for officials at the National Institutes of Health to summon university scientists from
hundreds of miles away. So when
Dr. Michael Siegel of Boston University and a colleague got the call
to meet with the director of NIH’s
Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Al-
keting and underage drinking. “I
don’ t [expletive] care!” Koob
yelled, referring to alcohol advertising, according to the scientists.
Koob also made it clear that the
institute would be pulling back
from funding any more such research, recalled Siegel and his colleague, David Jernigan of Johns
Hopkins University, who described the previously undisclosed
meeting in Bethesda, Md., in separ a t e i n t e r v i e w s w i t h S TA T.
ALCOHOL, Page A8
‘If they’re soliciting
money from industry,
they wouldn’t want to
do anything that
would affect their
chance of getting that
money.’
DR. MICHAEL SIEGEL, BU
scientist
Aid boost
unlikely to
help most
schools
State funding proposal
would leave many in need
By James Vaznis
GLOBE STAFF
Governor Charlie Baker’s effort to boost local
education aid would offer little relief to most
school systems across Massachusetts that are grappling with escalating budget costs, according to a
Globe review of the proposal.
Although Baker’s proposal increases aid by
more than 2 percent overall, approximately 60 percent of school systems would receive an increase of
less than 1 percent in general education aid, the review found. Two school systems under state receivership, Holyoke and Southbridge, would see aid increase by a mere 0.2 percent. Southbridge may
have to cut 30 positions in the coming months.
The meager increases for next year reflect a recent trend of relatively flat state aid for many
school systems under a funding formula widely
criticized by educators for failing to adequately estimate the annual costs of providing a public education and accurately weigh a community’s ability
to pay.
All the while, state data indicate that school
spending has been increasing by nearly 4 percent
annually.
As a result, the school funding crunch that has
the urban districts of Brockton and Worcester considering a lawsuit against the state has also
reached into the state’s suburban and rural areas,
which are closely monitoring the potential legal
showdown.
Many school systems say they find themselves
in a constant budget-cutting mode as they attempt
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
SCHOOL FUNDING, Page B8
Some skills are not readily available: These students are learning to be blackjack dealers at an MGM-sponsored school.
Leaving little to chance
Mass. Democrats
hoping to regain
Capitol Hill clout
With 3,000 jobs to fill, casino digs into data, creates incentives, seeks exemptions
By Katie Johnston
GLOBE STAFF
SPRINGFIELD — Long before MGM Resorts International got the green light to
build a nearly $1 billion casino and hotel
downtown, it analyzed the local labor market to figure out what it would take to fill
3,000 jobs in a state new to gambling.
T he socioeconomic snapshot that
emerged became a road map for creating a
workforce from scratch.
Census data and labor reports revealed a
higher-than-average number of single parents and former offenders. So MGM Springfield added federally funded day care to the
resort and lobbied to loosen a state law that
restricts casinos from hiring people with
criminal records. A lack of experienced
blackjack and poker dealers in the area led
to the creation of a gaming school.
Managers also fanned out to senior centers, veterans clubs, vocational high schools,
even churches to talk up casino jobs. They
pored over layoff data from the state, includ-
Pothole payouts? City
helps fund car repairs
ing from a Springfield hospital and a nearby
Sam’s Club that had recently closed, to pursue workers who might be good fits.
Now, months before its scheduled opening in late summer, MGM Springfield is embarking on a major hiring spree to staff its
hotel, restaurants, bowling alley, movie theater, spa, retail shops, and 125,000 square
feet of gambling space, all of which take up
three city blocks.
On Monday, the resort is set to announce
Neal, McGovern could rise
if party takes House control
By Liz Goodwin
GLOBE STAFF
MGM HIRING, Page A6
BREAK TIME FOR BUNNIES
Handful of craters responsible for
chunk of $163,000 given to drivers
By Laura Crimaldi
GLOBE STAFF
Not all potholes are created
equal — and some, such as a
trio of teeth-rattling craters in
Charlestown, have cost the
city thousands of dollars in
payments to drivers whose vehicles were damaged by the
gaping cavities.
Just ask Agnes Viel, an Everett resident who struck a water-filled pothole on Rutherford Avenue three years ago as
she was driving home. The city
paid Viel, 49, $5,015 to repair
her Lexus Gx460, the maximum allowed under state law.
“I was lucky. I got something,” said Viel, an accountant who claimed $8,000 in
damage. “It’s their responsibility to take care of the road.”
Viel was one of the three
motorists who received the
maximum pothole payouts
from the city over the past five
years, and they all suffered
their damage in Charlestown.
One of the three was driving a
2005 Lamborghini Murciélago, which carried a base price
of $320,000 when it debuted.
Between 2013 and last year,
the city paid more than
1
CHARLESTOWN
93
2
3
1
Rutherford Ave. at Sullivan Square
$5,015
2 Rutherford Ave. at Austin St.
$5,015
Monument Square at Soley St.
3
$5,000
4
Hu
nt
in
g
to
n
BACK BAY
4
s
tt
se
hu
c
sa
as
M
5
SOURCE: City of Boston
DELEGATION, Page A7
POTHOLES, Page A6
Highest city pothole damage payouts
SOMERVILLE
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Their labors done, a pair of Easter bunnies wandered off Sunday
after a sunrise service for thousands of people on Castle Island. B1.
WASHINGTON — The once mighty Massachusetts delegation — locked out of power and languishing in the minority in Congress — may be
poised to seize back some of its former glory.
If some political analysts are
right and a “blue wave” of firedup Democratic voters gives the
party control of the House in
the midterm elections, Representatives Richard Neal and
Jim McGovern would likely become chairmen of two of the
most powerful committees in
Congress next January.
Neal, after nearly 30 years in Representative
the House, became the ranking Richard Neal
m e m b e r o n t h e Wa y s a n d
Means Committee in 2017.
This month, House minority
leader Nancy Pelosi will officially tap McGovern, who has
more than 20 years of seniority,
to be the top Democrat on the
Rules Committee, succeeding
the late Representative Louise
Slaughter.
Fresh-faced delegation Representative
members such as Representa- Jim McGovern
tives Joe Kennedy III and Seth
Moulton often steal the headlines as rising stars,
but it’s their more experienced colleagues who have
quietly risen through the ranks.
Chairmanships would position the Massachu-
5
Huntington Ave. at Mass. Ave.
$4,990
Huntington Ave. at Mass. Ave
$4,515
GLOBE STAFF
In the news
The MBTA, seeking to revive
bus service, will unveil projects to beef up some existing routes and expand the
Silver Line. B1.
Israel rejected calls for an
inquiry into the deaths of at
launch a website to help
health care consumers compare the prices of common
For breaking news, updated
stories, and more, visit our website:
BostonGlobe.com
medical tests or procedures.
B1.
Forty percent of Massport
workers earned at least
$100,000 in 2017. B1.
least 15 Palestinians at the
Gaza border. A5.
President Trump vowed there
will be no more attempts to
forge a deal for the children of
State officials are set to
A2.
undocumented immigrants.
No April foolin’
Monday: Snow returns.
High 41-46, low 32-37.
Tuesday: Clouds, rain late.
High 45-50, low 40-45.
Sunrise: 6:25. Sunset: 7:11.
Complete report, B13.
VOL . 293, NO. 92
*
Suggested retail price
$2.50
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
‘No more DACA deal,’ Trump vows; hits Mexico
In Easter tweets,
he also threatens
to halt NAFTA
By Katie Rogers
NEW YORK TIMES
PALM BEACH, Fla. — President Trump unleashed a series
of fiery tweets on Sunday in
which he promised there would
be “no more DACA deal” and
threatened to walk away from
the North American Free Trade
Agreement.
Trump announced last year
that he was ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which protects
young immigrants from deportation, but courts have blocked
his decision.
The president had been negotiating with Democrats on a
legislative solution, but seemed
in his tweet on Sunday to withdraw his support for such talks.
Trump made his statement
minutes after wishing the nation a happy Easter Sunday,
and he blamed Democrats and
the Mexican government for an
increasingly “dangerous” flow
of unauthorized immigrants
Trump complained that “liberal” laws were preventing Border Patrol agents from doing
their jobs, and said that Republicans should use the “nuclear
option” to sidestep Democratic
opposition in the Senate and
enact “tough laws now.”
T he president , who has
spent much of his holi day
weekend golfing with supporters and watching television,
was apparently reacting to a
“Fox and Friends” segment on
immigration that had aired
minutes before.
In his tweets, Trump referred to “caravans” of immigrants heading toward the
southern border, a subject that
was addressed on the Fox program.
A group of hundreds of Central Americans has been traveling through Mexico toward the
United States, where the immigrants hope to seek asylum or
sneak across the border. A reporter for BuzzFeed has been
traveling with the group as it
makes its way north.
As he headed to church in
Palm Beach on Sunday morning, Trump addressed his immigration tweets, saying: “Mexico
has got to help us at the border.
And a lot of people are coming
in because they want to take advantage of DACA.”
DACA gave temporary protected status to hundreds of
thousands of young immigrants
brought to the country illegally
as children. The program requires immigrants to have lived
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump and his wife, Melania, arrived for Easter
services at a church in Palm Beach, Fla., on Sunday.
in the United States since 2007,
meaning any crossing the border now would not be eligible.
Trump announced last year
that he was ending the program, but courts have blocked
his decision. He has been negotiating with Democrats on a legislative solution, but seemed in
his tweet on Sunday to withdraw his support for such talks.
Outside the church, the
president said the Democrats
“blew it” after having “had a
great chance.”
“But we’ ll have to take a
look,” he added. He did not respond to a question from re-
porters about whether his
tweets meant that he would not
support any deal for DACA recipients.
In turning his Twitter ire on
Mexico, Trump said the country
was “doing very little, if not
nothing, at stopping people
f r o m f l o w i n g i n t o Me x i c o
through their Southern Border,
and then into the US.”
He said Mexican leaders
“must stop the big drug and
people flows, or I will stop their
cash cow, NAFTA.”
“Need wall!” he added.
T h e p r e s i d e n t ’s t w e e t s
seemed at odds with some uni-
fying steps taken last week by
members of his administration:
The homeland security secretary, Kirstjen Nielsen, met with
President Enrique Pena Nieto
of Mexico to discuss ways to
work together on security and
trade issues, according to a description of the conversation released by the Department of
Homeland Security.
But Trump may have been
hearing a different voice over
the weekend. He was accompanied to his Palm Beach resort,
Mar-a-Lago, by Stephen Miller,
a senior policy adviser who has
shaped much of the Trump administration’s hard-line stance
on immigration.
The president, in his tweets,
criticized what he called “catch
and release,” a practice in which
detained unauthorized immigrants are sometimes released
as they wait for a hearing before
an immigration judge. In some
cases, they are released because
the government has nowhere to
house them.
Critics say the practice —
which, contrary to the president’s tweet, is not enshrined in
law — gives the immigrants an
opening to skip their hearing
and settle undetected in the
country.
Tr u m p’s tw e e t s S u n d ay
echoed remarks on “Fox and
Friends” by Brandon Judd, pres-
ident of the National Border Patrol Council, whom the president has praised in the past.
“Our legislators actually
have to stand up, and the Republicans control the House
and the Senate; they do not
need the Democrat support to
pass any laws they want,” Judd
said on the program.
“They can go the nuclear option, just like what they did on
the confirmation,’’ he said.
“They need to pass laws to end
the catch-and-release program
that’ll allow us to hold them for
a long time.”
The president attended Easter services at the Church of
Bethesda-by-the-Sea, an Episcopal church near his Palm
Beach home, joined by his wife,
Melania, and his daughter Tiffany.
Sunday’s church visit was
Trump’s first public appearance
with his wife since CBS’ ‘‘60
Minutes’’ aired an interview the
previous Sunday with Stormy
Daniels, the adult film star who
says she had sex with Trump in
2006, early in his marriage and
a few months after Trump’s wife
had given birth to their son.
The White House says
Trump denies the affair. Melania Trump spent most of the
past week in Palm Beach with
her son. The family returned to
Washington later Sunday.
Daily Briefing
Resignation, or
firing? It may
matter at VA
MAX WHITTAKER/NEW YORK TIMES
A woman identified as Wanda Cleveland lay in the street after being struck by a Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office vehicle during a protest.
61­year­old woman is hit by a sheriff ’s office vehicle during protest against a police killing
SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A
police vehicle struck a woman
as it peeled away from people
protesting the police killing of
Stephon Clark, 22, in March.
The victim, 61, called it a hit
and run. Wanda Cleveland was
hit in the leg Saturday and taken to a hospital, where she was
treated for injuries to her arm
and back of the head.
Rallies have been tense
since Thursday, when an independent autopsy concluded
Clark was shot eight times,
mostly in the back.
In a video from ABC10, protesters took to busy Florin
Road south of downtown,
chanting slogans, including
‘‘Say his name! Stephon Clark!’’
among moving traffic. About
two dozen people appear to approach a sheriff’s cruiser and
surround it. ‘‘When people are
occupied, resistance is justified’’ the crowd chants. The
cruiser’s lights flash and the si-
ren blares. Another cruiser
pulls up. ‘‘Back away from my
vehicle,’’ a deputy says four
times into a loudspeaker. After
a few moments, the first cruiser slowly pulls forward, and a
woman emerges from the
crowd in between the vehicles.
The second cruiser strikes
her and she hits the ground.
In a video by public defender Guy Danilowitz, the woman’s white sign is lit up by the
headlights before impact. The
longer ABC10 video does not
show deputies circling back.
Fire and rescue personnel firemen arrive about seven minutes later.
The sheriff’s office said the
collision occurred at ‘‘slow
speeds’’ after protesters were
‘‘yelling while pounding and
kicking the vehicles’ exterior.’’
The incident is under investigation by the California Highway Patrol. The Sacramento
department is conducting an
internal review. It was not immediately clear if any disciplinary measures would be taken.
Before the incident, Cleveland, an activist at Sacramento
City Council meetings, recalled
how she felt she was unjustly
arrested three years ago for allegedly touching a police officer during a tense meeting.
‘‘I’m on a mission now. I will
never allow a cop to touch me
again,’’ she had said.
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — David
Shulkin, the former Veterans
Affairs Secretary, is making it
clear he was fired, despite the
White House’s conflicting
claims. Spokeswoman Lindsay
Walters on Sunday said
Shulkin had ‘‘resigned’’ when
President Trump said on Twitter Wednesday he was nominating White House doctor
Ronny Jackson to replace him.
But in TV interviews,
Shulkin said he had not submitted a resignation letter, or
planned to. He said he had
spoken to Trump by phone
earlier that day, with no mention of his job status, and was
scheduled to meet with the
president the next morning.
‘‘I came to run the Department of Veterans Affairs because I’m committed to veterans,’’ he said. ‘‘And I would not
resign, because I’m committed
to making sure this job was
seen through to the very end.’’
The semantics could be relevant to Trump’s ability to
name an acting VA secretary.
Last week, Trump named Defense Department official Robert Wilkie to the acting position, bypassing Shulkin’s deputy secretary, Tom Bowman.
Bowman has come under criticism for being too moderate to
push Trump’s agenda.
Under federal law, a president has wide authority to
temporarily fill a job if someone ‘‘dies, resigns, or is otherwise unable to perform the
functions and duties of the office.’’ There is no mention of a
president having that authority if the person is fired.
It’s unclear if courts would
seek to draw a legal distinction
between a firing and a forced
resignation, if that is indeed
what happened to Shulkin.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
US sides with PLO on damages suit
Teens walk 50 miles to honor MLK
US website dodges Tillerson’s firing
WASHINGTON — The
Trump administration is siding with the Palestine Liberation Organization in urging
the Supreme Court to reject an
appeal from US victims of terrorist attacks in the Middle
East more than a decade ago.
The victims want the high
court to reinstate a $654 million verdict against the PLO
and Palestinian Authority in
connection with attacks in Israel in 2002 and 2004 that
killed 33 people and wounded
hundreds more. An appeals
DUNDEE, Miss. — A group
of teens are walking 50 miles
from northern Mississippi to
Memphis in tribute to Martin
Luther King Jr. on the 50th
anniversary of his assassination. Six middle school, high
school, and college students,
plus two adult mentors, began
the march Saturday in
Dundee, accompanied by police cars, support vans, and a
portable restroom.
The 50-mile distance represents one mile for each year
since King was gunned down
WASHINGTON — Rex Tillerson all but vanished from
the State Department website
as his unceremonious firing by
tweet took effect this weekend.
The ‘‘Secretary of State Tillerson’’ link disappeared overnight Saturday, replaced by a
generic ‘‘secretary of state’’ tab.
It leads to a page that says
Deputy Secretary of State John
Sullivan ‘‘became acting Secretary of State on April 1, 2018.’’
It offers no explanation.
The link to Tillerson’s biography as 69th secretary of
court tossed out the verdict in
2016. It said US courts can’t
consider suits against foreign
groups over random attacks
not aimed at the United States.
The victims say offices the
Palestinians keep in Washington are sufficient to allow the
lawsuit in a US court. The appeals court disagreed.
Theodore Olson, lawyer for
the victims, said the appeals
court decision would hurt US
victims of ‘‘many acts of terrorism overseas.”
ASSOCIATED PRESS
in Memphis April 4, 1968.
The teens range in age from
14 to 19. Five are black. One is
white. ‘‘It’s a way to show people that you can have friendships with different people of
different backgrounds, different races, on all levels,’’ said
Damonte Steele, a 15-year-old.
The group plans to walk 10
to 15 miles per day, taking part
in community meetings after
they finish for the day and
spending nights in hotels, said
organizer Jarvis Ward.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
state briefly returned a ‘‘We’re
sorry, that page can’t be
found’’ message. After being
notified of the message, the
State Department restored the
link, and an archive page for
Tillerson’s tenure was enabled.
President Trump fired Tillerson via Twitter March 13,
but his departure did not become official until March 31.
Sullivan will be acting secretary until CIA director Mike
Pompeo is confirmed by the
Senate, possibly this month.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A3
Dell recommends Windows 10 Pro.
B U Y M O R E SAV E M O R E
GET UP TO
525 OFF
$
S E L E C T P C s F O R Y O U R B U S I N E S S W I T H C O U P O N *.
23"
EXTRA $50 OFF
Inspiron Desktop
Starting price $639.99 | Save $90.99
549
$
After coupon* SAVE50
As low as: $17/moΔ
7th Gen Intel® Core™ i5 processor,
Windows 10 Pro, 8GB memory*,
1TB* hard drive
Add the Dell 23 Monitor - P2317H for
$199.99 ($60 in savings).
Order code: SMI3668W10PS201
15.6"
15.6"
EXTRA $50 OFF
$538 OFF
Starting price $898.57 | Save $319.57
Starting price $1,437.14 | Save $538.14
Vostro 15 3000
$
579
Dell Precision 3520
$
899
After coupon* SAVE50
As low as: $18/moΔ
After coupon* SAVE100
As low as: $27/moΔ
7th Gen Intel® Core™ i5 processor,
Windows 10 Pro, 8GB memory*,
1TB* hard drive
7th Gen Intel® Core™ i5 processor,
Windows 10 Pro, 4GB memory*, 500GB*
hard drive, 2GB NVIDIA® Quadro® M620
graphics, 3 Years Hardware Service with
On-Site Service After Remote Diagnosis*
Order code: CAV153W10P18S060B
Order code: XCTOP3520HWUS
SMALL BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY ADVISORS
OUR US-BASED TEAM CAN HELP YOU CUSTOMIZE THE RIGHT
PC AND SERVICE OPTIONS FOR YOUR BUSINESS.
Shop Dell.com/businessdeals or call 877-BUY-DELL
FREE
SHIPPING
PRICE
M ATC H *
E A SY
FINANCING∆
Offers valid 4/2/2018 - 4/11/2018 unless otherwise noted.
∆
Dell Business Credit: Offered to business customers by WebBank, Member FDIC, who determines qualifications for and terms of credit. Taxes, shipping and other
charges are extra and vary. Minimum monthly payments are the greater of $15 or 3% of the new balance shown on the monthly billing statement.
*Offers subject to change, not combinable with all other offers. Taxes, shipping, and other fees apply. Free shipping offer valid only in Continental (except Alaska)
U.S. Offer not valid for Resellers. Dell reserves the right to cancel orders arising from pricing or other errors. Coupon Offers Valid through 4/12/18, 8 a.m. ET. Coupon
SAVE50 valid with select PCs $499+ and SAVE100 coupon valid with select PCs $999+. Valid with select other offers, but not with other coupons. Limit 5 per customer.
Excludes: PowerEdge, PowerVault Servers, and select PCs. Price Match Guarantee: If you find a lower-price advertised on the internet for an identical electronic product
or a similarly configured Dell, HP, Apple or Lenovo computer, Dell will match that price. Call or Chat online with a Dell Expert and we’ll walk you through the process.
Learn more at dell.com/sb/pricematch. Hard Drive capacity varies with preloaded material and will be less. System memory may be used to support graphics, depending
on system memory size and other factors. Onsite Service after Remote Diagnosis is determination by online/phone technician of cause of issue; may involve customer
access to inside of system and multiple or extended sessions. If issue is covered by Limited Hardware Warranty and not resolved remotely, technician and/or part will be
dispatched, usually within 1 business day following completion of Remote Diagnosis. Availability varies. See dell.com/servicecontracts/US. Ultrabook, Celeron, Celeron
Inside, Core Inside, Intel, Intel Logo, Intel Atom, Intel Atom Inside, Intel Core, Intel Inside, Intel Inside Logo, Intel vPro, Itanium, Itanium Inside, Pentium, Pentium Inside, vPro Inside, Xeon, Xeon Phi, and Xeon Inside are trademarks
of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and/or other countries. Microsoft and Windows are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. Screens simulated, subject to change. Windows
Store apps sold separately. App availability and experience may vary by market. Dell, EMC, and other trademarks are trademarks of Dell Inc. or its subsidiaries. Copyright 2018 Dell Inc. All rights reserved. 242997
Built for business to save
time, save money and
safeguard your data.
T h e
A4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
The World
Amid skepticism, Kim sends new signs of thaw
Attends concert
by visiting group
from the South
By Choe Sang-Hun
NEW YORK TIMES
S E O U L — K i m Jo n g Un
clapped and he smiled, even
posing for a group photo with
a K-pop band.
The appearance by North
Korea’s leader on Sunday at a
concert by South Korean musicians in Pyongyang was all the
more unusual because his authoritarian government has
been struggling to stave off
what it sees as an infiltration
of the South’s pop c ulture
among his isolated people.
But Kim shook the hands of
members of South Korea’s
most popular girl band, Red
Velvet, which he and his wife,
Ri Sol Ju, watched from a balcony.
After watching Red Velvet
perform, Kim reportedly pronounced the event a “gift for
Pyongyang citizens.”
The two-hour show at the
East Pyongyang Grand Theater was part of a political détente between the neighboring
countries as relations have
thawed. It was the first time a
North Korean leader watched
a South Korean musical performance in the North’s capital.
Just a day earlier, the United Nations announced new
economic measures against
North Korea, blacklisting 27
ships, 21 shipping companies,
and one individual accused of
helping the North evade previ-
ous international sanctions.
The UN move is intended
to increase pressure on North
Korea ahead of planned summit meetings between Kim
and the presidents of South
Korea and the United States.
US officials are also keeping
the pressure on the North. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said
Sunday that he is glad John
Bolton will serve as President
Trump’s national security adviser going into the talks with
North Korea because of his
‘‘very healthy skepticism.’’
Hopes have been raised
that Kim may be willing to discuss his nuclear weapons program with Trump, and other
measures to reduce the threat
of war — possibly in exchange
for security guarantees and an
easing of the sanctions that
have severely pinched the already struggling North Korean
economy.
Graham said he had dinner
with Bolton a couple of nights
ago and the hawkish former
amb as sa dor to th e UN e x pressed fears that North Korea
is ‘‘just buying time’’ as it seeks
to develop a nuclear-armed
missile.
‘‘He sees these negotiations
as a way of buying time. That’s
what they've done in the past,’’
said Graham, a member of the
Senate Armed Services Committee. Bolton will replace Army Lieutenant General H.R.
McMaster on April 9.
The South Korean troupe
flew to Pyongyang on Saturday
with great fanfare. Its show occurred just weeks before Kim
is scheduled to meet with
EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Kim Jong Un and South Korea’s culture minister, Do Jonghwan, greeted the visitors, including Red Velvet (below).
EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
South Korea’s president, Moon
Jae-in, at a border village on
April 27, and before a planned
summit meeting with Trump
in May.
They were the first South
Korean singers to perform in
North Korea in more than a
decade. Their visit reciprocated a North Korean art troupe’s
performances in South Korea
during its Winter Olympics in
February. Moon watched one
of the North Korean performances.
Kim and Ri, a former singer, were among hundreds of
North Koreans who filled the
1,500-seat theater to watch
the South Korean singers, in-
cluding older crooners, rockers, and K-pop starlets.
On Sunday evening, thunderous clapping erupted when
Kim and his wife entered the
concert hall and seated themselves in a second-floor balcony, according to pool reports
from South Korean journalists
and officials.
Attention was focused on
how Kim would react to the
pop singers, particularly Red
Velvet. The five-member girl
group is typical of South Korean girl groups — known for
their chirpy, bubble-gum harmonies and sexy choreography.
Their tunes are so infectious that the South Korean
military has broadcast them
across the border in a psychological war against North Korean soldiers. The North used
to threaten to direct its artillery at the loudspeakers, warning of an “all-out war” if the
South didn’t turn them off.
But things have changed.
South Korean officials said
the North did not attempt to
reject any of the South Korean
song lineup or change the pop
stars’ lyrics or risqué dance
moves.
“Please tell President Moon
how good this kind of exchange is. I know there has
been attention to whether I
will come and see Red Velvet,”
Kim was quoted as telling
S o u t h Ko r e a n o ff i c i a l s . “ I
thank you for bringing this gift
to Pyongyang citizens.”
Kim Yerim, a Red Velvet
member who is known as Yeri,
was quoted as saying, “The audience clapped loudly and
even sang along.”
The South Korean culture
minister, Do Jong-hwan, told
reporters in Pyongyang after
the show that Kim “showed
much interest during the show
and asked questions about the
songs and lyrics.”
Kim’s acceptance of Red
Velvet and South Korean pop
culture was striking because
his government has expanded
a crackdown on DVDs and
computer thumb drives containing South Korean pop
songs, movies, and TV dramas
smuggled from China.
It has called for establishing “mosquito nets” to keep
out “decadent capitalist influence.”
Defectors from the North
have said that those who were
caught selling or watching
South Korean K-pop music
videos could be sent to prison
camps.
The South Korean singers
now in the North will hold a
joint concert with North Korean performers Tuesday at an
indoor stadium in Pyongyang.
South Koreans will see a recorded version of the concert
later this week, according to
local news media. It is unclear
if, or when, ordinary North
Koreans will be allowed to see
it.
In the past week, Kim traveled by train to pay a stealth
visit to President Xi Jinping of
China in Beijing.
Other gestures from the
North to foster the détente
have included sending athletes, cheerleaders, and an art
troupe to the South during the
Winter Games in February.
Daily Briefing
Gay marriage foe vies in Costa Rica
IBRAHIM YASOUF/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
A Syrian man carried a child Sunday at a camp for displaced people in Kafr Lusin, near the border crossing with Turkey.
Rebels agree to leave town near Syrian capital; larger agreement rumored
BEIRUT — A rebel faction
trapped by government forces
outside the Syrian capital
agreed to evacuate to northern
Syria on Sunday as reports
swirled of a larger agreement
that would have the government retake full control of the
eastern Ghouta region after
seven years of revolt.
Fighters from the Faylaq alRahman group left Douma on
buses sent by the Syrian gov-
ernment to the rebel-held province of Idlib, SANA state news
agency reported.
Some 1,300 fighters, activists, and civilians signed up to
leave the town, according to
the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights monitoring group.
It was the first organized
evacuation of fighters from
Douma, one of the earliest centers of the antigovernment
demonstrations that swept
through the country in 2011.
Security forces responded
by putting the town and other
suburbs around Damascus under siege, bombing hospitals
and residential areas, and
blocking the entry of food and
medical relief.
Douma is a stronghold of
the Army of Islam rebel group.
The town is one of the last
around the capital to hold out
against the government.
Later Sunday, a media outlet linked to the Syrian military
reported that the Army of Islam also agreed to leave to
north Syria, effectively transferring control of Douma to
Damascus. The deal would
mark the end of a weeks-long
push by the government to
consolidate its control of the
eastern Ghouta region.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
UK inquiry hints at high­level spy plot
Chinese space lab falling to Earth
LONDON — British officials investigating the poisoning of a former Russian double agent, believe it is likely
that the attacker smeared a
nerve agent on a door handle
at his home. This operation is
seen as so risky and sensitive
that it is unlikely to have been
undertaken without approval
from the Kremlin, according
to officials who were briefed
on the early findings of the inquiry.
This theory suggests that
an assassin, who Britain believes was working on behalf
BERLIN — China’s defunct
Tiangong 1 space station hurtled toward reentry of the
Earth’s atmosphere on Sunday,
and space officials were monitoring a large orbital track for
possible debris.
Most of the craft was expected to burn up on reentry,
so scientists said falling debris
posed only a slight risk to people on the ground.
The European Space Agency forecast that the station,
with a name that translates as
‘‘Heavenly Palace,’’ would reenter sometime between Sunday
of the Russian government,
walked up to the door of Sergei Skripal’s brick home on a
street in Salisbury on March 4,
the day he and his daughter,
Yulia, were sickened.
Skripal, who was freed in a
spy swap with the United
States in 2010, is still in critical condition, but Yulia is reportedly conscious.
Because the nerve agent is
so potent, officials said, the
task could have been carried
out only by professionals familiar with chemical weapons.
NEW YORK TIMES
night and early Monday.
The Aerospace Corp. said
that based on its orbit Tiangong 1 would come back to
Earth over a range covering
most of the United States, China, Africa, southern Europe,
Australia, and South America.
It said Russia, Canada, and
northern Europe would be out
of range. Only about 10 percent of the bus-sized, 8.5-ton
spacecraft was expected to survive being burned up on reentry, mainly its heavier components.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica —
An evangelical pastor who has
capitalized on opposition to
same-sex marriage was in a
tight presidential race in Costa
Rica on Sunday against a novelist and former Cabinet minister.
Fabricio Alvarado went
from also-ran to leading candidate after he came out strongly
against a call by the InterAmerican Court of Human
Rights for Costa Rica to allow
same-sex marriage.
His opponent, Carlos Alvarado of the governing Citizen
Action Party, has openly
backed allowing gays to wed.
Recent polling showed the
candidates — who are not related — in a statistical tie
heading into the vote. They
were the top vote-getters in a
first-round election in early
February.
The two share similarities
beyond that last name. Both
have backgrounds in journalism and both have recorded
music: Fabricio Alvarado as a
gospel star and Carlos as a college-age rock ‘n roller.
Though lacking major party backing, Fabricio Alvarado
enjoyed high name recognition, especially in evangelical
E. BECERRA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Presidential candidate
Carlos Alvarado is a
novelist and ex-labor aide.
circles, and for working on one
of the country’s main TV
newscasts.
Carlos Alvarado is a novelist and former labor minister.
Both candidates have opted
for economic advisers who
take a conservative approach
to economics, maintaining the
free market, and reducing the
size of government.
In Mexico on Sunday, frontrunning candidate Andres
Manuel Lopez Obrado opened
his campaign for the July 1
presidential election in Ciudad
Juarez, the border city that
launched some of Mexico’s key
resistance struggles.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pope urges peace in Easter message
VATICAN CITY — On
Christianity’s most joyful day,
Pope Francis called for peace
in a world marked by war and
conflict, beginning with Syria
and extending to Israel, where
15 Palestinians were killed on
the Israeli-Gaza border two
days before Easter Sunday.
Francis reflected on the
power of Christianity’s core belief — that Jesus rose from the
dead following crucifixion —
in his formal ‘‘Urbi et Orbi’’
Easter message delivered from
the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica to a packed square of some
80,000 faithful below.
The pope said the message
of the resurrection offers hope
in a world ‘‘marked by so
many acts of injustice and violence.’’
‘‘It bears fruits of hope and
dignity where there are deprivation and exclusion, hunger
and unemployment; where
there are migrants and refu-
gees, so often rejected by today’s culture of waste, and victims of the drug trade, human
trafficking, and contemporary
forms of slavery,’’ the pope
said.
In Jerusalem, hundreds of
Christians marked Easter by
flocking to the Church of the
Holy Sepulchre, built on the
site where they believe Jesus
was crucified, buried, and resurrected. Worshipers prayed
and sang hymns in the church
and viewed the edicule, the
chamber believed to mark Jesus’ tomb.
A historic restoration of the
chamber was completed last
year, aimed at reversing the effects of years of exposure to
water, humidity, and candle
smoke. The limestone and
marble structure stands at the
center of the church, a 12thcentury building on a 4th-century foundation.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The World
In mall’s
ashes,
outrage
builds
A5
Israel rejects calls
for investigation of
Gaza border deaths
By Loveday Morris
WASHINGTON POST
Disaster fuels
Russian angst
By Yuras Karmanau
ASSOCIATED PRESS
K E M E R O V O, R u s s i a —
Trapped inside a movie theater
at a burning shopping center,
11-year-old Vika Pochankina
made a panicked phone call to
her aunt. ‘‘I’m suffocating. Tell
Mama that I loved her,’’ the girl
said.
Yevgenia Pochankina told
her niece to cover her nose
with her clothes to fend off the
smoke.
‘‘After a moment, she disconnected,’’ the aunt said.
The deaths of 64 people —
including 41 children — in a Siberian shopping center fire on
March 25 have tormented their
loved ones, bringing not only
grief over those they lost but
deep dismay about the state of
life in Russia.
Relatives of the dead — and
many others in Russia — ask
why the shopping center ’s
emergency exits were locked,
why the mall ’s fire alarms
didn’t sound, whether the center ever met building standards or if inspectors were
bribed to turn a blind eye to deficiencies.
Living in Kemerovo, a Siberian city 1,900 miles east of
Moscow, they are hurt and angry over what they see as official callousness after the fire.
The regional governor
didn’t visit the scene, President
Vladimir Putin didn’t declare a
national day of mourning until
two days after the fire, and officials have dismissed their protests over the blaze as political
opportunism.
‘‘This tragedy reflects all of
Russia’s problems — the cor-
SERGEI GAVRILENKO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Yevgenia Pochankina (left) viewed a tribute for the victims of a fire in Siberia. Her niece,
Vika, 11, was one of the 41 schoolchildren who died.
ruption of officials who closed
their eyes to problems with fire
safety, uncoordinated work of
the special services, the imperviousness of authorities,’’ said
Rasim Yaraliyev, head of a citizen’s group pressing for answers about the fire.
Aman Tuleyev, who had
been governor of the Kemerovo
region for 20 years, resigned
on Sunday. Tuleyev was under
intense pressure from residents after the fire, although
Putin said last week that it was
too early to talk about disciplining officials.
In a video message addressed to the people of Kemerovo posted on the local administration’s website Sunday,
Tuleyev said that he had taken
it upon himself to vacate his
post.
‘‘I believe this is the only
right and thoughtful decision
for me,’’ Tuleyev said, ‘‘because
one can’t work as a governor
with such a heavy moral burden; it’s just not right.’’
Vika was one of six schoolchildren from the village of
Treshchevsky who had traveled
30 miles that day to Kemerovo,
a trip rewarding them for being good students. As they sat
in the theater watching an ani-
mated film, a fire broke out in
the four-story Winter Cherry
mall.
Vika and her classmates
were among the dead. Teacher
Oksana Yevseyeva, the trip’s
chaperone, had left the children to watch the movie themselves in the theater while she
did some shopping. She was on
the first floor when the fire
broke out above.
‘‘I begged the guards to give
me a mask and let me in to the
children when the fire started,
but they said there is smoke everywhere, you will just die,’’ she
said.
Six people have been arrested in the case, including the
head of the regional construction inspection agency when
the shopping center was developed in a former candy factory
and the general director of the
company that owns the mall.
But distrust in Russian officials’ promises of a thorough
investigation is strong.
‘‘They’re not telling us the
truth. Judging by everything,
nobody saved the children,
they closed them off and abandoned them,’’ said Olga Begeza,
whose daughter Diana wanted
to go on the trip but couldn’t
because her mother didn’t have
the $7 to pay for it.
‘‘It seems that our lives
d o n’ t c o u n t f o r a n y t h i n g .
That’s the only thing my family
has understood,’’ she said.
Complaints about official
corruption and incompetence
are widespread in Russia, and
in Kemerovo they are aggravated by what’s seen as an insensitive response from officials.
Although Putin visited Kemerovo on Tuesday, he did not
speak to a large gathering of
demonstrators demanding answers, protesting corruption,
and calling for regional officials’ ousters.
Deputy regional governor
Sergei Tsivilyov did show up
but incurred the crowd’s anger
when he dismissed as ‘‘a PR
stunt’’ concerns that the death
toll was far higher than officially reported.
In a meeting with Putin,
Tuleyev added to the anger by
blaming ‘‘the opposition’’ and
‘‘local busybodies’’ for fomenting the 10-hour protest.
In the days after the fire,
tens of thousands of people in
Moscow, St. Petersburg, and
other cities streamed to makeshift memorials to the fire victims, bringing flowers and
stuffed toys.
GAZA CITY — Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman of Israel
on Sunday rejected international calls for an inquiry into the
deaths of at least 15 Palestinians, saying that troops ‘‘deserve a commendation’’ for
their response to protests at the
Gaza border.
The ‘‘March of Return’’ to
mark the anniversary of land
appropriation by Israel in 1976
drew tens of thousands of Gaza
residents to the border fence on
Friday. Israel’s use of live ammunition to push them back
triggered calls by the United
Nations, European Union officials, rights groups, and Gaza
families for an investigation.
The Israeli military said it
adhered to rules of engagement
during what it characterized as
an attempt by Hamas, the militant group that controls Gaza,
to break through the fence into
Israel and endanger its security.
The Palestinian representat i v e t o t h e Un i t e d S t a t e s ,
Husam Zomlot, accused Israel
of ‘‘indiscriminate murder’’ and
called firing on demonstrators
‘‘morally repugnant and a
crime against humanity.’’
Lieberman told Israel’s Army Radio that only people who
tried to approach the border
fence had been shot. Israel’s
military says its rules of engagement are confidential but comply with international law.
‘‘Under no circumstances
will a commission of inquiry be
established,’’ Lieberman said.
Israeli troops pulled out of
Gaza in 2005, but the United
Nations still considers it occupied territory because Israel has
‘‘effective control.’’
The movement of goods and
people has been severely restricted since Hamas, which Israel and the United States consider a terrorist organization,
took over Gaza 11 years ago.
Israel has fought three wars
with Hamas; tensions have
been building again recently as
rocket fire from Gaza became
more frequent after President
Trump’s announcement the
United States would recognize
Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.
A growing humanitarian crisis has fueled frustrations, with
Palestinians in Gaza laying
blame primarily on restrictions
by Israel. T he border with
Egypt remains largely closed,
while punitive financial measures leveled by the Palestinian
Authority against rival Hamas
have added to Gaza’s woes.
No Israeli soldiers have been
reported injured in the border
demonstrations so far, but Israel has accused Hamas of attempting to use the protests as
cover to carry out attacks. On
the Palestinian side, the Gaza
Health Ministry said more than
700 people suffered gunshot
wounds on Friday alone.
At Al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza
City, administrative workers
showed computer records that
listed 283 people admitted with
injuries sustained in the border
demonstrations. Al-Shifa is the
main medical facility in Gaza
Strip but one of more than a
dozen hospitals and clinics that
took in casualties.
‘‘Most of them were direct
gunshots to the lower limbs,’’
said Ayman al-Sahbani, head of
Al-Shifa’s emergency department. He said the injured included 70 children under 18.
At one point on the border
near Gaza City there was a gunshot injury every few minutes.
Gunfire continued in consistent
bursts throughout the day, as
did the use of tear gas, sometimes dropped from drones.
All injured people observed
by The Washington Post over
the course of the day appeared
to have been shot in the legs.
Imagine your home, totally organized!
Custom Closets
Garage Cabinets Home Offices
Pantries
Laundries
Hobby Rooms
40% Off
Plus
Free Installation
40% off any order of $1000 or more. 30% off any order of $700 or
more. Not valid with any other offer. Free installation with any
complete unit order of $500 or more. With incoming order, at time
of purchase only.
Call for a free in home design consultation and estimate
855-275-2507
www.closetsbydesign.com
MA Lic #119162 and Insured 2015 © All Rights Reserved. Closets by Design, Inc.
BG
Follow us
A6
The Region
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
To staff Springfield casino, MGM digs into data
uMGM HIRING
Continued from Page A1
openings for about 1,000 of its
3,000 jobs, mainly in food and
beverage service. Just over 100
employees have been hired so
far.
Overall, roughly 80 percent
of MGM’s jobs will be full time,
with the company helping to
provide local training for many
of them. Given MGM’s good relationship with organized labor
at its other resorts, a fair share
will probably have union protections.
Wynn Boston Harbor has
been undertaking similar workforce development efforts, including analyzing demographics and partnering with nonprofits and community
colleges, as it looks toward
opening in Everett next year.
MGM has committed to filling more than a third of its jobs
with Springfield residents and
natives. The company would
not disclose entry-level wages,
other than to say they are competitive and above minimum
wage and the average annual
salary will be $40,000.
The median household income in Springfield is nearly
$ 3 6 , 0 0 0 ; s t a t e w i d e , i t ’s
$71,000.
The company stresses its
commitment to moving people
up the career ladder, but service
workers such as waiters and
housekeepers typically don’t
have much room to advance,
said Tom Juravich, interim director of the Labor Center at
the University of Massachusetts
Amherst. That makes for a less
reliable form of economic development.
“What I worry about is the
large number of people who
will be in low-wage jobs that really won’t go anywhere,” Juravich said. “This is not like bringing Amazon to town, or even
traditional manufacturing or
health care, because those jobs
all have a much higher predominance of middle-wage and
high-wage positions.”
Thuy Nguyen, the daughter
of Vietnamese immigrants,
lived in Springfield until her
parents lost their manufacturing jobs and moved to Maine.
Nguyen, 26, came back to the
city for college and turned an
unpaid MGM internship into a
job as a campaign organizer in
2013, when the resort was trying to woo voters in a city referendum. After stints at MGM resorts in Las Vegas and Maryland, Nguyen returned to
Springfield last fall to work in
employee relations.
Initially, she said, “My parents thought I was crazy to run
back to Springfield, where they
know there aren’t any jobs.”
Now, “they’re very proud.”
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
The MGM Springfield resort and casino, under construction on Main Street, is due to open in late summer — in a city with a 6.6 percent jobless rate.
So far, however, even in a
city with a 6.6 percent unemployment rate — well above the
state rate of 4 percent — the
gaming school is only at half capacity for dealer jobs, which
pay around $45,000 a year,
mostly from tips, in line with
t h e n at i o n a l av e ra ge . T h e
school’s director speculates that
the novelty of the industry in
the area is holding people back.
Math anxiety and mandatory
background checks could also
be roadblocks. And training
isn’t cheap — $400 for a sixweek roulette class — although
everyone who completes two
courses gets an audition for an
MGM job, and those who are
hired get reimbursed.
But the casino company is
determined to breathe life into
a city that has been ravaged by
a decades-long decline in manufacturing and a tornado in
2011.
“We’re looking for a renaissance,” said MGM Springfield
president Michael Mathis.
On a recent day at the Massachusetts Casino Career Training Institute gaming school, on
the ninth floor of MGM Springfield’s administrative offices,
chips clinked and automatic
card shufflers whirred as a few
dozen students learned the ins
and outs of blackjack. The students, ranging in age from their
20s to their 70s, all dressed in
white shirts and black pants,
took turns dealing while instructors leaned in to show
them how to stack chips and
where to put their hands to
avoid suspicion.
A dealer drew an ace and a
10 of clubs for himself — blackjack — and raked in the bets
from his fellow students.
“When you lose, the house is
happy,” said Raymond Caporale, a retired phone company
worker with a cane hooked over
the table. Caporale, a 71-yearold Springfield native who likes
to bet on horses, had always
wanted to work in a casino. His
daughter, a MassMutual employee, is also interested in a
job.
“I have a knee issue,” he said.
“But . . . you can just put that
aside, take a couple of Tylenol,
and we’re all set to go.”
Diane Garvey, who was recently laid off from a sales job,
thought her background might
help her become a dealer. “I
have the gift of gab,” she said.
The gaming school is a col-
laboration between Holyoke
Community College and
Springfield Technical Community College, which are part of a
statewide consortium that was
formed after the state authorized gambling in 2011. MGM,
which is providing the instructors and the gaming equipment, is looking to hire 450 table games dealers — for mini
baccarat, roulette, craps, blackjack, and carnival games — and
100 poker dealers.
Instructor Angel Rivera, 45,
a Holyoke native, will be a floor
supervisor once the casino
opens. After several decades as
a dealer in Atlantic City and at
Mohegan Sun, he has mastered
the fine art of entertaining
guests while dealing cards. Rivera had been working in security for Springfield Public
Schools, but when MGM announced it was vying for a casino, he jumped at the chance to
get back in the game.
“Even when there was nothing here, they had my resume,”
he said.
Getting to know the local
workforce is key, said Wanda
Smith-Gispert, regional vice
president of talent and workforce development for MGM.
The best loss-prevention specialists, she has found, often
have a background at Marshalls, the discount department
store. Bank tellers make excellent cage cashiers, the employees who cash in players’ chips.
When Smith-Gispert saw the
math scores of Springfield students, she met with the state’s
education secretary to talk
about how to better prepare potential employees. To make up
for a shortage of culinary professionals in the region, MGM
gave Holyoke Community College $500,000 to expand its
cooking school, now named the
HCC MGM Culinary Arts Institute. MGM also asked Cambridge College, which has a
branch in Springfield, to teach
its hospitality students the art
of “luxury guest service” — saying, “It’s my pleasure,” instead
of “ You’re welcome,” for instance — and to drill students
on the top 10 questions tourists
ask in Springfield, including
where to buy souvenirs and go
leaf-peeping.
To op en u p jobs to e ve n
more people, MGM appealed to
the Massachusetts Gaming
Commission to change a state
law that previously barred
many former offenders from casino jobs. As a result, 800 of the
MGM Springfield spots, including housekeepers, cooks, and
front desk clerks, have been exempted from that restriction.
MGM has also partnered
with local agencies to secure
scholarships for residents who
can’t afford training. With help
from organizations such as
New England Farm Workers’
Council, which assists low-income residents from all walks
of life, Yoly Carrasquillo was
able to attend security and hospitality classes, and soon, the
gaming school. The 25-year-old
Holyoke resident, a former
home health aide who lives in
subsidized housing with her
two children, has her sights set
on a management role at MGM.
For the first time, she can see a
career path.
“It’s a great opportunity for
us single mothers,” she said,
noting the resort’s on-site day
care. “On break time we could
run across the street and give
our kids a few kisses.”
Katie Johnston can be reached
at katie.johnston@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@ktkjohnston.
City has reimbursed drivers $163,000 for pothole damage
uPOTHOLES
Continued from Page A1
$163,000 to nearly 300 drivers
whose cars were damaged by
defects on Boston streets, rec o r d s s h o w. O n e s t r e e t i n
Charlestown has resulted in
more than $27,000 in payments, and another spot in
Back Bay led to $23,000 more.
The drivers took advantage
of a little-publicized state law
that requires municipalities to
reimburse people for property
damage or personal injur y
caused by problems with their
streets. The law says drivers
can recoup a percentage of
their vehicle’s value up to
$5,000.
So drivers with more expensive cars are eligible for
larger payouts.
In some cases, the city also
reimburses the $15 filing fee.
In Boston, motorists must
file a claim within 30 days of
sustaining damage. If the incident occurred on a state road,
repayment is only possible if
someone was injured. The
maximum payout on a state
road is $4,000, state law says.
From 2013 to last year, the
average settlement in Boston
was $560.
Twelve claims have been
filed so far this year, including
six from drivers who say their
cars were damaged at the
same place in the Back Bay:
where Huntington Avenue
runs under Massachusetts Avenue, records show.
That spot has cost the city
nearly $23,000 in repayments
in the last five years. One
$4,990 payout went to the
owner of a Bentley Continental GTC, who hit a pothole
there in 2013.
“You would think the multiple claims in similar spots
would generate notice,” said
Samuel Tyler, president of the
Boston Municipal Research
Bureau, a fiscal watchdog.
But Chris Osgood, Boston’s
chief of streets, said that while
motorists are encouraged to
file claims for damage, those
reports don’t drive decisions
about which roads to repave.
The city prioritizes repaving
work, he said, based on reports to the 311 complaint system and engineering assessments.
“We do want to make sure
people have a good safe experience on our roads,” Osgood
said.
Paul Kastrinakis said the
Somerville dealership where
he leased his car encouraged
him to file a claim after he hit
a pothole near the Bunker Hill
Monument during a storm
four years ago. The impact
flattened the rear passengerside tire and bent the axle on a
2014 Mercedes Benz truck
that he had leased the month
before.
“ The damage was astronomical,” said Kastrinakis,
who was charged about $6,000
to repair the vehicle. The city
repaid him $5,000.
The spot where his truck
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
‘I said, “Are you serious? I’m not going
to get anything for that.’’ ’
MICHAEL BARSAMIAN. after a pothole damaged his Bentley
was damaged — the intersection of Soley Street and Monument Square — is still pockmarked with potholes. At least
three were in the intersection
on March 30.
Parts of Rutherford Avenue, the street where Viel hit a
pothole, are still scarred by
craters. In the last five years,
the city has spent more than
$27,000 to reimburse drivers
after their vehicles were damaged there, records show.
Potholes develop during cycles of freeze and thaw, which
lets water seep into cracks in
the pavement and expand,
causing asphalt to deteriorate
under the weight of passing
cars.
Wo r ke rs r ec e nt l y fil le d
about 10 potholes on the
southbound side of the Rutherford Avenue underpass
near Sullivan Square, where
over a three-day stretch in
mid-January, at least two drivers got flat tires, costing them
hundreds of dollars in repairs,
city records show. Both submitted claims for reimbursement.
That road is scheduled to
be repaved this year, according
to the city, which blamed the
pothole problem on high water table levels and heavy traffic. Officials are also redesigning Rutherford Avenue as part
of an effort to decrease congestion and improve the road for
pedestrians and bicyclists.
Anthony Scott, 24, said he
got two flat tires while driving
south on Rutherford Avenue
on Jan. 13. He said he submitted a claim for payment at the
urging of his mother, a city
employee. A police officer who
helped him at the scene also
told him about the claims process, Scott said.
“In that general area the
road is pretty bad,” said Scott,
who lives in Allston. The city
paid him $258, records show.
Two days later, Everett resident Jim Booker hit a pothole
in the same area while driving
his 2015 Mitsubishi Mirage.
The impact damaged two
tires, but Booker said he replaced all four for more than
$500.
The city repaid him $260,
records show.
“The whole car just shook
and I almost went into the
stone barrier,” said Booker,
who was commuting to his job
at a group home in Quincy.
Booker said he sometimes
travels the Tobin Bridge, a toll
road, to avoid the spot where
he damaged his car.
“Better safe than sorry,” he
said.
The same problems that
face Rutherford Avenue —
high water table levels and
heavy traffic — have also
dogged Huntington Avenue,
the city said. The avenue is
scheduled to be repaved this
year.
Michael Barsamian, the
self-made beauty salon entrepreneur, hit a pothole there in
April 2013, flattening two tires
and damaging two rims on his
2013 Bentle y Continental
GTC. The damage cost more
than $6,200 to fix, and Barsamian said his son-in-law encouraged him to make a claim.
“I said, ‘Are you serious?
I’m not going to get anything
for that,’” said Barsamian, who
continues to cut hair on Saturdays at Lord’s and Lady’s Hair
Salon in West Roxbury.
The city repaid him $4,990,
records show.
Less than two years after
Barsamian hit a pothole on
Huntington Avenue, another
driver got a $4,515 payment
from the city for pothole damage sus tai ned by his 20 07
BMW 530xi, records show.
In January, another BMW
owner driving through the underpass hit a pothole covered
by snow and slush, causing
more than $4,000 in damage,
according to a claim filed with
the city. The area was a hodgepodge of potholes and patches
when a reporter recently visited.
“ They never really fixed
that underpass,” said Barsamian. “Maybe the mayor will get
somebody over there and fix it
right.”
Laura Crimaldi
can be reached at
laura.crimaldi@globe.com.
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Nation/Region
A7
Neal, McGovern could get
top House leadership posts
uDELEGATION
Continued from Page A1
setts delegation to shepherd the
Democratic legislative agenda if
a Trump backlash puts the
House back in the party’s hands
after eight years of GOP control.
“If they are both chairs, I
think that will be the most power the state has had frankly
since Tip left,” said former Massachusetts representative Barney Frank, who had served as
chair of the House Financial
Services Committee.
Representative Thomas P.
“Tip” O’Neill Jr., the legendary
Cambridge lawmaker, was
speaker of the House from 1977
to 1987 and was so effective at
sending money back to Massachusetts that the massive Big
Dig tunnel under downtown
Boston was named after him.
Edward M. Kennedy worked
with him in tandem in the Senate, prompting one former Kennedy aide to call the duo “the
most powerful delivery system”
for Massachusetts of all time.
In today’s gridlocked, highly
partisan Capitol Hill, holding a
chairmanship often is an exercise in frustration. Nonetheless,
Neal and McGovern would be
key players touching nearly every piece of significant legislation in a Democratic-controlled
House.
As Ways and Means chairman, Neal could direct attempts to roll back the Republicans’ tax reform package and
any health care changes.
On the Rules Committee,
McGovern would serve as the
gatekeeper for all legislation,
deciding which bills move forward to the House floor and
which bills quietly die in committee.
The stakes in the 2018 election couldn’t be any higher for
the Massachusetts team, because there is not a single Republican among the nine representatives.
In the US Senate, Democrats face a more difficult path
for 2018, and most analysts say
odds are high that it will remain in Republican control.
Democratic Senator Elizabeth
Warren of Massachusetts is expected to easily win a second
term; Ed Markey, the state’s
other Democratic senator, does
not face reelection until 2020.
The potential upgrade of
the state’s House delegation has
old-timers seeing visions of the
glory days once again.
“The Massachusetts delegation will be poised once again
to deliver for their home state,
just like they used to do in the
golden years of Speaker O’Neill,
Senator Kennedy, and others,”
said Democratic strategist Jim
Manley, who used to work for
Kennedy.
But Neal, who has seen the
ups and downs of the delegation since first winning office in
1988, isn’t picking out curtains
for the chairman’s plush office.
“I’m certainly confident, but
I’m not overconfident,” Neal,
69, said of his chances to become chairman.
After Kennedy’s death in
2009, the Massachusetts dele-
gation across both chambers
lost nearly 200 years of seniority in the space of a few years,
reaching a low point in 2015 of
a paltry combined 93 years in
office.
Frank retired in 2012 after
32 years in the House. Markey’s
37 years of House seniority
were essentially erased when
he became a freshman senator
in 2013.
Also, Representative John
Olver retired after 2012, leaving Massachusetts without a
seat on the powerful Appropriations Committee until Representative Katherine Clark was
appointed to one in 2017.
That made for the least experienced delegation since the
1960s — a big liability in an institution that runs on seniority.
“Well, it was a good lesson in
humility,” Neal said. “There’s a
rhythm to these things. And I
think we’re on the right side of
that rhythm at the moment.”
If he becomes chairman,
Neal plans to seek a repeal of
the state and local tax deduction cap put in place by Republicans last year. The cap hurts
higher-income taxpayers in
states and cities with steep local
taxes, such as Massachusetts.
Neal also wants to lower health
care premiums and shore up
pension plans.
The Springfield politician
considers himself a bipartisan
dealmaker, an attitude that
would come in handy if Republicans keep their Senate majority, as legislation must be approved by both chambers.
McGovern declined an interview request through an aide,
because he has not yet formally
been named ranking member
on the Rules Committee. But a
Democratic leadership aide
confirmed he would be selected
early this month.
If Democrats take the
House, the full Democratic conference would need to approve
nominations of both Neal and
McGovern as chairmen.
McGovern has his seat on
Rules thanks to the late Representative J. Joseph Moakley,
who called in a favor on his
deathbed in order to get his former staffer, McGovern, on the
key committee.
W h i l e H o u s e s p e a k e r,
O’Neill methodically spread out
Massachusetts lawmakers
across the best committees,
hoping they would climb the
ranks over time and deliver for
their state. The delegation has
SPRING TRY ON
EVENTS
- Lexington -
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Thurs, April 5
9 am - 5 pm
- Needham -
tried to keep this tradition
alive, even with diminished
power to do so.
Massachusetts companies
and industries are excited to
perhaps soon have a direct line
to chairmen pushing for a bigger piece of the funding pie for
them and their interests.
Larry Rasky, a longtime lobbyist and CEO of Rasky Partners, said the promotions
would make “an enormous difference in Massachusetts’ priorities being funded.”
“Obviously Congressman
Neal cares about Massachusetts
companies, and he’s going to
continue to always do that. But
when you’re chairman you really can have the definitive hold
on what’s in the bill and what’s
not in the bill,” said Rasky.
Rasky also said the plan for
high-speed rail between Springfield and Boston would also get
a boost if Democrats take control. “That doesn’t get done
without serious heavy lifting
from the delegation,” he said.
Massachusetts lawmakers
say they’re excited to potentially be power players again.
“There’s absolute certainty
that with the seniority we have
in the House, it will be a much
more effective delegation than
it’s been in a while,” said Representative Mike Capuano, who,
if Democrats take over, could
lead subcommittees of the
transportation and finance
panels.
Capuano said he would seek
a bigger piece of the funding pie
for Massachusetts if Democrats
gain the majority, especially for
transportation projects.
The slow machinations of
the House and its levers of power often don’t translate to voters. Capuano is facing a primary challenge from Boston City
Council member Ayanna Pressley, but he doesn’t plan to make
his seniority an issue in his
campaign by pointing out he
would have more leverage in
the chamber.
“Let’s be honest; the average
person doesn’t know how the
sausage is made,” he said.
GLOBE/FILE 1979
Edward M. Kennedy (left) and Thomas P. O’Neill worked closely to help Massachusetts.
Liz Goodwin can be reached at
elizabeth.goodwin@globe.com.
Open
April
6-8 at
7-9
11am
Perkins Cove • Ogunquit, Maine
www.barnbilly.com
Your savings could be
growing faster.
1082 Great Plain Ave.
Fri, April 6
9 am - 5 pm
michelsonshoes.com
%
1.55
HIGH YIELD SAVINGS
no minimum balance
APY*
Recognized as a NerdWallet Best
Savings Account three years in a row!*
Visit us at synchronybank.com or call 1-800-753-6870
to get started.
*Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of 4/1/18 and subject to change at any time without notice. Rates
are variable and subject to change any time without notice after the account is opened. No minimum opening deposit
required. Fees may reduce earnings. Visit synchronybank.com for current rates, terms and account requirements.
Offer applies to personal accounts only.
AWARDS: © 2016, 2017, 2018 and TM, NerdWallet, Inc. All rights reserved.
© 2018 Synchrony Bank
A8
Nation/Region
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
For Kushners, redemption in White House was mirage
Family, company
still facing array
of investigations
By Sharon LaFraniere
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — Charles
Kushner felt a sense of redemption last year when his son Jared was named senior White
House adviser.
A dozen years earlier, a scandal stemming partly from a
family falling-out had reduced
the senior Kushner from real
estate baron to an inmate at a
federal prison camp in Alabama.
Now, with his son newly installed as a top aide to the president, Kushner even expressed
hope, one close family friend
said, that he might receive a
pardon.
Absolution, however, is not
what the White House has conferred on the Kushners. For the
patriarch and his family, the
pinnacle of American political
power has turned out to be a
wellspring of trouble.
Jared Kushner is embroiled
in the special counsel inquiry,
including questions about
whether he discussed the family’s business with foreign offi-
cials — a suggestion he has denied.
His younger brother, Josh,
has opposed the Trump presidency, driving a wedge between
the men in a family that prizes
close ties.
The elder Kushner, his company, and his family are assailed by criminal and regulatory inquiries largely rooted in
their newfound access to presidential power.
The family ’s East Coastbased real estate empire is under a fiscal and ethical cloud,
shunned by some investors
who fear being dragged into
the spotlight trained on the
Kushner nexus with President
Trump.
Two major Manhattan properties are on creditors’ watch
lists, one after foreign investors
backed out of a financing deal.
In a recent interview in his
15th-floor office at 666 Fifth
Ave. — an aluminum-clad Manhattan skyscraper that has become a symbol of the family’s
troubles — Charles Kushner
brushed it all aside as false insinuations whipped into a publicity frenzy partly by political
opponents.
Slender, silver-haired, and
impeccably dressed, Kushner,
63, was by turns charming,
blunt, and philosophical, an
engaging contrast to Jared
Kushner’s more stilted persona.
He made little effort to hide
his contempt for the investigations of his business and family,
saying that the stacks of records he has voluntarily given
investigators rebut any suggestion of impropriety.
“Go knock yourselves out for
the next 10 years,” he said. “We
Bank, Germany’s largest lende r, r e f i n a n c e d a Ku s h n e r owned property in Times
Square.
State regulators in New York
are examining Kushner loans
from that bank and two others,
including lines of credit to Jared Kushner. Jared Kushner’s
White House meetings with
lenders and partners of Kushner Cos. have raised repeated
questions about conflicts be-
‘Go knock yourselves out
for the next 10 years. We
didn’t do anything wrong.’
CHARLES KUSHNER
Head of family with close links to Trump
didn’t do anything wrong.”
A long list of investigators
are testing that claim. Federal
prosecutors in Brooklyn are
studying whether one of Kushner’s daughters dangled White
House influence before prospective Chinese investors. So
is the Securities and Exchange
Commission.
The Brooklyn federal prosecutors also are investigating
the terms on which Deutsche
tween his official and personal
interests.
Most recently, the head of
the federal Office of Government Ethics informed a House
member in a letter that he had
asked the White House counsel
to examine meetings in the
White House last year between
Jared Kushner and officials
from two financial companies.
The companies later lent the
Kushner Cos. more than a half-
billion dollars.
The meetings were reported
earlier by The New York Times;
the letter was reported by CNN.
Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the
White House press secretary,
said Tuesday that the counsel’s
office was not investigating
whether Kushner broke the
law.
Charles Kushner described
the loans as arm’s-length transactions that did not involve his
son.
On top of all of this, the political prize at the root of those
travails — Jared Kushner ’s
White House post — appears to
be losing its luster. Although he
remains Trump’s senior adviser, Jared Kushner, 37, was
stripped of his top-secret security clearance in February for
reasons that remain undisclosed.
Kushner, who friends say
was taken aback by the decision, has avoided questions
about how he will fulfill his
once-sweeping White House
duties without that privilege.
He has also lost some of his
closest allies: two aides, Reed
Cordish and Josh Raffel, recently announced their departures, as did Gary D. Cohn, the
president’s economic adviser.
Still hoping to make an impact
on global affairs, Kushner has
turned his attention from the
Middle East stalemate to US relations with Mexico.
Charles Kushner is adamant
that his family remains united
in the face of their difficulties.
But friends say Jared Kushner’s
sister is distressed by investigators’ focus on her, and there are
tensions between Jared and
Josh over Trump.
That Josh Kushner, 32, has
made no secret of the fact that
he did not vote for Trump upset
his brother, several friends
said. Voting records show Josh
Kushner did not vote in the
2016 presidential election.
Josh’s spokesman, Jesse Derris,
said the brothers “are just as
close as ever.”
And while Charles Kushner
insists his bankers are loyal, investors are eager and deals are
plentiful, some business associates say the drumbeat of unflattering headlines is putting tremendous pressure on the family business.
Banks must assess the risk
of any continuing regulatory or
criminal inquiries before making loans; potential investors
are worried that they could
come under scrutiny or that
projects will be delayed or fall
apart.
Scientists say NIH undercut
funding amid industry deal
uALCOHOL
Continued from Page A1
Shocked by the encounter, they
retreated to an NIH cafeteria,
asking each other what had just
happened — and why.
It would take them three
years to figure it out: In 2014
and 2015, Koob’s agency was
quietly wooing the alcoholic
beverage industry to contribute
tens of millions of dollars for a
study on whether drinking
“moderate” amounts of alcohol
was good for the heart. Those
efforts were brought to light by
recent reports in WIRED and
The New York Times.
Now STAT has found that
the ties between Koob, his
agency, and the alcohol industry were deeper than previously
known — and that Koob told an
industr y official he would
quash “this kind of work,”
which the industry objected to.
Doing so would be a radical departure from the NIH mission,
where decisions about what research to fund are supposed to
be based on scientific merit and
public need.
Koob, in a previously undisclosed e-mail sent six months
before the contentious 2015
meeting and provided to STAT,
assured the alcohol industry’s
leading trade group that re-
search like Jernigan’s and Siegel’s on alcohol advertising,
which had been published in
respected journals, would never again be funded.
“Sam: For the record. This
will NOT happen again,” Koob
wrote in a 2014 e-mail to Samir
Zakhari, senior vice president
for science at the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States,
the lobbying group for alcoholic beverage producers.
In a written response to
STAT, Koob said the e-mail
“was to convey that I had no intention of supporting research
that was not of the highest scientific quality. NIAAA funds a
vast amount of research on underage drinking , which is
among the Institute’s top research priorities.” An institute
spokesman said Koob and other officials were not available
for interviews.
At the time of the 2015
meeting, no outsider was aware
of the institute’s efforts to get
industry funding for the very
costly study of moderate drinking.
With those revelations, Siegel said, “Things finally made
sense. If they’re soliciting money from industry, they wouldn’t
want to do anything that would
affect their chance of getting
that money. Of course that will
bias them toward intimidating
researchers who study things
they don’t like.”
In fact, Koob was true to his
word. Jernigan applied for another NIAAA grant later in
2015 and received a high rating
from a review panel comprising
other scientists. But an Advisory Council that Koob leads has
t h e u l t i m at e a u t h o r i ty o n
whether to fund studies, and it
rejected the proposal.
The saga involving Siegel
and Jernigan began in 2011,
w h e n t h e y a nd c o ll e a g u e s
launched a study of whether alcohol marketing is associated
with underage drinking. The
research came in response to a
“request for applications” from
the institute. Such requests reflect the institute’s priorities;
when it identifies an important
public health or scientific question, it wants to ensure researchers study it.
The scientists were awarded
a grant, receiving roughly
$600,000 per year from 2011 to
2014. Their “ABRAND” study
eventually yielded 27 papers
published in respected journals, including one in 2014 that
found a strong link between
what alcohol brands teenagers
saw advertised on television in
the previous 30 days and what
brands they drank.
“That had never been reported before,” Siegel said.
Dr. Susanne Tanski of Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine, who studies underage
drinking, said Siegel’s and
Jernigan’s paper became a key
piece of evidence in the growing recognition that marketing
by alcohol producers increases
brand awareness among future
customers.
The study did not sit well
with the alcohol industry, nor
with Koob, a neurobiologist
who became the institute’s director in January 2014.
After a staffer at the free-
BOSTON GLOBE MEDIA
1 Exchange Place, Suite 201
Boston, MA 02109-2132
JOIN THE
SPRING
HOUSE HUNT
The Boston Globe (USPS 061-420)
is published Monday-Saturday.
Periodicals postage-paid at Boston, MA.
Postmaster, send address changes to:
Mail Subscription Department
1 Exchange Place, Suite 201
Boston, MA 02109-2132
YEARLY MAIL SUBSCRIPTION
RATES FOR NEW ENGLAND
Seven days $886.08
Daily (6 Days) $599.04
Sunday only $390.00
For all other mail subscription rates and
information, call 1-888-MYGLOBE or
visit www.bostonglobe.com/subscribe
Whether you’re new to the city, a first-time homebuyer, or simply
looking for your next remodeling project, we’ve got you covered.
Visit RealEstate.boston.com
Free newspaper reading service for
the visually impaired: Contact Perkins
Braille & Talking Book Library at
800-852-3133 or
www.perkinslibrary.org
GETTY IMAGES FOR HBO/FILE 2016
George Koob is the director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism,
which reportedly has persuaded the alcoholic beverages industry to help fund a heart study.
market Competitive Enterprise
Institute penned an oped slamming Jernigan for having a “neo-prohibitionist agenda” funded with taxpayer dollars, Koob rushed to reassure
the industry.
O n Ju l y 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 , h e e mailed Zakhari, who had
joined the Distilled Spirits
Council in 2012 two months after retiring from the institute,
where he had worked for more
than 20 years. The industry
group had hosted discussions
about funding for the moderate
drinking study.
In the e-mail, after assuring
Zakhari that “this will NOT
happen again,” Koob continued, “It was funded over 3 years
ago under a PA [project announcement] that does not exist anymore,” according to a
copy of the e-mail Siegel obtained through a public records
request and shared with STAT.
Koob ended with a promise: “I
will NOT be funding this kind
of work under my tenure. Best
wishes George.”
Zakhari replied less than
two hours later : “ T hanks,
George. I am 100% sure that
you will spend research money
on real science. You have several people in the division of epidemiology who push to fund
this kind of research out of
shear [sic] ignorance or because they are sympathetic.
This kind of research not only
wastes precious research dollars but also damages NIAAA’s
stature within the NIH community. Best regards, Sam”
A spokesman for the Distilled Spirits Council, Frank
Coleman, did not respond to
questions about Zakhari’s communications with the institute
but said his concern about
Jernigan’s work “echoes the
many questions that have been
raised about his advocac y
methodologies and conclusions.”
In his written response to
STAT, Koob said the e-mail exchange was triggered by “critical evaluation” of one of Jernigan’s studies “in the media and
the scientific community.” In
early 2015, he continued, “I informed Dr. Jernigan that I
would be pleased to receive
proposals on intervention-related research in the advertising domain, when a hypothesis
was being tested that could assist the goal of preventing underage drinking.”
A few months after the email exchange, Koob summoned Jernigan and Siegel.
The meeting took place in January 2015, and Koob’s deputy
and two other institute officials
also attended, said Siegel and
Jernigan.
Siegel summarized his and
Jernigan’s ABRAND study,
showed the officials published
papers describing their findings and tried to convince them
that studying advertising was
important as part of a larger effort to reduce underage drinking, much as had been done for
cigarette smoking.
“I have a clear memory of
this because it was not something you could forget,” Siegel
said. “Dr. Koob kept trying to
downplay the importance of
this research, insisting it was
not advertising that made teenagers drink but peer pressure
and parents. He was giving us
the industry line.”
He and Jernigan agree that
their study did not make an
open-and-shut case that ads
caused teens to drink the advertised brands, or to drink, period.
“That’s a perfectly legitimate
scientific criticism of our work,”
Jernigan said. “But that’s not
the discussion we had.”
Instead, Koob responded to
Siegel’s presentation with his
profane declaration. He invoked his college-age son and
his friends, saying underage
drinking has nothing to do with
what ads teenagers see, the scientists recalled.
Finally, Koob reiterated the
pledge he had made to the alcohol industry group: No matter
how high a score a grant proposal on this topic the two scientists received from the re-
viewers who evaluate funding
requests, Siegel recalled Koob
telling them, “I’ll never fund it.”
Jernigan’s recollection is slightly different: He believes Koob
left the door open to funding
one more study.
S i e ge l a n d Je r n i g a n r e mained puzzled about the
meeting until the recent media
revelations that institute and
academic scientists had, in
2014, pitched the industry on a
proposed study described as
likely to provide enough evidence of the health benefits of
moderate drinking for alcohol
“to be recommended as part of
a healthy diet.”
The institute received $67
million for the study from industry, funneled through an
NIH foundation, later in 2015.
That study will be led by Dr.
Kenneth Mukamal of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
It didn’t take three years for
the scientists to conclude that
Koob wasn’t bluffing about not
funding “this kind of work.”
Jernigan had submitted a
proposal for a small pilot study,
to be funded at about $200,000
in each of two years, to analyze
the Facebook pages and Twitter
accounts of alcohol brands to
see whether they were marketing their products in ways that
could promote underage drinking.
In an evaluation of the grant
application in June 2015, institute reviewers said “the proposed research is significant
and innovative.” The reviewers,
according to the evaluation
shared by Siegel, scored it “in
the exceptional range.”
The proposal then moved to
the second layer of review,
called the Advisor y Council, which Koob chairs. Lowerscoring proposals can be funded and higher-scoring proposals denied. Jernigan’s study was
denied funding by the council;
he said he never received any
explanation.
Sharon Begley can be reached
at Sharon.begley
@statnews.com
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
Candidate for top military job
was a figure in bribery case
Tycoon claimed
he had done
favors for admiral
By Craig Whitlock
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — When the
Pentagon last chose a new
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, it was rattled by a lastminute surprise: A corrupt defense contractor known as ‘‘Fat
Leonard’’ confided to federal
agents that he had an unsavory
past with one of the finalists to
become the nation’s top military officer.
Leonard Glenn Francis, a
maritime tycoon who had recently pleaded guilty to bribing
Navy officers, told authorities
in early 2015 that he had paid
for opulent dinners and other
favors for Admiral Samuel
Locklear, then-commander of
US military forces in the Pacific,
according to previously undisclosed documents and six people familiar with the case.
Francis also shared with investigators several photographs
of him drinking and socializing
with Locklear, who was one of
four contenders to head the
Joint Chiefs. Some photos were
from a banquet in Singapore
that Francis had hosted for the
admiral and other Navy officers
that featured prostitutes as entertainment, according to the
documents and people familiar
with the case.
Locklear told The Washington Post that he was at the party
but was unaware of any prostitutes, and he said he had limited contact with Francis over the
years. After separate investigations, the Justice Department
declined to press charges, and
the Navy cleared the four-star
admiral of wrongdoing. But his
association with the 350-pound
contractor helped sink his
chances to lead the Joint Chiefs,
other documents show.
Now retired, Locklear is the
highest-ranking officer known
to have been investigated in
what has become the worst corruption scandal in Navy history.
When the still-unfolding
scandal became public in 2013,
Navy leaders promised transparency and accountability as
they vowed to purge crooked officers from the ranks.
Since then, however, the Navy has kept most details of its
investigations a secret, including the allegations surrounding
Locklear and hundreds of other
officers. The Post confirmed
Locklear’s involvement through
interviews and documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act.
The Justice Department has
filed criminal charges against
29 defendants who worked for
the Navy or Francis’ company,
Glenn Defense Marine Asia.
But those represent only a fraction of the people swept up in
the scandal.
Separately, the Justice Department has provided the Navy with dossiers on 550 people
who had contact with Francis —
including about 60 admirals —
to determine whether they violated military law or ethics
rules.
The Navy has publicly identified only 11 individuals who
have been charged under military law or who committed misconduct.
Navy officials decide whether to release the names of offending officers ‘‘on a case-bycase basis,’’ according to a statement from Commander Mike
Kafka, a Navy spokesman.
The Navy also has refused to
disclose how many people it has
kicked out of the service for taking bribes or gifts from Francis.
Francis’ Singapore-based
company held lucrative contracts to resupply Navy vessels
in the Pacific for more than a
quarter-century. He has confessed to swindling the Navy
out of $35 million and bribing
scores of officers.
He remains in federal custody while he awaits sentencing.
One of his attorneys, Ethan Posner, declined to comment on
his behalf.
On Jan. 15, 2015, Francis
pleaded guilty in federal court
in San Diego and agreed to cooperate with investigators.
T he investigations into
Locklear intensified in early
2015 as he came under strong
consideration to become the
next chairman of the Joint
Chiefs.
Then-Defense Secretary
Ashton Carter had settled on a
shortlist of Locklear and three
other finalists, according to a
March 30, 2015, e-mail from a
White House official that was
made public by WikiLeaks.
The e-mail was sent by
Christopher Kirchhoff, a National Security Council official,
to John Podesta, the chairman
of Hillary Clinton’s presidential
campaign. Kirchhoff said that
Carter was slated to decide
within days whom he would
recommend for the Joint Chiefs
job but that no clear front-runner had emerged.
Kirchhoff noted Locklear’s
chances had dimmed because
of his ties to Francis. He said
the admiral ‘‘may drop from the
slate absent Ash’s extraordinary
intervention because as soon as
the Fat Leonard [investigation]
pops, Locklear will be forced to
retire.’’ He added that Carter’s
staff was ‘‘doubtful they could
keep Locklear in play.’’
Carter declined to comment.
In an interview with The Post,
Kirchhoff said he knew ‘‘for a
fact that Ash was undecided
and was really wrestling with
the decision.’’
Ultimately, the White House
chose someone else: Marine
General Joseph Dunford, who
still holds the job. The following month, Locklear retired
from the military.
G l o b e
The Nation
A9
Diverse. Distinguished. Dependable.
Boston’s premier assisted living community is
a tapestry of smiling, friendly faces that reflect
the diversity of our area.
Steps from Symphony Hall, we’ve earned a reputation for delivering
a more catered, independent lifestyle filled with exceptional services,
vibrant amenities, and peace of mind...all for the most affordable rates.
Call 617-247-1010
or SusanBailisAL.com
Susan Bailis
Personalized Assisted Living
352 Massachusetts Ave at St Botolph Street, Boston
20%-50% off
open box and display items
Pendants as low as $50.00
N EENAS
www.neenaslighting.com
BOSTON
617-859-1700
BROOKLINE
617-232-1900
WELLESLEY
781-235-4510
Are Stairs a Problem?
“I love the peace of mind I get from knowing that
my wife and I can safely get up and downstairs.”
R 7-Day Money Back Guarantee
R Professional Installation
R Short Term Rentals
R Also for Stairs that Turn
R Tax Free!
Glide Upstairs on a Stannah Stairlift!
A Stannah stairlift is a great alternative to
remodeling, moving to a new house or relocating
to the first floor. If stairs are the problem, why
make a dramatic change? We can help you
carry on enjoying life in the home you love!
Want to learn more?
( Call toll-free: 11 (617)
307-4373
617-855-1803
8
om
Visit us online at www.Stannah-Stairlifts.co
Or visit our showroom:
20 Liberty Way, Suite A, Franklin MA 02038
MA HIC #160211, CT Elevator Ltd Contractor License #ELV.0475333-R5
Special O
Offer
Mention “Boston Globe” and save
$200 off
ff your Stannah Stairlift!*
*Excludes rentals & previous purchases. May not be combined
with any other offer. Only one discount per purchase.
A10
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
M
Democrats, the other grand old party
ulling the age cohort of Democratic
party leadership brings to mind a
line from T.S. Eliot: “I grow old . . . I
grow old . . . I shall wear the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.”
When it comes to stars, this is a party of senior citizens. According to a recent CCN poll, Joe Biden, 75,
leads the pack of would-be Democratic presidential
contenders. Biden is followed by Senator Bernie Sanders, 76 — an independent who, in 2016, challenged
Hillary Clinton, now 70, in Democratic primaries and
caucuses. Behind Sanders is Senator Elizabeth Warren,
68.
At this point, voter polling preferences essentially
reflect name recognition. For Democrats, the bestknown are Medicare eligible. Given their elders’ grip
on the party and its money, younger Democrats will
find it tough to break through. And those who dare
can expect to be called out by cranky oldsters. Locally,
former US representative Barney Frank is so horrified
by a bid from Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley,
44, to unseat longtime incumbent congressman Michael Capuano, 66, that he labels it “politics at its most
egotistical.”
For Democrats, the bright spot is that when it
comes to issues, they have youth on their side. A majority of millennials — 59 percent — affiliate with the
Democratic party or lean Democratic, according to a
recent Pew Research Center survey. Also, according to
Pew polling, a majority of millennials — 57 percent —
hold liberal or mostly liberal positions. For example,
60 percent believe government has a responsibility to
provide health coverage for all. Close to 80 percent of
white millennials say immigrants do more to strengthen than burden the country. Add to that the activism
that has broken out among young people after the horrific high school shooting in Parkland, Fla.
Young blood can flush out the party’s old, withered
arteries. However, the primary pump already seems
primed to process the same old suspects. After Biden
and President Trump trash-talked each other, jokes
broke out about a septuagenarian smackdown that
could end with a 2020 presidential showdown.
What a bummer that would be for Democrats. At
71, Trump, has been around. But, Biden has been
around even longer. In November 2020, the former
vice president will be turning 78. If he won, he would
be turning 82 at the end of his first term in office. With
all due respect to Biden’s legendary resilience, that’s
old. Some might say too old. To be sworn in as president, you must be at least 35 years old. But there’s no
limit on how old you can be. In 2016, Sanders proved a
senior citizen can connect with the younger generation. He won more votes among those under age 30
than Trump or Clinton.
Ultimately, voters will decide when it’s time for the
party to pass the torch. To do it, they have to be able to
hear the voices of the young. Those lines written by Eliot about aging, after all, were first published in 1915,
the year the poet turned 27.
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
To save the right whale, the lobster
industry must step up
A
number of events over the past
two weeks have probably gotten
the full attention of the US lobster
industry and increased pressure
for it to take the lead in fighting
the potential extinction of the
North Atlantic right whale.
In response to the deaths of the endangered
whale, including 12 in Canada last year, Canada has
imposed new restrictions on ship speeds and snow
crab fishing, as well as earmarked $1 million more
annually to help free marine mammals from fishing
gear.
In addition, survey
teams on Saturday ended their aerial search for right whale calves off the
southeastern US coast. For the first time since the
spotters began their survey, in 1989, they recorded
zero births this calving season. Last year only five
births were recorded, well below what used to be the
average of 15 per year. Last year there were 17 confirmed right whale deaths. Already this year, a 10year-old female, who was just entering her breeding
years, died after becoming entangled in fishing gear.
She was discovered off Virginia.
There are only about 450 North Atlantic right
whales, including about 100 breeding females. Females used to give birth every three to four years.
Now they give birth only every eight years, if at all.
Photographic evidence suggests that about 85 percent of right whales show signs of entanglement in
B y Jo h n K . B u l l a r d
abcde
Fo u n d e d 1 8 7 2
JOHN W. HENRY
Publisher
BRIAN McGRORY
Editor
VINAY MEHRA
President
ELLEN CLEGG
Editor, Editorial Page
LINDA PIZZUTI HENRY
Managing Director
JENNIFER PETER
Managing Editor
fishing gear, which affects the whale’s fitness and is
likely one of the reasons for the longer breeding
cycle.
The $669 million lobster industry must assume a
leadership role in solving a problem that it bears significant responsibility for creating. Entanglements
occur in other fixed-gear fisheries, but the number
of lobster trawls in the ocean swamps the other
fisheries.
Lobstermen know the gear, the ocean, and how to
adapt. And they know best how to save whales. They
have already modified their gear to reduce their effects on large whales. They participate in gear research and continue to work with the Take Reduction
Teams at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But it is time to acknowledge that these
efforts are not enough. The industry needs to consider other ideas, including closing additional areas and
reductions in trap limits as well as trying out lowerbreaking-strength ropes or testing ropeless gear
technology.
They don’t have to do it alone. Scientists are willing to share their knowledge of whale behavior and
location. NGOs are willing to shake the bushes for
funding to help implement changes. And I know
from my time at NOAA that finding solutions is the
agency’s highest priority.
The American lobster industry, not solely responsible, also cannot solely end whale mortalities in fishing gear. Our Canadian friends know that they cannot have a repeat of last year and have announced
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Mark S. Morrow
Jason M. Tuohey Digital Platforms and Audience Engagement
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Janice Page Arts and Newsroom Innovation
Marjorie Pritchard Editorial Page
David Dahl Print and Operations
Dante Ramos Ideas
Larry Edelman News and Features
measures that are tough, fair, balanced, and equivalent to what the United States has had in place in our
waters. They also announced a significant financial
investment in further survey and research. In the
United States, more than 25,000 miles of rope have
been removed from the paths of whales. Along the
Atlantic coast, 25,000 square miles of area have been
closed to protect whales. But more needs to be done
to save the right whales.
The decision on March 20, by the Marine Stewardship Council, to suspend the sustainability certification of Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence snow crab
fishery because of its links to the deaths of the North
Atlantic right whale is news the US lobster industry
should take note of. As the word “extinction” gains
currency, as the public sees photos of the gruesome
injuries sustained by these whales, consumers may
ask themselves if they want to participate in the species’ demise.
The right whales don’t care about our borders.
They just want to live. They want to go about their
business eating and reproducing without humans
hitting them with ships or wrapping them up with
fishing gear. We should want this too. Two hundred
years ago, my ancestors and others from Nantucket
and New Bedford thought these were the “right”
whales to hunt. For New Englanders, and the lobster
industry, they are now the right whales to save.
John Bullard retired as NOAA Fisheries regional
administrator in January.
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Peter M. Doucette Chief Consumer Revenue Officer
Jane Bowman Vice President, Marketing & Strategic
Partnerships
Doug Most Director, Strategic Growth Initiatives
Dan Krockmalnic General Counsel
Dale Carpenter Senior Vice President, Print Operations
Charles H. Taylor Founder & Publisher 1873-1921
William O. Taylor Publisher 1921-1955
Wm. Davis Taylor Publisher 1955-1977
William O. Taylor Publisher 1978-1997
Benjamin B. Taylor Publisher 1997-1999
Richard H. Gilman Publisher 1999-2006
P. Steven Ainsley Publisher 2006-2009
Christopher M. Mayer Publisher 2009-2014
Laurence L. Winship Editor 1955-1965
Thomas Winship Editor 1965-1984
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A11
Inbox
Party? Hardly
It seems most former marijuana users
will pass on resuming the party
ALEX BEAM
Confessions of a
climate­change snowflake
C
aptain Louis Renault: And what in
heaven’s name
brought you to Casablanca?
Rick Blaine: My health. I
came to Casablanca for the waters.
Renault: The waters? What
waters? We’re in the desert.
Rick: I was misinformed.
–“Casablanca,” 1942
Years ago, I owned a house about
50 miles south of Halifax, Nova Scotia.
I once made the mistake of visiting in
June — a very cold, very wet, and miserable June.
The house was habitable for July,
August, and September and pretty
darned grim the rest of the year. But
hope, in the form of global warming,
loomed just over the horizon. Climate
change would bathe Nova Scotia in
Bermuda-like zephyrs, and I looked
forward to living in the land of phosphorescent currency (Canada’s twodollar coin glows in the dark) more or
less year-round.
Now I feel like Rick Blaine of “Casablanca”; I was misinformed.
Ditto for New England. I used to fly
to Los Angeles in late February to
avoid the worst of the Boston winters,
but I knew better times were ahead.
New England was going to be metaphorical toast, if you read the newspapers during the 1980s. Globe columnist Diane White asked, sardonically:
“Does this mean they may be opening
on cold Arctic sea water flowing
underneath the warmer currents
arising from the equator. But because of accelerated glacial melting in the Arctic, fresh, cold water — lighter than saline sea water — is entering the circulation
ADOBE
system and bollixing everything
up.
What does it all mean? “The
a Club Med in Maine?”
US East is abnormally cold. We’re being flooded with Arctic air,” Jonathan
More misinformation.
Martin, a professor of atmospheric sciLast month, Rutgers University
ences at the University of Wisconsin,
and the company Atmospheric and
told The Washington Post. “So we’re
Environmental Research released a
freezing.” As of this writing, it seems
study confirming what has become all
too obvious: “Five of the past six winunlikely that Club Med will be openters have brought persistent cold to
ing a resort in Portland, Maine, unless
the eastern US.”
it features year-round cross-country
In a prepared statement, Jennifer
skiing.
Francis, Rutgers professor of marine
Second, it probably means I will be
spending less time in New England
and coastal sciences, said that “recent
than in previous years, which may
observed heavy snowfalls, in particular in the northeastern United States,
work out better for all concerned. Canada, a.k.a. Snow Mexico, now seems
may be linked to [rapid Arctic warmlike a distant memory.
ing], though further research is required to confirm the linkage.”
Lastly, I thought I would share the
National Weather Service’s 8-to-14-day
Arctic warming is causing wild
swings in the jet stream, the air curtemperature forecast. Starting April 5,
rent that in the past reliably prevented there is a 70 to 80 percent chance of
colder than normal readings. (It also
polar air from flowing into New Engpredicts some warming later in the
land. Other research suggests that
month.)
warming is affecting the Gulf Stream,
the ocean current that supposedly
New England as tropical paradise?
I was misinformed.
warmed the waters south of Halifax.
The Gulf Stream is a complex loop
of cold and warm currents (the AtlanAlex Beam’s column appears regularly
in the Globe. Follow him on Twitter
tic Meridional Overturning Circula@imalexbeamyrnot.
tion, if you must know) that depends
Re “Dude, it’s back” (Page One, March 24): My colleagues
and I also wondered whether former marijuana users
would resume use if it were legalized in their state. So we
asked them. Data from RTI International’s national survey,
conducted in 2016 and 2017, suggest that 10 percent of
adult former users would definitely use it again if it were
legal, and 26 percent would probably use it. Most people
didn’t think they would resume use, even in the context of
legalization. In fact, the most common response we received was “definitely not” (35 percent).
It is worth noting that our data are a snapshot from a
moment in time, and people’s intentions to use marijuana
may change in response to the changing social and legal
environment. It is also possible that some respondents
were reluctant to report their plans to resume marijuana
use, since it is illegal at the federal level, and was illegal for
recreational use in the states where we asked this question.
In any case, our data appear to confirm what reporter
Robert Weisman found in talking with baby boomers
across Massachusetts: Some look forward to trying it
again; others aren’t especially interested.
JANE A. ALLEN
Research public health analyst
Center for Health Policy Science and Tobacco Research
RTI International
Waltham
For this high school student, ‘Can
women have it all?’ is wrong question
Re “Women in surgery juggle it all” (Business, March 22):
We find ourselves still asking, “Can women have it all?” It
looks like the answer is still somewhere around the “no”
end of the spectrum for an absurd number of jobs. The
time has come for me, as a high school student, to figure
out what to do with my life, and along with that comes
looking to others for guidance. Besides the typical encouragement and well-intentioned “Avoid art school at all costs”
speeches, there are always quips about having a family, especially when I voice my aspirations of becoming a surgeon.
I hear, “With that type of job, you are easily going to be
working 70 hours a week. How are you going to make time
for a family?” The questions we should be asking are: Why
should your work dictate when to stop breast-feeding, and
why do up-and-coming professionals feel guilt if they start
a family?
This is a reality we don’t want to address. Employers
have a responsibility. Women cannot have it all until having
children is seen as a familial responsibility, not solely a
woman’s. Women cannot have it all until the workplace
consciously adjusts. But who cares when it only affects
women?
GRACE RAJAN
East Longmeadow
Jehovah’s Witnesses’ views
on surgery misrepresented
MARGERY EAGAN
I
Are Trump
Christians
really
Christian?
t’s the day after Easter, 2018, a good time to call out
Donald Trump supporters who claim to be Christians.
They’re not.
Here’s the Merriam-Webster definition of a
Christian: one who professes belief in the teachings of Jesus Christ.
They don’t.
But this is not me speaking.
This is what’s been argued ever more fervently in Christian and secular circles since Trump’s election. The president has apparently divided a faith just as he has divided
this country.
Just days ago, in a dramatic and unprecedented move,
23 prominent Christian leaders — including Bishop Michael Curry, leader of the Episcopal Church; Richard Rohr,
Catholic priest and famed spiritual writer; and Jim Wallis,
an evangelical and founder of Sojourners magazine — issued a manifesto at ReclaimingJesus.org saying just that.
It details what Christianity rejects. And most are policies
Trump and his self-professed Christian supporters embrace.
So what can we call such Christians?
Since almost no black evangelicals support Trump, “you
can’t call them evangelicals,” Wallis said in an interview
last week. “I keep telling the press, call them old white
evangelicals, nearly all men, rich, the ones benefiting from
the tax cuts.
“Or Trump evangelicals,” he said, “part of a fake church,
to use (the president’s) language.”
“Reclaiming Jesus” is less about condemning romps
with porn stars and more about condemning tax cuts for
the wealthy, cuts to health care and food benefits for the
poor, and the shunning of refugees and immigrants. It rejects Trump’s “America First” slogan as “theological heresy,” along with misogyny, racism, xenophobia, and presidential lying.
“How we treat the hungry, the thirsty, the naked, the
stranger, the sick and the prisoner” forms Christianity’s
radical roots, the document says. It’s a position definitely
at odds, say, with deporting young mothers back to
Mexico.
But “white evangelicals are not the only problem,” Trinity College religion professor Mark Silk wrote last week on
Religious News Service. Silk says it’s white religious people, period.
Silk cites a December Gallup poll: Non-Hispanic whites
who described themselves as very religious approve of
Trump’s presidency 2-1 while nonwhites, religious or not,
disapprove by 73 percent or more. The same poll showed
51 percent of white Catholics approving of Trump, while a
Pew poll last month found that 48 percent of mostly white
mainline Protestants do too.
This summer, Catholic John Gehring, author of “The
Francis Effect: A Radical Pope’s Challenge to the American
Catholic Church,” weighed in on the same subject. In
“What’s Wrong with White Christians?” he writes that
they’re more than twice as likely to blame poverty on individual failings than are those with no religion at all. Citing
a Kaiser Family Foundation report, Gehring says that
white evangelicals and half of white Catholics are particularly wedded to this view, recognizing few systemic inequalities, like poor inner city schools. Referring to another study, he writes that 36 percent of white evangelicals
and 47 percent of white Catholics even recognize America’s
enduring racism, though 86 percent of black Protestants
do.
“And a majority of the descendants of white Catholic
immigrants once feared and loathed in this country voted
for a president who ran on an explicitly nativist message,”
Gehring writes, calling all this “a crisis at the heart of white
Christianity. The dark-skinned Jesus who preached justice
The president has apparently
divided a faith just as
he has divided this country.
to those in the shadow of an empire would likely not recognize many of his nominal followers today.”
I’ve thought that often when hearing Franklin Graham
demonize Muslims. Or Trump’s religious defenders say
they don’t like his tweets but love his get-tough policies. Or
seeing Fox News’ Laura Ingraham ridicule a teenage Parkland massacre survivor or provocateur Ann Coulter spout
off against desperate refugees — when both so often wear
crosses around their necks.
Wallis quotes the New Testament, where Christ made
his mission statement clear: “To proclaim good news to the
poor. . . . To set the oppressed free.”
“Christians” who don’t support that “are destroying the
integrity of the faith,” Wallis said. “That’s why we couldn’t
keep quiet anymore.”
Margery Eagan is cohost of WGBH’s “Boston Public Radio.”
Alex Beam was incorrect when he declared that being one
of Jehovah’s Witnesses means to belong to “a religion that
abjures surgical interventions” (“Could hip surgery have
saved Tom Petty and Prince?” Opinion, March 29). Jehovah’s Witnesses, based on Scripture (Acts 15:20, for one),
do abjure blood transfusions, but not surgery. Beam has
confused Jehovah’s Witnesses with another religion.
Many surgeries do not typically require the use of
blood. For those that might, nonblood substitutes and other medical advancements are available. Jehovah’s Witnesses appreciate the cooperation of the many skilled surgeons
who use their talents and latest techniques while respecting our Bible-trained consciences.
For example, my wife benefited from such fine doctors
when she had lung surgery last year at Massachusetts
General Hospital, following several surgeries there for
cancer, all successful and without the need for blood transfusions.
GEORGE CHAPPELL
Manchester, Conn.
Traffic jams, stormy seas, transit woes
— they’re all linked to climate concerns
Lines of cars, choking the highways (“Boston’s clogged arteries,” Page A1, March 26). High tides flooding downtown
Boston. Trains derailed or on fire. These recent images
from the Globe’s front pages may seem unconnected, but
in fact they are closely linked. The dramatic increase in
traffic, exacerbated by proliferating ride-sharing vehicles,
contributes to the rise of carbon emissions. This rise, in
turn, is warming the Arctic. A recent study, suggesting that
the melting of polar ice may cause more blizzards in New
England, has already proved true during this stormy winter. Meanwhile, our broken public transportation system
pushes more commuters into their cars, or into Uber or
Lyft vehicles, resulting in a decrease in public transit
revenue.
Where is the leadership that connects the dots and offers a vision for tackling these problems? The Legislature
has drafted a number of excellent bills that address climate
change. Why hasn’t the governor championed passage of
these laws, and why doesn’t the House speaker move them
on to a vote?
What about taxing carbon and using the revenue to fix
our ailing transportation system? A billion-dollar seawall
won’t stop the rise in emissions that threatens our quality
of life and degrades our future. We need bold, swift action
now.
LIZA KETCHUM
Watertown
Letters should be written exclusively to the Globe and
include name, address, and daytime telephone number.
They should be 200 words or fewer. All are subject to
editing. Letters to the Editor, The Boston Globe, 1 Exchange
Pl, Ste 201, Boston, MA 02109-2132; letter@globe.com
A12
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
Only in America Can A Story Like
THIS Really Be True!
Minnesota man’s miraculous invention has now been
purchased over 32 Million times!
Chaska, MN - You know how the
old saying goes: only in America. We
say this in reference to the down-andout character who made it to the heights
of his dreams, pulling himself up by
his bootstraps to achieve success. Are
these tales just myths meant to bolster
the spirits of the down-trodden? Or are
there real Americans with lives so incredible, they just need to be told? You
be the judge.
Meet Mike Lindell, an inventor and
entrepreneur whose story is the stuff
from which famous sayings are born.
Chances are at some point in the past
13 years you have seen Lindell’s picture
in the paper, listened and watched him
on TV, or met him at events across
the United States. A gregarious type,
Lindell describes himself as, “a lover
of talking with people,” and he really
enjoys sharing how he overcame the
kind of life many others know well, too.
His story goes like this:
Throughout the 80s and 90s, Lindell
struggled with addictions and though
he owned his own businesses, Lindell
toiled in the mire of compulsion. With
no regard for making choices to improve his life Lindell says, “I had taken
my addictions to the limit and could not
go on one more day living that way.”
He recognized the desire for more than
the endless routine of addiction and
wanted to positively impact people. So
overnight and with the grace of God,
Mike Lindell stopped his addictive
behavior and found a new way.
A Better Path
With a clear head and focused mind,
Lindell says, “I discovered an old problem had crept back into my life. Since I
was a young boy I suffered from a lack
of good, quality sleep.” As a youngster,
Lindell went to great lengths to get a
good night’s sleep, even spending an
entire paycheck at age 16 on an expensive pillow in hopes of curing his sleep
woes but to no avail. Lindell remembers tossing and turning throughout
the night, folding his pillow in half,
using his arm for support, only to wake
more tired than when he went to sleep.
Lindell’s lifelong search for a good
night’s sleep created an obsession to
figure out the cause of his poor sleeping
and what effect his exposure to chronic
sleep deprivation had caused. To study
his issues more deeply, Lindell consulted with experts in the sleep industry
and continued to talk with the folks he
would come into contact with on a daily
basis. After gathering all the data, studies and stories from people, more than
ever Lindell recognized and understood
the harmful effects of poor sleep. Even
more so, Lindell realized the effect of
sleep interruptions are all around us
and permeate the lives of all walks of
people - and in epidemic proportions.
Lindell continues, “I was acutely aware
of what was wrong but still needed
to answer the biggest question of all,
WHY?”
Eureka Moment
Process of elimination led Lindell to
have a true eureka moment; it occurred
to him the villain and cause of his sleep
deprivation was none other than the
pillow he was sleeping on. Lindell tried
“every pillow in the world,” in search of
something that helped but nothing did.
“Most pillows on the market cause
sleep interruptions by going flat and
causing you to toss and turn all night
trying to readjust or flip the pillows
over to the cool side,” Lindell explains.
“The effect prevents people from
enjoying the uninterrupted sleep our
bodies need to rejuvenate and heal,” he
continues. So he set out to invent and
manufacture “The World’s Most Comfortable Pillow.”
With Over 32 Million MyPillow’s
Sold - People Can’t Be Wrong
Year after year, Lindell marketed his
pillows throughout the country at shows
and expos during the day and worked
alongside his family at night to make
the pillows. He also spent time talking
with consumers about their personal
sleep frustrations. He has since invented, manufactured and delivered more
than 32 Million MyPillow’s (“The
World’s Most Comfortable Pillow”) to
his many satisfied customers. Lindell’s
MyPillow is designed to conform to
each individual’s support needs. It is
washable and dryable and is guaranteed
not to go flat for 10 years.
Lindell is so assured customers will
love MyPillow that he takes his offer
a step further than most and provides
a 60-day, no questions asked money-back guarantee. Though Lindell
was originally told by the big bedding
companies that his unorthodox business
plan, 10-year warranty and 60-day money-back guarantee would put him out of
business, his company now boasts more
than 1,600 employees and manufactures
the MyPillow right here in the United
States. In 2013 MyPillow was awarded the prestigious QStar Award for
“Product Concept of the Year” by QVC.
Lindell himself has become well-recognized in public due to his frequent
infomercial airings, guest appearances
on shows such as Imus in the Morning,
and being the subject of a recent one
hour documentary titled, “The Mike
Lindell Story: An American Dream.”
All this time later Lindell says he has
learned the value of making choices
that, “not only better my own life, but
also improve the lives of others.” His is
a story that comes true it seems, only in
America.
Inventor, Manufacturer and C.E.O. of MyPillow®, Inc., Michael J. Lindell. Chaska,
Minnesota is where The World’s Most Comfortable Pillow is made and your best night’s
sleep is created.
In the early days, Mike and his family, friends and neighbors spent countless hours
hand-making each MyPillow one-by one, and it’s this hard work and dedication to
“doing it the right way” that has helped MyPillow to become such a classic American
success story.
Many pillows go flat throughout the night, causing you to sleep poorly. MyPillow’s
cover provides maximum comfort so you can rest well. The supportive but soft
patented fill adjusts to your exact individual needs which allows you to get the deep
and restorative sleep you need to wake up feeling great.
Discover the Secret of a Great Night’s Sleep Just Like these People Did!
Gary G. wrote; “It’s
the first pillow I have ever
owned that actually does
all the things that Mike
says it does in his
commercial. PLUS, I love
the fact it can be cleaned
in my washer and dried in
my dryer!”
Jan M. B. wrote; “I’m not
one to write testimonials, but
I can’t help but rave about
MyPillow. Just as they claim, it
provides restful sleep. In fact,
I wake up very refreshed, and
I don’t have to fight with the
pillow like before. I’m SO glad I
ordered them.”
Jose L. wrote; “The pillow is
amazing. I got this as a
Christmas gift. After 9 days
using the pillow, I find I’ve woke
up every day feeling like I got
excellent sleep. I look forward
to every night. I got one pillow
for my wife and son and they
also love it! THANKS!”
Find Out Why Our Satisfied Customers Have Purchased
Over 32 Million MyPillow’s!
CALL NOW
ORDER ONLINE @
OR
800-308-9316
mypillow.com
USE PROMO CODE:
boston93
50% off MyPillow’s 4-Pack Special!
Including 2 MyPillow Premium Pillows
and 2 Go Anywhere Pillows!
Business
PAGES B9­11
For breaking news, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/business
Tiny implant may help
immune system mount
attack against cancer
Legal pot use system blinks to life on Monday at noon
Greater Boston rents are again on the rise
Saks, Lord & Taylor report security breach
Metro
B
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E M O N DAY, A P R I L 2 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N GL O B E .C O M /M E T R O
Website
on health
costs due
in spring
Adrian Walker
A Senate
untethered
The Massachusetts
Senate is an institution
on the edge.
Mind you, it has
never been an island of
serenity. But the current level of intrigue is
something new.
Its membership includes an internally beloved former president (Stanley C. Rosenberg), a current president (Harriette Chandler), and a president-in-waiting (Karen Spilka). What it
doesn’t have at the moment is much in the
way of actual leadership.
“This is a fluid situation,” Spilka said last
week. “It’s unprecedented. This has never
happened before. So I think trying to get
the temperature of what my colleagues
want and trying to be respectful under the
circumstances.”
Ah, the circumstances. Just a few
months ago, Rosenberg looked safely ensconced in the president’s chair. But that
was before the State House was rocked by
allegations that his husband, Bryon Hefner,
had sexually assaulted a series of men, revelations that were first reported by my colleague Yvonne Abraham. After an Ethics
Committee investigation was initiated,
Rosenberg’s continued leadership quickly
became untenable.
Enter Chandler. The 80-year-old Worcester Democrat agreed to serve as acting
president, while the Senate operated under
the illusion that Rosenberg might somehow
return. A few weeks ago her status became
“permanent” — meaning that she would
serve through the end of the year.
But political ambition, once unleashed,
is not so easily reined in. The jockeying for
the presidency that the Hefner scandal set
in motion never really stopped. A couple of
weeks ago, Spilka announced that she had
the votes to claim the presidency. That is
when things got really weird.
She was claiming victory in an election
that wasn’t supposed to be taking place.
And despite Spilka’s faux-conciliatory
claims to the contrary, it didn’t take much
to see that Chandler was not willing to simply be tossed aside. She walked away from
media availability in which Spilka was talking about a “respectful transition.”
So much for all that mutual respect.
So here’s where they are. Spilka would
like to become Senate president, the sooner
the better. Chandler is willing to step down
but would like to serve until the end of formal sessions on July 31. Some Spilka backers are clearly uneasy at the prospect of appearing to kick Chandler to the curb but also say they are becoming worn down by the
intense drama around them.
No one is to blame here — other than
Hefner, who was indicted last week on
charges of sexual assault, criminal lewdness, and distributing nude pictures without consent. Chandler wants to leave on
something resembling her own terms.
Spilka wants the job she has the votes for.
The rest of the Senate wants to find some
way, any way, to emerge from this dark
cloud. Rarely have I spoken to senators
more eager to get to the routine work of
passing a budget.
Spilka and Chandler are “talking about
timing,” their camps say. But the talks aren’t really going anywhere, raising the distinct and awkward possibility of going
through the spring frozen in place. It’s almost enough to make me long for the departed days of the Billy Bulger Senate monarchy. Whatever else one might say about
it, there was never any hand-wringing
about who was in charge. Dictatorships
have the virtue of clarity.
The fight over who will wield the gavel is
small potatoes in comparison with the sexual abuse scandal that put it in motion.
Hefner’s alleged victims moved a long step
closer to justice, which is welcome news.
But a broken Senate eventually means
that many important things can’t move forward. Goodness knows, little enough happens in the Legislature as it is. This isn’t
good for anyone.
If change is inevitable — as it appears to
be — then it needs to happen sooner rather
than later. Choosing a president will not repair the damage that’s been done. But there
is only one path forward, and limping
along with a lame-duck president obviously
isn’t it.
Adrian Walker is a Globe columnist. He can
be reached at adrian.walker@globe.com.
State project aims
for transparency
By Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
GLOBE STAFF
he tired city bus, an old cog of the urban transit system that suffers from
poor service and declining ridership, is about to get some love.
The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is unveiling two
projects this month to expand bus service, beefing up some existing
routes and launching a new branch of the Silver Line that will go to Chelsea. They are just the start of what officials hope will be a revival of bus
service in the Boston area.
Like transit planners across the country, the MBTA has prioritized
buses because they are a less expensive and quicker way to improve overall service. Bus lines are not nearly as expensive as rail lines and are more flexible to operate.
“It’s the area we can actually impact the fastest, because it doesn’t require us building a
bunch of infrastructure upgrades,” said Luis Ramirez, the T’s general manager.
The MBTA and advocates who have pressed for better service have coalesced around the
bus system as low-hanging fruit that could provide dramatic improvements in public transit.
Cities around the world have been looking for ways to make buses run better, boosting service levels, crafting new routes, speeding up trips, and combatting the car traffic that turns
riders off from buses. Slowly, and modestly, these ideas are beginning to sprout in Boston.
Notably, some activists have used the proposal by a private real estate developer to build
an overhead gondola system in the Seaport District as an opportunity to argue that buses are
by far the better and more cost-efficient solution to traffic congestion.
“For too long the narrative has been that the only way to fix the T is to spend billions of
dollars on mega-projects,” said Stacy Thompson, director of the nonprofit Livable Streets
For years, Massachusetts health
policy makers have envisioned a
website that could serve as a onestop shop for consumers who want
to know the price of a common
medical test or procedure.
State officials are finally preparing to launch such a website this
spring, months later than their previous self-imposed deadline, and
with more tempered ambitions.
Officials at the Center for Health
Information and Analysis, a state
agency that serves as a clearinghouse for health care data and is required by law to create a public
health care cost website, are stressing that the project is only a piece of
a broader state goal of increasing
transparency around medical costs.
The more modest tone comes
about a year after they began the
long-delayed effort of creating a
website and started holding dozens
of meetings with hospital leaders,
doctors, and health insurers. Those
meetings have highlighted a critical
question: Instead of helping consumers, is this information going to
confuse them?
“There’s a whole bunch of things
that could be wrong with the site,
including that nobody ever comes,”
said Ray Campbell, executive director of the state agency, known as
CHIA. “But the biggest danger that
we confront is confusing people.”
The website, which has been
tested by industry insiders over the
past two months, shows payments
to physicians and health care facilities for hundreds of outpatient
medical services. The numbers represent the total amount an insurance company paid for a service,
plus the amount paid out of the
consumer’s pocket. So if a particu-
BUSES, Page B3
HEALTH WEBSITE, Page B5
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2017
Passengers on a Route 111 bus passed through Bellingham Square in Chelsea. The city will soon
be served by a new branch of the Silver Line that will run on dedicated bus lanes.
MBTA’S BETTING
ON A BUS REVIVAL
Beefed­up routes, new Silver Line branch
are part of response to ridership declines
T
By Adam Vaccaro
GLOBE STAFF
Massport
staff: 40%
Faithful flock for early Easter Mass earn over
$100,000
‘By the time the priest starts talking about the resurrection, you see
the sun come up over his shoulder. It’s very moving.’
MICHELLE LINSKEY, Hyde Park resident attending a sunrise service at Castle Island on Sunday
By Jeremy C. Fox
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
By Matt Rocheleau
and Cristela Guerra
GLOBE STAFF
GLOBE STAFF
Thousands of the faithful arrived at Castle Island
before dawn Sunday, streaming past Fort Independence and gathering at the edge of Boston Harbor to
celebrate a sunrise Easter Mass.
But there was no sunrise — at least, none visible —
as the gray, overcast sky gradually lightened above the
massive crowd that huddled together, many wearing
knit hats and warm hoodies, some wrapped in Patriots team blankets, while temperatures hovered in the
mid-40s.
During communion, the clergy and parishioners
Fo u r i n 1 0 w o r k e r s e a r n e d
$100,000 or more in 2017 working
for the Massachusetts Port Authority, which manages Logan International Airport and seaport terminals in Boston as well as Worcester
Regional Airport and the Hanscom
Field airport in Bedford.
Of the 1,381 employees who received a check from Massport last
year, 555 of them, or 40 percent,
received six-figure sums, according
to payroll records for the authority,
which is one of several independent state agencies that files its records separately from most state
offices.
The figures did not include
newly disclosed pay records for
State Police troopers who work at
Massport properties and whose
salaries are covered by Massport,
but who are still considered State
Police employees.
Massport’s ratio of six-figure
earners was significantly higher
than at another major independent state agency, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority,
where about one-third of workers
topped $100,000 last year. It also
soared well above the overall average of 12 percent across most state
offices.
SERVICE, Page B5
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Patricia Reid of South Boston helped take down
the altar after the Easter service on Castle Island.
SHOOTINGS —
Loved ones set up
an impromptu
memorial at the
corner of Dacia and
Wayland streets in
Boston following a
fatal shooting Friday.
It was the first of
two fatal shootings
this past weekend.
Both men appeared
to have been
targeted, said Police
Commissioner
William B. Evans.
B3
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
MASSPORT, Page B4
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
TheMetroMinute
GET SMART
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
A look back at
public health
By Leslie Anderson
GLOBE STAFF
Some anniversaries remind us why it’s better to be alive now than 100 years ago.
As World War I began to wane, another
scourge spread across the globe. The influenza pandemic of 1918 killed an estimated 50
million people around the world, including
tens of thousands in Massachusetts.
On Wednesday, the Public Health Museum in Massachusetts will sponsor two presentations: “World War I & The Great Influenza
Pandemic in Massachusetts” by Dr. Marian
Moser Jones and “Clara Barton & The Founding of the American Red Cross” by Emily
Thomas. The talks will begin at 7 p.m. at the
Tewksbury Public Library, 300 Chandler St.
A big crowd is expected Saturday when
Rockport’s Town Meeting votes on a zoning
measure that could clear the way for the sale
of recreational marijuana in parts of town.
Two members of the Board of Health are expected to speak on either side of the issue.
Plymouth has already decided to regulate
rather than to ban the sale of recreational
marijuana, voting last year to limit the number and location of retail shops. A proposal to
adopt a 3 percent local sales tax on recreational pot will be on the agenda when Town Meeting convenes Saturday.
Even more fleeting than spring are the vernal pools it brings. Naturalist Doug Lowry will
lead an outing Saturday to the spots where
amphibians breed at North River Wildlife
Sanctuary, 2000 Main St., Marshfield from 9
a.m. to noon. Register at www.massaudubon.org/northriverprograms.
DEBEE TLUMACKI FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE/FILE
Finally, here’s a happy centennial to celebrate. On Wednesday, the Brockton High
School concert band will perform the world
debut of “Brockton,” a piece commissioned for
the 100th anniversary of the city’s Rotary
Club.
The 12-minute piece is in three movements: “Shoe Town,” a tribute to the immigrants who worked in local factories; “City of
Champions,” dedicated to all the champions
who have made Brockton great, including
heavyweight boxing champion Rocky Marciano (photo above); and “A New Diversity,”
which celebrates the city’s diverse population.
Vincent Macrina, director of the high
school’s music department, will conduct
“Brockton” during the school’s spring concert
at 7 p.m. He is celebrating his 45th year in the
system.
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Frank Oglesby Jr. has come out of retirement to lend his familiar voice to announcements for the new Silver Line.
Voice of T returns for new Silver Line
By Steve Annear and Adam Vaccaro
T
GLOBE STAFF
here was a brief moment two
summers ago when Frank Oglesby Jr. wasn’t sure what the future held for his voice-over career.
He had been eating cherries and enjoying his recent retirement from the MBTA,
when his body had a strange and sudden reaction to the fruit.
“For two months, my voice wasn’t the
same,” said Oglesby, who speaks with a
soothing baritone. “I was worried — a little
worried — and then I realized, ‘Well, this
could be it, and I’ve got to think about what
I need to do.’ ”
Luckily, with a bit of tea, some anti-inflammatories, and a variety of
herbs, the symptoms soon passed. And these days, Oglesby has plenty of
voice work lined up — including a triumphant return to work, on a contract basis, with the MBTA.
On Tuesday, Oglesby, 56, stepped back into the recording booth to
once again lend his calming vocal skills to the transit agency where he
worked in various capacities for decades.
Next month, when the T debuts the SL3, a new Silver Line route that
will shuttle passengers between Chelsea and Boston, riders will be greeted by the familiar sound of Oglesby coming through the speakers, announcing each new stop along the way. The SL3 is the T’s first new line
in almost 11 years.
“I love working with the MBTA in this capacity,” he said. “I’m very
comfortable doing it.”
Oglesby retired from the T in July of 2016. At the time, he was managing paratransit contracts and recording announcements for the subway on the side, a gig he first picked up in the early nineties. To this day,
the T uses his voice to alert passengers about train arrivals, stops, and
transfers.
During his recent recording session, stuffed inside the see-through
booth in the corner of an office on the eighth floor of Ashburton Place,
Oglesby felt right at home.
It was a bit of a squeeze, the shoulders of his copper-colored suit jacket nearly touching the edges, but it was a familiar place for the man who
has long been known as “The Voice of the T.”
As he kept his face close to the microphone, Oglesby read a series of
Leslie Anderson can be reached at
leslie.anderson@globe.com.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
‘We found strength in each
other. In the dark,
everybody is huddled up,
and all of a sudden a ball of
fire starts coming over the
horizon. By the time the
priest starts talking about
the resurrection, you see
the sun come up over his
shoulder. It’s very moving.’
MICHELLE LINSKEY, 50, of Hyde Park,
speaking of the experience of being at an
Easter sunrise Mass on Castle Island
TIME MACHINE
April 1, 1945: The Globe reports that Boston’s air is sometimes 10 times dirtier than
that in the suburbs. The culprit: the increased
use of soft coal during the winter.
new announcements from sheets of paper.
“Upcoming arrivals. Upcoming departures,” he said, rattling them off like an announcer at Bingo night. “Route 86. Route 88.
Route 96. Route 170. Route 171.”
It was over in what felt like an instant.
“We call him ‘One-take Frank,’ ” joked the
multimedia specialist who edits Oglesby’s recordings.
Oglesby said he was eager to take the job
when the MBTA reached out about doing announcements for the SL3, which begins running April 21.
“It was like, ‘Let’s do this. When?’ ” he
said.
Transit officials were similarly happy to
have Oglesby back on board.
“Our customers know Frank’s voice as well as they know the T logo or
the CharlieCard,” MBTA general manager Luis Manuel Ramirez said in a
statement. “It’s only fitting that customers on our newest transit line
hear the familiar voice to which they’ve grown accustomed while commuting on MBTA services.”
On the new line, buses will arrive at stations every 10 minutes during
rush hour, and every 12 to 15 minutes off-peak. Officials expect about
8,700 passengers to take the trip each day.
Because it runs on a bus-only roadway between the four new Chelsea
stops, much of the route will break free from the region’s snarling traffic
issues.
But the commutes won’t be completely free of headaches: Buses will
still compete with cars in the Ted Williams Tunnel and parts of the Seaport and East Boston, where the new line will stop at the Airport Blue
Line stop before veering toward Chelsea.
Buses will also occasionally need to detour to avoid a drawbridge between Boston and Chelsea that lifts during the day, with delays lasting
more than 20 minutes.
When that happens, however, riders can trust that Oglesby will be
there, keeping them informed.
“A drawbridge is currently raised ahead of us,” passengers might hear
him say. “We apologize for the delay while we wait.”
Steve Annear can be reached at steve.annear@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @steveannear. Adam Vaccaro can be reached at
adam.vaccaro@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @adamtvaccaro.
AROUND THE REGION
A L L STON
Five hospitalized after
two­car crash on Pike
Five people were transported to hospitals early
Sunday after a two-car crash on the Massachusetts Turnpike in Allston, according to State Police. State Police received a call reporting the
crash on the eastbound lane at 4:46 a.m., according to Trooper Paul Sullivan. Sullivan said he did
not know the cause of the accident or the condition of the passengers. Two of the victims were
transported to Boston Medical Center, two to
Massachusetts General Hospital, and one to
Tufts Medical Center, Sullivan said. The two cars
involved were a 2016 Lexus NX200t and 2007
GMC Ukon. Sullivan said Boston EMS and the
Boston Fire Department assisted State Police.
H AV E RH I L L
Methuen teen who died
in Saturday crash ID’d
The Methuen woman who died after her car
rolled over and crashed in Haverhill Saturday
evening has been identified as 18-year-old Alexis
Spartz, according to Massachusetts State Police
officials. Spartz was driving a 2004 Lincoln LS on
Route 495 northbound with a 19-year-old female
passenger, who was not identified, when she lost
control of the car, State Police said in a statement. Spartz and the passenger, who is also from
Methuen, were transported to Lawrence General
Hospital for serious injuries. Spartz was pronounced dead at the hospital, and the passenger
was transported to Tufts Medical Center for further treatment, State Police said. The passenger’s
condition was not specified Sunday. The cause of
the crash is under investigation, police said.
FAI R H AV E N
Man who barricaded
himself now in custody
A Fairhaven man was in police custody Sunday
afternoon following an hours-long standoff with
local police and a regional SWAT team in a residential neighborhood. The incident ended peacefully and there is no threat to the community, according to a statement from Fairhaven police. At
8:38 a.m., a 49-year-old man living at 18 Winsegansett Ave. turned away Fairhaven officers who
tried to make contact with him and “then barricaded himself inside the home,” the statement
said. The man was alone inside the house, and
officers had reason to believe he was armed with
a knife, the statement said. Fairhaven police
were joined by a SWAT team from the Southeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council.
Police found three knives inside the home when
the man was taken into custody around 12:30
p.m., a police spokesman said.
CA M B R I D G E
Larry Nassar accuser
to speak at Harvard
The first woman to publicly accuse former sports
doctor Larry Nassar of sexual abuse will be
speaking about justice and forgiveness at Harvard University. Rachael Denhollander is slated
to speak Thursday at an event titled ‘‘Can We
Reconcile Justice and Forgiveness?’’ She’s expected to discuss how religion influenced her ideas
about justice and her ability to forgive people
who don’t seem to deserve it. Denhollander told
police in 2016 that Nassar molested her when
she was a 15-year-old gymnast. Dozens of other
women later testified in court that Nassar had
abused them too. He pleaded guilty in November
to molesting patients and possessing child pornography and was sentenced to spend the rest of
his life in prison. The event will be moderated by
Harvard professor and developmental psychologist Nancy Hill. (AP)
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
Residents grieve shooting victims at handmade memorials
2 killed in separate
Dorchester attacks
By Andrew Grant
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Candles flickered and balloons bobbed in the breeze
Sunday morning at two memorials on Dorchester streets
as loved ones remembered the
victims of Friday and Saturday’s fatal shootings.
In the first shooting, a 35year-old-man was shot in the
c he s t i n a “ b razen attack”
shortly after 9 a.m. “on what’s
supposed to be a real holy day,
Good Friday,” said Boston police Commissioner William B.
Ev a n s a t t h e s c e n e Fr i d ay
morning.
The second shooting at the
corner of Evans and Morton
streets Saturday took the life
of a 38-year-old man who police said was sitting in his vehicle when he was shot in the
head about 4 p.m. during a
drive-by shooting.
Both men appeared to be
specifically targeted, Evans
told reporters Saturday, but
police do not believe the killings are connected.
As of Sunday evening, Boston police said both investigations were active and ongoing.
They declined to identify the
victims, and did not comment
further.
On Evans Street Sunday
morning, friends gathered to
remember the vic tim shot
there, a man they described as
a lighthearted, caring friend
and a good father.
“He was my friend,” said
Yv e t t e C l e m e n t s , o f D o r chester, as she wrapped masking tape around the belly of a
yellow teddy bear, attaching it
to a telephone pole in the middle of a makeshift memorial.
“He was a nice guy. Had a
lot of tragedy in his life, a few
skeletons in his closet, but a
nice guy and a real good father,” Clements said.
Shortly after Clements left,
a small group of men and
women clutching candles, car-
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Ashanti Mclaurin (left), who identified herself as the girlfriend of a man shot dead on Evans Street on Saturday, was comforted Sunday by Ana Bennett.
rying a bouquet of roses, and
holding a large brown teddy
bear appr oached the telephone pole.
As the second bear was being taped to the pole, one of
the women in the group
placed the flowers in its arms
before stepping back and wiping her eyes.
“We’re here to remember
[him],” said Ashanti Mclaurin,
36, of Dorchester, who identified herself as the victim’s girlfriend.
“He was just a neighborhood guy who loved laughing.
He was so smart and ambitious and just at the wrong
place at the wrong time,” she
said.
After a pause, Mclaurin’s father, Eric Lott, said the me-
sible so people always have a
place to come by. People may
not make the funeral, but they
can come by and rub [the ted-
“This is all just so unfortunate. The violence, the killing,
it all has to stop,” she said.
Others, like Lott, were fo-
‘He was my friend. He was a nice guy. Had a lot of tragedy in
his life, a few skeletons in his closet, but a nice guy and a real
good father.’
YVETTE CLEMENTS, remembering the man shot dead at the corner of Evans and Morton streets
mentos were a way for the victim to be remembered.
“This is about respecting
him. Giving him love. I want
to keep this up as long as pos-
dy bear’s] head. That way they
won’t forget [him].”
Many in the community,
such as Clements, just want
the violence to end.
cused more on remembering
those killed. “How do you say
goodbye?” he said. “You can’t.”
Three miles away on Wayland Street, the man who was
killed Friday was memorialized by dozens of objects that
mourners had placed under a
street mural depicting two
large red hearts.
On an empty street Sunday
afternoon, candles burned and
a cluster of heart-shaped balloons swayed in the wind. A
few empty bottles of cognac
and vodka lay tipped on their
sides among Twix bars and a
mango.
Beside the memorial, someo n e h a d w r i tt e n i n c h a l k :
“R.I.P Pac-Man.”
Andrew Grant can be reached
at andrew.grant@globe.com
T aims to beef up bus system
uBUSES
Continued from Page B1
Alliance, an advocacy group
pushing for better buses. “I
think this is a hopeful time for
buses.”
Greater Boston’s bus system
is already massive, providing
about 400,000 rides a day, second only to the subway system.
Many bus routes serve low-income and minority neighborhoods that are not near subways, including communities
where the rapid transit system
was removed decades ago and
replaced by buses.
Yet buses are also the T’s
least reliable mode of transit,
with only about two-thirds of
all bus trips arriving on time on
any given day. Boston’s infamous congestion doesn’t help,
nor do crowded vehicles, which
can slow boarding.
And with the rise of alternatives like Uber, bus ridership
has been dropping at an alarming rate. Despite jam-packed
buses on certain lines at certain
hours, weekday MBTA bus ridership fell more than 7 percent
from 2014 to November 2017,
and by more than 12 percent on
Saturdays.
Transit activists say the best
way to fight back is to improve
bus service overall, and the T is
hoping to do just that.
In the short term, the MBTA
is adding more early-morning
trips on 10 bus lines and will
start service earlier in the day
on several routes that get busy
before dawn.
It will be more convenient
for early-morning workers, and
new routes could result in increased rush-hour capacity by
spreading more riders over the
course of a morning, Ramirez
said.
On April 21, the T will open
a new branch of the Silver Line
to serve Chelsea. Crucially, the
line will run on bus-only roadways along portions of the
route in the Seaport District
and in Chelsea, which should
make the service faster and
more reliable.
However, the new service is
not expected to ease congestion
on Silver Line buses in the Seaport, which are so crowded that
The MBTA does
not control the one
thing that may
influence bus
service more than
anything else:
traffic on local
roads.
passengers must sometimes
wait for several buses to leave
before they can board at South
Station.
Other upcoming initiatives
should also result in improved
bus service.
The MBTA is moving to an
all-electronic, no-cash fare system that will allow passengers
to board through both front
and rear doors. The T predicts
these ac tions will shor ten
boarding times, cutting as
much as 10 percent off the time
of a bus trip.
The T is also considering an
all-night bus service, proposed
by the advocacy group Transit
Matters, between Chelsea and
Mattapan that would stop at
South Station and Logan Airport. The authority is also
working with Boston,
Brookline, and Cambridge to
install technology that automatically changes traffic lights
to speed buses through certain
intersections.
Perhaps the most ambitious
undertaking is quietly bubbling
under the surface: a review of
every bus route, potentially
leading to schedule or route
changes and the purchasing of
more buses to meet demand.
That last idea is of particular
interest to some advocates, who
note that a few cities have
bucked the trend of falling bus
ridership. Houston redrew its
entire bus map a few years
back, and ridership rebounded
after years of decline, inspiring
other transit systems to consider changes, said Jon Orcutt,
communications director for
the national advocacy group
Transit Center.
“They’re taking ownership
of the fact that these cities have
changed,” Orcutt said. “ You
have to have that kind of approach, a rolling review of how
bus routes are performing.”
But the T does not control
the one thing that may influence bus service more than anything else: traffic on local roads.
“This is an area where we
need to see municipalities take
the lead,” Thompson said. “Our
municipalities are a little behind the curve, in terms of their
peers around the country.”
The T has been prodding
municipal governments, including Boston’s, to take steps
like reserving traffic or parking
lanes for buses. It’s common
elsewhere; London, New York,
Cleveland, and Seattle have cordoned off sections of city streets
for buses, while others have
dedicated long stretches of road
for “bus rapid transit” systems
with big stations and raised
platforms for faster boarding.
This spring, Boston will test
a bus-only lane on a notoriously
congested strip of Washington
Street in Roslindale. Parking
will be banned on one side during the morning rush. Everett
set aside a stretch of Broadway
for buses, Somerville recently
created a bus lane near Union
Square, and more are coming to
Arlington, Cambridge, and Watertown.
Transit advocates and philanthropic groups, including the
Barr Foundation, have been
pushing for changes to improve
the T’s bus service. The Cambridge, Watertown, and Arlington proposals are all funded by
grants from Barr.
In March, the Livable Streets
Alliance called for bus-only
lanes in other parts of Boston.
They could also be outfitted
with the traffic-light technology, the group says.
So far, Boston has no set
plans for bus lanes beyond the
Roslindale test. But Gina Fiandaca, the city’s transportation
commissioner, said officials are
“definitely taking a look at
where high demand is” to consider other possible bus lanes.
Adam Vaccaro can be reached
at adam.vaccaro@globe.com.
s
’
t
r
a
he
t
n
e
t
con
o
t
n
e
t
s
Li
your
ne w
full, the
r
o
d
e
r
d by
f ra c t u
. Inspire
hear t is
it
r
o
u
t
o
k
y
a
r
h
e
W he t he
, Meredit
s t will sp
e
a
b
c
d
lo
o
G
p
te r s
oston
d
L ove L e t
in The B
n
m
ships, an
lu
n
o
c
io
t
r
la
la
e
u
r
nce,
her pop
les roma
k
time.
c
a
t
in
tion at a
s
e
u
Golds te
q
ig
eb
eak— on
h ear t br
up?
a
et over
g
I
o
d
1: How
Season
break
Stitcher
tters.s
e
L
e
v
o
L
or visit
how
A NEW PODCAST FROM
Presented by
B4
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
At Massport, 4 in 10 workers are paid $100k or more
uMASSPORT
Continued from Page B1
S t i l l , Ma s s p o r t d i d n o t
claim the highest share of
workers who collected
$100,000 or more last year.
For e xample, at least twothirds of State Police employees had six-figure sums;
among troopers alone, at least
88 percent did.
Massport defended its
spending on payroll.
“The authority strives to be
a fiscally prudent organization
while maintaining the highest
levels of safety, security and
service at each of our facilities,” spokeswoman Jennifer
Mehigan said in a statement.
“We require specialized, highly
trained staff and must remain
competitive to attract the appropriate people for numerous
critical roles.”
Massport is funded differently than most other state offices. Nearly all of its operating
costs are paid for with money
it generates from its various
properties, including fees paid
by airlines, rental car companies, and people who park in
lots it owns.
Payroll accounts for about
17 percent of Massport’s total
annual budget. It is the authority’s third-largest expense
category, and that percentage
does not account for benefits
for both active and retired
LEGAL NOTICES
workers.
Mary Z. Connaughton, director of government transparency at the Pioneer Institute, a
nonprofit think tank that supports limited government, said
that, on the one hand, “managing Massport is a complicated
operation, and compensation
that assures high-quality management is important.”
But on the other hand, she
cautioned, “these levels of pay
may jeopardize Massport’s
long-term fiscal health.”
“Of course, they will not affect Massport’s profitability in
the short term, with agency
revenues spiking higher in
Boston’s booming economy,”
she added. “But, longer term,
the upward trend of higher salaries and increased pension liabilities that go with them may
no longer be sustainable when
the next downturn hits.”
At Massport, 23 employees
earned $200,000 or more, including five who collected
more than $250,000 in 2017.
The highest-paid employee
was Edward C. Freni, director
of aviation at Logan, who was
paid $320,599.
Next was John P. Pranckevicius, chief financial officer at
Massport, who collected
$293,612.
Houssam H. Sleiman, director of capital programs and environmental affairs, received
LEGAL NOTICES
City Of Boston Public Improvement Commission
LEGAL NOTICES
The Massachusetts Port
Authority’s properties
include Hanscom Field
airport in Bedford (left),
Logan Airport, and Seaport
terminals in Boston, and
Worcester Regional Airport.
Payroll accounts for about
17 percent of Massport’s
total annual budget.
LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2017
$289,774.
Massport CEO Thomas P.
Glynn was paid $287,298.
The port director, Lisa S.
Wieland, received $250,713.
Massport officials said toplevel executives manage multiple, large areas of the authority’s operations.
For example, they said, Freni’s job includes oversight of
Logan Airport, which served
over 38 million customers last
year and generates an estimated $13.3 billion in economic
activity annually.
Massport also said some
jobs demand high pay to attract quality talent. Massport
said it has lost employees and
failed to hire prospective
LEGAL NOTICES
City Of Boston Public Improvement Commission
March 29, 2018
March 29, 2018
Ordered: That due notice be given that this Commission
is of the opinion that in said City of Boston the following
public improvements will be considered at the request of
the petitioner: Horizons Watermark LLC.
Ordered: That due notice be given that this Commission
is of the opinion that in said City of Boston the following
public improvements will be considered at the request of
the petitioner: 90 Cottage Street LLC.
On a petition by the petitioner for the making of Specific
Repairs within the following public ways in Roxbury, consisting of curb, sidewalk, and pedestrian ramp reconstruction, as well as new and relocated specialty pavement,
street trees, and driveway curb cuts:
On a petition by the petitioner for the Vertical Discontinuance of a portion of Cottage Street (public way), East Boston, located on its northwesterly side at address #90 between Everett Street and Maverick Street, vertically above
the grade of the sidewalk.
• Columbus Avenue – at address #1785, on its westerly
side north of Dimock Street.
• Dimock Street – on its northerly side between
Columbus Avenue and Amory Street.
• Amory Street – on its easterly side north of
Dimock Street.
This Commission appoints April 12, 2018, at 10:00 AM, in
Boston City Hall room 801, as the time and place for the
Public Hearing to consider the petition of the petitioner.
This Commission appoints April 12, 2018, at 10:00 AM, in
Boston City Hall room 801, as the time and place for the
Public Hearing to consider the petition of the petitioner.
CHRISTOPHER P. OSGOOD
GINA FIANDACA
GREGORY ROONEY
SEAN LYDON
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION
CHRISTOPHER P. OSGOOD
GINA FIANDACA
GREGORY ROONEY
SEAN LYDON
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION
A true copy of an order passed by said Commission
on said day.
Attest:
Todd M. Liming, P.E.
Executive Secretary
A true copy of an order passed by said Commission
on said day.
Attest:
Todd M. Liming, P.E.
Executive Secretary
City Of Boston Public Improvement Commission
March 29, 2018
Ordered: That due notice be given that this Commission
is of the opinion that in said City of Boston the following
public improvements will be considered at the request of
the petitioner: Horizons Watermark LLC.
On a petition by the petitioner for the acceptance of a Pedestrian Easement adjacent to the following public ways
in Roxbury:
• Columbus Avenue – at address #1785, on its westerly
side north of Dimock Street.
• Dimock Street – on its northerly side between
Columbus Avenue and Amory Street.
• Amory Street – on its easterly side north of
Dimock Street.
This Commission appoints April 12, 2018, at 10:00 AM, in
Boston City Hall room 801, as the time and place for the
Public Hearing to consider the petition of the petitioner.
CHRISTOPHER P. OSGOOD
GINA FIANDACA
GREGORY ROONEY
SEAN LYDON
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION
City Of Boston Public Improvement Commission
March 29, 2018
Ordered: That due notice be given that this Commission
is of the opinion that in said City of Boston the following
public improvements will be considered at the request of
the petitioner: 21 Merchants Row Corp.
On a petition by the petitioner for the granting of a Sidewalk Café License for seasonal outdoor seating within
Merchants Row, Boston Proper, located on its easterly
side at address #21 south of Chatham Street.
This Commission appoints April 12, 2018, at 10:00 AM, in
Boston City Hall room 801, as the time and place for the
Public Hearing to consider the petition of the petitioner.
CHRISTOPHER P. OSGOOD
GINA FIANDACA
GREGORY ROONEY
SEAN LYDON
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION
A true copy of an order passed by said Commission
on said day.
Attest:
Todd M. Liming, P.E.
Executive Secretary
Insurance Commissioner’s Verified Complaint Requesting Appointment of Liquidator for Minuteman Health, Inc.
(“MHI”)
A true copy of an order passed by said Commission
on said day.
Attest:
Todd M. Liming, P.E.
Executive Secretary
City Of Boston Public Improvement Commission
March 29, 2018
Ordered: That due notice be given that this Commission
is of the opinion that in said City of Boston the following
public improvements will be considered at the request of
the petitioner: Northeastern University.
On a petition by the petitioner for the making of Specific
Repairs within St. Botolph Street, Roxbury, on its southeasterly side at address #238 between Gainsborough
Street and Public Alley no. 823, consisting of curb realignment, sidewalk and pedestrian ramp reconstruction,
as well as new and relocated specialty pavement, street
trees, street lighting infrastructure, irrigation infrastructure,
stormdrain infrastructure, and street furniture.
This Commission appoints April 12, 2018, at 10:00 AM, in
Boston City Hall room 801, as the time and place for the
Public Hearing to consider the petition of the petitioner.
CHRISTOPHER P. OSGOOD
GINA FIANDACA
GREGORY ROONEY
SEAN LYDON
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION
A true copy of an order passed by said Commission
on said day.
Attest:
Todd M. Liming, P.E.
Executive Secretary
City Of Boston Public Improvement Commission
March 29, 2018
Ordered: That due notice be given that this Commission
is of the opinion that in said City of Boston the following
public improvements will be considered at the request of
the petitioners: Braintree Street Realty LLC and WJG Realty
Company LLC.
On a joint petition by the petitioners for the Discontinuance of any and all rights to travel the public may have had
within a portion of Everett Street (public way), Brighton,
located north of Braintree Street.
This Commission appoints April 26, 2018, at 10:00 AM, in
Boston City Hall room 801, as the time and place for the
Public Hearing to consider the petition of the petitioners.
Notice is hereby given that a hearing will be held on April 25,
2018 at 11:00 a.m., before Justice Lowy of the Supreme Judicial Court for Suffolk County, Massachusetts, in the Oliver
Wendell Holmes, Jr., Courtroom, John Adams Courthouse, One
Pemberton Square, Boston, Massachusetts, to consider and
act upon the Verified Complaint Requesting Appointment of
Liquidator brought by the Commissioner of Insurance of the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. (An electronic copy of this
notice as well as the Verified Complaint, related pleadings, and
a Q&A document have been posted on Massachusetts Division
of Insurance website at https://www.mass.gov/lists/receiverships.)
Any person intending to object to the Verified Complaint shall
file that written objection with the Court at least five days
prior to the hearing, and shall simultaneously provide a copy,
to counsel for the Receiver, J. David Leslie, Rackemann, Sawyer
& Brewster, P.C., 160 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts
02110.
A true copy of an order passed by said Commission
on said day.
Attest:
Todd M. Liming, P.E.
Executive Secretary
City Of Boston Public Improvement Commission
March 29, 2018
Ordered: That due notice be given that this Commission
is of the opinion that in said City of Boston the following
public improvements will be considered at the request of
the petitioner: Combined Jewish Philanthropies of Greater
Boston Inc.
On a petition by the petitioner for the granting of a Projection License for the installation of a canopy over a portion of the sidewalk within High Street, Boston Proper, on
its northwesterly side at address #126 northeast of Pearl
Street.
This Commission appoints April 12, 2018, at 10:00 AM, in
Boston City Hall room 801, as the time and place for the
Public Hearing to consider the petition of the petitioner.
CHRISTOPHER P. OSGOOD
GINA FIANDACA
GREGORY ROONEY
SEAN LYDON
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION
A true copy of an order passed by said Commission
on said day.
Attest:
Todd M. Liming, P.E.
Executive Secretary
CITY OF QUINCY
PUBLIC HEARING
2018-2019 ANNUAL ACTION PLAN
The City of Quincy Community Development division
will hold a public hearing at
5:00 P.M. on April 4, 2018 in
Room 121 at 34 Coddington
Street, Quincy MA 02169
to review proposed usages
of available P.Y. 2018 Community Development Block
Grant (CDBG); Home Investment Partnerships Program
(HOME); and Emergency
Solutions Grant (ESG) funds.
The program year begins
on July 1, 2018 and expires
June 30, 2019. During the
upcoming 2018 plan year,
these U. S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) funds will be
expended for activities such
as: Public Services; Public Facilities & Infrastructure; Code Enforcement;
Homeowner Rehabilitation;
Homebuyer
Assistance;
HOME Housing production;
Homelessness Prevention;
and Emergency Shelter. The
City expects that in excess
of 70% of the CDBG Funds
and 100% of the HOME and
ESG funds will be expended
on activities that benefit primarily low and moderate income people. The purpose
of the hearing is to obtain
the views of interested
citizens, organizations and
other parties as to the city’s
housing and community development needs. Persons
with speech, hearing or
sight disabilities and persons requiring translation
services will be accommodated to the greatest extent
possible provided a request
for such assistance is made
at a reasonable time prior
to the hearing. For questions or accommodations
requests, please contact
Sean Glennon, Community
Development Director, at
617-376-1167 or sglennon@
quincyma.gov or 34 Coddington Street, Quincy, MA
02169.
Community
Preservation Plan
Public Hearing
- Monday, April 9, 2018 from
6-7:00pm in Winter Chamber at 26 Court Street, 1st
floor, Boston, MA 02108.
The public is invited to offer input on the needs and
possibilities in Boston’s
neighborhoods for Community Preservation Act funds.
Approximately $20 million
will be raised every year
in the City for affordable
housing, historic preservation, and parks and open
space. A draft of the inaugural Community Preservation Plan outlining priorities
and goals for the first year
of projects is available at
www.boston.gov/cpa
MALDEN BOARD OF
APPEAL
City Of Boston Public Improvement Commission
March 29, 2018
Ordered: That due notice be given that this Commission
is of the opinion that in said City of Boston the following
public improvements will be considered at the request of
the petitioner: National Grid.
On a petition by the petitioner for Grant of Location to relocate a gas regulator station and associated infrastructure
within Brooks Street, Brighton, to be located on its westerly side between Woodmont Street and Nonantum Road.
This Commission appoints April 12, 2018, at 10:00 AM, in
Boston City Hall room 801, as the time and place for the
Public Hearing to consider the petition of the petitioner.
CHRISTOPHER P. OSGOOD
GINA FIANDACA
GREGORY ROONEY
SEAN LYDON
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION
A true copy of an order passed by said Commission
on said day.
Attest:
Todd M. Liming, P.E.
Executive Secretary
CITY OF BOSTON
TREE REMOVAL HEARING
950 Commonwealth
Avenue in Allston
CHRISTOPHER P. OSGOOD
GINA FIANDACA
GREGORY ROONEY
SEAN LYDON
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION
LEGAL NOTICES
In accordance with M.G.L.
Chapter 87, the City of
Boston will hold a public
hearing on the request to
remove one elm tree that
is 19” in diameter at chest
height at 950 Commonwealth Avenue in Alston.
The hearing will be held at
the Boston Parks and Recreation Department, 1010
Massachusetts Avenue, 3rd
floor, on Thursday, April 5,
2018 at 11:30 am. Public
testimony will be taken at
the hearing or may be provided prior to the hearing
in writing to parks@boston.
gov, or the above address.
CITY OF BOSTON
TREE REMOVAL HEARING
240 Mount Vernon Street
in Dorchester
PUBLIC HEARING
The Malden Board of
Appeal will hold a public
hearing at the John and
Christina Markey Malden
Senior Community Center, 7 Washington Street,
Malden, MA at 6:30 P.M.
on Wednesday, April 18,
2018 on the petition of McDonald’s USA LLC (Archland Property I LLC) for a
variance of Section 3.35.5.7,
3.35.6.2 and 3.35.9.3.4.1
Chapter 3, of the Revised
Ordinance of 1991 as
Amended of the City of Malden, Sign Design Control Ordinances regulating the appearance, size, placement,
and/or locatin of signs
located on residential and
commercial properties, at
the location known as 114
Broadway, Malden, MA and
also known by City Assessor’s Parcel ID # 125 481
118. Petition and plans are
available for public review
in the office of the City Assessor, 110 Pleasant Street,
3rd floor, Malden, MA.
James O’Brien, Chairman
CITY OF BOSTON
TREE REMOVAL HEARING
In accordance with M.G.L.
Chapter 87, the City of
Boston will hold a public
hearing on the request to
remove one Norway Maple
tree that is 19” in diameter
at chest height at 542 East
Sixth Street in South Boston. The hearing will be held
at the Boston Parks and
Recreation
Department,
1010 Massachusetts Avenue, 3rd floor, on Thursday,
April 5, 2018 at 10:00 am.
Public testimony will be
taken at the hearing or may
be provided prior to the
hearing in writing to parks@
boston.gov, or the above
address.
In accordance with M.G.L.
Chapter 87, the City of
Boston will hold a public
hearing on the request to
remove one red oak tree
that is 22” in diameter at
chest height at 275 Canterbury Street in Roslindale.
The hearing will be held at
the Boston Parks and Recreation Department, 1010
Massachusetts Avenue, 3rd
floor, on Thursday, April 5,
2018 at 10:30 am. Public
testimony will be taken at
the hearing or may be provided prior to the hearing
in writing to parks@boston.
gov, or the above address.
275 Canterbury Street in
Roslindale
By Chris Chase
The 18th European Individual Championship just concluded in Batumi, Georgia, with a
surprising winner, the Croatian
grandmaster Ivan Saric, with
8.5/11. He earned about
$28,000 and a seed into the
next World Cup for his troubles.
Going into the last round, there
were eight players tied at 7.5.
Saric was the only one of the 7.5
point group to win, beating
Czech No. 1 David Navara.
Today’s game is between one
of England’s best players and
fourth-place finisher, Gawain
Jones, and Russian Ernesto Inarkiev. Jones is known as an aggressive player with very good
tactical skills. So, it must have
been a pleasant surprise for Inarkiev how quiet the opening
was but he made a mistake with
18…g5 letting Jones enter into
murky but entertaining territory that Inarkiev was really not
ready to defend.
2018 European Individual,
Batumi, Georgia
Gawain Jones (2651) — Er­
News
CONTACTS, TIPS, COMMENTS
Switchboard: (617) 929-2000
(617) 929-7400
newstip@globe.com
comments@globe.com
SPOTLIGHT TEAM TIP LINE
(617) 929-7483
Customer service
PRINT AND DIGITAL
(888) 694-5623
customerservice@globe.com
nesto Inarkiev (2684)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+
Nd7 3...Bd7 is the preferred
move 4.a4 Ngf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2
b6 7.0–0 Bb7 8.Re1 g6 Black’s
not in the mood to take the
pawn:8...Nxe4 9.Nxe4 Bxe4
10.Bc4 d5 11.Ng5 Nf6 12.Nxe4
dxe4 13.Qe2 Qc8 14.d3 exd3
15.Qxd3 e6 16.f4 g6 17.f5 gxf5
18.Qxf5 when White should
have more than enough compensation for the pawn 9.d4
cxd4 10.Nxd4 Bg7 This time
White’s comp is very clear:
10...Nxe4 11.Nxe4 Bxe4
12.Bxa6 Bxg2 13.Bb5 Bb7
Advertising
DISPLAY
(617) 929-2200
bostonglobemedia.com
CLASSIFIED
(617) 929-1500
boston.com/classifieds
City
7-day home delivery
Retail Other
$20.00 20.00 20.00
Sunday-only
home delivery
$8.00 8.00
8.00
Daily single copy
$2.00 2.00
2.50
Sunday single copy
$4.50 4.50
5.00
Lottery
SUNDAY MIDDAY
0872
Payoffs (based on a $1 bet)
All 4 digits
First or last 3
Any 2 digits
Any 1 digit
$6,232
$872
$75
$7
All 4 digits
First 3
Last 3
$260
$145
$145
5071
SUNDAY NIGHT
Payoffs (based on a $1 bet)
EXACT ORDER
All 4 digits
First or last 3
Any 2 digits
Any 1 digit
$4,917
$688
$59
$6
ANY ORDER
All 4 digits
First 3
Last 3
April 1
MASS CASH
MEGABUCKS
March 31
11-19-29-37-39-49
Jackpot: $$1,564,442; 0 winners
ANY ORDER
Experience Globe.com
Among all Massport employees, the average pay was
$93,616 last year, up from
$88,448 in 2016 and $80,366
in 2011.
Altogether, Massport spent
about $129.3 million on payroll last year, up from about
$95 million in 2011.
Massport officials said the
increasing amounts were in
line with significant growth in
operations over those years.
The number of employees who
received pay from the agency
last year was up slightly — by
about 1.4 percent — from the
1,362 workers the agency paid
in 2016. The number is up by
about 16 percent from the
1,193 employees it paid in
2011.
“For the time frame be tween 2011 and 2017, several
business areas, including Logan International Airport,
Conley Terminal [a marine
Matt Rocheleau
can be reached at
matthew.rocheleau@globe.co
m. Follow him on Twitter
@mrochele
Chess notes
EXACT ORDER
In accordance with M.G.L.
Chapter 87, the City of
Boston will hold a public
hearing on the request to
remove two London Plane
trees that are each 10” in
diameter at chest height at
240 Mount Vernon Street
in Dorchester. The hearing
will be held at the Boston
Parks and Recreation Department, 1010 Massachusetts Avenue, 3rd floor, on
Thursday, April 5, 2018 at
11:00 am. Public testimony
will be taken at the hearing
or may be provided prior
to the hearing in writing to
parks@boston.gov, or the
above address.
CITY OF BOSTON
TREE REMOVAL HEARING
542 East Sixth Street in
South Boston
workers because they received
higher salary offers elsewhere.
Massport, like other arms
of state and municipal governments, has faced criticism in
the past for generous pay and
benefits for employees and for
other payroll-related issues.
The agency says it is careful
about payroll spending. For example, officials said Massport
froze worker pay and new hiring and laid off some employees in the years immediately
following the start of the 2008
recession.
But since then payroll
spending has grown, records
show.
The share of six-figure earners last year topped the 36 percent of Massport employees
who earned $100,000 or more
in 2016. In 2011, the earliest
year of available data, 27 percent of Massport employees
earned $100,000 or more.
shipping facility in South Boston], and [nearby] Flynn
Cruiseport Boston, increased
business activity by 30 percent,” Mehigan said.
The agency said that in recent years it also has bolstered
its information technology
staff to protect against growing cybersecurity concerns and
expanded the number of multilingual customer ser vice
workers at Logan to account
for increased international
flight options.
Available data on Massport’s payroll only showed the
total amount of money employees were paid during the
year. It didn’t include more detailed breakdowns of other
types of compensation, such as
overtime pay.
Massport officials provided
general statistics about overtime spending: Last year, 902
employees earned overtime
pay at an average amount of
$16,157 per employee.
Officials said overtime is
needed to keep operations running smoothly and safely, and
they said it is often cheaper
than hiring permanent workers, particularly since demand
for services can fluctuate, depending on season, weather,
day of the week, and security
concerns that can arise if violence or threats occur in other
parts of the world.
$205
$115
$115
01-03-17-25-28
Jackpot: $100,000; one winner
PREVIOUS DRAWINGS
Saturday
Friday
Thursday
Wednesday
Tuesday
Midday
3752
7362
2141
8931
7986
Night
0539
2146
2124
2215
1818
WEEKEND NUMBERS
AROUND NEW ENGLAND
Sun. Maine, N.H., Vermont
Day: 3-digit 927
4-digit 7424
Eve: 3-digit 627
4-digit 8570
Rhode Island
Sunday
9185
Saturday's Powerball
08-24-52-55-61
Powerball 21
Jackpot: $50 million; 0 winners
14.Nc6 Bxc6 15.Bxc6 Rc8
16.Qxd6 11.Bg5 h6 12.Bh4 0–0
13.Bc4 Re8 14.Nf3 Qc7 15.Bb3
Rac816.Qd2 Qc5 17.Rad1 Nh5
18.Nd5 g5?! Don’t play this is if
you are not sure that the sac on
g5 is not good 19.Bxg5!? This is
rather unclear but is an opportunity to mix it up that Jones
has been waiting for. 19...hxg5
20.Qxg5 e6? Again, he’s not in
the mood to defend a murky position. Best is 20...Nhf6! a sample line runs 21.c3 Rcd8 22.Bc2
Kf8 23.b4 Qc8 24.Re3 e6
25. Nxf6 B xf6 26.Q f4 Bxc3
27.Qxd6+ Kg8 28.Nd4 Bxd4
29.Rxd4 Nf8 30.Qg3+ Ng6
when Black is better but it’s
hard for a human to see that
21.Ne7+ Rxe7 22.Qxe7 Nhf6
23.Bxe6!? Well why not? The
engines consider this and the
more straightforward (and boring) 23.Qxd6 as equal but this is
so much more fun! 23...fxe6
2 4 .Q xe 6 + Kf 8 ? ! 2 4 . . . K h 8
25.Qh3+ Qh5 (25...Kg8 is
equal)26.Qxh5+ Nxh5 27.Rxd6
Rc7 28.Red1 Nhf6 29.Ng5 Rxc2
30.e5 Nxe5 31.Rxb6 Bd5
32.Rxa6 Rxb2 with another
murky position that the engines
think is slightly better for Black
25.Nh4! The main problem
with 24...Kf8 25...Qg5?!
25...Ne5 may hold: 26.Nf5 Rc7
27.Rxd6 Ne8 28.Rd8 Bc6 but it
does look very scary for Black
26.Qxd6+ Kg8 27.Qe6+ Kh7?!
This allows the knight check on
g5. Thus better is 27...Kh8 (Not
27...Kf8 as 28.Rxd7 Nxd7
29.Ng6+; wins) 28.Nf3 Qf4
29.Rxd7 (29.Qh3+ Qh6
30.Qxh6+ Bxh6 31.e5 Nd5
32.Rd4 and the engines feel
that this unusual position (a
rook and 5 pawns for three
pieces) is equal.) 29...Nxd7
30.Qxd7 Rb8 31.Qh3+ Qh6
32.Qxh6+ Bxh6 is better for
White 28.Nf3 Qf4 29.Qh3+
Qh6? Necessary is 29…Kg6 but
life is not easy for Black
30.Nh4+ Kg5 31.Rd3 Ng4
32.Nf3+ Kg6 33.Rxd7 Rh8
34.Nh4+ Rxh4 35.Qxh4 Bc8
36.Rxg7+ Kxg7 37.f3 Qf6
38.Qg3 Qd4+ 39.Kh1 Qe5
40.fxg4 Qxg3 41.hxg3 Bxg4
42.Rf1 30.Ng5+ There goes
Black’s queen 30...Kg8 31.Qe6+
Kh8 32.Nf7+ Kh7 33.Nxh6 Nc5
33...Kxh6 34.Rxd7 34.Qf5+
Kxh6 35.Re3 And now goes
Black’s king. 35...Bh8 36.Rg3
And Black resigned as it is mate
after 36...Rg8 [36...Bxe4
37.Qg5+ Kh7 38.Rh3+ Nh5
39.Rxh5#] 37.Rh3+ Kg7
38.Rh7+ Nxh7 39.Rd6 Ne6
[39...Ng5 40.Qf6+ Kh7
41.Qh6#; 39...Nf8 40.Qf6+ Kh7
41.Qh6#] 40.Rd7+ Kh6
41.Rxh7#; 1–0
Chris Chase can be reached at
BostonGlobeChessNotes@gmail
.com.
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B5
TAKING IT TO THE
RIVER — The Boston
skyline formed a
backdrop for a trio of
sailboats as they moved
along the Charles River
on Easter Sunday under
a dramatic sky.
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Crowds flock to Castle Island for Easter service
uSERVICE
Continued from Page B1
distributed the host to about
2,400 people, according to the
Rev. Robert E. Casey.
“They come from Rhode Island, from South Boston close
by, and from all over Massachusetts,” Casey said. “It’s a beautiful celebration of Easter to have
them all getting up so early in
the morning to celebrate the
Lord’s resurrection. . . . It demonstrates their faith in the
Church and in the Lord Jesus,
and what it means to them in
their daily life.”
The Castle Island Association and St. Brigid Parish hosted the Catholic Mass, which
welcomed people of all faiths,
continuing a tradition that has
persisted for more than 30
years, according to Casey, who
led Sunday’s Mass and said he
has participated for 19 years.
Winds off the harbor
whipped through the shivering
crowd and caused a fluttering
of the cloth atop the folding table that served as an altar. Airplanes leaving Logan International Airport rumbled overhead intermittently. But the
clergy and the congregation
kept their focus on a message
of resurrection, salvation, and
peace.
Among those in attendance
were a few government officials, including Boston Police
Commissioner William B. Evans, a South Boston native, and
C o n g r e s s m a n S t e p h e n F.
Lynch, another lifelong neighborhood resident.
Lynch said he and his family
had been coming to the Mass
“as long as I can remember”
and that he was there Sunday
with about 20 relatives.
“It’s a wonderful way to
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Roughly 2,400 people received Communion at the Easter sunrise service on Castle Island, said a priest in attendance.
start the day,” he said. “To be
honest with you, it’s the most
spiritual day of our year . . . because of this gathering, and
people getting up before dawn
and coming out here on this
hillside on Castle Island overlooking the sea. It’s just a beautiful, beautiful venue.”
Some came to observe traditions that were uniquely their
own.
Ten years ago, three friends
— all survivors of breast cancer
— attended the Mass for the
first time. Year af ter year,
they’ve returned, meeting by
the same rock to pray with family, co-workers, and newfound
friends.
“We found strength in each
other,” said Michelle Linskey,
50, a Hyde Park resident. “In
the dark, everybody is huddled
up, and all of a sudden a ball of
fire starts coming over the horizon. By the time the priest
starts talking about the resurrection, you see the sun come
up over his shoulder. It’s very
moving.”
Sitting side by side on a
bench, Mary and George Balaconis watched as the crowd
moved forward to take communion. George Balaconis, 64,
said the gathering reminded
him of a scene in the film “Field
of Dreams” in which a group of
people seems to emerge from
thin air.
“It’s very spiritual to be out
in Mother Nature,” said his
wife, Mary, 61. “We’re praying
for peace. We have a son in the
military. We want him to come
home and to be safe wherever
they send him.”
Paul Maiullari, 58, of South
Boston, attended with his wife
and seven children, maintaining a longstanding tradition.
“It’s just the best way to celebrate Easter, our most holy of
days,” he said. “There’s nothing
better.”
His son, Joseph, 17, said he
didn’t mind waking up early.
“It’s a great tradition, that
we just keep going,” he said.
“Even though it’s cold out, so
many people come.”
Nearby, Paul’s daughter, Erin, 29; his son Tony, 26; and
Tony’s boyfriend Mike Brennan, 27; shared a post-Mass
shot of Irish whiskey with Nicole Raukohl, 38, of South Boston.
Raukohl said her mother
was told on a trip to Ireland
that it was traditional to drink
a shot after Easter Mass, but a
friend from Ireland later told
Raukohl she was misinformed.
“She says it’s not an Irish
tradition, but we’ve made it our
tradition for the last four
years,” Raukohl said.
Sunday marked Brennan’s
first sunrise Easter Mass.
“I think it’s great,” he said.
“I’m always happy by the water,
so it’s a good way to start Easter.”
Tony Maiullari said he enjoys the tradition but would
prefer better weather.
“I like it when the sun actually shows up,” he said.
Nearby, the Easter Bunny —
Mark Gendreau, 51, of Malden
— drew a crowd of children eager for chocolate.
“See those smiles?” he said,
gesturing with a fuzzy paw toward the children. “That’s why
I do this.”
Some shy children stayed
away, only moving closer when
they realized the giant furry figure wasn’t actually a rabbit.
One family asked for a photo of
Gendreau holding their infant,
who promptly started crying.
“Hi guys,” Gendreau said,
leaning down to speak to the
children. “Like chocolate? Take
two.”
Jeremy C. Fox can be reached
at jeremy.fox@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@jeremycfox. Cristela Guerra
can be reached at
cristela.guerra@globe.com.
State’s health­costs website is now due to arrive this spring
uHEALTH WEBSITE
Continued from Page B1
lar service was $250, for example, that could include $200
paid by the insurer and $50 by
the consumer.
The figures provide a snapshot of the sometimes wide
cost difference for the same service at one health care provider
versus another. One Boston-area hospital, for example, was
paid $257 for a mammogram,
while another was paid $439,
and another was paid $573, according to state data.
But consumers should not
try to find their specific out-ofpocket costs for a mammogram, MRI, colonoscopy, or
other service based solely on
the state website, Campbell
warned. For that, they should
turn to their own insurance
companies. Commercial health
insurers in Massachusetts already are required to run websites that show the costs of services for consumers, depending
on their specific health plans.
Massachusetts’ effort to create a health care cost website,
w h ic h w as suppo sed to be
ready by September, has been
delayed in part because of
problems with a subcontractor
that made errors loading the
data, setting the project behind
by several weeks, CHIA officials
said.
Other delays were a result of
the agency’s many meetings
with members of the health
care industry, officials said. The
agency has addressed more
than 200 technical and other
issues based on feedback from
people in the industry who tested an early version of the website.
In addition to cost information, the website is expected to
include some health care quality data, explanations of common medical terms, and suggested questions to ask a doctor before undergoing a
procedure.
Officials said they are
spending about $571,900 to
launch the site. They have not
announced exactly when it will
go public.
He a l t h c a r e p r o v i d e r s ,
which traditionally have preferred to keep price information secret, are supporting the
state transparency effort — if
grudgingly.
“I think they’re very curious
to see [information] about
their competitors,” Campbell
said. “I think they’re nervous
about people seeing it about
them.”
Doctors and hospital leaders credited state officials for
keeping them informed about
the website ahead of its launch.
But Dr. Henry L. Dorkin,
president of the Massachusetts
Medical Society, raised several
concerns.
Dorkin said some doctors
who tested the site — himself
included — found it was lacking information about all of the
facilities where they worked
and all of the insurers they contracted with.
In addition, the site uses
2015 numbers, so some of the
information is no longer relevant.
“If it only shows a portion of
a physician’s practice, or the
data is so old that it doesn’t
show physicians where they
currently are [working], there
are a lot of opportunities for
misinterpretation,” said Dorkin, who works at Boston Children’s Hospital.
“I’m just not sure exactly
how well the data would help
someone,” he said.
Steve Walsh, president of
the Massachusetts Health &
Hospital Association, said hospital leaders support the concept of greater transparency in
health care, but they want to
make sure the information on
the state website isn’t misleading.
The hope among policy
makers is that consumers,
armed with more information,
will be able to make better
choices about where they get
their care. This could include
choosing lower-cost medical facilities, which would save money for the consumer and the
broader health care system.
But it’s unclear how many
consumers and employers will
use the state website.
At Massachusetts’ largest
health insurers, which operate
their own cost websites, the
numbers of people searching
for information is just a fraction of the total insured.
Blue Cross Blue Shield of
Massachusetts said it received
38,240 inquiries on its cost
website in 2017, about 5,000
more than the previous year.
Har vard Pilgrim Health
Care said 40,000 people visited
its cost website in 2016, but
that fell sharply last year when
the site was taken down for several months to be updated.
At Tufts Health Plan, the
cost estimator website had
22,567 page hits last year, almost 9,000 less than the previous year.
Insurers said the y have
worked to improve and promote their websites over the
past few years.
Lora Pellegrini, president of
the Massachusetts Association
of Health Plans, said the state’s
upcoming health care cost website can also play an important
role.
“We see this as another tool
for consumers and employers
to understand the differences
around the cost of health care
services,” she said. “We’re hoping it will spur a public conversation about how can we make
health care more affordable.”
Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
can be reached at
priyanka.mccluskey
@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @priyanka_dayal.
T h e
B6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
AVERBUCK, Ruthe (Braun)
BY CITY AND TOWN
ARLINGTON
CHAMBERS, Elaine C. (Riley)
COTTER, John F., Jr.
COTTER, John III
BOSTON
CRISOSTOMO, Santiago, MD
MORALES, Carlos E.
BRIDGEWATER
FERRARA, Vera (Russo)
BROOKLINE
CRISOSTOMO, Santiago, MD
NORWOOD
WOZNIAK, Regina C. (Sobiech)
ORLEANS
MEAD, Michael Ernest
OSTERVILLE
TARNOFF, Peter
PEABODY
ANTONELLI, Antonio
RANDOLPH
AVERBUCK, Ruthe (Braun)
CAMBRIDGE
CHAMBERS, Elaine C. (Riley)
READING
BRENNAN, Thomas E.
COHASSET
PERINI, Eileen C. (Callahan)
REVERE
GROSS, Joseph H.
PROCOPIO-RUGGIERO, Helen C.
(Hlabanis)
DORCHESTER
FINNEGAN, Thomas F.
DOVER
PERINI, Eileen C. (Callahan)
SALEM
WHITTIER, Faith L. (Ballantyne)
EAST BOSTON
ALFANO, Alfonse J., Jr.
GRAFFEO, Eugene C.
MEAD, Michael Ernest
PROCOPIO-RUGGIERO, Helen C.
(Hlabanis)
STONEHAM
ALLAN, Judith M. (Conley)
EASTON
FERRARA, Vera (Russo)
WALTHAM
WHITTIER, Faith L. (Ballantyne)
FALMOUTH
FINNEGAN, Thomas F.
FRAMINGHAM
GROSS, Joseph H.
HINGHAM
PERINI, Eileen C. (Callahan)
HYDE PARK
PATTERSON, Thomas F.
MALDEN
GRAFFEO, Eugene C.
MARTHA’S VINEYARD
MEAD, Michael Ernest
MEDFIELD
PERINI, Eileen C. (Callahan)
MEDFORD
PATTERSON, Thomas F.
MELROSE
ALFANO, Alfonse J., Jr.
GROSS, Joseph H.
WHITTIER, Faith L. (Ballantyne)
NEEDHAM
CAMPANELLA, Karen G. (Eriksen)
JONES, Marilyn M. (Messier)
MERCHANT, John
WAKEFIELD
ALLAN, Judith M. (Conley)
BRENNAN, Thomas E.
LOUGHLIN, Anne M. (Fahey)
WELLESLEY
JONES, Marilyn M. (Messier)
PERINI, Eileen C. (Callahan)
WEST ROXBURY
MORALES, Carlos E.
WESTFORD
WHITTIER, Faith L. (Ballantyne)
WINTHROP
CAPONE, Adelaide (O’Brien)
GRAFFEO, Eugene C.
LESSARD, Muriel A. (Fredericks)
PROCOPIO-RUGGIERO, Helen C.
(Hlabanis)
WOBURN
CHAMBERS, Elaine C. (Riley)
COTTER, John F., Jr.
COTTER, John III
OUT OF STATE
FLORIDA
FERRARA, Vera (Russo)
NEW BEDFORD
WAINER, Beverly W.
NEW HAMPSHIRE
ALFANO, Alfonse J., Jr.
MEAD, Michael Ernest
NEWTON
JONES, Marilyn M. (Messier)
NEW JERSEY
PATTERSON, Thomas F.
NORTON
WOZNIAK, Regina C. (Sobiech)
NEW YORK
MEAD, Michael Ernest
ALFANO, Alfonse J., Jr.
Of Melrose and Windham,
NH, April 1, 2018, at age
74. Beloved husband of Joanna M. Alfano, with whom he shared
43 years of marriage. Devoted father of
Anthony J. Alfano of Peabody, Christine
J. LaBrecque and her husband Keith of
Salem, NH, and Nicholas J. Alfano and
his wife Sara of Newburyport. Loving
brother of Armando Alfano and his
wife Jeanette of Biddeford Pool, ME.,
Anna Colarusso and her husband Augy
of Danvers, JoAnn Maylor and her husband Bill of Danvers, the late Domenic
Alfano and his surviving wife June
of Florida, and the late Louie Alfano.
Proud grandfather of Sophie, Lucy,
Lucas, and Lexi. Also survived by many
loving nieces and nephews. Relatives
and friends will gather in honor and
remembrance of Alfonse’s life during
visiting hours at the Robinson Funeral
Home, 809 Main St., MELROSE on
Wednesday, April 4 from 4-8 pm. His
Funeral Mass will be announced. Gifts,
in Alfonse’s memory, may be made to
the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, P. O.
Box 849168, Boston, MA 02284. For
online tribute, or directions visit:
RobinsonFuneralHome.com
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose (781) 665-1900
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
BRENNAN, Thomas E.
ALLAN, Judith M. (Conley)
Of Stoneham, March 31. Loving mother
of Kenneth R. Allan of Stoneham, Scott
D. Allan and husband Luiz Costa, Jr. of
NY and Nancy A. Allan of Stoneham.
Devoted grandmother of Jasmine and
Kesandra. Sister of Tilly Foley and
Barbara Tirimacco. Funeral from the
McDonald-Finnegan Funeral Home,
322 Main St., STONEHAM on Thursday
at 9 am followed by a Funeral Mass
in St. Patrick Church, 71 Central St.,
Stoneham at 10. Interment St. Patrick
Cemetery. Visitation for relatives and
friends will be held at the Funeral
Home Wednesday from 4-8 PM. For
obit/directions/guestbook:
www.mcdonaldfs.com.
ANTONELLI, Antonio
Antonio Antonelli, 87, of Peabody, died
Friday morning at the Brentwood Nursing Home in Danvers following a brief
illness. He was the devoted husband of
Filomena (Iocco) Antonelli with whom
he shared over 61 years of marriage.
Born in Orsogna, Italy, he was the
son of the late Joachim and Carolina
Antonelli. He was raised in Italy and
later immigrated to the United States
and has lived in Peabody for the past
49 years.
Antonio was the proprietor of
Antonelli’s restaurant and catering
in Peabody for 38 years. He also was
a member of the Orsogna Plaza in
Everett.
Besides his loving wife, he is
survived by his two sons and daughtersin-law, Anthony and Cheryl Antonelli
and Jack and Christine Antonelli, all of
Peabody, his grandchildren, Michael,
Andrew, Matthew and Carolina Antonelli, and by his three great grandchildren, Matt, Ava, and Mia Antonelli.
His funeral will be on Wednesday at
9:30 AM at the Conway, Cahill-Brodeur
Funeral Home, 82 Lynn St, PEABODY,
followed by his Funeral Mass at 10:30
AM at St. Adelaide’s Church, Lowell
St, Peabody to which relatives and
friends are kindly invited to attend.
Visiting hours will be held on Tuesday
from 4:00 until 8:00 PM. Burial will
in Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. For
directions and on-line obituary, visit
www.ccbfuneral.com
Every life is a story
Ask your funeral director for details.
85, formerly of Randolph, passed away
peacefully on March 30, 2018. Born
and raised in Boston, MA to the late
Max and Eva (Weiner) Averbuck, on
August 27, 1932. Ruthe lived every day
to the fullest. Ruthe, and her beloved
companion, the late Morris Factor,
loved to travel the world, visiting all
seven continents, where she grew her
personal collection of renowned art and
antiques from across the globe. Ruthe
was vibrant, outgoing, loving and a true
original. She adored participating in the
arts and live theatre with her daughters
and granddaughter. Always ready to
help anyone in need, Ruthe was a loyal
friend to many. Ruthe was a devoted
mother to Marla Melito and the late
Michele Braun, a proud and cherished
grandmother to Erica Rose Melito
and a dear sister to Loretta Chandler,
her husband Melvin, and the late Paul
Averbuck. Ruthe enriched lives and will
be missed by many. Her family extends
a heartfelt thank you to the wonderful
staff at Heights Crossing. Services at
Temple Sinai, 25 Canton St., Sharon on
Wednesday April 4, 2018 at 11:00 am.
Following interment at Baker St., West
Roxbury, the family will receive visitors
at the home of Marla Melito until 9;00
pm and Thursday, 2-8 pm. Remembrances may be made, in memory
of Ruthe, to Northeastern University
Hillel, to enrich the lives of the next
generation of the Boston Jewish community, online or by mail to 70 Saint
Stephen Street, Boston, MA 02115.
A Featured Life offering lets you honor your
loved one with a professionally written narrative.
Call 617-929-1500 or email
deathnotices@globe.com
Of Reading, March 30.
Beloved husband of Donna
M. (Smith) Brennan.
Loving father of Justin M. Brennan and
wife Jessica of Salem and Sean T.
Brennan and wife Michelle of Reading.
Brother of Jean Hanlon and husband
Edward of Wilmington & the late
Robert Brennan and his surviving wife
Ann. Devoted “Papa” of Jake and Lucy.
Funeral from the McDonald Funeral
Home, 19 Yale Ave., WAKEFIELD
Thursday at 9:30 followed by a Funeral
Mass in St. Athanasius Church, 300
Haverhill St., Reading at 10:30.
Interment Wood End Cemetery.
Visitation for relatives and friends will
be held at the Funeral Home Wednesday, 4-8. PM. In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be made to St.
Anne’s Shrine, 16 Church St., Fiskdale,
MA 01518. For obit/directions/
guestbook: www.mcdonaldfs.com.
CAMPANELLA, Karen G.
(Eriksen)
CAPONE, Adelaide (O’Brien)
Of Stamford, CT, formerly of Winthrop, March 27, beloved mother of
Michelle Schonback and her husband
David of Stamford, CT. Dear sister of
the late Joseph O’Brien, Mary Farrell,
John O’Brien, Anne Salame, Francis
X. O’Brien, Rita O’Brien and Claire
Limone. Cherished grandmother of
Danielle Garbien and her husband
Timothy of Rye, NY. Great grandmother of Adelaide Grace and Timothy
MacKinney.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano and
Son Funeral Home 147 Winthrop St.,
WINTHROP, on Monday, April 2, 2018
from 4:00 to 8:00 PM. The funeral will
be conducted from the funeral home
on Tuesday, April 3, 2018 at 9:00 AM
followed by a funeral mass in St. John
the Evangelist Church, Winthrop, at
10:00 AM. Interment to follow the
mass in the Belle Isle section of Winthrop Cemetery. Memorial donations
may be made to www.caringforacure.
org. For directions or to sign the online
guestbook go to
www.caggianofuneralhome.com.
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
CHAMBERS, Elaine C.
(Riley)
Of Woburn, formerly of Cambridge.
Passed peacefully on March 28, 2018.
Beloved daughter of the late William J. Riley and Rose (Tocci). Loving
sister of Jack Riley and his wife Janet
of Chatham, formerly of Cambridge,
and the late William J. “Billy” Riley,
Jr. Devoted aunt of Sean and David
Riley, and great aunt of Will, Katy, Jack,
Henry, Stephen and James. Former wife
of Edward Chambers of Jupiter Florida.
A Memorial Mass will be scheduled at
St. Peter’s Church, Cambridge in June.
Relatives and friends invited. Complete
details to follow. Arrangements from
the Keefe Funeral Home, Arlington &
Cambridge. In lieu of flowers, donations in Elaine’s memory may be made
to JERICHO, The Bureau for Exceptional Children and Adults, 537 Northampton Street, P.O. Box 1039, Holyoke,
MA 01041. For directions or to leave
a message of condolence, please visit
www.keefefuneralhome.com.
COTTER, John F., Jr.
Of Arlington. Passed away peacefully
on March 21, 2018, at the age of 97.
Beloved husband of 65 years to the late
Irene B. (Fitzpatrick). Loving father of
Christine M. Silva of Woburn and the
late John “Jack” Cotter, III. Cherished
grandfather of Eric J. Silva of Washington, DC. Dear brother of William
Cotter and his wife Barbara. John is
also survived and loved by many nieces,
nephews, and relatives. Funeral from
the Keefe Funeral Home, 5 Chestnut
St., (Rt.60, adjacent to St. Agnes
Church) ARLINGTON, on Saturday,
APRIL 14th at 9 am. Funeral Mass at
Saint Agnes Church at 10am. Relatives
and friends invited. Visiting hours
Friday, APRIL 13th from 5-8 pm. Burial
in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Arlington.
For obituary, directions, or to send a
condolence visit
www.keefefuneralhome.com
CRISOSTOMO, Santiago MD
Of Malden, formerly of East Boston,
peacefully, March 29. Visiting and service on Tuesday April 3. For more info:
www.ruggieromh.com.
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston 617-569-0990
GROSS, Joseph H.
Of Boston on March 26, 2018. Son
of the late German and Concordia
Crisostomo. Beloved husband of the
late Flor de Liza (Vicente) Crisostomo.
Loving father of Santiago “Chip” V.
Crisostomo of Kenmore Square, Boston,
Dr. German V. Crisostomo of Boston
and his partner Michael of Plymouth,
and Leonardo V. Crisostomo and his
wife Stephanie Rudd of Brookline.
Cherished grandfather of Lenny Turner
and his wife Hannah. Also survived by
granddog Pogi. Dear brother of Luis of
the Philippines, Felicisimo of CA, the
late Segundo, Graziano, Ligaya, Pio,
Gloria, Ambrosia, Pedro and Justiniano. Also survived by loving nieces
and nephews. The family will receive
visitors on Monday, April 9th from
4pm to 8pm in the Boston Harborside
Home, 580 Commercial St., BOSTON. A
Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday,
April 10th in Trinity Church, 206 Clarendon St., Boston at 10am. Services will
conclude with entombment in Mount
Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge. For
online condolences and/or directions,
please visit: www.bostonharborsidehome.com
Boston Harborside Home of
J.S. Waterman & Sons
Waring-Langone
617-536-4110
FERRARA, Vera (Russo)
89, of Easton, and formerly of Deerfield
Beach, FL, died Thursday, March 22,
2018, at Good Samaritan Medical
Center, Brockton, MA. Born in Hyde
Park, MA, on March 13, 1929, she was
the daughter of the late Carmen and
Angelina (Alberto) Russo of Everett,
MA, and the sister of the late Sam,
Chris, and Mary, and surviving siblings,
Louise and Anna. In 1946, Vera married Leonard H. Ferrara, also of Everett,
MA, who pre-deceased her in 2002. It
was here that Vera happily raised her
family and supported her husband in
his efforts to successfully begin his own
steel manufacturing company, Superior
Railing Co., which survives today as
Superior Rail & Iron Works. She was a
devoted mother to her surviving three
children; Leonard H. Ferrara, Jr., of
Raynham; Tyla Jennings of Bridgewater; and Deborah (Chris) Osburn of Amherst, NH; and seven grandchildren:
Russell Ferrara of Hudson, NH; Rick
(Tina Figueiredo) Jennings of Bridgewater; Lenny (Casey) Ferrara of Attleboro; Jason (Rania) Osburn of Plano,
TX; Todd (Kara) Jennings of Berkley;
Kelly (Greg Kindl) Osburn of Uxbridge;
and Tony (Jessica) Ferrara of Raynham;
and ten great-grandchildren: Brianna,
Arianna, Teagan, Jenny, JT, Nicolas,
Ava, Madison, Drew and Kyle. A
Funeral Mass will be held at St. Anne’s
Church, 660 N. Main St., Raynham on
Saturday, April 7th at 10:00 a.m. She
will rest in peace with her beloved husband at the Pleasant Street Cemetery in
Raynham. For online guestbook:
www.ccgfuneralhome.com.
Prophett-Chapman
Cole & Gleason
508-697-4332
COTTER, John “Jack” III
Of Needham, March 28, 2018. She
is survived by two daughters, Kristen
Campanella of Carmel, NY, and Wendy
Tripician and her husband Nicholas of
Haddonfield, NJ, a son Gregory Campanella of Auburn, a brother Steven
Eriksen and his wife Sarah of Marshfield, MA, her brother-in-law Richard
Demarais of Ogunquit, ME, and six
grandchildren. Karen was predeceased
by her parents Erik and Gladys Eriksen of Needham and her sister Linda
Desmarais of Ogunquit, ME, previously
of Needham and Andover. Karen was
a lifelong member of the First Baptist
Church of Needham. Visitation will
be in the Chapel of the First Baptist
Church, 858 Great Plain Avenue, Needham at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, April 3,
followed by a memorial service at 11:00
and a reception at 12:00 also at the
church. To share a memory of Karen,
please visit
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Of Arlington. Passed away on January
31, 2018. Beloved son of the late John
F. Cotter, Jr. and Irene B. (Fitzpatrick).
Loving sister of Christine M. Silva of
Woburn. Proud uncle of Eric J. Silva of
Washington, DC. Jack is also survived
and loved by many dear relatives and
relatives. His arrangements will be
held from the Keefe Funeral Home,
5 Chestnut St. (Rt.60, adjacent to St.
Agnes Church), ARLINGTON. Relatives
and friends invited. Visiting hours will
be held on Friday, APRIL 13th from 5-8
pm. His burial will be held along with
his father’s services in Mount Pleasant
Cemetery, Arlington. For obituary,
directions, or to send a condolence visit
www.keefefuneralhome.com
Share a memory
Eaton Funeral Home
Needham 781-444-0201
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries
FINNEGAN, Thomas F.
Of Falmouth, formerly of Dorchester
on March 25, 2018. Beloved husband
of Donna J. (Johnson). Loving father of
William Finnegan and Kari Finnegan,
both of Dorchester. Cherished grandfather of Adrianna, Kelsey, Thomas,
and Matthew and great-grandfather
of Blake. Devoted brother of Eleanora
Golden of Delray Beach, FL, John
Finnegan & his wife Elizabeth of
Naples, FL, Stephen Finnegan & his
wife Carol of Milton, Julie Matzel & her
husband Rob of Mashpee, and the late
Joseph Finnegan, Anne Finnegan, Patricia Collins, and David Finnegan. Dear
brother-in-law of Michael Collins, Hildegard Finnegan, Ellen Finnegan and
the late Bernard Golden. Visiting hours
in the John J. O’Connor & Son Funeral
Home, 740 Adams St. (near Gallivan
Blvd.) DORCHESTER, Tuesday April
3, 2018 from 4-8pm. Funeral Mass in
St. Ann Church Neponset, Wednesday
April 4, 2018 at 10 o’clock. Relatives &
friends are respectfully invited. In lieu
of flowers, remembrances may be made
in Thomas’ name to the Alzheimer’s Association or to Visiting Nurses Association of Cape Code – Hospice. Interment
private. For directions & expressions of
sympathy, www.oconnorandson.com.
Celebrate their lives
To submit a paid death notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and on Boston.com, contact
your funeral director, visit boston.com/deathnotices or call 617.929.1500. Now offering custom
headings and enhanced listings.
GRAFFEO, Eugene C.
To submit an obituary for editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail
to obits@globe.com, or send information by fax
to 617.929.3186. If you need further assistance
about a news obituary, pleasecall 617.929.3400.
Of Framingham, formerly
of Revere, MA. Entered into
rest on March 31, 2018 at
the age of 99. Born in Melrose to the
late Lawrence and Lillian (Harrison)
Gross, he was a US Navy veteran of
WWII and survivor of the sinking of the
USS Yorktown CV-5 during the Battle
of Midway in 1942. Beloved husband
of the late Constance (Levitan) Gross.
The loving brother of Aaron Gross and
the late Rosalyn Green. Dear uncle
of Carole Grosberg and her husband
Randy, and great-uncle of Lauren and
Jodi. Loving friend of many, including
his cherished friend, Laura Aurelio.
Services will be held at Stanetsky
Memorial Chapel, 475 Washington
Street, CANTON, MA on Tuesday, April
3, 2018 at 2pm, followed by burial in
Sharon Memorial Park, Sharon, MA.
Expressions of sympathy in his memory
may be donated to the American Heart
Association, PO Box 417005, Boston,
MA 02241-7005 or at www.heart.org.
Stanetsky Memorial Chapel
(781) 821-4600
www.stanetskycanton.com
JONES, Marilyn M.
(Messier)
Of Needham, March 29, 2018. Beloved
wife of William D. Jones. Loving
mother of Diane M. Ryan and her
husband Bill and the late David D.
Jones and his surviving wife Laura.
Dear grandmother of Lori Jones,
Allison Stering, and Grace Ryan and
great grandmother of Nirvana. Sister
of Jacqueline Ferrara. Visitation will
be held in the Eaton Funeral Home,
1351 Highland Ave., NEEDHAM, on
Tuesday morning, April 3rd from 10
am to 11:30 am, followed by a Mass of
Christian Burial in St. Joseph Church
at 11:30 am. Interment to follow at St.
Mary’s Cemetery, Needham. In lieu of
flowers, donations, in Marilyn’s name,
may be made to St. Joseph Parish, 1382
Highland Ave., Needham, MA 02492.
Marilyn was always a volunteer. Her
primary volunteer role and devotion
was to St. Joseph’s Parish. She served
through the decades as a Religious Education teacher, Head Sacristan, Eucharistic Minister, Lector, Co-Chairman of
the Knit Booth for the Annual Bazaar,
served on the Women’s Guild and was a
valuable member of the prayer line. Her
presence will be deeply missed, but her
abounding love for God and others, her
smile, compassion and determination
will live on in the hearts of all of those
who knew her. For full obit, directions
or to share a memory of Marilyn, please
visit: www.eatonfuneralhomes.com.
Eaton Funeral Home
781-444-0201
Paying
tribute to
your loved
ones is
important
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and on
Boston.com, contact
your funeral director, visit
boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500. Now
offering custom headings
and enhanced listings.
To submit an obituary
for editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail
to obits@globe.com, or
send information by fax
to 617.929.3186. If you
need further assistance
about a news obituary,
please call 617.929.3400.
To access death notices
and obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B7
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
LESSARD, Muriel A.
(Fredericks)
MEAD, Michael Ernest
MERCHANT, John
PERINI, Eileen C. (Callahan)
WAINER, Beverly W.
Of Cohasset and Medfield, formerly of
Dover, March 31, 2018. Beloved wife
of David B. Perini. Visiting hours at
the George F. Doherty & Sons Funeral
Home, 477 Washington St., Rte 16,
WELLESLEY, Wednesday, April 4 from
4-8, followed by a Funeral Mass in The
Most Precious Blood Church, Dover,
Thursday, April 5 at 1 p.m. Relatives
and friends kindly invited. Interment
Woodlawn Cemetery, Wellesley. Complete notice to follow.
94, died Sunday, April 1, 2018 at St.
Luke’s Hospital. She was the beloved
wife of the late beloved Sidney Wainer.
A lifelong resident of New Bedford, she
was the youngest and last surviving
daughter of the late Aaron and Ethel
(Schuster) Curhan. Born on Martha’s
Vineyard, she worked alongside Sidney
at his business, Sid Wainer & Sons
throughout her life. Beverly was a life
member of Brandeis National Committee and Council for Jewish Women.
Bev enjoyed winters with Sidney in
Boca Raton. Devoted mother of Henry
Wainer and Debby Abrahams. Loving
mother-in-law of Marion Wainer and
Mark Abrahams. Dear sister of the late
George and Sydney Curhan, Fanny
Kaner, Libby Macey, Lillian Pure, and
Esther Lassow. Loving grandmother of
Matthew Abrahams, Lori Abrahams,
Andrew Wainer, Jamie Leimkuhler,
Rebecca Abrahams, Alexandra Wainer
and Sara Wainer. Cherished great
grandmother of Sophie, Noah and Eli
Abrahams. A private family graveside
service will be held. In lieu of flowers,
contributions in her memory may be
made to New Bedford Zoological Society, 425 Hawthorne St., New Bedford,
MA 02740. Shiva will be private. For
online condolences, please visit ShalomMemorialChapel.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley (781) 235-4100
Of Winthrop, March 29, devoted wife of
Ernest Lessard. Loving mother of David
Lessard and his wife Karen of Winthrop, Mary McGrail and her husband
Charles of Winthrop, Richard Lessard
and his wife Jane of Andover, Kathryn
Dixon of Winthrop, Nancy Feeley and
her husband Patrick of Winthrop,
Linda Sirois and her husband Mark of
Ipswich and Donna Farland and her
husband Chester of NH. Dear sister of
Louise Weinhold of NH and the late
Christian Fredericks, Dorothy Bachini
and William Fredericks. Also survived
by 24 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano and
Son Funeral Home 147 Winthrop St.,
WINTHROP on Tuesday, April 3, 2018
from 4:00 to 8:00 PM. The funeral will
be conducted from the funeral home
on Wednesday, April 4, 2018 at 9:00
AM followed by a funeral mass in St.
John the Evangelist Church, Winthrop
at 10:00 AM. Interment to follow the
mass in Winthrop Cemetery. Memorial
donations may be made to the Joslin
Clinic at www.joslin.org. For directions
or to sign the online guestbook, go to
www.caggianofuneralhome.com.
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
LOUGHLIN, Anne M. (Fahey)
Of Wakefield, March 30. Beloved
wife of the late Arthur Paul Loughlin.
Loving mother of Marie Correa and
husband Alec of Northwood, NH, and
Anita Loughlin of Wakefield. Sister of
James “Jim” Fahey, Patricia Sheehan,
and the late Leo Fahey, Jr. and Joan
McCarthy. Cherished grandmother of
Robert Correa of Dover, NH and Alec
Michael Correa of Northwood, NH.
Also survived by many nieces and
nephews. Funeral from the McDonald
Funeral Home, 19 Yale Ave., Wakefield
on Thursday at 10:30 am followed by
a Funeral Mass in St. Joseph Church,
173 Albion St., Wakefield at 11:30 am.
Visitation for relatives and friends at
the Funeral Home on Wednesday from
4-8 pm. Interment St. Patrick Cemetery,
Stoneham. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to St. Vincent de Paul
Society, 11 Market Square, Lynn, MA
01905, or to St. Joseph Church, 173 Albion St., Wakefield, MA 01880 or to the
Salvation Army, 209 Broadway, #233,
Saugus, MA 01906. For obit/guestbook:
www.mcdonaldfs.com.
Every life
is a story
worth
sharing
The Boston Globe’s new
Featured Life offering lets you
honor your loved one with a
professionally written narrative
about their life and achievements.
For more details and pricing
information, contact
Was born to parents Ernest Meixell
Mead and Marjorie Brand Mead on August 28™, 1950 in Peekskill, New York.
Michael attended local schools graduating from Hendrick Hudson High School
in Montrose, New York in 1968. In
high school he was a highly ranked national forensic league student debater
graduating as one of the top point
scoring students in the nation. He was
a national merit scholarship finalist,
a New York state regents scholar and
upon acceptance to Colgate University
in Hamilton, New York was awarded a
Colgate war memorial scholarship. At
Colgate, he majored in political science
graduating with high honors in 1972.
He kept his hand in public speaking,
being the university’s student coach
in 1971-1972. After a year of volunteer coaching at his high school and
substitute teaching, Michael applied for
and was accepted at Boston University
and Boston College Law Schools. But
in a life defining moment, he opted to
go to work for H.E. Harris Company of
Boston, Massachusetts, then the largest
mail order postage stamp company in
the world. Ultimately he worked with
the company from the fall of 1973
until the end of 1982 becoming over
time a travelling buyer, appraiser, and
manager of collectibles processing for
the company. Changes in market conditions led to the company’s unravelling
and in January1983 Michael went into
business for himself under the dba of
Britannia Enterprises. He kept that
business name his entire career. Starting in the fall of 1987 and lasting for a
few years he became a certified public
accountant having achieved the highest
score in the state of New Hampshire
during their winter sitting. He was
hired shortly after the exam by the
then Santerre and Company operating
out of Nashua, NH but did the bulk
of his work experience for Lawrence
Martin CPA’s in Manchester, NH. After
his two year experience period, he
received his license and for a period
of time subcontracted for Martin and
developed a bit of his own business as
a self-employed CPA in Rochester, New
Hampshire where he and his wife Betty
Ann Mead had bought a house. However, nothing Michael ever undertook
as a career path, he was also accepted
at Boston University’s MBA program
in the late 1970s but withdrew after
meeting his future wife, interested
him the way professional philately and
trade in other paper collectibles did.
He kept returning to this true love and
had been self-employed without further
interruption for the past twenty five
years. Michael’s business was oriented
towards trade shows in the United
States, Canada and England. Over time
he probably had booths at 1000 events.
He did a little mail order but always
loved doing business face to face with
dealers and collectors. He was born to
travel having spent at least one night in
every one of the lower 48 states as well
as a good half year in both England and
Canada. Over time he gave a lot back
to the hobby and profession having
been bourse chairman for one of the
most successful stamp shows in the
country, philatelic show of Boxborough,
Mass, for well over 30 years, the longest
serving volunteer bourse chairman at
the time of his passing in the country.
He belonged to numerous professional
trade associations and collector groups,
was a past president of the New England Chapter of the American Stamp
Dealers Association, a life member of
this group and the American Philatelic
Society, as well as two term American
representative to the Canadian Stamp
Dealers Association board of directors.
Michael is survived by his wife of 37
years who has been institutionalized
by Alzheimer’s Disease for quite some
time, his dear loving support and, companion, Cecily Hull Bryant of Tisbury,
Mass with whom he had shared such
love and joy over the last days of his life
and her son Joshua, his cousin Martha
Perone of Wrentham, Massachusetts
and her husband Ralph, his sister-inlaw Sally Hirsch of Richmond, Virginia
and his two devoted nephews, his
deceased sister Nancy Mead Hirsch’s
two children, Alexander Hirsch of
Norfolk, Virginia and Michael Hirsch of
Richmond, Virginia, as well as a parade
of other family members, personal
friends, close business associates and
clients many of whom with which he
developed lifelong friendships. Michael
always felt blessed for the richness of
his life and was always proud that he
followed his own path, unconventional
in its way, through the twists and turns
of life. But at last, master Falstaff, he
had heard the chimes at midnight and
the good Lord called him home. There
will be no funeral service. For memorial
guest book visit ccgfuneralhome.com
Chapman, Cole and Gleason
Oak Bluffs
508-693-1495
Passed away peacefully in his home of
55 years in Needham, MA, on March
18, 2018, surrounded by his loving
family. He was 88. A memorial service
will be held on Saturday, April 14th,
at 2 p.m. at the First Parish Unitarian Universalist Church, 23 Dedham
Avenue, Needham (http://uuneedham.
org). In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made in John Merchant’s name to
Plugged In Band Program, the nonprofit co-founded and co-directed by
his daughter and son-in-law, Sandra
and Tom, located at 40 Freeman Place,
Needham, MA 02492 (www.pluggedinband.org). To see his full obituary or
to share a memory of John, please visit
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
MORALES, Carlos E.
Carlos Enrique Morales, 78, long
time resident of West Roxbury, MA,
passed in peace on Thursday, March
29th, 2018, at home with his family
by his side. Carlos was born in the
Andes town of Timotes in Venezuela,
to Octavio Morales and Ana Perez de
Morales. As a young man, he competed
as a boxer, a platform diver, a body
builder, and a martial artist. After
a long career in the Venezuelan oil
industry (PDVSA) and as a university
educator (Unversidad Simon Bolivar),
Carlos retired and moved to the Boston
area to be closer to his kids and grandkids. After a brief retirement, he joined
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where
he worked alongside his wife for 17
years on the Nurse’s Health Study. Carlos will be remembered by family and
friends as a loving husband, supporting
father and grandfather, and as a bocce
ball tournament champion. Carlos is
survived by his wife, Mercedes, with
whom he shared 51 year of marriage,
his son Carlos, his wife Sandra, his son
Tanus, and his wife Carmen. He is also
survived by eight grandchildren: Anna,
Dimitri, Zavier, Olivia, Zoe, Alexandra,
Izan, and Elisa. He is further survived
by his siblings Orlando, Jesus, and
Leida, along with many nephews and
nieces. Carlos will be greatly missed by
all. Services will be held at 10:00 AM
on Thursday, April 5th, 2018 at Saint
Theresa of Avila Church, West Roxbury.
In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the American Cancer
Society (http://www.cancer.org) or the
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center,
Cancer Center Fund (https://www.
bidmc.org/give).
Kfoury Keefe Funeral Home
West Roxbury 617-325-3600
PATTERSON, Thomas F.
Of Medford, March 31, age 69. Beloved
husband of Jill N. (Boeri) Patterson.
Son of the late Joseph P. and Mary V.
(Rumley) Patterson. Devoted father of
Jeffrey T. Patterson and his wife Caitlin
McClain of Hyde Park, Brian F. and his
wife Susan Patterson of Montvale, NJ,
and baby Mark. Cherished grandfather
of Colin and Nate. Loving brother of
Anne and her husband Joseph Pisarri
of Reading and Kathleen “Kazy” and
her husband John Grzelcyk of Charlestown. Brother-in-law of Carol Patterson,
Donny LaPorte, Georgia Patterson, Russell Fleming, Steve and his wife Karen
Boeri, Lois (Boeri) Salvato, and Peter
and his wife Tricia Boeri. Also survived
by many nieces, nephews, great-nieces,
great-nephews and friends. Tom was
also the brother of the late Joseph
Patterson, Patricia LaPorte, Michael
Patterson, and Mary Fleming and
brother-in-law of the late Anthony M.
Salvato, Jr., and son-in-law of the late
Victor J. and Natalie M. Boeri.
His Funeral will be held from the
Beals-Geake-Magliozzi Funeral Home,
29 Governors Ave., MEDFORD,
Thursday, at 10:00 AM, followed by
a Mass of Christian Burial celebrated
in St. Raphael Church, 514 High St.,
Medford, at 11:00 AM. Relatives and
friends respectfully invited. Visiting
hours Wednesday from 4:00 to 8:00
PM. Interment Oak Grove Cemetery,
Medford. In lieu of flowers, donations
in Tom’s memory may be made to the
Charlestown Boys & Girls Club, 15
Green Street, Charlestown, MA 02129.
www.bgcb.org/donate. For additional
information, please visit,
www.magliozzifuneralhome.com.
Boston Globe Classifieds
at 617-929-1500 or
deathnotices@globe.com.
Express
your sympathy
View The Boston Globe’s complete
list of death notices and sign the
guestbook at boston.com/obituaries.
PROCOPIO-RUGGIERO,
Helen C. (Hlabanis)
Of Winthrop, formerly of East Boston,
peacefully, on March 31. Beloved wife
of the late John Procopio and the late
James N. Ruggiero. Devoted mother
of James N. Ruggiero and wife Marilyn
of Boxford, George Ruggiero and wife
Lona of Tewksbury. Dear sister of
Mary Chiulli of Winthrop and the late
Anna Phillips, Rita Paladino, Thomas,
Walter, and Albert Lopez. Cherished
grandmother of James, Rene and
Rena, also survived by her many loving
nieces and nephews. Family and friends
will honor Helen’s life by gathering in
the Ruggiero Family Memorial Home,
971 Saratoga St. (Orient Heights)
EAST BOSTON on Wednesday, April
4 from 4-8 PM and again on Thursday
morning at 8;30 before leaving in
procession to St John The Evangelist
Church, Winthrop St., Winthrop for a
funeral mass celebrating Helen’s life
at 10 AM. Services will conclude with
Helen being laid to rest in Holy Cross
Cemetery. In honoring Helen, in lieu
of flowers, memorial donations may be
made to Winthrop Place, 26 Sturgis St.,
Winthrop, MA 02152. Funeral home
is handicapped accessible, children’s
lounge available, courtesy valet parking
at front entrance, ample off street parking with attendant in our several off
street parking lots. For more info: www.
ruggieromh.com.
TARNOFF, Peter
Of Osterville, MA, passed away the
morning of March 29, 2018, at age 68.
He lived a vibrant life and waved the
white flag reluctantly. He had so many
avocations in which he was fluent that
one friend commented that he lived
every day as if it were it was his last,
but studied his interests as though he
would live forever. He loved Cape Cod,
his final home, but began his life in
Norwalk, Connecticut.
Peter attended St. Luke’s School in
New Canaan, Connecticut; he then
went on to St. Lawrence University for
two years before transferring to Boston
University. There, while studying journalism, he nurtured his loves of photography and music. He was the first
photo editor of the newly formed campus daily newspaper, The Daily Free
Press, still in publication 48 years later.
Peter loved music and he befriended
musicians and music promoters alike
in Boston, as he was much more than a
casual fan. Latter day collectors of rock
and roll images prized his music photos
made beginning in the 1960’s.
After college, Peter began a diverse
career - working only in industries that
he loved, including alpine skiing, wine,
finance, and lastly education. It was not
a surprise to his friends that Peter, as
a legendary storyteller and unusually
patient explainer of complexities, spent
the remainder of his working life as an
educator. He taught math and financial
literacy at numerous schools on Cape
Cod and in the Boston area.
Peter married Donna Driscoll-Tarnoff
on April 25th 1981, in Milton, Massachusetts. Peter and Donna met in 1979
in Connecticut, while both working in
the ski industry. They enjoyed 31 years
of marriage, skiing in Vermont, traveling in France and Italy, and raising
their two sons Nicholas (31) and Alexander (28), until her passing in 2012.
Peter was pre-deceased by his
beloved wife, Donna Driscoll, his father,
Edwin Tarnoff, and his brother, Jeffrey
Tarnoff. He was exceptionally proud of
his two sons Nicholas, of Atlanta, GA,
and his wife Chelsea, and Alexander,
of New York, NY. He is survived by his
mother, Betty Tarnoff, sons Nicholas
and Alexander, and many nieces and
nephews and large extended family and
friends. He will be greatly missed by all
who had the pleasure of knowing him.
His friends have assured the family
that they will fill the void of his absence
with memories and stories too many to
number.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend visiting hours on Tuesday, April 3, 2018, 4:00 pm- 7:00 pm in
the Dolan Funeral Home, 460 Granite
Avenue, EAST MILTON SQUARE, Milton. Interment Private. See www.dolanfuneral.com for online condolences and
directions. In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made, in memory of Peter
Tarnoff, to the Admiral’s Watch of the
Barnstable Clean Water Coalition or to
Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth
Class of 1979 Fund.
WHITTIER, Faith L.
(Ballantyne)
WOZNIAK, Regina C.
(Sobiech)
Age 94, of Norton, formerly of Norwood, March 30, 2018 . Beloved wife of
the late Edward W. Wozniak. Devoted
mother of Edward J. Wozniak of Fallbrook, CA, Judith A. Vinson of Norton
and Joanne M. Halpin of Hopedale. Her
Funeral will begin on Wednesday, April
4th at 9:00 A.M. from the Norton Memorial Funeral Home, 19 Clapp St. (Off
Route 140, Taunton Ave.) NORTON,
followed by a Mass of Christian burial
celebrated at 10:00 A.M. in St. Mary’s
Church, 1 Power St., Norton. Burial
will follow at the Highland Cemetery
in Norwood. Visiting hours will be held
on Tuesday, April 3rd from 5:00-8:00
P.M. at the Funeral Home. In lieu of
flowers, donations in her memory may
be made to a charity of ones choice. For
complete obituary, please visit
www.nortonmemorial.com
Funeral Services
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
Of Melrose, March 30, 2018, at age
88. Beloved wife of the late Ernest W.
Whittier with whom she shared 56
years of marriage. Devoted mother
of Stephen D. Whittier and his wife
Ann of Salem, Allyson L. Whittier of
Melrose, Kenneth E. Whittier and his
wife Jane of Waltham, and Heather
F. Romano and her husband James
of Westford. Dear sister of the late
Gordon R. Ballantyne Jr. and his wife
Carolyn. Cherished grandmother of
Erika Siegfried and her husband John,
Justin Whittier, Christopher Whittier,
Jason Whittier, Kenneth Whittier,
Collin Whittier, Manuela Romano,
and Manuel Romano. Adored great
grandmother of Ursula, Georgia, and
John-Iver. Also survived by numerous
nieces and nephews. Relatives & friends
will gather in honor & remembrance of
Faith’s life during visiting hours at the
Robinson Funeral Home, 809 Main St.,
MELROSE on Tuesday, April 3 from 4-8
p.m., and again for her Funeral Service
celebrated on Wednesday at 10:00 a.m.
Gifts in Faith’s memory may be made to
MSPCA, 350 Huntington Ave., Boston
MA 02130. For online tribute or directions visit RobinsonFuneralHome.com
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose (781) 665-1900
Affordable Cremation
1310 complete
617 782 1000
$
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
Celebrate
their lives
Honor your loved ones
with a photo in the
Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
Honor your
loved one
with a photo in
The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
T h e
B8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
Obituaries
Steven Bochco, creator of ‘Hill Street Blues’
Efrain Rios Montt, 91,
Guatemalan dictator
convicted of genocide
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Steven
Bochco, a writer and producer
who created seminal television
dramas in the 1980s, including
‘‘Hill Street Blues’’ and “L.A.
Law,’’ died Sunday. He was 74.
A family spokesman said Mr.
Bochco died in his sleep after a
battle with cancer.
Mr. Bochco, who won 10
primetime Emmys, created several hit television shows including ‘‘NYPD Blue,’ and ‘‘Doogie
Ho w s e r,
M.D.’’
Premiering in January 1981,
‘‘Hill Street
Blues’’ challenged, even
confounded
the meager
Mr. Bochco
audience
won 10
that samprimetime
pled it.
T hen, on a
Emmys.
wave of critical acclaim, the series began to
click with viewers, while scoring a history-making 27 Emmy
nominations its first year.
During its seven-season run,
it won 26 Emmys and launched
Mr. Bochco on a course that led
to dozens of series and earned
him four Peabody awards, in
addition to the 10 Emmys.
‘‘Hill Street Blues’’ had a
sprawling universe of engaging
yet flawed characters, a zippy
pace, and layers of overlapping,
scripted dialogue, shot in a documentary style.
But what really set the show
apart were the multiple narratives that interlaced each episode with those that came before and after. With the rare exception of the few prime-time
soaps, almost every series up to
that time — whether comedy or
drama — made each episode
freestanding, with a reset but-
By John Otis
WASHINGTON POST
NBC
Michael Conrad (left) played Sergeant Phil Esterhaus and Daniel J. Travanti played
Captain Frank Furillo on “Hill Street Blues.”
ton for the one that came next.
Mr. Bochco once recalled a
fan telling him that ‘‘Hill Street
Blues’’ was the first TV series
with a memory.
‘ ‘ T h a t ’s w h a t I a l w a y s
thought of myself doing in the
context of TV: craft a show that
over time would have a memory,’’ he told the Associated Press
in an interview two years ago.
‘‘I sensed that very early in my
career. It just took me another
10 or 12 years to get to the
point where I earned the right
to take a shot at it.’’
“L.A. Law’’ took much of the
technique Mr. Bochco established in “Hill Street’’ — interwoven storylines, characters
built through the interplay of
an ensemble cast — and moved
it to the courtroom. It won four
Emmy Awards for outstanding
drama series.
Mr. Bochco grew up in Manhattan, the son of a painter and
a concert violinist. On arriving
in Los Angeles after college, he
wrote for several series at Universal Studios. Then he got a
big break: writing the screenplay for the 1972 sci-fi film ‘‘Silent Running.’’ But Mr. Bochco
said the disrespect he confronted as the writer soured him on
writing for the big screen.
‘‘Once you've delivered the
screenplay they don’t want you
around, because you’re gonna
get in the way of someone else’s
vision,’’ Mr. Bochco said.
WASHINGTON — Efrain
Rios Montt, the Guatemalan
militar y dic tator who was
charged with genocide and
crimes against humanity for
atrocities committed by his
troops during the country’s
long-running civil war, died
Sunday. He was 91.
The retired brigadier general, said to be suffering from dementia, spent the last several
years of his life consumed by
legal battles stemming from
his short but barbarous reign
as the country’s leader. His
lawyer Jaime Hernandez told
the Associated Press he suffered a heart attack.
G e n e r a l R i o s Mo n tt a s sumed power March 23, 1982,
in a coup staged by junior officers. Guatemala was long familiar with rule by military
strongmen and human rights
abuses. But during General Rios Montt’s 17-month reign, repression by state security forces
reached new levels of brutality.
A UN-sponsored truth commission found that nearly half
of all the human rights violations during the 36-year conflict occurred in 1982, a year
when General Rios Montt was
de facto ruler of Guatemala for
nine months. More than
200,000 Guatemalans perished during the civil war’s violence, according to the UN
commission, and government
forces were responsible for the
vast majority of deaths.
Under General Rios Montt’s
command, the armed forces
destroyed nearly 600 villages
in the northern highlands and
killed thousands of innocent
civilians, according to the UN
truth commission report published in 1999. Most of the victims were Mayan Indians who
make up about half of Guatemala’s population.
He turned the tide in the
war. The country’s four main
guerrilla groups suffered massive losses and never recovered. They disarmed under a
1996 peace process that ended
t h e w a r. B u t G e n e ra l R i o s
Montt upset civilian leaders by
banning political parties and
becoming increasingly vague
about leaving power. He was
ousted in a coup on Aug. 8,
1983.
He was elected to Congress
in 1990 and eventually rose to
become president of the legislature.
On Jan. 27, 2012, shortly after the general’s retirement
from Congress, a Guatemalan
judge ruled that he bore chainof-command responsibility for
massive violations and must
stand trial. On May 10, 2013,
he was found guilty of the
slaughter of 1,771 members of
the Mayan Ixil indigenous
group. It marked the first time
a former head of state had
been convicted of genocide
within his or her country.
Howe ver, 10 days later,
Guatemala’s Constitutional
Court threw out the conviction
on a technicality. After much
legal wrangling, a three-judge
panel in 2015 ordered a retrial.
By then, General Rios Montt
was reportedly suffering from
dementia and, if convicted,
was to serve his sentence at
home or in a hospital.
Governor’s aid proposal unlikely to offer relief to most schools
uSCHOOL FUNDING
Continued from Page A1
to keep spending down. They
are increasingly relying on fees
from families for buses, athletics, full-day kindergarten, and
other programs to help fill in
the gaps.
In some cases, school and
town leaders have made the
wrenching decision to ask voters to increase their property
taxes beyond the state limit of
2.5 percent, a move that can pit
neighbor against neighbor and
can create lingering resentment regardless of the outcome
of a vote.
Kristin Sullivan, a parent in
the Dennis-Yarmouth school
system, refers to a spate of budge t c uts in recent years as
“death by a thousand paper
cuts.” Her school system would
receive less than a 1 percent increase in state aid under the
governor’s proposal.
“Public education is getting
chipped away,” Sullivan said.
“What is public education going to look like in 10 or 20
years if they don’t fix the funding formula? . . . It seems like
almost every other year our
towns need funding above and
beyond the 2.5 percent limit
because our state funding is
lower than other districts.”
On Tuesday, two communities where tax override votes
have failed in recent years will
try their luck again.
North Attleborough, near
Rhode Island, is seeking to
raise $6.5 million in an effort to
avoid closing an elementary
school and other drastic cuts to
the schools and town services,
while Reading, north of Boston, is looking for $4.15 million
to save a middle-school foreign
language program and stave off
other cuts in the schools and
services.
Both towns, where state education aid is slated to increase
by less than 1 percent, have
well-organized groups promoting the overrides. In Reading,
supporters recently gathered at
the Unitarian Universalist
Church for a get-out-the-vote
rally that drew about 100 supporters.
“It really comes down to
voter turnout,” said Michele
Sanphy, co-chair of Yes for
Reading, in an interview. “The
challenge is keeping people
ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Members of the group Yes for Reading consulted last month during a meeting at the Unitarian Universalist Church.
motivated, interested, and enthusiastic and avoid any sense
of false security or complacency. We need every single vote.”
Other communities,
though, would make out well
under the governor’s proposal,
including several well-to-do
ones in terms of income or
property wealth. Wellesley
would increase 4.3 percent;
Burlington, 5 percent; Wayland, 7 percent; and Winchester, 12.6 percent.
Those exceeding 4 percent
increases also include some urban systems, such as Fitchburg, Lynn, and Fall River.
Massachusetts Education
Secretary James Peyser, who
advises Baker on education
policy, said the wide span of increases reflect the intricacies of
the state’s funding formula,
which takes into account a variety of factors, including a
community’s ability to pay and
annual increases or decreases
in enrollment.
Peyser also noted that Beacon Hill adjusted the formula a
decade ago and that benefited
some school systems in more
affluent communities. The
change, being implemented
gradually, aims for the state to
fund at least 17.5 percent of
the costs of a school system’s
“foundation budget,” the minimum amount a system is required to spend under the
state’s formula. Previously,
many affluent school systems
were receiving very little state
aid.
“The state is committed to
providing a minimum share of
resources to all communities,”
Peyser said Friday.
Under Baker’s proposal, local education aid, known officially as Chapter 70, would
reach $4.85 billion, representing an increase of $104 million.
A good chunk of the increase is
to help districts address rising
health care costs.
But more money could be
c o m i n g . Co l l e e n Q u i n n , a
spokeswoman for the executive
office of education, said Friday
the administration is in the
process of exploring a targeted
funding increase for certain
communities.
Yet even districts receiving
big increases in aid are confronting problems. While state
aid for Brookline schools is
slated to go up 7.5 percent, voters this spring will consider a
$6.6 million override, most of
it for the school’s operating
budget.
The system has been grappling with the twin challenges
of rising costs and enrollment,
and a ballot-box defeat could
result in larger class sizes, fewer services for students who
need help with academics or
their social-emotional well-being, and other cuts.
The varying increases in
state aid come as the state has
been stepping up its demands
on local schools, which in turn
requires them to spend more
money.
For instance, districts have
been buying textbooks, software, and other materials as
they bring programs into line
with new state standards for
teaching English and math.
Many districts also have been
buying computers and upgrading their operating networks
because the state is moving its
standardized testing system
from paper booklets to cyberspace.
All the while, school systems say they are dealing with
a growing population of students experiencing anxiety, depression, and trauma — requiring a new set of services and instructional approaches — and a
spate of national school shootings is prompting the need for
more police officers in their
schools.
Thomas Scott, executive director of the Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents, sai d more dis tri c ts
should be going for override
votes to address the tight finances and the growing demands, but they don’t.
“I think there are many
towns where the thought of going out for an override vote and
knowing the resistance that
would occur makes it too politically treacherous,” he said.
Three years ago in North At-
tleborough, voters rejected a
$4 million override to support
its school and town operating
budgets — the second time in
three years — forcing school officials to close an elementary
school and reassign 900 students, among other cuts.
Now this bedroom community of 28,000 is facing the possibility of another school closing and other cuts if a $6.5 million override doesn’ t pass
Tuesday.
“There’s only been one year
over the last 10 years that we
didn’t have to do layoffs,” said
Scott Holcomb, North Attleborough superintendent. “Our
moral imperative is to open as
many doors as possible for children, but any town or city going through what we are with
budget cuts . . . runs the risk of
closing doors and opportunities.”
On the North Shore, the
towns making up the Triton
Regional School District will be
holding overrides this spring to
support the district’s proposed
operating budget. In Newbury,
voters will consider a $359,790
o v e r r i d e ; i n R o w l e y, a
$532,640 override; and in
Salisbury, an $800,000 override.
As with many systems, state
aid for Triton is slated to increase by less than 1 percent
next year. The portion of the
district’s budget supported by
state aid has shrunk from nearly 27 percent over a decade ago
to 21 percent next year.
“We’ve been slowly cutting
for years,” said Nerissa Wallen,
a School Committee member.
If the overrides don’t pass,
the district could face nearly $1
million in cuts, including 17
professional staffers, six instructional assistants, money
for substitute teachers, new
history textbooks for the high
school, and districtwide teacher training.
She predicts that if the cutting continues, the district is
one or two budget cycles away
from experiencing the kind of
class sizes becoming common
in Brockton, with 30 or more
students.
James Vaznis can be reached at
james.vaznis@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globevaznis.
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B9
Business
With a mouse click, pot licensing will kick off
Mass. set to take first applications from
would­be recreational marijuana sellers
By Dan Adams
GLOBE STAFF
On Monday at noon, decades
of debate all come down to this:
a click of a computer mouse by
a state technology contractor.
With that, the Massachusetts
state government’s system for
legal pot use will blink to life,
and businesses can begin applying for licenses to grow, process,
and sell cannabis to adults 21
and older.
The behind-the-scenes milestone will not have an immediate impact on consumers. But it
does mark the beginning of a
process that regulators expect
will lead to the debut of recreational pot sales in July.
And for longtime activists,
it’s a moment some believed
might never arrive.
“I speculated this could hap-
pen, but I never dreamed that I
would live to see it,” said Lester
Grinspoon, an 89-year-old former Harvard psychiatry professor who in the 1970 s helped
found the movement that culminated in voters’ decision in
2016 to legalize the drug. “It
certainly is gratifying.”
On Monday, the application
process will open to certain
businesses that qualify for expedited review: medical marijuana dispensaries that are already
open or have a provisional permit, and so-called economic
WYSS INSTITUTE AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY
‘I never
dreamed that
I would live to
see it. It
certainly is
gratifying.’
LESTER GRINSPOON,
founder of the movement
that culminated in
Massachusetts voters’
2016 decision to legalize
marijuana
empowerment applicants —
companies that are either led
by, employ, or benefit communities that had high rates of arrests for drug crimes. This is
part of a broader effort to redress racial disparities in the
past enforcement of marijuana
prohibition.
Qualifying companies will be
allowed to submit full license
applications beginning April 16
for any type of marijuana business. Next, on May 1, the state
will begin accepting applications from cultivation firms,
The goal of
using this
aspirin-size
device
(enlarged
below) is to help
the body’s
immune system
create a
sustained attack
against cancer.
Device stimulates patient’s own immune cells to fight tumors
C
STAT
ancer immunotherapy — the process
of activating a patient’s own immune
system to fight a tumor — is a booming field in drug development. But it
faces certain hurdles. Fewer than a
quarter of cancer patients benefit from leading drugs in the class known as “checkpoint
inhibitors,” and personalized cellular therapies are costly and complicated to create and
deliver.
To help solve those challenges, scientists at
Harvard have developed an implantable device that would pull immune cells into the implant, train them to recognize pieces of the
patient’s tumor, and then release these cells
— with the goal of creating a sustained attack
against the cancer. And recently the researchers announced they have struck a licensing
agreement with Novartis to use their approach to make an implantable cancer vaccine.
The aspirin-size implant, made of biodegradable materials like the ones in medical
sutures, is intended to sit under the skin and
dissolve over weeks or months. Loaded into it
are tumor proteins and immune modulators
— whose exact nature Novartis is not disclosing — that stimulate the patient’s immune
cells, the first step in an immune response
that cancer patients may lack.
“This specific approach is quite next-generation,” said Dr. Keith Flaherty, director of
developmental therapeutics at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, who is
not involved in the project. “Using a polymerbased device to create a hub where immune
system education goes on, that’s quite novel.
‘This specific approach is
quite next­generation.’
DR. KEITH FLAHERTY,
director of developmental therapeutics
at the Massachusetts General Hospital
Cancer Center
This vaccine uses fragments of a patient’s
own tumor. That kind of package deal has
never been delivered before.”
Two predominant types of cancer immunotherapy on the market today are checkpoint inhibitors and CAR-T therapy — and
the implant has similarities to and differences from each of them.
Checkpoint inhibitors take the brakes off a
patient’s immune cells. These drugs make
cancer cells more visible to the immune T
cells that can attack and kill them. Individual
drugs — PD-1 or CTLA-4 inhibitors — are
MARIJUANA, Page B10
After a flat
year, rents
are on the
rise again
This tiny implant could make a huge
difference for cancer patients
By Elizabeth Cooney
craft marijuana-growing cooperatives, and other small businesses. Finally, retail stores,
makers of marijuana-derived
products, and transportation
companies can begin applying
June 1.
Medical dispensaries, especially those already open and
serving patients, are champing
at the bit to add a recreational
license to their operations.
“We’ve got our incorporating
documents, financial statements, operating agreements —
Strong demand fuels
4% average increase,
but is it just a blip?
By Tim Logan
GLOBE STAFF
With the spring real estate market
blooming, rents in Greater Boston are
again accelerating, though it’s not yet
clear if that’s a blip or a longer-term
trend.
New figures from several real estate
data firms show the price of an apart-
On the rise
named for proteins on the surface of the T
cells involved.
Meanwhile, the newer CAR-T drugs — the
first of which was FDA-approved last year —
rely on T cells that are extracted from a patient’s blood, genetically altered to target the
tumor, and then returned into the bloodstream.
Each of these treatments has drawbacks.
Only about 1 in 5 cancer patients will respond
to a checkpoint inhibitor, presumably because some of them lack an immune response
to be unblocked. Some cancer types are a better match than others, owing to how many
mutations they have and therefore how many
mutated proteins may prompt an immune response.
As for CAR-T, the therapy is successful
when it targets a molecule present in cancer,
but if it’s less precise, healthy cells can also be
destroyed. It’s also so new that it’s not widely
available — and the treatment process is cumbersome and expensive.
By contrast, an implantable cancer vaccine likely has lower potential for side effects
than other immunotherapies, the Harvard
scientists said. Because it is local and not systemic, doses of any immune boosters can be
lower. It more selectively elicits an immune
response than checkpoint inhibitors, which
in some patients can cause severe side effects
IMPLANT, Page B10
Monthly rents in Greater Boston
picked up speed again at the start
of 2018.
Q1
Q2
Q3
$1,762
2013
$1,781
$1,809
Q4
$1,820
Q1
$1,834
Q2
Q3
2014
$1,876
$1,908
Q4
$1,919
Q1
$1,933
Q2
Q3
2015
$1,966
$1,994
Q4
$2,022
Q1
$2,031
Q2
Q3
2016
$2,052
$2,073
Q4
$2,047
Q1
$2,054
Q2
Q3
2017
Q4
$2,094
$2,120
$2,131
2018 Q1
$2,152
SOURCE: REIS INC.
ment in the region is on the upswing
after staying relatively flat over the last
year or so. It’s a sign that strong demand continues in the region’s housing market and raises the question of
whether Boston needs to build even
more places for people to live if it
hopes to make a meaningful dent in
what are some of the nation’s priciest
rents.
In the first three months of the
year, the average rent for an apartment
in Greater Boston rose to $2,152, up 4
percent from a year prior, according to
the real estate firm Reis Inc. That was
the quickest pace in nearly two years
and far faster than the 1 percent
growth rate of this time last year.
Other market-watchers, such as
ApartmentList and RentalBeast, also
showed rent increases picking up
speed over the last year.
That comes amid a bit of a lull in
the region’s wave of housing construction — at least in terms of new apartment buildings opening — even as the
ranks of renters continue to swell,
thanks to strong job growth and a
wave of baby boomers downsizing into
apartments.
Those older tenants, along with
thirtysomethings who would consider
buying a home but can’t find one in
Boston’s drum-tight market, are willing and able to pay higher rents, said
RentalBeast president Ishay Grinberg.
It’s those deeper-pocketed renters who
are now driving demand — and prices
— for many newer buildings.
“A lot of these buildings now are almost aimed at boomers,” Grinberg
said. “They have a lot of cash, as opposed to someone who just graduated
from college.”
Meanwhile, the rising cost of housing in long-popular neighborhoods in
RENTS, Page B11
B10
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
TALKING POINTS
CYBERSECURITY
DEBIT, CREDIT
CARD DATA STOLEN
FROM 5 MILLION
SAKS AND LORD &
TAYLOR
CUSTOMERS
ENVIRONMENT
XI JINPING HAS A
NEW RECRUIT IN
CHINA’S
POLLUTION FIGHT:
WALMART
TRADE
CHINA LEVIES NEW
TARIFFS ON US
MEAT, FRUIT,
OTHER PRODUCTS
Saks has been hacked — adding to the already formidable challenges faced by the luxury retailer. A well-known ring of cybercriminals has obtained more than 5 million
credit and debit card numbers from customers of Saks Fifth Avenue and Lord & Taylor, according to Gemini Advisory, a cybersecurity research firm that tracks stolen financial data. The data, it said, appear to have been stolen using software that was implanted into cash register systems and that siphoned card numbers until last month.
Hudson’s Bay Co., of Toronto, which owns both chains, confirmed the breach and said
it has “taken steps to contain it. Once we have more clarity around the facts, we will
notify our customers quickly and will offer those impacted free identity protection services, including credit and web monitoring.” Hudson’s Bay said its e-commerce platforms appeared to have been unaffected. The breach follows the theft of 40 million
card numbers from Target in 2013 and 56 million card numbers from Home Depot in
2014. Last year, Equifax disclosed that sensitive financial information on 145.5 million
Americans had been exposed in a breach of its systems. Gemini Advisory said Sunday
that a group of Russian-speaking hackers known as Fin7 or JokerStash posted online
Wednesday that it had obtained a cache of 5 million stolen card numbers, which the
thieves called BIGBADABOOM-2. The hackers, who have also hit other retail chains,
offered 125,000 of the records for immediate sale. Fin7 did not disclose where the
numbers had been obtained. But the researchers, working with banks, analyzed a
sample of the records and determined the card numbers seemed to have been used at
Saks and Lord & Taylor stores, mostly in New York and New Jersey, from May 2017 to
March 2018. — NEW YORK TIMES
Chinese President Xi
Jinping has vowed to
slash pollution and prioritize living standards
over unbridled growth.
In Bentonville, Ark., the
world’s largest retailer
is signing on. Walmart
has committed to cutting 50 million metric
tons of carbon emissions by 2030 from its
Chinese operations —
attempting to play good
corporate citizen in a
country where it’s making increasingly ambitious investments. China is the only nation where the retailer has made a specific emission plan public. Walmart says the
planned reductions are equivalent to emissions from the annual electricity consumption of 40 million Chinese households. Xi has appeared to take a bigger international
role on the environment even as President Trump has withdrawn from the Paris agreement. Winning in China is increasingly important to Walmart as it slashes US prices to
counter competition from Amazon.com. ‘‘There’s definitely a positive attitude from the
Chinese government about the goals we are putting in place,’’ said Laura Phillips, Walmart’s senior vice president of sustainability. Walmart has pledged to cut a billion tons
of emissions worldwide by 2030. — WASHINGTON POST
China said it’s rolling out new tariffs on US meat, fruit, and other products as retaliation against taxes approved by President Trump on imported steel and aluminum. The
Chinese finance ministry said the new tariffs begin Monday. The announcement followed warnings Chinese officials have made for several weeks in an escalating trade
dispute with the United States. China is increasing the tariff rate on eight US products,
including pork, by 25 percent, and imposing a new 15 percent tariff on 120 US commodities, including fruits. The White House didn’t immediately respond to a message
on Sunday seeking comment. The Chinese tariffs mirror Trump’s 25 percent charge on
imported steel and 15 percent hike on aluminum. Trump’s tariffs are partly a response
to complaints that Beijing steals or pressures foreign companies to hand over technology. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Implant activates
immune cells
to attack tumors
uIMPLANT
Continued from Page B9
such as overwhelming inflammation. CAR-T can lead to neurotoxicity as well as inflammation.
Releasing the vaccine over
weeks would give the therapy
more time to bolster the immune system from within.
“Our goal is to do all the manipulation inside the body,”
said David Mooney, who leads
the Immuno-Materials initiative at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering
at Harvard University. “A vaccine strategy like what we’ve
developed here is intended to
generate a T cell response, and
it will be synergistic with
checkpoint therapies that are
very effective at allowing T
cells to function better.”
There are two possible ways
the cancer vaccine can work.
One approach, somewhat akin
to CAR-T, would load an implant infused with specific tumor antigens — inactivated
proteins taken from the patient’s tumor — and molecules
that lure immune cells inside
it, where they are taught to recognize those tumor antigens.
In that case, the implant would
be placed under the skin near a
lymph node.
Another approach would
keep those pieces separate. The
tumor antigens would be injected near the tumor, as would
the implant. The immune cells
stimulated by the implant
would learn to recognize the
antigens, and head for the
lymph nodes, where they
would spread that training to T
cells.
And by using various antigens, researchers think, they
could conceivably get a more
effective cancer treatment. “No
one is 100 percent sure of the
best target,” said Glenn Dranoff, global head of exploratory
immuno-oncology at the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical
Research. “Sometimes it makes
sense to let the immune system
do what evolution has empowered it with: that ability to find
the best antigen to go after.”
The implantable cancer vaccine infused with patients’ tumor antigens is now being tested for safety in a Phase 1 clinical trial at the Dana-Farber
Cancer Institute.
The scientists see the cancer
vaccine as part of a combination therapy that primes patients to benefit from checkpoint inhibitors. The challenge
is to increase the proportion of
patients whose immune systems are responding to their
cancers and just need a check-
‘This approach
could help build a
kind of momen­
tum . . . that over­
comes the tumors
completely.’
DR. KEITH FLAHERTY
point inhibitor to release the
brakes — the people who could
be one drug away from a strong
immune response.
Flaherty of Mass. General
thinks more patients could potentially benefit from a therapy
that enhances their immune
response.
“Even in patients who respond [to checkpoint inhibitors], there’s room for improvement,” he said. “This approach
could help build a kind of momentum in immune response
that overcomes the tumors
completely.”
But this and other attempts
at cancer vaccines face the
same uphill climb, Flaherty
said. The patient’s immune system has already seen the cancer, yet failed to attack it.
“ I f w e g e t e ff i c a c y, t h i s
would be a big win,” he said.
State’s application process for cannabis businesses to kick off
uMARIJUANA
Continued from Page B9
all that stuff — ready to go,”
said Norton Arbelaez, director
of government affairs for New
England Treatment Access, a
medical marijuana group that
operates dispensaries in
Northampton and Brookline
and has a cultivation operation in Franklin.
Arbelaez said the company
is already changing its processes, such as redesigning its
packages for edible marijuana
products for a new warning label, to comply with regulations issued by the Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission.
However, Arbelaez and others in the cannabis business
agree that the main challenge
for operators won’t be getting
through the state licensing
system, but rather through
city and town halls.
Before they can get a state
recreational pot license, companies must find locations
that comply with municipal
zoning, hold a public hearing,
and negotiate a so-called “host
community agreement” with
local officials. Many predict
this strong system of local control, plus the five- to six-month
period required to grow marijuana, will mean that very few
cannabis stores will be ready
to open this summer.
“Ultimately, municipalities
are the gatekeepers,” Arbelaez
said.
Nonetheless, the start of
the application process brings
with it a new sense of momentum, following a six-month delay imposed by the Legislature
and a monthslong debate over
the nitty-gritty of the rules for
Mari­
juana
samples
at the
New
England
Canna­
bis
Conven­
tion in
Boston
last
month.
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
the recreational industry.
“It’s an exciting step,” said
Steve Hoffman, chairman of
the cannabis commission. “It’s
starting to become real.”
Hoffman said state technology contractors and commission staff would be stress-testing the online system over the
weekend to ensure it can handle a flood of submissions.
But the agency ’s meager
staff — just nine people today,
eventually swelling to about
37 — may be the bigger constraint on how applications
are processed. Hoffman
pledged the small crew will
wo rk long hour s to ke ep a
backlog of applications from
building.
Hoffman, who previously
led software firms in the private sector, added that while
he was confident the system
should be able to handle a
large volume, “the tech gods
do have their own mind.”
Kamani Jefferson, head of
the Massachusetts Recreational Consumers Council, which
represents pot consumers,
said he was concerned about
municipal foot-dragging and
local zoning rules that favor
established operators.
Still, Jefferson said, he felt
relief that the long journey to
legalization seemed to be nearing an end.
“You feel it in the air,” Jefferson said. “You feel it in conversations with consumers
and potential business own-
ers. It’s something new; it’s exciting.
“It’s not going to be overnight, but it’s definitely here in
Massachusetts.”
Dan Adams
can be reached at
daniel.adams@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@Dan_Adams86.
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
After a flat year, rents are starting to rise again
uRENTS
Continued from Page B9
Boston’s core is pushing younger, not-quite-as-affluent renters
to new neighborhoods and suburban towns where they, in
turn, are also driving up prices.
That’s pushing rents up far faster in neighborhoods such as
Dorchester and Mattapan than
in areas closer to downtown.
Still, there may be some relief coming this summer, when
a wave of new buildings open.
More than 20 large apartment
buildings — about 7,200 apartments in total — are set to open
in and around Boston this year,
according to the real estate data
firm CoStar. They range from a
585-unit building on Harrison
Avenue in the South End to
230-unit buildings in places
like Revere and Randolph.
New supply has dampened
price growth over the past couple of years, and it should help
keep a lid on additional increas-
es this summer, said Mark
Hickey, an economist in CoStar’s Boston office.
“We have more inventory
growth right now than we have
had in 30 years,” Hickey said at
a recent talk on the rental market. “The most since the 1920s,
maybe.”
The benefits of that new
supply are concentrated at the
top end of the market, for people who can afford $4,000 for a
one-bedroom apartment, but
they ’re beginning to filter
down. As new buildings offer a
month — sometimes two — of
free rent to help fill their units,
older landlords are considering
concessions too, just to keep
up.
More landlords with smaller
properties are willing to cover
brokers’ fees, for instance, instead of having tenants pay
them, to negate an advantage
that many large new buildings
have because they don’t use
Business
brokers, Grinberg said.
“There’s so much new inventory, it’s scaring some of the
smaller landlords,” he said.
“ T he y feel like the y ’re unarmed.”
Across the broader market
though — away from the glitzy
new buildings in the Seaport
and the South End — rents are
clearly on the rise.
Sheila Dillon, chief of housing for Boston Mayor Martin J.
Walsh, said policy makers are
puzzling over whether the city’s
target of 53,000 new housing
units by 2030 might need to be
B11
raised to meet job and population growth that has exceeded
earlier expectations.
She’s also working with
mayors of cities and towns
close to the city on a broader regional goal, for what is increasingly a regional problem.
“We still know we don’t have
enough supply,” Dillon said.
“We need to keep building to
stabilize the market.”
Tim Logan can be reached at
tim.logan@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter
at@bytimlogan.
()
INFO VALID 4/02/18 ONLY
()
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
8
Stadium Seating
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
Rear Window Captioning
G
5
6
K
Hearing Impaired
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 4:15, 7:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 5:00, 7:30
PETER RABBIT (PG) 4:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 4:20, 6:30
THE LEISURE SEEKER (R) 7:30
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 5:00, 7:40
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) 8:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G (12:30, 3:50) 7:00,
10:10
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) G (1:15, 4:30) 7:45
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) (1:35, 4:35) 7:35, 10:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (4:00) 10:00
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) G (1:00) 7:05
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (1:50, 5:00) 8:00, 10:30
UNSANE (R) (1:20, 4:20) 6:50, 9:45
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) (12:40, 4:05) 7:20, 10:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (1:30, 4:15) 7:15, 10:05
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (12:35, 3:30) 6:30, 9:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (1:45, 4:45) 7:30, 10:25
RED SPARROW (R) (2:00, 5:05) 8:15
GAME NIGHT (R) (4:05)
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:45, 3:45) 6:45, 9:55
PETER RABBIT (PG) (1:05, 3:35) 6:15, 9:50
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN SING-ALONG (NR)
(12:50)
BELMONT
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
www.studiocinema.com
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 4:30
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) 8:00
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG)
(1:25) 4:25, 7:35, 10:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G (12:30, 3:40) 7:00,
10:10
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) G (1:00) 4:30, 8:00
HICHKI (NR) (12:25, 3:25) 6:15, 9:05
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) (1:10, 3:40) 6:30, 9:10
NEEDI NAADI OKE KATHA (NR) (1:20) 7:45
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (12:55) 4:00, 7:05,
9:55
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) (12:45, 3:50)
6:45, 9:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (12:05, 2:30) 4:55, 7:30,
9:50
UNSANE (R) (1:15) 4:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) (12:40) 4:05, 7:10, 10:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (1:15) 4:20, 7:20, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (1:10) 4:15, 7:15, 10:25
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (12:35, 3:45) 6:35, 9:25
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:10, 3:35) 6:50, 10:05
RED SPARROW (R) 4:35
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
www.artsemerson.org
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 2:45, 6:00, 9:15
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) G 12:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 1:45,
5:00, 8:15
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent G 12:30,
1:30, 3:15, 4:15, 6:00, 7:00, 8:45, 9:45
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
2:00, 6:00
AMAZON ADVENTURE 3D (NR) 12:00, 4:00
GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D (NR) 1:00, 3:00, 5:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G (3:05) 10:05
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) G (11:30) 6:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RPX G (12:00) 7:10
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RPX G (3:35) 10:30
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (12:50, 1:20, 3:50) 4:20, 6:50,
7:20, 9:50, 10:20
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (12:25, 12:55) 4:00,
6:30, 10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) G (3:30) 9:45
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (1:00, 3:45) 6:35, 10:45
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (12:05) 4:05, 7:15, 10:25
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (12:15) 6:45
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) (12:30, 3:40) 10:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (12:40) 4:10, 7:40, 10:45
GAME NIGHT (R) (3:55) 10:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (11:35, 2:50) 6:20, 10:10
BOSTON: AN AMERICAN RUNNING STORY (NR) 7:30
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE 10
121 Grandview Rd.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 11:00, 5:10, 10:30
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 2:30,
7:50
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:40, 7:30, 10:30
BLACK PANTHER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:30, 4:45
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:15, 2:20, 7:30, 10:15
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:40, 2:50,
6:00, 9:10
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 12:40,
3:50, 7:00, 10:10
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 11:00, 2:15, 4:30, 7:40,
10:10
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20,
10:00
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 5:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:00, 2:05, 4:45, 7:45, 10:25
ACRIMONY (R) G 11:10, 2:00, 4:40, 7:00, 9:50
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) 11:15, 2:00,
4:40, 7:15, 9:50
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
www.coolidge.org
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
ITZHAK (NR) 11:15, 4:15, 6:45, 9:00
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
9:55
THE LEISURE SEEKER (R) 1:45
FOXTROT (R) 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45
BURLINGTON
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
20 South Ave.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
CAMBRIDGE
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:55, 7:10, 10:05
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:50, 5:05, 8:15
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:05
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:40, 3:25, 6:25, 9:05
UNSANE (R) 11:35, 10:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:25, 4:25, 6:50, 9:20
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 5:15, 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:20, 3:35, 6:45, 9:55
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:45, 3:00, 6:15, 9:25
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 12:45, 4:00, 7:15,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:30, 1:00, 2:10,
4:10, 4:55, 7:35, 10:20
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:25, 2:15, 5:00, 7:40, 10:35
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) 8:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:40, 1:55, 4:20, 6:35,
9:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 11:15, 2:05, 4:45, 7:25
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 1:45, 4:15, 6:55, 9:30
ACRIMONY (R) 12:15, 3:30, 6:40, 10:00
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
www.applecinemas.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:35, 4:30, 7:40, 10:35
PETER RABBIT (PG) 12:05, 2:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 4:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:40, 3:35, 6:25, 9:15
UNSANE (R) 3:55, 9:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 6:55, 9:35
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 1:25, 6:50
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:45, 12:15, 3:00,
3:30, 6:15, 6:45, 9:25, 9:55
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 12:45, 4:00, 7:15,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:15, 1:10, 1:55,
3:50, 4:35, 6:40, 7:25, 9:20, 10:05
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 12:50, 3:40, 7:00, 9:45
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) 8:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:40, 1:50, 4:05, 6:35,
9:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:05, 3:45, 6:30, 9:05
ACRIMONY (R) 1:20, 4:10, 7:05, 10:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:10, 3:55, 6:40, 9:25
HICHKI (NR) G 9:25
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 4:25, 9:05
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 2:00, 4:15, 6:35,
9:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) G 1:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) 6:40
RANGASTHALAM (NR) G 3:00, 6:10, 9:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 1:10, 2:40, 4:00,
5:30, 6:50, 8:30, 9:35
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:55
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:15, 4:00, 6:15, 8:30
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 5 (1:30, 4:00) 6:30, 9:00
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 5 (1:25, 4:05) 6:50, 9:30
ITZHAK (NR) 5 (1:15, 3:45)
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 5 (2:05, 4:35) 7:05, 9:40
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 5 (1:00, 1:35, 2:00, 3:30,
4:10, 4:40) 6:00, 6:45, 7:20, 8:30, 9:10, 9:45
FOXTROT (R) 5 (1:20, 4:15) 7:10, 9:20
UNSANE (R) 5 6:40, 9:25
THE CHINA HUSTLE (R) 5 (1:50, 4:20) 7:15, 9:45
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
55 Boylston St.
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:20
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 2:00, 8:00
GAME NIGHT (R) 2:00, 8:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:40, 2:30, 6:00, 9:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:40, 2:30, 6:00, 9:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:20, 3:00, 6:30, 10:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:20, 3:00, 6:30, 10:00
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30,
10:40
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30,
10:40
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:00, 5:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:00, 5:00
DANVERS
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
100 Independence Way
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.amctheatres.com
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) 8:00
ACRIMONY (R) (12:10, 3:15) 7:05, 10:35
DEDHAM
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
www.REGmovies.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 10:00, 1:00, 4:00, 7:10,
10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 10:40, 1:30, 4:20, 7:20, 10:10
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 10:30, 3:50, 9:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G 1:10, 6:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:30, 3:00, 6:30, 9:45
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 1:20, 8:00
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) G 12:20, 3:40, 7:00, 10:15
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 10:00,
4:40
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 10:50, 1:30, 3:50, 6:20,
9:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) 10:00, 1:00, 3:40
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG) AMC
Independent G 11:15, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:20, 4:40, 10:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) RealD 3D 2:00, 7:20
RED SPARROW (R) 10:20, 10:10
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 11:50, 2:30, 5:00, 7:55,
10:15
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:50, 2:15, 4:45, 10:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 10:10, 12:50, 3:30, 6:40, 9:20
ACRIMONY (R) G 11:00, 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:15
ANNIHILATION (R) 7:10
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) AMC Independent G
10:20, 1:00, 3:45, 6:50, 9:30
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) G 10:15, 1:20,
4:10, 6:50, 9:40
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) AMC Independent G
11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10
UNSANE (R) AMC Independent G 6:30, 9:20
FLOWER (R) AMC Independent G 10:00, 1:30, 4:00,
6:30, 10:15
DOUBLE FEATURE: PETER RABBIT / JUMANJI (NR)
G 12:30, 5:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 10:40, 4:20, 10:00
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 1:40,
7:10
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.amctheatres.com
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 12:30, 3:30, 6:30,
9:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 1:30,
4:30, 7:30, 10:15
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:30, 9:50
BLACK PANTHER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:10, 6:45
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 3:15, 9:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G 12:15, 6:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 12:00, 3:10, 6:20,
9:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 12:50,
4:00, 7:10, 10:15
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 12:15, 1:00, 2:30, 4:45,
5:30, 7:20
SHERLOCK GNOMES 3D (PG) RealD 3D G 3:15, 10:10
PETER RABBIT (PG) 12:00
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG) AMC
Independent G 1:45, 4:20, 7:00, 9:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 4:15, 9:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) RealD 3D 1:00, 7:00
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 1:45, 6:50, 9:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 4:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 2:00, 4:45, 7:30
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 9:35
ACRIMONY (R) G 1:15, 4:30, 7:20, 10:15
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) AMC Independent 1:25,
4:10, 6:50, 9:40
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) G 1:30, 4:10,
6:45, 9:30
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) AMC Independent G 2:30,
5:05, 7:40, 10:15
UNSANE (R) AMC Independent G 7:45
UNSANE (R) AMC Independent G 10:10
LEXINGTON
LEXINGTON VENUE
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
5 DOL DSS
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 4:00, 7:00
THE POST (PG-13) 6:45
BOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORY (NR) 4:15
LITTLETON
O'NEIL CINEMAS AT THE POINT
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:15, 1:45, 4:05,
4:35, 6:55, 9:45, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:15, 2:05, 4:45, 7:40, 10:20
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:05, 1:30, 3:55, 6:45,
8:50
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) 8:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 12:50, 3:45, 6:35, 9:20
UNSANE (R) 2:25, 5:00, 7:35, 10:00
ACRIMONY (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 9:40, 10:30
READING
1208 Constitution Ave 978-506-5089
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
www.oneilcinemas.com
FURNITURE - READING
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 11:45, 3:00, 6:50, 10:10
GAME NIGHT (R) 5 1:15, 10:20
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 5 10:30, 4:00, 7:25
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 5 11:15, 1:50, 4:35, 7:15,
9:55
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 5 10:45, 1:25, 4:15, 6:40,
9:30
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 5 10:55, 1:30, 4:05,
6:40, 9:40
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 5 11:05, 2:05, 4:50, 7:35,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 5 11:30, 2:15, 5:00,
7:45
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) 5 10:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 5 10:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 12:00, 3:30, 7:00
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 1:30, 3:15, 4:30,
6:20, 7:30, 9:35, 10:30
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:30, 4:05, 6:40, 9:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:25, 4:10, 7:00, 9:40
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 2:00, 9:50
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 6:15, 6:45, 7:15, 9:25, 9:55,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:05, 11:40, 1:45,
2:15, 4:25, 4:55, 7:05, 9:45
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:35, 9:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:10, 2:20, 4:40
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) 8:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:10, 3:50, 6:25, 9:10
UNSANE (R) 11:10, 4:50, 7:20
ACRIMONY (R) 1:35, 4:20, 7:10, 10:00
MILLBURY
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
READY PLAYER ONE: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(PG-13) 12:50
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) 3:50, 6:50, 9:50
REVERE
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:00, 2:20, 2:50, 6:05,
9:15
LEAGUE OF LEGENDS CITY CHAMPS (NR) 7:05
PETER RABBIT (PG) 12:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:00, 2:55, 6:10, 9:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:40, 4:30, 7:35, 10:15
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 12:30, 6:20
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) 1:35, 4:15, 6:55,
9:35
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 1:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:45, 6:15, 6:45, 7:15,
8:00, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:35, 1:45,
2:15, 2:45, 4:25, 4:55, 7:10, 10:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:20, 4:20, 7:30, 10:15
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:25, 12:55, 2:35, 3:05,
4:50, 5:20, 7:00, 9:20
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) 8:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:10, 3:55, 6:30, 9:10
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG) 1:25,
4:10, 7:25, 10:10
THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT (R) 7:30, 9:40
UNSANE (R) 1:15, 3:40, 6:40, 9:05
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:15, 2:30, 5:45, 8:55
ACRIMONY (R) 1:00, 3:50, 7:20, 10:05
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
SOMERVILLE
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
5 6 8 DSS
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
www.showcasecinemas.com
5 6 I DIG
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:45, 3:25, 4:05, 6:30,
7:10, 9:50, 10:20
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:30, 1:50
GAME NIGHT (R) 10:30
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 2:00, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:35, 2:20, 5:05, 7:45, 10:25
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 5:00, 7:25
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:00, 12:30,
1:00, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 9:30, 10:00,
10:30
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:40, 1:45, 2:15,
4:20, 4:50, 7:00, 9:35, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:40
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:45, 2:05, 4:30, 6:55,
9:10
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) 8:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:15, 3:55, 6:40, 9:20
ACRIMONY (R) 12:50, 3:50, 7:05, 10:05
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
READY PLAYER ONE: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(PG-13) 12:50
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) 3:50, 6:50, 9:50
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
http://somervilletheatre.com/
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 6:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5:00, 8:00
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 4:10, 5:20, 6:45, 7:45
TAUNTON
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
ACRIMONY (R) (12:45, 3:35) 6:40, 9:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G (1:00, 3:25) 6:50,
8:50
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) G (12:30, 3:55)
6:00, 9:30
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) (1:15, 3:40) 6:20, 10:10
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (12:35, 3:20) 7:30,
10:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (1:10, 3:45) 6:30, 9:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (1:05, 3:50) 7:00, 9:45
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (12:55) 7:20
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (12:40) 4:10, 7:10, 9:50
GAME NIGHT (R) (3:30) 10:10
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:50, 3:55) 6:10, 9:20
WALTHAM
EMBASSY CINEMA
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
www.landmarktheatres.com
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 (1:00, 4:05) 7:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 5 (1:05, 4:10) 7:20
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 5 (1:15, 4:00) 7:10
UNSANE (R) 5 (12:50, 4:20) 7:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 G (4:15) 7:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 G (12:40, 1:10) 6:45
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 5 G (3:45)
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:10, 12:55, 3:05, 6:10,
7:00, 9:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:30
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:25, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:35, 4:50, 7:45, 10:25
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:00, 12:30,
1:00, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 10:00, 10:30
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 4:30,
7:05, 9:45, 10:10
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:30, 4:20, 7:30, 10:15
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:05, 2:30, 5:00, 7:10,
9:25
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:45, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05
ACRIMONY (R) 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:20
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:55, 3:40, 4:10, 6:40,
7:10, 10:10
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:00, 1:20
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:35, 4:20, 6:50, 9:35
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:10, 1:55, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 12:05
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) 11:20, 2:00,
4:40, 7:20, 10:05
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 1:10, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:25, 6:15, 6:45, 7:15,
7:45, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25
WESTBOROUGH
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:20, 3:20, 3:50, 6:30,
7:00, 9:30, 10:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:15
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:55, 2:25, 7:25
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:00, 3:45, 6:25, 9:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:10, 1:45, 4:25, 7:10, 9:45
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 1:35
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 6:15, 6:45, 7:15, 9:25, 9:55,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:05, 11:35, 1:40,
2:10, 4:15, 4:45, 6:50, 7:20, 9:40, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:20, 4:05, 6:55, 9:35
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:50, 2:00, 4:20, 6:35,
9:00
UNSANE (R) 4:50, 10:05
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
10:10
ACRIMONY (R) 1:15, 4:10, 7:05, 9:50
T h e
B12
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
ASK AMY
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
Parents disagree on whether
three kids are enough
Q. My wife and I have three beautiful children.
I am ready for a vasectomy, but my wife does
not want to permanently close the door on
having more children.
I have tried communicating my feelings
and desire to move on to the next phase of life,
as we raise the children we have. I have no desire to start the infant cycle over again.
My wife is an amazing mother and has a
deep love for children. How can we come together on something we completely disagree
on?
HUSBAND AND FATHER
A. When it comes to sex and the pregnancies
that sometimes result, the person who says
“no” should prevail. In this regard, your wishes
outweigh your wife’s. And so — just as a woman will use birth control when she wants to exercise her right to prevent pregnancy, you
should use birth control to assert your right to
prevent pregnancy. Your options are somewhat
more limited than your wife’s, and I can understand why you would want to get a vasectomy.
There are many ways to experience the
deep love of children other than having another baby. Your wife could work at a nursery
school or at your kids’ school. She could volunteer holding and nurturing babies as a “cradle
cuddler” at your local hospital’s neonatal unit.
You don’t have any equivalent options.
You two might have success discussing this
with a couples counselor, who could cuddle
and coach you both through this very important issue.
VALERIE MACON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES (LEFT); ADAM ROSE/ABC
Roseanne Barr the actress (left) and Roseanne Conner, her character on “Roseanne.”
Reconciling the two Roseannes
The latest Roseanne uproar is nothing new.
All along, throughout Roseanne Barr’s TV career, there have been two Roseannes — Roseanne Barr and Roseanne Conner.
The real Roseanne has long been an annoying, illogical, moody, impulsive star who breaks
things — such as the national anthem — because she wants to. She is the Tabloid Roseanne, and her pranks are exhausting and offensive.
For years, the Tabloid Roseanne was among
TV’s most powerful talents, a woman who ushered in a new model of the TV wife and mother,
but she nonetheless chose to rely on stupid
stunts to propel her into the news, sowing outrage and disbelief in order to get publicity. She
once faxed slur-ridden, homophobic notes to
critics who didn’t like her then-husband Tom
Arnold’s ill-fated TV series, “The Jackie Thomas
Show,” and one of her show’s executive producers once took an ad in Variety saying that he’d
prefer “the relative peace and quiet of Beirut” to
working for her. Nowadays, she contents herself
with right-wing conspiracies and going after
Marjory Stoneman Douglas students.
Roseanne Conner, her character on “Rose-
anne,” has always been less complicated and
more positive. She has been a symbol of working-class pride, a woman who says what she
wants despite the cultural signals that urge her
to stay submissive, and a wife and mother willing to do anything for her family. Roseanne
Conner has faced economic challenges that became part of the plotline, in contrast to most
other TV comedies, and she was way ahead of
the curve on the importance of openness toward LGBT people. While the Tabloid Roseanne
is aggressively rude for attention, Roseanne
Conner has been vulgar as a defensive weapon
against those who are better off.
On the revival of “Roseanne,” Roseanne Conner can’t afford the deductible for knee surgery,
which leads to a lot of pain and heartache. She
is also a fierce protector of her grandson, who is
gender queer and gets picked on for wearing
girl’s clothing to school. Yup, she’s a Trump voter, even though the circumstances of her life —
which also include a mixed-race granddaughter
and two financially struggling daughters —
don’t appear to be among Trump’s priorities.
Go figure. Reconciling Roseanne Barr and
Roseanne Conner has never been easy.
Monday April 2, 2018
7:00pm
2
WGBH Greater
PBS Boston
4
WBZ Wheel
CBS NEW
5
WCVB News
ABC (CC)
6 WLNE ABC Daily
7
WHDH News
(CC) HD
NBC Boston
7:30pm
8:00pm
Movies
8:30pm
Steves
Antiques Roadshow
Part 1 of 3. HD TV-G
Jeopardy Big Bang Young
NEW
Theory
Sheldon
9:00pm
9:30pm
Antiques Rdshow
(CC) HD TV-G
Big Bang Biblically
Theory
NEW
Sports
Crossing: The series News
premiere. NEW
(CC) HD
J Kimmel
NEW
In. Ed.
American Idol (CC) HD TV-PG-L NEW
Family
News HD
Extra HD Family
TV-PG
Feud
Feud
The Crossing NEW
News HD
News
News
(CC) HD
J Kimmel
(11:35)
Extra
(10:01) Good Girls
(CC) TV-14-L NEW
NBC10 at J Fallon
11 PM
NEW
News
News
(CC)
NBC10 at Access
7:00pm
TV-G
The Voice (CC) TV-PG-DL NEW
9 WMUR ABC N.H. Ch.
10
WBTS News
NBC (CC)
In. Ed.
American Idol (CC) HD TV-PG-L NEW
Extra HD The Voice (CC) HD TV-PG-DL NEW
TV-PG
The Crossing NEW
(10:01) Good Girls
HD TV-14-L NEW
11
WENH Greater
PBS Boston
Steves
Independ. Lens (CC): The story Amanpour
of Shahin Najafi. TV-14 NEW
12
WPRI Wheel
CBS NEW
Jeopardy Big Bang Young
NEW
Theory
Sheldon
25
WFXT ET/
FOX Tonight
TMZ HD
TV-PG
27
WUNI Rosa de Guadalupe El rico y Lazaro
HD TV-14-D
(CC) HD
36
WSBE Steves
PBS
38
WSBK Big Bang Big Bang News HD
Theory
Theory
44
WGBX British Baking (CC): Midsomer Murders: Happy Valley (CC)
PBS Easter recipes.
Conclusion. TV-PG TV-PG
Crimson Field (CC): PBS NewsHour
A wave of patients. (CC) HD
50
56
WBIN I Survived... TV-14
Boston's Finest
WLVI The Gold Goldberg DC's Legends HD
TV-14-LSV NEW
CW
Dr. G: Med/Exam
News (CC)
WNAC ET/
FOX Tonight
68
WBPX Criminal Minds
ION (CC) HD TV-14-LV
Encore
Flix
Lucifer (CC):
Resident: Conrad
Lucifer's recipients. battles physicians.
Papá a toda madre
(CC) HD
TMZ HD
TV-PG
Deadly Motives HD
Penn & Teller (CC)
HD NEW
News (CC)
News
(CC)
Por amar sin ley
(CC) HD
News
(CC) HD
Noticiero
Uni
Life: Examining
insects. HD TV-PG
BBC
News
Mum
(CC) HD
Seinfeld
TV-PG
Seinfeld
TV-PG
Lucifer (CC):
Resident: Conrad
Lucifer's recipients. battles physicians.
News
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
J Kimmel
J Fallon
NEW
The Late
Show
(11:35)
TMZ
Law & Order SVU: A Law & Order SVU
killer stalks Benson. (CC) HD TV-14-DLV
Drugs Inc. TV-14-D
Modern Modern
Family
Family
(11:05)
The Gold
Seinfeld
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
PREMIUM CABLE
(9:45) Frost/Nixon (2008) (CC): Nixon's
Jackie (2016) (CC): Portrait of Jackie
(5:50) ★★★★ The
1977 TV interview. HD TV-14
Verdict (CC) TV-PG Kennedy. HD R
(6:54) I Saw the Light (2015) (CC): Biopic ★★ The Falcon and the Snowman (1985): (11:14) ★★ License/
of Hank Williams. HD R
Two Americans sell secrets. HD TV-14
Drive (1988) PG-13
(6:35) ★★ Undertow (CC): Two (8:25) ★★ 54 (1998) (CC): Life ★★★ Punch-Drunk (2002) (CC) Pretty
brothers run away. TV-14-V
during the disco era. HD R
A businessman finds romance. Persuas.
King in the Wilderness (2018): MLK's last Barry HD Silicon
TV-MA
Valley
three years. HD NR NEW
HBO
Tonight/ Vice
Oliver
News
HBO 2
Here and Now (CC)
(6:30) ★★
Undercover Brother HD TV-MA
(5:55)
Cartoon Homeland (CC) HD
Sleepless Pres. HD TV-MA
Showtime
Big Bang Biblically NCIS: A hit-and-run News
Theory
NEW
witness flees.
Weekends Nature (CC): A look The Secret Life of
at disabled animals. Dogs HD
64
Cinemax
Antiques Roadshow Antiques Rdshow
Part 1 of 3. NEW
(CC) HD TV-G
Atomic Blonde
(2017) (CC) HD R
Barry HD ★★ The Last Boy Scout (1991) (CC): An
TV-MA
ex-QB and a PI team up. HD TV-14-DLSV
Billions (CC) HD TV- Homeland (CC) HD Billions (CC) HD TVTV-MA
MA-LS
MA-LS
Silicon
Valley
Showtime 2
Pirates/
Chest
Starz!
(7:03) Counterpart
(CC) HD TV-MA
★★★ Amistad (1997): Slaves revolt at sea in 1839
Zack and
Miri
and land in a U.S. prison. HD TV-14-V
Outlander: Season (8:57) Outlander
(9:55) Outlander
Ash vs.
Counter.
3 begins. HD TV-MA (CC) HD TV-MA
(CC) HD TV-MA
Evil Dead
TMC
(6:00) Looking for
Eric (2009) HD NR
Alone in Berlin (2016) (CC): German
couple protest Nazis. HD R
(7:20) Get the Gringo: Man
lands in a Mexican prison. R
(9:45) Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (2011)
(CC): British spy hunts for a mole. HD R
SPORTS
Boston Sports Tonight (CC) Live. HD
Comcast
SportsNet
(6:00) Early Edition
(CC) Live. HD
ESPN
MLB Baseball (CC): Baltimore Orioles at Houston Astros. From SportsCenter (CC)
Minute Maid Park. Live. HD
Live. HD
ESPN Classic
(6:00) Classic Bask. Classic College Football (CC): 2013:
(CC)
Texas A&M at Mississippi.
Classic College Football (CC): From 2012:
Missouri at Texas A&M.
ESPN 2
College GameDay (CC): NCAA
Championship preview. Live. HD
MLB Baseball (CC): Cleveland Indians at
Los Angeles Angels. Live. HD
Golf
NBCSN
NESN
Live From the Masters (CC) Live. HD TV-G Live/Masters: A look at the tournament.
Super High (CC) HD Super High (CC) HD Super High (CC) HD Super High (CC) HD
MLB Baseball (CC): Boston Red Sox at Miami Marlins. Live. HD Innings
Red Sox
FAMILY
Craig
Gumball King/Hill Am. Dad Cl/Show Am. Dad Burgers Burgers
(7:05)
Bunk'd
Gravity
Gravity
Raven's Stuck/
Andi
Bizaard.
Bunk'd
HD TV-G Falls
Falls
Home
Middle
Mack
Cartoon
Disney
Best of Felger &
Mazz (CC) HD
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
Ins. PGA Learning
Super High (CC) HD
Sports
Producer
Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
Stuck/
Bunk'd
Middle
HD TV-G
Freeform
(6:00) Puss in Boots The Karate Kid (2010) (CC): A young boy learns kung fu from a The 700 Club (CC)
HD TV-G
(CC) TV-PG-V
kindly maintenance man. HD TV-PG-V
Nickelodeon
Noggin
Henry D. Thunder Thunder
Bubble
Shimmer Nella th
Nicky
Sunny
News
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
Independ. Lens (CC): The story Amanpour
of Shahin Najafi. TV-14 NEW
NCIS: A hit-and-run News
The Late
witness flees.
Show
Chronicle American Idol (CC) HD TV-PG-L NEW
HD
Q. Two years ago, I was in an abusive relationship that ended when I got pregnant.
I left the situation immediately, and have
never returned. My young son’s father has never met the child or shown any interest in being
involved. That’s not really a problem for me.
Since then, I’ve gotten engaged to another
man, “Barry,” with whom I have a much
healthier relationship.
He’s the only father my son has ever known,
and he plans on adopting him in the near future.
Should I ever tell my son that the man who
has raised him is not his father?
And when do I address that? I feel as
though at some point it’s necessary, so that my
son doesn’t find out on his own and is upset
with me for not being honest. Is there an age
that is too early or too late?
K
F. House F. House F. House F. House Friends
Peppa
Peppa
Peppa
Umizoomi Rusty R.
Friends
Blaze
A. Yes, you should tell your son.
One way to introduce the concept of the
distant biological parent would be to be open
and celebratory about the adoption process.
Take pictures of you and your husband holding
your son at the courthouse. Celebrate this as
the day “Barry” became your child’s “Forever
Dad.”
Keep in mind that an adoptive parent is the
“real parent.” Don’t use the phrase “real father”
to describe your son’s biological parent.
You and Barry should share this story as often as your son wants to hear it, and always in
a very joyful way.
At around the age of four, children start to
become fascinated by babies, families and relationships. Use photos to help tell his story. You
can say, “First I met this man. His name is
Steve Smith [provide both names]. He put the
seed in mommy’s body that grew into a baby,
and that baby is you! Then I met Daddy and he
told me his wish was to be your forever father,
and so the three of us got the papers signed
and . . . we’re a family! Do you remember this
day? That was a great day for us.”
Through time, answer every question carefully and truthfully. Later on, if your son wants
to meet his biological parent, help him try to
make that connection. You and his father
should also help him to handle whatever consequences flow from that particular challenge.
Q. “Driving Me Nuts” complained of her 90year-old husband’s sexual “jokes” directed at
women.
Approaching 80, I have seen lots of men my
age, and older, expect laughs from ill-timed, illtold or just plain unfunny stories.
If this guy’s behavior doesn’t respond to
spousal admonition, maybe he ought to see a
doctor. Age by itself doesn’t connote dementia,
but it certainly can lead to a dimming of perspective on one’s own conduct. A talking-to by
a health care professional might help sharpen
his focus.
MIKE
A. Thank you for sharing your perspective. I
had a feeling that this man was always this
way, and — like you — I believe that these comments and “jokes” were never funny.
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
Specials
7:00pm
7:30pm
Powered by
8:00pm
8:30pm
A&E
Dog/Hunter (CC)
HD TV-PG-L
AMC
(6:00) ★★★★ Jaws (1975) (CC): A
bloodthirsty shark. HD
Animal Planet Alaska/Frontier
(CC) HD TV-14
9:00pm
9:30pm
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
BASIC CABLE
Dog/Hunter (CC)
Dog & Beth: Fight of Their Lives (CC): A
HD TV-PG-L
profile. HD TV-PG-L
Alaska/Frontier:
The Willard Cabin.
(11:03) Dog/Bounty
Hunter HD TV-PG-L
The Terror (CC) HD (10:01) McMafia: Semiyon is
TV-14-V NEW
accused. HD TV-14-LSV NEW
(11:17)
Terror
Alaska/Frontier HD Alaska/Frontier HD Alaska/Frontier
TV-14 NEW
TV-14 NEW
(CC) HD TV-14-L
BBC America
BET
X-Files HD TV-14
X-Files HD TV-14
X-Files HD TV-14
X-Files HD TV-14
X-Files HD TV-14
(11:35)
(6:25) A Madea Christmas (2013): Madea Tyler Perry's Madea's Big Happy Family (2011)
Martin
(CC): Madea unites her family. HD TV-PG-L
visits a rural town. HD TV-PG-D
Bravo
Vanderpump (CC)
HD TV-14
CMT
CNN
Comedy
Central
Last Man Last Man ★★ Mr. & Mrs. Sm. (2005): Married assassins. HD TV-14-DLSV
OutFront HD NEW
Anderson Cooper
Anderson Cooper
CNN Tonight Live.
(6:50)
(7:25)
Office
Office
Office
Office
Office
Office
Office
Office
HD TV-14 HD TV-14 HD TV-14 HD TV-14 HD TV-14 HD TV-14
CSPAN
CSPAN 2
Dest. America
Discovery
DIY
E!
Fit & Health
Food
(1:17) Public Affairs Events
Landmark Cases (CC) NEW
Politics and Public Policy
Public Affairs
Commun. Steven
(9:05) Gregg
Andrew Keen,
Brad Smith, The
Haunting TV-PG-LV Haunting TV-PG-LV Haunting TV-PG-LV Haunting TV-PG-LV Haunting TV-PG-LV
Fast N' Loud (CC) HD TV-14-DL NEW
Fast N' Loud NEW
Kaufman NEW
(11:01) Fast N' Loud
Maine Cabin TV-G
Maine Cabin TV-G
Maine Cabin TV-G
Maine Cabin TV-G
Maine Cabin TV-G
★★★ Meet/Parents: CIA man cows son-in-law to be. ★★ Meet the Fockers NEW
E! News NEW
Monsters Inside Me Monsters Inside Me Monsters Inside Me Monsters Inside Me Monsters Inside Me
Spring Baking (CC) Spring Baking (CC) Vegas
Kids Baking HD
CakeBoss CakeBoss
Vegas
TV-G
HD TV-G
HD TV-G NEW
NEW
Cakes
Fox Movies
Fox News
FUSE
FX
Hallmark
Home &
Garden
Lincoln
FXM
MacCallum NEW
Malcolm Malcolm
Guardian/Galaxy
F. House F. House
Love or List: A lack
of private space.
Crimson Peak (CC): A woman moves into a mansion. (10:20) Crimson Peak TV-14
Carlson NEW
Hannity HD NEW
Ingraham Angle HD Fox News@Night
Chris
Chris
Chris
Chris
Chris
Chris
Chris
Chris
5th Wave: Teen faces an alien invasion. TV-14-LV
5th Wave (2016) HD TV-14-LV
F. House F. House F. House F. House Middle
Middle
G. Girls
G. Girls
House
House
Flipping Virg. (CC) House
House
House
House
Hunters Hunters HD TV-G NEW
Hunters NEW
Hunters Hunters
History
American Pickers
(CC) HD TV-PG
American Pickers
(CC) HD TV-PG
American (CC) HD
TV-PG NEW
HLN
HSN
ID
Crime & Justice
Monday Night TV-G
Homicide Hunter
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Unmasking a HD
Monday Night TV-G
VF Confidential HD
TV-14 NEW
Forensic Forensic Forensic Forensic
Monday Night TV-G Healthy Cooking
Evil Talks (CC) HD Cold Hearted (CC)
TV-14-V NEW
HD TV-14 NEW
IFC
Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Contagion: A deadly
virus goes airborne.
Lifetime
Lifetime Mov.
MSNBC
MTV
National
Geographic
F. 48 (CC) HD TV-14 F. 48 (CC) HD TV-14 Mary Kills NEW
A Mother's Revenge Double Mommy (2017) (CC) HD TV-14
Hardball Live. HD
All In/Hayes Live.
Maddow NEW
Teen Mom OG
Teen Mom OG
Teen Mom NEW
Wild
National Parks (CC) One Strange Rock (CC) HD
NEW
NEW
HD TV-G NEW
NatGeoWild
NECN
Ovation
OWN
Incredible Dr. Pol
Dr. K's Exotic TV-PG
The Take Business The Take Business
★★ Conan the Barbarian (1982) TV-14
Dateline on OWN
Dateline on ID (CC):
(CC) HD TV-14-V
A dorm-room death.
Oxygen
Paramount
QVC
Science
Sundance
Dateline/Secret
Friends
Friends
Inspired Style Live.
Survivorman TV-PG
(6:00) Pet Sematary
II (1992) TV-14-LV
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
TV One
USA
Resident Evil 4
Faster: A man avenges his brother. TV-14 Skyfall: James Bond defends his boss M.
Championship Central (CC) Live. HD
NCAA Tournament: The national championship. Live. Madness
★★★ Executive Suite (1954) (CC) TV-PG
Steelyard Blues
Golden Boy: A sensitive youth is torn.
Lost Family TV-PG Lost Family TV-PG Long Lost Family: A search by siblings.
Lost Family TV-PG
(6:00) Star Wars/Force (2015) TV-14-LV
NCAA Basketball Tournament (CC) Live. HD
Last O.G.
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre
Bizarre
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre
Bizarre
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
NCAA Basketball Tournament (CC) Live. HD
Jokers
M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Mom
Mom
King/Qu. King/Qu.
Fatal Attraction
Falicia Blakely (2017): A teen mother.
For My Man
For My Man
Modern Modern WWE Monday Night Raw (CC): From Atlanta. Live. HD TV-PG-V (11:05) Ninja vs.
Family
Family
Ninja HD TV-PG
VH-1
WAM
WE
Love & Hip Hop
Legends of Oz
Criminal Minds
Vanderpump (CC)
HD TV-14
Vanderpump (CC)
HD TV-14 NEW
Summer House
Watch
(CC) HD TV-14 NEW NEW
Pawn
NEW
Pawn
Stars
V'pump
★★ Mr. & Mrs. Sm.
CNN Tonight Live.
The Daily Jordan
Show
Klepper
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Forensic Forensic
Benefit Cosmetics
VF Confidential
(CC): Chris Paciello.
UnReal NEW
(11:02) Fir. 48 TV-14
Nanny Seduction: A nanny steals a child.
Last Word Live. HD The 11th Hour Live.
Teen Mom: Young NEW
Teen Mom
One Strange Rock
One Strange Rock
HD TV-PG NEW
(CC) HD TV-PG
Dr. K's Exotic TV-PG Rocky Mountain
necn News 9PM
necn News 10Pm
X Company NEW
Dateline on OWN
Dateline on OWN
(CC) HD TV-14
(CC) HD TV-14
Dr. K's Exotic TV-PG
necn News 11PM
★ Conan/Destroyer
Dateline on ID (CC):
A dorm-room death.
Dateline NEW
In Ice Cold Blood
Snapped TV-PG
It Takes Snapped
Friends
Friends
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Logo by Lori Live.
Isaac Mizrahi Live. Shawn Killinger (CC) Live. HD
Survivorman TV-PG (9:02) Planets and Beyond (CC) HD TV-G Survivorman TV-PG
★★★ The Green Mile (1999) (CC): A death-row inmate has supernatural healing
powers. TV-14-LV
Love/Hip NEW
Teyana
Leave It Love & Hip Hop
Teyana
Leave It
The Chronicles of Narnia (2008) (CC) HD TV-PG
(10:31) ★★ The Wiz (1978) HD
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B13
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Morning snow will leave
a coating to an inch with
higher amounts south of
Mass Pike. Partly sunny
in the afternoon before clouds
increase at night.
WEDNESDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Clouds will limit sunshine as a warm front
brings rain in the afternoon and evening with
rising temperatures through the
overnight hours.
HIGH
41-46
LOW
32-37
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
It will be mild for early
April. It will turn windy
ahead of a cold front
delivering some rain in
the afternoon. Cooler air will
return at night.
HIGH
45-50
LOW
40-45
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
HIGH
45-50
LOW
28-33
HIGH
43-48
LOW
32-37
4
2
2
6 P.M.
A new storm will return
the chance for a bit of
rain. It will otherwise
be mostly cloudy and
breezy. Cooler air will follow for
this weekend.
High pressure will
promote a good deal
of sun, but it will be
cool for early April with
temperatures several degrees
below normal.
HIGH
61-66
LOW
31-36
8
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
1
5
6
8
1
12
3
24
2
0s
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
TUESDAY
TODAY
4
6
12
9
Difficulty Level
4/02
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Tides
TODAY: Snow leaving 1-3 inches across southern New
England this morning will give way to some sunshine for
the afternoon. Partly sunny north.
TOMORROW: Rain will spread back across southern New England in the afternoon. With cold air in
PRESQUE ISLE
places, there can be a wintry mix in the north.
36/17
EXTENDED: Mild air will surge across the
region on Wednesday ahead of a cold front
MILLINOCKET
delivering rain and ushering in much
39/19
cooler air by the night.
BURLINGTON
45/29
MONTPELIER
41/25
MT. WASHINGTON
17/11
LEBANON
48/26
RUTLAND
43/26
Wind
Boston Harbor
N 4-8 kts.
Seas
Temp
1 ft.
43/34
East Cape
1:25
1:39
1:44
1:24
Yesterday
High/low
59/41
Mean
50
Departure from normal +7
Departure for month +7
Departure for year +121
5 p.m. rel. humidity 21%
BAR HARBOR
40/30
PORTLAND 44/31
LACONIA
47/27
MANCHESTER
PORTSMOUTH 44/31
BRATTLEBORO
50/33
50/25
NASHUA 49/31
PITTSFIELD
45/28
BOSTON 44/35
WORCESTER
PROVINCETOWN
SPRINGFIELD
NEW
44/31
51/29 PROVIDENCE
39/35
BEDFORD
44/32
47/34
HYANNIS 40/31
HARTFORD
51/31
NEWPORT
43/36
BRIDGEPORT
OAK BLUFFS NANTUCKET 41/33
41/29
47/36
New England marine forecast
High tides
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
1:32
10.6
7:36
-0.3
A.M. P.M.
1:06
1:06
1:09
1:11
1:15
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
1:32
1:32
1:36
1:36
1:39
1:00 1:25
---12:25
12:50 1:16
Boston’s recent climate
AUGUSTA
43/27
BERLIN
42/18
1:06
11.0
7:17
-0.9
High tides
Old Orchard ME 12:59
Hampton
Beach NH
1:13
Plum Island
1:19
Ipswich
12:58
BANGOR
43/24
NEWPORT
42/23
A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
High tides
A.M. P.M.
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
2:08
2:09
1:20
1:11
Heat
15
15
22
4620
4878
4519
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
0
April readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
59.0
41.0
34.7
76
Normal
high
50
Normal
low
36
20
Wind
Seas
Temp
0
Vineyard
NE 4-8 kts.
1-2 ft.
42/29
-20
Record
low
Yesterday’s low 41°
Martha’s
NE 4-8 kts.
1-3 ft.
40/29
Nantucket
NE 6-12 kts.
2-3 ft.
41/33
Buzzards Bay
NE 4-8 kts.
1 ft.
40/29
Provincetown
N 4-8 kts.
1 ft.
39/34
6:25 a.m.
7:11 p.m.
12:46
9:37 p.m.
March
April
2.5"
2.3
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Visibility
Wind
High/low temperature
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
Dense fog
3/16 of a mile
west at 65 m.p.h.
26/11
7.0”
0.55
T
T 0.05 T
T
T
T
FIRST
Apr. 22
Moon and Jupiter – A. MacRobert
FULL
Apr. 29
The waning gibbous moon is up by 10 p.m. By 11,
look below it (by less than a fist at arm’s length) for
Jupiter. By dawn on Monday they hang together in
the southwest.
0.03 0.01
T 0.09
0.01 0.07
You will deal well with others, as
long as you can keep the conversations moving. You express intensity, drive, and insight when
approaching any issue. You could
be overly serious at times. You
might opt to head in your own direction. Tonight: Be with a favorite person.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
You might need to rethink a recent episode involving an important relationship or interaction. A
partner seems to be much more
serious than you realize. Make an
adjustment, if needed. A friend
could come up with an inspired
idea. Try it; it could work. Tonight: Be nice.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Honor a need to do something
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
ºIn 1792, Congress passed
the Coinage Act, which authorized establishment of the US
Mint.
ºIn 1800, Ludwig van
Beethoven premiered his Symphony No. 1 in C Major, Op.
21, in Vienna.
ºIn 1865, Confederate President Jefferson Davis and most
of his Cabinet fled the Confederate capital of Richmond, Va.,
March
0.01 0.01 0.08
Yesterday
Precip days in April
0.5"
0.0"
April
24 Hr. Precipitation
0.00”
0
East
♠ 873
♥A984
♦ Q 10 9 4
♣65
South
♠ AJ5
♥762
♦ AK83
♣KQ4
South
1 NT
2♥
3 NT
West
North
Pass
2♦
Pass
2 NT
All Pass
Opening lead — ♣
East
Pass
Pass
J
“You still don’t believe me, child,” the Queen of Hearts
scolded Alice.
“My cousin is delusional,” the Queen of Diamonds
whispered. “She thinks she’s the most potent card in
Wonderland, and no ace or king dares capture her.”
“I heard that!” the Queen of Hearts roared. “Deal the
cards.”
As declarer at 3NT, Alice won the first club with the king
and led a heart. West, the Dormouse, played the queen,
and Alice was about to cover with dummy’s king when she
sensed the Queen of Hearts’ glare. So Alice played low from
dummy. She won the next club in her hand, led a second
heart to force out East’s ace and had nine tricks.
“See,” the Queen of Hearts gloated. “If you put up the
king on the first heart, East ducks and ducks again if you
come to your hand and lead a second heart to the 10. You
get only two heart tricks and go down.”
In fact, Alice also succeeds by capturing the queen of
hearts with the king, then leading a low heart. But why
upset Her Majesty?
1.0"
0.71
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1
NEW
Apr. 15
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
Today is Monday, April 2, the
92nd day of 2018. There are
273 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Actress Sharon
Acker is 83. Actress Linda
Hunt is 73. Singer Emmylou
Harris is 71. Social critic and
author Camille Paglia is 71.
The Cars drummer Dave Robinson is 69. Actor Christopher
Meloni is 57. Actor Michael
Fassbender is 41.
1.5"
1.15
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday,
April 2, 2018:
This year you often seem resistant
to new ideas and experiences. As a
result, you tend to say “no’’ to new
adventures. Don't worry; this
phase is temporary. You will put a
lot of time and energy into improving communication. If you
are single, you suddenly could
meet someone without trying.
The person you meet after summer will hold the strongest potential for an excellent relationship. If
you are attached, you and your
partner will try to come to terms
with new ideas and styles. You
both have strong ideas. SCORPIO
emphasizes the importance of
comfort on all levels.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
2.0"
Moon phases
LAST
Apr. 8
13
1923
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
1918
Record
high
80
40
Cod Canal
Almanac
Norm.
50.3
35.8
33.1
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 59°
60
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
West
♠KQ96
♥Q
♦J52
♣ J 10 9 7 3
2:13 2:47
1:38 2:00
10:0810:30
10:0110:23
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Normal Temperatures
100
2:42
2:40
1:46
1:38
South dealer — Both sides vulnerable
North
♠ 10 4 2
♥ K J 10 5 3
♦ 76
♣A82
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
0.00”
Norm. month to date 0.13”
Year to date
13.76”
Norm. year to date 11.06”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ 10 4 2 ♥ K J 10 5 3 ♦ 7 6 ♣ A
8 2. Your partner opens one diamond, you respond one
heart, he bids one spade and you try 1NT. Partner next bids
two hearts. What do you say?
ANSWER: Your partner has a good hand. He wouldn’t have
bid a third time with a minimum. If he held A 9 6 5, A 6 4,
K 10 4 2, Q 3, he would have no reason to think a contract
of two hearts would be better than 1NT. Bid four hearts.
very different. Someone you care
about has been on your case. Do
your best to compensate, but expect to try a new approach or
play the waiting game. Tonight:
Think through a hassle until the
wee hours.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Give way to another type of
thinking. Understand that others
might feel more restricted than
you do, which prevents them
from finding a viable solution.
Consider the possibilities. Be positive when dealing with a challenging child or friend. Tonight:
Work on your to-do list.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Keep your eye on investments involving real estate. Use care with
your finances in general. How
you deal with others could
change, as you might need them
to work with you. Together, you
are even more powerful. Tonight:
Head home, as you are most relaxed there.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You might be inspired by a conversation with an intensely emotional friend. Sometimes you get
so frustrated by what you hear
that you want to pull back. Right
now, your frustration lies in trying to help this person settle in.
Tonight: Visit with friends at a favorite hangout.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Be aware of the costs of continuing as you have been. You are a
sign that loves the good life.
Overindulging seems to come
naturally. You will need to muster
up as much restraint as possible.
Your word choice will be particularly important. Tonight: Meet up
with a friend.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You have experienced an easing
up of spending. More funds seem
available, which only adds to
your security. Use this period to
work through a hassle that has
gone on too long. Do not hesitate
to put terms on a difficult and/or
changing situation. Tonight: Let
it all hang out.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Be aware of what is happening
with a close loved one who is
choosing to stay mum. Initiate a
long-overdue conversation with
this person. How you approach a
personal matter could change as
the result of a recent discovery.
Tonight: Take some much-needed
personal time.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
News comes to you through a
conversation that could encourage you to head in a certain direction. Use your sixth sense to determine which way would be best
to go. Sometimes you need to
make yourself a higher priority.
Today is a good example. Tonight: Dinner for two.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
A higher-up demands a lot of attention and wants to proceed in a
certain manner. The smart move
is to go along with this person's
ideas. If they work, great; if not,
your input will be appreciated.
Letting someone have some
space can be powerful. Tonight:
Accept an offer.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
You know what is needed, but
you might not know the best way
to proceed. Others could test your
patience. Allow your creativity to
soar. You'll find answers, even if a
group of friends seems a bit somber and uncreative. Tonight: If
you could do anything, what
would that be?
Jacqueline Bigar is at www.jacquelinebigar.com. (c) 2018 by
King Features Syndicate Inc.
as Union forces advanced.
ºIn 1917, President Woodrow
Wilson asked Congress to declare war against Germany,
saying, ‘‘The world must be
made safe for democracy.’’
(Congress declared war four
days later.)
ºIn 1932, aviator Charles A.
Lindbergh and John F. Condon went to a cemetery in The
Bronx, New York, where Condon turned over $50,000 to a
man in exchange for Lindbergh’s kidnapped son. The
child, who was not returned,
was found dead the following
month.
ºIn 1956, the soap operas ‘‘As
the World Turns’’ and ‘‘The
Edge of Night’’ premiered on
CBS-TV.
ºIn 1968, ‘‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’’ the groundbreaking science-fiction film epic produced and directed by Stanley
Kubrick and starring Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood, had
its world premiere in Washington, D.C.
ºIn 1982, several thousand
troops from Argentina seized
the disputed Falkland Islands,
located in the south Atlantic,
from Britain. (Britain seized
the islands back the following
June.)
ºIn 1986, four American passengers, including an 8month-old girl, her mother
and grandmother, were killed
when a terrorist bomb exploded aboard a TWA jetliner en
route from Rome to Athens.
ºIn 1992, mob boss John Got-
ti was convicted in New York
of murder and racketeering;
he was later sentenced to life,
and died in prison.
ºIn 2005, Pope John Paul II
died in his Vatican apartment
at age 84.
ºIn 2013, North Korea said it
would restart its long-shuttered plutonium reactor and
increase production of nuclear
weapons material in what outsiders saw as its latest attempt
to extract US concessions by
raising fears of war.
B14
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
“This is your captain speaking. Is there a clown on
board? We’re feeling a little sad in the cockpit.”
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
2
4
1
6
7
8
9
5
3
9
6
3
5
1
2
7
4
8
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
7
5
8
4
9
3
2
6
1
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
4
3
5
9
2
6
1
8
7
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
1
2
6
8
4
7
5
3
9
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
8
9
7
1
3
5
4
2
6
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
6
1
4
2
8
9
3
7
5
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
5
7
9
3
6
4
8
1
2
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
3
8
2
7
5
1
6
9
4
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B15
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
ZIPPY “Clothes-Cropped” by Bill Griffith
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
A plugger knows a good marriage takes some
sacrifice.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CONGER UP BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Weakly hit single
6 Reef material
11 Past word
14 Insect stage
15 Singing
production
16 Shedlike
housing
17 What to weather
19 Poetic “before”
20 Return into
custody
21 10/31 option
23 Mythical flying
horse
26 Guzzles
27 Puts into
government
28 Levelheadedness
30 Horn sound
31 Type of
knowledge
32 Turkish VIP
35 Mar. follower
36 Braced oneself
38 Howard or
Darling
39 Stand on it
40 “It’s been ___
good run”
41 Champagne
variety
42 Gourmands
44 Young
codfishes
46 Advance showing,
simply
48 Like dreamy
looks
49 It helps draw
the line
50 Like a wincer’s
expression
52 Asian tie
53 What passion is
58 “Matrix” hero
59 Get to yes
60 Mombasa
locale
61 Extreme suffix
62 Formal close
63 Matches audio
and video
DOWN
1 Diner specialty
2 “Well, ___-di-dah”
3 Pitchblende,
for one
4 Wrongly take
center stage?
5 U-turn from
ruddiest
6 Unconscious
states
7 Up for grabs
8 Split apart
9 Garfunkel or
Blakey
10 Arguer’s goal
11 Gardener’s
pushover?
12 Of the ear
13 Editor’s marks
18 Big birds, mate
22 Mug edge
23 Flower part
24 Not tarry to
marry
25 “The Lifted Veil”
author
26 Blackthorn’s
fruit
28 Places here and
there?
29 Tablet kin
31 Potential jury
member
33 Dutch cheese
34 Itching to go
36 Weekend part
37 Apple or lemon
41 Former
“60 Minutes”
reporter Ed
43 Small street kin?
44 Mentally
stable
45 Small streams
46 Not supine
47 Sticks figures?
48 Flutes in
marches
50 Land of Lima
51 Imitator
54 Trip taken
in vain?
55 Grog house
56 U.S. capital, once
57 ’70s shortage item
9
3
4
8
6 8
1 9
4 7
3 5
6
1 8 9
1
6
5 7 6
8
5
9
8 6
7 2
7 1
5 6
T h e
B16
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Vilma Uribe of Roslindale (left) and Laura Gaudette
of Brighton.
From left: Ali Sung of West Newton, Kim Tosi and daughter Carmen of Wellesley, and Nirva Patel of Weston.
For The Second Step, a night to celebrate successes
Over 300 guests attended The Second Step’s Celebrating Success gala last week at the Newton Marriott.
The event brought together individuals and businesses
from Greater Boston to support survivors of domestic
violence. Former WBZ-TV arts and entertainment critic
Joyce Kulhawik was the evening’s honoree. Besides a
cocktail reception, auction, and dinner, the gala
Wednesday night featured the premiere of the documentary play “No More Secrets, Survivor Voices From
The Second Step.” The play, curated by playwright/director Lisa Rafferty, is based on the book “No More
Secrets: Healing From Domestic Violence,” written by
women in a healing group at The Second Step to offer
hope to survivors, families, and communities. The Second Step is a local organization that supports people
who have experienced domestic violence.
Ann Munson and daughter Joanna Munson Palomba
of Watertown.
PHOTOS BY BILL BRETT FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
From left: The Second Step’s executive director, Matthew Swoveland,
with honored guest Joyce Kulhawik, former WBZ-TV arts and
entertainment critic, and her husband, Andrew Cohen.
Read local celebrity news at www.bostonglobe.com/names.
Names can be reached at names@globe.com or at
617-929-8253.
From left: David Rand of Jamaica Plain, Jeff Simes of Hopkinton, and Jody Simes
of Newton.
MORE CELEBRITY NEWS
Spielberg tops box office
Steven Spielberg has found his
way back to the top of the box office
with the action-adventure ‘‘Ready
Player One,’’ while Tyler Perry has
scored again with ‘‘Acrimony.’’
Studio estimates on Sunday said
Spielberg’s virtual reality-focused film
earned a solid $53.2 million since
opening Wednesday night, with $41.2
million of that coming from the threeday weekend.
Not adjusted for inflation, it’s Spielberg’s best opening in a decade, following ‘‘Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull,’’ which
launched with $100.1 million in 2008.
Based on Ernest Cline’s popular novel
and chalk full of references to 1980s
pop culture, including some nods to
Spielberg’s own films, ‘‘Ready Player
Sorry
One’’ is a return to the popcorn filmmaking that he became known for.
‘‘Tyler Perry’s Acrimony’’ took second place. Driven by an overwhelmingly female audience, the film starring Taraji P. Henson grossed $17.1
million over the weekend, followed by
‘‘Black Panther’’ in third with $11.3
million. With $650.7 million in domestic grosses, ‘‘Black Panther’’ is
poised to pass ‘‘Jurassic World’’ ($652
million) to become the fourth highest
domestic release of all time. (AP)
Schwarzenegger: I’m back
Arnold Schwarzenegger was in
good spirits as he continues to recover
from heart surgery in a Los Angeles
hospital.
The 70-year-old ‘‘Terminator’’ actor
and former California governor underwent a scheduled procedure to replace
a valve on Thursday. Spokesman Dan­
iel Ketchell said he played with one of
his old action-movie catchphrases
when he regained consciousness and
Chuck Diamond (left) and Marc Zwetchkenbaum,
both of Newton.
From left: Meagan King of Newton, Danielle Paulson of Marlborough, and
Missy Woodward of Newton.
announced, ‘‘I'm back.’’ Ketchell said
Schwarzenegger ‘‘continues to be doing very well, in good spirits, and recovering.’’
The pulmonic valve was installed
in 1997 for a congenital heart defect
and had to be replaced. (AP)
Royal Easter has no Harry
Queen Elizabeth II, Prince William
and his wife, Kate, and other senior
British royals celebrated an Easter
church service on Sunday at the chapel where Prince Harry and American
Meghan Markle will get married in
May. Harry and Markle did not attend
the service at St. George’s Chapel in
Windsor, England. Palace officials said
their weekend plans were private.
Prince Philip, the queen’s husband,
also did not attend. The 96-year-old
has retired from public duties. William and Kate arrived without their
children, Prince George and Princess
Charlotte. Kate is expecting the couple’s third child later this month. (AP)
TOLGA AKMEN /WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES
Children greet Queen Elizabeth II with flowers after the Easter service
on Sunday at Windsor Castle’s St. George’s Chapel. Prince William,
Princess Kate, and the Dean of Windsor, David Conner, look on.
‘After what these kids went through, I'm deeply ashamed.’ FRANK STALLONE, actor, brother of Sylvester Stallone,
apologizing for a Saturday tweet attacking teenager David Hogg, who has become a strong voice for gun control after the attack at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Baseball: Red Sox-Marlins, 7:10 p.m., NESN
NCAA basketball final: Michigan-Villanova, 9:20 p.m., TBS
Listings, C7
Sports
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E M O NDAY, A P R I L 2 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
Red Sox dig deep to top Rays
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
Red Sox 2 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.
— The Red Sox on SunRays
1 day started a pitcher
the y purchas ed from a Me xic an
League team for $30,000.
He was followed to the mound by a
29-year-old making his major league
debut after 10 long seasons in the minors with five organizations.
Then came the lefthanded reliever
who until the other day had never
pitched in a game above Double A.
At the end, the closer was the pitcher who allowed four runs on Thursday
and had never before recorded a save
in the majors.
Manager Alex Cora wasn’t joking in
spring training when he said it would
take the entire roster for the team to
accomplish its goals. That’s what made
a 2-1 victory against the Rays such a
satisfying one for the Sox.
Hector Velazquez, Marcus Walden,
and Bobby Poyner pitched 7‚ strong
innings. Then Cora went to Matt
Barnes and Joe Kelly to secure the
game. It left the Red Sox 3-1 on the
season.
Velazquez allowed one run on five
hits over 5„ innings, continuing what
has been outstanding starting pitching
to open the season. Chris Sale, David
Price, Rick Porcello, and Velazquez allowed two earned runs over 24 innings
and struck out 23. That’s an 0.75
earned run average.
For the first time in franchise history the first four starters in a season
gave up no more than one run.
Velazquez was hit hard early in
spring training but pitched well in his
final two games to earn a spot in the
rotation.
“I went into them with the mentality that it was a real game and I was getting myself ready to pitch in the big
leagues,” Velazquez said via a translator.
Velazquez made only one real mistake, a first-pitch fastball to Brad Miller leading off the second inning that
was up and over the plate. Miller lined
it over the fence in right-center.
The Rays otherwise had four sinRED SOX, Page C4
CHRIS O’MEARA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mookie Betts gets a hand from Xander Bogaerts (left) after scoring the
Red Sox’ first run in the fifth inning on J.D. Martinez’s single Sunday.
Pointed response
Christopher L.
Gasper
He’s a
Michigan
Fab Find
ROB CARR/GETTY IMAGES
The Bruins’ Anton Khudobin is unable to slide back in time to stop Claude Giroux from flipping home a backhander in overtime Sunday.
Bergeron caps late surge with tying goal, but Bruins lose to Flyers in OT
By Fluto Shinzawa
GLOBE STAFF
Flyers 4 PHILADELPHIA — The
point the Bruins recordBruins 3 ed in the 4-3 overtime
loss to the Flyers on Sunday didn’t really matter.
The way they grabbed it did.
The Bruins were 3.8 seconds away
from a legless 3-2 loss to the Flyers at
Wells Fargo Center. Patrice Bergeron
made sure that didn’t happen. During
six-on-five play, after his teammates
chased down the puck like it was a
brick of gold, Bergeron winged the
game-tying wrister through Petr
Mrazek.
For the Bruins, it was nice that the
overtime loss gave them a 2-point
cushion over Tampa Bay for the Eastern Conference lead. But it was even
nicer that the point gave them the
feather in the cap they deserved for
their last-second frenzy.
“We all believed that we could get
it done,” said Zdeno Chara, who
watched his six teammates fight for
the tying goal. “Very proud of the way
we battled and got that extra point
from that situation toward the end.
It’s a battle. We kept the puck in and
got rewarded. Everybody was pretty
happy about that.”
As he watched his players celebrate
on the ice, coach Bruce Cassidy could
not help but stroll up and down the
bench with a grin on his face. Among
all the attributes Cassidy has instilled
in his charges, his insistence on getting the next goal has gone viral
throughout his lineup.
“It’s been fairly typical of our
group,” Cassidy said. “We’ve done it
before where we’ve played from behind and been able to come back and
get points out of the game. Our guys
know they’re capable of it. We never
BRUINS, Page C2
CONFERENCE RACE
Bruins
Lightning
POINTS
110
POINTS
108
RECORD
49-17-12
RECORD
52-23-4
GAMES LEFT
4 (2 home, 2 away)
GAMES LEFT
3 (2 home, 1 away)
SAN ANTONIO —
Michigan basketball
once featured the
Fab Five. The most
celebrated collection of freshmen in
college basketball
history, they took
Michigan to backto-back Final Fours* (NCAA violations vacated those). Now, the Wolverines’ latest Final Four team features the Fab Find, fifth-year senior
forward Duncan Robinson, who
went from playing Division 3 hoops
for Williams College to one win away
from college basketball’s most coveted crown.
The New Castle, N.H.-bred baller
has traveled an anfractuous path to
the Final Four and the final game of
the 2018 NCAA Tournament, Monday’s night’s national title tilt between Michigan and Villanova at the
Alamodome. His road from junior
benchwarmer at The Governor’s
Academy in Byfield to star at Phillips
Exeter (N.H.) Academy to freshman
sensation for a Williams team that
was five seconds away from winning
a national title in 2014 to Michigan
Man is storybook stuff.
Mr. Robinson is the first player to
play in both the Division 3 and Division 1 Final Fours. He is believed to
be the first Division 3 player to transfer to a Division 1 school and receive
a full scholarship. The 6-foot-8-inch
sharpshooter is a Wolverines captain
and leads the team in 3-pointers
with 78.
How does a player who wasn’t recruited by Boston College, Boston
University, Northeastern, UMass, the
GASPER, Page C6
Final meeting: Bruins at Tampa Bay, Tuesday
Notre Dame wins title
with last­second shot
By Doug Feinburg
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Notre Dame 61 COLUMBUS,
Ohio — Arike
Mississippi St. 58 Ogunbowale
RON SCHWANE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Notre Dame players gather around the NCAA women’s basketball
championship trophy to celebrate the second title in school history.
hit the shot of her life — again.
Ogunbowale floated in a 3-pointer
from the corner with 0.1 seconds left,
lifting Notre Dame to its second women’s basketball title with a thrilling 6158 comeback victory over Mississippi
State in the NCAA championship
game on Sunday night.
It was the second straight game
that the junior guard hit a shot in the
final second to carry the Irish.
Her jumper with one second remaining in overtime knocked off previously unbeaten UConn in the semi-
finals Friday.
With this game tied, Ogunbowale
took the inbounds pass from Jackie
Young, dribbled twice toward the corner and, closely guarded, lofted home
an off-balance 3 in front of the Notre
Dame bench. Close to the same spot
on the court where she took down the
Huskies, too.
‘‘It just felt right,’’ said Ogunbowale, who scored 16 of her 18 points in
the second half. ‘‘I practice late-game
all the time. I just ran to Jackie and
said, ‘Throw it to me, throw it to me.’ ’’
Ogunbowale earned most outstanding player honors for the tournament.
All the Irish players could celeNOTRE DAME, Page C6
RONALD MARTINEZ/GETTY IMAGES
Duncan Robinson will try to lead
Michigan to the Division 1 title.
I N S I DE
Gronk leans to return?
ESPN report: Patriots star wants to
keep playing with Brady. C4
Ohtani wins in debut
He pitches six strong innings to
beat A’s in first start for Angels. C5
Poulter was masterful
He edges Hossler in Houston playoff to earn final spot at Augusta. C7
Sports
C2
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
Krug feeling awful about Carlo’s leg injury
By Fluto Shinzawa
for sure.”
The Bruins had immediate
reinforcements on hand Sunday. Chara returned against the
Flyers after missing the previous nine games because of an
upper-body injury. Nick Holden
occupied Chara’s right flank.
Adam McQuaid replaced Carlo
as Krug’s partner.
“You get pretty into it quite
early on,” said Chara (five shots
in 21:14 of ice time). “You’ve
got to keep moving your feet
and the puck. Those things
kind of come back quite quickly. You don’t have much time to
sit back and try to think about
what it was like. That’s also
nice.”
GLOBE STAFF
Torey Krug feels terrible for
Brandon Carlo.
This season, Krug and Carlo
have spent
BRUINS
more five-onNOTEBOOK five minutes
together than
any other Black-and-Gold tandem besides Zdeno Chara and
Charlie McAvoy. As much time
as they’ve played together this
year, they’ve shared just as
much misery off the ice.
Both defensemen missed
last year’s playoffs. Krug hobbled off in Game No. 81 after
spraining his knee against Ottawa. One game later, in the
regular-season finale, Alex
Ovechkin planted Carlo’s head
into the TD Garden glass, rendering him unfit for postseason
play because of a concussion.
So the news that Carlo’s
playoffs are in doubt again hit
Krug below the belt.
“I feel awful,” Krug said. “I
know specifically from talking
to him that it’s the one thing
he’s been looking forward to.
He went through it last year as
well, missing the time. This
year, he was excited for it. You
feel awful. It’s a tough break.
But I know he’s got a lot of support and a lot of great people
around him, and he’ll get
through a tough time.”
Carlo was injured in the
third period of Saturday’s 5-1
rout of the Panthers. As he
tried to kick a puck up the wall,
Nash gets repairs
ROB CARR/GETTY IMAGES
The Flyers gather behind goalie Anton Khudobin to celebrate Claude Giroux’s first goal.
Carlo lost his footing. As he
fell, the toe of the 208-pound
defenseman’s left blade dug into the ice. The torque of Carlo’s
fall bent the lower part of his
left leg before the tip of his
skate popped free. Trainer Don
DelNegro promptly called for a
stretcher.
As of Sunday morning,
swelling in Carlo’s leg kept the
Bruins from issuing a clear diagnosis on his condition and
NHL
Div.
A
A
A
GP
78
79
79
Nashville ......................1
Tampa Bay ..................0
W L OL
49 17 12
52 23 4
47 25 7
Pts. ROW
110
46
108
46
101
40
GF
261
283
267
GA
201
228
226
METROPOLITAN Div. GP W L OL
d­Washington
M 79 47 25 7
p­Pittsburgh
M 80 45 29 6
Columbus
M 79 44 29 6
Pts. ROW
101
44
96
43
94
38
GF
247
263
231
GA
230
246
217
WILD CARD
Philadelphia
New Jersey
Pts. ROW
94
38
93
37
GF
238
238
GA
235
236
36
32
31
29
25
26
25
24
232
220
228
253
207
199
210
187
236
247
256
288
242
252
274
260
Div. GP W L OL
M 79 40 25 14
M 79 42 28 9
Florida
Carolina
NY Rangers
NY Islanders
Detroit
Montreal
Ottawa
Buffalo
A
M
M
M
A
A
A
A
77
79
79
79
79
79
78
78
39
35
34
32
30
28
27
25
30
33
36
37
38
39
40
41
8
11
9
10
11
12
11
12
86
81
77
74
71
68
65
62
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
p­Nashville
p­Winnipeg
Minnesota
Div.
C
C
C
GP
79
78
78
W L OL
51 17 11
48 20 10
43 25 10
Pts. ROW
113
45
106
44
96
40
GF
258
260
239
GA
204
207
221
PACIFIC
d­Vegas
San Jose
Los Angeles
Div.
P
P
P
GP
79
79
79
W L OL
50 22 7
44 25 10
43 28 8
Pts. ROW
107
47
98
39
94
41
GF
263
243
229
GA
213
217
194
WILD CARD
*Anaheim
St. Louis
Div. GP W L OL
P 78 40 25 13
C 78 43 29 6
Pts. ROW
93
36
92
40
GF
220
215
GA
209
208
246
224
209
223
227
208
201
224
216
241
245
255
253
248
*Colorado
Dallas
Calgary
Chicago
Edmonton
Vancouver
Arizona
C
C
P
C
P
P
P
78
79
79
79
79
79
79
42
40
36
32
34
30
28
28 8
31 8
33 10
37 10
39 6
40 9
40 11
92
88
82
74
74
69
67
40
36
34
31
30
30
26
* — Not including late game; ROW — Regulation plus overtime wins
d — Clinched division
p — Clinched playoff berth
THE PLAYOFF FORMAT
Eight teams in each conference qualify. The top three teams from
each division comprise the first six spots; the two remaining teams
with the most points, regardless of division, earn the wild card spots.
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
At Philadelphia 4 BOSTON 3 (OT)
Washington 3
Nashville 4
Colorado
at Tampa Bay 1
New Jersey 2
at Pittsburgh 1
at Anaheim
at Montreal 1
MONDAY’S GAMES
Buffalo at Toronto
7
Edmonton at Minnesota
Carolina at Florida
7:30
Washington at St. Louis
8
Winnipeg at Ottawa
7:30
Colorado at Los Angeles
10:30
8
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
At BOSTON 5
Florida 1
At Pittsburgh 5
At Detroit 2
Ottawa 0
Buffalo 7
Montreal 2
at Nashville 4
At Vancouver 5 Columbus 4 (OT)
At Dallas 4
Winnipeg 3
at Toronto 1
At Arizona 6
St. Louis 0
NY Islanders 3
At Calgary 3
Edmonton 2
At New Jersey 4
NY Rangers 2
at Carolina 1
At Vegas 3
defensemen — to watch a
game. So yes, I think the whole
group felt bad for him watching him go off the ice on a
stretcher.
“Let’s face it. You go off on a
stretcher, it’s probably not
good news. We’re holding out
hope it’s not as bad as it
looked. But right now, it’s disappointing for him. He’s a wellliked guy on this team and
done a lot. That’s disheartening
McAvoy getting close
McAvoy missed his 15th
straight game. The defenseman
Fluto Shinzawa can be reached
at fshinzawa@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeFluto.
PREDATORS 4, LIGHTNING 1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
p­BOSTON
p­Tampa Bay
p­Toronto
recovery requirements. If Carlo
is out long term, he has his
boss’s sympathy.
“I don’t want to speculate
that he’ll miss,” coach Bruce
Cassidy said of the playoffs.
“But if he does, it [stinks], honestly, for a guy that’s played almost every regular-season
game. The only game he
missed this year, he was a
healthy [scratch]. We put him
up top — we had eight healthy
Riley Nash required 40-plus
stitches in and around his right
ear, according to Cassidy. Nash
was hit by a Krug shot Saturday.
“Hopefully there’s no more
damage than that,” Cassidy
said. “Right now, he would
have a tough time getting his
helmet on his head.”
Cassidy said there’s a
chance Nash could rejoin the
Bruins for one or both of the
next two stops (Tampa on
Tuesday, Florida on Thursday).
David Backes replaced Nash as
the No. 3 center between Dan­
ton Heinen and Brian Gionta.
skated on his own Sunday
morning under the watch of
skills coach Kim Brandvold.
Cassidy anticipated McAvoy
will be available Tuesday
against the Lightning . . . David
Krejci missed at least one shift
Saturday after taking a Mac­
Kenzie Weegar shot off the inside of his right foot. Krejci was
feeling better a day later. The
veteran centered Jake DeBrusk
and Ryan Donato for the second straight game . . . David
Pastrnak recorded a game-high
seven shots on net. Pastrnak
had some help on his powerplay goal, which caromed off
Andrew MacDonald and past
Petr Mrazek at 6:54 of the
third . . . Noel Acciari turned
heads with his ninth goal. The
grinding forward received a
pass from Backes and hummed
a snap shot over Mrazek and
under the crossbar at 14:25 of
the second to get the Bruins on
the scoreboard. Acciari saw
some shifts at right wing on the
third line when Cassidy
trimmed Gionta’s ice time . . .
Tommy Wingels didn’t play at
all in the third period or overtime. Wingels played a gamelow 6:24 . . . Brad Marchand
was named Second Star of the
Month for March. The left
wing scored 10 goals and 16 assists in 15 games.
Minnesota 1
San Jose 2
1
1
2 —
0 —
4
1
First period — 1. Nashville, Johansen
14 (Forsberg), 7:50. Penalties — Irwin,
Nsh (hi stick), 3:06. Hedman, TB (hold­
ing), 3:33. Hartman, Nsh (tripping),
12:05.
Second period — 2. Nashville, Fors­
berg 22 (Subban, Saros), 2:46 (pp). 3.
Tampa Bay, Palat 10 (Stralman), 7:32.
Penalties — Palat, TB (interference),
0:47. Fiala, Nsh (hooking), 12:36. Bitet­
to, Nsh (holding), 15:57. CSmith, Nsh
(delay of game), 19:35.
Third period — 4. Nashville, Forsberg
23, 6:24. 5. Nashville, CSmith 23 (Ek­
holm, Subban), 9:29. Penalties — None.
Shots on goal — Nashville 7­6­12 —
25. Tampa Bay 12­12­6 — 30.
Power plays — Nashville 1­2; Tampa
Bay 0­5.
Goalies — Nashville, Saros 10­5­7 (30
shots­29 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevs­
kiy 42­17­3 (25 shots­21 saves).
Referees — Garrett Rank, Dean Mor­
ton. Linesmen — Tony Sericolo, Kory
Nagy.
A — 19,092 (19,092). T — 2:24.
DEVILS 2, CANADIENS 1
New Jersey..................0
Montreal ......................1
0
0
2 —
0 —
2
1
First period — 1. Montreal, Carr 5
(Lehkonen, Reilly), 19:51 (pp). Penal­
ties — Reilly, Mon (delay of game),
5:38. Kinkaid, NJ, served by Wood (trip­
ping), 17:58. , NJ, served by Maroon
(delay of game), 19:51.
Second period — None. Penalties —
Deslauriers, Mon (roughing), 7:24.
Benn, Mon (holding), 17:21.
Third period — 2. New Jersey, Hischi­
er 19 (Vatanen, Palmieri), 0:26. 3. New
Jersey, Hall 37 (Zajac), 15:53. Penalties
— Alzner, Mon (hi stick), 1:16. , NJ,
served by Hall (too many men on ice),
13:45. Lovejoy, NJ (cross check), 14:53.
Deslauriers, Mon (slashing), 17:34.
Shots on goal — New Jersey 8­10­14
— 32. Montreal 7­8­11 — 26.
Power plays — New Jersey 0­5; Mon­
treal 1­4.
Goalies — New Jersey, Kinkaid 24­
10­3 (26 shots­25 saves). Montreal,
Price 16­25­6 (32 shots­30 saves).
Referees — Francois St.Laurent,
Brad Watson. Linesmen — Michel
Cormier, Trent Knorr.
A — 21,302 (21,288). T — 2:34.
CAPITALS 3, PENGUINS 1
Washington.................1
Pittsburgh....................0
1
0
1 —
1 —
ROB CARR/GETTY IMAGES
3
1
First period — 1. Washington, Oshie
18 (Burakovsky, JCarlson), 6:25. Penal­
ties — Stephenson, Was (hooking),
6:47. Sheary, Pit (hooking), 11:45.
Second period — 2. Washington, Or­
lov 10 (Kuznetsov), 13:46. Penalties —
Hagelin, Pit (tripping), 1:10. , Was,
served by Connolly (too many men on
ice), 5:57. Niskanen, Was (delay of
game), 6:37. Wilson, Was (tripping),
11:38. Smith­Pelly, Was (roughing),
12:50. Hornqvist, Pit (slashing), 12:50.
Ovechkin, Was (slashing), 15:08. As­
ton­Reese, Pit (hooking), 18:17.
Third period — 3. Washington, Wil­
son 14 (Niskanen), 0:23. 4. Pittsburgh,
Hornqvist 27 (Malkin, Hagelin), 16:15.
Penalties — Hornqvist, Pit (slashing),
17:39. Malkin, Pit, served by Kessel
(game misconduct), 18:59. Malkin, Pit
(roughing), 18:59. Oshie, Was (rough­
ing), 18:59. Malkin, Pit, served by Kes­
sel (interference), 18:59.
Shots on goal — Washington 13­11­
10 — 34. Pittsburgh 11­15­11 — 37.
Power plays — Washington 0­5;
Pittsburgh 0­5.
Goalies — Washington, Grubauer 15­
9­3 (37 shots­36 saves). Pittsburgh,
Murray 26­16­3 (34 shots­31 saves).
Referees — Brad Meier, Brian Poch­
mara. Linesmen — Ryan Daisy, Steve
Miller.
A — 18,639 (18,387). T — 2:39.
JASON BEHNKEN.ASSOCIATED PRESS
LIGHTNING LOSE — Ryan Johansen watches his shot get past
Andrei Vasilevskiy during Nashville’s 4-1 win Sunday. Tampa Bay
wasted a chance to tie the Bruins atop the Eastern Conference.
The Bruins’ Brian Gionta chases after the puck with the Flyers’ Brandon Manning in pursuit in the first period.
Bruins’ late goal salvages a point
uBRUINS
Continued from Page C1
quit on the puck at the end.
“Looking back, I’m sure they’d rather have gotten a good, strong clear. But
we stayed with it, made a play, and
were able to get one by him.”
Wayne Simmonds was in good position to corral Jori Lehtera’s chip off the
wall, carry the puck out of the zone,
and put the result on ice. But just before Simmonds exited the zone, David
Krejci raced over to seal off his approach. Once Krejci forced Simmonds
to cough up the puck, David Pastrnak
joined the fracas and started to get it
going the other way.
David Backes gained control at the
left circle and spotted Brad Marchand
in front. Brandon Manning swiped
away Backes’s backhand pass. But the
puck landed on Bergeron’s stick. The
center didn’t miss, burying his 30th
strike at a most timely moment.
“Just hounded the puck,” Marchand
said of the final surge. “Forced a couple
turnovers at the end. That was the biggest thing. We didn’t have a ton of control. But we continued to stay on it and
try to force them to make plays. Turned
a couple pucks over, and it ended up in
the net.”
When the playoffs start, the Bruins
hope they will not have to rally regularly. Like all teams, they prefer to play
with a lead. But the relentlessness they
showed on the tying goal is an attitude
they can carry into the postseason. It
would be foolish to believe they will
never face a come-from-behind moment. Rallies like Sunday’s serve as
Flyers 4, Bruins 3
At Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia
FIRST PERIOD
Philadelphia 1, Boston 0 — Giroux 28 (Konecny, Provorov)
9:38
No penalties
SECOND PERIOD
Philadelphia 2, Boston 0 — Konecny 24 (Provorov) 0:25
Penalty — Philadelphia, Sanheim (interference) 2:01
Penalty — Boston, Krug (slashing) 9:13
Philadelphia 2, Boston 1 — Acciari 9 (Backes, Heinen) 14:25
Penalty — Philadelphia, Filppula (tripping) 17:26
Penalty — Boston, Marchand (cross check) 19:07
THIRD PERIOD
Philadelphia 3, Boston 1 — Patrick 11 (Lindblom, Voracek)
5:31
Penalty — Philadelphia, Lindblom (hooking) 5:59
Philadelphia 3, Boston 2 — Pastrnak 33 6:54 (pp)
Philadelphia 3, Boston 3 — Bergeron 30 (Backes) 19:56
OVERTIME
Philadelphia 4, Boston 3 — Giroux 29 (Voracek) 3:39
No penalties
SCORE BY PERIOD
Boston.............................................0
1
2
0
—
3
Philadelphia...................................1
1
1
1
—
4
SHOTS BY PERIOD
Boston...........................................12
17
10
Philadelphia...................................7
8
8
0
1
—
—
39
24
Power plays — Boston 1 of 3; Philadelphia 0 of 2.
Goalies — Boston, Khudobin 15­6­7 (24 shots­20 saves). Phil­
adelphia, Mrazek 14­12­6 (39 shots­36 saves).
Referees — Graham Skilliter, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen —
Derek Amell, David Brisebois.
Attendance — 19,904 (19,543). Time — 2:29.
good practice.
“It gives us some confidence moving
forward,” Torey Krug said. “Because it’s
going to happen in the playoffs. We’re
going to have to score a desperation
goal at some point. So it gives us confidence going forward. Maybe get some
guys a little more comfortable with
some pressure and the puck on their
stick. We obviously made a good play
there to get one in.”
Despite the overtime loss — Claude
Giroux snapped a breakaway backhander over Anton Khudobin — the
last-second push had the Bruins feeling
better about a legless game until then.
They did not play with their usual
snappy pace. This is no surprise. The
Bruins beat the Panthers the day before. The 5-1 win over Florida was their
16th game in 31 days in March.
With that in mind, it did not surprise Cassidy that his team faced a 3-1
deficit in the third period.
“I think we were running on fumes
today. It showed,” Cassidy said. “Territorially, I still thought we did very well
in terms of the play. It’s just the chances we gave up — kind of high end
where they got behind our D — normally we’re reloading better if it’s a D
pinching. Or if it’s in the middle of the
ice, we’re able to shut those plays
down.”
The Bruins will not have much of a
breather in the final week. On Monday,
they will enjoy a day away from the
rink in Tampa. But on Tuesday, they
will play the first of four games in six
days. They conclude the regular season
with back-to-back home games against
Ottawa and Florida.
They can scratch several players.
But they will still have to dress 20.
Somehow, Cassidy will have to incorporate rest into the schedule before the
playoffs.
“Hopefully get a good rest, some
sunshine, rejuvenate,” Cassidy said of
Monday’s off day. “Our guys are wellconditioned. They’re pretty resilient.
Once the game’s on, they forget some of
that stuff. It’s human nature, when you
are a little tired, to not think on time
sometimes. That showed today.”
Fluto Shinzawa can be reached at
fshinzawa@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter.
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C3
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
p­Toronto
p­BOSTON
p­Cleveland
p­Philadelphia
p­Indiana
p­Washington
Miami
Milwaukee
W
55
53
47
46
46
42
41
41
L
21
23
30
30
31
35
36
36
Pct. GB Streak Home
.724 —
L1
31­7
.697
2
W 6 25­13
.610
8½
W 3 27­11
.605
9
W 10 26­11
.597
9½
W 5 26­13
.545 13½
L 1 22­17
.532 14½
L 1 24­14
.532 14½
L 1 23­15
Conf.
36­10
31­15
32­15
29­18
31­18
27­21
28­20
24­23
Detroit
Charlotte
New York
Chicago
Brooklyn
Orlando
Atlanta
37
34
27
26
25
22
22
40
44
50
51
52
54
55
.481
.436
.351
.338
.325
.289
.286
24­14
21­19
18­19
16­22
14­26
15­23
16­23
23­26
20­28
15­32
20­27
16­31
13­34
10­37
18½
22
28½
29½
30½
33
33½
W5
L3
L3
W2
L1
L3
W1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
c­Houston
d­Golden State
*Portland
San Antonio
Oklahoma City
Utah
Minnesota
New Orleans
W
62
56
47
45
45
44
44
43
L
15
21
29
32
33
33
34
34
Pct. GB Streak Home
.805 —
L1
32­6
.727
6
W 2 29­11
.618 14½
W 1 26­13
.584 17
W2
31­8
.577 17½
W 1 26­13
.571 18
W 2 25­13
.564 18½
L 1 28­11
.558 19
L 4 22­17
Conf.
39­9
32­16
29­17
27­20
26­23
30­17
31­17
22­25
Denver
LA Clippers
*LA Lakers
*Sacramento
Dallas
*Memphis
Phoenix
42
41
33
24
23
21
19
35
36
42
53
54
55
59
.545
.532
.440
.312
.299
.276
.244
25­23
23­24
17­28
11­36
13­37
18­29
13­35
20
21
28
38
39
40½
43½
W2
L2
L1
L4
L3
L1
L 15
28­10
21­16
19­17
13­27
14­25
15­24
9­29
* — Not including late game
c — Clinched conference
d — Clinched division
p — Clinched playoff berth
THE PLAYOFF FORMAT
The three division champions in each conference, plus the next five
teams with the best records, qualify. Seeding is based solely on record.
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Philadelphia 119 at Charlotte 102
At Atlanta 94
At Chicago 113
Utah 121
at Minnesota 97
At Denver 128
Milw.e 125 (OT)
Indiana 111
Washington 94
at LA Clippers 104
At San Antonio 100
Detroit 108
Houston 83
at Brooklyn 96
At Cleveland 98
Dallas 87
Orlando 88
At Golden St. 117
Phoenix 107
At Portland 113
Memphis 98
Sacramento
at LA Lakers
Okla. City 109at New Orleans 104
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
At BOSTON 110
Toronto 99
At Washington 107
Detroit 115
Charlotte 93
Brooklyn 110
at Miami 109 (OT)
Golden St. 112 at Sacramento 96
at New York 109
76ERS 119, HORNETS 102
PACERS 111, CLIPPERS 104
PHILADELPHIA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Ilyasova 27 5­8 2­2 0­3
Cvingtn. 33 7­21 2­2 2­11
Johnson 31 1­5 2­2 0­5
Redick... 28 7­15 1­1 0­2
Simmns 32 10­17 0­0 1­8
McCnnll 18 3­6 0­0 1­3
Belinelli. 31 9­10 1­1 0­1
Holmes . 17 3­3 0­0 2­9
Fultz ...... 16 2­5 0­0 0­1
Andersn.. 3 0­3 1­2 1­1
Korkmz ... 3 1­1 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 48­94 9­10 7­44
INDIANA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
T.Young 39 4­12 0­0 5­9
Bgdnvic 34 6­11 1­2 0­5
Turner... 32 9­15 4­5 4­8
Collison. 30 4­7 4­4 0­1
Oladipo. 38 11­17 5­6 1­4
Joseph... 21 4­9 0­0 0­2
Sabonis. 19 1­5 0­0 3­4
Stphnsn 20 3­9 2­4 1­5
Booker .... 4 0­0 0­0 1­1
Rbsn III ... 2 0­1 0­0 0­1
Totals .... 42­86 16­21 15­40
A
1
3
3
2
15
4
3
1
4
0
0
36
F Pt
6 16
5 17
3 4
2 20
0 20
1 6
2 22
4 6
0 4
1 1
0 3
24 119
FG%: .511, FT%: .900. 3­pt. goals: 14­
32, .438 (Ilyasova 4­7, Covington 1­9,
Johnson 0­1, Redick 5­8, Belinelli 3­4,
Anderson 0­2, Korkmaz 1­1). Team re­
bounds: 10. Team turnovers: 14 (21
pts.). Blocks: 5 (Ilyasova, Johnson, Sim­
mons 2, McConnell). Turnovers: 14
(Ilyasova 2, Covington, Johnson,
Redick 3, Simmons, Belinelli 5, Fultz).
Steals: 15 (Covington 7, Johnson, Sim­
mons 3, McConnell 2, Belinelli, Fultz).
CHARLOTTE
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
M.Wlms 22 2­9 0­0 0­3 1 0 5
Kd­Gcrt. 32 6­13 4­4 1­5 0 2 16
Howard. 26 4­7 2­5 1­10 0 2 10
Batum ... 22 3­9 2­2 1­4 3 3 8
Walker .. 26 2­7 5­5 0­1 4 0 10
Kmnsky 26 3­8 3­4 0­2 2 0 10
Lamb..... 24 5­13 0­0 0­2 2 3 12
Stone..... 16 0­0 0­0 0­0 2 1 0
Monk..... 24 6­13 0­0 0­2 3 1 16
Hrngmz. 22 2­3 11­14 6­11 0 1 15
Totals .... 33­82 27­34 9­40 17 13 102
FG%: .402, FT%: .794. 3­pt. goals: 9­
30, .300 (M.Williams 1­3, Batum 0­3,
Walker 1­5, Kaminsky 1­5, Lamb 2­4,
Monk 4­9, Hernangómez 0­1). Team re­
bounds: 9. Team turnovers: 16 (19
pts.). Blocks: 7 (Howard, Batum, Walk­
er, Lamb, Stone, Monk 2). Turnovers:
16 (Howard, Batum 4, Walker 4, Kamin­
sky 2, Monk 5). Steals: 8 (Kidd­Gilchrist
2, Howard, Lamb 2, Monk, Her­
nangómez 2).
Philadelphia .........28 32 31 28 — 119
Charlotte...............29 22 27 24 — 102
A — 17,005 (19,077). T — 2:12. Offi­
cials — Scott Foster, Kevin Cutler, Hay­
woode Workman.
SPURS 100, ROCKETS 83
HOUSTON
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Tucker... 28 1­7 0­0 1­3
Ariza...... 27 2­7 2­4 0­3
Capela .. 28 3­9 5­6 3­10
Gordon.. 29 7­15 2­3 0­3
Harden.. 36 8­19 8­8 1­3
Green .... 29 3­8 3­3 1­8
J.Jhnson 16 0­4 0­0 0­4
M a Mt.. 22 1­5 0­0 1­3
Andersn 18 0­1 2­3 0­2
Black ....... 4 1­2 2­2 1­2
Totals .... 26­77 24­29 8­42
A
1
0
0
1
8
0
0
1
0
0
12
F
0
1
0
5
5
2
1
2
2
1
19
Pt
3
7
11
18
25
11
0
2
2
4
83
FG%: .338, FT%: .828. 3­pt. goals: 7­
31, .226 (Tucker 1­6, Ariza 1­4, Gordon
2­4, Harden 1­6, Green 2­6, J.Johnson
0­2, Mbah a Moute 0­2, Black 0­1).
Team rebounds: 9. Team turnovers: 10
(13 pts.). Blocks: 3 (Capela 2, Green).
Turnovers: 9 (Gordon, Harden 5, Green,
J.Johnson, Mbah a Moute).
SAN ANTONIO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Andrson 26 2­4 1­2 0­1 5 0 5
Green .... 30 3­11 4­4 1­7 0 4 12
Aldridge 36 11­19 1­1 3­14 2 3 23
Murray.. 25 6­14 1­2 1­6 1 2 13
Mills ...... 37 5­9 1­1 0­5 4 3 14
Ginobili . 20 2­3 1­3 0­2 4 0 6
Gay........ 24 9­13 3­5 1­3 0 3 21
Parker... 13 1­3 2­2 0­1 3 3 4
Gasol..... 11 1­1 0­1 2­8 0 1 2
Forbes... 12 0­4 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
Totals .... 40­81 14­21 8­48 19 19 100
A
1
0
0
4
12
3
1
1
1
0
23
F Pt
2 8
2 15
1 24
0 14
4 30
0 10
2 2
1 8
0 0
0 0
12 111
FG%: .488, FT%: .762. 3­pt. goals: 11­
28, .393 (Bogdanovic 2­6, Turner 2­4,
Collison 2­3, Oladipo 3­6, Joseph 2­3,
Stephenson 0­5, Robinson III 0­1).
Team rebounds: 11. Team turnovers:
11 (12 pts.). Blocks: 4 (Turner, Oladipo,
Joseph, Stephenson). Turnovers: 10
(Bogdanovic 2, Turner, Collison, Oladi­
po 2, Joseph, Sabonis, Stephenson,
Booker). Steals: 8 (T.Young, Collison,
Oladipo 5, Sabonis). Technicals: Coach
McMillan, 9:58/3rd.
LA CLIPPERS
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Gallinari 32 1­9 5­5 1­6 1 1 7
Harris.... 37 9­16 0­0 0­4 7 2 21
Jordan... 28 4­8 0­2 5­12 0 2 8
Wallace 37 4­7 0­0 1­4 2 4 9
Rivers.... 37 7­15 1­2 2­3 7 3 18
L.Wllims 32 7­13 5­5 0­2 3 3 20
Thrnwll . 15 1­2 0­0 1­2 2 4 2
Harrell... 21 9­12 0­0 2­3 2 0 19
C.Wllms .. 0 0­0 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
Totals .... 42­82 11­14 12­36 24 19 104
FG%: .512, FT%: .786. 3­pt. goals: 9­
25, .360 (Gallinari 0­3, Harris 3­6, Wal­
lace 1­2, Rivers 3­8, L.Williams 1­4,
Thornwell 0­1, Harrell 1­1). Team re­
bounds: 5. Team turnovers: 13 (12
pts.). Blocks: 6 (Gallinari 3, Harris, Wal­
lace, Rivers). Turnovers: 13 (Gallinari,
Harris 2, Jordan 2, Wallace 3, Rivers 3,
L.Williams 2). Steals: 6 (Harris, Wal­
lace, Rivers 2, L.Williams 2).
Indiana ..................22 28 26 35 — 111
LA Clippers...........30 21 27 26 — 104
A — 15,866 (19,060). T — 2:07. Offi­
cials — Ken Mauer, Mark Ayotte, Tre
Maddox.
BULLS 113, WIZARDS 94
WASHINGTON
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Morris ... 30 4­7 0­0 1­5
Prter Jr. 30 7­12 0­0 2­3
Gortat ... 24 4­7 2­2 1­7
Strnsky . 32 3­5 2­2 1­5
Beal ....... 29 5­17 5­5 0­4
Obre Jr.. 16 2­8 0­0 0­0
Smith .... 17 3­8 0­0 1­4
Scott ..... 21 5­10 2­2 0­4
Sesions . 12 1­2 0­0 0­1
Meeks ... 19 3­4 1­1 0­3
Frazier .... 8 0­1 0­0 0­1
Totals .... 37­81 12­12 6­37
A
2
0
3
6
5
1
0
2
4
1
3
27
F
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
0
0
0
0
12
Pt
8
17
10
9
15
4
6
14
2
9
0
94
FG%: .457, FT%: 1.000. 3­pt. goals: 8­
30, .267 (Morris 0­1, Porter Jr. 3­7, Sa­
toransky 1­2, Beal 0­6, Oubre Jr. 0­3,
Smith 0­2, Scott 2­5, Meeks 2­3, Frazier
0­1). Team rebounds: 2. Team turn­
overs: 17 (19 pts.). Blocks: 4 (Gortat 2,
Satoransky, Smith). Turnovers: 16
(Morris 3, Porter Jr., Gortat, Satoran­
sky 4, Beal, Oubre Jr. 2, Smith, Scott,
Meeks 2). Steals: 5 (Morris, Porter Jr.,
Beal 3). Technicals: Morris, 9:02/3rd,
team, 5:20/3rd.
CHICAGO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Holiday . 17 5­7 0­0 0­0 3 1 12
Mrkken . 25 7­11 4­7 0­6 0 0 23
Lopez .... 17 3­4 0­0 0­4 3 0 6
Payne.... 25 2­4 0­0 0­2 2 2 5
Nwaba .. 20 4­10 2­2 2­6 5 1 10
Valntine 18 2­4 0­0 0­1 3 3 5
Grant..... 26 4­9 1­2 0­1 7 4 11
Portis .... 16 6­10 2­2 0­4 2 3 18
Felicio ... 21 2­5 0­0 4­8 0 1 4
Kilptrick 23 6­13 0­0 0­6 2 1 14
Arcdcno 15 0­2 0­0 0­0 2 0 0
Vonleh .. 18 2­3 0­0 0­2 1 1 5
Totals .... 43­82 9­13 6­40 30 17 113
FG%: .494, FT%: .667. 3­pt. goals: 6­
17, .353 (Anderson 0­1, Green 2­6, Mur­
ray 0­1, Mills 3­6, Ginobili 1­1, Gay 0­1,
Forbes 0­1). Team rebounds: 5.Team
turnovers: 9 (12 pts.). Blocks: 8 (Ander­
son, Green 2, Aldridge 3, Gay, Gasol).
Turnovers: 8(Green, Aldridge, Murray
2, Ginobili 2, Parker, Gasol).
Houston.................17 21 28 17 — 83
San Antonio..........26 20 29 25 — 100
FG%: .524, FT%: .692. 3­pt. goals: 18­
34, .529 (Holiday 2­2, Markkanen 5­8,
Payne 1­2, Nwaba 0­1, Valentine 1­3,
Grant 2­5, Portis 4­5, Kilpatrick 2­5, Ar­
cidiacono 0­2, Vonleh 1­1). Team re­
bounds: 8. Team turnovers: 17 (17
pts.). Blocks: 1 (Payne). Turnovers: 17
(Markkanen, Lopez 2, Payne 2, Nwaba,
Valentine 3, Grant, Portis, Felicio, Kil­
patrick, Arcidiacono, Vonleh 3). Steals:
7 (Nwaba 2, Grant 2, Portis, Arcidia­
cono, Vonleh). Technicals: .
Washington..........27 32 16 19 — 94
Chicago.................36 32 19 26 — 113
A — 18,418 (18,797). T — 2:15. Offi­
cials — Bill Kennedy, Tyler Ford, Mark
Lindsay.
A — 20,466 (20,917). T — 1:58. Offi­
cials — Derrick Stafford, Jason Golden­
berg, Kevin Scott.
CAVALIERS 98, MAVERICKS 87
DALLAS
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Nwitzki . 21 4­8 0­0 0­7 1 1 9
Barnes .. 36 10­19 5­5 0­3 5 0 30
Powell... 23 1­1 3­4 0­3 0 4 6
Fny­Sth . 30 2­7 0­0 1­4 0 3 5
Smth Jr. 33 6­17 0­0 1­4 6 3 14
Kleber ... 27 1­3 0­0 0­3 0 3 2
Noel....... 17 0­2 0­0 2­7 2 2 0
Hrrison.. 16 1­5 2­2 0­3 0 1 4
Ferrell ... 18 3­11 0­0 0­2 1 1 8
McDmtt 20 4­7 0­0 0­2 0 2 9
Totals .... 32­80 10­11 4­38 15 20 87
FG%: .400, FT%: .909. 3­pt. goals: 13­
37, .351 (Nowitzki 1­4, Barnes 5­10,
Powell 1­1, Finney­Smith 1­5, Smith Jr.
2­6, Kleber 0­1, Harrison 0­2, Ferrell 2­6,
McDermott 1­2). Team rebounds: 9.
Team turnovers: 15 (15 pts.). Blocks: 3
(Powell, Finney­Smith, Noel). Turn­
overs: 15 (Barnes, Powell 2, Smith Jr. 7,
Kleber, Noel 3, McDermott). Steals: 5
(Finney­Smith, Kleber, Noel, Harrison,
Ferrell). Technicals: def. 3­second.
CLEVELAND
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Love ...... 36 4­13 3­5 1­13
James.... 39 5­21 4­4 3­13
Nnce Jr. 22 3­3 1­3 2­6
Clderón. 22 3­6 0­0 0­1
Hood ..... 24 4­9 0­0 0­2
Green .... 17 2­4 0­0 1­3
Clarksn . 25 5­9 6­7 0­1
Thmpsn 20 1­5 2­2 2­7
Smith .... 26 6­11 0­0 1­4
Osman .... 7 2­3 1­2 0­0
Prrntes.... 1 0­1 0­0 0­0
Zizic......... 1 0­0 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 35­85 17­23 10­50
0
12
1
2
2
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
21
1
1
2
3
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
12
13
16
7
8
9
4
16
4
15
6
0
0
98
FG%: .412, FT%: .739. 3­pt. goals: 11­
26, .423 (Love 2­4, James 2­3, Calderón
2­5, Hood 1­3, Clarkson 0­2, Smith 3­6,
Osman 1­2, Perrantes 0­1). Team re­
bounds: 8. Team turnovers: 11 (14
pts.). Blocks: 1 (Love). Turnovers: 11
(Love 2, James 2, Nance Jr., Calderón,
Hood, Green, Clarkson, Thompson,
Smith). Steals: 7 (Love, Nance Jr.,
Hood, Clarkson 3, Osman).
Dallas.....................25 22 30 10 — 87
Cleveland..............18 30 25 25 — 98
A — 20,562 (20,562). T — 2:04. Offi­
cials — Sean Wright, Gediminas Petrai­
tis, Dedric Taylor.
PHIL LONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAVALIERS PREVAIL— LeBron James (16
points, 13 rebounds, 12 assists) drives past
Dallas’s Dorian Finney-Smith in the
Cavaliers’ 98-87 victory.
HAWKS 94, MAGIC 88
ORLANDO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Gordon.. 37 4­13 0­0 1­7
Isaac ..... 20 5­11 2­2 0­4
Vucevic. 31 3­19 4­4 2­14
Iwundu . 28 2­6 0­0 1­1
Agustin . 37 8­14 3­3 2­7
Birch........ 7 0­1 0­0 0­0
Purvis.... 11 0­2 0­0 0­0
Hezonja 28 5­12 1­2 1­2
Mack ..... 24 3­10 2­2 1­1
Biymbo . 17 3­8 0­0 3­5
Totals .... 33­96 12­13 11­41
A
3
1
3
2
3
1
1
0
5
0
19
F
1
0
2
1
3
1
1
0
0
1
10
JAZZ 121, T’WOLVES 97
Pt
10
15
10
5
20
0
0
14
8
6
88
FG%: .344, FT%: .923. 3­pt. goals: 10­
36, .278 (Gordon 2­6, Isaac 3­6, Vucevic
0­3, Iwundu 1­2, Augustin 1­5, Purvis
0­2, Hezonja 3­8, Mack 0­4). Team re­
bounds: 9. Team turnovers: 5 (2 pts.).
Blocks: 6 (Gordon, Vucevic 3, Iwundu,
Hezonja). Turnovers: 5 (Gordon 2,
Isaac, Iwundu, Hezonja). Steals: 8 (Gor­
don, Isaac, Vucevic 2, Iwundu, Hezonja
3).
ATLANTA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Prince ... 27 2­6 0­0 0­4
Collins... 33 5­9 0­0 0­11
Dedmon 34 7­16 0­0 1­10
Lee......... 23 2­7 0­0 1­4
Taylor ... 29 4­11 1­1 1­2
Dorsey .. 22 8­11 0­0 0­0
Plumlee 15 4­5 0­0 1­6
Muscala 25 5­11 0­0 1­10
Magette 19 2­6 0­0 0­2
Bembry. 14 2­3 0­0 0­3
Totals .... 41­85 1­1 5­52
A
8
1
3
2
5
2
1
3
5
3
33
F
3
0
2
0
2
3
1
0
1
3
15
Pt
5
10
17
4
9
19
8
13
5
4
94
FG%: .482, FT%: 1.000. 3­pt. goals:
11­36, .306 (Prince 1­3, Collins 0­3, Ded­
mon 3­7, Lee 0­2, Taylor 0­2, Dorsey
3­5, Muscala 3­9, Magette 1­4, Bembry
0­1). Team rebounds: 6. Team turn­
overs: 16 (13 pts.). Blocks: 3 (Collins 2,
Dedmon). Turnovers: 14 (Prince 4, Lee
2, Taylor 2, Dorsey 2, Muscala, Magette
2, Bembry). Steals: 0
Orlando .................18 25 21 24 —
Atlanta ..................21 35 13 25 —
88
94
A — 13,587 (18,729). T — 1:55. Offi­
cials — Marc Davis, JB DeRosa, Karl
Lane.
THUNDER 109, PELICANS 104
OKLAHOMA CITY
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Anthony 29 6­16 0­2 1­6
George.. 37 9­24 6­6 1­8
Adams .. 36 6­9 2­4 7­10
Brewer.. 29 2­8 0­0 3­5
Wstbrok 37 9­17 8­11 1­15
Abrines . 23 1­3 0­0 0­1
Grant..... 17 5­5 2­2 1­1
Felton.... 19 2­10 0­0 0­3
Ptterson 14 1­3 0­0 0­2
Totals .... 41­95 18­25 14­51
A
1
2
1
1
13
0
0
5
1
24
F Pt
4 16
3 27
2 14
2 4
5 26
3 3
1 12
2 4
0 3
22 109
FG%: .432, FT%: .720. 3­pt. goals: 9­
31, .290 (Anthony 4­8, George 3­11,
Brewer 0­2, Westbrook 0­1, Abrines
1­3, Felton 0­3, Patterson 1­3). Team
rebounds: 10. Team turnovers: 18 (13
pts.). Blocks: 4 (Adams, Grant 2, Pat­
terson). Turnovers: 18 (Anthony 3,
George, Adams 6, Brewer, Westbrook
7). Steals: 13 (George 3, Brewer 3,
Westbrook 2, Grant, Felton 2, Patter­
son 2). Technicals: Anthony, 11:11/2nd.
NEW ORLEANS
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Moore ... 31 6­12 0­0 1­4
Davis ..... 40 8­17 9­11 3­11
Okafor... 13 0­1 0­0 0­4
Rondo ... 34 5­9 0­0 0­8
Holiday . 34 4­10 3­4 0­5
Hill......... 13 1­4 1­2 0­3
Clark ..... 21 6­7 1­1 0­1
Mirotic .. 19 2­9 0­0 0­4
Diallo....... 7 1­3 2­3 1­2
Miller..... 27 5­11 1­2 2­2
Totals .... 38­83 17­23 7­44
A
1
3
1
9
8
2
1
0
0
3
28
F Pt
2 15
5 25
0 0
2 11
2 12
2 3
1 16
3 4
2 4
1 14
20 104
FG%: .458, FT%: .739. 3­pt. goals: 11­
32, .344 (Moore 3­6, Rondo 1­5, Holiday
1­4, Hill 0­2, Clark 3­3, Mirotic 0­5, Mill­
er 3­7). Team rebounds: 7. Team turn­
overs: 21 (18 pts.). Blocks: 3 (Davis 2,
Mirotic). Turnovers: 21 (Moore 2, Davis
4, Okafor 2, Rondo 6, Holiday 3, Hill,
Clark 3). Steals: 13 (Moore 2, Davis 3,
Rondo, Holiday 5, Hill, Miller). Techni­
cals: Mirotic, 5:04/3rd.
Oklahoma City.....20 33 27 29 — 109
New Orleans ........28 22 25 29 — 104
A — 18,500 (16,867). T — 2:11. Offi­
cials — Bill Spooner, Curtis Blair, Mi­
chael Smith.
A
1
4
1
0
3
1
2
2
3
17
A
3
3
0
0
7
1
1
1
7
0
0
23
F Pt
2 10
2 17
2 13
2 5
3 29
0 4
0 17
2 9
3 4
16 108
F
1
1
5
2
2
1
3
1
4
1
1
22
A
9
2
1
4
3
3
1
5
1
0
0
0
0
29
F Pt
1 5
4 16
1 6
1 21
3 23
2 4
4 10
1 14
1 13
0 1
0 1
0 2
1 5
19 121
FG%: .605, FT%: .720. 3­pt. goals: 11­
28, .393 (Ingles 1­4, Favors 0­2, Mitchell
1­3, Rubio 5­6, O'Neale 0­1, Crowder
2­6, Jerebko 1­2, Niang 0­2, Stockton
1­2). Team rebounds: 6. Team turn­
overs: 17 (16 pts.). Blocks: 7 (Favors 2,
Gobert 4, Rubio). Turnovers: 16 (Gob­
ert 3, Mitchell 5, Rubio, O'Neale 3,
Crowder, Exum, Burks 2). Steals: 8 (In­
gles, Mitchell 2, Rubio, O'Neale,
Crowder 2, Exum).
MINNESOTA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Gibson .. 34 3­7 0­0 2­6 1 2 6
Bjelica... 26 2­7 2­2 2­5 1 3 7
Towns... 36 7­13 6­6 1­7 2 2 20
Jones..... 33 6­13 1­1 0­0 4 0 15
Wiggins 36 10­22 2­3 1­6 4 1 23
Crwford 27 3­10 0­0 0­1 2 1 7
Dieng..... 19 1­2 0­0 0­5 2 1 2
Brooks .. 16 4­12 2­2 1­2 2 5 12
Ggs­Hnt .. 5 0­1 0­0 0­0 0 1 0
Patton..... 4 1­2 0­0 0­0 0 1 2
Brown ..... 4 1­1 0­0 0­0 1 0 3
Totals .... 38­90 13­14 7­32 19 17 97
FG%: .422, FT%: .929. 3­pt. goals: 8­
24, .333 (Bjelica 1­3, Towns 0­4, Jones
2­4, Wiggins 1­2, Crawford 1­4, Brooks
2­6, Brown 1­1). Team rebounds: 7.
Team turnovers: 14 (16 pts.). Blocks: 1
(Dieng). Turnovers: 12 (Bjelica, Towns
3, Jones, Wiggins, Crawford 3, Dieng 2,
Brooks). Steals: 10 (Bjelica 2, Jones 4,
Wiggins 2, Dieng, Patton).
Utah .......................28 33 26 34 — 121
Minnesota.............26 24 21 26 — 97
A — 18,978 (19,356). T — 2:03. Offi­
cials — Ron Garretson, Scott Wall, Tom
Washington.
WARRIORS 117, SUNS 107
PHOENIX
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Bender.. 36 5­9 0­0 1­10
Jackson. 36 9­23 2­2 0­2
Chriss.... 30 9­15 3­5 2­9
Daniels.. 18 1­5 0­0 0­0
Ulis ........ 42 5­14 1­1 2­4
Willims.. 17 3­7 2­2 0­6
House.... 34 6­11 3­3 2­6
Hrrison.. 15 1­3 2­2 1­4
Peters ... 12 2­3 1­1 1­1
Totals .... 41­90 14­16 9­42
A
1
5
1
1
9
3
3
3
0
26
F Pt
1 14
2 22
4 22
0 2
1 12
0 8
1 16
3 5
0 6
12 107
FG%: .456, FT%: .875. 3­pt. goals: 11­
31, .355 (Bender 4­6, Jackson 2­6,
Chriss 1­2, Daniels 0­4, Ulis 1­4, House
1­5, Harrison 1­2, Peters 1­2). Team re­
bounds: 3. Team turnovers: 15 (16
pts.). Blocks: 4 (Jackson, Chriss, House
2). Turnovers: 15 (Bender 2, Jackson,
Chriss 4, Daniels, Ulis 5, Williams, Pe­
ters). Steals: 8 (Jackson 2, Chriss, Dan­
iels, Ulis 2, Williams 2).
GOLDEN STATE
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Green .... 34 5­8 0­0 0­6 12 3 13
Durant... 35 12­19 2­2 0­11 8 1 29
Looney.. 24 2­5 1­2 1­4 0 3 5
Cook...... 34 7­11 2­2 0­4 6 1 19
K.Thmn . 33 10­19 1­1 0­2 2 0 23
West...... 11 1­5 2­2 2­4 1 2 4
McGee .... 4 1­3 0­0 2­3 0 0 2
Young ... 25 2­8 0­0 1­5 1 0 6
Livngstn 15 3­4 0­0 0­1 0 2 6
Bell ........ 16 5­7 0­0 1­5 1 0 10
Pchulia.... 6 0­0 0­0 0­0 0 2 0
Jones....... 2 0­0 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
Totals .... 48­89 8­9 7­45 31 14 117
FG%: .539, FT%: .889. 3­pt. goals: 13­
28, .464 (Green 3­5, Durant 3­6, Cook
3­5, K.Thompson 2­5, Young 2­7). Team
rebounds: 3. Team turnovers: 15 (19
pts.). Blocks: 7 (Green, Durant 2, Loo­
ney 2, Pachulia 2). Turnovers: 14
(Green 3, Durant, Cook 2, K.Thompson,
West 2, Young, Livingston, Bell, Pachu­
lia 2). Steals: 10 (Green 2, Looney, Cook
3, K.Thompson 2, Young, Bell).
Phoenix .................24 35 18 30 — 107
Golden State ........22 36 36 23 — 117
A — 19,596 (19,596). T — :. Officials —
Zach Zarba, Brent Barnaky, Leon
Wood.
Saturday night game
FG%: .452, FT%: .781. 3­pt. goals: 7­
19, .368 (Tolliver 2­4, Johnson 1­3, Bull­
ock 1­5, Jackson 0­1, Ellenson 0­2,
Smith 2­2, Kennard 1­2). Team re­
bounds: 7. Team turnovers: 11 (15
pts.). Blocks: 3 (Kennard, Moreland 2).
Turnovers: 9 (Johnson, Drummond,
Jackson 5, Kennard, Moreland). Steals:
9 (Tolliver 2, Johnson 4, Jackson, Smith,
Moreland). Technicals: . Ejections: .
BROOKLYN
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Carroll... 25 3­11 3­4 1­4
His­Jfrn . 30 6­11 2­3 2­8
Allen...... 30 6­9 2­4 1­6
Crabbe.. 21 2­5 0­0 0­4
Russell .. 28 5­15 0­0 1­4
Dnwdde 12 1­2 0­0 0­4
Cnnghm 18 3­6 1­2 0­1
Harris.... 29 6­12 1­1 1­5
LeVert... 31 4­10 1­1 0­1
Acy .......... 4 0­4 0­0 0­1
Staskas. 10 1­2 0­0 0­2
Totals .... 37­87 10­15 6­40
Reb
O­T
0­4
2­3
1­13
1­3
1­7
0­5
0­2
0­3
0­1
1­2
0­0
0­2
0­0
6­45
CELTICS 110, RAPTORS 99
PISTONS 108, NETS 96
DETROIT
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Tolliver . 33 4­7 0­1 2­12
Johnson 35 6­11 4­6 0­4
Drmond 25 4­7 5­6 4­14
Bullock.. 35 2­10 0­0 2­5
Jackson. 32 9­22 11­13 0­4
Ellenson 15 1­5 2­2 0­2
Smith .... 17 7­8 1­2 0­1
Kennard 25 3­10 2­2 0­1
Mreland 23 2­4 0­0 2­10
Totals .... 38­84 25­32 10­53
UTAH
FG
FT
Min M­A M­A
Ingles .... 28 2­5 0­0
Favors... 32 6­9 4­7
Gobert... 32 2­3 2­4
Mitchell 32 10­15 0­0
Rubio..... 27 9­14 0­0
O'Neale. 18 2­3 0­0
Crwder.. 23 4­10 0­0
Exum..... 17 4­6 6­6
Jerebko. 16 5­6 2­2
Niang ...... 4 0­2 1­2
Udoh ....... 4 0­0 1­2
Burks....... 4 1­1 0­0
Stckton ... 3 1­2 2­2
Totals .... 46­76 18­25
Pt
11
14
15
4
13
2
9
15
10
0
3
96
FG%: .425, FT%: .667. 3­pt. goals: 12­
43, .279 (Carroll 2­5, Hollis­Jefferson
0­1, Allen 1­1, Crabbe 0­2, Russell 3­11,
Dinwiddie 0­1, Cunningham 2­4, Harris
2­7, LeVert 1­6, Acy 0­3, Stauskas 1­2).
Team rebounds: 8. Team turnovers: 12
(12 pts.). Blocks: 5 (Allen 3, Crabbe,
Russell). Turnovers: 12 (Carroll 2, Allen
2, Russell 2, Harris 3, LeVert 3). Steals:
5 (Hollis­Jefferson, Crabbe, Russell 2,
LeVert). Technicals: . Ejections: .
TORONTO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Annoby . 19 3­4 1­2 0­1
Ibaka..... 32 5­7 2­2 2­10
Vlncinas 25 6­12 1­2 5­11
Lowry.... 34 4­13 1­2 0­3
DeRzan . 36 12­19 8­10 1­7
Poeltl..... 20 0­1 0­0 0­3
Miles ..... 20 0­6 3­3 0­5
Siakam.. 16 1­3 0­0 0­2
Wright... 12 1­4 0­0 0­2
VnVleet. 18 4­8 1­1 0­1
Powell..... 8 1­3 0­0 1­1
Totals .... 37­80 17­22 9­46
A
1
1
0
9
7
0
1
0
1
3
0
23
F
4
5
1
2
5
0
5
1
1
1
1
26
Pt
8
15
13
11
32
0
3
2
2
11
2
99
FG%: .463, FT%: .773. 3­pt. goals: 8­
35, .229 (Anunoby 1­2, Ibaka 3­3, Valan­
ciunas 0­1, Lowry 2­10, DeRozan 0­5,
Miles 0­5, Siakam 0­1, Wright 0­1, Van­
Vleet 2­5, Powell 0­2). Team rebounds:
5. Team turnovers: 15 (19 pts.). Blocks:
5 (Ibaka, Valanciunas, DeRozan, Poeltl,
Siakam). Turnovers: 15 (Anunoby, Iba­
ka 2, Lowry 2, DeRozan 2, Miles 4,
Siakam, Wright 2, VanVleet). Steals: 1
(Wright). Technicals: .
BOSTON
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Horford. 31 5­10 4­5 1­5 0 3 14
Tatum ... 33 9­16 4­4 0­6 4 2 24
Baynes.. 24 5­10 0­0 3­5 3 5 12
Brown ... 30 2­8 0­0 0­3 0 3 4
Rozier.... 37 8­17 3­4 1­3 7 1 21
Morris ... 35 7­15 10­11 0­9 3 2 25
Ojeleye . 18 1­3 0­0 1­2 1 0 2
Allen........ 8 0­0 0­0 0­0 1 3 0
Monroe. 17 3­7 0­0 2­7 0 2 6
Nader...... 7 0­2 2­2 0­1 0 2 2
Bird.......... 0 0­0 0­1 0­0 0 0 0
Silas ........ 0 0­0 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
Totals .... 40­88 23­27 8­41 19 23 110
Detroit ...................33 29 21 25 — 108
Brooklyn................28 20 22 26 — 96
FG%: .455, FT%: .852. 3­pt. goals: 7­
17, .412 (Horford 0­1, Tatum 2­2,
Baynes 2­2, Brown 0­1, Rozier 2­5, Mor­
ris 1­4, Ojeleye 0­1, Nader 0­1). Team
rebounds: 8. Team turnovers: 6 (2
pts.). Blocks: 3 (Brown, Morris 2). Turn­
overs: 5 (Rozier, Morris, Ojeleye, Allen,
Monroe). Steals: 6 (Horford, Brown 2,
Rozier, Monroe 2). Technicals: . Ejec­
tions: .
