close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Observer Magazine - 3 September 2017

код для вставкиСкачать
03.09.17
THE
BEAUTY
ISSUE
The trends, products
and people you
need to know about
right now
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
1
This week?s issue
COVER: ALEXANDER STRAULINO/TRUNK ARCHIVE
THE HOT LIST
This week we?re like children
let loose with the grown-ups?
MAKE-UP . We?ve created a
HOTLIST of new products,
exciting trends ? banana eyes
or snogged lips anyone? ?
and brilliant innovators. Eva
Wiseman heads all this up in
her column, arguing that among
all the politics, it?s important to
remember that applying a little
lippy is supposed to be fun.
Kate Grenville has an issue,
though. The writer reveals
how perfume and SCENT
INTOLERANCE can make
life unbearable.
JULIA DONALDSON talks
about life with the Gruffalo in
This Much I Know. Meanwhile,
an inadvertent crash with an
icy JUDE LAW is recalled in
a Brush with Greatness.
In FOOD , Nigel Slater turns
autumn fruit into delicious
puddings; while Jay Rayner
tries out Jean-Georges at the
Connaught in London.
In HOMES , we visit a
Modernist masterpiece built for
the stars; Lucy Siegle wonders
if we can make any impact on
ocean waste in ETHICAL LIVING ;
and Martin Love turns Tonka in
the latest version of Toyota?s epic
Hi-Lux in WHEELS . Alex Clark
heads to Croatia for a detox in
TRAVEL ; the Japanese secret to
longevity is revealed in INNER
LIFE ; and when a woman attacks
her sister-in-law for making the
wrong birth choices, MARIELLA
FROSTRUP intervenes.
14
17
15
20
22
THIS WEEK AT A GLANCE
49 WHEELS
30 NIGEL SLATER
42 HOMES
Editor Ruaridh Nicoll Deputy editor Alice Fisher Art director Jo Cochrane Commissioning editors Eva Wiseman, Shahesta Shaitly,
Emma Cook Assistant Juliana Piskorz Fashion editor Jo Jones Menswear editor Helen Seamons Chief sub-editor Martin Love
Deputy chief sub-editor Debbie Lawson Sub-editor Kate Edgley Deputy art director Caroline McGivern Picture editor Kit Burnet
Advertising managers Rich Cunningham, Guy Edmunds Colour reproduction GNM Imaging
Printed in the Netherlands by Roto Smeets Group BV, Hunneperkade 4, NL-7418 BT Deventer (+ 31 5 7069 4900; info@rotosmeetsgroup.com)
The Observer Magazine, King?s Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9GU 020 3353 2000 magazine@observer.co.uk
29 JUDE LAW
Follow us on Twitter
@ObsMagazine
46 GARDENS
Follow us on Instagram
THIS PRODUCT IS MADE FROM SUSTAINABLY
@ObsMagazine
MANAGED FOREST AND CONTROLLED SOURCES
Eva Wiseman
@EvaWiseman
Email Eva at e.wiseman@observer.co.uk or
visit theguardian.com/pro?le/evawiseman
for all her articles in one place
YOU PROBABLY THINK THIS
COLUMN?S ABOUT YOU, DON?T YOU?
I
t costs a lot to look this
political. Emmanuel
Macron?s personal makeup artist recently ?led two
claims for payment: one for
?10,000 (�200) and one
for ?16,000 (�,740) ? both
for doing his make-up for
press conferences. The
claims cover his ?rst three
months in office, meaning
he?s been spending almost
?10,000 per month on
make-up since becoming
president. Which shouldn?t be too surprising,
when you realise there is a whole industry,
literally, a爓hole self-help industry consisting
of earnest books and stripy jumpers and diets,
selling us tricks to appear more French.
But the international outrage expressed is
at Macron?s vanity. Male vanity, this perfumed
albatross that men must hide beneath their
blazers like a goitre for fear of seeming
vulnerable, but with a gravitational pull so
strong it leads them to organise speeches at
sweet little places like the Palace of Versailles.
The real problem with vanity is being caught
in the act. This ?expenses reveal? is the media
equivalent of somebody catching your mirror
face, the pony-like pout your lips stiffen into
when they happen upon a re?ective surface, be
it a car window or the back of a dessert spoon.
Worse than being caught masturbating, worse
than a stranger walking in on you in the Tesco?s
loo, somebody seeing your private mirror face,
and therefore not just the real you, the vain
you, but the you that you most desperately
want to present to the world, is the most
excruciating of embarrassments.
The associations we have with make-up and
that me-time in the mirror are largely shameful,
and grimly gendered. There was some kerfuffle
last week after comments Zadie Smith made
at the Edinburgh International Book Festival,
about limiting her seven-year-old daughter?s
mirror time, were mis-framed as a way of
scoffing at women?s vanity. Out of context,
Smith?s quote, her insistence that an hour and
a half for contouring was too long, was pinned
to the women?s wall on the internet and pelted
with darts by people who felt she was judging
their choice to wear make-up. It?s something
about the way news works today that leads to
these high-pitched rows between otherwise
sane and clever women, as if the reporter had
chucked a stink bomb over the fence before
running away. Is it because we?re trained to rise
to it, like mice in a lab? Or because, while we?re
primed to resist, it?s easier to slap out against the
people we saw as allies ? they?re closer, after all?
Anyway, Zadie Smith wasn?t dismissing those
of us who enjoy make-up, she was pointing
out the disparity between the grooming that is
expected of men and women, and teaching her
daughter the reality of what those before her have
labelled the ?hair and make-up tax?. ?I explained
it to her in these terms: you are wasting time,? she
said. ?Your brother is not going to waste any time
doing this. Every day of his life he will put a shirt
on, he?s out the door and he doesn?t give a shit if
you waste an hour and a half doing your make-up.?
The cheap alternative, of course, is that men like
Macron encourage everybody to take the time
to enjoy the thrill of a ?attering mirror, and the
magic that comes with a really good matti?er.
It?s not that men like Macron or children
like Smith?s daughter shouldn?t care about
how they look, though the arguments that
have bubbled up around them have sought to
debate that point. The service these arguments
have provided instead is that they?ve opened
a window into the twitchiness so many have
about vanity, and what is correct.
There are seas and oceans between
enjoying the sport of painting your face, and
the dangerous pursuit of perfection or even
?normality?, and I write this having dabbled in
both, my face having caused me such anxiety in
the past that I?ve cancelled plans, not wanting to
be seen. And now having grown older and busier,
and formed whole personalities around eyeliner,
time spent in front of the mirror with a make-up
bag, while sometimes frustrating, is largely jolly
and joyful, and pockmarked with nostalgia.
It?s not nothing, the time spent looking at
ourselves. It has value. Whether that?s ?10,000
a month I can?t say, but I do know vanity is not
simple, and making-up is not wasted time. The
danger is in the risk of falling into the mirror as
if a deep lake, and drowning for a little while. Male
vanity is a
perfumed
albatross
men
must hide
beneath
their blazers
like a goitre,
for fear of
seeming
vulnerable
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
5
We love...
SUB HEAD IN HERE
A bit of blurb to go in here roughly this
length this is appropriate dummy text that
is being employed in order to ascertain.
Name of item in here
X, website in here
MAKE A BIGGER SPLASH
Sweaty Betty?s double denim collection
makes you look at jeans in a different
light. These lightweight chambraystyle track pants are as comfortable
and cosy as they are stylish.
Boro Boro vest �, and Konara trousers
�0, both sweatybetty.com
AS NATURE
INTENDED
Jo Malone?s new
perfume range
is all about the
magic of the
forest. Think
oaks, redcurrants
and hazelnuts.
Now you can
smell of the great
and delicious
outdoors without
leaving your sofa.
English Oak and
Redcurrant cologne
�, jomalone.com
ONE, TWO
COLOUR MY SHOE
Charlotte Olympia has
collaborated with Crayola to
create slip-on sneakers for kids..
Yes they?re pricy, but they comee
with special pens for kids to
colour them in themselves,
and ensure they?re the coolest
cats at the start of term.
Crayola sneakers
�5, charlotteolympia.com
We love...
A LOVING SPOONFUL
Here?s an exact copy of Fortunato Depero?s 1927
masterpiece of graphic design and bookmaking ? Depero
Futurista. This is the original ?book as object?: you can
even unbolt it if you like, and display each page as art.
Arket, the new brand
from H&M, calls itself
?a modern-day market?.
In its new London store,
yo can pick up almost
you
ny
nything,
from classic
anything,
weeaters, to these little
sweaters,
nt spoons.
nty
dainty
The Bolted Book �5, waterstones.com
Set off spoons
s
� arket.com
THE FINE ART OF BOOKMAKING
NEW COMIC
BOOK HEROES
WORTH A LIE IN
Made from 100% natural
stonewashed French ?ax, Piglet?s
range of colourful linen bedding
gets softer and softer with wear.
These are bedroom basics for
those of us with aspirations of
perfection, but who long ago lost
the will to iron.
Piglet bedding From �, pigletinbed.com
Already a hero to
many, musician
and author Nick
Cave now gets
his own comic
book. This
graphic novel
tells Cave?s
story from his
childhood in
Australia to
success with the
Bad Seeds. The
book is from
independent
publishers Self
Made Hero. See
its website for
similar works
on Fidel Castro,
Josephine Baker
and ? upcoming
? Jeremy
Corbyn.
Nick Cave: Mercy
on Me by Reinhard
Kleist �.99,
selfmadehero.com
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
9
This much
I know
Julia Donaldson
I really wanted to be an actor. When I was 12, I understudied the fairies in
the Old Vic production of A Midsummer Night?s Dream with Judi Dench,
Tom Courtenay and lots of starry people, and I was completely stagestruck. I still do more performing than writing really.
I don?t want to say I?m sick of The Gru?alo, but I suppose I do feel a bit like
the little mouse in the story who makes up the Gruffalo and then comes
face to face with the real thing. I made him up and then, suddenly, here
he is in Chessington Zoo and there?s a little boy with a Gruffalo backpack.
It?s everywhere. It?s a weird feeling, but as long as I can use the Gruffalo as
a爐rampoline to bounce my other books about on then I?m happy with that.
A lot of people are awfully silly about relationships. I?ve noticed that
people who are incredibly sensible about practical things, like choosing
a washing machine, will suddenly make some wild decision about
relationships. I was always the other way round. I was a bit dreamy and
disorganised, but when it came to relationships I was quite fastidious.
I爓ouldn?t have rushed into anything.
I started busking when I was a student in Paris to make some money
and the songwriting grew out of that. Malcolm [Donaldson, her husband]
and I爑sed to get lots of gigs. We would be asked to sing after supper at
a燿entist?s dinner and I?d write a song about teeth or we?d perform at the
Covent Garden hat fair and I?d write a song about hats. It was tremendously
good training for the rhyming stories I write now.
Ideas can come from anywhere. I was on a safari and we saw these
wildebeests and the ranger said: ?The wildebeest is one of the ugly ?ve.?
And I just pricked up my ears. Ugly ?ve? Who are they? And I immediately
knew what my next story was going to be.
It?s a lovely feeling when a friendship gets this frisson and you realise
you?re attracted to that person. I think that?s probably a more sound
way than having the frisson ?rst and then ?nding out you?re not really
compatible. Malcolm and I have been married for 45 years and I can
honestly say we?ve never had to work at it.
It upsets me when I?m trying to read a rhyming story to my grandchildren
and I can?t immediately see where the stress should fall. I?m not saying
mine are perfect, but I try my very best to make it trip off the tongue. People
underestimate what a lot of crafting goes into it.
Quite a few of my books are subconsciously about loss [her eldest son
Hamish died in 2003]. Stick Man and Tiddler are both about characters
getting lost, and The Paper Dolls is about bereavement and memory. And
in my book for teenagers, Running on the Cracks, there?s a character who
has mental illness, but is very likable, and I suppose that was a way of
dealing with a lot of stuff.
The Ugly Five by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler is published on 7 September by Alison
Green Books. The exhibition A World Inside a Book: Gruffalos, Dragons and other Creatures
opens at the Discover Children?s Story Centre, London E15, on 21 October (discover.org.uk)
Interview JOANNE O?CONNOR Photograph ALEX LAKE
Author, 69
I was a bit
dreamy and
disorganised,
but when
it came to
relationships
I was quite
fastidious.
I wouldn?t
have rushed
into anything
To read all the
interviews in
this series, go to
observer.co.uk/
this-much-i-know
The hot list
OUR TOP 25 BEAUTY TIPS TO KEEP YOU AHEAD OF THE CURVE
1
HERO BEAUTY
Marching down the AW17
catwalks were models painted
up to show their strength. And
no one embodied this powerful
look more than the brilliant
Adwoa Aboah, walking for
Fenty x Puma, Rihanna?s label.
This is a taster of what to
expect from the Fenty beauty
line, launching next week.
Photograph JASON LLOYD-EVANS
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
13
The hot list
2
Infringe is a new
magazine on the
?anthropology of
hair?. Through
its amazing
photography,
you?ll see the art
of hairdressing
in a new light.
Kate Moss h
has llaunched
h d
her ?rst make-up palette
in America, with Japanese
beauty brand Decort�. It
includes a shade called,
wait for it, ?Moss Green?.
14
HOT TIP
4
BIG BROWS
You?ve heard of
boyfriend jeans,
now here?s the
boyfriend brow.
Brushed up, big and
bushy, it?s Cara D
times three.
3
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
Lush, a brand that promotes ethical
buying and supports grassroots
charities, has created the most #2017
beauty product yet. After the success
of their Sleepy lotion (it went viral
after customers said it cured their
insomnia) we?re enjoying their ?dget
spinner bubble bar (�95, lush.com).
5
31st State is the UK?s ?rst
skincare line designed for
teenage boys. Its Overnight
Clearing Pads are a revelation,
even for ladies. And importantly,
everything smells delicious
(from �99, 31st-state.com).
6
7
Lipstick Queen has designed
a blusher that goes on
black, turning sheer berry
on the skin. It describes it
he face
as a ?trace of lace? ? for the
(�, spacenk.com).
Olaplex is the
product that
everyone?s
talking
about ? if everyone
you?re talking to is
talking about hair. It?s
a爐hree-part treatment
that gives damaged
hair a thicker,
healthier look. Ask
in your local salon.
JASON LLOYD-EVANS
BUY THIS
GET REAL
Glossier, the
New York-based
beauty company
that became a cult
hit overnight,
comes to Europe
in October. It?s
a brand, says
founder Emily
Weiss, that
?celebrates real
girls in real life,
wherever they are.?
BANANA EYES
9
The ?banana? is the curved
crease in the eyelid ? the
place you can apply shadow
to create a wide-eyed effect.
But you knew that. This season?s little
twist is to switch up the colours for
a bold graphic hit, with one bright
shade right in your banana, and
another (we liked the sky-blue and
fuchsia combo at Oscar de la Renta)
across the lid.
8
ICURE
STATEMENT MAN
There were metallic
logo decals and glorious
graphic designs, but
the most exciting nail
trend this season
literally jangled. Dressed
with beads, crystals,
feathers and chains,
Libertine?s nail designers
?embraced the gypsy as
an icon of freedom?.
10
Rouge Dior Doublee
Rouge lipsticks aree
matte and metallicc
in one magic bullett.
Like Givenchy?s
Le Rouge twotoned lipstick
that contours and
colours, it brings
on one of those
?Why take two
bottles into the
ts.
shower?? moments.
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
15
The hot list
Making
their mark
Tricia Cudsen
?Society hasn?t yet come to terms
with the fact that we?re living longer?
?The beauty industry assumes we are
all engaged in an anti-ageing battle,?
says an emphatic Tricia Cudsen,
the 70-year-old founder of mature
make-up brand Look Fabulous Forever.
?I am determined to change this.?
Cudsen, a former management
consultant from south London, has
a�pro-ageing? attitude to beauty. She
launched Look Fabulous Forever in
2013, ?after wasting � on products
meant for skin a lot younger than mine?
and becoming ?increasingly exercised?
by the ?insulting? rhetoric around
older women and their beauty routine.
Cudsen?s mission was two-fold: create
products and imagery that were
?honest, featuring women over the age
of 55?; and to use ?positive language,
to represent ageing as something to
embrace, not to ?ght against?.
Look Fabulous Forever was
developed with a cosmetics
manufacturer based in Suffolk, to
speci?cally ?atter mature skin, which
16
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
has less collagen and is therefore
more porous. The top three sellers
are all primers. ?Older skin is bumpy,
meaning that make-up gets sucked
into the skin faster.? A lip primer ?seals
the edges of the lips so that the lipstick
doesn?t feather and bleed? while matte
eye shadow, Cudsen notes, ?is much
more ?attering on older women?.
These tips are delivered via her
?how to? videos, which have had more
than 4.2m views. Cudsen wants to
create a platform where she can ?talk
about con?dence and risk taking ?.
Her forthcoming book, Living the
Life More Fabulous: Beauty, Style and
Empowerment for Older Women, will
be out in February. Cudsen describes it
as a ?handbook for empowerment?.
?Society has not yet come to terms
with the fact that everyone is leading
much longer lives. Ageing is still
associated with catastrophe. We
need to re-frame longevity,? she says.
Cudsen admits that her mission may
sound ?incredibly grandiose ? I燼m
one woman, in her 70th year? but it?s
an essential one. ?Ageism has appalling
consequences. It feeds into all sorts
of issues, like older women not being
able to get jobs.?
The success of the brand has been
?staggering? says Cudsen, who put
�,000 into the business when she
launched it. Less than four years later
Look Fabulous Forever turns over
�. She puts its success down to one
thing: ?no trickery?. And she?s only
just got going. ?If I?m going to live
until I?m 90, I have another 20 years
ahead of me. And I intend to make
them really productive.? PANDORA SYKES
KALPESH LATHIGRA
If you?re a woman of colour, over 55, or hanker after luxury but
blanch at its price, there?s not been much on the shelves for you ?
until now. Meet the innovators giving the market a makeover
Ozohu Adoh
?The luxury market was not meeting
the needs of women of colour?
This year Ozohu Adoh, a Nigerianborn ex-accountant, launched
Epara, the ?rst luxury beauty brand
speci?cally targeting women of colour.
The line has already been bought by
Harrods, which knows its audience: in
2015, says Adoh, every �in �spent
in the store was by a Nigerian.
It began by accident. ?I had
excessive dry skin on my face. I爐ried
all the luxury skincare brands and
they just didn?t work.? She researched
ingredients, making her own
concoctions using mainly oils. ?It
took several iterations before I got
something that worked,? says Adoh.
When her skin cleared up ?friends
started to ask me for this thing in
a nondescript jar.? That was three
years ago. She has since developed
a line including cleansers, a mask,
serums and eye cream. Many of her
ingredients, such as marula and
moringa oils, and mango butter, are
found on African soil. ?I want to take
them mainstream,? she says.
Some have asked why women of
colour need their own skincare line.
?The market was not addressing our
needs,? says Adoh. ?Due to higher
levels of melanin, typical problems
present differently in darker skin
tones. Uneven skin tone caused by
hormonal issues or acne scarring can
take much longer to heal.?
The controversy of toxic
ingredients in beauty products aimed
at non-Caucasian women has been
topical of late. Many beauty care
products targeting this demographic,
particularly those products that
perpetuate the western ideal of
beauty (skin lightening, hair relaxers
or straighteners, etc), often include
harmful ingredients, such as steroids
and oestrogen, which go on to cause
reproductive harm.
Creating efficacious and ?clean?
products for women of colour is an
ethos Adoh hopes others will adopt.
It will, she says, help change the
beauty landscape. FUNMI FETTO
11
RS
THE INNOVATO
Photograph PHIL FISK
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
17
The hot list
Marcia Kilgore
?Instead of luxury labels, what people
want to portray is their own brand?
Marcia Kilgore was watching telly when
she had the idea. ?I thought, what about
Net?ix but for beauty ? so everyone could
get a bigger piece of the beauty pie??
The woman behind Bliss Spas, FitFlops
and Soap & Glory, Kilgore has long been
renowned for ?disrupting? the industry, but
this project threatened to go even further,
toppling it on its side, skidding into a hedge.
I?d heard a rumour that Kilgore?s new
venture was such a threat to established
beauty brands that she?d received death
threats. She chuckles. ?There?s room for us
and for them. After all, Net?ix exists, but
people still go to the cinema, right??
This is how Beauty Pie works: you pay
� a month for membership, and then
you can purchase its carefully curated
are at
at
collection of make-up and skincare
icks
ic
ks
factory prices. So, that?s � lipsticks
n
for �24, excellent foundation (in
and
Armani-esque bottles) for �75, and
idee
id
the new ?Super-Eye Energy Peptide
rici
ri
cing
ng
Infusion Cream? for �65. The pricing
odu
duct
ctss
is totally transparent, and the products
nci
cies
estt
are comparable to those in the fanciest
beauty halls.
As Beauty Pie nears its ?rst
anniversary, now with tens of
thousands of members, Kilgore
he
says the key to its success lies in the
e?n
e?
ne
?personal brand?. Rather than de?
ne
els
themselves through designer labels,
she says: ?What people really want to
portray is their own brand.?
Only a fraction of the cost of a luxury
product is the product itself. The rest is
what Kilgore calls LMAO, or ?Land?ll
Marketing and Overheads.? Kilgore
spends days at cosmetics factories: one will
produce a perfect lipstick, at another she
knows a product mixer who specialises in
foun
fo
und
d
foundation.
?You become quite elitist in
term
te
rmss of the quality. If something doesn?t
terms
have good
g
have
colour payoff or the pencil is
bit too
to dry, I reject them.?
a bit
th luxury brands, she says, her
Of the
voic
vo
icee dropping
d
voice
a little, 95% buy the
same products she does, tweaking the
same
colo
co
lo slightly, whacking it in their
colours
own packaging and adding a few
own
zero
ze
roes
es to
t the price ? often 30 times the
zeroes
pric
pr
icee it costs to make. ?We had this skin
price
brus
br
ush
h from Korea, a rechargeable one in
brush
soft
so
ft-t
-to
o
soft-touch
rubber, for �,? Kilgore says.
?In shops
shop
sh
op it would be more than �. I?ve
?In
seen things
thi
hin
n like it in the airport for �0.?
seen
Is there a company she ?nds particularly
disingenuous? She puts her hand over the
tape recorder and mouths the name of
a brand whose moisturisers sell for �0,
and whose formulations can be found for
a 10th of that through Beauty Pie.
?This is luxury, but for everybody,?
says Kilgore. She raises her chin, proud.
?We call it ?massperational?.? EVA WISEMAN
There?s room for us
and for big brands.
After all, Netflix
exists but people
still go to the cinema
Photograph PHIL FISK
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
19
The hot list
HIGH STREET
15
Resist, through makeup.
The overarching theme
of London Fashion Week
was politics but, as ever,
Ashish Gupta managed to have fun
in the process, deploying sequins
and slogans and face paint with gay
abandon. The make-up was inspired
by Lucha Libra wrestlers, sending
a爉essage of power, strength and joy.
Because throwing glitter in the face
of repression is never a bad thing.
14
Asos has long been the place
we?ve gone for a lunchtime beauty
pick-me-up, with its ever-evolving
stock of hard-to-?nd brands and
affordable cult products. So it makes
perfect sense that it has designed
its very own make-up collection,
launching 18 September. It features
46 shades of vibrant lipsticks,
highlighters and contouring palettes,
with names like ?Current Mood?
and ?Uncompromising?. Aimed at
both girls and boys, the new Asos
make-up collection is a millennial
goldmine. Prices from � Go play.
20
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
16
Everything you
u
know about
hairwashing
is wrong.
The founder of Bumble
& Bumble has launched
ry.
New Wash (�, hairstory.
com), the only product
you?ll need. Elsewhere,
hair scrubs like Redken?s
are proliferating, the ideaa
u to
being that they allow you
wash your hair less often..
JASON LLOYD-EVANS
12
13
Face masks are no longer
a fad, they?re a necessity.
There are the cheap
and reliable (Garnier?s
Moisture Bomb at �99) and the
super-luxe (SK-II?s treatment mask
at �). This two-step option from Dr
Jart + (�) is in the middle. The outer
mask stops the serum evaporating.
Plus, you look like Michael Myers.
Oral care just got
hip. Yes, we?re
talking about
toothpaste and
toothbrushes.
From high-end
dental ?oss
(Coco?oss
specialises
in delicious
fragrances) to
toothpastes that
don?t give you
much change
from �
(Lebon organic
toothpaste
comes in
?avours such
as ?Cap Ferrat
Mood?, though
Aesop?s new
offering, with
wasabi extract is
a爎elative bargain
at only � and
toothbrushes
that are pretty
enough to give
as gifts (Buly
1803?s lovely
tortoiseshell
brush is � on
net-a-porter),
looking after
your teeth has
never been
trendier.
The hot list
Eau de
torment
One sni? and Orange prize-winning novelist Kate Grenville?s head
would start to throb. Could she really be intolerant to... perfume?
Photograph ELISE DUMONTET
ne night in 2015, travelling around Australia on
a book tour, I lay on my
bed in the room of a posh
hotel admiring the job I?d
done on the door. Wide
packaging tape sealed
the crack where the door met the jamb, and
a燿amp towel was wedged against the bottom.
If a person from housekeeping had knocked
and then heard the sound of ripping tape
before the door opened, they might have felt
the need to call security. But there was method
in my madness. Part of the hotel?s poshness
was the lavish use of fragrance. Scented candles made the foyer smell like a ?ower shop.
An air freshener filled the lift with patchouli. Reed diffusers wafted musk along the
corridors. Luckily, the rooms themselves were
free of fragrance. Once I was sealed in like
a pharaoh, I could breathe freely.
Perfume and I go back a long way. My
mum?s bottle of Arp鑗e by Lanvin sat on its
own doily on her dressing table and before
she and Dad went out she?d put some on. She
showed me the right way to do it. You puffed
a few squirts into the air and walked through
O
22
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
the mist as it slowly drifted down. See, darling?
Like that. You don?t want to overdo it.
I felt very womanly to have my own bottle
of scent when I got older and started going
out with boys. I?d leave the house feeling
sumptuous and desirable. One night at a party,
a爓oman I admired exclaimed: ?Oh, you?re
wearing White Linen!? and I basked in her
tone of congratulation.
But half an hour after I?d left the house I?d
have a piercing headache, my nose would be
stuffed up, my eyes would be sore, and I?d be
cranky. If I thought about it at all, it was to
blame myself ? I must be tense and anxious.
Shopping was another problem. I was irritable and headachy after just a few minutes
of flipping through the clothes racks, and
just wanted to get out. When I started work,
I gravitated to jobs that didn?t involve people
groomed and scented for success. I found
work in the shabby back rooms of places that
made documentary ?lms. By the time I was 30
I called myself a writer, spending days alone in
my work room where the only scent was from
a sprig of jasmine in a jar.
But leaving the house often meant getting
a爃eadache. I was frequently unwell in ways
that no doctors could help. The worst thing
about it was the unpredictability. Why this
day and not that day? Why here but not there?
There was a feeling of frustration and helplessness in having my life dominated by random
lightning-strikes of headache and brain fog.
Life took on a treacherous feel, of never knowing where or when the next bolt would hit.
A few years later the penny dropped.
A爁riend brought a bottle of perfume as a gift.
As soon as I dabbed it on ? even while I was
still saying ?Thank you so much? ? I felt the
headache starting. I went into the bathroom
and scrubbed the perfume off my skin. The
headache faded. I remember thinking, why
has it taken me so long to work this out? It?s
simple. It?s not life that gives me a headache,
it?s perfume.
It was a huge relief to understand this was
no random thing: it was as plain and orderly
as cause-and-effect. When I was exposed to
fragrance, I got a headache. When I wasn?t, I
didn?t. Now I could do something about it. Over
the following weeks, I replaced all the products in the house with fragrance-free ones.
In the supermarket I?d surreptitiously open
packages to test them, because the most
17
HOT TOPIC
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
23
The hot list
The Case Against Fragrance by Kate Grenville, is out now.
Order it for �.04 from bookshop.theguardian.com
24
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
18
THE EYES
H AV E I T
On the lash: the
cats-eye flick
though the century
Brigitte Bardot
flicked it out for
maximum sex
appeal, like a
cartoon doe.
ARMOUR
Nina Simone?s razorsharp winged liner
was almost mystical
in its perfection.
No smudges, no
compromise.
19
Not 100% behind Balmain?s ?Girlfriend of a rock star?
look (why not just? ?Rock star??) But we love the grungy
lip rings. Armour, to protect your speech.
20
Amy Winehouse?s
winged liner was
inspired by the
Ronettes; she kept
painting until the
brush went dry.
At Versace AW17
more was more.
What was once
pretty and seductive
becomes a threat.
Don?t mess with an
eye like this.
Bin your liquid
foundation. Cushion
compacts have gone
from gimmick to
staple and it?s easy
to see why: portable
and ideal for layeringg
up. We like Guerlain
Lingerie de Peau
and Elizabeth Arden
Bouncy make-up.
CIN蒑ATH萉UE FRAN茿ISE; GETTY IMAGES; PA WIRE? JASON LLOYD EVANS
surprising things ? toilet paper, bin liners, cat
litter ? turned out to smell of pine forests or roses.
With every source of fragrance I eliminated, my
life improved. Leaving the house was still a爇ind
of Russian roulette, but the helplessness and frustration of not understanding was replaced by a
degree of acceptance.
But I wasn?t ready to go public. I?d never heard
of anyone who got sick from perfume, symbol of
everything desirable and glamorous. In fact, it
felt a little shameful, as if I was indulging a neurosis. Talking about it, even to friends, seemed
awkward . The secrecy and isolation became
something of a burden in themselves.
I had a few strategies for dealing with it. When
friends swooped in for a peck on the cheek, I?d
make a fending-off gesture, and when they said:
?Oh, got a cold?? I?d nod. I?d suggest our meetings
took place in caf閟 with an outdoor terrace and I?d
sit upwind.
Shame evolved into something more like anger
one night when I went with friends to the opera.
By bad luck the woman behind me was drenched
in especially pungent perfume. Within minutes
my head was pounding, my eyeballs felt too big for
their sockets and my brain was a blur. The sublime
music seemed like little more than noise.
I was so obviously ill that night that I had to
share my secret with my friends. As I?d feared,
they could hardly believe what I was telling them.
?Perfume?? they said. ?You get sick from perfume?? But once over their surprise, they were
sympathetic. One of them asked: ?Are there a lot
of others like you?? and I realised it was time to
?nd out more.
Three days later I was on the book tour, sealed
into that hotel room. I opened the laptop, searched
for ?fragrance headache? and within minutes I
was deep in the science of scent. I爎ead on with
growing exhilaration. It turned out I爓asn?t a lone
eccentric after all, but in company with millions
of others.
Now I?ve outed myself by writing a book about
fragrance, I?m unembarrassed about telling
people I can?t hug them and probably won?t come
to their party, because the fragrance will make
me sick. The amazing thing is how many of them
understand. Oh yes! They say. Me too!
I still wish I could wake up one day free of
the fragrance-headache tyrant, but I?ve stopped
waiting for that to happen. My life has shaped
itself around this fact, and it?s made me who I
am. Who knows if I?d have become a writer if
other options had beckoned? Writing has let me
travel the world and plunge into the peculiarities of human behaviour. If an odd and awkward
problem with fragrance is the price for that, it
might just have been worth it. The hot list
CLEANED UP
24
Jean Paul
Gaultier is
launching
his ?rst
f
me since
female
perfume
1
1993.
Scandal is a
s
o of
sensual
combo
h
ange.
honey
and orange.
P
ct
Prefer
abstract
abrielle
?orals? Try Gabrielle
C
Chanel,
the ?rst new
f
grance
feminine
fragrance
f
from
Chanel
i 15 years.
in
F
Feeling
more
?
?manly??
Keep your
nose peeled
for Tom
Ford?s Noir
Anthracite.
23
21
Farewell to ?no-make-up-make-up?,
hello to the ?washed look?. Instead
of pretending you are bare-faced,
you?re going for make-up that?s
minimal, but de?nitely there. Think
skin that is dewy, rather than glossy
or matte, ruddy cheeks like you?ve
been on a hike, a peachy glow which
elevates your features and lip colour
that isn?t a world away from your
own hue. It?s about beauty coming
from within (wafty ?wellness?
speak allowing). MAC describes it
as ?moderate? ? imagine something
fresh and clean, neither supernatural nor highly polished. It?s
even OK to look tired. Imagine!
22
Inspired by Studio 54,
Yves Saint Laurent?s
limited-edition
Hologram Powder
(�.50) is serious glitter for grownups. It gives a holographic sheen to the
skin for a proper hit of disco joy.
Neon is the
new black. At
Emilio Pucci?s
show, models
wore mascara
in neon yellow,
blue and green,
while Vivienne
Westwood used
c
cyan
to the same
effect. 3Ina ?
pronounced
Mina ? do a
llovely affordable
(�95) one in
purple which
((as Pantone have
created a爊ew
shade in Prince?s
honour) also
happens
to be the colour
of now.
SNOGGED LIPS
25
Pile it on, and kiss it off.
At Preen by Thornton
Bregazzi, make-up artist
Val Garland cited ?justsnogged? lips as the inspiration for
these red and smeary, glossy, fabulous
pouts. Could there be anything
easier to achieve? A bold cherry
lipliner all over, a blob of something
like Charlotte Tilbury?s Hollywood
Liquid Lipstick in Screen Siren, and a
beckoning over of the nearest lad that
isn?t a) wearing a T-shirt that reads
?FBI: Federal Boob Inspector?, or b)
smelling of a Subway meal deal, for
a quick, effective snog. Or, smudge it
with your ?nger. Either way. THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
27
A brush with
greatness
To read all the articles in this
series, go to observer.co.uk/
a-brush-with-greatness
JUDE LAW
BY PETER STANFORD
It was a good few
years since I?d
been ice-skating,
but when the
invitation came
in the run-up to
Christmas 2003 to
attend the evening
inauguration of the rink in the
courtyard at Somerset House, I was
pretty sure it would all come ?ooding
back. Children were welcome, it said,
so I took my seven-year-old son along.
Because I didn?t want to keep him up
late, I booked into the ?rst batch of
skaters as did, it turned out, several
celebrities, also bringing children,
who were lined up for the cameras.
The good news was that my son
proved remarkably adept on ice.
I?d say chip off the old block, but,
as I爍uickly discovered, I?d lost the
knack. Convinced it would click back
into place eventually, out we wobbled
into the middle for an ungainly
circuit. A couple of times I had to
grab my boy to avoid stumbling but,
unnoticed by me, he had started
going faster. The next time I reached
out in crisis, he wasn?t there. In his
absence, I broke my fall by clinging
on to a fellow skater.
As I pulled myself back up
to standing using this ice-rink
Samaritan?s arms, shoulders and even
donkey jacket like a climbing wall,
I燾ame face-to-face with Jude Law. Not
that he looked like himself as my eyes
fell at ?rst on his famously dimpled
chin. It was only when I got on level
terms that I realised who he was.
And he couldn?t have been
more charming as, dad-to-dad, we
bemoaned the fact that your kids
were never there when you needed
them. Off we went, me to the side
to cling on and hail my treacherous
offspring, and he for several more
elegant spins. Producers of Dancing
on Ice take note, should his ?lm
career ever go into a tailspin.
Later my son and I did manage
a couple of pretty competent laps
before he wanted a break. Even
without my Torvill, I was sure I燾ould
still be Dean, but quickly came
a燾ropper. As my arms ?ayed out,
someone was there to grab me.
Jude Law.
What are the chances, I said
once upright, trying to make light
of the coincidence. If he had had
a bell to call security, I?m sure he
would have used it, for he clearly
had me down as a stalker. Instead
Photograph EAMONN MCCABE
he made tracks as quickly as the
talented Mr Ripley after he?d
bumped off Dickie Greenleaf.
The next day, among the pictures
in the press, I spotted a shot of
a爂rumpy-looking Jude Law with his
kids leaving Somerset House early.
It was just too crowded out there, he
complained. I knew who he meant. Martin Luther: Catholic Dissident
by Peter Stanford is published by Hodder &
Stoughton at �. To order a copy for �,
go to guardianbookshop.com
Dad-todad, we
bemoaned
the fact that
our kids
were never
there when
we needed
them
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
29
Food
&
drink
Nigel Slater
@NigelSlater
Email Nigel at nigel.slater@observer.co.uk
or visit theguardian.com/pro?le/nigelslater
for all his recipes in one place
notes. They taste curiously of
Christmas.
The generosity of neighbours
gave me a chance to make another
unexpected pudding this week.
I gladly took the plums from their
tree and baked them between two
crisp crusts, the ?rst made from
crushed ginger biscuits ? the sort
you might make for cheesecake ?
then a fragile top crust of warm,
sweet oat-?ecked crumbs. We ate our
crumbly plum tart ? not quite cake,
not quite pudding ? with tiny cups
of black coffee. I don?t mind eating
plums every day throughout the
month because I know that this is my
only chance until next September.
PLUM AND
OAT CRUMBLE TART
The base is best when prepared with
open-textured ginger biscuits rather
than the ?atter, harder gingernuts.
Makes 12
For the base:
butter 75g
ginger biscuits 325g
For the ?lling:
plums 500g
caster sugar 3 tbsp
A VINE ROMANCE
When hot,
the grapes?
sweetness
intensi?es.
They taste
curiously of
Christmas
Early autumn is the time to roast dark
sweet muscat grapes and the season?s
gorgeous plums before they disappear
I put a bunch of grapes in the oven to
roast, the dark, sweet muscat variety
you only ?nd in late summer and
autumn. The bunch emerged, looking
like it had spent time in a ?ower press,
a thin layer of sticky syrup in the
roasting tin. We ate the purple-black
fruit, picking them from the stalk with
30 MAGAZINE
MAGAZINE
| 03.09.17
| 03.09.17
| THE| OBSERVER
THE OBSERVER
sticky ?ngers, stirring their juices into
iced rice pudding, thick with cream
and sweet with vanilla.
I have cooked with grapes before,
kneading them into a soft-crusted
foccacia for eating with goat?s
cheese. They made a seasonal
addition to a chicken escalope, too,
saut閑d in a little butter, the grapes
added to the pan with a splash
of Marsala. Hot, their sweetness
intensi?es, also their dark raisin
For the crumble crust:
butter 65g
?our 85g
oats 40g
almonds 30g, ground
pistachios 30g, shredded
water 2 tbsp
You will also need a baking tin, lined with
baking parchment.
Directions
Make the base by melting the butter
in a small saucepan. Crush the
biscuits to ?ne crumbs in a food
processor or bash them with a rolling
pin, then stir them into the melted
butter, making sure they are evenly
coated. Spoon the buttered crumbs
into the parchment-lined baking
Photographs JONATHAN LOVEKIN
Getting fruity:
plum and oat
crumble tart.
Facing page: roast
grapes and
rice pudding
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
31
Food & drink
Nigel Slater
Roast the
grapes
whole on
the vine ?
each person
can cut
their own
little sprig
at the table
WINES
OF THE
WEEK
Mixed grapes
making great
wines in
unexpected
places
David
Williams
@Daveydaibach
To read all
David?s columns
in one place, visit
theguardian.com/
pro?le/davidwilliams
tin, pushing them right into the
corners and covering the base evenly,
then smooth ?at. Leave in the fridge
for 20 minutes.
Set the oven at 180C/gas mark 4.
Halve and stone the plums, put
them in a bowl, add the caster
sugar, then toss them until they are
generously coated.
Make the crumble crust by putting
the butter and ?our into the bowl of
a爁ood processor and process to coarse
crumbs. Alternatively, rub the butter
into the ?our with your ?ngertips.
Put the oats, ground almonds and
shredded pistachios into the butter
and ?our and fold gently together.
Pour in the water then stir or shake
brie?y so that the crumbs stick
together in unevenly sized lumps.
Remove the tart tin from the fridge.
Spread the stoned plums over the
crumbs then scatter the crumble over
the plums, leaving the fruit showing
here and there.
Bake for 45-50 minutes, until the
crust is pale brown and lightly crisp.
Remove from the oven and leave for
an hour to settle.
Slice the tart into 12 small pieces
and serve. They are fragile, so use
a爌alette knife to lift them.
Domaine Gayda Figure
Libre Cabernet Franc,
France 2015 (from �.32,
Cambridge Wine)
In European wine, there is
always a tension between
the indigenous and the
incomer. I?m talking about
grape varieties, although
there is a ?avour of the
nativist v cosmopolitan
culture war in discussions.
Such arguments are
rather less pressing in the
Languedoc-Roussillon,
where the region-wide
IGP Pays d?Oc has always
encouraged a liberal
approach. One of the best producers in the
region, Domaine Gayda, makes two superb
wines from grape varieties most associated
with the Loire Valley for its Figure Libre
brand: a pitch-perfect Chenin Blanc 2015
dry white (from �.46, Cambridge Wine),
and a deeply satisfying, Bordeaux-esque
red Cabernet Franc.
ROAST GRAPES
AND RICE PUDDING
Bring the rice, water and milk to the
boil. As soon as the milk starts to rise
up the sides of the pan, lower the
heat to a simmer.
Using a vegetable peeler, remove
four pieces of peel from the lemon
and add to the rice, then leave on
a爈ow heat, with the occasional stir,
for about 15-20 minutes until the
rice is tender. Remove from the
heat, stir in the sugar and the vanilla
extract. Leave to cool, then tip
into a bowl, cover and place in the
refrigerator for 2 hours to thicken
and chill.
Set the oven at 200C/gas mark 6.
Place the bunch of grapes in
a爊onstick roasting tin. Put the
sugar, brandy and olive oil into a
small bowl and mix together. Pour
the dressing over the grapes and
toss them gently together. Roast for
45-50 minutes until the grapes have
collapsed and the dressing and juice
have formed a爏mall amount of deep
purple liquor in the roasting tin.
When the rice is chilled, whip the
cream until it starts to thicken. It
should be just thick enough to hold
a shape, but stop before it is thick
enough to stand in peaks. Fold the
cream into the chilled rice.
Serve the rice in bowls with the
grapes and juices from the tin. Anette Closheim Savvy,
Nahe, Germany 2016
(�.75, Oddbins)
Riesling has been the white
wine queen of German
vineyards and, for its fans,
there?s a feeling that nothing
else in the country can
match it for scintillating
steeliness. Certainly, purists
will wince when they see
the name sauvignon blanc
on the label of a wine from
one of riesling?s great
territories among the
forests and orchards along
the Nahe River. But they
really shouldn?t. Anette
Closheim?s Savvy sauvignon blanc is
no me-too, could-be-from-anywhere
version. It has the same appetising
mineral freshness as Closheim?s rieslings,
combined with a delicate, verdant
elder?ower and gooseberry fruitiness
that suggests the region is as important
in shaping the wine as the variety.
Quinta de Aves Aluada
Chardonnay, Castilla,
Spain 2013 (�, M&S)
Chardonnay is to white
wine what the croissant
and baguette are to
baking: a French export
found pretty much
everywhere. It?s why
the variety became the
anti-hero of wine?s antiglobalisation activists
and shorthand for the
standardisation of the
world?s vineyards. If
chardonnay?s remorseless
expansion has slowed
in the past decade, it
continues to produce superb wines from
all kinds of unlikely places. The heat and
dust of central Spain, for example, may
not seem a logical spot for great white
wine of any kind. But the cool of Quinta
de Aves?s high altitude vineyards have
produced a gorgeously, exotically ripe but
balanced Iberian take on chardonnay.
Two possibilities here. The grapes
can be roasted whole on the vine and
brought for each person to cut off
their own little sprig. Alternatively,
remove the fruit from the vine before
roasting. The puddle of sticky roasting
juices is essential, and can be spooned
over the chilled rice at the table.
Serves 6
For the rice:
pudding rice (or arborio) 95g
water 320ml
full cream milk 320ml
lemon half
caster sugar 4 tbsp
vanilla extract a few drops
double cream 50ml
sweet black grapes 450g
caster sugar 1 tbsp
brandy (or Marsala or sweet sherry)
3 tbsp
olive oil 1 tbsp
Directions
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
33
Food & drink
Nigel Slater
NIGEL?S
MIDWEEK
DINNER
SMOKED HADDOCK
OCK
AND SWEETCORN
RN
The recipe
Peel a medium onion,
n, halve it and
hen let it soften in
chop it fairly ?nely, then
2 tbsp of olive oil overr a moderate heat.
Stir regularly so the onion doesn?t
eaves and silky
colour. Remove the leaves
rs of corn then
?bres from 2 large ears
m the cobs.
slice the kernels from
Stir the corn into the onions, then
nd the same of
add 200ml of milk and
water. Add a couple of bay leaves
and a grinding of black pepper and
let it come almost to the boil. Lower
the heat and leave the milk and
sweetcorn to simmer until almost
tender. Lower in 2 pieces of smoked
haddock ?llet, each about 300g in
weight. Partially cover with a lid and
leave to simmer for 6-8 minutes until
the ?sh is tender.
Lift out the ?sh and keep warm.
and
n m
ilk
il
k
Tip the corn and
milk
food
od
into a blender or fo
ll b
unch
un
ch
ch
processor, add a small
bunch
will
l b
ll
of parsley, a handful of leavess wi
bee
閑.
perfect, and process to a rough pur�
pur閑.
Check the seasoning then pour
bowls Place a piece of
into shallow bowls.
smoked haddock on top of each and
serve immediately. Enough for 2.
The trick
The ?sh needs very little time in
which to cook, depending on its
thickness. Eight minutes is enough
for the thickest of ?llets. Once a ?ake
can be prized away from its neighbour
with ease, the ?sh is ready.
Photograph JONATHAN LOVEKIN
The twist
The beauty of this is that you can
use frozen or canned sweetcorn,
making this a recipe for all year.
Other vegetables can be incorporated,
such as peas and very ?nely diced
tomatoes. In cold weather, I like
to include diced potatoes, too.
Tarragon or dill, ?nely chopped, is
a delightful addition. Email Nigel at nigel.
slater@observer.
co.uk or visit
theguardian.com/
pro?le/nigelslater
for all his recipes in
one place
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
35
Jean-Georges at the
Connaught, Carlos
Place, London W1K
2AL (020 7107 8861).
Full meal for two,
including drinks and
service: �5 - �5
WE?RE IN THE MONEY
JEAN-GEORGES AT THE CONNAUGHT
Jean-Georges Vongerichten marries
classic French and Asian ?avours like no
one else, but hits you hard in the wallet
How was
dinner?
It would
have been
really nice
at �0 for
two. Sadly it
cost �5
36
It?s the ease with which they do it,
this blazered and Laboutined throng.
With an airy wave of a manicured
hand they order a � pizza as if it
was the most normal thing in the
world; as if it wasn?t an outrageous
act, which deserved to be prosecuted
as a crime against good sense.
Here too am I, preparing to be
just like them. Do I need to be
here? I爏uppose not. There?s always
another place that could be reviewed.
I燾ould be purring over some gap
year traveller?s take on the obscure
foods of Cambodia. But sod that. The
truth is, I very much want to be here.
The newly opened restaurant on the
conservatory side of the Connaught
hotel with its stained-glass windows
like sweet-wrappers and its
irritatingly low, badly engineered
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
tables, belongs to Alsatian-American
chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten.
And I like him.
I try to avoid the ?ouncier excess
of chef worship and napkin sniffing,
but with Vongerichten I fail. I have
spent atrocious amounts of my own
money at his ?agship high-end
restaurant in New York, simply
called Jean-Georges, chasing the
moment. Other chefs have attempted
to marry French classical cooking
with Asian ?avours. Vongerichten
has succeeded. He has a blissful way
with acidity and chilli heat. One
of the single best mouthfuls I have
ever eaten is his: an oblong of black
bread, spread with cold salted butter,
topped with a single raw sea urchin
and on top of that, a ring of pickled
jalape駉. Reminisce. And then
breathe. The room is high-windowed
and populated with characters
written by Tom Wolfe, those women
in their sunglasses like hub caps.
Unfortunately, it is in the base of
the Trump Tower. That used to be
hilarious. Now it isn?t.
The curious thing is that while
my love for Jean-Georges New York
remains undiminished, I have always
been disappointed by his diffusion
lines. I actively hated Spice Market
in Leicester Square, with its mushy
overpriced violation of a laksa. ABC
Kitchen in New York, which tried
hard to work the peasanty farmto-table vibe, was clumsy. And now
here he is with this new place in the
Connaught called, bravely, JeanGeorges, as if it were a direct sibling
of the Trump Tower site.
To be fair the prices here are of
a爏imilar magnitude. They are stupid
in the way Donald Trump is stupid.
It?s a kind of aggressive stupidity.
The cheapest bottle of wine is �.
I燼sk the sommelier if that really was
the cheapest they could ?nd. ?This
is Mayfair,? he says. ?You will ?nd
ANTONIO ZAZUETA OLMOS
Restaurants
Jay Rayner
NEWS
BITES
ANTONIO ZAZUETA OLMOS
@jayrayner1
nothing cheaper here.? Not only
is this not true of Mayfair; nearby
Sexy Fish and Scott?s have bottles
in the �s. It?s not even true of the
same building. On the other side of
the Connaught, H閘鑞e Darroze?s
restaurant has a cheaper bottle.
For this money, you get a symphony
of grey and battalions of waiters who
don?t talk to each other. One tells
us the kitchen is going to send out
a caviar freebie. I decline it. Only
what we order, please. They send
it anyway. Sharply, I send it back.
It?s that kind of place: in this dining
room you have to be aggressive to
avoid being pelted with caviar. Really,
people, it?s hell out there.
But sit back for a moment, and try
to imagine that you are there only
as eye-candy; as the lucky, depilated
guest who will never see inside
the paper folder holding the bill.
What do you get? Butter is good,
big on buttercup yellow, whipped
fats and salt crystals, though the
accompanying sourdough is tired,
with a soft crust. But don?t pout too
much about that my love, because
look: here are warm beignets of
Comt� cheese and black truffle to
make things better. So that?s mini
doughnuts of seriously pokey cheese
and truffle dredged through the deep
fat fryer? Get in.
One starter, tuna tartare on
avocado with a spicy ginger sauce,
is a Vongerichten classic. In New
York the tuna comes as ribbons. At
Spice Market they seemed to have
put it through the blender. Here it?s
a halfway house. There is bite to
the tuna. What matters is the broth:
a爈iquor full of depth and acidity,
?re and vivacity. It is all there. By
contrast salmon sushi ?improved? by
deep frying the lozenges of rice is no
improvement at all. It?s all kinds of
wrongness in four easy mouthfuls.
We order the fontina cheese and
black truffle pizza as a kind of midcourse. It is small; Domino?s still win
the ?feel the width? contest. But it
is also rather beautiful on its metal
frame. There is a blistered crust,
Email Jay at jay.rayner@observer.co.uk
or visit theguardian.com/pro?le/jayrayner
for all his reviews in one place
a爏hade of granite that co-ordinates
nicely with the other guests? pallor,
and then there?s the hot cheese,
drawing out to ribbons as you lift
each piece. The truffle comes in
waves. It?s preposterous, of course,
the item I will be eating as western
civilisation collapses. But ask me
if I could image eating it again and
sheepishly, I would say yes: if I was
drunk enough in Mayfair, I would
come here and drop the stupid
money. And in the morning, I would
hate myself. But we?ve all been
there, eh?
The � hamburger would make
me hate myself more. It?s served
medium rare if you wish, despite
Westminster Council?s threat of
legal hell?re should you do so.
There?s black truffle mayo, because
any amount of black truffle justi?es
a爌rice tag. There?s a slab of stinky
Somerset brie and some pickles. Pull
out a bit of the beef and it turns out to
have something to say for itself, but
it?s silenced by the haughty, bellowing
company. By comparison a dish of
two fat ?llets of John Dory, with
a�ery ginger chilli dressing, almost
feels like good value at �. It isn?t.
For dessert, somebody has made
a爈eaf out of chocolate, because
playing with food is required at �
a pop. They?ve ?lled it with caramel
and nuts. It?s a Snickers for someone
who wouldn?t dream of being seen
eating one. The other dish brings
meringue and lime and raspberry and
is rather lovely. Back home I?m asked
how dinner was. I say it was really
nice at �0 for two. ?Unfortunately,
it cost �5.? Oh, and that was after
they remembered to put on the
two glasses of champagne they had
somehow forgotten. Jean-Georges,
my friend, there are still things about
you I love very much. But boy, do you
make it tough. The sky is the limit: (from top)
tuna tartare with avocado; black
tru?e fontina pizza; John Dory;
raspberry mojito; and chocolate
and caramel pudding
? If � for
a glass of
champagne is
too rich for your
blood, where
else to go? The
best deal in the
capital I?ve found
is at The Heights,
the bar on the
15th ?oor of
the St George?s
Hotel by BBC
Broadcasting
House. A glass
will cost �90.
Plus you get
one of London?s
great secrets:
an astonishing
view across the
capital, presided
over by lovely
sta?.
? Any news
involving
legendary
Edinburgh
restaurateur
David Ramsden is
worth reporting.
His bistrocome-shambolic
meeting house,
The Dogs, has
long been an
institution in
the city. Now
he?s launching
a sibling, The Fat
Pony, on Bread
Street. It?s a wine
bar with small
plates, including
rabbit terrine
with pistachio
and toast, and
pork belly with
ginger and soy
(thefatpony.com).
? File this under
?It?s the thought
that counts.?
Currently, the
most gifted
grocery item at
Amazon ? ahead
of Bollinger
and a sweetie
assortment ? is
a 5-litre bottle
of Golden Swan
White Vinegar.
According to the
reviews it?s being
used to remove
limescale and kill
weeds.
THE OBSERVER | 03.0
03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
37
Fashion
@guardianfashion
@guardianfash
s ion
To see
T
e all tthe
he
e sho
shoots in
n thiss series
ies a
an
and
nd forr mor
more
e
sartorial ad
dvic
v e visi
i t ttheguardian.com/fashion
heguardian.ccom/
heg
m/fas
ashio
hion
advice
visit
REA
REASONS
ASONS T
TO...
O...
WEAR
WEA
AR A
SWEAT
TSHIR
RT
SWEATSHIRT
A sweatshirt with jeans becomes
a燾atwalk-worthy look this season.
?Boring basics? were centre
stage at Dries Van Noten, Gosha
Rubchinskiy and Balenciaga.
As part of this trend you?ll
?nd the branded sweatshirt.
We love seeing the old
Burberry logo back on
a爏weatshirt. Van Noten
spurned his own name on
his sweatshirts and made
homage to one of his
long-term suppliers
instead. Toki Sen-I is
a Japanese knitwear
specialist, fact fans.
A sweatshirt doesn?t
have to look sporty. Wear
a plain style, like M&S?s
claret version, over
a爏hirt for a smarter look.
But also, there?s
? no
need to mothball your
sportswear. Retro brands
such as Fila, Kappa and
Champion are having
a爏tyle moment, and
hirts
one of their sweatsh
sweatshirts
will make for a pocketfriendly wardrobe
update. Sweatshirt �5, shirt �5, and
jeans �5, all Dries Van Noten
(libertylondon.com)
Grooming Juliana Sergot using
Bobbi Brown and Kiehl?s Since 1851
Model Kesse at Premier
P emier
Pr
Fashion editor
e itor HE
ed
HELEN
ELE
L N SE
SEAMONS
EAM
AMON
NS
P
Ph
otographer DA
ANIIEL BEN
ENSO
N ON
Photographer
DANIEL
BENSON
1 Ora
Orange
O
nge �
�
Kappa
Kappa
p (slamjam
(slamj
(sl
a am
amj
socialism.com)
social
soc
ialism
ism.co
.com)
m)
2 Pin
Pink
k and
and nav
navy
vy
�,, Tham
�
Thames
es x
Fred
F
Fre
d Perry
Perr
erry
y (fred
(fred
(fre
d
perry.com)
perry.
per
ry.
y com
com))
3 Cla
aret
e ��.5
7.50,
0,
Claret
�.50,
marksa
mar
ks nd
ksa
marksand
spence
spe
nce
cer.c
r.ccom
spencer.com
4 Gre
G
y �295,
Grey
�5,
bur
burber
berry.
ry.com
com
burberry.com
5 Red ��,
0,
Wee
Weekda
kday
yx
Weekday
Champi
Cha
mpion
on
Champion
(weekd
(we
ekday.
ay.com
com))
(weekday.com)
6 Whi
White
te ��
09,
�9,
Gosha Rubchinskiy
Gosha
Rub
u chi
c nsk
nskiy
iy
y
x Adidas
Adid
das (end
(end
clothi
clo
thing.
ng.com
com))
clothing.com)
7 Pin
Pink
k vint
v
inttage ��,
8,
vintage
to
top
m .co
man
.com
m
topman.com
8 Tau
Taupe
pe ��,
0, Fila
Fila
(ur
rban
banout
out?
?tter
ttters.
ters.
s.
(urbanout?
com))
com
9 Bla
Black
ck �150, Ami
Ami
�0,
(harro
(ha
rrods.
ds.com
com))
(harrods.com)
7
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
Fashion
@guardianfashion
To see all the shoots in this series and for more
sartorial advice, visit theguardian.com/fashion
THE
MODERNIST
THE 80S
REVIVALIST
Roll up the hem of
your suit trousers
and complete the
hip-hop trend with
high-top trainers
Hoodie �.99,
hm.com Bomber
�5, allsaints.
com Necklaces
�, and �, both
gillianhorsup.com
Hoop earrings �,
urbanout?tters.
com Large hoops
�0, dinnyhall.
com Trainers
�, ?la.co.uk
Hat �, kangol.
com Trousers
�, urban
out?tters.com
5 WAYS
S
EAR...
TO WEAR...
A TROUSER
USER SUIT
A versatile suit is worth investing in.
Fabric and cut are key for the perfect
?t. Break the trousers and jacket up
and it becomes even more versatile.
With the right accessories, it can see
you through more than the working
week. Roll the trousers and wear
high-tops for a casual sporty look;
add heels for a date. Urban Out?tters?
unstructured unisex suit is cool ? just
don?t let your boyfriend borrow it. Fashion editor JO JONES
S Photographer
h
h DANIEL BENSON
SO
Create a cooler
edge by adding
a shirt with neckfastening detail,
and white boots
Jacket �, and
trousers �, both
urbanout?tters.
com Shirt �0,
equipmentfr.
com Boots �8,
allsaints.com
THE DINNER DATE
Layer over a lace
camisole, add heels
and a metallic belt, and
head for a night out
Camisole �5, Anine
Bing (net-a-porter.
com) Belt �, reiss.
com Heels �, dune
london.com Earrings
�, urbanout?tters.
com Suit as before
THE ART LOVER
THE BEATNIK
Split up the suit and wear the
jacket as a blazer. Style with cords and
a Fair Isle knit for a relaxed weekend out?t
Jumper �5, gudrungudrun.com Cords
�, urbanout?tters.com Scarf �0,
rockins.co.uk Jacket as before
Wear with an on-trend graphic
printed T-shirt
T-Shirt �, Kim Gordon & Other
Stories (stories.com) Shoes �.99,
zara.com Suit as before
Hair and make-up Juliana Sergot using
Lanc鬽e and Aveda Fashion assistant
Bemi Shaw Model Lilly at The Squad
Homes
For more inside tips, advice and ideas, go to
theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/homes
MODERN MASTERPIECE
A rare intact British Modernist house
has been decorated as if the era never
ended, ?nds Serena Fokschaner
Back to the 60s:
(clockwise from
main picture) Niki
fforde in her living
room; sideboard
and lamp from her
parents? home;
a pine half wall built
to house a TV and
hi-fi; the budget
kitchen which
echoes the original
low-key design;
and the Edward
Schoolheiferdesigned exterior
42
?It?s personal expression, not
faithfully reproducing an era, that
gives a home character,? muses
Niki fforde, ushering me inside her
restored 1960s home. The concertina
door swishes open to reveal an
avalanche of colour. A toe-cossetting
aubergine carpet clambers up
the navy-walled staircase.
Acid-yellow upholstery ?zzles against
mustard walls. Add a peppering
of contemporary art and furniture
and the odd midcentury ?nd and
you have a home that rekindles the
iconoclastic spirt of the original
without feeling retro.
It was the radical architecture of
the house that ?rst appealed to fforde.
Designed by Edward Schoolheifer in
1964 the three-bedroom townhouse
sits on the private Manygate estate
in west London, a rare example of
British Modernist housing. ?After
living in a claustrophobic London ?at
for 13 years I?d drawn up a precise
property checklist,? explains fforde,
who combines a job in television with
an interior design business.
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
?I wanted light and space with
a west-facing garden and a sense of
community. This place has it all,? she
continues, stepping outside to admire
the terraced facade, its simple design
de?ned by white weatherboarding
with picture windows enhancing
the weightless feel. A slate-lined
garden, which fforde designed to
?echo the linear feel of the house?
leads to shady communal lawns.
?I?m convinced that the shared space
makes us more neighbourly. We?ll
wave to each other as we walk past,
but there?s also an unwritten code
? when you draw your curtains it
means ?Don?t disturb!??
When the estate ? now
a燾onservation area ? was ?rst built,
its breezy, avant-garde feel also
appealed to actors working at nearby
Shepperton ?lm studios. Previous
Manygate incumbents include Julie
Christie, Rod Steiger and Marlon
Brando, who rented or bought
properties. Even now residents point
out the house where Tom Jones
lived for a spell, choosing green
carpets to evoke the valleys of home
and sprinkling celebrity stardust
on suburbia.
But Modernism is not for everyone.
?Over the years people have added
partition walls or shrouded the
windows with net curtains for
privacy. I was lucky that my house
was almost untouched,? says fforde,
who found the property by chance.
?One night an agent?s alert just
popped up on my PC.?
With three bedrooms and
a燽athroom upstairs, the focal point of
the interior is the open-plan ground
?oor where the kitchen is separated
from the living area by a爒eneered
half-wall, designed to house a stateof-the-art television. The original
pine ceiling is intact as are the
vinyl concertina doors, installed as
insulation and to soundproof the
hallway, where the telephone once
had pride of place. The 1960s
Photographs SUKI DHANDA
Residents
point out
the house
where Tom
Jones lived
for a spell,
sprinkling
celebrity
stardust on
suburbia
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
43
LIFE & STYLE
Homes
GET THE
LOOK
For more inside tips, advice and ideas, go to
theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/homes
Sideboard �9, Randall
(swooneditions.com)
IC 30 ?oor lamp
�5, Flos
(johnlewis.com)
gas-?red heating system, which
pumps warm air through vents, still
works and is ?surprisingly efficient
and means you don?t need spaceconsuming radiators?.
Time had been less kind to
the decoration. ?It was dirty and
cluttered with cardboard-coloured
carpets and Regency striped
wallpaper,? says fforde. ?So I燾orralled
a few friends and we began to restore
the house.? Wrenching up the carpets
fforde discovered the beech staircase
and Jarrah hardwood ?ooring.
Further excavation revealed original
lead-based paint hues of yellows,
purples and a clutch of forest-green
tiles: ?I?ll confess that at ?rst I was
tempted to paint everything white,
but discovering these colours made
me understand the house and
inspired me to think differently,
although I did draw the line at the
dark green.?
To this spirited backdrop fforde has
added possessions which date back
to her art student days at Central
Saint Martins. There is a photo of
Mick Jagger taken by fforde?s tutor,
the photographer Jill Furmanovsky.
A recent addition is the striking
aluminium sculpture by Jonathan
Clarke, whose work can also be seen
at Ely cathedral. Downstairs, the
heirloom sideboard and sculptural
lamp evoke her parents? 1960s house.
?My mother is extremely stylish.
She?ll hold out for the right pieces.?
A teak dining table stretches to seat
14 while a contemporary rug and
lean daybed, hugged by an arched
?oor lamp, look at home in the living
space. ?I?ve used a mix of objects,
some for nostalgic reasons, others
because they suit the house or ?tted
my bank balance,? fforde explains.
Fiscal caution did not play into
the original housebuilder?s sales ploy.
?Buy now ? pay later,? soothed the
brochure describing its typical buyer
as ?Chris, in his early 30s, working
for a comparatively substantial
salary as an advertising executive??
Over ensuing decades the estate,
predictably, fell out of fashion. But
nowadays Manygate has taken on
a new appeal, drawing professionals,
young families and design-conscious
commuters lured, once more, by
the pioneering spirit of Modernism
in suburbia. Linear feeling:
(clockwise from
top left) the
bedroom; beech
stairs; and the door
to the garden
I was
tempted
to paint it
white, but
discovering
the old
colours
made
me think
di?erently
Bedding
from �, Pavilion
(minimoderns.com)
Turned wooden bowl
�0, John Alfredo Harris
(objectdepoch.com)
Daybed One
�719, Another Country
(twentytwentyone.com)
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
45
Gardens
James Wong
@Botanygeek
To read all James?s columns in
one place, visit theguardian.com/
pro?le/james-wong
They will
make
a dramatic
di?erence to
houseplant
lovers in
basement
or northfacing ?ats
As a self-confessed science geek
I燼m fascinated by technology. Yet in
the world of gardening this is often
synonymous with the gimmicky
(?breglass meerkat solar light,
anyone?) or the hugely complex and
costly ? think hydroponic growers
tha
that require a degree in electrical
en
engineering to install. So it was
wi
with trepidation that I started
ex
experimenting with LED grow lights
las
last winter in my tiny ?at.
Nine months down the line I am
a ttotal convert, eulogising about
the
them to all my gardening mates.
Th
They are something I feel could be
a ggamechanger to many modern
ga
gardeners, if we could only get over
ou
our preconceptions. This is why?
Once upon a time grow lamps
we
were massive, ungainly things ?
?uorescent
u
tubes more than a metre
lon
long that required complex and
hid
hideous systems of stands, cables
an
and re?ectors. They were real power
gu
guzzlers, too, so not exactly great for
the planet, or your wallet ? which
would already have taken a pretty
eye-watering hit from the price of all
the kit. They even kicked out quite
a燽it of heat, which apart from raising
safety issues, could also damage the
very plants you were trying to grow.
However, recent breakthroughs in
LED technology have created a爊ew
generation of effective, cool-running
grow lights that cost a爁raction of the
old-school behemoths both to buy
and to run, consuming (according
to some manufacturers) 90%
less energy. Crucially, they have
shrunk down enough to be easily
incorporated into average living room
decor, some seamlessly integrated
into planter-cum-lamp designs.
Others are light and thin enough
to be ?xed pretty much invisibly into
standard ?at-pack shelves, turning
existing pieces of furniture in my
house into instant growing units.
These LED lights are becoming
increasingly widely available online
and even at a certain Scandinavian
home store.
But why bother in the ?rst place?
Surely part of the pleasure of getting
out in the garden is to escape the
relentless march of technology
into every aspect of our lives. Well,
here?s what my little experiment
has done for me: I was able to
grow houseplants in parts of my
dark, urban ?at that I never could
before. This is a huge bonus to an
obsessive plant collector like me, and
could make an even more dramatic
difference to houseplant lovers in
basement or north-facing ?ats where
lack of light is a serious issue.
Also, come spring seed sowing,
I started off a good six weeks or so
earlier and got zero etiolation on my
baby plants. Stronger plants, much
earlier, meant I got a bumper harvest
of tomatoes and chillies weeks ahead
of time. And all of this for the cost of
a couple of desk lamps than run on
minimal power. Brilliant! DUTCHSCENERY; NUI-STUDIO.COM; IKEA
SEEING THE LIGHT ON LED
Ethical
living
Lucy Siegle
@lucysiegle
Email Lucy at lucy.siegle@observer.co.uk
or visit theguardian.com/pro?le/lucysiegle
to read all her articles in one place
THE ECO GUIDE TO...
OCEAN WASTE
I?ve been sceptical about
the power of running shoes
to affect global change.
So naturally I had it in for
UltraBoost Uncaged Parley,
Adidas trainers that claim
to make peace with the
ocean. The shoe?s upper is
created from plastic waste
retrieved from a clean-up
operation in the Maldives,
and recycled polyester. But
Adidas has committed to
producing a million pairs of
these ocean waste running
shoes, and a swimwear line.
Meanwhile, Spanish
clothing company Ecoalf
works with 2,000 Spanish
?shermen who collect
4-5kg of deep-sea plastic
waste alongside their daily
catch, to be spun into new
yarn. And we can look
forward to seeing the fabric
Econyl on labels in the
future (regenerated from
?shing nets and secondhand carpets) in Italy, as it
becomes mainstream.
New Zealand ?ip-?ops
company Subs grinds
up plastic waste from
beach cleans, but also
upcycles old shoes so that
materials can be sustained
inde?nitely. Every pair of
?ip-?ops removes 0.52kg
of plastic from the sea.
That is, it has to be said,
a very small dent on the
12.7m tonnes of plastic
entering the ocean each
year. I also worry about the
effectiveness of scooping
ocean waste from the
surface, given that average
ocean depth is 1.2km.
But a recent report
analysing all massproduced plastics has
reassured me. It tells us
that almost all plastic ever
created still exists in some
form. So most of the ideas
we?ve had to get rid of it
have failed, spectacularly.
Innovation with huge
global appeal is therefore
pretty critical. The level
of innovation here is also
impressive: regenerating
marine debris degraded by
the sun and wind and ocean
currents is no mean feat.
Nor is taking a resource of
no value and turning it into
something so desired that
?shing ?eets could use it to
supplement their income. THE BIG PICTURE
NAVIGATING THE ARCTIC MELTING POT
It was the record nobody wanted: Finnish icebreaker MSV Nordica took
just 24 days to travel 6,215 miles from Alaska to Greenland, sailing
through the Northwest Passage to arrive on 29 July, earlier than ever
before. The timings of the voyage were made possible by the fact
that Arctic ice melts earlier each year. The voyage and the great melt
were experienced and documented by a crew of scienti?c researchers.
AP
WELL DRESSED
WEAR A POLAR BEAR FOR WWF
Ellie Goulding red
cord bracelet �,
daisyjewellery.com
It turns out that singer
Ellie Goulding is a bit
of a science nerd.
?I loved geography at
school,? she confessed
during a recent visit
to meet climate
scientists from the
British Antarctic
Survey in Cambridge,
where she also came
face to face with
a giant coldwater
star?sh (one of the
creatures that is
currently under threat
from climate change).
But it was the polar
bear (also famously
under threat from
climate change) that
has made it on to
Goulding?s climate
change bracelet
collection, designed
by the singer with
jewellery brand Daisy
of London, to raise
funds for WWF?s
climate work.
?We aim not only
to raise awareness
areness
of the e?ects
cts of
climate change
hange but
to encourage
rage this
conversation,?
ation,? says
Goulding,
g, ?for those
who wear
ar [the
bracelet],
t], it will show
they really care.?
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
47
LIFE & STYLE
Wheels
Martin Love
@MartinLove166
LET?S GO TO WORK
TOYOTA HILUX
The hard as nails Hilux is the enforcer
of the pick-up world. But is Toyota in
danger of softening it up?
�,556
Top speed: 106mph
0-62mph: 12.8 seconds
MPG: 36.2
CO2: 204g/km
If you ask the internet to name the
world?s toughest car, you get the
same answer every time: the Toyota
Hilux. It is utterly unyielding: there
are endless tales of the lengths people
will go to in trying to destroy it, most
famously by Top Gear. In a breathless
example of vehicle cruelty, Clarkson
and chums took an elderly 1988 model
and tried to batter it to death. They
dropped it, drowned it, crashed it into
a tree, ?attened it with a caravan and
then hit it with a wrecking ball. All
to no avail. The Toyota won.
That legendary sturdiness has seen
it driven to both the North and South
poles ? and all points in between.
In the almost 50 years since it was
launched in Japan, more than 18m
have been sold. It?s easily Europe?s
best-selling pick-up.
This is the eighth generation of
the vehicle. Out goes the old 3-litre
diesel and in comes a 2.4-litre 148bhp
turbodiesel. It?s smaller and lighter
than the old slogger, but it packs
more pulling power (up to 3.5 tonnes)
and is way more efficient. In this
class of truck it?s all about torque,
and the Hilux has that in spades.
Email Martin at martin.love@observer.co.uk
or visit theguardian.com/pro?le/martinlove
for all his reviews in one place
It stamps the ground with the
immovable authority of a sumo
wrestler entering the dojo.
The name is a contraction of High
and Luxury. They mean high as in
tall ? not wasted. And as for luxury,
it?s opulent only in the way a rubber
handle on a steel mallet feels lavish.
The original Hilux boasted a double
wishbone suspension. Half a century
later that?s what it still has. As they
say, if it ain?t broke don?t ?x it, and the
Hilux will never be broke.
Improvements have, of course,
been made. The stability control
system, for instance, adjusts the
brakes and throttle to reduce ?trailer
sway? in difficult conditions. (Trailer
Sway would be a great name for a
country and western singer.) The
cab has been softened up, too. Not
that long ago you could hose it down,
inside and out. It also has an excellent
touch screen and multimedia system,
Bluetooth, parking sensors and
cameras, aircon and cruise control.
The Hilux is a bona ?de working
vehicle ? unstinting labour runs
in its veins. Across the developing
world it?s the go-to truck for hefting
everything from animals to rocks.
But by turning it into a leisure 4x4, is
Toyota turning its back on that core
market? Yes, you can take it to the
depot during the week and then the
spa at the weekend. But how many of
us actually need a vehicle that can do
that? It?s a phenomenal bit of kit, but
only because it is ?t for purpose. It?s
a爓ork horse not a fashion pony. BICYCLE OF THE WEEK
TOKYOBIKE CS
Price: �0
Frame: steel
Gears: Shimano
Claris 8-speed
Saddle: Brooks
tokyobike.co.uk
What?s your favourite
colour? It?s a big question,
especially if you are a small
kid. Well, now we have an
official answer, thanks to
GF Smith, one of London?s
oldest paper merchants.
It conducted a survey
across 100 countries and
the winning shade was
Marrs Green. GF Smith
then daubed the hue on
everything from lamps to
satchels and T-shirts ? and
also this new frame from
Tokyobike. Founded in 2002
in the suburb of Yanaka,
Tokyobike in many ways
kickstarted the hipster
vogue for stripped-back,
retro steel frames. In
the way that mountain
bikes are designed for
mountains, so Tokyobikess
were designed for the
metropolis. This one has
smallish wheels and a
slender frame, making it
easy to handle. Green or
not, it?s at home in the city.
y.
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
49
Travel
For more inside tips, advice and holiday
ideas, go to theguardian.com/travel
YOUR GOOD HEALTH
CROATIA
The seven-night
Paleo Programme
at Hotel Ola costs
from �710pp
based on two
sharing, including
full board, ?ights,
transfers, tailored
paleo diet, lecture
and consultation,
two medical
examinations,
classes, treatments
and massages
(the healthyholiday
company.co.uk)
The ?rst relief: there is coffee. The
cave-dwellers inspiring the version
of the paleo regime on offer at Hotel
Ola, a stone?s throw from Split
airport, clearly needed their
morning pick-me-up as much
as I燿o. Also, they obviously
appreciated a modest glass of wine
now and again, which is surely fair,
given that grapes can be huntergathered and fermented, can?t they?
As this might suggest, I?ve come to
Croatia not because my body is
a爐emple, but because it?s a two-up,
two-down (with chunky ground-?oor
extension) in need of a little loving
restoration. Some of the decor is a bit
worse for wear, and the fuses keep
blowing. Before long, this corporeal
frame I call home will reach its
half-century, and I?d rather it did so
with its hinges oiled. Can a few days
of a Mediterranean version of the
paleo diet ? in which carbs are
reduced, proteins and healthy fats
increased, processed food eschewed
and fruit and vegetables abound ? set
me on the road to wellness?
To Trogir, then, a beautiful town on
the Adriatic coast, both a Unesco
World Heritage Site and, naturally,
one of the ?lming locations for Game
of Thrones, where it appears as Qarth,
?greatest city that was or ever will
be?. I?m not sure about that, but
certainly the evening I spent
wandering its labyrinth of narrow
marble streets, all heaving with stalls,
made me determined to return at
greater length.
Hotel Ola is a short distance away,
through the tiny settlement of Seget
Donji, and each of its 50 rooms has a
balcony with a direct sea view. Only
open a few months, the hotel is quiet,
spacious, immaculately clean and
deeply soothing: the vibe is less
frivolously indulgent spa than
sophisticated battery-recharging
station. Though this retreat is not one
without its challenges. Perhaps the
greatest of these is the most
innocuous sounding: the two-hour
walk along the ?Route of Health?,
with its bucolic vineyards and olive
groves. I爏hould have been alerted to
its rigours by the route?s other name,
Napoleon?s Road (the French
emperor annexed Dalmatia in the
early 1800s); certainly the penny
dropped once I looked up and saw
a爈ine of virtually unbroken verticality.
Suffice to say that it took very much
longer to ascend Mount Vlaska than it
did to return to sea level ? and I didn?t
even get all the way to the top to the
13th-century church of St Elias. To
make matters worse, my guide didn?t
50
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
GETTY IMAGES
Can a paleo regime on the coast of the
Adriatic set bonne vivante Alex Clark
on the path to health and ?tness?
Shore leave: Trogir, one
of the filming locations
for Game of Thrones.
Facing page: Hotel Ola,
with its inviting pool and
bedroom with a view
over the Adriatic
once break sweat or seem out of puff;
but like everyone else I encountered
during my stay he was unfailingly
charming and patient. I particularly
admired his tactful habit of pointing
towards objects on the horizon to
facilitate frequent rests.
Of course, I felt marvellous once it
was over, and it had the additional
advantage of making my other
exercise sessions ? early-morning
yoga and gym-based training ? look
like a (?at, leisurely) walk in the park.
Once again, the instructors could not
have looked more kindly on me ?
one even encouraging my clearly
fantastical dreams of completing
a�k run before I hit 50.
If I had less luck chatting to Ruzica
Jukicic, Ola?s head chef, it wasn?t
because of a lack of will and
bonhomie on both our parts, but
rather a language gap (she had more
English than I had Croatian). But
another staff member materialised to
interpret, and so began my paleo/
LCHF (low carb high fat) cookery
lesson, which saw such unfamiliar
ingredients as carob ?our, psyllium,
chia seeds and pickled samphire
emerge as a variety of breads,
puddings and delightful canap閟.
The menu leans heavily towards
the gluten free, but it?s more
enjoyably viewed as an excellent use
of local produce, including a herb and
vegetable garden. Fish and seafood
are particularly good, especially the
?Trogir barrel? ? sardines rolled in
almonds and served on slivers of beef
tongue and fresh tomato sauce ? and
the chargrilled octopus with baby
broad beans and a homemade
mayonnaise. Puddings, Dalmatian
wine and a large terrace on which to
eat and watch the boats go by sweep
away any longing for chips.
Indeed, those in pursuit of a hair
shirt would probably ?nd Hotel Ola
a爈ittle too easygoing, although there
are more rigorous weight loss and
detox programmes on offer. Nobody,
after all, forced me to have
a爓onderful Decl閛r facial, or a full
body scrub, or to sit by the rooftop
pool reading my book and gazing at
Croatia?s myriad pine-topped islands.
However, Hotel Ola presented
a爎ather lovely reset, and I felt
signi?cantly better, more rested and
even a little slimmer at the end of my
?ve-day stint. Admittedly, I went
from Split directly to Italy, where
I燼ttended a wedding of such epic
largesse ? and such monstrously
delicious plates of carb-heavy pasta
? that I returned to London too fat to
do up my seat-belt on the plane.
But what are you going to do? Go to
Tuscany and eat carob bread? The
point is, as the healthy love telling
you, it?s about adjusting your habits
over a lifetime. And, a month or so on,
I have. I now go to yoga and Pilates
classes ?ve times a week, swim
regularly and eat more ?sh and
vegetables. Chia seeds, not so much.
But Rome wasn?t built in a day. Dalmatian
wine and
a large
terrace to
watch the
boats go by
sweep away
any longing
for chips
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
51
Inner life
To read all the articles in this series,
go to observer.co.uk/inner-life
In Japan, people over retirement age
don?t put their feet up. They harness
their ikigai, says H閏tor Garc韆
We should
do less
when we
feel overwhelmed,
but keep
busy when
we feel
like doing
nothing
It is now known that working for
longer may help you live longer.
This may not sound all that
appealing, but staying in the
workplace for just one year more
than another retired and healthy
counterpart has been shown to be
associated with an 11% lower risk of
death from all causes. But perhaps
there?s another way to gain these
extra years without commuting for
any longer than necessary.
The people of Japan know this
intuitively, which is one of the key
reasons they have the longest life
expectancy in the world.
In Japanese culture, retiring and
not keeping your mind and body
busy is seen as being bad for your
health since it disconnects your
soul from your ikigai. Ikigai can be
translated as ?a reason for being?
? the thing that gets you out of bed
each morning. Finding your ikigai
is felt to be crucial to longevity and
a life full of meaning. The people of
Japan keep doing what they love,
what they are good at, and what the
world needs even after they have left
the office for the last time.
After more than 13 years of
living in Japan, I am still pondering
the meaning of ?retirement?
here. There is, in fact, no word in
Japanese that means ?retire? in the
sense of ?leaving the workforce for
good?. Retirement as we see it is
not looked upon favourably since it
implies that once you retire you will
cease to do anything at all, become
a burden on society and stop
following your passions.
What happens instead is that
Japanese people of retirement
age keep engaged with the world
around them, moving on to work
and activities that demand less
responsibility. The idea is to keep
mind and body active in order to ?ll
yourself with purpose and ikigai on
a燿aily basis.
In the course of researching
our book, my co-author Francesc
Miralles and I visited Ogimi, a village
on the Japanese island of Okinawa,
which is a three-hour ?ight from
Tokyo. With a population of 3,000,
this ?village of longevity? enjoys the
highest life expectancy in the world:
the longest living people in a country
of long-lived men and women.
When we asked the elders when
and how they retired they refused
to answer us directly, not talking
about or de?ning themselves by
what they had done throughout their
working life. Instead, they spoke to
us in detail about all the things they
are doing now in their 80s and 90s.
?Every day I wake up and go to the
?elds to grow tomatoes. Later I walk
to the grocery store next to the beach
and sell them. In the afternoon I go
to the community centre and prepare
green tea for all my family and
friends,? says 92-year-old Akira.
During our week in Ogimi, we
didn?t see anyone idling, but neither
did the villagers seem rushed or
overburdened. They always had
something to do, but not tasks that
would bring the people here to
a state of stress. In the west, our
modern urban lives are generally
ruled by bursts of intense hard work,
followed by burnout or, at the very
least, a TV or social media binge
on the sofa as we tell ourselves:
?I燿eserve this after so much work.?
The lesson we can draw from the
people of Japan ? and speci?cally
the residents of Okinawa ? is that we
should do less when we are feeling
overwhelmed, but keep busy when
we feel like doing nothing. Don?t
overwork, but don?t fritter those
hours away either. The answer to
longevity may well rely on a balance
between the two. Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and
Happy Life by H閏tor Garc韆 and Francesc
Miralles is published by Hutchinson on
7燬eptember at �.99. To order a copy for
�.04, go to bookshop.theguardian.com
A NEUROSCIENTIST EXPLAINS
DANIEL GLASER ON KEEPING UP WITH OUR FEATHERED FRIENDS
By now most of us will have
completed our annual migration.
Unlike the birds, our ability to get
there usually relies on a variety
of navigational aids, often on our
mobile phones.
In both birds and phones, tiny
accelerometers measure small
movements and rotations to
keep them orientated. They
52
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
both use magnetometers to
sense the earth?s magnetic field,
but the birds have an additional
trick ? polarised light.
Although the light waves
coming from the sun vibrate in
all directions, the way they are
scattered by the atmosphere
polarises them by lining up all
the waves in one axis. Human
eyes and mobile cameras can?t
see the difference, but birds can.
At sunrise and sunset in spring
and autumn the polarisation
is strongest in a band which
runs more or less north south
allowing birds to recalibrate
their compasses.
Birds also appear to use
their sense of smell to follow
landmarks, a trick which mobile
designers can only dream of.
GPS does give us an edge as the
birds can detect constellations,
but not satellites. Perhaps the
ultimate avian advantage is
that they don?t have to queue at
security before they fly.
Dr Daniel Glaser is director of Science
Gallery at King?s College London
AF ARCHIVE; ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
WANT TO LIVE LONGER? FIND YOUR IKIGAI
You are never too
old: elderly widower
Carl Fredricksen
sets out to fulfil his
dreams in Up (2009)
PERSONALITY QUIZ
BY BEN AMBRIDGE
Are you a control freak or a delegator?
Do you insist on taking decisions when
others are better placed? Or do you
pass the buck when it?s your call?
Imagine you are playing a gambling
game which involves guessing
whether a燾oin comes up heads or
tails. You?ve been guessing correctly
half the time and, if you keep this up,
will be �up. Now you are offered
a choice. For a small fee, you can
buy the services of an ?advisor?,
with access to the randomisation
procedures of the game.
(a) Would you delegate to an advisor
who charges � and has a 60%
success rate, giving
you an expected
net payoff of �(�expected winnings
minus the �fee)?
(b) If you said no,
what about an
advisor who charges
� and has an 80%
success rate, an
expected net payoff
of �(�winnings,
less �fee)?
(c) If you still said no, what about
an advisor who charges �and has
a�% success rate, an expected net
payoff of �(�winnings less �fee)?
NOW?S THE TIME TO...
Hop on board. A century ago, the Post O?ce built
a secret railway network under London stretching from
Paddington to Whitechapel, linking the capital?s many
post o?ces. The clandestine Mail Rail closed in 2003,
but is being opened to the public by the Postal Museum
from tomorrow (4 September). Ticket holders can
descend deep below the Mount Pleasant sorting o?ce
and clamber on board one of the two battery-powered
trains. The unique commute will o?er a glimpse of
1930s London, as guests hurtle down the stalactiteencrusted tunnels. �, kids free (postalmuseum.org)
If you said yes to (a), you?re a superdelegator. You?re happy for others
to take decisions even when you
have nothing to gain. If you held out
for (b), you?re ?exible and happy to
delegate when others know even
slightly more than you. If you held
out for (c) ? or continued to say no
? you?re a control freak and refuse
to delegate even when this costs you
money. In fact, most of us are super
control freaks. When a version of this
game was run under test conditions,
the average participant was prepared
to forgo �15 for the ability to make
their own decisions. Order Are You Smarter Than a Chimpanzee?
by Ben Ambridge (Pro?le Books at �.99) for
�.04, at bookshop.theguardian.com
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
53
Dear Mariella
@mariellaf1
If you have a dilemma, send a brief email to
mariella.frostrup@observer.co.uk. To have your say on this
week?s column, go to observer.co.uk/dear-mariella
MY NEPHEW IS DISABLED AND
IT?S ALL HIS MOTHER?S FAULT
Those are very serious
accusations. You do appear
unusually animated about
what is an extremely
personal matter, probably
none of your business and
a miscalculation rather
than a crime. Ponti?cating
about the affairs of others is
nothing new to yours truly,
but at a certain juncture
one does have to recognise
that people have a right to
make their own mistakes.
I?m very sorry to hear
about your nephew
and I爃ave no doubt
his condition pains his
parents far more than it
does you. Nobody could
have predicted such an
eventuality, not even the
doctor and, although you
feel strongly that they made
the wrong decision, it?s one
that was theirs alone to
make and then to live with
the consequences.
Why should it enrage
you that they took a爏mall
risk and paid a very high price? The far more
natural reaction to such a misfortune within
your immediate family would surely be
empathy. Instead you?re raging and blaming,
making assumptions about your sister-in-law?s
culpability and generally acting like
a demonic harpy instead of a concerned in-law.
We all dice with decision-making, most of
us getting it right and wrong in near equal
measure. Even the most cautious can wind up
on the wrong side of fate. I?m no medical expert,
but there is plenty of advice out there, from
the NHS and others, saying that a Vbac birth
is a爌erfectly safe option. Added risks occur in
0.35% to 2% of women, odds that most of us
would consider entirely acceptable. A C-section
is a medical procedure many would want to
avoid. The hospital stay and recuperation time
are much prolonged so I can understand why
your sister-in-law might not have wanted to
I have huge
anger at my brother?s wife for her
actions, which I feel are directly
responsible for my nephew being
handicapped.燜or her ?rst birth
she had an emergency C-section,
but she then chose to have a Vbac
(vaginal birth after ceasarean)
home birth for her second child ?
against all recommendations
from her doctor.�
The home birth went terribly
wrong and my nephew has been
left permanently damaged.營t?s
a爐ragedy almost Shakespearean in
its proportions. I knew my brother
was browbeaten, but not to the
extent he would let his wife harm
their child.
It?s caused major rifts in the
family. I think my brother didn?t
feel supported and has pretty much
cut me off because I was so upset.�
My heart is breaking over this.
I feel my nephew was exposed to
severe parental negligence and
I燾annot get past my anger over it.牋
THE DILEMMA
54
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
repeat the experience. I?m not going to get into
a debate about the pros and cons of 21st century
birth options, but they are plentiful. Some
would consider a water birth an indulgence,
others are determined to go drug free and still
others are eager to avail themselves of any
drugs they can lay their hands on.
You use incredibly emotive language ?
?parental negligence?, ?browbeaten?, ?tragedy?
of ?Shakespearean? proportions no less ? and
although you admit to carrying huge anger
I爓onder if you understand how much that
anger is carrying you. Rage, applied to this sad
state of affairs, is inappropriate and unhelpful.
Your brother and his wife made a perfectly
valid choice, one many other parents have
opted for with happy results. Childbirth has
decreased in danger for both mother and child
in the developed world. As a result many prefer
to welcome a new baby in the comfort of their
own home knowing they can easily reach
hospital if necessary.
I?m not in a position to judge whether
this incident is part of a pattern of indulgent
behaviour that might justify your judgmental
stance. Whatever your sister-in-law?s past
misdemeanours it strains credibility that your
current strife is rooted in this poor woman?s
regrettable decision, which even in your
description can?t be considered much more
than miserable misfortune. I?d be looking to
myself if I were you, and delving deep to try to
ascertain why you?ve taken this so personally.
Do you have children yourself? Is there a lot
of past history between you and your brother?
Could your response be exaggerated for reasons
other than the obvious?
Whatever the answers I?d urge you to set
about some honest soul-searching. We spend
a lot of time vicariously living other people?s
lives these days, whether it?s the Kardashians or
celebrities in the jungle, giving us an unrealistic
sense of our connection to strangers. You seem
to be suffering a similar malaise by confusing
whose life you are living and I?d urge you to
direct attention back to your own. Any excess
emotional energy would be better directed to
helping them cope with the challenge of your
disabled nephew rather than chastising them
for their culpability in his condition. The natural
reaction
to such
misfortune
should be
empathy.
Instead
you?re
raging like
a demonic
harpy
of not understanding was replaced by a
degree of acceptance.
But I wasn?t ready to go public. I?d never heard
of anyone who got sick from perfume, symbol of
everything desirable and glamorous. In fact, it
felt a little shameful, as if I was indulging a neurosis. Talking about it, even to friends, seemed
awkward . The secrecy and isolation became
something of a burden in themselves.
I had a few strategies for dealing with it. When
friends swooped in for a peck on the cheek, I?d
make a fending-off gesture, and when they said:
?Oh, got a cold?? I?d nod. I?d suggest our meetings
took place in caf閟 with an outdoor terrace and I?d
sit upwind.
Shame evolved into something more like anger
one night when I went with friends to the opera.
By bad luck the woman behind me was drenched
in especially pungent perfume. Within minutes
my head was pounding, my eyeballs felt too big for
their sockets and my brain was a blur. The sublime
music seemed like little more than noise.
I was so obviously ill that night that I had to
share my secret with my friends. As I?d feared,
they could hardly believe what I was telling them.
?Perfume?? they said. ?You get sick from perfume?? But once over their surprise, they were
sympathetic. One of them asked: ?Are there a lot
of others like you?? and I realised it was time to
?nd out more.
Three days later I was on the book tour, sealed
into that hotel room. I opened the laptop, searched
for ?fragrance headache? and within minutes I
was deep in the science of scent. I爎ead on with
growing exhilaration. It turned out I爓asn?t a lone
eccentric after all, but in company with millions
of others.
Now I?ve outed myself by writing a book about
fragrance, I?m unembarrassed about telling
people I can?t hug them and probably won?t come
to their party, because the fragrance will make
me sick. The amazing thing is how many of them
understand. Oh yes! They say. Me too!
I still wish I could wake up one day free of
the fragrance-headache tyrant, but I?ve stopped
waiting for that to happen. My life has shaped
itself around this fact, and it?s made me who I
am. Who knows if I?d have become a writer if
other options had beckoned? Writing has let me
travel the world and plunge into the peculiarities of human behaviour. If an odd and awkward
problem with fragrance is the price for that, it
might just have been worth it. The hot list
CLEANED UP
24
Jean Paul
Gaultier is
launching
his ?rst
f
me since
female
perfume
1
1993.
Scandal is a
s
o of
sensual
combo
h
ange.
honey
and orange.
P
ct
Prefer
abstract
abrielle
?orals? Try Gabrielle
C
Chanel,
the ?rst new
f
grance
feminine
fragrance
f
from
Chanel
i 15 years.
in
F
Feeling
more
?
?manly??
Keep your
nose peeled
for Tom
Ford?s Noir
Anthracite.
23
21
Farewell to ?no-make-up-make-up?,
hello to the ?washed look?. Instead
of pretending you are bare-faced,
you?re going for make-up that?s
minimal, but de?nitely there. Think
skin that is dewy, rather than glossy
or matte, ruddy cheeks like you?ve
been on a hike, a peachy glow which
elevates your features and lip colour
that isn?t a world away from your
own hue. It?s about beauty coming
from within (wafty ?wellness?
speak allowing). MAC describes it
as ?moderate? ? imagine something
fresh and clean, neither supernatural nor highly polished. It?s
even OK to look tired. Imagine!
22
Inspired by Studio 54,
Yves Saint Laurent?s
limited-edition
Hologram Powder
(�.50) is serious glitter for grownups. It gives a holographic sheen to the
skin for a proper hit of disco joy.
Neon is the
new black. At
Emilio Pucci?s
show, models
wore mascara
in neon yellow,
blue and green,
while Vivienne
Westwood used
c
cyan
to the same
effect. 3Ina ?
pronounced
Mina ? do a
llovely affordable
(�95) one in
purple which
((as Pantone have
created a爊ew
shade in Prince?s
honour) also
happens
to be the colour
of now.
SNOGGED LIPS
25
Pile it on, and kiss it off.
At Preen by Thornton
Bregazzi, make-up artist
Val Garland cited ?justsnogged? lips as the inspiration for
these red and smeary, glossy, fabulous
pouts. Could there be anything
easier to achieve? A bold cherry
lipliner all over, a blob of something
like Charlotte Tilbury?s Hollywood
Liquid Lipstick in Screen Siren, and a
beckoning over of the nearest lad that
isn?t a) wearing a T-shirt that reads
?FBI: Federal Boob Inspector?, or b)
smelling of a Subway meal deal, for
a quick, effective snog. Or, smudge it
with your ?nger. Either way. THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
27
A brush with
greatness
To read all the articles in this
series, go to observer.co.uk/
a-brush-with-greatness
JUDE LAW
BY PETER STANFORD
It was a good few
years since I?d
been ice-skating,
but when the
invitation came
in the run-up to
Christmas 2003 to
attend the evening
inauguration of the rink in the
courtyard at Somerset House, I was
pretty sure it would all come ?ooding
back. Children were welcome, it said,
so I took my seven-year-old son along.
Because I didn?t want to keep him up
late, I booked into the ?rst batch of
skaters as did, it turned out, several
celebrities, also bringing children,
who were lined up for the cameras.
The good news was that my son
proved remarkably adept on ice.
I?d say chip off the old block, but,
as I爍uickly discovered, I?d lost the
knack. Convinced it would click back
into place eventually, out we wobbled
into the middle for an ungainly
circuit. A couple of times I had to
grab my boy to avoid stumbling but,
unnoticed by me, he had started
going faster. The next time I reached
out in crisis, he wasn?t there. In his
absence, I broke my fall by clinging
on to a fellow skater.
As I pulled myself back up
to standing using this ice-rink
Samaritan?s arms, shoulders and even
donkey jacket like a climbing wall,
I燾ame face-to-face with Jude Law. Not
that he looked like himself as my eyes
fell at ?rst on his famously dimpled
chin. It was only when I got on level
terms that I realised who he was.
And he couldn?t have been
more charming as, dad-to-dad, we
bemoaned the fact that your kids
were never there when you needed
them. Off we went, me to the side
to cling on and hail my treacherous
offspring, and he for several more
elegant spins. Producers of Dancing
on Ice take note, should his ?lm
career ever go into a tailspin.
Later my son and I did manage
a couple of pretty competent laps
before he wanted a break. Even
without my Torvill, I was sure I燾ould
still be Dean, but quickly came
a燾ropper. As my arms ?ayed out,
someone was there to grab me.
Jude Law.
What are the chances, I said
once upright, trying to make light
of the coincidence. If he had had
a bell to call security, I?m sure he
would have used it, for he clearly
had me down as a stalker. Instead
Photograph EAMONN MCCABE
he made tracks as quickly as the
talented Mr Ripley after he?d
bumped off Dickie Greenleaf.
The next day, among the pictures
in the press, I spotted a shot of
a爂rumpy-looking Jude Law with his
kids leaving Somerset House early.
It was just too crowded out there, he
complained. I knew who he meant. Martin Luther: Catholic Dissident
by Peter Stanford is published by Hodder &
Stoughton at �. To order a copy for �,
go to guardianbookshop.com
Dad-todad, we
bemoaned
the fact that
our kids
were never
there when
we needed
them
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
29
Food
&
drink
Nigel Slater
@NigelSlater
Email Nigel at nigel.slater@observer.co.uk
or visit theguardian.com/pro?le/nigelslater
for all his recipes in one place
notes. They taste curiously of
Christmas.
The generosity of neighbours
gave me a chance to make another
unexpected pudding this week.
I gladly took the plums from their
tree and baked them between two
crisp crusts, the ?rst made from
crushed ginger biscuits ? the sort
you might make for cheesecake ?
then a fragile top crust of warm,
sweet oat-?ecked crumbs. We ate our
crumbly plum tart ? not quite cake,
not quite pudding ? with tiny cups
of black coffee. I don?t mind eating
plums every day throughout the
month because I know that this is my
only chance until next September.
PLUM AND
OAT CRUMBLE TART
The base is best when prepared with
open-textured ginger biscuits rather
than the ?atter, harder gingernuts.
Makes 12
For the base:
butter 75g
ginger biscuits 325g
For the ?lling:
plums 500g
caster sugar 3 tbsp
A VINE ROMANCE
When hot,
the grapes?
sweetness
intensi?es.
They taste
curiously of
Christmas
Early autumn is the time to roast dark
sweet muscat grapes and the season?s
gorgeous plums before they disappear
I put a bunch of grapes in the oven to
roast, the dark, sweet muscat variety
you only ?nd in late summer and
autumn. The bunch emerged, looking
like it had spent time in a ?ower press,
a thin layer of sticky syrup in the
roasting tin. We ate the purple-black
fruit, picking them from the stalk with
30 MAGAZINE
MAGAZINE
| 03.09.17
| 03.09.17
| THE| OBSERVER
THE OBSERVER
sticky ?ngers, stirring their juices into
iced rice pudding, thick with cream
and sweet with vanilla.
I have cooked with grapes before,
kneading them into a soft-crusted
foccacia for eating with goat?s
cheese. They made a seasonal
addition to a chicken escalope, too,
saut閑d in a little butter, the grapes
added to the pan with a splash
of Marsala. Hot, their sweetness
intensi?es, also their dark raisin
For the crumble crust:
butter 65g
?our 85g
oats 40g
almonds 30g, ground
pistachios 30g, shredded
water 2 tbsp
You will also need a baking tin, lined with
baking parchment.
Directions
Make the base by melting the butter
in a small saucepan. Crush the
biscuits to ?ne crumbs in a food
processor or bash them with a rolling
pin, then stir them into the melted
butter, making sure they are evenly
coated. Spoon the buttered crumbs
into the parchment-lined baking
Photographs JONATHAN LOVEKIN
Getting fruity:
plum and oat
crumble tart.
Facing page: roast
grapes and
rice pudding
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
31
Food & drink
Nigel Slater
Roast the
grapes
whole on
the vine ?
each person
can cut
their own
little sprig
at the table
WINES
OF THE
WEEK
Mixed grapes
making great
wines in
unexpected
places
David
Williams
@Daveydaibach
To read all
David?s columns
in one place, visit
theguardian.com/
pro?le/davidwilliams
tin, pushing them right into the
corners and covering the base evenly,
then smooth ?at. Leave in the fridge
for 20 minutes.
Set the oven at 180C/gas mark 4.
Halve and stone the plums, put
them in a bowl, add the caster
sugar, then toss them until they are
generously coated.
Make the crumble crust by putting
the butter and ?our into the bowl of
a爁ood processor and process to coarse
crumbs. Alternatively, rub the butter
into the ?our with your ?ngertips.
Put the oats, ground almonds and
shredded pistachios into the butter
and ?our and fold gently together.
Pour in the water then stir or shake
brie?y so that the crumbs stick
together in unevenly sized lumps.
Remove the tart tin from the fridge.
Spread the stoned plums over the
crumbs then scatter the crumble over
the plums, leaving the fruit showing
here and there.
Bake for 45-50 minutes, until the
crust is pale brown and lightly crisp.
Remove from the oven and leave for
an hour to settle.
Slice the tart into 12 small pieces
and serve. They are fragile, so use
a爌alette knife to lift them.
Domaine Gayda Figure
Libre Cabernet Franc,
France 2015 (from �.32,
Cambridge Wine)
In European wine, there is
always a tension between
the indigenous and the
incomer. I?m talking about
grape varieties, although
there is a ?avour of the
nativist v cosmopolitan
culture war in discussions.
Such arguments are
rather less pressing in the
Languedoc-Roussillon,
where the region-wide
IGP Pays d?Oc has always
encouraged a liberal
approach. One of the best producers in the
region, Domaine Gayda, makes two superb
wines from grape varieties most associated
with the Loire Valley for its Figure Libre
brand: a pitch-perfect Chenin Blanc 2015
dry white (from �.46, Cambridge Wine),
and a deeply satisfying, Bordeaux-esque
red Cabernet Franc.
ROAST GRAPES
AND RICE PUDDING
Bring the rice, water and milk to the
boil. As soon as the milk starts to rise
up the sides of the pan, lower the
heat to a simmer.
Using a vegetable peeler, remove
four pieces of peel from the lemon
and add to the rice, then leave on
a爈ow heat, with the occasional stir,
for about 15-20 minutes until the
rice is tender. Remove from the
heat, stir in the sugar and the vanilla
extract. Leave to cool, then tip
into a bowl, cover and place in the
refrigerator for 2 hours to thicken
and chill.
Set the oven at 200C/gas mark 6.
Place the bunch of grapes in
a爊onstick roasting tin. Put the
sugar, brandy and olive oil into a
small bowl and mix together. Pour
the dressing over the grapes and
toss them gently together. Roast for
45-50 minutes until the grapes have
collapsed and the dressing and juice
have formed a爏mall amount of deep
purple liquor in the roasting tin.
When the rice is chilled, whip the
cream until it starts to thicken. It
should be just thick enough to hold
a shape, but stop before it is thick
enough to stand in peaks. Fold the
cream into the chilled rice.
Serve the rice in bowls with the
grapes and juices from the tin. Anette Closheim Savvy,
Nahe, Germany 2016
(�.75, Oddbins)
Riesling has been the white
wine queen of German
vineyards and, for its fans,
there?s a feeling that nothing
else in the country can
match it for scintillating
steeliness. Certainly, purists
will wince when they see
the name sauvignon blanc
on the label of a wine from
one of riesling?s great
territories among the
forests and orchards along
the Nahe River. But they
really shouldn?t. Anette
Closheim?s Savvy sauvignon blanc is
no me-too, could-be-from-anywhere
version. It has the same appetising
mineral freshness as Closheim?s rieslings,
combined with a delicate, verdant
elder?ower and gooseberry fruitiness
that suggests the region is as important
in shaping the wine as the variety.
Quinta de Aves Aluada
Chardonnay, Castilla,
Spain 2013 (�, M&S)
Chardonnay is to white
wine what the croissant
and baguette are to
baking: a French export
found pretty much
everywhere. It?s why
the variety became the
anti-hero of wine?s antiglobalisation activists
and shorthand for the
standardisation of the
world?s vineyards. If
chardonnay?s remorseless
expansion has slowed
in the past decade, it
continues to produce superb wines from
all kinds of unlikely places. The heat and
dust of central Spain, for example, may
not seem a logical spot for great white
wine of any kind. But the cool of Quinta
de Aves?s high altitude vineyards have
produced a gorgeously, exotically ripe but
balanced Iberian take on chardonnay.
Two possibilities here. The grapes
can be roasted whole on the vine and
brought for each person to cut off
their own little sprig. Alternatively,
remove the fruit from the vine before
roasting. The puddle of sticky roasting
juices is essential, and can be spooned
over the chilled rice at the table.
Serves 6
For the rice:
pudding rice (or arborio) 95g
water 320ml
full cream milk 320ml
lemon half
caster sugar 4 tbsp
vanilla extract a few drops
double cream 50ml
sweet black grapes 450g
caster sugar 1 tbsp
brandy (or Marsala or sweet sherry)
3 tbsp
olive oil 1 tbsp
Directions
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
33
Food & drink
Nigel Slater
NIGEL?S
MIDWEEK
DINNER
SMOKED HADDOCK
OCK
AND SWEETCORN
RN
The recipe
Peel a medium onion,
n, halve it and
hen let it soften in
chop it fairly ?nely, then
2 tbsp of olive oil overr a moderate heat.
Stir regularly so the onion doesn?t
eaves and silky
colour. Remove the leaves
rs of corn then
?bres from 2 large ears
m the cobs.
slice the kernels from
Stir the corn into the onions, then
nd the same of
add 200ml of milk and
water. Add a couple of bay leaves
and a grinding of black pepper and
let it come almost to the boil. Lower
the heat and leave the milk and
sweetcorn to simmer until almost
tender. Lower in 2 pieces of smoked
haddock ?llet, each about 300g in
weight. Partially cover with a lid and
leave to simmer for 6-8 minutes until
the ?sh is tender.
Lift out the ?sh and keep warm.
and
n m
ilk
il
k
Tip the corn and
milk
food
od
into a blender or fo
ll b
unch
un
ch
ch
processor, add a small
bunch
will
l b
ll
of parsley, a handful of leavess wi
bee
閑.
perfect, and process to a rough pur�
pur閑.
Check the seasoning then pour
bowls Place a piece of
into shallow bowls.
smoked haddock on top of each and
serve immediately. Enough for 2.
The trick
The ?sh needs very little time in
which to cook, depending on its
thickness. Eight minutes is enough
for the thickest of ?llets. Once a ?ake
can be prized away from its neighbour
with ease, the ?sh is ready.
Photograph JONATHAN LOVEKIN
The twist
The beauty of this is that you can
use frozen or canned sweetcorn,
making this a recipe for all year.
Other vegetables can be incorporated,
such as peas and very ?nely diced
tomatoes. In cold weather, I like
to include diced potatoes, too.
Tarragon or dill, ?nely chopped, is
a delightful addition. Email Nigel at nigel.
slater@observer.
co.uk or visit
theguardian.com/
pro?le/nigelslater
for all his recipes in
one place
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
35
Jean-Georges at the
Connaught, Carlos
Place, London W1K
2AL (020 7107 8861).
Full meal for two,
including drinks and
service: �5 - �5
WE?RE IN THE MONEY
JEAN-GEORGES AT THE CONNAUGHT
Jean-Georges Vongerichten marries
classic French and Asian ?avours like no
one else, but hits you hard in the wallet
How was
dinner?
It would
have been
really nice
at �0 for
two. Sadly it
cost �5
36
It?s the ease with which they do it,
this blazered and Laboutined throng.
With an airy wave of a manicured
hand they order a � pizza as if it
was the most normal thing in the
world; as if it wasn?t an outrageous
act, which deserved to be prosecuted
as a crime against good sense.
Here too am I, preparing to be
just like them. Do I need to be
here? I爏uppose not. There?s always
another place that could be reviewed.
I燾ould be purring over some gap
year traveller?s take on the obscure
foods of Cambodia. But sod that. The
truth is, I very much want to be here.
The newly opened restaurant on the
conservatory side of the Connaught
hotel with its stained-glass windows
like sweet-wrappers and its
irritatingly low, badly engineered
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
tables, belongs to Alsatian-American
chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten.
And I like him.
