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The Economist (Intelligence Unit) - What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy (2018)

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A report from The Economist Intelligence Unit
What the Internet of Things
means for consumer privacy
Sponsored by
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
Contents
1
About the research
2
Introduction
3
1
A perception of danger
5
2
Control and transparency
7
3
Consumer demands for privacy rights
9
4
What industry and government can do
10
Conclusion
12
Appendix: survey results
13
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
About this
report
What the Internet of Things means for consumer
privacy discusses the findings of an Economist
interviews with experts on privacy in the digital era.
Intelligence Unit (EIU) research programme,
Our thanks are due to the following individuals:
sponsored by ForgeRock, that explores the privacy
• Giulio Coraggio, partner, head of global IoT and
concerns and priorities of global consumers
stemming from the Internet of Things (IoT) and
related technologies.
At the core of the research is a global survey of
1,629 consumers that The EIU conducted in October
2017. Respondents come from eight countries:
Australia, China, France, Germany, Japan, South
Korea, the UK and the US. They fall into six age
2
Additional insights were obtained from in-depth
gaming, DLA Piper
• Amanda Long, director-general, Consumers
International
• Kathleen McGee, head, Bureau of Internet and
Technology, Office of the Attorney-General of the
State of New York
groups ranging from 16 to over 65, and the sample is
This report was written by Denis McCauley and
divided evenly among men and women.
edited by Veronica Lara from The EIU.
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
Introduction
“The IoT combines
the technologies of
multiple providers,
which makes the
tracking of
collected personal
data extremely
difficult, if not
impossible, in most
cases.”
Giulio Coraggio,
partner, head of global IoT
and gaming, DLA Piper
As the digital era has unfolded, consumers have
become steadily more aware of the uses that
recording the transfer of data to different parties, are
businesses make of the personal information that is
also complex. “The IoT combines the technologies of
handed over when accessing services. Many
multiple providers, which makes the tracking of
consumers have become adept at exercising control
collected personal data extremely difficult, if not
over how their data are used, for example through
impossible, in most cases,” says Giulio Coraggio,
consent forms and opt-outs. However, the IoT—the
partner and head of global IoT and gaming at DLA
rapidly expanding network of devices, physical
Piper, a law firm.
objects, services and applications that communicate
The same issues make the privacy challenges of
over the internet—poses a new set of privacy
the IoT difficult for government and industry to
challenges, as it changes the relationship between
address. According to Amanda Long, director-general
individuals and their personal data. Gartner, a
of Consumers International, a consumer advocacy
research firm, projected the number of “connected
organisation headquartered in London, it is the
things” in the global consumer segment to reach 7bn
cross-sector and crossborder interlinkages that make
in 2018, rising to 12.9bn in 2020.1
the IoT such a tricky area for stakeholders to grasp
The biggest challenges are ubiquity and
3
The data custody chains, or documentation
and address.
invisibility: connected devices number in the billions
A handful of organisations are seeking to build
today, and they transmit data without device owners
consumer and industry knowledge about the unique
knowing when or how that happens. “American
challenges the IoT poses to data privacy. These
consumers are very knowledgeable about privacy
include non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
protection issues,” says Kathleen McGee, head of the
such as Consumers International and the Online
Bureau of Internet and Technology at the New York
Trust Alliance (OTA).2 Government bodies such as the
State Attorney-General’s office, “but they do not
UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office and the US
appreciate just how far-reaching IoT devices are in
Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and inter-
their world.”
governmental organisations such as the Global
1
2
Gartner, February 7th 2017. “Gartner Says 8.4 Billion Connected “Things”
Will Be in Use in 2017, Up 31 Percent From 2016,” https://www.gartner.
com/newsroom/id/3598917
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
The OTA is part of the Internet Society, a US-based non-profit
organisation that seeks to foster common practices and standards for
internet infrastructure and use.