Toronto .................33 22 29 15 — 99
Boston ...................31 22 29 28 — 110
A — 16,097 (17,732). T — 2:13. Offi­
cials — David Guthrie, Derrick Collins,
Jonathan Sterling.
A — 18,624 (18,624). T — 2:16. Offi­
cials — James Capers, Aaron Smith,
James Williams.
MATHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
Aron Baynes was in a zone — and a new area code — with his jumpers Saturday.
Celtics’ success continues
to make them a hot ticket
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
After a mild and brief
downturn, the Celtics have
quickly climbed back among
the NBA’s elite. Brad Stevens
guided the team to 25 wins in
his first season as coach in
2013-14 and increased that total in each year that followed,
from 40 to 48 to 53 victories.
On Saturday the Celtics
matched last season’s 53-win
total, and they have six games
remaining to keep Stevens’s
streak alive.
With this success comes
greater interest, and with
greater interest comes heftier
prices. Including next year’s
rates that have already been
set, the Celtics have increased
season ticket prices by an average of 4.5 percent per season
over five years. Increases vary
based on seats, plans, and
tiers.
Pricing for one set of season tickets in a front row of a
third-level, corner baseline
section, acquired by the Globe,
shows a slightly higher markup than the average in recent
years. One seat was $40 per
game in 2015-16, $43 in 201617, $48 this season, and $56
next year.
“We price tickets largely
based on demand and understanding what the data tells us
about the actual market value
of a ticket,” Celtics president
Rich Gotham said in an e-mail
message. “The success of our
team and excitement about
our future has led to unprecedented demand with a completely sold-out season, a secondary market where our tick-
ets are selling on average at 80
percent above face value, and
a large waiting list for season
tickets.”
According to the Celtics,
the team’s season ticket renewal rate over the last two
season has been at an all-time
high. The team said season
tickets are considerably cheaper than individual tickets on a
per-game basis, and there are
additional perks that come
with being a season ticketholder.
“Year to year, our tickets
are generally priced in the top
10 in the NBA, which is appropriate based on factors including the consistent success of
the team, demand, and market size,” Gotham said. “We
certainly look at ticket pricing
for what we consider to be
comparable market NBA
teams for reference, but each
market has unique circumstances.”
In a recent letter to season
ticket-holders about 2018-19
renewals, acquired by the
Globe, the Celtics said that
they now have a season ticket
wait list for the first time since
the 2008 championship season.
The letter also described
how the Celtics are reinvesting
in the product by building
their state-of-the-art training
facility in Brighton and helping pay for TD Garden expansions and renovations, and
touted the team’s home wins
this season against the Warriors, Rockets, and Knicks.
“We are in an enviable position, with a team that’s built
for the future, while compet-
ing at the highest level right
now,” the letter states.
. . .
Entering the Celtics’ game
against the Raptors on Saturday night, Aron Baynes had
made just 1 of 19 3-pointers
over 360 career NBA games.
He had been more persistent
this season, going 0 for 12
from beyond the arc. But the
burly center was not firing
away to be a sideshow.
“It’s something I’ve been
working on,” Baynes said. “I’m
not going to rush and say it’s
going to be what I’m going to
fall back on or anything. But
it’s always good to have that as
an option.”
In the first quarter of Boston’s 110-99 win over the Raptors, Baynes hit two 3-pointers
over a 94-second span. The
first was a dart from the right
corner, and the second a longer, top-of-the-key shot.
Baynes did not attempt another three in the game, and is
now shooting 14.3 percent
from beyond the arc this season.
“It’s one of those things,”
Baynes said. “That’s the evolution of the game. And I’m just
always trying to add something to your game. That’s one
thing I try and work on every
day. It’s not what I put the
most effort into, but it’s one of
those things that you’re always
trying to add to your game and
get better in some regard.”
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at
adam.himmelsbach
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
WIN A $2500
SHOPPING SPREE
E
From Northern New England’s
Largest Golf Selection
• Register to win in any of our four superstores—
Hudson, NH, Greenland, NH,
West Lebanon, NH, or Scarborough, ME
• Over $11,000 in total golf prizes
• Try new clubs before you buy
on our outdoor driving ranges or
in our indoor fitting bays
• Receive an expert custom club fitting
• Get the best names at the best prices
Open Daily • No NH Sales Tax
Route 3A Hudson, NH 603-595-8484
Route 33 Greenland, NH 603-433-8585
Route 12A West Lebanon, NH 603-298-8282
Payne Road Scarborough, ME 207-883-4343
golfskiwarehouse.com
No purchase necessary.
Must be 18 years or older to
participate. Registration ends on
May 31, 2018. For details, visit
www.golfskiwarehouse.com.
C4
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
Johnson hopes to pitch
in with bat vs. Marlins
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
BRIAN BLANCO/GETTY IMAGES
Hector Velazquez impressed on Sunday, allowing five hits and one run in 5„ innings.
Sox dig deep to top Rays
uRED SOX
Continued from Page C1
gles off Velazquez. He struck
out five with one walk.
His spot may be temporary
with Drew Pomeranz and Eduardo Rodriguez soon to return
from injuries, but Velazquez
has made an impression.
J.D. Martinez drove in his
first run as a member of the Sox
in the fifth inning, tying the
game with a single that scored
Mookie Betts from second.
With the bases loaded in the
sixth inning, Rafael Devers singled for his fourth RBI in three
games. But third base coach
Carlos Febles was too aggressive in sending Brock Holt to
the plate. The throw from Carlos Gomez was accurate and
Holt was out by 8 feet.
It was part of what was a
wasteful day at the plate for the
Sox. They had 14 runners on
base via hit, walk, hit by pitch,
or error, but were 2 for 10 with
runners in scoring position.
But the bullpen held. When
Velazquez allowed a two-out
single by Matt Duffy in the sixth
inning, Cora went to Walden.
His long-awaited debut was
nearly spoiled when Joey Wendle lined a fastball to right field
for a double. Duffy was at third
before Betts hit the cutoff man,
but third base coach Matt Quatraro held the runner.
The inning ended when Wilson Ramos popped up to right.
Walden then worked a perfect
seventh. That ended a memorable day for him.
“ To be considered a bigleaguer now, to have that debut,
it’s an honor,” he said.
Poyner started the eighth to
face lefty-hitting Kevin Kiermaier and got him on a fly ball.
With Gomez, Miller, and
Duffy coming up, Cora went to
Barnes. He struck out Gomez,
strategically walked the
Red Sox 2, Rays 1
At Tropicana Field, St. Petersburg, Fla.
BOSTON
AB R H BI BB SO
Betts rf
3 1 2 0 0 0
Devers 3b
4 0 1 1 1 1
Martinez lf
5 0 1 1 0 2
Benintendi lf
0 0 0 0 0 0
Bogaerts ss
5 0 0 0 0 2
Moreland 1b
4 0 0 0 0 0
Vázquez c
3 0 0 0 0 0
Bradley Jr. cf
3 1 1 0 1 0
Swihart dh
3 0 1 0 1 1
Holt 2b
3 0 0 0 1 0
Totals
33 2 6 2 4 6
TAMPA BAY
Span dh
Kiermaier cf
Gómez rf
Miller 1b
Duffy 3b
Wendle 2b
Ramos c
MSmith lf
Hechavarria ss
Totals
AB
5
4
4
3
4
4
3
4
4
35
R
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Avg.
.286
.250
.200
.000
.471
.000
.222
.100
.333
.000
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 2 .167
0 0 0 2 .067
0 0 0 2 .133
1 1 1 1 .200
2 0 0 1 .375
2 0 0 0 .222
1 0 1 1 .200
1 0 0 0 .286
1 0 0 0 .200
8 1 2 9
Boston............................... 000 011 000 — 2 6 0
Tampa Bay....................... 010 000 000 — 1 8 1
E—Faria (1). LOB—Boston 11, Tampa Bay 9.
2B—Wendle (1). HR—Miller (1), off Velázquez.
SB—Betts (1), Bradley Jr. (1). Runners left in scor­
ing position—Boston 5 (Martinez, Bogaerts,
Vázquez, Holt 2), Tampa Bay 5 (Span, Ramos 2,
MSmith, Hechavarria). RISP—Boston 2 for 10,
Tampa Bay 0 for 5.
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Velzquez W 1­0 5„ 5 1 1 1 5 79 1.59
Walden
1‚ 1 0 0 0 0 14 0.00
Poyner
‚ 0 0 0 0 0 1 9.00
Barnes
„ 0 0 0 1 2 15 0.00
Kelly S 1
1 2 0 0 0 2 19 27.00
Tampa Bay
Faria
Alvarado L 0­1
Chirinos
IP
4
1
4
H
4
1
1
R ER BB SO NP ERA
1 1 3 2 83 2.25
1 1 0 1 17 4.50
0 0 1 3 56 0.00
Faria pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Alvarado
pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners­
scored—Walden 1­0, Alvarado 2­0, Chirinos 1­1.
HBP—by Faria (Betts), by Chirinos (Betts,
Vázquez). Umpires—Home, Manny Gonzalez;
First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Andy
Fletcher. T—3:24. A—14,256 (31,042).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
SECOND INNING
RAYS — Miller homered to right on the first
pitch. Duffy singled to center. Wendle fouled out
to third baseman Devers. Ramos singled to left,
Duffy to second. Smith flied out to left fielder
Martinez. Hechavarria grounded into fielder’s
choice, shortstop Bogaerts to second baseman
Holt, Ramos out.
FIFTH INNING
RED SOX — Betts singled to center. Devers
walked on a full count, Betts to second. Martinez
singled to left, Betts scored, Devers to second. Al­
varado pitching. Bogaerts struck out. Moreland
flied out to center fielder Kiermaier. Vázquez
grounded out, second baseman Wendle to first
baseman Miller.
SIXTH INNING
RED SOX — Bradley Jr. singled to center. Chiri­
nos pitching. Swihart struck out. Holt walked on a
full count, Bradley Jr. to second. Betts was hit by
a pitch, Bradley Jr. to third, Holt to second. De­
vers singled to right, Bradley Jr. scored, Holt to
third, Betts to second. Holt was out advancing,
right fielder Gómez to catcher Ramos, Holt out.
Martinez lined out to left fielder Smith.
lefthanded-hitting Miller on
four pitches, and then struck
out Duffy on four pitches.
“We had Barnes [for] the
high-leverage situation with the
middle of the order up,” Cora
said. “I thought that eighth in-
ning was very important.”
Craig Kimbrel was not available after pitching two days in a
row, so Kelly had the ninth.
Kelly got two quick outs before allowing singles by Mallex
Smith and Adeiny Hechavarria.
With Smith on third, Denard
Span, who beat the Sox with a
three-run triple in the eighth inning on Thursday, worked the
count full.
The Sox weren’t going to
give Span another chance, especially with Hechavarria on the
move. Kelly threw a changeup
at Span’s back foot, a pitch that
left only two possible outcomes.
“He’s going to strike out or
walk. You don’t want him to put
the ball in play in that situation,” Cora said.
Span swung and missed,
Christian Vazquez dug the ball
out of the dirt and tagged him
to end the game.
“I wasn’t going to let him hit
it,” Kelly said. “We would have
taken our chances with the next
guy.”
Kelly helped blow the game
Thursday, giving up four runs
with the Sox up, 4-0. On Sunday
he got his first career save in
what was his 100th relief appearance.
“I was very thoroughly
aware of that,” said Kelly, who
kept the ball. “I’ve pitched out
of the bullpen five seasons at
different points. I’ve had fiveinning relief appearances, I’ve
pitched in different games but
never a save.”
Kelly also appreciated what
was a show of confidence from
Cora.
“ T h a t w a s aw e s o m e , t o
come back and pitch in a close
game like this,” he said.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at peter.abraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@peteabe.
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. —
Brian Johnson made a decision
after his sophomore year at Cocoa Beach
RED SOX
(Fla.) High
NOTEBOOK School that led
to his being
slotted into the rotation to face
the Miami Marlins on Monday
night.
Johnson was already a highprofile recruit after two years
of high school and he committed to the University of Florida
after being promised he would
be allowed to hit as well as
pitch.
“At first they wanted me as a
pitcher,” Johnson said. “But I
wanted the opportunity to hit
and they were honest about
giving me a chance. They let
me hit from the start of my
freshman year.”
When he wasn’t pitching for
the Gators, Johnson was the
first baseman or designated
hitter. He hit .324 with 15
home runs, 29 doubles, and 91
RBIs in his career over 478 atbats. Johnson won the John
Olerud Two-Way Player of the
Year Award in 2012 was on the
SEC All-Freshman team as the
DH in 2010.
So when the Red Sox set up
their rotation, they scheduled
Johnson for Game 5 in the National League park with the
idea that he could do something to help the offense.
“Everybody’s excited about
watching him,” manager Alex
Cora said on Sunday. “I know
he is. Hopefully he can get two
sac bunts down.”
Johnson started preparing
to hit during the last week of
spring training. He took batting practice with a focus on
bunting and did a few baserunning drills.
Johnson was 0 for 2 last
June 14 in a start at Philadelphia. He fouled out trying to
bunt and grounded out to
shortstop.
“I get more nervous in batting practice. I feel there are
high expectations,” Johnson
said. “I just try and hit the ball
up the middle and then everybody is like, ‘C’mon, c’mon,’
and I try to pull it.”
Johnson hit a ball out in one
of his BP sessions, but he has
modest goals against the Marlins.
“I just want to help out,” he
said. “If I had to get a bunt
down, I’d be happy to. If I got a
hit, I’d be really excited.”
Red Sox pitchers were 2 for
22 with eight strikeouts last
season and just one successful
sacrifice. Chris Sale had a
memorable double at Philadelphia on June 15 and David
Price a single against the Reds
on Sept. 22.
Pitching is what Johnson is
most concerned about and he
did that well in spring training.
The lefthander had a 1.72
earned run average over five
starts and 15„ innings.
“Confidence-wise, he’s at an
all-time high,” Cora said. “He
did a good job. He got better
and better with location, using
that fastball to the outside part
of the plate against righties and
after that he can expand outside or he expand low and in
with that breaking ball. He’s in
a good spot.”
Johnson will have a large
group of friends and family at
the game. But he’s not sure of
BRIAN BLANCO/GETTY IMAGES
Mookie Betts just beats the throw to the Rays’ Joey Wendle
in the first inning for his first steal of the season.
Red Sox 3, Rays 2
Saturday night game
At Tropicana Field, St. Petersburg
BOSTON
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Betts rf
4 0 1 0 1 0 .182
Benintendi cf
3 0 0 0 2 1 .000
Ramirez dh
5 1 1 0 0 0 .250
Martinez lf
4 1 2 0 0 0 .200
Bogaerts ss
4 1 3 2 0 0 .667
Moreland 1b
3 0 0 0 1 0 .000
Núñez 3b
4 0 0 0 0 1 .250
Holt 2b
2 0 0 0 2 1 .000
Leon c
4 0 0 0 0 2 .000
Totals
33 3 7 2 6 5
TAMPA BAY
Span dh
Kiermaier cf
Gómez rf
Miller 1b
Duffy 3b
Wendle 2b
Hechavarria ss
MSmith lf
Sucre c
a­Cron ph
Totals
AB
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
3
2
1
33
R
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 1 1 .286
0 0 0 0 .091
2 1 0 0 .182
0 0 0 2 .143
3 0 0 0 .333
0 1 0 2 .000
0 0 0 1 .182
1 0 1 0 .333
1 0 1 1 .500
0 0 0 0 .125
8 2 3 7
Boston............................... 010 101 000 — 3 7 0
Tampa Bay....................... 000 001 010 — 2 8 1
a­lined into a double play for Sucre in 9th. E—
Duffy (1). LOB—Boston 9, Tampa Bay 8. 2B—Betts
(1), Ramirez (1), Martinez (1), Bogaerts (5),
Gómez (1). HR—Bogaerts (1), off Kittredge,
Gómez (1), off Poyner. SB—Ramirez (1), Duffy (1).
CS—Betts (1). SF—Wendle. Runners left in scor­
ing position—Boston 5 (Benintendi, Holt, Leon 3),
Tampa Bay 4 (Kiermaier 2, Hechavarria 2). RISP—
Boston 1 for 12, Tampa Bay 1 for 7. Runners
moved up—Moreland. GIDP—Ramirez. DP—Bos­
ton 1 (Bogaerts, Moreland); Tampa Bay 1 (Hecha­
varria, Wendle, Miller).
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Porcello W 1­0 5‚ 6 1 1 1 4 89 1.69
Hembree
1‚ 0 0 0 1 2 21 0.00
Poyner
„ 1 1 1 0 0 9 13.50
CSmith
„ 1 0 0 0 1 13 13.50
Kimbrel S 2
1 0 0 0 1 0 16 0.00
Tampa Bay
Kittrdge L 0­1
Yarbrough
Romo
Roe
IP
3‚
4
„
1
H
3
4
0
0
R ER BB SO NP ERA
2 1 1 1 57 2.70
1 1 3 3 73 2.25
0 0 1 1 13 0.00
0 0 1 0 13 6.75
Inherited runners­scored—Hembree 2­1,
Poyner 1­0, Yarbrough 1­1, Romo 2­0. WP—Hem­
bree. Umpires—Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Man­
ny Gonzalez; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Laz Diaz.
T—3:21. A—17,838 (31,042).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
SECOND INNING
RED SOX — Martinez grounded out, third base­
man Duffy to first baseman Miller. Bogaerts hom­
ered to left on a 3­1 count. Moreland flied out to
center fielder Kiermaier. Núñez struck out.
FOURTH INNING
RED SOX — Ramirez doubled to left. Martinez
grounded out, shortstop Hechavarria to first
baseman Miller. Yarbrough pitching. Bogaerts
fouled out to first baseman Miller. Moreland
walked on a full count. Ramirez stole third. Núñez
safe at first on throwing error by third baseman
Duffy, Ramirez scored, Moreland to second. Holt
struck out.
SIXTH INNING
RED SOX — Martinez doubled to right. Bogaerts
doubled to left, Martinez scored. Moreland
grounded out, first baseman Miller unassisted,
Bogaerts to third. Núñez popped out to third
baseman Duffy. Holt walked. Leon struck out.
RAYS — Gómez doubled to center. Miller struck
out. Duffy singled to left, Gómez to third. Hem­
bree pitching. Wendle hit a sacrifice fly to left
fielder Martinez, Gómez scored. On Hembree’s
wild pitch, Duffy to second. Hechavarria struck
out, catcher Leon to first baseman Moreland.
EIGHTH INNING
RAYS — Gómez homered to left on the first
pitch. Miller popped out to first baseman More­
land. Smith pitching. Duffy singled to center.
Wendle struck out. Duffy stole second. Hechavar­
ria flied out to center fielder Benintendi.
the exact numbers.
“God knows,” he said. “A lot
of people are just going to show
up. It’ll be fun.”
The Marlins are expected to
call up 24-year-old righthander
Trevor Richards to face Johnson. It would be his major
league debut.
Richards was signed out of
an independent league in 2016
and finished last season in
Double A. He appeared in four
spring training games and allowed one earned run over 12
innings.
Paying attention
Since the start of spring
training, Red Sox players have
been on the field for the national anthem and have stood
in a straight line a few feet in
Red Sox-Marlins
series thumbnails
At Marlins Park
Miami, Fla.
Monday, 7:10 p.m.
NESN, WEEI­FM (93.7)
W­L ERA
LHP Brian Johnson
—
—
RHP Trevor Richards
—
—
Tuesday, 6:10 p.m.
NESN, WEEI­FM (93.7)
W­L ERA
LHP Chris Sale
0­0 0.00
RHP Jose Urena
0­1 11.25
Head to head: This is the first of
four games; the Sox went 2­2 vs.
the Marlins in 2015.
Miscellany: The depleted Marlins
split a four­game series with the
Cubs to open the season, including
a 2­1 win in a 17­inning marathon
on Friday night . . . Former Red Sox
reliever Junichi Tazawa pitched
three scoreless innings against the
Cubs, allowing one hit and striking
out four . . . Star outfielders Gian­
carlo Stanton, Christian Yelich, and
Marcell Ozuna, and second base­
man Dee Gordon all departed in
the offseason . . . After drawing
32,151 on Opening Day, attendance
was under 14,000 for each of the
final three games.
front of the dugout at the
warning track.
That isn’t unusual for many
teams but is for the Sox. Under
former manager John Farrell,
there was a team rule to be on
the field for the anthem. But
usually there were no more
than a handful of players on
the field and they stood near
the dugout railing.
Cora told the players to be
on the field for the anthem.
They have lined up because
that is what Cora and the
coaches have done.
National success
Monday will be the first of
20 interleague games for the
Sox. They have won 33 of their
last 43 games against National
League teams and were 16-4
last season. Since interleague
play started in 1997, the Sox
are 227-156 (.593). That’s the
best winning percentage in
baseball, just ahead of the Yankees . . . Cora is planning to
give J.D. Martinez a day off
Monday with no DH available.
Of note, Andrew Benintendi replaced Martinez for defensive
reasons in the ninth inning
Sunday . . . With Blake
Swihart, Hector Velazquez,
and Marcus Walden playing
Sunday, Johnson is the only
player on the roster yet to appear in a game.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at peter.abraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@peteabe.
Gronkowski is reportedly leaning toward return in 2018
By Nora Princiotti
GLOBE STAFF
Pa t r i o t s t i g h t e n d R o b
Gronkowski is leaning toward
returning for the 2018 season
and not retiring from football,
something he acknowledged as
a possibility after the Super
Bowl in February, according to
an ESPN report.
The report, citing sources
close to Gronkowski, says that
no final decision has been
made, but that the chance to
continue playing with Tom Brady has him “pretty certain” he’ll
come back. If he does, it would
be despite a lengthy injury history and feeling increasingly
burnt out by the rigid demands
of playing in New England and
for coach Bill Belichick.
There is frustration on both
sides, as Belichick has questioned whether Gronkowski
would be fully committed to
football, according to ESPN.
Gronkowski’s Instagram post
congratulating Danny Amendola, who departed in free
agency for Miami, annoyed
Belichick because it contained
the words “Be FREE, Be HAPPY” which seemed like a shot at
Patriots culture.
That’s a small detail, but it
w o u ld n’ t b e t h e f i r s t t i m e
Gronkowski’s outsized personality rubbed up against the
r u l e s a t Pa t r i o t P l a c e . I t
brought to mind one example
from November, a news confer-
ence after the Dolphins home
game where Brandin Cooks celebrated a touchdown with
Gronkowski by jumping on his
back and riding him like a
horse. Gronkowski said he
wished he was allowed to talk
about it, but that players had
already been chastised for talking about celebrations.
“We got yelled at. We’re not
allowed to talk about celebrations. That’s what we got told.
But , I kind of want to talk
about it, but I kind of don’t because I’ ll get in trouble, so I
d o n ’ t k n o w w h a t t o d o ,”
Gronkowski said.
It was silly and Gronkowski
said it with a laugh, thrilled to
be celebrating the Patriots
17th-consecutive winning season, which the team clinched
that day. Still, it’s an example of
how the organization’s rigid
culture can wear on players.
One former Patriot, asked if he
was happy to be out of the
building, brought up scrutiny
of social media posts as something he did not miss.
Gronkowski also works with
Brady’s trainer Alex Guerrero,
who has been at the center of
disagreements between Patriots coaches and players.
Those examples seem disproportionately small to lead to
something as significant as the
retirement of the most important player in the Patriots off e n se o t h e r t h a n B ra d y. I f
Gronkowski’s frustrations have
Belichick displeased and concerned, that could make it
harder for the sides to reach an
agreement on a new contract, if
that’s something that would
move Gronkowski to stay. For
his All-Pro talent, Gronkowski
is considered underpaid, on the
books for $8 million next year.
Judging by the Patriots’ act i o n s , i t d o e s n’ t l o o k l i k e
they’re bracing for Gronkowski’s departure. They’ve met privately with high-level tight end
draft prospects such as South
Carolina’s Hayden Hurst, but
weren’t active at all in the tight
end market during the busy
free agency period. Austin Seferian-Jenkins, Eric Ebron, Trey
Burton, Jimmy Graham,
Levine Toilolo, Darren Fells,
Niles Paul, and Luke Willson
all switched teams, and there
was nary a whisper about the
Patriots as major bidders for
any of them.
Without Gronkowski, the
Patriots would have Dwayne
Allen, Jacob Hollister, and Will
Tye on the roster at tight end
and would need to find another
No. 1 option at the position if
they couldn’ t coach one of
those players into making a significant leap.
Nora Princiotti can be reached
at nora.princiotti@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter at
@NoraPrinciotti.
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C5
Baseball
AL
EAST
BOSTON
New York
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
W
3
2
2
1
1
L
1
2
2
2
3
Pct.
.750
.500
.500
.333
.250
GB
—
1
1
1½
2
Div. Last 10
3­1
3­1
2­2
2­2
2­2
2­2
0­0
1­2
1­3
1­3
Streak
W3
L2
W2
L2
L3
CENTRAL
Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland
Kansas City
Detroit
W
2
2
1
0
0
L
0
1
2
2
3
Pct.
1.000
.667
.333
.000
.000
GB
—
½
1½
2
2½
Div. Last 10
2­0
2­0
0­0
2­1
0­0
1­2
0­2
0­2
0­0
0­3
Streak
W2
W2
L1
L2
L3
WEST
Houston
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland
Texas
W
3
3
2
1
1
L
1
1
1
3
3
Pct.
.750
.750
.667
.250
.250
GB
—
—
½
2
2
Div. Last 10
3­1
3­1
3­1
3­1
0­0
2­1
1­3
1­3
1­3
1­3
Streak
W2
W3
W1
L3
L2
NL
EAST
Washington
Atlanta
New York
Miami
Philadelphia
W
3
2
2
2
1
L
0
1
1
2
2
Pct.
1.000
.667
.667
.500
.333
GB
—
1
1
1½
2
Div. Last 10
0­0
3­0
2­1
2­1
0­0
2­1
0­0
2­2
1­2
1­2
Streak
W3
W1
L1
W1
L1
CENTRAL
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
St. Louis
Cincinnati
W
3
3
2
1
0
L
0
0
2
2
3
Pct.
1.000
1.000
.500
.333
.000
GB
—
—
1½
2
3
Div. Last 10
0­0
3­0
0­0
3­0
0­0
2­2
0­0
1­2
0­0
0­3
Streak
W3
W3
L1
W1
L3
WEST
Arizona
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Colorado
San Diego
W
2
2
2
1
0
L
1
2
2
2
3
Pct.
.667
.500
.500
.333
.000
GB
—
½
½
1
2
Div. Last 10
2­1
2­1
2­2
2­2
2­2
2­2
1­2
1­2
0­0
0­3
Streak
L1
W2
L2
W1
L3
RESULTS
SUNDAY
BOSTON 2
at Tampa Bay 1
Chi. White Sox (ppd.)
at Kansas City
1st: Pittsburgh 1
at Detroit 0
Houston 8
2d: Pittsburgh 8
at Detroit 6
LA Angels 7
at Oakland 4
at Texas 2
Minnesota 7
at Baltimore 0
At Seattle 5
Cleveland 4
At Toronto 7
NY Yankees 4
Washington 6
at Cincinnati 5
At Miami 6
Chi. Cubs 0
San Francisco
at LA Dodgers
St. Louis 5
at NY Mets 1
BOSTON 3
at Tampa Bay 2
SATURDAY
Pittsburgh (ppd.)
at Detroit
At NY Mets 6
Washington 13
St. Louis 2
at Cincinnati 7
Houston 9
at Texas 3
LA Angels 8
at Oakland 3
At Toronto 5
NY Yankees 3
Cleveland 6
Minnesota 6
at Baltimore 2
Chi. Cubs 10 (10 inn.)
At Atlanta 15
at Miami 6
Philadelphia 2
Chi. White Sox 4
at Kansas City 3
Colorado 2
at Arizona 1
Milwaukee 7
at San Diego 3
At LA Dodgers 5
San Francisco 0
at Seattle 5
MONDAY’S GAMES
Odds
.............2018.............
W­L
ERA
Team .............. 2017 vs. opp ..............
rec.
W­L
IP
ERA
BOSTON AT MIAMI, 7:10 p.m.
Johnson (L)
Richards (R)
­160
+135
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
2­2
0­0
19.2
0.0
6.86
0.00
1­0
—
0.00
—
0­0
0­0
0­1
1­1
7.2
13.1
11.74
4.73
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
1­0
1­0
28.1
6.0
4.13
3.00
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
0­0
1­0
0.0
15.1
0.00
5.87
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
0­1
0­0
6.0
0.0
4.50
0.00
MINNESOTA AT PITTSBURGH, 1:05 p.m.
Lynn (R)
Taillon (R)
+100
­120
BEN MARGOT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shohei Ohtani went six strong innings in his Angels pitching debut, allowing three hits and striking out six in beating the A’s.
Ohtani impresses in his pitching debut
By Janie McCauley
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Angels 7 OAKLAND, Calif. —
Shohei Ohtani could
A’s
4 exhale, at last hav-
ing made it through a whirlwind
week and not one, but two separate debuts in the big leagues.
He got his first career hit, then
three days later earned a win on
the mound. Souvenir balls for
each occasion.
Impressing manager Mike Scioscia with both his poise and repertoire, the two-way star from Japan won his major league pitching debut Sunday. He threw
three-hit ball over six innings and
led the Los Angeles Angels past
the Oakland Athletics, 7-4.
‘‘Personally I feel like I got off
to a good start and obviously the
team went 3-1 on the first road
trip, so I’m very happy with the
results,’’ Ohtani said through a
translator.
After being the designated hitter in the opener, he expected to
be far more nervous to pitch. It
didn’t show.
Reaching the upper 90s with
his fastball and keeping the A’s
guessing with a nifty splitter,
Ohtani struck out six and retired
14 of his final 15 batters.
He didn’t hit while pitching, as
Albert Pujols played DH and
went 0 for 5.
Ohtani pounded his glove following a 1-2-3 shutdown fifth. He
walked one, and the only damage
against him came on Matt Chapman’s three-run homer in the second. The 23-year-old righty briefly removed his cap and looked to
the sky after the drive, then went
back to work and blanked the A’s
the rest of the way.
‘‘After that three-run shot, Scioscia came up to me and said I’m
doing fine,’’ Ohtani said.
Ohtani began the seasonopening series by hitting a single
on the first pitch he saw as a big
leaguer, part of a 1-for-5 day at
the plate. He capped the set by
posting his first win.
Not too shabby, considering he
struggled in spring training with
his arm and bat. He went 0-1
with a 27.00 ERA in a pair of Cactus League outings and wound up
pitching against minor leaguers
on back fields, and also had trou-
ble making contact with his
swing.
Ohtani received ample support from the Los Angeles lineup.
Mike Trout hit a tying double in
the fifth and Justin Upton followed with a go-ahead sacrifice
fly. The Angels added insurance
in the seventh, getting Andrelton
Simmons’s two-run single and an
RBI single from Kole Calhoun.
Ohtani began the game with
four straight outs — fanning
three — before allowing consecutive singles to Matt Joyce and Stephen Piscotty that set up Chapman’s first home run of 2018.
The Angels staked Ohtani to a
quick 2-0 lead on back-to-back
doubles by Luis Valbuena and Jefry Marte second against Daniel
Gossett (0-1).
Cheers of ‘‘Ohtani!’’ greeted
the pitcher as he prepared to
throw his first pitch, a 96-m.p.h.
fastball called strike to Marcus
Semien. Ohtani fanned the leadoff man on four pitches and got
through the first on 13 pitches,
nine for strikes.
In all, Ohtani threw 92 pitches, 63 of them strikes.
Angels 7, A’s 4
at Oakland­Alameda County Coliseum
LA ANGELS
AB R H BI BB SO
Cozart 2b
5 0 2 0 0 0
Trout cf
5 1 2 1 0 0
Upton lf
3 1 1 1 1 1
Pujols dh
5 0 0 0 0 0
Calhoun rf
4 1 1 1 0 0
Simmons ss
4 1 3 2 0 0
Valbuena 3b
4 1 1 1 0 1
Marte 1b
4 1 3 1 0 0
Maldonado c
3 1 0 0 1 1
Totals
37 7 13 7 2 3
OAKLAND
Semien ss
Lowrie 2b
Olson 1b
Davis lf
Joyce dh
Piscotty rf
Chapman 3b
Lucroy c
Powell cf
Totals
AB
3
4
3
4
3
3
3
4
4
31
R
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
4
H
0
0
0
0
2
2
1
0
0
5
BI BB SO
0 1 2
0 0 0
0 1 2
0 0 2
0 1 0
1 1 0
3 1 1
0 0 0
0 0 1
4 5 8
Avg.
.368
.300
.235
.211
.235
.438
.143
.429
.273
Avg.
.294
.235
.143
.286
.286
.267
.286
.167
.143
LA Angels................................020 020 300 — 7 13 0
Oakland...................................030 000 001 — 4 5 1
E—Powell (1). LOB—LA Angels 6, Oakland 5. 2B—
Trout (3), Valbuena (1), Marte 2 (2). HR—Chapman
(1), off Ohtani. SF—Upton. DP—LA Angels 1; Oakland
2.
LA Angels
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Ohtani W 1­0
6 3 3 3 1 6 4.50
Bedrosian
1 0 0 0 1 0 5.40
Wood
1 0 0 0 1 1 0.00
Parker
‚ 2 1 1 1 1 13.5
Middleton S 1
„ 0 0 0 1 0 0.00
Oakland
Gossett L 0­1
Petit
Buchter
Hatcher
Coulombe
Casilla
IP
4
1
1
„
‚
2
H
6
1
2
4
0
0
R ER BB SO
4 4 2 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
3 2 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
ERA
9.00
0.00
0.00
10.8
0.00
0.00
Gossett pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited
runners­scored—Middleton 2­0, Petit 2­2, Coulombe
1­0. WP—Middleton. NP—Ohtani 92, Bedrosian 15,
Wood 14, Parker 18, Middleton 11, Gossett 66, Petit
13, Buchter 24, Hatcher 17, Coulombe 6, Casilla 12.
Umpires—Home, Will Little; First, Ted Barrett; Sec­
ond, Lance Barksdale; Third, Chad Fairchild. T—3:07.
A—14,644 (48,592).
TAMPA BAY AT NY YANKEES, 1:05 p.m.
Pruitt (R)
Montgomery (L)
Off
Off
BLUE JAYS 7, YANKEES 4
KANSAS CITY AT DETROIT, 1:10 p.m.
Hammel (R)
Liriano (L)
­105
­115
ST. LOUIS AT MILWAUKEE, 2:10 p.m.
Mikolas (R)
Davies (R)
+110
­130
CHI. CUBS AT CINCINNATI, 4:10 p.m.
Chatwood (R)
Mahle (R)
­145
+125
CHI. WHITE SOX AT TORONTO, 7:07 p.m.
López (R)
García (L)
+130
­150
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
0­0
0­0
5.1
0.0
5.06
0.00
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
2­1
1­1
19.1
9.2
2.33
5.59
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
1­2
0­1
23.0
4.0
5.87
9.00
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
0­1
2­0
10.0
16.2
6.30
3.24
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
0­0
1­0
6.1
6.0
4.26
0.00
BALTIMORE AT HOUSTON, 7:10 p.m.
Tillman (R)
Morton (R)
+185
­225
PHILADELPHIA AT NY METS, 7:10 p.m.
Lively (R)
Harvey (R)
+110
­130
WASHINGTON AT ATLANTA, 7:35 p.m.
Roark (R)
Newcomb (L)
­130
+110
LA DODGERS AT ARIZONA, 9:40 p.m.
Ryu (L)
Walker (R)
­120
+100
TEXAS AT OAKLAND, 10:05 p.m.
Colon (R)
Triggs (R)
+125
­145
CLEVELAND AT LA ANGELS, 10:07 p.m.
Clevinger (R)
Ramírez (R)
­135
+115
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
1­0
0­1
10.1
6.2
5.23
2.70
Bettis (R)
­120
—
—
0­0
Mitchell (R)
+100
—
—
0­0
Team rec. — Record in games started by pitcher this season
0­1
0­0
4.2
0.0
1.93
0.00
COLORADO AT SAN DIEGO, 10:10 p.m.
PIRATES 1, TIGERS 0
NY YANKEES
Gardner cf
Judge rf
Stanton lf
Gregorius ss
Walker 1b
Drury 3b
Andújar dh
Wade 2b
Romine c
Sánchez ph
Totals
AB
5
3
2
4
4
3
4
4
3
1
33
R
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO
0 0 0 2
1 0 2 2
0 0 3 1
1 1 0 1
1 1 0 1
2 2 1 0
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
5 4 6 12
Avg.
.118
.200
.286
.286
.214
.385
.000
.083
.000
.071
TORONTO
Travis 2b
Donaldson dh
Smoak 1b
Solarte 3b
Granderson lf
Grichuk rf
Martin c
Pillar cf
Ngoepe ss
Morales ph
Díaz ss
Totals
AB
4
3
4
5
4
4
3
4
2
1
1
35
R H BI BB SO
0 1 1 1 2
2 1 0 2 1
2 3 6 1 1
0 1 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 2
1 1 0 1 1
1 3 0 0 0
0 1 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0
7 12 7 5 12
Avg.
.083
.154
.467
.231
.200
.143
.125
.462
.167
.000
.100
DETROIT
Martin cf
Candelario 3b
Cabrera 1b
Castellanos rf
Martinez dh
Hicks c
Mahtook lf
Iglesias ss
Machado 2b
Totals
AB
3
3
4
2
4
2
2
3
3
26
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 0 .111
0 0 1 0 .143
0 0 0 1 .200
1 0 2 1 .375
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 1 1 .000
0 0 1 0 .111
0 0 0 0 .111
1 0 0 1 .333
2 0 6 5
Pittsburgh..................100 000 000 — 1 6 0
Detroit........................000 000 000 — 0 2 0
LOB—Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 5. 2B—Polanco
(2), Bell (1), Moran (1), Castellanos (1). HR—.
CS—Frazier (1), Iglesias (1). DP—Pittsburgh
3; Detroit 3.
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Williams W 1­0
6 0 0 0 5 1 0.00
Feliz
1 1 0 0 0 1 36.00
Kontos
1 1 0 0 1 0 0.00
Rivero S 1
1 0 0 0 0 3 21.60
Toronto
Stroman
Barnes
Axford
Clippard W 1­0
Oh S 1
Detroit
Fulmer L 0­1
Greene
IP
5
1
1
1
1
H
3
1
0
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 3 8 7.20
0 0 0 1 3.86
0 0 2 1 6.75
0 0 1 1 3.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
Gray pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Inherit­
ed runners­scored—Green 1­0. IBB—off Rob­
ertson (Donaldson). NP—Gray 89, Green 26,
Kahnle 18, Robertson 26, Stroman 85, Barnes
16, Axford 16, Clippard 18, Oh 16. Umpires—
Home, David Rackley; First, Kerwin Danley;
Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Scott Barry.
T—3:03. A—29,091 (49,286).
CHICAGO
Almora Jr. cf
Bryant 3b
Rizzo 1b­2b­1b
Russell ss
Schwarber lf
Caratini c
Heyward rf
Báez 2b­1b­2b
Quintana p
La Stella ph
Duensing p
Zobrist ph
Totals
AB
5
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
2
1
0
1
35
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 1 .167
1 0 1 1 .389
1 0 0 0 .150
1 0 0 0 .357
2 0 0 0 .333
0 0 0 1 .000
1 0 0 0 .286
0 0 0 1 .067
0 0 0 2 .000
1 0 0 0 .500
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .364
8 0 1 6
MIAMI
Brinson cf
Dietrich lf
Castro 2b
Anderson 3b
Cooper 1b
Rojas 1b
Maybin rf
Rivera ss
Wallach c
Peters p
Telis ph
Steckenrider p
Guerrero p
Bour ph
Barraclough p
Totals
AB
3
4
2
3
2
2
4
4
3
1
1
0
0
1
0
30
R
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 1 .250
1 1 0 0 .316
1 0 2 0 .294
1 3 1 1 .333
0 0 0 1 .143
1 0 0 0 .333
1 0 0 1 .231
1 0 0 0 .167
2 1 1 0 .154
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 1 .250
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .143
0 0 0 0
—
8 5 5 5
Chicago......................000 000 000 — 0 8 0
Miami.........................000 051 00x — 6 8 0
LOB—Chicago 10, Miami 6. 2B—Russell (2),
Schwarber (2), Anderson (1), Rojas (2), May­
bin (2), Wallach (1). HR—. S—Peters.
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Quintana L 0­1
6 6 6 6 4 2 9.00
Duensing
2 2 0 0 1 3 0.00
Miami
Peters W 1­0
Steckenrider
Guerrero
Barraclough
The Yankees’ Giancarlo Stanton heads back to the
dugout after striking out in the fifth inning.
PITTSBURGH
Frazier dh
Harrison 2b
Polanco rf
Bell 1b
Dickerson lf
Marte cf
Cervelli c
Moran 3b
Mercer ss
Totals
NY Yankees...............004 000 000 — 4 5 0
Toronto......................010 000 24x — 7 12 1
E—Solarte (1). LOB—NY Yankees 8, Toron­
to 9. 2B—Gregorius (3), Díaz (1). HR—Drury
(1), off Stroman, Smoak 2 (2), off Kahnle, off
Robertson.
NY Yankees
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gray
4 7 1 1 3 8 2.25
Green
2 1 0 0 0 4 0.00
Kahnle
„ 1 2 2 1 0 9.00
Robertson BS 1;
1‚ 3 4 4 1 0 18.00
L 0­1
MARLINS 6, CUBS 0
TOM SZCZERBOWSKI/GETTY IMAGES
TWINS 7, ORIOLES 0
GAME 1
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
3 1 1 0 1 1 .400
4 0 0 0 0 1 .222
3 0 1 1 1 1 .500
4 0 2 0 0 0 .500
4 0 0 0 0 0 .100
3 0 1 0 0 0 .375
3 0 0 0 0 0 .222
3 0 1 0 0 0 .111
1 0 0 0 1 1 .143
28 1 6 1 3 4
IP
6
1
1
1
H
6
1
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 1 7.71
0 0 0 2 0.00
IBB—off Quintana (Brinson). HBP—by Pe­
ters (Rizzo). WP—Quintana. NP—Quintana
104, Duensing 32, Peters 89, Steckenrider 14,
Guerrero 18, Barraclough 10. Umpires—
Home, Carlos Torres; First, Larry Vanover;
Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Chris
Guccione. T—2:36. A—10,428 (37,442).
IP
8
1
H
4
2
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 3 1.13
0 0 1 1 16.20
HBP—by Fulmer (Mercer). NP—Williams
85, Feliz 11, Kontos 17, Rivero 14, Fulmer 90,
Greene 23. Umpires—Home, Lance Barrett;
First, John Libka; Second, Bill Welke; Third,
Tony Randazzo. T—2:30. A—14,858 (41,297).
PIRATES 8, TIGERS 6
PITTSBURGH
Harrison 2b
Mercer ss
Marte cf
Bell 1b
Cervelli dh
Freese 3b
Polanco rf
Rodríguez lf
Díaz c
Totals
GAME 2
AB R H BI BB SO
5 2 3 2 0 0
4 0 0 1 0 0
4 2 1 1 1 1
3 0 1 0 1 2
4 1 1 1 0 1
4 1 2 2 0 1
4 0 0 0 0 2
4 0 0 0 0 2
4 2 2 0 0 1
36 8 10 7 2 10
DETROIT
Machado 2b
Candelario 3b
Cabrera dh
Castellanos rf
Goodrum 1b
McCann c
Jones cf
Iglesias ss
Reyes lf
Mahtook ph­lf
Totals
AB
5
5
4
5
5
3
4
4
1
3
39
Avg.
.357
.091
.333
.462
.231
.500
.333
.000
.500
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 1 0 1 .286
0 1 0 0 1 .167
2 3 2 1 1 .357
2 2 1 0 2 .385
0 2 1 0 1 .400
0 1 1 1 0 .333
0 1 0 0 1 .500
0 0 0 0 1 .077
0 0 0 0 0 .000
1 1 0 0 1 .167
6 12 6 2 9
Pittsburgh..................003 050 000 — 8 10 0
Detroit........................200 101 002 — 6 12 0
LOB—Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 8. 2B—Harrison
(1), Machado (3), Cabrera 2 (3), Goodrum (1).
3B—Candelario (1), Castellanos (1). HR—Har­
rison (1), off Carpenter, Marte (1), off Car­
penter, Freese (1), off Farmer, Cabrera (1),
off Kuhl. SB—Marte (1). CS—Bell (2). SF—
Mercer. DP—Detroit 1.
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Kuhl W 1­0
5„ 8 4 4 0 4 6.35
Santana
‚ 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Glasnow
2 1 0 0 2 2 0.00
Neverauskas
0 2 2 2 0 0 18.00
Rivero S 2
1 1 0 0 0 2 13.50
Detroit
Carpenter
Farmer L 0­1
VerHagen
Saupold
Jiménez
IP
3
2
2
1
1
H
5
4
0
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 1 3 9.00
5 5 1 4 22.50
0 0 0 3 9.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
Neverauskas pitched to 2 batters in the
9th. Inherited runners­scored—Santana 2­0,
Rivero 1­1. WP—Farmer, VerHagen. NP—Kuhl
85, Santana 3, Glasnow 37, Neverauskas 7,
Rivero 16, Carpenter 69, Farmer 49, VerHagen
31, Saupold 10, Jiménez 15. Umpires—Home,
Nic Lentz; First, Bill Welke; Second, Tony
Randazzo; Third, John Libka. T—3:14.
A—18,438 (41,297).
MINNESOTA
AB
Dozier 2b
5
Mauer dh
2
Grssman ph­dh
1
Sanó 3b
5
Rosario lf
4
LaMarre ph­lf
1
Morrison 1b
5
Escobar ss
4
Buxton cf
4
Kepler rf
3
Garver c
4
Totals
38
R H BI BB SO
2 2 2 0 1
1 1 0 2 0
0 0 0 0 1
1 1 1 0 4
1 1 0 0 1
0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 1
2 2 2 0 1
0 2 1 0 0
0 0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 1
7 10 6 3 10
BALTIMORE
Davis 1b
Machado ss
Schoop 2b
Jones cf
Mancini lf
Rasmus rf
Beckham 3b
Álvarez dh
Sisco c
Totals
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
AB
3
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
30
ASTROS 8, RANGERS 2
Avg.
.357
.364
.500
.143
.167
1.000
.000
.333
.273
.300
.000
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 0 .000
1 0 0 1 .333
0 0 0 0 .077
0 0 0 2 .083
0 0 0 0 .111
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0 .091
0 0 0 1 .000
2 0 0 0 .400
3 0 1 6
Minnesota..................402 001 000 — 7 10 0
Baltimore...................000 000 000 — 0 3 1
E—Beckham (1). LOB—Minnesota 7, Balti­
more 4. 2B—Mauer (2), Escobar (1), Sisco (1).
HR—Dozier 2 (2), off Gausman, off Araujo,
Sanó (2), off Gausman, Escobar (1), off Gaus­
man. SB—Buxton (2).
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Berríos W 1­0
9 3 0 0 1 6 0.00
Baltimore
IP
Gausman L 0­1
4
Araujo
1„
Bleier
1‚
Brach
1
Givens
1
H
7
2
0
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
6 6 2 5 13.50
1 1 1 2 3.38
0 0 0 0 0.00
0 0 0 1 10.80
0 0 0 2 0.00
Inherited runners­scored—Bleier 1­0. WP—
Gausman 2. NP—Berríos 107, Gausman 73,
Araujo 36, Bleier 15, Brach 6, Givens 20. Um­
pires—Home, Marty Foster; First, Mark Rip­
perger; Second, Joe West; Third, Doug Ed­
dings. T—2:35. A—17,212 (45,971).
NATIONALS 6, REDS 5
WASHINGTON AB
Eaton lf
5
Solís p
0
Madson p
0
Doolittle p
0
Rendon 3b
5
Harper rf
4
Zimmerman 1b
4
Turner ss
4
Taylor cf
3
Montero c
3
Gonzalez p
3
Grace p
0
Goodwin ph­lf
0
Difo 2b
3
Totals
34
R
2
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
6
H BI BB SO Avg.
2 2 0 0 .615
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
1 2 0 0 .231
2 2 1 0 .400
1 0 1 1 .125
1 0 1 1 .273
0 0 1 2 .125
0 0 1 0 .000
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .333
1 0 1 0 .333
8 6 6 6
CINCINNATI
Hamilton cf
Suárez 3b
Votto 1b
Duvall lf
Gennett 2b
Iglesias p
Mesoraco c
Schebler rf
Peraza ss
Romano p
Gallardo p
Peralta p
Gosselin ph­2b
Totals
R
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
5
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 0 2 .111
0 0 2 1 .182
1 0 0 0 .273
1 1 0 1 .222
1 0 0 1 .538
0 0 0 0
—
1 0 0 1 .200
1 0 0 0 .333
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
1 2 1 0 .500
7 4 3 8
AB
5
2
3
4
4
0
4
3
4
2
0
0
1
32
Washington...............200 001 201 — 6 8 0
Cincinnati.................. 000 001 022 — 5 7 0
LOB—Washington 8, Cincinnati 5. 2B—
Hamilton (1), Duvall (1), Gennett (2). HR—
Eaton (2), off Gallardo, Rendon (1), off Roma­
no, Harper 2 (2), off Romano, off Iglesias,
Gosselin (1), off Doolittle. SB—Turner (1),
Difo (1). DP—Washington 2; Cincinnati 1.
Washington
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gonzalez W 1­0 6 5 1 1 1 7 1.50
Grace
1 0 0 0 0 0 9.00
Solís
0 1 2 2 2 0 27.00
Madson
1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
Doolittle S 2
1 1 2 2 0 1 9.00
Cincinnati
Romano L 0­1
Gallardo
Peralta
Iglesias
IP
6
1
1
1
H
4
3
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 4 2 4.50
2 2 1 1 18.00
0 0 1 1 0.00
1 1 0 2 9.00
González pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Solís pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Inherited
runners­scored—Grace 1­0, Madson 3­1.
IBB—off Romano (Montero). HBP—by Solís
(Votto), by Doolittle (Schebler), by Peralta
(Goodwin). NP—Gonzalez 91, Grace 3, Solís
19, Madson 7, Doolittle 20, Romano 95, Gallar­
do 28, Peralta 11, Iglesias 17. Umpires—
Home, Marvin Hudson; First, James Hoye;
Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, Quinn Wolcott.
T—2:47. A—10,335 (42,319).
HOUSTON
Springer rf
Bregman 3b
Altuve 2b
Correa ss
MGonzález 1b
Davis 1b
Gattis dh
Marisnick cf
Stassi c
Fisher lf
Totals
AB
3
5
5
5
4
1
4
5
3
4
39
TEXAS
AB
Andrus ss
3
Tocci cf
0
Gallo 1b
4
Beltré dh
3
Mazara rf
4
Chirinos c
4
Odor 2b
3
Rua lf
3
Profar 3b­ss
3
Robinson cf­3b
3
Totals
30
MARINERS 5, INDIANS 4
R H BI BB SO
0 0 1 1 2
1 1 0 0 0
2 3 0 0 0
2 2 2 0 1
0 0 0 0 3
0 1 0 0 0
1 3 3 1 0
0 0 0 0 4
1 2 1 0 0
1 1 1 0 1
8 13 8 2 11
Avg.
.200
.125
.563
.438
.154
.143
.333
.143
.429
.167
CLEVELAND
AB
Lindor ss
4
Kipnis 2b
4
JRamírez 3b
4
Alonso 1b
4
Encarnacion dh 4
Chisenhall rf
3
Pérez c
3
Naquin lf
4
Zimmer cf
4
Totals
34
R
0
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 1 1 .154
0 0 0 2 .273
0 0 0 0 .000
2 0 0 0 .300
2 3 0 1 .333
1 0 1 1 .300
0 0 1 0 .000
0 0 0 1 .125
1 1 0 2 .111
7 4 3 8
R
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
Avg.
.538
.000
.250
.286
.214
.000
.083
.000
.000
.167
SEATTLE
Gordon cf
Segura ss
Canó 2b
Haniger rf
Seager 3b
Vogelbach dh
Healy 1b
Suzuki lf
Heredia lf
Freitas c
Totals
R
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
5
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 0 1 .333
2 1 0 0 .250
2 0 1 1 .600
1 2 1 0 .625
1 1 1 1 .100
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 1 .222
0 0 1 0 .000
1 0 0 2 .250
8 5 4 8
H BI BB SO
1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
2 1 0 2
0 0 1 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 2
0 0 1 1
0 0 0 3
0 0 0 1
1 1 0 2
4 2 3 12
Houston..................... 000 022 301 — 8 13 0
Texas..........................100 000 010 — 2 4 0
LOB—Houston 8, Texas 4. 2B—Altuve (1),
Correa (3), Gattis 2 (4), Stassi (2), Andrus (2).
3B—Fisher (1). HR—Gallo (1), off Cole, Robin­
son (1), off Devenski. SB—Altuve (1), Correa
(1). SF—Springer. DP—Houston 1.
Houston
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Cole W 1­0
7 2 1 1 3 11 1.29
Devenski
1 2 1 1 0 0 4.50
Giles
1 0 0 0 0 1 4.50
Texas
Minor L 0­1
Martin
Cláudio
Jepsen
Gardewine
IP
4„
„
1
„
2
H
3
2
4
1
3
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 2 5 3.86
2 2 0 1 7.71
3 3 0 2 11.57
0 0 0 0 0.00
1 1 0 3 6.00
Inherited runners­scored—Cláudio 1­1,
Jepsen 1­1. HBP—by Minor (Stassi). PB—
Stassi. NP—Cole 102, Devenski 21, Giles 11,
Minor 93, Martin 17, Cláudio 28, Jepsen 11,
Gardewine 32. Umpires—Home, Gabe Mo­
rales; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Ron Kulpa;
Third, Ed Hickox. T—3:13. A—26,758 (48,114).
DODGERS 9, GIANTS 0
SAN FRAN.
Jackson cf
Panik 2b
McCutchen rf
Posey c
Longoria 3b
Pence lf
Belt 1b
Crawford ss
Stratton p
Osich p
Tomlinson ph
Gómez p
Moronta p
Totals
AB
4
3
4
4
4
4
3
3
1
0
1
0
0
31
LA DODGERS
AB
Taylor cf
5
Font p
0
Seager ss
4
Puig rf
4
Grandal c
4
Bellinger 1b
4
KHrnándz 2b­cf 4
Pederson lf
4
Farmer 3b
3
Hill p
2
Cingrani p
0
Utley ph
1
Fields p
0
Barnes ph­2b
1
Totals
36
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 2 .083
1 0 1 0 .400
0 0 0 1 .063
2 0 0 0 .308
0 0 0 1 .000
1 0 0 1 .286
1 0 1 0 .231
1 0 1 1 .214
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
6 0 3 7
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 2 0 0 2 .267
0 0 0 0 0
—
1 1 0 0 1 .091
2 3 1 0 1 .231
2 2 1 0 1 .400
2 2 2 0 0 .154
1 2 2 0 1 .333
0 0 1 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 1 .333
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 1 1 0 0 .333
9 13 8 0 7
San Francisco...........000 000 000 — 0 6 0
LA Dodgers................000 104 04x — 9 13 0
LOB—San Francisco 8, LA Dodgers 4. 2B—
Posey (2), Belt (1), Taylor (1), Puig (1), KH­
ernández (2). HR—Bellinger (1), off Osich.
SB—Posey (1). CS—Puig (1). S—Stratton.
DP—LA Dodgers 1.
San Francisco
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Stratton L 0­1
5‚ 5 3 3 0 4 5.06
Osich
„ 2 2 2 0 1 10.80
Gómez
1 5 4 4 0 1 36.00
Moronta
1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
LA Dodgers
Hill W 1­0
Cingrani
Fields
Font
IP
6
1
1
1
H
5
0
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 3 5 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
Gómez pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. In­
herited runners­scored—Osich 1­1, Moronta
2­2. IBB—off Hill (Crawford). HBP—by Strat­
ton (Farmer). NP—Stratton 88, Osich 7,
Gómez 22, Moronta 18, Hill 82, Cingrani 14,
Fields 9, Font 21. Umpires—Home, John
Tumpane; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Jim
Reynolds; Third, Mike DiMuro. T—2:47.
A—41,866 (56,000).
AB
4
4
3
2
3
4
4
3
0
4
31
Cleveland...................010 100 020 — 4 7 0
Seattle........................000 020 30x — 5 8 1
E—Segura (1). LOB—Cleveland 6, Seattle 8.
2B—Alonso (1), Segura (1), Canó (2), Seager
(1), Freitas (1). HR—Encarnacion 2 (2), off
Leake, off Nicasio, Gordon (1), off Otero, Han­
iger (2), off Olson. SB—Lindor (1). S—Gordon.
DP—Seattle 1.
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Bauer
5 5 2 2 3 7 3.60
Otero L 0­1
1‚ 1 1 1 0 1 6.75
Olson
„ 2 2 2 0 0 27.00
Goody
1 0 0 0 1 0 0.00
Seattle
Leake W 1­0
Nicasio
Díaz S 2
IP
7
1
1
H
5
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 3 4 2.57
2 2 0 1 9.00
0 0 0 3 0.00
IBB—off Leake (Chisenhall). HBP—by Bau­
er (Haniger). NP—Bauer 101, Otero 24, Olson
13, Goody 12, Leake 101, Nicasio 21, Díaz 17.
Umpires—Home, Jim Wolf; First, D.J. Rey­
burn; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Alfonso
Marquez. T—2:57. A—24,506 (47,943).
CARDINALS 5, METS 1
ST. LOUIS
Fowler rf
Pham cf
Carpenter 2b
Hicks p
Leone p
Ozuna lf
JMartínez 1b
Molina c
DeJong ss
Gyorko 3b
Weaver p
Garcia ph
Bowman p
Muñoz ph
Wong 2b
Totals
AB
4
3
3
0
0
5
4
5
3
3
2
1
0
1
0
34
R
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 3 .000
2 0 2 0 .300
0 0 2 0 .182
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
3 2 0 2 .231
0 0 0 0 .455
1 1 0 0 .333
2 2 1 1 .364
1 0 1 0 .250
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
9 5 7 8
NY METS
Cabrera 2b
Céspedes lf
Bruce rf
Frazier 3b
Flores 1b
Plawecki c
Lagares cf
Matz p
González ph
Sewald p
Evans ph
Rhame p
Blevins p
Ramos p
JoReyes ph
Rosario ss
Totals
AB
4
4
4
3
4
3
4
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
4
32
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 0 .308
1 0 0 0 .364
1 0 0 0 .167
0 0 1 2 .200
0 0 0 2 .167
0 0 1 2 .333
3 0 0 0 .556
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 1 0 .429
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 1 .000
1 1 0 1 .273
7 1 3 8
St. Louis.....................011 110 010 — 5 9 0
NY Mets.....................010 000 000 — 1 7 0
LOB—St. Louis 10, NY Mets 8. 2B—Ozuna
(1), Bruce (1). HR—Molina (2), off Matz, De­
Jong 2 (2), off Matz, off Rhame. SB—Pham
(1), Gyorko (1). S—Matz. DP—NY Mets 2.
St. Louis
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Weaver W 1­0
5 5 1 1 3 3 1.80
Bowman
2 1 0 0 0 2 11.57
Hicks
1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Leone
1 1 0 0 0 2 0.00
NY Mets
Matz L 0­1
Sewald
Rhame
Blevins
Ramos
IP
4
2
1„
‚
1
H
4
3
2
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 3 4 6.75
1 1 1 2 4.50
1 1 1 1 5.40
0 0 2 0 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
Inherited runners­scored—Blevins 1­0.
HBP—by Sewald (JMartínez). WP—Weaver.
NP—Weaver 92, Bowman 23, Hicks 9, Leone
14, Matz 89, Sewald 55, Rhame 30, Blevins 15,
Ramos 19. Umpires—Home, CB Bucknor;
First, Chris Conroy; Second, Fieldin Culbreth;
Third, Brian O'Nora. T—3:15. A—22,486
(41,922).
C6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
Notre Dame wins on last­second shot
uNOTRE DAME
Continued from Page C1
CHRIS O’MEARA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rays pitchers finally cooled off Xander Bogaerts, striking
him out in the ninth to cap an 0-for-5 day.
Hitters have some
catching up to do
Nick Cafardo
ON BASEBALL
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. —
What we’re going to hear is
it’s early, the team won three
out of four, Tampa Bay’s pitching was a lot better than anyone’s given them credit for,
and, of course, the oldie but
goodie, the pitchers are ahead
of the hitters.
We’re already hearing how
negative we are in the media
to dwell on the Red Sox’ lack
of offense amid such an excellent start. But an issue is an
issue. It didn’t come into play
this series, but if it continues,
it will be an issue. After all,
this team had to go out and
spend $110 million on a home
run hitter (J.D. Martinez) because it needed to fix its impotent power numbers.
“We probably could be a
lot more aggressive than
we’ve been,” said Red Sox hitting coach Tim Hyers following Sunday’s 2-1 win over the
Rays. “That will come. [The
Rays] did pitch well. We had
some hitters coming back
shaking their heads a bit, but
we did square up some balls
and hit some balls hard so
that’s a good sign.”
It was a sentiment echoed
by manager Alex Cora, who
took three out of four wins, all
one-run victories, which was a
sore spot for this team a year
ago.
“This lineup will hit,” said
Red Sox first baseman Hanley
Ramirez, who was out of the
lineup Sunday. “We’re just a
little bit off. We’ll get there,
but the good thing is you have
to give a lot of credit to our
pitching. They’ve really kept
us in the games and they’ve
allowed us to win those
games. We’ve got to score
more runs and have those big
innings. We haven’t had that
but we still won.”
The Red Sox are hitting
.214 over the first four games
with 12 extra-base hits — 10
doubles and two homers. Not
exactly what you’re looking
for, but so far the slump
hasn’t hurt. In fact, if it wasn’t
for the bullpen implosion on
Opening Day, the Red Sox
would have swept. They had a
4-0 lead heading into the
eighth inning.
“Yeah, we haven’t been
able to give our pitchers some
breathing room, but we’re
winning the games and that’s
what’s important,” said Mookie Betts. “We want to score
more runs and we need to get
that done.”
Cora had said he pretty
much had the lineups
planned out a few days ahead
in this series. He wanted to
keep some people off their
feet on the hard Tropicana
Field turf and so, even this
early in the season, Cora was
experimenting.
All of Boston’s positional
players have now played after
Blake Swihart (1 for 3) got to
DH in Sunday’s win.
Don’t know about you, but
these games with Tampa Bay
were awfully close, much closer than they should have
been, but that’s because the
Sox just couldn’t muster a big
inning in the four-game series. Tampa Bay, meanwhile,
scored nine runs in the four
games, six coming in one inning on Opening Day.
The Red Sox scored 10
runs. Is that because Tampa’s
pitching has been much better than advertised or because
Boston’s hitting hasn’t woken
up? These are normal earlyseason questions, but it’s obvi-
‘This lineup will
hit. We’re just a
little bit off . . .
The good thing is
you have to give a
lot of credit to our
pitching.’
HANLEY RAMIREZ
ous that the “launch angle”
concept hasn’t taken hold
quite yet.
Sunday’s lineup was particularly curious because even
though Rays starter Jake Faria
is a righthander, he’s been
able to eat up lefthanded hitters, holding them to a .179
average and a .559 OPS last
season. Lefties hit .135
against his virtually unhittable changeup. Only Max
Scherzer (.110), Stephen
Strasburg (.128), and Carlos
Carrasco (.130) were nastier.
Cora decided to sit Andrew
Beinintendi, who has started
the season 0 for 11. Faria exited after allowing a Martinez
RBI single in the fifth inning,
but he held lefthanded hitters
to 1 for 8 with three walks.
The only lefthanded hit off
him was an opposite-field hit
by Swihart in the fourth inning.
Later, with the bases loaded in the sixth, Rafael Devers
singled in the go-ahead run.
But, like last year, the Red Sox
got a run thrown out at the
plate when Brock Holt tried to
score from second base.
We’ve seen some life out of
Martinez the past couple of
days after he started the season 0 for 6.
Martinez was supposed to
be the missing ingredient in
the Sox lineup — the power
source — but that machine
hasn’t been cranked up just
yet. The Red Sox hit two homers in four games — one of
them Eduardo Nunez’s insidethe-park home run and the
other a Xander Bogaerts “outside-the-park” homer.
“Four games and no home
runs?” I kidded Martinez.
“I knew that was coming,”
smiled Martinez, who went 3
for 15 with an RBI, a double,
a pair of runs, two walks, and
five strikeouts in the seasonopening series.
The other bad thing is that
the Sox are now 6 for 36
(.167) with runners in scoring
position. They’ve had their
share of base runners, but
don’t often capitalize. They
were 2 for 10 on Sunday and
left 11 runners on base. One
hit away in so many cases.
Hitting, of course, can be
contagious. Right now leaving
runners on base is an epidemic.
The baseball adage of being as good as your pitching is
certainly true. The Red Sox
have won with pitching and
lost once because of it over
the first four games. As they
head into Miami, which has
been playing extra-inning
games and could have a depleted pitching staff, now
could be the time to take advantage of the situation.
Then again, the pitchers
are ahead of the hitters. Tampa Bay’s pitchers were really
good.
We’ve heard it all before,
but it’s too early to complain,
right?
Nick Cafardo can be reached
at cafardo@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
brate after pulling off the biggest comeback in title game
history. They rallied from a 15point deficit in the third quarter and were down 5 in the final 1:58. Marina Mabrey hit a
3-pointer from the wing and
Young had a shot in the lane to
tie it.
The title came 17 years to
the day after Notre Dame’s only
other championship in 2001 on
Easter.
‘‘It’s Easter Sunday, and all
the Catholics were praying for
us,’’ said coach Muffet McGraw,
who was wearing floral shoes
in honor of the holiday. It was
McGraw’s 800th win at Notre
Dame and the 888th of her career.
When the final buzzer
sounded, a wild celebration
started with the Irish faithful
who were part of the sellout
crowd. McGraw’s team had
fallen short four times in seven
years in the title game, losing
in 2011, 2012, 2014, and 2015.
Many of the Notre Dame alums
who were on teams that had
fallen just short of winning a title were there to enjoy it, including Natalie Achonwa, Natalie Novosel, and Becca Bruszewki
This version of McGraw’s
squad refused to lose, and the
run was even more improbable
because the Irish lost four players over the season to ACL injuries.
Tied as the clock ran down,
Mississippi State star Teaira
McCowan missed a layup with
27.8 seconds left, and both
teams turned the ball over. McCowan then fouled out of the
game stopping an Irish fast
break and set up the final 3 seconds.
After Ogunbowale’s clutch
shot, the officials huddled and
put one-tenth of a second on
the clock. A couple of Mississippi State players had already
headed for the locker room,
while Notre Dame players celebrated.
The court was cleared, and
Mississippi State tossed a futile
inbounds pass into the lane as
the buzzer sounded.
Fo r t h e f o u r t h s t ra i g h t
NCAA game, the Irish found
themselves trailing at the half.
They were down 40-25 early in
RON SCHWANE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Notre Dame’s Arike Ogunbowale sinks the winning shot over Victoria Vivians.
the third quarter before finally
getting on track offensively.
The Irish closed the period
with a 16-1 run to tie the game
at 41 heading to the final quarter.
The Irish (35-3) were
buoyed by severe foul trouble
by Mississippi State that saw all
five of its starters with three
fouls in the third quarter.
It didn’t look good for the
Irish in the first half. After getting out to a 12-6 lead with
3:41 left in the opening quarter, Mississippi State outscored
Notre Dame, 24-5, the remainder of the half.
The Irish went more than
eight minutes without a point,
missing seven shots and committing five turnovers during
the game-changing run.
At the same time, the 6-foot7-inch McCowan and Victoria
Vivians were powering the
Bulldogs offense. McCowan got
the burst going with 5 straight
points and Vivians capped it
with the final 6 points to give
the Bulldogs a 30-17 lead at the
half.
Vivians finished with 21
points and McCowan 18 to go
along with 17 rebounds to lead
the Bulldogs (37-2).
The Irish had just 3 points
in the second quarter, setting
an NCAA Tournament record
for the fewest points in a period. That was 5 fewer than the
previous mark for futility set by
Syracuse in 2016 against
UConn.
It didn’t matter in the end as
Notre Dame found a way to rally, just as they had done all season.
‘‘This team is relentlessly
driven,’’ said Jess Shepard, who
scored 19 points to lead the
Irish. ‘‘We've been down multiple times this year, but nobody
stops us.’’
N.H. native is a Michigan Fab Find
uGASPER
Continued from Page C1
University of New Hampshire,
or the University of Maine, and
had one offer to play Division 2
basketball from Merrimack
Co l l e ge e n d u p a s t h e 5 3 d
1,000-point scorer in the history of Michigan basketball and
on a team playing for the national championship?
“A lot of luck, a lot of things
breaking and falling your way,”
said Robinson, who sat out the
2014-15 season after transferring. “There’s no [blueprint]
for it quite frankly. It just kind
of had to all come together, and
fortunately for me it did. It’s a
once-in-five-lifetimes situation
that something like that happens.
“I’m fully aware that I’m an
anomaly, not because there are
players in Division 3 who aren’t
good enough. But more so just
because things have to fall your
way.”
The plan wasn’t for Robinson to leave Williams, not after
a scintillating freshman season
in which he averaged 17.1
points per game and became
the first Williams freshman to
score 500-plus points. Robinson and Williams were a perfect fit.
He had committed to the
school before he helped Phillips Exeter capture its first
NEPSAC Class A championship
in 2013. He had a strong bond
with Williams basketball legend Mike Crotty (Robinson’s
AAU coach) and deep basketball connection with Williams
coach Mike Maker.
Maker was the first one to
make the leap to Division 1,
leaving for Marist, which fired
him last month after four seasons. Maker called his old boss
at West Virginia, Michigan
coach John Beilein, and told
him Robinson might be just the
shooter the Wolverines were
looking to import to Ann Arbor.
Beilein, who coached a season at Division 3 Nazareth Col-
NCAA thumbnail
A look at Monday’s NCAA Tourna­
ment final:
1. Villanova (35­4) vs. 3. Michigan
(33­7), 9:20 p.m.m TBS: A team
could not play better than Villanova
did in dismissing Kansas in the
semifinals, treating the Jayhawks
like a 16 seed from the SWAC. The
Wildcats have set the NCAA record
for 3­pointers in a season but it’s
not like they chuck up threes indis­
criminately; it all happens within
their finely tuned offensive con­
cept. As we in Boston know, they
can win in other ways as they
proved against Texas Tech in the
East final. Michigan is a hot team
with a 14­game winning streak but
the Wolverines only played about
12­13 really good minutes against
Loyola, and that was good enough.
It won’t be Monday night. They’ll
need to play well for 40 minutes to
even have a chance and they’ll
have to hit 10­plus threes to win. I
don’t think that’s happening.
JOE SULLIVAN
lege and was the head coach at
Division 2 Le Moyne College for
nine seasons, was probably
more receptive than most
coaches to listening to his former assistant and taking a
chance on a Division 3 refugee.
There were people who told
Robinson that he was making a
huge mistake. That he would
never crack the rotation for a
Power Five conference school.
He had heard it all before when
he was at Governor’s, scrounging for playing time and registering DNP-CDs.
Tom Brady was doubted,
underappreciated, and underestimated during his time as a
football player at Michigan.
Robinson has a somewhat similar story from his time at Governor’s. He grew physically
there — going from a 5-6 freshman to a 6-5 senior — and emotionally.
“I think that was the first
time that my love for basketball
was really tested. I didn’t play
really at all as a junior, and, as a
lot of you know, your junior
year in high school is when
you’re supposed to start getting
recruited,” said Robinson. “I
found myself sitting on the
bench, literally posting DNPs. I
kind of made a decision that if I
was going to do this then I
needed to commit myself to it.
“I’m thankful for the support system — really my family
— at that time that encouraged
me and believed in me. I have a
lot of memories there, some
good, some bad. But I’m thankful certainly for my time there.”
He is also thankful for another Final Four. He admits
that this one is a little different
from his first one in sleepy Salem, Va. Back then Robinson
was wowed that Williams got a
police escort to the championship game.
Robinson is still close
friends with former Williams
teammates Dan Aronowitz,
Mike Greenman, and Dan
Wohl. They still grieve a gutwrenching loss to WisconsinWhitewater. Quardell Young
drove the length of the court
Tyus Edney-style for a traditional 3-point play with 0.9 seconds left that provided a 75-73
Wisconsin-Whitewater victory.
Robinson, who had 17
points that day, launched Williams’s last shot at that national
title, a desperate half-court
heave.
Robinson said Young’s shot
is his most vivid individual
memory from his first Final
Four, but what resonates most
from the experience is the basketball brotherhood that Williams team built.
“I loved that experience as
well as I loved this one,” said
Robinson.
“In the moment, it’s everything; the same way that this is
everything to us that was everything to me back then. The
level of the national eye is different, but when you put in the
hours with your teammates,
you practice for 12 months of
the year and put everything
you got into something and
love your brothers the way that
you should it means just the
same. The level doesn’t really
matter.”
Robinson’s unorthodox
road to Division 1 served him
well this season.
He started the first 18
games before he was sent to the
bench in favor of more-athletic
freshman Isaiah Livers. Robinson embraced his new role and
was named the Big Ten Sixth
Man of the Year.
“He handled that like a pro,”
said Livers. “If I ever get like I’m
starting and a young guy comes
and takes my spot, I’m definitely going to take it as he did.”
In the national semifinal
victory over NCAA Tournament darling Loyola Chicago
on Saturday night, Robinson,
who is averaging 9.4 points per
game, scored all 9 of his points
in the second half of Michigan’s
comeback. He hit a 3-pointer
with 17:47 left that broke a
string of 10 straight Michigan
3-point misses.
Michigan is 29-0 this season
when Robinson scores 6 points
or more.
The symmetry of his career
is remarkable. The last game
he played for Williams was a
national championship game.
The last game he’ ll play for
Michigan will be a national
championship game.
“Yeah, I hope there isn’t too
much symmetry in terms of the
loss,” said Robinson. “Though
some symmetry is OK. I’m certainly appreciative of it . . . It’s
incredible the journey that I’ve
taken, and the people that I’ve
been able to share it with along
the way.”
It would be a fitting ending
to Robinson’s road less-traveled
journey if the Fab Find accomplished something the fabled
Fab Five never did — winning a
national championship.
Christopher L. Gasper is a
Globe columnist. He can be
reached at cgasper@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@cgasper.
T h e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C7
Scoreboard
Colleges
JOSH HEDGES/GETTY IMAGES
Ian Poulter won the Houston Open — and the last available spot for the Masters.
Playoff pays off for Poulter
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ian Poulter delivered another big moment Sunday, this
one for himself.
Down to
GOLF
his last putt,
ROUNDUP
Poulter made
a 20-foot birdie on the 18th hole to force a
playoff with Beau Hossler, and
then he won the Hous ton
Open with a par on the first extra hole to earn the last spot in
the Masters.
One week after Poulter was
mistakenly told he had locked
up a spot at Augusta National
through the world ranking, he
left no doubt by winning with
a clutch moment reminiscent
of his Ryder Cup heroics from
Medinah in 2012.
‘‘I had to dig deep today,’’
said Poulter, who closed with a
5-under-par 67.
Hossler, who also shot 67,
overcame a three-shot deficit
with four straight birdies on
the back nine. He had a
chance to win on the 18th in
regulation with a 30-foot birdie putt that trickled over the
right edge of the cup.
That set the stage for
Poulter, and the 42-year-old
from England lived up to his
nickname as ‘‘The Postman’’
by delivering his biggest putt
in years. Poulter pounded his
chest five times when the putt
dropped, and all Hossler could
do was smile.
In the playoff on the 18th,
one of the more daunting fin-
ishing holes off the tee with
water down the left side and a
bunker to the right, Hossler
found the bunker for the second time. He hit into a greenside bunker, and his third shot
caught way too much ball and
went over the green and into
the water.
Poulter was safely on the
green as Hossler took his penalty drop, chipped onto the
green and took two putts for a
triple bogey. They finished at
19-under 269.
Poulter won for the third
time on the PGA Tour, and his
first in America since the
Match Play in 2010 at Arizona.
When he reached the quarterfinals of the Dell Technologies Match Play last weekend
in Austin, he was told that it
was enough to get him into the
top 50 in the world ranking —
the cutoff for qualifying for the
Masters — by the end of the
weekend.It turned out he
needed to win his quarterfinal
match; Poulter was informed
of the mistake before he teed
off. Kevin Kisner beat him, 8
and 6.
Poulter was so disappointed that he contemplated not
even going to Houston, and
when he opened with a 73 in a
first round of low scoring, he
packed his bags and prepared
to go home to Florida the next
day. Instead, he bounced back
with a 64, and shot 65-67 on
the weekend.
LPGA — Inbee Park and Per-
nilla Lindberg played until it
was too dark to see — and still
couldn’t decide the ANA Inspiration in Rancho Mirage, Calif.
They’ll return to Mission
Hills on Monday morning for
the fifth extra hole in the tour’s
first major championship of
the season.
Jennifer Song dropped out
with a par on the third playoff
hole, and Park and Lindberg
decided to take one more trip
down the par-5 18th in fading
light.
With portable lights and
the scoreboard helping illuminate the green, Park made a 6foot par putt and Lindberg
made a short putt to match.
They finished at 7:21 p.m., 15
minutes after sunset.
Play will resume at 8 a.m.
PST on the par-4 10th in the
first Monday finish in tournament history.
On the third extra hole,
Park hit a wedge from the
rough to 1½ feet to set up a
birdie, and Lindberg made a 5footer. Song missed a 10-foot
birdie try.
Park and Song had putts to
win on the first two extra
holes. Park missed from 15
feet on the first, and Song’s 7footer went to the right on the
second.
Park scrambled to save par
on the second playoff hole after hitting into the right fairway bunker and nearly hitting
her third into Poppie’s Pond
right of the green.
SportsLog
Antipin suffered concussion in hit
Buffalo Sabres defenseman Victor Antipin
suffered a concussion and a broken nose and
will be out indefinitely when he was checked
into the glass during Saturday night’s game
against the Predators. The Sabres said Antipin
also suffered cuts to his face and dental injuries
when he was hit by Predators forward Scott
Hartnell behind the Buffalo net. Antipin was
hospitalized briefly. Hartnell was given a fiveminute major and a game misconduct for the
hit. Hartnell said he was just trying to finish a
check and was not head hunting with the Predators leading at that point. “I didn’t try to hurt
the guy,” Hartnell said. “It was just kind of a
hockey play. Those plays happen 10, 15 times a
game. It was just an unfortunate accident.” . . .
Philipp Grubauer made 36 saves and the Washington Capitals celebrated Alex Ovechkin’s
1,000th regular-season game by clinching their
third straight division title with a 3-1 win over
the host Pittsburgh Penguins. With the win, the
Capitals secured home-ice advantage through
the first two rounds of the postseason . . . Wil­
liam Karlsson scored a shorthanded goal in the
third period, and the expansion Vegas Golden
Knights clinched the Pacific Division title with a
3-2 victory over the Sharks on Saturday night.
In a pregame ceremony, the Golden Knights retired No. 58, raising a banner with 58 stars and
the names of the lives lost in the Oct. 1 concert
shooting in Las Vegas.
NBA
Heat fine Whiteside for rant
The Miami Heat fined center Hassan White­
side an undisclosed amount for ‘‘comments
detrimental to the team’’ — a response to his remarks expressing frustration with his role. He
went on an expletive-laden tirade after Miami’s
110-109 overtime loss Saturday to the Brooklyn
Nets, when the Heat missed a chance to clinch a
playoff spot, saying he should play more and
might be better elsewhere . . . Ben Simmons had
20 points and 15 assists as the Philadelphia
76ers kept up their passing prowess, beating
the Hornets, 119-102, in Charlotte, N.C., for
their 10th win in a row. The Sixers set a team record with its ninth straight game of 30 or more
assists — they had 36 on their 48 baskets . . .
Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said Kawhi Leon­
ard is continuing his injury rehabilitation in
New York with his own team of doctors, but is
unsure when the forward and "his group" will
clear him to play. Leonard has missed all but
nine games this season while nursing right
quadriceps tendinopathy, an injury that flared
up late in the offseason . . . Warriors guard Pat­
rick McCaw was released from a hospital following a terrifying fall during Saturday’s game
at Sacramento. The team said preliminary tests
showed McCaw had no structural damage after
suffering what was listed as a bruised lumbar
spine. The second-year pro was taken on a
stretcher after a fall following a flagrant-one
foul by the Kings’ Vince Carter in the Warriors’
112-96 win . . . Forward Jeremy Evans, the 2012
slam dunk contest champion and six-year veteran, signed a 10-day contract with the Hawks.
Evans, 30, last played in the NBA with the Dallas Mavericks in the 2015-16 season.
MISCELLANY
Chargers pick up QB Smith
Quarterback Geno Smith agreed to terms on
a one-year deal with the Los Angeles Chargers.
Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Smith will
likely join Cardale Jones in backing up Phillip
Rivers. Smith played four seasons with the Jets,
then spent last season with the Giants. Smith
has appeared in 35 games, including 31 starts,
and thrown for 6,174 yards with 29 touchdowns . . . John Isner won the biggest title of his
14-year career, holding every service game and
rallying past Alexander Zverev in the Miami
Open men’s tennis final, 6-7 (4-7), 6-4, 6-4, in
Key Biscayne, Fla. . . . Dele Alli scored twice in
four minutes as Tottenham won at Chelsea, 3-1,
for the first time 28 years in English Premier
League soccer . . . Pelayo Novo, a midfielder for
the Spanish second-division soccer club Albacete, faces a "very slow" recovery after falling
from the third floor of the team's hotel, the club
said. Novo was in stable condition a day after
undergoing surgery for multiple fractures.
Novo fell into an open space by a set of stairs in
an interior area of the hotel, reportedly while
leaning on a railing and using his phone . . .
Max Holloway will attempt to become a two-division UFC champion when he steps in for injured Tony Ferguson at UFC 223 in Brooklyn on
Saturday. Holloway (19-3) will fight Khabib
Nurmagomedov (25-0) for the UFC lightweight
title in the main event at Barclays Center, the
UFC announced.
Basketball box scores
MEN
FINAL FOUR
Villanova, 95­79
At San Antonio
KANSAS (31­8) — Azubuike 4­6 0­0 8,
Vick 4­7 0­0 8, Mykhailiuk 2­8 5­6 10,
Newman 6­14 7­8 21, Graham 9­18 1­2
23, Cunliffe 0­0 0­0 0, Garrett 0­4 0­0 0,
Lightfoot 0­0 0­0 0, Teahan 0­0 0­0 0,
Young 0­0 0­0 0, Sosinski 1­1 0­0 2, De
Sousa 2­4 3­4 7. Totals 28­62 16­20 79.
VILLANOVA (35­4) — Spellman 6­15
0­0 15, Booth 4­9 0­0 10, Bridges 4­8 0­0
10, Brunson 7­14 1­3 18, Paschall 10­11
0­0 24, Cosby­Roundtree 0­0 0­0 0, Del­
aney 0­0 0­0 0, Grace 0­0 0­0 0, Samuels
0­0 0­0 0, Gillespie 1­2 0­0 3, DiVincenzo
4­6 4­4 15. Totals 36­65 5­7 95.
Halftime: Villanova, 47­32. 3­pt.
goals: Kansas 7­21 (Vick 0­2, Mykhaili­
uk 1­4, Newman 2­5, Graham 4­8, Gar­
rett 0­2), Vill 18­40 (Spellman 3­9,
Booth 2­6, Bridges 2­5, Brunson 3­8,
Paschall 4­5, Gillespie 1­2, DiVincenzo
3­5). Rebounds: Kansas 33 (Newman
8), Vill 33 (Spellman 13). Assists: Kan­
sas 8 (Mykhailiuk, Graham 3), Vill 20
(Booth, Brunson 6). Fouls: Kansas 12,
Vill 14. A: 68,257.
Michigan, 69­57
At San Antonio
LOYOLA CHICAGO (32­6) — Krutwig
7­11 3­4 17, Ingram 1­4 0­0 2, Richard­
son 2­4 0­0 4, Townes 4­12 0­0 8, Custer
5­9 4­4 15, DiNardi 0­0 0­0 0, Negron 0­0
0­0 0, Shanks 0­0 0­0 0, Skokna 0­2 0­0
0, Williamson 0­2 0­0 0, Satterwhite 0­0
1­2 1, Jackson 3­7 4­4 10. Totals 22­51
12­14 57.
MICHIGAN (33­7) — Livers 0­0 0­0 0,
Wagner 10­16 1­2 24, Simpson 0­6 0­0 0,
Abdur­Rahkman 2­11 3­4 7, Matthews
7­12 2­4 17, Baird 0­0 0­0 0, Brooks 0­0
0­0 0, Davis 0­0 0­0 0, Watson 0­0 0­0 0,
Teske 1­1 0­0 2, Simmons 1­2 0­0 3,
Poole 2­5 3­4 7, Robinson 2­6 3­4 9. To­
tals 25­59 12­18 69.
Halftime: Loyola Chicago, 29­22. 3­
pt. goals: Ly­Il 1­10 (Ingram 0­2, Rich­
ardson 0­1, Townes 0­2, Custer 1­3,
Skokna 0­1, Williamson 0­1), Mich 7­28
(Wagner 3­7, Simpson 0­3, Abdur­Rah­
kman 0­5, Matthews 1­2, Simmons 1­2,
Poole 0­3, Robinson 2­6). Rebounds:
Ly­Il 32 (Ingram 9), Mich 36 (Wagner
15). Assists: Ly­Il 6 (Ingram 2), Mich 8
(Simpson 3). Fouls: Ly­Il 17, Mich 11.
WOMEN
National Championship
Notre Dame, 61­58
At Columbus, Ohio
NOTRE DAME (35­3) — Westbeld 2­4
2­2 6, Shepard 8­10 3­3 19, Young 2­7
2­2 6, Mabrey 3­9 3­3 10, Ogunbowale
6­21 5­7 18, Nelson 1­1 0­0 2. Totals 22­
52 15­17 61.
MISSISSIPPI STATE (37­2) — McCow­
an 7­19 4­8 18, Johnson 1­6 0­0 3,
Schaefer 2­5 0­0 6, William 3­4 0­0 6,
Vivians 8­18 4­5 21, Bibby 0­2 0­0 0,
Campbell 0­0 0­0 0, Danberry 1­5 0­2 2,
Holmes 0­0 2­2 2. Totals 22­59 10­17 58.
Halftime: Tied at . 3­pt. goals: ND 2­9
(Westbeld 0­1, Shepard 0­1, Mabrey
1­4, Ogunbowale 1­3), MissSt 4­16
(Johnson 1­5, Schaefer 2­5, William 0­1,
Vivians 1­5). Rebounds: ND 35 (West­
beld 9), MissSt 38 (McCowan 17). As­
sists: ND 8 (Shepard, Young, Mabrey
2), MissSt 9 (Danberry 3). Fouls: ND 17,
MissSt 21. A: 19,599.
HOCKEY
MEN’S NCAA DIV. 1 TOURNEY
NORTHEAST REGIONAL
At DCU Center, Worcester
Saturday, March 24
Boston University 3..................Cornell 1
Michigan 3...................... Northeastern 2
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Michigan 6..............Boston University 3
EAST REGIONAL
At Webster Bank Arena, Bridgeport,
Conn.
Friday, March 23
Notre Dame 4.............. Michigan Tech 3
Providence 1...........................Clarkson 0
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Notre Dame 2.....................Providence 1
MIDWEST REGIONAL
At PPL Center, Allentown, Pa.
Saturday, March 24
Ohio State 4..........................Princeton 2
Denver 5..............................Penn State 1
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Ohio State 5...............................Denver 1
WEST REGIONAL
At Sioux Falls, S.D.
Friday, March 23
Air Force 4........................St. Cloud St. 1
Minn. Deluth 3.....MSU­Mankato 2 (OT)
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Minn. Duluth 2.......................Air Force 1
FROZEN FOUR
at Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul
Thursday, April 5 — Semifinals
Ohio State vs. Minnesota­Duluth, 6
p.m.; Notre Dame vs. Michigan, 9:30
Saturday, April 7 — Final
Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.
NBA G League
Playoffs
Single Elimination
CONFERENCE QUARTERFINALS
Eastern Conference
Raptors 92....................Grand Rapids 88
Erie 96....................................Lakeland 90
Western Conference
Rio Grande Valley 107............Texas 100
South Bay 125......... Oklahoma City 105
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Eastern Conference
Mon., Apr. 2: Raptors at Westchester7
Tue., Apr. 3: Erie at Fort Wayne..........7
Western Conference
Mon., Apr. 2: Rio Grande at Austin.....7
Tue., Apr. 3: South Bay at Reno...........9
Tennis
MIAMI OPEN
At Key Biscayne, Fla.
Singles
Men
Championship
John Isner (14) def. Alexander
Zverev (4), 6­7 (4), 6­4, 6­4.
Doubles
Women
Championship
Ashleigh Barty, and CoCo
Vandeweghe def. Barbora Krejcikova
and Katerina Siniakova (6), 6­2, 6­1.
TUE
MIA
7:10
NESN
MIA
6:10
NESN
TB
7:30
NBCSN
4/2
BASKETBALL
MEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT
EAST REGIONAL
Friday, March 23 — Semifinals
Villanova 90..................West Virginia 78
Purdue 65.........................Texas Tech 78
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Villanova 71......................Texas Tech 59
SOUTH REGIONAL
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Loyola­Chicago 78.......Kansas State 62
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Friday, March 23 — Semifinals
Kansas 80..............................Clemson 76
Duke 69.................................Syracuse 65
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Kansas 85...........................Duke 81 (OT)
WEST REGIONAL
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Michigan 58...................Florida State 54
FINAL FOUR
Saturday, March 31
Michigan 69..............Loyola­Chicago 57
Villanova 95.............................Kansas 79
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP
Monday, April 2
Michigan vs. Villanova..................... 9:20
WOMEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT
ALBANY REGIONAL
Monday, March 26 — Final
UConn 94....................South Carolina 65
SPOKANE REGIONAL
Monday, March 26 — Final
Notre Dame 84........................Oregon 74
KANSAS CITY REGIONAL
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Mississippi St. 89.......................UCLA 73
LEXINGTON REGIONAL
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Louisville 76..................Oregon State 43
FINAL FOUR
Friday, March 30
Notre Dame 91................UConn 89 (OT)
Mississippi State 73..Louisville 63 (OT)
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP
Sunday, April 1
Notre Dame 61...........Mississippi St. 58
NIT
MEN
Tuesday, March 27 — Semifinals
at Madison Square Garden
Western Kentucky 64.................Utah 69
Penn State 75........Mississippi State 60
Thursday, March 29 — Final
Penn State 82.............................. Utah 66
WOMEN
Wed., March 28 — Semifinals
Virginia Tech 64..........West Virginia 61
Indiana 71......................................TCU 58
Saturday, March 31 — Final
Indiana 65.....................Virginia Tech 57
MON
4/3
MIL
8:00
NBCSB*
WED
4/4
Y
THU
FRI
Y
Y
SAT
SUN
TB
2:05
NESN
TB
1:05
NESN
TB
1:05
NESN
FLA
7:30
NESN
OTT
7:00
NESN
FLA
7:30
NESN
4/5
4/6
TOR
8:00
ESPN,
NBCSB
4/7
4/8
CHI
7:30
NBCSB
ATL
1:00
NBCSB
MTL
7:30
myTV38
Home games shaded
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI­FM 93.7; Bruins, Celtics, and Revolution, WBZ­FM 98.5
ON THE AIR
BASEBALL
1:05 p.m.
7:10 p.m.
7:10 p.m.
10:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay at NY Yankees
Baltimore at Houston
Boston at Miami
Cleveland at LA Angels
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
9:20 p.m.
NCAA final: Michigan vs. Villanova
ESPN
ESPN
NESN
ESPN2
TBS
Golf
WEB.COM SAVANNAH
At Golf Club of Houston
Humble, Texas
Final (Par: 72)
(x­won on first playoff hole)
$1,260,000 (­19)
x­Ian Poulter................73­64­65­67—269
$756,000 (­19)
Beau Hossler................65­68­69­67—269
$406,000 (­16)
Emiliano Grillo.............69­68­67­68—272
Jordan Spieth...............68­67­71­66—272
$280,000 (­15)
Sam Ryder .................. 66­68­71­68—273
$243,250 (­14)
Keith Mitchell..............67­71­67­69—274
Henrik Stenson............68­68­69­69—274
$182,000 (­13)
Abraham Ancer...........68­66­72­69—275
Paul Dunne...................64­71­69­71—275
Matt Every....................67­70­72­66—275
Russell Henley.............69­71­70­65—275
Matt Kuchar.................68­68­69­70—275
Julian Suri.....................66­69­73­67—275
$122,500 (­12)
N. Lindheim..................68­66­73­69—276
Shane Lowry................68­68­71­69—276
Grayson Murray..........67­69­72­68—276
M. Thompson...............67­71­70­68—276
$88,200 (­11)
Daniel Berger...............69­72­68­68—277
Bud Cauley...................67­69­71­70—277
Robert Garrigus...........69­69­67­72—277
Chesson Hadley.......... 68­68­69­72—277
Charles Howell III....... 71­67­70­69—277
Nate Lashley................70­69­68­70—277
$54,163 (­10)
Bronson Burgoon........67­68­75­68—278
Tony Finau....................70­70­69­69—278
Luke List.......................68­68­70­72—278
Jamie Lovemark..........69­69­71­69—278
Phil Mickelson.............68­71­72­67—278
Scott Piercy..................68­70­70­70—278
Martin Piller.................68­73­70­67—278
Shawn Stefani.............67­69­70­72—278
$34,809 (­9)
Rob Oppenheim.......... 69­72­72­66—279
Roberto Diaz................68­69­72­70—279
Lucas Glover................65­73­72­69—279
James Hahn................. 69­67­73­70—279
J.B. Holmes...................73­68­68­70—279
John Huh.......................70­67­70­72—279
Andrew Putnam..........71­69­69­70—279
Kevin Tway.................. 65­70­69­75—279
Tyrone Aswegen.........72­68­71­68—279
Nick Watney................ 71­69­69­70—279
Aaron Wis.....................69­69­71­70—279
$20,860 (­8)
Ryan Armour................66­70­72­72—280
Keegan Bradley...........68­71­70­71—280
Ben Crane.....................72­67­72­69—280
Rickie Fowler...............66­68­73­73—280
Hunter Mahan.............71­69­70­70—280
Denny McCarthy.........68­73­71­68—280
Troy Merritt.................69­69­72­70—280
Brett Stegmaier...........67­69­74­70—280
Kevin Streelman..........68­72­69­71—280
$16,083 (­7)
Byeong Hun An...........69­72­71­69—281
Tyler Duncan............... 68­72­71­70—281
Bobby Gates................ 70­71­70­70—281
Seungsu Han................71­70­71­69—281
Matt Jones....................70­71­72­68—281
Thomas Pieters...........69­72­70­70—281
Justin Rose...................68­69­72­72—281
Johnson Wagner.........71­67­71­72—281
$15,190 (­6)
Brandon Harkins.........70­71­70­71—282
Tom Hoge.....................68­73­68­73—282
Seamus Power............ 67­72­74­69—282
Adam Schenk...............70­69­73­70—282
$14,630 (­5)
Chad Campbell............69­71­73­70—283
Jason Dufner................71­67­71­74—283
Danny Lee.................... 68­70­70­75—283
Sean O’Hair..................71­68­74­70—283
$14,210 (­4)
Tom Lovelady..............70­69­70­75—284
Dawie van der Walt....70­69­69­76—284
$13,930 (­3)
Greg Chalmers............67­72­65­81—285
Rory Sabbatini.............69­71­71­74—285
$13,650 (­2)
Ernie Els........................70­71­71­74—286
Sam Saunders.............70­66­75­75—286
$13,440 (­1)
Aaron Baddeley...........71­68­74­74—287
$13,300 (Even)
Ethan Tracy..................70­67­73­78—288
Made cut did not finish
$12,950 (­2)
Scott Brown.......................71­70­73—214
Jonathan Byrd...................69­70­75—214
Joel Dahmen......................68­71­75—214
Bill Haas.............................68­72­74—214
$12,320 (­1)
Jason Kokrak.....................67­74­74—215
Kelly Kraft..........................70­71­74—215
Ben Silverman...................73­68­74—215
Scott Stallings...................73­68­74—215
Lee Westwood..................69­70­76—215
$11,830 (Even)
Fabian Gomez...................68­73­75—216
Richy Werenski.................70­71­75—216
New England players
279 (­9) — Rob Oppenheim, $34,809,
Andover, 69­72­72­66
280 (­8) — Keegan Bradley, $20,860,
Hopkinton, 68­71­70­71
215 (­1) — Scott Stallings, $12,320,
Worcester, 73­68­74
216 (E) — Richy Werenski, $11,830,
South Hadley, 70­71­75
At Landings Club ­ Deer Creek GC
Savannah, Ga.
Final (Par: 72)
$99,000 (­21)
Sam Burns....................72­65­65­65—267
$59,400 (­20)
Roberto Castro............73­65­66­64—268
$31,900 (­17)
Justin Hueber...............67­67­69­68—271
Scott Langley...............70­66­68­67—271
$20,075 (­15)
Julian Etulain............... 68­68­67­70—273
Edward Loar................ 68­65­70­70—273
Curtis Luck...................71­68­69­65—273
$15,950 (­14)
John Chin......................68­69­69­68—274
Sungjae Im...................70­67­71­66—274
Chase Wright...............69­70­68­67—274
$12,100 (­13)
Cameron Champ.........67­70­67­71—275
Kyle Jones....................65­69­75­66—275
Max Marsico................67­68­70­70—275
Ryan McCormick.........69­67­72­67—275
$8,250 (­12)
Mark Anderson............68­68­70­70—276
Eric Axley..................... 71­68­68­69—276
Kevin Dougherty.........69­67­71­69—276
Michael Hebert............71­67­70­68—276
Brady Schnell...............72­67­73­64—276
Ben Taylor....................68­72­70­66—276
Josh Teater...................68­68­71­69—276
$5,316 (­11)
Jamie Arnold................70­69­69­69—277
Joseph Bramlett..........70­70­68­69—277
Christian Brand...........65­69­71­72—277
Cameron Percy............69­67­73­68—277
Peter Tomasulo...........69­68­73­67—277
$3,891 (­10)
Seann Harlingten........68­70­71­69—278
Bo Hoag........................74­66­66­72—278
Dan McCarthy..............70­66­72­70—278
Sebastian Munoz........69­70­72­67—278
Henrik Norlander........72­69­71­66—278
David Skinns................73­67­66­72—278
$3,011 (­9)
Mark Hubbard.............70­69­73­67—279
Sean Kelly.................... 70­69­72­68—279
Carlos Ortiz..................70­71­66­72—279
Scott Pinckney............ 72­69­69­69—279
Roger Sloan..................68­71­72­68—279
Michael Weaver..........72­68­72­67—279
$2,255 (­8)
Zac Blair....................... 71­70­70­69—280
Jimmy Gunn.................72­69­72­67—280
Billy Kennerly...............69­67­77­67—280
Steve Marino...............71­66­72­71—280
Maverick McNealy......69­68­70­73—280
Alex Prugh....................70­71­70­69—280
$1,678 (­7)
Jacques Blaauw...........75­66­67­73—281
Brian Davis...................73­66­76­66—281
Scott Harrington.........73­68­73­67—281
Ben Kohles...................72­69­69­71—281
Fernando Mechereffe 71­66­76­68—281
Matt Ryan.....................74­67­69­71—281
Chris Thompson..........72­69­71­69—281
$1,493 (­6)
Conner Godsey............72­69­74­67—282
Max Homa....................69­71­76­66—282
Rick Lamb.....................72­67­76­67—282
Nelson Ledesma..........70­71­72­69—282
Jin Park.........................68­68­80­66—282
Erik Compton...............68­71­72­71—282
Gerardo Ruiz................71­70­70­71—282
$1,430 (­5)
Jonathan Hodge..........71­69­73­70—283
Stuart MacDonald.......77­64­68­74—283
Kyle Thompson........... 73­67­73­70—283
$1,386 (­4)
Bryan Bigley.................72­67­73­72—284
Albin Choi.....................74­66­72­72—284
Hank Lebioda...............70­66­75­73—284
Timothy O’Neal............66­73­77­68—284
Sepp Straka................. 73­66­73­72—284
$1,337 (­3)
Chip Deason.................70­70­75­70—285
Ken Duke......................69­70­73­73—285
Augusto Nunez............69­70­73­73—285
J.T. Poston....................71­70­74­70—285
$1,304 (­2)
Shane Bertsch.............71­68­78­69—286
Seth Reeves.................67­73­70­76—286
$1,282 (­1)
Brock Mackenzie........ 69­70­72­76—287
Patrick Newcomb.......68­69­68­82—287
$1,265 (Even)
Jared Wolfe..................72­69­76­71—288
$1,254 (+1)
Brad Hopfinger............71­70­71­77—289
$1,243 (+2)
Andrew Novak.............71­69­76­74—290
$1,232 (+7)
Tag Ridings..................71­68­79­77—295
At Mission Hills CC
Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Fourth Round (Par: 72)
Playoff suspended due to darkness
Inbee Park......70­69­67­67—273
­15
Jennifer Song.69­69­68­67—273
­15
P. Lindberg.....65­67­70­71—273
­15
A. Jutanugarn 72­69­68­65—274
­14
Jessica Korda.67­68­73­66—274
­14
M. Jutanugarn70­70­66­69—275
­13
Charley Hull...69­68­69­69—275
­13
Ayako Uehara 66­71­70­69—276
­12
C. Masson.......72­68­69­68—277
­11
Jodi Shadoff...70­67­69­71—277
­11
Sung H. Park..68­64­74­71—277
­11
Amy Olson......69­68­68­72—277
­11
R. O'Toole.......72­69­70­67—278
­10
Nelly Korda.... 71­69­71­67—278
­10
P. Phatlum......70­73­69­67—279
­9
Hannah Green70­74­70­66—280
­8
B. Altomare....68­73­70­69—280
­8
Sun Y. Yoo......69­71­71­69—280
­8
J. Lee6.............71­70­69­70—280
­8
A. Stanford.....72­73­70­66—281
­7
A. Munoz........ 71­70­72­68—281
­7
Lydia Ko..........70­70­73­68—281
­7
L. Thompson..68­72­70­71—281
­7
Beatriz Recari 66­72­72­71—281
­7
Marina Alex....73­69­69­71—282
­6
Austin Ernst...72­70­69­71—282
­6
Bronte Law.....70­70­70­72—282
­6
Minjee Lee......74­71­64­73—282
­6
S. Feng............71­70­67­74—282
­6
Michelle Wie..75­67­72­69—283
­5
a­A. Thitikul....71­71­72­69—283
­5
Mirim Lee.......73­71­69­70—283
­5
In Gee Chun...68­71­73­71—283
­5
Ha Na Jang.....67­73­71­72—283
­5
Cristie Kerr.....68­72­70­73—283
­5
In­Kyung Kim.71­70­68­74—283
­5
Jeong Eun Lee72­67­75­70—284
­4
Alena Sharp... 71­68­75­70—284
­4
Emma Talley..69­73­71­71—284
­4
J. Concolino....71­73­72­69—285
­3
Sarah J. Smith71­72­73­69—285
­3
Hee Y. Park....69­71­75­70—285
­3
Jenny Shin......71­73­70­71—285
­3
a­Lilia Vu........ 73­70­71­71—285
­3
A. Nordqvist...73­70­70­72—285
­3
Chella Choi.....68­73­72­72—285
­3
Sei Y. Kim.......70­70­73­72—285
­3
So Yeon Ryu...75­70­73­68—286
­2
Lindy Duncan.70­73­74­69—286
­2
B. Henderson.70­75­70­71—286
­2
Hyejin Choi.....73­70­72­71—286
­2
Sandra Gal......72­71­70­73—286
­2
Nasa Hataoka 70­73­70­73—286
­2
Caroline Inglis71­72­69­74—286
­2
New England players
280 (­8) — Brittany Altomare,
Shrewsbury, 68­73­70­69
Latest line
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Monday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
Villanova...............6½ ..............Michigan
National Hockey League
Monday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At Toronto......­285 Buffalo...........+255
At Florida........­168 Carolina.........+158
Winnipeg........ ­173 At Ottawa......+161
At St. Louis.....­141 Washington...+131
At Minnesota.­200 Edmonton......+180
At Los Angeles­175 Colorado........+163
Transactions
PGA HOUSTON OPEN
LPGA ANA INSPIRATION
*—100.7 FM WZLX
AHL
BASEBALL
Detroit (AL): Recalled P Ryan Car­
penter from Toledo (IL).
Kansas City (AL): Assigned P Wily
Peralta outright to Omaha (PCL).
Signed P Kyle Lohse to a minor league
contract.
Los Angeles (AL): Optioned INF Ryan
Schimpf to Salt Lake (PCL).
New York (AL): Placed OF Billy McK­
inney on 10­day DL. Recalled INF
Miguel Andujar from Scranton/Wilkes­
Barre (IL).
Toronto (AL): Assigned P Sam Moll
outright to Buffalo (IL).
Atlanta (NL): Optioned P Rex Broth­
ers to Gwinnett (IL). Designated P
Akeel Morris for assignment. Selected
the contract of P Josh Ravin from
Gwinnett.
Cincinnati (NL): Optioned P Jackson
Stephens to Louisville (IL). Reinstated
P Raisel Iglesias from paternity leave.
Miami Marlins : Optioned OF Braxton
Lee to New Orleans (PCL). Designated
P Brian Ellington for assignment. Se­
lected the contract of P Severino Gon­
zalez from New Orleans.
Pittsburgh (NL): Recalled P Clay Hol­
mes from Indianapolis (IL).
St. Louis (NL): Traded INF Breyvic
Valera to the L.A. Dodgers for OF Johan
Mieses. Assigned Mieses to Palm
Beach (FSL).
BASKETBALL
Atlanta (NBA): Recalled F Tyler Ca­
vanaugh from Erie (NBAGL). Trans­
ferred G Josh Magette and F Andrew
White III from Erie. Signed F Jeremy Ev­
ans to a 10­day contract.
LA Lakers (NBA): Recalled F Travis
Wear from South Bay (NBAGL).
FOOTBALL
Los Angeles Chargers : Signed QB
Geno on a one­year contract.
HOCKEY
Carolina (NHL): Recalled G Callum
Booth from Florida (ECHL) to Charlotte
(AHL).
New Jersey (NHL): Activated F Mar­
cus Johansson from injured reserve.
Assigned G Mackenzie Blackwood
from Binghamton (AHL) to Adirondack
(ECHL). Recalled G Ken Appleby from
Adirondack to Binghamton.
Tampa Bay (NHL): Signed D Cal
Foote to a three­year, entry­level con­
tract.
Soccer
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts. GF GA
N.Y.C. FC ................ 4 0 1 13 10 4
Columbus............... 3 1 1 10 9 5
Atl. United FC........ 3 1 0 9 8 6
NEW ENGLAND ..... 2 1 1 7 6 5
New York............... 2 2 0 6 10 5
Montreal ................ 2 2 0 6 5 5
Philadelphia .......... 1 1 1 4 2 3
Orlando City.......... 1 2 1 4 6 8
Toronto FC............. 1 2 0 3 3 4
D.C. United ............ 0 3 2 2 5 10
Chicago.................. 0 2 1 1 6 8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Kansas City ........... 3 1 1 10
Vancouver ............. 3 1 1 10
LA Galaxy .............. 2 1 1 7
Los Angeles FC..... 2 1 0 6
Minn. United ......... 2 3 0 6
FC Dallas................ 1 0 2 5
Colorado ................ 1 1 1 4
Houston.................. 1 2 1 4
Real Salt Lake....... 1 2 1 4
San Jose................. 1 2 0 3
Portland ................. 0 2 2 2
Seattle.................... 0 3 0 0
10
7
7
9
6
5
6
7
4
6
4
0
9
7
6
5
9
2
4
6
9
7
9
5
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
NO GAMES SUNDAY
FRIDAY’S GAME
Montreal at NEW ENGLAND............7:30
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Atlanta United FC 1........Minn. United 0
Colorado 3........................Philadelphia 0
LA Galaxy 4.................Los Angeles FC 3
Montreal 1..................................Seattle 0
NEW ENGLAND 2....................Houston 0
New York City FC 2...............San Jose 1
Orlando City 4...................... New York 3
Portland 2.................................Chicago 2
Sporting K.C. 1...................D.C. United 0
Vancouver 2......................... Columbus 1
NWSL
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L OL SL Pts.
x­Lehigh Val . 44 17 4 5 97
WB/Scran ..... 40 21 6 2 88
Providence ... 41 23 3 2 87
Charlotte....... 40 26 1 3 84
Bridgeport .... 34 27 5 3 76
Hartford ........ 31 31 6 3 71
Hershey......... 29 33 4 5 67
Springfield.... 29 34 5 2 65
GF
243
225
204
234
191
196
190
197
GA
200
204
166
202
189
239
230
219
North Division
x­Toronto...... 50 18 1 1 102
x­Syracuse.... 43 20 3 4 93
x­Rochester.. 33 20 11 6 83
x­Utica........... 36 24 6 4 82
Binghamton.. 23 36 7 4 57
Belleville ....... 26 39 2 3 57
Laval .............. 24 38 7 2 57
230
223
214
200
175
175
196
151
176
202
202
225
250
260
Western Conference
Central Division
Chicago......... 38 21 7 3 86
Manitoba ...... 39 24 4 4 86
Gr. Rapids..... 39 24 1 7 86
Rockford ....... 37 25 4 4 82
Milwaukee.... 35 29 4 1 75
Iowa............... 30 25 9 6 75
Cleveland...... 22 37 7 3 54
217
238
219
216
197
213
167
182
189
197
212
211
229
234
Pacific Division
x­Tucson ....... 38 19 5 1
Ontario.......... 35 21 4 2
San Diego ..... 35 23 3 1
Texas............. 35 24 7 4
Stockton........ 31 25 2 4
San Antonio.. 33 27 10 0
Bakersfield ... 28 24 9 1
San Jose........ 28 26 4 4
197
187
192
204
190
181
171
161
164
170
175
213
181
193
190
188
82
76
74
81
68
76
66
64
x­Clinched Playoff Spot
y­Clinched Division
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
NO GAMES SUNDAY
NO GAMES MONDAY
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Providence at Bridgeport......10:30 a.m.
Lehigh Valley at Charlotte....................7
Hershey at WB/Scranton.................7:05
Milwaukee at Chicago...........................8
Cleveland at Iowa...................................8
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Bakersfield 2........................San Diego 1
Bridgeport 5............................Hartford 1
Charlotte 4............................. Syracuse 1
Grand Rapids 6...................Milwaukee 2
Hershey 6...................................... Laval 3
Lehigh Valley 4......................Belleville 2
Ontario 5................................Cleveland 3
Providence 3..................WB/Scranton 1
Rochester 5.......................Binghamton 3
Rockford 5...............................San Jose 3
Stockton 4.........................San Antonio 1
Texas 2............................Chicago 1 (SO)
Toronto 5............................... Manitoba 4
Tucson 4.........................................Iowa 3
Utica 6..................................Springfield 5
North Carolina ...... 2
Seattle.................... 1
Portland ................. 1
Washington........... 1
Houston.................. 0
Utah ........................ 0
Chicago.................. 0
Orlando .................. 0
Sky Blue FC ........... 0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
2
1
1
0
6
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
0
2
2
3
3
1
1
3
1
0
0
1
3
2
1
1
4
3
1
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
NO GAMES SUNDAY
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Chicago at Utah.................................3:30
North Carolina at Washington.............7
NEXT SUNDAY’S GAMES
Seattle at Sky Blue FC...........................5
Orlando at Portland............................... 6
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
North Carolina 1...............Sky Blue FC 0
Portland 3.................................Chicago 2
Washington 2...........................Orlando 0
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE
GP W D L GF GA Pts
Man City...........31 27 3 1 88 21 84
Man United ......31 21 5 5 60 23 68
Liverpool...........32 19 9 4 75 35 66
Tottenham........31 19 7 5 62 26 64
Chelsea.............31 17 5 9 53 30 56
Arsenal..............31 15 6 10 58 41 51
Burnley .............31 12 10 9 29 27 46
Leicester...........31 11 10 10 47 43 43
Everton .............32 11 7 14 38 53 40
Bournemouth...32 9 10 13 39 51 37
Watford ............32 10 7 15 41 57 37
Newcastle ........31 9 8 14 31 40 35
Brighton............31 8 10 13 28 42 34
West Ham ........31 8 9 14 39 57 33
Swansea ...........31 8 7 16 25 44 31
Huddersfield ....32 8 7 17 25 53 31
Crystal Pal........32 7 9 16 31 50 30
Southampton...31 5 13 13 29 47 28
Stoke .................32 6 9 17 29 61 27
West Brom.......32 3 11 18 25 51 20
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Arsenal 3.......................................Stoke 0
Chelsea 1.............................Tottenham 3
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Everton vs. Liverpool...............7:30 a.m.
Stoke vs. Tottenham...................10 a.m.
Leicester vs. Newcastle..............10 a.m.
West Brom vs. Swansea............ 10 a.m.
Watford vs. Burnley....................10 a.m.
Bournemouth vs. Crystal Palace10 a.m.
Brighton vs. Huddersfield..........10 a.m.
Man City vs. Man United......11:30 a.m.
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Brighton 0...............................Leicester 2
Crystal Palace 1....................Liverpool 2
Everton 1.................................Man City 3
Man United 2..........................Swansea 0
Newcastle 1.....................Huddersfield 0
Watford 2.......................Bournemouth 2
West Brom 1.............................Burnley 2
West Ham 3................... Southampton 0
C8
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, A P R I L 2 , 2 0 1 8
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
Kelly Chrysler*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
Honda Cars of Boston*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
Kelly Honda*
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
Ferrari Of New England*
Mirak Hyundai
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Cityside*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
Infiniti of Hanover
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
Herb Chambers Infiniti
Westborough*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
Framingham Ford*
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
2060 Washington St, Hanover
781-570-5200
infinitiofhanover.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Kelly Infiniti*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
Kelly Ford*
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Quirk Ford*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
540 Southern Artery, Quincy
617-770-0070
quirkford.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Mirak Genesis
Kelly Jeep*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St, Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.*
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
Lev Kia of Framingham*
Kelly Nissan of Danvers*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyauto.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
Toyota of Watertown*
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
VillageSubaru.com
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
Mirak Chevrolet*
smart center Boston
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway,
Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
smart center Lynnfield
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
Best Chevrolet*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
Boch Maserati*
Kelly Maserati*
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016
herbchamberslincoln.com
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
Honda Village*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Audi Shrewsbury
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
340 Mystic Ave, Medford
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
volvoofnorwood.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo of Boston
525 Boston Post Rd. • Route 20 • Wayland, MA 01778
New 2018 Alfa Romeo
194
Q4 STELVIO $
AWD
INCOMING UNIT• MSRP: $44,790
LEASE FOR
*
/ MO. 24 MOS.
$3,999 due at signing
New 2017 Alfa Romeo
GIULIA
Q4 AWD
STK# A140 • MSRP: $47,590
LEASE FOR
199
$
**
/ MO. 24 MOS.
$3,999 due at signing
Available at Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo through 4/9/2018 to qualified lessees with Tier 1 approved credit through Chrysler Capital . Delivery by 4/9/2018 required. Subject to availability – quantities are limited. **24-month closed-end lease for a new 2017
model year Alfa Romeo Giulia Q4 AWD (in-stock only) with an MSRP of $47,590 (stock # A140).*24-month closed-end lease for a new 2018 model year Alfa Romeo Stelvio AWD (in-stock only)with an MSRP of $44,790 (stock # incoming unit). Lessee is
responsible for insurance, maintenance, repairs, $0.50 per mile over 10,000 miles per tear, and excess wear and tear. MA sales tax, doc, reg, acq, security deposit, and first months payment are separate. Lease payment reflects conquest cash for customers currently leasing a competitive brand vehicle (non Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, FIAT or Alfa Romeo product) and enter into a new purchase or lease of an eligible model. Extra charges may apply at lease end. Requires Tier 1 Credit approval with
Chrysler Capital. In stock models only. ^Includes all incentives, and excludes taxes and all dealer fees. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales excluded from all offers.
855-806-3336
herbchambersalfaromeoofboston.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo of Millbury
2 Latti Farm Rd. • Route 20 • Millbury, MA 01527
855-866-0411
herbchambersalfaromeo.com
Sales: Monday-Thursday 8:30am - 8:00pm
Friday-Saturday 8:30am - 6:00pm, Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm
Service: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 6:00pm
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
10 730 Кб
Теги
The Boston Globe, newspaper
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа