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The Guardian - April 12, 2018

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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:1 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:S
Thursday
12 April 2018
Issue № 53,381
£2.00
What’s in
that cherry
bakewell?
Sent at 11/4/2018 20:59
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The murder that shocked Iceland
How one killing shook
a nation’s sense of itself

Journal
Britain’s favourite
ultra-processed foods,
unpacked  G2
Police ‘run
out of leads’
on Stephen
Lawrence
Vikram Dodd
Police and crime correspondent
▲ Donald Trump has told Russia that it should not have become partners with a ‘gas killing animal’ like Syria’s President Bashir al-Assad PHOTOGRAPH: EVAN VUCCI/AP
Trump tells Russia to get ready
for US missile strikes in Syria
•
Julian Borger Washington
Andrew Roth Moscow
Patrick Wintour
The US and Russia came significantly
closer to a direct clash over Syria
yesterday when Donald Trump sent
an incendiary tweet telling Moscow to
“get ready” for US missiles – which the
Russians have vowed to shoot down.
A standoff over the poison gas
attack on a rebel-held suburb of
Damascus on Saturday has spiralled
into the most dangerous confrontation
between the two nuclear-armed powers since the height of the cold war,
driven by Vladimir Putin’s uncompromising backing for the Assad regime
in Damascus and the volatility of the
US president.
“Russia vows to shoot down any
and all missiles fired at Syria,” the US
president tweeted. “Get ready Russia, because they will be coming, nice
and new and ‘smart!’ You shouldn’t be
partners with a Gas Killing Animal who
kills his people and enjoys it!”
The Kremlin spokesman, Dmitry
Peskov called for calm. “We do not participate in Twitter diplomacy,” Peskov
500
The number of patients said to have
been taken for treatment around
Douma with signs of chemical attack
was quoted as saying by Interfax. “It is
important not to take steps that could
harm an already fragile situation.”
Theresa May was under pressure to
decide if Britain will join coordinated
military action. She summoned her
cabinet for an emergency meeting
today to discuss next steps, having
already warned that the attack “could
not go unchallenged”. She said “all the
indications are that the Syrian regime
was responsible”.
Labour, Liberal Democrats and the
SNP all urged the prime minister to
observe the convention of consulting
MPs before any intervention. Jeremy
Corbyn is understood to be considering whipping MPs to oppose military
action if a vote is held.
In Syria, regional leaders said they
were bracing for a strike against air
force targets – a more comprehensive
list of airfields than the attack on a single air-base a year ago.
Syrian planes had been flown to
three Russian air bases and senior
Syrian government officials had been
moved to safe houses, according to
Turkish sources.
Trump’s 7am tweet came after
reports that the Russian ambassador to Lebanon, Alexander Zasypkin,
had said Russian forces in Syria would
intercept incoming US missiles and
return fire at their source – implying
US planes or ships. None of this was
done last year. Zasypkin’s
9 
reported remarks suggest
Scotland Yard has said it has run out of
leads in the Stephen Lawrence murder
investigation, ahead of the 25th anniversary of the racist killing.
The Metropolitan police said yesterday it was reviewing the case, which
means it is considering closing it down
– although it will wait until a three-part
BBC documentary about the case is
broadcast next week to see if anyone
new comes forward.
At least three of the gang who
shouted abuse before the black teenager was stabbed at a south-east
London bus stop in 1993 are still free.
The force’s leadership believe they
have exhausted all leads and avenues
of inquiry in one of the most high-profile murder hunts in the UK.
In a statement released yesterday,
police said: “Despite previous public
appeals, rigorous pursuit of all remaining lines of inquiry, numerous reviews
and every possible advance in forensic techniques, the Met investigation
team is now at a stage where, without
new information, the investigation is
unlikely to progress further, and this
was explained to the family earlier
this year.”
Two of the gang of at least five white
men who attacked Lawrence were
convicted of murder in 2012, and the
trial judge asked police to
19 
continue the hunt for the
Plus Why
Liverpool fear
no team in
Europe
rope
Sportt
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:2 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 20:53
•
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
Inside
Thursday 12 April 2018
National Pages 5-33
Deportation row Woman who was accused
of feigning illness died days later | Page 5
Weather warning Gulf Stream at weakest in
1,600 years due to global warming | Page 13
Zuckerberg’s pledge Facebook chief
vows to fight election meddling | Page 14
Fired up Groundbreaking Tricycle theatre
becomes Kiln after £7m makeover | Page 33
World Pages 34-39
Algeria air disaster More than 250 feared
dead as military plane crash lands | Page 34
▲ Leading brands such as HiPP baby food have denied selling lower quality
products to eastern Europe PHOTOGRAPH: AGENCJA FOTOGRAFICZNA CARO / ALAMY
More bubbles, less gas Brewer finds the
recipe for an eco-friendly beer | Page 36
EU to stop firms selling
inferior quality brands
in eastern Europe
Cosby claims Witness says star assaulted
her over the course of four days | Page 38
Financial Pages 41-45
Economic concern Forecaster says UK growth
rate fell by half in first part of year | Page 41
Tesco profits up Now UK’s biggest supermarket
aims for an extra £2.5bn slice of market | Page 45
Journal Centre section
Amid echoes of the
cold war, the search
for new solutions
ns
Larry
Elliott
Page 1
After this win
for abortion
rights, fight on
Rhiannon
Lucy Cosslett
Page 5
G2 Centre section, tucked inside Journal
Tasting the ruby KitKat An old favourite
gets a new hue. But what’s it like? | Page 2
Xanthan gum anyone? The truth about
our most popular processed snacks | Page 8
Sp
Sport
port Bac
Back section
Co
County
cricket As the new season dawns,
why this could be Lancashire’s year | Page 52
wh
‘Fracaso sin excusas’ Barcelona reacts ‘Fr
badly – to Champions League exit | Page 57
bad
Puzzles G2, page 16 | Journal, page 12
Contact
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guardian.readers@theguardian.com.
Letters for publication should be sent to
guardian.letters@theguardian.com or
the address on the letters page.
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No. 53,381, Thursday 12 April 2018. Registered as a
newspaper at the Post Office ISSN 0261-3077.
Daniel Boffey
Brussels
Brussels intends to make it illegal for
food and drink multinationals to sell
inferior versions of well-known brands
to customers in eastern Europe, after
studies suggested hundreds of products were involved in the practice.
An EU directive banning so-called
“dual food” was announced yesterday
following longstanding complaints
from member states in central and
eastern Europe.
Coca-Cola, Pepsi, HiPP baby food,
Birds Eye, Lidl and Spar have denied
accusations of selling lower quality
goods in the east bearing identical
branding to products sold in western Europe. Persil and Ariel have
been accused of selling a less effective washing product formula, a claim
they rebut.
The European commission will next
month provide member states with a
methodology for testing multinational
Recovering Yulia
Skripal turns down
offer of help from
Russian embassy
Patrick Greenfield
Yulia Skripal, who was poisoned in
Salisbury last month along with her
father, a former Russian spy, has said
she does not wish to take up the offer
of services from the Russian embassy,
according to a statement issued on her
behalf by the Metropolitan police.
In a statement published yesterday
evening, she said her father remained
seriously ill and she was still suffering
from the effects of the nerve gas used
against them. She also addressed comments made by her cousin Viktoria in
the Russian media, asking Viktoria not
to contact or visit her in the UK.
Skripal confirmed she was safe and
Worse, or just different?
Spar strawberry yoghurt
Result: 40% less strawberry in
Slovenian product than Austrian.
Company response: “The tastes and
consumer wishes are different.”
Tulip luncheon meat
Result: meat in German can
was pork, Czech product was
mechanically extracted poultry.
Company: “The two products
mentioned are different products.”
Birds Eye fish fingers
Result: 58% fish meat in Slovakian
recipe, 65% in Austrian.
Response: recipes adapted to tastes.
Bottle of Coke
Result: fructo-gluco syrup and 11.2g
of sugar in Slovenia, 10.6g in Austria.
Response: “We occasionally adapt
beverages to meet consumer tastes.”
had specially trained officers available to her during the recovery. She
also said she would give interviews
to the media in due course, but asked
the press to have patience while she
recovers.
She and her father were found collapsed on a park bench in Salisbury
on 4 March after being poisoned with
a nerve agent. Skripal, 33, flew to the
UK the day before she and her father
are believed to have been poisoned
with the nerve agent novichok.
Sergei Skripal, 66, is also making
good progress and doctors hope he
will be able to leave hospital “in due
course”.
The testimony of the Skripals will be
crucial in establishing the credibility
of the British government’s claim that
‘I am in a different life
than the one I left just
over a month ago’
Yulia Skripal
brands, so that the real culprits can
be identified. Funding has also been
committed.
However, Věra Jourová, the most
senior justice official at the European
commission, who is responsible for
consumer affairs, said central and eastern European governments, including
in her home state, the Czech Republic,
needed to see explicit legislation outlawing the practice, which has now
been drafted.
Jourová said: “There is some misunderstanding between some parts
of Europe that the problem is not that
serious.
“Colleagues in trade and industry
had legitimate concerns that we must
not open the Pandora’s box but I think
we have come forward with a proportionate solution.
“We are not dictating tastes. I am
not touching Danish herrings, I am
not touching Czech sausages. If there
exists a brand that is marketed in
many member states, there is legitimate expectation that the brand will
contain the same thing, and it doesn’t
in cases ... My estimation remains the
same – several hundreds of products.”
Products with different recipes, but
bearing the same branding, will only
be allowed on sale if the food company
can prove that the taste preferences in
one part of Europe differ from those in
another area.
The food industry has for years
insisted that differences between
similarly branded products can be
explained by a desire to satisfy cultural
preferences, rather than to cut costs.
The action against the “dual food”
problem was among a series of efforts
to increase consumer confidence
announced in Brussels.
Consumer organisations are to be
given the ability to launch collective
action on behalf of aggrieved people. Fines will be increased to up to
4% of annual turnover for companies
deemed to have trampled on the rights
of their customers.
Jourová said: “In a globalised world
where the big companies have a huge
advantage over individual consumers,
we need to level the odds. Consumer
authorities will finally get teeth to punish the cheaters. It cannot be cheap
to cheat.”
it was “highly likely” the Russian state
targeted them with the nerve agent.
Moscow has waged a furious media
battle in an attempt to discredit the
UK’s account. It is likely it will want
to bring Yulia back to Russia.
In her statement, Yulia said: “I have
left my father in their care, and he is
still seriously ill. I too am still suffering with the effects of the nerve agent
used against us.
“I find myself in a totally different
life than the ordinary one I left just
over a month ago, and I am seeking
to come to terms with my prospects,
whilst also recovering from this attack
on me … I have access to friends and
family, and I have been made aware
of my specific contacts at the Russian
embassy, who have kindly offered me
their assistance in any way they can.
At the moment I do not wish to avail
myself of their services, but if I change
my mind I know how to contact them.
“Most importantly, I am safe and
feeling better as time goes by, but I
am not yet strong enough to give a
full interview to the media, as I one
day hope to do.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:3 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 18:32
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
News
3
Theatre review
Cuba Gooding
hoofs stylishly,
but this is a night
at the museum
‘The leading
actors all do
their stuff,
the ensemble
is lively and
the band is
exceptional,
producing
the evening’s
best moment’
Cuba Gooding
Jr exudes charm
as self-seeking
lawyer Billy
Flynn
Chicago The Musical
Phoenix Theatre, London
★★★☆☆
The vaudeville show about
death and celebrity is topical
and funny – but it all too
faithfully follows in the
footsteps of the 1996 version,
writes Michael Billington
PHOTOGRAPHS:
TRISTRAM KENTON/
GUARDIAN
I
f this Kander and Ebb musical
feels as if it has been with us
forever, that is because it has.
It premiered in 1975, directed
and choreographed by Bob
Fosse, and was given a more
minimalist revival by Walter Bobbie
that bowed on Broadway in 1996 and
came to London a year later.
It is that version, now starring
several Chicago veterans as well
as Cuba Gooding Jr, that has been
faithfully recreated and, while it
is done with great professional
skill, it is beginning to resemble an
animated corpse.
That image is appropriate since
the show is all about death: speaking
of Chicago in the 1920s, it argues that
“in this town murder is a form of
entertainment”.
Using the form of a Brechtian
vaudeville, Kander and Ebb follow
the story of Roxie Hart, a small-time
hoofer who shoots her lover and
exploits her mythical pregnancy to
escape the rap. Fame, however, is
fleeting and Roxie soon finds that
she is yesterday’s news. Her solution
is to go into partnership with
another headline-seeking killer,
Velma Kelly, and form a touring
sister act.
The show is harsh, cynical and
funny, and chimes well with an age
that understands the psychotic
nature of celebrity.
I’m all for reviving old
musicals, but this one has not
been imaginatively rethought.
Tania Nardini and Gary Chryst
are credited, respectively, with
▲ Sarah Soetaert and Josefina
Gabrielle take the applause as
murderous lead characters Roxie
and Velma; above left, the cast
Bob Fosse was a
highly inventive
choreographer, but
here the dance begins
to feel not so much
Fosse-ised as ossified
recreating the 1996 direction and
dance. But even in 1996’s revival, the
choreography by Ann Reinking was
“in the style of Bob Fosse”.
His trademarks are still visible:
the men sport tilted bowlers, there
is much jutting of the bum and
thrusting of the pelvis, and chairs
are dragged backwards across the
stage. He was a highly inventive
choreographer, but here the dance
begins to feel not so much Fosseised as ossified.
Even if the production is a carbon
copy, individual performers bring
to it their own individuality. Sarah
Soetaert invests Roxie with the elfin
mischief of a naughty schoolgirl
who, eyeing up the rippling muscles
of the male chorus, coos: “These
are my boys.” Josefina Gabrielle,
another Chicago regular, plays
Velma as the more hard-bitten of
the two lead characters and does
some impressive spins, twirls and
high-kicks.
As the self-seeking lawyer Billy
Flynn, Gooding Jr displays too much
surface charm and sings modestly
but hoofs energetically.
Meanwhile, Ruthie Henshall,
who played Roxie in London in 1997,
now zestfully executes the role of
the jail den-mother, and Paul Rider
inevitably scoops up the sympathy
as Roxie’s discarded husband in a
number, Mr Cellophane, celebrating
his invisibility.
The lead actors all do their stuff,
the ensemble is lively and the
onstage band, under the direction
of Ian Townsend, is exceptional: the
evening’s best moment comes when
the brass are given the spotlight at
the start of the second act.
But, while it is pleasant to
renew acquaintance with numbers
such as All That Jazz and Razzle
Dazzle, everything is exactly as
I remember it from 1997. That
includes the chilling moment when
a rope descends from the flies as a
Hungarian girl dies protesting her
innocence to remind us of the reality
of judicial murder.
For all the commitment, this is
as much a piece of museum theatre
as those old Soviet shows that went
unchanged through the decades.
At Phoenix Theatre, London, until 6
October. Box office: 0844 871 7627
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:4 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 20:37
•
4
IMF warns
that punitive
tariffs could
destroy trade
across world
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
News
Richard Partington
The head of the International
Monetary Fund has warned of
“darker clouds looming” for the
global economy amid simmering trade
tensions between the US and China,
urging governments around the world
to steer clear of protectionism or face
negative consequences.
Christine Lagarde said the current
system for world trade was “in danger
of being torn apart”, with the potential
to upset the global economic upswing
and make consumers poorer.
Speaking in Hong Kong amid signs
the standoff could be abating, Lagarde
said it would be an “inexcusable, collective policy failure” for trade to break
down with nations erecting punitive
tariff systems against their rivals.
“Let us redouble our efforts to
reduce trade barriers and resolve disagreements without using exceptional
measures,” she said.
Her comments come after Donald
Trump threatened $150bn (£106bn)
of import tariffs on Chinese goods,
in response to what he said were
“unfair” trading practices used by the
communist nation. The US has a trade
deficit worth $375bn with China.
Beijing threatened to retaliate with
its own tariffs on US imports, although
both Trump and the Chinese president
Xi Jinping have since moved to diffuse
tensions. Wall Street rallied on Tuesday
after Xi said he would continue opening the Chinese economy and would
lower some import tariffs.
However, the standoff is still likely
to dominate the agenda at the IMF’s
meeting in Washington next week,
when world leaders and central
bankers discuss the world economy.
Using language that could be
interpreted as a veiled attack on
Trump, Lagarde said nations could
make domestic policy changes to
address trade imbalances and use
international forums to settle disputes.
“We can all do more – but we cannot
do it alone,” she said.
“Unfair trade practices have little
impact on a country’s overall trade
deficit with the rest of the world. That
imbalance is driven by the fact that
a country spends above its income.”
BA to charge for checked
luggage and seat selection
on long-haul flights
Rebecca Smithers
British Airways passengers will now
have to pay to check in luggage on
some long-haul routes.
A new “basic fare” was introduced
yesterday for passengers with hand
baggage only where tickets will cost
up to £60 less than the standard return
fare, the airline said.
Basic fare tickets have gone on sale
for flights from London to Austin,
Boston, Delhi, Denver, Dubai, Hong
Kong, Oakland, Philadelphia, Punta
Cana and Singapore. The cheapest fare
– to Dubai – will cost £143 each way, or
£286 overall.
Passengers will still be served complimentary food and drink and be able
to take two items of hand luggage. But
checking in a bag for people flying on
basic fare tickets will cost from £80
return, with seat selection starting at
£20 each way. BA already offers this
type of basic fare on short-haul flights.
The airline said the move to offer
a basic fare on long-haul routes was
about being competitive with the other
operators offering cheaper flights, and
was not about increasing the cost of a
standard fare.
“Needs vary from trip to trip, some
will be flying on business, some for
leisure, some will be on short hops,
others will be longer stays,” said BA’s
chief commercial officer, Adam Daniels. “We need to ensure the fares we
provide reflect those differing needs so
customers can select the best option.
Someone travelling for a short meeting or leisure break, who isn’t planning
to check in a bag and is happy for us
to allocate them a seat, will appreciate the option to secure a lower fare.
“They’ll still receive our generous hand baggage allowance, a seat
allocated to them in advance, complimentary food and drink, in-flight
entertainment, blankets and headphones, all at no extra cost.”
The changes are part of a larger
roll-out by BA’s parent company
International Airlines Group (IAG).
American Airlines, Iberia and Finnair
are also introducing the basic fares
under the IAG guidelines.
Last month competitor Virgin
Atlantic launched its first hand-baggage only ticket in a revamp of its
economy service.
Virgin is offering cheaper fares on
its routes that are similar to low-cost
competitors, where passengers can
only take cabin luggage and are not
able to choose their seat in advance.
In January the budget airline
Ryanair changed its rules to restrict
passengers to take only one small piece
of hand luggage into the cabin – rather
than the two items previously allowed
– unless they pay for priority boarding.
£80
The minimum cost of checking in
a bag on a basic return fare. Seat
selection will start at £20 each way
Deep sleep: Airbus to put passenger beds in cargo hold
Airbus has announced plans to
place beds for passengers in the
cargo hold of planes, as airlines
explore new ways of wringing
extra revenue from customers.
The cargo sleeper compartments could be operating in the
Franco-German firm’s A330 longhaul planes from 2020.
The modules “will be easily
interchangeable with regular
cargo containers”, said Airbus and
French firm Zodiac Aerospace, its
partner in the project.
The firms say the berths would
improve passenger comfort and let
airlines “add value” commercially,
in an industry where competition
for passengers is often driven by low
fares rather than gimmicks.
Geoff Pinner of Airbus said: “We
have already received very positive
feedback from several airlines on
our first mock-ups.”
Christophe Bernardini of Zodiac
said: “An improved passenger
experience is today a key element of
differentiation for airlines.”
Ryanair has admitted exploring
the possibility of putting flyers in
the hold, one of several adventurous
ideas – such as charging for toilet
use – that never took off. Australian
airline Qantas has also confirmed it
is exploring the concept of putting
beds in the hold. Staff and agencies
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:5 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Mariah Carey
ar
Star reveals bipolar
nt
disorder treatment
Page 11
Sent at 11/4/2018 19:24
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
•
‘Brexit betrayal’
Ambassador
lambasted
Page 23
5
TGI Friday’s
staff to ballot
for strike in
row over tips
Sarah Butler
Woman who ‘feigned illness’
at deportation died days later
Husband attacks handling of
case by Home Office after his
wife collapsed at Heathrow
Diane Taylor
A South African woman who collapsed
during her attempted deportation
from the UK was accused by immigration officials of faking illness to avoid
being put on a plane, but died five days
later, the Guardian can reveal.
The Home Office has referred the
case of Nancy Motsamai, 35, who
died on 12 March, to the independent Prisons & Probation Ombudsman
for investigation. Her husband, Fusi
Motsamai, also 35, has condemned the
Home Office’s treatment of his wife.
“We repeatedly asked the Home
Office to release Nancy’s passport to
allow her body to be transported to
her home country for burial but they
did not,” he said.
His distress was compounded when
the Home Office sent a text to his wife’s
phone on 30 March – more than two
weeks after her death – warning her
of penalties if she did not attend an
appointment at a Home Office reporting centre on 5 April.
The Home Office has confirmed
that the text was sent after they were
notified about Motsamai’s death. A
spokesman said the texting error was
caused by an automated system that
had not been updated.
The couple’s barrister, Linda
Appiah, had advised the government’s
legal department of her client’s death
in a letter dated 16 March. The Home
Office said it was not notified until 23
March, a week before the text was sent.
The couple had been living and
working in the UK for more than a decade, but ran into difficulties when they
applied to renew their visas. Both were
ordered to report regularly to Eaton
House, a Home Office centre in Hounslow, west London. When the couple
attended on 7 March, they were told
they were to be forcibly removed that
day and would be put on a plane to
South Africa.
Appiah said she had filed a judicial
review claim on 5 March over the
Home Office’s handling of the couple’s
visa application. The Home Office,
however, insists there were no legal
barriers to removing the couple two
days later.
“Nancy said she felt unwell while
we were at Eaton House,” said her husband. When the couple were taken to
Heathrow airport several hours later,
she collapsed in a corridor.
“An immigration official at the
airport accused Nancy of faking her
collapse to avoid being put on a plane,”
he said. “He told Nancy that he would
handcuff her hands and feet and make
her walk to the plane like a penguin,
and that he would put her on to the
plane even if he had to carry her.”
Officials then decided to put the
couple into detention instead. “We
were detained separately, but after
we were released Nancy told me that
a nurse at the detention centre told
her she was too ill to be detained, but
the nurse was overruled by a superior
and she was held overnight,” he said.
The next morning both of them
were released, but she collapsed and
▲ Fusi and Nancy Motsamai visiting
Portpatrick on Scotland’s west coast.
The couple had lived and worked in
the UK legally for more than a decade
died of a pulmonary embolism five
days later. Nancy’s body was eventually flown to South Africa on 5 April
after the country’s high commission
agreed to provide an emergency travel
document allowing her body to be
placed on a flight.
“Nancy was the kind of person
who would light up the room with her
smile,” said her husband. “She loved
helping others and volunteered to help
at the church with different youth programmes. She believed in justice and
used to get cross when injustice happened to others and no one was held
accountable for it.”
The Rev Lucy Brierley of Woking United Reformed Church, which
supported the couple and continues
to support Fusi, condemned the UK’s
immigration deportation system as a
travesty and an embarrassment. “This
case is an indictment of the administrative chaos in the UK visa and
immigration system,” she said.
A Home Office spokesperson said:
“Our thoughts and condolences are
with Mrs Motsamai’s family at this
difficult time. We take our responsibilities towards detainees’ health
and welfare seriously. When there
are claims that the highest standards
have not been met these will be investigated thoroughly.”
TGI Friday’s is facing the first strike
over tips in Britain in the escalation
of a row between waiting staff and the
restaurant chain.
In February the chain, which has 83
outlets, proposed redistributing 40%
of service charge payments paid on
credit and debit cards to back-of-house
employees, including kitchen staff, in
lieu of a wage increase.
Waiting staff are angry at the loss of
card tips – a move on which the Unite
union claims they were not properly
consulted. Kitchen staff are said to be
unhappy about swapping a rise in basic
pay for a share of tips.
Tips distributed via an automatic
system known as a tronc are excluded
from national insurance, but that also
affects the calculation of payments
such as redundancy, maternity pay
and pensions. The company has
denied its decision was for tax reasons.
Unite said it would ballot workers
at two TGI Friday’s restaurants a week
until 1 May about striking over the new
tips policy and allegations of unpaid
trial shifts. Ballots will start in Covent
Garden in central London and Milton
Keynes next week and there will be a
protest outside the Covent Garden restaurant tomorrow.
Dave Turnbull, a Unite regional
officer, said: “Our members are bravely
fighting back against a system that
forces workers to live on low pay and
without income security.”
Some restaurants are using various
methods to withhold service charges
paid on cards from staff as their profits are squeezed. Some require waiters
to pay a percentage of sales they have
generated to the restaurant from their
tips or they persuade staff to cut their
wages to the legal minimum and make
up the difference via tips. Such practices remain in place nearly two years
after the completion of a government
consultation on proposals to tackle
unfair handling of tips after revelations in the Guardian and other papers.
The government said action on
tipping was still “under consideration”. TGI Friday’s did not respond to
a request for comment.
‘Our members are
fighting a system
that forces workers
to live on low pay’
Dave Turnbull
Unite officer
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:6 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
National
▼ Rupert Murdoch and Jerry Hall.
The regulator is due to report to the
culture minister on Sky’s bid by 1 May
PHOTOGRAPH: STEFAN WERMUTH/REUTERS
Fox cartel allegations
should have bearing on
Sky takeover – Watson
Mark Sweney
Labour’s deputy leader, Tom Watson,
has said that 21st Century Fox’s potential involvement in a sports rights
cartel in Europe needs to be considered by the UK competition regulator
before it makes a final decision on
whether to approve the Rupert Murdoch company’s takeover of Sky.
The European commission raided
the offices of a number of TV companies across Europe – including Fox and
Ziggo Sport, a Dutch subsidiary owned
by Vodafone and Virgin Media’s parent, Liberty Global – on Tuesday over
concerns that they “may have violated
EU antitrust rules that prohibit cartels
and restrictive business practices”.
The raid on the offices of 21st Century Fox’s subsidiary Fox Network
Group, which has its European headquarters in Hammersmith, west
London, was understood to include
officials from the UK’s regulatory body,
the Competition and Markets Authority. The CMA sent a separate team to
the one that is set to deliver its verdict
to Matt Hancock, the culture secretary,
on whether to clear Fox’s £11.7bn Sky
takeover bid.
“News that Fox offices in London
have been raided by EU officials is concerning,” said Watson, who is also the
shadow culture secretary. “Given the
CMA is currently preparing its final
advice for the secretary of state on
the proposed Sky deal, it is important
they establish the facts of what has
happened here and take it into consideration in their judgment.
“If Fox has done something to violate EU laws then that should have a
bearing on whether the deal receives
approval,” Watson said.
Fox has said that its subsidiary is
“cooperating fully” with the investigation, which the EC says does not
mean its targets have necessarily committed anti-competitive behaviour.
Sources close to the company stressed
that it is nothing to do with the Fox/Sky
deal. “Unannounced inspections are a
preliminary step into suspected anticompetitive practices,” the EC said.
21st Century Fox’s own offices have
not been raided, and a spokesman for
Sky, which is a major player in the
European sports rights market, also
said that none of its offices had been
involved in the raids.
‘News that Fox offices
have been raided by
the EU is concerning’
Tom Watson
Deputy Labour leader
Legal experts say the EC inquiry
into a separate Fox subsidiary is outside the direct scope of the CMA’s
investigation, which is looking at
media plurality issues relating to the
Murdoch family adding Sky News to
control of the Sun and Times.
However, as the Fox businesses
are the ultimate responsibility of 21st
Century Fox’s chief, James Murdoch,
whose connection to the phonehacking scandal at the family’s UK
newspapers partly derailed the 2010
bid for Sky, the emergence of another
potential scandal could not have come
at a worse time.
The CMA is due to deliver its final
recommendation by 1 May to Hancock,
who then has 30 days to decide
whether to approve the deal.
“In reality, the EC probe is not going
to mean any delay to the Fox/Sky deal,”
said one competition lawyer, who
wished to remain anonymous. “This
kind of raid happens near the start of
a case, so it is probably two to three
years from a decision even if it turns
out there is an open and shut case.
“At this stage, Fox has to be presumed innocent and there is nothing
the CMA is going to be able to look at
anyway. It is also hard to see how any
competition law violation is relevant
to broadcasting standards or media
plurality,” the lawyer said.
However, public and political campaigners such as Watson, the former
Labour leader Ed Miliband, and Sir
Vince Cable, the Liberal Democrat
leader, have managed to pressure the
government into calling for extensive
scrutiny, against the recommendations of the media regulator, Ofcom.
Fox Network Group distributes Fox
Sports in a number of markets across
Europe and also owns a controlling
stake (51%) in the media company that
holds the broadcast and sponsorship
rights to the Dutch Premier League.
The remaining stake is owned by the
Dutch Premier League and Big Brother
maker Endemol Shine, which is 50%
owned by Rupert Murdoch’s Fox. As a
result of the arrangement, Fox Sports
broadcasts all Dutch Premier League
games exclusively in the Netherlands.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:7 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
National
PHOTOGRAPH: HENRY
NICHOLLS/REUTERS
7
Look, no hands The dial on the south side face of the Elizabeth Tower was revealed handless yesterday to allow
for lighting trials as part of a five-year, £29m renovation of the tower. The toll of the Great Bell, better known as Big
Ben, was suspended in August as scaffolding was raised to allow for repairs to the structure and mechanisms of
the four clocks. The east dial, facing the Thames, has kept working and visible but chimeless during the works.
RHS digs in to heart of Salford
to create new 62-hectare garden
Frances Perraudin
The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS)
has unveiled plans for its first new garden in 17 years – a 62 hectare (154 acre)
site in the heart of Salford, Greater
Manchester.
RHS Garden Bridgewater – which
is being developed in the derelict gardens of the now-demolished stately
home Worsley New Hall – has been
described as the biggest gardening
project in Europe.
Local volunteers and RHS staff have
already started cultivating the muddy
site, working around the estate’s surviving outbuildings and walls. When
it opens in 2020 it will join Harlow Carr
in North Yorkshire, Hyde Hall in Essex,
Rosemoor in Devon and Wisley in Surrey as the society’s fifth garden.
The renovation is based on a design
by the landscape architect Tom
Stuart-Smith and will cost £30m, £19m
of which is being provided by Salford
Council. The RHS hopes for 1 million
visitors per year once completed.
The first phase of the plans includes
the restoration of the four hectare (11
acre) Walled Kitchen Garden, one
of the largest in the UK, which will
sit along side an education garden,
a therapeutic garden, two lakes and
community spaces.
The RHS announced yesterday that
following a nation-wide competition
the kitchen garden would be designed
by the Chelsea flower show gold medallists Charlotte Harris and Hugo Bugg.
Harris said: “Our design references
the history of the [nearby Bridgewater canal] and the estate and the wider
area’s role in the industrial revolution.”
The plan for the garden involves
“pushing the boundaries” of what can
be grown in the north west, Harris said,
by experimenting with more exotic
plants. “We want to inspire visitors to
‘Our design refers
to the Bridgewater
canal and the wider
area’s role in the
industrial revolution‘
Charlotte Harris
left, with co-designer Hugo Bugg
think of their spaces in different ways,
whatever kind of space they have at
home, whether it’s a balcony or a larger
garden,” said Harris.
Marcus Chilton-Jones, curator of
RHS Bridgewater, said the organisation had been looking to develop a new
garden somewhere in the midlands or
the north west, scouring the M6 corridor for a suitable site. “The reason
they ended up here is it’s the best site.
It’s got lots of different soils, lots of
history, lots of people nearby, infrastructure,” he said.
While the immediate surrounding
area of Worsley is affluent, areas a few
miles away like Eccles have patches
of deprivation. “It’s both the biggest
challenge of the site and the biggest
opportunity,” Chilton-Jones said of the
demographics in the surrounding area.
“Because we can engage a different
type of person in a different community in gardening, so we can make
more of a difference to people’s lives.”
He said one of the key objectives
of RHS Bridgewater would be programmes that work with young
offenders and volunteer opportunities
that prioritise people living nearby.
The Elizabethan Gothic-style Worsley New Hall was built by the Egerton
family, who held the title of Duke of
Bridgewater, in 1846.
Early UK asparagus
crop defies ‘beast
from the east’
Rebecca Smithers
Consumer affairs correspondent
UK supermarkets have begun stocking the first batches of British-grown
asparagus this year, despite the impact
of the recent “beast from the east” cold
weather system.
Marks & Spencer was first off the
block with British asparagus on sale
in selected branches last week – nearly
three weeks before the traditional start
of the eight-week season on 23 April
– while Waitrose put the first spears
on sale yesterday. Sainsbury’s is likely
to stock small quantities from the
weekend.
But the much larger mainstream
crop – grown in the open in fields
rather than in polytunnels or glasshouses – is likely to be delayed by two
weeks as a result of adverse weather
conditions and the impact of up to
three separate snowfalls which sent
temperatures plummeting, according
to the trade body British Asparagus.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:8 Edition Date:180412 Edition:03 Zone:
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The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
National
News
xSubjectxxxx
Syria conflict
▼ Russian president Vladimir Putin
and foreign minister Sergei Lavrov
attend a Kremlin ceremony yesterday
PHOTOGRAPH: SERGEI ILNITSKY/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Gas attack must
be challenged,
says May as she
weighs MPs’ vote
PM consults cabinet on next
steps, including bypassing
backing from parliament
Heather Stewart
Jessica Elgot
Theresa May has not ruled out committing the UK to joining a coordinated
military intervention in Syria without
consulting MPs, after insisting the
chemical weapon attack on Douma
“cannot go unchallenged”.
The prime minister will discuss the
next steps with her cabinet colleagues
today, after summoning them to an
emergency meeting.
Downing Street sources said they
would take “one step at a time”, but
with the US president, Donald Trump,
pressing for urgent action, they did
not rule out bypassing the convention
that the House of Commons is offered
a vote before military action.
Some ministers are privately warning that they still need to be convinced
of the evidence against the Syrian
regime. But most are expected to
offer May their backing, after she said
“all the indications are that the Syrian
regime was responsible”.
Without a stable majority in parliament, May would be reluctant to
risk suffering an embarrassing defeat
over military action, as David Cameron
did in 2013, when Labour opposed
airstrikes in Syria.
And with parliament still in recess
until Monday, some senior MPs
insisted that the Commons should
not be a block to action.
Johnny Mercer, the MP for Plymouth, said: “Binding votes on foreign
policy, guided by extremely sensitive
intelligence which can never be shared
in the Commons, are a bad idea. They
can help shape debate – the view of the
Commons is extremely important – but
must never inhibit our ability to act.”
▲ Theresa May assured ministers ‘all
indicators’ point to the Syrian regime
But Labour, the Liberal Democrats
and the Scottish National party have
all insisted that MPs must be given the
chance to debate and vote on May’s
plans, as convention dictates.
Jeremy Corbyn said: “Parliament
should always be given a say on military action.” He warned about the
risk of airstrikes escalating into a “hot
war” between the US and Syria’s main
backer, Russia.
The Lib Dem leader, Sir Vince Cable,
said: “The government must present
the objectives of any proposed action
to parliament. A unilateral response
by any country, outside of a wider
strategy, without allies is not the way
forward.”
But unlike Corbyn, he signalled
that his party could be prepared to
back action if it believes May has a
coherent plan in collaboration with
international partners.
“The use of chemical weapons is a
clear red line, and there must be consequences for crossing it. Britain is an
outward-facing nation, willing to play
our part in upholding international
law,” Cable said.
Some of the Tory rebels who
opposed military action in 2013 indicated that they would be willing to
support May this time.
The Tory MP Andrew Percy said:
“My view would be that if the evidence
is clear that the Assad regime was the
cause of this attack then the UK must
not stand on the sidelines and must
work with the US and France on any
action against the regime.”
As well as promising to work with
“our closest allies” in determining how
to hold the Syrian regime to account,
the prime minister questioned the role
of the UN in investigating what happened on the ground, after Russia’s
“appalling” use of its veto to water
down plans for an independent UNled inquiry.
May’s approach contrasted with
that of Corbyn, who warned that any
military action could lead to an escalation of the long-running conflict.
The Guardian understands that the
Labour leader has not ruled out whipping his MPs to oppose any military
action – though a final decision would
depend on what motion she presented
to the Commons.
It is unclear whether the Democratic Unionist party’s 10 MPs would
throw their weight behind May, as the
confidence and supply agreement the
Tories struck last year did not explicitly cover military intervention.
The DUP’s MPs voted against airstrikes in Syria in 2013 – though they
could take a different stance today.
Some ministers are cautious about
any action being taken, demanding
clear evidence of a Syrian role – and
a careful plan for what happens next.
Douma
Eyes were
burning
and hearts
slowed
▲ A young child is treated after the
poisonous gas attack in Douma
Martin Chulov
Middle East correspondent
F
oaming at the mouth,
eyes burning and
struggling to breath, the
patients overwhelmed
medics in the Syrian
town of Douma in the
hours after 7:30pm last Saturday.
By the following day an estimated
500 people were heading to health
facilities with “signs and symptoms
consistent with exposure to toxic
chemicals” said reports passed to
the World Health Organisation from
its partners in Syria.
Even in an area numbed by
months of relentless attacks this was
an unusual event.
Doctors were treating symptoms
that they had not seen before. Some
patients were convulsing, several
had pinpoint pupils, and the slow
heartbeat of others was barely
keeping them alive.
All complained of a pungent
smell, like chlorine. That industrial
chemical had been dropped on
Douma and the rest of the Ghouta
area many times before and doctors
could easily recognise its effects.
But something else was killing the
people, and they had no idea how to
treat it. “Something was working on
the nervous system,” said a doctor
who spoke using a pseudonym.
“Chlorine doesn’t do that. While
there was clearly chlorine on some
of the people we treated, there was
also something else.”
In the five days since, intelligence
technicians have pored over
satellite images, radio intercepts
and flight paths to try to establish
what happened in Douma. In
Jordan, officials prepared to receive
biological samples from some of the
estimated 42 dead and the hundreds
more who survived.
Smuggling routes in and out
of Damascus are well worn, and
makeshift crossings along the
watertight Jordanian border
suddenly open when there’s a need.
Getting samples, especially corpses,
to laboratories has been a top
priority this week as the US has tried
to establish if the gas used contained
more than chlorine.
One official who examined
samples from patients after the sarin
strikes in Ghouta in 2013, and at
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•
9
Continued from page 1
Trump tells Russia
to prepare for Syria
missile attacks
Khan Sheikhoun, 2017, said: “[Nerve
agents] degrade very quickly in situ.
If there was going to be a productive
fact-finding mission they’d need to
get there immediately.”
Jerry Smith, who led the UN
mission to supervise withdrawal of
the Syrian government’s stockpile of
sarin late in 2013, said the patients’
symptoms could suggest exposure
to an agent in addition to chlorine.
Organophosphate-based poison,
including sarin, causes such
symptoms. Pinpoint pupils and
severe mouth foaming have been
telltale signs in past attacks. In Paris,
London and Washington this week
intelligence agencies pored over
videos from the scene where most
people were killed. US officials said
‘Something, not
chlorine, was
working on their
nervous system’
Doctor in Syria
they seemed similar to images taken
after the two confirmed sarin strikes.
By Tuesday, US officials were
suggesting that the bomb that hit
the three-storey residential building
in Douma had both chlorine and
a nerve agent. Military officials in
all three capitals insisted the bomb
had been from one of two Syrian
government helicopters which had
left the Dumayr airbase north of
Douma 30 minutes earlier. Its flight
path was mapped, but local spotters
in Douma logged two helicopters.
Syrian and Russian planes had been
flying bombing runs over the area
since Friday night.
Russian troops entered Douma
on Tuesday and inspected the house
where most people died. Rescuers
had taken videos of a large yellow
cylinder on the building’s roof, its
nose crushed by impact. The shell
was similar to cylinders widely used
in Syria to drop chlorine bombs.
A regional official said it was
possible the cylinder held two
canisters. “[The contents] cannot
be mixed – it would be volatile,
unstable – but can be combined. The
point of detonation [could have]
dispersed them together.”
any incoming attack would trigger
retaliation – whether or not there were
Russian casualties.
Vladimir Frolov, a former diplomat
and foreign affairs analyst in Moscow,
told the Guardian that he believed
the ambassador’s remarks were mistranslated, and noted that the Russian
envoy had referred directly to Moscow’s stated policy. But with tensions
rising he believed Putin may have to
step in to restate Moscow’s policy.
“I think until now they thought it
would be good to keep the US in doubt
about the real Russian reaction, but
Trump has raised the stakes today,”
Frolov said. “Putin needs to … restore
clarity and calm things down.”
The Russian foreign ministry
spokeswoman, Maria Zakharova,
claimed a US missile salvo could be
used to destroy evidence of Saturday’s
poison gas attack in Douma, which
Moscow claims was staged. The Russian army yesterday said it was going to
send military police into the suburb to
safeguard the site. Their deployment
appeared part of a plan proposed by
Moscow to bring specialists from the
Organisation for the Prohibition of
Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to the site.
Western officials have warned that
any Russian effort to control the visit
could turn the inspection into a new
flashpoint, rather than a potential
escape ramp from the looming crisis.
Syria’s other main backer, Iran –
which has significant ground forces
in the country, serving alongside Syrian army and allied militias – could also
retaliate if its troops are hit.
“It is hard to think of a more risky
situation,” said Joseph Cirincione, the
president of the Ploughshares Fund,
an arms control advocacy group. “You
have the US attacking from the air
against ground forces that are intermingled with Iranians and Russians.
The chances of US killing Russians
or Iranians is quite high. Their reaction is … certainly not going to be
understanding.”
Less than an hour after warning
Russia to “get ready”, Trump appeared
to strike a less aggressive tone in a second tweet: “Russia needs us to help
with their economy, something that
would be very easy to do, and we need
all nations to work together. Stop the
arms race?”
The World Health Organisation,
based in Geneva, said yesterday that
it had received reports from its health
partners around Douma that 500
patients had been admitted to hospital
with symptoms of a chemical attack.
The Russian foreign ministry
insisted: “Damascus has neither the
motive to use chemical weapons nor
the chemical weapons themselves.”
A spokesman for the Russian army
accused the White Helmets rescue
organisation of staging the attack.
The bellicose tone from Trump
raises questions about whether he
will wait for a UK parliamentary
endorsement for action and may make
it more difficult for May to win such
a vote.
Additional reporting Martin Chulov
Analysis
Julian Borger
‘A frighteningly clear
illustration of how wars
start by miscalculation’
D
onald Trump’s twitter storm yesterday
morning warning Russia to “get ready”
for US missiles fired at Syria was a
frighteningly clear illustration of how
wars can start by miscalculation. While
the trigger points in the president’s mind
are unknowable, it seems likely from past experience
that he had seen something on the morning news – most
probably a version of remarks by a Russian diplomat in
Lebanon that may have been edited or mistranslated to
make them sound worse than they were.
According to a report in Arabic translated into English,
the diplomat – Alexander Zasypkin – was warning that
Russia would shoot down incoming US missiles and
attack ships, submarines or planes they were fired from.
That went further than the official Russian red line,
laid down by the chief of general staff, Valery Gerasimov,
in March, that Russia would use its air defences and
other weapons to respond to a threat to Russian
servicemen in the region.
Whatever Zasypkin did or did not say, it unleashed a
direct threat against Russia unlike anything seen from a
US president in modern history. It was more like a piece
of dialogue from Dr Strangelove. “Get ready Russia,
because they will be coming, nice and new and ‘smart!’”
was the line from Trump’s thumb at 7am.
The president sent out a slightly more conciliatory
tweet an hour later, but his initial gut level response will
have had its effect as it was heard down the US chain of
command, rippling out to US allies and enemies. It will
make it harder to find a way out of
the present crisis.
‘Whatever Zasypkin
Even before Trump arrived in the
said, it unleashed a
Oval Office, the horrors of the Syrian
war were destined to turn into a
threat against Russia
global crisis. “The Russians have
unlike anything seen
been trying to force us to accept a
peace for some time now, and we
from a US president in
have not been sufficiently organised
modern history’
to come up with a counter-strategy,”
said Evelyn Farkas, a former deputy
assistant secretary of defence for
Russia and Eurasia. “We have failed
to connect our anti-Isis-operations to a strategy for the
civil war and a route to a tenable peace.”
The failure of the UN security council to serve as
a vehicle for compromise has been due in part to
Moscow’s policy of blanket denial when it comes to
the Assad regime’s involvement in war crimes, most
importantly the use of chemical weapons. The western
powers have been infuriated to see that line crossed and
feel they cannot stand by and watch it erased altogether.
Maxim Suchkov, a Russian political analyst, said:
“I believe the risks are high and serious. For Russia
the conflict around Syria has long been about bigger
things, primarily the new world order, the rules-settling,
changing what Moscow has seen as detrimental US
policies.”
Both sides then see a potential existential threat in the
Syrian conflict. For the west, it is the normalisation of
the use of weapons of mass destruction. For Russia – or
at least Putin – it as an all-or-nothing battle over Russian
resurgence as a nation.
“Without clear goals and a strategy for Syria, striking
its airbases and other military facilities is pointless
and risks escalating to direct conflict with Russia,” said
Bruce Blair, a former nuclear missile launch officer and
now a scholar at Princeton University. “The backdrop to
this confrontation is two nuclear states with thousands
of nuclear-armed missiles on launch-ready alert.
Communications between the US and Russian militaries
are essential right now to avoid direct clashes between
our forces and prevent this crisis from spinning out of
control.”
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•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
National
11
‘I didn’t want to believe it’: Carey
reveals she has bipolar disorder
“the hardest couple of years I’ve been
through”. In 2014, Carey separated
from her husband Nick Cannon, the
rapper and TV host with whom she has
twins. In January 2016, she said she
was engaged to the Australian billionaire James Packer but said in October
2016 that the engagement had ended.
“Until recently I lived in denial and
isolation, and in constant fear someone would expose me,” she told the
magazine. “It was too heavy a burden
to carry and I simply couldn’t do that
any more. I sought and received treatment, I put positive people around me
and I got back to doing what I love –
writing songs and making music.”
Carey said that she was currently
in “a really good place”, adding: “I’m
hopeful we can get to a place where
the stigma is lifted from people going
through anything alone. It can be
incredibly isolating. It does not have
to define you and I refuse to allow it to
define me or control me.”
Woman died after being burned
by acid spilled on her by stranger
over herself after the incident in High
Wycombe, Buckinghamshire.
She was treated in hospital and
released briefly after sustaining burns
on up to 5% of her body.
Rand died on 14 June, 11 days after
the incident, from multi-organ failure
after developing septicaemia caused
by the burns, the court heard.
Xeneral Webster, 19, of Hammersmith, west London, denies murder.
Alison Hunter QC, prosecuting,said
Webster had been in a dispute in High
Wycombe with Saqib Hussain, from
whom he was trying to wrest a bicycle.
Hunter said CCTV footage showed
Webster reaching into his satchel for
a bottle. “What he produced next is
an open-topped bottle of acid and he
Laura Snapes
Mariah Carey has discussed her experiences with bipolar disorder for the first
time, telling a US magazine that she
hoped that talking about her experiences would help change perceptions.
The multimillion-selling singer told
People magazine that she was first
diagnosed with the disorder in 2001,
when she was hospitalised for a physical and mental health breakdown,
saying: “I didn’t want to believe it.”
The singer, who is in her late 40s,
said it was not until recently that
she had sought treatment, following
‘Until recently I lived
in denial, isolation
and in constant
fear that someone
would expose me’
Mariah Carey
Initially, Carey believed she was
experiencing a severe sleep disorder.
“But it wasn’t normal insomnia and I
wasn’t lying awake counting sheep. I
was working and working and working … I was irritable and in constant
fear of letting people down. It turns
out that I was experiencing a form of
mania. Eventually I would just hit a
wall. I guess my depressive episodes
were characterised by having very low
energy. I would feel so lonely and sad.”
The magazine reports that Carey is
in therapy and taking medication for
bipolar II disorder, which is characterised by episodes of mild “hypomania”
and major depression, and symptoms including insomnia, irritability
and hyperactivity. A bipolar I disorder
diagnosis requires the experience of at
least one full manic episode.
Carey told People that she had been
recording her 15th album. The record
is expected to be the first release on
Butterfly MC Records, her new joint
venture with a Sony subsidiary, Epic.
PHOTOGRAPH: TAYLOR HILL/FILMMAGIC
Press Association
A woman unwittingly caught up in a
dispute between two men died after
being splashed with acid, a court heard.
Joanne Rand, 47, was sitting on a
bench when she was struck from head
to toe with powerful sulphuric acid last
June, Reading crown court was told.
She screamed in pain and ran to a
nearby KFC restaurant to splash water
▲ Joanne Rand was hit by acid as she
sat on a bench, jurors heard yesterday
makes to throw it towards Mr Hussain. And he said to Mr Hussain: ‘This
is acid,’” she said. “At this moment Mr
Hussain, panicking, knocks the acid
out of Mr Webster’s hand.”
The bottle rolled and hit Rand, who
was sitting a few metres away, Hunter
said. She “instantly noticed that her
hair was wet and that her face had
begun to burn”, the prosecutor added.
Webster was captured on CCTV putting on a balaclava before cycling back
to the bench where Rand had been sitting to retrieve the bottle. He discarded
it and the bicycle before getting the
train home to London, the court heard.
Hunter said: “That Joanne Rand
was not Mr Webster’s intended victim on 3 June 2017 makes no difference
Labour plan to
use road tax to
fund free buses
for the under-25s
Jessica Elgot
Political correspondent
Labour has pledged free bus travel for
the under 25s, paid for by ring-fenced
cash from road tax.
The party said local authorities who
moved to introduce public ownership
of bus services or franchising would
be given the funds to provide free
travel, to incentivise councils to create
municipally-owned bus companies.
The party said it could help up to
13 million young people save £1,000
a year, based on the average price of
a bus ticket in England. The policy
would cost £1.4bn per year by the
end of a five-year parliament, with
franchising or municipalisation of
services likely to be staggered.
Labour said the funds would use
around a fifth of the income from
vehicle excise duty revenues, forecast
to be £6.7bn in 2021, which is currently
allocated to road building.
The party said it would use shadow
chancellor John McDonnell’s pledge
for a £250bn national transformation
fund to pay for road building out of
government borrowing.
Jeremy Corbyn will launch the
policy at a visit to a sixth form in Derby
today. “Young people deserve a break.
Nearly eight years of Tory austerity
have hit their incomes, their chance to
buy a house and their career opportunities,” he will say.
“Young people also tend to be in
lower paid, more insecure work, and
they spend a higher proportion of their
income on travel. Free bus travel will
make a huge difference to their lives.”
The shadow transport secretary,
Andy McDonald, said the funding
would incentivise councils to bring
services back into public ownership
and that companies often choose to
run only the most profitable routes,
leaving councils to fund the rest.
“Buses are vital for easing road congestion and air pollution, but for too
long, private bus companies have run
services for profit not people,” he said.
The transport minister, Nusrat
Ghani, said Labour had “no real ability
to deliver” the promise of free travel,
suggesting it could cost up to £13bn,
which Labour has denied.
in law to his culpability for her death,
because it arises in these circumstances where he was intending to
unlawfully kill or at least cause GBH
[grievous bodily harm] to another.”
She said Webster knew the consequences of having acid in a public
place, having been the victim of an
acid attack himself.
Webster admitted being involved
in an altercation; he said it occurred
because he had been sold spice instead
of cannabis. But he denied possessing
acid. He denies six charges: murder
and an alternative count of manslaughter; possession of acid; possession of
ammonia; attempted GBH with intent;
and robbery of a bicycle. The trial is
expected to last three weeks.
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:13 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 11/4/2018 16:42
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
National
Climate change
13
▼ New York hit by a tidal wave in The
Day After Tomorrow. Experts say the
film’s science was essentially correct
PHOTOGRAPH: ALLSTAR/20TH CENTURY FOX
Gulf Stream at weakest for
1,600 years due to warming
The current linked to climate
change is experiencing an
unprecedented slowdown
Damian Carrington
Environment editor
The warm Atlantic current linked to
severe and abrupt changes in the climate is now at its weakest in at least
1,600 years, new research shows.
The findings, based on multiple
lines of scientific evidence, throw
into question previous predictions
that a catastrophic collapse of the Gulf
Stream would take centuries to occur.
Such a collapse would see western
Europe suffer far more extreme winters, sea levels rise fast on the eastern
seaboard of the US and would disrupt
vital tropical rains. The new research
shows the current is now 15% weaker
than it was in about AD400, an exceptionally large deviation, and that
human-caused global warming is
responsible for at least a significant
part of the weakening.
The current, known as the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation
(Amoc), carries warm water northwards towards the north pole. There
it cools, becomes denser and sinks,
and then flows back southwards. But
global warming hampers the cooling
of the water, while melting ice in the
Arctic, particularly from Greenland,
floods the area with less dense freshwater, weakening the Amoc current.
Scientists know that Amoc has
slowed since 2004, when instruments
were deployed at sea to measure it. But
now two new studies have provided
comprehensive ocean-based evidence
that the weakening is unprecedented
in at least 1,600 years, which is as far
back as the new research stretches.
“Amoc is a really important part of
the Earth’s climate system and it has
played an important part in abrupt climate change in the past,” said David
Thornalley, a geographer at University College London who led one of the
new studies. He said current climate
models do not replicate the observed
slowdown, suggesting that Amoc is
less stable that thought.
During the last ice age, some big
changes in Amoc led to winter temperatures changing by 5-10C in just
one to three years, with major consequences for the weather over the land
masses bordering the Atlantic.
“The [current] climate models don’t
predict [an Amoc shutdown] is going
to happen in the future,” said Thornalley. “The problem is how certain are
‘[A shutdown] is a
tipping point that
is low probability
but high impact’
David Thornalley
University College London
we it is not going to happen? It is one of
these tipping points that is relatively
low probability, but high impact.”
The study by Thornalley and colleagues, published in Nature, used
cores of sediments from a key site
off Cape Hatteras in North Carolina
to examine Amoc over the last 1,600
years. Larger grains of sediment reflect
faster Amoc currents and vice versa.
They also used the shells of tiny
marine creatures from sites across the
Atlantic to measure a characteristic
pattern of temperatures that indicate
the strength of Amoc. When it weakens, a large area of ocean around
Iceland cools as less warm water is
brought north, and the waters off the
east coast of the US get warmer.
The second study, also published
in Nature, used the characteristic
Ocean circulation in the Atlantic is driven by warm
surface currents and cold deep-water return flows
15%
Reduction in the
strength of the
Gulf Stream’s
current since
about AD400
Cold deep water
Warm surface water
10C
The plunge in
temperatures
within just a few
years following
Amoc changes in
the last ice age
Source: Nature
pattern of temperatures, but assessed
this using thermometer data collected
over the last 120 years or so.
Both studies found that Amoc today
is about 15% weaker than it was 1,600
years ago, but there were also differences in their conclusions. The first
study found significant weakening of
Amoc after the end of the “little ice
age” in about 1850, which was the
result of natural climate variability,
with further weakening caused later
by global warming.
The second study suggests most of
the weakening came later, and can be
squarely blamed on the burning of fossil fuels. Further research is now being
undertaken to understand the reasons
for the differences.
However, it is already clear that
human-caused climate change will
continue to slow Amoc, with potentially severe consequences. Alexander
Robinson, a climatologist at Madrid
University and one of the team that
conducted the second study, said: “If
we do not rapidly stop global warming,
we must expect a further long-term
slowdown of the Atlantic overturning.
“We are only beginning to understand the consequences of this
unprecedented process,” he said. “But
they might be disruptive.”
A 2004 disaster movie, The Day
After Tomorrow, envisaged a rapid
shutdown of Amoc and a devastating
freeze. The basics of the science were
portrayed correctly, said Thornalley.
“Obviously it was exaggerated – the
changes happened in a few days or
weeks and were much more extreme.
But it is true that in the past this weakening of Amoc happened very rapidly
and caused big changes,” he said.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:14 Edition Date:180412 Edition:03 Zone:
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•••
14
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The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
National
News
Data scandal
▼ Facebook’s CEO, Mark Zuckerberg,
arrives for questioning by the House
energy and commerce committee
PHOTOGRAPH: LEAH MILLIS/REUTERS
Zuckerberg admits his own
Facebook data was given to
Cambridge Analytica
David Smith
Washington
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg
was given a rougher ride on his second day of congressional testimony
in Washington yesterday as he faced
questions about his company’s ability
to track its users’ movements, shopping habits and browsing histories.
The billionaire entrepreneur
revealed that his own personal information was among the data handed
over to the political consultancy
Cambridge Analytica, accused of
enabling Facebook data to be used to
manipulate voting intentions in the
US and around the world.
Congresswoman Anna Eshoo, questioning Zuckerberg at a hearing of the
House energy and commerce committee, asked him if his data was “included
in the data sold to the malicious third
parties”. After a brief hesitation, he
replied: “Yes.”
Eshoo, from California, called Facebook’s terms and conditions around
privacy a “minefield” and asked Zuckerberg one of many blunt questions
put to him yesterday: “Are you willing to change your business model to
protect users’ privacy?”
Zuckerberg, 33, gave one of many
evasive responses: “Congresswoman,
I’m not sure what that means.”
On Tuesday Facebook began notifying more than 87 million people
around the world, including one
million in the UK, that their private
information may have been given to
Cambridge Analytica – the worst privacy debacle in his company’s history.
Zuckerberg and Facebook’s chief
operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg,
have been on a media apology tour
since the Cambridge Analytica story
was broken by the Observer, the
Guardian’s sister Sunday newspaper.
The data was collected through an
app called ThisIsYourDigitalLife, built
by academic Aleksandr Kogan, separately from his work at Cambridge
University. Cambridge Analytica has
worked with scientists from Cambridge University’s psychometrics
centre on ways to predict human
behaviour by using big data.
Congressman Eliot Engel of New
York asked if Facebook plans to sue
Kogan, Cambridge University or Cambridge Analytica. Zuckerberg said legal
action was being considered but suggested he had only just learned about
the psychometrics centre.
“What we found now is that there’s
a whole programme associated with
Cambridge University where … there
were a number of other researchers
building similar apps,” he said.
“We do need to understand whether
there is something bad going on at
Cambridge University overall that
will require a stronger action from us.”
Threat of regulation
The digital secretary, Matt
Hancock, has warned Facebook
that it was not above the law, as
he threatened the social media
firm with regulation if it failed to
protect users’ data.
At what government
sources said was a “robust but
constructive” meeting with senior
Facebook executives, Hancock
warned the relationship between
government and social media
firms would have to change.
Afterwards, Hancock said:
“Social media companies are
not above the law and will
not be allowed to shirk their
responsibilities to our citizens. We
will do what is needed to ensure
that people’s data is protected –
that includes further regulation.”
Sources said Hancock called for
evidence Facebook’s attitude to
safeguarding its users’ data had
changed. Heather Stewart
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:15 Edition Date:180412 Edition:03 Zone:
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•••
15
Zuckerberg was presumably
referring to Cambridge University’s
psychometrics centre, which media
reports have suggested worked with
Cambridge Analytica on ways to predict human behaviour, although the
university denies this.
The university reacted by saying
it would be “surprised” if Zuckerberg was only now aware of the work.
“Our researchers have been publishing
such research since 2013 in major peerreviewed scientific journals, and these
studies have been reported widely in
international media,” a spokesman
said. “These have included one study
in 2015 led by Dr Aleksandr Spectre
[Kogan] and co-authored by two Facebook employees.”
Zuckerberg was widely said to
have emerged unscathed from his
five-hour appearance at a joint Senate committee on Tuesday in what
had been billed as a moment of reckoning for Silicon Valley. He was rarely
thrown off his talking points by middle-aged senators displaying a lack of
tech expertise.
But members of the House were
more punchy and willing to interrupt his flow as they asked questions
about privacy, surveillance, censorship and politics, regularly asking for
yes or no answers which he struggled
to provide. In his opening statement,
committee chair Greg Walden quoted
the company’s early motto to “move
fast and break things”, asking if the
company had “moved too fast and broken too many things”.
Bobby Rush of Illinois pondered:
“What is the difference between
Facebook’s methodology and the
methodology of the American political pariah J Edgar Hoover?”
Marsha Blackburn said: “I can’t let
you filibuster right now.” John Sarbanes from Maryland said: “Facebook
is becoming a self-regulated superstructure for political discourse. Are
we, the American people, going to regulate the political dialogue or are you,
Mark Zuckerberg?”
Frank Pallone asked Zuckerberg to
make a clear commitment to change
all Facebook’s default settings to
minimise the possible collection of
personal data.
The Facebook founder declined to
give a simple response, saying: “Congressman, this is a complex issue that
I think deserves more than a one-word
answer.”
Pallone replied: “That’s disappointing to me.”
Mike Doyle, a Democratic congressman from Pennsylvania, raised
the Cambridge Analytica matter and
asked: “When the Guardian made
the report, was that the first time you
heard about it?”
He accused Facebook of “turning a
blind eye” to developers’ abuses, adding: “There is a real trust gap here. This
developer data issue is just one example. Why should we trust you to follow
through on these promises?”
Zuckerberg answered: “Respectfully, I disagree with that characterisation. We’ve had a review process for
apps for years. We’ve reviewed tens of
thousands of apps a year.”
Florida Democrat Kathy Castor told
him: “A devil’s bargain has been struck.
Americans do not like to be manipulated. They do not like to be spied on …
Facebook now has evolved to a place
where you are tracking everyone.
You are collecting data on just about
everybody … I don’t think the average
American really understands that …
you’re following Facebook users even
after they log off that platform.”
Zuckerberg tried to reply: “Broadly
I disagree with your characterisation,”
but was frequently cut off by Castor.
She demanded: “You are collecting
personal data on people who are not
Facebook users, yes or no?”
Zuckerberg failed to give a yes or no
and Castor pounced again: “You watch
where we go. Isn’t that correct?”
He said: “Everyone has control
over how that works.” But again she
interjected: “Are you saying you don’t
gather data on where people travel?
It’s practically impossible these days
to remain untracked in America. And
that’s not part of the bargain.”
Several other members pressed
Zuckerberg on whether Facebook is
transparent about how much information it collects on users and even
non-users.
Some tech analysts following the
proceedings picked holes in his testimony, accusing him of conflating
different points on the issue of if users
own and control their data.
Five things we learned from
the second day of testimony
1
Mark Zuckerberg is just like us
His data was sold to a
malicious third party as well,
he confirmed, in an answer
to a question from the Democratic
representative Anna Eshoo.
Facebook is refusing to explicitly
confirm that this malicious third
party is GSR, the company started
by the Cambridge University
researcher Alexsandr Kogan.
Zuckerberg’s admission makes
it harder than ever for Facebook
to claim that its platform circa
2013 was fit for purpose: if even
the CEO cannot lock down his
privacy settings, who can?
2
Facebook is declaring war
on Cambridge University
Zuckerberg implied that
Facebook had only just
discovered that the university has
a large psychographics research
team, and he is shocked. “There’s
a whole programme associated
with Cambridge,” he said.
Zuckerberg said they needed
to understand whether
“something bad” was going
on at Cambridge University,
and implied that if Facebook
discovers something amiss, it may
consider suing the institution.
3
Regulation is very
much on the table
But in the meantime, the
EU’s general data protection
regulation (GDPR) is everyone’s
favourite. Multiple congressional
representatives asked Zuckerberg
whether or not he would
enforce GDPR for Americans, a
question he repeatedly dodged
by promising GDPR “controls”
rather than “protections”.
4
Facebook’s American roots
are a strength
As on the previous day,
Zuckerberg had responded
to a question about breaking up
the firm by noting that doing so
would weaken the US’s competitive
advantage against China.
But it is a tricky line to walk.
Something between 85-90%
of Facebook’s users are based
outside the US. Facebook knows
its future growth is reliant on
new international users.
5
There are some questions
Zuckerberg can’t – or won’t
– answer
By the end of the second
hearing, we had learned the
areas Facebook wanted to avoid.
Questions about its profiling
prowess, for instance, were
generally answered through
misdirection. Asked who owns “the
virtual you”, Zuckerberg’s favoured
response was to note that you
own all the “content” you upload,
and can delete it at will. But the
advertising profile Facebook builds
up about you cannot be deleted,
and you have no control over it.
Similarly, Zuckerberg repeatedly
tried to dodge the question of
how much data Facebook holds
about users’ browsing behaviour.
Alex Hern
Sketch
John Crace
‘Yes but no but yes but
no but what was that
again? The Zuck plays
the four-minute rule
T
he Facebook share price may have risen
5% after the Senate failed to lay a glove
on Mark Zuckerberg the previous day, but
he still looked tense as he settled into his
booster seat in preparation for his session
before Congress. He needn’t have worried.
His programmers had done their job just fine and his
algorithms were all in order. It might be a little tougher
than the day before, but the next few hours were still
going to sail by in a blur of anodyne animatronics.
Zuckerberg began with a five-minute statement.
All he’d ever wanted was to teach the world to sing in
perfect harmony but he’d been devastated to wake up
one morning to find he was one of the richest people
on the planet and evil people were doing beastly things
on his beloved Facebook. He was trying to stamp it out,
he added, attempting the expression his operators had
assured him could be interpreted as sincere.
The first few questions came from committee chair
Greg Walden. Was Facebook a media company? Oh no! It
was just a total coincidence it had livestreamed 25 Major
League Baseball games. Was it a financial institution?
Oh no! It was just a total coincidence people could send
each other money through it. Had he
ever thought to monetise people’s
‘All he’d ever wanted
data? “We don’t sell people’s data,”
Zuckerberg said, sounding hurt.
was to teach the world
There was no need when he could
to sing but he’d woken
flog so many advertisements.
Just when it looked as if we
up one day to find he
might be getting somewhere,
was one of the richest
Walden called himself to heel. Every
questioner was just going to get
people on the planet’
four minutes each. The first hint
of a smile crossed the Zuck’s face.
This was going to be a doddle. Just
ramble on in vague generalities to
wind the clock down. If things felt like they were getting
a bit tricky say, “I respectfully disagree” or “That’s too
complex to answer here, let me get back to you.”
Some Republicans weren’t even that interested in
asking him anything about the data scraping scandal
involving Cambridge Analytica that had prompted the
hearing in the first place. Joe Barton merely wanted to
know why a couple of Conservative bloggers had been
shut down on Facebook, while Fred Upton reckoned
that more regulation might make life too tricky for startups. As if they stood a chance.
The Democrats were a little more forensic. Anna
Eshoo tried to narrow things down by asking some yes
or no questions, but wasted half her allotted time in a
preamble. And even when it looked momentarily as if
Zuck was close to being put on the spot all he had to do
was drag out his answers. Yes but no but yes but no but
yes but no but what was the question again?
Just occasionally a few nuggets did come out. We
learned that the Zuck’s own data had been mined by
Cambridge Analytica, though we didn’t discover what
ads pop up for socially awkward, secretive billionaires.
Most bizarrely of all, we learned that the Zuck thought
there was a huge team of Cambridge University
academics hell-bent on undermining Facebook. We ran
out of time before he was able to expand on that.
But mostly we learned exactly what Zuckerberg
wanted us to learn. That he was devastated to find
people had taken advantage of him, but hadn’t quite got
round to doing anything about it. That he just happened
to be CEO of one of the most profitable companies in the
world and was giving his best impression of someone
who didn’t have a clue how it was run.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:16 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:17 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
National
Photography
17
Michelle, 1974
Andrea and
monstera, 1974
Portraits of Middle England
The subjects of John Myers’s photographs, taken in Stourbridge
with a 5in x 4in Gandolfi plate camera between 1972 and 1979,
were ordinary residents living near him in the West Midlands
town where he lectured at the local art college. John Myers:
The Portraits will be published by RRB Photobooks on 21 April.
Photographs by John Myers
▼ Green Lane,
Lye, 1973
Mr Jackson,
1974
▼ David in
knight’s armour,
1974
▲ Two snooker
players, 1973
Nicola and
Donny Osmond,
1973
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:18 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
18
Testing at
age of four to
go ahead as
critics call for
boycott
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
National
Sally Weale
Education correspondent
Plans to roll out the testing of fouryear-olds in their first weeks at school
have been unveiled by the government
despite widespread hostility from
many teachers, who have vowed to
oppose the new assessments.
Ministers say the controversial
new baseline assessments in reception classes will measure the progress
a child makes from the start of primary
school to the age of 11 and provide a
more accurate measure of the effectiveness of schools.
Critics are concerned that children
will be labelled as low ability at the
start of formal education and argue
there is no research that indicates that
four-year-olds can be reliably tested.
Announcing that the £10m contract to develop the new test would
be awarded to the National Foundation
for Educational Research, Nick Gibb,
the school standards minister, said:
“This quick, simple assessment will
help us to capture the progress that
children make throughout primary
school and provide a fairer measure
for school accountability.”
The test will take 20 minutes and
its aim is to assess communication,
language, literacy and maths skills. It
has won the support of some teachers’
leaders as it will replace statutory tests
sat at the age of seven, thus reducing
high-stakes testing in primary schools.
The Department for Education said
no preparation would be required for
the test – to be used in all schools in
England by 2020 – and many children
would be familiar with the material.
However, Neil Leitch, head of the
Pre-school Learning Alliance, an
education charity, warned that it put
pressure on the youngest children
and would encourage coaching of preschoolers to ensure they were ready.
“No test-condition assessment can be
designed well enough to reflect the
complexities and variation of a child
in reception,” he said.
The National Education Union has
called for a boycott of the new test but
there was conditional support from
the National Association of Head
Teachers as it would reduce the volume of high-stakes testing in year 2.
Parents who
home-school
say oversight
will remove
their rights
England, which they regard as a vital
alternative to state education.
Eileen Tracy, who has been locked
in a dispute with Westminster council over the home education of her
12-year-old daughter, Lilian Hardy, star
of the West End stage show Matilda
last year, said: “Registers don’t make
people safe. If registration made kids
safe then no schoolchildren would
self-harm, suffer abuse, develop eating disorders, turn to crime or commit
suicide. We know that most UK children are in poor mental health despite
being registered already. Let’s not
waste public resources on yet more
of what doesn’t work.”
The home education lobby also
accuses the government of wrongly
conflating the problem of illegal
schools with home-schooling.
The schools watchdog, Ofsted, has
raised concerns that illegal schools
are exploiting what it has described as
“unusually permissive” rules governing the education of children outside
mainstream schools, putting pupils at
risk of radicalisation.
Elizabeth Lil, who has two children –
a 19-year-old daughter who is in school
after nine years of home-schooling and
a son, 13, still in home education – said:
“Home education and home-educated
children are not a problem. There’s
no evidence to suggest that they are.
Unregistered schools are being conflated with home education.
“These proposals are very worrying
because they undermine basic human
rights – privacy, freedom of association and the ability to educate your
children as you would wish. Also, the
government doesn’t want to admit the
reasons that home education numbers
are rising – it’s not to do with radicalisation, it’s because schools are failing
ever greater numbers of children.”
Estimates suggest that about 45,500
children in England are currently being
home-educated, but the real figure is
likely to be much higher.
Children who enter the school system have to deregister if their parents
elect home education, but children
who are never put into school are currently not required to register.
“Instead of strangling home education and viewing home-educating
parents as suspect and in need of
state control, the UK could celebrate
that we provide a cost-effective way
for children to become educated in a
way adapted to a world in need of free
thinkers and workers who can think
outside the box,” said Tracy.
“The UK’s existing laws on home
education are second to none. Existing
powers afforded to councils are spelled
out in the government’s excellent and
very precise and considered guidelines to local authorities on elective
home education. These already give
councils ample powers.”
Sally Weale
Education correspondent
Parents who home-school their children have hit out at government
proposals to increase oversight.
Supporters of home education
say the proposals undermine parental rights and cast suspicion on those
who choose not to put their children
in schools.
The parents were responding to
plans, published by the Department
for Education on Tuesday, intended to
address what some see as an unusually
permissive approach to children
being educated outside mainstream
schooling.
Among the measures under consideration is a compulsory register
of home-educated children, with the
threat of penalties or prosecution for
parents who refuse to comply.
In a separate move, ministers are
also considering introducing fines for
schools if they “off-roll” challenging
or problematic children by persuading parents to home-school.
Many home educators are opposed
to a register, claiming it will not make
children safer. They also fear that the
proposals, if approved, will strangle
the home education movement in
45,500
Official number of children currently
being home-educated in England – but
the real figure may be much higher
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:19 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
National
Crime
19
‘Our thoughts
remain with those
who loved him’
Continued from page 1
remaining attackers. The Met bungled the first inquiry, missing crucial
chances to catch the whole gang.
Lawrence was an A-level student
with dreams of becoming an architect.
His mother, Doreen, had to endure a
25-year campaign for justice that saw
her become a peer for her inspiring
efforts – but her biggest wish was to see
all her son’s killers brought to justice.
The senior officer in charge of the
investigation, Chris Le Pere, has retired
and since late last year worked in a consultative role. In the Met statement,
Le Pere said: “We understand that 25
years is a poignant anniversary of the
tragedy of the murder of Stephen, and
our thoughts remain very much with
those who loved him, and feel his loss.
“With the approaching anniversary
and airing of a documentary, Stephen:
The Murder That Changed a Nation,
there is still the opportunity for someone who knows what happened that
night to have a conscience and come
forward. I would say to you, it is never
too late to do the right thing.”
Doreen Lawrence told the Daily Mail
last week she would understand if the
Met ended the investigation.
The last big investigative opportunity that detectives had revolved
around a leather strap found yards
from blood at the scene where Lawrence was stabbed. Investigators were
optimistic that the strap might produce evidence of guilt and believed it
was left by one of the suspects as they
fled the scene.
But leaders of the Metropolitan
police, from commissioner Cressida
Dick downwards, have in recent
months come to believe that they have
run out of leads.
Six years ago at the Old Bailey, Gary
Dobson and David Norris were convicted of Stephen’s murder after being
tied to the murder scene by advances
in forensic science. Among the prime
suspects still at large are brothers Neil
and Jamie Acourt, and Luke Knight.
Sentencing Dobson and Norris after
their conviction, trial judge Mr Justice
Treacy told police: “The convictions
of Gary Dobson and David Norris will
not hopefully close the file on this matter. On the evidence before the court,
there are still three or four other killers
of Stephen Lawrence at large.
“Just as advances in science have
brought two people to justice, I hope
the Metropolitan police will be alert to
future lines of inquiry not only based
on advances in science but perhaps
also from information from those who
have been silent so far, whoever they
might be.”
Lawrence, who was 18, was murdered on 22 April 1993 as he and a
friend, Duwayne Brooks, waited for
a bus in Eltham, south-east London.
They were attacked by a group of five
to six white youths who shouted:
“What, what, nigger?” and then
rushed towards them. Lawrence was
enveloped by the group, which swallowed him up through its “weight of
numbers”, the murder trial of Dobson
and Norris heard.
The Acourt brothers and Knight
were named to police within hours of
the killing, but police delayed making arrests for two weeks until being
shamed into doing so when Nelson
Mandela championed the Lawrence
family’s struggle during a visit to
London.
The case is one of the most infamous murders in Britain, and caused
shockwaves across the criminal justice system and society. The fight for
justice by Lawrence’s parents led to
a public inquiry which uncovered
blunders by the police, blamed on
“institutional racism”, that allowed
his killers to escape justice.
But also it has been claimed that
Clifford Norris, the gangster father of
one of the prime suspects, used ties
to corrupt officers to thwart the first
murder inquiry. Norris has denied
corruption.
Other investigations into the fallout
from the Lawrence case continue. A
criminal investigation into claims that
police corruption shielded the killers is
‘There is the
opportunity
for someone
who knows
what
happened
to come
forward’
Chris Le Pere
Retired officer
Stephen
Lawrence was an
A-level student
with dreams of
becoming an
architect before
his murder on a
street in southeast London
PHOTOGRAPH:
FAMILY HANDOUT/PA
Neville
and Doreen
Lawrence
in 1999
responding to
the publication
of the inquiry
report into their
son’s murder
PHOTOGRAPH: SEAN
SMITH/GUARDIAN
Gary Dobson,
left, and David
Norris were
convicted of
murder in 2012
after the law on
double jeopardy
was changed
▲ Angry scenes
as eggs are
thrown outside
the public
inquiry in 1999
into the murder
of Stephen
Lawrence
still being conducted by the National
Crime Agency, Britain’s equivalent of
the FBI. Furthermore, an inquiry into
claims that undercover police spied on
the Lawrence campaign, among others, continues.
In a 2012 interview with the Guardian, Doreen Lawrence recalled the way
the Met failed her: “In the early stages
they were trying to prove that Stephen
more or less caused this to himself,
because of who he was. He belonged
to a gang, and we as a family were not
law-abiding citizens, so whatever happened was down to us.”
Stephen’s father Neville Lawrence
said yesterday he remained hopeful
that after the publicity around the
25th anniversary of Stephen’s death
and the BBC documentary, someone
would speak up. He told the Press
Association: “I’m hoping that somebody, somewhere, that may have some
information might just come forward.
I’m hopeful.
“The threat of anything happening
to them now isn’t as great as it was in
the early days. I’m pleased that they
[the police] tried all different options
and are still trying after all these years.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:20 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 20:42
•
20
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
National
Police urge residents to respect
floral tributes for stabbed man
Flowers torn down again in
standoff with relatives over
alleged burglar’s death
Alexandra Topping
Police have urged members of the public to respect the wishes of the family
of a man fatally stabbed at a house in
south-east London after floral tributes
were yesterday removed for a fourth
time. Henry Vincent, 37, died after a
struggle with Richard Osborn-Brooks,
78, whose house he was allegedly burgling with an accomplice who remains
at large.
A three-day standoff between Vincent’s family and residents in Hither
Green continued yesterday as a
neighbour pulled down 16 bouquets
from the fence where they had been
displayed.
The family, who have identified
themselves as Gypsies, said they were
being treated differently because of
their backgrounds and said they
cYanmaGentaYellowb
wanted to remember Vincent as a
brother, son and friend and “a good
man”. They have vowed to continue
returning to replace the tributes.
The Metropolitan police issued
a statement yesterday saying that
while a small police presence was in
place, “the location and nature of floral
tributes is generally not a matter for
police”. But “the wishes of family and
friends to mark the loss of a loved one”
should be respected. “We urge members of the public to respect the wishes
of those who choose to place flowers
and other tributes in the area.”
Osborn-Brooks, who was arrested
on suspicion of murder after Vincent’s death and later released without
charge, has been hailed as a hero by
some local people for taking on the
alleged intruders. Officers have spoken
with Vincent’s family about their reasons for not taking any further action
against Osborn-Brooks, according to
the Metropolitan police.
Neighbours have described the
tributes on a fence opposite OsbornBrooks’ house as inappropriate and
in poor taste.
▲ Henry Vincent, left, was fatally
stabbed during a tussle in the home
of Richard Osborn-Brooks, right
An angry local resident tore down
the flowers yesterday, shouting:
“These are scumbags, scumbags,
scumbags. We’ve had enough in this
country of scumbags.”
In front of a scrum of cameras and
journalists, Iain Gordon called OsbornBrooks a hero and said: “I’d like to
shake his hand and buy him a drink.
I’m sure he’s distressed. He had to kill
someone. How would you feel?”
Another neighbour, who did
not want to give her name, said she
agreed. “He [Vincent] is not a victim,
he walked into someone’s house. The
way they are treating [Osborn-Brooks]
is disgusting, he was only protecting
his house.”
Her sister added: “I think people are
angry that he’s had to leave his house.
I think the police made the right decision but the fact they can’t protect him
isn’t right.”
Osborn-Brooks has not returned to
the property since the incident. Vincent’s family have denied allegations
that threats have been made against
him. He remains under police guard
with his wife, Maureen.
Lisa Smith, a Romany journalist,
said the focus on Vincent’s ethnicity
in some media reports was concerning.
“This is a horrible situation, and it can’t
be condoned but it was a crime committed by one man, it has nothing to
do with ethnicity,” she said. “Gypsies
and Travellers are already demonised,
and this just plays into that.”
On Tuesday an inquest into
Vincent’s death was opened and
adjourned at a coroner’s court in Borough, south London. Two female
relatives, accompanied by a police
family liaison officer, were present
for the brief hearing, during which
police authorised the release of Vincent’s body to his family.
The Met has released an image of
the man alleged to have been Vincent’s accomplice in the burglary. He
was named as Billy Jeeves, who the
force said had links to Orpington and
Swanley in Kent and Cambridge.
‘We urge
the public
to respect
the wishes
of those who
choose to
place flowers
in the area’
Scotland Yard
statement
Iain Gordon
pulling down
the tributes. He
called Richard
Osborn-Brooks a
hero. ‘I’d like to
shake his hand
and buy him a
drink,’ he said
PHOTOGRAPH:
GARETH FULLER/PA
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:21 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 20:42
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
National
21
Parents of dying
baby praised by
judge after battle
for treatment
Press Association
A high court judge has expressed
his sympathy for the parents of a
23-month-old boy who is approaching death and has been at the centre of
a life support treatment battle.
Mr Justice Hayden described what
had happened to Alfie Evans and his
parents as “profoundly unfair” as
he endorsed an end-of-life care plan
drawn up by specialists.
Alfie’s parents, Tom Evans and Kate
James, from Liverpool, have lost battles in the high court, court of appeal,
supreme court and European court of
human rights over his treatment. In
February, Hayden ruled that doctors at
Alder Hey children’s hospital in Liverpool could stop treating Alfie, against
the wishes of his parents.
Yesterday he endorsed a detailed
plan put forward by Alder Hey doctors for withdrawing life-support
treatment during a follow-up hearing in London. The judge said details
of that plan could not be revealed
because Alfie was entitled to privacy
at the end of his life.
He said the couple had left no stone
unturned in their fight for continued
treatment. He said Evans delighted
in Alfie. “He is at times hot-headed
and impetuous but he delights in his
son,” said the judge. “Tom, at 21, has
encountered an unfairness about
which he can do nothing. His frustration at that has been palpable.”
He has heard that Alfie, born on
9 May 2016, is in a “semi-vegetative
state” and has a degenerative neurological condition that doctors had not
definitively diagnosed.
Specialists at Alder Hey said lifesupport treatment should stop and Mr
Justice Hayden said that he accepted
that. Court of appeal judges upheld
his ruling. Alfie’s parents had wanted
to move him to a hospital in Rome or
Germany. Neither were present at yesterday’s hearing.
▲ Alfie’s parents, Tom Evans and
Kate James, had sought to take him
to Germany or Italy for treatment
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:22 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 20:41
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
6: 5.
V6 .
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In brief
Stage
Gender-blind theatre
casts female Hamlet
The first experiment in democratic
casting by Shakespeare’s Globe has
led to its artistic director, Michelle
Terry, taking the role of Hamlet and,
in As You Like It, a role normally
played by an elderly man.
Terry (right) announced her
first season as artistic director at
the London open-air playhouse
in January with the eyecatching
promise of giving more power to
creative people involved in the
plays. A company of 12 actors helped
to decide who would play who in the
two plays once rehearsals started.
Given Terry’s stage pedigree,
including a barnstorming
performance as Henry V in London’s
Regent’s Park open air theatre in
2016, it is no surprise the company
chose her to play Hamlet.
In As You Like It, Terry will
play Adam, an elderly – “almost
fourscore” – and faithful family
servant. The Globe’s gender-
Benefits
Self-employed to lose
under universal credit
,@þ ª¥áþ
Thousands of self-employed, agency
and zero-hours contract workers
will be potentially hundreds of
pounds a year worse off under
universal credit, according to
research by Citizens Advice.
The charity says that flaws in the
new benefit mean self-employed
workers whose earnings fluctuate
monthly could receive far less over a
year than employees in “traditional”
jobs who earn the same amount.
It says that unless it is updated
it risks “creating or exacerbating
financial insecurity for the rising
sector of the workforce in nontraditional work”. Its analysis shows
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blind approach to casting means
Jack Laskey, known for his role
as DS Peter Jakes in ITV’s series
Endeavour, will play the heroine
Rosalind in As You Like It – a role
which has been played by Helen
Mirren, Maggie Smith and,in 1991, a
young Adrian Lester. Bettrys Jones
will play the lovesick Orlando, and
in Hamlet she will be Laertes.
Mark Brown
that a self-employed worker who
earned £9,750 a year would be £630
worse off than an employee with
identical annual income who is paid
a regular monthly salary.
The anomaly will affect people
who have their own businesses, as
well as those working in seasonal
jobs such as agriculture and
hospitality.
About 4.5 million people in the
UK hold down jobs which vary in
hours or earnings each month,
while a further 4.8 million are selfemployed, the majority of whom are
eligible for in-work benefits.
A DWP spokesperson said:
“Universal credit is a flexible benefit
that supports people both in and
out of work, those on low incomes
and the self-employed and it is
succeeding.” Patrick Butler
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PHOTO: ANTONIO
OLMOS/OBSERVER
Gillian Ayres, the English abstract painter, has
died at the age of 88. A spokesman for the Alan
Cristea Gallery in London, which represented
her, described her as a “pioneering, great,
wonderful woman”. Ayres, pictured above at
her studio in Bude, north Cornwall, had her
first solo show in 1956. She was nominated
for the Turner prize in 1989, and her work was
collected by institutions including MoMA in
New York and the Tate in London. PA
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:23 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 19:49
•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
National
Brexit
23
You’re failing us, Mr Ambassador:
Britons abroad vent fury in Paris
Lisa O’Carroll
Brexit correspondent
It was supposed to be a simple mission
to update Britons in Paris about their
rights after Brexit.
Instead, the ambassador, David
Cameron’s former chief of staff
Edward Llewellyn, was subjected to
a two-hour roasting by Britons who felt
“betrayed” and “left out in the cold”.
“I went there seeking reassurance
and came away terrified about my
future,” Ian Fox, a senior executive,
said after the meeting, held in the 18thcentury embassy building, scene of
two centuries of British diplomacy.
Llewellyn began with a speech
about the “considerable progress”
Brexit negotiators had made, but
ended up being heckled and provoking laughter when he told them that
Theresa May, the prime minister, had
made their rights a priority.
Asked if there would be a second
referendum, Llewellyn was unequivocal. “There is not going to be a second
referendum,” he said. “A second referendum is not the government policy.”
One woman wanted to know about
inheritance law for children born in
France and wanted answers about the
future EU research funding rights for
a young PhD student born to British
parents in France but now studying
in London. Would he continue to get
funding if he returned to France?
Afterwards she said that many felt
the only way to avoid being stripped
of their rights was to acquire French
nationality. One woman, who has
already made the decision to get a second passport, told the ambassador: “I
feel betrayed, but luckily I have a lifeboat: by blood, I have a right to have
Spanish nationality, but I have to give
up my British passport.”
One man, married to a New Zealander, was angry that the rights of
his family, including children born in
New Zealand but now living in France,
were up in the air.
“You say May is looking after our
interests,” he told the ambassador. “If
she is stripping us of our rights, that is
demonstrably false. She is happy to
flush my rights down the toilet as long
as it saves the Tory party.”
After the meeting, he said: “I have a
lot of respect for those that were fronting up for the UK government. It is a
difficult job. However, they should not
have tried to put a gloss on things and
suggest that May and the UK government is fighting for us. Whatever they
are doing can only be considered making the best of a very bad job indeed.”
About 60 British nationals went to
the meeting, armed with questions
about their rights, the rights of their
children to remain as EU citizens and
the freedom to continue working
across Europe.
What about future spouses? What
if they fall in love with a French man
or woman? Can they go back to Britain with them? What happens about
assets or inheritance rights for children
born in France? One woman raised the
question about what would happen if
she had a child born after 31 December 2020, when the Brexit transition
phase ends.
There are about 100,000 British
nationals in France and, like many
of the estimated one million Britons
settled in other EU countries, chief
among their concerns is the end of
Geoff Ross’s
plans to move to
Amsterdam and
rent out his Paris
apartment may
be scuppered
by constraints
on freedom of
movement
Pensions
‘The government
doesn’t care about
Britons in Europe’
Geoff Ross, 79, has been in France
for 42 years because he has “always
been a Francophile”. As part of a
pension plan he bought a small
two-room flat in Amsterdam with
a view to moving to the Dutch city
and renting out his much more
spacious flat in the centre of Paris
▲ Edward Llewellyn, one-time chief
of staff for David Cameron, insisted
there would be no second EU vote
freedom of movement and employment rights after Brexit. Officials had
no good answer for how Britons would
be treated if national law in some countries dictates that priority is given to
EU nationals in employment, barring
UK nationals from automatic consideration for jobs in the EU after 2020.
“I felt really angry,” said Fox. “They
don’t seem to be taking us seriously.”
“There are issues that are not
resolved,” admitted the ambassador. But there were also “grounds for
confidence that we will reach an agreement” encompassing all the rights
being sought.
‘I did not come here
highly qualified as
a doctor or scientist.
I had to learn French,
become integrated.
It was not easy’
to top up his small pension. “I
don’t know if I can do that now
because of this problem with
freedom of movement. If I moved
to Amsterdam, could I be legally
entitled to come back to Paris? Now
I can do that with no formalities.
“My pension is tiny. I made the
mistake of travelling for work as
a consultant and didn’t accrue
full pension rights. The only
way to be sure is to get a French
passport. I don’t think anyone in the
government or opposition gives a
tuppenny’s you-know-what about
British residents in Europe.”
Travel freedoms
‘I feel very angry,
disenfranchised,
forgotten about’
Victoria Lemarchand, 50, has lived
in the capital since 1990. “I feel
very angry and disenfranchised.
We’ve been completely forgotten
about,” she says. Her big post-Brexit
worry is the threat to freedom of
movement, which allows her to
work in any EU country. And would
her French husband have more
rights than her? She’s also worried
about visiting her elderly mother
if there are border checks in the
future. She is furious she did not
have a vote in the referendum or the
general election so she could make
her protests heard.
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Lynda Petit
in the Place de
la Concorde in
Paris, her home
for the past
quarter of
a century
ALL PHOTOGRAPHS:
ED ALCOCK/GUARDIAN
Recruitment
‘99% of people I
take on are young,
trying to get on’
▲ Victoria Lemarchand feels let down
by not having been given a voice in
the European Union referendum
and worries about the future
Lynda Petit, 51, has lived in Paris
since 1993. Speaking of the former
chancellor and Brexit campaigner
Nigel Lawson, who lives in a country
house in Gascony, she says: “I think
people should live in harmony with
their beliefs. He is a rich man and he
is not going to be affected by Brexit,
yet people like me will be. I think he
should be kicked out of the country.”
Petit runs a recruitment agency
for support workers and believes
Britons in France are being unfairly
categorised as affluent second-home
owners. “I did not come here as a
highly qualified doctor or scientist.
I had to learn French, become
integrated. It was not easy; 99% of
the people I recruit are young people
laden with debt trying to get on.”
In future, she says, companies
who are looking for young language
graduates will look elsewhere.
“They want people now, they don’t
want red tape. Brexit is shutting
doors on young people’s futures.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:24 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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24
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
National
‘Deceitful’ mother gets
life over baby’s murder
Seven-month-old daughter,
who was born prematurely,
had ‘catastrophic injuries’
Press Association
A “deceitful” and “manipulative”
mother has been jailed for a minimum of twenty-one-and-a-half years
for murdering her seven-month-old
baby and injuring another child.
Jennifer Crichton, 35, was yesterday sentenced to life imprisonment
at Liverpool crown court.
She was found guilty of the murder of her daughter Amelia as well as
three counts of causing grievous bodily harm with intent and one count of
child cruelty against another child,
who cannot be named for legal reasons, following a five-week trial at
Preston crown court.
Crichton, of Leyland, Lancashire,
had been arrested after the other child
was seriously injured, years before the
birth of Amelia, but was not charged
until last year.
Crichton appeared to show no emotion as she was sentenced. Mr Justice
Holgate described her as “self-centred,
deceitful, manipulative and lacking in
any real remorse”.
He said Amelia’s death had a “devastating effect” on her father, Richard
Sheppard, who Crichton had tried to
blame for the death at one point, and
the rest of her family. He said: “Their
pain over losing a much-loved young
child and her life being so cruelly cut
short will endure.”
Crichton was under a social services care plan devised by Lancashire
County Council and outsourced to a
local social care provider at the time
she fatally attacked her daughter on
19 April last year.
The court heard she had told a psychiatrist she had shaken the baby
three times before she slipped from
her grasp on to a tiled floor. But Mr
Justice Holgate said expert evidence
found a fracture to the baby’s skull that
showed she had suffered a strike of a
“violent nature”.
He said: “I’m sure that the defendant either forced Amelia down to the
ground or she struck her head on a
hard surface.” He said Amelia had also
suffered bleeding to the brain and injuries caused by having been shaken in
a “vigorous and violent” way.
Simon Jackson QC, defending, said
Crichton was a “vulnerable woman
▲ Amelia Crichton, who spent six months in intensive care after being born
prematurely, was murdered by her mother Jennifer, top right PHOTOGRAPH: PA
House of Fraser
to push luxury
Chinese brands
in its UK stores
Rob Davies
House of Fraser will begin stocking
“premium Chinese brands” in its
department stores as part of an effort
by its parent company to burnish the
image of goods made in China and
support Beijing’s trillion-dollar “Belt
& Road” international trade plan.
Sanpower, which bought the
department store chain in a £480m
deal in 2014, said it hoped to harness
the reputation built up by the department store chain over 169 years to help
convince UK shoppers to buy luxury
Chinese goods.
The company did not name the
brands destined for its 59-strong store
network but said they would include
items ranging from lingerie to electrical appliances.
Sanpower’s billionaire chairman
Yuan Yafei is expected to espouse
the merits of the plan at a meeting in
Shanghai today with Scotland’s first
minister, Nicola Sturgeon, who is on
a visit to boost Sino-Scottish trade
relations.
£88bn
The amount Xi Jinping, president
of China, has pledged to support his
country’s Belt and Road Initiative
unable to cope, ultimately, with the
pressures of motherhood”.
Amelia, born “on the cusp of life”
at 24 weeks, had spent six months in
intensive care due to being premature
before going to live at home in Leyland. She died in hospital two days
after the attack last year.
Brett Gerrity, from the Crown Prosecution Service, said: “Amelia Crichton
was a small, defenceless baby who suffered catastrophic injuries at the hands
of her mother.
“Jennifer Crichton denied any
responsibility for her death until four
weeks into the trial, when she pleaded
guilty to manslaughter.
“We did not accept the plea as we
were satisfied that the injuries which
led to her death were deliberately
inflicted. The jury, having heard the
evidence, agreed and convicted her
of murder.”
The move comes with House of
Fraser’s financial health under the
microscope following dismal Christmas sales and widespread malaise
among UK high street retailers.
“The traditional image associated
with ‘made in China’ is changing,” said
Simon Pickering, House of Fraser’s UK
director of global product sourcing.
“Increasing numbers of high-quality Chinese products are becoming
popular with British and European
consumers. Once these products enter
House of Fraser’s sales channel, they
will be able to access Europe and the
greater global market, given quality
and credit endorsement from House
of Fraser.”
Sanpower said this would help
support China’s so-called Belt &
Road Initiative, which aims to build a
modern-day Silk Road of infrastructure, bringing the country’s goods
to the world via a vast web of trade
partnerships.
President Xi Jinping, China’s head
of state, recently pledged £88bn to
support the policy but has been forced
to address suspicions about China’s
intentions. “The Belt and Road initiative is not a Chinese plot, as some
people internationally have said,” Xi
said earlier this week.
“It is neither the post-World-WarTwo Marshall Plan, nor is it a Chinese
conspiracy. If you had to [call it something], it’s an ‘overt plot’,” he told
China’s official news agency Xinhua.
At a meeting with the international
trade minister, Liam Fox, in Hong Kong
earlier this month, Yuan insisted he
planned to invest in House of Fraser.
The Guardian revealed after the
meeting that Nanjing-based Sanpower was to inject £15m into House
of Fraser. A further £15m investment
has reportedly been agreed since then.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:25 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
National
25
▼ Mary river turtle, one of the species
on the new Evolutionarily Distinct
and Globally Endangered reptiles list
PHOTOGRAPH: CHRIS VAN WYK/ZSL/PA
It’s not pretty and it has
odd habits – but a plea
goes out for punk turtle
Animal that breathes through
its genitals is on latest list of
100 most endangered reptiles
Patrick Barkham and agencies
It sports a green mohican, fleshy finger-like growths under its chin and it
can breathe through its genitals.
The Mary river turtle is one of the
most striking creatures on the planet
– and also one of the most endangered.
The 40cm (16-inch) turtle, which
is only found on the Mary river in
Queensland, features in a new list of
the most vulnerable reptile species
compiled by the Zoological Society
of London. Despite the turtle’s punk
appearance – derived from vertical
strands of algae that also grow on its
body – its docile nature made it historically popular as a pet.
Gill-like organs within its cloaca –
an orifice used by reptiles for excretion
and mating – enable it to stay underwater for up to three days, but it was
unable to hide from the pet collectors
who raided its nests during the 1960s
and 1970s.
It is 30th on ZSL’s Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered (Edge)
list for reptiles. First established in
2007, Edge lists have previously been
published for amphibians, birds, corals
and mammals, helping to guide conservation priorities for the 100 most
at-risk species. Each species is given
a score combining extinction risk with
its evolutionary isolation or uniqueness. The latest list is supported by a
study in the journal Plos One.
Top of the list is the Madagascar bigheaded turtle, which has an Edge score
higher than that of any other amphibian, bird or mammal yet is still taken
for food and global trade.
Other unusual and endangered
species include the Round Island keelscaled boa from Mauritius, a snake
which is the only terrestrial vertebrate
known to have a hinged upper jaw; the
minute leaf chameleon from Madagascar, which is the size of a human
thumbnail; and the gharial, a slendersnouted fish-eating freshwater crocodile. Less than 235 gharial survive in
the rivers of northern India and Nepal.
Rikki Gumbs, coordinator of Edge
reptiles, said: “Reptiles often receive
the short end of the stick in conservation terms, compared with the likes
of birds and mammals. However, the
Edge reptiles list highlights just how
unique, vulnerable and amazing these
creatures really are.”
He added: “Just as with tigers, rhinos and elephants, it is vital we do
our utmost to save these unique and
too often overlooked animals. Many
Edge reptiles are the sole survivors
of ancient lineages, whose branches
of the tree of life stretch back to the
age of the dinosaurs. If we lose these
species there will be nothing like them
left on Earth.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:26 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
26
National
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
▼ Paddy Jackson, left, and Stuart
Olding are currently suspended from
playing for Ulster and Ireland
PHOTOGRAPHS: PA
Irish rugby fans call for
acquitted players’ recall
Newspaper advert demands
internationals cleared of rape
be allowed to play again
Henry McDonald
Ireland correspondent
Supporters of two Irish rugby internationals acquitted of rape have taken
out a full-page newspaper advertisement demanding their playing
suspensions be lifted.
Paddy Jackson and his Ulster clubmate Stuart Olding were cleared last
month in a high profile trial in Belfast. Their two friends, Blane McIlroy,
26, and Rory Harrison, 25, were also
acquitted, the former of indecent
exposure, the latter of perverting the
course of justice and withholding
information.
The ad in yesterday’s Belfast Telegraph states: “As Ulster and Irish rugby
fans we want these innocent men reinstated and rightly allowed to resume
their roles for both club and country. The IRFU [Irish Rugby Football
Union] should take note of the silent
majority and not bow to the court of
social media.”
The fans backing for Jackson and
Olding, who are currently suspended
from all Ulster and Ireland duties,
comes ahead of a planned protest outside the Kingspan stadium in Belfast
on Friday.
Campaigners are planning to hold
a demonstration at the home of Ulster
Rugby before the province’s clash with
the Welsh side Ospreys. They want
Ulster and Ireland to ban the pair from
playing for both sides.
Supporters of the 21-year-old
woman who was at the centre of the
case against Jackson, Olding, McIlroy
and Harrison also took out an advertisement in the Belfast Telegraph last
week. The four men were unanimously
cleared of all charges by a jury at Belfast crown court, but the ad referred
to evidence heard in court of WhatsApp messages in which the men used
lewd language to describe the sexual
encounter at the centre of the allegations made by the woman.
Organised by a rugby fan, Anna
Nolan from Belfast, the ad last week
said the players’ behaviour “falls
far beneath the standards that your
organisations represent and as such
we demand that neither of these men
represents Ulster or Ireland now or at
any point in the future”.
Supporters of Jackson and Olding
said that both men had apologised for
the content of the messages. “What is
reprehensible is the extent of the social
media backlash aimed at incriminating men unanimously acquitted of any
crime,” they said. “We are fed up with
this cyber persecution.”
The advertisement yesterday,
printed in red ink on a white background, is signed by “Real fans
standing up for the Ulster men.” On the
future rugby careers of Jackson and
Olding, the IRFU has said: “A review
process in relation to this matter is
under way and it would be inappropriate to comment on any matter
pertaining to that process until it is
completed.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:27 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
National
27
▼ Alexander Perepilichnyy was found
dead outside his home in Weybridge,
Surrey, after he went jogging in 2012
PHOTOGRAPH: VAGNER VIDAL/INS
Girlfriend
recounts
hours
before
Russian’s
death to
inquest
Haroon Siddique
A Russian businessman and
whistleblower who died while jogging was nervous in the days leading
up to his collapse and vomited several
times the night before his death, an
inquest has heard.
Alexander Perepilichnyy, 44, was
found dead outside his home in Weybridge, Surrey, on 10 November 2012.
His girlfriend, Elmira Medynska,
gave evidence via video link from
Paris yesterday to the inquest at the
Old Bailey in London.
She said Perepilichnyy had
appeared distracted when she met him
in Paris two days before his death, and
different from when she had seen him
previously. On the evening before he
died, they went to dinner at the Buddha Bar: Medynska said Perepilichnyy
positioned the couple so he could see
everyone around them but she could
not. She thought this unusual as it
meant him sitting on the sofa and her
on the chair, whereas it was customarily the other way round.
“He was looking for people around
... He was a little bit stressful that evening,” said Medynska.
She told the court that Perepilichnyy sent back some food she thought
might have been vegetable or prawn
tempura because he did not like the
taste and was ill when they went back
to the Hotel Bristol, where they were
staying together. She said he was in the
bathroom for about an hour.
“He stayed a lot of time there and I
started to hear a lot of noise from the
bedroom. It was a noise like he had
vomited,” said Medynska. “I heard it
three times.”
When he came out of the bathroom
he had red eyes and a red face but did
not talk about vomiting or the food he
had eaten earlier, she said.
Perepilichnyy was threatened after
revealing details of a $230m (£165m)
fraud, stolen from taxes paid by the
investment company Hermitage
Capital to the Russian treasury, and
carried out by a gang with alleged links
to the Kremlin.
A lawyer who investigated the case,
Sergei Magnitsky, was arrested and
died in prison in 2009.
Medynska, a Ukrainian fashion
entrepreneur, first met Perepilichnyy
in Kiev in May 2012 after he had begun
messaging her in March, having seen
her profile on an online dating site.
She told the court that when she met
Perepilichnyy in Paris on 8 November,
they went for lunch at the George V
hotel. She said Perepilichnyy did not
eat anything but drank a lot for lunchtime and more than usual, spilling
wine on himself, and describing his
hands as shaky.
When he took her shopping the
next day, buying her a Prada handbag and Christian Louboutin shoes,
Open verdict on man found dead
on beach with sock in his mouth
Press Association
The death of a man found naked on
a beach with a sock and headphones
in his mouth remains unsolved four
years later, following an open verdict
in a coroner’s court.
Retired electrician Alan Eric Jeal,
64, was discovered at high tide on
Perranporth beach in Cornwall at
about 2pm on 25 February 2014. He
was wearing only socks and one walking shoe and had suffered multiple
injuries, including a fractured spine,
before drowning.
Coroner Dr Emma Carlyon reached
an open conclusion following a oneday inquest yesterday into Jeal’s death
in Truro. “I find it is not possible to a
criminal standard, or on the balance of
he was “on another planet”, ignoring
her and looking at messages on his
phone, she said.
Medynska said Perepilichnyy was
fine the morning after he vomited
following their meal at the Buddha Bar.
They ate a “classic French breakfast”
of eggs and hot chocolate before going
to the airport together, for Perepilichnyy to return to London and Medynska
to Ukraine. She said: “He told me he
wanted to see me. He said he want to
meet in December in Switzerland.”
Later the same day, Perepilichnyy
died near his home.
During an interview with French
police last month, Medynska said that
she never had any sense that her lover
was in danger and that he just struck
her as a “busy and tired businessman”,
the inquest heard.
She told the court that she did not
find out Perepilichnyy was dead until
31 December when she searched the
internet for his name. She said she
had not even known he was married
and was very scared to read about his
death. She said she later received an
email from Perepilichnyy’s account
saying she would die of Aids, which
she believes may have been sent by
Perepilichnyy’s wife.
Shortly after his death, which was
then unbeknown to her, Medynska
said she received four calls – on 12 and
13 November – from an English number from people with English accents
who said they were with Perepilichnyy in hospital.
They told her he had been in a car
accident and that they were at hospital with him. They asked her questions
about who she was and when she had
last seen him and where Perepilichnyy lived. But they refused to answer
her questions about his condition
and did not tell her that he had died,
Medynska said.
The inquest continues.
camera in Perranporth at 10.30pm on
24 February.
A dog walker discovered Jeal’s
body the following day. His rucksack
was later found nearby. His dark blue
jacket, with a wallet containing £95
and a 1950s photograph of Jeal as a
child, was also discovered, and his
missing shoe was located in a cave.
Dr Amanda Jeffrey, a Home Office
pathologist, said Jeal’s blood alcohol
level was twice the legal drink-drive
limit. He had not taken drugs. There
were no injuries to his mouth that
would suggest the sock had been
forced inside, she told the inquest.
Jeal suffered injuries to his head and
chest when he was alive and there was
also evidence of drowning; these injuries could have been caused by Jeal
falling and then entering water.
“The sock had clearly been purposely stuffed into the mouth,” Jeffrey
said. “It would be a rather bizarre thing
to do to one’s self.”
Jeal left no note at his flat and there
were no forensic links to any third
party, said Detective Sergeant Steve
Hambly of Devon and Cornwall Police.
“I personally remain open-minded as
to the circumstances of Alan’s death
but I’m confident that all practical
inquiries have been conducted,” he
told the inquest.
▲ Details of a
$230m tax fraud
in Russia were
revealed by
Perepilichnyy
before his death
His girlfriend,
Elmira
Medynska, left,
gave evidence at
the inquest by
video link
probability, to exclude an intentional
death, accidental death or the involvement of another,” she said.
The inquest was told that neighbours of Jeal, who lived alone in
Wadebridge, heard raised voices in
his flat on the day before his death.
They heard a man shouting, possibly
while on the phone, for several minutes before the front door slammed.
CCTV cameras showed Jeal walking to catch the bus from Wadebridge
to Truro at 5pm. He took buses from
there to Newquay and then Perranporth, where he arrived at 10.25pm.
The last known sighting of
Jeal is believed to be on a CCTV
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:28 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:29 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
National
29
Numbers living in
temporary housing
on course to rise 25%
Patrick Butler
Social policy editor
More than 100,000 homeless households in England will be living in
temporary housing within two years,
based on existing trends – an increase
of over a quarter on the current total,
according to an annual state-of-thenation report into homelessness.
The Homelessness Monitor says the
explosion in the placement of homeless families in temporary homes,
often miles from where they work and
go to school, is driven by dwindling
social and private rented housing.
A combination of high rents, the
loss of social homes through right to
buy, and the impact of welfare reforms
means councils in many parts of the
country struggle to access settled
housing as they try to tackle escalating homelessness, it says.
Councils are left with limited
resettlement options, especially in
high-rent areas in the south-east, the
report says, because benefit-reliant
tenants are priced out.
Since 2010 the number of homeless
people in temporary accommodation
has grown by 61%. Council spending
on this form of housing has increased
by 39% over the same period, at a cost
to the taxpayer of £845m in 2016.
Jon Sparkes, chief executive of the
homelessness charity Crisis, said: “It’s
truly terrible that, across England,
councils are finding it increasingly
100,000
Predicted number of households
in England living in temporary
accommodation in two years’ time
difficult to find homeless people somewhere to live. This means ever more
people are ending up trapped in B&Bs
and hostels, with no stability and often
in cramped conditions.”
Temporary accommodation,
including hostels and B&Bs, is provided by councils as interim housing,
but it is not uncommon for tenants to
be stuck in it for years.
The report identifies the government’s four-year freeze on local
housing allowance introduced in 2016,
which has left rent support for private sector tenants lagging far behind
actual rents, as both a major driver of
homelessness and a barrier to rehousing homeless households.
The monitor says it is striking how
homelessness has shot up the political and media agenda over the past
year. “It feels like it is, finally, an issue
that can no longer be ignored as ‘collateral damage’ in the course of welfare
reform and retrenchment,” it says.
The monitor notes the government
has devoted “energy and profile” to
the issue, introducing a Homelessness Reduction Act this month and
promising to eradicate rough sleeping by 2027.
But it questions whether the political will exists to tackle structural
causes of homelessness such as welfare reform, poverty, and cuts to health
and social care budgets.
Strikingly, the report notes that
social housing – once the main source
of homes for people owed a homelessness duty – is increasing hard to access,
with two-thirds of local authorities
reporting difficulties in this area.
But the report also says some housing associations are reluctant to supply
homes to tenants reliant on benefits,
or those with complex health needs.
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PHOTOGRAPH: BBC/PA
Making a splash The sports presenter Mike Bushell fell in a swimming
pool during a live interview on BBC Breakfast. He got into the shallow
water to chat to the England Commonwealth Games swimmers Sarah
Vasey, Adam Peaty, Siobhan-Marie O’Connor, Ben Proud and James Guy,
on Australia’s Gold Coast. But then he slipped into deeper water with his
sound equipment on. The athletes burst out laughing before Bushell
lost sound and was cut off. He said later: ‘I just thought it was a little
Jacuzzi or a kids’ pool. I didn’t realise there was a step there.’
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:30 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
•
30
Eyewitness
Sent at 11/4/2018 16:47
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The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:31 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 11/4/2018 16:48
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•
31
Winnie
Mandela
South
Africa says
farewell
Mourners have flocked to the
heart of the Soweto township
to pay tribute to Winnie
Madikizela-Mandela.
Her grandson Bambatha
Mandela described her as
‘an extraordinary woman, a
mother, a soldier, a fighter …
Even at 81 she was one person
I thought would live for ever.’
The choice of Soweto’s
Orlando stadium for the
memorial service yesterday,
and the state funeral on
Saturday, was symbolic.
Unlike many leaders of
the era who moved from
townships such as Soweto,
Madikizela-Mandela stayed
in the community where she
met Nelson Mandela at a bus
stop in 1957. ‘I don’t think I
want to wake up alongside
my enemies,’ Bambatha
remembered her saying.
‘I was here in 1974 when she
came to the schools and said
we were marching out,’ said
Lilian Motgung from nearby
Zakariyya Park. ‘She was a
hero for us, a fighter with us.’
In the stadium, the Soweto
gospel choir sang, prompting
mourners to stand and dance
beside their foldaway chairs.
The deputy president, David
Mabuza, said: ‘You reminded
our daughters and mothers
that they are powerful beyond
measure. You are a torchbearer of our liberation.’
Agence France-Presse Soweto
Soweto, Johannesburg
Members of the crowd at the Orlando
stadium during the memorial service
for Winnie Madikizela-Mandela
PHOTOGRAPH: MARCO LONGARI/GETTY
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:32 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:33 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
National
Theatre
33
‘I do believe in
political theatre. But
it is about the stories
first, and stories
we don’t hear, from
people who don’t
have a platform’
Indhu Rubasingham
Kiln’s artistic director
Tricycle becomes Kiln
Groundbreaking theatre is all
fired up after £7m makeover
Nosheen Iqbal
I
n the six years since Indhu
Rubasingham was appointed
its artistic director, the
Tricycle theatre has achieved
three West End transfers,
two Olivier awards, a Liberty
human rights award and has
mentored hundreds of London’s
teenage refugees through its
Minding the Gap programme. Now,
almost two years since it closed
for a £7m facelift, the building is
preparing for its most dramatic
flourish. The Tricycle is no more:
Rubasingham is relaunching it as the
Kiln theatre.
“It’s an opportunity we could
only take at this moment,” she says,
visibly excited as she gives me a
hard-hats-and-fluoro-tabards tour
of the refurbished space, which is
still five months from being curtainready. “It’s been bubbling in my head
and I never thought it would happen
but it’s the next part of the story
for this building. Kiln as a word is
associative with Kilburn. Kilns have
a relationship with cultures across
the world, they are a physical thing,
melting pots associated with heat
and cooking.” To put it another way,
Rubasingham is hoping to establish
the Kiln theatre as the hottest ticket
in town. “People who love us aren’t
going to not come because we’ve
changed the name,” she laughs. “We
can’t have been that good in the
first place if that’s true, but this is
an opportunity to grab people who
don’t go to the theatre. It’s for people
who think we are a children’s theatre
or aren’t sure what we do.”
Under her predecessor, Nicolas
Kent, the Tricycle became known for
political dramas such as The Great
Game: Afghanistan and The Bomb,
and verbatim, tribunal plays, staging
inquiries based on spoken evidence.
“I do believe in political theatre,”
says Rubasingham. “But my politics
are that it’s about the story first and
the stories we don’t hear, from the
people who don’t have a platform.
I’m committed to showing the world
through different lenses.”
To that end, her new season
features six new plays, including five
world premieres, and one British
premiere. The theatre reopens in
September with Holy Sh!t by Alexis
Zegerman, telling the story of two
London couples and their four-year-
old daughters, and will be followed
by the theatre’s most ambitious
project yet: the first stage adaptation
of Zadie Smith’s White Teeth, a
story rooted in the Kiln theatre’s
north-west London neighbourhood.
Both productions will be directed
by Rubasingham. “New writing
is risky,” says Rubasingham, of
her tendency to avoid staging the
classics, “but if you really want to
be in on the zeitgeist, it’s the best
way to do it.” She cackles when I say
her gift for staging “caustic, foulmouthed plays” has been praised
in the Observer. “I love language
whatever form that takes, I relish it.”
Next January, a co-production
with Tamasha and Live theatre
companies will see the taxi driverturned-playwright, Ishy Din,
follow up his smash-hit 2012 play
Snookered with Approaching Empty,
a play set in a Middlesborough
minicab office following the death
of Margaret Thatcher. The Son,
the final part of Florian Zeller’s
acclaimed family trilogy (which
includes The Father and The
Mother), will carry the season into
▼Indhu Rubasingham, above, is
directing the Great Wave, below at
the National Theatre.
MAIN PHOTOGRAPH: DAVID LEVENE/GUARDIAN
PHOTOGRAPH BELOW: MARK DOUET
spring and will be followed by new
commissions from Samuel Adamson
and Anupama Chandrasekhar.
Rubasingham has had much
to prove on her “longer, more
meandering” journey to become the
country’s first woman of colour to
run a theatre. “Everything is defined
by your race and gender when
you’re not ‘normal’ in that picture,”
she says, with slow consideration.
“When I started, I was often asked,
‘How does being Asian influence you
as a director?’ and I’d say, ‘I have no
idea!’. Or, I would do plays with so
many different writers and then be
told, ‘Oh, it’s a shame you’ve been
pigeonholed’. I wasn’t pigeonholed –
I wanted to tell all these new stories!
It’s such a tightrope, you have to be
comfortable in your skin and have
confidence. You don’t want to be
a tickbox exercise or be accused of
being a tokenistic add-on.”
She was born in Sheffield,
in a traditional Sri Lankan
Tamil household, and studied
drama at Hull University after
a transformative stint of work
experience at Nottingham
Playhouse when she was 16. I ask,
following the Royal Shakespeare
Company’s recent suggestion that
a theatre review in the Daily Mail
had a “blatantly racist attitude”,
whether critics have become less
prejudiced during her career. She
offers a wry smile and points me
towards coverage of her Romeo
and Juliet, which she set in
Ottoman-era Istanbul at Chichester
Festival theatre in 2002, or when
she cast David Harewood in The
Misanthrope.
“But that journey of frustration
and obstacles has informed me
and pushed me,” she points out. “It
made me better and made me clear
about my vision. It’s more difficult if
you do not see people like you in the
industry, people like you on stage,
people like you in the stories told.
But it’s also the fuel that drives and
makes me curious about people’s
journeys and cultures, to fight for
the unheard and tell stories that
demand empathy.”
As a consequence perhaps of
endlessly applying for funding
grants, Rubasingham has a tendency
to speak in form-filling arts jargon,
but her passion and talent burns
bright; her current production of
The Great Wave at the National
Theatre, about the scandal of North
Korea’s abduction of young Japanese
citizens, has gripped audiences
and sold out its run. She has a track
record for kicking down the door of
the established canon with original
work. “Theatre needs different
voices to make it relevant,” she says,
matter of fact. “It’s exhilarating.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:34 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 19:52
•
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
34
Trump’s anger
intensifies over
‘crazy’ Mueller and
FBI investigation
President’s agitation growing
in wake of raid on offices of
his lawyer Michael Cohen
Tom McCarthy
New York
Tensions between Donald Trump and
individuals he holds responsible for
the investigation into his campaign’s
links to Russia reached new levels yesterday, as Trump said Robert Mueller,
the special counsel leading the investigation, had been driven “crazy” by
a failure to find evidence of collusion,
and former FBI director James Comey
was said to have compared the US president to a mob boss.
Trump has been increasingly agitated about the investigation since
Monday, when FBI agents raided the
home and office of his personal lawyer,
Michael Cohen, and seized documents
including records of six-figure payments made to two women who claim
to have had affairs with him before the
2016 election.
He openly remarked in the White
House on Monday that “many people”
have said he should fire Mueller, and
was yesterday reported by CNN to be
considering firing Rod Rosenstein, the
deputy attorney general, in order to
put pressure on the special counsel.
Trump returned to attacking Mueller and Rosenstein yesterday morning
in a tweet that blamed the US’s current
Republicans
given a jolt as
Ryan says he
will step down
Ben Jacobs
Washington
Paul Ryan, the speaker of the US House
of Representatives, has announced he
will not seek re-election, in a move
seen as underlining Republican concerns over November’s elections.
Ryan’s plans have been the source
of much speculation, amid Republican
fears over their majority in the House
after the nationwide midterm vote.
His spokesman, Brendan Buck, said
▲ Comey may have called Trump a
‘mob boss’ in a forthcoming interview
director: “How strange is it for you to
sit here and compare the president to
a mob boss?” Comey himself doesn’t
speak in the video.
Comey is preparing for a media blitz
in support of a book to be released next
week that he has framed as a showdown with Trump, who has said that
he fired Comey with the Russia investigation on his mind.
Mueller – who was appointed to
investigate alleged collusion between
the Trump campaign and Russia
after Comey’s dismissal – has produced indictments of or pleas from
19 individuals, including Trump’s
former campaign chairman and his
first national security adviser, as well
as three companies based in Russia.
The prosecutors have not brought any
charges specifically related to collusion so far.
It is not clear that the president
could fire Mueller directly, despite
a claim on Tuesday by White House
press secretary Sarah Sanders that he
has that power. The president could,
however, assign the task to a justice
department official – although several
possible candidates, perhaps including Rosenstein, would be likely to
resign instead of carrying out the president’s order.
The prospect of firing Mueller was
openly mooted on Fox News, which
the president watches avidly, in a
Tuesday evening report musing on
“what might happen if the president
decides to pull the plug”.
“The man who became famous for
saying ‘you’re fired’ is facing what
could be the most serious and consequential personnel decision of his life
tonight,” the report said.
US senators yesterday introduced
a bipartisan measure to protect Mueller if Trump did attempt to fire him.
If passed, the bill would ensure that
Mueller or any future special counsel
could only be fired for “good cause”
by a senior justice department official.
Should a termination take place, the
special counsel would have 10 days to
seek an expedited judicial review to
determine whether the firing was for
good cause.
the Wisconsin congressman would
“serve out his full term, run through
the tape, and then retire in January”.
Ryan’s departure increases the
number of House Republicans not
seeking re-election to 46 – almost 20%
of the 237 total. This record exodus has
left many Democrats optimistic about
their chances of picking up the 24 seats
needed to retake the majority.
Speaking at a press conference yesterday morning, Ryan insisted that he
had never sought the job of speaker,
which he has held since 2015, and
that his plans to retire were focused
on his desire to spend more time with
his children. “If I’m here for one more
term, my kids will have only known
me as a weekend dad,” said Ryan, 48.
“This is a titanic, tectonic shift,” an
unnamed Republican told Axios, the
news website that first reported Ryan’s
decision. “This is going to make every
Republican donor believe the House
can’t be held.”
Ryan was first elected to Congress in
1998 and was Mitt Romney’s running
mate in the 2012 presidential election
won by Barack Obama.
Donald Trump, who has long had a
contentious relationship with Ryan,
yesterday praised him on Twitter,
writing: “Speaker Paul Ryan is a truly
good man, and while he will not be
seeking re-election, he will leave a
legacy of achievement that nobody
can question.”
Ryan initially declined to endorse
Trump after he clinched the Republican nomination and called his attacks
on a Hispanic judge the “textbook definition of a racist comment”. But he
later embraced Trump’s candidacy
and has been an ally of the administration on Capitol Hill.
Ryan may leave behind a competitive race in his district near the
Canadian border. Trump won it by 10%
in 2016, but Barack Obama came first
in 2008 and only narrowly lost in 2012.
“bad blood with Russia” on the investigation, accused Mueller of a conflict of
interest and characterised the atmosphere in the White House as “very
calm and calculated”.
“Much of the bad blood with Russia
is caused by the Fake & Corrupt Russia Investigation, headed up by the
all Democrat loyalists, or people that
worked for Obama,” Trump wrote.
“Mueller is most conflicted of all
(except Rosenstein who signed Fisa
& Comey letter),” Trump continued.
“No Collusion, so they go crazy!”
“Fisa” refers to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, under which
the FBI conducted surveillance during
the presidential campaign on a Trump
aide with Russia ties. The “Comey
letter” refers to a May 2017 letter written by Rosenstein that recommended
Comey be fired.
A clip released yesterday of an interview with Comey, to be screened at the
weekend, shows interviewer George
Stephanopoulos asking the former FBI
Rescuers at the
burnt-out tail
section of the
Russian-built
Ilyushin Il-76,
which became
separated from the
fuselage, in a field
near Boufarik
PHOTOGRAPH: RYAD
KRAMDI/AFP/GETTY
More than 250 dead
as military aircraft
crashes in Algeria
Body bags for
some of the 257
dead lined up near
the crash. Three
days of national
mourning have
been announced
PHOTOGRAPH:
ENNAHAR TV/AP
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:35 Edition Date:180412 Edition:03 Zone:
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 11/4/2018 23:24
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•••
Green beer
World’s largest brewer
claims breakthrough
Page 36
People smuggling
‘Arrested’ kingpin
living free in Uganda
Page 37
35
Pope Francis
admits ‘grave
errors’ over
Chilean sex
abuse scandal
Associated Press
Santiago
Ruth Michaelson
Cairo
A military plane carrying soldiers and
their families has crashed soon after
takeoff, killing 257 people in what
appears to be the worst aircraft disaster in Algeria’s history.
The defence ministry said 247 passengers, mostly soldiers and their
relatives, died yesterday along with
10 crew members when the plane
crashed into a field next to an airbase
in the town of Boufarik, 20 miles from
the capital, Algiers.
The cause of the crash is unclear and
an investigation has been launched.
The head of the Algerian army, the
vice-minister of defence and the military chief of staff have visited the
site to inspect the wreckage. The government has declared three days of
national mourning.
Video taken close to the crash site
and published by the local news site
Algérie24 showed a plume of black
smoke billowing into the air. Pictures
showed the burnt-out tail section of
the aircraft separated from the rest
of the fuselage, which was being
attended to by rescue workers. The
Algerian TV network Ennahar published images of body bags lined up
in the field.
It is the deadliest plane crash since
Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 was
shot down over eastern Ukraine in July
2014, killing all 298 people on board.
The aircraft that crashed yesterday was a Russian-built Ilyushin Il-76
military transport. The Il-76 has been
involved in a number of crashes, most
recently in 2016 when one on a firefighting mission went down near Lake
Baikal in Siberia, killing all 10 crew
members on board. An Il-76 owned
by the Iranian air force crashed near
Varamin in 2009, killing seven people;
the cause of that incident is disputed.
Yesterday’s flight was en route to
the Algerian region of Tindouf before
heading south to Béchar, according to
the defence ministry.
Tindouf borders Morocco and the
restive Western Sahara, a disputed territory annexed by Morocco after Spain
withdrew from it in 1975, and claimed
by both Morocco and the Polisario
Front separatist movement.
Spain
Algiers
Oran
Morocco
300 km
300 miles
Boufarik
military
Algeria base
A member of Algeria’s ruling
National Liberation Front party told
Ennahar that those who died included
members of the Polisario Front,
according to Reuters, and Algérie24
reported that 26 of those killed were
citizens of the Western Sahara.
The Polisario Front promotes independence for the Sahrawi people of
the Western Sahara, some of whom
live in Tindouf.
The previous worst air crash on
Algerian soil occurred in 2003, when
102 people were killed after a civilian airliner crashed at the end of the
runway in Tamanrasset. There was a
single survivor.
An Algerian air force Lockheed
C-130 Hercules crashed in a mountainous area of the Oum El Bouaghi
province in 2014, killing at least 75
people on board and also leaving just
one survivor. The defence ministry
said poor weather conditions were the
likely cause of that crash.
Pope Francis has admitted he made
“grave errors” in judgment in a clerical sex abuse scandal in Chile and has
invited the abuse victims he discredited to Rome to beg their forgiveness.
In an extraordinary letter published
yesterday, Francis also summoned all
of Chile’s bishops to the Vatican for
an emergency summit in the coming
weeks to discuss the scandal, which
has badly tarnished his reputation and
that of the Chilean church.
The Vatican orders up such emergency visits only rarely, when Vatican
intervention is urgently required, such
as when the clerical sex abuse scandal
exploded in the US in 2002.
Francis said the meeting, just a year
after the Chilean bishops were last in
Rome on a regular visit, would have as
its objective “repairing scandal where
possible and re-establishing justice”.
Francis blamed a lack of “truthful and balanced information” in his
missteps in judging the case of Bishop
Juan Barros, a protege of Chile’s most
notorious predator priest, the Rev Fernando Karadima. Francis had strongly
defended Barros during his January
visit to Chile, despite accusations by
victims that Barros witnessed and
ignored their abuse.
In Chile and during an airborne
press conference returning to Rome,
Francis had accused the victims of
“slander” for pressing their case
against Barros, demanded they present “proof” of their claims. He also
revealed he had twice rejected Barros’s resignation and insisted: “I am
convinced he is innocent.”
After his remarks caused an outcry, Francis sent the Vatican’s most
respected sex abuse investigator,
Archbishop Charles Scicluna to Chile.
Francis said the clergy must now
work together to “re-establish confidence in the church, confidence that
was broken by our errors and sins, and
heal the wounds that continue to bleed
in Chilean society”.
Karadima was removed from the
ministry by the Vatican for sexually
abusing minors and sentenced in 2011
to a lifetime of penance and prayer.
Scicluna and the Rev Jordi Bertomeu spent nearly two weeks in
Chile and New York this year interviewing Karadima’s victims, who have
denounced Barros’s silence.
In his letter, Francis thanked the 64
people who testified and had the courage to bare the “wounds of their souls”
for the sake of truth. He said he felt
“pain and shame” in reading the 2,300page dossier his envoys prepared.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:36 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 16:20
•
36
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
World
Satellites to monitor
global water crisis
as fears for the next
‘day zero’ intensify
New system’s creators point
to problems in Iraq, India,
Morocco and Spain
Jonathan Watts
Global environment editor
Shrinking reservoirs in Morocco,
India, Iraq and Spain could cause the
next so-called “day zero” water crisis, according to the developers of a
satellite early warning system for the
world’s 500,000 dams.
Cape Town recently grabbed global
headlines by starting a countdown to
“day zero”: the day when taps would
be cut off for millions of residents as a
result of a three-year drought. Drastic
conservation measures have forestalled that moment in South Africa,
but dozens of other countries face
similar risks from rising demand, mismanagement and climate change, say
the World Resources Institute (WRI).
The US-based environmental
organisation is working with research
group Deltares, the Dutch government
and other partners to build a water and
cYanmaGentaYellowb
security early warning system that
aims to anticipate social instability,
economic damage and cross-border
migration. A prototype is due to be
introduced this year, but a preview was
unveiled yesterday that highlighted
four of the worst-affected dams and
the potential knock-on risks.
The starkest decline is that of
Morocco’s second-largest reservoir,
Al Massira, which has shrunk by 60%
in three years owing to recurring
drought, expanding irrigation and the
increasing thirst of neighbouring cities
such as Casablanca. Despite recent
rains, the WRI said water was now at
the lowest level in a decade. The last
time the dam was so depleted, grain
production fell by half and more than
700,000 people were affected, it said.
Pressure on this water source will
grow this year when a new water
transfer project links it to the city of
Marrakech.
In Iraq, the Mosul dam has seen a
more protracted decline but it is also
now down 60% from its peak in the
1990s as a result of low rainfall and
competing demand from Turkish
hydropower projects upstream on
▲ The dry basin of the Theewaterskloof reservoir in
South Africa. Cape Town has been forced into drastic
water-saving measures PHOTOGRAPH: MIKE HUTCHINGS/REUTERS
▲ The drought in southern Spain
has led to a 60% shrinking of a
crucial reservoir in the region
PHOTOGRAPH: DANIEL RAMOS/GETTY
the Tigris and Euphrates. As in Syria,
water stress has added to conflict and
been a driver for the relocation of people from the countryside.
Tensions have also been apparent
in India over the water allocations
for two reservoirs connected by the
Narmada river. Poor rains last year
left the upstream Indira Sagar dam a
third below its seasonal average. When
some of this shortfall was passed on
to the downstream Sardar Sarovar
‘Things will only
get worse as water
demands increase’
Charles Iceland
World Resources Institute
reservoir, it caused an uproar because
the latter is a drinking-water supply
for 30 million people. Last month, the
Gujarat state government halted irrigation and appealed to farmers not to
sow crops.
The social risks are lower in industrialised countries that are less
dependent on agriculture and more
economically resilient. Spain has
suffered a severe drought that has
contributed to a 60% shrinking of the
surface area of the Buendía reservoir
over the last five years. This has hit
hydropower generation and pushed
up electricity prices, but the agricultural knock-on effects are limited by
the relatively small – 3% – contribution of farming to the nation’s GDP.
All four dams are in the mid-latitudes – the geographical bands on
either side of the tropics where climate
change is expected to make droughts
more frequent and protracted. As
more reservoirs are scanned in the
coming months and years, the WRI
expects more cases to emerge.
“These four could be a harbinger of
things to come,” said Charles Iceland
of the WRI. “There are lots of potential Cape Towns in the making. Things
will only get worse globally, as water
demands increase and the effects of
climate change begin to be felt.”
Gennadii Donchyts, senior
researcher for Deltares, said the reservoir-monitoring service will steadily
grow in size as information is added
from Nasa and European Space Agency
satellites that provide resolutions of
between 10 and 30 metres on a daily
basis. The large amounts of data generated are analysed using Google’s Earth
Engine and algorithms to compensate
for periods where parts of the Earth’s
surface are covered by cloud.
More bubbles,
less gas: world’s
largest brewer
finds holy grail
of beermaking
Daniel Boffey
Brussels
The world’s largest brewer it is to introduce what it claims is a greener way to
put bubbles in beer and reduce its CO2
emissions by 5%.
The Belgium-based company AB
InBev says it has developed a technique to generate gas bubbles without
the need to boil water and hops. It
conducted four years of tests at an
experimental brewery in Leuven, east
of Brussels, and then on a larger scale
in two plants in Britain. The method it
has developed does not detract from
the taste of the finished drink, its says,
while using less heat and water.
Bubbles are said to be crucial in
determining the taste of a beer. Traditionally, gas bubbles are generated
via steam through the natural cooking process, requiring high levels of
water and heat. AB InBev says, however, it is able to simulate the effects
of boiling the brew.
The new method involves heating
the brew to below boiling point and
then blowing nitrogen or CO2 into the
tank to create bubbles without changing the taste. The company claims that
because the beer is brewed at a lower
temperature in the early phase, it can
also stay fresh for longer.
David De Schutter, the company’s
research director for Europe, said:
“Boiling and these gas bubbles are the
sacred formula in the brewing process.
Each brewer goes through a boiling
process.
“Our innovation is to heat everything up to just below boiling point,
which provides 80% energy savings
at this point in time. There is a lot less
steam released, which allows you to
spend less on water. In our case, we
managed to go from 5% evaporated
water to less than 1%.”
AB InBev claims that when it has
adopted the technique in all its breweries around the world it will reduce
its global CO2 emissions by 5% a year,
equivalent to the energy consumption
of 120,000 families.
Studies suggest there will be 80%
less evaporation as a result of a 0.5%
reduction in water consumption, said
to be the equivalent of 1,200 Olympic
swimming pools.
The company, which hopes all its
breweries will adopt the technique
within 10 years, is offering to share
the patented technology free of charge
with smaller brewers.
A fee would be charged to the company’s larger rivals in the market. AB
InBev has vowed to invest the money
in further research to reduce its ecological footprint.
5%
The amount of CO2 emissions
AB InBev calculates it will cut by
adopting its new brewing practices
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:37 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 18:02
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
World
37
▲ Alena Popova with the cutout of
Leonid Slutsky for the protest
Activists facing
jail for sexual
harassment
protest against
Russian MP
Marianna Spring
PHOTOGRAPH:
ED JONES/AFP/GETTY
Seasonal cycle Children ride unicycles during the opening of the April spring friendship art festival outside a
theatre in Pyongyang today. The event is part of the annual commemorations of the birth of North Korea’s
founder, Kim Il-sung. The grandfather of Kim Yong-un remains the country’s “Eternal President” despite dying in
1994. The week-long celebrations feature concerts, dance performances and acrobatics.
People smuggler ‘held in Italy’
seen living high life in Uganda
Multiple witnesses say that
‘The General’ is free and
out partying in Kampala
Lorenzo Tondo Palermo
Alon Mwesigwa Kampala
One of the world’s most wanted people
smugglers, whom Italian prosecutors
claim to have in jail in Sicily, is living
freely in Uganda and spending his
substantial earnings in nightclubs,
according to multiple witnesses.
Prosecutors in Palermo announced
the capture of Medhanie Yehdego
Mered in Sudan in June 2016, describing it as “the arrest of the year”. The
suspect was extradited to Italy with
the help of the British Foreign Office
and the UK’s National Crime Agency
(NCA).
But a documentary by the Swedish
public broadcaster SVT in collaboration with Guardian reporters reveals
that the 35-year-old Eritrean known as
“The General” has never been arrested
by European police forces.
Instead, a 29-year-old refugee,
Medhanie Tesfamariam Behre, was
extradited to Italy, where he remains
in prison charged with human trafficking offences. SVT is also in possession
of a file revealing how a European
police authority is aware that the real
smuggler is still at large, but cannot
persuade Italian prosecutors to issue
a new arrest warrant.
SVT collected dozens of testimonies
from Ugandan and Eritrean citizens in
Kampala who claim to have seen and
met Mered. “We had mapped out all
the places, bars and hotels where he
had been seen in Kampala before we
went there,” said reporter Ali Fegan.
“We documented a lot of testimonies
of people who say he lives there.”
One witness said Mered had
appeared at the Hotel Diplomate in
Muyenga, an upscale Kampala suburb.
Mered had tried to chat up two Eritrean
women. “He was very drunk,” the witness said. “He tried to pick the girls up
[to dance], but he was totally wasted.
He is some kind of a wild celebrity and
no one tries to arrest him.”
The investigation into Mered’s
people-smuggling ring began after a
shipwreck on 3 October 2013 in which
368 migrants died off the island of
Lampedusa. Italian prosecutors in
Palermo led the hunt.
After two years, during which they
intercepted more than 20,000 phone
calls, in June 2016 the prosecutors in
Palermo announced the capture of
Mered. Since news of the arrest broke
there have been serious doubts over
the man’s identity. Dozens of Mered’s
victims claim the wrong man is on
trial and, according to the family of
the extradited suspect, the man being
held in Sicily is an Eritrean refugee who
made his living milking cows.
The Guardian spoke to at least 10
people, including employees of an
NGO run by Eritreans in Kampala, who
said they had made private inquiries
and were confident Mered was in the
capital. Asked why they do not report
▲ Medhanie Yehdego Mered is still at
large while authorities say he is in jail
it to the police when they see Mered, a
witness said many Eritreans in Uganda
do not see him as evil. “To many
Eritreans, he is a product of necessity.
[It is] an unfortunate situation, but
he helps them run away from worse
conditions at home,” one said.
Another said some people didn’t
know who to report to and would fear
retribution if they did. “Even if we tell
[Uganda] police, they will not arrest
him,” a witness said. “He is rich and
can pay anyone to get his freedom.”
One witness said Mered moved with
four or three Ugandan guards. “They
are not from a registered security company. He keeps changing guards.”
Mered’s wife lives in Sweden and
on multiple occasions has publicly
claimed that European authorities had
arrested the wrong person. According to SVT she had made the Swedish
police aware of the mistake more than
18 months ago.
SVT reporters also interviewed
the Palermo prosecutor, Calogero
Ferrara, who led the investigation,
about operations against people
smugglers. But when the reporter
asked for a comment on the arrest of
Mered, Ferrara ended the interview
and told the reporters to leave.
Berhe’s mother, Meaza Zerai
Weldai, travelled from Eritrea to
Palermo in October for a DNA test that
confirmed her relation to the man in
prison, proving that he is not Mered.
According to the SVT documentary Swedish authorities supplied the
Sudanese telephone number that was
used to geolocate the man arrested
in Sudan. Both the NCA and Italian
prosecutors declined to comment.
Three Russian activists could face jail
today in what they claim is an official crackdown on their campaign for
sexual harassment allegations made
against the MP Leonid Slutsky to be
taken seriously.
Authorities arrested Alena Popova,
Anastasiya Glushkova and Anastasiya
Alekseeva last week on the charge of
having organised a mass event without
permission after they protested with
a cardboard cutout of Slutsky outside
the State Duma, the Russian parliament, in Moscow. If found guilty at a
hearing today, they will receive a fine,
community service or be imprisoned
for up to 10 days.
Slutsky has been accused by a number of women of sexual harassment.
More than 600 media professionals
from outlets such as RBC, TV Rain,
RTVI and Echo of Moscow, as well as
the Tass news agency, have signed an
open letter calling for a boycott of the
Duma over the allegations. The parliament’s ethics committee has cleared
Slutsky on the accusations brought by
several journalists.
The charges against the protesters
follow an unprecedented outcry over
sexual harassment in Russia, where
the issue is often painted as merely a
pet subject for western liberals.
Popova, Glushkova and Alekseeva
claim members of “patriotic” organisations arrived at the protest to
intimidate them into giving up their
campaign as they accused the activists
of “working for the West”.
Vladimir Putin’s spokesman,
Dmitry Peskov, recently suggested
the claims against Slutsky were made
because claims of sexual harassment
had become “fashionable”.
Russian law demands that a protest
of more than two people be granted
permission from local authorities.
The three women had been picketing
the Russian parliament individually.
The activists had four requests to hold
larger protests in Moscow denied.
Popova, a prominent women’s
rights campaigner who was detained
twice before being arrested and
charged, said: “Without permission
for a protest you can stand alone with
a poster, and can pass that poster
to another person, but not stand
together. We did that, and our single
picket abided by the law.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:38 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 17:57
•
38
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
World
Journalists to stand
trial over report on
Myanmar massacre
Soldiers jailed for killings yet
judge rejects plea to drop
case against two reporters
Agence France-Presse
Yangon
Two Reuters journalists arrested while
investigating a massacre of Rohingya
Muslims face trial in Myanmar after
a court rejected a motion to drop the
case against them.
Reporters Wa Lone, 32, and Kyaw
Soe Oo, 28, were detained in December and accused of violating the
country’s Official Secrets Act for possessing material relating to security
operations in Rakhine state that was
handed to them by the police.
Myanmar has faced global condemnation and accusations of extrajudicial
killings, ethnic cleansing and genocide
as about 700,000 Rohingya Muslims
fled Rakhine for Bangladesh after a
military crackdown on insurgents.
The government rejects the allegations, claiming it was defending itself
against attacks from the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army in August.
The two reporters have been held
in Insein prison in Yangon since their
arrest while facing hearings to determine whether the case will go to trial,
with 17 out of 25 witnesses having
given testimony.
Their lawyers asked the Yangon
court to dismiss the case last week,
citing in part troubling discrepancies
in witness statements, but the motion
was rejected.
“The court decided that the proposal from the defendants’ lawyer to
release the defendants before all the
witnesses were cross-examined has
been rejected,” the judge, Ye Lwin,
cYanmaGentaYellowb
said. The pair had been investigating
a massacre of 10 Rohingya men on
2 September in the Rakhine village of
Inn Din that was carried out by security
forces and local residents. The military
admitted the atrocity took place and
Reuters later published the story while
the reporters were in prison.
Seven soldiers were sentenced to
jail with hard labour for their part in
the killings on Tuesday. The army
has claimed the Rohingya men were
terrorists, but has not presented any
evidence to back up the claim.
Wa Lone referred to the sentencing
as he was being put into the police van
after the hearing. “Those who killed
people in the mass killing were given
a sentence of 10 years. We were simply trying to find out the news and
report this and we are facing a trial
that could result in us going to prison
for 14 years,” he said.
One of his lawyers, Than Zaw Aung,
also compared the cases: “My question
is why are the journalists still in detention in prison if their report is true.”
The case against the journalists has
proceeded despite international calls
for their release. Reuters announced
last month that the prominent human
rights lawyer Amal Clooney had joined
the legal team.
The president of Reuters, Stephen
J Adler, said the company was deeply
disappointed with the court’s decision.
“We believe there are solid grounds for
the court to dismiss this matter and to
release our journalists. Wa Lone and
Kyaw Soe Oo were reporting on issues
in Myanmar in an independent and
impartial way,” he said.
Wa Lone, who turned 32 yesterday, expressed optimism. “I believe
in democracy. I also believe that one
day we will be released because of freedom of expression,” he said.
‘He said he
was looking forward
to working
with me, that
I had been
highly recommended’
Heidi Thomas
Witness
Bill Cosby
leaving the
courthouse in
Norristown,
where he is being
retried over
sexual assault
allegations
PHOTOGRAPH:
GILBERT
CARRASQUILLO/GETTY
Cosby prosecutors produce witness who
says star assaulted her over four days
Ed Pilkington
Pennsylvania
Prosecutors in the Bill Cosby trial rallied from a blistering attack on the
comedian’s chief accuser yesterday
with testimony from one of several women who say he drugged and
attacked them long before he allegedly
assaulted Andrea Costand in 2004.
The first of the five women, Heidi
Thomas, returned to the witness stand
after recalling in disturbing detail
how in 1984 she was allegedly lured
TV host off air after
threatening Florida
shooting survivor
Associated Press
St Louis
A conservative commentator who sent
a tweet saying he would use “a hot
poker” to sexually assault an outspoken 17-year-old survivor of the Florida
high school shooting has resigned
from a Missouri TV station and been
taken off the radio.
to Cosby’s house in Reno, Nevada,
made to consume an unidentified soporific and then attacked over four days
of semi-consciousness. Thomas said
she had been 24 and hoping to build
a career in musical theatre when her
agent contacted her and said a “Mr C”
was looking for “promising young talent” to mentor.
A phone call was arranged and Bill
Cosby came on the line. “He said he
was looking forward to working with
me, that I had been highly recommended,” Thomas told the jury.
She said she was met from the
airport and taken to Cosby’s house
where he asked her to read the part of
a drunk woman from a script.
Cosby appeared unimpressed, she
said, and asked her: “If you were to
drink, what would you drink?” She
said he handed her a glass of white
wine and after just one sip she remembered very little of the next four days.
The TV star has denied drugging and
molesting Thomas, as he has denied
allegations of more than 50 other
women who have publicly accused
him. He stands trial, for the second
time in 10 months, on three counts of
aggravated indecent assault. The first
trial, last June, ended in a mistrial.
The trial continues, with four other
accusers as well as Constand still to tell
their stories.
St Louis’s KDNL-TV accepted Jamie
Allman’s resignation and cancelled
The Allman Report, according to a brief
statement from the Sinclair Broadcast
Group, which operates the TV station.
Several businesses pulled advertising from Allman’s shows after he
sent the tweet on 26 March targeting
David Hogg, who has strongly advocated for stricter gun control since 17
people were killed in the 14 February
mass shooting at his school in Parkland, Florida.
Hogg’s willingness to take on the
gun-control cause has made him a
target for some conservatives.
The host of a Fox News programme,
Laura Ingraham, took a week’s leave
after apologising via social media for
saying that Hogg had “whined” about
not getting in to some colleges.
Another student, Emma Gonzalez,
has been falsely depicted in a doctored
photo tearing up the constitution.
Sinclair is a conservative-leaning
company which owns nearly 200 local
TV stations, making it one of the largest such companies in the US.
Donald Trump last week defended
the company after a video showing dozens of Sinclair news anchors
reading a script expressing concern
about “fake stories” and “one-sided
news stories plaguing the country”
appeared on TV news reports and was
circulated online.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:39 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 17:48
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
World
Brazil
39
Plastic into profit Residents
turn choking tide of waste
into community enterprise
Plastic and
other rubbish
clog the Tejipió
river in Recife,
worsening
flooding risks.
Now residents
collect and
recycle the waste
PHOTOGRAPH: MOISÉS
LOPES/TEARFUND
A poor city neighbourhood in
Recife is showing the world
how to quell plastic pollution
Sandra Laville
Recife, Brazil
M
aria das Graças
started collecting
her plastic bottles
after she saw
the body of her
neighbour floating
past her house, carried along with
the pollution that helped cause the
deadly flooding. She stores them
by the front door of her one-storey
home, which sits on the litter-strewn
banks of the Tejipió river in northeast Brazil.
When she has enough she will
take them to the local storage skip,
where a litter collector will pay her
two reals for 50 plastic bottles –
about 40 pence. She’s not just doing
it for the money but to stop the tide
of plastic drowning this community.
Every day Maria and other
residents of Coqueiral, a poor
neighbourhood in the city of Recife,
feel the impact of the world’s plastic
binge. It is visible in the river that
once flowed through the area.
Fifty years ago when Rildo
Wandray was a boy, he would jump
into the Tejipió and swim, while his
friends fished beside him.
Now the river is stagnant, blocked
at every tributary by a tide of plastic
waste: Coca-Cola and Fanta bottles,
water containers, crisp packets and
other food wrappers.
Globally, some 2 billion people
live in communities with no rubbish
collections. While international
attention has focused recently on
the plastic-litter crisis in the oceans,
the impact of plastic on the world’s
poorest is no less destructive,
causing flooding, disease and
hundreds of thousands of premature
deaths from toxic fumes caused by
burning the waste.
In Recife the plastic waste is
exacerbating already devastating
flooding from rising sea levels
caused by climate change. And those
living around the Tejipió are tired of
waiting for the government to act.
For Das Graças, the tipping point
came when flooding took the life
of one of her neighbours. “I was
trapped inside my home with my
son,” she said. “There was nothing
we could do, the water came up and
we could not get out. I looked out
and saw a body float past. She was
face down, I could see the hair.
“That night the flood nearly took
me too,” she said. “Ever since then I
have collected my bottles. I wanted
to try and do something to reduce
the waste going into the river.”
40p
The equivalent of what residents can
earn for every 50 discarded plastic
bottles they sell to a litter collector
3%
The target for global development
funding of waste projects lobbied for
by the Christian charity Tearfund
‘I was trapped. The
water came up and
we could not get out
– I looked out and
saw a body float past’
Maria das Graças
Coqueiral resident
Organised and supported by
the local baptist church through
its Instituto Solidare project, local
communities are mobilising with
street protests, public meetings
and awareness campaigns. They
are also trying to build a network of
entrepreneurs who can make a living
out of collecting the waste – and
turning it into products they can sell.
The Recife campaign is supported
by Tearfund, an international
Christian charity that is lobbying
for global development funding
for waste projects to be increased
from 0.3% to 3% – a move which
would push waste higher up the
international agenda, reduce global
plastic littering, help cut down
on marine litter, and improve the
environment and the lives of the
world’s most vulnerable.
Today, ahead of next week’s
Commonwealth heads of
government meeting in London,
Penny Mordaunt, the international
development secretary, is expected
to announce increased UK funding
for waste and sanitation globally to
tackle growing plastic pollution.
In Recife, Evandro Alves, who
heads Instituto Solidare, says the
world’s poorest are suffering the
most from the plastic waste crisis.
“The situation here in this
community, where life is already
incredibly hard, has been getting
worse,” he said. “We are seeing more
and more plastic being used and
thrown away, and it stops here. So
we decided to mobilise.”
The movement in Coqueiral,
Alves believes, could be replicated
across the developing world, taking
advantage of the opportunities
waste creates.
“The waste is a problem but it
is also an opportunity for people
to earn a living, to create a circular
economy for themselves,” he said.
“This could be transformative and
improve the quality of life for people
in the poorest areas of the biggest
cities. This is a battle for everyone –
and everyone needs to be part of it.”
Young people in Recife are at
the forefront of the campaign,
eliciting support and mobilising on
social media. In one piece of direct
action, pupils whose school is on
the riverside removed some of the
waste from the Tejipió – a sofa,
plastic bottles, a TV, tables, chairs –
and built a house on the banks they
called Casa Lixo (House of Trash).
Some women are involved in
an enterprise making handbags,
jewellery and toys out of the
plastic and other waste collected.
It provides them with employment
▲ Flooding linked to pollution and
rising sea levels affects Recife’s
poorest communities the most
PHOTOGRAPH: TEARFUND
and a small income – and in a small
way achieves the local management
of waste that a 2010 Brazilian law
promised but failed to create.
Olga Gomes, one of the women
who works in the group Seleta,
said: “We are putting a lot of work
into researching the market and
trying to make sure we can make a
business out of what we are doing. It
is empowering.” For her, the mission
for the future is clear: “I want to see
my grandchildren swim in the river
like I did and I want this work to take
me across the ocean.”
The movement is being adopted
by some of the poorest communities
across the world. Other groups have
formed in Jos in Nigeria and Maputo
in Mozambique. They are driven,
as in Recife, by young people, who
use digital media to spread the fight
against waste across the globe.
Naomi Foxwood, senior
campaigner for Tearfund, said:
“For them it is a justice issue
because often municipal waste
is just dumped in the poorest
communities, whereas it is collected
from the more wealthy areas.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:40 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 11:32
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
40
Classified
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:41 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 11/4/2018 19:30
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
41
FTSE 100
All share
Dow Indl
Nikkei 225
-
-
-
-
1.1471
1.4206
7257.14
3991.85
24282.72
21687.10
-0.0005
+0.0032
9.61
4.01
125.28
107.22
£/€
£/$
Surveyors say
interest from
housebuyers
still declining
Patrick Collinson
Britain’s property surveyors have
issued the most downbeat assessment
of the housing market for five years.
The Royal Institution of Chartered
Surveyors (Rics) said that, in March,
demand from buyers fell for the 12th
month in a row, new instructions
from sellers declined for the seventh
consecutive month, and prices were
flat nationally.
Rics measures confidence in
the property market by balancing
surveyors noting price rises against
those seeing price falls, and said the
latest figures were the lowest since
2013. Its survey is in sharp contrast to
figures earlier this week from Halifax,
which revealed a spike in prices.
“ Nationally, the price balance remained unchanged at zero,
representing the joint lowest reading
since February 2013,” said Rics.
The downshift was deepest in
London and the south-east, the institute said, but prices were rising in parts
of the Midlands and the north.
“London exhibits the weakest feedback. Respondents in the south-east,
East Anglia and the north-east also
reported prices to be falling but to a
lesser extent than in the capital.
“Meanwhile, prices continue to
drift higher across all other parts of the
UK, with Northern Ireland, Wales and
the east Midlands seeing the strongest
readings.”
“Stamp duty and Brexit have killed
the fluidity of the London market,”
said Toby Whittome of Jackson Stops
in London. “Only when the extent
of the resulting economic damage is
properly understood will things be
able to change for the better.”
Rics said the reversal in the property market could prompt the Bank of
England to delay the next rise in interest rates. Its chief economist, Simon
Rubinsohn, said: “The latest Rics
results provide little encouragement
that the drop in housing market activity is likely to be reversed any time
soon. It has the potential to impact
the wider economy, contributing to
a softer trend in household spending.
“This could make Bank of England
deliberations around a May hike in
interest rates, which is pretty much
odds-on at the moment, a little more
finely balanced.”
Predictions that rents would rise
with higher taxes on buy-to-let houses
have not materialised, with demand
from prospective tenants weak in
much of the UK. But in Wolverhampton, Andrew Pearce of Millennium
Properties said: “Demand is at an alltime high but supply is dwindling.”
Forecaster blames beast of
east for hit to 2018 growth
Thinktank says cold weather
helped to halve first-quarter
increase in Britain’s GDP
Richard Partington
Economic growth in the UK is expected
to have fallen by half in the opening
months of the year, one of Britain’s
leading forecasting bodies has said,
amid renewed concerns for the health
of the economy.
The National Institute of Economic and Social Research (Niesr) said
growth was set to fall to 0.2% in the
first quarter of 2018 from 0.4% in the
final three months of last year, when
the economy enjoyed a mini-recovery
despite an overall slowdown in 2017
triggered by the Brexit vote.
Amit Kara, head of UK macroeconomic forecasting at the thinktank,
said the main reason for the weakness was severe weather in March,
dubbed the “beast from the east” in
the media, which was likely to have
disrupted activity in all major sectors
of the economy.
The estimate, which comes ahead
of official figures from the Office for
National Statistics (ONS) later this
month, followed news that Britain’s
factories recorded a surprise fall in production in February, in the first drop in
activity in the sector for almost a year.
Confirming fears of a slowdown in
the UK economy so far this year, figures
from the ONS showed manufacturing
output declined by 0.2% in February,
falling well behind economists’ expectations for growth of 0.2%.
There was also a sharp drop in
construction output, suggesting continued pain for the industry amid the
fallout from the collapse of Carillion.
Monthly output unexpectedly fell by
1.6% in February, as builders were
seemingly hit by the snow at the end
of the month.
Factories producing machinery
such as turbines, pumps, compressors and agricultural tools recorded
the sharpest falls in February, the
worst month for the manufacturing
sector since March last year.
▲ Snow in March across much of
Britain, including Edinburgh, affected
sectors such as housebuilding and
machinery manufacture
PHOTOGRAPH: JANE BARLOW/PA
Ruth Gregory, UK economist at the
consultancy Capital Economics, said:
“Manufacturing growth appears to
have come off the boil.”
However, the ONS said there was no
evidence that heavy snowfall in February had a negative impact on output,
which will probably stoke fears for the
health of Britain’s factories – which
have generally performed better than
much of the economy in the last year.
Overall industrial production,
which includes mining, quarrying and
The National Institute of Economic
and Social Research estimates GDP
growth to be 0.2% in Q1 2018
Quarter-on-quarter growth, %
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
2015
2016
Source: ONS, NIESR
2017
2018
energy, rose by 0.1% compared with
the previous month. Energy supply
provided the biggest contribution,
rising by 3.7%.
The figures provide a snapshot of
the economy just before there was further snowfall in early March, meaning
there could be more bad news to come
from manufacturers.
There had been signs of the weakness for the economy earlier this year
from company surveys, which showed
falling activity compared with the final
months of 2017.
However, there was better news for
Britain’s trade deficit – the difference
between imports and exports – which
shrank more than expected to £10.2bn
in February from £12.2bn in January.
Ian Stewart, chief economist at
Deloitte, said there were still positive
signs for the British manufacturing
sector, with demand for goods helped
by the strength of the world economy
and a weak pound. “If we can’t do well
in terms of manufacturing output in
conditions like that then we’ve got
problems,” he said.
Economists said the Bank of England was likely to press ahead with
raising interest rates from as early
as next month, despite the apparent
weakness for the economy.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:42 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 17:19
•
42
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
Financial
▼ Trinity Mirror’s £200m purchase of
the Express and Star titles will give it
24% of the national paper market, an
analyst said PHOTOGRAPH: LEON NEAL/GETTY
Watchdog investigates
Mirror-Express deal
Mark Sweney
The £200m deal struck by the publisher of the Mirror titles to buy
Richard Desmond’s Express and Star
newspapers is to be investigated by the
competition regulator and referred to
the culture secretary over concerns it
could reduce media plurality in the
national newspaper market.
Trinity Mirror shareholders voted in
February to approve the deal to add the
Daily Express, Sunday Express, Daily
Star and Daily Star Sunday newspapers, as well as magazines including
the celebrity title OK!, to its national
titles the Daily Mirror, Sunday Mirror
and Sunday People.
The Competition and Markets
Authority has launched a phase one
inquiry which will look at whether
the deal will result in a “substantial lessening of competition” in the
national newspaper sales or advertising market. The CMA said it had until
7 June to decide whether to move to a
fully fledged phase two competition
investigation.
The CMA has also referred the deal
to the Department for Digital, Culture,
Media and Sport, saying it “considered
that the transaction may raise public
interest considerations”.
Matt Hancock, the culture secretary, will now weigh up whether the
deal triggers media plurality concerns under the Enterprise Act 2002,
which states that there is a need “in
relation to every different audience in
the United Kingdom, or in a particular
area or locality of the United Kingdom,
for there to be a sufficient plurality of
persons with control of the media
enterprises serving that audience”.
If he believes there may be concerns, Hancock can ask the media
regulator Ofcom to look at whether
the public will lose too much from
a reduction in plurality with Trinity
Mirror controlling so many national
newspaper titles.
Simon Fox, the Trinity Mirror chief
executive, has repeatedly pledged
that his Labour-supporting Daily and
Sunday Mirror will keep Desmond’s
Brexit-supporting titles editorially independent. “The Mirror is not
going to go rightwing and the Express
is not going to go leftwing,” he said.
“They will absolutely all have editorial independence.”
As the deal was completed, however, the editors of the Daily Express
and Daily Star resigned. Trinity Mirror immediately announced the
appointment of two of its own executives – Sunday Mirror and Sunday
People editor Gary Jones, and Daily
Mirror associate editor Jon Clark – as
replacements.
Fox has said he believes the deal
will pass muster with the competition
regulator, saying the combined circulation of Trinity Mirror’s national
titles would still be less than that of
the Sun. Enders Analysis estimates
that the enlarged company will
account for 24% of national newspaper circulation.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:43 Edition Date:180412 Edition:03 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 23:20
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•••
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Financial
Business view
Larry Elliott
The economy feels chilly but
don’t dismiss the chance of
green shoots after the thaw
T
he UK economy
had a poor start to
2018. Manufacturing
output was flat in
January and fell
slightly in February.
Construction remains firmly
in recession. Export volumes
are rising but less quickly than
imports.
By the end of this month, the
Office for National Statistics will
publish its flash estimate of growth
in the first quarter. Most City
economists think it will be 0.3%,
down from 0.4% in the final three
months of 2017. At one of Britain’s
long-established think tanks, the
National Institute of Economic and
Social Research, they think it could
be as low as 0.2%.
To be sure, there are reasons to
think the position is not quite that
gloomy. The unexpectedly cold
weather, especially the snow at the
end of February and the beginning
of March, stopped work on building
sites and prevented consumers
from getting to the shops. On past
form, there will be a bounceback in
activity in the second quarter. Over
time the first quarter number may
well be revised upwards as well.
Even so, it is still obvious that
the economy has lost momentum
in recent months. Last year’s story
was of weaker but better balanced
growth, with consumer spending
muted by industry doing well. This
year’s story, so far, has been weaker
growth pure and simple.
There are reasons factory output
has stalled. Sterling has been rising
on the foreign exchanges as the
43
markets have started to bet against
a cliff-edge Brexit. That makes
exports more expensive at a time
when demand from the rest of
Europe has faltered. After years of
under-investment, it is also the case
that manufacturing has lacked the
capacity to meet rising demand.
The pound rose against the dollar
after the news in anticipation of
a quarter-point rise in borrowing
costs from the Bank of England next
month. This looks a bit curious.
Threadneedle Street is clearly
worried about wage inflation picking
up, but in the past the Bank’s
response to such data would have
been to cut borrowing costs, not to
raise them.
starting to draw down her pension
has a pot of £132,000 compared to
£212,000 for the average man.
Assuming a 3% annual yield, that
would provide a man with an annual
income of £6,360 according to
Zurich’s calculations while a woman
would get £3,990.
Clearly, women will have smaller
pension pots than men until such
time as their equality in lifetime
earnings. In the meantime, they
would need to get a yield of 5%
on their investments in order to
achieve the same annual income
as men. That’s achievable but only
by taking more of a risk with that
money so carefully accumulated
over the decades.
Gender gap not retiring
Three years have passed since new
rules came into force allowing
people over 55 to draw down money
out of their accumulated pension
pots to live on when they stop
working. The new arrangements are
designed to provide more choice but
as new research from the financial
firm Zurich UK has shown, they have
also highlighted how the gender pay
gap extends beyond retirement.
Over the course of their working
lives, women tend to earn less than
men. Inevitably, therefore, they also
tend to stick less away into defined
contribution pension schemes. That,
in turn means, the average woman
‘On past form, there
will be a bounce-back
in activity in the second
quarter. Over time, the
first quarter may well
be revised up as well’
Tesco out of the wilderness
The past year has been tough for the
retail sector. A big structural shift
– the relentless growth of online
shopping – has coincided with a
cyclical downturn caused by the
impact of higher inflation on family
budgets.
Almost 6,000 shops across Britain
closed last year – the lengthiest list
of casualties since the economy was
clawing its way out of recession in
2010.
All of which makes the
performance of Britain’s biggest
retailer, Tesco, impressive. In the
year to February, the company saw
operating profits rise by 28% and
gain market share in food despite
the strong competition from the
discount chains Aldi and Lidl.
The City liked what it saw in the
Tesco numbers yesterday. For a
start, Tesco seems to have recovered
from the time three years ago when
it announced a £6.4bn loss – the
biggest in British high street history.
Secondly, while it is still early days,
investors think the takeover of the
food wholesaler Booker will pay off.
Finally, cost-cutting and greater
efficiency meant profit margins
rose to 3% in the second half of the
year, making a 2019-20 target of
3.5%-4% look achievable, especially
if – as looks likely – falling inflation
and rising wages gradually boost
consumer spending power.
FirstGroup
rejects takeover
approach from
US firm Apollo
Patrick Greenfield
PHOTOGRAPH:
PHILIPPE LOPEZ/
GETTY IMAGES
Air France crippled by strikes Air France
pilots and cabin staff protested outside the
company’s headquarters at Charles de Gaulle
airport, Paris, yesterday in an ongoing pay
dispute. Union members insisted they were
not backing down, as their latest walkout
forced the cancellation of about 30% of the
airline’s flights worldwide. Staff want a 6%
pay rise, after seven years of salary freezes as
the company attempted to stem losses. The
flag-carrier argues that such pay rises would
threaten the turnaround effort.
Bus and rail company FirstGroup has
rejected a takeover approach from the
American private equity group Apollo
Management, the British transport
operator has announced.
After shares rose more than 7% during trading yesterday, amid rumours
of a takeover bid, FirstGroup’s board
issued a statement confirming an initial proposal had been made by Apollo
but had been unanimously rejected,
dismissing it as “opportunistic”.
The Aberdeen-based company,
which runs several well-known travel
operations, including Great Western
Railway, the American Greyhound Bus
brand and First Bus, said the proposal
was “preliminary and highly conditional”. The board said it rebuffed
the approach because it “fundamentally undervalues” FirstGroup and is
“opportunistic in nature”.
“There can be no certainty that any
firm offer will be made nor as to the
terms on which any firm offer might be
made,” the board said in a statement.
Under the UK’s takeover rules,
Apollo has until 9 May to clarify its
intention to make an offer.
FirstGroup was founded in 1995
through a merger of Badgerline and
GRT Bus Group, growing into an international company with several rail and
bus operations in the UK, Ireland,
Canada and the US. The firm now has
around 100,000 employees.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:44 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:45 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Financial
45
▼ Tesco’s operating profit rose by 28%
in the last quarter of its financial year,
its ninth straight quarter of growth
PHOTOGRAPH: GRAEME ROBERTSON/GUARDIAN
Tesco eyes
£2.5bn in
wholesale
business
via Booker
Sarah Butler
Tesco is aiming to grab another £2.5bn
of sales in the UK as it teams up with
wholesaler Booker to sell its products
to independent corner shops, restaurants and cafes.
The UK’s biggest supermarket chain
unveiled the plan as it announced a
28% rise in operating profits, bolstered
by better-than-expected sales growth
in the last three months of its financial year.
The UK’s biggest retailer said it
made a pre-tax profit before exceptional items of £1.64bn in the year to
24 February as total group sales rose
2.8% to £57.5bn. Sales at established
UK and Irish stores rose 2.4% in the
final quarter, slightly ahead of the 2.2%
expected by analysts.
Dave Lewis, Tesco’s chief executive,
said: “This has been another year of
strong progress, with the ninth consecutive quarter of growth. More people
are choosing to shop at Tesco and our
brand is stronger, as customers recognise improvements in both quality
and value.
“We have further improved profitability, with group operating margin
reaching 3% in the second half. We are
generating significant levels of cash
and net debt is down by almost £6bn
over the last three years. All of this
puts us firmly on track to deliver our
medium-term ambitions.”
The update is the first since the
completion of Tesco’s £3.7bn takeover of grocery wholesaler Booker last
Up to 2,000 jobs in jeopardy as Shop Direct closes three warehouses
The owner of the online shopping
brands Very and Littlewoods is to
close three warehouses in Greater
Manchester, putting nearly 2,000
jobs at risk.
Shop Direct will shut sites
in Shaw, Little Hulton and
Chadderton from mid-2020 as part
of plans to move to an automated
warehouse in the east Midlands.
The switch to a robot-led facility
puts the jobs of 1,177 Shop Direct
employees and 815 agency workers
in doubt and reflects similar
decisions by Amazon, Ocado and
John Lewis.
The Usdaw union, which
represents warehouse workers,
said they were “shocked and
devastated” by the planned
closures. Mike Aylward, an Usdaw
divisional officer, said: “The
Regulations to protect millions
more holidays booked online
Rebecca Smithers
Consumer affairs correspondent
British holidaymakers will benefit
from greater protection when booking holidays online, under new rules
that could safeguard millions more
UK package holidays every year when
things goes wrong.
Updated UK Package Travel Regulations, part of an EU directive that
comes into force for holidays booked
from 1 July, aim to make online retailers as responsible for consumer
protection as traditional travel agents.
According to Abta, the travel agents’
trade body, the surge in online booking has created a gap in consumer
protection, with 50% of holidays not
financially protected if a firm fails.
An estimated 45m overseas holidays
are taken each year by Britons, 20m
of which are package holidays with
flights, coach or rail travel and are primarily protected by Abta.
But 3m so-called “flight-plus”
arrangements which have until now
had lesser protection will be brought
into the safety net.
Flight-plus is a booking where a
flight departing the UK and accommodation and/or car hire are booked
at the same time or within a day, but
where the way in which it is sold means
that it is not a package holiday.
According to government figures
UK families spend on average £22.10
per week on package travel abroad
£22.10
Amount spent per week, on
average, by UK families on
package travel overseas
company has been providing
employment for families in the
north-west for many decades
and these sites have different
generations of the same families
working there. The impact of
closures will be huge on hundreds
of families, local businesses and
the local communities.”
Development of the east
Midlands site will start in May. It is
expected to be operational in 2021.
It will be fully automated, which
Shop Direct said would allow it to
respond more quickly to changing
consumer demand.
Approximately 500 jobs will be
created at the site, and during peak
periods Shop Direct expects to
employ 200-300 agency workers.
“For Shop Direct to continue
to meet customer demand,
– over a third of household spending
on recreation and culture.
Internet booking has surged and
last year 83% of Britons booked a holiday online.
The regulations are published the
day after the government launched
its Modernising Consumer Markets
green paper, which seeks to strengthen
enforcement of consumer rights.
“When we book a package holiday we expect it all to go according
to plan, but if a company goes bust it
can ruin more than just the holiday,
leaving people out of pocket or even
stranded,” consumer minister Andrew
Griffiths said.
“These new rules mean that internet explorers can book their holidays
online, secure in the knowledge they
will be compensated in the same way
as someone who booked their holidays
through a travel agent if something
does go wrong.”
“More holiday travel arrangements
will be classified as packages meaning
greater protection for these types of
holiday” said Mark Tanzer, chief executive of Abta.
the business now needs a new,
purpose-built and automated
facility in a central, well-connected
location,” the company said.
The affected employees are
consulting with the group about
the changes and they are being
supported by the Usdaw union.
The retailer is owned by
David and Frederick Barclay, the
billionaire brothers, who also
own the Daily Telegraph and
Sunday Telegraph. “This is a
tough day for the business and
we know how difficult this news
will be to hear for our teams in
Shaw, Little Hulton and Raven
[Mill, Chadderton],” said Derek
Harding, Shop Direct’s interim
chief executive. “However, these
proposals are necessary.”
Sarah Butler and PA
month. Booker’s former chief executive, Charles Wilson, has taken over as
head of Tesco’s UK business.
Lewis said the deal would bring
about cost savings and a potential £2.5bn in extra sales from joint
projects.
Tesco has already begun testing a
mini version of Booker, badged Chef
Central, at one of its supermarkets and
is considering using its home delivery
vans to serve Booker’s clients, which
include restaurants and independent
convenience stores.
Wilson said there were about 100
Tesco locations which could be suitable for Chef Central because there
was no Booker cash-and-carry nearby.
Tesco is also rumoured to be planning
to test a new discount chain or family
wholesaler similar to Costco. Lewis
declined to comment on the rumours.
Tesco is also trying out selling 30
Booker products, such as catering-size
bags of rice, on the shelves of its supermarkets, while Booker is adapting 30
Tesco products, such as ready-made
mash, for wholesale to its thousands
of convenience store clients. The products will be made by Tesco suppliers
but sold under different brand names.
Despite rumours that Lewis might
be tempted to leave Tesco and hand
over the top job to Wilson, he indicated
he planned to stay on. Lewis said he
was “looking forward to [Wilson] and I
and the whole team working together
over the coming years”.
Despite “difficult circumstances”,
which include a tough UK market
and an inquiry by the Serious Fraud
Office into accounting problems dating to 2014, before Lewis took charge,
the Tesco boss said the company was
“slightly ahead of where we thought
we might be at this stage”.
According to the latest market share
data from Kantar Worldpanel, the
UK’s biggest supermarket chain held
a 27.6% share of the market in the first
12 weeks of the year, unchanged from
the same period in 2017.
Lewis pointed to a “really strong”
performance on food, which he said
was the engine of growth. He said
Tesco had gained market share on food
in the UK over the past year as food
sales had risen by nearly 3% in value,
although volumes had risen just 0.7%.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:46 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:47 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 16:23
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:48 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 16:08
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
While some birds plunder the scales
for melody, the house sparrows’ song is
nothing more than an exclamation mark
Journal Country diary Page 7
48
Weather
Thursday 12 April 2018
UK and Ireland Noon today
Forecast
Sunny Mist
Low 7 High 14
Around the UK
London
Fog
1012
9
Sunny intervals
Lows and highs
Precipitation
Air pollution
Tomorrow
9
14 55%
Low
11
55%
Low
11
55%
Low
55%
Low
40%
Low
40%
Low
45%
Low
25%
Low
Manchester
1016
Mostly cloudy
19
Overcast/dull
7
8
12
Sunny showers
Shetland
Inverness
17
Birmingham
Moderate
Edinburgh
Light showers
Low 7 High 15
18
1008
Sunny and heavy showers
Glasgow
Saturday
7
Leeds
Newcastle
ca
12
6
Rain
Sleet
Belfast
Light
snow
12
Snow showers
10
Heavy snow
Moderate
Dublin
York
Liverpool
rpoo
ol
10
5
35C
Birmingham
ming
30
10
Norwich
25
20
Thundery showers
15
15
1
15
1004
L
London
Cardiff
Ca
14
10
X
Dover
5
Temperature,
ºC
0
13
-5
15
-10
Wind speed,
mph
1008
L
H
H
1008
1016 1008
L
1024
1016
Cold front
1016
1024
H
L
L
Warm front
1008
Occluded front
L
1008
Trough
Jet stream
The jet stream
will carry one
storm into
south-eastern
France today
and another low
pressure centre
Average speed, 25,000ft
Direction of
jet stream
8
12
Edinburgh
8
Fiji has been in the firing line of
heightened tropical activity over the
last couple of weeks, with tropical
cyclone Josie providing the first
punch of severe weather early last
week. While it didn’t make direct
landfall, a huge amount of rain fell
across the islands, with estimated
totals in excess of 250mm. This
brought severe flooding, causing at
least two deaths, and nearly 1,200
people were evacuated.
Meanwhile, in the southern states
of the US, the springtime storm
season has awoken. Strong to severe
thunderstorms, and some tornadoes,
affected Texas and Louisiana on
Friday night, with baseball-sized
hailstones, causing power outages.
New Zealand has seen a notable
cold spell in recent days. Christchurch
saw highs of 27C give way to highs of
just 8C over just a few days, compared
to the 17C that is the average high
temperature for this time of year. In
addition, up to 50cm of rain fell over
the mountain passes of the South
Island. Nicholas Lee (MetDesk)
Weatherwatch contributors will take
part in Freak Weather in History
at the British Library on 2 May.
Details at https://www.bl.uk/events/
freak-weather-in-history.
110-159kph
160-209
210-259
Cardiff
Around the world
1032
1000
H
11
World Weatherwatch
L
1000
1008
7
5
The Channel Islands
L
The storm track
will be to the
south on Friday
to Saturday.
There will be a
couple of bands
of showers,
perhaps
thundery.
6
-15
Atlantic front
Low pressure
well south;
damp easterly
flow.
Plymouth
Slight
-20
7
Bristol
Nottingham
tting
tt
Ice
Thundery rain
9
Newcastle
Atlantic Ocean
260 and above
Forecasts and graphics provided by
Accuweather, Inc ©2018
Algiers
18
Lagos
31
Ams’dam
18
Lima
23
Athens
23
Lisbon
13
Auckland
17
Madrid
12
B Aires
19
Malaga
17
Bangkok
35
Melb’rne
27
Barcelona
16
Mexico C
23
Basra
31
Miami
27
Beijing
21
Milan
15
Berlin
22
Mombasa
30
Bermuda
18
Montreal
7
Brussels
18
Moscow
10
Budapest
25
Mumbai
32
C’hagen
11
N Orleans
25
Cairo
32
Nairobi
24
Cape Town
27
New Delhi
33
Chicago
18
New York
16
Corfu
23
Paris
16
Dakar
24
Perth
21
Dhaka
36
Prague
21
Dublin
9
Reykjavik
7
Florence
18
Rio de J
31
Gibraltar
16
Rome
17
H Kong
28
Singapore
32
Harare
20
Stockh’m
8
Helsinki
8
Sydney
32
Istanbul
20
Tel Aviv
23
Jo’burg
16
Tenerife
21
K Lumpur
33
Tokyo
22
K’mandu
25
Vancouv’r
10
Kabul
23
Warsaw
20
Kingston
31
Wash’ton
23
Kolkata
36
Well’ton
15
L Angeles
21
Zurich
18
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:49 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Cricket
Sent at 11/4/2018 17:04
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
Netball
49
Wisden history as England to face
England women’s Jamaica after win
trio earn accolade over New Zealand
Page 53 Page 50 Chris
Coleman’s
‘do-the-opposite’
approach at
Sunderlan
Sunderland
echoes Geo
George
Costanza’
Costanza’s plan
RICHARD SEL
SELLERS/PA;
NBC TV/KOBA
TV/KOBAL/
REX/SHUTTER
REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
bemoans what feels like a lifelong losing streak. “It
became very clear to me sitting out there today,” he tells
Jerry and Elaine, “that every decision I’ve ever made,
in my entire life, has been wrong. My life is the opposite
of everything I want it to be. Every instinct I have, in
every aspect of life, be it something to wear, something
to eat … It’s all been wrong.”
“If every instinct you have is wrong,” reasons Jerry,
not entirely reasonably, “then the opposite would have
to be right.” George duly decides to fight his natural
impulses and see what happens, and is immediately
rewarded when a beautiful woman agrees to a date,
despite the fact he introduced himself to her with the
words: “I’m unemployed and live with my parents.”
As Coleman freely admits, this will basically be
Sunderland’s approach to potential new signings – we’ve
got a wantaway owner and you need to take a guess what
division we’ll be playing in next season.
I
Every loser wins?
Coleman channels
Seinfeld to diagnose
Sunderland but risks
meeting sticky end
Marina Hyde
I
f we had to slap a name on this era in football,
we could do worse than the Rise of the Quants.
These days, there is a widespread belief that
even the mascot needs to have read Moneyball
and not simply be able to critique the movie. The
biggest clubs employ armies of data analysts,
while advanced metrics and tactical analytics
are the adornment of increasing amounts of
commentary. Privately, you might think some of your
friends speak the language of football statistics much as
Andy Gray once spoke the language of Spanish, when he
inquired of a La Manga hotel receptionist: “Eh senoreo,
where’s the fucking taxio?” But like Andy, they certainly
have a go, and forcefully so.
In this occasionally stifling and frequently
deeply boring atmosphere, it’s refreshing to hear
of idiosyncratic tactical approaches. All respect to
Chris Coleman, then, who this week gave the media
a glimpse into his forward planning. “We just need to
look and see what’s happened in the last five years,”
the Sunderland manager explained, “and then do
the opposite.”
Obviously, Coleman was not being completely serious
but there was something cheerily liberated about his
comments. Liberation is what he is aiming for, what with
Sunderland trapped in the Championship relegation
zone. Perhaps Chris will turn out to be a counterculture
hero – football’s equivalent of The Diceman, the
protagonist of Luke Rhinehart’s cult anti-analysis novel,
who makes all his decisions on the throw of a dice.
An even closer analogue to the Sunderland manager’s
“do the opposite” approach exists. There’s a Seinfeld
episode called The Opposite, where George Costanza
t’s not just fictional sitcom characters failing
to give absolute primacy to tactical science,
though – real football people are at it too.
A year or so ago, the Borussia Mönchengladbach
coach Dieter Hecking let daylight in on magic
when he said tactics were important “but you
must not make any secret science out of it”.
Many of the secrets that observers scientifically
divined each week were quite beyond him. “Today there
are even websites, presenting alleged thoughts of us
coaches after the game,” Hecking marvelled. “I have read
them once after a Wolfsburg game. I was wondering:
‘Am I supposed to have come up with these highly
complex things?’”
Soon after, the German FA’s head of coaching
education, Frank Wormuth, declared tactics “overrated”
and less important than the quality of players. Wormuth
compared the fetishisation of modern tactical analysis to
some pretentious art exhibition preview, “where people
are seized by a canvas with colour patches, wondering
what the painter wanted to tell them, and afterwards pay
a lot of money for it. What did the painter want to tell us?
Nothing. Perhaps he had just had a bad day.”
At the England level, we are always encouraged to
believe we have come a long way technically in the
past 25 years or so. At the start of our journey, horrified
documentary viewers were able to watch Graham
Taylor’s tactical plan unfold as he judged a game was
“made for Wrighty”, or bellowed
rhetorically: “Can we not knock it?”
The other
At the end of our journey, we were
day a chap deep in the realms of the FA elite
development director Dan Ashworth’s
wrote
spreadsheets. And yet, looking at
crossly to
England’s last major tournament
me saying exit to Iceland, you could be forgiven
for thinking we had perhaps not
I’d spoiled
journeyed anywhere at all but were
a plot point simply knowing the place for the
first time.
of Return
As for Coleman’s do-the-opposite
of the
dossier, how might it pan out? I’m
Jedi (1983) not sure if one is permitted to run
so-called spoilers to Seinfeld episodes
for him
– the other day a chap wrote crossly
to me saying I’d spoiled a plot point of
Return of the Jedi (1983) for him, because he’d only got
up to Star Wars: A New Hope (1977).
But let’s live dangerously: at the end of The Opposite,
George gets a coveted sporting job of his own,
hired by the New York Yankees. The next episode
opens with him offering batting advice and, though
it’s not explicitly clear this is the continuation of
do-the-opposite policy, George promptly approaches
management with a creatively destructive scheme.
The Yankees, he says, would be advantaged by
switching from playing in polyester uniforms to cotton.
Unfortunately, the cotton kits shrink, the Yankees
end up running like penguins, and … well, spoilers.
A reminder that asking: “What’s the worst that can
happen?” is tempting fate in sport, and we can only
hope Coleman’s convention-bucking goes better.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:50 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 19:41
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
•
Sport
Commonwealth Games
50
cYanmaGentaYellowb
▼ Helen Housby (left) and
Jodie Gibson celebrate the
win against New Zealand
MARTIN RICKETT/PA WIRE
Games
digest
Medals
1
Australia
57
43
45
2
England
25
20
21
3
India
12
4
8
4
South Africa
10
7
9
5
New Zealand
9
10
8
7 Scotland
7
11
14
8 Wales
7
8
8
19 Northern Ireland
1
0
1
Today’s highlights
• Hockey W semi-finals 10am
Olympic champions England v NZ
followed by Australia v India
• Diving M 3m springboard
10.07am Jack Laugher aims for
gold No 2 in the pool
• Athletics M 800m final 1.13pm
Botswana’s Nijel Amos is favourite,
England’s Kyle Langford features
One to watch
ch
Dina
Asher-Smith
Women’s
200m final,
12.38pm
Asher-Smith,
the European
champion,
faces the
Olympic
champion,
Elaine
Thompson,
in a strong
200m final.
Neville to use historic win
as a springboard to gold
Number of the day
8.41m
A Games record in the long jump,
the second set by Luvo Manyonga
on his way to securing gold
Caught on camera
Usain Bolt arrived on the Gold Coast
as the world’s fastest cheerleader,
eight months after his retirement
Weather
27°
Martha Kelner
Gold Coast
Tracey Neville has urged her England
netball team to use the historic victory over New Zealand to spur them
to Commonwealth gold and allow the
veteran Geva Mentor to retire happy,
whenever that may be.
England beat the fast declining New
Zealand, who also lost to Malawi, to
top their group. It is the first time they
have defeated them since netball was
introduced to the Commonwealth
Games in 1998 and it continued their
unbeaten run.
The 54-45 win means they face
Jamaica in the semi-finals on Saturday.
“It was guts and a lot of hard work that
got us through that performance,”
Neville said. The coach paid tribute to
the 33-year-old Mentor, who made her
England debut against New Zealand
in 2001 aged 16 and is widely considered one of the world’s best defenders.
“Geva is so experienced,” Neville said.
“It’s brilliant to have her at the back,
she comes through when we need her.
I always joke she’s not retiring until
she gets a gold medal. You talk about
people starting to dip at the end of their
career, she’s just got better and better.
She’s like a fine wine.”
Mentor, who is from Bournemouth and plays her club netball for
Sunshine Coast Lightning in Australia, said beating New Zealand, the
No 2-ranked team in the world after
Australia, in a major tournament was
a breakthrough, despite the Kiwis’ faltering form.
“It’s important for us to have that
win,” she said. “We’ve done it the past
couple of times but we’ve never done
it in a major tournament. We mean
business and if we want to achieve
it and go all the way into that goldmedal final, we’ve got to beat every
team.
“We knew New Zealand were definitely going to be hurting after that
Gold for Laugher
Jack Laugher completed the
first part of a possible hat-trick
with men’s 1m springboard gold.
The 23-year-old Harrogate diver
dominated to defend the title he
won at Glasgow 2014. Laugher
led throughout to triumph with
a score of 438.00 to take gold
ahead of Australia’s James Connor
(412.45). Laugher was due to
compete in the 3m springboard
today and synchronised
springboard event with Chris
Mears tomorrow. Martha Kelner
loss to Malawi and we knew they’d
have a point to prove. The number
of girls playing in Australia – we have
that experience now. We’re collectively able to pull together as a team.
It’s exciting netball, exciting for the
crowd and for us as a team to be able to
hold off when we know New Zealand
are coming back at us. It’s character
building.”
The woes of England’s track and
field team continued when the highjumper Robbie Grabarz, a bronze medallist at the London Olympics in 2012,
failed with three attempts at 2.21m.
However, Dina Asher-Smith and
Zharnel Hughes qualified comfortably for their respective 200m finals
and have a good chance of restoring
some glory to the team.
Hughes, who is originally from
Anguilla and trains in Jamaica at
Racers Track Club, the former base of
Usain Bolt, looked in imperious form
has he won his semi-final in 20.37sec.
Asher-Smith, Britain’s fastest
woman over 100m and 200m, came
second in her semi-final behind
Jamaica’s Shericka Jackson, who is
also joined in the final by her compatriots Elaine Thompson and Sashalee
Forbes.
“Obviously you want to go and win a
semi-final but I eased off,” Asher-Smith
said. “You can get into a tear-up if you
want to and there was a little thing in
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:51 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 11/4/2018 19:42
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
51
Heart surgery, cold and
no cash fail to kick sand
in England duo’s faces
It has been a hard road for
Chris Gregory and Jake Sheaf,
but now they have a shot at
a beach volleyball medal
Martha Kelner
Gold Coast
T
the back of my mind reminding me it
was a semi-final. I’m really excited. I
ran 22.44 and I feel good so I’m happy
with that.”
The 22-year-old said she was
not feeling any additional pressure
after other established names in the
England team, including Grabarz,
Andrew Pozzi and Sophie Hitchon,
failed to deliver in recent days.
“I don’t pay attention to what’s happening outside the bubble,” she said,
“so I don’t know what’s been said. But
we all want to come out here and do
well and we all want each other to do
well. We are a team so there’s no individual pressure.”
In News
BBC presenter
takes a dip during
live interview
Page 29 he white sands and
turquoise waters of
Coolangatta on the
southernmost tip of the
Gold Coast are a long
way from the ice-cold
hangar at a Dorset school where
Chris Gregory and Jake Sheaf usually
play their beach volleyball.
The pair have overcome severe
financial strain, heart surgery and
the freezing conditions of their
training base but they are not in
Australia to enjoy the weather, much
as they might.
Winning the bronze medal today
against the New Zealand brothers
Ben and Sam O’Dea would not only
be the biggest victory of their career,
it could prompt a meaningful change
to the sport’s future in Britain.
Beach volleyball is making its
Commonwealth Games debut in
Australia. When the next Games are
held in Birmingham in 2022 there are
13 sports guaranteed a place, with
beach volleyball among another
13 sports fighting for the four
remaining spots.
While Birmingham may not have
such a stunning backdrop as the
Gold Coast, London 2012 proved
volleyball can draw the crowds on
home shores, proving one of the hits
of the Olympics when it was played
on Horse Guards Parade. Gregory
and Sheaf know an English medal
could prompt Birmingham 2022
organisers, who decide which sports
to include, to look kindly on beach
volleyball.
“I’m obviously biased,” Gregory
said, “but the atmosphere, venue,
crowd and everything they
do around beach volleyball is
incredible and it would only be an
asset to a Commonwealth Games
at home, so I hope we can keep it
in. A medal for us would go a long
way to convincing them. It was our
goal coming here to give ourselves a
chance to win a medal and we have
done that. Of course it’s not gold
but it’s always good to look at the
positives.”
Their semi-final was the Ashes
on sand as the third seeds faced
Australia, with the home nation
ranked No 1. England won the first
point but it was the only time they
were ahead. Gregory, who at 6ft
9in is the tallest member of Team
England, made several excellent
blocks but Australia won the first set
21-13. Dancers dressed as lifeguards
Chris Gregory and Jake Sheaf take
on Australia in the semi-final
MIKE FREY/BPI/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
▲ The impressive beach volleyball
arena at Coolangatta
provided the entertainment
between sets as Feeling Hot Hot Hot
by the Merrymen blared around the
arena but it did little to inspire an
comeback. England called a timeout at 18-12 down in the second set
and it briefly revived them as they
got back to 18-15 but Australia’s class
showed.
“We wanted to do better,” Gregory
said. “It’s been really tough just
getting here. We’ve had a lot of ups
and downs on and off the court
but we knew we were going to face
them.”
To say they have faced obstacles
on the route to the Gold Coast would
be an understatement. Gregory was
identified as part of the Sporting
Giants programme, a nationwide
talent search that began in 2007 with
‘There was a risk I’d
need a pacemaker,
which would have
meant no sport
but it all went well’
the London Olympics in mind. It
counts the world champion rowers
Helen Glover and Vicky Thornley
among its alumni. Gregory did not
make it to a home games but the
scheme encouraged him to address
an irregular heartbeat.
“I kept having these episodes,”
he has said. “During matches or
training I’d get this fast heartbeat. I
was aware but left it for a while but
they kept getting worse. Eventually,
they diagnosed it as supraventricular
tachycardia.”
H
e had heart surgery at
Kings College hospital
in London. “It was
four hours on the
operating table,” he
said. “I was awake the
whole time. There was a risk I’d need
a pacemaker and that would have
meant no sport at all but thankfully
it went well.”
While many athletes in Team
England have a comfortable
existence on UK Sport funding,
Gregory and Sheaf have had to use
industry and imagination, funding
themselves for most of the last fouryear cycle.
Their rise up the world rankings,
from outside the top 300 to 65th in
the world by last March was enough
to secure £40,000 of Sport England
funding, which allowed them to
compete internationally for the last
year. For most of the year the duo,
both 28, practise inside what is little
more than a shed in the grounds of
a school in Bournemouth, enduring
freezing cold in the winter, a huge
contrast to the Gold Coast heat.
“This is an incredible arena,”
Gregory said after the semi-final,
“by far the best we’ve ever played in.
We’re disappointed not to be in the
final but it’s always good to reflect
on what you’ve achieved and it’s not
over yet.”
▲ Weightlifter Olivier Matam Matam
is in the awol Cameroon contingent
Police on the
lookout after
five athletes
go missing
Ben Doherty
Five Cameroon athletes have
been reported missing from the
Commonwealth Games athletes’
village and it is suspected they have
fled with the intention of not returning home.
The weightlifter Olivier Matam
Matam and the boxers Christian Ndzie
Tsoye and Simplice Fotsala have been
missing since earlier this week, while
the weightlifters Arcangeline Fouodji
Sonkbou and Petit Minkoumba went
awol on Tuesday. All had finished
their events except Tsoye, who failed
to show up at the weigh-in for his 91kg
quarter-final bout, granting his opponent a walk-over. Queensland police
have been notified of the athletes’
disappearance.
Victor Agbor Nso, the team manager, told Cameroon’s state broadcaster it was unfortunate for the
country’s image. “We have officially
informed our hierarchy back home:
the ministry of sports and the president of the national Olympic committee of Cameroon. We have also made
a formal complaint to the Australian
police,” he said.
The Queensland Commonwealth
Games minister, Kate Jones, said the
police were “keeping a watching brief
on these athletes”. She added: “When
athletes come to Australia to compete
we expect them to front up on the field
and compete, so we are disappointed
about that.”
Before the Games began, the home
affairs minister, Peter Dutton, warned
athletes would be closely monitored
to ensure they did not overstay their
visas and that they returned home
after competition ended.
“Our message to the 0.5% of people
who might think they can overstay a
visa, or not act within the conditions
of that visa, is that Australia has very
tough laws and they need to abide by
the laws,” he said in January.
Francophone Cameroon, in central Africa, faces entrenched development challenges and widespread
poverty. In recent months 15,000
anglophone separatists have been
forced over the border into Nigeria,
as the result of a crackdown on the
campaign for an independent state
of Ambazonia.
Athletes from Cameroon have fled
from events before. Following the 2012
London Olympics, 21 athletes were
reported missing, including seven
from Cameroon.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:52 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 18:24
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
•
52
Sport
Cricket County Championship Division One
Onions arrival
can drive title
tilt for Lancs
In
n our county countdown
Ali Martin looks at
Division One, where
Lancashire
ancashire have recruited
well while Essex and Surrey
present
resent strong challenges
Essex
Hampshire
After last summer’s title success,
England came knocking for the
head coach, Chris Silverwood, to
fill their bowling coach vacancy.
Thus Anthony McGrath has stepped
up from number two, with the
popular Dimi Mascarenhas joining
the staff. On the field they bring
in Peter Siddle for early overseas
duties, before Neil Wagner returns
to send them down from mid-May.
Matt Coles, from Kent, is their
other significant addition. A blend
of experience and youth suggests
another challenge, especially if
Simon Harmer and Jamie Porter pick
up where they left off.
Starting like a train last summer
before grinding to a halt, Hampshire
have since bolstered their batting by
drafting in Hashim Amla () as their
early overseas player and winning
the race to sign Sam Northeast from
Kent. The latter appears primed
for the step up to Division One and
is freed from captaincy duties, so
if runs flow then England chatter
may well follow. Dale Steyn is due
for a two-match stint in June and a
possible return later in the season
but much depends on his fitness.
Reece Topley will be white-ball
only and Mason Crane is out for two
months.
Lancashire
Nottinghamshire
Somerset
Durham were raided over the winter,
with Keaton Jennings and Graham
Onions () bolstering a side that
surpassed expectations last summer
and appear to be shaping up for a
title challenge. Onions replaces Kyle
Jarvis, who has given up Kolpak
status to return to Zimbabwe, but
Shiv Chanderpaul returns in this
capacity, aged 43, after averaging 51
last season. Liam Livingstone steps
up as captain although he will be
pushing for a Test place, while the
experienced Australian seamer Joe
Mennie arrives as overseas player.
Haseeb Hameed, Alex Davies and
Saqib Mahmood are due strong
seasons.
Notts’ return to the top flight comes
after a golden summer in which
they lifted both white-ball trophies.
The previous two times promotion
has been achieved the title has
followed but consolidation would be
fine given the retirements of Chris
Read and Michael Lumb, and Alex
Hales going limited-overs only. In
come the veteran Chris Nash from
Sussex and Ross Taylor as the early
overseas player. Tom Moores gets
his chance with the gloves while
Steven Mullaney steps up as captain.
A long-term injury to Paul Coughlin,
after the all-rounder signed from
Durham, is a blow but Jake Ball ()
returns from the Ashes with a point
to prove.
Last summer’s great escape followed
a title challenge the previous year,
so which way Somerset go this time
around is tricky to gauge, especially
as they are under new management.
The pitch at Taunton – aka Ciderabad –
will likely continue to be a strong asset,
although how much they see of Jack
Leach () will now hinge on England’s
requirements. Jamie Overton’s return
from injury and his twin Craig’s confidence from international honours are
plusses, although Cameron Bancroft
has seen his overseas deal scrapped
for his role in the Australian ball-tampering scandal. Tom Abell just about
survived his first year as captain and
should be better for it.
Captain Ryan ten Doeschate
Coach Anthony McGrath
Last season:
County Championship first
Royal London Cup semi-finals
T20 Blast eighth in South Group
Championship prediction second
Ryan ten Doeschate led
Essex last year to their
first Championship
triumph since 1992
Captain Liam Livingstone
Coach Glen Chapple
Last season:
County Championship second
Royal London Cup fourth
T20 Blast seventh in North Group
Championship prediction first
Captain James Vince
Coach Craig White
Last season:
County Championship fifth
Royal London Cup sixth in South Group
T20 Blast semi-finals
Championship prediction sixth
Captain Steven Mullaney
Coach Peter Moores
Last season:
County Championship second in Division Two
Royal London Cup winners
T20 Blast winners
Championship prediction fifth
Surrey
Worcestershire
Yorkshire
Rory Burns replaces Gareth Batty as
captain and could push for England
honours if the opener adds more
centuries to his already consistent
returns. Kumar Sangakkara’s
departure leaves a 1,491-run hole
to fill – Virat Kohli may possibly fill
this for three matches – while their
overseas deal for Mitchell Marsh has
been scuppered by ankle surgery.
Tom Curran has gone to the IPL but a
reinforcement comes in the shape of
Morne Morkel, signed on a two-year
Kolpak deal. Vikram Solanki, Ryan
Sidebottom and Chris Taylor have all
joined the coaching staff.
The Pears are newly promoted but
under new management, with the
Steve Rhodes era now ended. In
come Kevin Sharp and the former
New Road favourite Alan Richardson
to run the show. Steve Magoffin has
arrived from Sussex to take the new
ball (citing the latter as inspiration),
while a fellow Australian, Travis
Head, is their overseas player.
Otherwise it is over to homegrown
talent again, with Daryl Mitchell
looking to replicate last year’s
four-figure summer and Joe Clarke
getting a chance to nudge the
England selectors in Division One.
Two away games to begin with are
handy given the latest flooding to hit
New Road.
Geoffrey Boycott has already
pooh-poohed the appointment of
a sports psychologist to address
falling returns from the batsmen
in first-class cricket last year. But
the diagnosis is at least accurate,
with Gary Ballance’s () average
of 67 some 30 runs higher than
the next best. Two old favourites
return to share overseas duties, with
Cheteshwar Pujara – Steve to his
team-mates – signed up until June
and Kane Williamson thereafter. To
the annoyance of those in charge,
David Willey and Liam Plunkett
have been lost to the IPL at the 11th
hour, while Adil Rashid has signed a
white-ball only deal.
Captains Rory Burns and Jade Dernbach (T20)
Coach Michael Di Venuto
Last season:
County Championship third
Royal London Cup runner-up
T20 Blast quarter-finals
Championship prediction third
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Captain Joe Leach
Coach Kevin Sharp
Last season:
County Championship first in Division Two
Royal London Cup semi-finals
T20 Blast eighth in North Group
Championship prediction eighth
Captain Gary Ballance
Coach Andrew Gale
Last season:
County Championship fourth
Royal London Cup quarter-finals
T20 Blast fifth in North Group
Championship prediction fourth
Captains Tom Abell and Lewis Gregory (T20)
Coach Jason Kerr
Last season:
County Championship sixth
Royal London Cup quarter-finals
T20 Blast quarter-finals
Championship prediction seventh
One day to go
The County Championship begins
at 11am tomorrow, with all three
Division One games at Test grounds.
Essex open the defence of their title
against Yorkshire at Headingley,
Lancashire host Nottinghamshire
at Old Trafford and Hampshire face
newly promoted Worcestershire
at the Ageas Bowl. It is the second
season of the eight-team top
division (with 10 in Division Two)
but Essex beware – Middlesex were
relegated last season, a year after
being crowned champions. The
Championship will take centre stage
until 24 May – the first day of the first
Test against Pakistan, at Lord’s.
Online tomorrow
Tanya Aldred kicks off the season
on the original county cricket blog
theguardian.com/sport
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:53 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 19:30
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Sport
Cricket
53
World Cup-winning women take
pride of place in Wisden awards
Ali Martin
Women make up the majority of
Wisden’s cricketers of the year for the
first time in the award’s history, with
three World Cup winners – Heather
Knight, Anya Shrubsole and Nat Sciver
– in the famous five for 2018.
Only twice before have female
cricketers been among the list of
leading players from the previous
English summer. Claire Taylor broke
new ground in 2009 and Charlotte
Edwards followed five years later. But
that heady day last July, when Knight
lifted the trophy at a packed Lord’s,
has opened the floodgates.
Making up the quintet are Jamie
Porter, whose 75 wickets propelled
Essex to their first County Championship title since 1992, and Shai
Hope, scorer of twin hundreds as an
unheralded West Indies side pulled off
a shock five-wicket victory over England in the second Test at Headingley.
Indeed, it is the first time since
2002 that no current England men’s
international has made the list. The
130-year-old award can be won only
once in a career, of course, although
it is perhaps Tammy Beaumont, leading scorer and player of the women’s
World Cup, whose case was strongest
among those to miss out.
Describing Knight’s achievement
as “the culmination of a personal tour
de force that helped change women’s
cricket for ever”, Wisden’s editor, Lawrence Booth, noted the 27-year-old’s
captaincy during a campaign in which
she scored 364 runs at an average of 45,
including a century against Pakistan.
It is Shrubsole who is on the cover
of the 155th edition, however, after the
▲ The England medium-pacer Anya
Shrubsole on the cover of Wisden 2018
seamer lit up a Lord’s final that had
been slipping away from the home side
with a spell of five for 11, in figures of
six for 46, that derailed India’s chase of
229 and, according to Booth, secured
“national hero status”.
The 26-year-old told ecb.co.uk:
“Hopefully this paves the way and
there will be many, many women’s
cricketers to receive this accolade in
the future. We’ve had an amazing 12
months, and it’s something that all of
us will never forget.”
Sciver, meanwhile, is credited with
producing the most memorable shot of
2017 – the deliberate clip between her
legs that was dubbed “The Natmeg”
in some quarters – but is described as
“more than a one-trick pony”, given
her 346 runs in the tournament and
figures of three for three with the ball
against West Indies.
New to Wisden this year is the introduction of an award for the leading
Twenty20 cricketer in the world. It is
another sign of the times, too, both
in terms of the format’s recognition,
some 15 years on from its inception,
and the nationality of the winner:
Afghanistan’s leg-spin sensation,
Rashid Khan.
The 19-year-old is one of the most
in-demand Twenty20 cricketers on the
circuit – Wisden describes his googly as
“one of the most dangerous deliveries
in the world game” – with 80 wickets
in 2017 at 14 apiece.
This short-format award complements the existing men’s and women’s
leading cricketer in the world categories, which this year are India’s two
captains: Virat Kohli and Mithali Raj.
Their sides lost their respective global
finals – the Champions Trophy and the
Women’s World Cup – but they enjoyed
stellar returns personally.
For Kohli it is the second year in succession he has topped the lot, with his
2,818 runs across all formats more than
700 ahead of Joe Root in second place.
Raj, meanwhile, surpassed Edwards
as the all-time leading run scorer in
women’s ODIs and scored a record
seven successive half-centuries.
Elsewhere in Wisden, which is published today, Booth uses his notes to
warn the England and Wales Cricket
Board not to take the Ashes for granted
after the winter’s 4-0 defeat in Australia amid a record run of 13 away
Tests without a victory for the national
team.
6-46
Racing
O’Connor the jockey to follow on
board Balnaslow in Foxhunters’
Greg Wood
The Grand National meeting at Aintree
will open today with four consecutive
Grade One races and several of the
sport’s best chasers and hurdlers in
action, but it is the fifth event on the
card – a hunter chase – that may be
studied most closely by the punters
ahead of the biggest betting race of the
year on Saturday.
The word ‘heavy’ no longer appears
in the going description for the Grand
National course after a dry night and
the track was “quietly drying out”
yesterday according to Andrew
Tulloch, Aintree’s clerk of the course.
How quietly should become apparent
when 22 runners are due to go to post
for the Foxhunters’ Chase a few hours
after the final declarations are made
for the National itself.
A slow-motion finish will be
taken as final confirmation that the
National on Saturday will be the most
demanding test since the famous
fences were modified with plastic
cores before the 2013 renewal. “It’s
Anya Shrubsole
India were 191-3 as they chased
229 before Shrubsole took 5-11
to swing the momentum to
England. She finished with
record World Cup final figures
still a bit soggy down at the Canal
Turn,” Tulloch said yesterday. “That’s
always the wettest bit on the course. It
should be mainly dry on Thursday. The
forecast [is] drizzle overnight tonight
and Thursday into Friday with possible
showers on Friday and Saturday, but
being showers, we may miss one or we
might get one.”
Today’s Foxhunters’ seems sure to
be a fierce examination both for the
horses and their amateur riders, and
one in which the huge experience
of Derek O’Connor could prove vital
aboard Balnaslow (4.05).
O’Connor is an amateur jockey in
name only, as his winning ride on
Edwulf in this season’s Irish Gold Cup
demonstrated. He has completed the
course on all three of his previous starts
in this race, finishing runner-up twice
including a one-and-three-quarter
length defeat on his mount 12 months
DAVE THOMPSON/IDI VIA GETTY IMAGES
Heather Knight
Scored 364 runs at an
average of 45 as she
captained England to the
World Cup, including a
century against Pakistan
HARRY TRUMP/IDI VIA GETTY IMAGES
HARRY TRUMP/IDI VIA GETTY IMAGES
Anya
Shrubsole’s
figures in the
World Cup
final against
India at Lord’s
Nat Sciver
Scored 369 runs at 46.12 and
took seven wickets during the
tournament. Those runs included
129 against New Zealand and a
career-best 137 against Pakistan
ago, and has an obvious chance to
finally add the “amateurs’ National”
on his record.
The only disappointment after the
Cheltenham Gold Cup last month
was that the extended duel between
Native River and Might Bite had to
have a loser. The two horses staged a
magnificent spectacle as they fought
out a private battle from the off, and
Greg Wood’s tips
Aintree 1.45 Cyrname (nb) 2.20 Malaya 2.50 Might Bite
3.25 Supasundae 4.05 Balnaslow 4.40 Theinval (nap)
5.15 Dissavril
Southwell 1.55 Gleaming Sun 2.30 Raaqyah
3.00 Jabbarockie 3.35 Tricky Dicky 4.15 Kingstreet
Lady 4.50 Amadeus 5.25 Dream Ally
Taunton 2.10 Zoltan Varga 2.40 Dentley De Mee
3.15 Robert’s Star 3.55 Le Coeur Net 4.30 Risk And Roll
5.05 Fly West 5.35 Mark’s Folly
Chelmsford 5.45 Harperelle 6.15 Clear Water
6.45 Commander Han 7.15 Maratha 7.45 Zac Brown
8.15 Strictly Carter 8.45 Global Style
with Native River in summer quarters Might Bite (2.50) should have a
straightforward path to victory in the
opening day’s feature chase, the Grade
One Betway Bowl.
Nicky Henderson, Might Bite’s
trainer, is all but certain to retain
his title as champion trainer and he
has several more runners with clear
chances in the day’s remaining Grade
One events. His perennial rival Paul
Nicholls has several live runners on the
card too, however, and both Cyrname
(1.45), in the Manifesto Novice Chase
and Malaya (2.20) in the Anniversary
Juvenile Hurdle have realistic
opportunities to give their trainer his
first Grade One success of 2018.
The gamble on Katie Walsh’s mount
Baie Des Iles for the Grand National
continued yesterday, and the grey
is now top-priced at 16-1 (from 20-1)
having been available at 66-1 last week.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:54 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 18:13
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
•
54
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Sport
Football
‘We played on dirt
tracks, with rocks either
side as our goalposts’
It has been a long road from
Tunisia to Stevenage for Dino
Maamria, started by meeting
a holidaying Burnley scout
Ben Fisher
A
lmost three weeks into
the job, Dino Maamria
is at ease, sat in his
manager’s office at
Stevenage’s training
ground, charting his
ambitions for a club close to his
heart and telling his fascinating
story. It is tale of determination,
how, as a teenager from Gafsa, in
south-west Tunisia, on the edge of
the Sahara desert, he realised his
dream of becoming a footballer, and
now, having earned his stripes in the
non-league game, he is carving out a
reputation as a manager.
A gregarious character, Maamria,
a former striker for Stevenage
and the former assistant manager
under Graham Westley, makes
compelling company over an hour’s
conversation, much of which
revolves around his unorthodox
journey to England, including how
Brian Miller, the former Burnley
scout on holiday at the time, offered
him a two-week trial after spotting
him playing against Étoile Sportive
du Sahel, a team from Sousse, a
tourist resort in the north.
Maamria was playing for La
Marsa, near Tunis, on the back of
another trial, afforded to him after a
lorry driver parking up overnight at
the nearby wheat factory scribbled
his name on the back of a matchstick
box. “I was playing, bare feet as
a 15- or 16-year-old. Somebody
approached me and said: ‘Can I have
your name please?’” He has not
looked back since arriving at Turf
Moor 23 years ago.
Dino Maamria had
three spells as a
Stevenage player
“From a very young age, I wanted
to be a footballer,” he says. “My
teacher would have a go at me for
saying that because they thought
I should be a doctor or something.
When I told people I was going to
be a footballer, they laughed. I get
it, those people who said I had no
chance, because at that time there
was no chance to go from the desert
to the city – to be at one of the top
clubs, it was impossible.”
The youngest of seven siblings,
his upbringing was tough (they
would run the 20-mile round trip
to school) – but one of which he is
proud. “I came from a very poor
background, I was born in a tent …
but there is no shame in that. I lived
in a tent until I was four, so that tells
you where I have come from. We
used to share a bed, my brothers and
me, we would top and tail. Yes, I was
poor but I loved it and I wouldn’t
swap it for the world.
“I lived in a tent with a couple of
goats, and one of them I used to call
Gary, because of Gary Lineker. It is
normal to have goats or camels in the
south of Tunisia, where it’s very dry
and they can survive the heat and go
without drinking for days. We would
use the goat’s milk for breakfast. Leo
now, my little boy, I tell him about
the story and he always says: ‘Daddy
I want a goat for my birthday.’ I take
him and my daughter, Maya, home
every year to see my family and all
the rest of it.”
His late father, Youssef, worked in
the phosphate mines – “a dangerous
job that did not pay a lot” – but it was
a conversation between his mother,
Zara, and a neighbour, a couple
of weeks before his baccalaureate
exams, that spurred him. “They
asked: ‘Why is he not studying
and revising like everybody else?’
My mum said: ‘He is going to be a
footballer.’ My neighbour laughed at
her, I always remember that and that
gave me that drive.”
Maamria has always been
captivated by football, inspired
since he was a seven-year-old
hearing history on the radio from
the 1978 World Cup, Tunisia’s first
finals. His bold smile broadens as he
rattles off their results with pride,
particularly that 0-0 draw with
West Germany. “We played on dirt
tracks, wherever we could, with
rocks either side – that was our goals.
Tunisia is a third-world country but
we are obsessed with football. North
Africa is mad about football: Tunisia,
Algeria, Morocco and Egypt, there is
a big rivalry. Growing up, they were
big games. It’s good; Tunisia have
got England, 18 June … I am ready
for that already.”
But who will he support? “I’m
quite torn,” he says. “In 1998,
I wanted Tunisia to win [when
England won a group game 2-0] but I
had only been here three years and it
‘I’m torn about who
to support. In 1998
I wanted Tunisia
to win but I am
almost English now’
▲ Dino Maamria
was previously
assistant
manager at
Stevenage and
left Nuneaton
to take the top
job last month
GRAEME ROBERTSON/
THE GUARDIAN
was still quite fresh then, and some
of the players were my friends. But
this time, I know the English setup,
I know Gareth Southgate and I have
been around the England camp a bit.
I definitely want England to win the
World Cup, that’s for sure. Tunisia
can’t, they won’t. I am very proud
to be in England since ’95 and I am
almost English now.”
M
aamria is adamant
he is more famous
in the UK than in
his homeland and
admits that, while
he has embraced
the culture, England has “looked
after” him, he says with sincerity.
“I remember the first time I came to
Burnley,” Maamria says, breaking
into laughter. “Back then in England;
if you go for a drink, you go to a pub.
In Tunisia there is a coffee culture
but in Burnley everywhere was shut
at 5pm. I was like: ‘What is going on
here, it is 5pm, and for us it is just the
start of the evening.’ So, I had to go
to the pub to have a cup of coffee and
people were looking at me funny.”
A thirst to learn meant Maamria
started his coaching badges in his
mid-20s while out with a broken
leg at Burnley. He worked with Jay
Rodriguez and Richard Chaplow,
all the time improving his language
skills. After Northwich Victoria,
Southport and Nuneaton Town –
whom he left to return to Stevenage
last month – Maamria is relishing
his fourth manager’s job and the
task at hand at a club 15th in League
Two. “I am quite proud because I am
probably the first African and the
first Muslim to be a manager in the
Football League. I am proud of that,
but I am not going to sit on that, I
want to kick on as well.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:55 Edition Date:180412 Edition:03 Zone:
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 11/4/2018 23:57
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•••
Sport
Football Sky Bet Championship
55
▼ Wolves’ Rúben Neves
celebrates after scoring
with a stunning volley
MATT WEST/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Europa League
Wolves
nearly
up after
Neves’
stunner
Wolves
Wenger urges
Arsenal to
heed warning
from Rome
Stuart James
in Moscow
2
Jota 6, Neves 51
Derby
0
Peter Lansley
Molineux
If this is the game that moves Wolves
to within touching distance of the
Championship title, then it will also
be remembered as the night Rúben
Neves scored a goal worthy of any
champions.
The Portugal playmaker volleyed
his latest majestic strike into the
top corner from 30 yards as Nuno
Espírito Santo’s team moved to within
one result of a return to the Premier
League.
Wolves will seal promotion if
they beat Birmingham at home on
Sunday lunchtime, or the evening
before should Fulham falter against
Brentford. Moving on to 92 points,
they have already gained their record
haul at this level and, 11 points clear,
could also be anointed champions on
Sunday.
Derby’s promotion plans have for
some time been restricted to holding
on to their play-off berth and, even
after successive victories before last
night, they are not bankers in fifth
place.
Neves converted a brilliant free-kick
to secure victory at Cardiff last Friday
and has scored six long-range goals
this season. Signed for £15.6m from
Porto last summer, the 21-year-old
midfielder has lived up to his billing
and Gary Rowett believes he belongs
Financial fair play
PSG may face
sanctions over
Qatari deals
David Conn
Uefa has informed Qatar-owned Paris
Saint-Germain they may face sanctions for breaches of financial fair play
rules, relating to huge deals with Qatari
sponsors which a preliminary investigation has found to be excessive.
The deals, in particular a sponsorship by the Qatar Tourism Authority
thought to be paying €120m annually,
have been assessed for Uefa by an
independent marketing consultancy
not only in the Premier League but at
the top end of it.
“That’s almost the first time I’ve
applauded an opposition goal,” the
Derby manager said. “It’s Champions
League stuff, not just Championship.
He’s a Champions League player.
Race for Premier League
Championship endgame
Wolves
Fulham
Cardiff
Aston Villa
P
42
42
41
42
W
28
23
24
22
D L
8 6
12 7
8 9
10 10
F
76
72
62
66
A
36
41
35
40
GD
+40
+31
+27
+26
Pts
92
81
80
76
Remaining fixtures
Wolves
Sun Birmingham h
21 Apr
Bolton a
28 Apr Sheff Wed h
6 May Sunderland a
Fulham
Sat
Brentford h
20 Apr
Millwall a
27 Apr Sunderland h
6 May Birmingham a
Cardiff
Sat
21 Apr
24 Apr
28 Apr
6 May
Aston Villa
Friday
Leeds h
21 Apr
Ipswich a
28 Apr
Derby h
6 May
Millwall a
Norwich a
N Forest h
Derby a
Hull a
Reading h
as far above genuine commercial “fair
value”.
The formal investigation into PSG’s
finances was begun following last
summer’s transfer window in which
the club spent £198m signing Neymar,
followed by a loan deal with an option
to sign the French forward Kylian
Mbappé, valued at £167m.
Javier Tebas, the president of
La Liga, accused PSG of financial
doping and “peeing in the swimming pool” and promised to formally
complain to Uefa. Tebas also accused
Manchester City, owned by Sheikh
Mansour of Abu Dhabi’s ruling family,
of similarly receiving excessive money
from Abu Dhabi sponsorships. City,
though, did not face an accelerated
investigation.
PSG, bought by Qatar Sports Investments in 2011, announced their first
deal with the Qatar Tourism Authority
shortly before its accounts were
That’s what you get when you spend
nearly £16m. At 21, when you play with
that much control … For me, he should
be playing for one of the top-four clubs
in the country. They’re like a Premier
League side but our season’s not
going to be defined by games against
Wolves.”
Wolves’ home form has been almost
serenely consistent all season. They
have lost once in 21 league matches
at Molineux and will be relishing
Sunday’s derby.
“We are close,” Nuno said. “We have
to play on Sunday. Nothing changes,
nothing changes. We have to prepare
well. The game on Sunday means a lot
to our fans, to us. We have to be very
cautious.
“I was very pleased. We are fortunate to have this talent [Neves]. We
still have a long way to go and Rúben
knows he has a lot to work on and
improve. Now I’m boring because I’ll
go home and you know what I’m going
to do? Watch the game again.”
Wolves set about Derby with
panache and were ahead within six
minutes. Diogo Jota timed his run
perfectly to latch on to Willy Boly’s
angled lofted pass and get beyond the
backline. Even then he had his back to
goal but the Portuguese winger took
the ball down with one touch, turned
and calmly lifted it over Scott Carson.
Neves dispatched two wonderful
strikes that Carson could only parry
during the first half but there was no
stopping the goal that arrived on the
day Wolves closed the voting for their
goal of the season competition.
When Barry Douglas’s corner was
cleared by Chris Baird, Neves appeared
to miscontrol the ball for a moment.
But perhaps he was just teeing himself
up. For his next touch was a right-foot
volley from 30 yards that flew into the
top corner. It was a remarkable goal
from a remarkable player.
assessed by Uefa last time. Following
an investigation in 2014, Uefa’s club
financial control body (CFCB) agreed a
settlement with sanctions against PSG,
having determined the fair value of the
QTA sponsorship was “significantly
below that submitted by the club”.
This time the CFCB’s “investigatory
chamber” commissioned a prominent
independent marketing company,
Octagon, to value the current QTA
deal.
Octagon are understood to have
assessed the deal’s benefit to the QTA
is very much less than the money the
QTA is paying PSG. So PSG faces sanctions and Uefa a very public test of its
robustness in applying its FFP rules.
The club are understood to have
commissioned their own independent valuation, and to be arguing the
sponsorships are fair value, given the
increased profile generated by the
Neymar and Mbappé signings.
Race for the Golden Boot
Wolves
3-4-3
Ruddy; Bennett•,
Coady, Boly; Doherty,
Saiss, Neves, Douglas;
Cavaleiro
(Gibbs-White 82),
Afobe (Costa 66),
Jota (Bonatini 73)
Subs not used
Norris, N’Diaye,
Batth, Hause
Derby
4-2-3-1
Carson; Wisdom,
Pearce, Davies, Baird;
Huddlestone, Ledley
(Palmer 73); Weimann,
Vydra (Hanson 85),
Lawrence; Nugent
(Jerome 82)
Subs not used
Roos, Forsyth,
Keogh, Thomas
Referee Tim Robinson Attendance 28,503
Kane handed Stoke
goal to boost tally
Harry Kane has been handed a boost
in his bid for a third successive
Premier League Golden Boot after
being awarded Tottenham’s second
goal at Stoke. The goal was given
to Christian Eriksen but after Spurs
appealed to the Premier League’s
goal accreditation appeals panel
the decision was overturned and
Kane’s tally now stands at 25, four
behind the leading scorer Mohamed
Salah. The decision also means
Kane’s overall total is 36, the most
prolific season of his career. Kane
was adamant he got a touch on
Eriksen’s wicked free-kick at Stoke,
which turned out to be the decisive
moment in a 2-1 win. Agencies
With Roma’s extraordinary comeback
against Barcelona fresh in the mind,
Arsène Wenger said there will be
no complacency among his Arsenal
players as they take on CSKA Moscow
with a healthy 4-1 lead from the first
leg and desperate to reach their first
European semi-final in nine years.
Wenger described the remarkable
events in the Stadio Olimpico on Tuesday, where Roma won 3-0 to go through
on away goals, as a “good warning” for
Arsenal, who are in exactly the same
position as Barcelona were in before
the second leg and determined to
avoid similar ignominy.
With the Europa League now the
priority for Arsenal by virtue of the fact
that winning the trophy is their only
realistic chance of qualifying for the
Champions League, Wenger will not
take any chances in Moscow and is set
to recall six players who were rested
for the 3-2 win against Southampton
on Sunday, even though his team are
in a commanding position.
“The best way to build on the
advantage is to try to win the game,
so we will play with our best possible
team and have a positive attitude,” said
the Arsenal manager, who revealed
Granit Xhaka will be absent with flu.
“We are in a position where I don’t
think we are under threat of complacency. It is an important target for us
to go as far as possible [in the competition]. Tuesday night [in Rome] may be
a good warning for us but let us not go
overboard as well. We are in a strong
position and it is how we approach the
game that will be vital.”
Arsenal’s season will be defined by
what happens in the Europa League.
Asked whether his own future depends
on success in the competition, Wenger
said: “The Europa League is important
for us, everyone knows that.”
CSKA Moscow (3-1-4-2, probable) Akinfeev;
V Berezutski, Ignashevich, A Berezutski; Natkho;
Nababkin, Dzagoev, Golovin, Kuchayev; Musa,
Wernbloom.
Arsenal (4-2-3-1, probable) Cech; Bellerín, Koscielny,
Mustafi, Monreal; Ramsey, Elneny; Özil, Wilshere,
Welbeck; Lacazette.
Referee Felix Zwayer (Ger). TV BT Sport 2, 8.05pm.
▲ Arsène Wenger: ‘I don’t think we
are under threat of complacency’
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:56 Edition Date:180412 Edition:03 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 23:41
•••
56
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
Sport
Football Champions League
Klopp effect makes him more
than a Liverpool cheerleader
Manager has turned his side
into Champions League’s
highest scorers while also
able to keep top teams at bay
Andy Hunter
T
he Liverpool dressing
room was a predictably
emotional place around
8.30pm on Tuesday,
after a first half in
which their passiveness
and Manchester City’s excellence
had threatened their hold on the
Champions League quarter-final.
However, while elsewhere in the
Etihad Stadium Pep Guardiola was
combusting and getting himself sent
to a padded seat, Jürgen Klopp was
silent. He had a victory against the
finest team in the land to plot.
Klopp the gurning, manic
cheerleader is an image the
Leading
the way
into the
last four
Jürgen Klopp
enjoys the
moment
after his side
sealed their
quarter-final
win 5-1 on
aggregate
RICH LINLEY/
CAMERASPORT
VIA GETTY IMAGES
8
The number of
times Jürgen
Klopp has
beaten Pep
Guardiola in
14 matches
between their
sides
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Liverpool manager regrettably
accepts he cannot shake but, as
Virgil van Dijk said before the second
leg: “He is much more than that.”
Another demonstration that
teams do not reach the last four
of European football’s elite
competition on pure emotion was
served at half-time at the Etihad.
Klopp initially let his players do the
talking, or the shouting in Dejan
Lovren’s case.
“I told the lads to wake up
because it was not good enough and
I said we were sitting too deep,” the
centre-back said after one of the
most commanding matches of his
Liverpool career.
His manager listened, waited for
order to descend on the dressing
room and began his tactical
instructions for the second half with
some pointed advice for Lovren.
“Yes, we are sitting too deep,” Klopp
said, “because you are not pushing
up.” Lovren elaborated: “He wanted
me and Virgil to be more compact
and push the team up but it was
quite difficult to push up when
City had the ball. It was all positive,
nothing negative, but I needed to
remind the guys we had 50 minutes
to be in the semi-finals of the
Champions League and we needed
to give more. The first 10-15 minutes
wasn’t good enough.
“When you see the second half,
again they had a couple of chances
but nothing too serious. We did
much better in the second half –
we were higher, we were much
more compact and we were better
organised defensively.”
City, without their conductor on
the sidelines, still managed seven
attempts on goal in the second half
– 13 in the first – but found no way
to add to Gabriel Jesus’s secondminute opener. Liverpool had three
after half-time and converted two.
Klopp’s team were evidently
more clinical in both games but
also more disciplined, organised
and mature. They had luck, too,
▲ Dejan Lovren said Liverpool
deserve more respect after their wins
especially between the 41st and
42nd minutes of the second leg
when Bernardo Silva struck a post
and Leroy Sané’s tap-in was wrongly
disallowed for offside, changing the
complexion of the tie and that of the
City manager.
In a contest billed as the calm,
brilliant precision of the Premier
League champions-elect versus the
ferocity of Klopp’s attacking game,
it was Liverpool who displayed
the former, and more besides. Had
they beaten the runaway leaders of
the Spanish or German league 5-1
on aggregate there might be wider
recognition of what Liverpool’s
European Cup-winning captain Phil
Thompson called “one of the great
European results in our history”. As
Lovren put it: “When you concede
one goal and score five against
Manchester City, I think we should
respect Liverpool more.”
L
iverpool are unbeaten
and the highest scoring
team in this season’s
Champions League.
The versatility they
displayed over two legs
against Guardiola’s side also bodes
extremely well for what lies ahead
on the road towards the final in
Kiev. Roberto Firmino and Sadio
Mané dropped deep and wide to
create a five-man midfield as the
visitors regained their composure
and executed Klopp’s second-half
gameplan to perfection. His defence,
as per the instruction to Lovren and
Van Dijk, were far more compact.
Encouragingly for Klopp, the shape
of his team changed around the
half-hour mark as players took
responsibility for combating City’s
breathless approach.
“It was a difficult situation for
us in the second minute but I was
calm,” Lovren said of Jesus’s early
goal. “If I’m not calm then we have a
big problem. We talked on the pitch,
a few of us, and said: ‘We need to
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:57 Edition Date:180412 Edition:03 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 23:41
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•••
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
57
▼ Nicolás Otamendi (left)
struggled to cope with the
runs of Mohamed Salah
ANDREW YATES/REUTERS
keep our heads and stick together
because this is a crucial moment and
if we are not calm we will concede
another one.’ To concede such a
quick goal was not what we wanted
but maybe it acted as a wake-up call.
We had luck, we had luck in a couple
of moments to be honest, but when
you look over the two games we
have been brave and when you are
brave the luck goes with you.”
Lovren looked forward to
next season in the aftermath of
Liverpool’s third consecutive victory
over City – Klopp’s eighth win in 14
matches against Guardiola – and said
the Premier League title race will
be much closer. “It was weird this
season because we didn’t catch up
well from the beginning,” he said.
“I’m definitely confident that next
season we can push everyone, even
ourselves to do better, from the
beginning to the end.”
Next season can wait. Europe
is again full of possibilities for
Liverpool, improving Liverpool,
in the present. The Croat added:
“The competition is wide open and
anything is possible now. From a
personal point of view I don’t want
Real Madrid in the semi-finals.
They have a lot of experience in the
Champions League, a lot of records
and over the past three seasons it
is always them, but whoever we
get will find it difficult to come to
Anfield and score.”
Double trouble
Uefa charges
Guardiola over
half-time rage
Paul Wilson
Pep Guardiola has been hit with
two Uefa disciplinary charges following his dismissal in Manchester
City’s Champions League defeat by
Liverpool.
Guardiola was sent to the stands by
the referee Antonio Mateu Lahoz at the
end of the first half after coming on to
the pitch at half-time to protest over
a disallowed effort by Leroy Sané. The
official ruled out the tap-in for offside,
although the ball came to Sané after
Loris Karius’s punch rebounded off
James Milner.
Having been ordered away from the
dugout Guardiola was then subject to a
Uefa regulation that forbids any communication with coaching staff on
the sidelines, but it is understood the
governing body believes he may have
contravened this rule and will charge
him with improper conduct.
Guardiola has admitted telling the
referee the goal should have stood,
though he denies using bad language.
The flashpoint came with City leading
1-0. Had Sané’s effort counted they
would have gone in 2-0 ahead, with
every chance of going on to cancel out
Liverpool’s 3-0 lead from the first leg.
In the event Liverpool scored twice to
run out 5-1 aggregate winners.
Liverpool have been charged with
disciplinary offences over the behaviour of their fans. Uefa alleges fireworks were let off and objects thrown
at the Etihad Stadium.
Guardiola’s bald
fact is that rivals
wised up to City
City manager is not ‘a fraud’
and has not been ‘found out’
– rather teams saw how to
exploit his team’s weak spots
Barney Ronay
I
s Pep Guardiola a bald fraud?
Before Manchester City’s three
consecutive defeats in the
last nine days, this seemed
to be one of the more urgent
questions of the modern
sporting age. It looked a simple
enough dichotomy. Is the man who
gave us the most compelling elite
club team and the finished-article
Lionel Messi, a high-class manager
whose teams retain a skein
of brittleness against the best
opponents? Or is he, in fact, a fraud.
And not just a fraud but a bald fraud.
A bald foreign fraud, the worst kind
of fraud there is.
Things have moved on in the past
few days, glossed by the elimination
from the Champions League on
Tuesday at the hands of a fine,
compact, ice-cold Liverpool team.
The public appear to have spoken.
An internet search for the phrases
“bald fraud” and “Pep Guardiola”
over the past seven days produces
a decisive 4,700 matches, even if
many of those relate to an article by
the otherwise excellent journalist
Ken Early openly denying – imagine!
– that Guardiola is a bald fraud.
Before the first-leg defeat by
Liverpool, these same search
numbers were down in the
one-thousands. And frankly the
data doesn’t lie. The question is
no longer, whether Guardiola is a
bald fraud. It is instead: how long
has he been a bald fraud? And how
was European football, with all
its misleading facts and data and
elements of obvious beauty so
easily tricked out of its jewels, its
virtue and its timeshare in Alicante
by this handsome egg-headed
swindler?
There is of course another point
of view. Stepping away from the
tribal blurts of received footballing
opinion, it is possible the bald fraud
narrative is an oversimplification.
Football has always loved its
pig-headed certainties, its binary
shades, although it is a relatively
new idea that successful, confident,
(foreign) people are no longer
allowed just to lose but must instead
be “found out”, exposed, stripped
bare of their fanciness.
The main point here is that
sticking to this narrative also
misses the best bits of City’s recent
struggles. Not to mention the deeper
fascination of how Guardiola, who
is actually pretty good at coaching
football teams, might adapt to an
effective, considered response to his
team’s frictionless domination of the
first three-quarters of the season.
The first point is obvious enough.
Other football managers are also
allowed to be clever, adaptive,
resourceful people at the top of
their profession. If Jürgen Klopp
and José Mourinho have found a
way to interfere with the fine-point
machinery of Guardiola’s team, this
does not naturally mean his life’s
work is meaningless.
City fans have been quick to point
to bad luck (Leroy Sané’s disallowed
goal at the Etihad Stadium) and to
the fact anyone can lose in knockout
football as evidence that nothing has
changed. The truth is somewhere in
between. Something different has
clearly been happening in the past
three games and in the last 10, five of
which have been lost.
The basic statistics from those
three defeats make for interesting
reading. City dominated every
metric, as is so often the case. In
defeat to Liverpool (twice) and
Manchester United they had more
corners (23 to six combined) more
shots (51 to 19) and – of course – more
possession of the ball. Across those
270 losing minutes City made a
staggering 1,778 accurate passes to
their opponents’ 799, an average
of three and a half more accurate
passes every minute of every game.
This was not all cold possession
or meaningless sideways passing.
City were still pressing forward and
making chances. And yet on the one
metric that matters they lost by a
combined score of 8-3, to opponents
who for long periods appeared
comfortable sitting out that familiar
sky blue weather front.
So what has changed? There are
two obvious answers. The balance
of play was exactly the same as
in two big games City won earlier
Elements of English
football have been
desperate for him
to fail, and exactly
in this way
in the season against Manchester
United and Arsenal – but with one
exception. City also dominated the
dribbling numbers in those previous
games, whereas in their last three
games they were out-dribbled every
time, with City players dribbled
past four or five more times on
each occasion.
This stat chimes with the wider
sense of a shift of attitude, a change
in the way City’s opponents have
been prepared to play without the
ball, knowing they also have a way to
attack. For most of what was in the
end a comfortable two-leg victory
Liverpool sat and waited without
seeming rushed or panicked, a team
prepared to see not having the ball
as an opportunity, a chance to strike
from deep at what can be a fragile
defence.
Again this is not a magic bullet.
City have not been “exposed”. But
all managers study their opponents
for weaknesses and while Nicolás
Otamendi, in particular, has
improved under Guardiola he was
also reduced to a cartwheeling funk
every time Mohamed Salah ran in
his direction.
H
ence those dribble
stats. Hence
Manchester United’s
controlled, driving
aggression in the
second half at the
Etihad Stadium. Perhaps there was a
clue in Crystal Palace’s performance
at Selhurst Park on New Year’s
Eve, when Roy Hodgson sent his
team out to press aggressively and
isolate Wilfried Zaha against City’s
defenders, producing their biggest
test to date.
Again there is nothing in this
that requires anyone to be shamed
or retrospectively stripped of
their achievements. Guardiola’s
excellence brought some studied
excellence in response from
Hodgson – and now from Klopp and
Mourinho. The league is improved
by this process, our entertainment
improved and given shape.
The most interesting question
now is how Guardiola will respond.
Elements of English football have
been desperate for him to fail and
in exactly this way to be exposed as
lazy and vain, an Improper Football
Man, all foreign-accented short
cuts and dossier-fondling privilege.
Let’s face it, he ticks some pretty
hot boxes, from the basic offence of
being both foreign, successful and
arrogant, to deeper issues of method
and attitude, of a notably academic,
theorising approach.
The easy response would be to go
out and buy players good enough
to implement those ball-playing
tactics without weaknesses, players
so good the system will always
work. It will be fascinating to see
how he plays it, whether he tinkers
with his own setup or looks to
surprise his opponents in turn, as
he did in varying methods at Bayern
Munich, or simply coaching what he
has to more and better of the same.
Defeat will always leave Guardiola
open to the taunts of the bald-fraud
squad. In reality, to lose this way,
still hammering at the same door,
lost in his own methods, is simply
a part of his appeal, those draining,
quixotic defeats another layer to the
pleasure his teams can bring.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:58 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 19:54
•
58
The Guardian Thursday 12 April 2018
Sport
Football Champions League
Klopp effect makes him more
than a Liverpool cheerleader
Manager has turned his side
into Champions League’s
highest scorers while also
able to keep top teams at bay
Andy Hunter
T
he Liverpool dressing
room was a predictably
emotional place around
8.30pm on Tuesday,
after a first half in
which their passiveness
and Manchester City’s excellence
had threatened their hold on the
Champions League quarter-final.
However, while elsewhere in the
Etihad Stadium Pep Guardiola was
combusting and getting himself sent
to a padded seat, Jürgen Klopp was
silent. He had a victory against the
finest team in the land to plot.
Klopp the gurning, manic
cheerleader is an image the
Leading
the way
into the
last four
Jürgen Klopp
enjoys the
moment
after his side
sealed their
quarter-final
win 5-1 on
aggregate
RICH LINLEY/
CAMERASPORT
VIA GETTY IMAGES
8
The number of
times Jürgen
Klopp has
beaten Pep
Guardiola in
14 matches
between their
sides
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Liverpool manager regrettably
accepts he cannot shake but, as
Virgil van Dijk said before the second
leg: “He is much more than that.”
Another demonstration that
teams do not reach the last four
of European football’s elite
competition on pure emotion was
served at half-time at the Etihad.
Klopp initially let his players do the
talking, or the shouting in Dejan
Lovren’s case.
“I told the lads to wake up
because it was not good enough and
I said we were sitting too deep,” the
centre-back said after one of the
most commanding matches of his
Liverpool career.
His manager listened, waited for
order to descend on the dressing
room and began his tactical
instructions for the second half with
some pointed advice for Lovren.
“Yes, we are sitting too deep,” Klopp
said, “because you are not pushing
up.” Lovren elaborated: “He wanted
me and Virgil to be more compact
and push the team up but it was
quite difficult to push up when
City had the ball. It was all positive,
nothing negative, but I needed to
remind the guys we had 50 minutes
to be in the semi-finals of the
Champions League and we needed
to give more. The first 10-15 minutes
wasn’t good enough.
“When you see the second half,
again they had a couple of chances
but nothing too serious. We did
much better in the second half –
we were higher, we were much
more compact and we were better
organised defensively.”
City, without their conductor on
the sidelines, still managed seven
attempts on goal in the second half
– 13 in the first – but found no way
to add to Gabriel Jesus’s secondminute opener. Liverpool had three
after half-time and converted two.
Klopp’s team were evidently
more clinical in both games but
also more disciplined, organised
and mature. They had luck, too,
▲ Dejan Lovren said Liverpool
deserve more respect after their wins
especially between the 41st and
42nd minutes of the second leg
when Bernardo Silva struck a post
and Leroy Sané’s tap-in was wrongly
disallowed for offside, changing the
complexion of the tie and that of the
City manager.
In a contest billed as the calm,
brilliant precision of the Premier
League champions-elect versus the
ferocity of Klopp’s attacking game,
it was Liverpool who displayed
the former, and more besides. Had
they beaten the runaway leaders of
the Spanish or German league 5-1
on aggregate there might be wider
recognition of what Liverpool’s
European Cup-winning captain Phil
Thompson called “one of the great
European results in our history”. As
Lovren put it: “When you concede
one goal and score five against
Manchester City, I think we should
respect Liverpool more.”
L
iverpool are unbeaten
and the highest scoring
team in this season’s
Champions League.
The versatility they
displayed over two legs
against Guardiola’s side also bodes
extremely well for what lies ahead
on the road towards the final in
Kiev. Roberto Firmino and Sadio
Mané dropped deep and wide to
create a five-man midfield as the
visitors regained their composure
and executed Klopp’s second-half
gameplan to perfection. His defence,
as per the instruction to Lovren and
Van Dijk, were far more compact.
Encouragingly for Klopp, the shape
of his team changed around the
half-hour mark as players took
responsibility for combating City’s
breathless approach.
“It was a difficult situation for
us in the second minute but I was
calm,” Lovren said of Jesus’s early
goal. “If I’m not calm then we have a
big problem. We talked on the pitch,
a few of us, and said: ‘We need to
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:59 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 11/4/2018 20:21
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
Thursday 12 April 2018 The Guardian
59
▼ Nicolás Otamendi (left)
struggled to cope with the
runs of Mohamed Salah
ANDREW YATES/REUTERS
keep our heads and stick together
because this is a crucial moment and
if we are not calm we will concede
another one.’ To concede such a
quick goal was not what we wanted
but maybe it acted as a wake-up call.
We had luck, we had luck in a couple
of moments to be honest, but when
you look over the two games we
have been brave and when you are
brave the luck goes with you.”
Lovren looked forward to
next season in the aftermath of
Liverpool’s third consecutive victory
over City – Klopp’s eighth win in 14
matches against Guardiola – and said
the Premier League title race will
be much closer. “It was weird this
season because we didn’t catch up
well from the beginning,” he said.
“I’m definitely confident that next
season we can push everyone, even
ourselves to do better, from the
beginning to the end.”
Next season can wait. Europe
is again full of possibilities for
Liverpool, improving Liverpool,
in the present. The Croat added:
“The competition is wide open and
anything is possible now. From a
personal point of view I don’t want
Real Madrid in the semi-finals.
They have a lot of experience in the
Champions League, a lot of records
and over the past three seasons it
is always them, but whoever we
get will find it difficult to come to
Anfield and score.”
European glory
Semi-finals
hold no fear
for defender
Andy Hunter
Trent Alexander-Arnold has said
Liverpool fear no one in the Champions League semi-final draw tomorrow and believes his game reached
new heights after being targeted as a
weak link by Manchester City.
The 19-year-old excelled in both
legs of the quarter-final and insists
a sixth European Cup triumph is a
realistic aim for Liverpool given the
manner of their 5-1 aggregate defeat of
the runaway Premier League leaders.
Alexander-Arnold, who was nine the
last time Liverpool reached the Champions League semi-finals, claims there
is no team in the competition who
intimidate Liverpool.
“Throughout the whole tournament there hasn’t been a team who
strike fear in us,” he said. “We’ve
looked at it from the start that we’re
in it to win it. Whoever we draw on
Friday, we’ll look forward to the game
and hopefully get to the final.”
Pep Guardiola and his team sought
to exploit Alexander-Arnold’s inexperience, particularly in the first leg at
Anfield, only for the Liverpool-born
defender to thrive in his duel with
Leroy Sané. “I guess Man City looked
at it and felt I was the weak link,” the
teenager said. “It was a bigger, harder
test. I had to play to a better level than
I’ve probably ever played before. It
tested me to a new level and now I
know that I’ve got that in me.”
Guardiola’s bald
fact is that rivals
wised up to City
City manager is not ‘a fraud’
and has not been ‘found out’
– rather teams saw how to
exploit his team’s weak spots
Barney Ronay
I
s Pep Guardiola a bald fraud?
Before Manchester City’s three
consecutive defeats in the
last nine days, this seemed
to be one of the more urgent
questions of the modern
sporting age. It looked a simple
enough dichotomy. Is the man who
gave us the most compelling elite
club team and the finished-article
Lionel Messi, a high-class manager
whose teams retain a skein
of brittleness against the best
opponents? Or is he, in fact, a fraud.
And not just a fraud but a bald fraud.
A bald foreign fraud, the worst kind
of fraud there is.
Things have moved on in the past
few days, glossed by the elimination
from the Champions League on
Tuesday at the hands of a fine,
compact, ice-cold Liverpool team.
The public appear to have spoken.
An internet search for the phrases
“bald fraud” and “Pep Guardiola”
over the past seven days produces
a decisive 4,700 matches, even if
many of those relate to an article by
the otherwise excellent journalist
Ken Early openly denying – imagine!
– that Guardiola is a bald fraud.
Before the first-leg defeat by
Liverpool, these same search
numbers were down in the
one-thousands. And frankly the
data doesn’t lie. The question is
no longer, whether Guardiola is a
bald fraud. It is instead: how long
has he been a bald fraud? And how
was European football, with all
its misleading facts and data and
elements of obvious beauty so
easily tricked out of its jewels, its
virtue and its timeshare in Alicante
by this handsome egg-headed
swindler?
There is of course another point
of view. Stepping away from the
tribal blurts of received footballing
opinion, it is possible the bald fraud
narrative is an oversimplification.
Football has always loved its
pig-headed certainties, its binary
shades, although it is a relatively
new idea that successful, confident,
(foreign) people are no longer
allowed just to lose but must instead
be “found out”, exposed, stripped
bare of their fanciness.
The main point here is that
sticking to this narrative also
misses the best bits of City’s recent
struggles. Not to mention the deeper
fascination of how Guardiola, who
is actually pretty good at coaching
football teams, might adapt to an
effective, considered response to his
team’s frictionless domination of the
first three-quarters of the season.
The first point is obvious enough.
Other football managers are also
allowed to be clever, adaptive,
resourceful people at the top of
their profession. If Jürgen Klopp
and José Mourinho have found a
way to interfere with the fine-point
machinery of Guardiola’s team, this
does not naturally mean his life’s
work is meaningless.
City fans have been quick to point
to bad luck (Leroy Sané’s disallowed
goal at the Etihad Stadium) and to
the fact anyone can lose in knockout
football as evidence that nothing has
changed. The truth is somewhere in
between. Something different has
clearly been happening in the past
three games and in the last 10, five of
which have been lost.
The basic statistics from those
three defeats make for interesting
reading. City dominated every
metric, as is so often the case. In
defeat to Liverpool (twice) and
Manchester United they had more
corners (23 to six combined) more
shots (51 to 19) and – of course – more
possession of the ball. Across those
270 losing minutes City made a
staggering 1,778 accurate passes to
their opponents’ 799, an average
of three and a half more accurate
passes every minute of every game.
This was not all cold possession
or meaningless sideways passing.
City were still pressing forward and
making chances. And yet on the one
metric that matters they lost by a
combined score of 8-3, to opponents
who for long periods appeared
comfortable sitting out that familiar
sky blue weather front.
So what has changed? There are
two obvious answers. The balance
of play was exactly the same as
in two big games City won earlier
Elements of English
football have been
desperate for him
to fail, and exactly
in this way
in the season against Manchester
United and Arsenal – but with one
exception. City also dominated the
dribbling numbers in those previous
games, whereas in their last three
games they were out-dribbled every
time, with City players dribbled
past four or five more times on
each occasion.
This stat chimes with the wider
sense of a shift of attitude, a change
in the way City’s opponents have
been prepared to play without the
ball, knowing they also have a way to
attack. For most of what was in the
end a comfortable two-leg victory
Liverpool sat and waited without
seeming rushed or panicked, a team
prepared to see not having the ball
as an opportunity, a chance to strike
from deep at what can be a fragile
defence.
Again this is not a magic bullet.
City have not been “exposed”. But
all managers study their opponents
for weaknesses and while Nicolás
Otamendi, in particular, has
improved under Guardiola he was
also reduced to a cartwheeling funk
every time Mohamed Salah ran in
his direction.
H
ence those dribble
stats. Hence
Manchester United’s
controlled, driving
aggression in the
second half at the
Etihad Stadium. Perhaps there was a
clue in Crystal Palace’s performance
at Selhurst Park on New Year’s
Eve, when Roy Hodgson sent his
team out to press aggressively and
isolate Wilfried Zaha against City’s
defenders, producing their biggest
test to date.
Again there is nothing in this
that requires anyone to be shamed
or retrospectively stripped of
their achievements. Guardiola’s
excellence brought some studied
excellence in response from
Hodgson – and now from Klopp and
Mourinho. The league is improved
by this process, our entertainment
improved and given shape.
The most interesting question
now is how Guardiola will respond.
Elements of English football have
been desperate for him to fail and
in exactly this way to be exposed as
lazy and vain, an Improper Football
Man, all foreign-accented short
cuts and dossier-fondling privilege.
Let’s face it, he ticks some pretty
hot boxes, from the basic offence of
being both foreign, successful and
arrogant, to deeper issues of method
and attitude, of a notably academic,
theorising approach.
The easy response would be to go
out and buy players good enough
to implement those ball-playing
tactics without weaknesses, players
so good the system will always
work. It will be fascinating to see
how he plays it, whether he tinkers
with his own setup or looks to
surprise his opponents in turn, as
he did in varying methods at Bayern
Munich, or simply coaching what he
has to more and better of the same.
Defeat will always leave Guardiola
open to the taunts of the bald-fraud
squad. In reality, to lose this way,
still hammering at the same door,
lost in his own methods, is simply
a part of his appeal, those draining,
quixotic defeats another layer to the
pleasure his teams can bring.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:60 Edition Date:180412 Edition:01 Zone:
•
Three cheers
Wisden honour
for England
women’s
World Cup trio
Page 53 Barça blues
Where did it all
go wrong for
Messi and co
in Rome?
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Sports newspaper of the year
The Guardian
Thursday 12 April 2018
Page 57 Real Madrid
Juventus
1
3
Ronaldo 90pen
Sent at 11/4/2018 21:59
Mandzukic 2, 37,
Matuidi 59
Real Madrid win 4-3 on aggregate
Ronaldo saves
Madrid with
late penalty
Real were
rescued from a
shock exit in a
dramatic finish
at the Bernabéu
after Juventus
had wiped out
a 3-0 first-leg
deficit
‘On a night of nerves
Ronaldo showed none’
Match report
Page 56 CHRIS BRUNSKILL LTD/GETTY IMAGES
Guardiola under fire
City manager hit with two
Uefa charges after outburst
Paul Wilson
Pep Guardiola has been hit with two
separate Uefa disciplinary charges as
a result of the Manchester City manager’s dismissal in the Champions
League defeat by Liverpool.
Guardiola was sent to the stands by
the referee Antonio Mateu Lahoz at the
end of the first half after coming on to
the pitch at half-time to protest over
Pep Guardiola
spent the second
half in the stands
a disallowed effort by Leroy Sané. The
official ruled out the tap-in for offside,
though there was considerable sympathy for the City manager given the
ball came to Sané after Loris Karius’s
punch rebounded off James Milner.
Having been ordered away from the
dugout and technical area Guardiola
was then subject to a Uefa regulation
that forbids any communication with
coaching staff on the sidelines, but it
is understood the governing body
believes he may have contravened this
rule and will charge him with improper
conduct.
Guardiola has admitted telling the
referee the goal should have stood,
though he denies using bad language.
The flashpoint came at a crucial stage
of the match, with City leading 1-0. Had
Sané’s effort counted they would have
gone in 2-0 ahead, with every chance
of going on to cancel out Liverpool’s
3-0 lead from the first leg. In the event
their momentum stalled in the second
half and Liverpool scored twice to run
out 5-1 aggregate winners.
Liverpool have been charged with
disciplinary offences over the behaviour of their fans. Uefa alleges fireworks were let off and objects thrown
at the Etihad, just as they were outside
Anfield when the City team bus was
attacked before last week’s game.
Uefa’s control, ethics and disciplinary
body next convenes at the end of next
month.
Barney Ronay page 59
Revealed
How Klopp and
Lovren inspired
Reds comeback
at half-time
Page
P
age 58 
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