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
Privacy Enforcement Network (GPEN), are also
To explore this topic, The EIU has conducted a survey
prominent in such efforts.3
of over 1,600 consumers in eight countries. The
The purpose of this report is to augment the
discusses how industry and government can help to
concerns in relation to internet-connected devices.
build consumer trust in the age of IoT.
3
4
report draws on the analysis of the results and
discussion by identifying consumers’ main privacy
The GPEN is an inter-governmental committee of privacy enforcement
authorities.
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
1
“A growing number
of people are
connected to the
smart grid, for
example, and they
don’t have a choice
about transmission
of their data.”
Amanda Long,
director-general,
Consumers International
A perception of danger
Consumers may not appreciate the ubiquity of
not be secure in the hands of online service providers
interconnected sensors in their everyday devices, but
and device manufacturers.
they nonetheless sense danger about the automatic
Consent, or the lack of it, looms large in
transmission of their personal data. This is supported
consumer fears about how their data are being
by the fact that consumers’ perceptions of risk maps
used. For Ms Long, the main issue is the lack of
closely to the activities in which they most often use
choice involved in the automatic collection and
internet-connected devices. For example,
transmission of data inherent in the IoT: “A growing
consumers’ two most frequently reported uses of
number of people are connected to the smart grid,
connected devices (eg, smartphones and laptops) are
for example, and they don’t have a choice about
to make online payments for goods and services, and
transmission of their data.” Ms McGee notes that
to access personal messaging and social networks—
although many consumers concerned about privacy
with each of these activities cited by 79% of
exercise choice by declining to purchase some
respondents. These activities are also the two most
smart home appliances, say for the kitchen, they
commonly perceived as riskiest, with 79% of survey
may be less aware that other devices, such as their
respondents believing online payments put personal
televisions, are collecting data about their habits
privacy at least “somewhat at risk”, and 74% saying so
and preferences. Even when they are fully aware,
for messaging and social networks.
they may not be given the choice of opting out, as in
This may explain why consumers value the
security (80% assessing this as “very important”) and
the case, cited by Ms Long, of a national rollout of
smart meters to every energy user.
privacy (75%) features of devices much more highly
Consumer concerns are about more than material
than the devices’ affordability (47%) or ease of use
damage resulting from such collection and sharing of
(48%). It is no surprise to Mr Coraggio, who notes that
their data without consent. About three of every four
consumers are well aware that their data have been
respondents (74%) fear that cumulative privacy
commodified by companies. Respondents’ concern
invasions could weaken their civil rights. Such fears
with this resounds clearly in the survey, where 89%
are not misplaced: a 2016 report from the US FTC
cite their discomfort with the ability of third parties
acknowledged the potential that “big data” could be
to access personal data without their consent. Nine
used to support discriminatory practices by
in ten fear the possibility of identity theft or fraud,
businesses and governments. 4
and nearly as many believe their personal data may
4
5
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
Federal Trade Commission, January 2016, Big Data: A Tool for Inclusion
or Exclusion?, https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/reports/
big-data-tool-inclusion-or-exclusion-understanding-issues/160106bigdata-rpt.pdf
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?
(% of respondents)
Strongly agree
I am concerned about the possibility
of identity theft or fraud
54
I am concerned that my personal information may
not be kept secure by online service providers
64
I am concerned that my personal information
may not be kept secure by manufacturers
46
I would like to personally manage how
my data are collected and shared
50
33
I am uncomfortable with companies building a
“profile” of me to predict my consumer behaviour
Providing my personal information may
have more drawbacks than benefits
Note: Percentages may not add to total due to rounding.
On a regional level, the US consumers surveyed
are the most wary of data misuse: 76% are “strongly
35
90
40
89
25
89
42
39
32
41
87
36
86
74
35
73
41
72
Source: Economist Intelligence Unit survey, 2018.
security breaches.
Data privacy has become a “hot button” issue for
concerned” with third parties accessing their
US consumers in the past couple of years, according
information without consent, compared with 68% in
to Ms McGee. “They should be concerned with what
Europe and 57% in the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region.
corporate America and government alike are doing in
Compared with other regions, US respondents most
their bedrooms,” she says. “I would like to see a lot
frequently cite strong concern with the building of
more transparency about how personal data are
behavioural profiles based on their data, and the
being collected and used.”
potential of identity theft and fraud resulting from
6
Total
50
I am uncomfortable with third parties being able
to access my information without my consent
Small privacy invasions may eventually
lead to a loss of civil rights
Somewhat agree
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
2
Control and transparency
What could assuage the data privacy fears that
providing much—if not most—of their data through
consumers have voiced? The survey provides some
such devices involuntarily and without any clarity. A
clues.
2016 GPEN study found that six of every ten IoT
Nearly nine in ten respondents (86%) want the
devices did not properly inform consumers about
ability to manage their personal information
how their personal data are being used, and 72% did
proactively. And many would value the creation of
not instruct consumers how to delete their data from
channels (such as unsubscribe platforms and
the device.5 “Whether consciously or not, consumers
personal user profiles) to ensure their personal
are paying for the use of free applications and
information is kept private. When it comes to the
services with their data,” says Mr Coraggio.
The demands from consumers in our survey raise
automatic collection of data, consumers want the
power to control what personal information is
the question of how much consumer control of
collected by connected devices—92% say this is
IoT-enabled data transmission is actually realistic.
important, including about two of every three saying
“Control is almost impossible when you don’t have
it’s “very important”. The overwhelming majority also
transparency or choice,” says Ms McGee. “I’m sure I
demand transparency about automatic data
cross the paths of many IoT sensors every time I walk
collection, which means being informed when
out to get a coffee,” she observes. “I have no control
personal data are being collected (92%), and being
over that and I have no transparency.”
Consumers say they want control over their
notified at the point of sale about the data collection
capabilities of devices (89%).
However, the reality is that consumers are today
automatically transmitted data, believes Ms Long,
probably because they currently have very little.
How important are each of the following actions in terms of protecting the personal
information consumers provide for automatic collection?
(% of respondents)
Very important
Informing consumers when personal
information is being collected
68
Enabling consumers to control what
personal information is being collected
66
Informing consumers when security
upgrades become available
58
Informing consumers at the point of sale about
the data collection capabilities of devices
53
Note: Percentages may not add to total due to rounding.
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
25
25
Total
92
92
32
90
36
89
Source: Economist Intelligence Unit survey, 2018.
5
7
Somewhat important
Global Privacy Enforcement Network, 2016 GPEN Annual Report,
https://www.privacyenforcement.net/sites/default/files/Annual%20
Report%202016.pdf
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
““We need to
determine how
many steps from
origin are required
in terms of
transparency...”
There are not many examples of good data control
transparency,” she says, “as consumer data collected
tools in the IoT market, and companies that recognise
in this way change hands many, many times.”
Kathleen McGee, head of
the Bureau of Internet and
Technology, Office of the
Attorney-General of the
State of New York
this absence ought to be able to begin taking
determinations? When it comes to IoT privacy risks
says: “There’s a gap in the market for a smart business
specifically, discussions tend to revolve around the
to try to do this.” The dilemma, according to Ms Long,
development of standards rather than new
is that no one has yet been able to identify practical
legislation. Mr Coraggio believes the legal safeguards
forms of direct control for IoT devices.
being built now for data privacy, at least in Europe
Because of these difficulties, solutions are more
through the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation
likely to coalesce around transparency, in the view of
(GDPR), are adequate to deal with IoT-specific risks.
Ms McGee. This, she maintains, is where regulators
“GDPR is very strict,” he says.
are going to channel their privacy demands toward
Scheduled to enter into force in May 2018, GDPR is
industry in relation to the IoT. “From a regulatory
the world’s most comprehensive effort to date to
perspective, in the US we are going to expect clear
bring countries’ data protection rules into line with
terms and conditions and transparency in terms of
the modern capabilities of digital technology. Its
use of data, and we will be enforcing them.” But that
impact will be felt far beyond Europe and, as we will
raises another difficulty, relating to the often long
see, it is already shaping consumer attitudes about
chain of data custody. “We need to determine how
their rights to data privacy.
many steps from origin are required in terms of
8
What will regulators use to guide such
measures to provide some degree of control. She
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
3
GDPR is going to
have a spill over
effect in the US.
Consumer demands for
privacy rights
Judging by the survey, many consumers globally want
The enumerated rights mirror those enshrined in
the types of data privacy rights that EU citizens will
GDPR, and although none are specific to the
enjoy when GDPR comes into force. When asked to
challenges raised by the IoT, they are directly relevant
cite the most important rights regarding third-party
to it. According to Mr Coraggio: “GDPR grants
use of their personal information, the majority of
individuals much stronger tools, such as the [ability to
consumers (57%) most frequently cite the right to
launch class action claims] against companies that
erasure of their information (also known as “the right
exploit consumers’ personal data.”
to be forgotten”), followed by the rights to object to
Ms Long agrees that IoT-relevant privacy
the use of their personal data, and to be informed in a
prescriptions are well enshrined in GDPR, and points
clear way how the data are being used.
out that they apply to all companies that process EU
On a regional level, the right to erasure is most
citizens’ data. Many US and Asian companies, then,
frequently cited by European consumers (61%), and
whether or not they have a physical EU presence, will
it remains at the top of consumers’ lists in APAC
need to abide by GDPR.
(56%) and the US (50%). Demand for the right to
The worldwide influence of the new EU rules may
object is weaker, however, in APAC (39%) than in
also come to be felt by non-EU consumers. For
Europe or the US (50% in each). Notwithstanding
example, Ms McGee believes GDPR is going to have a
these few differences, consumers in all three regions
spill over effect in the US. “American regulators and
place the greatest weight on those rights that
consumers are starting to have a new construct of
address fundamental issues of transparency and
what privacy means and what consent means. It’s
control.
shifting towards a European model.”
Thinking about your personal information and how it might be used by third parties,
which of the following rights do you consider most important? Please select up to three.
(% of respondents)
57
The right to erasure
45
The right to object
42
The right to be informed
38
The right to restrict processing
34
The right of access
Rights in relation to automated
decision-making and profiling
18
The right to rectification
18
The right to data portability
11
Source: Economist Intelligence Unit survey, 2018.
9
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
4
What industry and government
can do
If proactive consumer management of their personal
protections would also help to earn consumer trust.
data proves to be impractical in the IoT context,
Nearly a third of respondents say that a rigorously
confidence building measures in the IoT’s integrity
upheld industry-led commitment to privacy
are well within the ability of industry and
protection would be effective, either from individual
government. Improved transparency is realistic,
companies or as a collectively maintained “code of
according to the experts we interviewed for the
conduct” across industries. A similar share of
study, and is a good starting point for building trust.
respondents demand that industry collaborate with
“If consumers are adequately informed of how their
governments to develop privacy standards and
personal data are processed, it should be possible to
ensure their rigorous enforcement.
build their confidence in the IoT,” says Mr Coraggio.
Such rigour, consumers believe, requires
Efforts such as posting simple notices or electronic
sanctions: 92% want stricter punishment than exists
alerts that devices are autonomously collecting data
today for companies that violate consumer privacy
are small steps towards building transparency. They
norms. Mr Coraggio agrees: although he believes that
could help device manufacturers and service
GDPR provides sufficient remedies for consumers
providers improve customer relationships and
and governments to address privacy violations, he
enhance their brand.
says that business compliance needs to be monitored
At the very least, some consumers would like such
more closely than has been the case previously.
companies to publicly commit to maintaining
“Otherwise,” he states, “the privacy rules will never
consumer privacy. Cross-industry standards on
be taken seriously.”
delivering such transparency and other privacy
Enforcement of GDPR rules is the job of each EU
Which of the following measures would be most likely to make you more confident that
your information is being kept private and secure?
(% of respondents)
Don’t know
Collaborate with governments
to ensure that privacy standards
are rigorously upheld
10
Conceive and enforce a privacy “code
of conduct” with other manufacturers
and software providers
Publish and publicly adhere to
a commitment to maintaining
customer privacy
Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding.
10
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
31
16
16
26
Create channels (eg, unsubscribe
platforms) through which consumers like
me can proactively ensure that private
information remains private
Source: Economist Intelligence Unit survey, 2018.
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
member’s supervisory authority, which in most cases
Voluntary standards and guidelines agreed by
is its data protection agency or regulator.6 The
multiple stakeholders would do much to build trust in
penalties it can apply if a company is found to be in
the IoT but, as Ms Long notes, these typically require
breach are stiff: up to 4% of annual global turnover or
leadership from institutions such as the UN, OECD or
€20m (whichever is greater).
International Organisation for Standardisation and
7
According to Ms Long, monitoring and
can often take several years to complete. She points
enforcement will not be effective unless countries
out that the international UN guidelines on consumer
establish oversight bodies that have responsibility for
protection include some digital elements, particularly
all aspects of digital consumer protection. Such
related to e-commerce, which can act as a starting
bodies exist in many countries such as the UK, she
point for future development of IoT standards.9
says, but few operate with the scope necessary to
address the full range of challenges posed by digital
technologies.8
11
6
See, for example, the blog at: PwC, February 15th 2017, “Identifying a
controller or processor’s lead supervisory authority,” http://pwc.blogs.
com/data_protection/2017/02/identifying-a-controller-or-processorslead-supervisory-authority.html
7
EUGDPR.org, “GDPR Key Changes,” https://www.eugdpr.org/
key-changes.html
8
Consumers International, in Securing Consumer Trust in the Internet of
Things: Principles and Recommendations, makes the following
recommendation: “Countries should have oversight bodies with
responsibility for all aspects of digital consumer protection including
the internet of things. Such bodies must have the necessary authority
and independence to fulfil their mandates and the technical resources
and capabilities to respond to developments in the sector,” http://www.
consumersinternational.org/media/154809/iot-principles_v2.pdf
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
9
UN Conference on Trade and Development, United Nations Guidelines
for Consumer Protection, 2016, http://unctad.org/en/pages/
PublicationWebflyer.aspx?publicationid=1598
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
Conclusion
The jury may be out on whether IoT-specific privacy
but manufacturers and service providers in the IoT
legislation is needed, but experts and consumers
value chain need to join in as well. Many have been
appear to agree that GDPR’s provisions are a good
vocal in discussions on IoT security, but less so when
starting point for countries looking to build concrete
it comes to educating consumers about IoT privacy
privacy safeguards relevant to the IoT. There is also a
issues.
broad consensus that, along with IoT-related bodies
standards is likely to take time, but educational
is needed to ensure adherence by device
initiatives targeted at both consumers and
manufacturers and service providers. These
businesses should be widened, in terms of geography
messages come through clearly from the consumers
and sectors. Meanwhile, confidence-building
in our survey and the experts we interviewed.
measures, such as public company commitments to
It is also apparent that more education and
12
Multi-stakeholder agreement of IoT privacy
of privacy standards and guidelines, close monitoring
maintaining privacy or the posting of alerts that
knowledge-building efforts are needed by all
devices are collecting data, can be taken by
stakeholders involved, perhaps even before
businesses now. The need for such measures is
standards are developed. NGOs and a few
urgent, as the IoT and other data-crunching
government bodies have led the way in this effort,
technologies are moving ahead at great speed.
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
Appendix:
survey
results
Percentages may not
add to 100% owing
Which of the following internet-connected devices have you used in the last 12 months?
to rounding or the
Please select all that apply.
(% of respondents)
ability of respondents
Smartphones
to choose multiple
Smart entertainment devices (eg, televisions and gaming consoles)
responses.
86
44
Wireless printers and scanners
39
In-vehicle systems (eg, built-in GPS tracking)
29
Wearable devices (eg, Fitbit)
18
Household appliances and devices (eg, “smart” refrigerators, smart speakers and voice assistants)
16
Healthcare devices (eg, blood pressure monitors)
14
Home security systems
13
Smart utility meters
11
Home automation systems (eg, smart lighting, smart home security)
10
Personal safety alarms
7
Other
6
None of the above
1
13
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
For which of the following activities do you use internet-connected devices?
Please select all that apply.
(% of respondents)
Online payments for goods and/or services
80
Personal messaging and social networks
79
Entertainment (eg, television viewing, online gaming)
66
Managing finances
56
Managing transportation and/or travel
47
Work-related activities
43
Managing healthcare and/or wellness
25
Community and/or citizen activities
18
Managing home technologies (eg, appliances)
17
Other
1
To what degree do you agree or disagree with each of the following statements?
(% of respondents)
Not at all at risk
Slightly at risk
Somewhat at risk
At risk
Very much risk
23
16
Don’t know/
Not applicable
Managing home technologies (eg, appliances)
16
26
7
13
Work-related activities
11
26
27
16
7
14
Personal messaging and social networks
4
19
27
27
20
3
Entertainment (eg, television viewing, online gaming)
19
32
23
15
6
6
Online payments for goods and/or services
4
15
26
27
27 2
Managing healthcare and/or wellness
15
23
27
16
9
10
Managing finances
7
15
24
25
24
4
Community and/or citizen activities
16
27
23
13
7
14
Managing transportation and/or travel
13
28
28
16
7
8
Other
14
14
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
29
43
7
7
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
How strong should consumer privacy protections be for each of the following activities?
(% of respondents)
Much more
relaxed
Somewhat
more relaxed
Current level of
protection is
about right
Somewhat
stronger
Much stronger
Don’t know/
Not applicable
Managing home technologies (eg, appliances)
2
6
33
28
18
13
20
13
Work-related activities
2
5
29
31
Personal messaging and social networks
1
5
20
36
34
4
Entertainment (eg, television viewing, online gaming)
3
8
39
29
15
6
Online payments for goods and/or services
2
3
14
30
49 2
Managing healthcare and/or wellness
2
4
30
30
25
9
Managing finances
2
3
15
29
48
4
Community and/or citizen activities
3
6
36
28
14
14
Managing transportation and/or travel
2
6
35
32
17
8
Other
36
36
29
Thinking about internet-connected devices in general, how important are each of the following issues to you?
(% of respondents)
Very
unimportant
Somewhat
unimportant
Neither important
nor unimportant
Somewhat
important
Very
important
Don’t know/
Not applicable
Privacy
21
3
18
75 1
Reliability
3 1
3
21
72 1
Affordability
2 2
11
38
47 1
Ease of use
2
3
8
39
48
Security
3 1 3
15
13
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
80 1
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?
(% of respondents)
Strongly
disagree
Somewhat
disagree
Neither agree nor
disagree
Somewhat
agree
Strongly
agree
Don’t know/
Not applicable
Small privacy invasions may eventually lead to a loss of civil rights
1
5
17
42
33
4
I am uncomfortable with third parties being able to access my information without my consent
2 2
7
25
64 1
I am concerned that my personal information may not be kept secure by the manufacturers of internet-connected devices
1 2
9
41
46 1
I would like to personally manage how my data are collected and shared
1 2
10
36
50 1
I am concerned that my personal information may not be kept secure by online service providers
1 2
8
40
50 1
I am concerned about the possibility of identity theft or fraud
1 2
8
36
54
1
I am uncomfortable with companies building a “profile” of me to predict my consumer behaviour
2
6
19
35
39 1
Providing my personal information may have more drawbacks than benefits
1
6
20
41
32 2
Which of the following measures by device manufacturers and service providers would be most likely to make you more
confident that your information is being kept private and secure?
Please select one.
(% of respondents)
Collaborate with governments to ensure that privacy standards are rigorously upheld
32
Create channels (eg, unsubscribe platforms) through which consumers like me can proactively ensure that private information remains private
26
Publish and publicly adhere to a commitment to maintaining customer privacy
16
Conceive and enforce a privacy “code of conduct” with other manufacturers and software providers
16
Other
0
Don’t know/Not applicable
10
How important are each of the following actions in terms of protecting the personal information
consumers voluntarily provide online?
(% of respondents)
Very
unimportant
Somewhat
unimportant
Neither important
nor unimportant
Somewhat
important
Very
important
Don’t know/
Not applicable
Increasing the security of personal information stored online
11
4
20
73 1
Requiring compliance with consumer opt-out requests
11
7
31
58
3
Controlling the sale of personal information
11
6
21
70 2
Requiring the disclosure of the types of information that is collected
1 2
8
36
50
3
Increasing punishment for companies that violate consumers’ privacy
11
16
5
22
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
70 1
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
Personal information is increasingly collected automatically by connected devices (for example, smartphone tracking
of user location and behaviour). With this in mind, how important are each of the following actions in terms of
protecting the personal information consumers provide for automatic collection?
(% of respondents)
Very
unimportant
Somewhat
unimportant
Neither important
nor unimportant
Somewhat
important
Very
important
Don’t know/
Not applicable
Informing consumers when personal information is being collected
11
5
25
68 1
Enabling consumers to control what personal information is being collected
11
6
66 1
25
Informing consumers when security upgrades become available
11
7
32
58 1
Informing consumers at the point of sale about the data collection capabilities of devices
1 2
8
36
53 1
Thinking about your personal information and how it might be used by third parties, which of the following rights
do you consider most important?
Please select up to three.
(% of respondents)
The right to erasure: also known as “the right to be forgotten”, you are entitled to withdraw consent to the use of your personal information
and request that it be deleted or removed.
57
The right to object: you are entitled to object to your personal information being used for any purpose, including scientific and statistical research,
direct marketing, and matters of public interest.
45
The right to be informed: organisations must inform you of the use of your personal information in a clear and easy-to-understand way.
42
The right to restrict processing: you are entitled to block or prevent organisations from further processing your personal information.
38
The right of access: organisations must confirm whether your personal information is being used in some way, and provide you with access to the information used.
34
Rights in relation to automated decision-making and profiling: you are entitled not to be subject to decisions based on automated processing and
profiling that may harm you in some way.
18
The right to rectification: organisations using your personal information must correct it if it is inaccurate or incomplete.
18
The right to data portability: you are entitled to obtain and reuse your personal information across different services, transferring it in a safe and secure way.
11
Other
0
17
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
Do you use internet-connected devices to make
purchases, access business services or perform tasks that
require you to reveal personal information (such as your
name, date of birth or credit card number)?
With what gender do you identify?
(% of respondents)
(% of respondents)
Female
49.5
Male
50.3
Other 0.1
Yes
No
100
0
Prefer not to say 0.1
What is your approximate annual household income?
(% of respondents)
Under US$25,000
Do you ever have thoughts or concerns about your online
privacy and data security?
(% of respondents)
19
US$25,000 to US$49,999
30
US$50,000 to US$74,999
20
US$75,000 to US$99,999
Yes
No
100
0
12
US$100,000 to US$149,999
8
US$150,000 to US$250,000
3
Over US$250,000
1
Prefer not to say
In which country are you personally located?
6
(% of respondents)
Germany
13.1
France
12.8
UK
12.5
Australia
12.4
Japan
12.4
US
12.3
South Korea
12.3
China
12.3
Choose your year of birth
(% of respondents)
4
3
2
1
18
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
1995
1999
1990
1985
1980
1975
1970
1965
1960
1955
1950
1945
1940
1935
0
What the Internet of Things means for consumer privacy
While every effort has been taken to verify the accuracy
of this information, The Economist Intelligence Unit Ltd.
cannot accept any responsibility or liability for reliance
by any person on this report or any of the information,
opinions or conclusions set out in this report. The findings
and views expressed in the report do not necessarily reflect
the views of the sponsor.
19
© The Economist Intelligence Unit Limited 2018
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