I try to avoid the ?ouncier excess
of chef worship and napkin sniffing,
but with Vongerichten I fail. I have
spent atrocious amounts of my own
money at his ?agship high-end
restaurant in New York, simply
called Jean-Georges, chasing the
moment. Other chefs have attempted
to marry French classical cooking
with Asian ?avours. Vongerichten
has succeeded. He has a blissful way
with acidity and chilli heat. One
of the single best mouthfuls I have
ever eaten is his: an oblong of black
bread, spread with cold salted butter,
topped with a single raw sea urchin
and on top of that, a ring of pickled
jalape駉. Reminisce. And then
breathe. The room is high-windowed
and populated with characters
written by Tom Wolfe, those women
in their sunglasses like hub caps.
Unfortunately, it is in the base of
the Trump Tower. That used to be
hilarious. Now it isn?t.
The curious thing is that while
my love for Jean-Georges New York
remains undiminished, I have always
been disappointed by his diffusion
lines. I actively hated Spice Market
in Leicester Square, with its mushy
overpriced violation of a laksa. ABC
Kitchen in New York, which tried
hard to work the peasanty farmto-table vibe, was clumsy. And now
here he is with this new place in the
Connaught called, bravely, JeanGeorges, as if it were a direct sibling
of the Trump Tower site.
To be fair the prices here are of
a爏imilar magnitude. They are stupid
in the way Donald Trump is stupid.
It?s a kind of aggressive stupidity.
The cheapest bottle of wine is �.
I燼sk the sommelier if that really was
the cheapest they could ?nd. ?This
is Mayfair,? he says. ?You will ?nd
ANTONIO ZAZUETA OLMOS
Restaurants
Jay Rayner
NEWS
BITES
ANTONIO ZAZUETA OLMOS
@jayrayner1
nothing cheaper here.? Not only
is this not true of Mayfair; nearby
Sexy Fish and Scott?s have bottles
in the �s. It?s not even true of the
same building. On the other side of
the Connaught, H閘鑞e Darroze?s
restaurant has a cheaper bottle.
For this money, you get a symphony
of grey and battalions of waiters who
don?t talk to each other. One tells
us the kitchen is going to send out
a caviar freebie. I decline it. Only
what we order, please. They send
it anyway. Sharply, I send it back.
It?s that kind of place: in this dining
room you have to be aggressive to
avoid being pelted with caviar. Really,
people, it?s hell out there.
But sit back for a moment, and try
to imagine that you are there only
as eye-candy; as the lucky, depilated
guest who will never see inside
the paper folder holding the bill.
What do you get? Butter is good,
big on buttercup yellow, whipped
fats and salt crystals, though the
accompanying sourdough is tired,
with a soft crust. But don?t pout too
much about that my love, because
look: here are warm beignets of
Comt� cheese and black truffle to
make things better. So that?s mini
doughnuts of seriously pokey cheese
and truffle dredged through the deep
fat fryer? Get in.
One starter, tuna tartare on
avocado with a spicy ginger sauce,
is a Vongerichten classic. In New
York the tuna comes as ribbons. At
Spice Market they seemed to have
put it through the blender. Here it?s
a halfway house. There is bite to
the tuna. What matters is the broth:
a爈iquor full of depth and acidity,
?re and vivacity. It is all there. By
contrast salmon sushi ?improved? by
deep frying the lozenges of rice is no
improvement at all. It?s all kinds of
wrongness in four easy mouthfuls.
We order the fontina cheese and
black truffle pizza as a kind of midcourse. It is small; Domino?s still win
the ?feel the width? contest. But it
is also rather beautiful on its metal
frame. There is a blistered crust,
Email Jay at jay.rayner@observer.co.uk
or visit theguardian.com/pro?le/jayrayner
for all his reviews in one place
a爏hade of granite that co-ordinates
nicely with the other guests? pallor,
and then there?s the hot cheese,
drawing out to ribbons as you lift
each piece. The truffle comes in
waves. It?s preposterous, of course,
the item I will be eating as western
civilisation collapses. But ask me
if I could image eating it again and
sheepishly, I would say yes: if I was
drunk enough in Mayfair, I would
come here and drop the stupid
money. And in the morning, I would
hate myself. But we?ve all been
there, eh?
The � hamburger would make
me hate myself more. It?s served
medium rare if you wish, despite
Westminster Council?s threat of
legal hell?re should you do so.
There?s black truffle mayo, because
any amount of black truffle justi?es
a爌rice tag. There?s a slab of stinky
Somerset brie and some pickles. Pull
out a bit of the beef and it turns out to
have something to say for itself, but
it?s silenced by the haughty, bellowing
company. By comparison a dish of
two fat ?llets of John Dory, with
a�ery ginger chilli dressing, almost
feels like good value at �. It isn?t.
For dessert, somebody has made
a爈eaf out of chocolate, because
playing with food is required at �
a pop. They?ve ?lled it with caramel
and nuts. It?s a Snickers for someone
who wouldn?t dream of being seen
eating one. The other dish brings
meringue and lime and raspberry and
is rather lovely. Back home I?m asked
how dinner was. I say it was really
nice at �0 for two. ?Unfortunately,
it cost �5.? Oh, and that was after
they remembered to put on the
two glasses of champagne they had
somehow forgotten. Jean-Georges,
my friend, there are still things about
you I love very much. But boy, do you
make it tough. The sky is the limit: (from top)
tuna tartare with avocado; black
tru?e fontina pizza; John Dory;
raspberry mojito; and chocolate
and caramel pudding
? If � for
a glass of
champagne is
too rich for your
blood, where
else to go? The
best deal in the
capital I?ve found
is at The Heights,
the bar on the
15th ?oor of
the St George?s
Hotel by BBC
Broadcasting
House. A glass
will cost �90.
Plus you get
one of London?s
great secrets:
an astonishing
view across the
capital, presided
over by lovely
sta?.
? Any news
involving
legendary
Edinburgh
restaurateur
David Ramsden is
worth reporting.
His bistrocome-shambolic
meeting house,
The Dogs, has
long been an
institution in
the city. Now
he?s launching
a sibling, The Fat
Pony, on Bread
Street. It?s a wine
bar with small
plates, including
rabbit terrine
with pistachio
and toast, and
pork belly with
ginger and soy
(thefatpony.com).
? File this under
?It?s the thought
that counts.?
Currently, the
most gifted
grocery item at
Amazon ? ahead
of Bollinger
and a sweetie
assortment ? is
a 5-litre bottle
of Golden Swan
White Vinegar.
According to the
reviews it?s being
used to remove
limescale and kill
weeds.
THE OBSERVER | 03.0
03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
37
Fashion
@guardianfashion
@guardianfash
s ion
To see
T
e all tthe
he
e sho
shoots in
n thiss series
ies a
an
and
nd forr mor
more
e
sartorial ad
dvic
v e visi
i t ttheguardian.com/fashion
heguardian.ccom/
heg
m/fas
ashio
hion
advice
visit
REA
REASONS
ASONS T
TO...
O...
WEAR
WEA
AR A
SWEAT
TSHIR
RT
SWEATSHIRT
A sweatshirt with jeans becomes
a燾atwalk-worthy look this season.
?Boring basics? were centre
stage at Dries Van Noten, Gosha
Rubchinskiy and Balenciaga.
As part of this trend you?ll
?nd the branded sweatshirt.
We love seeing the old
Burberry logo back on
a爏weatshirt. Van Noten
spurned his own name on
his sweatshirts and made
homage to one of his
long-term suppliers
instead. Toki Sen-I is
a Japanese knitwear
specialist, fact fans.
A sweatshirt doesn?t
have to look sporty. Wear
a plain style, like M&S?s
claret version, over
a爏hirt for a smarter look.
But also, there?s
? no
need to mothball your
sportswear. Retro brands
such as Fila, Kappa and
Champion are having
a爏tyle moment, and
hirts
one of their sweatsh
sweatshirts
will make for a pocketfriendly wardrobe
update. Sweatshirt �5, shirt �5, and
jeans �5, all Dries Van Noten
(libertylondon.com)
Grooming Juliana Sergot using
Bobbi Brown and Kiehl?s Since 1851
Model Kesse at Premier
P emier
Pr
Fashion editor
e itor HE
ed
HELEN
ELE
L N SE
SEAMONS
EAM
AMON
NS
P
Ph
otographer DA
ANIIEL BEN
ENSO
N ON
Photographer
DANIEL
BENSON
1 Ora
Orange
O
nge �
�
Kappa
Kappa
p (slamjam
(slamj
(sl
a am
amj
socialism.com)
social
soc
ialism
ism.co
.com)
m)
2 Pin
Pink
k and
and nav
navy
vy
�,, Tham
�
Thames
es x
Fred
F
Fre
d Perry
Perr
erry
y (fred
(fred
(fre
d
perry.com)
perry.
per
ry.
y com
com))
3 Cla
aret
e ��.5
7.50,
0,
Claret
�.50,
marksa
mar
ks nd
ksa
marksand
spence
spe
nce
cer.c
r.ccom
spencer.com
4 Gre
G
y �295,
Grey
�5,
bur
burber
berry.
ry.com
com
burberry.com
5 Red ��,
0,
Wee
Weekda
kday
yx
Weekday
Champi
Cha
mpion
on
Champion
(weekd
(we
ekday.
ay.com
com))
(weekday.com)
6 Whi
White
te ��
09,
�9,
Gosha Rubchinskiy
Gosha
Rub
u chi
c nsk
nskiy
iy
y
x Adidas
Adid
das (end
(end
clothi
clo
thing.
ng.com
com))
clothing.com)
7 Pin
Pink
k vint
v
inttage ��,
8,
vintage
to
top
m .co
man
.com
m
topman.com
8 Tau
Taupe
pe ��,
0, Fila
Fila
(ur
rban
banout
out?
?tter
ttters.
ters.
s.
(urbanout?
com))
com
9 Bla
Black
ck �150, Ami
Ami
�0,
(harro
(ha
rrods.
ds.com
com))
(harrods.com)
7
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
Fashion
@guardianfashion
To see all the shoots in this series and for more
sartorial advice, visit theguardian.com/fashion
THE
MODERNIST
THE 80S
REVIVALIST
Roll up the hem of
your suit trousers
and complete the
hip-hop trend with
high-top trainers
Hoodie �.99,
hm.com Bomber
�5, allsaints.
com Necklaces
�, and �, both
gillianhorsup.com
Hoop earrings �,
urbanout?tters.
com Large hoops
�0, dinnyhall.
com Trainers
�, ?la.co.uk
Hat �, kangol.
com Trousers
�, urban
out?tters.com
5 WAYS
S
EAR...
TO WEAR...
A TROUSER
USER SUIT
A versatile suit is worth investing in.
Fabric and cut are key for the perfect
?t. Break the trousers and jacket up
and it becomes even more versatile.
With the right accessories, it can see
you through more than the working
week. Roll the trousers and wear
high-tops for a casual sporty look;
add heels for a date. Urban Out?tters?
unstructured unisex suit is cool ? just
don?t let your boyfriend borrow it. Fashion editor JO JONES
S Photographer
h
h DANIEL BENSON
SO
Create a cooler
edge by adding
a shirt with neckfastening detail,
and white boots
Jacket �, and
trousers �, both
urbanout?tters.
com Shirt �0,
equipmentfr.
com Boots �8,
allsaints.com
THE DINNER DATE
Layer over a lace
camisole, add heels
and a metallic belt, and
head for a night out
Camisole �5, Anine
Bing (net-a-porter.
com) Belt �, reiss.
com Heels �, dune
london.com Earrings
�, urbanout?tters.
com Suit as before
THE ART LOVER
THE BEATNIK
Split up the suit and wear the
jacket as a blazer. Style with cords and
a Fair Isle knit for a relaxed weekend out?t
Jumper �5, gudrungudrun.com Cords
�, urbanout?tters.com Scarf �0,
rockins.co.uk Jacket as before
Wear with an on-trend graphic
printed T-shirt
T-Shirt �, Kim Gordon & Other
Stories (stories.com) Shoes �.99,
zara.com Suit as before
Hair and make-up Juliana Sergot using
Lanc鬽e and Aveda Fashion assistant
Bemi Shaw Model Lilly at The Squad
Homes
For more inside tips, advice and ideas, go to
theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/homes
MODERN MASTERPIECE
A rare intact British Modernist house
has been decorated as if the era never
ended, ?nds Serena Fokschaner
Back to the 60s:
(clockwise from
main picture) Niki
fforde in her living
room; sideboard
and lamp from her
parents? home;
a pine half wall built
to house a TV and
hi-fi; the budget
kitchen which
echoes the original
low-key design;
and the Edward
Schoolheiferdesigned exterior
42
?It?s personal expression, not
faithfully reproducing an era, that
gives a home character,? muses
Niki fforde, ushering me inside her
restored 1960s home. The concertina
door swishes open to reveal an
avalanche of colour. A toe-cossetting
aubergine carpet clambers up
the navy-walled staircase.
Acid-yellow upholstery ?zzles against
mustard walls. Add a peppering
of contemporary art and furniture
and the odd midcentury ?nd and
you have a home that rekindles the
iconoclastic spirt of the original
without feeling retro.
It was the radical architecture of
the house that ?rst appealed to fforde.
Designed by Edward Schoolheifer in
1964 the three-bedroom townhouse
sits on the private Manygate estate
in west London, a rare example of
British Modernist housing. ?After
living in a claustrophobic London ?at
for 13 years I?d drawn up a precise
property checklist,? explains fforde,
who combines a job in television with
an interior design business.
MAGAZINE | 03.09.17 | THE OBSERVER
?I wanted light and space with
a west-facing garden and a sense of
community. This place has it all,? she
continues, stepping outside to admire
the terraced facade, its simple design
de?ned by white weatherboarding
with picture windows enhancing
the weightless feel. A slate-lined
garden, which fforde designed to
?echo the linear feel of the house?
leads to shady communal lawns.
?I?m convinced that the shared space
makes us more neighbourly. We?ll
wave to each other as we walk past,
but there?s also an unwritten code
? when you draw your curtains it
means ?Don?t disturb!??
When the estate ? now
a燾onservation area ? was ?rst built,
its breezy, avant-garde feel also
appealed to actors working at nearby
Shepperton ?lm studios. Previous
Manygate incumbents include Julie
Christie, Rod Steiger and Marlon
Brando, who rented or bought
properties. Even now residents point
out the house where Tom Jones
lived for a spell, choosing green
carpets to evoke the valleys of home
and sprinkling celebrity stardust
on suburbia.
But Modernism is not for everyone.
?Over the years people have added
partition walls or shrouded the
windows with net curtains for
privacy. I was lucky that my house
was almost untouched,? says fforde,
who found the property by chance.
?One night an agent?s alert just
popped up on my PC.?
With three bedrooms and
a燽athroom upstairs, the focal point of
the interior is the open-plan ground
?oor where the kitchen is separated
from the living area by a爒eneered
half-wall, designed to house a stateof-the-art television. The original
pine ceiling is intact as are the
vinyl concertina doors, installed as
insulation and to soundproof the
hallway, where the telephone once
had pride of place. The 1960s
Photographs SUKI DHANDA
Residents
point out
the house
where Tom
Jones lived
for a spell,
sprinkling
celebrity
stardust on
suburbia
THE OBSERVER | 03.09.17 | MAGAZINE
43
LIFE & STYLE
Homes
GET THE
LOOK
For more inside tips, advice and ideas, go to
theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/homes
Sideboard �9, Randall
(swooneditions.com)
IC 30 ?oor lamp
�5, Flos
(johnlewis.com)
gas-?red heating system, which
pumps warm air through vents, still
works and is ?surprisingly efficient
and means you don?t need spaceconsuming radiators?.
Time had been less kind to
the decoration. ?It was dirty and
cluttered with cardboard-coloured
carpets and Regency striped
wallpaper,? says fforde. ?So I燾orralled
a few friends and we began to restore
the house.? Wrenching up the carpets
fforde discovered the beech staircase
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
2
Размер файла
20 661 Кб
Теги
The Observer, journal
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа