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The Searcher November 2017

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THE SEARCHER
NO 387 NOVEMBER 2017 £3.99
Exclusive:
A Roman hoard
with a difference
2016 Nations’
Greatest Winners
Rally round-up
Product Test:
XP HF elliptical coil
using it on contaminated
+ ‘worked out’ sites
Bumper Issue:
770955 922115
1 1
9
ISSN
NOVEMBER 2017 ISSUE 387
0955-9221
includes
5 hoards!
WON’T
ANYTHING
WHY I BUT A
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then within about half
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a stunning radiate of
Claudius II. I was so
happy!"
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Cleaning
pencil set
searchlight
ON THE COVER
14
nod to the dog Pete
A
Cresswell, Andy Boughton &
Part 2 FLO Kurt Adams
22
28
38
FEATURES
VOLUME 33 No. 3 ISSUE No. 387
Dedicated to: Karolyn Hatt founding Publisher and Editor
Publisher, Editor, Design and Layout: Harry Bain
Numismatic Consultant: Peter D Spencer BA (Hons)
Typesetting, Production and Repro: Jim Judd,
Tradeset Ltd
Printed and Distributed by: Warners Group plc,
For Editorial and Advertising: Harry Bain
Call: 01483 830133
Email: info@thesearcher.co.uk
Write to: 17 Down Road, Guildford,
Surrey GU1 2PX
Assistant Editor: John Winter
Call: 01296 580244
Email: john@thesearcher.co.uk
Field Reporter: Daniel Spencer
Email: daniel@thesearcher.co.uk
Videographer/Reporter: Sid Perry
Email: sid@thesearcher.co.uk
For Identification and Valuation Desk
Email: coinidman@yahoo.co.uk
Write to: Searcher Publications Ltd, PO Box 197,
Leeds, LS18 5WQ
For Subscriptions, Current and Back Issues
www.thesearcher.co.uk or call: 01778 392036
Email: subscriptions@warnersgroup.co.uk
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Write to: The Searcher Subscription Dept, Warners,
West Street, Bourne, Lincs. PE10 9PH
For Queries on Availability & Distribution
Call Nikki Munton on: 01778 391171
E-mail: nikkim@warnersgroup.co.uk
Front Cover Photo: Some of the finds within the hoard
found by Pete Cresswell. Copyright Pete Cresswell
22
24
Product News: Minelab
Equinox Series
28
INNERS: Nations’ Greatest
W
Finds Competition
Peter D. Spencer
roduct test: XP HF elliptical
P
coil – using it on contaminated
and ‘worked out’ UK sites
72
74
69
An Irish coin hoard
Eugene O’Sullivan
roduct Review: C-Scope
P
wireless headphones
David Rees
REGULARS
08
Widescan
News and views from in and
around the hobby
32
38
Irish Inspiration
Diminic Quinn
60
Identification and
Valuation Desk Your monthly
he Dairsie Hoard:
T
Part 1: Finding Roman
Treasure David Hall
Part 2: Rebuilding Roman
silver Dr Fraser Hunter
77
lub Activities Your club news
C
and images of finds. Email:
info@thesearcher.co.uk
46
48
Rally report: Coil to the Soil
Gary Cook
76
Subscription information
How you can subscribe
to this magazine
ally report: Dorset & West
R
Pathfinders Charity rally
David Whitcombe
87
52
56
69
Detecting Medley
John Winter
igital subscription
D
information How you can
subscribe to this magazine
digitally
95
96
Saleroom Scene Recent
coin auction results
Read’s Miscellany
Brian Read
Celtic hoard unearthed in
Lincs A Searcher report
guide for the detectorist,
numismatist and archaeologist
lassified Advertising
C
Including items For Sale,
Wanted, Exchange,
Miscellaneous and the
Classified Advert Order Form
December issue on sale: 27 October
Get in touch with us at
thesearcher.co.uk
twitter.com/thesearchermag
facebook.com/pages/The-Searcher-magazine/
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 7
widescan
BUMPER HOARD ISSUE!
Harry Bain
Editor/Publisher
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Gift Subscriptions/
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and back issues:
Call 01778 392036
or see online.
Digital subscriptions:
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Next issue
on sale
27 Oct
H
ello and welcome to your bumper November issue …
Our EXCLUSIVE this month is a fabulous and very glamorous Roman
founders’ hoard. I say glamorous, as I haven’t ever seen one with such an
eclectic array of contents. Pete Cresswell is still in shock after
discovering such a significant find.
Our second hoard, from Scotland, was found by 14 year old David Hall on a
Detecting Scotland dig. David describes events as they unfolded and in Part 2 Dr
Fraser Hunter explains the European significance of this silver Roman hoard.
A Viking hoard from Northern Ireland is also within our pages and Diminic Quinn
recounts how he became hooked on the hobby and how he continued to add to
his Shanmullagh Hoard, which is currently on display in the Belfast Museum.
The winners of the 2016 Nations’ Greatest Finds Competition are also
announced which, for the first time, includes Jersey. Well done to those who were
nominated and congratulations to the winners. You’ll shortly be receiving your
trophies.
There is much more in the rest of the magazine!
At Detectival we launched the SPARTAN which is the result of a new
collaboration with Black Ada. Spartan is a Limited Edition spade and is retailing
at £39.95. An optional extra is a reinforced spade bag for protection and
transportation and will be available from blackada.com and other Black Ada
stockists at £7.50. See their advert on page 13.
Harry Bain, Editor
EXHIBITION NEWS
TREASURE UNEARTHED EXHIBITION Kevin Gorman
In mid August, the North-West Region of the NCMD hosted their
bi-annual exhibition of detecting finds in Chester Town Hall.
The four judges whose job it was to select the best coin, best
artefact, best themed showcase, and the best overall club stand
were: Dr Kevin Leahy, Clive Coleman (Chairman of the NCMD),
Harry Bain (editor of The Searcher) and Mark Olly (archaeologist
and local historian).
Unearthed UK, brought along a complete array of machines
and accessories, plus three brand new detectors which they gave
away in a free raffle.
The day was a success both in terms of reaching out to the
public and also as a regional event. A full write up will be in the
next issue of the NCMD newsletter Digging Deep.
There are far, far, too many people to thank individually, and
so, to everyone who rose from their beds at an unearthly hour to
make this day happen, you have our heartfelt and sincere thanks.
8 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
TREASURE LAW UPDATE
HOBBY NEWS
ISLE OF MAN TREASURE
LEGISLATION CHANGE
A BREAK FROM DETECTING
Allison Fox, Curator: Archaeology, Manx National Heritage
On 5 July this year, the parliament of the
Isle of Man gathered at the ancient open
air site of Tynwald Hill. One of the acts
being given Royal assent was the Treasure
Act 2017, replacing the existing Treasure
Trove Act.
After two stages of consultation with
relevant bodies including the Manx
Detectorists Society and the NCMD and
with an accompanying Code of Practice
the Act started its journey through the
Manx legislative system. One noticeable
difference is a clause allowing an object
to be designated Treasure if it is of
outstanding significance to the Isle of
Man.
The Code of Practice details the
procedures to be followed after a find is
made, from reporting and depositing
with Manx National Heritage, through to
the Coroner’s inquest and valuation. This
Greeba Viking goldsmiths hoard found by
Colin Gough; Rob Middleton
clarity and transparency of procedure is
one of the major improvements enabled
by the new Act.
It is extremely important that all
parties involved are treated fairly and
that the procedure after discovery is
plainly stated and available for all to see.
It is crucial that everyone has confidence
in the system, and it is hoped that the
new Act will provide this.
From 1 October 2017, the Treasure
Act will replace Treasure Trove on the
Isle of Man and we await the first find
under the new legislation.
Thanks to all those who responded to
our requests for help and guidance,
including from finders and their
representatives, colleagues in the British
Museum and those within the Treasury
department of the Isle of Man
Government.
FINDS NEWS
A REAL BUZZ!
John Ward
I’ve been detecting for two and a half
years and use a Deus on the Deep
program and Sid’s program and tweak
both to suit me and the ground
conditions. I’ve been lucky enough to
have found some interesting finds and
you’ll find me out most weekends
meeting loads of people that love the
hobby as much as myself,
On this particular day I found the
gold ring in Wetherby, North Yorkshire
when out with Northumbrian Search
Society and have since been back to
show the farmer and am taking it to
the FLO. It does give you a real buzz
when you find something good!
Dave Grantham
It was on a glorious day in May when
Mike Pahlen (left) and myself decided on
a beach detecting day near Bridlington
in East Yorkshire. In company with
Mike’s partner who I refer to as ‘Shelley
the digger’, we arrived at the beach.
We have very little experience of
detecting, let alone beach detecting. The
finds were few, but the sun was shinning
and that’s all that mattered. We were out
doing something we enjoy.
A couple of hours with our X-Terra’s
was tiring, so a suggested break was
agreed. It’s important to have a rest,
discuss the finds, detect and maybe rest
again. You can’t get enough rest
especially when you have flask of tea and
some chocolate biscuits. (Mike did eat
most of them). Could have done with a
couple of pillows though and some sun
cream!
Keep believing!
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 9
Twenty years on
John Winter looks back
Another vintage
edition
Old Yellowbelly was talking
about what had recently been
in the papers about our hobby.
I particularly liked his bit on a
well-known broadsheet.
“The Daily Telegraph
reported in depth on what
many of us saw on television
as the Time Team’s finest
hour when at last they actually
produced something tangible,
though the finds were
users and the organisers due
nothing to write home about.
to the funeral of Diana,
Perhaps this site will
Princess of Wales.
develop into something
Leisure Promotions sought
worthwhile, and joking aside,
advice as to what was the
all respectable metal detector
correct thing to do as the
users wish the Team the best.
detecting hobby had to be
How many of you saw the
seen to be in keeping with
chap with the detector busy
the rest of the country. The
searching in the background
decision was taken to
while some filming was in
postpone the morning’s
progress?
events and have a service
I have to confess
on the site. And that’s
that while watching
what happened.
NOVEMBER
the Time Team, I am
Afterwards Mick
1997
consumed by a great
commented, “The
urge to have someone
service was very moving
direct them en masse to the
and many people were in
nearest Oxfam for a changetears … when we finished it
up of clothing.”
was a very quiet group of
detectorists who walked off to
the start of the first event.”
The day Britain cried
Another reason for
The Newbury Rally of ’97
remembering this Rally can
turned out to be one to be
be seen on the front cover …
remembered, as predicted by
the Newbury Rally Hoard of
organiser Mick Turrell. And
75 coins mostly from the
he was right. The day was
reign of Charles I with one or
‘difficult’ for both detector
Red Rocket
Brian and Mo’ Cross make an
appearance in this issue and
relate their experiences with
a group of American
detectorists. “You can’t beat
detecting AND good
company,” Bri declared.
They’d had a great time with
the ‘Yanks’.
He concluded the report
by saying, “although they
had undoubtedly learned
something from us, we had
learned that sheer
doggedness really can
pay off.”
FINDS NEWS
FINDS NEWS
VISTA GOLD FINDS GOLD!
Danny Adams Morrell
At 6:15 the alarm goes. My plans for the
day were; Jason’s dig with Lincolnshire
Relic Hunters till lunch then go and see
Peter the farmer and detect the rest of
day there.
I prepared a flask, let the dogs out and
load the van with my two machines; a
Minelab CTX 3030 and Deeptech Vista
Gold. Then a steady two and half hours
drive to Market Rasen to meet the group.
I started with my CTX and dug about
15 targets but nothing. I heard a few
Roman coins and hammered had been
found so my mojo returned. It’s here;
I’ve just got to find it!
Lunch arrived and I bade my farewells
and 30 minutes later was knocking on
Peter’s door. I’ve never really had much
off his land but the finds have been my
best – a beautiful Hadrian denarius, a
Stephen and two years before that a
gold stater.
This time I used my Vista Gold. The
two Elizabeth I and James I.
The two joint finders were
Brian and Andy. I’m sure that
many of you reading this will
remember that Rally,
especially Mr. Malugani who
won £1000!
stubble was about 4” high and as usual
not many alerts but suddenly, bang, a
signal! I dug out a big chunk of stubble,
which split open to reveal the gleaming
golden edge of a coin.
In retrospect I wish I’d slowed down
and really savoured the moment. I
quickly took a photo before carefully
clearing the surrounding soil around the
Roman head. It looked perfect. I double
checked the area again, but found
nothing
I can’t remember the drive home – I’d
just found the coin of a Roman Emperor!
10 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
BOBBY’S LUCKY
DAY!
Bobby Baker is a member of the History
Unearthed charity detecting group and
has been detecting since about 1986. He
recently found an unusual cufflink with
his Deus, and a mourning ring, which
he’d like to share with Searcher readers.
Initially, he thought that the cufflink
was some kind of Roman silver artefact,
but after gentle cleaning saw that it was
quite a rare item – a William and Mary
cufflink. On the same dig he found the
mourning ring from 1690 with the
inscription: IN MEMORY OF SJ FB
Both items have been declared and, at
present, going through the Treasure
process.
COMPETITION
WINNER
CAPTION COMPETITION
DETEKNIX/QUEST
Scuba Tector
Is there no end of interest in The Searcher!
Paul Bancroft contacted us with a series of fascinating
pictures he’d taken whilst having a read of his favourite
detecting magazine and cuppa at his local farm shop
after a hard day’s detecting.
A rather unkempt juvenile jackdaw spied the
magazine on the chair and decided to investigate, no
doubt attracted by the shiny bracelet on the cover. He
pecked at the image for some time and then proceeded
to turn the pages to find out more.
The picture of the editor eventually attracted his
attention and he looked closely at the image. Kevin - for
that is the bird’s name – had turned up at the centre one
day and the staff took him under their collective wing as
it were, and fed him mealworms. He’s become quite a
character.
For the competition, we’d like you to suggest a
caption to accompany the third, larger picture. The
eventual winner will receive a year’s subscription – or the
extension of a current one – to the magazine, plus a
Searcher polo shirt,
baseball cap, and water
bottle!
Send your entry,
marked ‘Bird
Competition’, to the
assistant editor at john@
thesearcher.co.uk
The Closing date is
30 October. Good luck!
FINDS NEWS
A STUNNING RING FROM YORKSHIRE!
Yet another beautiful and immaculate
condition gold ring has been unearthed
in Yorkshire. It has been described as: ‘A
complete gold and gem finger ring of
medieval date, c.AD 1400 - 1500. The
hoop of the ring is circular with a
D-shaped section which widens to a
double ovate bezel. Both bezels are
moulded into a quatrefoil shape,
achieved by recessing four semi-circles
around a deep round-topped coloured
settings, either gem or glass, at the
centre. One setting is pink/red, while the
other is green.
The shoulders of the hoop are
decorated with elaborate incised foliate
motifs of curvilinear stemmed flowers
© PAS
within a fluted border. The lowest
quarter of the hoop, opposite the bezel,
is undecorated. The interior surface of
the hoop is also undecorated’. Date wise
is probably from the 15th Century and
gems have been analysed to be a ruby
and emerald.
A comparable ring is the Green
Hammerton ring which was also
discovered in Yorkshire.
Alex McGrow from Glenrothes was
the winner of the Quest Scuba Tector
competition in the September issue.
Luckily he doesn’t live too far from the
coast either!
Our thanks to both Deteknix/Quest
and Detectorbits for supplying the test
and prize unit.
It was an extremely popular
competition so commiserations to all
those who entered but weren’t successful.
WINNER
Detectival Ticket
competition
Colin Parry from Monmouth was the
lucky winner of the pair of tickets for
Dectectival and Minelab goodies! I say
lucky as the event is now all SOLD OUT!
Our thanks to Detectival organisers
Mark and Karen Becher and also Minelab
for the goodies.
Look out for more competitions
in future issues!
FINDS NEWS
MEDIEVAL HORSE HARNESS PENDANTRichard Biggs
I started this great hobby as a young lad in 1976, my
first machine being a Fieldmaster. Since my retirement
I have started detecting again and after a lot of research
and advice from an old friend of mine I decided to
purchase an XP Deus … and I’m pleased I did, for I
have found something special.
Three hours of finding the usual shotgun cartridges,
pieces of lead and buttons I got a great signal very close
to one of the farmer’s hay stacks. My settings were
Sensitivity 90, Discrimination 10, Ground 90 and
Frequency 12.
At 6” down the signal was still in the hole so I dug
another clod and the artefact was out! I could see the
quatrefoil shape and the enamel of what
I first thought was a bronze brooch. When
I saw more and especially the hinge, I
realised it was a wonderful example of a
medieval horse harness pendant
complete with enamel and what looked
like small animals in each corner. I was
very happy indeed.
My better half was with me and took
photos of our wonderful find. It was a
great end to the day. I have found two
others on the field but nothing like this.
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 11
FINDS NEWS
FINDS NEWS
DUDLEY DUO DREAM DIG Martin Sibley
CRACKING COIN!
Nathan Storer
On a welcoming warm Wednesday
morning 20 hardcore detectorists form
the Dudley MDC attended a dig in sunny
Shropshire.
Half way up the field Craig struck with
the first coin of the day, a Victorian
penny. A little further on I came across
the first silver, a ‘bull head’ sixpence.
Later a shocked and overwhelmed
Craig shouted, “Mart I think I have got
something really good! I think it is a
spearhead,” he gasped. “Crikey” I said,
“that looks great. What a find!” He
couldn’t believe his luck, at what he was
holding in his trembling hands and off
he wondered across the field to show his
find to others.
I remembered whilst on another dig,
when someone found part of a spear the
other part was found later, so I decided
to detect the opposite way to Craig and
follow the plough lines when I stumbled
on a scratchy signal which, at first, I
thought wasn’t worth digging. After
taking out the first clump of soil I could
see the first part of a green object. I
realised it was the other half!
The edges were still sharp as though it
had never been used. “You are not going
to believe it – I’ve the other half ” I
screamed.
I’m 31 and have only been detecting for
about 12 months now but back in June
this year I was invited to a rally with
Central Searchers in Brigstock,
Northampton.
We had a choice of stubble or plough
and I took to the stubble. I worked my
way across the field with my Deus set up
in Basic 1 and as a reached the far side of
the field I received a really crackly signal.
I dug it any way and retrieved the target.
At that point I didn’t know what it was
other than a coin.
Once I started showing people and
realised what I’d found I couldn’t
concentrate so I moved to the plough
field. Five minutes later I’d unearthed
another hammered too! Must have been
my lucky day!
Full ID courtesy of Rod Blunt:
The coin is a ‘small flan’ type penny of
Edward the Confessor, struck at Chester
(Leigeceaster) by moneyer Alcsie (Spink
1175; North 818).
It was about ten metres away and
almost in a straight line, just like on the
previous dig. I could see Craig was a little
disappointed that he’d not dug the other
half, but at the same time he was ecstatic
that I’d found it. We put the two pieces
together and they fitted like a jigsaw.
Perfect.
I decided there and then that the
spearhead needed to be complete and
kept as one. I gave Craig my find – with
some regrets I admit, but knew it was the
right thing to do.
FINDS NEWS
MY NORMAN
COIN
Lewis Bell-Langford
I found the coin near Taunton on
pasture, which has been ploughed in the
past. It was my first outing with my new
XP Deus 9” HF coil. My settings were
-6.4 Disc, full tones, Reactivity 3, and
Frequency 28.8.
I was digging every signal, because I
didn’t know what to expect with the new
coil. About two hours into my session
after unearthing the usual buttons and
bits of rubbish, I discovered a wonderful
William coin. It was only 5” down, and it
gave a quiet two-way signal with no
numbers on the screen.
The coin was on its edge in the side of
the hole, which I think is the reason for
the weak signal. I knew it was a
hammered coin, but was shocked to see
the familiar king’s portrait with a bonnet
when I rubbed the mud away. I knew it
was Norman and I was chuffed to find
such a special coin.
12 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
The obverse legend reads + EDPERD
RE and the reverse + ALCSIE ON LEI.
The LEI looks like IEI with a thick first
‘I’, as the diesinker has entered the
wedge forming the base of the ‘L’
coincident with the base serif of the ‘I’.
The EMC database doesn’t have a
small flan type coin of this type with
moneyer Alcsie (they normalise the name
as ‘Ealhsige’). However the EMC does
have two ‘expanding cross’ coins, the
following issue, with this moneyer.
Spartan
Designed and manufactured
in the UK since 1984
Developed with The Searcher
Available from
all good stockists
or online at
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Launched at Detectival, the
new Spartan is the product
of a rigorous development
programme with The Searcher
magazine. Based around the
Gladuis, this long handled
shovel features our new
Bootsaver to help prevent
split soles. Completed by a
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for a warmer grip in the colder
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Searcher Magazine Full Page Advert (Spartan).indd 1
14/09/2017 17:20
EXCLUSIVE
A NOD TO
THE DOG
Pete Cresswell
AKA crazycressy7
PART
1
T
he night before I was talking to a few
of my detecting friends that I have
had the pleasure to detect alongside.
While chatting I was also watching Harry AKA
iDetect latest YouTube video of him finding a
925 silver St Christopher. I noticed a four leaf
clover in the hole. I took a screen shot and
sent it to him and said “Harry did you see the
four leaf clover? That’s your good luck!”
We had a bit of a giggle and banter about
it and I was telling the boys a story of when
myself and my wife were sitting outside a surf
shop in Braunton North Devon 12 years ago
and I looked down and found a four-leaf
clover. I stuck it to the back of a surfing
sticker that I’d bought from the shop, and it’s
been in my junk draw for 12 years. I sent the
boys a photo on the chat. Harry then came
back with “Put it in your pocket bro’ for
tomorrow when you go detecting.” So it went
straight in my mobile phone wallet.
14 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
EXCLUSIVE
The next morning was the usual detecting
morning where Andy my brother-in-law picks
me up in his chariot and we drive to our
permission. The normal chat on the way is of
who’s found what on YouTube and settings
they used. We arrived at what we call our
Roman field and geared up.
Andy is always the first off as I am always
rolling up a cigarette. Andy had his 6” sniper
coil on and headed to an area where we had
had a few minims, the odd fibula fragments
and bits of orange samian ware and oyster
shells. I headed down the hedge line as I have
done that bit to death with two cheaper
machines and I wanted to see if the CTX
could find stuff I may have missed.
My first target was a bit of lead, second was
a mashed up copper jetton. I met one of the
game keepers with his dogs and we chatted
for ages. I could see Andy had been down on
his knees a few times so I said I best get off
and go find something. Andy then moved to
another area where we’d had a few grots
and Medieval buckles. I walked to the Roman
area and unearthed a few bits of the usual
lead and a few buttons.
I’m still getting used to the CTX and
received an iffy signal but with a little tweak
in my ear. I detect with ‘ears only’ and don’t
use numbers as I believe that if the detector
is telling you there’s something there then you
must DIG IT! I looked at the target trace to
see if it was iron (as I was on Gordon
Heritage’s Tadpole 4 setting).
The red box in the bottom right hand corner
of the screen was indicating it was iron but
there was also a red target trace heading to
the right hand side of the screen and it was
jumping all over the place! I couldn’t get a
pinpoint trace. I checked in Ghost 4 setting for
iron as this is then an open screen. Still getting
an iffy signal I decided to dig it.
Digging down to about 9” I started to give
up hope as I thought it may be a horse shoe
or deep iron and started to back fill. In the
back of my mind I was remembering that
Andy and I often joked that I used to get
caught out with deep iron using the cheaper
machines. I would say “I ‘m grave digging
again!”
I stood back and rolled a cigarette and
I had this little voice in my head from Rich
(AKA PONDGURU YouTube) saying “IF IN
DOUBT, DIG IT OUT” so in I went again!
LEFT & ABOVE the bronze dog
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 15
EXCLUSIVE
As he was a few hundred yards away I carried
on digging and out popped what looked like
a fragile spoon bowl, followed by its handle.
I realised then it was Roman. I put the probe
back in the hole and retrieved a Roman coin.
By this time Andy was with me. “What have
you got mate, I see your digging a grave
again!” I replied: “I think I’ve got a hoard!”
We both looked at each other and then
looked at the finds. I was shaking. Things go
through your mind … madness … I’ve never
had such a rush! We knelt by the hole and
I recounted what had happened. He stuck his
pointer in the hole and it went mad. With my
small hand trowel I carefully started removing
some more soil. Bit by bit.
I removed small pieces of bent over metal
and placed them in a spoil heap. We didn’t
recognise anything, they just looked like bent
plates of tin. About 30 minutes into digging
and we’d about half a shopping bag of bits of
folded metal.
While I was videoing I popped out my four
leaf clover and said to the camera “Harry
remember this?!” All of a sudden Andy said:
“WOW Pete look at this. I looked up and
in his hand was a lovely buckle and another
metal fragment.
16 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
So I carried on, and at a pinpointer’s depth and
a half it started sounding off. The first target
to come out was what looked like a Georgian
door knob! (I won’t tell you what I said) but
I popped the pointer back in the hole just
to double check and it still gave an alert.
Next to reveal itself was what looked like
a strap end, although I’d never seen this type
before. I went in again and retrieved a small
flat bit of metal. I waved it over the coil and
it gave me a good signal.
In went the pointer again and my first
thought was blinking farmers dumping stuff!
Next out popped a lump the size of a Satsuma
so I unpacked my toothbrush and water, gave
it a clean and a face appeared! Don’t ask me
why, but it reminded me of Andy’s son Tom
(sorry Tom) … a Roman nose I think. I looked
around to see where Andy was and he was
back at the chariot having some refreshments.
My head started spinning … OMG is this what
I think it is?!
Out came my mobile as we often send
videos for ID’s. I hit record and called Andy:
“You might want to come over here!”
We carried on removing the soil with our
hands then Andy said “Pete!”
Once Andy had washed the mud off what
looked like a lions head, other items started to
appear: A possible cross mount with a face
and other artefacts. I was making short videos
and sending them to the chat live. Let’s just
say the chat was alive! Rich (AKA Richbiss
YouTube) came back with “That looks like
casket mounts” while Andy was cleaning off
the artefacts he said “I don’t think my heart
can take much more”.
I had to take a break but Andy kindly
carried on removing more dirt from around
the hole. “Pete!” he said holding out his hand
and in it was a lovely a lion head mount.
Finally we reached what looked like
a concentrated lump of lots of bits
in the bottom.
We took it in turns to dig a small trench
around the lump so we could try and remove
it. Using our pointers set to 1” detection
we still couldn’t remove it. I made the decision
to carefully remove bit by bit from the top
and move downwards so not to damage what
was beneath it.
Whilst using my fingers lifting small bits
of metal out, Andy was still going through
the spoil, finding fragments as small as cut
quarters. He took over filming and out came
some bigger bits that almost looked like horse
bridle parts.
I managed to remove a big lump and it was
not until I placed it on the spoil I realised it was
some sort of animal figurine. “Oh wow!” said
Andy. My head was hurting. We’d had the sun
on the back of our heads near on two hours
at this stage. I sent a few more videos to the
chat as my phone was going mad and I rang
the tennant farmer and asked her to come out
to the site.
Whilst waiting we placed the artefacts on
a plank of wood to present to the tennant
farmer and placed the dog in her hands and
said she was the third person to hold that
in about 1700 years. Needless to say she was
gobsmacked and the look on her face was
priceless. After about 20 minutes she left
us to it as we explained what we’d be doing
next as regards to handing it over to our FLO,
Kurt Adams.
We then got back to the hole and
retrieved just a few smaller items more out.
Just to doubly make sure we put Andy’s CTX
3030 fitted with a 6” coil and mine fitted with
stock coil AND both pointers around the walls
and bottom of the hole and there were
no more signals.
Two hours had passed and we stopped for
a bite to eat and then attacked the spoil. Andy
went over with his 6” coil and I was on my
knees picking out the other little fragments.
After which we did handful by handful with
our probes slowly back filling the hole that
took another 2.5 hours. Using both machines
to go back over the hole and spiral out I got
a huge BOOM! A shotgun cartridge!
By this time my phone was on fire as ID’s
were flowing. Ian (AKA RAFMAN, YouTube)
came back with the dog ID … we now think
it’s something to do with a healing licking dog
of the Celtic God of Mars Noden and possibly
connected with a 3rd century temple. John
(AKA John316 YouTube) came back with the
face mounts as bucket handle mounts and
also John ID’d the lion as God of Mars war
boot that was also found on a stone statue
of Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.
I rang the FLO and asked if we could meet
as soon as possible. We took a rucksack full
of the artefacts and asked if we could show
him in his office as we needed a big table.
Let’s just say our FLO and his work colleagues
had a few raised eyebrows!
Andy gave the animal figurine a very light
clean and it revealed itself to be a dog.
We were blown away. He gave me a big hug
and said well done mate. I could have cried,
I could feel myself welling up. Detecting for
me is finding artefacts and history. Our minds
were racing: “Why, why, why?” The artefacts
just didn’t make sense.
We placed the dog on Andy’s bonnet
as a joke to say it would look just like a Rolls
Royce and he even joked about drilling a hole
through the dog and bolting it down. It was
a mad ten minutes.
Acknowledgements
I would like to say a big thanks to: Andy
brother in law and detecting buddy, Harry
(iDetect), Ian (AKA ashenaya), Rich (Richbiss),
Ian Rafman, John (John316),4 Kingdiggers,
Neil, Coin mister north Wales, Ian Hughes,
Rich, Pondguru “if in doubt dig it out”. Not
forgetting Corrine at Joan Allen for doing such
a great deal on my CTX!
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 17
EXCLUSIVE
OPPOSITE FROM TOP three exquisite escutcheons;
a 3rd-4th century buckle THIS PAGE FROM TOP coin
dated to 318 AD; face fragment from statue; Pete’s lucky
four-leaf clover
EXCLUSIVE
FROM TOP Fragments of Roman spoon; the ‘Georgian
door knob’; currently unidentified large artefact
18 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
EXCLUSIVE
Detecting partner Andy Boughton
shares his memories of the day …
It was a sunny Sunday morning and myself
and Pete went to a site we’d detected many
times before. We immediately concentrated
on an area that had produced quite a few
Roman coins in the past, although what
I really wanted was an Eddie penny in honour
of my new grandson Eddie.
It was hard going because of the stubble
and brilliant sunshine but we persevered.
I had already dug up a couple of small Roman
coins in the usual poor condition when
I noticed Pete on all fours digging a hole and
looking rather sweaty. After several minutes
he stood up stretched his back and started
rolling a fag.
I knew he’d probably found something
interesting as having a smoke calms him
down. He tends to find quite a few interesting
things so I see him in this pose on a regular
basis. He eventually called me over so he
could gloat over, no sorry, show me what
he’d found.
At first I thought the initial find was a Georgian
door knob and I was a bit disappointed he’d
called me over for such a trivial piece of scrap
metal but then he said that the pin-pointer
was ‘going mad’ when he put it in the hole.
He continued to pull out pieces of bent
metal plate from the ground which appeared
to be very interesting. However, the next
handful of dirt was a truly fantastic sight
as it was a Roman spoon with a Roman coin
lying next to it!
We looked at each other stunned. Over
the next hour or so Pete continued to pull out
Roman artefact after artefact and I was giving
them a gentle clean. Eventually he extracted
the last piece … a fantastic bronze dog. I just
couldn’t believe what I was holding.
After having over 40 years experience
in this great hobby I have never been involved
in such an amazing find and feel totally
honoured to have been there to help recover
it all. Thanks to Pete and the tennant farmer
for letting me have a day I will never forget.
THIS PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT
Andy Boughton holding the bronze dog; artefact in hole;
presentation for tennant farmer; bagged folded metal
plates; most of the pieces of the hoard; furniture fittings
and finely crafted handles
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 19
EXCLUSIVE
1
THE HOARD
THAT GOT
US ALL
NODDING
Kurt Adams
FLO Gloucestershire & Avon
PART
2
First thing on Monday morning, I had
a message to contact Pete because
he had found something really
important. I know Pete, he’s a really nice
person, sensible and level headed
so I knew that if he said it was important
I had to see it, then after speaking
to him and hearing how excited he was,
my curiosity was sparked.
The next day both Pete and Andrew came
into the office carrying two large bags of finds
and said with massive grins on their faces
‘we need a big table’. Pete then said we’re
going to show you the finds but leave the
best until last, at which point Pete and
Andrew shared a conspiratorial laugh. By this
point, my curiosity was killing me and I had
to see what they had brought in.
The first items that they pulled out were
two boxes containing thin copper alloy strips
that form bands that come from various
caskets or boxes and in amongst this group
were fragments of lock furniture that would
have come from these boxes. Curiously, all of
these bands were folded, presumably in order
to reduce their size. This means that they
could not have come from a box that had
rotted in the ground; instead they must had
been stripped from their parent artefact.
2
Next came various furniture fittings from
finely crafted handles and more simple
furniture studs to exquisite escutcheons
(FIG 1). By now we were not even halfway
through and Andrew’s and Pete’s excitement
was becoming infectious, so I had to stop
them and call some people over as I had
a feeling that the things we were about to see
would be important.
Now the whole office was on tender
hooks, waiting to see what would be revealed
next. Pete didn’t disappoint – out came
various fragments of statues and figurines.
As with the casket fittings, all were broken
and we couldn’t believe our eyes. Then
Andrew said ‘this is the really important find’,
at which point my mind screamed ‘there’s
more!’ Pete reached into his bag and pulled
out a carefully wrapped bundle revealing
a complete licking dog statue that he placed
on the table to a chorus of gasps and choice
words; my mind already racing with possible
scenarios for the hoard was blown away when
I saw the statue.
20 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
What’s the find?
The assemblage was found in a tight bundle,
so presumably it was contained within a sack
that has subsequently rotted away. This
assemblage, although not containing any gold
or silver is still a hoard and as all of the items
are broken, with the exception of the dog,
this most likely make it a founders’ hoard.
This is a hoard of metalwork that is
collected together, often with a large
proportion of broken items (scrap objects or
items that are no longer relevant), that will be
melted down to be recast. Fortunately, a coin
was also found with the assemblage that
dates to AD 318. This late Roman date is also
corroborated by the presence of a 3rd-4th
century buckle and late Roman pan fragment.
On first inspection, the statue fragments
do not have any diagnostic elements that
could tie them to any particular deity, but
future research may reveal more. The dog
on the other hand could have an interesting
story to tell. At first glance, one could be
forgiven for suggesting an 11th-12th century
date as the facial features of the animal are
reminiscent of the Romanesque style of that
period. However, this was found at that
bottom of the assemblage so its Roman date
is assured (FIG 2).
EXCLUSIVE
3
The dog figurine is especially significant
to Gloucestershire as there are a number
of religious sites that have a connection
to this animal such as the shrine at Pagans Hill,
Chew Stoke which was thought to be
dedicated to Mercury and where a large
statue of a dog was found outside of the
building. The shrine at Nettleton Shrub
in Wiltshire was dedicated to Apollo
Cunomaglus (hound-lord) also has a sculpture
depicting Diana and a hound.
However, most importantly is the temple
at Lydney in Gloucestershire that was
dedicated to Nodens a god associated with
hunting, the sea and healing. During
excavations ten depictions of dogs were
recovered, these range from basic sheet
copper alloy representations to the finely
made and famous Lydney Dog (FIG 3). This
together with other artefacts that were found
on the site has led people to believe the main
purpose of the shrine at Lydney was healing.
Dogs within the classical world are often
associated with healing, possibly because they
are observed to lick their own wounds in
order to heal them. Representations of licking
dog’s however are very rare, two other
copper alloy figurines were found at Llys Awel
and show a small crude seated licking dog,
possibly from a curative spring.
The Dog from this hoard is similarly shown
as licking (FIG 4), so we can surmise that
it is a representation of a healing dog. But for
the moment what can we say about the
hoard; could this have come from a healing
shrine? Could this dog and the statue
fragments have come from the shrine
at Lydney? Why are all the items in the hoard
broken and only the dog left complete?
Like many if the items that we see,
this hoard raises far more questions
than it could answer, but to be honest
that’s why it’s so exciting.
OPPOSITE PAGE FAR LEFT three exquisite escutcheons;
close-up of the licking dog THIS PAGE FROM TOP
the famous Lydney Dog from the temple in Gloucestershire;
the healing dog from a healing shrine?
4
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 21
product news |
“The Minelab EQUINOX Series is the all-terrain multipurpose detector that obsoletes all single frequency
VLF detectors. Equally adaptable for all target types
and ground conditions … just select your detecting
location and go!”
Who is the Equinox for?
EQUNIOX has been designed for the
serious coin and treasure enthusiast
looking to upgrade to a high
performance detector, without the
high cost. It’s also suitable for the new
detectorist, having several pre-set
modes for different detecting locations.
Where does the Equinox fit in the
Minelab product range?
The EQUINOX Series can be considered
to be ‘above’ the X-TERRA series.
What modes does the Equinox have?
There are four main detecting modes:
Park, Field, Beach, Gold; with default
search profiles that can be customised
and saved.
Is the Equinox waterproof?
Yes, EQUINOX is waterproof and
fully submersible. Exact waterproof
capabilities will be announced at a later
date.
What frequencies does the Equinox
operate at?
Selectable single frequencies: 5kHz,
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simultaneous multi-frequency.
Does EQUINOX have wireless audio?
EQUINOX comes with both fast
Bluetooth (Qualcomm APTX Low
Latency) and Minelab’s proprietary
Wi-Stream technology built in to the
detector.
What are the key differences
between the 600 & 800?
EQUINOX 600
3 Detecting Modes (Park, Field, Beach)
4 frequency options (5, 10, 15, Multi)
Bluetooth headphones supplied
EQUINOX 800
4 Detecting Modes (Park, Field, Beach,
Gold)
6 frequency options (5, 10, 15, 20, 40,
Multi)
Bluetooth headphones and WM 08
supplied
What is Multi-IQ?
Multi-IQ is Minelab’s new simultaneous
multi-frequency technology which is
expected to make all single frequency
VLF detectors obsolete.
What are the advantages of
Multi-IQ?
Due to the way in which Multi-IQ
synchronizes signals across multifrequencies, according to the ground
22 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Minelab EQUINOX
Series
conditions, there are three main
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a. Increased target ID accuracy
b.Reduced noise levels for all ground
types
c. Faster recovery speed
The Multi-IQ signal is also individually
matched to the four EQUINOX
Detecting Modes (Park, Field, Beach,
Gold) giving optimum performance
across all targets types in specific
ground locations.
How is Multi-IQ different from
BBS/FBS?
Multi-IQ uses a different group of
fundamental frequencies than BBS and
FBS to generate a wide-band multifrequency transmission signal that
is more sensitive to high frequency
targets and slightly less sensitive to
low frequency targets. Multi-IQ uses
the latest high-speed processors and
advanced digital filtering techniques for
a much faster recovery speed than BBS/
FBS technologies. Multi-IQ copes with
saltwater and beach conditions almost
as well as BBS/FBS, however BBS/FBS
still have an advantage for finding high
conductive silver coins in all conditions.
When will the Equinox be available,
and how much will it cost?
EQUINOX will be available in the coming
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product test |
XP HF Elliptical Coil –
Using it on contaminated sites
Gary Cook
XP HF Elliptical Coil 24X13CM
Now for those of you that know me,
you will know that I am a big fan of
XP and have been using the brand
for quite a few years now. I’m now of
course using the Deus that has been my
detector of choice since they first came
out. When I was asked to test the new
HF elliptical coil, of course I jumped at
the chance!
For the last few weeks I’ve been
using the new coil with the Beta
version of the new 4.1 software which
has cleared up a few bugs including a
far better connectivity between coil
headphones and pointer.
I like to tell it as it is, without all the
complicated usual stuff you might get
with a regimented field test. So from a
detectorist and not what I think you will
BELOW: Figs 1&2
want to hear. For me, I want to see just
how good this coil is supposed to be.
Remember it’s my opinion and findings.
It was delivered quickly and packaged
well. (Figs 1 & 2)
Now if I can set it up and pair it to my
machine then anyone can, just follow
the easy instructions, trust me it takes
less than 15 minutes. NB. The new coils
will only work with the new Version 4
software available to download FREE
from the XP website.
The one thing I would like to point
out is the battery is now housed
in the stem and is easily accessible
making it far easier to change.
The elliptical coil has been designed
to winkle out the finds on highly
contaminated ground, sites that have
been contaminated with iron and
24 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
habitation and also for mineralised soil.
Don’t be put off by the words ‘Gold
Prospecting’ on the coil. True, it has
been designed to pull out small pieces
of gold in magnetic and mineralised
soil. But let’s just think about it for
a moment. If it can pull out minute
fragments of gold in bad soil, then
it’s going to help you find those small
finds like cut halves, quarters and small
Roman minims in contaminated iron
invested sites we have over here. Surely
that is a good thing, right?
As you know if you use the Deus its
recovery (Reactivity on the control box)
is extremely fast, so its ability to pick
out finds amongst iron is already very
good. Mix that with the small size and
shape of the elliptical coil and you are
onto a winning combination. On iron and
contaminated sites, the iron signal can,
with many other machines, completely
blank and rub out the good signals
mixed in amongst it.
So, for my first trip out I decided
to take it to a small 10 acre field that
myself and friends have detected on
for the best part of 20 years. (Figs 3
& 4) Areas of it are infested with iron
and occupation debris. It’s a Roman site
that has produced coins and artefacts
a plenty but have dried up especially
as it’s not been ploughed for over four
years. So ideal for this coil test.
I set up using one of my own
programs as now it’s not that
mineralised (just a lot of iron) so the
Ground Balance (GB) 88 and Frequency
14kHz to start with. The beauty of
the new HF coils is the higher
range frequencies. The
elliptical has three base
Frequencies 14kHz,
30kHz and 74kHz along
with 7 increments.
which means you can
run it from 13kHz to
80kHz.
Within the first few
minutes I noticed the iron
buzz coming through and the
coil came alive. I like to hear iron buzz
as I believe it helps guide me to the
occupied areas and where there is
iron, there are usually finds. I wasn’t
expecting much but I came across a
signal mixed within the iron that was a
bit scratchy, but there was something
that intrigued me. I decided to raise the
frequency up to 30kHz and noticed the
signal was now coming through a lot
clearer. So I raised it up again to 74kHz
and WOW! It was even clearer. Time to
dig.
This was never going to be about
amazing finds and it was only a smallish
piece of lead (Fig 5). BUT it’s a small
piece of lead mixed in amongst the iron
that I’ve not previously found and it
could quite easily of been a cut quarter
(forever the optimist!).
For those of you asking what’s
the advantage with higher
frequencies. Here is your
answer. The higher
frequency will ‘clear up’
signals and produce
a much more refined
sound for very small
targets enhancing them
to allow the user to hear
them clearer and deeper.
I moved on and the nonferrous finds continued to come.
Mainly lead and small bits of bronze.
(Fig 6) Nothing exciting I will admit but
please remember these were all signals
we’ve all missed over the years.
Moving on I fell into a
signal that had me a bit
perplexed. It’s hard to
explain but it sounded
like iron but a weird
iron sound. I know I
sound mad, but I’m sure
most of you have had
a signal like it. Changing
the angle, it kind of cleared
up a bit. So again I raised
the frequency up to 74kHz and
it became higher pitched, more solid
and less broken. Switching over from
the horseshoe profile to the
X/Y screen, I noticed the
line was smaller and more
horizontal going from
bottom left to top right
indicating that it had
the potential to be a
good find. Let’s get it
out I thought. About 6”
down I was amazed to
see a small trumpet brooch
in the hole (Fig 7). I was never
expecting that from the signal! I was
beginning to like this coil.
What did it tell me? Small targets
like cut halves and odd shaped artefacts
could come through very scratchy and
produce a low ID number, and can even
fall into the iron range especially
as in my case when they are
in amongst iron like this
brooch was.
By using this elliptical
coil set up to the higher
frequencies, these
scratchy targets will be
enhanced and produce a
clearer ‘dig me’ signal. So
small or odd shaped targets
should be easier to hear on
iron infested sites.
It was beginning to rain, so I started
to head back to the car when I was
stopped in my tracks by the buzz of
iron and a clear signal almost at the
same time. I slowed my sweep down
and there was the buzz of iron and next
to it a clear signal reading about 49
and showing a nice reading on the XY
screen (which I was finding easier to
understand as the time went by).
In layman’s terms if the line is
straight, going from bottom left to top
right then it’s a good signal. If there are
a mixed amount of lines jumping around
then it is probably a bad signal.
What was the target? Well, it was a
button and a nail from the same spot
(Fig 8). I can only assume that the
button and the nail were lying
next to each other. The
recovery speed really
was exceptional and the
problem of iron overpowering good signals
has virtually been
eradicated with this coil.
A few days later I was
itching to take the coil
out for another spin but this
time on a site that has produced
a lot of Medieval and Roman finds. The
field has a fair bit of contamination,
is slightly mineralised and a high
BELOW: Figs 3, 4 & 6 ABOVE: Figs 5, 7 & 8
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 25
concentration of coke. So again I kept
the GB on 88.
The barley stubble had been cropped
and worked over, so happy days! I
decided to use a different program and
chose Gary’s Ultimate program, using
a Discrimination of -6.5. With this
program you literally hear all the signals
but you’ve got to have your wits about
you and listen hard. The great thing
is, you’ll not miss much. Additionally,
using the XY screen makes identifying
coke easy because it shows it as a thin
vertical north to south line on the meter.
I started with a 74kHz frequency.
I headed for an area of black soil in
this larger 60 acre field, which again
has been worked hard and although
occasionally the odd hammered pops up,
they are few and far between. As I began
to tune myself into the sounds I noticed
there were more spits and shorter
scratchy signals than on the previous
field but less longer louder sounds and
the buzz of iron.
I put it down to it being slightly more
mineralised and less iron. The first hour
produced a few bits of lead and a couple
of buttons and half a medieval spectacle
buckle (Fig 9). Nothing to write home
about but I was not disappointed. It
proved to me that this coil can winkle out
finds that we’d missed over the years.
The coil was well balanced and
lightweight and it filled me with
confidence where I’d no worries that I
may be missing targets. I continued to
meander around the area of dark soil
which had a lot of broken bits of pottery
on the surface.
Amongst the spits and spurts I
heard a very faint but solid signal.
The numbers weren’t really giving me
anything excitable – late 20’s and to be
honest my first reaction was foil or coke.
So I switched over to the XY screen. In
a situation like this the XY screen can
give you a better indication. The reading
was a small left to right line. This told
me straight away that it was not coke or
foil (in theory the line would be vertical
and thin). But as you know sometimes
signals, theories, numbers and lines can
come back and bite you on the backside!
I was over the moon to see a
hammered penny of one of the Edwards.
It got me thinking as to why the
signal was a bit iffy. So I decided
to re-bury the coin at roughly
the same depth and place it
on its edge. Going over the
coin again the signal was
almost identical; faint but
solid, with numbers in the
low 30’s. I then switched the
frequency down to 30kHz and
the signal got worse. Down to 14kHz
and the signal dropped into low numbers
with minimal if any sound.
If in normal detecting mode and
didn’t know anything was there, I
would’ve walked on and missed it.
What did this tell me? Obviously, this
coil on the higher frequency is perfect
for finding coins on their edge and was
proving itself as it showed me it can
help clear up these signals … and I mean
clear up! On 74kHz my signal was a real
‘doozy’. Over the next couple of hours a
few bits and pieces came up, amazingly
those we’d clearly previously missed.
I decided to have another half hour
and headed back to the car. As I got
closer to the gate the contamination
was getting worse and my machine
was crackling, spitting and basically just
plain being noisy. To the point I almost
switched it off when PING! A clear ‘stop
you in your tracks’ signal. Nothing dodgy
or worrying about it. Only 2” down was
another hammered coin! A great way to
end the day (Fig 10). What impressed
me was the clarity of the signal, mixed
in with all the iron and gateway rubbish
like foil etc.
The next day I decided to go to a
local farm which has been one of our
best Roman sites with many of the
26 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
fields still producing plenty of finds
every year. However, this particular one
was not one of the more productive
fields. I programmed in a basic two tone
program: Discrimination 5.5 and GB 90
as per XP recommendations when there
is no mineralisation.
The small elliptical coil was
perfect for getting in amongst
the stubble. A signal came
through which was a bit
broken but good enough.
Skipping through to the
higher frequencies the
signal became clearer. The
target revealed itself as a
Roman denarius. Unfortunately
it was broken and split which might
have been the reason why the signal
was coming through a bit iffy. (Figs 11
&12).
In summary
How can I sum up the elliptical coil?
To start with I would have to say in all
honesty it’s a real little gem. It really did
prove its worth.
If you have fields that have a lot of
iron and contamination then this coil is
perfect. Also, scratchy signals are clearer
and louder and the reactivity is excellent.
However, it’s not just on iron sites.
It will excel if you have sites that have
been detected to death and finds have
dried up. Signals that may have been
originally dismissed as iron or rubbish,
could be coins on edge or odd shaped
artefacts. And pinpointing is a piece of
cake and very accurate.
If you detect mainly with ‘pay as
you dig’ clubs where you have to cover
as much ground as you can in a day
then obviously it is not the coil to use.
But on your ‘worked out’ permissions
where you can take your time this coil is
perfect.
BELOW: Figs 9, 10 & 11 ABOVE: Fig 12
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Metal
Detecting
Nations’ Greatest Finds
Competition 2016
Peter D. Spencer
The Winners
Most Significant Artefact
Corneliu Thira – London
Medieval pilgrim badge
Second place
Jason Baker – Somerset
Roman ingot
Third place
Mark Bailey – North Lincolnshire
Iron Age axehead
28 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017
This year the judging panel was
made up of Tim Loughton, who is
the Member of Parliament for East
Worthing and Shoreham; Dr
Michael Lewis (Head of the Portable
Antiquities Scheme) and yours truly
(writer and consultant).
Tim Loughton is a supporter of
the Portable Antiquities Scheme, a
member of the Friends of the British
Museum and of the Royal
Archaeological Institute and Chair
of the British Museum and APPG.
Having also studied Ancient History
at Cambridge University, he was the
ideal man to take part in the
judging.
This year’s nominations came in
from England, Wales, the Isle of
Man and Jersey. All of the National
Finds Advisors for the Potable
Antiquities Scheme were responsible
for the English nominations, Mark
Lodwick for Wales, Allison Fox for
the Isle of Man and Neil Mahrer for
Jersey.
From England came the highest
number of nominations: 37 artefacts
and ten coins. There were one coin
and five artefacts from Wales and
one each from the Isle of Man and
Jersey.
With many artefacts and coins to
choose from, when I received the
nominations I made out a short list
of candidates before the judging
took place.
Artefacts
As always, the artefacts included
some really splendid finds. I just
mention those that made it onto my
short list but to be nominated means
that all the other items stood out in
some way.
My list, which is in no particular
order, starts with the Bronze Age
miniature anvil (Dorset,
PUBLIC-B21001). Over the years I
have seen a host of Bronze Age
antiquities but this is only the
second one of its type I have heard
of as a detecting find. However, a
report dated 2012 states that six are
on record in Britain. The find, from
Dorset, is intact and in very good
condition.
Number two is the Iron Age horn
cap (Oxfordshire, BERK-AC74EE).
These things were once thought to
have been fixed onto the end of
axles on Iron Age chariots.
However, they have never been
found during archaeological
excavations of chariot burials, so the
earlier attribution has now been
discounted. There are presently 20
horn caps in museums or private
collections but many are only
fragmentary. On this one the covers
at the top and bottom are missing
but it is otherwise in very good
condition.
Number three is the Iron Age or
early Roman period strap junction
(West Sussex, SUSS-F35BF5). Strap
junctions are quite rare but
examples of this size are extremely
rare. It is quite robust, which has
helped it to survive for around 2000
years. There is some damage and
loss to the decorative coral elements
but overall this find still has a great
deal of ‘eye appeal’.
Number four is the Late Bronze
Age or Early Iron Age ‘Sompting’
type looped and socketed axe head
(North Lincolnshire) FAKLFB5DF6). Over the years detectorists
have found a very high number of
looped and socketed axe heads, in
hoards and as singleton finds. This
one is a rare type with very
attractive decoration and is in
exceptionally good condition.
Number five is the Late Iron Age
terret ring (Berkshire, BERKEF2DF9). I’ve never seen one with
the curious raised elements on the
top, which is described as being “. . .
highly unusual decoration . . .” on
the PAS report. It’s a good size
(roughly 48mm wide and 53mm tall)
and the bronze fabric is smooth and
attractive.
Number six is the large and
heavy (19.30 kg.) lead ingot, which
has been dated to circa 164-69 AD
(Somerset, SOM-23F798). Along the
upper face, in two lines, is an
inscription in raised letters. Four
other ingots with the same
inscription are on record but only
two (both fragments) are known
today. Therefore, the latest find
would seem to be an extremely rare
example of this type of ingot.
Number seven is a 14th-16th
century lead-alloy pilgrim badge
(London, PUBLIC-364487).
Measuring roughly 73mm tall by
35mm wide, this is larger than most
other badges I have seen. It depicts
the martyrdom of Thomas Becket
set in an architectural frame topped
by a cross with trefoil terminals.
Saint Thomas has his head bowed
and before him is a knight, about to
strike a fatal blow with his sword.
For something so delicate this has
managed to survive in remarkably
good condition.
Number eight is a 17th century
(circa 1640) wheel lock pistol
(Jersey). I’ve seen a small flint lock
pistol as a detecting find but never
before one of the earlier wheel lock
types. The wooden elements are
badly decayed and the barrel and
other metal parts corroded but for
something that has been in the soil
for well over 300 years its condition
isn’t too bad. It’s an astonishing find
and well worth a showcase of its own
in any museum.
So, my short list of artefacts was
made up of eight items. All are very
significant finds and most are in
outstanding condition.
Coins
Sadly, there were fewer nominations
in this category. However, my short
list did contain some very interesting
coins.
Number one is an Ancient British
silver minim of the Atrebates and
Regni (Hampshire, FASAMEB7789). On the obverse is a
reference to Caratacus (CAR) and
on the reverse is CV, an abbreviation
of Cunobelinus. The combination of
imagery and lettering was previously
unknown before the discovery of
this coin. Therefore, it is yet another
addition to the known types of
Ancient British coins.
Number two is an Ancient British
silver unit of the Durotriges (Isle of
Wight, IOW-45CA1A). At first sight
this doesn’t appear to be out-of-theordinary but those taking a closer
look at the obverse with see CV RA
between the wreath and crescents.
The coin is described as being
incomplete but the oval flan might
just have two striking cracks. The
obverse is similar to ABC 2157 and
2160 but neither of these has the
extra letters. Therefore, this is
another previously unknown
Ancient British silver coin.
Number three is a denarius of
Pescennius Niger (North Yorkshire,
PUBLIC-C27DF1). Proclaimed
emperor by his troops in AD 193,
after being defeated in battle four
times by Septimius Severus, Niger
fled but was overtaken and executed
in AD 194. Only two denarii are
known of this type and this
specimen has the distinction of
being the first official coin of
Pescennius Niger to be recorded on
the PAS database.
Number four is a gold tremissis
attributed to the Visigoths in Gaul
and dated to circa 461-70 AD (Isle of
Wight, IOW-7D7783). It is struck in
the name of Severus III, whose dates
are AD 461-65. At this time the
Visigoths were producing imitations
of Roman gold coins; they are now
very to extremely rare. A note on
the PAS report states that there is
only one example on the PAS
database and the British Museum
collection does not include a
tremissis of the type. This being a
coin of the Visigoths makes it far
rarer than a standard tremissis of
Severus III.
Number five has been described
(on the PAS report) as both an early
Continental tremissis and an early
Anglo-Saxon tremissis (Suffolk,
SF-0C182A). As it will have been
struck in England I prefer to call it a
thrymsa. The obverse is similar in
some ways to that found on the ‘two
emperors’ type but the reverse is
altogether different. A coin with the
same obverse was found in Suffolk
in 2003 and was listed in the Coin
Register in the 2003 edition of the
British Numismatic Journal; the late
Mark Blackburn and John Newman
suggested it was probably an East
Anglian issue and the find spot of
the latest coin supports that
attribution. It is a stunning coin, an
almost perfect strike in wonderful
condition.
Number six is the Aethelstan of
East Anglia penny (Wales, NMGWDAB2C6). The type is known but
the obverse is struck from an
extremely rare die. The outer edge
is slightly chipped but the coin is
otherwise in very good condition.
Winner
Most Significant Coin
Martin Mayhew – Suffolk – Anglo Saxon shilling
Second place
Paul Stimpson – Wales – Aethelstan penny
Third place
Andy Aartsen – Hampshire
Silver minim of Caratacus
Winner
Most Significant Find Wales
Paul Stimpson – Aethelstan penny
Second place
Early Medieval brooch – Flintshire
Third place
Penannular brooch
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 29
Winner
Most Significant Find
Isle of Man
Steve Robinson – Bronze Age chisel
Winner
Most Significant Find
Jersey
Tony Collins – Wheel lock pistol
The judging
On the day the judging took place Harry (editor
of The Searcher) was unable to attend due to rail
problems at Waterloo. Michael and Tim were at
the British Museum and I was 200 miles away, at
home. However, we had arranged to keep in
contact with each other over the telephone.
Judging via the telephone also saved me well over
five hours of travel and the necessity of getting up
very early in the morning.
Most significant artefact
When the call came through I briefly spoke to
Tim and Michael (Brexit was mentioned only
once!) and then we got down to discussing the
nominations. Tim and Michael had already
picked out a few items and we started by
comparing their short lists with mine.
My list of artefacts was made up of eight
nominations. However, only three of them were
on the short list drawn together by the other two
judges. Tim’s other choices included the Roman
bronze owl (Essex, ESS-820B43), the Roman/Early
Medieval dividers (Oxfordshire, BERK-8A377C)
and the Roman pan (East Yorkshire, YORYM20B68C). Additionally, both Michael and Tim
were impressed by the Roman diploma (County
Durham, DUR-C3E4FE).
We decided that the first, second and third
places should be selected from the three artefacts
we had all placed on our short lists: the Bronze Age
axe head, the Roman lead ingot and the lead-alloy
pilgrim badge. This was a really outstanding trio
but we eventually awarded third place to the
Bronze Age axe head. This is in great
condition with really attractive
decoration. Second place went to the
Roman lead ingot. It is of great rarity
and certainly the heaviest entry in
this year’s competition. This, of
course, means that first place was
awarded to the pilgrim badge. It is a
superb find and all three of us were
amazed that it was seemingly
untouched by the ravages of time.
After discussing the pros and
cons of each nomination we decided
that third place should be given to
the penannular brooch. Second
place went to another brooch: the
one measuring 74mm in diameter. It
was a close call for first place but the
top spot was awarded to the
Aethelstan penny.
Most significant coin
The single entry from Jersey was the
wheel lock pistol, which I included
on my short list of artefacts. I have
looked several times at the
photograph of this find and am
amazed that something like this
ended up in the soil. It must have
been purposely buried, for no-one
could have dropped something of
this size and not speedily realised
they had lost it. From the Isle of
Man the single entry was a Bronze
Age chisel. This highlights the fact
that there was activity on the island
long before it was colonised by the
Vikings.
I had six coins on my short list, all of
which were significant in one or
more ways. Tim liked the Caratacus
minim, which was one of the coins I
had selected. This and two other
coins, the Aethelstan penny from
Wales and the Anglo-Saxon gold
thrymsa from Suffolk, made up the
judges’ short list. I’d have included
the Visigothic copy of a tremissis of
Severus III but I was outvoted.
We gave third place to the minim
of Caratacus. It is the smallest coin
struck by our Ancient British
ancestors but its importance is
magnified through being a
previously unknown type. Second
place went to the Aethelstan penny,
which is an extremely rare variety.
One coin stood out from all the
other nominations: the Anglo-Saxon
gold thrymsa. We all agreed that
this was without doubt the most
significant coin. It’s of great rarity,
in superb condition and its eye
appeal is second to none.
Most significant Welsh find
The six nominations from Wales
were made up of an Early Iron Age
socketed axe head (NMGW-DA8631),
which is unusual in that it is cast iron
rather than bronze; an 8th-9th
century penannular copper-alloy
brooch (NMGW-DA579E), lacking a
pin but still of regional importance;
a 13th-15th century lead alloy or
pewter brooch, with a zoomorphic
openwork frame (NMGW-DADB4F;
a Middle Bronze Age tool, circa
1500-1300 BC in date (NMGWDABBEA); an openwork circular
copper-alloy brooch, dated to the
late 8th to the 9th century (LVPL30A793), which, at 74mm in
diameter, is exceptionally large and
this find has been noted to be of
national importance; a penny of
Aethelstan of East Anglia (NMGWDAB2C6), which I had included on
my short list of the most significant
coins.
30 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Most significant finds from
Jersey and the Isle of Man
Tailpiece
When deciding on the items placed
first, second and third we took into
consideration the historical and
local importance, archaeological
significance and the state of
preservation of entries. Of course,
personal preference also played a
part but this was reduced through
the fact that all three judges had to
agree. Therefore, it could be argued
that the judging, in effect, was a
democratic process.
There were no nominations from
Scotland, which is a great pity as
many interesting coins and artefacts
turn up north of the border. Some
good finds are unearthed in
Northern Ireland, too, but no
nominations came from there.
However, perhaps both will join in
the competition next year.
Editor’s note: We would very
much like to thank Tim
Loughton MP for coming to
judge this competition at the
British Museum during
parliamentary recess. Also,
Dr Michael Lewis, Head of the
Portable Antiquities Scheme,
who hosted, and Peter Spencer,
for his valuable and experienced
input.
Some Irish
inspiration
Diminic Quinn
Brought to you by
Sid Perry
I suppose you are thinking here goes another success story …
well it’s more about the love of this wee hobby which
I had the pleasure of starting in the early 80’s.
O
ver 30 years ago when a mate
showed me this new piece of
scientific equipment he had
bought, and showed me how it could find
‘treasures’ beneath our feet. To someone
who thought ‘treasures’ only came from
buried pirate treasures on far off islands
I was truly amazed. So off I went to buy
a cheap detector from a work colleague
who said it was awful as all he had found
was “coke cans and yet more rubbish”.
And yes, you’ve guessed it, that’s exactly
what I was digging for the next
few months.
While talking to my mate one night,
he told me they were dredging a local
river and I should try detecting it. He
said the river, for hundreds of years
would have been the main and safest
way of travel. So off I went and got
permission from one of the farmers
to detect.
The diggers were dredging and had
large piles of stacked silt about 10’ high,
for about a mile. After a few days digging
rubbish, came my first good find, a large
Viking battle axe that most detectorists’
would recognise!
That was me hooked. From then on
I bought books, I met older detectorists
who were amazing in the information
they shared with me. Word got out and
spread like wild fire of the site and soon
loads of people could be seen detecting
but now at least it was possible to exchange
information and show our finds and learn
more from this.
After a while the diggers started to
fill the site and spread it across the fields
and sow them out in grass so I decided
to upgrade my detector as it would really
only lift items near the surface.
By this time I had found something
from about every era of our history and
was taking finds to our main museum
in Northern Ireland who recorded and
displayed loads of artefacts from the site.
With the fields sown out in grass,
32 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
I needed to move on and get a more
modern detector so I contacted Mick
Turrell, from Leisure Promotions who
was so helpful and bought a secondhand
Fisher 1266X from him.
That’s when my finds rate got even
better with a Bronze Age sword, bronze
spears, and Viking artefacts which is a
hoard now on permanent display in the
museum. Consisting of mainly broken
early Christian relics of between the
9th and 12th centuries.
I continued with the Fisher 1266X
for another few years until I decided to
upgrade and was advised by a dealer to
go for a T2 SE which I did and now I
can go very deep for smaller finds like
hammered coins and small artefacts.
With the T2 I can go over old worked
out sites from years ago and still get
hammered coins and artefacts from a
good depth. Using Sensitivity at 80,
Disc at 20 and 2+ now for real deep
signals the BP (Boost Package) mode is
something else, very deep seeking and
once you have used it you know there is
nothing left to find in that field.
This detector I’ll never change but
maybe will upgrade to the latest version
of it sometime. I still love my old Fisher
but it sadly needs repairing.
On the day my Bronze Age sword
came out I can still remember my mates
face when I called him over. It was on
everyones bucket list! However, shortly
after he found a lovely gallowglass broad
axe and he followed two weeks later with
a Viking sword.
Over the next few months we found
more axes, spears and the odd sword
blade, Viking weights, more early
Christian relics (broken by the Viking
raiders).
When the finds started to dry up
we fell back on old fields with our new
detectors. With more depth we found
more of the Viking ‘treasures’ which are
also on display in the Museum officially
named the Shanmullagh Hoard after
the area it was found – Shanmullagh
meaning ‘old hill’.
The best and most important find
was made by myself and two mates on a
lovely summers day. Just after a Sunday
dinner, we met up and started detecting
when within 20 minutes one of them
found a decorated small square plate.
Then the other two found another one
each. I thought they were from a bronze
sword sheath but after showing it to the
museum they discovered it was in fact a
7th century house shrine and were able to
trace information of an important Bishop
in the 7th century falling into the river
with a very important artefact.
Over the next few years we found
more plates from the shrine and were
allowed to take part in excavations with
the museum to try to find more of it. This
we did and included a find of the hinge
and locking system. Now also on display
in pride of place in Belfast Museum.
I have had an exciting detecting life,
I’m now 62 and love the hobby and
everything that goes with it! I hope to
keep going for years to come.
I have a lot of people to thank
for helping me along the way on my
adventure. The Searcher for supplying
a magazine that helped me identify
finds over the years and years of reading
other peoples stories. Mick Turrell for
starting me on the right road with the
1266X, and Pepsi Piro for supplying
and advising me to go with the T2,
the landowners for their permissions
and last of all the local museums for
changing their views on detecting and
working with us saving our history.
Good searching to you all and keep to
the code of conduct for metal detecting
and be responsible in our hobby.
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 33
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08/09/2017 13:56:06
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November2017.indd 4
08/09/2017 13:56:46
DAIRSIE HOARD
The Dairsie
Hoard
PART
1
Finding Roman Treasure
David Hall
W
hen I look back at the
discovery of the Dairsie
Hoard it was such an exciting,
crazy and magical experience, one that
I will carry with me for the rest of my life
and being only 14 at the time, I would
hope that is a very long time indeed.
The hoard discovery was not a solo
effort and I have many fellow detectorists
to thank for their help in the recovery
of the treasure. There were so many
helping that I couldn’t possibly name
them all, so thank you to all of my fellow
detectorists from the Detecting Scotland
club. You will always have my thanks,
respect and gratitude for the kindness
you showed me.
There were a few people that stood
out above others with their help: special
thanks to Tam Hall (my dad) for his
38 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
guidance and for putting up with me
and my detecting addiction, Derek
McLennan for his initial identification
of a possible hoard and his finding of the
main deposit, Sharon McLennan, Mark
Selby, John Branagh and Eddie Collier
with their help detecting and collecting
together the various pieces that were
found by other detectorists. This hoard
was more a team effort. Yes, I found the
initial pieces and declared a hoard, but
as much credit goes to everyone who
managed to unearthed some of the
Dairsie Hoard pieces, those that tried to
find them and those who helped manage
the situation on the day – without you it
would not have been possible and I salute
you all in my best Roman manner.
CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE David Hall; David Hall and
Eddy Collier Kneeling with collected pieces; crowd round
main deposit hole; collection of recovered pieces of Beaker
DAIRSIE HOARD
I shall now tell my story on the discovery
of the Dairsie Hoard. I had been waiting
anxiously all week for the opportunity
to get back out detecting, as I was still
at school and my studies took precedent
over my digging, but finally, Sunday
9 August 2015 arrived – DIGGING DAY
and we made our way to Dairsie, which
is located in Fife.
Promptly at 9:30am, the dig started
and around 110 eager detectorists
charged into the three fields that had
been allocated. At first I headed to a
long field on a slope, but a quick search
proved it to be very quiet and I decided
to move to another field; the original
field where all the cars were parked and
I headed over to see my dad.
As I was walking over to him I heard
a strong positive signal from my Garrett
Ace 250, reading between the ‘foil’ and
the ‘5c’ indicators, not a great sign.
However, I stopped dead in my tracks,
as this was one of the few positive signals
I had heard so far and I was going to
dig it. I dug out the clod and the target
was not visible in the spoil, so using my
Garrett pinpointer I checked the hole
and soon spotted the target lying in the
earth. To my amazement, it was a small
piece of silver, quite thick and with what
looked like part of an edge on it. I quickly
shouted on my dad to come over and
while walking over, he dug a target which
was a larger piece of silver, around the
size of my palm!
We noticed that this piece of silver
had the appearance of being folded
twice over onto itself with an unusual and
interesting design punched onto it. We
asked another nearby detectorist what he
thought the silver may be from and he
suggested it may be part of a Victorian
mirror – to be honest I didn’t really know
what it was, as I had only been detecting
for around six months.
We continued to search the immediate
area and after finding several more
bits of this strange looking silver, I
decided to seek out my friend and fellow
detectorist, Derek McLennan (Finder
of the Galloway Hoard), to ask for an
ID. Almost everybody on the Detecting
Scotland digs tend to approach Derek
for identification, such is his reputation
– he is also an accomplished detectorist,
so I didn’t mind bothering him! Within
seconds of showing him he exclaimed
“Who told you Victorian? This is
definitely Roman or Pictish and possibly
from a hoard … Where did you find it?”
Now, being fairly new to the hobby, at
first I didn’t realise what this meant or
how important this find would turn out
to be, nevertheless I pointed to where I
found it and Derek and I set off back to
the general find spot, where my dad was
waiting. Upon arrival, Derek approached
one of the dig marshals and said that
there was a possible hoard and that the
rest of the marshals should come to the
area and cordon it off, but keep it quiet
for the time being. As Derek, my Dad and
I were discussing the possible location
of where the rest of the hoard may be
buried, I looked up and got the fright of
my life; a stampede of detectorists was
moving towards us at a ferocious pace!
So, the plan to keep it quiet while
recovering the hoard hadn’t quite
worked out, but Derek shouted to all
the detectorists that a hoard had been
declared by me and that anybody
searching was doing so on the basis
that this was a recovery operation and
any pieces of silver they found had to
be given to the marshals as part of my
original hoard find. Everybody that came
to help understood this and they all
agreed eagerly to help with the recovery
of my hoard and to deposit any pieces of
silver they found with the marshals.
Derek, myself, my dad and dozens
of other members of the club all started
to detect the area and some pieces of
silver were found, although the ‘spread’
was quite large and we realised that the
hoard had obviously been scattered at
some point by ploughing. By roughly
3pm we had found around 120 pieces
of silver of varying sizes and it became
apparent that these were from at least
three separate vessels.
Everybody was continuing to search
the general area, but I noticed that Derek
was gridding a smaller area by himself,
using his Minelab CTX 3030 and going
very slow and low. He dug a fairly deep
hole and suddenly stood up, called me
with a smile and said, “Think I have
found the main deposit wee man.”
I looked into the hole and saw what
looked like the decorated rim of a silver
vessel: a huge grin appeared on my face
and I honestly don’t think it went away
for weeks.
As word spread, a crowd soon gathered
and a discussion followed on what to do
next. As it was Sunday, contacting the
Treasure Trove Unit in Edinburgh was
impossible, combined with the amount
of detectorists and the rather exposed
location, it was decided that the hole
should be widened to assess how much
silver was in the main deposit.
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 39
DAIRSIE HOARD
Derek and I covered the exposed silver
with a polythene bag and set about
widening the hole.
Once the full extent of the deposit
had been exposed the polythene bag was
removed. Looking at it we could clearly
see that it was part of a large decorative
plate with a lovely beaded rim. We also
noticed that the plate had been folded
in on itself at least twice. Again, it was
discussed whether the artefact should
remain in the ground, but for the
aforementioned reasons and the fact that
it was actually lying directly on top of the
subsoil, it was decided to remove it for
safe keeping and until the archaeologists
could get to the site. The artefact and
a small amount of the surrounding soil
were carefully excavated as best we could
and placed within a container.
Following the discovery of the
hoard main deposit the majority of the
detectorists started to leave the field.
My dad, Derek and I continued to search
the area and we found around 60 more
pieces of Roman silver, including some
tiny fragments. Derek explained that the
reason the majority of the detectorists had
not found much of the silver was because
the soil was heavily mineralised and thus
out of reach of some machines.
He was confident that much more
silver fragments would be under the soil,
but it was safe enough to leave for
the archaeologists, as he was sure the
archaeological recovery of the remaining
pieces would provide a good spread
pattern and depths for the historical
record. He was also confident that apart
from the main deposit spot, all the
archaeology under the soil would
be untouched. At that, we decided that
we would also leave the field and return
home.
By the time we arrived home, word
had spread throughout my family and we
had to pay visits to several excited family
members, to show them the beautiful
hoard of hack-silver. After what seemed
like hours we eventually managed to go
to bed for some much needed rest, but
it’s fair to say I never slept very much that
night, or indeed the next few nights.
The National Museum of Scotland
(NMS) soon got in touch and my
mum and I then visited the museum
in Edinburgh to meet with Dr. Fraser
Hunter, Principal Curator of Iron Age
and Roman Collections and Stuart
Campbell of the Treasure Trove Unit.
We took along the hoard of Roman hacksilver and deposited it with them: they
appeared to be extremely pleased
and excited about the discovery.
We also arranged with Fraser to meet
at the hoard site the following day, in
order to do a geophysical survey and
a small test trench. Fraser also asked if
a few detectorists could come along to
help them during the excavation and
to search the surrounding area for any
more silver and Derek, Sharon and
fellow detectorists, Martin Brooks, Grant
Maxwell, Eddie Collier and Jim Conley
were all going to meet us at the site.
The next day many hours were spent
detecting, while the archaeologists
decided where to put the trench and
were trying to work out the general
spread of the silver. Derek had used the
GPS feature on his Minelab CTX3030
and showed the archaeologists the
areas where the larger pieces of silver
and the main deposit had been found.
After a successful day, the detecting
team had recovered around another
30 pieces of hack-silver, which was a
great achievement and even better, the
geophysical survey revealed some very
interesting features under the earth, some
of which were potentially prehistoric.
We arranged with the archaeologists to
40 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE Collection of large pieces
of fluted bowl; Martin Brooks (Detectorist) excavating;
large silver ingot
meet again, at which time a larger scale
excavation would take place.
On the following Thursday morning
we all met at the field and Sharon and
Derek discussed with the archaeologists
how to proceed utilising the detecting
for the best result. It was decided that
best practice would be to excavate down
in small layers, approximately 15cm at a
time, as this way the detectorist’s could
adequately detect and flag targets and the
archaeologists could record and excavate
them layer by layer. It was hoped that the
end result would give a nice spread of the
remaining silver fragments and would
clearly show the direction of impact from
the ploughing and the full spread of
fragments from that point.
The detectorists took turns detecting
and flagging within the trench and also
DAIRSIE HOARD
detecting the spoil. I fired up my trusty
Garrett Ace 250 and started detecting the
site. The detecting team managed to find
over 200 more silver pieces during the
trench excavation, some of which were
absolutely miniscule.
Throughout the excavation the
detecting team helped the archaeologists
working in the main trench, shovelling
spoil and scraping away the remaining
topsoil to help reveal features. I helped
excavate a posthole, possibly part of a
prehistoric monument. During this mini
excavation we found three pieces of
prehistoric pottery within the posthole!
The whole experience kept getting more
exciting and we eventually recovered a
total of 408 pieces of Roman hack. It wasn’t until after the excavation was
finished that I started to ponder over the
amazing history that had lain hidden for
thousands of years – that is, until it was
discovered by chance through my metal
detecting – amazing!
Months passed, and then I received an
email from the museum asking if I would
like to help with the conservation of the
hoard and my school agreed that I could
travel to Edinburgh once a week to help
with the conservation process. My first
task was to weigh, measure and catalogue
every piece of silver.
I was then asked to start looking at the
various pieces, trying to fit together some
of the more prominent fragments, rim
sections and any piece with a pattern.
It really was a slow process and on a
good day I might be lucky to fit six
pieces together. Regardless of how slow
it was, I really had a great time. To say
it was a hugely interesting experience
would be a massive understatement and
I cannot thank Dr. Fraser Hunter and his
colleagues enough.
Finally after being on holiday for a few
weeks and thus not being able to help
out at the museum, I was told that there
would be a press release on 31 July – this
just blew my mind. On the day, my dad
and I arrived at the NMS, expecting to
be interviewed by a journalist from a local
newspaper. Much to our amazement the
BBC turned up and I was interviewed
for TV, which was yet another great
experience. However, my favourite
part was being able to see the silver
pieces from the hoard all cleaned and
conserved; it just looked incredible and
the difference from when it was found,
to seeing it ready for display was simply
phenomenal. It is sure to make a fantastic
display when it is finally exhibited
to the public.
As for me and what’s next? Well I’m
still at school and entering my final year
of studies and hoping to go to university,
so my detecting days may be slightly more
restricted for a few years. However, I’ll
never forget that day and I am definitely
not giving up, so who knows, perhaps one
day I might get lucky again and that’s
what makes this hobby so addictive!
I would like to thank the following
people and organisations for their help
and generosity: My mum and dad Tam
& Fiona Hall, my wee sister Katy Hall,
Derek & Sharon McLennan, Dr. Fraser
Hunter, Stuart Campbell, Nigel at
Regtons, National Museum of Scotland,
Treasure Trove Unit, Garrett Metal
Detectors, Detecting Scotland and of
course all the fellow detectorists who
helped me recover the hoard.
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Targets flagged in trench;
Prehistoric standing stone remains being excavated;
large recovered pieces; David Hall at excavation site
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 41
DAIRSIE HOARD
Rebuilding
Roman silver
PART
2
The fantastic Dairsie Hoard
Dr Fraser Hunter Principal Curator
of Iron Age and Roman collections,
National Museum of Scotland
I
t’s not every day that a silver jigsaw
puzzle ends up on your desk – but
that’s the challenge that we’ve been
facing for the past few months. This
is no ordinary jigsaw, though – we’re
piecing back together a hoard of hackedup Roman silver. This new discovery is
changing our views on Rome’s relation
with Scotland 1700 years ago. It’s a find
of European importance – but why?
What’s so important about a pile of silver
shrapnel?
As you’ve read, the hoard was found at
Dairsie in Fife in 2015. Schoolboy David
Hall made the first finds, with around
200 fragments recovered that day. The
discovery was reported to the Treasure
Trove Unit, who got me involved as they
know my weakness for shiny Roman
things, and we went out to dig at the site,
finding another 200 fragments and a story
to go with them.
What about the silver?
Well, the find came at the perfect time
– we were just starting the latest phase
of the Glenmorangie Research Project,
looking at Scotland’s Early Silver, and this
was wonderful new evidence to work with.
408 pieces of silver came from the field,
but this is not how they went into the
ground 1700 years ago.
Originally, parts of four Roman silver
vessels were buried as a hoard. There was
a dish, a bowl, a beautifully decorated
beaker, and a rolled-up silver cylinder.
The beaker was buried intact, but the rest
had been cut up into pieces and folded
or rolled into packages. We call this hack
silver, when valuable objects have been
cut into chunks of silver; the weight of
the raw material was more important
than the beauty of the object.
As well as being hacked in the
Roman period, these objects have
suffered further damage – generations
of ploughing have shattered them into
hundreds of pieces. That’s what makes
our jigsaw so difficult – some of the
fragments are tiny.
The Devil’s jigsaw
We can reconstruct what the vessels
once looked like from examples found
elsewhere. Conservation is still underway
– the photos show you what they look
like now, as our conservators clean
off the corrosion and Fife mud, and
painstakingly piece them back together.
It’s hard to imagine the original
quality of the vessels now. The dish was
cut into quarters, with two of these folded
into bundles. It was once a lovely item,
with a decorative beaded rim and
a beautiful engraved pattern in the centre
set off with a dark inlay called niello
to give it a colour contrast. Examples
from elsewhere show us this was made
in the later 3rd century AD. The bowl
had elegant flutes hammered into it.
It would be used to wash your hands at
a posh dinner party, but it’s been a real
puzzle to reconstruct. It was cut into
thirds, but only two were tightly folded
up and buried, then later smashed
by the plough.
This three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle
has left us scratching our heads and
folding up bits of paper to try to work
out what happened! The cylinder is a
puzzling piece – its irregular surface
suggests it may have been a flawed
casting. But the real gem of the show is
the beaker.
This paper-thin silver has been
smashed into the tiniest fragments,
but we think it was intact when it was
buried, as almost all the rim survives
42 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
and there’s no trace of cut marks. It’s
been beautifully decorated with patterns
hammered in from the outside, so you’d
see them best as you drank from it.
What does it mean?
So why did this hacked-up silver end
up in Fife? Scholars used to think such
hacked-up silver was barbarian loot –
beautiful objects cut up by our ancestors
because they could not appreciate their
artistic value. But we’ve been doing a
lot of research into this recently, and
the story is more complex. Hacksilver
is found in the Roman world as well as
beyond its borders. A lot of it is cut up
quite carefully, into halves or quarters,
not just randomly hacked – and a lot of it
matches Roman weight standards.
These give the clues we need – this
silver was being used within the Roman
economy as bullion. Its value was as
a raw material. At times of economic
hardship, the family silver could be cut
up and traded off. But why was it in Fife?
DAIRSIE HOARD
CLOCKWISE FROM OPPOSITE TOP
LEFT Detail of hacked fragments;
folded dish and rim fragments;
decorated dish rim; Niello-inlaid
design from dish centre; two different
styles of vase shown on the beaker;
two folded fragments of fluted bowl.
Images © National Museum Scotland
When the hoard was buried in the later
3rd century AD, Scotland was outside
the Roman world. But the Romans still
maintained an interest in the area. A
century earlier they’d been sending silver
coins into Scotland as a form of bribery.
This was sensible frontier diplomacy
– using silver sweeteners to buy peace
beyond the frontier. But this policy ended
in the early 3rd century. We thought
the Roman world had lost interest in
Scotland as more pressing problems
elsewhere took their eye. Only in the
dying days of the empire did rich pay-offs
reappear, with finds like the Traprain Law
Treasure.
But this Fife find rewrites the story. It
shows there were continuing attempts to
keep the northern tribes sweet – especially
on the east coast. Around this time the
troublesome groups known as the Picts
were emerging in eastern Scotland north
of the Forth, so silver like the Dairsie
find might have been targeted at them.
This isn’t just a first for Scotland – it’s
the first time we see this policy anywhere
in Europe. Hacksilver finds north of the
frontier are known from the 4th and
5th centuries – but this discovery has
pushed the policy back a hundred years.
It’s rewriting our view of Roman frontier
politics. Not bad for a silver jigsaw.
Why was it there?
The finds are great – but we wanted to
know more. Had the detectorists found
all the fragments – and why was the find
there at all? So we went digging. First,
we worked with the detectorists to scan
the area again, finding bits which they’d
missed in their excitement. Then we
stripped the soil away in spits, finding
more and more silver. At this point, the
skills of the field archaeologists took
over – cleaning, drawing, digging and
puzzling. Why was the hoard buried here?
Were there any clues?
Yes, there were. We found tell-tale
black marks in the subsoil – traces
of pits. Two of them had big broken
stones in them and some prehistoric
pottery, suggesting there was an ancient
monument here – a pair of standing
stones, already 2000 years old when the
hoard was buried. To the other side was
a small peat bog. Wet places were often
seen as special or sacred in prehistory,
and we think it’s no accident the silver
was buried here. This was a memorable
place – there would have been tales and
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 43
DAIRSIE HOARD
myths about the ‘auld stanes’ and the
strange wet place. Was the silver buried
as a sacrifice, or an offering of valued
material?
So, our silver jigsaw is telling us tales.
It’s a find of European significance,
changing the way we understand how
Rome dealt with its northern neighbours.
The digging has given us clues about
why it was buried here. But the jigsaw
continues – as I type, our conservators
are busily gluing bits of silver together. Come and see the results in our free
exhibition on Scotland’s Early Silver,
opening at the NMS in Edinburgh
on 13 October 2017 – or go to our
website and look for more blog posts
in a few weeks, when we get the silver
stuck together.
44 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
National Museum of Scotland
www.nms.ac.uk/
Blogs blog.nms.ac.uk/
Glenmorangie Research Project
www.nms.ac.uk/collections-research/
our-research/current-research/
early-medieval-scotland/
ABOVE Fragments of repoussé-decorated beaker
Images © National Museum Scotland
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Rally report Gary Cook
COIL TO THE SOIL RALLY
24 - 28 AUGUST
This year it was being held near Doncaster, South
Yorkshire. The area has plenty of history with a
Roman Road running virtually through the site, so
expectations were high.
I quickly checked in inside the main marquee
and was informed there was a field set aside for
people to detect on Thursday afternoon from
12.30pm.
People were arriving including a group from
Holland and setting up their tents. I noticed that
the Burger Van ‘Food to Go’ was open so I grabbed
a coffee before getting out on the available field. A
lot of detecting was already taking place and finds
were being made including Roman and medieval,
of which there was a lovely Roman bird brooch
also a very nice Roman plate brooch.
I was up bright and early Friday morning as
detecting was to start at 9.15, after a short briefing
from Ian Norfe we were off. The field we were on
was huge and we all started to spread ourselves
out into our own lines and zones. The ground had
been cultivated and worked down so was easy to
detect on. The sun was out and very hot so when
I thought I could hear music I could not believe
what I saw coming over the hill an ice cream van –
amazing! Well I couldn’t resist, myself and my two
mates Alan and John tucked into a 99 with flake
of course.
It was not long before the finds
were beginning to show themselves
with a varied selection from all ages
I managed to see a really nice gold
hammered quarter noble and a
Celtic silver unit. A bronze Celtic
coin was found and a selection of
hammered coins plus Roman coins
and brooches. Also, a modern gold
wedding band. A really nice eye’s
only find was a gorgeous flint arrow
head.
Feeling peckish I popped back
to grab a bite from the burger van
and whilst there I called into the
marquee and purchased some raffle
tickets for the weekend’s raffle. The
NCMD were also in attendance along
with Mike and Karen from Roman
Remains, and Crawfords who were
also there. During the afternoon,
I decided to try the other side of
the field and I was glad I did, as
I managed to winkle out a silver
denarius of Septimius Severus and
part of a Roman bracelet.
Entertainment was laid on
throughout the weekend including
live music and bingo although
it looked like Ian had his own
entertainment lined up!
Saturday was upon us and
Ian gave us a short briefing and
informed us that the raffle was to
take place at 1.30pm and to look
out for tokens that had been spread
around the field as these could then
be redeemed for raffle tickets.
Saturday’s field was as big if not
bigger than Friday’s and was in soft
stubble, once we had spread out I
picked a line and managed to find
a couple of Roman coins. Stopping
for a chat to a chap from Newcastle
he showed me a nice trumpet brooch
and a few other finds he had just
found.
Lunchtime approached and we
headed back to the site for a bite and
the raffle, there was a good selection
of prizes to be had and Lorraine
Watson from Lancaster was over the
moon with her year’s subscription to
The Searcher magazine.
A couple of nice finds from
Saturday afternoon were a Medieval
swivel heraldic pendant and a half
sovereign.
In the evening, we had a quiz and
music and bonfire night came early
with a great fireworks display.
Sunday, we were given another massive stubble
field to detect and as before Ian told us to look
out for tokens. Finds from this field were the
same as the previous days a mixed bag of Roman,
Medieval and modern. Including silver Roman
and brooches, one of which was a nice plate
brooch with blue enamel, (apologies to the finder,
as I am sure the plate brooch was from Sunday
but not 100%). Sunday’s raffle took place again
around 1.30pm with another very good selection
of prizes to be won the lucky ones who found
tokens again redeemed them for raffle tickets.
Unfortunately, I had to depart Sunday
afternoon but Ian informed me that there was
also a field available and detecting on the Bank
Holiday Monday. So, in all if you stayed you had
detecting for five straight days so real value for
your weekend ticket. Ian later told me that finds of
a similar sort had been made on the Monday.
To finish I would like to thank
Ian Norfe and the team from Coil
to the Soil for their hospitality and
for making me and everyone who
attended very welcome to a well-run
and great fun weekend.
Ian has asked me to thank
everyone who attended and to those
who helped organise it. Special
thanks also to the three landowners
whose land the event was held on,
one of which very generously at
his own request a £600 donation
was made to the injured Jockey
Foundation.
Well done for a great weekend Ian
and I am already looking forward to
next year’s, please keep a space free
for me!
RALLY REPORT
Dorset & West
Pastfinders
Big Charity
Weekender
David Witcombe
I have only been detecting for
a little over two years and was
introduced to the hobby when
I met Malcolm Andrews. Together
we formed Dorset & West
Pathfinders (DWP) after a charity
dig that Malcolm organised for the
charity Breathe On. I was hooked
straight away.
We run DWP as a totally nonprofit making club and over the
last two years our members have
raised over £25,000 for a lot
of very deserving charities which
are nominated by our dig of the
day landowner.
Friday 18 August Those who were
staying that night arrived and set up
their tents/vans etc and at 2pm we
set them off on the free field. Within
minutes Mike Pittard picked out two
hammered coins just a few feet from
the camp edge. Various other coins and
artefacts were also found so an excellent
start to the weekend.
Saturday 19 August After a hearty
breakfast Malcolm sent them off and
it did not take long before ‘gold’, ‘silver’
and ‘hammie’ was heard over the radio.
Along with, staters/Roman and so many
other wonderful finds.
44 THE SEARCHER twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Sunday 20 August Sunday saw some
sore heads and more fresh faces. News
had got around of the haul from the
previous day so expectations were
running high and then DISASTER. One
of our new fields became unavailable to
us. A few frantic calls and the day was
saved. Well done to Malcolm!
Malcolm gathered the diggers
together and like an old fashioned grand
prix start most hot-footed off to one
particular field that had produced in the
past. It was a bit of a steep walk to start
with. One of our more senior members
David Alner (81) let the 50 or so people
past and decided to stay local to the
camp and after a while was rewarded
with the most beautiful Edward the
Confessor penny.
The finds were not as good as the
previous day but none the less some
very nice finds did come up so the day
finished up very well. By mid afternoon
the weather god struck again and the
numbers dwindled and the weekend
came to a soggy and wet end.
The total raised was £2,000 which
has already been handed over to the
landowners charity of choice.
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Detecting
Medley
John Winter
What a Whopper!
In 2011, and amidst great excitement, I
reported on a 69.43oz gold nugget that
had been unearthed in Western Australia.
My short piece was entitled, ‘What a
Beauty!’
That magnificent specimen has been
surpassed. My Aussie correspondent
Ray Swinnerton (unpaid) has sent me
information about a nugget, which
at 139.05oz, is almost twice that size.
Unbelievable!
Thanks to the Eureka Echo, the official
journal of the prospectors’ and miners’
association of Victoria (PMVA), for
both the information on this find and
photographs on which my story is based.
Syd Pearson has been prospecting for
gold for over 37 years and found many
fine specimens, but never the BIG one …
until this particular day. An excavator had
dug a large trench. Syd was detecting in
the sidewall (on his claim in the Golden
Triangle) and using a Minelab, when
there was a ‘deep sound’.
Thinking that it was an aluminium
can, Syd dug into the clay, but missed the
target, and so he ran the detector over
the area again. The same deep noise was
heard. Syd said, “With another dig, the
spade clunked and it rolled over. I could
see the colour and I pounced on it like a
tip rat”.
Syd’s first thought was to ring his wife
Catherine. Pumped up with excitement
he proclaimed, “I think it’s the Lady
Catherine nugget!” He’d often joked with
his wife that if he found a gold nugget
weighing over 100oz he would call it the
‘Lady Catherine’.
In the field, Syd estimated the nugget
to weigh close to 100oz. At home he
employed a more sophisticated manner.
He jumped on the bathroom scales and
weighed himself at first with the nugget
and then without.
The scales didn’t seem right – the
nugget was too heavy. He tried weighing
himself and the nugget about six times
before taking it to the local Minelab
dealer and having it weighed there.
Syd was pleasantly surprised. The
Lady Catherine weighed in at 4.325kg
(139.05oz). Eureka! (Gold is always
weighed in a troy ounce, which is a bit
heavier than a regular ounce.) He’d
finally struck it rich! Australian detecting
forums discussed the news with awe and
disbelief.
You may be wondering about that
rather large trench. Ray tells me that Syd
is a miner and the trench would have
been dug with his own digger and truck
in the search for gold. A deal will have
been struck with the farmer of the land.
His type of mining is called ‘Dig and
Detect’. A trench is dug in the 40-hectare
claim and can go down as far as 30’,
depending on the bottom.
He removes the soil, spreads it out
and detects. When he is finished in one
trench, he digs the next, maybe 18” from
the first. Syd says that the Minelab can
‘see’ into the walls, so he isn’t worried
about missing ‘big’ bits of gold.
You may also be wondering about the
reference to an aluminium can, this can
be explained. Because the whole area was
mined in the Gold Rush days, Syd often
finds junk deep down.
Syd Pearson
Trench
On Scales
52 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
The Papal satirical medal re-visited
In my last Medley I highlighted
an unusual ‘protest’ medal,
showing an example found
by a detectorist. Allan
Carey of Weymouth
and Portland MDC
contacted me showing
a fine example that he
had found. What’s more
he was able to give me
more information – and
a picture of the other side,
which is gratefully received.
The identification given by a
club member when it was
found is based on the
excellent information on
the Papal Artifacts (sic)
site.
An unknown artist
minted the bronze
medal during the papacy
of Pope Paul III in 1544.
The obverse shows the
pope wearing the papal tiara.
However, when turned 180 degrees, he
is revealed as the devil. On the
reverse is a cardinal with a
wide-brimmed hat. When
similarly rotated, he
becomes a buffoon with a
fool’s cap and bells.
The Latin inscriptions
further underscore the
satirical nature of the
medal. They read: “The
perverse Church has the
face of the devil” and “Fools are
sometimes wise“.
Satirical medals, especially
those featuring double
heads, were used as tools
of propaganda and were
widely circulated in the
context of the 16thcentury wars of religion.
Indeed, several variations
on this theme are known,
many of which have survived
to the present.
Feedback on the
Geordie coin
I am always pleased to receive
comments on my scribblings.
Feedback is important.
Unfortunately, with a magazine
it can take a long time. Mick
Farrow of Sussex tells me that
he has several George III
pennies and halfpennies. I bet
they are in better fettle than
the one shown in my March
Medley!
A cuff around the ear
The Christmas 2016 dig organised by
DetectingScotland was held on a ‘braw
sunny day with mulled wine and much
seasonal cheer in evidence’.
Detectorist Eleanor Fallance was with
her partner, 9-year-old daughter Erin,
and under a tree by the river she found a
lone silver cufflink with a decorative floral
design. Nothing spectacular. The item lay
in the finds’ box, occasionally catching
her eye because it was so pretty. Then she
had a brainwave!
She said, “If I can’t dig the bling, I
shall have the bling specially made!”
Eleanor took the link to a local lady
silversmith who remodelled it into a
pair of fine looking earrings. Erin is also
looking forward to wearing them when
she is old enough.
Eleanor and Erin
The unique earrings and will
undoubtedly be a source of interest
whenever they are worn … and what
a good example of recycling! Thank
you for allowing me to relate your tale,
Eleanor. Sorry about the title and I’m
pleased that you are ‘delighted’ with your
first ‘wearable’ find.
Medal Obverse and Reverse
He told me that the die axis
on these coins is what he calls
North/South - turning the coin
from bottom to top gives you a
correct view of the other side.
I know what you mean, Mick.
What I didn’t know is that the
edge of the coin is generally
known as a ‘rope edge’.
Earrings
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 53
The antique clothing button
Patrick Law of Yorkshire is becoming a
regular contributor. It may surprise you
to know that on this occasion it is because
of a button he has found. But it isn’t just
any old button!
I was surprised and delighted to see
the antique button; the first I’ve seen
found by a detectorist and would like
to share the artistry, workmanship and
design that has gone into this humble
fastening. I’ve seen others, but always
with some kind of fancy border. It seems
that a standard die was made, then a
different border, sometimes cut steel,
could be chosen, resulting in various
finishes and embellishments. I could
be way off the mark here and if anyone
can tell me more, I’d be grateful for the
information. Estimated date is around
the middle to late 1800’s.
Pat’s button depicts a knight wearing
a full suit of armour and is made from
stamped pierced brass, without border.
The ‘knight’ is King Arthur of course,
complete with his plumed helmet and
holding aloft his famed sword Excalibur.
Anne, the owner of the excellent
Pat’s Button
and useful site Once Upon a Button
tells me that she owns a set of
four, all without a border. She
checked for me her buttons
with a border and the central
image of King Arthur was
exactly the same size as the
example found by Pat, 1 and
1/8”.
An interesting fact is that the
size of buttons, as designated by
the National Button Society
in the States (I didn’t know
either) deems that the button
without border is known ‘as
small’. It is the border that
makes the button a large size.
Anne commented, “One of
the things I find fascinating
about button collecting is the
variation that can be found
in one specific button design.
The King Arthur buttons I
own with borders are all of
one piece, so there may have
been dies without a border, and
dies with a border.”
If you know where this
rather ornate style of button
was manufactured and any
other details, please let me
know.
LEFT: Button: Kind permission of
Once Upon a Button
Significant finds
I had a little teaser in the May edition
when I asked if any of you had heard of
Randolph Dee, the venerable and
respected detectorist from County
Durham? He’s been swinging for 40 years
now and in that time has amassed many
finds of note. One of Randy’s favourites
was an Iron Age Celtic dragonesque
brooch. But I reckon that may have
changed …
I went on to say that in February of
this year, whilst wielding his XP Deus
in Yorkshire, he unearthed something
unique and quite exciting. On the
UKDFD it is tentatively described as
the handle of an Anglo-Saxon cosmetic
implement and a find of special
significance, as this is the first ever
recorded on any database. No wonder
he’s excited! So, what is it?
Part of the description is as follows:
‘A cast copper-alloy object of the mid
Anglo-Saxon period, tentatively
identified as the handle of a cosmetic
implement. The object consists of a
highly stylised human figure, mounted
axially on a plain, slightly tapered,
sub-cylindrical base … no close parallel
has been traced … the figure is a
representation of the Norse god, Odin,
wearing a headdress depicting his
companion ravens … it would seem
most likely that the object is a
Scandinavian import, as very few
comparable objects are
recorded as having
been found in
Britain.’
Randy would
like to thank Rod
Blunt for all
54 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
of the work he has put into the
identifying of this find. A full description
and record of this unique item can be
seen on the UKDFD, number 52640.
Randy made another decent find in
the same field and it also looked as
though it may be Anglo Saxon in origin.
He sent it to Kevin Leahy, the National
Finds Adviser for the PAS who said that it
was ‘clearly 6th century and some sort of
harness fitting.’ Randy was advised to
take it to the FLO for recording.
LEFT: Cosmetic Implement showing the face of Odin
BELOW: Saxon harness fitting?
Read’s Miscellany
Brian Read
eviating from the usual format, this month’s objects are all finds’ of a single
detectorist, Steve Llewellyn, who is based in Teesside. Our editor, Harry
Bain, in conversation with Steve, asked him to consider writing an
article for the magazine, specifically showing-off some of his discoveries. Although
more than happy to oblige with sharing his finds pictorially, Steve proved a little
reticent at scribing, and yours truly was very happy to take on the task. I just love
studying artefacts from the past.
Like many of us, Steve started as a lone detectorist and then teamed up with
another independent hobbyist. In 2000 both joined the Dunelme Metal Detecting
Club in County Durham, where Steve accepted the post of sites officer. In 2014 he
formed a charity-based Facebook group called ’History Unearthed’ who fundraise
for the Air Ambulance Service. For his small group, Steve acts as sites officer, and
obtains sites all over the country.
D
It is not always easy to accurately
identify and ascribe objects from photos,
especially when showing only one
perspective, multi views at the very least
are desirable though in the flesh is always
preferable. Therefore here my opinions
are tentative and in some instances,
perhaps inaccurate. Nineteen objects are
listed by prehistoric and historic period.
Uncovered in Cumbria, No. 1 is a very
nice late Bronze Age, c.BC 1000 – c.BC
800, cast copper-alloy (bronze) small
socketed-gourge. The haft socket features
a pronounced peripheral lateral collar
and a concave groove tapers from the
cutting-edge to below the collar leaving a
plain peripheral band.
This Roman Iron Age (c.1st century
BC – c. AD 400) cast copper-alloy
one-piece toggle-fastener turned up in
North Yorkshire, No. 2. Two types are
recorded, with or without loops – this
example is looped. The narrowed central
body is hemispherical cross-section, the
reverse inside of which is flat while the
rounded front has moulded transverse
decoration – six grooves and three plain
ridges alternating with two beaded
ridges; at each end of the body is a
bulbous terminal between which spans
a hemispherical cross-section bridge,
thereby forming a loop. Whether such
objects were solely used as dress fasteners
is uncertain.
1
2
3
56 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
From Lincolnshire came this c.2ndcentury AD Roman cast copper-alloy
plate brooch No. 3. Circular with
peripheral multiple knops (some a
little abraded), and ornamented with
a six-point star and a central roundel;
the star, roundel, field segments
and borders seemingly retain much
champlevé enamel – the star is mainly
now orange with one point in now red,
three segments of the field are now white
though one segment has tiny sections in
now orange, the other three segment of
the field are now red with one segment
retaining a remnant of now orange; all
design elements are bordered with what is
perhaps now white. If my interpretation
of the enamel colours is accurate, then
the arrangement is curious, however,
what appears to be now red is possibly
metal and some of the now white was
really formerly another colour. Most of
the catch-plate and twin lugs for a sprung
pin, which retains the axis spindle and
a small section of pin, survive on the
reverse.
North Yorkshire produced No 4, a
c.2nd-century Roman cast copper-alloy
circular stud, the perimeter of which
is abraded in places; on the front is a
4
champlevé enamelled swirled triskele and
three ring-and-dot motifs – the triskele
is now white bordered with possible now
blue, the ring-and-dot annulets are now
white and the dots now red; while the
field is now red; the reverse retains a stub
of circular cross-section stud.
Usually described as ‘votive’,
miniatures of certain life-sized objects
found by detectorists in locations with
no known religious association, may well
be simply toys. Such an object is No. 5
that came to light in East Yorkshire, a
delightful model of a late Bronze Age cast
copper-alloy socketed and side-looped
axe. The late Paul Robinson (sorely
missed by me), former curator at Wiltshire
Heritage Museum, Devizes, wrote a paper
on such objects, and he classified the
one considered here as Type II, dating
somewhere between the late Bronze Age
until the end of the Roman period.
Discovered in North Yorkshire No.
6 is an interesting pommel/handle
substantially cast in copper alloy, shaped
as a three-dimensional ram’s head,
from a knife or perhaps a razor. The flat
underside has a tang hole around which
survives residue of whitish material,
possibly lead solder. This type of object is
5
typically Roman Iron Age (c.1st century
BC – c. AD 400), as this example probably
is, though sheep/rams were deified by
many cultures as far back as Neolithic.
Sadly incomplete, No. 7 is a padlock
front, decorated with punched ringand-dot motifs, which came from North
Yorkshire. Steve suggests it is Norman
though to me it appears to be Roman
period.
Lincolnshire was the findspot for No.
8, an incomplete hollow-cast copper-alloy
three-dimensional possible spout in the
form of a human mask. This, I think, is
possibly Roman period.
No uncertainty with No. 9 however,
also ascribed as Roman period, an
incomplete cast copper-alloy terret – a
reign guide. Attached to the inside top of
the hollow skirt is a stub of iron, probably
a remnant of stud used for attaching the
terret to a chariot’s (or other wheeled
vehicle’s) wooden pole. Found in North
Yorkshire.
Another Roman period object, No. 10,
this time discovered in County Durham,
is a chunky cast copper-alloy rotary key.
The incomplete bow may have originally
been circular, however, the warded bit is
intact.
The next object turned up in North
Yorkshire, No. 11, which is possibly
a strapend, is cast copper-alloy and
comprises a subcircular plate from
which extends a basal tapering stem
with a median ridge and terminates in
a hemisphere, convex side outwards;
each side of the stem at its juncture
with the plate is a knop while a third
knop is located at the top of the plate;
a frontal embossed mask appears to be
anthropomorphic though may be animal
and the reverse is flat; four rivet-holes
are drilled through the plate, spaced
equidistant, one of which is torn, while
two retain separate copper-alloy rivets,
the lower rivet-hole forms the mouth.
The closet parallel for this being a
strapend is the late Saxon type with a
globular terminal though these have split
attachment-ends. I feel a date of c.11th –
c.12th century is perhaps appropriate.
Tweezers ascribed as Roman period
is a type of artefact not that uncommon,
however, Saxon ones like No. 12 are
much scarcer. This fine copper-alloy
example, with traces of gilding, came
from East Yorkshire, of which the top
of each arm has four bands of engraved
transverse grooves and five punched
6
7
9
12
8
11
10
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 57
dots configured as a cross, the top of the
suspension loop is similarly grooved and
retains a separate copper-alloy split ring.
Although sadly fragmented, No. 13 is
a c. AD 750 – c. AD 1100 Anglo-Saxon
cast silver strapend discovered in North
Yorkshire. The basal terminal is devolved
zoomorphic, and the lower half of the
front features a shield-shaped panel
of Trewhiddle style decoration and a
remnant of similar decoration above,
this suggests it is seemingly Thomas
Class A, Type 1. The typical split in the
attachment end possibly extends very low
or the strapend was very short.
Also found in East Yorkshire is a
c.14th-century cast copper-alloy circular
seal matrix with a hexagonal tapering
handle and a collared pointed suspension
loop No. 14. The photo of the matrix is
too blurred for me to interpret accurately
and an impression is not available,
however it appears to be a voided
quatrefoil with two letters below and an
indistinct mark above; according to Steve,
within the quatrefoil are the heads of four
dogs.
Described as a possible ‘hooked tag’
or ‘pendant’, I am not convinced either
13
of these suggestions is correct for No.
15. Discovered in North Yorkshire, it is
possibly c.14th-century, cast copper alloy,
lozenge-shaped with a long projection
tapering from one angle; the front is
embossed with five ring-and-dot motifs
configured as one in each angle and one
central on a field of linear grooves, all
within a linear border. If this is a hooked
clasp, then the plate should have drilled
sewing- or rivet-holes or a transverse
loop on the reverse: marks for a lost loop
are not evident on the reverse and the
projection does not seem to be a broken
hook. Likewise, the projection is too thin
and pointed to have been a suspension
loop normally seen on harness pendants,
albeit some pendants have a crude hook
instead of a loop but as already stated, no
sign of a break is evident. Nonetheless,
an early medieval pin-head retaining a
remnant of shaft is a possiblity.
East Yorkshire produced No. 16,
a beautiful cast copper-alloy circular
probable harness-pendant embossed with
the mask of a facing beast, possibly a lion,
in voided beaded circles, the suspensionloop survives as does much gilding on the
front, the reverse of the mask is concave.
16
14
17
15
58 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Dating could be as early as the 12th
century though probably no later than
14th.
Distorted when retrieved from the
ground, after being disclaimed, this lovely
(?) cast silver fede finger-ring underwent
restoration by a master jeweller, No. 17.
Fede rings date back to Roman times
though the style of engraved decoration
and floret on this example suggest late
medieval, possibly c.15th century. In the
Middle Ages, finger-rings with claspedhands bezels symbolised trust and fidelity
and were popular as wedding rings.
The final object in Steve’s assemblage,
which came to light in Lincolnshire,
is an extremely large elaborate cast
copper-alloy four-tined fork, the likes
of which I have not seen before and
seemingly no one else has either No. 18.
Although two-tined forks were everyday
kitchen-tools for centuries, including
the Roman period and 4th century AD
Byzantine, precisely when dining forks
became popular is unclear. Around the
17th century is thought to be right for
Northern Europe.
18
HISTORICA
Entries now being accepted for our
Coins & Antiquities Auction
23 January 2018
We are
always happy
to accept
consignments
of quality coins
and artefacts
Prehistoric
through
to Post
Medieval
Single items
or collections
15th Century Gold Brooch ‘Honour
and Joy’ Realised £20,800
Verica ‘Warrior Rex’ Gold Stater
Realised £2,300
Highly competitive commission rates
Contact: Adam Staples / Lisa Grace 07392 872903
Email historica@hansonsauctioneers.co.uk
www.hansonsauctioneers.co.uk
The Auction Centre, Heage Lane, Etwall, Derbyshire, DE65 6LS
Find us on Facebook
Another historic sale for Historica,
with some awesome results from our
August auction. Star lot on the day, as
expected, was a beautiful heart-shaped
gold brooch. Found by a detectorist
in 2016 and dating from the period
of the Wars of the Roses, it captured
the imagination of both the local and
National media and ITV filmed its sale
for the evening news. Thanks to strong
competition from pre-sale commission
bids, and with nine telephone bidders
on the line, it immediately soared past
its estimate and eventually sold to the
phones for a whopping £20,800.
Amongst the other medieval gold
jewellery on offer was a sapphire ring
found in the river Thames, which
achieved a hammer price of £4,900.
Posy rings also performed well, with a
pair inscribed ‘in thee my choice I do
rejoice’ and ‘Guide our wayes lord all
our dayes’ selling for £1,050 and £1,250
respectively.
Many Historica lots come from metal
detectorists, a very fine Verica Warrior
Rex gold stater came to us directly from
the finder and we were very happy to see
this reach a sum worthy of its beauty.
Highlight of the Roman coins section
was complete hoard of 281 bronze coins,
Twitter @HistoricaUK
recovered by detectorists in 2014 and
disclaimed as treasure, which sold for
£600.
The market is still strong for quality
coins and antiquites and Historica are
always happy to accept consignments for
our forthcoming auctions, either as single
items or an entire collection. For more
information please contact Adam Staples
or Lisa Grace 07392 872903 or email
historica@hansonsauctioneers.co.uk.
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 59
A monthly identification
and valuation guide
for the detectorist,
numismatist
and archaeologist
Address: The postal address for the
Identification and Valuation Desk
is given below. This address is only
for this section of The Searcher.
Please do not send in the finds
themselves, email:
coinidman@yahoo.co.uk
Finder’s address: Please include
a contact address (preferably postal)
when sending in inquiries. We may need
more information about a find
so it is important to include an address
where we can contact you. Names and
addresses are never passed on to any
third party.
B
ob Paterson found
this Spanish gold
coin (roughy 20mm
in diameter and 3.38
grams in weight) whilst
he was detecting in
Aberdeenshire. It’s shown enlarged
to highlight the detail. Mr Paterson
said he is 71 years old and has been
detecting for the last five years. As is
required under the law in Scotland,
the coin was reported to the Treasure
Trove authorities but neither they
nor the owner of the land on which it
was found laid claim to it so it ended
up being returned to the finder. We
were asked to give an estimate of the
potential value of the coin.
Illustrations: In order to provide
accurate identifications and valuations
we need good quality photographs,
scans or drawings to work from. Images
of finds should be posted to us,
as we do not undertake the task
of printing out images from
computer screens.
Dimensions/metal: When sending
in images of finds please provide details
of size and whatever metal things are
made of (if known). Some Roman coins
utilise the same legends and design
for different denominations, so size can
be important.
Speed of inclusion: Much depends
on how many other finds are waiting
to be featured in the Identification
and Valuation Desk. Sometimes items
appear very quickly but if there
is a backlog it may take a little longer.
If you require a speedy response then
say so and we’ll get back to you
as quickly as possible (sometimes
by return of post).
Treasure Act: For those not familiar
with the Act we will give help and
advice about what needs reporting
and how it needs to be reported.
Finds classed as treasure will only
be published if they have been through
or are going through the necessary
procedure.
Identification & Valuation Desk, PO Box
197, Leeds LS18 5WQ
or email: coinidman@yahoo.co.uk
60 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
The images are dark and the flan
is flat in places, so it is difficult to pin
down. However, the authorities in
Scotland had seen and handled the
coin and were therefore able to identify
it. It is a gold escudo of Philip III of
Spain, whose dates are 1598 to 1621.
To the left of the shield of arms on
the obverse is a letter S over a V; the S
stands for Seville (the mint) and the V
is for the surname of the assayer, who
is Juan Bautista Veyntin. Only part of
the legend shows up: VS III, which
is the end of PHILIPVS III. Within a
quatrefoil on the reverse is the Cross
of Jerusalem and the only part of the
legend that can be seen is REX. A
coin of this type is known as a ‘cob’,
which derives from caba de barra, the
literal meaning of which is ‘end of a
bar’. Roughly shaped discs are said to
have been cut from the ends of gold
bars and then struck with obverse
and reverse dies. The end result was
usually a very crude looking coin with
flat areas due to the uneven thickness
of the blank discs. This is certainly an
unusual find for Scotland but it does
suggest that Spanish
gold coins were in use
in the country during
the early years of the
17th century. In business
and other transactions
when a payment was
due it didn’t really
matter what currency
was used. We once saw a
list of subscribers to an
enterprise involving a
ship heading overseas.
Besides Scottish and
English coins, investors
used Netherlandish,
Spanish and Portuguese
currency to buy shares
in the cargo, which
would be sold and other
goods bought with the
proceeds. Exchange rates
and weights were well
known in business circles,
so gold coins from any
number of countries
would be accepted.
Mr Paterson said
he was delighted when
both the landowner
and the Scottish
authorities allowed him
to keep his find. It isn’t
particularly valuable in
cash terms but money
isn’t everything. We
wouldn’t be surprised if
he is the only person to
have unearthed a Philip
III escudo in Scotland,
so it counts as a really
wonderful find.
Next month: Amongst
the coins will be Ancient
British gold and silver,
a very rare Roman
denarius dating from
the Civil War period of
AD 68-69, Anglo-Saxon
pennies and hammered
gold. The artefacts will
include a rare prick spur,
the dating of which is
debatable, a bronze head
from a 15th century
lavabo and two seal
matrices dating from the
medieval period. Miss
the next issue of The
Searcher and you won’t
be able to see and read
about these and many
more detecting finds.
EUROPEAN. This hammered silver coin was found
somewhere in Lincolnshire by Rod Pearce. Mr Pearce
wanted to know what figure would need to be handed
over to the landowner. The coin is really tiny and
is shown its actual size (10mm in diameter) and
enlarged. On the obverse is a shield of arms and at
the top and either side are pairs of letters, which
aren’t altogether clear. On the reverse is a voided
cross ancrée with letters in the angles. It’s obviously
not English, so what exactly is it? Well, it took quite
some time to pin down. We eventually identified it
as a silver petit denier of Artois. The letters on the
obverse are ME hA VT, which stand for Mehaut, who
was Countess of Artois from 1302 to 1329. In the
angles of the reverse the four letters are A R T h,
which stand for Artois. The first reference we traced
about the coin was in Monnaies Franccaises Provenciales
by Emile Boudeau, first published in the 19th century
but a revised edition is dated 1970. On the death of
her father (Robert II) in 1302 Mahaut (as she was
known) became Countess of Artois. Robert III of
Artois (grandson of Robert II) was Lord of Conchesen-Ouche, of Domfront and of Melunsur-Yevre; in
1309 he also received the county of Beaumont-leRoger in restitution for the county of Artois. This
Robert believed that he rather than Mahaut should
have inherited Artois. When Mahaut died in 1329 the
county passed to her daughter, Joan II, Countess of
Burgundy. Robert III tried again to gain possession of
Artois and for a time (1330-31) the county was placed
in the custody of the King of France. To further his
cause, Robert had forged papers drawn up. However,
the deception was uncovered, the forger executed,
Robert’s property confiscated and he was forced to
beat a hasty retreat from France. Robert eventually
MEDIEVAL. Pictured here is a seal matrix, which was
found by John Hillyer of Northamptonshire. The
images of the face and side of the matrix are very
dark but Mr Hillyer sent a really good impression,
which we photographed (see the illustration). We
were told that it was found in Northamptonshire
during a dig organised by the Central Searchers’
Group. Mr Hillyer tried to record it with his local
FLO but she was on long term sick leave; on her
return she resigned her post as FLO. He therefore
asked if we could tell him more about his find. Well,
its most probable date of manufacture is some time
during the 14th century. The photograph of the
face was too dark for us to interpret the imagery
but the impression taken from it is excellent. The
lettering in the legend is fairly crude and ambiguous
in places but we read it as *SAVNCA MERGORETA,
which is a rough version of Saint Margaret. In the
centre is the standing figure of St. Margaret, with a
cross-topped staff to the right and a palm frond to
the left. Though not very clear, she could be meant
to be standing on a dragon. This saint (Margaret of
Antioch) was venerated during the medieval period
and is supposed to have been responsible for killing
a dragon. A number of saints appear on seal matrices
but St. Margaret is one of the less common. All in all,
Mr Hillyer has been fortunate enough to unearth a
really great find.
It is weak in places but it is
well struck
ended up in England, in the Court of Edward III. He
gave information to Edward that proved to be very
useful in the forthcoming war with France. When he
died his body was interred in Blackfriars’ church but
his grave is now in St. Paul’s Cathedral.
Boudeau attributes an earlier petit denier to
‘Robert I-III’ but another reference work dates it to
1250-1300 (the period when Robert II was Count
of Artois). Curiously, the coin like the one found by
Mr Pearce is dated in both reference works to 1332,
which is three years after Mahaut’s death. Could it
have commemorated a good Countess, at a time
when a bad Count had tried in vain to claim the land
she had ruled over?
The obverse of the earlier coin is similar to that
of Mahaut but without the surrounding letters; on
the reverse is a cross fleurdelisee with A R A S in the
angles. An example of this coin, in VF condition, was
recently sold for 1,260 euros. We traced two examples
of the earlier coin but only a single example (in the
Museum of Geneva) bearing the name of Mahaut.
The earlier coin is certainly very rare indeed but
the later one is even rarer. The illustrations show
that it is weak in places but it is well struck and all
the important detail is reasonably clear. Taking into
consideration its state of preservation, we’d expect
a pre-sale auction estimate to be set at £500-600.
Some bids might come from the UK but most
would probably be sent from dealers, collectors and
(perhaps) museums in Europe.
It’s small in size but would seem to be one of
the rarest foreign coins ever to be published in The
Searcher. If any readers in Europe or elsewhere know
of any other specimens then we’d appreciate it if they
would let us have details.
MEDIEVAL. After spending a couple of hours doing
research, Bill Byford believed this find to be a penny
of Henry V. However, he couldn’t understand why it
appeared to have a sunken cross on the obverse. On
the reverse the legend reads CIVI TAS LOn DOn, so
the coin was struck at the mint situated in the Tower
of London. On the obverse there is a mullet to the
left and a broken annulet to the right of the king’s
crown and the legend reads +hEnRIC REX AnGL
&F. Therefore, this is a Henry V London penny of
class C (number 1778 in the Standard Catalogue). The
sunken cross on the obverse is a defect known as
ghosting. When this penny was struck the deeply cut
long cross on the reverse sucked in metal from the
obverse and the end result is the ‘ghostly’ cross on
the obverse. This defect occurs occasionally during
previous and later reigns but seems to be particularly
prevalent during the reign of Henry V. The ghosting
does detract from the overall appearance of the
obverse but the condition of this coin is still way
above average for the denomination and the reign.
The ghosting does detract
from the overall appearance
Its most probable date of
manufacture is some time
during the 14th century
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 61
ANCIENT BRITISH. Kevin Sawyer is the finder of this
very small Ancient British gold coin. It’s a quarter
stater, which measures about 12mm in diameter but
is shown enlarged in order to highlight the detail. On
the obverse there is a ring in the centre surrounding
a large pellet; four lines decorated with pellets are
equally spaced around the ring; there are crescents
in two of the angles and locks of hair and what might
be meant to represent small animals in the other two.
On the reverse is a horse facing left, with a dotted
ring with a star inside above, a ring below and in
front and a pellet under the horses tail. This is a
quarter stater of the Corieltauvi and is so rare that it
is missing from almost all the main reference works.
However, it is listed as the Torksey Quarter type in
Ancient British Coins (number 1776 on page 93) and
said to be excessively rare. There is a small flat area
on the edge but the coin is otherwise well centred
and in VF condition. Over the years we have featured
many Ancient British gold quarter staters in the ID &
V Desk but this one is probably the rarest type of all
those that have been sent in.
ANGLO-SAXON. Robert James said that he initially
thought this find was a tag from a sack. However,
when he posted his find on Facebook there was much
interest in it and his club leader told him to declare it
under the Treasure Act. At the time of writing it was
in the possession of the local Finds Liaison Officer.
This find is an Anglo-Saxon hooked tag (sometimes
referred to as a clothing fastener), which is made
of silver and will date from the late 9th or the first
half of the 10th century. These things are sometimes
made of base metal but all the best examples are
silver. At the top it a hook, with the point (slightly
chipped) facing downwards; at the bottom are two
holes, which would be used to attached this tag to
clothing; the centre has been cut away to reveal a
creature of indeterminate identity, with a bulbous
body, puffed-out chest, and clawed feet; a few
decorative elements are above, below and in front
of the creature. These tags are sometimes plain,
sometimes with simplistic decoration but the most
outstanding examples have zoomorphic decoration
similar to the example found by Mr James. On the
back there are several scratches and more on the
front but they are not as noticeable on this side.
However, the main zoomorphic decoration stands out
clearly. Therefore, despite the scratches, this is still a
very attractive piece of Anglo-Saxon artwork.
ROMAN. This Roman denarius was unearthed by
Damon Ward, who asked for his find to be identified
and valued. It is a coin of Geta and was struck during
the period that he was Caesar under Septimius
Severus and Caracalla. He was raised to the rank of
Augustus in AD 209 and campaigned in the Roman
province of Britannia. However, in AD 212 he was
murdered on the orders of Caracalla. On the obverse
of Mr Ward’s coin is the draped bust of Geta and a
legend reading P SEPT GETA CAES PONT. On the
reverse a FELICITAS PVBLICA legend surrounds the
standing figure of Felicitas, who holds a caduceus and
a cornucopia. In volume II of David Sear’s Roman
Coins and Their Values this type is listed as number
7173 and is said to have been struck at Rome during
AD 203. The coin looks to be in near VF condition,
so our price range would be £25-30.
Shown enlarged in order to
highlight the detail
The main zoomorphic
decoration stands out
clearly
ANGLO-SAXON. Barry Chatterton said he hadn’t
been able to identify this cut halfpenny (shown
enlarged), so he asked for our help. On the obverse
is the diademed head of a king and a legend that
starts with +ÆÐ and ends with GLOX. Within the
inner circle on the reverse is part of a hand facing
downwards and what remains of the legend reads
LVDONI+. All this adds up to the coin being a cut
halfpenny of the second hand type of Aethelred II.
On the reverse is the end of the legend, which is a
variety of the London mint signature; the other half
of the coin would have had the moneyer’s name
62 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
The coin looks to be in
near VF condition
NORMAN. David Midgeley is the finder of this
hammered silver penny. Mr Midgeley thinks it is
a coin of Stephen and asked for it to be identified
and valued. His find is not in good condition but
enough of it shows up for us to say it is a ‘Watford’
type penny of Stephen. Only the latter part of the
legend on the obverse is visible and the area in which
the head of the king is situated is almost completely
flat. The reverse is better and on this side the
legend reads +GILBERT ON :ED: so the moneyer
is Gilbert and the mint is Bury St. Edmunds. This is
one of the scarcer mints of the ‘Watford’ type. The
obverse would grade only Fair; the reverse is in better
condition and would grade Fine for the issue. In
its present state of preservation Mr Midgeley’s coin
shouldn’t be worth any less than £125 to a collector.
Its condition leaves something to be desired but
any Norman period penny counts as a really good
detecting find.
This is one of the scarcer
mints of the ‘Watford’
type
on it. In terms of wear, this cut halfpenny is in VF
condition. Unfortunately, it has a small edge chip and
has lost a larger piece in front of Aethelred’s face.
Even with the defects mentioned this is still a very
nice detecting find.
In terms of wear, this cut
halfpenny is in VF condition
ANGLO-SAXON. This Anglo-Saxon penny doesn’t
have much eye appeal but what it lacks in appearance
it more than makes up for in rarity. It was unearthed
by a detectorist who goes by the name of Mimzy,
who had it identified before he sent it in to the ID
& V Desk for it to be valued. The coin is a penny
of Edward the Confessor and is an example of the
extremely rare transitional pyramids type (Standard
Catalogue number 1185). On the reverse the legend
reads +HEAÐEPVLF ON PI (the mint signature is
unclear). Therefore, the moneyer is Heathwulf and
the mint has been attributed to Droitwich. There was
a similar coin in the Norweb collection (November,
1986, lot 828) in EF condition, which sold for
£5,100. Earlier, in 1976, a transition pyramids type
An example of the
extremely rare transitional
pyramids type
STUART. These two finds were unearthed by Tyndall
Jones of West Sussex. The first is a knife handle and
Mr Jones said it looks to be an iron core overlaid
with bronze. At the top, wearing a tall hat, is a
figure joined just below the waist to the top of the
handle. We were asked if we could date this find. The
knife handle will date from circa 1600. The figure
is worn but the hat is of the sugar loaf type, which
was popular at the time. On some of the portraits
of James I he is depicted wearing a similar hat,
sometimes with the brim at the front held back by a
jewelled band at the base of the hat.
Find number two is a gunmoney shilling of James
II. The title for this series of coins stems from the
fact that many of them were made from recycled
cannon barrels. James Stuart was the younger
brother of Charles II and when the latter died he
had no legitimate children; therefore, James Stuart
became King James II. However, there was a great
snag about this, as James was a Roman Catholic. At
this time the country was staunchly Protestant and
many were worried that the new king would reinstate
Catholicism as the State religion. The early worries
proved to be justified, when James started to appoint
Catholics as officers in the army and navy. Other
controversial moves by the king eventually lead to an
invitation being sent to William of Orange (who was
married to a daughter of James II) to come over to
England in order to protect liberty and property. On
5 November 1688 William and a large army landed
in south-west England. James offered concessions
but it was too late. Many English army officers joined
the Dutch, together with the entire navy, and James
was forced to flee. On Christmas Day of 1688 he
ROMAN. Ian Fussell said this Roman denarius was
unearthed during a detecting rally. We were asked
to let him have more information about it. This is
an early denarius, with a head on both sides. On the
obverse is the head of Mark Antony and a legend
reading M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT
Q P. On the reverse is the head of Octavian (renamed Augustus in 27 BC) and a legend reading
CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C. In volume I
of David Sear’s Roman Coins and Their Values this is
listed as number 1504 and is said to have been struck
penny with a reverse legend reading HEÐEPI ON
PIEPIC, also attributed to Droitwich and in F/VF
condition sold for £3,300. The high prices achieved
by the two examples cited are not only because of
the rarity of the type but also due to Droitwich being
an excessively rare mint. According to information
received by Mimzy from UKDFD, his coin has been
reattributed to Winchester, which does seem more
plausible for a mint signature reading PI (WI). The
coin has an edge defect and oxidisation on both
sides. As already mentioned, it doesn’t have much
eye appeal and its overall appearance isn’t good.
However, it is a significant rarity and this led to us
giving a rather high pre-sale estimate on Mimzy’s
find.
arrived in France. James managed to raise an army in
Ireland but he lacked the necessary funds to pay his
soldiers. His army was therefore paid in gunmoney.
Crowns, halfcrowns, shillings and sixpences were
struck bearing two dates: 1689 and 1690. At first the
coins were close to the size of standard currency but
when metal became scarce the diameter and weight
was reduced. Besides the date, there was also the
month of striking on the coins. Those supporting and
fighting for James were told that when he regained
the throne the gunmoney coins would be redeemed;
this process would be costly, so it would be done on a
monthly basis.
The knife handle will date
from circa 1600
The shilling found by Mr
Jones certainly isn’t in good
condition
The shilling found by Mr Jones has a crown on the
reverse flanked by I R (for James Rex); above is the
mark of value (XII) and over this is the date; under
the crown is Sep: with a letter R directly over the p –
this abbreviation is for September. Mr Jones said the
only book he had on gunmoney was an old catalogue
dating from 1963-64, which prices September 1689
shillings at seven shillings and sixpence in VF but
September 1690 is £2 in the same condition. He
asked what the figures would be today. Firstly, we
can’t make out the date on this shilling but the size
of the bust points towards it being the earlier, large
size (1689 rather than 1690). In the latest priced
catalogue a gunmoney shilling of September 1689
in VF condition is £80 but September of 1690 has
shot up to £750. We’ve seen a few gunmoney coins
as detecting finds but they cannot be classed as
common, even though huge numbers were struck.
The shilling found by Mr Jones certainly isn’t in
good condition but it is nonetheless an interesting
detecting find with a really fascinating story behind it.
at Ephesus during the spring and summer of 41
BC. This is a rare coin but its condition does leave
much to be desired. The obverse would grade about
Fine, the reverse only Fair, and there appears to be
a crack in the flan. On the plus side, Mark Antony
is well known and so is the man who was given the
name Augustus, so Mr Fussell has found two famous
Romans on the same coin.
Mr Fussell has found two famous
Romans on the same coin
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 63
TUDOR. Each and every year we see
a very wide range of Elizabeth I coins
as detecting finds. A few are in good
condition but the majority are very
worn, damaged or both. The earliest
coins of Elizabeth I could circulate for
many decades and end up with little of
their design still intact. And, the bust of
Elizabeth on the obverse was shallowly
engraved, so after only a few years of
circulation it could disappear. Here
are a couple of coins found by James
Patmore, which are both of Elizabeth
I but they are in above average
condition. The first is a hammered
coinage sixpence (Standard Catalogue
number 2560), with mint mark pheon
on both sides and dated 1561 on the
reverse. The toning is uneven and it
has been struck very slightly off centre
but it is otherwise in near VF condition.
The bust of Elizabeth is only slightly
worn but she does look to have a dirty
face. Of the sixpences of this date that
come out of the soil this specimen
would be amongst the best 5%.
The toning is uneven and it
has been struck very slightly
off centre
Coin number two is another sixpence,
which has mint mark acorn on both
sides and is dated 1573 on the reverse.
The obverse is interesting, in that
parts of the bust of Elizabeth stand
out but other parts are flat; this could
be due to a weak strike or to die wear
through continuous use. Alternatively,
it might simply be because the original
silver disc was not perfectly even in
thickness, so when placed between
dies some of the thinner areas were
left blank. Two quarters of the shield
on the reverse are mostly flat and this
side is slightly double struck. However,
any detectorist would be very pleased if
he or she managed to find a couple of
Elizabethan coins as good as these two.
The obverse is interesting,
in that parts of the bust of
Elizabeth stand out but other
parts are flat
IRON AGE. Mr B. Wise of Buckinghamshire sent in this find to be identified and
valued. It is an Iron Age brooch (shown enlarged), of a type that will date from
the 4th century BC. There are a few different types, some equal-ended and others
with different ends. This one measures 42mm long by 28mm at it widest point.
At one end are three roundels with decoration in the form of raised rings, which
are secured at two points to the bow of the brooch; at the other end is a similarly
decorated roundel and below it is the mount for the fastening pin, which is
missing. They are quite rare but over the years we have featured a few in the ID &
V Desk in The Searcher; most have been damaged in some way and all have been
minus their fastening pin. Apart from a few flecks to the surface, this example
looks to be in really good condition and is the best we have ever seen of its date
and type. We have not traced a similar brooch being offered from sale over recent
years, so pricing is difficult. However, because of its exceptional condition we’d
suggest that to a collector this find shouldn’t be worth any less that £200.
This find shouldn’t be worth
any less that £200
ROMAN + TUDOR. These two coins
were unearthed from Shropshire soil
by Craig Freestone. We were asked
for valuations, as Mr Freestone has a
50/50 agreement with a landowner.
The first is a Roman denarius with the
head of Julia Mamaea on the obverse.
This Julia was the mother of Severus
Alexander and is said to have been
the real power behind the throne.
However, in AD 235 she and her son
were murdered by their own troops and
Maximinus was proclaimed emperor.
On the reverse of this denarius is the
standing figure of Fecunditas, who
holds a cornucopia in one hand and
extends the other to a child at her feet,
and is accompanied by a FECVND
AVGVSTAE legend. In volume II of
David Sear’s Roman Coins and Their
Values the type is listed as number 8207
and is dated to AD 232. The surface on
both sides is a bit rough but the coin
is otherwise in reasonable condition;
however, it is a fairly common type so
our price range would be £15-18.
Mr Freestone has a 50/50
agreement with a landowner
64 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Coin number two is a sovereign type
penny of Henry VIII. It was struck
during the second coinage at the
Tower mint at London and has mint
mark fleur de lis on the obverse only.
Sovereign type pennies of London of
this coinage turn up less frequently
than those of Durham. The coin is in
better than Fine condition but is very
dark in colour and would be worth
£40 to a collector. Mr Freestone asked
if we could advise him how to clean the
penny. We said he should leave it in its
‘as found’ condition. More coins have
been ruined by cleaning than in any
other way, so unless they are obviously
of no value then it is far safer just to
leave them alone.
More coins have been
ruined by cleaning than in
any other way
STUART. Colin Mitchell said this coin was a recent
find and had been unearthed in North Wales. Mr
Mitchell asked what we could tell him about his find,
including the correct term for its condition and an
approximate value. Firstly, this is a shilling of James
I, struck during the first coinage with the second bust
on the obverse and mint mark thistle on both side.
Some coins just grade as Fine, VF or EF but it is not
unusual for hammered silver coins to require a more
detailed description of their state of preservation.
Three quarters of the legend on the obverse is sharp
and clear but the other quarter is weak. The centre
is also indistinct but the king’s face is visible. On the
reverse one quarter of the legend is weak and so is
TUDOR. Each year we see dozens of hammered gold
coins that have been found by detectorists. A few are
in really good condition but most have defects of one
kind or another. The obverse of the coin pictured
here is in quite decent condition but the edge is badly
damaged. In the centre is a crowned double-rose, with
H to the left and R to the right, both of which have
a crown above. The reverse is far more worn and has
vertical scratches over the entire surface, as if someone
has been giving it a going-over with a stiff wire brush;
there is a crowned shield on this side but it hardly
shows up, nor does most of the legend. The finder
(Kevin Wakeford) identified the coin as a crown of the
double rose but didn’t know if it was struck for Henry
VIII or for his son, Edward VI. However, as there is
GEORGIAN. The images of this spoon were sent in
by John Baker but it was found by a friend of his
(Tony Curry) some time back. It was believed to date
from the reign of George II but we were asked for
our opinion on it. The stem is almost fully covered
in ‘bright-cut’ decoration, so-called because the
cutting reflected light. At the top is an oval cartouche
engraved with P over EH and these letters are likely
to be the initials of the original owner. We also
received an enlargement of the hallmarks on the back
of the spoon. There is a lion passant (sterling silver),
a lower case m (the date letter), the head of George
III (the duty mark), and HB (the maker’s mark).
There is no assay office mark but it is not unusual
for this to be missing. The date letter is for 1787
and the maker’s mark is that of Hester Bateman,
one of the most well known London silversmiths.
Therefore, rather than being made during the reign
of George II, this spoon was made when George
This spoon was made
when George III was
on the throne of
England
the top-right quarter of
the shield of arms but
this side is otherwise in
Fine condition. Most
of the coins of James I
that turn up as detecting
finds are the low
denominations, so it’s
nice to see an unclipped
shilling of this reign. In
its present condition a
pre-sale auction estimate
would be likely to be
£40-60.
Currency struck during this
coinage usually has Lombardic
letters
III was on the throne
of England. Hester
Bateman would not
have actually made this
spoon, even though it
bears her mark. Instead
it would have been made
by one of the smiths that
she employed. Today
she would be described
not as the maker of the
spoon but as its sponsor.
Silver spoons turn up
fairly often as detecting
finds but this one is in
much better condition
than most of the others
we have seen.
It’s nice to see an unclipped
shilling of this reign
a Roman letter H on the obverse he leaned towards
Edward VI. On the obverse the mint mark at the start
of the legend is a pellet within an annulet, so this coin
was struck during the third coinage of Henry VIII
(Standard Catalogue numbers 2305-07). Currency struck
during this coinage usually has Lombardic letters
whereas those issued during the posthumous coinage
(under Edward VI but bearing the name of Henry VIII)
sometimes have Roman letters. This type of crown
usually has a crowned Lombardic letter h to the left of
the rose but a rare variety has the Roman H. Kevin said
he didn’t want a valuation, as his find would be handed
over to the landowner. However, this is his very first
hammered gold coin, so even though it is battered and
bruised in still counts as a really great find.
ROMAN. It’s always nice to dig up a Roman coin in
decent condition and really great when one made
of gold surfaces. The specimen featured here was
unearthed by Fiona Laurie, who asked for it to be
identified and valued. It’s an aureus of Nero who,
amongst other things, is said to be responsible for
setting fire to Rome. On the obverse is the laureate
head of Nero, together with a legend reading NERO
CAESAR AVGVSTVS. In the centre of the reverse
are the closed double doors of the ‘Twin Janus’ and a
rather lengthy legend reading IANVM CLVSIT PACE
P R TERRA MARIQ PARTA. David Sear (in volume
I of Roman Coins and Their Values) comments about
this reverse type: “This curious rectangular structure,
the precise location of which remains uncertain,
consisted of two arched gateways joined by walls
lacking a roof. On the rare occasions when Rome
was not at war with a foreign enemy the doors of the
‘Twin Janus’ were ceremonially closed, an event which
Nero commemorated extensively on the coinage
of AD 65-67.” This gold aureus was struck at Rome
during AD 65. It has been struck off centre on both
sides and strictly speaking it would grade only Fine,
so a pre-sale auction estimate would be in the region
of £800-1,000. However, it is an attractive and
rare Roman gold coin and with competition between
prospective buyers in the right saleroom the hammer
price might pass through the upper estimate.
Nero who, amongst
other things, is said
to be responsible for
setting fire to Rome
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 65
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Cost
£1,269.00
Deposit min 10%
£126.90
THE LEGENDARY
Balance
£1,142.10
6 Months
£190.35
CTX 3030 + FREE
CTX 17” COIL
Cost
£1,999.00
Deposit min 10%
£199.90
£1999
Balance
£1,799.10
6 Months
£299.85
GPX 4500
£2495
GPX 5000
£3999
INCLUDING FREE
15X 12 MONO COIL
£500!
9 Months
£199.90
12 months
£95.18
SUP
SUM ER
M
OFFE ER
R
SPEC
OFFEIAL
R
JUST
FBS2 TECHNOLOGY
9 Months
£126.90
12 months
£149.93
NOT JUST FOR GOLD! THE GPX RANGE
OFFER SUPERIOR PERFORMANCE AND
DEPTH ON COINS AND RELICS TOO
SAVE
MINELAB FBS TECHNOLOGY OFFERS TRUE MULTI-FREQUENCY TECHNOLOGY TO OUTPERFORM THE
COMPETITION IN ALL CONDITIONS – INCLUDING WET BEACHES, PASTURE & WOODLAND!
THE WORLD’ BEST UNDERWATER/BEACH DETECTOR
WITH FREE ACCESSORY PACK INCLUDING
EXCALIBUR II
£1249
Cost
£1,249.00
MINELAB CARRY BAG, EXCALIBUR HIPMOUNT KIT.COIL COVER, RECHARGEABLE
BATTERY & CHARGER AND HEADPHONES INCLUDED AS STANDARD.
Deposit min 10%
£124.90
Balance
£1,124.10
6 Months
£187.35
9 Months
£124.90
X-TERRA 705
WAS
NOW
Cost
£489.00
£489
Deposit min 10%
£48.90
£369
£329
6 Months
£73.35
9 Months
£48.90
12 months
£36.68
SAVE £100 ON RRP!
NOW JUST
£349
BEATS ANY DETECTOR IN ITS PRICE RANGE!
INCLUDING HEADPHONES,
COIL COVER, BATTERIES &
FOLD-AWAY SPADE.
NOW JUST
WITH 10.5” 7.5KHZ
DD SEARCH HEAD
10.5” 7.5KHZ DD COIL, 15” 7.5KHZ DD ALL
TERRAIN COIL, HEADPHONES & COIL COVER
Balance
£440.10
NOW WITH 9” SPIDER COIL
X-TERRA 305
£659
UNBEATABLE DEAL ON THE FANTASTIC X-TERRA 505.
X-TERRA 505
WAS
CMD DUAL PACK - GREAT VALUE
CMD DUAL PACK INCLUDES
INCLUDES FREE HEADPHONES,
COIL COVER & CONTROL
BOX COVER.
£599
12 months
£93.68
Cost
£349.00
Deposit min 10%
£34.90
Balance
£314.10
6 Months
£52.35
9 Months
£34.90
12 months
£26.18
GREAT STARTER MACHINE
INCLUDING FREE HEADPHONES, BATTERIES & COIL COVER.
Cost
£329.00
Deposit min 10%
£32.90
6 Months
£49.35
9 Months
£32.90
12 months
£24.68
EXTREME SENSITIVITY ON TINY GOLD AND SILVER,
EXCELS IN BAD GROUND. GREAT IRON DISCRIMINATION
NEW
ALL FOR JUST £819
Balance
£296.10
PACK INCLUDES 10X 5DD COIL 5” DD COIL,
HEADPHONES, COIL COVERS & RECHARGEABLE KIT.
Cost
£819.00
Deposit min 10%
£81.90
Balance
£737.10
6 Months
£122.85
9 Months
£81.90
12 months
£61.43
TRADE ENQUIRIES WELCOME ON MINELAB PRODUCTS
F6, MERCIA WAY, FOXHILLS INDUSTRIAL ESTATE, SCUNTHORPE, NORTH LINCOLNSHIRE DN15 8RE
TELEPHONE: 01724 845608 | FAX: 01724 278885 | EMAIL: sales@crawfordsmd.com
crawfords
METAL
DETECTORS
TELEPHONE: 01724 845608 | FAX: 01724 278885 | EMAIL: sales@crawfordsmd.com
£339
£214
£299
Cost
Deposit Balance
6
9
12
min 10%
Months Months months
£339.00 £33.90 £305.10 £50.85 £33.90 £25.43
INC. P&P
NEW ACE 300i AND 400i IN STOCK NOW
NEW NOKTA IMPACT
& IMPACT PRO
GARRETT AT PRO
DESIGNED FOR TOUGH UK AND EUROPEAN CONDITIONS.
INCLUDING HEADPHONES,
COIL COVER & FREE UK
DELIVERY.
• STYLISH BALANCED DESIGN
• 3 FREQUENCIES
• 12 SEARCH MODES
Deposit Balance
6
9
12
min 10%
Months Months months
£629.00 £62.90 £566.10 £94.35 £62.90 £47.18
• ON-LINE FIRMWARE UPDATES
NOKTA
IMPACT
MAKING AN IMPACT ON
YOUR FINDS RATE
£799
ER 2
RACW IN
NO CK
STO
R
L FO
CAL AILS
DET
DEVELOPED FOR
SEARCHING COINS,
JEWELLERY AND RELICS,
OFFERS YOU THE
IDEAL COMBINATION
OF INNOVATIVE
TECHNOLOGY AND
ADVANCED DESIGN.
MAKRO
RACER
Cost
Deposit Balance
6
9
12
min 10%
Months Months months
£799.00 £79.90 £719.10 £119.85 £79.90 £59.93
£899
NOKTA
IMPACT PRO
£629
Cost
MAKRO STD
Deposit Balance
6
9
12
min 10%
Months Months months
£639.00 £63.90 £575.10 £95.85 £63.90 £47.93
MAKRO PRO
Cost
Deposit Balance
6
9
12
min 10%
Months Months months
£809.00 £80.90 £728.10 £121.35 £80.90 £60.68
£639
Cost
Deposit Balance
6
9
12
min 10%
Months Months months
£899.00 £89.90 £809.10 £134.85 £89.90 £67.43
£809
Cost
CRAWFORDS WILL MATCH ANY GENUINE PRICE OR OFFER
INTEREST FREE CREDIT NOW AVAILABLE
C.SCOPE
PRO
DEALER
CS1MX
YOUR DEUS,
YOUR WAY
CHOOSE YOUR
DEUS COMBO
£719
Built on the famous
FORS platform, the
FORS Relic offers
new features and
unbelievable
unmasking
capabilities for relic
and coin hunting.
£719.00
6 Months
£107.85
Deposit
min 10%
£71.90
9 Months
£71.90
(HEADPHONES WILL WORK WITHOUT THE REMOTE BUT
THE REMOTE OFFERS MANY MORE USER FUNCTIONS)
22WS4 ........... 9” COIL, WS4 HEADPHONES ...................................................... £689
28WS4 ........... 11” COIL, WS4 HEADPHONES .................................................... £719
22WS5 ........... 9” COIL, WS5 HEADPHONES ...................................................... £745
28WS5 ........... 11” COIL, WS5 HEADPHONES .................................................... £799
22RC ............. 9” COIL, REMOTE CONTROL ..................................................... £999
28RC ............. 11” COIL, REMOTE CONTROL ............................................... £1,029
22RCWS4 ...... 9” COIL, REMOTE CONTROL, WS4 HEADPHONES ................... £1,199
28RCWS4 ...... 11” COIL, REMOTE CONTROL, WS4 HEADPHONES ................. £1,267
22RCWS5 ...... 9” COIL, REMOTE CONTROL, WS5 HEADPHONES ................... £1,289
28RCWS5 ...... 11” COIL, REMOTE CONTROL, WS5 HEADPHONES ................. £1,319
NOKTA
FORS RELIC
Cost
£169
ADD THE REMOTE CONTROL?
Balance
£647.10
12 months
£53.93
Detector
Cost
28RCWS5
28RCWS4
22RCWS5
22RCWS4
28RC
22RC
28WS5
28WS4
22WS5
22WS4
£1,319.00
£1,267.00
£1,289.00
£1,199.00
£1,033.00
£999.00
£800.00
£719.00
£745.00
£689.00
Deposit
min 10%
£131.90
£126.70
£128.90
£119.90
£103.30
£99.90
£80.00
£71.90
£74.50
£68.90
Balance
6 MONTHS
9 Months
12 months
£1,187.10
£1,140.30
£1,160.10
£1,079.10
£929.70
£899.10
£720.00
£647.10
£670.50
£620.10
£197.85
£190.05
£193.35
£179.85
£154.95
£149.85
£120.00
£107.85
£111.75
£103.35
£131.90
£126.70
£128.90
£119.90
£103.30
£99.90
£80.00
£71.90
£74.50
£68.90
£98.93
£95.03
£96.68
£89.93
£77.48
£74.93
£60.00
£53.93
£55.88
£51.68
9” OR 11”
COIL?
WS5 FULL SIZE
HEADPHONES
OR WS4
BACKPHONES?
CS3MXi
£319
Cost
£319.00
6 Months
£47.85
Deposit
min 10%
£31.90
9 Months
£31.90
Balance
£287.10
12 months
£23.93
CS6MXi
£525
ALL COMBINATIONS
INCLUDE SHAFT
KIT, CHARGER AND
MANUAL ETC
Cost
£525.00
6 Months
£78.75
Deposit
min 10%
£52.50
9 Months
£52.50
Balance
£472.50
12 months
£39.38
www.crawfordsmd.com
VISIT OUR FANTASTIC NEW WEBSITE AND SHOP SAFELY AND SECURELY
WITH THE PEACE OF MIND OF SAGEPAY & PAYPAL
TOO BUSY TO CALL US THROUGH THE DAY? THEN CALL
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(UP TO 8PM
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TOP QUALITY DIGGING TOOLS
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GARRETT AT-MAX
£849.00
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£349.00
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£119.99
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£99.99
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£64.99
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£179.95
GARRETT MS-2
HEADPHONES
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£25
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PRO-POINTER II
PROBE
£99.95
• EASY TO SET UP AND USE
• DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY FOR USE WITH
METAL DETECTORS
• WORKS WITH MOST METAL DETECTORS
£89.99
INC. P&P
AT PROBE
£124.95
LIGHTWEIGHT DETECTING
HARNESS
£110
PRO-FIND
25 PROBE
THE EGONOMIC DESIGN EVENLY
DISTRIBUTES WEIGHT FROM YOUR
SHOULDERS, VIA THE J-STRUT, MAKING
YOUR DETECTOR SWING LIGHTER.
£95.00
INC. P&P
INC. P&P
DETECH 13”
ULTIMATE COILS
For:• Garrett AT-Pro
• Minelab E-trac
• Minelab Sovereign
• Fisher F75
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13” Ultimate .............. £129.00
SEF8x6 ........................ £109.00
SEF 10x5 ..................... £129.00
SEF12/10 ..................... £129.00
SEF 15x12 ................... £149.00
SEF 17x15 ................... £169.00
SEF 21x17 ................... £189.00
£259
INC. P&P
NOKTA POINTER
PROBE
INC. P&P
• POWERFUL
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£32.99
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+ £6.00 P&P
NEW 15” ALL TERRAIN
X-TERRA COIL
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£230
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Coltek Coils For Minelab metal detectors
Detech Coils are available for:
Minelab E-Trac/Explorer/Safari
Minelab Sovereign
Garrett AT-Pro
Teknetics T2
Fisher F75
Tesoro / laser
£389
COILTEK 18” ROUND
ELITE MONO COIL
FOR MINELAB GPX, GP
AND SD DETECTORS
15” DD All terrain - E-trac/Explorer/Safari ..............£199.00
12x8 DD - E-trac/Explorer/Safari .............................£169.00
10x5 DD - E-Trac/Explorer/Safari .............................£159.00
10x5 DD - CTX3030 ...............................................£295.00
14x9 DD - CTX3030 ...............................................£349.00
18” Mono Elite - GPX5000/4500 ...........................£389.00
14” Mono Elite - GPX5000/4500 ...........................£329.00
14” DD PRO Elite - GPX5000/4500 ........................£329.00
Interest free Credit over 6, 9 or 12 months now available on most detectors over £300. Minimum 10% deposit (paying a higher deposit will reduce your monthly payments)
www.crawfordsmd.com
VISIT OUR FANTASTIC NEW WEBSITE AND SHOP SAFELY AND SECURELY
WITH THE PEACE OF MIND OF SAGEPAY & PAYPAL
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TELEPHONE: 01724 845608 | FAX: 01724 278885 | EMAIL: sales@crawfordsmd.com
Celtic hoard
unearthed
in Lincs
A Searcher report
A hoard of gold and silver coins dating
to the dawn of the Roman conquest has
been unearthed by Sean Scargill and
Hugh Jenkins in a field near Riseholme
in Lincoln.
There were 282 late Iron Age coins
comprising: 40 gold staters, 231 silver
units, and 11 silver half-units, all NorthEastern types and attributed to the
Corieltavi.
This is a relatively large hoard which
appears to have been drawn from a
circulation pool of local coinage that was
dominated by inscribed issues which are
thought to have been produced after
20 BC.
Deposition may have occurred in the
early post-Roman conquest years as the
hoard includes all the major inscribed
issues from the region: VEPO CORF,
AVNT COST, and IISVPRASV, and is
comprised of gold staters, silver units,
and silver half-units.
The coins were apparently contained
within a bag that in turn was placed
within a ceramic vessel. The vessel
appears to have been a small jar of dark
brown or black shell-tempered fabric,
but only a small number of base sherds
survive. A small, oval, copper-alloy strap
fitting presumably used as a bag-tie was
discovered resting on the top of the coin
hoard, but no evidence of the bag itself
has survived.
Dr Adam Daubney, FLO said: “The
findings offer a fascinating glimpse into
a period of history when huge political
changes were occurring.
“Many of the coins in the hoard are
stamped with names of people that we
believe were local rulers - names such as
Dumnocoveros, Tigirseno, and Volisios.
These are some of the earliest personal
names ever recorded from the region.”
The discovery site is owned by
the University of Lincoln whose
archaeologists have carried out a survey
of the area to help answer questions
about why the coins were buried.
Some of the coins from the hoard
© PAS
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 69
Garrett Z-Lynk Wireless Specials
™
£ 699.95
*items not to scale
NEW AT adapter
connector included!
Garrett introduces the new Z-Lynk Wireless System for VLF
(single frequency) and pulse (multi-frequency) detectors.
• Lightning-fast speed—Near-zero
delay (17-milliseconds) from your
detector to your headphones, this
system is 6x faster than Bluetooth
speed, and up to 4x faster than other
wireless headphone kits.
• Versatility—Nearly universal;
designed to work with most detector
brands and most wired headphones
• Frequency-Hopping
Technology—creates an
infinite number of channels
to prevent interference with
nearby headphones and
wireless devices
• Extended Hunting Time—
Get up to 30 hours of
operation per charge
To learn more about Z-Lynk™ technology visit garrett.com
AT Pro International detector Key Features:
 Two Detectors in One:
Choose from 3 easy-to-learn Standard Modes or
3 Pro Audio Modes with more target info and depth.
 Ground Balance:
Automatic and manual adjust. Balances to saltwater.
 High-Res Iron Discrimination™: 40 levels
• Digital Target ID
• Iron Audio ™
• Full Notch Discrimination
* The Garrett AT Pro International special offer is valid through December 31, 2017 at participating dealers only. Accessories items are subject to change.
Regton Ltd.
metal detection specialists
82 Cliveland Street
Birmingham B19 3SN
Garrett_July_2017.indd 1
Order & Enquiry Hotline:
0121 359 2379
Tel: 0121 359 2379
Email: sales@regton.com
www.regton.com
5/5/2017 1:48:37 PM
£ 419.95
ACE 400i detector Key Features:
 Digital Target ID for better target information
 Iron Audio™ allows the user to hear discriminated
iron and to alter the mid-tone signal’s range
 Adjustable Frequency to help eliminate interference
 Higher 10 kHz frequency better sensitivity to low and
medium conductivity targets (gold, lead, etc.)
 8.5 x 11 inch PROformance™ DD searchcoil
*Also includes
3 FREE
ACCESSORIES:
Z-LYNK WIRELESS SYSTEM INCLUDES:
Environmental
Cover-Up
ClearSound
Easy Stow Headphones
8.5 x 11" DD
searchcoil cover
Garrett’s Z-Lynk Wireless System works
with most brands of metal detectors and
headphones with 1/4” connectors!
• Simply Faster!
• Simply Versitile
• Near-Zero Delay speeds target
recovery
• Extended Hunting Time per Charge
MADE IN USA
Garrett_July_2017.indd 2
5/5/2017 1:48:42 PM
Brothers-in-Arms …
of Edward groats!
Eugene O’Sullivan
Co Down MDC is a small club with only
three brother members, Michael, David
and myself.
We started metal detecting many
years ago with a C-Scope. As time
passed detecting fell by the way
side, but five years ago we
decided we would once
again take it up.
Today we have the
drive to find bigger
and better things
and turn history on
its head. From that
point we have done
our homework and have
discovered incredible things
including our fair share of
coins, rings, Bronze Age artefacts from
axe and spear heads and much more
besides.
The Hoard
Our most recent find was a hoard of 30
Edward IV groats in mint condition.
Michael decides where we go and gets
most of the permissions. He’s the man
who does all the homework and deserves
most of the credit.
We had been searching in the rain with
little result except a good soaking, until I
turned up what was the only good signal
of the day … an Edward IV groat. By the
end of the session I had seven similar
coins and all in fine condition.
By this time we were
soaked to the skin, but
we had results and that
was important. We
returned home, talked
about our experience,
and decided to return
the next day.
We are glad we did.
After about three hours
and using his Garrett 200i,
Michael gave the nod that
he was onto something great. When
David and I went over to look he had
three coins in his hand and a smile on
his face.
David and I turned over another
sod for him and, at around 9”, there
were another 27 Edward IV groats. We
paused for a little, just looking at one
another until it sank in. David and I were
delighted that Michael had found them.
After all, he made the call!
72 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
product review |
Specification
Transmitter:
Operating voltage 3.7VDC
(re-chargeable lithium battery)
Charging information 5VDC @ 50mA
Frequency 2.4GHz ISM BAND
Power 5dbm
Modulate GFSK
Distance 10-15m
Headphones:
Operating voltage 3.7VDC
(re-chargeable lithium battery)
Charging information 5VDC @ 50mA
Frequency response 20-15000Hz
Audio output 600mVp-p
Distortion <1%
S/N ratio >70db
Separation >50db
RRP: £75.00
Availability: C-Scope stockists or www.cscopemetaldetectors.com
During the past 30 plus years of
detecting I suppose one piece of our kit
that has caused me the most pain has
been headphones; we all wear them. By
pain, I mean the sort you get when you
accidently step on the lead and they are
jerked off your head unexpectedly!
More recently manufacturers
have developed some machines that
use wireless technology, but not
all of us want to change, or even
consider purchasing such a machine
mainly just to have that capability.
Another consideration is we all have
our favourites and possibly a backup
machine – just in case, and why not?
Some of the actual wireless
headphones designed for the hobby
are quite expensive. I experimented
with several bluetooth transmitters and
receivers, but found there was always
a slight latency that made their use
impractical.
C-Scope advised me about a product
they supply called the International
Wireless Headphones. It became
apparent that this could be my answer
at a reasonable retail price.
The package consisted of a neat carry
case measuring 140mm x 120mm x
50mm containing: Wireless headphones,
transmitter, headphone charger lead,
transmitter charger lead, 230V mains
charger, 6.3mm male stereo jack plug
to female 3.5mm stereo jack socket
convertor, 6.3mm male stereo plug to
3.5mm female socket extension lead
and Velcro fixing pad.
I removed the transmitter and
headphones from the case and placed
them on charge which took about 3- 4
hours for this first charge.
I have previously used a wide range
of headphones including in-ear types,
and such as Koss. Although I like to be
able to hear the detector sounds clearly,
I also like to have some sense of sounds
around me when I am out in the field.
By choice I prefer not to wear the
headphone band over my head, and with
this folding headset you can wear it that
way, but also you can use them with the
band dropped down around the back of
your neck; this works for me. I can then
quickly drop them around my neck when
for example digging a find.
74 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
C-SCOPE wireless
headphones
David Rees
To get ready for detecting you
separate the Velcro pad, and stick
the prickly strip onto your machine.
This needs to be within reach of the
jack phone output socket, so at the
top of the stem, or near the control
box depending on what machine you
are using. Stick the other fuzzy half
of the Velcro strip to the back of the
transmitter. Replacement or spare Velcro
is readily available.
You now plug the cable from the
transmitter into your output socket on
the detector directly or by using one of
the short included accessory leads or
adaptor plug. This depends whether that
output socket is 6.5mm or 3.5mm.
Operation is now relatively easy.
After switching on your detector the
transmitter is turned on by sliding the
small switch on the side of it to the ‘on’
position. The indicator light with start to
blink on and off quickly. Now hold down
the power button on the headphones
for 2-3 seconds until the red indicator
on the transmitter is permanently lit.
At the same time, the LED on the
headphones will be red and flashing
on and off quickly. This indicates the
transmitter and headphones have been
‘paired’ and are now working as one set.
What a pleasure it can be now
when detecting and having no leads
connecting me to the metal detector.
That takes a short while to accustom to,
but I now appreciate the added freedom
and still can use one of my favourite
machines.
METAL DETECTORS & ACCESSORIES
FIRST CLASS MAIL ORDER SERVICE – ALL THE WAY!!!
01243 830005
Detector Distribution,
P.O. Box 833 Bognor Regis, PO21 9GN
www.detector-distribution.co.uk
Secure, easy to navigate online shop open 24/7
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED PRICE
Garrett Metal Detectors
ACE 250
XP Metal Detectors
NEL Coils
£214.95
With:
Garrett phones
Coil Cover
Batteries
DVD
DEUS £1363.00
XP Deus with 11” coil, Remote Control,
WS5 headphones, mains charger, coil cover,
and hip mount pouch
Big NEL
15” x 17”
Euro Ace £299.95
With:
Headphones
Meter Cover
Backpack
Batteries
Coil Cover
DVD
DEUS £715
XP Deus with 9” coil, WS4 headphones,
mains charger and coil cover
Tornado NEL
12” x 13”
Ace 200i £169.95
Other options available
Ace 300i £259.95
With:
Headphones
Coil cover
Meter cover
Ace 400i £339.95
With:
Headphones
Coil cover
Meter cover
XP Metal Detectors
Machine only Prices
ADX 150 ............................................................................ £349.00
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THE TISBURY COLLECTION
OF COMMONWEALTH SILVER COINAGE PART II
Featured within the sale of Ancient, British and
Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals
6 – 7 December 2017 | London
For more information, please contact Richard Bishop:
Tel: +44 (0)20 7563 4053 | Email: rbishop@spink.com
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76 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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clubactivities
Please email your club news and images of finds to:
info@thesearcher.co.uk or send to The Searcher,
17 Down Road, Merrow, Guildford, Surrey GU1 2PX
Identifications made in this section are supplied
by individual clubs.
Blackpool MDC Andy Harvey
There was a 335A.D. Romulus and Remus bronze hammered found by Ed Graham
and an unusual Viking lead alloy gaming piece found by Hilary Fagen. The Blackpool
MDC currently has 44 members and the club meetings are on the first Thursday of
every month hosted at the Conservative Club in Tyldesley Road, Blackpool. We meet
at 7.30pm for 8pm.
Results of our finds competitions were:
Artefacts post 1500
1st 1600’s sword belt slider –
John Rigby
Artefacts pre 1500
1st Viking lead alloy gaming piece –
Hilary Fagen
Coins pre 1662
1st Bronze AE3
Romulus and Remus
– Ed Graham
2nd Elizabeth I
threepence –
Pete Summers
Coins post 1662
1st Charles II
Maundy fourpence
– Martin Kilkenny
2nd Victoria
fourpence –
Pete Summers
2nd Snake (sword) buckle 16th-17thC
– Pete Summers
2nd Part of a Roman ring – Ed Gratten
Any Sites Find
1st Lucilla sestertius – Sue Hurrell
SHRADS Keith Arnold
Here are our results:
Club Sites Coin
1st Henry VII sovereign penny –
Adrian Kiermasz
Club Sites Artefact
1st Edward & Alexander medallion –
Tony Brown
2nd Henry II cut quarter penny –
Tony Brown
2nd William III counter marked 6d–
Martyn Weaver
2nd Purse bar loop – Nick Keeler
3rd Spur – Tony Brown
3rd George V sixpence – Chris Goodchild
3rd Annular
buckle –
Norman Rouse
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 77
BSEMDG Graham Tredgett
A lovely lady called Nettie Edmondson from the St Neots club came and gave us a
presentation and brought along quite a few of her finds that were very well presented
and catalogued which had many members in awe.
Rob O’Brien won artefact of the month with an unusual crotal bell with a face on
the bottom of it backed up by a nice Tealby cut half in the coin section.
We had an invite to a local open day, first one we have ever done, and it all went
well. It was well received by members of the public. It felt good to promote the hobby!
Crotal bell with face
Tealby
cut half
Bike brooch
East Norfolk MDS Andy Carter
Winners of our Find of the Month competition were:
Ancient coin (Celtic & Roman)
1st Cast copy of Hadrian sestertius –
Jean Chaplin
2nd Faustina the Elder sestertius –
Dave Clarke
Later mediaeval coin (short-cross to
Henry VII)
1st Richard II halfpenny – Andy Carter
2nd John Irish penny of Dublin –
Jimmy Shaul
Post-mediaeval coin (Henry VIII to
present day)
1st Louis XIV ½ pistole coin weight –
Jean Chaplin
2nd Charles I shilling – Gerry Cook
Metal artefact (pre - Norman Conquest)
1st Early Saxon gilded mount –
Jean Chaplin
2nd Late Saxon stirrup terminal –
Graham Davies
Metal artefact (Post- Norman
Conquest)
1st Decorated 17th century spur –
Jimmy Shaul
2nd Enamelled horse harness pendant –
Andy Carter
Non-metallic or Natural find
1st Notched flint implement –
Gerry Cook
2nd Large flint scraper – Lewis Fakes
Tony Gregory Award for Best Find
of the Month
Early Saxon gilded mount – Jean Chaplin
Kendal & District MDC Ian Watedge
The latest club rally produced some very nice finds, including a number of hammered
coins and artefacts dating from 670AD to present day.
New members are always welcome. The club meets at the Cross Keys Hotel,
Milnthorpe on the last Thursday of each month. 7.30pm for 8pm start.
Find of the Month
Artefact post 1600
Artefact pre 1600
1st Palstave axe head – Tony Philips
1st Silver finger
ring – Mike Holt
2nd Dagger quillion – Mike Holt
Buckle plate
2nd WWII Tank Corps badge – Mike Holt
80 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Coins and Tokens pre 1662
1st John penny – Rod Hall
2nd Edward II
groat –
Duncan Wappett
Coins and Tokens post 1662
1st George III florin
– Duncan Wappett
2nd George III
sixpence –
Judith Wappett
Herts & District MDS David Roberts
Henry VIII half penny – David Roberts
At our September meeting the winner of the coin section was Elaine Richards with a
fine Coenwulf penny. The artefact of the month winner was Steve Brandom with his
Roman bronze phallic mount. Other entries included: Malcolm Beagle’s Henry III cut
half penny, from David Roberts a Henry VIII half penny, some Iron Age fragments
from Jonny Cope and a splendid enamelled Roman seal lid from Pete Cross.
Coenwulf penny – Elaine Richards
Roman bronze phallic mount –
Steve Brandom
Henry III cut half penny –
Malcolm Beagle
Roman enamelled seal lid – Pete Cross
Iron-Age fragments – Jonny Cope
2nd Bronze Roman ring – Mark Baker
Invicta Seekers MDC Greg Sweetman
Artefact
1st 14th C. artefact – Rick Brooks
Coins
1st Elizabeth I
groat –
Mark Hesmer
2nd Edward II penny – Gerry Hone
3rd Tudor knife/fork handle –
Barry Warhurst
3rd 3rd C. Roman
Barbarous radiate –
Julie Smith
Maidenhead Search Society Andrew Thompson
Members had been busy and the finds table was packed with desirable coins and
artefacts.
Artefact of the month
Coin of the month
Gold and diamond snake ring –
Gold Queen Anne touch piece –
Tony Firbank
Vito Mingolla
Theme
Box of bells – Mick Washington
Finds display
Mick Washington
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Derby Artefacts RC
LHSS Charlie Atkinson
Two Dales MDC Paul Tritt
Bridget Whitehouse
Our August meeting was quite sparse
with many members still away on holiday.
Jenny Grace did well with first place for
her coin (such an easily missed scrap of
a coin) and second place for her Roman
brooch.
Coin of the Month
1st Commonwealth half d (1649 –
1660) – Jenny Grace
Coin of the Month
1st Septimus Severus denarius –
Sid Deaton
Following a suggestion from one of
our members, this month we debuted
a Mystery Object Table. This raised a
lot of interest and discussion resulting
in a couple of the items finally being
identified. This will likely become a
regular feature in future meetings as
more members bring in their puzzling
objects.
The winners of the find of the month
competitions were:
2nd Henry VIII sovereign penny –
Christiaan Smit
Artefact of the month
Dragonesque brooch – Rob Brown
2nd Edward III groat – Dave Fenlon
Coin of the month
Honorius solidus – Danny Morrell
3rd Elizabeth I sixpence –
Charlie Atkinson
Artefact of the
Month
1st Fusiliers cap
badge found by the
mystery man who
put it on the finds
table then apparently
went home leaving it
behind! Please get in
touch to get it back.
2nd Roman fibula brooch – Jenny Grace
Find under 300 years
Gold watch fob – Mark Shepherdson
Artefact of the Month
1st Roman dolphin brooch - Sid Deaton
2nd equal
Silver hawking
bell Charlie Atkinson
Spindle whorl – Graham Harrison
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84 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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Hinckley Search Society
David Mann
Plenty of finds on view at our September
meeting with some special items.
Competition results:
Coin of the month
Julia Domna denarius – Wayne Rushin
Yeovil MDC Colin Spiller
Another great turnout by club members, with loads of very interesting finds on the
table, although as for winners it could have became a two horse race if it wasn’t for
John Coulson and his florin.
Collection
Brian Read
Coin post
King George VI florin – John Coulson
Art pre
James I double crown eleven shillings
coin weight – Brian Read
Artefact of the month
Roman fibula – Mike Anderson
Club Dig Winners
Irish penny – Alan Edwards
Edward lll penny – Glen Wooding
Edward lll half penny – David Evans
Roman fibula – Mike Anderson
14th Cent strap end – Paul Strike
Coin pre
Henry VI gold noble annulet issue –
Simon Merrett
Art post
Georgian toy cannon – Simon Merrett
Brighton MDC Graham Amy
Club Coin
Cartwheel penny
– Luke Dodgson
Medieval seal matrix – Anita Malin
Club Artefact
Coach decoration –
Pip Paine
Non Club Artefact
Iron Age ring –
Derek Page
Non Club Coin
Henry II Tealby
silver penny –
Derek Page
Henry groat – Brian Lawrence
Here are our results find for September:
Non Club artefact
Saxon strap end – Ray Wilson
Best Club Coin
Cromwell
Commonwealth
penny –
Paul Davidson
Quinarius Alectus – Glen Wooding
Non Club coin
John half
cut penny –
Sharon Byrd
86 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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Medway History Finders Dave Clarke
Our August meeting
Coins
1st Doge Leonardo Loredan soldino –
Dave Knight
2nd Henry VIII sovereign penny –
Karen Burch
2nd Strap fitting – Kevin Mankelow
3rd George III sixpence – John Dobbins
Artefacts
1st Palstave axe – Dave Clarke
Quakers Acres MDC Graeme Thompson
Some very nice coins on the table this month made judging really tough. We also had
a super Summer club rally in the late August good weather with BBQ, raffle and a fire
pit under the stars.
August Competition winners:
Coin Section
1st Edward III quarter noble –
Mark Stansfield
3rd Watch winder – John Dobbins
2nd Equal Casket key – Lance Todd
Artefact Section
1st Equal Wool weight –
Graeme Thompson
2nd Equal Roman figurine – Lance Todd
2nd Sceat – John Ward
3rd Equal Clothes fastener – Andy Walton
3rd Henry VI groat – Elain Stoddart
1st Equal Spear tip – Lance Todd
Stour Valley S&RC Angela Kernan
Our finds for the month results were:
Coins
1st Denarius of
Commodus –
Tony Player
2nd Elizabeth I sixpence – David Grenfell
3rd Elizabeth I threepence – David Eagles
Artefacts
1st Roman finger
ring – John Earley
2nd Medieval seal
ring – John Slade
88 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
3rd Anglo Saxon
cruciform belt
mount – Tony
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thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 89
Essex Detector Society Tony Robson
Here are the winners and pics for the Find of the Month Competition for August.
Coin
1st Cunobelinus Biga quarter stater –
Julie Argent
2nd Medieval 14th century horse
harness pendant – Liam Argent
3rd Henry III voided long cross penny –
Tony Robson
3rd Cast copper alloy sword/dagger
pommel – Bruce Thirkettle
2nd Edward I halfpenny – Nick Argent
Artefact
1st Papal bulla 13th century Pope
Gregory X – Don Morris
2nd Army Service Corps cap badge –
Keith Kerley
Swale S&RC Jack le Breton
Here are our competition results
Coins
1st George IV silver shilling –
Trevor Heyworth
2nd Roman Constantine I nummus –
David Villanueva
3rd Roman coin – Syd Hallybone
Artefacts
1st Bronze bust, Celtic – Syd Hallybone
West Kirby MDC Chris Andrews
Fifty-four members attended our September meeting, including four new members.
Club membership now totals 122.
Artefact of the Month
1st Medieval purse bar – Cyril Hathaway
3rd Leaden tokens,
13th/14th C –
Keith Kerley
Coin of the Month
1st Henry III penny – George Fowles
2nd Pot leg circa 1600 – George Fowles
2nd Constantius I Roman coin – Phil Moy
90 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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The find of the month Winners were:
Best Artefact
Medieval gold ring – Jeff Warden
Modern Artefact
John Smiths beer barrell bush –
Ian Critchley
Runner up
Medieval Coin
Edward penny – Jack Coultard
Trowbridge & District MDC David Rees
We had a good meeting this month with nearly 60 present. Our FLO Richard was
present, and he was kept very busy recording items. Dave Crisp sold tickets for the
Western Region Christmas Raffle with the first prize being a new XP Deus.
Find of the month coin went to Steve with a Henry VII groat, and artefact to Gary
with his rare Bronze Age palstave axe mould.
Other finds on the table included: Post medieval cloth seal, Celtic unit Epaticcus,
13th C. buckle, Dutch two stuivers, Elizabeth I half groat, fibula brooch, follis
Constantine I, Charles I half crown, Georgian shoe buckle, Late Tudor buckle, Long
cross cut quarter, Marlborough farthing, Philip I Dupoudius, Richard I short cross,
Saxon zoomorphic strap end, vessica seal.
13th Century buckle
Saxon zoomorphic strap end
Henry VII groat
Mike Apps
Our August meeting was very busy with
the harvest having started early there was
plenty to talk about and show. We had a
display competition with the theme of
items beginning with the letter A and this
was won by Dave Cobb.
Our competition results were:
Coin of the month
1st Spanish ducat 1580-83 –
Allan Carey
Best Coin
Henry VI half penny – Ron Stifman
Other winners were:
Medieval Artefact
Medieval dagger chape – Barry Hilton
Weymouth & Portland MDC
Bronze Age palstave axe mould
4000 years old – very rare!
1680 Two Stuivers
Dutch hammered coin Celtic unit Epaticcus
92 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
2nd Offa penny – Martin Savage
3rd Charles I shilling – Margaret Hamilton
Artefact of the month
1st Vessica seal matrix – Martin Savage
2nd Victorian mourning brooch –
Clive Smith
3rd Saxon silver strapend – Clive Smith
Royal Phoenix DG Paul Shrubb
We had our summer social BBQ, lots of
beer and a raffle with lots of prizes. The
Find of The Month results were judged
Everyone present including myself
had a lovely evening and can’t wait for
The Christmas Social in December.
TREASURE WORLD
Head Office & Retail Sales: 24 Bridge Street, Downham Market. PE38 9DH
Tel: 07971 304050 email: treasureworld@hotmail.co.uk website: www.treasureworld.co.uk
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Now – 26 November
Tour: Billingsgate Roman
house & baths
Museum of London
Various times
Adv booking only. www.
museumoflondon.org.uk
30 September - 1 October
Muchelney Annual Rally,
South West MDC, Somerset,
Call Mike Charles on 07502
371074 for more info.
Limited places
2 October
Ancient British Coins
Liz’s List 91 Fixed Price
catalogue
www.celticcoins.com
7 October
Bloomsbury Coin Fair
9.30am-2pm £2 entry.
www.bloomsburycoinfair.com
11 October
PAS Conference 2017:
20 Years of Treasure
Yorkshire Museum
10.30am-4pm
FREE www.eventbrite.
co.uk/e/portableantiquities-schemeconference-2017-20years-of-treasuretickets-35401941159
12 October
Auction: Coins Military &
Ephemera, Dukes Auctions
www.dukes-auctions.com
18 October
Audio described tour:
Medieval London
Museum of London
2pm-3.30pm
Free. Adv booking. www.
museumoflondon.org.uk/
events
23 October
Family Walk: Roman
London Museum of London
12-12.45pm £5-£7.50
adults, Adv booking advised
www.museumoflondon.org.
uk/events
24 October
SITE TOUR: Roman Fort
Gate tours
Museum of London
2pm-2.30pm
Adv booking only £5. www.
museumoflondon.org.uk/
events
27 October
SITE TOUR: Roman Fort
Gate tours
Museum of London
2pm-2.30pm
Adv booking only £5. www.
museumoflondon.org.uk/
events
28 October
Family Walk: Roman
London
Museum of London
12-12.45pm
£5-£7.50 adults,
Adv booking www.
museumoflondon.org.uk/
events
31 October
Tour: Ceramics, glass &
metals conservation
British Museum. Information
Desk 11am-12.20pm,
12pm-1.20pm, 2pm3.20pm, 3pm-4.20pm
Free. Booking essential.
volunteers@britishmuseum.
org
3 November
Lecture: Vikings and
the Rus’
British Museum, BP Lecture
Theatre 1.30pm-2.30pm
Free, booking essential.
www.britishmuseum.org/
whats_on/
4 November
Family Walk: Roman
London
Museum of London
12-12.45pm
£5-£7.50 adults,
Adv booking. www.
museumoflondon.org.uk/
events
Every Saturday until 26
November
Site tour: Billingsgate
Roman House & Baths
Museum of London
10.30am-12pm
Adv booking £5-£8. www.
museumoflondon.org.uk/
events
6-19 November
eAuction Ancient British
Coins Chris Rudd List 155.
www.the-saleroom.com
10 November
SITE TOUR: Roman Fort
Gate tours
Museum of London
2pm-2.30pm
Adv booking only £5. www.
museumoflondon.org.uk/
events
21- 25 November
Antiquities & Coin
Catalogue Auction
Timeline Auctions
enquiries@timelineauctions.
com
22 November
Audio described tour:
Medieval London
Museum of London
2pm-3.30pm
Free. Adv booking. www.
museumoflondon.org.uk/
events
28 November
Antiquities only
Bonhams of New Bond
Street and Knightsbridge,
London. Tel: 020 7468 8226
29 November
Antiques and coins
Hartley’s of Ilkley. Tel:
01943 816363
2 December
Bloomsbury Coin Fair
9.30am – 2pm
£2 entry. www.
bloomsburycoinfair.com
94 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
4 December
Ancient British Coins
Liz’s List 92 Fixed Price
catalogue
www.celticcoins.com
8 December
SITE TOUR: Roman Fort
Gate tours
Museum of London
2pm-2.30pm
Adv booking only £5. www.
museumoflondon.org.uk/
events
23 January
Antiquities auction
Historica
www.hansonsauctioneers.
co.uk
If you would like your event
included in this column please
email us on:
info@thesearcher.co.uk
or write to: 17 Down Road,
Merrow, Guildford, Surrey
GU1 2PX
the searcher is in no way
whatsoever involved with the
organisation or running of any
events advertised on this page
and cannot be held responsible
for anything that may occur at
the event. All enquiries and/or
complaints should be made to the
relevant organiser.
The sale held by Spink Coin Auctions
on 5 July included British and
foreign coins and commemorative
medals in gold, silver and base
metal. A total of 528 lots went under
the hammer and a few of them are
featured on this page. All the prices
quoted are before the addition of the
20% buyers’ premium and any VAT
that may have been payable.
Lot 4, Ancient British silver unit,
Cantii uninscribed coinage, profile
head/horse, facing left, ABC 216, good
VF, edge chip, found in Kent, £800.
Lot 13, Ancient British gold stater,
Belgae, British B, Chute type, S. 22,
about VF, found in Dorset, £480.
Lot 31, Ancient British silver unit,
Iceni, diademed head/horse facing
right, S. 432, good VF, found in Norfolk
during 1999, £180.
Lot 40, Ancient British silver unit,
Corielauvi, boar/horse type, S. 396,
good VF, found in Nottinghamshire,
£240.
Lot 43, Ancient British silver unit,
Corieltauvi, AVNT COST, blundered
legend/horse facing left, ABC 1950,
about VF, £200.
Lot 46, Ancient British silver stater,
Durotriges, uninscribed coinage,
ABC 2160, about EF, £230.
Lot 53, Ancient British gold stater,
Catuvellauni, Tasciovanos, crossed
wreaths/horse facing right, S. 214,
good VF, found in Oxford during 2014,
£1,500.
Lot 54, Ancient British silver unit,
Catuvallauni, Tasciovanos, head left/
horse facing right, S. 227, good VF,
very rare, £650.
Lot 59, Ancient British gold stater,
Catuvellauni and Trinovantes,
Cunobelin, corn ear/horse facing right,
S. 288, obverse stuck from a rusty die,
otherwise about EF, £1,400.
Lot 62, Ancient British silver unit,
Catuvellauni and Trinovantes,
Cunobelin, head left with CAMVL in
front/CVNO below the seated figure
of Victory, S. 303, good VF, slightly
porous, rare, found in Essex during
2002, £150.
Lot 64, Ancient British silver unit,
Catuvellauni and Trinovantes,
Cunobelin, head right/horse facing
right, S. 312, VF, rare, £320.
Lot 68, Ancient British bronze
unit, Catuvellauni and Trinovantes,
Cunobelin, Janus head/CAMV in panel
below a sow, S. 346, about EF, found in
Essex, £420.
Lot 69, Ancient British silver unit,
Catuvellauni and Trinovantes,
Cunobelin, ornate flower/CVNO below
horse, S. 305, edge chip and light
porosity, otherwise nearly VF, rare,
£230.
Lot 70, Ancient British gold stater,
Dobunni, COMVX, tree/horse facing
right, S. 385, graded as good VF but
with striking cracks, extremely rare,
found in Gloucestershire during January of
2017, £5,000.
Lot 73, Aethelred II penny of London,
CRVX type, moneyer Wulfnoth, S. 1148,
VF but creased, £240.
Lot 75, William I penny of London, two
stars type, moneyer Wulfwine, S. 1254,
weak in places, otherwise good Fine,
£420.
Lot 79, Henry II ‘Tealby’ type penny
of London, class A2, moneyer’s name
unreadable, S. 1337, good Fine for issue,
£180.
Lot 155, Stephen penny of London,
cross and piles type (VI), moneyer
Rodbert, S. 1281, flat areas, reverse off
centre, surface cracked, otherwise nearly
Fine, extremely rare and cheap at £100.
Lot 173, Henry IV groat of London,
type III obverse, Henry V series B
reverse, annulet to left and pellet to
right of crown, S. 1760, irregular but
Fine, very rare, a bargain at £500.
Lot 174, Henry V groat of London,
series B2a, scowling bust, S. 1762, good
Fine, obverse legend double struck,
rare, £200.
Lot 178, Edward IV groat of London,
heavy coinage, group III, M.M. rose,
quatrefoils by bust, eye after TAS, S.
1974, portrait weak, otherwise good VF,
£160.
Lot 185, Scotland, Alexander II short
cross and stars type penny in the name
of William I, phase A, Roxburgh,
moneyers Peris and Adam, S. 5034, VF,
well struck on a round flan, £1,100.
Lot 192, Scotland, James VI hat piece,
1592, Edinburgh, S. 5457, tooled on eye
and slight crease, otherwise Fine and
rare, £4,500.
Lot 199, Ireland, Henry VIII groat, h
and A flanking the crowned Irish harp,
S. 6472, almost VF, £140.
Lot 200, Ireland, Philip and Mary
groat, 1558, M.M. rose, S. 6501D, VF
for issue, £250.
Lot 266, Charles II guinea, 1663,
elephant below the first bust of the
king, S. 3339, a few light hairlines but
a magnificent coin retaining some of
the original mint lustre, on a pre-sale
estimate of £25,000-30,000 the hammer
did not fall until the bidding had
reached £45,000.
Lot 4
Lot 40
Lot 53
Lot 64
Lot 70
Lot 155
Lot 173
Lot 185
Lot 192
Lot 266
thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 95
Classified Advertising
01243 545060
www.detecnicks.co.uk
sales@detecnicks.co.uk
Family run and owned
business
Trading since 1979
Multi Line Dealer
Interest Free Credit
Based in Birmingham
Purpose built showroom
Call for the latest second hand
machines and coils
Find us on Facebook & Twitter
Steve Cox
Prompt repair and service
of detectors
UK’s Independent
Minelab Authorised
Service Centre (ASC)
Warranty/non warranty repairs,
Musketeer & Musketeer Advantage,
Sovereign XS & Elite, Explorer S,
XS & SE Range, CTX3030, Excalibur,
E-Trac, Quattro, Safari, X-Terra Range
Tried and tested worldwide,
quality UK manufactured keypads
for all Explorer range
15 years experience of repairing/
servicing detectors
Used Detectors
CS6MXi CS6MXi + Wireless Headphones CS2M Wolftrax Goldbug DP Euroace fitted with 6 x 9” coil Rapier Plus Rapier fitted with 8” Polo coil Hawkeye Hawkeye E-Trac Explorer SE Pro Explorer XS X-Terra 305 Fors Core Pro Jupiter v1 T2 Special Edition Warranty to
04/04/2019 Cibola M6 (Warranty to 01/12/17) Coinmaster V3i MX Sport (warranty to 01/08/2018) Classic IDX Goldmaxx (Not Power - non Deus
style stem) £350.00
£400.00
£75.00
£375.00
£375.00
£180.00
£250.00
£225.00
£325.00
£350.00
£750.00
£475.00
£349.00
£225.00
£575.00
£300.00
£650.00
£225.00
£340.00
£110.00
£749.00
£525.00
£175.00
£275.00
Over 30 years of experience,
knowledge and advice for both the
beginner and the veteran detectorist.
Part EX deals available.
Accessories and books.
Used Detectors and Coils
Call us for an up-to-date list of
secondhand machines and coils.
Interest free credit available.
0% FINANCE AVAILABLE
CALL FOR LATEST USED STOCK
IN HOUSE SERVICE & WARRANTY
AFTERSALES SUPPORT
www.joanallen.co.uk
Phone: 01959 571 255
Email: sales@joanallen.co.uk
For help identifying your finds, latest competitions
and news “Like” our Facebook Page
www.facebook.com/JoanAllenDetectors
check our website for up to date listings.
U.K. next working day delivery is included where
machines are purchased @ £100+.
Where purchased at less than £100, a £10.00
delivery charge will be applied.
Unless specified otherwise all our used detectors are
covered by our own 3 month warranty.
Used detectors will be supplied with headphones
if requested at the time of purchase.
3 Orchard Crescent, Arundel Road, Fontwell,
West Sussex BN18 0SD
CRAWFORDS METAL DETECTORS
USED DETECTORS, ACCESSORIES & SPECIALS LIST
C.Scope CS 1220 XD Later 8” coil version. Mint
£229
Fisher 75 DST Superb Condition
£579
Minelab Safari PRO Superb condition. 1 year warranty £649
£729
Minelab E-Trac Very good condition
Minelab Excalibur II Ex-Demo
£1029
Minelab Explorer SE PRO Mint- low hours use
Nokta Velox 1 Near mint condition. Very deep detector £339
Teknetics G2 Plus Camo Green classic model very good
£239
Whites Spectra V3i Mint
£449
XP Goldmaxx Power Later model on Deus Stem.
Good condition
£429
Coils, Coils, Coils!! We have too many used coils to list.
Call us 01724 845608
Steve Elden
Unless specified otherwise, all our used
detectors carry a 90 day warranty.
Please note we only take the best quality
trade-ins so you can be sure all models are as
described. This ensures you get a used detector
you can trust and no hassle!
Note used detectors change daily.
Please call for Latest List.
Based in Norfolk, But will travel
anywhere to buy collections of
Coins & Artefacts, with best prices
paid, I even buy the junk finds.
Coiltek Coils for Minelab in stock now
Coins & Antiquities
LP Metal Detecting
Unit 18, Orchard Business Park,
Kingsclere, RG20 4SY
Tel: 01635 597975
email: info@leisure-promotions.co.uk
Open 9.30am – 5pm Mon-Sat
www.lpmetaldetecting.com
COMPETITIVE PRICES GUARANTEED
Our 2nd hand stock changes daily, please
www.metaldetectorrepair.com
MserviceR@virginmedia.com
Tel: 0208 241 4789
Metal Detecting
Detecting
Metal
Established in 1968, Joan Allen
Electronics has become one of the
best known and trusted brands
associated with metal detecting
throughout the world.
Crawfords are now the Sole UK importer for
Detech Coils and metal Detectors
Professional & Discreet service
Tel: 07899 036250
Email: stevescoins@hotmail.com
96 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
01724 845608
or visit
www.crawfordsmd.com
Classified Advertising
Midland Detector Centre
Now Mike Longfield Detectors
Arado 120B. Very good condition..................... £165
Blisstool LTC 64X. Little used........................... £400
C-Scope CS4Pi. Very little used....................... £220
C-Scope 1220XD Looks as new.
With 10” polo coil......................................... £250
Fisher CZ6. Good condition.............................. £250
Goldenmask 2. Little used............................... £230
Garrett AT PRO. Little used. With new phones.£350
Laser Rapier Plus. Used once.......................... £250
Laser Tejon. Very little used............................. £330
Laser B1-HP. Little used.................................. £220
Laser Trident 1. Good condition....................... £260
Laser Hawkeye. Very good condition............... £340
Laser B3 Powermax. Good condition............... £200
Minelab Safari. Very little used....................... £530
Minelab Quattro. Very good condition.............. £250
Minelab X-Terra 50. Little used........................ £225
Minelab Explorer SE. Very little used............... £375
Teknetics T2. Looks unused............................. £350
p78
Tesoro Euro Sabre. Very little used.................. £230
Tesoro Trident II supreme. Near new............... £345
Tesoro Cibola. Little used................................. £250
Tesoro Vacuero very little used........................ £295
Tornado 13” coil unused for Fisher F75............. £75
Vista RG 750 V2. Very little used...................... £150
Whites MX5. Unused, in box............................ £300
Whites classic III with new coil........................ £160
Whites TM808. Looks unused......................... £300
Whites Classic IDX. Near new.......................... £245
XP Gmax II. Very little used.............................. £445
XP Goldmaxx. Very good condition.................. £300
XP ADX 150. Little used................................... £200
XP ADX 200. Nice condition............................. £280
XP Goldmaxx Power. Nice one......................... £320
Huge Quantity of Coils. All Makes and Sizes
The Searcher takes no responsibility
for any of the products or services
advertised within these pages.
METAL DETECTORS
LTD
TRADE TOKENS, ARTEFACTS, MEDIEVAL
COINS, not pricey, lovely items for the
discerning collector. Tel: 0151 625 6089.
THE BOOK ‘A Fortune under your feet’ by
Edward Fletcher, good condition, 1970 copy.
Offers please. Tel: 01563 529268.
XP DEUS, 11” coil with cover, remote control,
with hip mount pouch. In mint condition. Well
looked after, little used. 2 years warranty left.
£900 including P&P. Tel: 07594 687485.
FRIENDLY HELP AND ADVICE
FOR BEGINNERS
PART EX-SWAPS-COILS-BOOKS
ALWAYS LOADS OF SECONDHAND
AND EX DEMO DETECTORS IN STOCK
LOADS OF SECONDHAND COILS IN STOCK!
ALL USED MACHINES
Wanted
ARE SOLD WITH MY OWN WARRANTY
GARRETT ACE 100/150 and XP ADX 100 in
good working order. Call 07588 090790.
IF YOU LOOKING FOR A DETECTOR
ADs
PLEASE
PHONE AS STOCK CHANGES DAILY
17:20 Page 1
19/1/15
FREE NEXT DAY DELIVERY
Urgently Wanted all detectors and
Accessories for exchange or Cash
Pro-tectors Covers
Is now part of Staffs Metal Detectors
www.pro-tectors.co.uk
PEPSI PIROS
METAL DETECTORS
Metal Detector Covers and Accessories
USED DETECTOR LIST:
£695
Minelab E-Trac superb
XP Deus 28WS5 Lite ex display
£659
full warranty
Minelab Safari with batt pack
superb £525
£395
Nokta Fors Gold Plus superb C-Scope 3MXi new boxed
full warranty £280
10 Carlton Road, Worksop, Notts, S80 1PH
Tel: 01909 476611
Mon-Fri 8.30am-7.30pm Sat 9am-5pm
For latest stock list phone – Kevin
01889 564045 Mobile 07796 024042
Tel: 01676 533274
All warranted for 2 months
83 Station Road, Balsall Common,
Nr. Coventry CV7 7FN
mikelongfield@hotmail.com
For Sale
STAFFORDSHIRE
Or visit my Web site-Updated daily
www.staffsmetaldetectors.co.uk
E MAIL smdetectors@hotmail.com
Open 9am to 8pm Monday to Friday
Saturday 9am to 12pm
Visits strictly by appointment
Join
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Pay online by Credit/Debit or Paypal or send
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thesearcher.co.uk NOVEMBER 2017 97
Classified Advertising
John Philpotts
Coins & Artefacts
bought at fair prices
Established in business 15 years, detecting for 25 years
Confidentiality assured, Friendly, Discreet & Professional service
Single items to whole collections bought.
Phone: 01242 898107
Mobile: 07793 676309
Email: john@philpotts1.plus.com
Post: PO Box 281, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, GL7 9ET
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98 THE SEARCHER NOVEMBER 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Metal
Detectors
VK10+
 Deep Seeking Concentric Search Coil
 Microprocessor Controlled Discrimination
 Pinpoint Mode
 Adjustable Ground Balance
VK20
VK30
£165.00
£205.00
VIKING 1
£85.00
£159.00
VIKING 5
£95.00
VK40
£240.00
VK10
VIKING 6
£104.00
£135.00
CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR SPECIAL OFFERS!
www.metaldetectors.co.uk
Viking Metal Detectors Ltd. 1 Angela Street, Mill Hill, Blackburn, Lancashire BB2 4DJ
T: 01254 55887 E: viking@metaldetectors.co.uk W: www.metaldetectors.co.uk
Push your limits to the
MAX
TM
PN: 1142160
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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•
Built in Z-Lynk™ Wireless Technology
NEW Garrett MS-3™ Z-Lynk Wireless
Headphones included
Increased Detection Depth
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Backlight: illuminates LCD screen
Submersible to 10 feet (3 meters)†
High-Res Ground Balance: 175 pts.
Adjustable Threshold
Adjustable Volume
Automatic Ground Balance Window™
Large Display Numbers
And more!
INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE:
* NEW AT Max Cap
* 8.5”x11” DD Coil Cover
* Free for a limited time during introduction.
† For fully submerged operation, optional
waterproof headphones are required.
Early finds made by field
tester George W. with
the AT Max International.
These tiny Medieval
Russian silver coins are
from the reign of Ivan IV
(1530-1584), known as
“Ivan the Terrible.”
POWERFUL, WIRELESS,
ALL TERRAIN PERFORMANCE.
Built for the
professional treasure hunter.
Regton Ltd.
metal detection specialists Order & Enquiry Hotline: 0121 359 2379
82 Cliveland Street
Birmingham B19 3SN
Garrett_single_Aug_2017.indd 1
Tel: 0121 359 2379
Email: sales@regton.com
www.regton.com
6/2/2017 3:15:04 PM
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