close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

2018-02-15 Los Angeles Times part 2

код для вставкиСкачать
S2
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
WHAT’S INSIDE
THE QUOTE
6
A MOTHER KNOWS
6
Laurie Metcalf rides familiar
highs and lows as “Lady Bird’s”
caring mom of a teenager.
HOW THEY COMPARE
Each best picture finalist
this year shares traits with
past winners of the big prize.
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
8
HIS FINEST ‘HOUR’?
14
Rachel Morrison makes some
history as a cinematography
nominee. And she’s not done.
Also
IN A WAR ZONE
12
Documenting the “Last Men in Aleppo.”
— Edgar Ramirez, “Bright”
NOT AS EASY AS FACE SWAP APP
B I G DAT E S
Friday: Make-up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild
final voting closes.
Saturday: American Society of Cinematographers
Awards.
Sunday: BAFTA Awards; Motion Picture Sound
Editors Golden Reel Awards.
Tuesday: Oscars final voting opens; Costume
Designer Guild Awards.
Feb. 24: Cinema Audio Society Awards; Make-up
Artists and Hair Stylists Guild Awards.
Feb. 27: Oscars final voting closes.
March 3: Film Independent Spirit Awards; BAFTA
tea party.
March 4: Academy Awards.
18
So many subtleties in turning humans into “Apes.”
22
THE GOLD STANDARD
24
Features animated, nonfiction or foreign.
Photographs by, from top,
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times;
Richard Foreman Miramax Films;
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times;
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
22
LOS ANGELES TIMES
14
TAKES HER BEST SHOT
THE ENVELOPE
Richard Foreman Miramax Films
S
Gary Oldman remains pensive
even as the acclaim for his
work as Churchill grows.
S3
What film or performance had an
impact on you this past year?
“I got to tell you something. One of
the movies that shocked me the
most and that touched me the most
was ‘It.’ I [don’t] see any nominations for it. I think that horror as a
genre — the same way as comedy
sometimes — that it’s not taken
seriously whereas many of the
movies that have changed our lives,
they have changed them because
they have made us laugh or because
they’ve scared us. ‘It’ is an amazing
movie. It will be remembered. The
performances were incredible. Bill
Skarsgard’s performance is incredible and it’s a movie that scared me
on many, many levels.”
8
THE ENVELOPE
{ This week on latimes.com/envelope }
BUZZMETER
ORIGINAL
SCREENPLAY
S4
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
The Envelope scoured the darkest of theaters to find six of the world’s most highly trained (or maybe that’s opinionated) Oscar pundits, writers and film critics to predict this
year’s Oscars. They’ve tried their hand at the nominations (and pretty much nailed it) but now the pressure is on. With few obvious winners at this stage, who will take the top
prizes in the key categories? Here the Buzzmeter panelists offer up their predictions on who the winners will be. Check back here each week as they weigh in on a new category or
go online for all their picks at once at latimes.com/buzzmeter. Predictions can change, so check back often!
Justin Chang
Los Angeles Times
Kenneth Turan
Los Angeles Times
“The Big Sick”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri”
“The Big Sick”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri”
A very tight three-way race
between “Lady Bird,” “Get Out” and
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri.” My pick could and probably
will change tomorrow.
“Lady Bird’s” many partisans will
have their moment here.
Justin Lubin Universal Pictures
“GET OUT,” starring Daniel Kaluuya and Allison Williams, is a favorite.
Tom O’Neil
Gold Derby
Anne Thompson
Indiewire
Nicole Sperling
Vanity Fair
Glenn Whipp
The Envelope
“The Big Sick”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri”
“The Big Sick”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri”
“The Big Sick”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri”
“The Big Sick”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri”
“Three Billboards” for the
win because it delivers the most
dazzling, innovative, gutsy and creative
script of the year.
“Get Out” and “Lady Bird” will duke it
out for the win. Advantage: Jordan
Peele, whose “Get Out” invented a new
genre, while “Lady Bird’s” coming-ofage story is more conventional.
This might be the most competitive
category of all. But I think it comes
down to “Get Out” and “Lady Bird,”
with Jordan Peele’s horror movie edging out Greta Gerwig’s teen saga.
“Get Out” has to win something ...
though the same could be said for
“Lady Bird.”
S5
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
THE CONTENDERS
‘LADY’ ON AN EMOTIONAL RIDE
By Michael Ordoña
‘What rang
really true
was the
butting of
heads.’
S6
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
T
he easy flow of dialogue and
low-key authenticity of Greta
Gerwig’s “Lady Bird,” and the
writer-director’s background
in improvised indies, led to
speculation about how much of her movie
had been ad-libbed.
Laurie Metcalf, collecting awards-season laurels, including an Oscar nomination,
for her role as the protagonist’s exasperated mother, knows exactly how much:
“Zero. Which is a testament to what she
wrote,” says the three-time Emmy winner
and multiple Tony nominee. “Greta’s writing is so precise, you just hook into the
scene. It’s streamlined. There’s not an
ounce of fat on this movie.
“She would have scenes where we could
overlap because she wanted to shoot it in a
master or something; she wasn’t worried
about [us] stepping on each other’s lines,
like the opening scene in the car. It was
orchestrated, so it was so much fun to do.”
That car scene, with its surprising ending (a spoiler for those who haven’t seen it),
beautifully sets up the wide-ranging
mother-daughter dynamic between Metcalf’s Marion and Saoirse Ronan’s Lady
Bird that is the bedrock of Gerwig’s semiautobiographical comedy-drama.
“I love the [emotional] scope of it,” Metcalf says of that rough ride, “going from crying, to bickering, to lashing out, to the giant
exit.”
That volatile chemistry roils throughout
the film, as when Marion and Lady Bird
look for a dress at a thrift store for a school
event.
“We’ve got some bickering going on, and
it’s mounting and could go haywire, and
then it’s, ‘Oh, we’ve found the perfect dress,
yaaay!’ And everything is immediately forgotten,” Metcalf says.
“Some people say that sort of sums up a
mother-daughter [relationship] because
they can be at each other’s throat and then
it all falls away and it’s like it never
happened.”
Metcalf didn’t have to do much research
to get the relationship’s wild swings.
“I had a teenager in the house and two
out of the house. What rang really true was
— L AURIE M ETCALF,
of her character’s
mother-daughter
relationship in
“Lady Bird”
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
the butting of heads and the strong-willed
nature of those two characters. Coming
from a place of heart but coming so aggressively at each other. I think the father says,
‘You two are so much alike.’
“They’re operating at such a dysfunctional level, and probably have been for a
couple of years; they’re both on hair-trigger
responses of getting their feelings hurt and
lashing out. I understood that part of it,”
she says, laughing. “We’ve lived it.”
Then there was the calm — the love —
between the outbursts.
“Greta included moments of heart
where they do support each other. It wasn’t
always as contentious as this and it won’t
always be. And a little bit of those softer
moments go a long way in the movie. Because she put those in, the battles can be
fierce.”
Lady Bird can be a maddening kid, but
Marion isn’t always Mom of the Year, either.
“I tell you, it really was startling when I
would hear my character say some of these
things, the criticisms,” says Metcalf. “This
was lashing out at a child who is, granted,
making you crazy. But I have many, many
harsh things I say to her, which to me are
truthful; they’re not said just to be mean.
“But hearing them come out of my character’s mouth made me realize I’ve said
harsh things to my own kids … Yes, it’s all
coming from a place of love, from heart. But
when you want something so badly for
someone else, you become aggressive
about it …”
The actress pauses, then admits, “It’s
coming from anger also. Greta just hit the
nail on the head.”
All that complexity and precision could
be summed up in one of the final scenes.
Marion drops Lady Bird off at an airport for
her first-ever extended absence, leaving in
yet another cloud of discontent. Marion
then drives off on an emotional journey —
captured in a continuous shot.
“I knew Greta wanted to do it in one
take, so it was my job to go through the
beats,” Metcalf says, drawing a diagram on
a napkin: Marion’s circular driving route.
“Here’s the drop-off point, and I’ve got to
get all the way around to here. Right
around here, I’m still mad,” she says,
laughing heartily as she makes a hash mark
about a quarter way around the circle. “I’m
still so pissed off at her that I can’t bear it.
“Then right about here [about halfway
around], I see the ‘Return to Airport’ sign,
then I’m sort of having some regrets about
how the past month has been, where they
haven’t really spoken with each other. Then
here comes the decision to go back, and
here comes the hope, the exhilaration of
‘Maybe I can make it, maybe I can make it.’
Then park, and run inside.
“You don’t need a picture of me for the
article; just take a picture of [the diagram]
— ‘The Journey of “Lady Bird,” ’ ” she says,
laughing.
calendar@latimes.com
S7
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
OSCAR ARCHIVE
HEY, THAT’S KIND OF LIKE ...
BY LISA ROSEN >>> The best picture nominations are in, telling tales from history books and from imagination, from the angry to the
hopeful, with coming-of-age scenarios, horror hybrids and dives into World War II. But which has the right formula to take home Oscar
gold? In a way, each of them. Let’s take a look at them in the light of history. Academy award history, that is. Here are this year’s nine
nominees, compared to past Oscar winners similar in nature.
“DARKEST HOUR”
“THE KING’S SPEECH”
Movies about great men in times of crisis are always popular, from the winning “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962) to “Patton”
(1970). But “The King’s Speech” (2010) is a particular match,
not just for the overlapping time frame and characters but
also for the reliance on soaring oration to galvanize a nation.
Laurie Sparham The Weinstein Co.
Focus Features
Movies about great countries in times of war are likewise
perennial awards bait, going all the way back to “All Quiet on
the Western Front” (1929/1930). That film addressed a different
era, but it strove for a realistic and harrowing account of war
— for its time, a radical move — much like Christopher Nolan’s
immersive story.
Melinda Sue Gordon Warner Bros.
S8
AP
“CALL ME BY YOUR NAME”
“OUT OF AFRICA”
Here’s a coming-of-age story that we don’t see every year,
or any year. The only previous Oscar-winning film with an
openly gay love story (we’re looking at you, “Lawrence of Arabia”) is last year’s victor, “Moonlight,” whose hard-fought tale
is about as far from the easy languor of “Call Me’s” Italian
countryside as possible. So we have to strike out a bit, to 1985’s
“Out of Africa,” for an exotic locale, a romance as surprising
and adventurous as the characters involved, and heartbreak
that feels endless and beautiful.
Universal
Sony Pictures Classics
“GET OUT” | TAKE YOUR PICK
Writer-director Jordan Peele’s film defies neat classification, so a mash-up is called for. The last time a horror movie
won was “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991). In our book, Bradley Whitford’s paterfamilias is no less repugnant than Anthony Hopkins’ Hannibal. For the clear-eyed stare-down of
racism in a small town, add 1967’s “In the Heat of the Night.”
The examination of slavery may have been more explicit in “12
Years a Slave” (2013), but “Get Out’s” body-snatching offers a
terrifying metaphor of its lasting toll.
[See Archive, S10]
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
“DUNKIRK”
“ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT”
Justin Lubin Universal Pictures
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
S9
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
[Archive, from S8]
“LADY BIRD”
“TERMS OF ENDEARMENT”
Coming-of-age stories are nothing new to the Academy
Awards. Unless the hero is a heroine, in which case they’re a
bit thinner on the ground. But for a mother-daughter story
with fireworks as potent as the ones between Saoirse Ronan
and Laurie Metcalf, one need tune only into 1983’s “Terms of
Endearment.”
TIFF
Paramount Pictures
“PHANTOM THREAD” | “REBECCA”
This one comes courtesy of “Phantom” writer-director Paul
Thomas Anderson himself. In interviews, he has repeatedly
mentioned finding inspiration in gothic romances such as
1940’s “Rebecca.”
United Artists
Laurie Sparham Focus Features
“THE POST” | “SPOTLIGHT”
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
“All the President’s Men” also dealt with political wrongdoing and attacks on the press from the White House, but it
was only a nominee in 1977, so that won’t do. But 2015’s “Spotlight” won the Oscar for its celebration of the unglamorous
sleuthing that great reportage requires. Both films focus on
institutionalized and hidden abuses of power, and the people
who worked to expose them, despite the fiercest opposition.
“THE SHAPE OF WATER” | “THE LORD OF
THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING”
LOS ANGELES TIMES
This would have been a whole lot easier if “E.T. the ExtraTerrestrial” had won in 1983. “Shape” likewise elides easy categories. When does the monster ever get the girl? When does
the lead ever get to breathe underwater? It’s a stretch, but
2003’s “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” likewise
uses magic, fantasy and some CGI to tell the eternal story of
love and devotion winning over the forces of evil and ignorance. Here too, heroism doesn’t come in a standard package.
Fox Searchlight Pictures
Pierre Vinet New Line Productions
THE ENVELOPE
“THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING,
MISSOURI” | “NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN”
For a bleak story full of rage and humor to burn, and a lead
as tough as leather, there’s “No Country for Old Men” (2007).
Javier Bardem’s sociopathic Anton Chigurh wouldn’t be out of
place in Ebbing.
Merrick Morton Twentieth Century Fox
S10
Kerry Hayes Open Road Films
Niko Tavernise
calendar@latimes.com
Richard Foreman Miramax Films
S11
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
THE DOCUMENTARIES
MAKING ART
DURING WAR
By Janet Kinosian
irector Feras Fayyad’s powerful documentary “Last Men in Aleppo” follows
volunteer members of the White Helmets as they rescued civilians inside
the Syrian war’s Battle of Aleppo from 2015 to early 2017 and is the first
Syrian film to earn an Oscar nomination.
Arrested twice by the Assad regime and tortured for his work, Fayyad
was forced to leave his homeland and flee to Jordan, then to Turkey, and today lives in
Denmark. Before sitting down with The Envelope, Fayyad had just returned from
screening the film at the Davos World Economic Forum.
“This film has helped me to not be just a victim,” Fayyad says. “It put me in the position of being equals [to the regime], to have a voice and have my words understood. Not
just my voice, but the voice of hundreds of thousands of Syrians who lost their lives —
they couldn’t tell their story, but I could. So many souls, many souls …”
S12
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
D
The film’s synopsis says it follows Syria’s
White Helmets. Yet, for me it felt more
about the citizens being bombed and
under siege by their government and
how people react.
Yes, that’s correct. It’s not just about
the White Helmets. It’s talking about the
impact of the Syrian war over the Syrian
citizens and society and how it has
divided and destroyed the country. In
human terms, how do people survive such
a conflict and yet do what they can for
their own society? This is what makes it
shareable with everyone on the Earth
right now. Do we stay and fight or go
somewhere else and start over?
How much actual film footage did you
have prior to editing?
I filmed between 300 and 350 hours,
but I put about 80 hours in front of the
editor; the film was five hours when we
sent it to Sundance. I tried to make it as
chronologically real as I could, so I didn’t
want to change the timeline at all; I’m
aware how important the subject is and
that it’s a historical document. It’s a historical story made before anyone else has
the power to tell us a different story and
remove the reality that happened. It
becomes about who will write the real
history, so in the shooting and also the
editing process I was careful.
The film opens with a zoom shot of a
goldfish eyeball and goldfish also
re-occur throughout the film. How did
that fish allegory come about?
That was from one of the main characters, Khaled, when he bought goldfish to
make a pond for some fun around him, a
space to breathe inside all the death.
When he was killed, I saw how the media
covered refugees and I wanted to show
what [the refugees’] real dreams were
versus what the international community
or media thinks they should be. So I found
the bombed-out home and put the beautiful fish tank inside it.
It’s about resistance. But it’s also
about a collective memory — a more
global view — so inside the eyeball you can
see small stars, and then I pull back out. I
tried to bring the galaxy down into the
one small eyeball and out again.
Chris Pizzello Invision/AP
FERAS FAYYAD wanted “Last Men in Aleppo” to show people affected by
the Syrian war before anyone could “remove the reality that happened.”
I read a line of yours I liked: “Make art
during war.” Normally, people wait until
war ends to create stories to sort
through and heal the trauma. Why is this
“during war” important to you?
That’s a true thing. In Davos, they
called it, “Art in the War Zone.” Normally,
the world says you have to wait to tell your
war stories until the end. I think as an
artist you need an attitude: It’s the middle
of the war; this is our normal — and what
is your role as an artist? Should we close
our eyes and sleep until the end of the war
and then tell you our opinion? Then why
are we here?
As an artist, you have to think [about]
how you can tell the stories and provide
people a big question in the midst of all of
this — you want them to feel so that opens
their minds up to solutions.
You were arrested twice and tortured by
the Assad regime and you said an interrogator told you, “You’ll have double the
amount of torture because you’re a filmmaker.” Having just been nominated for
an Oscar, what feeling does it produce in
you? Revenge or something else?
At that time, I couldn’t answer the
investigator. I had to keep silent, or I
would be killed. I was in front of a very
powerful man who represented authority
— and who told us the people would have
no voices and no one would hear our
screams and our pain or our shouting for
justice.
To me, bringing the movie to this place
says a lot not just to the investigator
trying to torture me, but for a thousand,
hundred voices all over the world that
they have to not give up and not let the
depression, the fear, the sacredness kill
them or keep them silent. Everyone can
have a voice to do something.
calendar@latimes.com
S13
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
HE’S AS MUCH
SID VICIOUS
AS WINSTON
CHURCHILL
S14
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
By Glenn Whipp
or someone who has been winning as much as Gary Oldman has these last few months — a Golden Globe, a SAG
Awards honor, tributes at the Santa Barbara and Palm
Springs film festivals and countless other prizes for his
turn as Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour” — the idea
of loss never seems far from the 59-year-old actor’s mind.
Primarily, this wistfulness arrives when thoughts turn
to the two sons — Gulliver, 20, and Charlie, 18 — whom he raised as a single
parent and who still live with him in Los Feliz but won’t for much longer because as he knows, as all parents know, “you have to let them go.”
Shown a family photo that Charlie posted on his Instagram account from a
party shortly after the Golden Globes, Oldman looks at the image for a couple
of minutes, bathing in the memory. Even after he finishes talking about it, he
only reluctantly breaks his gaze.
“I’d left my phone in the car so I hadn’t had any kind of notification from
them,” he says. “I was sitting at the Focus after-party and felt somebody tap
me on the shoulder and I turned around and it was Charlie and Gulliver
dressed in their finest, just with big smiles on their faces. It meant more to
me than the prize. Do you know what I mean?” Oldman pauses, dabbing his
eyes with a linen napkin.
This kind of pensiveness seems to surround Oldman. A conversation about
music turns to his old friend David Bowie, whom he’d talk to on Skype each
Sunday morning. Oldman misses those conversations and often finds himself
staring at a photograph, wondering what Bowie would make of it. What
would Bowie have to say about Brexit or Donald Trump? What would he
make of Oldman’s portrayal of Churchill?
“It’s funny, the last thing he said to me … ‘Blackstar’ [Bowie’s final album,
released on his birthday two days before he died] was done and he was telling
me that he had all these ideas. He was already on to the next thing,” Oldman
[See Oldman, S16]
says.
F
GARY
OLDMAN ,
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
S15
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
wearing a
Churchill pin
on his lapel,
says, “I’ve got
a big heart.
Sometimes I
have a big
mouth.”
GARY
OLDMAN ,
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
S15
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
wearing a
Churchill pin
on his lapel,
says, “I’ve got
a big heart.
Sometimes I
have a big
mouth.”
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
S16
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
LETTING
GUARD
DOWN
[Oldman, from S14]
“And I had the computer on my lap and
I think he had to go off for some therapy
and we tried to disconnect, and I kept
coming up on the screen, and he pressed
disconnect again and so the last thing he
said to me was, ‘... off!’ He pressed it again.
‘Oh, ... off.’ ” Oldman laughs quietly. “Very
David.”
When Oldman burst on the scene in the
1980s playing punk rocker Sid Vicious in
“Sid & Nancy,” gay British playwright Joe
Orton in Stephen Frears’ “Prick Up Your
Ears” and a soccer hooligan in Alan
Clarke’s BBC television drama “The
Firm,” critics and audiences were taken
aback by performances that were fearless,
frightening, funny and completely dissimilar.
“To be young when Gary’s work was
coming out was heaven,” says Ben Mendelsohn, who plays King George in
“Darkest Hour.” Mendelsohn presented
Oldman awards at the Santa Barbara
International Film Festival and AARP’s
Movies for Grownups event. “To watch
him then was to wonder: ‘How the … does
he do it?”
Oldman moved to America shortly
afterward, having feverish fun as the title
character in Francis Ford Coppola’s “Dracula,” playing Lee Harvey Oswald in Oliver
Stone’s “JFK” and delivering a spectacular, intense performance as Ludwig van
Beethoven in “Immortal Beloved.”
But there was also alcoholism that led
to carelessness with both his life and his
career. Offered both “Waterworld” and
“The Scarlet Letter,” Oldman left the decision to the flip of a coin. (“The Scarlet Letter” won.) “I was not well,” he says.
Oldman met his third wife, Donya
Fiorentino, at an Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting in 1996. Five years later, their marriage ended in a painful, protracted divorce. Recently, Fiorentino’s accusation
that Oldman hit her with a telephone has
resurfaced in stories pegged to the attention he has been receiving for “Darkest
Hour.”
Talking about that time, Oldman em-
‘I turn everything
down. That’s my
process. When you
look at me, do you
see Winston
Churchill?’
— G ARY O LDMAN
Jack English Focus Features
“DARKEST HOUR” stars Kristin Scott Thomas as Clementine Churchill and
Gary Oldman as Winston, newly made prime minister during World War II.
phatically denies her account.
“We had a conclusion,” Oldman says.
“It’s a case of she said and the police and
the district attorney and social services
and evaluators and witnesses and the
judge said something entirely different.”
A Times review of court records confirms Oldman was awarded sole custody of
their sons, Gulliver and Charlie, with
Fiorentino allowed once-a-week visits in a
public location supervised by court-ordered monitors.
“Does the judge award children to a
wife beater?” Oldman asks. “There’s no
history of that. I’ve been married five
times. And I am not proud of it. Maybe I’m
a romantic or an optimist or just ‘never say
never,’ but there’s nothing like that in my
history.”
Oldman also came under fire for a 2014
Playboy magazine interview in which,
while sharing his views on political correctness, he came off as defending anti-Semitic remarks Mel Gibson made during a
2006 drunk driving arrest. “We’ve all said
those things. We’re all … hypocrites,” Oldman said then.
“I believe I’m a good man,” Oldman
says now. “I’ve got a big heart. Sometimes
I have a big mouth. But I’ve tried to make
my apologies and, as they say, make my
amends. Hell, we’re talking about change
all the time. We can learn. We can change.”
Oldman went on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”
immediately after the 2014 interview to
apologize. He told Kimmel: “Words have
meaning and they carry weight. And they
carry on long after you’ve said them.”
Years later, he understands those sentiments more than ever, as he is still being
asked about his remarks.
“It was a bad day,” Oldman says of the
Playboy interview. “I guess I was trying to
illustrate the absurd by being absurd.
What I was really talking about was the
double standard of things and the hypocrisy. And I was indelicate in the way I said it.
That I know. But I’m not a malicious person.”
Oldman doesn’t dwell on his missteps
and, judging from the standing ovations
he has received at events these past few
months, most other people don’t either.
“He’s gone through a lot in his life and
learned from it. It’s a lovely story,” says
filmmaker Rod Lurie, who directed Oldman in the 2000 movie “The Contender.”
Lurie says he and Oldman still communicate regularly, hoping to collaborate again.
“There’s not one director who has worked
with Gary who doesn’t crave to work with
him again.”
That may work out for Oldman, who,
now that his sons are older, is ready to
work more often. Probably. “I turn everything down,” he jokes. “That’s my process.” And, in fact, he initially turned down
the chance to play Churchill, considering
the offer ridiculous on its face. “When you
look at me, do you see Winston Churchill?”
he asks, raising his eyebrows.
Oldman’s towering, transformative
turn in “Darkest Hour” is miles apart from
his other Oscar-nominated performance,
delicately playing George Smiley, the impassive, inscrutable British secret service
agent in 2011’s “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.”
Oldman’s most memorable characters
are not men characterized by their restraint.
“I suppose [Commissioner] Gordon,”
Oldman muses, referring to his turn in
Christopher Nolan’s “Dark Knight” trilogy.
“That first one, I made 26 round-trip
flights between London and Los Angeles
so I could be home with my boys. People
called Gordon ‘world-weary.’ It was really
just jet lag.”
Finishing breakfast the day after the
SAG Awards, Oldman notes he’s about to
make that exact same trip, making a quick
jaunt to London to do a couple interviews
and meet his second grandchild. (He has a
son, Alfie, with his first wife, Oscar-nominated actress Lesley Manville. He also has
a 9-year-old stepson with his fifth wife, art
curator Gisele Schmidt.)
“This has all taken some getting used
to,” Oldman says, reflecting on the conveyor belt he has been on the last few months.
“I’m quite a private person. I’ve never been
any good with crowds. It’s all very nice. No
complaints. But there’s an energy of people coming at you that you absorb. It’s
quite frenetic. The night of the Golden
Globes, I must have taken 300 selfies and
it felt like I had met 1,000 people. And
they’re all lovely and gracious and wellmeaning.”
He turns quiet, staring into the distance. “Well, it’s shocking really, when you
think about it, that that many people
wanted to meet me in the first place. One
should never take for granted the sound of
applause.”
glenn.whipp@latimes.com
Twitter: @glennwhipp
S17
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE
S18
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
CAESAR (Andy Serkis, with
help from Weta Digital) is more
expressive in the latest “Apes.”
Twentieth Century Fox
THE CRAFT
UP CLOSE WITH THE ‘APES’
By Michael Ordoña
‘W
ar for the Planet of the Apes” has its epic moments — apes riding horses on the beach, a battle at a snowy
mountain fortress — but they’re not the film’s most amazing accomplishments. Those come nearer to the
movie’s heart. ¶ “This is all about close-ups,” says senior visual effects supervisor Joe Letteri, a four-time
Oscar winner who’s nominated again along with visual effects supervisor Dan Lemmon for “War.” Letteri
says director Matt Reeves “told the story in really long, lingering close-ups. That subtlety of performance,
where the camera doesn’t blink and everything is on screen; those are, to me, the moments a character
lives or dies by.” ¶ And that is a big deal. These are performance-captured, computer-generated, talking
apes the audience must believe exist. The viewer has to believe they think and feel. The final installment of Reeves’ “Planet of the Apes”
trilogy has far more ape dialogue and emotion than the others: Protagonist chimpanzee Caesar (Andy Serkis) has evolved over three films
into a more expressive being, formed by tragedy and love, leading a new society. ¶ “You have to be right there with that character,” says
Letteri. “You have to look into Caesar’s eyes and know what he’s going through.” ¶ Over the seven years of the trilogy and 15 years of the
cinema-changing work that Letteri, Lemmon (an Oscar winner for “The Jungle Book”) and the rest of New Zealand effects house Weta
[See ‘Apes,’ S20]
Digital did on the “Lord of the Rings” films, “King Kong” and “Avatar,” they relentlessly pushed forward. ¶ Lemmon
S19
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
S20
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
TRULY
GREAT
APES
[‘Apes,’ from S18]
says, “One of the things that’s great about
our job is these kind of nerdy, technical
problems; when you get them right, they
turn into pictures that are much more realistic and compelling than they ever were
before. So you get to solve this interesting
technical puzzle, but you also solve a creative, artistic problem … [it] enables people to tell stories that wouldn’t have been
available even 10 years ago.”
“War” couldn’t have been credibly executed without advances they’ve made recently, says Letteri: “If the first film had
been all about ape dialogue, it probably
would have ended up looking like a guy in a
monkey suit.”
They cite the growing skill of the artists
on their team, mixed with technical innovations that have allowed filmmakers to,
say, shoot performance-capture sequences live with other actors and to take
those scenes outside — out of sound
stages and into real-world environments,
such as those snowy mountains.
But it gets nerdier than that.
Letteri and Lemmon say the Wetadeveloped tool PhysLight fixes the problem of characters and objects moving
through varied lighting environments and
their light and color not behaving realistically.
Lemmon says, “Now, on set, we can
record all the real-world light data in a
scene and measure its spectral wavelengths coming to a given point in an environment. So now our computer-generated
apes have the same light” as in the real
world.
Working with Serkis since 2002’s “The
Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers” has
helped them learn subtleties and tricks
they could apply to other actors’ work.
Letteri laughs and says, “We’ve spent a
lot of time looking at Andy’s face. His is
probably the most studied face on the
planet. We’ve really learned to tease out
what these details and nuances are.
“So when you get a character like Bad
Ape, Steve Zahn, throwing something new
at us — all that dialogue — we had a good
Twentieth Century Fox
ACTORS in performance-capture suits, left, are transformed by Weta Digital into apes that humans can root for.
Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
foundation to build on, we knew how to get
there.”
Serkis has expressed particular awe at
Weta advances in depicting eyes — the material, the fluid, reflections of light in them.
“We’re up close on all of these characters in long, extended performance
pieces,” says Lemmon. “All of that stuff
happening in the face, in the eyes, the audience has to totally engage with.
“We’d put Andy side-by-side with Caesar [on monitors]. Andy, I’d see he was angry, but also a little sad. Caesar, I’d see the
anger, but wasn’t reading the sadness yet.
So what is it about Andy’s face that we’re
not getting? It could be that Andy has
these particular folds that chimpanzees
just don’t have. He has this skin fold above
his upper lid that we adapted into the design of Caesar.”
Letteri says the solutions “vary from
case to case. For instance, chimps don’t
really have eyebrows, which are very important to expressiveness. So we built
these extra fat pads in, around where the
eyebrows should be. If we really need to
emphasize them, sometimes we’d tease in
a little extra light to emphasize the line. So
visually, you think you’re seeing eyebrows
and expressions, but it’s all done with
lighting.”
Lemmon says, “One of the things the
critics touched on was that you end up
more engaged with the apes and their
struggle, and rooting for them to overcome
the last vestiges of the human race. So if
you can get human audiences rooting for
their own demise, hopefully that’s a sign
you’ve done something right.”
VISUAL EFFECTS supervisors Dan Lemmon, left, and Joe Letteri faced the
challenge of director Matt Reeves filming extended close-ups of the apes.
calendar@latimes.com
S21
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE latimes.com/envelope
THE CINEMATOGRAPHERS
HOW IT
FEELS
TO BE
FIRST
By Gregory Ellwood
THROU
achel Morrison made history
as the first woman to be nominated for a cinematography
Oscar for her work on Dee
Rees’ “Mudbound.” Unlike
other nominees she didn’t find out about it
while groggily watching the announcement in bed or getting a multitude of
phone calls.
Instead, at 5:30 a.m. Morrison was at
the airport for an early flight to Utah
where she would be joining acting nominee
Octavia Spencer as a member of the U.S.
dramatic jury at the 2018 Sundance Film
Festival.
“I had no idea when they were gonna
make the announcement, so I was totally
caught by surprise,” Morrison says. “And I
had a sleeping 2 1/2-year-old on my shoulder. So I was silently freaking out dancing
around and probably looked like a crazy
person.”
An independent cinema veteran with
notable Sundance releases such as
“Dope,” “Fruitvale Station” and “Sound of
My Voice” on her resume, Morrison admits
that while she was honored by the Oscar
nomination, earning recognition from the
American Society of Cinematographers
earlier this year actually meant more to
her.
“Those are my peers and my heroes,
and so, first of all, when that kicked in, holy
crap, this is all kind of real,” Morrison says.
“This whole experience has been a lifelong
dream of mine, but when that happened? I
even said if the Oscars didn’t come to pass,
the ASC was the one that really was an incredible validation to me.”
When Morrison attended New York
University as an undergraduate, there was
only one other woman in her cinematography class, Emmy winner Reed Morano.
S22
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
R
RACHEL
Morrison
shot both
“Mudbound”
and “Black
Panther.”
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
And at the time there weren’t that many
women to look up to in the industry, so she
clearly understands the importance of the
recognition she’s received this year.
“I remember it was Ellen Kuras, Nancy
Schreiber, Lisa Rinzler and Tami Reiker
was kind of a known name at the time,”
Morrison says. “For 15 years, there were no
new names. That was really kind of incomprehensible. When people ask me why
there are so few female DPs, it makes no
sense to me. Everything about what we do
actually speaks to women’s strengths like
empathy and visualizing emotion.”
Comparing the number of women in
still photography, which she believes is
closer to a 50/50 gender split, Morrison believes the door should be open for more
women to excel at the art of cinematography. And for those who are told it’s
too hard to break down industry archetypes she has some advice: Don’t listen to
them.
“In terms of hearing people saying it’s a
boys’ club, you almost have to tune that
out. I think if you start to internalize any of
that or believe any of that, then you’re sort
of setting up your own stumbling blocks
and your own hurdles,” Morrison says. “If
anything, I think Reed and I, we always
looked at it as an advantage and not a deficit. We get to stand out in a room. We’re
memorable. You have to keep reminding
yourself of all the positive things.”
That being said, there have been justifiable frustrations. Just as female filmmakers have seen their male counterparts get
more opportunities at a studio level, the
same can be said for Morrison and other
female DPs. She notes, “I’ll never know
what happens behind closed doors, but it
took me 12 indies, eight of which were at
Sundance, and all of these things to get a
studio film and I watched my male
counterparts have one successful film at
Sundance and start shooting $30-million
movies.”
After successful collaborations with
Ryan Coogler and Rick Famuyiwa, Morrison came to the attention of Rees, who was
putting her crew together for “Mudbound,” a period drama that would eventually be shot in the steamy South.
“She saw something in my work that
she thought was right for this moment,
and for me I was impressed with her ability
to take that short, ‘Pariah,’ and make a
feature of it,” Morrison says. “And a script
that I thought was incredibly moving and
incredibly relevant. All about gender and
racial inequality, which is exactly what
we’re going through now.”
At the moment Morrison isn’t just celebrating her Oscar nomination but also the
critical raves she’s earning for her work
with “Fruitvale’s” Ryan Coogler on Marvel
Studios’ new release, “Black Panther.”
She knows that “Mudbound” set a
pretty high bar for her as an opportunity
to shoot a film with a message in a period
setting. She’d love to do another period
film or sci-fi, “something that gets the creative juices flowing but is also a good story.
“I think it’s gonna be hard to go back to
daytime contemporary interiors after
that,” Morrison says with a smile. “The
script would have to be absolutely amazing to make me wanna go shoot in a New
York apartment [again].”
calendar@latimes.com
S23
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
THE GOLD STANDARD | GLENN WHIPP
PRIMED FOR OSCAR GLORY
‘C
oco” will return Pixar to prominence. The Oscar for foreign-language feature might go to a movie starring a transgender actress.
And Agnès Varda could have a second Oscar to go along with the honorary award she won in November. ¶ Here’s a look at the
Oscar races for animated feature, foreign-language feature and documentary feature.
ANIMATED FEATURE
“The Boss Baby”
“The Breadwinner”
“Coco”
“Ferdinand”
“Loving Vincent”
S24
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
The winner: “Coco”
Analysis: There are a handful of locks at
this year’s Oscars, but “Coco” winning
this category is the surest of sure things.
You can bet your (after)life on it. (Sorry.)
Pixar’s poignant tale explores death as
a way of affirming the importance of remembering the past. Yes, the storytelling
was a tad predictable, but its eye-popping
animation and the heart-melting song
“Remember Me” make it one of the studio’s better recent efforts. It’s not quite
“Inside Out,” but it helped put the unnecessary sequels “Cars 3” and “Finding
Dory” in the rear view mirror.
Even Academy of Motion Picture Arts
and Sciences members who haven’t
watched “Coco” know “Remember Me,”
written by Robert Lopez and Kristen
Anderson-Lopez, the team behind
“Frozen.” The song is already popping up
during in memoriam tributes, including
last month’s Producers Guild Awards.
That original song Oscar is in the bag
too.
The inclusion of “The Boss Baby” and
“Ferdinand” among the nominees raised a
few eyebrows. Neither film found fans
among critics (“Boss Baby” has a 50 score
on Metacritic; Ferdinand sports a 58),
leading some to wonder if the academy’s
new voting rules helped big-budget studio
movies.
The jury remains out on that question.
Previously, animators dominated the
voting. This year, the academy told members that anyone interested could vote.
But to do so, members had to demonstrate accountability, seeing a majority of
the 26 eligible movies and indicating when
and how they viewed each film. I’d imagine the time-consuming requirements
limited the number of newcomers to vot-
Disney Pixar
“COCO” could celebrate early as the shoo-in for animated feature, and “Remember Me” is the favorite for original song.
ers with a passion for animation. Or silly
movies in which Alec Baldwin voices an
authoritative infant. Or some combination of both.
It’s not like “The Boss Baby” and “Ferdinand” crowded out a widely acclaimed
movie. GKids’ “The Breadwinner,” the
story of a brave Afghan girl standing up to
the Taliban, scored a nomination after
earning great reviews. Another GKids
movie, “Mary and the Witch’s Flower,”
could be considered the category’s biggest
snub. But given its legacy — it’s the offering from Studio Ponoc, the animation
studio seen as the heir to the beloved
Studio Ghibli — “Mary” failed to live up to
expectations.
[See Gold Standard, S26]
S25
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
[Gold Standard, from S24]
FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FEATURE
“A Fantastic Woman”
“The Insult”
“Loveless”
“On Body and Soul”
“The Square”
The winner: “A Fantastic Woman”
S26
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
Analysis: “The Square,” Ruben
Östlund’s unsparing art world satire, is
the biggest commercial success of the
nominees and boasts a truly unforgettable scene in which a man, pretending to
be an ape, causes mayhem during a
museum gala dinner. Actually, it’s one of
a handful of memorable moments —
Elisabeth Moss and Claes Band engaging
in a tug-of-war over a condom comes in a
close second — in an overlong, sometimes shapeless movie that often lapses
into heavy-handed social commentary.
But again, its highs are spectacular.
So “The Square” could well win the
Oscar. But I think the academy will fall
behind “A Fantastic Woman” on the merit
of the film, which has returned to theaters
in a limited release after an Oscar-qualifying run in November, and the memorable
lead turn from its star, transgender actress Daniela Vega. Chilean filmmaker
Sebastián Lelio’s movie is a story of
strength and perseverance, qualities Vega
embodies with a steely grace that lingers
long after the film has ended.
Cohen Media Group
JR AND Agnès Varda form an unlikely creative alliance in “Faces Places.” If
the film takes the prize, Varda will be the oldest ever Academy Award winner.
DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
“Abacus: Small Enough to Jail”
“Faces Places”
“Icarus”
“Last Men in Aleppo”
“Strong Island”
The winner: “Faces Places”
Analysis: Picking up an honorary Oscar
at the Governors Awards in November,
89-year-old French filmmaker Agnès
Varda danced on stage with presenter
Angelina Jolie and delighted the assembled academy members each time the
camera caught her expressive reactions
and duo-tone pageboy haircut. Oh, and
by the way, Varda made the year’s bestreviewed documentary, the beguiling and
tender “Faces Places,” which won top
awards from the Los Angeles and New
York film critics as well as the National
Society of Film Critics.
Varda’s primary competition is probably the Netflix doping documentary
“Icarus,” a movie that began as a “Super
Size Me”-style lark and ended up telling
the story of state-sanctioned steroid use
by Russian Olympians. Of the five nominees — and this is a pretty strong slate —
“Icarus” generated the biggest headlines,
but in terms of craft, it’s a little sloppy. A
better Netflix alternative would be
“Strong Island,” Yance Ford’s powerful
examination of his brother’s 1992 murder.
The film manages to be both an intensely
personal meditation on grief and a probing look at a system in which racial injustice continues unabated.
glenn.whipp@latimes.com; Twitter: @glennwhipp
Michelle Bossy
TRANSGENDER ACTRESS Daniela Vega portrays a woman facing con-
tempt and discrimination after her boyfriend dies in “A Fantastic Woman.”
S27
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
S28
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 15 , 2 018
LOS ANGELES TIMES
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018
PS1
PS2
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018
LOS ANGELES TIMES
LOS ANGELES TIMES
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018
PS3
PS4
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
1
Размер файла
41 818 Кб
Теги
Los Angeles Times, newspaper
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа