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Good Things Magazine - December 2017 - January 2018 part 1

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goodthingsmagazine.com
GOURMET FOOD LUXURY ESCAPES
175
Luxury gift ideas
for foodies
THE HOT LIST
FOR 2018
LONDON'S
HIDDEN
VILLAGES
TOP CHEFS'
CHRISTMAS
RECIPES
MEET THE CHEF
CLARE
SMYTH
The story behind
her new restaurant
16-pages of beaches and heavenly hotels
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CONTRIBUTORS
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EDITOR’S LETTER
Welcome to
My good things
THIS MONTH...
W
riting the last editor’s letter
of 2017 and it’s time to reflect
on our good things of the past
year. It goes without saying that
I love my job and have met so many amazing
people in the last twelve months. From world
famous chefs to the kitchen stars of tomorrow,
food producers, artisan distillers and a host
of other people who call the world of food
their own. And the one thing they all have
in common is a shared passion for quality
ingredients and making the most of nature’s larder. The field to fork
story has never been more important with consumers starting to be
more demanding about the provenance behind what they feed their
families. And the big supermarkets are starting to listen too. People
opting for a vegetarian or vegan diet is on the rise – with the under25s leading the way – and the hospitality industry has been quick
to recognise this diversity with restaurants offering some stunning
menus based purely around all things green. Caring about what
we eat and where it comes from shouldn’t be viewed as a trend and
I’m hoping that 2018 continues in the same vein because first class
animal welfare and championing local ultimately benefits us all.
Mulling my food highlight of the year and it has to be Ynyshir
in Wales. I was blown away by Gareth Ward’s cooking, the passion
emanating from his tiny kitchen and his creativity with ingredients
sourced from a few miles of his front door, was inspirational. I asked
my team the same question and got some pretty diverse replies.
Web editor Sophie nominated a seafood safari in Fiskebäckskil,
Sweden where she plucked and ate oysters straight from the sea.
Editor Zoe loved Vauxhall’s Brunswick House where Andrew Clarke’s
delicious food is presented with an almost painterly eye. Art Director
Hannah remembers fondly spending the weekend (while eight
months pregnant) at the cookery school at Thyme in the Cotswolds.
I hope you have enjoyed reading Good Things in 2017 as much as
we have enjoyed putting it together. See you in 2018!
My favourite florist Paula Pryke has
just opened The Weeping Willow,
a stunning addition to the gastropub scene in Suffolk. The food is as
colourful as the decor. Go visit!
The Shinjuku
Sour at Zuma,
Knightsbridge
gets my vote
as prettiest
cocktail of
the year
Cheer up your dustman with these
Christmas pudding bin bags, £10.50
for 12, rockettstgeorge.co.uk
Carole Hamilton Editorial Director (editor@goodthingsgroup.com)
JOIN THE
CONVERSATION
twitter.com/GoodThingsUK
instagram.com/GoodThings_UK
Plant-based
high tea at
Farmacy in
Notting Hill
is always a
surprise, in
a very good
way!
facebook.com/GoodThingsUK
Good Things is also online and updated daily. Visit
goodthingsmagazine.com for inspiration, recipes
and competitions. Plus sign up for our newsletter
to receive all the latest news straight to your inbox.
Winner of the Gourmand
Awards' ‘World's Best Food
& Tourism Magazine 2015’
goodthingsmagazine.com
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5
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L A
R E C H E R C H E
D E
L ’ Œ U V R E
16/10/2017 13:34
CONTENTS
20
Guest chef
Meet Clare Smyth
113
THE DINING EDIT
Who’s on our hot
list this month
117
December
in this issue
Out & About
17 Restaurant of the month
Flat Three: where Oriental meets Scandi
free-range life - and their own musical
instruments!
18 The dining edit
36 My life on a plate
Don’t plan that festive diary until you’ve
read our hotlist for food-lovers.
20 Meet the guest chef
Clare Smyth on life at the top of the
culinary ladder - where she plans to stay
24 2018 - A year of Good Things
Giselle and Emily Roux: a mother and
daughter team from a culinary dynasty
41 London’s hidden villages
Shop off the beaten track with our guide
to the Capital’s secret retail meccas
We know what’s ‘so next year’; and,
after reading our report, so will you
46 My life in a glass
Vitalie Taittinger balances motherhood,
her career... and a glass of Champagne
26 Dispatches from the dining table
The places we’ve tasted and rated;
including Whatley Manor and Ella Canta
Entertaining & Interiors
32 Talking turkey
Down on this farm, birds enjoy a
50 Breakfast at Claridge’s
Start your day in fine style with recipes
from the luxury London hotel’s kitchen
54 The main event
Take a break from tradition and try a
different meat on the Christmas table
with recipes from a host of top chefs
62 Cheese to please
Michel Roux shows you how to put
together a knockout cheeseboard
67 THE LUXURY GIFT GUIDE
32-pages of covetable objects and
experiences to suit every recipient
100 The sweetest endings
Recipes for the grandest finales
you’ll ever put on your dining table
108 Baked to perfection
Forget thickly-iced fruitcake that so
often ends up discarded - serve up this
stunning Scandi-style bake instead
goodthingsmagazine.com
Contents ZP CHECKEDCathy.indd 9
9
24/11/2017 11:05
31
A
E
ST
TA
F
O
M
EX
IC
O
W
er
evi
ew E
lla
n
ndo
Canta in Lo
GOURMET
GIFT GUIDE
Bakes to bubbly and
a whole lot more –
175 ideas for your
favourite foodie
67
120
132
110 The art of entertaining
Make the setting as stunning as the food
with tips for top-notch table dressing
Luxury Escapes
117 Hotel of the month
The Bond-esque Spitbank Fort in the
middle of the Solent
We grab a spoon and dig on in...
128 The Monday morning crew
This female collective celebrates
Jewish food culture the world over
from their base in Sydney
132 Exploring Ecuador
119 Destination of the month
The vibrant South American country
has so much to offer, from culture and
cuisine to spectacular scenery
120 Where in the world
140 The art of cooking
Lauded Mexican chef Martha Ortiz
uncovers the country’s cuisine
123 The great gourmet escape
144 WINTER SUN SPECIAL
16-pages of fantastic inspiration for
hotting up the coldest season
Crystal waters, powder sand and
endless sun; St. Barths is pure paradise
The top 10 destinations to put on your
travel wish list for 2018
Australia’s food scene is vast and varied.
10
162 The Last Word
Sir Terence Conran on how to design
the perfect cafe or restaurant
On the
cover
Raspberry lemon
thyme mousse,
damson sorbet,
blueberry almond
slice created by
Corrine Jones,
Pastry Sous Chef
at The Montagu/
Hyatt Regency
– The Churchill.
themontagu
restaurant.co.uk
goodthingsmagazine.com
Contents ZP CHECKEDCathy.indd 10
24/11/2017 11:16
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07/11/2017 17:17
CONTRIBUTORS
EDITORIAL
Featuring
Guest Chef
Clare Smyth
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Carole Hamilton
EDITOR Zoë Perrett
ART DIRECTOR Hannah Talmage
FASHION EDITOR Charlotte Ellis
WELLNESS EDITOR Leonie Lee
SUB EDITOR/FEATURES Cathy Howes
WEB EDITOR Sophie Ritchie
Core’s chef patron is
GUEST CHEF Clare Smyth
a tough cookie who
GUEST CHEF ALUMNI Cyrus Todiwala, Wyn Ma,
Dan Doherty, Alfred Prasad, Cláudio Cardoso,
Antonio Favuzzi, Maurizio Morelli, Michele
Nargi, Andy Needham, Stephen Terry, Ben
Tish, Martin Morales, Nigel Haworth, Raymond
Blanc, Michel Roux Jr., Sarah Barber, Andrew
Fairlie, Glynn Purnell, Jonny Lake, Tom Sellers,
Monica Galetti, Marcus Wareing, Richard
Corrigan, Michael Caines, Simon Rogan,
Tom Aitkens, Hélène Darroze
runs a tight ship, but
not without warmth
and a real passion
Vitalie Taittinger
for her craft. Having
Michel Roux
Andi Walker
worked all over the
Serve up a
The chef set to shake
This woman doesn’t
world in Michelin-
cheeseboard worthy
up the Essex dining
just lead a Champagne
starred kitchens,
of a Michelin star this
scene by taking on the
lifestyle – she also
she’s at the very top
Christmas with top
dining rooms at The
works exceptionally
of her game.
tips from the chef.
Riverside Inn in 2018.
hard.
see p20
see p106
see p18
see p46
COMMERCIAL
SALES DIRECTOR Deborah Maclaren
ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Anne Mead-Green
ACCOUNT MANAGER Aleksandra Iwanik
RESTAURANT SERVICES PARTNER
Uttam Tripathy, BookingWire
FOUNDER & PUBLISHING DIRECTOR
Courtney Maggs-Jones
Martha Ortiz
Terence Conran
Jason Atherton
Richard Johnson
The chef behind
The world-renowned
Make this chef’s
What’s coming up
London Mexican
restaurateur and
hearty venison and
in street food in
restaurant, Ella
designer gives a
beetroot recipe to
2018? The European
Canta, on the food of
masterclass on how
impress your guests
Street Food Awards
her homeland.
to set up a restaurant.
this season.
founder reveals all.
see p140
see p162
see p54
see p24
GET IN TOUCH
FOR EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES, PLEASE CONTACT
Carole Hamilton
carole.hamilton@goodthingsgroup.com
FOR COMMERCIAL ENQUIRIES, PLEASE CONTACT
Courtney Maggs-Jones
courtney.maggs-jones@goodthingsgroup.com
+44 (0) 20 3815 8121
FOR SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES,
PLEASE CONTACT
info@goodthingsmagazine.com,
+44 (0) 20 3815 8120
Tom Copas Jr.
Giselle &
Emily Roux
Don’t order your
Raymond Blanc
MMCC
The chef shows you
Australia’s Monday
Good Things is available to purchase
and enjoy online, iPhone and iPad from
goodthingsmagazine.com
Christmas turkey
The mother and
how to add a little
Morning Cooking
@GoodThingsUK
until you read about
daughter on sharing
French flair to your
Club on cooking
GoodThingsUK
this man’s fab farm.
kitchen wisdom.
dining table.
and community.
see p32
see p36
see p54
see p128
Good Things is published by, operated by and property of Good Things Media & Publishing Ltd (the publisher). The entire contents
are protected by copyright 2017 and all rights are reserved. Reproduction without prior permission is forbidden without the written
permission of the publisher. Every care is taken in compiling the contents of the magazine, but the publisher of Good Things assumes
no responsibility in the effect arising there from, including advertising claims made in the magazine and its digital reproductions,
nor for statements made in editorial contributions from external sources, or in those reproduced from any other source. Readers are
advised to seek professional advice before acting on any information which is contained in the magazine and its digital reproductions.
Neither the publisher nor Good Things accept any liability for views expressed, pictures used or claims made by advertisers. All
material submitted for publication in Good Things is at the owner’s risk. No responsibility for its return is acceptable by the publisher.
@GoodThings_UK
GoodThingsMagazine
goodthingsmagazine.com
Good Things Media & Publishing Limited
5 Aylesford Street London SW1V 3RY
Tel: +44 (0) 20 3815 8120
Email: info@goodthingsmagazine.com
Good Things contains photography which may be provided and paid for by suppliers.
This edition of Good Things magazine is available for copy sale and subscription in both print and digital in the UK and overseas
Good Things is a member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC), and is part of TGI’s Reader Survey.
Copyright © 2017 Good Things Media & Publishing Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
ABC Certified
Circulation:
20,299
Whilst I would love for you to keep me on your
coffee table and for every time you cook, when
you have finished with me, I am recyclable.
12
goodthingsmagazine.com
Contribs ZP READCathy.indd 12
22/11/2017 23:57
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Swiss perfection for your home
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Out & About
GUEST CHEF CLARE SMYTH ON FEMALE CHEFS P20 THE FOOD TREND
FORECAST FOR 2018 P25 TURKEYS WHO PLAY MUSIC DOWN ON THE
FARM P34 GISELLE & EMILY ROUX’S NEW FRENCH CUISINE P38 VITALIE
TAITTINGER ON THE DAILY PLEASURES OF CHAMPAGNE P46
SPICE TRAIL
When Sir William
Hawkyns commanded the
first East India Company ship
in 1604, he cemented a cultural
bond still evident on the menu
at Hawkyns by Atul Kochhar. At
The Crown Inn Amersham, 400
years later, the spice maestro
continues to wow with
his latest East-West
fusion dishes.
Heritage beetroot with
sweet potato chaat,
hawkynsrestaurant.co.uk
goodthingsmagazine.com
Out&about openerCATHY ZP CHECKED.indd 15
15
18/11/2017 22:00
COSY UP
IN BABYLON
Take in the spectacular views over London’s skyline,
enjoy great value set lunch menus, relax on the heated
terrace with a hot cocktail and kick back with live jazz
every Tuesday!
t 0207 368 3993
e babylon@roofgardens.virgin.com
www.roofgardens.virgin.com
@Babylon_London
7th Floor,
99 Kensington High Street
(Entrance on Derry Street)
London W8 5SA
OUT & ABOUT
Restaurant of the month
A
Flat Three
Japanese, Korean and
Nordic-inspired menu is the
compelling mix waiting to
be explored at minimalist
Flat Three in leafy Holland Park. Chef
Pavel Kanja is vegan and offers both plant
based and non-vegetarian tasting menus.
He’s a master with flavours and we think
meat-eaters will be surprised just how
wonderful Britain’s plant and vegetable
bounty can be made to taste in his expert
hands. Charred king cabbage was our
dish of the day. Mixed with flaxseed
udon noodles, gochujang chilli paste and
pickled, dried cauliflower, it sings with
flavour - chef Pavel following his heart.
120-122 Holland Park Avenue, London W11
• 020 7792 8987 • flatthree.london
goodthingsmagazine.com
Restaurant of the monthCHCathy ZP READ.indd 17
17
27/11/2017 13:27
The dining edit
Eat, drink and make merry. Zoë Perrett knows the foodiest festivities
UNTIL 31 DECEMBER
The Curious Teepee at The Oast House,
Manchester. This pair of giant tents is decked
out with fire pits, fairylights and fur throws.
On The Oast House’s menu? Mulled wine,
fondue, and festive ‘hanging kebabs’.
Free entry, theoasthouse.uk.com
Fodder for thought
Shop, eat, covet, repeat
When Michael Thompson and Ollie Downey
left Fera at Claridge’s to go their own way,
they developed Fodder’s inimitable ‘fine
dining gone wild’ style. From December,
these enfants terribles of haute cuisine will
be in residence at East London's Curio Cabal
in East London, dishing up tasting menus,
foraged cocktails, and Christmas feasting
menus. fodderpopup.com
LASSCO Ropewalk’s salvage warehouse is the most
wonderful place to pick up unique Christmas gifts,
from antique furniture to ornate chandeliers to
rare artworks – and dine on fine food as you do so.
