close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Seattle Times - January 4, 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
5 ways to assess
if the tax plan is
working CLOSEUP > A3
Time’s up
Seahawks TE Jimmy Graham
should go wherever free agency
takes him
Let’s agree on a few things
in 2018 — like facts JERRY LARGE > B1
LARRY STONE > C1
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
CLOUDS, RAIN
High, 46. Low, 42. > B8
seattletimes.com/weather
WINNER OF 10 PULITZER PRIZES
INDEPENDENT AND LOCALLY OWNED FOR MORE THAN 121 YEARS
SEATTLETIMES.COM
Injured conductor who was
at front of train sues Amtrak
FATAL DEC. 18 DERAILMENT
He had asked to ride the route
to familiarize himself
with the new bypass track
By MIKE LINDBLOM
Seattle Times transportation reporter
Attorneys for an injured conductor filed
suit Wednesday against Amtrak, alleging
the railroad failed to provide safe working
conditions when a speeding passenger
TRAFFIC LAB
train derailed last month south of Tacoma.
Garrick Freeman suffered rib and hip
injuries, severe pain and emotional shock,
says the eight­page complaint, filed in
Pierce County Superior Court.
It’s the first of many upcoming lawsuits
and claims — including a second case filed
Wednesday, by an injured passenger.
Freeman, the conductor, was riding in
the lead locomotive to familiarize himself
with the new, faster bypass track from
Tacoma through Lakewood to DuPont,
Pierce County. On Dec. 18, its inaugural
run, the state­owned Cascades 501 train
flew off a track curve, traveling 78 mph in a
30 mph zone. Three people died and doz­
ens of others were injured.
Freeman, 48, has seven years of experi­
ence and had requested the daytime trip to
learn the route, where he rode in the left
Conductor
Garrick
Freeman
See > AMTRAK, A6
Initially the real­estate brokers were a bit panicked
in this first for the Seattle area, but the sale went smoothly
ELLEN M. BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES
Cary Kuo used cryptocurrency, or digital funds, to get the money needed for the down payment and to help secure a conventional mortgage on
his recently purchased Tukwila home. This is believed to be a first in the Seattle­area real­estate market.
The house that
cryptocurrency bought
By MIKE ROSENBERG
Seattle Times business reporter
In what is believed to be a first for
Seattle­area real estate, a young
investor has used bitcoinlike cryp­
tocurrency to buy a house in Tuk­
wila.
The three­bedroom rambler sold
Friday for $415,000, and the buyer
used a combination of bitcoin cash
(a new type of bitcoin) and several
other cryptocurrencies for the
10 percent down payment and to
help secure a conventional mort­
gage for the remaining cost of the
house.
Before the sale closed, the funds
were converted to regular U.S.
currency to pay the seller and meet
requirements of the lender, and so
closing costs like taxes could be
calculated and paid.
The 23­year­old buyer, Cary Kuo,
a design engineer in the aerospace
industry who had been renting an
apartment in Renton, beat out four
other offers on the house.
Bitcoin and other cryptocurren­
cies are digital funds that fluctuate
in value daily, and are produced in
limited numbers using software,
without involvement of a bank,
government or central authority.
They can be used directly to buy
things electronically when the seller
See > BITCOIN, A6
ELLEN M. BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES
This is the Tukwila home Cary Kuo recently purchased for
$415,000. He’s renting out two of the three bedrooms.
Washington AG: Motel 6 gave guest info to government
SIX LOCATIONS
IN STATE
Employees provided
personal info on
at least 9,150 people
to immigration
authorities
By PHUONG LE
The Associated Press
Washington’s attorney general
sued Motel 6 on Wednesday, alleging
the national budget chain disclosed
the private information of thousands
of its guests to U.S. immigration
authorities in violation of the state
consumer­protection law.
Attorney General Bob Ferguson
said motel employees divulged the
names, birth dates, driver’s license
numbers, license­plate numbers and
room numbers of at least 9,150
guests to U.S. Immigration and Cus­
toms Enforcement agents without a
warrant. At least six people were
detained on or near motel property
during a two­year period.
Motel 6 was aware that the agents
used the guest­registry information
to single out guests based on their
national origin in violation of Wash­
ington state’s anti­discrimination
law, the state’s lawsuit filed in King
County Superior Court alleged.
Ferguson said at least six Motel 6
locations in the state — all in the
Puget Sound region and corporate­
owned — provided the information
Trump
blasts
Bannon:
‘He lost
his mind’
FORMER KEY AIDE ASSAILS
PRESIDENT IN NEW BOOK
Remarks could lend
credibility to Russia probe
The Washington Post
and The New York Times
WASHINGTON — President
Donald Trump unleashed on his
former chief strategist and cam­
paign manager Wednesday,
issuing a long and unusual state­
ment questioning Steve Bannon’s
mental stability, honesty and
political influence.
“Steve Bannon has nothing to
do with me or my Presidency,”
the statement said. “When he
was fired, he not only lost his job,
he lost his mind. Steve was a
staffer who worked for me after I
had already won the nomination
by defeating seventeen candi­
dates, often described as the
most talented field ever assem­
bled in the Republican party.”
The statement
from Trump
came after Ban­
non criticized
Trump and his
family in recent
interviews —
mocking the
president’s intel­
Steve
lect, criticizing
the operations of Bannon, for­
the White House mer White
and torching
House aide
Donald Trump
Jr. and the president’s son­in­law
and senior adviser, Jared Kush­
ner.
Late Wednesday, lawyers for
Trump sent a cease­and­desist
letter to Bannon, arguing he has
violated a nondisclosure agree­
ment in speaking about his time
on the campaign and in Trump’s
most trusted inner circle.
His most recent comments,
published online Wednesday in
excerpts from a book by journal­
ist Michael Wolff, came two
weeks after a Bannon profile in
Vanity Fair that infuriated the
president and his senior aides.
The book, “Fire and Fury:
Inside the Trump White House,”
which paints an unflattering
portrait of Trump’s campaign
and administration, came after
Wolff spent months in the White
House — often in Bannon’s office.
Trump was aware of the project
and gave the blessing for others
to talk to Wolff, the author said.
One senior White House official
said Trump advisers considered
Wolff friendly and believed it
would be beneficial to speak with
him; this person also said Trump
was interviewed by Wolff.
In the book, Bannon was quot­
ed suggesting that Donald Trump
Jr.; Kushner, his brother­in­law;
and Paul Manafort, then­cam­
paign chairman, had been “trea­
sonous” and “unpatriotic” for
talking with Russians offering
incriminating information on
See > BANNON, A5
Paul Manafort sues
Mueller, Rosenstein, U.S.
Justice Department > A4
without guests’ knowledge or con­
sent. Washington’s Supreme Court
makes it clear that guest­registry
information is private, he said, and
See > MOTEL 6, A6
© 2018 Seattle Times Co.
Our newsprint contains recycled
fiber, and inks are reused.
7
59423 24000
3
THU
$1.50
4
A2 News |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
Nation&WorldReport
Newsline
For updates and more in­depth stories:
Protests over caste tensions
bring busy Mumbai to a halt
seattletimes.com/nationworld
DALIT GROUPS
India’s booming economy.
That message was similar
to the one sent by Dalits and
other marginalized groups in
state elections last month in
Gujarat, where the BJP, led
by Prime Minister Narendra
By VINDU GOEL, KAI SCHULTZ
Modi, who is from Gujarat,
AND HARI KUMAR
suffered some erosion of its
The New York Times
governing majority.
Every year, thousands of
MUMBAI, India — Mum­
Indians assemble near Pune
bai, India’s bustling commer­
to commemorate the Battle
cial hub, came to a standstill
of Koregaon, when Dalits
Wednesday as protesters
were hired by the British
called for a general strike
army to defeat upper­caste
and thousands took to the
Hindu rulers 200 years ago.
streets.
The 1818 battle is seen as a
The catalyst for the strike
RAFIQ MAQBOOL / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
point of community pride for
was violence against mem­
Protesters
block
a
highway
during
a
statewide
strike
called
Dalits, who are at the bottom
bers of the lower­caste Dalits,
by Dalit groups — long subjected to discrimination — in
of India’s stratified caste
or so­called untouchables,
Mumbai, India, on Wednesday.
system and have long been
that occurred when several
subjected to discrimination.
hundred thousand gathered
But the celebrations
of Indian society.”
on New Year’s Day at a mon­ and social hierarchy.
In the Goregaon neighbor­ turned sour this year, with
“We are here to demand
ument southeast of Mumbai
scuffles breaking out Mon­
hood of Mumbai, a Dalit
to commemorate the victory justice,” said Jitender Nika­
day and Tuesday between
stronghold, nearly 1,000
200 years ago of a British­led lje, a Dalit protester.
On Wednesday, both hous­ people marched down closed Dalits and far­right Hindu
force against high­caste
es of Parliament were repeat­ streets Wednesday, shouting protesters, who threw stones
Hindus.
at people leaving the event.
chants denouncing both the
edly adjourned in response
But as marchers blocked
The unrest in Pune then
BJP and the Congress party,
to the protests. Rahul Gan­
train tracks and highways,
fanned out to Mumbai, about
dhi, the leader of the opposi­ which ran India for most of
they also expressed deeper
75 miles northwest, where
the period since indepen­
tion Congress party, wrote
frustrations with both of
schools, trains and business­
on Twitter that the attacks by dence from Britain.
India’s major political par­
By shutting down Mumbai es shut down Wednesday.
far­right Hindus were part of
ties, which they accuse of
Dalit protesters, reacting to
for a day, he and other pro­
a “fascist vision” by India’s
failing to improve the lot of
testers hoped to prompt swift the violence near Pune,
governing Bharatiya Janata
the hundreds of millions of
arrests of the Pune assailants blocked traffic, hurled stones
Party, or BJP, which has ties
Indians who have tradition­
ally been stuck at the bottom to Hindu nationalist groups, and to draw India’s attention at buses and deflated tires in
some areas of the city.
to keep Dalits “at the bottom to those left behind despite
of the country’s economic
Parliament adjourns;
buses, trains, schools
shut down
Days after N. Korea overture,
hotline to S. Korea hums again
By KANGA KONG
AND JIHYE LEE
Bloomberg News
North Korea contacted
authorities in Seoul over a
hotline for the first time in
about two years, paving the
way for a thaw during the
Winter Olympics despite
U.S. President Donald
Trump’s fresh taunts at Kim
Jong Un.
Officials from both coun­
tries spoke several times
Wednesday to conduct tech­
nical checks before agreeing
to stop for the day, according
to Lee Yeon­du, an official
with South Korea’s Unifica­
tion Ministry. President
Moon Jae­in has proposed
holding talks Jan. 9 at the
border village of Panmun­
jom, which would be the first
formal gathering between
the two sides since 2015.
The move shows further
progress after Kim called for
improved relations with
South Korea in a New Year’s
Day address. Tensions over
North Korea’s nuclear pro­
gram had threatened to hang
over the Games in Pyeo­
ngchang, a city about 50
miles from the border divid­
ing the Korean Peninsula.
The detente between the
two Koreas progressed even
as Trump continued a war of
words with Kim, who
warned on Monday that the
nuclear button is “always on
my desk.” The U.S. president
responded Tuesday night,
saying on Twitter that he had
“a much bigger & more pow­
erful one than his, and my
Button works!”
The president has ex­
pressed doubts about Kim’s
pre­Olympics overtures, with
an administration official
saying North Korea is aiming
Europe fears U.S. reaction
to demonstrations in Iran
to drive a wedge in the U.S.­
South Korean alliance.
“We are very skeptical of
Kim Jong Un’s sincerity in
sitting down and having
talks,” State Department
spokeswoman Heather Nau­
ert told reporters in Wash­
ington.
The U.S. has about 30,000
troops in South Korea and
provides a nuclear deterrent.
Moon has repeatedly
sought to reassure his citi­
zens that he’s doing every­
thing to prevent a war. He
has long pushed for North
Korea to attend the Olym­
pics, which start Feb. 9.
Besides discussing the
Olympics, South Korea is
looking to improve overall
relations with North Korea
during the discussions.
While Kim might seek an
easing of sanctions and the
cancellation of joint military
The reimposition of sanc­
tions could also further un­
dermine the standing of
Rouhani, while allowing
Iran’s hard­liners to argue
By STEVEN ERLANGER
tions renewal in mid­Janu­
that it had been wrong to
The New York Times
ary,” Geranmayeh said.
trust the United States on the
BRUSSELS — The Europe­
So far, the European Union nuclear deal, which could
an Union has called the
and its member states have
founder.
deaths of Iranians over near­ issued statements condemn­
With protests against the
ly a week of protests “inex­
ing the violence and warning Islamic government in Iran
cusable,” but its members
the Iranian government not
and its economic perfor­
have so far pushed back
to overreact. But the state­
mance, including the vast
against American efforts to
ments do not support the
sums it spends supporting
issue a stronger, joint con­
protesters or condemn the
Shiite allies abroad like the
demnation.
Islamic government as ex­
Syrian government, Leba­
The Europeans fear that
plicitly as Trump’s Twitter
non’s Hezbollah movement
President Donald Trump
messages do.
and the Houthi rebels in
may use the protests in Iran
European officials say they Yemen, Trump may decide
as a reason to reimpose U.S.
are for now resisting U.S.
that to waive the sanctions
economic sanctions on Iran,
efforts to issue a more critical again would only give more
possibly killing the multilat­
joint statement at the United economic help to a regime he
eral deal that limited the
Nations or at the U.N. Hu­
disparages.
country’s nuclear program.
man Rights Council in Gene­
Europeans are the biggest
The Europeans also sug­
va, as called for by Nikki
potential investors in Iran
gest that Trump’s open sup­
Haley, Trump’s ambassador
and also have been fierce
port for the protesters in Iran at the United Nations.
defenders of the nuclear deal
risks helping the country’s
Trump already “decerti­
that Rouhani supported
religious and political hard­
fied” Iran last October for
against deep skepticism from
liners and damaging the
not, in his view, living up to
the hard­liners and Iran’s
relatively more moderate
its commitments under the
Supreme Leader Ayatollah
Iranian president, Hassan
nuclear deal, negotiated in
Ali Khamenei.
Rouhani.
2015 under President Barack
The protests that broke out
The European reluctance
Obama. But even then he
a week ago in the northern
to side more openly with the signed a waiver on the sanc­
city of Mashhad have shown
protesters is the latest diver­ tions, which he must do
some signs of abating, but
gence of approach with the
every 120 days.
demonstrators are still taking
United States over a critical
The White House press
to the streets after dark in
matter of foreign policy since secretary, Sarah Huckabee
many outlying provinces.
Trump announced he would Sanders, said Trump had not Elite forces with the Revolu­
move the U.S. Embassy in
decided what he will do
tionary Guards Corps were
Israel to Jerusalem.
about the sanctions.
deployed to three of them
“The Europeans see an
“We certainly keep our
Wednesday — Hamadan,
erratic response by Trump to options open in terms of
Isfahan and Lorestan — to
the situation and believe that sanctions,” she said. “In
help quell uprisings there.
his messaging is playing right terms of signing a waiver
The government took
into the hands of the more
later in January, the presi­
another step Wednesday to
radical elements in Iran, and dent hasn’t made a final
tamp down the uprising,
they don’t want to add fuel to decision on that. He’s going
staging pro­government
the fire,” said Ellie Geran­
to keep every option on the
rallies throughout the coun­
mayeh, an Iran expert with
table.”
try and affording them gen­
the European Council on
If he does not sign, re­
erous coverage on state­con­
Foreign Relations.
newed sanctions will affect
trolled media.
The nuclear deal “is in the
both American and European
But little of the action,
background of all this for the companies, given the power either for or against the gov­
Europeans and for Rouhani, of the dollar and the U.S.
ernment, has found its way
too, especially given sanc­
banking system.
to the capital.
exercises between the U.S.
and South Korea, analysts
said easier measures would
include humanitarian assis­
tance and reuniting separat­
ed families.
Earlier on Wednesday,
Kim welcomed Moon’s fol­
low­up steps for talks be­
tween the two countries in a
statement on the Korean
Central News Agency (KC­
NA) that included none of
the usual insults that North
Korea has often used to de­
scribe its southern neighbor.
“We will try to keep close
communications with the
south Korean side from sin­
cere stand and honest atti­
tude, true to the intention of
our supreme leadership, and
deal with the practical mat­
ters related to the dispatch of
our delegation,” KCNA said.
It called the talks “the first
meaningful and good step
for improved north­south
relations.”
HOW TO CONTACT
THE NEWSPAPER
Subscriptions,
delivery and billing:
206­464­2121
Toll­free in Washington state:
1­800­542­0820
Monday­Friday 7:00 a.m. to 6
p.m. and weekends and holidays
7 a.m. to noon. Online:
seattletimes.com/subscribe
Classifieds:
206­624­7355
Advertising:
206­464­2400
Newsroom:
206­624­7323
THE NATION
Police hoax: A Los Angeles man suspected of making a
hoax emergency call that led to the fatal police shooting
of a Kansas man told a judge Wednesday he would not
fight efforts to send him to Wichita to face charges. Tyler
Barriss, 25, waived his right to an extradition hearing in
Los Angeles Superior Court. Police have said Andrew
Finch, 28, was shot after a prankster called 911 last
week with a fake story about a shooting and kidnapping
at Finch’s Wichita home. Barriss was charged with mak­
ing a false alarm, which covers calling police or a fire
department and knowingly giving false information.
Wichita Police Chief Gordon Ramsay said officers who
responded reported that Finch’s hands went up and
down around his waistband before he was shot.
Fire at Clinton home: Firefighters responded to Bill and
Hillary Clinton’s home in Chappaqua, New York, on
Wednesday after a small fire in a building on the proper­
ty. Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill tweeted that the fire
was in a building used by the Secret Service, not in the
Clintons’ residence. He said the former president and
the former secretary of State were not home at the time.
Russell M.
Nelson
Thomas S.
Monson
Mormon leader dies: Russell M. Nel­
son, a 93­year­old former heart sur­
geon whose conservative track record
on the religion’s leadership panel has
led Mormon scholars to predict he
won’t make any major changes, is set
to become the next Mormon church
president after the death of church
President Thomas S. Monson. Monson
died Tuesday night at his home in Salt
Lake City after leading The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter­day Saints for
nearly a decade. He was 90. Nelson is
likely to be formally named to the post
in the coming days under longstand­
ing church protocol designed to en­
sure a smooth handover by giving the
post to the longest­tenured member of
the governing Quorum of the Twelve
Apostles.
ODDS & ENDS
Jewels stolen: Thieves on Wednesday stole precious
Indian jewels from the famed Al Thani Collection that
were on show at Venice’s Doge’s Palace, making off with
a brooch and a pair of earrings by mixing in with the
crowd on the final day of the exhibition, police said. The
Al Thani Collection includes gems dating from the time
of the Mughal Empire. Police said the stolen items were
made of gold, platinum and diamonds, and news reports
estimated their value in the millions of euros.
PASSAGES
Fred Bass, 89, who transformed his father’s small used­
book store in Manhattan, the Strand, into the largest
used­book store in the world with the slogan “18 Miles
of Books,” died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at
his home in Manhattan.
TODAY IN HISTORY
Corrections
To report an error, email
corrections@seattletimes.com
or call 206­624­7323.
The Seattle Times is published daily
by The Seattle Times Co., 1000 Den­
ny Way, Seattle, WA. F.A. Blethen,
publisher and chief executive officer.
Periodicals postage paid at Seattle,
WA, and at additional mailing offic­
es. Vol. 140 No. 4. Postmaster: Send
address changes to The Seattle
Times, P.O. Box 70, Seattle WA
98111. ISSN 0745­9696.
Weekly home delivery rates
All subscriptions include unlimited
digital access to the smartphone and
tablet web apps, the Print Replica
and seattletimes.com
$10.50
Friday,Saturday,Sunday*
$6.99
Sunday*
$4.99
Mon.­Sat.plusadvancedSunday $10.50
Monday­Friday
THE WORLD
Storm hits Europe: Storm Eleanor tore through Europe
on Wednesday with winds of up to 100 mph, bringing
lightning and heavy rain, battering houses with hail,
flooding streets and uprooting trees. The storm hit
Ireland before passing through Britain and on to the
Continent. The storm was expected to be felt as far
north as the Baltics and as far south as Italy. Workers
raced to restore power to thousands of homes, and to
clear highways and train tracks of trees and overturned
vehicles. The storm claimed at least one life, that of a
skier in the French Alps hit by a falling tree. High tides
threatened coastal areas and forced authorities in Lon­
don to close the Thames Barrier to protect the city.
1951: North Korean and Communist Chinese forces
recaptured the city of Seoul.
More contact information can be
found in each section
Sunday­Saturday
AARON CHOWN / AP
Children in Aberystwyth, Wales, stand back as a
wave crashes over the sea wall on Wednesday.
$10.50
* Includes Thanksgiving and Christmas day papers
1960: Author Albert Camus died in an automobile acci­
dent in Villeblevin, France, at age 46.
1974: President Richard Nixon refused to hand over tape
recordings and documents subpoenaed by the Senate
Watergate Committee.
BIRTHDAYS
Football coach Don Shula, 88. Opera singer Grace Bumb­
ry, 81. Actress Dyan Cannon, 79. Historian Doris Kearns
Goodwin, 75. Rock singer Michael Stipe, 58.
Seattle Times news services
Lottery
Daily Game: Numbers Wednesday
7­3­8
Match 4: Numbers Wednesday
5­18­21­22
Hit 5: Numbers Wednesday
2­13­26­32­33
No winner
Saturday's cashpot: $190,000
Powerball:
Numbers Wednesday
2­18­37­39­42 Powerball 12
Saturday's estimated jackpot:
Not yet determined
Lotto: Numbers Wednesday
7
16 17 21 24 26
No winner
Saturday's jackpot: $1.5 million
Keno: Numbers Wednesday
7­9­10­15­19­22­27­34­42­46
54­57­59­62­66­68­69­75­78­80
Mega Millions:
Numbers Tuesday
1­42­47­64­70 Mega 22
Friday's estimated jackpot:
$418 million
Mailsubscriptionrates:
WithinUnitedStates
How to reach editors
Sunday­Saturday
52weeks
26weeks
$780
$390
13weeks
$195
Sunday
52weeks
$260
13weeks
$65
26weeks
$130
Paymentterms:
Paymentoptionsincludecheck,money
order,VISAorMasterCard.A$25feewillbe
chargedonallchecksreturnedfor
non­sufficientfunds.
Corrections: Karen Cater 206­464­8975 or kcater@seattletimes.com
Front page:
Features:
Melissa Davis 206­464­2506 or
Paige Collins, 206­464­8997 or
mdavis@seattletimes.com
pcollins@seattletimes.com
Local news:
Matt Kreamer, 206­464­2453 or
mkreamer@seattletimes.com
Business:
Rami Grunbaum, 206­464­8541 or
rgrunbaum@seattletimes.com
Sports:
Paul Barrett, 206­464­2093 or
pbarrett@seattletimes.com
Photos:
Danny Gawlowski, 206­464­2450
or dgawlowski@seattletimes.com
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
CloseUp
5 ways to assess whether GOP
tax plan delivering as promised
P O L I T I C S | As soon as
summer, it may
become clear whether
the tax cuts have
inspired spending. But
it may take years to
assess the impact of
pay raises.
President
Donald Trump
signed a tax­
overhaul bill
into law at the
White House
on Dec. 22.
By JOSH BOAK
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — If President
Donald Trump and his Republican
allies are right, the $1.5 trillion
tax­cut plan they sped into law last
month will make individuals and
businesses more prosperous. Pay­
checks will grow. Stocks will surge.
Consumers will spend more. The
economy will accelerate.
Critics counter that the tax plan
will mainly enrich the already
wealthy and swell corporate profits
while leaving most ordinary house­
holds with comparatively modest
tax cuts — and, eventually, tax
hikes.
So how best to judge who’s
right?
As soon as summer, it may be­
come clear whether the tax cuts
have unleashed stronger consumer
spending. But it could take years to
know whether many people are
enjoying the generous pay raises.
Here are five ways to assess
whether the tax plan is delivering
on its promises:
ARE YOU SPENDING MORE?
The tax cuts were sold as a way
to turbocharge spending on cars,
appliances, home projects and
splurges out at restaurants. All that
is tracked by the government as
retail sales, which are up a decent
4.2 percent year to date.
By February, workers should
begin receiving more take­home
MIKE THEILER / BLOOMBERG
pay because the tax cut means that
a lesser portion of their income will
be withheld for taxes. With more
money in their pockets, consumers
typically spend more. If that pat­
tern holds true again, spending at
retailers could begin rising within
months.
Yet there’s also the risk that the
tax cuts — spread out over 26 pay­
checks this year — might feel too
paltry for some Americans to notice
or care enough to step up their
spending. Others might be inclined
to use their tax savings to pay
health­care or child­care costs, in
which case the boost to retail
spending — the economy’s primary
fuel — might not budge much.
MORE STOCK GAINS?
Trump, a billionaire business­
man, treats the stock market as an
emblem of his success. He boasts
frequently about record­high stock
indexes as proof that his economic
agenda already has cheered inves­
tors, emboldened businesses and
enriched most Americans.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 stock
index has climbed more than 22
percent since Trump’s 2016 elec­
tion. Many stock analysts have
suggested that the stock market
has likely priced in much of the
higher profits that might result
from slashing the corporate tax
rate from 35 percent to 21 percent.
But Gary Cohn, Trump’s top eco­
nomic adviser, has asserted that
the stock market had yet to fully
account for how much the tax cuts
would boost profit margins.
Even if stock markets keep rising,
it would intensify what critics say
the tax cuts would do overall: Re­
ward the rich and neglect pretty
much everyone else, thereby fur­
ther widening the nation’s wealth
gap. Less than half of U.S. house­
holds own any stocks, even in re­
tirement accounts.
A MORE ROBUST ECONOMY?
Trump administration officials
have asserted that the tax cuts
would propel the economy ahead
at a sustained 3 percent annual
rate year after year, up from a
recent annual pace of roughly 2
percent.
Their idea is that companies
would invest in new equipment,
which would increase worker pro­
ductivity and wages. Those work­
ers then would spend their wind­
falls and help accelerate the econo­
my. Trump has gone so far as to
forecast annual growth of as much
as 6 percent a year — a boast that
draws widespread skepticism
among mainstream economics.
Federal Reserve policymakers
largely agreed last month that the
U.S. tax overhaul would likely
benefit the economy, according to
minutes of the Fed’s Dec. 12­13
meeting released Wednesday, but
they were split on whether the
resulting growth would warrant a
faster pace of rate hikes this year.
Fed officials believed the tax cuts
would drive consumer spending
and increased business investment,
though they expressed uncertainty
over the magnitude of the boost.
The Fed is projecting growth of 2.5
| News A3
percent this year, up from a previ­
ous forecast of 2.1 percent. But it
then foresees growth slowing to
2.1 percent in 2019 and 2 percent
in 2020.
CRANKING OUT MORE GOODS?
Trump has said that lower corpo­
rate tax rates will draw factories
back to the United States from
overseas. Last month, the president
cited an example: The owner of the
New England Patriots would be
investing in a paper mill.
“A friend of mine, Bob Kraft,
called me last night, and he said
this tax bill is incredible,” the presi­
dent said. “And he said, based on
this tax bill, he just wanted to let
me know that he’s going to buy a
big plant in the great state of North
Carolina, and he’s going to build a
tremendous paper mill there.”
The government monitors the
manufacturing sector’s perfor­
mance, so any changes will become
evident in that data over the next
few years.
IS YOUR PAY UP?
Trump says lower business tax
rates will lead to handsome pay
raises for workers. An average
household would receive an addi­
tional $4,000 a year, according to
Trump’s top economist, Kevin
Hassett. That’s equivalent to a
nearly 5 percent pay hike.
Almost no mainstream econo­
mist envisions anything close to
that much pay growth. A number
of companies, including AT&T,
Comcast and Wells Fargo, have
recently paid bonuses to employees
— as a result, they said, of the low­
er tax rates. But most Americans
will know if the corporate tax cuts
are helping them only if some of
the tax savings goes into significant
pay increases, not just one­time
bonuses. The best measure on a
month­by­month basis comes from
the government’s jobs report: Aver­
age hourly earnings.
Some economists say it could
take more than a year to meaning­
fully assess whether the tax cuts
have raised worker pay broadly.
But Hassett told The Associated
Press that the tax cuts could be the
very spark needed to ignite higher
wages.
“It’s precisely now that we buy
insurance for that wage growth
with a big tax reform,” he said.
A4 News |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
Alabama’s new senator sworn in
Manafort sues Mueller,
DOJ over Russia probe
SUIT CHALLENGES
APPOINTMENT
GLEN STUBBE / STAR TRIBUNE VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. Doug Jones, D­Ala., is sworn in by Vice President Mike Pence, right, in the Old Sen­
ate Chamber in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. Jones, whose surprise win last month
narrowed the Republican majority to just 51­49, was joined by Tina Smith of Minnesota,
appointed to replace Sen. Al Franken, who resigned amid sexual­misconduct allegations.
Trump dissolves embattled
voter­fraud commission
By KURTIS LEE
Los Angeles Times (TNS)
President Donald Trump
announced late Wednesday
he is ending the voter­fraud
commission he launched last
year as the panel faces a
flurry of lawsuits and criti­
cism from Democrats and
Republicans alike.
“Rather than engage in
endless legal battles at tax­
payer expense, today I signed
an executive order to dis­
solve the commission,”
Trump said.
The voter­fraud commis­
sion, launched by executive
order in May with the stated
goal of restoring confidence
and integrity in the electoral
process, has faced a barrage
of lawsuits in recent months
over privacy concerns, as the
commission sought personal
data on voters across the
country.
Trump has alleged — with­
out evidence — that 3 million
to 5 million illegal votes were
cast in the 2016 presidential
election in which his Demo­
cratic opponent, Hillary
Clinton, garnered nearly
3 million more overall votes,
though Trump gained a
majority in the Electoral
College.
Most analysts have said
that there has been little or
no evidence of voter fraud in
U.S. elections.
The president tapped Vice
President Mike Pence to
serve as chairman, with the
job of vice chairman going to
Kansas Secretary of State
Kris Kobach, a Republican
who helped create some of
the controversial voter­iden­
tification laws that critics say
Trump expected at championship game
President Donald Trump is reportedly making plans to attend
the college football national championship game between
Georgia and Alabama on Monday night in Atlanta. The Atlanta
Journal­Constitution reported Wednesday that local law­
enforcement personnel are working with the Secret Service to
prepare for Trump’s arrival at Mercedes­Benz Stadium. First
lady Melania Trump also is expected to attend. A White House
official did not contest the report, although the plans are not
final. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
opened the daily briefing by offering Trump’s congratulations
to the two teams for their semifinal victories, noting both are
“in the heart of Trump country.” The president won Alabama
by 30 points and Georgia by 5 over Democrat Hillary Clinton.
But Trump suffered an embarrassing political defeat last
month when Republican Roy Moore, whom the president had
endorsed, lost to Democrat Doug Jones in the U.S. Senate race
in Alabama.
— The Washington Post
disproportionately affect
minorities. Of the 13 original
members, eight are Republi­
cans and five Democrats.
The commission had con­
vened twice — in Washing­
ton, D.C., in July and New
Hampshire last month — and
heard testimony about how
to better improve the voting
process and registration.
Last month, Maine’s secre­
tary of state, Matthew Dun­
lap, a Democrat on the panel,
filed suit against the commis­
sion alleging he was denied
full access to the internal
information he needed to
fully participate in the com­
mission’s work.
A federal judge ruled in his
favor.
The commission has also
faced a flurry of lawsuits over
privacy concerns as the panel
requested voter names, ad­
dresses and other data in all
50 states — although officials
in 15 states have reportedly
denied the requests.
The nonpartisan U.S. Gov­
ernment Accountability
Office announced in the fall
that it had accepted a request
from Democratic lawmakers
to review the commission.
In an Oct. 18 letter re­
questing the investigation,
Democratic Sens. Michael
Bennet of Colorado, Cory
Booker of New Jersey and
Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota
wrote that the manner in
which the commission is
conducting its work “will
prevent the public from a full
and transparent understand­
ing of the commission’s con­
clusions and unnecessarily
diminish confidence in our
democratic process.”
A review by the agency
was expected to be complet­
ed in the months ahead.
Sessions replaces some U.S. attorneys he forced out
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Attor­
ney General Jeff Sessions on
Wednesday named 17 inter­
im U.S. attorneys to tempo­
rarily take the place of some
of the dozens of Obama
administration holdovers he
ordered to resign last year.
The vacancies had been
temporarily filled by prose­
cutors who are permitted to
serve in that position for just
300 days.
Sessions in March sought
resignation letters from 46
U.S. attorneys who were
Obama appointees, includ­
ing Preet Bharara, the high­
profile Manhattan federal
prosecutor who was fired
after refusing to step down.
The U.S. attorneys Ses­
sions named included Nicola
Hanna, a former assistant
U.S. attorney in Los Angeles
and San Diego, for the Cen­
tral District of California;
Richard Donoghue, a former
assistant U.S. attorney in the
Eastern District of New York,
to head that office; Matthew
Schneider, the chief deputy
attorney general in Michigan
for that state’s Eastern Dis­
trict; Timothy Garrison, a
prosecutor in the Western
District of Missouri to head
that office; Craig Carpenito,
a partner at Alston & Bird for
the District of New Jersey;
and Grant Jaquith, the acting
U.S. attorney for the North­
ern District of New York to
head that office.
curity adviser Michael Flynn
and Trump campaign for­
eign­policy aide George
Both pleaded
Says investigators Papadopoulos.
guilty to lying to investiga­
given ‘carte blanche’ tors — Flynn about contacts
with Russia’s ambassador
The Washington Post
and Papadopoulos about
contacts with foreigners
President Donald
Trump’s former campaign claiming high­level connec­
tions to them — and are
manager, Paul Manafort,
cooperating with investiga­
asked a federal court
tors.
Wednesday to void the
Trump, in social­media
Justice Department’s ap­
postings after Christmas and
pointment of Special
New Year’s Day, has attacked
Counsel Robert Mueller
and charges Mueller’s
the special­counsel investiga­
tion, Justice Department and
office filed against him,
elevating Trump support­
the FBI, including the FBI’s
ers’ attempts to discredit
former director, James Com­
the probe into Russian
ey; former General Counsel
interference in last
James Baker; and
year’s election.
Deputy Director
Manafort’s at­
Andrew McCabe.
torneys argued in a
Top federal law­en­
17­page lawsuit in
forcement officials
federal court in
huddled Wednesday
Washington that
afternoon with House
the department
Speaker Paul Ryan to
exceeded its legal
discuss a request
authority when, in Paul
from congressional
May, acting Attor­
investigators for
Manafort
ney General Rod
documents related to
Rosenstein or­
a dossier alleging
dered Mueller to investi­
connections between Trump
gate “links and/or coordi­
and Russia, according to
nation” between the Rus­
people familiar with the
sian government and
meeting.
Trump campaign, as well
Deputy Attorney General
as “any matters that arose
Rod Rosenstein and FBI
or may arise directly from” Director Christopher Wray
that investigation.
requested the meeting, ac­
The order “purports to
cording to Ryan spokeswom­
grant Mr. Mueller carte
an AshLee Strong.
blanche to investigate and
The meeting in Ryan’s
pursue criminal charges in offices took place just hours
connection with anything
before a deadline Wednes­
he stumbles across while
day that House Intelligence
investigating,” no matter
Committee Chairman Devin
how remote from his origi­ Nunes, R­Calif., set for the
nal charge, Manafort attor­ FBI and DOJ to turn over
neys Kevin Downing and
documents related to how
Thomas Zehnle wrote.
the agencies used informa­
They said the special­
tion in a now­famous dossier
counsel office’s indictment as part of an investigation
of Manafort alleging he
into alleged ties between
committed fraud, conspir­ Trump’s campaign and Rus­
acy and money laundering sian officials. The dossier,
in secretly lobbying for a
compiled by former British
Russian­friendly political
intelligence officer Christo­
party in Ukraine focuses
pher Steele, details Trump’s
not on actions with the
alleged connections to Rus­
Trump campaign in 2016
sian officials and financiers
but private business deal­
and exploits in Moscow.
ings that began much
House and Senate Republi­
earlier, adding that he was cans, defensive of the presi­
interviewed by the Justice dent, have pointed out that
Department in 2014.
the Democratic National
A spokesman for the
Committee and Hillary Clin­
special counsel’s office
ton’s campaign paid for re­
declined to comment. “The search that ended up in the
lawsuit is frivolous, but the dossier as reason to discredit
defendant is entitled to file it. Scrutiny of the dossier and
whatever he wants,” a
the government’s reliance on
Justice Department (DOJ) it are also part of a wider
spokeswoman said.
GOP effort to look at whether
The lawsuit, assigned to political bias affected the
U.S. District Judge Ketanji FBI’s and DOJ’s conduct in a
Brown Jackson, a 2013
series of Obama­era investi­
Obama appointee, esca­
gations, including the Clin­
lates attacks by current
ton email probe.
and former Trump officials
Nunes said late Wednes­
on the legitimacy of the
day he believes the depart­
government’s investiga­
tion into campaign activi­
ties.
Manafort, 68, and his
longtime deputy, Rick
Gates, 45, have pleaded
not guilty and remain
under home detention
awaiting trial on charges
including money launder­
ing and fraud.
Their indictment, an­
nounced Oct. 30, marked
the first criminal charges
disclosed in probes into
possible Russian influence
in U.S. political affairs,
which have also swept up
former Trump national­se­
ment soon will provide the
committee with the docu­
ments it had requested and
access to the witnesses from
which it had wanted to hear.
On Tuesday, the founders
of Fusion GPS wrote an Op­
Ed in The New York Times
pushing back on accusations
that the dossier had prompt­
ed the DOJ’s and FBI’s scruti­
ny of Trump’s alleged Russia
ties and accusing Republi­
cans in Congress of perpetu­
ating “fake investigations”
into their activities.
The two founders of the
firm, Glenn Simpson and
Peter Fritsch, made their first
extensive public comments
on the controversy surround­
ing the company in the com­
mentary.
They accused congressio­
nal Republicans of “selective­
ly” leaking to far­right media
outlets details of the firm’s
testimony to congressional
committees and called for
full release of the testimony
transcripts “so that the Amer­
ican people can learn the
truth about our work and
most, important, what hap­
pened to our democracy.”
The New York Times re­
ported Dec. 30 that the Rus­
sia probe began when cam­
paign adviser George Papa­
dopoulos tipped off an
Australian diplomat in May,
2016 that Russia had “politi­
cal dirt on Hillary Clinton.”
The Australians ultimately
informed the FBI two months
later, according to the Times.
