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The Guardian - April 17, 2018

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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:1 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:S
How sleep became
a billion-dollar
business G2
?
Sent at 16/4/2018 21:59
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?It isn?t possible to win more ? Sport
convincingly than this?
Barney Ronay on Manchester City
Tuesday
17 April 2018
Issue ? 53,385
theguardian.com
�00
May defends
joining Syria
strikes before
parliament
had its say
Pippa Crerar
Jessica Elgot
Rudd tells MPs: we
were wrong over
Windrush citizens
?
Amelia Gentleman
The British home secretary has delivered an unprecedented apology for the
?appalling? actions of her own department towards Windrush-era citizens,
acknowledging that the Home Office
had ?lost sight of individuals? and
become ?too concerned with policy?.
In the face of mounting criticism,
Amber Rudd announced the creation
of a new Home Office team, staffed
by 20 officials, dedicated to ensuring
that Commonwealth-born long-term
UK residents will no longer find themselves classified as illegal immigrants.
She promised that cases would be
resolved within two weeks and application fees would be waived.
In a highly unusual acknowledgement that the government?s hostile
immigration policy is having catastrophic effects on individuals? lives,
Rudd said: ?Frankly, how they have
been treated has been wrong ? has
been appalling ? and I am sorry. That
is why I am setting up a new area in my
department to ensure that we have a
completely new approach to how their
situation is regularised.?
How the U-turn happened
7.16am
Penny Mordaunt MP
?We need to do a better
job with the process?
Caroline Nokes MP
12.57pm Suggests some people
were deported in error
3.54pm
Amber Rudd MP
Sets up a new Home Office
team and says: ?I am sorry?
Theresa May has said that waiting for
the UN to authorise military action in
future would effectively give Russia
a veto on British foreign policy as she
defended her decision to join international air strikes against the Syrian
regime.
The prime minister accused
Moscow of preventing inspectors from
reaching the site of the chemical weapons attack on Douma and suggested
that Bashar al-Assad?s forces, backed
by the Russians, were attempting to
destroy evidence of the attack.
She faced down her critics in a
heated debate in the Commons in
the wake of the atrocity, which she
described as ?a stain on our humanity?, insisting the UK had needed to
act rapidly to prevent further attacks.
May faced widespread recrimination for launching strikes before
consulting parliament ? although
many of those MPs critical of the lack
of scrutiny said they would have given
her their support ? but suggested the
?security? of the operation could have
been compromised.
?I am absolutely clear that it is
parliament?s responsibility to hold
me to account for such decisions ? and
parliament will do so,? she told MPs.
?But it is my responsibility as prime
minster to make these decisions. And
I will make them.?
She added: ?This was a 11 ?
She made a significant criticism of
her own department, adding: ?I am
concerned that the Home Office has
become too concerned with policy and
strategy and sometimes loses sight of
the individual. This is about individuals, and we have heard the individual
stories, some of which have been terrible to hear.?
She said she was ?very sorry? for
the ?anxiety? suffered by numerous people who arrived in the UK as
children after newly tightened immigration laws required them to prove
that they were here legally.
2 ?
The Guardian has been
McPartlin ban
Drink-drive TV
star told he must
pay �,000 5 ?
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:2 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 21:08
?
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
Inside
Tuesday 17 April 2018
News
National Pages 5-20
Continued from page 1
Eternal renters A third of young adults willl
never own their own home | Page 4
Rudd tells MPs: we
were wrong over
Windrush citizens
Conception warning Research ?nds diets of
both parents can a?ect child health | Page 8
?Bleak future? Chief inspector of probation?s
?s
verdict on prospects of ex-o?enders | Page 9
Grenfell inquiry Deadly blaze was fuelled by
a botched refurbishment, police told | Page 14
4
World Pages 21-28
India trial Eight appear in court over rape
and murder of eight-year-old girl | Page 22
Conchita Eurovision winner reveals she is HIV
positive after ?blackmail bid by ex? | Page 24
Holocaust concert Pieces of music created
in camps are played for ?rst time | Page 25
Financial Pages 29-33
?Greenwash? claim BP?s strategy to cut carbon
footprint is attacked by campaigners | Page 30
The B-side What pop stars do with the
rest of their lives when the hits dry up | Page 32
Journal Centre section
?There is life on the
high street you
ou
will never ?nd
d
on the web
Simon Jenkins
ins
Page 1
?Just what
kind of person
does Net?ix
think I am?
Lizzie O?Shea
Page 4
G2 Centre section, tucked inside Journal
Lord of the Flies ? for real How a 1950s
experiment became relevant again | Page 4
Cool for cats Why millennials are
embracing their inner cat lady | Page 6
Sport Back section
Fast and loose How Cal Crutchlow became
the best Brit since Barry Sheene | Page 41
Commonwealth Games Gold Coast ?nale
lowers the bar for Birmingham | Page 43
Puzzles G2, page 16 | Journal, page 12
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No. 53,385, Tuesday 17 April 2018. Registered as a
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documenting a growing scandal
over the past five months affecting
an unknown number of people who
arrived in the UK as children from the
Caribbean as children (often on parents? or siblings? passports) but never
formally naturalised or applied for a
British passport.
Because new immigration rules
mean individuals are increasingly
required to show documents proving a right to be in the UK before they
can take up work, rent properties,
access healthcare, or claim benefits, many have lost their jobs or been
made homeless or refused urgent
healthcare. Some have been sent
to immigration removal centres or
threatened with deportation.
Rudd?s colleague, the immigration minister Caroline Nokes, earlier
appeared to suggest people had been
deported in error back to countries
they left as children. Rudd said she
was unable to confirm whether this
was the case and had asked Caribbean
diplomats whether they were aware of
mistaken deportations.
Rudd?s announcement came after
the prime minister was forced into an
embarrassing U-turn over Downing
Street?s refusal to schedule a meeting requested by 12 Carribean heads
of government to discuss the problem at the Commonwealth heads of
government meeting (Chogm), which
opened in London yesterday.
The rebuff was described as ?most
unfortunate? by the Barbados high
commissioner just before the meeting
began. Within hours, Theresa May?s
official spokesman announced she had
agreed to set up a meeting after all. He
added that the prime minister ?deeply
values? the contribution the Windrush
generation have made, but the outrage
over the initial refusal overshadowed
the opening of the conference.
The decision to back down on the
refusal to hold a meeting followed
anger from politicians of all parties on
this issue. Over 140 MPs from all parties
sent a letter to May, expressing concern about the incorrect classification
Still waiting for justice
One who could benefit from the
Home Office?s announcement of a
dedicated 20-strong taskforce to
deal with cases of Windrush-era
British residents with immigration
issues is Richard Stewart.
He was 10 when he moved
from Jamaica to London in 1955
to live with his older sister, who
was working in the UK as a nurse.
In 1966, he was signed up to play
cricket for Middlesex.
More than 50 years later,
he is facing problems with his
immigration status because he
does not have a British passport.
?I?ve always thought of myself as
British. It does seem unfair.?
Refugee turned volunteer
among ?rst Obama fellows
David Smith
Washington
The Obama Foundation has
announced the first 20 Obama fellows,
including two from the UK, who will
take part in a two-year non-residential
programme aimed at bringing together
leaders who are ?creating transformational change on many of the world?s
most pressing problems?.
The announcement, made via the
Guardian, is the latest step in Barack
Obama?s political afterlife. The former president has spoken out against
Donald Trump?s policies on only a few
occasions, keen to avoid the criticism
that he is leading the ?resistance? or
crowding out other Democrats. He is
also writing a presidential memoir.
But he has long taken a particular
interest in the next generation of leaders in the US and around the world.
Speaking at a conference in Japan
last month, he said he aspired to create ?a million young Barack Obamas or
Michelle Obamas? who would pick up
the baton in what he described as the
?relay race that is human progress?.
The fellows, chosen from 20,000
applicants from 191 countries, are
engaged in areas including healthcare,
organising communities, technology
and the arts. Their work includes helping deaf children have equal access to
literacy tools and treating addiction.
Obama said: ?These 20 leaders, representing 11 countries, are tackling
some of the toughest challenges in
their communities. They are doing the
hard work ? not for recognition, often
without enough resources ? because
they have a vision of the world as it
should be: a little more just, less isolated, more connected.?
He added: ? The foundation will
facilitate hands-on trainings, leadership development, coaching and
personalised plans and strategies to
help these leaders scale [up] the work
they?ve already started.?
One of the fellows is Zarlasht
? Zarlasht_Halaimzai, once a refugee,
set up the Refugee Trauma Initiative
of many Commonwealth-born, longterm British as ?illegal immigrants?
and calling on her to find a ?swift resolution of this growing crisis?.
The communities secretary, Sajid
Javid, said he was ?deeply concerned?
about the Windrush scandal, adding
?this should not happen to people who
have been longstanding pillars of our
community.?
Rudd?s announcement came in
response to an urgent question called
by Labour?s David Lammy, who said it
was ?inhumane and cruel? for so many
in the Windrush generation ?to have
suffered so long in this condition?
?This is a day of national shame and
it has come about because of a hostile
environment policy that was begun
under her prime minister. Let us call
it as it is. If you lay down with dogs,
you get fleas, and that is what has happened with this far-right rhetoric in
this country,? he said.
The shadow home secretary, Diane
Abbott, expressed scepticism about
whether the new Home Office team
would really resolve the problems
faced by hundreds of people. ?How
much confidence can people have in
the special team when people with
lawyers have been unable to resolve
their situations?? she asked.
Satbir Singh, CEO of the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants,
welcomed the new team. ?The Home
Office must commit to a system which
treats affected people with fairness,
humanity and flexibility,? he added.
?We?ve witnessed the culmination of
years of government policy explicitly
designed to turn us into a hostile society and which have made the Home
Office an island of inhumanity and
incompetence.?
How the story unfolded, pages 6-7 Journal David Harewood Page 4 Halaimzai, who came to Britain as
a refugee from Afghanistan aged 11.
After training in psychotherapy, she
visited the Calais refugee camp and
was struck by the lack of volunteers
who could speak refugees? languages.
She is the co-founder of the Refugee
Trauma Initiative (RTI), which gives
psychological help to refugees traumatised by war, torture and displacement.
Halaimzai, 36, applied for the
fellowship on the last day before applications closed. ?I?m thrilled to be part
of it,? she said from northern Greece,
where the RTI does much of its work.
?It feels exactly the right thing for me.?
The Obamas had been a personal
inspiration, she recalled. ?When he
was elected it was the first time I felt,
as a minority in the UK, that I could
shoot for the stars because the precedent had been set. Their commitment
to empowering people and changing
things in a creative way is great.?
The foundation said selection
weighed factors such as geographic
diversity, commitment to the foundation?s values and existing work.
They also include Alex Smith, who
is founder of North London Cares and
South London Cares, which help fight
loneliness by connecting elderly people and young professionals.
Koketso Moeti, a civic activist
in South Africa, struggled to apply
because she lacked an internet connection. A friend stepped in and she hit
the button with just minutes to spare.
Applications for its 2019 fellows
class will open in the summer.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:3 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 20:52
?
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
News
Researchers make
plastic-eating
mutant enzyme
better ? by accident
Damian Carrington
Environment editor
Scientists have accidentally created a
mutant enzyme that breaks down plastic drinks bottles. The breakthrough
could help solve the global plastic
pollution crisis by enabling the full
recycling of bottles for the first time.
The new research was spurred by
the discovery at a waste dump in Japan
in 2016 of the first . Scientists have now
revealed the detailed structure of the
crucial enzyme produced by the bug.
An international team then tweaked
the enzyme to see how it had evolved,
but tests showed they had inadvertently made the molecule even better at
breaking down the PET (polyethylene
terephthalate) plastic used for softdrink bottles. ?What actually turned
out was we improved the enzyme,
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
which was a bit of a shock,? said Prof
John McGeehan, at Portsmouth University, who led the research.
The mutant enzyme takes a few
days to start breaking down the plastic ? far faster than the centuries it
takes in the oceans. But the researchers are optimistic this can be speeded
up even further and become a viable
large-scale process.
?What we are hoping to do is use
this enzyme to turn this plastic back
into its original components, so we can
literally recycle it back to plastic,? said
McGeehan. ?It means we won?t need
to dig up any more oil and, fundamentally, it should reduce the amount of
plastic in the environment.?
About 1m plastic bottles a minute
are sold around the globe and, with
just 14% recycled, many end up in the
oceans, where they have polluted even
the remotest parts, harming marine
3
life and thus people who eat seafood.
?It is incredibly resistant to degradation,? said McGeehan. ?It is one of
these wonder materials that has been
made a little bit too well.?
However, even those bottles that
are recycled can only be turned into
opaque fibres for clothing or carpets.
The new enzyme indicates a way to
recycle clear plastic bottles back into
clear plastic bottles.
?Oil is cheap, so virgin PET is cheap,?
said McGeehan. ?It is so easy for manufacturers to generate more of that stuff,
rather than even try to recycle. But I
believe there is a public driver here:
perception is changing so much that
companies are starting to look at how
they can properly recycle.?
The research, published in the US
journal Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences, began by determining the precise structure of the
enzyme produced by the bug. The
team used the Diamond Light Source,
near Oxford, an intense beam of x-rays
10bn times brighter than the sun that
can reveal individual atoms.
The structure of the enzyme looked
very similar to one evolved by many
bacteria to break down cutin, a natural polymer used as a protective
coating by plants. But when the team
manipulated the enzyme to explore
this connection, they accidentally
improved its ability to eat PET.
?It is a modest improvement ? 20%
better ? but that is not the point,? said
McGeehan. ?It?s incredible because
it tells us that the enzyme is not yet
optimised. It gives us scope to use all
? Sorting bottles at a recycling plant
near Dhaka, Bangladesh. Recycled
PET flakes are sold on to east Asia
PHOTOGRAPH: ABIR ABDULLAH/EPA
PET projects
1m
The approximate number of drinks
bottles made of PET plastic that are
sold each minute around the globe
14%
The share of those plastic bottles
that are recycled. The process only
makes opaque fibres of limited use
70C
The temperature at which PET
melts. Crucially, ?extremophile
bacteria? can survive this heat
the technology used in other enzyme
development for years and years and
make a super-fast enzyme.?
Industrial enzymes are widely used
in, for example, washing powders and
biofuel production. They have been
made to work up to 1,000 times faster
within a few years ? the same timescale
McGeehan envisages for the plasticeating enzyme. A patent has been
filed on the specific mutant enzyme
by the Portsmouth researchers and
those from the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado.
One possible improvement being
explored is to put the mutant enzyme
into an ?extremophile bacteria? that
can survive temperatures above the
70C melting point of PET ? the plastic is likely to degrade up to 100 times
faster when molten.
Earlier work had shown that some
fungi can break down PET plastic,
which makes up about 20% of global
plastic production. But bacteria are far
easier to harness for industrial uses.
Other types of plastic could be broken down by bacteria evolving in the
environment, McGeehan said. PET
sinks in seawater but some scientists
have conjectured that plastic-eating
bugs might one day be sprayed on the
huge patches of plastic flotsam in the
oceans to clean them up.
But Prof Adisa Azapagic, at Manchester University, warned: ?A full
life-cycle assessment would be needed
to ensure the technology does not
solve one environmental problem
? waste ? at the expense of others,
including additional greenhouse gas.?
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:4 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:S
Sent at 16/4/2018 18:10
?
4
Silver hoard
linked to first
Christian
king of
Denmark
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
News
Agence France-Presse
Berlin
A 13-year-old boy and an amateur
archaeologist have unearthed a ?significant? treasure trove in Germany
which may have belonged to King
Harald Bluetooth, who brought Christianity to Denmark.
Ren� Sch鰊 and his student Luca
Malaschnitschenko were looking for
treasure using metal detectors in January on northern R黦en island when
they chanced upon what they initially
thought was a worthless piece of aluminium. On closer inspection, they
realised that it was a piece of silver,
German media reported.
Over the weekend, the regional
archaeology service began a dig covering 400 sq metres (4,300 sq ft). It has
found a hoard believed to be linked to
the Danish king Harald Gormsson, better known as Bluetooth, who reigned
from around AD958 to 986.
Braided necklaces, pearls, brooches,
a Thor?s hammer, rings and up to 600
chipped coins were found, including more than 100 that date back to
? Some of the items that may have
belonged to King Harald Bluetooth
Chinese site
Weibo backs
down over
homosexual
content ban
Lily Kuo
One of China?s largest social media
sites, Sina Weibo, has reversed a ban
on online content ?related to homosexuality? after an outcry from the
country?s internet users.
On Friday, Sina Weibo had said that
for the next three months, it would
be removing comics and videos ?with
pornographic implications, promoting
bloody violence, or related to homosexuality?. The internet company said
the initiative was in an effort to ?create
a sunny and harmonious community
environment? and comply with
China?s cybersecurity laws.
In response, Weibo users posted
photos with their partners, comments,
and rainbow emojis, accompanied by the hashtags #iamgay and
#iamgaynotapervert.
A woman in Shanghai wrote in a
post that received more than 55,000
likes: ?I am the mother of a gay son.
My son and I love our country.
?But today ? I suddenly [find] that
in this strong country, Sina Weibo is
discriminating against and attacking
this sexual minority.?
Many quoted China?s constitution and laws about the protection of
minorities. One internet user referred
to article 38 of the constitution, which
maintains that the ?personal dignity?
of Chinese citizens is ?inviolable?
Bluetooth?s era, when he ruled over
what is now Denmark, northern Germany, southern Sweden and parts
of Norway.
?This trove is the biggest single
discovery of Bluetooth coins in the
southern Baltic Sea region and is therefore of great significance,? the lead
archaeologist, Michael Schirren, told
the news agency DPA. The oldest coin
is a Damascus dirham dating to 714 and
the most recent a penny from 983.
The treasure may have been buried
in the late 980s when Bluetooth fled
to Pomerania, where he died in 987.
and insult directed against citizens is
prohibited.
Others pointed out that homosexuality was decriminalised in 1997 and
removed from the government?s list of
mental disorders in 2001.
Following the deluge of comments,
Sina Weibo said on Monday that its
campaign would no longer include
gay content and only focus on checking pornographic and violent material.
?Thank you everyone for the discussion and your suggestions,? it said.
Much of China?s LGBT community
has been forced underground. Only
15% said they had told their parents,
and 5% had come out publicly, according to a 2016 survey from the UN. Gay
conversion therapy is still used in some
public hospitals and private clinics.
The online dissent over Sina Weibo?s policy was a sign of growing
acceptance of and confidence among
China?s gay community, according to
Lu Pin, an activist and the founder of
the Feminist Voices blog. Vibrant gay
communities exist in cities such as
Shanghai, where rights groups have
organised cruises for family members
to come out to one another. Businesses
have been targeting the so-called pink
economy of the LGBT community.
?China?s gay community continues to push through obstacles. The
growth around the world in support
for gay rights has also given the Chinese strength? Lu said.
China?s online space has come
under increasingly tighter control.
In January, authorities ordered Sina
Weibo to shut several portals as part of
the government?s efforts to eliminate
?vulgar? or ?harmful? online content.
State media said 128,000 websites
were closed for such content last year.
Weibo censors deleted posts and
blocked searches related to the ban.
But one user wrote defiantly: ?Every
time you delete, we will start again.?
? A man holding a rainbow flag
after taking part in a run during
Shanghai Pride last June
PHOTOGRAPH: AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:5 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 16/4/2018 18:24
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
?
Red alert
Scientists find gene
for hair colour
Page 9
Grenfell tower
Fire fuelled by poor
overhaul decisions
Page 14
5
A third of today?s
young adults will
never own their
home, says study
Five million millennials may
still be renting at retirement,
Resolution thinktank warns
Patrick Collinson
One in three of the millennial generation will never own their own home,
according to a report that predicts
many of them will be forced to live
and raise families in insecure privately
rented accommodation all their lives.
In a gloomy assessment of the housing outlook for millennials ? the 14
million or so Britons aged 20 to 35 ?
the Resolution Foundation thinktank
predicts half will be renting in their
40s, and a third could still be renting
by the time they claim their pensions.
The foundation?s Intergenerational
Commission believes there will be an
explosion in the housing benefits bill
as taxpayers pick up the tab for paying
rent to landlords once the millennials
reach retirement.
?This rising share of retiree renters,
coupled with an ageing population,
could more than double the housing benefit bill for pensioners from
�3bn today to �bn by 2060 ? highlighting how everyone ultimately pays
for failing to tackle Britain?s housing
crisis,? the report says. It calls for a
radical overhaul of the private rented
sector, proposing a three-year cap on
rent increases, which would not be
allowed to rise by more than the consumer price index, currently 2.5%.
The report adds to a growing chorus of demands for rent stabilisation,
including a call last year by the Labour
leader, Jeremy Corbyn, for rent controls in some cities.
Resolution also wants ?indeterminate? tenancies to be the sole form
of contract in England and Wales,
Number of families with children
living in the private rented sector
? Children in private rented homes
? Children in owner occupied homes
5m
4m
3m
2m
1m
0
04
06
08
10
12
14
16
Source: Resolution Foundation analysis of MHCLG,
English Housing Survey
replacing the standard six-month or
12-month contracts demanded by
most landlords. This would follow
Scotland?s lead, where open-ended
tenancies began in December 2017, and
has long been the standard practice in
Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden
and Switzerland.
Greater security of tenure is vital
as more families are raised in the private rented sector, the report says. The
number of privately renting households with children has tripled from
600,000 in 2003 to 1.8m in 2016.
The thinktank said: ?While insecurity in the private rented sector is
often seen as an acceptable risk when
childless, the disruption it can cause
to schooling, friendship groups and
support networks once young people
have a family is clearly less than ideal.?
It said public policy had failed to
catch up with extraordinary changes
in renting. ?In 2003, the number of
children in owner-occupied housing outnumbered those in the private
rented sector by eight to one. That ratio
has now fallen to two to one.?
But landlords vigorously opposed
any suggestion of rent controls. David
Cox, chief executive of the Association
of Residential Letting Agents, said:
?Rent controls do not work. The last
time rent controls existed in this country, the private rented sector shrank
from 90% [of all housing] to 7%.
?At a time of demand for private
rented homes massively outstripping supply, rent controls will cause
the sector to shrink. In turn, this means
professional landlords will only take
the very best tenants, and the vulnerable and low-income people that rent
controls are designed to help will be
forced into the hands of rogue and
criminal operators.?
The Intergenerational Commission is also calling for the UK to tax
foreign investors in rented property
more heavily, as happens in Vancouver and Australia, where buyers from
abroad face levies of up to 15%.
In addition it sets out reforms to
improve the supply of houses in the
UK, including giving local councils
more powers to compulsorily acquire
land, and greater access to finance to
build affordable homes.
Lindsay Judge, an analyst at the Resolution Foundation, said: ?Britain?s
housing problems have developed
into a full-blown crisis over recent decades and young people are bearing the
brunt, paying a record share of their
income on housing in return for living
in smaller, rented accommodation.?
Drink-drive
o?ence lands
McPartlin with
�,000 ?ne
Haroon Siddique
The TV presenter Ant McPartlin has
been fined �,000 and disqualified
from driving for 20 months after pleading guilty to drink-driving.
The 42-year-old entertainer was
charged last month after being
involved in a collision with two
other cars while driving his Mini
in Richmond, south-west London.
Appearing at Wimbledon magistrates
court yesterday, he admitted driving
while over the limit.
His 20-month disqualification will
be reduced by five months if he attends
a drink-driving referral course.
The Bafta-winning presenter of I?m
a Celebrity ? Get Me Out of Here! failed
a breathalyser test after the collision
on 18 March and was arrested. He was
released under investigation the next
day and charged by postal requisition
two days later.
A child who was a passenger in one
of the cars was taken to hospital to be
checked as a precaution. Others were
treated at the scene for minor injuries.
McPartlin was originally scheduled
to appear in court on 4 April, but the
hearing was adjourned.
After he was charged, McPartlin announced he was returning to
? Ant McPartlin leaves court after
being fined and disqualified from
driving for 20 months
PHOTOGRAPH: STEPHEN LOCK/I-IMAGES
rehabilitation, where he spent two
months last year receiving treatment
for depression, alcoholism and addiction to prescription painkillers.
Speaking briefly outside the court
following sentencing, McPartlin said:
?I just want to say I?m truly sorry for
what happened.
?High standards are expected of
me, I expect them of myself. I?ve let
myself down, I let a lot of people down.
And for that I am truly sorry. I?d like to
apologise to everybody involved in the
crash and I?m just thankful no one was
seriously hurt.?
ITV announced that the host of Saturday Night Takeaway would step back
from his work commitments.
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6
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The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
National
Windrush apology
Rudd?s U-turn
At last, an end
to the staggering
heartlessness
Amelia Gentleman
F
or years, the government
approach to Windrush
children with
immigration problems
has been both absurd
and cruel. Over the
past five months, as this scandal
gradually unfolded, the Guardian
has documented numerous cases
of retirement-age UK residents who
described how the Home Office?s
refusal to believe that they are in the
UK legally has ruined their lives.
Many have cried as they explained
how upsetting it is to be classed as an
illegal immigrant after more than 50
years in the UK, studying, working,
bringing up children in a country
they believed to be their own.
The extent of official Home Office
heartlessness has been staggering,
so victims may find it encouraging to hear ministers are promising
now to deal with cases ?sensitively?.
How sensitively remains to be seen.
Less than a month ago, Theresa May
chose to take a very harsh position.
She was called on at prime minister?s questions to look into the
case of Albert Thompson (who does
not use his real name after legal
advice) who is still being refused free
NHS treatment by the Royal Marsden Hospital, five months after his
radiotherapy was due to start. She
refused to intervene, stating that
Thompson needed to ?evidence his
settled status in the UK?.
Yesterday?s move is an extraordinary government U-turn. It is
remarkable that officials have
decided they want to be sensitive
today, when for months they have
been holding an obstinately firm
line. Repeatedly, when the Guardian has contacted the Home Office to
highlight cases of people who have
lost their jobs, their homes, or been
unable to get passports to travel to
visit dying parents, officials have
indicated that the fault lies with the
individual, for failing to provide
enough evidence.
It?s hard to pick out the harshest example, but the case of Paulette
Wilson sticks out. For 18 months,
Natalie Barnes accompanied her
mother, Paulette, when she went to
sign in monthly at the Home Office
reporting centre in Wolverhampton,
as demanded by the immigration
officials, who had noticed that Wilson had no papers proving she was
here legally.
Barnes tried repeatedly ? occasionally angrily ? to explain to staff
that her mother, 61, a former cook
who had lived in the UK for more
than 50 years, and had worked in the
House of Commons serving food to
MPs, was not an illegal immigrant.
Eventually, Home Office workers
at the reporting centre got so fed up
with her that she was banned from
the building, and her mother had to
go in alone. In October, without her
daughter to argue for her, Wilson
was detained and sent to Yarl?s Wood
immigration removal centre, ahead
of deportation to Jamaica, a country she had not visited since 1968.
Barnes can?t remember how many
times she explained to staff they had
got it wrong, but the culture of disbelief that runs through the Home
Office meant she was not listened to.
The government is under pressure now, more than ever before, to
abandon this ?hostile immigration
environment? which May introduced as home secretary.
The Home Office readily admits
that these newly-tightened immigration rules are what is behind the
Windrush problem, acknowledging
in a new briefing paper that: ?Recent
changes to the law mean that if you
wish to work, rent property or have
access to benefits and services in the
UK then you will need documents to
demonstrate your right to be in the
UK.? The guidance note adds: ?We
recognise that this is causing problems for some individuals who have
lost documents over the long period
of time they have been in the UK.?
The government position appears
to have softened significantly now,
with home secretary Amber Rudd?s
admission that things have gone
wrong in her department. On Friday,
the Home Office was still recommending that people in this situation
should get legal advice ? though
legal costs are often unaffordable to
people whose immigration problems
mean they can neither work nor
claim benefits. The new announcement waives application fees and
the new team of 20 dedicated Home
Office staff members should remove
the need for expensive lawyers.
Barnes said she and her mother,
Paulette Wilson, were overwhelmed.
?We had no support. We never met
a case worker, we just kept being
told by a man behind the glass in the
reporting office: you need to bring
more evidence. This has been very
traumatic for my mum; she tries not
to show, but I can see it in her eyes.
It?s been really hard for her but I feel
very happy for everyone else in this
situation. Knowing they have people
trying to help them sort it out will
make a huge difference.?
Timeline
How the
story of
injustice
unfolded in
the Guardian
Anthony Bryan, left,
becomes the second of the Windrush
generation facing deportation under Theresa May?s
?hostile environment? policy
to tell his story to the Guardian. Bryan?s deportation to
Jamaica was only cancelled at
the last moment after a legal
intervention. ?They don?t tell
you why they are holding you
and they don?t tell you why
they let you out. You feel so
depressed,? he said.
Paulette Wilson, right,
who has lived in the
UK for more than half a
century, speaks to the Guardian about her treatment at
the hands of the Home O?ce.
The government had threatened to send her to Jamaica ? a
country she has not seen since
she left it at the age of 10.
The government
relents in Wilson?s
case, ?nally giving her
o?cial leave to remain in the
UK. During her more than 50
years in the UK, Wilson had
served food to MPs as a cook
in the House of Commons and
raised a family. But the Home
O?ce did not initially believe
she was in the country legally.
28-11
2017
01-12
2017
11-01
2018
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?
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
7
?I?m a proud man; I?m
embarrassed at my age
to be living like this,?
Renford McIntyre, right, tells
the Guardian as the former
NHS driver, who arrived in the
UK in 1968, details how he has
been left homeless, living in
an industrial unit after being
told he was eligible neither to
work, nor for any government
support. The same day, Hubert
Howard, far right, who came
here with his mother from
Jamaica as a three-year-old,
tells how he lost his job when
he was told he was he was an
illegal immigrant.
21-02
2018
The issue begins to
snowball, as senior
Caribbean diplomats
urge the Home O?ce to adopt
a ?more compassionate?
approach towards retirementage Commonwealth citizens.
?In this system one is guilty
before proven innocent, rather
than the other way around,?
the Jamaican high commissioner to London, Seth George
Ramocan, says.
22-02
2018
May refuses to intervene in Thompson?s
case, having promised
to do so when confronted by
the Labour leader, Jeremy
Corbyn, at prime minister?s
questions. She says the decision lies with the hospital
under her government?s new
rules, which place a responsibility on clinicians to decide
whether or not a case is urgent
and demand documents
before giving treatment where
they are thought not to be.
22-03
2018
International anger
at Britain?s treatment
of the Windrush generation grows as Caribbean
diplomats condemn the
Home O?ce. ?I am dismayed
that people who gave their all
to Britain could be seemingly
discarded so matter-of-factly,?
says Guy Hewitt, the high
commissioner for Barbados to
the UK.
12-04
2018
Voices of opposition
are also raised domestically, as four Church
of England bishops join a call
for an immigration amnesty
for those people who moved
to the UK from the Caribbean
decades ago. They start a petition that is backed by more
than 140,000 signatories by
yesterday.
13-04
2018
FABIO DE PAOLA/THE GUARDIAN
Three more cases: those
of Sarah O?Connor and
Elwaldo Romeo, below,
and Michael Braithwaite, right,
who have lived in the UK for
50 years. O?Connor was challenged to prove she was here
legally by the bene?ts agency,
and Romeo received a letter
from the Home O?ce saying
he was ?liable to be detained?.
Braithwaite, a special needs
teaching assistant, lost his job
after his employers ruled he
was an illegal immigrant.
26-03
2018
There is widespread
outrage as it emerges
a man who has lived
in London for 44 years is told
to produce a British passport or face a bill of �,000
for cancer treatment ? forcing
him to go without. O?cial suspicion about his immigration
status also led to, left, Albert
Thompson ? not his real name
? being evicted and spending
three weeks homeless.
10-03
2018
The Labour MP David
Lammy tells the Commons: ?Let us call it as it
is. If you lay down with dogs,
you get ?eas, and that is what
has happened with this farright rhetoric in this country.?
The home secretary, Amber
Rudd, announces the creation
of a team dedicated to
ensuring no more Windrushera citizens be classi?ed
as illegal immigrants and
acknowledges Home O?ce
failings. This comes 24 hours
after Downing Street refuses
a diplomatic request to discuss the issue at this week?s
Commonwealth heads of government meeting. More than
140 MPs from all parties sign
a letter to the prime minister,
demanding she ?nd a ?swift
resolution of this crisis?. The
same day, it emerges a man
who moved from Jamaica in
1955 has spent seven years
?ghting the Home O?ce over
his status. Richard Stewart
cannot a?ord the �400 fee to
naturalise in the UK.
16-04
2018
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?
8
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The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
National
Poor pre-conception diet
may harm health of child
Sarah Boseley
Couples who are obese, as well as those
who smoke and drink alcohol, could be
risking the health of their future children, say experts who are calling for far
more awareness of the effects of modern lifestyles on babies in the womb.
A series of three scientific papers
in a leading medical journal spell out
the consequences of poor diet and
lifestyles for the next generation.
They urge schools, GPs and nurses
to talk to young people and those who
may be planning a family about how
to be fitter and healthier before they
embark on pregnancy.
The ?pre-conception? period can
have a profound impact on the growth,
development and long-term health of
children, they say. Some of the interventions that exist to help pregnant
women be healthier are taken up too
late. Folic acid helps prevent neural
defects, but most women do not start
to take it until they have seen a GP to
confirm their pregnancy, which can be
after a month or two. The crucial time
is in the early days and weeks.
The lead author, Prof Judith Stephenson of University College London,
said: ?The key message is to act earlier,
before conception. The idea that
there are things you can do before the
pregnancy that will affect the health of
the baby is not always grasped.?
She said the scientists did not
want to distress parents who might
have been overweight when they had
children. ?All the evidence points to
early events being very influential
in later life, but you are not doomed
at that stage,? she said. ?Things
you do throughout childhood and
adolescence also have a powerful
influence on future health.?
The global series of three papers in
the Lancet also highlights the risks of
undernourished girls in the developing world having stunted babies with
poor cognitive development. The
issues are not just with the mother?s weight. Obesity in the father has
been linked to impaired fertility and an
increased risk of disease in the child.
There is a window of opportunity to
get the healthy message across when
couples are thinking of having a child,
said Stephenson. ?Couples are very
motivated around this time,? she said.
PHOTOGRAPH:
RZSS/SI翹 ADDISON/
COVER IMAGES
It?s a boy The ?rst polar bear to have been born in Britain for
25 years is a boy, the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland has
said. Sta? at the charity?s Highland Wildlife Park in Kincraig
discovered the sex of the four-month-old cub during his ?rst
routine health check yesterday. Employees said they were
preparing a list of names for the public to choose from.
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?
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
National
9
? The McKays from Perth ? (clockwise
from left) Steven, Esther, Rebecca,
Chloe, Lois and Abigail ? have
featured in a photography exhibition
on redheads in Scotland. The 100 new
genes discovered are most accurate
when predicting red or black hair
PHOTOGRAPH: KIERAN DODDS/PANOS
Scientists
tie strands
together to
see key to
hair colour
Understa?ng
and delays
blamed for
rising attacks
on NHS sta?
Denis Campbell
Ian Sample
Science editor
Forensic scientists are a step closer
to predicting the colour of someone?s
hair from their DNA alone after finding 100 new genes that influence hue.
A test based on the new genetic
markers was found to be 10-20% more
accurate than existing forensic tests
and was most reliable for red or black
hair, with brown or blond hair proving harder to predict, researchers said.
?If someone leaves blood at a crime
scene, you could say from their DNA
whether they had black or red hair
with about 90% certainty,? said Tim
Spector, a lead author on the work at
King?s College London.
Hair colour is one of the most heritable features, with studies on twins
suggesting that genetics explains up to
97% of hair colour. Until now scientists
have known of only 13 genes that affect
where an individual?s hair will lie on
the scale from light to dark.
After studying the DNA of nearly
300,000 people, researchers from
King?s and Erasmus University medical centre in Rotterdam uncovered
124 genes that contributed to hair
colour, either by directly affecting the
natural pigment melanin or through
other biological mechanisms, many
of which are still unclear.
The fresh haul of hair colour genes
explain 35% of red hair, 25% of blond
hair and 26% of black hair, according
to the study, reported in the journal
Nature Genetics. It is likely that hundreds of other genes also affect hair
colour in ways too subtle to detect.
One factor that complicates a forensic test is the common tendency for
children who are born blond to have
their hair turn brown a few years later.
While that change itself could well
be driven by genes, the researchers
found none that seemed to explain the
effect. ?We know that some blond kids
become brown but we have no idea
why that is,? said Manfred Kayser, a
senior author on the paper at Erasmus.
Perhaps more intriguing was the
124
Number of genes that affect hair
colour uncovered by the team. Until
now, just 13 genes were known about
97%
Genetics explains up to 97% of hair
colour, which is one of the most
heritable of all human features
Failure of plan for probation service
means bleak future for ex-o?enders
Jamie Grierson
Ex-offenders trying to turn their lives
around face a bleak future, a probation
inspector has warned, as ambitious
government plans to boost the role of
charities and volunteers in the probation service have failed to materialise.
Dame Glenys Stacey, chief inspector of probation, described the low
involvement of non-profits, charities
and voluntary groups in the rehabilitation and supervision of ex-offenders
as ?an exasperating situation?.
The sector in England and Wales
was overhauled in 2014 by the then
justice secretary, Chris Grayling, who
broke up existing probation trusts and
discovery of marked differences in
hair colour among men and women.
The scientists, who drew on data
gathered by the UK Biobank and the
US genetics company 23andMe, found
that women were 25% more likely to
report having blond hair than men,
and three times less likely to report
dark hair. While it cannot be ruled out
that some participants were mistaken
about their own hair colour, the numbers echo findings from other studies
that used optical instruments to measure colour. In the past the differences
have been attributed to sexual
preferences, with women supposedly preferring darker men and men
preferring blondes. ?If this was going
on, it?s hard to prove,? said Kayser.
Beyond its hair colour insights, the
research tells us more about genes
linked to diseases such as skin cancer.
?Pigments are far more than just
cosmetic ? they are important for the
immune system and play a role in
many diseases,? said Spector.
?Understanding the genetics could
lead to new therapies.?
replaced them with a public sector service dealing with high-risk offenders,
and 21 privately run companies managing low- to medium-risk offenders.
In a report on ?probation supply
chains?, or the outsourcing of services, the Inspectorate of Probation
said Ministry of Justice press releases
around 2013 to 2014 ?gave the impression? that there would be a wide array
of organisations involved in the delivery of services. But the inspectorate
found that ?almost four years on, this
expectation has not been realised?.
Grayling?s hopes that third-sector
organisations would wholly run some
of the community rehabilitation
companies (CRCs) were disappointed
when the charities and voluntary
groups were unable to bid because of
the financial guarantees demanded by
the government. However, it was still
expected that third-sector organisations would provide specialist services
? such as bespoke services for women,
drug and alcohol abuse or gang membership ? through sub-contracts.
But most CRCs have not subcontacted services to the third sector
owing to their own ?financial instability?, and many of the contracts in place
before the reforms were not renewed.
Growing numbers of NHS personnel are suffering violent attacks at
work, with understaffing and delays
in patients accessing services being
blamed for the rise.
Figures supplied by hospital trusts
in England show 56,435 physical
assaults on staff recorded in 2016-17,
up 9.7% on the 51,447 the year before.
The data, from 181 of the NHS?s 244
hospital trusts, was obtained by the
Health Service Journal on behalf of the
health union Unison.
Nurses, paramedics and mental
health staff are among those most
likely to be assaulted.
Acute hospital trusts have seen the
biggest increase. There were 18,720
assaults on their staff during 2016-17,
21% up from the previous year. Unison said the jump was staggering and
is linked to NHS pressures and growing
waits for urgent and emergency care.
The figures appear to show that
trusts with the worst performance
against key NHS-wide treatment
targets are more likely to see their personnel being attacked.
Hospitals should treat and then
admit, transfer or discharge 95% of
A&E patients within four hours, provide non-urgent care to 92% of patients
within 18 weeks and meet strict financial targets. But short staffing, tight
budgets and rising demand mean that
many cannot meet all these targets.
At trusts that treated 90% or
fewer of patients waiting for planned
care under the referral to treatment
18-week care pathway, assaults on staff
went up by an average of 36.2% from
5,125 in 2015-16 to 6,982 in 2016-17, far
more than the general 9.7% increase.
Likewise, hospitals with large deficits have also seen notable increases.
At those that were more than �m
in the red, assaults rose from 4,152 in
2015-16 to 5,113 in 2016-17 ? a 23.1%
increase. In contrast, trusts that were
in the black saw only a 1.5% rise.
Unison says that if the figures were
extrapolated to include the 63 trusts
that did not respond, the true total of
assaults every year would be about
75,000, or 200 a day.
?Across the entire NHS, staff shortages are harming patient care and
helping to create a hostile environment
where health workers are increasingly
at risk of being assaulted?, said Sara
Gorton, Unison?s head of health.
?It?s no accident that trusts where
the pressures seem the most extreme
? where there are huge financial deficits or where it?s a struggle to meet
growing demands on services ? have
seen the steepest rise in the number
of attacks.?
Staff in mental health services are
seven and a half times more likely to be
assaulted. There were 33,820 assaults
in 2016-17 in the mental health trusts
that responded ? a 5% annual rise.
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10
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
National
Syria conflict
Britain and US claim Russia
targeting governments with
?malicious? cyber-o?ensive
Ewen MacAskill
Defence correspondent
The cyberwar between the west and
Russia has escalated after Britain
and the United States issued a joint
alert accusing Moscow of mounting
a ?malicious? internet offensive that
appeared to be aimed at espionage,
stealing intellectual property and laying the foundation for an attack on
infrastructure.
Senior security officials in the US
and UK held a rare joint conference
call to directly blame the Kremlin for
targeting government institutions,
private sector organisations and
infrastructure, and internet providers supporting these sectors.
Rob Joyce, the White House cybersecurity coordinator, set out a range
of actions the US could take, such as
fresh sanctions and indictments as
cYanmaGentaYellowb
well as retaliating with its own cyberoffensive capabilities. He added: ?We
are pushing back and we are pushing
back hard.?
Joyce stressed the offensive could
not be linked to Friday?s raid on Syria.
It was not retaliation for the US, UK and
French attack as the US and UK had
been investigating the cyber-offensive
for months. Nor, he said, should the
decision to make news of the cyberattack public be seen as a response to
events in Syria.
Joyce was joined in the call by representatives from the FBI, the US
Department of Homeland Security
and the UK?s National Cyber Security
Centre (NCSC), which is part of the surveillance agency GCHQ.
The US and UK, in a joint statement,
said the cyber-attack was aimed not
just at the UK and US but globally.
?Specifically, these cyber exploits were
directed at network infrastructure
devices worldwide such as routers,
switches, firewalls, network intrusion detection systems.?
It added: ?Russian state-sponsored
actors are using compromised routers
to conduct spoofing ?man-in-the-middle? attacks to support espionage,
extract intellectual property, maintain
persistent access to victim networks
?Russian statesponsored actors are
using compromised
routers to conduct
spoo?ng attacks to
support espionage?
Joint statement
United States and Britain
and potentially lay a foundation for
future offensive operations.
?The current state of US and UK
network devices, coupled with a
Russian government campaign to
exploit these devices, threatens our
respective safety, security, and economic wellbeing.?
The US and UK have previously
blamed Russia for cyber-attacks such
as the crippling NotPetya ransomware
attack in June 2017, which created disruption worldwide, hitting 2,000 users
include multinationals and a health
provider in Pittsburgh, and for a cyberintrusion into the US energy grid.
But they portrayed this as far more
serious because of the potential to
undermine infrastructure. Millions of
machines had been targeted in a ?sustained? campaign and the US and UK
admitted they still did not know the
full extent to which the system had
been compromised.
Previously the two nations have
spoken only of attacks ?originating
from Russia?, with lines between
Russian criminals and state activity
being blurred, but on this occasion
they pinned blame on the Kremlin.
The US and UK said they had ?high
confidence? that the Kremlin was
behind the attack. It is the first time
they have issued joint advice to all
sectors that might have been compromised, offering steps to identify
and neutralise potential problems
relating to the attacks.
? Protesters demonstrate against
bombing Syria outside the Houses of
Parliament in London yesterday
PHOTOGRAPH: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Ciaran Martin, chief executive of
the NCSC, which works closely with
GCHQ, said: ?This is a very significant
moment as we hold Russia to account.?
Howard Marshall, deputy assistant
director of the FBI?s cyber division,
who was also on the conference call,
said: ?We will bring every tool to
bear against them in every corner of
cyberspace.?
The decision of the American and
British governments to go public
reflects a loss of patience with Moscow after a series of cyber-attacks
and hacks allegedly originating from
within Russia.
It could also be born out of frustration over Russia?s supposed
interference in democratic elections in
the US and Europe, its support for Syria?s Bashar al-Assad and incidents such
as the use of a nerve agent in Salisbury.
Both the US and UK, like Russia,
have cyber-offensive capabilities.
The head of GCHQ, Jeremy Fleming,
in his first public speech last week,
described how such a capability was
used to degrade Islamic State?s ability to disseminate propaganda from
its Syrian headquarters in Raqqa.
It was the first time that the UK has
admitted to having used its capability for cyber-attack.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:11 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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?
11
Commons debate
MPs show broad support for
strikes despite lack of scrutiny
Peter Walker
Jessica Elgot
The Commons response to Theresa
May?s statement on military strikes in
Syria exposed a paradox: while many
believed she should have first sought
parliament?s approval, it seemed clear
this would have been granted anyway.
The Labour MP Jess Phillips
summed up this view, saying: ?I regret
that there wasn?t a parliamentary vote
on this issue. But I wish to tell the
prime minister and the house that she
would have had my vote had I been
asked to give it.?
Some other Labour MPs stood up to
contradict Jeremy Corbyn?s view that
the UK?s involvement in Saturday?s
military action was legally questionable and should not have happened,
while also regretting May?s decision
to not recall parliament.
A number of Conservative MPs supported May?s decision to join the US
and France in the strikes, with several
of them criticising Corbyn?s position.
But May came under repeated
pressure over the lack of advance
parliamentary scrutiny of the decision.
Yvette Cooper, a senior backbench
Labour MP, said May and her ministers
?appear today to not just be arguing
about the circumstances of last week
but rejecting the entire principle of
consulting and debating and voting in
parliament ahead of military action?.
Another Labour MP, Hilary Benn,
asked for an assurance from May that if
there was a further chemical weapons
Continued from page 1
May defends joining
Syria strikes before
Commons debate
limited, targeted strike on a legal basis
that has been used before. And it was a
decision that required the evaluation
of intelligence and information, much
of which was of a nature that could not
be shared with parliament.?
However, Jeremy Corbyn said
the strikes were ?legally questionable? and that parliament should have
been given the chance to approve the
action, which he suggested was at ?the
whims? of the US president, Donald
Trump.
He also called for a renewed diplomatic effort by the UK government and
its allies to bring peace to the region,
The Labour leader has been granted
a debate today that will allow MPs to
consider the rights of Parliament to
debate and approve military action by
British forces overseas.
The prime minister attacked Corbyn?s suggestion that diplomatic
efforts had not been exhausted. ?The
leader of the opposition has said that
he can ?only countenance involvement in Syria if there is UN authority
behind it?. The house should be clear
that would mean a Russian veto on our
attack in Syria, ?she will come to parliament first, she will share such
evidence as she can with us as she
has today, and that she will trust parliament to decide what is to be done?.
The prime minister also came under
pressure over the limited numbers of
Syrian refugees brought to the UK.
The Liberal Democrats? deputy leader, Jo Swinson, highlighted
what she called ?the jarring contrast
between the humanitarian arguments
[May] makes for this military action
and her government?s inhumane
and inadequate approach to Syrian
refugees, which has left vulnerable
children stranded and alone?.
Labour?s Stella Creasy called on
May to rethink her approach to Syrian
refugees who had fled to Europe.
?They are the same people fleeing
this horror, they are the people who
needed this safe haven.?
Caroline Lucas, the Green party?s co-leader, said international
inspectors should have been asked
to examine the suspected chemical
weapons sites attacked on Saturday.
A series of MPs took aim at Corbyn?s
insistence that even military action
to avert humanitarian catastrophes
should only happen with the approval
of the UN security council.
Conservative MP Dominic Grieve
said such a position would mean ?any
tyrant, megalomaniac, person intent
on carrying out genocide, if they have
the support of an amoral state within
the security council, they will be able
to conduct that genocide with total
impunity?.
Among the Labour MPs who very
publicly disagreed with their leader?s stance was Chris Leslie, who
said the military strike was ?absolutely the right thing to do?, adding:
?Those who would turn a blind eye,
who would do nothing, in pursuit of
some moral high ground, should also
be held accountable.?
? Theresa May faced questions over her ?inhumane? approach to Syrian
refugees despite her humanitarian case for military action PHOTOGRAPH: AFP/GETTY
foreign policy.? May, who spent more
than three hours at the despatch box,
also denied that Britain had joined
the US-led airstrikes at the request
of Trump, saying it was ?legally and
moral right? thing to do in response to
the attack that killed up to 75 people.
She told the Commons: ?We have
acted because it is in our national interest to do so. It is in our national interest
to prevent the further use of chemical
weapons in Syria ? and to uphold and
defend the global consensus that these
weapons should not be used.?
The prime minister pledged there
would be a further diplomatic push
to bring the Assad regime back to the
negotiating table as well as a ?full
range? of political and economic
levers, to strengthen the ban on the
use of chemical weapons.
May denied Corbyn?s claims in a
Guardian article that the attacks had
just demolished empty buildings. She
said the targets included a scientific
? Jeremy Corbyn said the airstrikes
on Syria were ?legally questionable?
research centre developing chemical
weapons, a chemical weapons bunker
and command post and a missile base,
assessed to be a location of sarin gas.
?Very careful scientific analysis
was used to determine where best
to target these missiles to maximise
the destruction of stockpiled chemicals and to minimise any risk to the
surrounding area,? she said.
The statement marked a new low
in diplomatic relations with Russia,
already poor in the wake of the Salisbury attack, with the Kremlin reacting
furiously to claims that it was hindering the Douma investigation.
It comes after Ken Ward, the US
ambassador to the Organisation for
the Prevention of Chemical Weapons,
expressed concerns that the Russians
had tampered with the attack site
with the aim of thwarting the weapons inspectors? fact-finding mission.
May told MPs: ?The regime has
reportedly been attempting to conceal
the evidence by searching evacuees
from Douma to ensure they are not
taking out of the region samples that
could be tested elsewhere.?
She cited intelligence that showed a
?wider operation? to conceal the facts
of the attack was underway, supported
by the Russians.
Moscow strongly denied interfering
with the work of inspectors, suggesting the international missile strikes in
response had made it difficult for the
OPCW to travel to the scene.
Sketch
John Crace
It was a teeny-weeny
attack, so why bother
MPs? little heads with
something so trivial?
I
t was meant to be her best ?war? voice, but
Theresa May sounded more like a nervous, new
curate leading prayers for the first time as she
spoke in the Commons on the Syrian airstrikes.
Piety can be a hard-won virtue and sometimes a
PM has to fake it to make it. Especially when she?s
not entirely certain she?s done the right thing.
May began more in sorrow than anger. She hadn?t
wanted to get involved but the Syrian regime?s use of
chemical weapons had left her no option. So far, so
good. It was when she got on to the reasons why she
hadn?t recalled parliament to sanction her military
intervention that she struggled to maintain good faith.
Think of it this way, she said. It was only a teenyweeny airstrike ? carefully calibrated as a token gesture
to make everyone feel as if Britain was doing the right
thing, while guaranteeing that the Russians did nothing
beastly to us in return. So under the circumstances, she
had decided not to disturb MPs while they were on their
hols. She knew how exhausted they all were and didn?t
want to bother their pretty little heads about something
so trivial. And besides, there was always a chance they
might make her look stupid by voting against her.
Jeremy Corbyn started by pointing out you can get
lawyers to say almost anything ? he had found one who
agreed that the airstrikes were legally questionable ?
and wondered why May was limiting her humanitarian
efforts to Syria when there were so many other
flashpoints deserving attention. The Labour leader was
heckled by the Tories throughout, while the opposition
benches sat glumly in silence. The problem wasn?t so
much what he was saying as what
he wasn?t. Most Labour MPs believe
?Corbyn pointed out
there is nothing that could persuade
their leader to take military action
you can get lawyers
any kind. Especially when the
to say almost anything. of
Russians are involved.
The Tories queued up to praise
He had found one who
May. Ken Clarke declared she had
agreed airstrikes were
behaved like a ?real prime minister?
by taking decisive action without
legally questionable?
consulting MPs only to then say it
would have been better if she had
first consulted parliament. No one
picked him up on this bizarre contradiction, but it wasn?t
that kind of day. Rather it was a day for being tough,
sounding tough and hanging tough. Anyone who dared
suggest the PM had put a foot wrong was a traitor. Tories
Andrew Percy and Steve Double sobbed their gratitude
to Theresa for saving them the hassle of making
decisions they were too stupid to make for themselves.
Labour were more divided. Hilary Benn and Yvette
Cooper made it clear that while they backed the actions
in principle, May would have been better advised to
have consulted parliament. Others were less guarded.
Chris Leslie attacked Corbyn by saying inaction had
its own consequences and those who advocated doing
nothing should be held to account. Ben Bradshaw went
further, demanding May do some more bombing if the
Syrians relapsed. Bomb. Bomb, bombety, bomb.
Amid all this self-righteousness and selfcongratulation, the fate of the Syrian people got
overlooked. Only Stella Creasy spoke about taking more
refugees, an idea instantly dismissed by the PM on the
grounds that the Syrians would hate our weather and
were much happier where they were. No one really
demurred. But then the three-hour statement had
never really been about Syria. It had been about making
parliament feel better about itself. Big. Important.
Caring. And in that it had been time well spent.
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Sent at 16/4/2018 20:40
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?
National
Syria conflict
13
? A young boy in Douma, where
chemical weapons inspectors have
been denied access to certain sites
PHOTOGRAPH: OMAR SANADIKI/REUTERS
?It is our concern that
[the Russians] may
have tampered with
the site [of the Douma
chemical attack]?
Kenneth Ward
US ambassador to OPCW
Russia and Syria accused of
blocking weapons inspectors
offering 22 people to interview as witnesses instead, he said, adding that he
hoped ?all necessary arrangements
will be made ? to allow the team to
deploy to Douma as soon as possible?.
Speaking in parliament yesterday,
Theresa May accused Syria and Russia
of attempting to cover up the attack.
The prime minister said: ?The Syrian
regime has reportedly been attempting
to conceal the evidence by searching
evacuees from Douma to ensure samples are not being smuggled from this
area, and a wider operation to conceal
the facts of the attack is under way,
supported by the Russians.?
The British delegation to the OPCW
tweeted: ?Russia & Syria have not yet
allowed access to Douma. Unfettered
access essential. Russia & Syria must
cooperate.?
The Russian deputy envoy to the
United Nations, Dmitry Polyanskiy,
said the obstacles were due to western
bombing. ?If you go to a site which was
just bombed I imagine you might have
certain logistic problems,? he said.
Earlier, Russia?s deputy foreign
minister, Sergei Ryabkov, said the
inspectors could not access the site
because they did not have the appropriate UN permission. In response, the
Macron rows back on comments
about US military withdrawal
[Isis] and will finish the day that the
war against [Isis] has been completed.
I suggested no change last night.?
However, Macron said that by joining forces with France and the UK
for Saturday?s strikes, the US ?fully
realised that our responsibility goes
beyond the war against Isis and that
there is also a humanitarian responsibility and a responsibility to build
peace over the long term?.
France and other European nations
had been alarmed by Trump?s comments about ending America?s
presence in Syria, which contradicted
US military leaders. Despite a string
of military victories that have driven
the group back, Isis militants are still
in control of pockets of land in Syria.
Th e weekend strikes on Syria
marked a new phase in Macron?s presidency. It was the first time France?s
youngest modern president, who has
Patrick Wintour
Diplomatic editor
Russia and the Syrian regime have
been accused by western diplomats of
denying chemical weapons inspectors
access to sites in the town of Douma.
Russia and Syria had cited ?pending security issues? before inspectors
could visit the town, which is northeast of Damascus, Ahmet 躾黰c�,
director general of the Organisation for
the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons,
told a meeting of the OPCW?s executive council. Syrian authorities were
Angelique Chrisafis Paris
Jon Henley
Emmanuel Macron has clarified a
suggestion that he was responsible
for shifting the US position on Syria,
after the White House rebutted an earlier comment by the French president
that he had convinced Donald Trump
to maintain a military presence there.
After Macron said in a live TV interview on Sunday night that he had
changed the US president?s mind on
rapidly withdrawing US troops, the
White House issued a statement saying
the US view had not changed and
Trump still wanted US forces to leave
?as quickly as possible? and ?completely crush Isis?.
Macron said yesterday he had
?never said? that either the US or
France would stay engaged militarily
over the long term. He said the French
and US positions were in line and had
the same long-term target of building
a stable and peaceful Syria.
?We have one military objective and
only one: the war against Isis,? he told
a press conference.
?The White House is right to recall
that the military engagement is against
UN said it had provided the ?necessary
clearances? for a fact-finding mission.
Russian military officials were at the
site of the Douma attack days before
the OPCW reached Damascus. ?It is our
concern they may have tampered with
it,? Kenneth Ward, the US ambassador
to the OPCW, told the council meeting.
In an interview with the BBC, the
Russian foreign minister, Sergei Lavrov, said he could ?guarantee that
Russia has not tampered with the site?
and reiterated the Russian line that any
attack on Douma was ?staged?.
At the weekend the OPCW sent
inspectors to Douma to search for evidence and interview witnesses. Their
arrival coincided with a Syrian military
announcement that it had ?purified?
the region of eastern Ghouta, of which
Douma is a part, after a two-month
campaign that has killed nearly 2,000
civilians, following years of siege.
Western countries are pushing at
the OPCW in The Hague and the UN in
the New York to secure wider support
for a clampdown on the use of chemical weapons in Syria. The suspicion is
that the Syrian government previously
misled inspectors when it declared its
entire chemical weapons stockpile had
been disclosed and destroyed.
The UN security council?s 15 members were due to meet last night to
discuss a call for action to eliminate
any covert Syrian stockpiles.
The White House said there had
been no decision on imposing sanctions on Russian entities suspected
to have given support to the Syrian
chemical weapons programme, contradicting remarks on Sunday by the
US envoy to the UN, Nikki Haley.
Haley had said in a television interview that sanctions would be ?coming
down? the following day. But the White
House spokeswoman, Sarah Sanders,
said: ?We are considering additional
sanctions on Russia and a decision will
be made in the near future.?
European Union foreign ministers
meeting in Luxembourg threatened
new sanctions against Syria, but there
was little support among member
states for fresh US measures against
Russia. A joint statement from the 28
also fell short of wholehearted support for the US-led strikes.
Syria joined the OPCW in 2013 after
a sarin gas attack that killed hundreds
of people in Ghouta. The move was
part of a joint Russian-US deal that
averted military action threatened by
the then US president, Barack Obama.
The OPCW?s powers are limited. It
needs a two-thirds majority to take
decisions, and a Russian veto at the
UN last November means it can only
state if chemical weapons have been
used, not attribute responsibility.
Peter Wilson, the UK?s envoy to the
OPCW, told the meeting: ?Failure to act
to hold perpetrators to account will
only risk further barbaric use of chemical weapons, in Syria and beyond.?
? Emmanuel Macron, who is pushing
French diplomacy, with New Zealand
PM Jacinda Ardern and Canadian
PM Justin Trudeau yesterday
been in power for a year, has used his
constitutional role as commander-inchief to order a military strike.
For the centrist president, foreign
policy means pushing France to the
forefront of a complex and fracturing world stage, attempting to talk
to everyone. Under Macron, French
diplomacy is seen as seeking to fill the
gaps left by a more distant Trump and
a British prime minister preoccupied
with Brexit.
Macron was the only leader of the
trio to hold what a French official
called a frank phone conversation
with the Russian president, Vladimir
Putin, before the strikes, and a firm
conversation with the Turkish leader,
Recep Tayyip Erdo?an, afterwards.
The former French foreign minister
Hubert V閐rine argued that the strikes
had strengthened French diplomacy,
showing that Paris was ?credible?.
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14
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The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
National
? Liverpool?s Alder Hey hospital has
boosted security amid protests over
plans to take Alfie Evans off life support
PHOTOGRAPH: CHRISTOPHER THOMOMD/GUARDIAN
Botched work fuelled
Grenfell blaze, Met told
Robert Booth
The Grenfell Tower fire was fuelled by
botched refurbishment decisions that
went well beyond the use of flammable cladding panels and insulation, a
report for the Metropolitan police has
reportedly revealed.
Gaps around windows, wrongly fitted cavity barriers meant to stop fire,
and dozens of missing or faulty door
closures helped spread the fire that
claimed 71 lives last June.
A survivors? group, Grenfell United,
said the findings were shocking and
showed ?an industry that is broken?.
The analysis, seen by the Evening
Standard, comes as the more than 530
core participants in the public inquiry
digest confidential technical reports
commissioned by its chairman, Sir
Martin Moore-Bick, parts of which, it
is understood, tell a similar story.
Those reports are expected to be
made public when experts give evidence to the inquiry in June.
Scotland Yard is also investigating
the blaze and has said it is considering
possible manslaughter and corporate
manslaughter charges.
The technical report has been
drawn up by BRE Global, the building
research company that runs fire testing in the UK. It reportedly identified
multiple ?deficiencies? in the �m
recladding of Grenfell between 2014
and 2016 carried out for the Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management
Organisation, the social housing arm
of Kensington and Chelsea council.
Cavity barriers meant to expand and
seal the gap between the concrete surface of the building and the cladding in
the event of fire were of ?insufficient
size specification?, the Evening Standard reported the experts as concluding.
They were designed to close a 25mm
gap but were installed with a 50mm
gap. Some were installed upside down
or back to front and the failures ?provided a route for fire spread?.
The report said that ?none of the
materials used would be capable of
providing 30 minutes? fire resistance?
and this allowed ?a direct route for fire
spread around the window frame into
the cavity of the facade ? and from the
facade back into flats?.
Alfie Evans? parents
lose appeal to take
him abroad for care
Josh Halliday
Frances Perraudin
The parents of a 23-month-old boy at
the centre of a life-support treatment
battle have lost their latest legal fight to
move him from Liverpool to a hospital
in Rome.
Court of appeal judges ruled yesterday that Tom Evans, 21, and Kate
James, 20, could not take their son
Alfie Evans abroad for treatment for a
rare degenerative brain disease.
The couple, from Liverpool, have
already lost cases in the high court,
court of appeal, supreme court and
European court of human rights.
Judges have heard that Alfie is in
a ?semi-vegetative state? and that
further treatment would be futile.
Lord Justice Davis, Lady Justice
King and Lord Justice Moylan yesterday upheld a ruling by the high
court judge Mr Justice Hayden, who
endorsed a plan put forward by Alder
Hey children?s hospital for withdrawing life-support treatment.
Alder Hey has brought in extra
security because of protests in support
of the toddler?s parents at the hospital.
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Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
National
Retreat of
the robots?
Humans are
underrated,
says Musk
Samuel Gibbs
Worried about a robot taking your job
soon? Don?t fret yet: the car manufacturer Tesla says automation has been
holding back its production line.
Tesla?s chief executive, Elon Musk,
said the company had struggled to
reach its targets for its Model� concluding that humans rather than
machines were the answer.
?Excessive automation at Tesla was
a mistake. To be precise, my mistake.
? Primary schools have struggled to accommodate large numbers of children
following a birthrate spike, but the bulge is gradually shifting PHOTOGRAPH: ALAMY
More pupils get place
at ?rst-choice school
Sally Weale
Education correspondent
Thousands of parents in England
learned yesterday that they have been
denied a place for their child at their
first choice of primary school.
Evidence suggests, however, that
pressure on reception classes is easing in some areas including London,
where demand was down 2.3%.
More than half a million families
were told which primary their fouryear-old will be going to in September.
Early analysis of local authority data
suggested that in many areas higher
proportions of children gained places
at their first choice of school.
In most areas about 90% of parents
got their wish, but thousands missed
out. Some failed to secure a place at
any of their preferred primaries.
Many parents will now be considering an appeal; others will be wondering
how to negotiate new challenges.
One father tweeted: ?So our littlest
has been given a place ? it would have
been a lot easier had it been the same
primary school as her sister. Looking
forward to working out how to be in
two different places at the same time.?
In London, 86.5% of families got
their first choice, up 0.6% on 2017, but
2,314 children did not get into any of
their chosen schools.
Primary schools in recent years
have struggled to accommodate growing numbers of children following a
spike in the birthrate ? in 2001 the average woman had 1.64 children but by
2008 the figure was 1.97. The bulge is
cYanmaGentaYellowb
now gradually shifting, with applications for secondary schools up 4%.
As well as a recent birthrate drop,
some London boroughs claim demand
is down because of welfare reform
changes and high property prices,
which have forced some families to
leave the capital. In some boroughs,
however, demand remains high and
success rates for securing a place at
parents? preferred place are the lowest in the country.
The most difficult borough to get
into a first preference school is Kensington and Chelsea, where just 68%
of families secured their top choice of
reception place in September. The figure was 76.5% in Camden and 76.7% in
Hammersmith and Fulham.
Birmingham also recorded a slight
drop in applications and 5.5% more
parents getting their first choice, making up 92.9% of applications. Just over
200 children did not receive an offer
from any of their preferred schools.
In a Press Association sample survey of 40 councils, 28 (70%) reported a
rise in the proportion of families given
their first preference of school.
In some areas almost all four-yearolds got into their first preference
school: in Wiltshire it was 93.4%; in
Central Bedfordshire it was 96%; in
Cornwall it was 95.2%; and in Lincolnshire it was 95%.
Nick Gibb, schools standards minister, said: ?We?re investing �8bn to
create even more good schools and
good school places ? building on the
825,000 we?ve created since 2010
? resulting in nine out of 10 pupils
securing one of their top three choices.?
15
Humans are underrated,? Musk said.
Asked during a tour of Tesla?s factory
whether robots had slowed down production, rather than sped it up, Musk
told the US broadcaster CBS: ?Yes, they
did ? We had this crazy, complex network of conveyor belts ? And it was
not working, so we got rid of that
whole thing.?
Caught in what Musk has called
?manufacturing hell?, the electric car
firm has failed to hit its weekly production target of 2,500 Model 3 vehicles
in the first quarter of 2018, fostering
doubts within the industry that Tesla
? Tesla has missed its key production
targets for the Model 3, with Elon
Musk blaming excessive automation
will be able to hit its 5,000-a-week target within three months.
The shortfall has delayed crucial
deliveries. Musk said he had been
forced to take direct control of the production line this month, resorting to
working all night and sleeping at the
factory. ?We were able to unlock some
of the critical things that were holding us back from reaching 2,000 cars
a week. But since then, we?ve continued to do 2,000 cars a week,? he said.
Tesla has also faced negative publicity over a fatal crash of one of its cars
while in Autopilot mode.
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?
16
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
In brief
National
Politics
Courts
?Concern? over voter
targeting in Brexit poll
Woman admits killing
son who fell from flats
The parliamentary committee
investigating fake news has
published excerpts of interviews
with individuals connected
to Leave.EU and SCL, which it
says raise concerns about how
voters were targeted in the Brexit
referendum.
In one clip Nigel Oakes, the
founder of SCL, Cambridge
Analytica?s parent company,
compares Donald Trump?s political
campaigning strategy to that of
Adolf Hitler. Material from the
interviews, conducted by Emma
Briant, an academic specialising in
propaganda, have been published by
the digital, culture, media and sport
committee in connection with its
inquiry into fake news.
In another excerpt Leave.EU?s
former communications director,
Andy Wigmore, says that the group
sent Nigel Farage to locations
identified as prime campaigning
targets by insurance actuaries.
Wigmore later accused the
committee of being ?complicit in
creating a fake news agenda? to
undermine the result of the EU
referendum. He denied that Leave.
EU had used Cambridge Analytica
?in any way?. David Pegg
Stepping
out
Sarah Lamb
and Ryoichi
Hirano in
the Royal
Ballet?s Elite
Syncopations,
by Kenneth
MacMillan,
at the Royal
Opera House
PHOTOGRAPH:
TRISTRAM KENTON
FOR THE GUARDIAN
Crime
Two people stabbed to
death within an hour
Two people were stabbed to death
in London in separate domestic
incidents within the space of an
hour, bringing the number of killings
in the capital this year to almost 60.
A man in his 20s was attacked
with a knife in Colindale, north-west
London, just before 6pm on Sunday.
Ambulance and air ambulance crews
treated him at the scene and he was
taken to hospital in central London,
but died later that evening.
A woman, also in her 20s, who
knew the victim, was arrested on
suspicion of murder.
About 40 minutes later, a woman
in her 30s was stabbed to death in
Brixton, south London. She was
pronounced dead at the scene.
A man was arrested on suspicion
of murder and was in custody at a
south London police station.
The pair are thought to have
known each other, and the victim?s
next of kin have been informed.
Formal identification has yet to be
completed. Patrick Greenfield and
Matthew Weaver
A 23-year-old woman has admitted
killing her 18-month-old son, who
died after he fell from the sixth floor
of a block of flats.
Elliot Procter was found with
fatal injuries at the bottom of
the Newcastle House flats in the
Barkerend area of Bradford, West
Yorkshire, last October.
His mother, Gemma Procter, was
due to go on trial at Bradford crown
court yesterday accused of his
murder but pleaded guilty to
manslaughter by reason of
diminished responsibility when the
charge was put to her again.
Kama Melly QC, prosecuting, said
the plea was acceptable and two
psychiatrists who had assessed her
agreed on their conclusions, which
were not shared with the court.
No details of what happened at
Newcastle House on 21 October
2017 were outlined in the 10-minute
hearing. Procter stood in the dock
surrounded by staff from the secure
hospital where she is being held.
She waved to a woman in the public
gallery, who blew her a kiss.
Procter spoke only to confirm her
name and to deny murder but admit
manslaughter. She will be sentenced
in June. PA
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?
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
National
Religion
17
? One church in Stornaway has
called the mosque ?unwelcome?, but
others have been supportive
PHOTOGRAPHS: MURDO MACLEOD/GUARDIAN
? The Callanish standing stones ? one of the oldest
religious sites in the Outer Hebrides
?Millions are praying for us?
Race to finish Outer Hebrides
mosque in time for Ramadan
Harriet Sherwood
Religion correspondent
A
couple of weeks ago,
Aihtsham Rashid was
standing in front of
a derelict building in
Stornoway on the Isle
of Lewis, considering
the scale of the task of turning it
into the first mosque in the Outer
Hebrides.
?This could take years,? the Leeds
builder told crestfallen members of
the tiny local Muslim community as
they gazed at the crumbling walls,
sagging roof and broken windows.
But by last week five roofers
wearing hi-vis jackets emblazoned
with ?Stornoway Mosque Team?
were hammering nails into new
joists and beams. Plumbers,
plasterers and electricians arrive on
the island this week. A prayer carpet
is on order.
Money and support ? both moral
and practical ? have poured in since
Rashid set up a JustGiving appeal.
Donations from around the world
have pushed the total raised so
far well past the �,000 target.
Builders and tradesmen assisted by
locals ? some juggling their regular
jobs ? are working from 8am to 8pm,
seven days a week.
Now, Stornoway?s Muslims ? a
few dozen people out of about 8,000
in the town ? are hopeful that the
mosque will be ready for the start of
the Islamic holy month of Ramadan
in mid-May.
?It?s a big challenge to get it done
in time for Ramadan, but we?ll do
our best. Some things are out of our
control, but now we have millions of
people praying for us,? Rashid told
the Guardian.
Muslims have lived in Stornoway
since the 1950s, adapting to life
on an island where the Sabbath is
still observed and churches retain
considerable influence.
But they never had a formal place
of worship. Instead, prayers were
held in people?s living rooms, and
the bodies of the dead were washed
in garages. It could take several
days for an imam to come from the
mainland to say funeral prayers.
Over the years, some Muslims left
the island ? for work, to join children
and grandchildren on the mainland,
and to be part of bigger, mosquebased communities.
But since 2015, the dwindling
numbers in Stornoway have been
boosted by the arrival of several
families fleeing the civil war in Syria
and the need for a mosque has taken
on a renewed urgency.
The community bought a derelict
building and planning permission
to turn it into a mosque was granted
last summer. But little headway
was made until a friend of Rashid?s
visited the island a few weeks ago.
?I got a call from this guy, and he
said, ?You?re needed up here.? I had
to ask him where Stornoway was,
I爃ad to look on a map,? said Rashid.
?I packed my bags and got on a
plane; two planes. I took one look
[at the building] and thought ?These
guys need some help.??
Rashid runs a construction firm
specialising in new-build properties
but which also has experience of
mosque-building. As well as raising
money for the project, he has
negotiated discounts on supplies
and called in contractors. ?Most
of the people helping to build the
mosque are non-Muslim,? he said.
The response of other Stornoway
residents has been mostly
encouraging, according to members
of the Muslim community. A woman
turned up at the site this week with
a cheque for �0. ?This goes a long
way to show the love and support we
have been receiving,? the mosque
team tweeted.
No one from the local Muslim
community wanted to be quoted
directly or named in this article,
saying they wanted to get on with
the project quietly and peacefully.
Some were especially wary of the
media, which they said had tried to
stir divisions over the mosque and
had routinely misrepresented Islam.
The only strident opposition
has come from the Free Church
(Continuing), a breakaway from the
Free Church of Scotland. It described
the mosque as a ?most unwelcome
development? in a statement
that spoke of ?the oppression of
Christians and the reduced status of
? Roofing begins on the mosque, which has exceeded its crowdfunding target
?I come at this from
the point of view of
freedom of religion?
James Maciver
Free Church of Scotland minister
women under Islam? and ?militant
Islamists?. Greg MacDonald, the
moderator of presbytery of the Outer
Hebrides Free Church (Continuing),
said the church?s response to the
mosque was guided by the biblical
commandment to love God. ?We
object to the promotion of all false
religion, including the promotion
of Islam through a mosque in
Stornoway,? he told the Guardian.
In contrast, James Maciver, a
minister with the Free Church of
Scotland, the biggest congregation
on the island, said he supported
Muslims? right to worship.
?They have always been regarded
by the local community as people
who?ve contributed to the local
economy and integrated well. I don?t
remember any animosity towards
them. Outsiders may have got
the impression that the Christian
community here have resisted the
mosque, but that?s not the case.
?I come at this from the point
of view of liberty of conscience,
freedom of religion ? I have no
right to come between someone?s
conscience and their god.?
Back at the mosque building site,
work will begin on the interior once
the roof is weather-proofed. The
prayer room will have a women?s
section and a separate mortuary
will meet the needs of the dead.
There are plans to invite Stornoway
residents to the mosque for tea, to
give people an opportunity to ask
questions and get to know their
Muslim neighbours better.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:18 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:19 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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?
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
National
19
? Oliver McGowan, whose mother
said before the inquest he ?wanted
to make everybody happy. His mild
disabilities did not hold him back?
Teenager ?died
after arrogant
doctors defied
drug warning?
Steven Morris
The family of a talented teenage athlete
say he lost his life because ?arrogant?
doctors defied their wishes and gave
him antipsychotic medication.
Oliver McGowan, 18, who had epilepsy, cerebral palsy and autism, was
admitted to Southmead hospital in
Bristol on 22 October 2016 after a seizure that did not respond when his
normal medicine was administered.
His father, Tom, mother, Paula, and
Oliver himself repeatedly told paramedics and doctors he should not be
given antipsychotic medication as he
had reacted badly to it in the past, it is
claimed. His father said Oliver also told
those treating him: ?Please do not give
me antipsychotics, I don?t like them.
They mess with my brain.?
Tom McGowan told an inquest at
Avon coroner?s court that doctors prescribed olanzapine on 25 October, an
antipsychotic medication used to treat
schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.
He said they saw their ?once vibrant
and active boy? deteriorate over
the next week before being told his
prognosis was ?appalling? and if he
survived he would never walk again,
would be blind and would have no
memories or language. On 30 October
?Please don?t give me
antipsychotics. They
mess with my head?
Oliver McGowan
a scan found Oliver had neuroleptic
malignant syndrome, a reaction to
antipsychotic drugs, and he required
life-saving surgery to alleviate swelling in his brain. But he continued to
deteriorate and the family agreed to
life support being withdrawn. He died
on 11 November.
McGowan said: ?We firmly believe
that Oliver would not have died if he
had not been administered olanzapine. We are driven to conclude that the
doctors were arrogant and felt they
knew best and as a result prescribed
an antipsychotic which Oliver and ourselves had expressly forbidden.
?We had sound reasoning for
saying ?no? to the administration
of olanzapine ? Oliver?s previous
reaction to the drug. But no matter
how forcefully we relayed this to the
doctors, we were ignored ? If Oliver
had not been prescribed olanzapine
we believe he would be alive today,
enjoying college and having a productive life.?
His family described his disabilities as mild but said he had a ?steely
determination and a can-do attitude?. Speaking before the inquest,
his mother said: ?He wanted to make
everybody happy and did his best to
achieve that. Oliver?s mild disabilities
did not hold him back.? Oliver played
in football squads for youngsters with
cerebral palsy and was training with
Team Bath, aiming to compete in the
Paralympics on the track.
The family is being backed by the
charity Inquest. Its director, Deborah
Coles, said: ?We hope there is a thorough inquiry into this death and that
it uncovers any systemic lessons in the
hope of protecting lives in the future.?
Dr Luke Canham, a specialist registrar in neurology, who treated
Oliver on the night he was admitted to
Southmead hospital, said he recalled
speaking to his parents and being
handed a folder containing details of
their son?s medical history. He said: ?I
explained I would not be using antipsychotics. I made it very clear to my
colleagues ? the concerns the family
had about the use of antipsychotics.?
The inquest continues.
Defence solicitors
?may become
extinct in places?
Owen Bowcott
Legal affairs correspondent
Criminal defence solicitors may
become extinct in parts of England
and Wales within five years because
of cuts to legal fees that have rendered
the profession unprofitable, according
to the Law Society.
The strongly worded warning
comes as barristers have begun refusing to take on legal aid cases and are
planning mass walk-outs in protest at
what they say is sustained underfunding of criminal trials.
The suggestion that defendants
could soon be left unrepresented highlights the crisis of confidence in the
criminal courts, as even the lord chief
justice, Lord Burnett of Maldon, said
in a speech yesterday.
Data unveiled by the Law Society,
which represents solicitors across
England and Wales, shows those
specialising in criminal work are an
increasingly ageing cohort.
?If a suspect cannot access free
advice and representation, a fair trial
would be jeopardised, and cases would
collapse,? said its president, Joe Egan.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:20 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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?
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
National
20
World?s poorest pay
for pollution as 95%
breathe unsafe air
Study ?nds billions of people
at risk from global peril that
threatens rich countries least
Fiona Harvey
Environment correspondent
More than 95% of the world?s population breathe unsafe air and the burden
is falling hardest on the poorest communities, with the gap between the
most polluted and least polluted countries rising rapidly, a comprehensive
study of global air pollution has found.
Cities are home to an increasing
majority of the world?s people, exposing billions to unsafe air, particularly
in developing countries, but in rural
areas indoor air pollution is often
caused by burning solid fuels. One in
three people worldwide face the double whammy of unsafe air both indoors
and out. The report, by the Health
Effects Institute, used new findings
such as satellite data and better monitoring to estimate the numbers of
people exposed to air polluted above
the levels deemed safe by the World
Health Organization.
This exposure has made air pollution the fourth highest cause of death
globally, after high blood pressure, diet
and smoking, and the greatest environmental health risk.
Experts estimate that exposure
to air pollution contributed to more
than 6m deaths worldwide last year,
playing a role in increasing the risk of
stroke, heart attack, lung cancer and
chronic lung disease. China and India
accounted for more than half of the
death toll.
Burning solid fuel such as coal or
biomass in their homes for cooking or
heating exposed 2.6 billion people to
indoor air pollution in 2016, the report
found. Indoor air pollution can also
affect air quality in the surrounding
area, with this effect contributing to
one in four pollution deaths in India
and nearly one in five in China.
Bob O?Keefe, vice-president of the
institute, said the gap between the
most polluted air on the planet and
the least polluted was striking. While
developed countries have made moves
to clean up, many developing countries have fallen further behind while
seeking economic growth.
He said there was now an 11-fold
gap between the most polluted and
least polluted areas, compared with a
six-fold gap in 1990. ?Air pollution control systems still lag behind economic
development [in poorer nations],?
he said.
But he added: ?There are reasons
for optimism, though there is a long
way to go. China seems to be now moving pretty aggressively, for instance
in cutting coal and on stronger controls. India has really begun to step up
on indoor air pollution, for instance
through the provision of LPG [liquefied petroleum gas] as a cooking fuel,
and through electrification.?
The number of people exposed to
indoor air pollution from burning solid
fuels has fallen from an estimated 3.6
billion around the world in 1990 to
about 2.4 billion today, despite a rising population.
? London is no stranger to fog and
smog but China and India account for
half the deaths linked to air pollution
6m
The number of deaths worldwide
last year in which experts say
that air pollution was a factor
2.4bn
The number of people worldwide
exposed to indoor pollution from
solid fuels, against 3.6bn in 1990
Emissions from transport are a
growing concern, however, as road
traffic increases. Diesel fuel is a leading cause of air pollution in some rich
countries, including the UK, but in
poorer countries the often decrepit
state of many vehicles means petroldriven engines can be just as bad in
their outputs, especially of the fine
particulate matter blamed for millions of deaths a year.
O?Keefe said governments were
under increasing pressure to deal with
the problems through regulation and
controls, and hailed internet access as
having a significant impact.
?Social media has been very important, as a growing number of people
have access to it and to data and discussions [on air pollution]. People now
have the ability to worry about not just
the food they eat and a roof over the
head, but they have the means to discuss [issues] in public,? he said.
Today?s report reinforces an increasing volume of data in recent years that
has shown how air pollution is increasing and causing deaths. More data has
become available in the past decade
from satellites and on-the-ground
monitoring, while large-scale studies have revealed more of the health
risks arising from breathing dirty air,
which rarely kills people directly but
is now known to contribute to other
causes of death.
Change in injury
payouts cuts car
insurance prices
to four-year low
Patrick Collinson
PHOTOGRAPH: VIEW
FINDER PICTURES
On the rocks Wild Kashmir goats on the Great Orme overlooking Llandudno, north
Wales, where they have been admired for generations but are causing problems for the
Ysgol San Sior primary school, chewing on fruit trees planted by pupils. The headteacher,
Ian Keith Jones, said yesterday: ?My ?rst job every morning is to chase the goats o? the
school ?eld. They?re a great tourist attraction but not when they cause so much damage
to the school.? The herd, from which the Royal Welsh regiment obtains its mascot, is said
to be descended from a pair presented to Queen Victoria by the Shah of Persia.
UK car insurance prices have recorded
their first year-on-year fall since 2014,
following changes to whiplash payouts
and a review of compensation paid to
victims of motor accidents.
The average premium in the first
three months of 2018 was �8, down
by 2% on the same period last year,
according to the comparison site Confused.com. It said prices peaked in the
final quarter of 2017, but had since
fallen by 7%.
The average figure masks huge
differences according to the type of
driver. The average male driver aged
17 to 20 pays �348, compared with
�699 paid by women of the same age.
Confused.com attributed the fall
in premiums to a mixture of changes
designed to curb the high number of
whiplash claims, which cost UK drivers �n a year, and the ?Ogden rate?,
which is used to calculate personal
injury payouts.
?Insurers seem to have softened
prices as the government announces
a review of the Ogden rate discount,
expected in April 2019, which could
mean insurers pay out less when a
claim is made. The government has
also announced a reform to the way
whiplash claims are calculated and
paid, which may have also had an
impact,? it said.
The government had to backtrack
on proposals for a new Ogden rate
formula last year after insurers said it
would overcompensate crash victims.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:21 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
On trial in India
Eight men accused of
raping Muslim girl, 8
Page 22
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?
Notes off hope
Music composed
omposed in
mps debuts
Nazi camps
Page 25
21
Daniels has day in court
The porn film star Stormy
Daniels arriving at a New
York court yesterday. Donald
Trump?s lawyer Michael
Cohen is under criminal
investigation for personal
business dealings and was
ordered to appear before a
judge to answer questions
about his practice. He has
denied wrongdoing. Daniels,
alleges that she had a sexual
encounter with Trump and
was paid $130,000 by Cohen to
keep quiet.
PHOTOGRAPH:
SETH WENIG/AP
Trump hits back after ?red
FBI director says president
is ?morally un?t? for o?ce
Tweet accusing Comey of
lying is latest in barrage of
criticism between two sides
Sabrina Siddiqui
Washington
Donald Trump lashed out at James
Comey on Twitter yesterday following a television interview in which the
former FBI director labelled the president ?morally unfit? for office.
Trump?s tweet came the morning
after Comey gave his first televised
interview since he was unceremoniously fired last May while overseeing
the FBI?s investigation into Russian
interference in the US election.
In a lengthy interview with ABC?s
George Stephanopoulos to discuss his
new book, A Higher Loyalty, Comey
offered his sharpest rebuke yet to
Trump?s presidency and described
his former boss as a ?stain? on those
who worked for him.
?A person who sees moral equivalence in Charlottesville, who talks
about and treats women like they?re
pieces of meat, who lies constantly
about matters big and small and insists
the American people believe it, that
person?s not fit to be president of the
United States, on moral grounds,?
Comey said.
He later added that Trump might
have obstructed justice by repeatedly pressing him to drop his inquiry
into former national security adviser
Michael Flynn. ?There?s certainly
some evidence of obstruction of justice,? Comey said, while adding that
if Trump were to fire special counsel
Robert Mueller it would ?set off alarm
bells that this is his most serious attack
yet on the rule of law?.
Yesterday, Trump took aim at
Comey, tweeting: ?Comey drafted
the Crooked Hillary exoneration long
before he talked to her (lied in Congress to Senator G), then based his
decisions on her poll numbers.
?Disgruntled, he, McCabe, and the
others, committed many crimes!?
Trump was likely to have been
referring to Comey?s decision in July
2016 to clear Hillary Clinton of criminal wrongdoing in her use of a private
James Comey
called the
president
a ?stain? on those
who worked for
him
email server as secretary of state.
On Sunday, Trump similarly suggested that Comey?s handling of the
Clinton case seemed to be based on
the assumption she would win, while
at the same time launching a personal
attack on Comey. He tweeted: ?Slippery James Comey, a man who always
ends up badly and out of whack (he is
not smart!), will go down as the WORST
FBI Director in history, by far!?
He also appeared to cite Comey?s
testimony before Congress last year, in
which he told the Iowa senator Chuck
Grassley, a Republican, that he had
never been an anonymous source,
nor had he authorised someone else
to do the same.
Trump has also repeatedly highlighted the former deputy FBI director
Andrew McCabe?s admission that he
authorised an agent to speak anonymously to the press. McCabe was fired
last month, two days before he was due
to retire. Comey was fired by Trump
in May last year because of his investigation into ?this Russia thing with
Trump and Russia?.
There is no evidence Comey or
McCabe committed any crimes.
The Trump administration, with the
support of the Republican National
Committee, has mounted a campaign
to discredit Comey as his book is published. Yesterday, as Trump prepared
to head off to Florida for a week, his
senior counsellor, Kellyanne Conway,
sought to undermine Comey?s credibility by questioning his controversial
decision to reopen the investigation
into Hillary Clinton?s use of a private
email server 11 days before the November 2016 presidential election.
?This guy swung an election. He
thought the wrong person would win,?
Conway said on ABC?s Good Morning America, seeming to suggest that
Comey had contributed to Trump?s
victory. But she quickly rowed back
on that in a tweet, writing: ?He did not.
He swung and miss [sic]. I was putting
to bed that he was even capable of such
a thing. Add sarcasm and stir.?
In his interview, Comey defended
the 28 October letter, which Clinton
has said lost her the election to Trump.
?If I ever start considering whose
political fortunes will be affected by
a decision, we?re done,? Comey said,
referring to what he believed was the
FBI?s responsibility to act as an independent law enforcement agency.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:22 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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?
22
Delhi
Eight men appeared in court yesterday accused of involvement in the rape
and murder of an eight-year-old Muslim girl in India?s Jammu and Kashmir
state, a case that has sparked nationwide outrage and criticism of the
ruling Bharatiya Janata party.
Protests have taken place in cities
across India during the past few days,
with anger fuelled by initial support for
the accused by ministers from the BJP.
The protests have also focused
on another rape incident allegedly
involving a BJP politician in the poor
northern state of Uttar Pradesh, and
more rallies demanding action against
rapists and violence against women
took place yesterday in the capital and
Ahmedabad, Gujarat, home state of
the prime minister, Narendra Modi.
The girl, from the Bakarwal nomadic
community, which roams Kashmir?s
forests, was drugged, held captive
in a temple and repeatedly raped for
a week before being strangled and
bludgeoned in January, police said.
According to the charge sheet, the
kidnapping, rape and killing of the girl
was part of a plan to drive the nomads
out of Kathua district in Jammu, the
mostly Hindu region of India?s only
Muslim majority state.
Russian investigative journalist
dies after ?fth-?oor balcony fall
Andrew Roth
Moscow
A Russian investigative journalist who
confirmed the deaths of mercenaries
from his country in Syria has died after
falling from his fifth-floor balcony.
Maksim Borodin, 32, was a reporter
for the Novy Den website in Yekaterinburg, Russia?s fourth largest city,
gaining attention for his reports on
the Russian private military company
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
World
Eight men plead not
guilty of kidnap, rape
and murder of girl, 8
Reuters
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Wagner, and for his investigations
into prisons and corrupt officials in
his native Sverdlovsk region. He said
last year he had been hit on the head
with a metal pipe shortly after giving
an interview on the controversial
historical romantic drama Matilda.
?His work was very dangerous,? said
Vyacheslav Bashkov, a local civil rights
activist. ?He was one of the best.?
Police have not opened a criminal
case into Borodin?s death, indicating
they are treating it as a suicide or
The alleged ringleader, a retired
bureaucrat, Sanji Ram, looked after
a small Hindu temple where the girl
was held captive and assaulted. Two
of the eight on trial are police officers,
who are accused of being bribed to stifle the investigation.
Ankur Sharma, a lawyer for the
accused, said the men had pleaded
not guilty and were willing to take a
lie detector test. The judge adjourned
the case until 28 April.
Deepika Singh Rajawat, the lawyer representing the victim?s family,
said she had received rape and death
threats for taking up the child?s case,
and requested that the trial be held
outside Jammu and Kashmir.
?I was threatened yesterday that
?we will not forgive you?. I am going to
tell the supreme court that I am in danger,? said Rajawat, who has fought for
a proper investigation since the girl?s
body was found in January.
National outrage over the Kathua
case has drawn parallels with the massive protests that followed the gang
rape and murder of a girl on a Delhi
bus in 2012, which forced the then Congress-led government to enact tough
new laws against rape, including the
death penalty.
However, activists say violent
crimes against women are often poorly
investigated, and if those accused have
political connections they are often
protected. On Friday, Modi declared
that the guilty would not be shielded,
but he has been criticised for not
speaking out sooner. Three other child
rapes, including one in Surat, Gujurat, were also reported at the weekend.
Before leaving for an official visit to
Europe this week, Modi received an
open letter from 50 former civil servants criticising the country?s political
leadership over its weak response.
?The bestiality and the barbarity
involved in the rape and murder of an
eight-year-old child shows the depths
of depravity that we have sunk into,?
it said. ?In post-independence India,
this is our darkest hour and we find
the response of our government, the
leaders of our political parties, inadequate and feeble.?
accident. But Polina Rumyantseva, the
editor of Novy Den, said his reporters
would need full access to Borodin?s
apartment to assess whether there had
been foul play.
Rumyantseva said that reporters
from the paper had been in the apartment and didn?t see any signs of a
struggle. It appeared to investigators,
she said, that Borodin had gone on the
balcony to smoke and had fallen.
?If there?s even a hint of something criminal, we will make it public,?
Rumyantseva told Radio Svoboda.
Borodin?s death on Sunday has
raised questions in Russia, where 38
journalists have been murdered since
1992, according to the Committee to
Protect Journalists. Most of those
cases remain unsolved. Harlem
Desir, the representative on freedom
of the media at the Organisation for
Security and Co-operation in Europe,
said on Twitter: ?[The] death of
journalist Maxim Borodin in #Russia
is of serious concern. I call on the
authorities for a swift and thorough
investigation.?
Bashkov, who said he had worked
with Borodin for more than a decade,
said the reporter had called him two
nights before his death because there
were men in camouflage and masks
outside his building.
After trying to contact a lawyer,
Bashkov said Borodin called him
back to say that the men had left and
he must have been mistaken.
? A protest over the Kathua rape, one
of several recent child rapes in India
PHOTOGRAPH: SIVARAM V/REUTERS
Experts ba?ed
by rapid spread
of ?esh-eating
infection in
Australia
Melissa Davey
A tissue-destroying ulcer once rare
in Australia is spreading rapidly and
has reached epidemic proportions in
regions of Victoria, prompting experts
to call for urgent research into how it
is contracted and spread.
In an article published in the
Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) yesterday, authors led by Daniel O?Brien,
an associate professor at the health
service provider Barwon Health, said
incidents of Buruli ulcer were on the
rise but researchers were baffled as to
why Victoria was particularly affected.
There have been no reported cases in
the states of New South Wales, South
Australia or Tasmania.
In 2016, there were 182 new cases of
the ulcer in Victoria ? by far the most
ever reported, O?Brien said. Cases
reported up to 11 November 2017 had
further increased by 51% compared
with the same period in 2016, from
156 to 236.
?Despite being recognised in Victoria since 1948, efforts to control the
disease have been severely hampered
because the environmental reservoir
and mode of transmission to humans
remain unknown,? O?Brien said. ?It is
difficult to prevent a disease when it is
not known how infection is acquired.?
The first sign of infection is usually a painless lump on the skin often
dismissed as an insect bite. The slowmoving infection then burrows into
a layer of fat between the skin and
the lining that covers muscles. Here
it takes hold, spreading sideways
and through the body, destroying tissue along the way, before eventually
erupting back through the skin in the
form of an ulcer. Those affected often
have no idea the infection has taken
hold until the ulcer appears. When it
does, the pain can be extreme.
The infection responds to a roughly
eight-week course of antibiotics, but
in rare cases surgery to remove skin
or even amputation is needed. The
disease is most often associated with
swampland areas in tropical countries
and is most prevalent in Africa.
?It seems to occur in very specific
areas of Victoria,? said Prof Paul Johnson, an internationally renowned
Buruli ulcer expert. ?If you don?t
enter an endemic area, you don?t get
the disease.?
Johnson believes it is likely that
the bacterium that causes the ulcer,
Mycobacterium ulcerans, is spread by
mosquitoes and possums. His research
team caught a large number of mosquitoes in affected areas and found a
small proportion carried the bacteria.
They then found that ringtail possums
in affected areas excreted the bacteria
in their faeces.
The authors of the MJA article called
for urgent government funding to
research the bacterium. ?The time to
act is now,? they wrote.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:23 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 16:58
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
World
23
? Portuguese
photographer
Baptiste de Ville
d?Avray sought
to capture the
Mediterranean
seaside resort
atmosphere of
the Moroccan
coastline
? The Dutchman
Bas Losekoot
shot Familiar
Strangers in
Lagos. By 2050,
the Nigerian
capital is set to be
the world?s third
biggest city
? In Shadows
of Domestic
Work, Ralph
Eluehike, a Lagos
resident, uses
a performance
concept to focus
on the plight of
the world?s 65
million servants,
who, he says,
are living a
life ?of torture,
hopelessness,
and virtual
imprisonment?
Anna Boyiazis?
Finding Freedom
in the Water. Life
in the Zanzibar
archipelago is
based on the sea,
yet most girls
never learn to
swim. Islamic
culture and a
lack of modest
swimwear had
discouraged
them, until the
Panje Project
NGO was set up
Life in Africa
Artists from Nigeria, Ivory
Coast, Angola and Morocco,
as well as Europe and the
US, have been shortlisted
for the 2018 CAP prize, the
only global competition
for contemporary
African photography. The
photographs cover subjects
as diverse as female genital
mutilation, nomadic life, the
plight of domestic workers,
and learning to swim. The five
winners will be announced at
the Photo Basel international
art fair in June.
All photographs:
2018 CAP prize
?Monankim?
girls from Bakor
tribes in
Nigeria?s Cross
River state, by
Jenevieve Aken.
From the age
of 14 the girls
undergo female
genital
mutilation. If
they survive,
they recover in a
?fattening? room
? Casablanca
Not the Movie
is a long-term
project featuring
the city by the
Moroccan-born
Yassine Alaoui
Ismaili and
references the
1942 film, shot
almost entirely
at the Warner
Brothers studio
in California
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:24 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 18:18
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24
The Eurovision winner Conchita has
told fans she is HIV positive and has
been having regular treatment for several years.
The Austrian drag performer, 29,
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
World
Eurovision winner Conchita
reveals she is HIV positive
Laura Snapes
cYanmaGentaYellowb
made a public statement on Instagram in response to an ex-boyfriend
allegedly threatening to reveal the
information.
?I have been HIV positive for several years,? Conchita wrote. ?That is
actually irrelevant to the public, but
an ex-boyfriend threatened to reveal
this private information. In the future,
I don?t want to give anyone the right
to cause me pain and influence my life
in that way.
?I have been in treatment since my
diagnosis, and under the threshold of
detection for several years, preventing
the spread of the virus.
?Until now, I haven?t wanted to
go public with this information for
several reasons, two of which I will
discuss: the most important was my
family, who since day one have been
discreet and unconditionally supportive. I would gladly have spared them
the attention over their son, uncle and
brother being HIV positive. Likewise,
my friends have been aware of this for
quite some time, and behaved in an
unbiased way that I would wish for
anyone in this situation. Secondly, I
believe that this information is primarily relevant to those with whom I have
had sexual contact.
?Coming out is better than being
outed. I hope to show courage, and to
take another step towards the destigmatisation of people who have become
infected with HIV due to their actions
or through no fault of their own.
?To my fans: this information about
In brief
The Netherlands
Cannabis banned from
key sites in The Hague
The Hague has become the first
Dutch city to ban the smoking of
cannabis around its city centre,
central railway station and major
shopping areas, in the latest
example of a wider trend towards
reining in the country?s traditional
gedoogbeleid (tolerance policy).
Flyers are to be distributed at
cannabis-selling coffee shops and
homeless shelters to warn of fines
for those caught breaching the ban.
my HIV may be news to you, but it?s
not the totality of my identity. I am
well, and stronger, more motivated,
and freer than ever. Thank you for your
understanding.?
Conchita, formerly known as Conchita Wurst, won the Eurovision song
contest in 2014 with Rise Like a Phoenix. Conchita is a recording artist and
drag queen portrayed by Thomas
Neuwirth.
The singer recently recorded a special edition of BBC Radio 2?s Friday
Night Is Music Night, which will be
broadcast later this month.
Cannabis is sold openly in 573
coffee shops in 103 of the 380
municipalities in the Netherlands,
including The Hague. However,
awareness of stronger varieties of
the drug now available, compared
with the 1970s when the tolerance
policy came in, and concern that it
is encouraging antisocial behaviour,
has led to a change in attitudes.
The ban will be enforced by
the police, with warnings given to
those found using the drug in 13
designated public places over the
next two weeks. Fines will apply
after that period.
The municipality of Amsterdam
prohibits drug use around schools
and playgrounds. Rotterdam
introduced a ban on use in 2010
around five schools, which was later
extended to schools across the city.
Daniel Boffey Brussels
South Korea
Airline suspends
boss?s daughter
Korean Air has suspended one
of its chairman?s daughters from
her marketing role after she
allegedly hurled a cup of water at
an advertising agency official in
a meeting. Cho Hyun-min, also
known as Emily Cho, is the younger
sister of Cho Hyun-ah, who became
known for a notorious ?nut rage?
incident on a flight in 2014. Cho
apologised yesterday, saying: ?It is
my big fault that I could not control
my emotions.? AP Seoul
Australia
Italy
Surfer in hospital after
escaping shark attack
Judge releases seized
migrant-rescue ship
A surfer who was bitten on the leg by
a shark managed to bodysurf back
to shore, where friends used the
rope from his board as a tourniquet
while he waited for paramedics.
The 37-year-old was attacked at
Cobblestones beach in Gracetown,
on Western Australia?s south-west
coast, yesterday. He was flown to
Royal Perth hospital for surgery.
Surf photographer Peter Jovic told
the ABC network: ?A shark popped
up and pretty much ended up
knocking a surfer from his board.?
The surfer ?ended up miraculously
bodysurfing into a little wave and
getting pushed in by a local at the
same time before everyone came to
his aid?.
A second man, unaware of the
incident, was bitten on a nearby
beach later in the afternoon.
Calla Wahlquist and AAP
Italian authorities have released a
migrant-rescue ship that has been
impounded for almost a month, but
are still investigating two of its crew
members on suspicion of enabling
illegal immigration.
The Open Arms, which is run
by a Spanish NGO and has rescued
more than 5,000 people from the
Mediterranean in three years, was
seized after it docked in Sicily with
218 migrants on board.
Its crew had refused to hand them
over to Libya?s coastguard, arguing
they were in international waters.
The ship was impounded and
three people investigated. A judge
ordered its release yesterday, but
prosecutors have yet to decide if its
captain, Marc Reig, and the
mission?s coordinator, Anabel
Montes, should face trial.
Lorenzo Tondo and Sam Jones
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:25 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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?
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
World
Israel
25
Aviva Bar-On, who was a camp
prisoner as a child, at Sunday?s
concert, where she also performed
PHOTOGRAPH: MIKA GUROVICH/JNF UK
Notes of hope: music composed
in Nazi concentration camps
receives premiere in Jerusalem
Harriet Sherwood
Jerusalem
At 85 ? and given the powerful emotions of the moment? it would not have
been surprising if Aviva Bar-On?s voice
had wavered. But as she sang in clear
tones in front of an audience of 3,000
people in Jerusalem on Sunday night,
it was easy to imagine the nine-yearold Nazi concentration camp prisoner
she once was.
Bar-On performed a song she committed to memory more than seven
decades earlier at the Theresienstadt
camp (now Terez韓) in Nazi-occupied
Czechoslovakia. Composed by the
Jewish poet and musician Ilse Weber,
who was later murdered at Auschwitz,
the song had never before been heard
in public.
It was one of 11 pieces performed
at the concert, the culmination of a
30-year quest by Francesco Lotoro, an
Italian composer and pianist who has
tenaciously tracked down thousands
of songs, symphonies and operas from
the Holocaust.
The music was created in the
darkest, most desperate moments
imaginable by musicians and performers whose lyrics and scores were
written on scraps of paper or memorised. Some were forced to play as
their fellow inmates were led to the
gas chambers.
?Some [of the music] was written in notebooks, on coal sacks, food
wrappers, tickets,? Lotoro said. One
five-act opera was found on sheets of
toilet paper. Some was held only in the
memories of survivors, now in their
80s and 90s.
Lotoro, who travelled the world,
searching in bookshops, attics and
archives, and interviewing Holocaust
survivors, has salvaged and recorded
8,000 pieces of music, ?but there are
more than 10,000 more waiting to be
deciphered?.
On Sunday, for the first time in
more than 70 years, a fraction of this
music was performed in a concert in
Jerusalem called Notes of Hope. The
audience included Holocaust survivors and their descendants.
Nineteen children from two music
academies in the Negev desert, who
have been mentored by Lotoro for
the past two years, played with the
Ashdod Symphony Orchestra. They
were accompanied by some of Israel?s
most eminent performers, singing in
Hebrew, Yiddish, German, Czech and
Romany, with Lotoro conducting.
Despite the circumstances of their
composition, most of the songs were
spirited and upbeat. Zitra (Tomorrow),
composed by Joseph Roubicek for a
young prisoner, Manka, looks forward
to a day when ?everyone will be happy
at heart?. In a video recorded by Yad
Vashem, Israel?s Holocaust memorial,
and shown at the concert, Manka said
?singing was something that made you
forget the hunger?.
Bar-On sang When I Was Lying
Down in Terezin?s Children?s Clinic,
which makes light of the illnesses and
diseases suffered by many inmates.
The young Jewish Czechoslovakian
spent three years in the Theresienstadt
camp from the age of nine. ?They were
very hard years of hunger, illnesses
and epidemics,? she said. ?The most
terrible thing for me was the toilets,
and the long queues. The hygiene situation was very bad.
?But the musical life of the camp
was very rich. There were famous
opera singers and high-ranking musicians. There were lots of performances
and a women?s choir.
?We didn?t know about the gas
chambers. When people received the
order to go to the train, we didn?t know
where they were going.?
During a spell of sickness, BarOn was nursed by Weber. ?She was a
wonderful, smiling lady. She played
the mandolin and sang; some of her
songs were very funny. Now I?m the
Children from two music academies, mentored and conducted by Francesco
Lotoro, played with the Ashdod Symphony Orchestra PHOTOGRAPH: MIKA GUROVICH/JNF
only one in the world who remembers
them,? she said. After the liberation
of the camp in 1945, a small notebook
containing Weber?s lyrics was discovered. Eventually, it found its way to
Lotoro, who was frustrated by the lack
of a musical score. But Bar-On?s memory came to the rescue.
In Westerbork, a transit camp in the
Netherlands, Max Ehrlich, a prominent performer in the risque pre-war
Berlin cabaret scene, teamed up with
fellow musician Willy Rosen to create
the Camp Westerbork Theatre Group.
Alan Ehrlich, the performer?s
nephew, said: ?Suddenly, the best
cabaret in Europe was to be found in
a concentration camp. Their music
became Westerbork hits, with prisoners constantly humming their tunes.?
The camp commandant sat in
the front row of all the troupe?s
performances of original songs,
jokes, sketches and dance routines.
Entranced, he kept the performers?
names off the lists of those destined
for the death camps.
?They were playing for their lives,?
said Alan Ehrlich.
Max Ehrlich was eventually
deported to Auschwitz in 1944, where
he was recognised by a Nazi guard and
forced to perform one final time before
being sent to the gas chambers.
Born seven months after Max Ehrlich?s death, Alan Ehrlich has spent
decades tracing his uncle?s life and
works. A breakthrough came with the
discovery of a folder of lyrics, scripts
and stage instructions in 1998. But,
again, the music had to be coaxed from
a survivor, Louis de Wijze, who had
performed in the troupe.
Ehrlich, who was in the audience on
Sunday, said it was crucial for younger
people and future generations to know
about the Nazi camps. ?In the world
today, there are conflicting stories
[about the Holocaust] that are total
lies. It?s very important to establish
what happened as absolute fact.?
The material resurfaced by Lotoro?s
dogged detective work originated
from Jews, Roma, political prisoners,
soldiers and others in concentration,
forced labour and prisoner-of-war
camps over a 20-year period.
?In the camps, there was an explosion of creativity,? he said. ?When your
life is in danger, you create more as a
testament for the future.?
The concert, attended by the Israeli
defence minister, Avigdor Lieberman,
was staged by the Jewish National
Fund UK, and timed to mark the 70th
anniversary next month of the founding of the state of Israel.
Samuel Hayek, the chairman of JNF
UK, said he hoped the music would
help focus attention on rising levels
of antisemitism across Europe and in
England, ?where it is a major cause
for concern?.
He said he had been moved to tears
by the music: ?To be a respected and
valued person in a community, then
stripped of your humanity and dignity, to be hungry and beaten, to not
know where your loved ones are ? and
then to sing!?
Lotoro said his quest to find music
of the Holocaust would continue. ?I
can?t stop,? he said. ?I feel a moral duty
as a person, as a Jew, to go on. It?s a
mitzvah [good deed], a reparation.?
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:26 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
?
26
Eyewitness
Sent at 16/4/2018 17:58
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The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:27 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 16/4/2018 17:58
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
? Tokyo
Play fighting during the ceremonial
spring festival sumo tournament at
the controversial Yasukini war shrine
PHOTOGRAPH: TORU HANAI/REUTERS
27
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:28 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 20:10
?
28
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
World
Seven inmates stabbed to death in
fighting at South Carolina prison
Ed Pilkington
Seven inmates at a maximum security prison in South Carolina have been
killed with homemade knives as wardens struggled for seven hours to bring
mass fighting under control.
A further 17 inmates required medical treatment for their injuries in
outside hospitals. The unrest at Lee
Correctional Institution in Bishopsville was the worst outbreak of fatal
violence in the state in recent times.
The deaths bring the number of
inmates killed by fellow prisoners in
South Carolina to 20 since January
2017, and mark an alarming increase
in violence within the correctional system over the past five years. Most of
the victims appeared to have died as
a result of stabbings or slashings with
homemade knives, known as shanks.
The weapons are ubiquitous within
South Carolina?s 21 prisons.
Steve Bailey, a columnist for the
local Post and Courier newspaper, who
investigated conditions at state prisons earlier this year, said: ?Put simply,
anyone who can has a knife.?
His research discovered a steady
rise in violent deaths among inmates
in the state in recent years. Last year,
there were up to 18 murders and six
suicides. In 2016, there were five murders and six suicides, while in 2009
there were two deaths.
There has been a similarly steep rise
in serious assaults in the past couple of
years, with 250 inmates requiring hospital treatment in 2016 and 2017 alone.
But while violence has increased, the
prison population has steadily fallen
as part of a nationwide trend towards
giving non-violent offenders non-custodial sentences.
The fighting at Lee Correctional
Institution, which has about 1,600
inmates, including some of the most
dangerous in the state, erupted at
about 7.15pm on Sunday and quickly
spread to three housing units. Control
was not restored until shortly before
3am yesterday.
The deaths occurred as a result of
inmates fighting each other in numerous altercations, the prison service
indicated. Precisely what might have
sparked the unrest was unknown.
The increase in violence in South
Carolina?s prisons has a number of
causes, experts say, including gang
activity, the increasing prevalence
of smuggled mobiles, exacerbating
illegal trade, and rivalries. But the
overwhelming problem is staff shortages and the consequent dire morale
among officers.
More than 600 staff positions are
vacant in South Carolina ? almost onethird of the correctional workforce.
A reason for that, in turn, is low pay,
with the Post and Courier pointing
out that a prison guard has an annual
starter salary of about $27,000 ? about
$4,000 less than a bin lorry driver.
The shortages mean there are too
few guards to keep an eye on volatile
prisoners. According to the state?s
prison chief, Bryan Stirling, the ratio
of inmates to officers is more than 200
to one ? vastly above the standard of
30 recommended nationally.
The crisis of staff shortages is replicated across the country. Research
by The Pew Charitable Trusts has
found many states, including Kansas,
Nebraska, New Mexico, Michigan, Missouri and West Virginia, grappling with
the associated problems of shortages
and high staff turnover.
visitors a year. The rabbits play a vital
role in nibbling away at the invasive
American black cherry, a variety of the
woody plant Prunus serotina that gets
in the way of other species. Birds on
the island are also known to use the
rabbit warrens to lay eggs.
Jan Willem Zwart, a forester who is
working on the project, said the fall in
rabbit numbers was already noticeable. ?Rabbits eat grasses and saplings
that have just come up. That prevents
the landscape from becoming closed.
We do not know exactly how many rabbits are still here, but we clearly see
that the vegetation on the island is
increasing,? he said.
?It might be the wild cats in the
dunes that are keeping the numbers
down. We don?t know. But we are
going to catch a number of rabbits
on the island. In the village there are
still enough, they like to dig under the
houses. In the long run, we want to
expand them elsewhere on the island.
?We want to do that in an animalfriendly way. That is why we are going
to use ? ferreting. The ferret goes into
the rabbit hole and chases them out.
We will catch them there and put them
in a paddock, a safe place away from
predators?.
It is hoped that in a secure area
nature will follow its course.
The project, aided by the Dutch
national heritage organisation, considered importing rabbits but the
paperwork was deemed overwhelming because a permit would be required
for every animal.
Psychedelic
fleurs
Some of the
30爉illion
tulips on
show at
Holland Sea
of Flowers in
the Dafeng
district of
Yancheng, a
coastal city
in China?s
northern
Jiangsu
province.
More than
300 varieties
of tulip are
grown at
the爏ite.
PHOTOGRAPH:
IMAGINECHINA/REX
Ferrets drafted in to help solve
puzzle of disappearing rabbits
Daniel Boffey
Brussels
It is not a pastime for which rabbits
usually require much encouragement.
But a mystery depletion in numbers on
the Dutch island of Schiermonnikoog
has led to an emergency effort to coax
the local population into breeding ?
well, like rabbits.
Ferrets are being deployed to chase
remaining animals out of their warrens
and into the hands of conservationists,
cYanmaGentaYellowb
who are bringing them together, safe
from the stress of predators, in the
hope that romance will blossom.
It is believed that rabbit numbers
on Schiermonnikoog, or Grey Monk
island, have been declining for the past
three years, although conservationists
are only working from the memories of
the 947 people who live there.
The concern is that the unexplained
decrease could have a negative effect
on the biodiversity of the island, a
9.9爉ile-long nature reserve off the
north coast which attracts 300,000
US Starbucks
hit by protests
after two black
men arrested
for trespassing
Damien Gayle and agencies
Protesters targeted a Starbucks in
Philadelphia yesterday after two
black men were arrested last week
for trespassing.
The protests followed the release of
a video that showed the two men being
arrested after a store manager called
the police because they were sitting
in the store without placing an order.
The two said they were waiting for a
friend, who arrived just as they were
taken away in handcuffs.
?We don?t want this Starbucks to
make any money today. That?s our
goal,? said Abdul-Aliy Muhammad,
one of the protest?s organisers and
co-founder of the Black and Brown
Workers Collective, as protesters
moved to the front counter shortly
after 7am and chanted ?Starbucks coffee is anti-black? and ?We are gonna
shut you down?.
The arrests have caused a PR crisis for Starbucks. Its chief executive,
Kevin Johnson, said in an interview
yesterday on ABC?s Good Morning
America that he was planning to meet
the mayor, the police and hopefully
the men who were arrested. Johnson
called the arrests reprehensible.
?I?d like to have a dialogue with
them so that I can ensure that we have
the opportunity to really understand
the situation and show some compassion and empathy for the experience
they went through,? he said.
The protesters gathered outside the
store in the pouring rain, while inside
it looked like business as usual. However, most people drinking coffee at
the tables were regional leaders for the
company?s corporate side.
Just before 7.30am, the protesters
moved inside and stood in front of the
counter, some holding banners reading ?End Stop and Frisk?, and chanting
slogans such as: ?A whole lot of racism,
a whole lot of crap, Starbucks coffee is
anti-black.?
Speeches decried police brutality
and gentrification. The firm?s regional
vice-president, Camille Hymes,
attempted to talk to the protesters,
but was shouted down.
Starbucks has removed the manager, but declined to say whether she
is working at another location.
Officials have said police officers
were told the men had asked to use
the store?s toilets but were refused
because they had not bought anything,
and they refused to leave.
Police have not released the names
of the men, who were arrested and later
released after the district attorney?s
office said there was lack of evidence
that a crime had been committed.
The mayor of Philadelphia has
ordered a city commission to review
policies at Starbucks after the arrests
prompted social media users to accuse
the company of racial discrimination.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:29 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 16/4/2018 20:21
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?
29
FTSE 100
All share
Dow Indl
Nikkei 225
-
-
+
+
1.1588
1.4330
7198.20
3970.00
24644.28
21835.53
+0.0030
+0.0083
66.36
31.33
284.14
56.79
�/?
�/$
WPP shares slide as Sorrell?s
exit leaves uncertain future
Analysts rule out immediate
crisis but market reacts to
lack of succession planning
Mark Sweney
Sir Martin Sorrell?s abrupt resignation
from WPP triggered a 6.5% slide in the
group?s share price yesterday as investors mulled the uncertain future of the
world?s largest advertising business.
Sorrell, who founded WPP 33 years
ago, resigned with immediate effect
on Saturday after an investigation into
allegations of personal misconduct.
Analysts reacted cautiously to the
resignation, telling investors there
will not be an immediate crisis at
WPP. However, they acknowledged
that the market had reacted to uncertainty over succession planning at the
group, compounding a performance
that has resulted in shares declining by
more than one-third over the past year.
One of WPP?s largest shareholders,
Harris Associates, said it was ?regrettable? to have a leadership transition
without Sorrell?s involvement.
Roddy Davidson, an analyst at the
investment group Shore Capital, said:
?It highlights the apparent lack of
detailed succession planning that has
troubled us and many other observers.
?We are not overly concerned
about the immediate impact of Sorrell?s departure on the group?s flagship
agencies, as these are major international enterprises in their own right,
with strong performance track records
and independent management structures. That said, the resultant vacuum
at the top of the company is not ideal.?
WPP?s share price ended the day
down 6.5% at �.11p.
The next test for WPP comes on
30 April, when it reports first-quarter
results, with a failure to meet analysts? expectations likely to increase
the pressure for a breakup or disposals.
Sorrell has ?unreservedly denied?
the misconduct allegations and WPP?s
board has said it will not be publishing the outcome of the investigation
into them by an independent law firm.
This was criticised by the Liberal
Democrat leader, Sir Vince Cable,
who called for any investigations to
be made public. WPP said it had concluded the investigation and had no
further comment to make. After years
?We believe Sir
Martin [above] will
be hard to replace
with one person. This
has led to questions
over the size of WPP?
Paul Richards
Analyst at Numis
of above-par performances, WPP put
out two growth warnings last year ?
before reporting its worst financial
year since the 2009 ad recession ? as
clients pulled budgets and investors
started to question the future of the
global holding company model.
Davidson said: ?Whether WPP
should survive in its current form is a
more challenging question.?
Stephen Carter, the chief executive of the publishing group Informa,
the former ITV chief executive Adam
Crozier, the Sky chief executive, Jeremy Darroch, and Andrew Robertson,
the chief executive of the ad network
BBDO, are among those tipped as possible successors to Sorrell.
Mark Read and Andrew Scott, who
were appointed joint chief operating
officers following Sorrell?s departure,
are the leading internal candidates.
Paul Richards, an analyst at Numis,
said: ?We believe Sir Martin will be
hard to replace with one person. The
succession has led to questions over
the size and scope of WPP.?
Alex DeGroote, an analyst at Cenkos Securities, put the breakup value
of WPP?s parts at about � a share, valuing the group at �bn.
Sum of its parts
How a breakup of WPP could add up
46%
Sir Martin Sorrell?s resignation has
raised the question of whether
his successor will be able to stop
a breakup of the world?s largest
advertising group.
WPP employs more than
200,000 staff in 400 separate ad
businesses in more than 3,000
offices in 112 countries. According
to analysts, a breakup could net
shareholders more than �bn,
about � a share, far more than its
current value of �.50 a share or
�bn market capitalisation after
its value plummeted by more than
a third in the past year.
WPP reports its operations in
four main business groupings:
? Advertising and media buying
(estimated sale value �bn-plus)
The largest is advertising and
media investment management ?
essentially the agencies that make
ads and those that buy the space
they appear in ? which is the jewel
in Sorrell?s crown. AMIM made
�1bn in profit last year (almost
50% of WPP?s total of �3bn),
accounts for 46% of revenues and
boasts the best margin, of 19%.
Global advertising networks
J Walter Thompson The world?s
oldest advertising agency group,
with clients including Shell,
Debenhams and Kit Kat.
Ogilvy & Mather Clients include
Unilever?s Dove, as well as Boots.
Young & Rubicam Its most notable
campaigns of recent times have
included Virgin and the BBC.
Grey Global Clients include
Marks & Spencer (including its
Paddington Bear campaign),
Lucozade and Birds Eye.
Global media agency networks
Proportion of
WPP?s income
from advertising
and media
buying, which
made �1bn in
profit last year
? Advertising and media buying ? Market research ? Public relations & public affairs
? Branding & identity, healthcare and specialist communications
�bn
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
2012
2013
Source: Annual Report & Accounts 2016
2014
2015
2016
? Market research (�5bn)
The second-smallest profit centre for
WPP, which calls it data investment
management, contributes 15% of the
group?s profits (�0m) and 18.5% of
revenues. WPP is already mulling a
potential sale.
? Branding, healthcare and
specialist (�n-�bn)
The division has some attractive
assets due to the profitability of
areas such as healthcare. It is also
home to a number of WPP?s valuable
digital and interactive businesses. It
accounts for 27.5% of profits (�5m)
and 28% of total revenues.
Digital advertising businesses
include Wunderman, VML and
MediaCom Employs almost 6,000
AKQA, which has clients including
staff globally, with clients including Nike and Volvo. Branding agencies
Sky, Gillette and Mars.
include Fitch and Coley Porter
Mindshare Has clients including
Bell. Healthcare communications
HSBC and Marmite owner Unilever. agencies include GCI and Common
It is in charge of allocating $35bn
Health. Clients include AstraZeneca,
(�.4bn) worth of advertising
Sanofi, Colgate, GlaxoSmithKline
spend a year.
and Kimberly-Clark.
Wavemaker Formed from the
recent merger of MEC and Maxus,
? Other investments (�n)
WPP also has assets that are not part
it employs 8,500 staff with clients
of its core business lines but could
including L?Or閍l, Vodafone,
Compare the Market and Morrisons. be worth as much as �n. These
Essence Clients include BT, Google, include stakes in the Vice media
group and Nasdaq-listed software
the Financial Times and Visa.
group Globant. WPP lists these
investments on its books at a value
? Public relations (�4bn)
The least profitable of WPP?s units, of �2bn. However, analysts point
accounting for just 8% (�3m) of
out that the true market value could
the total operating profit and 7.7%
be more than �n.
of revenues. Companies within
Mark Sweney
Marks &
Spencer?s
Christmas
advertising
campaign,
featuring
Paddington
Bear, was made
by WPP agency
Grey Global
Advertising and media buying accounted for �5bn of
WPP's total revenues in 2016
this division include Cohn & Wolfe
and Burson-Marsteller (which are
merging globally), Hill + Knowlton
Strategies, Finsbury, Buchanan,
Clarion and Ogilvy PR.
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30
BP strategy to
cut carbon
footprint is
?greenwash?,
experts say
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
Financial
Adam Vaughan
Environmental leaders have dismissed
BP?s new low-carbon strategy as
?greenwash? and a lightweight
response to climate change and the
market?s rapid switch to renewables.
In a strategy published yesterday,
BP said there would be no increase
in its carbon footprint over the next
seven years because it would cut
emissions from its oil and gas rigs,
and offset the rest.
The UK oil firm said it would achieve
a saving of 3.5m tonnes of carbon dioxide-equivalent by 2025. That is equal
to about 7% of its current operational
emissions.
However, it still has no target for
its biggest contribution to global
warming, which is the burning of its
main products, oil and gas, unlike
rivals such as Shell.
Tom Burke, the chairman of the
environmental thinktank E3G and a
former BP adviser, said: ?Who cares
about operational emissions? The
problem is they have nothing to say
on their product. This is a 20th-century
response to a 21st-century problem.?
The former UK government adviser
characterised the plan as ?lightweight
PR? and ?greenwash?. He said BP had
?wasted 20 years? since the former
chief executive Lord Browne tried to
reinvent the firm as Beyond Petroleum
in 2000.
The criticism was echoed by Carbon
Tracker, a thinktank that has analysed
the risk of big oil being left with
stranded assets by action on climate
change, a danger about which the Bank
of England has also warned.
?Improvements in BP?s operational
emissions, while welcome, are too
small to move the needle to prevent
runaway climate change or reduce
BP?s exposure to carbon risk,? said
Luke Sussams, the senior researcher
at Carbon Tracker.
BP pledged to hold leaks of methane,
a powerful greenhouse gas, to today?s
levels, even as it targets more ?leaky?
production, such as shale in the US.
The company also hinted that it plans
to make further moves into electric
vehicle infrastructure, such as rapid
charging points.
? Christine Lagarde has previously warned of the risks PHOTOGRAPH: WANG ZHAO/AFP
Cryptocurrencies can
make financial world
a better place, says IMF
Richard Partington
The advance of bitcoin and other digital currencies could make the global
financial system safer, despite the
?inevitable? accidents waiting to
happen, the head of the International
Monetary Fund has said.
Christine Lagarde said some tools
built using the technology behind
bitcoin, known collectively as
crpyto-assets, hold the potential to
revolutionise high finance by making
it faster, cheaper and safer. But there
are ?real threats and needless fears?.
Writing as politicians and central
bankers gather in Washington for the
IMF?s spring meeting, she said there
was hope for a world where firms using
digital currencies can co-exist alongside traditional banks. That diversity
could build a ?financial ecosystem that
is more efficient and potentially more
robust in resisting threats?, she said.
An increasing number of consumers have used cryptocurrencies as an
alternative to traditional banks. But
many have lost money from price
movements and after cryptocurrency
exchanges were hacked.
Lagarde has previously issued
warnings over the risks posed by bitcoin and other digital currencies,
calling for global regulators to stage a
crackdown by using its technology to
?fight fire with fire?.
Last month, she said authorities could harness the potential of
cryptocurrencies to help bring them
under control. Failure would allow
the unfettered development of a
?potentially major new vehicle for
money laundering and the financing
of terrorism?.
The governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, has called bitcoin
and other cryptocurrencies ?inherently risky? and said they have failed
to fulfil their most basic function as
money. Bitcoin hit almost $20,000
(�,000) in value in the run-up to
Christmas, before crashing by more
than half this year.
But ahead of the IMF?s global financial stability report, which looks at
emerging risks from banking, Lagarde
said there were merits from looking
again at crypto-assets.
?A clear-eyed approach can help us
harness the gains and avoid the pitfalls,? she said.
Comparing recent developments
with the advances of the 1990s ? when
thousands of technology companies
were started, only to collapse a few
years later during the dotcom crash
? she said many crypto-assets were
bound to fail.
More than 1,600 digital currencies
are in circulation, having ballooned in
number in recent years.
But just as a few technologies that
emerged during the dotcom era have
since transformed the world, she said
crypto-assets that survived this process of ?creative destruction? could
have a significant impact on how we
save, invest and pay our bills.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:31 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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?
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
Financial
Business view
Nils Pratley
WPP board tried to do things
by the book, but unfortunately
Martin Sorrell wrote the book
H
ow does this work?
The board of a
FTSE 100 company
launches an inquiry
into allegations
of ?personal
misconduct? against its chief
executive. It goes to great lengths
to show it is doing things by the
book, hiring an outside legal firm
for the investigation and retaining
two others to act as advisers.
Then, ahead of a directors?
meeting to consider the findings
of the inquiry, the chief executive
resigns, despite having rejected
the allegations ?unreservedly?.
The board deems the departure a
retirement, meaning the chief can
keep an incentive package worth
up to �m, and the company
vows the inquiry details will never
be disclosed.
To put it mildly, the WPP board?s
handling of Sir Martin Sorrell?s exit
seems confused. We may never
know who leaked the fact of the
inquiry, but, once the lid was off, the
anxiety to keep the findings secret
looks questionable. Adherence to
process seems to have lasted only
as long as it was useful to say so. If
chairman Roberto Quarta comes
under pressure from shareholders to
say more, he cannot complain.
At a push, one could say Quarta
is being pragmatic. Why risk
handing ammunition to rivals? But
the messy and unexplained exit
of the boss of 33 years? standing
creates problems of its own. Even
now, Sorrell is ?available to assist
with the transition?, says WPP, yet
the founder signed off his email to
staff with an ambiguous ?back to
the future? pledge. Did he mean
31
he wants to get back into the
advertising business? Matters could
become yet more complicated if
Sorrell sets up in competition or bids
for parts of the old empire.
WPP?s sticking-plaster solution
to succession ? Quarto becomes
executive chairman and two senior
executives, Mark Read and Andrew
Scott, become chief operating
officers ? is fine, as far it goes. But if
a permanent successor is recruited
from outside WPP, he or she could
take six months to arrive, and a
post-Sorrell strategy could take
another half a year to be finalised.
That is a long period of uncertainty
to navigate when the City is
questioning whether WPP?s holding
company model is fit for the age of
Facebook and Google.
An optimistic view is Sorrell?s
departure could prove liberating for
operational chiefs who have known
only micro-management from the
centre. But Citigroup?s list of the
immediate risks sounds correct:
account losses; a leak of talent; a
break-up and sale of some divisions;
and ?deep restructuring with a great
deal of cost and uncertainty?.
The share price fell 6.5% on the
first trading day after Sorrell?s exit.
Even after a fall of one third in the
past year, that looks fair. A board
that for years had to defend itself
against the charge it was in thrall
to Sorrell and his pay package has
made the break. But it?s not obvious
that it knows what to do next.
Splitting headache
? Costa is bigger now, but because
a demerger from Premier Inns is
feasible doesn?t mean it stacks up
?A board that had to
defend itself against the
charge it was in thrall to
Sorrell finally made the
break. It?s not obvious it
knows what to do next?
The idea of splitting Whitbread in
two ? separating the Costa coffee
business from the Premier Inn hotel
chain ? was a terrible idea when first
promoted by jobbing investment
bankers half a decade ago. Costa was
too small, and too reliant on Premier
Inn?s cash flows. But maybe, as new
6% activist investor Elliott Advisors
believes, the calculation is different
now. Costa is bigger, is a market
leader in the UK and no longer has to
be subsidised.
The difficulty, however, lies in
believing the manoeuvre would
somehow unlock �n of value
from a company worth �7bn. Just
because a demerger is feasible, it
doesn?t mean the numbers stack up.
A split might push the share price
a little higher, as the 7% rise on news
of Elliott?s presence on the register
suggests, but dreams of an instant
40% re-rating sound fantastical.
Whitbread has only two moving
parts and the market ought to be
able to price both easily. Costa, with
a Chinese operation yet to break
even, is not going to command a
Starbucks-style global rating.
Whitbread chief executive Alison
Brittain should stick to her stance of
setting policy according to the needs
of the business. The short-term
demands of US hedge funds should
not be a priority. If Whitbread does
its job well, the share price will look
after itself.
Scandals prompt
new EU law to
shield corporate
whistleblowers
Jennifer Rankin
Brussels
PHOTOGRAPH:
CHOPPERSHOOT
Royal progress The QE2, which has been converted into a ?oating Dubai hotel, opens some
of its restaurants to the public on Thursday, before a full formal hotel launch in October. After
being bought by a Dubai government-owned company for $100m (�m) in 2007, the ship was
expected to be quickly re?tted, but the ?nancial crisis the following year delayed the project.
Employees who blow the whistle on
corporate-sponsored tax avoidance or
cheating on product standards would
be entitled to special legal status under
a draft EU law.
The European commission will
propose a law next week to protect
whistleblowers after corporate scandals exposed the limited help available
for people seeking to expose corporate behaviour in the public interest.
A former PricewaterhouseCoopers
employee, Antoine Deltour, received
a six-month suspended sentence for
theft and breaking Luxembourg?s professional secrecy laws after helping to
reveal tax avoidance on a huge scale.
Though his conviction was overturned
on appeal, he still faces court in May.
Proponents of the law say it could
have led to earlier exposure of the
VW emissions scandal. It would give
whistleblowers protected status,
including the right to legal aid and
possible financial support. Companies would be banned from firing or
demoting them and face ?dissuasive?
penalties for seeking to block employees seeking to uncover wrongdoing.
Although the law will come into
force after the UK leaves the EU, the
British government may find it forms
part of core EU standards that must be
respected to secure a trade deal.
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32
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
Financial
Receding royalties How stars keep
the money flowing in the digital age
Sean Farrell
O
n Thursday the singersongwriter Billy Bragg
will give a talk at the
Bank of England about
how to build a better
society. Bragg, a proCorbyn activist and veteran protest
singer, was invited as part of an
effort to ?shake up? thinking at the
Bank, he told the Guardian.
While Bragg?s spot at Britain?s
central bank is highly unusual,
his unpaid appearance is part of a
wider trend that has pop and rock
stars trading on their name without
necessarily selling CDs or records.
Books, music coaching, public
appearances, personalised birthday
cards and house gigs are some of the
ways musicians have been earning
money to extend their careers or
make up for dwindling royalties in
the digital age. Often, fans are not
interested in new music but want to
interact with bands, as consumers
spend more on experiences rather
than goods such as CDs. Chris
Difford, co-founder of Squeeze
and the lyricist for hits including
Tempted and Up the Junction,
is touring the UK to promote his
autobiography, Some Fantastic
Place, and fans are there for his
anecdotes as much as for the music.
?People do want an experience
and they?re not interested in CDs
any more. When I ask the audience
who?s got a CD player, hardly anyone
puts their hand up,? Difford says.
His royalties from Squeeze?s most
famous songs have slumped from
�,000 a year in the 1980s to �500
now. Outside Squeeze, Difford
makes money from an expanding
portfolio of activities including
songwriting workshops (he has
also hosted masterclasses for the
Guardian). A weekend workshop
costs �0 a person and a week-long
version �200.
On Saturday Difford travelled to
Kendal in Cumbria to play as a 60th
cYanmaGentaYellow
?When I ask who?s got
a CD player, hardly
any hands go up?
Chris Difford
Co-founder of Squeeze
birthday present for a farmer who
is a Squeeze fan. He charges �000
for these house gigs. A sponsored
podcast and a standup comedy set
are next on his list.
Difford is one of a growing
collection of rockers publishing
autobiographies. The genre has
moved beyond globe-straddling
celebrity tomes such as Rod Stewart?s
Rod: The Autobiography to more
personal accounts such Clothes,
Music, Boys ? Viv Albertine?s memoir
of her career in the Slits ? and Bedsit
Disco Queen, by Everything But the
Girl?s Tracey Thorn.
Pauline Black, lead singer of the
Selecter, published her memoir,
Black by Design, in 2011 and
recently sold the film rights. She
says the book, which describes
growing up as a black woman in
London and her role in the 2-Tone
movement, has raised awareness
of her and the band.
In August, in a booking that
echoes Bragg?s Bank gig, she will be
paid to give a hard-hitting talk about
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:33 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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Sent at 16/4/2018 18:17
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?
33
? Pauline Black of the Selecter at the
Victorious festival in Southsea. Below
right, Billy Bragg at Glastonbury
MAIN PHOTOGRAPH: LORNE THOMSON/REDFERNS
race and gender to an insurance
company. ?That?s what they want
and that?s what they?re going to get,?
she says.
Miles Hunt, lead singer with the
Wonder Stuff, has published three
volumes of diaries charting the rise
and disintegration of the band?s
original lineup in the 1980s and early
90s. He funded the original print run
by selling handwritten lyrics to fans
but stopped after about 600 sets. ?It
got tiresome and there comes a point
when you?ve done too many and
they become meaningless,? he says.
It?s not only frontmen and women
gaining a new lease of life. Mike
Lindup, Level 42?s keyboard player,
has been offering music mentoring
online for the past few months. At
�0 an hour, take-up has been thin
and Lindup is rethinking his prices.
�
Charge for a
performance by
Chris Difford of
Squeeze, whose
royalties are
down to about
�500 a year
�
The price of a
Wondergram
greetings card
from Miles Hunt,
lead singer with
the Wonder Stuff
Next month he and Phil Gould,
Level 42?s former drummer and
chief lyricist, will host the second of
what Lindup hopes will be a series
of evenings where they talk about
their music. The �-a-ticket event,
in Brighton, is a charity benefit,
although both men will pick up a fee.
Lindup still tours with Level 42
and has worked as musical director
for the Michael Jackson Thriller Live
musical, but that show?s last tour
took him away from home for 10
months. Despite co-writing hits such
as Something About You, living off
royalties is not an option, he says.
?To make a living, feed the family
and all that I need to be working
but I?m 59 with a young son and
I?d rather not be out on tour for
months at a time. You have to think
creatively to say: ?What can I do so
that I?m fulfilled as an artist while
making as good a living as I can???
David Hepworth, author of
Uncommon People: The Rise and
Fall of the Rock Stars, says pop?s
heyday, when musicians grew rich
as distant idols, was a blip ? though
many rock careers have been
durable. ?Now the record sales have
gone, these rock stars have got to go
out and get the money directly from
the customer,? he says.
?Some deal with this better than
others. They are lucky they still have
the name recognition that allows
them to do it.?
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34
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
Education
?In this country it?s
been universities,
universities,
universities, when
it should have been
skills, skills, skills?
Robert Halfon
MP
under Margaret Thatcher and the
father of the national curriculum. ?I
think he?s a great man. The more I
hear from him, the more I think he?s
got it.?
Bakerites, according to Halfon,
favour a broader curriculum
focusing on creativity and technical
skills. Baker is largely responsible
for England?s 49 university technical
colleges (UTCs). With university
and industry sponsorship and
government funding on the same
basis as academies, they offer
courses for students aged 14 to 19.
?I want one in every town,? says
Halfon. I point out that nine UTCs
have closed, mainly because of lack
of recruits. ?That?s because other
schools don?t want their pupils to
go to them. They see them as rivals.
And there?s been no leadership at
all from the government. They?re
traditionalists, not Bakerites.?
Profile ?The Tory party should
change its name to the Workers?
party. I am 100% serious?
Robert Halfon has
radical plans in his role
as chair of the education
select committee
Peter Wilby
A
fter last year?s general
election, one of
Theresa May?s first
moves was to sack not
only Justine Greening,
the education
secretary, but also Robert Halfon,
the skills minister, whom she had
appointed to the job less than 11
months earlier. Why, I ask Halfon in
his House of Commons office, was
he caught up in this purge? ?I have
no idea. She just said to me: ?Go back
to the backbenches. You?re good at
campaigning.??
He took the prime minister at
her word. His first campaign was
to get himself elected by his fellow
MPs as chair of the education select
committee. ?I stood for days on end
in Commons corridors and in the
members? lobby handing out my
ladder of opportunity.? Pardon? He
hands me a sheet of paper depicting
a ladder with five rungs. It lays
out the statistics of educational
inequality ? ?when getting similar
GCSE results and living in the same
neighbourhoods, pupils on free
school meals are 47% less likely to
attend Russell Group institutions?
? and policies needed for a more
socially just system.
Many will dismiss this as typical
Tory flannel intended to make a
deeply unequal society a touch
more acceptable. But Halfon is
not an orthodox Conservative. He
has been called the champion of
?blue-collar Conservatism? and ?a
white-van Tory? even though he
went to Highgate, a fee-charging
school in London, and the middleclass University of Exeter, before
becoming chief of staff to Oliver
Letwin, an old Etonian. He has nearzero experience of business.
Last August, he wrote that
?charitable status for most private
schools should come to an end?. He
has since accepted that abolishing
the schools? tax breaks would entail
a dauntingly complex overhaul
of charitable law. Instead, he now
proposes a compulsory levy on
private schools to finance bursaries
for the disadvantaged. It would
operate similarly to the apprentice
levy; schools would get the money
back if they provided their own
bursaries in line with government
criteria. ?I have nothing against
private schools,? Halfon says. ?I just
want to make sure pupils from poor
backgrounds also have a chance to
go. Bursaries are offered now but
they often go to the middle classes.?
Halfon?s biggest passion is for
apprenticeships and skills training,
on which the select committee has
been taking evidence. He thinks FE
colleges should be funded much
more generously. ?In this country,
it?s been universities, universities,
universities when it should have
been skills, skills, skills. There?s huge
amounts of snobbery. Things will
really change only when technical
education passes the dinner-party
test so that when you say you did an
apprenticeship, people say ?wow!
what?s your trade?? FE was cut under
our government. I?m not denying
that. It was stabilised for just one
year when Sajid Javid was business
secretary. He went to an FE college. I
think that says it all.?
He believes half the students in
universities should be on degree
apprenticeships. ?It?s much better
than abolishing student fees which
would just help the middle classes.
? Robert Halfon, who stopped Toby
Young?s appointment to the Office for
Students. His new role gives him more
power than a junior minister, he says
PHOTOGRAPH: SARAH LEE/GUARDIAN
Degree apprentices earn while they
learn so they won?t end up in debt.?
There should also be discounts for
those taking courses in, for example,
healthcare, coding, construction
or engineering, where nearly all
graduates get jobs. In one interview
this year, he picked out medieval
history as a subject for which
students should pay full whack.
The risk of focusing exclusively
on skills, I suggest, is that students
are trained for obsolescence. Don?t
subjects such as medieval history
produce trained minds flexible
enough to cope with anything? ?I
think with every degree you get a
trained mind, not just arts degrees.?
Show Halfon a sacred cow and
he wants to slaughter it. GCSEs
should go, he says. At 16, only tests
to monitor progress are necessary.
A-levels should be replaced by a
baccalaureate covering a far wider
range of subjects. Everybody should
have to do some maths, even at
university. Grammar schools, so
loved by the prime minister, ?aren?t
a priority?. And more money should
be going to universities that focus
on skills and employability. ?They
should be seen as elite.? He cites
Nottingham Trent, which recruits
a quarter of its students from
households with annual incomes
of less than �,000, and the Open
University, describing it as ?one of
Britain?s greatest achievements?.
Would he call himself an
educational traditionalist? No.
An anti-traditionalist? No. ?I?m
a Bakerite.? He?s talking about
Kenneth Baker, education secretary
H
alfon, brought up
in Hampstead,
north London,
wanted to be an
MP from the age of
10 which sounds
a nerdy ambition until you learn
that he couldn?t aspire to be a
footballer because he was born with
a moderate spastic diplegia that
restricts his mobility. By 14, he was
knocking on doors for the Tories. He
took a politics degree and became
chair of his university?s Conservative
Association. He first contested
Harlow, in Essex, in 2001, losing then
and in 2005, before victory in 2010.
His father, an Italian Jew by origin
who ran a successful wholesale
fruit and vegetable business, was a
dedicated Tory who briefly served
as a councillor and took his teenage
son to meet Thatcher. ?I?m a tribal
Conservative,? Halfon says. ?It?s like
a way of life. But I think we need
fundamental, radical change.?
He thinks the Tories should
change their name to the Workers?
party ? ?I?m 100% serious? ? and
adopt his ladder as their symbol
?instead of that silly cauliflower?.
In his new role, Halfon has
already persuaded the government
to give foster carers 30 hours a
week of free childcare ? a working
parents? entitlement from which
they were previously excluded ? and
(it is said) he stopped Toby Young?s
appointment to the Office for
Students board. He doesn?t mince
his words: in the Sunday Times, he
described Young?s appointment as
reinforcing ?an image of my party as
heartless and cruel?.
He exudes determination,
describing everything he disagrees
with as ?incredible?. His present
job, he says, gives him more power
than a junior minister. Expect him to
cause ministers lots of trouble.
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?
35
? Lord Butler believes that a decision
by Cambridge or Oxford could prompt
other institutions to follow
PHOTOGRAPH: ANTONIO OLMOS/GUARDIAN
Oxbridge revolt Will the
top universities decide to
go private and raise fees?
Anna Fazackerley
A
s universities wait to
see if the government
will cut tuition fees
? and therefore their
income ? one of the
most controversial
questions of all is being discussed.
Could Oxford and Cambridge
universities opt to break free from
state control and go private?
The government launched its
review of post-18 education in
February. With the Tories keen to
woo young voters, following Jeremy
Corbyn?s commitment to end tuition
fees, a reduction of the �250 fees
cap is widely expected. But vicechancellors say quality could be
threatened if the government does
not plug any gap with new funding.
Unlike other universities, Oxford
and Cambridge say fees, even at
�250, do not cover the costs of
the tutorial-led teaching for which
they are famous. A spokesperson
for Cambridge would not comment
about going private, but said each
student costs an average of �,500 a
year to teach.
If they declared themselves
independent, they could set their
own fees and not have to endure
state regulation, which requires
them to prove the quality of their
research ? and what they do with
it ? plus that of their teaching
and the amount their graduates
earn.Matt Robb, of EY-Parthenon,
a consultancy that advises
universities, says: ?Oxford and
Cambridge are currently in the top
five institutions in the world. If
that status were threatened by loss
of funding, and this was the only
solution, I think they wouldn?t blink
in pushing to go private.?
Some experts argue that this
could solve a conundrum for
ministers, who want to cut fees
but don?t want to damage two such
stellar British brands.Lord Butler,
a crossbench peer and former
master of University College Oxford,
argues: ?If the government looks
at its interests clearly it ought to
be sympathetic and encouraging
towards this idea. It would save
a lot of money [on loans and
teaching funding]. It would be a
very good solution for some leading
universities to be cut loose, on the
condition that they had a needsblind admissions system [with no
one turned away because they can?t
afford the fees].?
Butler adds that other elite
universities might follow. A senior
Oxbridge college figure agrees: ?It
would really only work if Oxford
and Cambridge, Imperial College
London, UCL, Kings College London
and the LSE all went together.?
Speculation about what the top
two could charge students varies,
but several insiders suggest around
�,000. They insist this would
Opinion
Laura McInerney
Year 6 Sats are stressful all
round. It is time for ministers
to come up with an alternative
T
he past few years
have seen a glut of
parents proclaiming
they are going to
boycott year 6 Sats,
the government?s
national primary tests. Instead of
sending their child in to school
for exam week, they will ?educate
them elsewhere?, in a park or
a museum, to get around the
school absence rules. This year is
no exception. If enough parents
followed the trend, would it ever
finish off Sats, which have become
increasingly unpopular?
In the US, parental protest
contributed to several states
abandoning the Obama
administration?s plan for a
national curriculum, known as the
?common core?, against which all
children would be tested. And states
that continued still face protests.
Just last year, in Long Island, New
York, almost 80,000 children
boycotted their maths exams.
Here in England, our boycotting
bark is worse than its bite. In 2016,
more than 45,000 people signed a
petition supporting parents keeping
their children at home on Sats day.
But when test day came, only a few
schools reported big absences.
Yet there are some compelling
reasons to remove children from
the exams. Teachers are under
serious pressure to get great
results. Performance-related pay
means their salary can be pegged
to children?s scores and, if overall
results are low, the school can be
allow Oxbridge to follow Harvard
University and offer ?needs blind?
admissions. One academic manager
says: ?Perhaps just one third of
students might pay the actual sticker
price.? But such high fees would still
stir up huge controversy.
Lord Butler says: ?I think the
government might be anxious that
independent universities would
become like private schools and
would be largely confined to the
well off. However, that needn?t be
the case as universities with strong
brands could ensure that access
could be completely means tested.?
However Nick Hillman, director
of the Higher Education Policy
Institute thinktank, says: ?If they
walk away from the regulatory
system they are basically the same as
private schools. No one chases Eton
hard about needs-blind admissions.
labelled as failing or ?coasting?,
enabling the government to remove
the school?s management (which it
is not afraid to do).
Add this pressure on to a fragile
teacher ? maybe he or she is new,
maybe this year the class has a few
more struggling kids ? and suddenly
the pressure becomes too much.
Now, their stress transfers to the
pupils, and it?s only a matter of time
until your 11-year-old comes home
crying because she overheard her
teacher saying it?ll ruin his life if the
class don?t get great scores.
It was this sort of pressure that
led Jill Wood, the headteacher of
Little London primary school in
Leeds, to go and physically get a
child out of bed on test day and
put him in an exam hall with a sick
bucket on standby.
Last year she was the first
headteacher to have her entire
school boycott Sats, after she swore
never again to put her children
through the pressure for something
she felt was so meaningless.
But rebellion never comes
free. Parents about to mark their
calendars to keep their children
home need to know that the tests
can be taken at any time up to a
week after the original date. To
keep your child from being scored
in maths or English, this year you
People often talk about admissions
in America in a very positive light,
but although there are needs-blind
admissions, Ivy League universities
also give places to the children of
donors and alumni. Part of moulding
a class is handpicking the wealthy.?
Money is not the only driver
behind the latest rumblings.
There is also resentment about the
government?s drive to treat students
as consumers and to assess the value
universities offer them.
Stephen Toope, Cambridge?s
vice-chancellor, blogged last month:
?For a generation now, politicians
of all stripes have talked as if UK
universities are broken, and hence
in need of ?market discipline?. They
talk as if our students, smart and
energetic people, are in need of
protection. This is an own goal.?
Another vice-chancellor, who has
? Instead of sending their child to
school for exam week, some parents
will ?educate them elsewhere?
?Your 11-year-old comes
home crying because
she overhead her
teacher say it?ll ruin
his life if the class
don?t get great scores?
asked not to be named, says: ?We are
seeing a real threat to institutional
autonomy from ministers. I think
right now we must be the closest
we?ve ever been to a point where
Oxford and Cambridge will turn
round and say, ?Sod this, we are fed
up with being criticised, we?ll go
private?.?
But many in the sector think
this is a leap too far. Prof Simon
Marginson, director of the centre
for global higher education at UCL?s
Institute of Education, says that
changing the relationship between
universities and the state would be
hugely problematic.
?In political terms, giving these
universities what they want is the
opposite of what the government
needs to do at the moment,? he says.
?It needs to show it is supporting
poor people, not elite universities.?
would need to keep them home for
at least six days.
Secondly, most secondary schools
use Sats scores to set children by
ability, particularly in maths. Having
no score on their report card can
mean they are simply lumped into a
middle-ability set. Even if the school
does its own tests, it can often take
at least a term for inaccuracies to be
corrected.
Without Sats, it would be difficult
for the government to track, for
example, if poorer children were
falling behind in some schools more
than in others. The tests may not be
super reliable, but no data will make
inequalities even harder to tackle.
One alternative would be a
?sample? test, given to a group of
selected children across the country,
without relaying the individual data
back to schools, thus diminishing
the stress on teachers and reducing
the relentless drilling most 11-yearolds endure in the months leading
up to the tests .
The government should consider
this option, but so far it seems dead
set against doing so.
If you are planning to keep
your child at home for six days
next month, perhaps one of their
educational activities could be
writing to the minister to advocate
for some better ideas.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:36 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 12:20
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
36
The Guardian Jobs Senior Education, Higher Education, Schools, Courses
STUDY GERMAN IN AUSTRIA
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF
VIENNA
Highams Park School
London
Salary: MPS / UPS �,661 - �,497
From September 2018
Closing date: Midday 27th April, 2018
We are seeking to appoint a talented and inspirational teacher of Maths who
will have the opportunity join the Maths Department in a successful and wellrespected school with a large Sixth Form. There is also the opportunity to take on
the post of KS5 Maths Coordinator for a suitably experienced candidate.
Highams Park School is a highly successful and heavily oversubscribed local 11-18
comprehensive with approximately 1600 students on roll including approximately
400 in the 6th Form. In the most recent 2017 OFSTED inspection report the
school was judged to be good and excellent results are achieved at GCSE and
A-level. The school has an excellent reputation in the local area and students now
enjoy the new 6th form building which opened in September 2017. The school is a
converter Academy.
The successful candidate will join a well-resourced and vibrant Maths Department
which is housed in its own teaching block with excellent facilities. This is a
magnificent opportunity develop teaching skills within a friendly, well qualified
department which achieves excellent results and where Maths and Further Maths
are popular subjects at A-Level. The department is well organised, fully embracing
the new curriculum and assessment changes in secondary Maths.
Please visit the schools website for more information
http://www.highamsparkschool.co.uk/index.php
We are committed to the safety of our pupils through our recruitment and school
practices; all jobs are subject to an Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check.
The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) helps employers make safer recruitment
decisions and prevent unsuitable people from working with vulnerable groups,
including children
Rewarding Volunteering Opportunity
DELHI SCHOOLS, INDIA
Always looking for great people for great jobs
Have you got the skills we are looking for to contribute towards our mission to providing outstanding teaching and
learning? We currently have a number of vacancies for teachers, heads of department and outstanding practitioners
in a range of subject areas.
Dudley Academies Trust was formed in September 2017 uniting Castle High School, Hillcrest School and Community
College, Holly Hall Academy and High Arcal School under the sponsorship of Dudley College of Technology. The Trust,
when combined with the sponsor, annually supports 8,500 young people aged 11 to 19 years old and employs almost
1,100 sta?.
You will be joining the Trust at an exciting time as we are at the beginning of our journey to provide a ?rst-class
education for the young people of Dudley, with outstanding teaching and learning being the Trust?s foremost priority.
The Trust recognises that our sta? are our most valuable asset and investing in our people is a key strategic priority
for the Trust. A common and extensive programme of sta? development operates across the Trust, this is extended
to senior and middle leaders, aspiring leaders, teaching and support sta? and non-quali?ed teachers.
Want to discover more about the Trust and the opportunities it can o?er to you?
Join us at one our recruitment open events being held on the morning of Saturday 21st April 2018 and the evening of
Wednesday 25th April 2018. To book your place please call 01384 363067.
Or alternatively please visit www.dudleycol.ac.uk/jobs to apply.
Are you an experienced primary or secondary senior teacher or teacher trainer?
The Helga Todd Foundation runs research based pre-service and in-service teacher training
programmes in India.
From mid- July 2018 we shall be continuing our Phase 2 CPD initiative to deliver a creative
and interactive teaching and learning programme to teachers in a number of Delhi schools.
We require candidates in the following areas and specialisms: Early Years, Maths, Science
and Humanities/Social Sciences and Communications.
In addition, we require volunteers with experience of leading school improvement in
primary and secondary phases.
Assignments are from 4 to 6 weeks.
You will be working as a volunteer with costs of fares, accommodation and subsistence
met by the Helga Todd Foundation. You will also receive a modest allowance and training
materials.
For more information, please contact info@helgatoddfoundation.com
or send your C.V. to Richard- richard.pook@wandleassociates.co.uk.
Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.
July-September 2018
Intensive courses, leisure
time activities, special
courses
Course fee for 4 weeks:
EUR 480
Flat rate (course and
accommodation):
For 4 weeks: EUR 965 ?
1.037
For more details, please visit:
www.germancourses.at
Tel: (+43) 1 4277 24101
Fax: (+43) 1 4277 9241
Email: sprachenzentrum@
univie.ac.at
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:37 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 12:20
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
The Guardian Jobs Schools
37
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:38 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 14:45
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:39 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 14:45
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:40 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 17:40
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
The wild violet colony is expanding its
territory, spreading a sweet scent ?
a testament to our infrequent mowing
Journal Country diary Page 7
40
Weather
Tuesday 17 April 2018
UK and Ireland Noon today
Forecast
Around the UK
London
Sunny Mist
Fog
1000
996
988
Low 11 High 20
1004
992
11
Sunny intervals
Lows and highs
Precipitation
Air pollution
Tomorrow
10
18 5%
Low
Manchester
Mostly cloudy
24
Shetland
Inverness
11
Overcast/dull
14
13
Sunny showers
Edinburgh
1016
24
Glasgow
Light showers
Low 10 High 20
Thursday
10
Low
15
5%
Low
65%
Low
65%
Low
65%
Low
65%
Low
60%
Low
Leeds
Newcastle
ca
14
11
Sleet
65%
Moderate
Sunny and heavy showers
Rain
14
Birmingham
31
Light
snow
Belfast
13
14
Newcastle
Moderate
York
Snow showers
15
Heavy snow
Dublin
Liverpool
rpoo
ol
1020
Nottingham
tting
tt
Ice
35C
Thundery rain
10
15
14
Birmingham
ming
30
Norwich
25
20
Thundery showers
14
15
1008
5
Temperature,
篊
0
16
-5
1012
13
-10
Wind speed,
mph
Dover
Plymouth
Moderate
-15
-20
H
1016
1008
984
L
976
L
L
1016
1024
1024
992
H
H
1000
Cold front
1024
Warm front
H
1016
H
Occluded front
1016
1016
Trough
Jet stream
The jet stream
will shift out
into the Atlantic
by Wednesday,
bringing warm
weather to the
UK.
Average speed, 25,000ft
Direction of
jet stream
110-159kph
160-209
210-259
8
12
Cardiff
10
13
Edinburgh
14
Weatherwatch
1008
L
1016
Rainy spells in
the north-west
on Wednesday;
otherwise,
dry and warm.
Warm and dry
across the UK on
Thursday.
9
1016
1000
Bristol
17
The Channel Islands
Atlantic front
A cold front will
move across the
UK today.
LLondon
nd
d
Cardi?
Ca
10
X
1
18
15
15
Atlantic Ocean
260 and above
Forecasts and graphics provided by
Accuweather, Inc �18
Around the world
We tend to think of April as being
one of the less extreme months,
weather wise. And usually it is: a
mixture of Chaucer?s sweet April
showers and spells of sunshine,
leavened by light southerly breezes,
bringing back the birds from Africa.
In practice, April?s weather can
be just as fickle as any other month.
And in the first year of the new
millennium, it was the wettest April
on record across much of the UK.
The England and Wales
precipitation series began in 1766,
yet is still used by the Met Office to
assess rainfall records. Taking the
average across the whole area, a total
of 143mm (more than 5.6in) of rain
fell in April 2000. This easily beat
previous wet Aprils, such as 1782,
1818 and more recently 1998, all of
which topped the 130mm mark. The
highest figures were in the south.
In comparison, typical April
rainfall is roughly 40-80mm, while
in some years it can drop as low as
10mm ? barely noticeable at all.
Stephen Moss @stephenmoss_tv
Algiers
19
Lagos
31
Ams?dam
18
Lima
23
Athens
22
Lisbon
20
Auckland
22
Madrid
21
B Aires
27
Malaga
21
Bangkok
31
Melb?rne
15
Barcelona
19
Mexico C
26
Basra
31
Miami
26
Beijing
25
Milan
24
Berlin
18
Mombasa
29
Bermuda
22
Montreal
5
Brussels
18
Moscow
17
Budapest
22
Mumbai
35
C?hagen
12
N Orleans
26
Cairo
35
Nairobi
23
Cape Town
23
New Delhi
38
Chicago
5
New York
10
Corfu
21
Paris
20
Dakar
23
Perth
22
Dhaka
39
Prague
18
Dublin
15
Reykjavik
10
Florence
23
Rio de J
27
Gibraltar
20
Rome
20
H Kong
25
Singapore
32
Harare
23
Stockh?m
15
Helsinki
12
Sydney
20
Istanbul
17
Tel Aviv
27
Jo?burg
20
Tenerife
22
K Lumpur
32
Tokyo
16
Stephen Moss will be one of the panel
of Weatherwatch contributors taking
part in Freak Weather in History at
the British Library on Wednesday 2
May, at 7pm
K?mandu
25
Vancouv?r
11
Kabul
17
Warsaw
18
Kingston
30
Wash?ton
12
Kolkata
38
Well?ton
18
L Angeles
20
Zurich
21
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:41 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 16/4/2018 17:31
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
Football
Commonwealth Games
Mourinho ready
to drop United?s
subdued stars
Martha Kelner on
the Gold Coast?s
golden moments
Page 46 Page 43 41
Cal Crutchlow
has shot to the
top of MotoGP
on a non-works
Honda and
without having
to spend endless
hours in the gym
NICOLAS AGUILERA/
EPA
Valentino Rossi, who was 21 when he graduated, or Marc
M醨quez, the champion, who was 20 when he won the
first of his four titles and is 25 (and rode on Sunday like a
hot-headed teenager).
Crutchlow also came into MotoGP from Superbikes
rather than rising through the Moto3 and Moto2
categories, which offer a smoother ramp of preparation,
and arrived at the top at a time when no British rider had
won a grand prix for 30 years. There had been several
decent prospects since Barry Sheene took his last victory
in 1981 but none managed to make a significant impact.
And he found himself on a grid packed with talent, from
Rossi through Casey Stoner, Jorge Lorenzo, Dani Pedrosa
and Andrea Dovizioso, all of whom won races during
his爁irst season.
It was a little bit like Andy Murray trying to break into
a top echelon occupied by Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal
and Novak Djokovic, and it took him a while to do it.
Whereas the race winners were riding works machines,
Crutchlow spent his first three seasons on a privately
entered Yamaha run by one of the satellite teams.
Gradually, he worked his way up to become a challenger
for podium places, despite some mishaps, and in the
2013 Dutch Grand Prix at Assen he landed his first pole
position, going on to finish third, a few seconds behind
Rossi and M醨quez.
F
Fast and loose
Crutchlow takes
laid-back route
to be best Brit
since Sheene
Richard Williams
I
n a universe of professional sportsmen and
women happy to proclaim the incredible
rigour of their winter training regimes, it was
refreshing爐o hear Cal Crutchlow summarising
his very different preparation for the MotoGP
season a few minutes after climbing off his
Honda in Argentina two weekends ago, having
won the second race of the new campaign and
shot to the top of the world championship standings.
He爏poke of spending the off-season on holiday
in California with his wife and their one-year-old
daughter.�It shows you don?t have to ride motorcycles
all winter and do press-ups and pull-ups,? he said,
?because I haven?t done one.?
This is Crutchlow?s eighth season in MotoGP and
perhaps it has taken him all that time to learn how to
relax and make the most of his talent. His performance
on the Rio Hondo circuit, in tricky conditions requiring
the highest level of feel and intelligence, was that of a
rider who has grown out of the years when he always
seemed to be having something to prove.
On a chaotic day, when a drying track provoked
a pre-start episode of chaos throughout the field
over the choice of tyres, and featured a performance
of startling immaturity from the reigning world
champion,燙rutchlow was the one who kept his head.
It was he who best assessed the changing nature of the
asphalt/rubber interface throughout the 24 laps and
who爐ook his victory, after a fierce four-way fight, with
cool panache.
He is 32 and did not achieve promotion to the top
tier until he was 25. Contrast that with the most famous
rider on the current grid, the seven-times champion
or 2014 he announced a big move to
Ducati, believing only a hook-up with
a factory team would give him the
chance of victories. After a year of
mechanical unreliability and crashes
on the Italian machines, however, he
and the team parted company. Having
gone from 12th爐o seventh to fifth in
the championship standings in his three years, now
he slumped to 13th, behind two younger Brits, Bradley
Smith and Scott Redding.
Needing to rebuild his career, he moved to another
satellite outfit, the Monaco-based Team LCR. There he
was given a factory-specification Honda RC213V, as used
by Stoner and M醨quez to win the world titles in 2012 and
2013. The rehabilitation took time and a third place in
Argentina was the only top-three finish in a season when
he hauled himself back up to eighth in the standings.
After a bad start to 2016, his fortunes were
transformed not just by a win in wet conditions in the
Czech Republic GP at Brno, ahead of
It was a bit Rossi and M醨quez, but by a follow-up
victory at Phillip Island in Australia
like Andy
after M醨quez, the pole man, crashed
on the first lap. This was the first time
Murray
a British rider had won two grands
trying
prix in a season since Sheene in 1979.
If 2017 was a year of marking time,
to break
with a single third place and six other
into a top
top-five finishes, this season has
echelon
started on a very different note. And
now, after adding the points for fourth
occupied
place in Qatar to his win in Argentina,
by Federer, he is the first British rider since
Nadal and Sheene 39 years ago to sit on top of the
world standings.
Djokovic
A huge draw in many countries,
MotoGP will once again pack out
Silverstone in August without managing to attract a
wider British audience. This is a particular mystery since,
season after season, it offers the most spectacular racing
to be seen in any form of modern motor sport, with
a compelling range of personalities and nationalities
among the riders, who retain a sense of human agency
long lost to Formula One. On Sunday, for instance,
Crutchlow and his Honda were fighting for the podium
places with an Australian on a Ducati, a Frenchman on a
Yamaha and a Spaniard on a Suzuki.
As long as he is on a non-works machine, the odds are
still heavily against the Coventry-born rider mounting
a season-long challenge for the title. But when he and
his rivals meet again this weekend at the Circuit of the
Americas in Austin, Texas, the Englishman will have a
new status to defend.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:42 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 19:36
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
?
Sport
42
Rugby union
Cornwall vote can lift
its sport into fast lane
Council approval is required
today for � funding which
will open co?ers for an initial
6,000-capacity stadium
Robert Kitson
A
ERIC GAILLARD/
REUTERS
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Bristol Rugby will become Bristol
Bears to seek a ?global audience? on
their Premiership return next season,
the owner, Steve Lansdown, said. PA
mid the onrushing
tide of worrying
world news stories,
the outcome of a
123-person vote in
Truro?s county hall
might seem relatively trivial. If you
live in Cornwall or have the faintest
interest in the growth of professional
club rugby union, however, today is
as defining a moment as any in the
county?s sporting history.
No pressure on Cornwall?s
councillors but the decision
on whether or not to approve
council funding for the proposed
new Stadium for Cornwall goes
way beyond sport. If you had a
once-in-a-lifetime chance to boost
your region?s economy, offer hope to
those young athletes not destined to
become world-class surfers or sailors
and create a lasting community
legacy, would you grasp it? Or would
you take the view that public money
allocated for development is better
spent on something other than
a ballpark which may never host
sustainable top-tier football or rugby?
Not all those voting are sports fans
and political pressures also mean the
vote could still go either way. The
positive argument runs as follows:
the council says ?Yes? and approves
� of funding towards the stadium
project, which it remains confident
the government will match. This
would remove the funding logjam
that has delayed the much-debated
�.3m project for years.
An initial 6,000-capacity complex
with a 4G pitch would be in use for
365 days a year, shared by Cornish
Pirates, Truro City燜C and Truro and
Penwith College. There would also be
a health club and Cornwall?s biggest
conference facility attached, all on a
site with excellent transport links.
Crucially, the money is not being
diverted from stretched social care
budgets or pothole-repair funds. It
reflection on the race in case anything
should be done to reduce risk.
However, connections of Final
Nudge are philosophical about the
bad luck that meant their horse ran
out of room when the field packed up
at the race?s eighth obstacle.
?I jumped the fence fine, I just
wasn?t allowed to get my landing
gear down,? said Gavin Sheehan,
Final Nudge?s jockey, who broke an
arm. Sheehan said the congestion was
caused by the pace slowing down after
Becher?s Brook, two fences earlier.
The leader over the Canal Turn,
Daryl Jacob on Ucello Conti, swung out
wide to take the fence at an acute angle
and save ground on the landing side,
a particularly effective version of the
manoevre made usually by the leader
at that point. But when the packed field
of 32 remaining runners followed him
at a similar angle, some found themselves running out of爎oom.
Sheehan said: ?As soon as my horse
got up into the air, the horse on my left
came over a little bit and the horse on
my outside came over, they basically
came in a triangle in front of me. The
horse on my right, Lord Windermere,
I think he fell as well. The two of us
were kind of knocked over.
?I think it was just because we
were going a bit steadier. If we were
going on a stride, I don?t think we
would have been as congested as we
Hitting top form Novak Djokovic looked back
to his best as the former world No�defeated
the Serbian Dusan Lajovic 6-0, 6-1 in the Monte
Carlo Masters opening round yesterday
Sport
In brief
Tennis
Evans set for Glasgow
return after drug ban
Dan Evans will make his comeback
in Glasgow next week after receiving
a wildcard entry from the Lawn
Tennis Association. He is set to
play in the qualifying draw for the
Glasgow Trophy, an ATP Challenger
event, having served a one-year ban
after testing positive for cocaine
during the Barcelona Open. Evans,
24, said: ?I have learned a lot about
myself in my time away.? PA
Racing
Canal Turn
incident under
Aintree focus
Chris Cook
The Canal Turn incident that took three
runners out of the Grand National on
Saturday will be considered by Aintree officials as part of their annual
Formula One
Horner urges Ricciardo
to stay at Red Bull
Daniel Ricciardo has been urged to
stay with Red Bull when his contract
expires at the end of the season.
The Australian won emphatically in
China on Sunday and the team chief,
Christian Horner, said: ?Why would
he want to be anywhere else?? PA
Rugby union
Bristol rebrand as Bears
for Premiership return
is ring-fenced development cash
which, by law, cannot be used for
anything other than the economic
regeneration of one of the country?s
poorer regions. Among beneficiaries
of such funds are the Eden Project,
Tate St營ves and Newquay airport.
The timing, from English
rugby?s perspective, could hardly
be more significant. On Thursday
the Professional Game Board is
scheduled to meet to discuss, among
other things, the ongoing future of
promotion and relegation to and
from the Premiership. No爋ne is
suggesting the Pirates would thrive
in the Premiership right now but
imagine that potential avenue being
forever closed. What price then a
brave new world for the athletic sons
and daughters of ancient Kernow?
Perhaps the best person to consult
on this cat?s cradle of related issues is
Mark Evans, the former Saracens and
Harlequins chief executive who has
been assisting the bid. Like everyone
else, he is unsure which way the
Truro vote will go but is convinced a
?No? will kill stone dead any chance
of professional club rugby taking
root in the rugby-mad far-west. ?If it
doesn?t happen this time it?ll never
happen unless a billionaire comes
out of nowhere. The Pirates will go
back to being a level�r�side with
very little aspiration, and another
heartland goes.?
Evans has been saying for two
decades that club rugby?s rulers
should be more concerned with
growing the sport than chasing
profit. Ending automatic promotion
and relegation, he believes, is a small
part of a much bigger picture. ?The
current model is bust, in my view. It?s
not growing the game significantly,
it?s not profitable for the investors,
television figures for club rugby
are not growing significantly [and]
attendances are only growing largely
through the marquee games.
?Are we prepared to say the
English league will always be
propped up by extremely wealthy
people? If all the revenue goes out
of the changing room door, the
game doesn?t grow. All that money
could go into marketing the game
or improving facilities. Some club
ticket prices are getting ridiculous.
We?ve got too many games which
leads to too many injuries, which
leads to oversized squads, which
leads to a Championship that is
dysfunctional. What we are doing
to our second tier is nothing short of
shameful. All the game has done is
ridden the wave of higher and higher
media rights. To which I would say a
rising tide floats all boats.?
Evans points to Australian
rules football, which has invested
hugely in places previously without
an elite AFL club, and thinks
rugby should follow suit ? how
about a Brighton-based side, for
example? ? if the numbers stack up.
?I爓ant the game to be bigger via
a managed-growth model, with a
closed league and a percentage of
central television money syphoned
off to build up new markets.
Premiership Rugby can?t have it
both ways. They can?t say we want
to be independent and control our
own destiny and not have a growth
strategy. I defy anybody to stand up
and say, ?This is working.??
Which is why the decision
this week resonates far beyond
Penzance, Redruth, Camborne and
every other Cornish rugby town.
Here?s hoping that Hellfire Stadium,
Stack Stevens Park or the Vickery
Arena receives its green light, even
in these uncertain economic times.
Build it, to borrow from Kevin
Costner in Field of Dreams, and they
will surely come.
The Stadium
for Cornwall is
proposed for
Threemilestone,
close to Truro,
and would host
several sports
were.? All of the jockeys who exited
the race at that fence were prepared
to accept the incident as the kind of
bad luck that arises in Grand Nationals.
Chris Cook?s tips
Newmarket 1.50 Aurum 2.25 Jawwaal
3.00營燗m A Dreamer 3.35 Symbolization
4.10燦oble Peace 4.45 New Show
5.20燫obero�(nb) 5.55 Arzaak
Exeter 2.00 King Calvin 2.35 Albert D?Olivate
3.10 Royal Palladium 3.45 Choix Des
Armes (nap) 4.20 L?Auberge Du Bois
4.55營rish燭histle 5.30 Palmaria
Carlisle 2.10 Scales 2.45 Skipping On 3.20燚uke
Debarry 3.55 Achill Road Boy 4.30 Skywards
Reward 5.05 Dica 5.40 Lily?s Gem
?I think it?s just one of those things,?
Andrew Lynch said. ?If they did any
more about it, they?d probably take
more away from the National. It?s
just爑nfortunate.?
Aintree long ago installed a false
inside rail on the approach to the
Canal Turn, which has usually helped
to reduce such congestion. Its clerk
of the course, Andrew Tulloch, will
now consider if additional measures
are needed.
?We will look at it, as we look at
everything that arises each year,? he
said. ?We?ll have a discussion with
jockeys as well. It?s very much getting
their feedback on what other things we
can do. It?s all evidence based.?
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:43 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 16/4/2018 18:40
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
Sport
Commonwealth Games
Gold Coast finale
lowers the bar
for Birmingham
Eleven days of largely slick
operation were somewhat
undermined by bum notes
struck in the last 24
4 hours
Martha Kelner
Gold Coast
T
he organisers of
Birmingham 2022,
possibly daunted by
following an event so
well received on the
ground, may have
felt some relief as the Gold Coast
Commonwealth Games ended on a
bum note.
Furious spectators and even
the host broadcaster condemned a
closing ceremony that barely paid
a passing mention to the athletes.
Usain Bolt, paid to be here by a
telecommunications company and
still the biggest draw even eight
months into retirement, was on
the DJ decks and a Kylie Minogue
impersonator featured.
But the athletes had already
been seated before the show
began, an outrage which reached
the Queensland premier,
Annastacia Palaszczuk. ?I?m just as
disappointed as anyone else,? she
said. ?We wanted to stand there and
celebrate our athletes and it didn?t
happen. Whoever was responsible
for making that decision should
hang their head in shame.?
A mea culpa followed from the
Commonwealth Games chairman,
Peter Beattie. ?We wanted to get
the athletes in early but we made
a serious error of judgment by not
having them in the broadcast,? he
said. ?It was driven by concerns
about the welfare of athletes but
they should have been involved.
There were too many speeches, I
shouldn?t have spoken because it
bored the athletes silly.?
A potentially more serious
oversight unfolded on the marathon
course when the Scottish runner
Callum Hawkins collapsed with heat
exhaustion and was left on the road
for several minutes without medical
attention as spectators snapped
selfies. He was released from
hospital yesterday.
These were rare errors from
an organising committee which
delivered 11 days of slick operations,
? Athletes wander into the Carrara
Stadium for the closing ceremony
mostly full stadiums and a notable
absence of traffic jams, helped by the
exodus of locals scared off before the
Games began by regular warnings of
impending chaos.
Where Birmingham could
struggle to compete is with the
stunning vistas, particularly the
sandy beaches and turquoise waters
that provided the backdrop to the
open-air aquatics centre and the
volleyball stadium. The venues for
the gymnastics, cycling and netball
were sold out for almost every
session, pumping with music and
entertaining sport.
The only disappointment was that
many of England?s leading names
failed to perform. The Brownlee
brothers arrived slightly injured and
left without medals. Max Whitlock
was outshone on the pommel
horse by the 18-year-old Rhys
McClenaghan from Northern Ireland.
The world indoor champion hurdler
Andrew Pozzi and the Olympic
medallist hammer thrower Sophie
Hitchon faltered, and Adam Peaty
was beaten in the pool for the first
time in four years.
But at least they showed up. Bolt
was bemused that some of England?s
best sprinters, including CJ Ujah,
who had every chance of winning
a 100m medal, did not travel.
Sebastian Coe, the president of
athletics? governing body the IAAF,
was also surprised. ?My gut instinct
is try to not sit out championships
because they are important at the
end of your career,? he said. ?When
you turn your cards over it?s medals
that people judge you on, not fast
times in the Diamond League.?
While Scotland and Wales
comfortably exceeded their best
medal hauls at an away Games,
analysts suggested it was England?s
second worst showing in 21 as they
won 16.2% of the medals on offer.
Their only poorer performance was
Melbourne 2006. The timing of the
Games in the southern hemisphere,
when our best athletes would usually
be in heavy training, does not help,
so they will almost certainly bounce
back in July 2022.
T
hese Games will be
recalled in England
not for the medal table
but for the netball
team, who provided
the most thrilling
and unexpected result by beating
Australia. The tales of perseverance
and triumph against the odds also
cut through. The weightlifter Zoe
Smith, who has battled injury,
funding cuts and worked as a
waitress between training, won
silver, just days after having an
epidural to ease agonising pain.
No stranger to heartache was the
400m hurdler Kyron McMaster of
the British Virgin Islands, who won
43
Home nations highlights reel Three golds to savour
1
England?s
netballers
stunned the
favourites
Australia with
a final-second
one-point win for
Commonwealth
gold in their
first major final
since�75
SCOTT BARBOUR/
GETTY IMAGES
2
Scotland?s
Katie Archibald
won 3,000m
individual
pursuit gold
before brother
John secured
silver in the
men?s 4,000m
individual
pursuit.
RYAN PIERSE/
GETTY IMAGES
3
Northern
Ireland
gymnast Rhys
McClenaghan,
18, was in tears
after pipping
the Olympic
champion Max
Whitlock to gold
on the pommel
horse.
PAUL CHILDS/
REUTERS
gold only months after his coach was
killed by Hurricane Irma.
Tom Daley produced a
performance which will live longer
in the memory than any perfectly
executed back 3� pike. ?There are
37 countries in the Commonwealth
where it?s illegal to be who I am;
hopefully we can reduce that
number,? he said, calling on the 37 of
the 53 where homosexuality is illegal
to change their laws.
Given that number was 43 four
years ago in Glasgow, it is not a
hopeless plea. Where other sporting
bodies scarper at the mere mention of
politics, the Commonwealth Games
Federation chief executive, David
Grevemberg, actively promotes
discussion of human-rights issues.
The Rwanda women?s beach
volleyball team were encouraged to
wear black armbands to mark the
24th anniversary of the genocide,
while Australia?s indigenous culture,
which it still wrestles with, was a
major part of the opening ceremony.
The question which pervades
every Commonwealth Games is ?do
they really matter?? From a sporting
perspective it is impossible to argue
they compare with the Olympics
or a world championships. But the
Games has shown once again that
they offer something wholly, often
wonderfully, different.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:44 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 19:22
?
44
Sport
Cricket
?I lived every moment
of the Ashes defeat ?
I was just as gutted?
Exclusive
Ben Stokes recalls his stirring
England return, explains
why爌laying in the IPL is not
about money and has his say
on the Root captaincy debate
Ali Martin
Bengaluru
I
t?s 6pm at the Chinnaswamy
Stadium in Bangalore. A
drowsy sun has already slunk
below the stands, kites glide
overhead and after three
hours of intense training in
the heat, where he has batted twice,
thundered in with the ball for the
first time in weeks and stayed late to
work on his flying boundary catches,
Ben Stokes strolls over for a chat.
There is of course one almighty
elephant in the ground. We both
briefly acknowledge this but it
remains just that. This is his first
in-depth interview since the
incident in Bristol on 25燬eptember
last year but regarding events that
night Stokes must wait to have his
say in court this summer after he and
two other men pleaded not guilty to
affray. For now it is only cricket, both
England and Indian Premier League,
that can be on the agenda.
The Indian Premier League first,
where the 26-year-old is in his
second season and at his second
side, Rajasthan Royals. Eoin
Morgan, one of his two international
captains, has recently credited the
all-rounder?s MVP-winning stint
with the runners-up Rising Pune
Supergiant last year for ?breaking
down barriers? and causing the
English invasion that has a record
12爌layers spread across six of the
eight franchises.
Stokes appreciates their presence
in Twenty20?s great tamasha, rather
than with their counties, is not to
everyone?s taste back home. The
subject of his �7m deal with Pune
last year ? a record for an overseas
player ? and new price tag at just
a shade under, is one at which he
squirms. ?Last year there was so
much said about me and the money.
? Ben Stokes celebrates with Royals
team-mate Dhawal Kulkarni
I just shy away from it. I don?t want
to come across as arrogant. I don?t
know how to answer it. It?s just
weird,? he says.
?Some people think we?re going
for one reason but as a sportsman
that is genuinely not what it is
about. It?s about being exposed to
the best T20 players in the world in
front of capacity crowds every three
or four days. I don?t think people
understand that or see it for what
it is. We don?t quite get that in our
T20 right now ? there aren?t many
international matches ? but when
the new competition kicks off [in
2020] maybe that will happen more.?
Stokes is clearly enjoying his time
with the Royals. The inaugural IPL
winners in 2008, they are now trying
to rebuild public trust in their first
season back after a two-year ban
for the spot-fixing scandal that cost
three players their careers. He has
struck up a particular rapport with
Shane Warne, the team?s mentor,
while Jos Buttler is a familiar face
in the ranks. But as is the case with
England, all team-mates tend to
gravitate towards him.
His only off-field struggle in
India has come from some of the
commercial demands that pack
out the schedule on non-match
days. ?They ask you to do things
that are so far out of your comfort
zone ? it?s just not me,? he says,
perhaps in reference to some lively
Bollywood-style dancing of his that
can be witnessed during the IPL?s
numerous TV ad breaks.
The feet are moving better on the
field even if the returns do not yet
jump off the page. His third match
against Royal Challengers Bangalore
? a high-scoring 19-run win on the
day after the interview ? is the most
impactful yet, with a 21-ball 27 from
No� his first wicket of the campaign
and a leaping boundary catch to
remove Brendon McCullum that
kickstarted the RCB struggle in their
pursuit of 218. While the latter was
a classic case of Stokes making the
ridiculous look sublimely simple ?
his extra training 24 hours earlier
leapt to mind as he sprung high ? it
is likely the bowling will have given
Stokes most satisfaction, purely for
the fact he was charging in at full tilt
for the first time in a long time.
A pre-Christmas spell in
New Zealand with Canterbury
notwithstanding, the general lack
of action leading into his return for
England in February had affected his
body. Bowling in the one-day series
saw wickets follow but he found his
legs seized up after spells. Then, just
before the Tests that followed, some
historical stress fractures in his lower
back suddenly began to cause him
grief and injections were required.
Just 10 laboured overs were
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
? Ben Stokes enjoys taking
on the best T20 players in the
IPL with Rajasthan Royals
AIJAZ RAHI/AP
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:45 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
45
Ten Doeschate
unhappy after
Headingley?s
big washout
MICHAEL BRADLEY/AFP/GETTY
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 16/4/2018 20:14
sent down in the two Tests that
followed the jabs but Stokes says he
is feeling himself again; to prevent
a recurrence he is remodelling his
bowling action. The late step into
the crease that pointed him to fine
leg and left him needing to twist in
order to straighten up is being eased
out. He is happy with the results but
the true test is in the middle.
The return to the England camp
? he has been restored to the side
until the end of proceedings ? was
probably as smooth as he and his
employers could have hoped.
Stokes says the squad?s response
felt no different to before from
his perspective ? ?it?s not like we
hadn?t stayed in touch? ? but admits
watching his Test colleagues among
them go down 4-0 in Australia was
tough. ?I lived every moment of the
Ashes. I?m sure it was nowhere near
the emotions of the guys out there
but I was just as gutted.?
Readjustment batting-wise took
little time either, with one low-key
score of 12 in the first one-dayer at
Hamilton ? ?I was anxious. I was
guilty of thinking too far ahead
and trying to make an impression.
It was like I was at the start of my
career,? ? before a less flustered
unbeaten 63 steered Morgan?s
side to a series-levelling win at
Mount燤aunganui. ?I was really
emotional after getting man of the
match in that second game back. It
was such a relief to perform and be
there at the end. I had five minutes
to myself after getting back to the
dressing room, sat in my bubble and
taking it all in. The lads appreciated
that and gave me space. It was a
great feeling.?
For the Tests that followed
that eventual 3-2 win, a setback
? albeit one that was widely
expected ? took place when Stokes
was told by Joe燫oot and Trevor
Bayliss he would not return to the
vice-captaincy. ?They just said
they wanted to stick with Jimmy
[Anderson]. But regardless, I know
my role and it won?t change how I
go about things. It won?t be in the
back of my mind and I won?t hold it
against anyone,? he says.
?It?s all about what I?m going to
do in the future. I just want to get us
back to playing the way we want to
play. We were so close to being one
of the best teams in the world. We?ve
slacked off in the past two years but
knowing how close we were gives
you that desire to get back there.?
That slacking off, as he puts it,
bottomed out with the 58 all out in
Auckland ? ?It was like the pins in a
bowling alley falling down in slow
motion? ? from which a 1-0 series
Graham Hardcastle
Headingley
?I had five
minutes sat
in my bubble.
The lads gave
me space.
It was a
great feeling?
defeat followed. From being one
Test win away from holding all nine
bilateral Test trophies in 2016, only
for Pakistan to win at the Oval and
square the series, England have five
in the cabinet to match their world
ranking of fifth.
Root, Bayliss and the as-yet
reformed selection panel have a
job on their hands. The former is
battling to turn half-centuries into
three figures, too ? his last nine have
gone unconverted ? and it is a topic
Stokes has been discussing with one
of his new friends in India.
?I have seen a lot of people saying
he shouldn?t be captain ? I won?t
say who ? and that his batting is
being affected by it. I had a chat with
Warnie about this, because I don?t
see it. Look at his average [52.6]
and all the runs scored ? why do
people have a big thing about not
converting? He said Joe is a great
player but this is what can make
him one of the greatest. I sort of
understand it�
?But the thing about Joe is he
doesn?t bat for himself. If he thinks
it is time to take a team down, he
will go for it. That?s how he wants
us to play as a team and as captain,
he feels he has to set the standard.
People can have a go at him but the
bigger picture, that?s what he is
trying to build. When it clicks ? and
that is coming ? those scores will
become 150s and 200s. Hopefully
when people read what I have
said here they will understand
a燽it爉ore.?
Doubtless much of the heat from
the end of England?s sorry Test
travails this winter was drawn by
Australia?s ball-tampering scandal
and before Stokes heads up to the
dressing room at the Chinnaswamy,
before his new team?s departure
from the ground, his views on the
topic are sought.
?I?m keeping my mouth shut.
Certain people said some things and
it then comes back to get you�? he
says, before stopping himself from
elaborating on who and what he
means. Given the aforementioned
elephant, it is probably for the best.
? Yorkshire
say they have
state-of-the-art
drainage but
that the amount
of rainfall was
too much
TGSPHOTO/REX/
SHUTTERSTOCK
Ryan ten Doeschate has criticised
Yorkshire?s lack of action after the
opening match in Essex?s defence of
the County Championship was abandoned without a ball being bowled yesterday ? the first four-day washout in
history at Headingley.
The Essex captain bemoaned the
fact there had not been any work done
on the problem area of the outfield.
After a fourth-day 10am inspection,
the ICC elite panel umpires Ian Gould
and Richard Illingworth decided there
had been no significant improvement
in saturated patches towards the old
Football Stand end of the ground,
where redevelopment is taking place.
However, the Yorkshire chief executive, Mark Arthur, insisted that work
was not a factor in problems. ?That?s
just one or two people trying to find a
story,? he claimed. ?There was a stand
beforehand, and the drainage doesn?t
impact on the stand or vice versa. We
had state-of-the-art drainage put in
seven or eight years ago ? there?s no
problem with it in any shape or form. It
is the quantity of rain and snow we?ve
had over recent weeks and months.?
Ten Doeschate accepted conditions
were not fit but said: ?I understand
they?ve had a lot of rain but we haven?t
seen a drop in the 30-odd hours we?ve
spent at the ground. It?s not fit, but we
haven?t seen any work going on.?
Yorkshire say the water table was so
high that any heavy machinery would
have only made conditions worse.
Yorkshire are due to face Nottinghamshire at Headingley on Friday and
their coach, Andrew Gale, said: ?We
should be fine because the forecast is
good. Someone told me it?s going to be
warmer than Ibiza this week.?
In a tumultuous morning?s play at
Old Trafford, meanwhile, 12 wickets
fell for 25 runs. Lancashire started the
day trailing Nottinghamshire by six
runs but lost eight wickets in 56 minutes. Nottinghamshire, set 10 to win,
then lost four wickets. It was their first
win in the top division since April 2016.
At the Ageas Bowl, Worcestershire
were all out for 127, losing against
Hampshire by 196 runs, despite an
unbeaten 45 from Travis Head. There
were four wickets for Kyle Abbott and
three for Fidel Edwards.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:46 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 18:10
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
?
46
Sport
Football
Premier League
FA Cup semi-final spots up for
grabs, Mourinho tells United
Jamie Jackson
Jos� Mourinho has appeared to question the ambition of some Manchester
United players after the defeat by West
Bromwich Albion that left Manchester
City Premier League champions.
The team who lost 1-0 at Old Trafford were all internationals and the
cYanmaGentaYellowb
? Jos� Mourinho has called into
question his players? character
manager offered an enlightening
response yesterday when asked
whether he was getting enough from
experienced players. ?Consistency
has nothing to do with age,? he said.
?It has to do with personality, has to
do with the way you live for football,
what is your priority in your life, what
are your ambitions. This has nothing
to do with age.
?I have met players of 30 years old
who were not consistent at all and I
found boys of 18, 19, 20 who were real
men, real pros. It is not about the age.?
Mourinho will make changes for the
match at Bournemouth tomorrow with
a view to giving players the chance to
make the side for the FA燙up semi-final
against Tottenham on Saturday.
?Rotating is not the right word,? the
manager said. ?If I play a player against
Bournemouth and the player is phenomenal, he plays in the semi-final.
So it is not rotating, because rotating
[sounds] like a player that plays
against Bournemouth is to give a rest
to somebody that is going to play in
the semi-final. It is an opportunity for
some people to play and try to get a
place for Spurs.
?Some of the guys that played
[against West Brom] don?t have a place
in that team [for Bournemouth]. What
is the criteria for a manager to choose
a team? I only know one criteria: the
way they play. Or do you want me to go
for the price they cost, or their salary,
or their beautiful face??
Mourinho refused to single out Paul
Pogba, indicating the midfielder was
replaced against West Brom because
of a booking. ?It was not just him [who
was poor],? he said. ?And he had a
yellow card.
?With only two midfield players,
you cannot play with one at risk of
not being able to make a foul. You
can do it if your team is not losing the
ball, but our team was losing the ball
so everything was complicated. We
were losing lots of balls, so by losing
lots of balls, with turns and flicks and
tricks, the midfield players and central
defenders are at risk of one touch, one
late challenge and they are out.?
ple were talking about us then. In the
second year we managed to pull it all
together. We took some risks, R鷅en
Neves would have been offered to a
number of people ? not just Wolverhampton Wanderers, as would have
some of the other players.?
The 44-year-old Thelwell, who
joined the club 10 years ago, admits
Wolves are now ?moving into a different stratosphere? and confirmed
that had they not won promotion
this year, adhering to the financial
fair play (FFP) regulations could have
proved a stumbling block. ?We have
always been very positive about the
possibility of getting promoted this
year,? Thelwell said. ?Yes, possibly [we
would have failed FFP] the answer is,
in short, but thank God we don?t have
to wrestle with that now and that we
have got a different problem to solve.
?From our perspective we are not
keen to put a ceiling on it really, it?s
almost dare-to-dream stuff. It sounds
a little bit ridiculous when you look
at the recent history where Wolves
have been. But, why not is the answer
from my perspective. They [Wolves?
owner Fosun] are uber-ambitious,
and they have been uber-supportive.
With the squad we?ve got, the age of
the players, the coach we?ve got, sky?s
the limit爎eally.?
Sky Bet Championship
Wolves count
blessings
that gamble
on promotion
paid o?
Ben Fisher
R鷅en Neves plans on staying at
Wolves next season after helping
to end their six-year exile from the
Premier League and the midfielder
hopes an outstanding first season in
England can earn him a place in the
Portugal squad at the World Cup finals
in Russia this summer.
Neves has been the club?s marquee
signing, with the �.8m club-record
buy from Porto excelling since
swapping the Champions League for
the Championship last summer. He
is among the players at Wolves who
belong to the agent Jorge Mendes but
the 21-year-old midfielder admits he
is keen to play in the top flight with
Wolves, with the club one point away
from being crowned champions.
?It?s [going to be] my first season in
the Premier League, it?s the place that
Wolves deserve, that the fans deserve
as well,? Neves said. ?I am happy here
and if it?s possible I?d like to stay here
for my first year in the Premier League.
Honestly, I love to play here, I love the
boys, I am really happy to play here and
I?m really happy to stay. I think I have
it all to stay but in football we never
know but, yes, I would like to stay.
?We are really happy because we
achieved our goal a little bit earlier but
now we have other goals ? we want to
be champions. We have three games
to go so we have to come back to our
hard work to try to get this goal. It?s
really good for me. When I came [to
Wolves], I came to improve myself and
help the club. We are in the Premier
League [now] and that?s the most
important thing.?
Neves has been capped five times
and admits his form, including six
goals, has helped to put him on the
radar of Fernando Santos, the Portugal manager. ?Of course all the players
? R鷅en Neves enjoys one of his goals
and hopes it was seen in Portugal
SAM BAGNALL/AMA/GETTY IMAGES
are thinking about that,? he said. ?I燼m
honestly focused on the here and now
but if after that I have to go to the World
Cup, I am happy with that. They have
Wolves燭V, sometimes the games are
on Sky Sports, so they can see my
games. They sent me a message to
congratulate me for the promotion
but nothing more.?
Wolves clinched promotion on
Saturday, when Fulham could only
draw with Brentford, and celebrated
on Sunday with a 2-0 victory against
Birmingham City. That win was their
29th of the season and Kevin Thelwell,
the club?s sporting director, believes
Nuno Esp韗ito Santo deserves enormous credit. ?There?s 101 reasons why
we have got promoted but the main
reason is Nuno,? Thelwell said. ?You
hear a lot of coaches and managers
needing more time, spending more
time to pull off a philosophy, nine or
12 months or maybe longer, but this
guy did it in four weeks. He deserves
a huge amount of credit, he?s done a
fantastic job.?
Of the criticism of Wolves? relationship with Mendes, whose Gestifute
agency has seven clients at the club,
including Esp韗ito Santo, Thelwell said:
?Jorge is an agent just like any other.
We?ve taken some of Jorge?s clients but
also taken clients from other agents. My
perspective on it is we haven?t broken
any of the rules, we are very clear on
that and the EFL suggests we are very
clear on that and Jorge is an agent that
has helped us to improve the squad,
just like some other agencies have.
?In the first year our recruitment
didn?t go so well and not so many peo-
?We haven?t broken
any of the rules,
we are very
clear on that?
Kevin Thelwell
Wolves? sporting director
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:47 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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?
Sport
Football Manchester City?s title triumph
De Bruyne?s
next City target
is to improve
in Europe
Jamie Jackson
Kevin De Bruyne believes Manchester City?s ambition must be to win the
Champions League. Pep Guardiola?s
side secured the Premier League title
on Sunday after winning the EFL Cup
in February, yet thoughts are turning
to how the team can improve.
Last week City were knocked out of
the Champions League by Liverpool
at the quarter-final stage. De Bruyne
said: ?That?s the next step for us. We
have played some great games in the
Champions League and we?ve not been
too far away.
?Maybe we haven?t gone as far as
we would have liked but there have
been performances along the way that
show we could do something special
in the future.
?It?s great to play at the highest level
and success doesn?t come easy when
you?re playing against teams who have
been around it for so many years, but
we improved a little on [the last-16] last
season and we?ll look to do the same
again next year. It?s what we all want;
to do the best we can in all of the competitions and the Champions League
is no different.?
De Bruyne hopes that Guardiola can
strengthen the squad. ?It?s important
for the club to add new players and to
keep getting stronger,? the Belgium
international said. ?That?s true for all
teams. We have a great group of players
right now and with a few additions
here and there hopefully that will take
us on to another level. Competition
will be even tougher next season and
we have to be ready for that.
?Not only in the Premier League
but in the Champions League and the
cup competitions too. If we want to
keep achieving I think competition for
places is a good thing and only makes
you try to improve as a player.
?The feeling among the squad is
great. We have enjoyed the season a
lot but there is work to do if we want to
achieve more in future. That can be the
trickiest thing in football, to not only
win but keep winning. Having such a
young squad will hopefully help us to
achieve that.?
? Kevin De Bruyne has set his sights
high for next season at City
47
Analysis
Jonathan Wilson
Vulnerable channels
and 20 zones: the
tactics behind a title
O
ttmar Hitzfeld, the
former Borussia
Dortmund and Bayern
Munich manager, used
to speak of the red
zone, a central area of
the pitch just outside the penalty
box. Control that, he believed, and
you controlled the game. If in your
half you denied the opposition the
ball in that space, they were forced
wide and while crosses can be
dangerous they are a low percentage
route to goal.
At the other end a player with
time on the ball in that zone was a
major threat, able to shoot or slide
balls through the defence. As teams
have become increasingly adept at
plugging the red zone ? often with
the use of two holding midfielders
? the danger area has shifted.
Manchester City, notably, target the
area on the edge of the Hitzfeld red
zone, the space between the central
defender and the full-back.
An awareness of the vulnerability
of that area is not something
particularly new. In a 4-4-2 a forward
with any level of tactical awareness
would try to exploit it. Perhaps the
centre-back and the full-back both
think the other is covering and the
forward is left unmarked. Or perhaps
both mark the one player, leaving
space elsewhere. Or if one marks the
forward he can move into the other
defender?s zone, disrupting the
defensive structure.
It is a simple enough idea but, as
Thierry Henry explained on Sky, it
remains potent at the highest level.
The idea of disruption, of existing in
the pockets that elude the marking
structure, was at the heart of Pep
Guardiola?s Barcelona.
?If you stand between the rightback and the right centre-back and
Sam [Samuel Eto?o] or me does the
same on the other side, suddenly
you hold four players alone,? Henry
said. ?Just from you being high and
wide, and then coming back in, you
are actually freezing four players
because we are threatening to go in
behind.?
Because they were so terrified of
leaving Henry or Eto?o free, defences
did not push up and full-backs did
not move into midfield. The effect
was to create more space in midfield
for Lionel Messi dropping off as a
false nine and for Xavi and Andr閟
Iniesta advancing from midfield (not
to mention Dani Alves?s surges from
a notional right-back position).
David Silva would often burst into
space created by Manchester City?s
wide players MAN CITY VIA GETTY IMAGES
City have exploited the same
basic idea slightly differently but
the importance of those channels
between the centre-back and fullback is seen in the way Guardiola,
as he did at Bayern, has the City
training pitches marked out in 20
zones. In principle no more than
three zones in the same horizontal
line and no more than two zones in
the same vertical line should ever be
occupied.
If a player moves into a zone that
means four in the same horizontal
line are occupied, one of the other
three should move, ensuring the
man on the ball always has two or
three passing options. But what
is also significant is that dividing
the pitch in such a way emphasises
the importance of those channels
between full-back and centre-back.
Last season one of the great
City?s leaders
Most minutes played
Ederson 2,925
Most goals
Sergio Ag黣ro 21
Most assists
Kevin De Bruyne 15
Most successful passes
Nicol醩 Otamendi 2,665
Most tackles
Kevin De Bruyne 58
Most errors leading to goals
Nicol醩 Otamendi 3
Ag黣ro
Sterling
San�
De Bruyne
strengths of Chelsea was the way
their structure controlled those
channels, their 3-4-2-1 system
providing both two holding
midfielders (N?Golo Kant� and
Nemanja Matic) and two players
who were in effect inside-forwards
(Eden Hazard and Pedro or Willian),
who operated in awkward pockets in
which they fell outside the natural
zone of the opposing centre-back,
full-back and holding midfielder.
G
uardiola had Kevin
De Bruyne and David
Silva operating in ?free
eight? roles from the
start of last season,
to all intents roving
inside-forwards whose forward runs
would exploit those channels. The
big difference with Chelsea, though,
was that City maintained out-andout wingers (in the modern sense of
the term) rather than wing-backs.
Guardiola did toy with a back
three at the start of this season,
although that seemed to be a way of
getting Sergio Ag黣ro and Gabriel
Jesus into the side in a 3-3-2-2 (or
perhaps even 3-1-4-2) rather than
Chelsea?s 3-4-2-1.
The system brought two wins
and a draw but perhaps because
the attacking six frequently found
themselves strung out in a line as the
forwards tried to drop off to create
space for Silva and De Bruyne to
burst into, it never resurfaced after
a switch to 4-3-3 brought a 6-0 win
D Silva
? Wing kings Key to City?s
attacking prowess is the
positioning and movement
of their wide attackers
over Watford and a 5-0 win over
Crystal Palace in quick succession.
The role of Fernandinho in
protecting the back four is crucial,
particularly on those occasions
when both full-backs have been
given licence to attack. But there
have also been times when the fullbacks, Fabian Delph in particular
(and most notably away against
Chelsea), have tucked inside, with
the corresponding centre-back
moving wider, occupying precisely
those channels De Bruyne and
David Silva try to attack at the
other end of the pitch.
That is useful as a way out
from the back ? and Ederson?s
calmness in possession has been
a major feature, notably at home
against Tottenham when he
bypassed the press with a string
of accurate long passes. It also
gives City protection against the
counterattack; although, as the
Champions League games against
Liverpool suggested, perhaps not
enough.
City?s domination of the
channels at one end of the pitch
has been their triumph; their
failure to do the same at the other
end has been their undoing.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:48 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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48
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
Sport
Football Manchester City?s title triumph
? Pep Guardiola?s side
have been uplifting to
watch this season
PHIL NOBLE/REUTERS
Guardiola needs to do
the unexpected ? win
the Champions League
After joyously cruising to the
Premier League title a bigger
challenge lies ahead for his
expensive winning
g machine
Barney Ronay
Y
ou won. Fine. Now win
again. Win better. Even
in a moment of triumph,
with his beautifully
engineered seventh
domestic title safely
stowed away, it is hard to avoid that
nagging paradox that runs through
Pep Guardiola?s managerial career.
Although not before making space
for a little grateful applause. It was
fitting Manchester City?s Premier
League title arrived at a canter in the
end, leaving some clarity around the
edges, some time to step back and
simply admire. A prolonged stutter
to the line may have confirmed a few
hard-to-shift Proper Football Man
Prejudices. But it would also have
been misleading.
City have the most points, most
shots, most goals and most passes.
They?ve been strolling away at the
top of the league since the fifth week
of the season, a 6-0 win at Watford
nestled in the middle of a 5-0, a 4-0,
a 5-0 and a 7-2.
In reality it is not possible to win
more convincingly than this. Not
least when, besides the numbers,
there is also the basic tone and
texture of this league title, the sense
of players stretching out into the
fringes of their own talent, finding
new patterns and rhythms.
From August into April these
Premier League champions have
been a rare joy, a team that keep the
ball with the usual Pep-issue mania
but come forward in a relentless
swarm, spreading the game into
every available part of the space
whatever the score, whatever the
time on the clock.
It is worth noting that had City
failed to deliver this season the same
Manchester United who clanked their
way to a square-headed title-sealing
defeat by West Brom may now be in
line to win the Premier League.
In the event United?s expensive
brand of stodge is a reminder of just
how difficult it is to engineer drive
and fluency in a standard modern
team of expensive bolt-on parts. By
contrast, the champions have been
a rare gift, a reminder that for all its
vested interests, its fixed hierarchies,
elite modern football can still be a
genuinely uplifting thing.
At which point the wheels start
to clank, the screen dissolves and
another version of this movie begins
to roll. This is the alternative history
of Pep. For all its brilliance this City
team are also a ruthlessly assembled
winning machine. Just as for the
manager another league title is
another season spent exclusively
in the company of the sport?s
financially incontinent elite.
En route to winning the title and
a League Cup Guardiola has spent
�8m on players in two seasons,
the greatest single transfer splurge
in history. And so that paradox kicks
in: a brilliant team who also have a
sense of inevitability about them,
a project that simply cannot be
allowed to fail.
How to resolve this contradiction
is not immediately clear. There are
shades of a footballing version of
the Peter Principle. Guardiola has
been so good at managing teams he
only ever gets to manage the ones
who are so powerful they cannot
fail.
Even through this glaze there are
other contradictions. For all this,
Guardiola has somehow managed to
retain not just the moral high ground
but an air of likable asceticism. He
seems an oddly monk-like figure,
known for the purity of his methods,
the idealistic obsession with detail.
At times this can be endearingly
comical. Even in the middle of the
title stroll Guardiola spent Christmas
Day watching videos of Newcastle,
the kind of festive viewing choice
that brings to mind the response of
one exasperated friend to the news
that the dying poet Philip Larkin
was seeing out his days drinking
?nothing but cheap red wine? ? the
suggestion that he could, at least,
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:49 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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?
49
Vincent
Kompany
poses for the
phone after
Manchester
City were
confirmed as
title winners
How to give top dogs
an even bigger bite
City?s attention will now
be focused on the areas
where a champion team
can be improved
in January 2017. Jesus has nine
league goals in 14 starts (13 in all
competitions), and last year there
were seven in eight. This is an
impressive ratio that will have to be
continued.
Jamie Jackson
Bolster central midfield
Guardiola has Fernandinho,
G黱dogan, David Silva
and Kevin De Bruyne as frontline
midfielders. There is also Fabian
Delph, who is not trusted in the
position, plus Oleksandr Zinchenko,
who is preferred at left-back. Yet the
manager will bolster this area in the
close season for two reasons. First,
Silva is 32 and Fernandinho turns 33
next month so each will have their
game time managed next season.
Second, Guardiola?s is a fierce
football ethos based on midfielders
being the prime personnel on which
his teams are founded. In saying
once that Fernandinho can play
all 10 outfield positions Guardiola
made the manifesto clear. Borussia
Dortmund?s Julian Weigl, 22, is
among those the manager will
consider in the transfer window.
3
Work on plan B
Pep Guardiola can bridle
at the suggestion he does
not adjust the gameplan when
required and for the 3-0 Champions
League quarter-final first-leg
defeat by Liverpool he did do so.
The problem was that dropping
Raheem Sterling for Ilkay G黱dogan
was such a rare move ? removing
a forward for an extra midfielder
? it disrupted Manchester City?s
rhythm. He has admitted it may
have caused his players to wonder
if their ultra-positive coach was
?wary? of Liverpool and affected
how they performed. By 31 minutes
the tactic had failed and after 57 on
came Sterling for G黱dogan. Yet if
Guardiola did more of this kind of
adjustment the team would view it
as less an experiment and more the
norm and he would surely become as
slick with plan B as with plan A.
1
Keep Sergio Ag黣ro
Despite Ag黣ro?s 30 goals in
39 appearances ? 21 of which
were scored in the Premier League
? Guardiola remains lukewarm
regarding the Argentinian. The
manager believes City are better
with Gabriel Jesus as the spearhead
because of the Brazilian?s swifter
link play that allows the side more
fluidity. Although Guardiola is open
to Ag黣ro leaving this summer, it
would be detrimental to let him go.
Could Jesus step up and contribute
the weight of goals required should
Ag黣ro depart? His figures suggest
so but he is yet to enjoy a sustained
injury-free period since joining
2
? Sergio Ag黣ro scored a hat-trick
in the 6-0 demolition of Watford that
perfectly showed off City?s style
DAN MULLAN/GETTY IMAGES
try some expensive red wine.
At the same time he is clearly a
brilliant manager on a very basic
level, venerated in England partly
because so much of what he does is
an upgrade on the old managerial
tropes. Like a George Graham for the
non-contact age, Guardiola spends
hours drilling his defensive line,
enacting what is in effect a more
fluid version of moving up and down
together holding a piece of rope.
I
n the old Don Revie style he
makes a point of knowing the
first name of everyone at the
club, of urging his players to
bond and spend time together
socially, although rather than
nine pints of lager it is breakfast with
the club nutritionist and quinoa
doggy bags after training.
Yet there are those obvious blind
spots. Guardiola has never managed
a team where success would not
have arrived in some form or other.
He is rightly feted for his 12 trophies
at the Camp Nou. But Barcelona
have won almost as many since
he left and as many Champions
Leagues without him since Lionel
Messi showed up.
Similarly with City, where
this season?s achievements on
trophies alone are an exact replica
of what Manuel Pellegrini rustled
up in his first season. There is
nothing to compare with Porto
winning the Champions League, or
Internazionale, or Atl閠ico Madrid?s
rise. Winning a title he had no right
to win, wrestling against the tide of
history. This remains the unticked
box for a manager routinely venerated
as the best of his generation.
With this in mind next
season presents another kind of
opportunity. It may be harsh to say
Guardiola must win the Champions
League for his time at City to be
Guardiola has
never managed
a team where
success would not
have arrived
?Channels and zones. The
tactics behind the title?
Analysis
Jonathan Wilson Page 47 judged an unqualified success but
it is also true, as it was at Bayern
Munich. Albeit this time around
there is a chance to enter, for the first
time, a frontier territory.
Winning the Champions League
would be undeniably Guardiola?s
own work, at least with this current
City, who are not a collection of
ready-made global stars but a team
with an attacking unit aged 21, 22
and 23, where nobody in the regular
first XI has won this competition
before.
This may well change as City
strengthen in the summer. No doubt
Guardiola?s obsession with the
Champions League will contribute
to this. Seven years on from his
last victorious semi-final, this
competition has undeniably got
away from him.
Never mind, for now, the money
spent, the will-to-power of the
Premier League?s Emirati overlords.
If this title has been a freewheeling
joy, next season presents something
else, a chance for Guardiola to do
something different, to win for the
first time against the prevailing tide.
Replace Vincent Kompany
The perennial question
of who will replace
Vincent Kompany remains
despite the captain?s late-season
run of fitness that has taken his
league appearances to 15 (19
in all competitions). Guardiola
hopes Aymeric Laporte?s January
recruitment can help provide an
answer, as the Frenchman competes
with Kompany, Nicol醩 Otamendi
and John Stones for a place. Yet
Kompany?s injury proneness means
Guardiola has only three central
defenders he can rely on. Expect
Kyle Walker and Benjamin Mendy
to be shifted across from full-back
on occasion but West Brom?s Jonny
Evans, a career centre-back, may
again be of interest.
4
Continue to be brave
This may be counterintuitive
after City were dumped
out of the Champions League 5-1 by
Liverpool but Guardiola must not
lose courage in his quest for ever
more perfect football. Given how
invigorating City are to watch, next
season?s fascination will be whether
the Pep way can conquer Europe,
while he tries to retain the Premier
League crown. To do so he has to
solve the issue that plagued him at
Bayern Munich, between 2013-16,
and in two European campaigns
at City: how to fill the gap in the XI
where he fielded Lionel Messi for his
two-time European Cup-winners
Barcelona. The Argentinian was
Guardiola?s genie in a bottle, his
go-to when the team needed to pull
away from sides who came at his
Bar鏰, just as J黵gen Klopp?s team
did at City. Guardiola has to find
another way, and if he maintains the
desire to always dazzle, the result
could be a Messi-less City who are
even better than his gilded Bar鏰.
5
Gabriel Jesus
is preferred to
Sergio Ag黣ro by
Pep Guardiola
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:50 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
?
Sport
Football Premier League
50
Carroll?s late strike just
enough to spare Hart
West Ham
1
Carroll 90
Stoke
1
Crouch 79
Possession
West Ham
64%
Shots on target
6
Fouls
14
Daniel Taylor
London Stadium
79?
Substitute
makes
his mark
Peter Crouch
pounces
after Joe
Hart parries
Xherdan
Shaqiri?s shot
to open the
scoring for
Stoke
DAVID KLEIN/
REUTERS
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Stoke
36%
6
21
It was threatening to be another grim
night for West Ham United and, for
Jose Hart, a personal ordeal given
that the England manager, Gareth
Southgate, was here to see the latest
evidence of his deterioration. Hart has
already lost his place as England?s No 1
and, at this rate, he must be in danger
of being cast adrift from the squad that
Southgate takes to the World Cup in
Russia this summer.
Unfortunately for Hart, the mistake that led to Peter Crouch, one of
the Stoke?s substitutes, opening the
scoring can hardly be described as a
one-off. Indeed, Hart did something
very similar in the 3-0 defeat at home
to Burnley last month, having just
been recalled to the side after a long
spell in the wilderness.
His latest lapse came after 79 minutes and at that stage Stoke will feel
they ought to have registered their first
away win since October. Instead it was
another substitute, Andy Carroll, who
had the final say, lashing in an 90thminute equaliser to spare West Ham
an ignominious result. David Moyes?s
team also had three second-half goals
disallowed and it was a dramatic finale
to a game that had taken an age to
ignite.
Not that Karren Brady, the club?s
vice-chairman, seemed too enthused.
A quarter of an hour before kick-off,
her Twitter feed pinged up a cheery
message reminding television viewers to tune into her new show, Give It
a Year, at 8pm, as if it had slipped her
mind that a televised football match,
involving her own team, was kicking
off at precisely that time.
As PR own-goals go, it wasn?t the
ideal way to start the night and the
replies from West Ham?s fans were particularly fruity (?Give it a year? You?ve
had eight,? being the general tone,
expletives removed). Then the game
kicked off and, for a long while, it was
tempting to think there might have
been people at home turning over from
the football, just as she requested.
It certainly took a while before there
was anything to liven up the atmosphere. Stoke?s fans, who seem to spend
an inordinate amount of time booing
either the match officials or opposition players, quickly set about targeting Marko Arnautovic, formerly one of
their favourites. Arnautovic, in turn,
looked eager to make the point that,
deep down, they probably miss him.
Yet the game lived down to expectations during the opening 45 minutes
? two ordinary sides huffing and puffing without any real wit or creativity
? and when the half-time announcer
introduced a West Ham fan who had
flown in from Australia it was tempting to wonder whether he might have
chosen a more attractive fixture.
? Marko Arnautovic is disappointed
after West Ham had a goal disallowed
The only noteworthy chance for
West Ham until that point had fallen
to Arnautovic, inside the six-yard area,
with a snap shot that struck Jack Butland in the face and flew out for a corner. Southgate at this stage had little
to see as Butland and Hart were largely
untroubled. Stoke?s best chance fell to
Moritz Bauer, coming in from the right,
but the Austrian aimed a tame shot
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:51 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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?
Results
straight at Hart. Stoke?s lack of threat
was hardly a surprise bearing in mind
they had managed only seven league
goals since the turn of the year. They
had lost all seven of their previous
trips to London, conceding 26 goals
and scoring only five, but at the start
of the second half the penny finally
seemed to have dropped that West
Ham can be vulnerable when teams
run at them. It is just a pity for Stoke
that Xherdan Shaqiri is not a more consistent performer. Shaqiri showed in
flashes that he is surely too talented to
remain with Stoke if they are relegated
and Bauer?s driving runs on the right
of midfield were another prominent
feature.
All the same, it was easy to see why
they were averaging under a goal per
game this season. Stoke have not managed two goals in a league fixture since
beating Huddersfield 2-0 in January.
They have the worst goal difference
in the league and it is a problem that
urgently needs to be fixed if there is
to be a dramatic feat of escapology
in their remaining four fixtures, with
Europa League-chasing Burnley and
Champions League semi-finalists Liverpool their next two opponents.
The other subplot to the evening
was that this was Michael Oliver?s first
game as a referee since the now-infamous Champions League tie between
Juventus and Real Madrid, Gianluigi
Buffon?s red card and all the unpleasantness that has followed. Oliver had
a steady night ? a nice change, presumably, from being told he has a ?dustbin
for a heart? ? and his assistant got the
big decisions right. Arnautovic had
strayed offside before directing in a
55th-minute header and the same
player was flagged again when Edimilson Fernandes fired in a shot from
20 yards. This time, Arnautovic was
standing directly in Butland?s line of
vision and that looked like being a key
decision when Hart spilled Shaqiri?s
shot for Crouch to turn in the rebound.
West Ham
4-2-3-1
Hart; Zabaleta, Rice,
Ogbonna, Cresswell?;
Kouyat�, Noble;
Fernandes
(Hern醤dez�),
M醨io�(Carroll�),
Masuaku (Lanzini�);
Arnautovic
Subs not used
Adri醤, Hugill, Evra,
Cullen
Stoke
4-4-1-1
Butland; Zouma,
Shawcross, Indi?, Pieters;
Bauer (Crouch?�),
Allen,燦diaye?,
Sobhi�(Cameron�);
Shaqiri; Diouf (Ireland�)
Subs not used
Grant, Fletcher, Campbell,
Sorenson
Referee Michael Oliver Attendance 56,795
Rodriguez looks
to the future
after Bong case
Simon Peach
Jay Rodriguez wants to move on after a
Football Association charge of racially
abusing Brighton?s Ga雝an Bong was
found to be not proven, with the West
Bromwich Albion forward saying ?the
truth always comes out?.
Rodriguez has been under added
duress for three months after being
accused of making an alleged comment to the Brighton defender when
the sides met on 13燡anuary. The FA
announced on Friday that the Independent Regulatory Commission
?determined that on the balance of
probabilities the allegation was not
proven? against Rodriguez.
?I am always a great believer that
the truth always comes out and it has,?
the 28-year-old forward told BBC WM.
?Now we can move on and I can just
carry on working hard for the team.?
Rodriguez capped a fine display
on Sunday with the goal that secured
rock-bottom West Brom a shock 1-0
win at Manchester United ? and Manchester City the Premier League title.
?You always dream as a young lad
to come here and score. We need to
believe still ? especially coming here
and showing that ? we can go and beat
anyone. We need to keep that between
us and keep working.? PA
Pochettino plots
Spurs? blueprint
to catch City
51
Football
PREMIER LEAGUE
Man City (C)
Man Utd
Liverpool
Tottenham
Chelsea
Arsenal
Burnley
Leicester
Everton
Newcastle
Bournemouth
Watford
Brighton
West Ham
Huddersfield
Crystal Palace
Swansea
Southampton
Stoke
West Brom
West Ham
Carroll 90
56,795
P
33
33
34
33
33
33
33
33
34
33
34
34
33
33
34
34
33
33
34
34
W
28
22
20
20
18
16
14
11
11
11
9
10
8
8
9
8
8
5
6
4
(0) 1
D
3
5
10
7
6
6
10
10
9
8
11
7
11
11
8
10
9
13
10
12
L
2
6
4
6
9
11
9
12
14
14
14
17
14
14
17
16
16
15
18
18
F
93
63
78
65
57
62
33
49
39
35
41
42
31
41
27
36
27
33
31
27
A
25
26
35
30
33
45
29
47
54
42
56
60
46
59
54
54
46
53
64
52
Stoke City
Crouch 79
GD
+68
+37
+43
+35
+24
+17
+4
+2
-15
-7
-15
-18
-15
-18
-27
-18
-19
-20
-33
-25
Pts
87
71
70
67
60
54
52
43
42
41
38
37
35
35
35
34
33
28
28
24
(0) 1
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE NORTH
Curzon Ashton 2 Nuneaton Town 2
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE SOUTH
Chelmsford 3 Wealdstone 0
EVO-STIK NORTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE
Stourbridge 2 Workington 3
BOSTIK PREMIER LEAGUE
Brightlingsea Regent 0 Leatherhead 7;
Kingstonian L Merstham L
EVO-STIK SOUTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE
Hitchen 0 Slough 1
BUNDESLIGA
Mainz 2 Freiburg 0
Mauricio Pochettino has passed on his
congratulations to Manchester City on
becoming Premier League champions
and immediately turned his thoughts
to how he and Tottenham might get
the better of them next season.
Spurs have work to do to guarantee
a place in the top four, a job that continues at Brighton tonight, before the
FA Cup semi-final against Manchester
United on Saturday.
Pochettino is also still chewing over
the performance that enabled City to
ease to a 3-1 win at Wembley last Saturday. He believes elements of that
display showed Spurs can compete but
that his team must start next season
strongly if they are to have a hope of
becoming champions.
?I want to congratulate Pep, the
coaching staff and of course the
players ? they deserve the title,? he
said. ?In football, after a whole season,
it is the most consistent side that has
the capacity to win.
?[On Saturday] when we reached
our real levels we showed we can compete with Manchester City. But to be
consistent over the entire season is the
challenge for us. If we want to win and
challenge for big things, we need to
start from day one in pre-season.?
Kent v Gloucestershire
Canterbury Gloucestershire (19pts) beat Kent (3)
by five wickets
Kent First innings 64 (MD Taylor 4-20)
Gloucestershire First innings 110
(GH Roderick 51; MJ Henry 4-33)
Kent Second innings 153
(DJ Bell-Drummond 61; RF Higgins 5-22)
Gloucestershire Second innings (overnight 61-1)
BAC Howell not out ......................................................52
?GH Roderick lbw b Henry.............................................26
JR Bracey c Gidman b Henry ............................................0
JMR Taylor lbw b Stevens ................................................2
GL van Buuren b Stevens.................................................9
RF Higgins not out .........................................................0
Extras (b1, lb7, w1, nb4) ...............................................13
Total (for 5, 28 overs)..................................................108
Fall cont 81, 81, 84, 102.
Did not bat K Noema-Barnett, CN Miles, DJ Worrall,
MD Taylor.
Bowling Henry 14-3-37-3; Stevens 9-1-39-2;
Stewart 2.2-0-10-0; Gidman 2.4-1-8-0; Podmore 0-0-6-0.
Toss Uncontested, Gloucestershire elected to field.
Umpires NL Bainton and M Burns.
PRIMEIRA LIGA
Rio Ave 1 Tondela 1
INDIAN PREMIER LEAGUE
Kolkata Kolkata Knight Riders 200-9 (N Rana 59).
Delhi Daredevils 129 (GJ Maxwell 47).
Kolkata Knight Riders won by 71 runs.
Cricket
Tennis
SPECSAVERS COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP
Division One (fourth day of four)
ATP ROLEX MONTE CARLO MASTERS (Monaco)
First round: R Bautista Agut (Sp) bt P Gojowczyk (Ger) 6-4
6-3; A Ramos Vi駉las (Sp) bt J Donaldson (US) 6-3 6-3;
A Rublev (Rus) bt R Haase (Neth) 7-6 (9-7) 2-6 7-5;
B Coric (Cro) bt J Benneteau (Fr) 6-2 6-3; K Nishikori (Jpn)
bt T Berdych (Cz) 4-6 6-2 6-1; M Raonic (Can) bt L Catarina
(Mon) 3-6 6-2 6-3; N Djokovic (Ser) bt D Lajovic (Ser) 6-0
6-1; G M黮ler (Lux) bt F Mayer (Ger) 7-5 6-4; A Bedene
(Slo) bt M Basic (Bih) 6-4 7-6 (7-3); S Tsitsipas (Gre)
bt D Shapovalov (Can) 6-3 6-4; P-H Herbert (Fr)
bt P Lorenzi (It) 7-6 (9-7) 6-4.
Hampshire v Worcestershire
Ageas Bowl Hampshire (21pts) beat Worcestershire (4)
by 196 runs.
Hampshire First innings 290
(GK Berg 75no, JM Vince 75; J Leach 4-42)
Worcestershire First innings 211 (OB Cox 65)
Hampshire Second innings 244 (KJ Abbott 51)
Worcestershire Second innings (overnight 59-3)
DKH Mitchell lbw b Abbott ............................................35
JC Tongue c Wheal b Berg ................................................4
TM Head not out ..........................................................45
GH Rhodes c Amla b Edwards...........................................1
?OB Cox b Wheal .............................................................0
E Barnard lbw b Edwards .................................................4
*J Leach c McManus b Edwards ........................................0
SJ Magoffin c Vince b Dawson .........................................6
Extras (lb6, nb2) .............................................................8
Total (49.5 overs) .......................................................127
Fall cont 67, 67, 95, 96, 101, 101.
Bowling Berg 13-4-26-1; Abbott 17-6-45-4;
Edwards 11-2-33-3; Wheal 5-1-15-1; Dawson 3.5-2-2-1.
Toss Uncontested, Worcestershire elected to field.
Umpires JW Lloyds and MJ Saggers.
Lancashire v Nottinghamshire
Paul MacInnes
Bowling Barker 25-5-99-2; Wright 19-3-76-0;
Stone 22.5-4-80-8; Patel-16-2-64-0; Rhodes 6-0-49-0.
Warwickshire Second innings
WMH Rhodes b Robinson ................................................6
DP Sibley not out ..........................................................42
IR Bell c B C Brown b I Sharma ........................................10
IJL Trott lbw b I Sharma...................................................4
AJ Hose not out ............................................................15
Extras (nb10) ...............................................................10
Total (for 3, 35 overs)....................................................87
Fall 25, 45, 55.
Did not bat SR Hain, TR Ambrose, KHD Barker,
JS Patel, OP Stone, CJC Wright.
Bowling I Sharma 9-3-16-2; Robinson 11-1-41-1;
Wiese 10-4-16-0; Whittingham 2-0-5-0; Wells-3-0-9-0.
Toss Uncontested, Sussex elected to field.
Umpires SJ O?Shaughnessy and PR Pollard.
Old Trafford Nottinghamshire (20pts) beat Lancashire (3)
by six wickets.
Lancashire First innings 158 (JT Ball 5-43)
Nottinghamshire First innings 222
Lancashire Second innings (overnight 58-2)
KK Jennings lbw b Gurney .............................................27
*LS Livingstone c Moores b Ball ....................................12
S Chanderpaul c Taylor b Gurney .....................................0
DJ Vilas c Wessels b Ball...................................................6
SJ Croft b Ball .................................................................0
J Clark c Nash b Ball.........................................................0
TE Bailey c Moores b Gurney ............................................1
JM Mennie c Moores b Gurney .........................................0
GOnions not out .............................................................0
Extras (b4, lb4)...............................................................8
Total (34.2 overs) .........................................................73
Fall cont 58, 62, 66, 66, 66, 73, 73.
Bowling Ball 10-5-14-4; Fletcher 6-1-16-0;
Gurney 12.2-5-25-6; SR Patel 6-2-10-0.
Nottinghamshire Second innings
*SJ Mullaney c Onions b Mennie ......................................1
JD Libby c Livingstone b Mennie ......................................4
CD Nash c Hameed b Mennie ............................................0
LRP Taylor c Livingstone b Onions....................................0
SR Patel not out .............................................................4
MH Wessels not out ........................................................1
Extras ............................................................................0
Total (for 4, 5 overs)......................................................10
Fall 1, 5, 5, 9.
Did not bat ?TJ Moores, L Wood, LJ Fletcher, JT Ball,
HF Gurney.
Bowling Onions 3-0-6-1; Mennie 2-1-4-3.
Toss Uncontested, Nottinghamshire elected to field.
Umpires GD Lloyd and NA Mallender.
Yorkshire v Essex
Headingley Yorkshire (5pts) drew with Essex (5).
Match abandoned without a ball being bowled.
Division Two (fourth day of four)
Warwickshire v Sussex
Edgbaston Sussex (12pts) drew with Warwickshire (10).
Warwickshire First innings 299
(TR Ambrose 81, IR Bell 70; D Wiese 4-56)
Sussex First innings (overnight 194-6)
*?BC Brown c Ambrose b Barker ....................................91
OE Robinson c Ambrose b Barker ...................................12
D Wiese lbw b Stone ....................................................106
I Sharma b Stone...........................................................22
SG Whittingham not out ................................................0
Extras (b2, lb4, nb8) .....................................................14
Total (88.5 overs) .......................................................374
Fall cont 194, 349, 361
Cycling
UCI EUROPE TOUR: TOUR OF THE ALPS (Italy)
Stage one: (Arco-Folgaria-134.6km) 1 P Bilbao (Sp) Astana
Pro Team 3hr 26min 41sec; 2 LL S醤chez (Sp) Astana Pro
Team at 6sec; 3 I Sosa (Col) Androni Giocattoli-Sidermec;
4 T Pinot (Fr) Groupama-FDJ at 10sec; 5 C Froome (GB)
Team Sky all at same time.
Basketball
NBA
Western Conference Play-offs: First round:
Oklahoma City 116 Utah 108 (Oklahoma lead series 1-0);
Houston 104 Minnesota 101 (Houston lead series 1-0).
Eastern Conference Play-offs: First round:
Boston 113 Milwaukee 107 (Boston lead series 1-0);
Cleveland 80 Indiana 98 (Indiana lead series 1-0).
Baseball
MLB
Boston 3 Baltimore 1; Chicago Cubs P Atlanta P; Cincinnati 2
St Louis 3; Cleveland P Toronto P; Detroit P New York
Yankees P; Houston 1 Texas 3 (EI); Kansas City P LA Angels
P; Los Angeles Dodgers 7 Arizona 2; Miami 3 Pittsburgh 7;
Minnesota P Chicago White Sox P; New York Mets 3
Milwaukee 2; San Diego 10 San Francisco 1;
Seattle 1 Oakland 2; Tampa Bay 4 Philadelphia 10;
Washington 5 Colorado 6.
Ice hockey
NHL
Western Conference Play-offs: First round:
Los Angeles 2 Vegas 3 (Vegas lead series 3-0);
Minnesota 6 Winnipeg 2 (Winnipeg lead series 2-1).
Eastern Conference Play-offs: First round:
Philadelphia 1 Pittsburgh 5 (Pittsburgh lead series 2-1);
Washington 4 Columbus 5 (Columbus lead series 2-0).
Fixtures
Football (7.45pm unless stated)
Premier League
Brighton v Tottenham
Sky Bet League One
Bradford v Portsmouth; Doncaster v Bury;
Gillingham v Rotherham; Rochdale v Oldham;
Shrewsbury v Charlton; Wigan v Oxford Utd.
Sky Bet League Two
Accrington Stanley v Yeovil; Exeter v Chesterfield;
Lincoln City v Wycombe.
Vanarama National League
Aldershot v Gateshead; Bromley v Dag & Red; Dover
v Tranmere; Eastleigh v Ebbsfleet Utd; Guiseley v Barrow;
Hartlepool v Leyton Orient; Maidenhead Utd v Sutton Utd.
Vanarama National League North
Blyth Spartans v AFC Telford; Boston Utd v Harrogate Tn;
Brackley v Bradford P A; Chorley v Stockport County;
FC United of Manchester v York; North Ferriby Utd
v Gainsborough; Southport v Salford C;
Spennymoor Tn v Kidderminster.
Vanarama National League South
Braintree Tn v Whitehawk; Concord Rangers v Bognor Regis
Tn; East Thurrock v Dartford; Gloucester v St Albans;
Truro City v Hungerford Tn; Poole Tn v Hampton & R.
Ladbrokes Scottish Championship
Brechin v Dundee Utd; Dumbarton v Inverness CT;
St Mirren v Falkirk.
Ladbrokes Scottish League Two
Berwick v Stenhousemuir
Rugby union (7.45pm unless stated)
Greene King IPA Championship
Yorkshire Carnegie v Ealing Trailfinders
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:52 Edition Date:180417 Edition:03 Zone:
Sent at 17/4/2018 0:13
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
???
Sports newspaper of the year
The Guardian
Tuesday 17 April 2018
?
?I was just as gutted
about the Ashes?
Stokes opens up about
his England regrets
Exclusive Pages 44-45 Blue moon rising
Barney Ronay on what
lies ahead for Guardiola?s
title-conquering City side
Pages 48-49 Match report
Daniel Taylor
Page 50
West Ham
Stoke
1
1
Carroll 90
Crouch 79
Hart ache
Southgate sees former England
No�keeper?s slip-up let in Crouch
? Peter Crouch
follows up for
Stoke after Joe
Hart spills the
ball for West
Ham, who
later equalised
through their
substitute
Andy Carroll
DAVID KLEIN/
REUTERS
e away from the National. It?s
just爑nfortunate.?
Aintree long ago installed a false
inside rail on the approach to the
Canal Turn, which has usually helped
to reduce such congestion. Its clerk
of the course, Andrew Tulloch, will
now consider if additional measures
are needed.
?We will look at it, as we look at
everything that arises each year,? he
said. ?We?ll have a discussion with
jockeys as well. It?s very much getting
their feedback on what other things we
can do. It?s all evidence based.?
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:43 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 16/4/2018 18:40
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
Sport
Commonwealth Games
Gold Coast finale
lowers the bar
for Birmingham
Eleven days of largely slick
operation were somewhat
undermined by bum notes
struck in the last 24
4 hours
Martha Kelner
Gold Coast
T
he organisers of
Birmingham 2022,
possibly daunted by
following an event so
well received on the
ground, may have
felt some relief as the Gold Coast
Commonwealth Games ended on a
bum note.
Furious spectators and even
the host broadcaster condemned a
closing ceremony that barely paid
a passing mention to the athletes.
Usain Bolt, paid to be here by a
telecommunications company and
still the biggest draw even eight
months into retirement, was on
the DJ decks and a Kylie Minogue
impersonator featured.
But the athletes had already
been seated before the show
began, an outrage which reached
the Queensland premier,
Annastacia Palaszczuk. ?I?m just as
disappointed as anyone else,? she
said. ?We wanted to stand there and
celebrate our athletes and it didn?t
happen. Whoever was responsible
for making that decision should
hang their head in shame.?
A mea culpa followed from the
Commonwealth Games chairman,
Peter Beattie. ?We wanted to get
the athletes in early but we made
a serious error of judgment by not
having them in the broadcast,? he
said. ?It was driven by concerns
about the welfare of athletes but
they should have been involved.
There were too many speeches, I
shouldn?t have spoken because it
bored the athletes silly.?
A potentially more serious
oversight unfolded on the marathon
course when the Scottish runner
Callum Hawkins collapsed with heat
exhaustion and was left on the road
for several minutes without medical
attention as spectators snapped
selfies. He was released from
hospital yesterday.
These were rare errors from
an organising committee which
delivered 11 days of slick operations,
? Athletes wander into the Carrara
Stadium for the closing ceremony
mostly full stadiums and a notable
absence of traffic jams, helped by the
exodus of locals scared off before the
Games began by regular warnings of
impending chaos.
Where Birmingham could
struggle to compete is with the
stunning vistas, particularly the
sandy beaches and turquoise waters
that provided the backdrop to the
open-air aquatics centre and the
volleyball stadium. The venues for
the gymnastics, cycling and netball
were sold out for almost every
session, pumping with music and
entertaining sport.
The only disappointment was that
many of England?s leading names
failed to perform. The Brownlee
brothers arrived slightly injured and
left without medals. Max Whitlock
was outshone on the pommel
horse by the 18-year-old Rhys
McClenaghan from Northern Ireland.
The world indoor champion hurdler
Andrew Pozzi and the Olympic
medallist hammer thrower Sophie
Hitchon faltered, and Adam Peaty
was beaten in the pool for the first
time in four years.
But at least they showed up. Bolt
was bemused that some of England?s
best sprinters, including CJ Ujah,
who had every chance of winning
a 100m medal, did not travel.
Sebastian Coe, the president of
athletics? governing body the IAAF,
was also surprised. ?My gut instinct
is try to not sit out championships
because they are important at the
end of your career,? he said. ?When
you turn your cards over it?s medals
that people judge you on, not fast
times in the Diamond League.?
While Scotland and Wales
comfortably exceeded their best
medal hauls at an away Games,
analysts suggested it was England?s
second worst showing in 21 as they
won 16.2% of the medals on offer.
Their only poorer performance was
Melbourne 2006. The timing of the
Games in the southern hemisphere,
when our best athletes would usually
be in heavy training, does not help,
so they will almost certainly bounce
back in July 2022.
T
hese Games will be
recalled in England
not for the medal table
but for the netball
team, who provided
the most thrilling
and unexpected result by beating
Australia. The tales of perseverance
and triumph against the odds also
cut through. The weightlifter Zoe
Smith, who has battled injury,
funding cuts and worked as a
waitress between training, won
silver, just days after having an
epidural to ease agonising pain.
No stranger to heartache was the
400m hurdler Kyron McMaster of
the British Virgin Islands, who won
43
Home nations highlights reel Three golds to savour
1
England?s
netballers
stunned the
favourites
Australia with
a final-second
one-point win for
Commonwealth
gold in their
first major final
since�75
SCOTT BARBOUR/
GETTY IMAGES
2
Scotland?s
Katie Archibald
won 3,000m
individual
pursuit gold
before brother
John secured
silver in the
men?s 4,000m
individual
pursuit.
RYAN PIERSE/
GETTY IMAGES
3
Northern
Ireland
gymnast Rhys
McClenaghan,
18, was in tears
after pipping
the Olympic
champion Max
Whitlock to gold
on the pommel
horse.
PAUL CHILDS/
REUTERS
gold only months after his coach was
killed by Hurricane Irma.
Tom Daley produced a
performance which will live longer
in the memory than any perfectly
executed back 3� pike. ?There are
37 countries in the Commonwealth
where it?s illegal to be who I am;
hopefully we can reduce that
number,? he said, calling on the 37 of
the 53 where homosexuality is illegal
to change their laws.
Given that number was 43 four
years ago in Glasgow, it is not a
hopeless plea. Where other sporting
bodies scarper at the mere mention of
politics, the Commonwealth Games
Federation chief executive, David
Grevemberg, actively promotes
discussion of human-rights issues.
The Rwanda women?s beach
volleyball team were encouraged to
wear black armbands to mark the
24th anniversary of the genocide,
while Australia?s indigenous culture,
which it still wrestles with, was a
major part of the opening ceremony.
The question which pervades
every Commonwealth Games is ?do
they really matter?? From a sporting
perspective it is impossible to argue
they compare with the Olympics
or a world championships. But the
Games has shown once again that
they offer something wholly, often
wonderfully, different.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:44 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 19:22
?
44
Sport
Cricket
?I lived every moment
of the Ashes defeat ?
I was just as gutted?
Exclusive
Ben Stokes recalls his stirring
England return, explains
why爌laying in the IPL is not
about money and has his say
on the Root captaincy debate
Ali Martin
Bengaluru
I
t?s 6pm at the Chinnaswamy
Stadium in Bangalore. A
drowsy sun has already slunk
below the stands, kites glide
overhead and after three
hours of intense training in
the heat, where he has batted twice,
thundered in with the ball for the
first time in weeks and stayed late to
work on his flying boundary catches,
Ben Stokes strolls over for a chat.
There is of course one almighty
elephant in the ground. We both
briefly acknowledge this but it
remains just that. This is his first
in-depth interview since the
incident in Bristol on 25燬eptember
last year but regarding events that
night Stokes must wait to have his
say in court this summer after he and
two other men pleaded not guilty to
affray. For now it is only cricket, both
England and Indian Premier League,
that can be on the agenda.
The Indian Premier League first,
where the 26-year-old is in his
second season and at his second
side, Rajasthan Royals. Eoin
Morgan, one of his two international
captains, has recently credited the
all-rounder?s MVP-winning stint
with the runners-up Rising Pune
Supergiant last year for ?breaking
down barriers? and causing the
English invasion that has a record
12爌layers spread across six of the
eight franchises.
Stokes appreciates their presence
in Twenty20?s great tamasha, rather
than with their counties, is not to
everyone?s taste back home. The
subject of his �7m deal with Pune
last year ? a record for an overseas
player ? and new price tag at just
a shade under, is one at which he
squirms. ?Last year there was so
much said about me and the money.
? Ben Stokes celebrates with Royals
team-mate Dhawal Kulkarni
I just shy away from it. I don?t want
to come across as arrogant. I don?t
know how to answer it. It?s just
weird,? he says.
?Some people think we?re going
for one reason but as a sportsman
that is genuinely not what it is
about. It?s about being exposed to
the best T20 players in the world in
front of capacity crowds every three
or four days. I don?t think people
understand that or see it for what
it is. We don?t quite get that in our
T20 right now ? there aren?t many
international matches ? but when
the new competition kicks off [in
2020] maybe that will happen more.?
Stokes is clearly enjoying his time
with the Royals. The inaugural IPL
winners in 2008, they are now trying
to rebuild public trust in their first
season back after a two-year ban
for the spot-fixing scandal that cost
three players their careers. He has
struck up a particular rapport with
Shane Warne, the team?s mentor,
while Jos Buttler is a familiar face
in the ranks. But as is the case with
England, all team-mates tend to
gravitate towards him.
His only off-field struggle in
India has come from some of the
commercial demands that pack
out the schedule on non-match
days. ?They ask you to do things
that are so far out of your comfort
zone ? it?s just not me,? he says,
perhaps in reference to some lively
Bollywood-style dancing of his that
can be witnessed during the IPL?s
numerous TV ad breaks.
The feet are moving better on the
field even if the returns do not yet
jump off the page. His third match
against Royal Challengers Bangalore
? a high-scoring 19-run win on the
day after the interview ? is the most
impactful yet, with a 21-ball 27 from
No� his first wicket of the campaign
and a leaping boundary catch to
remove Brendon McCullum that
kickstarted the RCB struggle in their
pursuit of 218. While the latter was
a classic case of Stokes making the
ridiculous look sublimely simple ?
his extra training 24 hours earlier
leapt to mind as he sprung high ? it
is likely the bowling will have given
Stokes most satisfaction, purely for
the fact he was charging in at full tilt
for the first time in a long time.
A pre-Christmas spell in
New Zealand with Canterbury
notwithstanding, the general lack
of action leading into his return for
England in February had affected his
body. Bowling in the one-day series
saw wickets follow but he found his
legs seized up after spells. Then, just
before the Tests that followed, some
historical stress fractures in his lower
back suddenly began to cause him
grief and injections were required.
Just 10 laboured overs were
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
? Ben Stokes enjoys taking
on the best T20 players in the
IPL with Rajasthan Royals
AIJAZ RAHI/AP
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:45 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
45
Ten Doeschate
unhappy after
Headingley?s
big washout
MICHAEL BRADLEY/AFP/GETTY
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 16/4/2018 20:14
sent down in the two Tests that
followed the jabs but Stokes says he
is feeling himself again; to prevent
a recurrence he is remodelling his
bowling action. The late step into
the crease that pointed him to fine
leg and left him needing to twist in
order to straighten up is being eased
out. He is happy with the results but
the true test is in the middle.
The return to the England camp
? he has been restored to the side
until the end of proceedings ? was
probably as smooth as he and his
employers could have hoped.
Stokes says the squad?s response
felt no different to before from
his perspective ? ?it?s not like we
hadn?t stayed in touch? ? but admits
watching his Test colleagues among
them go down 4-0 in Australia was
tough. ?I lived every moment of the
Ashes. I?m sure it was nowhere near
the emotions of the guys out there
but I was just as gutted.?
Readjustment batting-wise took
little time either, with one low-key
score of 12 in the first one-dayer at
Hamilton ? ?I was anxious. I was
guilty of thinking too far ahead
and trying to make an impression.
It was like I was at the start of my
career,? ? before a less flustered
unbeaten 63 steered Morgan?s
side to a series-levelling win at
Mount燤aunganui. ?I was really
emotional after getting man of the
match in that second game back. It
was such a relief to perform and be
there at the end. I had five minutes
to myself after getting back to the
dressing room, sat in my bubble and
taking it all in. The lads appreciated
that and gave me space. It was a
great feeling.?
For the Tests that followed
that eventual 3-2 win, a setback
? albeit one that was widely
expected ? took place when Stokes
was told by Joe燫oot and Trevor
Bayliss he would not return to the
vice-captaincy. ?They just said
they wanted to stick with Jimmy
[Anderson]. But regardless, I know
my role and it won?t change how I
go about things. It won?t be in the
back of my mind and I won?t hold it
against anyone,? he says.
?It?s all about what I?m going to
do in the future. I just want to get us
back to playing the way we want to
play. We were so close to being one
of the best teams in the world. We?ve
slacked off in the past two years but
knowing how close we were gives
you that desire to get back there.?
That slacking off, as he puts it,
bottomed out with the 58 all out in
Auckland ? ?It was like the pins in a
bowling alley falling down in slow
motion? ? from which a 1-0 series
Graham Hardcastle
Headingley
?I had five
minutes sat
in my bubble.
The lads gave
me space.
It was a
great feeling?
defeat followed. From being one
Test win away from holding all nine
bilateral Test trophies in 2016, only
for Pakistan to win at the Oval and
square the series, England have five
in the cabinet to match their world
ranking of fifth.
Root, Bayliss and the as-yet
reformed selection panel have a
job on their hands. The former is
battling to turn half-centuries into
three figures, too ? his last nine have
gone unconverted ? and it is a topic
Stokes has been discussing with one
of his new friends in India.
?I have seen a lot of people saying
he shouldn?t be captain ? I won?t
say who ? and that his batting is
being affected by it. I had a chat with
Warnie about this, because I don?t
see it. Look at his average [52.6]
and all the runs scored ? why do
people have a big thing about not
converting? He said Joe is a great
player but this is what can make
him one of the greatest. I sort of
understand it�
?But the thing about Joe is he
doesn?t bat for himself. If he thinks
it is time to take a team down, he
will go for it. That?s how he wants
us to play as a team and as captain,
he feels he has to set the standard.
People can have a go at him but the
bigger picture, that?s what he is
trying to build. When it clicks ? and
that is coming ? those scores will
become 150s and 200s. Hopefully
when people read what I have
said here they will understand
a燽it爉ore.?
Doubtless much of the heat from
the end of England?s sorry Test
travails this winter was drawn by
Australia?s ball-tampering scandal
and before Stokes heads up to the
dressing room at the Chinnaswamy,
before his new team?s departure
from the ground, his views on the
topic are sought.
?I?m keeping my mouth shut.
Certain people said some things and
it then comes back to get you�? he
says, before stopping himself from
elaborating on who and what he
means. Given the aforementioned
elephant, it is probably for the best.
? Yorkshire
say they have
state-of-the-art
drainage but
that the amount
of rainfall was
too much
TGSPHOTO/REX/
SHUTTERSTOCK
Ryan ten Doeschate has criticised
Yorkshire?s lack of action after the
opening match in Essex?s defence of
the County Championship was abandoned without a ball being bowled yesterday ? the first four-day washout in
history at Headingley.
The Essex captain bemoaned the
fact there had not been any work done
on the problem area of the outfield.
After a fourth-day 10am inspection,
the ICC elite panel umpires Ian Gould
and Richard Illingworth decided there
had been no significant improvement
in saturated patches towards the old
Football Stand end of the ground,
where redevelopment is taking place.
However, the Yorkshire chief executive, Mark Arthur, insisted that work
was not a factor in problems. ?That?s
just one or two people trying to find a
story,? he claimed. ?There was a stand
beforehand, and the drainage doesn?t
impact on the stand or vice versa. We
had state-of-the-art drainage put in
seven or eight years ago ? there?s no
problem with it in any shape or form. It
is the quantity of rain and snow we?ve
had over recent weeks and months.?
Ten Doeschate accepted conditions
were not fit but said: ?I understand
they?ve had a lot of rain but we haven?t
seen a drop in the 30-odd hours we?ve
spent at the ground. It?s not fit, but we
haven?t seen any work going on.?
Yorkshire say the water table was so
high that any heavy machinery would
have only made conditions worse.
Yorkshire are due to face Nottinghamshire at Headingley on Friday and
their coach, Andrew Gale, said: ?We
should be fine because the forecast is
good. Someone told me it?s going to be
warmer than Ibiza this week.?
In a tumultuous morning?s play at
Old Trafford, meanwhile, 12 wickets
fell for 25 runs. Lancashire started the
day trailing Nottinghamshire by six
runs but lost eight wickets in 56 minutes. Nottinghamshire, set 10 to win,
then lost four wickets. It was their first
win in the top division since April 2016.
At the Ageas Bowl, Worcestershire
were all out for 127, losing against
Hampshire by 196 runs, despite an
unbeaten 45 from Travis Head. There
were four wickets for Kyle Abbott and
three for Fidel Edwards.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:46 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 18:10
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
?
46
Sport
Football
Premier League
FA Cup semi-final spots up for
grabs, Mourinho tells United
Jamie Jackson
Jos� Mourinho has appeared to question the ambition of some Manchester
United players after the defeat by West
Bromwich Albion that left Manchester
City Premier League champions.
The team who lost 1-0 at Old Trafford were all internationals and the
cYanmaGentaYellowb
? Jos� Mourinho has called into
question his players? character
manager offered an enlightening
response yesterday when asked
whether he was getting enough from
experienced players. ?Consistency
has nothing to do with age,? he said.
?It has to do with personality, has to
do with the way you live for football,
what is your priority in your life, what
are your ambitions. This has nothing
to do with age.
?I have met players of 30 years old
who were not consistent at all and I
found boys of 18, 19, 20 who were real
men, real pros. It is not about the age.?
Mourinho will make changes for the
match at Bournemouth tomorrow with
a view to giving players the chance to
make the side for the FA燙up semi-final
against Tottenham on Saturday.
?Rotating is not the right word,? the
manager said. ?If I play a player against
Bournemouth and the player is phenomenal, he plays in the semi-final.
So it is not rotating, because rotating
[sounds] like a player that plays
against Bournemouth is to give a rest
to somebody that is going to play in
the semi-final. It is an opportunity for
some people to play and try to get a
place for Spurs.
?Some of the guys that played
[against West Brom] don?t have a place
in that team [for Bournemouth]. What
is the criteria for a manager to choose
a team? I only know one criteria: the
way they play. Or do you want me to go
for the price they cost, or their salary,
or their beautiful face??
Mourinho refused to single out Paul
Pogba, indicating the midfielder was
replaced against West Brom because
of a booking. ?It was not just him [who
was poor],? he said. ?And he had a
yellow card.
?With only two midfield players,
you cannot play with one at risk of
not being able to make a foul. You
can do it if your team is not losing the
ball, but our team was losing the ball
so everything was complicated. We
were losing lots of balls, so by losing
lots of balls, with turns and flicks and
tricks, the midfield players and central
defenders are at risk of one touch, one
late challenge and they are out.?
ple were talking about us then. In the
second year we managed to pull it all
together. We took some risks, R鷅en
Neves would have been offered to a
number of people ? not just Wolverhampton Wanderers, as would have
some of the other players.?
The 44-year-old Thelwell, who
joined the club 10 years ago, admits
Wolves are now ?moving into a different stratosphere? and confirmed
that had they not won promotion
this year, adhering to the financial
fair play (FFP) regulations could have
proved a stumbling block. ?We have
always been very positive about the
possibility of getting promoted this
year,? Thelwell said. ?Yes, possibly [we
would have failed FFP] the answer is,
in short, but thank God we don?t have
to wrestle with that now and that we
have got a different problem to solve.
?From our perspective we are not
keen to put a ceiling on it really, it?s
almost dare-to-dream stuff. It sounds
a little bit ridiculous when you look
at the recent history where Wolves
have been. But, why not is the answer
from my perspective. They [Wolves?
owner Fosun] are uber-ambitious,
and they have been uber-supportive.
With the squad we?ve got, the age of
the players, the coach we?ve got, sky?s
the limit爎eally.?
Sky Bet Championship
Wolves count
blessings
that gamble
on promotion
paid o?
Ben Fisher
R鷅en Neves plans on staying at
Wolves next season after helping
to end their six-year exile from the
Premier League and the midfielder
hopes an outstanding first season in
England can earn him a place in the
Portugal squad at the World Cup finals
in Russia this summer.
Neves has been the club?s marquee
signing, with the �.8m club-record
buy from Porto excelling since
swapping the Champions League for
the Championship last summer. He
is among the players at Wolves who
belong to the agent Jorge Mendes but
the 21-year-old midfielder admits he
is keen to play in the top flight with
Wolves, with the club one point away
from being crowned champions.
?It?s [going to be] my first season in
the Premier League, it?s the place that
Wolves deserve, that the fans deserve
as well,? Neves said. ?I am happy here
and if it?s possible I?d like to stay here
for my first year in the Premier League.
Honestly, I love to play here, I love the
boys, I am really happy to play here and
I?m really happy to stay. I think I have
it all to stay but in football we never
know but, yes, I would like to stay.
?We are really happy because we
achieved our goal a little bit earlier but
now we have other goals ? we want to
be champions. We have three games
to go so we have to come back to our
hard work to try to get this goal. It?s
really good for me. When I came [to
Wolves], I came to improve myself and
help the club. We are in the Premier
League [now] and that?s the most
important thing.?
Neves has been capped five times
and admits his form, including six
goals, has helped to put him on the
radar of Fernando Santos, the Portugal manager. ?Of course all the players
? R鷅en Neves enjoys one of his goals
and hopes it was seen in Portugal
SAM BAGNALL/AMA/GETTY IMAGES
are thinking about that,? he said. ?I燼m
honestly focused on the here and now
but if after that I have to go to the World
Cup, I am happy with that. They have
Wolves燭V, sometimes the games are
on Sky Sports, so they can see my
games. They sent me a message to
congratulate me for the promotion
but nothing more.?
Wolves clinched promotion on
Saturday, when Fulham could only
draw with Brentford, and celebrated
on Sunday with a 2-0 victory against
Birmingham City. That win was their
29th of the season and Kevin Thelwell,
the club?s sporting director, believes
Nuno Esp韗ito Santo deserves enormous credit. ?There?s 101 reasons why
we have got promoted but the main
reason is Nuno,? Thelwell said. ?You
hear a lot of coaches and managers
needing more time, spending more
time to pull off a philosophy, nine or
12 months or maybe longer, but this
guy did it in four weeks. He deserves
a huge amount of credit, he?s done a
fantastic job.?
Of the criticism of Wolves? relationship with Mendes, whose Gestifute
agency has seven clients at the club,
including Esp韗ito Santo, Thelwell said:
?Jorge is an agent just like any other.
We?ve taken some of Jorge?s clients but
also taken clients from other agents. My
perspective on it is we haven?t broken
any of the rules, we are very clear on
that and the EFL suggests we are very
clear on that and Jorge is an agent that
has helped us to improve the squad,
just like some other agencies have.
?In the first year our recruitment
didn?t go so well and not so many peo-
?We haven?t broken
any of the rules,
we are very
clear on that?
Kevin Thelwell
Wolves? sporting director
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:47 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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Sent at 16/4/2018 19:52
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
Sport
Football Manchester City?s title triumph
De Bruyne?s
next City target
is to improve
in Europe
Jamie Jackson
Kevin De Bruyne believes Manchester City?s ambition must be to win the
Champions League. Pep Guardiola?s
side secured the Premier League title
on Sunday after winning the EFL Cup
in February, yet thoughts are turning
to how the team can improve.
Last week City were knocked out of
the Champions League by Liverpool
at the quarter-final stage. De Bruyne
said: ?That?s the next step for us. We
have played some great games in the
Champions League and we?ve not been
too far away.
?Maybe we haven?t gone as far as
we would have liked but there have
been performances along the way that
show we could do something special
in the future.
?It?s great to play at the highest level
and success doesn?t come easy when
you?re playing against teams who have
been around it for so many years, but
we improved a little on [the last-16] last
season and we?ll look to do the same
again next year. It?s what we all want;
to do the best we can in all of the competitions and the Champions League
is no different.?
De Bruyne hopes that Guardiola can
strengthen the squad. ?It?s important
for the club to add new players and to
keep getting stronger,? the Belgium
international said. ?That?s true for all
teams. We have a great group of players
right now and with a few additions
here and there hopefully that will take
us on to another level. Competition
will be even tougher next season and
we have to be ready for that.
?Not only in the Premier League
but in the Champions League and the
cup competitions too. If we want to
keep achieving I think competition for
places is a good thing and only makes
you try to improve as a player.
?The feeling among the squad is
great. We have enjoyed the season a
lot but there is work to do if we want to
achieve more in future. That can be the
trickiest thing in football, to not only
win but keep winning. Having such a
young squad will hopefully help us to
achieve that.?
? Kevin De Bruyne has set his sights
high for next season at City
47
Analysis
Jonathan Wilson
Vulnerable channels
and 20 zones: the
tactics behind a title
O
ttmar Hitzfeld, the
former Borussia
Dortmund and Bayern
Munich manager, used
to speak of the red
zone, a central area of
the pitch just outside the penalty
box. Control that, he believed, and
you controlled the game. If in your
half you denied the opposition the
ball in that space, they were forced
wide and while crosses can be
dangerous they are a low percentage
route to goal.
At the other end a player with
time on the ball in that zone was a
major threat, able to shoot or slide
balls through the defence. As teams
have become increasingly adept at
plugging the red zone ? often with
the use of two holding midfielders
? the danger area has shifted.
Manchester City, notably, target the
area on the edge of the Hitzfeld red
zone, the space between the central
defender and the full-back.
An awareness of the vulnerability
of that area is not something
particularly new. In a 4-4-2 a forward
with any level of tactical awareness
would try to exploit it. Perhaps the
centre-back and the full-back both
think the other is covering and the
forward is left unmarked. Or perhaps
both mark the one player, leaving
space elsewhere. Or if one marks the
forward he can move into the other
defender?s zone, disrupting the
defensive structure.
It is a simple enough idea but, as
Thierry Henry explained on Sky, it
remains potent at the highest level.
The idea of disruption, of existing in
the pockets that elude the marking
structure, was at the heart of Pep
Guardiola?s Barcelona.
?If you stand between the rightback and the right centre-back and
Sam [Samuel Eto?o] or me does the
same on the other side, suddenly
you hold four players alone,? Henry
said. ?Just from you being high and
wide, and then coming back in, you
are actually freezing four players
because we are threatening to go in
behind.?
Because they were so terrified of
leaving Henry or Eto?o free, defences
did not push up and full-backs did
not move into midfield. The effect
was to create more space in midfield
for Lionel Messi dropping off as a
false nine and for Xavi and Andr閟
Iniesta advancing from midfield (not
to mention Dani Alves?s surges from
a notional right-back position).
David Silva would often burst into
space created by Manchester City?s
wide players MAN CITY VIA GETTY IMAGES
City have exploited the same
basic idea slightly differently but
the importance of those channels
between the centre-back and fullback is seen in the way Guardiola,
as he did at Bayern, has the City
training pitches marked out in 20
zones. In principle no more than
three zones in the same horizontal
line and no more than two zones in
the same vertical line should ever be
occupied.
If a player moves into a zone that
means four in the same horizontal
line are occupied, one of the other
three should move, ensuring the
man on the ball always has two or
three passing options. But what
is also significant is that dividing
the pitch in such a way emphasises
the importance of those channels
between full-back and centre-back.
Last season one of the great
City?s leaders
Most minutes played
Ederson 2,925
Most goals
Sergio Ag黣ro 21
Most assists
Kevin De Bruyne 15
Most successful passes
Nicol醩 Otamendi 2,665
Most tackles
Kevin De Bruyne 58
Most errors leading to goals
Nicol醩 Otamendi 3
Ag黣ro
Sterling
San�
De Bruyne
strengths of Chelsea was the way
their structure controlled those
channels, their 3-4-2-1 system
providing both two holding
midfielders (N?Golo Kant� and
Nemanja Matic) and two players
who were in effect inside-forwards
(Eden Hazard and Pedro or Willian),
who operated in awkward pockets in
which they fell outside the natural
zone of the opposing centre-back,
full-back and holding midfielder.
G
uardiola had Kevin
De Bruyne and David
Silva operating in ?free
eight? roles from the
start of last season,
to all intents roving
inside-forwards whose forward runs
would exploit those channels. The
big difference with Chelsea, though,
was that City maintained out-andout wingers (in the modern sense of
the term) rather than wing-backs.
Guardiola did toy with a back
three at the start of this season,
although that seemed to be a way of
getting Sergio Ag黣ro and Gabriel
Jesus into the side in a 3-3-2-2 (or
perhaps even 3-1-4-2) rather than
Chelsea?s 3-4-2-1.
The system brought two wins
and a draw but perhaps because
the attacking six frequently found
themselves strung out in a line as the
forwards tried to drop off to create
space for Silva and De Bruyne to
burst into, it never resurfaced after
a switch to 4-3-3 brought a 6-0 win
D Silva
? Wing kings Key to City?s
attacking prowess is the
positioning and movement
of their wide attackers
over Watford and a 5-0 win over
Crystal Palace in quick succession.
The role of Fernandinho in
protecting the back four is crucial,
particularly on those occasions
when both full-backs have been
given licence to attack. But there
have also been times when the fullbacks, Fabian Delph in particular
(and most notably away against
Chelsea), have tucked inside, with
the corresponding centre-back
moving wider, occupying precisely
those channels De Bruyne and
David Silva try to attack at the
other end of the pitch.
That is useful as a way out
from the back ? and Ederson?s
calmness in possession has been
a major feature, notably at home
against Tottenham when he
bypassed the press with a string
of accurate long passes. It also
gives City protection against the
counterattack; although, as the
Champions League games against
Liverpool suggested, perhaps not
enough.
City?s domination of the
channels at one end of the pitch
has been their triumph; their
failure to do the same at the other
end has been their undoing.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:48 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 19:50
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
48
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
Sport
Football Manchester City?s title triumph
? Pep Guardiola?s side
have been uplifting to
watch this season
PHIL NOBLE/REUTERS
Guardiola needs to do
the unexpected ? win
the Champions League
After joyously cruising to the
Premier League title a bigger
challenge lies ahead for his
expensive winning
g machine
Barney Ronay
Y
ou won. Fine. Now win
again. Win better. Even
in a moment of triumph,
with his beautifully
engineered seventh
domestic title safely
stowed away, it is hard to avoid that
nagging paradox that runs through
Pep Guardiola?s managerial career.
Although not before making space
for a little grateful applause. It was
fitting Manchester City?s Premier
League title arrived at a canter in the
end, leaving some clarity around the
edges, some time to step back and
simply admire. A prolonged stutter
to the line may have confirmed a few
hard-to-shift Proper Football Man
Prejudices. But it would also have
been misleading.
City have the most points, most
shots, most goals and most passes.
They?ve been strolling away at the
top of the league since the fifth week
of the season, a 6-0 win at Watford
nestled in the middle of a 5-0, a 4-0,
a 5-0 and a 7-2.
In reality it is not possible to win
more convincingly than this. Not
least when, besides the numbers,
there is also the basic tone and
texture of this league title, the sense
of players stretching out into the
fringes of their own talent, finding
new patterns and rhythms.
From August into April these
Premier League champions have
been a rare joy, a team that keep the
ball with the usual Pep-issue mania
but come forward in a relentless
swarm, spreading the game into
every available part of the space
whatever the score, whatever the
time on the clock.
It is worth noting that had City
failed to deliver this season the same
Manchester United who clanked their
way to a square-headed title-sealing
defeat by West Brom may now be in
line to win the Premier League.
In the event United?s expensive
brand of stodge is a reminder of just
how difficult it is to engineer drive
and fluency in a standard modern
team of expensive bolt-on parts. By
contrast, the champions have been
a rare gift, a reminder that for all its
vested interests, its fixed hierarchies,
elite modern football can still be a
genuinely uplifting thing.
At which point the wheels start
to clank, the screen dissolves and
another version of this movie begins
to roll. This is the alternative history
of Pep. For all its brilliance this City
team are also a ruthlessly assembled
winning machine. Just as for the
manager another league title is
another season spent exclusively
in the company of the sport?s
financially incontinent elite.
En route to winning the title and
a League Cup Guardiola has spent
�8m on players in two seasons,
the greatest single transfer splurge
in history. And so that paradox kicks
in: a brilliant team who also have a
sense of inevitability about them,
a project that simply cannot be
allowed to fail.
How to resolve this contradiction
is not immediately clear. There are
shades of a footballing version of
the Peter Principle. Guardiola has
been so good at managing teams he
only ever gets to manage the ones
who are so powerful they cannot
fail.
Even through this glaze there are
other contradictions. For all this,
Guardiola has somehow managed to
retain not just the moral high ground
but an air of likable asceticism. He
seems an oddly monk-like figure,
known for the purity of his methods,
the idealistic obsession with detail.
At times this can be endearingly
comical. Even in the middle of the
title stroll Guardiola spent Christmas
Day watching videos of Newcastle,
the kind of festive viewing choice
that brings to mind the response of
one exasperated friend to the news
that the dying poet Philip Larkin
was seeing out his days drinking
?nothing but cheap red wine? ? the
suggestion that he could, at least,
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:49 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
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Sent at 16/4/2018 19:50
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
49
Vincent
Kompany
poses for the
phone after
Manchester
City were
confirmed as
title winners
How to give top dogs
an even bigger bite
City?s attention will now
be focused on the areas
where a champion team
can be improved
in January 2017. Jesus has nine
league goals in 14 starts (13 in all
competitions), and last year there
were seven in eight. This is an
impressive ratio that will have to be
continued.
Jamie Jackson
Bolster central midfield
Guardiola has Fernandinho,
G黱dogan, David Silva
and Kevin De Bruyne as frontline
midfielders. There is also Fabian
Delph, who is not trusted in the
position, plus Oleksandr Zinchenko,
who is preferred at left-back. Yet the
manager will bolster this area in the
close season for two reasons. First,
Silva is 32 and Fernandinho turns 33
next month so each will have their
game time managed next season.
Second, Guardiola?s is a fierce
football ethos based on midfielders
being the prime personnel on which
his teams are founded. In saying
once that Fernandinho can play
all 10 outfield positions Guardiola
made the manifesto clear. Borussia
Dortmund?s Julian Weigl, 22, is
among those the manager will
consider in the transfer window.
3
Work on plan B
Pep Guardiola can bridle
at the suggestion he does
not adjust the gameplan when
required and for the 3-0 Champions
League quarter-final first-leg
defeat by Liverpool he did do so.
The problem was that dropping
Raheem Sterling for Ilkay G黱dogan
was such a rare move ? removing
a forward for an extra midfielder
? it disrupted Manchester City?s
rhythm. He has admitted it may
have caused his players to wonder
if their ultra-positive coach was
?wary? of Liverpool and affected
how they performed. By 31 minutes
the tactic had failed and after 57 on
came Sterling for G黱dogan. Yet if
Guardiola did more of this kind of
adjustment the team would view it
as less an experiment and more the
norm and he would surely become as
slick with plan B as with plan A.
1
Keep Sergio Ag黣ro
Despite Ag黣ro?s 30 goals in
39 appearances ? 21 of which
were scored in the Premier League
? Guardiola remains lukewarm
regarding the Argentinian. The
manager believes City are better
with Gabriel Jesus as the spearhead
because of the Brazilian?s swifter
link play that allows the side more
fluidity. Although Guardiola is open
to Ag黣ro leaving this summer, it
would be detrimental to let him go.
Could Jesus step up and contribute
the weight of goals required should
Ag黣ro depart? His figures suggest
so but he is yet to enjoy a sustained
injury-free period since joining
2
? Sergio Ag黣ro scored a hat-trick
in the 6-0 demolition of Watford that
perfectly showed off City?s style
DAN MULLAN/GETTY IMAGES
try some expensive red wine.
At the same time he is clearly a
brilliant manager on a very basic
level, venerated in England partly
because so much of what he does is
an upgrade on the old managerial
tropes. Like a George Graham for the
non-contact age, Guardiola spends
hours drilling his defensive line,
enacting what is in effect a more
fluid version of moving up and down
together holding a piece of rope.
I
n the old Don Revie style he
makes a point of knowing the
first name of everyone at the
club, of urging his players to
bond and spend time together
socially, although rather than
nine pints of lager it is breakfast with
the club nutritionist and quinoa
doggy bags after training.
Yet there are those obvious blind
spots. Guardiola has never managed
a team where success would not
have arrived in some form or other.
He is rightly feted for his 12 trophies
at the Camp Nou. But Barcelona
have won almost as many since
he left and as many Champions
Leagues without him since Lionel
Messi showed up.
Similarly with City, where
this season?s achievements on
trophies alone are an exact replica
of what Manuel Pellegrini rustled
up in his first season. There is
nothing to compare with Porto
winning the Champions League, or
Internazionale, or Atl閠ico Madrid?s
rise. Winning a title he had no right
to win, wrestling against the tide of
history. This remains the unticked
box for a manager routinely venerated
as the best of his generation.
With this in mind next
season presents another kind of
opportunity. It may be harsh to say
Guardiola must win the Champions
League for his time at City to be
Guardiola has
never managed
a team where
success would not
have arrived
?Channels and zones. The
tactics behind the title?
Analysis
Jonathan Wilson Page 47 judged an unqualified success but
it is also true, as it was at Bayern
Munich. Albeit this time around
there is a chance to enter, for the first
time, a frontier territory.
Winning the Champions League
would be undeniably Guardiola?s
own work, at least with this current
City, who are not a collection of
ready-made global stars but a team
with an attacking unit aged 21, 22
and 23, where nobody in the regular
first XI has won this competition
before.
This may well change as City
strengthen in the summer. No doubt
Guardiola?s obsession with the
Champions League will contribute
to this. Seven years on from his
last victorious semi-final, this
competition has undeniably got
away from him.
Never mind, for now, the money
spent, the will-to-power of the
Premier League?s Emirati overlords.
If this title has been a freewheeling
joy, next season presents something
else, a chance for Guardiola to do
something different, to win for the
first time against the prevailing tide.
Replace Vincent Kompany
The perennial question
of who will replace
Vincent Kompany remains
despite the captain?s late-season
run of fitness that has taken his
league appearances to 15 (19
in all competitions). Guardiola
hopes Aymeric Laporte?s January
recruitment can help provide an
answer, as the Frenchman competes
with Kompany, Nicol醩 Otamendi
and John Stones for a place. Yet
Kompany?s injury proneness means
Guardiola has only three central
defenders he can rely on. Expect
Kyle Walker and Benjamin Mendy
to be shifted across from full-back
on occasion but West Brom?s Jonny
Evans, a career centre-back, may
again be of interest.
4
Continue to be brave
This may be counterintuitive
after City were dumped
out of the Champions League 5-1 by
Liverpool but Guardiola must not
lose courage in his quest for ever
more perfect football. Given how
invigorating City are to watch, next
season?s fascination will be whether
the Pep way can conquer Europe,
while he tries to retain the Premier
League crown. To do so he has to
solve the issue that plagued him at
Bayern Munich, between 2013-16,
and in two European campaigns
at City: how to fill the gap in the XI
where he fielded Lionel Messi for his
two-time European Cup-winners
Barcelona. The Argentinian was
Guardiola?s genie in a bottle, his
go-to when the team needed to pull
away from sides who came at his
Bar鏰, just as J黵gen Klopp?s team
did at City. Guardiola has to find
another way, and if he maintains the
desire to always dazzle, the result
could be a Messi-less City who are
even better than his gilded Bar鏰.
5
Gabriel Jesus
is preferred to
Sergio Ag黣ro by
Pep Guardiola
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:50 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 16/4/2018 22:00
The Guardian Tuesday 17 April 2018
?
Sport
Football Premier League
50
Carroll?s late strike just
enough to spare Hart
West Ham
1
Carroll 90
Stoke
1
Crouch 79
Possession
West Ham
64%
Shots on target
6
Fouls
14
Daniel Taylor
London Stadium
79?
Substitute
makes
his mark
Peter Crouch
pounces
after Joe
Hart parries
Xherdan
Shaqiri?s shot
to open the
scoring for
Stoke
DAVID KLEIN/
REUTERS
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Stoke
36%
6
21
It was threatening to be another grim
night for West Ham United and, for
Jose Hart, a personal ordeal given
that the England manager, Gareth
Southgate, was here to see the latest
evidence of his deterioration. Hart has
already lost his place as England?s No 1
and, at this rate, he must be in danger
of being cast adrift from the squad that
Southgate takes to the World Cup in
Russia this summer.
Unfortunately for Hart, the mistake that led to Peter Crouch, one of
the Stoke?s substitutes, opening the
scoring can hardly be described as a
one-off. Indeed, Hart did something
very similar in the 3-0 defeat at home
to Burnley last month, having just
been recalled to the side after a long
spell in the wilderness.
His latest lapse came after 79 minutes and at that stage Stoke will feel
they ought to have registered their first
away win since October. Instead it was
another substitute, Andy Carroll, who
had the final say, lashing in an 90thminute equaliser to spare West Ham
an ignominious result. David Moyes?s
team also had three second-half goals
disallowed and it was a dramatic finale
to a game that had taken an age to
ignite.
Not that Karren Brady, the club?s
vice-chairman, seemed too enthused.
A quarter of an hour before kick-off,
her Twitter feed pinged up a cheery
message reminding television viewers to tune into her new show, Give It
a Year, at 8pm, as if it had slipped her
mind that a televised football match,
involving her own team, was kicking
off at precisely that time.
As PR own-goals go, it wasn?t the
ideal way to start the night and the
replies from West Ham?s fans were particularly fruity (?Give it a year? You?ve
had eight,? being the general tone,
expletives removed). Then the game
kicked off and, for a long while, it was
tempting to think there might have
been people at home turning over from
the football, just as she requested.
It certainly took a while before there
was anything to liven up the atmosphere. Stoke?s fans, who seem to spend
an inordinate amount of time booing
either the match officials or opposition players, quickly set about targeting Marko Arnautovic, formerly one of
their favourites. Arnautovic, in turn,
looked eager to make the point that,
deep down, they probably miss him.
Yet the game lived down to expectations during the opening 45 minutes
? two ordinary sides huffing and puffing without any real wit or creativity
? and when the half-time announcer
introduced a West Ham fan who had
flown in from Australia it was tempting to wonder whether he might have
chosen a more attractive fixture.
? Marko Arnautovic is disappointed
after West Ham had a goal disallowed
The only noteworthy chance for
West Ham until that point had fallen
to Arnautovic, inside the six-yard area,
with a snap shot that struck Jack Butland in the face and flew out for a corner. Southgate at this stage had little
to see as Butland and Hart were largely
untroubled. Stoke?s best chance fell to
Moritz Bauer, coming in from the right,
but the Austrian aimed a tame shot
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:51 Edition Date:180417 Edition:01 Zone:
Tuesday 17 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 16/4/2018 22:00
cYanmaGentaYellowb
?
Results
straight at Hart. Stoke?s lack of threat
was hardly a surprise bearing in mind
they had managed only seven league
goals since the turn of the year. They
had lost all seven of their previous
trips to London, conceding 26 goals
and scoring only five, but at the start
of the second half the penny finally
seemed to have dropped that West
Ham can be vulnerable when teams
run at them. It is just a pity for Stoke
that Xherdan Shaqiri is not a more consistent performer. Shaqiri showed in
flashes that he is surely too talented to
remain with Stoke if they are relegated
and Bauer?s driving runs on the right
of midfield were another prominent
feature.
All the same, it was easy to see why
they were averaging under a goal per
game this season. Stoke have not managed two goals in a league fixture since
beating Huddersfield 2-0 in January.
They have the worst goal difference
in the league and it is a problem that
urgently needs to be fixed if there is
to be a dramatic feat of escapology
in their remaining four fixtures, with
Europa League-chasing Burnley and
Champions League semi-finalists Liverpool their next two opponents.
The other subplot to the evening
was that this was Michael Oliver?s first
game as a referee since the now-infamous Champions League tie between
Juventus and Real Madrid, Gianluigi
Buffon?s red card and all the unpleasantness that has followed. Oliver had
a steady night ? a nice change, presumably, from being told he has a ?dustbin
for a heart? ? and his assistant got the
big decisions right. Arnautovic had
strayed offside before directing in a
55th-minute header and the same
player was flagged again when Edimilson Fernandes fired in a shot from
20 yards. This time, Arnautovic was
standing directly in Butland?s line of
vision and that looked like being a key
decision when Hart spilled Shaqiri?s
shot for Crouch to turn in the rebound.
West Ham
4-2-3-1
Hart; Zabaleta, Rice,
Ogbonna, Cresswell?;
Kouyat�, Noble;
Fernandes
(Hern醤dez�),
M醨io�(Carroll�),
Masuaku (Lanzini�);
Arnautovic
Subs not used
Adri醤, Hugill, Evra,
Cullen
Stoke
4-4-1-1
Butland; Zouma,
Shawcross, Indi?, Pieters;
Bauer (Crouch?�),
Allen,燦diaye?,
Sobhi�(Cameron�);
Shaqiri; Diouf (Ireland�)
Subs not used
Grant, Fletcher, Campbell,
Sorenson
Referee Michael Oliver Attendance 56,795
Rodriguez looks
to the future
after Bong case
Simon Peach
Jay Rodriguez wants to move on after a
Football Association charge of racially
abusing Brighton?s Ga雝an Bong was
found to be not proven, with the West
Bromwich Albion forward saying ?the
truth always comes out?.
Rodriguez has been under added
duress for three months after being
accused of making an alleged comment to the Brighton defender when
the sides met on 13燡anuary. The FA
announced on Friday that the Independent Regulatory Commission
?determined that on the balance of
probabilities the allegation was not
proven? against Rodriguez.
?I am always a great believer that
the truth always comes out and it has,?
the 28-year-old forward told BBC WM.
?Now we can move on and I can just
carry on working hard for the team.?
Rodriguez capped a fine display
on Sunday with the goal that secured
rock-bottom West Brom a shock 1-0
win at Manchester United ? and Manchester City the Premier League title.
?You always dream as a young lad
to come here and score. We need to
believe still ? especially coming here
and showing that ? we can go and beat
anyone. We need to keep that between
us and keep working.? PA
Pochettino plots
Spurs? blueprint
to catch City
51
Football
PREMIER LEAGUE
Man City (C)
Man Utd
Liverpool
Tottenham
Chelsea
Arsenal
Burnley
Leicester
Everton
Newcastle
Bournemouth
Watford
Brighton
West Ham
Huddersfield
Crystal Palace
Swansea
Southampton
Stoke
West Brom
West Ham
Carroll 90
56,795
P
33
33
34
33
33
33
33
33
34
33
34
34
33
33
34
34
33
33
34
34
W
28
22
20
20
18
16
14
11
11
11
9
10
8
8
9
8
8
5
6
4
(0) 1
D
3
5
10
7
6
6
10
10
9
8
11
7
11
11
8
10
9
13
10
12
L
2
6
4
6
9
11
9
12
14
14
14
17
14
14
17
16
16
15
18
18
F
93
63
78
65
57
62
33
49
39
35
41
42
31
41
27
36
27
33
31
27
A
25
26
35
30
33
45
29
47
54
42
56
60
46
59
54
54
46
53
64
52
Stoke City
Crouch 79
GD
+68
+37
+43
+35
+24
+17
+4
+2
-15
-7
-15
-18
-15
-18
-27
-18
-19
-20
-33
-25
Pts
87
71
70
67
60
54
52
43
42
41
38
37
35
35
35
34
33
28
28
24
(0) 1
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE NORTH
Curzon Ashton 2 Nuneaton Town 2
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE SOUTH
Chelmsford 3 Wealdstone 0
EVO-STIK NORTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE
Stourbridge 2 Workington 3
BOSTIK PREMIER LEAGUE
Brightlingsea Regent 0 Leatherhead 7;
Kingstonian L Merstham L
EVO-STIK SOUTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE
Hitchen 0 Slough 1
BUNDESLIGA
Mainz 2 Freiburg 0
Mauricio Pochettino has passed on his
congratulations to Manchester City on
becoming Premier League champions
and immediately turned his thoughts
to how he and Tottenham might get
the better of them next season.
Spurs have work to do to guarantee
a place in the top four, a job that continues at Brighton tonight, before the
FA Cup semi-final against Manchester
United on Saturday.
Pochettino is also still chewing over
the performance that enabled City to
ease to a 3-1 win at Wembley last Saturday. He believes elements of that
display showed Spurs can compete but
that his team must start next season
strongly if they are to have a hope of
becoming champions.
?I want to congratulate Pep, the
coaching staff and of course the
players ? they deserve the title,? he
said. ?In football, after a whole season,
it is the most consistent side that has
the capaci
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