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The i Newspaper – April 13, 2018

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QUA L I T Y, C O N C I S E – T H E F U T U R E O F I N D E PE N D E N T JOU R NA L I S M
Helen Mirren
Grand National 2018
‘I hate doing
sex scenes’
SEE CENTRE PAGE PULL-OUT SECTION
Interview on privacy,
Brexit and becoming lazy
FR DAY
The Vaccines
Rock’
vi
PLUS
Books l TV Top Picks
CONSUMER
FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
Number 2,304
MARK STEEL
Public grief and
moral outrage
All hail the flower
vigilantes
P23
i@inews.co.uk
@theipaper
theipaper theipaper
EDF joins
British Gas
in energy
price rise
Cabinet
gives May
go-ahead
to attack
Syria
P10
COURTS
Cliff Richard
‘deserves
big payout
from BBC’
P9
STEPHEN BUSH
Forget stop
and search
The real reason
crime is rising
» Ministers agree that use of chemical weapons must be
challenged and back co-ordinated international response
» French President says he has proof that Assad
government used chlorine gas on civilians
» Russia calls for emergency UN Security Council meeting,
and vows to protect its troops from Western missile strikes
P17
EUROPA LEAGUE
Arsenal reach
semis after
Moscow drama
P58
P5-7
PLUS WOMEN IN TECH
P22
I TYSON FURY’S COMEBACK
P53
I HOMES & DESIGN
P42
I PUZZLES
P50
NEWS
2-28
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
TV
36-37
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
3
ThePage3Profile
UNITED STATES
TOM CHURCH,
WOULD-BE TRAIN PASSENGER
‘Tiger on loose’ turns
out to be a raccoon
Oliver Duff
A report of a “tiger in Harlem”
caused a social media frenzy in New
York City yesterday. Twitter users
reported that police were chasing a
loose tiger along a street at 8.30am.
Shortly afterwards, the police
department confirmed that there
was indeed a wild-animal sighting in
the area – but it was a raccoon.
Symptoms of a silent killer
SAUDI ARABIA
First fashion show
a bit of a cover-up
Saudi Arabia kicked off its firstever fashion week with shows by
international labels Roberto Cavalli
and Jean Paul Gaultier. In line with
Saudi cultural norms and rules on
gender segregation, the catwalks
were open only to women and “no
outside cameras” were allowed to
film inside the auditorium.
MUSIC
Sir Elton: your songs
are too bad to sing
King of the road?
This resourceful traveller
bought a car rather than pay
the price of a train ticket from
London to Bristol. What’s more,
he saved money. Tom Church,
27, had planned to travel by rail
to visit a friend in Bristol but
took exception to the cost of a
return ticket, which can be as
much as £218. Mr Church, from
London, purchased a car, tax
and insurance instead.
Not the typical route…
Mr Church, who runs a voucher
code website, said this was
actually a cheaper option.
Where did he find the car?
It was being offered for £80
on a classified advert website.
Sounds like an old banger.
Mr Church admitted the 1997
Honda Civic was a “very old
car” but said the MOT for it was
“fine”. The original owner was
selling the car for scrap.
Many passengers, however,
travel on the route for far
less than this – an off-peak
return today would cost less
than the £80 Mr Church paid
for the car.
How much did the whole
enterprise cost him?
On top of the £80 car, there
was six months of road tax at
£81.38, single-day insurance
for £20.43 and petrol for the
trip at £25.
In total, the journey cost Mr
Church £206.81. An Anytime
Return ticket from London
to Bristol starting today was
priced at £211.40 yesterday,
while passengers travelling
first class could expect to pay
more than £300.
Did he enjoy the journey?
Mr Church said: “I actually
prefer the train – it only takes
an hour and a half, as opposed
to three and a half hours by
road – so my legs got a bit sore
sitting for that long.” However,
he was impressed with the
car’s condition.
“I was quite surprised at
how well the car ran. I wouldn’t
have guessed it was 21 years
old,” Mr Church said.
Luke Bailey
Sir Elton John has called on singers
and bands to write better songs. The
hitmaker, 71, said he was a big fan of
Stormzy and Kendrick Lamar but
added that there was a lot of music
in the charts that he could not sing.
Sir Elton announced earlier this year
that he was retiring from performing
live with a three-year, 300-date tour.
UNITED STATES
Mummified monkey
is found in shop
Workers renovating a department
store discovered the mummified
remains of a monkey. Labourers
found the carcass in an air duct on
the seventh floor of the century-old
building. A long-time employee of
the shop in Minneapolis recalled
that a monkey had escaped from its
pet department in the 1960s.
Letter from
the Editor
i@inews.co.uk
“After seeing a great
review of i on Monday
night’s BBC News
channel, I thought I’d
give it a try,” writes Paul
Morris, of Crackington
Haven, north Cornwall.
“Eschewing my usual rag
(The Times), I bought your
Tuesday edition. I was
impressed by your front
page about prostate
cancer. Turning to page
4, in a story under the
heading of ‘symptoms’,
I found not one mention
of the symptoms.
“In disappointment,
I jettisoned i and
returned to my usual,
rather boring, paper.
Yours, perplexed...”
I too had been irritated
by this – and stomped
around the office
moaning, “What are the
bloody symptoms!” in
what colleagues must
have found concerning
behaviour.
The article in question
was mislabelled – it was
actually a backgrounder
on people who get the
disease. But infuriatingly
a piece on symptoms
is exactly what plenty
of readers would have
wanted to digest,
alongside our cover
story about major new
research into better
diagnosis and treatment.
The quick summary
about symptoms, then,
is that most men with
early prostate cancer
don’t show any. As the
cancer grows, it can
press on the urethra and
change the way that men
urinate, but confusingly
this symptom is more
likely to be a sign of
the (non-cancerous)
condition, an enlarged
prostate. Still worth
checking out, though,
if you have difficulty
urinating, a weak flow,
need to urinate more
suddenly or often,
especially at night. Too
much information?
Men need to talk
more about their health,
because silence is killing
them. The Prostate
Cancer UK and NHS
websites have more
information and advice.
Back to north
Cornwall. My wife and
I surf about 20 miles up
the coast, so we know
and love the area. After
an entreaty from me,
Mr Morris decided to
visit the village shop
yesterday to try i again.
And in a shameless
attempt to get him to
buy i for a third day this
week, I told him I would
cover the mistake in
today’s column.
“All right! I can take
a hint!” he chuckles,
adding, as I sit at my
desk: “Sunny now: sea
glittering blue and
surf clean.”
Till tomorrow, then,
when iweekend includes
a Grand National guide
for those who like a
dabble, a spring special
on Britain’s birds, a travel
guide to Europe avoiding
airports, Tony Parsons,
comedian Cariad Lloyd
and our pick of news,
views, culture and sport.
nhs.uk/conditions/
prostate-cancer/
symptoms/
4
NEWS
MEDIA
BBC urged to cancel Powell’s ‘rivers of blood’ broadcast
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
Lord Adonis has called on Ofcom to
order the BBC to axe a Radio 4 documentary in which Enoch Powell’s “incendiary and racist” Rivers of Blood
speech will be broadcast in full.
The infamous 1968 speech predicted “rivers of blood” and “the black
man having the whip hand over the
white man” because of immigration.
Powell was sacked as a Conservative
frontbencher as a result.
The speech will be read by the
actor Ian McDiarmid during the
Radio 4 programme marking its 50th
anniversary, broadcast tomorrow.
Presenter Amol Rajan, BBC media
editor, reflects on the speech’s “enduring influence and significance”.
Lord Adonis’s letter read:
Enoch Powell at a meeting in the late
1960s EXPRESS NEWSPAPERS/GETTY
“Because of the time-sensitive and
urgent nature of the issue, I am writing directly to ask Ofcom to instruct
the BBC to cancel its proposed broadcast on Saturday of Enoch Powell’s
infamous 1968 speech. It seems extraordinary that one should have to
make the argument in today’s Britain
that Powell’s speech is an incitement
to racial hatred and violence which
should not be broadcast.” Ofcom
does not have the power to order the
BBC to cancel programmes.
The BBC said: “This is a rigorous
journalistic analysis of a historical
political speech. It’s not an endorsement of the controversial views
and people should wait to hear the
programme before they judge it.
Many people know of this controversial speech but few have heard it
beyond soundbites.”
TRAVEL
Friday the 13th
‘slump’ rejected
by big airlines
By Simon Calder
Claims by a fare-comparison website
that “superstitious Brits” are shunning flights on Friday 13th have been
flatly rejected by the three biggest
airlines serving the UK.
Kayak claimed fares for Friday 13
April to Auckland are barely half the
level for other Fridays in April. The
firm asserts the average fare for departures to New Zealand’s largest
city on “the superstitious date” was
just £554 return, compared with an
average of £1,049 on other Fridays.
However, Kayak’s results have
been difficult to replicate – especially
for any fares to Auckland as low as
£554 return.
Looking ahead to the next Friday 13th, in July, the lowest fare to
Kayak claimed fares to Auckland were
half the level of other Fridays GETTY
British Airways owner
International Airlines
Group (IAG) has confirmed it is
considering buying Norwegian,
Europe’s third largest low-cost
carrier. Shares in Norwegian
soared by nearly 48 per cent.
Auckland with a two-week stay on
Kayak is £1,039 return. That is 4 per
cent higher than the average of the
other Fridays in July.
The fall in fares to Belfast was dramatic, according to Kayak, with the
April average of £107 return falling
41 per cent to £63. British Airways,
easyJet and Ryanair all compete
between London and Belfast and all
dismissed Kayak’s claims.
A spokesperson for easyJet said:
“There is absolutely no truth in this
effect. Either for Friday 13th or September 11th.”
British Airways reported that
there is no drop in demand, adding
that Friday is its busiest day.
Ryanair’s spokesperson said: “No,
as always customers continue to book
in their thousands. Every day is a
lucky day for our 130 million customers, who enjoy the lowest airfares in
Europe both on Friday 13th, September 11th and each of the 364 days we
operate annually.” THE INDEPENDENT
HUNGARY
Orban ‘threatened by mercenaries’
By Pablo Gorondi
IN BUDAPEST
A Hungarian magazine has
published more than 200
names of people it claims
are likely to be members
of a group that the authoritarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban says
are “mercenaries” paid by
Jewish US-Hungarian billionaire George Soros (inset)
to topple the government.
Those on the list in Figyelo include
members of rights organisations such
as Amnesty International, anti-corruption watchdog Transparency International, refugee
advocates, investigative
journalists and faculty
and officials from the
Soros-founded, Central
European University.
Figyelo was formerly
a respected business
magazine, which took on an
unabashedly pro-government
slant after it was acquired by an
Orban ally in December 2016. AP
SYRIA CRISIS
NEWS
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i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
5
COVER STORY
UNITED STATES
Cabinet gives May backing to
‘take action’ against Assad in Syria
‘I never said
when’: Trump
steps back
from strikes
By Lewis Smith
Theresa May was given the go-ahead
by the Cabinet yesterday to “take action” against the Assad regime.
Ministers agreed it was vital the
use of chemical weapons in Syria
does not go “unchallenged” and gave
the Prime Minister their backing to
work with the US and France in coordinating an international response.
No 10 pointedly avoided saying
last night that military action was
imminent but a government source
indicated that British-backed strikes
against Syria would take place. Submarines have already been ordered
into the region and aircraft have been
placed in a state of readiness.
The emergency meeting of Cabinet came amid rising international
tension following the attack on the
rebel-held town of Douma in Syria
on Saturday which Western intelligence is convinced involved chemical
weapons. No 10 described the attack
as “shocking and barbaric”.
Ministers sat down for their meeting shortly after the French President Emmanuel Macron announced
he had “proof ” chemical weapons
had been used by Bashar al-Assad’s
forces. The US has also put together
its biggest air and naval strike force
since the 2003 Iraq War.
Russia, however, has threatened
to hit back on behalf of Mr Assad’s
regime, its ally, if the West launches
military strikes in Syria.
No 10 said ministers agreed Mr
Assad had a “track record” of using
chemical weapons, including against
civilians, and that it was “highly
likely” he was responsible for the
attack on Douma. The bombing left
up to 75 people dead, many of them
children, and prompted widespread
By Guy Faulconbridge
IN WASHINGTON
Rebel fighters and their families travelling from Douma arrive at the Abu al-Zindeen checkpoint yesterday AFP/GETTY
Vote demanded Corbyn raises spectre of Iraq
Opposition leaders have demanded
a parliamentary vote before any new
military action in Syria. The Prime
Minister summoned her top team to
No 10 amid signs she is preparing to
join US-led air strikes against Syria.
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn
raised the spectre of the Iraq war as
he insisted MPs should have their say.
He said: “Parliament must be
consulted on this. Surely the lessons
of Iraq, the lessons that came there
from the Chilcott Report, are that
there has to be a proper process
of consultation... Just imagine the
scenario if an American missile
shoots down a Russian plane or vice
versa. Where do we go from there?”
Liberal Democrat leader Sir Vince
Cable told the BBC: “Parliament can
and should be recalled immediately
and a vote held on this issue. The
position is a very dangerous one
because of Russian involvement, also
because we have an erratic President
of the United States.”
calls for action. In a statement issued
last night, No 10 said of the bombing:
“The Prime Minister said it was a further example of the erosion of international law in relation to the use of
chemical weapons, which was deeply
concerning to us all.
“Following a discussion in which
every member present made a contribution, Cabinet agreed it was vital
that the use of chemical weapons did
not go unchallenged. Cabinet agreed
the Prime Minister should continue
to work with allies in the United
States and France to co-ordinate an
international response.”
FRANCE
Macron has ‘proof’ that regime used chemical weapons
By John Irish
IN PARIS
France has proof that the
Syrian government carried out a chemical weapons attack last week,
President Emmanuel
Macron said yesterday,
in an announcement that
added to the feeling a missile
strike against the Assad regime
is just days or hours away.
France is expected to join the
United States and Britain in
carrying out air strikes in
response to the use of
the weapons.
“We have proof that
last week, now 10 days
ago, chemical weapons
were used, at least with
chlorine, and that they
were used by the regime of
Bashar al-Assad,” Mr Macron
(inset) said, without giving any de-
tails about the evidence. The attack
on Douma on 7 April killed dozens of
people, including children.
“Our teams have been working on
this all week and we will need to take
decisions in due course, when we
judge it most useful and effective,”
Mr Macron told broadcaster TF1,
when asked whether a red line had
been crossed.
Germany said yesterday it would
not join any military strikes against
Syria, but its supports Western ef-
forts to show the use of chemical
weapons is unacceptable, Chancellor
Angela Merkel said.
“Germany will not take part in
possible – there have not been any
decisions yet, I want to stress that –
military action,” Ms Merkel said after
meeting Danish Prime Minister Lars
Lokke Rasmussen in Berlin.
“But we support everything that
is being done to show that the use of
chemical weapons is not acceptable,”
she added. REUTERS
President Donald Trump cast
doubt last night over the timing of
his threatened strike on Syria in
response to a reported poison gas
attack, even as France said it had
proof of Syria’s guilt.
Fears of confrontation between
Russia and the West have been
running high since Mr Trump
said on Wednesday that missiles
“will be coming” after the suspected chemical weapons attack in
Douma on 7 April, and lambasted
Moscow for standing by Syrian
President Bashar al-Assad.
But yesterday he appeared to
take a step back. “Never said when
an attack on Syria would take
place. Could be very soon or not so
soon at all!” he tweeted.
Later, US Defence Secretary
Jim Mattis said the US had not
yet made a decision on any potential military attacks in Syria, but
would discuss options at a White
House National Security Council
meeting scheduled for last night.
But the gradual hardening of
Washington’s stance towards Moscow was underlined by Mike Pompeo, the right-wing CIA director
picked to be the next Secretary of
State. He told the US Senate that
years of conciliatory US policy toward Russia were “now over”.
In contrast with his predecessor Rex Tillerson, Mr Pompeo is
vowing to promote democracy
and human rights. He chastised
Russia for acting “aggressively”
and emphasised that the Trump
administration considered Russia
“a danger to our country”. But he
will also say that diplomatic efforts
with Moscow must continue.
There were signs, though, of a
global effort to head off a direct
confrontation between Russia and
the West. REUTERS
Donald Trump had tweeted that
missiles ‘will be coming’ AFP/GETTY
Syria options No-fly zone, sanctions and blockade
Following the suspected chemical
weapons attack in the Damascus
suburb of Douma on 7 April, it is
widely expected that the UK will join
the US and allies in military action
against Syrian government targets.
Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the
Labour Party, has said that “more
bombing, more killing, more war will
not save life. It will just take more
lives and spawn the war elsewhere”.
There are other non-lethal
methods that the UK could employ in
its response.
It could enforce a no-fly zone
over Syria which would limit the
possibility of any future chemical
attacks, since gas attacks are often
carried out from the air.
Sixty per cent of the British public
would support this kind of action,
in comparison to the 22 per cent of
the population who are in favour of
launching cruise missile attacks on
Syrian military targets, according to
a recent YouGov poll.
Alternatively, the UK could impose
further sanctions upon people
affiliated to, and in the employment
of, the Syrian government. This is
what it did along with the US and the
EU after sarin gas was used against
civilians in April 2017
Another possible option would be
to establish a naval blockade around
Syria as Russia threatened in 2015
– in that case to ensure the delivery
of armaments.
This would not affect the delivery
of arms by land, but it could help
starve Bashar al-Assad’s regime
of essential equipment. However,
the move would almost certainly
provoke Russia into a response.
The UK could also reconsider its
strategy of dispensing aid to Syrian
rebel forces, such as the Free Syrian
Army, through private contractors.
In December 2017, the BBC
claimed that money intended to help
establish a police force had instead
been channelled to people linked
to the al-Nusra Front, an extremist
group with ties to al-Qaeda.
Mattha Busby
6
NEWS
SYRIA CRISIS
RUSSIA
Moscow warns West: the priority
now is to avert the danger of war
By Makini Brice
and Michelle Nichols
Russia warned the West yesterday
not to take military action against
Syria and said it was trying to avert
a war with the US. Vassily Nebenzia,
the Russian ambassador to the
United Nations, said he could not
rule out war should the US attack
Syria in retaliation for the attack on
civilians in Douma.
“The immediate priority is to
avert the danger of war,” he said
after a closed-doors meeting at the
UN in New York City. “We hope
there will be no point of no return.”
When asked if he was referring
to a war between the America and
Russia,headded:“Wecannotexclude
any possibilities, unfortunately,
r
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because we saw messages that are
coming from Washington. They were
very bellicose.”
Russia has called a meeting of
the UN Security Council today to
discuss the Syria crisis and has
asked for UN Secretary-General,
Antonio Guterres, to address the
meeting. A Russian foreign ministry
spokeswoman, Maria Zakharova,
said that Western leaders had no
authority to be “investigators,
prosecutors and executioners”.
Syrian opposition activists
and doctors say that a gas attack
last week by the regime of Syria’s
President, Bashar al-Assad, killed
dozens of people in Douma, a
rebel-held town near the capital,
Damascus. The Syrian government
has denied the allegations.
Ms Zakharova described the
claims as fake but said that the
international chemical weapons
watchdog should investigate them.
She insisted that Russia would
ensure the team’s security.
Moscow has said that it will
target US missiles and the ships or
aircraft firing them if an attack on
Syria threatens the lives of Russian
military personnel based there.
Asked to comment on possible
US air strikes, President Vladimir
Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov,
said it was “necessary to avoid
any steps that may fuel tensions in
Syria”. He added that it would have
an “utterly destructive impact on
the Syrian settlement”.
Mr Peskov would not say if
Moscow could use a Russian-US
military hotline to avoid escalation
in the event of a US attack, saying
only that “the hotline exists and has
remained active”. On Wednesday,
Donald Trump warned Russia that
it should “get ready” for a missile
attack on its ally, but posted a tweet
yesterday saying that it may come
“very soon or not so soon at all”.
MILITARY
Russia capable of
repelling US strike
By Andrew Osborne
IN MOSCOW
A leading US military expert has said
that Russia has the technical capability to repel a US attack.
Ben Hodges, a former US army
general, said Russian military capabilities in Syria include surface-toair missiles designed to shoot down
military aircraft, missiles and drones.
Moscow also has between 10 and 15
warships and support vessels deployed in the Mediterranean, plus
dozens of war planes and helicopters
at its Hmeymim airbase.
Russia has said it will target US
missiles and the ships or planes that
fire them if an attack on Syria threatens the lives of its own military personnel based there. REUTERS
Comment
£10
8
£
*
The West so easily forgets its
role in Saddam’s gas attacks
Robert Fisk
e pests...
Let's weed out gard
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W
e all know the
problems of proof
when it comes to
chemicals and gas.
Unlike depleted
uranium – which we used to use in
our munitions – it doesn’t, like a
shell fragment or a bomb casing,
leave a tell-tale hunk of metal with
an address on it. When all this
started with the first gas attack in
Damascus, the Russians identified
it as gas munitions manufactured
in the Soviet Union – but sent to
Libya, not to Syria.
But it’s a different war that I’m
remembering today. It’s the IranIraq war between 1980 and 1988,
when Saddam Hussein invaded
Iran. When the Iranians stormed
into Iraq years later, Saddam
used gas on thousands of Iranian
soldiers – and civilians, for there
were nurses and doctors at the
war front.
Funny how we forget this now.
We don’t talk about it. We have
forgotten all about it. Talk about
the “normalisation” of chemical
warfare – this was it!
But in our desire to concentrate
minds on Syria, we’re not
mentioning the Iran gassings
– Iran being another one of our
present-day enemies, of course
– and this may be because of our
lack of official memory.
NEWS
2-28
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
TV
36-37
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
7
INQUEST
Seafood poisoning linked
to whistle-blower’s death
By Emily Pennink
Vladimir Putin at
an exhibition in
the Space Pavilion
in Moscow
yesterday REUTERS
SYRIA
Assad’s forces take control
of last rebel-held town
By Tom Miles
IN GENEVA
The Russian military announced
yesterday that the Syrian
government is now in full
control of the last rebelheld town on the outskirts of Damascus that
was the site of a suspected chemical attack over
the weekend.
This would mark a major
victory for Syrian President
Bashar Assad (inset) as the United
States and its allies consider punitive
military attacks against Syria following the suspected chemical attack
that killed 40 people.
The United Nations said it was
More likely it’s because of what
happened: the institutionalisation
of chemical warfare, the use
of chemicals by Saddam who
was then an ally of the West
and of all the Gulf Sunni states,
our frontline Sunni hero. The
thousands of Iranian soldiers
who were to die were referred to
on Iraqi radio after they crossed
the frontier. The “Persian
insects” had crossed the border, it
announced. And that’s how they
were treated.
For the precursors for the Iraqi
gas came largely from the United
States – one from New Jersey
– and US military personnel later
visited the battlefront without
In our desire to
concentrate minds on
Syria, we’re not mentioning
the Iran gassings
hopeful of getting aid to at least
100,000 Syrians who are desperate
for help after months of battle ended
years of siege around the rebelheld enclave.
Humanitarian adviser
Jan Egeland said: “What
I hope is that the battle
for eastern Ghouta, very
belatedly, now is over because there seems to be an
agreement on Douma, the
remaining rebel stronghold,
that could lead to us getting access for the first time in a long time, to
help the people inside Douma.”
The UN had been prevented from
sending aid, Egeland said, adding
that he hoped all those who wanted
to leave would be evacuated. REUTERS
making any comments about the
chemicals which were sold to
the Iraqi regime, of course, for
“agricultural” purposes. That’s
how to deal with insects, is it not?
Yet not a soul today is
mentioning this terrible war,
which was fought with our
total acquiescence.
Of the thousands of Iranians
who were asphyxiated, a few
survivors were even sent to
British hospitals for treatment.
They had blisters on their skin
and, horrifically, more blisters
on top of the first blisters. I wrote
a series of articles about this
obscenity for The Times, which
I then worked for. The Foreign
Office later told my editors that
my articles were “not helpful”.
No such discretion today. No
fear of being out to get Saddam
then – because in those days, of
course, the good guys were using
the chemicals.
The “number one suspect” in the
death of a wealthy Russian whistleblower is seafood he ate during a romantic meal with his lover in Paris,
an inquest heard.
But a “malignant” poisoner at the
smart Japanese restaurant could
also be to blame, it was claimed.
Alexander Perepilichnyy, 44, collapsed while out jogging near his
home in Weybridge, Surrey, in November 2012.
The married father had spent the
night before with his ex-model girlfriend Elmira Medynska, 28, at the
Buddha Bar in Paris.
The Old Bailey has heard he sent
back “bad” tempura prawn and ate
either sushi or sashimi, then vomited repeatedly at his hotel.
Giving evidence on Wednesday,
Ms Medynska said: “I think maybe
he vomited because it was not good
food in the restaurant.”
Coroner Nicholas Hilliard QC is
examining how Mr Perepilichnyy
died and who might have had a motive for murder.
The inquest heard from a cardiologist on the effects of fish poisoning
on the heart. Dr Peter Wilmshurst
Dr Geoffrey Kite, from Kew,
first raised the possibility
that an unknown compound in
Mr Perepilichnyy’s body could be
the poisonous plant gelsemium.
But testing ruled it out “beyond
reasonable doubt”, he said.
Alexander Perepilichnyy vomited
repeatedly after eating seafood in a
Paris restaurant PA
said that histamine or scombroid
poisoning could result from eating
long-distance fish, such as salmon,
tuna and mackerel. Symptoms include rashes, hives cramps, vomiting and itching.
The cardiologist, who had experienced fish poisoning himself,
said: “It’s rarely fatal. There are
cases of people who have died of it.”
Dr Wilmshurst said there was a
“more than 50 per cent” chance it
was poisoning, if Perepilichnyy ate
fish. Asked if that contributed to his
death, Dr Wilmshurst said: “If you
cannot find any other reason, that
becomes the number one suspect.”
Bob Moxon Browne QC, for Legal
& General Assurance, suggested
there were three possibilities, including “malign” intent.
Professor Robin Ferner said he
first thought of the plant alkaloid
Colchicine when he looked for a
delayed-action poison which causes
vomiting in the way described by Ms
Medynska, although none was identified in the body.
The toxicologist did not agree
that fish poisoning caused Mr
Perepilichnyy to suffer a fatal cardiac arrhythmia, although nothing
could be ruled out.
SALISBURY ATTACK
Watchdog endorses UK’s nerve agent verdict
By Gavin Cordon
The international chemical weapons
watchdog has confirmed Britain’s
analysis of the chemical used in the
Salisbury nerve agent poisoning, as
Russia continued to deny responsibility for the attack.
The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW)
said the toxin had an “almost complete absence of impurities”.
Britain said the finding backed its
assessment that it was produced in
the kind of controlled scientific environment most likely to be found in a
state laboratory.
The OPCW report does not directly name Novichok – the military
grade nerve agent developed by Russia, which the UK has said was used
to poison former double agent Sergei
Skripal and his daughter, Yulia – and
nor does it identify its source.
However, it states that its analysis of biomedical and environmental
samples “confirm the findings of the
United Kingdom relating to the identity of the toxic chemical that was
used in Salisbury”.
It said that the name and structure
of the chemical were included in its
full classified report made available
to member state governments.
In its report, the OPCW said it had
been able to collect blood samples
from the Skripals and from detective sergeant Nick Bailey who was
also hospitalised in the incident, as
well as environmental samples from
contaminated “hot spots” in the area.
Yulia Skripal,
who was
poisoned in
Salisbury along
with her father,
the Russian
former spy
Sergei Skripal
GETTY
‘No doubt’ Johnson demands answers from Kremlin
The Foreign Secretary said the
Organisation for the Prohibition of
Chemical Weapons (OPCW) backed
Britain’s view that only Russia could
have carried out the March attack.
“This is based on testing in four
independent, highly reputable
laboratories around the world.
All returned the same conclusive
results,” said Boris Johnson.
“There can be no doubt what was
used and there remains no alternative explanation about who was
responsible – only Russia has the
means, motive and record.
“We invited the OPCW to test
these samples to ensure strict
adherence to international chemical
weapons protocols. We never
doubted the analysis of our scientists at Porton Down.”
He said Britain has called a
meeting of the OPCW executive
council in The Hague to discuss
“next steps”, adding: “The Kremlin
must give answers.”
However, Georgy Kalamanov,
Russia’s deputy minister of industry
and trade, maintained it was impossible to pinpoint the agent’s origin.
8
NEWS
TECHNOLOGY
Cambridge University hits
back at Zuckerberg claims
By Alastair Reid
Cambridge University has criticised
Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony to
US Congress after the Facebook
founder suggested that “something
bad” may have taken place in the
way researchers used private data
collectedonhissocialmediaplatform.
A spokesman for the university
said that Facebook had yet to
provide evidence for its claims.
T h e u n i ve rs i ty s a i d i n a
statement: “Our researchers have
been publishing such research
since 2013 in major peer-reviewed
scientific journals, and these
studies have been reported widely
in international media.
“These have included one study
Mark
Zuckerberg
testifies
before the
US Congress
GETTY
in 2015 led by Dr Aleksandr Spectre
[Kogan] and co-authored by two
Facebook employees.”
Dr Kogan, who also uses his
married named Spectre, is accused
of giving the private data of tens of
millions of Facebook users to the
political consultancy Cambridge
Analytica after collecting it via a
Facebook app in 2013.
Pete Fleming, a market research
manager at Facebook, and Dr Kogan
were among the co-authors of a 2015
study which used Facebook data
about almost 60 billion friendships
to understand issues surrounding
social class and relationships.
SOCIETY
Drinking limit
guideline is good
for your health
pectancy and several adverse health
outcomes,” said Dr Dan Blazer, the
The recommended alcohol limit in report’s co-author.
some EU states, including Italy, PorMen in the US are advised to
tugal and Spain, is almost 50 per cent drink no more than 11 glasses of
higher than in the UK, a report pub- wine, or pints of beer, almost double
lished in The Lancet has revealed.
than in the UK. Italians, Portuguese
The UK recommends people do and Spanish drinkers are warned
not drink more than 14 units a week that consuming more than around
– or around six pints of beer or
nine glasses of wine could be
glasses of wine – giving it
dangerous.
one of the strictest set of
Experts, who are inguidelines in the world.
creasingly associating
Regularly drinking
a higher risk of stroke,
more than this could
fatal aneurysm, heart
Number of pints
take years off your life,
failure and death with
of beer that US
experts have today
excessive drinking,
men are advised to
warned, in support of
say
that if you regularstick to per week,
the UK’s recently lowly
have more than nine
compared with six
ered guidelines.
drinks a week you risk
in the the UK
“Doctors and other
shortening your life by one
healthcare professionals
to two years.
must heed this message and transMore excessive drinking – a weekmit it to their patients. This study ly total of more than 17 drinks – was
has shown that drinking alcohol at linked with a shorter life expectancy
levels which were believed to be safe of four to five years.
is actually linked with lower life ex“The findings ought to be widely
disseminated and they should provoke informed public and professionThe report, including data
al debate,” wrote Professors Jason
from almost 600,000
Connor and Wayne Hall from the
drinkers in 19 countries, shows
University of Queensland Centre for
that approximately half go over
Youth Substance Abuse Research,
the weekly recommended limit.
Australia, who led the team that carried out the study.
By Mattha Busby
11
HOSPITALS
Long winter made waiting times worse
By Alex Matthews-King
More patients than ever before were
left waiting for more than four hours
in A&E departments in March,
official figures show.
Data from NHS England revealed
yesterday that only 84.6 per cent of
patients in emergency rooms and
urgent care walk-in centres were
seen within four hours last month,
well below the 95 per cent target that
was last hit in 2015.
The arrival of the “Beast from the
East” storm brought snow just as the
weather would usually be improving,
and NHS leaders warned of pressures lasting into the summer. While
cancer operations were meant to be
spared from the suspension of nonurgent care, figures show hundreds
were cancelled as trusts struggled
to cope. This was in addition to those
patients left in pain waiting for hip
operations or cataract surgeries.
Ian Dalton, the chief executive of
NHS Improvement, said: “These statistics highlight the mammoth pressures facing the NHS this winter,
which have continued into March.
Nobody working in the NHS will be
happy.” THE INDEPENDENT
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9
EDUCATION
May’s former college launches sex harassment probe
By Barbara Speed
An independent inquiry is being
launched into allegations of misconduct and sexual harassment at
the Prime Minister’s former Oxford
college.
St Hugh’s has confirmed that its
governing body commissioned the
investigation following claims about
the behaviour of a now-deceased
Fellow. It is understood the Fellow
is Professor David Robertson, who
died in August last year.
The inquiry was set up after author Mel McGrath wrote an article
on the website The Pool, accusing
Professor Robertson of “doing a
Weinstein on me” – a reference to
Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein
– when she was an undergraduate in
the 1980s.
The inquiry will be chaired by Alison Levitt QC, who carried out a review into the crimes of Jimmy Savile
and who has been tipped to become
the director of public prosecutions.
Ms McGrath wrote: “David, who
was my tutor, held tutorials in his flat
on college grounds and had an un-
canny knack for scheduling a shower,
at whatever time of day, just before
I arrived. He’d open the door – as if
innocently – dressed in his bathrobe
and, one time, in a tiny towel.
“I would have to undergo the humiliating experience of reading my
essay, on which I had laboured hard,
while David sat opposite, half-naked
and man spreading.”
The college confirmed that an investigation had been launched but
a spokeswoman said it would be inappropriate to comment until the
investigation was complete.
Former students include Theresa
May, the Burmese political leader
Aung San Suu Kyi, the human rights
lawyer Amal Clooney and the suffragette Emily Davison.
COURTS
COURTS
Soldier
‘tampered
with wife’s
parachute’
Sir Cliff ‘deserves
top-end payout
over BBC filming
of police raid’
By Mattha Busby
A soldier who was cheating on his
wife with multiple other women tampered with her parachute in an attempt to kill her, a court has heard.
Emile Cilliers, 38, of the Royal Army
Physical Training Corps, was £22,000
in debt and believed he would get an
insurance payout of £120,000 in the
event of his wife’s accidental death. He
has denied two charges of attempted
murder and a third of damaging a gas
fitting to endanger her life.
A retrial at Winchester Crown
Court heard that Mr Cilliers wanted
to permanently “get rid” of his wife,
a highly experienced parachutist and
parachute instructor.
The court was told that Mr Cilliers was in “contact with a number
of prostitutes” and had been having
an affair with one woman, as well as
his ex-wife. In the month before the
alleged murder attempt, Mr Cilliers
apparently arranged to meet his exwife for sex before arranging to have
unprotected sex with a prostitute.
Victoria Cilliers survived the
4,000ft fall but suffered severe injuries after jumping from a plane with a
defective parachute at the Army Parachute Association in Netheravon,
Wiltshire, on 5 April 2015.
“Those at the scene immediately
realised something was wrong with
her reserve parachute,” said Michael
Bowes QC, prosecuting. “Two vital
pieces of equipment which fix the
parachute to the parachutist’s harness were missing, and their absence
meant her reserve parachute would
inevitably fail.”
The trial continues.
By Brian Farmer
and Sian Harrision
Sir Cliff Richard’s lawyers have told
a High Court judge that the singer
should get compensation at the
“very top end of the scale” because
BBC coverage of a police raid on his
home caused him “great damage”.
The 77-year-old singer has sued
the BBC over coverage of the raid
following a sex assault allegation.
Sir Cliff, who denied the allegation and was not charged with any
offence, says he suffered “profound
and long-lasting damage” as a result of coverage.
BBC editors have said they will
“defend ourselves vigorously”.
A barrister leading Sir Cliff ’s
legal team told Mr Justice Mann in
the High Court the BBC’s coverage
of the search at the singer’s apartment in Sunningdale, Berkshire,
in August 2014 was a “very serious
invasion” of privacy.
Justin Rushbrooke QC said the
footage of the police raid had a “prolonged impact” on Sir Cliff.
He did not give any indication of
the amount the celebrity wanted.
Lawyers have told Mr Justice
Sir Cliff Richard, arriving at the Rolls Building in London, was caused ‘great
damage’ by the BBC coverage of the raid over a sex assault allegation PA
The singer initially
sued the BBC and
South Yorkshire Police after
complaining about coverage of
the raid. South Yorkshire Police
agreed to pay Sir Cliff Richard
£400,000 after settling a claim.
Mann how in late 2013, a man
made an allegation to the Metropolitan Police, saying he had been
sexually assaulted by Sir Cliff, during an event featuring evangelist
Billy Graham at Sheffield United’s
Bramall Lane football stadium in
Sheffield, when a child in 1985.
Metropolitan Police officers
passed the allegation to South
Yorkshire Police in July 2014.
Sir Cliff denied the allegation and
in June 2016 prosecutors said that
he would face no charges.
A BBC spokesman said it reported Sir Cliff’s “full denial of the
allegations at every stage”.
“In a nutshell, it is Sir Cliff ’s
case that the BBC’s coverage of the
search was an invasion – indeed a
very serious invasion – of his privacy for which there was no lawful
justification,” Mr Rushbrooke said.
“The fact and the details of the
investigation which the BBC published to the world at large, along
with the video footage of his apartment being searched, were private
information and there was no public interest in the disclosure of this
information to the millions of viewers and website readers around the
world to whom it was published.
“For strong public policy reasons,
persons who are under investigation but have not been charged with
any offence should not be publicly
named other than in exceptional
circumstances – circumstances not
present in this case.”
The trial continues and is expected to last 10 days.
SOCIETY
Parkinson: Men feel under threat about flirting
By Sherna Noah
Army sergeant Emile Cilliers at
Winchester Crown Court PA
Sir Michael Parkinson has said men
feel “under threat” over the “merest” sign that they could be flirting.
The chat-show host has previously
said: “There isn’t a man of a certain age who doesn’t look back and
wonder, ‘Was my behaviour entirely
appropriate?’”
Now the 83-year-old has told the
Daily Mirror about having a photograph taken with a female mayor.
“I had to say to her, ‘Do you mind if
I put my arm on your shoulder?’ She
said, ‘Not at all. Why do you ask?’”
the broadcaster (inset)
recalled. “You feel yourself, all men do, being
under threat for the
merest indication they
might be flirting with
someone.”
The TV veteran has had
prostate cancer in recent years.
And he has revealed that he
had to learn how to walk
again after back surgery.
He told the newspaper:
“I can’t pretend I didn’t
get depressed at times,
but I didn’t get to a crying
depression stage. That’s not
really in my nature. Keeping
working was important.”
10
NEWS
ENERGY
EDF follows British Gas with increase in electricity rate
By Alan Jones
Energy company EDF is to increase
its standard variable electricity tariff by 1.4 per cent – £16 a year – from
June, affecting about 1.3 million customers. The French firm is also increasing charges for using cash or
cheque payment by £6.
The company said 59 per cent of
its customers who are on a fixed tariff, have a direct debit gas account or
are on the safeguard tariff or prepayment meter will not be affected
by the 1.4 per cent rise.
Béatrice Bigois of EDF,
said: “We know that price
rises are not welcome
and we have worked to
offset rising energy and
policy charges by cutting
our own costs.”
British Gas announced a
5.5 per cent increase both for
gas and electricity customers earlier
this week.
EDF said the 1.4 per cent
increase will take average bills to £1,158 a year,
which it said reflected
the increase in some of
the fixed costs associated
with supplying electricity.
A dual-fuel standard
variable customer choosing
to pay by cash or cheque will see
a combined increase of £28 a year
(+2.3 per cent) to £1,248 a year.
Stephen Murray, energy expert at price comparison website
MoneySupermarket, said: “Clearly
the price rise from British Gas has
opened the floodgates and we’re now
officially in price rise season. It’s fair
to say the forthcoming energy price
cap is looking like a key factor in this
round of price rises.
“The Big Six suppliers know they
have a short window to adjust prices
upwards before the Government
starts to enforce pricing legislation.
“Regardless of what’s happening, consumers on standard tariffs
should focus on their own energy
usage and get themselves on a competitive fixed-rate tariff as soon as
possible. The chances are that you’re
unnecessarily paying too much for
your energy and now is the time to
switch and save.”
LEGAL
Ex-council head
‘lied in Cyril Smith
abuse inquiry’
By Dean Kirby
NORTHERN CORRESPONDENT
The former leader of Rochdale Council could face a police investigation
after the national child abuse inquiry
found he lied in evidence about a
school linked to the town’s late MP
Cyril Smith.
The Independent Inquiry into
Child Sexual Abuse said it “defies
belief” that Richard Farnell, who was
the council’s Labour leader from 1986
to 1992 and again for several years
until 2017, was unaware of abuse at
the council-run Knowl View school.
It also said it was “shameful” he refused to take responsibility but chose
to blame senior education and social
services officials at the council.
Mr Farnell denied lying to the inquiry, saying he is “shocked” at the
findings. Speaking to the Manchester
Evening News yesterday, he said he
was “deeply sorry” for the “grave mistakes” and “unacceptable failings” of
the council while he was in charge in
the late 1980s and early 1990s.
But he added: “I am shocked at
the findings of the inquiry. I told
the truth.”
The 167-page report says Smith’s
Steve Rumbelow, the chief
executive of Rochdale
Council, admitted council officers
failed “in their most basic duty of
care to children”.
The inquiry said it ‘defies belief’ that
Rochdale Council’s leader Richard
Farnell was unaware of the abuse
“prominence and standing” allowed
him to pressure people in the town to
keep quiet about abuse allegations.
Richard Scorer, a lawyer for Knowl
View abuse victims, has called for
Smith to be stripped of his knighthood and for perjury charges to be
considered against Mr Farnell, who
has been suspended by Labour.
Greater Manchester Police said it
will “look to consult” with the inquiry
about “possible offences”.
Mr Scorer, from law firm Slater
and Gordon, said: “To lie under oath
is a serious crime and I expect police would consider whether perjury
charges are appropriate in this case.”
The inquiry’s report highlighted
the vulnerability of children at Knowl
View and found that staff at the now
closed school were “complacent and
arguably complicit” in the abuse.
TERRORISM
MI5 ‘weakened Isis’ with cyber attack
By Pat Hurst
Isis terrorists struggled to promote
their ideology of hate online after the
UK launched its first cyber campaign
against the extremists, the head of
the UK intelligence service has said.
Ex-MI5 senior officer Jeremy
Fleming, in his first public speech
since becoming head of GCHQ last
year, said the UK cyber attack on
Isis was “too sensitive to talk about
in detail” but his organisation and the
Ministry of Defence had conducted a
“major offensive”.
Mr Fleming, speaking in Manchester, said: “These operations have
made a significant contribution to
coalition efforts to suppress Daesh
[Isis] propaganda. Cyber is only one
part of the wider international response. Did it work? I think it did.”
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11
PEOPLE
‘Superman’
star’s son
opens spinal
cord clinic
By Flora Thompson
Not everyone
is a winner
Racegoers turned out in style
for the first day of the Grand
National meeting at Aintree.
Trainer Nicky Henderson had
three wins and the big race is
tomorrow at 5.15pm. REUTERS
Four-page sport pullout
SPORT
Investors planning expanded global
club tournament to rival World Cup
By Katie Grant
An international consortium of
investors has produced a $25bn
(£17.6bn) plan to organise global
football tournaments for Fifa,
potentially transforming how the
beautiful game is played.
The group, which includes investors from Japan, the US, United
Arab Emirates (UAE) and China, is
discussing proposals to expand the
“Club World Cup”, along with the creation of a new league competition for
national teams, The Financial Times
(FT) has reported.
The Club World Cup is an international competition organised by Fifa,
the sport’s global governing body,
played annually by seven top teams
from across the globe. This year’s
competition will be staged in UAE.
Under the new system, from 2021,
the Club World Cup would be played
every four years by the top 24 club
teams, according to “people with
knowledge of the plans”, the FT said.
A new national team competition
would take place every two years, it
reported, rivalling and perhaps even
replacing the World Cup.
Fifa would have a 51 per cent stake
in a joint venture with the consortium, with the investors guaranteeing revenues of at least £17.6bn, it
is understood.
Fifa President Gianni
Infantino, speaking at the South
American Football Confederation
(CONMEBOL) annual conference
held in Colombia last month,
confirmed Fifa interest in the
expansion of the Club World Cup.
“For two years we have been
The identities of the
investors behind the
expansion plan are unclear, but
it was suggested theconsortium
may have been assembled by
the London and Jersey-based
investment firm Centricus.
talking about a Club World Cup with
24 teams, more inclusive and with
more respect for the international
calendar, with fewer games,” he said.
“We have studied it, we have spoken
to the [Fifa decision-making] Council.
We want to do something that people
like... there are companies that are
interested and that is a good sign that
there is interest.
“The question is not if we have to
do a more significant Club World
Cub, but rather, why it hasn’t been
done until now. It’s time to do it.”
One source with knowledge of the
offer was quoted as saying: “This
whole idea is that world football is not
just about Europe.”
The son of the late Superman
star Christopher Reeve will
open the country’s first spinal
cord rehabilitation clinic for
paralysed children.
The actor’s 38-year-old son,
Matthew, attended the official
launch of Neurokinex Kids in
Crawley, West Sussex, yesterday.
The clinic is the first of its kind
in the UK and is part of Neurokinex Gatwick – the only affiliation to
the Christopher and Dana Reeve
Foundation’s NeuroRecovery Network outside the US.
Christopher Reeve was injured
in 1995 after being thrown from
a horse at an equestrian competition in Virginia. He became
quadriplegic and was confined to
a wheelchair for the rest of his life.
This prompted him to campaign for more support for those
with spinal cord injuries. Before
he died aged 52 in 2004, he also
lobbied for human embryonic
stem cell research.
The £300,000 centre has the capacity to treat 20 paralysed children a day and pledges to use the
latest scientific research to help
them become more active.
The organisation believes young
children who are paralysed are
more likely to develop long-term
health problems when they grow
older but they are more receptive
to activity-based rehabilitation.
The son of the late ‘Superman’ star,
Matthew Reeve GETTY
LITERATURE
Across
Classic novel ‘set to inspire women in China’
By Katrine Bussey
A new edition of Muriel Spark’s classic novel The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie is being published in China with a
foreword penned by Scotland’s first
minister Nicola Sturgeon.
Dame Muriel Spark, who died in
Italy at the age of 88, wrote more
than 20 novels. The Prime of Miss
Jean Brodie was her most famous
work and it was made into an Oscarwinning film starring Maggie Smith.
The publication of the new Mandarin translation of the work is part
of a series of special events that
mark the 100th anniversary of the
‘The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie’ by
Muriel Spark was published in 1961
birth of the Edinburgh-born writer.
It was announced by the first
minister at a special event at Fudan
University in Shanghai to celebrate
both the author’s centenary and
China’s year-long Inspiring Women
in the Arts programme.
Ms Sturgeon said: “I am delighted
that Chinese readers will enjoy The
Prime of Miss Jean Brodie.
“This publication highlights the
global appeal of Muriel Spark, and
underlines her status as one of Scotland’s best-loved writers. She has
inspired countless female authors
to take up writing, and I’m confident
she will continue to do so.”
1
3
4
No 2304
Down
1
2
Solution, page 53
Islamic ruler
initially called
the greatest
getting credit
for returning (6)
Actor Derek
involved in CIA
job somehow (6)
Haphazard or damn
disorganised (6)
Caught old prime
minister with key
(1,5)
He is an old priest
surrounded by a
bad smell (6)
12
NEWS
HISTORY
Ancient Egyptian text reveals earliest sex assault accusation
By Tom Embury-Dennis
A 3,000-year-old Egyptian text has
been identified as one of the first
records of a powerful man being
called out for sexual assault.
The script, known as Papyrus Salt
124, outlines a list of alleged indiscretions by an important artisan called
Paneb, who lived in the ancient city
of Thebes – now part of Luxor – in
about 1200BC.
Paneb was the chief foreman in
a community of artisans who built
royal tombs in the ancient city. But
his apparent corruption, both legal
and moral, led one furious peer to
write a complaint to the pharaoh’s
chief official.
Though the history of Paneb is not
new – the papyrus was discovered
in the 19th century by Egyptologist
Henry Salt – the allegations regarding his sexual misconduct are being
reassessed in the wake of the #metoo
movement.
The chief accusation by the author Amennakht was that Paneb
TECHNOLOGY
bribed his way to the position of chief
workman. But he went on to allege
a litany sexual assault and adultery
offences, though ambiguities in the
text make the exact nature of some
of the charges unclear.
One allegation of rape, however,
does appear clear cut. Amennakht
accused Paneb of taking the clothes
of a woman called Yemenwaw, before
he “threw her on top of a wall and
violated her”.
In another, Amennakht relayed
testimony by Paneb’s own son
Papyrus Salt 124 records a complaint
about the immoral actions of the
artisan Paneb BRITISH MUSEUM
The SpaceX factor
Rocket science
brought to Earth:
‘London to China
in half an hour’
180,000
mph
By Rhiannon Williams
TECHNOLOGY CORRESPONDENT
SpaceX wants to replace international aeroplane travel with rockets
within the next decade, in what it is
calling “space travel for earthlings”.
Speaking at TED 2018 (Technology, Entertainment and Design) in
Vancouver, Gwynne Shotwell, the
firm’s chief operating officer, said
the technology will be up and running in the next decade – the same
timeframe in which SpaceX hopes
to fly to Mars.
Around 100 passengers could fit
inside one of its Big Falcon Rockets
(BFRs), which could make the journey between London and Shanghai in half-an-hour at a speed of
16,000mph.
Each rocket could complete multiple long-haul trips a day. The com-
Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX’s
chief operating officer, said the
16,000mph service could be
operational in the next decade GETTY
Aapehty, who swore on oath examples of “debauchery” by his father.
Dr Roland Enmarch of the University of Liverpool said ancient
Egyptians considered adultery “reprehensible”. “Sleeping with married
women, whether they wanted to or
not, was a no-no, and taking them by
force just makes it worse,” he said.
Paneb was “probably put to death
eventually”, Mr Enmarch said,
which “may have had something to
do with filching materials from the
royal tombs”. THE INDEPENDENT
Alongside plans to travel
to and create a hospitable
city on Mars, SpaceX is also
working on a satellite initiative
to deliver high-bandwidth
internet across the globe.
pany says seats will cost somewhere
between the price of an economy
and business class flight.
“If we can run trips that last a half
hour or an hour, we can run dozens
of them a day,” Ms Shotwell said. “A
long-haul aircraft can only do one.
“I’m personally invested in this
one, because I travel a lot, and I
do not love to travel. And I would
love to get to see my customers in
Riyadh, leave in the morning and be
back in time to make dinner.”
The BFR could take off and land
on launch pads on bodies of water
outside major cities.
SpaceX founder and Tesla boss
Elon Musk first touted the notion
of international rocket travel last
September, claiming most places
on Earth could be reached in under
half an hour, and everywhere in
under an hour.
At the time, Mr Musk estimated
a flight between Shanghai and New
York would take 39 minutes from
blast off to landing, covering 7,400
miles. Commercial airlines currently take 15 hours.
SpaceX has safely launched and
landed several rockets without
human passengers in the past year.
Mr Musk and Ms Shotwell’s ambitions face numerous obstacles
in terms of safety regulations, fuel
consumption, environment concerns and rocket launch infrastructure requirements.
SpaceX aims to complete its first
unmanned voyage to Mars by 2022,
followed by a manned mission in
2024. Mr Musk hopes to colonise
the planet within a century.
The new flight times
SpaceX ‘BFR’
348ft
Saturn V
363ft
Top speed achieved by
the rocket in orbit without
being restricted by friction
from the air or weather
The ‘BFR’ will make a flight
to the Moon in preparation
for its mission to Mars
SpaceX ‘BFR’ can carry
100 passengers in 40
cabins and can transport
150 tons of cargo
A Boeing 787 Dreamliner
can carry 290 passengers
up to 9,782 miles, with
a top speed of 678 mph
SpaceX aims to complete its
first unmanned voyage to
Mars by 2022, followed by
a manned mission in 2024.
Prime movers How far can you get in 30 minutes?
n Get the train from London
Waterloo to Guildford
(assuming trains are on time).
n Take a ferry between Staten
Island and Lower Manhatten
(right) in New York.
n Catch a train from York
to Leeds, or from Taunton
to Exeter.
n Walk the length of the
Golden Gate Bridge, or
the Brooklyn Bridge.
n Complete a 6.2-mile
run (in 26 minutes and 17
seconds, like Ethiopian
long-distance runner Kenenisa
Bekele (below, far left) in 2005).
n Set a record for swimming
in Antarctic waters, like British
swimmer Lewis Pugh (below,
left), who spent 30 minutes and
30 seconds in sub-zero waters
in December 2005.
n Take Elon Musk’s
Hyperloop ultra-speed
transport system between
New York and Washington.
n Take Elon Musk’s rocket
from London to Shanghai, Los
Angeles, Hong Kong, Cape Town
or New York.
NEWS
2-28
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BUSINESS SPORT
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13
NATURE
Charismatic animals ‘more likely to go extinct’
By Rachel Roberts
Some of the world’s most beloved
animals are at risk of extinction because too many people assume their
iconic stature guarantees their survival, a study suggests.
Animals which are the biggest
draws in zoos and safari parks, including lions, tigers and polar bears,
could be threatened by their own
“charisma”, researchers concluded.
Using a combination of surveys,
zoo statistics and films, researchers
identified the top three most “charismatic” animals as tigers, lions and
elephants, followed by giraffes, leopards, pandas, cheetahs, polar bears,
grey wolves and gorillas.
“I was surprised to see that although these 10 animals are the most
charismatic, a major threat faced by
nearly all of them is direct killing by
humans, especially from hunting
and snaring,” said William Ripple, an
academic in forest ecology at Oregon
State University and a co-author of
the international study, published in
PLOS Biology.
Many of these animals are so
frequently depicted in pop culture
– including films and television –
that this could promote the idea of
a “virtual population” that is flourishing far better in the media than
in nature, according to lead author Depicting endangered animals such as giant pandas in pop culture can give the impression they are flourishing GETTY
Franck Courchamp of the University
of Paris.
The researchers found the average French citizen will see more virtual lions through photos, cartoons,
logos and brands in one month than
there are wild lions left in West Africa, with the world’s population at
less than 8 per cent of historic levels.
“Unknowingly, companies using
giraffes, cheetahs or polar bears for
marketing purposes may be actively
contributing to the perception that
these animals are not at risk of extinction, and therefore not in need of
conservation,” Dr Courchamp said.
To fight the problem, the authors
suggest that companies using images of threatened species for marketing purposes provide information to
promote their conservation.
And they also suggest some of the
profits generated by the companies
using animal images should be used
to protect endangered species –
something larger companies including Disney already do.
Around 800,000 “Sophie
the giraffe” baby toys were
sold in France in 2010 - more
than eight times the numbers
of giraffes living in Africa, the
authors of the study found.
LEGAL
Circus laws may force UK’s last lion tamer into jaws of early retirement
By Mattha Busby
The UK’s last lion tamer has been
refused a licence to perform in a
circus with three big cats, in a move
which is likely to force him into an
early retirement.
Thomas Chipperfield, 28, appealed against the Department for
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs’ original decision in July, but it
was thrown out as the Government
reaffirmed its “absolute” commit-
ment to ban animals in circuses.
The circus artiste, from Cannock,
Staffordshire – who prefers to be
called a big cat trainer – has always
stressed that his animals have all the
relevant welfare licences and are
checked by vets.
Although the court recognised
that Mr Chipperfield was highly
experienced with big cats, this was
trumped by licensing concerns.
The judge felt he would be unable
to provide written itineraries and
maintain suitable care plans for his
two lions and tiger.
Performing with big cats is not illegal in the UK but there are regulations in place which effectively
prevent the practice.
The Conservative Party has said
it is in favour of a ban but has been
unable to find parliamentary time to
steer through legislation.
Mr Chipperfield’s pursuit of a second appeal limited what he could
say, but he told the BBC that he had
The Conservatives are in favour of a
ban on performing with big cats AFP
“consistently acted in good faith
with my team on the advice given
by the circus licensing panel and
their inspectors. This advice was
often conflicting.”
Mr Chipperfield’s father was a
circus presenter, and as a result
he was raised around wild animals
in Ireland.
He made his circus debut aged 11
with two alligators and by the time
he was 15 he was able to put his head
in their open mouths.
NATURE
ENVIRONMENT
Increased risk of
drought adds to
bees’ problems
Gulf Stream current at its weakest in 1,600 years
By Josh Gabbatiss
Catastrophic changes in global
weather patterns could be on the
horizon as scientists confirm the
warming Atlantic current has
reached a “record low”.
The Gulf Stream current is now
By Claire Hayhurst
Bees are at risk from climate change
because more frequent droughts
could cause plants to produce fewer
flowers, researchers say.
A study by the University of Exeter
examined the impact of droughts –
which are expected to become more
common in many parts of the world
– on flowering plants.
Drought roughly halved the overall
number of flowers, meaning less food
for bees and other pollinators, the
study found.
The research, which was carried
out in collaboration with the
Drought halved the number of flowers
for bees to pollinate, the study found
University of Manchester and the
Centre for Ecology and Hydrology,
is published in the journal Global
Change Biology.
Bees are already under pressure
around the world from threats
including habitat loss, the use of
particular pesticides and the spread
of diseases.
at its weakest point in the past 1,600
years. Climate change resulting
from rising levels of carbon dioxide
in the atmosphere is a likely cause.
Two international teams of scientists have undertaken extensive
analyses of sea surface temperature
data and underwater sediments.
Both studies were published in the
journal Nature.
In both papers, the researchers
found the current had slowed down
by roughly 15 per cent, although one
study found the dip had occurred
over the past 150 years, the other
since the 1950s.
MOTORING
Diesel vehicles still account for 40% of UK car market
By Neil Lancefield
More than two out of five cars on UK
roads are diesel-powered despite
concerns over emissions.
Although demand for new diesel
cars plummeted last year, Depart-
ment for Transport data shows
a total of 12.9 million diesels are
licensed.
This represents a market share of
40.1 per cent and demonstrates the
significant position diesel continues
to hold in the automotive industry.
Steve Gooding, director of research charity the RAC Foundation,
said the data highlights “just how entrenched” diesel cars have become.
He said: “It could take several
years before the size of the overall
diesel fleet is significantly dented.”
NEWS
NEWS
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VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
TV
36-37
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
arts
Culture
All’s well that ends Welles
Orson Welles began filming The
Other Side of the Wind in 1970 with
a cast including John Huston, Peter
Bogdanovich and Dennis Hopper.
Principal shooting ran for six
years but Welles left behind just a
45-minute print of the “film within a
film” that he worked on until he died
in 1985. Netflix stepped in with the
financing to complete the film from
the 1,000 negative reels stashed in a
Paris warehouse.
Netflix boss Ted Sarandos said
completing Welles’s film in line with
his “true artistic intention” was “a
dream come true”. Huston’s character
is based on Ernest Hemingway, who
once threw a chair at Welles.
The 2018 line-up includes cinema
auteurs Jean-Luc Godard, Wim
Wenders and Spike Lee, whose
BlacKkKlansman is about the real
story of a black Colorado police
officer who went undercover in 1978
to infiltrate the Ku Klux Klan.
Orson Welles (centre) with
John Huston (left) and Peter
Bogdanovich on the set of
‘The Other Side of the Wind’
THE WELLES-KODAR COLLECTION,
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SPECIAL
COLLECTIONS RESEARCH CENTER
Cannes ‘stuck n the ast’ ove efusa
to aow Netflx to ente Wees fim
By am shwi
ArTS AND MEDiA COrrESpONDENT
Netflix has withdrawn the world premiere of Orson Welles’s final movie
from the Cannes Film Festival after
organisers banned the streaming
platform from entering its features
in competition.
Netflix rejected a request to unveil The Other Side of the Wind, the
long-awaited completed version of
an unreleased film Welles had begun
shooting in 1970.
Last year, two Netflix films
competed for Cannes’s Palme d’Or.
But the organisers of the 71st festival
said it was reintroducing a ban on
any films which do not have theatrical distribution in France. Netflix releases films such as Oscar-nominated
drama Mudbound simultaneously in
cinemas and online.
Ted Sarandos (inset), Netflix’s chief
content officer, accused Cannes of
being “stuck in the past”. Netflix releases should be considered “on fair
ground with every other film-maker”,
he said. Sarandos said he had refused
a request to screen The Other Side of
the Wind in an out-of-competition slot.
Cannes artistic director Thierry
Frémaux said of the Welles withdrawal: “We all had a desire to see
this film... but we don’t have the same
position. Last year when we had
[Netflix] on the red carpet we
were very criticised.”
Welles’s daughter Beatrice urged Netflix to reconsider. “Let my father’s
work be the movie that
bridges the gap between
Netflix and Cannes,” she
wrote in an email to Mr Sarandos. French law requires a gap of
up to 36 months between a film’s
cinema release and its release online.
PeoPle
W1A star Alex Beckett has died suddenly at the age of 35, his agent said.
The comedy star was best known
for his role as Barney Lumsden,
from Perfect Curve PR, in TV satires
Twenty Twelve and W1A.
“We’re deeply saddened by the
loss of Alex – a wonderful man and
a hugely talented actor,” his agent
Gavin Denton-Jones said.
“Our thoughts are with his family
and we kindly ask that their privacy
be respected at this difficult time.”
The Welsh-born actor was currently starring as the character
Waitwell in The Way Of The World
at London’s Donmar Warehouse.
Senior staff at the theatre said it
was “with profound sadness that we
announce the sudden death of actor
Alex Beckett”.
His W1A co-star Jessica Hynes
expressed her sadness in a post on
Twitter, writing: “Alex Beckett was a
wonderful, clever, kind, brilliant per-
38
In tomorrow’s
life
“High definition vinyl” could hit
stores next year to boost the resurgent market in LPs.
The first records stamped “HD
vinyl” will offer longer playing
times and the most precise reproduction yet of a studio recording,
the Austrian-based firm behind
the initiative said.
Income from vinyl LPs grew by
24 per cent last year, UK industry
body BPI said. Collectors are set to
snap up limited releases available
at 240 stores at next weekend’s
Record Store Day.
A European patent was first
filed in 2016 for High Definition
Vinyl, promising greater audio fidelity, volume and extended playing times than regular LPs.
Rebeat Innovation has received £3.4m in funding to launch
HD vinyl manufacturing, which
involves converting audio digitally to a 3D topographic map.
Lasers inscribe the map on to the
“stamper” that etches the grooves
into the vinyl.
Günter Loibl, Rebeat CEO, said
the process allows records to be
made with the minimum loss of
audio information. The HD vinyl
can be played on normal record
players but can feature up to 30
per cent more playing time and
amplitude, he said. Rebeat has ordered its first £420,000 laser and
is set to begin test pressings in
September. “By summer 2019 we
shall see the first HD vinyls in the
stores,” Mr Loibl predicted.
14 – 15 April 2018
Great tIt
Parus major
PLUS how you can help them thrive
By am shwi
House sParroW
Passer domesticu
s
The house sparrow
well-known and is one of Britain’s most
a grey head and best-loved birds. Males have
black bib with
and white cheeks.
chestnut sides
The bigger the
dominant the
bib, the more
male
sparrow has pale within its flock. A female
with a pale stripe brown feathers all over
behind the eye.
The house sparrow
is small
but it’s a sturdy
bird
stout beak designed with a
for
eating seeds. It
could
unkindly be described
as scruffy as its
feathers look
loose.
Of the six tit species
that breed in the
great tit is the
UK, the
largest. It has
similar plumage
to a blue tit but
with
and white cheeks. a distinctive black head
The chest is bright
yellow with a
stripe running
black
down.
wider and sometimesThe stripe in males is
extends down
legs. They feed
primarily on insects to the
take seeds from
but will
a feeder.
20 birds to spot
in your garden
There is one British director in
competition, Pawel Pawlikowski, for
Cold War, the follow-up to his 2015
Oscar-winning Ida. The film,
backed by Amazon Studios
and Film4, is a love story
set in a politically divided
1960s Europe.
Only three of the 18
films competing for this
year’s Palme d’Or are directed by women, the same
number as last year, a disparity
which has prompted criticism. They
are Eva Husson, Nadine Labaki and
Alice Rohrwacher.
HD vny
maks atest
evouton
n musc
son – so glad to have known him, so
sad he is gone.”
Shane Allen, controller of comedy commissioning at the BBC, said:
“We’re all incredibly crushed to hear
of Alex’s untimely death.
“He was a very prolific, versatile
and much-admired comedy star
whose role as Barney Lumsden in
both Twenty Twelve and W1A was a
key ingredient of their success.”
“We think of him fondly and
Alex Beckett (far right) in ‘W1A’ with
our hearts go out to his family and
Sara Pascoe, Joel Fry and Jessica Hynes friends at this painfully sad time.”
tib pi c
my c
Bck
By Bb sp
15
Blue tIt
Cyanistes caeruleus
starlInG
Sturnus vulgaris
Starlings spend
much
and run confidently of their time in flocks
along the ground.
look black from
They
a
closer they are distance but when you get
actually very
glossy with a
sheen of purples
and greens.
They are one of
the most common
birds and are
garden
first
after a wet night. in the queue for worms
mixes, including Starlings eat mostly seed
sunflower hearts
cake, and will
and suet
eat from feeders
or the ground.
20
birds to
spot in your
garden
A colorful mix
of
green makes the blue, yellow, white and
attractive and blue tit one of our most
most recognisabl
visitors. Blue
e garden
tits
seeds and nuts, eat insects, caterpillars,
although during
summer they
spring and
mostly feed on
invertebrates.
They were infamous
for following
milkmen in order
sneaky sips from to take
milk bottles
by pecking through
the foil
tops. This phenomeno
n
has practically
died
out now with
the
decrease of
doorstop
deliveries.
MaGPIe
Pica pica
WoodPIGeon
Columba palumbus
BlaCKBIrd
Turdus merula
Males live up
to their
females are brown name but, confusingly
,
often with spots
streaks on their
breasts. The bright and
yellow beak and
orangeeye-ring make
blackbirds one
adult
of the most striking male
They can often
be seen hopping birds.
lawns and foraging
around
in leaf litter. Blackbirds
are members
of the thrush family
have a varied
diet, eating insects and they
in the summer
and fruit in the and worms
winter.
From a distance,
close up a subtle the magpie appears black and
white,
blue and green
often seen in
sheen can be seen. although
pairs or small
Magpies are
groups. It is a
chattering call.
noisy bird with
Magpies are jacks-of-all
a harsh,
predators and
-trades –
pest-destroyers;
arrogant attitude
their challenging scavengers,
has
, almost
During the winter won them few friends.
the magpie’s
vegetarian, and
in the summer diet is largely
insects. Only during
predominately
the spring, when
its young, does
it became a predator, feeding
the nests of songbirds
raiding
for eggs and young.
Magpies are surrounded
by
superstition, including
versions
of the poem that
“One for sorrow, opens:
two for
joy.”
CHaffInCH
Fringilla coelebs
The chaffinch
is a
gardens. The malefamiliar sight in many UK
hood and a pink has a smart blue-grey
face
is brown and buff, and breast. The female
white markings and both have black and
on their wings.
are woodland
birds but have These finches
adapted to
live wherever
there
or hedges. You’re are trees
to see chaffinchesmore likely
hopping
around on the
ground
beneath feeders
rather than
on them.
CarrIon CroW
Corvus corone
The all-black carrion
crow is one of
adaptable of our
the cleverest,
most
alone or in pairs, birds. They are fairly solitary,
usually found
although they
may form
Carrion crows
will come to gardensoccasional flocks.
although often
for food and
cautious
when it is safe, initially, they soon learn
and will
take advantage return repeatedly to
of whatever is
on offer.
Carrion crows
have also worked
out how to eat
shellfish by
dropping them
from
a height to break
their shells.
Collared dove
Streptopelia decaocto
This dove is mainly
buff coloured
black half collar,
and a long, white with a thin,
black base. Collared
tail
doves originally with a
from southern
came
Asia and spread
from there. The
naturally
species was first
in Britain in 1953
recorded
and has since
become a
common UK garden
bird.
One reason behind
the collared
dove’s success
is its ability
breed year-round to
. However,
they won’t win
any
prizes for their
nest building
–
sometimes just
a flimsy
platform
of twigs.
GreenfInCH
Chloris chloris
Its twittering
and wheezing
song and splash
of yellow and
green as it flies
make this
finch a truly colourful
character. Although
quite sociable,
they
birds at the table. can squabble with other
The female looks
more brown but
be confused –
don’t
once
the yellow in her she flies off you’ll spot
tail and wings.
Greenfinches
eat nuts and
seeds mainly,
and
sunflower seeds enjoy
hearts, peanuts and
and
nyjer seed in
particular.
dunnoCK
Prunella modularis
No wonder dunnocks
are often overlooked
not only are they
–
a slender beak, small, brown and grey with
but they also like
around under
to creep
bushes in a mouse-like
searching for
way
their
Dunnocks have insect and spider prey.
different breedingadapted to make use of
known for ‘trios’ strategies and are well
breed with two – often one female will
males. This suits
as she might get
the
more help rearing female,
her chicks.
Wren
Troglodytidae
The wren is a
tiny brown bird,
seen foraging
usually
at
between paving the corners or the garden,
slabs
insects. It is dumpy, for tiny spiders and
almost rounded,
fine bill, quite
with a
long
round wings and legs and toes, very short
a short, narrow
It has a remarkably
tail.
loud voice Wr
roost t
h
The UK’s largest
and commonest
woodpigeon is
largely grey with pigeon, the
patch and white
a white neck
wing patches.
will pretty much
Woodpigeons
eat anything you
the bird table.
put out on
Their sheer size
to push away
allows them
smaller
everyone welcomes birds with ease and not
the sight of
them in their
garden.
Unlike other garden
birds,
who scoop up
water
throw their heads and
to allow it to drop back
down their throats,
woodpigeons
suck it up
using
their
beak as
a straw.
life
GoldfInCH
Carduelis carduelis
39
How to.. attract
birds
to your garden
F
rom bees to butterflies,
to feathered friends, frogs P
i
w
there
Goldfinches have
are lots of things
Water brings a
magical quality
and bright yellow a distinctive scarlet face,
do to help wildlifeyou can
your garden, and
to
and give
and delicate bird, wing patch. A dashing
is the key to life
nature
for so many creatures
you have a few a home – whether
are increasingly these seed-eating finches
that live in it.
Many people put
or a big garden.flowerpots, a balcony
tables for food. visiting bird feeders and
but fewer providefood out for birds,
If
garden, howeverA nature-friendly
sunflower hearts you’re filling seed feeders,
a regular supply
clean water.
and nyjer seeds
of
offer places for big or small, will
food for these
birds to shelter
Birds need water
birds. Goldfinches are great
breed and as long
thistle seeds.
and
also love
and bathing. Water for drinking
The goldfinch
announces its
provide birds withas food is supplied,
arrival with a
important during is particularly
tinkling, trilling
plenty
of
feeding
opportunities.
call. If you’re
lucky, you may
natural supplies the winter when
be visited by a
roBIn
small flock.
dry, hot weather may be frozen, and in
Erithacus rubecula
op bi c
when water can during the summer
Over
half of UK
Their tuneful
winter, to stop be hard to find. In
voices, along with
for birds – that’s adults put out food
cheeky attitudes
their
can float a smallit freezing over you
we’re giving our a lot of extra help
endeared robins and bright red breast, have
a ping pong ball, light object, such as
feathered friends.
to
the
Different
on
British public.
But don’t be fooled
species
water so that the the surface of the
– they are aggressively
different foods, of birds prefer
territorial and
keep it moving gentlest breeze will
in the
can
different seasons
and stop
Robins are often be quite vicious.
If you have a smallice forming.
associated with
different parts and
Christmas time
– believed to
balcony with nogarden or
country. So try of the
be because scarlet-jack
room
a range
pond or bird bath, for a
of food, and adapt
eted
postmen used
to
worry. A washingdon’t
what works best to
Christmas cards, deliver
in
lonG-taIled
and the
bowl set in the up
your garden.
similarly-coloured
tIt
ground
Aegithalos caudatus
will soon provide
Although winter
robin redbreast
feeding benefits
a welcome drink
Looking like a
became linked
ball on a stick,
to
birds most, food
long tailed tits
to visiting birds
are easily recognised
the tradition.
or
with their distinctive
shortages can
mammals.
colourings, small
occur
at any time of the
can be up to 9cm body and a long tail, which
in
Gi bi By feeding the year.
Both males and length.
birds
females are black,
No wildlife-frie h
m
year round, you’ll
and pale pink,
white
ndly
with distinctive
garden is complete
a better chance give them
You’ll probably
white crowns.
notice
without
periods of food of surviving the
are in small, excitable them most when they
60 species are a nestbox. Over
shortage. Place
flocks of about
known
feeders out in the
love to hang from
the
20. They
nestboxes. Regular to have used
feeders full of
enough so they open and high
fat balls.
residents
blue, great and
include
are out of reach
JaCKdaW
ground predators
of
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Plus
l Weekend TV
l Gong out
l Fms
l Books
l Comment
NEWS
2-28
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
TV
36-37
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
17
MyView
StephenBush
Stop and search does not cut crime
We must find solutions that work, not resort to proven failures
I
f history ever reaches a kinder
verdict on Theresa May
than the current consensus
that she threw away her
parliamentary majority and
her political authority in an
election that she didn’t need to call,
stop and search will be a major
part of it.
May’s decision to crack
down on its illegal use – which
disproportionately targeted
ethnic minorities, who were seven
times more likely to be searched
even though they were not seven
times more likely to engage in
criminal behaviour – was a sign
that she had a mode of policy
beyond mere illiberalism and
a willingness to challenge
Conservative Party orthodoxies.
The Labour government of Tony
Blair tried to clamp down on the
use of stop and search immediately
after the Macpherson report into
the murder of Stephen Lawrence
concluded that the Metropolitan
Police was institutionally racist.
But the way Labour achieved
it was simply to reduce the
total number of people being
searched. Ethnic minorities who
had no case to answer were still
disproportionately represented
but, crucially, a number of genuine
criminals of all races were able to
escape. Crime in London rose even
as it fell across the country.
What May did was different: in
clamping down on its illegal use,
the total number of searches fell
significantly, but the number of
arrests did not. As a result, crime
in London continued to fall along
with crime in the rest of the country,
and did so for the next four years.
Analysis, both from the Home
Office and independent experts,
showed that May had achieved
reform without making life easier
for criminals.
Now, for the first time in a quarter
of a century, crime is rising again,
provoking a furious political debate
as to why. For many Conservatives,
the answer is simple: May’s reforms
to stop-and-search powers.
But the problem here is that
crime isn’t just rising in London,
but across the country. It is not
the case that fewer people are
being stopped and searched in
Coventry than four years ago – but
that crime is rising there at the
same rate as in the capital. So
any explanation for why crime is
rising which is confined to London
alone – whether that be stop and
search, or the effectiveness of the
city’s Mayor, Sadiq Khan – doesn’t
Theresa May’s proposals mean that more innocent people will be searched by police for no reason other than their accent or the colour of their skin GETTY
hold water. Something else is going
on. In all likelihood, just as schools
and hospitals are beginning to
feel the strain of the long years
of public spending restraint, so
too is law enforcement. That is
the explanation backed up by the
Home Office’s own report, and,
unlike May’s changes to stop and
search, it is as true – truer, in fact –
in Coventry as it is in London.
It has the distinct downside
of exposing to criticism some of
the decisions made by successive
Conservative governments – but
that doesn’t make it untrue. But that
question is secondary to the broader
importance of stop and search as
a political issue, which is not as a
matter of policy, but as a character
tell. When politicians reach for
stop and search as a solution to the
problem of rising crime, it tells us
three things about them.
The first is that they follow, rather
than lead, public opinion, which still
strongly opposes May’s changes to
stop and search. Never mind that
the over-use of stop and search was
a waste of time that encouraged
minority groups to distrust the
The over-use
of stop and search
was a waste of time
that encouraged
minority groups to
distrust the police
police, and never mind that it doesn’t
work – there are votes to win.
The second is that politicians
have no respect for evidence in
their policymaking process. As
old-fashioned as this concept may
seem, politicians should at least
try to come up with solutions that
work, rather than ones which are
proven failures.
But the third, given that
Westminster still looks very little
like the country it represents,
is the price that politicians are
willing for other people to pay.
Rolling back May’s changes to
stop and search means that more
innocent people – people who have
committed no crime and have
no plans to do so, who are, in the
language of political cliché
“hard-working people who pay
their taxes” – will be searched for
no reason other than their accent
or the colour of their skin.
What unites May’s critics is one
thing: none of them envisages that
they will be searched more. That
misfortune will happen to other
people, who they will never meet,
and do not much care about. And
there is no more damning test of
anyone seeking to have power
over other people than the price
they are willing for others to pay for
their rhetoric.
Stephen Bush is a special
correspondent at ‘New
Statesman’ magazine
Twitter: @stephenkb
i@inews.co.uk
18
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@
Your
View
TWEETS
AND EMAILS
Free bus rides
are not enough
Labour is promising
young people free bus
travel. It also insists that
UK citizens must lose
their EU freedom of
movement after Brexit.
So instead of being
free to live and work
anywhere in the EU from
Barcelona to Budapest,
youngsters will have
to limit their horizons
to free bus tickets
to Barnsley or
Barnstaple. Living the
dream, eh, Jeremy?
CHRIS WEBSTER
NORWICH
Jeremy Corbyn says he
will fund his new bus
scheme from road tax
receipts (I suppose he has
no potholes in his street
– but many roads in the
UK are in serious need of
proper repairs). Good old
Jeremy, trying to catch
the younger voters with
promises that he cannot
possibly keep.
BARRY BEVITT
PONTEFRACT,
WEST YORKSHIRE
There’s a right
place to mourn
Peter Atkinson (Your
View, 12 April) says
that burglars’ families
deserve respect because
they have not burgled
anyone. That’s fine, as
long as they have not
profited in any way
from their relatives’
crimes, and do not
seek deliberately to
provoke the victims
of those crimes by
posting “tributes” on
their garden fences.
The police are quoted
as wishing to respect
the needs of families to
mourn the passing of
loved ones. That’s fine
also, as long as they do
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You only continue to own your own home with a lifetime mortgage.
Russia has given the
world such cultural
delights as the
Bolshoi Ballet GETTY
their mourning well
away from the places
defiled by the loved
ones’ activities.
ROGER SLATER
MACCLESFIELD,
CHESHIRE
Yes, burglars have
families too, and they
have a right to place
flowers in remembrance
of a relative who has
died. Surely the place for
this is at the deceased’s
grave, rather than on a
public street in Hither
Green, where they
serve only to create bad
feeling and disturbance
to local residents?
DAVID BASS
FAVERSHAM, KENT
Love Russia, but
not its leaders
I agree totally with
Valerie Stark (Another
View, 12 April). The
Russian people do need
some of our love and
respect. We should
concentrate on the
positives that Russia
(not the USSR) has
given us – read about
the great moderniser,
Peter the Great; delve
into the works of
Chekhov, Pushkin and
Dostoyevsky; listen
to the symphonies of
Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev
and Borodin; watch some
of Sergei Eisenstein’s
classic movies; listen
to opera stars Anna
Netrebko and Feodor
Chaliapin; watch the
sublime dancing of
the splendid Bolshoi
ballet company.
We have no grouse
with the Russian people.
Our problems with the
Russian Federation stem
from its leaders and its
corrupt oligarchs.
GRAHAM B BULL
YATE, SOUTH
GLOUCESTERSHIRE
Churchill had
huge respect
I, too, was born before the
Second World War and,
although only four years
old, I can remember
the anticipation of
parents and family when
Churchill was about to
speak. All were gathered
around the radio and his
words were listened to
with great respect.
They were certainly a
source of inspiration to
everyone of every class.
He was a great leader in
war, but the electorate
turned to Clement Attlee
for hope and peace at the
next general election.
M GRAVES
WIVENHOE, ESSEX
‘Will of people’
is worthless
I have lost count of
the number of times
that the “will of the
people” has been used
to justify the economic
and political self-harm
that will result from
leaving the European
Union. When it comes
to pushing the country
into a potentially lethal
conflict, it seems that the
will of the people counts
for nothing.
SIMON SMITH
NORTH LINCOLNSHIRE
Social media is
an unsocial ill
I could not agree more
with Simon Kelner
(Voices, 12 April) that
social media is becoming
the scourge of our
age and its effect on
young people is indeed
invidious.
I am a primary school
governor, and it is lovely
to watch youngsters
interact with each other.
Where does this all fade
away and the ubiquitous
screen become their
default setting? It does
lead to an isolation and
you are only as good as
your next “like”.
This needs to be
addressed by investing
in youth clubs and
societies where young
people can feel at home
and make real, not
virtual, relationships.
We are creating
a generation who
cannot communicate
meaningfully without
their smartphones.
JUDITH A DANIELS
GREAT YARMOUTH
Brush strokes
with TV fame
John Payton (Your View,
12 April) invites names
for his new TV game
show. How about Winner
Takes Wall?
KEITH DUNNETT
ALFORD,
LINCOLNSHIRE
The Great British Dry Off,
followed after the first
series by the inevitable
Celebrity Dry Off.
GRAHAM TURNER
CHESTERFIELD
How about Van Gogh’s
Ear or Paint That Wall
With Zoë Ball?
RICHARD BRISTOWE
LEICESTER
Have I Got Hues for You?
JOHN JUDE
Pointless 2.
RICHARD FINCH
WIGTON, CUMBRIA
MORE COMMENT oninews.co.uk
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AY’S
Floating
their boat
A new cruise line
for millennials
LIFE
‘How I was
misdiagnosed with
epilepsy and
the treatment cost
me my son’
NEWS
2-28
People
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
By Jessica Barrett
TV
36-37
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
The Rock eyes
up the White
House in 2024
Rebel Wilson’s court battle over
magazine articles that portrayed
her as a serial liar is finally coming
to an end. The actress (inset) is
set to recoup her legal costs after
being awarded Australia’s largest
defamation payout of A$4.5m
(£2.5m) from the publisher
Bauer Media, which she
sued last year.
Bauer appealed
against the sum
awarded by the
Supreme Court
of Victoria. But
yesterday the court
confirmed that the
company will also have
to pay most of the star’s
legal fees, which could total A$1m.
Wilson, 38, alleged that she missed
out on roles in Trolls and Kung
Fu Panda 3 because of the stories
about her published in Woman’s
Day magazine and on various
Bauer websites.
We already live in a world in which
Donald Trump is US President, so
it is perhaps not so far-fetched that
Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson is giving
serious consideration to running for
the White House.
The actor and ex-wrestler is not
in a big rush to begin his campaign,
however, so we still have time to
let it sink in that there could one
day be a former WWF star as the
“leader of the free world”.
Johnson has confirmed that he will
not run for the presidency in 2020.
Speaking at the London premiere
(left) of his new film Rampage, the
45-year-old added: “I think right now
I am just learning as much as I can. I
respect our political process. I also do
not have any delusions that it’s easy.
And I have a tremendous respect, so
2020 is not going to happen.
“Maybe 2024, maybe 2028. I don’t
know. I think the best thing I can do
now is to go to work and learn. That’s
where we’re at.”
U
R
Y
T
H
M
I
C
You’ll Hardy
recognise him
Tom Hardy has revealed the extent
of the makeover that he undergoes
every day playing Al Capone in the
forthcoming biopic Fonzo.
The Peaky Blinders and Taboo actor
is portraying the Chicago gangster
in his later years, when Capone had
dementia as a result of neurosyphilis.
Hardy spends hours being
transformed with prosthetics
(pictured) for the role.
The biopic, directed by Josh Trank
and due for release later this year,
also stars Linda Cardellini, Matt
Dillon and Kyle MacLachlan.
S
= a r e m a d e of t h i s
19
i@inews.co.uk
Twitter: @jess_barrett
Truth hurts as
Wilson closes
in on £2.5m
E
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
»
20
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i@inews.co.uk
Please include a contact address with all correspondence
Why shouldn’t London be as green as Copenhagen?
KELNER’S VIEW
Simon
Kelner
I
was a captive audience in the
back of a London taxi last week.
As we crawled through the
clogged arteries of the capital,
going from one set of temporary
traffic lights to another, I gave
my cabbie a good listening to. His
particular beef was the proposal to
pedestrianise Oxford Street, which
a significant number of his fellow
cabbies oppose, because they believe
it will add to congestion, particularly
from buses, in and around the area.
My natural position is to
sympathise with London’s black
cab drivers, because they have had
a hard time of it recently. Uber has
come along and eaten their lunch,
and meanwhile there has been an
epidemic of roadworks in the centre
of the city, making a straightforward
journey lengthy, complicated and
frustrating for driver and passenger
alike. They have never had it so bad.
But the pedestrianisation of
Oxford Street? I’m not so sure
I agree with him. The impulse
to transform Europe’s most
polluted thoroughfare into an
environmentally friendly retail
“boulevard” – Mayor Sadiq Khan’s
description – is a noble one, and,
as those who work in, and visit,
the district will know, the teeming
streets of the West End at busy
periods are difficult for pedestrians,
too, to negotiate.
My cabbie, however, had a wider
point to make. “We’ve had almost
20 years of London Mayors,” he
said. “And what have they actually
done?” He went on to answer his
own questions. “Is the capital safer?
Knife crime is at all-time high. Has
the Congestion Charge worked? The
traffic is worse than ever. Housing?
I’ve never seen so many homeless
people on the streets. Supporting
business? Rate increases are killing
shops and restaurants.”
And on he went with his charge
sheet, indignant that Londoners
haven’t had good value from the
mayoral office.
That is open to debate, as it’s
difficult to see what the Mayor can
do about certain of his complaints
(the congestion, for instance, has
been massively exacerbated both
by the rise of Uber and the increase
in delivery drivers taking products
bought online back and forth from
the supplier). But what is clear to
anyone who lives, works and plays in
London – as I have done for 30 years
or so – is that it’s never been a harder
place to exist.
It is, by most criteria, the capital
of the world now, and with that
brings a huge influx of people and
commerce, with all the attendant
problems. The Mayor has limited
powers to affect matters, and I think
we have to be generous: London’s
current pre-eminence owes much
to some of the initiatives that came
from his office. The capital’s public
spaces, just to pick on one example,
have been completely re-invigorated
over the past two decades, and
contribute much to the city’s appeal
for visitors and residents alike.
In this vein, plans to turn Oxford
Street into a pedestrian haven should
probably be welcomed. Cabbies
may complain but the advent of
Crossrail should revolutionise the
way people get around town. A
pedestrian-only zone in the city
centre is a natural development of
this. Environmentally speaking,
London will never be Copenhagen,
but it shouldn’t stop the Mayor’s
office from trying.
SOCIETY
decades ago and was applauded
and inoffensive is now politically
incorrect. What can you do?” The
camera reveals a picture of Apu just
to be sure there is no mistake.
This was an entirely inadequate
response – a betrayal, even. Fans
are furious that the writers used
Lisa, a feminist eco-warrior, to voice
their middle-aged male opinion.
Perhaps they are trying to convince
themselves that they are the victims,
that by using Lisa – the voice of
reason and justice in the programme
– they can reassure themselves
that they are standing up for a truly
noble cause: their right to use racial
stereotypes without guilt.
It goes beyond Apu (inset). There
is not a single Asian character in
the series who exists outside the
confines of their stereotype – and
there aren’t many to start with.
I suppose their accents are
what the audience find
funny so there’s never a
need to develop them
as people. And yes, The
Simpsons makes fun of
every stereotype, but
the only characters
given any variety or
complexity are the
“yellow” ones. The same
cannot be said for the Asian
characters, however.
Maybe a little stereotyping could
be tolerated if there was more to
these characters than just a funny
accent. This was The Simpsons’
chance to adopt a new path that
considers the cultural repercussions
of their writing. They blew it. They
took Kondabolu’s documentary as
an attack, and proved his point.
So usually on the ball, they missed
the mark.
Lucinda
Diamond
Simpsons’
Apu stance
is a betrayal
am a huge Simpsons fan. My
bedroom wall is plastered with
pictures from the series; I
have seen every episode
to date at least three
times. It’s an obsession.
Not dissimilar to
comedian and fan
Hari Kondabolu, who
wrote and starred
in the documentary
The Problem with Apu,
in which he discussed
the stereotyped portrayal
of the Indian Kwik-E-Mart
owner Apu Nahasapeemapetilon.
The Simpsons’ response to this
has left fans heartbroken. In its
most recent episode, which aired
on Sunday night, Marge reads Lisa
a book with “politically correct”
terms, and Lisa complains. Marge
responds with “What am I supposed
to do?” at which point Lisa breaks
the fourth wall by staring directly
into the camera. “It’s hard to say.”
She begins: “Something that started
I
NEWS
NEWS
2-28
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
TV
36-37
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
AGRICULTURE
21
CULTURE
Batman to
help college
track down
lost TV clips
By Laura Harding
Lord Newborough
hopes that his Japanese
sika deer will be
popular with non-EU
customers RHUG ESTATE
Sheep farm adds venison to its menu
as it prepares for Brexit fallout
By Dean Kirby
One of the UK’s leading producers
of organic lamb is diversifying into
venison to ensure that his Welsh farm
has “a good future after Brexit” amid
concerns about future exports.
Lord Newborough, who owns
the Rhug Estate near Corwen in
Denbighshire, said he was “deeply
concerned” that overseas markets
would become harder to access.
The farm has introduced a new
herd of Japanese sika deer favoured
by leading chefs for their meat.
The business, which was recently
granted a royal warrant by the Prince
of Wales, already supplies other
producers’ venison to restaurants in
London and Hong Kong. Increasing
demand means that it will produce
its own venison, which the aristocrat
said was one way of ensuring the
farm has “a good future after Brexit”.
The 8,000-acre farm also has 5,000
ewes producing 7,500 lambs each
year. Around 93 per cent of Welsh
lamb exports go to the EU.
“A large percentage of the lambs
we produce go to the continent, but
we don’t know what the future will
be in exporting to the EU,” Lord
Newborough told the BBC.
“We are very accustomed to
sending it across the channel where
it’s readily received, but getting
ARTS
Hislop’s play is
given freedom
of the theatre
By Rachel Roberts
Ian Hislop’s radio play about freedom
of speech is to get a month-long
theatre run.
Trial by Laughter tells the true
story of satirist William Hone, who
was accused of seditious libel in 1817
access to the new markets is going to
be difficult. We are competing with
the southern hemisphere, where
they produce a much bigger lamb and
dominate markets like Singapore and
the Middle East.”
Gareth Jones, the estate’s manager,
said the farm needed to look at
various alternatives to lamb.
He added: “The problem at the
moment is that we don’t know where
we’ll be going with Brexit and that’s
the biggest issue for the agricultural
sector, not just in Wales, but the UK.”
A spokesman for the Government
told the BBC that it was committed
to securing the best deal with the
EU through an “ambitious economic
partnership”. The spokesman
added: “As we leave the EU we
will forge new and ambitious trade
links around the world, reaching
new customers for Welsh farmers
and products, such as a recent
agreement with Saudi Arabia worth
£25m to UK lamb farmers.”
New Zealand venison
producers have reported
that there is “unprecedented”
demand for venison in the
European pet food market. It is
commonly used in food for dogs
and cats with allergies.
Previously lost footage featuring
Batman star Adam West teaching
road safety to a group of children
will be screened for the first time
in more than 50 years.
The clip from May 1967 of Batman teaching children the Green
Cross Code will be shown to an
audience of TV professionals and
enthusiasts to kick off a hunt for
100 missing television clips.
The firm Kaleidoscope, which
specialises in finding lost television footage, recently discovered
the segment, which was never
screened outside of the UK.
It will be shown at Birmingham
City University tomorrow, as the
company launches its list of the
UK’s top 100 missing TV shows,
which industry professionals most
want to see recovered.
This includes early episodes of
Doctor Who featuring Mark Eden
as Marco Polo, Top Of The Pops and
The Avengers.
The full list will be unveiled at
Birmingham City University’s
Parkside Building alongside
screenings of found clips and episodes from famous shows such as
Out Of The Unknown, Sexton Blake
and The Goodies.
Viewers have been asked to
come forward with any recordings and video tapes which could
contain lost material.
Also in demand are the Hancock’s Half Hour episode Lady
Chatterley’s Revenge from 1957 and
the Dad’s Army episode The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Walker,
which was first screened in 1969.
ROYAL FAMILY
for pillorying the government and the
Prince Regent.
“It was a huge trial for free speech,”
Hislop, the editor of Private Eye told
the journal Chortle. “He basically decided to make the jury laugh. And he
wrote an account and it’s very, very
funny. They tried to rig the trial every
single way to put him away. But the
public were not having it.”
Trial by Laughter was originally
performed on Radio 4 and is now set
to run from September to October at
the Watermill Theatre in Newbury.
Princess Royal says recovering Duke is ‘on good form’
By Tony Jones and Jemma Crew
The Princess Royal said the Duke of
Edinburgh was “on good form” when
she visited her father in hospital
following his hip operation.
She is believed to be the first
member of the Royal Family to visit
the Duke, 96, since he had surgery
nine days ago.
The Queen also gave an update
when asked about Prince Philip’s
recovery, telling a well-wisher in
Windsor: “He said he’s getting
on very well.”
Princess Anne (inset)
spent 50 minutes at the
private King Edward
VII hospital in central
London with her father,
wh o h ad a p l a n n e d
surgery to replace his joint
with a prosthetic implant.
The Queen’s comment came
during a brief walkabout after a visit
to the King George VI Day
Centre in Windsor to mark
the 60th anniversary of
her opening the building.
At the time of the
operation, Buckingham
Palace said that the
surgery to replace the
joint had been a success
and Philip was “comfortable
and in good spirits”.
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NEWS
TECHNOLOGY
App ‘will detect fake videos of celebrities’
By Rhiannon Williams
TECHNOLOGY CORRESPONDENT
A computer scientist is working on
an app capable of detecting fake
footage of celebrities and politicians,
generated by the advanced software
he created as a student.
G oogle engineer Supasorn
Suwajanakorn demonstrated the
software, which he had trained
on 14 hours of footage of former
US President Barack Obama,
during a TED conference staged in
Vancouver. The system, which uses
a neural learning network to mimic
the way the human brain works,
studies the subject’s teeth, mouth
movement and facial expressions
and learns to mimic them uncannily.
Mr Suwajanakorn (inset), who
createdthesoftwareattheUniversity
of Washington, is concerned by how
easily such technology could be
manipulated to create videos which
appear entirely real. “These results
seemed intriguing, but at the same
time troubling; it concerns me, the
potential for misuse,” he said. “We
don’t want it to be in the wrong
hands, so we have to be very
careful about it.”
One example he used
was real-seeming
footage of a world leader
announcing nuclear war
in a video circulating on
social media and across
the internet.
M r S u w a j a n a ko r n i s
working with the AI Foundation on
an app called Reality Defender, which
could run in web browsers to spot
fake videos or doctored pictures.
“Video manipulation will be
used in malicious ways
unless counter-measures
are in place,” he told the
AFP news agency. “We
have to make it very risky
and cost-ineffective.”
W h i l e
M r
Suwajanakorn’s software
is remarkably sophisticated,
there is still a “long way to go”
before it can accurately model
people, the scientist has admitted.
Similar technology is already
being used to edit the face of
female celebrities onto the bodies
of pornographic actors, creaking
videos known as “deepfakes”.
Twitter, Reddit and the
world’s largest porn site
Pornhub, announced crackdowns
on deepfake videos in February,
following a spike in uploading.
SOCIETY
What women want:
more opportunities
in science, tech,
and engineering
A conference is aiming to change
attitudes, reports Heather Saul
F
or better or for worse,
technology is an
inescapable presence in
our lives. Getting users to
switch off occasionally is
now a bigger challenge than getting
them to switch on.
Yet despite being such an
all-consuming force, just 17 per cent
of people working in computing
technology in the UK are women.
The Empowering Women
with Science and Tech all-day
conference at this year’s Leeds
International Festival hopes to
change this by reshaping our
understanding of what a career in
science, technology, engineering
and maths (Stem) looks like.
Natasha Sayce-Zelem is the
head of technology at Sky and tech
festival director.
Her goal is to encourage women
to sidestep into a technology career
by using transferable skills they
may not know they already have, as
New openings
“I think it’s great to show that
regardless of where you
come from and your qualifications,
if you see a gap in what you
need, or want on the web
then, with drive and enthusiasm,
you can fill it.”
Sarah Beeny
“We need a diverse workforce to
help shape the current and future
direction of technology so it meets
all of our needs. Not everyone is
going to want to be a coder, and
that is all right.”
Natasha Sayce-Zelem
she did. Sayce-Zelem started out
as a freelance music photographer,
photographing acts including
David Bowie and Rage Against The
Machine, before segueing into TV
and then digital development.
Her own foray into a technology
career was “pretty scary”. “I
wondered if I was making a massive
mistake,” she says. But she has
never looked back.
Now she wants employers to
shape the next generation of talent
by bringing in “diamonds in the
rough”: the candidates with these
transferable interpersonal and
communication skills who can be
trained up.
Working in tech is about more
than just coding, something this
event is designed to highlight.
Last year, BBC Radio DJ Lauren
Laverne was a guest speaker
after co-founding The Pool, an
online platform targeted at
women, in 2015. This year,
property presenter and online
entrepreneur Sarah Beeny will
be talking about her successful
websites My Single Friend,
a dating site launched in
2005, and Tepilo, the
online estate agency.
Sayce-Zelem’s aim is
to tackle the alienation
that may deter some
women from working
in it. “I try to showcase
speakers that you wouldn’t
naturally associate with tech,”
she says.
Beeny (inset) insists she is not
a “tech fan” as such. “I actually
think founding an online business is
much easier if you are a bit of a tech
Luddite,” she says.
June Sarpong
will be chairing
a panel during
the conference in
Leeds GETTY
An empathetic approach
The all-female panel is compèred by
June Sarpong, the broadcaster and
author of Diversify, a collection of
research on diversity and inclusion
across society. Neuroscientist Dr
Sophie Scott will talk about the
science of laughter.
Belinda Parmar, who runs The
Empathy Business, will discuss
the power of empathy and its place
in business and the technology
industry. “We know statistically, on
average, women have higher levels of
empathy,” she said . “However, what
we don’t know is whether it’s because
women are socially conditioned to be
more sociable and pleasing of others.
“I’ll be talking about how gender
can divide us and empathy unites
us, and I’ll be talking about what I
think the future looks like in terms
of how we can have more empathy
in the way we recruit and in the
products themselves.”
This month, the median gender
pay gap was revealed as 9.8
per cent across UK businesses
with more than 250 staff. This
gap is exacerbated in the
tech industry by the
overwhelming number of
men in senior positions,
and it takes seed at
school. Just 10 per
cent of students who
completed an A-level
computing course in 2017
were female.
An enduring problem is a
lack of awareness of how creative
tech actually is, says Sayce-Zelem.
“A lot of what we do is around
people and problems. As a team,
we have to creatively problem
solve.” The process is so creative
she believes the science, technology,
engineering and maths acronym
Stem could be replaced with
“Steam”: “In all of those, the arts
are so important,” she says.
Improving awareness is also
about promoting women role
models in media, TV and film, she
adds. While dramas such as The
Social Network have highlighted
leading male figures, few celebrate
leading women.
“I know a lot of women who got
into law because of Ally McBeal,”
says Sayce-Zelem. “They enjoyed
relating to a lawyer and found the
different facets of her job really
interesting. Having a few more
of these roles written for women
in films and TV could be a really
progressive step forward.”
Her own role models include
Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE, the
co-founder of Stemettes, a social
enterprise which aims to improve
the representation of girls and
women in Stem industries, and
astronaut Helen Sharman, a
speaker at the festival.
“Most people won’t realise she
was not only Britain’s first female
astronaut into space, but she was
Britain’s first astronaut into space.
People focus on Tim Peake and his
amazing achievements, but Helen
was there doing it first.”
The discussion of what it
means to be a woman in tech
needs broadening urgently, she
adds. “There are a lot of women
who become alienated: they
don’t feel they belong in tech
‘gang’ because they don’t code
and they think it is exclusively
around coding.”
Getting 17 per cent closer to 50
per cent is about creating more
awareness of the vast range of roles
available, she says.
“It’s just not known to people
how cool and exciting the industry
is – and it’s constantly evolving.
Technology is the language we all
use. It’s the most spoken language
in the world.”
Leeds International Festival begins
on 27 April. For more information,
visit leedsinternationalfestival.com
24
NEWS
ENVIRONMENT
BRAZIL
New logging rules
may change the
tune of guitars
Ranchers plant
cocoa in effort
to save rainforest
By Michael Casey
IN CONCORD
An international crackdown on illegal logging in tropical forests is
threatening some American guitarmakers, whose top-end products
require small amounts of rosewood,
which is prized for its resonant sound.
Since new trade rules took effect in
The guitar industry’s
frustration is focused
on a United Nations convention
that is responsible for
combating wildlife smuggling.
2017, luthiers have complained about
long delays in getting permits to import rosewood and export finished
instruments that contain it. Warehouses have filled with unsold instruments, and a bagpipe maker in New
Hampshire went so far as to ask the
Governor to intervene after a permit
application was lost.
“I’m so annoyed. I’m so distraught
by this,” said Chris Martin, chairman
of Martin and Co, which uses rosewood in 200 models of acoustic guitar, some played by Eric Clapton, Ed
Sheeran, Sting and other stars.
Fearful that Africa and Asia were
losing rosewood forests, governments adopted the rules to stem the
Travel Offer
By Marcy Nicholson
Brazil’s cattle ranchers are planting
cocoa on their used-up pasture with
financial support from international
environmental groups, which hope it
will help save the rainforest.
For decades, ranchers have been
the engine of clear-cutting in the Amazon rainforest that has rendered an
area nearly the size of Spain treeless.
Environmentalists say the practice
destroys wildlife habitat and undermines the planet’s ability to absorb
carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas.
“Cocoa plantations favour the
local, regional and national economy,”
the international campaign group
The Nature Conservancy said on
its website.
The renewed planting could make
Brazil one of the world’s top three
cocoa growers again.REUTERS
Luthiers argue that they use only a small amount of rosewood AP
flow of smuggled rosewood to China’s
luxury furniture makers. But the restrictions have hurt companies that
use relatively tiny amounts of the
wood in guitars, clarinets and oboes.
Months after the regulations were
adopted, US acoustic guitar exports
fell by 28 per cent, and electric guitar
exports declined 23 per cent, according to Music Trades magazine.
Latin America proposed the
regulations to combat increased
rosewood smuggling over the
past decade.
“There are other woods that work,”
Mr Martin said. But guitar builders
and players know there is “something
very special” about rosewood’s richness of sound. “No one has found… a
wood that works better.” AP
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VOICES
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BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
25
CHINA
Baby is born four years after his parents died
By Rachel Roberts
A baby has been born to a surrogate
mother in China four years after his
parents died in a car crash.
The couple had frozen several
embryos and the mother was due
to undergo IVF five days after their
deaths in March 2013.
The baby boy was born in
Guangzhou in December 2017 after a
long and protracted fight by the dead
couple’s parents, Chinese media
reported yesterday.
Surrogacy is illegal in China, but
the grandparents used a woman
from Laos to carry the child, named
Tiantian. he parents, Shen Jie and
Liu Xi, were both only children born
during the era of China’s one-childper-family policy – leaving the two
sets of grandparents anxious to
carry on their bloodlines.
The embryos were frozen in a
liquid nitrogen tank in a Nanjing
hospital atfer the fatal accident.
When the hospital refused to meet
the grandparents to discuss the
situation, they tried a fresh tactic,
with one pair suing the other for
ownership of the embryos.
“The risk of suing the hospital was
too great,” Shen Xinnian, the father
of Mr Shen, told Beijing News.
Afteronesetofgrandparentswona
court case granting them ownership,
they hit another stumbling block
after being told they could take the
embryos only if another hospital
agreed to store them.
Other Chinese hospitals proved
unwilling to get involved because
of the legal uncertainty over
untransplanted embryos, leading the
grandparents to look to Laos, where
commercial surrogacy is legal.
With no airline willing to carry
a thermos-sized bottle of liquid
nitrogen, the embryos were taken
across the border by car, and two
were implanted into the womb of
the surrogate mother, resulting in a
pregnancy.
The 27-year-old woman gave birth
to the child in China after travelling
there on a tourist visa so the child
would have Chinese nationality.
Proving paternity was the next
hurdle, with all four grandparents
having to give blood and take DNA
tests to establish that both parents
had been Chinese nationals and
that the child was indeed their
grandson. Hu Xingxian, the baby’s
maternal grandmother, chose
the name Tiantian, which means
“sweet sweet”. “His eyes look like
my daughter’s,” Ms Hu told the
Beijing News. “But he looks more
like his father.”
Medical institutions are
banned from carrying
out “any form of surrogacy”
by a 2001 Ministry of Health
regulation, but it is a grey area,
with law-enforcement agencies
frequently looking the other way.
UNITED STATES
By Tom Embury-Dennis
In an interview set “to shock the
President”, the former FBI director
James Comey has reportedly compared Donald Trump to a mob boss.
A clip of the interview, which was
released ahead of its full broadcast
on Sunday, shows ABC’s George
Stephanopoulos ask Mr Comey
(inset): “How strange is it for
you to sit here and compare the President to a
mob boss?”
Mr Comey was fired
as head of America’s
federal law enforcement
agency last year after
he repeatedly refused to
promise his loyalty to Mr
Trump. The White House insists
it was triggered by his handling of a
2016 investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private email server.
According to the Axios news website, a source present at the filming
said the interview was “going to shock
the President and his team” and that
it would “certainly add more meat to
the charges swirling around Trump”.
The source said Mr Comey “told
George things that he’s never said
before” and that he “answered
every question”. In the clip, Mr
Stephanopoulos asks Mr Comey:
“Are there things you know, but
haven’t said, that could damage
Trump?”; “Was President Trump
obstructing justice?”; and “Should
Donald Trump be impeached?”
Mr Comey does not speak during
the 30-second video.
Last summer, Mr Comey
testified the President had
asked him to drop an investigation into sacked
National Security Adviser Michael Flynn and
pressured Mr Comey to
declare that Mr Trump
was not being investigated as part of Robert
Mueller’s investigation.
Appearing before the Senate
Intelligence Committee, Mr Comey
said the President had lied when he
claimed to the public the FBI was in
disarray and that agents had lost confidence in him. “Those were lies, plain
and simple,” he said.
Sunday’s ABC interview is the first
part of a high-profile press tour for
Mr Comey’s book, A Higher Loyalty:
Truth, Lies & Leadership, which will be
released next week.
THE INDEPENDENT
Punk turtle
on the edge
GREECE
Fighter pilot dies as airspace tensions intensify
By Luke Rix-Standing
A Greek air force fighter pilot
died when his jet crashed in the
eastern Aegean Sea while taking
part in near-daily mock dogfights
in airspace disputed with Turkey,
Greek defence officials have said.
Greek navy ships and army
helicopters were dispatched to
search for the missing pilot, whose
death was announced by the defence
minister. “A Greek pilot joins the
pantheon of heroes. He fell in the
defence of our national sovereignty
and territorial integrity,” Panos
Kammenos said.
Officials from the Greek defence
ministry told the state broadcaster
that a Mirage 2000-5 jet crashed
north of the island of Skyros.
They did not mention a possible
cause, but patrols have intensified
in recent weeks along the disputed
In tomorrow’s
boundary over the Greek islands,
with both Turkey and Greece flying
sorties in the area.
Though generally unarmed, their
close engagements have led to fears
of an inflammatory accident.
Turkey’s military denied any
involvement in yesterday’s crash,
accord in g to th e Haberturk
newspaper, saying that there were
no Turkish military planes in the
area at the time.
One-minute Wijuko
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13 APRIL 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
27
RWANDA
Trade can save
Africa, but only
on Africa’s terms,
says Kagame
In his final special report, Michael Day
assesses the President’s plan for peace
and prosperity across the continent
I
n a sign of Rwanda’s growing
confidence, the little African
nation has just locked horns
with Donald Trump in what
must be the US government’s
unlikeliest trade war.
For years, firms in Europe
and the US have bought surplus
donations from charities and
sold them on to the developing
world for a profit. But in 2016, east
African countries, concerned that
imported cast-offs were killing
their own nascent clothes trades,
decided to play dirty. Rwanda
increased tariffs on imported
used clothes from $0.20 to $2.50
per kilo. America has responded
by threatening tariffs of its own.
Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania
backed down. But not Rwanda.
On 29 March, Trump said he
would suspend duty-free access for
Rwandan goods by June. President
Paul Kagame said fine, you do that,
in so many words.
On his election in January this
year as head of the African Union,
Kagame (inset) declared that trade
could save the continent, but it
would have to be trade on Africa’s
terms. He went some way to
realising that goal last month when
the African Free Trade agreement
was signed in the capital, Kigale.
Firms such as Pharma Lab in
the Free Trade Zone, an industrial
area which has sprung up from
nothing in Kigali in just a few years,
are driving growth and helping to
modernise Rwanda’s economy
It sells and distributes German
medical laboratory products.
Employees are sent to Germany
to learn how maintain the devices.
Jacqueline Karakezi, the firm’s
founder and managing director,
says the government is also
The Rwandan capital’s burgeoning economy is helping to heal the wounds of the past CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY
political experiment. For now, it
appears to be working.
Growth rates have averaged 5-6
per cent over the last decade.
Across town from the Free Trade
Zone is Kigali’s telecom building.
On the sixth floor, the governmentand NGO-funded FabLab and
KLab provide space, facilities and
technical support for Rwandan
businesses, entrepreneurs and
students looking to design and
market tech ideas.
Out on the sixth-floor
balcony, 17-year-old
Linda Pacifique Ikirezi,
is working on her big
idea – an app that will
allow Rwandan workers
to connect with potential
employers. “This is great place
to come to, to see other people and
to get technical help,” she says.
Her dreams have some way to go
before being realised. And Rwanda
might never fully recover from what
happened 24 years ago. But seeing
a 17-year-old designing apps to help
Hutus and Tutsis find jobs suggests
things might be going in the right
direction. Let’s hope the rest of the
continent follows.
encouraging it to begin exporting
and even manufacturing products
and services to other countries in
the region.
A large photo portrait of
President Kagame hangs behind
her desk. Despite criticism from
overseas dissidents and human
right groups, Ms Karakezi is in
no doubt about who has revived
Rwanda. “Kagame is an exceptional
person,” she says. “He has a vision
for Rwanda, the region and Africa.”
She says that Kagame has
instilled discipline into Rwandan
industry and made the fight against
corruption a priority.
Rosette Kamariza, 26, is a
microbiology graduate who works
in the company’s air and water
purification units. She hails the
importance of new industry in
Rwanda. “I think this is crucial for
Rwanda’s success. We are now the
only factory in East Africa making
these things.”
In addition, both women indicate
how Rwanda has been successful
in getting women into skilled jobs.
Last week Kagame appointed a
woman, Yvonne Manzi Makolo,
as chief executive of the national
airline RwandAir. Nearly two-thirds
of MPs are women. It’s debatable
how much power parliamentarians
have. But Kagame clearly
understands the importance
of symbols – and the untapped
potential of women.
Pharma Lab, and the other
start-ups in the Free Trade Zone,
are small, for now at least. But
the significance lies in what they
represent. The Rwandan
government had grasped
that wealth and
employment is the best
way to fight unrest.
People don’t talk
politics in Rwanda.
They avoid any potential
source of conflict. “People
might get angry in a bar, but
they’ll never fight, ever,” says one
NGO worker.
Guilt and grief are not mentioned
much. But they loom large. It’s
impossible to walk down the street
here and see a middle-aged man
without wondering what he saw
or did 24 years ago. Kagame hopes
that he can put a lid on this and pass
the baton on to the next, untainted
generation. It’s effectively a giant
UNITED STATES
INDIA
POLAND
Louisiana approves bill
banning sex with animals
Minarets at Taj £6bn budget for battle against smog
Mahal gates fall By Luke Rix-Standing
highest in winter when households
Raising expectations Help for young entrepreneurs
In Kigali’s Telecom tower, help is at
hand for young entrepreneurs
FabLab offers help for people
looking to design furniture, buildings
and above all, business involving 3D
printing. There are 85 members.
The KLab has 1,200 members who
have software ambitions. For most
of them, that means a search for the
next big smart phone app. Typical
are Schandrack Shumbusho, 21, and
Pacifique Kamugisha, 23, who have
By Tom Embury-Dennis
Louisiana’s state senate has approved a bill explicitly banning sex
with animals by 25 votes to 10.
The bill, which now goes to the
House of Representatives, would
make sexual abuse of an animal
illegal, require an abused animal to
be taken from its abuser and bar
those convicted from owning any
pets in future.
A law covering “crimes against
nature” – which includes bestiality
– exists on the books, but was ruled
unconstitutional in 2003 by the
high hopes for their new Apple and
Android friendly apps that allow
secure, cash payments to be made
between smart phones. “It’s almost
ready. Now we just need financial
backing,” says Shumbusho. “We are
going to show it at the May investors
conference in Kigali.
Support from an overseas branch
of America’s Carnegie Mellon
university adds to the sense that
Kigali might be going places.
Supreme Court. The state senator
who wrote and sponsored the bill,
J P Morrell, said it was written to
better define bestiality and make it
illegal under an enforceable law.
Ahead of the vote, Mr Morrell
told lawmakers: “God forbid you
vote against this bill. Good luck
explaining it.”
The 10 senators – all Republican
– who voted against the bill were
senate president John Alario, Brett
Allain, Dan Claitor, Jack Donahue,
Jim Fannin, Ryan Gatti, Gerald
Long, Beth Mizell, Jonathan Perry
and Neil Riser. THE INDEPENDENT
By Luke Rix-Standing
A powerful storm toppled two
minarets at the entry gates of
the famed Taj Mahal in northern
India, but no damage was done to
the white marble main building.
Bhubanesh Kumar, an official
of the Archaeological Survey
of India, said the damage was
minor and would be repaired
by experts. The winds during
the storm on Wednesday night
reached 80mph.
The 17th-century Taj Mahal
attracts up to eight million
visitors a year. AP
use cheap coal and fuels or even
Poland’s government plans to spend
trash for heating. Some Poles wear
up to £6.3bn by 2028 on cleaner
masks when the pollution is high, as
heating as part of its efforts
air quality reports show.
to fight smog.
“We treat this problem
Polish Prime Minister
seriously. We don’t want
Mateusz Morawiecki
our children to associmade the announceate winter with masks
ment yesterday at a
on their faces, but
of Europe’s 50
with snow and sledge
government commitmost polluted
tee tasked with fighting
a n d s n ow m e n ,” M r
cities are in
Poland
air pollution under a new
Morawiecki said.
“Stop Smog” programme.
The government wants
The World Health Organisato co-finance household insution says that 33 out of Europe’s 50
lation and the purchase of cleaner
most polluted cities are in Poland,
heating systems, hoping that will
including Krakow. Air pollution is
significantly cut down the pollution.
33
28
NEWS
Panorama
Around the
world in
10 stories
IN GENEVA
MIDDLE EAST
Fifteen killed in
Taliban battle
Gaza casualties
stretch hospitals
The Taliban stormed a
government compound in
central Afghanistan, triggering
a lengthy gun battle which
killed 15, including three top
local officials, before they drove
Afghan forces out.
The attack in the Khuja
Omari district was the latest
insurgent assault in Ghazni
province, which is now largely
under Taliban control.
The Taliban, who took
responsibility for the attack,
planted mines to prevent
government reinforcements
from going to help. AP
Hundreds of Gaza Palestinians
wounded by Israeli fire in two weeks
of border violence are severely taxing
the coastal strip’s hospitals.
Palestinian health officials say
nearly 1,300 people have been shot
and wounded by Israeli soldiers
during the mass border protests,
which were called for by the
territory’s Hamas rulers.
The casualty figures are at the
heart of an intensifying debate over
the military’s open-fire orders. The
Israeli military has disputed the Gaza
count of wounded –in clashes that
have killed 33 Palestinians – saying
that at most dozens were shot. AP
Supporters of
jailed Lula take
on his name
By Luke Rix-Standing
More than 60 Brazilian
members of congress from the
opposition Workers’ Party have
formally changed their name to
“Lula” in honour of their jailed
former leader.
Party head Gleisi Hoffmann
WTO says Trump trade war
could cost America jobs
By Jamey Keaten
AFGHANISTAN
BRAZIL
SWITZERLAND
led the tribute to Luiz Inácio
Lula da Silva, the former
Brazilian president.
She will now be known as
Gleisi Lula Hoffmann in official
Congress documents, in a
move followed in droves by her
party colleagues.
But right-wing opponents
responded by adding Judge
Sérgio Moro – who convicted
Lula – to their names.
The former president began a
12-year sentence for corruption
on Saturday. He says the
corruption charges against him
were politically motivated.
The head of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) has warned that President Donald Trump’s plan to protect
US businesses with trade tariffs on
imports could cause a “domino effect” that costs jobs.
Roberto A zevedo waded
delicately into the possible impact
of a simmering US-China dispute
involving tit-for-tat tariffs that
could escalate into a trade war with
consequences for the global economy.
Asked if he could understand
Trump supporters who want to see
US manufacturing jobs return home,
Idaho
Scores of dead geese rained
down from the sky during a
“freak event” in the US.
The birds were migrating
north over Idaho when the
entire flock was struck by
lightning, wildlife experts say.
More than 100 plummeted
on to a car park and nearby
rooftop in the city of Idaho
Falls during a ferocious storm.
“All of them were dead,” said
James Brower, co-ordinator
with the state’s Department of
Fish and Game. “Nothing was
moving or twitching. Mother
Nature is sometimes cruel to
the wildlife kingdom.”
Officials initially found
51 birds on the ground on
Saturday but a further 61 were
later discovered on the roof of a
nearby warehouse.
They were a mix of snow
geese and Ross’s geese.
Mr Brower said that fish and
game officer Jacob Berl was
one of the first on the scene.
“He opened a few up and saw
their lungs were exploded. It’s
sad. It’s never something you
want to see.”
It is thought a perfect storm
of factors – the timing, wind
and direction of flight – all
contributed to the deadly
incident. However, in order
to better understand how
precisely the lightning affected
the flock, the department has
said it will now send several
of the birds for necropsies to
determine an official cause of
death. THE INDEPENDENT
Colin Drury
Mr Azevedo said that “every country,
every leader” wants to create jobs
and improve salaries.
But, he said, “actions that you
Survivor
bears
the scars
Auschwitz-Birkenau
survivor Zoltan
Matyah shows his prisoner number tattooed
on his arm outside the
Nazi death camp in
Oswiecim, Poland. He
gathered with others
ahead of the annual
“March of the Living”,
in commemoration
to the six million Jews
who were killed during
the Holocaust. AFP/
GETTY
PACIFIC OCEAN
Woman swept away by wave on cruise ship deck
A passenger who fell off a cruise ship
reportedly went on deck to be sick
before a wave swept her away as her
husband watched helplessly.
A member of crew on the P&O
cruise-liner Pacific Dawn raised the
alarm, prompting a search which
was still under way last night. P&O
said that a crew member saw the
woman fall over the side of the ship
about 4pm yesterday, 300km west of
New Caledonia, a French territory in
the South Pacific.
“A crew member notified the
bridge straight away and the ‘man
overboard’ incident response was
activated immediately,” said David
Jones, a spokesman for P&O.
“In line with this, Pacific Dawn
turned around to follow the course it
was on at the time of the incident.” .
The Australian Maritime Safety
Authority and New Caledonian
authorities issued a call for nearby
vessels to assist in the search.
AUSTRALIA
SWITZERLAND
NEW ZEALAND
Turnbull to ease
China ‘tension’
Billionaire still
missing in Alps
Ardern bans sea
oil exploration
Australian Prime Minister
Malcolm Turnbull has said there
is “some tension” in relations with
Beijing, following accusations
of Chinese meddling in the
country’s politics.
Mr Turnbull emphasised
positivity in the relationship,
and declined to say if Australian
officials had been refused visas to
China. He said he was confident
“any misunderstandings” would
be resolved. AP
A strong storm in the Swiss Alps was
hampering efforts yesterday to find
a German billionaire, Karl-Erivan
Haub, who has been missing on the
Matterhorn since Saturday.
The head of the rescue effort,
Anjan Truffer, said the bad weather
meant teams had not been able to
head out as planned, the DPA agency
reported. The businessman, 58, heir
to the Tengelmann retail empire, was
training for a ski mountaineering race
when he disappeared. AP
New Zealand’s government is to
ban all new offshore oil and gas
exploration in a historic climate
win that has come after seven
years of public protests.
By ending new oil and gas
exploration, Jacinda Ardern’s
coalition government has
effectively put the fourth-largest
exclusive economic zone (EEZ) on
the planet – covering more than
four million sq km – off limits for
any new fossil fuel exploitation.
By Katie Grant
Postcard
From...
WTO head Roberto Azevedo fears a
‘domino effect’ from the US policy AFP
take are not the end of the process”
but can prompt retaliation. “And
that kind of domino effect may have
implications that will undermine
your original goals,” he said.
Mr Trump has led efforts to
slap penalties on $150bn (£107bn)
worth of imports from China. China
has responded with a decision to
tax $50bn in US products such as
soybeans and small aircraft.
The 23-year-old WTO has faced
criticism it is ill-equipped to ensure
fair and free trade – as epitomised
by Mr Trump’s complaints about a
yawning US trade deficit with China
and claims it is swiping coveted
intellectual property. AP
13.04.2018
FR DAY
Film
Music
Comedy
Theatre
GoingOut
Staying In
Television
Books
I hate
doing sex
scenes
Helen Mirren talks
to James Mottram about
entering her ‘death period’,
the end of privacy and
the joy of laziness
H
elen Mirren saunters into a
Venetian garden in the midday
sun. Sporting a bright yellow
skirt, purple nail polish and
rainbow-coloured cardigan,
she’s here to talk about The Leisure Seeker,
an OAP road movie pairing her with Donald Sutherland. Leisure seeking is something she’s rather good at. “I’m unbelievably
lazy,” she says, grinning. “I’ve just spent two
months doing nothing at all.”
Still, when Dame Helen does get to work,
she makes it count. Her 40-year screen career ranges from the game-changing Baftawinning female detective Jane Tennison in
the Prime Suspect series to her Oscar-fêted
turn as Elizabeth II in The Queen. Even
when she’s not the lead – her gangster’s moll
in The Long Good Friday, her head housekeeper in Gosford Park (another Oscar nod)
– she’s utterly memorable.
Now she’s in her “death” period. In 2016,
she played the Grim Reaper – albeit wearing a beret and a feather boa – in the critically mauled Collateral Beauty with Will Smith.
“It was about finding the light in darkness
and suffering,” she says, defensively. In The
Leisure Seeker, her character Ella Spencer is
suffering from a terminal illness, while her
husband John (Sutherland), a former literature professor, is sliding towards dementia.
“As much a part of life as anything else”,
death can’t be ignored, she says. “We’re all
headed in that direction, sorry to tell you. You
realise that as you lose friends and colleagues. It becomes a part of your life at
every age; it’s not just what happens to
older people.”
Her first film with Sutherland since
1990 docudrama Bethune: The Making
30
FILM
FR DAY
‘I get to be in
action movies:
they love Oscar
winners!’
Continued from page 29
of a Hero sees this bickering married couple travel in a motor home
to the Florida Keys so that John
can realise his dream of visiting
Ernest Hemingway’s house.
The film is far removed from the
likes of The Best Exotic Marigold
Hotel. Capturing the frustrations
of long-term marriage, there’s
also a gentle bedroom moment
between Mirren and Sutherland.
“I was a bit nervous about the
sex scene. I didn’t really want to
do it,” she admits. How did she
get over it? “Donald was great. He
sort of took charge.”
It’s hard to imagine Mirren
being bashful: after a time at the
RSC in the late Sixties, she garnered a pin-up reputation in films
such as Caligula, Excalibur and
The Cook, The Thief, His Wife And
Her Lover. The truth is somewhat
different, though. “I always hated
doing sex scenes. Every part of
my life.”
Now 72, Mirren has a life-loving
aura about her, as sparkling as her
platinum-blonde bob. What happens when you die doesn’t concern her. “I’m not into that sort of
thing. Neither were my parents.”
Mirren’s English mother Kitty
and Russian father Vasily, who
played viola in the London Philharmonic and later drove a taxi,
were secular by nature. “Make
the most of [life]” was their motto.
“People are living longer, with
healthier lifestyles,” Mirren says,
before adding. “I don’t exercise.”
A thought strikes her about living on into your nineties. “Honestly, do you really want to live that
long? I do in a way because I’m so
fascinated by where technology is
taking us, having witnessed the
world without technology.” She’s
talking about the pre-internet age.
“It’s so fundamentally changed
our world.”
For her husband, the American
film director Taylor Hackford,
whom she met on 1985’s White
Nights, the rise of streaming sites
such as Netflix changed everything. “It’s devastating for film
directors, because they want their
movies to be watched communally
in a cinema.”
Needless to say, at home, Mirren daren’t watch movies on her
phone. “But I’ll watch them on my
iPad,” she smiles.
In her line of work, technology has, of course, changed issues of privacy. “There used to
be an understanding, but now it
is completely gone. Random people taking photos, emails being
hacked, people doing screen
grabs. It used to be if you did a
nude scene, for example, it was a
closed set, no photography. Now
they [take] a screenshot from the
movie and put it on the internet,
for everybody to see.”
What about social media? Does
it bring actors and fans closer together? “It appears to be closer,
but it isn’t really,” she says. “Actually it’s as managed as film magazines from the 1950s.” Thankfully,
Mirren’s Instagram account is delightfully from the heart – pictures
of John Hurt, George Michael
and London buses. “Everybody
brands themselves now. What
Andy Warhol said has come true.”
One potent moment in The Leisure Seeker sees Ella and John accidentally join a pro-Trump rally,
which director Paolo Virzi shot
before Trump became President
in November 2016; back then, nobody believed he would make it
to the White House. Has she considered moving back to Britain in
the wake of his election? “No,” she
says, carefully. “My husband is
American and I have a lot of family in America.” While it’s not hard
to see where her loyalties lie – her
Instagram features a girl with
“F**k Trump” painted on to her
lips – she has “great faith” in the
American people.
What about Brexit? “It’s very
hard to see where Brexit is going
to take us. Rather like Trump’s
America, it was a rather nostalgic
idea. Let’s go back to how it used
to be, with cricket and tea on the
lawn and people being nice to
each other. None of these horrible
problems [of today].”
For Mirren, the past few years
have been gloriously entertaining, even living out action-movie
fantasies in Red and Fast and the
Furious 8. Next, she stars in Luc
Besson’s crime thriller Anna,
then the big Disney extravaganza The Nutcracker and the
Four Realms. Lazy or not, Mirren
has clearly been enjoying these
post-Oscar freedoms.
“It’s one of the advantages of
winning: I get to be in action movies! They love having Oscar winners in their action movies. They
want to bring you down.”
‘The Leisure Seeker’ (15) opens
next Friday
On the road Mirren with Donald Sutherland in ‘The Leisure Seeker’
Mutants
go ape in
plotless
B movie
RAMPAGE (12A)
Filmof
theweek
HHHHH
Brad Peyton, 100 mins, starring:
Dwayne Johnson, Jeffrey Dean Morgan,
Malin Akerman, Naomie Harris
Reviews by Geoffrey Macnab
It’s when a giant crocodile, a
huge wolf and a King Kong-sized
ape scurry up a Chicago skyscraper that it becomes clear
that Rampage, the new monster
movie starring Dwayne “The
Rock” Johnson, has completely
lost the plot.
The film, loosely based on a
video game, must have cost a fortune, but its crummy storyline
would barely pass muster in the
ALSOSHOWING
A GENTLE CREATURE (18)
HHHHH
Sergei Loznitsa, 143 mins, starring:
Vasilina Makovtseva, Liya
Akhedzhakova, Valeriu Andriuta
The title of Sergei Loznitsa’s new
film comes from a celebrated
19th-century Dostoevsky short
story, but the action is set firmly
in contemporary Russia. The
protagonist is a forlorn young
woman (Vasilina Makovtseva)
whose husband is serving a
sentence for murder. The plot
revolves around her efforts to
deliver him a parcel full of basic
clothes and food stuffs.
If you’ve ever stood in a queue
at a post office or travelled on
an overcrowded bus, you will
feel sympathy for the plight
of Loznitsa’s hapless heroine.
Everything and everybody is
against this “gentle creature”.
In the Kafka-esque world
which the director portrays with
very grim humour, decency and
justice are in short supply. The
film has a warped, nightmarishlike feel. Makovtseva’s unnamed
protagonist is not the prisoner –
but she is caught in a purgatorial
world anyway.
CUSTODY (15)
HHHHH
Xavier Legrand, 94 mins, starring:
Léa Drucker, Denis Ménochet,
Thomas Gioria, Mathilde Auneveux
Custody is like a French version
of Kramer vs. Kramer – but done
as a brutal thriller instead of a
tearjerker. Some of its insights
are similar to those found in the
celebrated American movie:
when a couple get divorced,
it doesn’t mean they both
stop loving one another. The
difference here is that instead
of cuddly Dustin Hoffman,
the husband, Antoine (Denis
Ménochet), is a tormented,
boorish and abusive man. The
mystery is why the long-suffering
Miriam (Léa Drucker) married
him in the first place.
Only gradually do we realise
that Antoine may be unhinged
and wants to control every aspect
of his family’s life.
In the latter stages, the film
changes dramatically in tone.
What had appeared to be a
naturalistic study of the break-up
of a marriage turns into a violent
thriller. We begin to understand
the secrecy and shame which
have clouded the children’s lives.
A chilling and well-observed
study of domestic violence that is
all the more powerful because of
its slow-burn approach.
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
For no particular reason, Rampage opens with a scene in space.
A scientist is stuck in a spaceship
with a giant rat which has been
“genetically edited” and is now
trying to kill her. After a big explosion, the growth serum blasts
across the universe and lands in
the wildlife sanctuary. George
takes it and, in no time at all,
grows to King Kong size, escapes
from the sanctuary and goes on
the rampage. Cops and special
forces are after him but are powerless to stop him.
Nor can they do anything about
an enormous wolf which has also
quaffed down some of the growth
substance and is likewise on a
wrecking spree.
The special effects are the film’s
strongest element. We get to see
the monsters munching on aeroplanes and helicopters as if they’re
snacks. The wolf has a ravenous
Naomie Harris’s
main achievement
here is in keeping a
straight face
Cheeky monkey
George destroys
buildings and
aircraft alike
creakiest 1950s B movie. Director
Brad Peyton follows pretty much
the same formula as his previous
(and equally far-fetched) San Andreas. The slight difference here
is that it isn’t earthquakes which
are rumbling America but giant
mutant animals.
Johnson plays Davis Okoye, a
conservationist who works at the
San Diego Wildlife Sanctuary. He
is especially close to the albino ape
George, whom he rescued when
the chimp was two years old. He
has taught George sign language.
The animal knows how to give him
the finger, how to fist bump and
how to share a joke. Davis gets on
far better with his simian pal than
any of the humans he works with.
Film
Matrix
appetite which it can only satisfy
by eating soldiers.
It’s dispiriting to see an actress
of Naomie Harris’s calibre lumbered with some of the lines she
is given here as a genetic scientist
who continually tries to explain
just how the serum works. Her
main achievement is to keep a
straight face.
Dwayne Johnson is the same
likeable, impassive presence he
is in every other action movie. All
the death and destruction never
upsets him. The most agitated he
becomes is when he reminisces
about the poachers in Africa who
killed George’s mother. In fact, he
is far more upset about this than
about the soldiers massacred by
the mutant animals.
Thanks to Johnson’s screen
persona and the film’s sense of its
own ridiculousness, Rampage has
a certain charm, thrilling the audience one moment then making
them groan at a bad pun the next.
But sophisticated storytelling it
isn’t. THE INDEPENDENT
Life or death question
lacks shock value
TRUTH OR DARE (15)
HHHHH
Jeff Wadlow, 100 mins, starring:
Lucy Hale, Violett Beane, Tyler Posey,
Sophia Taylor Ali, Landon Liboiron,
Nolan Gerard Funk
Truth Or Dare is one of the sillier offerings from producer Jason
Blum, the man behind hits from
Paranormal Activity and Get Out
to Insidious and The Purge. It has a
very flimsy high-concept premise:
a group of college students go on
their last spring break to Mexico
for a few days of sex, sun and sangria. On their final night, they are
lured to an abandoned religious
mission where they play a game
of “truth or dare”. The game turns
out to be in deadly earnest. Back
at college, they are forced to keep
on playing by a malevolent force.
If they forfeit their turn, they die.
Bloodcurdling incidents soon
mount as the students perform
ever more lethal dares and reveal
devastating truths.
Early on, the film has some of
the same irreverent feel as Harmony Korine’s Springbreakers.
The good-looking, self-absorbed,
pampered college kids are relentless hedonists, and the game very
quickly reveals that they are far
more interested in their own wellbeing than in that of anyone else.
Even the main protagonist, Olivia
(Lucy Hale), who had been planning to do humanitarian volunteer
work during the spring break, has
a ruthless survival instinct.
Every character is hiding a secret and suffering anxiety as a result. Brad is gay but terrified about
coming out to his dad, a homophobic cop. The fun-loving Markie, Olivia’s best friend, is tormented by
the suicide of her beloved father.
Medical student Tyson has been
forging prescriptions.
Director Jeff Wadlow throws in
a fair amount of gore and the students hallucinate that the demon
is everywhere – that even their
best friends are taunting them.
Suddenly, these friends will start
speaking in a hoarse voice and develop rictus-like smiles that make
them look like a rip-off Joker.
But the real truth is that the
film is very rarely frightening.
Blum and his associates are trying
hard to establish Truth Or Dare as
a franchise. There is something
cynical in the way they try to tick
off boxes. This is a rites of passage
story and a tale about the shifting sands of friendship. It is also
surprisingly topical – a horror
picture for the social media age.
Cambridge Analytica may not
have details of the characters’ Facebook accounts, but the demon
most certainly does.
A few moments of ingenuity
aside, this is lacklustre film-making, its premise so contrived that
any attempts to stir up suspense
are stifled. THE INDEPENDENT
There’s
something
out there
A demonic
being
haunts
Lucy
Hale and
friends
REEL
= TALK=
JESSICA BARRETT
Big hitters join
CIA torture drama
Annette Bening (above), Adam
Driver and Jon Hamm will star in
The Torture Report. The script, by
Contagion writer Scott Z Burns,
will focus on the CIA’s treatment
of terrorist detainees in the wake
of the Twin Towers attacks.
Brit duo sign up to
psychological thriller
Russell Tovey (above) and Jim
Carter have joined Bill Condon’s
adaptation of The Good Liar. The
drama, based on the Nicholas
Searle novel, is about a con artist
(Ian McKellen) who meets a rich
widow (Helen Mirren) online.
Woah! Bill and Ted
plan reunion
A third Bill and Ted instalment
is edging closer: writer Chris
Matheson says he has come
up with a way in which Keanu
Reeves (above) and Alex Winter
could return to the roles. “You’re
told you’re gonna save the world,”
he says. “Now you’re 50 and you
haven’t done it. It affects their
marriages, their relationships
with their kids, their everything.”
WHAT CRITICS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NEW RELEASES
RAMPAGE (12A)
TRUTH OR DARE (15)
A GENTLE CREATURE (18)
CUSTODY (15)
“Ridiculous, of course, but not as
ridiculous as it might have been. As
much fun as it has, it seems shy of
going completely over the top.”
Empire
“Its propulsiveness allows you to
mostly ignore the odd plot strand
which doesn’t really pay off or the
general air of preposterousness.”
Entertainment Weekly
“A bleak, angry epic painting a
despairing portrait of a Russia that
feels more like a lawless frontier
state than a modern nation.”
The List
“Legrand works in the raw social
realist tradition, stripping away
sentimentality in favour of direct,
observational film-making.”
Variety
“Put the biggest action star on
the planet alongside even bigger
creatures and what do you have?
A giant CGI monstrosity.”
South China Morning Post
“The truth is that it’s a lazily
helmed, cheap-feeling trifle with
no true scares and an off-putting
cynicism coursing through it.”
TheFrightFile.com
“A film which starts out
naturalistically and gradually
transmogrifies into a
surrealistic political fable.”
The Daily Beast
“Perhaps the most dazzling
fusion of grim social realism
and giddy genre thrills since
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days.”
Sight and Sound
Silent film rules at
the box office
Dystopian thriller A Quiet Place,
which stars real-life couple
John Krasinski and Emily Blunt
(above), has earnt $71m (£50m)
in its opening weekend – the
second biggest opener of the
year, after Steven Spielberg’s
Ready Player One.
31
32
MUSIC
FR DAY
The great escape
Justin HaywardYoung (third from
left) and Freddie
Cowan (far right)
say they want to
offer people a break
from the world
‘We tried to find
out who we are…
Hailed as
…and ended up
rock’n’roll’s
saviours when
more confused’
they first
emerged in 2011,
The Vaccines
have returned
with a new album
that redefines
them – as silly,
apolitical and
even romantic,
they tell Roisin
O’Connor
T
he Vaccines’ frontman
Justin Hayward-Young
is sporting the same
short-sleeved shirt he
wears in the video for
“I Can’t Quit” from their recently
released fourth album, Combat
Sports. It’s alarmingly bright –
splashes of red with a tropical
pattern of green, yellow and pink.
The shirt is a good symbol for
the album itself. With a cluster of
radio-friendly pop-rock tracks, it
is full of youthful, frenetic energy.
Songs such as “Nightclub” and
“Put it on a T-Shirt” are heaps of
fun, full of colour, and often just
the right amount of silly.
“I think every record is reactive
to the previous one,” says Hayward-Young. “On the last record,
we did loads of rehearsals and
refined it on the computer. Then
when it came to playing it live,
we were super-excited about the
songs but realised we wouldn’t be
able to do them justice. I always
thought we were a great live band,
so we wanted a record that would
feel natural. It’s a reflection of how
we were feeling when we made it,
with renewed energy, especially
given the line-up change.”
After the release of their 2015
album English Graffiti, The Vaccines considered calling it a day.
Hayward-Young had lost sight
of what set the band apart from
other indie-rock bands and wondered if they could keep going.
“On the last record I think we
set out to find out who we were,
and at the end we came out feeling
more confused than informed,” he
says. “Then, when we started this
new process, especially when Pete
[Robertson] left and we talked
about not even having a drummer any more, we really were in
the wilderness. Our first record
defined us, and it was a challenge
working out how to grow from
that sound. So I’m really happy
we’re back at the core of what we
should be doing.”
“I think it speaks of who we
are now,” agrees lead guitarist
Freddie Cowan. “It’s more grownup. You respect the personality,
what the band is, but I think we
are being ourselves to the best of
our ability.”
When The Vaccines emerged,
there was hype well before the release of their debut, the tongue-incheek-titled What Did You Expect
from The Vaccines?. They came
third in the BBC’s Sound of 2011
poll, and landed their first NME
cover. They struggled to fend off
comparisons to other bands of
their time, but Hayward-Young
says they always believed they
were something more than those
other acts. “I knew we were capable of more than what some people were saying, despite the fact
they were hyping us,” he explains.
While the pair cite an eclectic
range of influences, once they were
in the studio for Combat Sports,
their producer Ross Orton “essentially banned” them from listening to music in the studio. “We
were grateful,” Hayward-Young
says. “He said: ‘If you’re going
to reference anyone, reference
yourselves.’ It was frustrating
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
It’s really good
to make yourself,
and the listener,
uncomfortable
on occasions
at the time, but it meant we were
going off instinct.”
He’s not sure about the suggestion of a Libertines/Pete Doherty
influence on his songwriting in
“Young American”, the sixth
track on the album. “I don’t hear
it as being as British as that…
I think I was trying to channel
Leonard Cohen,” he says. “It was
around the time he died. I was
obsessed with his lyrics and the
way he’d flip an entire phrase by
switching a word. ‘Young American’ was a conversation I wasn’t
able to have with someone. And
at the time I really wanted them
to hear it – now I don’t care. But
it was an uncomfortable moment.
“We keep talking about being
authentic, and I think it’s really
good to make yourself, and the
listener, uncomfortable on occasions. But I actually think the
song’s quite romantic. Our songs
are written huddled over a piano
or a guitar and often you don’t
hear that. So it’s nice to have
those moments on the record.”
One thing they didn’t do on the
record was attempt to turn it – or
any one track – into an overtly political statement. Hayward-Young
says he feels artists are given an
opportunity to make those statements, but it’s not the responsibility that some have made out.
“You can use your platform if
you want, to educate, to inform,
but equally people listen to music
to escape all of that,” he says. “To
dance, to get over a break-up, to
just disappear into this world
you’ve created and not be reminded of all the shit that’s going
on outside for a while.
“The rise of populism, Brexit,
Donald Trump – that’s a reaction.
People don’t like being told by the
people they consider to be the
elite, the entitled, so I think you
have to be conscious that it can
be counterproductive at times.
Also, imagine how bad our music
would be if it sounded the same
but we shifted the message,” he
says, breaking off with a laugh.
“You could argue that Nirvana
had a bigger cultural and therefore political impact than Rage
Against the Machine,” Cowan
adds. “It was just less explicit.”
With the record out, they’re
looking forward to their return
to Alexandra Palace in London
tomorrow night. “It was quite
a long time ago, now, since we
last played [there],” HaywardYoung says. “2012 was the last
time – that’s six years and we’re
still selling out a 10,000-capacity venue in London.” He beams.
“That’s pretty mind-blowing.”
THE INDEPENDENT
‘Combat Sports’ is out now. The
Vaccines play The O2 Academy,
Sheffield, tonight and Alexandra
Palace, London, tomorrow. They
headline Live at Leeds festival on
5 May (leedsinternationalfestival.
com/event/live-at-leeds)
ALBUMREVIEWS
A wild card
who’s as good
as she thinks
CARDI B
Invasion of Privacy
HHHHH
Album
ofthe
week
Download: Be Careful,
Bodak Yellow, Money Bag,
Bickenhead, I Like It, Ring ft Kehlani
Critics tried to call Cardi B’s
success a one-off, as if she were a
passing fad rather than a unique
and exciting artist – and you can
stamp a big fat “sexist” sign on
that. It’s the same sexism which
still tries to pit her against fellow
rapper Nicki Minaj, as though
you can only have one female MC
enjoy success at a time.
Referred to by one critic as
“the new American dream”, her
debut album Invasion of Privacy
recounts her rags-to-riches
narrative in album opener “Get
Up 10”: “Went from making tuna
sandwiches to making the news”.
There are so many meme-able
lines you’d be pushed to pick a
favourite, yet this writer’s is the
TINASHE
Joyride
HHHHH
Download: No Drama
(ft Offset), Faded Love
(ft Feature), Me So Bad
(ft Ty Dolla $ign)
After the R&B-tinged pop
singer’s successful full-length
debut, the 24-year-old teased her
sophomore effort incessantly.
But album delays and setbacks
added two years to the timeline.
Finally, Joyride has arrived – and
it’s a definite departure from her
previous work, with moodier
songs, fewer pop hooks and more
experimentation. It has a more
mature tone – but misses missing
the catchier elements that helped
Tinashe rise in the first place.
Ilana Kaplan
LAURA VEIRS
The Lookout
HHHHH
Download: The
Meadow, Heavy
Petals, Watch Fire
With her 10th folk-pop album,
Laura Veirs puts aside the tumult
of the current political climate
and creates her own response to
the chaos around her. The Lookout
is both delicate and powerful in
its allusions to protective imagery
and its response to the Trump
era, delivered via consistently
gorgeous folk melodies, as,
in finespun metaphors, Veirs
approaches the subjects of the
nation’s racial divides, mortality
and being a parent.
Ilana Kaplan
blatant but still splendid “Cardi
B on the charts, and expect that”.
It sums up her own belief in her
talent, her hold on the industry,
and how aware of it she is.
What really flies on Invasion
of Privacy is her voice: Cardi
B has a particular inflection
that conveys her personality so
beautifully. She’s as confident
as it seems possible to be while
weaponising her own sexuality
on album closer “I Do”, and
drips venom on “Be Careful” as
she prepares a bowl of cereal
with bleach.
Regardless of speculation
around the involvement of
ghostwriters on this record, each
and every line is her own thanks
to her delivery – references to
her personal life are sometimes
as specific as a single tweet sent
from her account last year.
She samples 60s boogaloo
hit “I Like It Like That” and
calls to her Dominican heritage
with bachata music on the sexy,
swinging “I Like It”. Saving spots
for Puerto Rican trap/reggaeton
singer Bad Bunny, and Colombian
artist J Balvin, she puts her own
spin on the Latin music explosion
that kicked off last year.
Remarkably, Chance the
Rapper’s contribution to the
hook on “Best Life” actually
seems to bring about a dip in the
energy, but by contrast Cardi
bursts on, carefree and fiery:
“I can’t believe they wanna see
me lose that bad,” she marvels,
laughing at her haters.
She’s wild and completely
unpredictable, and that’s
what this music industry
needs – someone who plays by
nobody’s rules but her own.
When she sings off the hook on
“Be Careful”, it’s just another
moment when Cardi B runs
to her own rhythm: because
nothing about Invasion of Privacy
is formulaic. THE INDEPENDENT
Roisin O’Connor
JOHN PRINE
The Tree of Forgiveness
HHHHH
Download: Lonesome
Friends of Science,
Caravan of Fools, God
Only Knows, When
I Get to Heaven
Bob Dylan calls John Prine’s
songs “Proustian”, respect
earnt back on his 1971 debut, but
undimmed for recent Americana
stars from Justin Vernon to Jason
Isbell. Isbell guests on these first
new Prine songs for 13 years,
which also include co-writing
credits for The Black Keys’ Dan
Auerbach and Phil Spector.
Little here goes much past
three minutes, or makes great
claims for itself. Shaggy dog
stories seem always at the point
of being told in lyrics which can
seem throwaway, but have no
loose threads. “Summer’s End”
evokes the seasonal sanctuary
of home for the lonely. “Caravan
of Fools”, by contrast, sees him
lower his cancer-scratched voice
to one of biblical portent. Some
songs are slight, yet still solid, like
good chairs you can settle into
for a while.
Nick Hasted
33
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i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
TELEVISION
35
FR DAY
1
BOSCH
FROM TODAY, AMAZON PRIME
Titus Welliver returns as the
troubled LAPD detective
Hieronymus “Harry” Bosch
in the fifth series of Amazon’s
meta crime drama (Bosch is
wealthy enough not to work
because his cases served as the
inspiration for a popular series
of crime novels). The story
is adapted from the novels of
Michael Connelly.
2
LOST IN SPACE
FROM TODAY, NETFLIX
This sleek update of the 60s
series stars Toby Stephens as
John Robinson, a patriarch
about to take his family on a
five-year mission into space
to explore a distant planet.
However, they are sabotaged
by Dr Smith (the ever-excellent
Parker Posey), which means
they end up stranded on an alien
planet – and they’re not the only
ones. Also starring Molly Parker
(Deadwood, House of Cards) as
Maureen Robinson.
THIS WEEK’S
Tento
watch
Chosen by
Jessica Barrett
4
THE CRYSTAL MAZE
SUN 8PM, CHANNEL 4
Richard Ayoade returns as host
for a new series of the rebooted
1990s adventure game show.
This week it’s a family affair,
the Hauxwells taking on the
physical, mental and mystery
challenges to determine how
3
HARRY HILL’S ALIEN FUN
CAPSULE SAT 7.30PM, ITV
Saturday nights are made for
Harry Hill. The comedian is
back with a new series of the
show in which he and some
celebrity pals try to stop an
alien invasion (because… why
not?). Hill is joined by an eclectic
bunch in the first episode:
ITV’s political editor Robert
Peston, actress Sally Dynevor
(Coronation Street’s Sally
Webster) and… Anneka Rice.
long they’ll get in the Crystal
Dome. Will they leave any of
their loved ones locked up on the
way?
5
THE TRAVEL MAN
MON 8.30PM, CHANNEL 4
Yet more Ayoade, this time
spending a deadpan 48 hours
on the Portuguese island of
Madeira with Peep Show star
Robert Webb. They sample the
local wine and cake, dine at a
restaurant that can be reached
only by sea or cable car, and
head to the capital, Funchal, for
an embroidery lesson.
6
TATE BRITAIN’S GREAT ART
WALKS TUES 9PM, SKY
ARTS
Art historian Gus CaselyHayford is joined by stars
such as Robert Lindsay,
Helena Bonham-Carter
and David Bailey for a
series of walks which
explore the areas that
inspired their favourite
artists. The first episode
takes Casely-Hayford and
Billy Connolly to Cookham
in Berkshire, where Stanley
Spencer was born and painted
for most of his life, describing
it as a “village in Heaven”.
7
Clockwise from top ‘Bob Geldof’
and his assistant in ‘Urban
Myths’; Billy Connolly in ‘Tate
Britain’s Great Art Walks’;
Stephen Lawrence remembered
STEPHEN: THE MURDER
THAT CHANGED A NATION
TUES 9PM, BBC1
Film-makers Asif Kapadia
and James Gay-Rees present
a three-part documentary
investigating one of Britain’s
most notorious murders. It has
been 25 years since Stephen
Lawrence was killed at a bus
stop by six white males in an
unprovoked attack. Failures in
the police investigation meant
the killers walked free. This
film follows Stephen’s mother
Doreen Lawrence’s struggle
for justice. We see the story
through her eyes, and the
eyes of Stephen’s family and
friends, and there is comment
from former
Metropolitan
Police
Commissioner
Lord Paul
Condon, that role’s
incumbent
Cressida
Dick, former
home
secretary
Jack
Straw
and
Theresa
May.
8
PARADISE
HUNTERS
TUES 9PM,
CHANNEL 4
Many of us
dream about
leaving our
jobs, but few
do it. Here,
two millennials
who are fed
up with their
mundane lives
risk everything
when they hand in their notice
and leave their friends and
family behind to start very
different jobs, from working on
a ranch in Mexico to becoming
a salmon farmer on a remote
Scottish loch.
9
THE ALIENIST
FROM THURS, NETFLIX
It’s New York in 1986 and a
series of murders of young,
male prostitutes has gripped
the city. The story, based on
the novel by Caleb Carr and
adapted by True Detective’s Cary
Fukunaga, follows the work of a
criminal psychologist who joins
forces with a journalist and an
aspiring female police detective
to investigate the murders.
Described as the “grizzliest
period drama yet”, it stars
Dakota Fanning, Daniel Brühl
and Luke Evans.
10
URBAN MYTHS
THURS 9PM, SKY ARTS
Live Aid was not only “the
day rock’n’roll changed the
world”, it was also the source
of countless music industry
rumours. Backstage At Live
Aid, the latest episode of the
comedy series Urban Myths,
imagines how some of those
rumours played out. We watch
Bob Geldof (played by Jonas
Armstrong) and his personal
assistant Marsha Hunt (Kerry
Howard) marshal the world’s
most famous faces – Sade, Midge
Ure, Elton John and Freddie
Mercury among them – in the
green room at Wembley.
Television Friday 13 April
CRITIC’S
CHOICE
Daytime
GERARD GILBERT
6pm
PICK OF THE DAY
===
11.25pm, BBC1
Friday night is comedy night, with
the excellent Episodes and Lee And
Dean (see both, right) joined by a
promising new mockumentary
co-written by and starring Lily
Brazier, left (Miche in People Just Do
Nothing) as Maxine, a Noughties
pop has-been now managing – or
mismanaging – her own girl band.
The deluded David Brent-like
Maxine decides to revive her own
career with “Mum rock”, which is
ironic given that she’s not much of
a mother either. “The kids still don’t
like me,” she complains to her
husband, an ex-boy-band member
now writing jingles (played by
Nathan Barley’s Nicholas Burns). All
that and Dane Bowers as himself.
8.30pm, BBC1
After the excitements of the
previous rounds, travelling to Peru
and recreating Michelin-starred
dishes, the three finalists now have
to cook their hearts out for the
chance to follow 2017 champion
Dr Saliha Mahmood Ahmed. Expect
to see all of them back next year,
when they get a chance to judge
instead of being judged.
Wannabe
MasterChef: The Final
===
The City & The City
9pm, BBC2
The production design alone makes
this adaptation of China Miéville’s
fantasy-thriller hybrid worthwhile,
but thankfully that’s not all there is.
David Morrissey’s Inspector Borlu
gets permission to pursue his
murder investigation in the shiny
city of Ul Qoma – having first
attended a course so that he can
see the place that he has been
conditioned not to. He gets a new
police partner, played by German
actress Maria Schrader, and there
are flashbacks to a previous visit
to Ul Qoma, when lover Katrynia
(Lara Pulver) went missing.
astonished to learn that their boss
prefers women. Either way, Liese
(Hilde de Baerdemaeker) is in a
permanently foul mood throughout
this latest investigation, which
involves a diamond trader murdered
in a hotel swimming pool – and that
means those heels are clacking extra
fiercely on Antwerp’s cobbles.
===
10pm, BBC2
David Crane and Jeffrey Klarik’s
sitcom is humming along so
sweetly that it’s a shame to think
this is the final series. Matt Le
Blanc’s heightened version of
himself is back on top, leveraging
his new-found celebrity to secure
a new show from the network,
and he wants Sean and Beverley
Rough Justice
6.00 Breakfast (S). 9.15
Commonwealth Games
2018 Live athletics, diving,
hockey and rugby sevens
on day nine (S). 1.00 BBC
News At One; Weather
(S). 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather (S). 1.45
Doctors (S). 2.15 800
Words (S). 3.00 Escape
To The Country (S). 3.45
Money For Nothing (R) (S).
4.30 Flog It! (R) (S). 5.15
Pointless (S).
6.00 Commonwealth
Games 2018 Day nine
continues with live
rugby sevens and lawn
bowls (S). 9.15 Oxford
Street Revealed (R) (S).
10.00 Homes Under The
Hammer (R) (S). 11.00
Britain’s Home Truths (R)
(S). 11.45 Dom On The Spot
(S). 12.15 Bargain Hunt (R)
(S). 1.00 Commonwealth
Games 2018 (S). 5.15 Put
Your Money Where Your
Mouth Is (S).
6.00 Good Morning
Britain (S). 8.30 Lorraine
(S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (R) (S). 10.30 This
Morning (S). 12.30 Loose
Women (S). 1.30 ITV News;
Weather (S). 1.55 ITV
Regional News; Weather
(S). 2.00 ITV Racing: Grand
National Festival Live
coverage of five races
from Aintree (S). 5.00 The
Chase (S).
6.00 Countdown (R)
(S). 6.45 3rd Rock From
The Sun (R) (S). 7.10 3rd
Rock From The Sun
(R) (S). 7.35 Everybody
Loves Raymond (R) (S).
8.00 Everybody Loves
Raymond (R) (S). 8.30
Frasier (R) (S). 9.00 Frasier
(R) (S). 9.35 Frasier (R) (S).
10.05 Ramsay’s Hotel Hell
(R) (S). 11.00 Undercover
Boss USA (R) (S). 12.00
Channel 4 News Summary
(S). 12.05 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 1.05 Posh
Pawnbrokers (R) (S). 2.10
Countdown (S). 3.00 A
Place In The Sun: Winter
Sun (R) (S). 4.00 Escape To
The Chateau: DIY (S). 5.00
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 5.30
Star Boot Sale (S).
6.00 Milkshake! 9.15
The Wright Stuff 11.15
Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It
Away! (R) (S). 12.10 5 News
Lunchtime (S). 12.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors (R)
(S). 1.15 Home And Away
(S). 1.45 Neighbours (S).
2.20 NCIS Special: Game Of
Shadows (R) (S). 3.20 FILM:
Patient Killer (Casper Van
Dien 2015) Psychological
thriller, starring Victoria
Pratt (S). 5.00 5 News At
5 (S). 5.30 Neighbours
(R) (S).
6.00 BBC News At
Six; Weather (S).
6.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.00 Eggheads (S).
6.30 Today At The
Games The best
of the action
from day nine
(S).
6.00 ITV Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.30 ITV News;
Weather (S).
6.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.30 Hollyoaks (R) (S).
6.00 Home And
Away Tori
enlists outside
help (R) (S).
6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 Emmerdale
Aaron and Liv
prepare for her
day in court, (S).
7.30 Coronation
Street (S).
7.00 Channel 4 News
(S).
7.00 The Gadget
Show A family
find out how
easy their
gadgets are to
hack (S).
David Morrissey stars x
in ‘The City & The City’
9pm, BBC2
Dean (Mark O’Sullivan)
is troubled by the job
the builders carry out
in ‘Lee And Dean’
10pm, Channel 4
Matt LeBlanc is back
on track in ‘Episodes’
10pm, BBC2
7.00 World News
Today (S).
7.30 BBC Young
Musician 2018
The percussion
category final
(S).
6.25 FILM: X-Men
2 (Bryan
Singer 2003)
Superhero
adventure,
starring Hugh
Jackman (S).
7pm
8pm
8.00 EastEnders
Woody has his
eyes on a new
venture (S).
8.30 MasterChef: The
Final Last in the
series (S).
8.00 Gardeners’
World Monty
Don beefs up
his borders
by dividing
perennials (S).
8.00 Love Your
Garden (S).
8.30 Coronation
Street Simon
is accused of
stealing Toyah’s
cash (S).
8.00 I Don’t Like
Mondays Alan
Carr hosts the
comedy game
show, with
guest Jonathan
Ross (S).
8.00 Springtime
On The Farm
Updates from
all of the stories
covered earlier
in the week. Last
in the series (S).
9pm
9.30 Have I Got News
For You Hosted
by Victoria
Coren Mitchell
(S).
9.00 The City & The
City Borlu
suspects a
nationalist group
of involvement
in Mahalia’s
death (S).
9.00 Lethal Weapon
A secret about
Riggs’ deceased
wife is revealed
when he visits
his father-inlaw in prison (S).
9.00 Gogglebox The
households’
opinions
on recent
television (S).
9.00 Jane McDonald:
My Life Story
Profile of the
singer (S).
9.00 Nat King Cole:
Afraid Of The
Dark The
journals of the
music legend (R)
(S).
10.00BBC News At
Ten (S).
10.25 BBC Regional
News (S).
10.35 The Graham
Norton Show
(S).
10.00Episodes Matt
tries to secure
confirmation of
a new series (S).
10.30 Newsnight (S).
10.00ITV News At Ten
(S).
10.30 ITV Regional
News (S).
10.45 FILM: Invictus
(Clint Eastwood
2009) (S).
10.00Lee And Dean
The builders
carry out their
first ever job for
a gay couple (S).
10.35 8 Out Of 10 Cats
(R) (S).
10.00Will & Grace (S).
10.30 Will & Grace
The best friends
discover a
connection
between their
parents (S).
10.30 Joy Of The
Guitar Riff The
impact of the
guitar riff on
popular music
over the past 60
years (R) (S).
11.25 Wannabe New
series (S).
11.50 Commonwealth
Games 2018 (S).
11.05 Front Row Late
11.35 The
Assassination
Of Gianni
Versace:
American
Crime Story (R).
11.20 Rob Beckett’s
Playing For
Time (S).
11.50 Rude Tube (R)
(S).
11.05 Greatest Ever
Celebrity
Wind Ups
Joe Pasquale
revisits more
celebrity pranks
(R) (S).
3.30 Commonwealth
Games 2018 (S).
12.30 Sign Zone:
Civilisations (R) (S). 1.30 Sign
Zone: Picasso’s Last Stand
(R) (S). 2.30 Sign Zone: The
Assassination of Gianni
Versace: American Crime
Story (R) (S). 3.30 BBC News
(R) (S).
12.50 FILM: Oldboy (Spike
Lee 2013) (S). 2.35 Kiss Me
First (R) (S). 3.30 Building
The Dream (R) (S). 4.25 The
Question Jury (R) (S). 5.20
Steph And Dom’s One Star
To Five Star (R) (S).
12.00 SuperCasino (S).
3.10 GPs: Behind Closed
Doors (R) (S). 4.00 The
Great Yorkshire Bridge (R)
(S). 4.45 House Doctor (R)
(S). 5.10 Divine Designs (R)
(S). 5.35 Wildlife SOS (R) (S).
11pm
Late
1.15 Jackpot247 3.00 Take
On The Twisters (R) (S).
3.50 ITV Nightscreen
Episodes
9pm, More4
Liese’s team are gathered around
a laptop watching her have sex
with her girlfriend. Someone’s been
covertly filming them, but who?
“She should have closed the
curtains,” reckons Sofie, while her
male colleagues are simply
7.00 The One Show
(S).
7.30 Sounds Like
Friday Night
Featuring Lily
Allen and Sam
Smith (S).
10pm
===
6.00 The Planet’s Funniest
Animals (R) (S). 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 6.45
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 7.10
Who’s Doing The Dishes?
(R) (S). 7.55 Emmerdale (R)
(S). 8.20 Emmerdale (R) (S).
8.55 You’ve Been Framed!
Gold (R) (S). 9.25 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (R) (S).
10.20 The Bachelor (R) (S).
12.15 Emmerdale (R) (S).
12.45 Emmerdale (R) (S).
1.15 You’ve Been Framed!
Gold (R) (S). 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (S). 2.35
The Jeremy Kyle Show (R)
(S). 3.40 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (R) (S). 4.50 Judge
Rinder (R) (S). 5.50 Take Me
Out (R) (S).
7.00 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold
Comical clips,
narrated by
Harry Hill (R) (S).
8.00 Two And A Half
Men Jake makes
an important
decision about
his future (R) (S).
8.30 Two And A Half
Men (R) (S).
9.00 FILM: X-Men:
The Last
Stand (Brett
Ratner 2006)
Adventure,
starring Hugh
Jackman (S).
9.00 FILM: American
Pie 2 (James B
Rogers 2001)
Comedy sequel,
starring Jason
Biggs (S).
11.30 Rollermania:
Britain’s
Biggest Boy
Band (R) (S).
11.05 FILM: My Entire
High School
Sinking Into The
Sea (Dash Shaw
2016) Animated
teen comedy (S).
11.05 Family Guy
Peter is forced
to return to
third grade (R)
(S).
11.35 Family Guy (R)
(S).
12.30 Cilla At The BBC (R)
(S). 1.30 Totally British: 70s
Rock ’n’ Roll (R) (S). 2.30
Nat King Cole: Afraid Of
The Dark (R) (S). 4.00 Close
12.35 FILM: Bad Teacher
(Jake Kasdan 2011)
Comedy, starring Cameron
Diaz (S). 2.25 FILM: The
Sitter (David Gordon
Green 2011) Comedy,
starring Jonah Hill (S).
4.00 Close
12.05 American Dad! (R)
(S). 1.05 Two And A Half
Men (R) (S). 1.30 Two And
A Half Men (R) (S). 1.55
Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (R) (S). 2.20
Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2
Nightscreen
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
(Stephen Mangan and Tamsin Greig)
to write it for him. First, however,
his ex-wife wants him to talk to his
young sons about “that video”.
FILM
CHOICE
LAURENCE PHELAN
===
Lee And Dean
10pm, Channel 4
Things are getting confusing for
poor Dean, as he and Lee carry out
their first ever job for a gay couple
and Lee (Miles Chapman) seems
surprisingly at home, either lounging
in their clients’ hot tub or perusing
their video collection. Ramon
Tikaram joins the cast as Mrs
Bryce-D’Souza’s errant husband
Jonty (“He’s been away finding
himself or something,” says Mrs B-D,
the brilliant Anna Morris) and the
episode ends at a poetry evening
where Dean makes his stage debut.
FILM OF THE DAY
===
9pm, TCM
(Stanley Kubrick, 1980)
Kubrick’s masterly Stephen King
adaptation is about a blocked
writer who takes a job as a live-in
caretaker and moves with his
young family into a remote,
snowbound hotel for the off season
– only to find that all work and no
play makes Jack an axe-wielding
maniac. Mr Nicholson’s (left)
wild-eyed and iconic performance
constantly threatens to overpower
the film, but doesn’t quite. In fact,
this is a terrifyingly plausible look
into the abyss of psychosis, and
no other horror film has the same
grandeur, meticulous attention to
detail or claim to the status of
cinematic high art.
8pm, Sky Cinema Greats
(Menhaj Huda, 2005)
A film with an authentic tone but
a melodramatic, tabloid-baiting
plot, about a fun-filled day in the
lives of a group of hoodie-clad
north London teenagers, involving
lashings of sex, drugs, violence,
swearing and urban music.
The Shining
Kidulthood
===
Wilson
12midn’t, Sky Cinema Premiere
(Craig Johnson, 2017)
Woody Harrelson stars as Wilson,
a dyspeptic but garrulous middleaged divorcee with a knack – a
perverse gift – for saying absolutely
the most socially inappropriate
thing at any one time.
Radio
BBC Radio 1
6.00 Classic Coronation
Street (R). 6.25 Classic
Coronation Street (R).
6.50 Heartbeat (R) (S). 7.55
The Royal (R) (S). 9.00
Judge Judy (R) (S). 9.25
Judge Judy (R) (S). 9.55
Judge Judy (R) (S). 10.20
Inspector Morse (R) (S).
12.35 The Royal (R) (S).
1.35 Heartbeat (R) (S). 2.40
Classic Coronation Street
(R). 3.15 Classic Coronation
Street (R). 3.50 On The
Buses (R) (S). 4.20 On The
Buses (R) (S). 4.55 You’re
Only Young Twice (R) (S).
5.25 Rising Damp (R) (S).
5.55 Heartbeat (R) (S).
6.00 Hollyoaks (R) (S). 7.00
Rules Of Engagement (R)
(S). 8.00 How I Met Your
Mother (R) (S). 9.00 New
Girl (R) (S). 9.30 New Girl
(R) (S). 10.00 2 Broke Girls
(R) (S). 11.00 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (R) (S). 11.30
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (R)
(S). 12.00 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 12.30 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 1.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S). 1.30 The Big
Bang Theory (R) (S). 2.00
How I Met Your Mother (R)
(S). 2.30 How I Met Your
Mother (R) (S). 3.00 New
Girl (R) (S). 3.30 New Girl
(R) (S). 4.00 Brooklyn NineNine (R) (S). 4.30 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (R) (S). 5.00 The
Goldbergs (R) (S). 5.30 The
Goldbergs (R) (S).
8.55 Food Unwrapped (R)
(S). 9.30 A Place In The
Sun: Summer Sun (R) (S).
10.30 A Place In The Sun:
Summer Sun (R) (S). 11.35
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 12.05
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 12.35
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 1.05
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 1.40
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 2.10
Come Dine With Me (R)
(S). 2.40 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 3.15 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 3.45 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S). 4.20
Come Dine With Me (R) (S).
4.50 A Place In The Sun:
Summer Sun (R) (S). 5.55
Kirstie And Phil’s Love It
Or List It (R) (S).
6.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.30 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.55 The Secret Life
Of The Zoo
Black rhino
Kitani is due
to give birth at
Chester Zoo (R)
(S).
6.00 Futurama
Farnsworth
reveals why he
is so devoted to
Zoidberg (R) (S).
6.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.00 House The
medic discusses
his latest
case with his
therapist (R) (S).
7.00 Murder, She
Wrote One of
Jessica’s friends
is charged with
murder (R) (S).
7.00 Hollyoaks Leela
is shocked by
the arrival of a
new face in the
village (S).
7.30 Extreme Cake
Makers (R) (S).
7.55 Grand Designs
Converting a
derelict church
into a family
home (R) (S).
7.00 The Simpsons
Bart and Lisa
look into the
future (R) (S).
7.30 The Simpsons
(R).
7.00 CSI: Crime
Scene
Investigation
An ice-hockey
player is killed
during a match
(R) (S).
8.00 Agatha
Christie’s
Marple A
gathering at a
Devon estate
leads to murder
(R) (S).
8.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
8.30 The Big Bang
Theory Howard
enrols on a
course taught
by Sheldon (R).
8.00 The Simpsons
8.30 Modern Family
Gloria and
Mitch are
invited to a
party at Oprah’s
house.
8.00 Blue Bloods
Danny and
Baez search
for a missing
journalist (R).
9.00 Rough Justice
The body of
diamond trader
is recovered
from a
swimming pool.
In Flemish (S).
9.00 Karl Pilkington:
The Moaning
Of Life The
factors that
shape people’s
identities (R) (S).
9.00 Game Of
Thrones Jaime
has a mission
for Brienne (R)
(S).
10.0024 Hours In
A&E A rail
worker is
airlifted in after
being hit by a
high-speed train
(R) (S).
10.00Sky Sports’
Funniest
Moments: Best
Bits A look
back at comical
moments (R) (S).
10.10 Game Of
Thrones Jon
and his men
attack the
mutineers at
Craster’s Keep
(R) (S).
9.00 FILM: GI Joe:
Retaliation (Jon
M Chu 2013)
Action, starring
Dwayne
Johnson (S).
10.00The Syndicate
Denise is
devastated
when her
husband leaves
her (R) (S).
6.00 Supergirl (R) (S). 7.00
Supergirl (R) (S). 8.00
Futurama (R) (S). 8.30
Modern Family (R) (S). 9.00
Modern Family (R) (S). 9.30
The Simpsons (R) (S). 10.00
The Simpsons (R) (S). 10.30
The Simpsons (R) (S). 11.00
Warehouse 13 (R) (S). 12.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (R) (S).
1.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S).
2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S).
3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(R) (S). 4.00 Stargate SG-1
(R) (S). 5.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S). 5.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.00 Fish Town (R) (S). 7.00
Richard E Grant’s Hotel
Secrets (R) (S). 8.00 The
British (R) (S). 9.00 The
West Wing (R) (S). 10.00
The West Wing (R) (S).
11.00 House (R) (S). 12.00
House (R) (S). 1.00 Without
A Trace (R) (S). 2.00 Blue
Bloods (R) (S). 3.00 The
West Wing (R) (S). 4.00
The West Wing (R) (S). 5.00
House (R) (S).
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast
Show With Nick Grimshaw
10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills
4.00 The Official Chart With
MistaJam 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
BBC Radio 1’s Dance Anthems
With MistaJam 7.00 Annie Mac
9.00 Pete Tong 11.00 Danny
Howard 1am B.Traits 4.00
Radio 1’s Essential Mix
BBC Radio 1Xtra
6am Mim Shaikh 10.00 Ace
12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00
Yasmin Evans 4.00 Sian
Anderson 5.45 Newsbeat
6.00 Sian Anderson 7.00 DJ
Charlesy 9.00 Semtex 11.00
Sir Spyro 1am Kan D Man And
DJ Limelight 4.00 Diplo And
Friends
BBC Radio 2
11.05 Killer Women
With Piers
Morgan The
story of Ashley
Humphrey (R)
(S).
11.10 The Big Bang
Theory Sheldon
loses his job (R)
(S).
11.40 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
11.05 24 Hours In
A&E A baby is
rushed in after
suffering a
seizure (R) (S).
12.05 Vera (R) (S). 1.55 The
Zoo (R) (S). 2.50 Million
Dollar Princesses (R) (S).
3.40 On The Buses (R) (S).
4.35 Rising Damp (R) (S).
5.00 Rising Damp (R) (S).
5.25 Judge Judy (R) (S). 5.45
ITV3 Nightscreen
12.05 First Dates (R) (S).
1.10 Tattoo Fixers (R) (S).
2.20 Gogglebox (R) (S). 3.10
Rude Tube (R) (S). 4.05 How
I Met Your Mother (R) (S).
4.50 Rules Of Engagement
(R) (S). 5.10 Rules Of
Engagement (R) (S).
12.10 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (R) (S).
1.10 24 Hours In A&E (R)
(S). 2.15 24 Hours In A&E
(R) (S). 3.15 8 Out Of 10
Cats: More Best Bits (R) (S).
3.55 Close
11.10 Game Of
Thrones Stannis
and Davos arrive
in Braavos for
their meeting
with the Iron
Bank (R) (S).
12.00 A League Of Their
Own (R) (S). 1.00 In The
Long Run (R) (S). 1.30 Brit
Cops: War On Crime (R) (S).
2.20 NCIS: Los Angeles (R)
(S). 4.00 The Real A&E 4.30
The Real A&E 5.00 The
Dog Whisperer (R).
12.10 The Sopranos (R)
(S). 1.20 The Sopranos (R).
2.35 Crashing (R) (S). 3.10
Without A Trace (R) (S).
4.10 The West Wing (R) (S).
5.05 The West Wing (R) (S).
6.30am Fearne Cotton 9.30
Trevor Nelson 12noon Jeremy
Vine 2.00 Steve Wright In The
Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo
7.00 Tony Blackburn’s Golden
Hour 8.00 Friday Night Is
Music Night 10.00 Sounds Of
The 80s 12mdn’t Anneka Rice:
The Happening 2.00 Radio 2’s
Funky Soul Playlist 3.00 Radio
2 Playlist: New To 2 4.00 Radio
2 Playlist: 21st Century Songs
5.00 Huey On Saturday
BBC Radio 3
6.30am Breakfast. 9.00
Essential Classics. 12noon
Composer Of The Week:
Pachelbel. The rich legacy of a
composer best known for the
Canon in D. 1.00 News 1.02
Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert.
Highlights from the Norfolk
and Norwich Chamber Music
series. 2.00 Afternoon Concert.
The BBC National Orchestra
of Wales celebrates its 90th
birthday. 4.30 BBC Young
Musician 2018. Highlights from
this year’s Young Musician
percussion finalists. 5.00
In Tune. Guests include the
Castalian Quartet and Pavel
Kolesnikov. 7.00 In Tune
Mixtape. Featuring music
by Debussy. 7.30 Radio 3 In
Concert. The BBC Symphony
Orchestra in works by Elgar,
Yiu and Elkington. 10.00 The
Verb. With writer and actress
Ruth Jones and poet Raymond
Antrobus. 10.45 The Essay:
One Bar Electric Memoir 11.00
Music Planet 1am Through
The Night.
BBC Radio 4
6am Today 9.00 The Reunion
9.45 Book Of The Week: Packing
My Library 10.00 Woman’s
Hour 11.00 The Opt Out 11.30
When The Dog Dies 12noon
News 12.04 Home Front
12.15 You And Yours 12.56
Weather 1.00 The World At
One 1.45 Chinese Characters
2.00 The Archers 2.15 Drama:
The Deletion Committee 3.00
Gardeners’ Question Time
3.45 Short Works 4.00 Last
Word 4.30 Feedback 4.55 The
Listening Project 5.00 PM
5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock
News 6.30 The News Quiz.
37
ONDEMAND
Lost In Space
Netflix
Less frivolous reboot of the
1960s series finds the Robinson
family veer off course.
Living With The
Brainy Bunch
BBC iPlayer
Two GCSE pupils move in with
their more successful peers.
Jesus’ Female Disciples
All4
How the Messiah’s female
followers were airbrushed out
of history by the early Church.
New series. Topical comedy
panel game, hosted by Miles
Jupp. 7.00 The Archers. Shula
receives a shock. 7.15 Front
Row. Arts programme. 7.45
How Does That Make You Feel?
By Shelagh Stephenson. Last in
the series. 8.00 Any Questions?
Topical discussion from Oxford
Town Hall. 8.50 A Point Of
View. Tom Shakespeare reflects
on a topical issue. 9.00 Home
Front Omnibus. Parts 26-30.
By Lucy Catherine. 10.00 The
World Tonight. With Razia
Iqbal. 10.45 Book At Bedtime:
Rabbit Is Rich. By John Updike.
11.00 Great Lives. Ayesha
Hazarika nominates Jayaben
Desai. 11.30 Ramblings. Clare
Balding explores the beaches of
Aberlady Bay with local school
pupils and teachers. 11.55 The
Listening Project 12mdn’t
News And Weather 12.30
Book Of The Week: Packing
My Library 12.48 Shipping
Forecast 1.00 As BBC World
Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast
5.30 News Briefing 5.43 Prayer
For The Day 5.45 IPM
BBC Radio 4 LW
9.45am Daily Service 12.01pm
Shipping Forecast 5.54
Shipping Forecast
BBC Radio 4 Extra
6am White Heat 6.30 Arthur
Mee: Encyclopaedist 7.00 The
Stanley Baxter Playhouse 7.30
The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The
Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase 8.00
I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again
8.30 Brothers In Law 9.00 It’s
Your Round 9.30 After Henry
10.00 Jude The Obscure 11.00
Podcast Radio Hour 12noon
I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again
12.30 Brothers In Law 1.00
White Heat 1.30 Arthur Mee:
Encyclopaedist 2.00 The
Essex Serpent 2.15 Disability:
A New History 2.30 Tristram
Shandy 2.45 On Her Majesty’s
Secret Service 3.00 Jude The
Obscure 4.00 It’s Your Round
4.30 After Henry 5.00 The
Stanley Baxter Playhouse 5.30
The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The
Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase 6.00
The Scarifyers: The King Of
Pick
ofthe
day
Radio 3 In
Concert
7.30pm,
BBC Radio 3
At London’s
Barbican, the
BBC Symphony
Orchestra, under
conductor Andrew
Davis (above), in
works by Elgar,
Raymond Yiu
and Elkington.
Winter 6.30 Mastertapes 7.00
I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again
7.30 Brothers In Law 8.00
White Heat 8.30 Arthur Mee:
Encyclopaedist 9.00 Podcast
Radio Hour 10.00 Comedy
Club: The Hitchhiker’s Guide To
The Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase
10.30 Comedy Club: The Show
What You Wrote 10.55 Comedy
Club: The Comedy Club
Interview 11.00 Comedy Club:
Kevin Eldon Will See You Now
11.30 Comedy Club: A Look
Back At The Nineties 12mdn’t
The Scarifyers: The King Of
Winter 12.30 Mastertapes
1.00 White Heat 1.30 Arthur
Mee: Encyclopaedist 2.00 The
Essex Serpent 2.15 Disability:
A New History 2.30 Tristram
Shandy 2.45 On Her Majesty’s
Secret Service 3.00 Jude The
Obscure 4.00 It’s Your Round
4.30 After Henry 5.00 The
Stanley Baxter Playhouse 5.30
The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The
Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase
BBC 5 Live
6am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00
Chiles On Friday 1pm The
Friday Sports Panel 2.00
Kermode And Mayo’s Film
Review 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5
Live Sport: The Friday Football
Social 9.30 At Home With Colin
Murray 10.00 Stephen Nolan
1am Up All Night 5.00 Under
The Weather 5.30 Saturday
Breakfast
BBC 6 Music
7am Shaun Keaveny 10.00
Tom Ravenscroft 1pm Mark
Radcliffe 4.00 Steve Lamacq
7.00 Iggy Pop 9.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 12mdn’t
Nemone’s Electric Ladyland
2.00 6 Music Classic Concert
3.00 6 Music Live Hour
4.00 The Celluloid Jukebox
5.00 Jon Hillcock
Classic FM
6am More Music Breakfast
9.00 Nicholas Owen 1pm
Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth
Classics At Seven 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. Presented by
Catherine Bott. 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1am Katie Breathwick
4.00 Jane Jones
Absolute Radio
6am Christian O’Connell’s
Breakfast Show 10.00 Leona
Graham 1pm Andy Bush 4.00
Dave Berry 7.00 Absolute 80s
With Claire Sturgess 10.00
Sarah Champion 4am Jay
Lawrence
Heart
6am Jamie And Emma
9.00 Toby Anstis 1pm Matt
Wilkinson 4.00 JK And Lucy
7.00 Club Classics 10.00 Lilah
Parsons 1am James Stewart
TalkSPORT
6am The Alan Brazil Sports
Breakfast With Ally McCoist
10.00 Jim White, Perry Groves
And Bob Mills 1pm Hawksbee
And Jacobs 4.00 Sam
Matterface and Darren Gough
7.00 The Season Ticket With
Danny Kelly And Laura Woods
10.00 The Two Mikes 1am
Extra Time With Tom Latchem
FR DAY
38
AGENDA
What’sontoday...
Visual Arts
AMERICA’S COOL MODERNISM:
O’KEEFE TO HOPPER
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford
An exploration of the “cool” in
American art in the early 20th
century, from early experiments
in abstraction by artists such as
Georgia O’Keeffe, Arthur Dove
and Paul Strand to the strict,
clean precisionist paintings of
Charles Sheeler and Charles
Demuth. Among the loans from
US institutions are 35 paintings
that have never been seen in the
UK before. (01865 278112) to 22 Jul
OCEAN LINERS: SPEED & STYLE
V&A, London SW7
This exhibition, the most
comprehensive ever about
international ocean liners, is
bookended by two ships: Brunel’s
Great Eastern of 1859, which
transformed ocean travel, and
the Queen Elizabeth II of 1969,
which brought the era of great
ocean-going passenger shipping
to a close. Between these two
vessels a whole transport culture
is on display, from fabulous
posters for the liners to archive
film clips, showing how the
golden age of ocean travel
helped shape the modern world.
(020 7942 2000) to 17 Jun
THE HOUSE OF FAME:
CONVENED BY LINDER
Nottingham Contemporary
Part retrospective, part kinship
jamboree, this celebration of
British artist and musician
Linder is a riotous exchange
between art, fashion, music and
architecture, spanning more
than 40 years of photomontage,
graphics, costume and
16 days
from on
£2,199pply
performance, starting with
her early photo collage for the
Buzzcocks’ 1977 single “Orgasm
Addict”. As well as her own
work, the exhibition includes
almost 200 works by 30 artists,
stretching from the 1600s to
today. (0115 948 9750) to 17 Jun
YTO BARRADA: AGADIR
Barbican Curve, London EC2
Yto Barrada, the 46-year-old New
York-based Moroccan artist, is
a force of life and her new show,
an interweaving of bits and
pieces, is a delight. There are live
performances, a mural, collages,
wickerwork sculptures and an
eight-minute movie, taking as
their starting point the 1967 novel
Agadir, by Moroccan author
Mohammed Khaïr-Eddine.
(barbican.org.uk) to 20 May
VICTORIAN GIANTS: THE BIRTH OF
ART PHOTOGRAPHY
National Portrait Gallery, London WC2
The first exhibition to examine
the relationship between four
ground-breaking Victorian
artists – Julia Margaret Cameron
(1815-79), Lewis Carroll (183298), Lady Clementina Hawarden
(1822-65) and Oscar Rejlander
(1813-75) – with material
drawn from public and private
collections featuring sitters
such as Charles Darwin, Alice
Liddell, Dante Gabriel Rossetti,
George Frederic Watts, Ellen
Terry and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.
(020 7306 0055) to 20 May
ANDREAS GURSKY
Hayward Gallery, London SE1
The gallery reopens after a
two-year refit with the first major
retrospective in a UK institution
of the German photographer,
featuring around 60 of the artist’s
images from the 1980s through to
his most recent work, including
Paris, Montparnasse (1993), an
immense photograph showing
a seemingly endless block of
flats, and Rhine II (1999/2015),
a sleek, digitally tweaked
vision of the river as a
contemporary minimalist
symbol. (020 3879 9555) to 22 Apr
PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST:
KÄTHE KOLLWITZ
Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, Swansea
This free exhibition of the
pioneering German painter,
printmaker and sculptor of
the late 19th and early 20th
century focuses on her portraits
of working women and her
two great series concerned
with social injustice: Ein
Weberaufstand (A Weavers’
Revolt) and Bauernkrieg
(Peasants’ War), with the
ever-present imagery of
death, especially a mother’s
grief, and the theme of war.
(01792 516900) to 17 Jun
Talks
CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL
Cambridge Union Society
On the bill this year are Lucy
Worsley, Harriet Harman, Luke
Harding, Rose Tremain, Alan
Hollinghurst, Robert Macfarlane,
Denise Mina, Ed Miliband,
Afua Hirsch and Jenny Uglow.
(01223 357 851) to Sun
ESTLITFEST
Print Room at the Coronet, London W11
This weekend centenary
celebration of Estonian
writing takes place as part of the
London Book Fair and features
Kristiina Ehin, Kai Areleid,
Rein Raud, Christopher
MacLehose, Ian Thomson,
Jaan Undusk, Mihkel Mutt
and the Estonian ambassador
to the UK, Tiina Intelmann.
(the-print-room.org) to Sat
Comedy
COUNT ARTHUR STRONG
Theatre Severn, Shrewsbury
Scattering malapropisms
gleefully as he goes, Steve
Delaney’s doddery old thesp
“delves into his own personal
box of video cassettes” to
pick highlights from his
“glittering” TV career – and tell
tales from the good old days.
(01743 281281) tonight
ROB AUTON
Soho Theatre, London W1
Rob Auton, dealer in wonderfully
strange comic poetry and
funny, surprising trains of
thought, has grown his hair long
– very long – and wants to tell you
all about it (and about eyebrows,
follicles and hirsuteness in
general) in The Hair Show.
(020 7478 0100) to Sat
RICHARD HERRING
Pound Arts Centre, Corsham
Richard Herring finds himself
face-to-face with his half
century – and his dodgy knees,
low-hanging testicles and
demanding family – in Oh Frig,
I’m 50! (01249 701628) tonight
HELEN MURRAY
Pick
ofthe
day
South Africa
Selected departures up to November 2018
& January to November 2019
Your tour includes...
✓ Full day guided safari in the Kruger National Park
✓ Tour of the legendary Zulu War battlefields of Isandlwana and Rorke’s Drift
✓ Internal flight to the stunning ‘Garden Route’
✓ Visit Hermanus for the world’s finest on-shore whale watching*
✓ Enjoy a scenic drive through the beautiful small country of Swaziland
✓ Stay in the heart of the fabulously beautiful Western Cape’s Winelands,
experiencing a cellar tour and tasting at a 300-year old wine estate
✓ Visits to the Cape of Good Hope and the Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens
✓ Visit to Johannesburg’s Apartheid Museum
✓ Stay three nights in Cape Town, dominated by Table Mountain
✓ Optional night in a tented safari camp, with a bushwalk with a ranger
✓ Return flights from London Heathrow
✓ Stay in three and four-star hotels with breakfast, two lunches and three dinners
✓ The services of our experienced and insightful tour manager
Optional Rovos Rail extension –
18 days from £4,099pp
Prices are based on two people sharing and are correct at time of print. Single
supplements may apply. This holiday is operated by and subject to booking conditions
of Riviera Travel, ABTA V4744 ATOL 3430 protected. Subject to availability. Additional
entrance cost may apply. Images used in conjunction with Riviera Travel. For further
information please write to Riviera Travel, New Manor, 328 Wetmore Road, Burton
upon Trent, Staffs, DE14 1SP. *Whale watching dependent on season.
For more information or to book,
please call: 01283 523447
www.ipariviera.co.uk
ABTA No. V4744
THEATRE
DEVIL WITH THE BLUE DRESS
Bunker Theatre, London SE1
Kevin Armento’s fascinating play revisits Bill Clinton’s notorious relationship with his intern (which always
gets dubbed the Monica Lewinsky Scandal) in the light of the #MeToo movement and the allegations
against Donald Trump. There is an almost abstract quality to the play, seen here in a fluent production by
Joshua McTaggart, with a largely bare dais of a stage on which the perspectives of five women at the centre
of the scandal clash, including Hillary Clinton (Flora Montgomery), Chelsea Clinton (Kristy Philipps)
and Lewinsky (Daniella Isaacs). (020 7234 0486) to 28 Apr
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
JESS ROBINSON
Junction, Cambridge
Impressionist Jess Robinson,
blessed with a belting voice,
brings Beyoncé, Kate Bush,
Judy Garland and a host of
other female icons to very
funny life in Here Come the Girls.
(01223 511511) tonight
World Music
MÉLISSA LAVEAUX
Rich Mix, London E2
The Haitian-Canadian singer’s
third album, Radyo Siwèl, is
on the No Format label, and is
packed with great pop-infused
songs, drawing on Haitian
music and poetry and steeped in
the island’s history and culture.
(020 7613 7498) tonight
Classical
LABÈQUE SISTERS
Royal Festival Hall, London SE1
Katia and Marielle Labèque
join the London Philharmonic
Orchestra under John Storgårds
for the world premiere of Bryce
Dessner’s Concerto for Two
Pianos, framed by Stravinsky’s
Jeu de Cartes ballet and
Rachmaninov’s Third Symphony.
(020 3879 9555) tonight 7.30pm
IGOR LEVIT
Wigmore Hall, London W1
The Russian-German pianist
premieres Frederic Rzewski’s
new work, Ages, in celebration of
the American pianist-composer’s
80th birthday, plus a selection of
Mendelssohn’s Songs Without
Words and a transcription of the
Adagio from Mahler’s 10th.
(020 7935 2141) tonight 7.30pm
Pop
THE ORIELLES
Brudenell Social Club, Leeds
Inquisitive, sardonic and
self-determined, this Halifax
trio deliver sharp hits of C86
revivalism on the debut album,
Silver Dollar Moment. Sisters
Sidonie B and Esmé Dee Hand
Halford (with pal Henry Carlyle
Wade) lead a keen-witted display
of DIY indie-pop thinking.
(lunatickets.co.uk) tonight
THE VACCINES
Academy, Sheffield
The ramalama indie-rock
hopes of 2011 return, rejigged of
line-up and refreshed of outlook.
After the Arctic Monkeys-aping
pop diversion of English Graffiti,
the whiplash riffs and bullish
tunes of Combat Sports
bristle with fighting spirit.
(gigsandtours.com) tonight
Dance
VOICES OF AMERICA
Sadler’s Wells, London EC1
A major coup for English
National Ballet: a world premiere
staging of William Forsythe, one
of the world’s most influential
choreographers. Plus Jerome
Robbins’ The Cage and Aszure
Barton’s Fantastic Beings.
(020 7863 8000) to 21 Apr
MATTHEW BOURNE’S
HIGHLAND FLING
Festival Theatre, Edinburgh
Scottish Ballet dance Bourne’s
“Romantic wee ballet”,
which brings the sprites and
Highlanders of La Sylphide to the
Scotland of Trainspotting. Expect
feral sylphs and sharp designs.
(0131 529 6000) to Sat
Folk & Roots
THE LOWEST PAIR
Café No 8, Launceston
‘Movies are made
by white men’
The film industry has long suffered from a lack of gender
diversity and monoculturalism. The East End Film Festival
will do its best to right that, says Kaleem Aftab
The Americana twosome
comprise the banjo picking of
Kendl Winter and Palmer T Lee,
mixing Winter’s high lonesome
harmonies and Lee’s Midwest
croon. (01566 777369) tonight
Theatre
CATHY
Soho Theatre, London W1
More than 50 years after Ken
Loach’s Cathy Come Home, Ali
Taylor’s play, which draws on
real-life experience to imagine
how a modern Cathy would fare,
reminds us that the state of
housing is still a very sore issue.
(020 7478 0100) to Sat
THE BAND
Newcastle Theatre Royal
Writer Tim Firth’s musical
about Take That is an infectious
homage to the music of Britain’s
best-loved boy band and the
power of youthful friendship.
The on-stage action never takes
itself too seriously as it journeys
from 90s suburban teenage
bedroom to the present day.
(thebandmusical.com) to Sat
HUMBLE BOY
Orange Tree Theatre, Richmond
Charlotte Jones’s 2001 domestic
comedy fuses Alan Ayckbourn’s
agonising humour with the artful
eloquence of Tom Stoppard, and
Paul Miller’s revival cherishes its
quirks, deliberately flirting with
cartoonish excess but achieving
warmth and poignancy.
(020 8940 3633) to Sat
LEGALLY BLONDE
Grand Theatre, Blackpool
Lucie Jones stars in Anthony
Williams’s brilliantly energetic
and witty production of the legal
musical, based on the 2001 film
and telling the story of how an
apparently air-headed California
valley blonde goes to Harvard
Law School and becomes a
seriously brilliant lawyer, without
ever giving up on her right to
wear pink at all times. (legally
blondethemusical.com) to Sat
MISS SAIGON
Palace Theatre, Manchester
Laurence Connor’s production
of Boublil and Schonberg’s great
sung-through drama from 1989
is a breathtakingly spectacular
and gripping piece of ensemble
theatre, which relocates the story
of Puccini’s 1903 opera, Madam
Butterfly, to 1970s Saigon during
the Vietnam War. Sooha Kim
gives a soul-stoppingly powerful
and poignant performance
as the Saigon bar-worker.
(miss-saigon.com) to 12 May
Bright spark Annika
Berg’s ‘Team
Hurricane’ has shades
of Harmony Korine
F
or too long in the film
industry, diversity has
looked good as a buzzword, yet made only
cosmetic difference in
practice. As the Argentine director Lucrecia Martel said at the
recent Cartagena Film Festival
in Colombia, “Films are made by
white middle-class men.” It is a
systemic problem in cinema, not
just Hollywood, as some would
have us believe.
So, as headline programmer at
the East End Film Festival, the
first question I had to face with
my fellow programmers was how
to create a festival that would
represent the full range of wonderfully diverse films from around
the world.
It’s trickier than you might
think. The film festival scene is
dominated by sales agents, mostly from France and Germany, who
take on films that they believe
they can put into competition at
Cannes, Berlin and Venice and sell
to a multitude of territories.
One needs to spend only five
minutes at any festival to realise
that, while film-makers may be diverse, those calling the shots are a
monolithic group. This bottleneck
pushes a certain type of movie,
which is why Cannes struggles to
have any female directors in competition and films from Africa remain as rare as cheetahs.
The problem that the industry
faces is exemplified by the career
of Sara Driver, the director of our
opening-night film, Boom for Real:
The Late Teenage Years of Jean-
Michel Basquiat. In the 1980s,
Driver was a key component of
the New York independent film
scene that gifted us directors such
as Jim Jarmusch and Spike Lee.
In 1981, she made her mediumlength directorial debut, You Are
Not I. The film played at Cannes
and the French movie bible Cahiers du Cinéma heralded it as one of
the best films of the 1980s.
Her feature debut Sleepwalk
opened Critics Week at Cannes,
1993’s When Pigs Fly played at
Locarno. She also produced two
other great 1980s movies, Jim Jarmusch’s Permanent Vacation and
the seminal Stranger Than Paradise. Driver wanted to direct
films, but the dramatic movies
she wanted to make had female
protagonists and, for the past 25
years, financiers balked – so Boom
for Real represents a welcome return to the director’s chair.
The East End is a discovery festival and only debut and second
films qualify for competition. Of
the eight vying for the top prize,
half are directed by women. These
include Different Kinds of Rain by
Isabel Prahl, an extraordinary
psychological drama that won
Best First Feature Film at Tallinn
Black Nights Film Festival; and
Sara Driver’s
debut was critically
lauded, yet for
25 years financiers
balked at backing her
High Fantasy, an inventive South
African body-swap dramatic comedy from former magician Jenna
Bass. I Am Another You is a documentary by the Chinese-born director Nanfu Wang that plays like
a slacker detective story, set in
Texas, while Annika Berg’s Team
Hurricane is an exciting radical
punk film about teenage girls.
I first saw it at the Venice Film
Festival and it gave me that same
tingly sensation I had when I first
saw Harmony Korine’s Gummo.
Another of the selected films,
Tigre, about a mother trying to
reconnect with her son in Argentina, is directed by female-male
team Silvina Schnicer and Ulises
Gaurdiola. Rounding off the competition are Indian drama Belekempa (The Bangle Seller) by Ere
Gowda, about village life; Daha
(More) by Onur Saylak, which tells
the brutal story of refugees being
smuggled to Greece; and Mexican
Sebastian Hoffman’s surreal black
comedy Time Share.
Throw into the mix the English
premiere of Fatih Akin’s Golden
Globe-winning Best Foreign Language picture In the Fade and enthralling new dramas from two
British female directors – the
Tanzania-set Pili by Leanne Welham, featuring a cast of non-actors living with HIV, and Deborah
Haywood’s misanthropic comedy
Pin Cushion – and it’s clear that the
seeds of change are being sown.
The East End Film Festival
runs to 29 April, various venues;
eastendfilmfestival.com
39
FR DAY
40
BOOKS
Loud immigrants and quiet heartbreak
THE ONE WHO WROTE DESTINY
Nikesh Shukla
(Atlantic, £14.99)
Review by Anita Sethi
T
he battle between fate
and free will rages
forcefully throughout
the engrossing third
novel by Nikesh Shukla. Are we destined to be who and
where we are, or do we have some
element of control over our identities and the direction of our lives?
These questions also echoed
throughout Shukla’s Costa First
Novel Award-shortlisted Coconut Unlimited, in which a group
of friends in 1990s Harrow form
a rap band in an attempt to define
themselves, as well as his second
novel Meatspace, in which a man
loses his job and his girlfriend
and feels as if he has lost control
over his own life until he is forced
to take the reins.
The One Who Wrote Destiny
traces the fickle fortunes of three
generations of the Jani family:
Mukesh, his twin daughter and
son Neha and Raks, and their
grandmother Ba. The narrative moves deftly through time
and place, from the 1960s to the
present, between the UK, Kenya
and New York, separated into
sections told in the first person by
each character.
Mukesh’s tale opens in 1966 in
Keighley, where he has moved
from Kenya. He feels as if he is in
an “in-between world”, dressed in
a navy-blue suit jacket that used to
belong to his father. He soon confronts the gap between his dreams
and reality. Instead of hanging out
with The Beatles and The Rolling
Stones as he had envisaged, his
welcome in England is somewhat
less glamorous – a bicycle crashes
into him and the person on it calls
him a “bloody wog”.
Shukla edited The Good Immigrant, a collection of essays about
race and immigration in the UK.
Those themes are tackled unflinchingly here, as he explores
both overt racism but also more
insidious forms of discrimination
and microaggressions. “They fear
a loud immigrant,” says Neha when
she gets into an altercation on the
bus. “It’s easier to dismiss me later
as an angry brown woman than
deal with me in the present.”
The character Raks is a comedian whose career is floundering – his jokes are, according to
his sister, distinctly unfunny. But
the author’s own gift for distilling
humour from the most painful
experiences is apparent, tackling
thorny topics with both gravity
and a lightness of touch.
Discriminatory behaviour Shukla explores insidious forms of racism in the UK from the 1960s on FOX/GETTY
Shukla, who worked until recently as editor of youth magazine
Rife, is also excellent at capturing
generational divides, not least
when Mukesh bemusedly asks
what a retweet is.
The emotional core of this moving novel is grief, a topic tackled
with sensitivity. It infiltrates all of
these lives. Neha, whose mother
died of cancer, struggles to keep
her own diagnosis a secret and
enumerates her worries: “Now
that I’m dying my biggest fear
appears to be the legacy of unfinished projects”. Shukla’s poignant
novella The Time Machine also explored grief and its royalties were
donated to the Roy Castle Lung
Cancer Foundation (the author’s
mother died of cancer in 2010).
This is a novel about the pain
of parting from places, as well as
from people. One chapter narrated by grandmother Ba is called
“I Heard that People Bear the Pain
of Being Away”. The novel gains
cumulative power as the grief
of generations gathers, until the
heartbreaking concluding chapter, “Everyone Disperses – One
By One They All Leave”.
Although the characters gain
some agency in their lives, the
novel also offers a clear-eyed look
at mortality – the destiny no one
escapes. This story, though, is
written with such vitality that it
lives beyond its ending.
ALSORELEASED
ROSIE: SCENES FROM
A VANISHED LIFE
Rose Tremain (Chatto &
Windus, £14.99)
After 14 novels, five collections
of short stories and almost every
prize for them, Rose Tremain
turns to non-fiction for the first
time with this lyrical account of
her life up to the age of 18.
There are all the elements
of a post-war idyll: handsome
parents, a privileged London
home and a paradisal Hampshire
retreat in 2,000 acres with a
dairy, a kitchen garden and staff
busy making roasts and puddings
– a place where a child could feel
“drugged with happiness”.
Pity about the adults, though;
neither Rosie’s bereaved
grandparents nor her unloving
mother (herself an unloved child)
had any time for her. Affection
was delegated to the nanny,
whom, unsurprisingly, Tremain
remembers with adoration.
The break-up of her parents’
marriage was bad enough, but
worse was the “Great Casting
Out”, when Tremain’s mother
remarried and decided that the
Top5
Books
best place for her two daughters
was boarding school.
Mother (chillily called
“Jane” throughout) is not to be
forgiven for this, nor for other
high-handedness. The book
starts with her dictating what
her daughter can or can’t have
remembered. Rose retaliates by
imagining her mother’s selfish
self-justifications: “Jo and Rosie
have got quite enough already,
thank you very much!”
Tremain tells us explicitly how
real-life stimuli fed through to her
fiction. She also tells us that she
punished her mother by putting
her into a novel with an unhappy
ending: “I took her husband away
from her and left her with an
unknown future.”
Rosie’s young life is often like
a novel. Her father joined a cult,
her piano teacher (the concert
pianist Joyce Hatto) turned out to
be involved in a notorious musical
hoax. The evocation of 1950s
schoolgirldom (“our minuscule,
girlie lives”), with all its emotions
and elations, is wonderfully vivid
– distinctive, like being donated a
set of dreams.
Rosie herself seems fated to
be misguided, not least by the
bizarre request from a beloved
English teacher to spend weeks
up a scaffolding in an exam term
painting a mural of Il Penseroso
on the classroom ceiling.
Another thoughtless
uprooting removed this budding
Michelangelo from school – just
at the point where she had fixed
on a scholarly future – to send
her to be “finished” with a view
to becoming a posh secretary.
“We’d work for men who’d been
educated to be whatever they
were capable of being, and we
would serve their needs.”
The narrative leaves us with
Rose emboldened by Paris in the
early 1960s and on the brink of
breaking free.
It’s a quiet drama, but as you’d
expect, it’s the writing that makes
this book such a delight: “Round
come the thermometers dunked
in TCP, Tuesdays dawn and serve
up the wonderful bacon pudding,
our charity garments begin to
take shape, tea is bread and jam
again, a cold wind sighs over the
hockey field.”
It’s a vanished life, as the
subtitle tells us, but vanished
into art. EVENING STANDARD
1. The Midnight Line Lee Child (Bantam)
2. The Shortest History of Germany James Hawes (Old Street)
3. The History of Bees Maja Lunde (Simon & Schuster)
4. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine Gail Honeyman (HarperCollins)
5. The Invisible Guardian Dolores Redondo (HarperCollins)
Claire Harman
BEALPORT: A NOVEL
OF A TOWN
Jeffrey Lewis
(Haus Publishing, £14.99)
Bealport is a town dependent
on a fading shoe factory that a
private equity mogul buys on
a whim, apparently with good
intentions. Things look good for
the locals, who have become used
to layoffs, shopping for broken
or water-damaged goods and
getting their kicks at the local
demolition derby.
An Emmy-winning writer on
1980s TV cop show Hill Street
Blues, Jeffrey Lewis also has four
novels to his name. His prose is
fluent and beautiful with a light,
witty touch and he can evoke a
character in just a few lines.
At the story’s heart is the
rivalry between two nicely drawn
brothers – solid, stolid Gary and
prodigal chancer Billy, who is
in his way as covetous and as
heedless of consequence as the
worst corporate asset-stripper.
Beneath the affectionate
portrayal of simple folk are
murkier undercurrents. There
is resentment of the rich and the
story takes in drug addiction,
sexual infidelity, guns and faith.
Although Donald Trump is never
mentioned, this is very much his
America. The narrative arc of
this short book is as inevitable
as it is neat. EVENING STANDARD
Nick Curtis
SHAKESPEARE’S
ORIGINALITY
John Kerrigan
(OUP, £25)
John Kerrigan is one of our most
incisive writers on Shakespeare.
This book comprises versions
of his Oxford Wells lectures and
looks at the trickiest of questions:
how original was Shakespeare?
It takes in textual sources,
innovation in stagecraft and the
history of when Shakespeare
became both the great original
and the best of adaptors,
including a bold piece on King
Lear that tracks its origins back
as far as the Oedipal myth.
Stuart Kelly
DEAR MRS BIRD
AJ Pearce
(Picador, £12.99)
This debut novel gives an
insight into the trials of twentysomething life – from flatsharing
to first jobs – while dodging
Luftwaffe bombs. Pearce is
said to have been inspired by
a collection of 1940s women’s
magazines, which might account
for the mannered language.
However, the twee turns of
phrase are undercut by the
impact of the Blitz for a tale that
combines humour and pathos.
Laura Paterson
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
The
hard
cell
THE SUN DOES SHINE:
HOW I FOUND LIFE AND
FREEDOM ON DEATH ROW
Anthony Ray Hinton
(Rider Books, £16.99)
Review by Alasdair Lees
I
n the spring of 2015, Anthony
Ray Hinton walked out of jail
after spending nearly three
decades on death row in an
Alabama prison. For 28 years
he’d lived in a 5ft by 7ft cell – the
size of a small bathroom – right
next to the chamber housing
Yellow Mama, the state’s garishly coloured electric chair. He’d
smelt the burning flesh of 54 of his
friends as they were executed, and
watched rats eating the blood of
men who had bashed their brains
in against walls.
He was undergoing, he says, a
slow-motion “lynching” by what
he perceived to be the southern
state’s racist authorities.
In 1985, at the age of 29, Hinton
was wrongfully convicted of the
murders of two restaurant managers in a cartoonish show trial.
“Chained and shackled like a
slave,” he notes, “going to auction.”
Empathetic figure Hinton befriended a KKK member who lynched a man
The story he relays in this incredibly moving chronicle of
spending half his life under the
sword of Damocles is one staggering revelation after another,
but also a lovely portrait of kindness, warmth and how faith is its
own reward. Pushed to the limits of his humanity in an almost
unimaginable hell hole, Hinton
experiences a miraculous inner
transformation that allows him
to endure a terrible wrong.
Hinton’s modesty summons
tears. His life before being nailed
to the cross is one of heartbreaking simplicity: high schooleducated, living with his mother,
working to clean gum off warehouse floors, chasing girls, gently
struggling with poignant everyday trials. But his youth is a
time when white people were still
bombing churches and setting
their dogs on black children.
“It doesn’t matter if you didn’t
do it,” the cops tell him after he
pleads his innocence when arrested, “one of your brothers did.” On
death row he somehow navigates
through his rage and despair to a
state of forgiveness and grace.
He builds memory palaces in
his imagination as a way of psychologically escaping the abyss
“where love and hope went to die”.
In an unprecedented move in
his part on death row, he reaches out with his voice, speaking
through the bars to the men on
his block, penetrating the infernal soundtrack of moans and
screams. He befriends men accused of horrific crimes, including a KKK member who lynched
a teenager, “the first white man
to be put to death [in Alabama] in
almost 85 years”.
He empathises with these loveless men who had been “taught to
kill”, “born broken or broken by
life”, some of them barely literate,
whom he concludes nevertheless
deserve to live.
One of his epiphanies is that
everyone is more than the sum of
the worst thing they’ve done.
The awful truth that emerges
is that he was statistically probably not the only innocent man
among the inmates he befriended.
The horrendous realities of the
American justice system that
surface throughout his book are
incomprehensible. His story
forms an astonishing document.
THE INDEPENDENT
COFFEE
TABLE
CHOICE
ONEMINUTE
WITH…
Aminatta Forna,
writer & academic
Where are you now and
what can you see?
In my office in Virginia in the
US. It’s on the corner of the
house, which sits on the edge of
a state park. One window faces
the road, the other, the woods.
Deer emerge from the trees
sometimes; once three huge stags
wandered on to my lawn.
What are you currently reading?
Mainly American classics,
the works my students would
have read at high school. I’ve
just finished Willa Cather’s My
Antonia. In between, I’m reading
Lesley Nneka Arimah’s stunning
collection of stories What It Means
When a Man Falls from the Sky.
Who is your favourite author
and why do you admire her/him?
Michael Ondaatje, for his
command of style, his boldness
in breaking genre and his
commitment to tackling some of
the dominant themes of our time,
such as the reverberating impact
of immigration and colonialism,
and the moral questions that
arise out of war and civil conflict.
Describe the room where
you usually write…
In London I wrote in my study,
overlooking the garden. I had
it painted my favourite shade
of yellow and I was surrounded
by photographs, paintings and
objects collected over time. In the
US, I work in a spare room.
Which fictional character
most resembles you?
When I was a kid, I saw myself
in Huck Finn. I think I still do.
Who is your hero/heroine
from outside literature?
The work of 200 female artists over the past 50 years is gathered in ‘Madam and Eve: Women Portraying Women’ (Laurence King, £40).
The artist Liz Rideal and curator Katherine Soriano brought their own experiences to bear on their choices – from Marina Abramovic to
Lisa Yuskavage. ‘One of us experienced formative teenage years in the late 1960s, from Mary Quant to Jimmy Hendrix, the other in the late
1970s, from The Osmonds to punk; one is single, one is married; one is a mother, the other not.’ The works are divided into five sections:
Body, Life, Death, Stories and Icons. Above, ‘Por um fio’ (‘By a Thread’), 1976, by the Brazilian-born American visual artist Regina Vater.
Here are a few: Gudush Jalloh,
Isatu Kabia, OB Sesay, Donald
Bash Taqi. They are: the vet
who saved the street dogs of
Freetown from extermination,
a midwife providing care to the
poorest women, a man who left
his job in London to spearhead
the Ebola rapid response unit in
Sierra Leone, and one of only two
government paediatricians in
the same country at a time when
infant mortality has dropped
dramatically. The West is so used
to seeing Africans as victims that
our heroes are rarely ever sung.
‘Happiness’ by Aminatta Forna is
out now (Bloomsbury, £16.99)
41
42
Homes & Design
Waste not want not
Dustcarts and bins may soon
be a thing of the past thanks to
automated waste-collection
systems, writes Vicky Richardson
A
housing scheme being
built in east London
proposes a dustcartfree future. It’s a
development where
far more of our waste can be
easily recycled. Europe’s largest
automated waste collection
system is being installed at the
443-acre Barking Riverside, close
to Barking town centre.
This is the first large-scale
project in the UK to adopt infrastructure which is already common in other countries.
Barking Riverside will have
11,000 homes, workplaces and
leisure facilities within a new
urban quarter that would usually
require 19,000 waste bins.
However, the Envac system
being used replaces these with
460 “waste outlets” and a network
of underground pipes to vacuum
waste to a local recycling plant,
which is also an ecology centre.
The master plan, by architects
Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands,
has streets designed for walking
and cycling, while the carbon
emissions from recycling vehicles
will be eradicated.
Matt Carpen, project director
forBarkingRiverside,says:“We’ve
learnt from major European
cities, such as Stockholm, and
integrated futureproof technology
to promote sustainability and
liveability for our residents.”
First in the UK with Envac
was Wembley Park, Quintain’s
regeneration of 85 acres, where it
is claimed the system can collect
the waste of 10,000 homes in
minutes and carbon emissions
from dustcarts have been slashed.
Such progress has been lacking
for years in Britain, whereas –
according to a 2014 report by the
London Waste and Recycling
Board – new homes have been
built in many cities around the
world using the technology.
Examples of vacuum and
pneumatic systems were cited in
New York, Doha, Stockholm and
Brisbane, begging the question
why the UK has done so little to
update its waste infrastructure.
One clear reason is the scale of
investment needed to install such
systems. With local authority
spending already so constrained,
the possibility of the new systems
being rolled out across the country
still seems like a pipe dream.
A more modest, yet ingenious,
approach is being tested in
Cambridge. Eddington is a 370acre community being built by
the University of Cambridge to
encourage researchers and key
workers to stay in the city.
Nine teams of architects are
working to provide thousands
of new homes and community
facilities such as schools, shops
and research centres. Eddington
has a sustainable strategy, which
includes a new underground
waste collection system.
Heather Topel, the project
director, says: “A huge benefit
is the removal of wheelie bins
to dramatically improve the
streetscape and remove the need
for weekly collections.”
So far 500 people have moved
into homes in the first phase
which are equipped with specially
designed bins in the kitchens,
access to composting facilities
and the new waste system where
instead of 3,000 individual
household bins, there are 450
underground bins.
Communal bins are located
on the street no further than 55
yards from each home. Rubbish
drops down into an underground
store and when the container is
80 per cent full a specially adapted
recycling lorry collects the waste.
The problem in the capital
remains that a large proportion of
the population lives in flats, where
it is harder to deal with waste and
to recycle: half as much waste
gets recycled from apartment
buildings compared to houses.
Currently 37 per cent of housing
is purpose-built flats, and by 2030
flats are set to make up half of the
city’s accommodation.
Resource L ondon, which
represents the capital’s waste
authorities, wants developers to
come up with new solutions to
encourage flat dwellers to recycle.
The clean streets of Cambridge
Eddington are more than
a pipe dream thanks to
an underground waste
collection system
A huge benefit
is the removal of
wheelie bins
How the vacuum system works
Air
flow
Peabody housing association,
managing 55,000 London homes, has
tested “intelligent” rubbish chutes at
a block in Aldgate East.
Such chutes are common in private
residences – for example at St George
Wharf, Vauxhall. The idea is that you
press a button to divert the waste to
the appropriate bin.
Sounds good in theory, but the
system needs regular maintenance
and can easily become blocked with
bad and hard-to-recycle rubbish
items such as takeaway pizza boxes.
Unfortunately, Peabody has drawn
the conclusion that design solutions
are not the answer: “We need to start
by improving recycling rates.”
Last month Peabody and Resource
London launched an in-depth,
two-year study to find out why flat
dwellers are so bad at recycling.
Apparently researchers will spend
time in residents’ homes to “learn
how recycling fits into their lives and
what motivates them to recycle”.
The research reinforces the
belief that the problem is down to
individual behaviour. Yet examples
from cities such as Stockholm, where
recycling is far more widespread and
efficient, suggest the problem is not
so much people with bad habits as
bad infrastructure.
In the meantime, London Mayor
Sadiq Khan is proposing that local
authorities should cut back rubbish
collection services to put more
pressure on householders to recycle,
which makes no sense at all.
Isn’t it time we put wheelie
bins in the dustbin of history?
EVENING STANDARD
SOURCE: ENVAC
Vicky Richardson is associate director
at the London School of Architecture
NEWS
2-28
Doing up
the dream
Ben Alden-Falconer
And lo, there was
light (and heat)!
But only after an
almighty struggle
When I first looked round the
house in Margate, I marvelled at
the vintage ceiling lights and the
Bakelite switches. But when I tried to
put a new bulb into one of the lights
and it exploded with a dramatic
flash – the ancient cord insulation
had crumbled to dust allowing
the wires to short-circuit – the old
electrics turned from being living
history to downright dangerous. I
replaced the cable, but it left me very
wary about how much I used the
70-year-old electrics.
I learned to be careful, turning off
the one electric heater if I wanted
to boil the kettle or use any power
tools. But the freezing weather has
been near-unbearable and the need
to use tools more pressing than ever,
so before they come in to rewire
the whole house in a few weeks, the
electricians have put in a temporary
fuse box and four new plugs from
which I can run extension cables.
Finally, I think, I can leave the
electric heaters on to dry out some
of the damp that remains after the
burst pipe, and also use more than
one at a time. Within an hour of using
the new plugs, though, an acrid smell
wafted up from the basement. When
I go to investigate, an oily black liquid
is dripping from the box next to my
meter, together with wisps of smoke.
I can actually feel the heat coming off
the black box and gingerly flick every
switch to “off”.
Time to phone Mick the builder,
who is as helpful as ever. It is brilliant
to have someone to call at a moment
like this, but we quickly establish that
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
TV
36-37
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
Ben was wary
about using the
70-year-old electrics
in his house but
he wasn’t afraid of
getting stuck into
the front gate
(below left)
They’ve
never seen
anything
like this in
40 years
on the job
the electricians will not be allowed
to touch anything “before” the meter,
so I start searching online for help.
My power supplier is closed for
the weekend, but I eventually get a
number for UK Power Networks, the
supplier for the South East. Its call
staff is brilliant, perhaps through
years of dealing with customers
panicked about losing power in the
cold and dark.
A variety of electrical experts
call that day. First on the scene is
someone to assess the situation.
Yes, he confirms, it is dangerous. The
black liquid leaking from the box is
bitumen, melted by intense heat.
He adds a warning that the old 30w
fuses will take more like 60w before
they actually blow; lucky I am not
using them!
I quiz him on whether the old
thick cable before the smoking box
is unsafe too (I might as well find out
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
43
while the experts are on hand) and
he tells me it has a steel core,
coated in bitumen and hessian,
with a steel sheath around the
outside - probably better than any
modern plastic casing.
Next in are the nearest available
electricians, who happen be
specialists in overhead power
lines. They’ve never seen anything
like this in 40 years on the job,
they declare, before making the
unit safe by disconnecting it and
covering it in yellow warning tape.
The guys I really need, apparently,
are the “jointers” who deal with
underground cable, and they’re tied
up on a job. A phone call is made to
HQ, but the afternoon is wearing
on, and the chances of power before
nightfall are not looking good.
The jointers arrive just
before dusk, a couple of friendly,
no-nonsense guys in blue boiler
suits. New box, new fuse – and power
is restored within the hour. I have
now been brought up to modern
safety standards, and my meter is
the only remaining piece of 1940s
equipment. Another planned day
of work has been scuppered, but
rather than twiddle my thumbs
without power, I have spent the day
in the garden hand-sanding the front
gate and starting to repaint it. It’s
certainly not a priority but a great
way to enjoy a rare bit of sun and
better than being idle.
Follow Ben’s renovation
progress on Instagram
@Margate_renovation_ipaper
DO N ’ T T H IN K DO W N S I Z I N G,
T H I N K R IG H T SI Z I N G !
Pictured: Fleur-de-Lis Marlborough
B U Y N O W ! S T U N N I N G N E W A P A R T ME N T S A C RO S S T H E S O U T H O F E N G L A N D
Wantage, Oxfordshire | 01235 766398
Wokingham, Berkshire | 0800 625 0026
Paignton, Torbay | 01803 698482
Wareham, Dorset | 01929 554557
Haywards Heath, West Sussex | 01444 455699
Marlborough, Wiltshire | 01672 516290
We Offer The Following
• Large 1 & 2 bedroom apartments
• Central locations close to amenities
• Fully integrated Neff appliances throughout
• Dual levels & balconies
• Secure, gated access with parking
• Weekly coffee mornings and other events
• Concierge on-site Monday to Friday
• Beautiful landscaped garden areas
• Digitally controlled luxury walk-in showers
• 24 hour emergency call system
• Owners’ Drawing Room with WiFi
• Support selling your home
• CCTV covering the grounds
• Lift to all floors
• Free national moving service
Now Selling At: Crowthorne, Haywards Heath, Marlborough, Paignton,
Rustington, Sandhurst, Wantage, Wareham, Wimborne, Wokingham
Coming Soon: Bourne End, Dorking, Poole, Shaftesbury,
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In Planning: Alton, Arundel, Bromley, Camberley, Cranleigh, Egham,
Fleet, Southbourne, Wooburn Green, Yateley
To request a brochure Freephone 0800 625 0026 / Visit www.renaissanceretirement.co.uk
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RETAIL
Carpetright to close 92
shops in restructuring plan
By Caitlin Morrison
Carpetright is to close 92 shops
across the UK, putting 300 jobs at
risk, as it seeks to combat growing
financial pressures.
Shares in the embattled retailer
fell by 8.1 per cent to 38.55p after
the announcement yesterday,
with investors bearish about the
company’s restructuring plan. A year
ago, the shares were trading at 236p.
“Carpetright intends to enter a
company voluntary arrangement,
which needs the approval of creditors,
but would give the business some
much-needed breathing space,” said
David Madden, an analyst at CMC
Markets. “A CVA is seen as a serious
sign that a business is struggling,
and in the near-term investors might
steer clear of the stock.”
The retailer, which employs nearly
2,700 staff, announced its intention
to close stores last month, when it
revealed that it was battling difficult
trading conditions.
Carpetright now says that
it has identified 205 sites that
are underperforming and/or on
unfavourable lease terms, or “in
certain cases, not expected to have
significant strategic value”.
Under the terms of the CVA,
Carpetright will seek reduced rent
and revised lease terms for the 113
shops it is not closing. The company
Carpetright was founded
by businessman Lord
Harris of Peckham in 1988,
when he opened the first shop in
Canning Town, east London. He
sold out of the business in 2014.
hopes to receive approval from both
its creditors and shareholders for the
CVA proposals by 30 April.
Meanwhile, the company is also
expecting to make £60m through
an equity capital raising, using the
proceeds to reduce debt and cover
the costs associated with the CVA.
“These tough but necessary
actions will enable us to address the
burden of a legacy UK property estate
consisting of too many poorly located
stores on unsustainable rents and
are essential if we are to restore our
profitability and deliver a successful
turnaround,” said Carpetright’s chief
executive, Wilf Walsh.
“Completion of the CVA and equity
financing will enable us to establish
an appropriately sized estate of
modernisedstores,oneconomicrents,
complemented with a compelling
online offer, enabling Carpetright to
The closures put 300 Carpetright jobs
across the UK at risk GETTY
address the competitive threat from a
position of strength.”
Richard Lim, the chief executive of
Retail Economics, said Carpetright’s
challenges go beyond a lack of
online presence. “A slower housing
market, the rising of the experience
economy and a deceleration in
the appetite for credit have also
hindered the furniture and flooring
market,” he added.
THE INDEPENDENT
TECHNOLOGY
Avast seeks
increased
security with
London float
By Ben Woods
Quote of
the day
I don’t think so
many companies
or people are
going to leave the
UK. It is the people
not coming
that we should
worry about
Ana Patricia Botin
The Santander boss fears
that the financial sector
will stall after Brexit.
The 30
Second
Briefing
MOTHERCARE
Is Mothercare still in trouble?
Yes. The struggling retailer, which
remains locked in talks with lenders
about a refinancing deal, reported
yesterday that its like-for-like
sales had slipped by 2.8 per cent
in the three months to 24 March.
The update followed a period of
turbulence for Mothercare, which
replaced its chief executive, Mark
Newton-Jones, last week.
What now?
Mothercare is said to be considering
a company voluntary arrangement
which would allow it to close lossmaking shops and secure discounts
on rents. New chief executive David
Wood said his “immediate priority”
was to ensure that Mothercare
returned to firmer financial ground.
But surely there are some bright
spots within the business?
Sales on Mothercare’s website rose
by 7.2 per cent over the quarter.
Investors seemed to be heartened
by this news, and the shares rose
by 6.7 per cent to 18.14p yesterday.
“This statement provides welcome
reassurance after a challenging
time,” said Clive Black, an analyst
at Shore Capital. But the shares are
still a long way off the 125p they
were trading at a year ago.
Why are Britain’s retailers
struggling so much?
High-street chains have been
battered by weak consumer
confidence amid soaring inflation.
They have also had to contend
with surging wages costs and
steep rises in business rates.
Since January, Toys R Us and
Maplin have filed for administration,
while fashion retailers such as
New Look and Select have begun
closing stores across the UK.
The cyber security specialist Avast
is lining up a bumper listing on the
London stock market which would
value the software company at
$4bn (£2.8bn).
The firm is planning to free float
25 per cent of its share capital in early
May, as it looks to raise $200m from
primary proceeds and $800m from
secondary shares.
Avast, which blocked two billion
cyber attacks per month last year,
said it would use the money to bolster
growth by driving down its debt pile.
The chief executive, Vincent
Steckler, said: “Over the past
30 years, Avast has grown from
a visionary start-up to the No 1
consumer cyber security company,
with 435 million users worldwide.
“This transformation of our
company has happened because of
the dramatic increase in the number
and types of threats around the
world which are a growing concern
to people, and Avast’s ability to stay
ahead of the bad guys with new and
evolving technologies and products.
“As a leading European tech
company, a listing on the London
Stock Exchange is a strategic and
natural fit, supporting the future
growth of our business.”
The Prague-based business is one
of the largest providers of security
software, with revenues and profits
of $779.5m and $451m last year.
The move would be seen as a coup
for the City of London as it gears up
for Brexit. Avast pulled back from
floating on New York’s Nasdaq in
2012, according to reports.
NEWS
2-28
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
BANKING
TV
36-37
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
RETAIL
Metro Bank faces investor
backlash over family links
WH Smith not
standing still
on stationery
expansion
By Kalyeena Makortoff
and Ravender Sembhy
By Laura Onita
The Metro Bank chairman, Vernon
Hill, is facing the prospect of an
embarrassing shareholder rebellion
after an investor hit out at more than
£21m of payments from the lender to
his wife’s architecture firm.
Royal London Asset Management
has warned it will vote against a
raft of resolutions at Metro Bank’s
annual general meeting on 24 April,
including the re-election of founder
and chairman Mr Hill and the
lender’s remuneration report. The
fund manager, which holds a 0.44
per cent stake in Metro Bank worth
£13.6m, said it would also vote against
the re-election of the heads of the
remuneration and audit committees.
Shirley Hill’s firm InterArch
was paid £4.6m in 2017, linked to
architectural design services for
Metro Bank, as well as a branding,
marketing and advertising agreement
that was renewed in January.
It brings the total amount paid
to InterArch to £21m, based on
accounts filed between 2010 and 2017.
Royal London’s head of responsible
investment, Ashley Hamilton
Claxton, said: “In a year when
large corporate failures dominate
the headlines, boardrooms should
pay especially close attention to
related party transactions such as
Vernon
Hill’s wife’s
architecture
firm was
paid £4.6m
in 2017
AFP/GETTY
the payments by Metro Bank to
InterArch, owned by the wife of the
bank’s chairman, for design and
branding services.”
In its annual report, Metro
Bank’s audit committee said
contracts with InterArch were at
“arm’s length” and were “at least
as beneficial as those which could
be obtained in the market from an
alternative supplier”.
In 2007, Mr Hill resigned from USbased Commerce Bancorp after the
lender faced scrutiny by regulators
over allegations of business deals
with the chairman’s family members.
Royal London also raised concerns
a b o u t t ra n s p a r e n c y a r o u n d
performance targets for executive
pay. Metro Bank’s annual report
detailed a remuneration package
totalling £496,667 for Mr Hill in 2017,
up from £405,000 a year earlier, while
chief executive Craig Donaldson took
home £1.5m, up from £1.3m in 2016.
Metro Bank said: “InterArch
provides architecture,
design and branding services to
the bank. The audit committee has
strong review and benchmarking
processes in place.”
ENERGY
Winter storms batter National Grid’s profits
By Emily Beament
National Grid, the UK’s power
generator, has warned over profits
after suffering a £140m hit from
ferocious storms in the US.
The group said that annual
headline group earnings – a measure
Outlook
CARL
MORTISHED
Even after Skripal,
it’s business as
usual with Russia
I
n the film The Godfather, there
is a scene where Michael Corleone, played by Al Pacino, proposes that he murder a rival
mafioso. He is advised caution,
but Michael argues that he is not motivated by revenge. “It’s not personal.
It’s strictly business,” he say.
In the gangster world, everything
of profits – would be lower than
previously expected, with the rough
weather conditions hammering the
US business.
However, the blow will be “largely
offset” by a £60m boost from
changes to finance costs and a
lower US tax charge of 24 per cent.
Despite the financial setback, it said
underlying group earnings were on
track to meet expectations.
The update comes after National
Grid was forced to issue a “gas deficit
warning” in March as extreme
weather conditions, including heavy
bouts of snow, battered the UK.
is personal, especially business. In
the civilised world, laws govern the
conduct of business. There is no need
for blood ties and blood shedding to
protect your interest.
But when gangsters subvert governments or become governments,
and when their proxies fight their
battles on our streets, no higher law
is enforceable. It’s either a game of
diplomatic bluster or threats of retaliation. Should we carry on “just doing
business” with a state-sponsored
criminal enterprise and its commercial puppets, or do we get personal?
Since the attempted killing in
Salisbury of Sergei Skripal, the
Russian former KGB agent, and his
daughter, the British Government
has behaved pretty much according to form. There has been lots of
posturing, snubs and the expulsion
of diplomats but little sign the Government has the appetite to harm
seriously the economic interest of
those who ordered the attempted
assassination or condoned it and
their business allies.
No such restraint in Washington,
where the US Treasury has fired a
blunderbuss at Russian billionaires
with links to the Kremlin. Their assets
will be frozen and they are barred
from doing business in America and
with Americans, including US banks.
One of them, Oleg Deripaska, could
find his core business, the aluminium
combine Rusal, in serious trouble.
Th
he British approach to
rellationships with pariah
states can be expressed
in godfatherly terms
Its share price halved this week as
investors concluded that Rusal’s
ability to conduct business in US
dollars is threatened.
The difference between Donald
Trump’s bare-knuckle punch and
Theresa May’s hand in glove is more
than diplomatic style. America can
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
The boss of WH Smith has said he
will ramp up his efforts to sell more
pens, pads and paper to halt a fall in
profits at its high street stores.
The newsagent recently signed a
deal with the Post Office to sell WH
Smith stationery in 175 locations.
It also snapped up Cult Pens, an
upmarket online stationer, for an
undisclosed sum, while it tries to
rely less on books, newspapers and
magazines. Chief executive Steve
Clarke said: “It’s key to our strategy.
Stationery is the most attractive and
has the highest margins.”
It already accounts for more than
half of its high street sales and 60 per
cent of profits, he added.
Revenues were
flat to £643m
for the six
months to 28
F e b r u a r y,
wh i l e p re tax profits
edged down
1 per cent to
£82m. Samestore sales were
up 3 per cent in its
travel arm, the largest
part of the business. WH Smith
has 839 travel stores – including
258 overseas – at railway stations,
airports and transport hubs, as well
as an increasing number in hospitals.
The strength of the travel arm
helped make up for weakness on the
high street, where like-for-like sales
fell 4 per cent as the boom in demand
for spoof humour book titles came to
an end.
Investec’s Kate Calvert dubbed the
results “solid”. “Another consistent
performance continuing a long track
record of steady growth and strong
cash generation,” she said.
Shares in WH Smith rose by
almost 2 per cent yesterday to 2,018p.
EVENING STANDARD
afford to shun Russia – its economy
is small, about the size of Italy. Russia sells almost nothing that America
needs but competes as an oil exporter.
It’s a moot point whether Britain
can afford to shun Russia.
The British approach to commercial relationships with pariah states
can be expressed in godfatherly
terms: it may be personal but we can
dress it up as business.
Without the economic power of the
EU, Britain will have to take the view
that a buck is a buck. London is the
UK’s engine and its job is to process
and service foreign capital, much of it
in flight. In the first half of last year,
Chinese investors spent £4bn on London real estate. These Chinese reckon
Brexit is a small risk compared with
the gangster economy back home.
Why would we ever put that flow
of foreign cash through a moral
filter? After all, it’s not personal. It’s
strictly business.
EVENING STANDARD
47
From the
business
pages
Lockheed keen on
shifting to India
The Hindustan Times
With the Indian Air Force in the
process of buying 110 fighter
jets, in a deal that could be
worth more than $15bn, US firm
Lockheed Martin has expressed
its readiness to shift its F-16
fighter aircraft manufacturing
unit to India. Asked if the
Trump administration would
allow it, Randall Howard of
Lockheed Martin said the
company had “full support of
the US government”.
Thai household
debt accelerates
The Bangkok Post
The Bank of Thailand has
sought to dispel fears that the
ratio of household debt to GDP
accelerated in the final quarter
of last year. It said the higher
debt load could be attributed to
seasonal spending by middleto upper-income earners. The
country’s household debt ratio
edged up from 77.3 per cent in
the third quarter to 77.5 per
cent in the fourth.
Kremlin dismisses
rouble slump fears
The Moscow Times
The Russian government
has pledged to minimise the
fallout from US sanctions and
dismissed steep falls in the
rouble as short-term volatility,
saying Russia needed time to
adjust to the curbs. The rouble
has shed more than 3 per cent of
its value against the dollar this
week despite rising oil prices.
Investors fear the US could
impose more sanctions.
DXB welcomes
Dubai visitor surge
The National
DXB Entertainments, which
operates Legoland Dubai, said
visitor numbers jumped by 45
per cent in the first quarter
thanks to cooler weather. The
leisure company, which also
owns hotels and cinemas,
received 851,000 visits in
the first quarter of the year,
up 55,000 over the previous
quarter. The company is
targeting India, Saudi Arabia
and the UK to attract tourist
numbers to its Dubai centres.
48
BUSINESS
The
Business
Matrix
The day at
a glance
FTSE 100 up 1.2 at 7258.3
3i Group
Admiral
Anglo Amer
Antofagasta
AB Foods
Ashtead Group
AstraZeneca
Aviva
BAE Systems
Barclays
Barratt Dev
BHP Billiton
BP
BAT
Berkeley Grp Hldgs
British Land
BT
Bunzl
Burberry
Carnival
Centrica
Coca-Cola HBC
Compass
CRH
Croda Intl
DCC
Diageo
Direct Line Ins
Easyjet
Evraz
Experian
Ferguson
Fresnillo
G4S
GKN
Glencore
GSK
892.4
1905.5
1670.4
949.2
2581.0
2031.0
5045.0
509.6
591.6
216.0
550.4
1445.8
504.5
4174.0
3883.0
653.0
240.5
2099.0
1718.0
4510.0
139.6
2501.0
1461.5
2376.0
4647.0
6590.0
2493.5
357.5
1661.0
396.8
1545.0
5306.0
1266.5
253.4
439.4
342.4
1429.6
-0.8
+9.5
-1.8
-1.2
+5.0
+19.0
-25.0
+7.6
-5.0
+1.4
-0.6
-2.6
-1.4
-46.0
-13.0
+7.2
+1.6
-17.0
-2.0
+9.0
+0.7
-9.0
-24.0
+13.0
+48.0
+15.0
-12.0
+4.1
+51.5
+2.2
-7.5
+24.0
-19.0
+0.1
+4.9
+0.1
-7.6
975.0
2184.0
1870.0
1071.0
3387.0
2185.0
5520.0
550.0
682.5
225.5
705.5
1662.4
536.2
5643.6
4270.0
695.0
318.0
2472.0
2024.0
5435.0
220.1
2711.0
1765.9
2955.0
4684.0
7762.5
2735.5
411.3
1698.7
468.9
1708.0
5722.0
1746.0
342.6
463.2
416.9
1724.5
Low
756.5
1766.0
950.1
11.1
2386.0
1476.0
4260.0
482.2
533.5
177.3
6.3
1103.0
436.9
3775.0
3031.0
589.0
216.4
1918.5
1481.5
4427.0
119.7
2077.0
1396.5
27.0
3497.0
6445.0
2186.5
337.6
1050.4
169.8
1428.0
4427.0
1150.5
233.8
3.0
270.0
1179.4
Company
Price
Chg
High
Halma
Hargrve Lans
HSBC Hldgs
IAG
Imperial Brands
Informa
IntCont Htls
Intertek
ITV
Johnson Matth
Just Eat
Kingfisher
Land Secs
Legal & Gen
Lloyds Bk Gp
Lon Stock Ex
Marks&Spen
Mediclinic Intl
Micro Focus Intl
Mondi
Morrison (Wm)
National Grid
Next
NMC Health
Old Mutual
PaddyPwrBetfair
Pearson
Persimmon
Prudential
Randgold Res
Reckitt Ben
RELX
Rentokil Initial
Rio Tinto
Rolls-Royce
RBS
Shell A
1195.0
1703.5
681.6
608.6
2466.5
723.8
4253.0
4810.0
142.9
3270.0
729.8
302.3
944.6
269.5
68.2
4238.0
270.8
580.8
1258.5
1907.0
230.1
823.6
5028.0
3370.0
237.8
7125.0
769.2
2660.0
1817.5
5692.0
6036.0
1505.5
273.2
3750.0
881.2
264.7
2368.5
+4.0
+13.5
+6.0
-7.0
-22.0
+3.8
+2.0
+5.0
-7.3
+41.0
+18.6
+4.9
-3.6
+3.7
+1.1
-8.0
+5.8
+4.8
+88.5
+19.0
+1.3
-3.9
+152.0
-2.0
+1.6
-105.0
+4.4
-15.0
+2.0
-184.0
-114.0
-20.0
-5.4
+28.5
-4.4
+1.5
-25.5
1341.0
1935.0
798.6
680.6
3956.5
773.0
4944.0
5470.0
220.2
3511.0
906.0
369.8
1217.1
279.9
73.6
4371.0
397.8
890.2
2970.5
2145.0
254.4
1174.3
5355.0
3558.0
259.6
8967.0
775.8
2901.0
1992.5
8255.0
8110.4
1784.0
338.8
4226.6
994.5
304.2
2579.5
Low
1022.0
1258.0
618.0
525.0
2301.0
631.0
3656.0
3927.0
141.0
2681.0
544.0
285.3
900.2
244.3
61.8
3164.0
262.0
495.4
26.8
1684.0
203.3
733.0
3565.0
1864.0
185.5
6027.4
563.0
2175.0
1612.1
5540.0
4973.4
1399.0
238.2
2882.5
795.5
221.8
1982.5
19772.9
3996.5
+118.0
+4.7
FTSE Eurofirst300
1485.3
+9.9
Dow Jones *
24551.2
S&P 500 *
2671.1
+361.8
Nasdaq *
7155.2
DAX
12415.0
CAC 40
5309.2
+31.3
Hang Seng
30831.3
-66.4
Nikkei
21660.3
-26.8
+28.9
+86.2
+121.0
EURO/
POUND
DOLLAR/
POUND
+ 0.48¢
FTSE 250
FTSE All Share
$1.4241
+1.2
+ 1.01¢
7258.3
€1.1561
Markets
FTSE 100
Company
Price
Chg
High
Shell B
Royal Mail
RSA Insur
Sage
Sainsbury(J)
Schroders
Scot Mort Inv Tst
Segro
Severn Trent
Shire
Sky
Smith&Neph
Smith (DS)
Smiths Gp
Smurfit Kappa Grp
SSE
Stan Chart
Standard Life Aber
St James Place
Taylor Wimpey
Tesco
TUI AG
Unilever
United Utilities
Vodafone
Whitbread
WPP
2411.0
570.8
654.2
672.0
253.0
3225.0
450.4
607.4
1847.5
3685.5
1301.0
1326.0
490.5
1501.5
2954.0
1296.5
733.1
377.0
1082.5
190.2
233.2
1587.0
3924.5
703.6
207.3
3809.0
1187.0
-22.5
+3.8
+1.8
+2.0
+2.6
+26.0
+2.2
+0.8
-2.5
+96.0
-9.0
+3.0
+3.5
+1.5
-18.0
+5.5
+3.4
+11.6
+7.5
+0.1
+7.8
+2.0
-19.0
-6.8
+1.1
+65.0
-12.0
2617.0
575.0
672.5
825.2
339.9
3784.0
479.2
626.2
2575.0
5021.0
1378.0
1442.0
565.0
1697.0
3254.0
1554.0
864.2
448.6
1279.5
211.9
234.2
1687.9
4557.5
1078.0
239.7
4333.0
1762.0
Low
2037.0
367.8
568.5
630.0
222.4
3043.0
361.1
474.5
1664.0
2940.5
11.4
1173.0
5.3
1354.0
1712.7
1176.5
678.8
349.4
1051.0
173.0
165.3
934.4
3678.5
648.6
190.1
3499.9
1074.0
For enquiries call +44 (0)20 7825 8300
GOLD
Per troy ounce,
London pm fix
– $0.67
High
$71.69
Chg
$1,338.4
Price
– $22.93
Company
OIL
Brent crude,
per barrel
RETAIL
PEOPLE
2,000 jobs to go as
Toys R Us closes
Tributes paid to
‘giant’ of unions
Toys R Us will shut its final
stores in less than two weeks,
resulting in the loss of more
than 2,000 jobs, the retailer’s
administrators have confirmed.
The toy chain collapsed in
February and insolvency
specialist Moorfields has been
selling off the retailer’s stock at
knockdown prices. Toys R Us’s
75 stores will close on 24 April.
Labour politicians and union
officials were among hundreds
who attended a memorial
service for the former Nupe and
Unison union leader Rodney
Bickerstaffe. Paying tribute
at Westminster Central Hall,
former deputy prime minister
John Prescott described Mr
Bickerstaffe as a “giant” of the
labour movement.
INSURANCE
TRANSPORT
Saga reports rise
in earnings
FirstGroup shares
up on ‘no buy-out’
The travel and insurance firm
Saga has reported a marginal
rise in earnings, boosting
investors’ confidence following
a profits warning in December.
The company said pre-tax
profits rose by 1.4 per cent to
£190.1m for the 12 months to 31
January, up from £187.4m a year
earlier. The shares rose 5.7 per
cent to 123.7p on the FTSE 250.
FirstGroup shares shot up by
8.2 per cent to 110.1p yesterday
after the transport company
confirmed it had rejected a
takeover approach by the US
private equity firm Apollo
Management. The firm – which
co-runs the South Western
Railway franchise – claimed
that the offer “significantly”
undervalued the company.
MEDIA
RETAIL
Disney ‘must bid
for whole of Sky’
Quiz fashion sales
grow by a third
Walt Disney must bid for the
whole of Sky even if Rupert
Murdoch’s £11.7bn offer for
the pay-TV group is blocked,
the Takeover Panel has ruled.
It will come as a blow to Disney,
which is understood to have
wanted the option to bid for
the rest of Sky or not should
regulators block the Fox bid.
The fashion retailer Quiz grew
its sales by almost a third in
its first financial year since its
initial public offering last July.
Group revenues jumped from
£89.8m to £116.4m in the year to
31 March, a rise of 30 per cent.
Online sales at the Glasgowbased firm more than doubled
in the year to £30.6m.
RETAIL
EMPLOYMENT
Dunelm sales up
despite gloom
‘50,000 jobs a day
needed for young’
The furniture retailer Dunelm
appeared to side-step the gloom
shrouding the retail sector as
it reported that third-quarter
sales rose by 5.1 per cent to
£268.2m. On a like-for-like basis,
store sales were up 1.2 per cent.
The firm’s shares climbed by
8.8 per cent to 570p on the news.
Commonwealth countries need
to create 50,000 jobs a day to
provide work for the growing
number of young workers, a
study suggests. The Overseas
Development Institute said that
17.5m new jobs were needed
every year until 2030 – 50 per
cent more than before.
the
markets
The FTSE 100 index edged out
of the red yesterday, ending
the day 1.2 points higher at
7,258.34 after Donald Trump
played down the prospect of a
military attack on Syria led by the
US and France.
***
Shares in IAG fell by 7p to 608.6p
amid news that the British
Airways owner is exploring a
potential acquisition of low-cost
carrier Norwegian Air Shuttle. The
biggest risers on the FTSE 100
were Micro Focus International,
up 88.5p at 1,258p, and Tesco which
rose by 7.8p. The biggest faller was
ITV, down 7.3p to 142.9p.
NEWS
2-28
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
TV
36-37
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
BANKING
Brexit foresight ‘could have changed
Goldman Sachs plans for new UK HQ’
By Kalyeena Makortoff
The boss of Goldman Sachs has said
that the US investment bank may
have delayed or even scrapped plans
for a new UK headquarters had he
known about Brexit earlier.
Lloyd Blankfein said there were “a
lot of reasons” to follow through on
the construction of the £1bn London
site, which is set to open in 2019, now
that the decision has been made.
“We are going to keep that building
and there’s a lot of reasons to have it
and it works out economically,” he
added. “But that’s not the same thing
as saying that if we knew four years
ago, when we made the decision to go
ahead, that we would have had
this outcome. We probably
would have delayed
that decision.”
T h e n e w o f f i c e,
which is being built
just off Farringdon
Street in the City of
London, is expected
to be about nine storeys
high when it is ready to
house staff next year, though
Goldman Sachs has kept the option
of letting out remaining space to
Oil price
soars amid
fears of
Syria strikes
The price of oil is at its highest
level in more than three years
as the likelihood of the US and
UK taking military action in
Syria increases.
Brent crude oil surged
past $72 per barrel yesterday
morning and remained at
around $72 for the most of
the day, while US benchmark
West Texas Intermediate oil
hit $67 at one stage.
The oil price goes up when
tensions heighten in and
around the oil-rich nations
of the Middle East, because
of threats to supplies. The
prospect of a Yemeni attack
on Saudi Arabia, and the
risk of the US reimposing
sanctions on Iran over its
nuclear programme, are also
keeping oil prices high.
In tomorrow’s
Tony Parsons
on modern crime
thrillers and why
his life has been
too easy to write
a memoir
other tenants, depending on how
much square footage it needs for its
local workforce.
T h e b a n k , e m p l oy s
around 6,500 UK staff.
“Even if we don’t fill it
all, it’s still economic...
for a lot of reasons
specific to Goldman
S a c h s ,” a d d e d M r
Blankfein (inset). He
has been a vocal figure
on Brexit and has not shied
away from bemoaning the
uncertainty that has since hit the
UK’s financial sector.
However, he admitted that the EU
withdrawal has not had the effect he
expected. “I’m at least wrong in the
fact that I would have thought there
would have been a worse outcome by
now,” he said. “There might be a lag
effect to this, or it may not happen.”
Goldman is expected to at
least double staff numbers
at its Frankfurt office to 400
through a mix of relocations and
recruiting German workers under
its Brexit contingency plans.
49
daily
money
The digital bank Tandem has
launched a new range of fixedterm savings accounts. Tandem
is offering a one-year fixed saver
paying interest of 1.80 per cent,
a two-year fixed account paying
2.10 per cent, and three-year fixed
account paying 2.30 per cent.
If a saver were to put in £1,000,
they would earn interest of
between £18 and £69, depending
on how long they are willing to tie
up the money. Customers can pay
in up to £2.5m, and have to put in at
least £1,000.
The highest-paying one-year
fixed bond on the market is from
Islamic bank BLME, which offers a
return of 1.95 per cent for savers
willing to pay in a minimum of
£25,000. Al Rayan, another Islamic
bank, offers an expected return
of 1.86 per cent on its one-year
account. It requires a much lower
initial deposit, at £1,000.
***
An increasing number of
grandparents are providing regular
financial support to their children
and grandchildren, research
has found. Nearly one in three
pensioners are helping to fund the
cost of everyday living for their
relatives, such as food, travel and
university tuition fees.
Those helping out are spending
an average of £4,300 a year,
according to insurance firm
Prudential, which commissioned
the research.
***
Shawbrook Bank has increased the
rate on its five-year fixed-rate Isa,
which now pays a market-leading
2.30 per cent a year. Savers must
invest from £5,000. Early access is
allowed, subject to 360 days’ loss
of interest.
ieat
Games&Puzzles
daily recipe
Crushed broad bean bruschetta
Kakuro
Zygolex® In i every day
How to play Fill the white squares so that the total in each
across or down run of cells matches the total at the start
of that run. You must use the numbers from 1-9 only and
cannot repeat a number in a run. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Find the missing words by following the RHYME, LETTERS and MEANING links
– eg, a word that rhymes with ‘cheek’, has one letter different from ‘pear’ and
has the same meaning as mountain, would be ‘peak’. Full rules at zygolex.com.
Solution, page 53
RHYME LETTERS
10
FORD
4
28
25
24
5
8
9
24
THREAD
CELL
4
PORE
7
23
30
13
4
4
HAM
A
ST G
AR RE
TE AT
R
12
SERVES 4
11
16
8
4
24
9
5
6
1
5
7
7
5
Killer Sudoku No 1261
How to play Each row, column and 3 by 3 box must contain
each number (1 to 9) only once. The sum of all numbers
contained in a dotted area must match the number printed
in its top-left corner. No number can appear more than
once in a dotted area. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
12
9
11
7
7
21
14
13
8
16
✂
12
13
7
8
9
0
10
9
11
<
4
4
2
2
<
∨
>
<
∨
∨
∨
2
3 3 1
2
2 1
2
2
2 1
1 2
0
2 1 2
4
2
3
3
1 0
0
3 2
3
1
3 2 1
1 0
2
0
2
5
7
∨
3
4
14
∧
∧
∨
3
1
2
0
16
∧
4
1
11
7
>
How to play Find all the mines in the grid. Numbers in certain squares indicate how
many mines there are in the neighbouring squares, including diagonally touching
squares. Mines cannot be placed in squares with numbers. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
5
10
MEANING
Minesweeper
13
10
14
17
9
10
7
12
RIPE
GLISTEN
LETTERS
Futoshiki
1
1
7 4
6
DIVAS
How to play
Place the numbers
from 1-5 exactly
once in each row
and column. The
greater than and
less than signs
(‘>’ and ‘<’) indicate
where one cell is
greater/less than
the adjacent
cell indicated.
Solution:
minurl.co.uk/i
2
4
5
SHIRE
RHYME
2
15
TUBE
4
FAN
How to play Place the numbers 1-9 once in each row, column
and bold-lined jigsaw region. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
3
9
4
5
Jigsawdoku
4
9
4
4
TORSO
TRUCK
9
SWAN
4
4
16
10
7
4
6
6
In Monday’s i
Tomato dhal with shallot tadka
DEPARTED
4
15
6
Recipe from riverford.co.uk/recipes
4
29
29
This makes a great sharing plate for a
party or barbecue and the recipe can
easily be scaled up to serve more.
Boil the beans in salted water for three
minutes until tender, double-pod, then
mash roughly with a fork.
Finely zest the lemon, then squeeze
the juice of one half into the beans. Stir in
the olive oil, lemon zest, Parmesan, mint
and chilli.
Season with salt and pepper to taste
(you may want a little more lemon juice
too). Toast, grill or griddle the bread, then
rub with a cut clove of garlic.
Drizzle with some olive oil, then pile
on the broad bean mixture and grate over
a little more Parmesan to serve.
BELT
3
9
15
600g young broad beans in their pods
1 lemon
4tbsp olive oil, plus a little
more for drizzling
2tbsp grated Parmesan or vegetarian
equivalent, plus more to serve
2tbsp finely chopped mint leaves
A pinch of dried chilli flakes
Thin slices of sourdough or ciabatta
1 garlic clove
MEANING
17
1
1
1
3 2
2
2
4 3
3
2
2
1
2 0
NEWS
2-28
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
TV
36-37
Maths Puzzle
Codeword No 1982
How to play Fill the empty squares with
numbers that will make the across and
down calculations produce the results
shown in the grey squares. Each numeral
from 1 to 9 must only appear once. The
calculations should be performed from
left to right and top to bottom, rather than
in strict mathematical order.
How to play The numbers in the grid correspond to the letters of the alphabet.
Solve the puzzle and fill in the letters in the key as you discover them.
Three letters are provided to give you a start. The solution will be printed in
tomorrow’s paper, the solution to yesterday’s codeword is on page 53.
x
x
÷
+
5
-
+
9
+
-
÷
23
19
17
5
-3
11
3
x
11
+
x
2
26
4
-
+
+
5
10
13
16
14
7
16
9
24
9
22
18
24
4
24
13
17
25
6
24
25
25
13
25
12
24
25
9
24
11
25
20
15
7
24
19
23
7
6
25
25
10
20
3
25
26
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
C
6
DOCK
DOWN
1 Contusion (6)
2 Traditional
wisdom (3,5,5)
3 Dismal (5)
4 Responding
impudently (9,4)
6 Shepherd’s delight,
proverbially (3,3,2,5)
7 Stratagem (4)
8 Esoteric (6)
13 Glacial period (3,3)
14 Foolishness (6)
16 Spartan serf (5)
17 Eager (4)
Stuck on the concise crossword?
For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3590.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble
accessing this number, please call our helpdesk
on 0333 202 3390.
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
With 100 brand new
number puzzles,
including Calcudoku,
Kakuro, Wijuko,
Hexagon, Maths and
Symbols of Value.
Solution to yesterday’s Concise Crossword
ACROSS 1 Purr, 3 Collated (Percolated), 9 Advance, 10 Sheet, 11 Salsa, 12 Cravat,
13 Beyond a joke, 16 Modify, 17 Spine, 20 Glint, 21 Wheedle, 22 Sinecure, 23 Oxen.
DOWN 1 Praise, 2 Rival, 4 Ore, 5 Loss adjuster, 6 Tieback, 7 Data, 8 Antagonistic,
12 Caddy, 14 Emotion, 15 Demean, 18 Index, 19 Ages, 21 War.
Available on Amazon
for £4.49. See minurl.co.uk/numbers
21
22
Today’s other puzzles Cryptic Crossword, page 24;
Five-Clue Cryptic, page 11; One-Minute Wijuko, page 25
Puzzle solutions See page 53 and minurl.co.uk/i
5 2
6
8 5
4
2
1 6
9
7 5
6
2 8
4
7 8
3 5
1 6
6 7
9
8
3
6
8 6
4
5
5
7 8
4
3
1
7
4
9 6
1
5 4
1 3
2 6
Monday: Harder
BACK
Maths Puzzle,
Word Ladder, Word
Wheel, Kakuro,
Minesweeper,
ABC Logic, Killer
Sudoku, Futoshiki,
Codeword,
Jigsawduko and
Wijuko created by
Clarity Media.
For more
puzzles,
see clarity-media.
co.uk
NEW THIS WEEK!
The i Book of Number Puzzles
7
4
SENT
Concise Crossword No 2304
ACROSS
1 Cry of
disapproval (3)
3 Defeat (4)
5 Enfold (4)
9 Disrobe (7)
10 Wireless (5)
11 River or coastal
fishes (12)
12 Shaman (8,3)
15 Made stronger (12)
18 Soviet political
prison (5)
19 Brisk musical
movement (7)
20 Deep cut (4)
21 Satirical sketch (4)
22 Attempt (3)
7 4
2 7
1
Y
Need a little help getting started? Then call for up to four extra clue letters on
0901 292 5204. Calls cost £1 plus your telephone company’s network access charge
(if you are having trouble with the phone service, call the helpline: 0333 202 3390).
Or text THEI CLUE to 85100 to receive your clues. Texts cost £1 plus your
standard network charge (if you are having trouble with the text service, call the
helpline: 0333 335 3351). Clues change each day at midnight.
16
5 1
6
22
1
Q
How to play Each numeral from 1 to 9 must
appear (once only) in the squares forming the
red letter i. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Sudoku Easier
25
5
6
idoku Exclusive to i
REAR
13
4
23
25
24
6
4
11
10
24
9
15
19
19
6
11
21
5
7
11
20
24
13
13
9
22
25
How to play
Convert the word
at the top of the
ladder into the
word at the bottom
of it, using only
the four rungs
in between. On
each rung, you
must put a valid
four-letter word
that is identical
to the word above
it, apart from a
one-letter change.
There may be more
than one way of
achieving this.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
+
+
25
24
2
1
13
12
13
25
25
10
11
25
15
22
9
57
-
25
4
4
11
7
8
1
÷
-
10
25
11
x
19
÷
+
7
15
24
17
Harder
360
25
6
Easier
8
22
Word
Ladder
51
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
Terms &
Conditions
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ABC Logic
How to play Place the letters
A, B and C exactly once in each row and
column. Each row and column has two
blank cells. The letters at the edge of a row/
column indicate which of the letters is the
first/last to appear in that row/column.
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
A
A
A
B
B
A
C
B
B
A
C
C
B
B
Word Wheel
This is an open-ended puzzle. How many
words of three or more letters, each
including the letter at centre of the wheel,
can you make from this diagram? We’ve
found 53, including one nine-letter word.
Can you do better?
B
C
I
A
N
A
R
E
O
52
Weather
NEWS
2-28
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-43
TV
36-37
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
BOXING
Fury’s return is good news – and he is
already targeting Joshua meeting
Steve
Bunce
After the glory, the fall, the darkest
of days, an increase of ten stone in
weight and far too many false starts
the return of Tyson Fury is set for
Manchester on 9 June.
Fury has his boxing licence back,
his waist back, a new desire in his
once dead eyes and in the next 18
months he wants some or all of his
heavyweight titles back. Fury is still
only 29, he has fought the bulge and
dropped as much as 100 pounds in fat
to confirm his desire to “leave history
behind and get back what is mine”.
Fury last fought in November
2015 when he was simply brilliant
over twelve rounds in Düsseldorf
in front of 50,000 silent fans; he
gave Wladimir Klitschko a boxing
lesson. He left the ring draped in
four championship belts and during the next few months he watched
helplessly as they were taken back
and at the same time his health on
both sides of the ropes went into vicious free fall.
At the end of 2016, he was lost,
overweight, suicidal and a raging
side-lined witness to the Anthony
Joshua machine. The rumours of a return, the pledges to end his exile were
treated with increasing disdain. Last
year Joshua, tired of the endless baiting, told him simply: “Shut up, you fat
f**k.” The reply made Fury chuckle.
“When I’m ready to fight Joshua
it will be an easy night,” said Fury
Tyson Fury
(right) on
his way to
victory over
Wladimir
Klitschko
during his
last fight in
2015 2015
in London yesterday. “He struggles
with throwing more than one punch
– he will not land a punch on me and
will need a bag of rice to touch me.”
Fury has always had a good boxing
brain and is a much smarter fighter
than he ever gets credit for but,
madly, he often fails to use his brain
When I am ready to fight
Joshua it will be an easy night
– he struggles with throwing
more than one punch
in his life away from boxing and often
bounces from calamity to calamity.
Fury will work with Frank
Warren, the promoter, who guided
Frank Bruno from the very edges of
retirement and then, through a selection of perfect opponents, to a night
of tears and joy at Wembley Stadium
when Bruno, in his fourth attempt,
won the world heavyweight title.
Bruno’s win that night and his final
journey to that fight remains one of
British boxing’s fairy tales.
“He will not be rushed,” insisted
Warren. “He will fight the men I pick
Puzzle solutions
Results Service
FOOTBALL
EUROPA LEAGUE QUARTER-FINALS 2ND-LEG
CSKA Moscow (1) ................2 Arsenal (0).................................2
Chalov 39
Welbeck 75
Nababkin 50
Ramsey 90
Agg: 3-6.
Marseille (3).............................5 RB Leipzig (1) ..........................2
Ilsanker 6 (og)
Bruma 2
Sarr 10
Augustin 55
Thauvin 38
Payet 60
Sakai 90
Agg: 5-3.
Red Bull Salzburg (0) ......4 Lazio (0) ...................................... 1
Dabbur 56
Immobile 55
Haidara 72
Hwang 74
Lainer 76
Agg: 6-5.
Sporting (1) ..............................1 Atletico Madrid (0) ...........0
Montero 28
Agg: 1-2.
SKY BET LEAGUE ONE
Bradford (0)............................ 0
TOP HALF
P
Wigan
40
Blackburn
41
Shrewsbury
41
Rotherham
41
Plymouth
40
Charlton
41
Portsmouth
41
Peterborough
41
Scunthorpe
41
Bristol Rovers
41
Fleetwood Town
42
Bradford
40
Shrewsbury (0)....................0
W D L
F A Pts
26 8 6 81 27 86
25 11 5 75 36 86
24 10 7 55 33 82
21 6 14 68 51 69
18 9 13 53 48 63
17 11 13 54 49 62
19 5 17 54 51 62
16 13 12 64 51 61
15 16 10 58 49 61
16 7 18 57 61 55
15 9 18 56 60 54
16 6 18 49 61 54
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE
FC Halifax (0) ..........................2 Gateshead (1)...........................2
Fondop-Talom 48
Burrow 37, 90
Kosylo 90
Att 1,302
North: Spennymoor Town 0 Brackley 3; AFC Telford
3 Leamington 2.
CRICKET
INDIAN PREMIER LEAGUE, Hyderabad: Mumbai
Indians 147-8 (20 overs); Sunrisers Hyderabad
151-9 (20 overs, Markande 4-23. Sunrisers Hyderabad win by 1 wkt.
WOMEN’S 3rd ONE-DAY TOUR MATCH, Nagpur:
England 201-9 (50 overs, A Jones 94). India 202-2
(45.2 overs, Raj 74no, Sharma 54no, Mandhana 53).
India Women win by 8 wkts. India win series 2-1.
and he will get there, it will be steady.
I’ve done this before, it’s what I do.”
Warren has a list of heavyweights,
all poised to play their part and get
their pay in Fury’s return. “The
heavyweight division has been put
on notice,” insisted Warren, who is
looking at a sensible and gradual
return. “It will be three or four
fights, he needs the rounds,” the
promoter added.
Fury also confirmed that he will no
longer be working with his uncle and
former trainer Peter Fury. Before,
during and after the Klitschko win
so much of the praise was placed at
Peter’s feet. That was then and now
a young trainer called Ben Davison,
with the skimpiest of qualifications,
will take over in the corner for one
of the highest profile ring returns
in decades.
It has been Davison’s task to manage the weight loss during the last six
months and he has done a great job.
However, arranging runs and a diet
must never be confused with what a
trainer has to do in the weeks before
a real fight – lifting up and easing
down an elite athlete is an ancient art
– and more importantly on the night
in the crucial sixty-second breaks
between rounds. However, Fury and
Davison certainly seem happy and he
deserves a chance.
Fury’s return is genuinely good
news for a thriving heavyweight
division and there is bold talk of
Joshua fighting the American
Deontay Wilder. Fury is back and a
lot of the current heavyweights will
start to feel a little uneasy – and so
they should. THE INDEPENDENT
COMMONWEALTH GAMES
ATHLETICS
Men, 200m Final: 1 J Richards (Tto) 20.12 secs, 2 A
Brown (Can) 20.34, 3 Le Reid (N Ire) 20.55.
800m Final: 1 W Kintamal (Ken) 1min 45.11secs, 2
K Langford (Eng) 1:45.16, 3 L Mathews (Aus) 1:45.60.
Pole Vault Final: 1 K Marschall (Aus) 5.70m, 2 S
Barber (Can) 5.65, 3 LCutts (Eng) 5.45.
Women, 200m Final: 1 S Miller-Uibo (Bah) 22.09
secs, 2 S Jackson (Jam) 22.18, 3 D Asher-Smith (Eng)
22.29. 400m Hurdles Final: 1 J Russel (Jam) 54.33
secs, 2 E Doyle (Sco) 54.80, 3 W Nel (SA) 54.96.
T38 100m Final: 1 S Hahn (Eng) 12.46, 2 R Clarke
(Aus) 13.17, 3 O Breen (Wal) 13.35.
Long Jump Final: 1 C Nettey (Can) 6.84m, 2 B Stratton 6.77, 3 S Proctor (Eng) 6.75.
BOWLS
Women, Triples - Gold Medal Match: Australia bt
Scotland 21-12. Bronze Medal Match: England bt
Canada 20-12.
CYCLING
Women’s Cross Country: 1 A Last (Eng) 1hr 18mins
02secs, 2 E Richards (Eng) 1:18.50, 3 H Smith (Can)
1:20.26.
DIVING
Men’s 3m Springboard Final: 1 J Laugher (Eng)
519.40pts, 2 P Gagne (Can) 452.70, 3 J Connor (Aus)
438.50.
WRESTLING Women’s Freestyle 76 kg Bronze: G
Nelthorpe (Eng) bt Hajaratu Kamara (S Leone).
MEDAL TABLE
1 Australia
2 England
3 India
4 Canada
5 South Africa
6 New Zealand
7 Scotland
8 Wales
9 Cyprus
10 Jamaica
21 Northern Ireland
28 Isle of Man
Gold
62
28
14
12
11
10
7
7
6
4
1
0
Silver Bronze Total
46
47
155
32
26
86
7
10
31
28
19
59
9
12
32
12
9
31
13
15
35
8
10
25
0
2
8
6
5
15
0
2
3
1
0
1
TENNIS
ATP GRAND PRIX HASSAN II, MARRAKECH,
MOROCCO: Second round: (2) K EDMUND (GB) bt
R Albot (Mol) 6-2 6-4.
RUGBY LEAGUE
BETFRED SUPER LEAGUE
Widnes (8)...............................20 Hull (12)................................39
Widnes: Tries: Wilde, Olbison (2). Goals: Gilmore
(4). Hull: Tries: Washbrook, Faraimo, Matongo,
Griffin (2), Talanoa, Shaul. Goals: Sneyd (5). D
rop Goals: Sneyd.
P W D L
F
A Pts
St Helens
10 9 0 1 282 114 18
Wigan
9 7 0 2 278 132 14
Warrington
11 7 0 4 208 161 14
Leeds
9 6 1 2 184 155 13
Hull
11 6 0 5 261 230 12
Castleford
8 6 0 2 151 160 12
Wakefield
9 4 0 5 180 166
8
Hull K R
10 3 0 7 171 228
6
Widnes
11 3 0 8 197 255
6
Salford
10 3 0 7 148 212
6
Huddersfield
10 2 1 7 148 283
5
Catalans Dragons 10 2 0 8 142 254
4
3
RUGBY UNION
AVIVA PREMIERSHIP RUGBY: Newcastle v Sale.
GUINNESS PRO14: Cheetahs v Munster (6.35),
Glasgow v Connacht, Ulster v Ospreys (7.35).
GREENE KING IPA CHAMPIONSHIP: Bristol v
Doncaster.
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REAR
SENT
PEAR
SEND
PEAK
SAND
PECK
SANK
DECK
SACK
DOCK
BACK
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ZYGOLEX
LEFT TO RIGHT:
cord; bell; pork;
gone; cork; gong;
bung; lung; long;
bunk; pine; trunk;
pipe; divan; shine
5-CLUE CROSSWORD
Across: 1 C-Ali-PH<, 3 Jacobi*, 4 Random*
Down: 1 C. Major, 2 H-Eli-um (He)
WORD WHEEL
NINE-LETTER WORD anaerobic
OTHER WORDS ace, acne, acorn, acre, aeon, aerobic, air,
arc, arcane, are, area, arena, aria, bacon, ban, bane, bar,
bare, barn, baron, beacon, bean, bear, boa, boar, bra, brace,
brain, bran, cab, cabin, cairn, can, cane, canoe, car, carbine,
carbon, care, cobra, cornea, crab, crane, ear, earn, era,
near, oar, ocean, race, rain, ran
YESTERDAY’S CODEWORD 1981
1
2
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W Z Q V P
D E
F
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K B U
L C Y O X
J
RUGBY UNION
Falcons poised
for ‘must win’
clash with Sale
By Andrew Baldock
Dean Richards believes
Newcastle can “almost kiss
the semi-finals goodbye” if
they do not beat Premiership
opponents Sale Sharks tonight.
The Falcons’ 27-13 defeat
at Worcester last weekend
dented their play-off hopes.
They are currently
fifth – one
point and one
place above
Kingston
Park visitors
Sale – with
three games
remaining.
Newcastle
rugby director
Richards (above)
said: “For us, it’s a must-win
game in terms of keeping our
top-four hopes alive and if we
don’t win then we can almost
kiss the semi-finals goodbye.”
Richards has made eight
changes to his starting lineup, with flanker Gary Graham
returning from injury, while
Sale are without suspended
backs Denny Solomona and
Mike Haley for the trip to
Kingston Park.
RUGBY LEAGUE
Widnes suffer
more injuries in
defeat by Hull
WIDNES
Tries Wilde Olbison 2
Goals Gilmore 4
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x
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FOOTBALL
THE SKY BET CHAMPIONSHIP
Aston Villa v Leeds.....................................................................................
RUGBY LEAGUE
BETFRED - SUPER LEAGUE: Leeds v Wigan.
CHAMPIONSHIP: Rochdale v London Broncos.
6
+
5
FIXTURES (7.45pm unless stated)
CRICKET
SPECSAVERS COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP
First day of four (11.00am)
First Division: Hampshire v Worcestershire
(The Ageas Bowl), Lancashire v Nottinghamshire
(Emirates Old Trafford), Yorkshire v Essex
(Emerald Headingley).
Second Division: Kent v Gloucestershire
(Canterbury), Middlesex v Northamptonshire
(Lord’s), Warwickshire v Sussex (Edgbaston).
MCC UNIVERSITY MATCHES
First day of three (11.00am): Durham v Durham
MCCU (Emirates Riverside), Glamorgan v Cardiff
MCCU (The SWALEC Stadium), Leeds/Bradford
MCCU v Derbyshire (Weetwood), Leicestershire
v Loughborough MCCU (Grace Road), Somerset
v Oxford MCCU (Taunton), Surrey v Cambridge
MCCU (The Kia Oval).
x
x
H A S
T R G M N
53
HULL FC
Tries Washbrook, Faraimo,
Matongo, Griffin 2, Talanoa, Shaul
Goals Sneyd 5 Drop goal Sneyd
20
39
Three tries in six secondhalf minutes for Hull proved
crucial as Widnes succumbed
to their fourth straight Super
League defeat.
Widnes enjoyed the early
pressure but were kept out by
a keen Hull defence and the
Vikings’ injury jinx struck
again when Chris Dean left the
field with a biceps injury.
And their problems were
compounded when co-captain
Chris Houston was forced off
having gone close to scoring
following the second-half
restart.
With their first real attack,
Hull opened the scoring when
Jake Connor’s smart flick
pass sent Danny Washbrook
scampering over, with Marc
Sneyd converting.
Hull went into the break 12-8
ahead but Widnes continued to
press and Tom Olbison scored
the first of two tries giving his
side a 14-12 lead. It would not
last long as Hull’s class showed
through. PA
54
SPORT
COMMONWEALTH GAMES
Hughes’ victory celebrations are cut
short in the most cruel fashion
By Ian Parker
IN THE GOLD COAST
England’s Zharnel Hughes celebrated victory in the men’s 200 metres
final before being told he had been
disqualified for catching Trinidad
and Tobago’s Jereem Richards in the
face with his arm. Hughes crossed
the line ahead of Richards, with both
men clocked at 20.12 seconds, but as
he completed a lap of honour with
the cross of St George draped over
his shoulders, race officials told him
of his disqualification.
Television replays showed Hughes’
left arm accidentally caught
Richards in the face
and affected his finish. Team England
lodged an appeal
against the decision but athletics
officials rejected it.
Hughes’ disqualification meant Northern Ireland’s Leon
Reid was bumped up
to a bronze medal and
Canada’s Aaron Brown got silver.
Katarina Johnson-Thompson leads
in the heptathlon overnight after victory in her 200 metres heat gave her
a 126-point lead after the first day of
competition. The world indoor pentathlon champion claimed victory in
23.56sec to move on to 3765 points
ahead of today’s javelin, long jump
and 800m.
Kyle Langford won silver in the
men’s 800m with a personal best time
of 1:45.16, narrowly behind Kenya’s
Zharnel Hughes talks with a track official after his men’s 200m final yesterday
in which he was disqualified for catching a competitor in the face with his arm AP
Wycliffe Kinyamal who won in 1:45.11.
England’s Dina Asher-Smith (left)
took bronze in the women’s 200m
final as Shaunae Miller-Uibo of the
Bahamas took gold and silver went to
Jamaica’s Shericka Jackson.
There was silver for Scotland’s Eilidh Doyle in the women’s 400m hurdles while England’s Shara Proctor
picked up bronze in the women’s long
jump.
Jack Laugher won a second gold
medal of the Games and his fourth
Commonwealth title overall with
victory in the men’s three metres
springboard. Laugher scored 519.40
points to take a second of three possible golds here. The 23-year-old diver,
RUGBY SEVENS
Zambia ready to play
their part in sport’s
greatest mismatch
By Tim Wigmore
They are the most iconic international sports team in professional
sport, with an unmatched winning
record: the All Blacks. Their name
has been built on rugby union but in
rugby sevens, they are scarcely less
formidable. Men’s rugby sevens has
featured in five previous editions of
the Commonwealth Games; New
Zealand have won four times.
Now, consider Zambia’s challenge. A country with 10,000 registered rugby players, who have never
reached the rugby union World Cup,
will tomorrow morning make their
Commonwealth Games debut –
against New Zealand.
“It’s a very exciting moment – it’s
amazing exposure for us as a team,”
says Zambia captain Israel Kalumba,
who works for the air force. “We’re
trying to surprise the world – to show
that Zambia can play with big teams
like New Zealand.”
While New Zealand’s players are
highly–paid professionals, complete
with their own support army of
sports scientists, Zambia’s players
are amateurs, who have only been
together as a squad for the last two
weeks.
For head coach Andrew Kaminsa
– who mixes his role with running a
construction business and played in
Zambia’s only previous game against
New Zealand, a 29–0 defeat in 2003 –
the challenge is as much in the mind
as on the pitch.
“It doesn’t matter whether its professional or amateur it’s the same
concept. I’ve been telling the boys
the All Blacks are human beings like
Israel Kalumba says his Zambia side
want to ‘surprise the world’
any of us. The only difference is they
probably play more rugby than us –
but in terms of the rules, the structure, it’s basically the same.
“It’s a bit different obviously – playing the All Blacks for the kind of players we have. We’re just going to stick
to our gameplan, to stop them and
see how we can run with the ball.”
That Zambia are in the Gold Coast
at all speaks to how international
rugby is changing. The sevens format, by its nature, lends itself better
to emerging nations rising.
who successfully defended the 1m
title on Wednesday, could complete
a Gold Coast hat-trick today when
he will compete with Chris Mears in
the men’s synchronised 3m springboard final. There was further joy for
Laugher at the end of the evening as
his girlfriend Lois Toulson picked up
bronze in the women’s 10m platform
for England.
Annie Last and Evie Richards
delivered an England one-two in the
women’s cross country mountain
bike race with a dominant performance. The pair pulled clear of the
pack in the first of six laps around
the Nerang forest and continued to
stretch their lead, with Last beating
Richards by 48 seconds as Canada’s
Haley Smith took bronze a further 96
seconds back.
Chris Gregory and Jake Sheaf’s bid
for a Commonwealth Games medal
in the beach volleyball fell short as
they lost the bronze medal game to
New Zealand brothers Ben and Sam
O’Dea 21-13, 21-15.
Scotland’s Kay Moran, Stacey McDougall and Caroline Brown had to
settle for silver in the women’s triples
of the lawn bowls as Australia took
gold with a 21-12 victory in the final.
England’s Katherine Rednall, Ellen
Falkner and Sian Honnor picked up
bronze with a 20-12 win over Canada.
Scotland’s Seonaid McIntosh took
bronze in the women’s 50m prone
rifle as Singapore’s Martina Veloso
took gold with a Games record 621.0.
In wrestling, England’s Georgina
Nelthorpe took bronze with victory over Kaharatu Kamara of Sierra Leone in the women’s freestyle
76kg, while Wales’ Curts Dodge beat
Ebimienfaghe Assizecourt of Nigeria
to bronze in the men’s freestlye 74kg.
“It’s cheaper to run than the 15-aside game,” Kaminsa says: a very real
advantage considering that, until
recently, Zambia were so short of
funds that the national squad often
didn’t have enough rugby balls to
conduct drills in smaller groups.
Just as significant is the structure of
the international game. While rugby
union is still a sport of hierarchies –
which is why the Six Nations eschews
promotion and relegation – the sevens
format is a meritocracy, with teams’
berths in the World Rugby Sevens
Series solely dependent on how they
perform on the pitch. In the current
edition, Fiji, USA and Kenya are all in
the top seven positions.
To tomorrow, then, when Zambia
play at 2:37am local time back home.
“Everyone is saying we can’t wait to
watch,” Kalumba says. “Sevens is a
game of chance.”
It is an opportunity not just to
cause a staggering upset but – more
realistically – to lift the sport in Zambia. Nothing can galvanise a sport
in a new frontier quite like the cachet of success in an international
tournament.
“They’ll be a bit physical we know
that – we just need to tackle them and
go low,” Kaminsa says. “The bigger
you are the harder you fall.”
CRICKET
Jake Ball was dropped after one
Test in the last Ashes series
Ball hopes
for chance to
prove he is
Test quality
By David Charlesworth
Jake Ball believes he is still
awaiting a proper opportunity
to prove his England credentials
after a miserable winter.
Ball had been identified as
a bowler suited to Australian
conditions ahead of the Ashes
but returned match figures
of one for 115 in the first Test
at Brisbane, his preparation
hampered by an ankle injury.
The Nottinghamshire
seamer was overlooked for the
remainder of the series and
he lost his place for England’s
Test tour of New Zealand that
followed. But Ball said: “I don’t
think one game is any time to
nail down a spot. I think you
need to be given a few games.
“In that sense, it’s
been frustrating
and I’d quite
like a run in
the side but
you’re not
Jake Ball’s
always going
figures after the
to get that.
first Ashes Test
“So far,
at Brisbane in
November
it hasn’t
worked out
but hopefully
I’m given a chance
at some point this summer or
maybe even the winter.
“I know I can bowl 85mph
plus. I’ve got the height, I
can get good bounce, get a bit
of seam movement and I’ve
proved that with Notts. I’d say
England haven’t quite seen that
from me yet.
“Out in Australia, I was
asked to bowl a lot of short
stuff, stuff I’m not used to, but
you have to be prepared to do
those jobs.
“When you go into a side
that’s got Jimmy Anderson,
Stuart Broad, Chris Woakes,
you’re not going to be the one
that takes the new ball and
bowls when it’s nice to bowl.
“You’re going to bowl the
overs which are harder
and the overs you’re not
comfortable with.”
1-115
NEWS
2-28
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-43
TV
36-37
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
55
COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP
Team-by-team guide to the season
Division One
ESSEX
Last season 1st
Coach Anthony McGrath
Captain Ryan ten Doeschate
Overseas star Peter Siddle
(first five CC matches)
One to Watch Adam Zampa
Essex have long fantasised about
adding a ‘mystery’ spinner to their
T20 armoury. In the Australian
leggie Zampa they feel they have
found their man. He arrives in
mid-summer with a reputation
for being hard to get away. Indeed,
his economy rate in T20s for Australia is a parsimonious 6.00.
i Forecast 4th
HAMPSHIRE
Last season 5th
Coach Craig White
Captain James Vince
Overseas star Hashim Amla
(first three months)
One to Watch Sam Northeast
With reportedly every top side
queuing up for Northeast (right)
this winter, there is the feeling of a
coup after Hampshire managed to
persuade him to swap Kent for the
Ageas Bowl. Fitting in alongside
Amla, Vince, Rossouw and Sean
Ervine makes him a linchpin in a
Galaticos-like order.
i Forecast 2nd
SOMERSET
Last season 6th
Captain Tom Abell (CC
and one-day), Lewis Gregory (T20)
Coach Jason Kerr
OverseasstarCorey Anderson (T20)
One to Watch Jamie Overton
The 23-year-old pace bowler needs
to prove his fitness and durability,
having missed the second half of
the last two seasons. With his twin
brother Craig having achieved a
place in England’s Ashes squad
and a call-up for the one-day side
during the winter, Jamie will be
fired up to follow suit.
i Forecast 7th
SURREY
Last season 3rd
Coach Michael Di Venuto
Captain Rory Burns (CC and
one-day), Jade Dernbach (T20)
Overseas starDean Elgar (Apr-May)
One to Watch Sam Curran
He will not turn 20 until June, but
Curran is already regarded as a
core member of Surrey’s teams in
all three formats. Since his debut at
17, in 2015, he has scored more than
1,000 first-class runs and is close
to 100 wickets. Expect his left-arm
swing and middle-order batting to
continue to catch the eye.
i Forecast 1st
LANCASHIRE
Last season 2nd
Coach Glen Chapple
Captain Liam Livingstone
Overseas star James Faulkner (T20)
One to Watch Haseeb Hameed
Having burst onto the scene in the
second half of 2016, Hameed had
a nightmare last season. He failed
to score a century and posted only
513 runs from 12 Championship
appearances. He lost his England
place and suffered a broken finger
– for the second time in 12 months.
The Boltonian will be aiming to
prove his troubles are over.
i Forecast 5th
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE
Last season 2nd in Div Two
Coach Peter Moores
Captains Steven Mullaney (CC and
one-day; Dan Christian T20)
Overseas star Ross Taylor (First
eight CC matches)
One to Watch Ross Taylor
Kiwi batsman Taylor is currently
11th in the Test rankings for batsmen and at seven in the ODI list.
The capture of the stylish strokemaker should guarantee a significant number of early-season runs
as Notts look to compete strongly
on their return to Division One.
i Forecast 3rd
WORCESTERSHIRE
Last season 1st Div Two
Coach Kevin Sharp
Captain Joe Leach
Overseas star Martin Guptill
One to Watch Dillon Pennington
The paceman impressed when
sharing the new ball during the
recent ICC Under-19 World Cup.
He is currently on a scholarship at
University Of Worcester but has
set his sights on making his firstteam breakthrough this summer.
Recently signed a two year contract with the county to come into
effect from this October.
i Forecast 8th
YORKSHIRE
Last season 4th
Coach Andrew Gale
Captain Garry Ballance
Overseas star Kane Williamson
One to Watch Matthew Fisher
A seam bowler who has been
earmarked for great things since
making his first-team debut aged
just 15 in 2013, the now 20-yearold was struck down by hamstring
troubles in 2016. It curtailed his involvement last year as workloads
were managed. But he played the
last two Championship games and
impressed – with the bat as well.
i Forecast 6th
Division Two
DERBYSHIRE
Last season 8th
Coach Kim Barnett
Captains Billy Godleman (CC and
one-day) Gary Wilson (T20)
Overseas star Duanne Olivier
(April-June)
One to Watch Duanne Olivier
His pace promises to provide Derbyshire with a menacing new ball
attack. The 25-year-old already
has experience of English conditions having played two Tests for
South Africa last summer and he
also brings consistency and control in the one-day format.
i Forecast 8th
DURHAM
Last season 9th
Coach Jon Lewis
Captains Paul Collingwood (CC)
Tom Latham (one-day) T20 TBC
Overseas star Aiden Markram
(Four CC Matches)
One to Watch Michael Potts
The next fast bowler off the Riverside production line could well
be Potts, who burst on to the scene
last season. The 19-year-old played
five matches, but took 14 wickets
and had the knack of striking at
crucial times. His consistency gave
even the best of batsmen issues.
i Forecast 5th
KENT
Last season 5th
Coach Matt Walker
Captain Sam Billings
Overseas star Adam Milne
One to Watch Sean Dickson
A latecomer to the county circuit,
the 26-year-old opening batsman
already boasts a brace of firstclass triple centuries and a double
hundred to boot. Consistency will
be key for Dickson, South Africaborn to a mother who hails from
Kent, as he looks to post his maiden 1,000-run season and improve
on a first-class average of 37.91.
i Forecast 4th
MIDDLESEX
Last season 7th Div One
Coaches Richard Scott;
Daniel Vettori (T20)
Captain Dawid Malan
Overseas star Ashton Agar (T20)
One to Watch Nick Gubbins
After bursting onto the scene in
Middlesex’s title-winning campaign of 2016, when he amassed
over 1,400 first-class runs, Gubbins endured a lean spell last season which ended with a hamstring
injury. Two centuries in the recent
South v North series fuelled hopes
that he has turned the corner.
i Forecast 2nd
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE
Last season 3rd
Coach David Ripley
Captain Alex Wakely
Overseas star Doug Bracewell,
One to Watch Brett Hutton
His ability was never questioned
by the Notts management but
their opportunities to pick him
were limited. Hutton has arrived
at Northants wanting more game
time and is certain to get greater
opportunities. His role as a bowling all-rounder looks a valuable
asset for the county, who hold
promotion ambitions.
i Forecast 6th
GLAMORGAN
Last season 7th
Coach Robert Croft
Captains Michael Hogan(CC),
Colin Ingram (one-day and T20)
Overseas star Shaun Marsh
One to Watch Lukas Carey
After taking seven wickets against
Northants on his Championship
debut in 2016, the 20-year-old
seamer continued to improve
during his second season. Carey,
took 35 wickets at 30 last year and
also featured in white ball cricket.
He moves the ball sufficiently to
trouble top-order batsmen.
i Forecast 7th
GLOUCESTERSHIRE
Last season 6th
Coach Richard Dawson
Captains Chris Dent (CC and Royal
one-day), Michael Klinger (T20)
OverseasstarDan Worrall (Not T20)
One to Watch Dan Worrall
Australian seamer Worrall is capable of suiting English conditions.
He bowls a full length and hits the
pitch hard, according to Michael
Klinger and Cameron Bancroft,
who have played against him back
home. He finished second leading
wicket-taker in the 2015-16 Sheffield Shield with 44 victims.
i Forecast 9th
LEICESTERSHIRE
Last season 10th
Coach Paul Nixon
Captain Michael Carberry
Overseas star Mohammad Abbas
One to Watch Callum Parkinson
One of the country’s brightest
spinning talents, the 21-year-old
left-armer turns the ball on the
most unpromising surfaces, and is
developing the flight and guile to
tempt batsmen into mistakes when
conditions are not in his favour. His
8-148 at Worcestershire last season was Leicestershire’s best individual bowling return since 2001.
i Forecast 10th
SUSSEX
Last season 4th
Coach Jason Gilliespie
Captains Ben Brown (CC and
One-day), Luke Wright (T20)
Overseas star Ishant Sharma (4
April – 4 June)
One to Watch Michael Burgess
Arrived at Hove a year ago as a
trialist and ended the season with
a maiden Championship hundred
and a contract at least until the
end of this season. The 23-yearold came through Surrey’s system
and had a spell with Leicestershire
but has blossomed at Sussex.
i Forecast 1st
WARWICKSHIRE
Last season 8th Div One
Coach Jim Troughton
Captains Jeetan Patel (CC and
one-day), Grant Elliott (T20)
Overseas star Colin de
Grandhomme (T20)
One to Watch Olly Stone
Given a belated Warwickshire
debut, following knee surgery
which ruled him out for a year, fastbowler Stone delivered some searing spells which suggests his pace
is not impaired by the injury. If he
stays fit, expect him to force his
way into the England reckoning.
i Forecast 3rd
56
Football
SPORT
PREMIER LEAGUE
Was it a penalty or does referee
Oliver really have a ‘bin for a heart’?
Will Magee debates the dramatic ending to Real v Juventus,
which was a sad finale to keeper Buffon’s European career
W
hen Michael Oliver
awarded a penalty
against Juventus
in the last minute
of stoppage time at
the Bernabeu – this after an incredible fightback from the Bianconeri
which saw them go from 3-0 down
to 3-3 on aggregate against Real
Madrid – the overwhelming feeling
was one of bitter disappointment.
After 90 minutes of rip-roaring
entertainment, for the game to
end in such an arbitrary fashion
felt deflating. Where fans had been
mentally preparing for a frenetic
period of extra time, instead they
were faced with a game abruptly
ended by an emphatic spot kick
from Cristiano Ronaldo.
Of course, it was not Oliver’s
prerogative to ensure that the
evening’s entertainment went on
indefinitely. Nor was it his job to
keep Gianluigi Buffon on the field,
with the legendary goalkeeper’s
furious reaction to the penalty
call ultimately going far beyond
what the referee could be expected
to tolerate.
That said, Buffon’s anger at
the decision to whistle for Medhi
Benatia’s last-ditch challenge
on Lucas Vazquez was perhaps
understandable. Not only did it
annihilate Buffon’s last chance of
winning the Champions League
before his retirement, it was also
a contentious call over what many
felt was an ambiguous incident.
Buffon didn’t hold back when
asked about Oliver after the match.
“To award such a doubtful, or
super-doubtful, penalty just before
the final whistle and destroy the
work of a team who gave absolutely
everything you have to have a
rubbish bin instead of your heart,”
Buffon said. “A human being cannot
decide the elimination of a team
Gianluigi Buffon remonstrates with referee Michael Oliver AFP/GETTY
with such a decision. When I don’t
feel I’m good enough, I put myself
in a corner. He should do the same.
It’s a matter of sensibility. It means
you don’t know where you are,
which teams are playing, you don’t
know shit.”
Juventus president Andrea
Agnelli was similarly robust in his
post-match comments, suggesting
that Champions League referees
are unsympathetic towards clubs
from Italy. “We absolutely need
VAR in the Champions League,”
Agnelli said. “This isn’t about one
or two points, but rather going
forward in a massive tournament
that brings so much money and
prestige, we can’t allow these
incidents to occur.”
Meanwhile, in his column for
the Daily Mail, former referee
Graham Poll backed Oliver over
the decision and praised his “very
strong but correct refereeing at the
Bernabeu”. “Oliver was courageous
enough to award a penalty which,
once converted, took Real Madrid
through to the semi-final,” Poll
added, adding that the decision to
send off Buffon was also correct
given his aggressive protests.
Even referees were divided
over the penalty call, however.
Former La Liga referee Eduardo
Iturralde told Spanish tabloid AS:
“The contact from behind wasn’t
enough. He shouldn’t have blown
for a penalty.”
Ultimately, when even
ex-referees can’t decide, the
decision is bound to be debated ad
infinitum. Still, when the incident
is that ambiguous, no wonder so
many felt it was a disappointing
way to end an incredible tie.
SPAIN
Internazionale ready to
move if Bale sale triggered
est fees to fund summer plans. His
former Wales manager, Chris Coleman, said Bale could only leave the
Internazionale will make a move for Bernabeu for another “giant club”.
Gareth Bale in the summer, should Asked if he has a future in Spain, the
Real Madrid decide to sell the Welsh Sunderland manager said: “The last
forward. While Bale and his
time I spoke to him, he was
advisors say they want to
very happy in Madrid, his
stay at the Bernabeu, it is
family is settled there.
known that Real want
But he is who he is,
to reshape their attack
Real Madrid are who
this summer, ideally
they are and there
La Liga appearances
through the purchase
are comings and
made
by
Bale
since
of Neymar from Paris
goings all the time.
joining Real Madrid
Saint-Germain, and
“If you work so
in September 2013
that will require sighard to get to a stage
nificant sales.
in your career where
While it is not certain
you are seen as one of
they want to sell Bale, sourcthe better players and
es close to the club say his status
you are playing for one of the
has changed. He is no longer seen as biggest clubs, that’s not somewhere
“intransferible” – to use the Spanish where you want to leave, I would
phrase – and is considered a player imagine.
who could fetch one of the high“Where does he go from there
one match fewer, with four games remaining in the regular season.
Fulham are determined not to sell
Despite being so young, Sessegnon
Ryan Sessegnon for at least a year has played a major part in Fulham’s
should they win promotion to the promotion push – starting 41 of their
Premier League this season.
42 matches at either left-back or on
The 17-year-old winger is
the wing. He has scored 14 goals
one of the most soughtand made six assists.
after youngsters in the
It is believed Sessegame and is wanted by
gnon would prefer to
Tottenham, Manchesstay at Fulham should
ter United, Liverpool,
they go up because
Ryan Sessegnon has
Manchester City and
he would be guaranstarted
all
but
one
Paris St Germain.
teed to play regularly
of
Fulham’s
league
It was thought that
under Jokanovic.
games this season
Sessegnon would leave
Sessegnon’s form
in the summer, but it is
has led to him be nomiunderstood that Fulham
nated for the Championare prepared to ignore bigship Player of the Season, as
money offers if they reach the top
well as the Young Player of the seaflight. Slavisa Jokanovic’s side are son at the EFL awards, which take
in the second automatic promotion place on Sunday.
spot having gone on a remarkable
Fulham value the teenager, who
20-game unbeaten run. They are one was part of the England side that
point above Cardiff, who have played won the European Under-19 ChamBy Simon Johnson
By Miguel Delaney
and Damien Spellman
121
Sessegnon won’t
go to Tottenham,
insist Fulham
41
Gareth Bale was taken off at half-time
against Juventus on Wednesday
that’s bigger? There’s nowhere
bigger, so if he does leave Madrid,
where’s he going to go? It’s going to
have to be another giant club.
“Is it back here? Probably, maybe
if he does move, if it’s on the cards.
But the last conversations I had with
him, he was happy there. He liked
the life in Madrid, loved the club.”
NEWS
2-28
Ryan Sessegnon
has two years left
on his Fulham
contract PA
Kane ‘will learn a
lot’ from furore
over goal appeal
By Jon West
pionships last summer, at around
£50million.
It is believed Spurs are very confident about securing his signature
if Fulham remain in the Championship. However, Fulham think Sessegnon would be a major asset in the top
flight and would look to keep him for
another 12 months if they go up.
Sessegnon, who has been at Fulham since he was eight, has two years
left on the contract he signed last
summer, so the club would be under
pressure to agree a new deal to ensure they receive a big fee when they
do eventually decide to sell.
The presence of Jokanovic at Craven Cottage is a key factor in Sessegnon’s future, too. The Serb took
charge of Fulham in 2015 and handed
the youngster his professional debut
a year later aged just 16 and 81 days.
Last month, Sessegnon said: “For
someone to have faith in you at the
tender age of 16 is massive. This season he has had total confidence in me
and I just want to repay him with my
performances. I’m really focused on
Fulham at the moment. I want to get
us into the Premier League.”
Jokanovic revealed recently that
he has spoken to Sessegnon about
the transfer speculation and said:
“I believe he can grow playing here,
rather than with a top-five Premier
League team. I think we can give him
what he needs.” EVENING STANDARD
Mauricio Pochettino says Harry
Kane “will learn a lot” from the
storm created by his controversial
goal appeal.
The Premier League’s goal
accreditation appeals panel’s
decision to award Kane the goal
initially credited to Christian
Eriksen in last Saturday’s 2-1
victory at Stoke put the striker on
25 league goals for the season, four
behind Golden Boot frontrunner
Mo Salah, of Liverpool.
It also unleashed a spectacular
backlash, with Salah himself
tweeting “Wooooooow really?”
when he heard Kane’s claims that
Eriksen’s free-kick had gone in off
his shoulder had been upheld.
Social media was soon awash
with photoshopped images of
Kane ‘stealing’ other goals from
the archives and former England
forwards Alan Shearer and Gary
Lineker fuelled the furore with
sarcastic posts.
The appeal gave the impression
that Tottenham were taking
undue trouble over an individual
award. Spurs manager Pochettino
countered that his player had
not been expecting the appeal to
have been so divisive. “Harry is
disappointed because he never
wanted to create this,” the coach
said. “Sometimes, it is a small or
simple thing that becomes bigger
and you cannot stop it. He is going
to learn a lot from this.
“Of course he never thought that
this situation was going to go on
to such big things when he was so
certain that he touched the ball. It’s
normal that he was disappointed.
Tottenham fans will back Harry
but others will kill him. People
have opinions but that is normal.”
Pochettino, who does not
indulge in social media himself,
also made it clear he had not
advised Kane about the appeal.
“I wasn’t involved,” he said. “I
am sure Harry and Christian were
agreed to do this. No-one said to
me what was going to happen.
The club believed it was right to
appeal.” THE INDEPENDENT
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
The
Fan
Matrix
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
57
ARSENAL
Newcastle the latest in
a long line of relegation
candidates we face in
the run-in as we pretend
that the Premier League is
worth anything other than giving
Aubameyang his contracted game
time and avoiding injuries to
anyone vaguely important for the
Europa League. George Bond
What supporters
are saying
about your club
BOURNEMOUTH
EDITED BY JAMES MARINER
PREMIER LEAGUE
Can’t see anything except
a defeat at Anfield.
Maybe Salah will be
rested but even then I
though Firmino had a cracking
game at City in midweek too. I’d
be delighted if we got a point up
there. Then again this club never
stops surprising us.
RoyalCherry (Up The Cherries)
BURNLEY
Stand Chat)
Let’s get the three
points against Leicester
tomorrow, and all but
make sure of a European
tour. It’s been a great season
whatever happens, but it would
be such a shame should it end on a
whimper, and we miss out on our
IMO deserved tag of best of the
rest. MACCA (Up The Clarets!)
CHELSEA
CRYSTAL PALACE
EVERTON
HUDDERSFIELD TOWN
BRIGHTON & HOVE
Palace next. Play as we
did last Saturday and
they as they did and
we’ll get spanked; play
as we CAN and they play Benteke
and we’ll win comfortably. My
prediction is a home win alas!
But I feel we already have enough
points. Tim Over Whelmed (North
Substitutions. Been
banging on about them
all season. Roy again
refuses to take players
off when they are shattered and,
surprise, we concede late. Have
never really enjoyed this season
and can’t wait for it to end, but a
win against Brighton would make
all the rubbish worth it. Ollie Potts
marcus (Grand Old Team)
LEICESTER CITY
LIVERPOOL
MANCHESTER CITY
MANCHESTER UNITED
NEWCASTLE UNITED
SOUTHAMPTON
STOKE CITY
SWANSEA CITY
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR
WATFORD
WEST BROMWICH ALBION
WEST HAM UNITED
What to do with Vardy
(above)? Is he the
main contributor to
managers’ demises
at our club? Maybe if he wasn’t
here we would take a new identity
anyway. If mugs like Everton
came knocking, I would maybe
let go. Don’t shoot me down in
flames! Gazza M (Foxes Talk)
In a week of stunning
comebacks it’s easy to
forget our dominant
second half at City.
Epitomised by Pogba
we were strong and brave –
showing what they can do when
let off the leash. WBA at home this
Sunday? Easy. Gabriel Counsell
We are not safe yet. Five
points thrown away in the
last two home games and
I’m fearing yet another
late-season collapse. I feel we need
two more points. We’ve the talent
to beat Huddersfield but they did
thrash us last time. Paul Cohen
Do we really think if Big
Sam has a decent end
to the season he will get
the sack? I suggest he
won’t & why should he? He would
have earned the right to see out
his contract and plan for next
season. Unless there is a plan and
a new manager in place, ready.
Can’t think of a
worse way to end our
Champions League
hopes than a loss to
Spurs which guaranteed their
qualification, followed by a draw
that essentially gave West Ham
their safety. Not quite sure how
Conte has survived Abramovich’s
wrath! Charlie Gould
If we pick up a win
in either home game
against Watford
tomorrow or Everton,
we should be confident of safety.
Circumstances may change but
that’s at least a target to aim for.
We don’t score many goals but it
only takes one chance to get us
over the line. Olly Diamond
The spectacular is
now our only hope of
maintaining our 10-year
run in the Prem! Monday
offers a good opportunity
against an uninspiring West Ham.
Arnautovic’s departure is one of
the main contributors to our lack
of success and could now damage
our dreams directly. Hugo Parrott
Harry Kane has been awarded with
this goal struck with his shoulder
against Stoke last Saturday
TV
36-37
Well, who predicted that
score? Fearing the worst,
I think most Reds would
have just appreciated
putting up a fight. But putting five
past City over two legs surpassed
expectations. Bring on whoever
in the semis, we can beat them all.
Still, shame we dropped points
against the Blues. Elliott Charles
Three wins on the
bounce and the Toon go
marching on. A sterling
2-1 win at Leicester
compounded the side’s change in
mentality over the past 24 months
under Rafa. An unrelenting
defensive display, and innovative
in the final third. Harry Savill
Naughton is crap and
cannot be relied upon.
Constantly leaving
right wing/corner open.
Whenever opposition
come down our right, he runs
backwards and watches and nearly
every time lets them in. Olsson, on
the opposite side, sticks the foot
in. SgorioFruit (Planet Swans)
Although we lacked a
cutting edge I actually
enjoyed large spells
of last week’s game.
Haven’t felt that for ages. While
disappointed to draw, those enjoyable spells were most important.
SmethDan (Westbrom.com)
Contrary to the two
teams we have just
lost to, Spurs play nice
football and will have
possession, which we need to
allow space for us to counter. This
will be an entertaining game and
am thinking 2-2, between two
good, footballing sides. Bluview
(Blue Moon)
Even without Stephens
against Chelsea
tomorrow, I’d stick with
five at the back and bring
Bertrand into centre. Bednarek
seems borderline competent,
but the prospect of watching
him against Hazard leaves me
uncomfortable. Nick Roberts
The appeal for Kane’s
goal at Stoke is more
embarrassing for him
than anything else. He’s
had a terrific season and
not winning the Golden Boot will
not detract. Praying City do not
resdiscover form, and that their
capitulation continues at least
another week. Charlie Taylor-Kroll
Two weeks ago this game
against Stoke looked
a relegation dog-fight,
fit for Monday night
viewing. But our point at Chelsea
all but confirmed West Ham’s
continued presence in the Prem.
Roll on next season! Joe Light
58
Football
EUROPA LEAGUE
Sport
Welbeck gets
complacent
Arsenal out
of big trouble
CSKA MOSCOW
Chalov 39, Nababkin 50
2
ARSENAL
Welbeck 75, Ramsey 90
2
Arsenal win 6-3 on aggregate
13.04.18
Pullout
RACING
Might Bite
swallows up the
competition
at Aintree
P55
CRICKET
Team-by-team
guide for
the new
County season
BOXING
P53
Steve Bunce on
why the return
of Tyson Fury
is good news
CSKA Moscow
Akinfeev
A Berezutski Ignashevich V Berezutski
By Jack Pitt-Brooke
AT THE CSKA ARENA
It says plenty about the new reality
for Arsenal that this draw with CSKA
Moscow, a game in which they lost the
plot and nearly lost the tie, is nonetheless a crucial step in their season.
All Arsenal had to do was avoid losing 3-0 to make it into the semi-finals.
But after going 2-0 down, and surrendering any grip on the game, Arsenal
were heading for exactly that. All that
talk about learning from Barcelona’s
defeat in Rome looked presumptuous, as a limited CSKA found it far
too easy to cut through. Fedor Chalov
and Kirill Nababkin scored either
side of half-time, both taking advantage of Petr Cech palm outs and static
defending to tap in.
This was not a young Arsenal team,
not with Cech, Laurent Koscielny,
Nacho Monreal, Jack Wilshere and
Aaron Ramsey playing. But they
looked lost for long periods and were
ultimately saved at the end. Danny
Welbeck converted from a one-two
with Mohamed Elneny with 15 minutes left, an away goal that killed
CSKA’s momentum, before Aaron
Ramsey scored a second, to equalise
on the night, with the game’s last kick.
Arsenal admitted Barcelona’s experience in Rome on Tuesday night
was on their minds. They had to avoid
a Russian repeat, which meant quietening the crowd, holding off the early
surge, making sure that this never
felt like the hosts were on the brink of
something special.
Of course, the CSKA fans were
loud, tucked in close to the pitch in
The
Sport
Matrix
The stories you
need to know
Nababkin
Kuchaev
Bistrovich
Dzagoev
Golovin
Musa
Chalov
Lacazette
Özil
Wilshere
Welbeck
Elneny
Ramsey
Monreal Koscielny Mustafi
Bellerin
Cech
Arsenal
Substitutions: CSKA Moscow Vitinho (Dzagoev, 38),
Natcho (Bistrovich, 72), Milanov (Chalov, 79); Arsenal
Chambers (Wilshere, 69), Iwobi (Lacazette, 77).
Booked: CSKA Moscow Golovin.
Man of the match Elneny.
Match rating 7/10.
Possession: CSKA Moscow 55% Arsenal 45%.
Attempts on target: CSKA Moscow 5 Arsenal 4.
Referee F Zwayer (Ger).
their modern new home. Their
Arsenal was that they had ridplayers responded: Krisden out the early pressure,
tijan Bistrovic flattened
and started to look comWilshere and Ramfortable, before concedsey in the opening
ing the first just before
minutes. Aleksandr
the break. Maybe comClean sheet kept
Golovin got on the
placency had started
by Arsenal keeper
ball, Ahmed Musa
to creep in, after they
Petr Cech in his last
ran in behind, and the
twice threatened on
15 matches, in all
Arsenal centre-backs
the break. Maybe they
competitions
had to do more desperwere unsettled by the
ate defending than they
arrival of Santos Vitinho
did for all of that comfortfor the injured Alan Dzagoev,
able first leg last week.
giving CSKA an extra body in the
But what was so frustrating for box. But the goal was all far too easy:
1
Konstantin Kuchaev’s unchallenged
cross from the left, Nababkin’s free
header at Cech, Fedor Chalov’s easy
tap in, without an Arsenal defender
anywhere near him.
Suddenly the second half had a different feel: CSKA only needed two
to knock Arsenal out. And they had
the crowd with them, the ball, and
Arsenal pinned back in their box, defending to keep their season alive.
Arsenal needed to take the sting
out of the game, but that means defending better than this: closing
down, anticipating, reacting, the
COMMONWEALTH GAMES
CRICKET
Bolt criticises Ujah for Games snub
India coast to series
win over England
Usain Bolt has criticised
English sprinter CJ Ujah
for opting not to compete
at the Commonwealth
Games. Ujah (right) chose
to focus on the World
Indoor Championships in
Birmingham, where he was
disqualified for a false start
in the semi-finals. He
recorded a 100-metre time
of 10.15sec in Arizona five
days ago, which would have
been enough for silver in
the Gold Coast. Asked about
Ujah’s no-show, 100m world
record holder Bolt (below)
said: “The Commonwealths
is an important stepping
stone. I would have done it.
I was very keen on coming
here as I look at this as a major
championship. I’m not one
of those persons that says
the Commonwealths is not
important. For me, I find it
very important. If they don’t
show up, that’s their loss.”
India recorded a comfortable
eight-wicket victory over England
at Nagpur to win the final one-day
international and secure the series
2-1. Despite 94 from wicketkeeper
Amy Jones, as England posted
201 for nine, the tourists could not
produce a repeat performance with
the ball. Smriti Mandhana, Deepti
Sharma and captain Mithali Raj
all hit half-centuries in a dominant
Indian display at the Vidarbha
Cricket Association Stadium.
NEWS
2-28
VOICES
16-20
FRiDAY
29-41
TV
36-37
BUSINESS SPORT
46-49
53-59
i FRIDAY
13 APRIL 2018
59
Payet leads Marseilles
through while Lazio slump
By James Mariner
Welbeck’s fine
finish was a
rare bright spot
for Arsenal last
night GETTY
whole thing. But that is not how
it went. Five minutes after the restart Golovin unleashed a hopeful
30-yarder, Cech parried it back
into play and Nababkin reacted far
quicker than Monreal to tuck in the
rebound.
All that talk about learning the
lessons of Barcelona looked empty,
given how sloppy and passive
Arsenal were here. Cech had to dive
to save from Kuchaev, and when
Musa ran into Shkodran Mustafi a
harsher referee could have given a
penalty. Arsenal needed to change
The semi-finalists
Arsenal, Red Bull Salzburg,
Marseilles, Atletico Madrid
Draw takes place at noon today
First legs Thursday 26 April,
Second legs Thursday 3 May
the game because they were heading for disaster. So Wilshere was
hauled off and Calum Chambers
came on, a third centre-back, a new
COMMONWEALTH GAMES
TENNIS
England’s agony in
hockey shoot-out
Edmund powers
into quarter-finals
England’s women hockey team
experienced the agony of penalty
shoot-out defeat as they were
beaten by New Zealand following
a goalless draw in their semi-final.
Hannah Martin was the only one
of England’s five shooters to beat
New Zealand goalkeeper Grace
O’Hanlon, who had come on
specifically for the shoot-out. Black
Sticks captain Stacey Michelsen
beat Maddie Hinch with the 10th
and final penalty to edge it 2-1.
British No 1 Kyle Edmund sailed to
his third quarter-final of the season
by beating Moldovan Radu Albot
in straight sets at the Grand Prix
Hassan II in Morocco. Second seed
Edmund, who made the last eight
at the Brisbane International and
the Australian Open in January,
overcame an untidy start to win 6-2,
6-4. He will play Malek Jaziri in the
quarter-finals after the Tusisian
beat Germany’s Mischa Zverev, also
by 6-2,6-4 yesterday.
formation to stem the tide. Within
minutes, Arsenal had scored, an
away goal that doubled what CSKA
had left to do. Welbeck, full of running, left Nababkin behind out on
the left, passed to Elneny and ran in
behind the CSKA defence. Receiving Elneny’s perfect through ball,
Welbeck opened up his body and
finished past Igor Akinfeev.
When Ramsey raced through in
stoppage time his finish was enough
to make the score look far better in
the end than it might have done 20
minutes before.THE INDEPENDENT
Sport on tv
Commonwealth Games
BBC One 9.15am; BBC Two 1pm
Golf: Open de Espagna
Sky Sports Golf, 11am & 4pm
Golf: RBC Heritage
Sky Sports Golf, 1pm
Racing: Aintree Festival
ITV, 2pm
Rugby union: Newcastle v Sale
BT Sport 1, 7pm
Football: Aston Villa v Leeds
Sky Sports Football, 7pm
Rugby league: Leeds v Wigan
Sky Sports Arena, 7.30pm
Dimitri Payet inspired Marseilles into
their first major European semi-final
for 14 years as they came from behind
to beat RB Leipzig 5-3 on aggregate
last night.
The former West Ham
United forward (right)
scored, assisted and had
another strike disallowed
as Marseilles won 5-2 on
the night to take their
place in today’s draw for
the semi-finals.
A goal down from the
first leg, the hosts fell further
behind within two minutes as
Bruma doubled Leipzig’s lead with an
away goal, cutting in from the right
and converting after good work from
Naby Keita and Jean-Kévin Augustin.
An Ilsanker own goal levelled on the
night for the French side, who added
another inside the opening nine
minutes through Bouna Sarr in a
whirlwind opening.
Payet had an effort disallowed
before setting up Florian Thauvin,
who volleyed in the home side’s third.
After Augustin pulled one back,
Thauvin repaid the favour to assist
a fine fourth from Payet and
Hiroki Sakai added a fifth.
Lazio conceded three
goals in five second-half
minutes to crash out in
Austria, losing 4-1 to Red
Bull Salzburg to go out
6-5 on aggregate. Amadou
Haidara, Hee-chan Hwang
and Stefan Lainer all found
the net late on to put out the
Italians, who had been two goals up
from the first leg.
Atletico Madrid complete the
last four, despite going down 1-0 at
Sporting Lisbon as Fredy Montero
scored. Diego Simeone’s side went
through 2-1 on aggregate.
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