Gather five friends for a sharing feast and an allround fabulous day out. lassco.co.uk
CHRISTMAS AWAY DAY
Stuff the turkey and forget the washing up;
spend Christmas Day at The Lanesborough,
where the hotel’s Michelin-starred Céleste
restaurant will be serving Eric Frechon and
Florian Favario’s five-course feast, featuring
luxurious ingredients like truffles and foie
gras. oetkercollection.com
18
goodthingsmagazine.com
Dining edit_v2 ZPCathy ZP READ.indd 18
20/11/2017 22:23
OUT & ABOUT
Dinner date...
A N DI
WALKE R
Spice & all things nice
Whether you’re in residence or just popping in
to see the spectacle, don’t miss The Dorchester’s
edible replica rendered entirely in gingerbread.
The London hotel’s lobby will also house a Sweet
Emporium stuffed with everything from candy
canes to giant lollipops. dorchestercollection.com
The MasterChef semifinalist and pop-up chef
talks festive favourites
Bar fly
WHERE? Blind Spot
WHY: This sexy ‘latenight speakeasy’ is a
secret spot behind a tea
counter façade at the
St. Martin’s Lane Hotel,
accessed via the tug of a
gold hand-shaped handle.
TRY: The festive
Christmas cocktails,
featuring warming
liqueurs and spices.
morganshotelgroup.com
PIE-EYED No time to cook? Pick up something to go
from Holborn Dining Room's stunning new Pie Room.
3
AL FRESCO
FESTIVE EVENTS
1
It's tempting to snuggle up indoors,
but venturing out reaps rich rewards...
1. Skylight at Tobacco Dock, London Styled as a
multi-level, neon-lit ‘urban après skate bar’, Skylight
features the capital’s first rooftop ice rink, heated
bars, street food, cutting-edge DJs, fondue and
seasonal cocktails. Free entry, skylightlondon.com
2. Rooftop igloos at Aviary, London The City
venue’s 10th floor rooftop is lined with fairylit igloos
kitted out with blankets and hot water bottles. With
hot cocktails and sharing platters, it’s the ideal postwork hangout. Various prices, aviarylondon.com
3. The Winter Forest at Broadgate, London
This fairytale pop-up promises a ‘magical
3
escape’ comprising snow-covered
pine trees, giant tipis, a pop-up
cinema, a Christmas market and a
spectacular neon light installation.
Free entry, broadgate.co.uk
Favourite cracker joke?
Q: Why was the snowman
sorting out the carrots?
A: Because he was
picking his nose!
Who would you most
like to find under the
mistletoe this Christmas?
Sadly there isn’t anyone
at the moment. I’m
hoping that may change!
Which festive dish is
non-negotiable on your
Christmas table?
I love glazed ham, it’s
an absolute must. And
the leftovers taste even
better the day after.
Best and worst parts of
a trad Christmas dinner?
The best has to be the
food as a whole and the
chance to get everyone
around the table; the
worst by far is the tidying
up when it's all over.
Your hopes for 2018?
For my first restaurant,
the Riverside Inn in Essex,
to be fully booked and
to continue to go from
strength to strength.
Dine with the date:
riversideinnchelmsford.
co.uk
2
goodthingsmagazine.com
Dining edit_v2 ZPCathy ZP READ.indd 19
19
20/11/2017 22:23
Guest chefCATHY ZP READ.indd 20
18/11/2017 22:33
OUT & ABOUT
MEET THE GUEST CHEF
CLARE SMYTH
Driven, determined and damn talented, this woman
is our kind of chef. She tells Zoë Perrett about Core,
culinary evolution and only ever accepting the best
T
hroughout her career, Clare
Smyth has worked in some of
the world’s toughest threestar kitchens. Naming her
biggest mentors as Gordon Ramsay
and Alain Ducasse, it stood to reason
that her first independent venture
would be a corker – and, indeed, Core
opened earlier this year to a rapturous
reception. But that doesn’t mean the
perfectionist chef is resting on her
laurels; in fact, it’s quite the contrary…
Was food a big part of your
childhood in Northern Ireland?
Yes and no. We were a farming family
so we produced food and ate good,
home-cooked dishes. Cooking was
a chore that all the children were
involved with, and I grew up with a real
understanding of where ingredients
came from and how to use them. But
there was definitely no haute cuisine.
Is that where your passion for
food began?
I was always quite creative and artistic,
so it kind of went that way – when
I started cooking, I had a flair for it
straight away.
How did your career shape up
post-catering college?
I couldn’t wait to finish college.
I graduated at 17 – I was always in a
hurry with my life! I knew I wanted
to cook at the very top level and moved
to London which, at first, was quite a
daunting place. The first kitchen
I really liked and felt comfortable in
was Bibendum. It was probably the
best place I could have started; classical
cooking with fantastic ingredients.
You’ve worked with a lot of big
names along the way...
By the age of 21 I knew I wanted to work
at a three-star restaurant. I ended up at
Restaurant Gordon Ramsay, because it
Lemonade parfait
with honey yogurt
Clare’s fast favourites
UK restaurants?
Am I allowed to say Restaurant
Gordon Ramsay and Alain Ducasse at
The Dorchester? There’s a reason why
they have three stars.
Worldwide restaurants?
I adore Fäviken, Saison in San
Francisco and Frantzén in Stockholm.
Chefs?
Again, I go back to Gordon and Alain.
Two of the greatest chefs in history.
Ingredient?
Vinegar – lots of different types.
Kitchen soundtrack?
Nothing at Core, but personally,
I like lighthearted pop.
goodthingsmagazine.com
Guest chefCATHY ZP READ.indd 21
21
18/11/2017 22:33
OUT & ABOUT
‘When I opened Core, I thought I’d have lots of female chefs
applying for jobs, but I only have one in my kitchen’
was the toughest place I could find.
I knew if I could make it in that
kitchen, I could make it pretty much
with the best of them.
And you spread your wings in
kitchens overseas, too?
I did a few weeks in the kitchens at
both The French Laundry in the USA
and Alain Ducasse’s Le Louis XV in
Paris, but as soon as I set foot in his
kitchen in Monaco, I knew that was
the place for me. I spent a few years
there, then took over the kitchen at
Restaurant Gordon Ramsay when
I was 28.
What were the important lessons
you learned during this time?
From working with Gordon,
management style and discipline –
never ever accepting something is not
22
the best it could be; there’s never an
excuse and you go to the ends of the
earth to achieve the highest level.
With Alain, very much a philosophy
that’s driven by produce and respect
for peers in the industry.
Did taking on a three-star kitchen
change the way you worked?
It was an incredible pressure. I took
over an existing three-starred kitchen
so it was different to winning them.
I was incredibly driven to retain those
stars, and it was difficult. I’d say to
Gordon ‘I don’t know if this dish is good
enough’, and he’d say ‘but you’ve been
training at this level your whole life, so
you do know’.
And, after a few years, I really started
to grow into those shoes, spread my
wings and have the confidence to
evolve my own style of cooking.
What’s it like working in Clare
Smyth’s kitchen?
We’re pretty relaxed…well actually,
it’s really tough! I keep thinking
we’re really nice, and we are, but the
standards are so high. We treat each
other with respect and create a good
working environment, but at the same
time it’s at the top level, so people need
to perform.
Women in the professional kitchen
is very much a current issue –
where do you stand?
It’s good to have a gender balance in
every workplace, but the unfortunate
thing is there just aren’t many female
chefs. When I opened Core, I thought
I’d have lots of females applying for
jobs, but I only have one in my kitchen
– and only four out of our team of 34.
It’s just the reality of it and the nature
goodthingsmagazine.com
Guest chefCATHY ZP READ.indd 22
18/11/2017 22:33
OUT & ABOUT
DESIGN
DETAIL
Clockwise from top
left: Isle of Mull scallop;
lamb with braised
carrot and sheep’s milk
yogurt; jellied eel with
toasted seaweed; pear
and verbena Poire
Williams sorbet
of hospitality at the high end. It’s
important we put the right role models
out there so women are more visible
and want to enter the industry.
What single dish are you most
proud of creating?
I don’t have one, because I continuously
evolve what I do. I would never say now
that something I made five years ago
was the best thing I ever cooked. I do
have some signatures, but even they
evolve because it’s important.
You shouldn’t stand still, ever.
Your first Solo venue, Core,
opened this year. Are you happy
with the reception it’s received?
We’ve been overwhelmed by demand
and popularity – we’ve been so busy
since opening. It’s touching that we
have such a following and that people
were so excited for us. We have repeat
guests every day. Some have been back
up to eight times. That’s phenomenal
and the most important thing is, it’s
not just about opening popularity, but
people wanting to come back time and
time again.
The restaurant is in very foodie
Notting Hill – what are your
favourite local haunts?
The Ledbury around the corner is
an amazing restaurant, but we’ve got
lots of little places too: noodle bars,
chocolate shops, boutique butchers.
I absolutely adore the area and keep
encouraging staff to take a break to go
and walk around the neighbourhood.
I also send them to Books For Cooks,
where I go a lot, too!
Given that Core is such a success,
any plans to expand?
I’m not really focusing on anything else
yet; I just want to make Core the best it
can be. I’m not looking to have five or
20 restaurants – my goal is to achieve
something with Core. I’m committed to
being there every day. It’s important for
me to build really strong foundations
with the restaurant and to invest in
training our team, because ultimately
that’s what stands you in good stead in
the future.
How will you mark Christmas at
the restaurant?
We’re doing a few special things to
engage with our guests, including a
‘12 Days of Christmas’ where they’ll
select gifts from under our tree, open
them and share with the table – it’ll
form part of their meal experience. I
like British traditions like Stilton and
Port, which we’re doing. It’s about that
warm family feel, and as much of it as
possible for me. Eggnog… everything!
Are you the designated Christmas
cook at home?
Yeah. I wouldn’t say I find it frustrating
watching other people cook, but it can
take a lot longer, so it’s easiest for me
to step in.
corebyclaresmyth.com
goodthingsmagazine.com
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18/11/2017 22:33
2018
A year of
Good Things
The restaurants to book, the foods to Instagram, the names to drop, the day-trip
destinations... make sure you’re bang on-trend with Zoë Perrett’s red-hot list
SCANDI-LOUS In April, cool London food destination Bloomberg Arcade
gets even hipper with the arrival of Scandi-influenced EKTE Nordic Kitchen
- a restaurant, café and sandwich bar from 1 Lombard Street’s Soren Jessen.
Great British booze
From award-winning
sparkling wines to cracking
craft beers to superior
spirits, the UK is holding
its own when it comes to
alcohol production. Drink
up on a one-day guided
Grape & Grain tour of
Surrey or Hampshire - on
which you’ll visit wineries,
breweries, and distilleries.
(grapeandgraintours.co.uk)
The foodie weekend:
CAMBRIDGE
It’s not just a city for cycling and
inspiring #architectureenvy - it’s an
increasingly great place to eat, drink,
and make merry
essex eating
The county’s culinary scene is
on the up: cafe-deli The Essex
Farmhouse showcases local
produce; Restaurant Richard Wilkins
in named for the eponymous
ex-Waterside Inn chef; and,
following a knockout residency,
MasterChef: The Professionals’
Andi Walker is taking
over at Chelmsford’s
Riverside Inn.
24
The fine diner: Salt Pig - English wines
and beautiful modern Med food
(salt-pig.co.uk)
The street eat: foodPark’s markets
feature the city’s finest street food
(foodparkcam.com)
The watering hole: Thirsty - discover
fine wine to drink in and take home
(wearethirsty.co.uk)
The haute hotel: An £80m renovation
will make University Arms a stunner
this summer (universityarms.com)
goodthingsmagazine.com
Out and about trends ZP READ.indd 24
24/11/2017 10:19
OUT & ABOUT
Trending in 2018
We digested Mintel’s ‘Global Food & Drink Trends 2018’ report so you don’t have to. Read on for our favourite themes…
1 2 3 4 5
TEXTURE
Take the rough with
the smooth - this
one is all about using
contrast to stimulate
the senses.
Try this: Michel Roux’s
Celery with Roquefort
butter and walnuts
(p106)
COLOUR SHOCK
From turmeric-stained
‘golden milk’ to black
coconut ice cream or
burger buns, expect
the unexpected.
Try this: Farm Girl
Café’s Butterfly or
Hibiscus matchas
(thefarmgirl.co.uk)
MINI TREATS
Keep puddings
teeny-tiny to help you
indulge without the
bulge (and clock up
those Insta-likes).
Try this: Pots & Co.’s
Salted Caramel &
Chocolate Pot
(ocado.com)
‘CURATED ADVENTURES’
PLANT-BASED
Whether it’s via a
PROTEINS
subscription box or a food
Nut milks, cauliflower
tour, we want all of our
‘steaks’ and faux-fried
chicken; no animals were edible experiences tailored
to our personal likes.
harmed in the making.
Try this: Taste Tripper’s
Try this: Essence Cuisine
themed discovery packs
- LA-style vegan haute
reveal London, deliciously
cuisine in Shoreditch
(tastetripper.com)
(essence-cuisine.com)
Tasty talent
EAT THE STREETS
DRINK UP
SPICE IT UP At the European
Street Food Awards, we saw
Tellicherry pepper, tamarind
and Thai basil on the menu but 2018 will be about Syrian
spice blend baharat.
UPPING THE ANTE The
awarding of a Michelin star
to Singapore’s Hong Kong
Soya Sauce Chicken Rice
and Noodle was the official
indication that street food is
pushing boundaries. In the
UK, Angela Hartnett is flying
the flag with Schmaltz in
East London’s Broadgate;
a food truck offering artful
sandwiches that are just
about as far from dude food
as humanly possible.
TURNING JAPANESE
Expect everyone to know
about okonomiyaki and
imagawayaki (which sound
so much edgier than ‘stuffed
pancakes’) by the spring.
LOW-ALCOHOL Driven by
a younger, health-focused
generation. Expect to see
plenty of low-alcohol options
on menus, with all varieties of
spritzes leading the way.
TEQUILA Due to agave’s nondigestible sugars, it’s better
for weight-watching than
gin or vodka - it won’t raise
blood sugar levels and cause
junk food cravings. It’s an
incredible spirit; it’s just got a
bit of growing up to do.
SHERRY Can sherry shake off
its stuffy image and find its
place at both ends of a great
meal? We think so. It comes
in a variety of styles, and a
mid-20s ABV makes it the
ideal lower alcohol alternative
to that post-dinner whisky.
BRANDY We reckon a young,
vibrant style with a bit of
Latin flair - like Pisco - might
lead it into brave new waters.
Kerb-side dining insights
from Richard Johnson,
British & European Street
Food Awards founder
(europeanstreetfood.com)
What’s hot in the world
of cocktails according to
Sam Jonathon, director
at Copperpot Bar
(copperpotbar.com)
On 7 February, the title of
Sussex Young Chef of the Year
will be awarded at the Sussex
Food and Drink Awards banquet.
Whether it’s Etch’s George Boarer,
64°’s Michael Notman-Watt or The
Star Inn’s Michael Sutherland,
it’s a given we can expect
great things from the new
champion.
goodthingsmagazine.com
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24/11/2017 10:19
OUT & ABOUT
Dispatches from the
dining table
From dinner with a view to a sensational dozen-course tasting menu,
Zoë Perrett visits two venues well deserving of their Michelin status
Galvin at Windows
22 Park Lane, London W1,
galvinatwindows.com
Despite the presence of maitre d’
extraordinaire Fred Sirieix, this is not
an episode of First Dates. But were
our relationship still at that awkward
fledgling stage, the bar’s intriguing
passport-style cocktail menu would
prove the perfect conversation starter.
Taking cues from a duo of
destinations on our travel hit list, we
go with a fruity, rum-centric Cuba and
the Uruguay; a devilish liquid dance
between mescal and tequila.
We move through to the Michelinstarred restaurant, and to a table
offering a glittering 28th floor cityscape
of London-by-night (its edges softened
somewhat by the liquor consumed thus
far), where we’re introduced to a bread
basket whose company we find so
agreeable, it’s topped up thrice.
The dining room is one of those so
slick in every element of its operation
26
that the food is almost incidental –
except here it’s exceptionally good.
Korean head chef Joo Won introduces
Eastern ingredients and techniques to
the Galvin brothers’ signature British
cuisine, and the marriage is one that’s
both surprising and winning.
Kimchi, spring onions and sesame
lighten and brighten a risotto starter
that’s made all the silkier by the river of
orange yolk which oozes from the soft
poached egg perched atop. For LB, it’s
Iberico pork – the tender, smoky meat
teamed with cool, crunchy mooli and a
hot, umami fermented chilli purée.
The sommelier team ensures what’s
in the glass is as well judged as what’s
on the plate; the risotto partnered with
a gently-oaked white rioja; the pork a
ripe, rounded pinot noir.
Mas de Daumas Gassac’s sweetyet-structured blended white flatters
a chunk of Beaufort-crusted hake
with spicy squid and hispi cabbage,
whilst a spicy, black-fruited Bordeaux
is sufficiently robust to stand up to
Cornish lamb rump plated alongside
melting confit fennel and an itsy bitsy
Shepherd’s pie. It tastes so much like
LB’s late mum’s that every mouthful
brings a tear to his eye.
By this stage we’re just assuming
everything will be flawless, and dessert
only affirms that notion. My multicomponent-ed Valrhona chocolate
cremeux could equally pose as pudding
or artwork; LB’s banoffee ice-cream bar
is the Magnum the eponymous brand
would kill to call its own.
Digestives, coffee, chocolates,
marshmallows from a sweet-shop
style jar… it feels like Team Galvin is
reluctant to let us leave - and we’re
every bit as reluctant to go.
THE VERDICT
Absolutely flawless. If ever the term
‘winner dinner’ was apt, it’s here.
★★★★★
goodthingsmagazine.com
Dispatches from the dining table ZPCATHY ZP READ.indd 26
20/11/2017 22:12
Whatley Manor
Easton Grey, Malmesbury, Wiltshire,
whatleymanor.com
A single amuse-bouche into a 12-course
tasting menu and I’ve already reached
peak surprise - because lifelong cheese
refuter LB is happily munching a
friable spiced cracker topped not only
with Exmoor caviar but with a veritable
avalanche of Parmesan.
We choose not to view the proffered
menu, feeling confident that The
Dining Room’s recently received
Michelin star means chef Niall
Keating knows what he’s doing. We do,
however, go for the paired drinks flight.
The classy, understated restaurant is
low-lit enough to feel intimate; bright
enough that you can appreciate what’s
on the plate – not that you won’t get a
thorough explanation of each dish from
the young, friendly team who not only
know their stuff but know how to build
a bit of repartee with their customers.
We give a warm reception to both the
hot and cold dishes that arrive next;
nuggets of tempura eel with a smoky
bacon-like character, a quivering egg
custard topped with beautiful bubbles
of salmon roe, chilled oysters leant
umami by a sherry mignonette and to
our glasses of Petit Beaufort.
It’s not just wine, though. Local
honey beer partners with aweinspiring sourdough loaves with a
cracking crust and a croissant-like
crumb. Slathered with a brown butter
that calls to mind that delectable
confection, the Werther’s Original, it’s
General
manager Sue
Williams is 2017
Hotel Manager
of the Year
one of the best things we’ve ever put in
our mouths; well deserving of its status
as a standalone course.
There’s a confident restraint to Niall’s
cooking and plating. Nothing is overegged (or over-any-other-ingrediented
for that matter); every component of
a dish is there to pull its weight. An
unlikely-sounding triumvirate of cured
mackerel with preserved raspberries
and salted cucumber is knockout,
as is squid ink tortellini filled with a
pork gelée which melts into its bath of
burned garlic vinaigrette.
Death Star-shaped vessels come
apart to reveal a sushi rice risotto
flavoured with a surf’n’turf combo of
scallops and chorizo. Were it not one of
a dozen dishes, I’d want a bucketload.
The stomach space saved is wellafforded to a pretty plate of alliumglazed salmon confit, and our final
savoury course: a super-rare Anjou
pigeon breast whose richness is
countered by crisp kohlrabi, spicy date
purée, and a medium-bodied Trentino.
Despite LB’s earlier breakthrough,
we skip the optional cheese course. It
proves a wise move because dessert
is a three-course spread: a rosemaryscented white peach sorbet, a sort
of deconstructed apple tart, and a
sinfully sticky black sesame kouign
amann. Coconut and fig maki rolls and
a diminutive lemon meringue pie-let
sweeten the ending still further.
Had I read the menu prior to dining,
I’d have anticipated a night of total food
hell; it’s composed almost exclusively of
ingredients I’d usually steer well clear
of. Yet tonight, I’ve received them all
with absolute delight. Niall’s flavour
combinations are distinct, diverse, and
beguiling; the product of a chef with a
magpie eye and a killer palate.
An elegant boozy-weave-meetsstuffed-waddle takes us out past a table
full of rock royalty – all clearly loving
the gastro-adventure just as we have.
THE VERDICT
Whether you’re a tasting menu
virgin or veteran, lover or hater, this
is one sure to tickle your tastebuds.
★★★★★
…AND SO TO BED
12 courses and as many
boozy beverages make
journeying home a bad
idea. So stay put. There
are few lovelier places
to hole up than Whatley
Manor: pre-dinner, we
give the spa’s hydro
therapy pool a whirl,
then make a postprandial return to a vast,
well-appointed suite
that’s considerably more
sizeable than the
house we call home.
goodthingsmagazine.com
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21/11/2017 11:18
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OUT & ABOUT
Dispatches from the dining table
Gidleigh Park
Carole Hamilton discovers peace, tranquillity, and some
sublime-yet-faff-free cooking in deepest, darkest Devon
J
ust when you think you must have
made a wrong turning, you spot the sign
encouraging you to keep going because
your two-Michelin-starred destination
is, indeed, just another mile along what is little
more than a track. And it’s definitely worth
keeping faith in your SatNav, because Gidleigh
Park is rather special.
The venue
Set in over 100 acres of woodlands, the hotel sits
on the banks of the Teign in Dartmoor National
Park. The welcome is as warm as the roaring
fire in reception. Our spa suite is a real stunner
with the biggest bathroom, complete with
sauna and steam room, and double doors onto a
balcony. Laying in the bath admiring the view,
I remember just why I love my job so much.
The food and drink
The kitchen is in the more than capable hands
of the charming Michael Wignall (guest chef
of Good Things' next issue), who joined the
hotel last year. Within 10 months, the chef was
awarded two Michelin stars and 5AA rosettes.
Michael cooks my kind of food: complex and
full of flavour, with a contemporary twist but
without all the faff of some other fine dining
establishments. The 10-course tasting menu
is the obvious choice to experience the skill of
the team; a notion shared by all but two other
diners in the nearly full restaurant on this
Chagford, Devon TQ13 8HH
particularly stormy autumn evening.
The meal starts with three appetite-piquing
umami nibbles and some fabulous homemade
bread. The tender marinated beef and Bovril
with a ridiculously golden egg yolk is followed
by loin of rabbit with truffle and Amontillado
sherry – my husband declares it a triumph, but
I have to pass since I have four bunnies at home
and am just too sentimental to enjoy eating
their relatives (I know, I know).
I love the yuzu-cured sea bass with a
wonderful poached oyster, and the poached
cod with cauliflower, coconut and curry is
deliciously different and packs a delicate
punch. The local duck with shiitake mushroom
teriyaki is flavoursome and moist - although I’ll
never be a massive fan of sweetbreads.
The Époisses cheese (stinky but worth the
effort) is followed by my favourite of the three
desserts; a fantastic Plymouth gin, cucumber
and chocolate concoction that sends me to bed
with a smile on my face.
Tasting menu £145 plus £95 for matching wines
THE VERDICT
This is right up there for a perfect foodie
weekend in the country. It's hard to fault
anything, except maybe the weather.
★★★★★
• 01647 432367 • gidleigh.co.uk
goodthingsmagazine.com
Review_GidleighPark CATHY ZP READ.indd 29
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18/11/2017 22:55
OUT & ABOUT
Dispatches from the dining table
Ella Canta
Martha Ortiz’s latest addition to the London dining scene gets the thumbs up from
Carole Hamilton, who was even persuaded to tuck into a golden grasshopper
READ MORE
Martha Ortiz
on art, food and
Mexico City
on p132
M
exican food and I are not very
well acquainted. Other than the
occasional tortilla or burrito, I
haven’t experimented much with
the country’s cuisine. Step forward Martha
Ortiz – the super-glamorous Michelin-starred
chef from Mexico City who just opened her first
restaurant on Park Lane – to educate my palate.
The venue
Restaurants in hotels are notoriously dull, but
the designers behind Ella Canta, which is housed
inside the InterContinental hotel, have done a
brilliant job. It helps that the dining room has
its own entrance on Park Lane and you don’t
have to wander through the hotel to find it. The
front of house team are Frida Kahlo look-a-likes
with flowers in their hair, and a visit to the
toilet reveals cactus arrangements and fringed
lampshades in every loo. This place tries hard,
and it works. The atmosphere is buzzing and you
instantly feel like you’ve arrived somewhere fun.
The food and drink
The margaritas – Mexico’s gift to the world
– are wicked, and a must while you mull the
menu; which is split into ‘overtures’, ‘main acts’
and ‘final curtains’.
My guacamole with ricotta and pomegranate
is a favourite, and comes topped with a golden
grasshopper – it’s £9 to partake in your own
version of a bushtucker trial. It actually
tastes fine, and is gone in two crunches. My
companion is more inclined to tuck into the sea
bass ceviche with mango and sangrita sorbet
which she declares light and very moreish.
I think I’ve drawn the short straw.
Martha is well known for saying Mexicans
‘eat colour’, so expect everything you try to be
vibrant and served in brilliantly coloured plates
and bowls. Our main courses, each priced at
£32 to reflect the Mayfair location, are both
delicious. We share the black cod with a kick
of chilli, and a sweet and rather wonderful soft
shell crab with hummus and pineapple purée.
To finish, you have to try the Mexican churros
with caramel and chocolate dipping sauces,
which are little bites of heaven. If we’d saved
more room, we would have tried the pudding
called ‘Maria Comes to London’ too – but with
no description on the menu, we leave none the
wiser as to whether it’s yummy or not.
I enjoyed the food and loved the atmosphere;
and could easily become a regular Friday night
haunt for those cocktails and that Mexican vibe.
THE VERDICT
Great food, great atmosphere and, if you’re
lucky, you’ll glance Maria on walkabout. She
looks like a supermodel in chef’s whites.
★★★★
One Hamilton Place, Park Lane, W1J 7QY • 020 7318 8715 • ellacanta.com
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OUT & ABOUT
32
goodthingsmagazine.com
TurkeyCATHY ZP READ.indd 32
20/11/2017 23:23
OUT & ABOUT
MEET THE PRODUCERS
TALKING TURKEY
On the Copas family farm, turkeys undergo firework training and have their own
musical instruments. Sophie Ritchie meets the stars of your Christmas feast
T
urkeys at Christmas, much like
pumpkins at Halloween, are so essential
to tradition that frantic procrastinators
have been known to throw down
their shopping baskets and fight each other in
supermarkets for their chance to grab the last.
For turkey farmers themselves, it’s their oncea-year chance to shine. It’s The X-Factor of the
feathered world. There’s no such thing as January
turkey sales or spring turkey clearances. The
show’s pretty much over and, if you’re lucky, sold
out by 23 December.
For Tom Copas Sr., the feathery performance
began back in 1957. After dropping out of school
as a teenager, Tom was given an unusual gift by
his disgruntled father – 153 turkeys to keep him
busy. In turn, he took these door to door, sold
every one and a small business was born.
Fast forward 60 years and Copas Turkey is
celebrating its 60th successful year, with
son Tom Copas Jnr now at the helm.
This year the farmers estimate
they will have 30,000 freerange and organic turkeys,
with around 16-20 differing
breeds of white and bronze,
all designed to reach different
weights by the end of
November. They are kept in
small flocks of roughly around
1,500 to 2,000.
Unlike many birds, Copas
turkeys are grown until they reach
full maturity at 26 weeks – which
means that, in contrast to a typical turkey
slaughtered in its lean teenagehood at 22 weeks,
the birds develop a final layer of fat. This helps
give them a self-basting quality when cooking,
ensuring a juicily tender, more flavoursome
Christmas spread.
All the birds are dry-plucked by hand, then
hung for an extra 14 days to allow natural
enzymes to work their magic and create that
smooth texture. After this, all the birds are
processed into an oven-ready product, with
greaseproof packaging, rosemary and giblets, a
cooking timer and simple instructions.
We visited the family farm in Berkshire and
spoke with Tom Jr. to find out more.
Tell us about the life of a Copas turkey…
Once they get a little bigger and a little tougher,
they’re introduced into the shed to get them
used to the British cold and natural light.
From six weeks on, the birds roam outside
during the day and make the most of cherry
orchards, sunflowers and, of course, their
musical instruments! We give them their own
tambourines and xylophones. They’re naturally
inquisitive animals, so it’s vital that they don’t get
bored or left without something to peck at.
Why is it important to keep turkeys calm?
Every part of the farming process feeds into this
final glorious product. By nature, turkeys can be
skittish creatures. It’s essential that the turkeys
are kept as calm and content as possible, to avoid
them getting spooked and jumping on each other
or crowding into corners.
How do you do this?
From special firework training
to their own array of musical
instruments, the flocks are
kept as stress-free as possible.
We train them not to be
afraid of fireworks by letting
explosions off during the day.
By the time Bonfire Night rolls
around, they’re not fussed!
‘Our herd
of alpacas
spend their days
protecting the
flock like fluffy
security
guards’
Are foxes a problem?
Copas turkeys are so free-range that
they actually have their own herder, in
the form of a well-loved border collie named
Kes. A third-generation turkey dog, Kes helps puts
the birds away at night to prevent them being
attacked by foxes. To keep foxes at bay further,
we even introduced a herd of alpacas to the farm.
They spend their days protecting the flock like
fluffy security guards!
When it comes to cooking turkey, people
get a little nervous. Any advice?
Most people panic about ruining the centre
showpiece on Christmas Day. We hope we can
help, with little things like the handy pop-up
cooking time or the bird’s self-basting layer of fat,
to help keep the kitchen calm on the big day.
goodthingsmagazine.com
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20/11/2017 23:23
OUT & ABOUT
Spicy tortilla soup Serves 6
This spicy soup is guaranteed to knock
the socks off any winter colds.
It can be as spicy as you like, so just
increase or decrease the chilli powder
and jalapeño quantities to suit your
crowd and their taste.
INGREDIENTS
• 1 tbsp olive oil
• 1 large onion, diced
• 1-2 tbsp hot chilli powder (to taste)
• 1 x can chopped tomatoes
• 1 litre turkey stock
• 1 x can sweetcorn
• 1 x can black beans, drained
• ½-1 jar green jalapeños, to taste
• leftover turkey, shredded
To serve
• 4 spring onions, sliced
• 1 avocado, sliced
• sour cream
MORE ONLINE
For the Copas
family recipe for
Coronation turkey perfect for the Boxing
Day buffet – go to
goodthingsmagazine.
com/coronation
turkey
• tortilla chips
• grated cheddar
METHOD
1. Heat the oil in a large frying pan set
over medium heat, add the onion,
and fry until softened. Stir in the chilli
powder, the tomatoes, and a dash of
the stock, and simmer for 2-3 minutes.
2. As the mixture begins to boil, add the
sweetcorn,beans, jalapeñosand another
dash of stock, and boil for 3 minutes.
3. Add the turkey and remaining stock
to the pan, and simmer for 5 minutes.
4. To serve, divide evenly between
serving bowls and allow guests to top
Turkey risotto Serves 4
Wild mushrooms – dried porcini in particular – are a delicious partnership to turkey, as is a
little streaky bacon if you fancy it.
with sliced spring onions, avocado and
a few dollops of sour cream before
INGREDIENTS
translucent. Add the wine and keep stirring.
covering the surface with tortilla chips
• 50g dried wild mushrooms (e.g. porcini)
4. Once the wine is absorbed, add a ladle of
and grated Cheddar.
• 250g chestnut mushrooms, sliced
hot stock and turn the heat down to a simmer.
• 50g butter
Continue adding ladles of stock and stir each
• 8 rashers smoked streaky bacon (optional)
one in before adding the next to create a
• 1 onion, finely chopped
creamy risotto. The rice should be ready after
• 300g risotto rice
approximately 15 minutes, when the rice is
• 1 small glass of white wine
soft but with a little bite.
• 1 ½ litres turkey stock, hot
5. Add the turkey meat when you add the final
• leftover turkey, brown and white meat
ladle of stock, and cook until heated through.
• 50g parmesan, finely grated
6. To serve, stir in the chopped parsley,
METHOD
parmesan and remaining butter. Set aside to
1. Soak the dried mushrooms in 500ml boiling
rest for a few minutes, then serve.
water for 20 minutes. Drain and add the liquid
to the turkey stock. Chop the mushrooms and
add them to the chestnut mushrooms.
2. Heat half the butter in a large frying pan set
over high heat, add the bacon (if using), and
fry. Add the onion, and cook until soft. Add
the mushrooms and continue to cook for a
few minutes.
3. Stir in the rice and increase the heat and fry,
stirring, for 1 minute, or until it looks slightly
34
Celebrate is
available from
selected retailers
and bookshops,
RRP £25, or
online at
amazon.
co.uk and
copasturkeys.
co.uk
goodthingsmagazine.com
TurkeyCATHY ZP READ.indd 34
20/11/2017 23:23
Christmas,
ROUX-STYLE
Emily: Christmas is epic. There
can be up to four of us in the kitchen.
Normally we assign each course to a
different person, and all help each other
when it comes to plating and serving. Giselle: I let all the real chefs
do the cooking at Christmas –
I concentrate on table
dressing and the wine! 36
goodthingsmagazine.com
My life on a plateCATHY ZP READ.indd 36
18/11/2017 23:38
OUT & ABOUT
My life on a plate
GISELLE & EMILY ROUX
They say behind every great man is a great woman; beside Michel Roux Jr.,
there are two – and they’re giving us a fresh new French lesson
T
hink ‘Roux’ and three male
names spring to mind, but
Albert, Michel and Michel Jr.
are not the full cast of this
culinary dynasty. Michel Jr.’s daughter
Emily is a Michelin-trained chef; his
wife Giselle a long-time hospitality
professional and the current secretary
at Le Gavroche. And now the pair have
teamed up to co-author New French
Table, a cookbook that’ll make you
rethink everything you thought you
knew about French cuisine. We talked
to the duo about food memories,
family ties, and whether they step on
each others’ toes in the kitchen.
What are your strongest food
memories from childhood?
ER: Being in the south of France with
my family, scorching my fingertips
peeling chestnuts that we’d roasted
over a bonfire. And making pasta with
my father; spaghetti strands were
literally hanging all over the kitchen
and the flat was full of flour!
GR: For me, it’s probably eating roast
chicken with pommes boulangères.
Giselle, was food a big part of
your life before you were a Roux?
GR: Yes, my parents were keen
gardeners and resources were
plentiful. They grew amazing fruit and
vegetables, fish came from a river at
the bottom of the garden, and we kept
rabbits and chickens.
Emily, has being part of a
legendary dynasty helped or
hindered your own career?
ER: On rare occasions, it’s helped
me get a restaurant reservation. It’s
sometimes a hindrance because some
people will always think that my
surname is my best asset.
Your new book bills itself as ‘a
fresh approach to classic recipes’
– can you explain that concept?
GR: Lighter recipes from the South of
France – Mediterranean-style, using
olive oil rather than cream and butter.
ER: You generally think of French food
as difficult to reproduce and too rich.
This shows you otherwise! Although
there are a few classics in there, we’ve
definitely jazzed them up.
Giselle, you’ve said that the book
came about when Michel stole ‘yet
another’ of your recipes for his
own book. Which one was it?
ER: A fennel and red onion tart.
What are your favourite recipes
from the book and why? GR: Everybody loves our cannelés.
They’re so easy to make and delicious! ER: Gâteau de Savoie – the lightest,
fluffiest cake. It also brings back lovely
memories with my grandmother. How does the mother-daughter
dynamic work in the kitchen? Do
you cook in perfect harmony?
ER: It really works. We love being
together in the kitchen. Possibly
because my mother is happy to learn a
few tricks of the trade.
GR: Emily taught me to work faster by
using the correct knives, but I’m still
not as fast as she is! It helps, too, that
we are both rather greedy.
Giselle, has Emily’s own style
influenced the way you cook?
GR: Definitely. Emily is a lot more
adventurous than me, doing things
like mixing vegetables into puddings.
I’d never have had the guts before!
Emily, what are the most valuable
lessons your mother taught you?
ER: Stay true to yourself. Concentrate
and work hard. There is also a French
expression she always used to tell me:
goodthingsmagazine.com
My life on a plateCATHY ZP READ.indd 37
37
22/11/2017 23:46
OUT & ABOUT
‘personne va te manger’. It literally
means ‘no one’s going to eat you’.
Basically, go for it!
Emily, what’s the most inspiring
kitchen you’ve worked in?
ER: I loved working for Akrame in
Paris. At the time there were just five
of us in a very small kitchen, but we
managed to achieve two Michelin
stars. It was a great achievement
which came from team effort.
When you’re not cooking, where
do you like to dine out?
ER: I love Asian and Italian food;
luckily London offers a lot of delicious
restaurants in this vein, like A. Wong
and Hai Cenato.
GR: I’m an A. Wong fan too. I also
enjoy the New Orleans-style food at
Plaquemine Lock in Islington.
Emily, you’ve been hosting
pop-ups at Le Gavroche –
anything else in the pipeline?
ER: In the run-up to Christmas we’ll
be doing demonstrations together,
because the dynamic on stage really
works. And further down the line, I’d
love to open my own restaurant. The New French Table by Giselle &
Emily Roux, published by Mitchell
Beazley, RRP £25
Escargots à la Bourguignonne Serves 4
This classic is utterly delicious; though perhaps not for those watching their diet.
Smothered in rich butter and punchy garlic, it will delight even the most cautious diners.
INGREDIENTS
incorporated and bright green in colour.
For the garlic and parsley butter
Season to taste, and set aside.
• ½ shallot, roughly chopped
3. If using snail shells, stuff the snails into
• 3 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
• 1 bunch of parsley, leaves roughly chopped
the shells and lay on a baking sheet. If
not, divide the snails between 4 small
individual ramekins on a baking sheet.
• 1 tbsp cognac
Divide the butter between the snails, either
• 100g softened butter
spooning it into the shells or over the snails
• salt and freshly ground black pepper
in the ramekins, ensuring that each snail is
For the dish
generously covered.
• 24 large canned snails
4. Transfer to the oven for 8 minutes, or
• 24 large snail shells (optional)
until the butter has melted and looks as if it
• fresh bread, to serve (optional)
has separated. Remove from the oven and
METHOD
switch the grill to high. Grill the snails for
1. Preheat the oven to 200°C.
5 minutes, until the butter is bubbling
2. For the butter, place the shallots, garlic,
and no longer looks separated.
parsley and cognac in a blender and pulse
5. Divide the snails between serving plates
until well combined. Add the butter to
and serve with fresh bread alongside for
the blender and pulse again until well
dipping into the butter, if liked.
38
goodthingsmagazine.com
My life on a plateCATHY ZP READ.indd 38
18/11/2017 23:38
IN BLACK,
EVERYTHING TURNS
OUTRAGEOUSLY BOLD.
Black soybeans fettuccini
with glazed salmon eggs
on lava stone plate.
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ITS NEW DARK
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10/05/2017 09:18
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Inspirational Cookery Courses
Learn to cook with passion and skill at one of the UK’s top culinary schools located on the edge of
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ingredients and range from short classes in your favourite cuisine to residential cookery weekends and
even professional qualifications in the Culinary Arts and Patisserie for aspiring chefs.
With 50 inspirational cookery courses to choose from, you are sure to find a course to suit your taste.
Ashburton Cookery School & Chefs’ Academy
Old Exeter Road · Ashburton · Devon · TQ13 7LG · Tel: 01364 652784
www.AshburtonCookerySchool.co.uk
Aspen_v2.indd 134
08/06/2017 15:30
OUT & ABOUT
LONDON’S
HIDDEN
VILLAGES
Step off the beaten track and explore some of
the Capital’s lesser-known neighbourhoods,
packed with independent businesses from
butchers and bakers to cafés and restaurants
Churchill Bar
and Terrace
goodthingsmagazine.com
Hidden villagesCHCathy ZP READ.indd 41
41
21/11/2017 11:18
Daisy Green
SPOTLIGHT ON...
FIND IT
Nearest
Underground
station:
Bond Street
portmanmarylebone.
com
Zayna
Portman Village, W1
The area around Seymour Street and New Quebec Street is a world
away from the crowds of nearby Oxford Street
THE GRAZING GOAT
A favourite watering hole with
locals who cram into the bar after
5pm, although the ground floor
is open for a good breakfast from
7.30am and you’re welcome for
coffee any time. The first floor
restaurant is gaining a reputation
for well-priced British fare, and
there are eight comfy bedrooms
if you fancy stopping overnight.
DAISY GREEN
A must-visit to see the Alice in
Wonderlandesque outdoor/indoor
garden by UK street artist, Shuby.
The Aussie brunch served at
weekends is justly famous. During
the week, pop by for breakfast or a
healthy lunch from the overflowing
‘kitchen table’.
LOCANDA LOCATELLI
Giorgio Locatelli is considered by
many to be one of the finest Italian
chefs in the UK, and his Michelinstarred restaurant, which he runs
with wife Plaxy, is delightful. They
are serving an Italian feast on New
Year’s Eve, £195pp.
ELISKA
Named one of the Top 30 Best
Interior Designers by The Sunday
Times, Eliská’s shop is the place
to find one-off or limited edition
pieces for your home. She offers
everything from bespoke furniture
to quirky homeware, linens and
accessories.
ZAYNA
When a restaurant is named after
the owner’s daughter you know
there’s going to be a lot of love
around. Enjoy a menu of North
Indian and Pakistani delicacies
divided according to cooking
method, from the pan, grill, tawa or
oven. The desserts are to die for.
BOXCAR
A new independent butcher, deli
and grill which sources a premium
selection of ethically reared
produce from British farms – it’s
the perfect place to find your
Christmas lunch. The Deli serves
charcuterie, cheese, pies, pasties,
beer, marinades, wine and coffee. THE CHURCHILL BAR & TERRACE
Had enough of shopping and fancy
a hot chocolate or a warming
cocktail? Make a date on the
alfresco Terrace at the Churchill
hotel on Portman Square. Decked
out with fur throws and kept cosy
with plenty of giant heaters, we
can recommend tucking into the
Smoked Applewood Cheddar &
Bacon fondue with bread and
potatoes for dipping.
LA PETITE POISSONNERIE
This fabulous French and Japanese
fusion fishmonger always has a
stunning show of fresh fish on show
as well as platters of fresh sashimi,
French wines and an array of
Japanese groceries.
PHILGLAS & SWIGGOT
With a reputation as one of the
friendliest places in London to buy
your wine, this is where to go for
Christmas advice. The store also
offers wine tasting evenings for up
to 20 people at £30pp, and gift
vouchers for wine-loving friends.
Boxcar
42
goodthingsmagazine.com
Hidden villagesCHCathy ZP READ.indd 42
20/11/2017 22:47
OUT & ABOUT
SPOTLIGHT ON...
Ham Yard, W1
In the midst of Soho, Ham Yard
has an urban village feel revolving
around a tree-filled pedestrianonly courtyard with a bronze
centrepiece by Tony Cragg.
Ham Yard Hotel
My Cup of Tea
La Petite Poissonnerie
FIND IT
Nearest
Underground
station:
Piccadilly Circus
HAM YARD HOTEL
Part of the super-swish Firmdale
group with award-winning
interiors by co-owner Kit Kemp,
the hotel has 91 bedrooms and
suites alongside a restaurant and
rooftop terrace. There’s even a
bowling alley and a cinema. The
restaurant will take the effort out
of Christmas Day - you can enjoy
Champagne and canapés followed
by a delicious three-course menu.
Choose from seasonal specials
including Black Forest ham
with celeriac remoulade, Roast
Rhug Estate turkey with all the
trimmings, and spiced caramelised
pineapple carpaccio with
buttermilk panna cotta. £110pp.
ANABELA CHAN
Hand-crafted jewels from designer
Anabela Chan and her newlylaunched label. Her fine jewellery
pieces are little works of art to be
loved and treasured forever.
MY CUP OF TEA
A tea drinker’s paradise committed
to providing the very best black,
green tea and tisanes. The shop
holds regular tastings or enquire
about bespoke group tastings.
DINOSAUR DESIGNS
Art and fashion collide at Australian
Dinosaur Designs’ first London
outpost for jewellery, home
accessories and funky furniture.
INIGO
A new sushi hand roll grab-andgo kiosk, combining the traditions
of serving fresh sushi with the
portability of a sandwich.
OVER UNDER COFFEE
Great coffee – chef Connie
Grossman draws inspiration from
her previous experiences working
for Two Hands in New York and
Ottolenghi in London. Breakfast is
highly recommended.
Over Under Coffee
goodthingsmagazine.com
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21/11/2017 11:19
OUT & ABOUT
Bombay Palace
SPOTLIGHT ON...
Connaught Village, W2
CONNAUGHT CELLARS
Step inside this Frenchstyle wine shop where you’ll
find everything from prestigious
bottles to interesting regional
grapes. Discover the downstairs
tasting room, which can be
booked for wine tastings and
private parties, where director
David Farber and his friendly
team can guide you. David tastes
over 5,000 varieties a year!
BUCHANAN’S CHEESEMONGER Take a tip from this artisan
cheesemonger and prepare
a simple festive cheeseboard
that presents a variety of styles
of cheese. You can’t go wrong
with a delicious English trio
of Dorstone goats’ cheese,
Appleby’s Cheshire and Cornish
Blue served with some Damson
Fruit Cheese and Charcoal
Crackers. Ask about their
bespoke hampers including wine
and accessories such as knives
and olive wood cheeseboards.
44
Or add a gift voucher for one of
the monthly London Cheese School
Masterclasses.
MUD AUSTRALIA
This is the destination for some
gorgeous kitchenware in a myriad
of lovely colours. Designed by
Shelley Simpson, all the individual
pieces combine craftsmanship with
style and functionality. Everything
is handmade in Sydney, and this is
the company’s only store in Europe.
BOMBAY PALACE
A stylish Indian restaurant and a
great location for your Christmas
party with private dining and
bespoke menus. The Goan fish
curry bursts with flavour and, every
Tuesday, you can make a date with
the veggie feast including salad
and a dessert for just £19.90. MARKUS COFFEE
At the oldest coffee shop in the
village (opened in 1957), you can
choose from 34 varieties of coffee
beans from 13 different countries
to select your perfect brew. The
knowledgeable staff will even
roast it for you in store using the
original machinery.
ABASTO
From the founders of Casa
Malevo, the Abasto food store
blends the twin passions of
coffee and food to create a little
slice of Argentina in London.
From the expertise of their
resident butcher to the wine
cellar/café, the store is wellknown for the empanadas, with
many flavours to choose from
including vegetarian options.
CASA MALEVO
Serving prime quality beef and
a host of fantastic Argentinian
wines, would-be gauchos will
love this unique restaurant.
CONNAUGHT KITCHENS
Home to boutique kitchen
specialists, this two-floor
showroom comprises a wealth of
kitchen displays with a free onehour consultation service to help
you plan your perfect design.
Background image: iStock
Just minutes from Marble Arch, Connaught Village is a tranquil escape from the West End. As part
of the Hyde Park Estate, the area is a rich blend of architectural heritage and exclusive green squares. goodthingsmagazine.com
Hidden villagesCHCathy ZP READ.indd 44
20/11/2017 22:57
OUT & ABOUT
And there’s more…
Abasto
FIND IT
Nearest
Undergrounds:
Paddington,
Marble Arch
connaught-village.
co.uk
Buchanan’s Cheesemonger
Markus Coffee
Columbia Road, E2 Well-known
for its Sunday flower market,
Columbia Road is best visited at
the weekend. Arrive early to snap
up the freshest cut flowers and
pot plants, pop into Cakehole
at Vintage Heaven (no. 82)
for antique china, glasses and
tableware – and homemade cake.
Take a pit stop at The Birdcage
(no. 80) a lively Victorian pub for a
craft beer. Nearest Underground:
Shoreditch High Street.
Shepherd Market, W1 With a
slightly seedy reputation due to
historic associations with
prostitution, the narrow
passageways are now home to an
array of boutiques and some good
restaurants, bars and pubs. Home
to Kitty Fisher’s, GQ’s Restaurant
of the Year in 2016. Nearest
Underground: Green Park.
Chelsea Green, SW3 A closely
guarded secret among the wealthy
locals, discover a mixture of
galleries, boutiques and cafés.
The Chelsea Fishmonger, Jago’s
butchers and wine merchants
Haynes, Hanson & Clark keep
the larders in their well-heeled
neighbours well stocked. Phil
Howard’s Elystan Street - London
Restaurant of the Year - is here too.
Nearest Underground:
South Kensington
Golborne Road, W10 Step away
from neighbouring Portobello
Road and discover the stalls selling
bric-a-brac, secondhand furniture,
clothes and food from FridaySunday. Sample fish and chips at
George’s Portobello Fish Bar. You’ll
have to queue, but it’s worth it.
And Lisboa Patisserie serves the
best custard tarts outside Portugal.
Nearest Underground:
Ladbroke Grove.
Mud Australia
goodthingsmagazine.com
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20/11/2017 22:48
My life in a glass
VITALIE TAITTINGER
Artistic, beautiful, a mum of three, and heir to a world-famous family business,
this woman gets to drink Champagne every day of the year…
A
s Taittinger’s artistic and
marketing director, Vitalie
is in charge of growing the
brand and ensuring it can
compete with all the other big names
in the business. Based in Reims, the
unofficial capital of France’s Champagne
region, Taittinger is the only family-run
Grande Marque Champagne.
You must think you have the best
job in the world...
I do love what I do. My days are varied
and I get to work alongside my father
and my brother Clovis, which has
been inspirational. Of course, we have
our moments, and we don’t always
agree on everything, but helping to
shape the future of our company is
hugely rewarding.
46
Did you always want to join the
family business?
Growing up, I dreamt of becoming an
artist - I have an art degree. In 2005,
our family briefly stepped away from
the wine that forged our identity,
although within a year my father had
bought back our business from the
Starwood hotel group and I realised I
wanted to be part of the adventure.
I didn’t have any formal wine training,
but I do think my artistic background
brings an extra dimension.
I am proud that Taittinger teams up
with artists to design special bottles
– including Roy Lichtenstein and
renowned Brazilian photographer,
Sebastião Salgado, who has created
a limited edition bottle for the 2008
vintage. I’m also lucky enough to
be part of events that Taittinger
sponsors, including the BAFTAS which is undeniably glamorous.
Tell us a little about the brand...
Our flagship wines are the Comtes
de Champagne, consisting entirely of
Chardonnay grapes, and the Comtes
de Champagne Rosé - a combination
of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.
Our chalk cellars are listed as a
UNESCO world heritage site, and
there we welcome visitors 18 metres
below ground to discover the art
of Champagne making – as well as
sampling our wonderful product!
Earlier this year, Taittinger planted
vines in Kent. Why the UK?
The county is already producing
goodthingsmagazine.com
My life in a glassCATHY ZP READ.indd 46
22/11/2017 23:48
OUT & ABOUT
A walk
among the
grapevines reveals
roses on the end of
every long row, called
the Guardians of the
Vineyard. If the roses
are healthy, the grape
harvest should be a
success.
‘The British like to drink Champagne
every day, not just for special occasions’
really good wines, and has the perfect
conditions with its chalk soils and
climate. The new wine will be called
Domaine Évremond after Charles de
Saint-Évremond, who first introduced
London to Champagne at the court
of King Charles II. We hope to release
our first English sparkling wine from
Domaine in 2023. Ultimately we are
aiming to produce 300,000 bottles per
year, but this won’t be for six years or
more as the vines take time to produce
the right quantity of the best fruit.
That’s good news for the British
who do love their Champagne!
Yes, Britain is a very important market
for us, and British people know a
lot about Champagne, probably
more than other nations. You are
becoming the connoisseurs of all our
markets and have no complex about
Champagne. You drink it every day,
not just for special occasions.
Is there a typical day for you?
No two days in my diary are ever
the same. I try to take my children
to school, then it can be meeting
journalists, tastings, working on
advertising, planning trips to our
customers, or attending events around
the world. I travel a lot, although try
not to be away for more than a few
days at a time. I am lucky to have a
supportive husband who also works
in the industry. I believe no one can
replace the mother but, at work,
everybody can replace you a little bit.
You have to have balance.
At mealtimes, do you always drink
Champagne?
It all depends on the moment. When
it’s very hot, I’m happy drinking a
cold beer, and it’s always a pleasure
drinking a glass of Bordeaux or
Burgundy. When I travel, I always try
the wine from the region I’m in. I enjoy
trying new things.
At home, I always have a few
bottles of Champagne to share with
friends when I’m cooking. And here’s
a little tip: if you have Champagne
that has gone flat, mix it with cream,
peppercorns and herbs (dill and sorrel
are excellent options), and bring
to a light simmer. Whisk in a lump
of butter, and you have a delicious
Champagne beurre-blanc.
Discover more at taittinger.com
goodthingsmagazine.com
My life in a glassCATHY ZP READ.indd 47
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22/11/2017 23:48
LUXURY ESCAPES
Entertaining
& Interiors
Image: Brayer Design Ltd. via Houzz
CUPBOARD
LOVE
Fancy a pantry in your
kitchen? According to a
survey by HouzzUK, you’re
not alone. Analysing activity
amongst two million users on
their site showed a photo of
a pantry was saved over
300,000 times in one
month. A definite
trend for 2018.
WAKE UP TO BREAKFAST THE CLARIDGE’S WAY P50
GAME FOR GOOSE, GROUSE OR PHEASANT THIS CHRISTMAS? P54
SHOWSTOPPING DESSERTS WITH A PARISIAN TOUCH P98
KNOW YOUR FROMAGE WITH MICHEL ROUX P106
Entertaining openerCHCathy ZP READ.indd 49
24/11/2017 10:21
ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
BREAKFAST AT CLARIDGE'SCATHY ZP READ.indd 50
18/11/2017 21:28
ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
Good morning,
SUNSHINE
Imagine waking up to breakfast at Claridge’s
every day – if only. Luckily, there are ways you
can enjoy a taste of 5-star luxury at home...
T
he charm of room service
seems especially magnified
at breakfast time: you’re
in a Claridge’s white robe,
the trolley is rolled in, carrying the
Guy Oliver-designed china and, for a
moment – hopefully longer – you can
still shut out the rest of the world. If
you’re going to go for it, go big, we say.
This toast is made with brioche, and
its thickness is perfect for drenching
up the maple syrup and clotted cream.
Vanilla brioche French toast Serves 4
INGREDIENTS
METHOD
For the French toast
1. Place the eggs, milk, icing sugar, vanilla
• 6 eggs
seeds and cinnamon in a large bowl, and
• 100ml milk
whisk until well-combined.
• 80g icing sugar
2. Add half the butter to a large frying pan set
• 1 vanilla pod, split lengthways, seeds scraped
over medium-high heat. While it melts, dredge
• pinch of ground cinnamon
the brioche triangles in the egg mixture.
• 20g salted butter
3. When the butter is foaming, reduce the heat
• 6 brioche slices, crusts removed, halved
to medium. Drain off any excess egg mixture
diagonally
from half of the brioche triangles and fry until
To serve
golden-brown. Repeat with the remaining
• 120ml maple syrup
brioche triangles.
• 200g clotted cream
4. Serve immediately, accompanied by the
• 200g berries of your choice
maple syrup, clotted cream and berries.
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ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
CROISSANTS
aren’t made in a day
This is a three-day recipe. To take away
some domestic guesswork, here’s a
proposed schedule:
• To serve croissants on a Saturday
RECIPE
ONLINE...
Find the Claridge’s
secret formula
at goodthings
magazine.com/
croissants
morning, pre-ferment the dough on
Thursday morning.
• Finish the dough on Thursday evening
and pound your butter. Refrigerate.
• On Friday morning, roll out the dough
and wrap the butter in it. Refrigerate. Roll
out and turn the dough.
• Friday late-afternoon, roll out and turn
the dough again. Refrigerate.
• Later on Friday evening, roll out
the dough, then cut and shape the
croissants. Refrigerate overnight.
• Early Saturday morning, get up and
set the croissants out to prove for
2 hours (preheating your oven now will
also warm up the kitchen). Go back to
bed. Wake up 2 hours later and bake the
croissants!
THE ESSENTIAL KIT
• a stand mixer fitted with the dough
hook
• 2 sheets of baking paper, at least
30cm square
• rolling pin
• pastry scraper
• pastry brush
• 2 trays, 1 lined with baking paper
• 2 baking trays, lined with baking paper
The profession of the tourier – someone
who creates pastries made from yeastleavened dough – is becoming a lost art,
and one you only find in the grandest
hotels. Too often, viennoiseries such as
croissants and pastries are bought in
from other bakeries, and are often made
with vegetable fat, rather than butter. Not
so at Claridge’s where tourier François
Grange has been working the night shift
(midnight to 10am) for 35 years (and
counting), keeping the dough rolling and
taking the pastry to the perfect level of
puff. Beyond pure tastiness, another byproduct of the recipe you can find online
(goodthingsmagazine.com/croissants)
is that your entire house will end up
smelling like a French bakery.
52
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ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
A word on EGGS
Guests often asks what makes Claridge’s
eggs so tasty and why the yolks are so
orange. The answer is Burford Brown
eggs from Clarence Court, where hens
range freely on green pastures that
contain plenty of chlorophyll. It’s
all this greenery that adds to the
colour and the rich flavour.
When René Redzepi was cooking for
the Noma pop-up at Claridge’s during
the London 2012 Olympics,
he commented on the flavour, freshness
and viscosity of the eggs. The
signature dish at Noma is an egg that
guests cook themselves at their table,
using a timer, and cooking an egg
perfectly should not be a luxury but
a most basic skill, says René.
‘When you crack an egg into a pan,’ he
counsels, ‘you want the yolk to sit atop
the white like a jockey.’
Everyone enjoys their eggs a certain
way. René likes his cooked hot and fast –
with crispy white edges and a runny yolk.
The Roux brothers like their eggs cooked
low and slow. Meredith, the co-author
Claridge’s scrambled eggs
Serves 1
of this book, requested scrambled eggs
almost daily during her stay, and
wanted to make sure everyone has
the Claridge’s method.
INGREDIENTS
• 3-4 eggs
• big knob of butter
• salt and pepper
METHOD
1. Whisk the eggs in a heatproof mixing bowl
placed snugly over a saucepan of water.
2. Bring the water to a simmer, then place the
bowl of eggs over the pan. Add a good knob
of butter and start mixing consistently with a
wooden spoon or spatula.
3. After 2½ minutes, the eggs will start to set
around the edges of the bowl. Turn off the
heat and keep stirring until the texture of the
eggs becomes mousse-like.
4. Around the 3½-minute mark, remove the
bowl from the pan – remember that eggs will
continue cooking even off the heat. When in
doubt, always undercook! Serve warm.
Claridge’s: The
Cookbook by
Martyn Nail
& Meredith
Erickson,
published by
Mitchell Beazley,
RRP £30
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ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
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22/11/2017 23:49
ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
Scott Fairweather’s GUINEA HEN
with sage & onion, bourguignon &
roasted parsnip sauce Serves 4
INGREDIENTS
and the stock has reduced to a glaze. Set
For the bourguignon
aside until required.
• 3 tbsp vegetable oil
5. For the roasted parsnip sauce, heat the
• 100g smoked pancetta lardons
oil for deep-frying to 150°C in a deep-fryer
• 100g silverskin onions, peeled
or a deep saucepan. Add the reserved
• 200g button mushrooms, caps only
parsnip peelings in small batches and fry
• 200ml red wine
until golden.
• 4 sprigs of thyme, leaves picked
6. Remove the peelings from the oil with
• 500ml chicken stock
a slotted spoon, and set aside to drain on
• 500ml beef stock
kitchen paper.
For the roasted parsnip sauce
7. Place the parsnips and bay leaf in a
• vegetable oil, for deep-frying
large saucepan and cover with the milk.
• 4 parsnips, peeled and thinly sliced,
Boil until completely softened, then
skins reserved
strain through a colander set over a bowl,
• 1 bay leaf, torn
discarding the bay leaf.
• 2 litres semi-skimmed milk
8. Place the parsnips, baked croissants and
• 2 small croissants, baked until crisp
crisp parsnip peelings in a food processor
• salt
and blend for 3 minutes, adding enough
For the confit onions
of the reserved cooking milk to achieve a
• 4 tbsp pancetta fat, reserved from
thick, smooth purée. Pass through a fine
the bourguignon
sieve and season to taste.
• 2 small white onions, halved
9. For the confit onions, preheat the oven
• 4 sprigs of thyme
to 180°C. Heat the reserved pancetta fat
• 50g unsalted butter, diced
in a frying pan set over medium heat, then
For the crispy sage
add the onion halves, cut side down, and
• 40g sage, leaves picked
fry until golden.
• vegetable oil
10. Add the thyme and butter, and roast in
• salt
the oven for 15–20 minutes.
For the roasted guinea hens
11. For the crispy sage leaves, preheat the
• 2 tbsp vegetable oil
oil for deep-frying to 180°C in a deep-fat
• 4 guinea hen breasts
fryer or deep saucepan. Add the sage
• salt
leaves in small batches, then remove with
To serve
a slotted spoon and set aside to drain on
• creamed potatoes
kitchen paper, seasoning lightly.
METHOD
12. For the guinea hens, preheat the
1. For the bourguignon, heat 1 tablespoon
oven to 180°C.
of the oil in a large frying pan set over
13. Heat the vegetable oil in a large
medium heat. Add the pancetta lardons
ovenproof frying pan set over medium-
and fry until golden and crisp. Drain in a
high heat, and season the guinea hen
colander set over a bowl, reserving the
breasts. Add to the pan, skin-side down,
cooking fat for the confit onions.
and sear until golden.
2. Heat the remaining oil in the same frying
14. Turn over, then place in the oven for
pan, then add the onions and mushrooms
6–8 minutes. Remove from the oven and
and fry until golden and softened.
set aside to rest for 8 minutes.
3. Return the pancetta to the pan, then
15. To serve, divide the creamed potatoes,
add the wine and bring to a simmer.
bourguignon and purée evenly between
Deglaze, scraping the bottom of the pan,
warmed serving plates. Add a confit
until reduced to half the original volume.
onion half and roasted guinea hen breast
4. Add the thyme and chicken and beef
to each plate, sprinkle with the crispy sage
stocks. Bring to a simmer then reduce
leaves and serve.
the heat to low and simmer gently for
Recipe courtesy of Scott Fairweather,
45 minutes, until the pancetta is tender
head chef at The Black Swan Hotel
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ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
Michael Wignall’s LAMB
with creamed kale & roasted
pumpkin Serves 4
INGREDIENTS
‘Keep the roasting juices from
the lamb to drizzle over the
dish just before serving’
For the roasted pumpkin
• 1 small Crown Prince pumpkin (or similar),
peeled and cut into 2cm wedges
• 25g butter
• salt
For the lamb
• 1½ tbsp vegetable oil
• 1 rack of lamb
• 30g unsalted butter
• salt
For the creamed kale
• 500ml double cream
• 1 sprig of thyme
• 3 bay leaves
• 1 clove garlic
• 1 head of kale
• salt
METHOD
1. For the pumpkin, preheat the oven to 180°C.
2. Heat the butter in a large frying pan set over
medium-high heat. When foaming, add fry
the pumpkin slices in batches until coloured.
Transfer to the oven for 5 minutes. Remove
and set aside, leaving the oven switched on.
3. Once the pumpkin wedges are cool, cut into
2cm cubes, season to taste, and set aside.
4. For the lamb, heat the oil in a large frying
pan set over medium-high heat. Season the
lamb and add to the pan, searing on all sides
until golden-brown.
5. Add the butter to the pan and transfer to a
roasting tin. Cook in the oven for 2–3 minutes,
then turn the lamb and cook for a further 1–2
minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside
to rest for 10 minutes, reserving the roasting
juices. Leave the oven switched on.
6. Meanwhile, make the creamed kale. Place
the cream in a large saucepan with the thyme,
bay leaves and garlic, and bring to the boil
until reduced to half the original volume.
7. Meanwhile, blanch the kale for 1-2 minutes
in a large saucepan of salted water, then
immediately plunge into iced water. Drain
on a clean tea towel and squeeze out any
excess water.
8. Finely slice the kale and transfer to a large
bowl. Strain the cream mixture through a
fine sieve onto the kale, season to taste,
and set aside.
9. To serve, carve the rested lamb into slices.
Divide the meat, pumpkin cubes and creamed
kale evenly between warmed serving plates
and serve, drizzled with the roasting juices.
Recipe courtesy of Michael Wignall, executive
head chef at Gidleigh Park
56
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ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
Raymond Blanc’s Spiced roasted PHEASANT Serves 4
For the game seasoning (makes extra)
2. For the pheasant, preheat the oven
• 100g coarse sea salt
to 190°C.
• ½ tbsp coarsely ground black
3. Set a heavy-bottomed frying pan over a
peppercorns
low heat. Add the butter and oil and, when
• 1 tsp juniper berries
foaming, add the birds and very gently
• 2 star anise
brown on all sides for 5 minutes, or until
• 5g stick of cinnamon
golden-brown.
• 2 dried bay leaves
4. Sprinkle the birds with game seasoning
• 5g peeled garlic cloves
and place them in a roasting tin. Transfer to
For the pheasant
the oven and cook for 30 minutes, turning
• 50g butter
halfway through. Remove from the oven
• 50ml vegetable oil
and set aside in a warm place to rest.
• 2 x 800g hen pheasants
5. Meanwhile, strain the excess fat from
• 2 tsp game seasoning (see recipe)
the roasting tin. Add the wine, port
• 100ml red wine
and thyme to the tin, set over a high heat,
• 100ml port
and cook until reduced to two-thirds of
• 2 sprigs of thyme
the original volume, scraping the bottom.
• salt and pepper
Season to taste, then strain into a jug.
METHOD
6. To serve, carve the meat, pour over the
1. For the game seasoning, place all the
jus and serve, accompanied by roasted
ingredients in a food processor and blend
winter vegetables.
for 2 minutes. Transfer the blended mixture
Recipe courtesy of Raymond Blanc at
to a sterilised, lidded container and set
Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons
aside until required.
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John Williams’ Roasted GROUSE with celeriac, salted grapes & walnuts Serves 10
INGREDIENTS
METHOD
briefly sear on all sides. Repeat with the
For the candied walnuts (makes extra)
1. For the walnuts, bring the water and sugar
remaining butter and grouse. Transfer to a
• 1 litre water
to the boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar.
roasting tin and cook for 10–12 minutes, or
• 1kg sugar
2. Place the walnuts in a large bowl and pour
until done to your taste. Remove from the
• 200g walnut halves
over the liquid, then refrigerate for 24 hours.
oven and set aside to rest, reserving 200ml
• 2 tbsp vegetable oil
3. Once soaked, strain off all of the liquid.
of the roasting juices.
For the celeriac purée (makes extra)
Heat the oil in a large, deep saucepan set
8. Heat a little oil in a medium frying pan
• 1 celeriac, peeled and diced
over medium heat, add the walnuts, and fry
set over high heat, add the salsify batons,
• 250g butter
until golden. Remove from the oil and drain
and caramelise. Add a little of the roasting
• 100ml double cream
on kitchen paper, then transfer to an airtight
juices and cook until glazed. Remove from
For the salsify
container until required.
the heat and finish with chopped parsley.
• 200g salsify, washed, peeled and put in
4. For the celeriac purée, bring a saucepan of
9. Heat a little oil in a medium frying pan
salted water to the boil, add the celeriac, and
set over high heat, add the girolles and
For the grouse
boil for 15-20 minutes, until tender.
sauté. Gently reheat the celeriac purée.
• 150g butter
5. Transfer to a food processor with 50g of the
10. To serve, set the roasting tin over a high
• 10 grouse
butter and blend to a purée, gradually adding
heat and quickly deglaze with the reserved
To serve
the remaining butter, followed by the cream
roasting juices. Strain through a fine sieve.
• a little olive oil
and a pinch of salt. Once incorporated, season
11. Remove the grouse breasts from the
• 200g salsify (see recipe)
to taste and immediately refrigerate.
crowns and put both breasts together,
• 20g chopped parsley
6. For the salsify, bring a large saucepan of
skin-side facing out. Place one pair of
• 150g girolles
salted water to the boil. Drain the peeled
breasts on each plate.
• 200g celeriac purée (see recipe)
roots, add to the pan, and boil for 20-30
12. Divide the purée between serving
• 80g Alsace bacon lardons, sautéed
minutes, or until tender. Refrigerate, then cut
plates and top with the salsify, girolles,
• 350g white grapes, peeled and salted
into batons and set aside.
lardons, grapes, walnuts and watercress.
• 80g candied walnuts (see recipe)
7. For the grouse, preheat the oven to 180°C.
Serve with the roasting juices on the side.
• ½ punnet of baby watercress
Heat half the butter in a large frying pan.
Recipe courtesy of John Williams,
• 200ml roasting juices
When it foams, add half the grouse and
Executive Chef at The Ritz
water with the juice of a lemon
58
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ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
Jason Atherton’s Roasted VENISON & beetroot with poached pears Serves 6
INGREDIENTS
• 1 bay leaf
the coriander seeds, cumin and Sichuan
For the roasted beetroot
• 1 tbsp sherry vinegar
peppercorns, and toast for a few more
• 600g beetroot, washed and trimmed
• 325ml red wine
seconds to release oils and fragrance.
• 4 tbsp caster sugar
• 400ml veal stock
4. Pour in the sherry vinegar and boil until
• 4 sprigs thyme
For the spiced poached pears
reduced to a sticky glaze. Add the butter,
• 4 cloves garlic, peeled
• 1 litre water
salt and honey and return to a simmer until it
• 4 tsp sea salt
• 375g caster sugar
reduces by two-thirds to a syrupy consistency.
• 1 tbsp sherry vinegar
• 1 tbsp lemon juice
5. Strain through a fine sieve and discard the
For the spiced honey sauce
• 5 star anise, lightly crushed
spices. Season to taste with a squeeze of
• ½ tsp edible lavender
• 4 sticks cinnamon
lemon juice, then set aside until required.
• ½ tsp coriander seeds
• 6 pears, peeled and cut into wedges
6. For the red wine sauce, heat the oil in
• ½ tsp cumin seeds
For the roasted venison
heavy-based pan set over medium-high
• ¼ tsp Sichuan peppercorns
• 6 x 100g pieces deboned loin of venison
heat. When hot, add the shallots and garlic,
• 60ml sherry vinegar
• 25g unsalted butter
and fry until lightly golden. Add the thyme,
• 25g unsalted butter
METHOD
peppercorns and bay leaf, and deglaze the
• ½ tsp sea salt
1. For the beetroot, place the beetroot in a
pan with the sherry vinegar and red wine.
• 200ml clear honey
large saucepan and add the sugar, thyme,
8. Boil the liquid until reduced by three-
• squeeze of lemon juice
garlic, salt and vinegar. Simmer over medium-
quarters, add the stock, and bring to the boil.
For the red wine sauce
high heat for 45 minutes, or until tender.
Reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
• 1 tbsp olive oil
2. Drain and set aside to cool. When cool
9. Pass the sauce through a fine sieve into a
• 1 shallot, sliced
enough to handle, peel and cut into cubes.
clean pan and boil steadily until reduced to a
• 1 clove garlic, chopped
3. For the spiced honey sauce, set a dry frying
syrup. Set aside until required.
• 1 sprig thyme
pan over medium heat. When hot, add the
10. For the pears, put the water, sugar, lemon
• ¼ tsp white peppercorns
lavender and toast for a few seconds. Add
juice and spices into a wide pan. Stir to
dissolve the sugar, then bring to the boil.
11. Add the pears to the syrup, then cover with
dampened baking parchment. Simmer for
about 10 minutes until tender, then set aside.
12. For the venison, heat the butter in a
frying pan. Add the venison pieces and sear
until golden on all sides, keeping the meat
medium-rare.
13. Remove and place in a warm tray to rest.
14. Meanwhile, gently reheat the pears and
the sauces. Place the beetroot in a frying pan
with 3 tablespoons of the spiced honey sauce
and toss to coat. Heat for 2 minutes, stirring
frequently, until hot.
15. Slice the venison, divide between warmed
plates, cover with the beetroot, the pears and
the red wine sauce, and serve immediately.
Recipe courtesy of Jason Atherton, chef and
global restaurateur
All recipes come from the Charitable
Bookings Cookbook. 365 Recipes From
The UK’s Finest Chefs. Book your next
restaurant at charitablebookings.com
and £1 will be donated to charity. Buy the
cookbook for £40 – the perfect gift for any
foodie this Christmas.
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ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
Mark Froydenlund’s Roasted organic Rhug Estate GOOSE
Serves 6
RHUG
ESTATE...
has one of the
largest organic farm
shops in the UK. Find
2,000+ products with a
focus on Welsh, local
and organic at
rhug.co.uk
INGREDIENTS
the oven, set aside to cool, and reduce the
• 70g salted butter, softened
oven temperature to its lowest setting.
• 1 tbsp chopped rosemary
6. While it cools, make the beurre noisette.
• 1 orange, zest only
Set a small saucepan over low heat, add
• 1 crown of Rhug Estate goose
the butter, and cook until golden-brown.
• 2 tbsp pomace oil
Remove from the heat and stir in the garlic,
• sea salt
thyme and salt.
For the beurre noisette
7. Pour the beurre noisette over the goose and
• 150g unsalted butter
roast in the oven until the internal temperature
• 4 cloves garlic
reaches 54°C (for medium-rare) or 65°C
• ½ a bunch of thyme
(for medium).
• sea salt
8. Remove the goose from the tin and set
you can cook your own delicious roast
METHOD
aside to rest for a minimum of 15 minutes.
goose at home. When we finish service
1. Preheat your oven to its highest
Increase the oven temperature to its highest
on Christmas Eve, we seal the goose skin
temperature.
setting. Strain the fat from the pan through a
until brown, then add loads of butter and
2. Place the butter in a small bowl. Add the
fine sieve and reserve.
chopped rosemary and orange zest, mix well,
9. Remove the breast from the bone, trim, and
We then put the birds in the oven at 65°C
then push under the skin of the goose.
return to the tin with the reserved fat. Reheat
until they reach 54°C in the centre. We
3. Rub the breast with the pomace oil and
in the oven, taking care not to overcook.
stay in the hotel and go down to baste
season well.
10. Slice the meat and finish with flaky sea salt.
4. Place the goose on a wire rack set over
Recipe courtesy of Mark and Shauna
cooked – then take them out to rest
a roasting tin and roast in the oven for 7
Froydenlund, joint chef-patrons of Marcus
before going back to bed ourselves.’
minutes, or until golden-brown. Remove from
at The Berkeley, London
60
First class birds
Mark and Shauna Froydenlund are
big fans of goose at Christmas.
‘In the restaurant we are fortunate to
have very large pans, big enough to
seal a whole goose. I’ve done my best
to replicate the methods we use here so
thyme, bay and garlic and caramelise.
the birds every so often until they’re
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24/11/2017 11:10
ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
CHEESE
TO PLEASE
Michel Roux knows how to create a decadent festive
cheeseboard – and he’s sharing his wisdom
CheeseCATHY ZP READ.indd 62
23/11/2017 17:03
ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
LET THEM
BREATHE
Cheeses should
be served at room
temperature to appreciate
their flavours to the full. So,
if they are stored in the
fridge, take them out an
hour or so before
serving.
Turn the page for Michel
Roux’s festive cheeseboard
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ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
optimal conditions as the cheeses
ripen. They will also be able to offer
you the chance to sample a few that
have caught your eye, and may even
supply you with little labels to identify
each variety on your cheeseboard.
Your choice will be determined
largely by the number of guests
For four people, my advice would be
to serve just one generous wedge of
perfectly ripe cheese such as Brie de
Meaux or Stilton, or a lovely piece of
Comté. I always like to serve an odd,
rather than even, number of cheeses.
For six to eight guests, I’d probably
offer five cheeses. For 10 to 12, I would
suggest serving seven at most, to
avoid the choice becoming confusing.
A
confirmed cheese-lover
since the age of seven
when he discovered local
examples at Saint-Mandé
market in Paris, Michel continued
to increase his knowledge of the
subject over a lifetime of international
travel. At the chef ’s Michelin-starred
restaurant, The Waterside Inn, you’ll
find one of the UK’s most renowned
cheese selections, so it’s little wonder
he’s such an authority on the topic.
Building your cheeseboard
Take the season into account
Flavour and texture is largely
determined by the milk, the quality
of which is affected by the food the
animal is eating at the time. During the
summer, cows, sheep and goats feed
on pastures, which are generally lush
at the start of the season, whereas
their feed is largely hay during the
winter months. Not surprisingly, fresh
cheeses made in late spring and early
summer tend to be more lively and
interesting than those produced during
the winter. This applies in particular to
goat and sheep cheeses.
Buy your cheese from a specialist
cheese producer or cheese shop
Failing that, buy from a supermarket
or delicatessen that offers an extensive
range of high-quality cheeses. A
specialist cheese producer will have
the advantage of an ageing cellar or
cave (cave d’affinage) that can provide
64
For a good variety pick one from each
of these categories:
• A fresh or white cheese, from the
Loire valley perhaps, where you can
find a host of fresh goats’ cheeses
between three and seven days
old. There is also a wonderful little
English goats’ cheese called Innes
Button. This cheese will prepare your
palate, much as in a wine tasting
where you would start with a local
wine before moving onto a premier
cru, then a grand cru.
• A soft fresh cheese with a natural
rind such as a Saint-Pierre, Brocciu
or Banon de Provence.
• A soft cheese with a bloomy
rind, such as Sharpham Brie or
Camembert.
• A soft cheese with a washed rind,
such as Stinking Bishop, Vacherin
Mont d’Or or Taleggio.
• A semi-firm hard cheese, such as
Berkswell or Saint-Nectaire, or a hard
cheese, such as Parmigiano Reggiano
or Comté.
• A blue cheese, such as Gorgonzola,
Stilton, Roquefort, Bleu des Causses
or Fourme d’Ambert.
• A flavoured cheese, such as Cornish
Yarg or Edam.
Don’t forget to provide several knives
Avoid using the same knife for all the
cheeses. I also advise you to make
a start on each cheese, as this will
encourage your guests to dig in…
Offer stunning accompaniments
Try little bunches of black or green
grapes, some pears or apples, celery
leaves, and a small dish of chutney.
You can serve quince paste alongside,
although it won’t necessarily go with
every cheese, or a little honey, which is
a perfect accompaniment to Parmesan.
Offer an assortment of breads
Walnut, raisin or fig bread or even
a lovely pain de campagne would
go beautifully. Provide a selection
of biscuits too: water biscuits, very
lightly sweetened oat biscuits and rye
crackers, perhaps.
A cheeseboard should look appealing
The actual board could be a large
piece of slate, a beautiful piece of
wood or a marble slab. If you have a
few vine leaves or chestnut leaves to
hand, you could use these to line the
surface. Arrange some dried fruits
(figs, apricots, dates), and walnuts and
hazelnuts around the cheeses.
There are no hard rules for selecting
a suitable wine or other drink
Red or white wine, vin jaune, whisky,
sherry, port, Sauternes, cider and beer
are all possibilities. It depends on your
chosen cheeses and personal taste.
It’s up to you when to serve the
cheese course
Savouring a cheeseboard is a
wonderful, relaxing way to end a meal,
but if you are serving a dessert, you
may prefer to offer the cheese first,
as a palate-cleanser before the sweet
finale. This is the tradition in France,
but the choice is yours.
Make cheese the focus of your meal
Try a tasting menu comprised entirely
of cheeses, with a selection of seven
to nine, from the mildest type to the
strongest, each one accompanied by a
different selected drink. You might like
to serve a few extras alongside, such
as cherry tomatoes, canapés, salami,
etc… as well as a green salad dressed
with a not-too-sharp lemon vinaigrette.
Cheese by
Michel Roux
with
photography
by Lisa Linder,
published by
Quadrille,
RRP £20
goodthingsmagazine.com
CheeseCATHY ZP READ.indd 64
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ENTERTAINING & INTERIORS
Celery with Roquefort
butter & walnuts Serves 4
This dish is lovely served as an
amuse-bouche with a glass of Sauternes.
INGREDIENTS
• 1 or 2 bunches celery, depending on size
• 8 walnuts in the shells
• 250ml cold milk
• 100g butter, lightly softened
• 200g Roquefort (or Stilton)
METHOD
1. Using a small knife, cut off 2–3cm from
the base of the celery bunches. Remove
the outer stalks (save for stocks or
soups), retaining the most tender inner
stalks. Soak in iced water for 10 minutes,
then drain, wrap in a damp tea towel and
refrigerate until required.
2. Remove the walnuts from their shells.
Bring a small saucepan of boiling water
to the boil, add the walnuts, and blanch,
2 or 3 at a time, for 2 minutes.
3. Drain and use a knife tip to remove the
skins, then immerse the nuts in the cold
milk and refrigerate.
4. Place the softened butter in a bowl
and crumble in enough of the cheese to
give the strength of flavour required. Mix
together using a fork.
5. To serve, arrange the celery stems on a
wooden cheeseboard, filling the hollows
with the Roquefort butter. Keep a few
stems unfilled and place the rest of the
cheese on the board, so guests can help
themselves. Drain the walnuts, add to the
board, and serve.
goodthingsmagazine.com
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Ad.indd 1
18/10/2017 18:53
GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Cardboard Leaf Wreath, £35,
rastallanddaughters.com
luxury
THE
GIFT
GUIDE
FOR
Gourmets
A TASTE OF CHRISTMAS ALL WRAPPED UP.
32 PAGES OF IDEAS TO DELIGHT ANYONE
WHO LOVES GREAT FOOD
goodthingsmagazine.com
GG opener finalCH ZP READ.indd 67
67
23/11/2017 17:04
GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
The Robin Gift Bag,
£35, waitrose.com
The Ultimate Collection, £1,000,
paxtonandwhitfield.co.uk
Charbonnel et Walker Luxury
Hamper, £170, selfridges.com
Whisky and Truffles,
£65, harrods.com
Chocolate & Gin Gift Box
£20, hotelchocolat.com
Red’s Italian Christmas Hamper,
£58, theredbeetle.com
HEAVENLY
Pierre Marcolini Gourmet
Hamper, £199, selfridges.com
Elegant Afternoon Tea,
£100, johnlewis.com
68
hampers
The Christmas Hamper,
£350, wolseley.com
Christmas Morning, £85,
harveynichols.com
Chelsea Flower Gift Box,
£100, partridges.co.uk
goodthingsmagazine.com
GG hampersCHCathy ZP READ.indd 68
23/11/2017 17:05
GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Luxury Christmas Hamper,
£125, nationaltrust.org.uk
69
GG hampersCHCathy ZP READ.indd 69
23/11/2017 17:05
GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Jazz cocktail
glasses,
set of 6, £60,
lsa-international.
com
Bump teapot, £100,
tomdixon.net
Zaha Hadid Sketch lowball glasses,
£55 for two, selfridges.com
Christmas tree, £175,
johnlewis.com
Question Mark plate,
£48, rorydobner.com
Fornasetti tumblers, set of 6,
£230, harrods.com
Artland vodka
decanter, £27.50
notjustjugs.com
TEMPTING
Inside Out Champagne flutes,
£19.99 for two, prezzybox.com
tableware
Artsy door
mat, £20,
amara.com
Manhattan tumbler,
£19.50 for 4,
marksand
spencer.com
Swarovski Crystal Prism
tray, £1,095, amara.com
70
Napkin rings, £76 for 4,
joannabuchanan.com
Mini decanter and shot glasses,
£125, historicroyalpalaces.com
goodthingsmagazine.com
GG china and glassCHCathy ZP READ.indd 70
23/11/2017 17:06
GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Festive ENTERTAINING TIPS
Lucie Massey, founder of Slap Ya Papa
For our Christmas meals we always serve plentiful piles of
delicious soul food. Christmas tables should be a hive of activity;
roasted turkey, truffled sprouts, a rich and umami gravy. Our secret Christmas weapon is candied yams: sweet potatoes
flavoured with sugar, spice and all things nice, topped with
molten marshmallow. Don’t spare on your ingredients – if you
can’t buy good butter, use olive oil and a sprinkle of truffle oil
on your vegetables. Dark chocolate is always better than milk
chocolate. And for your cheese course, serve only the best.
Neal’s Yard Dairy is our favourite.
Glassware from a selection,
Julien Macdonald at
debenhams.com
goodthingsmagazine.com
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71
23/11/2017 17:06
A shimmering collection of cookie baubles,
each with a pink ribbon for hanging on
the tree. £89.95 for a box of 11,
peggyporschen.com
72
goodthingsmagazine.com
GG chocolate & cakeCHCathy ZP READ.indd 72
23/11/2017 17:07
GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Chocolate buttons
bauble, £35,
paulayoung.co.uk
Panettone selection,
£16-18, eusebideli.com
Precieux hamper with macarons, chocolates, tea, jam and
marshmallows, £100.50, laduree.com
The Nutcracker biscuit
selection, £35,
biscuiteers.com
Mini Christmas cakes,
£8.50, gailsbread.co.uk
Chocolate truffles,
£29.50, thewolseley.com
Giant Praline Mince Pie, £15.95,
fortnumandmason.com
CHOCOLATE
& Cakes
The Salted
Caramel
Collection,
£25, hotel
chocolat.com
Chocolate selection,
from £3.99 each,
historicroyalpalaces.com
Black cherries, brazil nuts and
almonds gift bag, £5,
divinechocolate.com
Pink
Champagne
Truffles, £13,
fortnumand
mason.com
Gianduiotti selection
box, £19.95,
carluccios.com
Artisan du Chocolat Snowflake and
Truffles, £20, johnlewis.com
goodthingsmagazine.com
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23/11/2017 17:07
KitchenAid
Stand Mixer in
Silky Pink, £549,
exclusive to
harrods.com
Nutribullet
blender, £59.99,
argos.com
Integrated flatbread
maker, £760,
rotimatic.com
Alessi Il Conico Kettle,
£150, harrods.com
Bugatti Volo Toaster,
£170, harrods.com
GADGETS
We love
Citrus Press Pro, £219,
sageappliances.co.uk
Pixie Coffee
Maker, £139.99,
nespresso.com
74
Spice and Nut Grinder, £50,
Cuisinart, amazon.co.uk
DOIY Tropical Pizza
Cutter, £18,
selfridges.com
goodthingsmagazine.com
GG gadgetsCHCathy ZP READ.indd 74
23/11/2017 17:08
GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Liberty Flowers
Dualit Architect Toaster,
£125, libertylondon.com
Le Creuset Kettle, £85,
selfridges.com
Big Green Egg MiniMax
Charcoal BBQ, £600,
johnlewis.com
Dolce & Gabbana Citrus
Juicer, £399.95,
smeg.com
Tefal Mastermix Blender,
£90, amazon.co.uk
Spotlight on... FONDUE SETS
Starting out as a trend in the Sixties with home cooks
attempting to give a cosmopolitan edge to their
dinner parties, the popularity for fondue comes and
goes. But with many retailers reporting booming sales
this Christmas, it looks as though the trend for fondue
is on the rise once again. And what’s not to like?
Dipping cubes of artisan bread into bubbling cheese –
we definitely approve. One for the wish list, Santa.
Smart Grinder Pro, £199.95,
sageappliances.co.uk
Croft Collection Copper Fondue Set, £85, johnlewis.com
IFavine ISommelier Pro
Smart Decanter, £1,299,
harrods.com
goodthingsmagazine.com
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23/11/2017 17:08
GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Molecular Gastronomy Kit,
£39.99, prezzybox.com
Cookbook wall calendar, £6,
nationaltrust.org.uk
5-piece professional knife
set, £595, Monica Galetti
at flintandflame.co.uk
Cherry Ripe Butter, £4.95,
fortnumandmason.com
FOODIE
Oil and vinegar bottles, €25
each, designist.ie
favourites
Coffee Gator Pour Over
coffee maker, £39.99,
amazon.co.uk
Signature Q knife block
set in ash or walnut,
£225, robertwelch.com
Cafetière
gift set, £40,
origincoffee.
co.uk
Organic
Zambian
Honey, £25,
harrods.com
Trio of breakfast preserves, £18.95, thewolseley.com
76
goodthingsmagazine.com
GG foodiesCHcathy.indd 76
24/11/2017 10:25
GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
This page: Lillypuds large
Christmas pudding, £16.50,
farmshoplarder.com
Opposite page: Apron in a jar,
£24, thegreatgiftcompany.co.uk
goodthingsmagazine.com
GG foodiesCHcathy.indd 77
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23/11/2017 17:08
GIFT GUIDE
Exclusive cookbook free
when you buy Krug from
Majestic and spend £150+
Taittinger
Brut Rosé NV,
£47.99,
ocado.com
Louis Roederer Cristal, £150, laithwaites.co.uk
Krug 2004, £219.40, honestgrapes.co.uk
Moët & Chandon Limited Edition Magnum, £100, johnlewis.com
Nyetimber English
Sparkling Wine,
£34.99, waitrose.com
RBT
Tabletop
Corkscrew,
£180,
harrods.com
Digby Rosé Brut, £46, harveynichols.com. Hush Heath Balfour
Brut, £25.99, majestic.co.uk
FESTIVE
Lanson White Label, £35,
Leckford Estate Brut, £24.99,
both waitrosecellar.com
Bubbles
Pommery
Brut Royal
Magnum
£150, thechampagnecompany.
com
Veuve
Clicquot La
Grande Dame
Charlotte
Olympia, £170,
harrods.com
Spotlight on... CORAVIN WINE SYSTEM
Coravin is a revolutionary needle-through-the-cork
system that enables you to siphon wine out of
bottles without spoiling what’s left. Argon gas is
the other half of the Coravin equation – having
pushed the needle through the cork, you pull a
trigger to inject argon through the needle. When
the bottle is pressurised, you can pour the wine
into your glass – a mouthful just to taste or a full
glass. The wine left in the bottle reseals itself in
just a few minutes. We love it! The Coravin Model
Two Elite Wine System is available in 10 different
colours, £279, coravin.co.uk
78
Bruno Paillard
Champagne, £44.99,
selfridges.com
goodthingsmagazine.com
GG DrinksCHCathy ZP READ.indd 78
23/11/2017 17:09
GIFT GUIDE
Cocktail shaker
and glasses from a
selection, BIBA at
houseoffraser.com
Celebrate
NEW YEAR’S EVE
Scotch is the perfect Hogmanay
drink. I’ll be pouring Raasay While
We Wait single malt but, come
midnight, I’ll be reaching for the top
shelf stuff; The Tweeddale, a 27-yearold single grain. My favourite party
bars are Edinburgh’s Tigerlily and
Monty’s on Morrison Street.
Alasdair Day,
R&B Distillers
goodthingsmagazine.com
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5
2
6
3
4
7
1
13
8
9
SPIRITS &
Cocktails
12
WE LOVE...
These cute ginfilled baubles
make the perfect
festive favour at
your dining table
10
IN WITH THE GIN CROWD
1. Hortus Raspberry Gin Liqueur,
£11.99, lidl.co.uk 2. Oak-aged gin,
£40, marksandspencer.com
3. Palmers Dry Gin, £28, masterofmalt.com 4. Espensen Raspberry
Gin, £32.50, espensenspirit.com
5. Unicorn Tears, £40, johnlewis.
com 6. Bullards Strawberry & Black
Pepper Gin, £38.70, thedrinkshop.
com 7. Dockyard Chatham Dry Gin,
£36.40, copperrivetdistillery.com
8. Cotswolds Dry Gin, £34.95,
cotswoldsdistillery.com 9. Gin Lane
1751 Pink Gin, £20.78, masterofmalt.
com 10. Pickerings Gin Baubles,
£30, farmshoplarder.com 11. Rock
Rose Scottish Gin, £35, ginfestival.
com 12. Seedlip Spice 94
Botanicals, £27.95, thewhiskyexchange.com 13. Crazy Gin, £45,
harveynichols.com
11
80
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GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
FE ST IV E B E E R
PA IR I NG
Ed Hughes,
Beer Sommelier
Just like fine wine,
craft beer can be
paired with food why not try it out
this Christmas?
2
1
4
3
7
5
Christmas dinner
If you prefer bread
sauce with a light
turkey gravy on your
dinner, Doom Bar is a
good match as it won’t
overpower the lighter
flavours. If you have
bolder sides on your
Christmas table such as
cranberry sauce and a
heavier gravy, you could
serve Wolf Rock which
won’t shy away from
those big flavours.
WONDERFUL WHISKY
1. Rassay While We Wait,
£56.95, rbdistillers.com
2. The Balvenie Peat Week,
£59.28, masterofmalt.com
3. Yamazakura, 16 year-old
whisky, £135, harveynichols.
com 4. Suntory Chita Whisky,
£50.55, thewhiskyexchange.
com 5. Glenfiddich Winter
Storm, £199, glenfiddich.
com 6. Glenlivet XXV, £345,
fortnumandmason.com
7. Tweeddale Blended
Scotch, from a selection,
rbdistillers.com
Christmas pudding
For this it has to be
the Sharp’s 6 Vintage
Blend, a beer that has
delusions of grandeur
and can match up to
bold flavours. This beer
would also be a great
one for soaking the
pudding as you would
with something like a
brandy or a sherry.
6
Mince Pies
I would choose a
Blue Moon. This has
coriander and orange
notes in the beer, which
perfectly bridges the
gap between the flavour
profiles in the beer and
those in the fruity pie.
1
2
3
4
TIPPLES THAT MAKE RIPPLES
1. Mince Pie cocktail syrup, £6.99, tipplesworth.com 2. Christmas Pudding Madeira, £14.50,
fortnumandmason.com 3. Taylor’s Chip Dry Port, £14.99, virginwines.co.uk 4. Chocolate Liqueur, £12,
marksandspencer.com 5. Heavensake Ginjo Sake, £45, ukheavensake.com
5
Cheeseboard
It’s got to be Sea Fury.
The intense hoppy
flavour of the beer
cuts through the fat of
the cheese, and would
work wonderfully with
something like a vintage
mature Cheddar.
goodthingsmagazine.com
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GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Cheese-lovers can enjoy a
6-hour cheese and wine tasting
day, £150, and, for an extra
£25, take an online test and
get a cheese qualification too!
flavourtastings.co.uk
82
goodthingsmagazine.com
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GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Black cheese knife, £14.90,
Normann Copenhagen,
bearandbear.com
Mad Millie Cheese Kit,
£19.99, Lakeland at
ebay.co.uk
DOIY cheeseboard
and knives, £40,
selfridges.com
Cheese Lover’s Chutney
Tube Gift Set, £16,
The Smokey Carter,
notonthehighstreet.com
Blue Stilton, £6,
marksandspencer.com
The Ultimate
Cheese Making
Kit, £49,
cravedlondon.
com
Spiced Stilton,
£24, and Elegant
Rarebit, £14.95,
both fortnum
andmason.com
CHEESE
Quicks cheeseboard photo: David Geffen
Mice cheese knives, €18.50,
designist.ie
Cheeseboard
collection,
£14.50,
thebaytree.
co.uk
Lovers
Gluten free hamper, £100,
paxtonandwhitfield.co.uk
Marble cheeseboard, £78,
Anthropologie,
johnlewis.com
Feather cheese
knives, £35,
lauraashley.com
goodthingsmagazine.com
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GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
COOKBOOK Inspiration
The Great Dixter Cookbook
by Aaron Bertelsen,
£24.99, phaidon.com
Feasts by Sabrina Ghayour, £20,
Octopus Books
Chinatown Kitchen by Lizzie
Mabbott, £14.99, Octopus Books
Essential Winetasting by Michael
Schuster, £18.99, Octopus Books
The World is Your Burger by David
Michaels, £24.95, Phaidon
Vegan, The Cookbook by
Jean-Christian Jury, £29.95,
Phaidon
The Sportsman by
Stephen Harris,
£29.95, Phaidon
84
Indian Festival Feasts
by Vivek Singh, £23.99,
Bloomsbury
goodthingsmagazine.com
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23/11/2017 17:11
GOURMET
GIFT GUIDE
WE LOVE...
How to create
beautiful food
using simple
techniques and fresh
ingredients.
The busy cook’s
dream collection.
Basics to Brilliance by Donna Hay,
£25, Harper Collins
INSIDE...
WD-50 by Wylie Dufresne, £50,
Harper Collins
The first cookbook
from one of the world’s
most groundbreaking chefs.
When it opened in 2003, wd50
was New York’s most innovative fine
dining restaurant. This is a fascinating
look inside what is often called the
landmark for modernist cooking.
It earned 3 Michelin stars for
dishes like aerated foie gras
puffs and fried
mayonnaise.
Redzepi Downtime by Nadine Levy,
£27, Ebury Press
Modern Baker
by Melissa Sharp, £26,
Ebury Press
Modern British Food by
Jesse Dunford-Wood, £20,
Bloomsbury
Round to Ours by Alice
Levine/Laura Jackson, £25,
Quadrille Publishing
Recipes from an Italian
Butcher by The Silver
Spoon Kitchen, £29.95,
Phaidon
goodthingsmagazine.com
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23/11/2017 17:11
GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Wine Lover’s Kitchen by
Fiona Beckett, £16.99,
Ryland Peters & Small
IGNI, A restaurant’s first
year by Aaron Turner, £20,
Quadrille Publishing
WE LOVE...
Jeremy Fox has
a way of making
vegetables look like
an art form on the
plate. Magical
This is Gluten-Free by Victoria Hall,
£16.99, Ryland Peters & Small
On Vegetables by Jeremy Fox,
£29.95, Phaidon
Skandikitchen by Bronte Aurell,
£9.99, Ryland Peters & Small
Meat & Game by Tom Kitchin,
£22.99, Bloomsbury
Japanese Pâtisserie by
James Campbell, £16.99,
Ryland Peters & Small
86
Sweet by Yotam Ottolenghi/Helen Goh,
£27, Ebury Press
goodthingsmagazine.com
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GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
Andina by Martin Morales, £27,
Quadrille Publishing
Vietnamese Cuisine from
Elizabeth Street Cafe, £29.95,
Phaidon
Sushi Made Simple by Atsuko
Ikeda, £16.99, Ryland Peters & Small
The Cocktail
Garden by
Adriana Picker,
£14.99,
Quadrille Publishing
It’s always about the food,
Monday Morning Cooking Club,
£25, Harper Collins
River Cafe
30 by Ruth
Rogers, £28,
Ebury Press
mages: iStock
Hazana by Paola Gavin, £25,
Quadrille Publishing
goodthingsmagazine.com
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GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
FISH &
SHELLFISH MENU
Rick Stein Cookery
School, Cornwall
Discover some of Rick’s favourite
dishes and learn a range of techniques,
from preparing mussels and butterflying
a round fish to cleaning cuttlefish.
What’s more, you’ll enjoy the fruits of
your labour with lunch overlooking
the Camel Estuary.
From £198, rickstein.com
FRENCH BISTRO,
Ashburton Cookery School, Devon
Explore the soul of French cookery and learn
classic bistro recipes from different regions. You’ll
tuck into tasting plates of each dish and even take
home a delicious Bouillabaisse and self-made fresh
crusty baguette. £165, 13 Jan, 7 Feb, 25 March,
ashburtoncookeryschool.co.uk The gift of
GOURMET COOKING
Treat someone you love to some new kitchen skills – and reap the
benefits when they come home with their new-found confidence!
HAM CARVING MASTERCLASS,
Brindisa, London
At ‘Ham School’, fans of Spanish delicacies
will taste top quality hams, have a go at carving
a whole leg under the guidance of a master
carvers, and then taste some specially chosen
wine pairings. £75, brindisa.com
88
DINNER PARTY KNOW-HOW,
Thyme, The Cotswolds
Impress your friends by whipping up delicious
dinner party fare created with fresh, seasonal
ingredients and mastered at Thyme’s fabulous
country cookery school. Dates in January and
February, £185. thyme.co.uk
COCKTAIL MASTERCLASSES,
The Salt Room, Brighton
Every three months, expert bar manager
Matt Ottley teaches keen mixologists the
art of cocktail making at home, using all
the techniques you need from glassware to
garnishes. From £42, saltroom-restaurant.co.uk
goodthingsmagazine.com
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GOURMET GIFT GUIDE
THE ESSENTIAL VEGAN,
Leiths, London
This hands-on workshop will
equip you with a range of cool
recipes from broccoli pesto to
speedy chickpea curry.
£155, 6 Jan, leiths.com
MARCH FLAVOURS WITH NIGEL
HAWORTH, Northcote, Lancashire
Let Michelin-starred chef Nigel Haworth guide
you through the best seasonal produce – from
soft boiled hen’s egg to fillet of brill with a
Shiraz sauce. A delicious two-course lunch
with wine, plus afternoon tea is also included
in the price of this one-day course.
£350pp, 6 or 8 March 2018, northcote.com
BUTCHERY MASTERCLASS,
Parson’s Nose, London
As well as serving top quality meats in their
three shops, Parson’s Nose also offer expert
classes in butchery. Learn how to make your
own sausages for all those barbecues next
summer. £120, parsonsnose.co.uk
CELEBRITY CHEF MASTERCLASS,
Cactus Kitchen, London
Michel Roux Jr. hosts regular classes at this
Clapham school and has recently been joined
by Angela Hartnett as well as his chef daughter
Emily. Keep an eye on the website for upcoming
events, they sell out fast. cactuskichens.co.uk
GRILL LIKE A GAUCHO,
Gaucho, London
This guide to grilling really raises the steaks,
covering everything from cleaning cuts of meat
to mouth-watering marinades. Even better,
you’ll have enough leftovers to take home for
your own asado. £150, gauchorestaurants.com
WILD FOOD
MASTERCLASS,
River Cottage, Devon
Go wild with the best of nature’s
bounty with a day cooking and
feasting on foraged ingredients. Learn
how to search for the best ingredients,
and get to grips with everything from
rabbit to squirrel, limpets to
crabs, plus fungi, wild herbs and
fruit. £240, 4 March,
rivercottage.net
goodthingsmagazine.com
GG cookery coursesCHCathy ZP READ.indd 89
89
23/11/2017 17:12
It’s beginning to feel
A LOT LIKE CHRISTMAS
… with our favourite hotels and restaurants bringing out all the bells and whistles
The gift of food
Can’t decide what to get the foodie
in your life? D&D London, which
owns a group of hotels, bars and
restaurants in London, Leeds and
Paris, has the solution with vouchers
for various experiences and events.
How about a seven-course tasting
menu at Angler, the Michelin-starred
restaurant at South Place hotel
(£200), or a Champagne afternoon
tea for two at Chelsea hotspot
Bluebird (£59)?
shop.danddlondon.com
TWIXMAS
Escape post-Christmas but pre- any New Year’s
bash at The Painswick, voted Sunday Times
Ultimate Hotel of the Year. Borrow a pair of the
house wellies and go for a long walk before
tucking into more food courtesy of Jamie
McCallum’s latest menu. From £179 per room.
thepainswick.co.uk. Head further north to the
delightful sister ‘posh pub’, the Lord Crewe Arms
at Blanchland on the Northumberland/Durham
border. Simon Hicks is in the kitchen, and his
sausage on toast with HP and a fried egg is
legendary. lordcrewearmsblanchland.co.uk
90
goodthingsmagazine.com
GG hotels and restaurantsCHCathy ZP READ.indd 90
23/11/2017 17:13
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