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The Searcher - January 2018

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THE SEARCHER
NO 389 JANUARY 2018 �99
Exclusive:
Woden?s
wonderful
wisdom
Field techniques:
Increase your
finds rate
Field Test:
Garrett AT MAX
JANUARY 2018 ISSUE 389
Product Test: Minelab
PRO-FIND 15 & 35
The Martock Hoard
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Cleaning
pencil set
y Christma
sa
er r
M
n
appy New
searchlight
Ye
!
ar
d
aH
ON THE COVER
14
iscriminate iron? Not me!
D
Caroline Fathers
Front Cover Photo: Woden Head mount ?
Copyright and courtesy Mark Becher ?
Metal Detectives
32
44
66
FEATURES
VOLUME 33 No. 5 ISSUE No. 389
Dedicated to: Karolyn Hatt founding Publisher and Editor
Publisher, Editor, Design and Layout: Harry Bain
Numismatic Consultant: Peter D Spencer BA (Hons)
Typesetting, Production and Repro: Jim Judd,
Tradeset Ltd
Printed and Distributed by: Warners Group plc,
For Editorial and Advertising: Harry Bain
Call: 01483 830133
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41
Assistant Editor: John Winter
Call: 01296 580244
Email: john@thesearcher.co.uk
46
Field Reporter: Daniel Spencer
Email: daniel@thesearcher.co.uk
50
54
Videographer/Reporter: Sid Perry
Email: sid@thesearcher.co.uk
For Identification and Valuation Desk
Email: coinidman@yahoo.co.uk
Write to: Searcher Publications Ltd, PO Box 197,
Leeds, LS18 5WQ
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For Queries on Availability & Distribution
Call Nikki Munton on: 01778 391171
E-mail: nikkim@warnersgroup.co.uk
February issue on sale: 29 December
Get in touch with us at
thesearcher.co.uk
20
24
31
34
38
he Martock Hoard
T
John Philpotts
ead?s Miscellany
R
Brian Read
REGULARS
ield test: Garrett AT MAX
F
Desi Dunne
xplosive situation
E
David and Kat Lovey
08
12
ibulae Fest
F
Steve Taylor
Widescan
News and views from in and
around the hobby
Mailbox
Email: info@thesearcher.co.uk
with your letters
61
ubscription, gift card
S
and Searcher merchandise
information
How you can subscribe
to this magazine
roduct Test: Minelab
P
PRO-FIND 15 & 35
Gordon Heritage
etecting depression
D
William Dean talks to
John燱inter
70
ally Round-up
R
Daniel Spencer,
Malcolm Andrews
78
our holes in my button
F
John Winter
e-Searcher: A Late
R
Anglo-Saxon cosmetic knife
Bob Green
85
95
96
ne club: three hoards
O
Peter D. Spencer
ield techniques: It?s not
F
rocket Science ? teach
yourself some field craft
Derek McLennan
twitter.com/thesearchermag
52
Identification and
Valuation Desk Your monthly
guide for the detectorist,
numismatist and archaeologist
lub Activities Your club news
C
and images of finds. Email:
info@thesearcher.co.uk
igital subscription information
D
How you can
subscribe to this magazine
digitally
Saleroom Scene Recent
coin auction results
lassified Advertising
C
Including items For Sale,Wanted,
Exchange, Miscellaneous and the
Classified Advert Order Form
facebook.com/pages/The-Searcher-magazine/
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 7
widescan
2 18
Christmas cheer and a Happy New Year
Harry Bain
Editor/Publisher
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H
ello and welcome to your bumper January issue ?
May I start by wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy and Healthy
2018! May you tick off many of those finds on your ?Wish List? that have
eluded you. Please let us know when you do find something special!
On the cover is a Woden Head mount found by Caroline Fathers. A fascinating find
in many ways but most of all because it?s heavily gilded on one side and iron on the
other. It?s also got two garnets as eyes, which is all the more intriguing. We all
discriminate against iron, but this is one great reason not too!
Steve Taylor shares his finds from a potential temple site in ?Fibulae Fest? as
he?s discovered literally hundreds of fibulae and other Roman finds in one small area.
John Philpott?s describes the benefits of cleaning and conserving the coins in
disclaimed hoards such as the Martock Hoard.
Desi Dunne field-tests the Garrett AT MAX and Garrett has kindly given us a new
one to award in a competition. Gordon Heritage tests the new Minelab PRO-FIND
15 and 35, whilst, for vital field technique advice, Derek McLennan has shared some
?field craft? that could help increase your finds? rate.
CHRISTMAS GIFT CARD OFFER!
Buy a Subscription before December 14 and receive a Gift Card to present on the
day and a FREE binder worth �.00! See the information on page 61.
And if you?re looking for inspiration as a stocking filler you can also buy a Searcher
finds? pouch, spade bag, baseball cap, hoodie, polo shirt, water bottle for cleaning
finds and a rucksack! See them on page 61.
Harry Bain, Editor
Gift Subscriptions/
Folders/Current
and back issues:
Call 01778 392036
or see online.
Digital subscriptions:
thesearcher.co.uk
Next issue
on sale
29 DEC
DIG NEWS
CHARITY DIG GROUP
FIND TREASURE!
On a dig organised by a Facebook group, which raises thousands for
charity, Chris Bennett from Redcar in Cleveland found his first piece
of treasure after three years in the hobby ? a 13th century gold
and emerald finger ring.
Chris said: ?I found it after a long old walk without many signals with
my Deus on Ultimate program. I started to question my sanity for loving
our hobby and offered a gift of choice words to the detecting gods for
not ?playing nicely?. But, only seconds afterwards, my machine sparked
into life and this little beauty popped up from the fluffy soil. I must have
sat there grinning for 10 minutes wondering who the last person
to hold it was.
Thank you Chris for sharing your gorgeous first treasure find!
8 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
FINDS NEWS
A GOOD PARTNERSHIP
Malcolm Williams of South Wales is a
successful detectorist who has little time
for writing but his partner, Kat Freeman,
keeps us informed of his successes. They
complement each other!
There are stories of WWI bombs and
shells found on Brean Beach in Somerset
(when they had to call out the Bomb
Disposal Unit), unearthing a Bronze Age
dagger and the finding of a gold stater.
These stories must wait until another
time, but there is space to briefly
mention Malcolm?s finding of a rather
special brooch, which he called ?gorgeous?!
Kat tells me that on a recent dig to
which Malcolm had invited his friend
Ian, he had a remarkable result.
It was only ten minutes after arriving
at the permission and starting to search,
he had found a musket ball and a button
with his Deus and 11? coil.
Then there was a ?booming? signal!
Malcolm pulled out what he thought
was another button, but was surprised
to see that it was a super Anglo Saxon
brooch. He screamed like Tarzan and
shouted for Ian to come and have a look.
?Happy days?, chuckled Malcolm.
?That?s made my year!?
HOBBY NEWS
I WILL BE YOUR TREASURE NOW
AND FOREVER!
Emma Hurrell is the owner of the ?Best
Gift Shop in Berkshire? and that?s official.
The Handmade Craft Company, based
within the Holme Grange Craft village in
Wokingham won the Muddy Stiletto award
in 2017. One customer has described the
shop as, ?A fantastic array of quirkiness?.
And, so is Emma ? who has been
crafting as long as she can remember.
She describes her husband as ?very
supportive? and ?patient?. In 2017 it was
their 25th wedding anniversary and
Emma had a crafty plan!
Martin is an avid detectorist who has
bought most of his detecting gear from
Pete Turrell of LP Metal Detecting.
Emma sent him a rather odd request.
She explained that they were about to
renew their marriage vows and Martin
had bought her an eternity ring. What
HE really, really wanted was not a ring,
but a Remote for his Deus. Her problem
was not knowing exactly what he wanted
and she was seeking help and advice.
Pete of LP knew exactly what was
required and made the necessary
arrangements.
The following was the scenario she
had envisaged. At the point during the
renewal of vows when they are asked to
exchange rings, she would reveal the
Remote instead, ?Mad I know,? she
gushed, ?but I think it?ll be funny and
he?d be overjoyed! The guests will also
be a little stunned! Oh, and if he should
contact you, please deter him from
making a purchase!?
We can report that the day was
a success and Martin was surprised (and
delighted) with the unusual gift. Right
up to the last moment he thought he was
going to get a ring! His picture says it all!
Full marks to Leisure Promotions for
going along with the ?craftiness? and
playing a major part in making the day
a爏uccess.
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 9
Twenty years on
John Winter looks back
A Special Hoard
I suppose all hoards are
special ? especially to the
finders! John Castle, then with
Joan Allen Electrons Ltd.
comments, ?? but when the
British Museum advises that
you have found the largest
Saxon hoard from one part of
the Saxon era this century,
special is the right word!?
As well as showing the Kent
Hoard of Saxon coins found
by Phil Collins (no, not that
one) and Bert Douch on the
front cover, the yellow flash at
included the Elizabeth I
the bottom left-hand side
announces FREE WITH THIS shilling among others sent
back to a correspondent. He
ISSUE ? THE SEARCHER
ends by saying if that was the
INDEX from 1987-1997. I
case perhaps the finder will
have that index, and it has
return the coin before the
been very useful. What a
?enforcer? moves in! OY
pity it was discontinued
cracks me up every
and has never
JANUARY
time.
appeared again and
1998
OY also has a page
what a useful resource
of Searcher Research
it would be now! The
devoted to Pierced Ancient
magazine for the New
Coins that is well worth a read.
Year is still a black and white
production with only the
cover in colour.
Detecting: Comments
Thick person of the
month award
The honour of winning the
first of this mark of ignominy
has to go to Old Yellowbelly
for stupidity beyond the call
of duty (sic). He writes that he
managed to lose a fine coin
entrusted to him by one of his
friends, and somehow
managed this in a small room.
He reminded readers that the
search was still going on, but
it wasn?t beyond the bounds of
possibility that he had
FINDS UPDATE
from a newcomer
This month sees the debut (I
believe) of that well-known
and respected Searcher scribe,
Peter D. Spencer. The
opening paragraphs I include
verbatim. The whole article is
still as interesting and apt as it
was 20 years ago.
?This article is written by a
newcomer to detecting. To
some extent it is written from
the outside looking in rather
than, as in most cases, by
detectorists from the inside
looking out. I make a few
observations and express few
opinions. Some you may have
heard before but I hope at
least to provide some food for
thought.
Up to short while ago I was
one of those people who had
heard of detectorists/treasure
hunters/searchers but knew
little about them. I was,
however, a recipient of a kind
of received wisdom or
knowledge (or rumour?),
which seems to be prevalent
amongst wide society. To be
more succinct: I thought
detectorists were a bit dodgy.
To be sure, if anyone had
asked me to explain why I
would have been unable to,
but I have since found that
many other people are stuck
in the same mode of thought
as. For me, however, that was
soon to change.?
He ends by saying, ?What
change is now required is not
in detectorists but in the
prejudicial attitudes of many
professionals.?
FINDS NEWS
MORE FROM GOLDEN GIRL VISTA GOLD FINDS
GOLD AGAIN!
Mr. Grumpy
Our cover girl on the September 2016 edition was ?detectorista?
Nettie Edmondson, who had found gold each year for ten years
swinging the coil. In the November 2016 magazine we reported
that she had found another posey ring.
Nettie had promised us that when she found gold again,
The Searcher would be the first to be informed.
We waited patiently and were beginning to give up hope ?
and then we got a call in October 2017 saying that she had
found her seventh Celtic gold stater, appropriately named
Mr. Grumpy after the design on the obverse of the Trinovantes
? Dubnovellaunus example she had unearthed.
We wanted to check some detail with Nettie and, through
the marvels of modern technology, made contact with her
on the middle of a field, searching for more gold no doubt!
10 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
I?ve been on this new permission only a few times now and
already some nice items have already surfaced. However, I really
wasn?t expecting this lovely George III 1762 quarter guinea love
token to show itself so quickly!
It came up on arable land in Hertfordshire around 5? down
and was using my trusty DeepTech Vista Gold which gave
a lovely crisp signal. I couldn?t believe my luck and made for
a happy day?s detecting indeed. Aaron Cooper
READERS FINDS
READERS FINDS
BEGINNER FINDS BRONZE AGE HOARD MY FIRST
detectorists headed to the finds spot to
Occasionally we hear stories of beginners
GOLD燙OIN
look around for evidence of more axe
luck or walking back to the car chance
finds and this report is one such story!
Gary Burnett from Dorset had been
detecting for a meagre three months
when he stumbled across a ?bunch? of
large metal objects in a 60 acre ploughed
field near Salisbury, Wiltshire.
Gary pulled the six objects from the
ground, put them in his pocket and
casually took them back to the parking
area to event D.I.G organiser Steve
Henstridge. Gary asked him to ?take a
look at these old drill pieces?. Following
a brief pause, Steve looked up at Gary
and explained exactly what he had
found!
Gary had uncovered from a single
hole six Bronze Age palstave axe heads
in fantastic condition. Immediately the
local Find Liaison Officer Richard Henry
was contacted and on his advice the eight
heads.
Within the hour three additional axe
heads had been discovered, which were
likely to have been pulled away from the
main hoard by the plough. The original
heads had been deposited in the chalk
layer just under the plough soil and had
remained there until Gary and his almost
new Garrett 300i and NEL Tornado coil
located them.
Richard and team along with Steve
Henstridge revisited the field a few days
later to uncover the original hole and see
what could be learnt from this Bronze
Age deposit. Richard has dated the axe
heads to 4200 BC ? 4700 BC and
confirmed they are now with the museum
and undergoing preservation and
recording.
Congratulations Gary! Daniel Spencer
In October I took my friend Chris along
to a dig organised by LP Metal Detecting.
It was his first and he was looking
forward to it very much. I had explained
how exciting detecting could be, not
knowing what finds to expect, but I did
explain that most of the time you dig up
items such as ring pulls, foil paper, gun
cartridges, and assorted dross. What
happened that day is a moment that will
stay in my memory forever!
At the event I set my Deus up first with:
Setting: 2 - GM Power, Disc: 6.8, Sens:
90, Freq: 17.7, Iron Vol: 3 and Reactivity:
2. Then I showed Chris how to use my
wife?s Deus. His first signal was the first
of many bits of crap. The ground was
very difficult, lots of flint and hard to dig.
We weren?t getting many signals and
when we did it only turned out to be junk
but, not to be deterred, we plodded
on regardless.
When having our snack we talked
to Mick Turrell of LP and he advised
trying a smaller field. We decided to give
it a go. The first couple of finds were
a new two-pence piece and several shot
gun cartridges, I had just mentioned
to Chris that we should call it a day when
I had strong signal so began digging, fully
expecting anther gun cartridge.
I was carefully sifting through the
earth when I spied what looked like the
glitter of gold. At first I thought it was
coloured paper foil, but no. What slowly
appeared in my hand was definitely my
first gold coin, albeit bent! I didn?t do the
traditional gold dance, but called out and
ran over to see Chris. I just couldn?t
believe it, I have heard other people
mention the magic of discovering your
first gold coin and totally agree.
I didn?t have a clue what coin it was,
did a little research myself it was
confirmed by Harry at The Searcher that
it was an Edward III quarter noble.
Philip Hailstone
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 11
mail box
Email: info@thesearcher.co.uk with your letters. Only genuine names and
addresses accepted for publication.
Dear Editor
Competition prize
Just received the scuba tector competition
prize and would like to thank Searcher
magazine and Detectorbits for their
generosity. In the same post, I also
received an income tax rebate and since
good things happen in threes I am on my
way to buy a lottery ticket.
Alex McGrow
Dear Editor
For Services rendered
Just a quick note to thank Andy (Muddy
Hands) for his info on the ?for services
rendered? war badge (see Oct issue) and
to John Winter on passing on the above
information via the Letters Page.
The badge has been passed on to the
much interested farmer, on whose land
it was found for future research.
D.C. Allen Gloucester
Dear Editor
Pierced coins
I have followed with interest the recent
correspondence on the status and
meaning of pierced coinage and its
interpretation under the current Treasure
Act. The most recent letter on the subject
was from Dave Bryden who had found
a long cross penny with four piercings.
I can however, go a bit better than that.
Somewhat ironically, given the recent
discussions I have managed to recover an
Elizabeth I sixpence with no less than
seven piercings. The coin concerned is
dated 1582 and was found on a large
Buckinghamshire field fairly rich in
material from the late Tudor period.
Exposure on Facebook resulted in
various suggestions as to why the coin
had received this somewhat drastic
treatment. The majority view was that the
coin had been converted into a button
but I find this very difficult to believe.
Firstly an Elizabeth sixpence is quite a
large coin and buttons from this period
tended to be a great deal smaller. Leaving
aside the logistic dangers of defacing
regal coinage a sixpence in Tudor times
was a reasonable sum of money and
someone would have had to be fairly
wealthy to produced a set of buttons on
this basis.
The best suggestions I have heard so
far are that the coin was defaced by a
disaffected Catholic and this I believe is
the most likely reason. The coin shows a
little wear and had clearly not been in
circulation for a long time. In 1587 Mary
Queen of Scots was executed under the
orders of Elizabeth I and this was sure to
have provoked a furious reaction from
her Catholic followers in England and
Scotland. Could it be that this coin was
pierced and displayed with discretion to
show the owners disapproval of this act?
As soon as I have had a chance to
show it to the landowner it will be handed
over to the FLO and will presumably be
assessed as potential Treasure. The coin
is without doubt an extremely interesting
COMPETITION NEWS
CAPTION COMPETITION
We thank all of you who entered the
competition. From the large entry it was
difficult to choose a winner and we
commiserate if you missed out this time.
There were several entries in contention,
all worthy of the accolade, but John
Winter drew the short straw and had the
difficult task choosing only one!
The winner of the Bird Caption
Competition was Ashley Dunning
of Billingham in County Durham, with
his caption:
Been reading The Searcher magazine guys.
Looks as though we should modernise our
approach when looking for treasure. If all the
hype is true and the new Equinox can find
ring worms as deep as 12 inches, it?s time
to update our technique and buy a detector ?
Congratulations Ashley ? your
Searcher polo short, baseball cap and
water bottle will be ?winging? their way
to you shortly!
12 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
The opinions and thoughts shared here by our
readers are not necessarily shared by The Searcher.
novelty piece from a troubled time
in our history but treasure, surely not!
Any further suggestions as to why a coin
of this period would have received such
treatment would be appreciated.
Roger Paul (Hertfordshire)
Dear Editor
Reader feedback
I?ve been reading your magazine for the
last five years and I was just emailing
to say how much I love what you lot do!
During those cold dark winter?s
evenings I spend my time sat in my warm
bed, cup of tea and your magazine
keeping me entertained and filling my
head with dreams of finding ... that
special find!
You?re all brilliant and please keep up
the good work!
I?d love to know if you sell any T-shirts
or hoodies? I?d be proud to wear your
name on my next hunt!
Kirk Bowman
Ed: Thank you for the feedback Kirk! LP
Metal Detecting are currently stocking all of
our merchandise including: Finds pouches,
spade bags, baseball caps, water bottles,
rucksacks and also hoodies and polo?s at
www.lpmetaldetecting.com or alternatively
go爐o www.thesearcher.co.uk
Dear Ed
Hammered!
I really enjoyed Andrew Caley?s article
on the hammered coin. Amusing,
informative and ?right on?. Well
done Andrew!
Patrick Donnelly Colchester
EXCLUSIVE
Discriminate iron?
Not me!
CAROLINE FATHERS
On a chilly day in October my husband
Mark and I, attended a dig run by the
Southwest Detectorists MD UK. I set up
my Deus on the Standard program 6 with
full tones which I thought may just give
me more of a chance as the site we were
on was pasture fields.
The morning was slow going only
managing a Georgian halfpenny,
a Victorian penny and a musket ball
between us. However, we heard of an
Irish Edward penny coming up near
to where the cars were parked so we
decided we?d just try our luck on the new
field that had been opened up to us first.
I managed a pre-war Austin hub cap
in great condition and then headed back
to the car for lunch but quickly decided
to give the area close to the van a quick
go. I received a signal that wasn?t strong
and I was in two minds as to whether
to dig or not. But 6? down this rather
unusual find revealed itself.
Caroline Fathers is a member of Metal Detectives Club and
Mark Becher affectionately calls Caroline the ?iron finder?.
But Caroline has proved exactly why it?s not always good
to discriminate iron completely with this wonderful
Woden Head Anglo Saxon mount ? it makes me wonder
what else we could be missing don?t you?!
At first Mark and I couldn?t decide
whether I?d found something of interest
or not as the back of it was clearly quite
corroded iron. I put it in the top of my
finds pouch and carried on. But Mark
had a nagging feeling that it may well
be something good and suggested I keep
it safely in the van and we?d research
it later.
After a while a young lad called Tyler
Chant (aged only 14!) came up to us and
asked whether we?d found anything good,
and went on to show us his lovely
Bronze Age Palstave axehead he?d
just unearthed.
He was so happy with it as we all
would be, but most of all it was very
pleasing to see the younger generation
enjoying the hobby and finding
something amazing like that!
I retrieved my find and showed it to
Tyler who in turn got the dig organisers
and some other knowledgeable
detectorists who examined it as well.
14 THE SEARCHER JANUARY2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Their reaction was beginning to make
me believe that Mark was right and that
on our return home we put it on a forum
and I left my husband researching it.
The response was incredible and the
general consensus was that it was
probably Anglo Saxon.
I am due to record it with Anni Byard
my local FLO and will see whether it falls
under the Treasure Act soon but in the
meantime I?m truly happy and looking
forward to finding out more about it.
EXCLUSIVE
Kevin Leahy, National Adviser,
Early Medieval Metalwork
of the PAS commented:
This striking mount is Early Anglo-Saxon
and dates from the 6th to 7th century.
Faces like this, wearing a horned headdress (or sporting horns of their own)
are well known, appearing on some of the
foils decorating the Sutton Hoo helmet,
where the warriors carry swords and
spears and appear to be dancing.
A similar foil was found in a burial
at Caenby, Lincolnshire and the horned
warrior, carrying two spears, appears
on a gold buckle from Finglesham, Kent.
Horned warriors are not restricted
to England and appear on a die for
making foil mounts found at Torslunda,
Sweden and on a die from Ayton, in the
Scottish Borders Region.
The question is who do these mounts
represent? It has been suggested that
they depict the god Woden, one of whose
attributes was a spear and that the birds?
heads, on the ends of the horns,
represent the god?s two ravens. However,
these birds often have hooked, eagles?,
beaks not the pointed beaks of ravens.
We also see multiple depictions of the
horned warrior on the same foil
suggesting that it was not the god,
although it is possible that the god?s
image was duplicated to emphasise
his power.
Woden is sometimes shown with only
one eye as he gave up his other eye in
exchange for wisdom. The two garnet
inlaid eyes seen here, do not preclude the
face being that of Woden but it would
have been helpful if it had only one eye.
Finally, what was this mount used for?
Other examples, like the one from
Rempstone, Notts. has mounting pins
on its back as does a mount from
Finglesham, Kent. Many of the other
mounts, however, lack any signs
of a fixing. It is clear that the mount
described here was attached to an iron
object but we are left guessing what
it was: a helmet or a bucket? Unless you
find one still attached we are going
to be left to wonder.
Other examples on the PAS database
are shown on the right.
LEFT FROM TOP Mark and Caroline Fathers; Tyler Chant
and his Bronze Age Palstave axe head; all other images
courtesy and copyright Mark Becher.
ABOVE FROM TOP Caroline?s find; PAS Database refs:
Hamp-2432; CWO120; NMS559; 40DB05; CWO011;
YORYM-024D31 � PAS
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 15
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01635 597975 www.lpmetaldetecting.com
Unit 18, Orchard Business Park, Kingsclere, RG20 4SY
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02/11/2016 12:04
02/11/20
16 12:0
4
01635 597975 www.lpmetaldetecting.com
Unit 18, Orchard Business Park, Kingsclere, RG20 4SY
EXCLUSIVE
THE
MARTOCK
HOARD
John Philpotts
The discovery
On a typical British summer morning
of 21 July 2012, two detectorists headed
for a ploughed field near the village of
Martock on the edge of the Somerset Levels.
They had targeted the field due to it being
near the famous Fosse Way Roman road
and on previous visits found evidence
of Roman occupation so there was a sense
of excitement as they headed down the green
country lanes. Matthew and Paul are father
and son and had been detecting for 25 years
so knew a thing or two about reading fields
and picking the best areas to search.
After a few hours of searching Matthew came
across a clear signal and with little excavation
unearthed a lovely bronze coin of Constantine
the Great. After a few minutes of wondering
who last touched the coin, what it was used
to buy and why it was lost he stored it safely
and moved on. Or at least he would have
done had his machine not given several other
loud readings in the immediate area. He
pinpointed another signal, dug down and was
rewarded with another similar coin. Being
experienced he knew that there could
be more and called his father over to help
with the search.
20 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Over the space of several hours 419 coins
were recovered from the plough soil along
with several pieces of Romano-British
pottery. These were later identified to be from
several vessels but there was the majority
of a black burnished ware jar that is thought
to have been the hoard container.
They contacted their FLO who arranged
an excavation which unearthed a further
seven coins and further pottery sherds.
The 425 coins were all nummi and date
to a relatively short period of Roman
occupation, 317-330AD which was a very
prosperous time in Britain.
EXCLUSIVE
LEFT PAGE The Martock Hoard (prior to conservation)
LEFT archaeological excavation ABOVE the finders,
Matthew and Paul; The Hoard after convservation.
The whole find was then reported as Treasure
to the Coroner but with no museum showing
interest in acquiring the find it was disclaimed
and returned to the finders and
the landowner.
Having thought they?d never get to handle
the coins again they were pleased to be able
to show their friends and family and share
stories of that fateful day in July 2012.
After a few years they decided to sell
the coins and contacted a few companies
who expressed little interest due to the state
of preservation. However they were
recommended Silbury Coins and spoke
to me, John Philpotts, and I went on to buy
a large part of the hoard.
History of the area
The famous Fosse Way stretched from Exeter
through to Lincoln and passes close to the find
site. Many major Roman settlements were
established on it, the nearest to the Hoard
find spot was Ilchester. The Romans called
it Lindinis (translating to ?little marsh?) and was
a small settlement in Roman terms but still
had some 35 acres enclosed with walls and
was supported by a number of wealthy villas
in the immediate surrounding area.
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 21
EXCLUSIVE
Obverse samples
1 Military bust with
shield to front
2 Helmeted bust
3 Radiate bust
4 Military bust
5 Empress Helena
6 Empress Fausta
7Laureate bust with eagle tipped sceptre
8 Laureate bust with spear & shield to front
9 Laureate bust with shield & spear
10 Laureate bust left
11 Laureate bust right
12 Consular bust holding victory on globe
R1 Camp gate
R2 Standard with
captives
R3 Victory advancing
with trophy & captive
R4 Military trophy with bound captives at base
R5 Emperor holding
thunderbolt riding eagle
R6 Empress with
children
R7 Laurel wreath
with vows
R8 Two victories inscribing shield
R9 Altar
R10 Securitas standing
R11 Sol advancing
Reverse samples
The coins
The coins date to between 317AD-330AD
and were minted all over the Roman Empire
but predominately in the west. The reverse
of each coin has a combination of letters in
the exergue which tell us where it was struck.
The map above shows the mint distribution. There are
a wide variety of types and emperors represented,
remarkable given the short window of production.
Reverse types
All the designs above make a clear message
to anyone handling these coins, some are
designed as propaganda to show the power
of the Roman Empire (R1, R2, R3, R4, R5)
others to show the human side of emperors
who most Romans probably never caught
sight of (6).
22 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Some to promote the incredible engineering
capabilities of the Roman army (R1).
Some to celebrate the success of the rulers
(R2, R3, R4, R5, R7, R8). Last of all some
to pay respect to the gods (R9, R10, R11).
Often disclaimed hoards are sold without
the study and publication which is a shame as
it can bring joy to many involved with the find
and those having an interest in local history.
If you would like further information
on this hoard or are in the same position
as Matthew and Paul, please do get in touch
with me on the details below.
Spartan
Designed and manufactured
in the UK since 1984
Developed with The Searcher
Available from
all good stockists
or online at
blackada.com
Launched at Detectival, the
new Spartan is the product
of a rigorous development
programme with The Searcher
magazine. Based around the
Gladuis, this long handled
shovel features our new
Bootsaver to help prevent
split soles. Completed by a
robust black plastic handle
for a warmer grip in the colder
months, the new Spartan
will prove to be a faithful
companion out on the field.
Searcher Magazine Full Page Advert (Spartan).indd 1
14/09/2017 17:20
field test |
Garrett AT MAX
Specifications:
Operating principle: VLF
Frequency: 13.6kHz
Standard search coil: 11? DD
Weight: 1.4kg (3.03lbs)
Battery: 4 x AA alkaline
Warranty: 2 years
Price: �9.95
This test was a long time coming.
Garrett first announced the new AT MAX
in early May and I received the machine
in early October. So I was very eager to
test it because what I had done during
an ?off test period? was to go back to
the books to do some old fashioned
research and as a result began knocking
on doors to gain new permissions for
this test.
Testing is an uncertain business as
one never knows just how a machine
is going to behave - how better (or
worse) it will be than the last one.
The previous model, the AT Pro
International had been a very positive
affair and I was hoping this experience
would be the same.
New features and improvements
over AT Pro
I?ll jump straight in and will dispense
with the usual formalities of lengthy
paragraphs describing the Instruction
Manual and the build quality. On those
matters, the manual is very well done
with real colour photographs (in four
languages) and the build quality is the
usual ?Garrett strong? with no loose or
Field Test: Garrett AT MAX
Desi Dunne
floppy parts - a solid piece of kit. Power
is from the same battery arrangement
as the AT Pro - 4 x AA?s.
Features
lWireless - New Built-in ?Z-Lynk?,
wireless technology - cuts the cord!
Integrated circuitry transm? audio to
your wireless headphones
lNew Garrett WS-3, ?Z-Lynk? wireless
headphones
l New 13.6kHz ?optimised frequency?
l True All Metal Mode
l Adjustable Volume
l Adjustable Threshold
l Larger Target ID numbers
l Backlight
l High resolution Ground Balance
l Automatic Ground Balance Window
lMore controls for better manual
operation
l New rubber hand grip
Following along with the major
differences between it and the older AT
Pro, one of the operational modes has
been changed from the older PRO and
STD modes to a new one named, ALL
METAL - the previous Custom, Coins &
Zero modes have been retained. These
are Discrimination Modes and provide
more tonal information than the All
Metal Mode. They have Garrett?s ?Tone
Roll Audio?, which provides more target
information to help identify targets.
Contained in it are three distinct
audio tones:
lLow-Tone - identifies ferrous targets
(Digital ID < 35)
lMid-Tone - identifies non-ferrous
targets (Digital ID of 35 - 50)
24 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
lHigh-Tone
- non-ferrous targets
(Digital ID > 50) and greater than 50
to low 90?s
The All-Metal Mode can also be
used as a Discrimination Mode by
adding Iron Audio to the equation. This
doesn?t kick in until you set some level
of Iron Disc. This mode is the deepest
seeking and can be beneficial in certain
scenarios: beach detecting, pasture, or
in areas that are relatively free of iron
debris.
The first run
I ventured out to an established test
site nearby after the MS-3 wireless
headphones had been on charge for four
hours with the red light still on (typically
a five hour charge)
On site, soft moist earth with short
stubble I set up and it Ground Balanced
easily at ?84? (indicating just above
moderately mineralised soil). Custom
Mode with the ?foil pixel? notched back
in, Iron Disc at 23, Sensitivity at 7 (from
8 bars), (Custom Mode and Coins Mode
are the same except that Custom retains
your changes after you switch off the
detector).
At SENS 8, it was mildly over
sensitive with rapidly changing Target
ID numbers and unstable audio. Popped
the headphones on and they paired
immediately when pushing the ?Z-Lynk?
buttons, the IRON AUDIO & FREQ and
the flashing headphone icon on the
meter display became steady. I then
set a Threshold of ?1? and lowered
the燰olume on the headphones to
?a爂entle hum?.
TIP: It?s advisable to run a slight
Threshold with the headset in case of a
power loss with them. You might have
walked on before realising it as we tend
to look at the coil as we detect and may
not notice the headphone icon is not
displayed.
I heard the ?snap, crackle and pop? of
many small nails and larger bits being
discriminated out but I could still see their
corresponding target ID?s on the display.
There were many such sounds and it
seemed to be very quick at processing
them. It was so quick and confident, I
didn?t feel the ?IRON VOL? setting lent
much to the equation.
I used Iron Volume just twice on
sounds that had a positive ?pop? and
always circled the signal and allowed
the coil ?to see? the target completely
by moving the coil?s footprint over the
target area and listening out for that
raspy buzz that rejected iron makes.
It was very fast at discriminating the
iron, and more accentuated and easier
to discern than the AT Pro. It?s general
operation sound is different though: it?s
the tonality of the audio, less analog and
less warm. But on the positive side it has
miles more transmitter gain and receiver
sensitivity than the Pro. I was getting
hits from my boot eyelets and digger at
my side as I walked through the field.
A small bronze coin hit well at 59 and
loudly stood out among the iron sounds.
This was a surprise because I?d worked
the area hard with an E-Trac and a Deus,
in the weeks previous as last year a small
hammered came up while testing the AT
Pro and I was in the same spot now.
The coin was all the more significant
as it was the first of its type that I?ve
found, a James ll shilling from 1689. It
was in fantastic condition. Fig.1
Further along a loud double hit sound
with jumping TID?s in the 70?s produced
a complete surprise. At around the 8?
mark the pinpointer signalled a target
still in the hole wall and removing more
soil a coin was seen on edge. Removing
and examining it I could see it was
a large hammered coin completely
unclipped Fig.2 It was partially rusted
but later identified as an ?undated
Elizabeth I shilling First Issue 1559-60?,
and was a shock to me because the
next target was also a corroded item
similar to the first one (see Fig.2) and it
dawned on me, maybe these have been
brought up from a hoard? I had never
even considered it on this field because
hammered coins were a rarity.
Needless to mention I planned a
return visit.
It was nearing 7pm now and the back
light had to be turned on to see the
display and still the AT MAX just hummed
along and was very pleasant to listen to
with that comforting low Threshold hum.
Not a squeak out of it with everything
on including the back light and using the
AT Pro-Pointer. The AT Pro used to ?pip?
when it was turned on.
At the beach
Some models are not beach machines
but the AT MAX very definitely is and
it?s fully waterproof too. At the beach
wall area, I powered up and immediately
heard it wasn?t happy. So I selected
All Metal, full sensitivity and did an
automatic Ground Balance that settled
on 15. I changed to COINS. Iron Disc 23:
Sensitivity 6.
The machine was docile and
eventually I walked into the breaking
waves ... and it remained quiet! Up
to this I was happy but after dunking
the coil into the breaking wave of cold
seawater I was very impressed indeed!
This was a considerable ?beach stability?
improvement over that of the AT Pro.
Just don?t touch the coil to the sand ...
it燿oesn?t like it.
Heading back to the damp sand I
began to seek out targets. No signals
were coming so I increased the
Sensitivity to 8. After an age a positive
signal broke the monotony and it pin
pointed loudly so I began to dig. The
TID was in the high ?70?s? and sounded
good. I had to set the machine down
because it turned out to be deeper than
I thought and after reaching the foot
level a can end bottom (or top) shiny
like new was in my hand.
Continuing along I got a ?mirrorimage? sights and sounds of the first
signal and another can end was even
deeper than the first! I had to break
through a stone layer to get to it! This
was impressive! This was closer to
E-Trac FBS beach depth and again I
couldn?t fail to be impressed by this.
These signals (junk as they were) were
really loud! (single frequency VLF?s aren?t
normally deep beach seekers).
I hit another patch and all of a sudden
the signals came hot and heavy and
that?s the way it is on the beaches.
Multiple signals later I had post decimal
coins, a key tag, a piece of jewellery
minus the stone and the ?piece de
resistance?, a 1928 silver shilling that
strangely gave ferrous tones as well! It
had been deeper than the other coins,
around 10? and sometimes gave a
one-way signal and alternating TID?s of
59, 76, 79 and 82 once on the surface.
Then that patch dried up.
So, ?What?s it like on the beach?? It?s
good!
BELOW LEFT TO RIGHT
Fig. 1 Obverse & reverse of bronze coin
Fig. 2 Hammered coins ? some beach coins
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 25
Foreshore
These are difficult areas to work due
to lots of iron debris. I arrived the day
before Hurricane Ophelia was due to
hit. This wasn?t a ?dig? mission but an
experiment to see how the MAX might
handle it?
Walking towards the low water mark
the machine was grunting away on the
many ferrous bits concealed beneath the
muck and seaweed. I turned the Volume
down and used the speaker. Reaching
the low water I Ground Balanced, the
Ground Balance Window showed ?58?,
and I set off in COINS, Sensitivity at 5
but clearly it wasn?t happy. So I reduced
the Sensitivity which was better.
It began to ?spark? with ferrous grunts
every swing and was the same in and
out of the water. I later did hit a quieter
patch in the water.
Note to self: check your gear:
I decided to try the smaller 8.5? DD
and removed it from the bag but
immediately had a ?doh? moment when I
realised it was the wrong coil!
I had stupidly taken an Ace 400i coil
- wrong connector! Anyway, I changed
tack again and switched to All Metal,
reduced the Sensitivity to 3 and lo and
behold, it was much better. I even hit
three non ferrous bits and not having
a digger retrieved them by kicking
the爉ud!
Experimenting with the other Modes
I found All Metal to be the one I?d opt
for but with a small coil and the usable
sensitivity could be increased as the All
Metal mode is the deepest seeking of
the four modes.
A few other sites
Over the next few weeks I toured a
variety of different sites and noted the
sometimes sharper performance of the
detector and other times not so.
Case in point: a former F19 test site
was revisited and it had been a very
interesting experience and operationally
the two detectors are very similar but
the MAX has more speed to respond in
trash and is ?lightning quick?.
On a number of times positive signals
with TID?s in the 60?s failed to produce
any find at all, despite a very strong
pinpoint tone (much stronger than the
AT Pro). After digging out the holes
what happened was the over amplified
receiver of the MAX produced positive
hits on ferrous targets that once dug,
the halo effect ceased - hence no find.
The AT Pro-Pointer, was sometimes able
to detect tiny ferrous fragments that
had totally disintegrated and invisible to
the eye.
On a different field I got around five
small buttons all giving TID?s in the
60?s but they produced some ferrous
signaling too. I was using COINS with Iron
Disc at 35 and all the non ferrous pixels
on that also happened with a halfpenny
coin dated 1904. I was able to remedy
that by backing off the Sensitivity.
Reducing gain also reduced these
occurrences, and in a few cases lower
sensitivities produced better audio hits.
On the plus side, when a good
repeatable target presents itself, the
audio is straight up and solid and the
TID now with larger numbers locks on
well even if there is ?noise? all around it.
I think it?s so sensitive that it can detect
the ?halo effect? dynamic surrounding
the metal target especially in the
case of copper and some other lower
conductive metals.
The MAX has to be carefully set up
to match the conditions so it?s not a ?set
and forget? detector. Another example
of the advantage of making manual ?onthe-fly? adjustments, stray sounds of
blips and clicks (EMI) could be banished
by using the frequency shift button
several times during a search.
On a stubble site that had coke
signals fairly regularly, the MAX gave a
26 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
low volume ?croaky? sound without a TID
so I re-scanned the ground and it then
produced a high tone with a TID 50. This
was the exact break point from mid tone
to high and not having dug any exact 50
TID?s before I was curious what it might
be? Removing a few inches of soil and
I was amazed to find a small hammered
cut half that I couldn?t identify. (also in
Fig.2)
A good result was had at a fete
ground and with the grass long?ish I
didn?t know what to expect. The first
target was a surprise as an old button
came up from around 8?. Soon after
that the coins started to show. I was
after recent ?summer? losses and that?s
what transpired as many small coins
were found matted in the roots or just
a bit under the surface. What amazed
me was the loud reports of signals even
from the small 10c coins ? quite a feat
considering the coil was hovering at
least five to eight inches off the ground
due to tufty grass. Single, two together
and a few groupings of coins added to
the tally. About two hours later I had
close to ten euros and absolutely no junk
bar two screw caps.
What eventually drove me home was
the relentless EMI from the multitude
of sources ranging from phone masts,
industry, an airport, traffic and other
things. As the batteries depleted the
noise became worse and just before I
left it resulted in a constant ?buzzing?
that was intolerable. I observed the
battery icon change from 4 bars to 3
and back to 4 again as it fought the
interference.
I hit a farm that has huge chestnut
trees and set to work and I have to
say it is one of my favourite places
to search, around old trees. Signals
were plentiful and several pre-decimal
BELOW LEFT TO RIGHT
Control box ? Miscellaneous finds ? Euro coinage
pennies and halves turned up along
with more modern coinage. A mild
electrical ?blip? (from an electric fence)
accompanied me but wasn?t really a
problem as it remained as a background
noise and otherwise the machine was
perfectly stable.
Going further into the pasture
areas signals came in the form of the
ubiquitous old copper half penny?s, a
large old button that absolutely shouted
its presence and when dug I measured
the hole and it was around 10?. I didn?t
dig any iron and if anything doubtful was
heard I turned on Iron Audio and if was
?scratchy?, I left it alone.
A morning out with two detecting
pals on their permission was an
enjoyable experience and my finds at
the end of the session outnumbered
theirs. It was short stubble, damp soil
and warm and sunny.
Two of those copper rings came up,
one large the other thin: what might be
a hammered or a worn silver coin, this
item was really delicate: musket balls:
several small buttons, one was tiny and
ornate: a buckle fragment 3? long with
dotted designs on similar to a shoe
buckle. Fig 3
Conclusion
I said at the beginning, that this machine
was a long time coming from launch to
release but with all the extra information
that had been gathered from tester?s
and social media several improvements
were added to what was a ready to
release detector. Good things come to
those who wait!
I think the AT MAX is a new detector
totally in the transmitter/receiver
department.
It has way more Gain as my signet
ring air tests about 4? more than the Pro
at full Sensitivity. It?s as if the AT Pro ate
some energy bars!
It felt slightly heavier than the
Pro after a few hours spent working
through long grass, though their weight
is the same, 3.03lbs. The new MS-3
headphones are very comfortable, work
just great and I was in heaven with
them. The tones of the AT Pro in ?Pro
Mode?, might have the edge.
Its wireless capability, the new
Threshold control and back light made
it a better detecting experience for
me. It?s very intuitive: the buttons have
dual functionality. Just remember to
hit the Shift button and then make the
adjustment you want.
A detector that will definitely appeal
to its intended market, the essence of
classiness which is so evident here and
the broad appeal of a detector which
was actually created by detectorists
who made their wish-list known to a
company who listened.
This detector summed up in a single
word: Energetic! It?s got me searching
every chance I get!
Garrett AT MAX test results
(Scores out of ten based on price category)
Ergonomics (weight/balance): 9
Simplicity/user friendliness: 9
Build quality: 10
Weather resistance 10
Discrimination Performance 9
The Searcher Rating
Overall detection Performance 8
Value for money (�9.95): 9
Competition:Win a brand new
Garrett AT MAX worth �9.95
WIN
For your chance to win this Garrett AT MAX worth �9.95 just answer
this question Who is the UK Garrett Distributor? Fill in the coupon below
(no爌hotocopies allowed unless you are a current subscriber and your number
is required) and send it to爑s at the Garrett AT MAX Competition, the
searcher, 17 Down Road, Merrow, Guildford, Surrey, GU1 2PX. Closing date
for all entries by 2 January 2018 together with your name, address and contact
number. Good luck!
Who is the UK Garrett Distributor? ...........................................................................................................................................................
Name: ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Address: ............................................................................................................................................................................Postcode:.................
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Competition Rules: This competition is open to all readers except employees of the searcher (which includes all regular contributors and their families) and our printers and
distributors: Warners Group PLC. Only one entry is permitted per person. Entries will be accepted by POST only addressed to: Garrett AT MAX Competition, the searcher,
17燚own Road, Merrow, Guildford, Surrey. GU1 2PX. App subscribers ONLY by email or post. To be valid, entries need to be received on or before 2 January 2018. The draw
will take place soon after and the winners will be notified by telephone (if possible).There is no cash or other alternative to the prizes stated and the prizes is not transferable
and no part or parts of the prize may be substituted for other benefits, items or additions. The judges decision is final and binding. No correspondence will be entered into.
No爎esponsibility can be accepted for entries lost, delayed or damaged in the post.
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 27
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12 months
�.93
CS6MXi
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�5.00
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Deposit
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Balance
�2.50
12 months
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ADD THE REMOTE CONTROL?
(HEADPHONES WILL WORK WITHOUT THE REMOTE BUT
THE REMOTE OFFERS MANY MORE USER FUNCTIONS)
22WS4 ........... 9? COIL, WS4 HEADPHONES ...................................................... �9
28WS4 ........... 11? COIL, WS4 HEADPHONES .................................................... �9
22WS5 ........... 9? COIL, WS5 HEADPHONES ...................................................... �5
28WS5 ........... 11? COIL, WS5 HEADPHONES .................................................... �9
22RC ............. 9? COIL, REMOTE CONTROL ..................................................... �9
28RC ............. 11? COIL, REMOTE CONTROL ............................................... �029
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22RCWS5 ...... 9? COIL, REMOTE CONTROL, WS5 HEADPHONES ................... �289
28RCWS5 ...... 11? COIL, REMOTE CONTROL, WS5 HEADPHONES ................. �319
Detector
Cost
28RCWS5
28RCWS4
22RCWS5
22RCWS4
28RC
22RC
28WS5
28WS4
22WS5
22WS4
�319.00
�267.00
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Explosive situation!
David & Kat Lovey
Kat and I are Admin?s for the group TED
and we have been in the hobby now for
about three years.
One Sunday in October on one of our local
permissions in Essex, I?d not been out long
when I received a very strong signal on
my Deus. As I double-checked my target
I thought this appears to be a big target,
possibly two targets.
I dug a reasonably sized hole and on
removing the plug I revealed the top of some
large pipe like object. On closer inspection
I thought it resembled a canon shell or
some thing similar. I carefully dug around it
gradually showing more its shape now at
20cm in length and 8cm in diameter.
Not really thinking it was necessarily an
explosive I shouted over to my wife to come
over. I asked Kat who was now also looking
down at the object ?what do you think?? ?
She said a bomb but I?m not sure let me take
a photo and post on T.E.D to see if anyone
can identify it.
Immediately the fun comments started
to roll in ?run? ?boom? and ?call the bomb
squad!? While this was going on, on Kat?s
phone I proceeded to extract the object
about 30cm in total length and placed it on
the ground next to the hole and at this point
it struck me that this object was maybe
something else as I began to doubt my first
identification. I advised Kat to step away
just in case. I walked over and informed the
landowner and then contacted the police
on�1.
I was put through to the local police
station and explained that I?d possibly
uncovered an explosive device. 20 minutes
later I heard the sound of sirens and directed
the Police onto the field.
The Sergeant confirmed that the MOD
needed to deal with it and from the edge of
the field we all waited. The Police called for
further support and shortly after another
two officers arrived who were instructed to
go directly to neighbouring houses and order
homeowners to stay indoors and away from
the rear of their properties.
Approximately 40 minutes later the
MOD Bomb Disposal Unit arrived who
soon confirmed the device was a WWII 1kg
aircraft bomb. They moved it to the centre
of the field and after fitting an explosive to
the bomb performed a controlled explosion.
It was all very exciting and I am glad
that爐he day ended safely for everyone
involved and with a very loud bang! It?s
hopefully the last time I come across a live
bomb but爐he day and experience will remain
with us always.
A valuable lesson to all of us to be
more vigilant and more cautious when out
detecting!
It just goes to show just one of the
dangers and what unknowingly what we
potentially could walk over without realising.
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 31
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See our website for full information and product videos
Email: tonyhunt123@gmail.com Phone: 01202 870079 /872069 or mob 07968 470494.
Detectorbits, 232 Wimborne Road West, Stapehill, Wimborne, Dorset. BH21 2DY
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EXCLUSIVE
Fibulae
fest!
Steve
Taylor
Over the last 35 years of detecting I feel
I have been very fortunate in finding what
I have. Studying Land management has given
me the opportunity to work as a manager
on a few large estates throughout the county,
and detect on virgin sites.
Research is often the key to a successful
session searching, but you can often find
a site, which defies explanation. I?ve had my
share of luck over the years in finding the
Eldersfield brooch and Poulton Bronze Age
Hoard, which now reside in various museums.
A few years ago I gained permission
to detect on a site in Worcestershire from
a friend who told me he had 900 acres on his
family farm and I was welcome. I went to see
him, marked his fields down on my map and
asked him whether he?d had anyone detect
it in the past.
34 THE SEARCHER JANUARY2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
He told me a guy had been there several years
before and had found a few Roman coins,
but couldn?t tell me exactly where they
had come from. Because he had about
30 fields I knew it would be like looking for
a needle in a haystack to find this spot.
I remember driving around the various
fields and settling on one to the north of his
farm, which was about 50 acres with a gentle
slope at one end. There was no evidence
of previous habitation, but I thought I?d give
it a go.
After getting my White?s DFX out of the
boot, I was soon working my way across the
field, digging the odd hole as I went. Nothing
of any particular age had surfaced at that
time, but it was early days.
EXCLUSIVE
I wandered aimlessly for a while before my
machine gave out a positive buzz and
I started to dig. After removing a neat hole,
I placed the coil over the hole and found it
was still in there so, using my probe, I finally
located it in the side of the hole.
I could see green bronze, so I knew it was
old. After removing it I realised I was holding
a large 2nd Century Roman brooch. I gave
it a gentle rub and it looked complete apart
from the pin missing so I carefully placed
it in my finds pouch. I was now excited by
my first Roman object of the day and I started
sweeping the area for more evidence.
Delighted by my early success it wasn?t
long before I had another signal in the same
area. This time it was a lovely silver coin of
Tiberius, often referred to as a Tribute penny.
I now knew that I may have stumbled on
a Roman site and the coin may not have been
a casual loss.
I decided to head down the field along
a hedgerow expanding my search area. Within
an hour, I had uncovered several more coins
which were late 3rd Century but only bronze.
It was now getting late in the day and
I headed off home to clean and research
my finds.
After a quick wash in the sink, the silver
coin came up gleaming, The bronze coins had
seen better days, but could make out the
word Constantine, but it proved to me the
site had been occupied for several centuries.
The Polden Hill type bronze brooch was
perfect apart from a missing pin.
I was very pleased with my first day on the
new site, but I knew I had to get back as soon
as possible as the field would soon be seeded,
and I would have to wait a whole season
to return.
Several days past and I headed off
to search again. I remember sitting down
in the corner of the field trying to visualise
what had happened all those centuries ago,
to draw these people here. Apart from the old
bit of pot there was nothing to indicate any
buildings on the ground.
Over the next few weeks I?d gone
backwards and forwards over an area of
about three football pitches and it soon
became apparent that this site had been very
important to the Romans.
LEFT & RIGHT PAGE Numerous types of Roman brooches
and finds from the site
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 35
EXCLUSIVE
As time went on my brooch collection had
expanded beyond recognition as each outing
was producing a handful of coins and
brooches. I now started to stray further out
into the field and I remember this one eventful
day I had a faint signal, which I half-heartily
dug. On turning the clod over I could see a
lovely gold coin looking back at me and could
see straight away that it had a horse on one
side, and I knew instantly I?ve found my first
Celtic gold stater. This was an Atrebates
Remic type and in pristine condition.
THIS PAGE Finds from all periods from the site
I knew the Celts had traded with the Romans
so it was reasonable to assume on this early
site, these may turn up occasionally. I asked
the landowner whether he had ever ploughed
up any stone or pottery from this site, but
he said he?d found nothing over the years
to indicate it may have been a settlement.
I have now lost count of how many visits
I have made to the site over the years and
have found 600 odd coins and have 150
Roman brooches which may indicate it may
have been a temple site, where they had been
making offerings to the Gods, as many of the
brooches have pins missing and were probably
broken in antiquity.
36 THE SEARCHER JANUARY2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
On a recent visit to the site it had completely
changed, as the farmer has unwittingly spread
green waste, and the field was littered with
foil, aluminium fixtures and crushed circuit
boards. I look back at the good times now and
just remember what a site it was, and how
fortunate I was to have found it when I did.
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See our website for full information and product videos
Email: tonyhunt123@gmail.com Phone: 01202 870079 or mob 07968 470494.
Detectorbits, 232 Wimborne Road West, Stapehill, Wimborne, Dorset BH21 2DY
A selection of Gordon?s finds made with Minelab machines over the decades
product test |
Minelab PRO-FIND 15 & 35
Specifications:
Operating principle: VLF induction
balance
Frequency: 12 kHz
Weight: 1.93kg (6.8oz)
Battery Type: 1 x 9V PP3
Waterproof: To 3m (10?) (PRO-FIND
35) Splash proof (PRO-FIND 15)
Warranty: 2 years
Price: PRO-FIND 15: �.96
& PRO-FIND 35: �4.95
It doesn?t seem more than a month
goes by when another NEW pinpoint
probe is announced. The latest offerings
from Minelab, the PRO-FIND 15 and
35, supersede the PRO-FIND 25. Fig 1
Whenever I?m asked to test new
products, I?m always looking for
innovation, but what could possibly
be innovative in what is the most basic
of all metal detecting accessories?
Minelab PRO-FIND 15 & 35
Gordon Heritage
Out of the box(es) The PRO-FIND
15 is a single button, uncomplicated
pinpoint probe, Fig 2 with a rugged
soft yellow body and a hard black
plastic probe. There?s a speaker on the
reverse side of the body, which is ideally
positioned so a user can place his index
finger to reduce the emitted sound.
To fit the 9v PP3 battery, unscrew
the black plastic cap at the thick end of
the probe. Then screw the plastic cap
back on so the O-ring is fitted tightly.
Tip ? Add a little silicon grease to
the O-ring on either model, this will
assist future battery replacements (cap
removal). A dry O-ring can be a devil to
unscrew after a period of time.
The PRO-FIND 15 self-balances and
works extremely well, but couldn?t be
classified as anything new in the world
of pinpoint probes. For that you have to
go to the premium model, the 35.
The PRO-FIND 35 is very similar to
the old Minelab PRO-FIND probe. Fig 3
38 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
The colour has changed to yellow, but
the illuminating light and buttons remain
in a similar configuration. The overall
look and feel is the same as the PROFIND 15, with two extra buttons. The
battery is fitted in the same way, and
extra care should be taken with the
O-ring in the black screwcap, as this
probe is designed to go underwater
to a depth of to 3 metres.
Switching on the 35 and moving
it towards a silver coin gives excellent
depth/distance on first beeps, which
then increase briskly to a solid
continuous tone, indicating a nonferrous target.
Repeating the test; by moving the
probe towards an iron (ferrous) target;
the final continuous tone pulses in
amplitude, indicating a ferrous target.
This is the sort of innovation I love
seeing in a new product!
Ferrous Tone ID So why on earth
would we need a pinpoint probe that
gives a different tone to iron targets?
For me it?s very useful when digging
deep (over 12?) for targets at some
depth. I often get more than one target
in the sidewalls of the hole, and I?ve
wasted time chasing an iron nail when
the real target was deeper in the centre
of the hole.
It also helps when you?re
searching for small surface
targets. You often hear
multiple responses
to iron trash around
your dug target, which
were discriminated
by your main detector.
Finding these ferrous
targets, instead of your
true ?quarry? wastes valuable
detecting time.
Detector Interference Free (DIF)
Technology Both these new probes
have Detector Interference Free (DIF)
technology, which means that they
interfere less with a working detector
while switched OFF.
This becomes really important when
you use high power machines like
Minelab?s GPX detectors. These can
hear a non-DIF probe at over 2? when
switched off. DIF opens the detecting
coil loop of the probe when switched
off, making them harder to detect. Even
on lower powered detectors, probes can
cause noise, even when switched off.
DIF probes are now my preferred
pinpoint probe over other brands, and
have become as important as wearing
metal-free shoes and not carrying a
mobile phone. Anything that stops
unnecessary noise, while searching
productive sites is beneficial.
In use The PRO-FIND 15 is a simple
switch-on-and-use probe. Although
simple, it?s packed full of technology.
When you switch it on you?ll hear
two long tones followed by a short
beep once the probe has evaluated
the environment (battery condition,
temperature and electro-magnetic
interference) and sets the optimum
Sensitivity setting.
This third beep can take a few
seconds to sound the first time you
fit a new battery, or if the environment
has changed from the last time it was
used e.g. sunny day, then frosty
the following day. Then through
a day?s detecting, the probe
starts quickly and gives
excellent Sensitivity.
Tip ? It is important
to start the PRO-FIND
probes away from large
metal targets, to allow
them to perform their
calibration. If they sense
an ?overload? of metal,
the third beep will not sound.
They will then need to be switched
off and back on to reset.
The PRO-FIND 35 is a more versatile
probe, with extra manual adjustments
available. The biggest difference I saw
was a quicker start-up; you then have
buttons to ?tweak it? up or down to
get optimum Sensitivity. This is done
directly with the plus/minus buttons.
There are also button-combinations that
allow you to run it with no sound, only
vibration, and for enabling and disabling
the Ferrous Tone ID feature.
Other differences:
1 The PRO-FIND 15 is splash proof, while the 35 is waterproof
to 3 metres
2 The PRO-FIND 35 is supplied
with a battery, the 15 isn?t
3 Both probes are supplied with
a holster, but only the 35
has a lanyard
4 Only the PRO-FIND 35 vibrates and has a light to illuminate
a dug hole
Both probes have an alarm that sounds
after three minutes of inactivity (while
switched on). This has been designed to
help locate your PRO-FIND if accidently
left behind, by a hole. I?ve actually found
this feature more useful to indicate
when I?ve failed to switch-off before
holstering the probe, saving battery life.
Conclusion Both probes are very
good, but my favourite is clearly
the PRO-FIND 35. The Ferrous Tone
ID feature is really good. It?s not
infallible though, and probably why
Minelab haven?t claimed it to be
a ?discriminating? probe.
In use, I always double check ferrous
tone alerts by pulling the probe away
from the target, and then back on.
This then gives me a 95% accuracy
rate. The PRO-FIND 15 is a great
no fuss pinpoint-probe, giving great
depth automatically.
Based on the PRO-FIND 35
test results
(Scores out of ten based on price category)
Ergonomics (weight/balance): 10
Simplicity/user friendliness: 10
Build quality: 10
Weather resistance 10
Discrimination Performance 5
The Searcher Rating
Overall detection Performance 10
Value for money (�4.95): 9
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 39
Ferrous Tone ID
Waterproof
Audio & Vibration response
Available in two models: PRO-FIND 35 & 15*
* Not all features available on PRO-FIND 15
Discover more at: MINELAB.COM/PRO-FIND35
Detecting Depression
William Dean talks
with John Winter
D
epression is fairly common,
affecting many people at some
point during their life. Almost
anybody can develop the illness.
Most detectorists go through periods of
feeling down, especially when good finds
are scarce, but this is quite ?normal?. I?m
talking here of severe depression, often
caused by stressful life events ? like the
car crash experienced by detectorist
William Dean of Scotland.
I think that ?Wullie? is very brave telling
us his story. In my experience this is a
subject not often talked about on digs.
Wullie?s testimony and admitting to his
depression is not a sign of weakness and
shows graphically that he has suffered a
real illness with real symptoms.
What follows is his story and how he
has overcome his health problems with
the aid of metal detecting. If you have
depression you are not alone ? and it is
treatable. JW
?I have suffered with depression for
over 20 years, ever since I was involved
in a car crash. Furthermore, I have
been admitted to hospital on numerous
occasions, and been *sectioned five times.
I?ve been prescribed all sorts of antidepressants plus a full course and part
course of **electroconvulsive therapy
(ECT). The first few times I came out of
hospital I felt ashamed and wouldn?t go
out much because when I did I thought
people were talking about me.
When my depression was at its worst I
felt useless. I wouldn?t wash or shave and
became a recluse. I didn?t sleep much
and felt like I was in a dark hole.?
?Several times I couldn?t see a way
Detecting Depression.indd 41
out and tried to end my life. One of the
times I ended up in the intensive care
unit hooked up to all sorts of machines.
People who don?t understand depression
say that?s the coward?s way out but when
you get that low you see it as the only
alternative; you have absolutely nothing
to look forward to.
Things usually picked up after a little
while then the downward spiral would
set in. I didn?t want to end back up in
hospital so I started to self harm by
burning myself with a cigarette to take
away the feeling. But nothing seemed
to work and I would end up in that dark
lonely place that is depression.
When things started to get better for
me I tried all sorts of hobbies, getting
back to fishing, building garden furniture,
and flying remote controlled aeroplanes,
but that only lasted a short time.
I decided that I needed a hobby that
would keep me interested and looking
forward to doing every week. I had tried
detecting about 15 years ago but never
really got into it as the only access I had
was to the beach.
About five years ago I thought I
wouldn?t mind trying detecting again. I
now owned a car and could travel, so I
searched the Internet and found that the
Ayrshire Research and Detecting Group
was only a couple of miles from where
I lived. I contacted them and went to a
club meeting.
I was made very welcome and started
with a White?s MXT Pro and I now own a
Minelab CTX, which I love.?
?In the last five years detecting once
or twice a week I?ve never had a hospital
admission. I?ve found a hobby that gives
me something to look forward to every
week, made lots of friends and go to
Detecting Scotland digs as often as I can.
When I meet other people with
depression I tell them to think of a
hobby, go and do it, never be ashamed of
the illness and hold your head up high.
Don?t be afraid to speak to people about
it. They will then understand what you?ve
been going through.
For a long time I didn?t talk about
it but now speak freely about my
depression. I?m not ashamed any more.
If it hadn?t been for metal detecting, God
knows where I would be today.
I love meeting up with people,
having a laugh, showing finds and
the peacefulness of just you and your
machine, waiting for that sweet beep in
your headphones. When it comes the
excitement of not knowing what you
are going to unearth the feeling you get
when it?s something good.
If only they could prescribe this on the
NHS it would be better than any pill. If
anyone out there suffers from depression
and wants to talk about it feel free to
approach me on any digs, or just get in
contact with me via the editor site. If my
story helps only one person then it was
worth it.?
LEFT An example of an ECT machine
Image: Nasko/Wikimedia Commons
ABOVE Wullie Dean
*Being sectioned means being admitted
to hospital whether or not you agree
to it. The legal authority for your
admission to hospital comes from the
Mental Health Act rather than from your
consent. This is usually because you are
unable or unwilling to consent.
**Electroconvulsive therapy is now
a controversial form of psychiatric
treatment that involves inducing seizures
with the use of electrical stimulation
while a patient is under general
anaesthesia. JW
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 41
20/11/2017 12:19
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December2017-christmas-m.indd 3
14/11/2017 10:17:42
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December2017-christmas-m.indd 4
14/11/2017 10:18:08
Muchelney
Rally
Daniel Spencer
44 THE SEARCHER twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
This years rally was held on the same
land as the previous years dig for reasons
that would become obvious during
the two days detecting. The Welsh
contingent was out in full and again
many local detectorists had taken the
time out to attend. The land was typically
Somerset damp but nothing that would
hamper the weekend.
Laura and Nick from Detecnicks were
set up in the barn offering everything
from finds boxes through to machines
and opposite them were a very
welcoming tea, coffee and food stand.
Following on from the morning
briefing, everyone headed out to the
known hotspots or onto one of the
newer fields open to them this year.
Immediately the finds started to pop up
in the form of silver hammered coinage
which had obviously been pulled up by
the farm machinery following recent
ploughing in the fields.
Further on into the weekend the
FLO and finds cabinets were looking
very healthy. The highlights were the
calls of congratulations to a few lucky
detectorists who were pulling out Roman
silver denarii and top of the list, a gold
hammered coin.
