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Highlights Champs - April 2018

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April 2018 | 40
U
B
R
SC
-A-
DUB!
5N
FU
Food
Fake-Outs
Page 24
E LEPHANT
Grandmothers
Page 32
Shoes
Made of
TIRES!
Page 20
America’s leading children’s magazine is now in India!
h
t
n
o
M
s
i
h
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n
u
F
p
u
n
a
e
l
C
t
Close
ganize
ather or
f
is
h
g
helpin
lp him
Daksh is
n you he
a
C
.
t
e
s
clo
shoes?
the hall
pairs of
e
h
t
ll
a
match
FOUR WAYS TO
Celebrate
Trees
Signs of
Spring
SCRUB
-A-
DUB!
5
FUN
Food
Fake-Outs
Page 24
ELEPHANT
S
hoe
Made s
Grandmothers
Page 32
America’s
leading chil
dre
n’s magazin
TIRESof
!
Page
e is now in
20
India!
| 40
3. Send a thank-
My
s
Photo
ry
e
t
An
you letter to your
local park-service
workers.
sw
4. Write a poem about
your favorite tree.
e 38 .
April 2018
only food that
grows on trees.
pag
Can you fin
this magazine?
at another place in
2. Make a snack using
on
icturectsures
Find tdheaech P
of these 10 pi
collage by gluing
leaves, twigs, and
bark to paper.
er
When it is spring,
the leaves and flowers
of several trees change
colors. The Indian
cherry blossom comes
alive during spring
and so do the Flame
of Forest and Golden
Shower trees. What
signs of spring can
you see?
1 . Create a nature
Tongue Twister
Mohit and Mallishka
move to music.
Dear Reader
By Richa Shah, Managing Editor
editor.champs@delhipress.in
APRIL 2018 • VOLUME 5 • ISSUE NO. 61
Editor, Publisher & Printer: Paresh Nath
Managing Editor: Richa Shah
Copy Editor: Apeksha Shetty
Design Team: Kadambari Khedekar
EDITORIAL OFFICE: Delhi Press Building,
E-8, Jhandewala Estate, Rani Jhansi Marg,
New Delhi-110055.
Email:
highlightschamps@delhipress.in
For more information, visit
www.delhipress.in/highlightschamps
Printed & published by Paresh Nath on behalf of Shobhika
Media Private Limited. Printed at PS PC Press Private
Limited, 50 DLF Industrial Area Phase-I, Faridabad,
Haryana–121003 New Delhi–110055.
This copy is sold on the condition that jurisdiction for all
disputes concerning sale, subscription and published
matter will be in courts/forums/tribunals at Delhi.
ADVERTISEMENT & PUBLICATION OFFICE:
Delhi Press Building, E-8, Jhandewala Estate, Rani Jhansi
Marg, New Delhi-110055.
Phone: 41398888, 23529557-62. Fax: 91-11-23625020.
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New Delhi: Phone: 011-23416313/23417268
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For subscription contact: subscription@delhipress.in
Highlights—U.S. Team
Editor in Chief: Christine French Cully
Creative Director: Marie O’Neill
Editor: Judy Burke
Art Director: Patrick Greenish, Jr.
Senior Editors: Joëlle Dujardin, Debra Hess,
Carolyn P. Yoder
Associate Editor: Linda K. Rose
Assistant Editor: Annie Beer Rodriguez
Copy Editor: Joan Prevete Hyman
Editorial Assistant: Allison Kane
Senior Production Artist: Dave Justice
Contributing Science Editor: Andrew Boyles
CEO: Kent S. Johnson
Vice President, International: Andy Shafran
Editor, International Publishing: Julie Stoehr
The Orange Primate
On my trip to the island of Borneo, I hoped to see
orangutans in the wild, and not in a sanctuary or a
park. We were staying in a lodge on the Kinabatagan
river. To see the orangutans, we had to take a boat
along the river in the early morning, because that’s
when they are most active. We were lucky to see the
orangutans on our safaris in the wild, and these
primates were saintly compared to the other arboreal
monkeys making a racket on the islands. Solitary and
silent by nature, the bright orange primates spend their
time swinging from one tree to another looking for food.
When they get tired, they lie on a strong, leafy branch
and, with arms stretched upwards and one leg over the
other, doze off in the afternoon sun.
The orangutans are quite human-like when you
look at them closely—the way they scratch themselves,
how they turn on their backs to eat food if someone is
watching. The similarity is most pronounced in the way
they walk and hold things. The young ones are also
cheeky and playful and will always stay close to their
mother, who cares for her offspring for eight years. Read
about these big primates in My Sci (pages 26–27).
Since it’s spring, and the weather still not very hot, go
ahead and observe the animals in your neighborhood. I
would be excited to know how you think we are similar
to them and how we differ from each other.
Your friend,
This magazine of wholesome fun
is dedicated to helping children grow in basic skills and knowledge,
Think Green!
Finished with this issue? Save it to
reread, or pass it along to a friend,
classroom, or library. If it’s too worn
to be read anymore, please recycle it.
creativeness, in ability to think and reason,
in sensitivity to others, in high ideals and worthy ways of living—
for children are the world’s most important people .
in
TM
April
icer
Spw
e
Pot of the o10nly
VOLUME 5 • ISSUE NO. 61
7 ou comm have
st
s
mo spice lling
i
d
use teria-k .
c
ba owers
p
Dear Highlights Champs,
TM
—Talia
How thoughtful, Talia! Here are some ideas.
1 Think of what would make 2 Make a sign or card
you smile. Cookies? Some
wildflowers? A drawing?
that says “Welcome!” Get
your gift ready.
new neighbors. They’re sure
to appreciate your kindness!
8
28
11
4
3 With a parent, visit your
6
BrainPlay
7
Kites
8
Earth Day Birthday
10
Goofus and Gallant
Do you like mealtime to be
noisy or quiet?
36
Gallant Kids
Navya Singh files a petition
to save her favourite park
in Delhi.
12
Crafts
14
Hidden Pictures
Puzzle
19
A Week of Passover
Lunchboxes
Matzo every which way!
A butterfly clip, Easter
crafts, and more.
TM
Calling all campers!
Sky flowers on string-stems.
April wants to plan her own
party this year.
TM
Gallant is happy when his
friends do well.
APRIL 2018
16
No Goalie
Jamshed is upset when
Coach makes him the
goalie.
20
Walking in Tires
22
Travel Trek
John and Fadzai love their
thornproof sandals.
Join Wanda D. World and
Ed Venture on their journey.
24
Dessert for Dinner?
26
My Sci
28
Surprise your friends!
Swinging through the trees
with a mama orangutan.
Your Own Pages
See more drawings by
creative kids like Shreyas.
Elephant
Grandmothers
Learn about elephants’
communication.
34
Cleopatra Finds Her
Voice
Cleopatra became the first
Egyptian queen to learn the
language of her people.
30
32
Mystery of the
Missing Painting
One new painting, and one
missing painting? Hmm.
35
36
The Timbertoes
TM
Ma solves a problem—and
makes a game more fun.
What’s So Hot About
Spices?
Does eating spicy food
make you healthy?
38
Riddles
What did the bread do
on vacation?
Shreyas Krishna, Age 9
39
Paws and Think
40
Ask Arizona
43
Picture Puzzler
APRIL 2018
TM
Visiting a designer’s studio.
TM
When project partners
don’t pull their weight.
Hedgehog field day!
5
Take y
o
brain ur
on
a hike
!
w
e three ays to en
m
a
tertain yourself with no toys.
N
START
O?
imals
n
a
h
Whic u think
do yo ute?
are c
W H Y?
Why might people
name their boats?
ou
Do y
a
lw
nt
ay
a
se
w
at what you
What would it be like to
transfer to a new school?
How is
worrying
different
from
thinking?
WHAT MAKES
SOMETHING A “STORY”?
If you c
o
a comp uld connect
ut
brain, w er to your
you wa hat would
nt it to
do?
Do you like mealtime
to be noisy or quiet?
WHY?
“That bunch of rocks looks like
a turtle!” said Kiya.
What else could look like
something it’s not?
6
APRIL 2018
Which of
your favorite
activities are for
outside only?
?
WH
I’m
Shar
the s ky
h
boat.ark
THED
EN
Kites
By Cynthia Porter
Art by Charlotte Cooke
When brightly colored kites
reach for the sun,
sway in the windy light,
pull their string-stems
higher and higher,
then—
sky f lowers blossom.
APRIL 2018
7
“I’d like to
plan my
own party
this year.”
Earth Day
Birthday
By Jody Jensen Shaffer
Art by Roger Simó
“I just want a normal birthday party,”
April told Bhavika as they walked
home from school.
Bhavika knew what April meant.
April’s parents loved the environment.
And because April happened to be born
on Earth Day, all her parties had an
Earth Day theme. “Remember when
you turned seven?” Bhavika said.
8
APRIL 2018
“How could I forget the Throw-Out
Blowout?” said April.
“We helped out at your garage sale
and donated the money to charity. And
when you turned eight— ”
“It was a Tree Spree,” finished April.
“We planted mangoes.”
“Last year, we all collected
newspapers to recycle,” said Bhavika.
“The Print Sprint.” April groaned.
Bhavika giggled. “I thought it was fun.”
Later that night, as April loaded the
dishwasher, she said, “I’d like to plan
my own party this year.”
“Sure,” said Mom. “We could have a
Compost Carnival.”
“Great idea!” said Dad.
April cleared her throat. “I’d like to
go to Maze Craze instead.”
“Really?” said Dad, surprised.
“I guess we could do that,” said Mom.
April couldn’t wait for her birthday!
She and her friends would have so
much fun. And they wouldn’t have to
think one bit about the earth.
At school the next day, April told her
friends. “I’m having my birthday party
at Maze Craze!”
“You are?” said Jinal. “But we always
do something earthy on your birthday.”
“Remember that chameleon we found
two years ago?” said Tanay.
“Yeah,” said April. “This year, we’re
not even going outside.”
“Oh,” Tanay said.
The following weekend, everyone
gathered in the parking lot outside of
“This year,
we’re not
even going
outside.”
Maze Craze. “Thanks for coming,”
said April. “I’ve been so excited about
my party. No shovels. No collecting
recyclables. Nothing earthy about it.”
She shifted her feet. “Then I got here
this morning and saw this parking lot.”
April’s friends glanced around.
Plastic bottles bounced across the
cement. Newspapers and fast-food
The kids
fanned out
across the
parking lot.
sacks clogged the storm drain.
Shopping bags rustled in the trees.
“Even though I wanted a non-Earth
Day birthday, I couldn’t have fun
knowing this mess was out here. Can
we pick up the garbage in the parking
lot first, then go through the maze?”
“Of course!” said her friends. April’s
parents grabbed some gloves and
trash bags from the trunk of their car.
The kids fanned out across the
parking lot while their parents
watched for traffic. Before long, they
had filled three bags with bottles, cans,
and paper to recycle.
April looked at the bags and smiled.
It felt good to do something for the
earth. And with everyone pitching in,
it didn’t take long.
“Happy Earth Day, everyone,” said
April. “Now I’m ready for Maze Craze.”
“Happy birthday, April!” shouted
her friends.
Goaondfus
Gallant
TM
Goofus and Gallant are twins who are very differentone is selfish and thoughtless, the other gentle and
caring. There’s some of Goofus and Gallant in us all.
When the Gallant shines through, we show our best self.
“Nice job, Sam!” says Gallant.
“No fair! You always get good
grades,” says Goofus.
Gallant waits for a break so he
doesn’t disturb the performer.
“Be right back. I’m going for
a snack,” says Goofus.
YOUR Goofus and Gallant Moments
“I felt like Goofus
“I felt like Goofus “I feel like Gallant
when I hit my friend in when I stomped.”
when I fill my dog’s
Shina,
Age
7
the nose when I was
water bowl.”
Lucy
swatting at a bug.”
Cameron, Age 8
10
APRIL 2018
Tell us when you’ve felt like
Goofus or Gallant! Visit
HighlightsKids.com or write to
A-4, Shriram Industrial Estate,
Wadala, Mumbai-400031,
Maharashtra
Email:
highlightschamps@delhipress.in
Art by Leslie Harrington.
Gallant
Kids
Navya Singh receives an award for
her efforts to save the public park.
Petition For A Park
Navya Singh likes to call
herself an environmentalist.
Now eight years old, she,
with the help of her father,
saved a 30-year-old children’s
park that was about to be
demolished and replaced with
a community center in her
neighborhood in Rohini, New
Delhi.
Navya and her friends would
regularly play in a park in
their neighborhood. One day,
when she went there with her
father, she saw the ground
was being dug up. Looking
at the huge machines and
construction workers, she
asked her father about what
was going to happen to her
park.
Her advocate father, Mr.
Dheeraj Kumar Singh,
informed her that the Delhi
Development Authority (DDA),
Photo by Dheeraj Kumar Singh
the body that oversees public
development in Delhi, had
decided to convert the public
park into a community center.
They decided that the
children’s park would remain
instead of the community
center being built.
Navya was sad when she
realized that her park would
be gone and because there
were only a few places left
for children like her to play,
she decided that she would
really like to save the park.
She discussed with her father
about what she could do to save
it, and they decided that she
could petition against the DDA
and try and retain it.
Navya received huge support
from the residents of the area,
as well as her friends and
By Anshika Gupta
teachers. She wrote slogans
and poems to create awareness
among the people in the
neighborhood about the park
and the environment.
The judges praised Navya’s
efforts. They decided that the
children’s park would remain,
and the community center
plan was scrapped. Navya had
explained in her petition that
there was already an existing
community center a short
distance away.
Navya’s petition saved the
park that now is an outlet
for kids to play and enjoy
the beauty of nature. She is
currently studying in the grade
2 and has decided to keep up
with her efforts to save the
environment as well as other
public spaces.
Highlights Champs is proud to
know this Gallant kid.
APRIL 2018
11
Crafts
Easter Basket
By Susan Fulcher
1. Cut the top off
2. Poke two holes in
a square tissue
the box. Use metal
box. Cover it with
fasteners to attach a
cardstock. Make an
ribbon as a handle.
egg out of colored
Tape down the ends
of the fasteners. Add
paper. Glue it to
the box.
Easter grass.
Binder
nder Clip
Butterfly
By Régine
ine Frank
12
APRIL 2018
1. For the body, fold a short
chenille stick in half and
twist the halves together.
Bend one end to form a
head shape.
2. For antennae, glue two
pieces of thread to the head.
Craft samples by Buff McAllister. Photos by Guy Cali Associates, Inc.
Craft Challen
ge! Make
a bookmark
out of cardsto
ck, craft stick
s, and chenil
le sticks.
Egg Hunt and
Matching Game
For 2 or More Players
By Sherry Timberman
1. Cut an even number of eggs
from craft foam.
2. Decorate them with craft
foam so that each egg has
a match.
Around the World
TO PLAY:s
gg
Hide the e
house
r
u
around yo
backyard.
or in your
s
r who find
The playe
g
in
atch
the most m
.
w
pairs ins
An Earth Day Game
for 2 or More Players
By Channing Kaiser
1. Cut a large circle from blue poster board. Cut
seven continents from colored paper. Label
them 1–7. Use markers and colored paper to
decorate them. Glue them to the circle.
2. Cut 15 cards from cardstock. Write a challenge
on each card, such as “Skip in a circle for
10 seconds” or “Do your best imitation of a lion.”
3. Add wiggle eyes. Glue the body
to the top of a binder clip.
4. Cut wings from craft foam. Decorate
them with markers. Glue them to the
sides of the binder clip. Let them dry.
5. Use the butterfly to hold a bag
closed or to clip papers.
TO PLAY: Using small stones as game pieces,
players take turns tossing their pieces
onto the board. If the stone lands on a
continent, the player is safe. If the stone
lands in an ocean, the player must draw a
card and complete the challenge. Players use
scrap paper to keep track of each continent
they visit. The first player to travel to all
seven continents wins.
APRIL 2018
13
TM
Want ae?
challeng 15
Ring-Tail Tales
By Kelly Kennedy
In this big picture, find the kite, glove, hat, banana, arrow, crayon, fried egg, comb,
scissors, eyeglasses, paper clip, button, broccoli, and toothbrush.
14
APRIL 2018
k page
Fold bac the
to hide
clues.
picture
Picture Clues
kite
glove
hat
JOKES
“Knock, knock.”
“Who’s there?”
“Shamp.”
“Shamp who?”
Teacher: Abby, can you please
spell mouse?
Abby: M-O-U-S.
Teacher: What’s at the end?
Abby: A tail.
“Isn’t that what you
use for your hair?”
Abby Kemp
Isaiah Tinker
arrow
banana
crayon
Gunjan: Why did the melon
jump into the river?
Asmita: Because it wanted to be
a watermelon!
Kruti Shah
comb
fried
egg
Madhvan: What type of bus
has no passengers, stairs, or
doors?
Shreya: A sylla-bus!
One day, a man visited a ranch
for the first time. He looked at the
animals and asked the cowboy,
“How come that cow doesn’t have
any horns?”
The cowboy answered, “Well,
some cows have horns, some cows
don’t, and that there is a horse.”
Johanna Fuchtman
Make us laugh!
Samantha
scissors
eyeglasses
Kabir: What streets do ghosts
haunt?
Anagha: Dead-ends!
Send a joke or riddle, along with your
name, age, and address, to
TM
A-4, Shriram Industrial Estate, Wadala,
Mumbai-400031, Maharashtra
Email: highlightschamps@delhipress.in
Amir Sharif
paper clip
button
broccoli
toothbrush
BONUS
Can you also find
the lollipop,
snail, fish, and
flyswatter?
Batter Up
By Natalie Rompella
Use the clues to help these friends get into the correct batting order.
Avni and
Gauri will
be next to
each other.
Dhruv will
be next to
Kia.
Answer on page 38.
Jay will
not be next
to Avni or
Dhruv.
APRIL 2018
Kia will
bat first.
Avni will
not bat
last.
15
Ja m
k
Ta
r
Ba
l
a
a
sh
he
GAME
ON!
Da
s
d
Jamshed
Daksh
Tara
Bala
I’m No Goalie!
Jamshed didn’t like his new position,
but his teammates were counting on him.
By Rich Wallace
Art by Steve James, Gerald Kelley
T
he ball was moving fast,
straight toward the corner of
the goal. Jamshed pounced. He
stretched both arms as he f lew
through the air. The ball hit his
fingers and bounced away.
He’d made a save, but the
ball was still on the field. A
Hawk player darted over and
kicked it in midair. Jamshed
was on his knees, but he lunged
toward the ball again. This
time he caught it. He rolled onto
the grass and stood up, both
hands wrapped around the ball.
The Hawks were bombarding
him, but he’d made five saves
in a row.
Jamshed punted the ball. It
f lew toward midfield, then
bounced several times. Players
from both teams ran toward it.
The ball rolled out of bounds.
Jamshed stared at his hands.
“I’m more valuable when I use
my feet,” he muttered to his
teammate Tara, who was
playing defense. “I’m no goalie.
What was Coach thinking when
he put me here?”
“He was thinking you’d give
16
APRIL 2018
us our best chance to hold the
lead,” Tara said. “Three more
minutes. If you shut them
down, we’ll win the title.”
Jamshed bounced up and
down, keeping his eyes on the
action. He’d scored two goals in
the first half, helping the Cobras
build a 3–2 lead. He wanted to
score again. Instead, he’d spent
the entire second half trying to
stop the Hawks from scoring.
Jamshed sighed. He’d played
goalie a few times this season
and had done well. But that was
during regular games. This was
for the championship.
Tara was clapping her hands.
“Let’s go, Cobras!” she yelled.
Their friend Daksh, who was
Jamshed dived for
the line drive.
running near Tara, broke into a
smile. “Let’s go, Hawks!” he
called.
Daksh was the top scorer in
the league. He’d used some
tricky moves in the first half,
scoring one goal for the Hawks
and assisting on another. His
shots were as hard as rockets.
Jamshed rubbed his palms
together. He’d stopped a few of
those rockets. But he knew
Daksh would be back for more.
And here he was.
Daksh had the ball about
30 yards from the goal. Tara
and another defender rushed
over to stop him, but he moved
quickly to his left and passed
the ball to a teammate.
As Tara ran toward the ball,
Daksh slipped behind her and
darted to the goal. He was wide
open as the ball was passed
back toward him.
Jamshed froze. Should he stay
by the goal or try to intercept
the pass? If he made the wrong
choice, Daksh would score.
Jamshed wasted no time. He
sprinted toward the ball. He
and Daksh reached it at the
same time, but Daksh swept it
away and turned to shoot. They
were within the goal area,
about five yards from the goal
line, so Jamshed could use his
hands. But he would risk
getting kicked. He blocked
Daksh’s path and managed to
nudge the ball a bit with his
foot. Tara and another Cobra
raced over. The ball went back
up the field.
“Great teamwork!” Jamshed
yelled as the Cobras headed for
the Hawks’ goal.
“Risky move,” Tara said.
“Don’t leave the goal like that.”
“I had no choice,” Jamshed
replied.
Tara nodded and pointed
toward the clock on the
scoreboard. “Two minutes.”
Jamshed watched as his
teammates passed the ball back
and forth, trying to set up a
shot.
Tara started running up the
field, too.
“Don’t leave me stranded!”
Jamshed yelled. He needed
Tara back here on defense in
case the Hawks made a charge.
I’m no goalie, he thought.
Tara stayed near midfield.
The Cobras didn’t score, and
the Hawks came racing back
with the ball. Daksh moved to a
spot near Jamshed.
(Continued on next page)
APRIL 2018
17
(Continued from page 17)
“Watch him!” Jamshed called.
Tara shifted toward Daksh.
A hard shot from Daksh came
toward the goal, but Jamshed
was in a good position. He dived
toward the ball and batted it
away. It rolled to the side of the
goal and went out of bounds.
“Corner kick!” called the
referee. Daksh took the ball to
the corner to kick it back into
play.
Jamshed glanced nervously
at the clock. One minute left.
Daksh kicked the ball high
in the air, and it f loated toward
the goal. A Hawk player
trapped it on his thigh and let it
drop, then swung back his leg
to shoot.
The shot was high. Jamshed
jumped and the ball banged off
the top of the goal. It bounced
back onto the field, and players
from both teams scrambled
after it.
Tara kicked the ball up the
field, but the Hawks brought it
right back. As the final seconds
ticked away, every player on the
field was working frantically.
Then Daksh took over. He
slipped past one defender, then
quickly brought the ball in the
other direction. Tara stumbled
as Daksh faked her out. He
planted his left foot and shot
with his right.
Jamshed dived for the line
drive. He slowed it with his
hand, but it continued to wobble
toward the goal. Jamshed hit
the ground hard and rolled,
reaching for the ball as Daksh
charged toward it.
As Jamshed scooped up the
ball, Daksh went soaring over
him. Jamshed hugged the ball
tight.
18
APRIL 2018
“That was so close.”
The referee checked his
watch. He blew his whistle and
waved his arm. “Game over!”
The rest of the Cobras ran
toward the center of the field,
pumping their fists and
cheering loudly. They had won
the championship.
Jamshed stood up and turned
to Daksh, who was sitting on
the grass looking stunned.
“That was so close,” Daksh
said.
Jamshed reached out a hand
and pulled Daksh to his feet.
“You’ll have to teach me some of
those fakes,” he said.
“What for?” Daksh said.
“You’re a goalie.”
“Am I?”
Daksh smiled. “Best one I’ve
played against.”
A goalie? Jamshed would
have to think about that. He
ran toward his teammates to
celebrate.
Do you have
a sports tip
you’d like to share?
If so, send it to
TM
A Tip from
the Author
A-4, Shriram Industrial Estate,
Wadala, Mumbai-400031,
Maharashtra
Email: highlightschamps
@delhipress.in
Many young
soccer players kick
the ball with the same
foot every time. You’ll be twice as
tricky if you learn to use your other
foot, too.
Rich Wallace is the author of more
than 25 sports novels for kids. He has
coached and played a lot of sports, too.
A Week of
Passover
Lunchboxes
Matzo topped with jelly.
Buttered matzo, please.
Pizza made of matzo,
tomato sauce, and cheese.
Matzo with egg salad.
Tuna tastes good, too.
Wonder how I’d like the taste
of matzo barbecue.
Chocolate-covered matzo—
what a yummy treat.
Still I’m counting down the days
till I get bread to eat!
—Brianna Caplan Sayres
Matzo is a large, f lat cracker that is made of f lour
and water. Jewish people typically eat matzo in place
of bread during the eight-day religious festival of
Passover. It recalls a time when the ancient Israelites
rushed out of Egypt to escape slavery. Their bread
didn’t have time to rise, so it baked f lat in the hot sun.
You Finish
the Story!
What do you think
will happen next? Finish
the story in fewer than
75 words and send your
ending to
The Mysterious
Manor
“This house always gives me
the creeps,” said Priyanka as she
and Deep passed the blue house
on the corner. They walked by it
every day on their way to and
from school. Nobody had lived
there in years.
“My brother says it’s not a
house at all,” said Deep as he ran
his fingers along the iron fence
that surrounded the yard. “He
says it’s really a magic portal.”
Just then, the door on the
house burst open and . . .
A-4, Shriram Industrial Estate, Wadala,
Mumbai-400031, Maharashtra
Email: highlightschamps@delhipress.in
Please include your
name, age, and complete
address.
We must receive your
reply by May 1, 2018, to
consider it for publication.
19
Walking
in Tires
Sandals made of old tires help people
get around Zimbabwe.
Story and Photos by Cecil Dzwowa
Worn-out tires are no good for a car, right? But
they can be good for another type of
transportation: walking!
Where I live, in Zimbabwe, and in many other
countries, old tires are not thrown away. Instead,
craftsmen cut them up and make them into
sandals.
One of these craftsmen is Casper Mamutse.
He runs a small sandal-making business just
outside his house. “All you need are the skills,”
he says.
When Casper first saw a man named Isaac
wearing tire sandals, he thought they looked
funny. So he asked Isaac where he got them.
Isaac said he had made them himself. Casper
decided to buy a pair to make his friends laugh.
Thorns
ne s
and sto er
oth
don’t b en
h
John w ng
ari
he’s we als.
d
tire san
But his friends didn’t laugh. They wanted
their own. Every time a friend wanted a pair of
tire sandals, Casper returned to Isaac. He
returned to Isaac so many times that he worried
he was bothering him.
“Finally, I asked him to teach me how to make
tire sandals,” says Casper.
20
APRIL 2018
A New Skill
For more than six months, Casper was Isaac’s
apprentice. He learned how to cut and shape
soles from tires.
To make the right size, Casper traces a shoe
sole on the tire and cuts out a sole. Casper says
this is the hardest part of the process. “Cutting a
tire with a knife requires as much brains as
brawn,” he says. “You have to use a lot of power
and concentration or else you will cut your finger
along with the tire.”
After the sole is cut, Casper uses a knife to
peel off the soft inside part of the tire and cut it
Casper runs a small sandalmaking business outside his
house. Cutting a sole from
a tire requires power and
concentration, he says.
into strips. He attaches the strips to the sole for
This s
an
is com dal
p
and re lete
ady to
wear.
“belts.” From one tire, Casper can make about
four pairs of sandals for adults or about six pairs
for kids.
“Tractor Wheel” Design
Tire sandals come in many designs. Some
have f lat heels for city streets. Others have a
in a car does not bother me very much,” he says.
tough “tractor wheel” design for the countryside.
“After all, we are still moving on tires.”
The Zimbabwe countryside is full of sharp
thorns and stones. Unless you have thick soles,
thorns can pierce through your shoes. But strong
boots are expensive, and many people walk
barefoot.
“Almost half of my schoolmates don’t have
anything to put on their feet,” says Fadzai, a
10-year-old boy whose dad bought him a pair of
tire sandals.
But now they can get tire sandals, which are
strong and much less expensive than leather shoes.
Fadzai thinks that what his friends need now
are not cars to take them to school, but shoes. In
his village, there are only a few roads for cars
and buses anyway.
“Going to school on foot instead of
GreenSole
In India, two athletes, Shriyans
Bhandari and Ramesh Dhami,
recycle old shoes to slippers that
are then distributed in villages.
They get people’s old shoes by
mail, from collection boxes they’ve
placed in public areas, or during
their initiative’s donation drives.
The old shoes are washed and their
soles and the uppers are separated.
The soles are then made into the
base of the slippers and the uppers
into straps.
Their initiative has distributed
more than 50,000 pairs of slippers
through workers and volunteers to
the needy, mostly in villages.
APRIL 2018
21
R
E
K
T
L
E
V
A
TR
anda D. World
W
d
n
re a they discover?
u
t
n
o
e
d V , what d
E
ers lanet
t
By Annie Rodriguez • Art by Shaw Nielsen
t
o
r he p
t
e
t
ob
As gl plore
ex
2
A Dog’s DreaAlm
berta
ds of
In the dr y badlan , fossils of
da
na
Ca
rn
in weste
fferent species
more than 45 di
found within
of this have been Park.
___ Provincial
1
Go with
the Flow
A
Dinosaur
B
Snake
ugh
Traveling thro yon,
an
C
nd
ra
Arizona’s G
ver.
ri
is
th
de
ri
s
rafter
B
A
The
Colorado
The Rio
Grande
4
3
Helloooo
Up There
Ice Cubits
Hope you
’r
heights! V e not afraid of
enezuela
Ángel is b
’s Salto
elieve
world’s ta d to be the
llest ___.
The average thickness of
ice sheet is
Antarctica’s continental
A
B
about 10
about 22
tub Minars
Qu
ars
Qutub Min
deep (less
deep (more
than 1.6
than 1.6
meters).
kilo
s).
ter
kilome
A
waterfall
Answers on page 38.
B
tree
6
5
Wanted:
Scuba Div
ers
Smile,
ers
Sun Seseekason in
Ocean co
vers more
of the pla
than land
n et
,b
percent o ut we still have ___
f the sea to
explore!
is
During th sun stays up
e
th
,
y
a
w
r
in
No
ight—and
past midn doesn’t set!
ts it
som e s p o
A
S um m e r
A
50
percent
B
Winter
B
95
percent
7
Get the
Lowdown
If you’re standi
ng
lowest land on on the
Earth’s
surface, then
you must be
at the edge of
the
A
Pacific
Ocean.
B
8
Dead
Sea.
Mountain
Mystery
About 75 percent
of Japan
is mountainous, an
d those
mountains include
10 percent
of the world’s
A
9
volcanoes.
Naturally
Unique
B
gold mines.
This delta in
India and
Bangladesh
is home to th
e
world's larges
forest and is t mangrove
spread
two countrie across
s.
A
B
Sunderban
Niger
Delta
Delta
ght
i
S
t
h
g
Fli
i t in g
ut orb
a
r on a
An ast oesn’t need is
d
E a r t h p e to s e e t h s s :
e
o
telesc awesomen
n
a
i
l
a
r
t
A us
B
us
A
t
a
l
p yp s o n
t
a
g
e
n
r
i
the G r gather
l an d .
Barrie
Kin g I s
.
f
Ree
APRIL 2018
23
r
o
f
t
r
e
s
Des
?
R
E
N
N
I
D
FRUIT “COLE SLAW”
Mix cantaloupe, apple, and plum
sticks with a dab of vanilla yogurt.
family
d
n
a
s
d
.
ur frien
o
y
t treats
e
e
s
i
e
r
w
p
s
r
u
y
S
secretl
e
s
e
h
t
with
By Allison Kane
APPLE “FRIES”
Sprinkle apple
sticks with
cinnamon sugar.
STRAWBERRY
JAM “KETCHUP”
GREEN APPLE
“PICKLE” SPEAR
Sprinkle sesame
seeds along the top.
COOKIE “BURGERS”
Sesame seeds (Brush on a dab
of honey to make them stick.)
Vanilla wafers
Coconut flakes (Shake up the
flakes with a few drops of food
coloring in a sealed sandwich bag.)
Red and yellow icing
Chocolate-covered mint cookie
24
Photo by Guy Cali Associates, Inc.
Garden
Plotting
By Clare Mishica
The squares below show the garden plots of Mouse, Mole, Squirrel,
and Rabbit. Look at each friend’s sections of lettuce and tomatoes.
Then answer the questions.
1. Which friend’s tomatoes take up the most space?
2. Which friend planted equal areas of tomatoes and lettuce?
Answers on page 38.
Clock Challenge
Sent in by Ellie Gilma, Age 9
These clocks are all wrong!
Can you figure out the correct
times using the example?
Example: 1:89 would be 2:29.
Answers on page 38.
1
4
2:60
11:61
2
5
8:90
5:76
APRIL 2018
3
6
4:83
7:87
25
MY SC
Its arms are
longer than
its legs,
giving the
orangutan
a long reach
among the
tree branches.
Spotlight
On the
Move
with
Mama
For the first two years
of its life, a baby hangs
on to the fur of its
mother as she swings
through the trees.
That reddish flash
swinging from
tree to tree on the
Southeast Asian
islands of Borneo and
Sumatra just might
be an orangutan—
or two! The earth’s
largest tree-dwelling
primates, they are
usually solitary, but
a mother cares for
her child for about
eight years. After
the young one has
learned skills such as
knowing where and
when fruits grow and
how to cross gaps
between trees, an
adolescent will go off
on its own.
An orangutan may roam
a mile a day through the
trees, and it makes a new
nest each night.
26
APRIL 2018
Its hands and
feet, each with
a flexible big
toe or thumb,
can easily
handle food,
branches,
and more.
Tell Me Why
Why do
heights
make us
dizzy?
Leo Hanley, Age 8
Many scientists
who study this
sensation of “height
vertigo” think that it’s
about balance.
Three systems
in the body work to
balance us: the eyes,
sensors in the feet
and legs, and sensors
in the inner ear. When
the signals the brain
gets from these
systems “agree,” we
feel balanced.
But sometimes the
signals conflict. When
we are up high, our
eyes can’t report the
ground’s position
accurately. When the
brain can’t match up
signals from the
different systems, it
has trouble knowing
which information to
trust. As a result, we
may feel dizzy and
disoriented.
Dinosaurs
By Dougal Dixon
Art by Robert Squier
Timurlengia
tim-oor-LENG-ee-ah
(after Timur Lenk, a 14th-century conqueror
from the region where the fossil was found)
May have also had a
well-developed sense of smell
compared with earlier
tyrannosaurs
The inside of the Timurlengia skull fossil suggests that
this dinosaur had keen hearing. Scientists think this
shows that good hunting senses developed in
tyrannosaurs before their large size did.
Thin, sharp,
blade-like
teeth
WHERE:
Uzbekistan
Covering of
fine feathers
HOW LONG:
12 feet
Body about
the size of a
modern-day
horse
WHAT IT ATE:
Other small dinosaurs
WHEN:
90 million years ago
252
Triassic
201
Jurassic
145
66
Cretaceous
Present
Cenozoic
Science Meets Art
Can You Resist?
Make wax-resist watercolor paintings or decorated
eggs! Use a wax or soy crayon (not a washable crayon)
to draw on paper or on a hard-boiled egg. Then paint it
with watercolor paints or dye it. The wax forms a barrier
to keep the paint or dye from getting through.
Why does this work? Think of your best answer, then
read our explanation in Answers on page 38.
APRIL 2018
27
Cleopatra wished she
could understand the
people’s words.
By Vicky Alvear Shecter
Art by Cornelius Van Wright
and Ying-Hwa Hu
Cleopatra Finds
E leven-year-old Princess Cleopatra
sailed the Nile River on the royal barge.
Her father, the king of Egypt, played his
flute.
They were sailing from their palace
in Alexandria to cities along the Nile.
The king would often lead important
ceremonies.
Cleopatra watched for slithering
crocodiles and yawning hippos.
Sometimes she would catch a glimpse
of a Sacred Ibis bird tiptoeing along the
marshy banks.
As the royal barge sailed, people
crowded the banks, hoping to see the
princess and her father. They sang
and chanted and threw flowers. But it
bothered Cleopatra that she could not
understand what they said.
28
april 2018
How a future queen con
Her father explained that the
people of Egypt spoke Egyptian, while
Cleopatra’s family spoke Greek.
But her father was the ruler of Egypt!
Why didn’t he and his family speak the
native language?
They could thank their ancestors for
that, the king said. The royal family
traced its history back 250 years to the
time of the Greek conqueror Alexander
the Great. Alexander had conquered
Egypt. When he died, his Greek general,
Ptolemy, took over. Ever since, all of the
rulers of Egypt had spoken Greek.
Once back at home, Cleopatra insisted
on learning the Egyptian language. She
believed that a ruler should know her
people. And that meant knowing their
words.
The Great Library
s Her Voice
Cleopatra did much of her
studying at the Library of
Alexandria.
In ancient times, books came
in rolls called scrolls. Each time
a ship entered the harbor at
Alexandria, guards searched
the boat for scrolls. If any were
found, they were taken to the
library and copied by scribes.
The copies were returned to
the boats, but the originals
were kept at the library.
The Library of Alexandria
grew to become the largest in
the ancient world, with nearly
half a million scrolls.
nnected with her people.
Now she spoke
the language of
her people.
Cleopatra studied hard and soon
learned to speak Egyptian. But she
didn’t stop there. She also learned
Hebrew, Aramaic, Persian, Latin,
and some African dialects. She loved
learning and excelled in math and
science, too.
Later, when she ruled as queen,
one of her first acts was to visit the
city of Memphis for an important
religious ceremony. This time, she
spoke to the people in Egyptian. The
people loved her for learning their
language. She showed them respect
and honor in many other ways, too.
Cleopatra is remembered as a
brilliant queen. She was the only
Egyptian ruler in hundreds of years
to learn the language of her people.
april 2018
29
Your Own
Pages
Roshani, Age 14
Stage Fright
Anusha Shukla, Age 8
I once had a faraway dream
Of strawberr y shor tcake baked with
frosted whipped cream.
Mmm! It was such a delight on that
hot, hot day.
It tasted like pure joy and the beach’s
cool ocean spray.
The strawberries were sweet as the
juice ran down my cheeks.
While I watched the setting sun, in
the distance were faint car beeps.
Alas, it was just a breezy, delicious
summer night’s dream!
Swarnali Sarma, Age 8
When I got onstage,
I had stage fright.
Before I knew it, the
lights got bright.
Everyone stared right
at my eyes.
They didn’t even hear
any of my cries.
Finally, I recited my
part. It was fun!
I must have impressed
everyone.
Rhea Zhou, Age 8
Jasmine Kwan, Age 10
Vanshika Sharma, Age 6
Tomatoes are juicy.
Tomatoes are sweet.
Tomatoes are something
special to eat.
Reagan Wadas, Age 6
30
Monkeys
Monkeys rock the town
One, two, three, banana ra
in
Nighttime, sweet little creatu
K isses for you, monkeys, en res
Everlasting, sweet banana d the day
You, monkey, wake up, sleepdreams
See you later, monkey-gator yhead
Amelia Hammond, Ag
APRIL 2018
!
e8
Keerat Kaur Khurana, Age 9
ide,
W hile I was outs
I saw a kitten
In a mitten
Sippin’ juice.
I stepped closer.
ft,
His fur looked so
go home.
But I just had to
Christopher Eg
My Dinner
(Inspired by a Cat)
I quietly watch
The small mouse sits, unaware
Then I quickly pounce
an, Age 7
Prakhar Goyal, Age 9
Madison Alexander, Age 9
A Pretty Ballerina
The ballerina dances onstage
In a pink, sparkling tutu.
People admire her
As she twirls and leaps
In front of a colorful sunset!
She has some fake pearls
on her pink tutu,
And she wears some
crystalline shoes.
She jumps ever so daintily,
So her shoes touch the f loor
With barely a whisper!
After the storm
everything is wet—
the doorbell that rings,
our deck, and even my swing.
So then I jump in a puddle,
then I go inside,
watch a movie, and cuddle.
Marissa O’Connell, Age 7
Alëna-Irina Staško, Age 9
Ishika Kumari, Age 5
S. Shameeha Fathima, Age 10
Baby Brother
Baby brother pulls my hair
But he snuggles everywhere
Baby brother always cries
But he’s a ver y cute guy
Baby brother bugs me every day
But he always likes to play
Baby brother drives me nutty
But he is my best buddy.
Emmy Bella Valdez, Age 7
Share Your
Creative Work
We’d love to see it!
Art must be on unlined paper.
Poems must have fewer than
75 words. All submissions
must be created by you.
We cannot
return your
work, so you
might want to
keep a copy.
Include your name, age,
and address. Mail to
A-4, Shriram Industrial Estate,
Wadala Mumbai-400031,
Maharashtra
Email:
highlightschamps@delhipress.in
An elephant grandmother leads
her family to a new feeding area.
ELEPHANT
GRANDMOTHERS
When Dr. Karen McComb
came to Amboseli Park in East
Africa, her first task was to
learn the names of the one
hundred or so elephants most
often seen.
Scientists working in the park
have learned to study elephants
up close by watching them
By Jack Myers, Ph.D., Senior Science Editor
from Land Rovers. They have a
catalog of the park’s almost one
thousand elephants, identified
mainly by shapes and markings
on their ears and tusks. When
the scientists started the catalog,
they gave each elephant a
number until they discovered
that remembering individuals by
name is easier than by number.
There are estimates of age for all
of the elephants and even actual
records (like birth certificates)
for all born since 1972.
Amboseli was a good place for
Dr. McComb to study animal
communications, and elephants
were a great subject because
their lifestyle depends so much
on communication.
An Eating Lifestyle
Elephants make their living
eating grasses and plant
leaves. It takes a lot—about
three hundred pounds a day
for a grown-up. That means
Dr. Karen McComb
32
april 2018
elephants need to keep moving
around to find enough food. And
eating takes a lot of time—more
than half of each day is spent
munching food and looking for
more.
Big elephants are rough and
tough enough that they don’t
have to worry about predators
like lions. And there are not
many diseases that threaten
their lives. So elephants are
generally long-lived animals.
In big parks like Amboseli,
where they are protected from
human hunters, some live to
be more than 70 years old. The
real dangers to an elephant
come when it is a young calf,
especially when it is less than a
year old and small enough to
walk under its mother’s
belly. To make possible their
continuous search for food and
to protect their calves, most
elephants live in small family
groups.
Elephant Families
A typical family group is
composed of about six adult
females together with their
calves, both male and female.
When the males get to be about
15 years old, they leave their
families and go off to live in
all-male groups. The family
always has an old, old
grandmother, the matriarch,
who is the acknowledged leader.
The whole group of scientists
began a regular routine of
spending much of each day
driving through the park in
Land Rovers, watching the
elephants and listening to how
they communicate. In searching
for food, an elephant often drifts
away from the rest of its family.
Then it keeps in touch by special
“contact calls,” just to learn what
others in the family are doing.
The scientists saw that an
elephant had a characteristic
response when it heard a contact
call from another member of its
family. By holding out its ears, it
would show that it was listening,
and then might give its own
contact call in reply. Elephants
have very deep voices, mostly
infrasonic, with only some of
their sound vibrations in the
range of human hearing. They
can easily hear one another from
more than a mile away.
Strangers or Friends?
There were times when two
families came within each
other’s calling range. How would
elephants respond to calls from
members of other families?
To find out, the scientists
used “playback” experiments.
First they used microphones to
record the contact calls of 20
different females. Then they
watched a chosen family through
binoculars while they played
back a recorded call from an
amplifier on their Land Rover.
Their notes and videotapes
showed a wide range of
responses. Some families showed
a simple listening response.
Other families seemed agitated,
and nervously bunched together
while their calves moved closer
into the bunch. It was easy to see
that a family could distinguish
between other families by their
calls.
Fortunately, the park records
of many years showed how
often a family had been seen
and how often it had been seen
with another family. That gave
Amboseli Park in Kenya was a good place for Dr. McComb (on the Land Rover) to study
how elephants communicate with one another.
a scale of familiarity—from close
friends to total strangers. The
calls from a friendly family gave
a simple listening response.
Calls from strange families
were recognized with a nervous
bunching response.
Wise Elephants
Dr. McComb and her team
had learned a great deal about
elephant communication, but
they kept on thinking about
one puzzling observation. Some
families were “smarter,” or
better at distinguishing calls of
friends from those of strangers.
In elephant families,
everyone listens to
Grandma.
What made some families
smarter than others? The
scientists searched their
records for an explanation. To
their surprise there was only
one factor of importance: The
“smartest” families always
had the oldest matriarchs.
Evidently a family, as it did in
all other activities, waited for
some signal from the matriarch
before responding to a strange
contact call. And older, more
experienced matriarchs were
better at telling whether other
elephants were strangers or
friends just by their calls.
That was an important
discovery. It showed how an
elephant family depends on the
experience carried in the long
memory of the matriarch.
Dr. McComb had started
out to learn a little more about
elephant communication.
What she discovered was a
much bigger idea about the
importance of grandmothers in
the lives of elephants.
april 2018
33
Mystery of the
Missing Painting
By Wendy Hobday Haugh • Art by Bob McMahon
Grandma and Grandpa’s new
was small.
house
“Did you find space to hang all your
, Grandma?” Lilli asked.
paintings
“Grandpa hung them all this morning,” Grandma said.
“I love the
painting
of the
yellow
boat
They looked in every room. No
,” said Lilli. “Let’s find it!”
! Then Lilli spotted a
boat
by the
painting
. “What a pretty
door
, Grandma!”
yellow
house
“Hmm,” Grandma said. “I don’t remember that one.”
Lilli laughed and turned the
around. “It’s the
painting
Grandpa hung it upside down!”
34
APRIL 2018
of the
painting
.
boat
The
Timbertoes
Tommy was helping Pa.
This could
be a ball.
TM
By Rich Wallace • Art by Ron Zalme
Pa sanded it.
Ow! My
hand stings.
Let’s play
catch!
Ma had an idea.
Thanks,
Ma!
She sewed the fingers . . .
. . . and added a pad.
Soon they had a new game.
APRIL 2018
35
What’s So Hot About
SPICES?
By Gail Jarrow and Paul Sherman
Sour meat curry from India.
Spicy shrimp from Vietnam.
Hot tamales from Mexico.
Spicy foods seem to come from
countries with a tropical climate.
Two scientists, Jennifer
Billing and Dr. Paul Sherman,
wondered why. They thought
that healthy eating habits
probably helped people survive.
But how could eating spicy foods
in hot climates make diners
healthier?
Spices come from plant parts:
leaves, flowers, fruits, seeds,
or roots. (Salt isn’t a true spice
since it doesn’t come from a
plant.) Chemicals in spice plants
have aromas and tastes that
people like.
The desire for spices was so
great that it affected the course
of history. The Phoenicians,
Arabs, and Europeans explored
the world in search of shortcuts
to tropical regions of Asia, where
many of the popular spices grew.
Christopher Columbus was
looking for such a shortcut when
Jennifer Billing and
Dr. Paul Sherman
wondered why spicy
foods seem to come
from countries with a
tropical climate.
he bumped into America.
Without refrigeration, foods
spoil quickly and can cause
illness. Since ancient times,
people have used spices to keep
food from spoiling—to preserve
it. The Romans used red cumin
and coriander. Pirates preserved
wild game for sea travel by
smoking it and rubbing it with
allspice. The Egyptians also
knew that spices could prevent
decay. They even used them in
mummification.
Strong Chemicals
Hundreds of years ago people
didn’t know how certain spices
preserved foods. Since then,
scientists have discovered
that spices contain powerful
chemicals. These chemicals
protect the spice plants from
bacteria, insects, fungi, and
hungry animals. When we use
spices, the same chemicals
prevent the growth of bacteria
that spoil our food and can
sometimes make us sick.
Besides their taste,
what good are they?
Scientists have tested thirty
spices on dozens of food-spoiling
bacteria. Every spice affected at
least one type of bacterium. The
super bacteria killers were allspice, garlic, onion, and oregano.
These spices killed or slowed the
growth of all bacteria on which
they were tested.
Some spices aren’t so
appealing—at least until you
get used to them. You probably
wouldn’t cover yourself with the
scent of garlic or onion if you were
trying to impress your friends.
Eating fresh hot peppers and
chilies can blister your mouth.
Then why did people start
eating foods seasoned with these
red-hot spices? Ms. Billing and
Dr. Sherman had a clue. The two
scientists guessed that people
who added the spices to their
food would have been healthier
than those who didn’t.
If that guess was right,
recipes from tropical climates
(where foods spoil faster and the
risk of food poisoning is higher)
should contain more bacteriakilling spices than those from
cool climates. To test their idea,
the scientists studied recipes in
nearly one hundred cookbooks
from all over the world.
First they picked traditional
dishes that used meat, since
meat spoils quickly. They chose
older recipes that were first used
before refrigeration. Collecting
more than 4,500 recipes from
thirty-six countries, they listed
all the spices used.
The bacteria killers were the
big winners! Seven of the world’s
ten most commonly used spices
have strong antibacterial power:
onion, garlic, hot peppers, bay leaf,
cinnamon, cloves, and thyme.
Another finding puzzled the
scientists. Pepper and lemon/lime
juice ranked second and fifth in
the Top Ten. This was surprising
because these two spices aren’t
great at wiping out bacteria. But
it turns out that they boost the
bacteria-killing power of other
spices used with them.
The Spiciest Dishes
What about climate? Did
warmer countries have spicier
dishes? The scientists compared
the average temperature of each
country to the number of spices
used. They found that dishes
from cooler countries had few
spices. (In Scandinavia many
recipes have no spices at all.)
Foods get spicier as the
climate gets hotter. Dishes from
tropical countries like Ethiopia,
India, and Indonesia used the
most spices in the world. They
had an average of more than six
spices per recipe.
Recipes from hot climates
also won the prize for including
the most bacteria-killing spices.
For example, key ingredients in
curry dishes popular in India
37°
37° 42°
48°
47°
49°
54°
56°
are cumin, cinnamon, and cloves,
all good at killing bacteria or
slowing their growth. In the
United States, garlic, onion, and
hot peppers are used more in
the South than they are in the
North.
Spices in our food make it
more tasty. But as scientists
discovered, spices often do an
even more important job. People
living in hot climates had good
reason to get used to strongtasting spices. These bacteria
killers helped preserve foods and
kept people healthy.
Today we have other ways
to preserve our food, such as
refrigerating it and freezing
it. But that tasty chili powder
might still make your taco a
healthier lunch.
48°
48°
59°
57°
65°
46°
51°
63°
74°
69°
58°
56°
62°
66°
54°
67°
81°
76°
80°
70°
81°
81°
82°
Equator
79°
Average number
of spices in each
meat dish.
0 to 2.0
72°
80°
75°
65°
63°
2.1–3.0
3.1–4.0
4.1–5.0
5.1–6.0
Each temperature is the average for a typical year.
more than 6
The scientists found cookbooks from thirty-six different countries. The colors show that the
people in most warmer nations use more different kinds of spices than those farther north and south. Some warmer countries
may use large amounts of just a few spices.
Do you know of any cookbooks from countries not colored in on this map? Send the titles to Highlights champs, A-4, Shriram
Industrial Estate, Wadala, Mumbai-400031. We’ll send them to Dr. Sherman.
april 2018
37
S
L
E
D
RI D
Forest Funnies
What is a police off icer’s
favorite dessert?
1
Geoffrey Boden
an
How do you make
h?
ug
octopus la
2
Sudhir Bhusan
“Everyone takes me for granite.”
How many books can
you put in an empty
backpack?
3
Natasha Nair
page 26
Answers
My Sci
page 2
Fun This Month
Mystery Photo —Baseball.
page 15
Batter Up
Kia, Dhruv, Avni, Gauri, Jay.
page 22
Science Meets Art—Water and dye
molecules in the paint are polar
(positively charged at one end and
negatively charged at the other). But
wax is not very polar and has no
charge. Water molecules are more
attracted to each other than to
wax. So they go where other water
molecules go—for example, between
the fibers of the paper and into the
eggshell—but on the wax they just
bead up.
hen a bucket
What happens w
is embarrassed?
Sammy Lott
bread do
on vacation?
the
Brendan Luff
What do you get from
a pampered cow?
Picture Puzzler
1. B 2. A 3. A 4. A 5. A
6. B 7. B 8. A 9. A 10. A
These 18 items are missing in the
bottom image.
page 25
Garden Plotting
Shreya
7
1. Mole’s tomatoes take up the
most space.
2. Rabbit planted equal areas of
tomatoes and lettuce.
1. 3:00. 2. 9:30. 3. 5:23.
4. 12:01. 5. 6:16. 6. 8:27.
Aaron Osinski
Sarah
Cover: Scrub-a-Dub! by Jennifer Harney
APRIL 2018
9
8
wear
Why did the model
r flight?
fancy clothes for he
Zina De Voe
Answers: 1. A copcake. 2. With ten-tickles.
3. Just one. It’s not empty after that.
4. It turns pail (pale). 5. It loafed around.
6. Spoiled milk. 7. Silverware. 8. A fictionary.
9. Because she was going on the runway.
Illustration credits: Page 2: Kevin Zimmer: 6: Erin Mauterer, except (shark boat) iStock/malerapaso, (book)
iStock/orensila; 15: Jokes by Rich Powell, Batter Up by Christina Brown; 19: “A Week of Passover Lunchboxes” by
Stephanie Dehennin, You Finish the Story! by Mike Petrik; 25: Garden Plotting by Pat Lewis, Clock Challenge by
Shaw Nielsen; 26: Josh Cleland; 27: Science Meets Art by Michaela Schuett. Photo credits: Page 2: (Cherry
blossoms) Delhi Press Studio, (Mystery Photo) iStock/Nastco; 4–5: pixabay/Monicore; 6: (owl) iStock/GlobalP,
(fruit platter) iStock/Azurita, (crayons) iStock/barbaramarini, (USB cable) iStock/amnachphoto, (rocks) iStock/
AndrewRafalsky, (dog) iStock/damedeeso; 26: Jeff Mauritzen.
6
What do you call a robot’s
underwear?
What do you call a
book
of made-up words?
Clock Challenge
38
What did
5
page 43
Travel Trek
4
Clothing Designer’s Studio
d
n
s
w
a
a
P
Think
What are some skills needed to be
a clothing designer?
What might designers keep in mind when
creating clothes for exercise? For work?
For sleep?
What is “fashion”? How have fashions
changed in 25 years? 100 years?
500 years? Can you imagine how
styles might change in the future?
If you could design an outfit, what would
it look like?
Art by David Coulson.
I’ve been
wearing the
same coat for
years!
Ask
Arizona
TM
I don’t like group proj
ects
because I always end
up doing
more than my share
of the
work. What can I do?
—Overworked in Oot
y
Teamwork Trouble
By Lissa Rovetch • Art by Amanda Morley
Dear Overworked,
I know exactly how you feel!
I recently had a challenging
time working on a group project,
too. My teacher put me with
three people who weren’t all
that excited about getting any
work done, and the experience
was extremely stressful. Since
my story isn’t all positive, I’ll
change the girls’ names to
Cookie and Cupcake, and
I’ll call the boy Volcano.
Our assignment was to
pick one of the 29 states or seven
union territories and make a
brochure about it.
“Let’s pick Andaman and
Nicobar!” said Cupcake. “They
have super-cute swimsuits.”
“That is so true!” said Cookie.
“Speaking of swimsuits, there
are some get-ready-for-summer
sales happening right now.”
“Really? Maybe my mom
40
APRIL 2018
will take me shopping this
weekend,” said Cupcake.
I turned to Volcano.
“Which state do you think
we should pick?”
Volcano shrugged. “I don’t
care. But what happened to your
hair, Arizona? It looks like it got
caught in a blender!”
No one in my group
seemed very eager
to talk about
our project.
The rest of Volcano’s
comments during the meeting
were equally “helpful.”
At our next group meeting,
no one seemed very eager to
talk about our brochure, so I
went ahead and shared the
interesting facts I’d learned
about Andamanese food and
culture. When I was done, no
one said anything, so I pulled
out my notebook. “Cupcake,
you had offered to search for
pictures of Andaman’s sea life.
Were you able to find some?”
“I didn’t have time,” she
answered, “but here’s a
photo of me at the hotel pool
in Andaman.”
I looked at the picture she
had taped in her notebook and
smiled. “You look great, but you
probably don’t count as sea life.
Cookie, you were going to find
some historical information.
And Volcano, you were in charge
of Andaman’s geography, right?”
“I’ll do my part soon,”
said Cookie. “I’ve been really
busy lately.”
“Me, too. I’ve been really
busy!” said Volcano.
I was getting the impression
that no one but me planned to
work on the brochure.
“What am I going to do?” I
asked my wise old cat named
Cow when I got home. “Do I have
to do all the work for everyone if
I don’t want a bad grade?”
“Since we’re
working as a team,
we’re all relying on
each other.”
“I’ll do my part
soon. I’ve been
really busy.”
Cow didn’t even think twice.
He told me with one meow, two
purrs, and three tail f licks that,
yes, I was expected to do the
entire brochure by myself.
As we set the table for dinner,
my mom could tell I was stressed
out. “What’s going on?” she asked.
“No one else in my group is
doing any work,” I told her. “So
Cow and I agreed that the only
way to get the brochure done is
for me to do it myself.”
“Well, first of all,” my mom
said with a smile, “cats might not
be the best advice-givers when
it comes to homework. Second,
I doubt you’re responsible for
everyone else’s part. Why don’t
you check in with your teacher
about it?”
When I talked to my teacher
the next day, he explained he’d be
grading the assignment partly on
the finished brochure but mostly
on our individual work. So that
made me a lot less worried.
And at our next group meeting,
I tried to bring up my concerns
in a friendly way. “Since we’re
working as a team, we’re all
relying on each other to do
“Cats might not be the
best advice-givers when
it comes to homework.”
the best we can,” I told them.
“If anyone is having trouble,
maybe we can talk about
solutions together.”
Surprisingly, Cupcake,
Cookie, and Volcano all ended
up doing their share. They didn’t
necessarily do things the way I
would have, but I guess that’s the
deal with group projects.
So, dear Overworked, the next
time you’re stuck doing way
more work than anyone else,
I think you should: 1. Talk with
your group in a friendly way;
2. Discuss your concerns with
your teacher; 3. Do the best
job you can on your part of the
assignment; 4. Even if you happen
to live with the wisest cat in the
world, do not take his advice
about homework!
Ciao for now,
Arizona
Dear
Highlights Champs
TM
My friend has
been acting like
someone she’s
not. If I talk to
her, she’ll probably
deny it. What
should I do?
I slouch a lot. Can
you help me think of
ways to stop?
A Highlights Champs Reader
Even though you’re not sure your friend will listen to your
concerns, it’s a good idea to try to talk about this with her. Be
honest and kind. You might say “I’m glad we’re friends, but lately
you seem to be acting like a different person. I want you to know
that I like you as you are, and it makes me sad when you don’t
seem to be acting like yourself.” Perhaps your friend will be able
to explain why she has been acting as she has.
If your friend continues to act in ways that upset you, you might
decide to limit your time with her. When a friendship brings you
more heartache than joy, it’s OK to take a break from the person
and spend more time with other friends.
My sister always
cracks her knuckles
and it really annoys
me. What should I do?
Varick
People used to worry that
knuckle cracking would cause
arthritis later in life. Scientists
haven’t found evidence for that.
Still, your sister may not realize
that her knuckle cracking annoys you, so talking to her may
help. At a time when the two of you are getting along, you might
simply say “I’ve noticed that you crack your knuckles, and
I wondered if you could try not to do it around me.”
Try to concentrate on having fun with your sister rather than
focusing on her habit. If her knuckle cracking gets on your
nerves, just quietly leave the room.
42
APRIL 2018
Lydia
One thing you can try is
imagining a thread coming
out of the top of your head
like a puppet. When the
string is pulled tight, your
head lifts up and your spine
straightens.
If you’re sitting, try
putting both feet flat on
the floor. Your back should
be pressed up against the
chair and your hips should
be as far back as possible.
Putting a pillow or rolled
towel between your lower
back and the chair can help
you be more comfortable
and sit straighter.
You might also ask
your friends and family
to help by reminding you
when you’re slouching.
Good luck!
Write to us!
Please include your name, age,
and full address. Mail to
TM
Art by Keith Frawley.
r
e
l
z
u
z
P
Picture
Find 18 item
s
in the top
that appear
Art by Neil N
umberman
e.
ottom imag
b
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re missing
image but a
Rs. 1
Answers on pa
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(REGISTERED) RNI DELENG/ 52480/ 2013/ DL(C) - 14./1368/ 2017-19/ PO.
SRT Nagar. ND-55. Posting Dt. 01 to 07. Published 10/03/18. Pgs.44
Papa may sometimes forget that your best friend is now Kar thik,
and not Sunny. But don' t ever let him forget that the names of
your favourite jam-f illed, chocolaty and milky biscuit s
are now Fab! Jam-In, Fab! Bourbon and Fab! Milky Sandwich.
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