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Aviation News – May 2018

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SPECIAL ISSUE DAMBUSTERS
DAMBUSTERS
UK �70 May 2018 www.aviation-news.co.uk
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SPECIAL
Guy Gibson?s Lancaster
EXCLUSIVE F-35 Squadron Boss
617 Sqn Vulcans
Dambusters Through
the Decades
WIN
A DAY WITH
THE FIGHTER
COLLECTION
& Flying Legends tickets
Closing Date: June 1, 2018
GROWING HEATHROW
Global Opportunities
DC-9 FAMILY
Short-haul Success Story
CONTENTS
FEATURES
p42
REGULARS
p07
20 Heathrow ? Runway to Global
Opportunities
04 Headlines
Bernie Baldwin reports on the progress of the third
runway project at London?s Heathrow Airport as well as
other developments at the hub.
06 Military News
28 CH-53K: A New Breed of Stallion
14 Preservation News
10 Civil News
Tom Kaminski details the evolution of the Sikorsky
CH-53K King Stallion.
p10
17 Air Events Dates
34 G-For-George
54 Flight Bag
The Lancaster used by Wg Cdr Guy Gibson on the
Dams raid survived the war but was ultimately scrapped.
Nigel Price charts the history of this famous aircraft.
38 617 Sqn Through the Decades
We present a photographic rundown of the major
aircraft types used by 617 Sqn ? from 1943 to the
current day.
67 Register Review
72 Airport Movements
p16
76 Air Base Movements
FREE BOOK!
42 Dambusters Deltas
Dr Kevin Wright talks with former 617 Sqn Vulcan crew
members about their experiences on the unit.
48 New Era for the Dambusters
The Officer Commanding 617 Sqn, Wg Cdr John
Butcher, tells editor Dino Carrara about the unit?s
progress and plans with the F-35B.
56 DC-9 Family: Short-haul Success
Story
16 Airshow News
p62
Claim your FREE
Civil or Military
Aircraft Markings
book worth �.49
when you subscribe
to Aviation News.
See pages 26
and 27 for details.
Charles Woodley outlines the history of the Douglas
DC-9/MD-80 jet family.
62 Harbour Air: No Runway? No
Problem!
Tony Dixon examines Canada?s Harbour Air seaplane
operations.
77 Virgin Australia: Breaking the Mould
Chris Frame looks at the Virgin airlines brand in
Australia from its formation in 2000 as a low-cost carrier
to a full-service airline today.
Cover photos (main image): A montage featuring one of the UK?s F-35B Lightnings (the
Dambusters are due to re-form on this aircraft type) and artwork of Guy Gibson?s Lancaster
during the famous Dams raid. F-35B photo: Crown copyright 2016. Artwork: Antonis Karidis.
Inset (bottom left): A Qatar Airways Boeing 777-300ER taking off from Heathrow past British
Airways Boeing 747-400s parked at Terminal 5. AirTeamImages.com/Alex Peake. Inset
(bottom right): An Air Canada DC-9-32 in 1979. AirTeamImages.com/Caz Caswell
Overseas cover (main image): An American Airlines McDonnell Douglas MD-82. Galen
Burrows. Inset (bottom left): One of the four Engineering and Manufacturing Development
Sikorsky YCH-53Ks. Sikorsky Aircraft. Inset (bottom right): A Virgin Australia Airbus 330-200.
AirTeamImages.com/Sarmad Al-Khozaie
Copies of Aviation News incorporating Jets can be obtained each month by placing a standing order with your newsagent. In case of difficulty, contact our Circulation Manager. Readers in the USA may place subscriptions by visiting www.aviation-news.co.uk or by calling
toll free 800-428-3003 or fax 757-428-6253 or by writing to Aviation News incorporating Jets, 3300 Pacific Ave, Ste 500, Virginia Beach, VA23451-9828. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Aviation News incorporating Jets, Key Publishing Ltd C/O 3390 Rand Road,
South Plainfield, NJ 007080. Aviation News incorporating Jets (ISSN: 2047-7198), is published monthly by Key Publishing Ltd, PO Box 100, Stamford, Lincs, PE9 1XQ, UK and distributed in the USA by UKP Worldwide, 3390 RAND ROAD, SOUTH PLAINFIELD, NJ 07080.
Periodicals postage paid at RAHWAY, NJ AND AT ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES.
Printed in England by Warners (Midland) plc, Bourne, Lincolnshire. (ISSN 2047-7198). The entire contents of AVIATION NEWS INCORPORATING JETS is a copyright of Key Publishing Ltd, and can not be reproduced in any form without permission.
www.aviation-news.co.uk
3
HEADLINES
Maiden Flight for 737 MAX 7
The Boeing 737 MAX 7
on its first flight. Boeing
Boeing?s new 737 MAX 7 took off for the
first time on March 16. Piloted by Boeing
Test and Evaluation Captains Jim Webb
and Keith Otsuka, the aircraft completed a
successful 185-minute flight, taking off from
Renton Field, Washington State, at 10:17am,
and landing at 1:22pm at Seattle?s Boeing
Field. It was put through tests on its flight
controls, as well as checks of its systems
and handling qualities.
The aircraft is the third and newest
member of Boeing?s 737 MAX family to be
produced, with a maximum capacity of 172
passengers. The MAX 7 has a range of
3,850nm (7,130km), the longest in its family,
and is designed for exceptional performance
for airline customers flying out of airports
at high altitudes and hot climates. The
project now begins a comprehensive flight
test programme, leading to certification and
delivery in 2019.
?Everything we saw during today?s flight
shows that the MAX 7 is performing exactly
as designed,? said Keith Leverkuhn, Vice
President and General Manager of the
737 MAX programme. ?I know our airline
customers are going to enjoy the capabilities
this airplane will bring to their fleets.?
The 737 MAX family incorporates the
latest CFM International LEAP-1B engines,
advanced technology winglets, Boeing Sky
Interior, large flight deck displays and other
advanced features. According to Boeing, the
737 MAX is the fastest-selling aircraft in the
company?s history, accumulating more than
4,300 orders from 93 customers worldwide.
Anniversary
Markings for
Typhoon
Eurofighter Typhoon FGR4 ZK318 of 29 Sqn
has received special tail markings to celebrate
the RAF?s 100th birthday. The Coningsbybased fighter was first noted in its new colours
at its home station on March 29. Luke Webster
Shoreham Airshow Pilot to be Charged Over Deaths
The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has
announced it will charge pilot Andrew Hill
with manslaughter by gross negligence in
relation to the deaths of 11 people at the
2015 Shoreham Airshow.
The reviewing lawyer, Simon Ringrose
from the CPS Special Crime Division,
made the announcement to families of the
deceased at a private meeting in Lewes
on March 21. Simon Ringrose said: ?The
Crown Prosecution Service has considered
a full file of evidence received from Sussex
Police in relation to the deaths of 11 men at
the Shoreham Air Show in 2015.
?At approximately 1.20pm on 22 August,
2015, a Hawker Hunter aircraft piloted
by Andrew Hill attempted to perform a
loop manoeuvre as part of an aerobatic
display. The aircraft failed to complete
4
the manoeuvre and crashed onto the A27
dual carriageway. Eleven men who were
either in vehicles on the carriageway or
standing by the roadside were killed in the
incident. Mr Hill was thrown clear of the
aircraft and, although seriously injured, he
survived.
?Sussex Police conducted a thorough
and detailed investigation into the incident
and in November 2017 submitted a full
file of evidence to the CPS in relation to
the actions of the pilot, Andrew Hill. In
accordance with the Code for Crown
Prosecutors, I have considered whether
there is sufficient evidence to charge Mr
Hill with any offence and if so whether it is
in the public interest to do so.
?Following a careful review of the
evidence I have found there is sufficient
evidence to charge Andrew Hill with the
manslaughter by gross negligence of the
11 men who died. I have also authorised
a further charge against Mr Hill of
endangering an aircraft, contrary to Article
137 of the Air Navigation Order 2009.
?Mr Hill will be formally charged with the
offences and will appear before the courts
in due course. I would like to remind all
concerned that criminal proceedings have
now commenced, and the defendant has a
right to a fair trial. It is extremely important
that there should be no reporting,
commentary or sharing of information
online which could in any way prejudice
these proceedings.?
Mr Hill (54) of Hertfordshire is due to
appear at Westminster Magistrates? Court
on April 19, 2018.
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
Shuttleworth?s Spitfire Reflies After Epic Rebuild
The Shuttleworth Collection?s Supermarine
Spitfire V AR501 (G-AWII) returned to the air
on March 20, after a 12-year overhaul. Wellknown warbird pilot Stu Goldspink was at the
controls during the 15-minute flight from Old
Warden, Bedfordshire. Shuttleworth?s Chief
Engineer Jean-Michel Munn said: ?This is a
very original aircraft, and one that served in
combat during the Second World War. It?s a
privilege for the collection to be able to return
it to airworthy status and have it back flying for
visitors to experience the sight and sound of
this iconic type.?
The Spitfire has emerged in different
markings to the 310 (Czech) Sqn codes it
carried for many years, and now wears the
fighter?s last frontline scheme before it moved
into secondary duties. These are 1943-era 312
Spitfire V AR501, in its new markings following a 12-year extensive overhaul. Darren Harbar
Sqn markings, with the code letters ?DU-E?. It?s
planned to debut the fighter at a Shuttleworth
?Twin Pin? Airborne in Australia
Twin Pioneer VH-SYS flying
from Wedderburn. Phil Buckley
Scottish Aviation Twin Pioneer 3 VH-SYS
has reflown from Wedderburn, south of
Sydney, Australia, after a long period of
restoration. Yankee-Sierra is the world?s
only airworthy example of the type and is
now owned by Richard Thompson, who
has completed the work begun by previous
DHFS Retires
Squirrels and
Griffins
The Defence Helicopter Flying School
(DHFS) has retired its fleet of Griffin HT1
and Squirrel HT1/HT2 helicopters at
RAF Shawbury, Shropshire, after around
20 years of service. Students from the
final flying training courses taught on the
types graduated from the DHFS during
a ceremony at the base on March 28,
during which a farewell formation flypast
was made by a pair of both Griffins
and Squirrels. The last helicopters
were then flown to Cobham?s facility at
Bournemouth Airport, in Dorset, to be
decommissioned from the RAF.
These helicopters have been
replaced at Shawbury by a new fleet
of 29 Airbus Helicopters Juno HT1s
(H135s), which have been acquired
along with three Jupiter HT1s (H145s),
the latter being based at RAF Valley,
Wales. Dave Allport
www.aviation-news.co.uk
keeper Stephen ?Sy? Allsep, who died in
2015. In recognition of the latter, the name
?Sy? will be painted below the cockpit. The
Twin Pioneer is now being preparing for
this year?s flying season, which is likely to
include appearances at several airshows
and other public events. Phil Buckley
airshow on May 6, which is being themed
towards 100 years of the RAF. Darren Harbar
12 Squadron
Stands Down
After more than 25 years of Panavia
Tornado operations by the unit, the
RAF?s 12 Squadron has disbanded and
it personnel have been reassigned to
the two remaining RAF Tornado units:
IX and 31 Squadrons. The unit lodged
its standard at RAF College Cranwell,
Lincolnshire, on February 14 ? its 103rd
anniversary ? after displaying it before the
Queen 12 days earlier. No.12 Squadron
isn?t expected to be inactive for long, as
its due to re-form as a Typhoon squadron
at RAF Coningsby later this year.
Debut for ROKAF?s First F-35A
The Republic of Korea Air Force?s first F-35A Lightning II in flight. Carl Richards
The first Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning
II for the Republic of Korea was officially
rolled out during a special ceremony at Fort
Worth, Texas, on March 28. The event was
attended by more than 450 guests, including
five members of the Republic of Korea
National Assembly Defense Committee,
as well as Suh Choo-suk, Vice Minister of
National Defense and Lt Gen Lee Seongyong, Vice Chief of Staff of the ROKAF.
The Republic of Korea is acquiring 40
F-35As through the US Government?s
Foreign Military Sales programme and
they are all to be built by Lockheed Martin
in Texas. The first aircraft will be delivered
to Luke AFB in Arizona, where ROKAF
pilots and maintainers will begin training.
The new fighters are due to be delivered to
the Republic of Korea?s base at Cheongju
in 2019.
5
MILITARY NEWS
Typhoon Radar Testing ?On Track?
Typhoon 98+08 landing at
Manching on completion of its
second flight with the Captor-E
in March. Dr Andreas Zeitler
Flight trials by Airbus Defence and Space using
Tranche 3 Eurofighter Typhoon IPA8/98+08,
fitted with the Euroradar Captor-E active
electronically scanned array (AESA) radar
began in March. This is the second application
of the new radar; the first aircraft to receive it
being BAE Systems? IPA5, serial ZJ700.
Typhoon IPA8 first flew at Manching,
Germany, in September 2017, before being
upgraded with the new radar. The Captor-E
development programme for Typhoon
remains on track according to Eurofighter,
with a number of flights ? with the radar
both powered and unpowered ? having now
taken place.
Alastair Morrison, Senior Vice President of
Radar and Advanced Targeting at Leonardo
Airborne and Space Systems said: ?The first
phase of flight tests wrapped up last year and
we?ve seen some excellent results. Currently
we?ve been working with the first asset in the
UK, having the second asset will allow us to
run multiple programmes in parallel. This year
we?ll be performing a series of high-intensity
flight trials with incremental software updates
to enable the required capability to be available
for the first deliveries to the Kuwait Air Force.?
US Navy to Axe More 'Classic' Hornets
The US Navy is accelerating its transition
to the Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet as
a money-saving measure. The move to
retire 136 F/A-18A, ?B, ?C and ?D Hornets
could provide a saving of nearly $1bn in
maintenance costs over five years.
Under the plan, the US Navy will axe the
fighters by 2020. The move would provide
the service with an additional pool of spare
parts and enable it to transfer the best of the
aircraft to the Marine Corps, and to reserve
squadrons.
The proposal aims to recoup around
$124m in 2019 and $852m across future
years? defence plans. At the start of Fiscal
Year 2018 the naval aviation inventory
included more than 40 F/A-18A/Bs and 200plus F/A-18C/Ds. The service had previously
decided to transition its last operational
F/A-18C strike fighter squadrons, comprising
VFA-34, VFA-37, VFA-83 and VFA-131 to the
Super Hornet by the end of 2019. The latter
unit began its transition in October 2017.
Conversion of VFA-204 is already under way.
Meanwhile, Boeing has received a $73m
contract to begin work on a service life
modification (SLM) for the F/A-18E/F fleet
that will increase the Super Hornet's life from
6,000 to 9,000-plus hours. The programme
is a precursor to a subsequent effort that will
upgrade existing Block II Super Hornets to
the Block III configuration. The company will
initially work on four Super Hornets at its St
Louis, Missouri, facility but plans call for a
production line to be set up in San Antonio,
Texas, in 2019.
Roulettes PC-21 Breaks Cover
The first Pilatus PC-21 for the RAAF?s
Roulettes display team made its maiden flight
at Stans-Buochs, Switzerland, on March
23. PC-21 A54-019 (HB-HWS) is the 19th
example for the Australian air arm. The first
16 aircraft were for 2 Flying Training School at
RAAF Base Pearce, Western Australia, while
the 17th and 18th are for the RAAF?s Aircraft
Research and Development Unit (ARDU).
Under the AUS$1.2bn Australian Defence
Force Pilot Training System contract,
signed in December 2015, Lockheed Martin
Australia is delivering 49 PC-21s to the
RAAF, plus seven flight simulators, learning
aids, courseware and support for an initial
seven-year term.
The first RAAF PC-21 made its maiden
flight at Stans on July 21, 2016, followed
6
PC-21 A54-019 in RAAF?s Roulettes display team markings at Stans-Buochs on March 23.
Stephan Widmer
by the second on August 8 of the same
year. The first pair began their delivery flight
from Switzerland on February 10 last year.
Roulette pilots are qualified flying instructors
who work at the Central Flying School,
based at RAAF Base East Sale in Victoria.
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
Russia Sends
Su-57s to Syria
Two Sukhoi Su-57 fifth-generation fighter
prototypes have been sent to Hmeymim air
base in Syria?s Latakia province by Russia.
The pair arrived on February 21, escorted by
a Su-30SM or Su-35. It is unclear whether
the deployment was related to on-going test
and evaluation of the aircraft, but since it
coincided with the Defender of the Fatherland
Day military parade at Hmeymim it may have
been for ceremonial purposes.
Earlier in the month, deputy defence
minister Yuri Borisov announced the Su57 had completed its first stage of flight
acceptance tests flown by contractor test
pilots, and the defence ministry was close
to signing a contract for a batch of 12 preproduction Su-57s. Nine flying prototypes
are currently undergoing tests (T-50-1 to
T-50-6, and T-50-8, -9 and -11); the latest,
T-50-11, first flew last August 6. The first two
pre-production Su-57s could enter Russian
service in 2019, according to Borisov.
Farewell 829 NAS
The Royal Navy has decommissioned 829
NAS at RNAS Culdrose, Cornwall. The
unit provided Merlin HM2 helicopters for
the service?s Type 23 frigates. Crews and
aircraft have been transferred to 814 NAS as
part of changes to the Maritime Merlin Force
based at the station.
The Maritime Merlin Force?s 820 NAS
will provide aircraft for the carriers, with 814
NAS responsible for the small ships? flights
on board Type 45 destroyers and Type 23
frigates, Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels and
shore-based detachments. Operational
training will remain the preserve of 824
NAS, and 849 NAS will continue to operate
the Sea King ASaC7 until later this year.
David Billinge
First Production Il-76MD-M Arrives
Russian manufacturer Ilyushin has delivered
the first series production upgraded Il76MD-M transport aircraft for the Russian
Federation Air and Space Force, it was
announced on March 13. Aircraft RF-76746
made its first flight after modernisation on
February 28, 2016, before extensive air
testing, latterly at Zhukovsky, near Moscow.
Work on an eventual total of 30 aircraft will
continue in accordance with the nation?s
armaments programme.
The defence ministry signed a contract
with Ilyushin in August 2013 to extensively
modernise the air force?s Il-76MD and Il-78M
tankers to extend their service life by 15 years,
replace older apparatus and provide modern
navigation and communications equipment.
The improvements used elements of the
new-production Il-76MD-90A and Il-78M-90A
variants, for maximum commonality, while the
D-30KP engines have also been modified for
longer life. Dave Allport
More Typhoons for Saudi?
The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia,
Mohammad Bin Salman Al Saud,
signed a memorandum of intent (MOI)
during a meeting with UK defence
secretary Gavin Williamson that paves
the way for a purchase of 48 additional
Eurofighter Typhoons. The MOI was
signed at RAF Northolt, London, during
meetings that took place over three
New Aggressor Scheme
at NAS Fallon
The Naval Aviation Warfighting Development Center (NAWDC) at NAS Fallon, Nevada has
painted F/A-18C Hornet 164646/37 in a new scheme. The centre develops naval aviation tactics
and maintains a number of adversary aircraft that are flown by the instructors to simulate
?hostile? fighters. Tom Gibbons
www.aviation-news.co.uk
Ilyushin Il-76MD-M RF-76746 ? the first series
production example ? which has now been
handed over to the Russian defence ministry.
UAC
days starting on March 6.
Saudi ordered 72 Tranche 2 Typhoons
in 2007. The first 24 were built by BAE
Systems at Warton facility, after which
it was intended the remaining 48 would
be constructed in Saudi Arabia by the
Alsalam Aircraft Company. In the event,
the co-production deal foundered, and all
72 aircraft were built in the UK.
King Air 350
Enters RNZAF
Service
Beechcraft King Air 350i VH-ZPE, the
first of four examples being leased to the
RNZAF under the Aircrew Training Capability
programme, has been delivered. The aircraft
arrived at RNZAF Base Ohakea on March
24 ? it had first been ferried from the US
to Sydney-Bankstown Airport, Australia,
where it arrived on August 15 last year. On
November 26 it flew to Hawker Pacific?s
facility in Cairns and was painted in an
overall charcoal grey military scheme.
It was then registered to Hawker Pacific
as VH-ZPE on December 18, and on March
23 left Cairns for Brisbane before continuing
the next day via Lord Howe Island to
Ohakea. Dave Allport
7
MILITARY NEWS
Super Tucanos Delivered to Chile
Although this Embraer Super Tucano is wearing the Brazilian civil registration, it is one of the six
examples ordered by the Chilean Government in 2017. Roberto Antenore via Juan Carlos Cicalesi
The Chilean Air Force has received the first
two of an additional six EMB-314 Super
Tucanos from Embraer. Although their
acquisition has not been officially announced,
the pair was seen at the company?s S鉶
Jos� dos Campos facility, S鉶 Paulo state,
Display Jet Crashes
Claim Two Lives
Two separate fatal accidents involving
military demonstration team aircraft have
occurred during the run-up to the new
airshow season. Corporal Jonathan
Bayliss an engineer with the RAF?s Red
Arrows was killed when the Hawk T1
(XX204) he was flying in crashed at RAF
Valley at approximately 13:30hrs on March
20. The aircraft?s pilot ejected before the
crash and survived.
Across the Atlantic, a F-16C Fighting
Falcon of the USAF?s Thunderbirds team
crashed on April 4 during a routine aerial
demonstration training flight over the
Nevada Test and Training Range from
Nellis AFB, where the team is based. The
pilot, Major Stephen Del Bagno, was killed
in the incident. A statement from the USAF
issued the following day said: ?The team?s
participation at the March Air Reserve
Base ?The March Field Air & Space Expo?
has been cancelled. It is unknown how
this accident will impact the remainder of
the 2018 Thunderbirds Season.?
Investigations into both crashes are
ongoing.
on March 6 and again during a technical
stopover two days later at Foz do Igua鐄
International Airport in Brazil?s Paran� state.
The two ? FACh 463 and FACh 464 ?
were accompanied by Lockheed KC-130R
Hercules FACh 990. After the stopover
in Paran�, the aircraft continued to Los
C髇dores air base in Iquique, home of
Grupo de Aviaci髇 No.1 (1st Aviation Group).
Embraer announced three firm orders for
18 Super Tucanos last year; Afghanistan and
the Philippines were confirmed as customers
for six aircraft each, but the client for the
remaining six was not disclosed.
The FACh took on 12 similar EMB-314s in
2008, and the remaining four from the latest
order will be delivered this year.
Atlas Arrives for
Falklands Duty
Airbus A400M Atlas C1 ZM415 from 70
Squadron, based at RAF Brize Norton
in Oxfordshire, arrived at RAF Mount
Pleasant in the Falkland Islands on March
27, to replace the Hercules as the RAF?s
tactical airlift capability in the South
Atlantic. The C-130 has been operational
in the Falklands since the station opened
in 1985. RAF A400Ms are not currently
able to receive fuel in flight, and aircraft
deploying to the Falklands need to stop
for replenishment in South America.
New Aircraft
Fleet for
QinetiQ
Defence company QinetiQ is receiving eight
new aircraft for its Empire Test Pilots? School
(ETPS) work at MoD Boscombe Down,
Wiltshire.
The new fleet will include a pair of Pilatus
PC-21s, which are expected to be delivered
from the factory at Stans, Switzerland,
within the next few months. The PC-21s
are replacing QinetiQ?s Hawk T1s and
Alpha Jets. The final examples of the latter
retired in January, but QinetiQ?s Operations
Director, Nick Lay, commented: ?It is not
the end for the aircraft, as we will seek new
owners over the next few months and there
is every chance they will fly again. It?s the
end of an era, but equally the start of a new
and very exciting one for [the] ETPS and its
customers.?
The latest delivery, announced on March
23, was G-ETPG, the first of four Airbus
Helicopters H125s (previously designated
AS350 B3e). Already in full ETPS
colours, it entered service under the newly
8
QinetiQ?s first H125, G-ETPG at Boscombe Down on February 25. Its arrival with the unit was
officially announced a month later. QinetiQ
established QinetiQ Civil Flying Organisation
(QCFO), which for the first time allows the
company to operate civil-registered aircraft
independently of other agencies. Previously
all QinetiQ aircraft flew with military serials.
The remaining three H125s are set to be
delivered in 2018-2019. Other new aircraft
include a pair of Grob G 120TP-As, which
arrived from the factory in Germany wearing
full ETPS colours late in 2017. Dave Allport
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
HEATHROW AIRCRAFT
ENTHUSIASTS? FAIR
This popular event, now in its 25th year, will feature stalls buying, selling and exchanging any aircraft
related items. Models, books, magazines, printed matter including postcards, slides and photographs,
DVD?s and memorabilia should all be available in abundance.
SUNDAY 6th MAY 2018
10.30 - 15.00
KEMPTON PARK RACECOURSE
BRUNTINGTHORPE
AIRFIELD
27TH MAY & 26TH AUGUST 2018
STAINES ROAD EAST,
SUNBURY-ON-THAMES, MIDDX., TW16 5AQ
For local buses see www.tfl.gov.uk or www.traveline.org.uk
Nearest Station: Kempton Park (on site)
Massive Free Car Park
Bring along your surplus items to sell or exchange!
This event will be a MUST for all aircraft enthusiasts
Enquiries and Stall Bookings:
KEITH MANNING
01423 862256
Email: keith768@btinternet.com
www.aircraftenthusiastfair.co.uk
COLD WAR JETS
FAST TAXi DAYs
GATES OPEN 9:00
FIRST TAXI RUN 11:00
� FOR ADULT
� FOR O.A.P
www.bruntinghthorpeaviation.com
Jetliners Of The Red Star is a new book that
goes behind the Iron Curtain to tell the story
of the civilian jet airliners of the Soviet Union.
The Tupolev Tu-104, Tu-134, supersonic Tu-144, Tu-154
and Tu-204, the Ilyushin Il-62, Il-86 and Il-96, and the
Yakovlev Yak-40 and Yak-42 get a chapter each,
illustrated with rare photos from the past and present.
An introductory essay details the history of Aeroflot
and the Soviet aerospace establishment.
Experience the parallel world of the airliners of the
Cold War with this essential work.
Visit the Astral Horizon Press stand at LGW2018
April 22 at K2 Centre RH11 9BQ
Order now at
www.theairlineboutique.com
Two free DVDs with
every online purchase
CIVIL NEWS
World Cup Livery for EgyptAir 737
EgyptAir?s Boeing 737-866 SU-GEN has been repainted to show support for the country?s football team at this year?s FIFA World Cup in Russia.
The design, which is different on each side, features members of the squad and includes Liverpool FC?s Mo Salah. The picture shown here was
taken at Paris Charles de Gaulle on March 31. AirTeamImages.com/Matthieu Douhaire
Airbus Adjusts A380 and A400M Production Rates
European manufacturer Airbus is to
reduce the production rates for its A380
and A400M programmes. The new plan,
which was presented to the European
Works Council on March 7, involves the
production of six A380s per year starting
from 2020 which is down from 15 A380s
in 2017.
On the A400M programme, production
will be adjusted to eight units per year as
of 2020, following the expected production
of 15 A400M in 2018 and 11 units in 2019.
This adjustment is based on discussions
with the A400M launch customer nations.
Airbus is now entering into a formal
social process with staff representatives at
European and national levels, to analyse
potential implications for the company?s
workforce and to start joint mitigation
efforts.
At this stage, Airbus estimates the
maximum impact of these measures will
affect up to 3,700 positions at sites across
the company?s home countries of France,
Germany, the UK and Spain.
The adjustment of the A380 production
rate follows a recent order that provides
visibility to the programme for the years
to come. At a baseline of six deliveries
per year, Airbus can produce the A380 in
an industrial efficient way that allows it to
pursue further sales campaigns, which
may lead to higher production levels.
Ryanair-LaudaMotion in New Partnership
Ryanair Holdings PLC announced on March
20 that it has entered into an agreement with
Niki Lauda to support his plan to develop
and grow LaudaMotion GmbH, an Austrian
airline based in Vienna. LaudaMotion is an
Austrian AOC holder, which will shortly start
a range of scheduled and charter services
from Germany, Austria and Switzerland,
primarily to Mediterranean leisure
destinations.
Under the agreement, Ryanair
will acquire an initial 24.9% stake in
LaudaMotion and this will rise as soon as
possible to 75% subject to EU competition
approval. Niki Lauda will chair the board of
the airline and oversee the implementation
of his strategy to build a successful Austrian
low fares airline. Ryanair will provide
financial and management support to
LaudaMotion, as well as six wet-lease
aircraft, to enable the fledgling airline to
complete an extensive 21 aircraft flying
programme.
Ryanair says the cost of this 75%
investment in LaudaMotion (if approved by
10
LaudaMotion?s first A320, OE-LOF, at Cologne Bonn Airport on March 25. Markus Altmann
the EU) will be less than ?50m although
it will provide an additional ?50m for year
one start-up and operating costs. Both
Mr Lauda and Ryanair will work with the
existing management team of LaudaMotion
and expect the airline to reach profitability by
year three of operations if their plan to grow
the business to a fleet of at least 30 Airbus
aircraft is successful.
Ryanair?s Michael O?Leary said: ?We
look forward to working in partnership with
Niki to develop his vision for a successful
Austrian low fares airline to service the
schedule and charter markets.? Niki Lauda,
Chairman of LaudaMotion, said: ?I am
thrilled that in the partnership with Ryanair,
LaudaMotion will be able to establish itself
as a strong competitor and to grow quickly
and sustainably. A new player in the aviation
market is born and I am looking forward to
offering our passengers an extensive route
portfolio at competitive air fares.?
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
Goodbye Meridiana, Hello Air Italy
Meridiana, Italy?s second largest airline,
ceased to exist on March 1, and has been
replaced by Air Italy, a completely new airline
in terms of its aircraft, network, business
model and stakeholders, although it will retain
the latter?s ?IG? International Air Transport
Association airline code. Meridiana had
been owned by AQA Holding, a joint venture
between Alisarda (51%) and Qatar Airways
(49%) since September 2017.
Meridiana?s eight Boeing 737-800s and
three Boeing 767-300ERs will be phased
out. Starting in May, three new 737 MAX
8s and five former Qatar Airways Airbus
A330-200s will join the fleet, offering an
entirely new onboard product with individual
video screens for inflight entertainment and
Wi-Fi connectivity. The MAX 8s will have 178
bookable seats with a dedicated business
class cabin, even on domestic flights. On
long-haul services, the 260-seat A330s will
feature an executive cabin with 24 lie-flat
seats arranged in four rows in a 2+2+2
layout. Economy will be in the usual Airbus
2+4+2 configuration with a 31in (79cm)
pitch. Starting from May 2019, the A330s
will be replaced gradually by Boeing 787-8
Dreamliners leased from Qatar Airways.
Meridiana?s existing codeshare
agreements with eight airlines has been
retained, including its tie-up with Qatar
Airways on services to Seoul, Tokyo,
Singapore and Mal�, plus the MXP-Doha
connection. Air Italy is expected to announce
its US partner shortly, thus enabling
passengers to continue their journey beyond
New York and Miami. Matteo Legnani
Air Italy is the new name for Meridiana. The carrier is being given a complete overhaul,
including its fleet and network. Air Italy
2017 ? A Better Year for General Aviation
After several years of lacklustre
performance, General Aviation aircraft
deliveries in 2017 showed modest
growth, according to the General Aviation
Manufacturers Association (GAMA).
Overall, aircraft shipments rose from
2,268 in 2016 to 2,324 last year and
helicopter deliveries showed a healthy
7.5% increase, rising from 861 (2016) to
926. Business jets sales moved upwards
slightly, with newcomer, Honda Aircraft
producing 43 of their HA420 HondaJets,
but Bombardier deliveries of Learjets,
Challengers and Globals was down from
163 (2016) to 140.
Single-engined turboprops continued to
be popular, led by Pilatus, which handed
over 85 PC-12s, but there was a 20% fall
in sales of the King Air that dominates the
twin-turboprop sector. Single-engined
piston aircraft saw a healthy increase
with Cessna, Piper, Cirrus and Diamond
reporting a rise from 656 units to 742
? mainly thanks to large orders from
professional flight training schools.
Among the helicopter manufacturers,
Leonardo has not yet reported its figures,
but Airbus Helicopters was about equal to
last year with 352 commercial deliveries,
Robinson had a much better year thanks
to a 28% rise in R44s and Bell delivered
132 units including 27 of its new Model
505 Jet Ranger X. Rod Simpson
Aigle
Azur?s First
Widebody
Aigle Azur has taken delivery of its maiden
widebody aircraft. The former airberlin
Airbus A330-223, F-HTAC (ex D-ALPG),
is the first to wear the French carrier?s
striking new livery. Rowen Aquilina via
Chris Cauchi
Loganair Announces New Carlisle Services
Scotland?s Loganair has announced a
new partnership with Stobart Group that
will result in the carrier operating services
from the newly-renamed Carlisle Lake
District Airport to London Southend, as
well as flights from Carlisle to Dublin and
Belfast City. Loganair will operate eight
flights per day across the working week
and a total of 12 at weekends, connecting
Cumbria and the Lake District, which
receives 45 million visitors per year, to the
www.aviation-news.co.uk
three destinations. The services start on
June 4 and all will be operated by 34-seat
Saab 340s.
Loganair?s Managing Director, Jonathan
Hinkles, said: ?We?re both delighted and
honoured to become the first operator
at the new Carlisle Lake District Airport.
This partnership with Stobart will open up
Loganair?s services to a whole new range
of customers.
?With frequent services on each of the
three routes, we have every confidence
that these new flights will transform access
to and from the Lake District for many
thousands of customers each year, as well
as serving areas like the South West of
Scotland.
?This move highlights Loganair?s growing
reputation as an airline that consistently
looks for ways to develop into new markets
and we are confident that its brand will
travel well south of the border.?
11
CIVIL NEWS
?Aerosmurf? A320
Brussels Airlines Airbus A320 OO-SND has
gained a spectacular new livery celebrating
The Smurfs, as part of the company?s Belgian
Icon contest. The livery was designed by
Airbus A320 OO-SND showing off its new livery
at Manchester on March 28. Ashley French
Italian Marta Mascellani and was chosen by
the public. The Airbus, which has been named
Aerosmurf, was officially unveiled on March 24.
Another four Belgian Icons have been chosen
? Rackham (Tintin), Magritte, Trident (Red
Devils) and Amare (Tomorrowland).
Edinburgh?s Secondary Runway Closes
The secondary 12/30 runway at Edinburgh
Airport was closed on March 30 and is
to be redeveloped as part of a major
renovation project. Runway 12/30 was
used regularly until the new, longer 06/24
opened in 1977.
Two RAF veterans attended the closure
ceremony ? Dr Hamish MacLeod and Wg
Cdr George Robertson (Ret?d) learned to
fly at Edinburgh Airport between the late
1950s and early 1960s, when it was known
as RAF Turnhouse. Both said they were
sad to see the runway go, but understood
the need for the area to be redeveloped.
Gordon Dewar, Chief Executive of
Edinburgh Airport, said: ?We have a proud
history here and the 12/30 runway holds a
lot of special memories for many people.
It?s only right that we mark this special
occasion.
?It was a key military base where people
showed the utmost bravery and even
paid the ultimate sacrifice. Friendships
were created, bonds were formed ? most
of which would last a lifetime ? and they
remember our campus fondly.
?As time has gone on and technology
has advanced, the 12/30 runway has
moved out of regular operation, but the
part it has played in our history has never
been forgotten. Its past will always be
remembered and it has an exciting future
ahead of it.?
First 787-10 Handed Over
Singapore Airlines took delivery of its first 78710, the newest and largest variant of Boeing?s
Dreamliner family, on March 25. About 3,000
people marked the milestone at Boeing?s
facility in North Charleston, South Carolina,
where the latest 787 model is manufactured.
Like the other 787 Dreamliners, the
787-10 is designed with strong, lightweight
composites and advanced systems.
However, the 787-10 features a longer
fuselage that allows it to carry about 40
more passengers or a total of 330 seats in a
standard two-class configuration.
Mr Goh Choon Phong, Chief Executive
Officer of Singapore Airlines, the 787-10
12
Boeing and Singapore Airlines marked the
delivery of the carrier?s first 787-10 on March
25. Joshua Drake photo/PRNewsfoto/Boeing
launch customer, said: ?It is an honour for us
to be the world?s first airline to take delivery
of this amazing aircraft. The 787-10 is a
magnificent piece of engineering and truly a
work of art. It will be an important element
in our overall growth strategy, enabling
us to expand our network and strengthen
our operations.? Goh added: ?The 787-10
underscores Singapore Airlines? longstanding
commitment to operate a modern fleet and
marks the start of a new chapter in our
shared story with Boeing.?
Singapore Airlines ? through its
subsidiary Scoot ? already flies the 7878 and 787-9 Dreamliners. With 787-10?s
delivery, the group will be the first to operate
all three Dreamliner models. Singapore
Airlines has 68 additional Boeing widebody
jets on order, including 48 additional 787-10s
and 20 of the new 777-9s.
Singapore Airlines plans to put its 78710s into scheduled service in May, with
flights from Singapore to Osaka, Japan and
Perth, Australia. Prior to the introduction of
these services, the aircraft will be operated
on selected flights to Bangkok and Kuala
Lumpur for crew training purposes.
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
Cebu Pacific Air
Receives A321
IN BRIEF
COBALT AIR opened a new link from LondonGatwick to Athens on March 31. The service
is operated by an Airbus A320 featuring the
Cypriot carrier?s new business class product.
A second ATR 72-600 has joined Humbersidebased EASTERN AIRWAYS. The 72-seat
turboprop, G-IACZ, is one of two being leased
from Nordic Aviation Capital (NAC) and will be
based in Aberdeen where it will join sistership
G-IACY, operating oil contract charters to
Scatsta in the Shetlands.
Cebu Pacific Air, the Philippines-based low-cost carrier, has received the first of 39 Airbus A321s
that it has on order. The 230-seat aircraft, RP-C4111, was handed over at the manufacturer?s
Hamburg/Finkenwerder facility on March 17. Aside from seven A321ceos, Cebu Pacific also has
commitments for 32 A321neos, deliveries of which are expected to start late this year, running
through to 2020. AirTeamImages.com/Dirk Grothe
CIVIL ORDERS
Purchaser
Aircraft
Number Order Placed Notes
Aegean Airlines
A321neos
10
March 28
Aegean Airlines
A320neos
20
March 28
ALC
737 MAX 8
8
April 3
All Nippon Airways
777 Freighters 2
Bamboo Airways
A321neo
Up to 24 March 26
March 23
SkyUp Airlines
737 MAX 10
3
March 20
SkyUp Airlines
737 MAX 8
2
March 20
Turkish Airlines
787-9
25
March 12
Turkish Airlines
A350-900
25
March 9
Aegean Airlines has signed a memorandum of
understanding with Airbus to purchase 30 A320neo
Family aircraft ? 20 A320neos and 10 A321neos. It will
also acquire a significant number of new A320neo family
aircraft from leasing companies
See above
Order valued at $936.8m at list prices. Air Lease
Corporation (ALC) has ordered a total of 138 Boeing
737 MAXs
Order valued at $678m according to list prices
Vietnam?s FLC Group has signed a Memorandum of
Understanding with Airbus for up to 24 A321neo aircraft
for future operation by start-up carrier Bamboo Airways
Part of an order for five 737 MAX aircraft, valued at $624m
at list prices. The order includes two MAX 8s and three
MAX 10s
See above
The airline finalised a firm order for 25 Dreamliners
with options for five more, as part of its expansion
programme
The carreier has signed a Memorandum of
Understanding to acquire 25 A350-900s, with options
on another five. No timescale for delivery has been
given as we went to press
UN Sustainability Colours
Adorn Xiamen 787
China?s Xiamen Airlines took delivery of a specially painted Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner at the
manufacturer?s North Charleston facility on March 17. The carrier had signed an agreement
with the United Nations in 2017 to become the first airline to work with the international
body on sustainability ? B-1356 is painted in a blue livery that represents the sustainable
development goals adopted by the UN. Boeing
www.aviation-news.co.uk
America?s SkyWest Airlines has taken delivery
of the first EMBRAER 175-SC. The special
configuration aircraft, N262SY, is fitted with
70 seats instead of the usual 76. It will be
operated for Delta Connection and was part
of the 45-aircraft order SkyWest announced
in late 2017. Embraer says it?s in discussions
with other customers regarding the E175-SC.
A new link between Cornwall Airport Newquay
and Germany will begin this spring after
Lufthansa?s low-cost offshoot EUROWINGS
announced plans to serve the South West
England facility from Berlin/Tegel. The weekly
connection, which will launch on May 5, is in
addition to previously confirmed flights from
D黶seldorf and Stuttgart.
PRIMERA AIR has unveiled plans to fly
from Manchester. The service, which is
expected to start later this year, will be
served from the Scandinavian carrier?s new
base in Malaga. The airline is also opening
new seasonal connections from LondonStansted to Tenerife and Alicante, as well from
Birmingham to Alicante, Tenerife, Las Palmas
and Reykjav韐.
Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi of Iraq gave
the go-ahead on March 15 for international
flights to return to airports in the autonomous
region of KURDISTAN. This follows an
agreement with local authorities to direct
supervision of the airports at Erbil and
Sulaymaniyah by the Iraqi Interior Ministry.
Both had been restricted to only domestic
flights since September 29 last year when the
Iraqi Government retaliated against Kurdish
authorities for running an independence
referendum.
AMERICAN AIRLINES is set to retire 45
Boeing 737-800s by the end of 2020. The
Dallas-based oneworld carrier is looking to
lower the average age of its single aisle fleet,
with 13 jetliners due to be withdrawn in 2019
and the remainder soon after. The airline
plans to introduce 50 Airbus A321neos and 40
Boeing 737 MAX 8s between the end of this
year and 2020.
AIRCRAFT INDUSTRIES has started series
production of its L 410NG (New Generation)
in the Czech Republic following the receipt
of type certification by EASA and FAA
on December 19, 2017 and January 10,
2018 respectively. Development of the L
410NG began in April 2010, as part of the
modernisation of small transport aircraft
(MOSTA) project to increase the aircraft?s
efficiency. The first example should be
completed by the end of 2018.
13
PRESERVATION
Second Tornado for Duxford
Tornado GR4 ZA469/029 at
Duxford on April 1. Justin Ward
Panavia Tornado GR4 ZA469/029 was
delivered by road to the Imperial War
Museum Duxford from RAF Marham, Norfolk,
on March 27. It is being reassembled in the
AirSpace building and will be displayed in
Hangar 4. This is the second example of
the Tornado ?bomber? on show here ? Gulf
War veteran GR1B ZA465 is resident in the
AirSpace hangar.
People?s Mosquito Moves Forward
The People?s Mosquito Ltd, a UK aviation
restoration charity established with the aim
of returning a de Havilland Mosquito FB.VI
to UK skies, has announced an agreement
with Retrotec Ltd to build and test fly an
example in southern England. Under the
expert guidance of Guy Black, East Sussexbased Retrotec has established a reputation
for delivering some of the most authentic
aircraft restorations in the world over the past
30-plus years. The business, which is fully
accredited by the UK Civil Aviation Authority,
offers various services including design,
parts manufacture and reconstruction of
complete aircraft, all delivered by highly
experienced engineers.
A statement from the People?s Mosquito
said the agreement will see Retrotec?s
engineers given full access to its unique
collection of more than 22,300 original de
Havilland technical drawings to assist in
their work. The announcement went on to
say that this ??means the British-designed
and built aircraft can once again be built in
the UK, harnessing Retrotec?s restoration
expertise, complemented by experienced
engineering consultants from New Zealand.?
Concluding the statement were some
words from Guy Black: ?I am delighted that
Retrotec Ltd has been chosen to carry out
this exciting challenge and I wish TPM the
very best of luck in raising the necessary
funds to enable this to happen.?
Lancaster?s Dambusters Markings Liberator Tribute
Opens at Idaho
Museum
Avro Lancaster X C-GVRA in its Dambusters markings on March 30. Al Mickeloff
The Canadian Warplane Heritage?s airworthy
Avro Lancaster Mk.X C-GVRA has gained
Dambusters markings on its port side for the
2018 airshow season. The Hamilton-based
warbird now has the codes ?AJ-G? and the
14
serial number ED932, the markings of Wg
Cdr Guy Gibson?s aircraft from the famous
raid. C-GVRA retains its original ?VR-A?
codes on the starboard side. (See page 34
for more on ED932 G-for-George.)
A new Consolidated B-24 Liberator exhibit
was unveiled at the Warhawk Air Museum in
Nampa, Idaho, on February 3. It comprises
an original B-24 nose turret and a main
cockpit section taken from Consolidated
PB4Y-2 Privateer 59759, an aircraft derived
from the Liberator. More detailing will be
added to the cockpit as the project moves
forward.
It is being restored to resemble a lateproduction San Diego-built Liberator used by
the US Army Air Force. The team behind the
display is continuing to look for parts to fit out
the cockpit ? its members would particularly
like to acquire the external armour plating that
was unique to Eighth Air Force B-24s. www.
warhawkairmuseum.org Frederick Johnsen
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
Sunken Carrier and Aircraft Discovered
The long-lost wreck of the USS Lexington
aircraft carrier has been discovered on the
South Pacific seabed. The amazing deep
water find by the crew of research vessel
Petrel, happened on March 4.
The Lexington was found approximately
1.9 miles (3,000m) below the surface
of the Coral Sea around 500 miles off
Australia?s eastern coast. The ship went
down during the Battle of the Coral Sea
on May 8, 1942, with the loss of 216
sailors. Over 2,700 men were successfully
evacuated. The carrier is believed to have
sunk with 35 aircraft aboard, at least 11
of which have now been located. These
comprise Douglas TBD Devastators, SBD
Dauntlesses, and a single Grumman F4F
Wildcat. The last, which flew with US Navy
unit VF-3, features four visible ?kill? markings
and the squadron?s ?Felix the Cat? logo.
The Petrel belongs to Microsoft co-
A VF-3 Grumman F4F Wildcat discovered near to the USS Lexington. Paul G Allen
founder and philanthropist Paul G Allen,
who also owns the Flying Heritage &
Combat Armor Museum. Paying tribute
to the aircraft carrier?s crew Paul said: ?As
Americans, all of us owe a debt of gratitude
to everyone who served and who continue
to serve our country for their courage,
persistence and sacrifice.?
Comet Replica Races On
Good progress is being made by Ken
Fern on his de Havilland DH.88 Comet
reproduction G-RCSR in Derby. The
fuselage has been completed, most of
the aircraft?s internal controls and fittings
are already in place and the canopy is
now ready for glazing. The instrument
panel is based on de Havilland?s original
version with modifications suggested by
display pilot ?Dodge? Bailey who flies the
Shuttleworth Collection?s example, G-ACSS.
?Work on the wings is going well, with
the undersides finished, and the engine
and undercarriage support frames now
in place,? said Ken. ?Almost all the metal
fittings have been made, including the
Historic Fighter on the Move
undercarriage legs and engine bearers. If
all goes to plan, I hope to have the main
airframe finished by the end of this year
ready for the fitting of engines.? Ken is
hoping to acquire more Gipsy Queen II
engines (for spares or to be rebuilt) and
propellers. If you can help, contact: ken.
fern@btopenworld.com
Phantom for Sale
McDonnell F-4H-1 Phantom II ?145310?
(N815WF) has been listed for sale via
US broker Platinum Fighters for $3.95m
(�84m). The 1959-built jet is in the process
of being restored to fly by Aircraft Restoration
Services at French Valley Airport, California,
and is described as 80 to 85% complete.
Boxted Museum
Expands
Hawker Hurricane I R4118 was moved by
road from the Shuttleworth Collection?s base
at Old Warden, Bedfordshire to Duxford?s
Aircraft Restoration Company on March 7. The
fighter ? owned by Hurricane Heritage?s James
Brown ? needs an engine overhaul following
some issues with the motor last year. While
this work is being done, the control surfaces
will be re-covered, and the radiator, oil cooler
and coolant header tank will be repaired.
?Under the leadership of John Romain,
the Aircraft Restoration Company has a huge
www.aviation-news.co.uk
Hurricane R4118 is loaded for transport from
Old Warden, while James Brown (right) looks
on. Darren Harbar
depth of experience with rebuilds of this type,?
James commented. ?Importantly, they have
enough resources to complete the rebuild
work very quickly once overhauls to the
various components have been completed.
Once R4118 has been returned to flight, I
expect her to be placed on public display
within one of the hangars at Duxford.? www.
hurricaneheritage.com Darren Harbar
A new display hall is to open at Boxted
Airfield Museum in Essex to mark
the wartime base?s 75th anniversary.
Construction work began on the new
building on February 26, and is scheduled to
be finished by the end of this month (April).
The facility will house some of the
museum?s larger exhibits, including a
section of fuselage from a Martin B-26
Marauder and a Link Trainer. Before being
officially opened, the hall will be used for a
series of commemorative events. One of
these is scheduled to take place on May
27, featuring guest speakers, veterans and
family members of personnel who served
at Boxted. www.boxted-airfield.com
15
AIRSHOW NEWS
AIRSHOW NEWS
Airshows Mark RAF Centenary
This year is the 100th anniversary of the
RAF and many airshows will reflect the
spirit of its centenary celebrations.
The major milestone will be one of the
themes of the world?s biggest aviation event
at AirVenture Oshkosh (July 23-29). Rick
Larsen, Vice President of Communities
and Member Programs of the Experimental
Aircraft Association, which organises the
show, said: ?From the Word War One era
to the Battle of Britain and early jets, to
today?s modern military aircraft, the RAF
has been an integral part of aviation history.
We will fully celebrate that during the week
One of two Su-22s that displayed at RIAT in
2014. The type is due to be on show in the
static park this year. Key-Dino Carrara
at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh.? Another
theme highlights the 70th anniversary of
the Air Force Reserve, while the ?Year of the
Tanker? will pay tribute to air-to-air refuelling
aircraft.
The Royal International Air Tattoo at
Fairford in Gloucestershire (July 13 to 15)
will be among those celebrating RAF100.
There will also be the usual large presence
from air arms around the world. Highlights
anticipated in the static park are a Polish Air
Force Su-22, NATO C-17 Globemaster III,
Royal Canadian Air Force CC-177, CC-130
Hercules and CP-140 Aurora. A CF-188
Hornet is scheduled for the flying display
and other airborne exhibits will include a
Finnish Army Aviation NH90 TTH (the type
can also be seen in the static park) and a
USAF F-35A Lightning II will fly alongside a
P-51D Mustang.
RAF Cosford is hosting the service?s
only airshow in 2018 and will be presenting
a special 100th anniversary static
display illustrating aviation and air power
development over the last century.
Yeovilton Shaping Up
The French Navy will have a presence
in the static park with a Falcon 50M,
NH90 Caiman and Lynx HAS4, and the
Lithuanian Air Force is participating with
an L-39ZA and Mi-8T.
Left: The Lithuanian Air Force plans a
debut appearance at the RNAS Yeovilton
International Air Day with an L-39ZA and
Mi-8T (illustrated). Paul Johnson via RNAS
Yeovilton International Air Day
Below: The French Navy is due to send a
number of aircraft to the show including a
Falcon 50M. Kevin Wills via RNAS Yeovilton
Air Day
The RNAS Yeovilton International Air Day
(July 7) will show off a variety of modern
air power examples ? including aerial
demonstrations by a Royal Danish Air
Force F-16AM Fighting Falcon releasing
flares ? an Hellenic Air Force F-16, two
French Navy Rafales and an Atlantique
2, RCAF CF-188, plus a Czech Air Force
Gripen and L-159 ALCA (both will go on to
display at RIAT).
16
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
AVIATION EVENTS CALENDAR
AVIATION EVENTS CALENDAR
The ILA Berlin Air Show usually features an impressive array of German military aircraft, such as this Eurofighter at the previous event. This year?s
edition is once again being held at Sch鰊efeld and runs from April 25 to 29. Key-Andrew Mason
UNITED KINGDOM
APRIL
22 Barton, Manchester: LAA NW Strut Jodel & Homebuilt
Fly-in ? 0161 789 1362 www.cityairportandheliport.com
22 K2 Centre, Crawley, West Sussex: Gatwick
Air Enthusiasts? Fair ? 01403 252628 www.
gatwickaviationsociety.org.uk/introduction.asp
27-29 Sywell, Northants: Eurostar & Eurofox Fly-in ?
www.sywellaerodrome.co.uk
28 Turweston, Bucks: VAC Spring Fly-in ? 01280 705400
www.vintageaircraftclub.org.uk
28 Lakeside Lodge, Pidley, Cambs: BBM&L Vintage
Baloon Inflation Day ? www.bbml.org.uk
29 Henstridge, Somerset: LAA Wessex Strut Fly-in ?
01963 364231 www.wessexstrut.org.uk
29 Old Buckenham, Norfolk: Wings & Wheels ? www.
oldbuck.com/en/home/
MAY
05 Bodmin, Cornwall: Military Wings & Wheels & FOG
Charity Flying Day ? 01752 406660 www.bodminairfield.
com/events/
05-06 Popham, Hamps: Microlight Trade Fair ? 01256
397733 www.popham-airfield.co.uk
06 Dalton Barracks, Abingdon, Oxon: Air & Country
Show ? www.abingdonairandcountry.co.uk
06 Old Warden, Beds: Shuttleworth RAF Centenary Air
Show ? www.shuttleworth.org/events/
06 Breighton, North Yorks: Radial Fly-in ? www.realaero.com
06 Old Sarum, Wilts: BDAC Museum Vintage Sunday Flyin ? www.boscombedownaviationcollection.co.uk
06 Kempton Park Racecourse, Middlesex: Heathrow
Aircraft Enthusiasts Fair ? 01423 862256 www.
aircraftenthusiastfair.co.uk
07 Popham, Hamps: Auto/Aero Jumble, Classic Cars &
Vintage Fly-in ? 01256 397733 www.popham-airfield.co.uk
11-13 Allerton, E Yorks: Pocklington Flying Man Festival
Balloon Meet ? www.prba.org.uk
12-13 North Coates, Lincs: Spring Fly-in ? 01472-388850
www.northcoatesflyingclub.co.uk
13 Compton Abbas, Dorset: Vintage Fly-in ? www.
comptonabbasairfield.co.uk
13 Popham, Hamps: Van?s RV Fly-in ? 01256 397733
www.popham-airfield.co.uk
16-20 City Hall Gardens, Cardiff, Glamorgan: RAF 100
? Static Aircraft ? www.raf.mod.uk/raf100/about/
18-20 Ragley Hall, Alcester, Warks: Midlands Air Festival
& Balloon Meet ? www.midlandsairfestival.com
19 Old Warden, Beds: Shuttleworth Evening Air Show ?
www.shuttleworth.org/events/
19 Shobdon, Herefordshire: Aeronca Club US Classics
Fly-in ? 01568 708369 www.aeronca.co.uk
19 Newark Museum, Notts: V-Force Reunion Event ?
01636 707170 www.newarkairmuseum.org
19 Old Sarum, Wilts: BDAC Museum Aerobilia Sale ?
www.boscombedownaviationcollection.co.uk
20 Stow Maries, Essex: Wing & Wheels Show ? 01245
329358 www.stowmaries.org.uk
26 Old Sarum, Wilts: BDAC RAF Centenary Event ?
www.boscombedownaviationcollection.co.uk
www.aviation-news.co.uk
26-27 IWM Duxford, Cambs: IWM Air Festival ? www.
iwm.org.uk
26-28 East Kirkby, Lincs: Lanc, Tank & Military Machines
? 01790 763207 www.lincsaviation.co.uk
27 Bruntingthorpe, Leics: Cold War Jets Open Day ?
0116 2799300 www.bruntingthorpeaviation.com/open-days
27 Old Buckenham, Norfolk: LAA & Homebuilt Fly-in ?
www.oldbuck.com/en/home/
EUROPE
APRIL
18-21 Friedrichshafen, Germany: AERO GA Exhibition ?
www.aero-expo.com
21 Oostwald, Netherlands: Pancake Fly-in ? www.
oostwold-airport.nl/news/36/56/21-April-Pancake-fly-inn.html
21-22 Cannes, France: Red Bull Air Race ? www.airrace.
redbull.com/en_INT
25-29 Berlin, Sch鰊efeld, Germany: ILA Berlin Air Show
? www.ila-berlin.de/en
25-29 Antalya International Airport, Turkey: Eurasia Air
Show ? www.eurasiaairshow.com
MAY
05-06 Amiens Glisy, France: Air Show ? www.20000
lieuesdanslesairs-amiens.fr
06 Cuatro Vientos, Spain: Fundaci髇 Infante de Orleans
Flying Day ? www.fio.es/Exhibiciones.html
09 Moscow, Russia: Great Patriotic War Victory Day Parade
10 Hoogeveen, Netherlands: Wings & Wheels Show &
Fly-in ? www.ehho.nl
11-12 Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic: Helicopter Show
? www.helicoptershow.cz
16-25 Lotnisko Jezow Sudeki, Poland: Grunau Baby
Glider Meet ? www.aeroklub.jgora.pl
19-20 Eslov, Sweden: Nordic Aero Expo ? www.
nordicaeroexpo.eu
19-20 La Ferte Alais, France: Salis Collection Air Show
? www.ajbs.fr
19-20 Zermatt Heliport, Switzerland: Air Zermatt
50th Anniversary Open Days ? www.air-zermatt.ch/
wordpress/50-jahre-air-zermatt-ag/
19-20 Poznan-Lawica Airport, Poland: Poznan Air Show
? www.poznanairshow.pl
19-21 Midden Zeeland, Netherlands: NVAV Dutch
Homebuilt Fly-in ? www.nvav.nl/vereniging/agenda/
icalrepeat.detail/2018/05/19/51/-/nvav-flyin
24-26 Crocus Expo, Moscow, Russia: Heli Russia Trade
Show ? www.helirussia.ru/en
25-27 Friedrichshafen Airport, Germany: Klassikwelt
Bodensee ? www.klassikwelt-bodensee.de
26 Compiegne, France: Jodel Fly-in ? www.jodel-fr.com/
index.php/topic,5056.0.html
26 Dubova, Slovakia: Letecky den Dubova ? www.
leteckydendubova.sk
27 Ponte De Sor, Portugal: Portugal Air Summit Air Show
? www.portugalairsummit.com
29-31 Palexpo, Geneva, Switzerland: EBACE Business
Aviation Convention ? www.ebace.aero/2018/
31-03 Jun Nastatten, Germany: Slingsby & Vintage
Glider Rally ? www.aero-club-nastaetten.de
JUNE
01-03 St Yan, France: Air France Staff & Friends Fly-in &
Show ? www.flyin.lfbk.free.fr
02 Muret-L?Herm, France: Open Day & Air Show ? www.
airexpo.org
02-03 Pardubice, Czech Republic: Aviation Fair ? www.
aviatickapout.cz
02-03 Thun, Switzerland: GOST Old-Timer & Homebuilt
Fly-in ? www.gost.ch
03 Cuatro Vientos, Spain: Fundaci髇 Infante de Orleans
Flying Day ? www.fio.es/Exhibiciones.html
03 Kjeller, Norway: Kjeller Airshow ? www.flydagen.no
06-10 Royan, France: Air Sport Exhibition (Sea Front Air
Show 10th) ? www.lerevedicare.com
07-09 Le Bourget, Paris, France: France Air Expo ? www.
franceairexpo.com
07-10 Base Latecoere, Biscarosse, France: Seaplane
Fly-in (Sea Front Air Show 9th-10th) ? www.hydravionsbiscarrosse.com/rih-2018
09 Holzdorf AB, Germany: Tag der Bundeswehr ? www.
tag-der-bundesweher.de
09 Wunstorf AB, Germany: Tag der Bundeswehr ? www.
tag-der-bundesweher.de
09-10 Compiegne-Margny, France: WW1 Centenary
Air Show ? www.rsafrance.com/index.php/evenements/
evenement/378-fete-aerienne-de-compiegne-margny
09-10 Estonian Aviation Museum, Lange, Estonia:
Estonian Aviation Days ? www.lennundusmuuseum.ee/en/
estonian-aviation-days
09-10 Rybnik, Poland: Air Picnic ? dnlaeroklubu.pl
09-10 Sola Airport, Norway: Flydagen Sola
10 Aalborg, Denmark: Danish Air Show ? www.
danishairshow.dk
10 Lann-Bihoue, France: Base Aeronavale Open Day
10 Royan Seafront, France: Meeting Aerien Reve d?Icare
? www.lerevedicare.com
13-17 Oostwald, Netherlands: Warbird Weekend Fly-in ?
www.oostwold-airport.nl/nl/doen-zien/agenda.html
14-17 Knokke-Heist, Belgium: Beach Vintage Biplane
STOL Competition ? www.vintageairrally.com/rallies/
upcoming/stol-competition
16 Mlad� Boleslav, Czech Republic: Historical Air Show
? www.historical-airshow.com
16-17 BA105 Evreux-Fauville, France: Meeting de l?Air ?
www.meetingdelair.fosa.fr
16-17 Jyvaskyla, Finland: Finnish Air Force Centenary
Air Show ? www.ilmavoimat.fi/en/news
16-17 Seppe-Breda, Netherlands: Wings & Wheels
Event ? www.cca-seppe.nl/english/
16-17 Tikkakoski AB, Finland: Finnish Air Force 100th
Anniversary ? finaf100.fl
17 Motril Seafront, Spain: Festival Aereo Internacional
Ciudad de Motril ? www.moyrilairshow.com
22-24 Hodenhagen, Germany: OUV German National
Homebuilt Fly-in ? www.ouv.de/fly/termine/
23-24 Budapest, Hungary: Red Bull Air Race ? www.
airrace.redbull.com/en_INT
23-24 Ecuvillens, Switzerland: Old Timer Fly-in & Display
? www.appa-ecuvillens.ch
24 Meaux-Esbly: WW1 Centenary Air Show ? www.
meaux-airshow.fr
17
AVIATION EVENTS CALENDAR
Flyfest provides an opportunity for visitors to get up close to the aircraft taking part. The
show, which is organised by the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, takes place at Hamilton
International Airport on June 16 and 17. David Blais
24 Valence-Chabeuil, France: ALAT Air Show ? www.
aerotorshow.fr
24 Chalais, France: Open Days & RSA Fly-in ? www.
rsafrance.com/index.php/evenements/evenement/379rassemblement-club-rsa-acaa-ac-de-chalais
25-29 Banadets-Albefeuille Lagarde, France: Franglais
Friendly Microlight Fly-in ? www.bmaa.org/informationlibrary/microlight-competitions/microlight-competitionsevents-franglais-friendly-2018
29-01 Jul Kavala-Peramos, Greece: Sea Front Air Show
? www.kavala-airshow.com/en/
30-01 Jul Fricktal-Schupfart, Switzerland: Flugtage ?
www.flugtage.net
30-01 Jul St Die des Voges: Jodel D140 60th Anniversary
Fly-in ? www.jodel-fr.com/index.php/topic,5032.0.html
30-01 Jul BA133 Nancy-Ochey, France: FOSA & French
Air Force Air Show ? www.fosa.fr/meetingdelair/
30-01 Jul Ursel, Belgium: Air Show ? www.urselavia.be
NORTH AMERICA
APRIL
21 Ohio River, Louisville, Kentucky: Thunder over
Louisville ?- www.thunderoverlouisville.org
21-22 Columbus AFB, Mississippi: Wings over
Columbus ? www.wingsovercolumbus.net
21-22 Vero Beach, Florida: Vero Beach Air Show ?- www.
veroairshow.com
21-22 Atlanta Regional Airport, Peachtree City, Georgia:
CAF Dixie Wing WWII Heritage Days ?- www.wwiidays.org
27-29 Moore County Airport, North Carolina: Festival
d?Avion ?- www.festivaldavion.com
28 Beale AFB, California: Beale Air & Space Expo 2018
?- www.beale.af.mil/Expo2018/
28-29 JB Charleston, South Carolina: Joint Base Charleston
Air and Space expo ?- www.jbcharleston.com/2018-air-expo
28-29 Myrtle Beach International Airport, South
Carolina: Wings over Myrtle Beach Airshow ?- www.
wingsovermyrtlebeach.com
29 Half Moon Bay Airport, California: Pacific Coast Dream
Machines ?- www.miramarevents.com/dreammachines
MAY
04-06 MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina: Air Show ?www.cherrypointairshow.com
04-06 Draughton-Miller Central Texas Regional Airport,
Temple, Texas: Air Show ? centraltexasairshow.com
05 Holloman AFB, New Mexico: Open House & Air
Show ? www.holloman.af.mil
05 Manassas Regional Airport, Virginia: Manassas Air
Show ? www.manassasairshow.com
05-06 Fort Lauderdale, Florida: Air Show 2018 ? www.
fortlauderdaleairshow.com
05-06 Chino, California: Planes of Fame Air Show ?
www.planesoffame.org
05-06 Anchorage, Alaska: Great Alaska Aviation
Gathering ? www.greatalaskaaviationgathering.org
12 Pasa Robles Municipal Airport, California: Warbirds,
Wings and Wheels ? www.ewarbirds.org/wwwx/index.shtml
12-13 MacDill AFB, Florida: Airfest 2018 ? www.macdill.
af.mil/AirFest-2018/
12-13 Dyess AFB, Abilene, Texas: Big Country Airfest
2018 ? www.dyess.af.mil
12-13 Peterson AFB, Colorado Springs, Colorado:
NORAD 60th Anniversary Air Show
18
18-20 JB Langley-Eustis, Virginia: Air Power over
Hampton Roads ? www.airpoweroverhamptonroads.com
18-20 Military Aviation Museum, Virginia Beach
Airport, Virginia: Warbirds over the Beach Airshow ?
militaryaviationmuseum.org
19 Corsicana Municipal Airport, Texas: Corsicana Air
Show ? www.coyotesquadron.org
19 Evans Towne Centre Park, Georgia: Thunder over
Evans ? www.thunderoveraugusta.com
19 Paine Field Everett, Washington: Paine Field Aviation
Day ? www.painefield.com/198/paine-field-aviation-day
19 Bruce Campbell Field,Madison, Mississippi: Trail of
Honor Open House ? www.mississippiwingcaf.org/events/
trail-of-honor-open-house.html
19 Illinois Valley Regional Airport, Peru, Illinois: TBM
Avenger salute to Veterans ? www.tbmreunion.org
19 Salisbury Regional Airport, Maryland: 2018 Wings &
Wheels ? flysbyairport.com/event/2018-ings-wheels
19-20 Anderson Regional Airport, South Carolina:
Anderson Regional Air Show ? www.andersonairshow.com
19-20 Redlands Municipal Airport, California: Hangar
24 AirFest ? www.hangar24airfest.com
26-27 Stephens County Airport, Breckenridge, Texas:
Breckenridge Air Show ? www.breckenridgeairshow.com
26-27 Cannon AFB; New Mexico: Open House & Air
Show ? www.cannon.af.mil
26-27 Columbia Regional Airport, Missouri: Salute to
Veterans ? www.salute.org
26-27 Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, New York
state: Bethpage Air Show ? www.bethpageairshow.com
26-27 Miami Beach, Florida: National Salute to America?s
Heroes Air Show ? www.usasalute.com
JUNE
01-02 Bountiful Skypark Airport, Woods Cross, Utah:
Skypark Airport Aviation Festival
01-03 Reading Regional Airport, Pennsylvania: MidAtlantic Air Museum World War II Weekend ? www/maam.
org/maamwwii.html
02 Greenwood-Leflore Airport, Mississippi: Greenwood
Air Show
02-03 Clow International Airport, Bolingbroke, Illinois:
Cavalcade of Planes ? www.cavalcadeofplanes.com
02-03 NAS Patuxent River, Maryland: Pax River Air
Expo ? www.paxriverairexpo.com
02-03 Mountain Home AFB, Idaho: Gunfighter Skies
Airshow ? www.silverwingsofidaho.org
02-03 CFB Borden, Ontario, Canada: Armed Forces Day
& Air Show ? www.bordenairshow.ca
08-10 Greenwood Lake Airport, West Milford, New Jersey:
Greenwood Lake Air Show ? www.greenwoodlakeairshow.com
09-10 Indiana County Jimmy Stewart Airport,
Indiana; Pennsylvania: Jimmy Stewart Airshow ? www.
jimmystewartairport.com/airshow
09-10 Niagra Falls Air Reserve Station, New York
state: Thunder of Niagra International Air Show ? www.
thunderofniagra.com
09-10 Quonset State Airport, Quonset Point, Rhode
Island: Rhode Island National Guard Open House Air
Show ? www.rhodeislandairshow.com
09-10 Old Rhinebeck, New York: History of Flight and
WW1 Air Shows ? www.oldrhinebeck.org ? NB repeated
every Saturday & Sunday until Oct 21st.
16 Granite Falls Municipal Airport, Minnesota: Ray Fagen
Memorial Airshow ? www.fagenfighterswwiimuseum.org
16 Golden Age Air Museum, Grimes Airfield,Bethel,
Pennsylvania: Flying Circus Air Show ? www.
goldenageair.org/events.html
16 Military Aviation Museum, Virginia Beach Airport,
Virginia: FLying Proms ? militaryaviationmuseum.org
16-17 Chippewa Valley Regional Airport, Eau
Clare, Wisconsin: Chippewa Valley Air Show ? www.
chippewavalleyairshow.com
16-17 Gaylord Regional Airport, Michigan: Wings over
Northern Michigan ? www.wingsovernorthernmichigan.org
16-17 Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Hamilton
International Airport, Ontario: Flyfest ? www.warplane.
com
16-17 Ocean City, Maryland: OC Air Show ? www.
ocairshow.com
16-17 Olympia Regional Airport, Washington: Olympic
Air Show ? www.olympicairshow.com
16-17 St Thomas Regional Airport, Ontario: Great
Lakes International Air Show ? www.glias.ca
23 Flying Heritage and Combat Armor Museum, Paine
Field, Everett, Washington state: FHCAM Pacific Theater
Day ? www.flyingheritage.com/visits/events/fly-day.aspx
23-24 Dayton International Airport, Ohio: Dayton Air
Show ? www.daytonairshow.com
23-24 Hill AFB, Utah: Air Show: Warriors over the
Wasatch Utah Air Show ? www.theutahairshow.com
23-24 Wasaga Beach, Ontario: Heroes Festival Canada
? www.heroesfestiva.,ca
28-01 Jul Evansville Riverfront, Indiana: ShrinersFest
Air Show ? www.shrinersfest.com
28-04 Jul WK Kellogg Airport, Battle Creek, Michigan:
Battle Creek Field of Flight Air Show and Balloon Festival
? www.bcballoons.com
30 Cedar Creek Lake, Mabank, Texas: Thunder over
Cedar Creek Lake ? www.tocclairshow.com
30-01 Jul JB Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska: Arctic
Thunder Air Show 2018
30-01 Jul Indianapolis Regional Airport, Mount
Comfort, Indiana: Commemortive Air Force Wings over
Indy ? www.wingsoverindy.com
REST OF THE WORLD
APRIL
19-21 Toluca International Airport, Mexico: AeroExpo
2018 ? www.aeroexpo.com.mx
21-22 Caboolture Airfield, Australia: TAVAS Great War
Flying Display 2018 ? www.gwfd.tavas.com.au
21-22 Coffs Harbour Airport, Australia: Coffs Airshow
27-01 May Shangjie Airport, China: Zhengzhou Airport
28 Uitenhage Airfield, South Africa:
Wings & Wheels Festival Uitenhage ? www.
wingsandwheelsfestivaluitenhage.co.za
29 Mudgee Airport, Australia: Wings, Wheels & Wine ?
www.wingswheelsandwine.com.au
30 JMSDF Kanoya Air Base, Japan: JMSDF Open
House & Air Show ? www.air-memo.com
MAY
05-06 Illawarra Regional Airport: Wings over Illawarra ?
www.wingsoverillawarra.com.au
05 MCAS Iwakuni, Japan: MCAS Iwakuni Friendship Day
? www.friendship-day.net
11-12 Nelspruit Airport, South Africa: Lowveld Air Show
? www.lowveldairshow.co.za
20 Toowoomba Airfield, Australia: David Hack Classic
Meet
23-26 Astana International Airport, Kazakhstan:
KADEX 2018 ? www.kadex.kz
26 Matsieng Aerodrome, Botswana: Botswana
International Air Show 2018 ? www.botswana-airshow.
com
26-27 Makuhari, Japan: Red Bull Air Race ? www.airrace.
redbull.com/en_INT/event/chiba-2018
27 JASDF Miho, Japan: JASDF Open House ? Miho Air
Festival ? www.mod.go.jp/asdf/miho/
JUNE
01-03 Eerodromo Jose Martins, Brazil: Aviashow 2018 ?
www.aviashow.com.br
Readers are strongly urged to seek confirmation that shows are
definitely taking place before travelling ? displays can move
location, date or be cancelled, and this guide should only be used
as an outline. For more information, check out individual websites,
all of which are listed here where possible.
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
HEATHROW
RUNWAY TO GLOBAL
OPPORTUNITIES
Bernie Baldwin reports on the progress of the third runway project at
London?s Heathrow Airport as well as other developments at this hub.
G
etting a massive infrastructure
project under way is never an
easy task, even when the general
belief is that it is worthwhile and
desirable. Doing so when there is fierce
opposition presents a whole set of additional
challenges.
20
It is almost three years since the
Airports Commission in the UK ?
after reviewing various options
? decided that the best plan
for additional capacity in the
southeast of England was
Heathrow Airport?s new
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
northwest runway proposal. However, it was
October 2016 before the UK Government
gave it the go-ahead.
It is the location of the new runway that
has brought vociferous opposition, as the
development will involve the compulsory
purchase of houses located in the villages
of Sipson and Harmondsworth. While this
issue continues to be contentious, Heathrow
Airport Limited (HAL) has been underlining
its aim to mitigate the project?s impact on
local communities. In February a press
statement was released in letter form from
HAL Chairman, Lord Paul Deighton, who
wanted to stress: ?...the national importance
of expansion, but also the importance
of expanding the right way for local
communities and the country.? He stated:
?We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity
to reduce the negative impacts of Heathrow
on our local communities ? and to ensure
that local residents and businesses can
benefit from the positive impacts, including
jobs and investment which expansion will
create.? He also declared that HAL has
learned from past proposals regarding
Heathrow expansion, including its own in
2009, which were set aside because the
www.aviation-news.co.uk
Above: Heathrow Airport Limited?s CEO,
John Holland-Kaye. LHR Airports Limited
Below: An Etihad Airways Airbus A380
lifts off from Heathrow. Over 30 airlines
would like to start or grow operations from
Heathrow. AirTeamImages.com/Steve Flint
priorities were considered to be wrong.
?They [the priorities] put the interests of
airlines and the airport first. They did not
prioritise the needs of our communities,
passengers and country and it was right
these proposals were rejected.? This letter
came ahead of the final evidence session of
the UK House of Commons Transport Select
Committee Inquiry into the draft Airports
National Policy Statement (NPS).
The select committee reported its findings
on March 23 stating: ?We conclude that the
government is right to pursue development
at Heathrow and accept the strategic
arguments the government has made in
favour of its preferred scheme. The NWR
[northwest runway] scheme should offer the
greatest strategic benefits, provided it can
deliver the expected capacity, at the costs
outlined in the NPS and on the timetable
projected.? It went on to say: ?Safeguards
and mitigations are needed to ensure that
the interests of passengers are protected,
and the adverse environmental, social and
health impacts on affected communities are
appropriately mitigated. We acknowledge
HAL and the government?s efforts to mitigate
the environmental and social impacts
21
expansion consultation is scheduled for next
year. The airspace usage consultation will
continue over a further two stages next year
and a later date yet to be set. The CEO said:
?By choosing to consult at this early stage,
we are taking an inclusive and transparent
approach, putting local communities at the
heart of our plans.?
RUNWAY OPTIONS
A third runway will enable more destinations, such as those in China, to be served. David
Dyson/LHR Airports Limited
A Vietnam Airlines Boeing 787 at Terminal 4. One of the many carriers providing links to Asia
from the London airport. Anthony Charlton/LHR Airports Limited
from this scheme. We also acknowledge the
ambition they share that airport charges do
not increase in real terms because of airport
expansion.
?We have recommended several additional
conditions of approval to be included in the
final version of the NPS on air quality, surface
access, connectivity, costs and charges,
noise, community impacts, resource and
waste management. Sections of the draft
NPS dealing with these matters should be
revised before a final NPS is tabled for
approval by both Houses of Parliament.?
To reinforce the commitment to
local communities HAL is holding one
consultation composed of two parts, one
on airport expansion and another on
the changes to flightpaths and airspace
required for the third runway. The ten-week
consultation ran from January to March this
year with 40 events held across communities
surrounding the airport and also online, via
email or post. HAL Chief Executive Officer
John Holland-Kaye said at the time: ?This is
the biggest-ever public planning consultation
seen in this country and we?re looking forward
to going through the views expressed on
how to shape our plans. It is this feedback
that will help us deliver the huge
opportunities of expansion, while
keeping to the promises we have
made to local communities and
meeting strict environmental tests.?
A second stage of the airport
Feedback has been sought on potential
infrastructure which include three shortlisted
options for the new northwest runway
with length varying from between 10,499ft
(3,200m) and 11,483ft (3,500m). Additional
terminal capacity for Terminal 2 and 5 was
also explored. There were also proposals
for larger cargo areas, aircraft maintenance
facilities, fuel storage and car parking.
Airline operators are also keen to
ensure their voices heard. Airlines UK is
the association representing UK-registered
carriers and its Chief Executive, Tim
Alderslade, is keeping HAL aware of his
members? concerns. In a press release,
he said: ?Airlines have been consistent in
their support for expansion at Heathrow.
However, they have also been clear that
this backing remains conditional upon costs
being kept under control and passenger
charges not increasing in real terms, and
they will reserve the right to withdraw their
support if this is not achievable.
?The Government has rightly set out that
lower fares are one of the key drivers of
expansion at Heathrow, but if charges have
to increase to pay for a disproportionately
expensive runway, the resulting cost
pressures will force up passenger fares and
put at risk the viability of new and existing
routes, which post-Brexit would see the UK
fall further behind our international rivals in
Europe and the Middle East with respect to
international connectivity.?
The airlines and the airport agree they
should show consideration for the community
and must make every effort to be a good
neighbour. HAL has identified key elements
in the expansion programme that will help
minimise damage to the environment while
delivering sustainable growth.
As John Holland-Kaye said: ?One of the
biggest environmental issues in and around
Eurowings is one of the few low-fare airlines
operating from Heathrow. LHR Airports Limited
22
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
Heathrow?s northerly runway, in the foreground of a westerly looking view of the airport, with part of the Terminal 3 complex and Terminal 5
visible behind. Anthony Charlton/LHR Airports Limited
London is air pollution. As a transportation
hub, we are uniquely placed to take a leading
role in reducing impacts by targeting the
biggest source of emissions ? road vehicles.
?I believe that we are at the cusp of
an electric revolution, and that the shift to
electric vehicles is happening quicker than
people would have imagined even two
years ago. As part of our airport?s ambitious
plans to ?Go Electric?, we now have one
of the largest electric vehicle fleets in the
country. We have already spent over �
in charging infrastructure, but I often find all
the charging points are being used when I
come to charge my own electric car. Airside,
we are planning an ultra-low emissions
zone by 2025, to encourage all our partners
operating on the airfield to turn their own
fleets electric. We are trialling electric buses
and even electric HGVs in cargo.
?With new public transport like Crossrail,
HS2 [the high-speed rail route from London
to some northern cities ? also highly
contentious] and rail links to the west and
south on the horizon, the way people travel to
Heathrow is also set to be transformed. Our
goal is for 50% of all our passengers to use
public transport by 2030, up from 42% today.?
domestic connectivity. Heathrow has long
been an ardent campaigner for boosting
domestic flights at our airport. We believe
that every corner of our country should be
able to benefit from the growth and trade that
stems from links to the nation?s hub airport ?
that?s why we?ve made it cheaper to fly within
the UK by reducing our domestic passenger
charges by more than 50%. Putting nearly
�m back into the pockets of British
families and businesses each year will help
to spur growth in every part of the UK.?
He added: ?With expansion, existing carriers
like Flybe and new carriers like easyJet could
add connections to markets such as Newquay,
Liverpool, Dundee and Humberside, and bring
competition and choice on existing domestic
routes, helping to reduce costs for travellers.
And, through improved domestic connections,
we will help deliver up to �7bn in economic
benefits across the UK.?
In early February 2018, the topic of
choice and competition brought HAL under
fire from the IAG ? parent company of
Iberia and the airport?s biggest customer,
British Airways. It called on the UK Civil
Aviation Authority (CAA) to allow different
companies to run commercial facilities like
terminals: ?Competition would provide better
facilities more economically and ensure
customer charges do not rise to pay for new
infrastructure,? IAG declared. ?It would also
generate better financing options for new
infrastructure providing greater transparency
and, consequently, lower risk.?
IAG Chief Executive Willie Walsh said:
?This is not rocket science. Most major US
airports have terminals owned or leased by
airlines and there are European examples
at Frankfurt and Munich airports. There?s
absolutely no reason why this cannot
happen at Heathrow. With more passengers
and the introduction of internal competition,
the airport?s charges should go down.?
HAL disagrees with IAG?s argument
favouring airlines operating terminals.
While the CAA is still considering IAG?s
proposal, HAL is getting on with its task of
delivering the airport?s expansion. HollandKaye said: ?We have already selected
HUB
Heathrow Airport is Britain?s biggest hub
airport, with connections to a vast number
of countries. In fact, one of the ?selling?
points used to gain approval for the airport?s
expansion was its role as the ?UK?s Hub?.
Unfortunately, connections to many UK
regions in recent years have been hampered
by the airport operating at near capacity ?
but Holland-Kaye is keen for Heathrow to
grow and alleviate that situation. He said:
?Expansion will increase the opportunities for
www.aviation-news.co.uk
March marked the tenth anniversary of A380 passenger flights at Heathrow. Singapore Airlines
was the first carrier to fly the massive aircraft into the airport. David Poultney/LHR Airports Limited
23
Part of the Terminal 5 complex that is British Airways? main base of operations. Anthony Charlton/LHR Airports Limited
our ?programme client partners? to be part
of our planning team ? Arup, Jacobs, Mace
and Turner & Townsend. We are planning a
primarily UK-based supply chain to deliver
expansion, so that we deliver British jobs
while we build as well as when the new
airport opens. We will choose our delivery
partners during the next phase of planning.?
Heathrow?s expansion must be affordable,
sustainable and financeable, therefore the
CEO says the company will be looking
for partners who can be innovative in its
construction: ?We want to build as much as
possible off-site, minimising the impacts of
construction on communities around Heathrow
and spreading economic benefits across the
UK, so it is better to think of Heathrow as an
assembly site, rather than a construction site,?
he explained. ?We have already started the
selection process for these off-site ?logistics
hubs? from a long list of 65. We?re on track for
construction to start in 2021.?
AIRLINE FLEETS
While the final designs for the expansion
are not yet fixed, the airport will have to
estimate how many of its customer airlines?
flights are likely to involve the largest aircraft,
specifically the Airbus A380 and Boeing 747-8
Intercontinental so it can build the appropriate
infrastructure. Other new aircraft types
could benefit Heathrow, as Holland-Kaye
commented: ?We are still near the beginning
of a big change in airline fleets, with 787s,
A350s and A320neos transforming the way
we travel. The new, more efficient aircraft are
increasing the number of markets that can be
served efficiently from a hub airport. Qantas,
for example, has launched the first commercial
direct flight from Heathrow to Australia.
This could shift airline traffic from transferdominated hubs, such as those in the Gulf,
to markets like Heathrow, with strong O and
D [origin and destination ? meaning point-topoint] demand. With expansion, we can once
more be the world?s best-connected airport.?
In addition to the third runway?s preparatory
work, there have been some infrastructure
changes at the airport recently. For example,
a pier attaching the main Terminal 2 building
to a satellite has been removed. Access to
the north-south satellite has not been affected
as passengers can now reach it via a new
underground walkway.
CARGO
An Emirates Airbus A380 lifts off from Heathrow. The type has helped increase passenger
numbers at the slot-constrained airport. David Dyson/LHR Airports Limited
24
The CEO said: ?Cargo is hugely important.
Heathrow handles over 30% of non-EU
exports [by value], 94% of which travels in the
belly hold of passenger planes. As we add
new routes, we will broaden the UK?s trading
network. Expanding Heathrow will allow us to
double cargo capacity, while making the flow
of goods through the airport more competitive
against Frankfurt and Schiphol.?
Holland-Kaye may be looking forward
to that post-expansion position, but he
also confesses to being extremely satisfied
with recent results: ?Last year, we had a
remarkable record-breaking year with the
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
airport growing at its fastest rate in five
years. In 2017, 78m passengers travelled
through the airport as a result of larger and
fuller aircraft. Cargo volumes also increased
by 10.2%, promoting more British trade
growth and making our airport one of the
fastest growing European hubs for cargo.?
He added: ?We?re proud to have achieved
all of this while delivering outstanding
service for our passengers, as the airport
was named ?Best Airport in Western Europe?
for the third year running and ?Best Airport
for Shopping? for the eighth year running in
the Skytrax World Airport Awards.? Terminal
2 was also recently named World?s Best
Airport Terminal at the 2018 Skytrax World
Airport Awards.
Growth is being spurred by airlines
from all over the world wanting to serve
the airport. The addition of carriers has
continued this year, said Holland-Kaye:
?At the end of March 2018, Heathrow was
delighted to have Cobalt Air begin services
to Cyprus, joining the 81 airlines that operate
out of our airport. In 2017, we welcomed
Flybe services to Edinburgh and Aberdeen
and Beijing Capital Airlines flying to Qingdao.
?With Heathrow operating at its planning
cap, it is very hard for new airlines to get
slots,? he acknowledged. ?We have over 30
airlines that want to start or grow operations
at Heathrow, which can bring competition
and choice for passengers. Through our
expansion programme, we are working on
an increase in the planning cap from 2021
and the new runway from 2025 will allow us
to add more domestic routes and up to 40
new long-haul destinations, to Asia, Africa
and the Americas.?
NEW DESTINATIONS
Although the planning cap may have thwarted
some airline services, the airport has been
able to squeeze in some new destinations
this year. Hainan Airlines started a three
times weekly flight to Changsha on March 23
using a Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner. This will be
upgraded to the larger 787-9 from September
1. Tianjin Airlines is due to introduce a service
to Xi?an in May flown by an Airbus A330-200
Expanding Heathrow could double cargo capacity, much of which would be carried as belly freight
on passenger flights. Pure freighters, such as this CargoLogicAir Boeing 747-8F, also contribute a
significant amount to the airport?s cargo figures. David Dyson/LHR Airports Limited
(the start date has yet to be announced).
Meanwhile, Beijing Capital Airlines has
converted the charter route to Qingdao to
scheduled from March 26 (also flown by an
A330-200).
Some airlines have upgraded services
with the latest aircraft types in their fleets and
in some cases have added capacity, such
as when A380s are placed on a route. In
January, Malaysia Airlines flew its inaugural
A350-900 service from Kuala Lumpur while
in early February, Asiana began daily A350
flights from Seoul Incheon airport.
As well as numerous services to the Far
East, HAL has another link. In 2016, the
company signed a collaboration agreement
with Airport Authority Hong Kong with a
view to working together on a range of
projects. Some fruits of the agreement are
already being delivered, Holland-Kaye said:
?We?re very proud of this partnership, which
allows both airports to share their expertise
and experience. We are similar-sized hub
airports, with a strong passenger service
ethos, a very commercial culture, and
addressing the challenges of operating at
capacity while building new runways.
?We work together on projects including
airport operations, contingency planning,
passenger service, future terminal design
and the opportunities to be gained from
expansion. We have also had a number of
management secondments, where some
of our future leaders have a chance to get
in-depth experience of how a different airport
team tackles familiar problems.?
Looking ahead, overcoming the hurdles
to the third runway project will be HAL?s
biggest challenge in the next few years.
HAL Director of Communications, Nigel
Milton, was keen to stress the bigger picture
when he said in a commentary piece for
Business Travel News: ?It?s important not to
forget the reason we?re expanding Heathrow.
It is about more than just a runway. It is
about opportunities for our local community,
inside and outside the airport?s boundary. It
is about securing the country?s economy and
connecting the whole of the UK to global
growth. And it is about legacy ? building
the infrastructure today that our children will
need for tomorrow.?
An artist?s impression of Heathrow showing one of the options for the third runway and associated terminal. LHR Airports Limited
www.aviation-news.co.uk
25
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CH-53K
A NEW BREED OF STALLION
The US Marine Corps will gain a next-generation rotary
heavy-lift capability when its King Stallions are fielded.
Tom Kaminski details the evolution of this new helicopter.
S
ikorsky Aircraft?s CH-53K King
Stallion is the third generation
of the heavy-lift helicopter that
has served the US Marine Corps
for more than 50 years. It will replace the
CH-53E Super Stallion and is intended to
deliver big improvements in range, payload,
performance, cargo handling, turnaround
times and survivability.
Advanced technologies will result in a
major reduction of lifecycle costs over the CH53E, while improving reliability, maintainability
and interoperability.
When it enters service, the CH-53K will
become the rotary-wing backbone for the
Marines? expeditionary missions.
Like its predecessors, it will be tasked
to take armoured vehicles, equipment
and personnel to support the war-fighting
philosophy of ?distributed operations? deep
inland and launched from the sea.
28
REPLACEMENT
The CH-53K was born out of the Heavy Lift
Replacement (HLR) programme, which began
in 2000 when the Marine Corps announced
plans to upgrade the CH-53E fleet. The latter
had entered service in 1981, to replace the
CH-53A and ?D Sea Stallions which had
entered service in 1966 and 1969 respectively.
Award of a development contract was
anticipated for 2004 for what was then called
the CH-53X project which envisioned an
upgraded, more capable version of the ?E?-type.
In September 2003, an evaluation of seven
existing aircraft platforms and four alternative
CH-53E designs was completed. The analysis
determined that only an enhanced CH-53
would meet performance and survivability
requirements, operating and support cost
goals, and in-service capability dates.
It also showed that construction of new
airframes was more cost effective than
upgrading the existing fleet. In fact, lessons
learned from the USMC?s H-1 upgrades
and the US Army?s CH-47, revealed
remanufacture costs were nearly equal to
new production airframes. Additionally, the
need for a ?pipeline? of donor airframes would
negatively impact the service?s ability to
meet operational requirements. Ultimately, in
March 2004, the USMC announced plans to
purchase 156 new helicopters.
Formal research, development, test and
evaluation (RDT&E) efforts began when
Sikorsky received an initial $34m contract on
December 23 of that year. A $43.3m contract,
to continue with requirements definition,
engineering trade studies and risk reduction
efforts, was awarded the following August.
Approval to enter the System Development
and Demonstration (SDD) phase was given
on December 22, 2005 and an $8.4m interim
SDD contract was awarded early in the new
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
The first of four Engineering Manufacturing
Development (EDM) YCH-53Ks conducts
its maiden flight from Sikorsky Aircraft?s
Development Flight Center at William
P Gwinn Airport in Jupiter, Florida, on
October 27, 2015. All photos Sikorsky Aircraft
unless stated
year, on January 3. Two days later, Naval Air
Systems Command (NAVAIR) announced the
helicopter, which carried the Sikorsky model
number S-95, would be designated CH-53K.
ENGINES
A full $3.04bn SDD contract to produce five
airframes, including a single ground test
vehicle (GTV) and four flying engineering
development models (EDM), along with static
and fatigue test articles, was issued on April
5, 2006. At that time, systems integration and
RDT&E were expected to run until 2015 and
cost up to $4.4bn.
Sikorsky announced its selection of the
General Electric GE38-1B turboshaft engine
to power the CH-53K in December 2006. It
was a derivative of the CFE738 commercial
turbofan and the T407 turboprop that was
originally developed for the cancelled
Lockheed P-7A maritime patrol aircraft.
Subsequently designated the T408-GE-400, it
is equipped with a dual-channel full-authority
digital electronic control (FADEC) system and
features advanced health-monitoring functions.
Due to shifting priorities, development
progressed slowly, but the CH-53K programme
completed preliminary and critical design
reviews (PDR and CDR) in September 2008
and July 2010.
Although the CH-53K was originally
expected to fly in 2011, the SDD schedule
was adjusted in August 2011 and first flight
was set for 2013 with initial operational
capability (IOC) moving from 2015 to 2018.
Another revision pushed the dates to 2014
and 2019 respectively.
Final assembly of the GTV and EDMs
www.aviation-news.co.uk
respectively began in July and December
2011, and the former was delivered to
Sikorsky?s Development Flight Test Center in
Jupiter, Florida, on December 4, 2012. Testing
began in December 2013, then on January
24, 2014, the GTV?s engines were powered up
and the rotor head turned for the first time.
In May 2013, Sikorsky received a
$435.3m modification to the SDD contract
for four production representative system
demonstration test article (SDTA) CH-53Ks
to support operational evaluation (OPEVAL).
The first four SDTAs are being assembled
and test flown at the Florida facility ? the
initial example having made its maiden flight
in January this year. Final assembly and
flight testing of the SDTA five and six and
production aircraft will take place at Sikorsky?s
Stratford, Connecticut, facility.
On April 4, 2017 the programme was
granted Milestone C approval for the start
of low-rate initial production (LRIP), and
Sikorsky received a $304m contract for two
Lot 1 LRIP CH-53Ks on August 30.
Subsequent purchases will include six
aircraft in LRIP Lot 2, eight in Lot 3 and 13 in
Lot 4 for a total of 25 CH-53Ks before full rate
production (FRP) begins. Initial deliveries from
the LRIP lots are expected to begin in 2020.
An FRP decision is expected in 2020
and 169 aircraft will follow by 2028. Planned
orders were increased as a result of a USMC
force structure review that was completed in
March 2011.
The current Acquisition Program Baseline
(APB) was approved on April 24, 2013 and
the programme of record (POR) totals 200
CH-53Ks, including the SDTAs.
A Government Accountability Office (GAO)
review determined that since 2005 CH-53K
development expenditure had increased by
more than 46% to $7.3bn, and the price for a
single aircraft rose by 14%.
In March last year, the Marine Corps
confirmed that programme costs had
increased 21% over its original baseline.
The average recurring fly-away cost is
$87.1m per aircraft, but when development
costs were included, the average price
increased to $138.5m each.
DESIGN
Sharing only a family resemblance and
a similar configuration with the earlier
Super Stallion, the CH-53K is powered by
three 7,332shp (5,467kW) T408-GE-400
engines. With 63% fewer parts than the
General Electric T64 used on the CH-53E,
they provide a 57% increase in power over
CH-53E engines but with reduced fuel
consumption of about 18%.
The new main rotor hub design is based
on Sikorsky?s commercial S-92 helicopter
and its split-torque gearbox design was
developed for the US Army?s cancelled RAH66 Comanche. The 79ft (24.08m) and 20ft
(6.1m) diameter of the main and tail rotors
is unchanged from the CH-53E, but their
increased chord provides larger surface areas
that translate to additional lift.
Additionally, the high-efficiency composite
main rotor blades have an advanced airfoil
and swept tips that are optimised to increase
performance in hover and forward flight.
The CH-53K?s ?hot and high? performance
enables it to lift a 27,000lb (12,245kg)
29
Above: Known as EDM-1, the initial YCH53K was unveiled at Sikorsky Aircraft?s
Development Flight Center in Jupiter, Florida,
on May 14, 2015. King Stallion deliveries
will run through to 2029 when the helicopter
achieves full operational capability.
A CH-53K Ground Test Vehicle (GTV) began supporting King Stallion engine and powertrain
testing on January 24, 2014 when the powerplants were fired up and the rotor head was turned
for the first time at Jupiter, Florida.
A YCH-53K conducts its
first hover with a 12,000lb
external load on April
19, 2016. Load testing
progressed incrementally
until February 10, 2018
when the King Stallion
lifted a 36,000lb payload.
30
external load from sea level at a temperature
of 39.4癈 (103癋) fly over 110nm (203km)
and deliver it to a location at an altitude of
3,000ft (914m) and a temperature of 33.1癈
(91.5癋); nearly tripling the CH-53E?s capacity
in similar conditions.
This capability permits the CH-53K
to deliver two up-armoured high mobility
multipurpose wheeled vehicles (HMMWV or
Humvee), a single 31,000lb (14,061kg) LAV25A2 light armoured vehicle, or three 9,000lb
(4,082kg) sustainment loads to three separate
landing zones at a range of 110nm (204km).
It can operate at a maximum gross weight of
88,000lb (39,916kg) compared with the CH53E, which tops out at 74,000lb (33,566kg)
and can carry 16,900lb (7,666kg) internally.
Single, dual and triple external cargo hook
capability includes a single centre-point rated
for a 36,000lb (16,329kg) capacity and dualpoint hooks that are capable of carrying up to
25,200lb (11,431kg) each.
Its cabin is 14in (0.36m) wider than the
earlier model, enabling it to carry standard
463L series pallets, and cargo movement is
aided by an internal rail locking system and a
4,000lb (1,814kg) capacity cargo winch. Larger
external sponsons (projections) increase the
helicopter?s internal fuel load, alleviating the
need for external tanks. Constructed from
composite materials, each sponson houses
two self-sealing fuel tanks that hold 2,300 US
gal (8,706 lit) of fuel totalling 15,500lb (7,031kg).
Newly designed crashworthy seats provide
seating for 30 fully-equipped troops.
Composite materials are found throughout
the new aircraft.
Spirit Aerosystems produces the helicopter?s
cockpit and cabin section, as well as the
tailboom structure of that part of the aircraft.
Visibility from the cockpit is improved
through the incorporation of larger
windscreens and side panels.
GKN Aerospace builds the aft transition
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
fuselage section and the main rotor pylon,
and engine nacelles are produced by Aurora
Flight Sciences, while the tail rotor pylon,
horizontal stabiliser and sponsons are built by
Albany Engineered Composites.
Improved landing gear, produced by
H閞oux Devtek, is fitted, but the CH-53K?s deck
footprint remains unchanged from the ?53E.
Based on the US Army?s Common Avionics
Architecture System (CAAS), the type?s ?glass?
cockpit was developed by Rockwell Collins.
The electronic flight instrument system (EFIS)
provides five MFD 268 multifunction liquidcrystal flight displays and two CDU-7000
control/display units. Additionally, a UTC
Aerospace Systems Integrated Vehicle Health
Management System (IVHMS) is incorporated.
Developed by Hamilton Sundstrand, the
CH-53K?s triple-redundant ?fly-by-wire? flight
control system features advanced stability
augmentation, flight control modes that
include attitude command velocity hold,
automated approach to a stabilised hover,
position hold and precision tasks in degraded
visual environments, and tactile cueing.
Defensive systems include three GAU21 0.5in (12.7mm) machine guns, ballistic
protection and aircraft survivability equipment
(ASE), which comprises the AN/APR-39
Radar Warning Receiver (RWR)/Electronic
Warfare Management System, AN/AAQ24 Directional Infrared Countermeasures
(DIRCM), AN/AAR-47 Missile Warning System
(MWS) and the AN/ALE-47 Countermeasures
Dispensing System (CDS).
IN FLIGHT
Sikorsky unveiled the first of four YCH-53K
EDMs during a ceremony at its Florida
test facility, on May 5, 2014, when the then
Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen
James F Amos, announced the heavy-lifter
had been named King Stallion.
A 55-minute maiden flight was made by
YCH-53K EDM-1 on October 27, 2015, marking
the start of a 2,000-hour flight assessment
programme involving all four EDMs.
The first flight was delayed for more than
a year following the discovery of a crack in
a ground test article gearbox. Evaluations
of the redesigned gearbox began in August
2015 and more than 200 hours of trials in the
GTV preceded the initial lift-off.
The second and third EDMs began testing
on January 22, and June 21, 2016 and on
August 31 the fourth aircraft began work.
The YCH-53K first carried an external load
on April 20, 2016 when a 12,000lb (5,443kg)
payload was lifted. As part of the incremental
flight expansion tests, a 20,000lb (9,071kg)
external load was lifted on May 26, 2016, and a
27,000lb (12,247kg) payload followed on June
23. The out-of-ground-effect (OGE) external
load test was conducted 100ft (30.48m) above
the ground, while the helicopter performed
Although the King Stallion has the same physical footprint as the earlier CH-53E, it provides
a major increase in external lift capacity and performance over the Super Stallion.
The YCH-53K test programme is gradually transferring to NAS
Patuxent River, Maryland. Lockheed Martin/Sikorsky Aircraft
Right: US Marine Corps pilots manoeuvre a
YCH-53K carrying a 12,000lb external load
after completing a 110nm mission during the
King Stallion?s two-week initial operational
test (OT-B1) in October 2016.
www.aviation-news.co.uk
31
An EDM YCH-53K undergoes an engine run at Sikorsky Aircraft?s Florida test facility on
February 25, 2015. The type made its initial flight on January 22, 2016 with a redesigned
gearbox. Lockheed Martin/Sikorsky Aircraft
hover manoeuvres and demonstrated its
control authority. Another milestone was
achieved on February 10, 2018 when the King
Stallion demonstrated the maximum weight
external lift of a 36,000lb (16,329kg) payload
from its single centre point cargo hook. The
event marked the completion of critical flight
envelope expansion activities during which the
helicopter was flown at speeds of up to 200kts
(370km/h) and an angle of bank up to 60?.
Additionally, take-offs and landings from sloped
surfaces up to 12? were conducted, along with
external load auto-jettison and the first gunfire
testing took place on March 22, 2017.
A two-week operational assessment by
Marine Corps pilots, aircrew and maintainers
was completed on October 19, 2016.
Conducted at Sikorsky?s flight centre, the
OT-B1 (operational test) test phase was
also intended to minimise risk in advance
of the initial operational test and evaluation
(OPEVAL) phase.
As part of the OT-B1, the YCH-53K lifted
a 27,000lb (12,246kg) load in a hover, and
carried a 12,000lb (5,443kg) during a 110nm
(204km) mission.
During ground evaluations, combatequipped troops were embarked and
disembarked. Cargo was rigged both internally
and externally. Tactical bulk fuel delivery
system (TBFDS) operation and MEDEVAC
litter configurations were also checked.
According to NAVAIR?s H-53 programme
manager, Col Hank Vanderborght ?the
operational assessment was really the first
time where we had a Marine Corps crew
fly the aircraft and perform operationally
representative mission profiles.? Additionally,
he said, ?all test objectives were met, and
the aircraft performed very well. This further
increases our confidence in the design, and
is another key step to successfully fielding the
CH-53K.?
Flight evaluation began transitioning
from Florida when EDM-4 arrived at NAS
Patuxent River, Maryland, on June 30, 2017.
It subsequently underwent modifications
and completed extensive electromagnetic
environmental effects (E3) and night-vision
compatibility checks before returning to
the air. Three EDM aircraft had arrived at
Patuxent River by February 2018 and EDM 1
will follow this spring. Seven YCH-53Ks and
CH-53Ks s are expected to be at the base by
the middle of this year.
The integrated test team (ITT) will carry
out the remaining developmental and the
operational analysis at Patuxent River. The
ITT comprises pilots, aircrew, engineers
and maintainers from air test and evaluation
squadron HX-21, the Naval Air Warfare
Center Aircraft Division (NAWC-AD) and
Sikorsky Aircraft.
By mid-March, the five helicopters had
completed more than 800 hours of verification
flights, including 142 that were flown at
Patuxent River. Additionally, the GTV has
logged approximately 775 test hours. Initial
Operational Test & Evaluation (IOT&E) or
OPEVAL is scheduled to begin in September
2019 and should be completed by December
that year. This will be supported by four of
the SDTAs. The King Stallion remains on
track to reach IOC in December 2019. This
is when four aircraft and combat-ready crews
are declared ?ready for deployment?.
FIELDING
According to the latest Marine Corps Aviation
Plan, the King Stallion will equip eight activecomponent (AC) squadrons, two reserve
(RC) and one heavy helicopter training
(HMHT) Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS).
Marine aircraft group MAG-29 at MCAS
New River, North Carolina, will be the first to
transition to the CH-53K, and HMH-366 will
be the initial operational unit. Conversion will
begin in December 2019 and be completed
in Fiscal Year 2023. The FRS (HMMT-302)
is also scheduled to receive its first of 21
King Stallions in FY19 and HMH-461 and
HMH-464 will begin transitions in FY23 and
24 respectively. The change for the MAG-16
squadrons at MCAS Miramar, California, as
well as HMH-463 at MCAS Kaneohe Bay,
Hawaii, will start in FY26. Full operational
capability (FOC) will be achieved when
conversion of the last AC squadrons is
completed in FY29.
The reserve squadrons will transition to
the CH-53K beginning in FY29 and conclude
in FY32. Each operational AC squadron
will be assigned 16 CH-53Ks, while the
RC squadrons will receive eight. Three
helicopters, including two of the EDMs, will
support ongoing test and evaluation.
Two of the EDMs will eventually be
converted into practical job trainers (PJT) for
use by the Center for Naval Aviation Technical
Training Marine Unit (CNATT MARU) at
MCAS New River, North Carolina.
The King Stallion has already attracted
interest from Germany and Israel, which both
plan to replace ?legacy? CH-53s. German
requirements include 40 to 60 replacements for
the Luftwaffe?s current CH-53G/GA/GS fleet.
A German purchase could increase CH53K production by 25% and reduce unit costs
significantly.
The first SDTA CH-53K arrived at Holzdorf
Air Base, Germany, aboard a USAF C-17A
on March 27 for participation in the ILA
Berlin Air Show. While in Germany, the King
Stallion will also support demonstrations
for the Luftwaffe. In preparation for the air
movement, the programme achieved its
Air Transportability Test Loading Activity
certification from the USAF.
Israel hopes to replace its fleet of CH-53D
(S-65C-3) Yas?ur (Petrel) helicopters by 2025
and has reportedly requested pricing and
availability information for 20 aircraft.
Additionally, the US Navy could potentially
purchase a variant as a replacement for its
small fleet of MH-53E Sea Dragons, which
are tasked with aerial mine countermeasures
(AMCM) and vertical onboard delivery (VOD)
missions.
Lt Col Jonathan Morel pilots a King Stallion on December 18, 2015. He was the first marine to fly the helicopter.
32
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO 100 YEARS OF ACHIEVEMENT AND DETERMINATION
As a companion volume to this special
publication, to celebrate the centenary
of the Royal Air Force, Key Publishing
presents a unique 100-page tribute
to the bombers that have defended
Britain and fought in conflicts across
the world since 1918. Every major
combat type is covered, from the de
Havilland DH.9A of 1918 to today?s
Lockheed Martin F-35, with profiles
of such famous aircraft as the Hawker
Hart biplane, Halifax and Lancaster,
Mosquito, Vulcan and Tornado.
The development of each type is
covered along with examples of
operational use
Over 50 major bombers that
shaped the RAF?s heritage
Lavishly illustrated with archive
images and full-colour artwork
A N E W S P E C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N F R O M K E Y P U B L I S H I N G
Details of examples of the Royal
Air Force Museum?s collection
236/18
AVAILABLE NOW FROM
AND ALL LEADING NEWSAGENTS
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SU B SC RIB E RS C ALL F OR YOUR �00 D IS COUNT! S UB S C R IB E R S C A L L FOR YOUR �00 DISCO U N T!
DAMBUSTERS SPECIAL
G-FOR-GEORGE
The Lancaster used by Wing Commander Guy Gibson on the
Dams raid survived the war, but was ultimately scrapped.
Nigel Price charts the history of this famous aircraft.
34
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
M
ay 16, 1943. Britain and
her Allies were locked in a
desperate struggle with Hitler?s
Germany and its partners ?
war in Europe had been raging for nearly
four years and there was no end in sight.
Destroying the Nazi?s industrial heartland
was a prime objective for the RAF?s Bomber
Command, and the newly-formed 617 Sqn
aimed to strike a deadly blow by breaching
the mighty Ruhr dams.
By 9pm on that fateful evening 75
years ago, the 19 crews who carried out
the operation were at their Lancasters on
their Lincolnshire base. The squadron
commander, Wg Cdr Guy Gibson, and his
men turned for a photo to be taken as they
boarded their aircraft ? ED932, coded ?AJ-G?.
Just before 9.30pm Flt Lt Bob Barlow
eased the first Lancaster off RAF
Scampton?s runway and headed for the
Ruhr along with the other aircraft from that
wave. (Their journey time to the Sorpe Dam
www.aviation-news.co.uk
Left: Guy Gibson (second from the right) and
his men boarding their aircraft shortly before
taking off on the dams raid on May 16, 1943.
All photos via Andy Thomas unless stated
Above: The page in Guy Gibson?s logbook for
May 16, 1943. This historic document is held
at the RAF College Cranwell, Lincolnshire.
Below: Artwork of G-for-George. Key-Pete West
was the longest, hence why they took off
first.) Ten minutes later Gibson and his crew
were airborne, followed by the rest of his
wave so that both formations would attack
simulatenously.
The raid was famously a success ? the
M鰄ne and Eder dams were breached,
and the Sorpe was damaged. The level of
destruction/disruption on the Ruhr?s industry
is a hotly debated subject ? some historians
maintain the damage was soon repaired,
others insist it slowed Hitler?s war machine
and diverted forces to repair the damage,
and thus prevented some attacks. The
morale-boosting effects to the Allies, and the
dismay brought to the Nazis are, however,
beyond doubt.
It came at a heavy cost though ? a total
of 56 young men and eight aircraft from 617
Sqn were lost in the raid.
AFTER THE FLOODS
Following the attacks, 617 Sqn continued
as a frontline special operations unit within
Bomber Command; it helped to pioneer
bigger and more effective weapons and
innovative ways to mark targets for the
main force. The squadron?s Battle Honours
awarded for World War Two are: Fortress
Europe 1943-1944, The Dams, Biscay Ports
1944, France and Germany 1944-1945,
Normandy 1944, Tirpitz, Channel and North
Sea 1944-1945 and the German
Ports 1945.
The Dambusters crews
who returned from the raid
were mostly soon back
35
GUZZLE LANCASTERS
Along with ED932, the other two Lancasters said
to have been used on the little-known operation
sometime referred to as Guzzle were also important
Dambuster veterans. ED906 was flown by Flt Lt
David Maltby and crew as AJ-J during the raid and
ED909 AJ-P by Flt Lt Harold ?Mick? Martin. Like
Gibson?s aircraft, both attacked the M鰄ne Dam as
part of the first wave. All three were broken up for
scrap on or around July 29, 1947.
Right: Lancaster ED909 believed to be
being scrapped at Scampton in 1947.
RAF Scampton records via P H T Green
Above: Lancaster ED932 with an Upkeep mine fitted prior to the attack on the Ruhr. via Andy Thomas
Below: Lancaster Mk.7s NX679 (AJ-G), NX673, (AJ-P), in a photo taken from RT686. Key Collection
in action. Fewer than 50 of the original 133
Dambusters survived the war. Guy Gibson
was awarded a much-deserved Victoria
Cross for his role in the mission, but his time
with 617 was short; by August 1943, Wg Cdr
36
George Holden had become the unit?s OC.
The ever-popular Gibson was taken off
operations and undertook a series of ground
postings that included morale boosting visits
around Britain and public relations duties in
North America. He remained determined
to return to the front line though, and was
eventually granted permission to re-join
Bomber Command in a staff officer role
in mid-1944. On September 19, 1944 he
piloted a DH Mosquito of 627 Sqn on a raid
to western Germany. Sadly, Gibson and
navigator Sqn Ldr Jim Warwick were killed
when their aircraft, Mk.XX KB267, crashed in
the Netherlands while returning home.
The Type 464 Provisioning Lancaster
used by Guy Gibson in the raid was built by
Avro in Manchester during the early months
of 1943. Like its 22 siblings, ED932 was
extensively modified to carry the Upkeep
air-dropped mine, and arrived at Scampton
on April 30, 1943.
After the raid G-for-George was retained
by 617, and is known to have flown on a
small number of operational sorties. It is
also thought the modifications for the dams
raid made it suitable for large weapons
development work ? the Barnes Wallisdesigned 12,000lb (5,443kg) Tallboy
?earthquake? bomb for example. (The
Upkeep ?bouncing bomb? was, of course,
another one of Wallis? creations.)
According to the unit?s Operational
Record Book, Flt Lt J B Wilson and crew
used ED932 on an aborted sortie to a
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
special but unspecified target in Belgium on
December 22, 1943. The war load was 11 x
1,000lb (454kg) high-explosive bombs. The
aircraft is next noted as being used by Plt
Off N Ross on a 3hr 30min flight again to
Belgium on December 30, 1943. This time
ordnance was released.
UPKEEP DISPOSALS
Relatively little is known about the aircraft?s
subsequent time with the unit. It is thought
to have undergone a change of code
during the latter days of World War Two,
becoming AJ-V. However, there is no known
photographic evidence of this.
According to its RAF movement
card, ED932 was transferred to the RAF
Lossiemouth-based 46 Maintenance Unit
on February 7, 1945 for storage. On August
27, 1946 it was allocated to 61 Sqn, which
at the time was stationed at Waddington,
Lincolnshire.
It is believed three Dambuster veteran
Type 464 Provisioning Lancasters ? ED906,
ED909 and ED932 ? were reactivated in
order to dump the unused Upkeep mines, a
weapon that was still top secret at that point,
into the sea. This is sometimes referred to
as Operation Guzzle.
The Lanc trio was transferred Scampton
for use by the Station Flight, coded YFA, YF-B and YF-C respectively. All three
were still configured in such a way that
they could carry and drop the mine without
major engineering work having to be carried
out, and there are photographs of ED932
carrying the YF-C code. There is a largely
illegible entry on the aircraft movement
card dated November 8, 1946 which could
support the transfer.
Gibson?s aircraft is said to have suffered
an accident while at Scampton, but this
is unconfirmed by official records. ED932
was struck off charge on July 29, 1947 and
scrapped, along with ED906 and ED909. A
sad end to an historically important aircraft,
although some internal parts are thought
to have been saved and are now treasured
collectors? items in private hands.
THE DAM BUSTERS FILM
A version of Gibson?s Lancaster was
famously recreated for the 1955 Associated
British film The Dam Busters. Three RAF
Lancaster Mk.7s ? NX673, NX679 and
RT686 ? had their bomb bay doors and midupper turrets removed for their screen roles,
with NX679 (a machine that briefly served
post-war with 617 in real life) portraying
ED932. Sadly, NX679 suffered the same
fate as Gibson?s aircraft, and was scrapped
in July 1956.
The RAF Battle of Britain Memorial
Flights Lancaster also carried the
G-for-George markings in tribute to the
Dambusters and their leader in the late
1970s and early 1980s. (More recently it
flew in the markings of another 617 Lanc ?
?KC-A? Thumper III.)
This anniversary year will see another
version of AJ-G in the sky, albeit in North
America. The Hamilton-based Canadian
Warplane Heritage?s airworthy Lancaster
Mk.X has had the markings of Gibson?s
aircraft applied to the port side and is due to
display as ED932 for the 2018 season. (This
Canadian-built aircraft, registration C-GVRA,
famously visited the UK four years ago.)
The legend of the Dambusters continues
to be a high point of RAF history ? it?s such a
pity G-for-George isn?t here to pay tribute to
Bomber Command?s ?finest hour?.
Top: The RAF Battle of Britain Memorial Flight?s Lancaster flew as AJ-G in the late 1970s and
early 1980s, but retained its PA474 serial number. It is seen here at Abingdon on September 11,
1981. AirTeamImages.com/Carl Ford
Below: Canadian Warplane Heritage?s airworthy Lancaster Mk.X in its ED932 AJ-G markings on
March 10. Al Mickeloff
G-FOR-GEORGE ?
DAMS RAID CREW
Lead aircraft in the first wave of three attacks
Aircraft
ED932 ?AJ-G?
Primary target
M鰄ne Dam
Pilot
Wg Cdr Guy Gibson
Flight engineer
Sgt John Pulford
Plt Off Torger Taerum
Navigator Wireless operator Flt Lt Robert Hutchison
Plt Off Fred Spafford
Bomb aimer
Front gunner
F/Sgt George Deering
Flt Lt Richard Trevor-Roper
Rear gunner
www.aviation-news.co.uk
37
DAMBUSTERS SPECIAL
617 SQN THROU
We present a photographic rundown of the major aircraft
types used by 617 Sqn from 1943 to the current day.
Above: Initially referred to as ?Squadron X?, No.617 was formed at Scampton, Lincolnshire, on March 21, 1943, under the command of the
charismatic Guy Gibson. Although the unit?s famous for using new but highly modified Avro Lancaster B.III (Specials) for the Dams raid, the first
aircraft assigned was a standard Lancaster Mk.I, serial number W4940. Others ?second-hand? examples followed during the spring of 1943 as 617
trained for its date with destiny over the Ruhr valley in May 1943. Lancaster III ED817 ?AJ-C?, shown here, was one of the aircraft modified for the
raid, but it wasn?t used. P H T Green Collection
38
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
UGH THE DECADES
Below left: Two pressurised DH Mosquito XVIs, ML975 ?HS-M? and ML976 ?HS-N?, were loaned to 617 as the behest of the unit?s OC, Wg Cdr
Cheshire, to improve the accuracy of the low-level target marking in 1944. Both aircraft came from 109 Sqn. The experiment worked, and so two
Mk.VI fighter-bombers, NS992 ?S? and NS993 ?N? (illustrated) were permanently allocated. No.617 occasionally borrowed Mk.IVs from 627 Sqn,
which was co-located at Woodhall Spa in Lincolnshire. Douglas Garton
Below: A pair of brand new North American Mustang IIIs ? serial numbers HB825 and HB839, illustrated with Cheshire at the controls on July 6,
1944 ? were used by 617 for target marking from June to October 1944. P Clark via Mark Postlethwaite
www.aviation-news.co.uk
39
Above: The ?droop snoot?-equipped Lockheed P-38J Lightning ? referred to as the PB 38 ? was borrowed from the USAAF and evaluated by 617
for possible target-marking duties. It was used for only a few months and never received an RAF serial. via J D Oughton
Below: Avro Lincoln B.2s, such as RF513 ?KC-A?, were used by the unit from September 1946 to January 1952. J D R Rawlings
Above: The squadron entered the jet age when it started to operate English Electric Canberra B.2s, including WD997, in June 1952. It progressed
to the more capable B.6 variant in February 1955, but flew it for less than a year. EN-Archive
The Dambusters became an Avro Vulcan unit on May 1, 1958, when it re-formed
at Scampton flying the B.1. The B.1A and B.2 (illustrated) followed and served
until December 1981. (Also see page 42.) The Aviation Photo Company
40
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
Above: Tornado GR1s joined 617 in January 1983, and the Dambusters went on to fly GR1Bs and GR4s before standing down in March 2014. It
served operationally in several war zones during its time with the Tornado, including both Gulf Wars, and over Afghanistan. Tornado GR4 ZA365
?AJ-Y? was attending RIAT 2003. Key Collection
Below: After distinguished service with the Tornado, No.617 began preparing for the next stage of its illustrious career ? as the first operational
squadron to be equipped with the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II. It is expected the unit will have been ?stood up? at RAF Marham in
Norfolk by the time of the 75th Dams raid commemorations on May 16/17 this year. (Also see page 48 for an exclusive interview with 617?s new
commanding officer.) � MoD Crown Copyright 2016/SAC Tim Laurence
www.aviation-news.co.uk
41
DAMBUSTERS SPECIAL
DAMBUSTERS
DELTAS
In 1958 the arrival of the Avro Vulcan placed 617 Sqn firmly back
in the long-range strategic bomber role. Dr Kevin Wright talks
with former crew members about their experiences on the unit.
N
o.617 Sqn re-formed at
its wartime home of RAF
Scampton, Lincolnshire, on May
1, 1958 with Vulcan B.1s, armed
with nuclear and conventional weapons.
For success it relied on speed from four
Bristol Olympus 101 engines, altitude and
the combined skills of its pilot, co-pilot,
navigator-plotter, navigator-radar and an air
electronics operator.
Retired Wg Cdr, then Sqn Ldr Darrell
Hamley was already an experienced bomber
captain before flying the big delta. ?As soon
as I saw the Vulcan prototype for the first time
in 1952, [I thought] it was a gorgeous aircraft.
I thought ?I love that airplane?. Afterwards,
whenever asked what I wanted to fly next,
I just kept saying, Vulcan, Vulcan, Vulcan.
Eventually someone gave in and they posted
me to the Operational Conversion Unit.?
He joined 617 Sqn as a flight commander
in June 1959. ?It was a lovely aeroplane,
totally delightful, with a vast amount of
power. The easiest aeroplane to land you
could wish for.? Darrell flew all three versions
of the Vulcan: B.1 during conversion, B.1
and B.1A with 617 Sqn and later the B.2.
He was clearly impressed with its flying
dynamics: ?The B.1 handled like a dream. At
40,000ft it could do steep turns very happily.
When the rear fuselage ECM [electronic
countermeasures] bulge was added it
became the B.1A and slightly changed the
handling qualities. On the B.1 you just gave
her a boot of rudder and she went round. On
the B.1A you had to try a bit harder, but it was
still OK.?
ROUND THE WORLD
Scramble! The crew of a 617 Sqn Vulcan running to board their aircraft during an exercise
at Scampton in 1960. During the Cuban Missile Crisis, V-Force units were placed on Quick
Reaction Alert (instant readiness) duties. Key Collection
42
As part of the UK?s nuclear deterrent 617 Sqn
soon began to regularly fly training missions
across the world. There were single aircraft
?Ranger? flights to the Middle East, Africa
and elsewhere. On October 14, 1959, 617
Sqn undertook the first of many ?round the
world tours? taking a trio of Vulcans to New
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
Vulcan B.2 XL321 from
617 Sqn carrying a Blue
Steel practice round. This
aircraft joined 617 ? the
first operational unit to be
armed with Blue Steel ? at
Scampton, Lincolnshire,
on January 10, 1962. MoD
Zealand. Darrell Hamley described the
deployment: ?The three B.1s, XH498, XH499
[Darrell?s aircraft] and XH502, departed late
from Scampton due to fog. We refuelled
at Akrotiri and pushed on to Pakistan. On
landing at Karachi XH502 did not stream its
?chute. As a result, the brakes got hot and the
port undercarriage caught fire. It was rapidly
put out but delayed us a bit. From Karachi
we went to Butterworth, outside Penang
[Malaysia].? They all proceeded to Darwin,
Australia and finally to Ohakea in New
Zealand, arriving on October 19.
The deployment was in part to celebrate
the opening of Wellington International Airport
and the three aircraft flew around the islands,
so everyone could get to see the impressive
V-Bomber at first-hand. On the day of the
airport opening the trio was due to fly past,
with one aircraft, XH498 flown by Sqn Ldr
Tony Smailes, to land and be placed on static
display. Darrell: ?After two roller landings and
on finals for a full stop, a gust of wind saw
the main port undercarriage of Tony?s aircraft
clip the raised end of the approach runway.
The aircraft swung towards the crowd, but the
crew applied full power and the Vulcan got
back into the air, with a severely damaged
main undercarriage and leaking some fuel.
The squadron OC, Wg Cdr Douglas Bower,
was my navigator plotter and so we quickly
headed back to Ohakea, landed and he
raced to the tower to advise in any way he
could. Douglas suggested to go out over the
sea, get the rear crew out and abandon the
aircraft. However, Tony managed to safely
www.aviation-news.co.uk
recover XH498 and his crew to Ohakea.
As he landed he put all the aircraft weight
on the starboard undercarriage for as long
as he could, then deployed the braking
chute. When the port wing finally dropped,
the Vulcan ran off the runway and the nose
undercarriage sunk into the ground.? The
aircraft remained at Ohakea for some months
while a team from Avro completed repairs.
?We left New Zealand with two aircraft on
October 31. Our return home was via Fiji,
Christmas Island and Honolulu, then onto
San Francisco and Offutt AFB in Nebraska,
arriving November 6. Even then there were
further delays following a nose undercarriage
malfunction on XH499; XH502 continued
[via Goose Bay] to the UK. XH499 stayed
a further 10 days awaiting repairs before
leaving for Goose Bay in Canada.? Finally, on
the last leg of their flight on November 19,
over the Atlantic, Bomber Command declared
a generation exercise and so XH499 went
to Lossiemouth in Scotland for its part in
the dispersal plan, before finally returning to
Scampton the following day.
Darrell continued: ?The other thing we
were working on at the time were ?scrambles
and rapid starts?. It was crude with the
Three 617 Sqn Vulcans arrived at RNZAF Ohakea in October 1959, demonstrating the Vulcan?s
global reach. Air Force Museum of New Zealand
43
XH498 making an emergency landing at Ohakea after severely damaging
its port undercarriage during the Wellington International Airport airshow.
Air Force Museum of New Zealand
It took a repair team from Avro several months to make XH498 airworthy
again after its undercarriage collapsed at Ohakea. RNZAF Official
B.1, we had a rapid start capability, but on
the later B.2 was much more effective. We
used a lot of accumulators to provide bags of
electricity to start one engine and then bled
air across to get the others going.?
No.617 demonstrated its capability with
two displays using B.1As at the 1960 SBAC
Farnborough airshow with a four-Vulcan
?scramble?. ?On the first, it had been bucketing
rain when the launch order came. The
number one was ahead of me, I was in the
second Vulcan and could see virtually nothing
through the spray ahead. It must have been
even worse for three and four.
?On the Saturday we did it again. We got
the message from the Bomber Controller to
?scramble, scramble?, and got four Vulcans in
the air, in one minute twenty-four seconds. It
was very exciting for us and the crowds.?
The Vulcan B.1A joined 617 Sqn from
September 1960, gradually replacing the
B.1s. The upgraded B.1A had improved
Bristol Olympus 104 engines with 13,000lb
st (57.8kN) thrust compared with 11,000lb
(48.9kN) on the older model. It also carried a
new UHF radio, additional ECM equipment ?
fitted in a revised and slightly lengthened tail
cone ? and continued to be painted an overall
?anti-flash? white.
On June 20, 1961, No.617 Sqn?s XH481
undertook an epic flight. Sqn Ldr Mike
Beavis, later ACM, left Scampton and flew
non-stop to RAAF Richmond near Sydney.
He and his crew completed the 11,500 miles
RAF Scampton-based Vulcan B.2 XL317 of
617 Sqn, painted in its all-white anti-flash
livery, equipped with a Blue Steel training
missile in 1963. via AHB
(18,500km) trip in 20hrs and 5mins. They
required three air-to-air fuel top-ups from
Valiant tankers positioned on Cyprus, at
Karachi, and Tengah in Singapore. It clearly
demonstrated the Vulcan?s worldwide reach
with aerial refuelling.
BLUE DANUBE DISPOSAL
In the early days, Vulcans had carried the
huge Blue Danube nuclear weapon. At 24ft
(7.3m) long and 5ft (1.5m) wide, it was a
massive device that took up most of the bomb
bay. Wg Cdr Hamley remembered having
to dump a dummy version of the weapon
following a ?hang-up?. ?On July 25, 1961,
after the bomb had been retired and with the
nuclear and key components stripped out,
my crew was tasked to dispose of a Blue
Danube. We went to drop it on a range on
the Isle of Man. We did our bombing run, but
when the release button was pressed it [the
bomb] failed to release. We had a ?hang up?
but were not sure what had gone wrong. After
speaking to command headquarters, they
told us to drop it in the Wash, so we had to
fly all the way round Scotland and over the
Wash where I pushed the jettison button. We
watched the bomb [and rack] fall away and
make a huge splash in the water.?
FURTHER IMPROVEMENTS
In September 1961, the much more
powerful Vulcan B.2 arrived at Scampton
to replace 617?s B.1As. The new aircraft
were slightly over 8ft (2.4m) longer, with a
12ft (3.6m) larger wingspan and fitted with
more powerful Bristol Olympus 201 engines.
44
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
This 617 Sqn aircraft, Vulcan B.2 XL425, joined the unit for a 12-month stay in November
1972. After a spell with 27 Sqn, it re-joined 617 in April 1974. It was scrapped at
Scampton on April 13, 1982. The Aviation Photo Company
These generated 17,000lb st (75.6kN) of
thrust. The B.2?s distinctive cranked ?phase
2c? wing, had been strengthened, was
thinner, but better suited to the Vulcan?s now
low-level role. The switch to low level had
been necessitated by strengthening Soviet
air defences, especially deployment of the
SA-2 Guideline surface-to-air missile.
New navigation and electronic equipment
was fitted, including a Decca Mk.4 with
rolling map, three ARI 18205 Red Shrimp
jammers (later an ARI 18205 L-band
jammer), two chaff dispensers, an AR
I5952 Red Steer tail radar, a Blue Saga
(ARI 18105) radar warning receiver (RWR),
later replaced by the distinctive square
tail-mounted ARI 18228 RWR in the early
1970s. On November 19, 1962, the unit?s
XL319 was one of three Scampton B.2s that
arrived at RAAF Pearce in Perth, Australia,
a fourth arriving a few days later. As well as
participating in formation flypasts with RAAF
F-86 Sabres for the opening and closing
ceremonies of the Commonwealth Games,
the Vulcans deployed to RAAF Edinburgh
and visited New Zealand.
BLUE STEEL ERA
Dispersal and emergency scramble
exercises were a regular part of life on all
Vulcan units. The first Blue Steel standoff nuclear missiles arrived with No.617 in
October 1962, with the unit becoming the
first operational squadron with the weapon
in February 1963. Blue Steels was originally
conceived to be launched from high level,
where they had a range of about 200 miles,
well outside the SA-2s range. By the time
it entered service the transition to lowlevel operations meant it was fired from
around 1,000ft. This reduced the bomber?s
vulnerability to air defences, but in the
process shrunk the Blue Steel?s range to
around 35 miles.
The missile could also be delivered by
an ?unpowered toss? towards the target at
about 12,000ft. As part of Operation Fresno,
a series of tests for Blue Steel capabilities,
a 617 Vulcan launched an inert warhead
missile at the Aberporth range in Wales on
July 7, 1967. It achieved an error of 515 yards
from 35 miles.
Flt Lt Graham Gaston was a ?first tourist?
when he joined 617 in October 1969 as a
radar navigator; he explained his role setting
up and monitoring the missile. ?The mission
?Afterwards,
whenever asked
what I wanted to
fly next, I just kept
saying, Vulcan,
Vulcan, Vulcan.?
profile required us to fly at high level then
gradually drop down. As we approached the
release point we launched the missile while
flying straight and level. The Blue Steel flew
much like a conventional cruise missile we
see today?
It proved a temperamental weapon
and involved complex ground handling.
Powered by an Armstrong Siddeley Stentor
Mk.101 rocket motor, it burned an extremely
volatile combination of hydrogen peroxide
and kerosene. Blue Steel was retired on
December 31, 1970, when the UK national
deterrent role officially passed to the Polaris
submarine fleet. No.617 flew its last mission
with the weapon on December 21, 1970.
In preparation for the eventually abortive
employment of the US GAM-87 Skybolt
nuclear missile to replace Blue Steel,
approximately 43 Vulcan B.2s were fitted with
more powerful Olympus 301 engines that
developed up to 20,000lb (88.9kN) of thrust
and gave the aircraft huge power.
NAVIGATING THE VULCAN
Graham Gaston recalled the H2S Mk.9/9A
radar, the heart of the Vulcan?s navigation
and bombing system (NBS). ?It was basically
an easy system to use, the technology
was already old, dating back to wartime. It
could be temperamental and certainly had
its quirks. The radar display required good
interpretation skills to use it effectively.?
Flt Lt Adrian Reynolds joined 617 Sqn in
October 1971 as a radar navigator, a little
after the withdrawal of Blue Steel. His job
was to operate the Vulcan?s NBS too. Adrian
described how: ??we operated in both high
and low-level roles, normally down to 500ft,
but sometimes as low as 250ft, although
the higher we flew the more the H2S radar
would see. It was a very good system.?
Precise position fixes were obtained using
the H2S radar and these were fed directly
to the nav plotter?s ground position indicator
(GPI) system. Bombing was carried out
using the H2S, either aiming directly at the
target or clearly defined offset aiming points.
Operators worked from a 12in screen and,
once experienced, could see coastal outlines,
inlets, rivers, railway lines and other major
features that provided a good radar return.
Adrian: ?When operated at its most sensitive
settings, you could pick out features like the
stanchions on bridges. We went to Goose
Bay in Canada regularly, probably for 10
B.2 XL317 again, this time after receiving its dark
green/light grey camouflage which was more
suitable for its later low-level strike role.
The Aviation Photo Company
www.aviation-news.co.uk
45
No.617 Sqn started receiving the Vulcan B.2 in
September 1961. AirTeamImages.com/Caz Caswell
days every three months or so. It was good
practice, because it was supposed to be
like the Russian Steppe. Different seasons
made a big impact. The presence of ice and
snow during the autumn, winter and spring
continually changed the H2S radar picture
and presented a challenge for navigation.?
From 1965 a General Dynamics AN/
APN-171 terrain-following radar (TFR) was
introduced in the Vulcan B.2. Adrian said: ?It
was useful because when flying low-level it
warned you of rising ground ahead but was
prone to ?drop out? unexpectedly.? The Vulcans
generally flew high-low-high profiles, the crew
ride at low level could be very rough. He
continued: ?The rear compartment was dark
and hot, especially when wearing immersion
suits. It was like sitting inside a dustbin, with
the lid on and having someone keep hitting it
with a sledgehammer. It wasn?t enjoyable just
something you got used to.?
The switch to low level brought application
of the distinctive grey-green upper-surface
camouflage and a new nuclear weapon after
the withdrawal of Blue Steel. Vulcans carried
the retarded version of the WE177 bomb but
alternatively loaded with up to 20 conventional
1,000lb (453kg) high explosive, or cluster
munitions. Adrian: ?We had two nuclear roles.
The Vulcans were declared to NATO and
we were part of SACEUR?s [Supreme Allied
Commander Europe] nuclear capability. In
that role, we were more a tactical force, mainly
to hit secondary targets ? troop concentrations
and so on. As part of the independent UK
nuclear deterrent our crew was tasked against
Moscow itself. If we survived the attack we
were to recover to Tehran.?
Overseas training deployments continued
as a regular feature for 617 personnel. In July
1972 Adrian Reynolds? crew completed their
?round the world? tour, flying from Scampton
to Cyprus, to Dubai onto Gan, Singapore and
Australia for live bombing exercises. The
return to Scampton was by way of Wake
Island, Hawaii, Sacramento in California and
then Goose Bay. Operations closer to home
saw visits to Malta where Vulcans would
fly standard NATO low-level routes around
Greece and over central Italy.
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
Sqn Ldr Julian Grenfell was an air electronics
officer (AEO), with 617 Sqn from November
1966 to March 1969. The AEO?s three main
tasks on the Vulcan were: managing the
aircraft?s powerful electrical system, its UHF,
VHF and HF communications and ? most
importantly in wartime ? operating the ECM
equipment.
The AEO sat in the rear crew
compartment, just behind and slightly below
the flight deck. Julian recalls his ?office?: ?In
many ways you didn?t notice the noise from
the engines, you were used to them. It was
dark, but it was your office and you did your
job, you didn?t notice the forward movement.
The Vulcan had a three-phase electrical
system and its three-phase DC converter
produced a continuous tone over the
intercom. If the tone changed, or [anything]
interrupted it, it indicated that something
might be wrong.?
The AEO?s key role was operation of the
Vulcan?s defensive electronics. The systems
were manual and AEO?s had to determine
the types of radar threats detected ?
surveillance, tracking or acquisition ? and
then use an appropriate electronic jamming
system, or drop chaff, to degrade enemy
radar. ?You had a whole range of passive
and active systems available, including the
rearward-looking radar, Red Steer, to detect
fighters approaching from behind.
?The AEO would listen to the ARI
18105 Blue Saga, later the Marconi ARI
18228, to determine which Soviet radars
were looking at the Vulcan. This had
a small screen that gave us a direction
from where the signal was originating.
Additionally, it indicated the signal?s band
type, accompanied by an audio sound
which enabled you to identify the type of
No.617?s Vulcan B.2
XL384 over Niagara
Falls in 1965. MoD
46
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
This well-travelled B.2, XL444, served with 9, 27, 35, 44, 50 and 101 squadrons,
in addition to spending time with 617. The Aviation Photo Company
threat you were facing and determined the
countermeasures used.?
Julian participated in several Red Flag
deployments to the US: ?It was a great
improvement over training at home. Fighters
were up looking for you; our job was just
to get to the target at low level to deliver
our weapon. It was an extremely realistic
environment, even over the desert. The
Americans had all the equipment that the
Soviet air defences were using at the time.
Equally important, it was all operated using
Soviet procedures. The whole idea of Red
Flag for us was not just to get through to
the target, but to do so using our standard
operating procedures. If something was
wanting in our procedures, we had to change
them.?
Graham Gaston remembered clashing
with fighters closer to home: ?On occasions
we would practise fighter interceptions out
over the East Anglian coast. On rare good
visibility days, flying at around 44,000ft we
would even see the Lightnings take off from
Binbrook and then climb steeply. If we were
lucky they started contrailing which made
them very visible. One great thing about
the Vulcan was its manoeuvrability, even
at low speed. The captain turned into the
Lightning to do a head-on pass, which meant
it could not get a firm missile lock. He then
deliberately dropped our speed and lowered
the undercarriage. As the Lightning shot
past, the captain reversed our course, turned
back into the Lightning and kept doing this
until the fighter got short of fuel a few minutes
later and had to break off the engagement.?
GIANT VOICE COMPETITION
RAF Vulcans regularly visited the US to
participate in Red Flag exercises and
Giant Voice bombing competitions against
US Strategic Air Command aircraft. The
RAF made special preparations for the
November 1974 competition at Barksdale
AFB, Louisiana, in which Adrian Reynolds?
crew participated. It involved SAC Boeing
B-52s and two General Dynamics FB-111
squadrons, 27 SAC tanker units, plus the
four RAF Vulcans and their crews. Adrian
explained: ?We had not done too well in a few
earlier events. It had clearly been decided
at a high level that we should prepare much
more thoroughly for this competition.?
The crews began a two-month work-up
period in the UK, with the equipment on their
Vulcans being progressively fine-tuned. As
well as the usual two radar offset points
that could be programmed into the existing
navigation sets, another ?box? was installed
giving four more offsets. This enabled very
precise position fixes to be obtained. ?We
went out to the US a few weeks before the
competition, roughly knowing some of the
routes, we practised flying them.?
At the time, navigating precisely over
water was difficult. ?Our preparation even
involved using tide table and ocean current
data to enable us to more accurately calculate
our position over the Gulf of Mexico.? The
competition involved high level, low level,
plus a six-and-a-half hour astronavigation
sortie. Virtually every part of each mission
performance was scored, including the
important ?time over target?. ?Our three
crews were all in the top five, with the OCU
[operational conversion unit] crew winning
the competition?s top bombing and navigation
prize. It was a great three months?.
Graham Gaston detailed what it meant
to be assigned to the famous Dambusters
unit: ?Life on the squadron was good. It was
quite big with 11 five-man crews, plus all the
crew chiefs and groundcrew. Vulcan crew
chiefs were always a particularly key part of
the squadron. Each was assigned a specific
aircraft and they regularly travelled overseas
with the crew to oversee ground ops and
aircraft maintenance. We had a very distinctive
squadron identity. We were fortunate enough
to be on a unit that virtually everyone knew
about because of the Dambusters. If you
were part of it, you certainly made something
of it. Going into a squadron dinner to the
Dambusters March was very special.?
After nearly 23 years in the strategic
bomber role, 617 Sqn was the first Vulcan
unit to disband. On December 11, 1981,
Vulcan B.2 XL318, captained by the OC
Wg Cdr John Herbertson, overflew the
Ladybower Reservoir and Derwent Dam
which were famously used to rehearse for
the unit?s famous World War Two raid. The
squadron disbanded on the Vulcan on
December 31, 1981.
A most unusual scene ? a 617 Sqn Vulcan is followed down a Toronto International Airport taxiway by Air Canada Boeing 727, C-GAAC, on August
26, 1980. AirTeamImages.com/Caz Caswell
www.aviation-news.co.uk
47
DAMBUSTERS SPECIAL
NEW ERA
FOR THE
DAMBUSTERS
The Dams raid and the innovative bouncing bomb used in the attack
may forever define 617 Sqn, but its latest incarnation into a supersonic
stealth F-35B unit ensures its reputation for being at the cutting edge
applies equally today, as Officer Commanding, Wg Cdr John Butcher,
proudly tells editor Dino Carrara.
48
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
under the F-35B training unit VMFAT-501. A
T
Above: No.617 Sqn is due to re-form on
April 17 to operate the F-35B. MoD/Crown
Copyright 2016
Top right: Wg Cdr John Butcher, Officer
Commanding 617 Sqn, recreates the pose
from a famous wartime photograph of Wg
Cdr Guy Gibson, who led the Dams raid.
LCpl Jonah Lovy/USMC
Below: An RAF F-35B touching down at
MCAS Beaufort. Personnel assigned to 617
Sqn have been training at the South Carolina
base. DVIDS/Cpl Benjamin McDonald
www.aviation-news.co.uk
his is a special year for the RAF?s
617 Sqn ? not only does it mark the
75th anniversary since the famous
attack on the M鰄ne, Eder and
Sorpe dams, but it also opens an exciting
new chapter when the unit re-forms on the
F-35B.
The RAF?s first frontline Lightning (the
UK doesn?t follow Lockheed Martin in having
II after the name) squadron is currently
working up at MCAS Beaufort, South
Carolina in preparation for moving to its
permanent home at RAF Marham in Norfolk
later this year. Overseeing this process is
Wg Cdr John Butcher, Officer Commanding
(OC) 617 Sqn who told Aviation News: ?The
reason for being out in the States is to train
on the F-35 and to gain suitable experience
and qualifications on engineering the jet.
We are in a very good position to form the
squadron at RAF Marham this year.?
Preparing the pilots, engineers and the
large mission support flight to become
operational is progressing well. The
latter includes ground liaison officers and
intelligence officers who assist in a great
deal of pre-mission planning.
MCAS Beaufort was chosen because
US Marine Corps Lightning training takes
place there and 617 Sqn is working up
deal was struck enabling this US air arm,
the RAF and Royal Navy to work together,
sharing each country?s aircraft. The ?pooling
implementation agreement? will continue until
summer 2019 when 207 Sqn (the UK?s F-35
operational conversion unit) will re-form and
move to Marham where it will autonomously
train UK personnel.
The OC has previously been involved in
the Lightning programme. He worked for
two years in the F-35 Joint Program Office in
Washington, on secondment from Defence
Equipment and Support, looking at UK
requirements for the aircraft. He was also
Chief of Staff in the Lightning Force HQ,
within 1 Group, and then moved to Beaufort
last August. He also has experience of
another short take-off and vertical landing
(STOVL) aircraft, having been a qualified
flying instructor on the Harrier. During his
time with the Harrier he flew off the aircraft
carrier HMS Illustrious, and later operated
from the US Navy?s USS Ronald Reagan,
and John C Stennis while on an exchange
tour flying the Hornet with the US Marine
Corps. This carrier experience will prove
useful because the UK?s F-35s will form the
core element of the Britain?s carrier strike
capability from HMS Queen Elizabeth and
Prince of Wales.
49
HMS Queen Elizabeth
is the first of the UK?s
two new aircraft carriers.
No.617 Sqn is due to
achieve IOC Maritime
in 2020. MoD/Crown
Copyright 2017
Wg Cdr Butcher relished his maiden flight
on the F-35 on December 1 at Beaufort and
exclaimed afterwards: ?This was a memorable
day and climbing into the cockpit for the first
time felt really familiar as the simulator I have
been training in is so realistic. It was a real
thrill to finally fly this aircraft and it certainly
exceeded my expectations. The capabilities
and potential of this aircraft are immense,
and this is a very exciting time to be a fast
jet pilot.? By the end of the year the OC
will be one of 13 pilots in the squadron, but
he declined to disclose how many will be
assigned when the unit is fully operational.
Four of the 13 are ab initio pilots ? fresh from
flying the Hawk T2 with IV(R) Sqn at RAF
Valley on Anglesey ? also flew the F-35 for
the first time in December.
Composition of the squadron will mirror
the rest of the Lightning Force with a 60%
RAF and 40% Royal Navy division of
personnel. Wg Cdr Butcher will command
617 Sqn initially with Lt Cdr Adam Hogg as
his executive officer from the Royal Navy.
Those two roles will alternate between the
services.
MOVING TO MARHAM
An RAF Atlas C1 loaded with equipment left
Beaufort on January 25 to begin the move
to the Norfolk air base. The unit is due to
re-form on April 17 and will fly into Marham
with nine aircraft this summer. Project Anvil,
a �0m revamp of the base, will prepare it
for the arrival of the F-35s. Two of the four
hangars are being demolished to make way
for maintenance and logistics infrastructure,
and a Lightning Force headquarters. More
than 90% of both runways at the base are
to be resurfaced or replaced. The 6,000ft
(1,829m) cross runway is scheduled to
reopen towards the end of April and then
attention will switch to the main runway
which will be shut during the work. Three
concrete landing pads will be ready by
The UK has bought the
F-35B short take-off
and vertical landing
variant of the Lightning
II. Michael D Jackson/�
Lockheed Martin, 2016
50
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
No.617 Sqn is scheduled to achieve F-35B initial operational capability from land in December this year. MoD/Crown Copyright 2016
the end of the year. Among other new
facilities will be areas from which 617 and
207 Squadrons will operate. The second
frontline F-35 unit announced, 809 Naval Air
Squadron, will also be housed at the base.
It will work up under 617 Sqn and then split
away and form in mid-2023.
No.617 Sqn will declare Initial Operational
Capability from Land (IOC Land) this
December when aircraft will be cleared
to deploy on operations for a finite period
using the MBDA AMRAAM (Advanced
Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile), ASRAAM
(Advanced Short-Range Air-to-Air Missile)
and the Raytheon 500lb (227kg) Paveway IV
precision-guided bomb.
The next significant milestone will be IOC
Maritime. UK test pilots will start First of
Class Flight Trials aboard the HMS Queen
Elizabeth in the autumn, off the northeast
coast of the US.
Commenting on his squadron?s transition
to flying from the carrier, Wg Cdr Butcher
said: ?One of the great things about this
aircraft is the simulators are absolutely
fantastic and a leap ahead in technology.
For the pilots a lot of the workup will be
undertaken in the simulator where we can
fly to the ?carrier? and get a lot of our practice
approaches in that synthetic environment.
When we first go to the deck we will need to
start flying in calm and good weather as we
build up our experience on board. There?s
an added element, from my perspective, that
the 617 Sqn engineers need to experience
working on the flight deck. There?s a lot
of integration, which will need to happen
beforehand, to ensure they are safe to
operate in that environment and for them
to understand where the hazards exist as
they?ll be working right next to where the
aircraft are taking off and landing.?
Elements of 617 Sqn will join 17 Sqn
Black Knights for operational F-35B testing
on HMS Queen Elizabeth in autumn 2019,
and Wg Cdr Butcher said IOC Maritime
will be achieved in 2020. This will enable
617 Sqn to deploy to the carrier for the first
operational cruise in 2021.
He added that ?a development programme
all the way from IOC to FOC [full operational
capability] will see an increase in capability in
all domains.? The aircraft will be continually
improved in the years ahead under what
is termed C2D2 (Continuous Capability
Development and Delivery). For example, the
MBDA Meteor air-to-air missile and SPEAR
One of the four ab initio pilots assigned to 617 Sqn taxies out at MCAS Beaufort in December last year for their first flight in an F-35B. Lance Cpl
Erin R Ramsay/US Marine Corps 2017
www.aviation-news.co.uk
51
The squadron is to take up residence at RAF Marham and is due to arrive in the UK this summer. Extensive work is under way at the Norfolk
base in preparation for F-35B operations. MoD/Crown Copyright 2016
Cap 3 air-to-ground weapon are to be added
to the arsenal of the UK?s F-35s, the latter
likely to be in the mid-2020s.
FLYING THE F-35B
The OC was glowing in his praise of the
Lightning: ?It?s an absolute wonder. If you
have a look at the F-35 cockpit there are
very few switches and you have two rather
large panoramic displays, which you can
manipulate to create whatever information
displays you want. Also, with the helmet if
you add those two together and couple it
with the sensors that the Lightning has it
provides you with absolutely phenomenal
situational awareness. It allows you
to absorb all of the information in the
battlespace and process it and be able to
understand what is going on out there and
that informs your decision-making.
?In particular, the F-35B has the ability
for us to operate in all sorts of different
environments akin to how we used to
employ the Harrier, operating from not just
main operating bases but smaller strips
and carriers as well. And then you have the
stealth capability on top of that, the ability
to go supersonic and then come back and
land vertically. You really have this absolutely
amazing weapons system with huge flexibility
that provides you the cutting edge on the
battlefield and so, from my perspective, is an
absolute wonder and a pleasure to operate.?
While the future incarnation of the
Dambusters with its F-35Bs may seem far
removed from the Lancasters of the Dams
raid, Wg Cdr Butcher sees comparisons
between then and now. ?This is 617 Sqn?s
75th year, and the RAF?s 100th anniversary,
and when we look back at the squadron?s
history it was formed for a very special
mission. It brought together the very best of
defence and industry to create this squadron
to go and do what it did, and I think there are
many parallels to what UK defence is doing
this year. No.617 Sqn is once again being reformed for a very special purpose ? to bring
into service a supersonic stealth aircraft with
a short take-off and vertical landing capability
using the very best of UK defence from the
Royal Air Force and Royal Navy. I think you
can really see the similarities with what our
forefathers did 75 years ago and what we are
trying to achieve now.?
Initially RAF F-35Bs will have the AMRAAM and ASRAAM air-to-air missiles and Paveway IV precision-guided bomb in their arsenal.
The aircraft will receive numerous upgrades and capability improvements, including the addition of more weapons, in the years ahead.
MoD/Crown Copyright 2016
52
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
KEY DAMBUST & LANC 185X130.qxp_. 22/03/2018 16:15 Page 1
TO
The 75th Anniversary of
the Dambusters Raid
URS
The Story of the
Lancaster
3 days departing 28 Sep from �9
4 days departing 27 Jun & 18 Sep from �5
The breaching of the Mohne and Eder Dams in May 1943 has gone down
in history as one of the greatest feats of arms ever undertaken by the
RAF, achieved through the ingenuity and persistence of Barnes Wallis
and the skill and courage of the 617 Squadron. The 617 Squadron went
on to famously sink the German battleship Tirpitz, using Barnes Wallis?s
?earthquake? bombs. Discover more about this legendary operation with
aviation historians Prof. Richard Morris and Dr Robert Owen.
Enjoy a unique opportunity to see a Lancaster Bomber on an original
wartime airfield, and ride in it! First active in 1942, the Lancaster was
one of the main heavy bombers of the RAF, becoming the most famous
and successful night bomber of World War II, and world renowned as
the ?dam buster?. This once in a lifetime opportunity allows you to sit in
each position throughout the aircraft including the pilot?s seat before a
tail down taxy ride along the runway.
Full details of all our tours are available in our selection of brochures - please call for a selection or visit our website.
Please quote ref AVAP18 for any enquires
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Travel Editions Group Limited, 3 Young?s Buildings, London EC1V 9DB
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Flight Bag
? XXXXXXXXX
CARRIER
AVIATION
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CARRIERS AND THEIR UNITS
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Book
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Written
Book by: Gordon Thorburn
Price:
Edited�.00
by: Thomas Newdick
Price: �.99
Book
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Price: �
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Published by Harpia Publishing:
package
from Osprey. available
ISBN 9780997309225;
Published by Osprey Publishing:
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Spitfires in Castle
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more.
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while ?Movie Stars? provides
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engaging,
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O?Mara Books Limited: ISBN
Published
by Haynes
Published ISBN
by Robert
Davies; ISBN9781291969085,
9781782438168;available
availablefrom
Publishing:
9781785211416;
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from www.mombooks.com
available from www.haynes.com
its own chapter, followed by
?Stuka at
War?, beginning
with
FROM
SPITFIRE
TO METEOR
Aviation News incorporating Classic Aircraft November 2014
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
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234/18
DC-9 FAMILY
SHORT-HAUL
SUCCESS STORY
Charles Woodley outlines the history of the Douglas DC-9/MD-80 jet family.
B
y the end of the 1950s jet travel
had become the fashion on longhaul routes, with the Boeing 707,
Douglas DC-8 and de Havilland
Comet 4 well established in service. The
airlines wished to offer the attractions of jet
service on short-haul routes as well, and
US manufacturer Douglas responded with
its DC-9 twin-engined jetliner. The type, in
all of its many variants, went on to become
the biggest selling commercial aircraft in
the history of the Douglas company, with
close to 1,000 examples serving with airlines
throughout the world. In pretty much every
Air Canada operated a large fleet of DC-932s, as well as a small number of shorterfuselage DC-9-14s. Air Canada?s DC-9-32
CF-TLZ landing at Toronto on July 29, 1979.
AirTeamImages.com/Caz Caswell
respect, the DC-9 family of jetliners were true
trailblazers.
The origins of the DC-9 can be traced
back to the late 1950s, when the Douglas
Aircraft Company applied the designation
to a projected scaled-down, short-haul,
version of its successful DC-8. By 1959
the company was looking at options that
would have been powered by a pair of wing-
mounted Pratt & Whitney JT3D turbofans
? rear-slung engine layouts were not being
considered at this stage.
Also known at one time as the Model
2067, this project was rejected by the
airlines, and in 1960 Douglas signed a
two-year contract with France?s Sud Aviation
for licence production and marketing in
North America of the Caravelle jetliner.
The company?s sales efforts didn?t attract
sufficient orders, and so Douglas went ?back
to the drawing board?.
In 1962 the manufacturer announced
details of its Model 2086, a low-wing design,
British Midland Airways? DC-9-15 G-BMAA. The airline went on to build up a mixed fleet of pre-owned -10s and -30s. AirTeamImages.com/Carl Ford
56
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
this time with two
rear-mounted Pratt
& Whitney JT8D
powerplants. The
wing had a moderate
24% of sweepback,
wide-span doubleslotted trailing edge
flaps, airbrakes on
the upper surfaces,
and boundarylayer fences on the
undersides. There
was a tricycle undercarriage layout and a
?T-tail? configuration raised the tailplane and
elevators well clear of the jet efflux.
From the start, the aircraft was laid out
for two-pilot operation. It was intended as a
competitor for the Caravelle, which was by
then in service and for the BAC One-Eleven,
which was under development. It was also to
have a full two-year lead over Boeing?s 737
design.
Construction of what had now become
the DC-9 was initiated on July 26,1963,
at which date no firm commitments had
been received. However, by the time of the
prototype?s maiden flight on February 25,
1965, a total of 58 had been ordered. The
first flight, of 2hrs 13min duration by N9DC,
took the aircraft from the Long Beach plant in
California to the nearby Edwards AFB, where
the test programme, involving a further four
examples in due course, was carried out.
INTO SERVICE
Certification of the DC-9 was granted on
November 23, 1965. The first operator
was Delta Air Lines, whose initial example,
N3304L, was handed over at the Douglas
plant on October 7, 1966 and christened Delta
Prince by stewardess Carol Marie Koberlein,
foregoing the usual bottle of Champagne, for
one that contained water from 20 rivers on
the Delta route network. Later that day it was
flown to the airline?s Atlanta base, from where
sister ship N3305L operated the world?s
first DC-9 airline service on December 8, to
Memphis and Kansas City.
The opening production version of the
DC-9 was the series 10 (also called the
DC-9-10), with sub-designations being
allocated to individual airline customers. It
had been designed to suit the needs of the
The USAF?s 68-8934 was one of 21 C-9A
Nightingale aeromedical transport versions
of the DC-9-30 delivered to the air force
during 1968 and 1969. Key Collection
US domestic carriers, and the standard allpassenger version could hold up to 90 seats.
Convertible cargo/passenger versions
were built for Trans-Texas Airways as
the series 15MC (Multiple Change) with
reinforced flooring and a cargo door, and
for Continental Airlines as the series 15RC
(Rapid Change) with its passenger seats
mounted on pallets for speedy fitting and
removal. Production of the series 10 totalled
?Construction of
what had now
become the DC-9
was initiated on
July 26, 1963, at
which date no firm
commitments had
been received??
137 airframes, with the biggest customer
being Trans World Airlines (TWA), which
ordered 20.
The series 10 proved reliable in service,
but its seat/mile costs were higher than
those of the BAC One-Eleven. From the
DC-9?s inception, Douglas planned to
develop a range of variants with differing
seating capacity and range options, and
so the series 30
was produced as
a higher-capacity
DC-9, offering
improved operating
economics to
compete more
effectively with
the sales threat
from Boeing?s
upcoming 737, and
others. The series
30 incorporated a
14ft 11in (4.5m) fuselage ?plug?, to provide
accommodation for 105 passengers in
standard layout or 115 in high-density
configuration. Other changes included
wingtips extended by 4ft, the inclusion of fullspan leading-edge wing slats, and the fitting
of 14,000lb (62kN) thrust JT8D-7 engines
as standard. As with all DC-9 models, the
series 30 was also offered in all-cargo or
passenger/cargo versions.
The first example flew on August 1,
1966, and the series 30 entered service
with launch customer and the most prolific
operator of the variant, Eastern Air Lines,
on February 1, 1967. On April 28 that year
Douglas merged with the McDonnell Aircraft
Corporation to form McDonnell Douglas. The
interests of the two constituent companies
did not clash, as McDonnell was primarily
a manufacturer of combat aircraft, and
production of the DC-9 continued under the
Douglas name.
UNUSUAL VERSIONS
Specialised adaptations of the series 30
were also built for the US military. A total
of 21 served with the USAF as the C-9A
Nightingale aeromedical transport, and a
further three on VIP duties with the Special
Air Missions Wing as the VC-9C. The variant
was also used by the US Navy and US
Marine Corps as the C-9B Skytrain II logistics
support aircraft ? 24 new series 30s were
purchased, and a further five examples were
later acquired from airlines and converted for
military service. The Kuwait Air Force also
operated two series 30s as C-9Ks.
In all, a total of 662 series 30 airframes
were constructed ? the best-selling DC-9
variant ? and the -30 went on to have a
long service life, with KLM, Scandinavian
A Northwest Airlines DC-9-32 in the final version of the airline?s livery. A number of DC-9s passed to Delta Air Lines with that carrier?s take-over
of Northwest in 2008. Key Collection
www.aviation-news.co.uk
57
Seen in a typical pose for its work as a zero-gravity trainer is DC-9-32 N932NA, which was operated by NASA from 2004 until this year. NASA
A collection of SAS DC-9s, including a DC-9-41 which was one of two models produced specifically for the airline. Key Collection
The flight deck of a DC-9-51, illustrating the instrument panel which was superseded by the ?glass cockpit? of the Super 80 series and subsequent
models. Illustrated is Hewa Bora Airways? DC-9-51 S9-DBH during an internal flight across the Democratic Republic of Congo from Bangoka
International Airport to N?djili Airport. AirTeamImages.com/Serge Bailleul
58
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
A DC-9 Super 80 in the manufacturer?s livery. This variant
made its first flight in October 1979. Key Collection
Airlines System (SAS) and Swissair being
just three of the many European customers.
In March 1966 it had been reported in the
aviation press that Douglas was looking into
the production of high-density variants of
both the series 10 and the 30. These would
be based around the normal airframes but
would be able to seat up to 102 passengers
(on the -10), or 132 passengers (on the -30)
by incorporating new vinyl-covered sofatype seating with a 32in seat pitch. Aircraft
configured in this way would carry the
marketing suffix ?Diplomat? after their model
number. In the event, little interest was
shown by the airlines and the project was
dropped.
But Douglas did produce two specialised
versions to meet the demanding airfield
requirements of the SAS internal network.
The series 20 combined the fuselage of the
-10 with the increased wingspan of the -30
and was powered by 14,500lb thrust JT8D-9
turbofans. It could accommodate up to 90
passengers and entered SAS service in
January 1969. Also developed for the airline
was the series 40, which was like the -30
but had a fuselage lengthened by 6ft 4in to
provide seating for up to 125 passengers.
SAS continued to operate various versions of
the DC-9 until January 27, 2002.
On May 2, 1970 the crew of an Overseas
National Airways? DC-9-30, on lease to ALM
Dutch Antillean Airlines, carried out what
was later described as the first ditching of a
commercial jet airliner when they set it down
on the sea some 33 miles (53km) from St
Croix in the US Virgin Islands. N935F had
taken off from New York?s JFK airport with 63
people on aboard ? 40 survived, including
the flight crew.
In July 1973 Douglas announced the
DC-9-50, and from 1976 this became a
major production model. The -50 retained
the wingspan of the -30 but had a fuselage
lengthened by another 14ft 3in, representing
a total increase of almost 28% over the
original series 10. Other improvements
included more powerful JT8D-15 or -17
engines and new thrust reversers. The
cabin featured a fresh layout and d閏or,
designed to give a more spacious feel to
travellers accustomed to widebodied aircraft
including the Douglas DC-10. Up to 122
passengers could be accommodated in
standard layout, increasing to 139 in highdensity configuration. The first customer
was Swissair, which ordered ten and took the
model into service in August 1975. By mid1979 the DC-9 was in operation with around
50 airlines throughout the world.
In total, 976 examples of the DC-9 series
10 to series 50 models had been constructed
when production ended in 1982. Used
aircraft found a ready market, and in the UK
British Midland Airways utilised the DC-9
to inaugurate jet services on a network of
routes from Heathrow. The airline?s first
series 15 entered service in August 1976,
and by 1986 British Midland was operating
six -15s and two -32s.
Former airline DC-9s also found a new
role as luxurious corporate transports, as
well as for other, more unusual, duties. From
March 1970 until 1976, Purdue Airlines and
then Ozark Air Lines operated DC-9-32
N950PB on behalf of Playboy magazine
founder, Hugh Hefner. This aircraft was
painted black overall with the ?bunny? logo
on its tailfin and carried the name The Big
Bunny.
From 2004 until 2018 NASA used former
airline series 30, N932NA, as part of its
reduced gravity aircraft programme, replacing
a Boeing KC-135 on astronaut training
duties.
Probably the most unlikely operator of an
ex-airline DC-9 was Skyline Perris, based at
Perris Valley Airport in California. Its onetime
SAS DC-9-21 N217K was modified to carry
80 skydivers and their equipment in airline
comfort up to 13,500ft. From this altitude
they exited the aircraft via the ventral airstair,
from which the steps had been removed. As
of January 2018, this aircraft was grounded
for refitting, but is expected to resume its
duties in due course.
By the beginning of 2018 only a few
examples of the series 10 to series 50
variants continued to fly. Their operators
included Kalitta Air Charters II of Willow Run
Airport, Michigan, which had a -15F and
a -32F on cargo duties. The Mexican
American Airlines operated a large fleet of MD-82s and
MD-83s, in addition to earlier DC-9s. Key Collection
www.aviation-news.co.uk
59
An MD-83 used by the Spanish charter airline Spanair for inclusive-tour flights. Key Collection
The MD-87 had the shortest fuselage of the MD-80
family, and among the operatoprs which flew it was
German carrier Aero Lloyd. Key Collection
carrier Aeronaves TSM had -10 XA-UVR,
and in Africa, two -30s were believed to be
operational with African Express Airways,
and a DC-9-14 was still in service with the
Kenyan carrier Fly-SAX. Elsewhere, the
Dominican Republic-based airline PAWA
Dominicana was still offering passenger
charters with a 110-seat series 32.
NEW GENERATION ?
THE MD-80
Back in October 1977 the McDonnell
Douglas board had given the go-ahead to
develop the Super 80 series of ?stretched?
DC-9s, incorporating the latest technology.
It also included the newly-available Pratt
& Whitney JT8D 200 engine, which was
approximately 15% more powerful than the
JT8D-17 and had around 10% lower fuel
consumption. The first model was the Super
81, which could carry 137 passengers in
a two-class layout or 172 in high-density
configuration. The Super 81 made its
maiden flight on October 18, 1979.
FAA certification followed on August 26,
1980, and the first of 15 examples for launch
customer Swissair was delivered the next
month. McDonnell had already announced
its intention to develop a Super 82 variant for
airlines operating from ?hot and high? airfields,
and early orders were placed by Aeromexico
and the South American carrier Austral
L韓eas A閞eas. The Super 82 also had
appeal for airlines in more temperate zones,
where the model?s extra power permitted the
uplift of a greater load of passengers or fuel.
Also produced was the Super 83, which
shared the same 147ft 10in fuselage length
with the Super 81 and Super 82, the only
major differences between the three subvariants being in engine power output, fuel
capacities and weights. From 1983 the DC-9
Super 80 models were marketed as the
McDonnell Douglas MD-80 range.
In March 1984 sales were boosted by a
firm order from American Airlines for 67 MD82s and options on a further 100 (which it
subsequently received as well as some when
it took over TWA). At that time the carrier
was already operating 20 on lease from
McDonnell Douglas. The additional aircraft
were used to expand American?s operations
from its Dallas/Fort Worth and Chicago hubs.
At one point American Airlines had over 300
MD-80s.
In Europe, Finnair was flying three MD82s and placed the first European order for
the MD-83, for use on scheduled services
from Helsinki, and another for inclusive-tour
charters to the Mediterranean and North
Africa. The first company to take the MD-83
into service, however, was Alaska Airlines,
in February 1985. In the UK the MD-83 was
gainfully employed on holiday charters by
Paramount Airways and Airtours International
in the late 1980s and 1990s.
Two more variants of the MD-80 series
were produced. The MD-87 was a shortfuselage 114-130 seat version, 17ft 4in
shorter than the other models, and powered
by new Pratt & Whitney JT8D-200 engines. It
was officially launched in January 1985 after
orders were placed by Finnair and Austrian
Airlines. Production of the MD-87 ended in
1992 after 75 had been built.
The MD-88 reverted to the longer
fuselage of the earlier versions but
introduced a redesigned passenger cabin,
Delta Shuttle flew high-frequency services from La Guardia to Boston, Chicago and Washington from 2005 to 2008. Its aircraft were then absorbed back
into the mainline fleet. This is an MD-88 of which in early 2018 the carrier still had 113 examples, as well as MD-90s and Boeing 717s. Key Collection
60
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
an electronic flight
instrument system
(EFIS) ?glass?
cockpit, and greater
use of composite
materials. It
entered service
with Delta in
January 1988. A
150 of this variant
were built.
FUEL COSTS
The Arab-Israeli
conflict of the
1970s resulted an
Arab oil embargo on supplies to countries
supporting Israel in 1973. There was another
oli crisis in 1979 due to the Iranian Revolution
though by the 1980s the price had fallen to
1973 levels.
However, the initial increase in the price
of fuel had seen a three-fold increase. As
part of NASA?s Advanced Turboprop Project,
which started in the mid-1970s in response
to the increasing fuel costs, General Electric
developed its GE 36 Unducted Fan (UDF)
engine. This was a standard F404 unit
coupled with advanced ?propfan? propeller
blades in a unique gearless contra-rotating
configuration that was claimed to reduce fuel
consumption by 32%. Flight testing with the
powerplant fitted in place of the port JT8D on
an MD-80 was successfully carried out during
1987, with the eventual aim of introducing
UDF-powered aircraft into airline service in
late 1991. Two variants would have been
produced: the MD-91 (with 115 seats) and
the MD-92 (with 155 seats). These would
have been the world?s first propfan-powered
transports in service, but the ending of the oil
embargo brought about a drop in fuel prices,
and a lack of airline interest in a ?propeller?
airliner meant that the high development
costs could no longer be justified.
In August 1993 the MD-90 made its first
flight. This was a slightly stretched version
of the MD-80, re-engined with IAE V2500D5s and introducing an advanced flight deck
with an EFIS fit, a full flight management
suite, a state-of-the-art inertial reference
system, and LED dot-matrix displays for
engine and systems monitoring. The aircraft
also featured a redesigned passenger
cabin and carbon brakes. Delta was the
launch customer for the MD-90, with a firm
www.aviation-news.co.uk
Saudi Arabian Airlines acquired 29 MD-90s,
including the last one built. Key Collection
commitment for 50 and options on a further
110. It eventually operated 63 MD-90s and
two MD-90ERs (the latter version had a
higher gross weight and an auxiliary fuel tank
giving extra range). When Boeing merged
with McDonnell Douglas in 1997 the airline
cancelled the orders for the remaining MD90s and bought 737-800s instead.
The MD-90 also found favour with Saudi
Arabian Airlines, which ordered 29. It was
constructed on the same Long Beach
assembly line as the MD-80.
In October 1995 the MD-95 was
launched as an intended 106-seat DC-9-30
replacement, powered by two Rolls-Royce
715 high-bypass-ratio engines. Production
went ahead on the strength of a single order,
from Florida-based ValuJet (later renamed
AirTran Airways). In August 1997 McDonnell
Douglas merged with Boeing, leading to the
re-designation of the MD-95 as the Boeing
717-200. The company believed that the
100-seater market was buoyant enough at
that time to support both the 717-200 and
its own 737-600, with the 717 being more
profitable on shorter, regional services and
the 737 on longer routes. The first flight of
the Boeing 717 took place on September
2, 1998, and the following year the 717-200
became the first commercial aircraft to be
awarded joint certification by the US FAA
and Europe?s Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA).
AirTran Airways took delivery of its initial
A Boeing 717-200 of US carrier AirTran
(originally known as ValuJet). Before the
Boeing merger with McDonnell Douglas in
1997 the aircraft was designated the MD-95.
Key Collection
717 in September
1999.
Before the
merger, McDonnell
Douglas had set
up an additional
plant in Shanghai,
China, for 40
(later reduced to
20) MD-90s to
be assembled
under contract
as the MD-90T
Trunk Liner. By
September
1999, 134 MD90s had been ordered. But the conflict of
interests with Boeing?s own established and
successful 737 family led to a decision to
phase out the MD-90, and only two examples
were built in China. As a result of the merger,
Delta cancelled its order for the remaining
19 MD-90s still to be delivered and opted for
737-800s instead.
No further orders for the MD-90 were
accepted, and production at Long Beach
ended in 2000, after 116 examples had been
delivered, the last one going to Saudi Arabian
Airlines. Production of the 717 continued,
with the type being built on the same moving
assembly line as the 737 from 2001. By then,
the 717 was facing increased competition
from new Bombardier and Embraer products,
and sales slowed. In December 2003
Boeing lost out in the battle for a $2.7bn
order from Air Canada, and in January 2005
the company announced that it planned to
end production of the 717 once outstanding
commitments had been fulfilled.
On May 23, 2006 Boeing handed over
the final two aircraft to Midwest Airlines
and AirTran Airways in a ceremony at Long
Beach. A total of 156 examples of the
717 had been built. The type was the last
commercial aircraft to be made at the former
Douglas plant, which had been producing
aeroplanes since the 1920s.
By February 2018 Delta was still the
largest user of DC-9 derivatives, with a fleet
of 113 MD-88s, 65 MD-90s and 91 Boeing
717s. Other operators of the 717 worldwide
included Qantas Link, Volotea, and Hawaiian
Airlines. Earlier models of the MD-80
series are still active in some numbers, with
operators such as Far Eastern Air Transport
and Las Vegas-based Allegiant Airlines.
61
HARBOUR AIR
NO RUNWAY?
NO PROBLEM!
Tony Dixon examines Canada?s Harbour Air seaplane operations.
T
he 1920s and 1930s were the
heyday of large-scale commercial
seaplane operations, but as
demand for longer flights and
higher capacities grew, the floatplane largely
gave way to conventional airliners. However,
there are certain areas of the world that still,
even today, have the need for water-borne
operations. Harbour Air of British Columbia
in Western Canada can truly call itself an
air/sea operator, with virtually all services
landing on water.
Its primary route links Victoria Harbour
on Vancouver Island with the nearby
Vancouver Harbour Airport on the
mainland ? both being very close to the
respective business districts and centres of
government.
The carrier also has what it calls ?full
service? terminals at Nanaimo and South
Vancouver, plus other smaller buildings at
Whistler and Comox, plus it flies to a number
62
Above: Harbour Air employs the DHC-6 Twin
Otter 100 on its busiest routes. All photos
Tony Dixon unless stated
of other scheduled destinations with even
simpler handling facilities. It advertises that
?a pick-up and drop-off service is available
to and from the Gulf Islands, and other
charter destinations are limited only by the
customers? imagination?. Operations are not
restricted to landing on the sea, as any large
area of water, including lakes and rivers ? of
which there are many in Western Canada ?
can be used.
The South Vancouver hub (co-located
with the ?Flying Beaver Bar and Grill? that
offers excellent views of the arrivals and
departures) is on the bank of the Fraser
River that flows next to the south terminal
of Vancouver International Airport. Here
the aircraft can be towed via a taxiway to a
maintenance hangar for routine servicing.
However, as the fleet comprises seaplanes
that don?t have wheels, an ingeniously
modified pick-up truck is used. The aircraft
simply taxies close to a wood ramp and the
vehicle picks it out of the water in the same
manner as loading a boat onto a trailer.
Passengers on scheduled services here
can use a dedicated bus shuttle to the main
airport or to the south terminal to connect
with regional routes.
AIRCRAFT
Harbour Air primarily uses a fleet of de
Havilland Canada aircraft comprising 14
DHC-2 Beavers, 22 DHC-3T Turbo Otters
and three DHC-6 Twin Otters, a Cessna
Grand Caravan EX and a Cessna 180.
The five- or six-seat Beavers are used
for seaplane tours, on routes to smaller
communities and for charter operations,
while the two 18-seat Twin Otters are utilised
on the peak time services between the main
hubs. The carrier used to have more of
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
HARBOUR AIR HISTORY
The company was formed in 1982 as
Windoak Air Service using two Beaver
seaplanes providing links for the evergrowing forest industry, connecting remote
locations with larger towns. The carrier
also undertook private charters (including
transporting fishermen to isolated locations)
and was so successful that it added
scheduled flights between Vancouver and
Vancouver Island, the Gulf Islands, the
Sunshine Coast and Whistler.
In 1993, it began a series of takeovers by
acquiring Trans Provincial Airlines and has
since added Westcoast Air (2010), Whistler
Air (2012) and Salt Spring Air (2015) ? all
similar operators ? to its portfolio. Curiously,
over the years the types of aircraft operated
have changed little, with Beavers, Otters and
Twin Otters still in operation. The reason is
simple, there are few other types that can
provide the right passenger capacities and
economies of these aircraft.
A small European subsidiary, Harbour
Air Malta, was set up in June 2007 and a
Turbo Otter was based in Valetta harbour for
scheduled flights to the neighbouring island
of Gozo and sightseeing charters, but the
operation only lasted a few months.
Above left: The carrier supported local
sports team the Vancouver Whitecaps FC
and painted this aircraft specially. The
sponsorship deal ended earlier this year.
Left: The carrier?s primary route links the
harbours of Victoria and Vancouver.
Below: The busiest hub is the downtown
harbour airport in Vancouver. Spectators
can see all the movements from an elevated
area next to the cruise terminal, with aircraft
arriving or departing every 15 minutes in the
summer.
www.aviation-news.co.uk
63
Above: Harbour Air painted two of its
aircraft in special colours for the 150th
anniversary of Canada?s Confederation in
2017. Harbour Air
Left: A Westcoast Air DHC-6-100 in Victoria
Harbour in 2010 ? the same year the carrier
was taken over.
the type but has now standardised on the
10-14 seat Turbo Otter, which is the mainstay
of the fleet.
The company?s CEO, Greg McDougall,
founded the airline in 1982. ?As we grew,
market opportunities allowed for us to take
over smaller carriers,? he said. ?Our fleet of
Turbo Otters and Beavers are excellent, wellmade, aircraft and we have a maintenance
and engineering division where we service
them. The Otter and Beaver are iconic
in aviation and Canadian history. We still
fly these aircraft today, a testament to
their reliability and Canada?s excellence
in aviation. We fly by visual flight rules
[VFR], so our winter season is much more
abbreviated than our summer as we are
using daylight hours.?
The company president since last year
is Randy Wright, and he was the executive
vice president prior to that. He started with
the company in 2001 after working with the
Oak Bay Marine Group, which chartered
seaplanes on the British Columbia coast to
fly to its remote recreational fishing lodges.
ROUTES
The link between Vancouver Harbour and
Victoria Harbour ? a distance of 72 miles
(115km) takes around 35 minutes. Even
One of the company?s Otters in a special livery and ?Fly Carbon Neutral? titles.
64
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
TURBO
As the aircraft do not have wheels, a specially modified pick-up truck is used to take the aircraft
for maintenance.
during the winter the route is flown around
every 30 minutes (although this can depend
on demand), as there is a large amount of
business traffic, the regional government
being based in Victoria. First take-offs ?
during January for instance ? are 8am at
each end, with the last flights taking place
at 3.30pm as all must take off and land
in daylight. During the summer months
the services start both earlier (7am) and
end later (7.30pm) with the aircraft being
changed for bigger or smaller types
according to demand.
From downtown Vancouver Harbour,
there are further regular services to Comox
and Nanaimo on Vancouver Island, plus
others to Whistler, Sechelt and Salt Spring
Island. As mentioned earlier there is the
service from Victoria Harbour to South
Vancouver, for links to scheduled services
to and from the international airport, in
addition to Whistler and Pitt Meadows on the
mainland.
In the past, Harbour Air?s ?standard?
colours had been a yellow stripe along the
fuselage over a white base layer and a
?The Otter and
Beaver are iconic
in aviation and
Canadian history.?
stylised HA on the tail. However, this has
now changed to white overall with a blue
rear fuselage and tail. Keen to promote the
country?s 150th Confederation anniversary
in 2017, as well as its environmental efforts
and local sports teams, there are a number
The company?s mascot and brand
ambassador is ?Turbo the Otter?. In the
wild, river otters are renowned for their
sense of play and Turbo is no exception!
Often seen wandering around the Harbour
Air terminals, Turbo is known for helping
out, greeting planes, checking in guests or
?high fiving? everyone as they board their
aircraft. Harbour Air
of variations. A Beaver and a Turbo Otter
were painted red with a large maple leaf
insignia and ?CANADA 150? titles. Another
Otter has a light blue tail with ?FLY CARBON
NEUTRAL? titles. One wears ?Saltspring Air?
titles over the basic ?house colours? and a
further example retains the tail markings
of Whistler Air. The latter two were kept to
maintain links with local communities.
FUTURE OPERATIONS
The CEO said that the carrier is looking at
all options for future aircraft. New routes
are also being investigated and this may
include the expansion into international
services linking Vancouver Harbour with the
floatplane base on Lake Union in downtown
Seattle in the USA ? in co-operation with
US-based Kenmore Air. Negotiations are
still under way, as both sides believe there is
a demand for the route.
There is a landing stage next to the ?Flying Beaver Bar and Grill? at the South
Vancouver facility where aircraft can be moved onto land for overnight servicing.
www.aviation-news.co.uk
65
The latest changes on the UK, Irish, Isle
of Man, Guernsey and Jersey registers.
RESTORATIONS
REG?N
MODE(S) TYPE
G-AXMT
401835
Bucker Bu133 Jungmeister (built 46
by AG fur Dornier-Flugzeuge)
C/N
AJE Smith and RA Fleming,
Breighton, East Riding of Yorkshire
OWNER
G-AYRC
407579
Campbell Cricket
CA-346
BL Johnson, (Stanwick,
Northamptonshire)
G-BUYE
40754D
Aeronca 7AC Champion
7AC-4327
AA Gillon, (Midsomer Norton,
Somerset)
G-BWDO
4005E0
Sikorsky S-76B
760356
Trustair Ltd, (Euxton, Lancashire)
G-BXAG
407580
Eurocopter AS350BB Ecureuil
2951
FB Heliservices Ltd,
Bournemouth, Dorset
G-BXHB
407588
Eurocopter AS350BB Ecureuil
2993
FB Heliservices Ltd,
Bournemouth, Dorset
G-BXJR
407586
Eurocopter AS350BB Ecureuil
3000
G-BXKR
407582
Eurocopter AS350BB Ecureuil
G-BXMB
407584
G-CCHT
Virgin Atlantic Airways Airbus A330-223, G-VMNK, is a new addition
to the airline?s fleet. It was previously D-ALPA with airberlin.
AirTeamImages.com/Rolf Jonsen
G-CKTZ
4074EA
Cameron Z-77
12162
AA Osman, (Wembley, Greater
London)
G-CKUA
4074E3
Cameron Z-77
12159
AA Osman, (Wembley, Greater
London)
G-CKUS
407541
Conway Viper
DBC-01
DB Conway, (Carterton,
Oxfordshire)
G Scillieri, Rome-Ciampino, Italy
G-CKUU
407546
Piper PA-23-250 Aztec E
27-4700
G-CKUX
40754C
Ace Aviation Magic Laser
AL148/AM143
LP Harper, (Yeovil, Somerset)
G-CKVA
40754E
Britten-Norman BN-2T Islander
2315
FB Heliservices Ltd,
Bournemouth, Dorset
Britten-Norman Aircraft Ltd, Leeon-Solent, Hampshire
G-CKVC
4074F7
3008
FB Heliservices Ltd,
Bournemouth, Dorset
AutoGyro Cavalon (assembled
by Rotorsport UK Ltd)
RSUK/
CVLN/025
H2E Energy Ltd, (Christchurch,
Dorset)
G-CKVD
407564
Rolladen-Schneider LS1-F
326
Eurocopter AS350BB Ecureuil
3019
FB Heliservices Ltd,
Bournemouth, Dorset
GM Spreckley, (Pouligny Notre
Dame, France)
404972
Cessna 152
152-85176
AJ Gomes, (Croydon, Greater
London)
G-CIYX
407086
Embraer ERJ 145LR
145601
G-MTJN
407596
Aviasud Sirocco 377GB
(modified) MU-020
G-MVZI
402FAE
Thruster T300
G-MWMY
4032C3
G-THUN
EI-ECD
G-CKVE
407558
Aero 31 AM9
002
A Marshall, (Great Sutton, Cheshire)
G-CKVJ
40757D
Titan T-51 Mustang
Euro Aviation Ltd, Rochester, Kent
Air Kilroe Ltd trading as Eastern
Airways, Humberside, Lincolnshire
LAA 355-14781
(built by C Firth
and DG Smith)
G-CKVP
407509
AutoGyro Calidus (assembled
by Rotorsport UK Ltd)
RSUK/
CALS/035
PM Bidston, (Lymm, Cheshire)
AR Hawes, (Needham Market,
Suffolk)
G-CKVW
407592
Robinson R22 Beta II
2250
089-T300-387
RW Skelton, (Portadown, Co.
Armagh)
Startrade Heli GmbH and Co. KG,
Siegerland, Germany
G-CKVX
407467
809-1090-7W602
GR Walker, (Tywyn, Gwynedd)
Breezer Aircraft Breezer
M400 (assembled by Ascent
Industries Ltd)
UL142
Mainair Gemini Flash IIA
MW Houghton, Bakersfield Far,
Weldon, Northamptonshire
407595
Republic P-47D Thunderbolt
39955731
Fighter Aviation Engineering Ltd,
Duxford, Cambridgeshire
G-CKVZ
407578
Rotorsport UK Cavalon Pro
RSUK/
CAVP/005
AutoGyro GmbH, Hildesheim,
Germany
4CA71D
Boeing 737-8FH
30826
Airspeed Ireland Leasing 16 Ltd,
(for Jeju Air as HL8303)
G-BKWG
407594
SDplanes SD-1 Miniplane
247
RY Kendal, Ewesley Farm, Ewesley,
Northumberland
G-CKWM
407554
Van?s RV-8
LAA 303-14430
CAG Schofield, (Harpsden,
Oxfordshire)
G-CKWW
407555
Cameron Sport-50
12192
Cameron Balloons Ltd, (Bristol,
City of Bristol)
NEW REGISTRATIONS
REG?N
MODE(S) TYPE
C/N
OWNER
G-CKEF
40735B
Embraer Phenom 100
50000386
Affinity Flying Training Services Ltd,
RAF Cranwell, Lincolnshire
G-CLBZ
407549
Reims Cessna FR172J Rocket
0490
E Marinoni, Trustee of Aero Club
Bolzano, Bolzano, Italy
G-CKGP
40737F
Textron Texan II
PM-115
Affinity Flying Training Services Ltd,
RAF Valley, Anglesey
G-COPR
40755D
Robinson R44 Raven II
14172
BML Utility Contractors Ltd,
Denham, Buckinghamshire
G-CKGW
407380
Textron Texan II
PM-116
Affinity Flying Training Services Ltd,
RAF Valley, Anglesey
G-CSPT
407455
Gippsland GA8-TC-320 Airvan
GA8TC-320-11-181
Downlock Ltd, (Shiplake,
Oxfordshire)
G-CKOF
40742E
Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner
38786
Norwegian Air UK Ltd, OsloGardermoen, Norway (NB)
G-CYPC
40747E
Cessna 208B Grand Caravan
208B2355
G-CKOG
40742F
Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner
63314
Norwegian Air UK Ltd, OsloGardermoen, Norway (NB)
PMH Bell, Trustee of The Cyprus
Combined Services Parachute
Club, Dhekelia, Cyprus
G-CKRP
407457
Grob G.120TP-A
11145
Affinity Flying Training Services Ltd,
RAF Barkston Heath, Lincolnshire
G-CKRY
407458
Grob G.120TP-A
11144
Affinity Flying Training Services Ltd,
RAF Barkston Heath, Lincolnshire
G-DHKN
407435
Boeing 757-223
31308
DHL Air Ltd, Leipzig, Germany
G-DONE
407533
Bell 505 JetRanger X
65056
Simpson Heli Charters Ltd,
Norwich, Norfolk
G-DORO
4074C3
Robin DR400/140B Major 80
2708
RDW Evans, (Cookham, Berkshire)
G-ETPH
40740F
Airbus Helicopters AS350B3
Ecureuil
8485
Airbus Helicopters UK Ltd, Oxford
(for QinetiQ, Boscombe Down,
Wiltshire)
G-CKSA
40746C
Airbus Helicopters EC135P3
2045
Airbus Helicopters UK Ltd, Oxford,
Oxfordshire (for RAF, RAF Shawbury)
G-CKSB
40746D
Airbus Helicopters EC135P3
2042
Airbus Helicopters UK Ltd, Oxford,
Oxfordshire (for RAF, RAF Shawbury)
G-EZRS
4074B1
Airbus A320-214
8119
easyJet Airline Company Ltd,
London Luton, Bedfordshire (NB)
G-CKTE
407481
Aeropro EuroFOX 3K (assembled 53317
by Ascent Industries Ltd)
RJ Bird, (Birdham, West Sussex)
G-FXER
407497
Raytheon 400A (Nextant 400XT
conversion)
RK-310
Flexjet Ltd, Birmingham, West
Midlands
www.aviation-news.co.uk
REGISTER REVIEW BY STUART MCDIARMID
REGISTER REVIEW
67
REGISTER REVIEW BY STUART MCDIARMID
G-GBTV
Eurocopter AS355N Ecureuil II
5360
Cheshire Helicopters Ltd,
Blackshaw Heys Farm, Mobberley,
Cheshire
M-ATAK
43E9CD
Gulfstream G650
6047
STC Airliner Ltd, Jersey
M-CDBM
424B12
Textron B200GT King Air 250
BY-305
BAE Systems Marine Ltd, Walney
Island, Cumbria
G-GOFR
4074FB
UltraMagic M-105
105/104
Associazione Vivere Paestum,
(Capaccio, Italy)
M-GFGC
424B0B
Piaggio P.180 Avanti II
1231
Greensill Capital (IoM) Ltd,
Gloucestershire
G-GRLS
407335
Best Off Skyranger Swift
912S(1) (built by pupils of
Benenden School)
BMAA/HB/690
British Microlight Aircraft
Association Ltd, Headcorn, Kent
M-JSWB
424B0C
Gulfstream G650
6292
Treasure Depot Ltd, (Shanghai,
Peoples Republic of China)
G-IZRV
407548
Van?s RV-12
LAA 363-15496
DJ Mountain and HW Hall,
(Chelmsford & Rayleigh, Essex)
M-ODEM
424B1D
Bombardier Challenger 605
5952
Parker Holdings Ltd, Tel Aviv-Ben
Gurion, Israel
G-JRXI
40752E
Bell 505 JetRanger X
65058
Helicompany Ltd, Leeds East, North
Yorkshire
M-WRLD
424B1C
Raytheon 58 Baron
TH-2001
Myworld Aero Ltd, Malta
M-YGLF
424B0E
Gulfstream G650
6291
Quantum Air Ltd, Jersey
G-JSIC
40744E
Jonker JS-MD Single
(powered conversion by M & D
Flugzeugbau GmbH & Co KG)
1C-MD089
AGW Hall and K Barker, (Grayshott
& Stroud, Gloucestershire)
2-AERB
43EBF3
Boeing 777-28EER
28686
Ballymoon Aircraft Solutions Ltd,
(stored Taipei-Songshan, Taiwan)
2-CETH
TBA
Airbus A321-231
968
G-JZBI
407176
Boeing 737-800
63166
Dart Leasing and Finance Ltd,
Leeds Bradford, West Yorkshire
(NB) (operated by Jet2)
International Lease Finance
Corporation (stored Chateauroux,
France)
2-CETJ
TBA
Airbus A321-231
974
G-JZBJ
407177
Boeing 737-800
63165
Dart Leasing and Finance Ltd,
Leeds Bradford, West Yorkshire
(NB) (operated by Jet2)
International Lease Finance
Corporation (stored Chateauroux,
France)
2-FINC
TBA
Embraer 170
17000123
AerFin Ltd, (stored Teruel, Spain)
G-LEXS
4046B4
Agusta A109E Power
11154
Blade 5 Ltd, (South Molton, Devon)
2-FIND
TBA
Embraer 170
17000114
AerFin Ltd, (stored Teruel, Spain)
G-LOGN
407552
Piper PA-28-181 Archer III
2843279
IP Logan, Oxford, Oxfordshire
2-GZEN
TBA
Airbus A319-111
2245
G-LSKS
407544
Robinson R66 Turbine
0657
Heli Air Ltd, Wellesbourne
Mountford, Warwickshire
SAP Meridian 2245 LP, (stored at
London-Stansted)
2-HOVA
TBA
Agusta Bell 206B JetRanger III
8556
Topex Ltd, Pembrey, Carmarthenshire
G-NGCC
40754A
BRM Aero Bristell NG5 Speed
Wing
LAA 385-15516
GC Coull, (Edinburgh)
2-MSCC
TBA
Boeing 737-8H6
40145
Aldebaran Ltd and SL Pacific Ltd,
(stored at Marana)
G-OHUR
407562
Hy-Tek Hurricane 315
250218
M Ingleton, (Eastchurch, Kent)
2-NICE
43EC20
Bombardier Challenger 604
5505
G-PCJS
407524
Diamond DA 42NG Twin Star
42.N027
PJ Cooper and GEJ Sealey,
(Bishop?s Stortford, Hertfordshire &
Waterbeach, Cambridgeshire)
Beem Holdings Ltd, Oxford,
Oxfordshire
2-RLAV
TBA
Airbus A340-541
694
Global Airways Ltd, (stored at
Tarbes-Lourdes, France)
G-PDGV
40752F
Vulcanair P68C-TC
485-52TC
PLM Dollar Group PLC,
Wolverhampton Halfpenny Green,
Staffordshire
2-ZERO
TBA
Cirrus SR22T
0189
D. Lee, Guernsey
G-POTA
406EB0
Extra EA.300/LT
LT030
M Frizza & L Franceschetti, BresciaMontichiari, Italy
G-SMKR
4074A5
Aeropro EuroFOX 912(S)
LAA 376-15504
SM Kenyon-Roberts, (Tarland,
Aberdeenshire)
G-STUU
40754B
BRM Aero Bristell NG5 Speed
Wing
LAA 385-15512
SM Spencer, (London SW9)
G-SUEM
4074BB
Diamond DA42 Twin Star
42.332
SD Bell trading as Sue Air, North
Weald, Essex
G-SUMM
407577
Best Off Skyranger Nynja LS
912(1)
BMAA/HB/700
A Summers, (Buntingford,
Hertfordshire)
G-VBAT
407483
Cameron A-400
12152
Airxcite Ltd trading as Virgin Balloon
Flights, (Telford, Shropshire)
G-VBAU
407484
Cameron A-400
12153
Airxcite Ltd trading as Virgin Balloon
Flights, (Telford, Shropshire)
G-VMNK
407545
Airbus A330-223
403
Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd, London
Heathrow (NB)
G-XIXT
68
407557
407556
AB Sportine LAK-19T
035
PR Thomas and WM Kay, Dunstable
Downs, Bedfordshire
G-ZEZE
4010FC
Cessna 182S Skylane II
182-80741
S Bonham, Leicester, Leicestershire
EI-FPW
4CAF94
Bombardier CRJ900LR
15443
Cityjet Designated Activity
Company, Stockholm-Arlanda
(operated for SAS)
EI-GDY
4CACA8
Boeing 737-800
44818
Ryanair Designated Activity
Company, Dublin (NB)
EI-GDZ
4CACA9
Boeing 737-800
44820
Ryanair Designated Activity
Company, Dublin (NB)
EI-GEV
4CAF89
ATR 42-600
1213
Stobart Air Unlimited Company,
Dublin (operated for Aer Lingus)
EI-GEW
4CAF87
Airbus A330-203
472
Aircraft Engine Lease Finance Ltd,
(stored Mexico City-Benito Juarez
International, Mexico)
EI-GEX
4CAF88
Airbus A330-203
700
Aircraft Engine Lease Finance Ltd,
(stored Mexico City-Benito Juarez
International, Mexico)
EI-GEZ
4CAD96
Boeing 737-73V
32413
ECAF I 32413 Designated Activity
Company, (stored Jakarta-Soekarno
Hatta International, Indonesia)
EI-GJA
4CACAA
Boeing 737-800
44819
Ryanair Designated Activity
Company, Dublin (NB)
EI-GJB
4CACAB
Boeing 737-800
44822
Ryanair Designated Activity
Company, Dublin (NB)
EI-GJC
4CACAC
Boeing 737-800
44824
Ryanair Designated Activity
Company, Dublin (NB)
EI-GJD
4CACAD
Boeing 737-800
44821
Ryanair Designated Activity
Company, Dublin (NB)
EI-PGD
4CA6F3
Paramania Revolution 2
0307646
D Keoghegan, (Enfield, Co. Meath)
EI-SIE
4CAF7E
Airbus A320-251N
8058
Scandinavian Airlines Ireland Ltd,
Stockholm-Arlanda, Sweden (NB)
M-AATD
43EAFB
Bombardier Global 6000
9766
Unitrans IOM Ltd, TBA
Gulfstream G650, VP-BJC, is now M-ATAK and is owned by STC
Airliner. Graham Hocquard
CANCELLATIONS
REG?N
TYPE
C/N
REASON
G-ARFG
Cessna 175A (Modified)
56505
To Russia
G-AANV
de Havilland DH.60M Moth
13
To France
G-AMSV
Douglas C-47B-25-DK Dakota
32820
To Indian Air Force Historic Flight as VP905
G-ASLX
Piel CP.301A Emeraude
292
Cancelled as Destroyed (burnt out at
Mullinahone, Co. Tipperary, Republic of
Ireland 05.07.17 when it ran away on engine
start-up & collided with an electric fence)
G-AVHT
Auster AOP.9 (Modified)
B5/10/37
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (Permit to
Fly expired 01.07.16. To South Yorkshire
Air Museum, Doncaster 10.16)
G-AWVY
Britten-Norman BN-2A-26
Islander
48
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 01.08.14, destroyed during
filming of Bond movie Spectre in 2014)
G-BAXD
Britten-Norman BN-2A Mk.III-2
Trislander
359
Cancelled as Permanently WFU
(CofA expired 05.07.11, broken up at
Cumbernauld, North Lanarkshire 2016)
G-BEKL
Bede BD-4 150
BD4E/2
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (Permit
to Fly expired 14.10.80)
G-BFAK
Morane Saulnier MS892A Rallye
Commodore 150
10595
Cancelled as Destroyed (CofA expired
23.02.18, last reported at Thruxton,
Hampshire 07.07.17)
G-BIKH
Boeing 757-236
22179
Cancelled as Destroyed (flown to Madrid,
Spain 31.05.17 for parting out)
G-BMKG
Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk
38-82A0050
Cancelled as Destroyed. Broken up for
spares at Perth 02.17
G-BNLA
Boeing 747-436
23908
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
30.11.09)
G-BNLD
Boeing 747-436
23911
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
18.02.10)
G-BNLE
Boeing 747-436
24047
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
27.11.14)
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
G-CEPN
Kolb Firefly
FF05.4.00048
Cancelled as Destroyed (substantially
damaged in a forced landing in a field
at Newell Lane, Luffenhall, Hertfordshire
20.07.17)
G-CGLW
P & M Pegasus Quik
8509
Cancelled by CAA (crashed on landing at
Old Park Farm, Margam, West Glamorgan
18.06.17)
G-CHPR
Robinson R22 Beta II
3854
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 27.07.17, was based in Italy)
G-CILJ
Bell 206B JetRanger III
1153
To Philippines
G-CIYM
Yakovlev Yak-18T
7201413
To Germany
G-CKAK
Schleicher ASW-28
28032
To Denmark as OY-XPV
G-CKLJ
Grob G.120TP-A
11142
To Ministry of Defence as ZM317
G-CKLO
Grob G.120TP-A
11143
To Ministry of Defence as ZM318
G-CKOP
Lindstrand LTL Series 1-90
056
To Italy
G-CKRN
Grob G.102 Astir CS
1261
Cancelled as Destroyed (details unknown)
G-CKUF
Cessna 152
152-83630
To Hungary
G-CKUI
Kubicek BB40Z
902
To Italy
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
25.10.09)
G-DDAV
Robinson R44 Raven II
12124
To France
G-DGBE
Schleicher Ka.6CR-PE
9133A
Cancelled by CAA (CofA expired
09.04.18)
G-DHVM
FFA DH.112 Venom FB.50
752
Cancelled by CAA (Permit to Fly expired
29.04.16)
G-DOCE
Boeing 737-436
25350
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
03.12.14)
G-DOCG
Boeing 737-436
25350
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
16.12.13)
G-DOCH
Boeing 737-436
25408
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
08.11.13)
G-DOCS
Boeing 737-436
25862
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
10.06.14)
G-DOCU
Boeing 737-436
25854
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
03.08.13)
Embraer Phenom 100, PR-LTJ, has been given the registration G-CKEF
for Affinity Flying Training Services. The aircraft will be operated by
the RAF and has been allocated ZM337. John Wilson
G-BNLG
G-BNLH
Boeing 747-436
Boeing 747-436
24049
24050
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
15.12.14)
G-BNLI
Boeing 747-436
24051
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
20.08.14)
G-BNLM
Boeing 747-436
24055
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
09.12.13)
G-BNLR
Boeing 747-436
24447
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
31.01.14)
G-BNLS
Boeing 747-436
24629
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
20.05.14)
G-BNLT
Boeing 747-436
24630
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
23.04.14)
G-BNLU
Boeing 747-436
25406
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
03.11.14)
G-BNLV
Boeing 747-436
25427
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown to
Teruel, Spain for storage 31.07.16)
G-BNWC
Boeing 767-336
24335
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
23.09.14)
G-BNWD
G-BNWH
G-BNWN
G-BNWO
G-BNWR
G-BNWU
G-BSJU
G-BUOR
Boeing 767-336
Boeing 767-336
Boeing 767-336
Boeing 767-336
Boeing 767-336
Boeing 767-336
Cessna 150M
24336
24340
25444
25442
25732
25829
150-76430
PREVIOUS IDENTITIES
REG'N
P.I.
REG?N
P.I.
G-AXMT
ex D-EIBU
G-THUN
ex N147PF
G-BWDO
ex M-ERRY
G-VMNK
ex D-ALPA
G-BXAG
ex ZJ255
G-XIXT
ex LY-BDU
G-BXHB
ex ZJ262
G-ZEZE
ex G-LVES
G-BXJR
ex ZJ270
EI-ECD
ex D-ASXQ
G-BXKR
ex ZJ274
EI-FPW
ex C-GIAU
G-BXMB
ex ZJ278
EI-GDY
ex N6055X
G-CIYX
ex 5N-BSO
EI-GDZ
ex N1786B
G-CKEF
ex PR-LTJ
EI-GEV
ex OY-YCC
G-CKGP
ex N2843B
EI-GEW
ex PT-MVG
G-BKGW
ex N2770B
EI-GEX
ex PT-MVL
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
10.11.13)
G-CKOF
ex N1002R
EI-GEZ
ex HL8207
G-CKSA
ex D-HECY
EI-GJD
ex N1799B
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
15.05.14)
G-CKUU
ex HA-YCD
EI-SIE
ex D-AVVG
G-CKVD
ex D-9291
M-AATD
ex M-IRAS
G-CKVW
ex HB-ZMX
M-ATAK
ex VP-BJC
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 19.03.13. Last noted dismantled
at Kings Farm, Thurrock, Essex 05.17)
G-CLBZ
ex I-BZEB
M-CDBM
ex N305BY
G-CSPT
ex VH-AQQ
M-GFGC
ex B-8312
To Netherlands as PH-MSV
G-CYPC
ex N940HL
M-JSWB
ex N292GA
G-DHKN
ex N174AA
M-ODEM
ex N589MD
G-DONE
ex C-GADL
M-WRLD
ex HB-GJO
G-EZRS
ex F-WWDN
M-YGLF
ex N291GA
G-FXER
ex N451FL
2-AERB
ex HL7597
G-GBTV
ex N355J
2-CETH
ex TC-ETH
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
08.01.15)
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
18.08.14)
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
23.09.14)
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
10.03.14)
CASA 1-131E Series 2000
Jungmann
2134
G-BUXD
Maule MXT-7-160
17001C
To Belarus
G-BVHM
Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk
38-79A0313
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 23.08.13. Last noted stored at
Bagby, North Yorkshire 05.17)
G-BXCE
Eurocopter AS350BB Ecureuil
2971
To USA as N38RM
G-GOFR
ex F-GOFR
2-CETJ
ex TC-ETJ
G-BXIL
Eurocopter AS350BB Ecureuil
2994
To USA as N131TC
G-JRXI
ex C-GFNP
2-FINC
ex HZ-AEF
G-BXRP
Schweizer 269C
S 1334
To Australia
G-JSIC
ex D-KBHB
2-FIND
ex HZ-AEB
G-BZJB
IAv Bacau Yak-52
811601
To Poland
G-LEXS
ex G-IVJM
2-GZEN
ex G-EZEN
G-CCWE
Lindstrand LBL 330A
984
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 09.02.14)
G-LOGN
ex VH-JYM
2-HOVA
ex G-PRFI
G-LSKS
ex N657JG
2-MSCC
ex 9M-MSC
G-PCJS
ex UR-GRG
2-NICE
ex N664D
G-PDGV
ex OY-GIS
2-RLAV
ex F-WXAA
G-POTA
ex G-CIRJ
2-ZERO
ex PH-PVR
G-SUEM
ex PH-CCD
G-CDDV
Cameron Z-250
10625
To Czech Republic
G-CELW
Boeing 737-377
23659
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Cotswold Airport, Gloucestershire for
parting out 17.01.17)
G-CEOI
Cameron C-60
www.aviation-news.co.uk
10977
To Austria
69
REGISTER REVIEW BY STUART MCDIARMID
G-DOCV
Boeing 737-436
25855
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
29.10.13)
G-DUGI
Lindstrand LBL 90A
562
Cancelled by CAA (CofA current to
13.07.18)
G-EHOT
Cessna 172
28683
To Germany
G-EZBL
Airbus A319-111
3053
To Austria as OE-LQT
G-EZBY
Airbus A319-111
3176
To Austria as OE-LQH
G-EZDE
Airbus A319-111
3426
To Austria as OE-LKK
G-EZDP
Airbus A319-111
3675
To Austria as OE-LLM
G-EZDX
Airbus A319-111
3754
To Austria as OE-LQO
G-EZEN
Airbus A319-111
2245
To Guernsey as 2-GZEN
G-EZFD
Airbus A319-111
3810
To Austria as OE-LQP
G-EZFE
Airbus A319-111
3824
To Austria as OE-LQM
G-EZFG
Airbus A319-111
3845
To Austria as OE-LQQ
G-EZFK
Airbus A319-111
4048
To Austria as OE-LKL
G-EZFN
Airbus A319-111
4076
To Austria as OE-LQG
G-EZFR
Airbus A319-111
3053
To Austria as OE-LQV
G-EZTL
Airbus A320-214
4125
To Austria as OE-IVX
G-EZTV
Airbus A320-214
4234
To Austria as OE-IJP
G-EZUG
Airbus A320-214
4680
To Austria as OE-IJL
G-FAVS
Piper PA-32-300 Cherokee Six
32-7540091
To Spain
G-GIDY
Europa Aviation Europa XS
PFA 247-13467
To Netherlands
G-GRSR
Schempp-Hirth Discus bT
165
To Germany
G-HRLM
Brugger Colibri MB2
PFA 043-10118
Cancelled as Destroyed (Permit to Fly
expired 16.08.12, details unknown)
G-IRKB
Piper PA-28R-201 Arrow III
28R-7737071
Bombardier Global Express XRS, M-VQBI, has been registered in
Luxembourg as LX-ABC. AirTeamImages.com/Alex Snow
G-OLFA
Eurocopter AS350B3 Ecureuil
3108
To USA as N33AR
G-OTIF
BAe 146-200
E2056
To Australia as VH-SOF
G-PRFI
Agusta Bell 206B JetRanger III
8556
To Guernsey as 2-HOVA
G-RVRI
Cessna 172H
172-55822
To USA as N172PS
G-STLL
BRM Aero Bristell NG5 Speed
Wing
LAA 385-15183
To New Zealand
G-TZEE
SOCATA TB10 Tobago
727
Cancelled as Destroyed (CofA expired
27.06.17, details unknown)
G-WACJ
Beech 76 Duchess
ME-278
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 22.07.11, fuselage to fire dump at
Dublin Weston)
G-XRTV
Bombardier Challenger 601-3A
5085
To Canada
G-ZYAK
IAv Bacau Yak-52
877415
To Belgium as OO-CCP
Cancelled by CAA (badly damaged in
ground collision with Cessna F152
G-BJWH at Elstree 27.10.17)
EI-AEJ
Piper PA-16 Clipper
16-451
To Switzerland
EI-FED
Boeing 737-8KN
40236
To India as VT-JTN
EI-FJR
Boeing 737-86N
36820
To Ukraine as UR-PSZ
EI-FML
Airbus A319-111
2240
To Spain as EC-MUT
M-ASTR
Dornier 328-310
3176
To Germany as D-BSEA
M-FASH
Dassault Falcon 900B
173
To Saudi Arabia
M-HNDA
Honda HA.420 Hondajet
42000018
To USA as N420EU
M-HSNT
Bombardier Challenger 300
20233
To San Marino as T7-TOP
M-VQBI
Bombardier Global
Express XRS
9213
To Luxembourg as LX-ABC
2-QWEA
Boeing 737-8H6
40150
To USA as N764BC
2-QWEB
Boeing 737-8H6
40153
To USA as N766BC
2-RLAT
Boeing 777-31H
29063
To Malaysia as 9M-FSM
G-IVJM
Agusta A109E Power
11154
Re-registered as G-LEXS
G-JACK
Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III
421C1411
To Russia
G-JMOE
Boeing 757-330
29012
To Germany as D-ABOE
G-LRGE
Lindstrand LBL 330A
929
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 13.03.14)
G-LVES
Cessna 182S
182-80741
Re-registered as G-ZEZE
G-MSFC
Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk
38-81A0067
Cancelled by CAA (CofA current to
20.11.18)
G-MVZI
Thruster R300
089-T300-387
Cancelled by CAA (but restored again
later in the month)
G-MWUB
Solar Wings Pegasus XL-R
SW-WA-1510
To Pakistan
G-NDOL
Europa Aviation Europa
PFA 247-12594
Cancelled as Destroyed (crashed just
after take-off from Coal Aston, Derbyshire
28.05.17)
Key: NB ? Nominal Base
A place name in brackets relates to the owner?s address as where the aircraft is based is unknown.
UPDATES & CORRECTIONS
70
REG'N
DETAILS
REG?N
DETAILS
G-AKRA
Became D-ELIR 14.07.17
G-CHHM
Became F-CHHM 11.12.17
G-ANCX
Became OO-MOT 16.11.17
G-CHIO
Became OK-0015 13.07.17
G-AYCJ
Became AP-BMB
G-CHVT
Became F-CHVT 28.12.17
G-BKBN
Became RA-2615G
G-CIXC
Became LZ-AHI 18.10.17
G-BLEP
Became OK-6262 11.08.17 (cancelled as WFU 18.01.10)
G-CJEV
Became OO-ZES 15.02.18
G-BLLN
Became F-GLLN 28.12.17
G-CJKD
Became D-8215 25.09.17
G-BOYP
Became D-ERWL 03.07.17
G-CJMI
Became OO-NSL 08.02.18
G-BSRD
Became D-OSRD 08.11.17
G-CJVR
Became OH-HLR 20.02.17
G-BTOC
Became N199AH 7.12.17
G-CJZD
Type officially changed to a EuroFOX 912(S) 03.11.17
G-BTXT
Became F-HTXT 11.12.17
G-CKIJ
Became OH-HBV 10.07.17
G-BUAD
Became HB-BVI 20.12.17 (cancelled by CAA 10.03.95)
G-CKJY
Became F-HSAV 06.12.17
G-BWCK
Constructors number officially changed to PFA G/03-1260 & Builder changed to ACSM Hart 19.01.18
G-CKJD
Became OK-3210 11.09.17
G-BWMG
Became TZ-22H Mali Air Force
G-DCPA
Became VH-OVK 22.02.18
G-BXGH
Became D-EULL 13.10.17
G-DGCL
Became D-KKCL 14.08.17
G-BYOZ
Type officially changed to a Mainair Rapier (Modified) 22.01.18
G-DGSM
Became D-KGGE 02.08.17
G-BZIK
Became OE-ZIK 13.12.17
G-DMEV
Became F-GLBL 12.12.17
G-CBSR
Became OO-YAK 15.01.18
G-DMPP
Type officially changed to a DA 42M-NG 17.11.17
G-CCVM
Type officially changed to an RV-7 01.02.18
G-EOMP
Became PH-OMP 12.01.18
G-CDGG
Became PH-CVE 31.07.17
G-EZZY
Type officially changed to an Evektor EV-97A 22.01.18
G-CDSY
Became N213SF 23.02.18
G-FLIZ
Became PH-TOT 12.01.18
G-CDZD
Became VH-TON 31.01.18
G-FORC
Became D-ELSY 16.10.17
G-CECX
Became N484AB 13.02.18
G-HRLK
Became D-EAJA 04.10.17
G-CENI
Became ZK-EPY 18.12.17
G-IMED
Became F-HDOG 12.17
G-CFVK
Type officially changed to a Skyranger 912(2) 10.01.18
G-JAMA
Became OK-ASS 19.06.17
G-CGFS
Became LN-WNC 18.01.18
G-KCST
Became HZ-KT01 06.16
G-CHEI
Became EC-MUR 01.18
G-LEAA
Became F-HASJ 08.12.17
G-CHHJ
Type officially changed to a EuroFOX 912 22.11.17
G-LZZY
Became I-LZZY 12.17
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
NEW BOOKS FROM AIR-BRITAIN
AUSTER ? the Company and the Aircraft
Tom Wenham, Rod Simpson & Malcolm Fillmore
Auster Aircraft has a long and distinguished history, starting with its formation as British Taylorcraft in 1938 and ending with
its absorption into Beagle Aircraft in 1960.The Auster was not, strictly, a new design since it had its origins in the American
Taylorcraft two seater. However, World War II gave it a welcome momentum which led to more than 1,600 artillery spotter
Austers being built for the British and other air forces. The Rearsby factory was at maximum production during the war - but,
as with all other aircraft manufacturing plants, it found a sudden collapse in military orders when peace came. However,
there were returning flyers keen to keep their skills alive and the Autocrat and its successors were successful, not only in
the UK but also across the world. Using the same basic airframe, the Auster constantly changed its shape and the 180hp
Husky of 1960 was a very different animal from the original 55hp Taylorcraft Model C.
Austers were sold all over the world and were used for many tasks including crop spraying, aerial advertising and joyriding.
The company also developed new models including the very successful AOP.9, and the less successful Agricola, Atlantic
and Avis. This is the story of an iconic aviation company and classic light aircraft which live on in the hands of enthusiastic
owners today.
Members �.95 Non-members �.95
All Quick Reference Books
Members: �95 Non-members: �.50
AIRLINE FLEETS QUICK REFERENCE 2018
Annual edition of this very successful title. The content gives the fleets of all the operators you are likely to see with jet
and turbine equipment at any of the world's major airports down to approximately the size of a Jetstream.
Around 170 countries and 1700 operators in 304 pages. A5 soft-back format
INCLUDES LISTING COVERING CORPORATE & VIP AIRLINERS
MILITARY TRANSPORTS QUICK REFERENCE 2018
MTQR 2018 is produced in the established QR format and lists the worldwide fixed-wing military transports and patrol aircraft
fleets. Types range from the largest types down to some of the larger single-engine types such as the Cessna 208 and PC-12;
patrol types include the Atlantique and the Orion.
All known Western, Soviet and Chinese types are included. In addition to aircraft operated by the various air forces, navies and
armies, aircraft operated by governmental bodies are also included. Data includes serial or registration and c/n, and is presented
in order of country, air arm and then serial. In the case of Russia those aircraft with new style RF-prefixes, serials and associated colour codes are added. For ease of use the aircraft operated by the US air arms are in order of type rather than serial.
A5 soft-back format
BUSINESS JETS & TURBOPROPS QUICK REFERENCE 2018
Annual edition of this title. BizQR2018 includes all the world?s civil and military Business Jets in service
at January 2018, listed in registration/serial order by country.
Also includes all BUSINESS TURBOPROPS and
CORPORATE AIRLINERS in civil and military service.
Over 30,000 entries listed, civil and military.. 192 pages. A5 soft-back format
UK& IRELAND QUICK REFERENCE 2018
The 17th edition of this annual publication lists registrations & types of all current UK, Ireland, Channel Islands, Isle of Man &
foreign registered aircraft based in the UK correct to the end of February 2018. Includes the complete current UK, Irish and UKbased US military serials as well as military/civil registration/serial decode. Also includes an expanded aircraft index, museums
& VHF frequency listing.
A5 softback, 176 pages
Order at www.air-britain.co.uk
Air-Britain (Trading) Ltd, Unit 1A, Munday Works, 58-66 Morley Road, Tonbridge, TN9 1RA.
Tel: 01732 363815
E-mail: sales@air-britain.co.uk
ALL BOOKS POST FREE UK (overseas at cost)
Cheque or credit/debit card payments (not Amex)
AIRPORT MOVEMENTS COMPILED BY CARL HOPE
AIRPORT MOVEMENTS
A round-up of notable aircraft visiting UK airports.
ABERDEEN
1/2 SE-RHJ Citation 560XL. 5/2 4X-CUZ Hawker
800XP. 6/2 S5-ICR Citation 560XL. 8/2 OEGGG Citation 560XLS+. 11/2 OY-HLV EC175B
DanCopter to NHV for maintenance, dep 15/3;
D-IATE Cessna F.406 Air-Taxi Europe. 14/2 OEGXL Citation 560XL. 16/2 LX-EAA Learjet 45.
21/2 LX-ONE Learjet 45. 22/2 OO-JCV PC-12.
BENBECULA
20/2 50+68 Transall LTG61, German AF. 26/2
ZH004 Islander 651 Sqn, AAC.
BIGGIN HILL
1/2 D-CCGM Phenom 300. 4/2 F-GLNH Beech
1900D Twin Jet; OE-IGG Global Express; TC-ABN
Challenger 605. 7/2 RA-09602 Falcon 7X. 8/2
C-GLBX Global Express; SP-KHI Challenger
350. 9/2 OO-KOR CitationJet 525 CJ2+. 10/2
HB-PSK PA-46 JetPROP DLX; LX-JET Legacy
450; XA-CHD Falcon 2000LX; 2-CUTE Challenger
601-3A. 12/2 PH-SLC Vulvanair P-68C Observer 2;
PR-OMX Westwind 1. 13/2 D-FLUR PC-12. 14/2
PH-MDG Citation 680 Sovereign+. 15/2 F-HKAF
Diamond DA42; F-HTLV Cessna 182T; HB-FWI
PC-12. 18/2 F-HEVL Phenom 300; SU-SMM
Gulfstream G450. 20/2 P4-GVV Gulfstream
G450. 21/2 D-IUVH Citation 510 Mustang. 22/2
2-ZERO Cirrus SR-22T. 24/2 F-BPKI CEA DR.221;
N542MP Hondajet. 25/2 C-FLGZ Global 6000;
9H-GPS Citation 560XL. 26/2 D-COLO CitationJet
525C CJ4; D-FKAE TBM 850. 27/2 D-IMRB Beech
C.90GTi. 28/2 D-CAWR Citation 560 Encore; OEGHB Citation 560XLS; OK-HIS & PH-CYP PC-12s;
PH-DFB Diamond DA42.
BIRMINGHAM
1/2 YR-BMM 737-82R Blue Air f/v; 9H-BCP Learjet
45; D-CAWZ Citation 680 Sovereign+. 2/2 LX-RSQ
Learjet 45. 3/2 C-GLWB Gulfstream G200. 4/2
PH-EXT E175STD KLM Cityhopper; N888TY
BBJ1; VQ-BSF Falcon 7X. 5/2 EW-483TI An-12BK
Rubystar also 9th; SP-HAX A321-211 Small Planet
Airlines f/v; PH-LAU Falcon 900EX also 19th. 6/2
UR-CAH An-12BK Ukraine Air Alliance; UR-CQD
An-26B Vulkan Air also 23rd, 25th & 28th; CS-IHP
Falcon 2000. 7/2 4X-CUZ Hawker 800XP; D-IRKE
CitationJet 525 CJ1. 8/2 UR-CNN An-12BK Cavok
Air; D-ABQO Dash 8-Q402 Eurowings f/v. 9/2
D-AUTO Gulfstream G550; D-CFAX Learjet 60.
11/2 D-ABFR A320-214 Eurowings f/v. 12/2 EI72
British company Magma Aviation is using Air Atlanta Icelandic Boeing 747-481(BCF), TF-AMP.
The aircraft is shown arriving at Doncaster Sheffield Airport on February 18. Clive Featherstone
FPG CRJ900LR SAS f/v. 13/2 UR-CKM An-12BP
Cavok Air; UR-CNT An-12BK Ukraine Air Alliance.
14/2 EI-GEV ATR 42-600 Aer Lingus Regional f/v;
RA-26101 An-26-100 Pskovavia; D-IHKW CitationJet
525 CJ1+. 15/2 D-AGWK A319-132 Eurowings
f/v. 16/2 9A-DWA CitationJet 525A CJ2; D-CGMR
Citation 560XLS. 18/2 9H-AMY (also 25th) & 9H-JOY
Challenger 850s. 19/2 D-ATYB 737-8K5 TUIFly
f/v. 20/2 D-ICBA CitationJet 525A CJ2; F-HAHA
Citation 510 Mustang; I-TOPX Beech 400A. 21/2
CS-DVH CitationJet 525B CJ3; CS-DVZ Citation 550
II; D-ISWA CitationJet 525 CJ1. 22/2 EW-259TG
An-12BP Genex. 24/2 HB-JFI Falcon 2000LX. 26/2
CS-TKR 767-36NER EuroAtlantic Airways; N360PZ
Falcon 7X; OE-GXL Citation 560XL. 27/2 N656TT
Gulfstream G650ER; OH-YLW PC-12.
BRISTOL INTERNATIONAL
4/1 D-CAPB Citation 560 Encore+. 6/1 HB-JUF
Gulfstream G650; 9H-FGV Phenom 100. 7/1
OE-GWS Citation 560XLS+. 8/1 131/XQ TBM
700A ET00.060, French AF n/s. 10/1 9H-BBJ
BBJ1 also 25th. 11/1 F-HMBG CitationJet 525A
CJ2. 12/1 D-IEFD Citation 525 M2. 13/1 F-HIPE
Phenom 300. 13/1 OK-BEE Beech 400A. 17/1
9H-FAM Phenom 100 also 24th n/s. 18/1 F-HFKE
ERJ 145LR SiAvia. 20/1 F-HFKF ERJ 145LR
SiAvia; OO-PCJ & OO-PCK PC-12s. 28/1 N542MP
Hondajet.
CAMBRIDGE
15/1 I-NHCO Falcon 2000LX. 23/1 M-OTOR Beech
B.200GT. 27/1 C-FRJZ Astra SPX; OK-JFA Beech
400A. 31/1 M-WATJ Beech B.200GT.
2/2 M-DSKY TBM 910. 11/2 D-CONE Learjet 35A.
18/2 D-CNUE Learjet 60. 19/2 OE-HPG Challenger
300. 22/2 F-GZPE Avanti. 23/2 OO-STU Diamond
DA40. 24/2 2-GNSY Commander 114B. 25/2
D-IPPY Avanti; LX-NEW PC-12.
DURHAM TEES VALLEY
1/12 OY-EDP Citation 650 III also 3rd. 2/12 OKKPP Beech 400A also 9th. 4/12 F-HBZA Citation
550 II. 6/12 D-CBEN Citation 560XLS+; HB-ALL
ATR 72-202/F Zimex Aviation. 7/12 CS-TFQ
Learjet 45. 17/12 F-HERE Citation 510 Mustang.
29/12 9H-PLM Citation 650 VI dep 31st.
7/1 LX-NCG CitationJet 525B CJ3 n/s. 9/1 ECMHZ Gulfstream G650. 12/1 OY-EDP Citation
650 III also 14th n/s. 16/1 PH-SOE PC-12 dep
18th. 22/1 OH-RBX Citation 560XL n/s; LX-ONE
Learjet 45. 14/1 OE-GPS Citation 550 Bravo. 25/1
OO-GEE PC-12. 28/1 D-CFOR Learjet 35A. 30/1
D-IVIP Beech 200. 31/1 F-HINC Learjet 75 n/s.
EAST MIDLANDS
2/1 LN-DYD 737-8JP Norwegian for painting. 4/1
D-IJOA CitationJet 525A CJ2. 5/1 2-TBMI TBM
910; N528QS Gulfstream G550. 9/1 D-FHAZ
Learjet 60. 10/1 D-CHDC Citation 680 Sovereign.
12/1 YL-BBY 737-36Q Air Baltic for painting. 14/1
ZZ335 Voyager KC2 10/101 Sqns, RAF. 20/1 PH-EZP
E190STD KLM Cityhopper Leeds Bradford diversion;
LN-DYE 737-8JP Norwegian for painting; F-HRGD
ERJ 145LU Aero4M; C-FGSJ 767-39HER Cargojet op
for DHL. 21/1 F-HBIR Citation 510 Mustang; N420SK
Challenger 604. 22/1 N243PC Gulfstream G450;
Phoenix Air Gulfstream III, N163PA, taxiing for departure at Glasgow Prestwick Airport on
February 16. Kevin Kennedy
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
RA-82081 An-124-100M Volga-Dnepr Airlines. 23/1
D-ITIP Citation 525 CJ1. 24/1 T7-AMS PC-12; HB-IGV
Falcon 50EX; OY-YCD ATR 72-600 Nordic Aviation
Capital for painting. 26/1 LN-NOT 737-8JP Norwegian
for painting; F-HSAO Citation 680 Sovereign. 30/1
SP-ENL 737-8CX Enter Air for painting.
GLASGOW
2/1 OO-PCM PC-12. 3/1 N939FD 757-23A FedEx
Manchester diversion. 4/1 D-ITIM Hondajet. 5/1
D-ABQG Dash 8-Q402 Eurowings f/v; D-CQAJ
Learjet 35A; D-AEMC E190LR Lufthansa Cityline
f/v; N930ZD TBM 930 c/n 1216 on delivery. 7/1
HA-LXU A321-231(SL) Wizz Air f/v. 9/1 HA-LYW
A320-232(SL) Wizz Air f/v. 10/1 D-AEMB E190LR
Lufthansa Cityline f/v. 14/1 HA-LXR A321-231(SL)
Wizz Air f/v; D-CGAA Citation 560XLS+; 15+01
A319-115(CJ) FBS, German AF o/s; D-AIDM A321231 Lufthansa Keflavik diversion. 15/1 D-IGST
Premier 1A; D-ACKR CRJ900LR Lufthansa
Cityline f/v. 16/1 D-ABQA Dash 8-Q402 Eurowings
f/v. 18/1 YR-BMM 737-82R Blue Air f/v; OO-PCI
PC-12. 21/1 OO-PCK PC-12. 23/1 144615
CC-144B 412 TS, RCAF. 25/1 OK-UGJ Citation
680 Sovereign; D-ABVG Citation 750 X. 26/1 EISLU ATR 72-202/F ASL Airlines. 28/1 D-AGWG
A319-132 Germanwings f/v; D-ACKL CRJ900LR
Lufthansa Cityline f/v. 30/1 OY-NLA Citation 650
III; F-HSYS PA-34-220T. 31/1 A4O-MA 737-8MAX
Oman Air on delivery; D-ABQJ Dash 8-Q402
Eurowings f/v; D-IAKN CitationJet 525A CJ2.
GLOUCESTERSHIRE
2/1 OO-PCJ PC-12. 3/1 OO-PCI PC-12 also 7th9th. 4/1 OK-OKP Cirrus SR-22T also 29th. 6/1
OO-PCK PC-12. 10/1 D-GPEZ PA-30-160C dep
12th. 11/1 D-CEIS Citation 680 Sovereign. 15/1
PH-RLG Citation 680 Sovereign+. 17/1 2-RICH
PA-46-500TP; 2-TBMI TBM 930 dep 2/2. 26/1
2-HELO A109C.
1/2 D-FLEX TBM 700 also 7th. 2/2 D-EPPG PA-46500TP. 4/2 D-INCS CitationJet 525 CJ1 also 5th.
5/2 OK-OKP Cirrus SR-22T also 19th. 8/2 2-JSEG
Eclipse EA.500 also 10th. 11/2 D-IPVD CitationJet
525A CJ2 also 16th; F-GITZ AG5B Tiger. 12/2 OOVDC Beech G36 also 15th. 23/2 2-TBMI TBM 930;
D-FCAE Cessna 208B.
INVERNESS
3/12 T-874 Citation 560XL LTDB, Swiss AF also
7th. 13/12 OE-GIQ Learjet 45 also 18th. 14/12
F-HBPP CitationJet 525B CJ3; 9H-FAM Phenom
100 also 15th. 15/12 OK-RAH Beech 400XP. 18/12
4/F-RAFQ Falcon 900 ET00.060, French AF f/v.
29/12 F-GLND Beech 1900D Regional Airlines; SERMO Learjet 45.
Diamond DA42, D-GLUX, visited Exeter Airport on February 20. Ian Simpson
14/1 D-IJOA CitationJet 525A CJ2. 16/1 TC-FBH
A320-232 Freebird Airlines; EC-MSC Global 6000;
D-IHIR CitationJet 525A CJ2. 18/1 G-JZBG 7378MG Jet2 on delivery; 9H-AMY Challenger 850 Air
X Charter. 21/1 OY-EVO Citation 550 Bravo. 22/1
9H-YES 737-5Q8 Air X Charter. 26/1 F-HPBM
Phenom 100. 30/1 D-BUZZ Citation 750 X.
LIVERPOOL
1/1 HB-JFI Falcon 2000LX n/s. 3/1 D-AJET Legacy
650 n/s also 5th n/s; OK-SLX Citation 560XLS. 4/1
D-CHIC Phenom 300. 5/1 D-CAWX Citation 680
Sovereign also 9th n/s; D-CCCA Learjet 35A. 8/1
N3755P Lockeed 382 Hercules n/s. 9/1 VP-BNE
Gulfstream G550; OE-GBD Astra. 11/1 D-CHRD
Citation 680 Sovereign. 14/1 LN-AGR Falcon
7X. 15/1 D-CFOR Learjet 35A. 17/1 D-IKBO
CitationJet 525A CJ2 n/s. 19/1 D-IROL Do.228100 Businesswings. 23/1 D-AFAI Challenger 604;
D-BUZZ Citation 750 X; D-IJOA CitationJet 525A
CJ2 also 24th. 24/1 N533DL Cessna 208. 30/1
SU-TCE A320-232 Almasria Unversal Airlines;
D-CCCB Learjet 35A; 9H-GPS Citation 560XLS.
31/1 9A-JIM (also 31st) & D-IXXX CitationJet 525
CJ1s.
LONDON GATWICK
1/2 VP-BNC 737-800 Aeroflot f/v; D-CKHG Citation
560XLS. 2/2 VP-BKK 737-800 Aeroflot f/v. 3/2 VQBHB 737-800 Aeroflot f/v. 4/2 OH-LXD A320-214
Finnair f/v. 5/2 D-ASPI A320-214 Small Planet
Airlines Germany f/v. 7/2 EI-FYC 737-8MAX
Norwegian f/v; G-CKOF 787-9 Norwegian f/v;
C-GIAW Westwind 1124A f/v. 8/2 OH-LXF A320214 Finnair f/v. 9/2 G-CKOG 787-9 Norwegian
f/v. 10/2 OE-LBV A320-214 Austrian Airlines f/v;
9H-ILI Challenger 850 VistaJet f/v. 11/2 OH-LXL
A320-214 Finnair f/v. 12/2 VP-BZA 737-8LJ Aeroflot
f/v. 15/2 OH-LXM A320-214 Finnair f/v; OK-SWA
737-8MAX Smartwings f/v; TF-CAT A321-211(SL)
WOW Air f/v; YL-CSH CS300 Air Baltic f/v; TC-GNC
Falcon 2000 f/v. 16/2 B-18915 A350-941 China
Airlines f/v; VP-BSB 737-800 Aeroflot f/v. 17/2
VP-BRR 737-8LJ Aeroflot f/v. 18/2 OH-LZN A321-
231(SL) Finnair f/v. 19/2 OE-FRS CitationJet 525A
CJ2 f/v. 20/2 OO-TCT A320-212 VLM Airlines
f/v. 21/2 HA-LXT A321-231(SL) Wizz Air f/v. 22/2
UR-PSZ 737-800 Ukraine International Airlines f/v.
24/2 HB-JBD CS100 Swissair f/v; N142QS Global
6000 NetJets f/v. 25/2 OH-LXI A320-214 Finnair
f/v; LZ-AOB A319-112 Bulgarian Government
f/v. 26/2 HL7784 777-3B5ER Korean Airlines f/v;
M-GSIR Falcon 900DX f/v. 28/2 VP-BNP 737-800
Aeroflot f/v.
LONDON HEATHROW
1/2 VQ-BRJ 747-8F AirBridgeCargo f/v. 7/2
C-FVLU 787-9 Air Canada f/v. 8/2 EI-SIE A320251N SAS Ireland f/v. 9/2 ET-AVB A350-941
Ethiopian Airlines f/v; OO-SNJ A320-214 Brussels
Airlines f/v. 10/2 HB-JNG 777-300ER Swiss f/v;
VQ-BLQ 747-8F AirBridgeCargo f/v. 11/2 D-ABQM
Dash 8-Q402 Eurowings f/v. 12/2 G-CIXV E170LR
Eastern Airway op for Flybe f/v. 13/2 F-HRBE 7879 Air France f/v. 14/2 HL7202 777-300ER Korean
Air f/v. 16/2 9M-MAD A350-941 Malaysia Airlines
f/v; M-AJOR AW139 f/v. 17/2 9V-SKV A380-841
Singapore Airlines f/v; N451FX Gulfstream G450
f/v; VP-BMD 737-800 Aeroflot f/v. 18/2 EC-MGF
A319-112 Vueling f/v; JA842J 787-8 Japan Airlines
f/v. 19/2 ZS-SXM A330-343E South African
Airways f/v. 20/2 D-ATUZ 737-8K5 TUIfly op for
Eurowings f/v. 21/2 ZS-SXJ A330-343E South
African Airways f/v. 22/2 9V-SKU A380-841
Singapore Airlines f/v; D-BERT Falcon 2000LX f/v;
OM-GEX 737-8AS Air Explore op for Air France.
24/2 A6-EQE 777-300ER Emirates f/v; A7-ANA
A350-1041 Qatar Airways f/v; VQ-BHB 737-800
Aeroflot f/v. 25/2 C-FVLX 787-9 Air Canada f/v;
EC-MGF A321-231(SL) Vueling f/v; G-VMIK A330223 Virgin Atlantic Airways f/v; ZS-SXI A330-343E
South African Airways f/v. 26/2 VP-BGL Legacy
600 f/v. 27/2 4X-EDC 787-9 El Al f/v.
LONDON LUTON
2/2 N850KJ TBM 850; T7-CTG Challenger 605. 3/2
OK-TSM 737-9GJER Travel Service op for Wizz
Air. 5/2 I-AVND Learjet 45. 6/2 D-IFFF Cessna
LEEDS BRADFORD
1/12 D-BFIL Legacy 450; OK-EAS Beech 400A;
D-IJET Avanti. 3/12 LX-TAI PC-12. 5/12 G-JZBE
737-8MG Jet2 on delivery. 8/12 OY-MLS Vulcanair
P-68C. 14/12 SE-RIN CitationJet 525A CJ2;
D-AGRA CRJ200LR Pro Air Aviation. 15/12
OO-CIV CitationJet 525A CJ2. 16/12 OE-GBD
Gulfstream G100. 21/12 G-JZBF 737-8MG Jet2 on
delivery. 25/12 CS-DSF Falcon 8X.
4/1 CS-DGW CitationJet 525B CJ3. 6/1 CS-DSF
Falcon 8X. 13/1 D-IMAX CitationJet 525A CJ2.
www.aviation-news.co.uk
Orange2fly Airbus A320, SX-ORG, operating for Trade Air, at Cardiff Airport on March 16. It
carried French rugby fans for the 6 Nations match with Wales the following day. Phil Woods
73
AIRPORT MOVEMENTS COMPILED BY CARL HOPE
F.406. 7/2 C-FAMB Challenger 650; T7-LLS
Bell 429 Globeranger. 8/2 OY-DBS Falcon 8X;
D-ITFC Beech 200. 9/2 T7-PNI Legacy 600. 10/2
F-HBZA Citation 550 II. 11/2 9H-MRQ Learjet
35A; OD-CXJ Legacy 500. 13/2 N1TS BBJ1. 16/2
F-HJBR Phenom 300. 17/2 EZ-A007 737-7GL
Turkmenistan Airlines; OK-SYN Legacy 650. 18/2
OK-JMD Gulfstream G550; T7-SLA Challenger
850. 19/2 N650NR Gulfstream G650. 20/2
T7-ACA CitationJet 525 CJ1; EC-MJU 737-85P
Air Europa. 21/2 VP-BJN Global 5000; OE-LDN
Challenger 650. 22/2 OY-RUO ATR 42-500 Danish
Air Charter; OK-ZUB Beech 400XP; G-EZRS
A320-214(SL) easyJet on delivery. 23/2 CS-DPL
Global 6000. 24/2 OE-LEO Gulfstream G650;
TC-AAA Challenger 605. 25/2 N656FN Falcon 7X.
26/2 T7-WMB Global 6000; VP-CMR Gulfstream
G650ER. 27/2 F-HASJ Citation 510 Mustang.
28/2 OY-NEW Falcon 8X; D-IMOI Citationjet 525
CJ1; N280LS Gulfstream G280; HB-FXC Pilatus
PC-12.
LONDON SOUTHEND
2/2 D-EPPG PA-46-500TP f/v; F-GMSN Cessna
172S. 3/2 9H-YOU Challenger 850 f/v, n/s. 6/2
D-IHEB CitationJet 525 CJ1 f/v, n/s. 6/2 2-AKOP
Commander 114B; D-IPPY Avanti; OY-NCO
Do.328JET Sun-Air f/v, London City diversion;
HB-AEO Do.328-100 Skywork Airlines London
City diversion; OE-LGD & OE-LGG Dash 8-Q402s
Austrian Airlines both London City diversions; OEIZP A320-214(SL) ex Air Berlin D-ABHJ f/v, to Air
Livery, rolled out in easyJet Europe colours 26th
& dep 5/3; OE-IZT A320-214 ex Air Berlin D-ABDX
f/v, to Air Livery, rolled out in easyJet Europe
colours 19th & dep 19/3. 15/2 D-CSOS Learjet 45
n/s. 17/2 D-EBIE Mooney M.20K. 22/2 OE-IZE
A320-214 ex Air Berlin D-ABHM f/v, to Air Livery,
rolled out in easyJet Europe colours 8/3 & dep
15/3. 22/2 D-CCCA Learjet 35A.
MANCHESTER
1/2 HB-JCA CS300 Swiss f/v; OK-NEO A319112 CSA f/v, op for Eurowings. 2/2 D-ABQA
DHC8-Q402 Eurowings f/v; LX-JNC Challenger
605 f/v. 5/2 OH-LZP A321-231(SL) Finnair f/v;
G-VNAP A340-642 Virgin Atlantic for painting at
Air Livery; F-HSFJ Citation 680A Latitude f/v. 6/2
9V-SMS A350-941 Singapore Airlines f/v. 7/2
OK-PET A319-112 CSA op for Eurowings, f/v. 8/2
F-HPBM Phenom 100 f/v; D-CMDH Citation 680
Sovereign f/v. 9/2 SP-SPD ATR 72-212/F Sprint
Air f/v; N683GA Global Express f/v. 10/2 PH-EXM
E175STD KLM Cityhopper f/v. 11/2 N535RV
Hawker 800XP f/v. 12/2 YL-PSD 737-86N Primera
Air Nordic f/v, for painting at Air Livery; A7-CGC
Gulfstream G650 f/v. 13/2 EI-SIC A320-251N
SAS f/v. 14/2 EI-SIE A320-251N SAS f/v; D-CLAV
Phenom 300 f/v. 15/2 CN-RGP E190IGW Royal
Air Maroc f/v; CN-NMG A320-214 Air Arabia Maroc
f/v; EI-GEV ATR 42-600 Aer Lingus Regional
f/v; 2-AVCO Challenger 850 f/v. 18/2 TC-JOE
A330-303 Turkish f/v; OO-SNJ A320-214 Brussels
Airlines f/v. 19/2 HB-JME A340-313X Swiss
f/v, for painting at Air Livery into Edelweiss
Swedish Air Force Tp.102C (Gulfstream IV-SP), 102004, at Cambridge Airport on March 28,
where it collected personnel who had flown in Tp.84 (C-130H), 84007. The Hercules was
receiving attention with Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group. Justin Ward
Air c/s; F-HRAV ERJ 145LU Aero4M f/v. 21/2
OK-IHS PC12-47E f/v. 23/2 T7-AMS PC-12 f/v.
24/2 9V-SMT A350-941 Singapore Airlines f/v;
OE-IIH Gulfstream G650 f/v. 27/2 OE-LII Global
6000 f/v; SE-MJO Cirrus SR-22T f/v. 28/2 EI-FPV
CRJ900NG SAS f/v; A7-BDB B787-8 Qatar Airways,
5B-DCU A319-112 Cobalt Air, D-AINH A320-271N
Lufthansa & LN-RRZ 737-683 SAS all Dublin snow
diversions.
NORWICH
1/1 A9C-AWL RJ100 Bahrain Defence Force to
KLM Maintenance dep 9/2. 2/1 OK-BEE Beech
400A. 3/1 HB-JLQ A320-214 Swiss to Air Livery
dep 13th. 7/1 D-HOAE Airbus Helicopters H145
Wiking Helicopter Service. 12/1 EC-JFG A320-214
Iberia Express to Air Livery dep 19th. 18/1 PHSOE PC-12 also 22nd; XA-ZTK Gulfstream G550.
19/1 EC-LUD A320-214 Iberia Express to Air Livery
dep 21st. 22/1 9H-DDJ Learjet 75; D-COOL
Learjet 55. 23/1 D-AFAU Global Express to Air
Livery dep 7/2. 25/1 F-GZHM 737-8K2 Transavia
France to KLM Maintenance dep 1/2. 26/1 ECLUC A320-214 Iberia Express to Air Livery dep 3/2.
31/1 SE-DSU RJ100 Malmo Aviation.
PRESTWICK
1/1 57-1427 & 58-0122 KC-135Rs 117th ARS, Ks
ANG both n/s; 58-0073 KC-135R 106th ARS, Al
ANG n/s; 58-0098 KC-135R 132nd ARS, Me ANG
n/s; 62-3566 KC-135R 153rd ARS, Ia ANG n/s;
63-8881 KC-135R 191st ARS, Ut ANG dep 6th.
2/1 OK-BEE Beech 400A; SE-DSO RJ100 Malmo
Aviation to Chevron hangar for rest of month;
UR-CNN An-12BK Cavok Air; 61-0310 KC-135R
126th ARS, Ws ANG; 62-3506 KC-135R 117th ARS,
Ks ANG; 63-8876 KC-135R 168th ARS, Ak ANG.
3/1 62-3512 KC-135R 126th ARS, Ws ANG n/s.
6/1 57-2606 KC-135R 153 ARS, Ia ANG n/s. 7/1
92-1538 C-130H 187th AS, Wy ANG. 8/1 177702
CC-177 429 TS, RCAF; HB-FRB PC-12 c/n 1765
on delivery; 86-0013 C-5M 436th/512nd AW, USAF
n/s; RA-82047 An-124-100 Volga-Dnepr Airlines.
9/1 LX-MLO Global 5000; 177703 CC-177 429
TS, RCAF n/s. 11/1 01-0076 C-37A 76th AS, 86th
AW, USAF; 177702 CC-177 429 TS, RCAF. 13/1
LZ-ABJ An-26B Rose Air; 15003 CC-150 437 TS,
RCAF. 15/1 HB-FRC PC-12 c/n 1766 on delivery;
UR-CNT An-12BK Ukraine Air Alliance. 17/1
130612 CC-130J 436 TS, RCAF dep 20th. 19/1
B-537 C-130J-30 Esk.721, Royal Danish AF. 23/1
KAF343 C-17A 41 Sqn, Kuwait AF dep 25th, also
31st n/s; 900528 C-26D Naples AOD n/s; 177703
CC-177 429 TS, RCAF dep 25th. 24/1 HB-FRE
PC-12 c/n 1768 & HB-FRF PC-12 c/n 1769 both on
delivery. 25/1 84-0126 C-21A 76th AS, 86th AW,
USAF. 27/1 177705 CC-177 429 TS, RCAF.
29/1 PR-LTJ Phenom 100 on delivery to RAF. 30/1 HBVSB PC-24 c/n 101, first production aircraft delivery.
WICK
3/1 N172MJ Beech 1900D Raytheon. 4/1 4L-AVA
Beech C.90GTi. 5/1 95-00123 & 97-00102 UC35A-1s 1-214th Avn, US Army. 11/1 F-HSHC
Citation 525 M2. 12/1 D-IFHD Citation 525 M2.
17/1 A6-CTI & A6-CTJ Cirrus SR-22s on delivery
to Emirates Flight Training Academy. 20/1
SP-AMW Cessna 414A. 26/1 A6-CTK & A6-CTL
Cirrus SR-22s on delivery to Emirates Flight
Training Academy.
Key: f/v first visit; n/s night stop; o/s overshoot.
Visiting Jersey Airport on March 22 was Cessna Citation II. F-HBMR. Mike Illien
With thanks to: D Apps, D Banks, D Bougourd, S Boyd, J Brazier, N Burch, A Clarke, I Cockerton, KW Ede, M Farley, N French, P Gibson, J Gregory, G Green,
I Grierson, D Haines, M Harper, G Hocquard, S Lane, G Morris, S Morrison, R Roberts, RJ Sayer, A Smith, D Turner, Blackpool Aviation Society, Manston
Movements, Solent Aviation Society/?Osprey?, South Wales Aviation Group, CIAN, GSAE, The Aviation Society, EGPE ATC, www.dtvmovements.co.uk,
Aerodata Quantum Plus and RHADS.
74
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
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75
AIR BASE MOVEMENTS FROM MAR WWW.MILITARYAVIATIONREVIEW.COM
AIR BASE MOVEMENTS
A selection of the most interesting aircraft to visit air bases in the UK recently.
QINETIQ BOSCOMBE DOWN
28/2 G-ETPG H125 arrived on delivery to ETPS.
RAF BRIZE NORTON
US Navy Boeing E-6B Mercury, 163918, departing RAF Mildenhall on March 25. It had arrived
on detachment on March 20 and flew one mission during its stay. Matt Varley
11-5736/RS C-130J-30 37th AS, 86th AW, USAF
also 16th. 15/2 06-6155 C-17A 07-7172 C-17A
60th/349th AMW, USAF n/s. 20/2 10-0220 C-17A
62nd/446th AW, USAF n/s.
7/2 01 C-17A NATO SAC n/s. 9/2 0452 C-295M
Czech AF. 16/2 ZJ223 Apache AH1 AAC. 24/2
10-0213 C-17A 437th/315th AW, USAF n/s. 26/2
11-5731 MC-130J 67th SOS, USAF o/s.
RAF LEEMING
RAF CONINGSBY
14/2 ZD713/081 Tornado GR4 arrived from Marham
for Reduction to Produce.
9/2 ZJ811/811 Typhoon T3 arrived from
Lossiemouth for Reduction to Produce. 12/2
ZJ912/912 Typhoon FGR4 dep to Shawbury for
storage. 14/2 103/YT Xingu EAT00.319, French AF.
19/2 ZK424 Typhoon FGR4 arrived on delivery from
Warton.
RAF CRANWELL
13/2 ZJ210 & ZJ196 Apache AH1s 4 Regt, AAC.
15/2 G-CKRY & G-CKRP Prefect T1s arrived
on delivery, they will become ZM319 & ZM320
respectively.
14/3 G-CGKM, G-CGKO, G-CGKT & G-CGKX Tutor
T1s dep on delivery to Finland.
RAF FAIRFORD
12/2 07-7172 C-17A 60th/349th AMW, USAF. 27/2
80-1071/BB & 80-1096/- U-2S 99th RS, 9th RW,
USAF both n/s.
RAF LAKENHEATH
6/2 12-5757 MC-130J 67th SOS, USAF. 12/2
C-130H 180th AS, Mo ANG.
RAF ODIHAM
16/1 ZG917, ZF537, ZG918 & ZG538 Lynx AH9As
started and finished the farewell tour from the base.
RAF SHAWBURY
5/2 166693 C-40A USN also 6th. 12/2 164998/
AX C-130T VR-53, USN n/s also 15th, 16th & 20th.
19/2 50+86 Transall WTD61, German AF n/s also
21st n/s. 26/2 168438/LA P-8A VP-5, USN dep
02/3.
7/2 ZM526 Juno HT1 arrived on delivery to
Ascent. 8/2 ZM525 Juno HT1 arrived on delivery
to Ascent. 12/2 ZJ912/912 Typhoon FGR4 arrived
from Coningsby for storage. 16/2 ZM527 Juno HT1
arrived on delivery to Ascent. 20/2 ZM528 Juno
HT1 arrived on delivery to Ascent; XV123 Scout
AH1 dep by road to Everett Aero. . 27/2 XX335
Hawk T1 dep by road to Cosford.
AAC MIDDLE WALLOP
RAF VALLEY
The following Lynx AH9As arrived from Odiham
for RTP during January: 17/1 ZE380. 18/1 ZF537,
ZF538 & ZG885. 23/1 ZG923. 25/1 ZG918. 26/1
ZG917.
16/2 N2770B/326 & N2843B/325 Texan IIs arrived
on delivery, they will become G-CKGW/ZM326 &
G-CKGP/ZM325 respectively.
RAF LOSSIEMOUTH
RAF MILDENHALL
1/2 89-0510 AC-130U 4th SOS, USAF dep 3rd, also
9th; 33/XA TBM 700A ET43, French AF n/s. 9/2
87-0036 C-5M 436th/512nd AW, USAF n/s. 12/2
86-0013 C-5M 436th/512nd AW, USAF n/s. 15/2
J-013 F-16AM 332 Sqn, Royal Netherlands AF o/s.
21/2 164998/AX C-130T VR-53, USN n/s. 23/2
87-0039 C-5M 439th AW, AFRC n/s. 26/2 90-1974
C-130H 180th AS, Mo ANG dep 28th. 28/2 90-1972
RNAS YEOVILTON
16/1 ZG917, ZF537, ZG918 & ZG538 Lynx AH9As
on farewell tour. 24/1 N-4001 Lynx Mk.21B
Leonardo o/s.
20/2 ZZ406 Wildcat AH1 arrived on delivery from
Yeovil. 21/2 ZZ530 Wildcat AH1 arrived on delivery
from Yeovil.
Key: n/s night stop; o/s overshoot
Boeing P-8A Poseidon, 168438, of the US Navy?s
VP-5 arriving at RAF Lossiemouth on February 26.
It left the Scottish base on March 2. Niall Paterson
76
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
VIRGIN
AUSTRALIA
BREAKING THE MOULD
Chris Frame looks at the genesis of the Virgin airlines brand
in Australia and traces what?s made it so successful since its
formation in 2000 as a low-cost carrier to a full-service airline today.
F
or much of the 20th Century,
Australian air travel was dominated
by a long-standing duopoly.
Historically, domestic flights across
the nation had been the arena of just two
airlines; Ansett Australia and Trans Australian
Airways (later called Australian Airlines).
This arrangement was no accident. It was
a government-mandated setup stemming from
a highly regulated aviation sector, designed to
protect carriers serving Australia?s small yet
widely dispersed population. Dubbed the ?two
airline policy?, the legislation protected Ansett
and Australian Airlines from competition on
mainline domestic routes across the country.
Flight schedules between cities, timetables
and even aircraft flown were mirrored between
the two airlines, leading to very little product
differentiation or price competitiveness
between them.
This began to change in the 1990s,
when the Australian Government started to
deregulate the sector. International airline
Qantas (then state-owned) was merged with
Australian Airlines, effectively ceding half
www.aviation-news.co.uk
Virgin Australia A330 VH-XFJ taking off from
Perth on March 27, 2018. Key-Tom Allett
of the nation?s domestic traffic to the ?flying
kangaroo?. In the early years of deregulation,
the situation across Australia remained
relatively unchanged as Qantas and Ansett
retained a duopoly into the 21st Century.
There had been several unsuccessful
attempts to overcome the dominance of the
established carriers. Compass Airlines tried
in 1990 with Airbus A300s and again in 1992
using smaller McDonnell Douglas MD-80s.
Later, Impulse Airlines grew its regional fleet
to include Boeing 717s and started flying
on key routes on the Australian east coast.
However, Qantas ultimately acquired this
venture.
ENTER VIRGIN BLUE
It took the vision of British entrepreneur
Sir Richard Branson to truly change the
Australian airline sector. He was well aware
of the opportunities for a third carrier, having
travelled ?down under? many times as the
head of the Virgin brand.
In August 2000, under the direction of
Branson and founding CEO Brett Godfrey, a
new airline took to the sky. Virgin Blue began
its first flights between Sydney and Brisbane
using just two leased Boeing 737-400s.
From day one it made an impact on
the market. The no-frills carrier offered
affordable flights for a leisure market that
had never before enjoyed such choice
or flexibility. Its energetic staff ensured a
quality travel experience, while advertising
focused on the company?s mission to open
up the nation?s skies for everyone.
Rob Sharp is the Group Executive at
Virgin Australia, the successor to Virgin
Blue. He reflected on the impact that
the Virgin brand has made on Australian
aviation since its formation 18 years ago.
?Virgin Blue was established in 2000 as a
competitor to the incumbents [Qantas and
Ansett] and Virgin Australia continues to
play that role today, even after transitioning
into a full-service carrier. We take our role
of being the challenger in this market very
seriously, as it brings many benefits
77
Tigerair Australia?s fleet carries
distinctive markings, which are shown
off well on Airbus A320-232 VH-VNC.
All photos Chris Frame unless stated
to the travelling public, the economy and
communities across Australia.? He added:
?I had the privilege very early in the role to
spend some time with Sir Richard Branson
and executives from across the Virgin group
in the UK. When you operate as part of the
Virgin family, you have licence to do things a
little differently, because it?s who we are ? it?s
in our DNA.?
RAPID GROWTH
Virgin Blue was quickly successful in the
Australian market, but it had to fight hard to
compete against its larger rivals. Initially, the
airline?s services were restricted to the east
coast, while at both Sydney and Melbourne
it utilised makeshift temporary low-cost
terminals, due to the existing carriers holding
exclusive rights over the established fullservice facilities.
Yet, despite these difficulties, Virgin Blue
was enthusiastically supported by a new
group of air travellers who had, until then,
found the cost of flying out of reach. The
airline?s motto was ?keeping the air fair? and it
was true to its promise.
Rob Sharp recalled: ?Virgin Blue was the
first low-cost carrier in Australia and really
pioneered that market, opening up travel
possibilities to millions of Australians. Virgin
Blue?s entry to the domestic market brought
down airfares and Australians now enjoy some
of the lowest domestic airfares in the world.?
?The acquisition not
only gave Virgin a
significant footing in
the regional market,
but also introduced
Fokker 50s, Fokker
100s and A320s to
its fleet.?
In 2001, Virgin?s fortunes changed for the
better, as Ansett?s worsened. Throughout
that year, Ansett was plagued with highprofile incidents, including the grounding of
its 767 fleet (due to safety concerns) and a
worsening financial position.
When the once-dominant airline
unexpectedly collapsed in September 2001,
an opportunity was created to allow a quick
expansion of Virgin Blue. Although Ansett
was rebooted as a low-cost carrier, it only
flew until March 2002 ? the public had
lost faith in the brand and buyers for the
company remained elusive.
With Ansett no longer operational, Virgin
Blue moved quickly to secure space in its
former terminals. This saw Virgin gradually
gain better airport facilities across its network,
allowing a better passenger experience.
Realising its position as Australia?s
second largest airline, Virgin planned to
recreate the concept of affordable aviation
for all. The solution was a hybrid model;
taking the best of low-cost flying and
blending it with modern amenities which
even included airport lounges.
Known as ?The Blue Room?, the lounges
opened across Australia in spaces once
occupied by Ansett?s Golden Wing facilities.
Virgin?s route network also expanded to link
all major cities by August 31, 2002.
A busy scene in Sydney in 2016 with two
ATR 72-600s nearest the camera.
78
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
Two years later, the
airline extended its reach
overseas, with the launch
of Pacific Blue Airlines.
Based at Christchurch
in New Zealand, the
brand utilised Virgin?s
Boeing 737s and allowed
the company to take
advantage of the lower
cost of operating from
New Zealand for its transTasman flying.
The following year, Polynesian Blue was
established. A joint venture between the
Samoan Government and Virgin Blue, it flew
one 737 to four destinations and became
Samoa?s flag carrier.
From September 2007, Virgin Blue
introduced 20 Embraer aircraft to its fleet.
The order comprised both E170s and E190s,
and was valued at AU$850m. This made it
the single largest trade transaction between
Australia and Brazil at the time.
In 2009, Virgin Blue greatly expanded its
international presence when it inaugurated
long-haul flights through a
wholly owned subsidiary
named V Australia. A fleet
of five Boeing 777-300ERs
were allocated to the
new brand, which began
services to the US and
Abu Dhabi from Australia?s
east coast.
This growth was
bolstered by a series of
strategic alliances with
major international carriers
such as Singapore Airlines,
Delta Air Lines and Air
New Zealand.
The novel, multi-brand
approach led to the airline
dubbing itself a ?new world
carrier?. Its breakaway from
the traditional low-cost
model led to the addition
of features more closely
associated with full service
airlines. This included extra
legroom seats (referred
to as ?The Blue Zone?),
the creation of premium
lounges and seat back
video screens that offered
satellite television for a fee.
In May 2010, founding
CEO Brett Godfrey left
Virgin Blue, having
created a strong and
viable business that had
transformed air travel in
Australia.
A NEW
APPROACH
There was one area in
which Virgin Blue fell short
of its larger rival ? business
www.aviation-news.co.uk
replace Godfrey and lead
Virgin Blue into its second
decade. Borghetti reevaluated the structure of
Virgin Blue and introduced
a new vision for the
airline.
By 2011, it had
rebranded as Virgin
Australia, a name that
gradually replaced
both Pacific Blue and V
Australia. As such, Virgin
A spectacular view of a Virgin Australia
Australia
was
able
to create a recognisable
Boeing 777 landing at Los Angeles. Virgin
and concise presence across its global
Australia-photo by Tim Bowrey
network. Polynesian Blue was subsequently
rebranded as Virgin Samoa in December
travel. Despite its ?new world? approach,
that year.
there wasn?t a business class cabin on
Coinciding with its name change, the
board its narrow body fleet. Furthermore,
main airline established a viable domestic
the mixed bag of brands, consisting of Virgin
business class offering. To facilitate this,
Blue, Pacific Blue, Polynesian Blue and V
it acquired Airbus A330-200s for use on
Australia, meant marketing and selling the
key routes between Australia?s east coast
company?s offering was more fragmented
and the booming city of Perth in Western
than many competing airlines.
Australia.
Former Qantas Executive General
The airline was careful to preserve the
Manager John Borghetti was selected to
essence of the Virgin
Boeing 737-800 VH-YFV between
Blue culture, and its take
flights at Canberra in 2016.
on a quintessentially
Key-Tom Allett
Aussie style of customer
engagement. This culture
helped the relaunched
airline?s reputation to soar,
with it becoming a popular
choice for business
travellers.
EXPANDING
SERVICES
In 2012, Virgin Australia
set its sights on a new
wave of expansion,
leading it to acquire more
A330-200s. Part of this
growth was a commitment
to develop business class
services and, to that
end, a new product was
introduced offering a 2-2-2
layout of angled beds.
The new service was
widely touted as the finest
of its kind in Australia?s
domestic market, leading
to Qantas responding by
placing an internationalgrade 747-400 on
domestic duties.
In April 2013, Virgin
Australia acquired
Western Australian
regional carrier Skywest
Airlines, rebranding
it as Virgin Australia
Regional Airlines. The
two organisations had
a long-established
partnership, with Skywest
operating Virgin?s new
fleet of ATR turboprops,
79
introduced on Australia?s
east coast from 2011. The
acquisition not only gave
Virgin a significant footing
in the regional market, but
also introduced Fokker 50s,
Fokker 100s and A320s to
its fleet.
The business expanded
further in 2014, with the
acquisition of low-cost
carrier Tigerair. Virgin opted
to retain the Tigerair brand,
which has given it a vehicle
to grow its appeal to lowbudget leisure travellers.
It has since moved to
standardise the Tigerair fleet,
gradually replacing its A320s
with 737s to match the
equipment used by Virgin?s
mainline operation.
As Virgin?s push to
acquire corporate travellers
made inroads, Qantas
announced the creation of
a new world-class business
suite. It?s 1-2-1 fully flat bed
design threatened to eclipse
Virgin Australia?s 2-2-2
angled-bed offering. Starting
from 2015, the business
suite was rolled out across
Qantas? A330 aircraft. It has
since been included on new
Boeing 787s and will be
added to some other types.
Not to be outdone, Virgin reinvented its
wide body corporate class product in 2016
when it launched ?The Business?. It featured
a 1-2-1 layout, with the seats arranged in a
reverse herringbone design, and has been
widely celebrated by critics as one of the
finest premium services in the sky.
?The Business? was introduced in the
A330s, which flew the coast-to-coast
Top: One of ?The Business? seats in an A330200. They are also in the 777-300ERs.
Above: State-of-the-art 16in touch screens are
at the heart of the entertainment system in
business class.
sectors between Perth, Sydney and
Melbourne. It has since found its way into
the airline?s Boeing 777 fleet, allowing for
the standardisation of Virgin Australia?s
wide-body offering. ?The
Business? soon won an
array of awards and
received excellent reviews.
Sharp explained: ?The
coast-to-coast service has
evolved greatly since its
launch. Now, these routes
are operated by a younger,
more fuel-efficient fleet.?
Improvements in
business class have
been coupled with the
introduction of Economy X
across the airline?s domestic
fleet. For an additional
fee, economy travellers
can reserve extra legroom
seating which comes with
the additional benefits of
priority embarkation and
dedicated overhead storage
space.
Since its rebrand, Virgin
Australia has grown to
become a strong player in
premium travel across the
Asia Pacific region. It?s
now a household name in
Australia, New Zealand
and internationally, giving
the Virgin brand a sizable
footprint in this part of the
globe.
Sharp added: ?Virgin
Australia is one of the
largest Virgin companies
in the world by employee numbers, and the
largest Virgin business in Australia. We also
have the most number of aircraft of all the
Virgin airlines.?
TRANSITION AND TERMINALS
Virgin?s growth into a premium carrier
provided it with an opportunity to reflect
on its fleet and airport structure. After
VIRGIN AUSTRALIA ? A TRAVELLER?S EXPERIENCE
Flight details: VA569 Melbourne to Perth on
January 29, 2018. Aircraft: Airbus A330-200.
Embarkation: The crew meet passengers at the
main door. On presentation of a business class
boarding pass, the cabin crew escort guests to
their seats. All passengers (regardless of travel
class) are welcomed by name while a business
class customer?s hand luggage is stowed in the
overhead locker by the crew and jackets are hung
for passengers in a Virgin-branded suit cover.
Seating: The business class seats have a reverse
herringbone design and are in a 1-2-1 layout. The
seats convert into a fully flat bed. Finished in
leather, they come with a plush blanket, a pillow,
noise-cancelling headphones and a comprehensive
menu. Other features include USB power, multiple
lighting options, a large table for dining and working
and direct aisle access for all.
In economy, seats are laid out in a 2-4-2
configuration and offer a standard pitch of 31in
(79cm). Several offer a more generous 34in
(86cm) and are sold as ?Economy X?. All seats have
individual TV screens and headphones are provided
for all on embarkation.
80
Refreshments and dinner: After take-off, the meal
service begins. Dinner in business class consists
of an initial drinks service, which includes snacks.
There is a large selection of drinks, including
Australian and international beer, wine, spirits and
soft drinks, all of which are detailed in a menu.
Following this, passenger dinner orders are taken
and the tray table set with a white tablecloth, silver
cutlery and a salt and peppershaker in the shape
of the Sydney Opera House. The menu includes
a soup as well as a meat or vegetarian starter,
accompanied by warm artisan bread rolls, served
with butter. Main courses typically include a variety
of red meat, white meat, fish and vegetarian dishes.
Each meal is individually prepared for passengers
and delivered to the seat. Following main courses,
dessert is offered along with a cheese option, tea
and coffee.
For economy passengers, all coast-to-coast flights
come with hot meals, which are complimentary.
There are several options and each is served along
with beer, wine and soft drinks. For anyone with
specific dietary requirements, special meals can be
arranged before the flight.
Entertainment: Virgin Australia prides itself
on offering a high-quality inflight entertainment
experience. On its 737s, this comes in the form of a
Wi-Fi streaming service, which can be accessed on
passengers? own handheld devices using the Virgin
Australia app. On the A330s (and 777s), there are
individual screens built into every seat. The system
provides hundreds of options including the latest
and popular films, TV shows, documentaries and a
sizable music selection.
Business class passengers are provided with
high quality noise-cancelling headphones, while
economy travellers receive complimentary ear-pods.
The system also includes a selection of Virginbranded content, a moving map and information
about the destination.
Arrival: On arrival, business class passengers
are given priority disembarkation. There are
friendly staff at the aircraft door, aerobridge exit
and throughout the terminal to offer any additional
support. Luggage for business class as well
as Velocity Frequent Flyers (Virgin?s loyalty
programme) are tagged as priority and arrive first
on the baggage carousel.
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
an extensive review, the
aged Fokker 50s, acquired
when Skywest was
absorbed, were retired in
2016, while more changes
were announced later that
year. ?We are in the midst
of a fleet simplification
programme,? Rob Sharp
reflected. ?As part of the
programme, the Embraer
190 fleet was retired [the
E170s having left the
carrier in 2012], with its
last flight occurring on
February 3, 2017. Virgin
Australia Regional Airlines
will continue to operate the
F100 fleet in the charter
market, and the ATRs will
continue in regional New
South Wales. We are
retiring six of the ATR 72500s and two of the ATR
72-600s, leaving us with six
ATR 72-600s.?
Another key focus for
the airline in recent years
has been the development
of its services in terminals,
leading to a continuous
improvement programme
across its hubs. Perth is
home to one of Virgin?s
flagship terminals, which
opened in 2015. Built in synergy with
Perth International Airport, the new ?T1
Domestic? was a greenfield (no existing
building or infrastructure) project, which
answered many of Virgin?s operational
concerns in the Western Australian capital.
Sharp said: ?Prior to the new dedicated
www.aviation-news.co.uk
Top: Two members of the Virgin Australia
cabin crew, in the company?s colourful
uniform. Virgin Australia
Above: The A330-200?s main economy
class cabin which has a 2-4-2 configuration.
Below: The airline retired the E190 in February
last year.
Virgin Australia terminal in
Perth being constructed,
our operations were split
over three terminals for
international, domestic and
regional operations. This
created a clunky customer
experience for anyone
needing to transfer onto
connecting flights. Now,
all Virgin Australia regular
public transport services
depart and arrive from T1,
while the linked T2 regional
terminal is dedicated to
charter flights.
?The beauty of Perth
was we had a blank
canvass to create an
experience that rivalled
every domestic terminal in
Australia and designs were
focused on providing an
architecturally-designed,
fly-through check-in format.?
To that end, Virgin
Australia invested
heavily in technology
across the Perth design
to ensure a smooth
customer experience,
leading it to become
the launch customer of
a new hybrid check-in
technology created by
global air transport IT provider, SITA. ?This
technology allows the check-in experience
to be tailored to each guest, and means
we can easily change operations to meet
customer demand,? Sharp elaborated.
?It?s about giving our customers
the freedom to choose their airport
81
experience, but also improves efficiency and
speed. It frees up our people to perform a
concierge-style role and support our guests
as they move through.?
In addition, the new terminal has ample
covered aerobridges allowing the airline
to expand, a 400-person premium lounge,
and a sizable concourse with an array
of eateries and retail outlets to entertain
waiting travellers.
New lounges have also been built
at Brisbane Domestic Airport and Gold
Coast Airport, while others at Melbourne
and Sydney have had ongoing upgrades;
adding priority screening and expanded
seating areas.
?The no-frills carrier
offered affordable
flights for a leisure
market that had never
before enjoyed such
choice or flexibility.?
year the carrier announced a long-awaited
return to profit for the first half of the
financial year, while at the same time
it expanded its international services,
focusing on growing a presence in Hong
Kong with new direct flights from Melbourne
and Sydney. It operates an extensive
network across Australia, while its aircraft
can be seen as far afield as the US, Asia
and the Pacific Islands. The airline is a
major contributor to regional travel, as well
as supporting the vast minerals sector
through charter flights to mine sites across
Western Australia.
Despite the size and scope of the carrier
today, it retains that ?can do? spirit found on
the very first Virgin Blue 737.
FUTURE OUTLOOK
As Virgin Australia approaches its 18th
anniversary, its outlook is bright. This
Below: Boeing 737-800 VH-VUV on the ramp in Perth. It originally joined Virgin Blue in 2010.
The next issue is a Classic Jetliners special and will be on sale on May 17, 2018*
*UK scheduled on sale date. Please note that the overseas deliveries are likely to be after this date.
May 2018
Volume 80 No 5.
COVER DESIGN: Steve Donovan
& Tracey Croft
Founded in 1939 as
Air Defence Cadet
Corps Gazette.
PRODUCTION MANAGER: Janet Watkins
EDITOR: Dino Carrara
E-mail: dino.carrara@keypublishing.com
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS:
Nigel Price & Paul Watson
General enquiries to:
Tuesday Osborne,
Aviation News incorporating Jets,
PO Box 100, Stamford, Lincs,
PE9 1XQ, UK
Tel: +44 (0)1780 755131
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www.aviation-news.co.uk
DESIGN: Froggatt Designs
ADVERTISING AND COMMERCIAL:
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E-mail: sophie.studd@keypublishing.com
Group Marketing Manager:
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GROUP CEO & PUBLISHER:
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Contacts: PO Box 300, Stamford, Lincs, PE9 1BR, UK.
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Aviation News incorporating Jets (ISSN: 2047-7198),
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The Editorial team is always happy to receive correspondence. It is all read
and appreciated, but we cannot always guarantee a reply. While every care is
taken with material, the Publisher cannot be held responsible for any loss or
damage incurred. All items submitted for publication are subject to our terms
and conditions. These are regularly updated without prior notice and are freely
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are strongly recommended to take their own precautions before parting with any
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or on Twitter @AvNewsMag
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
Announcing the Schools
Aerospace Challenge 2017
Schools Aerospace Challenge is a competition
for 16-18 year olds, challenged to submit
design solutions to a fictitious, but realistic,
RAF Operational Requirement.
Each year, teams from schools, Air Training
Corps or other youth organisations, answer a
realistic aerospace design challenge set together
with the Royal Air Force. Shortlisted teams get
to experience lots of what the aerospace world
has to offer in a five-day Summer School at
Cranfield University.
Winners are announced at a prestigious
reception in London, with a prize of �000
for first place, and �000 to two runners up.
So, what are you waiting for?
Have you got what it takes? Get started on
the Schools Aerospace Challenge 2017.
For registration and competition details
go to
www.schools-aerospace-challenge.com
or email
info@schools-aerospace-challenge.com
Commemorating the 100th anniversary
of the RAF, this 100-piece limited edition
pays tribute to RAF legend ?Al? Deere.
Showcasing an engraved disc of
aluminium from Deere?s Supermarine
Spitfire X4276 engine, a plane that
was excavated over 40 years after an
accidental mid-flight collision, the C8 ?Al
Deere? TM-B Limited Edition celebrates
one of the RAF?s most revered pilots - and
in the Spitfire, its most iconic plane.
christopherward.co.uk
torville, California for storage
25.10.09)
G-DDAV
Robinson R44 Raven II
12124
To France
G-DGBE
Schleicher Ka.6CR-PE
9133A
Cancelled by CAA (CofA expired
09.04.18)
G-DHVM
FFA DH.112 Venom FB.50
752
Cancelled by CAA (Permit to Fly expired
29.04.16)
G-DOCE
Boeing 737-436
25350
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
03.12.14)
G-DOCG
Boeing 737-436
25350
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
16.12.13)
G-DOCH
Boeing 737-436
25408
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
08.11.13)
G-DOCS
Boeing 737-436
25862
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
10.06.14)
G-DOCU
Boeing 737-436
25854
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
03.08.13)
Embraer Phenom 100, PR-LTJ, has been given the registration G-CKEF
for Affinity Flying Training Services. The aircraft will be operated by
the RAF and has been allocated ZM337. John Wilson
G-BNLG
G-BNLH
Boeing 747-436
Boeing 747-436
24049
24050
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
15.12.14)
G-BNLI
Boeing 747-436
24051
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
20.08.14)
G-BNLM
Boeing 747-436
24055
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
09.12.13)
G-BNLR
Boeing 747-436
24447
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
31.01.14)
G-BNLS
Boeing 747-436
24629
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
20.05.14)
G-BNLT
Boeing 747-436
24630
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
23.04.14)
G-BNLU
Boeing 747-436
25406
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
03.11.14)
G-BNLV
Boeing 747-436
25427
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown to
Teruel, Spain for storage 31.07.16)
G-BNWC
Boeing 767-336
24335
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
23.09.14)
G-BNWD
G-BNWH
G-BNWN
G-BNWO
G-BNWR
G-BNWU
G-BSJU
G-BUOR
Boeing 767-336
Boeing 767-336
Boeing 767-336
Boeing 767-336
Boeing 767-336
Boeing 767-336
Cessna 150M
24336
24340
25444
25442
25732
25829
150-76430
PREVIOUS IDENTITIES
REG'N
P.I.
REG?N
P.I.
G-AXMT
ex D-EIBU
G-THUN
ex N147PF
G-BWDO
ex M-ERRY
G-VMNK
ex D-ALPA
G-BXAG
ex ZJ255
G-XIXT
ex LY-BDU
G-BXHB
ex ZJ262
G-ZEZE
ex G-LVES
G-BXJR
ex ZJ270
EI-ECD
ex D-ASXQ
G-BXKR
ex ZJ274
EI-FPW
ex C-GIAU
G-BXMB
ex ZJ278
EI-GDY
ex N6055X
G-CIYX
ex 5N-BSO
EI-GDZ
ex N1786B
G-CKEF
ex PR-LTJ
EI-GEV
ex OY-YCC
G-CKGP
ex N2843B
EI-GEW
ex PT-MVG
G-BKGW
ex N2770B
EI-GEX
ex PT-MVL
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
10.11.13)
G-CKOF
ex N1002R
EI-GEZ
ex HL8207
G-CKSA
ex D-HECY
EI-GJD
ex N1799B
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
15.05.14)
G-CKUU
ex HA-YCD
EI-SIE
ex D-AVVG
G-CKVD
ex D-9291
M-AATD
ex M-IRAS
G-CKVW
ex HB-ZMX
M-ATAK
ex VP-BJC
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 19.03.13. Last noted dismantled
at Kings Farm, Thurrock, Essex 05.17)
G-CLBZ
ex I-BZEB
M-CDBM
ex N305BY
G-CSPT
ex VH-AQQ
M-GFGC
ex B-8312
To Netherlands as PH-MSV
G-CYPC
ex N940HL
M-JSWB
ex N292GA
G-DHKN
ex N174AA
M-ODEM
ex N589MD
G-DONE
ex C-GADL
M-WRLD
ex HB-GJO
G-EZRS
ex F-WWDN
M-YGLF
ex N291GA
G-FXER
ex N451FL
2-AERB
ex HL7597
G-GBTV
ex N355J
2-CETH
ex TC-ETH
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
08.01.15)
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
18.08.14)
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
23.09.14)
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
10.03.14)
CASA 1-131E Series 2000
Jungmann
2134
G-BUXD
Maule MXT-7-160
17001C
To Belarus
G-BVHM
Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk
38-79A0313
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 23.08.13. Last noted stored at
Bagby, North Yorkshire 05.17)
G-BXCE
Eurocopter AS350BB Ecureuil
2971
To USA as N38RM
G-GOFR
ex F-GOFR
2-CETJ
ex TC-ETJ
G-BXIL
Eurocopter AS350BB Ecureuil
2994
To USA as N131TC
G-JRXI
ex C-GFNP
2-FINC
ex HZ-AEF
G-BXRP
Schweizer 269C
S 1334
To Australia
G-JSIC
ex D-KBHB
2-FIND
ex HZ-AEB
G-BZJB
IAv Bacau Yak-52
811601
To Poland
G-LEXS
ex G-IVJM
2-GZEN
ex G-EZEN
G-CCWE
Lindstrand LBL 330A
984
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 09.02.14)
G-LOGN
ex VH-JYM
2-HOVA
ex G-PRFI
G-LSKS
ex N657JG
2-MSCC
ex 9M-MSC
G-PCJS
ex UR-GRG
2-NICE
ex N664D
G-PDGV
ex OY-GIS
2-RLAV
ex F-WXAA
G-POTA
ex G-CIRJ
2-ZERO
ex PH-PVR
G-SUEM
ex PH-CCD
G-CDDV
Cameron Z-250
10625
To Czech Republic
G-CELW
Boeing 737-377
23659
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Cotswold Airport, Gloucestershire for
parting out 17.01.17)
G-CEOI
Cameron C-60
www.aviation-news.co.uk
10977
To Austria
69
REGISTER REVIEW BY STUART MCDIARMID
G-DOCV
Boeing 737-436
25855
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (flown
to Victorville, California for storage
29.10.13)
G-DUGI
Lindstrand LBL 90A
562
Cancelled by CAA (CofA current to
13.07.18)
G-EHOT
Cessna 172
28683
To Germany
G-EZBL
Airbus A319-111
3053
To Austria as OE-LQT
G-EZBY
Airbus A319-111
3176
To Austria as OE-LQH
G-EZDE
Airbus A319-111
3426
To Austria as OE-LKK
G-EZDP
Airbus A319-111
3675
To Austria as OE-LLM
G-EZDX
Airbus A319-111
3754
To Austria as OE-LQO
G-EZEN
Airbus A319-111
2245
To Guernsey as 2-GZEN
G-EZFD
Airbus A319-111
3810
To Austria as OE-LQP
G-EZFE
Airbus A319-111
3824
To Austria as OE-LQM
G-EZFG
Airbus A319-111
3845
To Austria as OE-LQQ
G-EZFK
Airbus A319-111
4048
To Austria as OE-LKL
G-EZFN
Airbus A319-111
4076
To Austria as OE-LQG
G-EZFR
Airbus A319-111
3053
To Austria as OE-LQV
G-EZTL
Airbus A320-214
4125
To Austria as OE-IVX
G-EZTV
Airbus A320-214
4234
To Austria as OE-IJP
G-EZUG
Airbus A320-214
4680
To Austria as OE-IJL
G-FAVS
Piper PA-32-300 Cherokee Six
32-7540091
To Spain
G-GIDY
Europa Aviation Europa XS
PFA 247-13467
To Netherlands
G-GRSR
Schempp-Hirth Discus bT
165
To Germany
G-HRLM
Brugger Colibri MB2
PFA 043-10118
Cancelled as Destroyed (Permit to Fly
expired 16.08.12, details unknown)
G-IRKB
Piper PA-28R-201 Arrow III
28R-7737071
Bombardier Global Express XRS, M-VQBI, has been registered in
Luxembourg as LX-ABC. AirTeamImages.com/Alex Snow
G-OLFA
Eurocopter AS350B3 Ecureuil
3108
To USA as N33AR
G-OTIF
BAe 146-200
E2056
To Australia as VH-SOF
G-PRFI
Agusta Bell 206B JetRanger III
8556
To Guernsey as 2-HOVA
G-RVRI
Cessna 172H
172-55822
To USA as N172PS
G-STLL
BRM Aero Bristell NG5 Speed
Wing
LAA 385-15183
To New Zealand
G-TZEE
SOCATA TB10 Tobago
727
Cancelled as Destroyed (CofA expired
27.06.17, details unknown)
G-WACJ
Beech 76 Duchess
ME-278
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 22.07.11, fuselage to fire dump at
Dublin Weston)
G-XRTV
Bombardier Challenger 601-3A
5085
To Canada
G-ZYAK
IAv Bacau Yak-52
877415
To Belgium as OO-CCP
Cancelled by CAA (badly damaged in
ground collision with Cessna F152
G-BJWH at Elstree 27.10.17)
EI-AEJ
Piper PA-16 Clipper
16-451
To Switzerland
EI-FED
Boeing 737-8KN
40236
To India as VT-JTN
EI-FJR
Boeing 737-86N
36820
To Ukraine as UR-PSZ
EI-FML
Airbus A319-111
2240
To Spain as EC-MUT
M-ASTR
Dornier 328-310
3176
To Germany as D-BSEA
M-FASH
Dassault Falcon 900B
173
To Saudi Arabia
M-HNDA
Honda HA.420 Hondajet
42000018
To USA as N420EU
M-HSNT
Bombardier Challenger 300
20233
To San Marino as T7-TOP
M-VQBI
Bombardier Global
Express XRS
9213
To Luxembourg as LX-ABC
2-QWEA
Boeing 737-8H6
40150
To USA as N764BC
2-QWEB
Boeing 737-8H6
40153
To USA as N766BC
2-RLAT
Boeing 777-31H
29063
To Malaysia as 9M-FSM
G-IVJM
Agusta A109E Power
11154
Re-registered as G-LEXS
G-JACK
Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III
421C1411
To Russia
G-JMOE
Boeing 757-330
29012
To Germany as D-ABOE
G-LRGE
Lindstrand LBL 330A
929
Cancelled as Permanently WFU (CofA
expired 13.03.14)
G-LVES
Cessna 182S
182-80741
Re-registered as G-ZEZE
G-MSFC
Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk
38-81A0067
Cancelled by CAA (CofA current to
20.11.18)
G-MVZI
Thruster R300
089-T300-387
Cancelled by CAA (but restored again
later in the month)
G-MWUB
Solar Wings Pegasus XL-R
SW-WA-1510
To Pakistan
G-NDOL
Europa Aviation Europa
PFA 247-12594
Cancelled as Destroyed (crashed just
after take-off from Coal Aston, Derbyshire
28.05.17)
Key: NB ? Nominal Base
A place name in brackets relates to the owner?s address as where the aircraft is based is unknown.
UPDATES & CORRECTIONS
70
REG'N
DETAILS
REG?N
DETAILS
G-AKRA
Became D-ELIR 14.07.17
G-CHHM
Became F-CHHM 11.12.17
G-ANCX
Became OO-MOT 16.11.17
G-CHIO
Became OK-0015 13.07.17
G-AYCJ
Became AP-BMB
G-CHVT
Became F-CHVT 28.12.17
G-BKBN
Became RA-2615G
G-CIXC
Became LZ-AHI 18.10.17
G-BLEP
Became OK-6262 11.08.17 (cancelled as WFU 18.01.10)
G-CJEV
Became OO-ZES 15.02.18
G-BLLN
Became F-GLLN 28.12.17
G-CJKD
Became D-8215 25.09.17
G-BOYP
Became D-ERWL 03.07.17
G-CJMI
Became OO-NSL 08.02.18
G-BSRD
Became D-OSRD 08.11.17
G-CJVR
Became OH-HLR 20.02.17
G-BTOC
Became N199AH 7.12.17
G-CJZD
Type officially changed to a EuroFOX 912(S) 03.11.17
G-BTXT
Became F-HTXT 11.12.17
G-CKIJ
Became OH-HBV 10.07.17
G-BUAD
Became HB-BVI 20.12.17 (cancelled by CAA 10.03.95)
G-CKJY
Became F-HSAV 06.12.17
G-BWCK
Constructors number officially changed to PFA G/03-1260 & Builder changed to ACSM Hart 19.01.18
G-CKJD
Became OK-3210 11.09.17
G-BWMG
Became TZ-22H Mali Air Force
G-DCPA
Became VH-OVK 22.02.18
G-BXGH
Became D-EULL 13.10.17
G-DGCL
Became D-KKCL 14.08.17
G-BYOZ
Type officially changed to a Mainair Rapier (Modified) 22.01.18
G-DGSM
Became D-KGGE 02.08.17
G-BZIK
Became OE-ZIK 13.12.17
G-DMEV
Became F-GLBL 12.12.17
G-CBSR
Became OO-YAK 15.01.18
G-DMPP
Type officially changed to a DA 42M-NG 17.11.17
G-CCVM
Type officially changed to an RV-7 01.02.18
G-EOMP
Became PH-OMP 12.01.18
G-CDGG
Became PH-CVE 31.07.17
G-EZZY
Type officially changed to an Evektor EV-97A 22.01.18
G-CDSY
Became N213SF 23.02.18
G-FLIZ
Became PH-TOT 12.01.18
G-CDZD
Became VH-TON 31.01.18
G-FORC
Became D-ELSY 16.10.17
G-CECX
Became N484AB 13.02.18
G-HRLK
Became D-EAJA 04.10.17
G-CENI
Became ZK-EPY 18.12.17
G-IMED
Became F-HDOG 12.17
G-CFVK
Type officially changed to a Skyranger 912(2) 10.01.18
G-JAMA
Became OK-ASS 19.06.17
G-CGFS
Became LN-WNC 18.01.18
G-KCST
Became HZ-KT01 06.16
G-CHEI
Became EC-MUR 01.18
G-LEAA
Became F-HASJ 08.12.17
G-CHHJ
Type officially changed to a EuroFOX 912 22.11.17
G-LZZY
Became I-LZZY 12.17
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
NEW BOOKS FROM AIR-BRITAIN
AUSTER ? the Company and the Aircraft
Tom Wenham, Rod Simpson & Malcolm Fillmore
Auster Aircraft has a long and distinguished history, starting with its formation as British Taylorcraft in 1938 and ending with
its absorption into Beagle Aircraft in 1960.The Auster was not, strictly, a new design since it had its origins in the American
Taylorcraft two seater. However, World War II gave it a welcome momentum which led to more than 1,600 artillery spotter
Austers being built for the British and other air forces. The Rearsby factory was at maximum production during the war - but,
as with all other aircraft manufacturing plants, it found a sudden collapse in military orders when peace came. However,
there were returning flyers keen to keep their skills alive and the Autocrat and its successors were successful, not only in
the UK but also across the world. Using the same basic airframe, the Auster constantly changed its shape and the 180hp
Husky of 1960 was a very different animal from the original 55hp Taylorcraft Model C.
Austers were sold all over the world and were used for many tasks including crop spraying, aerial advertising and joyriding.
The company also developed new models including the very successful AOP.9, and the less successful Agricola, Atlantic
and Avis. This is the story of an iconic aviation company and classic light aircraft which live on in the hands of enthusiastic
owners today.
Members �.95 Non-members �.95
All Quick Reference Books
Members: �95 Non-members: �.50
AIRLINE FLEETS QUICK REFERENCE 2018
Annual edition of this very successful title. The content gives the fleets of all the operators you are likely to see with jet
and turbine equipment at any of the world's major airports down to approximately the size of a Jetstream.
Around 170 countries and 1700 operators in 304 pages. A5 soft-back format
INCLUDES LISTING COVERING CORPORATE & VIP AIRLINERS
MILITARY TRANSPORTS QUICK REFERENCE 2018
MTQR 2018 is produced in the established QR format and lists the worldwide fixed-wing military transports and patrol aircraft
fleets. Types range from the largest types down to some of the larger single-engine types such as the Cessna 208 and PC-12;
patrol types include the Atlantique and the Orion.
All known Western, Soviet and Chinese types are included. In addition to aircraft operated by the various air forces, navies and
armies, aircraft operated by governmental bodies are also included. Data includes serial or registration and c/n, and is presented
in order of country, air arm and then serial. In the case of Russia those aircraft with new style RF-prefixes, serials and associated colour codes are added. For ease of use the aircraft operated by the US air arms are in order of type rather than serial.
A5 soft-back format
BUSINESS JETS & TURBOPROPS QUICK REFERENCE 2018
Annual edition of this title. BizQR2018 includes all the world?s civil and military Business Jets in service
at January 2018, listed in registration/serial order by country.
Also includes all BUSINESS TURBOPROPS and
CORPORATE AIRLINERS in civil and military service.
Over 30,000 entries listed, civil and military.. 192 pages. A5 soft-back format
UK& IRELAND QUICK REFERENCE 2018
The 17th edition of this annual publication lists registrations & types of all current UK, Ireland, Channel Islands, Isle of Man &
foreign registered aircraft based in the UK correct to the end of February 2018. Includes the complete current UK, Irish and UKbased US military serials as well as military/civil registration/serial decode. Also includes an expanded aircraft index, museums
& VHF frequency listing.
A5 softback, 176 pages
Order at www.air-britain.co.uk
Air-Britain (Trading) Ltd, Unit 1A, Munday Works, 58-66 Morley Road, Tonbridge, TN9 1RA.
Tel: 01732 363815
E-mail: sales@air-britain.co.uk
ALL BOOKS POST FREE UK (overseas at cost)
Cheque or credit/debit card payments (not Amex)
AIRPORT MOVEMENTS COMPILED BY CARL HOPE
AIRPORT MOVEMENTS
A round-up of notable aircraft visiting UK airports.
ABERDEEN
1/2 SE-RHJ Citation 560XL. 5/2 4X-CUZ Hawker
800XP. 6/2 S5-ICR Citation 560XL. 8/2 OEGGG Citation 560XLS+. 11/2 OY-HLV EC175B
DanCopter to NHV for maintenance, dep 15/3;
D-IATE Cessna F.406 Air-Taxi Europe. 14/2 OEGXL Citation 560XL. 16/2 LX-EAA Learjet 45.
21/2 LX-ONE Learjet 45. 22/2 OO-JCV PC-12.
BENBECULA
20/2 50+68 Transall LTG61, German AF. 26/2
ZH004 Islander 651 Sqn, AAC.
BIGGIN HILL
1/2 D-CCGM Phenom 300. 4/2 F-GLNH Beech
1900D Twin Jet; OE-IGG Global Express; TC-ABN
Challenger 605. 7/2 RA-09602 Falcon 7X. 8/2
C-GLBX Global Express; SP-KHI Challenger
350. 9/2 OO-KOR CitationJet 525 CJ2+. 10/2
HB-PSK PA-46 JetPROP DLX; LX-JET Legacy
450; XA-CHD Falcon 2000LX; 2-CUTE Challenger
601-3A. 12/2 PH-SLC Vulvanair P-68C Observer 2;
PR-OMX Westwind 1. 13/2 D-FLUR PC-12. 14/2
PH-MDG Citation 680 Sovereign+. 15/2 F-HKAF
Diamond DA42; F-HTLV Cessna 182T; HB-FWI
PC-12. 18/2 F-HEVL Phenom 300; SU-SMM
Gulfstream G450. 20/2 P4-GVV Gulfstream
G450. 21/2 D-IUVH Citation 510 Mustang. 22/2
2-ZERO Cirrus SR-22T. 24/2 F-BPKI CEA DR.221;
N542MP Hondajet. 25/2 C-FLGZ Global 6000;
9H-GPS Citation 560XL. 26/2 D-COLO CitationJet
525C CJ4; D-FKAE TBM 850. 27/2 D-IMRB Beech
C.90GTi. 28/2 D-CAWR Citation 560 Encore; OEGHB Citation 560XLS; OK-HIS & PH-CYP PC-12s;
PH-DFB Diamond DA42.
BIRMINGHAM
1/2 YR-BMM 737-82R Blue Air f/v; 9H-BCP Learjet
45; D-CAWZ Citation 680 Sovereign+. 2/2 LX-RSQ
Learjet 45. 3/2 C-GLWB Gulfstream G200. 4/2
PH-EXT E175STD KLM Cityhopper; N888TY
BBJ1; VQ-BSF Falcon 7X. 5/2 EW-483TI An-12BK
Rubystar also 9th; SP-HAX A321-211 Small Planet
Airlines f/v; PH-LAU Falcon 900EX also 19th. 6/2
UR-CAH An-12BK Ukraine Air Alliance; UR-CQD
An-26B Vulkan Air also 23rd, 25th & 28th; CS-IHP
Falcon 2000. 7/2 4X-CUZ Hawker 800XP; D-IRKE
CitationJet 525 CJ1. 8/2 UR-CNN An-12BK Cavok
Air; D-ABQO Dash 8-Q402 Eurowings f/v. 9/2
D-AUTO Gulfstream G550; D-CFAX Learjet 60.
11/2 D-ABFR A320-214 Eurowings f/v. 12/2 EI72
British company Magma Aviation is using Air Atlanta Icelandic Boeing 747-481(BCF), TF-AMP.
The aircraft is shown arriving at Doncaster Sheffield Airport on February 18. Clive Featherstone
FPG CRJ900LR SAS f/v. 13/2 UR-CKM An-12BP
Cavok Air; UR-CNT An-12BK Ukraine Air Alliance.
14/2 EI-GEV ATR 42-600 Aer Lingus Regional f/v;
RA-26101 An-26-100 Pskovavia; D-IHKW CitationJet
525 CJ1+. 15/2 D-AGWK A319-132 Eurowings
f/v. 16/2 9A-DWA CitationJet 525A CJ2; D-CGMR
Citation 560XLS. 18/2 9H-AMY (also 25th) & 9H-JOY
Challenger 850s. 19/2 D-ATYB 737-8K5 TUIFly
f/v. 20/2 D-ICBA CitationJet 525A CJ2; F-HAHA
Citation 510 Mustang; I-TOPX Beech 400A. 21/2
CS-DVH CitationJet 525B CJ3; CS-DVZ Citation 550
II; D-ISWA CitationJet 525 CJ1. 22/2 EW-259TG
An-12BP Genex. 24/2 HB-JFI Falcon 2000LX. 26/2
CS-TKR 767-36NER EuroAtlantic Airways; N360PZ
Falcon 7X; OE-GXL Citation 560XL. 27/2 N656TT
Gulfstream G650ER; OH-YLW PC-12.
BRISTOL INTERNATIONAL
4/1 D-CAPB Citation 560 Encore+. 6/1 HB-JUF
Gulfstream G650; 9H-FGV Phenom 100. 7/1
OE-GWS Citation 560XLS+. 8/1 131/XQ TBM
700A ET00.060, French AF n/s. 10/1 9H-BBJ
BBJ1 also 25th. 11/1 F-HMBG CitationJet 525A
CJ2. 12/1 D-IEFD Citation 525 M2. 13/1 F-HIPE
Phenom 300. 13/1 OK-BEE Beech 400A. 17/1
9H-FAM Phenom 100 also 24th n/s. 18/1 F-HFKE
ERJ 145LR SiAvia. 20/1 F-HFKF ERJ 145LR
SiAvia; OO-PCJ & OO-PCK PC-12s. 28/1 N542MP
Hondajet.
CAMBRIDGE
15/1 I-NHCO Falcon 2000LX. 23/1 M-OTOR Beech
B.200GT. 27/1 C-FRJZ Astra SPX; OK-JFA Beech
400A. 31/1 M-WATJ Beech B.200GT.
2/2 M-DSKY TBM 910. 11/2 D-CONE Learjet 35A.
18/2 D-CNUE Learjet 60. 19/2 OE-HPG Challenger
300. 22/2 F-GZPE Avanti. 23/2 OO-STU Diamond
DA40. 24/2 2-GNSY Commander 114B. 25/2
D-IPPY Avanti; LX-NEW PC-12.
DURHAM TEES VALLEY
1/12 OY-EDP Citation 650 III also 3rd. 2/12 OKKPP Beech 400A also 9th. 4/12 F-HBZA Citation
550 II. 6/12 D-CBEN Citation 560XLS+; HB-ALL
ATR 72-202/F Zimex Aviation. 7/12 CS-TFQ
Learjet 45. 17/12 F-HERE Citation 510 Mustang.
29/12 9H-PLM Citation 650 VI dep 31st.
7/1 LX-NCG CitationJet 525B CJ3 n/s. 9/1 ECMHZ Gulfstream G650. 12/1 OY-EDP Citation
650 III also 14th n/s. 16/1 PH-SOE PC-12 dep
18th. 22/1 OH-RBX Citation 560XL n/s; LX-ONE
Learjet 45. 14/1 OE-GPS Citation 550 Bravo. 25/1
OO-GEE PC-12. 28/1 D-CFOR Learjet 35A. 30/1
D-IVIP Beech 200. 31/1 F-HINC Learjet 75 n/s.
EAST MIDLANDS
2/1 LN-DYD 737-8JP Norwegian for painting. 4/1
D-IJOA CitationJet 525A CJ2. 5/1 2-TBMI TBM
910; N528QS Gulfstream G550. 9/1 D-FHAZ
Learjet 60. 10/1 D-CHDC Citation 680 Sovereign.
12/1 YL-BBY 737-36Q Air Baltic for painting. 14/1
ZZ335 Voyager KC2 10/101 Sqns, RAF. 20/1 PH-EZP
E190STD KLM Cityhopper Leeds Bradford diversion;
LN-DYE 737-8JP Norwegian for painting; F-HRGD
ERJ 145LU Aero4M; C-FGSJ 767-39HER Cargojet op
for DHL. 21/1 F-HBIR Citation 510 Mustang; N420SK
Challenger 604. 22/1 N243PC Gulfstream G450;
Phoenix Air Gulfstream III, N163PA, taxiing for departure at Glasgow Prestwick Airport on
February 16. Kevin Kennedy
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
RA-82081 An-124-100M Volga-Dnepr Airlines. 23/1
D-ITIP Citation 525 CJ1. 24/1 T7-AMS PC-12; HB-IGV
Falcon 50EX; OY-YCD ATR 72-600 Nordic Aviation
Capital for painting. 26/1 LN-NOT 737-8JP Norwegian
for painting; F-HSAO Citation 680 Sovereign. 30/1
SP-ENL 737-8CX Enter Air for painting.
GLASGOW
2/1 OO-PCM PC-12. 3/1 N939FD 757-23A FedEx
Manchester diversion. 4/1 D-ITIM Hondajet. 5/1
D-ABQG Dash 8-Q402 Eurowings f/v; D-CQAJ
Learjet 35A; D-AEMC E190LR Lufthansa Cityline
f/v; N930ZD TBM 930 c/n 1216 on delivery. 7/1
HA-LXU A321-231(SL) Wizz Air f/v. 9/1 HA-LYW
A320-232(SL) Wizz Air f/v. 10/1 D-AEMB E190LR
Lufthansa Cityline f/v. 14/1 HA-LXR A321-231(SL)
Wizz Air f/v; D-CGAA Citation 560XLS+; 15+01
A319-115(CJ) FBS, German AF o/s; D-AIDM A321231 Lufthansa Keflavik diversion. 15/1 D-IGST
Premier 1A; D-ACKR CRJ900LR Lufthansa
Cityline f/v. 16/1 D-ABQA Dash 8-Q402 Eurowings
f/v. 18/1 YR-BMM 737-82R Blue Air f/v; OO-PCI
PC-12. 21/1 OO-PCK PC-12. 23/1 144615
CC-144B 412 TS, RCAF. 25/1 OK-UGJ Citation
680 Sovereign; D-ABVG Citation 750 X. 26/1 EISLU ATR 72-202/F ASL Airlines. 28/1 D-AGWG
A319-132 Germanwings f/v; D-ACKL CRJ900LR
Lufthansa Cityline f/v. 30/1 OY-NLA Citation 650
III; F-HSYS PA-34-220T. 31/1 A4O-MA 737-8MAX
Oman Air on delivery; D-ABQJ Dash 8-Q402
Eurowings f/v; D-IAKN CitationJet 525A CJ2.
GLOUCESTERSHIRE
2/1 OO-PCJ PC-12. 3/1 OO-PCI PC-12 also 7th9th. 4/1 OK-OKP Cirrus SR-22T also 29th. 6/1
OO-PCK PC-12. 10/1 D-GPEZ PA-30-160C dep
12th. 11/1 D-CEIS Citation 680 Sovereign. 15/1
PH-RLG Citation 680 Sovereign+. 17/1 2-RICH
PA-46-500TP; 2-TBMI TBM 930 dep 2/2. 26/1
2-HELO A109C.
1/2 D-FLEX TBM 700 also 7th. 2/2 D-EPPG PA-46500TP. 4/2 D-INCS CitationJet 525 CJ1 also 5th.
5/2 OK-OKP Cirrus SR-22T also 19th. 8/2 2-JSEG
Eclipse EA.500 also 10th. 11/2 D-IPVD CitationJet
525A CJ2 also 16th; F-GITZ AG5B Tiger. 12/2 OOVDC Beech G36 also 15th. 23/2 2-TBMI TBM 930;
D-FCAE Cessna 208B.
INVERNESS
3/12 T-874 Citation 560XL LTDB, Swiss AF also
7th. 13/12 OE-GIQ Learjet 45 also 18th. 14/12
F-HBPP CitationJet 525B CJ3; 9H-FAM Phenom
100 also 15th. 15/12 OK-RAH Beech 400XP. 18/12
4/F-RAFQ Falcon 900 ET00.060, French AF f/v.
29/12 F-GLND Beech 1900D Regional Airlines; SERMO Learjet 45.
Diamond DA42, D-GLUX, visited Exeter Airport on February 20. Ian Simpson
14/1 D-IJOA CitationJet 525A CJ2. 16/1 TC-FBH
A320-232 Freebird Airlines; EC-MSC Global 6000;
D-IHIR CitationJet 525A CJ2. 18/1 G-JZBG 7378MG Jet2 on delivery; 9H-AMY Challenger 850 Air
X Charter. 21/1 OY-EVO Citation 550 Bravo. 22/1
9H-YES 737-5Q8 Air X Charter. 26/1 F-HPBM
Phenom 100. 30/1 D-BUZZ Citation 750 X.
LIVERPOOL
1/1 HB-JFI Falcon 2000LX n/s. 3/1 D-AJET Legacy
650 n/s also 5th n/s; OK-SLX Citation 560XLS. 4/1
D-CHIC Phenom 300. 5/1 D-CAWX Citation 680
Sovereign also 9th n/s; D-CCCA Learjet 35A. 8/1
N3755P Lockeed 382 Hercules n/s. 9/1 VP-BNE
Gulfstream G550; OE-GBD Astra. 11/1 D-CHRD
Citation 680 Sovereign. 14/1 LN-AGR Falcon
7X. 15/1 D-CFOR Learjet 35A. 17/1 D-IKBO
CitationJet 525A CJ2 n/s. 19/1 D-IROL Do.228100 Businesswings. 23/1 D-AFAI Challenger 604;
D-BUZZ Citation 750 X; D-IJOA CitationJet 525A
CJ2 also 24th. 24/1 N533DL Cessna 208. 30/1
SU-TCE A320-232 Almasria Unversal Airlines;
D-CCCB Learjet 35A; 9H-GPS Citation 560XLS.
31/1 9A-JIM (also 31st) & D-IXXX CitationJet 525
CJ1s.
LONDON GATWICK
1/2 VP-BNC 737-800 Aeroflot f/v; D-CKHG Citation
560XLS. 2/2 VP-BKK 737-800 Aeroflot f/v. 3/2 VQBHB 737-800 Aeroflot f/v. 4/2 OH-LXD A320-214
Finnair f/v. 5/2 D-ASPI A320-214 Small Planet
Airlines Germany f/v. 7/2 EI-FYC 737-8MAX
Norwegian f/v; G-CKOF 787-9 Norwegian f/v;
C-GIAW Westwind 1124A f/v. 8/2 OH-LXF A320214 Finnair f/v. 9/2 G-CKOG 787-9 Norwegian
f/v. 10/2 OE-LBV A320-214 Austrian Airlines f/v;
9H-ILI Challenger 850 VistaJet f/v. 11/2 OH-LXL
A320-214 Finnair f/v. 12/2 VP-BZA 737-8LJ Aeroflot
f/v. 15/2 OH-LXM A320-214 Finnair f/v; OK-SWA
737-8MAX Smartwings f/v; TF-CAT A321-211(SL)
WOW Air f/v; YL-CSH CS300 Air Baltic f/v; TC-GNC
Falcon 2000 f/v. 16/2 B-18915 A350-941 China
Airlines f/v; VP-BSB 737-800 Aeroflot f/v. 17/2
VP-BRR 737-8LJ Aeroflot f/v. 18/2 OH-LZN A321-
231(SL) Finnair f/v. 19/2 OE-FRS CitationJet 525A
CJ2 f/v. 20/2 OO-TCT A320-212 VLM Airlines
f/v. 21/2 HA-LXT A321-231(SL) Wizz Air f/v. 22/2
UR-PSZ 737-800 Ukraine International Airlines f/v.
24/2 HB-JBD CS100 Swissair f/v; N142QS Global
6000 NetJets f/v. 25/2 OH-LXI A320-214 Finnair
f/v; LZ-AOB A319-112 Bulgarian Government
f/v. 26/2 HL7784 777-3B5ER Korean Airlines f/v;
M-GSIR Falcon 900DX f/v. 28/2 VP-BNP 737-800
Aeroflot f/v.
LONDON HEATHROW
1/2 VQ-BRJ 747-8F AirBridgeCargo f/v. 7/2
C-FVLU 787-9 Air Canada f/v. 8/2 EI-SIE A320251N SAS Ireland f/v. 9/2 ET-AVB A350-941
Ethiopian Airlines f/v; OO-SNJ A320-214 Brussels
Airlines f/v. 10/2 HB-JNG 777-300ER Swiss f/v;
VQ-BLQ 747-8F AirBridgeCargo f/v. 11/2 D-ABQM
Dash 8-Q402 Eurowings f/v. 12/2 G-CIXV E170LR
Eastern Airway op for Flybe f/v. 13/2 F-HRBE 7879 Air France f/v. 14/2 HL7202 777-300ER Korean
Air f/v. 16/2 9M-MAD A350-941 Malaysia Airlines
f/v; M-AJOR AW139 f/v. 17/2 9V-SKV A380-841
Singapore Airlines f/v; N451FX Gulfstream G450
f/v; VP-BMD 737-800 Aeroflot f/v. 18/2 EC-MGF
A319-112 Vueling f/v; JA842J 787-8 Japan Airlines
f/v. 19/2 ZS-SXM A330-343E South African
Airways f/v. 20/2 D-ATUZ 737-8K5 TUIfly op for
Eurowings f/v. 21/2 ZS-SXJ A330-343E South
African Airways f/v. 22/2 9V-SKU A380-841
Singapore Airlines f/v; D-BERT Falcon 2000LX f/v;
OM-GEX 737-8AS Air Explore op for Air France.
24/2 A6-EQE 777-300ER Emirates f/v; A7-ANA
A350-1041 Qatar Airways f/v; VQ-BHB 737-800
Aeroflot f/v. 25/2 C-FVLX 787-9 Air Canada f/v;
EC-MGF A321-231(SL) Vueling f/v; G-VMIK A330223 Virgin Atlantic Airways f/v; ZS-SXI A330-343E
South African Airways f/v. 26/2 VP-BGL Legacy
600 f/v. 27/2 4X-EDC 787-9 El Al f/v.
LONDON LUTON
2/2 N850KJ TBM 850; T7-CTG Challenger 605. 3/2
OK-TSM 737-9GJER Travel Service op for Wizz
Air. 5/2 I-AVND Learjet 45. 6/2 D-IFFF Cessna
LEEDS BRADFORD
1/12 D-BFIL Legacy 450; OK-EAS Beech 400A;
D-IJET Avanti. 3/12 LX-TAI PC-12. 5/12 G-JZBE
737-8MG Jet2 on delivery. 8/12 OY-MLS Vulcanair
P-68C. 14/12 SE-RIN CitationJet 525A CJ2;
D-AGRA CRJ200LR Pro Air Aviation. 15/12
OO-CIV CitationJet 525A CJ2. 16/12 OE-GBD
Gulfstream G100. 21/12 G-JZBF 737-8MG Jet2 on
delivery. 25/12 CS-DSF Falcon 8X.
4/1 CS-DGW CitationJet 525B CJ3. 6/1 CS-DSF
Falcon 8X. 13/1 D-IMAX CitationJet 525A CJ2.
www.aviation-news.co.uk
Orange2fly Airbus A320, SX-ORG, operating for Trade Air, at Cardiff Airport on March 16. It
carried French rugby fans for the 6 Nations match with Wales the following day. Phil Woods
73
AIRPORT MOVEMENTS COMPILED BY CARL HOPE
F.406. 7/2 C-FAMB Challenger 650; T7-LLS
Bell 429 Globeranger. 8/2 OY-DBS Falcon 8X;
D-ITFC Beech 200. 9/2 T7-PNI Legacy 600. 10/2
F-HBZA Citation 550 II. 11/2 9H-MRQ Learjet
35A; OD-CXJ Legacy 500. 13/2 N1TS BBJ1. 16/2
F-HJBR Phenom 300. 17/2 EZ-A007 737-7GL
Turkmenistan Airlines; OK-SYN Legacy 650. 18/2
OK-JMD Gulfstream G550; T7-SLA Challenger
850. 19/2 N650NR Gulfstream G650. 20/2
T7-ACA CitationJet 525 CJ1; EC-MJU 737-85P
Air Europa. 21/2 VP-BJN Global 5000; OE-LDN
Challenger 650. 22/2 OY-RUO ATR 42-500 Danish
Air Charter; OK-ZUB Beech 400XP; G-EZRS
A320-214(SL) easyJet on delivery. 23/2 CS-DPL
Global 6000. 24/2 OE-LEO Gulfstream G650;
TC-AAA Challenger 605. 25/2 N656FN Falcon 7X.
26/2 T7-WMB Global 6000; VP-CMR Gulfstream
G650ER. 27/2 F-HASJ Citation 510 Mustang.
28/2 OY-NEW Falcon 8X; D-IMOI Citationjet 525
CJ1; N280LS Gulfstream G280; HB-FXC Pilatus
PC-12.
LONDON SOUTHEND
2/2 D-EPPG PA-46-500TP f/v; F-GMSN Cessna
172S. 3/2 9H-YOU Challenger 850 f/v, n/s. 6/2
D-IHEB CitationJet 525 CJ1 f/v, n/s. 6/2 2-AKOP
Commander 114B; D-IPPY Avanti; OY-NCO
Do.328JET Sun-Air f/v, London City diversion;
HB-AEO Do.328-100 Skywork Airlines London
City diversion; OE-LGD & OE-LGG Dash 8-Q402s
Austrian Airlines both London City diversions; OEIZP A320-214(SL) ex Air Berlin D-ABHJ f/v, to Air
Livery, rolled out in easyJet Europe colours 26th
& dep 5/3; OE-IZT A320-214 ex Air Berlin D-ABDX
f/v, to Air Livery, rolled out in easyJet Europe
colours 19th & dep 19/3. 15/2 D-CSOS Learjet 45
n/s. 17/2 D-EBIE Mooney M.20K. 22/2 OE-IZE
A320-214 ex Air Berlin D-ABHM f/v, to Air Livery,
rolled out in easyJet Europe colours 8/3 & dep
15/3. 22/2 D-CCCA Learjet 35A.
MANCHESTER
1/2 HB-JCA CS300 Swiss f/v; OK-NEO A319112 CSA f/v, op for Eurowings. 2/2 D-ABQA
DHC8-Q402 Eurowings f/v; LX-JNC Challenger
605 f/v. 5/2 OH-LZP A321-231(SL) Finnair f/v;
G-VNAP A340-642 Virgin Atlantic for painting at
Air Livery; F-HSFJ Citation 680A Latitude f/v. 6/2
9V-SMS A350-941 Singapore Airlines f/v. 7/2
OK-PET A319-112 CSA op for Eurowings, f/v. 8/2
F-HPBM Phenom 100 f/v; D-CMDH Citation 680
Sovereign f/v. 9/2 SP-SPD ATR 72-212/F Sprint
Air f/v; N683GA Global Express f/v. 10/2 PH-EXM
E175STD KLM Cityhopper f/v. 11/2 N535RV
Hawker 800XP f/v. 12/2 YL-PSD 737-86N Primera
Air Nordic f/v, for painting at Air Livery; A7-CGC
Gulfstream G650 f/v. 13/2 EI-SIC A320-251N
SAS f/v. 14/2 EI-SIE A320-251N SAS f/v; D-CLAV
Phenom 300 f/v. 15/2 CN-RGP E190IGW Royal
Air Maroc f/v; CN-NMG A320-214 Air Arabia Maroc
f/v; EI-GEV ATR 42-600 Aer Lingus Regional
f/v; 2-AVCO Challenger 850 f/v. 18/2 TC-JOE
A330-303 Turkish f/v; OO-SNJ A320-214 Brussels
Airlines f/v. 19/2 HB-JME A340-313X Swiss
f/v, for painting at Air Livery into Edelweiss
Swedish Air Force Tp.102C (Gulfstream IV-SP), 102004, at Cambridge Airport on March 28,
where it collected personnel who had flown in Tp.84 (C-130H), 84007. The Hercules was
receiving attention with Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group. Justin Ward
Air c/s; F-HRAV ERJ 145LU Aero4M f/v. 21/2
OK-IHS PC12-47E f/v. 23/2 T7-AMS PC-12 f/v.
24/2 9V-SMT A350-941 Singapore Airlines f/v;
OE-IIH Gulfstream G650 f/v. 27/2 OE-LII Global
6000 f/v; SE-MJO Cirrus SR-22T f/v. 28/2 EI-FPV
CRJ900NG SAS f/v; A7-BDB B787-8 Qatar Airways,
5B-DCU A319-112 Cobalt Air, D-AINH A320-271N
Lufthansa & LN-RRZ 737-683 SAS all Dublin snow
diversions.
NORWICH
1/1 A9C-AWL RJ100 Bahrain Defence Force to
KLM Maintenance dep 9/2. 2/1 OK-BEE Beech
400A. 3/1 HB-JLQ A320-214 Swiss to Air Livery
dep 13th. 7/1 D-HOAE Airbus Helicopters H145
Wiking Helicopter Service. 12/1 EC-JFG A320-214
Iberia Express to Air Livery dep 19th. 18/1 PHSOE PC-12 also 22nd; XA-ZTK Gulfstream G550.
19/1 EC-LUD A320-214 Iberia Express to Air Livery
dep 21st. 22/1 9H-DDJ Learjet 75; D-COOL
Learjet 55. 23/1 D-AFAU Global Express to Air
Livery dep 7/2. 25/1 F-GZHM 737-8K2 Transavia
France to KLM Maintenance dep 1/2. 26/1 ECLUC A320-214 Iberia Express to Air Livery dep 3/2.
31/1 SE-DSU RJ100 Malmo Aviation.
PRESTWICK
1/1 57-1427 & 58-0122 KC-135Rs 117th ARS, Ks
ANG both n/s; 58-0073 KC-135R 106th ARS, Al
ANG n/s; 58-0098 KC-135R 132nd ARS, Me ANG
n/s; 62-3566 KC-135R 153rd ARS, Ia ANG n/s;
63-8881 KC-135R 191st ARS, Ut ANG dep 6th.
2/1 OK-BEE Beech 400A; SE-DSO RJ100 Malmo
Aviation to Chevron hangar for rest of month;
UR-CNN An-12BK Cavok Air; 61-0310 KC-135R
126th ARS, Ws ANG; 62-3506 KC-135R 117th ARS,
Ks ANG; 63-8876 KC-135R 168th ARS, Ak ANG.
3/1 62-3512 KC-135R 126th ARS, Ws ANG n/s.
6/1 57-2606 KC-135R 153 ARS, Ia ANG n/s. 7/1
92-1538 C-130H 187th AS, Wy ANG. 8/1 177702
CC-177 429 TS, RCAF; HB-FRB PC-12 c/n 1765
on delivery; 86-0013 C-5M 436th/512nd AW, USAF
n/s; RA-82047 An-124-100 Volga-Dnepr Airlines.
9/1 LX-MLO Global 5000; 177703 CC-177 429
TS, RCAF n/s. 11/1 01-0076 C-37A 76th AS, 86th
AW, USAF; 177702 CC-177 429 TS, RCAF. 13/1
LZ-ABJ An-26B Rose Air; 15003 CC-150 437 TS,
RCAF. 15/1 HB-FRC PC-12 c/n 1766 on delivery;
UR-CNT An-12BK Ukraine Air Alliance. 17/1
130612 CC-130J 436 TS, RCAF dep 20th. 19/1
B-537 C-130J-30 Esk.721, Royal Danish AF. 23/1
KAF343 C-17A 41 Sqn, Kuwait AF dep 25th, also
31st n/s; 900528 C-26D Naples AOD n/s; 177703
CC-177 429 TS, RCAF dep 25th. 24/1 HB-FRE
PC-12 c/n 1768 & HB-FRF PC-12 c/n 1769 both on
delivery. 25/1 84-0126 C-21A 76th AS, 86th AW,
USAF. 27/1 177705 CC-177 429 TS, RCAF.
29/1 PR-LTJ Phenom 100 on delivery to RAF. 30/1 HBVSB PC-24 c/n 101, first production aircraft delivery.
WICK
3/1 N172MJ Beech 1900D Raytheon. 4/1 4L-AVA
Beech C.90GTi. 5/1 95-00123 & 97-00102 UC35A-1s 1-214th Avn, US Army. 11/1 F-HSHC
Citation 525 M2. 12/1 D-IFHD Citation 525 M2.
17/1 A6-CTI & A6-CTJ Cirrus SR-22s on delivery
to Emirates Flight Training Academy. 20/1
SP-AMW Cessna 414A. 26/1 A6-CTK & A6-CTL
Cirrus SR-22s on delivery to Emirates Flight
Training Academy.
Key: f/v first visit; n/s night stop; o/s overshoot.
Visiting Jersey Airport on March 22 was Cessna Citation II. F-HBMR. Mike Illien
With thanks to: D Apps, D Banks, D Bougourd, S Boyd, J Brazier, N Burch, A Clarke, I Cockerton, KW Ede, M Farley, N French, P Gibson, J Gregory, G Green,
I Grierson, D Haines, M Harper, G Hocquard, S Lane, G Morris, S Morrison, R Roberts, RJ Sayer, A Smith, D Turner, Blackpool Aviation Society, Manston
Movements, Solent Aviation Society/?Osprey?, South Wales Aviation Group, CIAN, GSAE, The Aviation Society, EGPE ATC, www.dtvmovements.co.uk,
Aerodata Quantum Plus and RHADS.
74
Aviation News incorporating Jets May 2018
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75
AIR BASE MOVEMENTS FROM MAR WWW.MILITARYAVIATIONREVIEW.COM
AIR BASE MOVEMENTS
A selection of the most interesting aircraft to visit air bases in the UK recently.
QINETIQ BOSCOMBE DOWN
28/2 G-ETPG H125 arrived on delivery to ETPS.
RAF BRIZE NORTON
US Navy Boeing E-6B Mercury, 163918, departing RAF Mildenhall on March 25. It had arrived
on detachment on March 20 and flew one mission during its stay. Matt Varley
11-5736/RS C-130J-30 37th AS, 86th AW, USAF
also 16th. 15/2 06-6155 C-17A 07-7172 C-17A
60th/349th AMW, USAF n/s. 20/2 10-0220 C-17A
62nd/446th AW, USAF n/s.
7/2 01 C-17A NATO SAC n/s. 9/2 0452 C-295M
Czech AF. 16/2 ZJ223 Apache AH1 AAC. 24/2
10-0213 C-17A 437th/315th AW, USAF n/s. 26/2
11-5731 MC-130J 67th SOS, USAF o/s.
RAF LEEMING
RAF CONINGSBY
14/2 ZD713/081 Tornado GR4 arrived from Marham
for Reduction to Produce.
9/2 ZJ811/811 Typhoon T3 arrived from
Lossiemouth for Reduction to Produce. 12/2
ZJ912/912 Typhoon FGR4 dep to Shawbury for
storage. 14/2 103/YT Xingu EAT00.319, French AF.
19/2 ZK424 Typhoon FGR4 arrived on delivery from
Warton.
RAF CRANWELL
13/2 ZJ210 & ZJ196 Apache AH1s 4 Regt, AAC.
15/2 G-CKRY & G-CKRP Prefect T1s arrived
on delivery, they will become ZM319 & ZM320
respectively.
14/3 G-CGKM, G-CGKO, G-CGKT & G-CGKX Tutor
T1s dep on delivery to Finland.
RAF FAIRFORD
12/2 07-7172 C-17A 60th/349th AMW, USAF. 27/2
80-1071/BB & 80-1096/- U-2S 99th RS, 9th RW,
USAF both n/s.
RAF LAKENHEATH
6/2 12-5757 MC-130J 67th SOS, USAF. 12/2
C-130H 180th AS, Mo ANG.
RAF ODIHAM
16/1 ZG917, ZF537, ZG918 & ZG538 Lynx AH9As
started and finished the farewell tour from the base.
RAF SHAWBURY
5/2 166693 C-40A USN also 6th. 12/2 164998/
AX C-130T VR-53, USN n/s also 15t
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