All finds were recorded by local
FLO Laura Burnett who is based at the
Somerset Heritage Centre commented
?The quantity and quality of finds were
outstanding. It?s surprising how some
land just keeps giving!?.
FIELD REPORT
We had two charity digs in October. Our
first dig was born due to an old work
colleague contacting me with a plea for
help as she was trying to raise funds
for her local children?s playground in
Pimperne which had fallen into disrepair
and there were no funds in the Council?s
coffers to help. I told her we could
help if we could find a friendly farmer
and we finally made contact with one
of our farmers who agreed to help by
offering us two fields which totalled
approximately 120 acres.
As with all of our digs we do a reccie,
to insure that the field doesn?t contain
green waste and that there are signals
in the field. We were astounded by the
amount of signals and in our 20 minutes
we all had lots of farm waste but a few
items including a lovely 17th century
token. The fields were in rape stubble
but had rotted down, but still quite
challenging. We advertised this when
posting dig so as everyone would know
what to expect on arrival.
Detectorists arrived on the day and
were greeted with the smell of bacon
and sausages cooking and there was the
usual banter before the ?off?. It didn?t
take long before news started to filter
back of finds surfacing, so as organiser
I could relax a little! Although our main
aim is to raise funds for charity it?s just
as important to me that the people who
attend have a good chance of finding
something nice.
People came back at lunch time for
the raffle with pouches full! Lots of farm
scrap but in amongst it some nice bits
and pieces. The finds case was starting
to fill up with the usual hammered silver,
lead items but more unusually we had
six various coin weights. The raffle draw
Dorset & West
Pastfinders
took 45 minutes as we had so many
prizes which had all been donated by our
members.
Digging continued and at 4pm we
judged the find of the day which was
won by Elaine Walder with a silver stater.
She won a year?s subscription to The
Searcher. Then as the dig was ending
Paul Hunt and Paul Clayton came back
to show us their finds. Paul had a lovely
Charles I commemorative medal which
although broken, was a cracking and
scarce find. Paul Clayton had a lovely
silver seal.
In total we raised �281 for the
playground fund at Pimperne!
Our second dig was a return to one
of our farms which produced some nice
finds but this time we were going to be
searching new fields which had maize
stubble.
On posting this dig on our Facebook
page it was full within two minutes ?
which is the fastest of any of our digs.
The rain held off until about 2pm but the
fields were very challenging indeed. It
wasn?t long before the finds were coming
in though, and from all periods - Roman
to modern.
Kev Welch had a very good morning
with a silver denarius and a papal bulla.
This dig was in aid of a number of
charities. The entry fees went to the
farmers choice of charity and the raffle
was for Isabella Stefanovic, who was
wanting to raise money for her sensory
equipment, to help in her progress. We
managed to raise �0 for the farmers
charity and the raffle raised �115 for
Isabella.
Many went home with some nice
finds but also very muddy and wet!
Charity digs
Malcolm Andrews
thesearcher.co.uk APRIL 2016 45
Four holes in my button
John Winter
John tells of the finding of a button and
the cleaning and research, but then goes
off on a tangent. Has this old duffer
finally lost the plot?
There?s no future in growing old. I used
to be a keen detectorist, but now that
I?m worn out, decrepit and disabled,
digging is no longer possible. Today I
get my ?fix? vicariously by writing about
the finds of others. My imagination is
triggered through their discoveries and
experiences.
The nearest I ever get to an active
participation in the hobby these days
is once every year, when Mrs. John
wields her pinpointer in the long grass
searching for the clothes whirligig metal
support. You know, the one nearest the
path. ?Left a bit. Right a bit.? And this
is only after finding fresh batteries to
replace the ones that have lost their
oomph through inactivity. Bit like me.
But recently, there has been a buzz of
excitement in the less than
extensive grounds of
Winter Mansions.
Whilst tending
her garden and
creating a hole
for a clematis
plant, Mrs.
John found
something of
significance. Not
a golden torc, an
enamelled Roman
brooch or a coin of Cnut, but
a four-hole metal button!
I?ll just wait awhile and let those last
few words sink in. The metal button
is probably one of the most common
items found ? and discarded ? by
detectorists. The housing estate on
which I live was built where a farm once
stood, so a find of this nature was to be
expected. A lot of them will be just plain
metal discs, so it?s always a pleasure to
find one with a bit of information on the
front. Most just have a maker?s back mark
like Firmin or Gaunt of London.
In days of old, farming involved large
manual workforces whose clothes had
sturdy metal buttons that were often
lost. Was this one of those? Objects of
this nature are difficult to date owing
to deterioration, but I was feeling
adventurous and wanted to know more.
And I was in for a little surprise!
Cleaning
Close examination by Mrs. John using a
magnifying glass plus diligent and gentle
cleaning with a soft brush and wooden
toothpick revealed the legend: DORE 25 CONDUIT St. ? W ? a place situated
in the West End of London.
Research on Mr. Google revealed
that Dore and Sons were ?tailors of
distinction? and were active in the 1890?s.
Their specialties were shooting, fishing,
yachting and travelling suits. They were
also makers of the ?War Office Sealed
Pattern Coat or Great Coat? for use
with the ?Lieutenancy Uniform?. A few
words on a simple button can lead us to
understanding more of the social history
of the time.
The firm seemed to be very versatile
and did a lot of general tailoring. I guess
that if our hobby had been popular then,
the best-dressed detectorists would be
wearing a suit ? preferably made of
camouflage material!
Here?s a fine example of a Dore?s
cardboard delivery box containing
?hygenic? underwear.
TOP Fig 2 Source ? Sketch newspaper of 1896
50 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Another
A second button was found, again with
front markings. No back
mark. Unfortunately,
it isn?t clear and all
I can decipher is
& Co. LONDON.
Any ideas?
Nostalgia
Writing the above
has reminded me of
my childhood. Some of
my earliest memories are of my mother
threading a needle, tying a knot on the
end of the double thread and sewing
buttons onto an article of clothing.
Me old Ma used to keep a box full of
buttons made from all kinds of materials,
not just metal. I used to play with them
on a typically rainy day. And so did my
children. The tiny object that keeps our
shirts and coats together is often taken
for granted until one of them falls off.
Have you seen a Granny?s box on your
visit to the local boot sale? Take a closer
look. It could contain a hidden treasure!
And, I presume the farmer and not
one of his workers lost the Dore example
? but I could be wrong.
Concern
My elation over finding the button was
short-lived. ?Kevin? phoned me. Judging
by his almost incomprehensible accent
I guessed he was from India, probably
Mumbai. He told me that I would be
arrested later in the day for ?illegal
activities?.
In the ensuing ? increasingly heated
- conversation I tried to determine what
these were. Had I failed to inform the
authorities about a particular find ?
or something totally unrelated to the
hobby? Was my past catching up on me?
I was worried.
At the mention of money I told him,
in no uncertain terms, to ?go away?. He
then accused me of not taking the matter
seriously, repeated the arrest scenario,
and put down the phone.
That night, because I didn?t want the
cops bashing down the door with that
red ?persuader? thingy, I left it open all
night. You can?t be too careful!
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RESEARCHER
A Late Anglo-Saxon
cosmetic knife
Bob Green
This article seeks to clarify the purpose and use of a hitherto
unknown artefact dating to the late Anglo-Saxon period.
Description and dating
This small enigmatic object survives from
a turbulent period in English history and
aesthetically encapsulates the naturalistic
and insular art form inspired by Christian
beliefs evolving within the later AngloSaxon period.
At the time of conducting research,
(April 2017), very few examples are
recorded and published. Each is similar
in size and appearance, and from county
find locations, are in the main reported
from within the south of England (old
Wessex), and to a lesser degree, the
midlands and east coast.
The artefact comprises two parts; an
ornate openwork sheath and a blade with
handle. Finds vary from sheath parts and
handles with corroded product remains
to complete examples such as HAMP93B652 (Fig.1), recorded on the Portable
Antiquities Scheme (PAS) database.
The knife and sheath are small in
dimension and easily held in the hand.
The recorded examples have an
approximate overall size of 60mm
x 20mm x 9mm. The opening within
the terminal end is typically 4mm
width x 6mm depth, taking compressed
distortion into account, (compare Fig.1
and Fig. 7).
The copper-alloy sheath is of
openwork form and appears to be
singularly cast into a tapering subtriangular shape with open ends
and centre. The openwork design is
representative of the Winchester style,
c.10th?11th century, comprising singular
or bifurcated coiling tendrils and foliates
moulded to each face of the sheath. The
bulbous open terminal is stylistically
zoomorphic in appearance, with small
rearward facing ears and lentoid eyes, the
created opening giving the impression of
a ?gaping mouth? and overall reminiscent
of the decorative element to be found on
earlier strap-ends of the period.
2
3
9
10
54 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
1
This can be most clearly seen on another
fine example from Hampshire; (UKDFD
25557), recorded on the United Kingdom
Detector Finds Database, (Fig. 7).
The knife comprises a single sheet
iron blade with short tang that is
permanently conjoined with a separately
cast copper-alloy handle making both
parts integral. The shape of the blade
within the sheath is unfortunately
undetermined due to loss or complete
corrosion. The handle element is
formed with either fine openwork
foliate decoration; (Fig. 9), to match the
Winchester style of the sheath, degrading
to a more solid form; (Fig. 10), with
simplified foliate mouldings. The base
of the handle, in all cases, has a short
rectangular projection for seating the
blade into the sheath and this is what
differentiates the casting from any other
handle type.
4
11
Identification and use
What?s certainly known is this artefact
comprises a small blade within sheath
as described. Owing, however, to its
small dimensions and fragility, it is most
likely that it had light functional use,
principally being an elaborate dress
accessory for the owner.
5
6
12
13
The use for such an object would have
been multi-functional, comparable t
o similar sized toilet articles of the
pre-Norman period, such as knives,
picks, spatulas or files. The most unique
element to this artefact is of course
the zoomorphic open terminal end.
Considering the difficult casting process
needed to achieve such results, the hollow
terminal is simply a convexly moulded
animal head with open mouth by
purposeful design, the resulting side view
giving the impression of a narrow ?slot?
(being either wedge-shaped or square).
This opening may create some
confusion and raise the question as to
whether it had its own purposeful use,
but this is simply an artistic expression
in order to reveal the beasts projecting
tongue (knife tip) for visual effect; (think
of this as an open-ended chape at the
terminal end of a scabbard). The blade,
other than for cutting, could be utilised
as a nail cleaner or pick and the blade
face may have been grooved to create
a nail file. The drawing below (Fig. 14)
shows a blade with pointed tip, but this
may have been rounded, or have had
an inverted ?V?-shaped end as found
on regular nail cleaners of the period,
giving the effect of a serpent tongue
when housed.
This small knife is a most elaborate
dress accessory of the period, and one
certainly not in common use.
7
The fact that the survivng sheaths and
handles display charcteristical differences
does, however, demonstrate that their
original manufactured quantities may
have been much greater and more have
yet to be discovered.
At the present time, based upon
find locations, it appears logical that
Wessex was the origin of manufacture
and influence, and the circulation of the
product effecting artistic interpretations
within other Anglo-Saxon or AngloScandinavian communities.
Distribution
The below map presently shows the
find locations and numbers of recorded
artefact parts. Many parts may have been
destroyed, particularly the fragile sheath
element, and lost in antiquity (Fig. 15).
Bibliography
Webley, R. and Burnett, L. 2013 ?Some unusual late 9th
to 12th century copper-alloy strap-ends or chapes? in;
J. Naylor; Portable Antiquities Scheme report for 2012
Medieval Archaeology 57.
Hinton, D, 1990 ?Buckles and other clothes fittings? in;
Object and Economy
in Medieval Winchester. Oxford
University Press.
Kershaw, J, 2008 ?The Distribution of the Winchester
Style in Late Saxon England: Metalwork Finds from
the Danelaw? in; Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology
and History 15. Oxford University Press.
Read, B, 2001 ?Metal Artefacts of Antiquity?.
Portcullis Publishing.
8
14
15
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 55
RESEARCHER
The style of the handle part, if found
on its own, is very similar in appearance
to slightly smaller Post-Medieval knife
end-stops, particularly if they are cast
with pierced tri-lobed mouldings, and
can be easily misidentified.
Interestingly, NCL-854196 (Fig. 6)
and DENO-B9C5E6 (Fig. 11), being
found in the east of England, differ
somewhat to the other recorded
examples, in that the underlying
Winchester style incorporates rounded
perforations that lend a certain
Scandinavian influence to the principal
ornamentation. (Note the open sheath
terminal is wedge-shaped rather than
square, and its handle is plainly arched).
Uniquely, NARC-D16C22 (Fig.12),
believed to be from the same artefact
group and found in the Midlands, also
has a simple arched handle but displays
a Jelling inspired central panel
of decoration. This may exemplify
a relationship between their find spot
locations being from within the Danelaw,
and the migration and acculturation
of the artefacts original identity.
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One club:
three hoards!
Peter D. Spencer
Hoard number one
I?m an honorary member of the West
Riding Detector Group and regularly
attend its outings. On 26 June 2016
all the arable land was under crop on
one of the estates we have permission
to search but a very large pasture field
was available. We had searched it before
and found nothing of note but anything
is better than nothing, so quite a high
number of club members turned up.
My best find during the previous visit
was a �coin and by lunch time all I had
in my find?s bag were bits and pieces of
fairly modern scrap metal. Shortly after
the break I was wandering along when
Peter asked me if I had seen the hoard
located by Dennis. Ah, I thought, I bet it?s
a group of decimal coins.
?All modern?? I asked.
?No, no,? said Peter, ?they are all
hammered coins.?
On some club sites I wouldn?t be
surprised to hear this but the field we
were on had never given up anything
dating before the reign of George II. I
spotted Dennis, about 50 yards away,
talking to several club members, so I
headed over. What he had found amazed
me. It was a group of hammered silver
coins and all except one were fused
together (Figure 1, shown enlarged). The
coins were so thin that it was difficult to
assess the actual number but we guessed
at ten. One coin, an Elizabeth I penny,
had separated itself from the others but
the rest were firmly stuck together. On
the top was a Commonwealth penny and
on the bottom what might be a Charles I
penny.
1
2
How did a group of small hammered
silver coins manage to stay together for
well over three centuries? When lost or
deposited in the soil they must have been
wrapped tightly together or they would
have spread about. The wrapping must
then have lasted long enough for the
coins to stick together. This, of course,
suggests that the field had not been
ploughed for a great length of time after
the coins entered the soil.
Dennis is an exceptionally keen
detectorist and everyone was pleased that
he had unearthed such an interesting
and unusual find. We also wondered
what would be revealed when the coins
were eventually separated. The find was
reported to the FLO at York (Rebecca
Griffiths) and was sent to the British
Museum to be catalogued.
The hoard was eventually disclaimed
and returned to Dennis. It turned out
that the group was made up of eleven
coins and, surprisingly, the group of ten
had not been separated whilst at the
BM. We already knew the top coin was a
Commonwealth penny and the bottom
coin on the BM report was identified as
a penny of Charles I but this is actually
a coin of Charles II. Dennis managed to
separate the coins without damaging any
of them and I catalogued them for him.
The group is made up of one Elizabeth
I penny (mint mark 1, dating it to 1601),
three Commonwealth halfgroats, two
Commonwealth pennies (one pierced
and the other on a much larger flan),
two Charles II third hammered coinage
pennies (one pierced), and three Charles
II third hammered coinage halfgroats.
There are six halfgroats and five pennies
in the hoard, which add up to one
shilling and five pence. All the coins are
illustrated (slightly enlarged) as Figure
2. The Elizabeth I penny is in much
better condition than the other coins,
suggesting that it might have been in the
possession of the original owner for quite
some time.
The hoard is unusual in its range of
coins. A single coin dates to 1601, whilst
all the others date between 1649 and
58 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
1662. Therefore, there is a gap of almost
50 years between the earliest and the
latest. Two whole reigns, those of James
I and Charles I, are absent. Coins of the
third hammered coinage of Charles II
are usually dated to 1662, as that was the
final year that coins were ?hammered?
by hand. The first milled silver coins,
crown pieces, were dated 1662 and in the
following year halfcrowns and shillings
were ?machine made?. Undated groats,
threepences, halfgroats and pennies
were also made by machinery; these were
probably struck after 1662 but before
small silver coins had dates placed upon
them (halfgroats in 1668 and the other
denominations in 1670). Therefore,
the latest coins in the hoard found by
Dennis suggest it was lost or deposited
in 1662 or shortly afterwards. Coins of
the Commonwealth are supposed to have
been demonetised after the Restoration
of Charles II in 1660 but this hoard
proves they were still in use until at least
1662.
Hoard number two
This just goes to show that really good
finds can be missed, even when lots of
experienced detectorists are present
during outings.
On a different estate to the one that
gave up the hoard found by Dennis, a
club outing was held on a truly enormous
pasture field. This was usually occupied
by sheep but on 8 March 2015 the
animals had been moved off, so we
were able to search it for the first time.
Needless to say, we were all hoping for
success but it seemed as if there had
been little human activity in the past,
for signals were few and far between.
However, with around 20 members
present the law of averages pointed
towards something decent turning up.
Sure enough, two fairly new members
unearthed the finds of the day. Tony G
managed to locate a George III shilling
(Figure 3) and Tony B did even better,
for he found a Charles I halfcrown
(Figure 4). When it surfaced he thought
it was a piece of aluminium but he was
3
4
delighted when it was identified as a large
hammered silver coin.
Another visit to the field the
following Sunday produced only a single
hammered coin. However, it was another
large one: a shilling of Elizabeth I (Figure
5), unearthed well away from where the
Charles I halfcrown turned up. Added
together, the hours spent searching ran
into several hundreds. The end result was
two very nice hammered coins but this
wasn?t much to show for all the time and
effort put in on a very large field.
During the first two visits I had
searched an area near the bottom of the
field without success. On a third visit on
12 March 2017 I did the same but after
unearthing a couple of cartridge caps
I started to wander to another area. I?d
have walked for 50 or 60 yards when I
thought I heard something, so I turned
around and saw Susan shouting and
waving to me. I propped up my machine
and waited for her to catch up.
?Go on then, what have you found?? I
asked when she drew up to me.
?What do you think to this?? she said
and dropped a really nice Elizabeth I
shilling into my hand.
6
5
7
?It?s a belter,? I said.
?And this?? she said, dropping another
Elizabeth I shilling into my hand.
?Two!? I gasped.
?And this?? said Susan, adding a third
to the other two (Figure 6 shows a pair
of the coins). I?ve included a photograph
of a delighted Susan, flanked by Steve
and Simon, who both managed to find an
Elizabeth I shilling (Figure 7).
It turned out that Susan had been
near to where I had been detecting at the
bottom of the field and had unearthed
all three coins within a few feet of each
other. I was very pleased for her but
somewhat disappointed that I hadn?t
managed to locate one of the shillings.
I?ve always said that detecting is all down
to luck. You can do research until you are
blue in the face but even on a really good
site your machine has to pass over a find
in order to dig it. I use a Minelab X-Terra
705, which is a very good machine and
through it I have had excellent results. It
might not go as deep as some machines
but who wants to dig a foot or more to
find buttons, cartridge caps and bits of
lead?
As could be expected, many club
members now targeted the lower end of
the field. During this and a subsequent
visit on 9 April the number of shillings
of Elizabeth I unearthed grew to nine;
the shilling found during 2015 raised
the number to ten. Dennis, bless him,
managed to find a shilling of Philip and
Mary (Figure 8), which was rather worn
but much rarer than the Elizabethan
coins. This was obviously a scattered
hoard, so all the coins were reported
under the Treasure Act to Rebecca
Griffiths. No museum expressed an
interest in acquiring the coins, so they
were speedily disclaimed and returned
to爐he finders.
8
thesearcher.co.uk JANURY 2018 59
Hoard number three
On 18 December 2016 my club had an
outing on the estate on which Dennis
had found his hoard of eleven coins.
This time we were on a well-weathered
field of barley stubble. We had been on
the field a few years back and a couple
of Northumbrian stycas had been found.
Most of it was now contaminated with
green waste but it wasn?t as bad as others
we have been on. When a couple of
tenant farmers started to dump this
disgusting waste on their fields our Site
Officer reported it to the Estate Manager,
who immediately banned its use.
Unfortunately, the damage had already
been done to some fields but others were
saved from contamination in the nick
of爐ime.
Anyway, the weather was decent for the
time of years and around 20 detectorists
took part in the outing. Several headed
off to the top of the field, were the stycas
had been found during the previous visit.
I wandered this way and that, digging up
nothing but the metallic junk that makes
up a high proportion of green waste. Not
long before lunch I was passing Brian,
who asked if I had seen the denarii.
?What denarii?? I asked.
?Three have turned up,? said Brian.
It transpired that two fairly new
members had struck it lucky; one
unearthed a single denarius and the
other found two. All the coins were in
good condition and had been found in
an area I had walked over. Yet again, this
was all down to shear luck. Had I walked
over a slightly different line, or swung the
9
10
search-head differently, then I might have
located one of the denarii. Figure 9 is a
denarius of Vespasian and Figure 10 a
coin of Trajan, both found by Simon.
More denarii turned up, spread over
quite a large area. Near the end of the
outing all the club members were in
a group, listening to the Site Officer
explaining that the coins counted as a
scattered heard so they would need to
be reported. I was near Steve, who was
listening but was also in the process of
digging a hole, the end result of which
was another denarius. Like all the others,
it was in good condition but had a small
edge chip. In total ten coins were found,
dating between the reigns of Nero and
Sabina.
On 19 February 2017 we revisited
the Roman hoard field. As I expected,
most club members concentrated on the
area where the denarii had been found.
I decided to ignore it and wandered up
to the top of the field. This had been
thoroughly searched during the previous
visit and I was surprised when I located
a couple of signals, which proved that
there is always something left. The targets
turned out to be a button and a piece
of lead but number three was far better.
It was a good signal but the target took
some time to locate. Eventually it came
out of the hole and I was delighted when
I broke open a small ball of soil and
discovered a decent looking Elizabeth
sixpence (Figure 11). If proof were
needed then this clinched the matter:
everything is down to luck. A group spent
the whole day searching the area that
11
had given up the denarii but only one
member (Kevern) managed to find a
coin. It isn?t in the best condition but is a
rare variety of Vitellius (Figure 12).
So, hoard number three was reported
to Rebecca Griffiths, who by this time
must have been thinking that the West
Riding Detector Group was inordinately
lucky. Like the previous two, this hoard
was disclaimed and the coins handed
back to the finders.
Astute readers will have noticed that
the three hoards add up to one of those
queer coincidences that crop up so often
in this hobby: all of them are made up
of eleven coins. The odds against this
happening must be enormous. Over
years to come the total for the shillings
and the denarii might rise but at this
moment in time all three hoards contain
the same number of coins.
Tailpiece
The West Riding Detector Group is one
of the oldest established clubs in the
UK and on many occasions its members
have reported Treasure finds. However,
during countless outings over a number
of decades the club had only located a
single hoard (the ?Knaresborough area?
hoard of Henry I pennies). Then, within a
relatively short space of time, no less than
three more were found. Perhaps we will
have to wait another decade or two before
the club stumbles upon another. Or, we
might discover another hoard in the
very near future. It?s a funny old game is
detecting, for you never know what the
next bleep in the headphones will lead to.
12
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60 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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FIELD TECHNIQUES
It ain?t rocket science
? teach yourself some field craft
Derek McLennan Beyond The Beep
I
am often asked why I?m successful at
detecting and to be honest there is
more than one thing that helps me
to find nice, interesting stuff. I will
say that having my fair share of luck
plays a part, research is key, attitude
is crucial, confidence in your machine
and equipment is paramount and of
course, boots on the ground and actually
spending hours doing the grunt work is
essential for successful detecting ? trust
me, you?ll have more poor days than
rich ones, but if you stick at it you will
eventually reach a balance with which
you?ll be happy.
Now with all the above accepted, the
main advice I usually give, as do many
other successful detectorists, is regarding
technique. For example, you can do all
the above and have the best machine in
the world, but you will suffer from a very
poor finds rate. In a busy area, packed
with history hiding just below the surface,
you will find yourself coming away with
slim pickings, when others are rejoicing
and indulging in celebratory dancing.
You may ask yourself, why is this? Well
quite simply, it is probably down to your
detecting technique and if you are fairly
new to it, you?ll be going through the
learning curve we all went through ?
well certainly those that lasted
the distance.
?Technique? as I called it above is
not just about slow and low which is the
number one rule, and it is especially
relevant after you find something of
interest. But it is also about reading
a field and other detectorist?s body
language, maintaining your discipline
and concentration during any searching.
We all tend to begin by swinging too
fast, usually driven on by the anticipation
of a fantastic find and even the
experienced, myself included, are guilty.
CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT It ain?t rocket science
Gridding Pattern; Swing one and swing two
ABOVE Do you swing so fast even a camera
can?t pick it up?
noticed the detecting crowd?s wildebeest
like behaviour as they stampede onto
the field at the beginning of the day, but
how many of you are involved in this
and how many sit back and wait until
the dust settles ? I recommend the latter
action. Don?t be a wildebeest, be a lion,
stalking your targets patiently, with skill
and experience. In any case, you will find
that those galloping off also tend to be
the first back, declaring the field ?empty?
of anything interesting and are already
looking to leave for pastures new.
Assuming you have either previously
done your research, or the dig organiser
has, take the time at the beginning
of your day to have a look at the field
you are about to search. You should be
looking for at least some of the following
features; high ground, old trees,
building ruins, ridge lines, flat ground,
hollows, natural tracks, dark soil,
clumps of nettles or other weeds, field
gates and any streams or rivers, as these
can be primary sources of a productive
area. Once you have digested the land
and the wildebeest have dissipated,
pick a line and head towards a distant
landscape feature and just give yourself
the first hour or two to do so slowly.
CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE ?and they?re off, but Sharon
waits; Derek McLennan of BTB with some of his detectors;
the herd is gathering
thesearcher.co.uk APRIL 2017 63
FIELD TECHNIQUES
You will find this normally happens
when you first step onto a fresh field
at the beginning of the day. However,
you may notice yourself slowing down
in the afternoon when you get tired
and this can result in more interesting,
or even the best finds being discovered,
or indeed while strolling back to your
parked vehicle at the end of the day ?
ask yourself why is this? Could it be that
you are a little tired and have actually
slowed both your swinging and walking
pace down?
I?m sure a good many of you reading
this have been on a dig or rally and have
FIELD TECHNIQUES
Stop occasionally, lift up your head
(yes, you should have been staring at the
ground watching your swing coverage)
and have a look around to see if you can
spot any other interesting features from
where you are in the field.
Indeed, if you prefer searching the
edge of a field then start going slowly
around it with a view to completing the
full field boundary, then once finished
the edge you could start a saltire pattern;
crisscrossing the field by going from
corner to corner.
If you find an interesting target,
the best tip I can give you is to spend
some time and grid the area slowly
(10 x 10 yards/meters as a minimum with
the target at the centre), as there may
be more interesting finds lurking nearby.
Far too many times I have watched
someone find something interesting
and then simply walk away from the
area, without gridding it thoroughly
? all they are doing, is handing the
potential opportunity of a great find
to someone else.
Undoubtedly, if you are on a public
dig, with friends, you?ll either hear,
or notice, if a specific area has become
productive ? a dancing detectorist or
a small gathering will usually give the
game away. At this point, you could
choose to head towards the area or
ignore it. If you decide to ignore it, make
a mental note of where it is and when
you eventually arrive near it, then slow
down and grid it.
If you decide to go to the possible
productive site immediately, then try to
swing slower and cover the ground more
accurately than all the others that will
already be there, most of them will be
zipping around desperate for a ?good?
loud signal. If you go slow, keeping the
coil low (touching) the ground and cover
as much ground as possible with your
swing, leaving no gaps between swings
(overlap), you will find targets the others
have missed. This technique is difficult
to maintain, especially if another great
target is found in the area by someone
else, but try your best to keep disciplined,
as it may just pay dividends ? if it doesn?t,
then it was good practice for when it
does.
To split your day, or if you are on a
field yourself, if by lunchtime you have
been disciplined and not found much,
you can spend the afternoon going on an
erratic meander (freestyling) all over the
field to see if it gets any better. Always
pick a point or feature to head towards,
as this will help maintain your discipline,
but feel free to change direction if you
want ? pick another feature or point
and head in that direction, until you
decide to pick another point and so
on. Remember though, if you find an
interesting target, don?t move away until
you have gridded the area.
These simple techniques will help you
to learn some field craft, to swing slower,
lower and more accurately, but most
importantly to pace yourself, which in
turn will eventually make you find more
good targets. Remember nine out of ten
times will result in nothing valuable
or ?treasure? as such, but if you follow
this simple advice, I?m sure you will find
many more interesting items that you can
then spend some time researching
and learning about ? knowledge has
a beginning but no end.
My final tip is to always go out with
the expectation of finding nothing,
but be happy if you find something
interesting or unusual to talk about or
research. You will then find that the
?star? finds will eventually find you and
if they don?t, then you will still have
found something interesting, you will
have learned something about your
technique, the field, the type of ground,
or your machine ? detecting is all about
constant learning and gaining valuable
experience.
When you are out in the field,
remember that sometimes you will win or
sometimes you will just learn, but that in
itself is a win; you can never actually lose
when detecting. The very best of luck
and I wish you many ?star? finds during
your lifetime detecting adventures.
Catch you next time from the
detectorist?s home of rocket science ?
the wilds of bonny Scotland.
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Ridgeline ? Very old tree
? Where would you go? ? High ground! BOTTOM LEFT
TO RIGHT Detectorists gathering in a field; detectorists
gathering when something has been found; church spire
landscape ? feature to walk towards.
Read?s Miscellany
Brian Read
outh-West England revealed 19 of this month?s artefacts and one came
from Buckinghamshire. They span from the late Bronze Age, probable late
Iron Age, Roman, early and late medieval and early post-medieval periods.
Photos are not to scale. Abbreviations: East Devon Metal-Detecting Club ? EDMDC,
Weymouth & Portland Metal-Detecting Club ? WPMDC, Yeovil Metal Detecting
Club ? YMDC.
copper-alloy wire axis spindle.
A probable Roman period, substantial
cast copper-alloy object turned up
for me in South-West Wiltshire No. 4.
It comprises an asymmetrical plate
punched or moulded on the front with
nine ring-and-dot motifs; a transverse
loop projects from the angular end, its
circular aperture filled with rust, the
reverse has two integral circular crosssection lugs or rivets, each bent towards
the rounded end. Function uncertain.
Another cast copper-alloy object
No.� an independent detectorist found
in Dorset. Quite small, it is circular, thick,
and has a slightly off-centre circular hole;
irregularly spaced abraded ring-anddot motifs decorate both faces and the
edge. Possibly Roman period though its
function is uncertain: possibly a bead
though if so, smaller spacer beads would
be required to allow the decorated faces
to be visible.
Dorset was the findspot for No. 6,
also for an independent detectorist. A
cast copper-alloy small cylindrical bead
drilled off-centre, with a biconical centre
S
A YMDC member found in South
Somerset this late Bronze Age, c.BC
1000 ? c.BC 800, cast copper-alloy small
socketed-gourge. The haft socket has
a pronounced peripheral lateral and
grooved collar No. 1.
Discovered in Dorset by an
independent detectorist, No. 2 is late
Iron Age La T鑞e culture c.500 BC ?
1st century AD. Cast copper-alloy, oval,
hemispherical cross-section with a
circumferential basal band, the lower
edge of which has an engraved
circumferential linear groove while the
upper edge has a similar groove with
repeating punched tiny dots; the domed
crown has a central raised annulet the
recess of which retains residue of possible
now reddish enamel (resembling a
ring-and-dot motif); the annulet sits in
a ?plump? S-coil cell that may have held
1
enamel, each side of which is embossed
with a comma shape configured head
to tail (if this pair were closed together
they would form a ?yin yang?); the
reverse or underside is flat with an
embossed shallow-domed oval and a
central circular cross-section stub that
is obviously broken. This object is
perhaps a stud or even a large pin;
however, its incompleteness precludes
establishing a precise function.
The same independent detectorist
found in Dorset No. 3, a Roman
c.2nd-century AD incomplete cast
copper-alloy unusual openwork platebrooch. Quatrefoil-shaped with four
circular apertures, each cusp has a
triangular knop and in the centre
is a pyramidal square cross-section
projection; the reverse retains the
catch-plate, lugs, hinged-pin and
2
4
3
5
66 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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and at both ends a collar engraved each
edge with a linear circumferential groove.
Date uncertain though perhaps Roman
period or even prehistoric.
This delightful late Anglo-Saxon
(c.9th ? c.10th century) Thomas Class
A, Type 1 strap-end an independent
detectorist found Buckinghamshire No.
7. Cast in copper-alloy the terminal is
zoomorphic, attachment end is split
with two rivet-holes for separate rivets,
and frontal decoration is ? engraved
Trewhiddle-style.
Sadly much abraded, No. 8 is a
cast copper alloy, seemingly narrow,
plain amphora-shaped strap-end. The
terminal is sharply pointed while the split
attachment-end features two rivet-holes,
one torn, for separate rivets. Ascribed as
late Roman or Sub-Roman, not AngloSaxon. Discovered in Dorset by an
independent detectorist.
A seemingly regionally significant
recovery in South Somerset for an
EDMDC member is No. 9, a possible
Thomas Class B, Type 6 incomplete
strap-end. Cast in silver, the beautifully
tooled animal-head terminal is 11thearly 12th-century Anglo-Scandinavian
Ringerike-style. Such strap-ends normally
have split attachment-ends, while here it
appears to be stepped. The broken edge
of the attachment section suggests a
rivet-hole for a separate rivet. (My
gratitude to Dr Kevin Leahy and Bob
Green for their respective opinions
concerning this find).
This late Saxon Williams Class A, Type
1 stirrup-strap mount, No. 10, is cast
copper-alloy and a very large example
that surfaced in South Somerset for a
YMDC member. The edges feature the
typical knopped-profile, here three each
side and a larger one at the apex; the
basal angled flange is Williams Type
C and has a single central rivet-hole;
another rivet-hole is sited below the apex
knop. Frontal decoration is obscure,
and appears to be linear and curvilinear
engraving though representing what is
unclear.
A new member of EDMDC was excited
to discover his first medieval brooch,
in East Devon No. 11. It is cast copper
11
8
7
alloy, square with a restriction on one side
still retaining a copper-alloy pin, each
corner projects slightly and is drilled
with a rivet-hole, three of which retain a
separate copper-alloy globular-headed
rivet and a copper-alloy sexfoil rove,
residue of a broken rivet in the fourth
rivet-hole.
A type of c. mid 13th century ? c. mid
14th century single-loop buckle that in
some areas is seemingly uncommon, is
becoming more apparent in the South
West of the country, No. 12. I have
recorded these in a range of sizes and
this one is quite small and cast copper
alloy, which is the norm though
allegedly, silver examples are known.
Basically oval in shape with an offset
and narrowed axis bar, their front bars
come in various profiles, frequently
pronounced and elaborately engraved
or moulded. This example, which has
linear engraving, a WPMDC member
found in South Dorset.
This next object is an unusual buckle,
cast copper-alloy, single-loop, oval/
circular, heavily moulded, with an offset
9
12
10
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 67
narrowed axis bar No. 13. The plan view
of the frame shows three knops spaced
equidistant on the wide and canted front,
though from the frontal perspective it is
zoomorphic, perhaps a bird with beak
and almond-like eyes; a separate sheet
copper-alloy plate is folded around the
axis bar and is pierced with a rivet-hole
retaining a separate copper-alloy rivet; a
stub of rust around the axis bar and rust
staining on the plate indicates an iron
pin. A date of c.12th ? c.13th century
seems right. Found in Dorset by a YMDC
member.
Again different to dozens I?ve
recorded, No. 14 is a cast copper-alloy
buckle, this time uncovered in South
Somerset by a YMDC member. A frontal
knop on its trapezoidal frame is notched
for a pin, which is lost; an incomplete
integral openwork plate has one rivethole, a hole for the pin, and linear
engraving. I feel a late medieval early
post-medieval date is appropriate.
An independent detectorist uncovered
No. 15 in Buckinghamshire, yet another
cast copper-alloy single-loop buckle,
this time probably early post-medieval.
Oblique linear engraving decorates the
front of the hexagonal frame that has a
frontal fleur-de-lis knop.
Medieval cast or sheet copper-alloy
small rotary keys, perhaps used with
caskets, are ubiquitous. The somewhat
corroded example here, No. 16, which
turned up in Dorset for a YMDC
member, is different to many I have
recorded though the type is known.
Mostly roughly rectangular cross-section,
the largish hexagonal bow has a circular
aperture while the simple bit and circular
cross-section locating pin extend from a
short shank.
Ascribed as c. late medieval early
post-medieval, No. 17 is a cast copperalloy strap-end retrieved in Dorset by an
EDMDC member. The sub-rectangular
attachment end is hollow (often described
as ?box construction?) and has two
rivet-holes, each retaining a separate
copper-alloy rivet, while the roughly oval
body has cusped edges and two circular
holes sited transversely and a broken
?crown-shaped? terminal; a trefoil formed
from three concave roundels decorate
the body front, each bearing a possible
blackletter lower case a on a hatched
ground, the front of the attachment end
bears a similar blackletter a and hatching
above three transverse ridges and three
transverse grooves; the body is cracked
transversely across which is ? soldered as
a repair a very thin gauge copper-alloy
rectangular sheet; sporadic white-metalcoating overall.
A pleasing cast copper-alloy openwork
roundel with a cusped edge bearing
an embossed lion with a lost right leg
suggests heraldically it is a ?lion rampant?
No. 18. The reverse shows no sign of
solder, rivets or lugs therefore precisely
to what or how it was affixed is unclear.
For an EDMDC member, East Devon
was the findspot. A post-medieval date is
tentatively ascribed.
Two cast copper-alloy post-medieval
(c.17th century) domed, openwork,
sunburst bridle-bosses were found by
YMDC members; No. 19 turned up in
South Somerset and No. 20, Dorset. The
former has a six-armed impeller and
a central lobe within a lateral border
embossed with foliate and pellets, a
cusped rim and two rivet-holes, one each
side. The other example is damaged but
complete, and has a lateral border with
a cusped rim with repeating fleur-de-lis
terminals, embossed repeating S-scrowls,
fleurets and hearts and two rivet-holes;
heart-shaped and triangular openwork,
a central hexagon with an embossed sixpetalled flower and a lobe.
15
14
13
17
18
16
19
68 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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A monthly identification
and valuation guide
for the detectorist,
numismatist
and archaeologist
Address: The postal address for the
Identification and Valuation Desk
is given below. This address is only
for this section of The Searcher.
Please do not send in the finds
themselves, email:
coinidman@yahoo.co.uk
Finder?s address: Please include
a contact address (preferably postal)
when sending in inquiries. We may need
more information about a find
so it is important to include an address
where we can contact you. Names and
addresses are never passed on to any
third party.
Illustrations: In order to provide
accurate identifications and valuations
we need good quality photographs,
scans or drawings to work from. Images
of finds should be posted to us,
as we do not undertake the task
of printing out images from
computer screens.
T
he photographs of
the coin featured
on this page came
in from Marek
Zacharko but it was
found by Mariusz
Jazdzyk. It?s an absolutely gorgeous
denarius of Carausius, who set himself
up as emperor in the Roman province
of Britannia in AD 287. The coin
is shown enlarged, to highlight its
amazing state of preservation. On the
obverse is a bust of Carausius facing
right and a legend reading IMP
CARAVSIVS P E AVG. On the reverse
the standing figure of Moneta holds
a cornucopia and scales; the legend
on this side reads MONETA AVG
and in the exergue are three letters:
RSR. The coin has been struck slightly
off centre but is otherwise in superb
condition. And, the dies, sometimes
of fairly inferior quality, have been cut
to a very high standard. The portrait
of Carausius is of a man you certainly
wouldn?t want to ?mess? with. The only
minus point is the lettering, which in
some cases is quite crude. However, this
is usual for most coins of this usurper
emperor.
Dimensions/metal: When sending
in images of finds please provide details
of size and whatever metal things are
made of (if known). Some Roman coins
utilise the same legends and design
for different denominations, so size can
be important.
Speed of inclusion: Much depends
on how many other finds are waiting
to be featured in the Identification
and Valuation Desk. Sometimes items
appear very quickly but if there
is a backlog it may take a little longer.
If you require a speedy response then
say so and we?ll get back to you
as quickly as possible (sometimes
by return of post).
Treasure Act: For those not familiar
with the Act we will give help and
advice about what needs reporting
and how it needs to be reported.
Finds classed as treasure will only
be published if they have been through
or are going through the necessary
procedure.
Identification & Valuation Desk, PO Box
197, Leeds LS18 5WQ
or email: coinidman@yahoo.co.uk
70 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
All denarii of Carausius used to
be very rare but over the last couple
of decades the number known has
increased through detecting finds.
This is to be expected, as he was based
in the province of Britannia. Year
on year the number of denarii on
record continues to grow and it is not
particularly unusual for new types and
varieties to turn up. Sam Moorhead,
who is based at the British Museum,
has been working on a corpus for a
number of years and hopes to publish
the fruits of his research during 2018.
If you have any coins of Carausius
and have not already been in contact
with Sam then do so at your earliest
opportunity.
A wide range of denarii of Carausius
appear in volume IV of
David Sear?s Roman Coins
and Their Values. Number
13521 is a denarius with
Moneta on the reverse
but it does not have RSR
in the exergue and the
dies are not as finely
cut as those used to
strike the coin on this
page. Sear prices several
denarii in EF condition
at figures lower than
�000. However, when
graded as EF and sold
at auction the hammer
price is usually at least
double the price quoted
by Sear and sometimes a
good deal more.
In the not too far
distant past rarity was
the most important
factor in regard to
value. Over more recent
years the focus has
shifted and today the
main factor is the state
of preservation. Even
relatively common coins
can now sell for a huge
premium if they are in
particularly outstanding
condition. This denarius
of Carausius is extremely
rare but most modernday prospective buyers
would be attracted to it
less for its rarity than its
wonderful condition. It
really is a truly stunning
coin.
Next month: Amongst
the coins will be Ancient
British and Roman gold,
Anglo-Saxon sceattas
and pennies, and a very
rare Viking Age penny
from the Shetland
Isles. The artefacts
will include a Viking
brooch, a medieval
silver seal matrix, and
an interesting pair
of miniature guns of
uncertain date. Miss
the next issue of The
Searcher and you won?t
see these and a wide
range of other coins and
artefacts, all of which are
recent detecting finds.
STUART. David Midgeley said he spotted this coin
on the surface of a field whilst he was detecting
in Bedfordshire. We were asked to help with
identification and a valuation. Mr Midgeley?s find
is a Charles II third hammered coinage halfcrown.
The first coinage has no mark of value and no inner
circles; the second coinage has a mark of value but
no inner circles; the third coinage has a mark of
value (XXX for 30 pence behind the king?s hair) and
inner circles. This is an astonishing coin to be found
lying on the surface. If the search-head of a detector
passed over it then it would have given off a very loud
signal. At the start of the reign of Charles II coins
were still being hammered. However, new machinery
was soon set up at the mint and ?milled? coins started
to be produced and put into circulation. Many think
the term milled stems from the grained edges placed
upon the first shillings and sixpences but this isn?t
correct. In the 1660s, and for a great length of time
before, anything produced by machinery of any kind
was said to be milled. For example, there were many
wind mills and water mills dotted about the country.
On the obverse of Mr Midgeley?s coin the bust of
Charles II is worn and overall this side would grade
only Fine. The reverse is better and we?d grade it as
about VF for the issue. This isn?t a really rare coin but
is the first specimen we have heard of as a detecting
find. In its present condition a likely pre-sale auction
estimate would be �0-350.
ANGLO-SAXON. The finder of this coin, Shaun
Dicker, said he has had it recorded with the EMC
at the Fitzwilliam Museum. He knows what it is but
he now wants to know what it might be worth. The
coin is a penny of the tribrach type of Coenwulf of
Mercia (AD 796-821). In the Standard Catalogue it
is listed as number 914 and in J. J. North?s English
Hammered Coinage it is number 342. On the obverse
the legend reads COENVVLF REX around a beaded
circle containing a letter M. The reverse is divided
into three sections with the moneyer?s name (DVN)
in the angles. A number of different moneyers?
names appear on tribrach pennies but Dun is
unrecorded. This name appears on other types
struck under Coenwulf but this is the first tribrach
penny to bear his name. However, thanks to the
efforts of detectorists, over fairly recent years many
new moneyer and type combinations have been
discovered. This coin is well struck on both sides
and would grade good VF for the type. If offered
for sale at auction then the likely pre-sale estimate
would be �500-1,800. With competition between
prospective buyers the hammer price might even
break through the upper limit.
EUROPEAN. The coin featured here was unearthed
by John Earley, who said he had not been able to
identify it. This find is a Continental sterling, which
copies the design of English pennies of the same
period. On the obverse is a bust similar to those on
pennies of Edward I and Edward II and the reverse
has the English cross pattee. The coin was struck
for Gaucher de Chatillon as Lord of Porcien and
Florennes (1312-22) in the Low Countries. The
legend on the obverse appears to read GALOES
COMES PORC but it should start with GALCES. On
the reverse the legend reads MON ETN OVA YVE, so
the coin was stuck at the Yves mint. The condition of
this sterling isn?t great but the main details show up
reasonably well. We?d grade it as Fair to about Fine
and as it is one of the less scarce European sterlings
we?d price it no higher than �-25.
GEORGIAN. John Baker is the finder of this shilling
of George III. On the reverse it is dated 1787, which
is a very common date. However, even though this
is common out of the ground it is quite rare as a
detecting find. This was the first year for quite some
time that shillings had been struck at the Royal Mint.
To make up for this a very large number were issued.
Most went straight into banks or were hoarded
rather than being placed into circulation. Therefore,
as few of them circulated it meant that few were
lost, which explains why they are rare as detecting
finds. Mr Baker said there are several types, so he
asked us to pin this one down. The 1787 shilling
is a type coin but there are a number of varieties.
Some lack the stop over the king?s head, some have
no stops by the date, some have no stops on the
obverse, some have hearts in the second quarter of
the Hanoverian shield, some have no hearts, and
some might have the second 7 of the date struck
over 6. Mr Baker?s specimen has all the correct
stops and has hearts in the Hanoverian shield, so it
ValDesk.indd 71
The third coinage has a mark of value
The coin is a penny
of the tribrach type
of Coenwulf of
Mercia
The coin was struck
for Gaucher de
Chatillon as Lord of
Porcien and Florennes
John Baker is the
finder of this shilling
of George III
is the common variety. On the obverse the legend
reads GEORGIVS III DEI GRATIA, which is quite
straightforward and translates as George III by the
Grace of God. However, the legend on the reverse is
long and complicated and reads M B F ET H REX
F D B ET L D S R I A ET E, which is an abbreviated
form of MAGNAE BRITANNIAE FRANCIAE
ET HIBERNIAE REX FIDEI DEFENSOR
BRUNSVICENNES ET LUNENBURGENSIS DUX
SACRI ROMANI ARCHI-THESAURARIUS ET
ELECTOR. The reverse legend is a continuation of
the obverse and translates as King of Great Britain
France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, Duke of
Brunswick and Luneburg, Arch-Treasurer of the Holy
Roman Empire. Mr Baker?s find is a decent example
of a 1787 shilling and he is one of the very few
detectorists who have ever managed to locate one.
This coin is much harder to find in the soil than gold
guineas of George III!
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 71
20/11/2017 12:26
MEDIEVAL. This find was unearthed in Devon by Rob March, who is based in
Somerset. Mr March believed it dated from the 13th-14th century and wanted to
know its history and value. The find is a copper-alloy seal matrix of a type we have
never seen before. It measures 28mm in diameter (shown enlarged) and within
an inner circle on the face is the head of a king, which is surrounded by a legend
that is difficult to interpret in places. In the centre of the reverse is a raised stud,
which is fairly short and this would make it difficult to hold. We think it likely that
the stud fitted into a handle made of wood or bone, which could be gripped when
the matrix was in use. The first part of the legend is fairly clear and reads S (short
for Seal of) SVBSID; this is followed by II (perhaps for V) P (followed by three
uncertain letters) ORVM. After a fairly thorough search through several reference
works we failed to interpret the legend. We thought that SVBSID could stand for
a reserve or secondary seal but the rest of the legend remained a mystery. The last
chance for success was the British Museum catalogue of seals, which runs to seven
volumes (total overall length about 18 inches). Volume I (published 1887) is on
English seals of various types; the pages are uncut, so they have to be turned one
at a time. We started at the back and slowly worked our way to the front; had we
started the other way round we?d have saved half an hour! The written description
of item number 1060 eventually jumped out at us, as it had the same legend
as on the matrix found by Mr March. The full legend can be read as S SVBSID
It measures
28mm in
diameter
(shown
enlarged)
TUDOR. This very unusual coin was found by Hugh
Vincent of Dorset. The coin is a first issue shilling of
Elizabeth I, with mint mark lis (quite rare) on both
sides. The obverse legend ends with REGIA (instead
of REGINA) so the bust, were it visible, would be
2B; this is because 2B is the only bust on record for
an obverse legend with this reading. The reverse is
in near VF condition and so is the obverse legend.
However, only very faint traces of the crown worn by
Elizabeth can be seen within the inner circle on the
obverse. Mr Vincent wanted to know what the coin
would be worth in its present condition, in order to
finalise matters with a landowner. The flans for coins
were not always the same thickness overall so it is not
unusual for flat spots to show up on coins. Were the
entire central area on this shilling thinner than the
edge then the reverse would also be very weak. We
are of the opinion that someone in the early 1560s
purposely removed the bust of Elizabeth. It?s not
unusual to see scratches, often in the form of a cross,
on shillings of Elizabeth I. This is often blamed on
Catholics, who were free to practice their religion
under Mary but not under her younger sister. Of
course, that a Catholic tampered with this coin can
never be proven but it is a possibility. With an obverse
as strong as the reverse we?d have said �0-900 but
with the missing bust (the most important feature on
Elizabethan coins) we would price the coin no higher
than �-100.
Mr Vincent wanted to know
what the coin would be worth
in its present condition
72 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
PANNORVM. The seal in the BM would have been
produced by the matrix pictured here or one like it.
It dates from the reign of Edward I and could have
been used to indicate that the ?subsidy? on a piece
of woolen cloth had been paid. By the middle of the
13th century there were millions of sheep in England
and the export of raw wool, mostly to Flanders, was
the backbone of the English economy. Up to 50,000
sacks were produced each year. Home producers
made a profit through selling wool for between �and �per sack. Merchants made even more, by
exporting sacks to Flanders and selling them for �
to �. Needless to say, English kings viewed wool as
a very profitable trade that could be milked. During
the reign of Edward I clerical subsidies were collected
from ecclesiastical establishments and lay subsidies
from the entire population. There were also subsidies
on things, like wool and cloth. In other words, a
subsidy was a tax. A seal, produced by a matrix,
would be placed upon each sack of wool on which the
tax had been paid. The second half of the legend is
a longer version of Pannus (Latin for piece of cloth).
Therefore, this matrix relates to cloth rather than
pure wool. The only other matrix we traced with a
similar legend dated from the reign of Richard II, so
this one, which dates from the reign of Edward I must
be extremely rare. Placing a figure on it is difficult, as
the overall condition isn?t clear. We gave Mr March
a minimum price range but sale by auction would
be the best route to take for something like this, as it
could then be fought over by prospective buyers.
ANCIENT BRITISH. Tyndall Jones of West Sussex said
this find was unearthed from a field that is littered
with all sorts of rubbish. It was used as a temporary
camp prior to D Day in 1944 but, unfortunately,
the range of domestic junk suggests that no waste
bins were available. However, with patience and
perseverance the occasional good find surfaces.
Pictured here (enlarged) is an Ancient British silver
unit of the Regni and Atrebates. Mr Jones said he
was dead chuffed when he unearthed this coin, as
it is his first pre-Roman silver find. The coin is an
inscribed issue, struck for Tincomarus, whose dates
are circa 25 BC to AD 10. On the obverse is a forward
facing head and on the reverse a bull with its head
turned towards the viewer; above the bull is TIN and
a letter C is below but doesn?t show up well. In Ancient
British Coins the type is listed as number 1109 (as the
Tincomarus Cernunnos type) and in the Standard
Catalogue it is number 86. This is one of the very few
Ancient British coins that have a facing head on the
obverse. The flan looks to be a bit porous but most
of the detail stands out quite well. It is also well and
centrally struck on both sides and is a very rare type.
In its present condition we?d give it a price range of
�-100.
This is one
of the very
few Ancient
British coins
that have
a facing
head on the
obverse
FORGERY. Details in regard to this find were given
to us by Peter Kurton, who is a member of the
West Riding Detector Group. Rather than being
a detecting find, Peter said it was discovered by a
neighbour in his garden. It purports to be a Roman
denarius dating from the first half of the 1st century
AD and is in astonishingly good condition. On the
obverse is the head of Caligula and a legend reading
C CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR POT. On the reverse
is the head of Agrippina Senior (Caligula?s mother)
and a legend that reads AGRIPPINA MAT C CAES
AVG GERM. Denarii of this type were struck under
the authority of Caligula during 37-38 AD in honour
of his deceased mother. In volume I of David Sear?s
Roman Coins and Their Values the type is listed as
number 1825. On page 44 in the February 2015 issue
ROMAN. This gold finger ring was found by Mr
J. C. Jepson of Lincolnshire. Mr Jepson said his
find has been declared to the Coroner but he and
the landowner are still waiting for a response. He
asked for a possible value, as (we quote) ?. . . it
could take a number of years for any formal value
to be confirmed.? Mr Jepson?s find appears to be a
Roman gold ring, which we would suggest is 3rd-4th
century in date. The hoop is made up of two gold
strands, held together by granules and more granules
decorate the outside edges. On both sides of the bezel
are heart-shaped motifs and the bezel itself is set with
a gem. The gem has been cut with a depiction of a
standing figure, which might be meant to represent
Apollo but this is a possibility rather than a certainty.
Everything looks to be intact but the hoop is distorted
out-of-shape. There are many different aspects in
relation to the value of gold finger rings: the date of
manufacture, the size, weight, set with a cut or uncut
stone and, above all, the state of preservation. In the
case of this find several of these points are uncertain.
Mr Jepson has reported the ring under the Treasure
Act and our advice would be simply to let matters run
their course. If a museum wishes to acquire the find
then Mr Jepson will eventually receive a provisional
valuation; if at that time he or the landowner is
uncertain as to whether or not the valuation figure
is in line with the market value then that is the time
to seek advice from an expert. The length of time
taken by a find to go through the Treasure procedure
varies. Sometimes it takes only a few months but in
other cases it can be well over a year. If at any point
a finder thinks the progress is too slow then he or
MEDIEVAL. This hammered silver coin was found
by Harry Birchall of Staffordshire. Mr Birchall said
he is now 83 years of age and sometimes thinks he
is too old to be wandering around fields detecting.
However, despite telling himself it is time to call it a
day, he cannot resist the urge to pick up his detecting
machine and spend a few hours in the countryside.
His latest find is a voided short cross penny of John,
which belongs to class Vb. On the reverse the legend
reads +BARTELME ON W, so Bartelme is the
moneyer and Winchester the mint. The number of
letters in the mint signature depends on the length
It purports to be a
Roman denarius
On both sides of the bezel
are heart-shaped motifs
she should contact the
appropriate authorities.
After all, both the finder
and the landowner
are key parties so any
hold-ups need to be
explained.
of The Searcher we featured an identical coin, which
had been found on a beach by David Maltby. After
doing some research into Mr Maltby?s find we were
able to say that we had traced a couple of similar
coins on the Forgery Network website. We have not
actually seen or handled either of the specimens
mentioned, so we can?t say if they are struck or cast
forgeries. One turned up on a beach and the other in
someone?s garden. With two being found in less than
two years it will only be a matter of time before they
start to be unearthed on detecting sites. So, if you
find a really superb denarius like this one then take
that it will be worth its weight in scrap metal. As we
said back in February of 2015, if something looks too
good to be true then the chances are that it is a fake.
MEDIEVAL. These two finds were unearthed by Mr
A. R. Button of Lincolnshire. The first is a London
halfgroat of Edward III. It has a square initial cross at
the start of the legends and the letter R has a wedgeshaped tail, so the coin was struck during series C of
the fourth coinage, pre treaty period. It looks to be
in near VF condition but has a large edge chip, which
will reduce its value to around �.
The coin was
struck during
series C of the
fourth coinage,
pre treaty period
Find number two is a late medieval period copperalloy door key, which will be 13th or 14th century
in date. No size was given but we are taking it that
it is a reasonable size (around 75mm in length).
Detectorists have found quite a high number of
similar keys, so in the late medieval period many
people must have had lockable doors on their homes.
This example looks to be intact but it appears to be
worn through regular use. Pricewise, it should be
worth �-80 to a collector.
Detectorists have found quite a high number of similar keys
There is a weak area
on the obverse
of the moneyer?s name and the size of the letters; on
this coin the name is long and the lettering large,
so a single letter W stands for Winchester. There is a
weak area on the obverse and both sides have been
struck slightly off centre but this penny is otherwise a
nice example of the reign, type and mint. We advised
Mr Birchall to get out detecting as often as he can. It
will keep him fit and he will still experience the thrill
of finding interesting coins and artefacts. And, of
course, there is the pleasure gained from the sights,
sounds and occasionally the smell of the wonderful
English countryside.
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 73
VICTORIAN + ROMAN. These two coins are from
a group of finds unearthed by Marc Duncan of
Gloucestershire. The first is a gold half sovereign
of Victoria. It has the old head of Victoria on the
obverse, is dated 1900 on the reverse and there is
no sign of a mint letter under St. George and the
dragon. The coin has even wear with no defects
and is in Fine condition. Its value in its present
condition would be close to the bullion price. On the
international market gold is priced in US dollars, so
the value of this half sovereign is also linked to the
exchange rate of the � sterling.
Coin number two is a denarius of Hadrian. The
obverse legend reads HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
around the bare head of the emperor. On the reverse
is the standing figure of Fortuna (holding in one
hand a rudder set on a globe and in the other hand a
cornucopia) and a legend that reads FORTVNA AVG.
In volume II of David Sear?s Roman Coins and Their
Values this type is listed as number 3494 and is dated
to AD 133. In terms of wear the coin would grade
about VF but there are metal flaws on the obverse
and a piece of silver looks to have flaked off under
Hadrian?s chin, so it might be a contemporary plated
copy. If it is solid silver we?d say �-35 but if it is
plated then only about one third of this price range.
MEDIEVAL. This hammered silver penny was
unearthed by Mrs Susan Hurrell of Gloucestershire.
Mrs Hurrell said it had been badly clipped but hoped
we could identify it for her. It measures only 14mm in
diameter but the illustrations are enlarged. This is a
really awkward one. There is a quatrefoil in the centre
of the reverse, so the coin must have been struck at
the ecclesiastical mint at York ? during the first or
second reign of Edward IV. The coin is very small in
size but this isn?t unusual for pennies of Edward IV;
they are often of full weight but appear to be clipped
because the flan was too small for the dies. However,
were the obverse legend and mint mark visible then
this would provide important pointers. There is a key
near the right shoulder of the king and an initial letter
to the left. The letter is badly struck and could be one
of three, so another pointer towards a definite ID is
missing. At both sides of the base of the crown are
large pellets and this should offer a crucial clue as to
the date of striking. Unfortunately, no York pennies of
Edward IV are on record with pellets by the crown. Of
the Edward IV pennies found in England as detecting
finds about one in three is Irish and rare varieties of
Edward IV pennies struck in Ireland do have pellets
by the crown and a quatrefoil on the reverse. However,
Irish pennies do not have an initial letter and a key
by the king?s shoulders. Therefore, the distinguishing
marks on this penny, besides being anomalous, are of a
combination not on record. The coin is of a reasonably
good style, so it will not be a forgery; but having said
this, it is impossible to pin down with any degree of
certainty. All we can say is that it is pretty definitely
a penny of Edward IV. Its anomalous nature would
certainly make it appealing to a specialist collector
and to some it would be of more interest than a
straightforward coin of Edward IV
On the international market
gold is priced in US dollars
If it is solid silver we?d say
�-35
MEDIEVAL. Carl Walmsley told us that this coin
was found during a detecting rally held in aid of a
charity. It?s a London groat of the last Plantagenet
king: Richard III. It has mint mark sun and rose
united on both sides but neither show up clearly
enough for us to identify the variety of either mark.
This is an unusual variety with no punctuation
marks in the reverse legend. Groats of Richard III
are not particularly rare but their popularity with
collectors ensures that they always sell for high
prices. After the death of his brother (Edward IV)
Richard immediately set about gaining the throne
for himself, despite the fact that the next in line was
Prince Edward. He stopped at nothing in his quest
and was probably responsible for the murder of
Edward and his younger brother, who had been held
in captivity in the Tower of London. However, his
reign was short, for he was killed at the battle fought
at Bosworth Field between his supporters and those
of Henry Tudor. This groat is a good size but the
surfaces, especially the reverse, are dark in colour.
And, there are a few old scratches on the king?s face.
The coin is otherwise in about VF condition. In its
present state of preservation a likely auction estimate
would be �0-1,000 but on a good day it could
break through the upper limit.
It has mint
mark sun and
rose united
on both sides
The coin is very small in size
but this isn?t unusual for
pennies of Edward IV
74 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
MEDIEVAL. The photographs of this coin were sent in
by Ron Jewell but it was unearthed in North Devon
by a friend named Steve. It is believed to be only the
second hammered gold coin to be found in Devon
in over 30 years. We were asked to identify it and
provide a valuation. It?s a half noble of Edward III,
which was struck during the treaty period ? when
England was flush with gold and silver through
successful campaigning in France. On the obverse
there is a saltire before EDWARD and double saltires
as stops in the legends. In the centre of the reverse
is a Lombardic letter E, there is a cross pattee at the
start of the legend and the same punctuation marks
as on the obverse. The imagery on the obverse,
showing the king standing in a ship and holding a
sword and shield, commemorates the English naval
victory at Sluys in 1340. In the Standard Catalogue this
type of half noble is listed as number 1506. In terms
of wear the coin would grade near to VF and no
defects of any kind show up. In its present condition
this hammered gold coin should fetch around
�500 if offered for sale at auction.
In terms of
wear the
coin would
grade near
to VF
TUDOR. Steve Kane said he unearthed this find about
ten years since but has never had it identified. It is
roughly square in shape and one side bears what
appears to be a bust of Henry VII within a beaded
circle. The other side is perfectly plain. Mr Kane said
it weighs 9.3 grams (143.5 grains) and he wonders
if it could be a coin weight for a testoon (shilling). A
major innovation during the reign of Henry VII was
the introduction of a more realistic profile portrait
of the king; this replaced the rather stylised facing
bust, which was first used on groats of Edward III.
Another innovation was the striking for the first time
of testoons; these had a profile portrait but few of
these large silver coins were struck and today they
are extremely rare. This find certainly does look like
a coin weight and testoons of Henry VII tipped the
scales at 144 grains, which is almost exactly the same
as Mr Kane?s find. However, we traced no weights of
this type dating from the reign of Henry VII. When a
completely new coin was issued it is likely that those
seeing it for the first time would want to check it out.
Therefore, a weight would be needed to do this. This
find looks like a coin weight, the portrait on it looks
like Henry VII, the actual weight matches a profile
portrait testoon, so everything points in the same
direction. A testoon was a large coin at the start of the
16th century, which ordinary folk might never even
see, so it would only be the better off who needed
to check them out. This would mean that only a few
weights were ever made; perhaps so few were made
that all except one have disappeared into the mists of
time. Should this be the case than Mr Kane?s find will
be very important, as it might be the only known coin
weight of its type dating from the reign of Henry VII.
We would welcome comments from readers on this
intriguing find.
A major innovation
during the reign
of Henry VII was
the introduction
of a more realistic
profile爌ortrait
ANCIENT BRITISH. We have featured a number of
gold coins found by Kevin Easton and his dad and
here is another one. Kevin said it was unearthed
by his dad from a site that produces mainly Roman
material. They say that persistence pays, for this
detecting duo have found at least 300 grots from a
site previously searched by another detectorist for 15
years. Besides the Ancient British coin and 300 grots,
Kevin recently unearthed an Anglo-Saxon disc brooch
and his dad found a lovely late medieval bronze
finger ring. The latest find (shown enlarged) is an
Ancient British gold quarter stater. It?s a coin of the
Catuvellauni and is an example of the Tasciovanus
Pegasus type. On the obverse is TASC within a panel
superimposed upon a vertical wreath. On the reverse
MEDIEVAL + ROMAN? Pete Wise asked
us to identify and value three of his
detecting finds. The first is a class Ib
voided short cross penny of Henry
II. The legend on the reverse reads
+IEFREI ON LVND, so Iefrei is the
moneyer and London the mint. The
coin is well struck on a round flan but
rather dark in colour. The surface of
the obverse looks to be slightly porous
but this side is otherwise in good Fine
condition; the reverse is better and
would grade about VF. In its present
condition this Henry II penny would
be worth around �0 to a collector.
Find number two is a voided short cross
cut halfpenny: From the style of the
head and shape of the X in REX on the
obverse this will be a class Vc penny of
John. The moneyer?s name, IOhAN,
shows up on the reverse, so the mint
is probably (though not certainly)
Canterbury. Voided short cross cut
halfpennies are now quite common, so
our best price range for this one would
be �4.
Find number three is a cast bronze
figure of a seated dog: Most of
the bronze animals unearthed by
detectorists date from the Roman
period. However, they usually stand on
their own legs or have an integrally cast
flat base. This one has a pointed stump
at the base and we can?t remember
seeing this on a Roman period casting;
having said this, the stump might
be for mounting purposes. Does any
reader recognise this as Roman or from
another period? Do let us know if you
can provide any useful input.
The coin is well struck on a
round flan but rather dark in
colour
The mint is probably (though
not certainly) Canterbury
Does any reader
recognise this as
Roman or from
another period?
is a left-facing horse with a ring-and-dot under
its raised tail and a star or sunburst below. In the
Standard Catalogue this type is number 226 and in
Ancient British Coins it is listed as number 2605 and is
said to be rare. Both sides have been struck off centre
but this is still a reasonably nice looking Ancient
British quarter stater and yet another gold coin to
add to the collection built up by Kevin Easton and
his燿ad.
A coin of the Catuvellauni,
which is an example of the
Tasciovanus Pegasus type
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 75
clubactivities
Please email your club news and images of finds to:
info@thesearcher.co.uk or send to The Searcher,
17 Down Road, Merrow, Guildford, Surrey GU1 2PX
Identifications made in this section are supplied
by individual clubs.
BSEMDG Graham Tredgett
We had a quiz we had originally planned for the September meeting but due to a lot
of members having other commitments it was cancelled. Sue Clark did a great job with
the quiz, every member took part in teams of four and the winning team was John
Wilde, Gerald O Sullivan, Pete Clark and Robert Stoute! Well done!
A few good items graced the finds table, from a gold ring, axe head, hammies and a
coin weight. A blind raffle raised �.00 many thanks to all members that took part!
Coin weight
Two hammies
George II
Edward I
Gold ring
Axe head
Norwich Detectors Steven Carpenter
The October meeting revealed to our amazement the discovery of two more gold
aureus of Augustus, bringing the total of last month?s hoard to six! Finds on show by
members also included a Theodosius siliqua and a Roman horse and rider brooch.
The monthly awards were:
Find of the Month
6th Century Anglo-Saxon small long
brooch ? Thomas Melvin
Token Award
Group of 17th century trade tokens
found close together ? David Soanes
Coin of the Month ? Ancient to 1066
Iceni Irstead type gold quarter stater ?
Denise Pye
Coin of the Month ? 1066 to 1485
John class 5a penny of Winchester ?
David Soanes
Artefact of the Month
Medieval horse harness pendant ?
Colin燤cRobert
Coin of the Month ? 1485 to Modern
George IV gold sovereign ? Vince Butler
Tony Gregory Award
Commonwealth lead trade weight ?
David Soanes
Committee Award
Pipe tamper hand holding scroll ?
David燬oanes
78 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
HISTORICA
Coins & Antiquities Auction
23 January 2018
Prehistoric
to PostMedieval
Single
items or
collections
Currently seeking consignments of quality coins and artefacts.
We regulary achieve excellent prices for Ancient & Medieval jewellery
Contact: Adam Staples / Lisa Grace 07392 872903
Email historica@hansonsauctioneers.co.uk
www.hansonsauctioneers.co.uk
The Auction Centre, Heage Lane, Etwall, Derbyshire, DE65 6LS
Find us on Facebook
This superb silver vesica-shaped seal
matrix was unearthed by a detectorist
in 2016. Dating to the 14th century,
this seal has survived in exceptional
condition. Engraved around the edge
of the seal face are the words FRANGE
LEGE TEGE (Break, read, conceal).
This Latin inscription refers to the
manner in which this matrix was used
to seal secret letters.
Once the intended recipient received
the letter, he/she would be able to
recognise the wax seal of the sender and
see that it had not been tampered with.
Twitter @HistoricaUK
Then, as indicated by the legend, they
would break the seal, read the letter
and then conceal it away from prying
eyes. The central device is of a finelyengraved falcon perched upon the arm
of a falconer and it would certainly have
belonged to a person of some status. The
imagination runs wild at the thought
of what a 14th century secret letter may
contain. A message of love, conspiracy,
treason?
The seal was declared as potential
Treasure and, after being disclaimed by
the Crown, the finder and landowner
consigned it to Historica, where it
will feature alongside a host of other
quality items in our January Coins and
Antiquities auction.
Gem-set gold rings, posey rings,
Saxon and Viking coins and hammered
gold are just some of the lots on offer.
Entries for the auction are still being
accepted until January 5, so if you
have anything suitable please
contact Adam Staples or Lisa Grace
on 07392 872903 or email historica@
hansonsauctioneers.co.uk
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 79
East Norfolk MDS Andy Carter
Winners of the monthly competition at our November meeting were:
Ancient coin (Celtic & Roman)
1st Hadrian denarius ? Andy Carter
Kendal & District MDC
Metal artefact (Post-Norman
Conquest)
1st Shield-shaped lead weight ?
Gerry燙ook
Find of the month
Artefact pre 1600
1st Roman steel yard weight ?
Joyce燘rown
2nd Trajan denarius ? Maurice Mayhew
Later mediaeval coin (short-cross to
Henry VII)
1st Henry III short-cross penny ?
Linda燬tephenson
2nd John short-cross penny ?
Andy燙arter
Post-mediaeval coin (Henry VIII to
present day)
1st James I shilling ? Andy Carter
2nd Charles II farthing ? Jean Chaplin
Metal artefact (pre-Norman Conquest)
1st Iron Age harness cheekpiece ?
Dave燙larke
Ian Watedge
With only one more club meeting before
the Christmas break, the club voted to
donate this year?s charity proceeds to the
local Air Ambulance Service.
New members are always welcome. We
at the Cross Keys Hotel, Milnthorpe on
the last Thursday of each month. 7.30pm
for 8pm start.
2nd Leg-shaped pipe tamper ?
Maurice燤ayhew
Non-metallic or Natural find
1st Large Nene Valley ware colourcoated sherd ? Tim English
2nd 12th-14th century spindle whorl ?
Mark Jones
Artefact post 1600
1st Georgian pipe tamper ? Martin Head
2nd Silver thimble ? Tony Philips
Coins and Tokens pre 1662
1st Edward III
half penny ?
Duncan燱appett
2nd Iron Age enamelled terret?
Gerry燙ook
2nd Flint borer ? Dave Clarke
Tony Gregory Award for Best Find
of the Month:
Iron Age harness cheekpiece ?
Dave燙larke
2nd Henry III voided long cross penny ?
Mark Jones
Coins and Tokens post 1662
1st George III half guinea ? Mark Jones
Brighton & MDC Graham Amy
Club site coin
Celtic silver unit ?
Ian Bouglas
Non club site coin
Siliquae of Julian II ?
Bob Dick
Club artefact
George I pin brooch ?
Graham Amy
80 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Non club site
artefact
Roman fibula
brooch ?
Derek燩age
2nd Masonic half penny token ?
Tony燩hilips
Overall find of the month
George III half guinea ? Mark Jones
Maidenhead Search Society Andrew Thompson
Roman brooch
Members had an interesting talk by Hugh Williams on the life and coins of
Constantine the Great. The finds table was laden and the winners were Jim Mather:
Roman gold solidus of Theodosius I, Sue Washington: Viking stirrup mount and Barry
Knight: Roman artefacts display.
Other notable finds were: Paul Berry: gold stater of Cunobelinus, Peter Grant:
Roman brooch, Mick Washington: Roman wheel brooch, Andrew Thompson:
Cunobelinus silver unit and John Long: pewter dog whistle.
Dog whistle
Gold stater
Silver unit
Roman wheel brooch
Stirrup
mount
Theodosius solidus
Wanted All Gold Finger Rings ? enamelled, jewelled, posy, mourning.
A 15th century jewelled
gold finger ring inscribed
?AMOUR MI TIEN?
(love grips me)
Highest prices given and paid immediately
14 Grafton Street, London, W1S 4DE
wartski@wartski.com
020 7493 1141
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 81
Essex DS Tony Robson
Find of the Month Competition results
were:
Coin
1st Cnut penny short cross ?
Tony燫obson
Derby Artefacts RC Bridget Whitehouse
The finds table was laden with all sorts of interesting artefacts and coins on display.
There was lively discussion and interest taken in all the finds. Barry told us that he
nearly threw away the votive shield as he had not recognised it for what it was until he
happened to chance on a picture and description of one. A prime example that you
should look twice before throwing ?scrap? away! In the end the Ruston family (father
and son) swept the board as follows:
Coin
Artefact
1st Cararcella denarius ? Mathew Ruston
1st Iron Age votive shield ? Barry燫uston
2nd Tasciovanus braided hair silver unit
? Dave Winchester
2nd Love token ? Barry Ruston
2nd Roman mount ? Barry Ruston
3rd James II cuirassed bust tin farthing
? Peter Barden
BSEMDG Graham Tredgett
Our November meeting was well attended with 26 members present and our FLO Alex
Bliss who brought along a PAS intern Riccardo to the meeting. We had Alex Fisher
along from the Suffolk Archaeology who gave us a talk on some local excavations that
have been taking place.
We had some nice finds again on the finds table. Best Artefact was judged to be a
lovely Roman bowl mount found by Sue Clark and the coin a Celtic silver unit. The
raffle raised � pounds.
Sword chape
Kevin Healy
Artefact
1st Celtic mount
anthropomorphic ?
Dave Winchester
Celtic unit
2nd 17th
cent. posy ring
betrothal ring ?
Tony Robson
3rd Late bronze
age bead ?
Liam argent
CYMDC Graham Walsh
This month?s fines table was a cracker with hard choices to be made as to which find to
vote for.
Our FLO was welcomed back to our club after what seems an age after her
maternity leave.
Coin of the month
David II groat ?
Mick Lodge
Under 300 years
George sixpence ?
David Lees (Long
Silver Dave)
82 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Artefact of the month
Medieval key ? Paula Walsh
(Gold Digger)
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Another excellent month for our members with a finds table well filled with
some great items.
Competition results:
Other finds
Coin of the month
Aethelred penny
Republican denarius ? John Ainsworth
Harness pendant
Nero denarius
Artefact of the month
Victorian silver toothpick ?
Wayne燫ushin
Vespasian denarius
Club Dig Winners
Edward penny ? Brian Wilkinson
Edward penny ? Brian Clark
LHSS Charlie Atkinson
Silver ring
2nd Equal Offa penny (only 3rd
recorded) ? Sid Deaton
Coin of the month
1st Corieltauvi
gold stater ?
Glenn燭insley
2nd Equal
Corieltauvi
gold stater ?
Bob燜orrest
Lions head
horse brass
Artefact of
the month
1st Roman
umbonate
brooch ?
Sid燚eaton
2nd Gold ring ? Ade Hammond
3rd Edward I
penny ?
Sally Shaw
3rd Crotal bell ? Colin Bullivant
Minehead Area Detectorists Richard Tarr
Ian Long our Chairman gave a roundup of the month just gone, and the date for the
November dig was announced. This dig is being run in conjunction with Somerset
Artefact Seekers and the land has previously produced great finds.
Laura our FLO was kept busy all evening identifying members finds and took a fair
few items away for recording. Her knowledge is amazing!
Coin of the Month
Henry VI half groat mint Calais ?
Tony Chambers
Artefact of the Month
Georgian hallmarked silver Christening
spoon ? Ross Campbell
84 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
New members are welcome, and our club
meets at 7pm on the first Thursday of
every month at the Hobby Horse pub in
Minehead. The local FLO attends our
meetings regularly and her next
bi-monthly visit will be in January.
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Metal Detecting Cumbria
Justin Bell
We had our first club dig this weekend
and second meeting tonight.
Our finds of the month were:
Best pre 1600 coin
Edward I/II penny ? Daniel Boake
Stour Valley S&RC Angela Kernan
We hold our meetings on the last
Wednesday evening of the month.
Unfortunately sad news was announced
that Bob Tydeman, a founder member,
had just died.
O BI T UA RY
Bob Tydeman
Finds of the month were as follows:
Coins
1st Edward the
confessor silver
penny ?
David Spohr
2nd Denarius
of Hadrian ?
Angela Kernan
Best post
1600 coin
Charles I half
groat ?
Ian Toomey
Pre 1600 artefact
We also had a fantastic find on our first
club dig by a new detectorist using a
Garrett Ace 250. Stuart Peacock found
a Bronze Age axe head!
3rd Roman silver
3rd century
Antoninianus ?
David Eagles
Artefacts
1st (joint winners)
Saxon stirrup
mount, 11th C ?
Darren Nunn
Roman bow brooch, 1st C. ? John Earley
2nd Medieval spoon handle ?
David燛agles
3rd Medieval
belt mount ?
John Earley
Stour Valley Search and Recovery
Club are very sad to announce the
recent death of Bob Tydeman at the
age of 92.
Bob was a founder member of
the Club in 1984. He had moved to
Hamworthy near Poole in the early
1950?s, with his engineering job.
Bob?s wife had died some years
ago and he lived with his daughter
Mel, who in latter years brought
him out to sites for detecting on a
Saturday or to meetings.
Bob had been Chairman of the
Club and in recent years was Liaison
Officer with the local museums. He
had some mobility problems in latter
years, but was always a cheerful and
enthusiastic member of the Club he
loved and very knowledgable about
finds.
He will be sadly missed.
R.I.P.
Angela Kernan
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86 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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Yeovil MDC Colin Spiller
Once again plenty to talk about, club leaflets handed out to everyone and loads on the
table to judge and admire. Results were:
Collection Rob March
Art pre
Copper alloy scribe pen ? Rob March
Art Post
Pendent seal ? Graham Calloway
Eyes only
Sharpening stone ? Colin Spiller
Coin Pre
Durotrigian silver stater ? Val Read
Coin Post
Victoria florin ? Roger Evans
Quakers Acres MDC Graeme Thompson
Excellent turn outs for meetings and club digs continue to see the club thrive.
October Competition winners:
Coin Section
1st Denarius Faustina II ? Keith Wallis
3rd Equal Elizabeth I half pence ?
Jackson McMillan
2nd Elizabeth I sixpence ?
Colin燞enderson
Artefact Section
1st Coin weight ? Keith Wallis
3rd Equal A hoard of brass ?
John燙rammond
3rd Equal Viking era bullion weight or
gaming piece ? Lance Todd
3rd Equal Edward III half groat ?
Andy燱alton
2nd James I Irish sixpence love token ?
Keith Wallis
88 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 89
Medway History Finders
Dave Clarke
Here are our finds for October:
October:
Coins
1st Spanish real ? Kev Reader
SHRADS Keith Arnold
The Treasurer reminded members of the
Christmas Charity raffle being run by the
Western Region of the NCMD. The first
prize is a Deus metal detector and the
tickets �50 for a strip of five.
West Kirby MDC Chris Andrews
Artefact of the Month
1st 4th Century Saxon cruciform
brooch ? Jacky Smith
Monthly competition results:
Any sites find
1st Henry VIII groat ? Matt Littlechild
2nd Henry VIII coin ? Anna Elliott
2nd Medieval sword/dagger pommel ?
George Fowles
3rd Spur ? Barry Dixon
2nd Commonwealth half groat ?
Tony燘rown
Coin of the Month
1st Constantine AE follis ? Paul Carpenter
3rd Celtic Gaul ?Remi Tribe? potin ?
Dave燢night
3rd Henry IV penny ? Rob Ryan
2nd American trime (3 cents) 1851 ?
1854 ? Dave Shiffman
Artefacts
1st Seal fob ? Stephen Elliott
Club sites artefact
1st Roman brooch ? Chris Goodchild
2nd Lead ring ? Laurie Hobbs
2nd Dagger guard ? John Dobbins
Equal 3rd 1751 novelty token
(doubloon) ? George Fowles
Equal 3rd Elizabeth I threepence ?
Paul燙arpenter
3rd Crotal bell ? Karen Burch
Joint 3rd Shire horse shoe ? Dave Thorne
Purse bar ? Nick Keeler
Spectacle buckle ? Ian Archurch
Two Dales MDC Andy Whelan
Amy Downes, FLO, kindly attended our November meeting to identify and record
finds. David Whelan was voted detectorist of the outing at a recent club outing.
The winners of the find of the month competitions were:
Coin of the month
Charles the Bold
French double
patard ?
Greg Dobson
Find under 300 years
Queen Victoria
half sovereign ?
Bill燬wainston
90 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Artefact of the month
Anglo Saxon
zoomorphic
mount ?
Jean燬wainston
Eyes only find
Neolithic flint blade ? Bill Swainston
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Swale S&RC Jacq le Breton
2nd Bronze Age spear tip ?
Trevor燞eyworth
Here are the results for our November finds:
Coins
1st Silver coin Harold I ? John Dobbin
3rd Bronze coin Constantine ?
Trevor燞eyworth
3rd National rifle club badge ?
Syd燞allybone
2nd Silver sixpence James I ?
Syd燞allybone
Artefacts
1st Crotal bell 16th-17th C ?
John燚obbin
Weymouth & Portland MDC Mike Apps
Our October meeting was a busy one with a talk by local historian Gordon Le Pard
on the Poole Swash Channel Wreck. This was an early 17th century Dutch wreck only
relatively recently discovered close to Poole harbour and which has many unique
features and items onboard.
Our monthly competitions results were:
Coin of the month
1st Irish penny of John ? Tom Jones
2nd Anglo Saxon sceat ? Karen Brown
3rd Edward III groat ? Jeff Braithwaite
Artefact of the month
1st Roman lozenge
brooch ?
Karen燘rown
WRDG Grenville Shuttleworth
Find of the month winners were:
Best Coin
Joint Winners
Roman Antoninus Pius sesterius ?
Jeff燱arden
Best Artefact
Roman plate brooch ? Simon Molyneux
2nd Medieval silver crenulated ring ?
Clive Smith
3rd Equal
Pilgrims
ampula ?
Martin燬avage
3rd Equal Purse bar ? Ron Howse
Other winners were:
Medieval Artefact
Buckle plate ? Peter Kurton
Modern Coin
George V shilling ? Ian Critchley
Mary groat ? Simon Molyneux
92 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Herts & District MDS David Roberts
Roman bronze Gordian ? Peter Cross
The November winner of the FoM coin section was Clive Reddish with his lovely
Ancient British quarter stater. Winning artefact was a bronze barrel-cask bung
unearthed by Michael Lidington. A few of the other entries included: John Pole?s
Charles I shilling, an English jetton entered by David Roberts, a Roman bronze of
Gordian by Peter Cross and Roger Paul?s Roman denarius of Marcus Aurelius.
Ancient British quarter stater ?
Clive燫eddish
Charles I shilling dating to 1625 ?
John燩ole
Roman denarius Marcus Aurelius ?
Roger Paul
English ?Sterling bust? jetton 1320-43
? David Roberts
Barrel-cask
bung ?
Michael
Lidington
Taynton MDC Geoff Blindell
A special find set off the evenings meeting with a discussion and history surrounding
Andy Frapes rare Edward the Confessor cut quarter. Another exciting find was John
Keenan?s Medievel stirrup ring with markings suggesting a Knights Templar ring
which hopefully will be confirmed by the FLO Kurt Adams at some point in the future.
Another coin of note was Steve McCoy?s James I shilling a huge lump of hammered
silver with a cross etched into the Kings face believed to have been defaced for
Religious reasons.
Winners were:
Hammered
Edward The Confessor cut quarter ?
Andy Frape
Pilgrim ampulla ?
John Feenan
Eyes only
Mesolithic flint blade ?
Dave Mayes
Artefacts
Medieval stirrup ring ? John Feenan
Neolithic thumbnail scraper ?
Geoff燘lindell
Neolithic scraper ? Andy Frape
Milled
Charles II groat ? John Feenan
Gratian siliqua ? Mick James
Horse harness pedant ? Peter Mccoy
James I shilling ? Steve McCoy
George II halfpenny ? Dave Hutton
Victoria gothic florin ? Les Hannah
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 93
Now ? 31 March 2018
Exhibition: 20 Years of
Treasure The Oxfordshire
Museum Free. Tel: 01993
814106
2 December
Bloomsbury Coin Fair
9.30am-2pm �entry.
www.bloomsburycoinfair.com
3 December
Cwmann nr Lampeter
LGD, Wales, www.lgd.com
4 December
Ancient British Coins
Liz?s List 92 Fixed Price
catalogue,
www.celticcoins.com
5 December
Highlights Tour
Ashmolean Msueum
11am-12pm, Meet at
Gallery 21, places are limited
www.ashmolean.org
6 December
Artefact and Coin ID
service (PAS)
Ashmolean Museum,
Gallery 1. 12pm-3pm
No booking required
www.ashmolean.org
6 & 7 December
Coin Auction Spink &
Son of Southampton Row,
London. Tel: 020 7563
4000
8 December
SITE TOUR: Roman Fort
Gate tours Museum of
London 2pm-2.30pm
Adv booking only �
www.museumoflondon.org.
uk/events
8 December
Gallery Talk: Lost
or found? Anglo
Saxon beliefs before
Christianity.
Britsih Museum, Room 41
Free, just drop in.
www.britishmuseum.org/
whats_on
8 December
Gallery Talk: Lost or
found? Anglo-Saxon
beliefs before Christianity
British Museum, Room 41
1.15pm-2pm Free.
Just drop in. www.
britishmuseum.org/whats_on
9 December
Gallery Activity: Hands on
coins Ashmolean Museum,
Gallery 7. 11.30am-3.30pm
No booking required
www.ashmolean.org
9 & 10 January
Coin Auction Classical
Numismatic Group. Triton
XXI in New York. Inquiries in
the UK should be directed to
the London office. Tel: 020
7495 1888
10 December
Finds ID Day
Potteries Museum & Art
Gallery 10am-3pm
teresa.gilmore@
birminghammuseums.org.uk
23 December
Gallery Activity: Hands on
coins Ashmolean Museum,
Gallery 7. 11.30am-3.30pm
No booking required
www.ashmolean.org
30 December
Gallery Activity: Hands on
coins Ashmolean Museum,
Gallery 7. 11.30am-3.30pm
No booking required
www.ashmolean.org
9-10 January
Coin Auction
Classical Numismatic Group.
Triton XXI in New York
Tel: 020 7495 1888
If you would like your
event included in this
column please email us on:
info@thesearcher.co.uk
or write to: 17 Down
Road, Merrow, Guildford,
Surrey GU1 2PX
the searcher is in no way
whatsoever involved with
the organisation or running
of any events advertised on
this page and cannot be held
responsible for anything that
may occur at the event. All
enquiries and/or complaints
should be made to the
relevant organiser.
23 January
Antiquities auction
Historica
www.hansonsauctioneers.
co.uk
27-28 January
Coins and other
collectables
Lockdales of Ipswich
Tel:�473 218588
12 December
Behind the scenes tours:
Scientific research
British Museum, Information
Desk 11am-12.20pm
(other times available)
Free. Booking essential
www.britishmuseum.org/
whats_on
15 December
Gallery Talk: Coins at
Christmas British Museum,
Room 68 1.15pm-2pm
Free. Just drop in. www.
britishmuseum.org/whats_on
16 December
Gallery Activity: Hands on
coins Ashmolean Museum,
Gallery 7. 11.30am-3.30pm
No booking required
www.ashmolean.org
17 December
Christmas LGD dig
Hallow Worcester,
www.lgd.com
20 Years of Treasure
The Oxfordshire Museum Now ? 31 March
The aim of the exhibition is to celebrate 20 years of both the
Treasure Act and the Portable Antiquities Scheme and
its contribution to our understanding of Oxfordshire?s history.
It will also cover what people can do if they find something
themselves and what the role of the Finds Liaison Officer is.
All of the objects on display have been found over the last
20 years by local people and detectorists. They include both
treasure finds and also items that have been recorded by the
Portable Antiquities Scheme.
Many of the objects have made their way into the county?s
permanent collections but there will also be examples of objects
that were recorded and then returned to their finder.
Objects range from clay pipes and pots to gold coin hoards
and Elizabethan rings. Recent acquisitions such as a beautifully
decorated pair of Roman callipers will be on display for the
first time.
94 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Dix Noonan Webb held a three-day
sale on 13, 14 and 15 September,
in which a total of 2,232 lots went
under the hammer. The sale included
a number of private collections,
together with material submitted for
sale by several other vendors. A few
of the lots that changed hands are
featured on this page. All the prices
quoted are before the addition of the
20% buyers? premium and any other
charges that may have been payable.
The references are all from standard
works on Roman coins.
Lot 126, George III half guinea,
1762, first bust, S. 3731, VF, very rare,
�900.
Lot 375, Edward the Confessor penny
of Dorchester, helmet type, moneyer
Blacaman, almost EF, the mint
extremely rare, �400.
Lot 389, Richard III halfgroat, type
3, M.M. half sun and rose on obverse
only, S. 2162, nearly VF, extremely
rare, �000.
Lot 511, Charles II shilling, 1675,
second bust with plume below, S. 3376,
obverse Fair, reverse Fine, very rare,
�0.
Lot 548, Henry III long cross penny
of Carlisle, class IIIab1, moneyer Ion,
S.�62B, about VF, rare �.
Lot 555, Henry III long cross penny
of Durham, class Vg, moneyer Roger,
S.�73, VF, rare, �0.
Lot 570, Henry III long cross penny
of London, class IVa, moneyer Nicole,
S. 1365, reverse off centre, otherwise
good VF and rare, �0.
Lot 793, Prince Henry of Scotland
penny of Bamborough, period D,
moneyer Willelm, S. 5013, partly flat
and surfaces slightly porous, otherwise
VF and extremely rare, �000.
Lot 802, Richard I penny of Carlisle,
class 4a, moneyer Alein, S. 1348A,
about VF, scarce, �0.
Lot 829, Elizabeth I penny, first issue,
M.M. lis, beaded inner circles, S.
2554A, Fair to Fine, believed to be only
three specimens known, �0.
Lot 871, Charles II double crown,
first hammered issue, M.M. crown on
obverse only, S. 3302, slightly double
struck on profile, otherwise good VF
and rare, �500.
Lot 900, William and Mary half
guinea, 1691, elephant and castle
below bust, S. 3431, some surface
marks, the reverse VF, the obverse
better, �700.
Lot 905, William III guinea, 1701,
second bust, S. 3463, nearly VF, �300.
Lot 1006, George III sovereign, 1820,
short date, closed figure 2, S. 3785C,
Fine or better, �0.
Lot 1229, Ireland, Edward I penny of
Cork, type III, S. 6259, nearly EF, full
flan, very rare, �300.
Lot 1234, Ireland, Edward IV groat of
Limerick, light cross and pellets coinage,
L on king?s breast, S. 6343, legends
partly flat, otherwise VF, �0.
Lot 1286, Ireland, James II Limerick
coinage halfpenny, 1691, S. 6594, good
Fine, die flaw on obverse, �.
Lot 1656, Aelius Caesar denarius,
Rome, AD 137, Spes on reverse, RSC 55,
VF, �0.
Lot 1664, Julia Mamaea sestertius,
Rome, AD 228, Felicitas standing on
reverse, RIC 676, VF, even brown
patina,牐70.
Lot 1668, Maximus Caesar dupondius,
Rome, AD 236-38, priestly implements
on reverse, RIC 12, VF, brown patina,
�.
Lot 1692, Geta denarius, Rome, circa
AD 210-11, Victory on reverse, RSC 219,
nearly VF, rare, �0.
Lot 1730, Augustus denarius,
Lugdunum, circa 15-13 BC, bull on
reverse, RSC 137, Fine or better, �0.
Lot 1742, Claudius denarius,
Lugdunum, circa AD 51, Pax Nemesis
on reverse, RSC 65, Fine, �0.
Lot 1750, Nero denarius, Lugdunum,
circa AD 56-57, EX S C in wreath on
reverse, RSC 207, good Fine, rare,
�0.
Lot 1754, Galba denarius, Gaul, AD 68,
Concordia standing on reverse, RSC 34,
some surface pitting, otherwise better
than Fine, rare, �0.
Lot 1758, Vitellius denarius, Tarraco,
AD 69, bust left, clasped hands on
reverse, RSC. 32, nearly VF, flan slightly
irregular, very rare with bust left, �0.
Lot 1836, Hadrian aureus, Rome, AD
119-25, Jupiter on reverse, RIC 63c,
better than Fine but light graze on
reverse, �300.
Lot 1842, Hadrian dupondius, Rome,
AD 118, Concordia seated on reverse,
RIC 556, good VF, �0.
Lot 1848, Antoninus Pius and Marcus
Aurelius denarius, Rome, AD 140-44,
bust of Aurelius on reverse, RSC 21,
VF,牐90.
Lot 1876, Carausius denarius, London,
AD 286-87, woman milking cow on
reverse, RSC 103 var., struck off centre,
otherwise better than VF and extremely
rare, �500.
Lot 126
Lot 511
Lot 570
Lot 871
Lot 1229
Lot 1656
Lot 1692
Lot 1750
Lot 1836
Lot 1876
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 95
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Tesoro Trident II supreme. Near new............... �5
Loads of Detector covers and accessories
Tesoro Cibola. Little used................................. �0
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Tesoro Cortes. Nice condition.......................... �0
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Tornado 13? coil unused for Fisher F75............. �
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North Vol 1 Circa 600-1272AD, hardback
and dust cover. In unused condition 250
pages. 1980 edition. P&P �00 Offers.
Tel:�903 260155.
ENGLISH HAMMERED COINAGE by J.J
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and plastic cover. In unused condition 250
pages. 1991 edition. P&P �00 Offers.
Tel:�903 260155.
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magazines. Heavy so buyer collects. �.00.
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thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 97
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9/29/2017 10:31:10 AM
. On the
obverse is the head of Caligula and a legend reading
C CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR POT. On the reverse
is the head of Agrippina Senior (Caligula?s mother)
and a legend that reads AGRIPPINA MAT C CAES
AVG GERM. Denarii of this type were struck under
the authority of Caligula during 37-38 AD in honour
of his deceased mother. In volume I of David Sear?s
Roman Coins and Their Values the type is listed as
number 1825. On page 44 in the February 2015 issue
ROMAN. This gold finger ring was found by Mr
J. C. Jepson of Lincolnshire. Mr Jepson said his
find has been declared to the Coroner but he and
the landowner are still waiting for a response. He
asked for a possible value, as (we quote) ?. . . it
could take a number of years for any formal value
to be confirmed.? Mr Jepson?s find appears to be a
Roman gold ring, which we would suggest is 3rd-4th
century in date. The hoop is made up of two gold
strands, held together by granules and more granules
decorate the outside edges. On both sides of the bezel
are heart-shaped motifs and the bezel itself is set with
a gem. The gem has been cut with a depiction of a
standing figure, which might be meant to represent
Apollo but this is a possibility rather than a certainty.
Everything looks to be intact but the hoop is distorted
out-of-shape. There are many different aspects in
relation to the value of gold finger rings: the date of
manufacture, the size, weight, set with a cut or uncut
stone and, above all, the state of preservation. In the
case of this find several of these points are uncertain.
Mr Jepson has reported the ring under the Treasure
Act and our advice would be simply to let matters run
their course. If a museum wishes to acquire the find
then Mr Jepson will eventually receive a provisional
valuation; if at that time he or the landowner is
uncertain as to whether or not the valuation figure
is in line with the market value then that is the time
to seek advice from an expert. The length of time
taken by a find to go through the Treasure procedure
varies. Sometimes it takes only a few months but in
other cases it can be well over a year. If at any point
a finder thinks the progress is too slow then he or
MEDIEVAL. This hammered silver coin was found
by Harry Birchall of Staffordshire. Mr Birchall said
he is now 83 years of age and sometimes thinks he
is too old to be wandering around fields detecting.
However, despite telling himself it is time to call it a
day, he cannot resist the urge to pick up his detecting
machine and spend a few hours in the countryside.
His latest find is a voided short cross penny of John,
which belongs to class Vb. On the reverse the legend
reads +BARTELME ON W, so Bartelme is the
moneyer and Winchester the mint. The number of
letters in the mint signature depends on the length
It purports to be a
Roman denarius
On both sides of the bezel
are heart-shaped motifs
she should contact the
appropriate authorities.
After all, both the finder
and the landowner
are key parties so any
hold-ups need to be
explained.
of The Searcher we featured an identical coin, which
had been found on a beach by David Maltby. After
doing some research into Mr Maltby?s find we were
able to say that we had traced a couple of similar
coins on the Forgery Network website. We have not
actually seen or handled either of the specimens
mentioned, so we can?t say if they are struck or cast
forgeries. One turned up on a beach and the other in
someone?s garden. With two being found in less than
two years it will only be a matter of time before they
start to be unearthed on detecting sites. So, if you
find a really superb denarius like this one then take
that it will be worth its weight in scrap metal. As we
said back in February of 2015, if something looks too
good to be true then the chances are that it is a fake.
MEDIEVAL. These two finds were unearthed by Mr
A. R. Button of Lincolnshire. The first is a London
halfgroat of Edward III. It has a square initial cross at
the start of the legends and the letter R has a wedgeshaped tail, so the coin was struck during series C of
the fourth coinage, pre treaty period. It looks to be
in near VF condition but has a large edge chip, which
will reduce its value to around �.
The coin was
struck during
series C of the
fourth coinage,
pre treaty period
Find number two is a late medieval period copperalloy door key, which will be 13th or 14th century
in date. No size was given but we are taking it that
it is a reasonable size (around 75mm in length).
Detectorists have found quite a high number of
similar keys, so in the late medieval period many
people must have had lockable doors on their homes.
This example looks to be intact but it appears to be
worn through regular use. Pricewise, it should be
worth �-80 to a collector.
Detectorists have found quite a high number of similar keys
There is a weak area
on the obverse
of the moneyer?s name and the size of the letters; on
this coin the name is long and the lettering large,
so a single letter W stands for Winchester. There is a
weak area on the obverse and both sides have been
struck slightly off centre but this penny is otherwise a
nice example of the reign, type and mint. We advised
Mr Birchall to get out detecting as often as he can. It
will keep him fit and he will still experience the thrill
of finding interesting coins and artefacts. And, of
course, there is the pleasure gained from the sights,
sounds and occasionally the smell of the wonderful
English countryside.
thesearcher.co.uk JANUARY 2018 73
VICTORIAN + ROMAN. These two coins are from
a group of finds unearthed by Marc Duncan of
Gloucestershire. The first is a gold half sovereign
of Victoria. It has the old head of Victoria on the
obverse, is dated 1900 on the reverse and there is
no sign of a mint letter under St. George and the
dragon. The coin has even wear with no defects
and is in Fine condition. Its value in its present
condition would be close to the bullion price. On the
international market gold is priced in US dollars, so
the value of this half sovereign is also linked to the
exchange rate of the � sterling.
Coin number two is a denarius of Hadrian. The
obverse legend reads HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
around the bare head of the emperor. On the reverse
is the standing figure of Fortuna (holding in one
hand a rudder set on a globe and in the other hand a
cornucopia) and a legend that reads FORTVNA AVG.
In volume II of David Sear?s Roman Coins and Their
Values this type is listed as number 3494 and is dated
to AD 133. In terms of wear the coin would grade
about VF but there are metal flaws on the obverse
and a piece of silver looks to have flaked off under
Hadrian?s chin, so it might be a contemporary plated
copy. If it is solid silver we?d say �-35 but if it is
plated then only about one third of this price range.
MEDIEVAL. This hammered silver penny was
unearthed by Mrs Susan Hurrell of Gloucestershire.
Mrs Hurrell said it had been badly clipped but hoped
we could identify it for her. It measures only 14mm in
diameter but the illustrations are enlarged. This is a
really awkward one. There is a quatrefoil in the centre
of the reverse, so the coin must have been struck at
the ecclesiastical mint at York ? during the first or
second reign of Edward IV. The coin is very small in
size but this isn?t unusual for pennies of Edward IV;
they are often of full weight but appear to be clipped
because the flan was too small for the dies. However,
were the obverse legend and mint mark visible then
this would provide important pointers. There is a key
near the right shoulder of the king and an initial letter
to the left. The letter is badly struck and could be one
of three, so another pointer towards a definite ID is
missing. At both sides of the base of the crown are
large pellets and this should offer a crucial clue as to
the date of striking. Unfortunately, no York pennies of
Edward IV are on record with pellets by the crown. Of
the Edward IV pennies found in England as detecting
finds about one in three is Irish and rare varieties of
Edward IV pennies struck in Ireland do have pellets
by the crown and a quatrefoil on the reverse. However,
Irish pennies do not have an initial letter and a key
by the king?s shoulders. Therefore, the distinguishing
marks on this penny, besides being anomalous, are of a
combination not on record. The coin is of a reasonably
good style, so it will not be a forgery; but having said
this, it is impossible to pin down with any degree of
certainty. All we can say is that it is pretty definitely
a penny of Edward IV. Its anomalous nature would
certainly make it appealing to a specialist collector
and to some it would be of more interest than a
straightforward coin of Edward IV
On the international market
gold is priced in US dollars
If it is solid silver we?d say
�-35
MEDIEVAL. Carl Walmsley told us that this coin
was found during a detecting rally held in aid of a
charity. It?s a London groat of the last Plantagenet
king: Richard III. It has mint mark sun and rose
united on both sides but neither show up clearly
enough for us to identify the variety of either mark.
This is an unusual variety with no punctuation
marks in the reverse legend. Groats of Richard III
are not particularly rare but their popularity with
collectors ensures that they always sell for high
prices. After the death of his brother (Edward IV)
Richard immediately set about gaining the throne
for himself, despite the fact that the next in line was
Prince Edward. He stopped at nothing in his quest
and was probably responsible for the murder of
Edward and his younger brother, who had been held
in captivity in the Tower of London. However, his
reign was short, for he was killed at the battle fought
at Bosworth Field between his supporters and those
of Henry Tudor. This groat is a good size but the
surfaces, especially the reverse, are dark in colour.
And, there are a few old scratches on the king?s face.
The coin is otherwise in about VF condition. In its
present state of preservation a likely auction estimate
would be �0-1,000 but on a good day it could
break through the upper limit.
It has mint
mark sun and
rose united
on both sides
The coin is very small in size
but this isn?t unusual for
pennies of Edward IV
74 THE SEARCHER JANUARY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
MEDIEVAL. The photographs of this coin were sent in
by Ron Jewell but it was unearthed in North Devon
by a friend named Steve. It is believed to be only the
second hammered gold coin to be found in Devon
in over 30 years. We were asked to identify it and
provide a valuation. It?s a half noble of Edward III,
which was struck during the treaty period ? when
England was flush with gold and silver through
successful campaigning in France. On the obverse
there is a saltire before EDWARD and double saltires
as stops in the legends. In the centre of the reverse
is a Lombardic letter E, there is a cross pattee at the
start of the legend and the same punctuation marks
as on the obverse. The imagery on the obverse,
showing the king standing in a ship and holding a
sword and shield, commemorates the English naval
victory at Sluys in 1340. In the Standard Catalogue this
type of half noble is listed as number 1506. In terms
of wear the coin would grade near to VF and no
defects of any kind show up. In its present condition
this hammered gold coin should fetch around
�500 if offered for sale at auction.
In terms of
wear the
coin would
grade near
to VF
TUDOR. Steve Kane said he unearthed this find about
ten years since but has never had it identified. It is
roughly square in shape and one side bears what
appears to be a bust of Henry VII within a beaded
circle. The other side is perfectly plain. Mr Kane said
it weighs 9.3 grams (143.5 grains) and he wonders
if it could be a coin weight for a testoon (shilling). A
major innovation during the reign of Henry VII was
the introduction of a more realistic profile portrait
of the king; this replaced the rather stylised facing
bust, which was first used on groats of Edward III.
Another innovation was the striking for the first time
of testoons; these had a profile portrait but few of
these large silver coins were struck and today they
are extremely rare. This find certainly does look like
a coin weight and testoons of Henry VII tipped the
scales at 144 grains, which is almost exactly the same
as Mr Kane?s find. However, we traced no weights of
this type dating from the reign of Henry VII. When a
completely new coin was issued it is likely that those
seeing it for the first time would want to check it out.
Therefore, a weight would be needed to do this. This
find looks like a coin weight, the portrait on it looks
like Henry VII, the actual weight matches a profile
portrait testoon, so everything points in the same
direction. A testoon was a large coin at the start of the
16th century, which ordinary folk might never even
see, so it would only be the better off who needed
to check them out. This would mean that only a few
weights were ever made; perhaps so few were made
that all except one have disappeared into the mists of
time. Should this be the case than Mr Kane?s find will
be very important, as it might be the only known coin
weight of its type dating from the reign of Henry VII.
We would welcome comments from readers on this
intriguing find.
A major innovation
during the reign
of Henry VII was
the introduction
of a more realistic
profile爌ortrait
ANCIENT BRITISH. We have featured a number of
gold coins found by Kevin Easton and his dad and
here is another one. Kevin said it was unearthed
by his dad from a site that produces mainly Roman
material. They say that persistence pays, for this
detecting duo have found at least 300 grots from a
site previously searched by another detectorist for 15
years. Besides the Ancient British coin and 300 grots,
Kevin recently unearthed an Anglo-Saxon 
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The Searcher, journal
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