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The Boston Globe – April 03, 2018

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Tu e s d a y, A p r i l 3 , 2 0 1 8
Baker eliminates
troubled troop unit
YOU CAN’T DO
THAT IN POLITICS.
(She just did.)
After pay scandal,
others on patrol
would be tracked
By Matt Stout
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
and Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
MATT YORK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Air Force
pilot and Arizona
US Representative
Martha McSally, a
Republican
running for
Senate, tells the
GOP to “grow a
pair of ovaries.”
Dana Nessel, a
Democratic
candidate for
Michigan attorney
general, has run
eye-catching ads.
DANA NESSEL 2018
Krish
Vignarajah, a
Democratic
gubernatorial
candidate in
Maryland,
holds a baby
to her breast
in a campaign
ad.
KRISH FOR MARYLAND
Women are running for office in record numbers —
and shattering gender decorum doing it
By Stephanie Ebbert
C
GLOBE STAFF
aution doesn’t always cut it.
Running like a man often
doesn’t work. Fed up with the
damned-if-you-do, damned-ifyou-don’t advice heaped on female political candidates, some of the
many women running for office this year
are doing whatever they damn well want.
In one campaign ad, a Republican congresswoman from Arizona tells her party
to “grow a pair of ovaries.” Democrats running for governor in Wisconsin and Maryland have pitched their candidacies on
camera while breastfeeding their babies. A
Michigan Democrat says that in choosing
their next attorney general, voters should
consider: “Who can you trust most not to
show you their penis in a professional setting?”
After an election that unleashed women’s fury and sexual harassment scandals
that spawned a thousand hashtags, women are shattering traditional limits of gender decorum in campaign ads. No longer
are they presenting themselves as toughbut-caring overachievers who are, incidentally, not men. Some of them are introducing themselves with images that are unapologetically in-your-face female.
In the news
Tuesday: Chilly, with drizzle.
High 42-47, low 38-43.
er, 81, lost support as her
work was marred by corruption and by the fallout from
the implosion of her marriage
to Nelson Mandela. B9.
South Korea and the United
States began their annual
war drills but, given recent
diplomatic overtures with
North Korea, have resisted using major weapons. A4.
VOL. 293, NO. 93
*
Suggested retail price
$2.50
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Governor Charlie Baker, in revealing the overhaul with
Colonel Kerry A. Gilpin, said the State Police’s reputation
was “tarnished.’’
Suspended trooper
Leigha Genduso spoke publicly
for first time about her hiring
despite her past involvement
in a drug-trafficking case. B1.
The changes include a department-wide body camera
program, which Baker said he
wants in place by the end of the
year.
State Police officials have also launched a 30-day review of
staffing at Troop F, the 140member unit that patrols Lo-
Wednesday: Isolated rain.
High 60-65, low 31-36.
High tide: 1:48, 2:16.
Sunrise: 6:23. Sunset: 7:12.
Complete report, D10
Stocks plummeted, in large
part because of the tit-fortariff-tats being exchanged
between Washington and Beijing. C1.
Teacher outrage over miserly
budgets and low salaries
broadened as thousands of
them walked off their jobs,
shutting down school districts in Oklahoma and Kentucky. A2.
The Villanova Wildcats won
the NCAA national championship, beating Michigan 7962. D1.
gan International Airport and
the Seaport and that has come
under fire after officials acknowledged not making public
years of salary and overtime data for the troop.
Baker has also directed Gilpin to create a plan to work
with Boston police on how the
two agencies — long at odds
over their jurisdiction of the
fast-growing waterfront neighborhood — will patrol the district.
The policy shifts follow sevSTATE POLICE, Page A5
Walsh seeks car alternatives,
pushes boost in parking fines
‘We need
to be
moving
people in a
different
way in the
city of
Boston.’
CHRIS OSGOOD
chief of streets
WOMEN CANDIDATES, Page A6
By Adam Vaccaro
GLOBE STAFF
Taking aim at one of Boston’s most
vexing problems, the Walsh administration is planning to crack down on
parking violations, reserve more parts
of city streets for buses and bicycles,
and set up designated pull-over spots
for ride-hailing services.
Those steps, detailed by city officials Monday, are part of a broad new
transportation strategy that will be included in Mayor Martin J. Walsh’s
budget request for the next fiscal year.
But in a city notorious for traffic
congestion, most of the measures focus not on managing cars, but on alternatives such as improving biking
and walking routes and speeding up
buses on city streets.
Walsh officials said the plan, which
will also include traffic signal improvements, should ease congestion
As they age, more boomers
request replacement parts
Marsh madness
Winnie Madikizela-Mandela
died. The antiapartheid lead-
Governor Charlie Baker and
the head of the State Police on
Monday announced the agency
would eliminate the scandalplagued Troop E unit and begin
tracking all cruisers through
GPS monitoring — part of an
overhaul in response to allegations that dozens of troopers
put in for overtime they never
worked.
The changes laid out by Baker and Colonel Kerry A. Gilpin
are designed to begin fixing
what Baker called the police
force’s “tarnished” reputation.
“It is clear that the actions of
members within this agency
have threatened that public
trust,” Gilpin said at a State
House press conference. “The
membership knows that we
need change. I’ve heard from
several members before this
press conference [who said],
‘We really need to take down
Troop E. We really need reforms.’ I think they’re ready for
change, they’re ready for leadership.”
By Robert Weisman
by making it easier for more people to
use buses, bikes, and sidewalks.
“We need to be moving people in a
different way in the city of Boston,”
said Chris Osgood, Boston’s chief of
streets. “All those sorts of things are
ways in which this is going to help
people get around our city better.”
The crux of the plan is a major increase in fines for parking violations,
such as for double parking. The fine
increase would have the dual effect of
discouraging practices that can worsen traffic, while raising $5 million to
fund transportation initiatives.
If approved by the City Council, the
parking fines and other changes
would go into effect in the fiscal year
beginning July 1.
The administration plans to hire
nearly 20 staffers for the city’s Transportation Department. One would be
TRANSIT, Page A5
Judge urged
not to oust
Joyce lawyer
By Maria Cramer
GLOBE STAFF
GLOBE STAFF
For a generation that pounded its joints doing aerobics, running marathons, and carving up
the ski slopes, it’s time to roll out
the spare parts.
Take Elliott Francis, 64, who
had his second hip replacement
surgery in February. Growing
up, he was “a jumper and a rebounder,” he said, scooping basketballs off the rim during Roxbury pickup games and later
playing in high school and college.
“We thought we’d be young
forever,” said Francis, who co-anchors a radio news program in
Washington, D.C. “ T he big
wake-up call is when our bodies
wear down.”
Baby boomers, determined to
keep moving no matter what
wear and tear and arthritis have
wrought, are fueling a surge in
joint replacements. Taking advantage of improved artificial
joints and surgical methods, aging Americans are getting so
many new hips, knees, shoul-
Seventy-one lawyers called
on a federal judge Monday to
reject an attempt by prosecutors to disqualify the attorney
for former state senator Brian
A. Joyce, contending the unusual move infringes on Joyce’s
right to a strong defense and
sets a dangerous legal precedent.
“Those of us who are committed to a fair process and the
right of a defendant to choose
his own counsel should support
them,” said retired Supreme Judicial Court justice Geraldine
Hines, one of the lawyers who
signed a friend-of-the-court
brief filed by the American Civil
Liberties Union and two prominent lawyers organizations.
“The public should take notice
when . . . so many people decided it was important to join
ranks on this.”
The 28-page brief urges US
District Judge Nathaniel M.
Gorton to reject a motion by
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
ders, and ankles that orthopedic
surgeons are having trouble
meeting the demand.
Hip replacements in the
United States more than doubled between 2000 and 2014 —
from 160,282 to 371,605 a year
— according to the most recent
data from the Healthcare Cost
and Utilization Project, which
tracks hospital discharges. Knee
replacements increased at an
even faster clip in the same period, from 274,467 to 680,886.
The procedures can cost up
JOINT REPLACEMENTS, Page A10
Therapist Caitlin
Abusamra showed
joint surgery
patients how to
get out of bed.
274,467
Knee replacements
in the US in 2000
680,886
Knee replacements
in the US in 2014
COOPER, Page A7
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Teachers expand protests against low pay, funding
Wave of walkouts
closes schools
across Ky., Okla.
By Dana Goldstein
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Thousands of
teachers in Oklahoma and Kentucky walked off the job Monday morning, shutting down
school districts as they protested low pay, cuts in benefits, and
a lack of scho ol fun ds in a
movement that’s spreading
across the nation.
The wave of strikes in red
states, mainly organized by
teachers on Facebook, has
caught lawmakers and sometimes the teachers’ own labor
unions flat-footed. The protesters say they are fed up with
years of education funding cuts
and stagnant pay in Republican-dominated states. The
movement began with job actions in West Virginia earlier
this year.
In Oklahoma City, where
thousand of protesting teachers
gathered at the Capitol on Monday, Katrina Ruff, a local teacher, carried a sign that read,
“Thanks to West Virginia.”
“They gave us the guts to
stand up for ourselves,” she
said.
Alicia Priest, president of
the Oklahoma Education Association, the state’s largest teachers union, said the walkout
would continue at least until
Tuesday, as members continue
pressing their demands for lawmakers to approve more funding, the Associated Press reported.
School districts in Oklahoma City and the Tulsa areas
have canceled Tuesday classes.
In Kentucky, teachers are
protesting a pension reform bill
that abruptly passed the state
House and Senate last week.
If the Republican governor,
Matt Bevin, signs it , the change
will phase out defined-benefit
pensions for teachers and replace them with hybrid retirement plans that combine features of a traditional pension
with features of the 401(k) accounts used in the private sector. Teachers in the state are not
eligible for Social Security benefits.
Chanting ‘‘enough is
ALEX SLITZ/LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER VIA AP
Thousands of teachers
rallied at the state Capitol
in Frankfort, Ky., Monday
as teachers such as Melissa
Knight (left) joined an
Oklahoma protest.
SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
enough’’ and ‘‘we’ll remember
in November,’’ the line of Kentucky teachers and school employees stretched for blocks
Monday as they traveled toward the Capitol building holding signs.
In response to the protests,
budget negotiators in the Ken-
tucky Legislature unveiled a
spending plan Monday that includes increased spending for
the main funding formula for
K-12 schools, the AP reported.
The plan also restored $254
million in money for school
buses that Bevin had proposed
eliminating.
The Kentucky higher education spending would be funded
by a 6 percent sales tax on a
host of services that had previously been tax-free. The spending and taxing proposals
cleared the Senate on Monday.
As the national movement
has gained momentum, it has
also grown more ambitious.
Striking West Virginia teachers
declared victory last month after winning a 5 percent raise,
but Oklahoma educators are
holding out for more.
Last week, the Legislature in
Oklahoma City voted to provide
teachers with an average raise
of $6,000 per year, or a roughly
16 percent raise, depending on
experience. Governor Mary Fallin, a Republican, signed the
package into law.
But teachers said it was not
enough. They have asked for a
$10,000 raise, as well as additional funding for local schools
and raises for support staff such
as bus drivers and custodians.
About 200 of the state’s 500
school districts shut down
Monday as teachers walked
out, defying calls from some
parents and administrators for
them to be grateful about what
they had already received from
the state.
To pay for the raise, politicians from both parties agreed
to increase production taxes on
oil and gas, the state’s most
prized industry, and institute
taxes on tobacco and motor fuel. It was the first new revenue
bill to become law in Oklahoma
in 28 years, bucking decades of
tax-cut orthodoxy.
Andrew Beaver, 32, a middle
school math teacher in Louisville, Ky., said he was open to
changes in teacher retirement
programs, such as potentially
asking teachers to work to an
older age before drawing down
benefits; currently, some Kentucky teachers are eligible for
retirement around age 50.
But he said he and his colleagues, many of whom have
called in sick to protest the bill,
were angry about not having a
seat at the negotiation table
with Bevin, a Republican, and
the Republican majority in the
Legislature.
“What I’m seeing in Louisville is teachers are a lot more
politically engaged than they
were in 2015 or 2016,” Beaver
said. “It really is a wildfire.”
In Arizona, thousands of
teachers gathered in Phoenix
last week to demand a 20 percent pay raise and more funding for schools.
“We’re going to continue to
escalate our actions,” said Noah
Karvelis, an elementary school
music teacher in Tolleson, outside Phoenix, and a leader of
the movement calling itself
#RedforEd, after the red Tshirts protesting teachers are
wearing across the country.
Karvelis, 23, said teachers
would not walk out of class unless they were able to win support from parents and community members across the state,
including in rural areas. But he
said the movement would be
influential regardless of whether it shuts down schools.
“We’re going to have a lot of
teachers at the ballot box who I
don’t think would normally go
in a midterm year,” he said. “If I
were a legislator right now, I’d
be honestly sweating bullets.”
Lily Eskelsen García, president of the National Education
Association, the nation’s largest
teachers’ union, called the
movement an “education
spring.”
Daily Briefing
Old, new drugs make deadly mix in Ohio
Cliff plunge may have been intentional
Democrats question Trump defense fund
CINCINNATI — A new
surge in the use of methamphetamine and cocaine mixed
with a powerful synthetic opioid are contributing to rising
drug overdose death tolls in
already hard-hit Ohio.
As county coroners have
begun releasing their 2017 tallies, a trend has emerged of
more deaths involving meth
or cocaine mixed with fentanyl, the painkiller blamed for
increasing US fatalities in recent years as authorities focused on reducing heroin
overdoses.
US authorities say illicit
fentanyl made in China has
flooded in, while there is increased availability of meth
and a rebound in cocaine. All
have been contributing to the
national rises in overdose
deaths and are increasingly
being seen in lethal mixes.
MENDOCINO, Calif. — An
SUV carrying a large family
from Washington accelerated
straight off a scenic California
cliff, and authorities now say
the deadly wreck may have
been intentional.
The wreck was discovered
last week, days after child
welfare authorities began investigating whether the children were being neglected.
Information pulled from
the vehicle’s software shows it
was stopped at a flat pull-off
area before it sped off the
steep rocky face and plunged
100 feet, said Captain Greg
Baarts of the California Highway Patrol.
Baarts said the electronic
information combined with
the lack of skid marks or
signs the driver braked led
authorities to believe the
crash was purposeful.
Five members of the Hart
family were found dead. The
search continued for three
more children believed to
have been in the vehicle when
it went over a coastal overlook and landed on rocks in
the Pacific Ocean below. The
missing children may have
been washed out to sea, authorities say.
‘‘This specific location is
very difficult to search because the ocean currents and
tides are strong, it’s unpredictable, and the murkiness
of the water makes it difficult
to see,’’ said Captain Greg Van
Patten, a spokesman for the
Mendocino County sheriff’s
office.
The multiracial family of
two married women, Sarah
and Jennifer Hart, and their
WASHINGTON — Congressional Democrats raised ethics
questions on Monday about
the framework of a defense
fund set up to help pay legal
costs for White House, Trump
campaign, and Trump transition officials caught up in investigations into Russian meddling in the election.
Eighteen House Democrats
claim the new defense fund
appears to be structured more
loosely than ones in earlier administrations. Because of the
way it’s set up, the fund could
receive donations from lobbyists or others with interests before the Trump administration
— and also could be used to influence witnesses, the Democrats warned in a letter to David Apol, acting director of the
Office of Government Ethics.
In late January, Apol told a
group of lawyers who set up
Authorities say many drug
users may be unaware they
are taking fentanyl.
States as different as New
Hampshire, West Virginia,
and Florida have seen rising
overdose death rates in recent
years. The problem is particularly acute in Ohio, where
overdose death rates have
been climbing steadily.
Spreading fentanyl and increased meth use ‘‘have
turned an already bad situation into something far
worse,’’ Butler County coroner
Dr. Lisa Mannix said recently
while announcing a fifth
straight record overdose toll
in the southwest Ohio county.
The 232 overdose deaths in
2017 were 21 percent more
than in 2016, Mannix said,
with meth-related deaths quadrupling last year.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Legal marijuana may help opioid problem
NEW YORK — Two new
studies suggest that legalizing
marijuana can help fight the
problem of opioid addiction
and fatal overdoses.
The new studies don’t directly assess the effect of legalizing marijuana on opioid addiction and overdose deaths.
Instead, they find evidence
that legalization may reduce
the prescribing of opioids.
The studies, led by researchers in Kentucky and
Georgia, were released Monday by the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. One looked at
trends in opioid prescribing
under Medicaid, which covers
low-income adults, between
2011 and 2016. Results
showed that laws that let people use marijuana to treat specific medical conditions were
associated with about a 6 percent lower rate of opioid prescribing for pain.
The other study looked at
opioid prescribing nationwide
for people using Medicare,
which covers people 65 years
or older and those with disabilities. Researchers found
that Medicare patients in
states with marijuana dispensaries filled prescriptions for
about 14 percent fewer daily
doses of opioids than those in
other states.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL
A police helicopter hovered
over the coastal cliffs of
Mendocino, Calif., after the
SUV was spotted last week.
six adopted children often
took spontaneous road trips
to camp and hike and traveled to festivals and other
events, offering hugs and promoting unity.
A passing motorist discovered the vehicle on March 26,
three days after social service
authorities in Washington
state opened an investigation
apparently prompted by a
neighbor’s complaint that the
children were being deprived
of food.
Authorities believe at least
one felony was committed,
but Van Patten declined to
specify.
‘‘To the best of my knowledge, there was not a suicide
note found at the residence,’’
said Baarts, who added that
authorities have been interviewing friends and family
members of the Harts.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
the fund that a draft agreement of its structure appeared
to be in compliance with federal ethics law. But the ethics office has not officially approved
of the structure of the fund,
called the Patriot Legal Expense Fund Trust LLC.
In a separate development,
a former employee of Trump’s
campaign team sued the organization to nullify a nondisclosure agreement she signed,
saying it muzzled her from airing discrimination claims.
Jessica Denson, who oversaw phone banks and Hispanic outreach, claims she was harassed by a superior. She had
filed a discrimination case
against the campaign in New
York state court, but the campaign sought to enforce the
confidentiality deal, filing an
arbitration claim asserting
$1.5 million in damages.
Trump seeks arbitration in Daniels case
President Trump asked a
federal judge on Monday to order private arbitration in a
case brought by a porn actress
who claimed she had an affair
with him.
Trump and his personal attorney, Michael Cohen, filed
papers in federal court in Los
Angeles asking a judge to rule
that Stormy Daniels’s case involving a nondisclosure agreement must be heard by an arbitrator instead of a jury.
Daniels, whose real name is
Stephanie Clifford, has been
seeking to invalidate the
agreement she signed days before the 2016 presidential
election. She has offered to re-
turn the $130,000 she was
paid.
She has said she had sex
with Trump once in 2006, and
that their relationship continued for about a year. Trump
married his wife, Melania
Trump, in 2005, and their son,
Barron, was born in 2006. The
White House has said Trump
denies having an affair.
Trump’s attorneys have argued that Daniels could owe
about $20 million for violating
the nondisclosure deal.
Daniels argues the agreement is legally invalid because
it was signed by her and Cohen, but not by Trump.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A3
The World
Afghan copter strike kills at least 70 at mosque
Was assembly
religious only?
That’s in dispute
By Rod Nordland
NEW YORK TIMES
KABUL — Afghan military
helicopters bombed a religious
gathering in the northern province of Kunduz on Monday, killi n g at l e a s t 7 0 p e o p l e a n d
wounding 30 others, according
to a local official in the area.
The official, Nasruddin Saadi, district governor of Dasht-eArchi, said the helicopters attacked a religious ceremony for
which about 1,000 people had
assembled in a mosque and surrounding fields around noon.
Witnesses reached by telephone said the mosque was also
a madrassa, or religious school,
and that members of the Taliban had been present at the assembly, which had been organized to recognize graduates,
appoint mullahs, and elevate
junior mullahs.
Saadi said the event was religious in nature and that the security forces decided to attack
because armed militants were
in attendance.
Brigadier General Mohammad Radmanish, a spokesman
for the Defense Ministry, denied the gathering had been for
religious purposes and said the
operation targeted the Taliban,
not worshipers.
“The Taliban and other insurgent groups were planning
to attack Afghan forces, but
their plan was discovered by
our forces,” Radmanish said.
Radmanish said the airstrike in the Dasht-e-Archi district of Kunduz province killed
more than 30 Taliban fighters,
including nine commanders,
the Associated Press reported.
‘‘I can confirm that a Taliban
training center was bombed
and no civilians were present,’’
he said.
But witnesses said children
and other civilians were among
the victims.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
An Afghan boy was treated at a hospital following an airstrike in the Dashti Archi district of Kunduz province.
Dasht-e-Archi is a Taliban
stronghold that has often been
the scene of heavy fighting. In
May, a US drone strike in the
district killed Mullah Abdul
Salam, the Taliban “shadow
governor” of Kunduz.
In 2016, an Afghan airstrike
killed another prominent Talib a n c o mm a n d e r, Maw l av i
Muawiyah, in Dasht-e-Archi,
along with 21 other fighters, according to the military.
US airstrikes in the area
have repeatedly been blamed
for civilian casualties, and Afghan forces are increasingly
taking over air operations
there.
A 40-year-old farmer from
the district, who gave his name
only as Mohammad, said there
had been a small number of
armed Taliban fighters among
the crowd at the assembly, but
that most of the attendees were
civilians, including madrassa
students and graduates.
He said that many children
had been present, and that the
first rockets fired by the helic o pt e rs h a d hi t a g r ou p o f
youngsters.
The farmer was unable to
say how many had been killed
or hurt, but added that one of
the wounded was his nephew,
age 10.
“Children come to any gathering where there is a free
lunch,” he said.
A spokesman for the Taliban, Zabihullah Mujahid, said
the death toll was far higher
than the official figure and that
no insurgents had been present
at the gathering, which was
strictly religious in nature.
Many Taliban commanders are
also mullahs.
“Bombing civilians and then
calling them mujahedeen is a
habit of the Americans and
their slaves,” Mujahid said, add-
ing that 150 people had died in
the military strike. “Those responsible for killing civilians
and insulting religion will be
brought to justice.”
Separately in the southern
Helmand province, at least 48
schoolgirls fell ill Monday in
what provincial authorities suspect is a case of mass poisoning,
the AP reported.
Dr. Nisar Ahmad Barak said
the girls were admitted to his
hospital in Lashkar Gah with
headaches and vomiting, but
were in stable condition. He did
not have any details.
Ahmad Bilal Haqbeen, dep-
uty director at Helmand’s education department, said the
girls attend 11th grade at the
city’s Central Girls School. He
said an investigation is underway. Both officials said the girls
were deliberately poisoned.
Most of Helmand province is
under control of the Taliban,
who oppose girls’ education.
The US military is racing to
demonstrate it is making progress in Afghanistan during a
critical period that will test
President Trump’s strategy, The
Washington Post reported.
Military leaders say the arrival of new troops and aircraft,
along with a renewed mission
to advise local operations more
closely, will help reverse a Taliban resurgence that has exposed the fragility of the long
American war.
‘‘This is not another year of
the same thing we've been doing for 17 years,’’ General Joseph Dunford Jr., chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said
during a tour of military facilities across Afghanistan last
week. ‘‘This is a fundamentally
different approach.’’
With an increased US force
of about 15,000, focused largely
on efforts to ensure Afghan
troops can launch offensives
against the Taliban, Dunford
said that ‘‘the right people at
the right level with the right
training’’ are in place ahead of
the 2018 fighting season, a sentiment repeated by other commanders.
Yet looming over the battlefield push are questions about
how long support can be sustained, given skepticism in Europe about an open-ended military effort and ambivalence
from Trump about involvement
in foreign wars.
The stepped-up campaign
comes as the main force behind
Trump’s Afghanistan strategy,
national security adviser H.R.
McMaster, prepares to exit the
White House. His successor,
John Bolton, may be a less ardent proponent of a stepped-up
US campaign.
Daily Briefing
Syrian rebels
begin leaving their
former stronghold
BEIRUT — The most powerful Syrian opposition faction
on the fringes of Damascus began abandoning its stronghold
in the enclave of eastern Ghouta on Monday, opening the
way for government forces to
secure full control of the area,after seven years of revolt.
The first fighters from the
Army of Islam left the town of
Douma around midday as part
of an evacuation deal that will
hand the town to the Syrian
government, the state news
agency SANA reported.
The rebels were headed to
Jarablus, a town in northern
Syria where control of the territory is shared between Syrian
rebels and Turkish forces.
The Syrian government dispatched more than 50 buses to
Douma to take the rebels and
their families out, the news
agency reported.
Rami Abdurrahman, the
Observatory’s director, said
Gay marriage foe loses Costa Rica election
ABDULMONAM EASSA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
A group of people arrive in Qalaat al-Madiq, Syria, after evacuating from Douma, a
former stronghold of the forces opposing President Bashar Assad.
some factions within the Army
of Islam oppose evacuating
and surrendering Douma to
the government of President
Bashar Assad.
The deal over Douma
would mark the end of a push
by Assad’s forces to consoli-
date their control over eastern
Ghouta, just outside the capital.
Douma was one of the earliest centers of the antigovernment demonstrations that
swept through the country in
March 2011. Syrian govern-
ment forces responded by putting the town and other suburbs around Damascus under
siege, bombing hospitals and
residential areas, and blocking
the entry of food and medical
relief.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
China space lab burns up, falls into Pacific
Cleric charged in Russia envoy’s slaying
BEIJING — China’s defunct Tiangong 1 space station mostly burned up on reentry into the atmosphere
over the central South Pacific
on Monday, Chinese space
authorities said.
The experimental space
laboratory reentered around
8:15 a.m. Beijing time, the
China Manned Space Engineering Office said.
Scientists monitoring the
craft’s disintegrating orbit
had forecast that the craft
would mostly burn up and
would pose only the slightest
of risks to people. Analysis
from the Beijing Aerospace
Control Center showed that
that had been the case, as the
space lab mostly burned up
ANKARA, Turkey — A
Gulen and seven people allegTurkish court has issued arrest
edly tied to his religious movewarrants for a US-based Musment on charges of attempting
lim cleric and seven
to destroy the constiother people for their
tutional order and
alleged involvement
premeditated murin the killing of Rusder, Anadolu Agency
sia’s ambassador to
reported.
Turkey, the country’s
Turkish authoristate-run news agenties have alleged that
cy reported Monday.
Karlov’s killer had
An off-duty police
links to Gulen, whom
officer fatally shot
Turkey also accuses of
Ambassador Andrei
coordinating a failed
Gulen is also
accused in a
Karlov in the TurkJuly 2016 coup.
2016 coup
ish capital on Dec.
Gulen has denied
19, 2016. The officer, attempt.
involvement in the
Mevlut Mert Altincoup attempt. He has
tas, was shot dead at the scene
lived in the United States since
by police.
1999 and lives near SaylorsThe court in Ankara issued
burg, Pa.
warrants for cleric Fethullah
ASSOCIATED PRESS
upon reentry.
Brad Tucker, an astrophysicist at Australian National
University, said that Tiangong 1’s reentry was ‘‘mostly
successful,’’ but that it would
have been better if the space
station had not been spinning
toward Earth.
‘‘It could have been better,
obviously, if it wasn’t tumbling, but it landed in the
Southern Pacific Ocean, and
that’s kind of where you hope
it would land,’’ Tucker said.
‘‘It’s been tumbling and
spinning for a while, which
means that when it really
starts to come down it’s less
predictable about what happens to it,’’ Tucker said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica —
Voters gave a resounding no to
an evangelical pastor who rose
to political prominence by
campaigning against same-sex
marriage, allowing Costa Rica’s governing party to win an
easy presidential victory.
While polls had indicated
Sunday’s runoff would be
tight, it wasn’t. Carlos Alvarado, a novelist and former Cabinet minister running for the
ruling Citizen Action Party,
won by a wide margin.
The Supreme Electoral
Council said that with 95 percent of ballots counted late
Sunday, Carlos Alvarado had
60.8 percent of the votes, and
evangelical Fabricio Alvarado
of the National Restoration
party had 39.2 percent. The
two men are not related.
Fabricio Alvarado had been
viewed as political also-ran
when he entered the presiden-
tial contest, though he enjoyed
high name recognition for his
evangelism and for working
on one of Costa Rica’s main TV
newscasts.
But he spoke out strongly
against a call by the InterAmerican Court of Human
Rights for Costa Rica to allow
same-sex marriage, and he finished first in the election’s first
round in February.
Carlos Alvarado, who finished second to get the final
spot in the runoff, spoke in favor of letting gays wed.
The victor wrote in his
Twitter account, ‘‘Let’s celebrate our 200 years of Independence with a government
worthy and up to date with the
times. Today, the world is
watching us and we sent a
beautiful democratic message.’’
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boko Haram militants kill 15 in Nigeria
MAIDUGURI, Nigeria —
Nigeria’s Boko Haram Islamic
extremists attacked two villages on the outskirts of the
northeastern city of Maiduguri
late Sunday, killing at least 15
people, the military said Monday.
The Boko Haram militants
tried to enter the center of
Maidugiri, the provincial capital of Borno state, but army
soldiers repelled them, gunning down six armed insurgents and seven suicide bombers, army spokesman Colonel
Onyema Nwachukwu said.
At least 83 people were injured and are receiving medical attention, he said.
Residents of Maiduguri retreated to their homes Sunday
night during an hours-long
battle marked by thunderous
explosions and gunfire.
Troops prevented the insurgents from entering the center
of Maiduguri, but they detonated their bombs in the outlying villages of Bille Shuwa and
Alikaranti, with one soldier
among the 15 casualties, Nwachukwu said.
Nwachukwu warned residents to remain watchful and
report any suspicious people
or activity to security officials.
A 14-year-old Boko Haram insurgent surrendered to soldiers after escaping an extremist enclave on the Lake Chad
islands, he said.
Survivors of the attack said
most of those killed by the suicide bombs were youths who
were targeted when they fled
after hearing gunfire between
the soldiers and the Boko
Haram fighters.
Boko Haram has killed
more than 20,000 people in its
nine-year effort to establish
Shariah law in Nigeria.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
A4
The World
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Kremlin says Trump offered to host Putin visit Subdued
Invitation report
fuels controversy
over March call
By Anton Troianovski
WASHINGTON POST
MOSCOW — President
Tr u m p p r o p o s e d m e e t i n g
Vladimir Putin at the White
House in a recent phone call,
the Kremlin said Monday, fueling a controversy over Trump’s
friendly tone toward the Russian leader amid mounting tensions with the West.
After the March 20 phone
call — in which Trump congratulated Putin for a reelection victory in a vote widely criticized
as not free and fair — Trump
said the two leaders had discussed plans for a possible
meeting.
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders said
Monday that ‘‘a number of potential venues, including the
White House,’’ were discussed
for the summit.
A Kremlin aide, Yury Ushakov, disclosed the invitation in
comments to Russian journalists Monday. But he added that
no preparations have been
made, according to Russian
news agencies.
Relations between Moscow
and the West have been in a
free fall since the nerve-agent
poisoning of a former Russian
double agent and his daughter
in Britain on March 4. British
authorities have linked the attack to Russia, setting in motion reciprocal actions that
have included expulsions of
Russian diplomats from the
United States, European Union
countries, and elsewhere.
‘‘I hope that the Americans
will not back away from their
own proposal to discuss the
possibility of holding a summit,’’ Ushakov said, according
to state news agency RIA Novosti.
‘‘When our presidents spoke
on the phone, it was Trump
who proposed holding the first
meeting in Washington, in the
White House,’’ he said.
Ushakov’s claim adds new
detail to a presidential phone
call that drew broad criticism
last month. Trump congratulated Putin even though many international observers described
Putin’s reelection as a sham,
and despite the advice of White
House advisers that he not offer
congratulations.
‘‘As the president himself
confirmed on March 20, hours
after his last call with President
MIKHAIL KLIMENTYEV/SPUTNIK/FILE 2017
Vladimir Putin conferred with President Trump in Vietnam
in November, their second meeting since the US election.
Putin, the two had discussed a
bilateral meeting in the ‘nottoo-distant future’ at a number
of potential venues, including
the White House,’’ Sanders said
Monday after Ushakov’s comments. ‘‘We have nothing further to add at this time.’’
After the phone call, Trump
also drew condemnation at
home and abroad for failing to
raise the poisoning of the former spy, Sergei Skripal, and his
daughter. The Kremlin denies it
had anything to do with the
nerve-agent attack. Skripal and
his daughter Yulia remain hospitalized.
Relations between Moscow
and Washington have taken a
further plunge since that phone
call, as the West has sought to
punish Russia for the Skripal
poisoning.
The United States and Russia traded diplomat expulsions
and consulate closings, while
US allies that expelled Russian
diplomats in solidarity also
faced in-kind retaliation from
Moscow.
Relations between Washington and Moscow also have been
strained by other issues, including the ongoing investigation of
Russia’s meddling in the 2016
election and intelligence reports suggesting that such in-
terference might continue in
the midterm election season.
Given the worsening environment, Kremlin aide Ushakov said Monday, ‘‘it is, of course,
difficult to discuss the possibility of holding a summit,’’ Russia’s Interfax news agency reported.
‘‘I hope that the situation
will allow us to discuss this issue,’’ Ushakov added, referring
to the planning for a Trump-Putin summit, according to Interfax. ‘‘We believe that it is rather
important and necessary for
both countries and for the entire international community.’’
Since Trump became president, the two have met at the
Group of 20 summit in Germany last July and, briefly, at the
Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Vietnam in November.
Trump drew criticism when
he met at the White House with
Ru s s i a n Fo r ei g n Mi n i s t e r
Sergey Lavrov last May, a day
after he fired former FBI director James Comey, who was
leading an investigation into
the president’s links to Russia.
The White House didn’t let
US reporters witness the meeting, which was also attended by
Russia’s then US ambassador,
Sergey Kislyak.
Crackdown, strike
follow deadly clashes,
protests in Kashmir
Students demand
end of Indian rule
over territory
By Aijaz Hussain
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SRINAGAR, India — A security clampdown and a strike
sponsored by separatists fighting against Indian rule shut
down most of Indian-administered Kashmir on Monday, a
day after protests and fierce
fighting killed 16 combatants
and four civilians.
Armed police and paramilitary soldiers in riot gear
fanned out across the region
and patrolled streets in anticipation of anti-India protests
and clashes.
Authorities also imposed a
curfew in some towns in
southern Kashmir and in the
old parts of the disputed region’s main city of Srinagar,
the urban center of protests
and clashes against Indian
rule.
Shops and businesses
closed in other areas where no
security restrictions were in
place. Separatist leaders who
challenge India’s sovereignty
over Kashmir called for a shutdown on Monday and Tuesday
to protest the killings.
Authorities shut schools
and colleges and canceled university exams in an attempt to
stop protests by students.
Despite the suspension of
classes, anti-India protests
erupted at the University of
Kashmir, where many students
gathered in the main campus
in Srinagar and shouted slogans such as ‘‘Go India, go
back’’ and demanded an end of
Indian rule over the region.
In addition to halting train
services in the most restive
towns, officials cut cellphone
Internet access in those towns
and reduced connection
speeds in other parts of the
Kashmir Valley, a common
government practice aimed at
calming tensions and preventing anti-India demonstrations
from being organized.
Troops laid steel barricades
and razor wire on roads and
intersections to cut off neighborhoods as authorities anticipated widespread protests.
At least 13 rebels and three
Indian army soldiers were
killed in Sunday’s fighting in
three gun battles in southern
Kashmir, where a new generation of rebels has revived militancy and challenged New Delhi’s rule with guns and effective use of social media.
As the fighting raged, large
anti-India protests erupted in
several parts of Indian-controlled Kashmir and at least
four civilians were killed and
dozens injured.
Residents said government
troops fired into the crowds of
mostly young protesters, causing injuries. They also said one
of the civilians who died in
southern Shopian near a gunbattle on Sunday was being
used as a human shield against
rebels by the Indian army.
An army officer, who declined to be named in keeping
with army regulations, rejected the accusation and said the
civilian was killed in the crossfire with insurgents.
In the past, such allegations
have rarely been probed, and
some accused military officials
have been rewarded.
TAUSEEF MUSTAFA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Kashmiri protesters clashed with Indian government forces Monday in Srinagar.
As Gaza toll climbs to 18, Israel sets inquiry on response
By Fares Akram
ASSOCIATED PRESS
GAZA CITY — Israel’s military rejected new allegations
Monday of unlawful use of
force against unarmed Palestinians during mass protests in
Gaza last week, as the Palestinian death toll rose to 18.
Israeli troops prevented a
mass breach of the border fence
and an attempt by Gaza’s militant group Hamas to ‘‘drag us
into a catastrophe,’’ said Brigadier General Ronen Manelis, an
army spokesman. He denied
soldiers acted unlawfully, but
said mistakes might have been
made and will be investigated.
Israel’s defense minister had
previously rejected international calls for an independent investigation.
Hamas, which organized
Friday’s mass march, has not
said if the final aim of future
protests — to be staged off and
on for the next six weeks — is a
mass breach of the border
fence. Hamas leader Ismail
Haniyeh on Sunday hinted at
an escalation, saying last Friday’s protests had a ‘‘limit,’’ but
that it’s not clear where that
limit would be next time.
In Friday’s march, thousands of Palestinians headed toward the border area along several points from the north to
the south of Gaza. Smaller
groups moved closer to the border fence, throwing stones,
hurling firebombs, or burning
tires.
Manelis alleged Monday
that Hamas staged the mass
march as a cover for attacks. He
said there were five attempts to
cross the fence, including with
cutters, and that three explosives were planted.
He said at least 11 of those
killed were members of militant groups, including two who
opened fire on soldiers near the
border, but would not say how
the others were killed. He defined actions near the fence as
terrorism, including throwing
stones and burning tires.
would have scrapped a plan to
send the migrants back to their
home countries, an approach
that had been widely maligned
at home and abroad.
‘‘It’s a good agreement,’’
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said hours before sus-
An Israeli official said Hamas staged
the Gaza march as a cover for attacks.
In a separate development
Monday, Israel suspended a
deal with the United Nations to
resettle tens of thousands of African migrants in Western nations and allow the rest to remain in the country.
The deal was intended to resolve an issue that has divided
Israel for the past decade. It
pending the deal. ‘‘It enables us
to solve this problem in a way
that serves, protects the interests of the state of Israel and
gives a solution to the residents
of southern Tel Aviv and other
neighborhoods, and also for the
people who came into Israel.’’
But later in the day Netanyahu said he was suspending im-
plementation so he can discuss
the plan further with Israeli residents of south Tel Aviv on
Tuesday. Israel is home to
roughly 35,000 African migrants, most of them from Eritrea and Sudan.
The Israeli military’s openfire policies came under more
scrutiny as amateur videos
emerged purportedly showing
two Palestinians being shot in
Gaza — one killed and one
wounded — while not posing
any apparent threat to soldiers.
In one video posted on social
media, a young man later identified as Abdelfatah Abdelnabi
is seen being fatally shot from
behind while carrying a tire as
he ran away from the border.
Manelis said the man in the
video ‘‘had carried out acts of
terror along the fence for several hours,’’ an apparent reference
to the burning of tires.
military
drills for
S. Korea
US, ally seek to
foster diplomacy
By Hyung-Jin Kim
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEOUL — The war games
being conducted this week by
the United States and South
Korean militaries have an unusually low-key approach.
For the time being, the allies
have resisted bringing in some
major armaments such as
bombers and aircraft carriers
and the North has avoided its
usual belligerent propaganda
against exercises that it claims
are an invasion rehearsal.
The reason is that both
Washington and Seoul are interested in nurturing a diplomatic outreach by North Korea’s young leader, Kim Jong
Un, after months of weapons
tests and threats of nuclear war
by the North.
This year’s drills come ahead
of two historic summits between Kim and his South Korean and American counterparts.
On Sunday, the first day of
the drills, Kim did not promise
to destroy Seoul but attended a
concert in Pyongyang of visiting South Korean pop singers,
clapping his hands and asking
for more such performances.
This year’s exercises were
postponed because of the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics,
where the Koreas worked out a
series of rapprochement steps,
including parading together behind a single flag during the
opening ceremony and fielding
a unified women’s hockey team.
Seoul and Washington both
publicly say the training this
time will be similar to previous
years.
But South Korean defense
officials say there are no immediate plans to bring in US aircraft carriers, powerful bombers, or other strategic assets
that have been deployed in and
around the Korean Peninsula
during past drills. The North
loathes such American weapons.
The two sets of drills, one
field-training and the other
computer-simulated, typically
run for two months, but this
year’s exercises are scheduled
to last for just one month. The
allies also have no immediate
plans to publicize the training,
according to Seoul’s Defense
Ministry.
North Korea’s state media
haven’t said anything about the
drills since their start. Even if
there is some criticism later, it
will probably be milder than
past warlike rhetoric, which often saw daily threats to launch
nuclear strikes on Seoul and
Washington or void the armistice that ended the 1950-53
Korean War.
Kim told visiting South Korean officials last month that he
‘‘understands’’ the drills will
take place and expressed hope
that they’ll be modified once
the situation on the peninsula
stabilizes, according to the
South Korean government.
While diplomacy holds, it’s
also unlikely that North Korea
will test any weapons, as it has
during past drills. Such tests
could endanger the North’s outreach and crush the current
rapprochement.
South Korea’s Defense Ministry said Monday that it hadn’t
detected any suspicious activities by the North Korean military.
Kim’s planned meeting with
South Korean President Moon
Jae-in on April 27 will occur
around the time the US-South
Korean drills end.
T he mee ting will be the
third-ever inter-Korean summit
since the Koreas’ 1945 division.
It is crucial because it may offer
insight about what nuclear disarmament steps Kim could offer and what concessions the
allies might be willing to provide.
It is unlikely that Kim will
completely give up his nuclear
ambitions.
Only last year he claimed to
have functional nuclear missiles targeting the entire US
mainland, though foreign experts believe the North hasn’t
perfected such missiles.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Region
A5
State Police overhaul eliminates troubled troop unit
uSTATE POLICE
Continued from Page A1
eral scandals, including an investigation that officials say
found 29 active and retired
troopers in Troop E had filed
for overtime shifts in 2016 that
they never actually worked.
Attorney General Maura
Healey has launched a criminal
investigation into the allegations, and Gilpin has expanded
an internal audit to examine
troopers’ overtime use over a
three-year period. The colonel
disclosed Monday that State Police would also begin auditing
the department’s top 50 earners
on a quarterly basis to flag any
questionable payouts.
In response, the department
now intends to shutter Troop E
— which has been tasked with
patrolling the Massachusetts
Turnpike — and disperse the
129 troopers there to other
troops around the state. Gilpin
said the agency has thus far
found no evidence of overtime
abuse in other units.
“The Massachusetts State
Police has a long and honorable
history. . . . That history, that
reputation, has been tarnished,” said Baker, who added
that those who have violated
department rules should also
be in danger of losing retirement benefits. Under state law,
public officials are in danger of
having their pensions stripped
if they’re convicted of a crime
linked to their official duties.
“If it’s up to me, I’d take it
away — period,” Baker said. “As
far as I’m concerned, that’s
stealing. And no one who sits in
one of these public positions
should steal — period. You
learn that when you’re in second grade. What we’re talking
about here is sworn officers of
the law.”
While Baker and Gilpin outlined various changes they intend to make, key details appear to be unsettled.
Baker said he directly ordered Gilpin to activate what’s
known as Automatic Vehicle
Locator technology to track
troopers’ cruisers during their
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Governor Charlie Baker also suggested that troopers who violated pay rules should lose retirement benefits.
shifts. State Police officials originally said the department has
had the capability of doing so
through laptops installed in every marked cruiser, but neither
Baker nor Gilpin could explain
why it wasn’t used.
But David Procopio, a State
Police spokesman, said hours
later that while State Police had
the hardware for the GPS technology, it doesn’t have the corresponding software. He said
State Police have “begun the
process of purchasing” it and
hope to have it operating within
30 days.
Procopio also released a
copy of a June 2015 draft order
on body cameras that Gilpin referred to during the press conference but was never put into
policy. It outlines broad details
of a body camera program, but
Procopio said that it “does not
necessarily reflect what our
new body camera policy will ultimately look like.”
One point of contention is
how the Seaport will be pa-
port is policed would require
legislation, and Gilpin did not
directly address a question of
whether the State Police was
willing to cede some of its control there.
port District to ensure that all
residents have access to the
same police services as the rest
of the city.”
The Globe reported last
week that neither the State Po-
‘Let’s face it, 99 percent of the guys on the job
right now are doing their job, day in, day out. . . .
To characterize the entire job as needing this
type of thing, I don’t agree.’
DANA PULLMAN, of State Police Association of Massachusetts, on GPS monitoring
trolled. For years, troopers have
fought Boston police to maintain their exclusive right to have
Troop F patrol Massport property along the South Boston waterfront.
Baker aides said it was unclear if changes to how the Sea-
City seeks to raise fines to ease
traffic, fund alternatives to cars
“We’ll be looking at all angles,” she said.
Nicole Caravella, a spokeswoman for Mayor Martin J.
Walsh, said that he “looks forward to working with the state
on a long-needed plan for concurrent jurisdiction in the Sea-
lice nor Massport had publicly
filed information on payouts
f o r Tr o o p F w i t h t h e s t a t e
comptroller since 2010. The departments later reached an
agreement in which the troopers would be paid directly by
the State Police and the data
would go online.
Gilpin said State Police did a
“high-level audit” of the troop
and found no “wrongdoing.”
The Globe also disclosed last
month that 245 troopers — or
about 12 percent of the force —
made more than $200,000 last
year, often by working long
overtime shifts or taking on
multiple details directing traffic
or providing security at special
events.
In his own afternoon press
conference, Dana Pullman —
president of the State Police Association of Massachusetts, the
union representing troopers
and sergeants — didn’t address
whether the union would oppose the various changes but
said he feels that many changes
should be hashed out at the collective bargaining table and not
done as a “knee-jerk” reaction.
“Let’s face it, 99 percent of
the guys on the job right now
are doing their job, day in, day
out,” he said.
Pullman expressed specific
skepticism about the GPS monitoring: “to characterize the entire job as needing this type of
thing, I don’t agree.”
State Police said Monday
they also intend to more stringently vet potential hires by
adding language to a questionnaire that candidates disclose
whether they have ever been
“connected to a criminal investigation,” even if they weren’t
charged. It comes in direct response to the 2014 hiring of
Leigha Genduso, who testified
in federal court in 2007 about
how she helped her live-in boyfriend deal marijuana and hide
evidence, the Globe reported.
A year later, she was hired as
a dispatcher by the State Police
and then joined law enforcement in 2014 as a trooper. Genduso has since been placed on
paid administrative leave.
John Ellement of the Globe staff
contributed to this report. Matt
Stout can be reached at
matt.stout@globe.com. Travis
Anderson can be reached at
travis.anderson@globe.com.
Call to Schedule 617-910-3524
uTRANSIT
Continued from Page A1
a transit coordinator, to work
closely with the state-run Massachusetts Bay Transportation
Authority on improvements
such as more bus-only lanes or
signal technology that would allow buses to move through traffic faster.
Four additional staffers
would manage the bus lanes on
a day-to-day basis.
Boston is planning to test its
first dedicated bus lane in a decade this spring along Washington Street in Roslindale, by
eliminating parking spaces in
the inbound lane during the
morning rush hour.
A two-day trial last year
made it clear the city needs
more people to manage the bus
lanes, said Boston Transportation Commissioner Gina Fiandaca.
Chris Dempsey, who leads
the advocacy group Transportation for Massachusetts, praised
the plan to hire a transit coordinator. He recently visited Seattle, which has a city employee
working closely on transit issues with the county government.
“In Seattle, the employees
really felt that even though they
didn’t operate the buses they
had the responsibility for the
buses operating faster on their
streets,” he said.
Another new position would
include developing designated
pick-up and drop-off spots for
ride-hailing companies in busy
parts of the city.
City officials have said this
might cut down on the number
of vehicles blocking traffic,
though it would not directly address the sheer volume of ridehailing cars adding to the city’s
congestion.
Motorists would see some
benefit, such as $2 million for
road resurfacing and improvements to the city’s 800 traffic
signals. Two planners would be
hired to help redesign the city’s
intersections to make them safer for pedestrians, and the city
would boost funding for biking
and pedestrian infrastructure.
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
The Walsh administration hopes increased parking fines
would fund more biking options in Boston.
Last year, Walsh released
“Go Boston 2030,” a master
plan that outlined dozens of
transportation priorities, many
of which centered on public
transit, cycling, and walking
improvements to reduce car
congestion.
But he was slow to put the
plan into action, critics have
said. And the mayor himself
has fueled criticism; he once declared himself “a car guy,” upset
cyclists when he said they share
blame for accidents with drivers, and expressed skepticism
on the efficacy of bus lanes.
Osgood, however, said the
new budget measures shows Go
Boston 2030 is moving from
ideas to implementation.
Some car owners will probably feel Walsh’s new measures
in the pocketbook. Boston
would seek to hire a new supervisor to beef up parking enforcement and increase parking
fines for the first time in a decade.
Osgood said the increases
would be for 11 types of violations that residents complain
about most.
The penalty for double parking in downtown neighborhoods would increase from $45
to $75; parking during street
cleaning would yield a $90 fine,
more than double the current
$40 cost; parking in a residentonly spot without a sticker
would rise to $60, from $40;
while overstaying a me ter
would shoot to $40, from $25.
The $5 million spending initiative and the increased park-
ing fines will both require approval from the City Council.
Andrea Campbell, the president of the council, said she
would review the plan but had
not yet seen it.
Councilor Michelle Wu said
it had her support.
“Traffic and congestion are
not givens we have to live with,”
Wu said. “They’re a direct result
of our policy choices and infrastructure and design choices.”
Adam Vaccaro can be reached
at adam.vaccaro@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter at
@adamtvaccaro.
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A6
The Nation
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Trump pushes Senate on border wall
Says it should end
the filibuster rule
to ensure passage
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — President
Trump repeated Monday that a
program shielding a group of
young immigrants from deportation is “dead” and urged Congress to use the ‘‘nuclear option
if necessary’’ — a rules change
— to push border legislation
through the Senate.
“DACA is dead because the
Democrats didn’t care or act,
and now everyone wants to get
onto the DACA bandwagon,”
Trump said in one of a series of
morning tweets on the matter.
It was his second consecutive day of using Twitter to rail
against the Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals program,
saying it was being exploited
amid lax border security.
Later, surrounded by children on the South Lawn of the
White House for the annual
Easter egg roll, Trump lashed
out again about the program,
saying that Democrats had
abandoned the immigrants
who were brought to the United
States illegally as children and
have benefited from DACA.
“The Democrats have really
let them down, they’ve really let
them down,” Trump said in response to a question shouted by
a reporter, as young children
crowded around him at a picnic
table where he was signing
their artwork.
“Now people are taking advantage of DACA,” Trump went
on. “It should have never happened.”
In his Twitter messages,
Trump urged the Congress to
use the ‘‘nuclear option’’ to get a
border security law passed —
changing Senate rules for ending filibusters. Senate majority
leader Mitch McConnell has
dismissed that option in the
Sotomayor calls
move alarming
By Adam Liptak
NEW YORK TIMES
SHAWN THEW/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
President Trump and his daughter Tiffany welcomed children taking part in the White House Easter egg roll Monday.
past, saying Republicans will
welcome the filibuster option if
they return to being a minority.
The House and the Senate —
both controlled by Republicans
— are in recess.
The president vented about
the failure of bipartisan talks to
enshrine DACA’s protections in
law. The negotiations became
necessary after Trump moved
last fall to end the program,
which had been created unilaterally by then-President Obama.
Those deliberations have
gone nowhere despite Trump’s
stated willingness to provide a
path to citizenship for nearly 2
million immigrants who could
be considered eligible.
D e m o c r a t s o ff e r e d l a s t
month to provide $25 billion for
the wall that Trump advocates,
in exchange for such an exten-
sion, but White House officials
rejected the deal, demanding
more measures to curb legal and
illegal immigration.
The $1.3 trillion funding
package Congress passed last
month included $1.6 billion in
border wall spending. But
much of that money can be
used only to repair existing segments, not build new sections.
The White House and the
Department of Homeland Security lashed out in February
against a bipartisan proposal to
codify DACA protections that
they said would have eviscerated immigration enforcement
for people arriving in the United States before June 2018.
The measure included a provision directing the department
to prioritize the removal of
“criminal aliens,” people posing
a national security threat and
people entering the country illegally after June 30.
Kirstjen Nielsen, the homeland security secretary, briefed
Trump on the migration situation last week after returning
from a trip to Mexico to meet
with President Enrique Peña
Nieto and other top Mexican officials Trump was concerned by
what he heard.
That was part of the reason
Trump spent part of his Easter
Sunday complaining on Twitter
about “caravans” of immigrants
heading north toward the USMexico border, they said.
But the posts also came after
the Fox News Channel, the
president’s favorite, reported
on a group of hundreds of Central Americans that has been
traveling through Mexico to-
ward the United States, where
some hope to seek asylum or
sneak across the border.
On Monday, Trump again referred to “large caravans of people” and repeated his calls for
Mexico to enforce border security laws.
Meanwhile, the Trump administration has introduced
production quotas for immigration judges in an effort to reduce enormous court backlogs,
raising concern among judges
and attorneys that decisions
may be unfairly rushed.
The Justice Department said
judges must complete 700 cases
a year to earn a satisfactory
grade. The standards take effect
Oct. 1.
Material from the Associated
Press was used in this report.
Women running for office break decorum to woo votes
uWOMEN CANDIDATES
Continued from Page A1
“This year we have women
that are running very boldly,
and they typically are in districts where they feel like campaigning boldly as a woman
will grab attention during this
very chaotic, very partisan political environment,” said Dianne Bystrom, director of the
Carrie Chapman Catt Center for
Women and Politics at Iowa
State University.
While few candidates link
their campaigns directly to the
#MeToo movement, many seem
to be emboldened by it, sensing
that in a moment when women
everywhere are speaking their
minds, the women running for
office can, too. Some are presenting themselves in ways
that, just a few years ago, a lady
wouldn’t have dared.
In an online video, Katie
Hill, a 30-year-old first-time
candidate running for Congress
in a district north of Los Angeles, details her wrenching deliberations over whether to end an
unplanned pregnancy with a
supportive partner. Before she
released the video, she showed
it to a group of eight women
who had already been elected
to Congress.
“They were like, ‘You can’t,’ ”
Hill, a Democrat, said in an interview. “They were nice about
it. They were like, ‘It’s a really
powerful story. It’s just a big
risk and you don’t need to take
it.’ But I feel like I do.”
Whether it’s advisable for a
woman to wield her gender as
an asset this election cycle depends on factors particular to
her campaign — the demographic makeup of the district’s
electorate, the field, the circumstances. Longshot candidates
often use attention-grabbing
ads to boost name recognition
despite dim hopes of victory.
“Obviously, if you’re a challenger, you have to take more
risks. You have to do more attention-grabbing; you have to
use things that set you apart,”
said Bystrom.
Typically, feminist appeals
are far more common from
Democrats, she noted. But Martha McSally, a Republican
House member running for
Senate, has one of the boldest
Justices
void case
on police
shooting
ads out there, telling “Washington Republicans to grow a pair
of ovaries,” while touting her
tough qualifications and saying
she “refused to bow down to Sharia law.” The first US female pilot to fly in combat, she sued
the Air Force to change a policy
requiring US servicewomen in
Saudi Arabia to wear traditional Muslim headscarves.
A Trump ally, McSally is positioning herself as a renegade
Republican in the race to replace Jeff Flake – and possibly
determine control of the narrowly divided Senate.
Maggie Hassan advertised their
roles as mothers, along with
their policy stances.
Now, female candidates are
putting forth “new images of
what we see as normal,” and
“pushing boundaries,” said Kelly Dittmar, assistant professor
of political science at Rutgers
University Camden and a scholar at the Center for American
Women and Politics.
“It expands voters’ notions
of what we deem as appropriate
and acceptable, and then it also
allows for women to use their
gender as a value-added, as a
Awards, when performers highlighted sexual misconduct in
their industry.
Dana Nessel’s provocative ad
for Michigan attorney general
suggests that “men are the
problem,” Dittmar noted, rather than blaming the problem of
sexual misconduct on broader,
institutional power dynamics.
“I’m not sure that’s the best
strategy,” said Dittmar.
“There’s a question about
how this resonates with male
and female voters,” Dittmar
said. “Does it feel like you’re attacking men?”
Amanda
Renteria, a
Democratic
candidate for
California
governor,
has said a
male frontrunner
should step
aside
because of an
affair.
AMANDA RENTERIA
Since women are so underrepresented in politics — less
than one-fifth of Congress —
they can be viewed as outsiders
by a restless electorate clamoring for turnover, Bystrom noted.
“If you look at an overall
strategy for women over the
last several cycles, they are seen
a s a ge n t s o f c h a n ge ,” s a i d
Bystrom. “That’s something
they can run on, either from the
left or the right.”
She pointed to the 2014 ad
that famously catapulted Iowa
Republican Joni Ernst to US
Senate. The newcomer touted
her three roles — as “mother,
soldier, conservative” — and
made a jarring reference to castration. (“I grew up castrating
hogs on an Iowa farm,” she said,
“so when I get to Washington,
I’ll know how to cut pork.”)
By 2016, when two established female candidates faced
off in the New Hampshire race
for US Senate, both Republican
Kelly Ayotte and Democrat
credential, as one among many
merits that they bring to officeholding,” Dittmar said.
That also holds true for LGBTQ candidates, she noted. In
Massachusetts, Alexandra
Chandler, a transgender woman, is running in the crowded
field for the Third Congressional District with a campaign
video that highlights not just
her background in naval intelligence but also her wedding to
her wife.
Not everything works, and
some approaches could be
cringe-inducing or outright
alienating.
In Illinois, Sol Flores lost a
bid for Congress last month after running an ad set in her
childhood bedroom where she
was molested by someone staying with her family.
“I’ll fight as hard for you in
Congress as I did to protect myself,” Flores, a Democrat, said in
the spot, which was timed to air
the night of the Academy
Expect more groundbreaking videos to come.
A Baltimore activist has created a Vote Me Too PAC to convert small donations into slick
campaign ads for female candidates who champion such issues
as protecting women from sexual violence. Sarah Sherman, a
42-year-old mother of twins, decided that she and her husband,
who makes videos for a living,
should put their skills to work
for promising politicians.
While fund-raising and
identifying candidates to support, the Vote Me Too PAC is
launching edgy ads on social
media. (“51 percent of our population has a vagina. 81 percent
of members of Congress don’t
have vaginas. Why is this a
problem?” one spot asks. “Because it leads to a culture where
sexual discrimination & sexual
violence are tolerated.”)
In California, Democratic
gubernatorial candidate Amanda Renteria released a cam-
paign video showing women
wearing pussyhats at last year’s
Women’s March on Washington. “People are saying ‘Time’s
up,’ and ‘Enough’s enough,’ ”
she says. “We’re quickly turning
a corner where people are saying this stuff matters. Personal
conduct matters.”
She soon made it an issue in
her fledgling campaign for governor, demanding that the male
front-runner step aside over
sexual misconduct — an affair
he acknowledged with an aide
more than a decade earlier.
That front-runner, who has
not stepped down, is Gavin
Newsom, the lieutenant governor and a fellow Democrat
whose spokesman derided
Renteria’s effort as a “brazen
and self-serving political stunt.”
Renteria is okay with “brazen.” (She noted in an interview
that she has never been a
shrinking violet, and that she
asked her future husband to
marr y her while they were
shown on the Jumbotron at a
Red Sox game.)
She was also the national political director for Hillary Clinton’s cautious-to-a-fault presidential campaign, and she is
not mincing words now.
“Now is not a time for cautiousness. Now is not a time to
poll-test how you feel or whether you think other people will
think you’re right about this,”
Renteria said.
While Renteria has been criticized as opportunistic for targeting Newsom and highlighting her own #MeToo story, she
doesn’t worry so much when her
mentors — who see her taking
on a popular fellow Democrat —
question her strategy.
“We’re done with the days
where we have to be silent,
where we’re putting our career
or our own truth at odds with
each other,” said Renteria.
“For some folks it might be a
little scary that a woman is now
on the stage . . . and wants to
talk about uncomfor table
things,” Renteria added. “The
exact conversation we need to
be having right now is the uncomfortable conversation.”
Stephanie Ebbert can be
reached at Stephanie.Ebbert
@globe.com.
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday ruled
for an Arizona police officer
who shot a woman outside her
home in Tucson. The court’s decision was unsigned and issued
without full briefing and oral
argument, an indication that
the majority found the case to
be easy.
But in an impassioned dissent, Justice Sonia Sotomayor
said the majority had gone badly astray.
“Its deci sion is not jus t
wrong on the law; it also sends
an alarming signal to law enforcement officers and the public,” she wrote. “It tells officers
that they can shoot first and
think later, and it tells the public that palpably unreasonable
conduct will go unpunished.”
The case started in 2010
when three police officers responded to a 911 call reporting
that a woman had been seen
acting erratically by hacking at
a tree with a knife.
They saw Sharon Chadwick
standing in the driveway of a
house. A second woman, Amy
Hughes, emerged from the
house, holding a kitchen knife.
She stopped 6 feet from Chadwick.
Although the officers did not
know it, the two women were
roommates. Hughes was not
moving, spoke calmly, held the
knife at her side, and made no
aggressive movements.
Chadwick later said she did
not feel threatened and that
Hughes had appeared composed.
The officers drew their guns
and told Hughes to drop the
knife, but it is not clear that she
heard them. Officer Andrew
Kisela opened fire, shooting
Hughes four times.
Screaming and bleeding,
Hughes asked, “ Why ’d you
shoot me?”
She survived and sued the
officer for using excessive force.
The US Court of Appeals for the
9th Circuit, in San Francisco,
allowed the case to proceed.
The Supreme Court reversed
that ruling, saying that Kisela
was entitled to qualified immunity, a doctrine that shields officials from suits over violations
of constitutional rights that
were not clearly established at
the time of the conduct in question.
The majority did not decide
whether Kisela’s actions violated the Constitution, but it did
say there was no clear precedent that would have alerted
him that opening fire in what
he said was an effort to protect
Chadwick amounted to unconstitutionally excessive force.
In d i s s e n t , S o t o m a y o r,
joined by Justice Ruth Bader
Ginsburg, said the majority’s
reasoning was perplexing.
“Hughes was nowhere near
the officers, had committed no
illegal act, was suspected of no
crime, and did not raise the
knife in the direction of Chadwick or anyone else,” Sotomayor wrote, adding that only one
officer had opened fire.
Sotomayor said a jury
should have been allowed to decide the case.
“Because Kisela plainly
lacked any legitimate interest
justifying the use of deadly
force against a woman who
posed no objective threat of
harm to officers or others, had
committed no crime, and appeared calm and collected during the police encounter,” Sotomayor wrote, “he was not entitled to qualified immunity.”
In a separate case Monday,
the Supreme Court rejected an
appeal from American victims
of terrorist attacks in the Middle East more than a decade
ago.
The justices did not comment in ending a lawsuit
against the PLO and Palestinian Authority in connection
with attacks in Israel in 2002
and 2004 that killed 33 people.
A lower court tossed out a $654
million verdict against the Palestinians.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Nation/Region
A7
At Memphis MLK event, Holder alludes to ‘bullies, bigots’
Ex­attorney general
appears to refer
to Trump in speech
By Adrian Sainz
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MEMPHIS — Despite advances the country has made
since the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr. was slain while fighting poverty and racism, ‘‘the
age of bullies and bigots is not
fully behind us,’’ former attorney general Eric Holder said
Monday.
The remark was one of two
thinly veiled references to President Trump that Holder made
during his appearance at a
symposium on the first of three
days of events commemorating
the 50th anniversary of King’s
assassination.
King was supporting striking sanitation workers when he
came to Memphis in 1968. He
was talking with friends on the
balcony of the Lorraine Motel
on April 4 when he was shot
and killed.
Museums, colleges, and activists have organized three
days of marches, speeches, and
conferences to remember King
and his legacy.
Holder, King’s daughter
Bernice King, and a group of
ministers toured the National
Civil Rights Museum on Monday.
Holder, who was the first
black US attorney general,
spoke at a symposium sponsored by the University of
Memphis and the museum. He
was introduced by Senator
Doug Jones, an Alabama Democrat who won a special election in December.
Holder said he is proud that
the nation has made progress
in the past 50 years achieving
racial, social and economic justice.
He said women, minorities,
students against gun violence,
and members of the LGBTQ
community have been inspired
by King’s nonviolent protests
and have launched movements
calling for ‘‘fairness, opportunity, and justice.’’
But in remarks that appeared to reference Trump
without mentioning his name,
Holder also noted that King’s
dream of equality for all has
not been reached.
‘‘We’re still marching, we
are still striving, and we’re still
calling on our nation’s leaders
to act with a sense of justice,
compassion, and common humanity,’’ Holder said.
‘‘ The unfortunate fact is
that in 2018, America’s long
struggle to overcome injustice,
to eliminate disparities and
eradicate violence, has not yet
ended, and the age of bullies
and bigots is not fully behind
us,’’ he added.
Holder said he has spoken
with young people who feel lost
in their own country and are
‘‘fearful that America’s toolongstanding divisions are
threatening to tear our nation
apart.’’
Holder said he is concerned
with gun violence, the disproportional incarceration of
young black men, and uneven
educational opportunities for
minorities.
King’s legacy includes the
lesson that ‘‘it is necessary to be
indignant, and to be impatient,
so that it impels us to take action,’’ Holder said.
Holder asked the crowd of
hundreds to do more to help
realize King’s dream of racial
and social equality and come
together to ‘‘heal this divided
nation.’’
71 lawyers urge judge to reject US bid to disqualify Joyce attorney
uCOOPER
Continued from Page A1
federal prosecutors to remove
Howard M. Cooper, a veteran
defense attorney representing
Joyce in a public corruption
case.
Prosecutors have said Joyce
“entangled” Cooper in a coverup
in the two years before his December 2017 indictment on corruption charges, and they plan
to call the lawyer to testify at trial. Cooper has a conflict of interest because he “was a participant in, and has first-hand
knowledge of,” key events at issue in the case, prosecutors allege. Joyce’s lawyers counter
that prosecutors have acknowledged they have no evidence
Cooper knowingly participated
in any wrongdoing.
The ACLU, the Massachusetts Bar Association, and the
Massachusetts Association of
Criminal Defense Lawyers,
which together wrote the brief,
said Cooper has done what any
attorney would do: defend his
client. “A decision for the government would have a chilling
effect on attorney advocacy,”
the brief stated. “Clients should
be free to have their counsel
make . . . arguments zealously
without undue concern that the
advocacy will force counsel off
the case in the event of a criminal charge.”
A spokeswoman for US Attorney Andrew Lelling declined
to comment on the brief.
Joyce, a lawyer who served
as assistant Senate majority
leader, faces 113 counts of corruption and racketeering. Federal prosecutors say he received
$1 million in bribes and kickbacks laundered through his
Canton law office. After his arrest in December, the prosecutors sought to have Cooper disqualified. That raised alarm
among lawyers, who compared
the tactics to those used by federal prosecutors in the 1980s,
when defense attorneys were
subpoenaed to testify against
their own clients in grand jury
investigations, said Martin
Healy, chief legal counsel of the
Massachusetts Bar Association.
“We’re seeing this as a return to the old days of trying to
silence the defense bar and disrupt an attorney who is trying
to defend his client,” he said. “It
certainly is something that has
disturbed the legal community.”
The brief accuses prosecutors of violating Joyce’s Sixth
Amendment right to counsel. It
was filed in support of Joyce’s
lawyers, who filed their own request Monday asking Gorton to
reject the prosecution’s motion.
That motion, filed in late
February, stated that Cooper
submitted a series of false documents to the State Ethics Commission and The Boston Globe
on Joyce’s behalf in 2015 and
2016 when the then-senator
was fighting accusations that
Donuts coffee that Joyce had received for free, prosecutors
said. Cooper told the commission that Joyce had paid full
price for the coffee, which Joyce
then gave out as Christmas
gifts, according to federal prosecutors Dustin Chao and William F. Bloomer.
In March 2017, prosecutors
tried to force Cooper to testify
that prosecutors may be using
their subpoena power to turn
“defense counsel into a witness.”
Since then, “the government
has not shown any reason to believe that Cooper did anything,
or failed to do anything, except
what his ethical duties allowed
and even required of him,” Max
Stern, one of Joyce’s lawyers,
wrote in their motion.
A decision to prevent Howard M. Cooper (left)
from representing Brian A. Joyce in a public
corruption case ‘would have a chilling effect on
attorney advocacy.’
FRIEND-OF-THE-COURT BRIEF
he had accepted free coffee
f r o m D u n k i n’ D o n u t s a n d
pushed the agenda of an insurance company on Beacon Hill
that he had done legal work for
and owned stock in.
Joyce enlisted Cooper’s legal
help to “conceal and perpetuate
the ongoing criminal schemes,”
effectively making Cooper a direct witness to Joyce’s duplicity,
prosecutors said.
Cooper submitted “false and
misleading” answers to the Ethics Commission, including a
backdated invoice for Dunkin’
before a grand jury that was investigating Joyce, according to
court documents filed by
Joyce’s lawyers Monday.
“We’ve shown a reasonable
basis for this court to find that
Mr. Joyce used the services of
Mr. Cooper to foster a crime
here,” Bloomer said at a hearing
before US District Court Judge
William G. Young.
“He’s the unknowing doof of
this nefarious conduct,” prosecutors have said of Cooper.
Young rejected the request,
expressing “grave concerns”
Defense lawyers typically rely on information provided by
clients in preparing their cases
and responses to allegations
made in the press, the lawyers’
brief stated.
Now that the case is headed
to trial, prosecutors are asking
Gorton, the judge assigned to
the case, to have Cooper disqualified from representing
Joyce.
If Gorton grants the prosecution’s request, the consequences would be devastating
for future criminal defendants,
the groups argued.
Clients “may be deprived of
zealous advocacy if counsel believe that vigorous advocacy in
other forums may result in add i t i o n a l c r i m i n a l c h a r ge s
against the client, the attorney
being called as a witness, or the
client being forced to hire new
counsel after the case is indicted,” the brief said.
Nearly 20 former federal
prosecutors signed the motion,
including Paul V. Kelly, who was
an assistant US attorney for 10
years and specializes in whitecollar criminal defense work.
“The Sixth Amendment right
to counsel is vitally important,”
Kelly said. “The government
needs to tread very carefully
when it seeks to disqualify counsel. . . . It just seemed that here
the procedural moves that were
being made were very close to
the line, or over the line.”
Maria Cramer can be reached
at mcramer@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @globemcramer.
Open
April
6-8 at
7-9
11am
Perkins Cove • Ogunquit, Maine
www.barnbilly.com
#GlobeDocs
FREE MONTHLY DOCUMENTARY
SCREENINGS
WITH ENLIGHTENING POST-FILM DISCUSSIONS WITH
DIRECTORS, SCREENWRITERS, AND GLOBE JOURNALISTS.
NEXT SCREE NING :
GI JEWS
Wednesday, April 18 | 7 P.M. |Coolidge Corner Theatre
GI JEWS: JEWISH AMERICANS IN WORLD WAR II tells the story of the 550,000
Jewish American men and women who fought in World War II. In their own
words, veterans both famous and unknown (including Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner,
and Henry Kissinger) bring their war experiences to life: how they fought for
their nation and their people, struggled with anti-Semitism within their ranks,
and emerged transformed.
Following the film, there will be a Q&A with Lisa Ades, director/producer,
Amanda Bonavita, producer, Maia Harris, writer, and Jonathan Sarna,
on-screen talent and film advisor. The Boston Globe’s Peter Keough will
moderate the discussion.
Visit Globe.com/GlobeDocs to register.
A8
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorials
State Police reforms:
Off to a good start
A
fter a string of scandals at the
Massachusetts State Police, Governor Charlie Baker announced
a series of reforms on Monday aimed at restoring public confidence in the agency. The changes represent a first step in the right direction.
The reforms start with the elimination of Troop E, the division in charge
of patrolling the Mass. Pike. Thirty active or retired troopers in the division
are being investigated for overtime
abuse, including so-called phantom
shifts, when they allegedly didn’t do
any work but still collected pay. Officers
currently assigned to Troop E will be
reassigned. Colonel Kerry Gilpin, who
took command of the force in November, after her predecessor and his deputy abruptly retired amid a different
controversy, also revealed that the department is activating a GPS tracking
system in all cruisers to track troopers.
The feature, it turns out, was already installed in marked police cruisers. Neither Gilpin nor Baker knew why
it hadn’t been activated already. But
better late than never, especially if the
feature helps prevent no-show shifts.
The future of Troop F, meanwhile,
remains unclear. That division, charged
with patrolling Logan Airport and parts
of the Seaport, was known as an especially lucrative posting among officers.
Troopers were found to be making hundreds of thousands of dollars in overtime shifts, and eight troopers at Troop
F had earned more than $1 million
each since 2014. Until last week, the di-
vision also had an unusual management structure, with pay coming from
Massport instead of the State Police.
Apparently, the reason why so many
troopers were earning so much in overtime is that the troop itself is understaffed. The staffing at Logan is “down
by 30 bodies,” she said. Gilpin said its
staffing levels are being scrutinized.
Hiring 30 more officers isn’t necessarily
the solution, though: Reducing the
troop’s responsibilities to match its current staffing levels should also be on
the table.
The rest of the reforms announced
Monday — the creation of 10 new positions in the inspections and internal affairs sections at the department; quarterly public audits of the top 50 pay
earners in the force; an independent
audit to assess the agency’s overtime
policies; and the development of a department-wide body camera program
— are common-sense policies that will
boost accountability, transparency, and
oversight.
But the agency also needs a culture
shift, and for leaders to embrace transparency as a virtue. Baker and Gilpin
should be pressing — or ordering — the
agency to stop making it so difficult for
the media and ordinary citizens to access records of police caught drunk
driving or the birth dates of state
troopers. Secrecy helped set the stage
for the alleged abuses at the State Police, and a greater commitment to
transparency might help prevent them
in the future.
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Governor Charlie Baker and Massachusetts State Police Colonel Kerry Gilpin
announce a series of reforms at the State House Monday.
Sinclair’s silly stunt
hints at deeper woes
V
iral videos are often frivolous
and sometimes poisonous. But
occasionally, they can be clarifying. Witness a montage released
by the website Deadspin over the
weekend, and viewed more than 7 million times as of Monday evening.
It shows dozens of local television
news anchors from all over the country, each employed by media giant Sinclair Broadcast Group, making the
same exact speech to their millions of
viewers — warning about “false news”
and journalists “who use their platforms to push their own personal
bias.”
The announcement has the feel of
state-run television, unmistakably
echoing President Trump’s harangues
against the media. Little surprise that
he tweeted a defense of Sinclair, and
an attack on “Fake News Networks,” on
Monday morning as outrage spread.
Already the largest owner of local
television stations in the country, Sinclair is proposing a $3.9 billion purchase of Tribune Media’s 42 stations.
Here in New England, that would
mean the broadcaster, which already
owns stations in Rhode Island and
Maine, would have a presence in Connecticut — subjecting even more of the
region’s viewers to the dubious “mustrun” segments Sinclair regularly foists
on its affiliates.
That’s not just speeches by anchors.
There are also centrally produced stories, like one that ran suggesting voters shouldn’t back Hillary Clinton because of the Democratic Party’s proslavery history.
The broadcaster’s political bias may
not even be the most compelling reason to restrain its growth. Sinclair has
a worrisome history of slashing staff
and reducing local news coverage.
And greater market power could mean
bigger retransmission fees for cable
companies — costs that would ultimately be passed on to the consumer.
To their credit, Justice Department
antitrust officials appear to be taking
these issues seriously. But if the merger is to be blocked, the public will have
to stay engaged — even if it’s through
viral videos.
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Chinese employees produce shoes for export at a factory in Shangrao, in China’s
central Jiangxi province, March 28.
Will China supplant
US economic
dominance?
By Kenneth Rogoff
A
s China and the United States engage in their latest trade tussle,
most economists take it as given
that China will achieve global
economic supremacy in the
long run, no matter what happens now. After all, with four times as many people as
the United States, and a determined program to catch up after centuries of technological stagnation, isn’t it inevitable that
China will decisively take over the mantle of
economic hegemon?
I am not so sure. Many who see China’s
huge labor force as a decisive advantage also worry that robots and artificial intelligence will eventually take away the majority of jobs, leaving most humans to while
away their time engaged in leisure activities.
And if robots and AI are the dominant
drivers of production in the coming century, perhaps having too large a population to
care for — especially one that needs to be
controlled through limits on Internet and
information access — will turn out to be
more of a hindrance for China. The rapid
aging of China’s population exacerbates the
challenge.
As the rising importance of robotics and
AI blunts China’s manufacturing edge, the
ability to lead in technology will become
more important. Here, the current trend toward higher concentration of power and
control in the central government, as opposed to the private sector, could hamstring
China as the global economy reaches higher
stages of development.
The possibility that China might never
supplant the United States as the world’s
economic hegemon is the flip side of the
technology and inequality problem. Everyone in the West is worrying about the future of work, but it is a bigger problem for
the Chinese development model than for
the American one. The United States needs
to struggle with the problem of how to redistribute income internally, especially given highly concentrated ownership of new
ideas and technology. But for China, there
is the additional problem of how to extend
its franchise as export superpower into the
machine age.
True, it is unlikely that President
Trump’s huffing and puffing and bluffing
will bring about a large-scale return of manufacturing jobs to the United States. But the
United States has the potential to expand
the size of its manufacturing base anyway,
in terms of output if not jobs. After all, today’s high-tech factory floors produce far
more with far fewer workers. And the robots and AI are coming not just in manu-
facturing and driverless cars. Robo-doctors,
robo-financial advisers, and robo-lawyers
are just the tip of the iceberg in machine
disruption of service-sector jobs.
To be sure, China’s rise is hardly a mirage, and its heady success is not built on
population size alone. India has a similar
population (both around 1.3 billion people), but for now, at least, it trails far behind. Chinese leadership must be credited
with doing a miraculous job of lifting hundreds of millions of people out of poverty
and into the middle class.
But China’s rapid growth has been driven mostly by technology catch-up and investment. And while China, unlike the Soviet Union, has shown vastly more competence in home-grown innovation — Chinese
companies are already leading the way in
the next generation of “5G” mobile networks, and its cyber warfare capacity is fully on par with the United States — keeping
close to the cutting edge is not the same
thing as defining it. China’s gains still come
largely from adoption of Western technology and, in some cases, appropriation of intellectual property. Trump is hardly the first
American president to complain on this
score, and he is right to do so (though starting a trade war cannot be the solution).
In the economy of the 21st century, other factors, including rule of law, as well as
access to energy, arable land, and clean water, may also become increasingly important. China is following its own path and
may yet prove that centralized systems can
push development further and faster than
anyone had imagined, far beyond simply
being a growing middle-income country.
But China’s global dominance is hardly the
predetermined certainty that so many experts seem to assume.
Yes, the United States faces vast challenges as well. For example, it must devise a
way to retain dynamic technological growth
while preventing excessive concentration of
wealth and power. To be a hegemon, however, does not require being the world’s
largest country — otherwise, England
would never have ruled much of the world
as it did for more than a century. China
might win the silicon future if the US drops
the ball, but it won’t become the dominant
global power simply because it has a larger
population. On the contrary, the coming
machine age could tilt the playing filed decisively in favor of a much less populous but
(until now) more innovative United States.
Kenneth Rogoff, a former chief economist of
the International Monetary Fund, is
professor of economics and public policy at
Harvard University. © 2018 by Project
Syndicate, www.project-syndicate.org.
abcde
Fou nd ed 1 8 72
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Publisher
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ELLEN CLEGG
Editor, Editorial Page
LINDA PIZZUTI HENRY
Managing Director
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Managing Editor
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SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
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Engagement
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
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BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
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T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A9
Inbox
JOAN VENNOCHI
No forgiveness for Ingraham
J
ust one mean tweet, and advertisers bailed on Fox News host
Laura Ingraham.
Bill O’Reilly and his employer
had to pay out millions to settle multiple
sexual harassment suits before corporate
sponsors boycotted the show that the Fox
News star was ultimately forced to quit.
Meanwhile, Sean Hannity was able to derail a boycott campaign by urging Keurig
coffee maker users, who also happened
to be Hannity fans, to smash the product
after the company said it was going to
pull ads from his show.
But for Ingraham, even saying sorry
wasn’t enough to stanch the flow of sponsors away from her show. She got into
trouble after she mocked David Hogg, a
17-year-old Parkland shooting survivor,
as a whiner who didn’t get into four colleges to which he applied. After he urged
companies to boycott her show, she
tweeted an apology. He refused to accept
it, and the tally of boycotters grew. This
week, Ingraham is on Easter break with
her children. She told viewers the vacation was planned, but it felt more like a
forced march off the air.
All Hogg had to do was wave a list of
corporate advertisers to a receptive
mainstream media, and advertisers vanished. Is their swift reaction a sign of national strength for the anti-gun movement? Maybe. When corporations buy
sponsorships, they are buying demographics. They don’t care much about the
content of the shows they may be sponsoring, and top executives may not even
know about the sponsorships, said John
Cullinane, a liberal Democrat and founder
of a Massachusetts computer software
company.
They start caring when they get caught
up in controversy, or start to feel they are
on the wrong side of public opinion. Cullinane said he once pointed out to then-
publican Roy Moore had made sexual advances to teenage girls by describing one
of the encounters as “consensual.” Later,
Hannity said he misspoke, but speculated
that Moore’s accusers were lying for money or political purposes. Even so, the boycott flopped.
Like Hannity, Ingraham was also do-
With Ingraham, there’s also something of a double
standard. Mean girls get less of a pass than mean
men.
Governor Tim Kaine of Virginia that his
Economic Development Department was
advertising on Rush Limbaugh. “He was
very surprised and very soon there was
one less Limbaugh advertiser,” said Cullinane. In this case, he added, “It took a kid
from Parkland, Florida, to point out the
obvious in a very effective way.”
With Ingraham, there’s also something of a double standard here. Mean
girls get less of a pass than mean men. Initial respondents to her tweet called out
Ingraham as a mother who should know
better. Imagine if Hannity tweeted what
Ingraham did — “David Hogg Rejected by
Four Colleges to Which He Applied and
whines about it.” Even if Hogg responded
in the same way and called for a boycott,
would the outrage would be as great and
the reaction just as swift? Remember,
Hannity was able to fend off a boycott after he justified reports that Alabama Re-
ing her job as paid provocateur. She just
under-estimated her target. Tragedy gave
Hogg a platform, and he’s using it. Ridiculing him over his college rejections was
pathetic. Still, I recently defended a local
sports radio host who used a nasty word
to describe Tom Brady’s five-year-old
daughter. In that case, Brady had all the
power. He could have demanded the
host’s firing, but didn’t.
In this post-Parkland moment, a high
school senior whose school was shot up
has all the power, at least for now. Hogg
took Ingraham’s tweet and ran with it. If
corporate America sticks with him, the
anti-gun movement truly has staying
power.
If that happens, what a shock for Fox.
Joan Vennochi can be reached at
vennochi@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @Joan_Vennochi.
Trump Derangement
Syndrome? Or simply
justified enmity?
Sex abuse allegations against Trump
must be fully adjudicated
Donald Trump has now been accused of sexually abusing at
least 15 women. The accusations range from unwanted
kissing and groping to the rape of a minor child. Worse,
several of the women say they and their families were
threatened with bodily harm to keep them quiet. That’s reportedly why the rape case never went forward.
These allegations need to be fully investigated, with
Trump being required to testify under oath. At a time when
other government officials and public figures have had
their careers ended over far less serious improprieties, it is
intolerable that the president should be given a free pass.
No one is above the law, especially not the president, who
derives all his power from our legal institutions. The press
must not let this matter drop or fade from view until the
full truth has been established and made public.
If Trump is innocent of these accusations, then let his
name be cleared. If he is guilty, he should face the full consequences.
GEORGE RAPPOLT
Needham
Slouching toward despotism
It is a most immediate objective of news analysts to evaluate Donald Trump’s so-called policies, but what seems of
greater concern is related more to character than policy. Becoming more apparent daily is the slouching of Trump toward despotism.
Efforts to fulfill his seeming wish to become a dictator
are not obscure: his admiration of dictators around the
world, some of whom he envies for their lifetime appointments; ridding himself of those who disagree with him; insistence that only he has supreme authority; his sense that
the military belongs to him (”my generals”); the desire to
roll tanks through the streets of Washington in a military
parade; his endorsement of torture, including the death
penalty for those who “misbehave” in certain ways.
It is beyond time for corrective action lest advancing
events cannot be curtailed or reversed.
DON R. LIPSITT
Cambridge
WARD SUTTON
Trump making his bid for leader
of the world — of self
Donald Trump appears to have no interest in running the
country (except into the ground), but he is obsessively interested in his own celebrity and popularity. More people
attended his inauguration, he claimed repeatedly and erroneously, than attended any presidential inauguration in
history. When Trump spoke to Hurricane Harvey victims
last summer in Corpus Christi, Texas, his focus was not on
the people who’d lost their homes, businesses, or lives to
the storm. Instead, he thanked everyone for coming out to
see him. “What a crowd, what a turnout,” he commented.
Trump was elated that the recent “Roseanne” reboot
drew more than 18 million viewers. “It was about us,” he
crowed.
To this and countless other exhibits of mind-boggling
self-centeredness, I say, let’s wait until Trump’s impeachment hearings are televised. That’s when he’ll get the ratings he truly deserves.
STEVE NADIS
Cambridge
Scandal at the State House?
He’s shocked
Your front-page news analysis describes a state Senate disrupted by chaos and scandal (“Upheaval hobbles Mass. Senate,” Mar. 31). True, but hardly new. This is the same body
that endured 18 years under the leadership of one whose
brother was, during those same years, organized crime
boss, murderer, gun runner, FBI informant, fugitive, and
FBI’s most wanted, to name but a few. That’s not as “salacious” as the Senate president’s husband being charged
with sexual assault, admittedly, but it’s worth remembering. (Indeed, the Globe was instrumental in breaking the
Bulger brothers story at the time.)
Of course, if one compares the state Senate to the House,
where three speakers in a row have had to resign amid
scandal, the Senate is probity personified.
JOSH PASSELL
Watertown
A cluttered house could be a sign
of a deeper disorder
Re “Junk science can’t reverse a clutter disaster” by Beth
Teitell (Page A1, March 28): Clutter is the tangible result of
two opposing societal imperatives: acquire more and do
not waste anything. At the intersection lies a massive accumulation of objects no longer needed but seemingly too valued to be trash. This makes clutter a pervasive problem.
As mentioned, paying for professional organizers and
buying books on organizing doesn’t necessarily make you
more organized or reduce your clutter. Paradoxically, it may
increase clutter, as new books with new solutions are purchased and saved. Letting go of objects that you no longer
need does reduce clutter significantly and make organized
living achievable.
When clutter gets to overwhelming proportions, as described in the article, it may be indicative of a larger problem, such as hoarding disorder, which affects up to 6 percent of the US population. As many as 50 percent of those
affected do not recognize they have hoarding disorder or
that their behavior is problematic. Even worse is that
hoarding symptoms increase in severity as an individual
ages. Consequently, clutter may represent the tip of a mental health and public health crisis as people become increasingly unable to declutter their lives.
Ward Sutton is a cartoonist and illustrator. Follow him on Twitter @WardSutton and suttonimpactstudio.com.
KAY T. JEWELS
Clinical research assistant
DONALD A. DAVIDOFF
Chief, neuropsychology department
McLean Hospital
Belmont
A10
The Region
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
As boomers age, demand for replacement parts booms
uJOINT REPLACEMENTS
Continued from Page A1
to $50,000 for knees and
$40,000 for hips, though the
prices vary widely among Medicare and private insurers,
which typically bear the bulk of
the cost. The average age of patients listed in the American
Joint Replacement Registry is
about 66.
With millions more boomers
still in their late 50s and early
60s, the trend will only continue.
“They’re aging, they’ve had
some injuries, and they want to
continue to be active into their
60s, 70s, and 80s. And they
need a good joint to do that,”
said Dr. David Mattingly, surgeon in chief at New England
Baptist Hospital in Boston, one
of the nation’s top orthopedics
centers.
The surgical surge has created an expanding brigade of bionic baby boomers whose artificial parts are accompanied by
sky-high expectations — something doctors struggle to manage. Despite steady improve-
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ment in technology and outcomes, replacement joints don’t
create superhumans. Still,
many patients are lifelong fitness buffs who begin plotting
their return to the gym, the golf
course, or the cross-country skiing trails the moment they are
discharged from the hospital.
Winthrop retiree John Carver, 76, is already back at the fitness center after having replacement surgery on his right
knee in February. “My goal is to
get back to an hour — 30 minutes on the elliptical and some
back exercises,” he said. A Marine veteran who ran the New
York City Marathon the year he
turned 40, Carver has scheduled a similar procedure on his
left knee in May, early enough
“to be ready for golf season.”
For those who are still working at physically demanding
jobs, there are other considerations.
“I’m up and down the scaffolding all day,” said David
Smith, 62, of Arlington, a construction superintendent in
Boston who had a hip replacement in January. “My first focus
was to just get on my feet so I
can work another 10 years. So I
said, ‘OK, let’s get this done.’ ”
Smith, who played hockey in
college and as an adult and
spent years lifting heavy equipment on building sites, plans to
return to his job this spring. But
he has already resumed golfing
— on a March trip to visit his
son and his family in Atlanta.
And, he promised, “I will get on
the skates again.”
Like Smith, many boomers
endured months or years of
p a i n b e f o r e s u r g e r y, p a i n
caused by “bone-on-bone” friction when cartilage deterioration eroded their bone cushioning. Some took multiple cortisone shots, hoping to avoid
surgeries. But having had the
procedures, many say they wish
they’d done it sooner.
West Newbury’s town clerk,
Mike McCarron,, 62, played
high school and college football
and once climbed Mount Washington in the winter. McCarron
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
At New England Baptist, a physical therapist showed
patients about to have joints replaced how to use crutches.
underwent two knee replacements simultaneously in 2011.
“I had a coupon,” he joked. Now
he runs on the treadmill at his
Merrimack Valley gym and
hikes in the Maine wilderness.
Susan Nadworny, 61, of Melrose, owned an aerobics studio
in Boston’s North End during
the 1980s and 1990s. There,
she spent three or four hours a
day leading high-impact exercise classes. Nadworny, who
now works as a public policy
advocate for people with disabilities, had knee replacement
surgery last April. Nearly a year
later, she pedals an indoor exercise bicycle and spends an hour
a day walking dogs in the
woods.
The vast majority of jointsurgery patients report much
less pain and greater mobility
afterward, with success rates
topping 95 percent, according
to the American Academy of
Orthopedic Surgeons, a physicians organization. In patientreported surveys, some still
complain of pain and tissue inflammation after their procedures. Smaller numbers suffer
serious complications, ranging
from blood clotting to hospitalacquired infections.
New England Baptist expects to perform a record 7,000
knee and hip replacements at
its Mission Hill campus this
year, a nearly sixfold increase
from the 1,200 annually it did
in the mid-1980s. “Most of the
busy guys do 15 to 20 a week,”
Mattingly said.
Last year, the average salary
for joint-replacement specialists topped $575,000, reported
the Dallas consulting firm Merritt Hawkins & Associates, compared with just over $230,000
for family doctors.
Because of improvements in
materials and the way they’re
treated and sterilized, implants
— which include polyethylene
‘I’m out walking
my Lab about five
miles a day, every
day.’
STEPHANIE DONVAN
A 60-year-old who had a knee
replacement
and titanium alloys — don’t
wear down as fast as they once
did. Implants now have a 90
percent chance of lasting two
decades, much longer than in
the past, Mattingly said.
While physical activity obviously plays a role in joint deterioration, genetics may be the
biggest factor in determining
who needs a replacement and
when, he said. Knee replacements were first offered in the
1960s, and hip replacements
began in the 1940s, so many
boomers are facing the same
surgeries their fathers and
mothers underwent.
But boomers may have a
tougher time coming to terms
with the reality that a new body
part doesn’t mean they can resume all of the high-impact activities that were a major part
of their lives.
“Nobody will return to playing football,” Mattingly said.
“The person who struggles is
the one who’s done long-distance running for years and just
doesn’t want to give it up.”
Technology could eventually
change that. Joint implants
have become more customized
to suit individual patients, but a
Billerica company is pushing
the personalization trend further. ConforMIS Inc. uses 3-D
printing and imaging software
to more precisely tailor replacement joints. It sells between
17,000 and 20,000 personalized knee implants a year — still
a small share of the market —
and last year won US regulatory
approval for its first hip implants.
“The baby boomer explosion
is a big deal in health care,” said
ConforMIS chief executive
Mark Augusti. “Technology has
to be part of the solution. Baby
boomers expect to be more active as they get older and have
higher expectations about quality of life in their later years.”
Stephanie Donvan, 60, of Arlington, who received a ConforMIS knee replacement in
May, recalled feeling like she
was “carrying a dead tree
trunk” before the surgery.
Now, she said, “I’m out walking my Lab about five miles a
day, every day. I can run in the
snow and ride my bike. I have
complete range of motion . . .
We want to keep going till we’re
in our 80 s or 90 s. We don’ t
want to give up all the things
we’re doing.”
Robert Weisman can be reached
at robert.weisman@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeRobW.
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T H E B O S T O N GL OB E T U ES DAY, A P R I L 3 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / M E T R O
Kevin Cullen
When Great
Trees Fall
When my niece Kathleen told me she was
dating some guy named
Nyall Sheldon, I couldn’t
decide what surprised
me most: that he was
English or that he had a
lip ring.
He lost the lip ring
pretty quickly, thank God, but you never
stop being English and Nyall Sheldon
was English.
He came to this country as a 3-yearold when his father got a job teaching at
Ohio State University. Nyall lost his accent but gained so much else growing up
in the United States.
Nyall would talk to a telephone pole.
He loved to fish and watch Premier
League soccer games and play lacrosse
and eventually he came to love my niece,
Kathleen Cannon.
They met in Ohio, where they went to
university, and got married on the Jersey
Shore, where my wife and her sisters
frolicked as children on the precious
week or two that my mother- and fatherin-law could afford.
When I first met Nyall, I was deeply
suspicious. Kathleen was our oldest
niece, the daughter my wife and I never
had, and we were fiercely protective of
her. But then Nyall told me the two
things he loved most in this world, besides my niece, were beer and Manchester United and I realized I was looking at a younger, far more fit and handsome version of myself. From that
moment on, we were budzos.
Because they fell in love in Columbus
they decided to settle in Columbus, leaving Ohio only to see friends and relatives. After their first child, Dylan, was
born a couple of years ago, they stopped
traveling as much and everybody went
to them.
Dylan has a head full of shocking
blond hair and an appetite that means
he would eat the next cow he meets, and
I have to tell you that we love that kid to
death.
When we found out that Kathleen
was pregnant with their second, the only
question was would we go out to Ohio
and help before or after the birth. I had
suggested the name Caoimhe, which in
the Irish means gentle and beautiful and
precious. Kathleen liked the name but
kept saying they didn’t even know the
baby’s gender so that maybe it was best
to wait on names.
And then we got the call a few weeks
ago.
Kathleen was puttering around the
kitchen when she heard a crash in the
basement. She rushed downstairs and
found Nyall in a heap. He had fallen off
their exercise bicycle.
Nyall was rushed to Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, where
the doctors found that he had a brain
aneurysm. He had no brain activity.
They put him on a bunch of machines to
keep him alive and Kathleen had to figure out what to do.
In the end, there was nothing to do
except what he and Kathleen had talked
about doing if the unthinkable happened, and that was harvest his organs
and give them to other people, so they
might live.
As the doctors tried to figure out if
there was any chance for Nyall, I postponed a business trip to Ireland. My wife
gripped my hand and told me to go,
while the medical staff at Ohio State
gripped Kathleen’s hand and examined
their options.
I have flown to Ireland from Boston
maybe 50 times, and this was the first
time I ever flew there feeling lousy. I was
in Connemara, where my grandparents
decided to chuck everything and take a
shot at America, when I learned that Nyall had died.
I flew home from Ireland and my wife
and I spent a sleepless few hours in our
bed in Hingham before heading to Logan for the flight to Ohio.
I dreaded the funeral service, because
there is nothing so sad, so utterly soul
crushing as to be witness to the death of
someone so young and so full of life. But
the service for Nyall was anything but
depressing. It was life affirming. It was
beautiful.
Nyall’s casket was draped with three
scarves: Ohio State, Manchester United,
and Brighton & Hove Albion, the last being the soccer team of his dad’s hometown.
Nyall’s dad, Ian, a professor at Ohio
State, spoke first and explained Nyall’s
CULLEN, Page B5
Trooper’s hiring ignored drug­case clues
She says no one asked about federal testimony with immunity
By Shelley Murphy
GLOBE STAFF
Trooper Leigha Genduso admitted on her State Police application
that she experimented with pot as a
teenager, but never mentioned that
she cut up bales of marijuana and
sold it in 10-pound packages covered
in gift-wrapping.
Still, a clue on Genduso’s 2012 application could have exposed her
past and raises questions about how
thoroughly she was vetted during
the hiring process.
A North Reading address that
Genduso listed as her former residence was forfeited to the govern-
ment in a federal drug case — a case
in which Genduso took the witness
stand in 2007 and recounted her role
in a marijuana-trafficking operation.
“I had a background investigation
like everybody else did,” Genduso,
36, said last week in her first public
comments since she was suspended
without pay in February amid revelations about her past. “I answered
the questions.”
Genduso, who dated and lived
with a top commander at the time
she applied to be a trooper, is now at
the center of an internal investigation into how she slipped through
the hiring process.
“There’s no way I would have ever
allowed somebody to be hired with
that type of background if I knew
about it at that time,” said former
State Police Colonel Timothy Alben,
who led the department from 2012
to 2 0 1 5. “ C l e a r ly t h at w a s n ot
brought to my attention.”
Alben said State Police applicants
have been turned away for far less
than what Genduso admittedly did.
Genduso, who became a dispatcher in 2008 and a trooper in
2014, said no one asked during the
hiring process about her federal testimony, which was given under a
GENDUSO, Page B5
‘I’VE BEEN TO THE MOUNTAINTOP . . .’
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
State Trooper Leigha Genduso
said she did not lie or mislead
State Police by not giving details
of her drug-selling past.
Schools’
fresh food
program
expands
Meals to be created,
cooked in buildings
By James Vaznis
GLOBE STAFF
PHOTOS BY MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
F
rida Duchatelier (from left), 8,
Dontaecjah Miller, 11, and Gary
Ambrose, 8, with the James J. Chittick
Elementary School choir, performed at City
Hall Plaza Monday during readings of
Martin Luther King Jr.’s last speech — 50
years ago today. King spoke of seeing the
promised land as he addressed striking
sanitation workers in Memphis. He was
assassinated the next day. B3.
At UMass Boston, budget cuts
target academic research centers
By Laura Krantz
GLOBE STAFF
Leaders of several academic research
centers at the University of Massachusetts Boston are furious with the school
after it announced that they would see
their budgets slashed as part of an attempt to lessen the school’s deficit.
On the chopping block is one center
that helps veterans and another that
studies Latino communities in Massachusetts, as well as others.
“We are all demoralized. We feel devalued in our service to veterans,” said
‘They don’t even
know what we do.
They don’t know
what we’re about.’
THOMAS KANE
Director of a UMass institute
that helps provide services to
military veterans
Thomas Kane, director of the William
Joiner Institute for the Study of War
and Social Consequences, one of 17 centers that are being cut.
The centers learned about the cuts in
a memo sent on March 26 by interim
chancellor Barry Mills, who is running
the university and managing its deficit
while the campus searches for a permanent leader. The original budget gap
was $30 million, but other cuts, including layoffs and a hiring freeze, have
shrunk it significantly.
UMASS BOSTON, Page B4
Two years ago, Jill Shah was volunteering during recess at a Roxbury
elementary school where she and
other volunteers were attempting to
get students to try some arugula and
other greens grown in the school
garden.
She was astonished to learn that
students rarely feasted on fresh
foods inside the building and instead
were being served frozen dinners because the school, like most in Boston, was not equipped with a fullservice kitchen.
A year later, Shah worked with
the school system on an experiment:
putting up money to build kitchens
in three schools in East Boston that
didn’t have them so students could
eat fresh meals prepared on site. The
experiment proved so successful that
Mayor Martin J. Walsh announced
Monday that it would be expanding
next fall to more than two dozen
schools in East Boston, Roxbury, and
Mattapan, and will be called “My
Way Cafe.”
The $3 million effort — half of it
being paid for by the Shah Family
Foundation — represents the latest
step by the school system and the
mayor’s office to get the freshest food
possible into the bellies of the system’s 56,000 students. (A separate
effort launched last fall replaced all
frozen dinners with fresher meals
prepared off premises by an outside
vendor, Revolution Foods.)
But the gold standard is meals
SCHOOL LUNCHES, Page B4
Chandler’s
hold on top
Senate job
is tenuous
By Joshua Miller
GLOBE STAFF
WHERE ARE
YOU, SPRING? —
A daffodil would
not be bowed by a
bit of snow on
Monday as seen
during an early
April storm on
Pleasant Street in
Brookline.
Tuesday’s forecast
calls for clouds
and some rain
developing during
the afternoon.
Temperatures will
mostly be in the
40s. Full report,
D10
LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF
The leadership position of Massachusetts Senate President Harriette
L. Chandler is so tenuous she is unsure whether she will still be the
chamber’s leader by next week.
“I don’t know!” Chandler said
when asked Monday if she expected
to retain her post for the next seven
days. “I, I — I would hope so for next
week. I can’t talk too much beyond
that.”
The comments came after her
weekly Monday meeting with Governor Charlie Baker and House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo, who looked on
stoically.
Chandler is facing internal pressure to step aside from Senator Karen E. Spilka, a fellow Democrat who
has claimed the votes to be the next
Senate president.
Spilka has been coy about when
she might move to take the gavel
from Chandler, who was elevated to
SENATE, Page B4
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
TheMetroMinute
GET SMART
ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE
Where pot’s legal
opioid use is down
By Kate Sheridan
STAT
As Massachusetts and other states legalize
medical and recreational marijuana, doctors
may be replacing opioid prescriptions with
suggestions to visit a local marijuana dispensary.
Two papers published Monday in JAMA
Internal Medicine analyzing more than five
years of Medicare Part D and Medicaid prescription data found that after states legalized
weed, the number of opioid prescriptions and
the daily dose of opioids went way down.
That indicates that some people may be
shifting away from prescription drugs to cannabis, though the studies can’t say whether
this substitution is actually happening or if
patients or doctors are the driving force.
“In this time when we are so concerned —
rightly so — about opiate misuse and abuse
and the mortality that’s occurring, we need to
be clear-eyed and use evidence to drive our
policies,” said W. David Bradford, an economist at the University of Georgia and an author of one of the studies. “If you’re interested
in giving people options for pain management that don’t bring the particular risks that
opiates do, states should contemplate turning
on dispensary-based cannabis policies.”
Previous research has pointed to a similar
correlation. A 2014 paper found that states
with medical marijuana laws had nearly 25
percent fewer deaths from opioid overdoses.
But the new research is the first to connect
marijuana legalization to prescription painkillers with such large data sets.
One of the two new studies found that
people on Medicare filled 14 percent fewer
prescriptions for opioids after medical marijuana laws were passed in their states. The
second study found that Medicaid enrollees
filled nearly 40 fewer opioid prescriptions per
1,000 people each year after their state
passed any law making cannabis accessible —
with greater drops seen in states that legalized both medical and recreational marijuana.
Those findings are somewhat positive
from a public health angle. Opioids, in addition to an addictive potential much greater
than that of marijuana, have other unappealing side effects.
“The effect of opioids chronically — they
wreak havoc on your GI tract,” said Marie
Hayes, a psychologist at the University of
Maine.
Of course, medical cannabis is a drug with
side effects, too. Obviously people can get
high, though that does depend on the concentration of the psychoactive compound, tetrahydrocannabinol, in the strain or formulation
that someone is using.
Marijuana’s safety profile isn’t really at issue. “People are convinced of its safety,” Hayes
said. But there’s just not a lot of evidence supporting marijuana as a chronic pain treatment in its own right.
“I would say the evidence has been very
modest up until about 10 years ago, because
nobody would fund the research,” she said.
Still, opioids as a chronic pain treatment have
a checkered reputation as well: One recent
study found opioids didn’t provide any more
relief for chronic arthritis pain than over-thecounter painkillers.
Americans seem more willing than ever to
accept marijuana. A recent Pew survey found
that 61 percent of Americans favor legalizing
pot. Nine states and the District of Columbia
allow adults to use it for whatever reason they
want, while more than 20 other US states
permit residents to use marijuana for medicinal purposes.
Neither Medicaid nor Medicare will reimburse people for money they spend on marijuana. While the amount of money spent on
opioids in states with a medical marijuana
law fell by about 8 percent, the costs of both
treatments might be comparable.
“I did a back-of-the-envelope calculation
that suggested that a daily pain management
dose of hydrocodone would be about $10 out
of pocket in the US,” Bradford said, though
Medicare Part D plans cover much of that.
A daily pain management dose of cannabis
likely cost about $6 last year — and that number should be lower by now, Bradford said.
“It’s becoming relatively comparable in cost.”
But while Americans may accept marijuana, the federal government does not. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has promised to
crack down on marijuana cases, with some
exceptions.
GRETCHEN ERTL FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Conrad Roy Jr. ran the Ireland 5k in New Bedford March 31 as he prepared to run the Boston Marathon in memory of his son.
Son’s suicide motivates his run
O
By Alana Levene
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
n early-morning runs along the hilly trails of Southeastern
Massachusetts, Conrad Roy Jr. can often sense his late son
beaming down on him.
He hopes that spirit guides his every stride in this month’s
Boston Marathon, which Roy will run in memory of his son,
Conrad Roy III.
“The days I feel like he’s there are the reason I enjoy running,” said Roy,
46, a tug boat captain from Mattapoisett.
Conrad Roy III, 18, killed himself nearly four years ago in a truck filled
with carbon monoxide, after his girlfriend sent him a text telling him to
“get back in” when he had second thoughts. Michelle Carter of Plainville
was found guilty last year of involuntary manslaughter. Carter, now 21, is
appealing the verdict.
Running helped Roy Jr. cope with the stress of the trial that became
known around the world as the “texting suicide case.”
On April 16, Roy will run the Marathon for the American Foundation
for Suicide Prevention. He hopes to raise $25,000 and has set up a page on
CrowdRise for donations. He got the idea to run from his sister, Becki Maki
of Hopedale, who told him the charity was recruiting Marathon runners.
“With the amount of attention this case has gotten, he’s been wanting to
do something positive,” Maki said.
Conrad Roy III was wearing a “Boston Strong” T-shirt — inspired by the
city’s resilience after the terror attacks at the Marathon in 2013 — on the
day he died. That also motivated her brother, Maki said.
“This is the perfect opportunity for him, running to honor his son, but
also being able to use it as a platform for suicide prevention,” Maki said.
Roy Jr., who ran his first half-marathon last year, started training for
the Boston Marathon nearly four months ago. On most days, he heads out
about 8 a.m. for 5- to 10-mile runs with a group from the New Bedford
YMCA. On his own, he does 20-mile runs and trail workouts in Dartmouth
and Rochester.
He also runs in local races, such as the Ireland 5k last Saturday in New
Bedford.
He thinks his son, a rower and runner, would marvel at his logging up to
45 miles a week.
“I think he’d just be really proud of me,” said Roy Jr. “I think he’d be just
smiling down on me.”
Alana Levene can be reached at alana.levene@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @alanalevene.
AROUND THE REGION
SWA N TO N , V T.
US agents arrest 20 in 4
cases at Canada border
The US Border Patrol says agents arrested 20
people who entered the country illegally in four
separate incidents in upstate New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire. The first case came
early Friday when agents in Champlain, N.Y. arrested nine Haitian citizens who had just crossed
into the United States near where I-87 reaches
the Canadian border. On Saturday, agents apprehended seven Romanians and a German citizen
who had just entered the country illegally in
Newport, Vt. On Sunday, a Guatemalan citizen
was apprehended near Franklin, Vt. and two other Guatemalans were apprehended near Pittsburg, N.H. (AP)
H A RT FO R D
Official says state facing
$197.7m budget deficit
State Comptroller Kevin Lembo says Connecticut
is on track to end the current fiscal year on June
30 with a $197.7 million deficit, but acknowledges that may change. The Democrat explained
Monday, in a letter to Democratic Governor Dannel P. Malloy, the final figure depends upon tax
receipts collected in April and growth in Wall
Street bonuses over the past year. A recent annual report from the New York State comptroller
revealed how bonuses in the securities industry
are up 17 percent over the last year, averaging
$184,220. Many workers on Wall Street live in
Connecticut and therefore would help fuel
growth in the withholding portion of the state’s
personal income tax. Lembo says the corporation
and sales taxes continue to underperform, noting
action will be needed to close the deficit. (AP)
was the blind spot in front of the tractor-trailer,”
prosecutors said. The crash happened just after 8
a.m. on Massachusetts Avenue in Porter Square.
The cyclist, Bernard Lavins, 60, of Lexington,
was struck in the middle southbound lane. Investigators concluded that Lavins “exited the bike
lane, which continues along Massachusetts Avenue to the intersection for Somerville Avenue,
with the intention to turn left approximately 36
feet prior to the crosswalk,” prosecutors said.
“The operator of the truck was not speeding, impaired, or distracted by cellphone or other objects at the time of the crash,” prosecutors said.
CA M B R I D G E
AU G U STA, M A IN E
No trucker charges
in fatal bike crash
LePage wants more US
funds on job training
The driver of a tractor-trailer involved in a bicycle crash that killed a 60-year-old man in Cambridge in October 2016 will not face charges,
prosecutors said Monday. Investigators determined that “it was very likely that the driver of
the truck could not perceive the cyclist as the cyclist entered the lane of travel without signaling,
and based on the cyclist’s speed and location,”
the Middlesex district attorney’s office said in a
statement. “The visibility study and witness
statements concluded that the cause of the crash
Governor Paul LePage wants more federal funds
used to help unemployed residents shifted to job
training, a move some local labor officials say
would take money from career counseling, hurting vulnerable job seekers. LePage’s administration last week submitted his plan that demands
that locally run workforce boards spend 70 percent of federal workforce funds on job training,
Maine Department of Labor spokeswoman Laura Hudson said Monday. The US Department of
Labor has 90 days to review the request. (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
R ATM THEFTS A Brazilian couple was arrested
Friday and charged with masterminding an ATM
skimming operation at banks in Saugus, Stoneham, and Medford, according to US Attorney
Andrew E. Lelling’s office. Alexandre Kawamura,
42, was charged with possessing device-making
equipment, and Karem Kawamura, 25, was
charged with aiding and abetting the use of a
counterfeit access device, Lelling’s office said. Alexandre Kawamura was caught on video installing and removing skimming devices on drive-up
ATMs at Eastern Bank branches in Saugus,
Stoneham, and Medford between Feb. 24 and
March 16, Lelling’s office said. Prosecutors allege that the devices he attached to ATM card
slots skimmed account information from the
magnetic strips of customers’ debit cards, and
pinhole cameras secretly recorded the victims as
they entered their PINs into the ATM keypads.
The scheme apparently went unnoticed until
March 16, when a customer called police to report that he’d found a skimming device on a
drive-up ATM in Stoneham, Lelling’s office said.
R BULLET FOUND A Bartlett High School business
teacher found a bullet in her storage closet Mon-
day morning, Webster school officials said. The
teacher was collecting supplies from the closet,
which is typically locked, when she spotted the
bullet around 8 a.m., said Lori Glennon, a Webster Public Schools spokeswoman. The teacher
immediately notified police officials, who conducted a full sweep of the school with dogs and
metal detector wands, according to a statement
from the superintendent’s office. While officials
conducted their search, the school followed safety protocols and issued a hold in place, the statement said. The sweep resulted in no further findings. Classes resumed around noon at the end of
the search, Glennon said. “Safety is our number
one priority. . . . Students and staff were very cooperative during the search,” the statement said.
R DRAMATIC FALL Two skiers survived a close call
Sunday on Mount Washington in New Hampshire when they fell several hundred feet down
Tuckerman Ravine but avoided injury, officials
said. Dramatic video of the fall was posted to the
websites of Northeast Alpine Start and WMURTV on Monday. The Mount Washington Avalanche Center said in an advisory that “meltfreeze crust” on the mountain was making for
tricky terrain. “This melt-freeze crust is strong
and supportive thanks to cold temperatures over
the weekend and presents the greatest threat of
the day in the form of long, sliding falls,” the advisory said. “While two skiers experienced this
sort of fall on the Lip yesterday and walked away
with no injuries thanks to a clean run-out, the result could have been much different if this had
occurred in Left Gully or Huntington, places that
have bushes or rocks to contend with.” Further
details were not immediately available.
R FATAL CRASH A 19-year-old woman from Paxton died and three other people were seriously
injured after two motorcycles crashed into a
pickup truck in Worcester on Sunday night, according to police. The Worcester Police Department said that the deadly collision occurred just
before 6:40 p.m. at the intersection of Perry Avenue and Millbury Street. Officers arrived and
found the four people who had been riding on
the two motorcycles on the ground with serious
injuries, according to a police statement. The
four victims were taken to the hospital, where
the woman was pronounced dead. The three others were in stable condition on Monday.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
Gang member admits to role in stabbing death of teen
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
A member of the MS-13
street gang admitted to his role
in the murder of a 15-year-old
boy on Constitution Beach in
East Boston in 2015, an ambush set in motion by a phony
Facebook account that offered
the victim a chance to meet a
girl, prosecutors said.
Carlos “Chuchito” Melara,
who also goes by the nickname
“Criminal,” pleaded guilty Friday in federal court in Boston
to conspiring to conduct enterprise affairs through a pattern
of racketeering activity, the US
Attorney’s office said in a statement.
The office said Melara and a
co-defendant, Henry Josue Parada Martinez, also known as
“Street Danger,” participated in
the slaying of Wilson Martinez,
who was fatally stabbed on
Sept. 7, 2015.
The killers lured Martinez
to the beach by posing as a girl
on Facebook who wanted to
meet him, according to the
statement. The gang was controlling the Facebook account
to ensnare suspected rivals
whom they wanted to murder,
the release said.
Melara, posing as a friend of
the purported girl, picked up
Martinez on a scooter on the
day of the murder and drove
him to the beach, where gang
members beat and stabbed
Martinez to death, according to
federal prosecutors.
The slaying earned Melara a
promotion to the status of a full
member, or “homeboy,” in MS13, prosecutors said.
Melara faces a possible life
term when he’s sentenced in
July, though a plea agreement
says that prosecutors will recommend 30 to 40 years behind
bars, court records show. He’ll
also be subject to deportation
when he finishes his sentence,
prosecutors said.
David J. Grimaldi, a lawyer
for Melara, said in an e-mail
that he and his client “resolved
the case in the manner we did
because we believe it was in
Mr. Melara’s best interest to do
so.’’
Parada Martinez pleaded
guilty to the same conspiracy
charge in November. He, too,
faces a possible life sentence in
July, as well as deportation proceedings when his prison term
ends.
A plea agreement filed in his
case doesn’t specify how much
time prosecutors will seek.
Melara and Parada Marti-
nez were among 61 members
or affiliates of MS-13 indicted
after a three-year investigation
into the murderous gang ’s
sprawling criminal network in
Greater Boston. Melara is the
40th defendant to plead guilty
or be convicted at trial, according to prosecutors.
Travis Andersen can be
reached at
travis.andersen@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@TAGlobe.
To honor King, Bostonians recite his last speech
Civil rights icon
died 50 years ago
‘He walked here,
he lived here, and
I think it’s so
critical for our
young people to
understand that
we’re literally
walking in his
footsteps.’
By Aimee Ortiz
GLOBE STAFF
Fifty years ago, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “Mountaintop” speech, a
stirring cry for economic justice tinged with almost a prophetic knowledge that he
would not live long.
“Like anybody, I would like
to live a long life. Longevity
has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now,” King
said in support of striking sanitation workers in Memphis.
“I just want to do God’s will.
And He’s allowed me to go up
to the mountain. And I’ ve
looked over. And I’ve seen the
Promised Land.”
King was assassinated the
next day — April 4, 1968.
On Monday in Boston, hundreds gathered in City Hall
Plaza to commemorate the
50th anniversary of King’s final speech, a poignant ceremony that included readings
from young children.
The event, sponsored by
the Boston Mountaintop Coalition, marked a “tremendous
opportunity for Bostonians to
come together around the values of social justice, equity,
fairness for all,” said Kevin Peterson, founder of the New Democracy Coalition and an organizer of the event.
“This speech is an expression of Dr. King at his most
mature,” Peterson said. “This
was a radical King that talks
about social justice . . . this is
King at his best, at the height
of his powers.”
Evelyn Johnson, 75, of Dorchester, said King “opened up
a lot of roads, a lot of paths, for
a lot of people.”
Honoring King through his
own words paid homage to his
enduring legacy, she said.
“They’re not letting his language go,” she said. “They’re
keeping it up.”
Boston Mayor Martin J.
TITO JACKSON
Former Boston city councilor,
referring to Rev. King’s years
spent in Boston
MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
Tony Wilson, a James Brown impersonator, helped teach members of the James J. Chittick Elementary School choir how
to do the moon walk after a City Hall Plaza ceremony honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King.
Walsh said the diversity of the
crowd — both racial and economic — was testimony to
King’s impact.
“Look around here today,
look at the faces that are on
the plaza, look at the mixture
of people from different backgrounds, different economic
backgrounds, different clergy,
different elected officials —
what he set out to do 50 years
ago is working in our city,”
Walsh said. “This is the face of
With two ferries out of
service, officials struggle
to get cars off Vineyard
By Emily Sweeney
GLOBE STAFF
Two ferries that service Martha’s Vineyard were still out of
service Monday, the Steamship
Authority announced, creating
a backlog in transporting vehicles on and off the island.
Steamship Authority officials posted a travel advisory on
the service’s website stating
that dozens of vehicle reservations were rescheduled.
“Because the M/V Island
Home and the M/V Woods Hole
have not yet returned to service, we have been unable to
carry the number of vehicles
that we expected to be able to
carry when we accepted vehicles reservations earlier this
year for today,” officials wrote.
“As a result, we have had to
change more than 50 vehicle
reservations to other trips today
where space was still available.”
The M/V Island Home travels between Woods Hole and
Martha’s Vineyard, and M/V
Woods Hole serves the Woods
Hole to Martha’s Vineyard
route as well as the Hyannis to
Nantucket route, according to
the Steamship Authority’s website.
Steamship Authority officials planned to keep the standby lines at both the Vineyard
‘We apologize for
all of disruptions
to our customers’
lives and
businesses.’
Boston; this is the face that Dr.
King spoke about.”
Former Boston mayor Raymond Flynn recalled meeting
King once in Mattapan, and
praised his message of nonviolence.
“He proved to the world
that you could be effective,
make an impact, have a profound influence in the culture
of America, and at the same
time advocate for peace and
justice,” he said. “That’s what I
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Haven and Woods Hole terminals open Monday, but they
didn’ t e xpec t there to be
enough open space for standby
customers to travel off the island from Vineyard Haven in
the morning or the afternoon.
The Steamship Authority
has also chartered the M/V
Whaling City Express to provide high-speed passenger ferry
service between Vineyard Haven and Woods Hole on an
hourly basis through Wednesday, officials said.
“As before, we apologize for
all of disruptions to our customers’ lives and businesses
that have been caused by these
events,” officials wrote, “and we
will provide updates as more information becomes available.”
Emily Sweeney can be reached
at esweeney@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @emilysweeney.
think this world so desperately
needs — a voice for peace and
justice.”
William Gross, superintendent in chief for the Boston Police Department, said he hopes
King’s words remain a guiding
force.
“It is instrumental that we
still live by those words,” he
said. “If people didn’t exercise
their First Amendment rights
to protest, I wouldn’t be here
as the first African-American
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Aimee Ortiz can be reached at
aimee.ortiz@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@aimee_ortiz.
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chief, and Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King led the way.”
King studied in Boston in
the early 1950s, and the city
became his “second home,”
Gross added.
”He never forgot us,” Gross
said. “You see all the protest
t h a t ’s go i n g o n o n B o s t o n
Common ... I think that’s in
the spirit of Dr. Martin Luther
King, sending the message
that racial inequality, prejudice, injustices won’t be toler-
ated.”
Former Boston city councilor and mayoral candidate Tito
Jackson said he hoped that
King’s Boston ties inspire others to carry on his legacy.
“He walked here, he lived
here, and I think it’s so critical
for our young people to understand that we’re literally walking in his footsteps,” he said.
In his final speech, King
spoke of the vast economic disparity between whites and
blacks, a gulf that persists today, Jackson said.
“In a city that a white family is worth $247,500 and a
black family is worth $8, we
have to have that conversation,” he said.
Children who read portions
of King’s speech came from
across the Boston area. Destiny Hartgrove, 9, of Randolph,
was chosen because she often
speaks before her church.
Even though it was a big
crowd, she wasn’t nervous.
She had her church friends
there with her, she said.
“Dr. Martin Luther King is
the best man around because
he helped civil rights,” she
said. “He’s a really cool man.”
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Spotlight’s Sacha Pfeiffer leads a conversation with Chessy
Prout, author of I Have the Right To: A High School Survivor’s
Story of Sexual Assault, Justice, and Hope.
Also joined by: Spotlight reporter Jenn Abelson,
writer/activist Jacyln Friedman,
and educator Ben Atherton-Zeman
Tue Apr 10 | 6:30 PM | CIC Boston | 50 Milk Street
Be a part of this can’t-miss discussion.
Free to the public but you must register.
Globe.com/Consent
B4
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Senate president’s hold on office is tenuous
uSENATE
Continued from Page B1
the Senate’s top post after Senator Stanley C. Rosenberg
stepped down from the presidency in December amid allegations his husband had committed sexual assault.
Chandler served as acting
Senate president until February, when her colleagues decided to remove “acting” from her
title, an attempt to end weeks of
intense political jockeying for
the presidency. At the time,
Chandler said she would serve
until the end of the current legislative session in early January
2019.
But Spilka’s announcement
two weeks ago that she has the
votes to be the next Senate president put that timeline into
question.
On Monday, Chandler did
not directly answer a question
about whether she was any
closer to resolving the issue of
when Spilka would take over.
“We’re still talking,” she replied.
Spilka, who lives in Ashland
and chairs the chamber’s powerful budget-writing committee, brushed aside the idea that
there is turmoil about when she
will ascend to the presidency.
“I do not think that there is
chaos,” she said as she walked
briskly away from reporters after an unrelated event Monday
afternoon. “We are in good discussions, so we are working the
transition out.”
The continued tumult over
the presidency comes days after
a statewide grand jury indicted
Bryon Hefner, Rosenberg’s husband, on multiple charges of
sexual assault, criminal lewdness, and distributing nude
photographs without consent.
Last year, the alleged victims
told the Globe that Hefner had
boasted of his influence on Beacon Hill and that they were reluctant to report his assaults for
fear of alienating his powerful
husband and harming their careers. Two of those men said
they are among the four victims
AN UNCERTAIN TENURE
Senator
Karen E.
Spilka
says she
has the votes to
replace Harriette
Chandler (above).
cited in Thursday’s indictment.
The Senate leadership drama began last fall, days after
the Globe first made public the
allegations against Hefner.
Rosenberg stepped down from
the presidency, Chandler took
the gavel, and the Senate initiated an investigation into the
conduc t of Rosenberg and
whether he had violated Senate
rules.
Chandler said Monday that
she hopes the results of that investigation, which is being conducted by the Senate Committee on Ethics and an outside
law firm, will be released soon.
“Hopefully it’ll be no more
than weeks, and hopefully that
won’t be many weeks,” she told
reporters.
Joshua Miller can be reached at
joshua.miller@globe.com.
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Moises Gaspar, 11, ate a fresh meal Monday at the Bradley Elementary School in East Boston, which features a full-service kitchen.
Schools’ fresh food program expands
uSCHOOL LUNCHES
Continued from Page B1
created and cooked inside a
school kitchen. “It shows kids
they are loved and we really
care about them,” said Shah,
the foundation’s president.
Walsh, along with Superintendent Tommy Chang, made
the announcement over lunch
at the Bradley Elementar y
School in East Boston, where a
kindergarten classroom was replaced with a full-service kitchen attached to a lunch room
that doubles as an auditorium.
There, Walsh and Chang
joined dozens of fifth-graders
for barbecued chicken drumsticks, brown rice, corn on the
cob, roasted broccoli, orange
wedges, and make-your-own
salad. They also sipped on cups
of water infused with fresh cut
strawberries and lemon.
“That chicken was pretty
awesome,” Walsh said after fin-
ishing his meal at a pint-size table.
Students said they too liked
the meal. “It’s really, really
good,” said Faviola Rodriguez,
11, who said it was vastly superior to the frozen dinners from
last year. “Before it looked and
tasted like plastic.”
The frozen dinners resembled those found in the supermarket — packaged in plastic
black containers with clear
plastic on top. Often the packages, heated up in a warming
oven, would sit so long that
condensation would form on
the top and the meals would become cool and wet.
“That was not appealing,”
said Paulina Gutierrez, 11.
“Now, I can see the steam coming off the food.”
About two-thirds of Boston’s
125 schools were built decades
ago without kitchens during a
time when students would ei-
ther go home for lunch or bring
one to school. Many of the
schools are small, serving as
few as 150 students, and the belief has long been there is not
enough space to create a fullfledged cafeteria experience.
But the Shah Family Foundation’s effort, initially dubbed
the “hub and spoke,” is debunking that misconception.
Under the model, the three
East Boston schools — the
Bradley, the P.J. Kennedy, and
East Boston Early Education
Center — are partnering with
East Boston High School on the
meals. The high school, which
long has had a full-service cafeteria, holds much of the fresh
food inventory, sends out the
proper amounts to the schools
daily, and also does some prep
work, such as making the barbecue sauce.
But most of the food, including the chicken, is cooked at the
individual schools. A similar arrangement will be used with
the other schools getting outfitted with kitchens.
Under the program, the
schools will receive a combination oven and steamer, a refrigerator, a freezer, several sinks,
and hot and cold serving stations.
Ken Oringer, a chef and
owner of Toro, Uni Boston, and
other restaurants showed cafeteria workers how to cook some
new menu items.
Walsh said he would like the
program to expand to all
schools that don’t have kitchens, noting that he hears a lot of
complaints about food from students and families at those
schools. “Having nutritious
meals in schools is a game
changer for people in the development of their brains and their
bodies and their understanding
of eating right and getting a bal-
anced meal.” Walsh said. “It
changes their outcomes in how
they perform in school. There is
no question about it.”
Chang said Roxbury and
Mattapan were chosen for the
expansion because the neighborhoods, which he described
as “food deserts,” are in the
greatest need for the healthiest
food possible in their schools.
One student, after lunch
w ra p p e d u p , a s ke d C h a n g
about his eating habits, and he
said the students are probably
doing a better job at getting a
nutritious meal.
“I don’t always eat healthy
all the time,” Chang admitted.
“The healthiest meal I will have
all week is probably this one,
but I promise I will do better.”
James Vaznis can be reached at
james.vaznis@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globevaznis.
Budget cuts at UMass Boston target research centers
uUMASS BOSTON
Continued from Page B1
According to the memo, university administrators surveyed
the 30 centers and institutes at
the university and determined
that 17 were not self-sufficient,
and combined to produce a deficit of $5 million in fiscal 2017.
The memo said the university will cut the funding for the
centers and institutes that have
required the largest university
subsidies. The university has
asked them to replace that
funding with private fund-raising, grants, and contracts.
“As the leaders of our centers
and institutes will rightly note,
they are doing important work
— and important work finds
funding and a future,” Mills
wrote. Asked for a comment for
this article, Mills was not available, said university spokesman
DeWayne Lehman.
The other centers set to have
their funding cut include the
William Monroe Trotter Institute for the Study of Black Culture, the Center for Women in
Politics and Public Policy, the
Institute for New England Na-
tive American Studies, the Labor Resource Center, and the
Center for Social Policy.
The cuts will save up to $1.5
million in the fiscal year that
begins July 1, the memo said.
Administrators plan to continue to reduce the $5 million subsidy over the next three years, it
said, adding that the university
will help the centers become
self-sufficient.
Center directors called the
university’s approach heavyhanded and unnecessary because the centers cost the university a small amount compared with its $430 million
operating budget. The cuts
have also drawn the attention
of some elected officials.
“This is really shortsighted,”
said state Representative Marjorie Decker, a Cambridge Democrat. “They think they can just
do this under the radar, and it’s
at the expense of our veterans.”
Decker, the daughter of a
Vietnam veteran, said she has
asked to speak with UMass officials and is also talking with
other legislators.
In the past, some centers at
UMass Boston had specific earmarks in the state budget, but
those were eliminated about a
decade ago, and they now rely
on the university for funding
each year.
The Joiner Institute provides free counseling to students who are veterans and also
provides services in the community, including a program
for high school teachers on how
to teach about war and veterans. The center also conducts
academic research about veterans, Kane said, and is working
on a project with refugees in
Iraq.
“The need is very great, our
voices are being ignored, and
they’re not valuing what we
bring to the university total educational experience,” said
Kane, the director.
Kane is especially frustrated
because he learned that UMass
plans to redirect $200,000 that
funds the institute toward
scholarships for veterans, but
he said no one consulted with
the institute about that plan before announcing it.
“They don’t even know what
we do. They don’t know what
we’re about,” he said.
According to UMass, the
Joiner Institute has a $400,000
deficit this year, down from
around $540,000 last year. But
Kane said what the university
calls a “deficit” is actually just
the money it costs to pay the
staff who run the institute.
The Joiner Institute started
the academic year with 5½ university-funded staff positions,
he said. Now it has just three
part-timers after two people
took buyouts, another left, and
another retired.
News about the program also troubled William Joiner III,
the son of the man for whom
the institute is named. Joiner, a
high school teacher in Newton,
recalled how his father became
the first director of veterans affairs at UMass Boston 30 years
ago. He said he wants the Joiner Institute’s funding restored.
The cost is tiny compared with
the services it provides, he said.
“The work the Joiner continues to do, you can’t put a price
on it,” he said.
Another center facing cuts is
the Mauricio Gaston Institute
for Latino Community Development and Public Policy.
Its director, professor Lorna
Rivera, said the university is
framing the issue incorrectly. It
is not the centers that have
landed the school in a deficit,
she said. It is the massive construction projects that have cost
tens of millions of dollars more
than anticipated.
The Gaston Institute has an
annual budget of about
$230,000, she said, most of
which pays for its three staff
members. The operating budget is around $25,000, she said.
The institute provides opportunities for students and faculty
and also produces research
about Latino communities in
New England, she said.
“Not only will students lose
out and faculty, but the general
public will not have the kind of
data that is needed for policymaking,” she said.
Laura Krantz can be reached at
laura.krantz@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@laurakrantz.
Officer
is found
guilty in
attack
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
A Suffolk Superior Court
jury Monday convicted a veteran Boston police officer of assault for hitting an Uber driver
in South Boston during a racially motivated attack in 2015
while the officer was off duty,
prosecutors said.
Michael C. Doherty, 43, of
South Boston, was convicted of
two counts of assault and battery for striking the driver during the early morning hours of
Jan. 4, 2015, District Attorney
Daniel F. Conley’s office said in
a prepared statement.
Jurors also convicted Doherty, a 16-year-veteran of the
force, of assault and battery for
purposes of intimidation, in
light of his “use of racial and
ethnic slurs during the confrontation,” but acquitted him of violating the civil rights of another man who tried to help the
Uber driver, the statement said.
A lawyer for Doherty
couldn’t be reached for comment. The department had
placed Doherty on leave with
pay soon after his arrest, then
suspended him without pay following his indictment.
“Today’s decision sends a
strong and definitive message
that police officers are not
above the law and must answer
for their actions should they
choose to behave in a way that
places the public in danger,
whether they are on duty or
off,” Boston police Commissioner William B. Evans said Monday. “As I have said before, I
hold my officers to a very high
standard, and I believe any actions that undermine the public’s trust should have appropriate consequences.”
Prosecutors said Doherty
was a customer of the 28-yearold Uber driver when he assaulted him around 2:45 a.m.,
after shouting that he had driven to the wrong location.
“What, you think I’m stupid,
you [expletive],” Doherty said,
using a racial slur against Hispanics, according to prosecutors.
When the driver stopped at
East Second and M streets, Doherty began hitting him, forcing
him out of the car and chasing
him around the vehicle, according to authorities.
T h e U b e r d r i v e r w av e d
down traffic for help, and when
another man stopped, Doherty
jumped in the Uber vehicle and
drove off, prosecutors said. Jurors on Monday also convicted
Doherty of using a motor vehicle without authority.
When he stopped the vehicle
on East First Street, he got out
and said to a passerby, “What
do you want, you [expletive]?”
using a racial slur against
blacks, officials have said.
He then began swinging at
both men, knocking the driver
to the ground, according to
court filings. The three men
struggled until Doherty saw police lights heading toward
them, and then walked away,
police have said.
Doherty had a black eye and
his arm in a sling during his district court arraignment shortly
after the fracas, and his lawyer
at the time said the officer “disputes these charges vigorously”
and was the true victim during
the encounter. He is scheduled
to be sentenced on April 17.
“The defendant’s conduct
that night was reprehensible,”
Conley said after the verdict.
“His words and actions have no
place in civilized society. They
represented a crime against the
victims, who were doing nothing more than trying to work
for a living, and they were a
slap in the face to countless police officers who work hard every day to earn the community’s trust with honor and professionalism.Racially motivated violence by anyone, sworn
or civilian, will be investigated
and prosecuted, and no one
should ever be afraid to report
it.”
Peter Schworm of the Globe staff
contributed to this report.
Travis Andersen can be reached
at travis.andersen@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@TAGlobe.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B5
Trooper’s past raises questions about hiring process
uGENDUSO
Continued from Page B1
grant of immunity. A transcript
of her testimony has been available on the court docket since
2008, and State Police assisted
the Drug Enforcement Administration during that investigation.
State Police applicants are
asked if they ever used or sold
drugs. Genduso wrote that she
“experimented” with marijuana
in 1999, then “terminated” use,
according to her 2012 trooper
application.
Defending that response in
her interview with the Globe,
Genduso said she gave “a vague
answer” to “a large open-ended
question” and didn’t believe she
lied or misled State Police by
failing to disclose her past. She
said she elaborated on her answer during a follow-up interview with a background investigator, but doesn’t recall being
asked if she sold drugs.
Her attorney, Vikas Dhar,
who shared Genduso’s personnel file with the Globe, said the
information she provided on
her applications “would trigger
or should have triggered followup questions and to the extent
the State Police failed to do that
is on them.”
He said he expects Genduso
to be reinstated.
On Monday, officials announced sweeping changes for
the State Police. Updates to
background checks for new recruits will include questions
about whether they were involved in a criminal investigation, even if they were not
charged with a crime. Officials
said the department is also exploring other methods to identify “potential red flags among
candidates.”
State Police spokesman David Procopio said the internal
investigation into Genduso’s
hiring is ongoing.
“In addition to investigating
the information she provided
during her hiring process, we
also are examining whether
other steps could have been tak-
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Leigha Genduso said she doesn’t understand why she’s facing harsh criticism for misdeeds she committed before joining
the State Police. But a former commander of the force acknowledged that Genduso should never have been hired.
en in an attempt to learn more
about her background,” Procopio said.
State Police background
checks involve reviews of criminal, driving, and credit histories; written questionnaires; assessment of past employment;
and interviews of people who
know, or know of, the applicant, according to Procopio.
Applicants who admit to
past recreational use of marijuana — which is now legal in
Massachusetts — are reviewed
on a case-by-case basis.
“Factors that are considered
are frequency and duration of
use, applicant’s age at the time,
and context in which it was
used,” Procopio said.
Genduso also shared on her
2012 trooper application that
she had been living with Daniel
Risteen, then a State Police major, for three years. Risteen was
later promoted to lieutenant
colonel, third in command of
the agency, but retired suddenly in late February, the same
day Genduso was suspended.
Risteen had been accused
last fall of taking part in the decision to order a trooper to remove embarrassing information from the report about the
arrest of a judge’s daughter.
Genduso said she and
Risteen broke up in October.
She declined to comment on
whether he knew about her
past, but said neither he nor
anyone else at the State Police
intervened in the hiring process. “There was no indication
to me that I was getting any special treatment at all,” Genduso
said.
Risteen could not be
reached for comment. His lawyer did not respond to requests
from the Globe.
Alben, who now runs a security consulting business, said
Massachusetts is one of the few
states that doesn’t allow law enforcement agencies to require
applicants to take polygraph examinations, and that an exemption should be created under
the law to allow that.
“I don’t want the public to
think everybody gets through,”
Alben said. “Clearly there’s an
issue with this one. We need to
go back and fix what the deficiency was because what we
know now would be disqualifying information for being hired,
no matter how she wants to
minimize that.”
Robert Long, a retired State
Police detective lieutenant and
security consultant, said any
background check should include calls to the police departments in the towns where an
applicant lived to determine
whether there were any interactions with them.
“There are very convincing
liars out there,” Long said. “I go
into every background check
very cynical.”
Genduso said she doesn’t
understand why she’s facing
harsh criticism for misdeeds
she committed before joining
the force.
Her personnel file shows she
received numerous commendations as a dispatcher and canine
officer — from guiding police to
rescue a kidnapped woman to
using her dog to track home-invasion suspects and uncover
drugs and cash.
“I feel like I’m being hung
out to dry because of mistakes
in my past,” Genduso said. “Nobody’s perfect, and basically everyone messes up.”
G e ndu so sai d sh e ha d a
tough childhood and left home
at 16. Three years later, she was
waitressing when she began
dating Sean Bucci, a disc jockey
and drug dealer.
In 2007, while testifying in
federal court in Boston, Genduso revealed that she had helped
Bucci break up bales of marijuana and launder money and
that she delivered up to 10
pounds of marijuana at a time
to her own customer. Her testimony helped send Bucci to prison for 10 years for marijuana
trafficking.
On her application for trooper, Genduso listed 23 Marshall
St. in North Reading as her
home address from 2002 to
2004. That home was bought
by Bucci with drug proceeds
and forfeited to the government
after his 2007 conviction, according to court filings and a
press release issued at the time
by the US attorney’s office.
Genduso said she turned her
life around after breaking up
with Bucci in 2004, began volunteering with rescue dogs,
and thought she might be able
to pursue a career in law enforcement, since she had no
criminal record.
“I wanted to start over,” said
Genduso, adding that she applied three times for dispatcher
jobs before getting hired.
But Alben said law enforcement is not a job for anyone
who was involved in drug trafficking and money laundering.
“I think people turning their
lives around is a very honorable
and noble thing to do, and I
give credit to anybody who has
done that,” Alben said. “But
they don’t belong in law enforcement, because integrity
means everything here.”
Shelley Murphy can be reached
at shelley.murphy@globe.com.
A life short in years, full in love
uCULLEN
Continued from Page B1
love of Man U, one of the most
storied sports franchises, and
Brighton, one of the least.
He had wanted to name his
first-born after Nile Rogers, the
musician who founded Chic.
But he also wanted to name
him after Niall Quinn, an Irish
soccer player. So he compromised and named him Nyall.
Ian Sheldon, a marvelous academic, spoke movingly of his
son, concluding his remarks
with the words of John Lennon,
another Englishman who died
far too young:
There are places I’ll remember.
All my life, though some
have changed.
Some forever, not for better,
Some have gone and some
remain.
All these places have their
moments.
With lovers and friends I
still can recall.
Some are dead and some are
living.
In my life, I’ve loved them
all.
But of all these friends and
lovers,
There is no one compares
with you.
And these memories lose
their meaning,
When I think of love as
something new.
Though I know I’ll never lose
affection,
For people and things that
went before.
I know I’ll often stop and
think about them.
In my life, I love you more.
And we cried because it was
as if Nyall was speaking to
Kathleen from the grave.
Nyall’s brother, Luke, noted
that Nyall and Kathleen had introduced him to his wife,
Marisa, who is Kathleen’s best
friend. So best friends married
two brothers and the couples
became inseparable, their sons
born months apart, so that Dylan and Conway will mark every milestone, from playing Little League Baseball to renting
tuxes for their high school
SHELDON FAMILY
Nyall Sheldon, with his
wife, Kathleen, and their
son, Dylan.
prom, together.
Luke sat at Nyall’s bedside
before he died and promised
his big brother he would look
after Kathleen and Dylan and
the baby who will be born at
summer’s end.
Bernie Kooi, one of Nyall’s
oldest friends, recalled that he
and Nyall had been buddies
since high school, that they
went from doing stupid things
together, chasing girls, and
playing sports, to trying to be
husbands and fathers.
“Being a good husband and
a good father was all Nyall
cared about,” Bernie said.
Nyall’s sister, Rebecca, got
up and read a poem by Maya
Angelou, called “When Great
Trees Fall.” And it was so apt
that we all ached listening.
When great trees fall,
Rocks on distant hills shudder,
Lions hunker down
in tall grasses,
and even elephants
lumber after safety.
When great trees fall
in forests,
small things recoil into silence,
their senses eroded beyond
fear.
When great souls die,
the air around us becomes
light, rare, sterile.
We breathe, briefly.
Our eyes, briefly,
see with
a hurtful clarity.
O u r m e m o r y, s u d d e n l y
sharpened,
examines,
gnaws on kind words,
unsaid,
promised walks
never taken.
Great souls die and
our reality, bound to
them, takes leave of us.
Our souls,
dependent upon their
nurture,
now shrink, wizened.
Our minds, formed
and informed by their
radiance
fall away.
We are not so much maddened
as reduced to the unutterable
ignorance
of
dark, cold
caves.
And when great souls die,
after a period peace blooms,
slowly and always
irregularly. Spaces fill
with a kind of
soothing electric vibration.
Our senses, restored, never
to be the same, whisper to us.
They existed. They existed.
We can be. Be and be
better.
For they existed.
Nyall’s organs and corneas
were given to people without
regard to their race, religion,
politics, or sexual orientation.
Others will live and be able to
see because of him.
I loved him not just because
he loved my niece, not because
he loved Man U, but because he
loved life and lived it like every
day might be his last, and then
one day it was.
Nyall Sheldon got 32 years
on this earth, which seems terribly short and unfair, but he
made ever y minute count.
That’s a pretty good legacy.
And someday, when their
children are old enough to understand, Kathleen will hold
their hands and introduce them
to the people who lived because
Nyall died and we as a family
will take some comfort there,
because at times like these
you’ll take comfort wherever
you can find it.
Kevin Cullen is a Globe
columnist. He can be reached at
cullen@globe.com
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PLYMOUTH
COMOLETTI, Agnes F. (Wraga)
CRISP, Eileen M. (Kelly)
QUINCY
COLLOVA, Charles J.
PEAK, Edward W.
READVILLE
RAYMOND, William J.
REVERE
FITZPATRICK, Cornelius J. , Jr.
GREENSTEIN, Gertrude (Hanock)
GRIFFIN, John I.
SARCIA, Roger W.
ROSLINDALE
CRISP, Eileen M. (Kelly)
O’FLANAGAN, Margaret A. (Hurley)
POLO, James C.
ROXBURY
BINGAMON, Roy J.
SALEM
GRIFFIN, John I.
SHREWSBURY
CHELSEA
GRIFFIN, John I.
SCHLICHER, Doreen A.
ROBER, Eric W.
COHASSET
PERINI, Eileen Callahan
DALY, Gerard F.
DEDHAM
PEAK, Edward W.
DORCHESTER
DALY, Gerard F.
ROSARIO, Sylvia E.
SOUTH YARMOUTH
PRIVE, Lorraine E. (LeBlanc)
MILLER, Don Peter
FALMOUTH
KELLY, Claire V. (Burke)
FRAMINGHAM
BARRACLOUGH, Susan J.
FRANKLIN
POLO, James C.
RILEY, Florence Loretta (Fay)
SCHNEIDER, Etta Yochevet (Mozer)
HINGHAM
ADELMAN, Sondra (Cohen)
PERINI, Eileen Callahan
HUDSON
WOODSIDE, Marie J. (White)
HYDE PARK
RAYMOND, William J.
JAMAICA PLAIN
CRISP, Eileen M. (Kelly)
LUNENBURG
DOUCETTE, Eva M. (Oley)
LYNN
GRIFFIN, John I.
LYNNFIELD
SARCIA, Roger W.
MALDEN
FORESTEIRE, Frederick W.
THING, George C.
MARSHFIELD
FERGUSON, Josephine (McGovern)
MATTAPAN
COMOLETTI, Agnes F. (Wraga)
MAYNARD
ROBER, Eric W.
MEDFIELD
PERINI, Eileen Callahan
FORESTEIRE, Frederick W.
WALPOLE
MacLACHLAN, Naifee (Salloom)
POLO, James C.
WALTHAM
TORTORELLA, Elfreda ‘Ellie’ (Eaton)
WOODSIDE, Marie J. (White)
WATERTOWN
JOYAL, Paul F.
TORTORELLA, Elfreda ‘Ellie’ (Eaton)
WELLESLEY
PERINI, Eileen Callahan
WEST ROXBURY
CRISP, Eileen M. (Kelly)
PEAK, Edward W.
POLO, James C.
WESTBOROUGH
JOYAL, Paul F.
WILMINGTON
PEREZ, Joseph A.
THING, George C.
WINCHESTER
MILLER, Don Peter
WINTHROP
LESSARD, Muriel A. (Fredericks)
WORCESTER
COLEMAN, Florence (Kenzerski)
OUT OF STATE
CALIFORNIA
SARCIA, Roger W.
FLORIDA
MELROSE
ALFANO, Alfonse J., Jr.
FORESTEIRE, Frederick W.
GREENSTEIN, Gertrude (Hanock)
THING, George C.
ROBINSON, Laura M. (Goullaud)
MILTON
O’FLANAGAN, Margaret A. (Hurley)
NAHANT
SARCIA, Roger W.
NATICK
BARRACLOUGH, Susan J.
NEWBURYPORT
MURGIDA, Frank T.
NEWTON
BARROW, Joseph G.
JOYAL, Paul F.
RAYMOND, William J.
SIMON, Alfred Mason
TORTORELLA, Elfreda ‘Ellie’ (Eaton)
MONAGLE, Kathleen M. (Collins)
O’FLANAGAN, Margaret A. (Hurley)
Of Melrose and Windham,
NH, April 1, 2018, at
age 74. Beloved husband
of the late Joanna M. Alfano, with
whom he shared 43 years of marriage.
Devoted father of Anthony J. Alfano of
Peabody, Christine J. LaBrecque and
her husband Keith of Salem, NH, and
Nicholas J. Alfano and his wife Sara
of Newburyport. Loving brother of
Armando Alfano and his wife Jeanette
of Biddeford Pool, ME., Anna Colarusso
and her husband Augy of Danvers,
JoAnn Maylor and her husband Bill of
Danvers, the late Domenic Alfano and
his surviving wife June of Florida, and
the late Louie Alfano. Proud grandfather of Sophie, Lucy, Lucas, and Lexi.
Also survived by many loving nieces
and nephews. Relatives and friends will
gather in honor and remembrance of
Alfonse’s life during visiting hours at
the Robinson Funeral Home, 809 Main
St., MELROSE on Wednesday, April 4
from 4-8 pm, and again on Thursday
at 9am before leaving in procession to
Most Blessed Sacrament Church, 1155
Main St., Wakefield for his Funeral
Mass celebrated at 10am. Gifts, in
Alfonse’s memory, may be made to the
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, P. O. Box
849168, Boston, MA 02284. For online
tribute, or directions visit:
RobinsonFuneralHome.com
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose (781) 665-1900
MAINE
ROBINSON, Laura M. (Goullaud)
THING, George C.
MARYLAND
O’FLANAGAN, Margaret A. (Hurley)
NEW HAMPSHIRE
ALFANO, Alfonse J., Jr.
ROBINSON, Laura M. (Goullaud)
SARCIA, Roger W.
BARRACLOUGH, Susan J.
Family will receive friends on Friday,
April 6 from 4-7 PM at John Everett
and Sons Funeral Home, 4 Park St.,
at Natick Common, NATICK, MA. A
Funeral Service will be held 11 AM
Saturday, April 7 at St. Paul’s Episcopal
Church, 39 E. Central St., Natick, MA.
SCHLICHER, Doreen A.
THING, George C.
OUT OF COUNTRY
BARROW, Joseph G.
IRELAND
O’FLANAGAN, Margaret A. (Hurley)
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director for details.
Age 88, entered into eternal
life on April 1, 2018. Roy
grew up in Brookline,
moved to Roxbury and has lived in
Braintree for 42 years. He was a Korean
War veteran and honorably served
consecutive enlistments of duty, first in
the Marine Corps, then the Navy and
finally with the U.S. Army. Mr.
Bingamon worked in the maintenance
department at the JFK Federal
Building in Boston for many years.
Prior to that he worked at the
Charlestown Navy Yard. Roy was a
talented artist as well as a student of
the violin at the N.E. Conservatory of
Music. His love for the Navy inspired
him to handcraft a large detailed scale
model of the aircraft carrier USS
Shangri-la which was in drydock where
he worked. The Navy was so impressed
with his craftsmanship that they took
official photographs of his model and
wanted to display it. Beloved husband
for 62 years to Rose A. (Morganelli).
Devoted father of James J. Bingamon
and John E. Bingamon, both of
Braintree. Beloved brother of the late
Robert Bingamon and the late
Dorothy. Funeral from the Clancy-Lucid
Funeral Home, 100 Washington St.
WEYMOUTH LANDING, on Thursday ,
April 5 at 11am, followed by a Funeral
Mass in Sacred Heart Church
Weymouth Landing at 12 noon
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited. Entombment in St. Michael
Cemetery in Boston. Visiting hours on
Wednesday from 3 until 6. For
directions see clancylucid.com.
COLEMAN, Florence
(Kenzerski)
RILEY, Florence Loretta (Fay)
MEDFORD
DOUCETTE, Eva M. (Oley)
FORESTEIRE, Frederick W.
MILLER, Don Peter
MILFORD
KELLY, Claire V. (Burke)
ALFANO, Alfonse J., Jr.
STONEHAM
DUXBURY
ROBER, Eric W.
FAIRHAVEN
TORTORELLA, Elfreda ‘Ellie’ (Eaton)
Levine Chapels, Brookline
(617) 277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
DALY, Gerard F.
TEWKSBURY
EVERETT
SCHLICHER, Doreen A.
Of Brookline and Hingham on Sunday,
April 1, 2018. For 58 years, she was
the beloved wife of the late George
Adelman. Loving mother of Merle Adelman and her husband, Ron Menner,
and Marjorie Trovato. Cherished and
adored grandmother of Andrew Trovato. Dear sister of Harold Cohen, and
sister-in-law of Edith (Adelman) Craft
and the late Jason Adelman. Fond aunt,
cousin and dear friend.
Services in the Chapel at Sharon Memorial Park, 40 Dedham Street, Sharon
on Thursday, April 5, 2018 at 12:00PM.
Immediately following the service, the
family will receive visitors at the Derby
Clubhouse at Linden Ponds, Linden
Ponds Way, Hingham until 3:30 pm. In
lieu of flowers, remembrances may be
made to Combined Jewish Philanthropies, 126 High Street, Boston, MA
02110.
SOUTH WEYMOUTH
DOVER
PERINI, Eileen Callahan
EAST BOSTON
ALFANO, Alfonse J., Jr.
BINGAMON, Roy J.
Age 95 years, of Brighton,
formerly of Newton on
Saturday, March 31, 2018.
Cherished son of the late Abraham &
Alice (Maron) Barrow. Beloved husband
of the late Triss (Blotcher) Barrow.
Loving father of Robert “Bob” Barrow
of Newton and the late Nancy Barrow.
Dear brother of Rose Leavitt of PA and
the late Sarah Goldstein and Paul, Sam,
Max, Raymond and Jack Barrow.
Services in the Chapel at Sharon
Memorial Park, 40 Dedham St., Sharon
on Wednesday, April 4 at 12:00 noon.
Shiva will be private. In lieu of flowers,
remembrances may be made to a
charity of your choice. Joseph served
his country in the US Army, based in
the South Pacific.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
70, April 1. Florence leaves behind
three siblings, Donna Gallagher and
husband Robert Gallagher of West
Boylston, Martin Kenzerski and wife
Kathleen Kenzerski of Franklin, and
Christine Graves of Tulsa, OK. Born
in Boston. Donations in Florence’s
memory can be made to: New England
Hospice, 190 Old Derby Street, Suite
304, Hingham, MA 02043. Fay Brothers Funeral Home, 1 West Boylston St.,
West Boylston is handling arrangements. Funeral Service is private.
COLLOVA, Charles J.
91, of Lancaster, PA,
passed away on Wednesday,
March 28, 2018 at the
Mennonite Home. He was the husband
of Camilla (Corey) Collova, with whom
he shared 50 years of marriage this past
June 11th. Born in Boston, MA, Charlie
was the son of the late Santo and Lena
(Yetto) Collova. Charlie was a US Navy
veteran, serving during World War II.
He was a graduate of St. Michael’s
College in Burlington, VT and earned
his MBA from the Wharton School of
the University of Pennsylvania. Charlie
had worked as an account executive for
various advertising agencies in the
Boston area from the mid 1950s until
1965. He then became the marketing
vice president for a mutual fund
company in Washington, D.C. in 1969.
In 1982, Charlie became an IRA
consultant to credit unions, which he
continued to do until retiring in the
mid 1980s. Moving to Lancaster in
1995, he was a long-time member and
supporter of the YMCA, especially
programs for disadvantaged children.
He was an avid believer in vigorous
daily exercise, always pushing to lift a
heavier weight or walk the treadmill for
10 more minutes. He was an adventurous and accomplished cook and
welcomed even casual visitors with an
offer of food. To his surprise, later in
life he developed a love for animals
after being adopted by a stray cat. He
enjoyed talking with young people,
urging them to continue their
education and praising their ambitions.
He considered obtaining his MBA while
working full-time to be his proudest
achievement and he believed it was
never too late to learn something new,
if batteries weren’t required. In
addition to his wife, Charlie is survived
by his children: Stephanie married to
Gain Bunten, Jennifer Collova and Jay
Collova; his grandchildren Alix Bunten,
Jared married to Ashling Bunten, and
Sofia Collova and his great-grandchild
Shaylyn Bunten. He was preceded in
death by his son, John, and his sister
Rose Collova. Relatives and friends are
respectfully invited to attend visiting
hours at Dolan Funeral Home, 460
Granite Avenue, EAST MILTON
SQUARE, Thursday 3-7 PM. A Funeral
Service will be celebrated in the Dolan
Funeral Home, 460 Granite Avenue,
EAST MILTON SQUARE, Friday at
11:00am. Interment in Mount
Wollaston Cemetery, Quincy. In lieu of
flowers donations in memory of Charles
may be made to The Home for Little
Wanderers, Atten: Development, 10
Guest St., Boston, MA 02135 or give@
thehome.org. See www.dolanfuneral.
com for online condolences.
COMOLETTI, Agnes F.
(Wraga)
Of Plymouth, formerly of Mattapan,
March 28, 2018. Beloved wife of the
late Robert T. Comoletti and devoted
mother of Anita J. Hadley of Plymouth
and the late Christine M. Comoletti.
Loving grandmother of Stephen J. Hadley Jr. of Batavia, Ohio and Kimberly
N. Craig and her husband Damon L.
Craig of Batavia, Ohio. Great grandmother of Ethan P. Craig, Nicholas A.
Craig and Alexander L. Craig. Funeral
Friday, April 6, 2018, at 9 AM from
the Joseph Russo Funeral Home, 814
American Legion Hwy. (nr Cummins
Hwy.), ROSLINDALE, followed by a
Funeral Mass in St. Angela Church,
1548 Blue Hill Ave., Mattapan at 10
AM. Relatives and friends are invited
to attend visiting hours Thursday, April
5, 2018, from 4-8 PM. Interment in
St. Michael Cemetery, Roslindale. Mrs
Comoletti may be remembered through
Catholic Charities, 275 West Broadway,
Boston, MA 02127 or donateccab.
org. See directions and Guest Book at
www.josephrussofuneralhome.com
Visiting Hours: Thursday 4-8 PM
CRISP, Eileen M. (Kelly)
Of Roslindale, April 1, 2018. Beloved
wife of the late Alan J. Crisp (Ret. BPD).
Loving mother of Kevin of CA, Patricia
Carroll and her husband Charles
of Plymouth, Michael and his wife
Virginia of Hanson. Devoted grandmother of Patrick O’Brien and his wife
Jill, Stephanie Diaz and her husband
David, Laura Crisp, Michelle Mathey
and her husband Max, Matthew Carroll, Eliza McDowell and her husband
Chris. Sister of Kathleen Brothers and
the late Mary Van der Wyk, Joseph,
John, Edward, and Ambrose Kelly. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews.
Funeral from the William J. Gormley
Funeral Home, 2055 Centre St., WEST
ROXBURY, Thursday, April 5th at 9
am, followed by a Funeral Mass in St.
John Chrysostom Church at 10 o’clock.
Visiting hours Wednesday 4-8 pm.
Relatives and friends invited. Interment
St. Joseph Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in her memory
to Cranberry Hospice, 36 Cordage
Park Circle, Suite 326, Plymouth, MA
02360. For directions and guestbook
www.gormleyfuneral.com
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
617-323-8600
Have the
talk of a
lifetime
You talk about many
92, of South Yarmouth
passed away peacefully at
home with family on March
31st. Born in South Boston to George
and Elizabeth Flynn Daly, he lived in
South Weymouth for many years and
later retired to South Yarmouth. He is
survived by his wife of 29 years,
Christine Shakalis Daly, his son Richard
Daly and his wife Susan, his daughter
Jacqueline Daly Esquivel and her
husband Raul, grandchildren Robert
Daly, Alyse Daly Sullivan, Lauren Daly,
Christina Esquivel and Meredith
Esquivel, great grandchildren Jay and
Will Daly and Charles Sullivan as well
as many nieces and nephews. He is
preceded in death by his first wife of 36
years, Barbara Kincade Daly, and his
three siblings Phyllis Morrison, George
Daly and Paul Daly.
After serving in the US Navy in
World War II, Gerry graduated from
Boston College with a BSBA. He
enjoyed a successful career with Stop &
Shop, first as a store manager and then
as a corporate buyer for candy, film and
tobacco across all divisions including
the grocery stores, Bradlees, Medi Mart
and Perkins Tobacco. His experience
and expertise made him a sought-after
contributor at industry conferences. In
1981 the Boston Confectionery Salesmen’s Club named him Candy Man of
the Year. In 1982, Gerry was inducted
into the National Confectionery Sales
Association Candy Hall of Fame and
was invited to deliver the keynote
address at the first annual Candy Marketing Conference in 1985. In the early
90s, he served as President and Chairman of the Board of the Confectionery
Salemen’s Club.
Gerry made the most of his 25 year
retirement indulging his passions for
golf, travel and socializing with family
and friends. He reconnected with BC
classmates via Class of ’50 golf tournaments. He served as President and
Treasurer of the Blue Rock Landing
Association, Treasurer of the Sixties
Golf League and as a member of the
Board of Directors of the Retired Men’s
Club of Cape Cod. Gerry also gave back
by volunteering for the American Lung
Association and the Museum of Natural
History in Brewster.
The family invites friends to celebrate
a life well lived on Wednesday, April
4th, from 4-7 pm at Morris, O’Connor
& Blute Funeral Home, 58 Long Pond
Drive, South Yarmouth. Funeral services will be held at St. Pius X Church,
Station Ave., South Yarmouth on Thursday, April 5th at 11 am. Gerry will be
laid to rest at Blue Hills Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests
that memorial donations be made to
Hope Hospice who provided loving care
and support during Gerry’s last few
weeks. https://www.hopehealthma.org/
giving/make-a-gift
Notes of comfort may be sent to the
Gerry’s family at
www.MorrisOConnorBlute.com
things with your loved
ones: from day-to-day
DOUCETTE, Eva M. (Oley)
details to big events.
Sharing stories with
those who matter most
isn’t just important
today; it will be
especially significant
when it’s time to honor
and commemorate
your lives.
Meaningful memorialization starts when
loved ones talk about
what matters most:
memories made,
lessons learned and
how they hope to be
remembered.
Download a free
brochure and have the
talk of a lifetime today.
It can make the
difference of a lifetime.
talkofalifetime.org
Of Cambridge, at the age of 94, April
1st, 2018. Beloved wife of the late
Frederick J. Doucette. Devoted mother
of Eva Doucette of Medford, and
Marie Doucette of Lunenburg. Loving
grandmother of Beth Auterio of Medford. Sister of the late Jenny Murray,
Stanley Oley, Terry Griffin, John Oley
and James Oley. Further survived by
many loving nieces and nephews. Late
Administrative Assistant of 35 years for
the City of Cambridge. Funeral from the
Keefe Funeral Home, 2175 Mass. Ave.,
NORTH CAMBRIDGE on Friday, April
6th at 9 am. Funeral Mass in St. John’s
Church at 10 am. Relatives and friends
invited. Visiting hours Thursday 4-8
pm. Services will conclude with burial
at Cambridge Catholic Cemetery. In lieu
of flowers, memorial contributions to
be made in Eva’s name to the Critter
Place, 10396 Snowbird Ave., Weeki
Wackee, FL 34614, 1-352-584-8724. To
leave a message of condolences please
visit www.keefefuneralhome.com.
Massachusetts Funeral
Directors Association
Honor your loved one with a
photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director
for details.
DALY, Gerard F. “Gerry”
Every life is a story
Funeral and Memorial
Information Council
A Featured Life offering lets you honor your
loved one with a professionally written narrative.
Call 617-929-1500 or email
deathnotices@globe.com
T h e
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MURGIDA, Frank T.
FERGUSON, Josephine “Jo”
(McGovern)
GREENSTEIN, Gertrude
“Gitty” (Hanock)
96 years of age. Of Charlestown, March
31, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Francis J. “Fran” Ferguson. Devoted mother
of Maureen Hagerty & late husband
Richard, Joanne Eatherton & husband
Gilbert, all of Charlestown & Francis J.
Ferguson & wife Penny of Marshfield.
Loving Nana to Noreen & husband
Sean, Thomas (BFD), Richard, Francis,
Shannon & husband Brian & Nana Jo
to Cpl. Thomas USMC, Taylor, Keighan
& Amelia. Beloved sister of the late
Margaret Dunbar & Helen McGovern.
Beloved sister-in-law of Joan Sodergren
& the late Audrea Devlin. Also many
loving nieces & nephews. Relatives &
friends are invited to attend Josephine’s
Funeral on Friday at 9 AM. from The
Carr Funeral Home, 220 Bunker Hill
St., CHARLESTOWN followed by her
Funeral Mass in St. Francis De Sales
Church at 10 AM. Burial at Woodlawn
Cemetery, Everett. Visiting hours
Thursday 4- 8 PM. in the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, kindly make a memorial donation in Josephine’s name to St.
Francis De Sales Church Building Fund,
303 Bunker Hill St., Charlestown, MA.
02129. For obituary, directions & online
condolences, www.carrfuneral.com
Lifelong resident of Revere
for over 86 years and
Melrose for 10 years, on
Monday, April 2nd, 2018. Beloved wife
of the late Lewis “Labby” Greenstein.
Devoted and loving mother of Gerald
Greenstein and Kay Midro of Montana
and Wendy Giles and husband George
of Melrose and the late Richard Greenstein and wife Jan Defeo of FL. Loving
daughter of the late Samuel Hanock
and Ida (Parker) Hanock. Dear sister of
Haskell Hanock of Revere and the late
Helen Wolfe. Cherished grandmother
of Josh and Courtney Greenstein,
Brandon and Emily Greenstein and
Gregory and Jarett Giles. Loving greatgrandmother of Lewis and Elliot Greenstein, Bella and Lila MacCaffrie, Willow
Greenstein, Giuliana and Gregory Giles.
Also survived by many nieces, nephews,
great-nieces and great-nephews and
extended family. Services at the Torf Funeral Chapel, 151 Washington Avenue,
Cary Sq., Chelsea, MA on Wednesday,
April 4th at 12noon. Relatives and
friends invited to attend. Interment in
Tifereth Israel of Revere Cemetery, Everett, MA. Memorial observation will be
held immediately following burial until
8PM, resuming Thursday and Friday,
12pm to 8PM at the home of Wendy
and George Giles in Melrose. In lieu
of flowers remembrances in “Gitty’s”
memory may be made to the HadassahATTN: Memorial Donations-40 Wall
Street, New York, NY 10005.
FITZPATRICK, Cornelius J.
“Connie”, Jr.
Torf Funeral Service
617-889-2900
GRIFFIN, John I. “Jackie”
Of Billerica, formerly of
Revere, unexpectedly April
2. Beloved husband of Marilyn R. (Rourke) Fitzpatrick. Devoted
father of Kathy Ioan and her husband
Cosmin of Littleton, Connie Fitzpatrick
and his wife Gina of Mansfield and
Tim Fitzpatrick and his wife Alice of
Somerville; Brother of Anna Porter and
her husband Howard of Stoneham,
Edmund “Ned” Fitzpatrick and his wife
Anne of Carlisle and Kevin Fitzpatrick
and his wife Susan of Billerica. Loving
grandfather of Conor, Cailin, Keira,
Adrian and Larisa. Funeral Thursday
from the Sweeney Memorial Funeral
Home, 66 Concord Rd., BILLERICA at
10:30 a.m. A Funeral Mass will be held
in St. Theresa Church, Billerica at 11:30
a.m. Relatives and friends respectfully
invited. Visiting hours will be held
Wednesday from 4- 7 p.m. Burial in Fox
Hill Cemetery, Billerica. In lieu of flowers, Memorial Contributions in Connie’s
name may be made to the Jimmy Fund,
PO Box 849168, Boston, MA 02284.
Late member of the US Army Reserve.
www.sweeneymemorial.com
FORESTEIRE, Frederick W.
Of Medford, April 1st. Beloved husband
of Hertha G. (Roach) Foresteire. Father
of Marie Forster and her husband
Mark of Medford, Robert Nelson of
Tewksbury, Maryann DeVito and her
husband Louis of Tewksbury, Fred
Foresteire and his wife Robin of Dracut,
Francis Nelson and Nancy Ferullo of
Saugus, Cheryl Hanson of Billerica,
Joseph Foresteire of Melrose and
Hertha Rocco and her husband Louis of
Medford. Brother of Margaret DeNapoli
of Malden and the late Philip Foresteire, Marie Greene, John and Robert
Foresteire. He is also survived by 21
grandchildren, 11 great grandchildren
and several nieces and nephews. Fred
has been a lifelong resident of Medford.
He worked as a wholesale meat cutter
at Omaha Steaks for over 40 years.
He was also a volunteer at the South
Dennis Recycling Center. Relatives &
friends are invited to attend his funeral
from the Breslin Funeral Home, 610
Pleasant St., MALDEN on Thursday
April 5th at 9 AM followed by a Funeral
Mass celebrated at Immaculate Conception Church, 600 Pleasant St., Malden
at 10 AM. Services will conclude with
interment in Oak Grove Cemetery in
Medford. Visiting hours will be held at
the funeral home on Wednesday April
4th from 4-8 PM.
Revere Native,
Former Music
Director: St.
Mary’s of Lynn,
St. Anthony’s
Shrine of Boston
& Immaculate
Conception
Parish of Revere
At 91 years, formerly of
Revere in Lynn, March
28th ending a lengthy
confinement, he died in the presence of
his God whom he loved so very much.
Beloved son of the late John C. & Sara
L. “Sadie” (Horner) Griffin. Devoted
brother & lifetime caregiver to the late
Edward F. “Buddy” Griffin. Cherished
cousin of Joanne L. Chisholm &
husband James, Denise M. Antony,
Charlene A. Palecki, all of Salem, James
D. Chisholm of Woburn, Robert J.
Mosey & wife Lisa of Gorham, ME,
Reverend Brother Paul Geysen, S.J. of
the Faculty at Boston College High
School & the late Isabelle J. Geysen,
James Geysen & his late wife, Karen,
Charles A. Mosey & John Geysen.
Family & friends are invited to attend
the funeral on Thursday, April 5th at
9:30 a.m. from the Vertuccio & Smith
Home for Funerals, 773 Broadway, (Rt.
107), REVERE, followed by a Funeral
Mass in St. Mary’s Church, 8 South
Common St., Lynn at 10:30 a.m.,
immediately followed with Interment
in Mt. Benedict Cemetery, West
Roxbury. Visiting hours are in the
Funeral Home on Wednesday, April
4th, 4 to 8 p.m. Parking available left of
the Funeral Home. Army veteran of
WWII. Retired Administrative Manager
for Americal General Life Ins. Co.
Throughtout his entire life John was an
exemplary Roman Catholic. He was
always active with the music ministries
of the above named parishes. Please
visit: www.vertuccioandsmith.com.
Breslin Funeral Home
(781) 324-0486
www.breslinfuneralhome.com
Funeral Services
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and
on Boston.com,
contact your funeral director,
visit boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
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Engineer, Marketer, Professor,
Musician, Family Man
P
rofessor Frank T. Murgida,
73, passed away March
3, 2018, at Massachusetts
General Hospital in Boston surrounded by his
loving family. Born in Lynn, he was
the son of the late Albert and Mary
(Marotta) Murgida. Raised in Lynn,
Middleton and Somerville, he was a
graduate of Somerville High School,
Class of 1961. In his youth, Frank was
recognized for his unusual curiosity,
talents, independence, and inventiveness, especially with electronic and
mechanical devices. By age 10 he
was regularly earning pocket money
repairing TVs and more. Frank created
his own workshop in the cellar of his
home, getting the equipment for his
projects from the many junk yards in
Somerville and Cambridge that were
treasure troves of World War II surplus
electronic equipment. He built his own
radio station and received his amateur
radio operator license at a young age.
Because of his electronic acumen, he
was part of the Civil Defense Unit in
Somerville during Hurricane Donna in
1960 and received a citation from Civil
Defense for rescuing elders during the
flooding. Frank played guitar for different groups including a band called
The El’Dorados. He also volunteered at
the Little Sisters of the Poor Convent
and Nursing Home and expressed
fondness for that experience. Frank
graduated from Wentworth Institute
of Technology where he was VP of his
class and Chairman of the JFK Library
Fund, Northeastern University, New
Hampshire College, and Nova Southeastern University earning degrees in
Electrical Engineering, an MBA, and
Doctoral degree in business. He started
his career as an enthusiastic electrical
engineer at Digital Equipment Corporation. He worked for many technology
startup companies including Triad Design, Identicon, Indalec, Kaye Instruments, and Gould Modicon. Later in
life, he became a college professor and
Chair of Computer Science at Daniel
Webster College. He taught computer
science and information technology at
DWC, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
and Wentworth Institute of Technology. He was also involved with Pure1Systems and ElderSafe Technologies,
Inc. He was an engineer, marketer, and
teacher without peer. Frank was an artist and accomplished guitar player and
singer. He was a member of the Rockport Community Chorus, the Chorus
Northshore, the Newburyport Choral
Society, the LaSalette Faith Community
Choir, the First Religious Society Unitarian Universalist Choir and Candlelight Chorale. For many years, Frank
was an international traveler and
entrepreneur who especially enjoyed
working in Japan, Australia and New
Zealand. He was a forward thinker in
the early days of digital computing,
and a recognized technical consultant
and business troubleshooter with a
wide breadth of experience in complex
computer systems development. Frank
was well rounded, reading two or three
books at a time on science, technology, computers, philosophy, world
religions, art, business, and current
affairs. He was a longtime member of
the First Religious Society Unitarian
Universalist Church in Newburyport.
Frank was spiritually reflective and
considered himself a Humanist. When
he first began sailing, he was a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary. He
was a member of the American Yacht
Club, Newburyport. For many years
he enjoyed sailing his boat, the Helen
Marie, with his family out of Arey’s
Cove, Pleasant Bay, Cape Cod. Frank
passionately shared his love of nature,
the sea, art, music, philosophy and
especially all things scientific with his
sons. While raising his family in West
Boxford, MA, Frank served as Beach
Commissioner at Styles Pond, coached
sons Matthew and Lucas in soccer and
baseball and was active with them in
scouting. He was a long-time Judge at
Masconomet Regional HS Science Fairs
and an avid advocate for this style of
inspired, resourceful and internallyfound development of the mind and
self well into his professorial years. In
his early work from the 1960’s on, he
left a legacy in the history of aerospace
navigation, computers, and the first
large scale integrated digital control
systems in the automotive, and defense
industries. Frank will be remembered
as a man of accomplishment, striving
for the best in himself and others. A
devoted husband, father and friend, he
will be missed by all who had the privilege to have known him. The Murgida
Family wishes to thank the many Doctors, Nurses, and Technicians at MA
Eye and Ear and Massachusetts General Hospital from many Departments
JOHNSTON, Lois
JOYAL, Paul F.
Of Boston passed away peacefully on
March 30, 2018 at the age of 94. A
Boston resident for many years, Lois
was born in Victoria BC, Canada and
immigrated to Boston from Prince
Edward Island, Canada at the age of 32.
In Boston, she worked for 50 years as
the secretarial night staff manager for
the Law firm of Riemer & Braunstein
before retiring in December of 2016
at the age of 93. Lois was an amateur
photographer, documenting the lives
and events of family and friends. In
addition to providing photos for the
“Fenway News”, Lois was best known
for her photographs of Boston’s “Fenway Victory Garden’s” where she spent
years photographing the gardeners,
their flowers and all that nature and
the city had to offer. As quoted, by Lois,
in an article by the Fenway News on
September, 2002 “I try to stay positive
and remember the only weapon is to relax. I try to have a loving nature, loving
is forgiving and forgiving is healing.”
Lois will be missed by all who knew
her. She is the beloved daughter of the
late Raulston A. and Agnes E. (Andernach) Johnston. Loving sister of Ione
Kelly and the late Beryl Best. Dear aunt
of Ron Kelly, Susan (Kelly) Sanderson,
Lisa (Kelly) Butler, Deborah KellyHawkes, Lynn (Craswell) Nicholson
and the late John David Craswell. Also
survived by many loving grandnieces
and nephews: Erin, Paula, Cheryl,
Robin, Christopher, David, Savannah,
Lydia, Christine, Laura, Lois, Katelyn,
Erika, Jonathan, Elenore, Jarrett, Avery,
Ethan, Elizabeth and Samuel.The family will receive visitors in the Boston
Harborside Home, 580 Commercial St.,
BOSTON, on Thursday, from 4-7pm
with a Prayer Service at 7pm in the
funeral home. For online condolences
and/or directions, please visit:
www.bostonharborsidehome.com
Of Watertown, April 1, 2018. Beloved
husband of Lucy A. (Marini) Joyal.
Devoted father of Michelle Henderson
and her husband Michael of Westboro
and David P. Joyal of Watertown. Loving grandfather of Hunter and Taylor
Henderson. Dear brother of Clement
Joyal and his wife Maureen, Elizabeth
Cody and her husband John, Patricia
Langeran and her husband Robert,
Donna Moran and her husband Robert.
Brother-in-law of Claudia White and
her husband Michael, Anthony Marini
and his wife Diana, Ronald Marini
and his wife Angela. Also survived by
many nieces and nephews. In lieu of
flowers, Paul’s family has designated
for memorial donations Preserving The
Love, a cancer research charity committed to preserving fertility in cancer
patients and founded by Paul’s nephew.
Contributions can be sent to Jefferson’s
Office of Institutional Advancement,
125 S. 9th St., Suite 600, Philadelphia,
PA 19107, attn: Preserving The Love.
Visiting hours in the Magni FH, 365
Watertown St, Rt. 16, Newton, Wednesday, April 4 from 4-8PM and again
Thursday morning at 8AM, before proceeding to St. Patrick Church, 212 Main
St, Watertown for a 9AM Funeral Mass.
Burial St. Mary’s Cemetery, Needham.
Boston Harborside Home of
J.S. Waterman & Sons
Waring-Langone
617-536-4110
Funeral Services
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
Andrew J. Magni & Son FH, Newton
www.magnifuneralhome.com
KACOYANIS, Kristen Marie
Of Belmont, passed away on March
29, 2018. Beloved daughter of Charles
and Josephine Schillace Kacoyanis.
Devoted sister of Nicholas and his wife
Catherine and Cassandra Kacoyanis
and her fiance Matthew Bazarian.
Loving granddaughter of Melchiona
Schillace, the late Giovanni Schillace,
Nancy Kacoyanis and the late Nicholas
Kacoyanis. Aunt of John and Fiona Kacoyanis. Also survived by many aunts,
uncles and cousins. Visiting hours
will be held at the Brown and Hickey
Funeral Home, 36 Trapelo Road, BELMONT, MA 02478 on Wednesday, April
4th from 4-8 PM. Relatives and friends
are kindly invited. Funeral service
at the Taxiarchae/ Archangels Greek
Orthodox Church, 25 Bigelow Avenue,
Watertown, MA 02472 on Thursday,
April 5th at 12 noon. Those attending
the funeral are asked to go directly
to the church. Interment Mt. Auburn
Cemetery, Cambridge. Expressions of
sympathy may be made to The National
Kidney Foundation, 209 West Central
Street, Suite 220, Natick, MA 01760 in
her memory.
who worked with Frank to determine
his courses of treatment. As a scientist,
Frank was always prepared to share
his research about his treatment plan.
This working relationship with medical
experts improved his quality of life
over many years. The family is especially grateful to Dr. Lucy Young, MEE;
Dr. Louis Ercolani, MGH; and Dr. Josef
Gendlerman, Internist. Frank is survived by his loving wife, Rev. Dr. Helen
Sampson Murgida of Newburyport; his
two sons, Matthew Murgida of Somerville and Lucas Murgida of Santa Ana,
CA; brother Alan Murgida of Lynn;
Sister Brenda and Brother-in-Law Jeff
Taylor of Rowley; Sister-in-Law and
Brother-in-Law Joyce and Joe Sampson of Tucson AZ; nieces Christine
Sampson of San Francisco, and Kate
Taylor of Hawaii; and nephews Joseph
Sampson of NC and Ben Taylor of VT.
The Professor Frank T. Murgida Award
for Innovative Thinking in computer
science and information technology
has been established. It will be a yearly
scholarship awarded to a creative and
resourceful student at Wentworth Institute of Technology, where Frank got
his start and closed his career. In lieu
of flowers, if you wish to contribute to
the award, please make checks payable
to Helen M. Murgida for the “Professor Frank T. Murgida Scholarship
Fund”. Family and friends are cordially
invited to attend a memorial service
and celebration of Frank’s life on April
7, 2018 at 11 AM at the First Religious
Society Unitarian Universalist Church,
26 Pleasant Street, Newburyport, MA.
Burial will be private. Funeral Arrangements are under the direction of
the Comeau Funeral Home, 485 Main
Street, HAVERHILL, MA. Please visit
Comeau Funeral Home on Facebook or
www.comeaufuneral.com.
Kevin B. Comeau Funeral Home
486 Main Street
Haverhill, MA 01830
www.comeaufuneral.com
KELLY, Claire V. (Burke)
Of Braintree and Falmouth, passed
away, surrounded by her loving family, on March 31, 2018, at the age of
88. Born and raised in Boston, Claire
graduated from Dorchester High
School. Claire volunteered as a Lunch
Mother at St. Francis of Assisi Church.
She spent her free time enjoying life
with her late husband, Jimmy, traveling, dancing, going to the beach and
wintering in Florida. She also enjoyed
crafts, spending her time crocheting or
doing ceramics. Claire had a nurturing
and compassionate way about her that
would always make you feel special. A
devoted wife, mother and grandmother,
Claire will be greatly missed by all
who were blessed to have known her.
Claire was the wife of the late James P.
Kelly. Loving mother of James P. Kelly
of Rowland, NC, Janet M. Clifford and
her late husband Bill of Marshfield,
and Kathy A. Chute and her husband
George of Milford. Sister of the late
John Burke, Mary Timmins and Arnold
Burke, Jr. Dear “Gramma” to Meghan
Herbst, Trevor Kelly, Grace, Harry and
Maggie Chute and Kate Clifford and
“Great Gramma” to Ryan and Emily
Herbst. Sister-in-law of Julianne Burke,
Rita M. Kelly and Myles and Joyce
Kelly. Cherished Aunt of Linda Shelton
and her husband Mark and their
children, Ryan and Kelly Letourneau
of Worcester. Also survived by many
nieces, nephews and friends. Reposing
at the Cartwright-Venuti Funeral Home,
845 Washington St., BRAINTREE. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited
to attend visiting hours on Wednesday,
April 4th, from 4:00 - 8:00 PM. A
Funeral Mass will be held on Friday,
April 6th, at 9:00 AM in St. Francis of
Assisi Church, Braintree. Burial will
follow at 2:30 PM in the Massachusetts
National Cemetery, Bourne. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions may
be made in Claire’s name to St. Patrick’s
Manor, 863 Central St., Framingham,
MA 01701. For directions or to leave a
sympathy message for the family, visit:
www.cartwrightfuneral.com.
LESSARD, Muriel A.
(Fredericks)
Of Winthrop, March 29, devoted wife of
Ernest Lessard. Loving mother of David
Lessard and his wife Karen of Winthrop, Mary McGrail and her husband
Charles of Winthrop, Richard Lessard
and his wife Jane of Andover, Kathryn
Dixon of Winthrop, Nancy Feeley and
her husband Patrick of Winthrop,
Linda Sirois and her husband Mark of
Ipswich and Donna Farland and her
husband Chester of NH. Dear sister of
Louise Weinhold of NH and the late
Christian Fredericks, Dorothy Bachini
and William Fredericks. Also survived
by 24 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano and
Son Funeral Home 147 Winthrop St.,
WINTHROP on Tuesday, April 3, 2018
from 4:00 to 8:00 PM. The funeral will
be conducted from the funeral home
on Wednesday, April 4, 2018 at 9:00
AM followed by a funeral mass in St.
John the Evangelist Church, Winthrop
at 10:00 AM. Interment to follow the
mass in Winthrop Cemetery. Memorial
donations may be made to the Joslin
Clinic at www.joslin.org. For directions
or to sign the online guestbook, go to
www.caggianofuneralhome.com.
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
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MacLACHLAN, Naifee
(Salloom)
Of Walpole, March 30, 2018, age
98. Beloved wife of the late John
MacLachlan. Devoted aunt of Sandra
and Roger Doyle of South Carolina,
Kathleen Gould of Boston, Margo Lee
and Edward Brobel, Jr. of Plainville,
Cheryl Dever Sullivan of Dedham, Valerie Lynn Dever of West Roxbury, and
Earnest Earl and Tracie Dever of West
Bridgewater. Relatives and friends are
kindly invited to attend a graveside service on Thursday, April 5, 2018 at 1:00
PM in the Highland Cemetery, Winter
Street, NORWOOD. Visiting hours are
respectfully omitted. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations may be made
to the Emmanuel Baptist Church, 63
Rockwood Road, Norfolk, MA 02056.
Delaney Funeral Home
www.delaneyfuneral.com
MAGNUSON, Doris L.
(Skogsberg)
Of Arlington. April 2nd. Beloved wife
of the late Norman H. Magnuson Sr.
Loving mother of Norman H. Jr., and
his wife Diane L. Magnuson (Hughes)
of Arlington. Cherished grandmother
of Norman H. III of Brooklyn, NY and
Kelsey H. Magnuson of Arlington. Also
survived by her loving nieces, Beverly
Winter, Susan Tucker, Diane Estella,
Donna Merrill and their spouses and
children. Also survived by her daughter
Janice Sopas and her three children,
all of Texas. Relatives and friends are
invited to visit in the DeVito Funeral
Home 1145 Mass. Ave., ARLINGTON
on Monday April 9th from 4 - 8 p.m.
Burial is private. Please visit devitofh.
com to send an online condolence.
MILLER, Don Peter
US Army Veteran
Of Medford, April 1.
Beloved husband of the late
Marie (Pagliarulo) Miller.
Devoted father of Linda Small and
husband Robert of Medford, Bruce
Miller of VA, Steven Miller and wife
Joyce of Tewksbury. Loving grandfather
of Kristi Conroy of Winchester, Robert
Small Jr. of Medford, Christopher
Miller of VA, Shannon Small of
Medford, Hayley Miller of NY, Jonathan
and Olivia Miller, both of Tewksbury.
Loving great grandfather of Atlas
Miller. Funeral from Dello Russo
Funeral Home, 306 Main St.,
MEDFORD, Thursday, April 5 at 9 AM
followed by a funeral mass celebrated
in St. Clement Church, 71 Warner St.,
Medord, at 10 AM. Relatives and
friends are respectfully invited to
attend. Services will conclude with
burial at Oak Grove Cemetery, Medford.
Visiting hours Wednesday 4 - 8 PM.
Late U.S. Army Veteran of Korea. To
leave a message of condolence visit
www.dellorusso.net.
Dello Russo Family Funeral Homes
Medford-Woburn-Wilmington
MONAGLE, Kathleen M.
“Kay” (Collins)
MURGIDA, Frank T.
PERINI, Eileen Callahan
See Enhanced Listing
O’FLANAGAN, Margaret A.
“Peggy” (Hurley)
Of Chevy Chase, MD, on March 28,
2018 at the age of 71. Formerly of
Roslindale, Milton, Scituate, Quincy,
MA, Tampa, FL, and Broadford, Co.
Limerick, Ireland. Beloved wife of John
O’Flanagan. Mother of John O’Flanagan
and his wife Monica of Tampa, FL,
Jennie O’Flanagan and her husband
Mark Morelli of Washington, DC, and
Kate Sun and her husband James
of Rockville, MD. Grandmother of
Rowan, Megan, Quinn, Patrick, Anna,
and Margaret. Sister of Daniel Hurley
(Jacqueline) of Beverly, MA.
Peg graduated from St. Claire’s High
School in Roslindale and received her
BA ‘68 and MSW ‘85 from Boston College. She was a Social Worker with the
elderly in the Boston area, in Florida
managing hospital units, then private
practice, and retiring to Ireland.
She was a great one for family and
friends.
Per her wish, cremation, then a
gathering in the Boston area yet to be
arranged.
Donations to Montgomery HospiceCasey House, 6001 Muncaster Mill
Road, Rockville, MD 20855 or Coalition
to Stop Gun Violence- www.csgv.org.
PEAK, Edward W.
Of Dedham and West
Roxbury, April 1, 2018.
Beloved husband of the late
Alma M. (Cullen) Peak. Loving father of
Susan Mutascio and her husband
Ronald of Dedham, Elizabeth Carney
and her husband Martin of West
Roxbury, Virginia Mullen and her
husband Paul Dobbs of AZ, Mary Peak
of Quincy, Theresa Peak of Dedham,
William Peak and his wife Lisa of West
Roxbury, Dorothy Peak of Quincy,
Edward W. Peak, Jr. of Quincy, and the
late Deborah Handrahan and Judith
Peak. Also survived by 18 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. A
Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated on Wednesday, April 4, in
The Holy Name Lower Church, West
Roxbury, at 12:30 pm. Relatives and
friends are invited to attend. Interment
Walnut Hills Cemetery, Brookline. Late
WW II Navy Veteran. Retired New
England Telephone Co. employee.
Edward was an avid private pilot who
enjoyed flying all over New England
with his family. Please visit:
www.lawlerfuneralhome.com
Lawler & Crosby Funeral Home
617-323-5600
Of Florida, April 1, 2018, at age 87, formerly of Cambridge. Devoted wife of 67
years to Paul Monagle. Loving mother
of Joan Barbosa and her husband
Richard, Paul Monagle and his wife
Kathleen, James Monagle and his wife
Maureen, Richard Monagle and the late
Maryalice Monagle. Cherished grandmother of Brian, Michael, Cameron and
Daniel. Treasured great-grandmother of
Penelope, Connor, August and Hannah.
Beloved sister of the late Maureen Kelly,
Daniel, Thomas, Francis, Philip and
Paul Collins. Also survived by many
nieces, nephews, and other loving
relatives and friends. Funeral from the
Rogers Funeral Home, 380 Cambridge
St., CAMBRIDGE, on Thursday, April
5, 2018, at 9:00 am. Funeral mass at
Sacred Heart Church, 49 Sixth St., Cambridge at 10:00 am. Visiting hours at
the Funeral Home on Wednesday, April
4, 2018, from 4:00 to 8:00 pm. Kay was
a retired employee of the Cambridge
School Department. In lieu of flowers,
donations in her memory may be made
to St. Jude’s Children Hospital, 501 St
Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
Age 40, of Wilmington, passed away on
March 31, 2018. Joe was the beloved
son of the late John and Anne (Drugan)
Perez. He was the dear brother of
Melissa Scolastico & her husband David
and Tara Cavanaugh & her husband
Paul, all of Wilmington. Joe was the
loving and caring uncle of Angela &
Andrew Scolastico and Anna & Jonathan Cavanaugh. Joe is also survived
by many aunts, uncles, cousins and
friends. Services will be held privately.
Rogers & Hutchins Funeral Homes
Arlington & Cambridge
www.rogersfuneralhome.net
Nichols Funeral Home, Inc.
978-658-4744
www.nicholsfuneralhome.com
PEREZ, Joseph A.
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Of Medfield and Cohasset, MA, formerly of Dover, MA, died peacefully on
Saturday, March 31, 2018 surrounded
by her beloved family. Loving wife of
David B. Perini; beloved mother of
Jennifer of San Francisco, CA, Kristin
and husband Bill Driscoll of Hingham, MA, Timothy and wife Patricia
of Harrison, NY, Andrea of Brooklyn,
NY and the late David Jr. Daughter of
Margaret Lynch and Denis Callahan.
Sister of Mary Guarente, Margaret Callahan, Noreen Cronin, Denis Callahan,
Kathleen Grannan, Christine Shanley,
and the late Ann Tibbetts and John Callahan. “Mimi” to her 10 grandchildren,
Eileen was born on August 8, 1937 and
raised in Arlington, MA. She attended
Arlington High School and graduated
from Cardinal Cushing Jr. College in
1957. Eileen married David B. Perini
in 1962. A lifelong learner, Eileen
returned to school twenty seven years
later, and at the age of 47, while still
raising five children, earned her Bachelor of Arts from Wellesley College in
1984. She went on to receive her Masters in Clinical Social Work from Boston
College in 1988, and worked as a
psychotherapist at BC for several years.
Beyond her husband, children and
grandchildren, the central passion of
Eileen’s life was her work for the Jimmy
Fund’s David B. Perini Jr. Quality of Life
Clinic, which she and husband David
established at the Dana Farber Cancer
Institute in 1992, soon after the death
of their son David Jr. at age 26. Determined to make something meaningful
of this tragedy, she dedicated herself to
growing the Clinic and supporting the
Dana Farber. She was a 29-year participant in the Boston Marathon® Jimmy
Fund Walk as captain of “Team Perini”
and was annually one of the Walk’s top
fundraisers. For 19 years, the David
Perini Memorial Golf Tournament was
held to support the Perini Quality of
Life Clinic, and in 1996, Eileen was
instrumental in securing a partnership
with Swim Across America to benefit
the Clinic and the Dana-Farber. Team
Perini has also participated in the PanMassachusetts Challenge for more than
25 years, raising more than $5M for the
Clinic. In 2010, Eileen and David created an endowment to support the Dana
Farber’s Adult Survivorship Program in
perpetuity. With this endowment, the
Perini Family Survivors’ Center was created and is now comprised of the Adult
Survivorship Program and the David B.
Perini, Jr. Quality of Life Clinic. There
are thousands of cancer survivors
whose lives are better because of the
Center, the services it provides, and
Eileen and David’s efforts to create and
support it. In addition, Eileen joined
the Dana-Farber Board of Trustees in
1990, furthering the Perini family’s
partnership as one of Dana-Farber’s
“first families.” Her husband David
served on the Board for many years,
and his father, Louis R. Perini, was a
Founding Trustee of the Institute who
served on the Board from 1948-1972
and helped to create and establish the
Jimmy Fund. Her daughter Jennifer
is currently a Dana-Farber Trustee.
Eileen became a Distinguished Trustee
in 2014. Her extensive service as a
Trustee included dedicated time as a
member of the Jimmy Fund Advisory
Executive Committee, Adult Patient and
Family Advisory Council, and Nursing
and Patient Care Visiting Committee. Eileen was also a member of the
Friends of Dana-Farber for multiple
years. In 2013, Eileen and David
received the Jimmy Fund’s highest
honor, when they were awarded the
Boston Red Sox Jimmy Fund Award
for their family’s decades of support.
Eileen was a prolific painter and loved
to fill her home with light and beauty.
She loved to learn, particularly about
world religion and psychology, and was
always reading and taking courses. She
was an avid walker, and could be seen
taking her daily power walks around
Dover, rain or shine. Eileen was a beautiful person with a beautiful soul who
absolutely loved being around people.
More than anything, Eileen loved to be
with her husband of 55 years, David,
their five children and ten grandchildren. She cherished her eight sisters
and brothers, who remained a central
part of her life until the end. A Mass
to celebrate Eileen’s life will be held
Thursday, April 5, at 1pm at Church of
the Most Precious Blood, 30 Centre St.,
Dover, MA 02030. Rite of Committal
to follow at Woodlawn Cemetery, 148
Brook St., Wellesley, MA 02482. Visiting
hours will be held on Wednesday from
4-8pm at the George F. Doherty & Sons
Funeral Home, 477 Washington St.,
Wellesley, MA 02482. Relatives and
friends are all invited. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to The David B.
Perini Jr. Quality of Life Clinic, Jimmy
Fund/Dana Farber Cancer Institute,
450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215.
Online guestbook and directions at
gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley 781-235-4100
POLO, James C.
Of Walpole, March 31, 2018, age 74.
Beloved husband of Gerri E. (Bracken)
Polo. Loving father of Lisa L. Collins
and her husband Kevin of Franklin,
Lindsay B. Howard and her husband
John of Roslindale, and Leslie S.
Caruso and her husband James of West
Roxbury. Cherished grandfather of
Riely, Teagan, Curren, Baylee, Sheamus,
and Tinsley. Brother of the late Nancy
Cosgrove. Nephew of Kitty Lombardi.
Also survived by many nieces, nephews,
cousins, and extended family. Relatives
and friends are kindly invited to attend
Jimmy’s Life Celebration on Thursday
from 4 to 8 PM and Friday from 10:30
to 11:00 AM in the James H. Delaney &
Son Funeral Home, 48 Common Street,
WALPOLE. A Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated in Saint Jude Church,
86 Main Street, Norfolk on Friday at
11:30 AM. Interment will follow in
Terrace Hill Cemetery in Walpole. In
lieu of flowers, memorial donations
may be made to: Dana Farber Cancer
Institute, P.O. Box 849168, Boston, MA
02284-9168.
Delaney Funeral Home
www.delaneyfuneral.com
PRIVE, Lorraine E. (LeBlanc)
Of Stoneham, April 1. Wife of the late
Andrew L. Prive. Mother of Kathleen
Kennedy and husband Michael of
Lynnfield, Jean Gravel of Stoneham,
Linda Prive of Cape Coral, FL and
Michael Prive and wife Svetlana of
Ashby. Grandmother of Katelin, Sarah
and Michael Kennedy and the late
Matthew Gravel. Sister of Marilyn Testa
of No. Reading and Jean LeBlanc of
Stoneham. Funeral from the McDonaldFinnegan Funeral Home, 322 Main
St., STONEHAM on Saturday at 9am
followed by a Funeral Mass in St. Patrick Church, 71 Central St., Stoneham
at 10am. Interment, Lindenwood
Cemetery, Stoneham. Visitation for
relatives and friends at the Funeral
Home on Friday from 5-8pm. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to the Alzheimer’s Association,
309 Waverley Oaks Rd., Waltham, MA
02452. For obit/directions/guestbook,
www.mcdonaldfs.com
RAMETTE, Christina
79, of Ashland, passed away Mon.
April 2nd after a period of declining
health. Born in Galway, Ireland, she
was the daughter of the late Martin
and Delia (Kearney) Tully and wife of
the late Henry P. Ramette, who died in
1985. Mrs. Ramette was an assembly
line worker for Fenwall Co. in Ashland
until her retirement in 2005 and was
a member of St. Cecilia’s Church in Ashland. She is survived by three children;
Marybeth Daley and her husband Kevin
of Millbury, MA; Christine Ramette of
Ashland; and Patrick J. Ramette and his
wife Barbara of Cahokia, IL; five grandchildren; Courtney Ekstrom and her
husband Jason, Patrick Daley, Heather
Daley, James Ramette, and John
Ramette, one sister, Bridget Winchester
of Gloucester, MA, and many nieces
and nephews. She was the sister of the
late Margaret Ramette and sister-inlaw of the late Paul J. Ramette. A Mass
of Christian Burial will be celebrated
Thursday April 5th at 9:00am in St.
Cecilia’s Church, 54 Esty St. Ashland,
MA with burial to follow in Wildwood
Cemetery in Ashland.
Calling hours will be held Wed.
from 4:00-7:00 PM in the Matarese
Funeral Home, 325 Main St. Ashland,
MA. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to the Alzheimer’s Association,
309 Waverley Oaks Rd, Waltham, MA
02452 www.mataresefuneral.com
RAYMOND, William J.
Of Newtonville, April 1, 2018. Husband
of Joanne M. (O’Brien) Raymond.
Father of Beth J. Raymond of Washington, DC and Christine J. Raymond
of New York, NY. Brother of Robert
Raymond (Madeline) of Niantic, CT,
Linda Raymond of Hyde Park, Paula
McCarthy (Finbarr) of Dedham and
Laura Morgan (Bobby) of Norfolk. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews.
Family and friends will honor and remember Bill’s life by gathering for calling hours in The Joyce Funeral Home,
245 Main Street (Rte. 20), WALTHAM
on Thursday, April 5th from 4 to 8
p.m. and again at 9:30 a.m. on Friday
morning before leaving in procession
to Our Lady Help of Christians Church,
573 Washington Street, Newton where
his Funeral Mass will be celebrated
at 10:30 a.m. Burial will be private.
Memorial donations may be made to
GWARC, 56 Chestnut St., Waltham,
MA 02453 or to Beth Israel Deaconess
Hospital Orthopaedics Oncology, 330
Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215.
For complete obituary, guest book and
directions please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
Share a
special memory
Add a cherished memory or condolence to the
online guestbook at boston.com/obituaries.
REAGAN, James “Jim”
James J. “Jim” Reagan III, 48, of
Andover, passed away on April 1, 2018
of cancer. Forever loved by his devoted
fiancee, Kara (Simko) Valin; children,
Hanna and James Reagan; stepsons,
Max and Ryan Valin of Andover; parents, Irene and James Reagan of NH;
brother, Brian and his wife, Sarah (Allen) Reagan and their children, Bryce
and Mya of Bedford, NH.
Jim was an amazing person who
was best known for his great sense
of humor, which made it only fitting
that he passed on April Fool’s Day and
Easter Sunday.
His favorite things to do were to
spend time at Loon with his family
and dogs, and attend his children’s
activities.
He was an avid Boston sports fan
and loved swimming, golfing, playing
tennis as well as ball with his kids. Jim
always enjoyed concerts, vacations, a
great steakhouse, and guy’s getaways
with his best friends, Mick, Pete, Laz,
Mike, and the late Proch.
Jim spent most of his working life at
the Cafe Escadrille in Burlington, MA.
Jim was surrounded by the love of
his amazing family and friends and
wanted to thank them for their support.
In lieu of flowers or casseroles,
contributions in Jim’s memory may be
made to Merrimack Valley Food Bank,
Inc., P.O. Box 8638, Lowell, MA 01853
or the Northeast Animal Shelter, 347
Highland Avenue, Salem, MA 01970.
Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend visiting hours on
Thursday, April 5, 2018, from 4:00-8:00
pm at Cataudella Funeral Home, 126
Pleasant Valley St., METHUEN. His
funeral mass will be celebrated at
12:00 noon on Friday, April 6, 2018
at St. Augustine’s Church, 43 Essex
St., Andover. The family requests
that those attending the funeral mass
to please go directly to the church.
Burial will be private. For directions
or to send condolences, please visit
www.cataudellafh.com.
Cataudella Funeral Home, Methuen
978-685-5379
RILEY, Florence Loretta
(Fay)
Of Franklin, formerly of
Walpole and Norwood
passed away on April 1,
2018 at the age of 94. Devoted mother
of Judith M. Riley of Franklin and the
late Maureen L. Riley. Loving sister of
Virginia Fay of Dedham, June M.
Gibbons of Quincy and the late Paul,
Peter and William Fay. Cherished Nana
of Michelle J. Mills and her husband
Stephen of Franklin. Great Nana of
Daniel and Katherine Mills. Devoted
and Special aunt of Donna Fay, Allison
Forde and many other nieces and
nephews. Daughter of the late Henry G.
and Florence M. (Scott) Fay. Florence
was a member of the American Legion
in Dedham and Past Commander and
Chaplain of the Norwood DAV. She was
a WWII US Army Air Corp Veteran and
was a Volunteer at the VA Hospital
Pharmacy in W. Roxbury for 11 years.
The Golden Girls are together again
Agnes, Eileen and Florence. The family
would like to give a special thanks to all
the Doctors and Nurses at the VA
Hospital W. Roxbury for all their
Compassion, Kindness and Professionalism for her over many years. Also the
family would like to thank the Staff
from the Clark House at Fox Hill Village
in Westwood for their kind and
compassionate care. Funeral from the
Kraw-Kornack Funeral Home, 1248
Washington St., NORWOOD, Thursday,
April 5, 2018 at 8am followed by a
funeral mass at 9am in St. Catherine of
Siena Church, Norwood. Visiting hours
will be held on Wednesday, April 4,
2018 from 4-7pm. Burial will be at St.
Joseph Cemetery, W. Roxbury with US
Army Honors.
Kraw-KornackFuneralHome.com
Family Owned and Operated
(781) 762-0482
ROBER, Eric W.
54, of Maynard, MA,
formerly of Duxbury, MA
died Sat., March 31, 2018
at the Lahey Clinic Medical Center in
Burlington. Beloved husband of 27
years of Susan E. (Misasi) Rober, and
loving father of Kate, both of Maynard.
Son of the late William R. and Sandra
M. (Stevens) Rober. Brother of Brenda
Farragher and husband Dave of SC,
Donna McCall and husband Fenton of
Duxbury, Elisia Azzarone and husband
Joe of Shrewsbury, and the late Melissa
Rober. Also survived by several nieces
and nephews. Visiting Wed., April 4th
from 5-8 p.m. at the Acton Funeral
Home, 470 Massachusetts Ave (Rte
111) ACTON. Funeral Mass Thurs.
April 5th at 10 a.m. in St. Bridget’s
Church, 1 Percival St. Maynard with
burial following in Glenwood Cemetery,
Great Rd (Rte 117) Maynard. In lieu of
flowers, memorial gifts may be made
to the Northeast Animal Shelter, 347
Highland Ave, Salem, MA 01970, also
online at www.northeastanimalshelter.
org. Memorial page www.actonfuneralhome.com US Air Force vet.
ROBINSON, Laura M.
(Goullaud)
Of Bonita Springs, FL formerly of
Mission Hill, Arlington, Burlington,
and York ME, April 1. Beloved wife
of Charles. Loving mother of Donna
Connolly & her husband Jim of Nashua,
NH, Charles & his wife Diana of Cape
Neddick, ME, Marianne McKenna &
her husband the late Robert of Billerica,
William & his wife Amanda of Methuen
and Laura Sullivan & her husband Kevin of Burlington. Proud grandmother of
James Connolly & his wife Alexandra;
Michael, Catherine & Bryan Connolly;
Siobhan Lopez & her husband Joseph;
Kyle, Samantha, Liam & Zoe Robinson;
Kaila, Thomas & Margaret Sullivan
and Craig Paradiso. Sister of George
Goullaud & his wife Mary of ME, Mary
Ann Scanlon & her companion Marilyn
Kuntupis of FL, Frank Downey & his
wife Marcia of FL, and the late Edna
Joyce and Joseph Goullaud. Sister-inlaw of Patricia Goullaud of Nashua,
NH. Also survived by many nieces and
nephews. Funeral from the Edward V
Sullivan Funeral Home, 43 Winn Street,
BURLINGTON (Exit 34 off Rt. 128/95
Woburn side) on Friday, April 6 at 9
a.m. Followed by a Mass of Christian
Burial in St. Margaret’s Church, 111
Winn St., Burlington at 10 a.m. Visiting hours Thursday 4-8 p.m. Interment
in Pine Haven Cemetery, BURLINGTON. Memorials in Laura’s name may
be made to Vitas Healthcare, 4980
Tamiami Trial North, Suite 102, Naples,
FL 34103 For directions, obituary &
online guestbook see www.
sullivanfuneralhome.net & www.
stmargaretburlington.org
ROSARIO, Sylvia E.
Comm. Sylvia
Eloine Rosario,
M.ED., LMFT
Sylvia E. Rosario was born in Boston,
MA in 1936 to Elaine Dulcenia Gomes
and Julius W. Snow, and raised by her
mother and Joseph A. Firmin. She was
a driven, ambitious, knowledgeable
and well-traveled woman. She met and
married the late Joseph J. Rosario, Jr.
(Retired Capt.) of New Bedford, MA,
and had daughters, Andrea, 59; Dana
(deceased); and Lita, 56.
In the 1970’s she began a career as
a college counselor and administrator
at AIC, then a contract administrator
for the Mass. Dept. of Ed., Civil Rights
Division for Title VII and IX Programs,
and a Race-Relations Trainer/Newton
Public Schools. In 1979, she received
an M.Ed. from Antioch University. In
1984, she moved to Washington, DC
and owned both a hair salon and an
antiques business. She found her true
calling, clinical psychology, and became
a Licensed Marriage and Family
Therapist. In 2012, at the age of 76, she
was appointed by D.C. Mayor Gray as a
Commissioner of the Board of Marriage
and Family Therapy, in 2013 voted
Vice-Chair, and was re-appointed. In
2013, she was a Collaborating Investigator for the APA’s DSM-5 Field Study.
Member: The American Association
of Marriage & Family Therapy, The
Association of Black Psychologists, The
International Association of Marriage &
Family Therapy, the American Counseling Association, and the International
Society for Mental Health Online.
She is survived by her daughters,
Andrea and Lita; three grandchildren,
Andre Dwayne, 30; Andrew Keith, 28;
and Lita Angelle, 23; beloved sisters,
Marie and Paula; nephews, Tyrone,
Wallace, Rahim and Imam, great-nieces
and nephews; stepsons, Frank, John,
and Antone; and many cousins (who
were like sisters and brothers) William,
Barbara, Claudia, Melva, Jeanne, Richard, Laurie, Melvin and Wendy and
their beautiful children and grandchildren all of whom she loved dearly.
Wake: Wednesday, April 4, 2018,
from 4-6pm, Pleasant Hill Baptist
Church (155 Humboldt Ave, Roxbury,
MA) and “A Celebration of Life Program” thereafter 6-9pm at The Museum
of the National Center for Afro-American Artists (300 Walnut Ave, Roxbury,
MA). Funeral Services: Thursday, April
5, 2018, 10:00am, Pleasant Hill Baptist
Church. Interment St. Michael Cemetery, Boston, MA. Repass at 135 Martin
Luther King Blvd., Roxbury, MA.
Honor your loved
one’s memory
with a photo in
The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director for details.
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
SARCIA, Roger W.
SIMON, Alfred Mason
Revere Firefighter
Victim of ALS
At 62 years, in Revere, following an
8 month battle with ALS. Beloved
husband of Paula S. (Olsen) Sarcia.
Devoted father of Master Sgt. Rachel L.
Wagner & her husband Staff Sgt. Alexander R. Wagner of Revere, both with
the U.S. Air Force; Jennifer L. Hubbard
& her husband Joseph A. Hubbard of
Windham, NH; Kristopher T. Sarcia of
Revere; Senior Airman John J. Sarcia
of Travis Air Force Base, CA. Cherished
grandfather to Kaleigh L., Aiden J.,
Brennan J. Hubbard & Korbin R. Wagner. Dear brother of Domenic R. Sarcia
& wife Rosemary of Lynnfield. Also lovingly survived by his father & motherin-law, John J. & Helen L. (Olsen)
Greene of Revere, his brother & sisterin-law, Richard I. & Patricia F. (Olsen)
Kane & their son, Ryan R. Kane, all of
Nahant. He is also survived by many
nieces, nephews & cousins. Family &
friends are invited to attend a Memorial
Visitation on Saturday, April 7th in the
Vertuccio & Smith Home for Funerals,
773 Broadway (Rte. 107), REVERE,
from 1-3 p.m., immediately followed by
the Funeral Service at 3:15 p.m. Parking available left of the funeral home.
Interment is private. Roger was a member of Revere Firefighters’ Union, Local
#926. In lieu of flowers, remembrances
may be made to the ALS Assoc. - Mass.
Chapter, 685 Canton St., Suite 103,
Norwood, MA 02062. Please visit:
www.vertuccioandsmith.com.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
SCHLICHER, Doreen A.
56, of Peabody and formerly of Everett,
passed away Thursday evening at her
home surrounded by her loving family
following a courageous battle against
cancer. She was the devoted wife of
Charles Schlicher with whom she
shared over 25 years of marriage.
Born in Boston, she was the
daughter of the late Albert and Grace
(Brophy) Collett. She was raised and
educated in Everett, later lived in
Chelsea and has spent the last 3 years
living in Peabody. She was a graduate of
Everett High School, class of 1979.
Doreen was employed as Corporate
Procurement Manager for Hood Milk
Company for over 25 years before her
illness. She enjoyed reading, walking,
and hiking with her dog Molly.
Besides her loving husband, she is
survived by her sister, Joanie Collett
Nakkashian of Salem, NH and nieces
and nephews.
Following cremation, her Funeral
Service will be held on Thursday at
11:00 AM at the Conway, Cahill-Brodeur Funeral Home, 82 Lynn St., PEABODY to which relatives and friends
are kindly invited to attend. Burial will
be in Cedar Grove Cemetery, Peabody.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be
made in her name to the MSPCA, 350
South Huntington Ave, Boston, MA
02130. For directions and on-line
obituary, visit www.ccbfuneral.com
SCHNEIDER, Etta Yochevet
(Mozer)
Of Franklin, MA. Entered into rest
on March 31, 2018 at the age of 85.
She was the beloved wife of the late
Herman Schneider. Survived by her
daughter, Bella Harris and her husband
Michael, and her son Arthur Schneider.
She was the loving sister of the late
Klara Deutcher, Miriam Heinisch,
Rachel Rosenfeld, Shya Mozer, Sara
Shaus, and Schmuel Mozer. Cherished
grandmother of Joshua Harris and his
wife Kim, and Alison Harris-Castro
and her husband Chico, and greatgrandmother of Eric and Emily Harris,
and Maya Castro. Services will be held
at the Stanetsky Memorial Chapel, 475
Washington Street, CANTON, MA on
Wednesday April 4, 2018 at 10:00am,
followed by burial in Sharon Memorial
Park. The family will receive family
and friends at the home of Michael and
Bella Harris on Wednesday from 2-4pm
and 7-9pm and continuing on Thursday
from 4-8pm. Expressions of sympathy
in her memory may be made to the
American Heart Association, PO Box
417005, Boston, MA 02241-7005 or at
www.heart.org.
Stanetsky Memorial Chapel
(781) 821-4600
www.stanetskycanton.com
Have the
Talk
SINGER, Max J.
Of Peabody, MA entered
into rest on Monday, April
2, 2018. Funeral services
will be held at Stanetsky-Hymanson
Memorial Chapel, 10 Vinnin St, Salem,
MA 01970 on Thursday April 5, 2018
10:00AM. Complete notice to follow.
Stanetsky-Hymanson
Memorial Chapel
www.stanetskyhymansonsalem.com
SULLIVAN, David R.
Longtime Norwood
resident, passed away on
April 1, 2018 at home. Loving father of Nancy DiMattia of Winter
Springs, FL, Marlena Doucette and her
husband Paul of Medway, and
Christopher and Scott Sullivan, both of
Norwood. Cherished grandfather of
Gregory, Andrea and her husband
Brian, Nicholas, Hannah, Jillian and
Joseph. Devoted brother of Martha
Porter and her husband Charles of
Middleboro and their children, Jay and
Tara.
Visiting hours will be held on Thursday, April 5th, from 4:00-7:00pm at the
Gillooly Funeral Home, 126 Walpole
Street (Rte. 1A), NORWOOD. Funeral
service and interment with military
honors will be private.
Memorial contributions in memory
of David R. Sullivan may be made to
the American Legion, Post 70, 37 Chapel Court, Norwood, MA 02062.
Gillooly Funeral Home
Norwood 781-762-0174
www.gilloolyfuneralhome.com
THING, George C.
North Conway NH
83, of Brownfield, ME, formerly of
Malden, MA, died March 29, 2018.
Born in Bath, Maine in 1934.
Educated in the Malden schools and
graduated from Malden High School in
1954. Longtime employee of MBTA.
George married Beverly R. Shivvers
in 1954, she passed away in 1974.
Since arriving in Brownfield, he loved
to volunteer at Samyra Mart, delivering
newspapers to his neighbors.
of a
Lifetime
You talk about many things with
92, died in the evening of
April 1, at his home at
Lasell Village in Newton,
MA. He was the son of Carl and Mary
Simon, brother of the late Blanche
Weinstein and Claire Bensusan, father
of Jeffrey and his wife, Ginny
(Schulman) Simon of Ipswich, MA,
Marc Simon and his companion, Susan
Thorne of Ipswich, Doug Simon and his
wife, Lisa Aubin of Wendall, MA and
Lisa Simon, of Boston. He was the
grandfather of Benjamin Simon, Kelly
(Simon) McSweeney and her husband,
Ross, Rachael (Simon) Cordella and her
husband, Dan, Rebecca (Simon)
Higgins and her husband, Paul, Abigail
Simon and her fiance, Ahmad Alsaadi,
and Carl Simon and his wife, Kate
Dailey. He was the happy great-grandfather of Evelyn and Benjamin Cordella,
Fiona and Caleb McSweeney, Niamh
Conor, and Aisling Higgins and Adrian
Simon.
Al Simon was born in 1925 of immigrant parents from Russia. He grew
up in Waltham and Newton. He was
set on joining the Marines, sweating by
putting a floor in his attic in the middle
of summer in order to meet the weight
requirement to enlist. He remained a
proud Marine for the rest of his life.
After graduating from Yale University,
he married his high school sweetheart,
Dookie Simon, who predeceased him,
and was later happily married to Edie
Simon, until her death. In recent years
he was fortunate to have Jackie Fink as
his friend and companion. For many
years he was in the textile business in
Waltham and Framingham with his
father Carl, as the “son” in Carlsons
Mills. He was a lifelong skier and tennis player.
He lived a long full life, centered on
his family, his country and his faith.
Services at Levine Chapels, 470
Harvard St., Brookline on Wednesday,
April 4 at 12noon. Burial will follow at
Sharon Memorial Park, 40 Dedham St.,
Sharon. Family will be receiving visitors at Lasell Village, Ballroom, from
4:30 pm until 8:00 pm on Wednesday,
April 4.
In lieu of flowers, remembrances
may be made to the American Technion
Society, 1 Gateway Center, Suite 716,
Newton, MA 02458.
SM
your loved ones. Meaningful memorialization
starts when loved ones talk about what
matters most.
Download a free brochure and Have the Talk of
a Lifetime today. It can make the difference of
a lifetime.
talkofalifetime.org
Survived by his son, George, Jr.;
daughter, Kathleen Lewis; son, William; son, Daniel; brother, Edwin; 9
grandchildren; 11 great grandchildren;
1 great-great grandchild. Predeceased
by son, John; mother, Helen Bartlett;
step-father, Daniel; father, Edward;
brother, Raymond.
Visiting Hours: 4-6PM, Thu., Apr. 5,
at the Wood Funeral Home, 9 Warren
St., Fryeburg, ME. Committal 10AM,
Fri., Apr. 6, at the Forestdale Cemetery
in Malden, MA. Full obituary at
www.woodfuneralhome.org.
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B9
Obituaries
Winnie Madikizela­Mandela; fought apartheid
By Alan Cowell
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Winnie
Madikizela-Mandela, whose
hallowed place in the pantheon
of South Africa’s liberators was
eroded by scandal over corruption, kidnapping, murder, and
the implosion of her fabled
marriage to Nelson Mandela,
died early Monday in Johannesburg. She was 81.
Her death, at the Netcare
Milpark Hospital, was announced by her spokesman,
Victor Dlamini. He said in a
statement that she died “after a
long illness, for which she had
been in and out of hospital
since the start of the year.”
Charming, intelligent, complex, fiery, and eloquent, Ms.
Madikizela-Mandela (Madikizela was her surname at birth)
was inevitably known to most
of the world through her marriage to the revered Mandela. It
was a bond that endured ambiguously: She derived a vaunted status from their shared
struggle, yet she chafed at being
defined by him.
Ms. Madikizela-Mandela
commanded a natural constituency of her own among South
Africa’s poor and dispossessed,
and the postapartheid leaders
who followed Mandela could
never ignore her appeal to a
broad segment of society.
Ms. Madikizela-Mandela retained a political presence as a
member of Parliament, representing the dominant African
National Congress.
Increasingly, though, Ms.
Madikizela-Mandela resented
the notion that her antiapartheid credentials had been
eclipsed by her husband’s global stature and celebrity, and she
struggled in vain in later years
to be regarded again as the
“mother of the nation,” a sobri-
Remembered
SHARE MEMORIES AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
TORTORELLA, Elfreda ‘Ellie’
(Eaton)
Age 72, of Waltham formerly of Watertown, March 31, 2018. Beloved wife of
Frank Tortorella. Loving mother of Tracy Hatfield & her husband Tim, Frank
Tortorella and his fiancee Judy, Russell
Tortorella & his wife Susan and Michael
Tortorella and his wife Kelly. Devoted
grandmother of Nicholas & Christopher
Hatfield and Madison, Tanner, Jacob,
Issac & Katherine Tortorella. Dear
sister of Eleanor Fanara & Larry Eaton.
Family and friends are welcome to the
Nardone Funeral Home, 373 Main St.,
WATERTOWN on Thursday at 10 AM
followed by an 11 AM Funeral Mass
in St. Patrick’s Church. Burial private.
Visiting hours Wednesday 4-7 PM. In
lieu of flowers, please make donations
in Ellie’s name to The Shriners Hospital
for Children - Boston, Development
Office, 51 Blossom Street, Boston, MA
02114.
Nardone Funeral Home
(617) 924 - 1113
www.NardoneFuneralHome.com
WOODSIDE, Marie J.
(White)
Of Waltham. April 1, 2018. Wife
of Robert I. Woodside. Daughter of
Elizabeth A. (Kelly) White of Waltham
and the late Lawrence F. White; sister
of Larry White (Deborah Wessell) of
Nashua, NH, Susan Travers (Joseph) of
Bourne, Linda Cunningham (Richie)
of Hudson and Clare Kidling (Bruce)
of Bourne; also survived by Rob’s
children, Nicholas Woodside (Celeste)
of Waltham and Adam Woodside (Melanie) of Hudson; Rob’s grandchildren,
Neko and Milo Woodside; also survived
by many nieces & nephews. Family
and friends will honor and remember
Marie’s life by gathering for calling
hours in The Joyce Funeral Home, 245
Main St. (Rte. 20), Waltham on Friday,
April 6th from 4 to 8 p.m. and again
at 9 a.m. on Saturday morning before
leaving in procession to Saint Mary’s
Church, 133 School St., Waltham where
her Funeral Mass will be celebrated
at 10 a.m. Burial will be in Calvary
Cemetery, Waltham. Memorials may
be made to Lustgarten Foundation,
1111 Stewart Ave., Bethpage, NY 11714
(www.lustgarten.org) or St. Vincent de
Paul at St. Mary’s Church, 133 School
St., Waltham, MA 02453. For complete
obituary guest register and directions
visit www.joycefuneralhome.com
JOANNE RATHE/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 1990
Ms. Madikizela-Mandela derived status from the struggle she shared with Nelson Mandela.
quet acquired during the long
years of Mandela’s imprisonment.
While Mandela was held at
the Robben Island penal settlement, off Cape Town, where he
spent most of his 27 years in
jail, Ms. Madikizela-Mandela
acted as the main conduit to his
followers, who hungered for every clue to his thinking and
well-being.
In time, her reputation became scarred by accusations of
extreme brutality toward suspected turncoats, misbehavior
and indiscretion in her private
life, and a radicalism that
seemed at odds with Mandela’s
quest for racial inclusiveness.
She nevertheless sought to
remain in his orbit. She was at
his side, brandishing a victor’s
clenched fist salute, when he
was finally released from prison
in February 1990.
Nomzamo Winifred Zanyiwe Madikizela was born to a
noble family of the Xhosaspeaking Pondo tribe in Transkei.
As a barefoot child she tended cattle and learned to make
do with very little, in marked
contrast to her later years of
free-spending ostentation. She
attended a Methodist mission
school and then the Hofmeyr
School of Social Work in Johannesburg.
One day in 1957, when she
was waiting at a bus stop, Mandela drove past. Mandela, approaching 40 and the father of
three, declared on their first
date that he would marry her.
Soon he separated from his first
wife, Evelyn Ntoko Mase, a
nurse, to marry Ms. MadikizelaMandela on June 14, 1958.
Ms. Madikizela-Mandela
was thrust into the limelight in
1964 when her husband was
sentenced to life in prison on
charges of treason. She was officially “banned” under draconian restrictions intended to
make her a nonperson, unable
to work, socialize, move freely,
or be quoted in the South African news media, even as she
raised their two daughters, Zenani and Zindziswa.
In a crackdown in May 1969,
she was arrested and held for 17
months, 13 in solitary confinement. She was beaten and tortured. The experience, she
wrote, was “what changed me,
what brutalized me so much
that I knew what it is to hate.”
After blacks rioted in the
segregated Johannesburg township of Soweto in 1976, Ms.
Madikizela-Mandela was again
imprisoned without trial, this
time for five months. She was
then banished to a bleak township outside the conservative
white town of Brandfort.
When Ms. Madikizela-Mandela returned to her home in
Soweto in 1985, breaking her
banning orders, it was as a far
more bellicose figure, determined to assume leadership of
what became the decisive and
most violent phase of the struggle. As she saw it, her role was
to stiffen the confrontation
with the authorities.
The tactics were harsh.
“Together, hand in hand,
with our boxes of matches and
our necklaces, we will liberate
this country,” she told a rally in
April 1986.
She was referring to “necklacing,” a form of sometimes arbitrary execution by fire using a
gas-soaked tire around a supposed traitor ’s neck, and it
shocked an older generation of
antiapartheid campaigners. But
her severity aligned her with the
young township radicals.
In the late 1980 s, Ms.
Madikizela-Mandela allowed
the outbuildings around her
residence in Soweto to be used
by the so-called Mandela United
Football Club, a vigilante gang
that claimed to be her bodyguards. It terrorized Soweto, inviting infamy and prosecution.
In 1991 she was convicted of
ordering the 1988 kidnapping
of four youths in Soweto.
Ms. Madikizela-Mandela’s
chief bodyguard was convicted
of murder. She was sentenced
to six years for kidnapping, but
South Africa’s highest appeals
court reduced her punishment
to fines and a suspended oneyear term.
By then her life had begun to
unravel. The United Democratic Front, an umbrella group of
organizations fighting apartheid and linked to the ANC, expelled her. In April 1992, Mandela, midway through settlement talks with President F.W.
de Klerk of South Africa, announced that he and his wife
were separating.
Two years later, Mandela
was elected president and offered her a minor job as the
deputy minister of arts, culture,
science, and technology. But after allegations of influence peddling, bribe taking, and misuse
of government funds, she was
forced from office. In 1996,
Mandela ended their 38-year
marriage, testifying in court
that his wife was having an affair with a colleague.
Bob Beattie; launched Alpine World Cup circuit
By Pat Graham
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER — The plaque that
rested for years on ski icon Bob
Beattie’s desk was inscribed
with a matter-of-fact motto: It
can be done.
That was a fitting mantra for
the ski racing pioneer who
helped launch the World Cup
circuit more than 50 years ago
and was part of the commentary crew that called one of the
most thrilling Alpine races at
the 1976 Winter Games.
Mr. Beattie died Sunday in
Fruita, Colo., after dealing with
various health issues. He was
85.
“Once he made up his mind
something needed to happen,
he would keep pounding away
until he got it done,’’ his son, Zeno, said in a phone interview.
‘‘He had a lot of friends and
they always came up to him and
said, ‘If it wasn’t for you, I never
would’ve accomplished whatever.’
‘‘He never really thought
about that too much. His whole
world was about working really
hard. And if you worked really
hard at something and you did
it as a team and not as an individual you can pretty much do
anything you ever wanted to
do.’’
Known as ‘‘Beats’’ or ‘‘Coach’’
to his friends, Mr. Beattie’s career included stints as coach of
the US ski team and at the University of Colorado, where he
led the Buffaloes to a pair of national titles.
In addition, Mr. Beattie,
paired with Frank Gifford,
called one of the Winter Olympics’ most famous ski races for
REUTERS/FILE 1997
In 1964, with Mr. Beattie as
coach, US men won Alpine
medals at a Winter
Olympics for the first time.
ABC — Austrian great Franz
Klammer’s electric downhill
run to capture gold in ‘76.
‘‘They realized Bob Beattie
and I had a peculiar way of calling it,’’ the late Gifford once said
in an interview with EmmyTVLegends.org. ‘‘Bob loved ski racing. . . . He would get so excited
at the race. My job was almost
like ‘Monday Night Football,’
identify the players and let him
go. He brought an unbelievable
excitement to it.’’
Mr. Be attie was born in
Manchester, N.H., and attended
Middlebury College in Vermont, where he lettered in tennis, skiing, football, and crosscountry running. He became
the ski coach following his
graduation. The team finished
third at the NCAA championships in 1956.
Soon after, he went to Boulder, Colo., to be an assistant
football coach before taking
over the ski program and turning it into a national power. The
Buffaloes won the title in 1959
and again in 1960.
He oversaw the US ski team
at the 1964 Olympic Games,
where Billy Kidd and Jimmie
Heuga finished 2-3 in the slalom. It marked the first two Alpine medals captured by American men at the Winter Olympics.
‘‘The pressure was severe.
We had promised everything —
rightfully or wrongfully — we
had promised everyone the
world,’’ Mr. Beattie told US ski
team historian Tom Kelly last
summer. ‘‘We loved each other.
We were a team.’’
In the mid-1960s, Mr. Beattie partnered with journalist
Serge Lang and French coach
Honore Bonnet to create the
World Cup, with racers traveling the globe to compete. It’s
still going strong, with stars
such as Lindsey Vonn, Mikaela
Shiffrin, and Marcel Hirscher
leading the way.
Over his career, Mr. Beattie
worked four Winter Games,
and called volleyball at the
1984 Summer Olympics in Los
Angeles. He also was involved
w i t h A B C ’s W i d e Wo r l d o f
Sports and hosted a ski show
for ESPN. In 1984, he was inducted into the US Ski and
Snowboard Hall of Fame.
Mr. Beattie also found time
to author several books on skiing and started a kids program
in the Aspen Valley that flourishes today. The family is planning a celebration with the ski
club this fall. ‘‘He influenced a
lot of people,’’ his son said.
B10
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
“Who the #!@!& touched my Xbox?”
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
2
1
9
7
6
8
3
4
5
3
6
7
4
2
5
9
8
1
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
8
4
5
3
9
1
6
2
7
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
4
5
6
1
8
9
7
3
2
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
1
9
3
2
4
7
8
5
6
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
7
2
8
5
3
6
4
1
9
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
9
3
2
6
5
4
1
7
8
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
5
8
1
9
7
3
2
6
4
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
6
7
4
8
1
2
5
9
3
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B11
ZIPPY “Donut do it, Zippy!” by Bill Griffith
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
Some pluggers prefer to eat “an apple a day” in a pie.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
6
9
4
2 8
9
5
1
5
3
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
INNER EAR BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Long-running
fights
6 Posed faces
10 Solicit
13 Way pointer
14 Sleep
interrupter
16 Place to
whirlpool
17 Test a car
19 “My good man”
20 Stu of old films
21 Surgeon’s
closure
23 Tiny toy
handler
26 Furniture
hauler
27 Great, wise
king
28 Fishes’
counterparts
30 Knee boo-boo
31 Field mouse
32 San Simeon
owner
34 Electrical
measure
37 German
steel city
39 By way of
40 Weirdly spooky
42 C homonym
43 Swinging
creatures
46 Sole
47 Impassioned
49 Inuit boot
51 Strands
53 Sawbuck
54 Tee preceder
55 Modern
headphone
56 Tuba material
58 Is multiplied?
59 Know well
64 Non-affirmatives
65 Lock up top
66 Sports venue
67 Dynamite cable
channel
68 Window part
69 Gumball price,
once
DOWN
1 Passing craze
2 Botch up
3 William Tell’s
home
4 Peacenik’s bird
5 Weave on the
road
6 Funny Cheech
7 Fairy-tale word
8 Antelope variety
9 Light detectors
10 Be an
impersonator
11 Richard’s VP
12 Silkwood or
Carpenter
15 Praise to the
skies
18 Overflowing
with
22 Do better than
23 23-Across
doubled?
24 Not tied up
25 Cause for
release
27 Lean animal
29 Sign of victory
30 Mark or
John, e.g.
33 “Good Times”
surname
35 Take away
36 Furtively
glimpses
38 “Absolutely”
41 Forest creature
44 Presents for
payment
45 Apply jelly
48 Steal
50 Pop a fastening
51 Intended
52 Sorkin or Judge
53 Garbage
56 Eleanor’s
successor
57 Marshy? No way
60 Pastoral
expanse
61 Winter
hideaway
62 Stopover place
63 Verbal vote
3
1
3
7
6 5
7
1
2
9
8
9
7 6
6
1 4
8
8
6
7
1
T h e
B12
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Krasinski and Blunt
on working together
in ‘A Quiet Place’
Actor John Krasinski has long been
enthusiastic about doing projects with
his wife, actress Emily Blunt, telling
Boston.com in 2016 that he wanted to
work with her “in any way, shape, or
form.” But according to a new interview in Vulture, once the duo actually
did start working together for the horror film “A Quiet Place,” out Friday,
they found that there were going to be
some challenges.
“Once she signed on,” the Newton
native and former star of “The Office”
told Vulture, “Emily was like, ‘Just so
you know, our personality differences
are going to be a problem.’ ”
Apparently, Krasinski is generally
more impulsive, while Blunt is more
measured.
“I’ll have an idea and want to jump
in,” Krasinski said, “and she’ll want to
think about it for three days.”
Krasinski explained the dynamic
another way, describing his wife’s
thought process when reacting to one
of his ideas: “The way Emily would
put it is, ‘Do you want me to just tell
you that your idea is awesome? Or do
you want me to feel that it’s awesome?’ ”
Blunt said she was occasionally
hard on Krasinski while he was cowriting the film (with Bryan Woods
and Scott Beck).
“He’d go upstairs to work for, like,
eight-hour stretches, and then he’d
come down looking like he’d been hit
by a truck,” Blunt told the publication.
“I remember being too hard on a scene
that he’d been struggling with. But he
processed what I was saying and
found a solution.”
“A Quiet Place,” which stars Krasinski and Blunt as parents who must live
in near-silence with their two children
to avoid a creature that hunts its prey
by sound, hits theaters April 6.
(Kevin Slane, Boston.com)
MORE CELEBRITY NEWS
Griffin: ‘Do I go too far? . . . That’s my job.’
MICHAEL LOCCISANO/GETTY IMAGES
Emily Blunt and John Krasinski at a “Final Portrait” screening at the
Guggenheim Museum last month in New York City.
BSO section member is tapped as next principal cellist
The French cellist Blaise Déjardin,
currently a member of the Boston
Symphony Orchestra’s cello section,
has been named its next principal cellist. Déjardin, 34, becomes the 14th
cellist to hold this principal position in
the orchestra’s history. He succeeds
cello legend Jules Eskin, who held the
position for 52 years until his death in
2016.
“It’s a huge honor, to get the job period, and to succeed Jules Eskin,” Déjardin told the Globe by phone on
Monday. “For me, the most overwhelming thing about winning the job
was not just that the committee chose
me as a musician, but that they know
me personally, and that I was respected enough by my peers. That personal
aspect meant a lot to me.”
According to the BSO, Déjardin
was chosen from an initial pool of
around 200 applicants. Among the audition committee were BSO cello section players who were not themselves
auditioning for the position, other
BSO principals from across the orchestra, and music director Andris Nel­
sons.
Blue
MARCO BORGGREVE
Blaise Déjardin succeeds the late
Jules Eskin as principal cellist.
A native of Strasbourg, Déjardin
joined the BSO in 2008. Prior to that,
he was a member of the European
Union Youth Orchestra and the
Gustav Mahler Jugendorchester as
well as a founding member of the Boston-based conductorless chamber or-
chestra A Far Cry. In 2010, along with
three other BSO section players, he cofounded the Boston Cello Quartet.
Déjardin’s start date as principal
has not yet been announced, but according to an orchestra spokesperson,
it will likely be this summer at Tanglewood. This type of position includes a
one-year probationary period. The appointment also means that Déjardin
will join the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.
“It will soon be 10 years that I’ve
played in the orchestra,” Déjardin said.
“I’ve looked up to all of the other principals and listened carefully to how
they are playing. Each principal brings
such a wonderful personality and
sound and quality — that’s always
been inspiring to me as a section player, even without knowing I’d ever get
this job. It pushed me to keep improving and to just enjoy the music.”
Jeremy Eichler of the Globe staff
contributed. Read local celebrity news
at www.bostonglobe.com/names.
Names can be reached at names@
globe.com or at 617-929-8253.
Kathy Griffin says she hopes to
make her US comeback by laughing
about the disturbing photograph that
got her in hot water with the feds and
almost killed her career. But she also
has this warning amid the jokes: ‘‘If it
happened to me it can happen to you.’’
Griffin is embarking this summer
on a North American tour that kicks
off a year after she was widely condemned for posing for a picture in
which she gripped a bloodied rendering of President Trump’s head. Ten
months on, she is unbowed.
‘‘I’m the same girl I’ve always been
— just a hard-working, obnoxious,
red-haired comedy girl. The whole
time I’ve been consistent in just trying
to make you laugh,’’ she told the Associated Press. ‘‘Am I shocking sometimes? For sure. Do I go too far? I hope
so. That’s my job.’’
She lost income, received death
threats, was denounced by Trump,
landed on an Interpol criminal list,
and was afraid to leave her home. She
said she was under investigation by
the Department of Justice for two
months.
‘‘It shouldn’t happen to an American citizen,’’ she said. Griffin said she
understands if people don’t like the
photo, but it is protected speech. ‘‘If
there’s one amendment I’m familiar
with it’s the First Amendment. I know
it back and forth and it’s how I make
my living.’’
The comedian’s life changed radically last May when the image came
out: ‘‘I really never thought that photo would take off at all. Like I’ve been
doing ‘shocking’ things my whole career.’’ She called the fallout ‘‘faux-outrage.’’
She said there were a few missteps,
including a hastily put-together apology video followed by a ‘‘disastrous’’
press conference with attorney Lisa
Bloom in which she called Trump a
‘‘bully’’ and only worsened the stillspiraling disaster.
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/AP
Kathy Griffin’s comeback tour
includes a stop at the Boch Center
Shubert Theatre June 21.
During those dark days, Griffin
said many colleagues like Anderson
Cooper turned away but one celebrity
reached out — Jim Carrey, someone
she didn’t know that well. He advised
her to find the comedy in her absurd
situation.
‘‘It was really meaningful to me
that he called,’’ she said. ‘‘Jim’s advice
was right on, which is: ‘Lean into this
topic and you'll find the comedy.’ And
luckily I found a lot of comedy while
hibernating.’’
This summer she plans to tour in
Mexico, Canada, and the United
States, including a stop in Boston June
21 at the Boch Center Shubert Theatre. The tour name alone is defiant:
The Laugh Your Head Off World Tour.
‘‘I’m trying to sort of get people to
forgive me and get people to come
back to me or give me a chance,” she
said. “And it’s interesting. It’s really
like I’m starting all over again,’’ she
said. (AP)
Rogen: Daniels long ago hinted at affair
A new character has emerged in
the continuing drama between adult
film actress Stormy Daniels and Presi­
dent Trump.
Seth Rogen, who has appeared in
‘‘The 40-Year-Old Virgin’’ and
‘‘Knocked Up,’’ two films that featured
cameos by Daniels, said in a recent
interview that he has known
about the affair between the
porn star and the future president for more than a decade.
‘‘I've known Stormy Daniels
a long time, and I'll be honest,
she may have mentioned some of
this stuff around 10 years ago,’’ Rogen
told talk show host Ellen DeGeneres in
an episode that aired Monday.
Daniels, who is suing the president,
alleges that the two had a sexual relationship in 2006, a claim the White
House denies. The Judd Apatow comedies in which Daniels appeared were
released in 2005 and 2007. According
to Rogen, no one was shocked to learn
during filming that Daniels had slept
with Trump, then starring in ‘‘The Apprentice.’’
‘‘At the time, when you asked a
porn star who they've been sleeping
with and the answer is Donald Trump,
it was like the least surprising
thing that she could have said,’’
Rogen told DeGeneres.
When Trump began his
presidential campaign, Rogen
didn’t think the fun factoid he
knew about Trump would matter to voters. ‘‘As his campaign rolled
out, it became clear that no one cared
about anything he did, and so it didn’t
really occur to me that it would come
out or that anyone would care about
it,’’ he said.
The comedian said that he hasn’t
seen Daniels in years but that ‘‘she’s
clearly done well with herself.’’
(The Washington Post)
)
‘He was a friend and colleague starting with the first episode of “Columbo” that he wrote and I directed. We
. . . stayed connected for 47 years. I will miss Steve terribly.’ STEVEN SPIELBERG, reacting to the death of TV producer Steven Bochco
NBC’s exhilarating ‘Jesus Christ Superstar Live’ pulses with energy
By Matthew Gilbert
GLOBE STAFF
There were times during Sunday
night’s “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in
Concert” when the crowd of Jesus’s
supporters were like
TELEVISION one single character
REVIEW
on the stage. In hipster-looking styles,
glitter, and tattoos, they moved in
loose synchronicity, an exuberant and,
later in the show, predatory mob. As
the choreography brought the racially
inclusive group to all corners of the
show’s single set, a spare industriallooking space with visible scaffolding,
they were like a troupe out of a Madonna or Lady Gaga concert, dancing and
singing among the band members and
the stars.
It was one of the many well-done,
energetic things about the production,
which once again reminded me of how
well “Jesus Christ Superstar,” from Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, has
aged since the album first appeared in
1970. The dancing crowd, reminiscent
of “Rent,” too, brought out the increasingly relevant theme of crowd mania,
which at one point, saw them taking
cellphone paparazzi pictures of Jesus
getting beaten. The idea of Jesus as a
pop superstar, always present in the
Rice and Webber’s story, was brought
to the fore quite effectively.
That crowd was vibrant, and so was
the audience at the Marcy Armory in
Brooklyn, who cheered and clapped
like a pop audience, not holding back
when the stars — John Legend as Jesus, Sara Bareilles as Mary Magdalene,
and Brandon Victor Dixon as Judas —
first appeared onstage. The NBC Easter special was as much like a concert
— thus the title — as it was a theater
event, and the outcome was exhilarating. The mob, the Marcy audience, the
stars, us — we all had to deal with the
intrusions of far too many commercial
breaks, threatening to bring down all
the get-up-and-go, and yet the pacing
never flagged.
The show is about the last days of
Jesus, but Judas and his complicated
feelings are a key element in the story.
Dixon, who has played Aaron Burr in
“Hamilton,” was a highlight, as his
frustration and torment grew across
the night. Wisely, he kept his affect
down, aware, perhaps, that the cameras require a somewhat less theatrical
performance than a live audience. His
version of “Superstar,” delivered while
dressed in a sparkly outfit, was exactly
the show-stopper it was meant to be.
In his leather vest, Dixon was con-
PATRICK RANDAK/NBC
Sara Bareilles as Mary Magdalene and John Legend as Jesus in “Jesus
Christ Superstar Live in Concert.”
sistently commanding, something
Legend struggled with a bit. Oh, Legend was fine, and at times touching, as
his voice rose sweetly to the high notes
on “Poor Jerusalem.” He made the
glamorous side of Jesus — the superstar side — clear. But he lacked the
stage presence and charisma you expect from a character who has brought
the world to its knees. His voice, too,
was perhaps too fine an instrument for
some of the rock operatic yelling in the
entirely sung-through show. When he
pushed too hard, when Jesus’s rage
erupts, he seemed more like a crooner
than a full-throated singer.
Also disappointing: Alice Cooper,
who was a dull King Herod. He arrived
on stage in a shiny orange suit and
sang “King Herod’s Song” almost dutifully. He brought little of the biting irony and vaudevillian mockery that the
song calls for and that we expected
from the man who sang “I’m Eighteen”
and “Billion Dollar Babies.” The other baddies, notably Ben Daniels as
Pontius Pilate and Norm Lewis and Jin
Ha as the Roman high priests Caiaphas and Annas, were far more compelling, their voices strong and melodic. Bareilles was excellent as Mary
Magdalene, bringing warmth, commitment, and distinction to her songs.
As with Legend, though, I kept wondering if she’d have gone deeper into
the role if the show weren’t a one-off.
But despite the quibbles, which included some spotty sound mixing, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”
was a pleasure throughout. The show
both respected the original score while
adding a present-day spin and a sense
of controlled chaos that kept it all
fresh.
Matthew Gilbert can be reached at
gilbert@globe.com.
Business
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T U E S DAY, A P R I L 3 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / B US I N E S S
Trade
tension
sinks US
stocks
‘Bump’ now looks
like ‘Trump slump’
By Matt Phillips
NEW YORK TIMES
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2005
Ships are unloaded at Massport’s Conley Terminal in South Boston in this 2005 file photo.
US, China plot round
two of trade fight
F
By Evan Horowitz
GLOBE STAFF
ears of a trade war gained strength
Monday — aggravating a stock market
sell-off — as China formally retaliated
against President Trump’s steel and
aluminum tariffs by slapping new duties on more than 100 US exports, including agricultural goods and steel
products.
What happens next is unclear.
As economic attacks go, this one is relatively
small, affecting about $3 billion of the $130 billion in US exports to China. But it’s also carefully
targeted to inflict maximal damage on a selection of niche industries rather than having a diffuse effect on the US economy as a whole.
Ginseng and almond growers, for instance,
may not have that much political clout or economic heft, but they are substantial players in
their regional homes — ginseng in central Wisconsin, almonds in central California. And China’s decision to aim at mid-market players like
these means the concentrated impact could be
severe.
China’s retaliation is
carefully targeted to
inflict maximal damage
on a selection of niche
industries. For example:
ginseng in central
Wisconsin, and almonds
in central California.
Worse, this may just be phase one of China’s
response.
Currently, the Trump administration is pursuing two sets of tariffs against Chinese exports:
one a limited duty on metals, the other a larger
but not-quite-finalized tax on electronics, clothing, and other goods.
China’s latest tariffs are a response to the first
set. Hence the $3 billion price tag, which is
roughly in line with the impact of the steel and
aluminum tariffs on China.
However, if the Trump administration
moves ahead with its grander plans for
tariffs on $50 billion to $60 billion of
other imports, the Chinese may end up
matching those, too, with more damaging restrictions against the soybean industry or aerospace companies like Boeing.
Then again, China could also decide not to
fight back. Retaliatory tariffs are hardly mandatory, especially given that China has expressed its
interest in finding a negotiated solution.
Strategy, not vengeance, is likely to determine
the next move. And that’s hard to predict, be-
Study says analyzing
genomes might not
inflate health costs
QUICK STUDY, Page C4
Sean P. Murphy
THE FINE PRINT
Some drivers miss out on Real ID
as RMV fails to tell the whole story
By Sean P. Murphy
GLOBE STAFF
By Sharon Begley
STAT
STAT, Page C5
STOCK MARKET, Page C4
INSIDE
Brigham and Women’s research
offers a positive note for the field
The first rigorous study of its kind finds that sequencing people’s genomes might not lead to extensive and expensive follow-up care, according to research from
Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.
“That’s been the critical question that has the field [of
medical genetics] very concerned: Will wholeSTAT genome sequencing drive up downstream
costs?” said Kurt Christensen of Brigham and
Women’s, lead author of the study, published in Genetics
in Medicine.
To find out, he and his colleagues recruited 100
healthy adults and 100 patients with cardiomyopathy,
assigning roughly half of each group to undergo wholegenome sequencing and the other half to have a review
of their family medical history.
The researchers followed the volunteers for six
months after they and their physicians received the sequencing or family history results, reasoning that if people were told they had a genetic variant that increased
the chance of having, say, a rare liver ailment, they would
seek further testing right away.
Over that period, the healthy volunteers who had genome sequencing incurred slightly higher medical costs
of $3,670, on average, compared with $2,989 for those
who had just a basic family medical history. The two
groups had fairly similar numbers of outpatient lab tests
(5.5 vs. 4.4) and doctor visits (8.4 vs. 6.9).
Medical costs for the cardiology patients who had
ADOBESTOCK PHOTOS
The Trump Bump is becoming the
Trump Slump.
In the first year of Donald Trump’s
presidency, ebullient investors propelled stock markets to one record
high after another. And Trump was the
bull-in-chief, celebrating the recordbreaking march as validation of his
economic policies.
Those days are done.
Even after a fast start to 2018, stock
markets finished the first quarter
down for the year — the first quarterly
decline since 2015. It suggested that a
period of calm and steadily rising markets had given way to a turbulent new
era with a bearish bent.
The plunge continued Monday,
with the Standard & Poor’s 500 index
sinking 2.2 percent. Investors jettisoned shares of financial, technology,
and many other businesses, spooked at
least in part by a tweet from Trump
aimed at one of the country’s biggest
companies: Amazon. And China imposed $3 billion of tariffs on US farm
goods and other exports, bringing the
world’s two largest economies closer to
a full-on trade conflict.
The Dow Jones industrial average
fell as much as 758 points, although
major indexes regained some of their
losses later in the afternoon. The Dow
lost 458.92 points, or 1.9 percent, to
23,644.19. The S&P 500 index gave up
58.99 points, or 2.2 percent, to
2,581.88.
The Nasdaq composite slumped
193.33 points, or 2.7 percent, to
6,870.12. The Russell 2000 index of
smaller-company stocks fell 36.90
points, or 2.4 percent, to 1,492.53.
Monday’s decline left stocks down
more than 4 percent so far in 2018.
They are now down more than 10 percent from their peak in late January.
That means the market has entered a
so-called correction — a term used to
indicate that the downward trend is
more severe and lasting than simply a
few days of bearish trading.
The stock market is still up more
than 20 percent since Nov. 8, 2016, the
day Trump won the White House — a
roller-coaster ride driven in part by ex-
BOLD TYPES
Elizabeth Hailer bringing
women into C­suites. C2.
RETAIL
Walmart said to be in talks
to acquire PillPack. C2.
REAL ESTATE
Planned Seaport home for
Amazon unveiled. C5.
Lost in the long lines surrounding
the Registry of Motor Vehicles’ chaotic
rollout of its new Real ID program is
this simple fact: Many drivers will end
up paying twice for licenses.
Knowing that Massachusetts was
moving to the more stringent Real ID,
the RMV nonetheless sent notices by
the thousands that urged drivers to renew their expiring regular licenses online for $50.
But why push people, including
those whose licenses weren’t expiring
for months, to get and pay for conventional licenses that will be inferior to
Real ID in the fall of 2020?
That’s what has Maureen O’Brien
baffled — and a bit steamed. She got
the letter about a month ago, though
her license doesn’t expire until the end
of August. O’Brien at first felt a pang
of gratitude toward the RMV. The letter seemed clearly premised on sparing her the misery of waiting in long
lines at an RMV branch office caused
by the launch of Real ID last week.
Here’s the key portion of the letter:
“Please note that our renewal requirements are changing March 26, 2018.
Because of the change, there may be
long wait times in RMV Service Centers. Skip the line, go online!”
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
Paulette
RenaultCaragianes got
a new regular
driver’s license
not knowing a
Real ID would
cost more later.
“You can do it now,” the letter said
of online renewal. “And it takes only a
few minutes!”
O’Brien told me she likes a “clean
desk.” She promptly renewed online.
Days later, O’Brien heard about
Real ID in the news media. As a regular traveler, it’s something she wants
— and will need after October 2020 to
board a plane on a domestic flight
without a passport or to enter a federTHE FINE PRINT, Page C4
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Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Bold Types
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2015
Somerville-based PillPack prepackages consumers’ medicines for their scheduled use.
Walmart reported in talks with PillPack
Deal could bolster
pharmacy offerings
By Robert Langreth
and Matthew Boyle
BLOOMBERG NEWS
NEW YORK — Walmart Inc. is in
early talks about a deal for closely held
PillPack, an online startup that could
help grow the retail giant’s pharmacy
offerings, according to people familiar
with the situation.
Somerville-based PillPack and Walmart declined to comment. CNBC first
reported the talks Monday, and said
LEGAL NOTICES
City of Newton
Legal Notice
Tuesday, April 10, 2018
Public hearings will be held
on Tuesday, April 10, 2018
at 7:00 PM, second floor,
Newton City Hall before the
Land Use Committee of the
Newton City Council for the
purpose of hearing the following petitions at which
time all parties interested
in the items shall be heard.
Notice will be published
Tuesday, March 27, 2018
and Tuesday, April 3, 2018
in The Boston Globe and
Wednesday, April 4, 2018 in
the Newton Tab, with a copy
posted on the city’s website
at www.newtonma.gov and
in a conspicuous place at
Newton City Hall.
#176-18 Petition to exceed
FAR at 133 Park Street
ALLEN LEMOS petition for
SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN
APPROVAL to enclose existing first and second floor
porches and construct a twostory side addition, exceeding the maximum allowable
FAR of .37 where .48 is proposed and .34 exists at 133
Park Street, Ward 1, Newton,
on land known as Section 72
Block 50 Lot 23, containing
approximately 10,615 sq. ft.
of land in a district zoned SINGLE RESIDENCE 2. Ref: 7.3.3,
7.4, 3.1.9 of the City of Newton Rev Zoning Ord, 2015.
#177-18 Petition to extend
non-conforming use at 36
Cummings Road
ANNAMARIA MARIANI/BILL
FABRIZIO petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL to construct a twostory addition to the rear and
side of the house, extending
the existing non-conforming
structure at 36 Cummings
Road, Ward 2, Newton Centre, on land known as Section
64 Block 03 Lot 47, containing approximately 18,866 sq.
ft. of land in a district zoned
SINGLE RESIDENCE 2. Ref:
7.3.3, 7.4, 7.8.2.C.2 of the
City of Newton Rev Zoning
Ord, 2015.
#178-18 Petition to amend
Board Order #257-13(4) at
145 Wells Ave
ANDRIAN
SHAPIRO/WELLS
AVENUE BUSINESSS CENTER,
LLC. petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL to
extend the hours of operation and increase the number
of customers at one time,
requiring an amendment to
Special Permit Board Order
#257-13(4) at 145 Wells Avenue, Ward 8, Newton Centre,
on land known as Section 84
Block 34 Lot 2G, containing
approximately 86,256 sq. ft.
of land in a district zoned
LIMITED
MANUFACTURING.
Ref: 7.3.3, 7.4 of the City
of Newton Rev Zoning Ord,
2015.
#179-18 Petition to exceed
FAR and extend nonconforming side setback at 110
Parker Ave
SETH DeAVILA AND TALYA
SALANT petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL to construct a second story addition and attic
space, further increasing the
nonconforming setback and
creating an FAR of .50 where
.48 is allowed and .38 exists
at 110 Parker Avenue, Ward
6, Newton Highlands, on land
known as Section 81 Block 26
Lot 03, containing approximately 6,160 sq. ft. of land
in a district zoned SINGLE
RESIDENCE 3. Ref: 7.3.3, 7.4,
3.1.3, 7.8.2.C.2, 3.1.9 of the
City of Newton Rev Zoning
Ord, 2015.
#180-18 Petition to amend
Board Orders 43-10 and 30712(2) at 199 Boylston Street
TIM FOX/SIMON MALLS petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/
SITE PLAN APPROVAL to allow non-accessory parking
to lease 496 parking stalls
to off-site, third party users,
requiring amendments to
Special Permit Board Orders
#43-10 and #307-12, a waiver
for 496 parking stalls and
approval to allow non-accessory parking at 199 Boylston
Street, Ward 7, Chestnut Hill,
on land known as Section 65
Block 08 Lot 100, containing
approximately 324,691 sq.
ft. of land in a district zoned
BUSINESS USE 1. Ref: 7.3.3,
7.4, 4.4.1, 5.1.4, 5.1.1 of the
City of Newton Rev Zoning
Ord, 2015.
#181-18 Petition to further
increase nonconforming FAR
at 64 Green Park
PHILIP KRAPCHEV AND KIMBERLY CLARK petition for
SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN
APPROVAL to replace a twostory enclosed porch with a
two-story addition, further
increasing the nonconforming FAR to .53 where .51 exists and .36 is allowed at 64
Green Park, Ward 7, Newton,
on land known as Section
73 Block 08 Lot 17, containing approximately 12,100 sq.
ft. of land in a district zoned
SINGLE RESIDENCE 2. Ref:
7.3.3, 7.4, 3.1.9,,7.8.2.C.2 of
the City of Newton Rev Zoning Ord, 2015.
***
You may call the City Council
Office at 617-796-1210 for
information.
the price being discussed was less than
$1 billion. It’s not clear if the talks will
lead to a deal.
Closely held PillPack has raised
$118 million in venture funding, the
company says on its website. It presorts pills into date- and time-stamped
packets for patients who take multiple
drugs — common for older people
dealing with several chronic conditions. It has also developed pharmacy
software that helps coordinate refills,
makes sure the shipments are on time,
and provides online help for patients.
Seniors are a key demographic for
Walmart, which runs about 4,700 US
pharmacies and has been eyeing how
to expand its health care business for
years.
Walmart also has a deal with insurer Humana Inc. to offer cobranded
Medicare drug plans. Last week,
Bloomberg News and others reported
that Walmart was discussing a closer
partnership or merger with Humana.
The two companies haven’t commented on the reports, and Bloomberg
reported that they are mainly considering a deeper partnership to provide
care to consumers at or near their
homes, as opposed to an outright
merger.
FDA won’t review Alkermes
depression drug; stock slides
By Adam Feuerstein
STAT
The regulatory plans for Alkermes
and its controversial drug for treatmentresistant depression have been upended
by the Food and Drug Administration.
On Monday, the FDA said it would
not review the Alkermes drug, called
ALKS-5461, because of “insufficient evidence of overall effectiveness,” the company said in a statement. The FDA told
Alkermes that additional “well-controlled clinical trials” would need to be
conducted for the drug to be resubmitted.
Alkermes shares were battered in response, falling 22 percent to close at
$45.23.
The FDA’s so-called refuse-to-file letter on ALKS-5461 is a blow to Alkermes,
which was counting on the approval of
the drug to boost revenue growth.
It’s also a black mark on the credibility of CEO Richard Pops, who had been
telling investors for months that the
ALKS-5461 clinical data were strong
enough to secure approval.
In its statement Monday, Alkermes
said it disagreed with the FDA’s decision
and an appeal is planned.
The clinical data package filed by Alkermes with the FDA consisted of three
phase 3 clinical trials of ALKS-5461 in
treatment-resistant depression. Two of
the three studies failed to hit their primary endpoints. Alkermes argued the
“totality” of the depression data showed
ALKS-5461 to be effective.
Investors were watching closely not
only because of the drug’s importance to
Alkermes’ growth story but also as a referendum on the FDA’s willingness to approve drugs based on data from failed
clinical trials. While the FDA has shown
some flexibility in approval standards
lately, Alkermes pushed too far.
Shares of Intra-Cellular Therapies fell
9 percent to $19.10 Monday because the
company is also seeking FDA approval
for a schizophrenia drug based on two
clinical trials, one of which failed to
achieve its primary endpoint. The Alkermes setback increases the risk that Intra-Cellular will also be turned away after its drug, lumateperone, is submitted
mid-year.
New state law offers patients
more medical data privacy
By Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
GLOBE STAFF
Governor Charlie Baker has signed legislation to give Massachusetts consumers
more privacy over their medical information.
The law requires health insurers to
send forms containing information about
medical treatments to the patient who received the care — not to the policyholder.
These forms, commonly known as an “explanation of benefits” or a “summary of
payments,” contain lists of medical services provided and the amount of money
charged, paid, and owed for each service.
The law will allow adult children and
spouses, for example, to receive these
statements directly, so they can keep confidential information about their medical
care. This is especially important for sensitive issues such as treatment of mental illness, domestic violence, and sexually
transmitted diseases, advocates of the law
said.
“In this day and age, where so little privacy seems to be left anywhere about anything . . . we should do everything we can
to make sure the patient’s privacy is properly protected,” Baker, flanked by lawmakers and advocates, said at a ceremonial bill
signing Monday afternoon. (The governor
signed the actual bill privately on Friday).
The legislation was supported by
health care providers, insurers, and other
health care groups, as well as the Bostonbased consumer advocacy group Health
Care For All.
The Massachusetts Association of
JOSE LUIS MAGANA/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2018
Governor Charlie Baker said the law
helps ensure that patient privacy is
properly protected.
Health Plans, a trade group for health insurers, did not initially come out in favor
of the measure, which was first proposed
several years ago. But insurers now support it.
“When we see that there are issues that
emerge, and we can try to help correct
them, we want to step in and do that, as
long as it makes sense,” said Lora Pellegrini, president of the insurers association.
“This one just makes common sense.”
Priyanka Dayal McCluskey can be
reached at
priyanka.mccluskey@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @priyanka_dayal.
CHRIS MORRIS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Poll may help institute’s chief
get more women in the C­suites
Efforts to bring more women into the C-suite have been slow to gain traction in Massachusetts. Elizabeth Hailer is hoping to step up the pace a bit.
To some extent, that’s part of her job description: Hailer (above) became
executive director of the Commonwealth Institute, a nonprofit that provides
career assistance for women, a little over a year ago.
But she’s taking that role to a new level by launching what she calls the
state’s first statewide corporate leadership development survey for women’s
careers. So far, about 100 companies have responded, and she expects many
more to be returned before the window closes later this month.
The research firm Chadwick Martin Bailey is conducting the confidential,
20-minute poll. Hailer has help from key sponsors that include American
Tower, DentaQuest, Liberty Mutual, the law firm Bowditch & Dewey, and
former Boston Fed chief Cathy Minehan.
The poll asks various questions aimed at figuring out what companies are
doing to develop, retain, and promote women.
“The most important thing is to take a snapshot of where we are, what
needs to be done going forward, and how we can best move the pipeline of
women leaders,” Hailer says.
Hailer has also been expanding her group’s membership — the total is approaching 500 individuals and businesses, up 25 percent from a year ago —
and this research project should help toward that end. When the institute
was started two decades ago, it was essentially a networking group for female
CEOs. The mission has since broadened to encompass a variety of executives
and entrepreneurs, including the next generation of women leaders.
“A lot of people still think it’s [only] for women CEOs, they can’t get in, or
it’s too exclusive,” Hailer says.
“That’s how it started. But the membership we offer today is very different
than what we offered 20 years ago. — JON CHESTO
One of Akamai’s original
big names is retiring
It’s hard to know what the boardroom turnover means for Akamai
Technologies Inc. One thing is for
certain: Change is coming to the
Cambridge company.
Most notably, George Conrades,
79, is retiring from the board as of its
annual shareholder meeting June 1.
But he has already lost his chairman
title. Frederic Salerno, the board’s
lead independent director, was elevated to the post last week.
Few individuals are more associated with Akamai than Conrades,
who has been a board member almost since the beginning, in the late
1990s. He was CEO from 1999
through 2005 and later became executive chairman. (Cofounder Tom
Leighton, the current CEO, has been
there since the beginning.) By the
time Conrades arrived at Akamai,
he’d already had a successful career
in the networking world, with top
posts at BBN and then at GTE, after it
acquired BBN.
“While I am retiring from a formal capacity, Akamai will always remain a part of me,” Conrades says.
The announcement Conrades will
retire made no mention of activist
investor Elliott Management’s stake
in the company, or of reports that
Akamai hired an investment bank to
weigh a possible sale of the company.
Akamai and Elliott recently agreed
to install two new directors. One of
them, Tom Killalea, is a former Ama­
zon executive.
Asked whether Conrades’ retirement was related to the company’s
strategic review, a company spokesman offered this in an e-mail: “For
the past 20 years, George has made
extraordinary contributions to Akamai and has been integral to the
company’s success. He’s up for a
three-year renewal term, and he decided now, given where he is in his
life and his career, that it was the
time to retire. It was completely his
choice.” — JON CHESTO
Among lobbyists, ML
is still leader of the pack
In Boston’s highly competitive
lobbying industry, ML Strategies
continues to finish ahead of the
crowd.
The government relations arm of
law firm Mintz Levin received the
most revenue from state lobbying of
any firm in the city last year, according to statistics from Secretary of
State William Galvin’s office. ML
scored nearly $3.9 million in lobbying fees, down slightly from $4.1 million in 2016. That was still enough to
keep ML ahead of its closest rivals —
O’Neill and Associates and Rasky
Partners — for another year.
Chief executive Steve Tocco takes
pride in overseeing a bipartisan
team, with operators like former Republican governor Bill Weld working
alongside former Democratic state
senator Steve Baddour.
ML’s client list continues to include companies from a wide range
of sectors, such as real estate (Div­
coWest), energy (NextEra), and nonprofits (New England Aquarium).
Casino operator Wynn Resorts remained ML’s top client. The company is likely to keep Tocco and his
team busy in 2018, as Wynn works
toward completing its $2.4 billion
Everett project amid increased scrutiny from the Massachusetts Gam­
ing Commission because of sexual
harassment claims against its founder, former CEO Steve Wynn.
Perhaps Tocco’s biggest win last
year wasn’t a new client, but a new
hire: Tocco lured former House Ways
and Means chairman Brian Dempsey
away from the State House to be his
number two. His previous top lieutenant, former US senator Mo Cow­
an, left earlier in 2017 to work for
General Electric. (GE used to be a
client, but state records show the
Boston-based company hasn’t enlisted ML for lobbying work in 2018.)
Tocco says his firm makes a point
of expanding beyond legislative
work, to include navigating other
facets of government bureaucracy
and providing strategic advice. ML
helped with permits for the new Om­
ni hotel proposed for the Seaport, for
example.
“Pure lobbying is probably only
half our practice, walking around
Beacon Hill and talking to people,”
Tocco says. “That’s always important
to have, and you need it. But you
don’t have to live and die on the legislative cycle.” — JON CHESTO
Can’t keep a secret? Tell us. E-mail
Bold Types at boldtypes@globe.com.
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
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TALKING POINTS
LENDING
MASS. DIVISION
OF BANKS FINES
LENDINGCLUB
$2 MILLION
GASOLINE
PRICES AT THE PUMP
ON THE RISE
Agenda
The Massachusetts Division of Banks fined LendingClub, a San Francisco-based lender and
loan servicer, $2 million for unlicensed activity involving more than 46,000 loans in Massachusetts, and for violating a 2011 consent decree related to smaller loans. LendingClub had
agreed in 2011 to surrender its license for making loans under $6,000. But state regulators
said the company and a subsidiary, Springstone Financial, have subsequently resumed
making small loans in the state for a fee without the proper license. The state says LendingClub also conducted third-party loan servicing in Massachusetts without a license. The
company was ordered to stop unlicensed activity and to reimburse its Massachusetts customers any charges above those allowed by state rules. “These actions demonstrate that our
agencies will take the necessary measures when needed to protect consumers from unfair
practices,” said Consumer Affairs Undersecretary John Chapman, in a statement. LendingClub said the settlement is “another step in putting the legacy issues behind us and moving
forward to concentrate on building the business.” — MARGEAUX SIPPELL
Gasoline prices in Massachusetts are on
the rise. AAA Northeast said the average
retail price of a gallon of regular unleaded gas in the state is $2.54. The state’s average gas price is 12 cents below the national average of $2.66. A year ago today,
gas prices in Massachusetts were 35
cents lower at only $2.19 per gallon.
Mary Maguire, AAA’s director of public
and legislative affairs, said the season
change brings about higher gas prices.
Maguire said 39 percent of US stations
are selling gas for $2.50 or less, and that
percentage will ‘‘dwindle’’ in the coming
weeks. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tuesday, April 3
➔ WORKSHOP
Intro to content
strategy
Learn the approaches to digital
storytelling across channels and how to
make advertising interactive instead of
intrusive in a class by Lydia Leavitt Cox,
vice president and director of creative
WORKPLACE
PARALEGAL INJURED
WHILE PLAYING ON
SOFTBALL TEAM
NOT ENTITLED
TO WORKER’S COMP
CLOTHING
JEANS MAY BE
MAKING A
COMEBACK
PAPER
CANADA’S BIGGEST
PRINTER PIVOTS FROM
SELLING NEWSPRINT
A Delaware judge says a paralegal injured while playing on his law firm’s softball team is
not entitled to worker’s compensation. The judge ruled late last week that Delaware’s Industrial Accident Board erred in concluding that William Weller ruptured his Achilles tendon during the course and scope of his work for Morris James, a Wilmington-based law
firm. Weller argued that Morris James employees were pressured into playing on the softball team. The judge said participation was voluntary and there was no evidence that playing softball was a job requirement. The judge also said the board erred in concluding that
Morris James received a substantial, direct benefit from its softball team in the way of increased productivity. The firm said softball games were intended to boost employee health,
morale, and camaraderie. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
strategy at Arnold Worldwide. Tuesday,
6:30 to 9:30 p.m., General Assembly
Boston, 125 Summer St., 13th floor,
Boston. $75. Register online or go to the
business agenda at bostonglobe.com.
Wednesday, April 4
From Ralph Lauren to Calvin Klein, America’s biggest fashion labels are
pinning their hopes on a blue jean revival. In recent years, jeans have struggled to beat back more comfortable styles such as leggings and yoga wear.
Last year, imports of elastic knit pants surpassed those of jeans for the first
time ever, according to the US Census Bureau. Yet while Levi Strauss & Co.
has struggled for years to stave off pressure from stretchy pants, there are
signs of a rebound. The jeans maker posted an 8 percent increase in revenue
in 2017, thanks to a significant revamp of its women’s jeans. That was its
strongest annual growth since 2011. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
Transcontinental Inc., Canada’s biggest printer, agreed to buy Coveris Americas for $1.32
billion to bolster its packaging unit as the company pivots away from its business supplying
the shrinking newspaper industry. After the acquisition, packaging, bags, and labels will
make up the largest segment at Montreal-based Transcontinental, which has seen declines
in its newsprint sales. Coveris, with 2017 revenue of $966 million and about 3,100 employees, has more than 3,500 customers and operations in the Americas, United Kingdom, and
Asia. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
➔ TALK
Product management
and society
Visit ProductTank Boston, where speakers
MANUFACTURING
FACTORIES SLOW
AMID TARIFF
CONCERNS
US manufacturers expanded at a slower pace in March, with many factories saying they’re
having a tough time getting supplies in order to meet demand from customers. The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing managers, reported Monday that
its manufacturing index slipped to 59.3 last month from February’s reading of 60.8, which
had been the highest since 2004. Multiple companies said that the introduction of steel
and aluminum tariffs by President Trump was causing concerns about rising prices. Some
companies bought up the metals ahead of their implementation, driving up costs.
— ASSOCIATED PRESS
with experience in product management
will discuss products and their potential
societal impacts. There will be a talk
followed by a question-and-answer
session and networking, with food and
drink provided. Wednesday, 6:30 to 8:30
p.m., Pivotal, 255 Main St., sixth floor,
Cambridge. Free. Register online or go to
the business agenda at bostonglobe.com.
HEALTH DEVICES
FITBIT DECLINES
AFTER
RECOMMENDATION
TO SELL STOCK
SOCIAL MEDIA
ZUCKERBERG HITS
BACK AT APPLE CEO
Fitbit Inc.’s troubles aren’t letting up. Shares of the
wearable health-device company fell 9.5 percent to
$4.62 after Morgan Stanley recommended investors
sell the stock, saying Fitbit’s plans to focus more on
software instead of devices are uncertain and will take
time to bear fruit. Fitbit, which helped pioneer the fitness-tracking industry, has been squeezed between
Apple Inc.’s high-end watch and cheaper options by
companies like Xiaomi Corp. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
Facebook Inc. chief executive Mark Zuckerberg (pictured) hit back against Tim Cook, calling the Apple Inc. CEO’s criticism of the social-media giant “extremely glib.” Cook was asked
about Facebook’s privacy crisis last month and called for stronger regulation of user data. A
day after, Cook said he “wouldn’t be in this situation” if he were in Zuckerberg’s shoes, in an
interview with Recode and MSNBC. While Facebook makes money selling targeted advertisements based on user data, Apple’s profit comes from hardware products like the iPhone,
iPad, and Mac. Zuckerberg responded in an interview with Vox, published Monday: “I find
that argument — that if you’re not paying, that somehow we can’t care about you — to be
extremely glib and not at all aligned with the truth. There are a lot of people who can’t afford to pay” for a service and that having an “advertising-supported model is the only rational model that can support building this service to reach people. If you want to build a service which is not just serving rich people, then you need to have something that people can
afford.” Meanwhile, Missouri’s Republican attorney general is launching a wide-ranging
probe into Facebook Inc.’s use of personal data. In a civil investigative demand dated Monday, Missouri’s Josh Hawley is asking Facebook to disclose every time it has shared user information with a political campaign or action committee, how much those campaigns paid
Facebook for such data, and whether users were notified. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
➔ NETWORKING
Careers in Edtech
marketing
Attend a networking and speaking event
featuring prominent companies in
educational technology. Attendees will
learn about marketing programs, discover
career opportunities, and meet and
mingle with professionals in the industry.
Wednesday, 6 to 8 p.m., LearnLaunch,
RESTAURANTS
CHILI’S OFFERS FREE
CHIPS AND SALSA
TO REWARDS
MEMBERS
Americans love freebies, especially in the form of chips and salsa. At least that’s the bet that
Chili’s Grill & Bar is making with an overhaul to its rewards program, which now offers
members free chips and salsa or a nonalcoholic drink with every visit. Early returns are
positive, the Brinker International Inc.-owned chain said, with in-restaurant customer signups tripling since the changes were introduced last month. Chili’s could use a boost: Comparable sales dropped 1.6 percent domestically in its most recent quarter.
— BLOOMBERG NEWS
281 Summer St., second floor, Boston.
Free. Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
Events of note? E­mail us at
agenda@globe.com
C4
Business
T h e
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Trump market bump is now a slump
uSTOCK MARKET
Continued from Page C1
pectations about what a Trump
presidency could bring to Washington.
At first, the prospect of Republicans controlling the White House
and both houses of Congress thrilled
investors. They anticipated a wave
of regulatory rollbacks and the
slashing of corporate and personal
tax rates. Many of those dreams
have been realized, culminating in
Trump signing a huge tax cut into
law in December. When the S&P 500
notched its high-water mark of
2872.87 on Jan. 26, it represented a
roughly 325 percent increase since
March 2009.
But since February, a toxic stew
of factors — many but certainly not
all of them emanating from Washington — has polluted what had
been the market’s placidly rising waters. And there’s little prospect of the
messes dissipating anytime soon.
First there was the risk that the
economy might be growing too fast,
which could prompt central banks
to hike interest rates sooner than expected. Then there was the risk of a
trade war ignited by the White
House imposing tariffs on certain
products, an action that quickly
prompted countries like China to
erect trade barriers of their own.
Next came the threat of a government crackdown on technology
companies, after revelations of their
misuse of customer data.
Monday ’s dose of unnerving
news was a presidential tweet aimed
at Amazon, which Trump accused of
hurting the United States Postal Service. Trump’s feud with the company
has been going on sporadically since
before he became president, but the
onslaught has accelerated lately. On
Monday, Trump tweeted that the
Post Office loses money by working
with Amazon “and this will be
changed.”
In the face of these factors, the
optimism of just two months ago
has all but evaporated.
The market’s decline over the
past two months has been broadbased. Six of the 11 sectors included
in the S&P 500 index are down more
than 10 percent from the market
high in late January.
On any given day, a particular
sector might be clobbered. One day
it could be industrial companies
such as Boeing or Caterpillar, which
export lots of products and therefore
could be harmed in a trade war. Another day could bring declines to
technology companies like Facebook
and Twitter, whose profits are vul-
nerable to tougher government regulation of social media networks.
The next day it could be energy and
financial companies, whose fortunes would be diminished if the
economy slows.
On Monday, just 13 stocks in the
S&P 500 rose.
T h e m e a t p r o d u c e r Ty s o n
dropped more than 6 percent, after
China imposed duties on pork and
fruit from the United States in response to the tariffs that the Trump
administration has imposed on
products imported from China. China is one of Tyson’s most important
export markets. Lean hog futures —
which reflect the anticipated prices
of pig carcasses — were down 3.9
percent.
After Trump’s complaint about
Amazon, it, too, was a big loser, falling 5.2 percent. Other giant tech
firms were sucked into the downdraft. Microsoft dropped 3 percent.
Facebook tumbled 2.8 percent,
bringing its year-to-date decline to
14.4 percent. And Intel dove 6 percent after a Bloomberg News report
that Apple was planning to use its
own chips in its computers instead
of Intel processors.
Six of the
11 sectors
included
in the
S&P 500
index are
down
more than
10 percent
from the
market
high in
late
January.
Material from the Associated Press
was used in this report.
US, China
plot second
round of
trade fight
uQUICK STUDY
Continued from Page C1
Markets
JUSTIN LANE/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/SHUTTERSTOCK
A trader worked on the floor of the New York Stock
Exchange with a screen in the background showing
the Dow Jones industrial average as the closing bell
drew near.
DOW JONES industrial average
cause it depends not only on China’s
assessment of what they’re likely to
gain — and lose — from additional
tariffs, but also their best guess
about how Trump himself will play
this tariff-escalating game.
Which leaves several possibilities.
China could back down. If its
leaders judge the risks of a trade war
too great, or the actions of Trump
dangerously unpredictable, they
may limit their response to US tariffs, preferring to resolve the issue
through direct negotiation or by
mounting a challenge at the World
Trade Organization.
Alternatively, China could continue matching US moves in hopes
of finding a stalemate situation
where tariffs between China and the
United States drift higher but without triggering a rising spiral. Then,
they might hope to maintain this
new equilibrium until a new US administration takes office or they otherwise feel their negotiating position has strengthened.
But what worries the world, and
has rattled investors, is the last possibility: an escalating trade war,
where both countries continue to introduce tariffs in the belief that they
can outlast any short-term econom-
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2006
ic damage and tilt the bilateral trade
relationship in their favor.
Monday’s market decline is being
driven by tech stocks like Amazon
and Tesla, but companies dependent
on global trade, including Caterpillar and Boeing, also fell.
If a full-on trade war does erupt,
there may be no winner. Proliferating trade restrictions would hurt
companies on both sides of the Pacific, forcing many to scramble for
new customers, new suppliers, and
new sources of labor.
Trump’s leverage has improved
in recent weeks, with the departure
of his free-trade-supporting adviser
Gary Cohn. Now, his economic team
is more unified, which should lead
to better-coordinated approaches,
and more credibility. But he’ll be
hampered by a lack of public support, not to mention substantial
skepticism from members of his
own party.
Meanwhile, Chinese President Xi
Jinping has the freedom that comes
with being permanent head of an
authoritarian government, though
even he knows that continued Communist Party control depends on the
ability to maintain strong economic
growth. In that sense, an exchange
of tariffs may be as bad for political
stability as for Chinese businesses
and consumers.
Both countries, in other words,
have good reason to avoid a trade
war, and lots of ways to back down.
But given that China has now introduced a set of matching tariffs, it
seems a first escape hatch has now
closed while the path to quick resolution has slightly narrowed.
The
Mediterranean
Shipping Co.
vessel Rafaela
is unloaded at
Massport’s
Conley
Terminal in
South Boston
in this 2006
photo.
Evan Horowitz digs through data to
find information that illuminates
the policy issues facing
Massachusetts and the United
States. He can be reached at
evan.horowitz@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @GlobeHorowitz
Lacking real story, drivers miss out on Real ID
uTHE FINE PRINT
Continued from Page C1
NASDAQ Composite index
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
al building. Why didn’t the RMV level with her about Real ID in its letter? Obviously, the RMV knew it was
coming. It made a veiled reference
to it — the “change” in requirements
on March 26.
Had she known, O’Brien would
have waited. Now she will have to
pay an extra $25 to upgrade her regular license.
Real ID is a much more potent
version of a standard driver’s license
(and state ID, for those who don’t
drive). Congress mandated it in
2005 as a homeland security measure. Drivers not concerned with
boarding planes or going to federal
buildings can still opt for a standard
license.
Most states have already gone
through the transition that’s now
happening in Massachusetts. The
overwhelming majority of people in
those states chose Real ID over a
standard one, even though there’s
more hassle involved in obtaining it,
such as presenting more documentation and doing it in person. rather
than online.
Simply put, it’s a far superior
form of identification.
What was left unsaid in that letter to O’Brien and some 285,000
other drivers was that anyone who
followed the RMV’s advice and renewed a license now would miss the
chance to get a Real ID several
weeks later.
O’Brien paid $50 for a license
good for five years, but basically obsolete in October 2020, so she gets
only 2½ years out of it — a $25 value.
“I am flabbergasted by the RMV’s
nondisclosure,” O’Brien wrote in an
e-mail to me. “I am angry the RMV
sent out this letter without telling its
customers what the facts were.”
She called it “a disservice.”
I agree, but the more questions I
asked the fewer answers I got.
The RMV falls under the purview
of Secretary of Transportation
Stephanie Pollack, but she declined
to be interviewed, and an RMV
spokeswoman approached my list of
written questions as if it were a
menu from which the agency could
pick and choose whether to answer.
So let me give you my best analysis. I figure RMV managers understood how much of a strain introducing Real ID would put on the
agency’s branch offices. This is an
election year, and Governor Charlie
Baker has gotten a lot of mileage
(rightly or not) out of a reputation
for being an able manager of basic
services.
One way to hedge against howls
of protest at branch offices would be
to maximize the number of people
who stay home and renew online.
Hence, the letter — or half a letter,
I’d call it.
I wrote to the RMV that I felt its
letter was “devious and deceptive,”
sent to “trick” drivers into forgoing a
full-fledged Real ID for the sake of
shorter lines.
The RMV did not reply directly to
that, but a spokeswoman wrote that
state transportation officials wanted
to “encourage behavior that would
benefit the customer.”
If so, mixed results, at best, I’d
say.
Like O’Brien, Paulette RenaultCaragianes feels cheated by the
RMV. She also renewed last month,
not knowing that the Registry was
about to unveil Real ID. Everyone
makes mistakes, she said, and the
RMV ought to own up to this one.
“I’m beside myself that they can’t
acknowledge, ‘Yep, we left something out that should have been in
that letter,’ ” she told me. “The RMV
solicited and encouraged online renewal. You asked me to come to
your party, RMV. I didn’t find the renew option on my own. You’re responsible.”
Before contacting me, RenaultCaragianes had written to the RMV
in an unsuccessful attempt to get a
waiver of the $25 upgrade fee.
(That’s the simple fix the RMV needs
to do for everyone misled by the letter.) When she pressed her case in a
second note, the RMV replied:
“Thank you for your feedback.”
You may read that as: “Go away.”
I do.
Sean P. Murphy can be reached at
smurphy@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @spmurphyboston.
‘I am
flabber­
gasted by
the RMV’s
nondis­
closure. I
am angry
the RMV
sent out
this
[renewal]
letter
without
telling its
customers
what the
facts
were.’
MAUREEN
O’BRIEN, who
recently renewed
her license
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
C5
First look offered
at planned Seaport
home for Amazon
In study,
optimism
on cost of
genetics
By Tim Logan
uSTAT
GLOBE STAFF
Continued from Page C1
whole-genome sequencing averaged
$8,109 for the six months that the
researchers followed them, less than
the $9,670 for those who had a family medical history.
That counterintuitive finding
was probably the result of a couple
of the heart patients in the family
medical history group being hospitalized for reasons unrelated to their
participation in the study, Christensen said. Excluding hospitalizations,
costs for the sequencing group averaged $5,392, compared to $4,692
for the family history group. Their
number of doctor visits (7.8 vs. 7.2)
was comparable, though those who
were sequenced averaged 9.5 outpatient lab tests, compared to 6.9 for
the family history group.
The spending difference isn’t
nothing, of course, and multiplied
by hundreds of millions of people (if
genome sequencing becomes as routine as, say, cholesterol tests) it
would add up to billions of dollars.
But sequencing is a one-time cost,
not a recurring one. In the study the
sequencing, including interpreting
the results, cost about $5,000, and
that has been falling quickly.
Overall, said medical geneticist
and coauthor Dr. Robert Green of
Brigham and Women’s, “downstream medical costs of sequencing
may be far more modest than the
common narrative suggests.” Green
leads the MedSeq project, which
studies how genome sequencing can
be integrated into clinical practice.
The modest downstream costs
cannot be explained by the sequencing not finding any red flags: 18 percent of the healthy patients had a genetic variant that was known to
cause disease or likely to do so. Of
the cardiology patients, half had a
variant associated with heart disease, and 16 percent had one or
more associated with another disorder.
The physicians in the study
Business
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
“seem to be responding responsibly”
to the sequencing results, Christensen said, not ordering countless follow-up tests or frequent screening
out of fear that they’ll miss signs of
the disease the patient is at risk for.
Whether every physician would
react that way is unclear, however.
Surveys show that doctors are not
well-versed in genetics or statistics.
That has spurred concern they’ll assume the worst of genetic variants
that experts classify as possibly (but
far from definitely) pathogenic or of
unknown significance, and order
endless, costly screening and other
tests out of an abundance of caution
or in the practice of defensive medicine.
“If someone has whole-genome
sequencing and it finds low-penetrant mutations,” those that might
or might not cause disease, “all the
problems of endless testing can occur,” said molecular geneticist Madhuri Hegde, chief scientific officer of
global lab testing at PerkinElmer
Inc. and an expert on genetic testing, who was not involved in the
study. It’s particularly critical, she
said, not to order tests, or panic,
when a patient has what’s called a
variant of unknown significance,
meaning studies are ambiguous
about whether it causes disease.
“That’s why genetic counseling is
so important,” Hegde said. “Physi-
cians need to stick to giving medical
advice and have genetic counselors
interpret genetic results.”
That’s easier said than done,
however, since the United States has
a shortage of genetic counselors. In
the study, the physicians all had access to a genome resource center, as
well as knowledgeable academic colleagues, to help them interpret sequencing results.
Only a study that enrolls more
patients and follows them longer
and that uses community physicians
rather than academic ones, who
don’t have special access to genome
expertise, can tell whether the encouraging results are likely to be
true in general. Christensen and his
colleagues plan to follow more patients for at least five years.
It’s even possible that widespread
genome sequencing could save money for the health care system.
“If you can identify individuals
who are asymptomatic but have an
actionable mutation,” such as one
causing breast or colorectal cancer,
Hegde said, “you can do prophylactic surgery or increased screening,
and probably save a lot of dollars” if
the person never develops cancer.
Sharon Begley can be reached at
sharon.begley@statnews.com.
Follow her on Twitter @sxbegle.
Follow Stat on Twitter: @statnews.
A big fear with
sequencing
individual
patients’
genomes has
been that
finding genetic
variants that
may or may not
cause health
problems will
lead to drastic
increases in
health care
costs.
Amazon is planning to lease
a whole new building in the
Seaport District to house 2,000
new employees. Monday we got
our first pictures of what that
building could look like.
WS Development released
images of the building it would
construct for Amazon on a pedestrian promenade. Designed
by architecture firm Gensler, it
would have 15 floors of office
space above a two-story retail
“paseo” that would be open to
the public.
The proposal is scheduled to
be reviewed Tuesday by the
Boston Civic Design Commission. It has already received its
major permits from the Boston
Planning and Development
Agency.
Amazon hasn’ t signed a
lease yet, which may be why
there’s no trademark orange arrow on the facade. But the company is in advanced negotiations with WS and last month
was approved for $5 million in
city property tax breaks to
bring 2,000 jobs to the site.
Amazon is scheduled to move
in in 2021, and as part of the
deal, the company has an option to lease a second building
across the street should it need
more room to grow.
Tim Logan can be reached at
tim.logan@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter at
@bytimlogan.
GENSLER
The Amazon building would have 15 floors of office space
above two stories of retail space.
C6
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
GE plans to sell trio
of health businesses
By Richard Clough
BLOOMBERG NEWS
SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES
Industry analysts are speculating on whether production of the Tesla Model 3 will meet its projections.
Musk joke fails amid Tesla cash burn
Stock price falls as
Model 3 struggles
By Craig Trudell
BLOOMBERG NEWS
Tesla Inc. investors aren’t
laughing after Elon Musk’s
April Fools’ Day joke about
bankruptcy, with the automaker’s cash reserves at risk amid
the monthslong struggle to
build the critical Model 3 sedan.
After the steepest monthly
drop in more than seven years,
Tesla shares fell as much as 8.1
percent on Monday, before closing down more than 5 percent
at $252.48. Unsecured bonds
the company issued in August
traded near record intraday
lows. Analysts widely expect
the company to soon report
that Model 3 production trailed
its projection of 2,500 units
during the last week of March.
T h e Mo d e l 3 w o e s a r e a
greater risk to Tesla than the fatal crash involving a Model X
driver using Autopilot, a related
US regulator’s investigation,
and a separate Model S recall,
all of which have weighed on investor sentiment since last
week.
Analysts at Jefferies Group
LLC and Moody’s Investors Service estimate that Tesla may
need to raise $2 billion to $3 billion in capital. That’s in large
part because the slow build of
Model 3 has limited returns on
investments the company made
to build its first mass-market
car.
“What seemed to be a shortterm issue has now been going
on for more than three quar-
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
CEO Elon Musk’s April Fools’ Day tweet about bankruptcy
was not well received by investors.
ters,” Philippe Houchois, an analyst at Jefferies, said Monday
o n B l o om b e rg Te l e v i s i o n .
“Management will need to address a proper funding plan”
and “reassure investors that
they’ve got the funds to even
potentially announce some further delay in the ability to ramp
the production.”
Musk told employees in an
e-mail early Monday morning
that the electric-car maker may
exceed a weekly production
rate of 2,000 Model 3 sedans,
according to the blog Jalopnik.
“If things go as planned today, we will comfortably exceed
that number over a seven day
period!” Musk wrote in the email sent at 3:01 a.m. Monday
California time, Jalopnik said.
A Tesla spokesman didn’t immediately respond to requests
for comment on the report.
Some analysts were speculating Tesla’s stock may rally if
p r o d u c t i o n e x c e e d s Wa l l
Street’s lowered expectations.
Tesla’s 5.3 percent bonds
due 2025 were trading at 86.9
cents on the dollar at 2:38 p.m.
in New York on Monday, Trace
bond price data show.
Shareholders voted in favor
of a pay package valued at $2.6
billion for Musk last month.
The 46-year-old billionaire has
seen his fortune tumble since
then, with Tesla shares plunging 22 percent in March, their
worst month since December
2010.
That didn’t stop Musk from
posting some playful April
Fools’ Day tweets.
“Despite intense efforts to
raise money, including a lastditch mass sale of Easter eggs,
we are sad to report that Tesla
has gone completely and totally
bankrupt,” the chief executive
wrote Sunday. Another post included a photo of Musk and a
message that he “was found
passed out against a Tesla Model 3, surrounded by ‘Teslaquilla’
bottles, the tracks of dried tears
still visible on his cheeks.”
On Monday, Musk tweeted
that he wouldn’t have joked
about Tesla going bankrupt if
he thought there was any
chance it would happen.
He also responded to a National Transportation Safety
Board spokesman who commented over the weekend that
the agency was unhappy that
Tesla shared information about
the death of a Model X driver.
The agency is looking into all
aspects of the March 23 crash,
including reports that the driver had previously raised concerns about Tesla’s driver-assistance system Autopilot. The
NTSB requires companies that
are parties to its investigations
to limit information released
during its probes.
“Lot of respect for NTSB, but
NHTSA regulates cars, not
NTSB, which is an advisory
body,” Musk tweeted, referring
to the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration. “Tesla
releases critical crash data affecting public safety immediately and always will. To do otherwise would be unsafe.”
The tongue-in-cheek bankruptcy posts by Musk were likely frustrating to Tesla’s investor
relations team, James Albertine, an analyst at Consumer
Edge Research who recommends buying the shares, wrote
in a report Monday.
He c a l l e d t h e m “ p o o r l y
timed,” though he added that
“there is likely nothing to see
here.”
NEW YORK — John Flannery’s reshaping of General
Electric Co. is underway.
After taking the helm last
year, the chief executive promised to shed businesses — from
lighting to locomotives — in a
bid to simplify the beleaguered
manufacturer. Complexity, he
said, was at the root of many of
Boston-based GE’s problems.
He started following
through on Monday, when one
of the company’s largest divis i o n s , G E He a l t h c a r e , a n nounced a deal to sell a trio of
information-technology businesses to the private equity
firm Veritas Capital. The $1.05
billion cash transaction is expected to close in the third
quarter.
The sale marks one of the
first significant portfolio moves
since Flannery trumpeted a
plan to exit at least $20 billion
worth of businesses.
The revamp, along with cost
cuts and culture change, is a
pillar of Flannery’s bid to pull
GE out of one of the deepest
slumps in its 126-year history.
The company’s stock has languished at the bottom of the
Dow Jones industrial average
for more than a year as GE
grapples with cash-flow challenges and weak demand for
industrial equipment.
While investors have
pressed for dramatic changes,
the midday announcement
failed to lift GE’s stock. It fell
2.7 percent to close at $13.12
amid a broad market decline.
Veritas, which recently invested in Truven Health Analytics and Verscend Technologies, plans to buy GE Healthcare’s assets in ambulatory care
management, enterprise financial management, and workforce management. The investment firm said it would work
with GE executives to form a
stand-alone business with the
units.
The new company should
benefit from an “urgent need to
digitalize our health-care system,” Veritas CEO Ramzi Musallam said in the statement.
The GE assets are focused
primarily on hospital workflow
and administrative IT functions. With the sale, GE Healthcare plans to sharpen its focus
on software-related clinical
care.
Health care has long drawn
scrutiny from GE investors.
The division, the company’s
third-largest, with 2017 sales of
$19 billion, is a solid cash generator and boasts high-growth
markets such as life sciences.
But some shareholders and ana l y s t s h av e a r g u e d t h a t i t
doesn’t fit as well with GE’s primary business of making industrial equipment, such as jet
engines and gas turbines.
Supreme Court rules for
car dealerships in pay case
By Jessica Gresko
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court ruled Monday
that car dealerships’ service advisers, like car salesmen and
mechanics, are exempt under
federal law from overtime pay
requirements.
The court ruled 5-4 that service advisers, who greet customers and propose various repair services, are salespeople.
The case affects the more than
18,000 dealerships nationwide.
Together, they employ more
than 100,000 service advisers.
The case before the court involved a Mercedes-Benz dealership in Encino, Calif., and several current and former service
advisers. Each side had a different interpretation of the Fair
Labor Standards Act, which
says that ‘‘any salesman . . . primarily engaged in selling or
servicing automobiles’’ doesn’t
have to be paid overtime.
The dealership argued that
the definition of salesman
clearly includes service advisers, who have a range of job responsibilities from helping to
diagnose mechanical problems
to preparing price estimates for
repairs. Service advisers had argued that they weren’t covered
by the definition.
Justice Clarence Thomas
wrote in a majority opinion
that the ‘‘ordinary meaning of
‘salesman’ is someone who sells
goods or services’’ and that service advisers ‘‘do precisely
that.’’
In a dissent, Justice Ruth
Bader Ginsburg wrote that because service advisers ‘‘neither
sell nor repair automobiles’’
they should not be exempt
from overtime payments.
The issue came to the high
court after the Department of
Labor changed its interpretation of the Fair Labor Standards Act in 2011. For the three
decades up to then, the department operated under the view
that service advisers didn’t
have to be paid overtime.
Trump lauds Sinclair in tiff over ‘fake news’
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
JOIN THE
SPRING
HOUSE HUNT
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President Trump lavished
praise Monday on the Sinclair
Broadcast Group, the owner of
nearly 200 television stations
that recently directed news anchors to read a message decrying “biased and false” reports.
“So funny to watch Fake
News Networks, among the
most dishonest groups of people I have ever dealt with, criticize Sinclair Broadcasting for
being biased,” Trump tweeted
Monday. “Sinclair is far superior to CNN and even more Fake
NBC, which is a total joke.”
The tweet followed a widelyviewed video montage of television anchors from around the
country reading from a script
decrying “biased and false” reports, in a message with striking parallels to Trump’s “fake
news” mantra.
Sinclair employs Boris Ephshteyn, a former Trump aide, as
its chief political analyst. The
broadcaster is seeking federal
approval to buy Tribune Media
Co. in a $3.9 billion deal.
One of Trump’s favorite targets, CNN, posted a story Monday quoting an unnamed Sinclair employee who said the onair advisory “sickens me.”
Among the anchors who
read the message were Alison
Bologna and Frank Coletta of
WJAR-TV in Providence. The
video mashup, done by the
ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE/2004
The Sinclair Broadcast Group has directed the news anchors for its nearly 200 stations to
read a message decrying “biased and false” reports.
website Deadspin and posted
over the weekend, included
brief clips of Coletta reading excerpts. WJAR, a major player in
the Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachusetts markets,
declined to comment Monday
morning.
A transcript of the on-air advisory posted to Deadspin read
in part, “The sharing of biased
and false news has become all
too common on social media.
. . . More alarming, some media
outlets publish these same fake
stories . . . stories that just aren’t true, without checking
facts first.”
The script went on to accuse
unnamed reporters of using
“their platforms to push their
own personal bias and agenda”
to control what people think.
On Monday morning, Brian
Stelter of CNN posted an article
quoting an investigative reporter at Sinclair who said, “It sickens me the way this company is
encroaching upon trusted news
brands in rural markets.” The
reporter spoke on the condition
of anonymity.
Stelter also obtained a
memo from Sinclair news executive Scott Livingston directing
television anchors to read the
message.
A Sinclair executive didn’t
immediately return a call seeking comment Monday.
Travis Andersen can be reached
at travis.andersen@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@TAGlobe.
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Baseball: Red Sox-Marlins, 6:10 p.m., NESN
NHL: Bruins-Lightning, 7:30 p.m., NESN Plus, NBCSN
NBA: Celtics-Bucks, 8 p.m., NBCSB
Listings, D6
Sports
D
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T U E S DAY, A P R I L 3 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
Johnson, Red Sox spot on
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
Red Sox 7 MIAMI — Drew Pomeranz and Eduardo RodriMarlins 3 guez should be ready to
rejoin the Red Sox rotation sometime
in the next two weeks. Their stints on
the disabled list will not be long.
Steven Wright is a little further behind in his recovery but is on track to
be sprung from Fort Myers a few
weeks later.
That makes every game Brian Johnson starts an important one for more
than the obvious reasons.
Johnson’s hold on a rotation spot
into late April is tenuous. But he’s also
pitching to show the Red Sox he can be
trusted when the inevitable need for a
starter arises later in the season.
So consider Monday night’s game
against the Miami Marlins to be something manager Alex Cora will file away
for future consideration.
Johnson went six innings and allowed one run as the Red Sox continued their good start to the season with
a 7-3 victory.
It has come against the Rays and
Marlins, two teams far more interested in saving money than winning
games at the moment, but the Sox are
4-1 with another game against the
Marlins on Tuesday before heading
back to Boston and Thursday’s home
opener in America’s Most Beloved Igloo.
“I can’t say I’m surprised because
this is what we should be doing,”
Mookie Betts said. “The pitching has
been great and we’re feeding off that.”
On a night when he wanted to rest
a few of his primary relievers, Cora
needed 18 outs from Johnson. He got
exactly that. The lefthander allowed
six hits, walked two, and struck out
five.
“He was excellent. We needed this
one. We needed him to go deep in the
game,” Cora said. “He did an outstanding job.”
In Hector Velazquez (who won Sunday) and Johnson, the Red Sox have
two starters they feel they can count
on when the manager wants to give extra rest to Chris Sale, David Price, or
RED SOX, Page D2
LYNNE SLADKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Catcher Christian Vazquez’s two-run double to left in the fourth inning
gave the Red Sox a 3-1 lead over the Marlins at Miami on Monday night.
The
Masters
AUGUSTA NATIONAL
Tara Sullivan
Augusta
by way of
Brockton
STAN GROSSFELD/GLOBE STAFF
Elinor Purrier, who recently won the mile at the NCAA indoor track championships, passes a covered bridge in her hometown of Montgomery, Vt.
Dairy­tale
ending
With a farm­grown work ethic,
Purrier won an NCAA track title
By Stan Grossfeld
GLOBE STAFF
MONTGOMERY, Vt. — After Elinor
Purrier won the mile in the 2018
NCAA Division 1 Indoor Track and
Field Championships, the University
of New Hampshire senior celebrated
with chocolate milk instead of champagne.
“I drink it after every workout and
every race,” she said. “It’s the perfect
ratio of carbs and protein. It’s perfect
for recovery. Plus it tastes good.”
If this sounds like an unpaid “Got
Milk” endorsement, in some ways it is.
Dairy is in the 23-year-old nutrition
major’s blood. In 1904, her greatgrandfather bought a dairy farm 10
miles south of the Canadian border
and her family has been operating it
ever since.
PURRIER, Page D6
STAN GROSSFELD/GLOBE STAFF
Elinor Purrier keeps busy at her family’s dairy farm in Vermont.
“[Farming has] taught me life isn’t a piece of cake,” she said.
Sans Carlo, Krug
needs partner
AUGUSTA, Ga.
— Augusta National didn’t
faze him, not as
he stared down
a packed gallery and put a
long, arcing
drive through
the Georgia sunshine, not as he later
dunked an approach shot a few feet
from the pin while practice partner
Rory McIlroy dropped more than
one ball in the water.
“That first tee alone, there’s people everywhere, I couldn’t pull the
trigger, no way I could hit a ball off
the tee,” Matt Parziale’s dad Vic is
saying later, quietly thankful that as
the caddie, all he had to do was hand
his son the proper club. “He hit it
straight.”
The media crush hasn’t fazed him
either, not as he calmly answered
question after question Monday afternoon at the Masters, not as he sat
for so many television cameras these
past few weeks that his professional
colleagues starting calling him “Hollywood,” not as he smilingly admitted, “It’s been long at times, but I
never stopped enjoying it.”
Because Matt Parziale gets it. He
really does. He may not be fazed by
the fuss, but sure does understand it.
If he weren’t living this amazing
story, if he weren’t the star of the
most improbable Masters story in
years, if he were spending yet another year watching the year’s first major from the comfort of his living
room couch (or perhaps from a firehouse chair) he would most certainly
be all in on a tale like this. But since
this story is his, it falls to the rest of
us to really revel in the unlikely magic of it all, to watch this 30-year-old
amateur golfer and full-time Brockton firefighter win the US Mid-AmaMASTERS, Page D5
MEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIP
INSIDE
Fluto Shinzawa
DiVincenzo leads
Villanova to title
Hanley
heats up
ON HOCKEY
By Eddie Pells
PHILADELPHIA — The Bruins have four games remaining before the playoffs. They are hoping no more
anvils plunge onto their heads.
The Bruins have endured a cartoonish season of
wretched luck. Brandon Carlo and Riley Nash are the latest poor fellows to have bank vaults whistle out of the sky
and land on their feet.
As of Sunday, the ringing in Nash’s right ear — the
center required 40-plus stitches after taking a Torey Krug
shot to the head on Saturday — had waned to the degree
that the Bruins considered him a possibility to rejoin the
team in Florida, either in Tampa or Sunrise. No such
brightness is in Carlo’s short-term future. Carlo’s left leg
has been compromised to the point that faces promptly
droop when the hard-luck defenseman’s name is mentioned.
Villanova 79 SAN ANTONIO — They chanted his
name from the cheap seats: ‘‘Di-Vin-cenMichigan 62 zo, Di-Vin-cen-zo.’’ By the time Donte Di-
On baseball, D3
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ON HOCKEY, Page D5
DAVID J. PHILLIP/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Villanova won its second national championship in
three seasons with a rout of Michigan on Monday.
Red Sox’
Ramirez is feeling good after
another big
night in Miami.
Vincenzo was done doing his damage, Villanova had another title and college basketball had its newest star.
The redhead kid with the nickname Big Ragu scored 31
points Monday to lift the top-seeded Wildcats to another
blowout tournament victory — this time 79-62 over Michigan for its second title in three seasons. Both came within
the confines of the Lone Star State after Villanova won it
all two years ago in Houston, some 200 miles away.
DiVincenzo, a 6-foot-5-inch sophomore guard from
Wilmington, Del., had 18 first-half points to help the Wildcats (36-4) pull ahead at halftime, 37-28, then scored nine
straight for Villanova midway through the second to put
the game away — capped by a 3-pointer he punctuated
VILLANOVA, Page D2
Pondering
Patriots
Why it’s foolish
to consider
trading Gronk,
and other
thoughts.
On football, D4
Rozier
could sit
Celtics guard
questionable for
Tuesday’s game
with sprained
ankle. D5
D2
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Johnson spot on as
Sox win 4th straight
uRED SOX
Continued from Page D1
Rick Porcello.
“It’s important because we
know that we have to take care
o f t h e s e g u y s ,” C o r a s a i d .
“When you have deep starting
pitching, it will help us. We can
pick our spots . . . Right now, we
feel better.”
Johnson finished off what
was an excellent first turn
through the rotation for the
Red Sox. The starters have
pitched 30 innings and allowed
three runs on 22 hits with 7
walks and 28 strikeouts.
“It was huge. You see one
guy go out there and do well
and you want to repeat that,”
Johnson said. “I think that’s
how it works.”
After scoring 10 runs in the
four games at Tampa Bay, the
offense broke loose. The Sox
had 12 hits, five for extra bases.
Outside of Johnson, every player in the lineup either scored a
run or drove one in. And that
was with J.D. Martinez getting
a day off.
“Just stay with the process,”
Cora said. “We’re not preaching
launch angle or hit the ball in
the air. We’re preaching swing
at strikes. When we do that,
we’re going to be better.”
Trevor Richards was recalled from the minors to make
the start for the Marlins. The
24-year-old righthander was
making his major league debut.
For three innings, Richards
lived the dream. He was working on a two-hit shutout and
had struck out four. But the second time through the order
changed that.
With two outs in the fourth
inning, Xander Bogaerts
reached on a dribbler that
hugged the third base line and
stayed fair. Eduardo Nunez
then lined a double to left field
and Bogaerts scored.
Jackie Bradley Jr. drew a
walk to keep the inning alive
and two runs scored when
Christian Vazquez also doubled
to left field. Bradley, running
hard with two outs, scored
without a throw to the plate.
W i t h Jo h n s o n o n d e c k ,
Vazquez knew the Marlins
would pitch him carefully. They
should have just walked him intentionally. Richards left a slider in the lower third of the
strike zone and Vazquez didn’t
wait to see if he would get another one.
The lead grew to 5-1 in the
fifth inning.
Andrew Benintendi grounded a ball to the right side and
cursed as he left the batter’s
box. Richards had a play, but
went to cover first base instead.
First baseman Justin Bour was
left trying to flip the ball behind
his back and that didn’t work.
“I’ll take it,” said Benintendi,
who had been 0 for 13.
Hanley Ramirez then
jumped on a high slider and
sent it soaring to left field for
his first home run. The ball
landed in the Marlins bullpen.
It was Ramirez’s first home
run at Marlins Park since July
16, 2012, when he was with Miami. They traded him to the Los
Angeles Dodgers a week later.
Red Sox 7, Marlins 3
At Marlins Park, Miami
BOSTON
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Betts rf
5 1 2 1 0 0 .316
Benintendi lf
4 1 1 0 1 1 .067
Ramirez 1b
5 2 2 2 0 0 .294
Devers 3b
5 0 2 1 0 2 .294
Bogaerts ss
5 1 2 0 0 1 .455
Núñez 2b
4 1 1 1 0 0 .250
Bradley Jr. cf
2 1 0 0 2 1 .083
Vázquez c
4 0 2 2 0 0 .308
Johnson p
2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
a­Swihart ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Hembree p
0 0 0 0 0 0
—
b­Moreland ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Walden p
0 0 0 0 0 0
—
Totals
38 7 12 7 3 6
MIAMI
Brinson cf
Dietrich lf
Turner p
c­Wallach ph
Castro 2b
Anderson 3b
Bour 1b
Maybin rf
Rojas ss
Holaday c
Tazawa p
O’Grady p
d­Rivera ph­lf
Richards p
Telis c
Totals
AB
5
3
0
1
5
3
4
4
4
2
0
0
2
1
2
36
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 2 0 0 0 .280
0 0 0 1 2 .273
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0 .143
1 3 1 0 1 .364
1 1 1 1 0 .333
0 1 0 0 1 .167
0 2 1 0 0 .294
0 0 0 0 1 .263
0 0 0 0 0 .167
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 1 .125
0 0 0 0 1 .000
1 1 0 1 0 .333
3 10 3 3 7
Boston............................... 000 320 101 — 7 12 0
Miami.................................010 000 011 — 3 10 0
a­flied out for Johnson in 7th, b­grounded out
for Hembree in 8th, c­grounded out for Turner in
9th, d­struck out for O’Grady in 7th. LOB—Boston
7, Miami 10. 2B—Devers (2), Núñez (2), Vázquez
(1), Castro (1). HR—Betts (1), off O’Grady, Ramir­
ez (1), off Richards, Anderson (1), off Johnson.
SB—Ramirez (2). CS—Devers (1). Runners left in
scoring position—Boston 4 (Benintendi, Bogaerts,
Johnson, Moreland), Miami 6 (Anderson 3, Rojas,
Holaday, Rivera). RISP—Boston 2 for 7, Miami 2
for 14. Runners moved up—Vázquez, Castro.
GIDP—Holaday. DP—Boston 1 (Núñez, Bogaerts,
Ramirez); Miami 1 (Telis, Castro).
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Johnson W 1­0
6 6 1 1 2 5 82 1.50
Hembree
1 1 0 0 0 1 17 0.00
Walden
2 3 2 2 1 1 38 5.40
Miami
Richards L 0­1
Tazawa
O’Grady
Turner
IP
4‚
1„
1
2
H
8
0
1
3
R ER BB SO NP ERA
5 5 1 5 93 10.38
0 0 0 1 16 0.00
1 1 1 0 19 2.70
1 1 1 0 31 3.86
Inherited runners­scored—Tazawa 1­0. HBP—
by Walden (Anderson). WP—Walden. Umpires—
Home, Jerry Meals; First, Ben May; Second, Ron
Kulpa; Third, Ed Hickox. T—3:09. A—11,113
(37,442).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
SECOND INNING
MARLINS — Anderson homered to right on a
2­0 count. Bour grounded out, shortstop Bogaerts
to first baseman Ramirez. Maybin grounded out,
shortstop Bogaerts to first baseman Ramirez. Ro­
jas struck out.
FOURTH INNING
RED SOX — Ramirez popped out to second
baseman Castro. Devers struck out. Bogaerts hit
an infield single to third. Núñez doubled to left,
Bogaerts scored. Bradley Jr. walked. Vázquez
doubled to left, Núñez scored, Bradley Jr. scored.
Johnson grounded out, third baseman Anderson
to first baseman Bour.
FIFTH INNING
RED SOX — Betts flied out to center fielder
Brinson. Benintendi hit an infield single to first.
Ramirez homered to left on a 1­1 count, Beninten­
di scored. Devers singled to right. Tazawa pitch­
ing. Telis in as catcher. Bogaerts struck out. De­
vers was caught stealing, catcher Telis to second
baseman Castro, Devers out.
SEVENTH INNING
RED SOX — O’Grady pitching. Swihart pinch­
hitting for Johnson. Swihart flied out to center
fielder Brinson. Betts homered to left on a 1­2
count. Benintendi walked on a full count. Ramirez
flied out to left fielder Dietrich. Devers lined out
to right fielder Maybin.
EIGHTH INNING
MARLINS — Walden pitching. Castro doubled
to center. Anderson was hit by a pitch. Bour
struck out. Maybin singled to center, Castro
scored, Anderson to second. Rojas grounded into
fielder’s choice, pitcher Walden to shortstop Bo­
gaerts, Anderson to third, Maybin out. Rivera
grounded out, second baseman Núñez to first
baseman Ramirez.
NINTH INNING
RED SOX — Betts flied out to right fielder May­
bin. Benintendi grounded out, second baseman
Castro to first baseman Bour. Ramirez singled to
center. Ramirez stole second. Devers doubled to
center, Ramirez scored. Bogaerts flied out to cen­
ter fielder Brinson.
MARLINS — Telis walked on a full count. Brin­
son singled to center, Telis to second. Wallach
pinch­hitting for Turner. On Walden’s wild pitch,
Telis to third, Brinson to second. Wallach ground­
ed out, third baseman Devers to first baseman
Ramirez. Castro grounded out, first baseman
Ramirez unassisted, Telis scored, Brinson to
third. Anderson popped out to shortstop Bo­
gaerts.
Betts homered in the seventh inning, a shot off Chris
O’Grady that also landed in the
Miami bullpen. Ramirez singled, stole second, and scored
on a double by Rafael Devers in
the ninth inning.
“Fun night,” said Ramirez, a
Miami resident who had his
family at the game. His sons,
Hanley Jr. and Hansel, have
been with the team all week.
The game drew a crowd of
only 11,113, many of them Red
S o x f a n s . D av i d O r t i z w a s
among them, sitting with Marlins CEO Derek Jeter and former Yankees catcher Jorge Posada next to the Miami dugout.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
MARK BROWN/GETTY IMAGES
Xander Bogaerts avoids Cameron Maybin to turn an inning-ending double play in the fourth Monday night in Miami.
Cora hung out with ‘Rock’ star
He recalls special
times at UMiami
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
MIAMI — Alex Cora played
in the College World Series
three times for the University
of Miami. LitRED SOX
tle did he
NOTEBOOK know he also
hung out with
one of the most famous people
in the world one night.
Cora once played video
games in a dorm room with
Hurricanes football player
Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.
It was PlayStation, to be exact.
“We didn’t know. We went
to his room and we were playing and all of a sudden 10 years
later he was a superstar,” Cora
said.
Cora has not had any contact with Johnson since.
“I don’t think he knows who
I am, or that I played PlayStation with him, but I can say I
did,” Cora said.
Cora’s connection to the
Hurricanes was originally
through former Miami righthander Alex Fernandez. Joey
Cora played with Fernandez
with the Chicago White Sox
from 1991-94 and asked him to
pass along word that his brother was interested in playing college baseball.
Fernandez contacted his
pitching coach at Miami, Lazer
Collazo, and soon legendary
Hurricanes recruiting coordinator Turtle Thomas went to
see Cora play at a summer tournament in Battle Creek, Mich.
Thomas was impressed and
Cora was offered a scholarship.
Florida State also was interested.
“I’ll say it now, it was either
MARK BROWN/GETTY IMAGES
Red Sox spot starter Brian Johnson yielded one run and six
hits in six innings in his successful season debut.
Miami or FSU, honestly,” Cora
said. “My first official visit, it
was to Miami. That was the only visit, I canceled everybody
else and decided to come here.”
The Hurricanes were a football powerhouse with Warren
Sapp and Ray Lewis on campus
at the time. Johnson, who was
known then as “Dewey,” was a
backup defensive lineman on
those teams.
After his football career
sputtered out, Johnson turned
to wrestling in 1996 and has
since become world famous as
an actor.
Cora still has a close association with Miami. Hurricanes
coach Jim Morris and pitching
coach J.D. Arteaga were expected to stop by Marlins Park during the series.
“Those three years that I
spent here, I had a blast,” Cora
said. “I grew up a lot, not only
as a player but as a person. This
is my second home. I have 25
people coming [to the game].
“There’s something about
this place, it’s pretty special.
I’m a ’Cane for life. I love the
Hurricanes. I love this city. It’s
fun to be here.”
Starters on track
Drew Pomeranz returned to
Fort Myers on Monday and
pitched five innings in a minor
league game. It was his latest
step in returning from a forearm strain.
Eduardo Rodriguez will
make the trip to Fenway South
on Tuesday with the goal of going six innings in a minor
league game. He is on the disabled list recovering from knee
surgery.
Pomeranz’s next start is expected to be with one of the minor league affiliates on a rehab
assignment.
That could be as soon as Saturday. For Rodriguez, it could
be Sunday.
“Most likely,” Cora said.
Cora speculated that those
Donte’s inferno sparks Villanova to title romp
uVILLANOVA
Continued from Page D1
CHRIS STEPPIG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Villanova’s Donte DiVincenzo drives for 2 of his 31 points in the NCAA title game.
with a wink over to T V announcers Jim Nantz and Bill
Raftery on the sideline.
Villanova, which emerged
from Boston as the East Region
champions, won all six games
by double digits over this tournament run, joining Michigan
State (2000), Duke (2001) and
North Carolina (2009) in that
rare air.
One key question: Could this
be one of the best teams of alltime?
Maybe so, considering the
way Jay Wright’s team dismantled everyone in front of it in a
tournament that was dripping
with upsets, underdogs and
parity.
Maybe so, considering the
Wildcats won in seemingly every way imaginable. This victory came two nights after they
set a Final Four record with 18
3-pointers, and one week after
they relied more on defense in a
win over Texas Tech in the Elite
Eight.
That debate’s for later.
DiVincenzo squashed any
questions about this game with
a 10-for-15 shooting night that
was better than that.
He opened his game-sealing
run with an around-the-back
dribble to get to the hoop and
get fouled. On the other end, he
delivered a two-handed rejection of Michigan’s Charles Matthews, when Matthews tried to
bring it into the paint.
The 3-pointer that sealed it
came from a big step behind the
arc; yes, the man was feeling it.
About the only drama as the
night closed was whether DiVincenzo could unwrap himself
from his teammates’ mob hug
to toss the ball underhanded toward the scoreboard. He succeeded there, too.
The Wolverines (33-8), who
earned a berth in the national
championship after knocking
off tournament darling Loyola
Chicago in the national semifinals Saturday, were led by Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman’s
23 points.
games would be with Single A
Salem or Single A Greenville
because of the cold weather in
New England. Triple A Pawtucket is home this weekend
and Double A Portland is at
Binghamton.
Once Pomeranz and Rodriguez show they are capable of
six innings and/or 90 pitches in
game conditions, they would
be ready to come off the disabled list.
Steven Wright has restarted
his throwing program after getting a platelet-rich plasma injection in his surgically repaired left knee last week. He
threw a bullpen session on
Sunday and is expected to pitch
in a game later this week.
Reliever Tyler Thornburg,
who is returning from shoulder
surgery, is scheduled for an inning on Tuesday. Because he
has not pitched since 2016, his
rehab assignment is expected
to take some time once it starts.
Rotation continues
J.D. Martinez was out of the
starting lineup as Cora decided
to use Andrew Benintendi,
Jackie Bradley Jr. and Mookie
Betts in the outfield. Through
five games, only Betts and
shortstop Xander Bogaerts
have started every game . . . Ra­
fael Devers batted cleanup on
Monday. He is the first 21-yearold to hit fourth for the Sox
since future Hall of Famer Jim
Rice in 1974 . . . Principal owner John Henry and chairman
Tom Werner attended the game
and were in the clubhouse beforehand. Henry owned the
Marlins from 1999-2002.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
Villanova 79, Michigan 62
At Alamodome, San Antonio
Min
Livers ..........20
Wagner.......33
Mtthws .......33
Simpson .....34
Adr­Rkmn...34
Baird .............0
Brooks...........3
Davis .............0
Rbnsn..........22
Smmns..........3
Teske ............7
Watson .........1
Poole...........10
Totals..........
MICHIGAN
FG
FT
M­A M­A
0­2
0­0
6­11
3­4
3­9
0­4
4­8
2­3
8­13
5­6
0­0
0­0
0­0
0­0
0­0
0­0
0­3
0­0
0­0
0­0
1­2
0­0
1­2
0­0
1­5
1­1
24­55 11­18
Reb
O­T
1­4
0­7
0­3
1­3
0­1
0­0
1­1
0­0
0­1
0­0
1­3
1­2
0­1
6­27
A F
0 1
1 4
1 5
2 1
0 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 3
0 1
1 1
0 0
1 2
6 20
Pt
0
16
6
10
23
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
3
62
FG%: .436, FT%: .611. 3­pt. goals: 3­23, .130 (Liv­
ers 0­2, Wagner 1­4, Matthews 0­2, Simpson 0­2,
Abdur­Rahkman 2­7, Robinson 0­3, Watson 0­1,
Poole 0­2). Team rebounds: 1. Blocks: 1 (Mat­
thews). Turnovers: 10 (Wagner 4, Matthews 3,
Simpson 3). Steals: 6 (Livers, Matthews 2, Simp­
son, Robinson, Poole). Technicals: 1 (Wagner).
VILLANOVA
FG
FT
Reb
Min M­A M­A
O­T
Paschall......27
2­5
1­2
1­8
Spellman ....29
3­8
2­2 4­11
Bridges .......36 7­12
2­2
2­4
Booth ..........23
1­4
0­0
1­2
Brunson ......28 4­13
0­0
0­2
Cby­Rtree.....4
0­0
0­0
1­1
Delaney ........0
0­0
0­0
0­0
Samuels........0
0­0
0­0
0­0
Gillespie......16
0­0
4­4
0­5
DiVincnzo...37 10­15 6­10
3­5
Totals.......... 27­57 15­20 12­38
A F
0 4
0 3
1 2
0 4
2 4
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
3 1
7 18
Pt
6
8
19
2
9
0
0
0
4
31
79
FG%: .474, FT%: .750. 3­pt. goals: 10­27, .370
(Paschall 1­3, Spellman 0­2, Bridges 3­7, Booth
0­3, Brunson 1­5, DiVincenzo 5­7). Team re­
bounds: 0. Blocks: 3 (Paschall, DiVincenzo 2).
Turnovers: 12 (Paschall 2, Spellman, Bridges 2,
Brunson 2, Cosby­Roundtree, DiVincenzo 4).
Steals: 5 (Bridges, Booth, Brunson 2, Gillespie).
Technicals: 1 (Spellman).
Michigan (33­8)....................... 28
Villanova (36­4)....................... 37
34
42
—
—
62
79
A — 67,831 (0). Officials — Doug Sirmons, Terry
Wymer, Jeffrey Anderson.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
D3
Baseball
AL
TIGERS 6, ROYALS 1
EAST
Boston
New York
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
W
3
2
2
1
1
L
1
2
2
2
3
Pct.
.750
.500
.500
.333
.250
GB
—
1
1
1½
2
Div. Last 10
3­1
3­1
2­2
2­2
2­2
2­2
0­0
1­2
1­3
1­3
Streak
W3
L2
W2
L2
L3
CENTRAL
Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland
Kansas City
Detroit
W
2
2
1
0
0
L
0
1
2
2
3
Pct.
1.000
.667
.333
.000
.000
GB
—
½
1½
2
2½
Div. Last 10
2­0
2­0
0­0
2­1
0­0
1­2
0­2
0­2
0­0
0­3
Streak
W2
W2
L1
L2
L3
WEST
Houston
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland
Texas
W
3
3
2
1
1
L
1
1
1
3
3
Pct.
.750
.750
.667
.250
.250
GB
—
—
½
2
2
Div. Last 10
3­1
3­1
3­1
3­1
0­0
2­1
1­3
1­3
1­3
1­3
Streak
W2
W3
W1
L3
L2
NL
EAST
Washington
Atlanta
New York
Miami
Philadelphia
W
3
2
2
2
1
L
0
1
1
2
2
Pct.
1.000
.667
.667
.500
.333
GB
—
1
1
1½
2
Div. Last 10
0­0
3­0
2­1
2­1
0­0
2­1
0­0
2­2
1­2
1­2
Streak
W3
W1
L1
W1
L1
CENTRAL
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
St. Louis
Cincinnati
W
3
3
2
1
0
L
0
0
2
2
3
Pct.
1.000
1.000
.500
.333
.000
GB
—
—
1½
2
3
Div. Last 10
0­0
3­0
0­0
3­0
0­0
2­2
0­0
1­2
0­0
0­3
Streak
W3
W3
L1
W1
L3
WEST
Arizona
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Colorado
San Diego
W
2
2
2
1
0
L
1
2
2
2
3
Pct.
.667
.500
.500
.333
.000
GB
—
½
½
1
2
Div. Last 10
2­1
2­1
2­2
2­2
2­2
2­2
1­2
1­2
0­0
0­3
Streak
L1
W2
L2
W1
L3
RESULTS
SUNDAY
Boston 2
at Tampa Bay 1
Chi. White Sox (ppd.)
at Kansas City
1st: Pittsburgh 1
at Detroit 0
Houston 8
2d: Pittsburgh 8
at Detroit 6
LA Angels 7
at Texas 2
Minnesota 7
at Baltimore 0
At Seattle 5
At Toronto 7
NY Yankees 4
Washington 6
at Cincinnati 5
At Miami 6
Chi. Cubs 0
San Francisco
at LA Dodgers
St. Louis 5
at NY Mets 1
at Oakland 4
Cleveland 4
SATURDAY
Boston 3
at Tampa Bay 2
Pittsburgh (ppd.)
at Detroit
At NY Mets 6
Washington 13
St. Louis 2
at Cincinnati 7
Houston 9
at Texas 3
LA Angels 8
at Oakland 3
At Toronto 5
NY Yankees 3
Cleveland 6
Minnesota 6
at Baltimore 2
Chi. Cubs 10 (10 inn.)
At Atlanta 15
at Miami 6
Philadelphia 2
Chi. White Sox 4
at Kansas City 3
Colorado 2
at Arizona 1
Milwaukee 7
at San Diego 3
At LA Dodgers 5
San Francisco 0
at Seattle 5
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Odds
.............2018.............
W­L
ERA
Team .............. 2017 vs. opp ..............
rec.
W­L
IP
ERA
BOSTON AT MIAMI, 6:10 p.m.
Sale (L)
Ureña (R)
Off
Off
0­0
0­1
0.00
11.25
0­1
0­1
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
2­1
1­1
12.0
15.2
6.75
6.32
0­0
—
6.00
—
1­0
0­0
1­2
1­1
23.1
13.1
4.24
4.73
—
1­0
—
0.00
0­0
1­0
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
0­0
—
8.10
—
1­0
0­0
2­0
0­1
18.1
2.0
7.36
31.50
—
0­1
—
3.86
0­0
0­1
0­0
2­0
0.0
13.2
0.00
2.63
—
—
—
—
0­0
0­0
2­1
1­1
19.1
9.2
2.33
5.59
—
0­0
—
6.35
0­0
1­0
0­0
3­1
2.0
25.0
13.50
3.24
—
0­0
—
0.00
0­0
1­0
0­1
2­0
5.0
23.2
7.20
3.04
—
1­0
—
0.00
0­0
1­0
0­0
1­0
0.0
7.0
0.00
2.57
Off
Off
0­1
—
1.50
—
0­1
0­0
2­0
1­1
15.1
18.1
0.59
3.93
Off
Off
0­1
0­0
4.76
9.00
0­1
1­0
0­2
3­0
7.1
27.2
11.05
2.28
—
0­0
—
7.20
0­0
0­1
0­0
0­0
5.1
0.0
3.38
0.00
KANSAS CITY AT DETROIT, 1:10 p.m.
Junis (R)
Boyd (L)
Off
Off
TAMPA BAY AT NY YANKEES, 4:05 p.m.
Archer (R)
Montgomery (L)
Off
Off
SEATTLE AT SAN FRANCISCO, 4:35 p.m.
Gonzales (L)
Blach (L)
Off
Off
CHI. CUBS AT CINCINNATI, 6:40 p.m.
Lester (L)
Reed (L)
Off
Off
CHI. WHITE SOX AT TORONTO, 7:07 p.m.
González (R)
Happ (L)
Off
Off
PHILADELPHIA AT NY METS, 7:10 p.m.
Lively (R)
Harvey (R)
Off
Off
WASHINGTON AT ATLANTA, 7:35 p.m.
Cole (R)
Teheran (R)
Off
Off
ST. LOUIS AT MILWAUKEE, 7:40 p.m.
Flaherty (R)
Anderson (R)
Off
Off
BALTIMORE AT HOUSTON, 8:10 p.m.
Wright Jr. (R)
Verlander (R)
Off
Off
LA DODGERS AT ARIZONA, 9:40 p.m.
Kershaw (L)
Godley (R)
TEXAS AT OAKLAND, 10:05 p.m.
Hamels (L)
Graveman (R)
CLEVELAND AT LA ANGELS, 10:07 p.m.
Tomlin (R)
Richards (R)
Off
Off
COLORADO AT SAN DIEGO, 10:10 p.m.
Freeland (L)
Off
—
—
0­0
Ross (R)
Off
—
—
0­0
Team rec. — Record in games started by pitcher this season
0­1
0­0
13.1
0.0
5.40
0.00
MARK BROWN/GETTY IMAGES
Hanley Ramirez, who has eyes on his second 30-30 season, likes the look
of his home run to left-center in the fifth inning Monday night.
Miami brings out
best in Ramirez
Nick Cafardo
ON BASEBALL
MIAMI – Hanley Ramirez befriended a little boy dealing with an affliction
before Monday’s game against the
Marlins and told him, “If I hit a home
run, I’m going to give you my jersey.”
He hit a home run and then after
the game ended, true to his word,
Ramirez took the jersey off his back
and handed it to the boy and signed it.
The boy was overcome with joy.
A memorable night for Ramirez in
his hometown, at his home ballpark,
against the team that employed him
for nearly seven years.
“I gave him a hug and told him I’ll
give him a jersey,” Ramirez said.
“When you see something like that, it’s
tough. It can happen to anybody.”
It was an emotional ending to an
important night for Ramirez, who
homered, singled, stole a base, and
played well defensively in Boston’s 7-3
win over the Marlins.
Ramirez has half-kidded about being a 30-30 guy this year. He was one
for the Marlins in 2008. Ten years later, he has two stolen bases and one
homer through five games.
“That’s 30-30 right there,” yelled
out Christian Vazquez.
Ramirez also wants to add 100 (as
in RBIs) to the totals as well.
Ramirez has to stay healthy and
productive enough to get 497 plate appearances for his 2019 option to vest
at $22 million. Piece of cake, right?
The feeling is if Ramirez hits the
ball like he did Monday night, John
Henry and Tom Werner, who were in
attendance, would have no problem
paying out the $22 million. Even
Ramirez said in spring training, “If I
hit, I play.”
He’s got that right. Ramirez hit a vicious shot to left-center with a man
aboard in the fifth inning.
Whether it was here at Marlins
Park or in the old Joe Robbie Stadium
where he played for many years, it was
always hard to hit homers in Miami.
He would become frustrated that balls
got knocked down or the ballparks
were so big that long fly balls or line
drives would stay in the park or get
caught. The people who are here all
the time say when the roof is open, the
ballpark plays even bigger.
So when you hit a home run here,
you’ve really hit a home run.
“I was very frustrated here for a
long time,” Ramirez said. “Hit a lot of
balls on the money that were caught. I
came back here over the years with the
Dodgers and the same thing, so this
one felt good.”
Ramirez lives in Miami and he
spent his best years as a big leaguer
here. He won the NL Rookie of the
Year in 2006 and won a batting title in
2009 (.342). He hit .300 or better four
times for the Marlins and made three
All-Star teams.
This is where he grew up after the
Red Sox traded him as the major chip
in the Josh Beckett/Mike Lowell deal
before the 2006 season. Ramirez, then
a shortstop, certainly made the Red
Sox sweat their decision to deal him
because back then he was a player who
could steal bases (he stole 51 in both
2006 and 2007), hit for power, and for
average. He became exactly what Ben
Cherington, then the Red Sox farm director, thought he would become.
Batting third Monday night, he had
a couple of frustrating at-bats with a
ground out to shortstop in the first
and a pop to second base in the fourth.
He just got under the pop-up. Just
missed it. But once the fifth came
around, Marlins starter Trevor Richards wasn’t able to fool him again.
Ramirez made a couple of nice
plays at first base, too.
It was a breakthrough night for the
Sox offense. Oh, not that double-digit
type game that featured a big inning,
but at least it was seven runs — which
was three fewer than the previous four
games combined.
Andrew Benintendi ended his
slump at 0 for 13 with a swinging bunt
toward first base. Eduardo Nunez
knocked in a run with a double in the
fourth and Christian Vazquez doubled
in a pair of runs with hard liner down
the third-base line. Mookie Betts homered.
In what seemed like a home game
with a partisan Red Sox crowd chanting “Let’s go Red Sox!” the Sox took advantage of the inexperienced Marlins
pitching and team. Sox lefty Brian
Johnson pitched six very good innings,
allowing one run, while the offense finally gave its starting pitcher some run
support.
The Red Sox even rested J.D. Martinez after a couple of games playing left
field on the hard Tropicana Field turf.
Yet, it was the right thing to do. Manager Alex Cora is going to do that now
and then. Ramirez was given the day
off Sunday in Tampa.
“It’s just exciting right now with the
way we’re playing,” Ramirez said.
Ramirez pointed to the upper deck
where he said he had three suites devoted to family members. He saw David Ortiz and met with him. He was
appreciative of the support Red Sox
fans gave him among the 11,000 and
change that attended the game.
It was a nice night overall for
Ramirez, who has had his two sons in
the Red Sox clubhouse on this road
trip.
He felt he did something good for a
little kid. He felt good about that. He
felt good about himself and the team is
feeling better about Ramirez being a
productive member of the 2018 team.
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @nickcafardo.
Harper powers Nationals
By Charles Odum
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nationals 8 AT L A N TA — B r y c e
Harper hit a three-run
Braves
1 homer and the quick-
ERIC CHRISTIAN SMITH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
GOLD STAR — AL MVP Jose Altuve high-fives
teammates before the world champion Astros
beat the Orioles, 6-1, in Houston’s home opener.
scoring Nationals beat the Atlanta
Braves, 8-1, on Monday night for the
first 4-0 start to a season in their Washington history.
Harper’s second-inning shot off
Sean Newcomb (0-1) to center field
gave the Nationals a 5-0 lead. He also
drew four walks and scored three runs.
For the fourth straight game as the
road team, the Nationals scored in the
first inning to give their starting pitcher a lead before his first pitch.
This time, the beneficiary was Tanner Roark (1-0), who allowed one run
in seven innings. Roark gave up four
hits with one walk and six strikeouts.
Howie Kendrick’s double to right
field drove in Harper, who walked, in
Washington’s two-run first inning.
Newcomb’s troubles continued in
the second.
After Newcomb gave up singles to
Pedro Severino and Anthony Rendon,
Harper walked to the plate as stadium
organist Matthew Kaminski played the
somber ‘‘Imperial March.’’ Braves fans
chimed in with boos.
Harper crushed a first-pitch fastball. The homer landed in the decorative rocks behind the 400-foot marker
on the center-field wall. He has three
homers — including two in Sunday’s
6-5 win at Cincinnati — and seven
RBIs.
Newcomb allowed six runs, five
earned, on five hits and four walks in
4‚ innings.
Braves righthander Anibal Sanchez,
whose contract was purchased from
Triple-A Gwinnett before the game,
pitched three scoreless innings in relief
to strengthen his bid for a spot in the
rotation.
Freddie Freeman’s single drove in
Ender Inciarte, who singled and stole
second, in the fourth.
Nationals pinch-hitter Brian Goodwin had a two-run single off Jose
Ramirez in the ninth.
BLUE JAYS 4, WHITE SOX 2
KANSAS CITY
Jay rf
Merrifield 2b
Moustakas 3b
Duda 1b
Cuthbert 1b
Orlando cf
Soler dh
Gordon lf
Escobar ss
Butera c
Totals
AB
3
4
4
3
1
4
3
3
3
2
30
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 1 .250
1 0 0 0 .167
0 0 0 1 .250
0 0 0 0 .200
1 0 0 0 .500
1 0 0 0 .125
0 0 1 1 .000
0 0 0 1 .182
2 0 0 0 .200
0 1 0 0 .222
5 1 2 4
DETROIT
Martin cf
Candelario 3b
Cabrera 1b
Castellanos rf
Martinez dh
McCann c
Mahtook lf
Goodrum ss
DiMachado 2b
Totals
AB
4
5
3
4
3
4
3
4
4
34
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 2 0 1 1 .231
1 1 0 0 2 .176
1 1 1 1 0 .353
2 2 1 0 0 .412
0 2 3 0 0 .182
0 1 1 0 0 .308
0 0 0 1 1 .133
0 0 0 0 1 .222
1 1 0 0 1 .278
6 10 6 3 6
Kansas City...............001 000 000 — 1 5 1
Detroit........................001 040 10x — 6 10 0
E—Merrifield (1). LOB—Kansas City 5, De­
troit 8. 2B—Escobar (1), Candelario (1), Marti­
nez (1). 3B—Escobar (1), Castellanos (2).
HR—. CS—Jay (1). SF—Butera, Martinez. DP—
Detroit 1.
Kansas City
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Hammel L 0­1
5 7 5 5 3 3 9.00
Keller
1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
Boyer
1 2 1 1 0 0 18.00
Herrera
1 1 0 0 0 3 0.00
Detroit
Liriano W 1­0
Jiménez
Stumpf
Saupold
IP
6„
„
„
1
H
4
0
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 3 1.35
0 0 0 0 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
Inherited runners­scored—Jiménez 1­0.
IBB—off Hammel (Cabrera, Mahtook). WP—
Liriano. NP—Hammel 88, Keller 12, Boyer 27,
Herrera 16, Liriano 94, Jiménez 12, Stumpf 7,
Saupold 19. Umpires—Home, Tom Hallion;
First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Dan Bellino; Third,
Adam Hamari. T—2:46. A—15,476 (41,297).
PIRATES 5, TWINS 4
MINNESOTA
AB
Dozier 2b
5
Mauer 1b
4
Sanó 3b
3
Rosario lf
4
Escobar ss
4
Kepler rf
3
Buxton cf
4
Castro c
3
Lynn p
1
Rogers p
0
Grossman ph
1
Hildenberger p
0
Morrison ph
0
Duke p
0
Reed p
0
Adrianza ph
1
Totals
33
R
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO
1 1 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 1 2
1 0 0 1
2 1 0 2
1 1 1 1
0 0 0 2
0 0 1 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
7 3 3 10
PITTSBURGH
Harrison 2b
GrPolanco rf
Marte cf
Bell 1b
Dickerson lf
Smoker p
Neverauskas p
Freese ph
Feliz p
Kontos p
Cervelli c
Moran 3b
Mercer ss
Rodríguez ss
Taillon p
EdgSantana p
Frazier lf
Totals
R
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
5
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 2 .278
1 1 4 0 .385
0 0 1 1 .250
1 0 1 1 .438
0 0 0 1 .077
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 1 0 .500
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 2 0 .200
1 4 1 0 .167
1 0 0 0 .154
1 0 0 0 .167
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .364
5 5 11 6
AB
4
1
4
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
2
3
2
2
2
0
1
27
Avg.
.316
.333
.176
.188
.385
.308
.200
.091
.000
—
.333
—
.000
—
—
.200
Minnesota..................000 004 000 — 4 7 0
Pittsburgh..................500 000 00x — 5 5 0
LOB—Minnesota 6, Pittsburgh 10. 2B—Sanó
(1), Escobar (2), Kepler (2), GrPolanco (3).
HR—Dozier (3), off Taillon, Moran (1), off
Lynn. S—Frazier. DP—Minnesota 1; Pitts­
burgh 1.
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Lynn L 0­1
4 3 5 5 6 3 11.25
Rogers
1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Hildenberger
1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
Duke
„ 0 0 0 2 2 10.80
Reed
1‚ 1 0 0 3 1 0.00
Pittsburgh
Taillon W 1­0
EdgSantana
Smoker
Neverauskas
Feliz
Kontos S 1
IP
5‚
‚
0
1‚
1
1
H
4
2
1
0
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 0 9 3.38
2 2 0 0 10.80
0 0 0 0 0.00
0 0 1 0 7.71
0 0 2 1 18.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
Smoker pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. In­
herited runners­scored—Reed 2­0, EdgSanta­
na 1­1, Smoker 1­1, Neverauskas 1­0. IBB—off
Reed (GrPolanco). HBP—by Neverauskas
(Morrison). Balk—Feliz. WP—Taillon, EdgSan­
tana. NP—Lynn 95, Rogers 11, Hildenberger 8,
Duke 24, Reed 29, Taillon 92, EdgSantana 13,
Smoker 1, Neverauskas 21, Feliz 21, Kontos
14. Umpires—Home, Chris Conroy; First, Fiel­
din Culbreth; Second, Brian O’Nora; Third,
Chad Whitson. T—3:26. A—30,186 (38,362).
REDS 1, CUBS 0
CHICAGO
Happ cf
Strop p
Bryant 3b
Rizzo 1b
Contreras c
Schwarber lf
Russell ss
Heyward rf­cf
Báez 2b
Chatwood p
Wilson p
Zobrist ph­rf
Totals
AB
3
0
3
3
4
2
4
3
3
2
0
0
27
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO
1 0 1 2
0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
0 0 2 2
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 2
1 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0
2 0 5 11
Avg.
.125
—
.333
.130
.190
.294
.278
.235
.111
.000
—
.364
CINCINNATI
Winker rf
Peralta p
Iglesias p
Pennington ss
Votto 1b
Gennett 2b
Suárez 3b
Duvall lf
Barnhart c
Hamilton cf
Mahle p
Gosselin ph
Hughes p
Ervin rf
Totals
AB
2
0
0
2
4
4
3
4
4
3
1
1
0
0
28
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 2 1 .222
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 2 1 .333
0 0 0 2 .200
1 0 0 0 .471
1 0 1 0 .214
0 1 0 1 .154
3 0 0 1 .364
0 0 1 0 .083
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 1 .333
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .000
5 1 6 7
Chicago......................000 000 000 — 0 2 1
Cincinnati.................. 000 100 00x — 1 5 0
E—Bryant (2). LOB—Chicago 6, Cincinnati
10. 2B—Barnhart (1). 3B—Báez (1), Suárez
(1). HR—. CS—Schwarber (1). S—Mahle. DP—
Chicago 1; Cincinnati 1.
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Chatwood L 0­1 6 4 1 1 6 4 1.50
Wilson
1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
Strop
1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
Cincinnati
Mahle W 1­0
Hughes
Peralta
Iglesias S 1
IP
6
1
„
1‚
H
1
0
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 2 7 0.00
0 0 1 0 3.86
0 0 1 2 0.00
0 0 1 2 3.86
Inherited runners­scored—Iglesias 2­0.
HBP—by Mahle (Rizzo). WP—Chatwood.
NP—Chatwood 92, Wilson 17, Strop 15, Mahle
86, Hughes 17, Peralta 16, Iglesias 22. Um­
pires—Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Paul Nau­
ert; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Carlos Torres.
T—2:33. A—18,963 (42,319).
CARDINALS 8, BREWERS 4
ST. LOUIS
Fowler rf
Pham cf
Carpenter 2b
Lyons p
Muñoz 3b
Ozuna lf
JMartínez 1b
Molina c
DeJong ss
Gyorko 3b
Garcia 3b
Hicks p
Mikolas p
Norris p
Wong 2b
Totals
AB
5
4
4
0
1
5
3
4
4
2
1
0
3
0
1
37
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 1 1 0 1 .056
0 1 0 1 1 .286
1 2 0 0 2 .267
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 1 0 0 0 .333
1 1 0 0 1 .222
0 0 1 0 0 .357
1 1 0 0 1 .313
2 3 3 0 1 .467
2 2 1 0 0 .500
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0
—
1 1 2 0 1 .333
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0 .000
8 13 8 1 8
MILWAUKEE
Cain cf
Yelich rf
Braun lf
Shaw 3b
Thames 1b
Piña c
Villar 2b
Arcia ss
Davies p
Woodruff p
Sogard ph
Drake p
Aguilar ph
Totals
AB
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
2
0
1
0
1
35
R
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 0 0 .500
0 0 0 2 .389
0 0 0 1 .083
2 0 0 0 .389
2 2 0 0 .250
2 1 0 1 .231
1 0 0 1 .200
0 0 1 2 .154
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .333
8 4 1 9
St. Louis.....................002 024 000 — 8 13 1
Milwaukee.................011 002 000 — 4 8 1
E—Mikolas (1), Davies (1). LOB—St. Louis 5,
Milwaukee 5. 2B—Gyorko (1), Shaw (4),
Thames (1). HR—DeJong (3), off Woodruff,
Mikolas (1), off Davies, Cain (1), off Mikolas,
Thames (1), off Mikolas, Piña (1), off Mikolas.
CS—Fowler (1), Pham (1). SF—JMartínez.
DP—St. Louis 1.
St. Louis
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Mikolas W 1­0 5„ 7 4 4 0 5 6.35
Norris
1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
Lyons
1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
Hicks
1‚ 0 0 0 1 1 0.00
Milwaukee
Davies L 0­1
Woodruff
Drake
IP
5„
1‚
2
H
8
3
2
R ER BB SO ERA
7 6 0 6 9.53
1 1 0 2 5.40
0 0 1 0 3.00
Inherited runners­scored—Norris 2­0, Hicks
1­0, Woodruff 2­2. HBP—by Davies (Gyorko).
WP—Mikolas. NP—Mikolas 91, Norris 12, Ly­
ons 12, Hicks 17, Davies 88, Woodruff 21,
Drake 36. Umpires—Home, James Hoye; First,
Jeff Kellogg; Second, Chris Segal; Third, Mar­
vin Hudson. T—2:59. A—45,393 (41,900).
CHICAGO
Moncada 2b
AGarcía rf
Abreu 1b
Davidson dh
Castillo c
Anderson ss
LGarcía lf
Sánchez 3b
Engel cf
Totals
AB
3
4
4
4
4
4
3
1
3
30
R
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO
1 0 1 0
0 0 0 1
3 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
2 2 0 2
0 0 0 2
0 0 1 2
0 0 1 1
0 0 0 0
6 2 3 10
Avg.
.231
.286
.417
.364
.231
.250
.250
.222
.300
TORONTO
Travis 2b
Donaldson dh
Smoak 1b
Solarte 3b
Granderson lf
Grichuk rf
Martin c
Pillar cf
Díaz ss
Totals
AB
4
4
4
3
3
1
3
3
3
28
R
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 2 .063
1 1 0 0 .176
0 0 0 2 .368
0 0 1 1 .188
1 0 1 0 .231
0 0 2 0 .133
1 2 0 1 .182
0 0 0 0 .375
1 1 0 0 .154
4 4 4 6
Chicago......................000 100 100 — 2 6 1
Toronto......................000 001 21x — 4 4 2
E—Sánchez (1), JGarcía (1), Martin (1).
LOB—Chicago 6, Toronto 4. 2B—Abreu (1).
HR—Castillo 2 (2), off JGarcía, off Oh, Donald­
son (1), off López, Martin (1), off Farquhar,
Díaz (1), off Farquhar. SB—Sánchez (1). DP—
Chicago 1; Toronto 3.
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
López
6 2 1 1 2 6 1.50
Avilán
‚ 0 1 1 1 0 6.75
Farq BS 1; L 1­1 1‚ 2 2 2 0 0 7.71
Bummer
‚ 0 0 0 1 0 0.00
Toronto
JGarcía
Oh W 1­0
Tepera
Osuna S 2
IP
6
1
1
1
H
4
1
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 7 1.50
1 1 1 0 3.00
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
Inherited runners­scored—Farquhar 1­1.
HBP—by JGarcía (Sánchez), by Oh (Sánchez).
NP—López 100, Avilán 13, Farquhar 17, Bum­
mer 14, JGarcía 92, Oh 23, Tepera 17, Osuna 8.
Umpires—Home, Jordan Baker; First, Jerry
Layne; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Vic Cara­
pazza. T—2:51. A—16,629 (49,286).
ASTROS 6, ORIOLES 1
BALTIMORE
ChDavis 1b
Machado ss
Schoop 2b
Jones cf
Mancini lf
Rasmus rf
Beckham 3b
PÁlvarez dh
Joseph c
Totals
AB
3
4
4
4
4
3
4
3
4
33
HOUSTON
AB
Springer cf
5
Bregman 3b
3
Altuve 2b
5
Correa ss
1
J.Davis 1b
4
Reddick rf
2
González 1b­ss
4
Gattis dh
4
McCann c
2
Fisher lf
3
Totals
33
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 1 0 .067
0 0 0 1 .231
1 0 0 1 .118
2 0 0 0 .188
1 1 0 2 .154
1 0 0 1 .111
0 0 0 1 .067
0 0 1 1 .000
0 0 0 2 .111
6 1 2 9
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 2 1 0 1 .250
0 1 1 2 1 .158
0 1 1 0 0 .476
0 0 0 0 0 .412
0 0 0 0 1 .091
1 1 0 2 0 .111
1 1 1 0 2 .176
0 1 0 0 0 .316
2 2 0 1 0 .500
1 2 2 0 1 .333
6 11 6 5 6
Baltimore...................000 000 001 — 1 6 0
Houston..................... 100 301 10x — 6 11 0
LOB—Baltimore 8, Houston 10. 2B—Schoop
(1), Rasmus (1), Springer (2), Bregman (2),
Altuve (2). 3B—Fisher (2). HR—Mancini (1),
off McHugh, González (1), off Tillman. CS—
Reddick (1). SF—Fisher.
Baltimore
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Tillman L 0­1
4 7 4 4 4 0 9.00
Castro
2 2 1 1 1 3 3.00
Bleier
1 2 1 1 0 1 2.70
O’Day
1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
Houston
Morton W 1­0
Peacock
Harris
McHugh
IP
6
1
1
1
H
3
0
1
2
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 2 6 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
1 1 0 1 3.86
Tillman pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. In­
herited runners­scored—Castro 1­0. HBP—by
Bleier (McCann), by Morton (Rasmus). WP—
Tillman. NP—Tillman 84, Castro 34, Bleier 18,
O’Day 9, Morton 91, Peacock 10, Harris 14,
McHugh 16. Umpires—Home, Bill Welke;
First, Tony Randazzo; Second, Lance Barrett;
Third, Nic Lentz. T—2:52. A—42,675 (41,168).
NATIONALS 8, BRAVES 1
WASHINGTON AB
Turner ss
5
Rendon 3b
6
Harper rf
2
Zimmerman 1b
4
Kelley p
0
Grace p
0
5
Kendrick lf­1b
Taylor cf
4
Difo 2b
4
Severino c
2
Roark p
4
Goodwin lf
1
Totals
37
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 0 1 1 .250
1 1 1 0 1 .211
3 1 3 4 0 .417
0 0 0 1 1 .083
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 2 1 0 1 .357
1 1 0 1 3 .167
1 1 0 1 2 .286
1 2 1 2 0 1.000
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 1 2 0 0 .429
8 10 8 10 10
ATLANTA
Inciarte cf
Albies 2b
FrFreeman 1b
Markakis rf
Tucker lf
Swanson ss
Flaherty 3b
Stewart c
Newcomb p
Moylan p
LAdams ph
Sánchez p
Bourjos ph
Ramírez p
SaFreeman p
Totals
R
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
AB
4
4
3
4
3
3
3
3
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
30
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 1 .316
0 0 0 2 .100
1 1 1 0 .333
0 0 0 1 .250
1 0 0 0 .400
0 0 0 1 .294
1 0 0 2 .500
0 0 0 1 .200
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .500
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
4 1 1 9
Washington...............230 010 002 — 8 10 1
Atlanta....................... 000 100 000 — 1 4 2
E—Kendrick (1), FrFreeman (1), Newcomb
(1). LOB—Washington 13, Atlanta 3. 2B—Ken­
drick 2 (3), Difo (1). HR—Harper (3), off New­
comb. SB—Taylor (2), Inciarte (1). DP—Wash­
ington 2; Atlanta 1.
Washington
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Roark W 1­0
7 4 1 1 1 6 1.29
Kelley
1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
Grace
1 0 0 0 0 1 6.00
Atlanta
IP
Newcomb L 0­1 4‚
Moylan
„
Sánchez
3
Ramírez
„
SaFreeman
‚
H
5
2
1
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
6 5 4 6 10.38
0 0 1 1 0.00
0 0 3 2 0.00
2 2 2 1 16.20
0 0 0 0 0.00
Inherited runners­scored—Moylan 1­1, Sa­
Freeman 3­0. IBB—off Moylan (Difo). HBP—
by Ramírez (Severino). WP—Roark. NP—
Roark 93, Kelley 10, Grace 14, Newcomb 97,
Moylan 12, Sánchez 58, Ramírez 28, SaFree­
man 1. Umpires—Home, Mike Winters; First,
Tim Timmons; Second, Rob Drake; Third,
Mike Muchlinski. T—2:55. A—25,054 (41,149).
DODGERS 9, GIANTS 0
Sunday night game
SAN FRANCIS­
CO
Jackson cf
Panik 2b
McCutchen rf
Posey c
Longoria 3b
Pence lf
Belt 1b
Crawford ss
Stratton p
Osich p
Tomlinson ph
Gómez p
Moronta p
Totals
AB
R
H BI BB SO Avg.
4
3
4
4
4
4
3
3
1
0
1
0
0
31
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
LA DODGERS
AB
Taylor cf
5
Font p
0
Seager ss
4
Puig rf
4
Grandal c
4
Bellinger 1b
4
KHernánd 2b­cf 4
Pederson lf
4
Farmer 3b
3
Hill p
2
Cingrani p
0
Utley ph
1
Fields p
0
Barnes ph­2b
1
Totals
36
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
2
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
7
.083
.400
.063
.308
.000
.286
.231
.214
.000
—
.000
—
—
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 2 0 0 2 .267
0 0 0 0 0
—
1 1 0 0 1 .091
2 3 1 0 1 .231
2 2 1 0 1 .400
2 2 2 0 0 .154
1 2 2 0 1 .333
0 0 1 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 1 .333
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 1 1 0 0 .333
9 13 8 0 7
San Francisco...........000 000 000 — 0 6 0
LA Dodgers................000 104 04x — 9 13 0
LOB—San Francisco 8, LA Dodgers 4. 2B—
Posey (2), Belt (1), Taylor (1), Puig (1), KH­
ernández (2). HR—Bellinger (1), off Osich.
SB—Posey (1). CS—Puig (1). S—Stratton.
DP—LA Dodgers 1.
San Francisco
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Stratton L 0­1
5‚ 5 3 3 0 4 5.06
Osich
„ 2 2 2 0 1 10.80
Gómez
1 5 4 4 0 1 36.00
Moronta
1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
LA Dodgers
Hill W 1­0
Cingrani
Fields
Font
IP
6
1
1
1
H
5
0
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 3 5 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
Gómez pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. In­
herited runners­scored—Osich 1­1, Moronta
2­2. IBB—off Hill (Crawford). HBP—by Strat­
ton (Farmer). NP—Stratton 88, Osich 7,
Gómez 22, Moronta 18, Hill 82, Cingrani 14,
Fields 9, Font 21. Umpires—Home, John
Tumpane; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Jim
Reynolds; Third, Mike DiMuro. T—2:47.
A—41,866 (56,000).
D4
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Marchand fined
for cross­check
By Kevin Paul Dupont
and Fluto Shinzawa
GLOBE STAFF
FILE/MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
Even multiple first-round draft picks might not be enough trade compensation for Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski.
Gronk solution? Rework deal
Ben Volin
ON FOOTBALL
A four-pack of Patriots
items to get you through the
pre-draft doldrums:
1. Positive signs Rob
Gronkowski will be back, and
there is no need to trade him.
Gronk dominated the news
cycle over the weekend. There
was a report from ESPN that
Gronk is “pretty certain” to return to the Patriots this season
as long as Tom Brady is still
with the team, and also some
speculation locally and nationally that Bill Belichick might
trade Gronkowski now that the
tight end is grumbling about
the program and his contract.
The ESPN report cited
sources close to Gronkowski
and Belichick, stating that
while both sides are frustrated
— Gronk with Belichick’s demanding style, Belichick wondering if Gronk is still committed to the team — the relationship is not irreconcilable, and
Gronk is expected to play football again this fall.
None of this should be too
surprising for anyone who has
followed the situation closely.
Gronk has been grumbling
about his contract since before
last season, and he clearly has
been clashing with Belichick
over his training regimen and
use of Alex Guerrero. One
tweet that should’ve gotten
more scrutiny was when
Gronkowski was named firstteam All-Pro and tweeted,
“Hard work and working
Smarter is paying off!!!!” The
word “smarter” seems to be a
direct reference to his use of
Guerrero, and the word was
noticeably capitalized.
But while Gronk and his
agent, Drew Rosenhaus, have
declined to discuss the tight
end’s future publicly since
Gronkowski mentioned retirement at the Super Bowl, momentum for a return is certainly building.
The most positive buzz
came from Robert Kraft, who
spoke about Gronk last week
at the NFL owners meetings in
Orlando. Kraft noted that he
saw Gronkowski at Gillette
Stadium a few weeks ago “after
hours.” That sure doesn’t
sound like a guy who is walking away.
Kraft also took joy in the
video from a Miami nightclub
of Gronkowski jumping on
Shaquille O’Neal’s shoulders
and taking a piggy-back ride.
“So that speaks well about
his potential athletic moves
this coming year,” Kraft said.
Gronk, set to make between
$8 million and $9 million this
year, undoubtedly feels underpaid when he sees lesser players cashing in big in free agency.
But there aren’t many jobs
out there that will pay you $9
million a year, either. And as
long as he’s playing for the Patriots and catching passes from
Brady, he’ll remain a superstar.
Let’s remember that the offseason program hasn’t even
begun yet (it starts April 16).
And Gronkowski gets a
$250,000 bonus for participating in 90 percent of the Patriots’ workouts this spring.
If Gronk doesn’t show up
for OTAs, then we have a story.
But I wouldn’t be shocked if he
appears on Day 1. Even if he’s
not pleased with the Patriots,
why turn down free money?
Now to the other aspect —
whether Belichick has tired of
Gronk’s attitude and contract
gripes. Belichick shipped Richard Seymour, Logan Mankins,
Wes Welker, and Vince Wilfork
out of town, so why can’t he do
it to Gronk?
Belichick absolutely could,
but it would be foolish. The
aforementioned players were
all good to very good, but
Gronkowski is a first-ballot
Gold Jacket. He’s also still on
the positive side of 30 (29 this
upcoming season), and still
one of the five most dangerous
weapons in the NFL. Realistically, no trade compensation is
going to be worth it, even multiple first-round picks.
The best solution still seems
to be reworking Gronk’s contract. The Patriots can easily
pay Gronk more in 2018 with a
nice signing bonus, while also
lowering his salary-cap number from $10.9 million. The
player is happy, and the team
creates more cap space. Winwin.
That is, unless the situation
behind the scenes is so poisonous that Belichick has no
choice but to ship Gronk out of
town. But that doesn’t seem at
all likely.
2. Malcolm Butler and his
agent get the last laugh.
Butler’s short documentary
with Sports Illustrated was an
excellent look behind the
scenes at Butler’s free agency
process — how he handled the
fallout from the Super Bowl
benching, the nerves he felt
throughout free agency, and
how he came to sign a fiveyear, $61.25 million contract.
In the film we learn that
nine teams called Butler’s
agent, Derek Simpson, to express interest. The Titans and
Bears were the most interested, while the Saints, Texans,
and, interestingly, the Lions,
all called.
Butler’s brother also said he
wanted Butler to sign with the
Texans or Lions. Butler’s relationship with Matt Patricia
must not have been affected by
the Super Bowl benching,
which puts into question how
much input Patricia had in
that decision.
We learn of a few initial offers. The Texans were willing
to only go for one year, but no
money was disclosed. The
Bears initially offered three
years and $30 million, which
was the same contract Logan
Ryan got from the Titans last
year. The Titans started out at
five years and $55 million. The
film gave the impression that
the Titans were negotiating
against themselves, but Larry
Lundy, Butler’s adviser, relayed
to us that that was not the
case, and that there were offers
from teams that didn’t make it
into the documentary.
Finally, two thoughts about
Butler’s relationship with
Simpson struck me while
watching this documentary:
First, it is noteworthy that
Butler stuck with Simpson
throughout the process. The
agent game is ruthless, and the
sharks have been swimming
around Butler for years, tempting him to drop his inexperienced agent and sign with
them. But Butler stayed loyal
to the agent who helped get
him into the NFL.
Second, good for Simpson
for negotiating a life-changing
deal for Butler. Simpson was
the target of a lot of mudslinging last year when Butler was
unable to get a suitable longterm contract from the Patriots. The slinging seemed to
have been started by Belichick
confidant Michael Lombardi,
who put the onus on Butler in
an article for The Ringer.
“The Patriots kept trying to
sign Malcolm Butler to a longterm extension and kept coming up empty— the underpaid
hero of Super Bowl XLIX is
looking for the moon and then
some,” he wrote.
That started weeks of chatter around Boston (not from
us) that Butler’s inexperienced
agent was messing it up. Well,
with Butler signing for $25
million guaranteed over the
next two years, despite an inconsistent season and the Super Bowl benching, Simpson
gets the last laugh.
3. Expect to see Josh Mc­
Daniels’s name pop up next
year for head coaching jobs.
In a March 16 Patriots chat
on Reddit, I mentioned that
even though McDaniels returned to the Patriots and is
the presumed heir apparent,
there was a rumor that McDaniels will put his name out
for other head coaching jobs
next year.
Then he did an exclusive interview with the Globe’s Jim
McBride last week, and I’m
more convinced than ever.
McDaniels’s quotes read
like an open letter to the other
31 teams.
R McDaniels made it clear
that he “absolutely” wants to
be a head coach again. If McDaniels already has the Patriots job lined up, why bother
mentioning that?
“And I apologize to anyone
who was affected in any way,”
McDaniels said. “Indianapolis
did a tremendous job. They
have a tremendous organization and I was lucky to be considered and I just think once I
found out [what my future in
New England was], I made the
right decision for me and my
family at this time.’’
Again, if he’s just going to
coach the Patriots, why the
need for a full explanation?
R McDaniels also made it
clear that “my family was
ready to go to Indianapolis,”
and that he’s not wedded to
New England.
“This isn’t a thing where
I’m telling you, ‘I couldn’t
move and all that,’ ” he said.
“And at some point, if I have to
move or if we end up moving,
they understand that’s part of
the situation and they were
ready to do that.’’
So don’t be surprised if McDaniels enters the head coaching fray next January.
4. March 31 was an expen­
sive day for the Patriots.
This past Saturday was a
day unofficially known as
“Signing Bonus Day.”
When the Patriots agree to
give a player a signing bonus,
the player usually doesn’t get
all of the money up front. Instead, the Patriots split the bonus into three payments, due
on March 31, October 31, and
March 31 of the following year.
It has nothing to do with the
salary cap, and everything to
do about protecting the Patriots from another Aaron Hernandez type of situation. The
Patriots also get to collect the
interest generated by the deferred payments.
But the Patriots had some
big checks going out this past
Saturday — a total of $17.25
million in deferred signing bonuses from the 2017 offseason,
including a $6 million payment for Stephon Gilmore and
$3.25 million for Dont’a Hightower.
Here is a full breakdown of
the signing bonus payments:
Gilmore: $6m (of $18m);
Hightower: $3.25m (of $10m);
Kyle Van Noy: $1.5m (of
$3.5m); Julian Edelman:
$1.5m (of $5m); Duron Harmon: $1.5m (of $5m); Lawrence Guy: $1m (of $4m);
James White: $1m (of $4m);
Alan Branch: $600k (of $2m);
David Andrews: $500k (of
$1.6m); David Harris: $250k
(of $1.25m); Kenny Britt:
$150k (roster bonus); Total:
$17.25 million
The Patriots also agreed to
$13.81 million in signing bonuses this past month, with a
large portion of it paid March
31, but the breakdown of deferred payments isn’t known
yet.
. . .
The Patriots hosted two free
agents Monday, both of whom
could potentially become
depth pieces.
Former Bills wide receiver
Jordan Matthews and former
Cardinals tight end Troy Niklas
both visited the Patriots, according to an ESPN report.
Both Matthews and Niklas
were second-round selections
in the 2014 draft.
Matthews also has met with
the Packers and Cardinals,
who reportedly extended him
an offer on Monday.
He played in 10 games last
season for the Bills, who acquired him from the Eagles in
August, and caught 25 passes
for 282 yards and one touchdown.
Niklas is primarily a blocker, having caught 11 passes in
15 games (11 starts) in 2017 in
Arizona.
Nora Princiotti of the globe
staff contributed. Ben Volin
can be reached at
ben.volin@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @BenVolin.
TAMPA — The oft-suspended Brad Marchand won’t have
to sit out the Bruins’ game
here Tuesday
BRUINS
night vs. the
NOTEBOOK Lightning, but
the irascible
left winger will show up
$5,000 lighter in the wallet,
fined that amount Monday for
his cross-check Sunday to the
Flyers’ Andrew MacDonald.
The NHL’s Department of
Player Safety announced the
fine at approximately 10 a.m.
Monday, less than 24 hours after the Bruins lost to the Flyers, 4-3, in overtime in Philly.
Marchand, the club’s top
scorer with 84 points, was suspended for five games just prior to his NHL All-Star Game
appearance for drilling New
Jersey forward Marcus Johan­
sson in the head with a flying
elbow Jan. 23. Marchand now
has ceded $375,475.60 in pay
this season.
Since returning Feb. 7,
Marchand has been on a tear,
delivering a line of 13-21—34
in 26 games.
With Marchand back at his
left wing spot Tuesday on the
No. 1 line with Patrice
Bergeron and David Pastrnak,
the Bruins will have a chance
to all but secure the No. 1 spot
in the Eastern Conference.
Lightning
thumbnails
R When, where: Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.
at Amalie Arena, Tampa.
R TV, radio: NESN Plus, NBCSN,
WBZ­FM (98.5).
R Goals: Nikita Kucherov 38,
Brayden Point 30, Steven Stamkos
27.
R Assists: Kucherov 59, Stamkos
59, Victor Hedman 45.
R Goaltending: Andrei Vasilevskiy
(42­17­3, 2.62 GAA), Louis
Domingue (7­3­0, 2.88).
R Head to head: This is the fourth
and final meeting this season. The
Bruins won the first three, includ­
ing 4­2 last Thursday at TD Gar­
den.
R Miscellany: The Bruins lead the
Eastern Conference with 110
points and have four games left.
Tampa Bay is second in the East
with 108 points and has three
games remaining . . . Bruins goalie
Tuukka Rask is 3­0­0 against the
Lightning this season, posting a
1.33 goals­against average and
.944 save percentage. He notched
a 23­save shutout in Tampa on
March 17.
The Bruins enjoyed a day
off here Monday, and provided
no update on the status of
their many injured charges, including Brandon Carlo.
The sophomore defenseman exited Saturday’s matinee
against Florida on a stretcher,
his left leg buckling in an awkward tumble along the boards.
Coach Bruce Cassidy only
would say Sunday that swelling in the leg prevented a final
diagnosis.
Cassidy also said over the
weekend that it’s possible defenseman Charlie McAvoy,
felled by a wrenched knee
March 3 vs. Montreal, might
return to the lineup Tuesday.
round-robin rookie camp in
Buffalo in September, a tournament that included Sabres
and Devils prospects.
Studnicka’s father, Todd,
played four years at forward
for the Maine Black Bears, and
for two of those years was a
teammate of Bob Beers, the
ex-Bruins blue liner who is
now the part of the 98.5 Sports
Hub radio crew for Bruins
broadcasts.
Keyser, who grew up in
Florida, went undrafted. But
he participated in Boston’s
rookie camp in September,
earned himself an entry-level
contract, and was the Generals’ No. 1 goaltender this season with a 28-13-0 record and
.904 save percentage. He went
1-4-0 with an .882 save percentage in the postseason.
Providence has seven
games remaining in the regular season and its next home
game is Friday at the Dunkin’
Donuts Center.
Studnicka and Keyser, because they are only 19, would
not be eligible to play in the
AHL next season. They would
be eligible to make the varsity
roster, but otherwise would be
obligated to return to Oshawa.
Help to Providence
Cave recalled
The Bruins will have their
reserve corps bolstered this
week when top junior prospects Jack Studnicka (center)
and Kyle Keyser (goalie) begin
their pro careers with AHL
Providence.
Studnicka and Keyser, both
of whom signed entry-level
contracts with the Bruins last
fall, wrapped up their junior
season with OHL Oshawa over
the weekend when the Generals — once home to Bobby Orr
— were eliminated by Niagara
in the opening around of the
playoffs.
Studnicka, the Generals’
captain, led the club in scoring
and finished with career highs
in goals (22), assists (50), and
points (72). The 6-foot-1-inch,
175-pound pivot was Boston’s
second pick, No. 53 overall, in
last June’s amateur entry
draft.
Smart and poised with the
puck, similar in style to
Bergeron, the 19-year-old
Studnicka is a righthanded
shot and projects as a No. 1 or
No. 2 center who could meld
with some of the top-end rookies the Bruins have added up
front this year, particularly
Jake DeBrusk and Ryan Do­
nato. Studnicka was among
Boston’s top performers in the
The Bruins recalled center
Colby Cave from Providence
late Monday afternoon, a
move that could indicate versatile forward Riley Nash will
be out of Tuesday’s lineup for a
second straight game after
sustaining a nasty gash when a
puck clipped him around the
ear Saturday, necessitating a
40-stich repair. Cave, a fourthyear pro, filled in for one game
with the varsity this season —
his NHL debut — and has
compiled a line of 11-22—33
this season with the WannaB’s
. . . Bergeron was not made
available to the media follow
Sunday’s OT loss. That is not
highly unusual in itself, but
Bergeron typically talks after
games. The veteran pivot has
played in only five games since
return after cracking a bone in
his right foot Feb. 24 in Toronto. It’s also possible that Cave
was recalled if Bergeron needs
extra time on the sideline prior
to the start of the playoffs.
No update on Carlo
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at
kevin.dupont@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeKPD. Fluto Shinzawa
can be reached at
fshinzawa@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @GlobeFluto.
FILE/MADDIE MEYER/GETTY IMAGES
Fourth-year pro Colby Cave, who was recalled Monday,
appeared in his only NHL game back in December.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
p­BOSTON
p­Tampa Bay
p­Toronto
Div.
A
A
A
GP
78
79
80
W L OL
49 17 12
52 23 4
48 25 7
Pts. ROW
110
46
108
46
103
41
GF
261
283
272
GA
201
228
228
METROPOLITAN Div. GP W L OL
d­Washington
M 80 48 25 7
p­Pittsburgh
M 80 45 29 6
Columbus
M 79 44 29 6
Pts. ROW
103
45
96
43
94
38
GF
251
263
231
GA
232
246
217
WILD CARD
Philadelphia
New Jersey
Pts. ROW
94
38
93
37
GF
238
238
GA
235
236
37
32
31
29
25
26
25
24
235
222
228
253
207
199
215
189
238
250
256
288
242
252
280
265
Div. GP W L OL
M 79 40 25 14
M 79 42 28 9
Florida
Carolina
NY Rangers
NY Islanders
Detroit
Montreal
Ottawa
Buffalo
A
M
M
M
A
A
A
A
78
80
79
79
79
79
79
79
40
35
34
32
30
28
27
25
30
34
36
37
38
39
41
42
8
11
9
10
11
12
11
12
88
81
77
74
71
68
65
62
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
p­Nashville
p­Winnipeg
Minnesota
Div.
C
C
C
GP
79
79
79
W L OL
51 17 11
49 20 10
44 25 10
Pts. ROW
113
45
108
45
98
41
GF
258
266
242
GA
204
212
221
PACIFIC
d­Vegas
San Jose
Anaheim
Div.
P
P
P
GP
79
79
79
W L OL
50 22 7
44 25 10
41 25 13
Pts. ROW
107
47
98
39
95
37
GF
263
243
224
GA
213
217
212
WILD CARD
*Los Angeles
*Colorado
Div. GP W L OL
P 79 43 28 8
C 79 42 28 9
Pts. ROW
94
41
93
40
GF
229
249
GA
194
228
217
224
209
223
227
208
201
212
216
241
245
258
253
248
St. Louis
Dallas
Calgary
Chicago
Edmonton
Vancouver
Arizona
C
C
P
C
P
P
P
79
79
79
79
80
79
79
43
40
36
32
34
30
28
30 6
31 8
33 10
37 10
40 6
40 9
40 11
92
88
82
74
74
69
67
40
36
34
31
30
30
26
* — Not including late game; ROW — Regulation plus overtime wins
d — Clinched division
p — Clinched playoff berth
THE PLAYOFF FORMAT
Eight teams in each conference qualify. The top three teams from
each division comprise the first six spots; the two remaining teams
with the most points, regardless of division, earn the wild card spots.
MONDAY’S RESULTS
At Toronto 5
Buffalo 2
At Florida 3
Carolina 2
Winnipeg 6
at Ottawa 5
At Minnesota 3
Edmonton 0
Washington 4
at St. Louis 2
Colorado
at Los Angeles
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Boston at Tampa Bay
7:30
Winnipeg at Montreal
Philadelphia at NY Islanders
7
Arizona at Calgary
Detroit at Columbus
7
Vegas at Vancouver
7
Dallas at San Jose
NY Rangers at New Jersey
Nashville at Florida
7:30
9
10
10:30
7:30
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
At Philadelphia 4
Nashville 4
Boston 3 (OT)
Washington 3
at Pittsburgh 1
at Tampa Bay 1
At Anaheim 4
Colorado 3 (OT)
New Jersey 2
at Montreal 1
MAPLE LEAFS 5, SABRES 2
JETS 6, SENATORS 5
Winnipeg......................3
Ottawa .........................1
2
2
1 —
2 —
6
5
First period — 1. Winnipeg, Copp 7
(Trouba, Tanev), 2:42. 2. Winnipeg,
Morrissey 7 (Lowry, Copp), 11:36. 3.
Winnipeg, Wheeler 21 (Scheifele, Con­
nor), 11:57. 4. Ottawa, Chabot 8 (Duch­
ene, Karlsson), 18:26. Penalties —
None.
Second period — 5. Ottawa, Duchene
25 (Karlsson, Hoffman), 1:28 (pp). 6.
Winnipeg, Tanev 8, 6:25. 7. Ottawa,
Chabot 9 (White, Hoffman), 11:58. 8.
Winnipeg, Wheeler 22 (Scheifele),
12:46. Penalties — Wheeler, Wpg (de­
lay of game), 0:57. Wheeler, Wpg
(cross­checking), 6:15. Paajarvi, Ott
(tripping), 8:40. , Wpg, served by Per­
reault (too many men), 18:24.
Third period — 9. Ottawa, Wolanin 1
(Dzingel, Hoffman), 4:47. 10. Winnipeg,
Perreault 17 (Ehlers, Myers), 14:38
(pp). 11. Ottawa, Duchene 26 (Karls­
son), 18:55 (pp). Penalties — Pyatt, Ott
(tripping), 1:17. McCormick, Ott (face­
off violation), 12:58. Chiarot, Wpg
(hooking), 17:15. Trouba, Wpg (delay
of game), 17:34. Pageau, Ott (rough­
ing), 18:10. Myers, Wpg (roughing),
18:10. Ryan, Ott (roughing), 18:10. My­
ers, Wpg (cross­checking), 18:10.
Shots on goal — Winnipeg 13­13­14
— 40. Ottawa 11­13­12 — 36.
Power plays — Winnipeg 1­3; Ottawa
2­5.
Goalies — Winnipeg, Hellebuyck ­­
(36 shots­31 saves). Ottawa, Anderson
­­ (40 shots­34 saves).
PANTHERS 3, HURRICANES 2
Carolina........................1
Florida ..........................2
1
0
0 —
1 —
2
3
First period — 1. Carolina, van Ri­
emsdyk 3 (McGinn, Williams), 3:44. 2.
Florida, Weegar 2 (McCann, Malgin),
4:03. 3. Florida, Dadonov 27 (Barkov,
Trocheck), 19:50 (pp). Penalties — Mal­
gin, Fla (tripping), 14:10. Lindholm, Car
(hooking), 19:27.
Second period — 4. Carolina, Ryan 15
(Stempniak, Dahlbeck), 13:48. Penal­
ties — McKeown, Car (instigator),
14:18. McKeown, Car, major (fighting),
14:18. Weegar, Fla, major (fighting),
14:18. Weegar, Fla (boarding), 14:18.
McKeown, Car (misconduct), 14:18.
Third period — 5. Florida, Petrovic 2,
12:02. Penalties — Darling, Car, served
by Williams (tripping), 13:37.
Shots on goal — Carolina 10­10­8 —
28. Florida 19­8­8 — 35.
Power plays — Carolina 0­1; Florida
1­2.
Goalies — Carolina, Darling 13­20­7
(35 shots­32 saves). Florida, Luongo
16­11­2 (28 shots­26 saves).
Buffalo..........................0
Toronto ........................1
1
3
1 —
1 —
2
5
First period — 1. Toronto, Johnsson 2
(Plekanec, Polak), 5:44. Penalties —
Scandella, Buf (hi stick), 7:24. Polak,
Tor (hi stick), 13:11. Polak, Tor, double
minor (hi stick), 19:09.
Second period — 2. Buffalo, Reinhart
24 (Ristolainen, O’Reilly), 2:27 (pp). 3.
Toronto, Matthews 32 (Rielly, Johns­
son), 5:01 (pp). 4. Toronto, Nylander 18
(Matthews), 7:39. 5. Toronto, Nylander
19 (Hyman), 10:32. Penalties — Falk,
Buf (interference), 3:59. Kadri, Tor (in­
terference on the goaltender), 11:13.
Third period — 6. Buffalo, Pominville
14 (Baptiste, Scandella), 2:56 (pp). 7.
Toronto, Matthews 33 (Nylander, Gar­
diner), 6:29 (pp). Penalties — Zaitsev,
Tor (hooking), 0:59. Mittelstadt, Buf (hi
stick), 5:44.
Shots on goal — Buffalo 9­10­15 —
34. Toronto 12­15­9 — 36.
Power plays — Buffalo 2­5; Toronto
2­3.
Goalies — Buffalo, Johnson 10­14­3
(36 shots­31 saves). Toronto, McElhin­
ney 11­5­1 (34 shots­32 saves).
Referees — Brad Watson, Ghislain
Hebert. Linesmen — Devin Berg, An­
drew Smith.
A — 18,846 (18,819). T — 2:32.
CAPITALS 4, BLUES 2
Washington.................0
St. Louis .......................1
3
1
1 —
0 —
4
2
First period — 1. St. Louis, Tarasenko
32 (Brodziak, Pietrangelo), 3:38. Penal­
ties — Orlov, Was (tripping), 16:24.
Second period — 2. Wash, Back­
strom 20 (Connolly), 0:51. 3. Washing­
ton, Chiasson 9 (Jerabek), 2:39. 4.
Washington, Burakovsky 11 (Back­
strom, Orpik), 7:54. 5. St. Louis, Ber­
glund 14 (Brodziak, Bortuzzo), 11:38.
Penalties — Schwartz, StL (holding),
3:47. Niskanen, Was (hi stick), 19:50.
Third period — 6. Wash, Ovechkin 46
(Kuznetsov), 18:29 (pp) (en). Penalties
— Vrana, Was (tripping), 8:51. Orlov,
Was (tripping), 10:48. Brodziak, StL
(slashing), 17:53.
Shots on goal — Wash8­15­11 — 34.
St. Louis 7­14­15 — 36.
Power plays — Washington 1­2; St.
Louis 0­4.
Goalies — Washington, Holtby 33­
16­4 (36 shots­34 saves). St. Louis, Al­
len 27­23­3 (33 shots­30 saves).
Referees — Gord Dwyer, Trevor Han­
son. Linesmen — Brian Murphy, Lonnie
Cameron.
A — 18,841 (19,150). T — 2:30.
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
Add Rozier (ankle) to
backcourt injury woes
By Adam Himmelsbach
Bucks thumbnails
GLOBE STAFF
The Celtics’ backcourt was so depleted in
the win over the Raptors on Saturday that forwards Jayson Tatum and Al Horford both had
opportunities to play point
CELTICS
guard. Now there is a chance
NOTEBOOK Boston could be even more
undermanned when it faces
the Bucks on Tuesday night.
Point guard Terry Rozier missed practice
Monday because of a sprained ankle he suffered when he took a hard fall against Toronto, and he is questionable for Tuesday’s game.
Backup point guard Shane Larkin, who
missed Saturday’s game because of an illness,
was discharged from a hospital on Sunday
night, but did not join the team on its flight to
Milwaukee Monday. There is a chance he
could be cleared to travel on Tuesday. And, of
course, guards Kyrie Irving (knee) and Mar­
cus Smart (thumb) remain sidelined.
Rozier insisted that he plans to play
against Milwaukee.
“I just know that I’m not a guy who wants
to sit out if I don’t have a legitimate reason,”
he said. “I’m fine. I can play. My ankle is not
super bad. The way I hurt it in Golden State is
way worse than this one, so I feel good about
it. The medical staff knows what they’re doing, so just getting it together and taking my
time with it.”
But with just over one week remaining in
the regular season, and Rozier’s health for the
playoffs of paramount importance, coach
Brad Stevens also made it clear that the Celtics would err on the side of caution.
“Obviously we’re not going to play him if
it’s hurting him, because he’s going to be incredibly important as we move forward,” Stevens said. “You saw the other night, he played
38 minutes. Obviously without Shane, too, he
would have more burden.”
Rozier’s injury occurred when he was fell
on a fast break in the fourth quarter of Saturday’s game. He said he initially thought he
had injured his knee, and that after the game
his Achilles’ tendon was sore.
“By the time I got home, all the pain transferred to my ankle and it ended up being my
ankle,” he said. “I watched the play like 10
times yesterday. Like I said, I’m fine. I iced it a
lot yesterday. I feel good. I feel way better today than yesterday.”
If Larkin and Rozier are both out, Stevens
would have no choice but to turn to more unorthodox lineups.
“We’ve got a lot of good players,” Rozier
said. “Al brings the ball down a lot. I was just
talking to him and he said hopefully I wasn’t
injured, because he said he gets tired of bringing the ball down all the time. We’ll find our
ways.”
Jaylen Brown said he has minimal experience as a primary ballhandler.
“I played point guard at Cal for a little bit,”
Brown said. “When I grew up, I was a point
guard, until I got tall. So I’m just trying to stay
with those ball skills. In the NBA, not so
much. Not at all, actually.”
Running commentary
Gordon Hayward has been quite open in
chronicling his recovery from a broken left
ankle, and on Monday he offered the latest
video evidence.
The forward posted a Players Tribune video to his Twitter account showing him completing a light jog on the Celtics’ practice
court. It is significant because previously he
was only able to run with the aid of an antigravity treadmill.
“It’s pretty slow running,” Stevens
quipped. “I was up there watching it the other
morning when they did that. The next step of
his progression is once every three days he
gets on the court and does that. So as you can
see it was about 20 percent speed, nothing
lateral, no jumping. So a long, long way away
[from returning].”
Hayward suffered the injury just minutes
into Boston’s season-opening loss to the Cava-
R When, where: Tuesday, 8 p.m., at BMO Harris Bradley
Center, Milwaukee.
R TV, radio: NBCSB, WZLX­FM (100.7).
R Scoring: Giannis Antetokounmpo 27.2, Khris Middleton
20.2, Eric Bledsoe 17.8.
R Rebounding: Antetokounmpo 10.0, John Henson 6.8,
Middleton 5.2.
R Assists: Eric Bledsoe 4.9, Antetokounmpo 4.8, Middle­
ton 3.9.
R Head to head: This is the fourth and final meeting this
season. The Celtics won two of the first three.
R Miscellany: Milwaukee has all but clinched the last
playoff spot in the Eastern Conference, holding a four­
game lead over ninth­place Detroit. Both teams have
five games left . . . The Bucks are coming off back­to­
back overtime road games, beating the Lakers, 124­122,
on Friday but losing to the Nuggets, 128­125, on Sunday
. . . Jabari Parker set season highs Sunday in minutes
(39), points (35), and rebounds (10).
CURTIS COMPTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Brockton firefighter Matt Parziale shares
a chuckle with Rory McIlroy on Monday.
liers on Oct. 17. He has consistently said that he
hopes to be back this season, but this video in no
way shows that a return is near. Still, his progression has been steady and noticeable.
“I think every day where he can accomplish
something new is a big deal,” Stevens said. “He’s
in here six days a week. He gets one off day a
week where he gets to rest it and still gets treatment on it and everything else. But everything
else, he gets those small accomplishments, and
those are a big deal when you’re rehabbing.”
Last week, Hayward posted a video on Instagram in which he drilled a 3-pointer while lying
on his back.
“If he can figure out a way to defend on his
back, he can really shoot it,” Stevens said, smiling.
Adam Himmelsbach can be reached at
adam.himmelsbach@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W
L
p­Toronto
p­BOSTON
p­Cleveland
p­Philadelphia
p­Indiana
p­Washington
Miami
Milwaukee
55
53
47
46
46
42
41
41
21
23
30
30
31
35
36
36
.724
.697
.610
.605
.597
.545
.532
.532
Pct. GB
—
2
8½
9
9½
13½
14½
14½
Streak Home
L1
W6
W3
W 10
W5
L1
L1
L1
31­7
25­13
27­11
26­11
26­13
22­17
24­14
23­15
36­10
31­15
32­15
29­18
31­18
27­21
28­20
24­23
Conf.
Detroit
Charlotte
New York
Chicago
Brooklyn
Orlando
Atlanta
37
34
27
26
25
22
22
40
44
50
51
52
54
55
.481
.436
.351
.338
.325
.289
.286
18½
22
28½
29½
30½
33
33½
W5
L3
L3
W2
L1
L3
W1
24­14
21­19
18­19
16­22
14­26
15­23
16­23
23­26
20­28
15­32
20­27
16­31
13­34
10­37
Streak Home
Conf.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W
L
c­Houston
d­Golden State
p­Portland
San Antonio
Oklahoma City
Utah
Minnesota
New Orleans
62
56
48
45
45
44
44
43
15
21
29
32
33
33
34
34
.805
.727
.623
.584
.577
.571
.564
.558
Pct. GB
—
6
14
17
17½
18
18½
19
L1
W2
W2
W2
W1
W2
L1
L4
32­6
29­11
27­13
31­8
26­13
25­13
28­11
22­17
39­9
32­16
30­17
27­20
26­23
30­17
31­17
22­25
Denver
LA Clippers
LA Lakers
Sacramento
Dallas
Memphis
Phoenix
42
41
33
25
23
21
19
35
36
43
53
54
56
59
.545
.532
.434
.321
.299
.273
.244
20
21
28½
37½
39
41
43½
W2
L2
L2
W1
L3
L2
L 15
28­10
21­16
19­18
13­27
14­25
15­24
9­29
25­23
23­24
17­29
12­36
13­37
18­30
13­35
c — Clinched conference
d — Clinched division
p — Clinched playoff berth
THE PLAYOFF FORMAT
The three division champions in each conference, plus the next five
teams with the best records, qualify. Seeding is based solely on record.
TUESDAY’S GAMES
BOSTON at Milwaukee
8
Charlotte at Chicago
Toronto at Cleveland
7
Portland at Dallas
8:30
9
Brooklyn at Philadelphia
7
Indiana at Denver
Atlanta at Miami
7:30
LA Lakers at Utah
Orlando at New York
7:30
Sacramento at Phoenix
Golden St. at Okla. City
8
Washington at Houston
8
8
9
10
San Antonio at LA Clippers 10:30
Bruins need a partner for Krug with Carlo out
uON HOCKEY
Continued from Page D1
It may be foolhardy to believe
the Bruins can close out the regular
season without another player pulling up lame. All hockey players engage in danger daily given the
speed, physicality, and anger of
their profession.
But the bosses can only plan
with the latest information on
hand, which is that Charlie McAvoy
could be ready to play on Tuesday
while Carlo cannot. It leaves coach
Bruce Cassidy and his colleagues
with one question on defense to be
addressed before the playoffs: who
will play on Krug’s right side?
Before his left leg crumbled
against the Panthers Saturday, Carlo had been raising his hand high
for that designation. The right-shot
defender has steered through more
peaks and valleys as a sophomore
than he did as a freshman, when he
enjoyed the stability of Zdeno
Chara on his left flank. But of late,
Carlo had incorporated more snarl
into his game. Meanness, like the
kind Kevan Miller and Adam Mc-
D5
Quaid have mastered, was the quality the coaching staff most wanted
Carlo to express.
If the coaches want nastiness, a
right shot, and familiarity to complement Krug ’s puck-rushing
touch, McQuaid is their man. Since
2013-14, Krug’s first full NHL season, the point-producing defenseman has logged 2,134 five-on-five
minutes with McQuaid at his side,
according to Corsica Hockey.
No other Black-and-Gold duo
has played together more since
2012-13. Chara and ex-Bruin Dougie Hamilton are second within this
segment with 1,348 five-on-five
minutes together. McQuaid has
been Krug’s security blanket, giving
his partner comfort to go on the attack.
“ You’ve got to develop some
chemistry with whoever it is that
you’re playing with,” Krug said of
the four remaining regular-season
games. “For a while now, we’ve
kind of been bouncing in and out of
D pairings. Whoever you’re on the
ice with, you try and play the same
way. There’s obviously tendencies
that certain players have, strengths
and weaknesses. At the end of the
day, you’ve got to go out and play to
your own strengths and weaknesses. Hopefully you guys can develop
some chemistry.”
The question Cassidy and his
colleagues have to answer, however,
is whether Nick Holden would be a
better option than McQuaid. Holden’s legs are livelier. The ex-Ranger
has more offense in his game. He is
not afraid to go up the ice. On Saturday, Holden knew to sprint to the
far post when David Krejci cycled
up the right-side wall. McQuaid
does not often give himself the
green light in such situations.
T he only issue that keeps a
Krug-Holden pair from being a
slam dunk is that they are both left
shots. Holden is comfortable manning the right side. He logged most
of his shifts on his weak side with
the Rangers and Avalanche. Holden
can pivot, angle his blade, and look
up the ice well enough to get the
puck going when he receives on the
right side in the defensive zone.
But Cassidy prefers left-right
balance on his blue line. Cassidy, a
former defenseman, believes defenders are best served being on
their strong side in their own zone
to execute clean, swift breakouts.
One area where Holden has to
b e m o s t m i n d f u l i s w h e n h e’s
wheeling around his own net.
When he emerges on his weak side,
Holden is on his backhand and
more at risk of being challenged for
the puck.
“When you’re playing the right
side, coming around the net, and
picking up the puck, you’ll be on
your backhand,” Holden said. “So
it’s just a little different angle making some passes in the D-zone. Also
in the neutral zone, when you get a
D-to-D pass, you’re twisting the
other way. Positionally, there’s not a
ton different. You’ll be skating in
the same areas. It’s just sometimes
the body and stick position are a little bit different.”
Even with two left shots on the
same pair, Krug and Holden would
be the best fit together. But given
the Bruins’ luck, Holden might be
needed elsewhere by the playoffs.
Augusta warms
to this firefighter
uMASTERS
Continued from Page D1
teur Championship and earn the most coveted
invite in golf, to savor every chance to root for
the guy who arrived in Augusta with his fellow
firefighting father by his side and a lesson for
us all in his bag.
“Oh yeah, it’s incredible,” Matt agreed
while taking his unexpected turn in the Masters interview room Monday. “But like you
said, I don’t see it that way. Because I’ve obviously lived it. But, no, it’s a great story, and I
understand why there’s so much attention.”
“I am surprised by how much attention,”
Vic said, “but people love firefighters.”
How could we not?
Hero may be an overused word, particularly when it enters the sports lexicon waged on
fields of play rather than those of true battle.
But here, inside a man willing to lay his own
life on the line every day to protect the imperiled in his struggling, hardscrabble hometown, here, inside a man willing to work multiple 24-hour shifts at one of the busiest ladder
companies in the nation to help bust walls
and break down ceilings to beat back fire,
here, inside a man who has done that and
more so many times across the past four years
on the job, there is a hero.
And here, inside a man who did it all while
continuing to find time for the game he has
loved since watching a certain red-shirted kid
named Tiger shake the game’s foundation in
1997, here, inside a man who ignored every
conventional wisdom about blue-collar kids
living in New England winters not being destined for golf greatness, here, inside a man
who walked away from the professional grind
of the mini tour and took the firefighter test
instead, but who couldn’t walk away from the
game, there is an inspiration.
From father to son. Like father, like son.
Hero and inspiration. What a combination.
“My dad actually just retired in November,
and he worked 32 years,” Matt said. “He never
missed any hockey game I had so I figured it
was a good schedule for me to play competitive golf. Being around the guys growing up, I
always enjoyed going to the station and
spending time with them. And I knew most of
them before I got on, and it’s such a great
group of guys. We have such a good time.
“But I don’t think it affects golf in any way.
I put a lot of work into preparing for tournaments, and just because I fought a fire doesn’t
mean golf ’s any easier. It’s different though,
too, where in a fire you’re there with 30 other
guys and sometimes you rely on them, they rely on you. On the golf course, you’re by yourself. It’s two separate situations.”
They are all colliding here. Back home at
Thorny Lea Golf Club, where Parziale is an
honorable heir to the legacy of Hall of Fame
member Herbert Warren Wind, famed golf
writer who coined the term “Amen Corner,”
club manager Chris Barron is opening the
doors for the city’s service men and women to
watch Parziale compete.
“The actual tournament days, Thursday
through Sunday, the city council, the Mayor’s
office, the Brockton Police, and Brockton Fire
have an open invitation to come to Thorny Lea
for drinks, food, and to watch the coverage,”
Barron said. “For Matt’s involvement with the
city, his father’s 30-plus years, it’s just a natural fit. The club is very supportive of him, and
this is such a Brockton story as well. Brockton
has its share of challenges, but this a great
story.”
One that any town, blue collar or blue
blood, struggling or thriving, would be proud
of. For Brockton Fire Station No. 1 over on
Pleasant Street, for Team 4 that counts Matt as
a member (though he’s on leave while golf
takes over), there is no other way to feel.
“It’s a tough job because we’re so busy —
the station Matt works at, the ladder company, was the seventh busiest in the country last
year, and the rescue there, they were the busiest in the US last year,” Brockton Fire Chief
Michael Williams said of his 194-member department. “It’s a tough job. There’s not a lot of
sitting around in Brockton.
“I’ve known Matt since he was a kid. His
dad and I have been friends since we started
in the department. They’re great people. This
is very exciting and it’s great for the city.”
The true golf test will come Thursday,
when the first shot off the first tee counts for
real. But whatever is in store for this Brockton
kid, the one who had to push his August wedding date back two weeks to account for another tournament, being here is a story worth
telling. Over and over again.
Tara Sullivan is a Globe columnist. She can be
reached at tara.sullivan@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @Globe_Tara.
D6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Scoreboard
TUE
WED
4/3
THU
4/4
4/5
FRI
4/6
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SAT
SUN
4/7
4/8
MIA
6:10
NESN
TB
2:05
NESN
TB
1:05
NESN
TB
1:05
NESN
TB
7:30
NESN
Plus,
NBCSN
FLA
7:30
NESN
OTT
7:00
NESN
FLA
7:30
NESN
TOR
8:00
ESPN,
NBCSB
MIL
8:00
NBCSB*
CHI
7:30
NBCSB
Y
Y
MON
4/9
ATL
1:00
NBCSB
MTL
7:30
Ch. 38
Home games shaded
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI­FM 93.7; Bruins, Celtics, and Revolution, WBZ­FM 98.5; * WZLX­FM (100.7)
ON THE AIR
STAN GROSSFELD/GLOBE STAFF
Though she’s a 10-time All-American at UNH, Elinor Purrier hasn’t neglected her duties on her family’s farm.
Purrier has a dairy-tale ending
uPURRIER
Continued from Page D1
Purrier grew up milking 30 dairy
cows each morning at 5:30, before
showering and heading to school. Her
other farm chores included tossing 40pound bales of hay and raising two
pigs.
She started running in eighth grade.
After school, Purrier would run the
mile and a half from tiny Richford High
School, touch the bottom of Canada,
and then run back. She’d run through
picturesque Montgomery, the coveredbridge capital of Vermont, and sometimes attack the steep 6-mile mountain
road up to Jay Peak.
Through hard work, talent, and
toughness, she became a 10-time AllAmerican at UNH, competing in the
mile, 3,000-meter steeplechase (outdoors), and cross-country.
“I think I’m different in the running
community,’’ she said. “I’m just myself
and feel like I have strong roots here
and I’ve always felt like an outsider.”
In high school, the boys teased her
about running, until she kicked their
butts in the local 10K Milk Run.
The graduating class was only 40
kids, and she never rubbed their faces
in it.
“No, ’cause I’m pretty humble,” she
said with a smile.
At away races, Purrier’s father, Charlie, noted that “nobody knew us and nobody knew her and she’d be way out in
front and [other parents] would say she
can’ t keep that up, her form is all
wrong, and we’re saying nothing. If
she’d run by we’d cheer and then it
would get real quiet.”
Elinor says farming has taught her
to be resilient. “It’s taught me life isn’t a
piece of cake, it’s going to throw a thousand challenges at you at once.’’
These are tough times for the dairy
industry. Dairy prices have dipped to
the levels of 35 years ago. One dairy coop recently mailed out a forecast of declining 2018 milk prices accompanied
by a list of suicide prevention hotlines.
“The fate of dairy farming is uncer-
tain,” says Charlie Purrier.
His daughter will forever be a dairy
advocate. Don’t tell her almond milk is
better.
“I can get pretty heated about this,”
she said. “The nutrients in milk are easier for the human to digest because it’s
not a plant.’’
Don’ t think of her as a country
bumpkin, either. She was named the
overall female Scholar Athlete for the
America East Conference for the 201617 school year. Still, coming from a
farm can be “a touchy subject. There’s a
lot of people that don’t get it, they
think, ‘Oh, you’re a hillbilly.’ ’’
Purrier has embraced her community, her family, and her school, according
to UNH women’s track coach Robert
Hoppler.
“One of the things I’m most proud of
is watching her develop as an athlete
and an individual,” he said.
She’s also tough. Don’t try to box out
the 5-foot-3-inch dynamo on the track.
“If there was women’s professional
football, she wouldn’t be running at all,
she’d be playing in the NFL for women,”
said Hoppler. “She’s a physical kid, very,
very, strong. She’d be able to run down
the field all day long.”
But winning a national championship had eluded her.
She finished 15th and third, respectively, her first two seasons in the indoor mile, and last year, she was leading down the stretch but got outkicked
at the line. The stinging loss only motivated her more.
In February, she recorded the second-fastest time for a women’s indoor
mile in NCAA history (4 minutes 26.55
seconds) at the Boston University David Hemery Valentine Invitational.
At the national championships last
month in College Station, Texas, she
made sure she looked like a champion.
Purrier wore her favorite pearl earrings
and put on makeup before the race.
“Look good, feel good, run good,”
was a mantra taught to her by Anne
Twombly, a former UNH runner.
Purrier came out strong and at one
point glanced at the videoboard and
saw she had established a sizable lead.
But with 40 meters left, Dani Jones of
the University of Colorado, known for
her strong kick, quickly closed the distance and even took a one-step lead.
“I didn’t know she was coming,”
Purrier said. “Literally, this is the same
exact thing that happened last year.”
But Purrier and Hoppler had practiced for this very scenario. She thought
of accelerating to the finish, and relaxing to keep the muscles from cramping.
In the last 10 seconds, Jones and
Purrier dashed to the wire.
“You just literally give every ounce
that you have,” she said. “You just have
to find a way to make your legs move a
little bit faster. I thought, I really, really
want it this time.”
At the finish, Purrier leaned forward
and finished in 4:31.76, just 0.06 ahead
of Jones. It was the closest race in the
women’s mile since 1991.
“That was just instinct, “ said Purrier of the lean-in. “I was almost jumping.”
She raised her arms but didn’t immediately celebrate. “I didn’t want to
take the risk of celebrating early, so I
waited a couple of seconds and then
Dani came and patted my back. Then I
saw the scoreboard,” she said.
Recently Purrier returned home for
spring break and spent time with the
family, the cows, and Nelson, her St.
Bernard.
“It still hasn’t sunk in,” she said.
The future is bright. Purrier dreams
of turning pro or possibly competing in
the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. In Montgomery, she is a local celebrity.
When she stopped in to the Montgomery Town School district annual
meeting to see her father, who was
chairing the meeting, someone yelled
out, “Elle is here.” Everyone started
clapping and cheering.
Here on the top of Vermont, she is
on top of the world.
Stan Grossfeld can be reached at
grossfeld@globe.com.
BASEBALL
1 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
6:10 p.m.
8 p.m.
10:07 p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit
Seattle at San Francisco
Boston at Miami
Baltimore at Houston
Cleveland at LA Angels
PRO BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
Boston at Milwaukee
8 p.m.
Golden State at Oklahoma City
10:30 p.m. San Antonio at LA Clippers
PRO HOCKEY
LeBron calls out Alabama football show
Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James is taking on Alabama’s powerful football program, contending the Crimson
Tide lifted concepts from a program on ‘‘Uninterrupted,’’ the
digital media platform James co-founded with business partner Maverick Carter. Last year, ‘‘Uninterrupted’’ aired ‘‘The
Shop,’’ a barber shop forum where James, Golden State forward Draymond Green, retired NBA player Charles Oakley,
and others have conversations while getting their hair cut.
Alabama recently released a trailer for ‘‘Shop Talk,’’ and the
clip shows coach Nick Saban and former Crimson Tide star
Julio Jones in a barber shop setting. On Monday, ‘‘Uninterrupted’’ sent a letter to Alabama, citing ‘‘exploitation’’ and
concerns over copyright infringement and intellectual property. Alabama officials did not immediately reply to a request
for comment . . . The Hornets formally offered their vacant
general manager position to longtime Los Angeles Lakers executive Mitch Kupchak, according to three people with
knowledge of the offer.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
UConn’s Stevens leaves for WNBA
University of Connecticut forward Azura Stevens is giving
up her last year of eligibility and entering the WNBA Draft
April 12 in New York. Under WNBA rules, a player with college eligibility remaining must turn 22 during the calendar
year of the draft to leave school early; Stevens celebrated her
22nd birthday Feb. 1. The 6-foot-6-inch junior transfer from
Duke joins former Husky Morgan Tuck as the only UConn
players to leave school early.
AUTO RACING
Stewart settles with Ward family
The family of racecar driver Kevin Ward Jr., who was fatally injured when struck by Tony Stewart’s sprint car, has apparently reached a settlement in its wrongful death lawsuit
against the former NASCAR star before a may trial could be-
gin. Ward was killed in August 2014 at Canandaigua Motorsports Park after he exited his car following a crash.
MISCELLANY
Canucks’ Sedin twins set to retire
Vancouver Canucks forwards Henrik and Daniel Sedin
will retire at the end of the season. The 37-year-old twins, in
their 17th season in the NHL after being selected second and
third overall in the 1999 draft, announced their plans in a letter on the team’s website . . . Wild defenseman Ryan Suter
has a broken right ankle that will require surgery, putting his
availability for the playoffs in doubt. Suter was hurt Saturday
at Dallas when he crashed leg-first into the end wall. No player in the league has been on the ice more since 2012, when
Suter signed with the Wild . . . Blues forward Scottie Upshall
is out indefinitely with a lacerated left kidney. Upshall, 34,
was injured Saturday night in a 6-0 loss to the Arizona Coyotes . . . Pernilla Lindberg, 31, recorded her first professional
golf victory with a major-record eight sudden-death holes
over two days to finish off Inbee Park in the LPGA’s ANA Inspiration at Rancho Mirage, Calif. Lindberg ended the protracted playoff Monday morning with a 30-foot birdie putt
on the par-4 10th hole . . . Outfielder Yasmany Tomas cleared
waivers and was assigned outright to Triple A Reno by the
Diamondbacks, who are responsible for the $42.5 million he
is owed in the remaining three seasons of a $68.5 million,
six-year contract. Tomas, 27, had the choice to reject the outright assignment, but doing so would have eliminated the remaining years of his contract . . . The Nationals placed catcher Matt Wieters on the 10-day disabled list with a mild left
oblique strain . . . US Open champion Sloane Stephens, citing mental and physical exhaustion from her run to the Miami Open championship, withdrew from the Volvo Car Open
in Charleston, S.C., the season’s first clay-court event . . . Bob
Beattie, a ski racing pioneer who helped launch the World
Cup circuit about 50 years ago, died Sunday in Fruita, Colo.
He was 85. Obituary, B9.
NBCSB
TNT
TNT
7:30 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay
NESN+,
NBCSN
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
Champions: Juventus vs. Real Madrid
FS1
Schools
Golf
BASEBALL
LPGA ANA INSPIRATION
PREP­PRIVATE
St. Sebastian’s 7.....Dexter Southfield 2
At Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Purse: $2.8 million
Fourth round (Par: 72)
Completion of suspended playoff
(a­amateur)
p­Pernilla Lindberg.....65­67­70­71—273
Inbee Park....................70­69­67­67—273
Jennifer Song...............69­69­68­67—273
Ariya Jutanugarn........ 72­69­68­65—274
Jessica Korda...............67­68­73­66—274
Moriya Jutanugarn.....70­70­66­69—275
Charley Hull.................69­68­69­69—275
Ayako Uehara..............66­71­70­69—276
Caroline Masson.........72­68­69­68—277
Jodi Ewart Shadoff.....70­67­69­71—277
Sung Hyun Park..........68­64­74­71—277
Amy Olson....................69­68­68­72—277
Ryann O’Toole.............72­69­70­67—278
Nelly Korda.................. 71­69­71­67—278
Pornanong Phatlum... 70­73­69­67—279
Hannah Green............. 70­74­70­66—280
Brittany Altomare.......68­73­70­69—280
Sun Young Yoo............69­71­71­69—280
Jeongeun Lee6.............71­70­69­70—280
Angela Stanford..........72­73­70­66—281
Azahara Munoz...........71­70­72­68—281
Lydia Ko........................70­70­73­68—281
Lexi Thompson............68­72­70­71—281
Beatriz Recari..............66­72­72­71—281
Marina Alex..................73­69­69­71—282
Austin Ernst.................72­70­69­71—282
Bronte Law...................70­70­70­72—282
Minjee Lee....................74­71­64­73—282
Shanshan Feng............71­70­67­74—282
Michelle Wie................75­67­72­69—283
a­Atthaya Thitikul.......71­71­72­69—283
Mirim Lee.....................73­71­69­70—283
In Gee Chun.................68­71­73­71—283
Ha Na Jang...................67­73­71­72—283
Cristie Kerr...................68­72­70­73—283
In­Kyung Kim...............71­70­68­74—283
Jeong Eun Lee............. 72­67­75­70—284
Alena Sharp................. 71­68­75­70—284
Emma Talley................69­73­71­71—284
Jacqui Concolino.........71­73­72­69—285
Sarah Jane Smith........71­72­73­69—285
Hee Young Park..........69­71­75­70—285
Jenny Shin....................71­73­70­71—285
a­Lilia Vu...................... 73­70­71­71—285
Anna Nordqvist...........73­70­70­72—285
Chella Choi...................68­73­72­72—285
Sei Young Kim.............70­70­73­72—285
So Yeon Ryu.................75­70­73­68—286
Lindy Duncan...............70­73­74­69—286
Brooke M. Henderson 70­75­70­71—286
Hyejin Choi...................73­70­72­71—286
Sandra Gal....................72­71­70­73—286
Nasa Hataoka..............70­73­70­73—286
Caroline Inglis..............71­72­69­74—286
Mi Jung Hur..................71­74­76­66—287
Catriona Matthew.......73­72­70­72—287
Gaby Lopez..................71­74­70­72—287
Stacy Lewis..................72­71­72­72—287
a­Albane Valenzuela..67­71­71­79—288
a­Rose Zhang...............72­70­77­70—289
Cydney Clanton...........71­74­72­72—289
Wei­Ling Hsu...............74­70­71­74—289
Nicole Broch Larsen...71­72­71­75—289
Paula Creamer............ 70­72­75­73—290
Jin Young Ko................72­72­71­75—290
Candie Kung................ 73­72­73­73—291
Lizette Salas................ 75­69­74­73—291
Kris Tamulis.................69­76­71­75—291
Laetitia Beck................74­69­73­75—291
Kim Kaufman...............70­73­73­75—291
Madelene Sagstrom...70­74­72­76—292
Morgan Pressel...........76­69­78­71—294
Tiffany Joh....................72­71­75­76—294
Angel Yin......................70­75­74­78—297
Florentyna Parker.......72­73­75­79—299
Ai Suzuki.......................72­73­80­76—301
p — won in fourth playoff hole.
New England players
280 — Brittany Altomare, Shrews­
bury, 68­73­70­69.
LACROSSE
BOYS
COLONIAL
Adv. Math & Sci. 12.....Nashoba Tech 3
MAYFLOWER
Old Colony 9..........................Blue Hills 6
NORTHEASTERN
Winthrop 13...............................Everett 1
PREP­PRIVATE
Pingree 9.................................... Thayer 2
NONLEAGUE
Acton­Boxboro 13................... Woburn 5
Bp. Fenwick 8...................Swampscott 6
Grafton 8..........................Ipswich 7 (OT)
Milton 9.................................Stoughton 4
GIRLS
NONLEAGUE
Ham.­Wenham 14............Bp. Fenwick 6
Newton North 9.................Watertown 4
Wakefield 14.....................Tewksbury 13
TRACK
GIRLS
NORTHEASTERN
Saugus 66....................Lynn Classical 65
VOLLEYBALL
BOYS
BAY STATE
Framingham 3........................Norwood 0
Natick 3...................................Braintree 1
Needham 3.............................Brookline 0
Weymouth 3..........................Wellesley 2
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Lowell 3..................................Lawrence 2
Methuen 3...........................N. Andover 0
SOUTH ALLIANCE
Gr. New Bedford 3....................Quincy 0
N. Quincy 3................. Digh.­Rehoboth 0
Taunton 3............................ Barnstable 0
WESTERN ALLIANCE
BC High 3....................Cath. Memorial 0
Milford 3..................................Medfield 1
St. John’s (S) 3..............................Millis 0
St. John’s Prep 3....................Xaverian 0
NONLEAGUE
Assabet 3...............................Fitchburg 1
Durfee 3..................................Randolph 1
Lexington 3.................................Norton 0
Westford 3................................Billerica 0
Winchester 3..................Central Cath. 2
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/high­
schools.
Colleges
BASKETBALL
NCAA Tournament ­ Championship
2. Villanova beat 7. Michigan, 79­62
Soccer
MLS
SportsLog
MLB
MLB
NESN
MLB
ESPN
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts.
NYC FC ................... 4 0 1 13
Columbus............... 3 1 1 10
Atlanta Unit FC..... 3 1 0 9
NEW ENGLAND ..... 2 1 1 7
New York............... 2 2 0 6
Montreal ................ 2 2 0 6
Philadelphia .......... 1 1 1 4
Orlando City.......... 1 2 1 4
Toronto FC............. 1 2 0 3
D.C. United ............ 0 3 2 2
Chicago.................. 0 2 1 1
GF GA
10 4
9 5
8 6
6 5
10 5
5 5
2 3
6 8
3 4
5 10
6 8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Kansas City ........... 3 1 1 10
Vancouver ............. 3 1 1 10
LA Galaxy .............. 2 1 1 7
Los Angeles FC..... 2 1 0 6
Minnesota Uni ...... 2 3 0 6
FC Dallas................ 1 0 2 5
Colorado ................ 1 1 1 4
Houston.................. 1 2 1 4
Real Salt Lake....... 1 2 1 4
San Jose................. 1 2 0 3
Portland ................. 0 2 2 2
Seattle.................... 0 3 0 0
10
7
7
9
6
5
6
7
4
6
4
0
9
7
6
5
9
2
4
6
9
7
9
5
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
FRIDAY, APRIL 6
Montreal at NEW ENGLAND............7:30
SATURDAY, APRIL 7
Houston at New York.............................3
Los Angeles FC at Atlanta United FC..5
San Jose at Philadelphia.......................7
D.C. United at Toronto FC................7:30
Colorado at FC Dallas............................8
Columbus at Chicago....................... 8:30
Vancouver at Real Salt Lake...........9:30
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE
GP W D L GF GA Pts
Man City...........31 27 3 1 88 21 84
Man United ......31 21 5 5 60 23 68
Liverpool...........32 19 9 4 75 35 66
Tottenham........31 19 7 5 62 26 64
Chelsea.............31 17 5 9 53 30 56
Arsenal..............31 15 6 10 58 41 51
Burnley .............31 12 10 9 29 27 46
Leicester...........31 11 10 10 47 43 43
Everton .............32 11 7 14 38 53 40
Bournemouth...32 9 10 13 39 51 37
Watford ............32 10 7 15 41 57 37
Newcastle ........31 9 8 14 31 40 35
Brighton............31 8 10 13 28 42 34
West Ham ........31 8 9 14 39 57 33
Swansea ...........31 8 7 16 25 44 31
Huddersfield ....32 8 7 17 25 53 31
Crystal Pal........32 7 9 16 31 50 30
Southampton...31 5 13 13 29 47 28
Stoke .................32 6 9 17 29 61 27
West Brom.......32 3 11 18 25 51 20
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Arsenal 3.......................................Stoke 0
Chelsea 1.............................Tottenham 3
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Everton vs. Liverpool...............7:30 a.m.
Stoke vs. Tottenham...................10 a.m.
Leicester vs. Newcastle..............10 a.m.
West Brom vs. Swansea............ 10 a.m.
Watford vs. Burnley....................10 a.m.
Bournemouth vs. Crystal Palace10 a.m.
Brighton vs. Huddersfield..........10 a.m.
Man City vs. Man United......11:30 a.m.
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Brighton 0...............................Leicester 2
Crystal Palace 1....................Liverpool 2
Everton 1.................................Man City 3
Man United 2..........................Swansea 0
Newcastle 1.....................Huddersfield 0
Watford 2.......................Bournemouth 2
West Brom 1........................................... B
Tennis
WTA VOLVO CAR OPEN
Singles first round
Alize Cornet (14) def. Kateryna
Bondarenko, 6­1, 6­2.; Christina
McHale def. Zarina Diyas, 6­4, 6­2.; Ber­
narda Pera def. Jana Cepelova, 6­2,
6­2.; Laura Siegemund def. Natalia
Vikhlyantseva, 7­5, 6­2.; Varvara Lep­
chenko def. Andrea Petkovic, 6­4, 7­5.;
Kiki Bertens (12) def. Veronica Cepede
Royg, 6­4, 6­1.; Fanny Stollar def. Fran­
cesca di Lorenzo, 7­5, 6­1.; Daria Gavr­
ilova (11) def. Ons Jabeur, 1­6, 6­4, 6­3.;
Naomi Osaka (10) def. Jennifer Brady,
6­4, 6­4.; Camila Giorgi def. Silvia Soler­
Espinosa, 6­1, 6­4.; Polona Hercog def.
Maryna Zanevska, 6­1, 6­4.; Mihaela
Buzarnescu (15) def. Vera Lapko, 6­4,
retired.; Aleksandra Krunic def.
Bethanie Mattek­Sands, 6­2, 6­2.; Caro­
line Dolehide def. Johanna Larsson,
5­7, 6­0, 6­4.
WTA ABIERTO SEGUROS
Singles
First Round
Ana Bogdan (6) def. Victoria Rodri­
guez, 4­6, 6­4, 7­6 (5).; Alison Riske def.
Evgeniya Rodina, 6­0, 7­6 (4).; Sachia
Vickery (7) def. Irina Falconi, 6­1, 6­4.;
Ajla Tomljanovic (8) def. Anna Karolina
Schmiedlova, 4­6, 6­1, 7­6 (6).
AHL
SUNDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled
MONDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Providence at Bridgeport......10:30 a.m.
Lehigh Valley at Charlotte....................7
Hershey at WB/Scranton.................7:05
Milwaukee at Chicago...........................8
Cleveland at Iowa...................................8
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Lehigh Valley at Charlotte....................7
Springfield at Belleville......................... 7
Rochester at Laval............................ 7:30
Cleveland at Milwaukee........................8
Rockford at San Antonio.......................8
Stockton at Texas............................. 8:30
Ontario at Bakersfield......................9:30
San Diego at San Jose.........................10
Latest line
NBA
Tuesday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At Phila..................9 ...............Brooklyn
At Cleveland.........1½ ................ Toronto
At Miami.............11½ ..................Atlanta
At New York.........1 ................Orlando
At Houston.......OFF .........Washington
At Milwaukee.......2 ............... BOSTON
At Oklahoma City3½ .......Golden State
Charlotte............... 5 ...........At Chicago
Portland................ 8½ .............. At Dallas
At Denver..............3½ .................Indiana
At Utah..............OFF .............LA Lakers
At Phoenix........OFF .........Sacramento
San Antonio..........1 .....At LA Clippers
National Hockey League
Tuesday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At Columbus..­233 Detroit............+213
Phila.................­158 At NY Island..+148
At New Jersey­223 NY Rangers...+203
At Tampa Bay OFF BOSTON...........OFF
Nashville.........­127 At Florida.......+117
At Montreal.... OFF Winnipeg.........OFF
At Calgary......­131 Arizona.......... +121
At Vancouver. OFF Las................Vegas
At San Jose.... ­174 Dallas.............+162
Transactions
BASEBALL
Baltimore (AL): Signed OF Michael
Saunders on a minor league contract.
Kansas City (AL): Claimed OF Abraham
Almonte off outright waivers from
Cleveland. Designated P Miguel Al­
monte for assignment.
Seattle (AL): Seny OF Cameron Perkins
outright to Tacoma (PCL).
Texas (AL): Selected the contract of P
Bartolo Colon from Round Rock (PCL).
Optioned P Nick Gardewine to Round
Rock. Transferred P Ricardo Rodriguez
from the 10­ to 60­day DL. Announced
1B Tommy Joseph cleared waivers and
accepted an outright assignment to
Frisco (Texas).
Pittsburgh (NL): Placed P Joe Mus­
grove on 10­day DL, retroactive to Fri­
day. Recalled P Clay Holmes from Indi­
anapolis (IL).
FOOTBALL
Indianapolis (AFC): Signed LS Luke
Rhodes.
HOCKEY
Boston (NHL): Fined Boston F Brad
Marchand $5,000 for cross­checking.
Calgary (NHL): Assigned F Dillon Dube
to Stockton (AHL).
New Jersey (NHL): Signed F Marian
Studenic to a three­year, entry­level
contract.
Vancouver (NHL): Announced Fs Hen­
rik and Daniel Sedin will retire at the
end of the season.
Cleveland Monsters (AHL): Signed F
Phil Lane to a professional tryout
agreement.
San Antonio Rampage (AHL) : Signed F
Travis Barron to an amateur tryout
contract. Reassigned F J.C. Beaudin to
Colorado (ECHL).
Stockton Heat (AHL) : Signed F D’Art­
agnan Joly to an amateur tryout agree­
ment.
COLLEGE
East Tennessee State : Placed football
coach Randy Sanders on paid adminis­
trative leave.
Michigan State : Freshman F Jaren
Jackson announced he is entering the
NBA draft.
Uconn : Announced junior F Azura Ste­
vens will enter the WNBA draft.
NBA G League
Playoffs
Single Elimination
CONFERENCE QUARTERFINALS
Eastern Conference
Raptors 92....................Grand Rapids 88
Erie 96....................................Lakeland 90
Western Conference
Rio Grande Valley 107............Texas 100
South Bay 125......... Oklahoma City 105
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Eastern Conference
Mon., Apr. 2: Raptors at Westchester7
Tue., Apr. 3: Erie at Fort Wayne..........7
Western Conference
Mon., Apr. 2: Rio Grande at Austin.....7
Tue., Apr. 3: South Bay at Reno...........9
Ski conditions
MAINE
Big Squaw — mg, 9­20 base, 29­29
trails, 1­1 lifts
Bigrock — sc, 12­36 base, 35­35 trails,
3­3 lifts
Black Mtn — mg, 25­25 base, 26­35
trails, 2­5 lifts
Mt Abram — pp, 36­36 base, 47­54
trails, 3­5 lifts
Shawnee Peak — pp, 30­42 base, 40­42
trails, 5­6 lifts
Sugarloaf — mg, 24­36 base, 86­162
trails, 8­13 lifts
Sunday River — mg, 18­28 base, 11­135
trails, 10­15 lifts
MASSACHUSETTS
Berkshire East — sc, 6­24 base, 30­45
trails, 3­5 lifts
Jiminy Peak — mg, 15­40 base, 43­45
trails, 5­9 lifts
Wachusett — mg, 7­50 base, 21­26
trails, 4­8 lifts
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Attitash — mg, 4­14 base, 28­68 trails,
4­11 lifts
Black — mg, 12­36 base, 21­45 trails,
2­5 lifts
Bretton Woods — mg, 12­24 base, 47­
97 trails, 3­10 lifts
Cannon — sc, 24­36 base, 61­97 trails,
5­11 lifts
Loon — mg, 25­36 base, 43­61 trails, 5­
10 lifts
McIntyre — sc, 12­12 base, 9­9 trails,
3­4 lifts
Mount Sunapee — mg, 20­28 base, 37­
66 trails, 3­10 lifts
Waterville Valley — sc, 16­20 base, 51­
60 trails, 5­11 lifts
Wildcat — lsgr, 20­40 base, 44­48 trails,
3­5 lifts
VERMONT
Bolton Valley — mg, 25­40 base, 42­71
trails, 3­6 lifts
Burke — mg, 16­40 base, 27­50 trails,
4­4 lifts
Jay Peak — mg, 20­46 base, 73­79 trails,
9­9 lifts
Killington — lsgr, 18­24 base, 90­155
trails, 12­22 lifts
Mad River Glen — sc, 12­36 base, 35­52
trails, 3­5 lifts
Magic — sc, 24­42 base, 42­50 trails, 3­5
lifts
Middlebury — mg, 6­36 base, 9­17
trails, 3­4 lifts
Mount Snow — mg, 32­42 base, 82­86
trails, 4­20 lifts
Okemo — mg, 36­48 base, 107­121
trails, 8­20 lifts
Smugglers Notch — mg, 14­56 base,
60­78 trails, 4­8 lifts
Stowe — vc, 1 new, 30­60 base, 75­116
trails, 7­13 lifts
Stratton — mg, 44­44 base, 71­97 trails,
4­11 lifts
Sugarbush — sc, 20­52 base, 72­111
trails, 8­16 lifts
NFL
CALENDAR
April 16 — Clubs with returning head
coaches may begin offseason workout
programs.
April 20 — Deadline for restricted
free agents to sign offer sheets.
April 26­28 — NFL Draft.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
D7
Auto Dealer Directory
Kelly Chrysler*
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
Kelly Honda*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Audi Shrewsbury
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016
herbchamberslincoln.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
Honda Village*
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
Mirak Hyundai
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
Boch Maserati*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
Kelly Maserati*
Ferrari Of New England*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti
Westborough*
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Infiniti of Hanover
2060 Washington St, Hanover
781-570-5200
infinitiofhanover.com
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Kelly Infiniti*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
Framingham Ford*
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
Kelly Ford*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
Quirk Ford*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
540 Southern Artery, Quincy
617-770-0070
quirkford.com
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Best Chevrolet*
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St, Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.*
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Kelly Jeep*
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Mirak Chevrolet*
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Lev Kia of Framingham*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
VillageSubaru.com
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
Toyota of Watertown*
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
340 Mystic Ave, Medford
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Nissan of Danvers*
Kelly Volkswagen*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyauto.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
Cityside*
Toyota of Wellesley*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Mirak Genesis
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
smart center Boston
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington*
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
smart center Lynnfield
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
volvoofnorwood.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
NEW 2018 MASERATI
GHIBLI
S Q4
Stk# M584, MSRP $79,910
LEASE
FOR
588
$
*
MO.
/36 MOS.
$6,999 CASH OR TRADE DOWN
7500 MILES PER YEAR
NEW 2018 MASERATI
LEVANTE
AWD
Stk# M594, MSRP $79,910
LEASE
FOR
639
$
**
MO./
36 MOS.
$6,999 CASH OR TRADE DOWN
7500 MILES PER YEAR
Available at Herb Chambers Maserati Boston through 4/9/18 to qualified lessees with Tier 1 approved credit through JP Morgan Chase Bank NA. Delivery by 4/9/18
required. Subject to availability – quantities are limited. *36-month closed-end lease for a new 2018 model year Maserati Ghibli S Q4 with an MSRP of $79,910 (stock #
M584). **36-month closed-end lease for a new 2018 model year Maserati Levante SUV All-wheel Drive with an MSRP of $79,910 (stock # M594). Lessee is responsible
for insurance, maintenance, repairs, $0.30 per mile over 7500 miles per year and excess wear and tear. Lessee may have to meet additional program requirements. All
applicable taxes and fees (title, registration, doc/title prep, bank acquisition) are additional to be paid by customer.
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston
527 Boston Post Road • Rt. 20 • Wayland, MA 01778
888-759-9612
HerbChambersMaserati.com
Sales: Monday-Thursday 8:30am-8:00pm, Friday 8:30am-6:00pm
Saturday 8:30am-6:00pm, Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm
Service: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pm
T h e
D8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
LOVE LETTERS
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
BY MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN
She might want kids . . . later
Q. I’ve been with my boyfriend for more than
four years. Our relationship is strong — we’ve
lived in different cities, traveled, and currently
live together. Overall he is a great partner. We
have quite the age difference of 13 years — he’s
42 (I’m younger). We’ve discussed getting married and spending our lives together, yet the one
hangup we have is deciding whether or not we
want to have kids. He is 100 percent sure he
doesn’t want kids and I’m about 80 percent sure
that I don’t want children.
We’ve discussed this extensively and I’m just
not sure I can commit without the option of
changing my mind. What if I wake up at 35 and
desperately want a child? Do I leave a sure thing
— my boyfriend — for something I’m not sure I
want?
CHILD OR NOT
A. I wish there was a simple answer to this question — one that involves my being able to know
what you’ll want in the future. Sadly, there isn’t.
All I know is that this issue is plaguing you, despite the 80-20 math. That says plenty.
Something to consider: Is it possible that
your question is about more than children? It
sounds like it might be. At 29, you’re not sure
what you want next, but your boyfriend already
has answers. Perhaps you want a partner who’s
more up in the air about everything. It might be
nice to be with someone who’s like, “Let’s figure
it out together.”
Most of the time I tell people that if they really love their lives, they shouldn’t worry too
much about things they might want in the future. But in your case, this is really bothering
you, and you say you’re not sure you can commit. That means this can’t be ignored.
MEREDITH
FRANK FRANKLIN II/AP
Actress Cynthia Nixon is trying to unseat New York Governor Andrew Cuomo.
Nixon takes campaign to ‘Wendy Williams Show’
Many are intensely interested in Cynthia Nixon’s campaign for governor of New York. How
else to get an update on the vibe among the “Sex
and the City” ladies?
Kristin Davis was first in line with her support, tweeting that Nixon is “one of the most intelligent and caring people” in her life. Sarah Jessica Parker finally fell in line, posting her support
on Instagram: “My sister on and off screen, you
have my love, support and vote.” And Kim Cattrall, who recently had a public tiff with Parker,
issued a wan, vague tweet: “I support & respect
any former colleague’s right to make their own
career choices.”
For those who wonder about the far less im-
Tuesday April 3, 2018
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Julie &
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I believe there is a compromise for 95 percent of the problems that people face in relationships. There is no compromise when it
comes to kids. And nobody can tell you what to
do, or what you may/may not want five years in
News
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
Amanpour Beyond
Black America Since MLK/I Rise (CC):
100 Days
Part 1 of 2. Jesse Jackson, Nas. HD TV-PG
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a family man. NEW HD TV-14-LV NEW
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Splitting
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At 29, I was completely sure I didn’t want
kids. At 31, I was completely sure I wanted a
kid. Don’t tie him down if you think you want to
be a mother one day. Let him go. If he finds his
way back to you at some point, knowing that
kids might be in the picture, then it will be a decision he made on his own.
LUCILLEVANPELT
Sports
American Exp.: The
MLK assassination.
Jeopardy NCIS: An orphaned
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7:00pm
TV-G
READERS RESPOND:
portant matter of Nixon’s politics, the actress,
who is trying to unseat two-term Democrat Andrew Cuomo, has granted her first TV sit-down
interview to Wendy Williams. Nixon will appear
on “The Wendy Williams Show” on Wednesday
to discuss her campaign. Why Wendy Williams?
The daytime talk show is popular in New York,
and Nixon has appeared on it before, in 2012.
“We win by getting her in front of voters, because we actually want them to see the real Cynthia,” campaign spokesperson Rebecca Katz told
Variety. “And that’s what we get with Wendy. Her
viewers are a large and crucial part of the electorate, and her show reaches all corners of the
state.”
Masters
Highlts
Live/Masters: A look at the tournament.
Overtime NHL
Top 10
Overtime Sports
Sports
Red Sox
Burgers
Andi
Mack
Burgers
Bizaard.
(10:01) Siren (CC)
HD TV-14-LV
F. House F. House F. House F. House Friends
Nella
Sunny
Peppa
Peppa
Peppa
Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
Stuck/
Bunk'd
Middle
HD TV-G
The 700 Club (CC)
HD TV-G
Friends
Friends
Umizoomi Rusty R.
Friends
Blaze
AMC
Society really pressures people to have children. Do your own thing.
MOOSEDODGER---I’m 100 percent sure I don’t want (more)
kids and I’d never marry anyone who isn’t also
100 percent sure they don’t want kids.
SETTINGTHEWORLDONFIRE
I know I’ve shared this before, but my exwife said she never wanted kids. I assumed all
my life that I’d someday have kids, but it was
never a burning need. So we didn’t have any.
Fast forward 18 years, to the end of the marriage, and she said, “I wanted kids, I just didn’t
want them with you.” Yeah, that left a mark.
Still there. But it’s not something that runs my
life either.
SLIM-DOES-BOSTON
Sorry this happened to you, Slim.
FREEADVICEFORYOU
If she stayed with you 18 years, she really
didn’t want kids. She was just saying that to
hurt you.
-ROADRUNNERPeople do change their minds sometimes,
letter writer. At 44, I was sure I didn’t want any
more kids. At 48, I had another and I couldn’t
be happier. Being “up there in age” has made
me appreciate being a father even more.
THATGUYINRI
If you stick with this guy then DO NOT begrudge him for it later. Or act passive-aggressively when you get invited to eight baby showers in one year when you’re in your early 30s.
It’ll sting.
TABLEFORONE
Baby fever can be all encompassing if it hits
you. Relationships come and go; kids are forever. Think carefully.
THEKIDSRALLRIGHT
Column and comments are edited and
reprinted from boston.com/loveletters. Send
letters to meredith.goldstein@globe.com.
Specials
7:00pm
A&E
the future. The fact that you’re asking the question, in my opinion, means there is a strong
likelihood that you know you want kids in the
future.
BOSTONSWEETS21
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T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
MOVIE STARS
New releases
YYY½ Foxtrot A startling, quietly
sardonic drama from Israel in which
sins of state violence and repression
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dead and Yonathan Shiray as the son
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(“Lebanon”). In Hebrew, with subtitles. (108 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYY Isle of Dogs A hand-crafted
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a film visually in love with Japanese
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(98 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
YY½ Ready Player One Ernest Cline’s
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(138 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RPX G (12:00) 7:10
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ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (12:50, 1:20, 3:50) 4:20, 6:50,
7:20, 9:50, 10:20
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (12:25, 12:55) 4:00,
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PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) G (3:30) 9:45
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (1:00, 3:45) 6:35, 9:30
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (12:05) 4:05, 7:15, 10:25
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (12:15) 6:45
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) (12:30, 3:40) 7:30, 10:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (12:40) 4:10, 7:40, 10:45
GAME NIGHT (R) (3:55) 10:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (11:35, 2:50) 6:20, 10:10
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 10:40, 1:30, 4:20, 7:20, 10:10
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 10:30, 3:50, 9:30
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YYYY The Death of Stalin From Armando Iannucci (“Veep,” “In the
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comedy, it features fine performances
by Steve Buscemi (as Nikita Khrushchev), Jeffrey Tambor (Malenkov),
and more. (106 min., R) (Ty Burr)
D9
YYY½ Love, Simon Fans of “Simon
vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda” — the
beloved 2015 young adult novel by
Becky Albertalli — can celebrate.
“Love, Simon” is great. It’s not exactly
like the novel, but it captures the best
parts. Part of the success of the film
can be credited to Nick Robinson, who
is perfect as Simon, a well-liked high
school senior who’s gay and doesn’t
know how — or when — to share. (96
min., PG-13) (Meredith Goldstein)
YYY Red Sparrow It seems that Jennifer Lawrence and director Francis
Lawrence were just getting warmed
up with the boundaries they tested in
the “Hunger Games” franchise. The
pair reunite for a story about a Russian spy that’s heavy on themes of sexual degradation and sadistic violence.
This is arrestingly dark fare that takes
risks across the board. Joel Edgerton
costars. (139 min., R) (Tom Russo)
YYY Unsane A beguilingly nasty exercise in paranoia, shot on an iPhone
by director Steven Soderbergh. Claire
Foy (TV’s “The Crown”) plays a damaged young woman held at a mental
institution against her will. The movie
messes with your head and vanishes,
leaving a lingering aftertaste of unreliable narrative. (98 min., R) (Ty Burr)
LEXINGTON
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:15, 1:45, 4:05,
4:35, 6:55, 7:25, 9:45, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:15, 2:05, 4:45, 7:40, 10:20
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:05, 1:30, 3:55, 6:25,
8:50
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 12:50, 3:45, 6:35, 9:20
UNSANE (R) 2:25, 5:00, 7:35, 10:00
ACRIMONY (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 9:40, 10:30
()
INFO VALID 4/03/18 ONLY
()
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
8
Stadium Seating
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
Rear Window Captioning
G
5
6
K
Hearing Impaired
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE 10
121 Grandview Rd.
CAPITOL THEATRE
5 6 DIG
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
www.amctheatres.com
6 I DIG
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 11:00, 5:10, 10:30
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 2:30,
7:50
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:40, 7:30, 10:30
BLACK PANTHER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:30, 4:45
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:15, 2:20, 7:30, 10:15
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:40, 2:50,
6:00, 9:10
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 12:40,
3:50, 7:00, 10:10
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 11:00, 2:15, 4:30, 7:40,
10:10
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20,
10:00
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 5:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:00, 2:05, 4:45, 7:45, 10:25
ACRIMONY (R) G 11:10, 2:00, 4:40, 7:00, 9:50
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) 11:15, 2:00,
4:40, 7:15, 9:50
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 4:15, 7:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 5:00, 7:30
PETER RABBIT (PG) 4:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 4:20, 6:30
THE LEISURE SEEKER (R) 7:30
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 5:00, 7:40
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G (12:30, 3:50) 7:00,
10:10
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) G (1:15, 4:30) 7:45
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) (1:35, 4:35) 7:35, 10:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (4:00) 10:00
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) G (1:00) 7:05
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (1:50, 5:00) 8:00, 10:30
UNSANE (R) (1:20, 4:20) 6:50, 9:45
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) (12:40, 4:05) 7:20, 10:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (1:30, 4:15) 7:15, 10:05
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (12:35, 3:30) 6:30, 9:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (1:45, 4:45) 7:30, 10:25
RED SPARROW (R) (2:00, 5:05) 8:15
GAME NIGHT (R) (4:05) 6:35, 9:35
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:45, 3:45) 6:45, 9:55
PETER RABBIT (PG) (1:05, 3:35) 6:15, 9:50
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN SING-ALONG (NR)
(12:50)
BELMONT
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
www.coolidge.org
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
ITZHAK (NR) 11:15, 4:45, 9:15
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
9:55
THE LEISURE SEEKER (R) 1:45
FOXTROT (R) 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 6:45, 9:15
BURLINGTON
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
20 South Ave.
5 6 DIG
www.studiocinema.com
www.amctheatres.com
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 4:30, 7:30
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
CAMBRIDGE
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
5 6 8 DIG
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
www.applecinemas.com
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG)
(1:25) 4:25, 7:35, 10:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G (12:30, 3:40) 7:00,
10:10
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) G (1:00) 4:30, 8:00
HICHKI (NR) (12:25, 3:25) 6:15, 9:05
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) (1:10, 3:40) 6:30, 9:10
NEEDI NAADI OKE KATHA (NR) 4:35
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (12:55) 4:00, 7:05,
9:55
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) (12:45, 3:50)
6:45, 9:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (12:05, 2:30) 4:55, 7:30,
9:50
UNSANE (R) (1:30) 4:30, 7:25, 10:05
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) (12:40) 4:05, 7:10, 10:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (1:15) 4:20, 7:20, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (1:10) 4:15, 7:15, 10:25
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (12:35, 3:45) 6:35, 9:25
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:10, 3:35) 6:50, 10:05
RED SPARROW (R) (1:20) 7:45
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:10, 3:55, 6:40, 9:25
HICHKI (NR) G 9:25
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 4:25, 9:05
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 2:00, 4:15, 6:35,
9:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) G 1:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) 6:40
RANGASTHALAM (NR) G 3:00, 6:10, 9:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 1:10, 2:40, 4:00,
5:30, 6:50, 8:30, 9:35
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:55
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:15, 4:00, 6:15, 8:30
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
www.artsemerson.org
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 5 (1:30, 4:00) 6:30, 9:00
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 5 (1:25, 4:05) 6:50, 9:30
ITZHAK (NR) 5 (1:15, 3:45)
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 5 (2:05, 4:35) 7:05, 9:40
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 5 (1:00, 1:35, 2:00, 3:30,
4:10, 4:40) 6:00, 6:45, 7:20, 8:30, 9:10, 9:45
FOXTROT (R) 5 (1:20, 4:15) 7:10, 9:20
UNSANE (R) 5 6:40, 9:25
THE CHINA HUSTLE (R) 5 (1:50, 4:20) 7:15, 9:45
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
CHESTNUT HILL
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
55 Boylston St.
www.amctheatres.com
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 2:45, 6:00, 9:15
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) G 12:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 1:45,
5:00, 8:15
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent G 12:30,
1:30, 3:15, 4:15, 6:00, 7:00, 8:45, 9:45
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
2:00, 6:00
AMAZON ADVENTURE 3D (NR) 12:00, 4:00
GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D (NR) 1:00, 3:00, 5:00
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.REGmovies.com
ACRIMONY (R) (12:10, 3:15) 7:05, 10:35
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G (3:05) 10:05
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) G (11:30) 6:40
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:20
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 2:00, 8:00
GAME NIGHT (R) 2:00, 8:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:40, 2:30, 6:00, 9:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:40, 2:30, 6:00, 9:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:20, 3:00, 6:30, 10:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:20, 3:00, 6:30, 10:00
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30,
10:40
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30,
10:40
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:00, 5:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:00, 5:00
DANVERS
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
100 Independence Way
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 10:40, 4:20, 10:00
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 1:40,
7:10
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 10:00, 1:00, 4:00, 7:10,
10:15
DEDHAM
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:55, 7:10, 10:05
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:50, 5:05, 8:15
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:05
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:40, 3:25, 6:25, 9:05
UNSANE (R) 11:35, 10:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:25, 4:25, 6:50, 9:20
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 5:15, 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:20, 3:35, 6:45, 9:55
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:45, 3:00, 6:15, 9:25
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 12:45, 4:00, 7:15,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:30, 1:00, 2:10,
4:10, 4:55, 7:05, 7:35, 10:20
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:25, 2:15, 5:00, 7:40, 10:35
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:40, 1:55, 4:20, 6:35,
9:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 11:15, 2:05, 4:45, 7:25
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 1:45, 4:15, 6:55, 9:30
ACRIMONY (R) 9:50
ACRIMONY (R) 12:15, 3:30, 6:40, 10:00
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:35, 4:30, 7:40, 10:35
PETER RABBIT (PG) 12:05, 2:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 4:40, 7:20, 9:50
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:40, 3:35, 6:25, 9:15
UNSANE (R) 3:55, 9:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 6:55, 9:35
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 1:25, 6:50
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:45, 12:15, 3:00,
3:30, 6:15, 6:45, 9:25, 9:55
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 12:45, 4:00, 7:15,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:15, 1:10, 1:55,
3:50, 4:35, 6:40, 7:25, 9:20, 10:05
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 12:50, 3:40, 7:00, 9:45
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:40, 1:50, 4:05, 6:35,
9:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:05, 3:45, 6:30, 9:05
ACRIMONY (R) 1:20, 4:10, 7:05, 10:00
FRAMINGHAM
LEXINGTON VENUE
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
5 DOL DSS
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 4:00, 7:00
THE POST (PG-13) 6:45
BOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORY (NR) 4:15
LITTLETON
READING
O'NEIL CINEMAS AT THE POINT
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
1208 Constitution Ave 978-506-5089
FURNITURE - READING
www.oneilcinemas.com
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 11:45, 3:00, 6:50, 10:10
GAME NIGHT (R) 5 1:15, 10:20
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 5 10:30, 4:00, 7:25
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 5 11:15, 1:50, 4:35, 7:15,
9:55
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 5 10:45, 1:25, 4:15, 6:40,
9:30
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 5 10:55, 1:30, 4:05,
6:40, 9:40
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 5 11:05, 2:05, 4:50, 7:35,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 5 11:30, 2:15, 5:00,
7:45
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) 5 10:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 5 10:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 12:00, 3:30, 7:00
5 8
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 1:30, 3:15, 4:30,
6:20, 7:30, 9:35, 10:30
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:30, 4:05, 6:40, 9:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:25, 4:10, 7:00, 9:40
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 2:00, 9:50
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 6:15, 6:45, 7:20, 9:25, 9:55,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:05, 11:40, 1:45,
2:15, 4:25, 4:55, 7:05, 7:35, 9:45, 10:10
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:35, 9:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:10, 2:20, 4:40, 6:50,
9:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:10, 3:50, 6:25, 9:10
UNSANE (R) 11:10, 4:50, 7:20
ACRIMONY (R) 1:35, 4:20, 7:10, 10:00
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.amctheatres.com
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 12:30, 3:30, 6:30,
9:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 1:30,
4:30, 7:30, 10:15
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:30, 9:50
BLACK PANTHER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:50, 6:45
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 3:15, 9:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G 12:00, 6:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 11:45, 3:00, 6:20,
9:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 12:45,
4:00, 7:10, 10:15
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 11:30, 12:15, 1:00,
2:30, 4:45, 5:30, 7:20
SHERLOCK GNOMES 3D (PG) RealD 3D G 3:15, 10:40
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG) AMC
Independent G 1:45, 4:20, 7:00, 9:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) G 11:35
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:45, 4:15, 9:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) RealD 3D 1:00, 7:00
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 2:05, 6:50, 9:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 4:25
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 9:35
ACRIMONY (R) G 1:15, 4:10, 7:20, 10:15
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) AMC Independent 1:25,
4:10, 6:50, 9:40
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) G 1:30, 4:10,
6:45, 9:30
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) AMC Independent G 2:30,
5:05, 7:40, 10:15
UNSANE (R) AMC Independent G 8:00
UNSANE (R) AMC Independent 10:10
READY PLAYER ONE: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(PG-13) 12:50
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) 3:50, 6:50, 9:50
REVERE
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:00, 2:20, 2:50, 6:05,
6:35, 9:15
PETER RABBIT (PG) 12:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:00, 2:55, 6:10, 9:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:40, 4:30, 7:35, 10:15
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 12:30, 6:20
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) 1:35, 4:15, 6:55,
9:35
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 1:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:45, 6:15, 6:45, 7:15,
8:00, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:05,
11:35, 1:45, 2:15, 2:45, 4:25, 4:55, 7:10, 7:40, 9:30,
10:00, 10:30
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:20, 4:20, 7:05, 9:50
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:25, 12:55, 2:35, 3:05,
4:50, 5:20, 7:00, 9:20
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:10, 3:55, 6:30, 9:10
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG) 1:25,
4:10, 7:25, 10:10
THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT (R) 7:30, 9:40
UNSANE (R) 1:15, 3:40, 6:40, 9:05
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:15, 2:30, 5:45, 8:55
ACRIMONY (R) 1:00, 3:50, 7:20, 10:05
SOMERVILLE
MILLBURY
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
5 6 I DIG
5 6 8 DSS
www.showcasecinemas.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:25, 3:25, 4:05, 6:30,
7:10, 9:50, 10:20
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:30, 1:50
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 2:00, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:35, 2:20, 5:05, 7:45, 10:25
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 5:00, 7:25
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:00, 12:30,
1:00, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 9:30, 10:00,
10:30
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:40, 1:45, 2:15,
4:20, 4:50, 7:00, 7:30, 9:35, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:40
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:45, 2:05, 4:30, 6:55,
9:10
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:15, 3:55, 6:40, 9:20
ACRIMONY (R) 12:50, 3:50, 7:05, 10:05
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
READY PLAYER ONE: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(PG-13) 12:50
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) 3:50, 6:50, 9:50
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
www.jordansimax.com
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:10, 12:55, 3:05, 6:10,
7:00, 9:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:30
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:25, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:35, 4:50, 7:45, 10:25
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:00, 12:30,
1:00, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 10:00, 10:30
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 4:30,
7:05, 9:45, 10:10
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:30, 4:20, 7:30, 10:15
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:05, 2:30, 5:00, 7:10,
9:25
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:45, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05
ACRIMONY (R) 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:20
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:55, 3:40, 4:10, 6:40,
7:10, 10:10
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:00, 1:20
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:35, 4:20, 6:50, 9:35
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:10, 1:55, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 12:05
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) 11:20, 2:00,
4:40, 7:20, 10:05
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 1:10, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:25, 6:15, 6:45, 7:15,
7:45, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25
http://somervilletheatre.com/
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 6:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5:00, 8:00
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 4:10, 5:20, 6:45, 7:45
TAUNTON
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
ACRIMONY (R) (12:45, 3:35) 6:40, 9:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G (1:00, 3:25) 6:50,
8:50
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) G (12:30, 3:55)
6:00, 9:30
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) (1:15, 3:40) 6:20, 10:10
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (12:35, 3:20) 7:30,
10:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (1:10, 3:45) 6:30, 9:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (1:05, 3:50) 7:00, 9:45
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (12:55) 7:20
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (12:40) 4:10, 7:10, 9:50
GAME NIGHT (R) (3:30) 10:10
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:50, 3:55) 6:10, 9:20
WALTHAM
EMBASSY CINEMA
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 (1:00, 4:05, 7:00)
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 5 (1:05, 4:10, 7:20)
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 5 (1:15, 4:00, 7:10)
UNSANE (R) 5 (12:50, 4:20, 7:40)
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 G (4:15, 7:15)
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 G (12:40, 1:10,
6:45)
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 5 G 3:45
WESTBOROUGH
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:20, 3:20, 3:50, 6:30,
7:00, 9:30, 10:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:15
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:55, 2:25, 7:25
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:00, 3:45, 6:25, 9:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:10, 1:45, 4:25, 7:10, 9:45
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 1:35
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 6:15, 6:45, 7:15, 9:25, 9:55,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:05, 11:35, 1:40,
2:10, 4:15, 4:45, 6:50, 7:20, 9:40, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:20, 4:05, 6:55, 9:35
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:50, 2:00, 4:20, 6:35,
9:00
UNSANE (R) 4:50, 10:05
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
10:10
ACRIMONY (R) 1:15, 4:10, 7:05, 9:50
T h e
D10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
Boston’s forecast
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Cloudy and chilly with
some rain and drizzle
developing during the
afternoon. Rain will
continue at night, tapering off
toward daybreak.
NOON
THURSDAY
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Mostly cloudy and
windy; periods of
rain in the afternoon.
Temperatures will be
much warmer during the afternoon. Rain will end early at night
HIGH
42-47
LOW
38-43
HIGH
60-65
LOW
31-36
SATURDAY
FRIDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Windy and colder with a
good deal of sunshine.
Winds will gust to near
40 mph. Wind will
diminish at night and clouds will
increase late.
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
2
6 P.M.
Partly sunny and colder.
However, a storm could
develop offshore. It may
threaten the area with
wintry weather late or during
the day Sunday.
Mainly cloudy and
breezy with a little rain
at times. Rain could be
mixed with snow early
in the day across some areas to
the north and west.
HIGH
45-50
LOW
32-37
NOON
HIGH
42-47
LOW
28-33
HIGH
48-53
LOW
28-33
11
2
12
5
3
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
6 A.M.
By Dave Green
WEDNESDAY
TODAY
3
1
20
5
6
3
4
5
4
9
2
6
1
Difficulty Level
4/03
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Tides
TODAY: Rain will spread back across southern New
England in the afternoon. There will be a period of snow
and ice in northern areas.
TOMORROW: Mild air will surge across the
region, but a strong cold front will bring rain and
strong winds as it sweeps through.
EXTENDED: Much colder air will push
back through the region on Thursday. It
will remain chilly Friday as another stom
system moves in.
A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
High tides
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
1:48 2:16
10.8 10.2
8:02 8:18
-0.6 0.1
High tides
Old Orchard ME
Hampton
Beach NH
Plum Island
Ipswich
1:40 2:09
1:54 2:23
2:02 2:28
1:39 2:08
A.M. P.M.
1:48
1:48
1:51
1:53
1:57
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
A.M. P.M.
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
1:41 2:08
12:39 1:09
1:32 2:00
Boston’s recent climate
Yesterday
High/low
39/31
Mean
35
Departure from normal -8
Departure for month -3
Departure for year +110
5 p.m. rel. humidity 64%
High tides
2:16
2:16
2:20
2:20
2:23
2:53
2:50
2:02
1:55
3:31
3:24
2:30
2:24
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
0
Normal Temperatures
April readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
49.0
34.0
34.7
Norm.
50.5
36.0
33.2
1967
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 39°
100
Record
high
80
75
Normal
high
60
51
Normal
low
40
36
New England marine forecast
Boston Harbor
Wind
Seas
Temp
S 8-16 kts.
1-2 ft.
44/39
East Cape
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Record
low
20
19
Wind
Seas
Temp
0
Vineyard
SE 6-12 kts.
2-4 ft.
44/42
-20
Yesterday’s low 31°
Martha’s
Cod Canal
SE 7-14 kts.
1-3 ft.
44/40
Nantucket
SE 7-14 kts.
2-4 ft.
44/42
Buzzards Bay
SE 6-12 kts.
1-3 ft.
44/41
Provincetown
SE 7-14 kts.
1-3 ft.
45/41
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2
March
Almanac
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
6:23 a.m.
7:12 p.m.
12:48
10:39 p.m.
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Visibility
Wind
High/low temperature
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
T
T 0.05 T
0.6"
T
T
T
0.03 0.01
T
0.09
0.01
0.07
0.01 0.01
0.08
0.11 0.2"
0.0"
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2
LAST
Apr. 8
NEW
Apr. 15
FIRST
Apr. 22
FULL
Apr. 29
MacRobert
Before 5:30 tomorrow morning, spot the waning moon. You’ll find Jupiter to its lower right and
orange Antares to its lower left. Much farther left,
Mars and Saturn form a close pair.
You are more than willing to
make an effort toward a key person in your life. You and this person also might need to reach out
to a mutual friend. Those around
you will be positively affected because of the hard work you put
in. Tonight: Be sensitive to a
loved one's feelings.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Others appear to be knocking on
your door. Make it OK to ignore
outside activity for a little while.
You want to have less of a hectic
pace. Not everyone can sustain
your high level of energy, which is
a gift that allows you to accomplish more than most people. Tonight: Out late.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Recognize your limitations. Ex-
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
is 69. Blues singer-guitarist
John Mooney is 63. Actor Alec
Baldwin is 60. Actor David
Hyde Pierce is 59. Comedianactor Eddie Murphy is 57. Rock
singer Sebastian Bach is 50.
Olympic gold medal ski racer
Picabo Street is 47.
ºIn 1776, George Washington
received an honorary Doctor of
Laws degree from Harvard College.
March
April
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
Precip days in April
East
♠ Q8742
♥ None
♦ J 10 7 6
♣AQ97
South
♠ A5
♥ A K J 10 7 4
♦ 42
♣653
South
1♥
4♥
West
North
East
Pass
2 NT
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — ♠ J
Unlucky Louie is my club’s foremost believer in Murphy’s
Law. Louie says that what falls in the bathroom will land in
the toilet, and the light bulb that’s hardest to replace will
burn out most often.
Louie was declarer at today’s four hearts. As usual,
something went wrong, and as usual, Louie failed to cope.
He won the first spade with the ace and took the ace of
trumps, sighing when East discarded. Louie took the king
of trumps and next led a club to dummy’s king. He lost
three clubs and a trump.
“If I were a mechanic,” Louie said, “my nose would start
to itch just when my hands were covered with grease.”
After Louie takes the top trumps, he should cash the A-K
of diamonds, ruff a diamond, lead a spade to the king and
return dummy’s last diamond.
When East follows, Louie discards a club: a loser on a
loser. East must concede a ruff-sluff or give dummy the
king of clubs. Even if West ruffs the fourth diamond to lead
a club, Louie loses only three tricks.
0.8"
0.4"
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
Today is Tuesday, April 3, the
93rd day of 2018. There are
272 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Actress-singer Doris
Day is 96. Conservationist Jane
Goodall is 84. Songwriter Jeff
Barry is 80. Actress Marsha
Mason is 76. Singer Wayne
Newton is 76. Singer Tony Orlando is 74. Comedy writer Pat
Proft is 71. Folk-rock singer/
songwriter Richard Thompson
1.0"
0.55
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday,
April 3, 2018:
This year you opt to get involved
in a key cause. There will be no
sitting back and letting others act
on your ideas. You will personally
guide your project and ideas to
completion. If you become frustrated, you easily could lose your
temper. Try to tame your emotions. If you are single, your appeal soars throughout your birthday year. If you know what kind
of relationship you desire, you
have the ability to create it. If you
are attached, the two of you could
be working toward a key goal together. Listen to each other's
thoughts and ideas. SCORPIO
helps ground you.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
1.2"
0.71
Moon phases
Mostly sunny Moon and planets before dawn – A.
100 miles
west at 27 m.p.h.
15/3
6.0”
1919
April
1.15
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
West
♠ J 10 9 6
♥Q 6 3
♦Q98
♣ J 10 8
2:56 3:34
2:22 2:44
10:5211:14
10:4511:07
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
30
47
44
4652
4900
4539
South dealer — Both sides vulnerable
North
♠ K3
♥ 9852
♦ AK53
♣K42
0.11”
1
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
0.11”
Norm. month to date 0.27”
Year to date
13.87”
Norm. year to date 11.20”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ K 3 ♥ 9 8 5 2 ♦ A K 5 3 ♣ K
4 2. You open one diamond, and your partner responds two
clubs. What do you say?
ANSWER: This is a matter of personal style. Some players
would bid 2NT to show a balanced minimum opening bid.
Others would raise to three clubs. I would accept either
action. I would not accept a bid of two hearts, even if I
were playing a style in which a “reverse” after a two-overone response did not promise extra strength.
plain what you expect from
someone, but don't forget to be
receptive to his or her needs as
well. You have to be more direct
with a person you deal with on a
daily basis. If you put in that extra effort, you will be rewarded.
Tonight: Out till the wee hours.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
A loved one seeks you out, as he
or she has a lot to share. As a result, you might need to rearrange
your schedule. Your willingness
to put in 100 percent when dealing with emotional situations
comes back in multiples. Recognize the need to stay open. Tonight: Be spontaneous.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Continue working from home, if
possible. A low-key environment
encourages more productivity as
well as a greater sense of security.
Events around your home seem
fortunate at this time. Be more
forthright about what is happening around you. Tonight: Stay
close to home.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Your ability to grasp the various
outcomes that stem from one decision could surprise others. Make
an effort to connect and brainstorm with friends. Screen your
calls, knowing full well you easily
could go overboard if you are not
careful. Tonight: Out and about.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
You'll want to deal with an important matter that might be affecting your ability to move forward. Be aware that relationships
with siblings could be difficult
right now. Share your feelings
and clear the air to allow greater
depth. Tonight: Pretend that you
are Casper the Ghost.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
The Moon in your sign highlights
you. Over the next few days,
you'll move a project to completion, or at least to the next phase.
Events occur that will leave you
shaking your head in amazement. Know that you don't need
to run interference. Tonight: Go
for what you want.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Take your time dealing with a difficult person. You might feel as if
you can get this situation under
control. You will succeed if you
remain positive. Understand
what is going on with others.
Open up discussions once everyone is relaxed. Tonight: Express
your ideas clearly.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
You open up to new possibilities.
The unexpected plays into a decision. A close friend understands
why you are following a certain
course, and won't interfere with
your pace or your decision. This
person will give you powerful
feedback. Tonight: Out among
the crowds.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Be willing to take the lead with
an important project. You seem
to have an unusual interest in
pursuing this matter. Demonstrate your leadership skills. You
see what is happening in a different way from how most people
involved see it. Tonight: Burn the
candle at both ends.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
You see what most don't. You'll
want to push a key matter to fruition. Try to understand where
others are coming from. You also
might need to pull back in order
to gain a broader perspective
than you have up till now. Listen
to what people share. Tonight:
Enjoy the moment.
Jacqueline Bigar is at www.jacquelinebigar.com. (c) 2018 by
King Features Syndicate Inc.
ºIn 1860, the legendary Pony
Express began carrying mail
between St. Joseph, Mo., and
Sacramento. (The delivery system lasted only 18 months before giving way to the transcontinental telegraph.)
ºIn 1882, outlaw Jesse James
was shot to death in St. Joseph,
Mo., by Robert Ford, a member
of James’s gang.
ºIn 1936, Bruno Hauptmann
was electrocuted in Trenton,
N.J., for the kidnap-murder of
Charles Lindbergh Jr.
ºIn 1942, during World War II,
Japanese forces began their final assault on Bataan against
American and Filipino troops
who surrendered six days later;
the capitulation was followed
by the notorious Bataan Death
March.
ºIn 1948, President Truman
signed the Marshall Plan, designed to help European allies
rebuild after World War II and
resist communism.
ºIn 1965, the United States
launched the SNAP-10A nucle-
ar power system into Earth orbit; it was the first nuclear reactor sent into space.
ºIn 1968, civil rights leader
Martin Luther King Jr. delivered what turned out to be his
final speech, telling a rally of
striking sanitation workers in
Memphis that ‘‘I’ve been to the
mountaintop’’ and ‘‘seen the
Promised Land. I may not get
there with you. But I want you
to know tonight that we, as a
people, will get to the Promised
Land!’’ (About 20 hours later,
King was felled by an assassin’s
bullet at the Lorraine Motel.)
ºIn 1996, Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski was arrested at
his remote Montana cabin. An
Air Force jetliner carrying
Commerce Secretary Ron
Brown and American business
executives crashed in Croatia,
killing all 35 people aboard.
ºLast year, a suicide bombing
aboard a subway train in St. Petersburg, Russia, killed 16 people and wounded more than
50.
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