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The Big Issue - April 16, 2018

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�50
EVERY MONDAY
NO. 1303 APRIL 16-22 2018
A HAND UP NOT A HANDOUT
S OF
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PLUS ICK PRO ? THE FUTU UGH
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Ethical ISAs
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WIN!
CONTENTS
BIG ISSUE SHOP
EARTH DAY
APRIL 16-22 2018 / NO. 1303
months behind at the moment.
It?s supposed to be spring but
it still feels like winter. On
page 28 Chris Packham talks
about the problem of plastic
pollution in our seas. I?m a
fisherman and it?s definitely
an issue. Some days it?s not so
bad but on others it?s filthy. I?m
also a big music lover; reggae,
heavy metal, rock, classical.
On page 45 you can read about
how classical music has been
opened up to everyone. If I?ve
had a bad day I put on Classic
FM and it lifts me up a bit. You
can read more of my story on
page 54.
INSIDE...
14 LETTER TO MY
YOUNGER SELF
Dougray Scott didn?t need
Wolverine ? his dad was his real hero
THE BIG ISSUE MANIFESTO
Vendor photo: Konrad S Leader
26 ENDANGERED
IN THE UK
Great news for European beavers,
but hedgehogs might want to
look away
34 VERTICAL
AGRICULTURE
Future farming looks like it
might be a bit up and down
WE BELIEVE in a hand up, not a handout...
Which is why our sellers BUY every copy of the
magazine for �25 and sell it for �50.
WE BELIEVE in trade, not aid?
Which is why we ask you to ALWAYS take
your copy of the magazine. Our sellers are
working and need your custom.
WE BELIEVE poverty is indiscriminate?
Which is why we provide ANYONE whose life is
blighted by poverty with the opportunity to
earn a LEGITIMATE income.
WE BELIEVE in the right to citizenship?
Which is why The Big Issue Foundation, our
charitable arm, helps sellers tackle social and
?nancial exclusion.
THE BIG ISSUE / p3 / April 16-22 2018
WE BELIEVE in prevention?
Which is why Big Issue Invest ofers
backing and investments to social enterprises,
charities and businesses which deliver social
value to communities.
CORRESPONDENCE
Write to: The Big Issue, Second Floor, 43 Bath St, Glasgow, G2 1HW
Email: letters@bigissue.com
facebook.com/bigissueUK
bigissue.com
@bigissueuk
COMMENT OF THE WEEK
A hole lot of respect for John
John, The Big Issue seller, who stands
outside the Co-op in St Marychurch,
Torquay, nearly every day, told me yesterday
he saved a man from falling down the
manhole. He told me the Co-op had blocked
staf toilets yesterday. A man came and
pulled up the manhole cover outside the
main doors. He did not have enough rods, so
went round to his van to make a phone call,
out of sight of the hole, no barrier or warning
around the hole. A male customer walked
out of the shop, looking at his receipt and
walked straight towards the hole, a few feet
in front of him. John said he saw what was
happening and rushed forward. He put his
hand out to stop the man and got to him
just in time.
Joan, email
point out that we shouldn?t be
seeking to mooch of each
other?s happiness levels.
Instead of seeking out happy
people, part of our
responsibility is to do good
things to make others happy,
and let life take its course
from there.
Laurie McKinlay, email
Right note
I found the article ?Key
Change? [Music, April 2-8]
fascinating but it did imply a
required degree of musical
knowledge and therapeutic
skill. I have messed about with
guitars for many years and
would in no way describe
myself as a musician.
However, three years ago
as a volunteer with the Royal
Voluntary Service I was
invited to attend a (free) course
with the Silver Linings Project
put on by the Sage Gateshead.
All ?students? worked with
older people, either in
residential or day care and we
were taught to play ukulele and
to get older people singing.
During that time we have
discovered that music is a mild
form of exercise requiring
deeper breathing and,
sometimes, hand-clapping or
arm-waving. We have also
noted the efects on memory.
I understand that research
at Leeds University has also
identi?ed the production of
oxytocin, a hormone which
helps people bond. The other
hormone which is produced by
activity is endorphins ? the
so-called feelgood factor.
So singing helps us
physically, mentally, and
socially and we usually
feel better for it. We don?t
have to be good at it, either.
Martyn Tuckwell, Volunteer,
Royal Voluntary Service
Dog days
I bought my copy of The Big
Issue this week in Wells-nextthe-Sea on the north coast of
Norfolk. Normally I get it from
my main man Easton at White
City Tube station. I was
reading Nicolette Amette?s
letter [Correspondence, April
2-8] and I ask her to look out
for Easton now that her
commute will take her there
every day. Easton?s a legend in
his red, gold and green
tracksuits... Listen out for his
beautiful catchphrase... ?...?Ave
a ?appy one!?
James Osborne, email
Having read of the terrible
ordeal of Big Issue vendor
Bubble, it was good to hear
that he is beginning to recover.
Also it was good to see our
Warminster vendor Paul on
the My Pitch page of The Big
Issue. Paul is a very pleasant
and friendly person, and
always asks how my husband
and I are if I haven?t been into
town for a few days. His dog,
Sprite, is certainly a big softie.
Most times I see him buried in
a ?ufy blanket, with just his
black nose peeking out,
gradually a long black muzzle
appears, then a pair of brown
eyes followed by the front
paws stretched out. When
fully emerged he then starts
nudging your legs ? a signal
that a fuss is required.
Jan, Warminster
Simple joys
Tears for Dave
I have just been reading your
article on happiness [March
26-April 1] and though there is
a lot of great information and
practical advice, I felt I had to
So, so sad to hear of the death
of Dave Hale over the Easter
weekend. He was outside M&S
Nottingham every afternoon,
rain or shine, and known to so
Easton promise
THE BIG ISSUE / p4 / April 16-22 2018
@bigissue
many in the city centre
community. Always greeted
me with ?Good afternoon sir,
how are you today?? Will be
greatly missed.
Mike Houghton, Nottingham
Read more tributes to this
much-loved vendor on page 6
@matoxley
Not bikes... for those
wanting to understand
the violence & killings on
London?s streets, this, from
the @BigIssue is by far
the best thing you?ll read.
Looks at the causes &
how to ?x things, without
sensationalising the situation
@GeorgeReeves94
Great editorial in this
week?s @BigIssue by
@PauldMcNamee praising
Justine Greening?s Social
Mobility Pledge. Practical
solutions are vital to break
down barriers to opportunity.
@EmilyLune
Stopped for my
usual lunch break chat
with our local @BigIssue
vendor to ?nd out he?s got
himself enough money
for a ?at and has been
ofered a job. Two months
on the streets of Bristol,
unbelievably deserving and
so heartwarming.
@ChloeSWilson
Loved learning more
about The Commonwealth
in my @BigIssue this
morning.
Especially that Nelson
Mandela once said ?The
Commonwealth makes the
world safe for diversity.?
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THE EDITOR
Bank on us
T
his week, blame the chronobiologists. Go on, you?ll feel better.
We all like somebody to blame. They?ll put your irritation down
to lack of sleep. That?s what they do, I?ve learned, the chronobiologists. They study sleep, its impact on us. Or, more tellingly, impact of
lack of it. Though last week, it was the long-liers who caught it from the
chronobiologists. Those who get up late are at risk of an early death.
Both lazy AND doomed.
Truth is, you might not be able to do much about it. The reasons are
complex. Could be because staying up later, you eat badly, maybe eat at
the wrong time, impacting health. There are psychological reasons. And
some of it might be beyond your control. Your body clock could be
largely inherited and hardwired. You were made this way.
Of course, if the sleep business doesn?t get you, the booze probably
will. Hot on the heels of the deadly lie-in report came the deadly booze
report. Even a glance at the devil?s buttermilk and you?re knocking years
off your life. Resistance is futile. The end is assured.
Survive it long enough and we?re in a period of uncontrollable uncertainty. The President of the United States of America tweets the planet
towards war. The only people left to see it, fought out by long-range
robot missiles, will be teetotal millennials, perfectly rested to make sure
their selfies look good as the cloud goes up and conspiracy theorists
argue that it?s not ACTUALLY happening and is being put together by
actors for the Deep State.
I spent some time last week in Dublin, speaking at a magazine
publishing event. And there, the majority of questions that came were
framed around Brexit, and around uncertainty. The event came on the
20th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement, though not related to
it. The Agreement ? that hard-won bulwark against the darkness, an
incredible document, birthed by serious, smart, brave people that
changed history, for the people across Ireland and for the people across
Britain and for the people beyond. And that is now being treated as some
sort of tatty printout that at best can be massaged, and at worst is an
irritant to be shredded and ignored. I couldn?t blame the chronobiologists when the good Dublin people asked good questions about a postBrexit future. The pesky border issue grows.
So, where to look when confusion grips? How about towards those
who genuinely hold levers of power, who make decisions that impact us
at every level? Those who, we hope, will do what is right when the
uncertainty grips.
How about Mark Carney, the Governor of The Bank Of England?
The BoE will play a key part in our futures post-March 2019, clearly.
In a speech last week, Carney discussed how things are changing,
how every technological revolution destroys jobs and livelihoods long
before the new ones come. From industrialisation of farming to ?the
hollowing out of middle-class jobs? as automation grips.
And as jobs and identity diminish, he saw how sides are chosen and
people blamed ? the people versus the elite, the virtuous versus the
damned. In all this, there was a message he echoed: ?When your knees
buckle, crawl, roll, do not give up.?
Mark Carney had read this in The Big Issue. It was from the Letter to
My Younger Self we ran with will.i.am. Turns out the boss of The Bank
of England is a regular reader of The Big Issue, and particularly fond of
Letter To My Younger Self. The pieces tend to have wistfulness, he said,
correctly, identifying the incredible content and heart these interviews
deliver every week, by brilliant Big Issue writers.
So there you are. Those leading, those who will be the prime
architects of a post-Brexit Britain, look for guidance from The Big Issue,
from the content we deliver, and from the spirit of our vendors. From the
men and women out there shoring up dignity, as Carney said, as they sell
and earn and rebuild their lives.
We will not give up.
Paul McNamee is editor of The Big Issue
@pauldmcnamee paul.mcnamee@bigissue.com
VENDORS GET
A COFFEE BREAK
Big Issue vendors
swapped magazines
for macchiatos after
undergoing training
to brew up new
barista skills.
Two sellers blended
in at Cardif?s Little
Man Cofee last week to build up
alternative skills that will hold them in
good stead with employers.
Resident barista Laura Bradford
gave insight into crafting a ?at white
and is planning to provide one-onone sessions with other vendors in
the future.
Dean Williams, who sells the
magazine at Church Street in the
Welsh capital, said: ?We learned
about grinding the beans and tricks
THE BIG ISSUE / p6 / April 16-22 2018
like how turning the
p upside down can
press
change the ?avour.
?There was a lot to
taake in and it was very
teechnical so I?m not sure
if I will be looking to
beecome a barista but I
enjoyed it and I?d like to go back
and do a bit more.?
Big Issue regional manager for
the Wales and South West Beth
Thomas added: ?It was great fun.
Laura and Ash from Little Man were
really engaging with the vendors and
are keen to do more of this.
?The aim is to ofer vendors
the opportunity to gain alternative
skills to help them move onto
employment opportunities.?
Tributes pour
in for Big Issue
vendor who had
?heart of gold?
Top artists and prisoners have both
produced mini-masterpieces on
postcards for charity ? and which piece
you get is down to the law of averages.
Tracey Emin, Jeremy Deller, Mark
Wallinger and Cornelia Parker have each
contributed to the 160 original artworks in
the Postcards from Prison exhibition at
high-end auction house Sotheby?s.
Each ticket to the May 10 event, hosted
by comedian Grif Rhys Jones, costs �0
and includes a champagne dinner for two,
as well as an art piece randomly drawn
from a lottery.
ON BIGISSUE.COM THIS WEEK
? E from Eels may
not be able to resist
Leonard Cohen ? but
it was his dog that
was seduced by his
charms instead
? Sara Cox talks taming her Radio 1 wild
child days to embracing parenting with
Radio 2
? Actor David Morrissey exclusively shares
the playlist he used to get in the zone
for new drama The City and the City
?BOB?S ALIVE!?
Lots of voices have praised Street Cat
Bob?s cartoon debut ? but none louder than
Brian Blessed.
The star gave his booming approval to the
?rst episode of Bob?s new show, which debuted online
last week, saying: ?What a delight this is,
absolutely terri?c.?
Bob?s owner James Bowen revealed that the ?lm
star feline will soon be hanging up his scarf. But his
animated swansong still had fans purring in delight.
?My young son deeply connected with Bob?s story
and always gives a little to those on the streets, even his
own pocket money,? said fan Amanda Arias.
?For my Bob, Street Cat Bob gave homelessness a
real human/feline narrative better than I could.?
Even Neil Fitzgibbon, who brought Bob to life
in his role as an animator, g
got in on the act. He said:
?A lovely moment today buying my
copy and explaining to the vendor
that I designed annd animated the
characterr of Bob that is
featured this week.?
THE BIG ISSUE / p7 / April 16-22 2018
Photo: Geofrey Swaine/REX/Shutterstock
WHAT?S HOT IN THE
BIGISSUESHOP.COM?
CARLOS PHOTOGRAPHY
Spanish-born Big Issue vendor Carlos
Gonzalez produces thoughtprovoking photography ?
with two of his ?nest works
now available in the shop,
limited to just 25 prints.
�5
All pro?ts from the event will go
towards leading prison arts charity
The Koestler Trust as they try to make a
diference behind bars with exhibitions, arts
mentoring and employment programmes
in a bid to break the cycle of reofending.
?We are so grateful to the all the artists,
both inside and out, who have donated a
postcard, and to Sotheby?s for hosting the
event,? said the Trust?s CEO Sally Taylor.
?Having donations from such high-pro?le
artists is wonderful and we?ve been blown
away by the amazing works by prisoners.
It is diicult to distinguish between them.?
Readers and locals have flocked
to much-loved vendor Dave
Hale?s pitch with floral tributes
after he passed away suddenly
earlier this month aged 43.
Known as ?Happy Dave? by his
regular customers on his pitch
outside Marks & Spencer in
Nottingham city centre, he
combined selling the magazine
with a role as a vendor co-ordinator
for three years.
And the shock news of his death
has seen an
outpouring of grief
on his pitch, with
?owers and
messages laid
outside the high
street store.
Reader Ash
Medley said:
?Dave had been
through several
mills, but he
managed to
secure a ?at,
which gave him
the dignity he
deserved. He would do anything for
anyone, if he could. And his sel?ess
manner enamoured him to so
many people.?
Big Issue sales development
worker Stephen Southall said that
Dave?s loss will be felt in the
Nottingham office and will leave an
?empty space? for everyone who
met the ?kind-natured? vendor.
?He wholeheartedly sold the
magazine, treating it like a
full-time job. He was kind-natured
with a heart of gold, and really
cared about every single one of his
regular customers. It gets said all
too much that vendors are out
rain or shine but in Dave?s case he
de?nitely was,? said Stephen.
Running mates
The Big Issue teams up with Skid Row Marathon ? a ?lm
about a running club in Los Angeles for homeless people
By Adrian Lobb
A
A combination of health and
new film following a
r unning g roup for
fitness, the routine of regular early
homeless people in the
morning runs, and the camaraderie
notorious Skid Row area of Los
that the team inspires has enabled
Angeles previews this week. And
the runners featured in the film to
make giant strides towards leaving
The Big Issue is delighted to be on
homelessness behind.
board as a media partner.
?I used to run when I was
Skid Row Marathon charts a
younger until my addiction
running group formed by 61-yearold superior court judge Craig
wouldn?t allow me to do anything,?
Mitchell (pictured right), who runs
says Ben Shirley, a musician whose
alongside homeless people and
dependencies led him to Skid Row.
recovering addicts every week.
?Recovery and running go hand
? London preview screenings
Judge Mitchell formed the
in hand.?
April 18-21 (including a live Q&A
group in 2011 when challenged by
Runners from the group have
with Judge Craig Mitchell at O2
a paroled ex-criminal he had
now competed at marathons in
Cineworld on April 21)
sentenced to witness the work of
Ghana, Rome and Jerusalem, as
the Midnight Mission ? which
well as in LA. And this weekend,
? UK-wide, one-day only
provides more than one million
Judge Mitchell runs the London
release on May 9. For details:
meals a year, alongside advice,
Marathon, raising money for The
skidrowmarathontickets.co.uk
Big Issue Foundation, as well as his
shelter and addiction therapy for
own Skid Row Running Club and
some of the estimated 4,500
? Sponsor Judge Mitchell at:
The Running Charity ? who use the
homeless people in Skid Row.
gofundme.com/skidrowmarathon
?The film was very important
transformative powers of running
for our participants because it
to help young homeless people in
conveyed to them that their lives
the UK.
are worth chronicling, they have a story that other
?It makes perfect sense. We are all engaged in the
people need to hear,? says Judge Mitchell.
same enterprise,? says Mitchell.
?I have run about 70 marathons so far. And if you
?Oftentimes, we try to avoid looking at people who
are homeless or addicted to drugs. We don?t want to have run New York or Boston, there is an electricity
know their stories. The film provided the exact in the air. I expect to encounter that in London ? I
couldn?t be more thrilled to be running.?
opposite. Everyone has an incredible backstory.?
THE BIG ISSUE / p9 / April 16-22 2018
STREET ART
You can buy
prints of some
artworks featured in
Street Art through
bigissueshop.com
At least half of the profit
from each sale goes
to the artist.
PATCHWORK PEOPLE
BY JOHN SHEEHY
Regular Street Art contributor John was born
in south-west Ireland in 1949. He emigrated
to London in the 1950s and has worked as a
builder and roofer, but endured lengthy spells
of unemployment. He has experienced periods
of homelessness and sufered mental health
problems. In 1999 he ?rst discovered his natural
ability and enjoyment of painting, encouraged by
The Big Issue. He has since exhibited at Somerset
House, The British Museum, The Royal Academy
and in Europe.
SANDYMOUNT
BEACH, DUBLIN
BY GERALDINE CRIMMINS
Geraldine is 60 and has struggled with drug
addiction and been homeless twice, living on
the streets around Victoria in London. Now
she?s clean and in a housing association ?at.
She?s coming of sickness bene?t and becoming
self-employed as an artist and a Cafe Art
calendar seller at Spital?elds Market. Geraldine
is currently Artist in Residence at Old Diorama
Arts Centre in London.
Street Art is created by people who are marginalised by issues like homelessness, disability and mental health conditions.
Contact streetlights@bigissue.com to see your art here.
THE BIG ISSUE / p10 / April 16-22 2018
CALLING ALL RUNNERS AND
SUPPORTERS! STAND OUT
FROM THE CROWD WITH A
CU
CU
USTOMISED MARATHON T-SHIRT
T
FROM THE BIG ISSUE SHOP!
PUTTING PEOPLE AND PLANET FIRST
WWW.BIGISSUESHOP.COM
Order by April 17th for delivery before the London Marathon
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JOHN BIRD
To understand how best
to help people, you have to
do a bit of detective work
I
n the early 1990s I would trawl their own eforts. And it made many of responding to crises but not breaking out
through second hand bookshops them feel proud.
of the day-to-day nature of crisis. I was not
But I knew that what was really going developing the thinking that was necessary
looking for the green and distinctive
covers of Penguin crime books. I was on though was we were responding to need to take the argument about poverty to the
after the works of George Simenon, who in this A&E way. We were doing nothing to next level. I was held back by education
had invented the detective Jules Maigret prevent people ending up where they and understanding.
Last week I had dinner with John
in the early 1930s. I could, in some obscure needed our help.
junk shop pick them up for 30p each, at
Prevention became a passion of mine. I Simenon, the son of George Simenon.
times never paying more than 50p.
kept asking why was it that we had a Penguin have been publishing new
Then I would try Charing Cross Road supposed socially supporting system that translations of Maigret stories once a
in London?s very centre, and the centre of had so many holes in it that there was a month for a few years and will continue into
the city?s second-hand bookshop trade. To danger we would be overwhelmed by 2020; yes, there are that amount of them.
The ?rst came out in 1931 and the last
my dismay you?d have to pay up to a few the failings.
in 1972.
quid a copy. And pay I did
because I had individually,
I wanted to share with him
with the aid of no degree in
that I had moved my thinking
analysing Simenon?s work,
on, because of the work of his
picked up my own take on
father. That sometimes a
problem cannot necessarily
this sleuth.
be tackled as a problem. Its
I discovered things that
history, where it came from,
later I found out to be true.
how it happened, why it
That what Simenon?s
happened has to be underdetective was fascinated with
stood.
was people. A nd how
Penguin have rescued
they came to do what they
what seemed to me to be a
did. This was not the usual
decline into obscurity by a
struggle to ascertain justice.
detective writer who was
This was an investigation
writing about the bigger
into thinking itself. Into
conditions of human life;
rational and irrational
especially among the poor,
thought.
George Simenon?s most famous creation Maigret was not your stereotypical sleuth
the troubled, the injured.
At the time I was struggling
under a mighty self-imposed weight. We
Maigret himself is not uninjured. There
I needed to think counter-intuitively. I
had started The Big Issue a few years before needed examples where people thought is the question that hangs over the stories
and we were spreading all over the world. counter-intuitively. And that?s where I met of his relationship to his wife. Where are
But the work we were doing was to do with Maigret. And found that reading him made the children? Even though you know that
the emergency of homelessness, when the me think around problems, and through they want them. A man who gives his life
people we met were riven with problems. them. He informed my thinking. He aided to allowing people to grow out of their difThey had often been abused, adding self- and abetted me in seeing problems as ?culties gets very little recompence. He is
abuse to the reasons why they were down composites. And that A didn?t always equal a public servant and he has to deal with the
and out.
or lead to B.
vagaries of political and state power, not
We acted like an A&E department. We
How do you sharpen your thinking? You always knowing what to do next.
were mopping up problems that were the read. But what if what you read is little more
John Simenon keeps his father?s work
failings of government, problems often than to pass the time away? An alive through ?lm, the translations and
through promoting and proselytising. He
caused by inept government programmes. entertainment.
Maigret described the world around a has his father?s eyes, and what seemingly
There was great satisfaction knowing
that ?a hand up not a hand out? was helping person in such a way that you realised that looked like a pair of his glasses. He keeps
people to improve their lives and win them the description may well not take you the wonder of an artist who probably knew
some sense of their own involvement in towards solving the crime because the more about life and its prejudices and its
their own lives. They were not simply the crime in some ways was not an essential incites than any other I know.
recipients of help but able to grow person- part of the story. That the people were.
It?s good to be found in such company.
ally. You would meet defeated people one
George Simenon had hit upon a way of
month and a few months later you would writing stories that enlightened thinking John Bird is the founder and Editor in
meet sellers, marketers, confident and and I was trying to think, but knowing I Chief of The Big Issue. @johnbirdswords
assured. They had their own money got by really did not know how to think. I was john.bird@bigissue.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p13 / April 16-22 2018
IN 1981
THE YEAR
DOUGRAY
SCOTT
TURNS 16?
Pope John Paul II is shot
and seriously wounded in
St Peter?s Square / The first
London Marathon takes
place / Reggae legend Bob
Marley dies aged 36
Dougray Scott
Acting heavyweight, proud Scot
LETTER TO MY YOUNGER SELF
Photos: Justin Williams/REX/Shutterstock; Kevin Mazur/WireImage; BBC
I
?d already decided I wanted to be an actor by didn?t work out, he did get to be an actor. I was in Australia
the time I was 16, having finally given up on the when he died suddenly. I didn?t get to say goodbye.
pipe dream of becoming a footballer. I?d been in
I think the first time I actually thought right,
a few school plays and musicals like Fiddler on the Roof, someone else thinks I?ve got something, was when
but it was when I was in a play called Suddenly Last I got the letter saying I?d been accepted into the
Summer that I thought, this is what I want to do. Acting Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. After that
gave me a cover. I was quite introverted as a young I got more con?dent. But I?ll be brutally honest, I still
teenager so acting was a real release. It gave me a way to don?t know what it is I?ve got and if I can really do this
channel all these emotions running through me. I didn?t well. There?s always an insecurity, every time I get a job.
know that?s what I was doing. I didn?t have a clue. But it I?m always working hard to make it interesting and
believable. When you get a bad review early on in your
felt good.
I had a tough time at school. My headmaster hated career, it?s like... ohhh no. As you go on, you learn that it?s
me. He sent all these letters to my mum telling her I was always going to be like that ? not everyone?s going to love
the most horrible child, argumentative and destructive, you. I do ?nd it hard to look at my own work, though I do
and I?d never amount to anything in my life. He tried to get round to it. But it takes me quite a long time to face
expelme?veorsixtimes.I?dliketogobacktomyyounger up to it. Eventually though, you have to learn to let it go.
It doesn?t rankle with me that I was
self at that time and say, stay calm. Don?t
first choice for Wolverine but couldn?t
worry. Ignore this man. He?s not going to
do it (Mission: Impossible 2 was overbe part of your life for very long. Nothing
running and ?Tom Cruise wouldn?t let
that happens now will de?ne who you are
me do it?). Yeah, the Marvel universe has
for the rest of your life.
taken over cinema but listen... I?m still the
My dad and my uncle were both in
same actor as I ever was. At the end of the
the Glasgow Unity Theatre. My dad
fought in the Second World War then got
day I think the path I took was the one I was
into acting in the Fifties. But he stopped
meant to be on. I?m still getting to act,
acting after six years and became a fridge
getting lots of opportunities ? The Woman
salesman. When I told him I wanted to be
in White (upcoming BBC series) is just one.
an actor he was quite happy to encourage
All I ever wanted was to do diferent things
me. It was just everyone else who said it
and never repeat myself. Yes, listen,
wouldn?t happen. Even when I did a
obviously it was a big deal in the
foundation course in drama, they
industry when I couldn?t do X-Men.
told me I?d never be an actor. My
But I think Hugh Jackman has done
teacher advised me to go into stage
a phenomenal job. If I?d done it, it
management if I wanted to work in
would have been diferent. Hand on
the theatre. But I felt I was so
heart, I don?t begrudge Hugh
anything because he?s been terri?c.
passionate I?d make it happen
And he?s a really lovely guy. What
eventually. I felt I had an affinity for
happened... that?s just life.
it. I didn?t care about being
I?m very connected to Scotland.
successful or famous, I would have
I love it, and I love being Scottish, as
done anything just to get on stage.
AndIwasbloodyminded.Everytime From top: With his wife, fellow actor Claire Forlani; everyone who knows me will tell
someone said no, no, no, no, I?d be as Sir Percival Glyde in the new BBC period drama you. They all say to me, you?re so
The Woman in White
fucking Scottish. Bloody minded,
thinking yeh, yeh, yeh, yeh.
I had a very good relationship with my dad. He patriotic... and an unusual combination of a Fifer and a
was a really complex guy. He came from a tough Glaswegian.Fifersare quite inward-looking, unreadable,
background, Barrhead in Glasgow, but he was a gentle, sometimes silent. I have that, but also the Glaswegian
softlyspokenman.Helovedtolaugh.Hehadalotofgood bloody-mindedness of my mum and dad.
friends in Glasgow. I always thought, before he died, at
To this day my favourite place on earth is around
somepointyouhavetogobackhomeandjusthaveagood the coast of Argyllshire ? Machrihanish, Kintyre,
long talk with him, about what he taught you in life. Gigha, Jura. IfIcould go anywhere in the world, I would
If I could have the chance to do that now, I?d say to him, always go there. The water is crystal clear, it?s like the
youweren?taroundforthemoviesandstuf,butyouhave Caribbean. The ferry to the island of Gigha is so
no idea the in?uence you?ve had on me. It was all to do incredible. You can see all the ?sh. If I could go back and
live any time in my life again, it would be when I was 10,
with you.
My first acting lessons were watching my dad go it was a very hot summer, and me and my mum and dad
out to work. No matter how he felt, he had to get to a and my sister were on the beach in Gigha. My dad had
point where he was palatable to the people he was trying just bought us all an ice cream. Just being with all my
to sell fridge freezers to. He?d get up, start shaving in his family, in the sun, lying on the beach and the water was
vest, then put his shirt on, then his tie, and then it was warm. I had no worries at all and I just thought, this life
?ta-dah!? He was getting into character. Then he?d walk is OK. If I could stay here for the rest of my life, I can?t
intopeople?shousesandsayinahappyvoice,?Hellohello imagine anything would make me happier.
hello, how are you today?? And I?d be like ? un-fuckingbelievable. You weren?t feeling like that when you got up Dougray Scott stars in The Woman in White, starting on
today. And he said, ?Listen, son ? no one wants to buy a April 22 on BBC One; Dougray is supporting The Water
fridge from someone who?s depressed.? I often think, he Efect campaign with WaterAid wateraid.org
always wanted to be an actor and though the theatre Interview: Jane Graham @janeannie
THE BIG ISSUE / p15 / April 16-22 2018
POLLUTION PODS
EVERY
BREATH
YOU TAKE
Over 90 per cent of the world's
population live in places where air
quality levels exceed World Health
Organisation (WHO) safety limits.
Pollution Pods, created by the artist
Michael Pinsky, will be installed in the
courtyard of London?s Somerset House this
week to give visitors the chance to breathe
in the best and worst from around the
globe. The series of five connecting domes
recreates the pollution from London,
Beijing, S鉶 Paulo, New Delhi and the
Norwegian island of Tautra.
It is estimated that the average
Londoner exposed to the current levels of
pollution will lose up to 16 months of their
life; a resident of New Delhi cuts their
existence short by four years.
?I wanted to test whether art can really
change people?s perceptions of, and actions
around, climate change,? Pinsky says. ?I
have tried to distil the whole bodily sense
of being in each place. For instance, being
in S鉶 Paulo seems like a sanctuary
compared to New Delhi, until your eyes
start to water from the sensation of
ethanol, whilst the air of Tautra is unlike
any you?ll have ever breathed before, it
is so pure.?
So take a round the world trip for a
breathtaking (literally) experience.
BEIJING
Primary sources of pollutants include exhaust
emission from more than ?ve million motor
vehicles, regional industry burning coal,
dust storms and very high levels of the
tiny particles, measured as PM2.5, which
penetrate deep into our bodies. While
signi?cant government interventions can
reduce it for short periods of time, PM2.5
levels at times reached over 600ug/m3 in
2017. The WHO has recommended average
levels do not exceed 10ug/m3 for PM2.5 ?
the level beyond which adverse efects on
health have been proven.
LONDON
Airlabs have recorded at over 20 times the
WHO limit for nitrogen dioxide in
hotspots. Around half of this is from
vehicles, mostly diesel ? hence levels are
usually higher by roadsides. The rest is from
building emissions and other sources. Nitrogen
dioxide is diicult to detect, which means that
we can still be breathing highly polluted air on
a day which appears to be clear.
Words: Steven MacKenzie @stevenmackenzie
THE BIG ISSUE / p16 / April 16-22 2018
S肙 PAOLO
While particulate levels are relatively low
(20-25ug/m3), the city is often cloaked
in smog. Many vehicles have switched to
ethanol-based fuel, which produces ozone
and formaldehyde when it breaks down in the
atmosphere. As well as causing smog, ozone
irritates eyes, which you may be able to feel
while walking through the pod.
NEW DELHI
High levels of particles and gaseous
pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide are
released from the huge amount of older
vehicles in the city. Air pollution is also
imported from neighbouring regions
through crop burning and industry. The
basin location means that the poor-quality
air struggles to escape and in certain periods
can worsen quickly. Over 50 per cent of
children have their lungs permanently
damaged by air pollution. PM2.5 levels hit
an incredible 1000ug/m3 last November.
TAUTRA
In Tautra in Norway, the absence of nearby
emissions means that the air is as pure as
possible. Airlabs? technology recreates this
by removing all pollutants from the air.
THE BIG ISSUE / p18 / April 16-22 2018
Everyone loves trees ? but creating new forests is a
complicated process. Author Peter Fiennes explains why
Trees ? and woods ? are having a rare moment in of Ireland. Our own Great Northern Forest will take
the news. The first saplings have just been planted 25 years and be a fraction of the size.
There?s ambivalence here, encapsulated by these
in two vast new northern forests. The tree butchers
of Sheffield Council have been forced by protesters to new forests. Are trees just another crop, like wheat or
call a temporary halt to the slaughter of their own potatoes, to be rotated and harvested? Is a wood
street trees. Beavers are back in our woods for the nothing more than a collection of trees? Or are woods
?rst time for over 400 years; and so, too, are pine places of wonder and mystery ? and is the very idea
martens (precariously). There?s even wild talk of the of trying to apply an economic value to wild nature
lynx (and the wolf) following soon. The demand for an absurdity? Anyone who is enthusiastic about
woodland ownership has never been higher.
rewilding would agree: sometimes the best thing we
And yet, despite this, Britain remains one of the can do with a landscape ? with nature ? is to leave it
least wooded countries in Europe, with a paltry 13 per well alone. Or at the very least keep the sheep from
cent tree cover (compared to the European norm of eating a forest?s young trees (get yourself a wolf is the
over 35 per cent). Recent ?gures suggest we could even usual solution?).
be reverting to a state of deforestation and that the
Of course, there are many diferent kinds of wood:
20th century, at the beginning of which only six per not just the conifer forests, and new plantations, but
cent of the land was covered by trees, was a short-lived also places for every kind of activity, from paintballing
shimmer of hope in a centuries-long story of to bird-watching. What one group needs (a place to
aggressive deforestation.
shout and shoot people with
The new forests are one
paint) is incompatible with
attempt to remedy this. The
the other. But woodland
?rst, at Doddington Moor in
lovers are starting to realise
Northumberland, is the only
that what we need is more
conifer-heavy woodland the
woods, of every kind, for
Forestry Commission has
everyone. We shouldn?t be
sanctioned in England for
?ghting over the last scraps
over 30 years. In just three
of wild Britain. There should
years more than 600,000
be enough forests for fun, as
trees will be planted,
well as woodlands of
covering over 350 hectares.
impenetrable tranquility
It will be a working forest
and peace.
The ?rst task is to save
(with an eye on amenity and
what is left of our ancient
conservation) and the trees
woodland (any wood that is
will be mostly non-native
Planting England?s largest forestry scheme at Doddington
conifers, with some broadover 400 years old). They are
leaves in the mix. They will be harvested regularly extraordinarily diverse in species ? and are threatened
and are destined for houses, fences and industry. As by neglect and development. Once we start talking
the saying goes, ?a wood that pays is a wood that stays?. about the need to plant more trees, it?s a sure sign that
The UK is the second biggest importer of forest prod- we haven?t looked after what we already have.
ucts in the world, worth over �bn last year. Conservation has failed.
Our woods are emptier than they have ever been.
Doddington is a chance to prove we can grow our own.
The other Northern Forest is being shepherded into Not just of our vanishing fauna and ?ora, but also of
life by a coalition of community forest trusts, local us. Most people are cut of from the woods ? and the
government and tree-planting charities, all of them only way to make the forests safe for the future is by
led by The Woodland Trust. One day it will stretch opening them up to as many people as possible. The
from coast to coast, from Hull to Liverpool, and over woods will only survive and ?ourish if we all have the
50 million (mainly native broadleaf) trees will be chance to learn to love them. That means access for
planted, mostly on low-value agricultural land, all; and diferent kinds of woodland for everyone. It
connecting what little is already there (the north has means taking every schoolchild to the woods ? to play
under eight per cent tree cover), leaving plenty of room and plant trees, of course, but also to see a working
for moors and meadows, and surging into the cities forest and learn about the uses of timber. We need to
(yes, even Sheffield), reconnecting 13 million people nurture the street trees in our cities. It means saving
with their lost wild woods.
what we have and planting many million more trees.
It?s a thrilling idea, announced with great fanfare In the end, ?the woods? are not something ?out there?.
by the government, who then grudgingly coughed up What happens to them is our choice and will afect all
a miserly �5m to get things moving. The remainder our livelihoods. For once, the woods need our help.
of the �0m budget will have to be raised by the
rest of us.
Peter Fiennes is the author of Oak and Ash and Thorn:
To put that in context, this year China is planting the Ancient Woods and New Forests of Britain, out now
6.6 million hectares of new forest ? an area the size (Oneworld Publications, �99) @p?ennes
THE BIG ISSUE / p19 / April 16-22 2018
ly,
g)
(Very slow
rt plantin
a
t
s
n
e
v
e
before you
Doddington Moor?s Andy Howard explains the
challenges behind boosting Britain?s tree count
SCOTLAND VS ENGLAND
In England there has been nothing like the project at Doddington Moor in
30 years. In Scotland, forestry is a bigger industry relatively speaking, so there
is political support. The Scottish government have also made a commitment
to being carbon-neutral by 2050. The policy is to become self-suicient in
building materials, and they are looking at biomass power plants. In England
they?ve said: ?We?ll build a nuclear power station and that?ll be one big hit
that resolves all our problems, right?? North of the border conifers are
accepted as part of the landscape and the economic bene?t is recognised,
whereas in England there are well-funded, loud pressure groups that
see conifers as the devil incarnate. They believe we must have nice
trees, we can?t have productive trees.
PRODUCTIVE WOODLAND
Our purpose is to produce what we call productive woodland. When
you build a house, your roof beams, furniture, fence posts ? all of
that stuf ? gets made from conifer trees. Then we?re putting in a
substantial amount of broadleaf, but we?ve chosen species that we
believe will also enable them to become productive. A tree grows
by reaching for light so if you?ve got competition these trees will go
for it and grow quicker.
PROVING THAT PLANTING TREES IS NOT A BAD THING
The general position of government agencies in England is that
planting a tree is the last option for a piece of land. Often there?s
then a habitat issue: is there some ?ora, fauna or ecology of higher
priority than a tree? That must be protected, so the process of
planting trees in England has been a monumental nightmare. As a
result landowners have just thought: ?You know what, I?ve got better
things to do with my life?.
RED TAPE
At DEFRA [Department for Environment, Food & Rural Afairs] meetings,
I?m sat in a room with civil servants from across various agencies, all of
whom are sat there to listen to the proposals ? well, they didn?t listen ? to
give their opinion on the proposals, whether they?ve read them or not.
One of the positions was that the site should be covered in
ground-nesting birds. It was 15 years ago, but there haven?t
been any gamekeepers on the site for a decade because there
has been no shooting on the site. They insisted livestock was
reduced so grass has risen up. There is invasive bracken and rhododendron
so any livestock we do put in would be poisoned. There are fox hunting bans
so we?ve got loads of foxes on the site that eat any ground
d-nesting birds that
do come, so there are none left. ?Ah yes, but it?s a prime ground-nesting bird
site,? they?d say. You go round and round in circles. Mother Nature doesn?t
work to civil service procedures. We can?t undo all thesse things that have
happened. Nobody wants to bring back fox hunting, so at one point I said,
?Listen, the only way we can achieve that is by napalming the entire place
and getting rid of what shouldn?t be there in your opinion. However, if
we do napalm it there?s no way we can restore it to what you think it should
be so we?re back to square one.?
CAN?T SEE THE WOODS FOR THE TREES
You may have a romantic notion about planting a tree that will live forever,
but it?s the forest which is permanent, not the tree. A treee has a life ? it stops
growing, stops absorbing carbon, and ultimately dies. T
That lifespan might
be 50-75 years for a conifer, hundreds of years for an oakk with other species
somewhere in between. Trees have a lifespan and if you don?t do something
with them then you kill the forest. But a forest ccan and should be
permanent. It?s been a huge battle to get this one approved but
hopefully we have broken the mould.
Andy Howard is project manager at Doddington Moor
M
A LEAFY LEGACY
hing, the media
The Big Issue works with Dennis Publish
company founded by Felix Dennis, a true Renaissance
R
man
and philanthropist who left much of his fortune to The
Heart of England Forest following his deaath in 2014.
gest forests in the
Out of his legacy has grown a one of the larg
country.
?Our goal is to create a huge, unbroken woo
odland ? a refuge
from the modern world where people can rediscover nature
and wildlife can ?ourish,? says community engagement
manager Toby Fisher. ?The Heart of Englaand Forest is not
only a perfectly positioned lung for the Midlaands, but a breath
of fresh air for the nation.?
Over 1.75 million native (broadleaf) trees haave been planted
so far along the Warwickshire / Worcestershhire border, from
orest of Arden to
the present-day borders of Shakespeare?s Fo
the edge of the Vale of Evesham.
?That?s over 12 per cent of the way towards our goal of a 30,000acre forest,? adds Fisher. ?It?s an ambitious vision, which we?re
determined to make happen, one tree at a time.?
For walking routes, events, donations, tree
dedications and to become a Friend of the F
Forest
visit heartofenglandforest.com.
THE BIG ISSUE / p21 / April 16-22 2018
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e
Trees ar
the
of the
Urban forests can breathe new life into areas where
poverty has taken root. Devika Jina of Trees for Cities
explains how they?re transforming landscapes and lives
Standing on top of the hill, wind blowing and cold
lapping my face, it is exciting to think that this spot
would soon be home to 7,000 new trees, if a little
tricky to picture.
We?re in Craigmillar, Edinburgh, to plant the ?rst
shoots of a new woodland with our funding partner here,
the People?s Postcode Lottery. We help unload the trees,
some tiny and twig-like, others thorny whips and saplings,
dodging the dug-out holes as the volunteers walk towards
us: an eclectic mix: staf from People?s Postcode Lottery
in their bright red hoodies, and a group of ?ve women,
residents and staf at The Thistle, local housing for people
with long-term health conditions. Their grins stretch from
ear to ear, gleaming against the pallid spring sky.
It?s amazing how two groups of people who have never
met can bond so quickly. While Ben, from Edinburgh
and Lothians Greenspace Trust, gives an introduction
on ?how on earth to plant a tree?, the laughter turns into
light teasing and soon everyone spreads out across the
hill, clutching their chosen saplings.
Tree puns and one-liners abound, and especially from
comedy duo Christopher and Heath who (admitting
they?d come prepared) boldly proclaim that ?trees are
the lungs of the world, and we?re here to help Edinburgh
breathe better!
better!?
Then there is Heelen, striking because of her
smile that never stop
ps, and the kaleidoscope
of keyrings her wheelchair is almost
buried under. She haas everything from
a decent proportio
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25-year history, Trees for Cities has
planted more than 770,000 trees in
deprived urban areas, as this is where access to green
space is most lacking and communities stand to gain so
much from the countless bene?ts of trees.
Craigmillar is in the bottom 10 per cent of
deprived areas in Scotland (Scottish Index of Multiple
Deprivation, 2016) and was ?rst built up in the late-1920s
with the opening of breweries and mines. When these
began to close in the Sixties and Seventies,
unemployment rates soared. Lying around three miles
outside Edinburgh?s bustling centre, its sparse landscape
is quiet, still almost, jarring against a mental picture of
what it would have been in its heyday.
Fast forward to 2018, and employment
opportunities are few and far between, with a solitary
tower block and school visible from the hill, joined most
recently by a hospital and new homes, built to ofer
afordable housing and a new heart for Craigmillar.
Peter, one of the volunteers from People?s Postcode
Lottery, grew up here and speaks of how tough it could
be. But looking out on to the vista, he?s hopeful about the
future of the area.
?When I think about the memories I have of
Craigmillar, there wasn?t much money around and there
were a lot of derelict houses,? Peter says. ?Planting these
treestodaymakesmethinkthatt
treestodaymakesmethinkthatthiscould be a totally
diferent place to the on
ne I remember from
my childhood. Everrything will be new,
and perhaps it won?t be looked down
upon any more.?
Peter's on to something,
and there's reasson to be optimistic
for Craigmill ar?s future. The
to picture.
woodland is easier
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THE BIG ISSUE / p23 / April 16-22 2018
ADVERTORIAL
POWERING
THE CHOICE
OF A CLEANER
GREENER FUTURE
After the Taff Bargoed valley?s three
coal mines were closed down in the early
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Now, it?s a well-loved community park
and wildlife reserve that has built its future
on a much greener form of energy, hydro
power.
The closure of the mines saw the loss of
over 500 jobs, left the landscape ravaged and
changed the valleys forever. But now, thanks
to 25 years of regeneration eforts, Taf
Bargoed Park has been transformed into an
area to be proud of ? one that brings together
the local community by providing important
wildlife habitats, environmental activities
and sports facilities.
Flowing right through the centre of the
park is the Taf Bargoed river, which feeds
into almost 12 acres of lakes and canoeing
weirs. It was here that the Friends of Taf
Bargoed Park Group found the key to the
park?s sustainable future: harnessing the
power of water.
With a background in renewable energy,
Paul Kent, Chair of the Friends group
carried out a great deal of research into how
an ornamental water cascade could not only
become a power source, but an income
source for the Park too, by installing a hydro
turbine and selling the power back to Good
Energy.
Taf Bargoed hydro was ?nally completed
in 2016. It generates a whopping 480
megawatt hours a year ? enough to power
150 average-sized households. The income
from the power is funding a dedicated Park
Warden role, as well as local community
groups like the busy rugby team, ?shing club
and canoeing club.
A COMMUNITY OF RENEWABLE
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Founded over 19 years ago, Good Energy is a
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?We decided to build
the hydro as we wanted to
help support the park for
future generations. We?re
proud to be doing our
bit for the environment
and for a cleaner, greener
National Grid too.?
Paul Kent ? Chair of
the Friends group.
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face extinction, but ma
like rhinos and pandas
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28th most denatured
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s
dsc
it?
t
lan
Bu
.
en
rld
fall
r
wo
ou
region in the
azingly well to
which have adapted am
there are hardy survivors
the winners and losers.
gh
ou
thr
s
run
rk Cocker
Naturalist and author Ma
EUROPEAN BEAVER
Several decades of campaigning have ?nally borne fruit for this
former British resident, and beavers have now been given their
green card to settle permanently in many parts of the country.
There are important self-sustaining populations in central
Scotland and Devon. The likelihood is that new introduction
projects will be fast-tracked because of the enormously
bene?cial efect of beavers and their dams on river systems, not
least their ability to prevent ?oods and enhance ?sh populations.
COMMON BUZZARD
When the myxomatosis virus all but wiped out
this country?s rabbit population in the Fifties
and destroyed this bird?s main diet, the buzzard
crashed along with its prey. Since then it has
made a spectacular recovery. Its thermal-riding
?ight display and wonderfully atmospheric catlike call are now seen and heard over almost every
British woodland. The common buzzard is once
again among our most abundant birds of prey.
LITTLE EGRET
L
This gloriously white heron was once con?ned
o the Mediterranean region in Europe, but
tto
it has steadily advanced northwards on the
winds of change in our climate. Since the
N
Nineties it has become a ?xture of almost
evvery part of the British coastline. It also
breeds widely and is now to be seen in
m
many inland area, like Nottinghamshire and
D
Derbyshire. It looks set to become a
co
ommon bird almost everywhere.
GRAVEL PITS
TREE BUMBLEBEE
This continental insect with its distinctive
tive
white ?bottom? and red-brown bodyy is a major
bene?ciary of the changing climate.
ffound
d
for the ?rst time on the south coast in 2001. Since
then it has undertaken an astonishing conquest
of our islands. Now it has been recorded in
northern Scotland and even Iceland. One handy
adaptation that has helped the insect to thrive is
its willingness to nest in roofs or holes in buildings.
One of the strangest bene?ts of the
British boom in road building and concrete
construction is the creation of so many new
wetlands at gravel-extraction sites. Once these
giant holes ?ll up with water theyy can create
important new habitats for duucks, grebes, swans,
otters, dragon?ies and a hostt of other wetlandloving wildlife. The mother of all habitatcreation sites is the massive Needingworth
N
Quarry in Cambridgeshire, which has created an
enormous nature reserve in itts place.
THE BIG ISSUE / p26 / April 16-22 2018
HEDGEHOG
Immortalised by Beatrix Potter as the linen-washing
Mrs Tiggy-Winkle, this cherished garden inhabitant
is the classic squashed corpse on our roads, but it has
also sufered from the widespread conversion of urban
gardens to concrete and tarmac. Since 2000 it has
declined by a third in urban areas and by a staggering
50-75 per cent in rural areas.
TURT
T
TLE DOVE
The beaautiful
a
little summer dove
was celeebrated
e
by Shakespeare as a
metaphor
metaph for ?delity, and its gentle
purring song was once a signature sound
of the English countryside. Not any
more. Turtle doves have declined by
more than 90 per cent in the last 30 years
because of agricultural intensi?cation.
PUFFIN
This hole-burrowing seabird of
coastal clifs and ofshore islands is
beloved by everyone for its amusing
habits and parrot?s beak. Yet it has
sufered many years of disastrous
breeding success as a result of climate
change and is now thought to be at
risk of extinction.
REAT YELLOW BUMBLEBEE
glorious golden insect was once found
widely
wid across most of Britain. Like many
bumblebees it is a victim of habitat loss,
especially of pastures and meadows with
wild ?owers. It is now found only at the
northern extremities of our islands.
FLOWER-RICH MEADOWS
?I know a bank where the wild-thyme blows, where
oxslips and the nodding violet grows.? Thus observed
Oberon in Shakespeare?s A Midsummer Night?s Dream
as a tribute to the dazzling ?ower-smothered ?elds that
were once the centrepiece of the English landscape.
Alas, changes in farm practice have seen all but one per
cent of these meadows turned into grass monoculture.
THE BIG ISSUE / p27 / April 16-22 2018
Our Place: Can We Save
Britain?s Wildlife Before it is
Too Late? by Mark Cocker
is out now (Jonathan Cape,
�.99) @MarkCocker2
Chris Packham says we need
to stop waiting for someone
else to sort out our mess
BE MORE
ATTENBOROUGH
Photo: Jef Gilbert / Alamy Stock Photo and Caroline Power Photography
I
f you are reading this and you are not aware
that 1) Climate change is happening and
threatens the future of all life on earth, 2)
Tigers, elephants and rhinos are being
ruthlessly poached to extinction, 3) Plastic
waste is a serious threat to marine life, 4) Air quality
in our cities is seriously endangering our health ? I
could go on. And on ? then you are a very rare human.
We ALL know about these issues. The critical question
is why we haven?t been doing anything about it?
It?s always tempting to say it is because ?they?
should be fixing it. The ?they? typically being
politicians at local, national and international levels.
But come on, look at them. The vast majority either
genuinely don?t understand the severity of the
problems, can only ever see in the short term,
or are complicit in avoidance because they have
vested interests.
?They? are not going to fix things at this point in
time. Recently our government published its 25-year
plan for the environment. God help us. Words, most
of the important ones missing, and target dates set
so long into the future I nearly wept. And to think we
paid for it too.
Environmental care is simply not high enough up
on their agenda, and plenty of the worst kind still think
continued economic growth is somehow sustainable.
THE BIG ISSUE / p28 / April 16-22 2018
David Attenborough:
It?s in his nature to care
And none even want to acknowledge that the single
most dangerous threat to our planet is that there are
too many humans on it. Too difficult, not a vote winner,
never mind.
So what do we do?
We could pour another drink, sit back and watch
our earth burn. Or we could acknowledge our
conscience and predicament and start ?xing things.
And to do that all we sometimes need is a
kick up the arse.
David Attenborough is a kind, gentle,
91-year-old man, but together with the BBC
he has just kicked some arse and started
some action. Following his missive on Blue
Planet II, plastics are now on everyone?s
agenda ? mine, yours, even perhaps our
government?s (yeah, let?s see if words
actually become actions). But why has it
taken this one, albeit brilliant, naturalist and
broadcaster to instigate something which
many have been trying to do for years?
Trust. For me it?s trust. He tells the
truth. He?s always told us the truth so we
believe him. He has no more vested interest than his
genuine and educated desire to help solve the world?s
environment problems. Attenborough vs May vs
Trump ? who would you believe? No brainer.
The other problem is that these environmental issues
are big issues. They can seem overwhelming,
impossible for you and I to play any meaningful role in
?xing. Wrong. I am one, we are many, together we
are millions.
Let?s take plastic: the current mantra is ?reduce, reuse,
recycle?. We can all do all of them. When you go shopping
avoid excessive packaging. And if you can?t, politely tell
the staf that you resent not having a choice to do so. We
are the consumers, the power is in our pockets.
Dump the use of single use water bottles or cofee
cups, buy a personal reuseable one ? use it, wash it,
re-use it. And when you do have to handle plastic, ?nd
the means to recycle it. If we could do this perfectly
we would ?close the circle? and no plastic would escape
into the environment.
But we are not perfect and there?s no chance that
we will be any time soon, so plastic will still litter and
damage our environment? unless we simply embrace
new technologies.
Oxy-biodegradable plastic can be programmed to
decay in the ?wild? with precision ? so the bag or bottle
that gets into the sea will be eaten by microbes in
months or years, not centuries. We need a portfolio
of measures and some pragmatic reality. Plastics like
this need to be put into production as soon as possible.
But they are not. Why? Guess. Yep, politics.
It is frankly embarrassing that so many of us realise
the gravity of the environmental crisis and yet our
elected representatives are almost invariably ? there
are exceptions ? not engaging at all. I sincerely hope
that we can vote for informed, committed and
determined politicians in the relatively near future.
Until then, it is down to us. It is about do-it-yourself.
And if we don?t it, then we are just doing ourselves in.
?Plastic drinking straw?? ?No thanks mate. Old
world, dead world, I?m for the new world. Attenborough
told me and he?s the man.?
By Chris Packham @ChrisGPackham
THE BIG ISSUE / p29 / April 16-22 2018
WASTE
MISMANAGEMENT
China plays a big part in the government?s new anti-plastic drive.
Greenpeace UK?s oceans campaigner Tisha Brown explains why
What was the ban?
The ban which was announced last year means that
China will no longer accept various materials
including plastic waste from foreign countries. The
new law came into efect at the start of 2018 and has
been introduced because much of the recyclable
material they?ve received has not been properly
cleaned or has been mixed with other non-recyclable
materials.
What does this mean?
This ban is a big deal because for
many years China has imported
much of the world?s waste. In
the UK, nearly two-thirds of
our plastic waste was sent
to China. Our recycling
centres are currently
stretched to capacity (which
is why there was a need to
export our recycled plastic in the ?rst place). There
are serious concerns that councils may be forced to
stop accepting some of our plastic for recycling and
that it will either end up in land?ll, become incinerated or even converted into jet fuel!
So should I stop recycling?
You shouldn?t stop recycling. Recycling is a really
important way of dealing with plastic waste. By
putting your plastic in a recycling bin, you?re doing
your bit to help prevent it ending up in land?ll, or
even in the ocean. But ultimately the government
needs to take responsibility to ensure that this
plastic is properly dealt with. One way of doing this
is through introducing a UK-wide deposit return
schemes or ?DRS? which the Westminster government recently announced
they are working on.
Scotland is already
making plans for a DRS.
THE BIG ISSUE / p30 / April 16-22 2018
Photo: VIEW CHINA PHOTO/REX/Shutterstock
?DON?T DEM
MONISE
PLASTIC ? W
WE
STILL NEED
D IT?
Plastic bottle recycling
at a dump in Wuhan,
Hubei Province, China
What else can be done?
The stark reality of this situation is that there?s
simply too much single-use plastic being produced. Companies must take action to reduce the
amount of plastic they?re creating. For example,
global drinks giant Coca-Cola produces an
estimated 110 billion single-use bottles every year.
We?re asking all businesses to reduce their plastic
footprint, and for retailers to remove non-recyclable plastic, as well as phasing out single-use plastic
packaging in their own-brand products in favour
of more sustainable packaging or dispensers and
re?llable containers. It has been easier and
cheaper for companies to export waste abroad
than ensure it is recycled in the UK. The problem
with exporting waste is that it is difficult to track
what happens to all of it. All too often as soon as it
is out of sight, it is out of mind.
Recent media coverage, including
cluding Blue Planet II
II,
seems to have helped create a watershed moment in
the effort to tackle plastic waste. With most news
outlets simplistically sticking to one viewpoint (that
plastic is Satan?s own material) few would argue that the
amount of plastic waste, including that which ends up in
the ocean, is not a serious problem. And yes, that includes
those within the packaging industry.
Many brands have been moving towards making as
much plastic packaging as possible recyclable, which is
sensible as long as the recycling infrastructure receives
adequate investment, but replacing plastic altogether
would be far more problematic.
When Iceland announced its ?plastic-free? targets,
managing director Richard Walker was seen on Channel
4 News holding a paper box which he said is replacing
plastic containers, before turning it over to reveal a plastic
lining. Replacing that with a water-based spray would be
the second step, he said.
This highlights the vital role plastic plays in keeping
food fresh and that it is not the one-dimensional cartoon
villain it?s often made out to be. It also proves that, realistically, a suitable replacement ? waterbased or otherwise
? mig ht not be
ava i lable i n t he
immediate or near
future. It could be
easier with beverage
containers, with glass
and metal providing
time-honoured alternatives.
Iceland?s Richard Walker puts a freeze on plastic
Some reasons why
so many producers opt for plastic for drinks bottles are
its light weight and greater toughness, design ?exibility
and economical production. Basically, despite all the great
qualities and recyclability glass and aluminium ofer,
plastic is cheaper and more durable. Rather than reverse
the trend, one would imagine the inclination would be to
go as far as possible down the plastic recycling route until
a viable alternative becomes available.
Whether it has become a hot topic because the prime
minister became emotional while watching Blue Planet
II or backed into a corner by China, the issue is at least
being addressed, but the government should not ignore
the packaging industry and brands, which largely have
similar goals and can add insight and balance to the debate.
Do the 200 cross-party MPs who are calling on heads of
the major supermarkets to eliminate plastic packaging
from their products by 2023 know if that?s practical?
It?s also worth bearing in mind that with packaging
waste (industrial waste is a whole diferent topic) we, the
consumers ? widely considered to be a driving force behind
the big companies? sustainability announcements ? can
be bufers between plastic waste and the ocean by how
we dispose of it.
Tony Corbin is content editor of Packaging News @PackNews
greenpeace.org.uk @GreenpeaceUK
THE BIG ISSUE / p31 / April 16-22 2018
UR
O
Y
A
BANANA DRAM
na, the worlld?s
Gee: Global warming will
as growing
become more expensive in the future
is feeling this at
n
uctio
prod
oa
conditions change. Coc
ent
the moment.
many foods will shift from traditional
Production of m
W e already seeing UK farmers
areas. We?r
so
tryinng out southern European crops,
to
soon
ots,
apric
lish
Eng
for
ook out
lo
be joined by English peaches. We
could see British almonds, even
d in
olives, which are being trialled
Kent.
W H AT
PEACHY KEEN
cause some crops to
L
L
WI
Gee: The Cavendish bana
most common variety, is under threat
globally from a fungus, so we could see
s
bananas go up in price soon. In the 1950
was
h
whic
el?
Mich
s
?Gro
was
ty
the main varie
a single
wiped out by fungus. This reliance on
ity. New
cultivar illustrates the need for biodivers
huge
a
have
d
coul
es
virus
t
stan
-resi
antibiotic
up prices.
impact on livestock or poultry, driving
AIR TODAY,
GONE TOMORROW
be
Gee: Hybrid crossbred
kale, have
a cross between Brussels sprouts and
d by a
joine
be
will
already hit the shelves and
ding
bree
ctive
Sele
.
vars
host of new culti
will give us foods with superenhanced nutrient content
? real super food.
Dr Gaye: I expect we will
be eating more seaweed
t protein
al ae nd
ill also
nd CBD.
HE BOOZE
k we will see less alcohol in in our
he future because of new taxation,
people are drinking less alcohol.
generation that drinks the most is
d around 55 currently and we are
ing to see that age group fade
t. We will see alcohol in luxury
ds like merlot ice cream instead.
ing bottled water will also be
of a statement ? you will buy it
cks of gold in, for example.
THE BIG ISSUE / p32 / April 16-22 2018
K
O
R FOODS
SUPER-DUPE
plants such as the ?Kalette?,
LO
ted will
Dr Gayye: Anything that can be 3D prin
detailed
ly
high
uce
prod
can
it
use
beca
attractive
ting you
prin
3D
With
.
designs at the cheapest cost
s that
olate
choc
of
s
boxe
ple,
exam
can make, for
with lots of
but
gns
desi
e
lattic
ate
intric
y
reall
have
lower to
air in so the chocolate content will be
n.
dow
s
keep cost
LI
KE
IN
hocolate could be gone within 30
years!? screamed headlines just after
Christmas, proclaiming cacao plants
imminent victims of climate change.
Then came raisins and sultanas ? kiss
goodbye to your hot cross buns and Christmas
puddings, we were warned, as yields plummeted
and prices soared following a heatwave in
California and frosts which decimated vineyards
in Italy and fruit crops in Spain.
In the last year reports have claimed that
cofee will cost more and taste worse as producers
in Ethiopia become increasingly vulnerable to
extreme climate events, while our cuppa is
endangered as worsening weather means fewer
areas are suited to growing tea. In 2017 Europe
saw historic lows in wine production, while the
mighty banana has fallen prey to pathogens in
recent years, which could drive Britain?s
favourite fruit to extinction. So will there be
C
SH OP
EAT UP YOUR
WRAPPER
Dr
PI
N
G
BA
R
E?
SKET
THE
F
U
T
U
anything left in our shopping baskets?
Well don?t need to stockpile our favourite
foods just yet, insists future-gazer and health
writer Lyndon Gee.
?Weather seems less predictable, so expect
price fluctuations more regularly when it comes
to fresh produce,? he says. ?These fluctuations
cause a temporary spike in prices but they usually
stabilise, so it shouldn?t mean a Christmas
pudding or mince pie shortage next Christmas!?
But make no mistake, with Brexit, technology
and global warming on its plate, the food industry
is embarking on a process of rapid change.
?The world in the next five years is going to
be unrecognisable from today and the next two
years are critical, we are really going to be shaken
up,? says food futurologist, Dr Morgaine Gaye.
We asked Gee and Dr Gaye to peer 10 years
into the future and tell us what we will be taking
to the till.
Gaye: In 10 years you?ll see
much
more edible packaging and
packaging that is compo
stable.
Examples like Bob?s Burge
rs in
Brazil, where the wrapper
for
their burgers was edible, or
Ooho! ?s edible water bottle
will
become commonplace.
Gee: Packaging will look
very
diferent in 20 years? time
as we
lose our love afair with pla
stic. New
vegetable-based edible pac
kaging and
biodegradable compostab
le packaging will
come to the fore.
BREXIT HAS-BEAN
S
Gee: Brexit is the bigges
t short-term shake-up for
the UK in terms of farmin
g and food. Under the
Common Agricultural Po
licy (C AP), tarifs make
food imported from outsid
e the EU more expensive
and this disproportionately
efects poorer
households. We could see
some prices go down.
Leaving the Common Fis
hing Policy could also
have an efect on the ?sh
we eat.
A shift in agriculture policy
could
mean a favourable enviro
nment for
smaller, more innovative
farmers
producing more diverse cro
ps. Look
out for exciting varieties
of fruit and
vegetables, chillies, quinoa
, beans or
legumes.
DEATH TO DIETS
Dr Gaye: Going on a die
t will be old
news. Buying food for a spe
ci?c type of diet will
be narrower than just veg
an or vegetarian and will
?t
a pro?le that is more spe
ci?c to you, based on
genetics and other charac
teristics.
Gee: But there will be ma
ny familiar foods too.
Expect lots more vegetable
protein, British quinoa,
apricots, peaches and alm
onds. It will
be healthier, with nutrien
t-charged
fruit and vegetables. In rea
l terms it will
be cheaper too, as yields
get greater
and mechanisation improv
es
eiciency.
BASKET CASE
Dr Gaye sai
FAD
DIETS
d: The idea of the
shopping basket is kind of
oldfashioned. I think that wh
at will instead
use a shopping wall, which
will be placed
where you come of the tub
e, for example,
and you will touch a but ton
for what you want and it
will be delivered to your hom
e an hour later. The
internet and online shopp
ing will no longer be
separate things, it will be
all around us.
Dr Morgaine Gay is a foo
d guturologist @morgain
egaye
Lyndon Gee is a food fut
urist, food and health
writer @LyndonGee
Words: Liam Geraghty
@Lazergun_Nun
THE BIG ISSUE / p33 / April 16-22 2018
From soil to sky ?
how a vertical farm
may look in the future
Vertical farms producing food in the skies are no sci-fi
fantasy ? the concept is already 20 years old. So why
aren?t they all around us? It?s a tough market to crack. A
number of large-scale vertical farm ventures backed
rigorously by tech investors ? looking to transform the
agricultural industry and produce seasonal food all year
round ? have failed in the past couple of years. Several,
including some from technology giants such as Google and
Panasonic, have all gone bust. Just last year the USA?s
once-largest vertical farm, FarmedHere, closed down. What?s
going on?
The major hurdle, says Professor Paul Ekins, director at
University College London?s Institute for Sustainable
Resources,isthatverticalfarmingisunder-fundedandunable
tooutgrowtheshadowofothersustainabletechnologies,such
as those found in the renewable energy sector.
?I?ve seen quite a few examples of pretty productive
systems in a vertical farming sense, but they are still very
much at the cutting edge of innovation. It?s also true to say
that the economics don?t stack up yet,? he says. ?That?s true
for lots of new ways of doing things and lots of new
technologies in the beginning.?
The problems vertical farms face in scaling up to a size
that can reliably feed hundreds of thousands of consumers
is simply that of cost and margins. Essentially, growers are
replicating the free resources of nature ? such as sunlight
and climate ? with technology that requires massive amounts
of energy to sustain it 24/7.
?All that you can get from that ridiculous expense is [a]
penny?s worth of vegetables. It makes no sense, at least for
now,? remarked one agricultural expert commenting on
Reddit. ?Sorry for this pessimistic comment, but this is what
I think is the major problem and what needs a breakthrough.?
Cost hasn?t stopped all progress, though, for those enticing Silicon Valley investors with promises of
Words: Ben Sullivan, Digital Editor, The Big Issue @_BenSullivan_
breakthrough tech. US-based vertical farming startup Plenty
is about to build 300 indoor farm facilities in China
following a $200 million funding round that included the
support of Google?s parent company Alphabet and Amazon
CEO Jef Bezos. There?s clearly a market here for innovation,
it?s just still in a very early stage.
?Any kind of really large-scale change, such as vertical
farming growing even a few per cent of global food, takes a
long time to become established and become embedded,?
Ekins says. ?And very often you ?nd that if they take hold
and lots of people start engaging in them they ?nd new ways
of doing it and because the of that the costs can often come
down quite dramatically.?
Vertical agriculture on a much smaller, localised scale, is
thriving however. Almost 40 metres below the streets of
Clapham, London lives Growing Underground, an urban
farming operation using sunlight-imitating LED lights and
computer-controlled hydroponic systems to grow
micro-greens all year round. After more than three years,
Growing Underground now supplies local Whole Foods,
Ocado, and M&S stores with fresh greens. Another London
vertical farming venture, GrowUp, has also taken advantage
of localised, small-scale urban produce growth to experiment
with indoor, urban vertical farming, with an onus on
reducing the environmental impact and cost of
transportation and packaging by selling and delivering to
local customers. These are just two of many examples in
the UK.
?I think we?re going to see it for quite a long time to come,?
Ekins adds. ?There will be communities that will get into it,
and at a community level that might become quite signi?cant.
That then might provide the springboard for much
larger experimentation.?
The numbers just don?t add up when it comes to a full-scale agricultural
revolution ? but signi?cant developments are occurring at a local level
WON?T SAVE US...YET
THE FUTURE OF FOOD
?We can grow food for money, or we can grow
food for people,? says Alice-Marie Archer, founder
of Bristol Fish Project. ?We need to figure out the
line between the two.?
A Community Interest Company (CIC), the project
was founded in 2011, when Archer sought a solution
to the challenges of increasing urban waste. Dismayed
by the repercussions of the corporate agriculture
systems, she saw that aquaponics could be used
to not only recycle waste to grow food sustainably,
but also help conservation efforts and a
disadvantaged community.
What, you might well ask, is aquaponics. Archer
explains: ?Aquaponics is the symbiotic growing of ?sh
and plants, usually in a recirculating water-based
system and typically without soil.?
To you and I, it?s about ensuring absolutely nothing
goes to waste. The technique turns urban food waste
into food for ?sh, and their waste feeds watercress
plants. The plants, which naturally ?lter water for
reuse, can be cultivated and eaten.
The way we consume and grow food is changing
ever faster, says Archer. ?Conventional agriculture
and its business model are failing across lots of fronts,
and we know we?re in a transition towards a diferent
food system.
?We need to ?nd ways to grow food that are sustainable and hydroponics and aquaponics have proven
they?re more sustainable in terms of water, in terms
of waste and there?s also that bene?t of growing food
near its consumers.?
Bristol Fish Project also has an important
conservation role, receiving funding from the
European Marine Fisheries Fund to build and run an
eel conservation project. Some 5,000 eels now make
up the heart of their aquaponic system.
But one of its key bene?ts which reaches beyond
that of conversation, recycling and sustainability is
its community impact. To help grow this, earlier this
year Bristol Fish Project received a loan of �,000
from Big Issue Invest?s Impact Loans England (ILE)
fund. ILE is funded through the Growth Fund, which
is managed by Access ? The Foundation for Social
Investment, with funding from Big Lottery Fund and
Big Society Capital.
Alan Tudhope, Investment Manager at Big Issue
Invest, the social investment arm of The Big Issue
Group, explains how the project?s social impacts align
with local and global sustainability aims.
?By offering employment and volunteering
opportunities to local people, promoting the importance of nutrition, and utilising sustainable,
environmentally-sound methods, Bristol Fish Project
succeeds in tackling issues of both local and global
importance,? he says.
?We at Big Issue Invest are delighted that
our investment will enable them to continue this
great work.?
The earliest versions of aquaponics that Archer
saw were American urban projects which developed
employment and nutrition in deprived areas. ?So we?ve
always developed our projects in areas like that and
we?re trying to make community scale aquaponic
farming accessible, a vehicle for local employment and
awareness of food issues,? she explains of her decision
to situate the CIC in the income-deprived area of
Hartclife in Bristol.
The farm has classroom space, where the project?s
concept can be taught to communities who want to
bring food systems into their own hands.
?Our mission now is to recreate the Bristol Fish
Project in other areas. We want to design a transferable
model for other communities. Our classroom helps
us share our concept system with them or teach them
how to make their own,? Archer explains.
She hopes that by providing communities
across the country with access to this technology
they can not only tackle social deprivation, but
put control of agriculture into the into the hands
of consumers.
The future of food is literally in their hands.
Visit bristol?sh.org for more info
Words: Dionne Kennedy @bowliekids
Image: Getty images
THE BIG ISSUE / p35 / April 16-22 2018
Plastic litter is choking
our marine wildlife
Join us today
and help stop the plast
www.mcsuk.org/join
Registered Charity No: 1004005 (England and Wales) SC037480 (Scotland)
THE ENLIGHTENMENT
Books
Shanty time page 38
Film
Sun, sex and Binoche page 41
EVERGREEN FUN
FAKE PLASTIC
PLASTIC TREES
One of the most disagreeable things about LEGO
(apart from the pain of standing on an errant
brick) is that they?re plastic and plastic is bad. And
although bricks can be endlessly recycled by being
used to build and rebuild, LEGO will launch a
more sustainable material this year, which could
please even Thom Yorke. Polyethylene derived
from sugarcane will mean that plants in LEGO sets
will themselves be made from plants.
THE BIG ISSUE / p37 / April 16-22 2018
Music
Tuning into classical page 45
BOOKS
WE WERE THE SALT OF THE SEA
On the crest of a wave
At sea with few skills and a sexist skipper, Roxanne Bouchard found
friendship in an unlikely place
THE BIG ISSUE / p38 / April 16-22 2018
Photo: Getty Images
S
ome mariners unwittingly found aboard a boat like that before, and I?ll admit both disappeared into the belly of our boat.
themselves written into the pages I was a bit nervous. It was a little choppy,
I grabbed the extension, strode across
of We Were the Salt of the Sea. A and to tie up the sailboat, I had to step over the deck of the ?shing boat and plugged the
few years ago, I signed up for an our boat?s lifeline, climb up on to the cord into an outside socket on the wall of
advanced sailing course that would take me handrail of the ?shing boat, jump down on a hut.
That?s when I saw him. A man, sidling
along the coast from the end of the Gasp� to the deck and quickly ?nd something solid
Peninsula and across the Gulf of St to tie our mooring line tight around. over towards me with his hands in his
pockets. ?That sailboat yours, is
Lawrence to Quebec?s North
she??
Shore. I wanted to put my
?No, she?s a training boat.?
seaworthiness to the test in these
?A training boat??
freezing and challenging waters,
?Yes, we?re learning how
where tankers surge through the
to sail.?
fog and the two-faced morning
?Ah. Do you like it??
calm suddenly gives way to
?A lot.?
unforgiving waves. I wanted to
He nodded.
set sail and see whales, but most
of all I wanted to ?nd my courage.
?Are you from around here?? I
Right from the start, I saw my
asked. ?Our radio?s not picking up
hopes were going to be dashed.
the weather. Do you know what
The ?rst night at dinner I joked
the forecast is for the next
that my goal was to learn to sail
few days??
I had barely had time to ?nish
solo, so I could beat the guys from
my sentence when my skipper
the Magdalen Islands in the
shouted, ?Roxa nne! The
R間ate des Fous! The skipper
looked down his nose at me and
breaker?s ?ipped. We need power.
turned away.
Figure it out, will you!? Then he
ducked
back
inside
There were ?ve of us learning:
the sailboat.
one retired gent coddling his
teenage daughter, a real
The man gave me a funny look.
comedian with a leg in plaster, an
?Who?s he??
a mateur
p h o t o g r a p h e r,
?Our captain.?
and me. So not an advanced
?And you choose to go aboard
sailing course. But, since there
his boat??
were only two of us doing the
I didn?t know what to say to
on-deck manoeuvres and I was
that. ?Do you know where I can
?nd someone to reset the circuit
the only one navigating the charts
breaker??
(there?s no sat nav on training
boats), I figured I?d learn
The man nodded to the ?shing
something all the same.
boat with the tip of his chin. ?Plug
The bay of Mont-Louis, scene of Roxanne?s memorable mooring dance
It turned out it would be a
yourself in over there, on the side
difficult week with the skipper always on ?Warming up for your little dance then, of the cabin.?
my back. A s far as he was I see!? our skipper joked, seeing me
?I can?t do that!?
concerned, the sea was a man?s world. prance around.
?Yes, you can. That?s my boat. L?Alberto.
It all turned out ?ne. The skipper took My generator?s running, so just plug your
Refusing to let him take the wind out of my
sails, I sang my way along, and on those the helm and manoeuvred us gently into extension in. And I?ll print of the weather
nights where we made ground, I would hop our mooring. The amateur photographer forecast for you.?
I was speechless.
out on to the wharf to do a little dance, and I climbed aboard the ?shing boat and
He smiled. ?When a woman dances on
which made my fellow crew members laugh. swiftly tied our boat up.
As the photographer returned to our my boat, I can?t refuse her anything!?
Still, I could feel the captain shooting
That?s how I met O?Neil Poirier, one of
daggers at me and it was dragging me down. sailboat, I realised there was no one else
the characters who would
Day ?ve, the sea had not been kind to us aboard the ?shing boat. The deck was vast,
give salt to the sea.
and our radio wasn?t picking up the weather clean and clear, and so ? oh, yes ? I made it
reports, so we decided to head into the bay my stage for my little mooring dance.
of Mont-Louis for the night.
The skipper soon brought me back down
As we made our approach, we saw we?d to earth. ?Go plug in the extension cord, will
We Were the Salt of the Sea by
Roxanne Bouchard is out now
have to moor our sailboat right alongside a you? We need power over here!? The
(Orenda Books, �99)
commercial ?shing boat. I had never set foot photographer passed me the cord, and they
READ MORE FROM...
DOUG JOHNSTONE
REVIEWS
FIVE OF THE BEST
DICTIONARIES
HARRY EYRES
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
THEORY OF BASTARDS / I STILL DREAM
Primate dream
SAMUEL JOHNSON?S
DICTIONARY OF THE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
(1755)
Pride of place has to go to our
inspiration for Johnson?s Brexit Dictionary,
a wise and sometimes witty masterwork,
which doesn?t just de?ne words with
delicious exactitude but illustrates
their meanings with apt and
beautiful quotations.
Doug Johnstone is gripped by the tale of a future in which a
group of apes hold the key to the development of the human race
Illustration: Dom McKenzie
S
cience ?ction is as broad a
church as any other genre,
from full-on laser-zapping
space operas to subtle literary
speculative tales only slightly removed
from modern reality. This week we
have two books that fall into the latter
category, books that have taken recent
advances in science and technology
and extrapolated them into intriguing
and convincing new places.
The superbly titled Theory of
Bastards is by Canadian writer
Audrey Schulman. Set in an alternate
near future, the story revolves around
a young female scientist called Frankie
Burke who has developed a distinct
theory of evolution and is testing it out
in a research facility on a group of
bonobos. Frankie has endometriosis,
giving her a body awareness few others can
understand, and she works closely with
ex-military biologist David Stotts. In
Schulman?s world humans are directly
connected up to the Quark, a kind of nextgeneration internet, while 3D printers
generate the food for the animals in the lab.
Added to this, large-scale climate events
are a constant threat to parts of civilisation,
and it?s one such event that precipitates a
major crisis in the story, with Frankie, Stotts
and the apes having to leave the research
station in order to survive.
There?s a lot going on in Schulman?s novel,
but the author weaves it together with skill
andsubtlety,quicklysettlingusintoFrankie?s
world and focusing on her fascinating
interactions with the bonobos. The apes are
like a matriarchal and paci?st version of
chimpanzees, where sex replaces violence as
the main form of societal control, and
Schulman has a lot of fun comparing ape
culture and interactions with the human
equivalents, for better or worse.
As the plot progresses the action and
tension increase too, as they should, but
Theory of Bastards continues to ask the reader
big questions into the bargain, about the
nature of human identity, about
communication, and about our attitude to
the environment and the planet. Delicately
of-kilter, this is an unsettling but endlessly
interesting read from start to ?nish.
In a diferent way our second book this
week also deals with big themes of human
identity and communication. I Still Dream
by James Smythe begins in 1997, where
teenager Laura Bow has invented a basic
artificial intelligence called Organon. As
Laura grows so does Organon, and the story
jumps forward in 10-year leaps as far as 2047.
At the same time as Organon and Laura
mature, another AI called SCION is being
developed by a company initially started by
Laura?s father, who disappeared from Laura?s
life when she was little.
Smythe is looking at how the internet
interacts with all our lives in I Still Dream,
and some of the plot later on seems ripped
from recent newspaper headlines, as we deal
with the repercussions of big data abuse.
SCION gets sold to the US government but
Smythe is no doom merchant, and he uses
Organon to balance his view, examining
possibly more optimistic futures.
At the heart of the novel, though, is Laura?s
journey through life, and how that is mirrored
and refracted through Organon?s path. It?s a
fascinating and emotional journey, one
depicted with honesty and clarity, looking at
love, loss and what it means to be human in
the digital age.
Words: Doug Johnstone @doug_johnstone
Theory of Bastards
by Audrey Schulman
(Europa Editions, �.99)
I Still Dream
James Smythe
(Borough Press, �.99)
THE BIG ISSUE / p39 / April 16-22 2018
VOLTAIRE?S
DICTIONNAIRE
PHILOSOPHIQUE
(Philosophical Dictionary)
(1764)
Not so much a dictionary as a collection of
brilliantly opinionated essays on Voltaire?s
favourite bugbears and preoccupations,
especially the fanaticism and cruelty of the
Catholic Church, and the superiority of
English to French culture and morals.
THE DEVIL?S
DICTIONARY
Ambrose Bierce (1911)
A Wildean compendium by
America?s answer to Oscar. the
kind of dictionary Lady Bracknell might
have compiled, which contrasts the noble
facades of words with the ugly reality of
what they mean in a material, cynical and
amoral world. ?Academy? becomes ?a
modern school where football is taught?
and ?beauty? is de?ned ?the power by
which a woman charms a lover and
terri?es a husband?.
THE OXFORD
DICTIONARY OF
QUOTATIONS
Still the ?nest of its kind,
ofering immortal sayings for
every occasion. Go straight to Horace
(the most quotable of all poets, with
mottos such as ?nil desperandum? and
?carpe diem?); the generous samples of
Shakespeare and the Bible ofer a brilliant
shortcut to complete reading.
COLLINS ENGLISH
DICTIONARY
Not the most famous
or glamorous, but the
most useful of modern
dictionaries, combining the virtues of an
encyclopaedia with those of a dictionary.
Johnson?s Brexit Dictionary: or,
An A-Z of What Brexit Really
Means by Harry Eyres and
George Myerson is out now
(Pushkin Press, �99)
A m azonian Andes
Save one of Earth?s
richest habitats
Donate to World Land Trust?s
urgent appeal to help us
permanently protect 400 acres
of tropical forest in one of the
most wildlife rich regions
in the world
FILM
READ MORE FROM...
EDWARD LAWRENSON
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
The heat is on
Juliette Binoche plays an artist with a busy love life in Let The Sunshine In,
the latest movie from French filmmaker Claire Denis
C
laire Denis is one of France?s
?nest ?lmmakers, and among its
most unpredictable. She flits
across genres with the same
searching intensity with which her roving
camera explores the bodies and faces of her
actors (Denis? ?lms have a restless visual
energy). She?s made family dramas of sumptuous, silky naturalism like 35 Shots of Rum.
She?s made a savage, exceedingly bloody
vampire movie (with Vincent Gallo!) in
Trouble Every Day. Her 2004 film The
Intruderwasabold,dreamlikeexperimental
chamber piece inspired by a French
philosopher?s novel. And now she?s working
on a big-budget, English-language sci-? with
Robert Pattinson.
Her new ?lm is a drama set in upmarket
Paris involving well-heeled bourgeois types
managing the quiet storm of their
complicatedlovelives.ThisisamilieuFrench
cinemareturnsto(andpackagesandexports)
like a re?ex, and gets you wondering if Denis,
habitual risk-taker that she is, confounding
expectations again by playing it safe?
Well, Let the Sunshine In may come in
the guise of a solidly traditional French
romanticdrama,butthisisabeguilinglyodd
and singular rif on familiar tropes.
Juliette Binoche plays Isabelle. She?s an
artist, but judging from the brief time she
spends in front of a canvas in her live-in
studio this doesn?t seem her principal
occupation: instead what she?s mainly
working on is her love life. In a plot that
advances in awkward ?ts like a succession can feel a little exhausting. But then it?s hard
of uncertain internet dates, the film not to be swept up by the jumpy tempo and
charts her romantic entanglements with sideways insight of Denis? ?lm.
What emerges is a
ahandfulofmen,relationfreeform assembly of
shipsofvaryingdegreesof
m om ent s
?
s om e
promise and disaster.
FINAL REEL
There?s a rich banker
excruciating, some tender,
Playing at London?s ICA,
(Xavier Beauvois), a
some sad, some funny.
Frames of Representation
smug, softly spoken
These fragments seem
is a week-long season of
50-something with a
scattershot but it all
documentary cinema from
line in self-absorbed
coalesces around a playful
around the
et serious focus on
cynicism that Isabelle has
world. Only
esire in middle
somehow fallen for. Then
in its third
ge, expressed in
there?s handsome, hardyear, Frames
n u n i n h i bit e d
drinking actor (Nicolas
will showcase
er for ma nce by
Duvauchelle), who exudes
films including
inoche. Sure, she
a mix of self-pitying
Khalik Allah?s
oes a lot of showy
petulance and boyish
lyrical tribute to Jamaican
acting ? switching from
charm, and who ?ees the
culture, Black Mother, and Boris
second things get serious.
tears to laughter in seconds
Mitic?s playfully profound essay
At an arts festival Isabelle
? but then a troubled love
film In Praise of Nothing (with
takes up with taciturn,
life has the knack of
musings voiced by Iggy Pop
working-class museum
bringing out the urge to
on the soundtrack).
employee (Paul Blain),
overdramatise in all of us.
?Fantasies always have
whom a male friend tells
her is not a suitable match (but only because an element of truth,? Isabelle?s pal tells her
he himself holds a candle for her). And, as (after Isabelle confesses to some fruity
if things weren?t busy enough, there?s also erotic role-playing with that appalling
G閞ard Depardieu on hand as a potential banker). Let the Sunshine In might seem like
suitor, a late-addition cameo that Denis an airy confection, but there?s a whole lot of
makes the most of ? even playing the ?nal truth hiding in its bubbly folds.
Let The Sunshine In is in cinemas
credits over his scene with Binoche.
?I?m tired. Is this my life?? Isabelle sighs, from April 20
slumped on her couch, and it?s true, that
dizzying range of options that confront her Edward Lawrenson @EdwardLawrenson
THE BIG ISSUE / p41 / April 16-22 2018
+++++
?One of the ?lms of the year has arrived ?
maybe the best of the year.?
Peter Bradshaw, THE GUARDIAN
+++++
?Mesmerising psychological drama.?
Tim Robey, THE DAILY TELEGRAPH
+++++
?A miracle?
Manuela Lazic, LITTLE WHITE LIES
Best Film, Best Actor
GERMAN FILM CRITICS? AWARDS 2017
WESTERN
12A
# ?NO D[ 8CNGUMC )TKUGDCEJ
NOW SHOWING
ICA
Curzon Bloomsbury
Picturehouse Central
Arthouse Crouch End
Home Manchester
Watershed Bristol
Tyneside Newcastle
Showroom Shef?eld
Arts Picturehouse Cambridge
Broadway Nottingham
Depot Lewes
IFI Dublin
www.newwavefilms.co.uk
WHEN WILL
WE KNOW WHAT
We ALL deserve a final
say on the BREXIT deal
BROADCAST
The most amazing feats aren?t on the big screen ? they?re all around us in the
natural world. Adventurer and presenter of CBBC?s Beyond Bionic Andy Torbet
guides us through the real-life superpowers of incredible animals
e tend to live a fairly sheltered
existence. I?ve been out on the
ice in the Arctic stalked by polar
bears ? and you realise that you are
not top of the food chain. It doesn?t
matter how smart you think you are,
how many Instagram followers you have or
whether there?s the latest phone in your
pocket ? if a polar bear wants to eat you, it?s
going to eat you.
In Beyond Bionic I go up against the
superheroes of the animal kingdom, looking
at how amazing these creatures are by asking
if a human can compete against them.
Inevitably the answer is no, so we then look
at how much technology I have to use to try
to compete.
And even with the best technology in the
world, sometimes you can?t get close.
One example is the ostrich, which is the
fastest animal on two legs. We used jetpacks,
special spring-loaded running boots and we
still couldn?t come anywhere near to running
as fast. The mako shark can swim at 60 knots
and jump nearly 10 metres out of the water.
Again, we tried to do that and failed
miserably.
Then we have Darwin?
k
ns b
bark
spider, a tiny little animal that
lives in the rainforestt in
Madagascar, that can ?re itss web
25 metres to catch may?ies?
?ying
up and down the river. It?s the
strongest web in the world,andfar
stronger than steel or titanium.
Pacu are like piranhas, but
they?revegetarian.Theyeatnutsthatfallinto
the river and have teeth very much like ours
? itlooksliketheyhavefalseteethin.They?re
the same body shape as piranhas but about
a metre long and 50kg in weight. They?re like
underwater rhinos.
We take butter?ies for granted because
they?re so common, but when you stop and
think that this animal completely changes
? this is not a juvenile growing up to be
somethingslightlydiferent,thisisacomplete
'Even with
a jetpack I
couldn't outrun
an ostrich'
morphological change. When a caterpillar
turns into a butterfly, that?s werewolf
technology right there.
ThePompeiiwormisafairlyunimpressivelooking creature ? basically it?s a little grey
slug ? but it lives on underwater volcanoes,
deep
hydrother
d
h d th rmal vents, so it is amazingly
heat-resistant.IItproducesamucusthatcoats
its body, which in itself doesn?t have any
heat-resistant properties, but it feeds
bacteria and so grows a bacteria layer
around its body which insulates it.
You?ve go
ot some amazing superhero
animalss, but from a survivalist point
of view some of these animals
THE BIG ISSUE / p43 / April 16-22 2018
are incredible because they?ve been around
for such a long time. Fossil records show the
African dwarf crocodile has been around for
250 million years. It saw the dinosaurs come
and go. And hissing cockroaches are almost
indestructible. It is an old cliche but it?s true,
if there?s ever a nuclear war that devastates
the world cockroaches would survive.
Biomimicry looks at the incredible talents
of animals, and asks how we can use what we
learn to advancetechnology. One example is
the Geckskin. It?s still very much in the
research and development stage, but engineers
are looking at how a gecko?s skin operates. The
physics behind it is phenomenal, basically a
gecko?s skin sticks to a surface like glass at a
molecular level ? there are molecular bonds
going on ? so they?re looking at how they can
replicate that in a synthetic material. They?re
working on a set of gloves that one day you
could use to climb up a glass building.
I think the peregrine falcon is the most
superhero-like of animals. It is the fastest
animal in the world, it will do 242 miles an
hour head down, towards prey. And it is one
of the most common birds of prey in Britain.
We see it all the time in cities now because it?s
a clif-dwelling bird ? a building to them is just
a man-made clif ? and it likes to hunt pigeons.
Andy Torbet is the new virtual guide at SEA
LIFE London?s new Rainforest Adventure
exhibit. @AndyTorbet
He was speaking to Steven MacKenzie
@stevenmackenzie
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MUSIC
READ MORE FROM...
CLAIRE JACKSON
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
OUT AND ABOUT
The Sony World Photography Awards
Exhibition (April 20 to May 6, Aldwych,
London; somersethouse.org.uk) returns
for another year and sees pieces from
600 international photographers on
display across a variety of genres including
portraiture, travel, wildlife and street
photography. There is a huge filtering
process behind the scenes, with judges
wading through 320,000 submissions to
get to the final 600. Mike Trow, former
picture editor at British Vogue, curates the
exhibition, and it will conclude with the
Outstanding Contribution To Photography
Award being handed out to the year?s
standout photographer.
Fashioned From Nature
(from April 21, South
Kensington, London; vam.
ac.uk) stretches back to 160
to trace the connections
(both visually and in terms
of fabrics) between nature
and fashion over four centur
and fauna have long been sources of
design inspiration, and this exhibition will
show how this has evolved over the years
(noting where certain themes rise and fall
in popularity) as well as how new ways of
making fabrics have been developed, what
the environmental impact has been and
why the past can be both aesthetically and
physically repurposed.
Sonica Festival (April 20-21, King?s Cross,
London; sonic-a.co.uk) is dedicated to the
visual and sonic arts, touring the world all
year round. It began in 2012 in Glasgow and
showcases the best creators in the space,
bringing together new collaborations and
pushing the envelope as far as it can.
Wilderness (until May 6, Walsall;
thenewartgallerywalsall.org.uk) takes, as the
title suggests, the wilderness as its starting
point. Artists across a variety of disciplines
consider isolation and expansive open
spaces in nature and how they relate to our
(occasional) need for solitude. From salt
deserts and remote mountain tops to the
most rugged of coastlines and ominous of
volcanoes, this is about revealing the extent
of the wild in the wilderness.
Eamonn Forde @Eamonn_Forde
Photo: Jane Hobson
PICTURE THIS
Not so niche
Can radio bridge the gap between populist and purist?
I
n the UK, we have an embarrassment
of riches when it comes to listening to
classical music on the radio. The two
ain stations, BBC Radio 3 and its commerial counterpart Classic FM, ofer a variety
f repertoire, concert broadcasts and
agazine-style segments. There?s a healthy
ense of rivalry between fans and industry
ypes;somelistenersfeelthatthestationthey
lump for says something about their idenity.Needlesstosay,thereisoftenasnobbishessonbehalfofsomeRadio3listeners,who
see their station as the preserve of a?cionados. But being successful ? populist, perhaps
? isn?t necessarily a bad thing. Earlier this
year, ?gures revealed that 5.7 million people
now listen to Classic FM every week ? and
over half a million of them are under 25.
Radio 3 has frequently been accused of
trying to emulate the station?s format to
improve its stats. In the heady days of online
message boards at the turn of the new
millennium, campaigners gathered to
petition the state-funded station about its
content. The group Friends of Radio 3 now
keep programmers on their toes, promising
to ?press Radio 3 to be distinctive, and to
maintain high artistic and intellectual
standards; to recognise that the content will
by its nature attract small audiences; and to
acknowledge the necessity to build an
audienceforthecontentratherthanalterthe
content to expand the audience?.
As a Radio 3 fan myself, I commend this
sentiment. I also wholeheartedly approve of
Classic FM and believe that it is equally
educational ? in a diferent way. (Hmm, this
fence post is getting uncomfortable. Bear
withme.)Ididn?tgrowupinamusicalfamily,
although my parents always supported my
woodwind squawking ? and on the rare
occasions I mustered a decent tune, my dad
would enquire after the composer. Interest
THE BIG ISSUE / p45 / April 16-22 2018
piqued, he tuned his car stereo to Classic FM
? and so began a decades-long exploration
of music.
There must be hundreds ? thousands ? of
newcomers to classical music with a similar
story. At Classic FM Live, held earlier this
month at the Royal Albert Hall, there wasn?t
a spare seat in the house. The event celebratedthe?BestofBritish?talent,andwhilethere
were the odd ?crossover? pieces that weren?t
to this writer?s taste, there was a superb
performance of Elgar?s cello concerto ? in
full ? by Leonard Elschenbroich and the
Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra,
conducted by Maxime Tortelier. The piece
may well have been new to some listeners,
who clapped enthusiastically in between
movements [gasps from classical stalwarts].
Guess what? No one minded in the slightest.
The classical music and opera world can
seemLondon-centric?partlybecausemedia
coverageofactivitytendstowardsthecapital.
It was wonderful, then, to have the opportunity to see English Touring Opera (ETO) on
mydoorstepatGLiveinGuildford.(Avenue,
I?m ashamed to say, that I have never been
to, having probably always traipsed into
?town? for performances.) The ETO?s raison
d?etre is to bring world-class music to local
theatres; this spring the company is touring
Mozart?s The Marriage of Figaro (pictured),
Puccini?s Il tabarro and Gianni Schicchi and
Rossini?s Fireworks! The ETO?s Figaro was
a laugh-out-loud farcical romp ? think if
MozartwroteaCarryOn?lm,butwithbetter
music. All the leads were superb, but Figaro
(Ross Ramgobin) and the Countess (Nadine
Benjamin) deserve special mentions for the
depth of their performances.
For more details on the ETO tour dates,
visit englishtouringopera.org.uk
@claireiswriting
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
Researcher
Working for Lord Bird
Fund Management
Investment Director
(35 hours per week - Salary on application)
Maternity Cover ?1 year FTC, Full Time ? Salary on application
Based in Westminster
Finsbury Park, London
Ref:BIC/RLB
Ref: BII/ID
Lord Bird is looking for a full-time parliamentary researcher
to further his and The Big Issue Group mission of dismantling
poverty by creating opportunity.
Big Issue Invest is one of the UK?s leading UK social impact investment ?rms.
Established in 2005, its Fund Management division (BIIFM) currently has
three investment funds totaling c�m assets under management and plans
to expand its offer further.
The successful candidate will have experience in research and
policy development with an ability to cover a range of policy
areas. You will require the con?dence to efectively communicate
complex research and policy outcomes to a range of audiences and
the ability to adapt quickly in a dynamic environment.
Our experienced investment team makes debt, equity and project ?nance
investments into mission-led organisations across the UK. These investments
span a range of sectors, deal sizes and structures, with the common theme
being a commitment to creating positive social impact through ?nance.
The team is now seeking to recruit an Investment Director on a one year ?xed
term contract from June 2018 as maternity cover.
Key tasks include:
? Lead on research, reporting and brie?ng across a range of issues,
centred on poverty prevention.
? Assist and support staf in Lord Bird?s office and the Group,
including on policy analysis/development.
? Assist in the planning, coordination and execution of campaigns,
events and conferences.
? Assist Lord Bird with his wider and extra-parliamentary activities.
The Investment Director will:
? Lead impact investments into socially-driven organisations
and projects across a variety of sectors.
? Represent Big Issue Invest externally and contribute to
business and market development; and
? Manage an existing portfolio of clients, identifying key risks
and opportunities.
Closing date: 24th April 2018
This opportunity would particularly suit an individual with lending skills who
is looking to gain direct investment experience and/or exposure to the impact
investment sector, or an individual with outcomes-based commissioning or
advisory experience.
For more details on the role and how to apply please go to
www.bigissue.com and click on Work For Us. If you have any queries,
please email researcher@bigissue.com stating the job reference.
For more details on the role and how to apply please go to
www.bigissue.com and click on Work For Us. If you have any queries, please
email personnel@bigissue.com quoting the job reference.
The Big Issue thanks all applicants for their interest and will
reply only to those invited for interview.
The Big Issue is striving towards Equal Opportunities
Closing date: Tuesday 27th April 2018
Please note that we can only accept applications from those who already
have the right to work in the UK
The Big Issue is striving towards Equal Opportunities
A site near to Bristol Central Quaker Meeting
looks likely to be available if we have the
money to move on it to create
low-running-cost affordable homes.
Invest now to make this possible.
Interest as before.
AEOBhousepeople.org.uk
3 Windsor Terrace, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4LW
L
Tel
T : 0117 926 5931
email: tonycrofts1939@gmail.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p46 / April 16-22 2018
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
WWW
THE BIG ISSUE / p47 / April 16-22 2018
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
THE BIG ISSUE / p48 / April 16-22 2018
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
Please help
us find
Larissa Bobb Semple - Acton, London
Larissa has been missing since 19 February this year.
She was last seen in Acton, West London. Larissa is
32 years old.
Larissa, please call Missing People on 116 000 or
email 116000@missingpeople.org.uk for advice and
support whenever you feel ready.
John Allen - Camden, London
John went missing from Camden in London on 11
March 2018. He is 54 years of age.
John is urged to call Missing People on 116 000
or email 116000@missingpeople.org.uk for advice
and support, including the opportunity to send a
message home in confidence.
Thomas Ogunmuyiwa - Camden, London
Thomas is also missing from Camden. He was last
seen on 2 July 2016, and was 55 at the time.
Thomas, we are here for you when you are ready;
we can listen, talk you through what help you need,
pass a message on for you and help you to be safe.
Please call or text 116 000.
Alicia Francis - Croydon, London
Alicia has been missing from Croydon since 14 March
this year. She is 39 years old.
Alicia, please call or text Missing People on
116 000 when you?re ready; we can listen, talk
through what help you need, pass a message on for
you and help you to be safe.
Timothy Salmon - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex
Timothy went missing from Clacton-on-Sea in Essex
on 1 May 2007. He was 43 years of age at the time
of his disappearance.
Timothy, please call Missing People on 116 000 or
email 116000@missingpeople.org.uk for advice and
support whenever you feel ready.
Chuni Kalsi - Birmingham, West Midlands
Chuni was last seen in Birmingham, West Midlands
on 30 March 2018. Chani is 65 years of age.
Chani, we can listen, talk you through what help
you need, pass a message for you and help you to be
safe. Please call Missing People on 116 000 or email
116000@missingpeople.org.uk.
Call or text 116 000
Email 116000@missingpeople.org.uk
It?s free, 24hr and confidential
Missing People would like to thank
The Big Issue for publicising
vulnerable missing people on
this page.
Our free 116 000 number is
supported by players of People?s
Postcode Lottery.
THE BIG ISSUE / p49 / April 16-22 2018
Registered charity in England and Wales (1020419)
and in Scotland (SC047419)
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
The Socialist Party
aims at building a moneyless world community based
on common ownership and democratic control with production solely
for use not profit. It opposes all leadership, all war.
for 3 FREE issues of our monthly Socialist Standard write to:
The Socialist Party (BI), 52 Clapham High Street. London SW4 7UN
www.worldsocialism.org.bi
Are your prayers for a soulmate
going unanswered?
Let ?Friends1st? change that for
you ? like we have for many
other Christians ? by
introducing you to your soulmate.
THE BIG ISSUE / p50 / April 16-22 2018
crisisinmentalhealth.org
A patient's experience of
The Mental Health Act 1983
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
Discover The
Writer In You!
What our students say:
?I?m currently working on my fourth
book, have been paid for my writing
by at least 15 different magazines, and
now earn half my income from writing
? all thanks to The Writers Bureau?s
course."
Sarah Plater
?I enrolled in The Writers Bureau?s
Creative Writing course in the hope
of building my confidence as a writer
and ending my cycle of publishing
failures. I currently work as a content
writer with a writing agency and have even won an
international writing competition."
Walter Dinjos
?I won the 2015 Flirty Fiction Prima
Magazine and Mills and Boon
competition. The prize was �0, a
three page feature in the magazine
and the chance to work with Mills and
Boon on my book. Also I have three stories in three
anthologies with other authors ? we?ve raised almost
�000 for cancer charities?
Rachel Dove
??I have been published in different
papers and magazines and am now
producing around 250 articles a year.
It?s going a bit too well at times!
Seriously, it?s very satisfying, stimulating
and great fun ? and thanks again to the WB for
launching me on a second career. I meet so many
interesting people and count myself mightly lucky.?
Martin Read
Being a writer can offer you a second income, extra spending money
or it can even be a full-time career. It?s your choice. But whatever your
writing ambitions, we have a course that will help you to achieve them.
That?s because our first-class home-study creative writing course contains
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are shown how to develop your writing style, present your manuscripts,
contact editors, find markets and HOW TO SELL YOUR WORK.
What?s more, you do not need any previous writing experience to
succeed on the course as it?s suitable for the absolute beginner.
Throughout the course you will be tutored by a professional writer, who
will offer constructive feedback on your twenty marked assignments. In
addition, you can count on the support of our dedicated Student Services
team who will do all they can to ensure that you get the most out of your
studies.
When you enrol, your full course is sent to you on a fifteen day trial. Your
studies are then flexible to your requirements. Moreover, we offer you a
full refund guarantee. If you do not earn back the equivalent of your fees
by the time you finish your course we will refund them in full.
So, if you would like to learn how to earn from writing, try our risk-free
course. For a free prospectus visit our website or call our freephone
number TODAY!
www.writersbureau.com
FREE CALL
24
?If you listen to the tutors and take
time to read the material you can be a
working writer, it really is an excellent
course. I've found part-time work as a
freelance writer for Academic
Knowledge. I've earned just under �00 in the past
year.?
Steph Thompson
Why not embark on a exciting writing journey of your own? Enrol on The
Writers Bureau's Creative Writing Course for only �4 (instalment terms
available) and you could be soon writing your own success story.
Writers
Bureau
29
0800 856 2008
Quote:
SZ16418
Members of
ITOL and ABCC
Years of
Success
www.facebook.com/thewritersbureau
www.twitter.com/writersbureau
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?I am delighted to tell everyone that
the course is everything it says on the
tin, excellent! I have wanted to write
for years, and this course took me by
the hand and helped me turn my
scribblings into something much more professional. I
am delighted that my writing is being published and I
am actually being paid. All thanks to the
Comprehensive Creative Writing course.?
George Stewart
HRS
Email:
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Enrol online to access your course modules TODAY at: www.writersbureau.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p51 / April 16-22 2018
COMPETITION
ON
FOUNDERS
John Bird and Gordon Roddick
Group chair
Nigel Kershaw
Managing director
Russell Blackman
EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION
Editor Paul McNamee
Managing editor Vicky Carroll
Features editor Steven MacKenzie
Digital editor Ben Sullivan
Books editor Jane Graham
News & entertainment Adrian Lobb
Film Edward Lawrenson
Radio Robin Ince
Music Malcolm Jack and Claire Jackson
Business support manager Robert White
Art director Ross Lesley-Bayne
Production editor Sarah Reid
Designer Gillian Smith
Junior designer Matthew Costello
Junior sub editor/writers Dionne Kennedy
& Liam Geraghty
ADVERTISING 020 3890 3899
Dennis Publishing, 31-32 Alfred Pl,
Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7DP
Group advertising director Andrea Mason
Group advertising manager Helen Ruane
Account manager Brad Beaver
Classified and recruitment: 020 3890 3744
Account director Jenny Bryan
Senior sales executive Imogen Williams
Vendor Comments
vendorcomments@bigissue.com
The Big Issue Group
020 7526 3200
113-115 Fonthill Road, Finsbury Park,
London, N4 3HH
Group managing director John Montague
Group finance director Clive Ellis
Group marketing & communications
director Lara McCullagh
Group HR director Elizabeth Divver
Distribution director Peter Bird
Big Issue Invest managing director
Ed Siegel
Big Issue Invest head of lending
Daniel Wilson-Dodd
editorial@bigissue.com
0141 352 7260
@bigissue
2nd floor, 43 Bath Street,
Glasgow, G2 1HW
Distribution/London 020 7526 3200
Printed at William Gibbons
BSME Cover of the Year 2017, PPA Cover of the Year
2015, PPA Scotland Cover of the Year 2015 & 2017
PPA Scotland
Consumer Magazine of The Year, 2017
Paul McNamee
British editor of the year 2016, BSME
WIN!
BIG ISSUE SHOP
EARTH DAY
GOODIE BAG
While President Trump continues to disparage
rage climate
li
change,
scientists across the world have once again stressed that the
hurricanes, droughts, floods and earthquakes that have struck
since last summer are a sign that we need to stop talking about
the potential threat ? it?s already here.
Sustainability sits at the forefront of tackling climate change, and
for many, it needs to be as much of a priority as pro?tability.
The Big Issue Shop ofers a huge range of products that put planet
before pro?t and help you shop with a social echo. To celebrate
World Earth Day we?re giving one lucky winner a special Big Issue
Shop Earth Day goodie bag, including a print of last year?s Earth
Day Special cover featuring the clever cuttle?sh, a choice of three
#WEARABIGISSUE T-shirts printed on an organic cotton
EarthPositive� T-shirt, manufactured solely on sustainable energy
generated from wind and solar power and a reusable Jerry water
bottle made from pure Tritan with no BPA, lead or phthalates.
There?s a removable box on the bottom of
the bottle, perfect for storing your keys at
the gym!
To be in with a chance of winning simply
answer the question below:
Which type of fish was splashed
on the cover of last year?s Big
Issue Earth Day Special?
Also win?
Send your answers with
EARTH DAY as the subject to
competitions@bigissue.com
or post to The Big Issue, 43
Bath Street, Glasgow, G2
1HW.
Include your name and address.
Closing date is May 1.
Include OPT OUT if you don?t
want to receive updates from
The Big Issue. We will not pass
your details to any third party.
For full T&Cs see bigissue.com
BELOW THE SURFACE
BOXSET ON DVD
Set against a backdrop of Copenhagen in crisis, Below The Surface is the sophisticated
Scandi-noir thriller from Kaspar Bafoed and Bafta award-winning writer/creator of
The Killing S鴕en Sveistrup.
On a rainy October morning, 15 Danes have their lives turned upside down when the metro train
they are travelling on is hijacked by unknown perpetrators, who will threaten to kill each of them, one
by one, if their demands aren?t met.
This is the beginning of a historic hostage situation that, over the
course of one single week, changes Denmark forever. The politicians
argue whether or not to negotiate with terrorists. In the press, there are
discussions on where the line is drawn in portraying the captives and
seeking out their families, and ordinary Danes are left thinking that it
could have been them.
To be in with the chance of winning one of five boxsets,
just answer this question:
Which other popular mystery series did producer
S鴕en Sveistrup create?
Enter as above, with BELOW THE SURFACE as the subject line,
or at bigissue.com/competitions
THE BIG ISSUE / p52 / April 16-22 2018
GAMES & PUZZLES
SUDOKU
SPOT THE BALL
A
B
C
D
There is just one simple rule
in sudoku: each row, column
and 3 x 3 box must contain
the numbers one to nine.
This is a logic puzzle and you
should not need to guess.
The solution will be revealed
next week.
E
F
ISSUE 1302 SOLUTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
To win Where I Find Myself by Joel
(Last week?s
Meyerowitz mark where you think the ball
Spot the Ball
is, cut out and send to:
revealed:
Chelsea v
Spot the Ball (1303), 43 Bath St, Glasgow,
Southampton
G2 1HW, by April 24. Include name,
(1979)
address, phone no. Enter by email: send grid
position (eg A1) to competitions@bigissue.com.
PRIZE CROSSWORD
1
2
3
4
6
5
7
8
9
10
11
10
11
12
13
14
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
17
19
18
21
22
23
CRYPTIC CLUES
Across
1. Substitute Dai sent
round (7)
8. Ancient vessel
in camp Horace
unearthed (7)
9. Failure of a barber? (7)
10. Kicks we got out of a
Cumbrian town! (7)
11. Can go over the
French girl?s body in
the air? (7)
12. Revised copy of
colourful floater (7)
14. She was in the
quadrangle
crushed (7)
18. Break at quarter
past four feeling
fidgety (7)
20. Sound opening (3-4)
21. Seaside disorder may
be infectious? (7)
22. Sarcastic piece from
the newspaper (7)
23. Pressing one chap
going after
divorcee (7)
To win a Chambers Dictionary, send completed crosswords (either cryptic or quick) to:
The Big Issue Crossword (1303), second floor, 43 Bath Street, Glasgow, G2 1HW by
April 24. Include your name, address and phone number.
Issue 1301 winner is Leigh Reynolds from Pimperne
QUICK CLUES
Down
1. As a result of the
irrelevance (13)
2. Look in such an
ungainly gait (6)
3. Throw out former gym
student (5)
4. There?s less light on
the boat that?s brightly
coloured coming up on
the outside (6)
5. Incident in part of a
soap opera perhaps (7)
6. Girl?s name ? sounds like
a nickname (6)
7. Rely on the New
Testament to give us our
balance (4,9)
13. Confused drunk hit
coach without
aspiration (7)
15. A roaming eater has to
fill up with gas (6)
16. Remove sediment from
port (6)
17. Gives a distorted face (6)
19. Huss I prepared for the
Japanese dish (5)
Across
1. Amusing (7)
8. Brutal (7)
9. Treat carelessly (7)
10. Relating to the sense
of touch (7)
11. Enchant (7)
12. Time when night
and day are of equal
length (7)
14. Greatest (7)
18. Italian composer (7)
20. Tidal wave (7)
21. Old Italian city (7)
22. Erupting mountain (7)
23. Succession of rulers (7)
Down
1. Deep in thought (13)
2. Powerful (6)
3. Unclouded (5)
4. Diminutive (6)
5. Medical examination (5-2)
6. Call in question (6)
7. Rigidity (13)
13. Escape (7)
15. Russian monetary unit (6)
16. Three-legged stand (6)
17. Upper arm muscle (6)
19. ----- Peter, apostle (5)
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
Issue 1302 solution
CRYPTIC: Across ? 1 I-spy; 4 Bravado; 8 Leading light; 9 Parallax; 10 Clef; 12 Sestet; 14 Acacia; 16 Etch; 17 Scrubbed; 20 Stenographer; 21 Respond; 22 Dyke.
Down ? 2 Swear; 3 Yodeller; 4 Bantam; 5 Able; 6 Angelic; 7 Out of hand; 9 Possessor; 11 Scrumped; 13 Suckers; 15 Scared; 18 Break; 19 Polo.
QUICK: Across ? 1 Slag; 4 Visited; 8 In conclusion; 9 Gunsmith; 10 Skit; 12 Append; 14 Master; 16 Haul; 17 Fingered; 20 Commendation; 21 Lottery; 22 Ruth.
Down ? 2 Linen; 3 Gloaming; 4 Vacate; 5 Shut; 6 Thicket; 7 Denatured; 9 Graphical; 11 Gangster; 13 Plummet; 15 Fiddly; 18 Roost; 19 Bede.
THE BIG ISSUE / p53 / April 16-22 2018
Photos: Action Images
MY PITCH
Carl Fellows, 52
M&S, LINTHORPE ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH
?I?ve got back in touch with my family.
I?ve got a ?at now so they come to visit?
ABOUT ME...
I LOVE ANIMALS
I have a couple of gold?sh but
no other pets as I?m not allowed
to keep them where I?m living. I
used to have dogs and I?d like to
have some again one day.
MY TEAM
I support Middlesbrough FC
and they?re doing quite well
at the moment. I don?t have a
favourite player, I just like to
see them win!
ON MY
PITCH?
I?m here Monday to
Wednesday from
10am-2pm and
Thursday to Saturday
from 7.30am
B
efore I started selling
The Big Issue I was
homeless and travelling
from place to place, sleeping
wherever I could. I was down
south in Andover, Winchester?
a couple of weeks in one place
and then I?d move on.
Before I was homeless I?d
been in demolition and worked
on a fair for a few years so I was
used to the travelling lifestyle.
But then I had a mental
breakdown while I was living
on the streets. I knew my health
was deteriorating. I told my
mum and she asked me to come
back home, so I did.
I wasn?t getting bene?ts and
I knew the person who sold The
Big Issue here before me so I
thought, why don?t I give that a
try? It?s a bit of extra money and
it feels like I?m giving something
back to society now. I didn?t
have any experience of selling
but I learned it on the job. I?ve
been selling the magazine for
?ve-and-a-half years now. My
customers are great, they look
out for me ? and so do the shop
workers around here. They buy
me teas and cofees, maybe a bit
of lunch. One of the reasons I do
this job is for my regulars.
Since I came home I?ve got
back in touch with my family.
And I?m also seeing my two
daughters again. They?re 22
and 32 and live in Stockton and
Sunderland. I?ve got a ?at now
so they come around to visit
every couple of weeks. I?ve also
got six grandchildren ? four
girls and two boys. It?s good
being a granddad. The Big
Issue gives me the money
to help with my kids and my
grandchildren. I help out
every now and then, and I also
like to put some extra away
for Christmas.
THE BIG ISSUE / p54 / April 16-22 2018
I ?sh for trout in Sunderland
and Redcar and I also go sea
?shing. Every now and then I
come home with something
for tea, but I wouldn?t say I?m
the greatest ?sherman. It?s
therapeutic with the sea breeze
though, and by the time I?ve
spent a few hours there I can
get a good night?s sleep.
After I had my breakdown I
was in a halfway house and I got
some support with my mental
health there. I still visit the
centres if I?m having a bad time.
But I?ve been back home for six
years now and it?s the longest
I?ve ever been settled. I couldn?t
go back to that nomadic
lifestyle. If I came into money,
I?d travel a bit but I?d always
come home. I can?t be running
away from myself no more.
Interview: Sarah Reid
Photo: Konrad S Leader
The last male northern white rhino in existence died last month. It marks the end for the entire
subspecies and is yet another tragic reminder of how we are destroying our planet.
Enough is enough. Please take action today and donate � to help save the
Critically Endangered eastern black rhino, before it suffers the same fate.
The world is witnessing the
extinction of yet another animal ?
the northern white rhino. This
magnificent creature was once
abundant across Central Africa, but
staggering rates of illegal hunting for
their horn wiped them out until just
three individuals were left. With the
recent death of Sudan, the last male,
only two female northern white
rhinos remain.
This has to be our final wake-up
call ? we must stop the senseless
slaughter of rhinos in the wild. We?re
asking Big Issue readers to donate
� to help save another Critically
Endangered rhino ? the eastern
black rhino ? today.
Because unless we act now, the
eastern black rhino could suffer
the same fate. It is teetering on
the edge of extinction with only
850 left in the wild. Ruthless
international gangs will stop at
nothing to get rhino horn, and we
need your help to protect rhinos on
the ground.
With the death of ?Sudan? - the last male - an entire
subspecies has now been lost. It?s time to take a
stand and protect the eastern black rhino.
You can make a difference ?
right now. In 2004, Fauna & Flora
International (FFI) helped to create
Ol Pejeta Conservancy, a safe haven
for endangered animals in Kenya.
?If you value the natural world ? if
you think it should be protected
for its own sake as well as
humanity?s ? then please support
Fauna & Flora International.?
Sir David Attenborough
Fauna & Flora International
vice president
Ol Pejeta is now home to over 100
eastern black rhinos, and with your
support today, we can help keep them
safe from poachers.
By making a donation of � by
14 May, you could help us recruit,
train and equip rangers to patrol the
conservancy and keep these majestic
animals safe. Your gift could help to
protect the last few eastern black
rhinos in the wild.
We must not bear witness to
another extinction. Please complete
the donation form to help save the
eastern black rhino now.
Photos: Rhino � Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Sir David Attenborough � Gill Shaw
YES ? I will do something to help save the black rhino, by giving � to Fauna & Flora International
Here is my gift of:
�
Other �
I enclose a cheque payable to Fauna & Flora International
OR
I wish to pay by credit/debit card
Card type: Visa
Amex
MasterCard
Maestro
CAF
Card No:
Expiry Date:
/
Security Code:
Issue No.:
(Maestro Only)
Let?s keep in touch!
To show how your support is helping, we will keep you informed of the progress on this and other
important work by post. We will also send you carefully selected projects where you could help make a
vital difference and invite you to events to see what your support has acheived. If you don?t want these
updates by post, just tick here
Your personal details are kept secure and are never sold, traded or
rented. See full details at www.fauna-flora.org/privacy or call for more information.
YES! Please also keep in touch via
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s was edible, or
Ooho! ?s edible water bottle
will
become commonplace.
Gee: Packaging will look
very
diferent in 20 years? time
as we
lose our love afair with pla
stic. New
vegetable-based edible pac
kaging and
biodegradable compostab
le packaging will
come to the fore.
BREXIT HAS-BEAN
S
Gee: Brexit is the bigges
t short-term shake-up for
the UK in terms of farmin
g and food. Under the
Common Agricultural Po
licy (C AP), tarifs make
food imported from outsid
e the EU more expensive
and this disproportionately
efects poorer
households. We could see
some prices go down.
Leaving the Common Fis
hing Policy could also
have an efect on the ?sh
we eat.
A shift in agriculture policy
could
mean a favourable enviro
nment for
smaller, more innovative
farmers
producing more diverse cro
ps. Look
out for exciting varieties
of fruit and
vegetables, chillies, quinoa
, beans or
legumes.
DEATH TO DIETS
Dr Gaye: Going on a die
t will be old
news. Buying food for a spe
ci?c type of diet will
be narrower than just veg
an or vegetarian and will
?t
a pro?le that is more spe
ci?c to you, based on
genetics and other charac
teristics.
Gee: But there will be ma
ny familiar foods too.
Expect lots more vegetable
protein, British quinoa,
apricots, peaches and alm
onds. It will
be healthier, with nutrien
t-charged
fruit and vegetables. In rea
l terms it will
be cheaper too, as yields
get greater
and mechanisation improv
es
eiciency.
BASKET CASE
Dr Gaye sai
FAD
DIETS
d: The idea of the
shopping basket is kind of
oldfashioned. I think that wh
at will instead
use a shopping wall, which
will be placed
where you come of the tub
e, for example,
and you will touch a but ton
for what you want and it
will be delivered to your hom
e an hour later. The
internet and online shopp
ing will no longer be
separate things, it will be
all around us.
Dr Morgaine Gay is a foo
d guturologist @morgain
egaye
Lyndon Gee is a food fut
urist, food and health
writer @LyndonGee
Words: Liam Geraghty
@Lazergun_Nun
THE BIG ISSUE / p33 / April 16-22 2018
From soil to sky ?
how a vertical farm
may look in the future
Vertical farms producing food in the skies are no sci-fi
fantasy ? the concept is already 20 years old. So why
aren?t they all around us? It?s a tough market to crack. A
number of large-scale vertical farm ventures backed
rigorously by tech investors ? looking to transform the
agricultural industry and produce seasonal food all year
round ? have failed in the past couple of years. Several,
including some from technology giants such as Google and
Panasonic, have all gone bust. Just last year the USA?s
once-largest vertical farm, FarmedHere, closed down. What?s
going on?
The major hurdle, says Professor Paul Ekins, director at
University College London?s Institute for Sustainable
Resources,isthatverticalfarmingisunder-fundedandunable
tooutgrowtheshadowofothersustainabletechnologies,such
as those found in the renewable energy sector.
?I?ve seen quite a few examples of pretty productive
systems in a vertical farming sense, but they are still very
much at the cutting edge of innovation. It?s also true to say
that the economics don?t stack up yet,? he says. ?That?s true
for lots of new ways of doing things and lots of new
technologies in the beginning.?
The problems vertical farms face in scaling up to a size
that can reliably feed hundreds of thousands of consumers
is simply that of cost and margins. Essentially, growers are
replicating the free resources of nature ? such as sunlight
and climate ? with technology that requires massive amounts
of energy to sustain it 24/7.
?All that you can get from that ridiculous expense is [a]
penny?s worth of vegetables. It makes no sense, at least for
now,? remarked one agricultural expert commenting on
Reddit. ?Sorry for this pessimistic comment, but this is what
I think is the major problem and what needs a breakthrough.?
Cost hasn?t stopped all progress, though, for those enticing Silicon Valley investors with promises of
Words: Ben Sullivan, Digital Editor, The Big Issue @_BenSullivan_
breakthrough tech. US-based vertical farming startup Plenty
is about to build 300 indoor farm facilities in China
following a $200 million funding round that included the
support of Google?s parent company Alphabet and Amazon
CEO Jef Bezos. There?s clearly a market here for innovation,
it?s just still in a very early stage.
?Any kind of really large-scale change, such as vertical
farming growing even a few per cent of global food, takes a
long time to become established and become embedded,?
Ekins says. ?And very often you ?nd that if they take hold
and lots of people start engaging in them they ?nd new ways
of doing it and because the of that the costs can often come
down quite dramatically.?
Vertical agriculture on a much smaller, localised scale, is
thriving however. Almost 40 metres below the streets of
Clapham, London lives Growing Underground, an urban
farming operation using sunlight-imitating LED lights and
computer-controlled hydroponic systems to grow
micro-greens all year round. After more than three years,
Growing Underground now supplies local Whole Foods,
Ocado, and M&S stores with fresh greens. Another London
vertical farming venture, GrowUp, has also taken advantage
of localised, small-scale urban produce growth to experiment
with indoor, urban vertical farming, with an onus on
reducing the environmental impact and cost of
transportation and packaging by selling and delivering to
local customers. These are just two of many examples in
the UK.
?I think we?re going to see it for quite a long time to come,?
Ekins adds. ?There will be communities that will get into it,
and at a community level that might become quite signi?cant.
That then might provide the springboard for much
larger experimentation.?
The numbers just don?t add up when it comes to a full-scale agricultural
revolution ? but signi?cant developments are occurring at a local level
WON?T SAVE US...YET
THE FUTURE OF FOOD
?We can grow food for money, or we can grow
food for people,? says Alice-Marie Archer, founder
of Bristol Fish Project. ?We need to figure out the
line between the two.?
A Community Interest Company (CIC), the project
was founded in 2011, when Archer sought a solution
to the challenges of increasing urban waste. Dismayed
by the repercussions of the corporate agriculture
systems, she saw that aquaponics could be used
to not only recycle waste to grow food sustainably,
but also help conservation efforts and a
disadvantaged community.
What, you might well ask, is aquaponics. Archer
explains: ?Aquaponics is the symbiotic growing of ?sh
and plants, usually in a recirculating water-based
system and typically without soil.?
To you and I, it?s about ensuring absolutely nothing
goes to waste. The technique turns urban food waste
into food for ?sh, and their waste feeds watercress
plants. The plants, which naturally ?lter water for
reuse, can be cultivated and eaten.
The way we consume and grow food is changing
ever faster, says Archer. ?Conventional agriculture
and its business model are failing across lots of fronts,
and we know we?re in a transition towards a diferent
food system.
?We need to ?nd ways to grow food that are sustainable and hydroponics and aquaponics have proven
they?re more sustainable in terms of water, in terms
of waste and there?s also that bene?t of growing food
near its consumers.?
Bristol Fish Project also has an important
conservation role, receiving funding from the
European Marine Fisheries Fund to build and run an
eel conservation project. Some 5,000 eels now make
up the heart of their aquaponic system.
But one of its key bene?ts which reaches beyond
that of conversation, recycling and sustainability is
its community impact. To help grow this, earlier this
year Bristol Fish Project received a loan of �,000
from Big Issue Invest?s Impact Loans England (ILE)
fund. ILE is funded through the Growth Fund, which
is managed by Access ? The Foundation for Social
Investment, with funding from Big Lottery Fund and
Big Society Capital.
Alan Tudhope, Investment Manager at Big Issue
Invest, the social investment arm of The Big Issue
Group, explains how the project?s social impacts align
with local and global sustainability aims.
?By offering employment and volunteering
opportunities to local people, promoting the importance of nutrition, and utilising sustainable,
environmentally-sound methods, Bristol Fish Project
succeeds in tackling issues of both local and global
importance,? he says.
?We at Big Issue Invest are delighted that
our investment will enable them to continue this
great work.?
The earliest versions of aquaponics that Archer
saw were American urban projects which developed
employment and nutrition in deprived areas. ?So we?ve
always developed our projects in areas like that and
we?re trying to make community scale aquaponic
farming accessible, a vehicle for local employment and
awareness of food issues,? she explains of her decision
to situate the CIC in the income-deprived area of
Hartclife in Bristol.
The farm has classroom space, where the project?s
concept can be taught to communities who want to
bring food systems into their own hands.
?Our mission now is to recreate the Bristol Fish
Project in other areas. We want to design a transferable
model for other communities. Our classroom helps
us share our concept system with them or teach them
how to make their own,? Archer explains.
She hopes that by providing communities
across the country with access to this technology
they can not only tackle social deprivation, but
put control of agriculture into the into the hands
of consumers.
The future of food is literally in their hands.
Visit bristol?sh.org for more info
Words: Dionne Kennedy @bowliekids
Image: Getty images
THE BIG ISSUE / p35 / April 16-22 2018
Plastic litter is choking
our marine wildlife
Join us today
and help stop the plast
www.mcsuk.org/join
Registered Charity No: 1004005 (England and Wales) SC037480 (Scotland)
THE ENLIGHTENMENT
Books
Shanty time page 38
Film
Sun, sex and Binoche page 41
EVERGREEN FUN
FAKE PLASTIC
PLASTIC TREES
One of the most disagreeable things about LEGO
(apart from the pain of standing on an errant
brick) is that they?re plastic and plastic is bad. And
although bricks can be endlessly recycled by being
used to build and rebuild, LEGO will launch a
more sustainable material this year, which could
please even Thom Yorke. Polyethylene derived
from sugarcane will mean that plants in LEGO sets
will themselves be made from plants.
THE BIG ISSUE / p37 / April 16-22 2018
Music
Tuning into classical page 45
BOOKS
WE WERE THE SALT OF THE SEA
On the crest of a wave
At sea with few skills and a sexist skipper, Roxanne Bouchard found
friendship in an unlikely place
THE BIG ISSUE / p38 / April 16-22 2018
Photo: Getty Images
S
ome mariners unwittingly found aboard a boat like that before, and I?ll admit both disappeared into the belly of our boat.
themselves written into the pages I was a bit nervous. It was a little choppy,
I grabbed the extension, strode across
of We Were the Salt of the Sea. A and to tie up the sailboat, I had to step over the deck of the ?shing boat and plugged the
few years ago, I signed up for an our boat?s lifeline, climb up on to the cord into an outside socket on the wall of
advanced sailing course that would take me handrail of the ?shing boat, jump down on a hut.
That?s when I saw him. A man, sidling
along the coast from the end of the Gasp� to the deck and quickly ?nd something solid
Peninsula and across the Gulf of St to tie our mooring line tight around. over towards me with his hands in his
pockets. ?That sailboat yours, is
Lawrence to Quebec?s North
she??
Shore. I wanted to put my
?No, she?s a training boat.?
seaworthiness to the test in these
?A training boat??
freezing and challenging waters,
?Yes, we?re learning how
where tankers surge through the
to sail.?
fog and the two-faced morning
?Ah. Do you like it??
calm suddenly gives way to
?A lot.?
unforgiving waves. I wanted to
He nodded.
set sail and see whales, but most
of all I wanted to ?nd my courage.
?Are you from around here?? I
Right from the start, I saw my
asked. ?Our radio?s not picking up
hopes were going to be dashed.
the weather. Do you know what
The ?rst night at dinner I joked
the forecast is for the next
that my goal was to learn to sail
few days??
I had barely had time to ?nish
solo, so I could beat the guys from
my sentence when my skipper
the Magdalen Islands in the
shouted, ?Roxa nne! The
R間ate des Fous! The skipper
looked down his nose at me and
breaker?s ?ipped. We need power.
turned away.
Figure it out, will you!? Then he
ducked
back
inside
There were ?ve of us learning:
the sailboat.
one retired gent coddling his
teenage daughter, a real
The man gave me a funny look.
comedian with a leg in plaster, an
?Who?s he??
a mateur
p h o t o g r a p h e r,
?Our captain.?
and me. So not an advanced
?And you choose to go aboard
sailing course. But, since there
his boat??
were only two of us doing the
I didn?t know what to say to
on-deck manoeuvres and I was
that. ?Do you know where I can
?nd someone to reset the circuit
the only one navigating the charts
breaker??
(there?s no sat nav on training
boats), I figured I?d learn
The man nodded to the ?shing
something all the same.
boat with the tip of his chin. ?Plug
The bay of Mont-Louis, scene of Roxanne?s memorable mooring dance
It turned out it would be a
yourself in over there, on the side
difficult week with the skipper always on ?Warming up for your little dance then, of the cabin.?
my back. A s far as he was I see!? our skipper joked, seeing me
?I can?t do that!?
concerned, the sea was a man?s world. prance around.
?Yes, you can. That?s my boat. L?Alberto.
It all turned out ?ne. The skipper took My generator?s running, so just plug your
Refusing to let him take the wind out of my
sails, I sang my way along, and on those the helm and manoeuvred us gently into extension in. And I?ll print of the weather
nights where we made ground, I would hop our mooring. The amateur photographer forecast for you.?
I was speechless.
out on to the wharf to do a little dance, and I climbed aboard the ?shing boat and
He smiled. ?When a woman dances on
which made my fellow crew members laugh. swiftly tied our boat up.
As the photographer returned to our my boat, I can?t refuse her anything!?
Still, I could feel the captain shooting
That?s how I met O?Neil Poirier, one of
daggers at me and it was dragging me down. sailboat, I realised there was no one else
the characters who would
Day ?ve, the sea had not been kind to us aboard the ?shing boat. The deck was vast,
give salt to the sea.
and our radio wasn?t picking up the weather clean and clear, and so ? oh, yes ? I made it
reports, so we decided to head into the bay my stage for my little mooring dance.
of Mont-Louis for the night.
The skipper soon brought me back down
As we made our approach, we saw we?d to earth. ?Go plug in the extension cord, will
We Were the Salt of the Sea by
Roxanne Bouchard is out now
have to moor our sailboat right alongside a you? We need power over here!? The
(Orenda Books, �99)
commercial ?shing boat. I had never set foot photographer passed me the cord, and they
READ MORE FROM...
DOUG JOHNSTONE
REVIEWS
FIVE OF THE BEST
DICTIONARIES
HARRY EYRES
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
THEORY OF BASTARDS / I STILL DREAM
Primate dream
SAMUEL JOHNSON?S
DICTIONARY OF THE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
(1755)
Pride of place has to go to our
inspiration for Johnson?s Brexit Dictionary,
a wise and sometimes witty masterwork,
which doesn?t just de?ne words with
delicious exactitude but illustrates
their meanings with apt and
beautiful quotations.
Doug Johnstone is gripped by the tale of a future in which a
group of apes hold the key to the development of the human race
Illustration: Dom McKenzie
S
cience ?ction is as broad a
church as any other genre,
from full-on laser-zapping
space operas to subtle literary
speculative tales only slightly removed
from modern reality. This week we
have two books that fall into the latter
category, books that have taken recent
advances in science and technology
and extrapolated them into intriguing
and convincing new places.
The superbly titled Theory of
Bastards is by Canadian writer
Audrey Schulman. Set in an alternate
near future, the story revolves around
a young female scientist called Frankie
Burke who has developed a distinct
theory of evolution and is testing it out
in a research facility on a group of
bonobos. Frankie has endometriosis,
giving her a body awareness few others can
understand, and she works closely with
ex-military biologist David Stotts. In
Schulman?s world humans are directly
connected up to the Quark, a kind of nextgeneration internet, while 3D printers
generate the food for the animals in the lab.
Added to this, large-scale climate events
are a constant threat to parts of civilisation,
and it?s one such event that precipitates a
major crisis in the story, with Frankie, Stotts
and the apes having to leave the research
station in order to survive.
There?s a lot going on in Schulman?s novel,
but the author weaves it together with skill
andsubtlety,quicklysettlingusintoFrankie?s
world and focusing on her fascinating
interactions with the bonobos. The apes are
like a matriarchal and paci?st version of
chimpanzees, where sex replaces violence as
the main form of societal control, and
Schulman has a lot of fun comparing ape
culture and interactions with the human
equivalents, for better or worse.
As the plot progresses the action and
tension increase too, as they should, but
Theory of Bastards continues to ask the reader
big questions into the bargain, about the
nature of human identity, about
communication, and about our attitude to
the environment and the planet. Delicately
of-kilter, this is an unsettling but endlessly
interesting read from start to ?nish.
In a diferent way our second book this
week also deals with big themes of human
identity and communication. I Still Dream
by James Smythe begins in 1997, where
teenager Laura Bow has invented a basic
artificial intelligence called Organon. As
Laura grows so does Organon, and the story
jumps forward in 10-year leaps as far as 2047.
At the same time as Organon and Laura
mature, another AI called SCION is being
developed by a company initially started by
Laura?s father, who disappeared from Laura?s
life when she was little.
Smythe is looking at how the internet
interacts with all our lives in I Still Dream,
and some of the plot later on seems ripped
from recent newspaper headlines, as we deal
with the repercussions of big data abuse.
SCION gets sold to the US government but
Smythe is no doom merchant, and he uses
Organon to balance his view, examining
possibly more optimistic futures.
At the heart of the novel, though, is Laura?s
journey through life, and how that is mirrored
and refracted through Organon?s path. It?s a
fascinating and emotional journey, one
depicted with honesty and clarity, looking at
love, loss and what it means to be human in
the digital age.
Words: Doug Johnstone @doug_johnstone
Theory of Bastards
by Audrey Schulman
(Europa Editions, �.99)
I Still Dream
James Smythe
(Borough Press, �.99)
THE BIG ISSUE / p39 / April 16-22 2018
VOLTAIRE?S
DICTIONNAIRE
PHILOSOPHIQUE
(Philosophical Dictionary)
(1764)
Not so much a dictionary as a collection of
brilliantly opinionated essays on Voltaire?s
favourite bugbears and preoccupations,
especially the fanaticism and cruelty of the
Catholic Church, and the superiority of
English to French culture and morals.
THE DEVIL?S
DICTIONARY
Ambrose Bierce (1911)
A Wildean compendium by
America?s answer to Oscar. the
kind of dictionary Lady Bracknell might
have compiled, which contrasts the noble
facades of words with the ugly reality of
what they mean in a material, cynical and
amoral world. ?Academy? becomes ?a
modern school where football is taught?
and ?beauty? is de?ned ?the power by
which a woman charms a lover and
terri?es a husband?.
THE OXFORD
DICTIONARY OF
QUOTATIONS
Still the ?nest of its kind,
ofering immortal sayings for
every occasion. Go straight to Horace
(the most quotable of all poets, with
mottos such as ?nil desperandum? and
?carpe diem?); the generous samples of
Shakespeare and the Bible ofer a brilliant
shortcut to complete reading.
COLLINS ENGLISH
DICTIONARY
Not the most famous
or glamorous, but the
most useful of modern
dictionaries, combining the virtues of an
encyclopaedia with those of a dictionary.
Johnson?s Brexit Dictionary: or,
An A-Z of What Brexit Really
Means by Harry Eyres and
George Myerson is out now
(Pushkin Press, �99)
A m azonian Andes
Save one of Earth?s
richest habitats
Donate to World Land Trust?s
urgent appeal to help us
permanently protect 400 acres
of tropical forest in one of the
most wildlife rich regions
in the world
FILM
READ MORE FROM...
EDWARD LAWRENSON
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
The heat is on
Juliette Binoche plays an artist with a busy love life in Let The Sunshine In,
the latest movie from French filmmaker Claire Denis
C
laire Denis is one of France?s
?nest ?lmmakers, and among its
most unpredictable. She flits
across genres with the same
searching intensity with which her roving
camera explores the bodies and faces of her
actors (Denis? ?lms have a restless visual
energy). She?s made family dramas of sumptuous, silky naturalism like 35 Shots of Rum.
She?s made a savage, exceedingly bloody
vampire movie (with Vincent Gallo!) in
Trouble Every Day. Her 2004 film The
Intruderwasabold,dreamlikeexperimental
chamber piece inspired by a French
philosopher?s novel. And now she?s working
on a big-budget, English-language sci-? with
Robert Pattinson.
Her new ?lm is a drama set in upmarket
Paris involving well-heeled bourgeois types
managing the quiet storm of their
complicatedlovelives.ThisisamilieuFrench
cinemareturnsto(andpackagesandexports)
like a re?ex, and gets you wondering if Denis,
habitual risk-taker that she is, confounding
expectations again by playing it safe?
Well, Let the Sunshine In may come in
the guise of a solidly traditional French
romanticdrama,butthisisabeguilinglyodd
and singular rif on familiar tropes.
Juliette Binoche plays Isabelle. She?s an
artist, but judging from the brief time she
spends in front of a canvas in her live-in
studio this doesn?t seem her principal
occupation: instead what she?s mainly
working on is her love life. In a plot that
advances in awkward ?ts like a succession can feel a little exhausting. But then it?s hard
of uncertain internet dates, the film not to be swept up by the jumpy tempo and
charts her romantic entanglements with sideways insight of Denis? ?lm.
What emerges is a
ahandfulofmen,relationfreeform assembly of
shipsofvaryingdegreesof
m om ent s
?
s om e
promise and disaster.
FINAL REEL
There?s a rich banker
excruciating, some tender,
Playing at London?s ICA,
(Xavier Beauvois), a
some sad, some funny.
Frames of Representation
smug, softly spoken
These fragments seem
is a week-long season of
50-something with a
scattershot but it all
documentary cinema from
line in self-absorbed
coalesces around a playful
around the
et serious focus on
cynicism that Isabelle has
world. Only
esire in middle
somehow fallen for. Then
in its third
ge, expressed in
there?s handsome, hardyear, Frames
n u n i n h i bit e d
drinking actor (Nicolas
will showcase
er for ma nce by
Duvauchelle), who exudes
films including
inoche. Sure, she
a mix of self-pitying
Khalik Allah?s
oes a lot of showy
petulance and boyish
lyrical tribute to Jamaican
acting ? switching from
charm, and who ?ees the
culture, Black Mother, and Boris
second things get serious.
tears to laughter in seconds
Mitic?s playfully profound essay
At an arts festival Isabelle
? but then a troubled love
film In Praise of Nothing (with
takes up with taciturn,
life has the knack of
musings voiced by Iggy Pop
working-class museum
bringing out the urge to
on the soundtrack).
employee (Paul Blain),
overdramatise in all of us.
?Fantasies always have
whom a male friend tells
her is not a suitable match (but only because an element of truth,? Isabelle?s pal tells her
he himself holds a candle for her). And, as (after Isabelle confesses to some fruity
if things weren?t busy enough, there?s also erotic role-playing with that appalling
G閞ard Depardieu on hand as a potential banker). Let the Sunshine In might seem like
suitor, a late-addition cameo that Denis an airy confection, but there?s a whole lot of
makes the most of ? even playing the ?nal truth hiding in its bubbly folds.
Let The Sunshine In is in cinemas
credits over his scene with Binoche.
?I?m tired. Is this my life?? Isabelle sighs, from April 20
slumped on her couch, and it?s true, that
dizzying range of options that confront her Edward Lawrenson @EdwardLawrenson
THE BIG ISSUE / p41 / April 16-22 2018
+++++
?One of the ?lms of the year has arrived ?
maybe the best of the year.?
Peter Bradshaw, THE GUARDIAN
+++++
?Mesmerising psychological drama.?
Tim Robey, THE DAILY TELEGRAPH
+++++
?A miracle?
Manuela Lazic, LITTLE WHITE LIES
Best Film, Best Actor
GERMAN FILM CRITICS? AWARDS 2017
WESTERN
12A
# ?NO D[ 8CNGUMC )TKUGDCEJ
NOW SHOWING
ICA
Curzon Bloomsbury
Picturehouse Central
Arthouse Crouch End
Home Manchester
Watershed Bristol
Tyneside Newcastle
Showroom Shef?eld
Arts Picturehouse Cambridge
Broadway Nottingham
Depot Lewes
IFI Dublin
www.newwavefilms.co.uk
WHEN WILL
WE KNOW WHAT
We ALL deserve a final
say on the BREXIT deal
BROADCAST
The most amazing feats aren?t on the big screen ? they?re all around us in the
natural world. Adventurer and presenter of CBBC?s Beyond Bionic Andy Torbet
guides us through the real-life superpowers of incredible animals
e tend to live a fairly sheltered
existence. I?ve been out on the
ice in the Arctic stalked by polar
bears ? and you realise that you are
not top of the food chain. It doesn?t
matter how smart you think you are,
how many Instagram followers you have or
whether there?s the latest phone in your
pocket ? if a polar bear wants to eat you, it?s
going to eat you.
In Beyond Bionic I go up against the
superheroes of the animal kingdom, looking
at how amazing these creatures are by asking
if a human can compete against them.
Inevitably the answer is no, so we then look
at how much technology I have to use to try
to compete.
And even with the best technology in the
world, sometimes you can?t get close.
One example is the ostrich, which is the
fastest animal on two legs. We used jetpacks,
special spring-loaded running boots and we
still couldn?t come anywhere near to running
as fast. The mako shark can swim at 60 knots
and jump nearly 10 metres out of the water.
Again, we tried to do that and failed
miserably.
Then we have Darwin?
k
ns b
bark
spider, a tiny little animal that
lives in the rainforestt in
Madagascar, that can ?re itss web
25 metres to catch may?ies?
?ying
up and down the river. It?s the
strongest web in the world,andfar
stronger than steel or titanium.
Pacu are like piranhas, but
they?revegetarian.Theyeatnutsthatfallinto
the river and have teeth very much like ours
? itlooksliketheyhavefalseteethin.They?re
the same body shape as piranhas but about
a metre long and 50kg in weight. They?re like
underwater rhinos.
We take butter?ies for granted because
they?re so common, but when you stop and
think that this animal completely changes
? this is not a juvenile growing up to be
somethingslightlydiferent,thisisacomplete
'Even with
a jetpack I
couldn't outrun
an ostrich'
morphological change. When a caterpillar
turns into a butterfly, that?s werewolf
technology right there.
ThePompeiiwormisafairlyunimpressivelooking creature ? basically it?s a little grey
slug ? but it lives on underwater volcanoes,
deep
hydrother
d
h d th rmal vents, so it is amazingly
heat-resistant.IItproducesamucusthatcoats
its body, which in itself doesn?t have any
heat-resistant properties, but it feeds
bacteria and so grows a bacteria layer
around its body which insulates it.
You?ve go
ot some amazing superhero
animalss, but from a survivalist point
of view some of these animals
THE BIG ISSUE / p43 / April 16-22 2018
are incredible because they?ve been around
for such a long time. Fossil records show the
African dwarf crocodile has been around for
250 million years. It saw the dinosaurs come
and go. And hissing cockroaches are almost
indestructible. It is an old cliche but it?s true,
if there?s ever a nuclear war that devastates
the world cockroaches would survive.
Biomimicry looks at the incredible talents
of animals, and asks how we can use what we
learn to advancetechnology. One example is
the Geckskin. It?s still very much in the
research and development stage, but engineers
are looking at how a gecko?s skin operates. The
physics behind it is phenomenal, basically a
gecko?s skin sticks to a surface like glass at a
molecular level ? there are molecular bonds
going on ? so they?re looking at how they can
replicate that in a synthetic material. They?re
working on a set of gloves that one day you
could use to climb up a glass building.
I think the peregrine falcon is the most
superhero-like of animals. It is the fastest
animal in the world, it will do 242 miles an
hour head down, towards prey. And it is one
of the most common birds of prey in Britain.
We see it all the time in cities now because it?s
a clif-dwelling bird ? a building to them is just
a man-made clif ? and it likes to hunt pigeons.
Andy Torbet is the new virtual guide at SEA
LIFE London?s new Rainforest Adventure
exhibit. @AndyTorbet
He was speaking to Steven MacKenzie
@stevenmackenzie
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MUSIC
READ MORE FROM...
CLAIRE JACKSON
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
OUT AND ABOUT
The Sony World Photography Awards
Exhibition (April 20 to May 6, Aldwych,
London; somersethouse.org.uk) returns
for another year and sees pieces from
600 international photographers on
display across a variety of genres including
portraiture, travel, wildlife and street
photography. There is a huge filtering
process behind the scenes, with judges
wading through 320,000 submissions to
get to the final 600. Mike Trow, former
picture editor at British Vogue, curates the
exhibition, and it will conclude with the
Outstanding Contribution To Photography
Award being handed out to the year?s
standout photographer.
Fashioned From Nature
(from April 21, South
Kensington, London; vam.
ac.uk) stretches back to 160
to trace the connections
(both visually and in terms
of fabrics) between nature
and fashion over four centur
and fauna have long been sources of
design inspiration, and this exhibition will
show how this has evolved over the years
(noting where certain themes rise and fall
in popularity) as well as how new ways of
making fabrics have been developed, what
the environmental impact has been and
why the past can be both aesthetically and
physically repurposed.
Sonica Festival (April 20-21, King?s Cross,
London; sonic-a.co.uk) is dedicated to the
visual and sonic arts, touring the world all
year round. It began in 2012 in Glasgow and
showcases the best creators in the space,
bringing together new collaborations and
pushing the envelope as far as it can.
Wilderness (until May 6, Walsall;
thenewartgallerywalsall.org.uk) takes, as the
title suggests, the wilderness as its starting
point. Artists across a variety of disciplines
consider isolation and expansive open
spaces in nature and how they relate to our
(occasional) need for solitude. From salt
deserts and remote mountain tops to the
most rugged of coastlines and ominous of
volcanoes, this is about revealing the extent
of the wild in the wilderness.
Eamonn Forde @Eamonn_Forde
Photo: Jane Hobson
PICTURE THIS
Not so niche
Can radio bridge the gap between populist and purist?
I
n the UK, we have an embarrassment
of riches when it comes to listening to
classical music on the radio. The two
ain stations, BBC Radio 3 and its commerial counterpart Classic FM, ofer a variety
f repertoire, concert broadcasts and
agazine-style segments. There?s a healthy
ense of rivalry between fans and industry
ypes;somelistenersfeelthatthestationthey
lump for says something about their idenity.Needlesstosay,thereisoftenasnobbishessonbehalfofsomeRadio3listeners,who
see their station as the preserve of a?cionados. But being successful ? populist, perhaps
? isn?t necessarily a bad thing. Earlier this
year, ?gures revealed that 5.7 million people
now listen to Classic FM every week ? and
over half a million of them are under 25.
Radio 3 has frequently been accused of
trying to emulate the station?s format to
improve its stats. In the heady days of online
message boards at the turn of the new
millennium, campaigners gathered to
petition the state-funded station about its
content. The group Friends of Radio 3 now
keep programmers on their toes, promising
to ?press Radio 3 to be distinctive, and to
maintain high artistic and intellectual
standards; to recognise that the content will
by its nature attract small audiences; and to
acknowledge the necessity to build an
audienceforthecontentratherthanalterthe
content to expand the audience?.
As a Radio 3 fan myself, I commend this
sentiment. I also wholeheartedly approve of
Classic FM and believe that it is equally
educational ? in a diferent way. (Hmm, this
fence post is getting uncomfortable. Bear
withme.)Ididn?tgrowupinamusicalfamily,
although my parents always supported my
woodwind squawking ? and on the rare
occasions I mustered a decent tune, my dad
would enquire after the composer. Interest
THE BIG ISSUE / p45 / April 16-22 2018
piqued, he tuned his car stereo to Classic FM
? and so began a decades-long exploration
of music.
There must be hundreds ? thousands ? of
newcomers to classical music with a similar
story. At Classic FM Live, held earlier this
month at the Royal Albert Hall, there wasn?t
a spare seat in the house. The event celebratedthe?BestofBritish?talent,andwhilethere
were the odd ?crossover? pieces that weren?t
to this writer?s taste, there was a superb
performance of Elgar?s cello concerto ? in
full ? by Leonard Elschenbroich and the
Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra,
conducted by Maxime Tortelier. The piece
may well have been new to some listeners,
who clapped enthusiastically in between
movements [gasps from classical stalwarts].
Guess what? No one minded in the slightest.
The classical music and opera world can
seemLondon-centric?partlybecausemedia
coverageofactivitytendstowardsthecapital.
It was wonderful, then, to have the opportunity to see English Touring Opera (ETO) on
mydoorstepatGLiveinGuildford.(Avenue,
I?m ashamed to say, that I have never been
to, having probably always traipsed into
?town? for performances.) The ETO?s raison
d?etre is to bring world-class music to local
theatres; this spring the company is touring
Mozart?s The Marriage of Figaro (pictured),
Puccini?s Il tabarro and Gianni Schicchi and
Rossini?s Fireworks! The ETO?s Figaro was
a laugh-out-loud farcical romp ? think if
MozartwroteaCarryOn?lm,butwithbetter
music. All the leads were superb, but Figaro
(Ross Ramgobin) and the Countess (Nadine
Benjamin) deserve special mentions for the
depth of their performances.
For more details on the ETO tour dates,
visit englishtouringopera.org.uk
@claireiswriting
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
Researcher
Working for Lord Bird
Fund Management
Investment Director
(35 hours per week - Salary on application)
Maternity Cover ?1 year FTC, Full Time ? Salary on application
Based in Westminster
Finsbury Park, London
Ref:BIC/RLB
Ref: BII/ID
Lord Bird is looking for a full-time parliamentary researcher
to further his and The Big Issue Group mission of dismantling
poverty by creating opportunity.
Big Issue Invest is one of the UK?s leading UK social impact investment ?rms.
Established in 2005, its Fund Management division (BIIFM) currently has
three investment funds totaling c�m assets under management and plans
to expand its offer further.
The successful candidate will have experience in research and
policy development with an ability to cover a range of policy
areas. You will require the con?dence to efectively communicate
complex research and policy outcomes to a range of audiences and
the ability to adapt quickly in a dynamic environment.
Our experienced investment team makes debt, equity and project ?nance
investments into mission-led organisations across the UK. These investments
span a range of sectors, deal sizes and structures, with the common theme
being a commitment to creating positive social impact through ?nance.
The team is now seeking to recruit an Investment Director on a one year ?xed
term contract from June 2018 as maternity cover.
Key tasks include:
? Lead on research, reporting and brie?ng across a range of issues,
centred on poverty prevention.
? Assist and support staf in Lord Bird?s office and the Group,
including on policy analysis/development.
? Assist in the planning, coordination and execution of campaigns,
events and conferences.
? Assist Lord Bird with his wider and extra-parliamentary activities.
The Investment Director will:
? Lead impact investments into socially-driven organisations
and projects across a variety of sectors.
? Represent Big Issue Invest externally and contribute to
business and market development; and
? Manage an existing portfolio of clients, identifying key risks
and opportunities.
Closing date: 24th April 2018
This opportunity would particularly suit an individual with lending skills who
is looking to gain direct investment experience and/or exposure to the impact
investment sector, or an individual with outcomes-based commissioning or
advisory experience.
For more details on the role and how to apply please go to
www.bigissue.com and click on Work For Us. If you have any queries,
please email researcher@bigissue.com stating the job reference.
For more details on the role and how to apply please go to
www.bigissue.com and click on Work For Us. If you have any queries, please
email personnel@bigissue.com quoting the job reference.
The Big Issue thanks all applicants for their interest and will
reply only to those invited for interview.
The Big Issue is striving towards Equal Opportunities
Closing date: Tuesday 27th April 2018
Please note that we can only accept applications from those who already
have the right to work in the UK
The Big Issue is striving towards Equal Opportunities
A site near to Bristol Central Quaker Meeting
looks likely to be available if we have the
money to move on it to create
low-running-cost affordable homes.
Invest now to make this possible.
Interest as before.
AEOBhousepeople.org.uk
3 Windsor Terrace, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4LW
L
Tel
T : 0117 926 5931
email: tonycrofts1939@gmail.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p46 / April 16-22 2018
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
WWW
THE BIG ISSUE / p47 / April 16-22 2018
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
THE BIG ISSUE / p48 / April 16-22 2018
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
Please help
us find
Larissa Bobb Semple - Acton, London
Larissa has been missing since 19 February this year.
She was last seen in Acton, West London. Larissa is
32 years old.
Larissa, please call Missing People on 116 000 or
email 116000@missingpeople.org.uk for advice and
support whenever you feel ready.
John Allen - Camden, London
John went missing from Camden in London on 11
March 2018. He is 54 years of age.
John is urged to call Missing People on 116 000
or email 116000@missingpeople.org.uk for advice
and support, including the opportunity to send a
message home in confidence.
Thomas Ogunmuyiwa - Camden, London
Thomas is also missing from Camden. He was last
seen on 2 July 2016, and was 55 at the time.
Thomas, we are here for you when you are ready;
we can listen, talk you through what help you need,
pass a message on for you and help you to be safe.
Please call or text 116 000.
Alicia Francis - Croydon, London
Alicia has been missing from Croydon since 14 March
this year. She is 39 years old.
Alicia, please call or text Missing People on
116 000 when you?re ready; we can listen, talk
through what help you need, pass a message on for
you and help you to be safe.
Timothy Salmon - Clacton-on-Sea, Essex
Timothy went missing from Clacton-on-Sea in Essex
on 1 May 2007. He was 43 years of age at the time
of his disappearance.
Timothy, please call Missing People on 116 000 or
email 116000@missingpeople.org.uk for advice and
support whenever you feel ready.
Chuni Kalsi - Birmingham, West Midlands
Chuni was last seen in Birmingham, West Midlands
on 30 March 2018. Chani is 65 years of age.
Chani, we can listen, talk you through what help
you need, pass a message for you and help you to be
safe. Please call Missing People on 116 000 or email
116000@missingpeople.org.uk.
Call or text 116 000
Email 116000@missingpeople.org.uk
It?s free, 24hr and confidential
Missing People would like to thank
The Big Issue for publicising
vulnerable missing people on
this page.
Our free 116 000 number is
supported by players of People?s
Postcode Lottery.
THE BIG ISSUE / p49 / April 16-22 2018
Registered charity in England and Wales (1020419)
and in Scotland (SC047419)
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
The Socialist Party
aims at building a moneyless world community based
on common ownership and democratic control with production solely
for use not profit. It opposes all leadership, all war.
for 3 FREE issues of our monthly Socialist Standard write to:
The Socialist Party (BI), 52 Clapham High Street. London SW4 7UN
www.worldsocialism.org.bi
Are your prayers for a soulmate
going unanswered?
Let ?Friends1st? change that for
you ? like we have for many
other Christians ? by
introducing you to your soulmate.
THE BIG ISSUE / p50 / April 16-22 2018
crisisinmentalhealth.org
A patient's experience of
The Mental Health Act 1983
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
Discover The
Writer In You!
What our students say:
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book, have been paid for my writing
by at least 15 different magazines, and
now earn half my income from writing
? all thanks to The Writers Bureau?s
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?I enrolled in The Writers Bureau?s
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and ending my cycle of publishing
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?I won the 2015 Flirty Fiction Prima
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and the chance to work with Mills and
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Rachel Dove
??I have been published in different
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producing around 250 articles a year.
It?s going a bit too well at times!
Seriously, it?s very satisfying, stimulating
and great fun ? and thanks again to the WB for
launching me on a second career. I meet so many
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Martin Read
Being a writer can offer you a second income, extra spending money
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THE BIG ISSUE / p51 / April 16-22 2018
COMPETITION
ON
FOUNDERS
John Bird and Gordon Roddick
Group chair
Nigel Kershaw
Managing director
Russell Blackman
EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION
Editor Paul McNamee
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Features editor Steven MacKenzie
Digital editor Ben Sullivan
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& Liam Geraghty
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Classified and recruitment: 020 3890 3744
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BIG ISSUE SHOP
EARTH DAY
GOODIE BAG
While President Trump continues to disparage
rage climate
li
change,
scientists across the world have once again stressed that the
hurricanes, droughts, floods and earthquakes that have struck
since last summer are a sign that we need to stop talking about
the potential threat ? it?s already here.
Sustainability sits at the forefront of tackling climate change, and
for many, it needs to be as much of a priority as pro?tability.
The Big Issue Shop ofers a huge range of products that put planet
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BELOW THE SURFACE
BOXSET ON DVD
Set against a backdrop of Copenhagen in crisis, Below The Surface is the sophisticated
Scandi-noir thriller from Kaspar Bafoed and Bafta award-winning writer/creator of
The Killing S鴕en Sveistrup.
On a rainy October morning, 15 Danes have their lives turned upside down when the metro train
they are travelling on is hijacked by unknown perpetrators, who will threaten to kill each of them, one
by one, if their demands aren?t met.
This is the beginning of a historic hostage situation that, over the
course of one single week, changes Denmark forever. The politicians
argue whether or not to negotiate with terrorists. In the press, there are
discussions on where the line is drawn in portraying the captives and
seeking out their families, and ordinary Danes are left thinking that it
could have been them.
To be in with the chance of winning one of five boxsets,
just answer this question:
Which other popular mystery series did producer
S鴕en Sveistrup create?
Enter as above, with BELOW THE SURFACE as the subject line,
or at bigissue.com/competitions
THE BIG ISSUE / p52 / April 16-22 2018
GAMES & PUZZLES
SUDOKU
SPOT THE BALL
A
B
C
D
There is just one simple rule
in sudoku: each row, column
and 3 x 3 box must contain
the numbers one to nine.
This is a logic puzzle and you
should not need to guess.
The solution will be revealed
next week.
E
F
ISSUE 1302 SOLUTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
To win Where I Find Myself by Joel
(Last week?s
Meyerowitz mark where you think the ball
Spot the Ball
is, cut out and send to:
revealed:
Chelsea v
Spot the Ball (1303), 43 Bath St, Glasgow,
Southampton
G2 1HW, by April 24. Include name,
(1979)
address, phone no. Enter by email: send grid
position (eg A1) to competitions@bigissue.com.
PRIZE CROSSWORD
1
2
3
4
6
5
7
8
9
10
11
10
11
12
13
14
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
17
19
18
21
22
23
CRYPTIC CLUES
Across
1. Substitute Dai sent
round (7)
8. Ancient vessel
in camp Horace
unearthed (7)
9. Failure of a barber? (7)
10. Kicks we got out of a
Cumbrian town! (7)
11. Can go over the
French girl?s body in
the air? (7)
12. Revised copy of
colourful floater (7)
14. She was in the
quadrangle
crushed (7)
18. Break at quarter
past four feeling
fidgety (7)
20. Sound opening (3-4)
21. Seaside disorder may
be infectious? (7)
22. Sarcastic piece from
the newspaper (7)
23. Pressing one chap
going after
divorcee (7)
To win a Chambers Dictionary, send completed crosswords (either cryptic or quick) to:
The Big Issue Crossword (1303), second floor, 43 Bath Street, Glasgow, G2 1HW by
April 24. Include your name, address and phone number.
Issue 1301 winner is Leigh Reynolds from Pimperne
QUICK CLUES
Down
1. As a result of the
irrelevance (13)
2. Look in such an
ungainly gait (6)
3. Throw out former gym
student (5)
4. There?s less light on
the boat that?s brightly
coloured coming up on
the outside (6)
5. Incident in part of a
soap opera perhaps (7)
6. Girl?s name ? sounds like
a nickname (6)
7. Rely on the New
Testament to give us our
balance (4,9)
13. Confused drunk hit
coach without
aspiration (7)
15. A roaming eater has to
fill up with gas (6)
16. Remove sediment from
po
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