Papadopoulos admitted in
October that he made a false
statement to the FBI about
his contacts with foreigners,
claiming to have high­level
Russian connections, and
made a plea agreement to
cooperate with the probe.
As previously reported by
multiple news outlets, Fusion
GPS was hired first in the fall
of 2015 by The Washington
Free Beacon, a conservative
website funded, in part, by
New York hedge fund opera­
tor Paul Singer to look into
various Republican presiden­
tial candidates, including
Trump. It already has been
reported that the Free Bea­
con called off Fusion GPS in
May 2016 as Trump was
clinching the nomination,
before Steele was hired by
the firm, according to the
Free Beacon.
The Washington Post
reported in October that the
Clinton campaign and the
Democratic Committee then
paid Fusion via a law firm for
its work on the dossier.
The dossier was published
by BuzzFeed, but Simpson
and Fritsch said they did not
leak the document to that
publication.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
< Bannon
base — he’s only in it for
himself.”
Trump and his senior
team were already incensed
Hillary Clinton in a June
with the recent Vanity Fair
2016 meeting at Trump
article in which Bannon
Tower in Manhattan.
attacked a number of senior
“The three senior guys in
Trump advisers and seemed
the campaign thought it was to mock the president.
a good idea to meet with a
“Steve pretends to be at
foreign government inside
war with the media, which
Trump Tower in the confer­ he calls the opposition par­
ence room on the 25th floor ty, yet he spent his time at
— with no lawyers. They
the White House leaking
didn’t have any lawyers,”
false information to the
Bannon said after The New media to make himself seem
York Times revealed the
far more important than he
meeting in July 2017, ac­
was,” Trump’s statement
cording to Wolff’s book.
said. “It is the only thing he
“Even if you thought that does well. Steve was rarely
this was not treasonous, or
in a one­on­one meeting
unpatriotic, or bad shit, and with me and only pretends
I happen to think it’s all of
to have had influence to fool
that, you should have called a few people with no access
the FBI immediately,” he
and no clue, whom he
continued, according to the helped write phony books.”
book.
A White House official
He also said that the
said that call logs show
chance that Trump Jr. did
Trump has spoken with
not introduce the Russians
Bannon only five times since
to his father “is zero,” a
he left. The official said
supposition rather than an
most of the calls were initi­
assertion but one that
ated by Bannon. However,
would contradict the presi­
Trump often uses cell­
dent’s insistence that he
phones to talk with advisers,
knew nothing about the
particularly those he knows
meeting at the time.
staff members will chafe at.
According to Wolff, Ban­
Bannon has in recent
non also predicted that a
weeks also alienated his
special­counsel investiga­
main financial backer, Re­
tion into Russia’s interfer­
bekah Mercer, after he told
ence in the 2016 election
several other major conser­
and any coordination with
vative donors that he would
Trump aides would ulti­
be able to count on the
mately center on money
Mercers’ financial support
laundering, an assessment
should he run for president,
that could lend credibility to a person familiar with the
an investigation the presi­
conversations said. The
dent has repeatedly called a person said Mercer now
witch hunt.
does not plan to financially
“They’re going to crack
support Bannon’s future
Don Junior like an egg on
projects — and that she was
national TV,” Bannon was
frustrated by his moves in
quoted as saying.
Alabama and some of his
Trump Jr. did not imme­
comments in the news me­
diately respond to a
dia that seemed to
request for com­
stoke unnecessary
ment. But he jabbed
fights.
at Bannon on Twit­
The book pres­
ter on Wednesday
ents Trump as an
when he reposted a
ill­informed and
message noting that
thoroughly unseri­
Alabama now had a
ous candidate and
Democratic senator.
president, engaged
“Thanks Steve,” the Michael
mainly in satisfying
younger Trump
his own ego and
Wolff, author
wrote. “Keep up the
presiding over a
of “Fire and
great work.”
dysfunctional White
Fury”
The president’s
House. It reports
statement is likely to
that early in the
hearten congressio­
2016 campaign, one
nal Republicans and
aide, Sam Nunberg,
advisers to Trump
was sent to explain
who have wanted
the Constitution to
him to distance
the candidate. “I got
himself from Ban­
as far as the Fourth
non, who was forced
Amendment,” it
out of the White
quotes Nunberg as
Bannon called saying, “before his
House this past
Donald
summer and has
finger is pulling
returned to his
down on his lip and
Trump Jr.
perch as head of the “treasonous” his eyes are rolling
conservative Breit­
back in his head.”
bart News website.
The book quotes an email
For months, Trump confi­ from an unnamed White
dants — from aides such as
House aide offering a harsh
Kushner, Trump lawyer Ty
assessment of Trump’s
Cobb and communications
operation: “It’s worse than
director Hope Hicks to
you can imagine. An idiot
friends such as Chris Ruddy surrounded by clowns.
and Chris Christie — have
Trump won’t read anything
tried to persuade him to cut — not one­page memos, not
ties with Bannon, who in
the brief policy papers;
recent months has worked
nothing. He gets up halfway
to back insurgent Republi­
through meetings with
cans such as failed Senate
world leaders because he is
candidate Roy Moore of
bored.”
Alabama.
The book also asserts that
Trump was infuriated at
Trump’s advisers and asso­
Bannon’s latest remarks,
ciates deride him in private,
telling senior aides and
calling him an “idiot,” a
advisers that Bannon was
“dope” or “dumb as” dirt.
“not well,” according to one Thomas Barrack, a friend
person familiar with the
and adviser to Trump, was
president’s frustrations. He quoted telling a friend that
complained that Bannon
the president is “not only
again was trying to take
crazy, he’s stupid.”
credit for his election win.
Reached by telephone
He huddled with Hicks and Wednesday, Barrack said
press secretary Sarah Huck­ this account was “totally
abee Sanders to craft
false.” Barrack added, “It’s
Wednesday’s fiery state­
clear to anyone who knows
ment after calling friends
me that those aren’t my
for much of the morning.
words and inconsistent with
Advisers also have tried to anything I’ve ever said.”
tell Trump that Bannon was
He said that Wolff never
not responsible for his win,
ran that quotation by him to
that Bannon leaks damag­
ask if it was accurate.
ing information to the news
A longtime media colum­
media, that he says things
nist and author, Wolff
about the president that are brings a high profile and
not true and that Bannon is years of experience but
more interested in Bannon
sometimes mixed reviews to
than Trump.
the task of chronicling
Bannon has few close
Trump’s White House.
allies inside the White
Interview subjects have
House. Stephen Miller, the
complained in the past that
Trump adviser and hard­lin­ he took comments meant to
er on immigration, has
be off the record and used
distanced himself from
them. In a 2004 profile,
Bannon, though he was
Michelle Cottle wrote that
spotted at a recent party at
“the scenes in his columns
the Capitol Hill town house aren’t re­created so much as
known as the “Breitbart
created — springing from
embassy.”
Wolff’s imagination rather
Trump’s statement said:
than from actual knowledge
“Now that he is on his own, of events.”
Steve is learning that win­
Wolff clearly benefited
ning isn’t as easy as I make it from close cooperation from
look. Steve had very little to Bannon. According to Sand­
do with our historic victory, ers, Wolff spoke with the
which was delivered by the
president just once, for five
forgotten men and women
to seven minutes, in the first
of this country. Yet Steve
month of the administra­
had everything to do with
tion, when Trump called
the loss of a Senate seat in
Wolff to thank him for his
Alabama held for more than criticism of a New York
thirty years by Republicans. Times article that the presi­
Steve doesn’t represent my
dent did not like.
FROM A1
| News A5
A6 News |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
< Amtrak
Traffic Lab
Traffic Lab is a Seattle Times project
that digs into the region’s thorny
transportation issues, spotlights
promising approaches to easing
gridlock, and helps readers find the
best ways to get around. It is
funded with the help of community
sponsors Alaska Airlines,
CenturyLink, Kemper Development
Co., Pemco Mutual Insurance
Company, Sabey Corp., Seattle
Children’s hospital and Ste.
Michelle Wine Estates. Seattle
Times editors and reporters operate
independently of our funders and
maintain editorial control over
Traffic Lab content.
FROM A1
front of the southbound locomotive,
said his attorney, Anthony Petru, of
Oakland, California.
“He had zero experience working
on this stretch of track. He was there
solely to familiarize himself,” Petru
said in a phone interview.
After the crash, Freeman was
treated at Harborview Medical
Center, then discharged to a rehabil­
itation facility Dec. 30, for a likely
one­ to two­month stay, the attorney
said.
Petru said he expects to name
other defendants including the
Washington State Department of
Transportation, which owns and
funds the Cascades trains; Sound
Transit, which owns the 14½­mile
bypass tracks; and Talgo, maker of
the passenger railcars. It’s unlikely
that individuals would be sued,
barring some “egregious” findings,
he said.
The case seeks a yet­undisclosed
payment to include lost earnings,
medical bills, rehabilitation costs,
home care and suffering. By federal
law, Amtrak’s liability is capped at a
combined $295 million for all cases
arising from any single passenger­
rail accident. Multiple suits would
likely be consolidated under a single
judge and court.
The other case filed Wednesday is
for Pennie Cottrell, who suffered
broken ribs, a fractured clavicle and
internal injuries, said her attorney,
Michael Krzak, of Clifford Law Offic­
es in Chicago.
Lawyers filed documents in King
County Superior Court, because of
Amtrak’s regional base in Seattle.
“Pennie was in railcar #7 — the
one that was dangling off the rail”
on a bridge over I­5, said Krzak.
Krzak said his firm is working with
nine other clients, including people
on the train and people who were
injured on the freeway.
The Minnesota­based Bremseth
Law Firm is representing or talking
with several people, including train
employees, said John Hiatt, the
firm’s longtime investigator. Seattle
attorney James S. Rogers says he’s in
< Bitcoin
the crash that the company is “pro­
foundly sorry,” and that he will
strive to improve the safety culture.
Passenger trains have reverted to
a slower waterfront route through
the Tacoma Narrows, until positive
train control, which could automati­
ELLEN M. BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES
cally slow or stop a speeding train, is
Conductor Garrick Freeman was riding in the lead engine of the speeding Amtrak train that derailed,
tested and ready later in 2018.
crashed through the woods and finally came to a stop in the southbound lanes of Interstate 5 on Dec. 18.
Positive train control is repeatedly
cited in the Pennie Cottrell filing,
which asserts Amtrak “knowingly
talks with a prospective client.
advises or reminds the engineer
initially said it always looks at po­
failed to make the system operable.”
Amtrak “failed to design, build,
about track restrictions or speed
tential distraction of crew members.
The lawsuit compares the Cas­
inspect, approve, maintain, repair
changes, and therefore must be­
Since then, NTSB stated the engi­
cades derailment to a Philadelphia
and operate the tracks safely, in­
come familiar with new territory.
neer made a remark about the train crash that killed eight people in May
cluding failing to activate positive
Conductors are authorized to apply being over speed six seconds before 2015.
train control technology on the
an emergency brake.
the derailment.
In that tragedy, an experienced
track,” the Freeman case asserts.
Since the crash, Amtrak hasn’t
Freeman, the conductor learning engineer was distracted by an emer­
For example, Petru said in the
discussed specifics about training on the route, “was not a distraction,”
gency on a nearby train, lost aware­
interview that railroad workers told the new trackway, but has said its
Petru said.
ness, and continued at 106 mph into
him some training of engineers
engineers and conductors “comply
NTSB investigators have not yet
a 50 mph curve, the NTSB deter­
occurred in groups rather than
with federal requirements related to interviewed Freeman, the attorney
mined.
one­on­one, and conductors made
both certification for the roles that
said.
U.S. Transportation Secretary
their familiarization trips at night in they hold and qualifications for the
NTSB representatives have de­
Elaine Chao last week sent letters to
a rear locomotive. Those remarks
territories over which they perform
clined to answer reporters’ ques­
railroad executives, but didn’t men­
echo previous comments by Hiatt,
service. Employees are encouraged tions the past several days and
tion the Cascades crash. “It is expect­
and a Seattle Times report Dec. 23
to express safety concerns at any
couldn’t be reached late Wednes­
ed that your organization is taking
that some workers were concerned
time.”
day.
all possible measures” to install
about group trainings.
Asked for comment Wednesday, a
Crashes sometimes can be blamed positive train control by a congres­
An engineer is responsible for
spokeswoman said, “We don’t com­ on operator error, said Petru. But in sional deadline of Dec. 31, 2018, she
operating the locomotive, including ment on pending litigation.”
most cases including this one, he
wrote.
making needed speed changes and
Speculation abounds as to what
believes “a number of systems
Seattle Times reporter Hal Bernton
contributed to this report. Mike Lindblom:
stops. A conductor is responsible for happened within the Cascades 501
failed” to prevent a crash.
206­515­5631 or
the whole train, including the safety locomotive, and the National Trans­
Amtrak’s new CEO, Richard An­
mlindblom@seattletimes.com. Twitter:
of passengers. The conductor also
portation Safety Board (NTSB)
derson, said in Tacoma the day after
@mikelindblom
Oleg Tkach, a Guild Mort­
gage branch manager who
handled the loan on the
purchase, said once he had
is willing to accept them as
all the buyer’s extended
payment. In other cases, like paperwork proving the mon­
with the Tukwila home sale, ey was his — and real — he
it can be cashed out like stock treated the cryptocurrency
and converted to regular U.S. like any other investment.
cash.
“It was just like any typical
Kuo said his entire down
transaction — people cash in
payment came from profits
their 401(k)s, or stocks” or
he had made since June
other investments, Tkach
while trading cryptocurren­
said. “To me, it makes sense,
cy, which the recent college
as long as you can document
graduate puts nearly all of his the purchase of it.”
spare income into. He said he
Ponio said the offer wound
started out with a $4,500
up looking like any other bid,
investment.
with traditional U.S. cash
It took Kuo a while to get
going to all parties involved,
final approval from his mort­ just with a lot of extra paper­
gage lender — providing a
work.
paper trail of his cryptocur­
“From my side, it was actu­
rency assets proved difficult
ally really seamless,” Ponio
because the digital funds
said. “It went just as it would
don’t come with anything
with a conventional transac­
akin to a regular bank state­
tion.”
ment. But the deal wound up
Bitcoin and real estate
going relatively smoothly in
the end.
There have been scattered
The real­estate brokers on reports of homes around the
both sides of the sale and the country selling for bitcoin in
mortgage­loan officer had
recent years, including in
never dealt with a bitcoin or
California, Florida and Texas
cryptocurrency transaction
— but those transactions
before and were initially
were typically for the full cost
skeptical and confused.
of the house and didn’t in­
“(Kuo) said ‘cryptocurren­ volve a loan.
cy’ and it was just, whoosh,
A few home sellers around
right over my head,” said
the country have marketed
Nelya Calev of John L. Scott, their properties as being
who represented Kuo. “A lot
bitcoin­friendly, while a
of it was so foreign, I’d pop
Miami homeowner just listed
up awake at 2 in the morning a condo with the stipulation
and go, ‘Uh! What if this goes that it can only be bought
wrong?’ ”
with bitcoin (listing price: 33
“There was a lot of panic,” bitcoins, or about $544,000
she said. “But really, it was
at the time of the listing last
not necessary.”
month).
The main concern from the
But there haven’t been any
husband and wife selling the reported home sales with
home, who didn’t know
cryptocurrency in the Seattle
much about cryptocurrency
area. Both Windermere and
either, was whether the mon­ John L Scott, the top two
ey was actually real, said the brokerages locally, said they
seller’s broker, Allan Ponio of hadn’t heard of a bitcoin sale
Marketplace Sotheby’s Inter­ here before. The Northwest
national Realty. Calev said
Multiple Listing Service,
Ponio initially “wasn’t crazy
which catalogs sales locally,
about the whole idea.”
said the same.
“I would look at it and say,
In 2014, a professional
‘Is this real money? Is that
poker player on Orcas Island
actually in his account?’ ”
made the local news when he
Ponio said.
asked for bitcoin for his
But Ponio kept an open
house. But the home never
mind. He did extra due dili­
sold (not because of the
gence with the buyer’s loan
bitcoin request — it was too
officer at Guild Mortgage,
expensive in regular dollar
one of the few — if only —
terms, the former listing
loan companies around
agent said Tuesday).
willing to deal with crypto­
currency.
Guild Mortgage had called
Fannie Mae to confirm it
would accept bitcoin as an
asset for purposes of securing
a mortgage. It would, the
federal agency told the com­
pany, as long as there was a
full paper trail documenting
the buyer had paid for the
cryptocurrency and then sold
it back into U.S. dollars, and
used that for the down pay­
ment.
FROM A1
It’s not possible to buy a
house here entirely with
bitcoin. Even if the seller
were willing to accept crypto­
currency as payment, and
there were no real­estate
brokerages or mortgage
companies involved, govern­
ment agencies that get taxes
on home sales still need
traditional cash.
In the Tukwila sale, state
and local governments col­
lected $7,392 in taxes, the
same as if the house had sold
through traditional means.
what he’s paying for his room
in an apartment now.
Tkach, at Guild Mortgage,
said Kuo’s future cryptocur­
rency­investment choices
didn’t factor into his decision
to grant a mortgage, since
Kuo met the regular income
and debt­to­income require­
ments. How homeowners
invest is up to them, he said.
The monthly mortgage
and property taxes still need
to be paid with regular mon­
ey.
Kuo has a bold plan for the
long term. The Texas trans­
Paying off the
plant plans to keep investing
mortgage
in cryptocurrency and cash
The bitcoin market has
out once a year, hoping to
been highly volatile — with
buy a new house each year
bitcoin’s value zooming from with the profits.
less than $7,000 at the start
“I put in a lot of money but
of November to as high as
I’m well aware of the risks,
nearly $20,000 in mid­De­
and I’d be fine with losing the
cember, and back down to
majority of it, due to my age
about $15,000 this week. But and I’m still single,” Kuo said.
Kuo had already cashed out
“If I were to lose a year’s
the cryptocurrency used for
worth of profits, I’d be OK.
the down payment by the
It’s just one of the natures of
time he bid on the home, so
the game.”
the gyrations of the market
Although cryptocurrency is
didn’t affect his offer. (Kuo
only being used by a tiny
said he barely invests in bit­
share of the population, the
coin, instead mostly using
agents involved said they
other cryptocurrencies like
expect the trend to creep into
Dash, Litecoin and Augur.)
real estate more.
From the sellers’ perspec­
“Unless something chang­
tive, they were getting a fixed es with cryptocurrency, I
amount of regular cash —
believe it’s going to become
ditto for the brokerages col­
more common,” Tkach said.
lecting their commissions.
Mike Rosenberg:
mrosenberg@seattletimes.com or
That, combined with Kuo’s
206­464­2266; on Twitter
real­estate professionals
@ByRosenberg
going into overdrive to be
helpful and communicative,
helped him win the bidding
war for the house, even
though one other bid was
actually slightly higher,
Ponio said. He said it helped
Kuo’s cause that the other
bidders weren’t seen as being
as serious — it was tough to
get ahold of their loan offi­
cers and brokers.
Of course, if Kuo continues
to invest in cryptocurrency
and the market tanks, it
could affect his ability to pay
off the mortgage if his in­
come can’t make up the dif­
ference. But he has added
security against that: He’s
renting out two of the three
bedrooms in the 1,650­
square­foot house — he says
his monthly payment, after
subtracting his rental in­
come, will be a little less than
< Motel 6
after news reports that
Motel 6 workers at two
Phoenix locations provided
guest information to agents
who later arrested 20 peo­
Motel 6 violated the law
each time it gave out private ple on immigration charges.
At the time, Motel 6 said
information.
in a tweet: “This was imple­
“In September, Motel 6
mented at the local level
issued a directive to every
one of our more than 1,400 without the knowledge of
senior management. When
locations, making it clear
we became aware of it last
that they are prohibited
week, it was discontinued.”
from voluntarily providing
Ferguson said the cases in
daily guests lists to Immi­
Washington state show the
gration and Customs En­
forcement (ICE),” the com­ practice was not isolated to
the two Phoenix locations.
pany said in an emailed
“The company’s actions
statement.
“Motel 6 takes this matter were methodical. They
very seriously, and we have trained their new employ­
ees on how to do this,” Fer­
and will continue to fully
cooperate with the Office of guson said.
Motel 6 trained its new
the State Attorney General,”
employees to provide guest
the company added.
lists to agents when they
Rose Richeson, an ICE
asked for it, without requir­
spokeswoman, did not
ing the agents to show a
immediately respond to
emailed questions Wednes­ search warrant or probable
cause, the lawsuit alleged.
day.
Between 2015 and 2017,
At a Motel 6 in Everett,
four of six corporate­owned
for example, agents visited
early in the morning or late locations that provided
at night and received a daily information to the federal
agency released at least
list of all guests staying at
the location, Ferguson said. 9,150 guest names.
His office is looking into
The agents would look for
Latino­sounding names, he whether 15 other Motel 6
locations that operate as
said. The agency would
then figure out if any of the franchises divulged similar
guests were wanted in con­ private information. Five
nection with civil immigra­ locations did not disclose
such information.
tion issues, the lawsuit
The state’s lawsuit seeks
alleges.
civil penalties of up to
The Attorney General’s
$2,000 per violation.
Office began investigating
FROM A1
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
Wintry blast socks Southeast
‘BOMB CYCLONE’ FORECAST
AS STORM PROWLS NORTH
Extreme temperatures
blamed for 17 deaths
BOB SELF / THE FLORIDA TIMES­UNION VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Michael Musgrove and his daughters Abigail, 5, left, and Annabelle, 7, shoot down
a hill in their makeshift sled in Waycross, Georgia, on Wednesday.
Across the Georgia­South Carolina line
in Charleston, the weather service report­
ed 5 inches, the most snowfall in Charles­
ton since December 1989.
The weather service said the winter
storm will probably intensify into a
“bomb cyclone” that could dump more
than 8 inches of snow on the Boston area
on Thursday and at least half a foot of
snow in the New York City region.
Meteorologists have been using the
term “bomb” for storms for decades, but
the phrase went viral on social media on
Wednesday. A storm is a bomb — or bom­
bogenesis happens — when it drops 24
millibars of pressure in 24 hours. This
storm looks like it will intensify twice that
rate, said Bob Oravec, lead forecaster at
the National Weather Service’s Weather
Prediction Center.
Blizzard warnings were issued from
Rhode Island to Maine. Oravec said he
expects they could be extended as far
south as parts of New York.
“It’s sort of akin to a hurricane travel­
ing up the coast,” says Ryan Maue, a
meteorologist at the private firm Weath­
er.US.
Utilities fear fuel shortage
as deep freeze grips country
By TIFFANY HSU
The New York Times
Homeowners, businesses
and utilities across much of
the United States were keep­
ing a close watch on fuel
supplies Wednesday as a
record­setting cold snap
caused demand for heating
oil and natural gas to soar.
With heating units in
homes and commercial
buildings running furiously
to fend off the deep freeze,
power companies warned of
possible fuel shortages to
come. Many utilities turned
to coal and oil to generate
electricity as the price of
natural gas, their usual fuel
of choice, surged.
“The sustained cold is
requiring round­the­clock
usage of some of these oil­
fired generators, and some
are already running short on
fuel,” said Marcia Blomberg,
a spokeswoman for ISO New
England, which operates a
regional grid and wholesale
power markets.
Local heating­oil compa­
nies described being run
ragged trying to meet the
needs of those trying stay
warm. Rhoads Energy of
Lancaster, Pennsylvania,
said it had gotten 3,816 calls
for customer visits on Tues­
day, up from about 900 a day
in the past couple of weeks.
“Demand has just been
incredible,” said Jennifer
Goldbach, the company’s
vice president of business
development.
The Federal Motor Carrier
Safety Administration, re­
sponding to what it said was
an “anticipated home heat­
ing fuel shortage,” declared a
regional emergency for large
swaths of the country, allow­
ing commercial drivers to
work overtime delivering
propane and heating oil. And
Coast Guard ice cutters were
working to clear paths for oil
tankers and other vessels on
the Hudson River and other
frozen waterways in the
Northeast.
Households were paying
more to cope with the plung­
ing temperatures. The cost of
residential heating oil at the
end of December surged
13 percent, to $2.92 a gallon,
compared with the same
period in 2016, according to
federal data; prices in Con­
necticut and Rhode Island
exceeding $3 a gallon.
Farther south, thousands
of Duke Energy customers in
North and South Carolina
were without power for parts
of the week, according to the
utility’s online outage track­
er. The South Carolina Elec­
tric & Gas Co. appealed to
customers to scale back their
energy use as a precaution­
ary measure “as extreme cold
temperatures in the area put
a strain on the company’s
Alaska, Virgin
cancel Northeast
flights before storm
By BRIAN J. CANTWELL
Seattle Times travel &
outdoors editor
By RUSS BYNUM
The Associated Press
SAVANNAH, Ga. — A brutal winter
storm smacked the coastal Southeast
with a rare blast of snow and ice Wednes­
day, hitting parts of Florida, Georgia and
South Carolina with their heaviest snow­
fall in nearly three decades.
Forecasters warned that the same
system could soon strengthen into a
“bomb cyclone” as it rolls up the East
Coast, bringing hurricane­force winds,
coastal flooding and up to a foot of snow.
At least 17 deaths were blamed on
dangerously cold temperatures that for
days have gripped wide swaths of the
U.S. from Texas to New England.
A winter­storm warning extended from
the Gulf Coast of Florida’s “Big Bend”
region all the way up the Atlantic coast.
Forecasters said hurricane­force winds
blowing offshore on Thursday could
generate 24­foot seas.
In Savannah, snow blanketed the city’s
lush downtown squares and collected on
branches of burly oaks for the first time in
nearly eight years.
William Shaw, a Savannah native, used
baby steps to shuffle along a frozen road
from his home to the post office.
“It almost seems the town is deserted
just like in the last hurricane,” said Shaw,
65. “There’s no one on the street. It’s got a
little eerie feeling.”
Families with children flocked to For­
syth Park near the downtown historic
district for snowball fights. The National
Weather Service recorded 1.2 inches of
snow — Savannah’s first measurable
snowfall since February 2010 and the
first that exceeded an inch in 28 years.
| News A7
electricity system.”
For utilities, the shale­drill­
ing boom of recent years
made natural gas a primary
fuel for generating electrici­
ty, as prices dropped and
supplies grew. But a limited
network of pipelines and an
increase in exports has
squeezed supplies in some
parts of the country.
The roaring demand for
the natural gas this winter is
driving prices higher than the
standard seasonal bump,
analysts said. Other fossil
fuels are becoming more
attractive by comparison.
ISO New England said coal
and oil had helped generate
nearly 35 percent of the
power provided by genera­
tors in the region as of
Wednesday, with natural gas
generating 24 percent. In the
past, natural gas has typically
accounted for nearly half of
the area’s electricity, fol­
lowed by nuclear power,
hydroelectric and other
renewables; coal and oil
together were responsible for
less than 3 percent.
“The mix is changing with
this cold weather,” said Ja­
cob Kilstein, an analyst with
Argus Research, an invest­
ment research firm. “Because
natural­gas prices are rising,
coal and oil are reaching in to
take its place.”
The icy weather is taxing
oil supplies to the hilt,
Blomberg, the ISO spokes­
Seattle­based Alaska
Airlines and its partner
Virgin America canceled
76 flights for Wednes­
day and Thursday at
five Northeast airports
in advance of an expect­
ed large, powerful win­
ter storm.
As of late afternoon
Wednesday, 25 of the
two airlines’ Wednesday
flights were canceled
and 51 flights on Thurs­
day. Heavy snow and
hurricane­force winds
are forecast, especially
in New England.
The Associated Press
reported late Wednes­
day that airlines nation­
wide had already can­
celed 500 U.S. flights on
Wednesday as the storm
socked the Southeast,
and many more will be
scuttled Thursday as the
brunt of the winter
weather is expected to
hit the Northeast.
Tracking service
FlightAware.com says
more than 1,700 flights
have been canceled for
Thursday. More than
half the flights sched­
uled for Thursday at
Boston Logan Interna­
tional Airport have been
scrubbed, and so have
nearly half the flights at
New York’s LaGuardia
woman, said.
Inventories of commercial
crude oil slid in recent weeks,
falling by more than 50 mil­
lion barrels year over year in
late December, according to
federal data. When used to
generate power, crude oil is
also subject to air­emissions
caps set by environmental
regulations.
“As oil inventories are
depleted, replenishment of
these fuels will be important
Airport. Two other New
York­area airports, JFK
and Newark, were also
hit hard along with
smaller airports in the
Northeast.
As a precaution, Alas­
ka and Virgin America
canceled most of their
flights in and out of
Boston, New York Ken­
nedy, New York La­
Guardia, Newark and
Philadelphia.
Most airlines were
letting customers
change reservations
without incurring a fee,
usually up to $200 on
U.S. flights. Alaska and
Virgin America are
waiving change and
cancellation fees for
passengers who wish to
alter their plans to or
from affected airports.
(Learn more at alas­
kaair.com and virgina­
merica.com.)
If you have plans to
fly to the East Coast in
the next few days, or
plan to meet a passen­
ger scheduled to fly
from that region, check
the status of flights
before heading for the
airport.
Check online for
Seattle­Tacoma Inter­
national Airport flights:
Go to http://www.port­
seattle.org/Sea­Tac and
click on “Find flights
and airlines.”
given the uncertainty around
weather and future fuel
demands for the remaining
two months of the winter
period,” Blomberg wrote in
an email.
The price of gasoline,
which is used in generators
as well as in vehicles, rose in
41 states over the past week,
according to GasBuddy.com.
The $2.49­a­gallon price was
the highest for the start of a
new year since 2014.
BUSINESS
WEDNESDAY’S
CLOSES
Y Dow 24,922.68
Bizline
A quick look at today’s
news. For updates:
seattletimes.com
CHARLES KRUPA / AP
After seven straight
years of growth in
domestic new­vehicle
sales, manufacturers
reported a decline of
about 1.8 percent in
2017, to 17.2 million
cars and light trucks.
An even larger drop is
expected this year.
Edmunds.com predicts
16.8 million light
vehicles will be sold in
2018.
up 98.67, +0.40%
Y Nasdaq 7,065.53
Rate hikes: The Federal
Reserve has entered 2018
without a clear plan for
raising its benchmark
interest rate and with the
added uncertainty of an
imminent change in its
leadership. An account of
the Fed’s final meeting of
2017, which the central
bank published Wednes­
day, said that officials
generally agreed that the
Fed should continue to
raise its benchmark inter­
est rate in the new year.
But the frequency of
future hikes remains a
question, with a range of
views among officials
Roku voice assistant:
Roku, which makes devic­
es for streaming internet
video on television sets,
said it plans to develop a
voice assistant and let
manufacturers create
Roku­connected speakers,
stepping up its competi­
tion with Apple, Google
and Amazon.com. Owners
of Roku TVs and players
will get the voice­powered
Roku Entertainment Assis­
tant free in a fall software
update, the company
said. The assistant will
enable users to use voice
commands to play music,
TV shows and movies on
voice­supported Roku
devices.
Compiled from Seattle Times
news services
Y Russell 3000 1,605.18 Z 10-year Treasury
up 9.32, +0.58%
2.44% yield, -0.02
Currencies C$1.2534=$1
112.52 yen=$1 1 euro=$1.2018
Intel, Microsoft join in scramble
to fix massive chip design flaw
PATCHING
SECURITY HOLE
Google find
underscores
potential
damage from
vulnerabilities
in hardware
By IAN KING
Bloomberg News
The world’s biggest chipmakers and
software companies, including Intel and
Microsoft, are coming to grips with a
chip vulnerability that leaves vast num­
bers of computers and smartphones
susceptible to hacking and performance
slowdowns.
Google researchers recently discov­
ered that a feature, present in almost all
of the billions of processors that run
computers and phones around the
world, could give cyberattackers unau­
thorized access to sensitive data — and
whose remedy could drag down device
performance.
News of the weakness, found last year
and reported Tuesday by The Register
technology blog, weighed on shares of
Intel, the biggest semiconductor maker,
while boosting rivals including Ad­
vanced Micro Devices (AMD). Intel’s
silence on the issue for most of Wednes­
day added to investors’ unease.
Late in the day, Intel, Microsoft,
Google and other tech bellwethers is­
sued statements aimed at reassuring
customers and shareholders.
Intel said its chips weren’t the only
ones affected and predicted no material
effect on its business, while Microsoft,
the largest software maker, said it re­
leased a security update to protect users
of devices running Intel and other chips.
Google, which said the issue affects
Intel, AMD and ARM Holdings chips,
noted that it updated most of its systems
and products with protections from
attack. Amazon.com, whose AWS is
No. 1 in cloud computing, said most of
its affected servers have already been
secured.
Hackers for decades have exploited
security holes in software — for exam­
ple, by inducing careless, unsuspecting
users to open attachments that unleash
See > INTEL, A10
Boeing
talks
address
worries
As beer sales slump, a new tack
Tesla delay: Tesla pushed
back a production target
for its Model 3 again and
shipped fewer of the
sedans than expected,
setting back CEO Elon
Musk’s goal to mass­man­
ufacture electric cars. The
electric­vehicle maker
now expects to assemble
5,000 Model 3s a week by
the end of June, delaying
plans to reach that mile­
stone by another three
months. Tesla delivered
1,550 Model 3s in the final
three months of the year,
trailing analysts’ average
estimate for about 2,900
units. Tesla has been
spending more than
$1 billion in cash a quarter
as it’s had trouble scaling
up Model 3 output.
Spotify listing: The
streaming­music giant
Spotify filed a confidential
registration with the
Securities and Exchange
Commission in late De­
cember, with the inten­
tion of listing its shares on
the New York Stock Ex­
change in the first quar­
ter, according to two
people briefed on the
company’s plans. As
expected, Spotify will
pursue a direct listing of
its shares, an unusual
process in which no new
stock is issued — and
therefore no money is
raised — but existing
investors and insiders can
trade their shares on the
open market. Such a
listing would bypass the
bureaucracy of a standard
initial public offering,
saving the company time
and potentially millions in
underwriting fees.
up 58.63, +0.84%
seattletimes.com/business | JANUARY 4, 2018 | A8
EMBRAER OF BRAZIL
Brazilian government
seeks safeguards of
firm’s military unit
By FABIOLA MOURA,
SAMY ADGHIRNI
AND RICHARD CLOUGH
Bloomberg News
LUKE SHARRETT / BLOOMBERG
Bottles of beer move along a conveyor belt at the Anheuser­Busch InBev NV Budweiser bottling facility in
St. Louis, Missouri. Rather than buying craft­beer producers, AB InBev is buying data on beer instead.
Major brewery sees future
in tracking beer trends
A B I N B E V | The company sees growth in figuring out what customers look for, what influences their
thinking, and how it can get products more easily into the hands of people who might want beer.
By FRITZ HAHN
The Washington Post
Anheuser­Busch InBev is the
biggest brewing company in the
world, but it has a problem it can’t
shake.
While Bud Light accounts for at
least 1 out of every 6 beers sold in
America, sales of its flagship beers
have been slumping: between 2010
and 2016, the value of Budweiser
sales fell 17 percent and Bud Light
sales slipped 14 percent, according
to alcohol­market analyst IWSR.
Through most of that period, craft­
beer sales grew at a double­digit
clip.
Back in 2011, when there were
half as many American breweries as
there are now, AB InBev responded
to surging craft­beer popularity by
purchasing Chicago’s Goose Island
for $38.8 million. In the process, it
loudly announced a new strategy:
“If you can’t beat ’em, buy ’em.” Six
years and one $100 billion merger
with SABMiller later, AB InBev
controls nine more formerly inde­
pendent craft breweries, from Seat­
tle’s Elysian to Virginia’s Devils
Backbone.
But as sales of hoppy IPAs contin­
ue to surge, and sales of Light (and
Lite) macrobrews continue to drop,
AB InBev is recalibrating its ap­
proach. Rather than buying up as
many craft­beer producers as it can,
it’s using its vast resources to buy
data — tons of it — through a little­
known division called ZX Ventures.
Launched in 2015, ZX Ventures is
charged with “disrupting” the beer
industry by developing and invest­
ing in businesses that will provide
value and improve user experienc­
es — and make more money for AB
InBev — somewhere down the
road. They’ve invested in e­com­
merce delivery systems, beer­rating
applications and home­brew sup­
pliers, all of which provide data
points that can tell them about
trends and help them get ahead of
the market.
Over the years, as AB InBev ab­
sorbed Elysian, Devils Backbone
See > BEER, A9
WISErg raises $19M in funding
FOOD­WASTE MANAGEMENT
Redmond company plans
to use money to expand
into Southern California
By MATT DAY
Seattle Times technology reporter
WISErg, a Redmond company
that makes fertilizer from food
waste, has raised $19.2 million
from investors, cash aimed in part
at building a production facility in
Southern California.
The company, founded in 2009
by former Microsoft employees
Larry LaSueur and Jose Lugo, uses
a proprietary machine it calls the
Harvester to stabilize the nutrients
in food scraps before they are
collected and processed into fertil­
izer for crops at the company’s
Redmond plant. WISErg then sells
the fertilizer to distributors that
sell goods to organic farmers.
The latest fundraising round
ELLEN BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES, 20912
An employee at PCC Natural Markets in Issaquah dumps renderings
into the WISErg Harvester that makes food scraps into fertilizer.
was led by Seattle investment
manager Laird Norton and includ­
ed contributions from Second
Avenue Partners. Both firms had
previously invested in WISErg.
The round brings the company’s
total investment haul to
$56.6 million, Chief Financial
Officer Terri Fujinaga said.
Fujinaga said the latest cash is
aimed at funding the construction
of a second production facility
somewhere in Southern California
See > WISERG, A9
Boeing is seeking control
of Embraer of Brazil while
offering the Brazilian gov­
ernment safeguards concern­
ing the company’s defense
unit, people familiar with the
matter said.
The U.S. plane maker is
arguing that deals it has
made in Australia and the
U.K. show that it can operate
defense businesses without
compromising military
plans, said the people, who
asked not to be named be­
cause the talks are private.
Brazil, which signaled oppo­
sition to an acquisition last
month, is now suggesting it
has some flexibility on the
control issue, the people
said.
Representatives from both
companies and Brazil’s gov­
ernment are exploring de­
fense protections that would
still give Boeing full access to
Embraer’s product lineup.
Boeing is also pledging to
retain the Embraer brand
while enlisting the Brazilian
company’s engineers on
programs such as the poten­
See > BOEING, A9
Cost of gene
therapy for
blindness
set at $850K
By MATTHEW PERRONE
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — A first­
of­its kind genetic treatment
for blindness will cost
$850,000 per patient, mak­
ing it one of the most expen­
sive medicines in the world
and raising questions about
the affordability of a coming
wave of similar gene­target­
ing therapies.
The injectable treatment
from Spark Therapeutics can
improve the eyesight of pa­
tients with a rare genetic
mutation that affects just a
few thousand people in the
United States. Previously
there has been no treatment
for the condition, which
eventually causes complete
blindness by adulthood.
Pricing questions have
swirled around the treatment
because of a number of un­
usual factors — it is intended
to be a one­time treatment, it
treats a very small number of
REACH THE EDITORS | Rami Grunbaum, Editor 206­464­8541 rgrunbaum@seattletimes.com | Suzanne LaViolette, Business News 206­464­2589 slaviolette@seattletimes.com
See > GENE, A10
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
Petrobras pays $3B to end suit
Bloomberg News
Brazil’s state­run energy
explorer Petrobras agreed
to pay $2.95 billion to
compensate U.S. investors
who lost money when a
massive corruption scandal
eroded the oil giant’s mar­
ket value.
The settlement will end a
three­year legal battle with
holders of Petrobras’ Amer­
ican depositary receipts
< Boeing
FROM A8
tial development of a jetlin­
er known as the “new mid­
market airplane,” said the
people.
The government has no
problem selling the Brazil­
ian state’s stake in Embraer
but is unwilling to give up
its “golden share,” said a
presidential aide who is
familiar with the talks. The
golden share gives the
government veto power
over a change in control at
Embraer as well as major
strategic decisions about
the company’s defense
operations.
Embraer’s American
depositary receipts climbed
4.1 percent Wednesday,
giving the company a mar­
ket value of $4.9 billion.
BNDESpar, the Brazilian
state development bank’s
investment arm, is among
Embraer’s largest share­
holders, with a 5.4 percent
stake, according to the
company’s website.
Other investors include
state­controlled banks
Banco do Brasil and Caixa
< WISErg
FROM A8
and bonds who filed law­
suits claiming large losses
after Brazilian prosecutors
exposed a wide­ranging
money­laundering and
kickback scheme involving
the company in 2014.
The accord represents
the largest U.S. class­action
settlement in a decade, ac­
cording to law firm Pomer­
antz, lead counsel for the
plaintiffs.
later this year.
WISErg’s Harvester is a
giant, refrigerator­looking
device paired with a larger
conversion tank. The com­
pany gets its raw materials
primarily from grocers.
Thirteen Harvester units are
in the Northwest at grocery
stores like Whole Foods and
PCC.
In California, the compa­
ny has parked a larger mod­
el Harvester at an industrial
site. The planned plant
nearby, Fujinaga said, will
“allow us to reach more
customers in a cost­effective
way. We’re excited.”
She said WISErg had
recently signed a deal with
Vivid Life Sciences to dis­
tribute its fertilizer east of
the Rockies.
The company in late 2016
made a CEO change. Co­
founder LaSueur was re­
placed by Brian Valentine,
an investor in the company
who previously held execu­
tive roles at Microsoft and
Amazon.
WISErg also had a large
round of layoffs in the sec­
ond half of 2016. The com­
pany currently employs 40
people, down from almost
100 in summer 2016. Before
the cutbacks, WISErg had
planned plants in Oregon
and California that year.
“The company, like a lot
of startups, got out ahead of
its skis with an aggressive
sales forecast that didn’t
come to pass,” Fujinaga said
of the cuts. “We right­sized
it.”
Economica Federal, accord­
ing to data compiled by
Bloomberg.
Boeing and Embraer are
pushing for an agreement
with the Brazilian govern­
ment soon since there’s a
risk that political opposi­
tion would mount before
the South American coun­
try’s presidential election
later this year, the people
said.
Boeing also wants to get
Embraer engineers started
as soon as possible on the
project to develop the new
aircraft.
A deal would give Boeing
an aircraft offering in the
100­seat category to coun­
ter a new threat from Air­
bus, which agreed in Octo­
ber to take control of Bom­
bardier’s CSeries program.
The Canadian jet, which
competes with Embraer’s
largest commercial planes, is
the target ofa U.S. trade
complaint brought by Boeing.
Boeing and Embraer
declined to comment. Bra­
zil’s Defense Ministry didn’t
immediately respond to a
request for comment.
Matt Day: 206­464­2420 or
mday@seattletimes.com; on
Twitter: @mattmday.
With assistance from Simone
Iglesias
DEAN RUTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES
Bill Mitchell is CEO of Seattle­based PicoBrew, which developed a home­brewing system.
A division of AB InBev, ZX Ventures, purchased a minority stake in PicoBrew in 2016.
< Beer
style or mimic the recipe of
an existing brand.
In October 2016, ZX Ven­
tures purchased a minority
and North Carolina’s Wicked interest in RateBeer, a 17­
year­old international beer­
Weed, the backlash to the
rating site that has grown to
announcement has become
formulaic: The craft brewery become one of the largest
online databases of crowd­
announces that nothing will
change despite the new own­ sourced beer, brewery and
bar rankings in the world.
ership. Fans get angry, call
But neither RateBeer nor ZX
the owners traitors and sell­
outs, and swear they’ll never Ventures publicized the deal
until June 2017, when beer
drink the beer again.
website Good Beer Hunting
But as a result of AB In­
published a story about the
Bev’s 2016 merger with
move. ZX Ventures did not
SABMiller, snapping up
respond to requests for com­
small brewers has become
ment for this article.
harder. The U.S. Justice
Although some beer lovers
Department’s settlement
bars AB InBev from acquiring feared that AB InBev would
try to goose its notoriously
any craft brewer “without
bad ratings on the site, what
allowing for department
seems more likely is that the
review of the acquisition’s
ZX Ventures team is interest­
likely competitive effects.”
ed in access to a large num­
So where are the growth
opportunities? That’s where ber of data points: The most
popular and trending beers,
ZX Ventures comes in. Ac­
styles and search terms in
cording to its mission state­
any region around the world.
ment, “ZX Ventures is hope­
Are more people giving
lessly dedicated to creating
high ratings to saisons in
and analyzing the data nec­
London than Los Angeles?
essary for determining our
ideal strategies, products and What are the most highly
technologies. We believe that rated beer bars in the South­
the more we know and learn east? Which beer styles have
grown the most in the past
about our consumers and
year, in terms of average
products, the better chance
we have of anticipating their ratings or the number of
searches, and where?
needs in the future.”
If certain cities are rating
Translation: They want to
sour beers higher than the
know everything about pur­
norm, for example, Elysian’s
chasing patterns and deci­
sour pineapple seasonal or a
sions. What are customers
new wild saison from Wicked
looking for? What are influ­
Weed could be given extra
encers thinking? How can
they make it easier to get AB promotional play in those
markets.
InBev’s products into the
For a look at the future,
hands of people who might
where e­commerce meets
want beer?
ZX Ventures’ broad portfo­ data wholly within an AB
InBev ecosystem, turn to
lio includes the purchase in
Brazil, AB InBev’s second­
2016 of Northern Brewer
Homebrew Supply and Mid­ largest market after the Unit­
ed States. After a long day on
west Supplies, two of the
the beach, a thirsty Brazilian
largest home­brewing busi­
nesses in the country. Also at can fire up Ze, a service that
promises one­hour beer
the end of 2016 it bought a
small minority stake in Seat­ delivery in 10 major cities,
including Rio de Janeiro. (ZX
tle­based PicoBrew, which
is also an investor in Starship
developed a countertop
Technologies robotic deliv­
home­brewing system that
uses Keurig­like “PicoPacks” ery service.) When the bot­
tles are empty, the drinker
to make beer in a certain
FROM A8
can go to an app called Be­
Hoppy, which helps find, log
and rate craft beers, similar
to the popular American app
Untappd. It can even display
information about a beer if
the user takes a picture of the
label.
RateBeer could help to
create a similar experience in
Europe, where ZX Ventures
has acquired Beer Hawk, a
UK­based online craft­beer
retailer, and Saveur Biere,
the leading French online
craft shop. Both increasingly
sell AB InBev products, but
also offer the AB InBev re­
searchers plenty of data to
consider.
Unfortunately for ZX Ven­
tures, most of these foreign
business models are unlikely
to take hold in the United
States. Marc Sorini, a veteran
lawyer who heads the Alco­
hol Regulatory & Distribu­
tion Group at McDermott
Will & Emery, an internation­
al law firm in D.C., says it’s
due to the three­tier system
of alcohol in this country,
which separates breweries
from means of distribution
and consumer sales to pre­
vent monopolies.
“Under ‘tied­house’ and
related laws in place in al­
most all U.S. jurisdictions,
ABI could not own an off­
premise retainer — online or
otherwise,” Sorini wrote in
an email. “While some specif­
ic exemptions to the tied­
house laws exist in almost
every state, existing laws in
many states would prohibit
ABI — either directly or indi­
rectly — holding an owner­
ship interest in an off­prem­
ise retailer capable of deliver­
ing beer to consumers.”
If e­commerce is off the
table, then the most important
way for AB InBev to make
money in an increasingly
crowded marketplace is to get
the right beer in front of the
right customers at the right
time. And right now, the
world’s biggest brewer is
tapping into a steady flow of
data that can help it do just
that.
| Business A9
A10 Business |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
Money & Markets
2,720
2,680
2,640
< Gene
FROM A8
S&P 500
7,080
Nasdaq composite
Close: 2,713.06
Change: 17.25 (0.6%)
6,980
Close: 7,065.53
Change: 58.63 (0.8%)
6,880
10 DAYS
2,720
7,200
2,640
6,900
2,560
6,600
2,480
6,300
2,400
J
A
S
O
Major indexes
Dow Jones
LAST % CHG
30 industrial
20 transp.
15 utilities
24,922.68
10,820.74
706.52
+.40
+.10
-1.29
Standard & Poor's LAST % CHG
500 Stocks
400 Mid-cap
600 Small-cap
2713.06
1923.36
943.24
NYSE
+.64
+.31
+.03
LAST % CHG
US 100
Energy
Financial
Healthcare
10,461.42
11,839.45
8,275.96
14,465.59
Nasdaq
+.51
+1.36
+.33
+.71
LAST % CHG
Industrials
Financial
Nasd Global Sel
Nasd Global Mkt
5,627.85
7,988.47
3,319.05
2,092.56
Other indexes
Wilshire 5000
Russell 1000
Russell 2000
Russell 3000
+.77
+.39
+.84
+.80
LAST % CHG
28,181.10
1,503.16
1,552.58
1,605.18
+.68
+.62
+.17
+.58
Foreign markets LAST % CHG
Frankfurt
London
Hong Kong
Mexico
Tokyo
Seoul
Singapore
Taipei
Toronto
12,978.21
7,671.11
30,560.95
49,782.23
22,764.94
2,486.35
3,464.28
10,801.57
16,371.55
+.83
+.30
+.15
-.50
-.08
+.27
+.99
+.85
+.38
NYSE
Volume
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
3,379,746,663
2,037,923,851
1,267,152,457
74,670,355
Gainers
LAST
Renren rs
SCANA
BlackBerry
KeyEngy
SpectrmB
HRG Grp
Netshoes n
ShakeShk n
ENSCO
CarboCer
18.32
47.65
13.53
13.63
118.94
17.92
9.34
47.08
6.61
11.19
CHG % CHG
+5.89
+8.78
+1.51
+1.27
+9.58
+1.34
+.70
+3.40
+.44
+.71
+47.4
+22.6
+12.6
+10.3
+8.8
+8.1
+8.1
+7.8
+7.1
+6.8
Losers
LAST
CHG % CHG
InnovInd n
SturmRug
VistaOutd n
CatoCp
Coeur
CinciBell rs
AtHomGr n
PimStPls
HamBchBr
Matson
32.08
52.85
14.08
15.27
7.51
20.10
30.07
14.93
24.93
29.45
-4.49 -12.3
-4.15 -7.3
-1.02 -6.8
-.96 -5.9
-.46 -5.8
-1.05 -5.0
-1.57 -5.0
-.75 -4.8
-1.22 -4.7
-1.40 -4.5
Most
active
VOLUME
(IN 00S)
GenElec
BkofAm
AT&T Inc
FordM
Oracle
BlackBerry
ValeantPh
AK Steel
Petrobras
FrptMcM
790613
541054
376430
265476
233533
225135
216817
214253
207449
202571
LAST % CHG
18.15
29.80
37.65
12.76
47.71
13.53
23.01
6.34
10.97
19.47
+.9
-.3
-2.3
+.8
+2.3
+12.6
+5.6
+1.6
+2.5
-1.5
Nasdaq
Volume
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
2,038,963,591
1,312,344,655
660,188,424
66,430,512
Gainers
LAST
CHG % CHG
CoherusBio
IntlnkEl n
InsysTher s
KrystlBio n
UrogenP n
Boxlight n
FutFintch lf
CallularBio
AdestoTc n
ArenaPh rs
11.40
6.17
13.38
10.61
44.58
5.74
5.00
14.30
7.10
40.17
+1.85
+.85
+1.85
+1.43
+5.94
+.73
+.63
+1.80
+.70
+3.96
+19.4
+16.0
+16.0
+15.6
+15.4
+14.6
+14.4
+14.4
+10.9
+10.9
Losers
LAST
CHG % CHG
AquaB Tc n
RiotBlck
LexnFint n
TechComm
Redfin n
AmOutBr
MoneyGrm
AndinaA un
NetElem rs
Resonant
6.82
24.36
15.39
8.25
28.20
12.14
12.11
14.00
12.61
7.07
-2.07
-3.54
-1.90
-.95
-2.87
-1.21
-1.20
-1.36
-1.22
-.67
Most
active
VOLUME
(IN 00S)
AMD
Intel
MicronT
SiriusXM
Apple Inc
Cisco
Microsoft
Nvidia
Comcast s
Facebook
1268685
1102714
405239
284400
278657
256248
223449
219540
197384
158105
-23.3
-12.7
-11.0
-10.3
-9.2
-9.1
-9.0
-8.9
-8.8
-8.7
LAST % CHG
11.55
45.26
44.98
5.21
172.23
39.17
86.35
212.47
40.41
184.67
+5.2
-3.4
+3.0
...
...
+.8
+.5
+6.6
-1.6
+1.8
Northwest stocks
Gainers
Marchex
KeyTech
ElectroSci
Cray
Intellicheck
AlderBio
Impinj
Expedia
MicronT
Losers
LAST
3.44
19.25
22.67
25.20
2.63
12.90
24.34
125.17
44.98
LAST
Redfin
28.20
ClearSign
3.35
CUI Global
2.75
ImmuneDes 3.95
HeclaMin
4.09
PetIQ
21.49
Funko Inc
6.42
AptevoTher
4.65
CraftBrew
18.95
Most
active
CHG % CHG
+.20
+.95
+.93
+1.00
+.10
+.50
+.78
+3.75
+1.31
+6.2
+5.2
+4.3
+4.1
+4.0
+4.0
+3.3
+3.1
+3.0
CHG % CHG
-2.87
-.15
-.11
-.15
-.15
-.63
-.17
-.10
-.40
-9.2
-4.3
-3.8
-3.7
-3.5
-2.8
-2.6
-2.1
-2.1
VOLUME
(IN 00S) LAST % CHG
MicronT
405239 44.98
Microsoft 223449 86.35
Starbucks
73171 58.71
Nike
55247 63.46
HeclaMin
51140 4.09
Costco
31263 190.58
Amazon
301301204.20
Boeing
29338 297.80
Weyerhaeus 27349 35.61
+3.0
+.5
+1.9
...
-3.5
+1.2
+1.3
+.3
+.9
N
10 DAYS
6,000
D
J
A
S
O
N
D
Northwest Stocks
Prices for most active publicly held companies in Washington, Oregon
and Idaho. Footnote definitions: http://markets.ap.org/footnotes.htm
COMPANY
52-WEEK
RANGE
LOW
TICKER
Achieve Life Sci
ACHV
Alaska Air
ALK
AlderBio
ALDR
Alpine Immune Sci ALPN
Amazon
AMZN
AnchorBanc
ANCB
Apptio
APTI
AptevoTher
APVO
Avista
AVA
Banner Corp
BANR
BarrettBus
BBSI
Boeing
BA
BoiseCascad
BCC
Bsquare
BSQR
CTI BioPharm
CTIC
CUI Global
CUI
CascadianTher
CASC
ClearSign
CLIR
Clearwater
CLW
ColumbBank
COLB
ColumbSport
COLM
Costco
COST
CraftBrew
BREW
Cray
CRAY
Data IO
DAIO
Digimarc
DMRC
ElectroSci
ESIO
eMagin
EMAN
Esterline
ESL
Expedia
EXPE
Expeditors
EXPD
F5 Networks
FFIV
FLIR Sys
FLIR
FS Bancorp
FSBW
FirstFinNW
FFNW
Fortive
FTV
Funko Inc
FNKO
Greenbrier
GBX
HeclaMin
HL
HeritageFin
HFWA
HomeStreet
HMST
Idacorp
IDA
ImmuneDes
IMDZ
Impinj
PI
Intellicheck
IDN
IsoRay
ISR
Itron
ITRI
JewettCam
JCTCF
JunoThera
JUNO
KeyTech
KTEC
KeyTronic
KTCC
Lattice
LSCC
LithiaMot
LAD
Marchex
MCHX
MicronT
MU
Microsoft
MSFT
Microvision
MVIS
NanoString
NSTG
Nautilus
NLS
Nike
NKE
Nordstrom
JWN
NWNatGas
NWN
NWPipe
NWPX
Omeros
OMER
Paccar
PCAR
PapaMurph
FRSH
PetIQ
PETQ
PhaseRx
PZRX
PopeResourc
POPE
PortlandGen
POR
Potlatch
PCH
RadiSys
RSYS
RadiantLog
RLGT
RealNetwork
RNWK
RedLionH
RLH
Redfin
RDFN
RiverviewB
RVSB
Schmitt
SMIT
Schnitzer
SCHN
SeattleGen
SGEN
SoundFinan
SFBC
Starbucks
SBUX
T-MobileUS
TMUS
Tableau
DATA
TimberlandB
TSBK
TrueBlue
TBI
Trupanion
TRUP
USEcology
ECOL
USGeothermal
HTM
Umpqua
UMPQ
WashFed
WAFD
Weyerhaeus
WY
WillametteV
WVVI
Zillow
ZG
Zumiez
ZUMZ
1.15
61.10
8.60
2.05
747.70
23.70
10.77
1.15
37.78
51.61
44.52
156.67
22.63
4.10
2.45
2.44
3.18
1.75
42.20
35.67
51.56
150.00
12.00
16.10
4.01
24.20
5.80
1.55
68.30
111.88
51.57
114.63
33.75
34.10
14.83
53.26
5.81
40.45
3.43
22.50
24.00
77.49
3.50
19.97
1.80
0.38
57.80
10.80
18.90
11.08
6.69
5.05
80.88
2.50
21.49
61.95
1.15
7.03
12.25
50.35
37.79
56.54
12.41
8.71
61.93
3.50
17.03
0.36
64.95
42.41
39.05
0.63
3.39
3.25
6.15
19.29
6.46
1.48
17.50
45.31
27.15
52.58
54.60
43.83
20.00
19.30
13.71
44.50
3.11
16.65
29.80
29.88
7.35
32.63
11.43
LAST
NET
CHG
%
CHG
1 10.18
1.41
4 101.43
74.66
3 25.45
12.90
9 12.87
11.21
01213.41 1204.20
4 27.45
24.84
0 25.49
24.04
0
4.82
4.65
9 52.83
51.30
4 62.75
54.98
8 69.32
62.99
0 299.33 297.80
0 40.95
39.35
2
6.35
4.50
1
6.48
2.72
1
6.90
2.75
4
5.24
3.87
6
4.70
3.35
2 66.68
46.15
7 48.06
43.60
0 73.59
71.96
9 195.35 190.58
9 20.10
18.95
9 26.65
25.20
7 16.49
12.29
7 41.75
35.80
8 27.72
22.67
1
3.00
1.65
3 102.70
75.65
3 161.00 125.17
0 66.25
65.07
6 149.50 134.04
0 48.43
47.48
9 58.00
54.11
2 21.29
15.74
9 75.69
72.42
2
9.90
6.42
0 54.45
53.10
2
6.78
4.09
8 33.25
30.45
6 32.50
28.45
6 100.04
88.98
1 13.05
3.95
2 60.85
24.34
4
4.55
2.63
1
0.69
.40
6 79.95
70.15
7 17.90
15.35
7 63.45
48.09
8 21.61
19.25
2
8.20
6.87
4
7.55
6.02
9 123.50 116.72
8
3.75
3.44
9 49.89
44.98
0 87.50
86.35
3
3.25
1.64
1 23.25
7.81
2 19.80
13.30
9 65.19
63.46
9 50.32
48.65
2 69.50
58.30
8 21.11
19.34
7 27.09
19.76
9 75.68
73.91
7
6.80
5.63
4 28.23
21.49
1
1.95
.39
4 79.50
70.10
3 50.11
44.55
8 56.35
51.75
1
5.26
1.04
5
6.65
4.70
1
5.45
3.38
9 10.10
9.65
7 33.49
28.20
7
9.54
8.60
5
4.47
2.73
0 35.20
34.70
5 71.32
56.61
9 34.75
33.68
5 64.87
58.71
7 68.88
63.61
8 82.32
71.61
6 32.10
26.40
8 29.50
27.10
9 33.00
29.63
6 55.75
50.85
2
4.94
3.39
7 22.86
20.81
7 35.90
34.05
9 36.92
35.61
6
8.86
8.16
6 50.91
42.73
8 23.10
20.50
-.03
-.35
+.50
-.10
+15.19
+.09
+.17
-.10
-.20
-.19
-.67
+.96
+.60
...
+.02
-.11
...
-.15
-.05
+.16
-1.08
+2.26
-.40
+1.00
+.19
+.30
+.93
...
-.15
+3.75
+.09
+1.46
+.37
-.47
+.36
+.04
-.17
-.85
-.15
+.15
-.40
-.86
-.15
+.78
+.10
-.01
+.85
+.10
+.74
+.95
-.02
+.12
+1.69
+.20
+1.31
+.40
...
+.01
-.05
-.03
-.47
-.50
+.10
-.40
+.89
-.10
-.63
-.01
+.10
-.33
+1.15
+.05
+.04
...
-.15
-2.87
+.15
+.04
-.30
+.48
+.38
+1.08
-.43
+1.40
-.08
-.25
+.69
-.15
-.02
-.01
-.20
+.31
-.09
+.43
+.50
-1.9
-0.5
+4.0
-0.9
+1.3
+0.4
+0.7
-2.1
-0.4
-0.3
-1.1
+0.3
+1.5
...
+0.7
-3.8
...
-4.3
-0.1
+0.4
-1.5
+1.2
-2.1
+4.1
+1.6
+0.8
+4.3
...
-0.2
+3.1
+0.1
+1.1
+0.8
-0.9
+2.3
+0.1
-2.6
-1.6
-3.5
+0.5
-1.4
-1.0
-3.7
+3.3
+4.0
-2.2
+1.2
+0.7
+1.6
+5.2
-0.2
+2.0
+1.5
+6.2
+3.0
+0.5
...
+0.1
-0.4
...
-1.0
-0.9
+0.5
-2.0
+1.2
-1.7
-2.8
-2.2
+0.1
-0.7
+2.3
+4.8
+0.9
...
-1.5
-9.2
+1.8
+1.5
-0.9
+0.9
+1.1
+1.9
-0.7
+2.0
-0.3
-0.9
+2.4
-0.3
-0.6
...
-0.6
+0.9
-1.1
+1.0
+2.5
HIGH
Mutual funds
15 largest stock funds
Fund indexes
LAST 4-WK YTD
NAV %RTN % RTN
FUND
Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl
250.47
Vanguard TtlSMIdxAdmrl
67.67
Vanguard InsIdxIns
247.06
Vanguard TtlSMIdxInv
67.64
Vanguard TtInSIdxInv
18.53
Vanguard TtlSMIdxIns
67.68
Vanguard TtInSIdxInsPlus
123.94
Vanguard InsIdxInsPlus
247.08
Fidelity Contrafund
125.10
Vanguard WlngtnAdmrl
73.02
American Funds GrfAmrcA m
50.58
Fidelity 500IndexPrm
94.83
American Funds CptlIncBldrA m 63.08
Dodge & Cox Stk
207.48
Vanguard TtInSIdxAdmrl
30.99
+2.8
+2.7
+2.8
+2.6
+4.0
+2.7
+4.0
+2.8
+3.1
+1.8
+3.7
+2.8
+1.4
+4.0
+4.0
+1.5
+1.4
+1.5
+1.4
+1.6
+1.4
+1.5
+1.5
+2.1
+.6
+2.1
+1.5
+.4
+1.9
+1.5
TOTAL % RTN
YTD
MORNINGSTAR 1 WK
Bear Market
Interm-Term Bond
Convertibles
Divers. Pacific Asia
High Yield Muni
High Yield Bond
Large Growth
Large Value
Mid-Cap Growth
Mid-Cap Value
Small Growth
Equity Prec. Metals
Technology
Small Value
World Large Stock
-2.43
-0.02
1.15
2.42
0.34
0.51
1.71
0.82
1.38
0.87
0.89
1.42
2.59
0.42
1.40
-2.86
-0.09
1.32
1.92
0.11
0.38
2.09
1.05
1.62
0.99
1.29
0.94
3.10
0.78
1.38
Bonds/interest rates/commodities
Bond yields
Barclays USAggregate
Barclays US HY Bd
Moodys AAA Corp Idx
Barclays US Corp
Treasury yields
3-month T-bill
6-month T-bill
52-wk T-bill
2-year T-note
5-year T-note
10-year T-note
30-year T-bond
Interest rates
LAST
2.76
5.71
3.52
3.31
PVS
LAST
1.39
1.58
1.81
1.92
2.24
2.44
2.78
WK
MO
QTR
YR AGO
r
t
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
2.65
6.10
4.00
3.40
WK
MO
QTR
YR AGO
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
.52
.64
.88
1.22
1.94
2.45
3.05
LAST
NET CHG
Gold (troy oz)
$1316.20
Silver (troy oz)
$17.18
Copper (pound)
$3.24
$61.63
Oil futures, light sweet
crude (barrel)
$4.36
Wheat (bushel)
(Chicago Board of Trade)
+$2.50
+$.06
-$.02
+$1.26
2.71
5.72
3.45
3.25
PVS
1.41
1.60
1.82
1.92
2.25
2.46
2.81
RATE WK AGO
Prime rate
4.50
4.25
Discount rate
2.00
1.75
Fed funds rate 1.25-1.50 1.00-1.25
Money market acct. 0.23
0.23
(Wash avg., $10K)
Wash. mortgage
3.87
3.88
(Avg 30-yr fixed)
CHG
+0.05
-0.01
+0.07
+0.06
CHG
-0.02
-0.02
-0.01
...
-0.01
-0.02
-0.03
Commodity prices
+$.02
patients and represents a
medical breakthrough.
Previously, Spark suggest­
ed its therapy, Luxturna,
could be worth more than
$1 million. But the company
said Wednesday it decided
on the lower price after
hearing concerns from
health insurers about the
affordability of the treat­
ment.
Consternation over sky­
rocketing drug prices, espe­
cially in the United States,
has led to intense scrutiny
from patients, politicians,
insurers and hospitals.
“We wanted to balance
the value and the affordabil­
ity concerns with a responsi­
ble price that would ensure
access to patients,” CEO
Jeffrey Marrazzo told The
Associated Press.
Luxturna is still signifi­
cantly more expensive than
nearly every other medicine
on the global market, in­
cluding two other gene
therapies approved earlier
last year in the United
States.
Pharmaceutical­industry
critics said the slightly lower
cost is a distraction from the
ongoing problem of unsus­
tainable drug prices.
“The company very clev­
erly convinced everyone
that they were going to
charge a million dollars, so
now they are being credited
for being reasonable,” said
Dr. Peter Bach, director of a
policy center at Memorial
Sloan Kettering Cancer
Center in New York.
Approved last month,
Luxturna is the nation’s first
gene therapy for an inherit­
ed disease. It requires a
45­minute operation in
which a tiny needle delivers
a replacement gene to the
retina, tissue at the back of
the eye that converts light
into electric signals that
produce vision. The therapy
will cost $425,000 per injec­
tion.
The treatment is part of an
emerging field of medicine
that could produce dozens
of new gene­targeting medi­
cations in the next few
years.
Like Luxturna, these ther­
apies are generally intended
to be taken once, a fact drug
developers argue sets them
apart from traditional drugs
taken for months or years.
Even compared with other
one­time gene therapies
Luxturna is still an outlier.
Two customized gene thera­
pies for blood cancer ap­
proved last year are priced
at $373,000 and $475,000.
Many older drugs for
< Intel
BILL WEST / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, 2017
Misa Kaabali, 8, has his eyes checked at the Children's
Hospital of Philadelphia. Misa was 4 when he received
his gene­therapy treatment.
ultrarare diseases also cost
hundreds of thousands of
dollars per year and can
quickly exceed a million
dollars. For instance, a drug
from Biogen called Spinra­
za, which treats a rare neu­
romuscular disorder, costs
$750,000 for the first year’s
supply and $375,000 for
subsequent years. The drug
is intended to be taken for
life.
Drug prices are not regu­
lated in the United States, as
they are in many other coun­
tries, so drugmakers can
price their goods like any
other manufacturer. Drug­
makers have historically
offered little explanation for
the prices they charge, other
than to cite the high cost of
developing a drug and the
fact that so many drugs fail
during trials and must be
abandoned. However, some
companies have begun to
offer more detailed reason­
ing as the backlash against
drug prices has heated.
Spark Therapeutics,
based in Philadelphia, has
said that the cost for a life­
time of blindness — includ­
ing lost earnings and care­
giver wages — can easily
exceed $1 million.
Not everyone agrees with
that argument.
Even at $850,000, a pre­
liminary analysis by one
group found that the drug
would need to be priced
significantly lower to be a
good value.
The estimate by the non­
profit Institute for Clinical
and Economic Review as­
sumes the drug will main­
tain patients’ vision for 10
years. However, Spark ex­
pects the drug’s effect to be
long­lasting, if not lifelong,
though it has only tracked
patients for about four
years.
The group’s director, Dr.
Steven Pearson, said paying
for gene therapies that have
not yet shown lasting bene­
fits will be an ongoing issue.
“If the payment is going to
“
be done all at once that will
create real affordability
concerns if we don’t have
tremendous confidence
about how long the effects
of the treatment will last,”
he said.
At least one gene therapy
sold overseas already
crossed the $1 million price
threshold, a treatment for a
rare protein disorder
launched in Europe. Manu­
facturer uniQure stopped
selling the therapy last year
for lack of demand. It was
never approved in the Unit­
ed States.
Like most prescription
medicines in the United
States, most of the immedi­
ate costs of Luxturna will be
borne by insurers — not
patients — including private
plans and government pro­
grams. For patients, Spark
said it will cover all out­of­
pocket expenses needed to
obtain the medication, in­
cluding transportation to
hospitals trained to adminis­
ter the injections.
Given Luxturna’s federal
approval and strong study
results, experts say U.S.
insurers will likely cover the
drug.
Spark will try to deflect
some pricing concerns by
offering unconventional
payment plans to insurers.
Under one arrangement
with the nonprofit insurer
Harvard Pilgrim, Spark will
refund some costs if patients
don’t experience the expect­
ed improvements in vision.
The company did not dis­
close how much money
would be returned to the
insurer, which covers more
than a million people in New
England.
Spark said it is also dis­
cussing a proposal in which
insurers would pay for the
drug in installments over
several years. That idea
would apply to government
programs like Medicare and
Medicaid, which provide
health coverage to the poor
and elderly.
Intel Chief Executive
Officer Brian Krzanich told
CNBC that a researcher at
Google made Intel aware of
the issue “a couple of
viruses or other malware
months ago.”
onto a device or network.
“Our process is, if we
The weakness uncovered by providing software to help
know the process is difficult
limit potential exploits.
Google, by contrast, under­
Intel’s efforts to play down to go in and exploit, and we
scores the potential damage
the impact resulted in a war can come up with a fix, we
wreaked by vulnerabilities
think we’re better off to get
of words with AMD. Intel
in hardware.
the fix in place,” Krzanich
said it’s working with chip­
Complex components,
makers including AMD and said, explaining how the
such as microprocessors,
company responded to the
can be harder to fix and take ARM Holdings, as well as
operating­system makers to issue.
longer to design from
Google, a unit of Alpha­
develop an industrywide
scratch if flawed.
bet, identified the research­
approach to resolving the
“It’s a big one, and it’s a
er as Jann Horn. While
issue. AMD was quick to
severe one. This gives an
retort, saying, “there is near­ many of its products have
attacker capabilities that
already been protected,
bypass the common operat­ zero risk” to its processors
ing system security controls because of differences in the some customers of Android
devices, Google laptops and
way they are designed and
that we’ve relied on for 20
its cloud services still need
built.
years,” said Jeff Pollard, an
to take steps to patch securi­
The vulnerability doesn’t
analyst at Forrester Re­
ty holes, the internet giant
just affect PCs. All modern
search. “There’s big impact
said.
microprocessors, including
on both the consumer and
Microsoft on Wednesday
those that run smartphones,
enterprise.”
are built to essentially guess released a security update
Intel’s stock remained
under pressure even after its what functions they’re likely for its Windows 10 operat­
ing system and older ver­
to be asked to run next. By
statement. It closed the
sions of the product to pro­
queuing up possible execu­
regular session Wednesday
tect users of devices with
down 3.4 percent and fell an tions in advance, they’re
able to crunch data and run chips from Intel, ARM and
additional 0.9 percent in
AMD, the company said in a
software much faster.
after­hours trading.
The problem in this case is statement.
Meanwhile rival AMD’s
Late in the day, Microsoft
stock climbed 5.2 percent in that this predictive loading
the regular session and rose of instructions allows access said that the majority of
Azure cloud infrastructure
2.3 percent more in extend­ to data that’s normally cor­
has been updated with the
doned off securely, Intel
ed trading.
fix and that most customers
Vice President Stephen
“We struggle to believe
won’t see a noticeable slow­
Smith said on a conference
that Intel won’t face some
down with the update.
call.
sort of financial liability,”
“We have not received
That means, in theory,
analysts at Sanford C. Bern­
any information to indicate
that malicious code could
stein wrote in a note.
that these vulnerabilities
find a way to access infor­
Applying the operating­
had been used to attack our
mation that would other­
system upgrades designed
wise be out of reach, such as customers,” Microsoft said.
to remedy the flaw could
The fixes were originally
hamper performance, secu­ passwords.
planned for release on
“The techniques used to
rity experts said.
Jan. 9 but were rushed out
The Register reported that accelerate processors are
Wednesday after the weak­
common to the industry,”
slowdowns could be as
much as 30 percent — some­ said Ian Batten, a computer­ ness was made public, ac­
cording to a person familiar
thing Intel said would occur science lecturer at the Uni­
versity of Birmingham in the with the situation.
only in extremely unusual
Apple didn’t respond to
U.K. who specializes in
circumstances.
requests for comment about
Computer slowdowns will computer security.
how the chip issue may be
The fix being proposed
vary based on the task being
performed and for the aver­ will definitely result in slow­ affecting the company’s
operating systems.
er operating times, but re­
age user “should not be
With assistance from Dina Bass,
ports of slowdowns of 25 to
significant and will be miti­
Alex Webb, Jeremy Kahn, Mark
gated over time,” Intel said, 30 percent are “worst­case”
Bergen and Spencer Soper
scenarios, he said.
adding that it has begun
FROM A8
It’s a big one, and it’s
a severe one.”
JEFF POLLARD
Forrester Research analyst
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
| News A11
OPINION
Last year was no ‘yawner’
AN INDEPENDENT, LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER
Founded Aug. 10, 1896
FRANK A. BLETHEN
Leonard Pitts Jr.
publisher
ALAN FISCO
president and chief financial officer
DON SHELTON
executive editor
MICHELE MATASSA FLORES
managing editor
KATE RILEY
editorial page editor
RYAN BLETHEN
associate publisher
EDITORIALS
The newspaper’s view
PASS WASHINGTON
VOTING RIGHTS ACT NOW
C
ivil­rights groups should not have to file lawsuits to ensure
elected city governments reflect the diversity of their
neighborhoods.
Yet that remains the reality
making the change, Yakima
in many places throughout
elected its first three Latina
Washington state, due to a
council members in 2015. Last
state law that bars most cities
year, Pasco voters had more
and towns from electing coun­ Latino council candidates to
cil members by geographic
consider than ever before,
district. In the extreme, this
adding two to the council in
prohibition can lead to all
the fall.
members of a city council com­
While Yakima fought the
ing from a single well­connect­ ACLU lawsuit — racking up
ed neighborhood. At times, the legal fees of $3 million — Pas­
law has made it difficult for
co welcomed the legal chal­
people of
lenge, see­
color —
ing it as a
including
much­
concentrat­
needed
ed commu­
opportuni­
nities of
ty to
immigrants
change its
who have
election
become
system.
citizens —
But there
GABRIEL CAMPANARIO /
THE SEATTLE TIMES
to elect
should be
candidates
an easier
of their choice.
way for cities to voluntarily
Lawmakers can finally solve move to electing council mem­
this problem by enacting the
bers by district, without the
Washington Voting Rights Act, cost and delay of a federal
a bill that has languished for
lawsuit. A state voting rights
years in a politically divided
act would provide that. The
Legislature.
measure would let cities adopt
The consequences of the
their own district­based voting
status quo are proven and real. systems to prevent or remedy
For years, the requirement that violations of residents’ voting
all council positions be elected rights. That’s a much cheaper
citywide in general elections
option than pursuing a federal
put Latino candidates at a dis­ court order to override the
advantage in city council races outdated state law.
in Yakima and Pasco, even
Democrats, who now control
though Latino residents made both chambers of Washing­
up about one­third of the vot­
ton’s Legislature, should not
ing­age citizens in each city.
waste any time in passing this
Only after the American Civil important legislation.
Liberties Union of Washington
All neighborhoods deserve
filed lawsuits accusing the
fair representation in their
cities of violating the federal
local governments.
Voting Rights Act did the Pasco
It is beyond time for the Leg­
and Yakima councils switch to islature to make sure that hap­
district­based elections. After
pens.
Editorial board members are
editorial page editor Kate Riley,
Frank A. Blethen, Donna Gordon Blankinship,
Brier Dudley, Mark Higgins, Melissa Santos,
William K. Blethen (emeritus) and Robert C. Blethen (emeritus).
THE SEATTLE TIMES has a legacy of independent family ownership. Past publishers were
ALDEN J. BLETHEN, 1896­1915; C.B. BLETHEN, 1915­1941; ELMER E. TODD, 1942­1949;
W.K. BLETHEN, 1949­1967; JOHN A. BLETHEN, 1967­1982; W.J. PENNINGTON, 1982­1985.
Other family members served as president: ALDEN JOSEPH BLETHEN, 1915­1921;
FRANK A. BLETHEN Sr., 1949­1967.
Syndicated columnist
It really wasn’t
all that bad.
That, at least,
was the consensus
response from a
dozen historians
to whom Politico
posed a question
in the waning hours of the old
year: “Was 2017 the Craziest Year
in U.S. Political History?”
Only one answered in the affir­
mative. The rest deferred to years
they consider crazier, including
1861, the year America went to
war with itself over slavery; 1919,
the year of the “Red Summer” race
riots; and 1968, the year of the
Democratic convention riots, the
MLK and RFK assassinations and
the Tet offensive. One historian,
H.W. Brands of the University of
Texas, said that, compared to the
first years of the Lincoln, Franklin
Roosevelt and both Bush presiden­
cies, our first year under Trump
was “a yawner.”
I beg to differ.
Granted, the question they were
asked was so vague — how are we
defining “crazy,” after all? — as to
be in some sense unanswerable.
And it’s true enough that 2017 saw
no major transformative or disrup­
tive events on the scale of 1861 or
even 1968.
Still, I’d argue that in essentially
writing it off as a so­called “yawn­
er,” the panel underestimates
2017. Something did happen last
year. It was easy to miss because it
was not stark or spectacular — no
riot, war or secession. No, this was
subtle and insidious, but all the
more foreboding for that.
It was, you see, the year the last
norms fell. Those norms, i.e., our
sense of what is allowable and
acceptable on the public stage,
have been eroding for years, but
2017 saw the process accelerate
like Usain Bolt. It was the year
things that are not supposed to
happen happened all day, every
day.
A president just doesn’t ridicule
his own FBI and CIA. Or interfere
with independent investigations.
Or bully the free press. Or speak
kindly of white supremacists and
credibly accused child molesters.
Or use his office for personal gain
when everyone can see him doing
it or lie when even babies know
he’s lying. He doesn’t threaten
nuclear war via Twitter.
A president simply doesn’t do
those things. Except that now,
evidently, he does. And that’s
scary.
Politics — and civil society as a
whole — rests on a foundation of
largely unspoken agreements, a
social covenant that defines us in
relation to one another, sets forth
the duties we owe and the expecta­
tions we maintain in deference to
the larger us. There have always
been things our leaders did — and
refrained from doing — not neces­
sarily because the doing or not
doing violated the law, but be­
cause it violated tradition, propri­
ety, common sense, ethics, states­
manship, the dignity of high office
and some native sense of right and
wrong.
All of which were conspicuously
absent from the presidency last
year. The result has been anger,
coarseness, political destabiliza­
tion and a trickle­down nastiness
visible both in anecdotes and in
hate­crime statistics. Nor is the
source any mystery. As white fans
jeered at players from a black and
Latino high school during a basket­
ball game: “Trump! Trump!
Trump!”
Yes, 1919 brought riots, 2001
unspeakable terror. But 2017 was
a sustained assault on the ideal of
the larger us. It taught us how
fragile is the social covenant, how
susceptible to anyone willing to
kick over the table, break the sil­
verware and beat his chest. It
taught us how shamefully docile
some of us will be in falling in line
behind such an individual.
Thankfully, it also taught us that
civil society is not something you
take for granted. It’s a choice you
make, a thing you have to fight for.
Which will be a fitting mission
for 2018 and beyond.
© 2018, The Miami Herald
Leonard Pitts Jr.’s column appears
regularly on editorial pages of The Times.
Email: lpitts@miamiherald.com
Banning guns in Senate gallery
is symbolism over substance
By PHIL FORTUNATO
Special to The Times
T
he presiding officer in the
state Senate, Lt. Gov. Cyrus
Habib, recently indicated that he
would implement a rule to ban
firearms in the public gallery of the
Senate starting with the 2018
legislative session.
I challenged that move in a letter
outlining my concerns with the
lieutenant governor’s authority to
make such a rule, the impracticali­
ty of enforcing the rule and broad­
er concerns about the constitution­
ality of infringing on law­abiding
citizens’ Second Amendment
rights. Since then, newspapers
have editorialized their agreement
with the proposed gun ban and
even called for far more sweeping
prohibitions on all legally carried
firearms at your state Capitol.
With all due respect, I disagree
with Lt. Gov. Habib and the edito­
rial writers siding with him on this
issue.
The impracticality of the ban
should be reason enough to revisit
this issue. We are talking about
licensed concealed­gun carriers
following the law, many of whom
you would never know are carry­
ing a gun. We have hundreds of
visitors to the Capitol every day.
This alone presents logistical chal­
lenges that these leaders failed to
consider. Will security search every
person and their belongings? Are
staff trained to conduct such
searches? If a legal weapon is
found, what will be done to safely
ensure its storage? Does taking and
returning the weapon run afoul of
new weapon­transfer laws? It isn’t
as simple as by fiat saying no weap­
ons in the Senate gallery.
What happens if visitors from
afar aren’t aware of the ban? Must
they leave their weapons unse­
cured in a car? That poses a serious
safety concern, with vehicle break­
TED S. WARREN / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
After a protest outside the Capitol in Olympia in January 2015, gun
owners display their weapons in the upper gallery of the House,
which was not in session.
ins on the rise in Olympia. Prowl­
ers would now have a new oppor­
tunity to get their hands on guns
they shouldn’t have, at the expense
of those following the rules. How
does that improve public safety?
We live in a changing world
where knives, trucks, pressure
cookers and pipe bombs combined
with any radical ideology pose a
real threat to public safety, espe­
cially in places like our Capitol. If
we need a change in policy to make
the people’s house safer, then there
should be a broader discussion
with a more diverse group of stake­
holders. It should not be hidden
under the guise of procedural rules
about decorum — the authority
that the lieutenant governor has
cited to implement this ban. As
with many gun bans, this is sym­
bolism over substance.
I am open to a sincere conversa­
tion about how to improve security
on our campus, but the proposed
blanket gun ban on lawful con­
cealed weapon carriers is reaction­
ary and fear­based, and will ulti­
mately do nothing to improve
safety. Just like the Legislature has
come together to discuss policies
around a safe work environment,
we should also follow the process­
es in place to develop adequate
tools that ensure the safety of those
who work in and visit the legisla­
tive building. I agree with Lt. Gov­
ernor Habib’s statement in a recent
interview that “he doesn’t get to
interpret [Senate rules] to give
himself some type of autocratic
control over the chamber,” but
ironically that’s exactly what he’s
done. Unfortunately, he has cho­
sen to do so with one of our na­
tion’s most fundamental rights.
State Sen. Phil
Fortunato, R­Auburn,
represents the 31st
District, covering parts
of Southeast King
County.
NorthwestVoices
30 years, in a variety of technical
nity. That is what this bill does,
Voting Rights Act
and management positions. This
ensuring that all voices in the
experience
gave
me
a
deep
appre­
‘Civic and fiscal sense’ community can participate in
Letters and emails
ciation for the sense of commit­
meaningful civic dialogue.
I encourage voters across the
ment that the great majority of
This makes civic and fiscal
for schools and other local needs. public­sector employees bring to
state to contact their state sena­
sense. It saves communities mon­
National monuments
their work each day. Yes, there
tors and representatives to bring
ey by setting up a means of resolv­
— Jean Ferry, Issaquah were a few staff members who
the Washington Voting Rights Act ing issues without the expenses of
Limits are justified
failed to pull their weight. But for to a vote within the new session’s
lawsuits. It fairly and honestly
Shrinking government every one of those, there were
A recent letter writer must not
first two weeks. At 60 days, the
connects voters and their repre­
have watched the Congressional
scores of employees who worked
session is very short. Bills not
sentatives, having those represen­
hearings about Bears Ears and
hundreds of hours of uncompen­
brought to the floor early often get tatives serve actual districts rather
Undervalued staff
Grand Staircase Escalante nation­
left behind. The WVRA should not than the community at large,
sated overtime or experienced
al monuments on C­SPAN [“Pub­
Re: “Trump keeps his pledge to other personal hardships because be one of those.
which dilutes the individual voic­
lic lands: ‘Save treasured places,’ ”
shrink size of government,” Dec.
they believed in the mission of
WVRA has a partisan history but es within the district. It is good for
Jan. 2, Opinion]. I did.
31, A1]:
their agency.
addresses nonpartisan concerns,
all of us.
It was pointed out that the mon­
The portrait this article paints of
Please contact your local Con­
ensuring that each person’s vote
— Neil Berkowitz, Seattle
uments were established under
a civil service hemorrhaging staff
gress people and their senators to has equal power. Our towns, cities
due to philosophical bias and
the Antiquities Act, which clearly
protest this senseless loss of an
and counties are stronger when
simple neglect is deeply troubling. invaluable resource, that is, the
specifies that property taken for a
our voters select representatives
national purpose must be restrict­
These are the folks who deliver
connected to their districts. Wash­
loss of competent and experi­
ed to the minimum needed to
our mail, keep our food safe, make enced federal staff who perform
ington does a capable job of pro­
fulfill its purpose. To the contrary,
sure that Medicare and Social
essential services that keep our
viding access to the ballot. But
ON THE WEB
these national monuments includ­
Security payments are made,
society functioning.
respecting the vote also requires
Read more letters online at
ed hundreds of thousands of acres
protect our environment, and
that we ensure that the vote re­
— Ron Paige, Bellevue flects all the people in the commu­ seattletimes.com/opinion
that did not approach that criteri­
perform a host of critical functions
on. The land was taken by the
that we often take for granted.
I had the opportunity to serve in Letters, not exceeding 200 words, must include your full name, address and telephone numbers for verification. Email:
federal government, off the local
letters@seattletimes.com; mail: Letters Editor, The Seattle Times, P.O. Box 70, Seattle, WA 98111.
the federal service for more than
tax rolls, diminishing the funding
REACH THE EDITOR | Kate Riley, editorial page editor, 206­464­2260 kriley@seattletimes.com | Mark Higgins, deputy opinion editor/digital, 206­464­2094 mhiggins@seattletimes.com
A12 News |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
NWTHURSDAY
seattletimes.com/localnews | JANUARY 4, 2018
B
SEATTLE>BROTHER OF CYCLIST KILLED ALONG TRACKS SUES>B2
Lands chief calls for carbon policy
CLIMATE CHANGE
communities as a way to fight cli­
mate change.
She staked out her position in a
letter to state legislative committee
leaders in the House and Senate
and in a climate­policy speech
planned for Thursday in Seattle,
By LYNDA V. MAPES
urging lawmakers to adopt a car­
Seattle Times environment reporter
bon­reduction policy this year.
That policy should use revenue
Hilary Franz, the state commis­
from a carbon tax or carbon cap to
sioner of public lands, has stepped
invest in natural landscapes that
to the center of the carbon debate
in Washington, calling for a strate­ can reduce carbon pollution and
gy that invests in forests, agricultur­ also support rural communities
that depend on farming, ranching,
al and aquatic lands, and rural
Wants state money from
tax or cap to be investing
in natural landscapes
timber and shellfish production,
Franz said in the letter.
Her initiative came just days
before Gov. Jay Inslee is expected
to announce his own carbon­tax
proposal for Washington that could
put the two elected leaders on a
collision course. Inslee has called
for using revenues from a carbon
tax to help pay for school funding
required under the Washington
Supreme Court’s McCleary deci­
sion.
Inslee’s spokesman, Tara Lee,
said Wednesday the governor ap­
preciates Franz’s support for a
carbon policy.
“Where the revenues go will be
an ongoing discussion through the
legislative session and likely be­
yond,” Lee said.
Rural communities are on the
front lines of climate change, such
as sea­level rise and increased
wildfire risk, and would benefit
from investments that secure and
enhance the natural­resource econ­
omies and landscapes that have
been their lifelines, Franz said
Wednesday.
“What is very clear, front and
center, is how much climate change
is already here, and the responsibil­
ity of the Department of Natural
Resources (DNR) to manage these
lands isn’t just for today, but for the
future,” said Franz, who oversees
5.6 million acres of state forests,
agriculture and rangelands, natural
areas and aquatic lands.
Forestlands and agricultural
lands are a critical part of the cli­
mate solution, Franz said, and must
be preserved from encroachment
See > CARBON, B4
Reaching for the sun
ALAN BERNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES
Amanda Witte practices handstands next to Black Sun, a 1969 sculpture by Isamu Noguchi in Volunteer Park. Witte says you “kick up, then there’s a moment of terror” and you
hold for five to 10 seconds. It’s easier, she says, when you’re next to a support.
Dozens of quakes not related to magma
NEAR MOUNT ST. HELENS
Expert says it’s a reminder
that bigger earthquake
can and will happen
By CHRISTINE CLARRIDGE
Seattle Times staff reporter
Although dozens of small
earthquakes shook the ground
near Mount St. Helens early
Wednesday, they were not
caused by shifting magma within
the active stratovolcano, accord­
ing to experts.
The swarm of tremors began
about 12:30 a.m. with a 3.9 mag­
nitude quake striking near Spirit
Lake, about seven miles from the
mountain that famously erupted
in 1980. Then, the initial quakes
were followed by “dozens and
dozens” more, according to Bill
Steele, of the Pacific Northwest
Seismic Network.
Despite the ample seismic ac­
tivity, it’s believed to be “pretty
normal tectonic activity that just
happened to be close” to the
mountain, said Seth Moran, the
scientist­in­charge at the U.S.
Geological Survey Cascades Vol­
cano Observatory.
“We don’t think it’s related to
Mount St. Helens because the
pattern of earthquakes, and the
style of how they occur, is very
different,” Moran said.
Moran said there are actually
tiny earthquakes occurring al­
most continuously in the masses
of unseen and uncharted faults
that run through Western Wash­
ington and Oregon.
The pattern of Wednesday’s
earthquakes — one large shock
followed by a series of weaker
aftershocks — is “typical, predict­
able and not that impressive” for
our fault­rich region and does not
appear to be related to volcanic
activity, Moran said.
The quakes are triggered by the
stress of the Pacific Plate crunch­
ing up against our North Ameri­
can Plate, and, according to Mo­
ran, it is not uncommon for us to
have earthquakes with magni­
tudes of 3, 4 or 5 a couple times a
year.
While authorities said there
were no reports of injuries or
damage from Wednesday’s trem­
ors, there is a small possibility
that a larger quake could follow
within 48 hours, Steele said.
“Whenever you have an earth­
quake, there is a very small
chance that it could hit another
fault that could rupture further,”
he said.
Moran said the series of small
quakes is a great reminder for
people that a bigger earthquake
can and will happen in our fu­
ture, and an opportunity to heed
the advice that’s out there.
“This one was kind of fun, but
take it seriously and have two
weeks of food and water on
hand,” he said.
— Information from The Associated Press
is included.
Christine Clarridge: 206­464­8983 or
cclarridge@seattletimes.com; on
Twitter: @c_clarridge
Woman’s family files wrongful­death suit
KILLED BY KING COUNTY
DEPUTIES IN 2016
Suit challenges officers’
account of what happened
By MIKE CARTER
Seattle Times staff reporter
The family of a 23­year­old
pregnant woman fatally shot in
2016 by sheriff’s deputies who had
been dispatched to check on her
well­being has filed a wrongful­
death lawsuit against the county
and deputies in King County Supe­
rior Court.
The complaint filed by the sister
of Renee Davis, a member of the
Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, alleges
deputies tampered with the scene
and failed to provide aid to Davis,
who bled to death from her
wounds.
The lawsuit claims that Davis
was suicidal and that statements
she had made to her boyfriend the
night of Oct. 21, 2016, made him
COURTESY OF DANIELLE BARGALA
Renee Davis was killed by King
County sheriff’s deputies in 2016.
concerned enough to seek out a
sheriff’s deputy near the tribe’s
powwow grounds and ask the
deputy to check on her. That dep­
uty, Nicholas Pritchett, and a
backup officer, Deputy Timothy
Lewis, responded to Lewis’ home
in the Skopabsh Village neighbor­
hood on the reservation, which
contracts for law­enforcement
services from King County.
According to the lawsuit, the
officers did little to inform them­
selves about Davis or her situation
and approached the home know­
ing that she owned at least one
firearm and that there were two
young children inside.
According to the complaint and
evidence produced at a King
County coroner’s inquest, the
officers pounded on the front door
before they entered the home and
kicked down the door to Davis’
bedroom home while her chil­
dren, ages 2 and 3, stood waiting
in the hallway. The deputies said
Davis was lying in bed and pointed
a handgun at them, but the law­
suit alleges there is no evidence
that occurred, outside of the depu­
ties’ “self­serving” statements.
The two officers fired a total of
eight rounds at the woman, who
was in her bed, striking her three
times in the abdomen, chest and
leg. According to the complaint,
Davis was four­months pregnant.
Statements by the deputies and
evidence introduced at the inquest
found that they recovered a hand­
gun but that it was not loaded.
Moreover, the lawsuit — filed by
Seattle attorney Gabriel Galanda
— states that when a third officer
arrived just after the shooting, he
found Pritchett and Lewis “stand­
ing around” while the woman lay
bleeding and “making gutteral
noises” on the floor. The third
deputy said he saw a handgun in
the woman’s hand, which contra­
dicts statements by Pritchett that
the woman dropped the gun on
the bed and fell to the floor after
the gunfire.
“Upon information and belief,”
the lawsuit alleges, “one of the
deputies placed the pistol in Re­
nee’s hand on the floor” before the
third officer arrived.
The six­member inquest jury in
May found the deputies had rea­
son to fear for their lives, however
the panel was divided on whether
the deputies showed concern for
See > LAWSUIT, B4
ACCEPT FACTS,
FIX PROBLEMS,
MOVE ON UP
Jerry Large
Seattle Times staff columnist
Last year, the
stock market
soared to re­
cord heights.
Drug deaths
also soared,
fueled by an
epidemic of opioid addic­
tion. Seattle’s real­estate
market was the hottest in the
nation, and its homeless
population boomed, too.
This year, I hope America gets
better at dealing with humans and
improving the social systems that
determine how well we do, individ­
ually and collectively.
We know how to get things done
when we really want to do them.
Last month, SpaceX launched a
reused space capsule atop a reused
rocket, a technical achievement
that will dramatically lower costs
for getting into space. That’s great,
and it happened because it became
a priority for some very focused
people, including a passionate
billionaire, Elon Musk.
Making spacecraft reusable was a
difficult problem to solve, but we
face some harder ones that could
benefit from intense focus. It’s a
new year, but we’ll drag into it a lot
of problems that result from failing
to deal with old business.
Like most people, I did some
looking back over the past few
days, and that’s something that
stuck out in stories about the year
and in my own columns. We let a
lot of problems linger, unsolved.
I wrote about climate scientists
struggling to make people aware of
global warming without wading
into politics, an almost impossible
task since politics has come to de­
See > LARGE, B4
REACH THE EDITORS | Matt Kreamer, 206­464­2453 mkreamer@seattletimes.com | Doreen Marchionni, 206­464­3110 dmarchionni@seattletimes.com | News Tips newstips@seattletimes.com
B2 NWThursday |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
Brother of cyclist killed on tracks sues Seattle
FIRST HILL STREETCAR
Claims city knew
but ignored ‘potential trap
for bicycle tires’
By EVAN BUSH
Seattle Times staff reporter
The brother of a bicyclist killed
while riding along the First Hill
Streetcar tracks is suing Seattle,
claiming the city knew the street­
car’s rails were a hazard but chose
to leave a “potential trap for bicy­
cle tires,” which threw Desiree
McCloud from her bike and
caused her death.
Cody McCloud, whose sister,
Desiree McCloud, was killed in
May 2016 after riding between
streetcar tracks on East Yesler
Way, was joined in the lawsuit
filed last month by cyclist Su­
zanne Greenberg, who claims she
also crashed on the roadway be­
cause of the tracks.
Both women were thrown from
their bikes when their tires “en­
gaged” the streetcar’s rail­and­
track groove on East Yesler Way,
the lawsuit says.
Seattle knew that “streetcar
tracks pose a crash risk,” accord­
ing to the lawsuit, which outlines
several ways the city could have
minimized the alleged danger.
Those options included installing
rubber filler in streetcar­track
grooves; choosing a different type
of rail; or excluding bicycles from
the streetcar’s lane, according to
the suit.
Desiree McCloud, 27, was rid­
ing with three other cyclists in
May 2016 from East Capitol Hill
to Alki Beach when her crash
KEN LAMBERT / THE SEATTLE TIMES, FILE
A “ghost bike” was installed near the scene of the First Hill crash that killed Desiree McCloud in 2016.
occurred. Surveillance images
from a Seattle Police Department
investigation showed her pedaling
between the streetcar tracks on
East Yesler Way when she at­
tempted to pass another cyclist in
her group.
That cyclist told police she saw
McCloud’s bike wobble before
McCloud crashed and tumbled to
the pavement.
McCloud died 11 days later at
Harborview Medical Center. An
autopsy found that McCloud, who
was wearing a helmet, died as a
result of blunt­force head trauma.
In a 2016 investigative report,
Zoning request to help
charter school opposed
By PAIGE CORNWELL
Seattle Times staff reporter
In an attempt to inhibit
the growth of charter
schools, the Seattle School
Board voted Wednesday to
oppose a request to let one
charter construct a larger
building than city zoning
rules allow.
The School Board’s reso­
lution, which passed 6­0
(with board member Zacha­
ry DeWolf recusing himself),
is aimed at a new high
school that the Green Dot
charter­school network
hopes to build within a few
miles of Rainier Beach High,
which is part of Seattle Pub­
lic Schools. Green Dot needs
a zoning variance from the
city in order to build the
three­story, 58,000 square­
foot school on the site.
The decision ultimately
rests with the city of Seattle,
but the board wanted to
take a stand. School Board
members said they are
concerned the Green Dot
school would draw students
— and funding — away from
other public schools, includ­
ing Rainier Beach, Franklin
and Cleveland high schools.
Allowing charters to build
large schools, board mem­
bers wrote in the resolution,
would be “highly detrimen­
tal” to the three high
schools’ ability to serve
Seattle students.
At the School Board meet­
ing, state Charter Schools
Association CEO Patrick
D’Amelio urged board
members to vote down the
resolution, saying that both
the charter organization
and the school district share
a commitment to students.
Only public schools can
request departures from
zoning regulations, includ­
ing those governing build­
ing height and distance
between a building and a
street. But the Department
of Construction and Inspec­
tions has proposed that the
code be clarified to include
charter schools. Charters
are public schools that are
free to students and receive
public funding to operate,
but they are run by nonprof­
it organizations and often
operate independently of
traditional school districts.
But at Wednesday’s meet­
ing, board members argued
that charter schools
shouldn’t be classified the
same as other public schools
because they aren’t gov­
erned by elected officials, so
are less accountable to
voters.
“If you’ve had enough of
us, you vote us out,” board
President Leslie Harris said
to the audience, referring to
herself and her fellow board
members. “That is what
public education is about.”
The construction and
inspections department will
make final recommenda­
tions to Mayor Jenny Dur­
kan this month or in Febru­
ary and the City Council will
review the issue this year,
said department spokes­
woman Wendy Shark.
The Green Dot network
runs three other schools in
Washington state and 25 in
California and Tennessee.
Across the state, about
2,500 students attend char­
ters, with more schools
slated to open next fall.
Paige Cornwell: 206­464­2530 or
pcornwell@seattletimes.com
police did not find evidence to
conclude whether the streetcar
tracks played a role in McCloud’s
crash.
“It is unknown if McCloud at­
tempted to cross back over and if
interaction with the rail was what
led to her loss of control, and that
question appears impossible to
resolve,” police wrote in the re­
port. “What is known is that no
other vehicles were involved and
that McCloud lost control of her
bicycle, which caused her to fall to
the ground. This incident, though
obviously tragic, appears to be the
sole result of some form of opera­
tor error on the part of McCloud.”
Cody McCloud’s lawyers have
said they can prove the streetcar
tracks grabbed McCloud’s tire.
In an interview this past May,
Greenberg, a sign­language inter­
preter, said she was traveling
downhill, braking, when a bus
pulled into a stop near the tracks.
She was trying to pass the bus and
did not see the tracks until they
had grabbed her tire, she said.
“It literally feels like it’s being
sucked in ... it pulls your wheel,
and you’re flying,”
she said.
Greenberg injured her arm and
AR O UN D THE NO R THWEST
Seattle
Kent
Federal prosecutors in
Seattle have charged a U.S.
Border Patrol agent with
attempting to entice a 14­
year­old girl in a complaint
alleging he sent the minor
nude photos and had sexual­
ly explicit online conversa­
tions with her and others.
A complaint, filed Wednes­
day in U.S. District Court,
came after the wife of Micah
Mardo, a border­patrol agent
attached to the Sumas,
Whatcom County, office,
expressed concerns to a
friend about messages found
on his phone, and the friend
contacted the National Cen­
ter for Missing and Exploited
Children.
Mardo was arrested by the
FBI and appeared Wednes­
day before U.S. Magistrate
Judge Mary Alice Theiler,
who ordered him held pend­
ing a detention hearing
Thursday. If convicted as
charged, Mardo faces a pris­
on term of not less than 10
years, and up to life.
The charges allege Mardo,
36, kept a Google chat ac­
count that contained explicit
sexual conversations and
images traded with several
minor girls. One of the vic­
tims, 14, reported that he
had apparently come to her
high school to watch her
participate in a sporting
event, and that he told her he
fantasized about his 14­year­
old daughter’s friends.
He is alleged to have ex­
changed nude and sexually
suggestive photos with that
girl and others.
According to records,
Mardo had worked for the
Department of Homeland
Security and the U.S. Border
Patrol in El Paso, Texas.
Kent police arrested a
22­year­old man Wednesday
shortly after a 48­year­old
man was fatally shot at a
busy intersection.
The two men, who appar­
ently knew each other, ar­
Sex charges filed
against agent
Man arrested
in fatal shooting
Mary Ann BANYI
Mary A. Banyi left peacefully to
meet her maker on December
22, 2017. She is loved and missed
by her daughter, Donna Wood;
her grandson, Brian Wood; her
granddaughter and her husband,
Colleen and Chris Faidley, and
their children, Mormor’s greatgrandchildren, C a m e r o n and
Jo celyn; as well as ex tende d
family members and friends.
Mary was a lovable and wellliked person and a hard worker.
She practiced her love for golf
extensively achieving 3 holesin- one.
Services are Saturday, 1/6 at
Our Lady of the Lake Catholic
Church, 8900 35th Ave NE,
Seattle WA 98115. 10:30 am
Rosary, 11:00 am Mass and
reception lunch following.
D onations may b e made to
MarysPlaceSeattle.org.
shoulder in the wreck, which
happened exactly a year after
McCloud’s death. Coincidentally,
a Q13 reporter who was working
on a story about McCloud’s death
and her brother’s legal claim
rushed to Greenberg’s aid.
Since Seattle installed its first
modern streetcar lines in 2007,
cyclists have aired concerns that
the streetcar tracks are a hazard.
The city does not collect data
about streetcar­track crashes
specifically, and many go unre­
ported. After a request from The
Seattle Times last year, more than
100 cyclists detailed falls they
believe were caused by rail tracks.
Seattle has faced legal action
over streetcar tracks before. In
2010, six bicyclists sued the city,
claiming the South Lake Union
streetcar tracks caused them to
crash and Seattle knowingly al­
lowed the unsafe conditions.
Although the city acknowl­
edged the tracks could be hazard­
ous, a judge agreed with the city’s
argument that it had a right to
build the streetcar line in the
manner it chose and that the
cyclists had not proved the city
breached its duty to provide rea­
sonably safe streets.
But, lawyers working on Mc­
Cloud’s lawsuit said in May that
they believe a 2016 Court of Ap­
peals decision about a Port Or­
chard bicycle crash could aid their
case because it clarified that bicy­
cles are a mode of ordinary travel
and that cities have a responsibili­
ty to maintain streets to be rea­
sonably safe for cyclists.
Evan Bush: 206­464­2253 or
ebush@seattletimes.com On Twitter
@evanbush
gued near 212th Street
South and 64th Avenue
South around 9 a.m.
Wednesday, Kent police
Cmdr. Jarod Kasner said.
Officers responded to a
report that a man had been
shot and arrived to find the
48­year­old unresponsive.
He was pronounced dead at
a hospital.
The suspected gunman
was located a short time later
Jennifer COLE
by Kent police.
As of late Wednesday
afternoon, it did not appear
he had yet been booked into
jail.
Both victim and suspect
are from Auburn, according
to Kasner.
The death appears to be
the first homicide of the new
year committed in King
County.
Times staff and news services
Donna A. (Lundell)
LINGWOOD
D o n n a “ To n i ” A . ( L u n d e l l )
Lingwood of Seattle, WA was
born Sept. 25, 1942 and passed
away Dec. 26, 2017. If ever there
was someone who loved to go,
do, and learn, it was her. She was
a beloved mother, wife, sister,
and friend, and will be missed
by her kids, daughters-in-law,
brothers, and grandchildren.
Services will be held 1/6/18 at 9:30
am: Washington Memorial Park,
16445 International Blvd.,
SeaTac, WA. More details and
online guestbook at http://
bonneywatson.com/
Jennifer Cole was born June 5,
1944 in Seattle to parents John K.
and Mildred R. Miller. She died
December 28, 2017 in Seattle of
liver cancer.
Jennifer graduated from West
Seattle High School (1962) and
Burnley School of Professional
Art (196 5). Jennifer married
Peter Cameron and raised a
daughter, Diana, and a son,
John. After her children were
grown, she married Harry Cole,
who die d in 2 014 .
After working in graphic arts she
wanted to be at home to raise her
children so she started crafting
humorous kitchen magnets and
Christmas ornaments designed
for tourists at Pike Place Market.
Starting at the Market in 1976,
she sold there for 41 years. In
1990 she took on an additional
part time job as a driver for
Metro, & was there for 24 years.
She leaves behind daughter
D i a n a , s o n J o h n (Ja n e) ,
b r o t h e r J o h n M ill e r, b e s t
buddy
Katherine
Detore,
devoted friend and Market
seller Betty Bennett (Ruthie),
computer guru Mo, many
good friends and neighbors.
“Death is nothing at all. I have
only slipped away into the next
room. I am I, and you are you.
What ever we were to each
other, that we still are.
Call
me by my old familiar name,
speak to me in the easy way
which you always used. Put no
difference in your tone, wear
no forced air of solemnity or
sorrow.
Laugh as we always
laughed at the little jokes we
enjoyed together. Pray, smile,
think of me, pray for me. Let
my name be ever the household
word that it always was, let it be
spoken without effect, without
the trace of a shadow on it. Life
means all that it ever meant. It
is the same it ever was, there
is unbroken continuity.
Why
should I be out of mind because
I am out of sight? I am waiting
for you, for an interval, some
where very near, just around
the corner. All is well.”
-Harry Scott Holland (1918-1947)
We miss you, Jennifer.
Jennifer will be honored at the
Pike Place Market on Thursday,
January 4th from 10am-4pm.
Dave ENSLOW
Dave Lee Enslow died at
Tacoma G eneral Hospital in
the early morning of December
17, 2017 from a stroke. He was
75 years old.
Dave will be buried in the
Sumner Cemetery.
A memorial will take place
on January 6, 2 018 at 11:0 0 a.m.
at C a l v a r y C o m m u n i t y
C h u r c h in Sumner.
All are welcome to attend.
In lieu of flowers or gifts, please
donate to the Gordon Family
YMCA and mark the donation
“Mayor Enslow” in the memo
or note line. See full obituary
Sunday Jan. 7 Seattle Times.
Virginia Mae HARDMAN
Virginia (Jennings) Hardman
passed away on December 18,
2 017. S h e w a s 94 . “ Gin ny ”
was born July 9, 1923 to Drs.
Alva and A gnes Jennings in
Edmonds WA . She at tende d
Edmonds High School, class of
1940 and graduated from the
University of Washington in 1946.
Ginny married William “Bill”
Hardman in 1945. Her life was
b l e s s e d wit h f o u r c hil d r e n ,
June, Gail, Bill and Jim. She
was preceded in death by her
husband, Bill, brother, Stanley
and grandchild, Crystal. She
is survived by her four children,
her sister Dorothy Jennings and
half sister, Beverly Jennings.
Jeannine Diane
(Jacobson) LUCAS
It is with great love and sorrow
that we announce the passing
of Jeannine Diane Lucas, born
in Madison, WI on November
14, 1954. She died peacefully at
her home in North Seattle on
December 27, 2017.
For full obituary and future
celebration of life visit http:/ /
www.dignitymemorial.com /
acacia-funeral-home /en-us /
index.page
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
Director of homelessness
agency stepping down
BY VIANNA DAVILA
Seattle Times staff reporter
Several board members
portunity at Accelerator
YMCA. But I guess it’s one of praised Putnam, including
Quinn. He pushed the agen­
my regrets we didn’t get it
The executive director of
cy to gather clearer data of
all sorted out.”
King County’s coordinating
people who access homeless
Adrienne Quinn, director
agency for homeless services
services, “so we know what’s
of King County’s Depart­
will step down at the end of
working and what’s not
ment of Community and
January, concerned about
working,” she said.
Human Services, echoed
the agency’s authority to
Putnam also drew praise
Putnam’s concerns.
respond to the regional
from board members for his
A coordinating agency
crisis.
efforts to look at homeless­
needs to exist “that really
Mark Putnam, who has
ness through a race and
has authority over
led All Home since
funding and ensures equity lens. Last year, All
December 2013
Home held a race­equity
that the funding is
when the agency was
summit, and the Coordinat­
aligned and that
still called the Com­
ing Board voted to focus on
we’re getting the
mittee to End Home­
helping more Native Ameri­
results that we all
lessness, is leaving to
cans experiencing homeless­
and the community
become the execu­
expects,” said Quinn. ness find permanent hous­
tive director of Accel­
ing.
Other cities, in­
erator YMCA, which
“Mark (Putnam) has done
cluding Portland and
provides more hous­ Mark Put­
ing for homeless
nam, director San Francisco, have an incredible amount of
work in four years in an
young adults than
of All Home, streamlined their
extraordinarily difficult
government struc­
any other organiza­
is leaving.
position,” Quinn said.
tures to centralize
tion in King County.
He won’t leave All Home
funding and strategies for
He said he is not leaving
until after the county’s annu­
homelessness.
because of his ongoing con­
al Point in Time Count of
“We will have continued
cerns about All Home’s gov­
people in homelessness,
conversations with stake­
ernance structure, but he
holders and between the city called Count Us In, on
does believe the agency
Jan. 26.
and the county about what
lacks authority over the
Kira Zylstra, assistant
the right structure is of All
region’s homelessness re­
director, will serve as All
sponse. All Home has a lot of Home going forward,”
Home’s acting director until
Quinn said.
responsibility but not much
a permanent replacement is
Putnam announced his
power to effect real change,
chosen.
departure at Wednesday’s
he said.
Vianna Davila: 206­652­6550 or
meeting of the All Home
The agency board can set
vdavila@seattletimes.com. On
policy and lay out strategies, Coordinating Board, the
Twitter @viannadavila
agency’s governing body.
but it has no authority to
enforce them and no dedi­
cated funding. The All Home
board includes representa­
tives from the city and coun­
ty, but those entities make
RAVE To Blair Walsh for missing the field goal during the
their own decisions about
Seahawks­Arizona game, putting the 12s out of their misery.
what programs to fund and
If people would now kindly please refrain from wearing
where to focus their efforts.
Seahawks gear until at least September, that’d be great!
“I believe we need to make
RANT Sea­Tac recently moved the airport shuttle waiting area
that kind of shift, where we
outside. Yes, it’s under cover, but still exposed to wind, cold
are really consolidating
authority over and oversight and, especially, noise. Come out of your warm, dry office,
around homelessness,” Put­ managers, and see how miserable you’ve made shuttle rid­
ers.
nam said. “That’s been one
of the challenges of the job,
The Seattle Times publishes reader rants and raves on a space­available
but it’s not the reason I left.
basis. We reserve the right to edit for length or content. Send yours to
rantandrave@seattletimes.com.
The reason I left is the op­
R AN T & RAV E
| NWThursday B3
B4 NWThursday |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
3
Police link gang End of the line
feud to killing
in Rainier Valley
< Large
FROM B1
BURIEN MAN CHARGED
IN DEC. 8 DEATH
in jail before posting $50,000
bail, jail and court records
show.
The male passenger in the
He was out on bail in
Toyota Camry was a friend of
July drive­by shooting Nejash, the December homi­
cide victim, according to
By SARA JEAN GREEN
charges filed in that first­de­
Seattle Times staff reporter
gree murder case.
The Seattle police homi­
An ongoing feud between
rival South Seattle gangs was cide detective investigating
apparently behind the Dec. 8 Nejash’s death noted that
while the specific motive for
shooting of 21­year­old Mo­
his killing is unknown, it is
hamed Nejash, who died at
likely related to an ongoing
Harborview Medical Center
feud between rival Seattle
before he could make it into
the emergency room, accord­ gang members, with Nejash
and Kifle on opposite sides of
ing to police.
that dispute, charging papers
King County prosecutors
say.
Wednesday charged Mar­
Police say Kifle stalked and
howe Kifle, a 24­year­old
ambushed Nejash after spot­
Burien man, with first­de­
ting him entering a marijua­
gree murder in connection
na dispensary just off Rainier
with Nejash’s death.
Avenue South around 1 p.m.
When he was arrested in
Lynnwood on Tuesday, Kifle on Dec. 8, according to the
charges. Kifle had also pa­
was armed with a handgun
tronized the same dispensary
loaded with polycarbonate­
and was sitting outside in his
tipped ammunition, “de­
signed in part to defeat body car when Nejash entered the
armor,” Senior Deputy Pros­ business, the charges say.
Driving a black Chrysler
ecutor Jason Simmons wrote
300, Kifle later followed
in charging documents.
Nejash, who was a passenger
Kifle was ordered held in
in a red Ford Taurus, the
lieu of $2.5 million bail.
At the time of last month’s charges say. He is accused of
firing at least six rounds into
fatal shooting in Seattle’s
the passenger side of the
Rainier Valley, Kifle was out
Taurus at the intersection of
on bail in a July 4 drive­by
Rainier Avenue South and
shooting in Burien, accord­
South Genesee Street, then
ing to court records. In that
case, Kifle was driving a Ford fleeing southbound.
The driver of the Taurus
Mustang when he is accused
of firing 15 rounds at a Toyo­ drove Nejash to Harborview,
where he died.
ta Camry occupied by two
Information from confi­
men, narrowly missing them,
dential witnesses and video­
charging papers say. The
unprovoked shooting ended surveillance footage from the
when the Camry rear­ended marijuana dispensary and
other area businesses helped
the Mustang and Kifle was
thrown from the vehicle, the police identify Kifle as the
gunman, the charges say.
charges say.
Sara Jean Green: 206­515­5654 or
Kifle was treated for his
sgreen@seattletimes.com
injuries, then spent two days
< Carbon
Mason County, in 1890.
The company today has
about 316,000 acres of
timberland in Washington,
by development. Such
primarily Douglas fir, typi­
lands sequester carbon
cally cut on about a 43­year
dioxide, a greenhouse gas
rotation, on average, Reed
linked to climate change.
said.
In addition to conserving
The company already is
land for timber and agricul­ engaged in carbon­credit
tural production and habi­
deals in Oregon that pay
tat for wildlife, people win
the company to grow its
too, by securing the critical trees bigger and longer,
natural supports they will
and Green Diamond would
need in a warming world,
love to see similar opportu­
Franz said.
nities in Washington, Reed
To do it, revenue from
said.
putting a price on carbon
“At a certain price, car­
emissions could fund in­
bon becomes more valu­
centives for timberland
able than the tree,” Reed
owners to grow trees lon­
said. “People who own
ger and bigger, and provide forests would love to feel
the money to permanently there is some motivation to
protect working forestlands grow bigger, older trees,
and agricultural lands,
and would work hard to
Franz said.
make it all work, at the
Carbon revenue could
same time being in the
purchase and transfer de­
interest of shareholders.”
velopment rights, and buy
Mo McBroom, director of
conservation easements to government relations for
preserve forests and agri­
the Nature Conservancy of
cultural lands at risk of
Washington, embraced
development. And the
money could also help pay
for restoration of forest­
lands and soils to make
forests and agricultural
lands healthier and more
productive, Franz said.
Her policy initiative
brought praise from Doug
Reed, president of Green
Diamond Resource Compa­
ny, a fifth­generation fami­
ly­owned timber business
founded near Shelton,
FROM B1
ELLEN M. BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES
A Sound Transit light­rail train heads toward the Angle Lake station in SeaTac on
Wednesday. Angle Lake is the southern terminus of the light­rail line.
Franz’s stance.
“You can reduce carbon
emissions if you are smart
about how you invest in the
natural environment,”
McBroom said. “Whether
agricultural soils, or se­
questering carbon in trees,
investing in the landscape
is a critical piece of a com­
prehensive climate policy.”
Washington’s Legislature
has not approved carbon­
pricing proposals in the
past, and Washington vot­
ers rejected a carbon­tax
initiative in 2016. Oppo­
nents have argue that put­
ting a price on carbon
would drive up costs for
consumers and provide
little benefit to the environ­
ment.
Backers of a carbon­price
proposal — including the
governor, tribes, and envi­
ronmental groups — are all
hopeful to get a plan passed
this year, whether by legis­
lation or initiative.
Washington is already
late in adopting policies
that help carbon pollution,
Franz said.
Atmospheric levels of
carbon dioxide are the
highest they have been in at
least 800,000 years, and
climate change is affecting
Washington in ways ex­
pected to intensify in the
years to come, from sea­
level rise to more frequent
and intense storms and
bigger, more frequent
wildfires, according to a
Climate Risk Assessment
prepared for DNR by an
independent team of cli­
mate experts.
“There is an urgency that
we need to do something
now. And we need to make
sure of two things,” Franz
said. “We need to reduce
carbon, not continue to dig
our hole deeper ... And we
need to be smart, and focus
on our natural­resource
economy, and recognize
the importance of our natu­
ral­resource communities.”
Lynda V. Mapes: 206­464­2515
or lmapes@seattletimes.com
< Lawsuit
FROM B1
Davis’s welfare when they
acted.
The Davis shooting is one
of several used as examples
by a group, “De­Escalate
Washington,” which last
month submitted signatures
to change a state law govern­
ing prosecution of law­en­
forcement officers when they
use deadly force. Washing­
ton has the most stringent
law in the nation, requiring
prosecutors to find an officer
acted with “malice” before
charges can be filed.
If the signatures are vali­
dated for Initiative 940, and
lawmakers take no action
this year, the measure will go
to the November general­
election ballot. If legislators
pass an altered version, both
proposals would go to the
ballot.
Mike Carter: 206­464­3706 or
mcarter@seattletimes.com; on
Twitter: @stimesmcarter.
fine where Americans stand,
even on issues where facts
are clear.
Conservative Republicans
and liberal Democrats are at
opposite ends of the spec­
trum of opinions on whether
human activities are causing
climate change. The science
of global warming has been
clear for years: The climate is
warming, and human activi­
ties are causing that rise.
The U.S. has never moved
as fast as it should to slow, or
prepare for the worst conse­
quences, of climate change.
People are notoriously bad at
time, effort or money on
problems that lie in the fu­
ture. But now that climate
change is already affecting
the planet, the U.S. has a
national government that
refuses to see the problem.
So, this year, the problem
of coaxing awareness and
action remains. That can be
said about many other issues,
as well, from access to afford­
able health care to efforts to
reform police practices to
immigration policy. This is
going to be a challenging
year for people who believe
our society hasn’t gotten to
equality yet.
Polls and surveys show
wide differences by party on
questions of racial and gen­
der equality. We don’t seem
to be living on the same plan­
et anymore, and that is partly
because we are inundated
with information, much of it
from sources that are biased.
I wrote about efforts to
combat “fake news” and to
help young people learn how
to distinguish between sourc­
es that make an effort to
adhere to the facts, and those
that put ideology above
truth.
That’s a huge problem.
There’s no way to have a civil
discussion when people can’t
agree on what’s true and
what isn’t. People at any
point on the political spec­
trum can be limited by infor­
mation bubbles, but, for
now, Americans who are
furthest to the right are most
often furthest from the facts.
That hasn’t always been the
case. I remember when con­
servative and sensible could
be used in the same sentence,
but today we have a prob­
lem.
It is the political right that
makes it difficult to gather
data on gun deaths and re­
jects what data there are in
favor of a belief that more
guns will make everyone
safer. I thought the shooting
deaths of 58 people at a Las
Vegas country­music festival
in October might make a
dent in that belief system,
but it didn’t.
Before we can address all
the social problems we still
face, we’ll have to find a way
to a shared body of facts.
No one could launch and
recover a rocket if they ig­
nored the facts, the data, the
calculations that make that
effort possible.
Jerry Large’s column appears
Monday and Thursday. Reach him
at 206­464­3346 or
jlarge@seattletimes.com
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
ReD & ROVeR | Brian Basset
CLassiC PeanUts | Charles M. Schulz
gaRFieLD | Jim Davis
BaBy BLUes | Jerry Scott & Rick Kirkman
LUann | Greg Evans
FRaZZ | Jeff Mallett
FOR BetteR OR FOR wORse | Lynn Johnston
aRLO & Janis | Jimmy Johnson
saLLy FORth | Francesco Marciuliano
the DUPLeX | Glenn McCoy
PiCKLes | Brian Crane
Between FRienDs | Sandy Bell-Lundy
CRanKshaFt | Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers
wUmO | Mikael Wulff and Anders Morgenthaler
Rhymes with ORange | Hilary Price
Betty | Gary Delainey and Gerry Rasmussen
FamiLy CiRCUs | Bil Keane
KenKen |
easy
HaRd
Rules
| NWThursday B5
Previous answer / easy
1. Each row and each column
must contain the numbers 1
through 4 (easy) or 1 through
6 (challenging) without
repeating.
2. The numbers within the heavily
outlined boxes, called cages,
must total the target number
in the top left of the cage, using
the math operation given. For
example 2- means the numbers
in the cage total 2 through
subtraction (3 and 1 or 4 and 2,
in any order).
3. Freebies: In single-box cages,
fill in the number in the top-left
corner of that cage. A good
way to start is to fill in these
boxes first.
Previous answer / Hard
B6 NWThursday |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
new york times daily Crossword | Edited by Will Shortz
daddy’S home | Tony Rubino and Gary Markstein
aCroSS
1 Venomous African
snake
6 Quandaries
10 Duchess of ___
(Goya subject)
14 “Ghosts”
playwright
15 Cartoon dog
16 Trollish sort
17 1984
Schwarzenegger
sequel
19 Go fast
20 Reeves of “The
Matrix”
21 Kind of bar
22 ___ Ranch
(onetime “Texas
White House”)
25 Early form of
airmail?
28 “Yay, me!”
30 It’s measured in
cups
31 Minor but
essential part
32 “In this way”
34 Round floor
cleaner
36 Many a bar
mitzvah
attendee
37 Chrysler model
discontinued in
2010
39 Mother of the
Virgin Mary
42 Butters up?
44 Opened one’s
mouth but didn’t
speak?
46 Fair-hiring inits.
48 Campaign freebie
49 Scary figure in
Stephen King’s “It”
50 Grinder
55 Org. whose symbol
is an eagle atop a
key
56 Run-of-the-mill
57 Language from
which “kayak”
comes
59 Pac-12 team
60 It’s four units
long in a popular
board game (with
the game’s other
pieces hinted at by
the circled letters)
65 Red giant in the
constellation Cetus
66 A penny is a small
one
67 Express
68 Future C.P.A.’s
study
69 “Gotta go,” in
textspeak
tundra | Chad Carpenter
dilBert | Scott Adams
non Sequitur | Wiley Miller
zitS | Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
No. 1130
PUZZLE BY TrEnTon CharLson
70 Fragrant
compound
doWn
1 Word after hot
or open
2 Blood letters
3 ___ Explorer
(browser)
4 Schnozz
5 Wings
6 Pope before Leo VI
7 For two
8 Potpourri
9 Congress
10 Bella of 1970s
politics
11 Unpredictable
sort
12 “Oh, cry me a
river!”
13 Giving heat?
18 Duty
21 Neighbor
of India and China
in Risk
22 Cheerful tune
23 Cocktail party
spread
24 Foreigner song
with the lyric
“With that one
guitar / He’ll come
alive”
26 Gaming debut of
2001
27 Agent
29 Actress
Headey
33 Join voluntarily
34 Just what the
doctor ordered,
for short?
35 Turn on the
waterworks
38 Watch over
40 Google heading
41 Novelist Ferber
43 Filter target
45 Pull off
46 Unearth
47 Pet store category
51 Lazy ___
52 Good at repartee
53 Big name in
microprocessors
54 ___-de-sac
58 Chinese menu
possessive
60 Take some
swings
61 Army ___
62 Success in the
game 60-Across …
or a hint to
interpreting the
circled squares
63 Winter coat
64 Each
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
PriCkly City | Scott Stantis
Blondie | Dean Young and John Marshall
Wizard of id | Brant Parker
PearlS Before SWine | Stephan Pastis
daily Crossword | A SYMBOLIC PUZZLE By Timothy E. Parker
Candorville | Darrin Bell
Shoe | Gary Brookins & Susie MacNelly
Super quiz | Ken Fisher
Score 1 point for each correct answer
on the Freshman Level, 2 points on
the Graduate Level and 3 points on the
Ph.D. Level
Subject: Crime and
PuniShment
(e.g., Who was the first director of the FBI?
Answer: J. Edgar Hoover.)
freShman level
1. Whom did Lynette
“Squeaky” Fromme try to
assassinate in 1975?
Answer________________
2. For what crime was Al
Capone sentenced to 11 years
in federal prison?
Answer________________
3. Which public enemy No. 1
was gunned down in Chicago
in 1943?
Answer________________
Graduate level
4. She was acquitted of the
ax murders of her father and
stepmother.
Answer________________
5. For what crime was Richard
Hauptmann executed by electric chair?
Answer________________
6. Her sentence was commuted by President Jimmy
Carter, and she was pardoned
by President Bill Clinton.
Ph.d. level
7. Between 1900 and 1910,
she was arrested some 30
times for hatchetations.
Answer________________
8. Clifford Irving’s “autobiography” of this man was determined to be a fraud.
Answer________________
9. In Scotland, a jury can rule
innocent, guilty or _____.
Answer________________
SCorinG: 18 points, doctor; 15-17,
honors graduate; 10-14, plenty smart;
4-9, hit the books harder; 1-3, remedial; 0, who read the questions to you?
Answer________________
ACROSS
1 Slightly open
5 Scenery, to a
speeder
9 As long as
14 Kinks hit
15 Country road
16 Misprint, e.g.
17 20 Speechifies
21 “Don’t bet ___”
22 Visualize
23 Wendigo relative
25 Lean
27 Sprinted
30 Animated
explorer
32 With lots of zip
36 Away from the
wind
38 Small plantation
40 Musical syllables
41 Taurus, for one
44 Hidden, in Paris
45 Comfort
46 Foot segment
47 Anteater features
49 Paper joiner
51 Vietnamese
holiday
52 Poetry of a people
54 Practice punching
56 Advanced deg.
59 Plate dropper’s
cry
61 Jong and Hill
65 Clipper, for Pan
Am
68 Aden’s country
69 Oft-parched
gully
70 Decorative sewing
bag
71 Commencement
72 Laurel of comedy
73 Defeat
waterproofing
DOWN
1 As well
2 A day in France?
3 Jessica of
Hollywood
4 Shabby and then
some
5 Be a rocket man
6 Fond du ___,
Wisc.
7 “... therefore ___
Caesar”
8 Horse controllers
9 Pursued,
as a career
10 Day divs.
11 Author Murdoch
12 Costly theater
seat
13 Fish-eating eagle
18 Marsh plant
19
24
26
27
28
29
31
33
34
35
37
39
42
43
48
50
Lubricates
Full of wrath
___ Gras
Carpenter’s tools
Otherworldly
creature
___ Modelo
(beer brand)
Nirvana-reacher
Put on coats
“There’s no ___
like home”
Marina
craft
Invest with some
trait
Flat-topped hills
Score more than
Dirigible kin
In a bit
Certain noble
Copyright 2018 McMeel Syndication
Yesterday’s Puzzle Solved
53
55
56
57
Disgorges
Reacts to yeast
BLT condiment
Word with “muy”
or “tres”
58 Weaponizes
60 Jazzy singing
1/4/18
62 Quote as a source
63 Malaria
symptom
64 Scissor
66 Iacocca or Remick
67 Toothpaste-box
letters
anSWerS: 1. U.S. President Gerald Ford. 2. Tax evasion. 3. John Dillinger. 4. Lizzie Borden. 5. Murder of Charles Lindbergh
Jr. 6. Patty Hearst. 7. Carry Nation. 8. Howard Hughes. 9. Not proven.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
Puzzles
Horoscopes
| NWThursday B7
Sudoku |
TODAY: JAN. 4, 2018
Complete the grid so that every row, column and
3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.
Rating the day: 10 is easi­
est, 0 is most challenging.
Yesterday’s Puzzle Solved
ARIES (MARCH 21­APRIL 19):
Wonderword | David Ouellet
Today is an 8. Romance
blossoms if you can hold
your temper. Avoid automat­
ic reactions. Use your prolif­
ic charms. Make time for
passionate embraces, family,
children and pets.
TAURUS (APRIL 20­MAY 20):
Today is a 7. Discuss plans
for domestic projects with
your family before getting
started. Ask for what you
want. Resolve a solution
that works for everyone.
GEMINI (MAY 21­JUNE 20):
Today is an 8. Don't disturb
a watchdog. Changes higher
up can affect you. Write
about your feelings. Resolve
basics. Research details with
more than one source.
HOCUS FOCUS | Henry Boltinoff
CANCER (JUNE 21­JULY 22):
SCORPIO (OCT. 23­NOV. 21):
Today is an 8. Professional
challenges have your focus.
Practice makes perfect. Re­
sist impulsive overindulging
or spending.
Find at least six differences in details between panels.
SOLUTION: 1. Visor is missing. 2. Newspaper is longer. 3. Paper is missing. 4. Glasses are missing.
5. Tie is lower. 6. Coat sleeve is longer.
Jumble | David Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Today is a 7. Tempers could
flare. You're actually less
efficient for a while. Finan­
cial solutions arise in con­
versation. Confide in an
authority figure. Accept as­
sistance.
LEO (JULY 23­AUG. 22): Today
is an 8. Take action later.
Obstacles block a personal
project. Interesting options
come up in discussion. Talk
about your ideas. Be pre­
pared.
VIRGO (AUG. 23­SEPT. 22): To­
day is a 7. Look before leap­
ing. Check your internal
gauges and listen to intu­
ition. Keep a positive atti­
tude despite challenges.
LIBRA (SEPT. 23­OCT. 22): To­
day is a 7. A group or com­
munity effort could get
stalled by disagreements or
differing priorities. Resist
the temptation to blurt out
something you'd regret.
Bridge | Steve Becker
TrUmp managemenT
SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22­DEC. 21):
Today is a 7. Plan your
agenda for an exploration
but leave later if possible.
Travel obstacles and delays
could disrupt. Lay low to
avoid expense and hassle.
CAPRICORN (DEC. 22­JAN. 19):
Today is a 7. Changes neces­
sitate budget revisions.
Make your moves strategi­
cally; or postpone them for
better conditions. Review
options. Consult an experi­
enced friend.
AQUARIUS (JAN. 20­FEB. 18):
Today is a 7. A partner's
opinion is important. Re­
solve a disagreement by
listening. Don't dig into
savings on a whim.
PISCES (FEB. 19­MARCH 20):
Today is a 9. Reconsider a
risky proposition. Heed ex­
pert advice with regard to
your work, health and fit­
ness. Others believe in you.
Push for excellence.
Copyright 2018
Tribune Media Services
The power of a crossruff is shown in this hand
where North undertook a
slam despite the series of
minimum bids South had
made during the auction.
West led a spade, taken
by dummy’s ace. Declarer
cashed the A-K of hearts,
discarding his spade loser,
and then embarked on a
crossruff.
The plan was to trump
three clubs in dummy and
three spades or hearts in
his own hand, and this,
together with the ace of
spades, A-K of hearts, A-K
of diamonds and ace of
clubs, would come to 12
tricks.
Accordingly, at trick
four South led a club
to the ace and ruffed a
club.
He then ruffed a heart
and ruffed another club.
Next he trumped a spade,
a club and a spade in alternating order to bring his
trick total to 10.
The A-K of diamonds
scored the 11th and 12th
tricks, and he lost only a
trump trick at the end.
Without the benefit of a
crossruff, South would not
have fared nearly so well.
If he had chosen to draw
trumps immediately, for
example, he would have
taken five trump tricks
instead of eight.
But this obviously was
not a hand in which to
draw trumps.
Indeed, West could have
defeated the contract had
he led a trump initially —
not at all a far-fetched lead
on the bidding.
Both North and South
had indicated distributional values, and a trump lead
to cut down ruffing ability
was well worthy of consideration. After a trump lead,
South would have scored
only seven trump tricks
instead of eight and gone
down one.
Tomorrow: Test your
play.
Copyright 2018 King Features
Syndicate Inc.
Dinner guests should eat what the host prepares, not bring their own surprise meals
Ask Amy
spent time preparing for another
occasion, and to use my mother’s
food instead.
My wife felt that she was being
DEAR AMY:
belittled and unappreciated. She
When my wife and I
asked me on numerous occasions to
were first married,
ask my mother not to bring food
we would invite my
without previously letting us know
parents to our home for Sunday
her intentions so that my wife
dinner. On many occasions, my
would not work in vain. I did so
mother, who was an excellent cook, reluctantly, to no avail.
would bring pots of her cooking
My thought process at the time
(without asking). She told my wife was that it was more gracious, with
to put away the food that she had
any guest, to use the food that the
Syndicated
columnist
TV PICKS
“THE FOUR: BATTLE FOR
STARDOM”
Premiere of a new music competition
that kicks off with four contestants;
mentors Meghan Trainor, Sean “Diddy”
Combs, DJ Khaled and record executive
Charlie Walk; and new contestants each
week vying for a slot in a live finale to
win a contract with iHeartRadio; 8 p.m.
Thursday on KCPQ.
Also on Thursday
“The Big Bang Theory,” 8 p.m.
(KIRO): Sheldon and Amy subject
their friends to secret experiments
to discover which would be most
qualified to be the best man and
the maid of honor at their wed­
ding.
“The Good Place,” 8:30 p.m.
(KING): Michael receives a surprise
visitor; Eleanor, Chidi, Tahani and
Jason attempt to solve a riddle.
guest prepared. My wife felt intimi­
dated by her new mother­in­law.
She still insists that I was remiss in
not more forcefully communicating
her wishes.
What is the appropriate response
to this situation?
invited to your house, we will hap­
pily eat the delicious food you pre­
pare for us. At our house, we’d like
you to eat the food we prepare. At
the very least, please let us know
your cooking plans in advance.”
This is an “Everybody Loves
Raymond” dynamic. And, just like
— Hungry Husband
in the long­running sitcom, some­
DEAR HUNGRY: It is not appropri­ times it is wisest to basically give in.
ate for a guest to bring an entree
and insist that her dish must be
DEAR AMY: I’m writing in appre­
served. You and your wife should
ciation for your “Book on Every
have said to her, “When we are
Bed” literacy campaign. My family
“Nashville,” 9 p.m. (CMT): Season­
six premiere; Juliette seeks to change
her life, Scarlett struggles to find
herself, and Will coaches Gunnar;
also at 10 p.m. on TVLAND.
“Will & Grace,” 9 p.m. (KING): Will
and Grace try to convince themselves
they’re OK with dating the same man
(played by Nick Offerman, Megan
Mullally’s real­life husband); Jack
and Karen get an annoying commer­
cial jingle stuck in their heads.
“Project Runway All Stars,” 9
p.m. (LIFETIME): Season­six pre­
miere; eight All­Star rookies
against eight All­Star veterans in
a battle to create cohesive collec­
tions.
“Van Helsing,” 9 p.m. (SYFY):
Season­two finale; secrets of the
Van Helsing family are unearthed,
and a climactic battle between
humans and vampires leaves
humanity’s fate in question.
started putting wrapped books on
our kids’ beds several years ago at
your suggestion, and now this is a
treasured family tradition!
— Happy Parents
DEAR HAPPY: Literacy starts with
books, and takes hold when books
are shared. I am grateful to families
who have adopted this tradition.
Copyright 2018Tribune Media Services
Send questions to Ask Amy, Chicago
Tribune, TT500, 435 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, IL 60611.
“Truth and Lies: Waco,” 9 p.m.
(KOMO): Twenty­five years after
the 51­day standoff and deadly
siege on David Koresh and the
Branch Davidian compound, new
details and survivor revelations
come to light.
Madeline Mckenzie:
mmckenzie@seattletimes.com
Program times may vary
depending on your cable
provider or service.
B8 NWThursday |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
Weather
Interactive radar: View the weather where you live
http://seati.ms/1Bv25Df
seattletimes.com/weather
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE: www.wrh.noaa.gov/Seattle
The Seattle Times information for the almanac, maps, Northwest temperatures and forecasts, national and international forecasts, marine forecast
and tides comes from ©2018, The Weather Company, LLC
National
5-day Seattle-area forecast
Today’s forecast
Today
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Mostly cloudy,
rain.
Mostly cloudy,
rain.
46
42
49
41
46
38
46
40
48
41
Mostly cloudy,
rain
developing.
Cloudy, rain.
Daytime High
Overnight Low
Mostly cloudy,
showers.
Daytime High
Overnight Low
Daytime High
Overnight Low
Monday
Daytime High
Overnight Low
Daytime High
Overnight Low
Puget Sound: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain in the afternoon. Highs in the mid- to upper 40s. Tonight: Rain at times. Rainfall amounts a tenth
to a quarter of an inch possible. Lows in the upper 30s to mid-40s.
Coast: Mostly cloudy with a slight chance of rain in the morning, then rain in the afternoon. Rainfall amounts less than a tenth of an inch likely.
Highs in the mid- to upper 40s. Tonight: Rain at times. Rainfall amounts a tenth to a quarter of an inch possible.
Mountains: Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain or snow. Snow level near 5,000 feet, except at the surface in the passes. Afternoon pass
temperatures in the upper 20s. Tonight: Rain or snow. A chance of light freezing rain in the passes. Snow level near 4,500 feet.
Eastern Washington: Mostly cloudy. Patchy freezing fog in the morning. A chance of freezing rain in the afternoon. Highs in the upper 20s to
upper 30s. Tonight: Cloudy. A chance of freezing rain or snow in the evening, then a chance of freezing rain overnight.
Seattle almanac
Unless noted, statistics for yesterday through
6 p.m. Readings taken at Sea-Tac airport.
Precipitation
24-hour total
24-hour total last year on Jan. 3
This month to 6 p.m. Jan. 3
Average for Jan. through this date
This year to 6 p.m. Jan. 3
Last year total through Jan. 3
Average year through Jan. 3
Temperature
Vancouver
Island
Low
33
21
36
6 in 1950
Tides
Elliott Bay
Today
Today
Tomorrow
Tomorrow
High Feet
Low Feet
High Feet
Low Feet
7:12 a
5:39 p
7:57 a
6:40 p
Port
Townsend
Today
Today
Tomorrow
Tomorrow
13.5 ft. 12:45 p 6.4 ft.
10.9 ft.
13.4 ft. 12:37 a -2.0 ft.
10.2 ft. 1:42 p 5.9 ft.
6:55 a 10.2 ft. 11:55 a 6.4 ft.
4:52 p 8.4 ft. 11:42 p -1.8 ft.
7:38 a 10.2 ft. 1:03 p 5.8 ft.
5:55 p 7.7 ft.
Marine forecast
Puget Sound and Hood Canal
Today
South wind to 10
kt. Wind waves 1
ft. or less.
PACIFIC OCEAN
Winds
Today's forecast............... SSW 5 mph
National forecast
Very unhealthy
Unhealthy
Moderate
Good
High: Camarillo, Calif. 81
ALASKA
Fairbanks
16/1
Anchorage
26/14
Particulate
matter
San
Francisco
62/52
Juneau
39/35
Los
Angeles
74/54
Ketchikan
45/42
Pollen
Pollenreport
report
Low
Predominant:
Moderate
High
Fri
Detroit
7/-3
North Platte Chicago
9/-3
35/11
Tomorrow
Yakima County officials
said they can’t definitively
predict the scope of an ex­
pected landslide on Rattle­
snake Ridge, where massive
cracks have opened several
hundred feet above the road.
However, officials said a
landslide could be limited in
scale. Geologists have been
monitoring the slow­motion
movement of soil in the area
since October.
Geologic experts “believe
that since the slide is slow­
moving and on a gentle slope
the landslide event will be
small in nature and hopefully
stabilize itself,” the Yakima
County Office of Emergency
Management said in a state­
ment issued Tuesday.
Meanwhile, about 35 of
the 50 or so residents living
in a collection of trailers and
Phoenix
75/48
HAWAII
El Paso
53/32
Atlanta
33/16
r
i
r
pc
r
33
36
27
22
pc
pc
Portland
27/2
Boston
25/5
New York
28/7
Dallas
46/28
Columbia
39/18
Shreveport
42/21
Houston
50/32
Mobile
43/20
H
Hi Lo W
Little Rock
33 17 pc
Los Angeles
74 54 pc
Louisville
20 4 pc
Memphis
28 15 s
Miami
59 43 s
Milwaukee
13 0 pc
Minneapolis
4 -10 pc
Missoula
18 18 pc
Nashville
24 9 pc
New Orleans
43 28 s
New York
28 7 sn
Norfolk
32 12 sn
Oklahoma City 42 25 pc
Omaha
14 4 pc
Orlando
52 34 s
Palm Springs
78 55 pc
Philadelphia
28 10 sn
Phoenix
75 48 s
Pittsburgh
13 -3 sf
Portland, ME
27 2 sn
Providence
27 5 sn
Raleigh
32 12 s
Rapid City
38 17 pc
Reno
56 35 pc
Richmond
30 10 sn
Sacramento
64 52 r
Salt Lake City
40 23 pc
San Antonio
50 34 pc
San Diego
70 52 pc
San Francisco
62 52 r
San Juan
86 75 sh
Santa Fe
51 20 pc
Sioux Falls
8 -1 c
St. Louis
14 6 pc
St. Ste. Marie, MI-3 -20 pc
Syracuse
20 -1 sf
Tampa
54 34 pc
Topeka
24 10 pc
Tucson
70 43 pc
Tulsa
37 21 pc
Wash., DC
29 12 sn
Wichita
37 19 pc
Wilmington DE 31 9 sn
Yuma
77 49 s
Today’s forecast
Hi Lo W
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Baghdad
Bahrain
Bangkok
Beijing
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edmonton
Frankfurt
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Lima
Lisbon
London
47
53
72
66
70
92
33
48
45
73
70
46
97
65
38
74
86
40
43
31
51
52
68
35
70
64
52
52
81
40
71
60
54
41
41
67
46
61
75
16
39
41
64
52
37
74
58
23
57
65
35
37
15
41
47
54
34
66
43
44
43
56
24
66
55
40
r
r
r
s
s
s
pc
pc
r
t
t
pc
s
pc
pc
s
s
c
r
pc
r
r
c
sn
c
pc
r
r
s
sn
pc
pc
r
Hi Lo W
Madrid
Manila
Mazatlan
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
New Delhi
Nice
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Puerto Vallarta
Reykjavik
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
Santiago
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Singapore
St. Petersburg
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver, B.C.
Victoria, B.C.
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg
Sun schedule
Sunrise
Today . . . . . . . . .7:56 a.m.
Tomorrow. . . . . .7:56 a.m.
Moon schedule
L
57
83
81
71
17
36
76
72
66
31
15
57
82
31
81
72
60
86
79
29
86
36
36
75
75
54
48
14
42
43
49
44
-6
45 pc
76 t
56 pc
45 s
-4 sn
29 c
60 t
46 s
50 pc
25 sn
-12 sn
46 r
62 s
25 s
71 r
52 s
46 pc
56 s
61 s
20 pc
73 t
35 sn
34 sn
64 r
62 pc
37 s
35 s
-4 pc
40 r
39 r
39 pc
35 pc
-17 s
Sunset
4:32 p.m.
4:33 p.m.
Miami
59/43
Jan. 8
Jan. 16
Jan. 24
Jan. 31
Moon rises
Moon sets
Today . . . . . . . . . 8:11 p.m.
9:55 a.m.
Tomorrow . . . . . . 9:26 p.m.
10:31 a.m.
Stationary
modest buildings at the base
of the ridge have not heeded
warnings to evacuate.
Under state law residents
can’t be forced to leave, but
the county’s emergency­
management office is collect­
ing their information to give
to first­responders should
43
30
38
44
38
Washington D.C.
29/12
Cracks monitored on hill near Yakima
By ALEC REGIMBAL
Yakima Herald­Republic
47
42
48
54
44
Hi Lo W
53 25 pc
33 16 s
31 7 sn
49 31 pc
27 10 sn
36 24 s
33 15 s
17 4 c
25 5 sn
13 -1 sf
21 -4 sn
39 21 pc
39 19 s
20 8 pc
33 14 s
9 -3 pc
16 0 pc
8 -3 sf
13 -1 pc
24 -1 sn
58 47 r
46 28 pc
51 24 s
7 -1 pc
7 -3 pc
-1 -17 s
53 32 pc
0 -11 c
56 23 pc
70 44 pc
11 0 sf
36 26 pc
9 -6 pc
85 76 sh
23 2 sn
18 18 pc
80 67 pc
50 32 pc
9 -6 pc
38 20 s
45 26 s
18 9 pc
47 38 r
66 46 pc
International
18/9
Warm
Today
No predominant pollens.
med
high
low
For more information:
www.pollen.com
Lo Wea
41 r
40 r
40 r
27 sn
28 pc
29 c
41 r
39 r
43 r
44 r
38 r
41 r
42 r
36 r
32 c
42 r
40 r
29 sn
30 i
40 r
29 c
32 pc
27 pc
31 pc
Kansas City
Denver
51/24
Cold
Thu
L
Minneapolis
4/-10
H
Honolulu
80/67
Jet Stream
Hi
43
43
45
29
32
30
45
44
45
46
43
43
43
41
35
46
45
29
31
44
32
32
29
33
Low: Presque Isle, Maine -22
H
Billings
36/24
Seattle Everett Tacoma Bellevue
For burn
burn ban
ban information:
information: www.pscleanair.org
www.pscleanair.org
For
IDAHO
Boise
Sun Valley
H
Seattle
46/42
Portland
44/38
Utqiagvik
2/-1
West wind to 10 kt.
Wind waves 1 ft. or
less.
Carbon
monoxide
50
MILES
Yesterday’s national extremes (contiguous U.S.)
Figures for cities show today’s
high/low forecast.
Air-quality index
index
Air-quality
Ozone
0
Omak
31/29
Mt.
Baker
Coeur
Everett
d’Alene
Port Angeles
45/41
Spokane
31/29
41/36
Washington
Seattle
29/29
Bellevue
46/42
Idaho
Wenatchee
43/41
Aberdeen
45/43
29/27
Tacoma Snoqualmie
Moses Lake
44/40
Olympia
Pass
29/28
Pullman
Ellensburg
43/42
Ilwaco
Mt.
35/32
32/28
ke River
na
Chehalis
49/43
Rainier
Lewiston
45/40
Yakima
Pasco
38/32
Longview
31/29 Walla Walla
33/31
43/38
32/32
River
C o l u mb i a
Pendleton
Cannon Beach
32/31
49/43
Portland
The Dalles
44/38
34/31
Mt.
Salem
Oregon
Hood
45/38
Tonight
Today’s main offender
British Columbia
Bellingham
43/40
Victoria
43/39
0.00"
0.00"
0.00"
0.55"
0.00"
0.43"
0.55"
WASHINGTON
Bellevue
Bellingham
Bremerton
Colville
Ellensburg
Ephrata
Everett
Forks
Friday Harbor
Hoquiam
Longview
Oak Harbor
Olympia
Port Angeles
Pullman
Seattle
Shelton
Spokane
Stampede Pass
Tacoma
Tri-Cities
Walla Walla
Wenatchee
Yakima
OREGON
Astoria
Bend
Eugene
Medford
Portland
S
High
49
33
46
58 in 1984
Yesterday
Last year, Jan. 3
Average, Jan. 3
Record on Jan. 3
Regional
temperatures
Today’s Northwest forecast
Albuquerque
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham, AL
Bismarck
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Casper
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Coos Bay
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Fargo
Flagstaff
Fresno
Grand Rapids
Great Falls
Green Bay
Guam
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Klamath Falls
Las Vegas
anything happen, said Hor­
ace Ward, the agency’s senior
planner. He saidColumbia
Asphalt and Gravel, whose
quarry is at one end of the
crack, will offer residents
hotel rooms if they evacuate.
Officials say the hillside
above the quarry is moving
an average of 1.4 feet per
week, and that no significant
movement has been seen.
But Ward said the resi­
dents were warned to evacu­
ate because officials say
“something could happen” in
the coming weeks.
The Rattlesnake Ridge
forms the eastern side of a
gap in ridges separating the
Upper and Lower Yakima
valleys. Running through the
gap are Thorp Road, Inter­
state 82, the Yakima River, a
Burlington Northern rail line
and Highway 97.
The state Department of
Transportation says it will
close Interstate 82 if rockfall
becomes a danger.
SPORTS
seattletimes.com/sports | JANUARY 4, 2018 | THURSDAY
C
QBS TO NFL>USC’S DARNOLD AND UCLA’S ROSEN DECLARE FOR DRAFT>C3
Time for Seahawks to
move on from Graham
Larry Stone
Seattle Times columnist
Jimmy
Graham
came to
Seattle in
March 2015
with visions
of grandeur
by the Sea­
hawks. Sure, he cost starting
Super Bowl center Max Ung­
er and a first­round draft
pick, a high cost indeed, but
ON THE WEB
Recap of a Q&A with
reporter Bob Condotta
seattletimes.com/sports
Pete Carroll and John
Schneider were convinced
they had acquired a differ­
ence­making tight end.
Three seasons later, how­
ever, Graham hasn’t made
nearly enough of a differ­
ence for Seattle. And as free
agency beckons for Graham,
it would benefit all parties to
call this a noble miscalcula­
tion and move on.
It was never quite the
marriage it seemed destined
to be. Graham’s first season
was marred by a serious
knee injury in the 11th
game. His second season
featured gaudy statistics —
See > STONE, C2
Inside Seahawks
already eyeing a new
kicker for 2018 > C2
H U S K Y
10
DEAN RUTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES
Jimmy Graham had five games this season with fewer than 10 receiving yards.
F O O T B A L L
DEAN RUTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES
Lineman Andrew Kirkland raises the Apple Cup trophy after the Huskies beat Washington State 41­14 in November. The Huskies won their fifth straight Apple Cup.
MEMORIES |
From Rondeau’s
goodbye to an
another Apple
Cup romp, here
are our favorites
TOP
MOMENTS
Porter plays
waiting game
with back, but
won’t rush
return to game
By DAVE MATTER
St. Louis Post­Dispatch
COLUMBIA, Mo. — Meeting
with reporters for the first time
since undergoing back surgery in
November, Missouri preseason
All­American freshman basket­
ball player Michael Porter Jr.
urged caution Tuesday about his
return to the court.
T
By ADAM JUDE / Seattle Times staff reporter
he Washington Huskies concluded their 2017 season
with a 35­28 loss to No. 9 Penn State in the Fiesta Bowl
on Saturday. The Huskies finished the season with a
10­3 record, marking the first time since 1990­91 that
the program has had back­to­back double­digit win totals.
Here is a review of the best moments of the season for UW:
10. So long, Bob Rondeau
After 37 years in the broadcast booth,
Bob Rondeau signed off for the last time
Saturday as the Voice of the Huskies.
“As I get later on in my life, I hear
people say I can’t wait until this is over,”
Rondeau told The Seattle Times’ Percy
Allen after the Apple Cup. “Well, guess
what? Don’t ever wish for the speedy
passage of time. Just don’t. It’s the most
valuable thing you can have. Good, bad
Porter, who led Nathan Hale to
a state championship and backed
out of his commitment to go to
Washington when Husky coach
Lorenzo Romar was fired, hasn’t
played since the opening min­
utes of Mizzou’s Nov. 10 opener.
Porter said he first suffered his
back injury during a summer
practice with his AAU team,
or indifferent. Savor the time. This
day was really long, but it could
never be long enough. It was ex­
traordinary.”
9. Hunter Bryant breaks
through
Hunter Bryant, the freshman
tight end from Issaquah, had his
coming­out party in the Huskies’
MO­KAN Elite, two years ago. He
called it “a trauma incident.”
“I went up for a dunk and got
hit really high in the air,” he said.
“I came flat down on my back.
That’s when I hurt it.”
Porter said the injury “pro­
gressed” in the weeks leading up
to Missouri’s first regular­season
game against Iowa State. Before
See > HUSKIES, C3
that game, Porter played in three
preseason exhibition games
against Kansas, Wisconsin and
Missouri State, but it was on
Nov. 10 when Porter told Tigers
coach Cuonzo Martin he was in
too much pain to play. Martin
took Porter out in the game’s
third minute.
Michael
See > PORTER, C5 Porter Jr.
REACH THE EDITORS: Paul Barrett, Sports Editor 206­464­2093 pbarrett@seattletimes.com | Scott Hanson, Assistant Sports Editor 206­464­2943 shanson@seattletimes.com
C2 Sports |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
SPORTS POLL
Vote at seattletimes.com/sports
Which season­ending football
game was most disappointing?
Penn State 35,
Huskies 28
49%
Cardinals 26,
Seahawks 24
35%
Michigan St. 42,
Cougars 17
16%
Today's question
Who will win this weekend’s NFC wild­card playoff games?
• Rams and Saints
• Rams and Panthers
• Falcons and Saints
• Falcons and Panthers
Around Town
A look ahead for our area teams
www.gohuskies.com (206­543­2200)
MEN
Saturday
@Wash. St.
1 p.m.
Pac­12
Jan. 11
California
8 p.m.
Pac­12
WSU basketball
WOMEN
Jan. 13
Stanford
5 p.m.
Pac­12
Friday
Utah
6 p.m.
Pac­12
Jan. 11
Stanford
6 p.m.
ESPNU
Seattle U basketball
WOMEN
Jan. 13
California
1 p.m.
Pac­12
Friday
Colorado
8 p.m.
Pac­12
Jan. 11
Chicago
State
7 p.m.
Gonzaga basketball
Saturday
@LMU
7 p.m.
ESPNU
Jan. 12
@Stanford
6 p.m.
Pac­12
WOMEN
Jan. 13
UMKC
1 p.m.
Saturday
@Grand
Canyon
1 p.m.
Jan. 11
@Chicago
State
5 p.m.
Jan. 13
@UMKC
Noon
www.gozags.com (800­325­SEAT)
MEN
Thursday
@Pepperdine
8 p.m.
ESPNU
Sunday
Utah
11 a.m.
Pac­12
www.goseattleu.com (206­296­2835)
MEN
Saturday
Grand
Canyon
7 p.m.
Jan. 12
@California
8 p.m.
Pac­12
www.wsucougars.com (800­462­6847)
MEN
Saturday
Washington
1 p.m.
Pac­12
Sunday
Colorado
2 p.m.
WOMEN
Jan. 11
Portland
6 p.m.
ROOT
Thursday
Pepperdine
6 p.m.
Saturday
LMU
2 p.m.
Jan. 11
@Portland
7 p.m.
Everett Silvertips | www.everettsilvertips.com (425­252­5100)
Friday, 7:05 p.m., at Victoria; Saturday, 7:05 p.m., Portland
Seattle Thunderbirds | www.seattlethunderbirds.com (253­239­7825)
Friday, 7:05 p.m., at Kelowna; Saturday, 7:05 p.m., Spokane
THURSDAY’S OTHER LOCAL EVENTS
College Basketball: Men, Western Washington vs. Northwest Nazarene,
7 p.m.; Women, Seattle Pacific vs. Northwest Nazarene, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY’S OTHER LOCAL EVENTS
College swimming: Men & Women, Seattle U. at Pacific Lutheran, 6 p.m.
On the Air
Thursday
NBA basketball
5 p.m.
Golden St. at Houston
7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers
NCAA men’s basketball
4 p.m.
UT Martin at Austin Peay
4 p.m.
Houston at Wichita St.
4 p.m.
Ohio St. at Iowa
5 p.m.
Maryland at Michigan St.
5:30 p.m. Arizona St. at Colorado
6 p.m.
N. Iowa at Missouri St.
6 p.m.
Arizona at Utah
6 p.m.
Cincinnati at Temple
6 p.m.
SMU at Tulane
7 p.m.
UCLA at Stanford
7:30 p.m. USC at California
8 p.m.
Gonzaga at Pepperdine
NCAA women’s basketball
4 p.m.
North Carolina at Boston College
7 p.m.
San Diego at Portland
High school football
3 p.m.
Under Armour All­American Game
Golf
3 p.m.
PGA Tour, Sentry Tournament of Champions
Premier League soccer
Noon
Tottenham vs. West Ham
Winter Sports
3:30 p.m. U.S. Olympic Trials, Speed Skating
Figure Skating
2 p.m.
U.S. Championships, Pairs Short Program
5:30 p.m. U.S. Championships, Men’s Short Program
TV
TNT
TNT
CBSSN
ESPN
ESPNU
FS1
PAC­12
CBSSN
ESPN
ESPN2
ESPNU
FS1
PAC­12
ESPNU
NOTEBOOK
If they go with Myers, the
Seahawks would hope it
turns out more like it did
with Stephen Hauschka
than with Walsh.
Hauschka is remembered
now for a successful six­
By BOB CONDOTTA
year run in Seattle, during
Seattle Times staff reporter
which he set a team record
It didn’t take long for the for highest career field­goal
Seahawks to begin moving percentage — 88.83 per­
on from kicker Blair Walsh, cent. But he had been
waived six times by five
as they signed free agent
teams before signing with
Jason Myers to a futures
the Seahawks.
contract Wednesday.
Seattle decided not to try
Myers, who spent the
2015 and 2016 seasons and to match offers they figured
six games of 2017 with the Hauschka would receive
Jacksonville Jaguars before when he became a free
being released, visited with agent last year, instead
signing Walsh in February
the Seahawks this week.
to a one­year contract
Signing an NFL futures
worth $1.1 million.
contract means Myers will
Hauschka signed a three­
become part of the team
year with the Buffalo Bills
when the new league year
worth up to $8.85 million,
begins March 14.
with $4 million guaran­
Walsh had a one­year
teed.
contract with Seattle and
The signing of Myers
will become an unrestrict­
ed free agent in March. He could be the first step in
Seattle reshaping its kick­
is not expected to return
ing units in 2018.
after making only 21 of 29
Visiting the Seahawks at
field­goal attempts. He
the same time as Myers was
missed a potential game­
winner from 48 yards Sun­ punter is Jeff Locke, who
played at UCLA and has
day against Arizona, three
been with the Vikings,
attempts in a 17­14 loss to
Washington and a 52­yard Colts and Lions in an NFL
career that dates to 2013.
attempt that could have
Unlike Myers, Locke did
tied the score against At­
not sign. But that he visited
lanta.
indicates Seattle is explor­
Myers, 26, made Jack­
ing options for possibly
sonville’s roster as an un­
drafted free agent in 2015. replacing veteran punter
Known for his leg strength, Jon Ryan, whose contract
Myers was 64 of 79 on field could make him vulnerable
to being a salary­cap casu­
goals (81 percent) and 76
alty in 2018.
of 88 on point­after at­
Ryan’s contract calls for
tempts (86.4 percent) in 38
cap hits of $3.2 million and
games with Jacksonville.
He was released in October $3.6 million the next two
following three misses that seasons, with Seattle able
proved critical in two losses to save $2 million and
$3 million in those two
(all from 52 yards or lon­
years by releasing him.
ger). Myers was 11 of 15
Ryan, who turned 36 in
this season before being
November, counted as just
waived but 10 of 11 from
a $1.6 million cap hit the
inside 50 yards.
Myers also had workouts past two years after signing
a four­year contract worth
with the Chargers and
$10 million in 2016.
Bengals, among others,
Locke, an All­Pac­12
following his release.
punter as a senior at UCLA
Myers’ background is
in 2012, was a fifth­round
similar to Walsh’s — being
waived the previous season pick of, yep, the Vikings, in
after a few critical misses — 2013 and played for Min­
nesota from 2013­16 be­
which might elicit skepti­
fore signing with the Colts
cism among fans.
as a free agent last March.
But the Seahawks also
likely will continue to look But despite signing a deal
that included $1.25 million
at kickers in the offseason
guaranteed, he was re­
and could sign more than
one to have competition in leased by the Colts in Au­
gust after losing the job to
training camp. Walsh was
the only kicker Seattle had Rigoberto Sanchez.
He signed with the Lions
in camp in 2017 after sign­
as an injury replacement
ing as a free agent last
for Sam Martin before
February.
Myers struggled with
Jacksonville, missing
key field goals
Total: 1,376
UW basketball
Seahawks add kicker
Myers; is Jon Ryan out?
Radio
880
ROOT
ROOT
ESPN2
being waived after five
games when Martin re­
turned.
Locke averaged 45.3
yards per punt with the
Lions with a net average of
42.2 that would have
ranked sixth in the NFL if
he had enough attempts to
qualify.
Ryan had a season that
was statistically mostly in
line with his others with
the Seahawks, averaging
45.0 yards per punt with a
net of 38.8.
Ryan is Seattle’s longest­
tenured player, joining the
team in coach Mike Holm­
gren’s final year and is the
only player on the roster
who predates the arrival of
coach Pete Carroll in 2010.
Ryan has played in 159
consecutive games, a Sea­
hawks record, and is the
franchise career leader in
many punting categories,
including punts (770),
punt yards (34,480) and
longest punt (77).
Notes
• Seahawks defensive coordi­
nator Kris Richard will be inter­
viewed by the Indianapolis Colts
for their vacant head­coaching
position, according to Ian Rapo­
port of the NFL Network. Rich­
ard, 38, has been Seattle’s defen­
sive coordinator the past three
seasons, taking over when Dan
Quinn left to become coach of
the Atlanta Falcons.
One tie between Richard and
the Colts is Ed Dodds, who
worked in Seattle’s personnel
department from 2007 until
leaving last spring to become the
vice president of player person­
nel for Indianapolis.
• Seattle signed fullback
Jalston Fowler to a futures deal.
Fowler, who played much of the
past three years with Tennessee
before being released in Decem­
ber, was on the Seahawks’ prac­
tice squad at the end of the 2017
season.
Fowler’s signing means seven
of the nine players on Seattle’s
practice squad at the end of the
season have been signed to
futures deals. The two that have
not are linebackers Kache Pala­
cio and Jason Thompson.
Palacio played at Washington
State, and Thompson is a Kenne­
dy High School grad.
Bob Condotta: 206­515­5699
or bcondotta@seattletimes.com.
On Twitter @bcondotta
ON THE WEB
Follow Seahawks news
from the Times’
Bob Condotta
seattletimes.co
m
/seahawks
GOLF
NBCSN
NBCSN
NBCSN
NBCSN
Friday
NBA basketball
TV
Radio
4 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston
ESPN
6:30 p.m. Washington at Memphis
ESPN
7 p.m.
Atlanta at Portland
NBCSNW
NCAA men’s basketball
3:30 p.m. Akron at Toledo
CBSSN
4 p.m.
Wisconsin at Rutgers
ESPN2
4 p.m.
St.Peter’s at Iona
ESPNU
5 p.m.
Northwestern at Penn St.
FS1
6 p.m.
N. Kentucky at Oakland
ESPN2
6 p.m.
Wright St. at Detroit
ESPNU
7 p.m.
Oregon at Oregon St.
FS1
NCAA women’s basketball
4 p.m.
Providence at Seton Hall
FS2
6 p.m.
Utah at Washington
PAC­12WA 1150
8 p.m.
Colorado at Washington St.
PAC­12WA
8 p.m.
Oregon at USC
PAC­12
Soccer
11:30 a.m. FA Cup, Liverpool vs. Everton
FS1
11:50 a.m. Manchester United vs. Derby County
FS2
Golf
3 p.m.
PGA Tour, Sentry Tournament of Champions GOLF
WHL hockey
7:05 p.m. Seattle at Kelowna
1090
7:05 p.m. Everett at Victoria
1380
Winter sports
3:30 p.m. U.S. Olympic Trials:Speed Skating
NBCSN
5 p.m.
Speed Skating: ISU European Championships* NBCSN
6 p.m.
Biathlon:IBU World Cup
NBCSN
7:30 p.m. IBSF World Cup Bobsleigh and Skeleton
NBCSN
Figure skating
1 p.m.
U.S. Championships, Short dance
NBCSN
8 p.m.
U.S. Championships, Ladies’ Free skate
5
* Delayed broadcast.
HOW TO REACH SPORTS EDITORS
Paul Barrett, Sports Editor, 206­464­2093 pbarrett@seattletimes.com
Scott Hanson, Assistant Sports Editor, 206­464­2943
shanson@seattletimes.com
Nathan Joyce, high­school sports, 206­464­2176
njoyce@seattletimes.com
To be included in sports calendars and other listings, send information
to Seattle Times, Sports calendar, 1000 Denny Way, Seattle, WA 98109
or email sports@seattletimes.com
< Stone
Graham wasn’t willing to
sell out to make the difficult
catch. Carroll even called
him out on it after a loss to
the most catches (65) and
Jacksonville, saying that on
yards (923) for a Seahawks one throw by Wilson that
tight end — but Seattle still was intercepted, “Jimmy’s
couldn’t master Graham’s
got to make that play,
hoped­for dominance in
hopefully, for us, where it’s
the red zone, with just six
either him or nobody.
touchdown catches.
That’s kind of what we are
And this past season,
counting on right there.”
while Russell Wilson finally
Graham finished tied for
figured out how to get the
second in the NFL in
6­foot­7 Graham the ball in dropped passes with seven.
the end zone (his 10 receiv­ His total yardage (520) was
ing TDs were most in the
his lowest since his rookie
NFL by a tight end and tied year with New Orleans, and
for second overall), it was
his yards per catch (9.1)
too often boom or bust with were the lowest of his ca­
Graham. He had five games reer by more than a yard. In
with fewer than 10 receiv­
other words, Graham in
ing yards, including a one­
2017 was a TD machine
reception­for­minus­1­yard with pedestrian contribu­
disappearance in the sea­
tion elsewhere.
son’s most critical game
And now he’s a free
against the Rams, a 42­7
agent. Common wisdom is
Seattle loss.
that Graham will use that
Wilson has called Gra­
power to find a team more
ham one of his best friends conducive to his skill set —
on the team, and during his perhaps even back with
locker­cleaning interview
Drew Brees in New Or­
Monday memorably re­
leans.
ferred to him as “a uni­
Graham by all accounts
corn,” which the quarter­
was a good teammate and
back defined thusly:
popular in the Seahawks
“There’s only so many of
locker room, but he never
these guys you can find,
felt fully vested in Seattle.
that can do what he can
Certainly, he never re­
do.”
vealed much of his person­
But perversely, the Sea­
ality to fans, making him­
hawks at times seemed
self virtually unavailable to
intent on making Graham
the media except for ex­
into something he is not.
tremely rare (and brief)
What he is, of course, is a
interview sessions. He was,
freak athlete who has the
by and large, the star who
uncanny ability to go up
never was.
and get an alley­oop pass. It
The Seahawks could
took Wilson time to master ensure the retention of
that, and in the interim,
Graham by slapping him
Graham never really took
with the franchise tag. But
to the essential task of
that’s something they ha­
Seattle receivers to find a
ven’t employed since 2010
way to get open while Wil­ and are unlikely to use on a
son scrambled around. And 32­year­old (in November)
Graham wasn’t renowned
tight end who would stand
for his blocking, but the
to earn over $11 million for
Seahawks kept trying to fit 2018.
that square peg into a
Carroll said Tuesday the
round hole.
Seahawks have talked to
It seemed at times that
Graham, and added, “We
FROM C1
love Jimmy, and we would
love him to be with us.”
The Seahawks, at this
point, would be better
served using the saved
money — they paid Graham
nearly $10 million this past
season — to better navigate
the salary cap while ad­
dressing their myriad
needs. There are some
intriguing tight ends on the
free­agent market (includ­
ing former Husky Austin
Seferian­Jenkins) who
would come much cheaper.
The Seahawks probably
could find a way to bring
back Luke Willson, himself
a free agent, to join hold­
overs Nick Vannett and
Tyrone Swoopes.
The subtext of the Sea­
hawks’ offseason is that
they want to get younger,
and this is one such oppor­
tunity. They could even get
better in the process; other
than touchdowns,
Graham’s production was
not overly daunting, nor
was his blocking.
It seems time to make a
clean break. Considering
the value of a first­round
pick, and that Unger is still
a respected and productive
player for the Saints,
named a team captain the
past two years — and bear­
ing in mind the dire straits
of Seattle’s offensive line —
you’d have to call this one a
net loss for the Seahawks.
When the trade was
made, Carroll told report­
ers, “The opportunity to get
a player that can make
these kinds of plays that
we’ve seen Jimmy Graham
do for a number of years
really got us excited.”
Unfortunately, though,
the Seahawks — through
fault that was partially their
own — saw those kind of
plays far less than they
expected.
Larry Stone: 206­464­3146
or lstone@seattletimes.com.
On Twitter @StoneLarry
Gruden says
‘good chance’
he will coach
Raiders again
NFL
Former coach says
he’s at stage where
he could return to field
The Associated Press
ALAMEDA, Calif. — Jon
Gruden says he had a good
talk with Oakland Raiders
owner Mark Davis about
returning to the organization
for a second stint as coach
and believes there is a “good
chance” it will happen.
Gruden gave an interview
to ESPN Radio on Wednes­
day to discuss his pursuit of
the Raiders job that opened
when Jack Del Rio was fired
after a disappointing six­win
season.
“It’s been a long couple of
weeks,” Gruden said. “I know
they’ve gone through their
process of interviewing can­
didates and until they’re
done I won’t know. I did have
a good meeting with Mark.
I’ve known him a long time
and got a lot of respect for
the Raiders football organi­
zation.”
Gruden has been out of
coaching the past nine years
while serving as ESPN’s ana­
lyst for “Monday Night Foot­
ball.” He is scheduled to
work the network’s playoff
game Saturday in Kansas
City between the Chiefs and
Tennessee Titans and could
come back to the Raiders as
soon as next week.
“I think there’s a good
chance,” he said. “I’m excited
about where I’m at in terms
of studying the game and
preparing to come back and
coach. I just don’t want to sit
here and speculate.”
Gruden apparently is al­
ready trying to put together a
staff. Bengals coach Marvin
Lewis said he expected de­
fensive coordinator Paul
Guenther to interview with
Oakland “at some point.”
Gruden spent four seasons
as coach in Oakland from
1998­2001. After leading the
Raiders to 8­8 records his
first two years, Gruden
helped the team reach the
AFC title game following the
2000 season and got Oak­
land back into the playoffs
the following season.
His tenure ended shortly
after the “Tuck Rule” loss to
the New England Patriots
when he was traded the
following month to Tampa
Bay for two first­round draft
picks, two second­rounders
and $8 million.
Gruden beat the Raiders in
the Super Bowl in his first
season with the Buccaneers
but didn’t win another play­
off game for Tampa Bay in
his final six seasons. He has a
95­81 career record.
The Raiders will be re­
quired to comply with the
“Rooney Rule” and interview
at least one minority candi­
date or otherwise face disci­
pline from the NFL. The team
has not commented on the
search and might have al­
ready conducted that inter­
view.
Gruden dismissed specula­
tion raised in a report by
ESPN over the weekend that
he would get an ownership
stake as part of his contract.
Notes
• Jarvis Landry’s return to the
Miami Dolphins in 2018 looked a
little less likely Wednesday after
coach Adam Gase delivered a
stinging critique of the excitable
receiver’s behavior in the season
finale.
Landry and teammate Kenyan
Drake were ejected in the fourth
quarter of Sunday’s loss to the
Buffalo Bills. Landry was an insti­
gator in the brawl that led to the
ejections.
“This last game was probably
the pinnacle of what I’ve ever seen
with him during a game,” Gase
said. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen it
get to a level where it was extreme­
ly bad. But the last game was about
as embarrassing as I’ve seen in a
long time. It was something we
can’t have happen.”
Landry, who led the NFL with
112 receptions, can become a free
agent this offseason. He has said he
wants to remain with the Dolphins,
and they’ve said they want him
back, but his volatile personality is
cause for a concern — especially on
a team that went 6­10 in part due
to a lack of discipline.
• The Green Bay Packers have
announced the departure of veter­
an defensive coordinator Dom
Capers.
Defensive­line coach Mike
Trgovac and inside linebackers
coach Scott McCurley were also
let go. Capers had been defensive
coordinator since 2009.
• The Detroit Lions have inter­
viewed Houston Texans defensive
coordinator Mike Vrabel for their
coaching position.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
| Sports C3
CollegeFootball
Rosen,
Darnold
will enter
NFL draft
ACROSS THE NATION
L.A. rivals could be
first two quarterbacks
taken in spring
The Associated Press and
The Orlando Sentinel
Within 30 minutes of one
another, UCLA quarterback
Josh Rosen and USC quarter­
back Sam Darnold an­
nounced they will enter the
NFL draft.
The Los Angeles rivals
have a chance to be the first
two quarterbacks taken and
possibly among the first few
players off the board in April.
Joining Rosen and Dar­
nold in announcing NFL
intentions Wednesday was
Oklahoma offensive tackle
Orlando Brown, another
possible top­10 pick.
Rosen’s decision was no
surprise. He has started for
UCLA since his freshman
season, though injuries cost
him most of his sophomore
year and this season he did
not play in the Bruins’ Cactus
Bowl loss against Kansas
State because he was being
treated for a concussion.
He passed for 9,301 yards
with 59 touchdown passes
and 26 interceptions in his
college career, but UCLA
never even so much as won a
bowl game during his time
there. He was close to fired
UCLA coach Jim Mora, but
Rosen said he discussed his
decision with new Bruins
coach Chip Kelly. After play­
ing for three offensive coor­
dinators in three seasons at
UCLA he decided to move on.
In his statement, Rosen said
attending UCLA was “the
best decision of my life.” He
also promised his mother
that he’ll return to Westwood
to finish his degree.
There was more uncertain­
ty about Darnold. He was a
third­year sophomore this
past season after sitting out
as a redshirt as a freshman.
Darnold took over as the
Trojans’ starting quarterback
four games into last season
as a redshirt freshman. He
won the Rose Bowl in his first
season with a record 453­
yard, five­touchdown perfor­
mance against Penn State,
and he led the Trojans to
their first Pac­12 champion­
ship since 2008 this season.
He passed for 7,229 yards
with 57 touchdown passes
and 22 interceptions in 27
games.
Notes
• A claim filed by the former
assistant to fired Arizona coach
Rich Rodriguez says he walked
around the office in his underwear,
fondled himself in front of her and
forced her to cover up an extramar­
ital affair he had with another
woman.
The claim seeking damages
against Rodriguez was filed by an
attorney for the former assistant
and her husband and is a required
precursor to a lawsuit against a
government official. It was re­
leased Wednesday by the Arizona
attorney general’s office.
Lawyer Augustine Jimenez III
is seeking a $7.5 million settlement
for his clients, saying in the claim
that jurors who might consider a
lawsuit against a coach who mis­
used his power could award tens of
millions of dollars “in this current
climate where #MeToo is in the
headlines.”
Arizona fired Rodriguez on
Tuesday night. The university said
it began an investigation in Octo­
ber after receiving a sexual harass­
ment complaint against Rodriguez,
but could not substantiate the
woman’s claims because she de­
clined to be interviewed by the
school.
“However, Arizona Athletics did
become aware of information, both
before and during the investiga­
tion, which caused it to be con­
cerned with the direction and
climate of the football program,” a
joint statement from university
President Robert Robbins and
athletic director Dave Heeke said.
• UCF will hold a parade Sunday
at Disney World to celebrate going
undefeated and winning the Peach
Bowl, feats the Knights say make
them national champions.
No. 12 UCF earned a 34­27 win
over No. 7 Auburn in the Peach
Bowl Monday, completing the first
undefeated season in school histo­
ry. The Knights went 13­0, won the
American Athletic Conference title
and posted the highest graduation
rate among all Football Bowl
Subdivision public schools.
The Knights knocked off the
Tigers, who previously earned wins
over Georgia and Alabama.
WSU loses assistant Manning to UCLA
COUGARS
grow into the starting spot.
salary of $301,500 in 2017.
Dale had eight tackles for
He joined the staff shortly
loss, three sacks, one forced
after Mike Leach hired Alex
fumble, one interception
Grinch as defensive coordi­
and four pass breakups.
nator in 2015 and helped
Manning came to WSU
Grinch overhaul the WSU
from Michigan, where he
defense, which finished 16th
By STEFANIE LOH
coached outside linebackers
nationally in total defense
Seattle Times staff reporter
WSU assis­
and cornerbacks from
this season.
2013­14. Manning graduat­
Under Manning’s tutelage, tant coach
Washington State rush­lineback­
ers coach Roy Manning is leaving to WSU’s rush linebackers have Roy Manning ed from Michigan in 2004
join Chip Kelly’s staff at UCLA, Bruce blossomed. Frankie Luvu
is off to UCLA and played three seasons in
the NFL, with the Bengals,
switched from inside line­
Feldman reported Wednesday.
backer to rush linebacker before this Jaguars, Bills, Texans and Packers.
Manning will join the UCLA staff
Manning has been a prolific re­
season and finished his senior year
as special­teams coordinator, Feld­
with a career­high 12 tackles for loss cruiter at WSU.
man of Sports Illustrated reported,
As the Cougars’ San Diego­area
— second on the team behind Her­
adding that several schools have
recruiter, the list of players he
cules Mata’afa. Manning also
tried to hire Manning this winter.
helped bring to WSU includes safety
coached the nickelbacks, and this
Manning, 35, just completed his
third season at WSU, making a base season he helped junior Hunter Dale Jalen Thompson, defensive end
Rush linebackers coach
is first Leach assistant
to leave this offseason
Derek Moore and defensive end Will
Rodgers.
His energetic personality also has
struck a chord with Cougars fans on
Twitter.
Manning is the first WSU assistant
reported to leave the staff this off­
season. Grinch is expected to join
Ohio State as the Buckeyes’ 10th
assistant after new NCAA rules
permitting an extra coach go into
effect Jan. 9.
Manning’s reported departure,
Grinch’s pending departure and the
new rules permitting a 10th assis­
tant would give Leach three posi­
tions to fill for the 2018 season.
Stefanie Loh: 206­464­8994
or sloh@seattletimes.com.
On Twitter: @stefanieloh
< Huskies
FROM C1
38­7 victory over Cal on Oct.
7. He had nine catches for
121 yards and his first career
touchdown reception — a
brilliant catch on the right
side of the end zone in which
he reached over a Cal defen­
sive back to steal the ball
away from what appeared to
be a sure interception.
“We knew coming in he
was about to be something
special,” senior receiver
Dante Pettis said. “This guy’s
the truth, and it’s showing.”
A partially torn ACL kept
Bryant out of the Huskies’
final four games of the regu­
lar season, one of a series of
blows to the UW passing
attack (Chico McClatcher
and Quinten Pounds were
lost for the season, and An­
dre Baccellia and Drew
Sample were limited much
of the season). Bryant did
return for the Fiesta Bowl,
playing just a couple of
snaps, and he figures to be a
prominent part of the offen­
sive plans in 2018, along
with another true freshman
standout, Salvon Ahmed.
8. Byron Murphy’s
impressive debut
For most programs, losing
the likes of Sidney Jones,
Budda Baker and Kevin King
in one offseason would be a
devastating setback. But the
Huskies knew they had
sufficient depth in the sec­
ondary, and they knew they
had an emerging star in
redshirt­freshman corner­
back Byron Murphy.
In his UW debut, Murphy
had two interceptions in the
season­opening victory at
Rutgers. “Nothing that I
haven’t seen. He’s got great
ball skills,” UW coach Chris
Petersen said. “If the ball’s
around him, the guy can
catch. He’s an instinctual
player. He kind of came out
of nowhere and undercut
guys.”
Murphy suffered a broken
foot during practice in late
September and missed the
Huskies’ first seven Pac­12
games. He returned in late
November and broke up
three passes and forced a
fumble in the Apple Cup,
and he had a spectacular
interception in the back of
the end zone in the Fiesta
Bowl.
7. Jake Browning
breaks TD record
In his third season as the
starting quarterback, Jake
Browning broke the school
record for career touchdown
passes, against Utah on
Nov. 18, surpassing Keith
Price’s record (75). Brown­
ing finished the season with
21 touchdowns, five inter­
ceptions and a school­record
completion percentage of
68.5 percent. He enters his
fourth season as the starting
QB in 2018 with 78 career
touchdown passes.
DEAN RUTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES
Myles Gaskin sails into the end zone, scoring a 26­yard touchdown in the Apple Cup. Gaskin is just the third Husky
running back to rush for 1,000 yards in three seasons. He has 4,055 yards in his UW career.
5. Myles Gaskin hits
1,000 (again)
Myles Gaskin joined Na­
poleon Kaufman and Chris
Polk as just the third running
back in UW history to rush
for 1,000 yards in three
seasons — and Gaskin nearly
chased down Kaufman’s
school rushing record in the
Fiesta Bowl. Gaskin had 98
yards on 14 carries in what
might have been his final
game in a UW uniform, and
he finished his career with
4,055 yards rushing (Kauf­
man has 4,106 yards).
This season, Gaskin did
break the school records for
career rushing touchdowns
(45) and total touchdowns
(49).
4. Gaskin’s Fiesta Bowl
burst
Trailing 28­7 early in the
second quarter, the Huskies
rallied against Penn State in
the second half of the Fiesta
Bowl, getting within a
touchdown on Gaskin’s
69­yard burst midway
through the fourth quarter.
Alas, Penn State held on to
the ball for more than six
minutes to all but ice the
game. In their desperate
final drive, the Huskies had
just 34 seconds to try to
drive 72 yards, and the
game ended after a failed
hook­and­lateral.
the Huskies’ senior wide
receiver, returned a punt 64
yards for a touchdown in the
Huskies’ 38­3 rout of Oregon
on Nov. 4, breaking the
NCAA record for punt­re­
turn touchdowns in a career.
It was Pettis’ fourth punt­re­
turn touchdown of the sea­
son and ninth of his career.
Pettis broke the record
just a few days after his dad,
Gary — the Houston Astros’
third­base coach — won a
World Series ring. “This
week has just been insane,’’
Pettis said after the game. “A
lot of blessings coming our
way.”
3. Dante Pettis’ record 2. Utah comeback
return
What a scene it was. And
All­American Dante Pettis, what a comeback.
6. Defense shuts down
Cal
In a 38­7 rout of California
at Husky Stadium on Oct. 7,
the Huskies’ defense regis­
tered eight sacks — while
often rushing just three
defenders — and held the
Bears to minus­40 yards
rushing. The Huskies were
in line for a shutout until a
Cal defender returned a UW
fumble for a touchdown, the
Bears’ only score of the day.
With the win, the Huskies
improved to 6­0 and rose to
No. 5 in the AP poll. Wash­
ington finished with the
Pac­12’s No. 1 defense for
the third consecutive season
DEAN RUTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES
— and could return nine
Byron Murphy had a pair of interceptions in the Rutgers game. A foot injury kept him
regular starters on defense
out of seven games, but he had a strong freshman season overall.
in 2018.
In the most dramatic
game of Petersen’s UW ten­
ure, the Huskies put togeth­
er two scoring drives in the
final 2:03, scoring 10 points
in the final 58 seconds to
beat Utah, 33­30, at Husky
Stadium on Nov. 18. Belea­
guered senior kicker Tristan
Vizcaino came through in
the biggest moment of his
career, drilling the game­
winning 38­yard field goal
through the uprights in the
west end zone as time ex­
pired.
“It’s a huge deal,” an emo­
tional Vizcaino said after­
ward. “I’ve let my team­
mates down a couple games
in the past, and being able to
bounce back and maybe
make it up to them tonight,
it meant a lot to me.”
1. Another Apple Cup
beatdown
This has become the norm
for the Huskies in the Apple
Cup: No. 15 Huskies 41,
No. 14 Cougars 14.
The UW defense inter­
cepted Luke Falk three times
and Vita Vea wrecked Wash­
ington State’s offensive
hopes from the start, as the
Huskies won their fifth
straight Apple Cup. Gaskin
had one of the best games of
his UW career, rushing for
192 yards and four touch­
downs.
“It’s definitely our favorite
game,” UW senior safety
Ezekiel Turner said. “The
ball was flying wild every­
where, and guys were just
coming up hitting every­
where. It was definitely fun
to be a part of. It’s always
fun whippin’ up on the
Cougs.”
Adam Jude: 206­464­2364
or ajude@seattletimes.com.
On Twitter: @a_jude
C4 Sports |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
CFP championship game has a familiar ring to it
ANALYSIS
Southeast region
has dominated last
three title games
By CHUCK CULPEPPER
The Washington Post
LOS ANGELES – College
football, that kooky, coast­
to­coast concoction, relies
heavily on its occasional
cross­regional, cross­cultur­
al, nonconference matchups,
and the way they foment all
the arguments, envies, re­
sentments, contempts, im­
modesties and other invalu­
able bad vibes.
When USC plays Alabama,
or Miami plays Notre Dame,
or Ohio State plays Oklaho­
ma, it stirs into more than a
meeting of players and
coaches and recruiting strat­
egies and X’s and O’s. It be­
comes an alluring clash of
styles, cultures, voting re­
cords and even ways of life.
Somehow here in 2018,
for its championship game,
this wide and woolly sport
has managed to distill itself,
for the third year running,
into half a day’s drive and a
sole 66­year­old human
being. Clemson played Ala­
bama, and then Clemson
played Alabama again, and
now Georgia will play Ala­
bama, all six rosters huddled
in three neighboring states in
one corner of a vast country.
It’s probably harmless in a
little three­year window, but
a decade of it probably
wouldn’t be healthy.
If you drove the 74 miles
from Clemson, S.C., to Ath­
ens, Ga., it would take you
about 90 minutes if you
drove responsibly, which on
Interstate 85 would rule out
some. If you then drove the
274 miles from Athens to
Tuscaloosa, Ala., it could
take 4½ hours even if, for the
Atlanta part of the journey, it
would be advisable to use a
helicopter.
As for the sole 66­year­old
human being, this whole,
provincial, intra­regional run
doubles as further testament
to the caliber of Alabama
coach Nick Saban, and this
third game only ratchets up
that sense, which needed no
ratcheting.
On Jan. 29, 2004, Saban
hired 28­year­old Kirby
Smart to coach his defensive
backs at LSU, whereupon
Smart issued a statement
reading, “Coach Saban is
known as one of the best
defensive coaches in all of
football, and to be able to
coach alongside him and
learn from him is something
special.”
It really marks that era,
when Saban still had only
one national title, that Smart
used that phrase “one of the
best,” which by now seems
puny.
On Feb. 10, 2006, Saban
hired 30­year­old Smart to
coach safeties with the Mi­
ami Dolphins, just as Smart,
then at Georgia, was about to
go interview with the New
York Jets for their job coach­
ing linebackers and nickel­
backs. If you would like to
pause here, insert your favor­
ite Jets joke and ponder how
Smart avoided doom, you
are, of course, free to do so.
On Jan. 9, 2007, Saban
hired 31­year­old Smart and
two other assistants to coach
ROGELIO V. SOLIS / AP
Alabama coach Nick Saban will have his team competing in its third consecutive national­title game Monday.
in life might have remem­
bered a remark in Greater
Phoenix, two Januarys prior.
Then, Alabama had just
fended off the Clemson Wat­
at Alabama, even though the sons by 45­40, for Saban’s
new Alabama coach “hadn’t
fifth national title and fourth
assigned them titles or du­
in Tuscaloosa. What mirth.
ties,” as The Associated Press Yet Saban’s poor headset had
put it. For one season coach­ endured an impromptu
ing defensive backs and eight collision with the turf that
coordinating the defense,
night, during the third quar­
Smart would remain along­
ter, as Clemson quarterback
side Saban, through four
Deshaun Watson roamed the
national titles until Decem­
premises in a giddy manner.
ber 2015, when the head­
In the postgame remarks,
coaching job at his alma
Saban not only expressed his
mater, Georgia, sprang open. appreciation and admiration
Now, Monday night, Sa­
for Smart, who was just then
ban will be able to gaze
leaving for Georgia. He also
across the field — not that he went on about how he tried
would take the time — at
to convince Alabama’s play­
42­year­old Smart but, of
ers of “hard practice, easy
course, also at himself.
game,” and “easy practice,
Unwitting humor actually hard game.”
injected itself into the discus­
“I told all the big guys, if
sions Monday night after
you don’t rush and run to the
that furious blur of a Rose
ball every time and what
Bowl, which Georgia won,
we’re doing in practice,
54­48, in double overtime
you’re going to die in the
over Oklahoma. The excel­
game, because this is the
lent Lindsay Schnell of USA
kind of game we’ve got to
Today asked Smart how his
play,” Saban said. Then, with
heart handled his fantastic
a sad, almost somber voice,
defense getting shredded by he added, “So they got 40
the Baker Mayfield brigade
points.”
in the heaving early stages of
In that voice, you might
the game. When Smart be­
have heard a crusader in the
gan by saying, “Yeah, I’m
battle against human imper­
really disappointed and
fection, a voice that knows
upset,” it sounded as if a
too well how in football,
winning coach might be
details matter, and details
committing sarcasm over an get left all over the after­
unwanted question.
noons and the evenings.
He wasn’t.
That Rose Bowl on Mon­
Oh, he wasn’t.
day, with Smart’s team as its
He actually was disap­
winner, had so many details
pointed and upset.
tucked in there that you
“I do think that the players might discuss them for de­
fought, and they (the Soon­
cades. On Georgia’s first
ers) are a good offensive
offensive play after halftime,
team, but man, we stunk it
with the score 31­17 against
up and played really bad,” he it, the line opened up a bou­
said. On the coronary mat­
levard, and Nick Chubb’s
ter, he concluded, “But if it
50­yard touchdown run
was a measure of a heart
changed the definition of the
attack, I’d be on the Richter
game, straightaway. On a
scale.”
scary third­and­10 with 1:06
While the cleverness of a
left, with the score 45­38
Richter scale reference while against Georgia, freshman
in Southern California did
quarterback Jake Fromm
show a keen sense of place,
completed a crucial CPR of a
an ear that has heard too
16­yard pass across the mid­
much college football chatter dle to Terry Godwin, from
MONDAY
Alabama vs. Georgia,
5 p.m., ESPN, Atlanta
the Oklahoma 23­yard line
to the 7. There was the outer
edge of Lorenzo Carter’s
considerable hand, which in
the second overtime became
the first in history to block a
field­goal attempt by Okla­
homa’s Austin Seibert.
Much and too much was
made of Oklahoma’s botched
squib kick before halftime,
but the facts remain that to
make that squib costly, Geor­
gia’s Tae Crowder had to
field the thing like a good
shortstop 12 yards from its
origin, and Fromm had to hit
Godwin precisely at the
sideline for 9 yards, and
Rodrigo Blankenship had to
nail a 55­yard field goal.
They, of course, practice
fielding squib kicks in Ath­
ens, as they surely do in
Tuscaloosa. They also recruit
with enhanced detail in
Athens, as screams Georgia’s
No. 1 ranking after the De­
cember signing period, even
if the idea that somebody
could learn all the recruiting
nuances from Saban, then
possibly upgrade them by
even a smidgen, seems math­
ematically implausible.
So here comes a next­door
clash of oncoming bruises
and escalating ticket prices.
If Saban’s 11­0 record
against his former assistants
is any indication, Alabama
will win this. That outcome
will bring, to many, a same­
ness. That’s fine, because the
game does benefit from its
kingdoms, whether fans
deem them gods or villains.
It’s just that one of these days
soon, even in all its raging
success, the College Football
Playoff might crave more
regional variety.
PUBLIC NOTICES
To place a legal ad call 206/652-6018 or email us at legals@seattletimes.com
Public Notices
Public Notices
Public Notices
CITY OF BURIEN
400 SW 152ND STREET (SUITE 300)
BURIEN, WASHINGTON 98166-3066
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
Date January 4, 2018
Applicant Verizon Wireless
Proposal Installation of a small cellular
network in the Southern Heights/Beverly
Park area of Burien consisting of small
cylinder or panel antennas and associated equipment to be attached to existing
or replacement utility poles located in the
public right-of-way.
File No. PLA 17-2728
File is available for viewing at Burien City
Hall during regular business hours.
Location In Northeast Burien an area
bounded by 4th Avenue SW on the west,
SW 116th Street and South 112th Street on
the north, Des Moines Memorial Drive
South on the east and South 120th Street
on the south.
Tax Parcel No. Located within the public
right-of-way.
Current Zoning Residential Single-Family,
Residential Multi-Family and Community
Commercial.
Application Submitted/Complete
Submitted: November 30, 2017
Complete: December 21, 2017
Other Permits Needed Right-of-way Permits
Other Studies Needed Radio Frequency
Propagation Maps
Review Process and Public Comment The
decision on this application will be made
by the Community Development Director. Prior to the decision, there is an opportunity for the public to submit written
comments. Written comments must be
received prior to 5:00 p.m. on Thursday,
January 25, 2018. Send written comments
to the project planner (see below). Please
indicate your name and address and refer
to the file indicated above. Only people
who submitted comments as indicated
above may appeal the decision on this application.
Project Planner (for written comments
and more information) Charles W. “Chip”
Davis, AICP
Department of Community Development
City of Burien
400 SW 152nd Street (Suite 300)
Burien, WA 98166-3066
Phone: (206) 248-5501
E-Mail: chipd@burienwa.gov
I, Shravya, residing at 4306, 156th ave ne
#GG223, Redmond WA 98052 have changed
my name to Shravya Omkar More
SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON,
COUNTY OF KING
BARBARA E. LAWSON AND GLEN
LAWSON, wife and husband vs. SWEDISH
HEALTH SERVICES D/B/A SWEDISH
MEDICAL CENTER; ROSS McMAHON,
M.D. AND “JANE DOE” McMAHON,
husband and wife; “DOE” DEFENDANTS
1-5; “DOE” CORPORATIONS 1-5, Case
No. 17-2-13559-3 SEA. TO DEFENDANT
ROSS McMAHON, M.D. A lawsuit has
been started against you in the aboveentitled Court by BARBARA E. LAWSON
and GLEN LAWSON (Plaintiffs).
You are hereby summoned to appear
within sixty days after the date of the
first publication of this Summons, to wit
sixty days after the 4th day of January,
2018, and defend the above-entitled action
in the above-entitled court, and answer
the Complaint of Barbara E. Lawson and
Glen Lawson, Plaintiffs, and serve a copy
of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for Plaintiffs at their office below
stated; and in case of your failure so to
do, judgment will be rendered against you
according to the demand of the Complaint,
which has been filed with the clerk of said
Court. This is a medical malpractice suit
against you for injuries Plaintiff Barbara
E. Lawson sustained while receiving treatment from you at Swedish Weight Loss
Services. Plaintiff Barbara E. Lawson
claims economic and non-economic damages as a result of your alleged medical
malpractice, and Plaintiff Glen Lawson
claims non-economic damages as a result of your alleged medical malpractice.
NORTHCRAFT, BIGBY & BIGGS, P.C.;
Attn: Aaron D. Bigby and Jacob A. Blair,
Attorneys for Plaintiffs, 819 Virginia, Suite
C-2, Seattle, WA 98101. Telephone: 206623-0229, Fax: 206-623-0234.
CITY OF CLYDE HILL
LOST PURSE: A purse was found in Clyde
Hill on 12/6/17, please contact the Clyde
Hill Police Department by 2/4/18 to claim.
A detailed description of the purse and
contents will be required. Clyde Hill Police
Department: 9605 NE 24th St, Clyde Hill,
WA 98004 425-454-7187
CITY OF KIRKLAND
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
SATTERBERG SHORT PLAT,
CASE NO. SUB17-00733
NEIGHBORHOOD: FINN HILL
PROPOSAL:
Moira
Haughian
of
The Blueline Group, the applicant, is
requesting a Process I Short Plat Permit
to divide one 105,576 SF parcel into 7 lots
ranging from 9,425 SF to 14,812 SF in the
RSA 4 zone. The proposal includes rightof-way dedications with the potential for
future through road connections. REVIEW
PROCESS/PUBLIC
COMMENT:
The
decision on this application will be made by
the Planning Director. Written comments
must be received prior to 5 PM on 1/22/18.
Send written comments to project planner,
Allison Zike, 123 5th Avenue, Kirkland,
WA 98033 or e-mail azike@kirklandwa.
gov. Additional information is available
at www.mybuildingpermit.com or you
may contact the Planning and Building
Department at 425.587.3600.
CITY OF SAMMAMISH
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
OF THE CITY COUNCIL
PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO
SMC 19A.08.190
NOTICE DATE: JANUARY 2, 2018
PUBLIC HEARING DATE:
FEBRUARY 6, 2018
Notice is hereby given that the City of
Sammamish City Council will hold a Public Hearing regarding proposed amendments to the Sammamish Municipal Code
(SMC) as they relate to prohibiting the
circumvention of zoning density with the
division of land.
SUMMARY of AMENDMENTS: The City
Council is considering proposed amendments to SMC 19A.08.190 - circumvention
of zoning density prohibited.
HEARING SCHEDULE: Public testimony
will be taken by the City Council on February 6, 2018 at a Public Hearing. The Public
Hearing will be part of a regular meeting,
which will start at 6:30 PM at the City of
Sammamish City Hall, located at 801 228th
Avenue SE, Sammamish, WA. Following
the Public Hearing, the City Council will
consider the proposed amendments. The
City Council is tentatively scheduled to
have a second reading of an Ordinance for
the proposed amendments at their February 20, 2018 meeting.
DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: A copy of
the proposed amendments is available and
may be obtained by contacting the City of
Sammamish (contact name and address
listed below).
CITY CONTACT AND PUBLIC COMMENTS SUBMITTED TO: Ryan Harriman, Senior Planner - Community Development Department, Sammamish City
Hall, 801 228th Avenue SE, Sammamish,
WA. Phone: (425) 295-0529; e-mail to
rharriman@sammamish.us.
CITY OF SHORELINE
NOTICE SEPA
THRESHOLD DETERMINATION
Project Description: 17233 15th Ave NE,
Building and Clearing and Grading Permits #s MFR17-1123 and CLG17-1124, for
new 5-story 243 unit apartment complex
with below grade structured parking for
267 spaces.
Threshold Determination: The City of
Shoreline has determined that the proposal will not have a probable significant
adverse impact on the environment and is
issuing a Mitigated Determination of Nonsignificance.
Administrative Appeal: Written appeals
of the SEPA threshold determination may
be filed with the City Hearing Examiner
pursuant to SMC 20.30.200-20.30.230 –
within 14 days of Notice of Threshold Determination.
The permit file and more specific information on submitting an administrative appeal are available for review at the City
Hall, 17500 Midvale Avenue N.
KING COUNTY
Public notice is hereby given that the King
County Real Estate Services, as custodian
for Tax Title Properties, is offering for
sale to the public an improved residential
parcel located at 13741 Macadam Road S,
Tukwila, WA 98168 and legally described
as:
BEGINNING AT THE SW CORNER
OF GOVERNMENT LOT 1, SECTION
15, TOWNSHIP 23 NORTH, RANGE 4
E.W.M., IN KING COUNTY WASHINGTON;
THENCE SOUTH 89°56’42” EAST 270’;
THENCE NORTH 57°41’12.5” EAST 362.11’,
MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF THE JAMES CLARK
COUNTY ROAD;
THENCE ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF ROAD NORTHWESTERLY
ON A CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH A
RADIUS OF 849.02’, A DISTANCE OF
46.45’;
THENCE NORTH 31 °08’30” WEST
132.93’;
THENCE ON A CURVE TO THE LEFT
WITH A RADIUS OF 70’ A DISTANCE OF
65.15’;
THENCE NORTH 84°28’00” WEST 145.71’;
THENCE ON A CURVE TO THE RIGHT
WITH A RADIUS OF 148.31’ A DISTANCE
OF 126.58’; THENCE NORTH 35°34’
WEST 32.57’ TO THE TRUE POINT OF
BEGINNING;
THENCE ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF ROAD N 35°34’ WEST 90’ TO
THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF
TRACT DESCRIBED IN INSTRUMENT
RECORDED OCTOBER 27, 1960, UNDER
AUDITORS FILE NO. 5217281;
THENCE SOUTH 54°26’ WEST 100’;
THENCE SOUTH 35°34’ EAST 110’;
THENCE NORTHEASTERLY TO A
POINT OF BEGINNING;
(ALSO KNOWN AS LOTS 12 AND 13,
BLOCK 1, HELLWIG’S ADDITTON TO
FOSTER, ACCORDING TO THE UNRECORDED PLAT THEREOF).
APN: 322920-0065-07
Sale will be by a sealed bid process, with a
minimum bid of $25,000. Sealed bids may
be mailed or delivered to King County Administration Building, Real Estate Services Section, 500 Fourth Avenue, Room 830,
Seattle, WA 98104, ATTN: Steve Rizika.
Bids must be received and acknowledged
prior to 5:00 pm January 9, 2018. The
property will be sold to the highest bidder
for cash to satisfy the full amount of taxes,
interest and costs adjudged to be due.
The parcels are offered on a “where-is”
and “as is” basis. King County makes no
representation of warranty, expressed or
implied, as to the physical condition of
any property, including location of boundary or other physical lines, its fitness for
any use or purpose, soils percolation, or
suitability for in-ground septic systems.
King County does not warrant that existing septic systems meet current health or
building codes. The county does not guarantee title, makes no representation or
warranty, expressed or implied, as to the
condition of title to the property.
For more information or to obtain a bid
form contact Steve Rizika (206) 477-2083.
steve.rizika@kingcounty.gov
KING COUNTY
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ADVERTISEMENT
Sealed bids will be received for C01224C17,
Transit Passenger Facilities Improvements 2018-2019 Work Order; by the King
County Procurement and Payables Section, 3rd Floor, 401 Fifth Avenue, Seattle,
WA 98104, until 1:30 PM on Tuesday
January 25, 2018. Late bids will not be accepted.
The Work on this contract will be issued
by Work Orders for construction of improvements at King County Transit Facilities. Sites may include Transit Bases,
Bus Zones and Park and Ride Lots located
within King County. Work may include
clearing, excavation, removal, and disposal of existing site materials; placing,
finishing and curing of unreinforced and
reinforced concrete slabs; paving with
Portland cement concrete and/or asphalt
concrete; construction of reinforced concrete retaining walls; handrailing; landscaping and other miscellaneous site improvements.
Estimated contract price: NTE $500,000
Pre-Bid Conference: 1:00 p.m., January
17, 2018. Bidders have the choice of attending: (1) in person at Procurement & Payables Section, Bidding Room, 3rd Floor,
401 Fifth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104. or (2)
via conference call 1-206-263-8114, then entering Conference ID 80794. No site tour.
Apprenticeship Requirements: 3% minimum Apprentice Utilization Requirement.
SBE Requirement: 10% minimum Small
Business Enterprise (SBE) Requirement
DBE Goal: The County has determined
that no DBE goal will be established for
this Contract. However, the County will
require that the selected Contractor report any actual DBE participation on this
Contract to enable the County to accurately monitor DBE program compliance.
Please see §00120 for further information.
Applicable Federal Provisions: Executive
Order 11246, Equal Employment Opportunity, Federal Labor Provisions and Davis
Bacon (Federal) Wage Rates
Federal Funding: Work Orders issued under this contract may be funded in part,
by the U.S. Department of Transportation,
Federal Transportation Administration
and will be subject to the requirements set
forth in the Grant that will be issued with
the Work Order. The federal participation
percentage is undetermined at this time.
In accordance with the requirements of
the FTA’s and USDOT’s policy on the utilization of socially and economically disadvantaged individuals and disadvantaged
business enterprises in procurement under assistance programs, the Contractor
shall comply with 49 CFR PART 26.
Complete Invitation to Bid Documents,
including all project details, specifications,
and contact information are available on
our web page at: https://procurement.
k i n g c o u n t y. g o v / p r o c u r e m e n t _ o v r /
default.aspx
WASHINGTON STATE
DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY
NOTICE: ANNOUNCEMENT OF AVAILABILITY OF A DRAFT WASTEWATER
PERMIT MODIFICATION
PERMIT NO.: WA0001791
APPLICANT: Shell Oil Products US
Seattle Distribution Terminal
2555 – 13th Avenue SW
Seattle, King County
Ecology is proposing to modify Shell Oil
Products US (Shell) National Pollutant
Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)
in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 90.48 Revised Code of Washington,
Chapter 173-220 Washington Administrative Code, and the Federal Clean Water Act. Ecology is proposing to modify
Shell’s permit in order to respond to a
Washington State Court of Appeals ruling
in another permit appeal. In that appeal,
the Court ruled that water quality-based
effluent limits, if required in an individual
permit, should be site-specific effluent
limits derived for that site, when deriving
such limits is appropriate and feasible.
Ecology has evaluated Shell’s submitted
data and proposes to revise Shell’s permit
in order to be consistent with the Court’s
ruling and Ecology’s policies governing
stormwater permitting. A final determination will not be made until all timely comments received in response to this notice
have been evaluated.
PUBLIC COMMENT AND
INFORMATION
The draft modified permit and fact sheet
addednum may be viewed at the Department of Ecology (Department) website:
https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/paris/PermitLookup.aspx The application, fact sheet,
proposed permit, and other related documents are also available at the Department’s Northwest Regional Office for inspection and copying between the hours
of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., weekdays. To
obtain a copy or to arrange to view copies
at the Northwest Regional Office, please
call Sally Perkins at (425) 649-7190, e-mail
sper461@ecy.wa.gov , or write to the address below.
Interested persons are invited to submit
written comments regarding the proposed
permit modification. All comments must
be submitted within 30 days after publication of this notice to be considered for the
final determination. Comments should be
sent to:
Permit Coordinator
Department of Ecology
Northwest Regional Office
3190 - 160th Avenue SE
Bellevue, WA 98008-5452
E-mail comments should be sent to
tmil461@ecy.wa.gov
Any interested party may request a public
hearing on the proposed permit modification within 30 days of the publication date
of this notice. The request should be sent
to the above address. The Department will
hold a hearing if it determines that there
is significant public interest. If you have a
special accommodation needs, please contact Tricia Miller at 425-649-7201, tmil461@
ecy.wa.gov, or at 711 or 1-800-833-6388
(TTY).
Weekly Permit Bulletin
Publish Date: January 4, 2018
For official notice and review of land
use
applications,
meetings,
decisions,
recommendations, hearings, and appeals of
land use decisions within the City of Bellevue,
please visit https://bellevuewa.gov/permitbulletin to view the City’s official Weekly
Permit Bulletin. For more information,
please contact Development Services in the
City of Bellevue either by phone 425-452-6800
or email at landusereview@bellevuewa.gov.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
2
Thomas has no hard feelings
in his return trip to Boston
second quarters.
He looked at the camera, pound­
ed his heart three times and
waved.
Late in Boston’s 102­88 win,
Celtics fans began chanting, “We
want I.T.!” Afterward, he shared
hugs with several players, includ­
ing Irving.
NBA
Notes
Traded star sits, gets
raucous welcome; sends
‘genuine love’ to Celtics
The Associated Press
BOSTON — Isaiah Thomas
wanted to make one thing perfect­
ly clear during his return to Bos­
ton: He isn’t holding onto any hard
feelings about the way he left.
Thomas, the former UW star,
returned to TD Garden on Wednes­
day night for the first time since he
was dealt to the Cleveland Cava­
liers in August as part of the block­
buster trade that brought Kyrie
Irving to the Celtics.
It was the lowest point of a
whirlwind summer for Thomas,
which was compounded by his
ongoing recovery from the hip
injury that cut short his postseason
run with Boston last season.
The injury sidelined him for
Cleveland’s season opener against
his former team back in October.
He missed the Cavs’ first 36 games
before returning to action against
Portland on Tuesday night, scoring
17 points in 19 minutes.
For now, his minutes are restrict­
ed, and he isn’t playing on back­to­
back nights. So he returned to
action Tuesday knowing that he’d
sit against the Celtics.
“I was out seven months. There’s
no way I was gonna come back
against Boston and play 17 min­
utes,” Thomas said. “It’s too big of
an opportunity to just a play
against my former teammates, my
former coaches, the city that gave
me my biggest opportunity.”
Thomas said he felt like he was
home when he walked into the
arena where he became a two­time
All­Star, so much so that he almost
went to the Celtics’ locker room.
“I love this city. I love this organi­
zation. They gave me an opportu­
nity to be who I always wanted to
CHARLES KRUPA / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cleveland guard Isaiah Thomas, center, smiles from the bench during
the second quarter of the team’s game at Boston. Thomas was mak­
ing his return after being traded by the Celtics during the offseason.
be,” Thomas said. “I can’t thank
them enough. So there’s no hard
feelings for anybody in this city or
anybody in this organization. I’m
glad I’m back. Like I always said,
it’s genuine love. And that’s for the
rest of my life.”
That respect is mutual, Celtics
coach Brad Stevens said.
“First and foremost, I will always
value him as a friend and as a per­
son,” Stevens said. “Lost amongst
all the talk of where people play
and everything else is the fact that
you did get to compete together. I
always appreciated that about
him.”
Though Thomas asked that there
not be any kind of tribute video for
him on this trip to the Garden, he
did receive an extended standing
ovation from the Boston fans when
he was shown on the scoreboard
monitors between the first and
•Joel Embiid shook off a sprained
right hand that nearly kept him out of the
lineup to score 21 points, grab 11 re­
bounds and lead the Philadelphia 76ers to
a 112­106 win over the visiting San Anto­
nio Spurs.
The Sixers snapped a 12­game losing
streak to the Spurs. They needed all 35
minutes from Embiid to knock off short­
handed San Antonio.
Embiid suffered the injury in a hard fall
Saturday against the Suns. Philadelphia’s
leading scorer and rebounder sat at his
locker before the game and said his hand
was swollen and he couldn’t shoot.
• The Chicago Bulls hope to decide on a
return date for guard Zach LaVine (ACL)
early next week. LaVine, a product of
Bothell High, will travel with the team to
games at Dallas and Indiana on Friday and
Saturday.
• Stephen Curry hit a long three­point­
er with three seconds to play, sending the
Golden State Warriors to a 125­122
victory over at Dallas. Curry finished with
32 points as Golden State’s “Big Four”
combined for 100 points.
Kevin Durant and former WSU star
Klay Thompson had 25 points each, and
Draymond Green scored 18 to go with 10
rebounds.
• Rookie Terrance Ferguson had 24
points, including six three­pointers, and
Oklahoma City rocked the Los Angeles
Lakers 133­96. Paul George also had 24
points and Russell Westbrook had 20
points and 12 assists.
• Former Gonzaga star Kelly Olynyk
scored 25 points, including a big layup
with 39 seconds left, and Goran Dragic
had 24 as Miami held off Detroit 111­104.
Olynyk finished with 13 rebounds and
Dragic had 13 assists.
• Giannis Antetokounmpo had 31
points and 10 rebounds, Khris Middleton
had 27 points, and host Milwaukee pulled
away for a 122­101 win over the Indiana
Pacers. Former Gonzaga star Domantas
Sabonis had a career­high 24 points on
10­of­13 shooting for Indiana.
• Gerald Green scored 27 points, Clint
Capela had 21 points and eight rebounds,
and the visiting Houston got by without
NBA scoring leader James Harden (left
hamstring), routing Orlando 116­98.
Standings, box scores > C6
< Porter
FROM C1
“My parents got multiple opin­
ions, and they kind of decided
surgery was the best (option),”
Porter said. “It’s a good thing I did
it. I feel a lot better now.”
Martin said Tuesday he wasn’t
familiar with the extent of Porter’s
initial injury until the freshman got
to campus this summer.
“It was not as if it was something
I read about or anything like that,”
Martin said. “To his credit, he prac­
ticed and played and didn’t com­
plain about it and did normal re­
hab.”
“Really, the time when we
played Iowa State, it was like, OK,”
Martin added. “But going through
the game you really didn’t know.
Then it was, OK, here we are. It’s an
issue. Let’s move forward.
“But it wasn’t an issue during
recruiting because I really didn’t
recruit him out of high school to be
able to study and understand it.”
On Nov. 22, Porter underwent a
procedure called a microdiscecto­
my of the L3­L4 spinal discs, per­
formed by Dallas spinal surgeon
Andrew Dossett. At the time, the
team announced Porter would face
a recovery time of three to four
months and likely miss the rest of
the season. Porter said he’s unsure
when he’ll be able to return to the
court.
“Rehab is going great,” he said.
“I’m getting stronger every day.
Right now it’s too early to tell. This
is the type of injury where I’ll feel
good before I’m allowed to play
because a lot of healing starts to
occur.”
Porter is scheduled to visit Dallas
on Thursday for a follow­up visit
with Dossett.
“Everybody’s different with this
injury, their recovery time,” Porter
said. “So I’m doing everything I can
to recover as quick as I can. I’ll feel
100 percent before my back really
is 100 percent. Eventually I’ll be
150 percent because I’ll be playing
without the pain and limitations I
had before.”
Porter said he planned to play
through his back pain this season,
like he has the past two years in
high school in Columbia and at
Nathan Hale, and manage the
condition after his freshman year.
“I’ve had that pain and just
played through it,” he said. “I kind
of forgot what it’s like to play nor­
mal. That’s why I feel I’m blessed to
A.M. Briefing
Baseball
Padres, Royals offer
Hosmer huge deals
The Padres, according to sources,
have offered first baseman Eric
Hosmer a seven­year contract,
further illustrating their level of
interest in one of the offseason’s
premier free agents. But attempts
to lure Hosmer to San Diego appear
to be facing stiff competition from
another small­market team.
According to a USA Today report,
the Royals have offered Hosmer a
seven­year, $147 million deal to
remain in Kansas City, while the
Padres’ bid is worth $140 million.
People with knowledge of San
Diego’s pursuit contradicted that
report. The Padres’ offer is lower
than $140 million, according to
sources who requested anonymity
because of the sensitivity of negoti­
ations. The exact amount proposed
is unknown, though it is well above
$100 million.
Olympics
Speedskater Davis
headed to 4th Games
Joey Mantia won the 1,000 me­
ters at the U.S. speedskating trials
in Milwaukee, while two­time
Olympic champion Shani Davis is
headed to his fourth Games.
Mantia finished in 1 minute, 9.15
seconds. Davis clocked 1:09.23 to
finish second. Mitch Whitmore was
third at 1:09.32 to grab the third
Olympic berth.
Davis is the world record­holder
in the 1,000, and won the event at
the 2006 and 2010 Olympics. The
35­year­old skater was eighth in
Sochi, where the Americans were
shut out of medals.
On the women’s side, Heather
Bergsma won the 1,000, with Brit­
tany Bowe second to join her long­
time rival on the Olympic team.
• Two executives for U.S. Figure
Skating warned against any poten­
tial boycott of the Pyeongchang
Olympics by the United States.
USFS President Sam Auxier,
asked about Sen. Lindsey Graham’s
comments that North Korea com­
peting in next month’s games
should prompt a U.S. team boycott,
said Graham and others “need to be
careful” about the American team
not participating. Auxier added,
“They shouldn’t be playing politics
with this.”
Added U.S. Figure Skating Exec­
utive Director David Raith about
political intervention in the Olym­
pic process: “It doesn’t help any­
body. We’ll be there.”
Skiing
Shiffrin dominates
for 7th slalom victory
Mikaela Shiffrin passed the
1,000­point milestone for the wom­
en’s World Cup season after just 14
starts.
The Olympic champion from
Eagle­Vail, Colo., took a slalom by a
huge margin for her seventh win of
the season, and 38th overall.
After skipping two speed races in
Val d’Isere last month, Shiffrin
leads the overall standings with
1,081 points after 16 of this sea­
son’s 38 races.
College basketball
Brey sets Notre Dame
victory mark with 394
JEFF ROBERSON / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Missouri’s Michael Porter Jr., right, talks with his brother Jontay Porter during Missouri’s game against
Illinois last month. Michael Porter hopes to return from back surgery before the end of the season.
have had the surgery because I feel
like I’ll be far better than I was
playing without those limitations. I
kind of expected it to be the same,
just playing through the pain. But
then it got worse to where I
couldn’t play anymore. I didn’t feel
like I’d be helpful to the team in the
state I was in.”
As part of his rehab, Porter is
currently running on a treadmill
and has started some light shoot­
ing, though he’s limited in how
high he can jump.
After watching a few home
games from the team locker room,
Porter was back on the bench for
MU’s last several games, including
the team’s Dec. 23 loss to Illinois in
the Braggin’ Rights Game.
“It was tough early on because
part of my physical therapy I’m not
supposed to be sitting for long
periods of time,” Porter said.
“That’s why I wasn’t on the bench
for those few games, even though I
really wanted to be. So that was
tough. Being able to be at practice
and sit now, I’m just trying to be a
good teammate. It gets tough
sometimes because you just want
to be out there so bad and help the
team. But I can still help in other
ways.”
Porter believes he might have
avoided surgery had he not rushed
into playing after the fall that
caused the back injury.
“It (stinks) because two years
ago when it happened, knowing
me, I rushed back into playing as
soon as I could,” he said. “That’s
when my body started compensat­
ing for the pain. If I would have sat
out when this initially happened,
there’s a chance all of this could
have been avoidable. But we had a
big tournament that weekend and I
just wanted to play.”
Porter, the preseason co­SEC
player of the year, has since
watched several close friends at
other schools put together dazzling
freshman seasons, especially Okla­
homa guard Trae Young and Duke
forward Marvin Bagley III. Both are
early candidates for national play­
er of the year.
“To see them succeed it’s awe­
some,” Porter said. “At the same
time, I know I could be doing the
same exact things they’re doing. It’s
tough. I just have to be patient. My
time is coming. I just can’t rush it.”
As for this summer’s NBA draft,
Porter said he’s not worried about
how his injury might impact his
stock as a prospect.
“I know when I’m healthy, peo­
ple will see what I’m capable of and
it will all take care of itself,” he
said. “It’s something I don’t stress
about it. Even if I get drafted fifth
or sixth, it’s what I do in the NBA
that determines my legacy. I’m still
going to become the best player I’m
going to become.”
Like he did several times before
the season tipped off, Porter left
open the possibility of returning to
Missouri for his sophomore year,
though he and freshman Jeremiah
Tilmon had to contain snickers
while Porter discussed the topic
Tuesday.
“Of course, there’s a chance,”
Porter said. “That hasn’t changed
at all. I really don’t know yet. I
haven’t thought about that really.”
Sounders start prep for 2018 season on Jan. 22
MLS home opener is March 4
against expansion Los Angeles FC.
NORT H WE ST |
Elsewhere
The Seattle Sounders unveiled
their full schedule for the 2018
preseason, including training
camps in Chula Vista, Calif. and
Tucson, Ariz.
The club is scheduled to play a
select number of preseason match­
es, including one against their
| Sports C5
rivals, the Portland Timbers, on
Feb. 3 at Tucson’s Kino Sports
Complex.
The club’s first day of training is
Jan. 22 at the Starfire Sports prac­
tice facility in Tukwila. Brian
Schmetzer’s squad heads down to
Chula Vista for a week of training
camp from Jan. 23­28. The club
then returns to Seattle for a brief
stint before heading to Tucson on
Feb. 2 for a week in Arizona.
The 2018 MLS SuperDraft is
Jan. 19. Seattle has the 22nd pick
in the first round and the 45th
overall pick in the second round.
Seattle’s 10th MLS campaign
begins in late February with its
participation in the CONCACAF
Champions League. The club’s
• Everett Silvertips goaltender Carter
Hart was named the WHL Goaltender of
the Month for December. Hart, 19, record­
ed a perfect 5­0 record, 0.60 goals­against
average and .983 save percentage last
month. It is the second straight monthly
award for Hart.
• The Silvertips signed prospect for­
ward Gage Goncalves.
From sports­information reports.
T.J. Gibbs scored a game­high 22
points to lead four players in dou­
ble figures as Notre Dame gave
coach Mike Brey his school­record
394th victory, an 88­58 Atlantic
Coast Conference triumph over
visiting North Carolina State.
The Irish (12­3, 2­0 ACC) played
without senior All­American
Bonzie Colson, who is scheduled
for Thursday surgery on a broken
left foot. Brey passed former Irish
coach Digger Phelps, who was
courtside.
• Trae Young fell one rebound
short of a triple­double to help
No. 7 Oklahoma defeat visiting
Oklahoma State 109­89.
Young, the nation’s leader in
scoring and assists, finished with 27
points, 10 assists and nine re­
bounds.
• Five­star basketball phenom
Zion Williamson, a 6­foot­6 for­
ward from Spartanburg, S.C., has
set Jan. 20 for his college an­
nouncement.
The finalists for Williamson’s
commitment are Kentucky, Clem­
son, Duke, Kansas, North Carolina
and South Carolina.
• Katie Lou Samuelson scored 19
points and the No. 1 Connecticut
women (12­0) routed host East
Carolina 96­35.
ELSEWHERE
• Novak Djokovic is still not sure
whether he will be able to play in the
Australian Open, where he has won six of
his 12 major championships.
Djokovic has been dealing with pain in
his right elbow. A statement posted on his
website says he will travel to Australia to
participate in two exhibition events.
• Rising star Bradie Tennell continued
her breakout season by winning the wom­
en’s short program at the U.S. Figure
Skating Championships in San Jose, Calif.
• The Vegas Golden Knights signed
scoring leader Jonathan Marchessault to
a $30 million, six­year contract extension,
the clearest sign yet that the first­year,
first­place organization is going for it.
Seattle Times news services
C6 Sports |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
2
Fanfare
ON THE WEB |Get updated sports scores: seattletimes.com/sports
To report news: 206­464­2276 e­mail sports@seattletimes.com
Basketball
NBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Northwest Division
W L Pcts. GB L 10 Strk
Minnesota ........ 24 15 .615 — 7-3 L-1
Oklahoma City .. 21 17 .553 2½ 7-3 W-1
Denver ............. 20 17 .541 3 5-5 W-1
Portland ........... 19 18 .514 4 5-5 L-1
Utah ................ 16 22 .421 7½ 3-7 L-1
Pacific Division
Golden State ..... 30 8 .789 — 8-2 W-2
L.A. Clippers...... 17 19 .472 12 6-4 W-4
Phoenix............ 15 25 .375 16 6-4 L-1
Sacramento ...... 12 25 .324 17½ 3-7 L-3
L.A. Lakers ........ 11 26 .297 18½ 1-9 L-8
Southwest Division
Houston ........... 27 9 .750 — 5-5 W-2
San Antonio ...... 26 13 .667 2½ 7-3 L-1
New Orleans ..... 19 18 .514 8½ 5-5 W-1
Dallas............... 13 26 .333 15½ 5-5 L-1
Memphis .......... 12 26 .316 16 4-6 L-1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pcts. GB L 10 Strk
Boston ............. 31 10 .756 — 7-3 W-4
Toronto ............ 26 10 .722 2½ 8-2 W-3
Philadelphia ..... 18 19 .486 11 4-6 W-3
New York.......... 18 20 .474 11½ 3-7 L-2
Brooklyn .......... 15 23 .395 14½ 4-6 W-2
Central Division
Cleveland ......... 25 13 .658 — 5-5 L-1
Detroit ............. 20 16 .556 4 6-4 L-1
Milwaukee ....... 20 16 .556 4 5-5 W-1
Indiana ............ 19 19 .500 6 3-7 L-5
Chicago ............ 13 25 .342 12 5-5 L-3
Southeast Division
Washington ...... 22 16 .579 — 7-3 W-3
Miami .............. 20 17 .541 1½ 7-3 W-2
Charlotte.......... 14 23 .378 7½ 4-6 W-1
Orlando............ 12 27 .308 10½ 1-9 L-3
Atlanta............. 10 27 .270 11½ 4-6 L-1
Thursday's Games
Golden State at Houston, 5 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.
Rockets 116, Magic 98
HOUSTON (116)
Ariza 4-7 1-2 12, Anderson 6-12 4-4 17,
Capela 8-12 5-6 21, Paul 3-13 1-1 8, E.Gordon 5-16 4-5 17, Green 9-15 2-2 27, Tucker
0-0 0-0 0, Black 1-2 0-1 2, Nene 5-8 0-0 10,
Weber 1-4 0-0 2, Brown 0-0 0-0 0. Totals
42-89 17-21 116.
ORLANDO (98)
Simmons 1-3 1-2 3, A.Gordon 7-23 0-0 16,
Biyombo 2-4 0-0 4, Payton 5-9 4-4 14,
Fournier 2-11 6-6 10, Iwundu 2-4 5-6 9,
Speights 1-7 2-2 5, Birch 2-3 0-0 4, Mack
1-3 3-4 5, Augustin 1-3 1-1 3, Hezonja 6-14
0-0 14, Afflalo 5-7 0-0 11. Totals 35-91
22-25 98.
Houston
25 30 34 27 — 116
Orlando
12 29 25 32 — 98
Three­point goals—Houston 15-34
(Green 7-10, Ariza 3-5, E.Gordon 3-10, Anderson 1-4, Paul 1-4, Weber 0-1), Orlando
6-31 (Hezonja 2-6, A.Gordon 2-6, Afflalo
1-3, Speights 1-5, Payton 0-1, Iwundu 0-1,
Mack 0-1, Augustin 0-1, Simmons 0-2,
Fournier 0-5). Fouled out—None. Re­
bounds—Houston 51 (Capela 8), Orlando
48 (Hezonja 9). Assists—Houston 25
(Paul 13), Orlando 16 (Mack 7). Total
fouls—Houston 19, Orlando 19. Techni­
cals—Payton. A—18,588 (18,846).
Wizards 121, Knicks 103
NEW YORK (103)
Thomas 1-3 0-0 3, Porzingis 5-13 5-6 16,
Kanter 5-8 2-3 12, Jack 5-11 0-2 10, Lee 3-6
0-0 8, Beasley 8-14 3-3 20, Dotson 0-1 0-0
0, McDermott 3-8 3-3 10, O'Quinn 6-10 1-1
13, Hernangomez 0-0 0-0 0, Ntilikina 3-7
0-0 7, Baker 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 41-86 14-18
103.
WASHINGTON (121)
Porter Jr. 3-9 0-0 8, Morris 5-9 0-0 11, Gortat 9-10 3-7 21, Wall 9-18 6-9 25, Beal
11-14 3-4 27, Oubre Jr. 3-7 0-0 6, Scott 2-4
0-0 5, Mahinmi 2-3 4-6 8, Meeks 0-2 0-0 0,
Satoransky 4-5 0-0 10. Totals 48-81 16-26
121.
New York
32 31 14 26 — 103
Washington
33 31 26 31 — 121
Three­point goals—New York 7-19 (Lee
2-2, Beasley 1-2, Thomas 1-2, McDermott
1-3, Ntilikina 1-3, Porzingis 1-4, Jack 0-1,
Baker 0-1, Dotson 0-1), Washington 9-23
(Satoransky 2-2, Beal 2-4, Porter Jr. 2-6,
Scott 1-1, Wall 1-3, Morris 1-4, Meeks 0-1,
Oubre Jr. 0-2). Fouled out—None. Re­
bounds—New York 36 (O'Quinn 10),
Washington 42 (Morris 11). Assists—
New York 19 (Jack 4), Washington 27
(Wall 9). Total fouls—New York 20,
Washington 21. Technicals—New York
coach Knicks (Defensive three second),
Lee. A—17,206 (20,356).
76ers 112, Spurs 106
SAN ANTONIO (106)
K.Anderson 7-8 0-0 14, Aldridge 10-21 4-6
24, Gasol 0-4 0-0 0, Murray 2-5 0-0 4,
Forbes 6-11 2-3 15, Bertans 4-10 2-2 13,
Hilliard 0-0 0-0 0, Lauvergne 1-6 2-2 4,
White 1-2 2-2 4, Mills 7-17 8-8 26, Paul 1-3
0-0 2. Totals 39-87 20-23 106.
PHILADELPHIA (112)
Covington 2-7 2-2 7, Saric 4-10 5-6 15, Embiid 6-12 9-11 21, Simmons 8-18 10-15 26,
Redick 6-12 5-6 20, Booker 1-2 0-0 2, Johnson 3-4 1-2 7, Holmes 1-2 0-0 2, McConnell
1-4 0-0 2, Bayless 3-7 0-0 7, LuwawuCabarrot 1-2 1-1 3. Totals 36-80 33-43 112.
San Antonio
22 27 35 22 — 106
Philadelphia
27 33 28 24 — 112
Three­point goals—San Antonio 8-25
(Mills 4-11, Bertans 3-9, Forbes 1-3, Gasol
0-1, White 0-1), Philadelphia 7-22 (Redick
3-4, Saric 2-4, Covington 1-4, Bayless 1-5,
Simmons 0-1, McConnell 0-1, LuwawuCabarrot 0-1, Embiid 0-2). Fouled out—
None. Rebounds—San Antonio 43
(Aldridge 14), Philadelphia 45 (Embiid
11). Assists—San Antonio 15 (Gasol 4),
Philadelphia 23 (Simmons, McConnell,
Redick, Embiid 4). Total fouls—San Antonio 25, Philadelphia 21. A—20,642.
Heat 111, Pistons 104
DETROIT (104)
Harris 6-13 7-8 19, Bradley 6-19 0-2 15,
Marjanovic 5-8 5-5 15, Smith 3-10 0-0 6,
Bullock 6-10 0-0 17, Tolliver 2-5 0-0 5, Moreland 0-2 0-0 0, Drummond 0-0 0-0 0,
Buycks 7-12 0-0 14, Kennard 6-7 1-1 13. To­
tals 41-86 13-16 104.
MIAMI (111)
Richardson 7-12 3-4 22, Olynyk 11-15 0-0
25, Whiteside 5-8 0-0 10, Dragic 9-19 3-4
24, T.Johnson 1-5 0-0 2, J.Johnson 6-8 1-1
16, Mickey 0-1 0-0 0, Adebayo 0-4 0-0 0,
Walton Jr. 0-0 0-0 0, Ellington 4-12 1-2 12.
Totals 43-84 8-11 111.
Detroit
29 23 29 23 — 104
Miami
24 32 25 30 — 111
Three­point goals—Detroit 9-24 (Bullock
5-8, Bradley 3-9, Tolliver 1-3, Kennard 0-1,
Buycks 0-1, Harris 0-2), Miami 17-34 (Richardson 5-7, J.Johnson 3-4, Dragic 3-5,
Olynyk 3-5, Ellington 3-10, T.Johnson 0-3).
Fouled out—None. Rebounds—Detroit
35 (Marjanovic 9), Miami 41 (Olynyk 13).
Assists—Detroit 21 (Bradley, Smith, Buycks 4), Miami 29 (Dragic 13). Total fouls—
Detroit 14, Miami 16. Technicals—Detroit coach Pistons (Defensive three second), Detroit coach Stan Van Gundy,
Miami coach Erik Spoelstra. A—19,600.
Nets 98, Timberwolves 97
MINNESOTA (97)
Wiggins 8-17 0-0 17, Gibson 1-5 3-6 5,
Towns 8-16 0-1 16, Jones 4-9 3-3 11, Butler
7-17 16-18 30, Georges-Hunt 0-0 0-0 0,
Bjelica 0-0 0-0 0, Dieng 3-5 2-2 8, Brooks
0-1 0-0 0, Crawford 5-10 0-0 10. Totals
36-80 24-30 97.
BROOKLYN (98)
Carroll 3-11 2-2 9, Hollis-Jefferson 4-8 2-2
10, Zeller 3-4 0-0 6, Dinwiddie 9-14 4-4 26,
Crabbe 3-9 1-1 9, Acy 3-6 0-0 8, Okafor 1-3
0-0 2, Allen 3-5 0-0 6, Stauskas 2-5 0-0 5,
Harris 6-7 1-2 17. Totals 37-72 10-11 98.
Minnesota
22 21 30 24 — 97
Brooklyn
24 24 23 27 — 98
Three­point goals—Minnesota 1-11 (Wiggins 1-3, Jones 0-1, Crawford 0-1, Butler
0-2, Towns 0-4), Brooklyn 14-30 (Harris
4-5, Dinwiddie 4-7, Acy 2-5, Crabbe 2-6,
Stauskas 1-3, Carroll 1-4). Fouled out—
None. Rebounds—Minnesota 32 (Towns
10), Brooklyn 38 (Crabbe 8). Assists—
Minnesota 10 (Butler 4), Brooklyn 22
(Dinwiddie 9). Total fouls—Minnesota
12, Brooklyn 23. Technicals—Minnesota
coach Timberwolves (Defensive three
second), Hollis-Jefferson. A—16,215.
Raptors 124, Bulls 115
TORONTO (124)
Anunoby 1-5 1-1 3, Ibaka 7-12 1-1 16, Valanciunas 0-2 0-0 0, Lowry 5-14 4-4 16,
DeRozan 10-20 10-10 35, Miles 2-7 0-0 6,
Siakam 2-4 0-0 4, Nogueira 0-0 0-0 0, Poeltl 3-5 0-0 6, VanVleet 5-7 2-2 13, Wright
10-15 1-1 25, Powell 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 45-92
19-19 124.
CHICAGO (115)
Valentine 6-12 0-0 14, Markkanen 9-17 2-2
22, Lopez 5-11 2-2 12, Dunn 1-6 0-0 2, Holiday 7-10 6-7 26, Zipser 2-3 0-0 4, Portis 1-7
0-0 2, Mirotic 7-17 3-4 20, Grant 4-7 3-4 11,
Nwaba 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 43-93 16-19 115.
Toronto
21 35 34 34 — 124
Chicago
31 28 31 25 — 115
Three­point goals—Toronto 15-38 (DeRozan 5-8, Wright 4-5, Lowry 2-7, Miles 2-7,
VanVleet 1-2, Ibaka 1-3, Siakam 0-1, Powell 0-1, Anunoby 0-4), Chicago 13-33 (Holiday 6-9, Mirotic 3-7, Valentine 2-5, Markkanen 2-8, Portis 0-1, Dunn 0-3). Fouled
out—None. Rebounds—Toronto 49
(Wright 13), Chicago 43 (Markkanen 12).
Assists—Toronto 23 (DeRozan 6), Chicago 29 (Dunn 8). Total fouls—Toronto 20,
Chicago 20. A—20,056 (20,917).
Celtics 102, Cavaliers 88
CLEVELAND (88)
James 8-15 3-3 19, Crowder 2-12 2-2 6,
Love 1-11 0-0 2, Calderon 2-4 1-1 6, Smith
4-6 0-0 10, Green 3-11 7-7 13, Osman 1-1
0-0 2, Frye 0-3 0-0 0, Thompson 3-5 4-4 10,
Korver 5-11 0-0 15, Wade 2-10 1-1 5. Totals
31-89 18-18 88.
BOSTON (102)
Tatum 6-14 2-2 15, Morris 1-6 1-2 3, Horford 5-7 0-0 11, Irving 5-14 1-2 11, Brown
5-13 3-3 14, Nader 0-2 1-2 1, Ojeleye 0-4
0-0 0, Yabusele 0-1 0-0 0, Theis 2-2 0-0 6,
Baynes 3-3 0-0 6, Smart 6-14 0-0 15, Larkin
0-0 0-0 0, Rozier 8-12 0-0 20. Totals 41-92
8-11 102.
Cleveland
21 26 21 20 — 88
Boston
32 23 26 21 — 102
Three­point goals—Cleveland 8-32 (Korver 5-8, Smith 2-3, Calderon 1-3, Green 0-2,
Frye 0-2, Wade 0-2, James 0-2, Love 0-4,
Crowder 0-6), Boston 12-36 (Rozier 4-6,
Smart 3-6, Theis 2-2, Horford 1-1, Tatum
1-3, Brown 1-6, Yabusele 0-1, Morris 0-2,
Ojeleye 0-4, Irving 0-5). Fouled out—
None. Rebounds—Cleveland 48 (Thompson 10), Boston 52 (Horford, Irving 9). As­
sists—Cleveland 16 (James 6), Boston 27
(Irving 6). Total fouls—Cleveland 17, Boston 20. A—18,624 (18,624).
Bucks 122, Pacers 101
INDIANA (101)
Bogdanovic 5-13 3-3 13, T.Young 2-8 0-0 4,
Turner 3-8 3-4 9, Collison 6-9 4-4 17, Stephenson 7-15 0-0 15, Wilkins 0-1 0-0 0, Sabonis 10-13 4-5 24, Leaf 0-2 0-0 0, Poythress 2-2 0-0 5, Joseph 5-9 0-1 10, J.Young
1-4 2-2 4. Totals 41-84 16-19 101.
MILWAUKEE (122)
Middleton 9-14 6-6 27, Antetokounmpo
12-18 7-8 31, Henson 3-6 3-5 9, Bledsoe
3-4 0-0 7, Snell 3-8 2-2 9, Maker 5-10 0-0
12, Dellavedova 3-3 0-0 8, Brogdon 5-9 7-7
17, Liggins 0-0 0-0 0, Brown 0-1 0-0 0, Kilpatrick 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 44-75 25-28 122.
Indiana
26 26 24 25 — 101
Milwaukee
34 28 31 29 — 122
Three­point goals—Indiana 3-15 (Poythress 1-1, Collison 1-2, Stephenson 1-3, Joseph 0-1, Turner 0-1, J.Young 0-1, T.Young
0-2, Bogdanovic 0-4), Milwaukee 9-17
(Middleton 3-4, Maker 2-2, Dellavedova
2-2, Bledsoe 1-2, Snell 1-3, Antetokounmpo 0-1, Kilpatrick 0-1, Brogdon 0-2).
Fouled out—None. Rebounds—Indiana
30 (Joseph, Stephenson 7), Milwaukee 34
(Antetokounmpo 10). Assists—Indiana
24 (Joseph 6), Milwaukee 33 (Dellavedova 9). Total fouls—Indiana 20, Milwaukee 23. Technicals—Indiana coach Nate
McMillan, Milwaukee coach Bucks (Delay
of game). A—15,613 (18,717).
Warriors 125, Mavericks 122
GOLDEN STATE (125)
Durant 10-20 4-4 25, Green 7-10 1-1 18, Pachulia 2-4 3-4 7, St.Curry 11-19 4-5 32,
Thompson 11-19 0-0 25, Young 0-2 0-0 0,
West 3-3 1-1 7, Bell 0-3 2-2 2, Livingston
1-4 0-0 2, McCaw 3-5 1-2 7. Totals 48-89
16-19 125.
DALLAS (122)
Barnes 7-13 2-2 18, Kleber 2-6 0-0 5, Nowitzki 5-11 2-3 12, Smith Jr. 6-18 0-0 14,
Matthews 7-11 1-2 22, Powell 7-9 5-5 21,
Mejri 0-1 0-0 0, Ferrell 4-7 0-0 11, Barea
3-6 6-9 13, Harris 2-7 1-1 6. Totals 43-89
17-22 122.
Golden State
35 32 24 34 — 125
Dallas
26 35 28 33 — 122
Three­point goals—Golden State 13-32
(St.Curry 6-13, Green 3-5, Thompson 3-6,
Durant 1-5, McCaw 0-1, Young 0-2), Dallas
19-42 (Matthews 7-10, Ferrell 3-5, Powell
2-2, Barnes 2-5, Smith Jr. 2-8, Barea 1-2,
Kleber 1-3, Harris 1-5, Nowitzki 0-2).
Fouled out—None. Rebounds—Golden
State 43 (Durant 11), Dallas 40 (Nowitzki,
Powell 8). Assists—Golden State 35
(St.Curry 8), Dallas 29 (Smith Jr. 8). Total
fouls—Golden State 21, Dallas 17. Tech­
nicals—Harris. A—20,212 (19,200).
Pelicans 108, Jazz 98
NEW ORLEANS (108)
Moore 2-5 0-0 6, Davis 11-26 6-6 29, Cousins 7-11 3-3 19, Rondo 5-9 0-0 12, Holiday
10-16 2-2 24, Miller 3-6 0-0 9, Cunningham
2-3 1-1 6, Nelson 1-6 0-0 3, Clark 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 41-82 12-12 108.
UTAH (98)
Ingles 3-7 0-0 11, Jerebko 3-5 1-1 7, Favors
5-10 1-2 11, Rubio 5-12 1-1 11, Mitchell
6-17 9-10 24, Johnson 9-12 0-0 20, Udoh
3-4 0-0 6, Hood 1-10 0-0 2, Burks 3-7 3-3 9.
Totals 38-84 15-17 98.
New Orleans
27 31 23 27 — 108
28 27 17 26 — 98
Utah
Three­point goals—New Orleans 14-30
(Miller 3-5, Moore 2-3, Cousins 2-4, Holiday 2-5, Rondo 2-5, Cunningham 1-2, Nelson 1-3, Davis 1-3), Utah 7-32 (Mitchell
3-11, Johnson 2-3, Ingles 2-6, Jerebko 0-1,
Burks 0-2, Rubio 0-3, Hood 0-6). Fouled
out—None. Rebounds—New Orleans 42
(Davis 15), Utah 36 (Favors 9). Assists—
New Orleans 23 (Holiday, Moore 5), Utah
23 (Rubio 7). Total fouls—New Orleans
18, Utah 21. A—18,306 (19,911).
Nuggets 134, Suns 111
PHOENIX (111)
Warren 5-16 3-3 13, Chriss 6-13 1-4 16,
Monroe 7-12 2-2 16, Ulis 2-6 0-0 5, Booker
4-13 7-8 17, Jackson 6-8 1-2 14, House 0-1
1-2 1, Bender 3-7 0-0 9, Len 1-6 4-6 6, Canaan 4-8 1-1 11, Daniels 1-2 0-0 3. Totals
39-92 20-28 111.
DENVER (134)
W.Chandler 7-9 0-0 17, Jokic 4-6 5-5 14,
Plumlee 3-5 1-2 7, Murray 6-11 0-0 13,
Harris 14-17 5-5 36, Craig 0-1 0-0 0, Jefferson 0-0 0-0 0, Barton 5-13 2-2 12, Faried
1-1 2-2 4, Lyles 5-11 4-4 16, Mudiay 2-3 0-0
5, Beasley 4-5 1-2 10. Totals 51-82 20-22
134.
Phoenix
26 41 18 26 — 111
34 27 37 36 — 134
Denver
Three­point goals—Phoenix 13-35 (Bender 3-7, Chriss 3-9, Canaan 2-6, Booker 2-7,
Ulis 1-1, Jackson 1-2, Daniels 1-2, Warren
0-1), Denver 12-27 (W.Chandler 3-4, Harris 3-5, Lyles 2-5, Jokic 1-1, Mudiay 1-2,
Beasley 1-2, Murray 1-6, Barton 0-2).
Fouled out—None. Rebounds—Phoenix
35 (Monroe 10), Denver 48 (Lyles 11). As­
sists—Phoenix 26 (Booker, Warren 5),
Denver 35 (Jokic 8). Total fouls—Phoenix
18, Denver 16. Technicals—Jackson, Denver coach Nuggets (Defensive three second) 2. A—14,079 (19,155).
Thunder 133, Lakers 96
OKLAHOMA CITY (133)
George 9-14 3-4 24, Anthony 8-14 2-3 21,
Adams 6-10 0-0 12, Westbrook 10-17 0-0
20, Ferguson 9-12 0-0 24, Huestis 2-4 0-0
4, Grant 3-5 0-0 6, Singler 1-2 0-0 2, Collison 0-0 0-0 0, Patterson 2-4 2-2 7, Johnson
3-4 0-0 6, Felton 0-3 0-0 0, Hamilton 3-4
0-0 7. Totals 56-93 7-9 133.
L.A. LAKERS (96)
Ingram 3-9 1-2 7, Kuzma 7-14 1-3 18, Randle 3-6 3-4 9, Ennis 2-5 0-0 4, CaldwellPope 5-9 0-0 12, Nance Jr. 2-6 0-0 4, Brewer 4-6 2-4 10, Zubac 0-1 0-0 0, Lopez 4-11
0-0 10, Caruso 2-3 0-0 5, Hart 2-7 1-1 6,
Clarkson 4-15 1-1 11. Totals 38-92 9-15 96.
Oklahoma City 26 37 33 37 — 133
L.A. Lakers
26 18 26 26 — 96
Three­point goals—Oklahoma City 14-30
(Ferguson 6-9, Anthony 3-5, George 3-7,
Hamilton 1-2, Patterson 1-3, Grant 0-1,
Singler 0-1, Huestis 0-2), L.A. Lakers 11-33
(Kuzma 3-6, Caldwell-Pope 2-2, Lopez 2-6,
Clarkson 2-8, Caruso 1-2, Hart 1-6, Ennis
0-1, Ingram 0-2). Fouled out—None. Re­
bounds—Oklahoma City 44 (Huestis 9),
L.A. Lakers 45 (Nance Jr. 7). Assists—
Oklahoma City 36 (Westbrook 12), L.A.
Lakers 24 (Ennis 6). Total fouls—Oklahoma City 17, L.A. Lakers 10. A—18,997.
College
Men’s Scores
Wednesday
WEST
Boise St. 90, New Mexico 62
Cal St.-Fullerton 68, UC Riverside 65
Nevada 92, Wyoming 83
Utah St. 81, Fresno St. 79, OT
SOUTHWEST
Abilene Christian 79, McNeese St. 74
Oklahoma 109, Oklahoma St. 89
Prairie View 78, Southern U. 74
Sam Houston St. 82, Cent. Arkansas 76
Stephen F. Austin 81, Nicholls 64
Texas A&M-CC 67, Northwestern St. 65
Texas Southern 85, Alcorn St. 70
Tulsa 90, UConn 88, 2OT
MIDWEST
Bradley 80, Valparaiso 71
Creighton 78, St. John's 71
Dayton 82, St. Bonaventure 72
Drake 87, Illinois St. 62
Indiana St. 61, Loyola of Chicago 57
Minnesota 77, Illinois 67
Notre Dame 88, NC State 58
Purdue 82, Rutgers 51
S. Dakota St. 87, N. Dakota St. 80
S. Illinois 65, Evansville 63
South Dakota 62, W. Illinois 50
SOUTH
Alabama St. 74, Grambling St. 66
Bethune-Cookman 86, SC State 80
Davidson 54, Saint Louis 51
East Carolina 67, South Florida 65
Florida A&M 84, Howard 76
Florida St. 81, North Carolina 80
Gardner-Webb 82, Campbell 80, OT
Georgia 71, Mississippi 60
Georgia Tech 64, Miami 54
High Point 84, UNC-Asheville 74
Jackson St. 59, Alabama A&M 56
Kentucky 74, LSU 71
Lipscomb 99, Fisk 53
Missouri 79, South Carolina 68
Morgan St. 85, Md.-Eastern Shore 82
New Orleans 72, Lamar 62
Norfolk St. 75, Coppin St. 67
Presbyterian 78, Longwood 65
Radford 85, Winthrop 79
UCF 65, Memphis 56
Virginia 78, Virginia Tech 52
Wake Forest 73, Syracuse 67
EAST
Brown 70, NJIT 69
Clemson 74, Boston College 70
Duquesne 69, George Washington 52
Fordham 69, Richmond 65, OT
George Mason 80, UMass 72, OT
Hartford 72, Albany (NY) 64
Marquette 95, Providence 90, OT
NC Central 65, Delaware St. 62
Rhode Island 74, La Salle 62
Saint Joseph's 87, VCU 81, OT
Stony Brook 71, Maine 70
UMBC 71, New Hampshire 67
Women's Scores
Wednesday
WEST
Colorado St. 65, San Diego St. 63
Fresno St. 57, Utah St. 56
New Mexico 100, Boise St. 83
UNLV 79, San Jose St. 60
Wyoming 66, Nevada 60
High School Scores
BOYS BASKETBALL
Almira/Coulee-Hartline 66, Wellpinit 58
Battle Ground 62, Heritage 44
Bellarmine Prep 63, Sumner 57
Bellevue 61, Mercer Island 57
Bonney Lake 44, Bethel 43
Capital 63, Central Kitsap 43
Chelan 56, Cascade (Leavenworth) 54
Davis 74, Hermiston, Ore. 60
Emerald Ridge 65, Graham-Kapowsin 60
Gig Harbor 71, Timberline 41
Horizon Christian Hood River, Ore. 64,
Klickitat 39
Kelso 56, Hudson's Bay 46
Kentwood 73, Kentridge 56
Life Christian Academy 83, Ocosta 38
Lincoln 68, Spanaway Lake 62
Odessa 65, Reardan 38
Port Angeles 66, Bremerton 47
Prairie 77, Evergreen (Vancouver) 53
Pullman 65, Cheney 47
Puyallup 63, Olympia 54
Redmond 54, Lake Washington 46
Richland 77, Central Valley 49
Rogers (Puyallup) 61, South Kitsap 50
Sehome 60, Meridian 54
Skyview 53, Camas 51
Tahoma 57, Mt. Rainier 50
West Valley (Spokane) 59, Clarkston 47
Wilson 89, Mount Tahoma 35
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Ballard 58, Lakeside (Seattle) 50
Bellarmine Prep 71, Sumner 54
Bethel 66, Bonney Lake 21
Camas 63, Skyview 14
Capital 49, Central Kitsap 41
Cheney 58, Pullman 47
Chief Sealth 58, Eastside Catholic 45
Clarkston 59, West Valley (Spokane) 49
Davis 58, Kennewick 50
Edmonds-Woodway 73, Stanwood 67
Genesis Preparatory Academy, Idaho 52,
Rogers (Spokane) 45
Glacier Peak 62, Mount Vernon 15
Horizon Christian Hood River, Ore. 53,
Klickitat 44
Kentridge 59, Kentwood 41
Liberty (Spangle) 56, Asotin 16
Lincoln 68, Spanaway Lake 30
Mountain View 48, Fort Vancouver 41
Olympia 51, Puyallup 43
Peninsula 55, Shelton 53
Prairie 68, Evergreen (Vancouver) 24
Rainier Beach 56, Blanchet 40
Reardan 45, Odessa 35
Redmond 60, Lake Washington 27
Rogers (Puyallup) 64, South Kitsap 38
Seattle Prep 61, Bainbridge 50
Tahoma 51, Mt. Rainier 42
Timberline 43, Gig Harbor 40
Todd Beamer 63, Federal Way 35
Washougal 79, Hockinson 67
West Seattle 77, Franklin 30
White River 69, Foss 21
On this day
Jan. 4
1970 — The Minnesota Vikings become
the first expansion team to win the NFL title by beating the Cleveland Browns 27-7
in 8-degree temperatures in Bloomington, Minn.
1970 — Kansas City's defense, highlighted by four interceptions, three in the final
quarter, carries the Chiefs to a 17-7 victory over Oakland Raiders in the last AFL title game.
1976 — The Dallas Cowboys become the
first wild-card team to make it to the Super Bowl with a 37-7 rout of the Los Angeles Rams in the NFC title game.
1986 — Eric Dickerson shatters the NFL
playoff record with a 248-yard rushing
performance and two touchdowns to
lead the Los Angeles Rams to a 20-0 win
over the Dallas Cowboys.
1991 — Fu Mingxia, a 12-year-old from
China, becomes the youngest world titlist in the history of any aquatic event by
winning the women's platform gold
medal at the World Swimming Championships in Perth, Australia.
1992 — Mike Gartner of the New York
Rangers scores his 1,000th NHL point
with a power-play goal in the third period
of a 6-4 loss to the New Jersey Devils.
Singles
Second Round
Hockey
NHL
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vegas ............. 38 27 9 2 56 135 106
Los Angeles ..... 40 24 11 5 53 120 91
San Jose .......... 37 21 12 4 46 102 93
Anaheim ......... 41 19 14 8 46 114 115
Calgary ........... 39 19 16 4 42 108 114
Edmonton ....... 40 17 20 3 37 114 131
Vancouver....... 40 16 19 5 37 106 132
Arizona ........... 41 9 27 5 23 94 146
Central Division
Winnipeg ........ 41 23 11 7 53 136 113
St. Louis.......... 42 25 15 2 52 122 104
Nashville ........ 39 23 11 5 51 123 107
Dallas ............. 41 22 16 3 47 123 114
Minnesota ...... 40 21 16 3 45 115 114
Chicago .......... 39 19 14 6 44 117 108
Colorado......... 39 20 16 3 43 126 122
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
Tampa Bay ...... 39 29 8 2 60 146 93
Boston............ 38 22 10 6 50 119 95
Toronto .......... 41 23 16 2 48 135 120
Florida............ 39 17 17 5 39 109 126
Detroit............ 39 16 16 7 39 106 120
Montreal ........ 40 16 20 4 36 101 126
Ottawa ........... 38 12 17 9 33 99 130
Buffalo ........... 39 10 20 9 29 86 129
Metropolitan Division
Washington .... 41 25 13 3 53 128 117
New Jersey ...... 39 22 10 7 51 123 116
Columbus ....... 41 23 15 3 49 115 115
N.Y. Rangers.... 40 21 14 5 47 125 114
Carolina.......... 39 18 13 8 44 110 119
N.Y. Islanders .. 40 20 16 4 44 137 144
Pittsburgh....... 41 20 18 3 43 116 129
Philadelphia.... 39 16 15 8 40 107 114
Thursday's Games
Florida at Boston, 4 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
San Jose at Toronto, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Vegas at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
New Jersey at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Calgary, 6 p.m.
Anaheim at Edmonton, 6 p.m.
Columbus at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Nashville at Arizona, 6 p.m.
RED WINGS 2, SENATORS 1 (OT)
Ottawa .....................0 0 1 0 — 1
Detroit ......................1 0 0 1 — 2
First—1, Detroit, Athanasiou 9 (Mantha,
Frk), 11:15. Third—2, Ottawa, Dzingel
11, 0:39. Overtime—3, Detroit, Athanasiou 10 (Larkin), 0:06. Shots on goal—Ottawa
14-11-9—34.
Detroit
11-11-12-1—35. Power plays—Ottawa 0
of 2; Detroit 0 of 1. Goalies—Ottawa, Anderson 9-12-6 (35 shots-33 saves). Detroit,
Howard 14-12-6 (34-33). A—19,515.
BLACKHAWKS 5, RANGERS 2
Chicago...........................1 1 3 — 5
N.Y. Rangers....................1 1 0 — 2
First—1, Chicago, Hinostroza 3 (Oesterle, Toews), 16:09. 2, N.Y. Rangers, Holden 4 (Nieves, Carey), 18:09. Second—3,
Chicago, Schmaltz 9 (Hartman, Kane),
8:56. 4, N.Y. Rangers, Zibanejad 13 (Buchnevich, Zuccarello), 11:32 (pp). Third—5,
Chicago, Sharp 5 (Kampf, DeBrincat),
2:24. 6, Chicago, Toews 12 (Wingels,
Saad), 19:06. 7, Chicago, Kane 18
(Schmaltz, Hartman), 19:55. Shots on
goal—Chicago 14-12-9—35. N.Y. Rangers
6-8-11—25. Power plays—Chicago 0 of 1;
N.Y. Rangers 1 of 6. Goalies—Chicago,
Glass 3-0-1 (25 shots-23 saves). N.Y. Rangers,
Lundqvist
18-11-4
(33-30).
A—18,006.
WHL
U.S. Division
GP W L OL SL GF GA
Everett .......... 39 23 14 1 1 128 94
Portland ........ 37 22 12 1 2 142 108
Tri-City........... 35 20 10 5 0 131 123
Spokane ........ 38 20 15 1 2 145 134
Seattle .......... 37 18 14 4 1 129 132
Pts
48
47
45
43
41
Figure Skating
US Championships Results
San Jose, Calif.
Women's Short Program
1. Bradie Tennell, Skokie Valley SC,
73.79.
2. Mirai Nagasu, Pasadena FSC, 73.09.
3. Karen Chen, Peninsula SC, 69.48.
4. Angela Wang, Salt Lake Figure Skating,
67.00.
5. Ashley Wagner, SC of Wilmington,
65.94.
Tennis
ATP World Tour Tata Open
Maharashtra Results
At Pune, India
Pierre-Hugues Herbert (8), France, def.
Yuki Bhambri, India, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. Benoit
Paire (4), France, def. Marton Fucsovics,
Hungary, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (6). Robin Haase
(5), Netherlands, def. Nicolas Jarry,
France, 3-6, 7-6 (5), 7-5. Gilles Simon,
France, def. Roberto Bautista Agut (3),
Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (5). Mikhail Kukushkin (7),
Kazakhstan, def. Laslo Djere, Serbia, 7-5,
7-6 (5). Marin Cilic (1), Croatia, def. Ramkumar Ramanathan, India, 6-4, 6-3. Ricardo Ojeda Lara, Spain, def. Ilya Ivashka,
Belarus, 6-4, 6-4. Kevin Anderson (2),
South Africa, def. Thiago Monteiro, Brazil, 7-6 (4), 3-2 retired.
ATP World Tour Qatar
ExxonMobil Open Results
At Doha, Qatar
Singles
Second Round
Andrey Rublev, Russia, def. Fernando
Verdasco (7), Spain, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Mirza
Basic, Bosnia-Herzegovina, def. Feliciano
Lopez (8), Spain, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Borna Coric,
Croatia, def. Nikoloz Basilashvili, Georgia, 6-1, 6-3. Dominic Thiem (1) Austria,
def. Aljaz Bedene, Slovenia, 7-5, 6-4. Peter Gojowczyk, Germany, def. Matteo
Berrettini, Italy, 6-2, 6-2. Guido Pella, Argentina, def. Stefano Travaglia, Italy, 7-6
(4), 6-3. Gael Monfils, France, def. JanLennard Struff, Germany, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3.
Stefanos Tsitsipas, Greece, def. Richard
Gasquet (5), France, 6-3, 6-4.
Brisbane International
Results
At Brisbane, Australia
Singles
Men
Second Round
Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, def. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, 6-1, 6-2. Nick Kyrgios (3), Australia, def. Matthew Ebden,
Australia, 6-7 (3), 7-6 (5), 6-2. Michael
Mmoh, United States, def. Mischa Zverev
(8), Germany, 6-2, 5-7, 6-4. Alex de Minaur, Australia, def. Milos Raonic (4), Canada, 6-4, 6-4.
Women
Second Round
Aleksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def.
Anett Kontaveit, Estonia, 1-6, 7-6 (2), 6-3.
Elina Svitolina (3), Ukraine, def. Ana Konjuh, Croatia, 6-3, 6-1. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, def. Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, 6-4,
6-3. Karolina Pliskova (2), Czech Republic,
def. CiCi Bellis, United States, 6-1, 6-1.
WTA Shenzhen Open Results
At Shenzhen, China
Singles
Second Round
Irina-Camelia Begu (4), Romania, def.
Ekaterina Alexandrova, Russia, 4-6, 6-1,
6-2. Katarina Siniakova (6), Czech Republic, def. Wang Yafan, China, 7-5, 6-3. Simona Halep (1), Romania, def. Duan
Ying-Ying, China, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2. Kristyna
Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Ana Bogdan, Romania, 6-4, 7-6 (3).
WTA ASB Classic Results
At Auckland, New Zealand
Singles
Second Round
Barbora Strycova (3), Czech Republic, def.
Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-1, 6-7 (3), 6-2.
Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, def. Ysaline Bonaventure, Belgium, 6-4, 6-3. Caroline
Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Petra Martic, Croatia, 6-2, 6-2. Sofia Kenin, United
States, def. Varvara Lepchenko, United
States, 6-4, 7-6 (6). Polona Hercog, Slovenia, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-4,
6-2. Sachia Vickery, United States, def. Veronica Cepede Royg, Paraguay, 6-2, 6-4.
Julia Goerges (2), Germany, def. Viktoria
Kuzmova, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-0. Agnieszka
Radwanska (4), Poland, def. Taylor
Townsend, United States, 6-3, 7-5.
Skiing
World Cup results
Wednesday
at Zagreb, Croatia
Women’s Slalom
1. Mikaela Shiffrin, United States,
1:43.07
2. Wendy Holdener, Switzerland, 1:54.66
3. Frida Honsdotter, Sweden, 1:55.18
4. Petra Vlhova, Slovakia, 1:55.31
5. Bernadette Schild, Austria, 1:55.45
6. Katharina Gallhuber, Austria, 1:55.98
7. Erin Mielzynski, Canada, 1:56.03
8. Katharina Liensberger, Austria,
1:56.27
9. Melanie Meillard, Switzerland, 1:56.40
10. Anna Larsson Swenn, Sweden,
1:56.41
ALSO
14. Resi Stiegler, United States, 1:56.76
Olympics
United States
Speedskating qualifying
Wednesday
Men’s 1000m
1. Joey Mantia, 1:09.14
2. Shani Davis 1:09.22
3. Mitchell Whitmore, 1:09.30
4. Jonathan Garcia, 1:09.59
5. Kimani Griffin, 1:09.63
6. Brian Hansen, 1:09.74
7. Emery Lehman, 1:10.90 PR SB
8. Trevor Marsicano, 1:11.45
9. Edwin Park, 1:11.85
10. Austin Kleba, 1:12.20
11. William Gebauer, 1:12.62
12. Steven Hartman, 1:12.74
13. Brett Perry, 1:12.77
14. Kyle Ronchak, 1:12.81
15. Casey Dawson, 1:13.34
16. Tyler Cain, 1:13.89
17. Conor McDermott-Mostowy, 1:14.46
18. Cooper McLeod, 1:14.98
19. Andrew Turner, 1:15.37
20. Ethan Cepuran, 1:15.58
21. Nathan Miller, 1:15.82
22. Patrick Miller, 1:16.27 PR SB
23. Levi Sinak, 1:16.40 SB
24. Alex Zamojski, 1:16.63 SB
25. Steve Smykal, 1:16.90
26. John Sullivan, 1:16.99
27. Kevin Geminder, 1:17.00 SB
28. William Valentine, 1:18.63
29. Evan Flaherty, 1:19.37
30. Kyle Essex, 1:19.79
DNF Nick Turro
DQ Fletcher Codd
Women’s 1000m
1. Heather Bergsma, 1:14.82
2. Brittany Bowe, 1:15.52
3. Mia Manganello,1:18.23
4. Jerica Tandiman, 1:18.59
5. Kelly Gunther (1987), USAUSA 1:19.34
6. Rebekah Bradford, 1:19.36
7. Sugar Todd, 1:19.41
8. Erin Bartlett, 1:19.71
9. Bri Bocox, 1:20.19
10. Paige Schwartzburg, 1:20.21
11. Franchesca Pasquarella, 1:20.59
12. Erin Jackson, 1:21.73
13. Chrysta Rands, 1:22.71
14. Allie Thunstrom, 1:22.86
15. Hannah Bosman, 1:23.05 SB
16. Briana Kramer, 1:23.92
17. Sara Rehklau, 1:24.17
18. Esther Munoz, 1:24.20 SB
19. Jamie Nielson, 1:24.57
20. Rebecca Simmons, 1:24.74
21. Mariah Richardson, 1:25.69
22. Jacquelyn Bernico, 1:26.78
Transactions
MLB
NATIONAL LEAGUE
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Traded RHP Dylan Baker to the L.A. Dodgers for cash.
BASKETBALL
WASHINGTON — Waived F Mike Young.
Assigned F Chris McCullough to Wisconsin (NBAGL).
NFL
CINCINNATI — Signed offensive coordinator Bill Lazor to a new contract.
GREEN BAY — Fired defensive coordinator Dom Capers, assistant linebackers
coach Scott McCurley and defensive line
coach Mike Trgovac. Signed G Kofi Amichia.
KANSAS CITY — Placed CB Phillip Gaines
on injured reserve. Signed DT Stefan
Charles.
MINNESOTA — Signed WR Brandon Zylstra to a reserve/future contract.
NEW ENGLAND — Signed LB Trevor Reilly
to the practice squad. Released WR Bernard Reedy from the practice squad.
SEATTLE — Signed K Jason Myers and RB
Jalston Fowler to reserve/future contracts.
WASHINGTON — Signed DL Montori
Hughes to a reserve/future contract.
zo will enter the NFL draft. Named Donte'
Pimpleton running backs coach and Raymond Woodie linebackers coach.
MEMPHIS — Announced the resignations of inside linebackers coach and recruiting coordinator Dan Lanning and defensive backs coach Marcus Woodson.
STANFORD — Announced TE Dalton
Schultz will enter the NFL draft.
TENNESSEE — DB Rashaan Gaulden announced he will enter the NFL draft.
UCLA — QB Josh Rosen will enter the NFL
draft.
WAGNER — Named Terrance Knighton
defensive assistant football coach.
WASHINGTON STATE — DT Hercules Mata'afa announced he will enter the NFL
draft.
Daily Line
NBA
Favorite
Thursday
Line
O/U
HOUSTON
LA CLIPPERS
OFF
1
Underdog
(OFF) Golden State
(213) Oklahoma City
College basketball
Thursday
Line
Favorite
WICHITA ST
9
Cincinnati
7
UAB
7½
CLEVELAND ST 1
Mid. Tennessee 13½
IOWA
1
IUPUI
2
GEORGIA ST
14½
GRGA SOUTHERN 12
Milwaukee
8
LOUISIANA TECH 8
MICHIGAN ST
14
Coastal Carolina 3
Old Dominion 14½
SOUTHERN MISS 1
N. TEXAS
7
TXAS-ARLINGTON9
LA-LAFAYETTE 10
TEXAS STATE
4
Arizona St
9½
SMU
8½
MISSOURI ST
7½
Arizona
4
UC DAVIS
4½
SNT MARY'S CA 19½
LONG BEACH ST 1
UC Snta Barbara 6
LYLA MRYMUNT 6
San Diego
7
UCLA
5
USC
6½
BYU
2
Gonzaga
19
Underdog
Houston
TEMPLE
FAU
Green Bay
FIU
Ohio State
Ill.-Chicago
UALR
Arkansas St
YNGSTOWN ST
UTSA
Maryland
LSNA-MONROE
RICE
UTEP
Charlotte
Troy
Appalachian St
S. Alabama
COLORADO
TULANE
N. Iowa
UTAH
UC Irvine
Pacific
Hawaii
CAL POLY
Santa Clara
PORTLAND
STANFORD
CALIFORNIA
SAN FRANCISCO
PEPPERDINE
National Hockey League
Favorite
Thursday
Line
Underdog Line
BOSTON
-190
TORONTO
-133
PITTSBURGH -148
PHILADELPHIA -120
Tampa Bay
-165
MINNESOTA -187
ST. LOUIS
-117
DALLAS
-165
COLORADO
OFF
Nashville
-175
EDMONTON -128
CALGARY
-110
Florida
San Jose
Carolina
NY Islanders
MONTREAL
Buffalo
Las Vegas
New Jersey
Columbus
ARIZONA
Anaheim
Los Angeles
+175
+123
+138
+110
+155
+172
+107
+155
OFF
+163
+118
+100
College Football
Favorite
Monday
Open Now O/U
Underdog
National Championship Game
Alabama
4½
3½ (44½)
Georgia
NFL
Favorite
Playoffs Saturday
Open Now O/U Underdog
KANSAS CITY 7½ 8½
LA RAMS
5
6½
Playoffs
JCKSONVILLE7½
N. ORLEANS 5½
8½
6½
(44) Tennessee
(48½)
Atlanta
Sunday
(39½)
Buffalo
Carolina
(48)
NHL
VEGAS — Signed F Jonathan Marchessault to a six-year contract extension
through the 2023-24 season.
MLS
LA GALAXY — Signed D Ashley Cole to a
one-year contract.
NEW YORK RED BULLS — Traded N Sacha
Kljestan and targeted allocation money
to Orlando City for F Carlos Rivas and D
Tommy Redding. Signed D Kevin Politz.
ORLANDO — Signed F Dom Dwyer to a
three-year contract.
COLLEGE
AUBURN — CB Carlton Davis and RB Kamryn Pettway will enter the NFL draft.
COLORADO — Named Kurt Roper quarterbacks coach.
FLORIDA — Named Greg Knox and Sal
Sunseri assistant football coaches.
FLORIDA STATE — Announced TE Ryan Iz-
EARN
2X
POINTS!
EVERY
FRIDAY
Time’s up
Seahawks TE Jimmy Graham
should go wherever free agency
takes him
LARRY STONE > C1
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
CLOUDS, RAIN
High, 46. Low, 42. > B8
seattletimes.com/weather
WINNER OF 10 PULITZER PRIZES
$1.50
INDEPENDENT AND LOCALLY OWNED FOR MORE THAN 121 YEARS
SEATTLETIMES.COM
X2 |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018 |
| X3
X4 |
| THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2018
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
22
Размер файла
10 441 Кб
Теги
The Seattle Times, newspaper
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа