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The Boston Globe – April 24, 2018

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Tu e s d a y, A p r i l 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
Airbnb furor
reveals fierce
lobbying fight
Sidewalk a path of horror
City vows to file new plan as
potent factions seek voice
By Tim Logan and Milton Valencia
GLOBE STAFF
Airbnb’s salvo last week against City Councilor
Michelle Wu for her stance on short-term rentals
surprised many. Even in the sharp-elbowed world
of Boston politics, public attacks by an out-of-town
company on a city councilor are rare.
But it popped the lid off the simmering debate
over Airbnb’s future in Boston as the council and
Mayor Martin J. Walsh try to hammer out rules to
govern the booming short-term rental industry. At
stake are hundreds of millions of dollars, with powerful interests on both sides.
For two months in public, and in two years of
quiet meetings before that, a vast array of interests
has been wrestling over an industry that’s changing the way people visit Boston and — some say —
turning too much of the city’s scarce housing stock
into hotels for out-of-towners.
It had been a largely civil debate — at least compared to lawsuits and loud protests over similar issues in cities such as New York and Los Angeles —
until last week. Then, industry giant Airbnb sent
an e-mail to thousands of Boston customers blasting Wu — who has pushed for tougher restrictions
over short-term rentals — and saying she is
“aligned with big hotel interests against the interests of regular Bostonians.”
The flare-up that followed, including frowns
from City Hall and scathing criticism of Airbnb on
social media, casts light on a debate with much at
stake for the city and its property owners.
AARON VINCENT ELKAIM/THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP)
A sidewalk was strewn with bodies and injured pedestrians after a van jumped the curb and traveled almost a mile.
Van plows into pedestrians along Toronto sidewalk; 10 killed, suspect held
By Amanda Coletta
and Alan Freeman
AIRBNB, Page A10
WASHINGTON POST
Gas prices rise,
with little relief
on the horizon
Impact on economy mixed;
lower­income Americans hurt
By Evan Horowitz
GLOBE STAFF
The rising price of gasoline is sucking money out
of drivers’ pockets — in Massachusetts and across
the country.
In the Bay State, a gallon of regular unleaded
now costs about $2.74, up 17 cents in the past
month and the highest since a brief spike last September. The average price at the pump has jumped
36 cents a gallon in the past year, a 15 percent increase.
Don’t expect any relief soon. Gas pricQUICK es generally go up during the summer, as
STUDY vacationers hit the road and refineries
switch to a more expensive summer
blend.
While a drop in global crude oil prices could
turn this trend around, tensions in Syria and growing demand have been pushing prices steadily upward since last summer. The expectation among investors is that the price of oil is likely to remain at
this higher level through the summer.
What does that mean for Massachusetts drivers
GAS PRICES, Page A7
$5
Price per gallon
(adjusted for inflation)
$4
$3
$4.58
June 2008
Gas prices have been
moving higher since
a Feb. 2016 low.
$2
$1.97
Dec. 2008
$1
$1.77
Feb. 2016
0
’91 ’94 ’97 ’00 ’03 ’06 ’09 ’12 ’15 ’18
SOURCE: US Energy Information Administration
GLOBE STAFF
In the news
Police captured the suspect in
the shooting deaths of four at a
NATHAN DENETTE/THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP
Officers spoke with a potential witness after the tragedy.
By Adam Vaccaro
GLOBE STAFF
For commuters on the Massachusetts
Turnpike, late July through early August
might be a good time for a vacation.
That’s when the sequel to last summer’s
“Pikeocalypse” hits, a major reconstruction
of the Commonwealth Avenue bridge in Boston that will require lane closures on the
highway and interruption of street traffic
and Green Line service.
Massachusetts transportation officials on
Monday announced the dates for the second
half of the bridge project, when the eastbound side of the long deck will be replaced.
The work will reduce the turnpike in Boston
to two lanes in each direction from July 27 to
Aug. 6. And between July 26 and Aug. 11,
that section of Commonwealth Avenue will
be closed to traffic, as well as the Boston University Bridge over the Charles River to Cambridge.
The MBTA will run shuttle buses along
the section of Comm. Ave. from July 27 to
Aug. 11, and some MBTA bus lines will face
of concerns about global warming and rising sea levels, may not
command the premium prices
they once did. C1.
Nashville restaurant. A2.
Waterfront homes, in these days
B1.
*
Suggested retail price
$2.50
TORONTO, Page A6
Massive repair of Comm. Ave.
bridge set to resume in July
The former State Police head of
payroll the pleaded not guilty to
VOL . 293, NO. 114
OTTAWA, Ontario — A white
rental van tore through pedestrians on a sidewalk along a busy
commercial street here Monday,
killing 10, injuring 15, and leaving
one of the world’s safest big cities
with a trail of carnage that spread
for nearly a mile.
Though officials did not say
whether the incident was terrorism-related, it marked the latest
grim reminder of how a vehicle
could be turned into a weapon —
in this case, speeding through a
crowd at lunch hour on a sunny
day, sending people and mailboxes
and baby strollers flying, in what
eyewitnesses described as a deliberate act.
Toronto Police Chief Mark
Saunders identified the man as
Alek Minassian, a 25-year-old
from Richmond Hill, Ontario.
Saunders said Minassian was not
known to police and he did not
have a weapon. Police said they
did not yet know of a motive.
The driver was taken into custody after a showdown, captured
on video, in which he told officers
that he had a weapon and said,
‘‘Shoot me in the head.’’ He gestured at police with an object and
then tossed it onto the ground.
Canadian officials were cautious in the aftermath of the tragedy, saying that they would need a
long investigation into one of the
country’s bloodiest mass killings.
Canada’s public safety minister,
Ralph Goodale, said he saw no
reason to raise the national terror
threat level. The episode had
echoes of vehicle attacks in the
charges of stealing public funds.
Emmanuel Macron, the president
of France, is expected to press
President Trump during talks this
week to not scrap the nuclear
agreement with Iran. A4.
For breaking news, updated
stories, and more, visit our website:
BostonGlobe.com
COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, Page A7
KEY DATES
July 26, 7 p.m.
Boston University Bridge closes.
Commonwealth Avenue closes between St. Paul Street and St. Mary’s
Street. Local traffic only between Kenmore Square and Packards Corner.
July 27, 5 a.m.
Green Line B shuts between Babcock
Street and Blandford Street. Shuttle
buses will run between these two stations.
July 27, 9 p.m.
Two lanes in each direction of the Mas­
sachusetts Turnpike between the former Allston Exchange and Beacon
Street overpass close. Additional lanes
will close during non-peak hours and
weekends.
Aug. 6, 5 a.m.
Lane reductions on the Mass. Pike
end.
Aug. 11, 5 a.m.
BU Bridge and Commonwealth Ave­
nue set to reopen. Green Line services
resume between Babcock and Blandford.
SOURCE: MassDot, Commonwealth Avenue Bridge
Replacement Project
The only surviving member of the
group that carried out coordinated terrorist attacks in Paris and
Brussels was convicted of shooting at the police while trying to
escape. A5.
A key Senate committee endorsed
Mike Pompeo to be secretary of
state. A6.
The Boston Bruins will face a
Game 7 against Toronto after los-
ing to the Maple Leafs, 3-1, in
their playoff series. D1.
Armenia’s prime minister resigned amid massive protests
against corruption. A6.
Serving of dim sun
Tuesday: Sun yields to clouds.
High 62-67, low 45-50.
Wednesday: Cooler, showers.
High 53-58, low 47-52.
High tide: 6:53, 7:39.
Sunrise: 5:50. Sunset: 7:36.
Complete report, B9.
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Elijah Botkin has refused to pay a renewal
fee that appears to be illegal in the state.
Signing a lease?
Guard against
those extra fees
The Fine Print
SEAN P. MURPHY
E
lijah Botkin absolutely loves his apartment in the Fenway, but two weeks ago
he did something few tenants in Boston’s extremely tight rental market
would dare to do: He refused to pay a surprise
charge sprung on him by the agent for his landlord.
The agent demanded $275 to renew Botkin’s
lease with a new roommate. Not a lot of money,
when you consider the apartment rents for
$3,100 a month and the roommates have
already paid another $6,200 in security and
other deposits.
And it’s not a lot of money when you consider how expensive it would be if Botkin is forced
to find a new place to live. The brokerage fee
alone for a new apartment would probably
exceed $3,000.
But Botkin did not hesitate to call the agent
and bluntly tell him: “What you’re doing is illegal, and I’m not paying it.”
The agent told Botkin (surprise, surprise) to
find another apartment and hung up. Both the
THE FINE PRINT, Page A10
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Suspect arrested in Nashville restaurant killings
Reinking found
armed in woods
near apartment
By Alan Blinder
NEW YORK TIMES
NASHVILLE — Police arrested a suspect Monday in the
killing of four people at a Waffle House in Nashville, ending
a wide search that had unnerved one of the largest cities
in the South.
About 160 law enforcement
officials had been involved in
the search for the suspect, Travis Reinking, 29, who officials
said used an AR-15 rifle to carry out a rampage at a restaurant southeast of downtown
Sunday morning.
Police said they arrested
Reinking on Monday afternoon
in woods near the apartment
complex where he lived after
receiving a tip from a member
of the public, bringing an end
to a manhunt that had
stretched into its second day.
Lieutenant Carlos Lara of
the Nashville police said Reinking was carrying a backpack
that contained a handgun, ammunition, and a holster.
In addition to the four people who were killed — Akilah
Dasilva, 23; DeEbony Groves,
21; Joe R. Perez, 20; and Taurean C. Sanderlin, 29 — four people were wounded in Sunday’s
shooting.
Authorities said there
would have been greater bloodshed had a 29-year-old customer, James Shaw Jr., not wrested
the rifle away from Reinking
while he was reloading. Reinking fled the restaurant after the
attack, police said, naked except for a green jacket.
The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation had added Reinking to its Top 10 Most Wanted
list, describing him as a 6foot-4 white male with brown
hair and brown eyes who
weighs 180 pounds.
Reinking has had other encounters with law enforcement, including an arrest near
the White House in July when
he crossed a security barrier in
pursuit of a meeting with President Trump.
Police reports show family
members expressed concern
for his welfare after he exhibit-
METRO NASHVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Travis Reinking (above)
after his arrest Monday;
police prepared to search a
wooded area (left); James
Shaw Jr. (below, right), was
hugged by Waffle House
CEO Walt Ehmer.
ed delusional behavior for an
extended time, including expressing a belief that entertainer Taylor Swift was stalking
him and hacking his phone
and Netflix account.
And after his arrest for the
White House episode, Reinking, who lived in Morton, Ill.,
was forced to surrender three
rifles and a handgun to officials
in August, just months before
he moved to Nashville.
After the rampage in Nashville on Sunday, officials could
not fully explain how Reinking
regained possession of his
weapons. The Tazewell County
sheriff ’s office in Illinois gave
the weapons he owned — including the AR-15 he took to
the Waffle House on Sunday —
to his father, Jeffrey Reinking.
Sheriff Robert M. Huston of
Tazewell County said in a news
conference Sunday that while
Travis Reinking “voluntarily
surrendered” the weapons on
Aug. 24, his father had a firearm owner’s identification card
and a legal right to take the
weapons.
“He was allowed to do that
after he assured deputies that
MARK HUMPHREY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
WADE PAYNE/THE TENNESSEAN VIA AP
he would keep them secure and
away from Travis,” Huston
said. “We have no information
about how Travis came back into possession of those firearms.”
Police in Nashville indicated
that Reinking’s father returned
the weapons to his son. He
could not be reached for comment Sunday.
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms, and Explosives Special Agent Marcus Watson said
at a news conference Monday
that Jeffrey Reinking’s act of returning the guns to his son is
‘‘potentially a violation of federal law.’’
Nashville authorities said
Reinking had worked in the
crane and construction industries. Reinking was fired from a
job about three weeks ago and
found a new job, but had not
been seen at work since Monday, a police spokesman said.
Amid the search Monday for
Reinking, the Nashville region
took a cautious approach as the
workweek began in the metropolitan area of more than 1.8
million people.
Most notably, Metro Nash-
ville Public Schools said it
would enforce “lockout” procedures at some schools, meaning that students would be able
to circ ulate through their
buildings but that guests and
visitors would be barred. Some
parents said they would keep
their children at home Monday
anyway.
Democratic lawmakers in
Tennessee said they want tighter gun laws after this weekend’s deadly shooting, the Associated Press reported.
Jeff Yarbro, chairman of the
Senate Democratic Caucus,
told news reporters Monday
his amendment would make it
illegal for someone to have or
buy a gun if that person was ordered not to by a state or federal court in Tennessee or another state.
He said the proposal would
outlaw loaning or giving that
person a gun. And if a gun were
confiscated, it would ban the
gun’s owner from returning it
to the person from whom it
was confiscated.
Ya r b r o s a i d t h e c h a n g e
would make it illegal for someone who failed a background
check to then buy from a private gun seller.
The proposal would require
the Republican-led General Assembly’s action in the final
days of its annual legislative
session. GOP leaders have
largely resisted calls for more
gun restrictions.
Po l i c e i n Co l o r a d o s a i d
Reinking had complained to
them in 2017 that pop star Taylor Swift was stalking him.
Salida, Colo., Police Chief
Terry Clark said the March 18,
2017, incident was the only
contact his officers had with
Reinking. Clark said an officer
met with Reinking but felt the
complaint was obviously false.
Clark said investigators believe Reinking came to Salida
for a job with a crane company
and stayed about six months,
leaving in either March or April
of 2017. The mountain town of
about 5,000 is a draw for
white-water rafters and mountain bikers.
Clark also said the US Secret
Service contacted Salida police
after Reinking was arrested
last July for refusing to leave a
restricted area near the White
House.
Daily Briefing
Hundreds mourn
woman killed on
Southwest flight
ALBUQUERQUE— Family
and friends gathered to mourn
an Albuquerque bank executive who died after the Southwest Airlines plane she was on
blew an engine in midair.
Nearly a thousand people
attended the evening service
Sunday for Jennifer Riordan,
43. It was held at Popejoy Hall
on the University of New Mexico campus, her alma mater.
‘‘We appreciate the outpouring of support from the
community. It truly touches
our hearts,’’ the Riordan family
said in a statement.
Lieutenant Governor John
Sanchez presented Michael
Riordan with a flag that was
flown at half-staff at New Mexico’s Capitol in Jennifer Riordan’s memory.
The community leader and
mother of two had been heading home from a business trip
Tuesday on a flight from New
York’s La Guardia Airport
bound for Dallas.
Early in the flight as the
plane was at 32,000 feet, one
of its twin engines suddenly
exploded. The impact showered the jet with debris and
shattered the window next to
Riordan.
Authorities said Riordan
was fatally injured when she
was sucked partway through
the window, sending passengers scrambling to help her as
the aircraft shook violently
and went into a rapid descent.
The plane made an emergency
landing in Philadelphia.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Clinton blasts Trump for criticizing media
BRYNN ANDERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A bronze statue called “Raise Up” is part the National Memorial for Peace and Justice.
National lynching memorial evokes terror of victims
MONTGOMERY, Ala. —
Visitors to the new National
Memorial for Peace and Justice
first glimpse them, eerily, in
the distance: Brown rectangular slabs, 800 in all, inscribed
with the names of more than
4,000 people who lost their
lives in lynchings between
1877 and 1950.
Each pillar is 6 feet tall and
made of steel that weathers to
different shades of brown.
Viewers enter at eye level with
the monuments, allowing a
view of victims’ names and the
date and place of their slaying.
As visitors descend downward on a slanted wooden
plank floor, the slabs seemingly rise above them, suspended
in the air in long corridors,
evoking the image of rows of
hanging brown bodies.
The memorial and an accompanying museum that
open this week in Montgomery
are a project of the nonprofit
Equal Justice Initiative, an advocacy group in Montgomery.
The organization says the
two sites will be the nation’s
first ‘‘comprehensive memorial
dedicated to racial terror
lynchings of African Americans and the legacy of slavery
and racial inequality in America.’’
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bush hospitalized with infection
HOUSTON — Former
president George H.W. Bush
has been hospitalized in Houston with an infection, just after attending the funeral of his
wife, Barbara, a spokesman
said Monday.
Jim McGrath said Bush is
‘‘responding to treatments and
appears to be recovering.’’ He
was admitted Sunday morning
to Houston Methodist Hospital after an infection spread to
his blood, McGrath said.
Barbara Bush was laid to
rest Saturday in a ceremony
attended by her husband.
Bush was hospitalized for
16 days in January 2017 for
pneumonia. During that hospital stay, doctors inserted a
breathing tube and connected
him to a ventilator.
McGrath said the 41st president was eager to get well so he
can get to his summer home in
Kennebunkport, Maine.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PAUL MORSE VIA ASSOCIATTED PRESS
George H.W. Bush, 93, at
the funeral of his wife,
Barbara, Saturday.
NEW YORK — Hillary Clinton excoriated President
Trump for his treatment of the
media, saying in remarks on
Sunday that press rights and
free speech are under open assault by the current administration, which she compared
to an authoritarian regime.
‘‘We are living through an
all-out war on truth, facts, and
reason,’’ Clinton said at the
PEN America World Voices
Festival, in Manhattan.
‘‘When leaders deny things
we can see with our own eyes,
like the size of a crowd at the
inauguration, when they refuse to accept settled science
when it comes to urgent challenges like climate change . . .
it is the beginning of the end of
freedom, and that is not hyperbole,’’ she said. “It’s what
authoritarian regimes through
history have done.’’
Clinton, who was delivering
the festival’s Arthur Miller
Freedom to Write Lecture, began by discussing threats to
press freedom and free speech
around the globe, including in
Vladimir Putin’s Russia.
But she soon turned her remarks to Trump, saying that
such freedoms are ‘‘in the most
perilous position I’ve seen in
my lifetime.’’
‘‘Today we have a president
who seems to reject the role of
a free press in our democracy,’’
she said of her 2016 opponent.
‘‘Although obsessed with his
own press coverage, he evaluates it based not on whether it
provides knowledge or understanding, but solely on whether the daily coverage helps him
and hurts his opponents.’’
The White House did not
immediately respond to a request for comment on Clinton’s remarks.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mistrial in fatal Border Patrol shooting
PHOENIX — A mistrial was
declared Monday in the case of
a US Border Patrol agent after
an Arizona jury acquitted him
of a second-degree murder
charge in the killing of a teenager from Mexico but deadlocked on lesser counts of
manslaughter.
The decision by US District
Judge Raner Collins means
that prosecutors could seek
another trial for Agent Lonnie
Swartz on the manslaughter
charges in the 2012 death of
Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez,
who was fatally shot as he
threw rocks at authorities during a drug smuggling attempt.
Jurors had deliberated 18
hours over five days in what
human rights lawyers say was
the first prosecution of a Border Patrol agent in a fatal
shooting across the border.
Swartz fired 16 shots
through a border fence. Prosecutors acknowledged Rodriguez was lobbing rocks across
the border during a drug
smuggling attempt. But they
say he didn’t deserve to die.
The defense said Swartz
was justified in using lethal
force against rock-throwers
and shot from the US side of
the border in self-defense.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A3
Rosenstein gets Supreme Court duty Most Americans say
teachers don’t make
enough, poll finds
Represents US
in appeal over
drug sentence
Many say they
back higher taxes
to help schools
By Mark Sherman
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Deputy
Attorney General Rod Rosenstein laid aside the stress of one
part of his job Monday to put
himself in a different kind of
pressure cooker: an argument
at the Supreme Court.
Dressed in a traditional
morning coat and striped
pants, with the added flash of a
pair of presidential cufflinks,
Rosenstein represented the
Trump administration in a case
about a prison sentence for a
convicted drug dealer at a rare
afternoon session of the court.
‘‘Not bad,’’ he said before the
arguments, showing the cufflinks briefly to friends who had
come to watch him argue. The
cufflinks were sent last week by
White House counsel Don McGahn, a Justice Department
spokeswoman said.
For a little while, Rosenstein
was able to cast off the worries
of overseeing the investigation
into Russian meddling in the
2016 election and the occasional public musings from President Trump about whether to
fire him.
The plan for Rosenstein to
appear before the justices has
been in the works for months.
The solicitor general’s office
argues almost every Supreme
Court case in which the government is involved. But it will occasionally cede its place to the
attorney general or the second
in command.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions has not argued a case, nor
did the two attorneys general
under President Barack
Obama: Eric Holder and Loretta Lynch. Previous attorneys
general who have argued at the
court include Robert F. Kennedy, Janet Reno, and Michael
Mukasey.
The justices will have another encounter with the administration Wednesday, when it
considers a case on the third
and latest version of Trump’s
By Carole Feldman
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein left the Supreme Court building with his two
daughters Monday after defending the government’s position on a drug sentence.
ban on travel from some countries with majority Muslim populations.
Opponents of the policy and
some lower courts have labeled
it a ‘‘Muslim ban,’’ harking back
to Trump’s campaign call to
keep Muslims from entering
the country.
The high-stakes arguments
at the Supreme Court could offer some indication about how
a court that runs on respect for
traditions and precedent will
deal with a president who regularly breaks with convention.
Apart from the campaign
statements, Trump’s presidential tweets about the travel ban
and last fall’s retweets of inflammatory videos that stoked
anti-Islam sentiment all could
feature in the court’s discussion
of the travel ban’s legality.
Just before the justices returned from lunch Monday,
Rosenstein wiped his face with
a handkerchief and steeled
himself for the court’s inevitable grilling. It was fairly mild, at
least compared with the heat he
has gotten on social media, including from the president.
Almost halfway through the
session, it was Rosenstein’s
turn.
Jurors get Cosby case
as the defense rests in
his sexual assault trial
By Graham Bowley
for simply one plane,” Steele
said. “You can’t tell us whether
NORRISTOWN, Pa. — Bill or not he got in a car as he
Cosby’s defense team rested its drove from New York to Philacase Monday after presenting delphia.”
additional witnesses whose tesWhether the encounter octimony was intended to suggest curred in January 2004 is imthat Cosby could not have sexu- portant because, beyond Conally assaulted Andrea Constand stand’s credibility, there is the
at his home near here in Janu- issue of Pennsylvania’s 12-year
ary 2004, as she has said.
statute of limitations for filing
The two final witnesses, a charges.
woman who worked for Cosby’s
Cosby was charged for the
agent at what is now called the drugging and assault of ConWilliam Morris Endeavor, and stand at the end of December
a pilot with expertise
2015, so if the enabout flight records,
counter had hapwere introduced to arpened earlier than
gue that Cosby was
Ja n u a r y 2 0 0 4 , h e
traveling and away
could not be prosecuted under Pennsylvafrom home during the
month in which Connia law.
stand says she was
His lawyers have
not denied that there
molested.
The witnesses
was a sexual encounpored over itineraries Bill Cosby’s
ter be tween Cosby
and Constand, a forand flight documents travel records
mer Temple Universiand testified to the ac- were studied
curacy of the records in the trial.
ty employee who said
typically kept in such
she once viewed him
as a mentor. But they have charcircumstances.
The records indicated that acterized it as part of a romanon many dates during that tic, consensual relationship
month Cosby had traveled to that involved no criminal beper formances in different havior.
states and then returned to his
Cosby is charged with three
house in New York, not to the counts of aggravated indecent
home outside Philadelphia the assault stemming from his ensite where Constand says she counter with Constand. The cowas drugged and sexually as- median, now 80, says she consaulted.
sented. His first trial last year
But prosecutors said the re- ended with a hung jury.
cords contained errors, were ofOn Monday the defense proten vague about the destina- duced a fax cover sheet showtion, and were hardly compre- ing, they said, that Cosby was at
hensive in detailing Cosby’s his Philadelphia home in the
whereabouts for the entire middle of December 2003. Permonth.
haps this was the period when
The Montgomery County Constand had visited the house,
district attorney, Kevin R. the team suggested.
Steele, said Cosby could have
But the prosecution said the
taken another private plane, a cover sheet carried no time
commercial plane, a train, or stamp and questioned whether
some other kind of transport to it had ever been sent. The dereturn to his home in Pennsyl- fense portrays Cosby as a victim
vania.
of Constand, who, they say, was
“They would be the records pursuing him for money.
NEW YORK TIMES
‘‘General Rosenstein?’’ Chief
Justice John Roberts said, inviting Rosenstein to defend the
modified sentence a judge imposed in the case from New
Mexico.
At issue was a difference of
six months — 9½ years or nine
years — between the judge’s
sentence and what the defendant wanted. The issue is how
much explanation a judge must
give when a sentence is modified.
He appeared comfortable
answering a steady stream of
questions from seven justices
over nearly 30 minutes.
Justice Clarence Thomas almost never asks one and didn’t
Monday, and Justice Neil Gorsuch is not taking part in the
case, probably because he was
involved in an earlier phase of
the case when he served as an
appellate judge.
What if a judge merely
checked a box in 600 resentencing proceedings and said no
more, Roberts asked.
‘ ‘ In n o c a s e i s t h e c o u r t
merely checking the box,’’
Rosenstein said, challenging
the premise of Roberts’s question.
Justice Sonia Sotomayor
wondered what should happen
if a judge believed that AfricanAmericans should be punished
more severely for crimes. The
defendant in this case is Hispanic.
‘‘How are we to determine
that reason didn’t play a part in
this?’’ Sotomayor asked.
‘‘Courts presume that district courts know the law and
apply it faithfully,’’ Rosenstein
replied.
After the arguments, Rosenstein, his wife and two daughters posed for photos on the
front steps of the court beneath
the phrase ‘‘Equal Justice Under Law’’ etched into the pediment.
In a separate matter Monday, the Supreme Court has
turned down an appeal from a
Missouri man who committed
robbery and other crimes on a
single day when he was 16 and
now isn’t eligible for parole until he’s 112 years old.
The justices left in place defendant Bobby Bostic’s 241year sentence.
Bostic’s defense team had argued that the prison sentence
violated the Constitution’s ban
on cruel and unusual punishment.
WASHINGTON — Americans overwhelmingly believe
teachers don’t make enough
money, and half say they would
support paying higher taxes to
give educators a raise.
The findings of the new poll
from the Associated PressNORC Center for Public Affairs
Research come amid recent
teacher strikes and other protests over low pay, tough classroom conditions, and the
amount of money allocated to
public schools in several Republican-led states.
Tens of thousands of Arizona teachers voted last week to
strike after rejecting an offer of
a 20-percent raise, because it
didn’t include a vow from state
lawmakers not to further cut
taxes before providing more
money for the state’s schools.
‘‘To educate children and
barely get a living is obnoxious,’’
said Elaine Penman, a company
manager in Tucson, who added
she and others went outside to
cheer on protesting teachers
who were marching by.
She’s among the 50 percent
of Americas who say they
would pay a higher tax bill if it
meant more money for teachers.
‘‘I’m a parent and I benefit
directly from what teachers do,’’
said Penman, who has two children in traditional public
schools and one in a charter
school.
In 2016-2017, the average
salary for a public school teacher was $58,950, down slightly
from the previous year, according to the National Center for
Education Statistics.
Overall, 78 percent of Americans said that’s not enough.
Just 15 percent think teachers
are paid the right amount,
while 6 percent think they’re
paid too much. In a 2010 APStanford poll, 57 percent of
Americans said they thought
teachers are paid too little.
Americans in states with the
lowest average teacher salaries
— less than $50,000 a year —
were slightly more likely to
think teachers were paid too little and that the national average should be an important factor in determining salaries.
The AP-NORC poll found
that parents and those without
children are about equally likely to think teachers are paid too
little. It’s a sentiment that crosses party lines, too. Nearly 9 in
10 Democrats, 78 percent of independents, and 66 percent of
Republicans think teacher salaries are too low.
Slightly more than half of
Americans — 52 percent — also
approve of teachers leaving the
classroom to strike in their
search for higher pay, while 25
percent disapprove. Among
those who say they’ve heard
about the recent teacher protests, 80 percent say they approve of such tactics.
The recent run of teacher
protests began in March in
West Virginia, where teachers
won a raise af ter going on
strike. The strategy soon spread
to Oklahoma, Kentucky, Colorado, and Arizona, where educators joined together online and
have held frequent protests
during the past six weeks.
Half of Americans would be
willing to shoulder the cost of
providing more money to
schools via higher taxes, with
only 26 percent opposed. But
while 69 percent of Democrats
say yes to higher taxes for
schools, only 38 percent of Republicans and 30 percent of independents say the same.
People living in urban areas
are more likely than those in rural areas to support such a tax
increase, 57 percent to 40 percent.
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The World
Macron will urge Trump to keep Iran nuclear deal
Merkel to deliver
similar message
later this week
By Peter Baker
and Julie Hirschfeld Davis
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — President
Trump will come under increasing pressure from visiting
French and German leaders
this week not to scrap the nuclear agreement with Iran next
month as US and European negotiators make halting progress
toward toughening the limits
on Tehran.
President Emmanuel Macron of France arrived Monday
at the White House for the first
state visit of Trump’s presidency, intent on using his unusual
bond with the US president to
try to persuade him to preserve
the Iran deal, at least for now.
While not as close personally to
Trump, Chancellor Angela
Merkel of Germany will follow
Friday to reinforce the message.
The back-to-back visits come
weeks before a May 12 deadline
set by Trump to “fix” the Iran
agreement or walk away from
it. Under the agreement, signed
in 2015 by Barack Obama, Iran
has curbed its nuclear program
in exchange for relief from crippling international sanctions.
But Trump and other critics
have assailed it because it begins to expire after a decade
and does not block Iran’s missile development or stop it from
destabilizing the region.
In recent weeks, US and European negotiators have generally come to a shared position
on measures to constrain Iran’s
ballistic missile program, according to people briefed on the
talks. But negotiators remain
divided over how to extend the
restrictions of the original
agreement that otherwise will
lapse starting in 2025.
The Europeans want assurances that if a supplemental
agreement is reached, the United States will stay in the deal —
ANDREW HARRER/POOL/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
President Trump, Melania Trump, Brigitte Macron, and French President Emmanuel Macron arrived Monday for dinner
at the estate of George Washington in Mount Vernon, Va. The Macrons will be feted with a state dinner on Tuesday.
a hard commitment for US officials to make given Trump’s
mercurial nature. But European leaders hope they can persuade him to hold off by showing enough progress in negotiations that he can claim he is
making the deal better.
“I suspect that this will be a
very difficult conversation,”
said Wendy R. Sherman, the
former top State Department
official who negotiated the Iran
deal for Obama. “I’m sure that
Macron will say how important
staying in the deal is to a strong
trans-Atlantic relationship in
all things, particularly security.
I think Merkel will deliver the
same message on Friday.”
Even so, the White House
signaled Monday that Trump
enters the talks with one set impression: “He thinks it’s a bad
deal — that certainly has not
changed,” said Sarah Huckabee
Sanders, the White House press
secretary.
If Macron and Merkel can
persuade Trump to stick by the
Iran agreement for now, it
could influence the president’s
forthcoming meeting with Kim
Jong Un, the North Korean
leader who already has a small
nuclear arsenal. Whatever its
flaws, US officials understand
that canceling the Iran deal
days or weeks before that meeting might complicate Trump’s
chances of making an agreement with Kim.
Mohammad Javad Zarif,
Iran’s foreign minister, implicitly made that point Monday by
noting that the negotiations
that led to the nuclear agreement between his country and
six world powers involved give
and take by all sides.
“And now the United States
is saying, ‘What’s mine is mine
and what’s yours is negotiable.
But whatever I gave you, now I
want it back,’ ” Zarif said in an
interview with The National Interest, a Washington policy
magazine. “Who would, in their
right mind, deal with the US
anymore?”
Trump faces conflicting positions among his own advisers
as he reconstitutes his national
security team. John R. Bolton,
his new national security adviser, has long advocated simply
ending the Iran deal, while
Mike Pompeo, set to become
secretary of state, is open to
keeping it if strong new provisions can be negotiated.
Macron arrived in Washington to a festive welcome: US
and French flags flew on Pennsylvania Avenue as he and his
wife, Brigitte Macron, arrived
at the White House and were
greeted by Trump and the first
lady, Melania Trump. The Macrons will return to the White
House on Tuesday morning for
a pomp-filled arrival ceremony
on the South Lawn, complete
with members of all five
branches of the military in formal uniforms. The presidents
will hold meetings and conduct
a joint news conference. In the
evening, the Trumps will host
their first state dinner, featuring rack of spring lamb and
Carolina gold rice jambalaya
cooked New Orleans style.
Trump, 71, and Macron, 40,
have forged an unlikely friendship, despite their political differences over the Iran deal, international trade, climate
change, and other issues. But
while Europeans consider Macron their envoy to Trump, he
has had mixed success influencing the president. The leaders
teamed up to launch airstrikes
against Syria in retaliation for a
suspected chemical attack, but
when Macron publicly said he
had persuaded Trump to keep
US troops in the country “for
the long term,” the White House
quickly rebutted him.
The negotiations with European officials, led by Brian
Hook, the State Department’s
director of policy planning,
have found some common
ground, according to people
briefed on the talks.
Negotiators have agreed on
measures to impose sanctions
on Iran if it tests long-range
missiles, but are still divided on
how to respond to testing of
short- and medium-range missiles. They have agreed that
Iran would be sanctioned if it
blocks international nuclear inspectors from military sites.
And they have made progress
in defining a trigger for reimposing sanctions — if Iran were
found to have expanded its nuclear program enough to allow
it to develop a weapon in less
than a year.
But negotiators are divided
over what would happen then.
The Trump administration
wants sanctions to be imposed
automatically if Iran trips that
wire, while the Europeans want
a reassessment to determine
whether the expansion is consistent with Iran’s civilian nuclear program.
Daily Briefing
Syrian troops seek
to isolate rebels in
Damascus battle
BEIRUT — Syrian government forces moved to cut off Islamic State militants in southern Damascus from nearby
rebel-held suburbs on Monday
in an attempt to force the extremists to surrender or evacuate the district, state media reported.
The area in southern Damascus is the last part of the
capital not controlled by President Bashar Assad’s forces.
Other insurgents in the area,
including an al Qaeda-linked
group, have said they would relocate to rebel-held regions in
northern Syria.
State-run al-Ikhbariya TV
said the government hopes to
isolate ISIS in Hajar al-Aswad.
The TV station showed thick,
gray smoke billowing from the
neighborhood as government
forces pounded it with artillery
and airstrikes.
The TV said ISIS snipers
20 Yemenis killed in Saudi­led airstrike
YOUSSEF BADAWI/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
Smoke and dust rose from the rebel-held Hajar al-Aswad neighborhood in the south of
Damascus on Monday amid unrelenting bombardment by the Syrian air force.
targeted journalists covering
the fighting, without saying
whether anyone was hurt.
Hundreds of ISIS militants
are holed up in Hajar al-Aswad
and Yarmouk, a Palestinian ref-
ugee camp that resembles a
residential neighborhood. Rebels from other factions hold the
nearby suburbs of Yalda, Babila, and Beit Sahem.
ISIS agreed to give up its
last pocket of Damascus on Friday but has yet to begin surrendering to government forces
and relocating to ISIS-held areas elsewhere in the country.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Taliban kill 14 Afghan troops, police
Paraguay elects ruling party’s candidate
KABUL — Taliban attacks
in western Afghanistan killed
14 soldiers and police officers
on Monday as Kabul residents
prepared to bury their loved
ones slain in a horrific bombing by the Islamic State that
targeted a voter registration
center the day before, killing
57.
Prayer services were held
for the Kabul victims as families of those killed in Sunday’s
bombing carried the bodies of
their kin and dug the graves at
a cemetery in the hills above
the Afghan capital.
The first of Monday’s nearsimultaneous attacks in western Badghis province hit army
units in the district of Ab Kamari, killing nine soldiers, said
Ghulam Sarwar Haidari, the
vatives, and the election was
ASUNCION, Paraguay —
closer than the 20-point edge
The son of a former dictator’s
that opinion polls had given
top aide won the presidential
Abdo going into the election.
election in Paraguay on SunThe new president
day, helped by a
begins a five-year
booming economy
term Aug. 15.
under his party.
Abdo, a 46-yearMario Abdo Benold marketing expert,
itez of the governing
campaigned on a
Colorado Party got
promise to continue
46.5 percent of the
the business-friendly
votes, with 96 perpolicies of outgoing
cent of 21,000 pollpresident Horacio
ing stations reportCartes and played
ing, officials said.
Mario Abdo
Benitez was
down fears of a reEfrain Alegre of
turn to the heavythe Authentic Radiaided by a
cal Liberal Party fingood economy. handed past of dictator Alfredo Stroessished second with
ner, who ruled from 1954 to
42.7 percent of the ballots.
1989. Abdo’s father was
Eight other candidates finStroessner’s secretary.
ished far out of the running.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Both candidates are conser-
deputy provincial police chief.
Moments later, another
large group of insurgents
struck police in Qadis district,
killing five police.
Sharafuddin Majidi,
spokesman for the provincial
governor, confirmed the casualty tolls. Taliban spokesman
Zabihullah Mujahid claimed
responsibility for the Badghis
attacks in a statement to the
media.
The attacks came on the
heels of Sunday’s suicide blast
in Kabul. The staggering casualty toll — 57 dead and 119
wounded — underscored the
struggles the government faces
to rein in militant assaults
even in large and well-protected urban centers.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANA, Yemen — An airstrike by the Saudi-led coalition hit a wedding party in
northern Yemen, killing at
least 20 people, health officials said Monday.
Harrowing images
emerged on social media of
the deadly bombing, the third
to hit Yemeni civilians since
the weekend.
Khaled al-Nadhri, the top
health official in the northern
province of Hajja, said most
of the dead were women and
children who were gathered
in one of the tents set up for
the wedding party in the Bani
Qayis district. He said the
bride was also among the
dead.
A Saudi-led coalition has
been battling Iran-allied
Shi’ite rebels known as
Houthis since 2015 in a stalemated war that has killed
more than 10,000 people.
Later Monday, the rebels
said that the official considered the head of state for the
territories under their control
was killed in a coalition airstrike. The rebels’ Supreme
Political Council said Saleh
al-Samad was killed in the
coastal Hodeida province on
Thursday.
‘‘We consider the so-called
forces of aggression, especially America and Saudi Arabia,
responsible for killing of Samad and all the consequences
of this crime,’’ Abdul-Malek
al-Houthi, the leader of the
rebels, said.
He said Samad was killed
on a road with six companions after meeting with local
officials. Mahdi al-Mashat, a
former fighter who until now
directed al-Houthi’s office,
was elected as the group’s
successor.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
36 killed in North Korea bus crash
BEIJING — Thirty-two Chinese tourists and four North
Koreans were killed late Sunday night in a traffic accident
in North Korea, Chinese officials said Monday.
Two other Chinese tourists
were badly injured and were
in ‘‘acutely serious condition,’’
the Foreign Ministry said in a
statement. It said China had
dispatched a medical team accompanied by diplomats to assist the North Korean side.
The accident occurred in
North Hwanghae province,
south of Pyongyang, North Korea’s capital, ministry spokesman Lu Kang said at a regularly scheduled news conference.
Footage on Chinese state
broadcaster CCTV showed the
mangled wreckage of a bus in
the dark with rain falling. Rescue vehicles were on the scene,
and the injured were shown
being treated in a hospital.
China and North Korea
share a lengthy border and a
traditional friendship dating
back to China’s military intervention on the side of the
North in the Korean War. China remains Pyongyang’s largest trading partner, although
commerce has dropped off by
about 90 percent under United
Nations sanctions.
The ministry described the
four North Koreans killed as
workers. North Korea requires that all visitors be accompanied by minders.
Other details on the backgrounds of those killed and injured and the circumstances of
the accident were not immediately disclosed.
Chinese tourists make up
the vast majority of visitors to
North Korea, where they pay
homage at sites related to China’s participation in the war.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
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The World
A5
Suspect in Paris attacks convicted of shooting at police
Abdeslam gets 20
years for Brussels
confrontation
By Alissa J. Rubin
NEW YORK TIMES
PARIS — Salah Abdeslam,
who is believed to be the only
surviving member of the group
that carried out coordinated
terrorist attacks in and around
Paris in 2015 and in Brussels
five months later, was convicted Monday of shooting at the
police in the Belgian capital
while he was on the run.
The Brussels Criminal Court
also convicted Sofien Ayari,
who was with Abdeslam at the
time of the fusillade, and sentenced both men to 20 years in
prison.
Abdeslam, 28, who has
French citizenship, and Ayari,
who is Tunisian, faced trial on
charges that included possession of illegal weapons and attempted murder in a terrorist
context.
The two men were accused
of shooting and wounding four
Belgian and French police officers who were searching for
them in southern Brussels,
four months after the attacks
in Paris and the northern suburb of St.-Denis that left 130
dead.
The confrontation occurred
four days before two deadly at-
tacks in Brussels, one at the
main airport and another on a
subway train.
“The silence of Abdeslam,
apart from his few remarks in
court, makes it reasonable to
fear that he has not taken the
right measure of his actions or
that he is sinking into silence.
His dangerousness remains intact,” said Judge Marie-France
Keutgen.
A b d e s l am att e n d e d t h e
opening day of the trial in February but has refused to cooperate since. He is being held in
a French prison. Ayari was also
absent.
Sven Mary, Abdeslam’s lawyer, described the rulings as
“creative” and said that he
would look into filing an appeal. Mar y argued that although Abdeslam was present
at the time of the police raid, he
did not open fire and there was
no evidence that he had even
picked up a gun.
If there is doubt about his
involvement, he should have
been released, Mary said.
Prosecutors responded that
he was at the scene of a shooting that took place as part of a
terrorism investigation and
that he was prepared to use a
firearm.
The trial did not include any
charges directly related to the
planning and execution of the
attacks in Paris. Proceedings in
that trial are not expected to
start for several years.
The conclusion of the Belgian case at the Brussels palace
of justice took place amid tight
security by the armed forces
and police.
Abdeslam and Ayari escaped after the shootout, fleeing out of the back of a house
and climbing over adjacent
rooftops.
A third man, who had been
hiding in the house with them,
was killed by police.
Contrary to some expectations, the trial revealed little
about the broader conspiracy
and attacks because it focused
narrowly on an individual episode — the shooting of police
officers — and because the two
defendants refused to testify
beyond giving very brief statements.
The trial, which took place
i n Fe b r u a r y, w a s t h e f i r s t
chance for most people to get a
glimpse of Abdeslam and to
hear his side of the story.
But in keeping with his past
conduct, Abdeslam revealed almost nothing. He refused to attend the trial after the first day.
After initially giving the impression that he might talk
about the case, he instead went
on a tirade about the justice
system and said it was biased
against Muslims.
Ayari fought with the Islamic State for a year before heading to Europe.
JOHN THOR DAHLBURG/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE
A Soviet army officer showed chemical weapons at a facility in Shikhany, Russia, in 1987.
Russian says secret Soviet lab
made poison tied to England
4 decades later,
scientist speaks
out on research
By Vladimir Isachenkov
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW — During the
Cold War, Soviet scientists at a
secret, high-security lab worked
frantically to counter the latest
US chemical weapons.
More than 40 years later, the
nerve agent they developed apparently turned up in a quiet
English town, where it nearly
killed a former Russian spy and
his daughter, according to one
of the main researchers who
worked at the lab.
Vladimir Uglev said he was
the scientist who in 1975 first
synthesized A-234, an odorless
liquid deadlier than any other
chemical weapons that existed
at the time.
‘‘Hundreds of thousands
could have been killed with
what I produced,’’ the 71-yearold former researcher said in an
interview.
Uglev detailed his deadly
and secretive work, recalling
how Kremlin leaders and the
military were ambivalent about
the chemical weapons program
and eventually came to see it as
burdensome and costly. And he
described how the Soviet
Union’s collapse could have led
to the lethal poisons falling into
the hand of unscrupulous persons.
Britain said that Russia used
A-234, which is from a class of
nerve agents known as Novichok, to poison ex-double agent
Sergei Skripal and his daughter,
Yulia, in Salisbury, England, on
March 4.
Russia has vehemently denied it was behind the attack,
which touched off a diplomatic
war between Moscow and the
West.
Russia has argued that the
United States, Britain, and other Western countries acquired
the expertise to make the nerve
agent after the Soviet collapse.
The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, an
international watchdog group
that analyzed samples in the
Skripals’ poisoning, confirmed
British conclusions about the
identity of the toxic chemical
but not its origin.
Uglev and Leonid Rink, another top scientist in the Soviet
program, had conflicting theories.
While Uglev said the nerve
agent could have come directly
from Russia, Rink echoed the
Kremlin line, alleging that Brit-
ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS
While Valdimir Uglev (left) said the nerve
agent in England could have come directly
from Russia, Leonid Rink (right) echoed
the Kremlin line, saying Britain might
have used a less­lethal substance and then
faked the evidence to implicate Russia.
ish intelligence might have
used a less-lethal substance and
then faked the evidence to implicate Russia. Britain has denied that.
Both scientists agreed, however, that it might never be possible to determine the nerve
agent’s source.
T he Skripals’ improved
health indicates they only got a
minuscule dose and might have
mitigated its effect by washing
their hands, Uglev said.
The Soviet program to design a new generation of chemical weapons began in the 1970s
to counter the United States,
Uglev said. The Soviets wanted
the equivalent of US binary
weapons — nerve agents made
up of relatively harmless components that turned deadly
when mixed.
The main research lab was
in Shikhany, a town in southwestern Russia that the KGB
sealed off to outside visitors.
The research was dangerous: Contact with just a few
milligrams — the weight of a
snowflake — were enough to
kill within minutes.
Uglev recalled once getting a
tiny amount of a Novichokclass agent on his hand.
‘‘I rinsed my hands with sulfuric acid and then put them
under tap water,’’ he said, adding it was the only way to survive. Another researcher who
was contaminated in 1987 died
of multiple illnesses five years
later.
By the end of the 1980s, scientists developed a host of
nerve agents and various precursors for binary weapons that
the military collectively dubbed
‘‘Novichok,’’ which means ‘‘newcomer.’’
But the effort was only partly successful, Uglev said. While
some nerve agents were deadlier than the US equivalents, the
main goal of developing feasible binary weapons wasn’ t
achieved, he said.
And although Soviet leaders
wanted to counter the Americans, they weren’t enthusiastic
about chemical weapons in
general, seeing them as excessive, when compared with Moscow’s massive nuclear arsenal.
When Mikhail Gorbachev
came to power in 1985, his reforms and closer ties with the
West led to cuts in many military programs and arms control
agreements.
The Novichok-class agents
were in lab quantities only and
never entered mass production,
Uglev and Rink said.
Uglev estimated that 200
pounds were made for research
and military testing. Samples
were shared with other Soviet
labs, and Rink said some could
have ended up abroad after the
Soviet Union’s demise.
Russia joined a treaty banning chemical weapons and
said last year it had fully destroyed its Soviet chemical arsenals under foreign oversight.
Rink, who worked in Shikhany until 1997, said US experts
made sure that even small
quantities of military-grade
nerve agents and their precursors were destroyed.
The United States, however,
couldn’t prevent the expertise
from spreading.
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Senate panel approves Pompeo for secretary of state
Paul, pressured
by president,
drops opposition
By Nicholas Fandos
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — The Senate Foreign Relations Committee, in a late pivot Monday evening, approved the confirmation of Mike Pompeo to be the
next secretary of state, after
Senator Rand Paul, Republican
of Kentucky, bowed to pressure
from President Trump and
dropped his opposition.
For days, the committee appeared ready to deliver a historic rebuke. Since it began considering nominees in the late 19th
century, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee has never
given a nominee for secretary of
state anything but a favorable
vote, according to the Senate
historian.
It has been almost 30 years
since any Cabinet nominee was
reported to the full Senate with
an unfavorable recommendation.
But minutes before the committee convened, Paul, an ardent opponent of interventionist foreign policy, declared his
support for Pompeo, the CIA director, to lead the State Department, securing approval from
the committee.
“After calling continuously
for weeks for Director Pompeo
to support President Trump’s
belief that the Iraq War was a
mistake, and that it is time to
leave Afghanistan, today I received confirmation that Direc-
tor Pompeo agrees with President Trump,” Paul wrote.
“President Trump believes
that Iraq was a mistake, that regime change has destabilized
the region and that we must
end our involvement with Afghanistan,’’ he said. “Having received assurances from Presid e n t Tr u m p a n d D i r e c t o r
Pompeo that he agrees with the
president on these important
issues, I have decided to support his nomination.”
Trump told reporters Monday afternoon that Paul has
“never let us down” and that
“he’s a good man.”
With two moderate Democrats signaling their support for
Pompeo earlier Monday, the
confirmation of the United
States’ top diplomat by the full
Senate this week was all but se-
cured anyway.
Even Monday, it took a “present” vote by Chris Coons, a Delaware Democrat, to allow the
nomination to move forward after Georgia Republican Johnny
Isakson, a Pompeo supporter,
failed to show up for the vote.
Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader, intends to
move the full chamber to begin
debate on Pompeo’s nomination as soon as Wednesday, with
a final vote expected before senators leave Friday for a weeklong recess.
But supporters of Pompeo
feared that he would become
the country’s 70th secretary of
state with a bruised standing
on the world stage after a Foreign Relations Committee rebuke.
“I understand the climate
we are in. I understand the polarization we have as a nation,”
Bob Corker of Tennessee, the
committee’s chairman, said
Monday. But Corker touted
Pompeo as one of the most
qualified secretaries of state in
history, ticking through his resume.
That partisan environment
had, in the end, provided
Pompeo a lift. Democrats up for
reelection in states Trump carried in the 2016 election broke
the nominee’s way.
Senators Joe Manchin III of
West Virginia and Joe Donnelly
of Indiana pledged their support Monday, joining Heidi
Heitkamp of North Dakota,
who declared her “yes” vote last
week. Other endangered Democrats from Trump states are under pressure to also fall in line.
Armenian protests
force leader to quit
Step may bring
shift in nation’s
links to Russia
By Amie Ferris-Rotman
WASHINGTON POST
MOSCOW — Armenian
Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan
stepped down Monday amid
large-scale protests against corruption and his expanded powers, a move that could alter the
former Soviet republic’s reliance on Russia.
Antigovernment demonstrations erupted almost two weeks
ago against the pro-Russian
Sargsyan when he was appointed prime minister after a decade as president, part of a
transition of governance that
expanded the role of the prime
minister.
The new government system
effectively tightened Sargsyan’s
grip over the country in the
‘The street
movement is
against my tenure.
I am fulfilling your
demand.’
South Caucasus.
Sargsyan, 63, was quickly replaced Monday by his close ally,
First Deputy Prime Minister
Karen Karapetyan, who previously worked for Russian gas
company Gazprom.
It seemed unlikely that the
elevation of Karapetyan would
placate the protesters, who oppose the ruling elite as a whole.
Opposition lawmaker Nikol
Pashinian told an evening rally
of tens of thousands of people
at Republic Square in Yerevan
that opposition activists want
to meet with Karapetian on
Wednesday to discuss a ‘‘peaceful transfer of power,’’ the Associated Press reported
The opposition will push for
an early parliamentary election
to prevent Sargsyan from running Armenia from behind the
scenes, Pashinian said.
Sargsyan was president
from 2008 until term limits
forced him out in March. His
SERZH SARGSYAN
KAREN MINASYAN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
People cheered in Yerevan, Armenia, after opposition leader Nikol Pashinyan, was freed.
political opponents accused
him of changing the law so he
could effectively retain power
into a second decade.
The protests, which drew
about 100,000 people at their
peak, including unarmed soldiers and clergy, paralyzed the
center of the capital, Yerevan,
for 11 consecutive days. A rally
Sunday attracted about 50,000
“MEREDITH IS HILARIOUS,
SMART, AND—
AS YOU WILL LEARN—
GIVES EXCELLENT ADVICE
WITHOUT JUDGMENT.”
—ALYSSA MASTROMONACO, New York Times bestselling author of
Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?
“HILARIOUS AND
HEARTWARMING.”
—FAITH SALIE,
author of Approval Junkie
A disarmingly honest
memoir about giving
advice when you’re
not sure what you’re
doing yourself.
Photo credit: Alex Teng
Available in
hardcover, ebook,
large print,
and audio, read by
the author
LoveLettersBook.com
On Monday, White House officials trained their fire on Senate Democrats, who they said
are stonewalling the president’s
nominees without good cause.
Trump, writing on Twitter,
labeled those voting against Mr.
Pompeo “Obstructionists” and
said he needed more Republicans in office in their place.
Trump did not include Paul
in his criticism. The president
said last week that Paul was
“very special guy ” who had
“never let me down.”
Committee Democrats stood
by their opposition.
“This is not about policy difference,” Virginia’s Tim Kaine,
said before casting a vote
against Pompeo. “I don’t want
to vote for people who are antidiplomatic to be the nation’s
chief diplomat.”
people, and about 200 soldiers
joined the protesters Monday.
They were led by Pashinyan,
who was arrested along with
hundreds of protesters a day
earlier and released just hours
before Sargsyan resigned.
‘‘The street movement is
against my tenure. I am fulfilling your demand,’’ Sargsyan
wrote to his country’s citizens
on his official website. ‘‘Nikol
Pashinyan was right. I was
wrong,’’ he wrote.
Upon hearing of his resignation, protesters in Yerevan
shouted in jubilation, car horns
honked, and Armenian news
outlets showed pictures of men
dancing in the streets.
Russia appeared to cautiously approve Sargsyan’s resigna-
tion. ‘‘Armenia, Russia is always
with you!’’ Foreign Ministry
spokeswoman Maria Zakharova wrote.
Under Sargsyan’s rule, Armenia bought weapons from
Moscow and joined the Eurasian Economic Union, a Russian-backed economic bloc designed to deter neighbors from
trading with Europe.
Joining Russia’s trade bloc
four years ago failed to bring a
promised economic boost to Armenia’s 3 million people, about
a third of whom live below the
poverty line.
Unlike popular movements
in other prodemocracy revolutions in recent years in Ukraine
and Georgia, the opposition in
Armenia has not said it wishes
to be allied with Europe. But
that could change.
Van jumps curb, careers along
sidewalk in Toronto, killing 10
uTORONTO
Continued from Page A1
French city of Nice, as well as in
London and New York City — a
method that the Islamic State
militant group encouraged followers to use. But mentally ill
people with no terrorism connections have also carried out
such assaults.
‘‘We lost a little bit of our innocence,’’ John Filion, a city
councilor who represents the
area where the tragedy occurred, said in a phone interview Monday. ‘‘We often think
of ourselves as being somewhat
excluded from the violence and
craziness that goes on in other
parts of the world. You just
kind of don’t think of Toronto
as a place where that kind of violence will come to.’’
Save for a police helicopter
circling overhead, the tragedy
brought an eerie silence to one
of the city’s busiest streets,
which had been filled Monday
afternoon with people enjoying
one of the first warm and sunny days of the year after a long
winter.
The attack took place in the
center of North York, a part of
Toronto that has grown over
the past two decades into a secondary downtown.
T h e a r e a — d o tt e d w i t h
shops, condo towers, and many
Korean restaurants — is so
heavily trafficked that Toronto’s
City Council debated widening
the sidewalks and reducing
lanes of traffic to make it more
pedestrian-friendly earlier this
year.
‘‘He started going down on
the sidewalk and crumbling
down people one by one,’’ Ali
Shaker, who was in the vicinity
of the incident, told CTV News.
‘‘He just destroyed so many
people’s lives.’’ He said the driver was traveling at an estimated
35 to 45 miles per hour.
Teresa Nolan, who lives
nearby, walked out of the Sheppard subway station — near
where the van came to a stop —
shortly after the episode occurred, to ‘‘a scary scene.’’ She
watched as police officers captured the suspect and heard on-
AARON VINCENT ELKAIM/THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP
Witnesses said the van traveled about 40 miles per hour,
striking anything in its path on a wide sidewalk.
lookers describing how they
performed CPR on the injured.
‘‘I watched it all happen, but
didn’t really take it all in until
after it ended,’’ she said.
Nolan has lived in the area
for almost two years and said
she “just loves its whole multicultural feel.’’
Another witness, Phil Zullo,
told Canadian Press that he
saw police arresting the suspect
and people ‘‘strewn all over the
road.’’
‘‘I must have seen about five,
six people being resuscitated by
bystanders and by ambulance
drivers,’’ Zullo said. ‘‘It was awful. Brutal.’
Sunnybrook Hospital, a
trauma center near the site,
said it had received 10 victims,
all of them adults. Two were
pronounced dead, five patients
were in critical condition, and
the rest were in serious condition, according to Dan Cass, the
hospital’s executive vice president.
John Flengas, the acting
emergency medical services supervisor for Sunnybrook, described the scene as “pure carnage,” with “victims everywhere.”
Images posted on social media showed bodies on a broad,
tree-lined sidewalk near a pedestrian plaza; some of them
covered with blankets. Several
witnesses said the debris left by
the crash included a child’s
stroller.
While Canadians are proud
of living in a country where
crime rates are generally low
and ethnic diversity is celebrated rather than feared, several
terrorism-related incidents in
recent years have reminded the
public that they are not immune to the kinds of events
that have struck Europe and
the United States.
In Quebec City, Alexandre
Bissonnette is in court this
week in a pre-sentencing hearing after pleading guilty last
month to six counts of first-degree murder in the shooting of
six Muslim men as they attended prayers at a mosque in the
city in January 2017. Bissonnette had mental health issues
and was attracted to far-right
politics and anti-immigrant
rhetoric.
In 2014, Canada’s Parliament was the scene of another
terrorism-related incident. Michael Zehar-Bibeau, a drug addict and convert to Islam, shot
and killed a Canadian sentry on
duty at the National War Memorial before heading to Parliament, where he was killed in
a shootout with security officers.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Region
A7
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Despite lane closures from the reconstruction of the Commonwealth Avenue bridge last July, traffic moved well on some days on the Massachusetts Turnpike, in the background.
Last phase of Commonwealth Ave. repairs set
uCOMMONWEALTH AVENUE
Continued from Page A1
detours. Weekend trains on the
Worcester commuter rail line
and Amtrak service to Albany
will also be replaced by shuttles.
State officials are urging
commuters to clear out if they
can.
“Very complicated traffic diversions, no matter which
mode you take,” said Jonathan
Gulliver, the state’s highway administrator. “We think the best
bet, however, is if you don’t
have to be in this area for a little
over two weeks, you should be
someplace else. . . . Regardless
of what mode of transportation
you take, you can expect to be
delayed.”
Last year, the state blitzed
the public with early warnings,
holding frequent media briefings about the construction
and broadcasting information
about the lane closures during
televised Red Sox games. While
traffic indeed backed up on the
Mass. Pike, that messaging may
have limited the disruptions.
During construction last year,
officials said, traffic on the
highway was down 20 to 30
percent, while ridership on the
Worcester commuter rail line
increased by about 25 percent.
Meanwhile, portions of the
work wrapped up weeks early
last year, although other portions were late by a couple of
days. And a few commuters
even have fond memories from
last summer: Cyclists celebrated car-free passage over the BU
Bridge during the construction.
More than 50 years old, the
Comm. Ave. bridge is considered “structurally deficient” —
meaning that while it is still
safe to use, it is due for replacement.
The $110 million bridge replacement project — $82 million for the construction contract, plus police details and
contingency funding for delays
and extra work orders — is one
of several major bridge projects
underway in the Boston area,
including the Longfellow and
North Washington Street bridges over the Charles River. The
Comm. Ave. contractor, Walsh
Construction Co., is also eligible for bonuses if it completes
the work early but will be penalized if it is delayed.
The state is using a technique called accelerated bridge
construction, meaning prefabricated concrete panels and
steel beams will be hoisted into
place over a relatively short
construction period. This leads
to massive but brief disruptions, whereas traditional
bridge construction can have
fewer lane closures, but last for
much longer. In this case, the
bridge will be replaced in essentially two fell swoops, with
the biggest construction periods lasting less than a month
each year.
Accelerated techniques were
also used on a pedestrian footbridge in Miami that collapsed
earlier this year, killing six people before it officially opened.
Gulliver noted that Massachusetts has rebuilt several bridges
with these techniques and said
the Comm. Ave. project is different from Florida’s because
the pre-fabricated materials
still need to be installed on-site,
whereas the Miami bridge was
built off-site and then placed
over a highway.
“That’s not the same thing
happening here,” he said.
There is a silver lining for
commuters this summer, compared with 2017. Last year’s
work required a shift to three
lanes in each direction on the
Mass. Pike for about three
weeks before the project started, to clear space for equipment. That won’t be required
this year, because the state will
be using different equipment
and smaller cranes.
Adam Vaccaro can be reached
at adam.vaccaro@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter at
@adamtvaccaro.
Recent spike in gas prices not necessarily a reason to panic
uGAS PRICES
Continued from Page A1
and the US economy as a
whole?
The effect on family budgets
isn’t slight. Higher gas prices
will wipe out any gains lowerincome Americans were getting
from the recently passed Republican tax cuts, according to an
analysis from Deutsche Bank.
Rising gas prices mean a
typical Massachusetts driver —
who puts around 1,000 miles
on his or her odometer each
month — will spend an additional $20 per month fueling
up, a loss of $240 over a year if
prices remain elevated.
And when oil prices rise, lots
of other things get more expensive too. It costs more for companies to ship products via
truck. And oil is also the principal ingredient in virtually every
piece of plastic you’ve ever
touched, which could mean
higher prices on all manner of
consumer goods.
We’re far from any records,
but today’s gas prices do seem
relatively high. Not once in the
12-year stretch from 1991
through 2003 did nationwide
prices at the pump touch $2.50
(even adjusting for inflation.)
But if current prices are high
compared with the 1990s, recent history looks rather different. Gas prices across the United States leaped above $3 per
gallon in 2010 and stayed there
for more than four years, at
some points crossing the $4
threshold. Yet that didn’t stop
the US economy from continuing its slow march toward recovery. Plus, Massachusetts gas
prices are slightly below the national average, and well below
what you find in higher-tax
states such as California (where
a gallon of gas costs $3.58).
Rising oil and gas prices aren’t the dire news they used to
be, back when America had to
send precious dollars overseas
to buy up limited supplies from
OPEC. Thanks to the fracking
revolution, the United States is
gas prices might deter drivers
and also create an incentive for
people to switch to fuel-efficient
vehicles. Businesses, too, would
have new reasons to eye cleaner-energy facilities and machinery.
Not to mention that by making driving more costly, higher
gas prices could cut down on
Boston’s much-lamented traffic,
encouraging folks to reconsider
car-pooling and public transit.
So while rising gasoline prices will undoubtedly cut into
family budgets, particularly
among lower-income families,
seeing a $3 sign at the local service station isn’t necessarily a
reason to panic. We’ve been
here before — not that long ago.
JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES
A typical Massachusetts driver could spend an additional $20 per month fueling up.
now among the world’s largest
oil producers. So when global
oil prices rise, US oil companies
prosper, which translates into
jobs and wages across large
swaths of rural America.
Then, of course, there are
the many good reasons to think
gasoline prices should actually
rise a lot further to reflect the
serious environmental costs of
our emissions-spewing cars.
Nearly 20 percent of US
greenhouse gas emissions come
from cars and trucks. Higher
Evan Horowitz digs through
data to find information that
illuminates the policy issues
facing Massachusetts and the
United States. He can be
reached at evan.horowitz@
globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeHorowitz.
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Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
Court should strike down Trump’s travel ban
T
he Supreme Court will journey into uncharted territory on Wednesday, when justices hear a legal challenge to President
Trump’s travel ban. Opponents will seek to
show that the president exceeded his authority and acted with religious animus when he
blocked travelers from a group of predominantly Muslim countries last year, and that the policy should be
struck down as a result.
Nothing quite like Trump v. Hawaii has come before
the court before — because no president has so readily
tweeted his bigoted motives.
There can’t be much serious dispute that Trump
does, in fact, harbor anti-Muslim attitudes. His promise
during the 2016 campaign to block Muslims from entering the United States was, explicitly, a promise to
discriminate based on religion. And the ban clearly
emerged from those promises. The government revised
the plan twice — and added North Koreans in an apparent effort to find some non-Muslims to block too —
but the chain of events and the president’s own tweets
make clear that the policy was intended to make good
on his bigoted campaign pledge. After-the-fact rationalizations of the type the administration has since concocted to defend the ban can’t undo the idea’s trajectory from tweet to policy.
The question is whether, from a legal standpoint,
any of that should matter.
To hear the Justice Department tell it, the president
has such broad powers over immigration that the
plaintiffs have no legal right to “challenge the exercise
of discretionary power vested by statute directly in the
president.” And they try to finesse their way past the
First Amendment by obfuscating the ban’s motives.
It’s a sweeping assertion of executive power that the
justices should reject.
As a fundamental matter, the country’s basic legal
guardrails — including the establishment clause that
prohibits favoring any religion over others — don’t
come with loopholes. The president’s actions clearly
“denigrated persons of the Muslim faith,” as the plaintiffs put it. That fact alone taints the whole order.
But even without a finding of animus by the court,
the president also lacks the power to ban whole nationalities. As the plaintiffs showed, Congress explicitly rejected discrimination by national origin in visa issuance. The president can temporarily ban classes of people, but he can’t simply rewrite that legal directive.
The case has attracted widespread attention, and
not just because of its impact on Muslims. With this decision, the justices will orient how federal courts respond to the Trump presidency and to his public statements. If the Supreme Court chooses to ignore or minimize the president’s words and tweets, or treat them as
somehow irrelevant, that will set an unfortunate seeno-evil precedent. But words have meaning. The better
outcome would be for the justices to send a signal to
the White House — and to the country — that the court
knows bigotry when it hears it, and knows that it has
no place in American law.
INDIRA A.R. LAKSHMANAN
The first round goes
to Kim Jong Un
P
resident Trump fancies himself the
master negotiator, but he may have
met his match in Kim Jong Un. The
North Korean dictator has
demonstrated a brazen disregard for
global norms, an embrace of high-stakes risks to
enter the nuclear club and eliminate threats to his
power, and an uncanny ability to fashion a
diplomatic silk purse of a summit from a sow’s
ear of outcast status.
In Trump’s Year Zero approach to foreign policy —
ignoring all that came before him in Republican and
Democratic administrations — the president has claimed
credit for reanimating negotiations with North Korea while
apparently not hearing or heeding hard-learned lessons that
should temper any optimism about what North Korea will
give away. As much as Trump’s threats of military force, his
playground goading of Kim as “Little Rocket Man,” and his
pressure on China to increase and enforce UN sanctions
may have pressured Kim, it’s as easy to argue that Kim
forced Trump to the negotiating table with relentless testing
that proved he can threaten the US with a nuclear warhead.
For a guy with few cards to play, Kim sure knows how to
play them. With a summit between South Korean President
Moon Jae-in and the North Korean leader looming this
Friday, Kim has parlayed a hand of twos and fours into
meetings with China’s and South Korea’s presidents, a
Korean presidential hotline, a possible discussion of a
peace treaty, and a summit with the most powerful
leader in the world.
After NBC’s Chuck Todd suggested that Kim has
given up very little and made it seem like a lot,
Trump erupted on Twitter Sunday. “Wow, we haven’t
given up anything & they have agreed to
denuclearization (so great for World), site closure, &
no more testing!” he fumed.
There’s one problem with Trump’s statement: It’s
not true. Kim is the first North Korean leader to
secure a long-coveted equal-footing meeting
with a US leader; a summit is big “give” from
the United States before getting any
concessions. Second, while the North Koreans
indicated to the South Koreans (and perhaps to
CIA director Mike Pompeo, who made a secret
trip) they’d consider denuclearization, they
haven’t agreed to anything. Kim on Saturday
called North Korea’s nuclear weapons a
“treasured sword” and “firm guarantee by
which our descendents can enjoy the most
dignified and happiest life in the world.”
As far as we know, Pyongyang and
Washington haven’t even agreed on the
definition of denuclearization. “What Kim
means and what Trump means are two
different things,” Wendy Sherman, a former
undersecretary of state who was North Korea
policy coordinator under Bill Clinton, said
in an interview. “What we mean is Kim’s
nuclear arsenal, but in the past, North
Korea has tried to put the entire
security architecture of northeast Asia
on the table,” including the removal
of US military forces and treaties that
keep the South and Japan protected under our nuclear
umbrella.
As for announcing a halt to testing, Kim has proved he’s
nuclear capable and had stopped testing anyway. Sherman
noted their nuclear test site probably was on the verge of
collapse in any event, and China — North Korea’s only
friend — was worried about radiation coming over the
border.
The North has conceded nothing yet, and the question
is: In exchange for the verifiable, irreversible
denuclearization we want, what does Kim want in return?
The last time the North negotiated, “they asked for
energy and economic assistance, a peace treaty and crossrecognition of states. They tried to end our military
exercises in South Korea and I refused,” recalled
Ambassador Chris Hill, a former assistant secretary of state
who, in the George W. Bush administration, was the last US
official to lead formal talks with North Korea.
Hill fears two things could go terribly wrong. Trump
could storm out, leaving us closer to the brink of war. Or
“what if [Trump] starts agreeing to something he can’t do,”
such as decoupling the US-South Korea military alliance, or
otherwise working against our long-term geopolitical
interests?
That’s the risk with the “Reykjavik approach,” in which
leaders like Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev
hammer out a deal. Kurt Campbell, a former assistant
secretary of state for East Asia, says “the base camp option”
is safer, in which aides do the legwork for a perilous
summit, nailing down agreements beforehand.
The Trump team knows the president might give
something valuable away. But implementing the base camp
approach is hard when all the North Korea experts at the
State Department have gone, including a three-decade
veteran who announced his retirement in February. Trump
has still not named an ambassador to South Korea.
It’s not just a problem of scant expertise, in which the
two Americans who know Kim best are Mike Pompeo and
Dennis Rodman. What if, as Hill says, the president won’t
read, won’t listen, and won’t learn from the mistakes of past
negotiations?
Indira A.R. Lakshmanan’s column
appears regularly in the Globe.
Follow her on Twitter @Indira_L.
LESLEY BECKER/GLOBE STAFF
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Both smoke and fire
in Gaza border clashes
JOAN VENNOCHI
Thanks for trusting the power of
the written word
T
hey don’t make
newspaper readers
like Bill Donovan
anymore.
My neighbor
from across the street died last
week at 85. When I knelt to
pay my last respects, of course
I smiled at the sight of that
day’s Boston Globe tucked inside the casket.
It was just what Bill would
want on his passage to eternity
— and a sadly perfect symbol
of an industry in transition.
But it also stood as testament
to the power of the printed word. And of
what once was an unbreakable bond between daily journalism and the reader next
door.
I know Bill did not agree with every
word in every Globe, unless Dan Shaughnessy wrote it. But he loved reading the
newspaper and debating its contents. Occasionally he would call out, “Good one, today!” as I walked the dog or did yard work.
Beyond any ego boost, it illustrated the intimate tie to our imperfect but aspirational
efforts to deliver news and information. If
his newspaper came late, or even worse, minus Red Sox scores, he would advise me “to
tell Mr. Henry” to get the problems straightened out because he was about to cancel his
subscription. He never did that permanently, although I suspect he sometimes stopped
delivery so he could sign up at a reduced
rate.
In this age of digital news, the connection between reader and written word is
indifference. We must give
them what Chartbeat says they
want.
In every business, it’s
change or die. The newspaper
business was slow to understand that. Today, survival
trumps nostalgia, as it should.
But there still should be room
for gratitude for loyal readers
like Bill Donovan whose day
didn’t really start until the
newspaper hit the front doorstep. Perhaps he had more of
an ordinary passion for newsADOBE STOCK
print because he worked as a
measured more precisely, and much more
photo engraver and spent 25 years in the
coldly. There’s no Bill Donovan hailing you
press room at The Salem Evening News. But
from his front porch. In real time, an unforthere are still others like him out there, who
giving beast of analytics called Chartbeat
don’t do Twitter but send e-mail and somemeasures page views and reader engagetimes even an old-fashioned letter, on paper.
ment time. Landing near the top of this
Sometimes they praise our work and someever-fluctuating list is a great feeling. But
times they vehemently disagree with it. But
when your work is nowhere to be found,
they are all part of a community called lovpanic and self-doubt set in. The first instinct ers of news and the printed word – and they
is to blame the headline for its lack of Web
are willing to pay for it.
appeal; then, the homepage for not underSometimes Chartbeat will tell you
standing the underlying brilliance of your
“there’s magic happening” with a story. It’s
offering and promoting it enough. Finally,
being picked up and shared on social media.
reality sets in.
It’s climbing in page views and reader enA vast and demanding digital audience
gagement time. Life is good. But there was
prefers the photo of a golden retriever holdalso magic when my neighbor called out
ing a “Boston Strong” flag in its mouth.
“Good one, today!” — even if he meant
Time to write about Stormy Daniels?
Shaughnessy. Rest in peace, Bill. And
In the past, we trusted readers to turn
thanks for reading us all those years.
the page and sample a menu of offerings,
Joan Vennochi can be reached at
from breaking news and softer features to
vennochi@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter
sports, horoscopes, and weather. Now, we
@Joan_Vennochi.
fear their wrath or, more dangerous, their
DAN WASSERMAN
Gaza’s desperate masses are
collateral damage in Israel’s blockade
The peaceful demonstrations that began on the eve of Passover have resulted in 34 Palestinian deaths and thousands
of gunshot-related injuries, as a way to “protect Israel’s sovereignty” (“4 Palestinians killed as Gaza border clashes resume,” The World, April 21). No Israeli injuries have been
reported.
The blockade of Gaza since 2007 created a virtual penal
colony, with limited water and energy resources and nearly
50 percent unemployment. The residents are desperate.
They are collateral damage in Israel’s efforts to destabilize
Hamas.
One of the lessons of Passover is that, because of Jewish
suffering in the past, we should understand and empathize
with others who are suffering. This is what I was taught.
Instead, the Israeli army has become an oppressor of a
downtrodden people with no escape and no other options
than to demonstrate.
What has happened to our Jewish values?
MARK GOLDEN
Newton
Hamas seems bent
on getting Arabs killed
Saturday’s article about the latest of Hamas’s “Great March
of Return” protests creates a misleading impression, starting with the headline “4 Palestinians killed as Gaza border
clashes resume.”
Hamas seems determined to win a propaganda victory
by getting as many Arabs killed as possible while it also
tries to send terrorists across the border into Israel to wreak
havoc here. Perhaps the most glaring example is the way
Hamas reportedly tried sending a 7-year-old child across
the border; fortunately, Israeli soldiers said they got her
safely back to her parents, risking their own lives. (Israel
probably has the only army in the world that tries to avoid
killing those attacking it.) Perhaps the most instructive,
symbolic act of the Hamas rioters was relegated to the last
sentence of Saturday’s article, with its reference to some of
their kites being emblazoned with swastikas. Such is the
nature of the enemy Israel faces.
ALAN STEIN
Netanya, Israel
In officer’s tragic death, we find a story
of two lives, with some missing pages
It was deeply moving to read the article “Two lives. Nothing
in common” (Page A1, April 19) and learn about Officer
Sean Gannon, who so tragically lost his life at such a young
age with so much potential ahead of him. It was heartening
and uplifting to see the amount of support he garnered
from his fellow officers and so many others. It was equally
upsetting to read the contrast with Thomas Latanowich,
the suspect in the Yarmouth police officer’s fatal shooting. I
would like to have known more about Latanowich’s early
upbringing and family life.
The article shows the loving, stable, and nurturing family that Gannon grew up in. But there was no mention of the
kind of family Latanowich was raised in and whether this
might have had some impact on the choices he made.
You write that “he had fallen in love with the ‘gangster lifestyle,’ ” according to someone who knew him.
My guess is that these two men had vastly different upbringings. I wonder what kind of intervention might have
helped change the course of Latanowich’s life.
DOROTHY VACCA
Waltham
Donald Trump, the ‘thanks, but
no thanks’ president
Macedonia could use our
friendship; and we could use theirs
By Rachelle G. Cohen
S
SKOPJE, Macedonia
o there’s dysfunction in
Washington and too many
empty offices on the upper
floors of the State Department. And yet here in this
corner of the former Yugoslavia that
has known more than its share of conflict, corruption, and ethnic upheaval, a
merry band of Americans work on the
assumption they can spread American
values — values like rule of law and free
press and open courts.
Sure, what better place to further
the case for American values than here,
the fake news capital of the world. It’s a
story their own mainstream journalists
find amusement in retelling. How a
bunch of unemployed young wiseguys
in the tiny town of Veles peddled fake
news to gullible Americans during the
2016 election and made a decent profit
off the Google ads they generated.
But Macedonia is more than a
punch line. It is a strategic partner in a
region where the United States needs
its friends. It longs for NATO membership, and its young people embrace
American culture — music, Burger
King, and English — as their own.
It’s also home to the highest per cap-
ita ratio of returned foreign fighters.
And it’s in the crosshairs of Vladimir
Putin for its westward looking ways
and its NATO aspirations.
Yes, it’s complicated. But it’s what
American diplomats and the private citizens who answer the call to work with
them do here and in countless other
places around the globe while Washington dithers.
“To help Macedonia be an effective
ally, that’s deeply in the US interest,”
said US Ambassador Jess L. Baily, a career member of the foreign service
posted here since 2014. “As a basic
proposition, when there has been conflict and instability in Europe, it has
come back to haunt the US. So these
are good investments.”
It’s not sexy stuff. It’s making progress toward more openness in government in inches. But when you see major backsliding in so-called democracies
like Hungary or Turkey, a little progress
is a good thing.
So on a warm spring day in a stuffy
downtown hotel room, Macedonian
judges and a handful of journalists —
not a match made in heaven — sit
around a long table, staring each other
down. It’s a first. They’re making a little
bit of history here — venting, yes, but
asking questions of each other and
their American speaker. That would be
me — come to preach the gospel of talking through their problems.
The rules are different here; defendants aren’t even identified by their full
name unless and until they have been
convicted. It’s initials-only when an indictment is handed down. But, as people here noted repeatedly, it’s a small
country, with only two million people.
And if it happens to be the former cabinet minister who’s indicted, it’s certainly no secret for long.
There’s a special prosecutor’s office
here now, bringing one corruption case
after another, and one of its superstars
is Lenche Ristoska, a woman it is said
who is adored by about two-thirds of
the country and feared by those who
have good reason to be looking over
their shoulders. The icy blue eyes don’t
hurt either. She is part of a new generation of leaders, leaders not afraid to
challenge the status quo.
The rules are changing here, slowly
but changing nonetheless. And in a little country with big dreams, where
Americans are still the good guys,
sometimes a win is a win is a win.
Rachelle G. Cohen, former editorial
page editor of the Boston Herald,
traveled to Macedonia as a pro bono
guest speaker at the request of the US
Embassy.
The juxtaposition of Annie Linskey’s front-page Sunday
Globe article on Donald Trump’s difficulty in finding legal
help (“Top defense attorneys took a pass on Trump”) and
Renée Graham’s column in the same edition on the boost
UN Ambassador Nikki Haley received politically from publicly contradicting her boss (“A long game, no matter the
cost,” Ideas), along with the apparent success of James
Comey’s book release, suggests yet another new twist on
this already surreal chapter of American history: It seems
that many are concluding it is now far more damaging to
one’s business or career to be hired by this president of the
United States than to be fired by him.
GEOFFREY PATTON
Ashland
In software, let’s admit that what were
once ‘glitches’ are now ‘defects’
Regarding the recent “glitches” in the state Registry of Motor Vehicles and IRS software: Given the increasing impact
that malfunctioning software has on peoples lives, it is time
to stop using the word “glitch” to describe these problems.
The proper word is “defect.”
It would be a good policy for the Globe to stop using the
word “glitch,” which in my experience is never used by professional software developers but is often used by people
who are trying to minimize the problem in the software.
RICK FRANK
Newtonville
The Gardner heist: piece of cake
Re “Gardner publishes its own book on heist” (Metro, April
22): I had to laugh at one of the titles of the several books
mentioned in Sunday’s “Names” feature: “Master Thieves:
The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled Off the World’s Greatest
Art Heist.”
From what I know of the story, a better title would have
been: “Taking Candy from a Baby.”
JOHN HAGAN
Boston
A10
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T h e
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G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
Fees put tenant at odds with landlord
uTHE FINE PRINT
Continued from Page A1
agent and the landlord refused
to talk to him anymore.
Botkin, 26, majored in math
and music at Northeastern.
And while he remains committed to building a career in music, he has never quite shaken
off the legal bug that bit several
years ago when he interned in a
law office. Online legal research
comes easily to him.
Botkin knows he’s really
sticking his neck out. He’d love
to stay in the apartment, because it’s so close to Northeastern, where he helps lead an 80member choir as a part-time
staff member, and even closer
to Symphony Hall, where he
lends his baritone to the highly
polished Chorus Pro Musica.
“My friends just pay these
extra housing charges, no questions asked,” Botkin said when I
visited his cramped apartment.
“But I can’t do that. I wish I
could. It would make life a lot
easier. But I can’t.”
Quixotic idealist? Righteous
defender of the law? Someone
about to learn one of life’s hard
lessons?
I’ve read up on landlord-tenant law and called half a dozen
lawyers. Everything I learned
suggests Botkin is on sound legal ground.
Here’s a summation of the
facts: Botkin and a couple he
met in college hired Cornerstone Real Estate to find them
an apartment. As the law mandates, Botkin and his roommates first signed a written
agreement, specifying the brokerage fee as one month’s rent,
payable to the broker upon the
signing of a lease.
The St. Stephen Street apartment Botkin and his roommates eventually leased is
owned by a couple in Connecticut. They gave the listing to
Boston’s Preferred Properties,
which opened it up to other
brokers by putting it on a multiple listing service. After Cornerstone showed the apartment,
Botkin and his roommates submitted references, employment
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Elijah Botkin was hit with new fees after he got a new roommate.
histories, pay stubs, and other
paperwork to Boston’s Preferred Properties, which acted
as the landlord’s agent.
Cornerstone and Boston’s
Preferred Properties split the
brokerage fee, said Larry Fisch,
Boston’s Preferred Properties
owner. The one-year lease commenced in September. But Botkin’s roommates decided to
move to Southern California
when the lease ends on Aug. 31.
To keep the apartment, Botkin
found a roommate to replace
them.
Boston’s Preferred Properties and the landlord appeared
happy to have Botkin and a new
roommate stay on. Botkin always paid his rent on time (by
direct bank debit). And there
were no complaints about noise
or anything else. But on April
11, Botkin received an e-mail
from Boston’s Preferred Properties demanding $275 in “application” and “rental” fees to
check the new roommate’s references, credit, and employment history.
This was not a brokerage
fee; Botkin already had his
apartment. He had also found a
replacement roommate on his
own.
The law says landlords (and
by extension their agents) are
limited in what they can charge
a tenant at the beginning of a
lease: first month’s rent, last
month’s rent, refundable security deposit, and the cost of a
lock and key.
The City of Boston website
tells prospective tenants to
“know your rights.” It lists examples of items landlords can’t
charge for, including an “application fee” and a “credit check
fee.”
A handbook on tenants’
rights put out by the Massachusetts Law Reform Institute says
the same thing. And a 2014
court ruling explicitly deems illegal a landlord’s attempt to impose any extra charges, whether labeled as “application,”
“amenities,” or “community”
fees.
Fisch told me he now realizes “application” fees are illegal,
and he will no longer levy them.
But he defended the “rental
fee,” which he said he needs as
compensation for checking references and running a credit
check on Botkin’s new roommate and for facilitating renewal of the lease.
I asked how he would have
been compensated if Botkin
and his current roommates had
stayed and simply wanted to renew the lease — little more than
changing the dates from 201718 to 2018-19. He said the landlord would pay him $100 for
that.
So why can’t the landlord
also pay the nominal fee it will
cost for a credit report on the
new roommate, I asked.
“Landlords typically will not
pay that,” he said.
Botkin filed a complaint
with the attorney general’s office. He said he got a return call
from one of its lawyers, who
seemed to agree the application
and rental fees demanded by
Boston’s Preferred Properties
conflicted with state law.
The danger is that Botkin
may win on the law but lose the
apartment, now that the landlord and agent have cut off all
communication.
“I just hope I don’t get punished for this,” he said.
Sounds like he already has
been.
Sean P. Murphy can be reached
at smurphy@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@spmurphyboston.
Airbnb debate takes sharp turn
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Continued from Page A1
On one side are neighborhood groups, housing activists,
and members of the city’s powerful hotel workers union, who
generally advocate for tighter
regulations. On the other side
are Airbnb and its small army
of “hosts,” along with a growing
industry of short-term rental
operators and service providers
who worry they’ll be clobbered
if the tougher rules on the table
take effect.
In the middle sits Walsh and
the City Council. T he y are
weighing a tight housing market and anxious neighbors
against the desire to keep Boston open to an increasingly
popular form of lodging, which
helps bring tourists — and their
wallets — to some of the city’s
less-traveled neighborhoods.
“The most important thing
to the mayor is that we preserve housing,” said Joyce Linehan, Walsh’s chief of policy.
“But there is a lot at stake. This
industry is very profitable, and
very popular. Users love it. So
there are advocates on all sides
making their case.”
There were standing-roomonly hearings after Walsh filed
new rules with the City Council
in January. Unite Here Local
26, which represents hotel
workers and had close ties to
many city elected officials,
brought its members out in
force.
But so did Airbnb, which encouraged hosts to come and
talk about what renting on the
service has meant for them.
Lesser-known — and less numerous — groups such as a coalition of short-term rental
hosts have hired lobbyists and
public relations experts to
press their case.
Even Stop Child Predators, a
Washington, D.C.,-based group
that lobbies for laws to protect
against sex abuse, has been
weighing in with press releases
pushing tougher regulations,
implying the risk unknown
renters pose to neighbors.
Given the competing interests and complexities of regulating a new industry, Walsh
pulled the bill before the Coun-
cil voted on it, but his aides say another slice of the industry —
he plans to file a new version the people who’ve gone into
business managing, cleaning,
soon.
Wu, meanwhile, called some and repairing short-term rentof AirBnB’s claims “fake news,” als — and they’re trying to get
and her supporters blasted the heard, too.
“We’re kind of the forgotten
company for spreading misingroup,” said Kama Cicero, a
formation to city residents.
This debate over short-term real estate agent who manages
rentals has played out across about 30 short-term rentals for
the country as cities grapple their owners. “We’re not the
with how to regulate the indus- homeowners. We’re also not
try. Airbnb and the hotel indus- someone who’s buying a buildtry have funded economic stud- ing and turning it into a hotel.”
A tight annual cap would
ies and fueled grass-roots political campaigns to push their clobber the short-term rental
vision of the industry’s future, business, said Cicero, who
and they have become experi- joined with other hosts and
suppliers to create the Boston
enced sparring partners.
But every city has unique Host Alliance, which is also
dynamics, said Will Burns, a lobbying City Hall, separately
from Airbnb. The new
former Chicago alderrules would kill jobs,
man who now directs
she said, and make it
public policy for Airhard to provide a
bnb. That makes the
valuable service. After
rules, and the flavor of
all, she pointed out,
debate, a little differpeople came to Bosent each time.
ton for extended
“It really depends
stints to work and
on what city you’re
study at the region’s
in,” Burns said, noting
that some cities are City Councilor many hospitals and
universities and needmost worried about Michelle Wu
potential safety issues has become an ed a place to stay long
before Airbnb gave
of short-term rentals, e-mail target.
the industry rocket
others quality of life,
others housing supply. “All fuel.
“That’s the type of clientele
these cities have different conwe cater to,” Cicero said in a recerns.”
In Boston, debate has cen- cent interview. “Families who
tered largely on the impact are coming to Boston, someshort-term rentals are having times for a while, and can’t afon one of the nation’s priciest ford a hotel the whole time.”
City officials say they’re tryhousing markets.
The Walsh administration ing to craft a policy that considestimates that more than 2,000 ers all the wrinkles of shortapartments in Boston have term rentals, while also probeen effectively taken off the tecting the housing market.
market for use as full-time And they’re keeping an eye on
short-term rentals — a number Beacon Hill, where lawmakers
Airbnb disputes. City officials are aiming to complete a bill of
have proposed capping many their own this summer to deal
apartments at 90 nights of with taxes and other rules for
short-term rental a year, a bid short-term rentals statewide.
Linehan said the Walsh adto limit what they call “de facto
hotels” while still allowing resi- ministration will come out
dents to rent a spare room or, with a new bill for the city, likeoccasionally, their whole apart- ly in a couple of weeks, and
send it back to the council for
ment.
Airbnb says it would accept yet more debate.
those sort of rules, as long as its
hosts can still rent their spare Tim Logan can be reached at
bedrooms. Burns wouldn’t say tim.logan@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter at
how firm a cap they’d support.
Either way, the idea alarms @bytimlogan.
Metro
B
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T U E S DAY, A P R I L 24 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N GL OB E .C O M /M E T R O
Ex­police payroll head pleads not guilty Vineyard
Allegedly deposited nearly
$24,000 in personal account
Denise Ezekiel
(right), a
former State
Police payroll
director who
is alleged to
have stolen
funds from the
department, is
escorted by a
Massachusetts
State Police
trooper to
district court
for her
Framingham
arraignment
Monday.
By John R. Ellement and Matt Rocheleau
GLOBE STAFF
FRAMINGHAM — The former head of payroll for
the Massachusetts State Police kept her head bowed in
court Monday as she pleaded not guilty to stealing
$23,900 in public funds.
Denise M. Ezekiel, 49, was released without bail after her arraignment in Framingham District Court.
State Police say Ezekiel, of Holbrook, deposited
$23,900 of state money into her personal account,
falsely claiming the 29 payments were reimbursements for travel and training expenses.
David Procopio, spokesman for State Police, said
that investigators have reviewed overtime and reimbursement records during her tenure, which began in
2013, and found no other misuse of state funds.
“As part of our investigation into Ms. Ezekiel’s alleged theft, we audited overtime and reimbursement
pay she received throughout her entire career at MSP,’’
man’s case
heard by
high court
Ruling could affect
future deportations
Came to US from
Brazil 18 years ago
By Akilah Johnson
GLOBE STAFF
A case involving an immigrant
from Brazil who lives on Martha’s
Vineyard was argued before the US
Supreme Court Monday. And while
the case won’t determine whether the
man will be allowed to stay in the
country, the decision could have
broader implications for how immigration authorities initiate some deportation proceedings.
The legal question in the case centers on whether a “notice to appear”
in immigration court with the time
and date written as “to be determined” is considered adequate notice. Under federal immigration law,
once a person receives notice to appear in immigration court, the proverbial clock that allows some immigrants in the country illegally to accrue the necessary time to qualify for
deportation relief effectively stops.
“This is an important issue that
will affect quite a few people,” said
Rachel Rosenbloom, co-director of
the Northeastern University School
of Law Immigrant Justice Clinic.
“The question here is, does he get to
have his day in court or not? The
question [also] is: Is he eligible to apply” for special consideration?
Wescley Fonseca Pereira arrived in
the United States from Brazil on a sixmonth tourist visa in 2000 and never
left. About 5½ year later, he was
charged with drunken driving and
was given a notice to appear in immigration court while in detention, according to court documents.
The notice ordered him to appear
in Boston immigration court “on a
date to be set at a time to be set to
show why [he] should not be removed from the United States,” according to documents filed in the Supreme Court case.
Pereira’s immigration court date
was later set for Oct. 31, 2007, and he
was sent a notice six weeks prior to
the hearing, according to documents.
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
EZEKIEL, Page B4
TRAINED TO PLAY, AND LEAD
IMMIGRATION, Page B4
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Halina Nguyen (center) and Sophia Monteiro (right) enjoyed a Playworks basketball practice at Neighborhood House Charter School.
I
By Cristela Guerra
GLOBE STAFF
f Nia Buyu, 10, has learned anything in her
two years as a junior coach, it’s that a game of
rock, paper, scissors solves most playground
conflicts.
On the field, she’s known as “Coach Nia.”
The fifth-grader’s expertise is recess.
Through a nonprofit called Playworks
New England, Buyu is one of 13 junior coaches at Neighborhood House Charter School in
Dorchester. It’s a volunteer position her teachers and administration selected her and others for — and to keep
the title, they need to keep their grades up.
Junior coaches, who don purple shirts, work alongside Playworks coaches toward common goals: to encourage youths to be physically active, and to use play to
teach social and emotional skills.
They might turn a game of tag into a lesson on re-
With team­
building
activities,
nonprofit
teaches junior
coaches at 40
Boston
elementary
schools
spect and inclusion. Coaches create a cohort of fourthand fifth-grade junior coaches to train in youth leadership and team-building activities.
Playworks has coaches at scores of schools in the region, according to Jonathan Gay, who has served as executive director of Playworks New England for the past
two-and-a-half years. The organization, a national nonprofit, started in 1996 in California.
“In Boston we’re serving 40 elementary schools across
the city,” Gay said. “When you start with Playworks, you
often start off as an AmeriCorps coach during your year
of service. . . . When you’re at your school, your serving
that one school community for that entire year.”
Once coaches graduate from AmeriCorp, a voluntary
civil society program, and wrap up their year of 1,700
hours of service, they often go on to be social workers and
teachers across local school districts. Some keep working
with Playworks as fund-raisers to continue spreading
The three Democrats vying for
the state’s top office blamed Governor Charlie Baker Monday for failing
to take more aggressive action to
combat climate change, promote
public transportation, and protect
the environment.
At a Suffolk University forum organized by environmental groups,
gubernatorial candidates Jay Gonzalez, former governor Deval Patrick’s
budget administration chief; Robert
K. Massie, an environmental activist
and entrepreneur; and Setti Warren,
the former Newton mayor — largely
offered similar views on a range of
energy and environmental issues.
But each criticized Baker for his
environmental record, saying he had
JAY GONZALEZ
said there is no
sense of urgency in
the state
administration. “If I
am governor,” he
said, “you can count
on that I will make
[climate change]
urgent.”
ROBERT K. MASSIE
suggested that the
state should consider
building a barrier in
Boston Harbor to
protect the city from
rising sea levels.
“We’re gong to have
to consider
retreating,” he said.
SETTI WARREN
would push the state
to build more
offshore wind power
and solar energy. “I
believe deeply that
we need change and
new direction at the
state level,” he said.
and Joshua Miller
GLOBE STAFF
not made the issue a priority or done
enough to resist the Trump administration’s rollback of environmental
regulations.
“I think we need to be aiming a
lot higher,” said Gonzalez, who took
issue with the notion that Baker is
too popular to beat.
“It’s easy to be popular when you
don’t do anything, and you never
take a stand, and your whole approach to the job is being cautious
instead of courageous,” he said.
“Elections are about choices, and in
this case, this is going to be a choice
between a governor who has made
no progress on any issue that affects
people’s lives in real ways.”
Warren joined the other candidates in pledging to devote at least 1
DEBATE, Page B5
INVESTIGATION, Page B5
Democrats challenge Baker on the environment
GLOBE STAFF
By Matt Stout
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
The state Senate paid nearly
$230,000 this month to a law firm
hired to investigate whether its former
president, Stanley C. Rosenberg, broke
any chamber rules in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations against his
husband, Bryon Hefner, state spending records show.
The disclosure comes as Hefner
readies to appear for his arraignment
Tuesday on multiple charges of sexual
assault, criminal lewdness, and distributing nude photographs without
consent.
The Globe reported in November
allegations against Hefner from four
unnamed men who said Hefner sexually assaulted or harassed them and
bragged he could influence Senate
business. Though three of the alleged
incidents took place when Rosenberg
was just feet away, the Globe found no
evidence the senator knew about the
assaults.
Two of the men have said they are
among the four victims cited in indictments against Hefner handed down
last month by a statewide grand jury.
Hefner’s attorney, Tracy Miner, has
said he would plead not guilty to the
charges in Suffolk Superior Court.
PLAYWORKS, Page B5
By David Abel
Hefner due
in court on
misconduct
charges
B2
Metro
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T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
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GET SMART
ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE
Lobsters:
All about them
By Margeaux Sippell
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
The cost of lobsters has been soaring
thanks to a combination of factors, including
bad weather and strong international demand, the Globe’s Janelle Nanos reported.
Diners are feeling the pain at restaurants in
the region. Here are some fast facts you might
not know about lobsters.
What are males and females called?
Male lobsters are called cocks; females are
called hens.
What do lobsters eat?
Their favorite snacks include crabs, clams,
mussels, starfish, small fish, sea urchins, and
marine worms. They have even been known
to become cannibalistic and eat other lobsters. As is fitting of their bottom-feeder reputation, they’ll eat pretty much anything, even
if it’s dead.
Do lobsters have teeth?
They do — in their stomachs. The teeth,
which look similar to three molars, are called
the “gastric mill.”
What are lobsters’ mating rituals?
The female lobster picks her mate. She
stands outside his den and releases her scent
in a stream of urine, which beguiles the male.
The female raises her claws and places them
on his head to let him know she is ready. They
enter his den, and some time after, from a few
hours to several days later, the female molts
and they mate. The female stores the sperm
for many months.
How long do they live?
They can live to be 100, although most
commercially fished lobsters that end up in
supermarkets and restaurants are caught at 5
to 7 years old.
How big do they get?
The average adult lobster is 9.8 to 20 inches long and weighs 1 to 2 pounds when
caught.
How nutritious are they?
Lobsters are a good source of protein but
high in sodium and cholesterol. One cup of
lobster meat has 129 calories, 1.2 grams of fat,
212 milligrams of cholesterol (that’s 70 percent of your daily intake), 705 milligrams of
sodium (29 percent of daily intake), 28 grams
of protein, and zero grams of sugar. They are
also a source of calcium, vitamins B-12 and
B-6, magnesium, iron, and potassium.
SOURCES: Umaine.edu, Maine Lobstermen’s Community Alliance, USDA.
Margeaux Sippell can be reached at
margeaux.sippell@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @MargeauxSippell.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
DINA RUDICK/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Massachusetts’ long maritime history is now codified on a map. The New Bedford Whaling Museum is among the many venues.
Map highlights maritime history
By Cristela Guerra
The trail includes the New Bedford Whaling Museum,
as well as several locations around the state that recognize author Herman Melville and his classic novel, “Moby
t’s a whale of a trail.
Dick.” Mount Greylock, which is said to have inspired
Those interested in exploring Massachusetts’
Melville’s image of a white whale, gets a trail shout-out,
maritime history and the state’s connection to
too.
some remarkable sea creatures now have a route to
The map took six months to create. Tina Malott, direcfollow: the Massachusetts Whale Trail.
tor of marketing and public relations at the New Bedford
The Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism made
Whaling Museum, said museum officials are excited to
the online map available to the public Monday morning.
see people learn more about the marine mammals, ocean
Whether traveling by foot or ferry, train or car, one can
health and conservation, and the history of whaling in
consult the map that highlights nearly 40 sites — includMASS. OFFICE OF TOURISM, TRAVEL
Massachusetts.
ing museums, whale-watching excursions, historic sites,
“Our state’s past, present, and future is intimately conand tours — that explore the effect of whales and whaling
nected to the sea and to whales in particular,” Malott said.
history on the region.
“As a whaling museum it’s easy to assume all we tell is the history of
“The trail captures the maritime spirit of Massachusetts and offers a
the whaling era when we hunted these magnificent mammals, and we
new way for visitors to engage with our long and storied connection to
do tell that story. But we also tell the story of whales today — how they
whales,” Francois Nivaud, executive director of the Massachusetts Office
eat, see, and live.”
of Travel and Tourism, said in an statement.
Just as the Freedom Trail traces many sites linked to Boston’s Revolutionary history, the Massachusetts Whale Trail details locations up the
Cristela Guerra can be reached at cristela.guerra@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter @CristelaGuerra.
coast and inland from New Bedford all the way to the Berkshires.
I
GLOBE STAFF
AROUND THE REGION
CO N CO R D, N . H .
State tallies number of
2017 overdose deaths
The New Hampshire Medical Examiner’s Office
has confirmed 483 drug overdose deaths for
2017, two fewer than the year before. More than
350 deaths were linked to fentanyl. Only one person overdosed from heroin alone. New Hampshire Public Radio reported the medical examiner’s office is still waiting for toxicology results on
six cases from 2017. State officials said 40 people
died from drug overdoses this year, and 34 of
them involved fentanyl. Another 86 cases are still
under review. (AP)
WAT E RV I L L E , M A I N E
Colby alumnus gives
$2.5m for student aid
Colby College said an alumnus has given the
school $2.5 million to help students needing financial aid to graduate from the college. Steve
Ford has now donated a total of $3.5 million to
the Waterville college he graduated from in
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
‘Very complicated traffic
diversions, no matter
which mode you take. We
think the best bet, however,
is if you don’t have to be in
this area for a little over
two weeks, you should be
some place else. . . .
Regardless of what mode of
transportation you take,
you can expect to be
delayed.’
JONATHAN GULLIVER, the state’s highway
administrator, as officials announced that the
eastbound side of the Commonwealth Bridge
will be replaced from July 26 to Aug. 11, work
that will reduce the Mass. Turnpike to two
lanes in each direction for much of that period.
1968, saying Colby helped him financially when
he needed it so he wanted to give back. Ford told
the Bangor Daily News that the new money is
earmarked toward the general financial aid pool
at the college to help students from Maine. Steve
Ford had a lifelong career as a corporate attorney, including 20-plus years with Scott Paper and
S.D. Warren, working with their Maine operations and timberlands. Colby offers about $6 million per year in financial aid to students from
Maine. (AP)
CON CO R D, N . H .
Negotiators reach early
deal with state workers
Negotiators have reached tentative labor contract agreements with New Hampshire’s four
state employee unions. Republican Governor
Chris Sununu announced the deals Monday, saying the agreements recognize both the tremendous work of state employees and the interests of
taxpayers. Under the agreement, workers represented by the State Employees Association, the
New England Police Benevolent Association, and
the New Hampshire Troopers Association would
get 1.5 percent raises upon execution of the contract, and another 1.5 percent raise in 2019. Cor-
rections workers, who are represented by Teamsters Local 633, would get a 9.1 percent raise
starting in July to better align their pay with other states. The agreements still need to be ratified
by the unions and the Legislature. If approved,
they would cost about $13.5 million in general
funds for fiscal year 2019. (AP)
M O N M O UT H , M A I N E
Woodchuck smoke­out
leads to 2­acre fire
An apple orchard employee’s attempt to channel
the soul of “Caddyshack’s” Carl Spackler ended
with a similar result. Authorities in Maine said
the employee, Ivan Campbell, started a fire on
Saturday to attempt to smoke out a woodchuck
from a hole in the ground in Monmouth. The
Kennebec Journal reported Campbell accidentally started a brush fire that burned almost 2 acres
of grass and brush. Monmouth Assistant Fire
Chief Ed Pollard described the effort as ‘‘not the
way to get rid of a woodchuck.” Pollard said it’s
unclear if the woodchuck was harmed or scared
off. In the 1980 film “Caddyshack,” Bill Murray’s
character Carl Spackler attempts to use explosives to kill a pesky gopher. He does not succeed,
but does cause a lot of damage. (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
R RAPE SENTENCING A Chelsea man convicted
of raping a young girl will serve 10 years in prison, prosecutors said. A jury found Alvaro Calderon, 33, guilty of aggravated rape of a child and
indecent assault and battery on a child under
14, the Suffolk district attorney’s office said.
Judge Janet Sanders imposed a decade in state
prison at Calderon’s sentencing on Monday, followed by two years of probation. During his probation, Calderon must register as a sex offender,
complete sex offender treatment, have no contact with the victim, have no unsupervised contact with children under 16, and wear a GPS
monitor, prosecutors said. Prosecutors presented evidence during Calderon’s three-day trial to
show that he sexually assaulted the child at her
home from May 2014 to July 2016, when she
was aged 6 to 8, prosecutors said. The abuse
ended when the child disclosed it to a family
member.
R TOP CHARGES DROPPED Prosecutors have dismissed the four most serious charges against a
New Hampshire teenager accused of plotting to
shoot up his former high school and cause mass
casualties in a case that has led to new restrictions in the state’s gun laws. A ruling by the
state Supreme Court has made the prosecution
against 18-year-old Jack Sawyer ‘‘untenable,’’
Rutland County State’s Attorney Rose Kennedy
said. The state was dismissing charges of attempted murder and aggravated assault with a
weapon, Kennedy said in a notice released Monday. Kennedy said she would proceed with two
lesser charges of criminal threatening and carrying a dangerous weapon. Sawyer has pleaded
not guilty to all charges. He had been held without bail following his arrest on Feb. 15, a day after the high school shooting massacre that killed
17 people in Parkland, Fla., but the judge in his
case set his bail at $100,000 last week. Prosecutors say Sawyer kept a diary called ‘‘The Journal
of an Active Shooter’’ in which he made detailed
plans for a shooting at Fair Haven Union High
School, in Fair Haven, and said his goal was to
kill more people than in any other school shooting. Authorities were alerted by a friend of Sawyer’s, who turned over some Facebook messages
in which Sawyer outlined the plot. Sawyer’s defense team contended that he didn’t take any
concrete steps toward committing a crime that
under state law would justify the charges. The
Supreme Court ruled that ‘‘preparation alone’’
did not prove an attempt at aggravated murder
so he could not be kept in jail without bail. (AP)
R WEDDING RIOT A wedding reception at a New
Hampshire hall turned chaotic Sunday, with
gunshots fired and a deliberate car crash outside. Police officers arriving at the Bektash Temple in Concord found numerous fights breaking
out among more than 300 people attending the
reception, the Concord Monitor reported. Police
say shots were fired and someone intentionally
crashed a car into another vehicle as it tried to
leave the scene. Police say no one was hurt by
the gunfire but one person was injured in the
car crash. Four men from Tennessee, Ohio, and
Pennsylvania have been arrested and charged
with felony riot. Two of the four also have been
charged with reckless conduct with a firearm.
(AP)
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
3 teens from Ashland accused of killing 1 of the boys’ mothers
ASSOCIATED PRESS
L I T C H F I E L D, Ma i n e —
Three teenagers tried to drug
one of the boys’ mothers before
strangling and stabbing her in
her Maine home, according to
cou r t doc uments.
A juvenile
petition containing chilling details of
the killing of
47-year-old
ANTHONY COCO
Kimberly
Mironovas
(inset) was released on Monday as the three teens — including the woman’s 15-yearold son — appeared in court in
Augusta.
The documents did not provide a motive for the killing,
and an attorney for the woman’s son did not immediately
return a message seeking comment.
Police found Mironovas’s
body early Sunday in her Litchfield home.
The Kennebec Journal reported that Mironovas had
moved from Ashland, Mass.,
and her son’s two friends were
also from Ashland.
Documents indicate Mironovas’ son and another 15-yearold boy were charged with
murder. A 13-year-old boy was
charged with conspiracy.
Kevin Sullivan, an attorney
for the 13-year-old, said his cli-
ent was bewildered.
‘‘He was in a house where
someone died and he’s completely distraught because of
it,’’ he said.
Sage Lockhart, who attended cosmetology school with
Mironovas, said her friend had
told her that her son was angry, and had been expelled
from school.
‘‘He was out of control and
had a lot of anger issues,’’ she
said. The teen was resentful of
the move to Maine and wanted
to go back to Massachusetts,
she added.
State prosecutors could
seek to try the boys as adults,
where murder carries a minimum sentence of 25 years. In
JOE PHELAN/KENNEBEC JOURNAL
Police found the body of 47-year-old Kimberly Mironovas
early Sunday in her home in Litchfield, Maine.
the juvenile system, the teens
could be detained only until
they reach the age of 21.
The trio allegedly put the
plan into motion on Saturday
with an idea to crush prescription pills and mix them with
the victim’s wine, the petition
said.
When the crushed medication failed to mix thoroughly,
they opted to strangle and stab
her, the petition said.
The Bangor Daily News reported that Mironovas’s son allegedly stabbed his mother in
the neck with a knife. He and
the other 15-year-old boy allegedly put on gloves before the
attack, the newspaper reported. The woman’s body was
found around 2 a.m., the newspaper reported. Court documents did not disclose who
called police, the report stated.
The Estates on Admiral’s Hill
invites you to a
Taste of Spring
OPEN
HOUSE
H
Thursday, April 26
2 to 5 p.m.
• Foods to Celebrate the Season
• Live Entertainment
• Tours of the Assisted Living
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2017
The Notre Dame des Canadiens Church in Worcester has been closed since 2008.
Last­minute campaign fights
to preserve Worcester church
By Elise Takahama
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
A majestic 89-year-old
church in Worcester may soon
be torn down, but community
members are still not giving up
on their beloved building.
The Notre Dame des Canadiens Roman Catholic Church
has been vacant since 2008,
leaving much of the interior to
slowly deteriorate, said Leslie
Choquette, a history professor
and the director of the French
Institute at Assumption College. Its French-Canadian parish has moved, taking many of
the church’s artifacts with it.
The community was hopeful when the CitySquare II Development Company bought
the property in 2010 from the
Worcester Archdiocese. The
development group had goals
of repurposing the church. Ultimately, however, it decided
on demolition.
“We made our very best effort, at a substantial cost, to
find a reuse for the building,
working with other developers
and various architects, engineers, contractors, and preservation groups to explore numerous renovation and reuse
options — including a hotel,
performing arts venues, residential uses, restaurant and
bar, marketplace, as well as
other facilities of public accommodation,” said a statement
from CitySquare II. “None of
these proved viable, and last
year, after careful consideration, we arrived at the difficult decision” to demolish the
building and sell the land.
Pamela Jonah, a CitySquare
I I s p o ke s w o m a n , s a i d t h e
group will continue, though, to
consider last-minute offers
from serious investors who
want to redevelop the church,
but it’s a long and complicated
process.
“We respect and recognize
the connection that preservationists and former parishioners and residents have to the
church,” Jonah said. “And we
made our best effort to save it.
But it’s more than just the purchase price. It’s having all of
those elements — financial
wherewithal, expertise, marketing plan, and commitment
within a reasonable time
frame.”
The first phase of the process, which began Monday and
is expected to take about six to
eight weeks, will include installation of a fence to safely secure the perimeter, Jonah said.
Preservationists are hoping
for an 11th-hour reprieve.
“We think the battle can still
be won,” said Ted Conna, a
spokesman for Save Notre
Dame Alliance. He said if the
building were repurposed and
integrated with other new development in the city, it could
be “a part of the rising tide that
lifts all boats. This project will
help everyone.”
On Tuesday, the preservation group will offer its alternative vision at a City Council
meeting. Members plan,
among other things, to ask that
the developers hold off on do-
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They’re also requesting that
the developers include the
building in property listings, so
potential buyers worldwide
can know it ’s for sale. T he
group also wants the city to
consider committing public
money to the project, Conna
said.
“We’ve got a great group of
people that were working on
this,” he said, “so it ain’t over
till it’s over.”
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T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
‘It seems like a very dry
and boring statutory question,
but a lot more is at stake.’
SUN AND SHADE
KARI HONG
BC Law School professor
who specializes in immigration law
High court hears
Vineyard man’s
deportation case
uIMMIGRATION
Continued from Page B1
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
A woman in silhouette walked up the steps at Paul Revere Park in Charlestown, having passed a garden of daffodils
that appeared to be straining to reach Monday’s sunshine.
Ex­police payroll head is arraigned
uEZEKIEL
Continued from Page B1
Procopio wrote in an e-mail.
“We found no other thefts or
irregularities.”
After the hearing, she was
escorted to a Jeep Cherokee by
a plainclothes state trooper
and rode off. She is due back in
court June 4.
Quincy District Court records show Ezekiel faced significant financial troubles
shortly before the alleged theft
began in 2016.
In late 2014 and early 2015,
a year before the theft, Ezekiel
was sued three times by three
credit card companies, which
claimed she owed them an estimated $23,000, according to
court records.
In March 2015, Ezekiel was
ordered to pay some $14,000
in one case, and records show
she paid off the entire amount
six months later.
She settled another case for
$2,336 that same month.
In the third case, Ezekiel
agreed to pay $6,500 in 2014,
but it was not clear from court
records whether she has paid
that debt.
The company has not recently tried to recover money
from her, records show.
Before joining the State Police in 2013, Ezekiel worked at
the state Department of Revenue dating back to 1987, records show. Ezekiel, a civilian
supervisor, was paid $95,000 a
year.
Officials at the Department
of Revenue declined to comment Monday.
The State Police investigation into Ezekiel, who last year
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Denise Ezekiel, a former payroll director for the State Police who is alleged to have stolen
nearly $24,000 from the department, stood in court on Monday.
oversaw a payroll of at least
$290 million, overlapped with
probes into alleged pay fraud
by troopers.
Procopio said last week that
Ezekiel’s case had “no connection” to those other cases. He
said investigators audited the
payroll department and have
not discovered missing money
by “anyone else in that unit.”
The agency has been under
fire for several other scandals
— including other payroll
blunders — prompting additional investigations and criticism from lawmakers, some of
whom have called for greater
oversight of the agency.
Although the criminal complaint against Ezekiel was filed
March 6, it was not known
publicly until Wednesday,
when MassLive reported that
her name was on a list of suspended State Police employees.
Ezekiel had applied to receive pension benefits with the
State Retirement Board just
five days before the criminal
complaint was filed, records
show.
Officials at the state retirement board said that unless
someone has been convicted of
a crime related to their employment, retirement benefits
are processed normally.
If there is such a conviction, the board can vote to revoke that person’s pension and
move to recoup any money beyond what the person paid into their pension over the
course of their career.
Travis Andersen of the Globe
staff contributed to this
report. John R. Ellement can
be reached at
ellement@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @JREbosglobe.
Matt Rocheleau can be reached
at matthew.rocheleau@
globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @mrochele.
He did not appear in court
and, records show, “was ordered removed in absentia.”
Pereira argued in court documents that he wasn’t in court
because he never received the
updated notice, saying it was
sent to his physical address in
Oak Bluffs and not his mailing
address. He petitioned to have
his case reopened in March
2013, and the request was
granted.
During the new proceedings, he asked that the deportation order be canceled under
a special provision for immigrants in the country illegally
“who have significant ties to
the country and have US citizen family members who will
experience hardships if they
a r e d e p o r t e d ,” e x p l a i n e d
Rosenbloom, who does not
represent Pereira.
“The idea is, someone who
is facing deportation can ask
for a chance to remain here,
and an immigration judge can
make a discretionary decision
weighing all the factors,” she
said.
But an immigrant needs to
be in the country for 10 years
to be eligible for that discretionary relief. A notice to appear in immigration court
stops the clock on accruing the
necessary time.
“They haven’t let him file
the application yet because of
this issue of whether he has
the required number of years
in the country,” said David
Zimmer, who argued the case
before the Supreme Court on
Pereira’s behalf. “If you’re not
eligible, you can’t even apply.
It’s a big deal.”
Zimmer said Pereira, who is
married and has two US-born
children, was not available
Monday to comment on the
case. He expects a decision in
late June.
According to court documents, Pereira argued that the
clock should have kept ticking
because the notice to appear
didn’t include a time and date.
An immigration judge disagreed, saying “the omission
of a date and time certain from
the notice to appear did not
‘somehow . . . negate the service of the Notice to Appear insofar as it would cut off [petitioner’s] continuous service,’ ”
according to the brief filed on
behalf of Attorney General Jeff
Sessions, who is named as defendant in the suit.
Pereira appealed to the
Board of Immigration Ap-
peals, which upheld the
judge’s decision. The Supreme
Court agreed to hear the case
in September.
“It seems like a very dry
and boring statutory question,
but a lot more is at stake,” said
Kari Hong, a Boston College
Law School professor who specializes in immigration law.
Should the nation’s highest
court side with Pereira, she
said, “it will give protection to
people to make sure they have
an actual time and date for
when they need to show up.”
Andrew “Art” Arthur, a resident fellow in law and policy
at the Center for Immigration
Studies, a nonprofit that advocates for stricter immigration
laws, doesn’t think that’s going
to happen.
“The fact is the plain language of the provision doesn’t
have anything that states the
date of the hearing has to be
part of it,” he said.
And this is an instance, he
said, when federal immigration authorities are entitled to
what’s known as “Chevron deference,” a practice in which
courts give so-called expert
agencies the benefit of the
doubt in decision-making
when laws are ambiguous.
“That should be the end of
the issue,” he said.
But Justice Neil Gorsuch,
who is the newest member of
the bench, is a skeptic of Chevron deference. His decision,
and that of the entire court,
has implications not only for
Pereira and other immigrants
like him, but also could reshape how Congress, federal
courts, and administrative
agencies function, legal experts said.
“People are watching Gorsuch,” Hong said.
O n We d n e s d a y, t h e S u preme Court will also hear arguments on Hawaii’s challenge to President Trump’s
travel ban. The policy under
review applies to travelers
from five countries with overwhelmingly Muslim populations: Iran, Libya, Somalia,
Syria and Yemen.
It also affects two non-Muslim countries, blocking travele rs f ro m No r t h Ko r ea a n d
some Venezuelan government
officials and their families.
Material from the Associated
Press was used in this report.
Akilah Johnson can be reached
at akilah.johnson@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@akjohnson1922.
Rare right whales
draw crowds to
Brant Rock shores
By Laney Ruckstuhl
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Whale-watchers were reflected in parked cars at Brant Rock in Marshfield Monday.
Dozens of right whales feeding off Marshfield since Saturday have attracted onlookers,
who are eager to spot the endangered animals.
The whales showed up near
the Brant Rock area over the
weekend. Crowds have been
gathering on the shore ever
since, Harbormaster Michael
DiMeo said Monday.
“There are quite a few pods
out there,” DiMeo said. “Probably 20 to 30 pods, and you can
see them from land. It’s pretty
neat.”
The rare whales grow to be
45 to 50 feet long and can
weigh up to 55 tons. They are
gray-blue in color and often
h av e w h i t e s p l o t c h e s a n d
bumps on their blubber.
According to the National
Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, there
are less than 400 North Atlantic
right whales left. They face two
main human threats: boat propellers and entanglement in
fishing lines.
DiMeo said the whales were
spotted in the area a couple
years ago, but they don’t always
come to Marshfield.
“It really all depends on the
winds and currents of what
they’re feeding on, which is the
krill,” he said.
The harbormaster and Coast
Guard have been patrolling the
area to ensure that boaters slow
down and go around the
whales, DiMeo said. NOAA sets
mandatory protection zones
where right whales are spotted.
Boaters must stay at least 500
yards away.
Laney Ruckstuhl can be
reached at laney.ruckstuhl
@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @laneyruckstuhl.
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B5
Hefner due for arraignment on misconduct charges
uINVESTIGATION
Continued from Page B1
The criminal indictments
may have added another layer
of complexity to the monthslong investigation
into Rosenberg.
Records reviewed by the
Globe show the
chamber paid Hogan Lovells US in
two installments
Bryon
this month, totalHefner
ing $229,511. The
checks were issued Friday, according to the state comptroller’s office.
But the payments may be a
sign the probe into Rosenberg’s
conduct and whether he broke
chamber rules is nearing an
end. The investigation has
played out behind closed doors
for months, and the Senate’s
Committee on Ethics has given
little indication of its status.
The Senate has said the Hogan Lovells report will be made
public while protecting the
identities of victims and witnesses. And once the firm’s
work is complete, it will be up
to the committee to decide how
to proceed.
In December the Senate ordered the Committee on Ethics
to retain a special investigator
and gave the committee subpoena power. Later that month,
the committee announced it
had retained the firm Hogan
Lovells US LLP, with lawyers
Anthony E. Fuller, Jody L. Newman, and Natashia Tidwell
leading the inquiry.
The Senate, which is exempt
from the state’s public records
law, has refused to release a
copy of its contract with the
firm or detail the payment
structure.
A spokeswoman for Senator
Michael J. Rodrigues, the committee’s chairman, declined to
comment Monday about the
payments and the committee’s
progress.
Fuller did not return a call
seeking comment Monday.
The committee on ethics
could find Rosenberg had done
nothing wrong. Or, if the major-
ity of its members find there
has been a violation of the rules
or other misconduct, they could
recommend disciplinary action. That could include reprimand, censure, temporary or
permanent removal from a position of authority, suspension
with or without pay, or expulsion.
In February, the Globe reported Hefner had access to
Rosenberg’s e-mails, tried to affect the state budget, and involved himself in the workings
of Rosenberg’s office, as well as
in Senate affairs — all after
Rosenberg had promised a
“firewall” between his personal
life and legislative business.
The story cited interviews with
unnamed people who dealt
with Hefner, as well as communications reviewed by the newspaper.
After the story published,
Rodrigues said the alleged conduct in that article was within
the scope of the investigation.
The Hefner saga has loomed
large for senators, and several
have said they look forward to
what they hope will be its conclusion with the release of the
investigative report.
Governor Charlie Baker also
weighed in on the inquiry Monday.
“I certainly think it’s important that this investigation be
finished in some reasonable period of time because the longer
it takes, the more open-ended
questions [it leaves],” he said after an unrelated event. “And
there’s a lot of work to do here
on the legislative side between
now and the end of the session”
on July 31.”
Rosenberg continues to
serve as a senator, and he is
running for reelection to his
seat. Aides say he is separated
from Hefner.
Asked about his husband in
Amherst last week, Rosenberg
declined to comment.
Reach Matt Stout at
matt.stout@globe.com. Follow
him on twitter @mattpstout
Joshua Miller can be reached at
joshua.miller@globe.com.
Nonprofit trains youth to play, and lead
uPLAYWORKS
Continued from Page B1
these programs to other schools
and playgrounds around the
state.
T here’s a waiting list of
schools who want to partner
with Playworks.
During recess, Buyu and
other junior coaches encourage
children to play together. They
lead games of kickball or basketball or reach out to students
who feel left out. When the
youngest among them cry because they don’t get their way,
Buyu tries to teach them about
sharing. “It comes with a lot of
responsibilities,” Buyu said of
her role. “I think the point of
being a junior coach is just to
show the kids that recess is to
h av e f u n a n d n o t t o w o r r y
about anything.”
Buyu leads by example. On a
recent Thursday, it was spirit
week at Neighborhood House
Charter School. Buyu made her
costume herself out of a
stretchy pink shirt and pants.
She wrote her school’s name on
the outfit in marker and declared herself “Super Nia” for
superhero day.
Her superpower? She saved
the world by doing backbends.
Claire Collins, Playworks coach
at the school, said Buyu’s positivity is reflected in everything
she does. Every child says hello
as Buyu walks through the hallways. They all know her name.
She’s in charge of facilitating
fun.
“We talk about what grades
are coming out, what games
they like to play, and who’s going to lead the games,” Collins
said. “Then junior coaches jump
into recess giving high-fives,
helping to lead games, and just
playing with the kids that are
there being good role models,
showing the kids what the recess expectations look like.”
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
10-year-olds Halina Nguyen (left), Sophia Monteiro (center), and Nia Buyu, 10, practiced basketball at Neighborhood House Charter School.
Buyu was also a member of
the Playworks Girls’ Basketball
League, which ran from March
through April school vacation.
On these teams, they don’t keep
score. There are no tryouts.
They scrimmage against other
Playworks teams from other
nearby elementary schools. The
point of this play is to encour-
age participation, especially
among young girls.
The National Alliance for
Sports found that only 59 percent of girls in urban elementary schools from third through
fifth grade participate in at
least one organized sport. In
comparison, an estimated 80
percent of boys in urban ele-
mentary schools participate in
at least one organized sport.
Gay said their teams are
motivating young girls to play
sports. At one of their final
practices, the girls cheered as
they practiced passing and
shooting. They played together
and learned offense and defense. It was cold, but most
didn’t care.
“I enjoy that we’re with all
our friends and it’s people we
know that will support us,” said
fourth-grader Sophia Monteiro,
10, a member of the team and
also a junior coach.
“They help us get better,”
said Adlemy Baez-Molina, 11, a
fifth-grader.
“They don’t discourage you,”
s a id Hali na Ngu yen , 10, a
fourth-grader. “They encourage
you . . . we’re better at stuff than
we thought we were.”
Cristela Guerra can be reached
at cristela.guerra@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@CristelaGuerra.
Gubernatorial hopefuls speak on environmental issues
uDEBATE
Continued from Page B1
percent of the state’s budget to
environmental issues.
“I believe deeply that we
need change and new direction at the state level,” he said.
“I will be your champion on
Beacon Hill.”
The forum was sponsored
by the Environmental League
of Massachusetts and nine
other environmental groups.
Baker was invited to attend
but said he was unavailable,
forum organizers said.
Baker has raised nearly $8
million for his campaign,
while the three Democrats collectively have less than
$200,000 in cash on hand. But
Massie told the crowd not to
worry, noting that Democrats
have won in special elections
from New Jersey to Virginia
over the past year.
“If a Democrat can win in
Alabama, a Democrat can win
in Massachusetts,” said Massie, who has founded environmental groups including the
Global Reporting Initiative
and the Investor Network on
Climate Risk.
Democrats will hold their
political convention in June,
when each of the candidates
has to secure at least 15 percent support from party delegates to appear on the ballot
for the September primary.
The general election is in November.
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Gubernatorial candidates Jay Gonzalez, Bob Massie, and Setti Warren before Monday’s forum on the environment.
Billy Pitman, a spokesman
for Baker, defended the governor’s record.
“[The governor is] proud of
his administration’s record on
nation-leading energy, environmental, and climate
change resiliency reforms including the largest procurement of clean energy in Massachusetts’ history, legislation to
promote energ y efficiency
transparency for home buyers,
and measures that will help
the Commonwealth meet its
greenhouse gas emission reduction targets and remain
the most energy-efficient state
in the nation.”
The Democratic candidates, meanwhile, addressed a
range of topics, from what
they would do to promote renewable energy to how they
would comply with a state law
mandating reductions in
greenhouse gases.
In response to a question
about how to maintain a reliable power supply without
promoting fossil fuels, Warren, an Iraq War veteran who
worked in the Clinton White
House, said he would push the
state to build more offshore
wind power and solar energy.
Gonzalez said he supports
similar proposals, saying he
would finance them by raising
taxes on millionaires and imposing a tax on companies
that produce carbon dioxide.
He also took aim at Baker
for not doing more to address
climate change.
“We have a governor only
talking about this now,” as the
election approaches, he said.
“There’s no sense of urgency. If
I am governor, you can count
on that I will make [climate
change] urgent.”
Massie suggested that the
state should seriously consider
building a barrier in Boston
Harbor to protect the city from
rising sea levels.
Government studies suggest sea levels could climb as
much as 10 feet by the end of
the century.
“We’re gong to have to consider retreating” from some
areas, such as parts of East
Boston and the waterfront in
South Boston, which will become increasingly prone to
flooding in the coming decades, he said.
On improving public transportation, Gonzalez, who also
ser ved as cha irm an o f the
Massachusetts Board of Early
Education and Care, said it
would be a top priority of his
administration and blamed
Baker for “dragging us backwards.”
“We have a governor who is
reducing investments in transportation,” he said. “That’s the
e xac t opposite of what we
should be doing.”
David Abel can be reached at
dabel@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @davabel.
T h e
B6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
ABRIC, Louis P., Jr.
BY CITY AND TOWN
ABINGTON
KELLOWAY, George R. Sr.
REVERE
ACTON
ASSAD, Helen Rose
AMICO, Peter P.
ALLSTON
PARIS, Carol (Whalen)
ABRIC, Louis P., Jr.
ASSAD, Helen Rose
FOX, Norman B.
ANDOVER
JOHNSON, Isabella E. (Vannett)
ZELANDI, Robert “Bert”
ARLINGTON
LEMMO, Joseph F.
PARILLO, Pauline T. (Saulnier)
WOLONGEVICZ, Mary Joanne (Foti)
BEDFORD
PEASE, Lynne (Arden)
BILLERICA
FAY, Marilyn L. (Finegan)
PARILLO, Pauline T. (Saulnier)
BOSTON
ABRIC, Louis P., Jr.
ASSAD, Helen Rose
ROCKLAND
SAUGUS
BARKOSKY, Claire J. (Bosia)
SOMERVILLE
BARKOSKY, Claire J. (Bosia)
BOYLE, Robert M.
PARILLO, Pauline T. (Saulnier)
PARIS, Carol (Whalen)
BROOKLINE
CIVITARESE, Giuseppe
FREMONT-SMITH, Harriet (Bateman)
TREFONIDES, Byron
WOLF, Cyrill (Green)
SOUTH BOSTON
CAMBRIDGE
BOYLE, Robert M.
LEMMO, Joseph F.
PARIS, Carol (Whalen)
SORRENTINO, Edith E.
ZELANDI, Robert “Bert”
CANTON
PARIS, Carol (Whalen)
COLL, Irene J. (Tobin)
STONEHAM
DAVIDSON, Wendi Rose
STOUGHTON
HEFFERNAN, Francis X.
TEWKSBURY
DAVIDSON, Wendi Rose
CARVER
ALONGE, Carmella (Buscemi)
MICELI, James R.
CHELMSFORD
PEASE, Lynne (Arden)
SMITH, Robert T.
CONCORD
AVAKIAN, Rose Esther (Ansourlian)
FRASCELLA, Mary Kottmann McHale
DEDHAM
JOHNSON, Isabella E. (Vannett)
EAST BOSTON
ABRIC, Louis P., Jr.
EASTLACK, Joseph M.
ZELANDI, Robert “Bert”
EVERETT
AMICO, Peter P.
FAY, Marilyn L. (Finegan)
SMITH, Robert T.
FRAMINGHAM
BAER, Stanley Sidney
RUEBUSCH, Patricia I.
GLOUCESTER
SUKEFORTH, Harold Steven
TYNGSBOROUGH
UPTON
FREMONT-SMITH, Harriet (Bateman)
WALPOLE
EASTLACK, Joseph M.
WALTHAM
ALONGE, Carmella (Buscemi)
RUEBUSCH, Patricia I.
SMITH, Robert T.
TREFONIDES, Byron
WATERTOWN
ALONGE, Carmella (Buscemi)
AVAKIAN, Rose Esther (Ansourlian)
FREMONT-SMITH, Harriet (Bateman)
RUEBUSCH, Patricia I.
GROVELAND
BARKOSKY, Claire J. (Bosia)
WEST ROXBURY
HANOVER
WOLONGEVICZ, Mary Joanne (Foti)
JOHNSON, Isabella E. (Vannett)
HOLBROOK
ASSAD, Helen Rose
ASSAD, Helen Rose
RUEBUSCH, Patricia I.
WESTFORD
HOLDEN
HEFFERNAN, Francis X.
SMITH, Robert T.
HUNTINGTON
RICCIARDELLI, Denis
TREFONIDES, Byron
LEXINGTON
FREMONT-SMITH, Harriet (Bateman)
PEASE, Lynne (Arden)
SUKEFORTH, Harold Steven
LYNN
ABRIC, Louis P., Jr.
MALDEN
BARKOSKY, Claire J. (Bosia)
MARTHA’S VINEYARD
GELOTTE, Helen Viera
WESTPORT
WESTWOOD
GELOTTE, Helen Viera
LANDY, Leah R.
TREFONIDES, Byron
WEYMOUTH
ROBERTS, Margaret C. (Creigan)
WILMINGTON
BOLANOS, Cecilia
MEDFORD
BARKOSKY, Claire J. (Bosia)
MICELI, James R.
MEDWAY
RICCIARDELLI, Denis
ABRIC, Louis P., Jr.
MELROSE
KELLOWAY, George R. Sr.
MIDDLEBORO
SUKEFORTH, Harold Steven
MIDDLEBOROUGH
FRASCELLA, Mary Kottmann McHale
MISSION HILL
RUEBUSCH, Patricia I.
NATICK
RICCIARDELLI, Denis
NEEDHAM
JOHNSON, Isabella E. (Vannett)
RICCIARDELLI, Denis
NORTH ANDOVER
DAVIDSON, Wendi Rose
PEMBROKE
HEFFERNAN, Francis X.
WOLONGEVICZ, Mary Joanne (Foti)
PLYMOUTH
BOLANOS, Cecilia
FRASCELLA, Mary Kottmann McHale
RANDOLPH
TROPED, Hyman
READVILLE
JOHNSON, Isabella E. (Vannett)
ASSAD, Helen Rose
WINTHROP
YARMOUTH
FRASCELLA, Mary Kottmann McHale
OUT OF STATE
Air Force Veteran
of Korean Conflict
At 86 years in Revere,
formerly of East Boston &
Winthrop, April 21st,
unexpectedly. Beloved husband of 28
years to Joanne E. (Burnham) Abric &
the late Jean M. (Rossetti) Abric.
Devoted father of Cheryl M. Abric of
Lynn & Louis P. Abric IV of Revere.
Also lovingly survived by Mark A.
Carrillo of East Boston, David R.
Carrillo & wife Michelle of Revere and
Jason P. Carrillo of CT. Cherished
grandfather of Louis P. Abric V of
Revere, Philip L. Abric & wife Dianna
of Boston’s North End, Anthony F.
Pirelli of Revere & the late Shanelle J.
Abric, Nicole M. Carrillo, David “DJ”
Carrillo, Dante P. & Nicholas S., all of
Revere, Alisha M. Carrillo of East
Boston, Cameryn A., Jason P. &
Madison H. Carrillo, all of Winthrop.
Brother of the late Leonard R. Abric.
Louis is also lovingly survived by two
precious great-granddaughters, Olivia
Finnegan & Aalya Carrillo & several
nieces and nephews. Family & friends
are invited to attend visiting hours on
Wednesday, April 25th from 5-7 p.m. in
the Vertuccio & Smith Home for
Funerals, 773 Broadway (Route 107)
REVERE immediately followed by the
Funeral Service in the Funeral Home at
7:15 p.m. Parking available left of the
funeral home. Entombment at
Woodlawn Columbarium, Everett will
be held privately. Air Force veteran of
the Korean Conflict. Retiree of the
Comfort Inn, Suffolk Downs Race Track
& Wonderland Dog Track. In lieu of
flowers, remembrances may be made to
the New England Center & Home for
Veterans, PO Box 845257, Boston, MA
02284-5257. Please visit www.
vertuccioandsmith.com
ALONGE, Carmella
(Buscemi)
Of Waltham, April 20th, 2018. Visiting
Hours in the Brasco & Sons Memorial Funeral Home, 773 Moody St.,
WALTHAM, on Wednesday 4 - 8 pm.
Funeral Mass at Sacred Heart Church
on Thursday at 10:00 a.m. For complete obituary, guestbook & additional
information, please refer to:
www.BrascoFuneralHome.
Waltham 781-893-6260
“Creating Meaningful Memories”
AMICO, Peter P.
CONNECTICUT
MICELI, James R.
Of West Roxbury, April 21, 2018.
Dear and devoted daughter of the
late Edward and Lucille (Hart) Assad.
Loving mother of Joseph S. Assad of
West Roxbury and Michael E. Assad
and his wife Jo Anne of Holbrook. Dear
sister of Stephen A. Assad and his wife
Marguerite Bova of Revere and the
late Robert Assad. Dear sister-in-law
of Renate Assad of Acton. Cherished
grandmother of Amanda. Also survived
by several other loving grandchildren,
nieces and nephews. Funeral Mass
Thursday at 10 a.m. at Immaculate
Conception Church, 133 Beach St.
Revere. Visiting hours Wednesday
4 - 8 p.m. at the Kfoury Keefe Funeral
Home, 8 Spring St. (at the corner of
Centre St.) WEST ROXBURY. Relatives
and friends respectfully invited to attend. In lieu of flowers, contributions in
Helen’s memory may be made to DAV
at www.davma.org/donate-now/ or 617727-2974. Interment will be private.
Guestbook and other information at
www.KfouryFuneral.com.
Kfoury Keefe Funeral Home
West Roxbury 617-325-3600
Greatly Loved
Of Concord, April 22, 2018. Beloved
wife of Avak Avakian. Devoted mother
of Marilyn, Paul and Jeffrey. Loving
sister of the late Lizzy, Danny and Manooshag. Also survived by many loving
nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral
service at Saint Stephen’s Armenian
Church, 38 Elton Avenue, Watertown
on Friday, April 27 at 11:00 a.m. Relatives and friends are kindly invited to
attend. In lieu of flowers, memorial
gifts may be made to Saint Stephen’s
Armenian Church. A visitation period
will be held in church on Friday morning from 10:00 – 11:00, immediately
prior to the Funeral Service. Interment
at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord.
BAER, Stanley Sidney
BAER, Stanley Sidney
NEW HAMPSHIRE
ALONGE, Carmella (Buscemi)
BOYLE, Robert M.
KELLOWAY, George R. Sr.
TREFONIDES, Byron
NEW JERSEY
MICELI, James R.
NEW YORK
BOLANOS, Cecilia
PENNSYLVANIA
TROPED, Hyman
Every life
is a story
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Share theirs in The Boston Globe
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you honor your loved one with a professionally written
narrative about their life and achievements.
For more details and pricing
information, contact Boston Globe
Classifieds at 617-929-1500 or
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Of Everett, formerly of
South Weymouth passed
away at the age of 53 years
old on April 20, 2018. Cherished son of
Angelo and Adele (Ruzzano) Amico.
Beloved husband of Jeanine (Demetrio)
Amico with whom he shared 25 years
of marriage. Loving father of Angela
and Anthony Amico and their beloved
dog Teddie. Dear brother of Stephen
and his wife Dori and Christopher and
his wife Christine Amico, brother-inlaw to Paula and her husband Michael
Peipman, Dollena and her husband
Christopher Bramante and Salvatore
Demetrio and his late wife Kristen.
Caring son-in-law to Florence and
Salvatore Demetrio. Also survived by
many nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles
and cousins. Family and friends will
honor Peter’s life by gathering in Vazza’s
“Beechwood” Funeral Home, 262 Beach
St., REVERE on Thursday, April 26
from 4:00PM to 8:00PM. A Funeral
Service will be held Friday morning at
the East Coast International Church, 65
Monroe St., Lynn at 10:00AM.
Interment will follow at Woodlawn
Cemetery, Everett, MA. Peter was a
graduate of Eastern Nazarene College.
He served in the Army National Guard
for four years and was a credentialed
minister in the Assembly of God
Church. Former Assistant Vice
President for the State Street Bank for
over 30 years. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to St. Jude
Children’s Hospital, 501 St. Jude Pl.,
Memphis, TN 38105. For guestbook
and directions please visit
www.vazzafunerals.com
79, of Wells, formerly of Ogunquit, ME,
died early Sunday morning, April 22,
2018, at York Hospital in York, ME. He
was born in Boston on August 1, 1938,
a son of Nathan and Anna (Shachat)
Baer. He grew up in Brighton, MA, and
earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from
Northeastern University.
Stanley was retired after a long
career at Zayre Corporation in Framingham, where the family lived for nearly
30 years. Stanley moved with his wife
Rita to Ogunquit in 2001, where he
remained active on the local Zoning
Board of Appeals. The couple moved
to Wells in 2017. Stanley, affectionately
named “Papa Baer,” was a beloved
presence in the Ogunquit area. Known
as an avid sports fan and a devoted
business follower, friends and strangers
alike enjoyed chatting with Stan as he
performed various daily errands around
town.
Survivors include his wife of 49
years, Rita Baer of Wells; his son,
Steven Baer of Damariscotta, ME;
his daughter, Robyn Gilmartin of
Bedford, MA; his brother, Melvin Baer
of Topsfield, MA; and his 4 beloved
grandchildren.
A Celebration of Life Gathering will
be held on Wednesday, April 25, 2018
from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Bibber
Memorial Chapel, 111 Chapel Road,
Wells, where words of remembrance
and prayers will be offered at 2:00
p.m., followed by a reception. Should
friends choose, the family encourages
donations in his memory to the charity
of one’s choice.
To share a memory or leave a
message of condolence, please visit
Stanley’s Book of Memories page at
www.bibberfuneral.com. Arrangements
in care of Bibber Memorial Chapel, 111
Chapel Rd., POB 910, Wells, ME 04090.
Affordable Cremation
1310 complete
617 782 1000
$
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
Breslin Funeral Home
(781) 324-0486
www.breslinfuneralhome.com
BOLANOS, Cecilia
Age 71, of Plymouth, formerly of
Valley Stream, Long Island, passed
away peacefully on April 22, 2018,
surrounded by her family. Cecilia was
a devoted mother and grandmother.
Born in Quito, Ecuador, Cecilia moved
to Jackson Heights, New York and then
Valley Stream in 1980. She worked as a
paralegal at the Certilman, Balin, Adler
& Hyman law firm until her retirement
in 2014, when she moved to Plymouth,
Massachusetts to be closer to her
grandchildren. She was a devout NY
Mets fan and loved nature, traveling,
and attending all of her grandchildren’s
events. She was the loving mother of
Christian Bolanos and his wife Jennifer (Caira) of Wilmington, cherished
“Grandma” of Christian, Allison and
Samantha Bolanos all of Wilmington.
Daughter of the late Juan and Olympia
(Villagomez) Bolanos. Dear sister of
Mercedes and Fanny Bolanos, both of
Plymouth and Susana Poholek and her
husband Frank of Rhode Island. Cecilia
is also survived by her niece, Vanessa
Fasanella and nephew, Alexander
Poholek and their families.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
will gather at the Nichols Funeral
Home, Inc., 187 Middlesex Ave. (Rt. 62)
Wilmington, MA on Thursday, April
26th at 9:00 a.m., followed by a Mass
of Christian Burial in St. Thomas of
Villanova Church, 126 Middlesex Ave.,
Wilmington, at 10:00 a.m. Visiting
hours will be held at the Funeral Home
on Wednesday, April 25th, from 4-8
p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations in Cecilia’s memory may be made to the Hope
Hospice, 765 Attucks Lane, Hyannis,
MA 02601.
Nichols Funeral Home
978-771-4992
www.nicholsfuneralhome.com
BOYLE, Robert M.
Robert M. “Bob” Boyle, 77, of Hampton, NH, formerly of Somerville, April
19, 2018. Husband of the late Pauline
(Glynn) Dwyer. Stepfather of Michael
of Hingham, John of Salem and
Shelly Murphy-Dwyer of Revere. Also
survived by two grandchildren, Conor
and Annie Dwyer. Retired lineman and
commercial installer for Verizon with
over 30 years of service. US Air Force
Veteran.
Visiting Hours: Friday, April 27,
2018 from 11 A.M.-1 P.M. at the
Remick & Gendron Funeral HomeCrematory, 811 Lafayette Road, (US RT
1) Hampton, NH. Friends respectfully
invited. In lieu of flowers donations
may be made to the New Hampshire,
S.P.C.A., P.O. Box 196, Stratham, NH
03885.
Please visit
www.RemickGendron.com
to view Bob’s memorial website
Announcements
Vazza Funeral Home
Revere 1-800-252-1127
Funeral Services
Claire J. Barkosky, of Malden, April
19th. Beloved wife of the late Walter R.
Barkosky. Mother of Paul Barkosky of
Malden, Mark Barkosky and his wife
Laura of Groveland and John Barkosky
and his wife Dee Dee Covino of Saugus.
Grandmother of Elaine Barkosky of
Saugus. Sister of Edmund Bosia of
Florida, Joseph Bosia of Tewksbury, and
the late Irene Paicopolos and Robert,
Joseph Jr. and Ernest Bosia. She is also
survived by many nieces and nephews. Claire was raised and educated
in Somerville. She is a graduate of
Somerville High School. She received
her bachelor’s degree from Salem State
College and her master’s degree in
education from Boston State College.
For many years, Claire was a teacher
at the Leonard and Belmont Schools
in Malden. Relatives and friends are
invited to attend her funeral from the
Breslin Funeral Home, 610 Pleasant
St., Malden, on Thursday, April 26th at
8:30 AM followed by a Funeral Mass
celebrated at Immaculate Conception
Church, 600 Pleasant St., Malden, at
10 AM. Services will conclude with
interment in Holy Cross Cemetery in
Malden. Visitation will be held prior
at the funeral home prior to the Mass
on Thursday only. In lieu of flowers,
donations in her memory may be made
to Cerebral Palsy of Massachusetts, 600
Technology Center Dr., Stoughton, MA
02072.
AVAKIAN, Rose Esther
(Ansourlian)
RICCIARDELLI, Denis
MAINE
BARKOSKY, Claire J. (Bosia)
Funeral Services
CIVITARESE, Giuseppe
68 of Brookline, died Saturday, April
21st in Care Dimensions Hospice
House with his loving family at his side.
He is survived by his wife of nearly 30
years, Elizabeth C. Lalos-Civitarese,
his daughter Isabella Emilia Civitarese
of Brookline; his mother, Emilia (Del
Zoppo) Civitarese of Poggiofiorito,
Abruzzo, Italy; his sister, Dr. Maria
Civitarese and her husband, Filippo
Ronchi of Rome; two nieces, Valentina
Ronchi and Francesca Mannelli, his
mother-in-law Froso (Poulias) Lalos of
Worcester and many cousins. A sister,
Theresa Vannucci predeceased him. He
was born in Poggiofiorito, Abruzzo, the
youngest of three children; his father
was the late Amedeo Civitarese. He
was a graduate of Leonardo Da Vinci
Institute of Technology and attended
Rome University. After returning to his
village, he carried on the family tradition of working the vineyards owned
by his family. In the summer of 1985,
a chance encounter on a Rome-bound
plane led to his meeting his future
wife, Elizabeth, and would change his
life forever. He left his native Italy and
immigrated to the U.S. to marry her
three years later. He learned English,
attended evening classes and soon
embarked on a new career as an HVAC
engineer, working at numerous Boston
hotels, most recently at the Fairmont
Copley. The real light of his life and
his pride and joy was his daughter,
Isabella. From the moment she was
born, he devoted himself to her, even
taking a 6-year break from work to stay
home and and help raise her. His most
fervent desire was to see her graduate
from Boston University, where she is
currently a freshman on a pre-med
track. Giuseppe was a true Renaissance
man--as comfortable in the kitchen
cooking up his mouth-watering Italian
specialties, as he was capable of drawing up blueprints and singlehandedly
renovating the apartments he owned.
No project was too daunting. He passionately followed Italian politics and
soccer and was an ardent Ferrari aficionado. He enjoyed traveling throughout
Europe but especially adored exploring
the vineyards of France and Italy. His
funeral is Thursday, April 26th with
a service at 11:00 a.m. in O’Connor
Brothers Funeral Home, 592 Park
Avenue, WORCESTER. Burial will follow in Hope Cemetery. Calling hours
are Wednesday, April 25th from 4:00
until 7:00 p.m. in the funeral home.
Please make memorial contributions to
the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450
Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215.
COLL, Irene J. (Tobin)
Of South Boston, April 22, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Daniel J. Coll. Devoted mother of Debbie Kostner of FL,
Danny Coll and his wife Judy, Denise
Coll and her husband Nick Sampson,
all of South Boston. Loving grandmother of Daniel Coll and his wife
Deirdre, Kerrie Coll, Jackie Hartshorn
and her husband Al, Kimberly Kostner
and Lauren Coll. Sister of Gerry Tobin
and the late Virginia Bizack and Dottie
Kellar. Daughter of the late Justin and
Helen (Moore) Tobin. Also survived by
4 great grandchildren, several nieces
and nephews. Visiting Hours in the
O’Brien Funeral Home 146 Dorchester
Street, SOUTH BOSTON on Tuesday
from 5-7 pm. Funeral Mass in Gate of
Heaven Church, 615 East Fourth Street,
South Boston on Wednesday at 10 am.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend all services. Interment Cedar
Grove Cemetery Dorchester. In lieu of
flowers, donations, in memory of Mrs
Coll, may be made to Seasons Hospice,
20 Burlington Mall Road, Suite 450,
Burlington, MA 01803.
Funeral Services
SWEENEY BROTHERS
HOME FOR
FUNERALS, INC.
One Independence Ave., Quincy
617-472-6344
Serving Quincy & The South Shore
LOCAL UNION 103,
I.B.E.W.
We regret to announce the death
of Brother John E. Maddaleni,
Jr. (Ret). Services were private.
Brother Maddaleni was a member
of the IBEW for 59 years.
Chuck Monahan
Financial Secretary
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B7
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
DAVIDSON, Wendi Rose
Of North Andover, formerly Stoneham and Malden, died April 20, at
age 49. Beloved daughter of Alan
“Al” Balestrier and step-daughter of
Donna Jean (Leach) Balestrier both of
Tewksbury; beloved daughter of the
late Patricia Marie (Bornstein) Fantasia;
devoted mother of Joshua J. Davidson
of Tewksbury, and Bryan B. Davidson
of Danvers; loving sister of David A.
Balestrier of Woburn, and Danny J.
Balestrier of No. Andover, with whom
she resided, and Wendy A. Mahoney
of Nashua, NH; aunt of Riley Bean,
Lilianna Bean, Amanda and Chelsea
Sutherland; she also leaves many
aunts, uncles and cousins, and shared a
special relationship with her aunt Sandi
Holmes of Methuen. Visiting hours
Thursday, April 26, from 4 until 7 p.m.
in the Tewksbury Funeral Home, corner
of 1 Dewey and 975 Main Sts. (Rte. 38)
TEWKSBURY CENTER, Ph. (800 in
MA or 978) 851 2950. Her funeral will
begin Friday at 9 a.m. from the funeral
home, followed by Funeral Mass Friday,
April 27, at 10 a.m. in St. William’s
Church, 1351 Main St. (Rte. 38) Tewksbury. Burial will be private. In lieu of
flowers, memorials to the American
Cancer Society, 30 Speen St, Framingham, MA 01701 will be appreciated.
see: tewksburyfuneralhome.com
EASTLACK, Joseph M.
US Army Veteran
Age 66 years, of Walpole,
April 21,2018. Beloved
husband of Gail M. (Lynch)
Eastlack. Loving father of Casey L.
Eastlack of Walpole. Brother of Mary
Ann Eastlack of Florida. Cherished
uncle of Keith Harmon, Gary Harmon,
Nicholas
Constantino, Jillian & Bryan Walsh,
Gregory Constantino, Melissa Lynch
and Brian Lynch. Great uncle of Kyle
and Kory Harmon, Jonathan and Alicia
Harmon, Kendal Clougher, and Jordan
Walsh. Cousin of the late Ginny Martinez. Stepson Elaine Eastlack and stepbrother of Toni Mendick, both of NJ.
He is also survived by his mother in law
Margaret Lynch of Jamaica Plain, his
in laws: Robert and Kathy Constantino
of Walpole, Billy and Denise Lynch of
Canton, Steven Lynch of Jamaica Plain,
Marc and Peggy Massei of Haverhill,
and the late Kevin Lynch.
Relatives and friends are kindly
invited to attend Joseph’s Life Celebration on Wednesday from 4pm to 8pm
in the James H. Delaney & Son Funeral
Home, 48 Common St., WALPOLE.
A Funeral Service will be held in the
funeral home on Thursday at 10AM.
Interment will be in Terrace Hill Cemetery, Walpole. Memorial donations
may be made to: American Cancer
Society, 20 Speen Street, Framingham,
MA 01701. US Army Veteran.
J. H. Delaney & Son Funeral Home
48 Common St., Walpole
www.delaneyfuneral.com
FRASCELLA, Mary
Kottmann McHale
93, formerly of West Hempstead, Long
Island, NY and Plymouth, MA, April
22, 2018. Beloved wife of the late William P. McHale. Mother of Maureen
Stachowicz Master and her husband
John Jr. of Haddonfield, New Jersey,
William P. McHale Jr. and his wife Ellen
of Concord, MA, Dennis K. McHale and
his wife Barbara of Baldwin, New York,
Timothy F. McHale and his wife Jane
of Brighton, MA, Christine Samolyk
and her husband Brian of Londonderry,
New Hampshire, Brian McHale of Merritt Island, Florida and Kevin McHale
and his wife Wendy of Sugarland, Texas. Grandmother of Meredith, Brendan,
Liam, Erin, Justin, Jonathan, Danny,
Michael, Emily, Katie, Gabe, Brian and
Allie and great grandmother to Lincoln,
Cedric, Olivia, Sophia, Zachary, Trea,
and Juniper. Also survived by one
brother, Gerald Kottmann of Bourne,
MA and many nieces and nephews. She
was also the sister of the late Joan Tagle, Claire Clemente, Eugene Kottmann
and William Kottmann. Visiting hours
Friday, April 27th at the Dee Funeral
Home, 27 Bedford Street, CONCORD,
MA from 5 to 8 p.m. Additional visiting
hours will be held in the Dee Funeral
Home on Saturday morning, April
28th from 9 to 10:30 a.m., followed by
a Funeral Mass in Holy Family Parish,
Monument Square, Concord Center, at
11 a.m. Burial in Holy Rood Cemetery
in Westbury, New York alongside her
husband William, will be held this summer. Contributions in her memory may
be made to Bethany Healthcare, www.
bethanyhealthcare.org. For her obituary and online guestbook, please visit
www.DeeFuneralHome.com.
Dee Funeral Home of Concord
978-369-2030
Caring for families since 1868
FREMONT-SMITH, Harriet
(Bateman)
Of Lexington, MA formerly of
Brookline. Died on April 22, 2018 from
a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease.
Wife of the late Maurice FremontSmith. She is survived by her sons Maurice Fremont-Smith, MD of Exeter, NH,
Peter Fremont-Smith of Whitefish, MT,
Gregory Fremont-Smith of Brookline,
MA and John Xavier Fremont-Smith
of Ellicott City, MD, and her daughters
Guinevere Fremont-Smith of Brookline,
MA, Dixie Fremont-Smith Coskie of
Upton, MA, and Amy Fremont-Smith
of Watertown, MA. She is predeceased
by her sons, Joseph of Hollis, NH.,
and Michael of Arlington, MA. She is
also survived by her 29 grandchildren
and 12 great-grandchildren. A Funeral
Mass will be celebrated in St. Lawrence
Church, 774 Boylston St., Brookline,
MA. on Thursday, April 26th at 10:00
AM. Interment will follow at St.
Joseph Cemetery, West Roxbury, MA,
For directions and online guestbook
www.bellodeafuneralhome.com
FAY, Marilyn L. (Finegan)
GELOTTE, Helen Viera
Of Billerica, formerly of Everett, unexpectedly April 23, Marilyn L. (Finegan)
Fay beloved wife of Donald L. Fay.
Loving mother of Donald Fay Jr. and
his wife Kelly of Billerica, Diana Fay of
Tewksbury and David Fay of S. Dennis.
Sister of Joseph Finegan and Barbara
Forsey of Peabody and Ruth Izzo of
Ohio. Grandmother of Brady and Liam
Fay and Colby Jusczak. Funeral Thursday from the Sweeney Memorial Funeral Home, 66 Concord Rd., BILLERICA
at 8 a.m. A Funeral Mass will be held at
St. Theresa Church at 9 a.m. Relatives
and friends respectfully invited. Visiting
hours will be held Wednesday from
4-7 p.m. Memorial contributions may
be made to the Lupus Foundation, 40
Speen St., Framingham, MA 01701.
Burial in Fox Hill Cemetery, Billerica.
www.sweeneymemorialfh.com
FOX, Norman B.
72, of Revere April 22nd. Dear brother
of Loretta Dietch & her husband
Stephen of Fl. Loving uncle of Joshua &
his wife Magdalena, Daniel & his wife
Dana, Jared & his wife Spirit & great
uncle of Benjamin, Judah, Jacob, Maxmillian, Zev & Oz Dietch. Services at
the Torf Funeral Chapel, 151 Washington Ave., Chelsea on Tuesday (Today)
April 24th at 1:30PM. Interment in
B’Nai Israel of Beachmont Cemetery,
Everett. For guest book & directions
www.torffuneralservice.com
HEFFERNAN, Francis X.
LEMMO, Joseph F.
Of Stoughton, age 90, April
21, Permanent Deacon,
Immaculate Conception
Church, Stoughton. Husband of the
late Lorraine (Wynott). Father of
Sharon Lavoie and her husband Paul of
Holden, Brian Heffernan and his wife
Marci of Pembroke and the late Francis
X. Heffernan, Jr. Grandfather of Emily
Plante and her husband Nicholas of
Holden, Dr. David Lavoie and his wife
Dr. Mary Lavoie of Scarborough, ME
and Patrick, Luke and Caroline Heffernan all of Pembroke. Great-grandfather
of Renee and Pierce Rettig and Cecilia
and Rose Lavoie. Also survived by his
special friend and prayer partner Carol
Anne Romanelli of Stoughton and
dear friend Donald Howard Platt of
Kirkland, WA.
Funeral will be held from the Immaculate Conception Church, 122 Canton St., Stoughton on Thursday, April
26 at 11 AM. Visiting Hours Wednesday from 4-7 PM at the Immaculate
Conception Church. Interment will
take place at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery,
Stoughton. In lieu of flowers, donations in Fran’s memory may be made to
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, PO Box
849168, Boston, MA 02284 or MakeA-Wish, 1 Bulfinch Place, 2nd Floor,
Boston, MA 02114. Directions and
obituary at www.farleyfh.com.
Of Arlington, April 21.
Beloved son of the late Carmelo and Sarah (Valentino)
Lemmo. Devoted brother of Charles
J. Lemmo. Funeral from the DeVito
Funeral Home, 1145 Mass Avenue,
ARLINGTON, Thursday morning at
9, followed by a Funeral Mass a 10
in St. Camillus Church. Interment to
follow Mt. Auburn Cemetery. Visiting
hours at the DeVito Funeral Home on
Wednesday 3 to 7pm. Joseph served
in the United States Army Air Corps
during WWII with the Anti-Submarine
Campaign. To send a condolence or for
directions visit,devitofuneralhomes.com
JOHNSON, Isabella E.
(Vannett)
Share a memory
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries
Democratic State
Representative
Late of Westwood, died peacefully in
her sleep at her home on Monday, April
23, 2018. She was the wife of the late
Herbert H. Landy and is survived by
her children, Susan Raskin Abrams,
Roberta Feldman, Stephen Raskin,
Betsy Magnuson and Meryl Landy, her
grandchildren Michaele and JoAnna
Magnuson, sons-in-law, Jeffrey Feldman, Ken Magnuson, and the late Philip Abrams and daughter-in-law Maggie
Raskin. She was the loving daughter of
Fannie and Harry Williams and sister
of Dorothy Prager and the late Isaac
Prager, Robert and Laura Williams,
and the late Rosalind and Julius Shack.
She is also survived by many loving
nieces and nephews. Services will be
held at the Stanetsky Memorial Chapel,
475 Washington Street, CANTON, MA
on Thursday, April 26 at 10:00 AM
followed by burial in Sharon Memorial
Park. Shiva will be held at the home of
Betsy and Ken Magnuson on Thursday
following burial until 8pm and Friday,
April 27th from 12:00 to 7:00 pm. In
lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy
in her memory may be donated to Good
Shepherd Community Care Hospice, 90
Wells Avenue, Newton, MA 02459.
Passed away peacefully on April 21,
2018.
A man of unerring moral principles,
consummate integrity and deep devotion to his constituents and, above all,
his family, State Representative James
R. Miceli was the second-longest serving member of the Massachusetts Legislature. He continuously represented the
towns of Wilmington and Tewksbury
since his 1977 election to the House
of Representatives, and he was a passionate and tenacious advocate for his
constituents and the causes he held
dear. During his 21st term, he was
Vice Chair of the House Committee on
Global Warming and Climate Change
and served on the Joint Committee on
Ways and Means, the Joint Committee
on Tourism, Arts and Cultural Development, the House Committee on Personnel and Administration, and the House
Committee on Ways and Means.
Rep. Miceli grew up in Boston’s
North End and graduated from Boston
English High School in 1953. He
earned a bachelor’s degree in business from Northeastern University in
1958 and met his beloved wife, Jean
Mattson, while both were students at
Northeastern. They were married on
August 9, 1958, in Rockport, Massachusetts, and moved to Wilmington in
1961. Rep. Miceli began his career in
the insurance industry at State Mutual
Insurance Company in 1958, moving
to Liberty Mutual Insurance Company
a year later. In 1972, he joined the
Walter G. Leavitt Agency in Stoneham
and opened his agency in Wilmington
in 1975. Rep. Miceli retired from his
insurance business in 2000 and focused
on his work in the legislature for the
next nearly two decades.
Rep. Miceli’s political career commenced in 1963 with his appointment
to the Wilmington Planning Board. He
was elected to the Board of Selectmen
in 1966, and he served four terms, two
as Chairman, until 1978. His first term
in the House of Representatives began
in late 1977.
Known for the legendary work
ethic that drove his above-and-beyond
effort for all he served, Rep. Miceli was
kind, compassionate and exceptionally thoughtful in the many ways
that he helped people throughout his
life. Above all, he was dedicated to
his family, and he took great pride in
the accomplishments of his children,
Hope, James Jr. and Christina, and his
cherished grandchildren, Andrew Jr.,
James III, Katherine, Q Jane, Alexander
and Christopher.
Rep. Miceli is the son of the late
Vincenzo and Louise Miceli and
brother of the late Josephine McCoy.
He is survived by his loving wife, Jean;
daughter and son-in-law Hope and
Andrew Spalla of Trumbull, Connecticut; son and daughter-in-law James
Jr. and Joanne Miceli of Sparta, New
Jersey; and daughter and son-in-law
Christina Miceli and Sanford Arbogast
of Tewksbury. He is also survived by
his grandchildren Andrew Spalla Jr.
of Bridgeport, Connecticut; Katherine
Spalla of Astoria, New York; James III
and his wife, Shanna, Miceli of Arlington, Virginia; Q Jane and her husband,
Alexander, Carleton of Fort Lupton,
Colorado; and Alexander Arbogast and
Christopher Arbogast of Tewksbury.
Rep. Miceli is also survived by many
nieces and nephews.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
will gather for Visiting Hours at the
Nichols Funeral Home, 187 Middlesex
Avenue (Route 62), WILMINGTON,
MA, on Thursday, April 26th from
1:00-5:00 p.m. and 6:00-9:00 p.m. A
Mass of Christian Burial will take place
on Friday, April 27th at 10:30 a.m. in
St. Thomas of Villanova Church, 126
Middlesex Avenue, Wilmington, MA.
Interment will follow in Wildwood
Cemetery, Wilmington, MA.
In lieu of flowers, donations in
Representative Miceli’s memory may be
made to the Development Office Tufts
Medical Center, 800 Washington Street,
#231, Boston, MA 02111 or to the Lahey Hospital & Medical Center, 41 Mall
Road, Burlington, MA 01805.
Stanetsky Memorial Chapel
www.stanetskycanton.com
781-821-4600
Nichols Funeral Home
978-658-4744
www.nicholsfuneralhome.com
Of Dedham formerly of Andover, April
22, 2018. Beloved wife of the late
Thomas P. Johnson for 64 years. Devoted mother of Scott Johnson and his
wife Mary Ellen of CT and Beth Bryte
and her husband Butch of Dedham.
Also survived by 7 grandchildren and 7
great-grandchildren. Visiting hours at
the George F. Doherty & Sons WilsonCannon Funeral Home, 456 High St.,
DEDHAM, Wednesday, April 25 from
3-7 p.m. Funeral from the funeral home
Thursday, April 26 at 9 a.m. followed
by a Funeral Mass in St. Mary’s Church,
Dedham at 10 a.m. Relatives and
friends kindly invited. Interment in St.
Joseph’s Cemetery, West Roxbury. Expressions of sympathy may be made in
Isabella’s memory to American Pennies
for Hunger, P.O. Box 6272, Plymouth,
MA 02360. Online guestbook and directions at gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
KELLOWAY, George R. Sr.
Of Epsom, NH, formerly of
Melrose, April 20, 2018, at
age 90. Beloved husband of
the late Gladys B. (Stone) Kelloway with
whom he shared 63 years of marriage.
Devoted father of Ron “Blue” Kelloway
& his wife Ruth of Exeter, NH, Laura
P. Kelloway & her companion Jack
McLaughlin of Abington, and David S.
Kelloway, Sr. & his wife Mary of Epsom,
NH. Dear brother of Gertrude Alley of
Melrose, and the late Ralph, Ernest,
Alva, Matthew, Mildred, Mary, William
and Walter. Also survived by 11 grandchildren, several great-grandchildren,
and many nieces & nephews. Relatives
& friends are invited to gather in honor
of George’s life for a Graveside Service
at Wyoming Cemetery, 205 Sylvan
St., Melrose, on Thursday, April 26
at 10am. Military honors will be presented by the US Navy. Gifts in George’s
memory to Concord Regional VNA, 30
Pillsbury St., Concord, NH 03301 or the
American Legion Post #112, 1044 Short
Falls Rd., Epsom, NH 03234. For online
tribute, see RobinsonFuneralHome.com
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose (781) 665-1900
Helen Viera Gelotte passed away
Sunday evening, April 15th, at the
Fisher Home in Amherst, Ma. She was
86. She leaves her two sons, Mark of
Hatfield Ma, and Matthew of Wellesley
Ma., daughter in-law Elizabeth Gelotte
and son in-law John Peters, Grandchildren, Elizabeth, Anna, Nicholas and
Leigh and dear cousin Marian Parsons
of Bourne Ma. as well as nieces, nephews, and other extended family. She
was preceded in death by her husband
Robert Gelotte, her father and mother,
Manual and Sarah (Aruda) Viera, her
sister Mary Delores, and her dearest
daughter Sarah Peters. A funeral service
will be held at the Hatfield Congregational Church, 41 Main St, Hatfield at
11:00 am on Saturday, April 28, with
a reception afterwards in the church
hall. A memorial gathering will be held
on Martha’s Vineyard in the Spring, at
a time to be determined. Burial will be
private.
MICELI, James R.
LANDY, Leah R.
PARILLO, Pauline T.
(Saulnier)
Of Somerville, April 21. Beloved wife
of Joseph Parillo. Devoted mother of
Paula Sheehan and her husband Robert
of Somerville. Loving grandmother
of Angela Sheehan and her husband
Josiah Coleman of Arlington, Stephanie
Sheehan of Somerville and her fiance,
Robert Gibson, and Courtney Iovanni
and her husband Jonathan of Somerville. Dear sister of Maurice Saulnier of
Billerica, and the late Richard Saulnier,
Bertha Flynn, Catherine Marchetti,
Henry Saulnier, Margaret Warren,
Harvey Saulnier, Barbara Davis, Donald
and Paul Saulnier, and Shirley Acord.
Survived by her beloved dog Cody.
Funeral from the Dello Russo Funeral
Home, 306 Main St., MEDFORD Thursday at 9 AM followed by a Funeral Mass
celebrated in St. Clement Church, 71
Warner St., Medford, at 10 AM. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited
to attend. Services will conclude with
burial at Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett.
Visiting hours Wednesday 4-8 PM. In
lieu of flowers, contributions may be
sent in Pauline’s name to the National
Kidney Foundation New England Chapter: 209 West Central St., Suite 220,
Natick, MA 01760 or www.kidney.org.
To leave a message of condolence visit
www.dellorusso.net.
Dello Russo Family Funeral Homes
Medford-Woburn-Wilmington
PARIS, Carol (Whalen)
In Jacksonville FL, formerly of Cambridge, Somerville and Allston entered
into rest on April 12, 2018 after a long
illness. Adored wife of Donald Paris.
Loving mother to Julie Whalen of Canton and Jimbo Whalen of Jacksonville
FL. Dear daughter of the late Daisy
and Harold Arenburg. Loving sister of
Shirley Cassesso and her husband Bobby, Bruce Arenburg and his companion
Rose, Robert Arenburg and the late
Barbara Kohl. Cherished grandmother
to Brady Gibbons. She also leaves
several nieces, nephews and many
dear friends. Carol was an inspiration
to everyone whose lives she touched.
Visiting Hours in the Lehman Reen &
McNamara Funeral Home 63 Chestnut
Hill Ave. (nr. Brighton Courthouse)
BRIGHTON Saturday April 28th from
2-4 pm. Relatives and friends are
kindly invited to attend. Interment
Private. Expressions of sympathy in
Carol’s memory may be made to Haven
Hospice Care Center 745 Blanding
Blvd Orange Park FL 32065. For
directions and guest book please visit
www.lehmanreen.com
Lehman Reen McNamara
617 782 1000 Brighton
PEASE, Lynne (Arden)
Of Chelmsford, April 18. Lynne is
survived by her husband, Robert Pease;
children, Gregory Pease and Emily
Pease and Emily’s wife, Maryanne;
brother John Arden and his wife
Sharon; nephews, Jamie Trinidade and
his wife Tracey, Christian Trinidade and
his partner Kathy Slowe, and Jonathon
Arden and his wife, Melanie; her nephews’ children; Goddaughter, Shaelyn
Lavalle; and many first cousins and
their children and grandchildren.
A memorial service will be held
on Saturday, May 5, 11:00 am, at the
First Church of Christ, Congregational,
25 The Great Road, Bedford, Massachusetts 01730. Donations in lieu of
flowers may be made to the attention
of Cancer Centers at Lahey Hospital,
Philanthropy Office, 41 Mall Rd., Burlington, MA 01805 or Massachusetts
General Hospital, Development Center,
125 Nashua St., Suite 540, Boston, MA
02114. For obituary visit
www.bedfordfuneralhome.com
Honor your loved
one’s memory
with a photo in
The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director for details.
RICCIARDELLI, Denis
86, of South Natick, passed away
suddenly, on April 20, 2018 at home.
Denis is survived by his loving wife,
Diane (Goddard) Ricciardelli of South
Natick, his three children Douglas
Ricciardelli and wife his Joanne of
South Windsor, CT; Denise Legee and
her husband Gary of Medway, MA; and
Dana Christensen and her husband
Randy of Huntington, MA. Brother
of Carol Branstiter and her husband
Will of Anchorage, AK and the late
Gloria Santini and her husband Midge.
Grandfather of Heather Ricciardelli of
Windsor Locks, CT; Brian Ricciardelli
of South Windsor, CT; Stephen Legee
of Plainville, MA; and Jennifer Legee of
Wethersfield, CT. A Private Celebration
of Life service will be held. In lieu of
flowers, memorial donations may be
made to Shriner’s Hospital for Children
at shrinershositalsforchildren.org.
Denis was a 1950 graduate of Needham
High School, where he was a standout
pitcher for the baseball team. A US
Army Korean War Veteran. A general
contractor, he was owner of Elden
Builders. Denis was a former member
of the Needham Golf Club, Sandy Burr
Country Club and the Village Club in
Needham. He had a passion for sports
and loved his family and took great
pleasure in spending time with and
supporting their endeavors. For full obit
or to share a memory of Denis, please
visit www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton Funeral Home
781-444-0201
ROBERTS, Margaret C.
(Creigan)
Of Weymouth, passed away April 20,
2018. Margaret was born in Glasgow,
Scotland to the late Edward and Mary
Creigan. Margaret was trained in Nursing in Scotland in 1964, moving to the
USA to work as an RN at Beth Israel
Deaconess Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. In the mid 1980s, she went
back to school, earning a Bachelors
and later a Masters in Education at The
University of Massachusetts, Boston,
where she also worked as an administrator. Margaret enjoyed an array of
things from classical music, crocheting
and history to her ardent interest in
sports. Beloved mother of Diana Roberts of NY, Stephen Roberts of Hingham, Graham Roberts of Weymouth,
and Mark Roberts of Boston. Margaret
is also survived by 3 grandchildren.
Services will be private.
RUEBUSCH, Patricia I.
Of Framingham, formerly of Watertown. April 22, 2018. Beloved wife
of Leo F. Ruebusch of Framingham.
Mother of Karen L. Stewart and her
husband, Richard, of Framingham.
Grandmother ‘Mimi’ of Samantha
L. Stewart. Sister of the late William
Hauswirth. Dear cousin of Ellen Egan
of Plymouth. Family and friends will
honor and remember Patricia’s life by
gathering for calling hours in The Joyce
Funeral Home, 245 Main Street (Rte.
20), Waltham on Wednesday, April
25th from 3 to 7 p.m. and again at
8:45 a.m. on Thursday morning before
leaving in procession to The Basilica
and Shrine of Our Lady of Perpetual
Help (Mission Church), 1545 Tremont
St., Boston where her Funeral Mass
will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Burial
will follow in Ridgelawn Cemetery,
Watertown. For complete obituary,
guestbook and directions please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
SMITH, Robert T.
Of Tyngsborough, formerly
of Waltham and Westford.
April 22, 2018. Husband
of Mary Ada (Hardy) Smith. Father of
Kathleen A. Smith (William Paquete)
and Brian J. Smith; grandfather of
Lucas Laroche; brother of Paul Smith
(Jean) of Everett, Harriett Smith of
CA and the late Carolyn Taylor; also
survived by nieces & nephews. Family
and friends will honor and remember
Bob’s life by gathering for calling hours
in The Joyce Funeral Home, 245 Main
Street (Rte. 20), Waltham on Thursday,
April 26th from 4 to 7 p.m. and again
at 9 a.m. on Friday morning before
leaving in procession to Saint Mary’s
Church, 133 School Street, Waltham
where his Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Burial with military
honors will follow in Calvary Cemetery,
Waltham. Memorials in his name may
be made to the Alzheimer’s Association,
309 Waverley Oaks Road, Waltham,
MA 02452. For complete obituary,
guest register and directions please visit
www.joycefuneralhome.com
T h e
B8
B o s t o n
Remembered
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
Obituaries
SHARE MEMORIES AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
‘We concocted something that was totally contrarian.’
RICHARD JENRETTE, in his 1997 memoir
SORRENTINO, Edith E.
A lifelong Cambridge resident and
beloved member of her neighborhood,
passed away on April 21. Beloved
daughter of the late Nicola and Philomena (Marino) Sorrentino. Dear sister
of the late Mary, Peter, Domenic, Antoinetta (Rita) Lentini, Rose Sette, Jean
Presho, Louise Sette, Alice Bertolami,
Mildred (Millie) DiNatale, Dorothy
(Lena), Philomena (Phyllis) Ferullo.
Also survived by many loving nieces,
nephews and friends. Funeral from The
DeVito Funeral Home, 761 Mt. Auburn
St., WATERTOWN Thursday morning
at 9 followed by a Funeral Mass at
10 in St. Mary Church, 132 Norfolk
St., Cambridge. Interment to follow
Mt. Auburn Cemetery. Visiting hours
Wednesday 4 to 8pm. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Edith’s
memory to: donate.mountauburn
hospital.org.caregroupparmenter
SUKEFORTH, Harold Steven
Richard Jenrette, founder of first Wall Street firm to go public
By Robert D. Hershey Jr.
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Richard H.
Jenrette, who was a founder of
the first Wall Street firm to offer
shares to the public and who,
after selling it to the giant but
ailing Equitable Life Assurance
Society, presided as chief executive over the company’s revival,
died Friday in Charleston, S.C.
He was 89.
His death, at Roper House,
one of many historical homes
he restored in a parallel avocational career, was confirmed by
Margize Howell, a president of
Classical American Homes
Preservation Trust, which Mr.
Jenrette founded. She said the
cause was complications of
lymphoma.
A courtly, soft-spoken North
Carolina native whom The New
York Times once called the “last
gentleman on Wall Street,” Mr.
Jenrette (pronounced JENreht) enjoyed storybook business success beginning in 1960.
That year, after an early stint
at the venerable Wall Street
firm Brown Brothers Harriman, he teamed up with two
younger Harvard Business
School friends, William H. Donaldson and Dan Lufkin, to form
Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette,
the first Wall Street securities
firm started from scratch since
the early 1930s.
By Mr. Jenrette’s account, it
was Lufkin who first observed
that Wall Street research operations of the day were concentrated on big blue-chip companies. Lufkin proposed that DLJ,
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
TROPED, Hyman
Harold Steven Sukeforth,
79, of Gloucester, MA, died
peacefully at his Nashua,
NH home on Saturday, April 21, 2018.
He was born in Middleboro, MA on
August 7, 1938, son of the late Earle
and Ruth (Moorhouse) Sukeforth. He
was a resident of Lexington, MA, where
he and his wife, Paula, raised their
family and made their home until 2012.
He graduated from Lawrence Academy
in Groton, MA in 1957 and received a
Bachelor of Science degree in Business
Administration from Northeastern
University in 1963. He served in the
United States Army from 1958 to 1963.
He was employed as a sales manager at
Webtex Company, becoming Director of
Sales for their Northeast Region.
Harold is survived by his beloved
wife, Paula C. (Stevens) Sukeforth, and
his loving sister, Ann B. Groome, and
her husband Richard “Dick” Groome
of Ogdensburg, NY. He was the loving father of Lisa Donegan and her
husband John “Jay” Donegan of Great
Falls, VA; Paul Sukeforth of Biddeford,
ME; Leslie Johnson and her husband
Keven Johnson, of Gardner; Carl
Sukeforth and his wife Anne-Laure
Grillot of Milton; Catherine Bellino and
her husband Mark Bellino of Woburn;
Ann McDonough and her husband
Leo McAuliffe of Westford. Harold, affectionately known as “Bubby”, was the
adoring grandfather of 17 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren: John,
Catherine, Claire, Sarah and Hannah
Donegan; Benjamin Sukeforth and his
wife Alexandria (Lee) Sukeforth; Daniel
Johnson and his wife Aili (Ruuska)
Johnson, Paul Johnson and his wife
Colleen (Biggins) Johnson, and Catherine Johnson; Loic Sukeforth; Peter
and Grace Bellino; Thomas, Ryan, and
Connor McDonough; Alexis and Kaitlin
McAuliffe; and his great grandchildren:
Liam, Isla, and Genevieve Johnson.
Bubby had a wonderful sense of
humor, a wry smile and especially loved
kidding his children and grandchildren.
He was an incredible cook, famous for
his Boston Baked Beans. He was an
avid reader and a diehard Patriots fan.
Respected and loved by his family and
everyone who knew him, Bubby will be
sorely missed.
Harold’s wake will be held at the
Douglass Funeral Home, 51 Worthen
Road, Lexington, on Wednesday, April
25, from 5 to 8 pm. The immediate
family will have a private burial service
at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge. Memorial contributions in lieu
of flowers may be made to Merrimack
Valley Hospice Care, 360 Merrimack
Street Bldg. 9, Lawrence, MA 01843.
Age 93, of Randolph, MA
and most recently of
Haverford, PA, on Sunday,
April 22, 2018. Predeceased by his soul
mate and wife of 46 years Hilda and
survived by Patti and Ron Levy, Barbie
Troped, Mike and Jen Troped and his
grandchildren both human and
otherwise Ty, Sarah, Manny, Navi and
Tari. Graveside services Wednesday,
April 25 at 1 p.m. Lindwood Memorial
Park, Randolph. Contributions in his
name can be made to his friends at
WCRB, listener supported classical
radio. Proud WWII veteran, former
attorney turned retail meat merchant,
lifelong Red Sox fan, and loving
husband, father, grandfather, brother
and uncle. Rest in peace.
WOLF, Cyrill (Green)
Of Brookline, at age 85, on April 23,
2018. She was dearly loved by her late
husband Merton Wolf, by her children
Jeffrey (Valerie Kiviat) Wolf, Paul Wolf,
Donna (Daniel) Behr, and by her sisterin-law Brenda Green. Predeceased by
her parents, Nathan and Edith (Yorra)
Green, her brother Edward Green,
and many, many friends and relatives.
Cherished grandmother to Elissa (Josh)
Strauss, Jason Wolf, Greg Wolf, Philip
Wolf, Leslie Wolf, Aaron Behr, and Alexander Behr. Dear great-grandmother of
Kaia and Emmett Strauss also survived
by many loving (great-grand and grand)
nieces and nephews and cousins. Cyrill
was a former kindergarten and first
grade teacher at the Edith C. Baker
School, having retired in 1995, and
thereafter serving for many years as
a volunteer reading specialist at the
Orenberger School in Boston. The
family expresses its deep appreciation to everyone at the Dana Farber
Thoracic/Pulmonary Oncology practice
for their wonderful support, treatment
and care-giving; and more recently to
the staff at Hebrew Rehabilitation and
Hebrew Senior Life. Services at Temple
Emanuel, 385 Ward St., Newton on
Wednesday,April 25 ,2018 at 10:00am.
Following the interment at Lindwood
Memorial Park a memorial observance
will be at the home of Donna and Daniel Behr until 9 pm. Thursday April 26
(1-4 and 7-9) and Friday April 27 from
1-4 PM. In lieu of flowers, remembrances in Cyrill’s memory may be made to
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, P.O. Box
849168, Boston, MA 02284 or Planned
Parenthood, 1055 Commonwealth Ave,
Boston, MA 02215
Lexington 781-862-1800
www.douglassfh.com
TREFONIDES, Byron, Sr.
Of Westport, formerly of Waltham.
April 19, 2018. Husband of Marguerite M. (Governor) Trefonides. Father
of Byron Trefonides, Jr. (Eileen) of
Londonderry, NH and Donna T. MacClary (Robert) of Westwood. Grandfather of Jeslyn Monaghan (Richard),
Nicholas and Stephanie Trefonides;
great-grandfather of Freya Monaghan;
brother of Steven Trefonides (Phyllis)
of Brookline; also survived by nieces
& nephews. Family and friends will
honor and remember Byron’s life by
gathering for calling hours in The Joyce
Funeral Home, 245 Main Street (Rte.
20), WALTHAM, on Wednesday, April
25th from 4:00 – 6:00 pm. Burial is
private. Memorials in his name may
be made to Judge Baker’s Center,
53 Parker Hill Avenue, Boston, MA
02120-3225. For complete obituary,
guest register & directions, please visit:
www.joycefuneralhome.com
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
WOLONGEVICZ, Mary
Joanne (Foti)
Passed away peacefully in her sleep
on Friday, April 20, 2018 at the age of
78. She was the daughter of the late
Gaetano “Guy” Foti and Josephine
(Bonanno) Foti. Mary was born on
April 16, 1940 and raised in the South
End of Boston and Dorchester. Beloved
wife of nearly 50 years to the late John
J. Wolongevicz. Together they lived and
raised their family in Hanover since
1965. Mary is survived by her five loving sons: John J. Wolongevicz and his
wife Deborah Amirault of Pembroke,
MA, Stephen Wolongevicz of Rockland,
MA, Michael Wolongevicz and his wife
Rebecca of Hanover, MA, Matthew and
Mark Wolongevicz, both of Hanover,
MA.
Mary will be fondly remembered
by her six grandchildren, Emily, Joey,
Caroline, Will, Katie and Michael.
Mary will also be remembered by her
extensive extended family; her in-laws,
Louise and the late James Brandon,
Dolores Wolongevicz, the late Rev.
Robert Wolongevicz, William and Betty
Wolongevicz, James and Patricia Wolongevicz. She had many cousins, nieces
and nephews and was the Godmother
to Edward White. She enjoyed every
holiday entertaining John and Dottie
Manos of Easton, MA and James Manos of Stoughton, MA. Mary was very
much a lover of animals and wildlife
and looked at her children’s pets as her
grandchildren as well.
Mary graduated from Dorchester
High School Class of 1957. She graduated from the Wilfred Beauty Academy
and became a hairdresser until she
started a family. She loved cooking,
playing cards and Bingo, fishing and
wildlife, time with her grandchildren
and boys, as well as, spending each
summer with her family and friends at
Point Sebago in Maine.
Visiting hours in the Sullivan Funeral Home, 551 Washington St, Rte 53
in HANOVER on Wednesday from 4-7
PM. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated
on Thursday at 9 AM at St. Mary of the
Sacred Heart Church, 392 Hanover St.,
Rte 139 in Hanover. Burial will follow
at Hanover Center Cemetery.
For directions and to sign Mary’s
online guest book, please visit
www.SullivanFuneralHomes.com
ZELANDI, Robert “Bert”
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and
on Boston.com,
contact your funeral director,
visit boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
To submit an obituary for
editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail to
obits@globe.com, or
information by fax to
617.929.3186. If you need
further assistance about
a news obituary, please
call 617.929.3400.
To access death notices and
obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
Devoted to Family
Of Stoneham, formerly of Beachmont
Revere on April 22, 2018. Beloved
husband of Marie (Brazzo) Zelandi. Devoted father of Robert Edward Zelandi
II and wife Michelle A Pezzulo. Dear
brother of Carlo Zelandi of Woburn and
the late Richard Zelandi. Cherished
grandfather of Robert Edward III,
Amedeo, Angelo, Domenic, Ashleigh,
Giavanna, and Francesca. Also survived by loving nieces, nephews and
friends. Bert enjoyed spending his free
time with his grandchildren and his
true passions were chess and fishing.
Funeral from the Paul Buonfiglio &
sons-Bruno Funeral Home 128 Revere
St, Revere on Thursday April 26,
2018 at 10:00am. Funeral Mass at St
Anthony’s Church at 11:00am. Relatives and friends are kindly invited. A
visitation will be held on Wednesday
from 4:00pm to 8:00pm. Interment
Woodlawn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to Care
Dimensions, 75 Sylvan St, Suite B-102,
Danvers, MA 01923. For guest book
please visit www.Buonfiglio.com
Paul Buonfiglio & Sons-Bruno
Funeral Home
NEW YORK TIMES/FILE 1990
Mr. Jenrette also bought
and restored historic
American homes.
as their firm would be known,
focus on small, fast-growing
companies, which the partners
came to see as the wave of the
future. For his part, Mr. Jenrette believed that while big
companies were quite profitable, their stocks had become
so expensive as to suggest limited further gains.
“We concocted something
that was totally contrarian,” he
recounted in his 1997 memoir,
“Jenrette: The Contrarian Manager.”
DLJ made its precedent-setting public stock offering in early 1970, and the considerable
profits it reaped likely contributed to the demise, about five
years later, of fixed commissions, pressure for which was
already building.
Many securities firms followed with public offerings of
their own, giving rise to criticism that publicly owned firms
took on more risk than they
would have had they remained
private partnerships.
When Donaldson and
Lufkin left the firm, Mr. Jenrette became chief executive
and, after surviving a severe
downturn in 1974, restored
high profitability and sold DLJ
to Equitable Life for $440 million, twice its book value, in
1985. Like his houses, Mr. Jenrette said, “I considered DLJ a
restoration job.”
Mr. Jenrette was induced to
join Equitable as vice chairman
and as president and chief executive of Equitable Investment
Corp., the holding company for
Equitable’s investment-oriented subsidiaries, including the
DLJ brokerage firm and its Real
Estate Group. The investment
corporation thrived, and in
1987 Mr. Jenrette was named
chairman of Equitable. He retired in 1996.
Mr. Jenrette was also building a far-ranging reputation involving what he called his hobby: buying and restoring historic American homes, more than
a dozen of which he lavishly
decorated and furnished with
period antiques.
“I’m probably better known
for old houses and antiques
than for Wall Street,” Mr. Jenrette said in an interview for
this obituary in 2012.
The setting for the interview
was the high-ceilinged octagonal library at Edgewater, his sixcolumned home built in 1824
on a Hudson River peninsula
just north of Poughkeepsie in
D u t c h e s s Co u n ty, N. Y. He
bought the home in 1969 from
author Gore Vidal, who had
done his writing in the library.
It still housed a large collection
of Vidal’s books.
Mr. Jenrette “had a major
impact on preservation,” probably as much as any single individual, said David J. Brown, executive vice president of the Nat i o n a l Tr u s t f o r H i s t o r i c
Preservation.
Brown cited in particular
two Jenrette rescues in Charleston: the elegant Mills House hotel and the Roper House, on the
Battery overlooking the harbor
and Fort Sumter. Those restorations, Brown said, helped spark
the city’s renaissance as a destination for what has become
known as heritage tourism.
A self-acknowledged “houseaholic,” Mr. Jenrette explained
his interest by saying that it was
probably inspired by “a dozen
too many” viewings of “Gone
With the Wind” as a child.
Mr. Jenrette’s renown in historic restoration circles led to
his hosting world dignitaries,
including the emperor and empress of Japan and Charles, the
Prince of Wales, who wrote the
foreword to Mr. Jenrette’s 1995
book, “Adventures With Old
Houses.”
He also assembled what was
believed to be the largest private collection of Duncan Phyfe
furniture; many of the pieces
are now at the Metropolitan
Museum of Art in New York.
Richard Hampton Jenrette
was born in Raleigh, N.C. His
father, Joseph, was a successful
local insurance salesman. His
mother, Emma, was an avid
gardener and lived to 101, according to the publication New
York Social Diary.
Richard was in public school
when he took a summer job as a
sports writer on The Raleigh
T i m e s . Hi s b o s s w a s Je s s e
Helms, who would serve six
terms in the US Senate. Mr. Jenrette later moved to The News &
Observer in Raleigh.
After graduating from the
University of North Carolina,
where he majored in journalism
and edited The Daily Tar Heel,
Mr. Jenrette reluctantly apprenticed as an insurance salesman,
taking after his father.
He didn’ t relish a career
prospecting for clients, he said,
though what he called “a great
two-year sales experience” gave
him credibility four decades later when he found himself chief
executive of Equitable Life.
With the Korean War on and
his draft board hovering, Mr.
Jenrette started a two-year active stint with the North Carolina National Guard. As a sergeant assigned to counterintelligence duty, he met a group of
Harvard graduates.
Having heard that Harvard
Business School was seeking to
become more diverse — “affirmative action in 1951 was a
Southern white male,” he remarked — he secretly applied to
the school without telling his
family that he hoped to quit the
insurance business.
After graduating with a master’s in business administration
and weighing various job offers,
he joined Brown Brothers Harriman, the very model of an oldtime Wall Street firm, whose
oak-paneled ambience included
roll-top desks, a large coalburning fireplace, and oil paintings of the founders.
He spent two years there as
a portfolio manager before leaving at 30 to start his own firm
with Donaldson and Lufkin.
Mr. Jenrette’s partner, William L. Thompson, died in
2013. He leaves a nephew and
nieces with whom he was close:
Dr. Joseph M. Jenrette III, Helen Wooddy, Betty Romberg,
and Nancy Reynolds.
Bennie Cunningham; won 2 Super Bowls with Steelers
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLEVELAND — Bennie
Cunningham, a versatile tight
end who starred at Clemson
and won two Super Bowls with
the Pittsburgh Steelers, died
Monday. He was 63.
The university said he died
of cancer at the Cleveland Clinic.
Mr. Cunningham played 10
seasons and caught more than
200 passes with the Steelers. He
was named to their all-time
team in 2007 in conjunction
with the franchise’s 75th anniversary.
Mr. Cunningham was an AllAmerican in the mid-1970s.
His seven scoring catches in
1974 set a school record for a
tight end that stood for 37
years. Current Clemson coach
Dabo Swinney called Mr. Cunningham one of the program’s
greatest players.
The Steelers drafted him
with the 28th pick in 1976. He
caught a touchdown pass in
Pittsburgh’s victory over Houston in the 1979 AFC title game
and had two more receptions in
a Super Bowl victory over the
Los Angeles Rams two weeks
later, when the Steelers cap-
NEW YORK TIMES VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 1980
Mr. Cunningham, who caught more than 200 passes with
the Steelers, was named to their all-time team in 2007.
tured their fourth championship in six years.
He retired after the 1985
season and returned to Clem-
son, where he earned a master’s
degree in secondary education
and served as a guidance counselor in Westminster, S.C..
Honor your loved one
with a photo in
The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director for details.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B9
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Sunshine followed by
increasing clouds. As
a storm system slowly
approaches from the
southwest, there will be a slow
increase in clouds during the
day.
THURSDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Breezy and cooler
with rain and drizzle at
times. A slow-moving
storm system will tap
into moisture from the Atlantic
Ocean, producing a rainy day.
HIGH
62-67
LOW
45-50
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Windy; a shower or
two in the morning,
then milder with clouds
breaking for some
sunshine. Winds will gust to
30 mph, while drier air slowly
arrives.
HIGH
53-58
LOW
47-52
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
HIGH
59-64
LOW
42-47
HIGH
61-66
LOW
45-50
4
5
8
6 P.M.
Partial sunshine with
a shower in spots in
the afternoon. While
one system passes by
offshore, a weaker one will bring
spotty showers to the area.
Times of clouds and
sunshine. In between
systems, a dry day is
expected with high
pressure overhead. Another
storm will bring in some clouds
at night.
HIGH
62-67
LOW
46-51
6
SATURDAY
FRIDAY
24
7
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
WEDNESDAY
TODAY
4
8
2
2
4
6
1
2
24
9
4
6
8
Difficulty Level
4/24
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
TODAY: High pressure will linger one more day, producing
sunshine in northern areas. Elsewhere, sunshine will yield
to increasing clouds.
TOMORROW: A rainy day is on tap as a storm
approaches New York City. It will be noticeably
PRESQUE ISLE
cooler with a gusty breeze, especially at the
66/39
coast.
EXTENDED: A damp day is on tap with
MILLINOCKET
more rain at times, though rain will taper
68/42
off and end in southern areas, where
clouds could break for some
sun.
BURLINGTON
69/47
AUGUSTA
68/45
BERLIN
68/38
MONTPELIER
65/42
MT. WASHINGTON
41/28
LEBANON
70/43
RUTLAND
66/44
New England marine forecast
Boston Harbor
Wind
Seas
Temp
S 6-12 kts.
1-2 ft.
63/48
East Cape
High tides
6:53 7:39
10.2 9.6
12:37 1:18
0.8 0.0
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
6:45 7:35
6:59 7:49
7:11 7:52
6:44 7:34
A.M. P.M.
6:53
6:53
6:55
6:59
7:03
Yesterday
High/low
58/43
Mean
51
Departure from normal +0
Departure for month -88
Departure for year +25
5 p.m. rel. humidity 37%
PORTLAND 64/44
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
High tides
7:39
7:39
7:42
7:43
7:45
5:49 6:31
6:37 7:23
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
Seas
Temp
Vineyard
S 6-12 kts.
1-2 ft.
58/44
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
10
Normal Temperatures
April readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
60/46
Nantucket
S 6-12 kts.
1-2 ft.
54/44
1-2 ft.
59/46
Provincetown
S 7-14 kts.
1-2 ft.
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 58°
100
56/44
58
Normal
low
43
29
20
0
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
March
2.0"
1.57
0.01 0.07
1.5"
0.01 0.01 0.08
0.11
0.2
0.21
0.01
T
0.06 T
0.04
0.23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
NEW
May 15
Moon and Regulus – A. MacRobert
FIRST
May 21
At nightfall, the moon shines high in the south.
Look to its right, by about a thumb-width at arm’s
length, for Regulus. About three times higher above
the moon is Algieba.
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You'll make an effort to energize
a key person in your life. Know
that you are an excellent cheerleader, but everyone has free will.
Excitement rises quickly, which
could affect your interactions
with others. Avoid a tendency to
overindulge. Tonight: Relax, and
kick up your feet.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
You are more in touch with a domestic matter than you realize.
Be careful about how much you
choose to share. You understand
a loved one better than he or she
does. You gain insights that others don't. Curb financial excess, if
possible. Tonight: Be naughty
and nice.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Make calls early in the day. Hon-
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, April 24, the
114th day of 2018. There are
251 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Movie director Richard Donner is 88. Actress Shirley MacLaine is 84. Actresssinger Barbra Streisand is 76.
Former Chicago mayor Richard
M. Daley is 76. Former Irish
taoiseach Enda Kenny is 67.
1933
April
1.0"
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday,
April 24, 2018:
This year you have the advantage
of luck and high sensitivity. Used
together, these qualities will help
you avoid making any errors. You
will need to curb an overindulgent side. In the long run, you
will be happier if you do. If you
are single, the next six months
could become a very significant
period for you, as you could meet
someone special. Do not commit
unless you feel as if you have met
Mr. or Ms. Right. If you are attached, the two of you could enter a very romantic period. You
also might welcome a new addition to your family! LEO likes
your energy, even if you rarely
agree with him or her!
Record
high
Normal
high
0.47
LAST
May 7
2007
86
Moon phases
FULL
Apr. 29
Norm.
54.3
39.5
35.9
80
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Mostly sunny
100 miles
southwest at 9 m.p.h.
34/19
15.0”
Actual
50.4
35.6
36.2
Yesterday’s low 43°
1-2 ft.
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
8:47
8:07
4:15
4:08
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
14
501
417
5106
5273
4842
Martha’s
S 6-12 kts.
Weather
Visibility
Wind
High/low temperature
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
8:00
7:32
3:40
3:33
Record
low
S 5-10 kts.
5:50 a.m.
7:36 p.m.
13:46
1:48 p.m.
8:38
8:38
7:53
7:41
40
Buzzards Bay
Almanac
7:51
7:49
7:07
6:57
60
Cod Canal
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
A.M. P.M.
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
6:49 7:32
Boston’s recent climate
BAR HARBOR
55/43
LACONIA
68/44
MANCHESTER
PORTSMOUTH 67/45
BRATTLEBORO
72/48
69/45
NASHUA 69/46
PITTSFIELD
64/44
BOSTON 64/47
WORCESTER
PROVINCETOWN
SPRINGFIELD
NEW
63/44
66/45 PROVIDENCE
57/44
BEDFORD
60/45
63/47
HYANNIS 55/45
HARTFORD
65/46
NEWPORT
53/45
BRIDGEPORT
OAK BLUFFS NANTUCKET 54/43
55/44
58/46
A.M. P.M.
High tides
Old Orchard ME
Hampton
Beach NH
Plum Island
Ipswich
BANGOR
69/45
NEWPORT
67/44
Tides
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
Actor-playwright Eric Bogosian
is 65. Comedian Cedric the Entertainer is 54. Singer Kelly
Clarkson is 36.
ºIn 1792, Captain Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle began
composing ‘‘War Song for the
Rhine Army,’’ later known as
‘‘La Marseillaise,’’ the national
anthem of France.
March
April
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
Precip days in April
0.5"
0.0"
0.00”
11
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
2.90”
Norm. month to date 2.95”
Year to date
16.66”
Norm. year to date 13.88”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
West dealer — N-S vulnerable
North
♠ Q875
♥ J
♦ AJ
♣AQJ864
West
East
♠ 10
♥ A Q 10 6 3
♦ Q874
♣K92
♠9
♥K 9 8 7 5
♦ K 10 9 6 5
♣7 5
South
♠ AKJ6432
♥42
♦ 32
♣ 10 3
West
Pass
4♥
5♥
All Pass
North
1♣
4♠
Pass
East
1♥
Pass
Pass
South
1♠
Pass
5♠
Opening lead — ♥ 7
As the players at the Mad Hatter’s took a tea break, the
Red Queens, who were kibitzers, kept up their bickering.
“I’m the most powerful card in Wonderland,” the Queen
of Hearts boasted. “No ace or king dares capture me.”
But the Queen of Diamonds insisted that losing a trick
could be better than winning one.
Against the Hatter’s five spades, West, the Dormouse, led
the seven of hearts. Alice, East, played the queen.
“Good!” the Queen of Hearts crowed.
The defense surely needed a diamond and a club. But
since dummy’s clubs would provide discards, Alice had to
lead a diamond quickly. Giving the Queen of Diamonds a
nod, Alice led ... the queen. The Hatter took the ace and
drew trumps, but when Alice took the king of clubs, she led
a diamond to West for down one.
If Alice leads a low diamond to the king and ace at Trick
Two, declarer succeeds. He draws trumps, ruffs his last
heart in dummy and exits with a diamond. When Alice
wins, she is end-played.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ 10 ♥ A Q 10 6 3 ♦ Q 8 7 4
♣ K 9 2. Your partner opens one spade, you bid two hearts,
he rebids two spades and you try 2NT. Partner next bids
three diamonds. What do you say?
ANSWER: Partner suggests six spades, four diamonds and
minimum values. If he held A K 8 7 5, 4, K J 9 3, Q 10 3,
he would have no reason to disturb 2NT. Pass and accept a
plus.
or the need to complete a certain
facet of work in the morning. Use
recent success to energize you.
Use your high energy and great
ideas. One-on-one relating draws
positive results. Curb a tendency
to overindulge. Tonight: Entertain at home.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Balance your checkbook with
care. Handle your finances with
strength and understanding. You
don't want a situation to get out
of control. Understand what is
happening with a loved one.
Make an important call in the afternoon; you need to clear the air.
Tonight: On the right path.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Understand that you might be
pushing someone away without
intending to. You could be too
distracted for your own good,
and might be missing an important detail or two. Recognize your
limits. Be willing to defer to oth-
ers about an important issue. Tonight: Let someone else pick up
the tab.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Listen to news openly. Your finances will be affected if you
don't simplify how you handle
money. Stay away from any wild
risks, unless you are sure you can
take a loss. Extremes punctuate
your day. Tonight: Have a longoverdue discussion with someone
in the know.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Relate directly to others. Understand your limits and what is
needed. If you're having an identity crisis, or are a victim of confusion, detach and try to look at
the big picture. Your perspective
at that point will give you some
insight. Tonight: So many invitations and calls.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You are in the spotlight most of
the day. You might prefer to be
elsewhere, but you must remain
where you are for now. Toward
the late afternoon, a meeting
could evolve into a celebration.
Share what you are feeling. Tonight: At a favorite spot with a favorite person.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Eye the big picture before taking
any action. You also might want
to do some research in the morning. By midafternoon, you probably will feel more secure about
your choices. A child or loved one
delights you with his or her
changeability. Tonight: Could go
till the wee hours.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
You know how to deal with a
partner, especially when speaking about matters that pertain to
both of you. You have unusual
drive, which helps you accomplish key goals. Before you act,
detach and decide if this situation is worth the effort. Tonight:
Go with the moment.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
You will see a loved one quite differently once you sweep away
your innate prejudices. A personal matter could change as a result. Allow your sensitivity to
come out. A loved one adores
how you demonstrate your caring
attitude. Tonight: Hang out with
a favorite person.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Dive into work as if there were no
tomorrow. You will accomplish a
lot in a short period. Calls, emails
and texts demand your attention
as the day comes to a close. Enjoy
your popularity. Be careful when
dealing with a friend who has a
crush on you. Tonight: Let it all
hang out.
ºIn 1877, federal troops were
ordered out of New Orleans,
ending the North’s post-Civil
War rule in the South.
ºIn 1915, in what’s considered
the start of the Armenian genocide, the Ottoman Empire began rounding up Armenian political and cultural leaders in
Constantinople.
ºIn 1916, some 1,600 Irish nationalists launched the Easter
Rising by seizing several key
sites in Dublin. (The rising was
put down by British forces five
days later.)
ºIn 1962, the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology
achieved the first satellite relay
of a television signal, using
NASA’s Echo 1 balloon satellite
to bounce a video image from
Camp Parks, Calif., to Westford.
ºIn 1967, Soviet cosmonaut
Vladimir Komarov was killed
when his Soyuz 1 spacecraft
smashed into the Earth after
his parachutes failed to deploy
properly during re-entry; he
was the first human spaceflight
fatality.
ºIn 1980, the United States
launched an unsuccessful attempt to free the American
hostages in Iran, a mission that
resulted in the deaths of eight
US servicemen.
ºIn 1990, the space shuttle
Discovery blasted off from
Cape Canaveral, Florida, carrying the $1.5 billion Hubble
Space Telescope.
ºLast year, astronaut Peggy
Whitson broke the US record
for most time in space and talked up Mars during a congratulatory call from President
Trump; the International Space
Station’s commander surpassed the record of 534 days,
two hours and 48 minutes.
Jacqueline Bigar is at www.jacquelinebigar.com.
(c) 2018 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
B10
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
“Not tonight, Mittens.”
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
8
4
7
5
6
2
3
9
1
6
9
1
3
4
7
5
8
2
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
2
3
5
9
8
1
6
7
4
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
9
8
3
6
2
4
1
5
7
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
5
7
2
8
1
9
4
6
3
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
1
6
4
7
3
5
9
2
8
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
4
5
9
2
7
3
8
1
6
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
3
2
8
1
9
6
7
4
5
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
7
1
6
4
5
8
2
3
9
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B11
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
ZIPPY “Syrupy Moment” by Bill Griffith
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
A plugger knows he can at least double the life of a
razor blade by shaving every other day.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
EASTERN BORDERS BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Vicks place
ending?
5 Alaskan king and
Maryland
10 Brown
deliverer
13 Not reticent
14 Painter Matisse
15 Dueling sword
16 Formally
comment
19 Allow
20 Braid
21 The Ponderosa,
for one
22 Type of space
24 “I do” lady
25 Part of
one’s act?
26 “We’ve had ___
good time”
28 Cast skin
30 Brown ermine
31 Vibrant hue
34 Map out with
purpose
38 Affirmative
39 May 7, e.g.
40 Orchestra tuner
41 Group for
the bright
42 Llama-rich
country
44 Spheres of
interest
46 Country legend
Lynn
49 Sermon
concluders
50 U-turn from
misery
52 4,000 1/2 pounds
53 Resurrection Day
treasure
56 Nights before
57 Immature ovum
58 Bits of history
59 Studio
construction
60 Golf cup
61 “Hey, you”
DOWN
1 Hardens eggs
2 Unexpected win
3 Workers on
antiques
4 Antelope
relative
5 Cash alternative
6 Visit again
7 Bugs on a hill
8 Some
undergarments
9 Butt plant?
10 Disrupt
11 1/100th of
a pound
12 Son of Adam
15 Electronic
messages
17 And others,
briefly
18 Literary
slip fixers
23 Curtain
hangers?
24 Den denizen
26 Like a baffled
sailor?
27 Decomposes
28 Do CIA work
29 Shade
30 Fancy without
31 All debaters
32 Heady psyche
33 Get blond
35 Riot preceder
36 Massive time
periods
37 Ripped
41 Repairs
42 Placard
43 Language in
“persecute”
44 What Young
MC said to
bust
45 Refill a flat
again?
46 Hosiery fabric
47 Garments of
old Rome
48 Dread feeling
49 Gets mellow
50 Party of quails
51 Exalt
54 It’s with
neither
55 One standing row
3
1
6 8
5
2 7
3
5
1
2 7
3 5
8
9
2
4
6 9
4 1
7
8
9
7 1
4
3 5
8
1
T h e
B12
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Local tech types
pack ‘Westworld’
premiere party
HBO invited boldface names from
Boston’s tech world to a premiere party Sunday for the second season of
“Westworld.”
The locals who packed the event
space at the Revere Hotel for an early
screening of the first episode, which
aired on HBO later that night, included employees from MIT SmartLabs,
Boston AI, Harvard Business School,
MassChallenge, Women Who Code,
FeatureX, and Affectiva. That meant
the Q&A portion of the program —
which featured “Westworld” actors
Shannon Woodward and Simon
Quarterman — got sort of technical.
One guest questioned the “Elmer’s
Glue”-ish goo inside of the robot characters on the show. Another asked
about the use of time on the sci-fi
western series.
Quarterman, who plays Westworld
exec Lee Sizemore, mostly laughed
when he tried to answer the science
and tech questions, but Woodward,
who plays a Westworld park employee, had answers. The actress said she
grew up in a science-loving home, and
with a dad who introduced her to Mi­
chael Crichton’s 1973 “Westworld”
film, among other sci-fi titles.
During the panel discussion, moderated by Globe columnist and innovation writer Scott Kirsner, Woodward
said, “My dad was a programmer. He
worked for IBM. . . . I’m a computer
kid. I grew up with computers in the
house before other people did.”
Quarterman did reveal one fact
about his casting. He said that when
he first auditioned for the show, he
went in for the character Bernard, a
central figure on the series. “That
didn’t work out,” Quarterman said,
laughing. (That role went to Jeffrey
Wright.)
Guests at the premiere went from
the screening room to an after-party at
the Revere, where a space was transformed into a western bar straight out
of the show. There was a saloon-style
piano (the musician played Radiohead
and other music featured on the series), and guests were offered a personality test to determine their char-
Twain touts Trump, then apologizes
Country singer Shania Twain has
apologized after saying in an interview
that she would have voted for Donald
Trump for president if she could.
Twain, who is Canadian, told The
Guardian in an article published Sunday: “I would have voted for him because, even though he was offensive,
he seemed honest.”
Twain added that she would have
supported Trump because of his
straightforward style, and said she
thought he would be transparent.
“Do you want straight or polite?
Not that you shouldn’t be able to have
both,” she said in the article. “If I
were voting, I just don’t want [expletive]. I would have voted for a feeling
that it was transparent. And politics
has a reputation of not being that,
right?”
Almost immediately, the online
backlash against the singer began.
“Shania Twain is canceled,” tweeted
@SoSofieFatale. “When people say
he’s ‘honest’ what they mean is that he
makes them feel good about being racist trash because they feel the same
way. He lies pathologically. If someone
can’t understand that they’re either
dumb, racists, or both.”
Twain, who is performing at TD
Garden in July, swiftly issued an apology for her comments, saying she supports inclusion and was taken offguard by the unexpected question.
“I would like to apologise to anybody I have offended in a recent interview with the Guardian relating to the
American President. The question
It’s a royal baby boy for Kate and William
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
“Westworld” cast members Simon Quarterman and Shannon
Woodward at the Revere Hotel on Sunday.
acter. At about 10 p.m., there were still
groups of people hanging out in front
of the Revere with HBO-provided cowboy hats in their hands.
In related news, “Westworld” will
The seedy streets of 1970s New
York were on display at the Tribeca
Film Festival Sunday with the premiere of “Mapplethorpe,” the longgestating biopic — co-produced by
Watertown native Eliza Dushku —
about photographer Robert Map­
plethorpe. English actor Matt
Smith, best known for playing
Prince Philip on “The Crown” (and
the boyish, bow-tied lead in “Doctor Who”) plays the celebrated
shutterbug. Variety’s review was
ambivalent, crediting director Ondi
Timoner for embracing the “hardcore bits” of Mapplethorpe’s character but faulting the film for failing
to “capture what made the radical
photographer tick.” Still, we’re excited to see the movie, which has
been a labor of love for Dushku, the
“Buffy the Vampire” actress who’s
spent about a decade trying to get
it made. Pictured: Timoner (far
left), Smith, and Dushku.
Flag from JFK assassination limo up for bid
What are you willing to pay for a chilling reminder of one of the darkest days
in American history?
We’re asking for Goldin Auctions, which is selling the American flag that was
affixed to the right side of President Kennedy’s limousine the day he was assassinated in Dallas. The auction
house swears it’s the flag, and
has included in the sale a detailed letter of provenance
from George Hickey III, the
son of former Secret Service
agent George Hickey Jr.
The flag measures 28-by19 inches and features yellow
tassels on its edges. It was
anchored to the custom 1961
Lincoln Continental convertible limousine that carried
Kennedy, first lady Jacque­
line Kennedy, Texas Governor John Connally, and his
BETTMANN/CONTRIBUTER
wife, Nellie.
In the letter, Hickey says his father brought home the flag “as a keepsake” and
placed it in the top drawer of his personal desk where it remained until his
death. The current bid is $30,000, but the auction house estimates the item
could fetch $100,000.
Globe correspondents J.D. Capelouto and Robert Steiner contributed. Read local
celebrity news at www.bostonglobe.com/names. Names can be reached at
names@globe.com or at 617-929-8253.
Work ethic
caught me off guard. As a Canadian, I
regret answering this unexpected
question without giving my response
more context. My answer was awkward, but certainly should not be taken as representative of my values nor
does it mean I endorse him. I make
music to bring people together. My
path will always be one of inclusivity,
as my history shows.”
Twain’s music has generally strayed
away from making bold political statements.
“I don’t have anything against or
for any particular person or point of
view on politics,” she said in an interview with CMT News in 2007. “I have
my own opinions, but my songs don’t
share them.”
Ironically, Hillary Clinton reportedly used Twain’s song “Rock This Country!” in her 2008 presidential campaign. Twain also performed for Bill
and Hillary Clinton at a presidential
gala in 1996.
MORE CELEBRITY NEWS
have a local on the show this season.
Actress Julia Jones, known for the
“Twilight” films and “Wind River,”
has joined the cast. The actress is
from Jamaica Plain.
Dushku’s ‘Mapplethorpe’ at Tribeca
ANDREW TOTH/GETTY IMAGES
ERIC JAMISON/INVISION/AP
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
‘The Rock,’ Hashian
welcome 2nd child
Did you hear about the baby? Not
that baby.
While everyone was focused on the
arrival of the royal baby — the little
boy born to Prince William and Kate
Middleton — professional wrestlerturned-action star Dwayne “The
Rock” Johnson and longtime partner
Lauren Hashian, daughter of late Boston drummer Sib Hashian, revealed
that they have a new baby girl. (The
baby, named Tiana, is the couple’s second daughter together.)
“Skin to skin. Our mana. Blessed
and proud to bring another strong girl
into this world,” Johnson wrote on Instagram. “Tiana Gia Johnson came into this world like a force of nature and
Mama @laurenhashianofficial labored
and delivered like a true rockstar.
“I was raised and surrounded by
strong, loving women all my life, but
after participating in baby Tia’s delivery, it’s hard to express the new level of
love, respect and admiration I have for
@laurenhashianofficial and all mamas and women out there,” he wrote.
“Word to the wise gentlemen, it’s critical to be by your lady’s head when
she’s delivering, being as supportive as
you can . . . holding hands, holding
legs, whatever you can do. But, if you
really want to understand the single
most powerful and primal moment
life will ever offer — watch your child
being born. Its a life changer and the
respect and admiration you have for a
woman, will forever be boundless.”
Hashian and Johnson have been together for about a decade. Their first
child, Jasmine, is a toddler. Johnson
also has a daughter with his ex-wife,
Dany Garcia.
Third time’s a charm. The Duchess
of Cambridge gave birth Monday
morning to a new prince who is fifth
in line to the British throne — and she
was home by suppertime.
The duchess and husband Prince
William drove to St. Mary’s Hospital in
London early in the morning, and
Kate Middleton’s 8-pound, 7-ounce
boy was born at 11:01 a.m., with royal
officials announcing the birth about
two hours later.
There followed a choreographed
operation perfected after the births of
the couple’s two other children. In late
afternoon, elder siblings Prince
George and Princess Charlotte were
brought to meet their baby brother.
Around 6 p.m. and wearing a vibrant
red dress, Kate emerged alongside her
husband, holding the tiny royal highness, wrapped in a white lace shawl.
After posing for dozens of photographers and camera crews outside the
hospital’s private Lindo Wing, the trio
headed home, with the baby nestled
securely in a car seat. Television news
helicopters followed the royal Range
Rover as it made the mile journey to
the family’s Kensington Palace residence.
William declared the couple ‘‘very
delighted’’ with the new addition to
the family.
The royal palace said ‘‘the queen,
the Duke of Edinburgh, the Prince of
Wales, the Duchess of Cornwall,
Prince Harry, and members of both
families have been informed and are
delighted with the news.’’ Prime Minister Theresa May offered ‘‘warmest
congratulations.’’
News of the royal birth came with a
mix of tradition and modernity typical
of Britain’s media-savvy royal family. It
was announced on Twitter and also
proclaimed in the forecourt of Buckingham Palace with a framed notice
perched on a golden easel.
Tony Appleton, a town crier from
southeast England, showed up in full
regalia to declare the newborn prince’s
birth outside the hospital. The words
‘‘It’s a boy’’ flashed in lights around the
top of London’s BT Tower, which can
be seen for miles around.
More ceremonial celebration will
come Tuesday, including the pealing of
bells at Westminster Abbey and a gun
salute in London’s Hyde Park.
The baby is a younger brother to 4year-old Prince George and Princess
Charlotte, who turns 3 next week.
Both were born at the same hospital,
as were William and his younger
brother, Prince Harry.
The infant’s name, which has been
subject to a flurry of bets, is likely to be
announced in the next few days. Ar­
thur and James are among bookmakers’ favorites for the new prince,
whose full title will be His Royal Highness, Prince (Name) of Cambridge.
‘‘You’ll find out soon enough,’’ William said when asked about the baby’s
name. (AP)
BEN STANSALL/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
The Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William with their third child.
‘I always assume every job is my last. Twenty years of desperately trying to get a
single job gets deep in your DNA.’ MELISSA MCCARTHY, actress-comedian, on why she works so hard
Business
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T U E S DAY, A P R I L 24, 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / B US I N E S S
UK challenges
Vertex’s prices
Maker of cystic fibrosis drugs urged to
‘commit to pricing that is responsible’
By Ed Silverman
STAT
Two UK health ministers are
calling on Vertex Pharmaceuticals to provide an “urgent resolution” to negotiations
STAT over access to its cystic
fibrosis drug, a battle
that has lingered for two years
and caused a ruckus among patients and government officials.
The company should “commit to pricing that is responsible and proportionate to the
benefits that patients receive”
and provide “all available data
supporting the cost effectiveness” of its most recent proposal to the government, according
to an April 19 letter from Steve
Brine, undersecretary of state
for public health and primary
care, and Lord O’Shaughnessy,
undersecretary of state for
health. A Vertex spokeswoman
said a meeting with the National Health Service is scheduled
for this week.
The missive was sent following a closely tracked debate last
month in Parliament, where
the Vertex cystic fibrosis treatment essentially epitomized the
clash between drug makers and
cash-strapped governments
over the cost of medicines.
At issue is Orkambi, which
was determined not to be costeffective by Britian’s National
Institute for Health and Care
Excellence. The NHS is refusing
to provide coverage unless the
drug maker lowers the price.
About 10,400 people suffer
from cystic fibrosis in the United Kingdom, and more than
116,000 people have signed an
online petition demanding
‘We ask you, as a
matter of the
utmost urgency, to
proceed with
negotiations in a
way that is
constructive . . . ’
STEVE BRINE,
LORD O’SHAUGHNESSY
Two UK health ministers, in a
letter to Boston-based Vertex
Pharmaceuticals
NHS coverage.
As noted previously, Bostonbased Vertex eventually offered
a “portfolio approach” to pricing. Basically, the company
would guarantee a set price for
an approved treatment and any
subsequent medicine, rather
than conduct separate negotiations for each drug as regulatory approval occurs. Variations
of such arrangements exist in
other countries, according to
the company.
In response, the NHS proposed to add Orkambi and all
future Vertex cystic fibrosis
drugs to the current budget
that was allotted to cover the
cost of Kalydeco, an older drug
that is already available in the
United Kingdom. In effect, the
agency was asking the company
to provide Orkambi and its future cystic fibrosis drugs at no
additional cost to the NHS. Vertex balked, in part, because just
Renewal rate for Celts’
season tickets: near perfect
The Boston Celtics are 2-2 in their first-round series with
the Milwaukee Bucks, and surgery has sidelined C’s star
Kyrie Irving (below) for the playoffs.
But the Celts can already chalk up this season as a financial success. The team doesn’t disclose revenue numbers;
however, president Rich Gotham says the season ticket
renewal rate just hit 97 percent. That’s the highest since the
heyday of 2010, when the Big Three of Kevin Garnett, Paul
Pierce, and Ray Allen ruled the parquet. (The typical rate is
around 90 percent.) Given the usual attrition from out-oftown moves or job changes, that’s about as close to perfect as
you can get.
The team also sold out every home game this season, all
41 — the best performance since the 2012-2013 season,
when Garnett and Pierce last played together here. (Allen
was already gone by then.)
The Celtics ownership broke more than a few hearts
around town when Isaiah Thomas was traded away for
Irving last summer. Gotham says he was sad to see Thomas
go, but the trade turned out to be huge for the team’s
business. Irving brought a personal following with him from
the Cavaliers — his jersey is among the NBA’s top sellers, for
example.
“He’s certainly added a buzz factor to the team,” Gotham
says. “He’s one of those players
that fans follow, not just Celtics fans, but fans from across
the globe.”
Gotham points to other
factors: residual enthusiasm from a strong playoff
run last year, and the
star power of others
such as Jayson Tatum
and Al Horford. Then
there was the team’s
rousing comeback after
a broken leg took Gordon
Hayward out in the season’s first game. A subsequent 16-game winning
streak helped fuel interest
among casual basketball
fans earlier in the season
than normal.
“Often the Patriots
have so much success in
the fall that people don’t
really turn their attention
to basketball until the
winter,” Gotham says.
“But this year we saw it
CHRIS MORRIS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
A harder sell
VERTEX, Page C4
Bold Types
BOLD TYPES, Page C5
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2018
Many were evacuated on March 2 from residences on flooded Post Island Road in Quincy’s Houghs Neck section.
Nor’easters, rising seas make buyers think twice about ocean views
By Katheleen Conti
GLOBE STAFF
Real estate broker Jim McGue expects to soon list for sale a home off
Quincy Shore Drive, a location whose
top selling point would normally be
its front-row water views. But the
low-lying street also took the brunt of
a number of recent nor’easters, and
McGue said the owners told him their
backyard was inundated during one
storm in March — the worst flooding
in their 25 years there.
“It’s been a challenge along the
Quincy waterfront,”
s a i d Mc G u e , w h o
owns Granite Group
Realtors in Quincy.
“People got flooded
and are fighting with
the insurance company, and they want
to sell the house.
MAUREEN
CELATA, a Revere What happened here
in March certainly
broker who says
underscores what a
many properties
100-year flood map
away from the
is all about. Quincy
water sell in a day
Shore Drive was
closed — I’ve never
seen it closed since
the Blizzard of ’78.”
The roads are dry now, and all
along Massachusetts’ coastline cleanups are mostly complete. But as the
spring real estate season blooms, the
memory of the storms hangs over waterfront and water-view properties
that otherwise would command premium prices. With rates for flood insurance already sky-high, and concern about global warming and rising
sea levels more widespread, some
prospective buyers are weighing
whether it’s worth it to live at the
ocean’s edge, real estate agents say.
Homes along or near the waterfront in Revere, for instance, aren’t
selling as fast this season as they did
last year, said Maureen Celata, owner/broker at M. Celata Real Estate in
Revere. And unlike many homes elsewhere in the Boston area, some Revere properties near the water are not
selling over asking price, she said.
“When properties are priced appropriately in any other part that’s
not coastal, they sell in a day,” Celata
said. “The coastal ones, it takes far
‘The coastal
ones, it
takes far
longer to
sell them.’
ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE/FILE 2018
On March 3, waves were crashing into the houses along Oceanside Drive in
Scituate during high tide.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2018
Flooded streets plagued the Marshfield-Duxbury area on March 8.
longer to sell them.”
A home in the Point of Pines
neighborhood that included a “private beach” sold for about 9 percent
below its $799,000 asking price, Celata said, and took 55 days to sell.
That’s an eternity in the region’s superheated real estate market, where a
longstanding drought of available
properties has sparked fierce competition among buyers.
That’s not to say the images of
flooded backyards and basements
have caused waterfront properties to
completely lose their cachet among
buyers who can afford the risk that
comes with multimillion-dollar
views.
One of Quincy’s highest-priced
properties, for instance, is on Sea Avenue. It’s listed at $985,000, or about
WATERFRONT, Page C5
C2
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
US may ease Rusal sanctions; aluminum plunges
By Jack Farchy,
Yuliya Fedorinova,
and Saleha Mohsin
BLOOMBERG NEWS
LONDON — The US softened
its position on sanctions against
Russian metals giant United Co.
Rusal, sparking a record plunge in
aluminum prices.
For the first time, the US Treasury discussed a path for lifting
the sanctions on Rusal, saying it
would provide relief if Oleg Deripaska relinquished control. It also
extended the deadline for companies to wind down dealings with
the Russian aluminum producer
by almost five months.
Rusal petitioned to be removed
from the sanctions list and Treasury granted the extension while it
considers the appeal, according to
a statement from Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.
“Rusal has felt the impact of US
sanctions because of its entanglement with Oleg Deripaska, but the
US government is not targeting
the hard-working people who de-
YURI KOCHETKOV/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK/FILE 2015
Russian
billionaire Oleg
Deripaska,
head of Rusal,
has been
targeted as
part of a US
sanctions
package that
hit dozens of
Russian
tycoons.
pend on Rusal and its subsidiaries,” Mnuchin said.
Aluminum plunged in response as traders speculated that
supply disruptions could ease.
Prices fell as much as 9.4 percent,
the most ever. US metal producers
also dropped, with Alcoa Inc. sliding 13.5 percent.
Washington’s clarification follows two weeks of chaos in global
metal markets. Aluminum shot to
multiyear highs as manufacturers
raced to secure supply. A German
lobbying group said European
plants may be forced to close and
carmakers could face supply
shortages.
Rusal’s wind-down operations
can include debt payments in US
dollars through Oct. 23, a Treasury
spokesman said in response to
questions.
The US statement also adds
pressure on Deripaska as he tries
to save the company without surrendering control. He owns 48
percent of Rusal and controls it
through a shareholder agreement
with others including Glencore
PLC and Viktor Vekselberg, who is
also under sanctions.
“If there were previously
doubts if Rusal will remain sanctioned if Deripaska sells out, now
we have a clear answer,” Oleg
Petropavlovskiy, an analyst at BCS
Global Markets, said by phone.
“Changing ownership structure
would be a solution for the company.”
Deripaska was targeted as part
of a sanctions package that hit
dozens of Russian tycoons, companies, and key allies of President
Vladimir Putin.
While analysts have suggested
that nationalization may be the
only solution, Russian Finance
Minister Anton Siluanov told reporters Friday that Rusal was not
on the list to be nationalized.
Rusal declined to comment.
Deripaska’s spokeswoman wasn’t
immediately available.
Rusal produces about 6 percent
of the world’s aluminum and operates mines, smelters, and refineries across the world from Guinea
to Ireland, Russia to Jamaica.
“It should calm things down,”
said Daniel Briesemann, an analyst at Commerzbank AG. “It looks
as if there was a lot of pressure
from the US aluminum downstream industry.”
At Russia’s request, Mnuchin
met with Siluanov during International Monetary Fund meetings in
Washington last week. The Rus-
sians were seeking “clarification”
on US sanctions, Mnuchin said to
reporters Saturday, without elaborating.
“Mnuchin’s statement about
the de-listing signals that this is
more than just getting an extra
few months to stop business with
Rusal,” said Brian O’Toole, a senior
fellow at the Atlantic Council who
previously worked in Treasury’s
sanctions unit. “It shows that Rusal is trying get off the list.”
The sell-off in aluminum after
the Treasur y announcement
spread through other commodity
markets on optimism the United
States isn’t likely to impose further
sanctions on Russia’s metals and
energy companies.
Palladium plunged by as much
as 5.4 percent and nickel as much
6.7 percent. They had both
jumped over the last two weeks
because of concern that Vladimir
Potanin, the billionaire who controls Russia’s biggest miner MMC
Norilsk Nickel PJSC, could be targeted.
Top Sears
investor
offers to
buy assets
Vanguard
preps for
big growth
in China
Firm headed by
CEO urges sale of
Kenmore brand
BEIJING — Vanguard Group
amassed $5.2 trillion of client
assets and revolutionized the US investment industry by offering lowcost funds to millions of Americans.
Now it wants to do something similar in China, even if the strategy
takes years to bear fruit.
More than four decades after
Vanguard founder Jack Bogle
opened the first S&P 500 index
fund, the firm is laying the groundwork for a China expansion, made
easier by the nation’s opening to
foreign asset managers. Vanguard
is on track to more than double the
size of its Shanghai office this year
and may seek approval to sell products to wealthy investors as a first
step before seeking a foreignowned mutual fund license when
regulators allow that in 2021, said
Charles Lin, the firm’s China head.
Vanguard hopes to have an “obvious cost advantage” compared
with local competitors, Lin said. It
may take time for its index-tracking
funds to catch on in China, but he
predicted the appeal of passive investing will grow as the country’s
markets become more efficient —
and thus tougher for active managers to outperform.
“We hope to be able to quickly
build up the size, achieve economies of scale and operational efficiency to lower investment costs as
quickly as possible,” said Lin, who
joined Vanguard in 2011 and is on
the committee responsible for its
non-US business.
Foreign investment firms are
pushing into China as financial
changes allow access to an assetmanagement industry that’s forecast to grow more than fivefold by
2030, to $17 trillion, dwarfing markets such as the United Kingdom’s.
While Vanguard is in one sense
playing catchup to rivals including
BlackRock Inc. that have operated
China joint ventures for years, the
nation is now offering foreign money managers the chance to run their
businesses without local partners.
For Vanguard, the ultimate prize
is the so-called wholly foreignowned mutual fund license, which
will allow it to eventually manage
money for mass-market investors.
While the company may have to
wait three years before regulators
grant such a license, it could in the
meantime apply for a private fund
management license to cater to rich
clients and learn about the local
landscape, Lin said.
The company is “actively studying” both options, and it’s “completely possible” it will do both, Lin
said.
Vanguard’s unique ownership
structure — the company is owned
by its funds and in turn its unitholders — allows it to limit costs to
about one-tenth of the industry average in the United States. The Valley Forge, Pa., company sells all
products online and doesn’t pay
distributor commissions. It’s also
very lean, employing about 400 investment professionals worldwide.
Fewer than 100 people oversee almost $4 trillion in passively managed funds. That structure may give
Vanguard an advantage in China,
where fees are higher than in the
United States.
BLOOMBERG NEWS
By Damian Troise
and Anne D’Innocenzio
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Sears’ biggest
shareholder has suggested the
company sell its well-known
Kenmore brand and some real
estate holdings, offering itself as
a potential buyer.
The ailing company has sold
off other major brands as it
struggles to stay afloat, with
Kenmore a notable remainder
from a powerhouse retailer that
survived two world wars and the
Great Depression.
The private equity firm ESL
Investment, headed by Sears
c h a ir m a n a n d C E O E d w a r d
Lampert, said it might buy the
assets — Kenmore, Sears Home
Services’ home improvement
business, and the company’s
Parts Direct business — if the
company is willing to sell.
T hat sent shares of Sears
Holdings Corp., which have lost
more than 70 percent of their
value in the past year, up 7.64
percent.
Lampert, who combined
Sears and Kmart in 2005 after
helping to bring Kmart out of
bankruptcy, has long pledged to
RICK BOWMER/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2017
turn the company’s fortunes
around. He said the retailer
would find ways to capitalize on
its best-known brands, like Kenmore appliances and DieHard
car batteries, as well as its vast
holdings of land.
But the company has continued to see shoppers move on to
Target, Walmart, and Amazon
and has closed hundreds of
stores, cut costs, and sold brands
to deal with falling sales.
In his letter to the board,
Lampert said Sears has been trying to sell the Kenmore businesses for nearly two years but has
been unable to find other buyers.
Kenmore could have substantial value. Amazon.com began
selling Kenmore appliances on
its site almost a year ago. ESL
has not placed a potential value
on Kenmore, but said its nonbinding proposal gives the services and home improvement
units an enterprise value of $500
million.
ESL said it also would be
open to making an offer for
Sears’ real estate, including the
assumption of $1.2 billion in
debt.
‘‘In our view, pursuing these
divestures now will demonstrate
the value of Sears’ portfolio of assets, will provide an important
source of liquidity to Sears and
could avoid any deterioration in
t h e v a l u e o f s u c h a s s e t s ,’ ’
Lampert wrote.
Sears, which started in the
1880s as a mail-order catalog
business, was a back-to-school
and appliance shopping destination for generations. Its storied
catalog featured items from bicycles to sewing machines to houses, and the company’s stores
were a fixture of suburban malls
from the 1950s to 1970s.
Sears chairman
and CEO
Edward
Lampert also
runs the
private equity
firm ESL
Investment.
NAFTA ministers set to meet again
amid intensified push for deal
By Eric Martin
BLOOMBERG NEWS
Senior trade officials from the
United States, Canada, and Mexico will meet again in Washington
in an intensified push to reach a
Nafta agreement in the next few
weeks.
Talks will pick up on Tuesday,
after Cabinet-level members
vowed on Friday to keep up the
momentum following consultations with their technical teams
over the weekend. Mexican Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo
said last week that after seven
months of discussions, the three
sides have entered a concentrated phase where ‘‘my negotiating
team is practically living in Washington.’’ Still, major differences
remain over key US demands.
Mexico scored a separate commercial victory over the weekend
with a deal in principle to update
a 17-year-old free-trade agreement with the European Union.
Guajardo jetted to Brussels to
help close the deal.
Chrystia Freeland, Canada’s
minister for foreign affairs, said
Friday that North American Free
Trade Agreement negotiators
have been making good progress
on updated rules for cars, which
she said will be at the heart of any
eventual updated Nafta.
‘‘We have had some very ener-
getic and productive conversations,’’ Freeland told reporters on
the steps of the US Trade Representative’s office following meetings with her counterparts. ‘‘We
are certainly in a more intense
period of negotiations, and we
are making good progress.’’
President Trump on Monday
said again that he could make
Mexican-immigration curbs a
condition of a new Nafta deal,
highlighting that a deal is still far
from certain. Trump in a Twitter
post said Mexico ‘‘must stop people from going through Mexico
and into the US,’’ adding ‘‘We
may make this a condition of the
new NAFTA Agreement. Our
Country cannot accept what is
happening!’’
Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray responded it’s unacceptable
to demand that Mexico tie changes to its ‘‘sovereign’’ immigration
policy to an updated trade pact.
‘‘Mexico decides its immigration policy in a sovereign manner, and the migration cooperation with the US takes place in
such a way that Mexico agrees,’’
Videgaray said on Twitter.
This week’s talks are set to be
the broadest and biggest since
the final official negotiating
round in Mexico City in early
March, according to a preliminary agenda obtained by
Bloomberg. Topics include automotive rules, agriculture, and legal and institutional matters such
as dispute settlement mechanisms.
Mexican President Enrique
Pena Nieto traveled to Germany
over the weekend to meet with
Chancellor Angela Merkel at the
Hannover Messe, a huge industry
show where Mexico is the chosen
partner country this year. Deepening ties with the EU is part of
Mexico’s push to diversify beyond
the United States, the destination
for 72 percent of the nation’s
$435 billion in exports last year.
Pena Nieto said he’s optimistic
he’ll have good news to announce
from the NAFTA talks.
The EU is an attractive target
for export expansion for Mexico,
in part because many countries
in the bloc have consumers with
comparable wealth and spending
habits to those of the United
States. The EU in recent years also inked a free-trade agreement
with Canada, which was implemented in 2017.
Mexico’s negotiations with the
EU began almost two years ago,
and technical teams will continue
to iron out the details, both sides
said Saturday. Analysts have
speculated that something similar could happen on NAFTA, with
an agreement in principle com-
JONATHAN LEVINSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
ing in the next few weeks while
technical teams continue to work
on the fine print.
Trump’s negotiators, led by US
Trade Representative Robert
Lighthizer, have been pushing for
a deal by early May. That would
meet US timelines for having an
agreement approved, at the latest, by the lame-duck session that
will follow mid-term congressional elections in November, said
two people familiar with the negotiations. Guajardo this month
said he sees an 80 percent chance
of an agreement by the first week
of May. Negotiators are also rushin g for a dea l as Me x i c o a p proaches elections on July 1.
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is keeping expectations modest, warning that recent signs of progress don’t mean
a deal is imminent.
‘‘There’s positive advances
that have been made, but it’s not
over ‘til it’s over,’’ Trudeau told reporters in Halifax, Nova Scotia,
on Saturday.
‘‘We have had
some very
energetic and
productive
conversations,’’
said Chrystia
Freeland,
Canada’s
minister for
foreign affairs.
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
C3
TALKING POINTS
CASINOS
STEVE WYNN’S
EX­WIFE WANTS
A COMPANY DIRECTOR
REMOVED
The former wife of Steve Wynn, who is also the biggest shareholder and cofounder of Wynn
Resorts, is seeking the removal one of the company directors overseeing an internal
investigation into sexual misconduct allegations against the casino magnate. Elaine Wynn
said in a filing Monday with US regulators that John Hagenbuch is allied too closely with
Steve Wynn. She asked shareholders to reject his reelection. Steve Wynn resigned as
chairman and CEO and later sold his company shares after The Wall Street Journal
reported that several women said he harassed or assaulted them and that one case led to a
$7.5 million settlement. He denies the allegations. He has filed a defamation lawsuit
against the Associated Press for its reporting on a separate allegation made to police. Elaine
Wynn also raised the issue of executive pay at Wynn, which she said is not tied to
performance. She said Hagenbuch was serving on Wynn’s compensation committee when
Steve Wynn’s pay was called into question in 2015. She also criticized a recently approved
$24 million pay package for CEO Matthew Maddox, calling it ‘‘exorbitant for a first-time
untested public company CEO.’’ Wynn said she is not seeking a seat on the board for herself
or anyone else and urged shareholders to withhold votes for Hagenbuch at the annual
shareholders meeting on May 16. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Agenda
Tuesday, April 24
➔ PANEL DISCUSSION
Network and learn
All those who identify as women are
invited to join DraftKings and She Geeks
Out, an organization that supports
diversity and inclusion in the business
community, for an evening of networking,
a panel discussion, food, and drinks.
Tuesday, 6 to 9 p.m., DraftKings, 125
Summer St., Boston. $10. Register online
INTERNATIONAL
EU TRADE CHIEF SAID
LEADERS OF FRANCE,
GERMANY WILL
PRESSURE TRUMP TO
BACK OFF TARIFFS
RETAIL
HASBRO HURT BY
TOYS ‘R’ US CLOSURE
The European Union’s trade chief said the bloc’s two most powerful leaders will tell President Trump to back off on plans to impose steel and aluminum tariffs when they visit Washington this week. French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela
Merkel will meet separately with Trump and are bent on safeguarding trans-Atlantic unity
to face common challenges, from Iran to North Korea and beyond. Both will insist that unity would be threatened if Trump starts imposing punitive tariffs on key EU industries. Last
month, Trump imposed tariffs of 25 percent on steel imports and 10 percent on imported
aluminum, but granted the EU a temporary exemption until May 1. The United States also
temporarily exempted big steel producers Canada and Mexico — provided they agree to
renegotiate a North American trade deal to his satisfaction. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
The demise of Toys “R” Us Inc. took a
toll on Hasbro Inc. last quarter and
that isn’t likely to abate until later this
year. Hasbro posted declining sales in
all business areas in the quarter, sending its shares down Monday by the
most in more than two months. The
toymaker said the drop was a result of
the Toys “R” Us liquidation, as well as
“uncertainty” in some operations and
excess inventory in Europe. The retailer, one of Hasbro’s largest customers,
filed for bankruptcy protection in September, had a terrible fourth quarter and then announced the liquidation of several divisions. This has presented another hurdle for toymakers that were already dealing with
slowing growth and concerns that the success of making so many products based off an
ever-growing slate of entertainment for kids is waning. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
or go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
➔ WORKSHOP
Assess your skill set
Those approaching a career change are
invited to attend a workshop hosted by
JVS CareerSolution. Participants will
identify their best skills and explore
occupations that suit them. Tuesday,
9:30 to 11:30 a.m., JVS CareerSolution,
75 Federal St., 3rd floor, Boston. Free.
SOCIAL MEDIA
FACEBOOK REMOVES
MORE ISIS CONTENT
IN FIRST QUARTER
Facebook Inc. said it was able to remove a larger amount of content from the Islamic State
group and Al Qaeda in the first quarter of 2018 by actively looking for it. The company has
trained its review systems — humans and computer algorithms — to seek out terrorist
groups’ posts. The social network took action on 1.9 million pieces of content from those
groups in the first three months of the year, about twice as many as in the previous quarter.
And 99 percent of that content wasn’t reported first by users, but was flagged by the
company’s internal systems, Facebook said Monday. Facebook, like Twitter Inc. and
Google’s YouTube, has historically put the onus on its users to flag content that its
moderators need to look at. After pressure from governments to recognize its immense
power over the spread of terrorist propaganda, Facebook started about a year ago to take
more direct responsibility. Chief executive Mark Zuckerberg earlier this month told
Congress that Facebook now believes it has a responsibility over the content on its site.
— BLOOMBERG NEWS
Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
Wednesday, April 25
➔ INFO SESSION
Get smart about
employee benefits
Attend an educational session hosted by
the New England Employee Benefits
Council called “Adrift in an Ocean of
SOCIAL MEDIA
INTERNS
AT HARLEY­
DAVIDSON
TO GET FREE
MOTORCYCLES
Harley-Davidson is offering free motorcycles for those who join its summer
internship program. Eight college students or recent graduates will have the
enviable task of being paid to ride a Harley and share their adventures on
social media. And the best part? They’ll keep their bikes at the end of the 12week internship. The Milwaukee-based motorcycle maker says it will teach
the interns how to ride, compensate them for their work and travels, and let
them keep their motorcycles. Harley-Davidson says it’s looking for those
who have the ability to create content on the fly, are creative, and have the
talent to take great photos and fun videos. Applicants must be 18 years or
older and looking to pursue a social media career. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Health & Welfare Plan Compliance?” The
session will feature speakers and is
designed to help employers and
consultants understand laws governing
health and welfare employee benefits.
Wednesday, 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.,
Forefront Waltham Conference Center,
404 Wyman St., Waltham. $170 for
members, $220 for nonmembers.
Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
ECONOMY
US HOME SALES
INCREASE BY
1.1 PERCENT
IN MARCH
RETAIL
WALMART CLOSE
TO DEAL FOR
MAJORITY STAKE
IN INDIA’S LEADING
E­COMMERCE
COMPANY
US sales of existing homes increased 1.1
percent on a monthly basis in March, which
suggests that buyers are undeterred by the
dwindling number of properties available on
the market. The National Association of
Realtors says that homes sold last month at a
seasonally adjusted annual pace of 5.60
million, up from 5.54 million in February.
This sales rate is higher than the 2017 total,
but March sales were down slightly over the
past 12 months. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Walmart is close to finalizing a deal to buy a majority stake in India’s leading e-commerce
company for at least $12 billion and may complete the agreement in the next two weeks,
according to people familiar with the matter. All the major investors in Flipkart Online
Services are now on board with the Walmart purchase, after an earlier debate over an
Amazon.com acquisition, said the people, asking not to be named because the matter is
private. Tiger Global Management will sell nearly all its 20 percent stake in Flipkart, while
SoftBank Group will offload a substantial part of its 20 percent-plus holding, the people
said. Walmart is likely to end up with 60 percent to 80 percent of Flipkart, valued at about
$20 billion, they said. The deal, if completed, would give Walmart a substantial foothold in
an emerging market of 1.3 billion people. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
➔ WORKSHOP
Using a job­seeking
app
Learn to navigate the Skillist app, which
posts full-time job openings with full
benefits and competitive pay. Those
SOCIAL MEDIA
PERSONAL FINANCE
EXPERT SUES
FACEBOOK IN BRITAIN
OVER SCAM ADS TIED
TO HIS NAME
A personal finance expert launched a lawsuit against Facebook in
Britain on Monday, claiming the social media company is allowing
the publication of scam ads featuring his name. Martin Lewis, who
founded the MoneySavingExpert website, says his name has
appeared on more than 50 advertisements in the last year, many of
them get-rich-quick scams. Attorney Mark Lewis, the claimant’s
cousin, said his client was seeking substantial damages, so that
‘‘Facebook can’t simply see paying out damages as just the ‘cost of
business’ and carry on regardless.’’ Facebook said it already took
action against fake ads. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
without a four-year degree can apply for
jobs in administration, coordination, and
customer service. Wednesday, 5:30 to 7
p.m., JVS CareerSolution, 75 Federal St.,
3rd floor, Boston. Free. Register online or
go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
Events of note? E­mail us at
agenda@globe.com
C4
Business
T h e
notices
& more
boston.com/classifieds
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
Premises: 152 Callender Street, Unit #1, 152 Callender
Street Condominium Dorchester (Boston), MA
By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Priscilla V. Graham
to Shawmut Mortgage Company and now held by Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency, said mortgage dated
December 20, 1990, and recorded with the Suffolk County
Registry of Deeds in Book 16641, Page 253, said mortgage
was assigned from Shawmut Mortgage Company to Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency by assignment dated
December 20,1990 and recorded with said Registry of
Deeds in Book 16641 at Page 288, for breach of the conditions in said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing
the same will be sold at Public Auction on May 15, 2018 at
11:00 AM Local Time upon the premises, directly in front of
the building in which the unit is located, all and singular the
premises described in said mortgage, to wit:
the unit (“Unit”) Number 1 of the 152 Callender Street
Condominium (the “Condominium”), located in Dorchester
Massachusetts, which Condominium was created pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter l83A by the recording of a Master
Deed (the “Master Deed”) dated September 20, 1990 and
recorded on October 19, 1990 with Suffolk Registry of
Deeds, in Book 16544, Page 001, and amended December
18, 1990, recorded herewith as Instrument No.
Said Unit contains approximately 1,088 square feet and is
shown on the floor plans of the Building recorded with the
Master Deed on the floor plan attached hereto and made
a part hereof, to which is affixed with verified statement in
the form required by said Chapter 183A, Section 9.
Said Unit is hereby conveyed together with:
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC UTILITIES
NOTICE OF ADJUDICATION
NOTICE OF PUBLIC COMMENT HEARING
NSTAR Electric Company d/b/a Eversource Energy
D.P.U. 17-147
Notice is hereby given that NSTAR Electric Company
d/b/a Eversource Energy (the “Company”) has filed with
the Department of Public Utilities (the “Department”) a
petition pursuant to the provisions of Section 6 of Chapter 665 of the Acts of 1956 seeking individual and comprehensive zoning exemptions from the operation of the
Boston Zoning Code (“Petition”). The zoning exemptions
are requested in connection with the Company’s proposed
modifications to an existing substation, Substation No. 385
(the “K Street Substation,” “Substation,” or the “Substation
Site”), located at 500 East First Street in the neighborhood
of South Boston in the City of Boston, Massachusetts. The
Petition has been docketed as D.P.U. 17-147. The Department will review the Petition to determine whether the
zoning exemptions should be granted and if the proposed
use of the land or structure is reasonably necessary for the
convenience or welfare of the public, pursuant to Section 6
of Chapter 665 of the Acts of 1956.
The Company also has filed information relating to proposed modifications to the existing Substation, which was
approved by the Energy Facilities Siting Board (“Siting
Board”) on January 14, 2005, in EFSB 04-1/D.T.E. 04-5/04-7.
The Department will review these modifications as part of
this proceeding.
The Department will conduct a public comment hearing commencing at 7 p.m. on May 2, 2018 at the Tynan
Elementary School at 650 East Fourth Street, Boston,
Massachusetts, 02127 to receive public comment.
At the public comment hearing, the Company will present an overview of the proposed changes at the K Street
Substation. Public officials and members of the public will
then have an opportunity to provide comments about the
proposed changes. The public may also file written comments with the Presiding Officer. To file comments, please
see instructions in the section “Comments, Intervention
and Participation” later in this Notice.
Description of the Projects
1.
An undivided 33 1/3 percent (%) interest in the Common Areas and Facilities of the Condominium, as it may be
amended pursuant to provisions of the Master Deed:
2. The exclusive right to use Parking Spaces on an
unassigned basis:
3.
The exclusive right to use those Common Areas and
Facilities appurtenant to said Unit as set forth in the Master
Deed:
4. All other rights, easements, agreements, interests and
provisions contained in the Master Deed, the Declaration
of Trust of the Condominium recorded with said Registry of
Deeds in Book 16544, Page 030 (the “Declaration of Trust”)
and the Rules and Regulations adopted pursuant thereto
(the “Rules and Regulations”), as any of the same may be
amended from time to time pursuant to the provisions
thereof.
Said Unit is conveyed subject to and with the benefit of:
1. The provisions of Chapter l83A as the same may be
amended from time to time:
2. The provisions of the Master Deed (including, without
limitation, the title matters set forth in Exhibit A to the Master Deed and the Grantor’s rights to add additional phases
to the Condominium as set forth in the Master Deed, the
Declaration of Trust and the Rules and Regulations, in each
case as the same may be amended from time to time pursuant to the provisions thereof:
3. Real estate taxes assessed against the Unit and the
Common Areas and Facilities which are not yet due and
payable:
4. Provisions of existing building and zoning laws.
Subject to the covenant for Affordable Housing and Buildable Lot Deed Rider set forth in a Deed from the City of
Boston, dated October 25, 1988, recorded with said Deeds,
Book 15182, Page 1, subject to the covenant for Affordable Housing as set forth in Deed Rider A which is attached
hereto and incorporated herein by reference.
The rights, agreements, easements, restrictions, provisions
and interests set forth above, together with any amendments thereto shall constitute covenants running with the
land and shall inure to the benefit of and bind, as the case
may be, any person having any time any interest or estate
in the Unit, his agents, employees, licensees, visitors and
lessees as though the same were fully set forth herein.
The description of the property contained in the
mortgage shall control in the event of a typographical error
in this publication.
For Mortgagor’s Title see deed dated December 18,
1990, and recorded in the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds,
in Book 16641, Page 234.
Said Unit will be conveyed together with an undivided
percentage interest in the Common Elements of said
Condominium appurtenant to said Unit and together with
all rights, easements, covenants and agreements as contained and referred to in the Declaration of Condominium,
as amended.
TERMS OF SALE: Said premises will be sold and
conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes,
tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which
take precedence over the said mortgage above described.
FIVE THOUSAND ($5,000.00) Dollars of the purchase
price must be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by
the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be
paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s
check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Shechtman Halperin Savage, LLP
1080 Main Street
Pawtucket, RI 02860
Attorney for Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency
Present Holder of the Mortgage
(401) 272-1400
NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S OF REAL ESTATE
Premises: 113 Sumner Street, Unit 72, Carlton Wharf
Condominium, East Boston (Boston), MA
By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained
in a certain mortgage given by Kristin M. Langone to City
of Boston Credit Union, said mortgage dated July 16, 2007,
and recorded with the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in
Book 42150, Page 192, for breach of the conditions in said
mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will
be sold at Public Auction on May 15, 2018 at 12:00 PM Local Time upon the premises, directly in front of the building
in which the unit is located, all and singular the premises
described in said mortgage, to wit:
Unit 72 in the Carlton Wharf Condominium established
by Master Deed dated April 15, 2005 recorded with the
Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 37009, Page 97,
together with a 4.14 percent undivided interest in the common areas and facilities of the Condominium as set forth in
the Master Deed and such other privileges and obligations
including an easement for the exclusive use of certain
common areas of the Carlton Wharf Condominium, all as
further described in the Master Deed.
The unit is also subject to the provisions of the Declaration of Trust of Carlton Wharf Condominium dated April 15,
2005 and recorded with said Deeds in Book 37009, Page
116.
The property contains approximately 956 square feet
of floor area and has a property address of 113 Sumner
Street, Unit 72, East Boston, MA 02128.
A deed conveying the unit from Gary Fanjiang to Kristin M.
Langone is recorded herewith.
The description of the property contained in the mortgage shall control in the event of a typographical error in
this publication.
For Mortgagor’s Title see deed dated May 29, 2007, and
recorded in the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds, in Book
42150, Page 186.
Said Unit will be conveyed together with an undivided percentage interest in the Common Elements of said
Condominium appurtenant to said Unit and together with
all rights, easements, covenants and agreements as contained and referred to in the Declaration of Condominium,
as amended.
TERMS OF SALE: Said premises will be sold and conveyed
subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles,
municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.
FIVE THOUSAND ($5,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price
must be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or
cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the
purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid
in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check
within thirty (30) days after the date of sale.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Shechtman Halperin Savage, LLP
1080 Main Street
Pawtucket, RI 02860
Attorney for City of Boston Credit Union
Present Holder of the Mortgage
(401) 272-1400
The Company’s proposed modifications at the K Street
Substation include: (1) the installation of a 345-kilovolt
(“kV”), 160 megavolt ampere reactive (“MVar”) voltage
regulator and related equipment, along with the conversion of the existing 345-kV straight bus to a ring bus (“Voltage Regulator Project”); and (2) the construction of a new
perimeter fence and barriers around certain equipment
at the Substation (“Security Fence Project”; together, the
“Projects”). The Company’s proposed voltage regulator
would be installed and operated on a parcel of land that
the Company purchased in 2007 (the “New Parcel”). The
New Parcel abuts and is to the rear of the existing Substation Site. The Voltage Regulator Project is proposed to
meet transmission system needs as identified by the Independent System Operator of New England (“ISO-NE”). As
part of the Security Fence Project, the Company proposes
one new perimeter fence to replace the existing fence at
the current Substation site and to encompass the New Parcel at the rear of the existing site to meet physical security
standards.
A copy of the Company’s Petition is available on the Department’s Website, www.mass.gov/dpu. Once at that
website, click on “DPU File Room”; then click on “Dockets/
Filings”; choose “Docket by Number” from the drop-down
menu; you will see a box with the words “Enter docket
number”; enter 17-147 in that box; and then click on the
“Go” icon, which is located next to the box. To request
materials in accessible formats for people with disabilities
(Braille, large print, electronic files, or audio format) contact
the Department’s ADA coordinator at DPUADACoordinator@state.ma.us or (617) 305-3500. The Company’s Petition
is also available in hard-copy format for public inspection
at the offices of the Department, One South Station, Boston, Massachusetts. A copy also will be available for public
viewing at the Boston Public Library, South Boston Branch,
646 East Broadway, South Boston; no later than fourteen
(14) days before the public hearing.
Comments, Intervention and Participation
Any person who desires to submit written comments on
the Company’s Petition may do so by filing an original and
two (2) copies of such comments no later than the close
of business (5:00 p.m.) on May 23, 2018 with Mark D.
Marini, Secretary, Department of Public Utilities, One South
Station, 2nd Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02110. An electronic copy of all comments should be sent by email to the
following: (1) the Department at dpu.efiling@state.ma.us;
(2) the Company’s counsel, David S. Rosenzweig, Esq.,
at drosen@keeganwerlin.com; and (3) the Department’s
Hearing Officer in this proceeding, Donna C. Sharkey at
Donna.Sharkey@state.ma.us.
Any person who interested in intervening as a party or participating as a limited participant in this proceeding must
file a written petition with the Hearing Officer. Petitions
must satisfy the timing and substantive requirements of
220 CMR 1.03(1). Receipt by the Department - not mailing
or postmark - constitutes filing and determines whether
a petition has been timely filed. A petition filed late may
be disallowed as untimely unless good cause is shown for
waiver pursuant to 220 CMR 1.01(4). To be allowed, a petition to intervene must demonstrate that the petitioner may
be substantially and specifically affected by this proceeding.
A petition to intervene also should be submitted to the
Department by email attachment to dpu.efiling@state.
ma.us, with a copy sent by email to the Company’s counsel David Rosensweig, Esq. at drosen@keeganwerlin.com;
and the Department’s Hearing Officer Donna C. Sharkey
at to Donna.Sharkey@state.ma.us. The text of the email
must specify: (1) the docket number of the proceeding
(D.P.U. 17-147); (2) name of the person or company submitting the filing; and (3) a brief description of the document.
The electronic filing should also include the name, title and
telephone number of a person to contact in the event of
questions about the filing. All written pleadings submitted
in electronic format will be posted on the Department’s
website, http://www.mass.gov/dpu.
Reasonable accommodations at public or evidentiary hearings for people with disabilities are available upon request.
Include a description of the accommodation you will need,
including as much detail as you can. Also include a way
we can contact you if we need more information. Please
provide as much advance notice as possible. Last minute
requests will be accepted, but may not be able to be accommodated. Contact the Department’s ADA coordinator
at DPUADACoordinator@state.ma.us or (617) 305-3500.
Interpretation services for those with limited English language proficiency are available upon request. Include in
your request the language required, and a way to contact
you if we need more information. Please provide as much
advance notice as possible. Last minute requests will be
accepted, but may not be able to be accommodated. Contact the Presiding Officer (contact information below). Any
person desiring further information regarding this Notice,
including information regarding intervention or participating in the adjudicatory proceeding, may contact the Hearing Officer at the physical address, telephone number, or
email address set forth below:
Donna Sharkey, Esq. Presiding Officer
Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities
One South Station, 5th Floor
Boston, MA 02110
(617) 305-3525
Donna.Sharkey@state.ma.us
LEGAL NOTICE
MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
By virtue of and in execution of the Power of Sale
contained in a certain mortgage given by Jennifer Jones
to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. acting
solely as a nominee for Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage
Corp., dated December 22, 2006 and recorded in Suffolk
County Registry of Deeds in Book 40994, Page 22 (the
“Mortgage”) of which mortgage The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York, as Trustee for TBW Mortgage-Backed Trust 2007-1, Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through
Certificates, Series 2007-1 is the present holder by assignment from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.
as nominee for Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp., its
successors and assigns to The Bank of New York Mellon, as
Trustee for TBW Mortgage-Backed Trust 2007-1, Mortgage
Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-1 dated October
19, 2012 recorded in Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in
Book 50614, Page 137 and confirmatory assignment from
Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (“MERS”),
solely as nominee for Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage
Corporation, its successors and/or assigns to The Bank of
New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York, as Trustee
for TBW Mortgage-Backed Trust 2007-1, Mortgage-Backed
Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-1 dated February
23, 2016 recorded in Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in
Book 56148, Page 1, for breach of conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same, the
mortgaged premises located at Unit No. 1 a/k/a Unit 314-1,
of the Amory Minton Condominium, 314 Amory Street, Jamaica Plain (Boston), MA 02130 will be sold at a Public Auction at 3:00 PM on May 7, 2018, at the mortgaged premises, more particularly described below, all and singular the
premises described in said mortgage, to wit:
Unit 314-1, the address of which is 314 Amory Street, Boston (Jamaica Plain), Suffolk County, Massachusetts, a unit in
the Condominium known as Amory Minton Condominium,
located at 314 Amory Street, Boston Massachusetts, established pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter
183A, by Master Deed dated October 29, 1986, at Book
13020, Page 044, as amended of record (the “Unit”). The
Condominium is comprised of the buildings, improvements
and structures thereon shown on the site plan filed with
the Master Deed.
The unit is shown on the floor plans of the buildings recorded simultaneously with the Master Deed and on a
copy of the portion of said plans attached to the first unit
for this Unit.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Pursuant to the provisions of M.G.L. c. 12C and in accordance with M.G.L. c. 30A, as amended, the Center for
Health Information and Analysis (CHIA) will hold a public
hearing on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 at 10:00 A.M. at 501
Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02116 relative to the adoption
of amendments to regulation:
957 CMR 3.00: Assessment on Certain Health Care
Providers and Surcharge Payors
The amended regulation, effective June 29, 2018, governs
the procedures for assessing and collecting an assessment on Hospitals, Ambulatory Surgical Centers (ASCs) and
Surcharge Payors to help fund CHIA’s expenses, pursuant
to M.G.L. c. 12C, § 7. The amended regulation also establishes the reporting requirements and related deadlines for
Hospitals, ASCs and Surcharge Payors to provide information required to calculate and collect the assessment as
well as the time frames for Hospitals, ASCs and Surcharge
Payors to submit their assessment payments to CHIA. The
procedures and methodology for assessing and collecting
the assessment as well as the reporting requirements and
payment time frames remain unchanged from those currently in effect and there are no new or additional reporting requirements. As for changes, CHIA has added compliance and penalty provisions consistent with M.G.L. c. 12C,
§11 and has made minor updates to the regulation. These
changes promote uniformity between the current regulation and other CHIA regulations.
It is anticipated that Hospitals, ASCs and Surcharge Payors
will incur no additional administrative costs resulting from
the proposed changes to this regulation. There is no fiscal
impact on cities and towns and no fiscal impact on small
businesses.
Individuals that notify CHIA of their intent to testify at the
hearing will be afforded an earlier opportunity to speak.
Speakers may notify CHIA of their intention to testify at
the hearing by emailing CHIA-Regulations@state.ma.us. Individuals may also submit written testimony to the same
email address. Please submit electronic testimony as an
attached Word document or as text within the body of the
email with the name of the regulation in the subject line.
All submissions must include the sender’s full name and
address. Individuals who are unable to submit testimony
by email should mail written testimony to the Center for
Health Information and Analysis, 501 Boylston Street, Suite
5100, Boston, MA 02116. Written testimony must be submitted by 5:00 P.M. on June 1, 2018. Copies of the regulation are available for inspection and/or purchase at the
Center for Health Information and Analysis or may
be viewed on CHIA’s website at www.chiamass.gov/
regulations.
The Unit is conveyed together with an undivided 6.5% in
the common areas and facilities of the Amory Monson
Condominium.
The Unit is conveyed together with such other rights and
easements as may be appurtenant to the Unit as set forth
in the Master Deed, in the original deed of the Unit, as
shown on any site plan and floor plans filed with said Master Deed.
B o s t o n
LEGAL NOTICES
City of Newton
Legal Notice
Tuesday, May 8, 2018
Public hearings will be held
on Tuesday, May 8, 2018
at 7:00 PM, second floor,
Newton City Hall before the
Land Use Committee of the
Newton City Council for the
purpose of hearing the following petitions at which
time all parties interested
in the items shall be heard.
Notice will be published
Tuesday, April 24, 2018 and
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 in The
Boston Globe and Wednesday, May 2, 2018 in the
Newton Tab, with a copy
posted on the city’s website
at www.newtonma.gov and
in a conspicuous place at
Newton City Hall.
#213-18 Special Permit Petition to extend nonconforming front setback at 140 Windermere Rd
JOHN AND DANIEL ARONE
petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL to
FURTHER EXTEND NONCONFORMING SETBACK by constructing a second-floor deck
above the existing sunporch,
extending the existing nonconforming setback vertically
at 140 Windermere Road,
Ward 4, Auburndale, on land
known as Section 43, Block
08, Lot 19, containing approximately 12,445 sq. ft. of land
in a district zoned SNIGLE
RESIDENCE 2. Ref: 7.3, 7.4,
3.1.3, 7.8.2.C.2 of Chapter
30 of the City of Newton Rev
Zoning Ord, 2015.
#214-18 Special Permit Petition to exceed FAR and lot
coverage at 458 Woodward
Street
STEFFI AND ERIC KARP petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE
PLAN APPROVAL to relocate
stairs and enclose an existing porch, further increasing
the existing nonconforming
lot coverage and nonconforming FAR to .63 where .59
exists and .44 is allowed at
458 Woodward Street, Ward
5, Waban, on land known as
Section 53, Block 26, Lot 16,
containing
approximately
6,276 sq. ft. of land in a
district zoned SINGLE RESIDENCE 2. Ref: 7.3, 7.4, 3.1.3,
3.1.9, 7.8.2.C.2 of Chapter
30 of the City of Newton Rev
Zoning Ord, 2015.
#215-18 Special Permit Petition to allow a rear-lot subdivision at 156 Otis Street
156 OTIS STREET LLC petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE
PLAN APPROVAL to allow a
rear lot subdivision to create two lots, raze the existing
single-family dwelling and
construct single-family dwellings on each lot at 156 Otis
Street, Ward 2, West Newton,
on land known as Section 24,
Block 13, Lot 14A, containing approximately 43,700 sq.
ft. of land in a district zoned
SINGLE RESIDENCE 2. Ref:
7.3, 7.4, 3.1.5, 3.1.10 and
5.4.2.B of Chapter 30 of the
City of Newton Rev Zoning
Ord, 2015.
***
You may call the City Council
Office at 617-796-1210 for
information.
City of Newton
Legal Notice
Tuesday, May 1, 2018
Public hearings will be held
on Tuesday, May 1, 2018
at 7:00 PM, second floor,
Newton City Hall before the
Land Use Committee of the
Newton City Council for the
purpose of hearing the following petitions at which
time all parties interested
in the items shall be heard.
Notice will be published
Tuesday, April 17, 2018
and Tuesday, April 24, 2018
in The Boston Globe and
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 in
the Newton Tab, with a copy
posted on the city’s website
at www.newtonma.gov and
in a conspicuous place at
Newton City Hall.
#209-18 Special Permit Petition to exceed FAR at 138
Arnold Road
LOUS FRANCHI/JAMS REALTY
LLC petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL
to EXCEED FAR by allowing
additional attic space above
an attached garage, creating
an FAR of .35 where .33 is
allowed at 138 Arnold Road,
Ward 8, Newton Centre, on
land known as Section 81,
Block 01, Lot 03, containing
approximately 15,250 sq. ft.
of land in a district zoned
SINGLE RESIDENCE 2. Ref:
7.3, 7.4, 3.1.3, 3.1.9 of Chapter 30 of the City of Newton
Rev Zoning Ord, 2015.
#210-18 Special Permit Petition to amend Special Permit
Board Order #129-16 at 23
Howe Rd
MARIA SANTOS petition for a
SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN
APPROVAL to amend Special
Permit Board Order #12916 to amend the site plan
approved in 2016 to allow
for the removal of dormers,
redistribution of living space
and enclosing a portion of a
patio, resulting in a reduced
FAR of .59 where .62 was approved and .44 is allowed at
23 Howe Road, Ward 8, Newton Centre, on land known
as Section 81, Block 11A, Lot
37, containing approximately
6,591 sq. ft. of land in a district
zoned SINGLE RESIDENCE 2 .
Ref: 7.3, 7.4, of Chapter 30 of
the City of Newton Rev Zoning Ord, 2015.
#211-18 Special Permit Petition to further increase nonconforming FAR at 48 Cotton
Street
ROBERTA AND PHILIP LEVY
petition for a SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL
to construct
a mudroom
and half bath, connecting
an attached garage ,as well
as a basement addition for
improved exterior access, extending the existing nonconforming FAR to .48 where .39
is allowed and .45 exists 48
Cotton Street, Ward 7, Newton, on land known as Section 73, block 22, Lot 02, containing approximately 9,153
sq. ft. of land in a district
zoned SINGLE RESIDENCE 2.
Ref: 7.3, 7.4, 3.1.9, 7.8.2.C.2
of the City of Newton Rev
Zoning Ord, 2015.
#212-18 Petition to amend
Board Orders #91-15 and
#182-09(2) at 180 Needham
Street
C P NEEDHAM STREET LLC
petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL to
amend Special Permit Board
Orders #91-15 and #182-09(2)
to allow a for-profit learning
center in the second-floor
office space at 180 Needham
Street, Ward 8, Newton Upper Falls, on land known as
Section 83, Block 28, Lot 01,
containing
approximately
8,960 sq. ft. of land in a district zoned MULTI USE 1. Ref:
7.3, 7.4, 4.4.1, 6.3.14 of the
City of Newton Rev Zoning
Ord, 2015.
***
You may call the City Council
Office at 617-796-1210 for information.
The Unit is also conveyed together with the exclusive right
and easement to use either (a) a garage, or (b) an outdoor
parking space designated by the Declarant on the first Unit
Deed if the unit as affected by the First Amendment of
Master Deed recorded with said registry at Nook 24090,
Page 296 stating garage space G-2 is the parking space
designated to Unit 314-1.
For mortgagor’s title see deed recorded with the
Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 40994, Page 20.
The premises will be sold subject to any and all unpaid taxes and other municipal assessments and liens, and
subject to prior liens or other enforceable encumbrances
of record entitled to precedence over this mortgage, and
subject to and with the benefit of all easements, restrictions, reservations and conditions of record and subject to
all tenancies and/or rights of parties in possession.
Terms of the Sale: Cash, cashier’s or certified check
in the sum of $5,000.00 as a deposit must be shown at the
time and place of the sale in order to qualify as a bidder
(the mortgage holder and its designee(s) are exempt from
this requirement); high bidder to sign written Memorandum of Sale upon acceptance of bid; balance of purchase
price payable in cash or by certified check in thirty (30)
days from the date of the sale at the offices of mortgagee’s
attorney, Korde & Associates, P.C., 900 Chelmsford Street,
Suite 3102, Lowell, MA 01851 or such other time as may be
designated by mortgagee. The description for the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event
of a typographical error in this publication.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York,
as Trustee for TBW Mortgage-Backed Trust 2007-1, Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-1
Korde & Associates, P.C.
900 Chelmsford Street
Suite 3102
Lowell, MA 01851
(978) 256-1500
Jones, Jennifer, 13-011514
powered by
Experience Globe.com
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
Merchants use Facebook to
fill Amazon with fake reviews
By Elizabeth Dwoskin
and Craig Timberg
WASHINGTON POST
SAN FRANCISCO — On Amazon, customer comments can
help a product surge in popularity. The online retail giant
says that more than 99 percent
of its reviews are legitimate because they are written by real
shoppers who aren’t paid for
them.
But a Washington Post examination found that for some
popular product categories,
such as bluetooth headphones
and speakers, the vast majority
of reviews appear to violate
Amazon’s prohibition on paid
reviews. They have certain
characteristics, such as repetitive wording that people likely
cut and paste in.
Many of these fraudulent reviews originate on Facebook,
where sellers seek shoppers on
dozens of networks, including
Amazon Review Club and Amazon Reviewers Group, to give
glowing feedback in exchange
for money or other compensation. The practice artificially inflates the ranking of thousands
of products, experts say, misleading consumers.
Amazon banned paying for
reviews a year and a half ago
because of research it conducted showing that consumers distrust paid reviews. Every once
in a while, including this
month, Amazon purges shoppers from its site who it accuses
of breaking its policies.
But the ban, say sellers and
experts, merely pushed an activity that used to take place
openly into dispersed and harder-to-track online communities.
There, an economy of paid
reviews has flourished. Merchants pledge to drop reimbursements into a reviewer’s
PayPal account within minutes
of posting comments for items
such as kitchen knives, rain
ponchos, or shower caddies, often sweetening the deal with a
$5 commission or an $10 Amazon gift card. Facebook this
month deleted more than a
dozen of the groups where sellers and buyers matched after
being contacted by the Post.
Amazon kicked a five-star seller
off its site after an inquiry from
the Post.
‘‘These days it is very hard to
sell anything on Amazon if you
play fairly,’’ said Tommy Noonan, who operates ReviewMeta, a website that helps consumers spot suspicious Amazon reviews. ‘‘If you want your
product to be competitive, you
have to somehow manufacture
reviews.’’
Sellers say the flood of inauthentic reviews makes it harder
for them to compete legitimately and can crush profits. ‘‘It’s
devastating, devastating,’’ said
PHOTOS BY AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Suspicious or fraudulent reviews are crowding out
authentic ones in some categories, a Post study found.
Mark Caldeira, owner of the baby products company Mayapple Baby. He said his product
rankings have plummeted in
the last year and a half, which
he attributes to competitors using paid reviews. ‘‘We just can’t
keep up.’’
Suspicious or fraudulent reviews are crowding out authentic ones in some categories, the
Post found using ReviewMeta
data. ReviewMeta examines red
flags, such as an unusually large
number of reviews that spike
over a short period of time or
‘‘sock puppet’’ reviewers who
appear to have cut and paste
stock language.
For example, the first ten
products listed in a search for
‘‘bluetooth speakers’’ had a total of 47,846 reviews, two thirds
of which were problematic,
based on calculations using the
ReviewMeta tool. So were more
than half of the 32,435 reviews
for the top 10 listed bluetooth
headphones.
Diet pills and other supplements also generated large
numbers of problematic reviews. Just 33 percent of the reviews for the top ten testosterone boosters listed on Amazon
appeared legitimate, like 44
percent of reviews for the top
listed weight loss pills, according to data crunched from ReviewMeta.
Incentivized reviewers give
higher ratings than non-paid
reviewers, according to ReviewMeta. The result is that consumers could unknowingly be
purchasing poorer quality
products.
‘‘I don’t like to be taken advantage of,’’ said Eric Hall, 53, a
research chemist in Minneapolis and an Amazon Prime customer who no longer trusts 5star reviews. He sees them as a
marker of likely fraud rather
than excellence.
Amazon says it aggressively
polices its platform for incentivized reviews. Amazon has filed
five lawsuits since 2015 against
people who write paid reviews
and companies that solicit
them.
‘‘We know that millions of
customers make informed buying decisions everyday using
Customer Reviews. We take this
responsibility very seriously
and defend the integrity of reviews by taking aggressive action to protect customers from
dishonest parties who are abusing the reviews system,’’ an Amazon spokeswoman, Angie
Newman, said in a statement.
‘‘We take forceful action against
both reviewers and sellers by
suppressing reviews that violate our guidelines and suspend, ban or pursue legal action against these bad actors.’’
‘‘The issue with fake or unreliable reviews has not subsided
at all but likely is worsening,’’
said Ming Ooi, chief strategy officer for Fakespot, a review auditing site that analyzes comments, similar to ReviewMeta.
Problems with the authenticity of Amazon reviews come
at a moment of broad public
concern over the accuracy of information on platforms built by
Silicon Valley. The spread of
Russian disinformation and
hoaxes on YouTube and Facebook has raised questions
about the role of technology
platforms in displaying and amplifying falsehoods, contributing to a climate of distrust and
social division.
Amazon has escaped the
scrutiny of its peers. But the
same network effects that enable misinformation also increasingly distort online commerce. Social media has accelerated the practice of online
reviewing because of its power
to bring together groups of people who gather for a specific
purpose, such as rating Uber
drivers.
‘‘We are committed to increasing the good and minimizing the bad across Facebook,’’ a
spokesperson, Rebecca Maas,
said in an email. ‘‘There are
many legitimate groups on Facebook related to online commerce, but the groups identified misuse our platform.’’ Facebook would not disclose which
groups it removed.
UK faults
Vertex’s
drug prices
uVERTEX
Continued from Page C1
5 percent of cystic fibrosis patients are eligible for Kalydeco,
but 50 percent of patients are
eligible for Orkambi.
“They wouldn’t make any
new funding available for Orkambi, which is obviously not viable and inconsistent with the
agreements we’ve reached in
other countries in the European
Union,” the Vertex spokeswoman said.
Nonetheless, the NHS asked
Vertex to review its proposal,
but the agency also indicated
that, unless this were to occur,
further progress was unlikely.
While pointing out that the
NHS and NICE are independent
of each another, the two health
ministers wrote that “the government will rightly stand by
any proposal that will provide
the best value and outcomes for
patients and the NHS.
“We ask you, as a matter of
the utmost urgency, to proceed
with negotiations in a way that
is constructive and supports
our joint aim of securing access
to your medicines currently licensed in the UK at a price that
is cost effective and fair,” they
wrote.
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2015
Boston-based Vertex has faced challenges from
governments in several countries about its drug prices.
Vertex has been grappling
with several governments, in
fact, over the price of its cystic
fibrosis treatments.
Later this week, a New York
state drug utilization review
board will examine concerns
that the cost of Orkambi may
cause the state Medicaid program to exceed a cap on drug
spending. Such reviews were
g r e e n l i g h t e d u n d e r a l aw
passed last year in a bid to control rising prices for medicines.
Depending upon the outcome,
the board could recommend a
supplemental rebate to lower
the cost to the program. This
marks the first time such a review will occur.
Two months ago, the company reportedly told the French
government it would cancel
planned clinical trials for testing cystic fibrosis drug combinations after the health minis-
try sought an 80 percent discount off the most recent offer
for Orkambi. The move sparked
anger from patient groups that
complained cystic fibrosis sufferers were being punished.
Last fall, the Netherlands
health minister indicated there
were plans to explore compulsory licensing in order to obtain
certain medicines at a lower
cost, a move that was precipitated by a dispute with Vertex
over Orkambi pricing. The two
sides subsequently reached a
deal. And Vertex also battled
with the Irish government for a
year over the cost of Orkambi
before agreement was reached
last April.
Ed Silverman can be reached at
ed.silverman@statnews.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@Pharmalot. Follow Stat on
Twitter @statnews.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
C5
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE/FILE 2018
On March 5, sea water made streets impassable in this Oceanside Drive neighborhood in Scituate during high tide.
Homes near water now a harder sell
uWATERFRONT
Continued from Page C1
Markets
Stocks wobble, bond yields rise
US stocks couldn’t hang on to an early gain and finished
mostly lower Monday as technology companies slipped.
Bond prices continued to fall, and the yield on the 10-year
Treasury note drew closer to 3 percent, a milestone it hasn’t
hit since 2014. Investors again focused on corporate deals
as Vectren agreed to be bought by CenterPoint Energy for
$6 billion. Sears’ CEO called for it to sell more assets. Henry
Schein said it will split off its animal health unit. After the
Treasury Department moved to ease sanctions on Rusal,
the Russian aluminum company, US aluminum company
stocks fell. Alcoa lost 13.5 percent, and Century Aluminum
plunged 53 percent. Stocks have faded in the past few days
as bond yields have climbed. The yield on the 10-year Treasury continued to trade at four-year highs, rising to 2.98
percent. A Bank of America Merrill Lynch Global Research
survey this month concluded that if the 10-year yield rises
to 3.50 percent, investors will start buying bonds while selling stocks. Walmart fell 1 percent; Bloomberg reported the
retailer might spend $12 billion to buy most of the Indian
e-commerce company FlipKart.
DOW JONES industrial average
$641 per square foot, compared
with a citywide average of $339
per square foot, said Constantine Valhouli, research director
at NeighborhoodX, a website
that tracks real estate values.
In Gloucester, the highestpriced units on a per-squarefoot basis are also along the waterfront: $1,042 on Atlantic
Road, and $1,039 on Mussell
Point Road. That’s about three
times Gloucester’s per-squarefoot average of $333.
It’s the same story in Scituate, which consistently bears
the brunt of coastal storms.
And in parts of Boston hit
hardest by winter storm surges
and tidal flooding — such as the
Seaport and East Boston — the
real estate market is still focused on luxury living, not rising sea levels, Valhouli said.
“ You wonder how many
more times are you going to see
those images of flooding during
the storm before that knowledge sinks in,” Valhouli said.
“That it’s going from a one-off
to something you’re going to
see more on the regular.”
A recent analysis by the
Union of Concerned Scientists,
a Cambridge science and environmental advocacy group, pinpoints several Massachusetts
coastal areas that now flood 26
times or more annually—not
only due to storms, but as a result of higher tides reaching farther inland. They include parts
of Marshfield, Scituate, Cohasset, Quincy, Revere, Lynn, Winthrop, and large swaths from
Ipswich to Salisbury. In Boston,
parts of South Boston, East Boston, the Seaport, the North End,
downtown, and Charlestown
are in the scientists’ frequentflood zone.
The group’s interactive map
includes scenarios for how
much more frequently floods
will occur and how much farther they will extend by 2035,
and all the way to 2100, when
it’s projected the seas could rise
by about 4 feet globally.
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
A shot from March 5 shows the kind of damage flooding from a big storm can do. This is
the basement of a home in Quincy.
Policy makers regionwide
have begun working on plans to
address the effects of climate
change, including rising sea levels. But so far, worrying about
flooding is not automatically a
factor for buyers looking at
homes in coastal neighborhoods.
“The real estate market has
so many variables and factors, I
guess weather is one we need to
pay a little more attention to going forward,” said Tony Wright,
the lead agent for Redfin in the
Salem and Lynn area. “Right
now, people are just asking,
‘How much money do I have to
pay for this house? What will be
a winning bid?’ . . . I have not
seen properties sitting.”
Aaron Terrazas, senior economist for the real estate website
Zillow, said shoppers are too
stressed about the lack of reasonably priced properties to
worry much about rising sea
levels.
“I don’t think [the Boston
area] is yet at the point that a
buyer is going to make a decision whether or not to buy because of ” recent flooding, Terrazas said. “Climate change is
such a long-term process, and,
of course, the effects are gradual, but the market right now is
being driven by immediate factors: inventory, rising interest
rates.”
Still, buyers should make it a
point to ask whether a property
was affec ted by the recent
nor’easters, said real estate attorney Richard Vetstein. In
Massachusetts, sellers have no
legal duty to disclose damage
unless they are asked directly,
he said. Agents and brokers, on
the other hand, are legally required to voluntarily disclose
any issues that may influence
the buyer not to enter into an
agreement.
“Evidence of recent flooding
should be pretty apparent,” Vetstein said.
Sellers with lower flood insurance rates have a better
chance at selling their homes
for asking price because they
can transfer those policies to
the new owners, said Rick
Stoeckel, an agent with Tonry
Insurance Group in Quincy.
“The problem is people who
weren’t locked in to a low rate
end up having to sell the house
at a reduced amount if they’re
in a flood zone,” Stoeckel said.
He had clients last year with
low flood insurance rates who
sold their half of a side-by-side
duplex on Quincy Shore Drive
for $30,000 more than the other half, which didn’t have flood
insurance. New flood policies
along Quincy Shore Dr. can
reach close to $3,000 a year,
Stoeckel said; he pays $1,600 in
flood insurance for his Quincy
Shore Drive home, while his
neighbor pays nearly $2,800.
The shortage of properties
for sale means people are still
willing to buy in flood zones,
said McGue, the Quincy broker
— if the insurance rates are reasonable.
For-sale properties that were
flooded, “they’re going to have
some issues,” he said. “To balance that, though, is that if people are in the flood zone and did
not get flooded, that gives them
bragging rights, as far as I’m
concerned: ‘No water in
March!’ ”
Katheleen Conti can be reached
at kconti@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @GlobeKConti.
‘Fearless Girl’ may have found a permanent home
uBOLD TYPES
monthlong installation ended
up lasting more than a year.
“Fearless Girl” will soon
right out of the shoot.”
stare down the New York Stock
With Irving out, the odds of
a championship title this seaExchange instead. The office of
Mayor Bill de Blasio hinted
son have dimmed. But the rethat the bull could move, as
newal numbers show that fans
well, possibly to join the girl —
believe another banner isn’t far
though the artist behind the
out of reach. — JON CHESTO
bull famously dislikes the juxtaOn the move in NYC
position.
Hooley says he thinks “Fear“Fearless Girl” is on the
less Girl” has found her permamove, and State Street CEO
nent home, though
Jay Hooley doesn’t
the exact timing of the
mind one bit.
move remains unclear.
The Boston finanThe current location
cial giant funded the
drew crowds and instatue as part of a
terrupted traffic on
campaign designed
the street, he says, creby the ad agency
ating a potential pubMcCann to promote
lic safety hazard.
State Street’s SHE
“The original purfund, which focuses
on companies with a Jay Hooley sees pose was to get NYSE
a “perfect
[companies] to have
significant number
marriage” of
more diverse boards,”
of female leaders,
the NYSE and
Hooley says. “By linkand to prod other
ing it more closely
companies to add
“Fearless Girl.”
with the New York
more women to their
Stock Exchange, we think that’s
boards.
a perfect marriage.”
The statue became an inThe State Street Global Ad­
stant tourist attraction after it
visors effort focused on the
went up last year, a defiant girl
hundreds of public companies
staring at the iconic “Charging
with no women on their
Bull” statue near Wall Street.
boards. More than 150 have
What was supposed to be a
Continued from Page C1
NASDAQ Composite index
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
added female directors since
the campaign began.
But Hooley says he was
surprised by how quickly the
statue, designed by sculptor
Kristen Visbal, took on a much
broader purpose.
“The world has viewed this
as a symbol of gender inequality,” Hooley says. “It was a moment in time, when I don’t
think anybody really appreciated the tension that underlies
the issue.” — JON CHESTO
A bonus bonanza?
When Mintz Levin handed
out $1,000 bonuses to all of the
law firm’s non-attorney staffers
last year after particularly
strong financial results, the
partners thought it would be a
one-and-done type of gift.
Not so. The Boston firm has
just shelled out nearly
$550,000 to give $1,000 apiece
to each of its 500-plus non-lawyer employees. (These are in
addition to the firm’s regular
merit-based bonuses.)
The reason? Another good
year. The firm’s gross revenue
rose about 8 percent to $403
million, and equity partner
profits rose 13 percent.
Bob Bodian, Mintz Levin’s
managing partner, said the
firm’s policy committee made
the decision on the last day of
its fiscal year, March 31, after
closing the books.
Bodian attributes some of
the firm’s success to a change in
its compensation structure:
Attorneys who land a new
client are required to share
some of the “production credit”
with younger lawyers who are
helping to serve that particular
client.
He says the change fostered
a more collaborative approach
at the firm, which in turn improved client satisfaction.
So should employees bank
on another bonus next spring?
It probably depends on how
the firm does between now and
then.
“We’re not calling it an
annual tradition, but it would
be great for the firm if that’s
how it turned out,” Bodian
says.
“If the trend continues and
we do as well next year . . . I
don’t see why we wouldn’t.”
— JON CHESTO
Can’t keep a secret? Tell us.
E-mail Bold Types at
boldtypes@globe.com.
C6
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
Auto Dealer Directory
Kelly Chrysler*
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
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Honda Cars of Boston*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
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Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
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877-338-9671
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100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
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Honda Village*
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
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Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
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Kelly Honda*
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
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855-278-0016
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540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
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Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
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Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
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888-293-8449
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Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
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855-845-0576
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Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
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Audi Shrewsbury
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
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Herb Chambers RAM of Danvers*
107 Andover Street, Route 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
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Herb Chambers RAM of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Road, Route 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
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Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
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978-683-8775
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Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
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888-318-7927
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Mirak Hyundai
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“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
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Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
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Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
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531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
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Kelly Maserati*
Ferrari Of New England*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
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Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
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978-560-0007
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Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
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855-857-4431
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Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
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844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti
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533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
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Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
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Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
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1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
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2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
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Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
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Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
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855-878-9603
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Infiniti of Hanover
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
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75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
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66 Galen St, Watertown
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Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Kelly Infiniti*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington*
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
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Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St, Natick
866-266-3870
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Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
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128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
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Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
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1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
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2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
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61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
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420 River Street, Haverhill
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of Westborough*
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800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
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760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
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Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
2060 Washington St, Hanover
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Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
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Sales: Monday-Thursday 8:30am-8:00pm, Friday 8:30am-6:00pm
Saturday 8:30am-6:00pm, Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm
Service: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pm
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Baseball: Twins-Yankees, 6:30 p.m., MLB Network
NBA playoffs: Bucks-Celtics, 7 p.m., NBCSB, NBA TV
Baseball: Red Sox-Blue Jays, 7:07 p.m., NESN
NBA playoffs: Heat-76ers, 8 p.m., TNT
Listings, D8
Sports
D
T H E B O S T O N GL OB E T U ES DAY, A P R I L 24, 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
Cora has long­term strategy
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
TORONTO — Alex Cora was sitting in the small visiting manager’s
office at Oakland Coliseum on Sunday morning, eating breakfast and
watching the Blue Jays-Yankees game
on television.
The Red Sox had been no-hit by an
undistinguished lefthander named
Sean Manaea the night before, but
Cora posted a lineup that did not include Mookie Betts, Eduardo Nunez,
and Hanley Ramirez.
The three players had been told a
few days earlier they would be getting
a day off and Cora didn’t change his
mind because of the no-hitter. For the
rookie manager, it was the first real
test of his resolve.
The easy thing, the expected
thing, would have been to use the
regular lineup. The Sox had a day off
on Monday, so Betts, Nunez, and
Ramirez would get their rest regardless.
But Cora had been telling the players for months he wanted them fresh
deep into the season and would manage accordingly. He also sees a benefit
in giving bench players regular atbats to keep them prepared.
“Today’s a big deal,” Cora said.
“We got no-hit, we can win the series.
Whatever. But what we’re trying to
accomplish is more than performing
today. It’s more about a long-term
plan than a short-term plan.
“Today is a big day for people understanding what we’re trying to do.
There’s a bigger plan in place.”
Cora was asked if he considered
changing his mind under the circumstances. The Sox hadn’t been no-hit
since 1993.
“No, no,” he said. “I think it’s more
important to stay the course, stay
with a firm plan and take care of
them. That’s the most important
thing. The benefit of the off days,
we’ll see that later in the season.”
A few hours later, Cora was back
in that same office after a 4-1 loss exRED SOX, Page D3
THEARON W. HENDERSON/GETTY IMAGES
Mookie Betts, here getting put out at second base by Oakland’s Marcus
Semien, will get back to work in Toronto after getting Sunday’s game off.
Pushed to the limit
Leafs turn
aside Bruins,
force Game 7
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
Maple Leafs 3 TORONTO — On a
day of unspeakable
Bruins
1 sorrow across this
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
The Bruins weren’t given much room around the net in Game 6. Here, Patrice Bergeron is shoved aside while Frederik Andersen gets to the puck.
city, with 10 lives lost to brutality and
bloodshed in the streets, the Maple
Leafs provided a morsel of solace to its
Blue-and-White citizenry Monday
night with a 3-1 win over the Bruins at
Air Canada Centre.
Amid the city’s first hours of grieving, the ACC shook and shook again as
William Nylander and Mitchell Marner moved the Leafs to a 2-1 lead in the
second period and evened the best-ofseven-game playoff series at three wins
apiece.
The decisive Game 7 — with the
winner to face Tampa Bay in the next
round — will be at TD Garden Wednesday night (faceoff: 7:30 p.m.) with the
Bruins in need of snapping out of an
offensive stupor that has seen them
score but nine goals over the last four
games.
“I think if anybody would have told
us at the start of the year that we are
going to be in Game 7, first round, at
home, we’d take it,” mused Brad
Marchand, his top scoring line again
dialed down to 0-0—0 by the stingy,
smarter Leafs. “Obviously, it’s tough
given the position we are in . . . but
again, we have to look forward to the
next game. It’s all we can control.
Same with them.”
BRUINS, Page D4
Reeling city comes together in sorrow
Tara Sullivan
TORONTO — A
disappointing
night for the
Bruins.
No doubt
about it.
Another
chance to close
out this openinground playoff series with the Maple
Leafs, another loss, this time by a 3-1
score at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre.
Series all tied at 3-3 now, so Game 7
NHL PLAYOFFS
Bruins vs. Maple Leafs
Series tied, 3-3
here we come, a win-or-go-home
showdown Wednesday night at TD
Garden for the right to keep on playing for the Stanley Cup.
But at least for a night, let’s refrain
from using some of the words often associated with losses like this, words
drawn from the outside world and
framed over our sporting obsessions,
borrowed from lexicons that really
don’t belong on fields of play. This was
not devastating. It was not a tragedy.
It was not a battle waged nor a war
lost.
Not on a day when the beautiful
city of Toronto experienced the real
thing. Not on another one of those awful nights when the real world invades
the protective stadium walls we love to
use as escape. This time it was a killer
van driver, a man who decided to plow
his vehicle through a busy downtown
SULLIVAN, Page D5
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
The Maple Leafs’ Jake Gardiner (51) and Andreas
Johnsson team up and take down Riley Nash.
Hurst is a shining son
in this NFL Draft class
By Nora Princiotti
GLOBE STAFF
CARLOS OSORIO/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Michigan tackle and Canton native Maurice Hurst Jr. was a precocious
athlete, and his mother had him on a fast track to the pros.
Maurice Hurst Jr. was always a
precocious kid.
“He did everything kind of early,
which might have been a sign,” said
Nicole Page, Hurst’s mother. “It
seemed like he always talked, and he
walked at, like, seven months. He
rode a bike without training wheels
at, like, 3. He always was very advanced, and very hyper, but very loving.”
It makes sense, then, that Hurst’s
trip on the fast track has him on the
cusp of an NFL career. Hurst should
hear his name called early in the upcoming draft, in which the Michigan
tackle is one of the top defensive linemen available.
That’s a bit too easy, though.
Hurst was brought up in Canton. If
his name sounds familiar, it’s because
he’s the son of former Patriots cornerback Maurice Hurst, who met Page
and had Maurice Jr. with her in 1995.
But the elder Hurst decided not to be
a part of his son’s life, and the two
don’t have a relationship.
Instead, Hurst was raised by his
mother, and also had his grandparNFL DRAFT, Page D6
I N S I DE
NBA PLAYOFFS
Celtics vs. Bucks
Game 5: Tuesday, 7 p.m.
NBCSB, NBA TV
Smart in Game 5?
Doctor’s visit looms as Celtics guard
is upgraded to questionable. D2
Gronkowski scratched
English horse is too sick to travel,
will miss the Kentucky Derby. D7
Vasil to get MRI
BC High ace righthander comes out
of game with elbow issue. D8
D2
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
NBA Playoffs
Smart gets upgraded to questionable
Celtics vs. Bucks
By Adam Himmelsbach
Series tied, 2­2
GAME 1 — Sunday, April 15
At Boston 113 (OT) ..Milwaukee 107
GAME 2 — Tuesday, April 17
At Boston 120............Milwaukee 106
GAME 3 — Friday, April 20
At Milwaukee 116............ Boston 92
GAME 4 — Sunday, April 22
At Milwaukee 104............Boston 102
GAME 5
Milwaukee at Boston
Tue., April 24, 7 p.m., NBCSB, NBATV
GAME 6
Boston at Milwaukee
Thu., April 26, TBA
GAME 7*
Milwaukee at Boston
Sat., April 28, TBA
* If necessary
ROCKETS 119, T’WOLVES 100
HOUSTON
FG
FT
Reb
Min M­A M­A
O­T A F Pt
Tucker ........24
1­3
0­0
0­4 0 1
3
Ariza............33 4­10
4­4
0­2 3 4 15
Capela ........32 6­11
2­4 7­17 3 2 14
Paul.............34 9­17
4­4
1­6 6 1 25
Harden........33 12­26
7­7
0­4 3 4 36
Anderson....17
0­3
0­0
0­1 1 2
0
Nene............14
1­3
2­3
1­5 2 1
4
Gordon........30 6­14
2­2
0­1 2 0 18
Green..........16
0­3
2­2
1­4 0 1
2
Black.............2
0­0
0­0
0­1 0 0
0
Jackson.........2
0­1
0­0
0­1 0 1
0
J.Johnson......2
1­1
0­0
0­0 0 0
2
Totals.......... 40­92 23­26 10­46 20 17 119
FG%: .435, FT%: .885. 3­pt. goals: 16­43, .372
(Tucker 1­2, Ariza 3­8, Paul 3­5, Harden 5­11, An­
derson 0­3, Gordon 4­10, Green 0­3, Jackson 0­1).
Team rebounds: 5. Team turnovers: 7 (5 pts.).
Blocks: 6 (Tucker, Capela 4, Harden). Turnovers:
6 (Capela, Paul, Harden, Nene, Green 2). Steals:
11 (Ariza, Paul 5, Harden 4, Gordon).
MINNESOTA
FG
FT
Reb
Min M­A M­A
O­T A F Pt
Gibson ........20
1­1
0­0
1­3 0 1
2
Wiggins ......29 5­14
3­4
0­3 1 2 14
Towns.........32 9­15
4­6 5­15 2 3 22
Teague........28
1­7
0­0
0­1 5 4
2
Butler..........38 7­17
4­5
2­9 5 2 19
Dieng...........16
1­2
0­0
0­5 1 2
3
Rose ............32 7­11
1­2
0­6 4 2 17
Bjelica.........16
2­4
1­2
1­3 1 3
7
Crawford....24 4­10
1­2
0­2 4 3 10
Gorgs­Hnt ....2
0­1
0­0
1­1 0 0
0
Brooks ..........2
2­2
0­2
0­0 0 0
4
Totals.......... 39­84 14­23 10­48 23 22 100
FG%: .464, FT%: .609. 3­pt. goals: 8­22, .364
(Wiggins 1­5, Towns 0­2, Teague 0­3, Butler 1­4,
Dieng 1­2, Rose 2­2, Bjelica 2­2, Crawford 1­2).
Team rebounds: 10. Team turnovers: 17 (19 pts.).
Blocks: 1 (Dieng). Turnovers: 16 (Wiggins, Towns
5, Teague 3, Butler, Rose 4, Crawford 2). Steals: 4
(Bjelica, Crawford 3).
Houston ......................... 21 29 50 19
Minnesota ..................... 21 28 20 31
—
—
119
100
A — 18,978 (19,356). T — 2:14. Officials —
James Capers, Mark Ayotte, David Guthrie.
NBA playoffs
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Raptors and Wizards tied, 2­2
Saturday, April 14
At Toronto 114............Washington 106
Tuesday, April 17
At Toronto 130............Washington 119
Friday, April 20
At Washington 122............Toronto 103
Sunday, April 22
At Washington 106..............Toronto 98
Schedule
Wed., Apr. 25 at Toronto............7 p.m.
Fri., Apr. 27 at Washington........... TBA
*Sun., Apr. 29 at Toronto...............TBA
76ers lead Heat, 3­1
Saturday, April 14
At Philadelphia 130.............Miami 103
Monday, April 16
Miami 113..............at Philadelphia 103
Thursday, April 19
Philadelphia 128..............at Miami 108
Saturday, April 21
Philadelphia 106..............at Miami 102
Schedule
Tue., Apr. 24 at Philadelphia.....8 p.m.
*Thu., Apr. 26 at Miami.................TBA
*Sat., Apr. 28 at Philadelphia.......TBA
Cavaliers and Pacers tied, 2­2
Sunday, April 15
Indiana 98....................at Cleveland 80
Wednesday, April 18
At Cleveland 100..................Indiana 97
Friday, April 20
At Indiana 92....................Cleveland 90
Sunday, April 22
Cleveland 104................at Indiana 100
Schedule
Wed., Apr. 25 at Cleveland........7 p.m.
Fri., Apr. 27 at Indiana................... TBA
*Sun., Apr. 29 at Cleveland...........TBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Jazz lead Thunder, 2­1
Sunday, April 15
At Oklahoma City 116............Utah 108
Wednesday, April 18
Utah 102..............at Oklahoma City 95
Saturday, April 21
At Utah 115............Oklahoma City 102
Monday, April 23
Oklahoma City...........................at Utah
Schedule
Wed., Apr. 25 at Okla. City...9:30 p.m.
*Fri., Apr. 27 at Utah...........10:30 p.m.
*Sun., Apr. 29 at Oklahoma City..TBA
Pelicans beat Trail Blazers, 4­0
Saturday, April 14
New Orleans 97.............at Portland 95
Tuesday, April 17
New Orleans 111........ at Portland 102
Thursday, April 19
At New Orleans 119........Portland 102
Saturday, April 21
At New Orleans 131........Portland 123
Warriors lead Spurs, 3­1
Saturday, April 14
At Golden State 113...San Antonio 92
Monday, April 16
At Golden State 116.San Antonio 101
Thursday, April 19
Golden State 110....at San Antonio 97
Sunday, April 22
At San Antonio 103...Golden State 90
Schedule
Tue., Apr. 24 at Golden St..10:30 p.m.
*Thu., Apr. 26 at San Ant.....9:30 p.m.
*Sat., Apr. 28 at Golden State......TBA
Rockets lead T’wolves, 3­1
Sunday, April 15
At Houston 104.............Minnesota 101
Wednesday, April 18
At Houston 102...............Minnesota 82
Saturday, April 21
At Minnesota 121.............Houston 105
Monday, April 23
Houston 119.............at Minnesota 100
Schedule
Wed., Apr. 25 at Houston.....9:30 p.m.
*Fri., Apr. 27 at Minnesota...9:30 p.m.
*Sun., Apr. 29 at Houston.............TBA
* If necessary
airtight defense. So Stevens got
Brown involved in a handful of
pick-and-pop actions at the top
of the key, helping spur a 20point second half.
“I definitely think we found
the level of comfort, playing in
that intensity, being physical,
setting tough screens, just owning our own space,” Brown
said. “Coach talks about owning our own space. I think we
did that in the last two quarters.”
GLOBE STAFF
and Owen Pence
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
The Bucks have mostly had
their way with the Celtics’ defense in this opening-round
playoff series,
CELTICS
shooting a reNOTEBOOK markable 54.2
percent from
the field against a unit that was
ranked No. 1 in the league during the regular season. But
when they come to Boston for
Game 5 on Tuesday with the series knotted at 2, their challenge might be a bit tougher.
The Celtics announced Monday evening that guard Marcus
Smart, who has been sidelined
since tearing a tendon in his
right thumb March 11, has
been upgraded to questionable
for Tuesday’s matchup. The return of Smart, perhaps Boston’s
best defender, could provide a
huge lift for the Celtics.
Smart was scheduled to see
a hand specialist in New York
on Tuesday, at which time he
would attempt to get full clearance for a return to game action. It is unclear if the improvement in his playing status
is an indication that the visit
was moved up to Monday. The
Celtics are scheduled to have a
pregame shootaround in
Waltham on Tuesday morning.
“I think the thumb, the surgery did its job,” Smart said
Sunday morning. “Thumb is
holding up well. I feel ready, I
feel strong enough to get back
out there. I’m just waiting on
the OK.”
Smart said he expects to
wear a small protective sleeve
or brace when he returns. He
said that he did not expect the
protection to hinder him,
though.
“It feels like nothing’s there,”
Smart said. “To have that comfortability, especially in my
dominant hand, my shooting
hand, that’s a good feeling to
have.”
Smart would likely be
tasked with attempting to slow
Milwaukee wing Khris Middle­
ton, who has shredded the Celtics this series, averaging 25.5
Center of attention
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Jaylen Brown, coming off a career-high 34-point game, did
some extra work after Monday’s practice in Waltham.
points on 61.5 percent shooting
overall and 62.5 percent from
the 3-point line. As of Sunday,
Smart had been taking part in
most portions of Celtics practices, but had yet to complete
any game-action workouts.
Brown back at work
Confidence is an integral
part of Jaylen Brown’s game,
his assuredness ascending with
each dynamic playoff performance. The second-year forward is an embodiment of
poise, often described by his elders as “wise beyond his years”
after showings such as Sunday’s stellar 34-point effort in a
104-102 loss in Milwaukee.
Brown understands how vital it is to carry over the conviction he so often displays in
game action and put it to use in
his training. As his teammates
slowly dispersed from the Celtics practice court in Waltham
on Monday, Brown hoisted
shot after shot, continuing to
refine a stroke that has unlocked a multitude of doors for
the Cal product.
Boston’s prized 21-year-old
doesn’t target a set number of
made jumpers when working
out, just “enough to feel good
about myself,” he explained.
Putting in hours over his first
two NBA summers to “fix” a
shot that would come and go in
his one-year stay in college,
Brown is now enjoying a payoff
in the form of gaudy playoff
percentages.
“It feels good,” Brown said
regarding his willingness — or
lack thereof — to bask in the
splendors of a rigorous work
ethic. “I want it to continue to
feel good, though. We’re still
playing, so I just want to keep
helping my team [by] shooting
the ball well.”
That hasn’t been a problem
so far. A 29-percent 3-point
shooter at Cal on three attempts per game, Brown has
shown a knack for consistent
improvement behind the arc.
During his rookie season,
Brown hit 34.1 percent of his
threes, taking about two a contest. He doubled his output in a
widely lauded sophomore campaign, attempting 4.4 3-pointers during the regular season,
and shooting a sizzling 39.5
percent on such looks.
Brown hasn’t relented in the
playoffs. He is averaging 23.8
points per game and canning
3.3 treys at a clip north of 46
percent.
Boston coach Brad Stevens
has used Brown in a variety of
ways on the offensive end. In
Game 2’s 120-106 win, Aron
Baynes and Greg Monroe set
flare screens to spring Brown
free.
The second half of Game 4
necessitated adjustments to
create any semblance of space
for Brown within Milwaukee’s
Milwaukee 7-foot-1-inch
center Thon Maker was the
Bucks’ X-factor in their two
wins, thrust into extended playing time with John Henson
sidelined by a sore back. Maker’s defense is his strong suit,
with five blocks in each of the
last two games.
But he has been beneficial
to Milwaukee’s offense as well,
hitting 5 of 10 3-pointers.
The simple notion of Maker’s looming presence has deterred many Celtics from slicing into the paint.
“Pick and roll, the off-ball
screens, drives, post-ups; he’s
affected us in a lot of ways,”
said Stevens. “He’s had a great
couple of games. He’s been very
effective and we just have to be
better, more consistent, doing
the right things in our attack.”
Boston has identified two
areas for potential improvement: inducing flailing Milwaukee limbs through the use
of pump fakes, and maintaining balance before springing up
for a shot.
“We need to play off two feet
more instead of one, and use
our jump stops and things like
that to be more effective,” said
Brown. “They’re all flying,
they’re really athletic, they’re
really long, and they’re good, so
we have to be a little bit smarter.”
Home­court cushion
Some Celtics fans may remember Boston’s 2008 firstround playoff series against Atlanta with jarring clarity. Boston, a heavily favored No. 1
seed, needed seven games to
discard the No. 8 Hawks, each
team unblemished at home.
Through four games, Boston’s 2018 first-round series
has followed a similar script.
Per Basketball Reference,
using data since 1984, the
Game 5 winner has taken a
best-of-seven playoff series 86
percent of the time.
The home team wins Game
5 75 percent of the time.
That gap is widened to better than 80 percent should a
seventh game be needed.
“Playing in front of your
home crowd, they can almost
be like the best sixth man in the
league, especially being in Boston,” Brown said. “Especially as
a group that hasn’t been playing together for an extensive
amount of time and with the
injuries and stuff, it probably
has an effect, the intensity level
of the game raised from Game
1 to Game 2 to Game 3 to Game
4.
“We talked about an expectance of that, but it’s different
when you actually are able to
see it on a road game in the
playoffs.
“I think we’re now accustomed to it and we’re ready to
fight.”
Fresh perspective
Brown had interesting insight to offer on the collectedness Jayson Tatum has displayed in his first playoff series,
noting that the rookie is “a lot
more ahead of the curve” than
Brown himself was at this time
last year. “Jayson has been incredible,” Brown said. “His
learning curve has been expedited with people being hurt.
He’s been one hell of a rookie
though.” . . . Tatum’s mother,
Brandy Cole, was present at
Monday’s practice and received
some helpful shooting tips
from her son after many of the
Celtics had scattered.
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at
adam.himmelsbach@
globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
Owen Pence can be reached at
owen.pence@globe.com.
Taking another look at their last­shot strategy
By Chad Finn
GLOBE STAFF
Three points on the CelticsBucks series while looking back
at Game 4 and ahead to Game
5...
ANALYSIS
1. Three
points also
happens to be the number the
Celtics should have somehow
ended up with on their final
possession. I didn’t mind who
took their final (and missed)
shot; Marcus Morris had a
rough shooting game (4 of 14),
but he’s fearless in late-game
situations, and pretty much any
other life situation as well.
I would have preferred trying to free him up for a winning
three and a stolen victory on
the road rather than an isolation back-to-the-basket 2-pointer for a tie and overtime.
Yeah, Brad Stevens said after the game that the play was
designed for a Terry Rozier 3pointer. You know what they
say about the best-laid plans.
Stevens has a much-lauded
and genuine knack for designing plays that uncannily lead to
a good shot whenever the ball
is being inbounded. The Bucks,
who have such length that they
sometimes look like they have
12 arms defending the court,
apparently thwarted Plan A
well here.
But Plan B, or C, or whatever play it was that resulted in
a rushed Morris fadeaway,
should have led to a better look,
preferably from longer range.
I’m curious about which
Celtic you wanted to see take
the shot there. Jaylen Brown
(34 points) and Jayson Tatum
(21) might have been obvious
options, but both were occasionally reckless with the ball
Sunday. Rozier has hit a ton of
big shots this year, but it didn’t
seem like his day or his favorite
arena (he was 2 of 10 from 3point range). He wouldn’t have
been my Plan A.
I don’t think there’s an obvious choice; just find the open
man, right? But forced to make
a choice, I’d probably rank the
top five preferences this way:
R Morris;
R Brown (he was 5 of 8 on 3pointers Sunday);
R Al Horford;
R Tatum;
R Rozier.
Aron Baynes teeing one up
wouldn’t have been the worst
secondary option, either. He
seems to have that in his repertoire now.
2. I suppose Bucks coach Joe
Prunty deserves credit for making several lineup changes and
minutes adjustments after the
two losses in Boston. Thon
Maker, Matthew Dellavedova,
Jabari Parker, and Malcolm
Brogdon all played relevant
roles in the Bucks’ two home
wins after being afterthoughts
or ignored altogether by their
coach in Games 1 and 2.
But the more obvious question is this:
What the heck was he thinking in the first place?
In Game 1, Jason Terry, who
might have been washed up before Maker was born, played
more minutes than Maker,
Parker, and Dellavedova combined. Maker played one minute in the first two games. Dellavedova didn’t even play in
Game 1. Tony Snell played
more total minutes in the first
two games than Brogdon, a
very polished and dependable
offensive player.
It is going to be interesting
to see how some of these guys
fare in Boston. The Celtics already figured something out in
the second half Sunday, scoring
67 points after the break.
I wouldn’t trust Eric Bledsoe
if I were a Bucks fan. Parker
seemed to feed off the home
crowd, and perhaps his own
annoyance with how little he
had played in Games 1 and 2. I
don’t think he’s the same in
Game 5.
Maker has been the unex-
pected wild card, shooting 5 of
9 from 3 over the past two
games after hitting 29.8 percent from that range during the
regular season. I suspect he’ll
return to being Thon Misser in
Boston. (I can hear your
groans. I’m not apologizing for
that. It had to be said.)
3. All right, so I’ve got more
than three items. Let’s make
these quick hits.
R Whenever this season
ends, we’ll appreciate the satisfying plot twists along the way
— the development of Brown
and Rozier, the arrival of Tatum, the contributions from unexpected sources such as Shane
Larkin.
But it will be impossible not
to dwell somewhat on the
what-ifs and what-could-havebeens. I’m convinced more
than ever that this team would
be the East’s representative in
the NBA Finals with a healthy
Gordon Hayward and Kyrie Irving, even if their presence may
have limited the development
of some of the younger players.
R The Celtics miss Daniel
Theis’s athleticism against the
Bucks. He could effectively
match up with Maker and even
Giannis Antetokounmpo on occasion.
R One of Stevens’s adjustments in Game 4 was to use
Semi Ojeleye as a defensive agitator. It worked for the most
part, but the tradeoff is that he
also has to play the other end of
the court. He’s shooting 22 percent in this series after hitting
34.6 percent of his shots during
the season.
R Rozier had a tough pair of
games in Milwaukee, shooting
5 of 19 and coming in at a minus-26. I would like to have
seen more Larkin down the
stretch Sunday, even though
Rozier played better late. I’d
imagine he’ll be much better
back on friendly hardwood.
R Horford played well Sunday (13 points, 9 rebounds, 4
assists), but here’s the familiar
refrain. He needs to shoot
more, and his teammates can’t
forget about him. He took just
eight shots.
R Here’s hoping agitator
Marcus Smart returns to this
series sooner rather than later.
There are at least five Bucks
that he could aggravate to distraction, and he could do it
without even initiating anything resembling a McHale/
Rambis moment.
R Celtics in six. Maybe seven.
But probably six.
Chad Finn can be reached at
finn@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeChadFinn.
Harden (36), Rockets push Timberwolves to brink
By Dave Campbell
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rockets 119 MINNEAPOLIS — James
T’wolves 100 Harden gave
Houston quite the jump-start
with 22 of the team’s 50 points
in the third quarter, and the
Rockets cruised past the Minnesota Timberwolves, 119-100,
on Monday night to take a 3-1
lead in their first-round playoff
series.
Chris Paul scored 15 of his
25 points in the near-record
third for the Rockets, who
turned a 50-49 halftime edge
into a 31-point advantage after
the torrid 12-minute span. The
only team in the history of the
NBA playoffs with more points
in one quarter was the Los Angeles Lakers, who scored 51
points in the fourth on March
31, 1962, in a loss to the Detroit
Pistons.
Harden finished with 36
points on 12-for-26 shooting,
Clint Capela added 14 points
and 17 rebounds, Eric Gordon
finally got going with 18 points
off the bench, and the Rockets
easily recovered from their
rough start.
Karl-Anthony Towns had 22
points and 15 rebounds for the
Timberwolves, who were dominated on both ends of the floor
during the decisive third and
missed 14 of 21 shots over several panicked possessions.
The Timberwolves rebound-
ed from their two defeats on the
road by matching the Rockets
with 15 makes from 3-point
range in Game 3, a startling development considering the
Rockets led the league in that
category during the regular season and the Timberwolves were
last.
They wisely took another
tack for Game 4, attacking the
basket in the first half with relentless abandon and plenty of
success while Towns watched
most of the first quarter from
the bench after picking up his
second foul less than three minutes into the game.
Derrick Rose, who finished
with 17 points and six rebounds, was the catalyst off the
bench with multiple musclehis-way-in layups on both fast
breaks and in the half court.
S t a r t i n g p o i n t g u a r d Je ff
Teague had only 2 points on 1for-7 shooting, playing with an
injured pinky finger.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
D3
Baseball
AL
EAST
Boston
Toronto
New York
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
W
17
13
12
8
6
L
4
8
9
13
17
Pct.
.810
.619
.571
.381
.261
GB
—
4
5
9
12
Div. Last 10
11­2
8­2
5­6
6­4
9­8
7­3
1­8
5­5
4­6
1­9
Streak
L2
L2
W3
W4
L3
CENTRAL
Cleveland
Minnesota
Detroit
Chicago
Kansas City
W
12
8
9
5
5
L
8
9
11
14
15
Pct.
.600
.471
.450
.263
.250
GB
—
2½
3
6½
7
Div. Last 10
7­2
7­3
2­1
4­6
6­7
5­5
2­4
2­8
4­7
2­8
Streak
W3
L4
L1
W1
W1
WEST
Houston
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland
Texas
W
16
15
11
12
8
L
8
8
10
11
16
Pct.
.667
.652
.524
.522
.333
GB
—
½
3½
3½
8
Div. Last 10
7­5
6­4
9­2
5­5
5­5
4­6
6­9
7­3
6­12
4­6
Streak
L1
W1
L2
W3
L1
NL
EAST
New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
*Washington
*Miami
W
14
14
12
10
5
L
6
7
9
12
16
Pct.
.700
.667
.571
.455
.238
GB
—
½
2½
5
9½
Div. Last 10
10­4
5­5
4­7
8­2
9­6
6­4
5­7
4­6
1­5
2­8
Streak
L1
W4
L1
L2
L4
CENTRAL
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Cincinnati
W
13
14
12
10
4
L
8
9
10
9
18
Pct.
.619
.609
.545
.526
.182
GB
—
—
1½
2
9½
Div. Last 10
11­4
8­2
6­7
7­3
5­2
3­7
5­5
5­5
3­12
2­8
Streak
W3
W6
L4
W1
W1
WEST
Arizona
Colorado
*Los Angeles
*San Francisco
San Diego
W
15
12
10
9
9
L
6
12
10
12
15
Pct.
.714
.500
.500
.429
.375
GB
—
4½
4½
6
7½
Div. Last 10
13­5
7­3
5­6
5­5
7­8
6­4
6­10
4­6
8­10
5­5
Streak
W2
L2
W2
W1
W1
* — Not including late game
RESULTS
MONDAY
At Cincinnati 10
Atlanta 4
Cleveland 2
at Baltimore 1
At NY Yankees 14
Minnesota 1
Oakland 9
at Texas 4
LA Angels 2
At Chi. White Sox 10
Seattle 4
San Diego 13
at Colorado 5
at LA Dodgers
Miami
Washington
at San Francisco
at Houston 0
SUNDAY
At Oakland 4
Boston 1
Cleveland 7
at Baltimore 3
At NY Yankees 5
Toronto 1
Kansas City 8
at Detroit 5
At Tampa Bay 8
Minnesota 6
NY Mets (ppd.)
at Atlanta
At Philadelphia 3 (11 inn.) Pittsburgh 2
Houston 7
At Milwaukee 4
Miami 2
At St. Louis 9
Cincinnati 2
At Texas 7
Seattle 4
Chi. Cubs 9
at Colorado 7
San Francisco 4
at LA Angels 2
At Arizona 4
San Diego 2
At LA Dodgers 4
Washington 3
at Chi. White Sox 1
TUESDAY’S GAMES
.............2018.............
W­L
ERA
Odds
Team .............. 2017 vs. opp ..............
rec.
W­L
IP
ERA
BOSTON AT TORONTO, 7:07 p.m.
Porcello (R)
Happ (L)
Off
Off
4­0
3­1
1.40
4.50
4­0
3­1
2­2
2­0
24.2
23.2
4.74
1.90
SEATTLE AT CHI. WHITE SOX, 5:10 p.m.
Gonzales (L)
TBA
Off
Off
1­2
—
5.94
—
2­2
0­0
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
0­3
0­2
4.60
8.00
0­3
1­1
0­0
0­0
1.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
2­1
0­0
1.63
2.70
3­1
1­2
1­1
1­0
10.0
6.0
3.60
3.00
3­0
1­3
2.91
5.14
4­0
1­3
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
2­0
1­2
4.98
3.80
3­1
2­2
1­0
0­0
11.2
0.0
4.63
0.00
1­0
2­1
7.71
4.57
2­2
2­2
0­1
1­0
7.0
6.0
3.86
4.50
Off
Off
1­1
0­2
5.82
15.43
1­3
0­2
1­0
0­0
22.0
0.0
4.09
0.00
Off
Off
1­0
1­3
5.82
4.76
3­1
1­4
1­0
0­2
6.0
7.1
0.00
11.05
2­1
3­0
3.60
0.72
2­1
3­1
0­0
2­0
0.0
17.0
0.00
2.12
1­2
1­2
4.84
2.35
1­3
1­3
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­1
2­1
2.77
4.22
1­1
2­2
0­2
0­0
11.1
0.0
4.76
0.00
—
0­3
—
5.85
0­0
1­3
0­0
0­1
0.0
13.1
0.00
5.40
2­2
2­1
6.98
3.77
2­2
2­1
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
Roark (R)
Off
1­1
3.24
1­3
Blach (L)
Off
1­3
4.10
1­4
Team rec. — Record in games started by pitcher this season
1­0
0­0
7.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
CHI. CUBS AT CLEVELAND, 6:10 p.m.
Chatwood (R)
Tomlin (R)
Off
Off
MINNESOTA AT NY YANKEES, 6:35 p.m.
Berríos (R)
Sabathia (L)
Off
Off
ATLANTA AT CINCINNATI, 6:40 p.m.
McCarthy (R)
Mahle (R)
Off
Off
ARIZONA AT PHILADELPHIA, 7:05 p.m.
Ray (L)
Velasquez (R)
Off
Off
DETROIT AT PITTSBURGH, 7:05 p.m.
Zimmermann (R)
Kuhl (R)
Off
Off
TAMPA BAY AT BALTIMORE, 7:05 p.m.
Faria (R)
Cobb (R)
OAKLAND AT TEXAS, 8:05 p.m.
Triggs (R)
Hamels (L)
LA ANGELS AT HOUSTON, 8:10 p.m.
Ohtani (R)
Morton (R)
Off
Off
MILWAUKEE AT KANSAS CITY, 8:15 p.m.
Davies (R)
Kennedy (R)
Off
Off
NY METS AT ST. LOUIS, 8:15 p.m.
Wheeler (R)
Weaver (R)
Off
Off
SAN DIEGO AT COLORADO, 8:40 p.m.
Lauer (L)
Freeland (L)
Off
Off
MIAMI AT LA DODGERS, 10:10 p.m.
Peters (L)
Maeda (R)
Off
Off
WASHINGTON AT SAN FRANCISCO, 10:15 p.m.
LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING
AB
Betts, BOS. ................... 71
Machado, Bal............... 89
Lowrie, Oak.................. 98
Altuve, Hou. ................. 94
Correa, Hou.................. 81
Smith, TB...................... 61
Judge, NY ..................... 77
Cano, Sea. .................... 74
Haniger, Sea. ............... 74
Gregorius, NY .............. 71
R
23
13
13
13
17
9
20
16
12
18
H
26
32
35
33
28
21
25
24
24
23
HOME RUNS
Trout, Los Angeles.............................................9
Haniger, Seattle..................................................8
Machado, Baltimore..........................................8
Gallo, Texas.........................................................7
Gregorius, New York.........................................7
Ramirez, Cleveland............................................7
Abreu, Chicago...................................................6
Betts, BOSTON....................................................6
Davis, Oakland....................................................6
Judge, New York................................................6
Lowrie, Oakland................................................. 6
Moustakas, KC....................................................6
Reddick, Houston...............................................6
RUNS BATTED IN
Gregorius, New York.......................................24
Haniger, Seattle................................................23
Lowrie, Oakland...............................................23
Davis, Oakland..................................................21
Correa, Houston...............................................19
Devers, BOSTON...............................................17
Gallo, Texas.......................................................17
Machado, Baltimore........................................17
Moustakas, KC..................................................17
Span, TB.............................................................17
Trout, Los Angeles...........................................17
HITS
Lowrie, Oakland...............................................35
Altuve, Houston................................................33
Machado, Baltimore........................................32
Correa, Houston...............................................28
Moustakas, KC..................................................27
Segura, Seattle.................................................27
uRED SOX
Continued from Page D1
plaining why he never turned to Betts, Nunez, or Ramirez.
As the Red Sox start a three-game
series against the Toronto Blue Jays
on Tuesday night, the game in Oakland on Sunday may be remembered
as being far more significant than the
final score. It was a window into how
Cora is different than former manager John Farrell and whether that will
benefit the Red Sox.
At 17-4, the Red Sox have the best
record in baseball, and that’s with
Xander Bogaerts and Dustin Pedroia
on the disabled list. But adversity always reveals more than success.
“Winning solves everything,” center fielder Jackie Bradley Jr. said. “But
there will be bumps in the road. The
biggest thing for me is we have a lot of
trust in [Cora]. What he told us he
would do, he’s done.
“We walk in here every day knowing what’s expected. That’s huge.”
J.D. Martinez said Cora is taking
the same approach Torey Lovullo
does with the Arizona Diamondbacks. When Martinez was traded to
Arizona last season, one of the first
things Lovullo told him was that he
would get days off whether he necessarily needed them or not.
“It makes sense to me,” Martinez
said. “ You want people healthy so
they go every single day down the
stretch. Save some now. It’s about 162
games.
“I’ve played for managers who
wanted you ready every day and you
didn’t know if you were off until you
saw the lineup. I get that. But it’s hard
to be ready every single day for six
months.
“If you know you’re going to be off
a few days ahead of time, it’s a mental
break. Maybe the night before you
can go out for dinner and not be
stressed.”
With Cora, it goes back to the four
seasons he played for the Red Sox
when Terry Francona was manager.
“This is something he used to say
back in the day. He told me, ‘Alex,
you’re going to manage one day.
You’ve got to remember, don’t chase
wins. If you start chasing wins on a
daily basis then you’re going to pay
the price later on.’
“So we have to be careful. When a
guy is down, he’s down.”
In Houston, that strategy worked
in 2017. Manager A.J. Hinch developed a deep roster that won 101
games during the season and went on
to a World Series championship. Cora, as bench coach, saw the benefits.
Only Alex Bregman and Jose Altuve played more than 140 games for
a team that was 20-8 in September
and 11-7 in the postseason.
In Boston, it may not be as easy to
sell. There can be an NFL mentality
with every game taking on outsized
importance.
“It’s win, win, win here all the
time,” first baseman Hanley Ramirez
said. “That’s a good thing. But it’s a
long season, too. You need the manager to look out for you.
“There are different ways to drive
the bus. There’s a different mentality
with Alex. You can call it culture or
whatever you want.”
How Cora manages the outside
forces may be as important as what
happens in the clubhouse. One of the
reasons Farrell was fired after last
season was because the Sox wanted a
different public representative of
their team.
Red Sox-Blue Jays
series thumbnails
at Rogers Centre, Toronto
Tuesday, 7:07 p.m.
NESN, WEEI­FM (93.7)
W­L
ERA
RHP Rick Porcello
4­0
1.40
LHP J.A. Happ
3­1
4.50
Wednesday, 7:07 p.m.
NESN, WEEI­FM (93.7)
W­L
ERA
LHP Eduardo Rodriguez
2­0
3.45
RHP Aaron Sanchez
1­2
3.86
Thursday, 7:07 p.m.
NESN, WEEI­FM (93.7)
W­L
ERA
LHP Chris Sale
1­1
1.86
RHP Marco Estrada
2­1
5.32
Head to head: This is the first of six series
this year, a total of 19 games. The Red Sox
went 13­6 vs. Toronto last season.
Miscellany: Porcello has a 1.31 ERA with 19
strikeouts over his last three appearances
at Rogers Centre . . . The Blue Jays had the
lowest team batting average (.240) and
fewest runs (693) in the AL last season; this
year they are hitting .234 but are second in
runs (116).
R
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
BATTING
AB
62
79
63
64
62
82
79
76
65
69
Villanueva, SD .............
Cabrera, NY .................
Grandal, LA ..................
Arenado, Col................
Flaherty, Atl. ................
Swanson, Atl................
Herrera, PHI.................
Martinez, StL. ..............
Hoskins, PHI.................
Bryant, Chi. ..................
R
13
16
11
8
9
12
12
7
15
12
H
22
28
22
22
21
27
26
25
21
22
Avg.
.355
.354
.349
.344
.339
.329
.329
.329
.323
.319
HOME RUNS
Blackmon, Colorado..........................................8
Harper, Washington..........................................8
Baez, Chicago.....................................................7
DeJong, St. Louis................................................7
Thames, Milwaukee...........................................7
Villanueva, SD.....................................................7
Albies, Atlanta....................................................6
Molina, St. Louis.................................................6
Belt, SF.................................................................5
Braun, Milwaukee..............................................5
LeMahieu, Colorado...........................................5
Polanco, Pittsburgh...........................................5
Pollock, Arizona..................................................5
RUNS BATTED IN
Baez, Chicago...................................................23
Harper, Washington........................................19
Hoskins, PHI......................................................19
Cespedes, New York....................................... 18
Tucker, Atlanta.................................................18
Franco, PHI........................................................17
Grandal, Los Angeles...................................... 16
Martinez, St. Louis...........................................16
Molina, St. Louis...............................................16
Pollock, Arizona................................................16
Villanueva, SD...................................................16
HITS
Cabrera, New York..........................................28
Swanson, Atlanta.............................................27
Albies, Atlanta..................................................26
Herrera, PHI......................................................26
LeMahieu, Colorado.........................................26
Castro, MIA.......................................................25
ANGELS 2, ASTROS 0
AB
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
2
0
0
0
1
0
34
H BI BB SO Avg.
2 0 0 0 .253
0 0 0 1 .289
1 0 0 0 .293
3 3 0 0 .301
0 0 0 0 .300
1 0 0 2 .262
0 0 1 0 .329
0 0 0 2 .339
0 0 0 2 .125
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .120
0 0 0 0
—
7 3 1 7
CINCINNATI
Schebler rf
Peraza ss
Votto 1b
Gennett 2b
Duvall lf
Barnhart c
Pennington 3b
Romano p
Gosselin ph
Winker ph
Peralta p
Iglesias p
Hamilton cf
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
5 3 2 3 0 0
4 2 2 1 1 0
3 0 1 1 2 2
4 0 1 2 1 2
3 1 1 2 2 0
5 0 1 0 0 2
3 1 0 0 1 1
2 0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0
3 2 1 0 1 2
34 10 10 10 8 11
Avg.
.292
.247
.247
.270
.178
.250
.111
.000
.130
.296
.000
.000
.179
Atlanta ......................001 100 020 — 4 7 0
Cincinnati .................000 025 03x — 10 10 1
E—Duvall (2). LOB—Atlanta 4, Cincinnati 8.
2B—Tucker (5), Duvall (5). HR—Markakis (3),
off Romano, Schebler (2), off Foltynewicz.
SB—Hamilton (5).
Atlanta
IP
Foltynewicz
4„
SFreeman L 0­1 ‚
Moylan
„
Biddle
1‚
Socolovich
1
H
3
1
2
1
3
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 4 7 2.77
3 3 2 1 5.59
2 2 0 1 3.00
0 0 1 1 0.00
3 3 1 1 9.00
Cincinnati
IP
Romano W 1­2
6
Peralta
1„
Iglesias S 3
1‚
H
4
3
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 1 1 5 4.78
2 2 0 1 1.59
0 0 0 1 0.93
Freeman pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. In­
herited runners­scored—SFreeman 1­0, Moy­
lan 3­2, Biddle 3­3, Iglesias 1­0. NP—Foltyne­
wicz 103, SFreeman 22, Moylan 13, Biddle 23,
Socolovich 37, Romano 98, Peralta 25, Igle­
sias 13. Umpires—Home, Chris Conroy; First,
CB Bucknor; Second, Brian O'Nora; Third, Fi
INDIANS 2, ORIOLES 1
Sox deal Elias to Seattle
The Red Sox on Monday traded
lefthander Roenis Elias back to
the Seattle Mariners. They will receive a player to be named later
or cash.
Elias was obtained Dec. 7,
2015, as part of a four-player
trade. He was 15-20 with a 3.97
earned run average in two seasons for the Mariners but appeared in only four major league
games for the Sox.
The 29-year-old from Cuba
dealt with several injuries and befuddled the coaching staff with
constantly changing mechanics.
Elias was shifted to the bullpen
at Triple A Pawtucket this season.
In four games, he allowed two
runs over 7‚ innings and struck
out nine.
With Brian Johnson now pitching in relief for the major league
team and Bobby Poyner and
Robby Scott in Triple A, the Sox
have solid lefthanded relief depth.
The trade also opened a spot
on the 40-man roster.
PETER ABRAHAM
The belief was that would improve
what can be a tense environment at
Fenway Park.
“You want a steady atmosphere
and somebody who keeps things in
perspective,” president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said. “I
think part of that is a comfort in dealing with the media from a manager’s
perspective.
“If you don’t handle that well, it
can become stressful and it can translate to the players and how they respond [to the media], too. Alex played
[for the Red Sox] and he knew what
he was getting into.”
If the Red Sox are still in first place
three months from now, unusual lineups will pass without comment. For
now, every day reveals a little something more about the new manager.
“I didn’t get here to change who I
am,” Cora said. “Whether it’s the lineup or anything else, I have to do what
I feel is right.”
Peter Abraham can be reached at
pabraham@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @PeteAbe.
CLEVELAND
AB
Lindor ss
3
Kipnis 2b
4
Ramírez 3b
4
Brantley lf
4
Encarnacion dh 4
Alonso 1b
3
Gomes c
3
Zimmer cf
3
3
Guyer rf
Totals
31
R
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 1 0 .224
0 0 0 2 .173
1 0 0 0 .237
0 0 0 1 .320
1 0 0 0 .149
1 2 0 1 .225
0 0 0 1 .245
0 0 0 1 .236
0 0 0 1 .129
4 2 1 7
BALTIMORE
Beckham 2b
Sardiñas pr­2b
Álvarez dh
Mancini ph­dh
Machado ss
Jones cf
ChDavis 1b
Valencia 3b
Sisco c
Santander rf
Gentry lf
Totals
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO
1 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
1 0 2 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 2
1 0 0 3
1 1 0 3
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
7 1 2 11
AB
4
0
3
1
2
4
4
4
4
3
3
32
Avg.
.179
.118
.200
.280
.360
.240
.169
.152
.256
.153
.200
Cleveland ..................020 000 000 — 2 4 0
Baltimore ..................010 000 000 — 1 7 0
LOB—Cleveland 3, Baltimore 6. 2B—Ramír­
ez (1), Valencia (2). HR—Alonso (5), off Gaus­
man. SB—Gentry (5). DP—Cleveland 2.
Cleveland
IP
Carrasco W 4­0 7‚
Miller
„
CAllen S 4
1
H
6
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 7 2.31
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 3 0.00
Baltimore
Gausman L 1­2
Bleier
H
4
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 1 7 4.66
0 0 0 0 0.57
IP
8
1
Inherited runners­scored—Miller 1­0. IBB—
off Carrasco (Machado). NP—Carrasco 81,
Miller 11, CAllen 16, Gausman 107, Bleier 8.
Umpires—Home, Jerry Meals; First, Gabe Mo­
rales; Second, Ed Hickox; Third, John Tump­
ane. T—2:21. A—10,614 (45,971).
eldin Culbreth. T—3:11. A—9,463 (42,319).
YANKEES 14, TWINS 1
MINNESOTA
Dozier 2b
Mauer 1b
Adrianza 1b
Sanó 3b
Rosario lf­cf
Morrison dh
Grossman lf
Escobar ss
Kepler rf
LaMarre cf­p
Castro c
Garver ph
Totals
AB
4
3
0
4
4
4
0
4
4
2
2
1
32
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 1 0 .307
0 0 0 2 .298
0 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 1 .200
1 0 0 2 .246
1 0 0 1 .107
0 0 0 0 .121
0 0 0 1 .255
1 0 0 0 .286
0 0 1 1 .471
1 0 1 0 .159
1 0 0 0 .188
6 1 3 8
NY YANKEES
Gardner lf
Judge rf
Gregorius ss
Torreyes ss
Stanton dh
Sánchez c
Hicks cf
Austin 1b
Andújar 3b
Torres 2b
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
3 2 0 0 2 0 .237
3 2 1 0 2 1 .325
5 1 1 4 0 1 .324
0 0 0 0 0 0 .417
4 3 4 2 1 0 .224
4 1 1 2 1 1 .192
4 2 1 1 1 2 .286
5 1 2 4 0 2 .296
5 1 2 1 0 1 .316
4 1 1 0 0 0 .125
37 14 13 14 7 8
Minnesota ................000 010 000 — 1 6 0
NY Yankees ..............310 010 36x — 14 13 0
LOB—Minnesota 9, NY Yankees 6. 2B—Ke­
pler (5), Garver (1), Judge (4), Sánchez (6),
Austin (5), Andújar (8). HR—Gregorius (7), off
Kinley, Stanton (5), off Odorizzi, Austin (4),
off LaMarre, Andújar (3), off Odorizzi. SB—
Gardner (2). S—Mauer.
Minnesota
Odorizzi L 1­2
Hildenberger
Busenitz
Kinley
LaMarre
IP
4„
1„
„
‚
„
H
5
2
2
3
1
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 3 5 4.50
1 1 1 2 4.66
2 2 1 1 6.75
5 5 2 0 24.30
1 1 0 0 13.50
NY Yankees
Tanaka W 3­2
Green
Hale
IP
6„
‚
2
H
3
0
3
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 5 5.28
0 0 1 0 1.74
0 0 0 3 0.00
Inherited runners­scored—Busenitz 1­1,
LaMarre 1­1, Green 1­0. HBP—by Tanaka (La­
Marre). NP—Odorizzi 106, Hildenberger 29,
Busenitz 28, Kinley 29, LaMarre 5, Tanaka 91,
Green 12, Hale 41. Umpires—Home, Sam Hol­
brook; First, Ryan Blakney; Second, Jim Wolf;
Third, D.J. Reyburn. T—3:38. A—39,249
(47,309).
LA ANGELS
Kinsler 2b
Trout cf
Upton dh
Pujols 1b
Valbuena 3b
Cozart ss
Calhoun rf
Young lf
Maldonado c
Totals
AB
4
3
4
3
4
3
3
3
3
30
R
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 1 .256
1 0 1 1 .307
1 1 0 2 .236
0 0 1 1 .258
1 0 0 2 .243
0 0 1 1 .221
1 1 0 1 .188
0 0 0 0 .211
0 0 0 0 .182
4 2 3 9
HOUSTON
Springer rf­cf
Altuve 2b
Correa ss
Gurriel 1b
Bregman 3b
González lf
Gattis dh
McCann c
Stassi ph­c
Marisnick cf
Reddick ph­rf
Totals
AB
4
4
4
3
3
4
4
2
1
2
1
32
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 0 .240
2 0 0 0 .351
1 0 0 1 .346
1 0 1 0 .278
0 0 1 0 .244
2 0 0 2 .215
0 0 0 1 .205
0 0 0 1 .304
0 0 0 0 .294
0 0 0 1 .125
0 0 0 0 .246
7 0 2 6
LA Angels .................000 011 000 — 2 4 0
Houston ....................000 000 000 — 0 7 0
LOB—LA Angels 4, Houston 7. 2B—Upton
(4), Correa (7). HR—. SB—Trout 2 (5). DP—LA
Angels 1; Houston 1.
LA Angels
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Skaggs W 3­1
7 4 0 0 1 3 2.96
Anderson
1 2 0 0 0 1 0.00
Middleton S 6
1 1 0 0 1 2 1.93
Houston
GCole L 2­1
Rondón
McHugh
IP
7
1
1
H
4
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 2 8 1.29
0 0 1 0 1.93
0 0 0 1 0.93
WP—GCole. NP—Skaggs 102, Anderson 20,
Middleton 21, GCole 109, Rondón 21, McHugh
12. Umpires—Home, Stu Scheurwater; First,
Eric Cooper; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third,
Cory Blaser. T—2:59. A—29,606 (41,168).
ATHLETICS 9, RANGERS 4
OAKLAND
AB
Semien ss
6
Piscotty rf
4
Lowrie 2b
4
Davis dh
3
Chapman 3b
4
Olson 1b
4
Canha cf­lf
4
Pinder lf
2
Joyce ph­lf
1
Smolinski ph­cf
2
Lucroy c
4
Totals
38
R H BI BB SO Avg.
2 2 1 0 0 .270
1 0 0 1 1 .277
1 2 0 1 0 .357
0 1 2 2 0 .272
1 1 1 0 2 .282
1 2 0 1 0 .282
2 2 1 1 1 .351
0 2 1 0 0 .267
0 0 0 0 0 .236
1 1 2 0 0 .125
0 1 1 1 0 .254
9 14 9 7 4
TEXAS
AB
DeShields cf
4
Choo dh
4
Mazara rf
4
Beltré 3b
4
Gallo lf
3
Profar ss
3
Chirinos c
4
Guzman 1b
3
Kiner­Falefa 2b
3
Totals
32
R
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
2 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 2 .237
0 0 0 2 .294
1 0 0 1 .298
1 1 1 0 .213
1 0 1 0 .255
1 2 0 2 .159
0 0 0 1 .207
1 0 0 1 .293
7 3 2 9
Oakland .................... 002 100 006 — 9 14 1
Texas .........................001 200 001 — 4 7 0
E—Lucroy (1). LOB—Oakland 10, Texas 3.
2B—Lowrie (7), Davis (7), Canha (3), Beltré
(8), Gallo (4), Kiner­Falefa (2). 3B—Chapman
(3), Smolinski (1). HR—Semien (3), off Jepsen,
Chirinos (3), off Cahill. SB—DeShields 2 (2),
Gallo (1). CS—DeShields (1). DP—Oakland 1;
Texas 3.
Oakland
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Cahill
5 4 3 3 2 6 2.25
Dull
1 0 0 0 0 1 9.00
Petit
1„ 1 0 0 0 0 2.51
Buchter W 1­0
„ 0 0 0 0 1 1.74
Hatcher
„ 2 1 1 0 1 11.37
Texas
Moore
Leclerc
Bush
Cláudio
Jepsen L 0­3
Chávez
IP
5
1„
‚
„
1
‚
H
7
0
0
1
3
3
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 2 2 5.55
0 0 2 1 0.00
0 0 1 0 5.06
0 0 1 0 7.59
4 4 1 1 4.63
2 2 0 0 6.28
Moore pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inher­
ited runners­scored—Leclerc 1­0, Bush 2­0,
Jepsen 1­0, Chávez 2­2. IBB—off Jepsen (Ol­
son). HBP—by Moore (Chapman). WP—Cahi­
ll. NP—Cahill 98, Dull 10, Petit 17, Buchter 11,
Hatcher 11, Moore 86, Leclerc 23, Bush 7,
Cláudio 8, Jepsen 23, Chávez 14. Umpires—
Home, Greg Gibson; First, Vic Carapazza;
Second, Jordan Baker; Third, Sean Barber.
T—3:20. A—17,060 (48,114).
PADRES 13, ROCKIES 5
SAN DIEGO
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Cordero cf
6 1 2 2 0 2 .256
Myers rf
6 1 4 2 0 0 .346
Hosmer 1b
2 2 2 0 4 0 .259
Pirela lf
5 2 2 0 0 0 .260
0 0 0 0 0 0
—
Stammen p
Lyles p
1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Asuaje 2b
5 2 2 4 0 1 .226
Galvis ss
4 1 1 0 1 2 .244
Spangenbrg 3b
5 1 1 2 0 0 .212
Ellis c
4 1 0 0 1 3 .150
Mitchell p
2 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Erlin p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .500
Szczur ph­lf
3 2 2 2 0 0 .304
Totals
43 13 16 12 6 9
COLORADO
LeMahieu 2b
Blackmon cf
Arenado 3b
Dahl rf
Story ss
Desmond lf
McMahon 1b
Oberg p
Senzatela p
Cuevas ph
Wolters c
Bettis p
Musgrave p
McGee p
Valaika 1b
Totals
AB
4
4
4
4
3
4
2
0
0
1
4
2
0
0
2
34
R
1
0
1
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
H BI BB SO Avg.
2 0 0 0 .292
0 0 0 2 .288
2 2 0 0 .353
2 0 0 1 .375
1 2 1 0 .247
1 1 0 0 .175
0 0 1 1 .133
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 1 .100
0 0 0 0 .083
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
1 0 0 0 .100
9 5 2 6
San Diego .................400 000 900 — 13 16 1
Colorado ...................401 000 000 — 5 9 0
E—Ellis (1). LOB—San Diego 9, Colorado 4.
2B—Myers 2 (2), Szczur (1), Desmond (3).
HR—Cordero (4), off McGee, Asuaje (2), off
Bettis, Arenado (4), off Mitchell, Story (5), off
Mitchell. SB—Myers (1), Hosmer (1), LeMa­
hieu (3), Story (5). CS—LeMahieu (1). DP—
San Diego 1.
San Diego
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Mitchell
5‚ 8 5 5 2 2 5.76
Erlin W 1­2
„ 0 0 0 0 2 4.20
Stammen
1 1 0 0 0 0 2.03
Lyles
2 0 0 0 0 2 2.35
Colorado
Bettis
Musgrave
McGee BS 1; L
0­1
Oberg
Senzatela
IP
5
1
H
5
0
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 2 5 2.40
0 0 0 1 0.00
‚
3
4
4
1
1 5.06
‚
2‚
3
5
5
0
5
0
2
1
0 6.55
2 7.90
Inherited runners­scored—Oberg 2­2, Sen­
zatela 2­2. Balk—Bettis. NP—Mitchell 90, Erlin
8, Stammen 20, Lyles 25, Bettis 94, Musgrave
10, McGee 17, Oberg 30, Senzatela 57. Um­
pires—Home, Tom Hallion; First, Adam
Hamari; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third,
Dan Bellino. T—3:24. A—24,419 (46,897).
Yankees blast off behind Andujar, Gregorius
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Avg.
.366
.360
.357
.351
.346
.344
.325
.324
.324
.324
Cora has long­term
strategy for Red Sox
REDS 10, BRAVES 4
ATLANTA
Inciarte cf
Albies 2b
FFreeman 1b
Markakis rf
Suzuki c
Tucker lf
Swanson ss
Flaherty 3b
Foltynewicz p
SFreeman p
Moylan p
Biddle p
Culberson ph
Socolovich p
Totals
Yankees 14 N E W Y O R K —
R o ok i e Mi g u e l
Twins
1 Andujar homered
and doubled and Didi Gregorius
had a grand slam as the New York
Yankees hammered the Minnesota Twins, 14-1, Monday night at
Yankee Stadium for their first
three-game winning streak under
manager Aaron Boone.
Slumping Giancarlo Stanton
homered in going 4 for 4 and
Gleyber Torres singled for his first
major league hit, a day after the
prized 21-year-old made his debut with the Yankees.
The teams hadn’t met since
New York topped the Twins, 8-4,
in the AL wild-card game last
October at Yankee Stadium.
This was no contest as Minnesota lost its fourth in a row and
brought in center fielder Ryan LaMarre to pitch in the eighth inning. It was more of the same for
him: Tyler Austin tagged him for
a two-run homer.
KATHY WILLENS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Yankees’ Miguel Andujar isn’t missing much: this secondinning homer extended his extra-base streak to seven games.
Andujar kept taking meaty
cuts and delivered an extra-base
hit in his seventh straight game —
tied with Pittsburgh’s Corey Dickerson for the longest streak in the
majors this year. Andujar is 15 for
29 (.517) during that span with
eight doubles, a triple, and three
home runs, raising his season average from .107 to .316.
The 23-year-old third baseman lined a solo drive into the
left-field seats in the second inning and added a hard double.
Stanton hit a loud, long drive
for his fifth homer, and Gary Sanchez boomed a two-run double.
Both sluggers began the game
batting under .190.
Brian Dozier singled home
Minnesota’s run. He has a teamrecord 17-game hitting streak to
begin a season, and a 24-game
string dating to last year.
Masahiro Tanaka (3-2) gave
up three hits in 6„ innings. He’s
won all five of his career starts
against the Twins.
Jake Odorizzi (1-2) was pulled
after Stanton’s solo homer in the
fifth.
The Yankees have beaten the
Twins five in a row and are 51-21
against them since 2008, their
best record versus an AL opponent. New York has won the season series 11 straight years, and
has lost it only once since 1992.
D4
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
NHL Playoffs
Wingels replaces Heinen in the lineup
His line puts up
team’s only goal
faced over the remaining 26:37.
Dropoff from top
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
TORONTO — A ticket to
Round 2 of the playoffs perhaps
as close as 60 minutes away,
Bruins coach
BRUINS
Bruce Cassidy
NOTEBOOK hinted late
Monday morning that he might consider a
lineup change for Game 6 of his
club’s first-round matchup with
the Maple Leafs.
“We’re deliberating,” said
Cassidy, following his club’s
morning workout at the Air
Canada Centre. “Everybody is
healthy, so there won’t be anyone out [due to health], at least
as of right now, that I’m aware
of . . . but we may tinker with
the lineup, yes.”
Come puck drop, Cassidy
pulled rookie Danton Heinen
out of the lineup in favor of
Tom Wingels, the versatile
winger acquired from Chicago
at the February trade deadline.
To start the night, Wingels
was assigned to second-line duty, playing right wing on a trio
with Jake DeBrusk and David
Krejci. That grouping accounted for the Bruins’ only goal in a
3-1 loss, with DeBrusk whipping one home from the left
circle 1:02 into the second period.
Rick Nash, previously Krejci’s right wing, moved down a
tier to ride left wing with Riley
Nash (no relation) and David
Backes.
Waiting in Round 2 are the
Lightning, a series likely to begin Saturday in Tampa Bay.
With speed and youth key
components of the Leafs attack,
Cassidy might have considered
bringing raw rookie Ryan Do­
nato back into the lineup.
Donato played in Game 2,
but only sparingly (9:24 ice
time), but has the legs and the
scoring ability that Cassidy values.
Heinen, 0-0—0 in five
games, sat out for the first time
in the postseason. Aside from
his lack of scoring, Heinen’s
presence had been inconsistent
throughout the five games.
Tribute in Toronto
Some 60 minutes after the
Bruins filed out of the ACC following their optional morning
skate, horror played out on the
city streets in Toronto when a
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Looking for some space in the crease, Rick Nash instead is sandwiched by Toronto’s Roman Polak (46) and Tyler Bozak.
Bruins vs. Maple Leafs
Series tied, 3­3
GAME 1 — Thursday, April 12
At Boston 5..........................Toronto 1
GAME 2 — Saturday, April 14
At Boston 7..........................Toronto 3
GAME 3 — Monday, April 16
At Toronto 4..........................Boston 2
GAME 4 — Thursday, April 19
Boston 3..........................at Toronto 1
GAME 5 — Saturday, April 21
Toronto 4..........................at Boston 3
GAME 6 — Monday, April 23
At Toronto 3..........................Boston 1
GAME 7
Toronto at Boston
Wednesday, April 25, 7:30 p.m.,
NESN, NBCSN
driver of a rental van drove
through pedestrians along a 1-
mile stretch of sidewalk near
the intersection of Yonge Street
and Finch Avenue.
According to reports, 10
died and 15 were injured in the
incident.
The Bruins later in the afternoon Tweeted out: “Our
thoughts are with all of those
affected by today’s tragedy. We
stand with the City of Toronto
during this difficult time.”
The incident occurred some
10 miles north of the ACC at
approximately 1:30 p.m. in the
North York section of the city.
In terms of distance, making a
Boston comparison, it would be
approximately the distance
from TD Garden to the intersection of the Mass. Pike and
Route 95.
One eyewitness, quoted at
length on CNN, estimated the
van barreled down the sidewalk at speeds in excess of 40
miles per hour, methodically
hitting pedestrians that came
across its path.
Late in the afternoon, the
mood on a crowded subway into the city from the North York
neighborhood was solemn as
the train approached Union
Station, adjacent to the ACC.
Commuters, including many
decked out in their Maple Leafs
shirts and ballcaps, were near
silent as they shuffled out of the
station into the brilliant late-afternoon sunshine.
The start of the game went
off without delay, shortly after
7 p.m. Prior to the national anthem being sung, the full house
went silent for 10 seconds
while a black-and-white still
picture of the great Canadian
city (population: 3 million) was
posted on the giant message
board above center ice.
“Our thoughts and prayers
are with the victims,” the PA
announcer read from a pre-
pared statement, “their families, first responders, and all
those affected. All of Toronto is
with you.”
Rask back in goal
Tuukka Rask (3-3, .909 save
percentage), yanked in Game 5
after giving up four goals, was
back on the job here for Game
6. He stopped 27 of 29 shots.
“Some of it, we’ll see tonight, obviously,” said Cassidy,
pondering what Rask’s mindset would be 48 hours later. “At
this time of year, in the playoffs,
you’ve got to have a short memory. That’s a position you generally have to have a short memory. You don’t want to drag stuff
into your next start, no matter
what time of year, but specifically this time of the year.”
Rask stopped only 9 of 13
shots he faced in Game 4, yielding to backup Anton Khudobin,
who stopped all eight shots he
In the first two games of the
series, Boston’s top line of Brad
Marchand, Patrice Bergeron,
and David Pastrnak rolled up a
bountiful 20 points, which included Pastrnak’s 3-3—6 night
in Game 2.
The trio then delivered only
3 points (1-2—3) in the following three games, albeit with
Bergeron sidelined in Game 4
with an injury. They were without a point Monday.
“We do believe that we can
win without them scoring,” said
Cassidy. “Maybe it hasn’t happened yet, but we do believe
that can happen. It happened
all year for us. We had secondary scoring and played good
team defense.”
Leafs coach Mike Babcock
kiddingly said, “We have?”
when it was pointed out that
the Blue and White held down
Boston’s top line in the three
game prior to Monday night.
“They are good players, and
they can play without the
puck,” said Cassidy. “They get
the puck back fast and they
compete hard at a high level.
“Lots of good lines in the
league can’t check; they can do
both, and that’s what makes
them so dangerous. They can
play against anybody at any
time. They play in all situations, so they never sit on the
bench and get cold.”
Team spirit
Red Sox skipper Alex Cora,
his charges in town to face the
Blue Jays, took in the action at
the ACC, as did at least 18 of
his roster players . . . The Bruins, who launched 90 shots in
Game 5, followed with 72, of
which 33 made it to the net.
The Leafs only squeezed off 43
shots, but 30 of them found
their way to the net . . . Leafs
center Nazem Kadri lost all but
two of his 12 faceoffs. Tomas
Plekanec lost 10 of 15 . . . Char­
lie McAvoy logged 24:35, tops
among the Bruins, and looked
a little more assured on his
skates. He is still building back
his game after missing a month
to a wrenched knee . . . Auston
Matthews again logged a Full
Thornton (0-0—0) and stands
1-1—2 through six games.
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at kevin.dupont
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeKPD.
Maple Leafs turn aside Bruins to force Game 7
uBRUINS
Maple Leafs 3, Bruins 1
Continued from Page D1
The position, a 3-3 series
deadlock, is harder for the Bruins to stomach, given how the
series began. They rolled up
embarrassing wins, 5-1 and
7-3, in the first two games, with
the Marchand-Patrice
Bergeron-David Pastrnak line
collec ting a stag gering 20
points.
Last Thursday, the Bruins
left the ACC with a 3-1 series
lead, the Leafs failing to pull
even on a night the Bruins were
without their franchise center,
Bergeron, in the lineup.
But what seemed a cakewalk
only days ago now has turned
into a tightrope act, with the
Bruins in severe need of rediscovering the mojo that saw
them click off a 14-0-4 midseason run. Their sticks haven’t
gone dead, but their scoring
confidence and acumen, once
c l ie n ts at Mr. Big and Tall
Menswear, now could be better
suited at the House of Mini-Me.
“We’ve got to stick with it,”
said coach Bruce Cassidy, who
saw rookie Jake DeBrusk score
his club’s lone goal. “We were
only down a goal in the third
period. One shot could make a
difference.”
But the goal never came. Ever since their clownish defensive efforts in Games 1 and 2,
the Leafs have played a smarter,
tighter 200-foot game, and
mixed in near-military-like discipline for the most part. In the
last four games — three of them
won by the Leafs — they have
allowed the Bruins only one
power-play goal. In Games 1
At Air Canada Centre, Toronto
FIRST PERIOD
No scoring
Penalty — Boston, DeBrusk (delay of game)
10:10
SECOND PERIOD
Boston 1, Toronto 0 — DeBrusk 3 (Krejci) 1:02
Toronto 1, Boston 1 — Nylander 1 (Kadri, Zait­
sev) 1:37
Toronto 2, Boston 1 — Marner 2 (Plekanec,
Hainsey) 13:25
Penalty — Boston, Miller (roughing) 14:19
Penalty — Toronto, Kadri (slashing) 19:50
THIRD PERIOD
Penalty — Boston, Backes (roughing) 1:53
Penalty — Toronto, Polak (roughing) 1:53
Penalty — Boston, McAvoy (tripping) 3:16
Penalty — Toronto, Marner (delay of game)
14:17
Toronto 3, Boston 1 — Plekanec 2 (Marner, Zai­
tsev) 18:46 (en)
SCORE BY PERIOD
Boston .................................... 0
1
0 —
1
Toronto................................... 0
2
1 —
3
SHOTS BY PERIOD
Boston .................................. 17
9
Toronto................................. 10 12
7
8
—
—
33
30
Power plays — Boston 0 of 2; Toronto 0 of 3.
Goalies — Boston, Rask 3­3­0 (29 shots­27
saves). Toronto, Andersen 3­2­0 (33 shots­32
saves).
Referees — Kevin Pollock, Francois St.Laurent.
Linesmen — Ryan Gibbons, Steve Miller.
Attendance — 19,604 (18,819). Time — 2:43.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
While Maple Leafs fans laughed nearby, Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy is irate about a second-period penalty call in Game 6.
and 2, they gave up five goals
on the advantage, which had
Bruins fans booking flights to
Tampa, and thumbing through
pina colada menus, for a Round
2 date with the sons of Phil Esposito.
Now it’s the Leafs who are
high-stepping. They only
trailed for 35 seconds in Game
6, and then Nylander stepped
up on the next shift and
knocked a loose puck by Tuukk a R a s k ( 2 7 s av e s ) f o r t h e
equalizer. The rich pour of Boston confidence couldn’t even
fill a shot glass. Nearly 12 minutes later, Marner scored on a
blind turnaround backhander
that zipped by Rask’s glove
hand.
“Yeah, I’d love to have him
make that save,” said Cassidy,
generally pleased by Rask’s
bounce-back after having to
pull his No. 1 goaltender in
Game 5. “But Tuukka kept us in
in the third, gave us a chance to
win when were down a goal
and we just couldn’t get the
next one.”
Ex-Canadien Tomas Plekanec, a trade-deadline pickup,
knocked home an empty-netter
with 1:14 left in regulation, and
the city without a Cup since
1967 again was back living the
big dream — albeit under a
thick cloud of sorrow that no
triumph ever will whisk away.
The Bruins now have their
off-day to recharge. Game 6 was
the first game in the series in
which the team that opened the
scoring failed to win.
When they were banking
point after point in the thick of
the regular season, the Bruins
typically scored first and then,
more often than not, built on
the lead. It’s exactly how this series began, until the Leafs
stopped obsessing over scoring
on home-run passes and began
buttoning up the full sheet, especially in the area in and
around goalie Frederik Andersen.
“ We’ ve go t to be be tt er,
we’ve got to find a way,” said
Bergeron, “we’ve got to find
ways to get those goals. It’s all
about the next game, obviously.
Bottom line, we need to be better as a team. We need to step
up.”
Bergeron, clearly fighting a
viral bug, finished with five
shots on net and won all but six
of his 29 faceoffs (79 percent
success). Marchand landed a
game-high six shots on Anders-
en, while Pastrnak fired 10
times, with only one making it
to the net.
But what they have now is a
classic postseason issue: The
top line, though playing well,
has been dialed down for four
straight games. Absent them,
the secondary scoring hasn’t
been there.
“As a player, you understand
what’s at stake,” said DeBrusk,
about to get his Game 7 indoctrination in the NHL. “We have
a good group of guys in here, a
lot of character. We’ve been
through a lot this year and we
don’t want to lose that. Neither
do they.”
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at
kevin.dupont@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeKPD.
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
D5
NHL Playoffs
Maple Leafs were
balm to hurting city
By David Alter
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Tuukka Rask makes a glove save on this close bid by the Maple Leafs’ William Nylander.
Rask performs better,
but result still the worst
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
TORONTO — Tuukka Rask,
who was pulled out of Game 5
in the second period, was not
the problem for the Bruins in
Game 6 against the Toronto
Maple Leafs on Monday night.
Rask was considerably better this time, stopping 27 of 29
shots he faced. He was particularly effective at the start of the
game, blunting any momentum
the Leafs gained from their
home fans.
“Not bad. Settled in and it
was a good first period,” Rask
said.
But Toronto goalie Frederik
Andersen was even better in a
3-1 victory for the Maple Leafs.
This game was an issue of the
Bruins missing chances, not
Rask missing pucks.
“I can stand up here and say,
well, our goalie, it would be
great if he goes and pitches a
shutout,” coach Bruce Cassidy
said. “Putting it all on your
goalie is not the way to go about
it.”
For Rask, the first goal was
one he regretted.
The Bruins scored the
game’s first goal at 1:02 of the
second period when Jake DeBrusk finally beat Andersen.
Then Toronto tied it 35 seconds
later.
When a long lead pass trickled in on Rask, he poked it to
defenseman Zdeno Chara. But
Chara was expecting Rask to
cover up and William Nylander
came away with it.
“There was no communication,” Rask said. “[Chara] was
facing me and I tried to play the
puck to his forehand . . . We
didn’t say anything there and
misplayed it.”
Nylander took the puck behind the net and passed it out
to the blue line. Rask stopped a
wrist shot from Nikita Zaitsev
that was deflected by Nazem
Kadri. But Nylander collected
the rebound and scored.
“You see [Andersen] making
save after save and they come
down and don’t spend a lot of
time in your end and they
score. It’s always discouraging,”
Cassidy said.”
Rask didn’t feel as if he had
to match Andersen.
“You just focus on that next
shot,” he said. “A lot of times,
the other guy is making saves
and there’s going to be a scoring
chance on you and you have to
make that save. That’s the thing
to focus on.”
Toronto took the lead at
13:25 of the second period on
what was essentially another
giveaway. As the Bruins tried to
clear, Brad Marchand started
up ice with the puck and lost
control of it. Mitchell Marner
swept in and backhanded the
puck over Rask’s glove. It deflected off the far post and in.
Rask offered no exc use.
Marner was that quick and accurate.
“It was a good shot,” Rask
said.
For Cassidy, the frustration
came with watching his players
get turned away by Andersen
only to see Toronto capitalize so
quickly when it had opportunities.
“Yeah, I’d love him to make
that save, match [Andersen]
save for save,” the coach said
“But Tuukka kept us in; gave us
a chance to win when we were
down a goal. We just couldn’t
get the next one.”
Now comes Game 7 back at
TD Garden on Wednesday.
Rask has been there before. He
beat the Maple Leafs in overtime in Game 7 of the 2013
first-round series on home ice.
But there were also Game 7
home losses to Philadelphia in
the 2010 semifinals and against
Montreal in the 2014 semifinals.
“I mean your season’s on the
line,” Rask said. “But you can’t
really let that get back in your
head. You’ve just got to play the
game like you can and stop as
many pucks as possible and
give your team a chance to win.
You don’t have to worry about
the pressure then.”
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
TORONTO — It’s an unusual
event in Canada’s largest city.
Toronto has developed a
reputation for its safety. But on
Monday, tragedy struck when a
man drove a rented van onto
Yonge Street and killed 10 people and injured 15 others.
In an instant, the city’s focus
shifted. Instead of all thoughts
pointing toward their beloved
Maple Leafs and their attempt
at playoff survival, feelings
changed to families affected.
“It’s just a senseless act,” said
Leafs coach Mike Babcock.
The Leafs broke from their
routine before their Game 6 victory over the Bruins.
Typically, Babcock would
give his usual speech just before
puck drop. But the tone
changed after tragedy struck
their town.
“Guys are here 2-3 hours before game time, and that’s all
that anyone was talking about,”
Babcock said. “We didn’t have a
team talk per se, that was the
conversation the whole time
leading into it.”
With a game at hand, sports
provided some players with a
bit of distraction from the real
world unfolding outside.
“In some way you are detached from it a little bit because you don’t have a lot of
time to put the TV on for an
hour,” defenseman Ron Hainsey said. “You get here and talk
to everyone and get more information at the same time we’re
trying to get ready for the game.
It’s a little odd.”
Before the puck dropped,
there was a moment of silence
for the victims. There was a
loud chant for Leafs goaltender
Frederik Andersen. It was the
first chance for Toronto fans to
show their appreciation in person after his 42-save performance on Saturday night in
Boston.
“It was awesome,” Andersen
said of the chants. “It’s a cool
feeling, and it makes you want
to battle harder.”
The Danish goaltender once
again came up big for the Leafs.
He made 17 of his 32 saves in
the first period as the Bruins
looked to try and accomplish
what they failed to on home ice
just two days prior.
Andersen struggled through
the first four games of the series. He posted an .880 save
percentage in that span. In
Game 2, Andersen allowed
three goals on five shots before
being pulled in favor of backup
goaltender Curtis McElhinney.
But when the Leafs have
needed him most, facing elimination, he’s been the reason the
team will play a Game 7 in Boston on Wednesday.
“He’s been really dialed in,”
L e a f s f o r w a r d Ja m e s v a n
Riemsdyk said. “ With each
game and he’s been getting better, and this is the Freddy we
know.”
On the ice, the Leafs overcame adversity when Jake DeBrusk beat Andersen for the
opening goal of the game at
1:02 of the second period.
Toronto scored three unanswered goals, and it was the
first time in this series that the
team that scored first failed to
win the game.
Offensively, the Leafs have
received prod uc tion from
Mitch Marner. The sophomore
forward scored the winning
goal in the second period and
added an assist. He leads the
Leafs with eight points (2-6-8)
this postseason.
The other sophomore weapons, Auston Matthews and William Nylander, have been relatively silent. Nylander scored
his first goal of the playoffs to
tie the game, 1-1, at 1:37 of the
second period. Both he and
Matthews have just one goal
and one assist during the postseason. Both players have yet to
live up to their regular-season
dominance and could be due.
Five years ago, both teams
battled in a first-round series
t h at w e n t s e v e n g a m e s . It
seems fitting for this playoff rematch to follow in similar fashion.
It was a difficult day for the
city of Toronto. The drop of a
puck onto a sheet of ice was the
most Canadian way to keep life
moving.
“That’s the power of sport, it
brings people together,” Toronto-born Leafs forward Connor
Brown said.
uSULLIVAN
intersection early Monday afternoon, killing 10 people and
seriously injuring 15 others,
finding yet another way to
puncture our sense of security
and belief in living our safe,
normal everyday lives.
“That goes beyond the game
of hockey,” Bruins forward Patrice Bergeron was saying after
the game, his sad eyes clearly
hurting for his native country.
“We’ve been battling in a tight
series the last two weeks. To be
honest, I know without a doubt
the city of Boston has been
through it unfortunately in
2013 and we’re all behind the
city of Toronto. Obviously our
thoughts and prayers go to everyone involved in this tragedy.”
Yes, Boston knows how this
feels, the marathon bombers
forever injuring the soul of the
city.
Humboldt, Saskatchewan,
knows, too, having lost half of a
junior hockey team in a tragic,
accidental bus collision.
Parkland, Fla., knows too, a
senseless act of gun violence in
a local high school bringing its
ugly brand of fear and chaos.
Different scenarios all, but
so many of the same emotions.
Loss is loss, and mourning is
mourning, and Monday was a
day of both for Toronto, a bustling, vibrant, diverse population of people who reeled in the
wake of what happened, but
who also came together in a
way we’ve come to recognize
since pos t 9/11 Ne w York.
That’s where sports plays its
most valuable role, reminding
us they are at their best when
they serve as happy diversion,
when they offer that safe place
to deposit otherwise pent-up
emotions and energy.
“It’s incredible the way you
see cities come together when
things like this happen and another great example of that
here tonight with Toronto,” forward Brad Marchand, of Halifax, Nova Scotia, said. “A lot of
respect for the people of Toronto and the way they’re handling
everything.”
There was the arena’s public
address announcer, introducing a solemn moment of silence
with the simple promise, “To all
those affected, all of Toronto is
with you.” There was resident
anthem singer Martina OrtizLuis delivering a rousing “Star
Spangled Banner” followed by a
stirring “O Canada.” There she
was, completing the opening
lines on her own and then holding her microphone up to the
rafters, sweeping it around the
arena as the fans took up her
cause, their voices ringing louder with every word, until she
joined them once again for the
finish.
“O, Canada, we stand on
guard for thee.”
And then the players delivered the best way they know
how, giving the almost 20,000
fans a thrilling, intense game
that was an honor to its sport.
Too many near misses for Boston’s liking. So many fantastic
Frederik Andersen saves, much
to Toronto’s delight. Plenty of
drama — a taut scoreless first
period set up a wild second one,
one it seemed the Bruins would
control with Jake DeBrusk’s
early goal, given that scoring
first had been the formula to
winning the series’ first five
games.
But when Toronto’s William
2
1
3
2
—
—
6
3
First period — 1. Washington, Orlov 1 (Nis­
kanen, Stephenson), 12:12. Penalties — None.
Second period — 2. Columbus, Foligno 1 (Mur­
ray, Cole), 8:40. 3. Washington, Ovechkin 4 (Or­
pik, Djoos), 12:50. 4. Washington, Ovechkin 5
(JCarlson, Kuznetsov), 18:23 (pp). Penalties —
Backstrom, Was (hooking), 1:16. Jenner, Cls (in­
terference), 3:18. Anderson, Cls (hi stick), 4:47.
Jones, Cls (holding), 17:10. Stephenson, Was
(roughing), 19:53.
Third period — 5. Columbus, Dubois 2 (Calvert),
2:25. 6. Washington, Smith­Pelly 2, 3:56. 7. Wash­
ington, Stephenson 1 (Beagle, Orpik), 5:30. 8. Co­
lumbus, Foligno 2 (Jenner, Bjorkstrand), 8:22. 9.
Washington, Eller 2 (Beagle), 19:46 (en). Penalties
— Djoos, Was (interference), 4:39. Kuznetsov,
Was (interference), 12:56. Wilson, Was (rough­
ing), 19:46. Dubois, Cls (roughing), 19:46.
Shots on goal — Washington 10­12­6 — 28. Co­
lumbus 7­14­17 — 38.
Power plays — Washington 1­3; Columbus 0­4.
Goalies — Washington, Holtby 4­1­0 (38 shots­
35 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 2­4­0 (27 shots­
22 saves).
Referees — Jean Hebert, Dan O'Rourke. Lines­
men — Pierre Racicot, David Brisebois.
NHL playoffs
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Lightning beat Devils, 4­1
Thursday, April 12
At Tampa Bay 5......................New Jersey 2
Saturday, April 14
At Tampa Bay 5......................New Jersey 3
Monday, April 16
At New Jersey 5......................Tampa Bay 2
Wednesday, April 18
Tampa Bay 3......................at New Jersey 1
Saturday, April 21
At Tampa Bay 3......................New Jersey 1
Capitals beat Blue Jackets, 4­2
Thursday, April 12
Columbus 4..............at Washington 3 (OT)
Sunday, April 15
Columbus 5..............at Washington 4 (OT)
Tuesday, April 17
Washington 3............at Columbus 2 (2OT)
Thursday, April 19
Washington 4........................at Columbus 1
Saturday, April 21
At Washington 4..............Columbus 3 (OT)
Monday, April 23
Washington 6........................at Columbus 3
Penguins beat Flyers, 4­2
Wednesday, April 11
At Pittsburgh 7......................Philadelphia 0
Friday, April 13
Philadelphia 5......................at Pittsburgh 1
Sunday, April 15
Pittsburgh 5......................at Philadelphia 1
Wednesday, April 18
Pittsburgh 5......................at Philadelphia 0
Friday, April 20
Philadelphia 4......................at Pittsburgh 2
Sunday, April 22
Pittsburgh 8...........................Philadelphia 5
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Sharks beat Ducks, 4­0
Thursday, April 12
San Jose 3................................at Anaheim 0
Saturday, April 14
San Jose 3................................at Anaheim 2
Monday, April 16
At San Jose 8...............................Anaheim 1
Wednesday, April 18
At San Jose 2...............................Anaheim 1
Knights beat Kings, 4­0
Wednesday, April 11
At Vegas 1..............................Los Angeles 0
Friday, April 13
At Vegas 2...................Los Angeles 1 (2OT)
Sunday, April 15
Vegas 3..............................at Los Angeles 2
Tuesday, April 17
Vegas 1..............................at Los Angeles 0
Jets beat Wild, 4­1
Wednesday, April 11
At Winnipeg 3...........................Minnesota 2
Friday, April 13
At Winnipeg 4...........................Minnesota 1
Sunday, April 15
At Minnesota 6...........................Winnipeg 2
Tuesday, April 17
Winnipeg 2...........................at Minnesota 0
Friday, April 20
At Winnipeg 5...........................Minnesota 0
Predators beat Avalanche, 4­2
Thursday, April 12
At Nashville 5..............................Colorado 2
Saturday, April 14
At Nashville 5..............................Colorado 4
Monday, April 16
At Colorado 5..............................Nashville 3
Wednesday, April 18
Nashville 3...............................at Colorado 2
Friday, April 20
Colorado 2...............................at Nashville 1
Sunday, April 22
Nashville 5...............................at Colorado 0
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Ron Hainsey (left) meets up with Mitch Marner after
assisting on Marner’s tiebreaking goal in the second.
Game offers respite from tragedy for Toronto
Continued from Page D1
CAPITALS 6, BLUE JACKETS 3
Washington .......................... 1
Columbus ............................. 0
Nylander answered just 35 seconds later, it was if the pressure
valve was released on the building, and all of Toronto’s emotions poured forth. Nylander
pumped his fist, the fans furiously waved their towels, the
building shook. The night belonged to Toronto. The Leafs
wouldn’t trail again, undeterred by having to take the
lead twice (the first disallowed
for goalie interference), eventually sealing it with an emptynetter, ultimately able to use
sports as a temporary Band-Aid
for a wounded city.
“Listen, you can’ t block
something like that out of your
mind obviously, but you have
to, right?” Bruins coach Bruce
Cassidy, he, too, a Canadian,
said. “That’s kind of the hand
you’re dealt today. You try to
stay focused on the task at
hand. By the same token you
wonder what the hell is the
matter with people, to be quite
honest with you. But here we
are. We have to play it. We did. I
thought both teams did a good
job.
“They did a good job defending their house.”
What choice did they have?
This was a city on edge. Extra
police were stationed around
the arena. Streets not normally
blocked off from traffic were
barricaded. The team was left
issuing a pregame statement
describing the new measures,
not simply to inform those
heading to the game, but to reassure them as well. It all went
fine, and sports did its job, offering a few hours of respite on
an overwhelmingly sad day.
When it was over, the arena
quiet but for the sounds of the
Zamboni clearing the ice, workers began the overnight task of
switching from hockey to basketball, as the Raptors have an
NBA playoff game here Tuesday. But out there, beyond the
playing fields we have come to
love as our escape, a beautiful
city hurt. That’s what we call
tragic.
The need to play a Game 7?
That’s just sports.
Tara Sullivan is a Globe
columnist. She can be reached
at tara.sullivan@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@Globe_Tara.
Capitals
eliminate
Columbus
By Mitch Stacy
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Capitals
6 COLUMB US , O h i o
Blue Jackets 3 — A l e x
Ovechkin scored twice and
Braden Holtby had 35 saves as
the Washington Capitals advanced to the Eastern Conference semifinals with a 6-3 win
over the Columbus Blue Jackets
in Game 6 on Monday night.
The Capitals will face Pittsburgh in the second round of
the playoffs for a third straight
year. The Penguins won each of
the last two years en route to
back-to-back Stanley Cups.
Chandler Stephenson had a
goal and an assist, and Dimitry
Orlov, Devante Smith-Pelly, and
Lars Eller also tallied for Washington, which never trailed in
the game after winning in overtime in Game 5 on Saturday.
Nick Foligno had two goals,
Pierre-Luc Dubois also scored,
and Sergei Bobrovsky made 22
saves for Columbus, which lost
in the first round for the second
straight season to remain the
only active franchise never to
win a playoff series.
Wa s h i n g t o n w o n f o u r
straight after going down 2-0
with two home OT losses, becoming the first NHL team to
win a series after losing the first
two games at home in overtime.
D6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
Next stop for Boise State linebacker is NFL
By Jim McBride
The top linebackers in the NFL Draft
GLOBE STAFF
Leighton Vander Esch did
everything but drive the bus at
Boise State last season.
The big linebacker left that
duty to his father, Derwin.
Looking for a way to make
the three-hour trek from the tiny town of Riggins, Idaho, to
Boise more entertaining, Derwin bought an old motor coach,
and with the help of family and
friends, he customized it.
They tore out some seats,
added a couch and stove, painted it orange and blue, and
adorned the sides and front
with the family name and
Leighton’s No. 38. When he was
done, Derwin invited anyone
from Riggins (population:
420ish) to hop on the Vander
Esch Express.
He had plenty of company
on his rides. The bus even made
it to the Broncos’ last two bowl
games in Phoenix and Las Vegas.
“Honestly, I thought my dad
was crazy for doing it at first,
but it turned out cool,” said
Leighton. “The support system
in Riggins is second to none.
The people there, I absolutely
love them. They support me
through everything, through
thick and thin.
“I’ve got to give it to them,
because without them, it would
be hard to do what I’m doing. I
love every single one of them. I
love going back and catching
up with e ve r y bo dy. It jus t
makes it that much better when
you can get extra people from
the town and all my family and
friends to make it to the game
on the bus.’’
In Boise, they ’ ve been
watching the real live version of
the Vander Esch Express develop from walk-on to starter to
probable first-round draft pick.
It’s been quite a journey for a
kid who never played 11-man
football until he arrived on
campus. In Idaho, most schools
play the eight-man version of
the sport because of a lack of
numbers.
Though it might have
seemed like a disadvantage,
Vander Esch believes playing
eight-man actually was instrumental in him getting an opportunity to excel at this level.
“ You’ ve got to be a wellr o u n d e d p l a y e r,” h e s a i d .
“You’re playing both sides of the
ball. Not that 11-man players
don’ t play both sides, but I
think it definitely helps with
the speed of the game being
able to open-field tackle. Those
are important aspects of the
game, and you’ve got to be able
INSIDE LINEBACKERS
PLAYER
SCHOOL
HEIGHT WEIGHT 40
RND
*Roquan Smith
Georgia
6-1
1
236
4.51
Rangy heat-seeker can get skinny and slip through crevices and land big
hits. Moves well laterally and takes efficient angles to the ball. Shows a
nice closing burst when blitzing.
*Tremaine Edmunds
Virginia Tech 6-5
253
4.54
1
Played mainly inside, but with his size and athleticism, he could play
anywhere at the next level. Has great read-and-react skills and often
lands the first blow. Has the speed to drop in coverage.
*Leighton Vander Esch Boise State
6-4
256
4.65
1-2
Instinctive, smart, and versatile enough to play multiple positions in a
3-4 or 4-3. Has the upper-body strength to stack and shed, and the
foot speed to cover from sideline to sideline
Rashaan Evans
Alabama
6-3
232
N/A
2-3
Like most Crimson Tiders, he is smart and instinctive. He diagnoses
plays in a flash and will explode to the ball. Effective covering runners
out of the backfield. Occasionally will overpursue and miss tackles.
*Malik Jefferson
Texas
6-3
236
4.52
2-3
Heavy hitter who will thump between the tackles all day long yet still
has the athleticism and light feet to make plays away from the line. Has
the skills to play all three downs and could emerge as exceptional
blitzer.
OUTSIDE LINEBACKERS
Lorenzo Carter
Georgia
6-6
250
4.50
2-3
Has superb quickness and power, allowing him to be disruptive in the
passing game or set the edge against the run. He’ll jolt and reroute tight
ends. Might need to pack on some poundage.
*Arden Key
LSU
6-6
238
N/A
2-3
Fast and powerful pass rusher. Another guy who will easily adapt and fit
in a 3-4 or 4-3 scheme. He’s a Jekyll-and-Hyde type, however. When
motivated, he is a terror; when distracted, he’s a distraction.
Ogbonnia Okoronkwo
Oklahoma
6-1
242
4.77
3-4
This copy editor’s nightmare can also cause some sleeplessness for offensive coordinators. Has a lightning first step and is exceptional at ragdolling blockers and finding the ball. Collected 17.5 tackles for losses
last season.
Kemoko Turay
DAVID BECKER/GETTY IMAGES FILE
Boise State linebacker Leighton Vander Esch (right) was credited with 141 tackles (91 solo,
8.5 for a loss), 4 sacks, 4 forced fumbles, and 2 interceptions last season as a junior.
to do everything. You’ve got to
have dynamic players that can
play everywhere.’’
Vander Esch’s journey to
Boise began his junior year at
Salmon River High when he
met with Broncos defensive coordinator Andy Avalos, who invited him to attend the school’s
camp.
“So I went to the summer
camp before my senior year, got
on film, did some drills for him,
ran through linebacker, tight
end, and quarterback [drills],’’
he said. “I played my senior
year, played in the championship on Boise State’s field, so
that was pretty neat getting to
play there for the first time,
then I got offered a preferred
walk-on position at linebacker.
There was no way I was turning
that down. I always wanted to
play there. It wasn’t even a decision for me.’’
After redshirting as a freshman, Vander Esch began show-
ing flashes of brilliance as a
part-time player in his second
year. He was poised for a breakout season as a redshirt sophomore but injuries limited him
to six games and prevented him
putting his stamp on the defense. That came this past season.
Vander Esch was credited
with 141 tackles (91 solo), including 8.5 for losses, 4 sacks, 4
forced fumbles, and 2 interceptions. Because of his exceptional instincts, athleticism, and
speed, the 6-foot-4-inch, 256pound Vander Esch (he played
at 2 4 0 l a s t s e a s o n b u t h a s
bulked up since) can fit into just
about any defensive scheme.
He played a lot of weak-side
linebacker at Boise State, but
was moved around a lot by Avalos to put him in advantageous
spots. No matter where he lined
up, he found the ball in a heartbeat.
Vander Esch excels at slip-
ping blocks at the line of scrimmage, shooting through gaps,
and making first contact in the
backfield.
The former high school basketball standout believes his
range is what sets him apart
from others in his class.
“I feel like I cover the field
really well; I’m always around
the ball,’’ he said. “I’m always
going to put myself in position
to be around the ball. We took
great pride in that at Boise
State, being relentless finishers
and making sure we always ran
to the ball.’’
Though he made his bones
defending the run and making
plays at the line of scrimmage,
Vander Esch said he’s “super
comfortable” in coverage.
“I take tremendous pride in
going into one-on-one matchups against the back or the tight
end,’’ he said. “That doesn’t
scare me one bit. I look forward
to it. I want to be put in that po-
Rutgers
6-5
252
4.65
3-4
Possesses a nonstop motor and a ton of experience (44 games). Explosive off the snap, can be very slippery, and will get his arms up and be
disruptive in the passing game. Sometimes will get swallowed up by
bigger linemen
Best of the rest: ILBs: *Christian Sam, Arizona State (6-2, 237, 4.75);
Fred Warner, BYU (6-3, 227, 4.64); Micah Kiser, Virginia (6-2, 240,
4.66); Josey Jewell, Iowa (6-1, 235, 4.82); Tegray Scales, Indiana (6-0,
230, 4.77); OLBs: Shaquem Griffin, Central Florida (6-1, 227, 4.38);
*Hercules Mata’afa, Washington State (6-1, 254, 4.76); Skai Moore,
South Carolina (6-2, 221, 4.73); *Jerome Baker, Ohio State (6-1, 229,
4.53); *Josh Sweat, Florida State (6-4, 251, 4.53).
*underclassman
sition.’’
Questions have swirled recently about Vander Esch’s
health. He played with a neck
guard in college, and NFL Media’s Mike Mayock said it’s because he has a cervical issue. He
was not flagged at the Combine
so it’ll be up to teams to do their
due diligence on his medicals.
With his combination of instincts, intelligence, versatility,
and physicality, Vander Esch
would seem to be a perfect fit
with the Patriots, who had him
in for a visit this past weekend.
Brian Flores could move him
around to a variety of spots,
much the way Dont’a Hightower and Kyle Van Noy are em-
ployed.
It’s approximately 2,800
miles from Riggins to Foxborough, but if that tiny town’s favorite son gets selected by Bill
Belichick, you just might see
the Vander Esch Express rolling
down the Mass. Pike this summer.
“Yeah, I’m sure it’ll definitely make the trip to wherever I
end up playing,” said Vander
Esch. “Maybe we’ll even make a
couple transformations to it.
We’ll see.’’
Jim McBride can be reached at
james.mcbride@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globejimmcbride.
Hurst’s mother had him on fast track to the pros
uNFL DRAFT
Continued from Page D1
ents, aunt, uncle, and cousins
around.
“He’s always felt loved, so I
think in that aspect he was fine,
but, I mean, did it hurt him?
I’m sure,” Page said. “Was it
tough watching other kids with
fathers? Absolutely.”
Hurst took to sports of all
kinds — early, of course. Page
had him in baseball, basketball,
pee-wee football, even dance,
and Hurst was a natural. His
cousins, both boys six years older, were his at-home tackling
dummies and throwing partners, the ones Hurst was always
trying to keep up with.
His mother was always
watching. Page was on the
board of Hurst’s Pop Warner
team and also coached the
cheerleading squad. She went
to every game. She even
coached one of his basketball
teams.
At home, she made flashcards before tests, helped with
school projects, and always
made sure homework got done.
“She’s really tough on me,”
Hurst said. “Always expects me
to do the right thing. Just always give good effort in school
and football and everything
that I do.”
Page was demanding, but
she also kept Hurst sheltered
from the financial struggles of
raising a quickly growing boy as
a single mother. Their home in
Canton was modest but loving.
They’d go to Martha’s Vineyard
every year as a family. When
one bill or another caused Page
stress, Hurst never knew.
Around the time he started
eighth grade, though, Hurst decided he desperately wanted to
go to Xaverian Brothers, a private Catholic school in Westw o o d . Tu i t i o n w a s a b o u t
$13,000 per year and was only
going up.
That led to a real-world conversation between mother and
son.
“I just had to sit down and
say, ‘Hey, I don’t have that kind
of income,’ ” Page said.
What she didn’t say was no.
There was a test Hurst needed
to pass to get into Xaverian. If
he passed, they’d need roughly
enough financial aid to cover
tuition above $7,o00.
Hurst passed the test. When
the financial aid package came,
it was just barely enough.
“You think, well, how do you
say no?” Page said. “Your word
is your word, and you’re like,
you’re just going to make it
work and that’s what I did.”
She lowered their cable
package and sold her old Jeep
Grand Cherokee. She took out
an extra mortgage, and any extra money went straight to tuition. Hurst had a work-study
job. At the end of each semester, he resold his textbooks. He
began to understand how hard
his mother worked.
“Just seeing the sacrifices
that we had to make to be able
to do that and afford that,”
Hurst said. “Just those type of
things, you start to notice that
are tough, especially on her.”
Hurst did well in school and
excelled in football. He was a
stellar defensive player but
could play a little fullback, too.
Top defensive linemen in the NFL Draft
PLAYER
POS.
SCHOOL
HT.
WT.
40
RD.
Bradley Chubb
DE
N. Carolina St. 6-4
269
4.65 1
Bronko Nagurski Award winner racked up 26 tackles for losses last season and is widely regarded as the best defensive player available in the
draft.
Harold Landry
EDGE Boston College 6-3
252
4.64 1
Injuries meant his senior season wasn’t as spectacular as his first-team
All-ACC junior year, but he has exceptional quickness and versatility.
Vita Vea*
DT
Washington
6-4
340
5.1
1
Former high school running back is an exceptional athlete for his size;
bench-pressed 225 pounds 41 times at the Combine.
Marcus Davenport DE
UTSA
6-6
264
4.58 1
Has the long, tall frame teams look for, and is fast and explosive.
Maurice Hurst
DT
Michigan
6-2
282
4.97 1-2
His 10.5 sacks over the past two seasons show that he can be a playmaker from an interior position. On the small side, but his quickness is
valuable, as interior pressure on quarterbacks is essential in today’s
game.
Da’Ron Payne*
DT
Alabama
6-2
311
4.95 1-2
Had only three sacks in as many seasons at Alabama, but he’s a runstuffer with good size and comes from a defensive powerhouse.
Best of the rest: DT Taven Bryan, Florida (6-4, 291, 4.98, 1-2); DE Sam
Hubbard*, Ohio State (6-5, 265, n/a, 1-2); DE Rasheem Green*, USC
(6-5, 275, 4.73, 2); DE Da’Shawn Hand, Alabama (6-4, 297, 4.83,
2-3); DT Tim Settle*, Virginia Tech (6-3, 335, 5.37, 2-3); DT Harrison
Phillips, Stanford (6-4, 307, 5.21, 3); EDGE Arden Key*, LSU (6-6, 238,
n/a, 4-6).
*underclassman
Hur s t ’s m os t f a m o u s h i gh
school play is probably a 75yard touchdown run.
O c c a s i o n a l l y, s o m e o n e
would notice his name and ask
about his father.
“I’d kind of just brush it off
or not really say much,” Hurst
said.
It wouldn’t take long for
them to notice his mother, anyway. Page never missed a game.
A list of 20 schools — includ-
ing pretty much every blueblood college football program
you can name — eventually
made offers to Hurst. Michigan,
with its strong academic offerings, won out. Hurst was a fourtime Academic All-Big Ten honoree, which required a GPA of
3.7 or higher. He got a degree in
sports management and began
working toward a master’s degree in social work.
As Hurst went through col-
lege, Page kept up her attendance streak. College football
schedules are set long in advance, so she’d book hotels at
least a year early to get good
deals. She knows more tips and
tricks than most travel agents.
That meant she was in the
Big House, or wherever Michigan was on the road, as Hurst
built his status as a top-flight
NFL prospect.
Hurst redshirted as a freshman and played in three games
as a sophomore. In the three
years since then, he has played
in all but one game. He was a
unanimous first-team All-Big
Ten selection in 2017, when he
made 59 tackles, including 13
for losses, and had 5.5 sacks.
At 6 feet 2 inches and 282
pounds, he’s smallish for an interior lineman but makes up for
it with a lightning-quick start,
which means he’s often long
gone by the time blockers can
be ready for him.
And as well as he played, the
thing his coaches seem quickest
to point out is that Hurst was
always down-to-earth, worked
hard, and was a good teammate.
“I wish we had more Mo
Hursts,” coach Jim Harbaugh
said this past season.
The NFL would probably say
the same.
There was a hiccup in
Hurst’s pre-draft process when
the results of an EKG at the
scouting combine were irregular. He’d had a similar result to
a test at Michigan, but had been
cleared to play. Hurst wasn’t allowed to work out at the Combine, though he did stay in Indi-
anapolis to meet with teams.
“It kind of sucked,” Hurst
said, “But at the same time I
was still there to be able to meet
with coaches and talk to them,
and get to talk football and just
be able to be around them.”
After he left, Hurst met with
cardiologists at Michigan and
Harvard, and was allowed to
participate in the Wolverines’
Pro Day. He ran a 4.97 40-yard
dash and recorded a vertical
jump of 31 inches, both very
good results for a defensive
tackle. Hurst was not among
the players asked to return to
Indianapolis for a medical recheck earlier this month.
It was an added stress during a busy time, but the big picture always remained bright.
Hurst should be drafted high.
He and Page aren’t fussing over
exactly how high. She’s thinking more about how quickly everything has gone by.
“To see possibly his dreams,
what he’s dreamed about so
long, come true is an overwhelming experience,” Page
said.
Hurst’s scholarship at Michigan made Page feel as though it
had all been worth it. The NFL
will be further proof, but she already feels validated. Hurst,
though, said he thinks there’s a
lot more he can do.
“Just be successful, in not
only football but hopefully as,
like, a dad,” he said. “Or just being a great son.”
Nora Princiotti can be reached
at nora.princiotti@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter at
@NoraPrinciotti.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
D7
Administrative leave
for Andover’s Perry
By Nate Weitzer
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF FILE
Though rumors have continued to swirl around Tom Brady’s plans for next season, his agent, Don Yee, has said that the
40-year-old Patriots quarterback’s intentions have not changed: He’ll keep playing into his 40s.
Brady’s agent says he’ll play
Yee: No change
in his intentions
By Nora Princiotti
GLOBE STAFF
Signs have always pointed
to Tom Brady returning for a
19th season with the Patriots
in 2018, but
PATRIOTS
the rumored
NOTEBOOK uncertainty
around that
subject was enough to make
Brady’s agent want to clear the
air.
“Tom’s intentions have not
changed,” Don Yee said Monday to ESPN. “He’s consistently
said he’ll play beyond this contract and into his mid-40s, or
until he feels he isn’t playing at
a championship level. I understand the constant speculation,
but this is one point he’s been
firm about.”
ESPN’s Adam Schefter had
reported last week that, though
Brady was likely to return,
multiple people around Brady
and the Patriots weren’t positive that was the case and
hadn’t received any assurances.
At that time, one of Schefter’s
sources put the odds that Brady would be back at 75 percent.
The final episode of the
“Tom vs. Time” documentary
Brady made with director
Gotham Chopra this past season also showed a post-Super
Bowl Brady trying to unplug
himself from football and feeling more conflicted between
his love for the game and his
desire to spend more time with
family.
If Brady is steadfast in his
desire to keep playing — something he did speak publicly
about after the Super Bowl
(and many, many times before
that) — then the question becomes why that hasn’t been entirely clear to those around the
organization.
The drama has been heightened somewhat by the fact that
Brady decided not to participate in all of the team’s offseason workouts this year. That
and the apparent lack of communication adds to the sense
that there are unresolved issues
between Brady and the team.
Yee told Schefter that Brady
is training every day and made
the point that the quarterback
feels he gets a lot out of train-
STEPHEN B. MORTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
The Patriots are reportedly “intrigued and impressed” by
Louisville quarterback Lamar Jackson.
ing on his own.
“He customizes his preparation to each season in order to
maximize his performance,”
Yee said. “His training methods are always evolving and
getting better. The year he
missed the first four games,
that month of training on his
own was particularly efficient.”
Yee didn’t deny that Brady
may have given some thought
to his contract situation, but also didn’t make it sound like a
major factor in Brady’s decision to stay away from Gillette
Stadium more than he has in
most offseasons past.
Brady will make $14 million
next season with a cap hit of
$22 million. It’s quite the bargain for the Patriots, who have
extended Brady with two years
left on his existing deal multiple times. Making a new deal
would be complicated, though,
if it seems increasingly likely
that Brady might retire sooner
rather than later.
“His objective every year is
to outperform his contract and
his own goals,” Yee said. “And
like every player, yes, he thinks
about his contract — it’s a pretty natural thing to do. Every
team’s management knows
this.”
Jackson impresses
The Patriots hosted Louis-
ville quarterback Lamar Jack­
son on a predraft visit, NFL
Network reported Monday.
According to the report, the
visit took place two weeks ago
and left the Patriots “intrigued
and impressed” with the 2016
Heisman Trophy winner.
Jackson played three years
at Louisville, throwing for
3,660 yards, 27 touchdowns,
and 10 interceptions his junior
season. He also rushed for
1,601 yards and 18 touchdowns. His playmaking ability,
speed, and versatility has
sparked comparisons to former
NFL quarterback Michael Vick,
who called Jackson “the spitting image” of himself.
Multiple teams reportedly
were interested in utilizing
Jackson’s talents as a wide receiver, but the 21-year-old said
at the NFL Combine that he
prefers to stick to quarterback.
NFL Network’s Mike May­
ock proposed the idea of Jackson going to the Patriots in a
conference call Friday.
“I think the first guy they’ve
got to evaluate is Lamar Jackson,” Mayock said. “Does he or
does he not fit for what they
could do down the road?
Belichick is an outside-the-box
guy, and I think that’s the first
thing you’ve got to think of is —
it’s a contrarian move — but
can you go from Tom Brady to
Lamar Jackson?”
Jackson is projected to a be
a first-round pick. The Patriots
have selections No. 23 and No.
31 in the first round and Nos.
43 and 63 overall in the second. Several teams picking
ahead of New England are also
interested in drafting a quarterback, so it’s possible that
Belichick would have to make a
trade to move up for Jackson.
One team interested in
Jackson could be the Arizona
Cardinals, who will be picking
at 15. After the retirement of
Carson Palmer, the team acquired Sam Bradford and Mike
Glennon this offseason. Former
Arizona coach Bruce Arians
told the Arizona Republic that
he was impressed with Jackson.
“That’s one guy I really am
intrigued with because he can
spin it and he’s been in a prostyle offense and he’s been hard
coached by Bobby [Petrino],”
he said.
“He brings that unique skill
set, and it makes me look back
at Vince Young. Vince could
beat you and he was a heck of a
leader. I don’t know why it
didn’t work out for him, but listening to him now, telling his
story, he’s like, ‘I didn’t put the
time in.’
“I think Lamar puts the
time in. He’s going to get better, and he just brings that
unique ability to break the
game open with his legs.”
Arians went on to say that
the Cardinals should select
Jackson if he’s available.
“Because he does it. He sits
in there and flips it up the
field,” Arians said. “He’s been in
a pro-style offense. He’s more
of a scrambler with designed
runs. I don’t think I’d design
runs for him. I would just let
him, a la Russell Wilson, take
what’s there, and whoosh, take
off running.”
In addition to Jackson, the
Patriots reportedly have
worked out Richmond’s Kyle
Lauletta and Washington
State’s Luke Falk. Both quarterback prospects are expected to
be drafted after Jackson, in the
second or third rounds.
Nora Princiotti can be reached
at nora.princiotti@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter at
@NoraPrinciotti.
Gronkowski withdrawn from Derby field
By Nora Princiotti
GLOBE STAFF
The Kentucky Derby doesn’t
have an official injury report
the way football teams do, but if
it did, it would have distributed
this update:
Gronkowski (illness): OUT.
The horse named for the
Patriots tight end was withdrawn Monday after developing a “slight infection” over the
weekend, according to his ownership group, Phoenix Thor-
oughbreds.
The 3-year-old colt developed a fever and is being treated with a three-day course of
antibiotics in England, according to owner Amer Abdulaziz.
He is “doing well,” Phoenix said
on Twitter, but this means he
cannot make the trip to Louisville for the May 5 race, the first
jewel in horse racing’s Triple
Crown.
This comes days after Rob
Gronkowski (the human) pur-
chased an ownership stake in
the horse.
“It’s unfortunate Gronkowski the horse will not be able to
race in the upcoming Kentucky
Derby due to an illness,” the
Gronkowski wrote on Twitter.
“I fully support what is best for
the horse. I know he will come
back strong and healthy and I
am excited to see him race
again very soon.”
Now, neither Gronkowski
will be at Churchill Downs.
“I will not be attending the
Derby without my baby Gronk
the horse being there,” he told
the Wall Street Journal.
Gronkowski was one of two
horses, the other being Quip, to
drop out of the Kentucky Derby
on Monday. Combatant and Instilled Regard took their places.
Nora Princiotti can be reached
at nora.princiotti@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter at
@NoraPrinciotti.
Andover High volleyball
coach E.J. Perry was placed on
paid administrative leave last
week pending an investigation, the specifics of which became public when schools superintendent Sheldon Berman mistakenly released a
draft of a confidential personnel memo detailing the allegations made against the 18year coach.
The memo confirmed the
nature of the allegations: that
while coaching the boys’ volleyball team, Perry made demeaning comments; referenced violence; used profanity; and engaged in ethnic
stereotyping of Asian-Americans.
It also detailed the conditions of Perry’s potential reinstatement under what was
termed a “Last Chance Agreement.”
Berman said he accidently
sent the memo to a Lawrence
Eagle-Tribune reporter Friday
when contacted for a comment on the investigation.
“This was an accident and
a mistake on my part, and I
sincerely apologize to Coach
Perry and the community as a
whole for my error,” Berman
said.
According to Perry’s attorney, his brother Timothy Perry, the release of a confidential
memo violates state law re-
garding collective bargaining
for union members. But the
coach does not plan to take legal action, according to the
Eagle-Tribune.
During the investigation,
assistant principals at Andover High interviewed 11
witnesses, including Perry,
and 19 students.
Andover High principal
Philip Conrad told the EagleTribune those witness statements led him to conclude the
allegations were true.
As part of his reinstatement, Perry is required to
apologize to the team for the
use of profanity, insensitive
language, and other comments that have created an atmosphere of fear around the
team.
He must also engage in anger management, complete
an online training course on
racial insensitivity, and meet
with athletic director Bill
Martin to develop coaching
strategies that focus on positive reinforcement.
Berman offered a statement saying, “[Perry] cares
deeply about his students and
is dedicated to their success. I
was pleased that Principal
Conrad and Coach Perry were
able to reach a positive resolution to the issues raised. I was
also pleased that Coach Perry
took responsibility. We are on
a constructive path to support
his re-entry.”
SportsLog
Flames hire Peters;
Wild seeking new GM
Former Carolina Hurricanes coach Bill Peters wasn’t without a job for long as the Calgary Flames introduced Peters Monday as their new head coach just days after he resigned from the
Carolina post. He replaces Glen Gulutzan, who was fired after
the Flames went 37-35-10 and missed the playoffs in his second
season. Peters, 53, resigned Friday after four seasons in Carolina and with a year remaining on his contract in the wake of general manager Ron Francis being reassigned within the organization. In his first stint as an NHL head coach, Peters went 137138-53 with the Hurricanes but wasn’t able to get the team into
the playoffs . . . Minnesota Wild owner Craig Leipold decided
the time was right to part ways with general manager Cliff
Fletcher after nine seasons and only two playoff series wins.
Minnesota has made six straight postseason appearances,
matching the longest current streak in the Western Conference
with the Anaheim Ducks, but has not reached the second round
since 2015. Last year, Leipold declined to extend Fletcher’s deal.
BASEBALL
White Sox’ Farquhar ‘progressing well’
Chicago White Sox reliever Danny Farquhar was talking to
his doctors and family after having surgery over the weekend to
address a ruptured aneurysm that occurred during Friday
night’s game against the Houston Astros. Farquhar, a 31-yearold married father of three children, remains in critical but stable condition in the intensive care unit at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. The team announced Monday that Farquhar is expected to remain hospitalized for the next few weeks.
The White Sox reported his medical team felt he was ‘‘progressing well.’’ He has use of his extremities and is responding to
questions and commands, according to the team . . . Davey Nel­
son, a Milwaukee Brewers broadcaster and former All-Star infielder who also coached in the majors, died at age 73 after a
long illness. Nelson played in the majors from 1968-77 and
made the 1973 AL All-Star team while with the Texas Rangers.
FOOTBALL
WR Snead says he’s joining Ravens
Wide receiver Willie Snead tweeted, “I can’t wait to strap it
on as a Baltimore Raven,’’ which means the New Orleans Saints
apparently won’t match the two-year, $10.4 million contract
Baltimore offered the restricted free agent on Friday. The Saints
had five days to match the deal . . . The Pittsburgh Steelers exercised the fifth-year option on outside linebacker Bud Dupree,
who has increased his sack total in each of his three seasons, going from 4 in 2015 to 4.5 in 2016 to 6 in 2017 as part of a defense that set a franchise record and led the NFL with 56 sacks
last season . . . Bennie Cunningham, a versatile tight end who
won two Super Bowls with the Pittsburgh Steelers, died of cancer at age 63. Cunningham, who starred at Clemson, played 10
seasons and caught more than 200 passes with the Steelers.
Obituary, Page B8 . . . Former NFL defensive tackle Dee Hardi­
son died at age 61 in Chapel Hill, N.C., where he had been hospitalized for several weeks.
MISCELLANY
Newgarden wins Grand Prix of Alabama
Defending series champion Josef Newgarden started on the
pole for the Indy Grand Prix of Alabama and led almost the entire way in Birmingham, winning the rain-delayed race for the
third time in four years. IndyCar had pushed back completion
of the race because of heavy rain Sunday. With a sizable lead
and showers starting anew, Newgarden made his second pit
stop with about 15 minutes left in the timed race to switch to
rain tires. Runner-up Ryan Hunter­Reay remained on the track
while rain soaked the course . . . UMass basketball coach Matt
McCall confirmed sophomore big man Chris Baldwin has asked
for his release and will transfer, according to the Daily Hampshire Gazette. Baldwin averaged 4.8 points and 4.1 rebounds
last season . . . Chris Gray became the first Boston University
men’s lacrosse player to be named Patriot League Rookie of the
Year and also was named to the all-conference first team. Gray
finished the regular season with a program-record 59 points.
D8
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
BC High’s Vasil hurts elbow
By Karl Capen
Baseball
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
After firing a 91-mile-perhour fastball in the second inning Monday afternoon at Monan Park, BC
SCHOOL
High ace
ROUNDUP
Mike Vasil allowed a basesclearing, three-run triple to
deep center field by Xaverian’s
Jack Whorf for a 5-1 deficit.
Then the 6-foot-4-inch,
210-pound senior righthander
from Wellesley clutched his
throwing arm in discomfort.
After a conversation with BC
Hi g h c o a c h No r m Wa l s h ,
along with the team trainer,
Vasil was removed from the
game with what is believed to
be an elbow strain.
Vasil, a projected firstround pick in June’s Major
League Baseball first-year
player draft who has already
committed to the University of
Virginia, will undergo an MRI.
“[Vasil] probably shouldn’t
have gone out there and he
should have said something to
me because he didn’t feel great
warming up, apparently,” said
Walsh after the Eagles’ 7-3
Catholic Conference loss.
Vasil, who fell one out shy
of a perfect game in his first
start against St. John’s Prep on
April 11, had thrown one inning of relief Saturday to close
out a 2-1 win against Braintree.
In 1„ innings Monday, he
yielded five runs while striking
out four. Pitching once again
in front of a group of major
league scouts, he was consistently hitting the lower 90s
with his fastball — topping out
at 95 miles per hour. But he
was leaving his fastball up in
the zone and that allowed
Xaverian hitters to get on top
of the ball.
“Obviously there is something there that aggravated
and caused a s train and I
think we are going to back off
and take it slow,” said Walsh.
“There is a lot at stake here,
there is an awful lot at stake
here. We don’t want to sacri-
Scoreboard
DEBEE TLUMACKI FOR THE GLOBE
Abington’s Jenna McDonough blocks the bag and tags out
Norton’s Madison Correia at third in the third inning.
fice that to win some high
school baseball games.”
Vasil believes it is nothing
serious.
“I think it is more restwise,” said Vasil, who returned
to the dugout in the fourth inning, his elbow wrapped in a
bag of ice.
“I think I should be back
fairly quickly. It is not seasonending or anything like that.
Nothing else you can do right
now [other] than get it
checked out and see how it
goes.”
Not appearing in as much
discomfort as he was before,
Vasil remained standing to
cheer on the Eagles (3-2)
against Xaverian (4-3).
South Boston 6, Tech Boston
1 — Alex Troncoso and Carlos
Vazquez combined on a no-hitter for South Boston (3-0).
Weston 6, Bedford 0 — Senior
r i g h t h a n d e r S a a j a n Ma y
tossed a no-hitter with nine
strikeouts for the visiting
Wildcats in the Dual County
League victory.
Sandwich 7, Martha’s Vine­
yard 0 — Junior John Tropea
tossed a no-hitter, striking out
10 for the Blue Knights.
Softball
Abington 5, Norton 4 — The
10th-ranked Green Wave (6-0)
struck for two runs in the
fourth inning on run-scoring
hits from Lauren Keleher
( d o u b l e ) a n d Je n n a Mc Donough (single) and added
two more in the fifth off Lancers ace Kelly Nelson to hand
No. 1 Norton (4-1) its first loss.
Revere 6, Marblehead 5 — Senior captain Victoria Correia
hit a walkoff homer with two
outs in the seventh to rally the
Patriots (6-1) from a 5-1 deficit.
Melrose 12, Stoneham 0 —
Junior Jill Stone recorded a
no-hitter for the Red Raiders
(3-2).
Hanover 16, Scituate 1 — Junior Caroline Zielinski (3-0)
dazzled for the Indians (4-0),
striking out 12 in a no-hitter
while also adding two hits and
four RBIs at the plate.
Volleyball
Needham 3, Natick 1 — Eli
Wallace (34 assists, 4 blocks),
Cam Robins (15 kills, 2
blocks), and Jack Cruickshank
(7 kills, 2 blocks) powered the
No. 2 Rockets (8-0) to a Bay
State win to hand the No. 1
Red Hawks (6-1) their first
loss of the season.
Globe correspondents Karl
Capen reported from
Dorchester, Katherine
Fominykh from Abington, and
Nate Weitzer from Natick.
North Division
W
L
Syracuse..................10
5
Pawtucket .................9
7
Scranton/W­B...........9
8
Buffalo .......................4
5
Lehigh Valley............7
9
Rochester ..................6
8
Pct. GB
.667 —
.563 1½
.529
2
.444
3
.438 3½
.429 3½
South Division
W
L
Norfolk .......................9
6
Charlotte ...................8
9
Durham......................7
9
Gwinnett....................6 10
Pct. GB
.600 —
.471
2
.438 2½
.375 3½
West Division
W
L
Toledo ......................12
5
Indianapolis ..............7
7
Columbus ..................7
9
Louisville ...................5
9
Pct. GB
.706 —
.500 3½
.438 4½
.357 5½
MONDAY'S GAMES
Pawtucket 6............................... Toledo 4
Rochester 2............................Gwinnett 1
Toledo 3............................... Pawtucket 0
Gwinnett 1............................Rochester 0
Durham 8....................................Buffalo 1
Charlotte 5.............................Louisville 3
Scranton/W­B 9...................Columbus 0
Norfolk 6.........................Lehigh Valley 3
Indianapolis 2........................ Syracuse 0
FIRST GAME
Toledo 3, Pawtucket 0
at McCoy Stadium, Pawtucket, R.I.
TOLEDO
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Mahtook cf
4 0 0 0 0 1 .156
Krizan dh
4 0 0 0 0 1 .400
DLugo 2b
4 1 1 1 0 2 .296
Stewart lf
2 0 0 0 0 1 .216
EEspinal 1b
3 1 1 0 0 0 .326
Adduci rf
3 1 1 1 0 1 .265
Saltlmcchia c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .300
Eaves 3b
2 0 0 0 1 0 .000
Kozma ss
2 0 1 1 1 1 .235
Totals
27 3 6 3 2 7
PAWTUCKET AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
RCastillo cf
3 0 1 0 0 0 .333
RFlores lf
3 0 0 0 0 0 .167
Travis 1b
3 0 0 0 0 1 .327
Olt dh
3 0 0 0 0 0 .257
De Jsus Jr. 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .217
DButler c
1 0 0 0 1 0 .276
JBetts 3b
2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
2 0 0 0 0 2 .226
ATavarez rf
MMiller ss
2 0 0 0 0 0 .206
Totals
22 0 1 0 1 4
Toledo
000 012 0 — 3 6 0
Pawtucket
000 000 0 — 0 1 0
LOB—Toledo 6, Pawtucket 2. 2B—
Saltalamacchia (1), Kozma (4), RCastil­
lo (6). HR—Adduci (2), DLugo (1).
TOLEDO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
BHardy W 2­0 6 1 0 0 1 4 0.52
Coleman S 4
1 0 0 0 0 0 2.45
PAWTUCKET
Shepherd L
0­1
RoScott
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
6 5 3 3 2 6 6.75
1 1 0 0 0 1 1.35
HBP—by Shepherd (Stewa rt).
T—1:48. A—1,823.
SECOND GAME
Pawtucket 6, Toledo 4
at McCoy Stadium, Pawtucket, R.I.
PAWTUCKET AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
RCastillo dh
4 2 1 0 0 2 .329
RFlores lf
2 1 0 0 2 2 .160
Travis 1b
3 1 1 0 0 2 .328
Olt 3b
4 1 2 5 0 1 .282
Ohlman c
4 0 1 0 0 2 .261
Barfield rf
3 0 0 0 1 1 .140
ATavarez cf
4 0 0 0 0 1 .211
De La Grra 2b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .171
MMiller ss
2 0 0 0 1 0 .194
Totals
29 6 7 6 4 11
TOLEDO
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Mahtook cf
4 1 0 0 0 1 .139
Adduci rf
4 2 2 2 0 1 .283
DLugo 2b
4 0 2 1 0 0 .307
Stewart lf
4 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Huffman dh
4 0 0 0 0 3 .268
EEspinal 1b
3 0 1 0 0 1 .327
RoRodrigz ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .191
Greiner c
2 1 1 1 1 1 .275
Kozma 3b
3 0 1 0 0 1 .241
Totals
31 4 7 4 1 9
Pawtucket
001 001 04 — 6 7 0
Toledo
000 020 02 — 4 7 0
LOB—Pawtucket 5, Toledo 5. 2B—Olt
(7), DLugo (5), EEspinal (1), Adduci (4).
HR—De La Guerra (1), Olt (2), Greiner
(1), Adduci (3). SB—De La Guerra (2),
RCastillo (4). GIDP—ATavarez, Olt.
DP—Toledo 2.
PAWTUCKET IP H R ER BB SO ERA
JSmith
4 3 0 0 1 3 0.87
Wrkmn W 1­1 3 3 2 2 0 5 6.75
Poyner
1 1 2 1 0 1 4.50
TOLEDO
IP
Turley
5„
MMontgmery 1‚
Voelker L 0­1 1
H
5
1
1
R
2
0
4
ER BB SO
2 1 9
0 1 2
3 2 0
ERA
3.12
2.84
6.00
HBP—by Voelker (Travis). T—2:09.
A—1,823.
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Syracuse at Indianapolis............. 11:05a
Toledo at Pawtucket.........................6:15
Charlotte at Louisville...................... 6:30
Columbus at Scranton/W­B............6:35
Gwinnett at Rochester..................... 6:35
Lehigh Valley at Norfolk.................. 6:35
Buffalo at Durham.............................7:05
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Lehigh Valley at Norfolk..............12:05a
Buffalo at Durham.........................10:35a
Charlotte at Louisville.......................11a
Gwinnett at Rochester.................11:05a
Syracuse at Indianapolis..................1:35
Toledo at Pawtucket.........................6:15
Columbus at Scranton/W­B............6:35
EASTERN LEAGUE
ENTER TO WIN
GIFT CERTIFICATES TO
SALTIE GIRL (WINNER)
FLOUR BAKERY + CAFE
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FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
TOR
7:07
NESN
TOR
7:07
NESN
TOR
7:07
NESN
TB
7:10
NESN
TB
4:05
NESN
TB
1:05
NESN
KC
7:10
NESN
MIL
7:00
NBA,
NBCSB
HBP—by McAvoy (Hilliard). WP—
McGrath. T—3:20. A—3,056.
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Erie at Altoona........................................6
New Hampshire at Binghamton.....6:35
Richmond at Bowie...........................6:35
Akron at Reading...............................6:45
Harrisburg at Trenton............................7
Portland at Hartford.........................7:05
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Erie at Altoona...............................10:30a
Harrisburg at Trenton..................10:30a
Richmond at Bowie.......................11:05a
New Hampshire at Binghamton.....6:35
Akron at Reading...............................6:45
Portland at Hartford.........................7:05
4/29
4/30
MIL
TBA
NBCSB
MIL
(if nec.)
TBA
NBCSB/TNT
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI­FM 93.7; Bruins, Celtics, and Revolution, WBZ­FM 98.5
ON THE AIR
Latest line
BASEBALL
6:30 p.m. Minnesota at NY Yankees
7:07 p.m. Boston at Toronto
MLB
NESN
PRO BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Boston
8 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia
10:30 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State
NBCSB, NBA
TNT
TNT
COLLEGE LACROSSE
7 p.m.
Bryant at Brown
NESN+
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
Schools
BASEBALL
ATLANTIC COAST
Nauset 6...............................Marshfield 0
BAY STATE
Brookline 9....................Newton North 5
Framingham 10.....................Braintree 1
Norwood 4.............................Wellesley 1
Walpole 1.....................................Milton 0
Weymouth 2..........................Needham 1
BOSTON CITY
Fenway 18......................Madison Park 4
S. Boston 6.......................Tech Boston 1
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Cathedral 15..........................Matignon 4
Lowell Cath. 10......Saint Joseph Prep 0
St. Mary’s 4.................Card. Spellman 2
CATHOLIC CONFERENCE
Cath. Memorial 4...........Malden Cath. 0
Xaverian 7................................BC High 3
DUAL COUNTY
Acton­Boxboro 14.. Lincoln­Sudbury 12
Boston Latin 5....................Cambridge 2
Newton South 5.................... Westford 3
Wayland 7.................Concord­Carlisle 2
Weston 6...................................Bedford 0
HOCKOMOCK
Attleboro 6..........Oliver Ames 5 (8 inn.)
Franklin 2...............................Mansfield 0
King Philip 6............................ Taunton 5
North Attleboro 12..............Stoughton 0
MAYFLOWER
Sacred Heart 5...........W. Bridgewater 2
MBIL
Brimmer & May 12....Cambridge (W) 2
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Andover 8...........................Chelmsford 1
Billerica 7................................Methuen 3
Central Cath. 10.........................Dracut 3
Haverhill 4...........................N. Andover 2
MIDDLESEX
Arlington 5................................Woburn 4
Burlington 6.......................Wilmington 0
Lexington 4..............................Belmont 2
Melrose 3................Stoneham 2 (8 inn.)
Wakefield 10...................... Watertown 3
NORTHEASTERN
Beverly 9.......................... Lynn English 2
Danvers 3...............................Winthrop 0
Everett 9.................................... Malden 7
Gloucester 6..............................Saugus 0
Medford 17..........................Somerville 6
Peabody 4.....................Lynn Classical 0
PATRIOT
Hanover 15...............................Scituate 9
Hingham 8............................... Duxbury 5
Plymouth North 8..........Whit.­Hanson 3
Silver Lake 8.............................. Quincy 0
PREP­PRIVATE
Brooks 11...................................Pingree 1
St. Sebastian’s 7......Worcester Acad. 5
SOUTH COAST
Seekonk 12..................Digh.­Rehoboth 9
SWCL
Oxford 7....................................Millbury 3
TRI­VALLEY
Westwood 6............................Medway 1
NONLEAGUE
Apponequet 12...................Dartmouth 9
Ashland 10.............................Hopedale 0
Bridge.­Raynham 8.............Hopkinton 2
Case 19...................................Westport 4
Coyle & Cassidy 4........Old Rochester 1
Dedham 15......................... Latin Acad. 3
Dover­Sherborn 10....................Sutton 1
Mashpee 9.........................Upper Cape 8
Natick 4..........................................Millis 1
Plymth S. 4Dennis­Yarmouth 3 (10 inn.)
Sandwich 7..................Martha’s Vnyd. 0
GOLF
LACROSSE
SOFTBALL
BAY STATE
Braintree 12.....................Framingham 2
Needham 5..........................Weymouth 3
Newton North 14..................Brookline 0
Norwood 4.............................Wellesley 0
CAPE ANN
Ipswich 3........................... Manchester 1
Lynnfield 16...................Masconomet 11
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Abp. Williams 6.......... Arlington Cath. 5
Austin Prep 18...................... Matignon 3
St. Mary’s 6...Card. Spellman 5 (9 inn.)
DUAL COUNTY
Concord­Carlisle 9...................Weston 4
HOCKOMOCK
Attleboro 14........Oliver Ames 2 (5 inn.)
Franklin 8...............................Mansfield 2
North Attleboro 9................Stoughton 3
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Chelmsford 5...........................Andover 3
Dracut 4...........................Central Cath. 2
Methuen 6................................Billerica 2
N. Andover 18.........................Haverhill 6
MIDDLESEX
Arlington 8................................Woburn 1
Burlington 8.......................Wilmington 5
Melrose 12............................Stoneham 0
NORTHEASTERN
Danvers 8...............................Winthrop 0
Everett 13................................Malden 10
Medford 13..........................Somerville 1
Peabody 8.....................Lynn Classical 4
Revere 6.............................Marblehead 5
PATRIOT
Hanover 16...............................Scituate 1
Pembroke 3................................Quincy 2
Silver Lake 12............................Quincy 0
PREP­PRIVATE
Tabor 12............................ St. George’s 2
SOUTH COAST
Digh.­Rehoboth 12..................Seekonk 0
NBA
Tuesday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At BOSTON...........2½ ...........Milwaukee
At Phila................10 ................... Miami
At Golden State. 11 .........San Antonio
Wednesday
At Toronto.............7 .........Washington
At Cleveland.........6½ .................Indiana
Transactions
Champions: Liverpool vs. AS Roma FS1
BOYS
CAPE ANN
Masconomet 14.....................Lynnfield 6
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Abp. Williams 13........Arlington Cath. 3
St. Mary’s 8........Card. Spellman 7 (OT)
COMMONWEALTH
Shawsheen 17..............Mystic Valley 10
ISL
Groton 8..................... Lawrence Acad. 4
MAYFLOWER
Tri­County 14................Southeastern 10
PREP­PRIVATE
Beaver CD 15.................. Marianapolis 1
NONLEAGUE
Cohasset 14....................... Middleboro 0
Oliver Ames 18...........Digh.­Rehoboth 2
St. John’s (S) 15................... Mansfield 8
GIRLS
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Card. Spellman 10...............St. Mary’s 8
COMMONWEALTH
Shawsheen 17..............Mystic Valley 13
DUAL COUNTY
Westford 17...............Acton­Boxboro 10
NORTHEASTERN
Peabody 15.................................Revere 4
PREP­PRIVATE
Beaver CD 15................Marianapolis 14
Brooks 13...................................Pingree 9
Middlesex 14...........Dexter Southfield 3
St. Paul’s 14..........................St. Mark’s 9
NONLEAGUE
Bp. Feehan 11..................... Marshfield 9
Gr. New Bedford 14 Bristol­Plymouth 7
New Bedford 10........................Bourne 9
St. John Paul II 19 Dennis­Yarmouth 16
Silver Lake 15...................Oliver Ames 7
Walpole 19...........................King Philip 6
Portland 000 010 001 10 — 3 8 2
Hartford 001 100 000 11 — 4 9 0
E—McAvoy (1), Rei (3). LOB—Port­
land 7, Hartford 12. 2B—Tobias (2),
Quiroz (4), Rabago (1), Hampson (6).
SB—Tobias (1), Hampson (12), Metzler
(1). S—Lucena, Lovullo, Carrizales.
SF—Rei, Matheny, Rodgers 2. GIDP—
Mundell. DP—Portland 2, .
PORTLAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
McAvoy
5 6 2 2 2 6 4.41
McGrath
2 1 0 0 1 3 1.80
Lau
3 1 1 0 3 1 2.25
Kelley L 0­1
‚ 1 1 0 0 0 1.69
4/28
Home games shaded
Pct. GB
.667 —
.588 1½
2
.563
.471 3½
.375
5
.353 5½
at Dunkin’ Donuts Park, Hartford,
Conn.
PORTLAND
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Sturgeon cf
5 0 2 0 0 1 .367
Mars lf
5 0 0 0 0 1 .179
Quiroz 2b
4 1 1 0 0 1 .302
Lovullo 2b
0 0 0 0 0 0 .056
Ockimey 1b
5 0 1 0 0 1 .231
Matheny rf
3 0 0 1 1 1 .306
Tobias 3b
4 1 2 0 0 0 .339
Tendler dh
4 1 0 0 0 2 .194
Rei c
1 0 0 1 1 1 .059
Lucena pr­c
0 0 0 0 0 0 .125
JRivera ss
4 0 2 1 0 1 .280
Totals
35 3 8 3 2 9
4/27
KC
7:30
NBCSB
Western Division
W
L
Richmond ................12
6
Bowie .......................10
7
Altoona ......................9
7
Akron..........................8
9
Harrisburg.................6 10
Erie .............................6 11
Hartford 4, Portland 3
4/26
Y
TOR
7:30
NBCSN,
NESN
GIRLS
ISL
Rivers 7.................................Middlesex 0
MASS. BAY
Duxbury 6............................Silver Lake 0
HARTFORD
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Wynkoop
6 5 1 1 0 3 4.20
JaGarcia
1 0 0 0 1 1 7.71
Schuh
0 0 0 1 0 4.50
Griggs
1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Pierpont
1 2 1 1 0 1 2.45
Cozart W 1­1 2 1 1 0 0 3 3.97
Presented by
THU
4/25
Pct. GB
.688 —
.588 1½
.467 3½
.438
4
.400 4½
.389
5
HARTFORD
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Hampson ss
4 2 1 0 1 1 .323
Daza lf
5 0 3 0 0 0 .286
Rodgers 3b
2 0 1 2 1 1 .306
Hilliard rf
3 0 0 0 1 1 .236
Mundell 1b
5 0 0 0 0 1 .203
Nunez dh
3 0 0 0 2 2 .196
Metzler 2b
4 2 2 0 1 0 .250
Carrizales cf
4 0 0 0 0 2 .152
Rabago c
5 0 2 2 0 2 .226
Totals
35 4 9 4 6 10
The Boston Globe’s Munch Madness 2018 might be over,
but the fun isn’t. Thanks to Cross Insurance, you could win
a gift certificate from each Final Four restaurant.
WED
Eastern Division
W
L
New Hampshire .....11
5
Trenton ....................10
7
Binghamton ..............7
8
Hartford.....................7
9
Portland.....................6
9
Reading......................7 11
MONDAY'S GAMES
Altoona 7..........................................Erie 0
Binghamton 8............New Hampshire 5
Bowie 4..................................Richmond 2
Reading 8..................................... Akron 4
Trenton 3.............................Harrisburg 1
Hartford 4.......Portland 3.......11 innings
Y
TUE
4/24
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
Y
NONLEAGUE
Abington 5..................................Norton 4
Boston Latin 15...................Fontbonne 7
Case 3..........................................Durfee 0
Mansfield 12........................Barnstable 0
Middleboro 7.........................Wareham 1
Plymouth South 3..Dennis­Yarmouth 2
Shrewsbury 12...................Holy Name 8
TENNIS
BOYS
BAY STATE
Brookline 5....................Newton North 0
Wellesley 5.............................Norwood 0
CATHOLIC CONFERENCE
BC High 5................................Xaverian 0
DUAL COUNTY
Wayland 4........................Boston Latin 1
HOCKOMOCK
Attleboro 5........................Oliver Ames 0
King Philip 5............................ Taunton 0
ISL
Roxbury Latin 15.........St. Sebastian’s 0
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Andover 5...........................Chelmsford 0
N. Andover 5...........................Haverhill 0
MIDDLESEX
Burlington 4..........................Stoneham 1
Lexington 5............................ Arlington 0
Reading 5..................................Woburn 0
Wakefield 5........................Wilmington 0
Winchester 4...........................Belmont 1
NORTHEASTERN
Marblehead 5.............................Revere 0
PATRIOT
Hanover 3.................................Scituate 2
Hingham 4............................... Duxbury 1
Plymouth North 4..........Whit.­Hanson 1
SOUTH COAST
Somerset Berkley 4...Digh.­Rehoboth 1
TRI­VALLEY
Dover­Sherborn 5...............Westwood 0
NONLEAGUE
Apponequet 4....................Middleboro 1
Maimonides 5........Saint Joseph Prep 0
Plymouth South 3..Dennis­Yarmouth 2
Rockport 3....................................Triton 2
GIRLS
BAY STATE
Brookline 3....................Newton North 2
BOSTON CITY
Latin Acad. 3...........................O'Bryant 2
CAPE ANN
Lynnfield 5................................ Ipswich 0
Manchester 5..................Masconomet 0
Newburyport 4............Ham.­Wenham 1
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Austin Prep 5.................Abp. Williams 0
Matignon 3........................... St. Mary’s 2
DUAL COUNTY
Boston Latin 4........................Wayland 1
HOCKOMOCK
Oliver Ames 5........................Attleboro 0
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Andover 3...........................Chelmsford 2
N. Andover 4...........................Haverhill 1
MIDDLESEX
Wilmington 5........................Wakefield 0
Winchester 4...........................Belmont 1
NORTHEASTERN
Marblehead 5.............................Revere 0
Swampscott 5.............................Salem 0
PATRIOT
Hingham 5............................... Duxbury 0
N. Quincy 5...........................Pembroke 0
SOUTH COAST
Somerset Berkley 5...Digh.­Rehoboth 0
NONLEAGUE
Apponequet 5....................Middleboro 0
Bridge.­Raynham 4....................Durfee 1
Fairhaven 4............................Westport 1
Nauset 4...............................Barnstable 1
Old Rochester 4....................Bp. Stang 1
Plymouth South 5..Dennis­Yarmouth 0
Sandwich 4...........................Monomoy 1
TRACK
BOYS
MAYFLOWER
Diman 116............................Blue Hills 19
W. Bridgewater 100........... Blue Hills 31
GIRLS
MAYFLOWER
Diman 73..............................Blue Hills 54
W. Bridgewater 116.................Diman 19
NORTHEASTERN
Lynn Classical 75................. Medford 61
VOLLEYBALL
BOYS
BAY STATE
Braintree 3.............................Wellesley 0
Brookline 3..........................Weymouth 0
Needham 3..................................Natick 1
Newton North 3.....................Norwood 0
COMMONWEALTH
Gr. Lawrence 3..............................PMA 2
Lowell Cath. 3......................Pope John 0
Malden 3.............................Essex Tech 0
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Chelmsford 3...........................Andover 0
Lowell 3...........................Central Cath. 1
N. Andover 3............................Billerica 2
WESTERN ALLIANCE
St. John’s Prep 3............ St. John’s (S) 0
NONLEAGUE
Brockton 3...................Digh.­Rehoboth 1
Framingham 3......................Algonquin 1
Gr. New Bedford 3.....................Durfee 0
Latin Acad. 3....................Boston Latin 1
O'Bryant 3............................Somerville 0
Quincy 3.................................Randolph 1
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/high­
schools.
BASEBALL
Atlanta (NL): Sent C Tyler Flowers to
Gwinnett (IL) for a rehab assignment.
Boston (AL): Traded P Roenis Elias to
Seattle for a player to be named or
cash.
Chicago (AL): Placed P Miguel Gonza­
lez on 10­day DL, retroactive to April
19. Selected the contract of P Chris
Beck from Charlotte (IL). Transferred P
Danny Farquhar to 60­day DL.
Colorado (NL): Selected the contract of
P Harrison Musgrave from Albuquer­
que (PCL). Placed P Chris Rusin on 10­
day DL. Transferred P Carlos Estevez
from the 10­ to 60­day DL.
Detroit (AL): Designated P Drew Ver­
Hagen for assignment. Recalled OF
Mike Gerber from Toledo (IL).
Los Angeles (AL): Placed P Blake Wood
on 10­day DL. Recalled P Eduardo Pare­
des from Salt Lake (PCL). Selected the
contract of P Justin Anderson from Salt
Lake. Optioned P Jaime Barria to Salt
Lake.
Los Angeles (NL): Recalled P Walker
Buehler from Oklahoma City (PCL).
Designated P Wilmer Font for assign­
ment.
Miami Marlins (NL): Sent P Elieser Her­
nandez and SS JT Riddleon a rehab as­
signments to Jupiter (FSL).
Milwaukee (NL): Assigned P Alec Ash­
er outright to Colorado Springs (PCL).
Minnesota (AL): Optioned P Gabriel
Moya to Rochester (IL). Reinstated P
Phil Hughes from 10­day DL.
New York (NL): Sent P Jason Vargas on
a rehab assignment to Las Vegas
(PCL).
Toronto (AL): Recalled P Tim Mayza
from Buffalo (IL). Placed P John Axford
on the bereavement list.
BASKETBALL
NBA: Named Derek Chang CEO of NBA
China.
FOOTBALL
Arizona (NFC): Signed DE Benson May­
owa to a one­year contract.
Denver (AFC): Traded P Riley Dixon to
the N.Y. Giants for a conditional 2019
seventh­round draft pick.
Indianapolis (AFC): Announced the re­
tirement of DE Dwight Freeney.
New York (NFC): Waived WR Darius
Powe. Acquired P Riley Dixon from
Denver for a 2019 conditional seventh­
round draft pick.
Oakland (AFC): Exercised their fifth­
year option on WR Amari Cooper.
Signed CB Daryl Worley.
Pittsburgh (AFC): Exercised their fifth­
year option on LB Bud Dupree.
CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Edmonton Eskimos: Released WR De­
vante Noil.
HOCKEY
Calgary (NHL): Named Bill Peters
coach.
Minnesota (NHL): Announced the con­
tract of general manager Chuck
Fletcher will not be renewed.
COLLEGE
Canisius: Named Scott Hemer wom­
en’s basketball coach.
Clemson: Named Shimmy Gray­Miller
assistant women’s basketball coach.
North Carolina: Junior F Luke Maye de­
clared for the NBA draft.
Providence: Signed women’s volleyball
coach Margot Royer­Johnson to a con­
tract extension.
Santa Clara: Named Scott Garson
men’s assistant basektball coach.
South Carolina: Dismissed G Rakym
Felder from the men’s basketball pro­
gram.
Tennis
ATP BARCELONA
Singles
First Round
Benoit Paire def. Nicolas Jarry, 7­6 (4),
6­7 (3), 6­4.; Malek Jaziri def. Tennys
Sandgren, 6­4, 6­4.; Marcel Granollers
def. Mikhail Kukushkin, 6­2, 6­2.; Dusan
Lajovic def. Pedro Martinez, 6­4, 6­7
(5), 6­3.; Rogerio Dutra Silva def. Jared
Donaldson, 6­3, 6­1.; Stefanos Tsitsipas
def. Corentin Moutet, 6­4, 6­1.; Guiller­
mo Garcia­Lopez def. Yuichi Sugita, 7­6
(5), 7­6 (5).; Ivo Karlovic def. Tommy
Robredo, 6­7 (5), 7­6 (8), 6­4.; Pablo
Cuevas def. Ricardo Ojeda Lara, 6­0,
6­4.; Leonardo Mayer def. Mischa
Zverev, 6­3, 6­0.
ATP BUDAPEST
Singles
First Round
John Millman, Australia, def. Radu Al­
bot, Moldova, 6­4, 7­5. Marco Cecchi­
nato, Italy, def. Mirza Basic, Bosnia­
Herzegovina, 6­3, 6­4. Aljaz Bedene (5),
Slovenia, def. Marius Copil, Romania,
6­7 (3), 7­5, 6­3. Lorenzo Sonego, Italy,
def. Hubert Hurkacz, Poland, 6­7 (2),
7­6 (8), 6­4.
WTA STUTTGART
Singles
First Round
Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def.
Daria Kasatkina, Russia, 6­2, 6­2.
WTA ISTANBUL
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts.
NYC FC ................... 5 1 2 17
Atlanta Utd FC...... 5 1 1 16
Orlando City.......... 4 2 1 13
NEW ENGLAND ..... 3 2 2 11
Columbus............... 3 3 2 11
New York............... 3 3 0 9
Chicago.................. 2 3 1 7
Montreal ................ 2 5 0 6
D.C. United Utd..... 1 3 2 5
Philadelphia .......... 1 3 2 5
Toronto FC............. 1 4 0 3
GF
16
17
14
12
11
14
9
9
6
3
4
GA
9
8
12
8
9
8
10
17
10
8
11
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Kansas City ........... 5 1 2 17
Los Angeles FC..... 4 2 0 12
FC Dallas................ 3 0 3 12
LA Galaxy .............. 3 3 1 10
Real Salt Lake....... 3 3 1 10
Vancouver ............. 3 4 1 10
Houston.................. 2 2 2 8
Colorado ................ 2 2 2 8
Portland ................. 2 3 2 8
Minnesota Utd...... 2 5 0 6
San Jose................. 1 3 2 5
Seattle.................... 1 3 1 4
20
16
9
8
9
8
14
9
12
9
11
5
11
13
3
10
14
17
9
8
14
15
13
8
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
FRIDAY, APRIL 27
Real Salt Lake at Vancouver.........10:30
SATURDAY, APRIL 28
Montreal at Atlanta United FC.............1
Chicago at Toronto FC...........................3
D.C. United at Philadelphia..............3:30
San Jose at Columbus......................7:30
Sporting Kansas City at NEW ENGLAND
.............................................................. 7:30
Houston at Minnesota United..............8
New York at LA Galaxy..................10:30
SUNDAY, APRIL 29
Orlando City at Colorado......................4
FC Dallas at New York City FC....... 6:30
Seattle at Los Angeles FC.....................9
Singles
First Round
Svetlana Kuznetsova (2), Russia, def.
Wang Qiang, China, 6­3, 6­3.
Christina McHale, United States, def.
Mona Barthel, Germany, 7­6 (4), 4­6,
6­3.
Auto racing
IRL HONDA GRAND PRIX
Monday
At Barber Motorsports Park
Birmingham, Alabama
Lap length: 2.3 miles
1. (1) Josef Newgarden, Chevrolet, 82
2. (4) Ryan Hunter­Reay, Honda, 82
3. (5) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 82
4. (10) Robert Wickens, Honda, 82
5. (3) Sebastien Bourdais, Honda, 82
6. (6) Scott Dixon, Honda, 82
7. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 82
8. (18) Takuma Sato, Honda, 82
9. (9) Simon Pagenaud, Chevrolet, 82
10. (7) Marco Andretti, Honda, 82
11. (8) Alexander Rossi, Honda, 82
12. (21) Matheus Leist, Chevrolet, 82
13. (11) Zach Veach, Honda, 82
14. (19) Jordan King, Chevrolet, 82
15. (17) Spencer Pigot, Chevrolet, 81
16. (22) Rene Binder, Chevrolet, 80
17. (20) Gabby Chaves, Chevrolet, 80
18. (23) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 80
19. (16) Z. Claman De Melo, Honda, 80
20. (12) E. Jons, Honda, 64, Mechanical
T h e
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
D9
LOVE LETTERS
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
READERS RESPOND:
BY MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN
BY MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
You’ve been together for six months, and his
ex has tried to break you up multiple times. You
think about your guy constantly, but you’re worried you don’t miss him enough. Do you love
drama or do you just need a problem to fixate
on? Either way, stop it.
JUST-ANOTHER-BOSTONIAN
PRESENTED BY
Should I miss
him more?
Correct me if I’m wrong, but don’t normal,
healthy people continue on with their lives as
functional people even when their significant
others are away for a while?
HARAJUKUBARBIE3
Two shows on PBS go back to where it all began
Q. My boyfriend and I have been together for
eight months, and he went off to basic training about a month and a half ago. We knew
each other for about nine months before we
started dating. There aren’t many problems in
the relationship other than his ex, who keeps
coming back to break us up (but I feel she
brings us closer together).
One real problem is the distance — sort of.
I’m worried because I don’t know if I really
miss him or if I just miss the company. Now
that he’s at basic training, I think about him
all the time, but I don’t think I really miss him
in a big way.
The first week was really tough, but since
then I’m basically living as I did when I was
single — except now I get correspondence every day. I’m not hanging out with other guys,
so it’s not like he’s been replaced or anything.
I’m just worried that there’s a lack of emotion
on my end.
Are my feelings strong enough? Is it bad
that I’m not more upset about the distance?
FEELING DISTANT
There are plenty of ways to observe the decline of civilization on television (which reminds me, there’s a four-pack of “Roseanne” in
the fridge on ABC, and Bravo’s got a new episode of “Real Housewives of Beverly Hills” at
9 p.m.), but wouldn’t it be nice to watch something about the rise of humanity? The kind not
assisted by extraterrestrials?
For those who just said, “Why, yes, yes it
would,” PBS is a showcase of auspicious beginnings tonight. Starting at 8 p.m., you can catch
part two of the nine-part PBS/BBC co-production “Civilizations,” a more pluralistic descendant of Kenneth Clark’s landmark 1969 survey
of Western art, “Civilization.”
Led by Columbia University professor of
history and art history Simon Schama, University of Cambridge professor of classics Mary
Beard, and British-Nigerian historian and
writer David Olusoga, the show peers through
the lines of history to see the many ways that
art of ancient peoples shaped their view of the
future, as well as our own view of the past.
A. You dated this person for about six months
before he left for basic training. That’s a good
amount of time, but it’s not forever. It makes
sense that you were able to jump back into
your single routine. That’s the one you’re used
to.
I don’t see any problem with how much
you’re missing him. You think about him a lot,
and it sounds like you do miss his company.
You’re not wishing you were single; you’re
simply able to enjoy yourself on your own. I’d
be more worried if you were waiting by your
phone, unable to focus on anything but the arrival of his next e-mail.
If he were local right now, you wouldn’t be
asking yourself massive questions about the
future of the relationship. There’s no reason to
do that now, just because he’s away.
Don’t feel bad about enjoying your life on
your own. Instead, focus on his correspondence, and then see how everything feels
when he returns.
MEREDITH
NUTOPIA LTD
Simon Schama (seen in India) is one of three principal contributors to “Civlizations.”
In an ostensibly enlightened era that finds
images of the Venus of Willendorf getting censored on Facebook for nudity, this is a series
rich with lessons worth revisiting (with a fair
share of fresh revelations that may have you
looking at old art anew. On that front, tonight’s episode examines how art through the
millennia has captured (and freed) the human
body.
Immediately following that is the series
premiere of “First Civilizations,” which takes a
more anthropological/archeological dig
through the ages to our very beginnings as a
complete mess. Trigger warning: There will be
cheesy dramatizations. Tonight’s episode
starts where most civilizations do, with “War”
and goes uphill/downhill from there, depending on your perspective.
Once you’re ready to return to modernity,
there’s a cold shower in the form of four
straight episodes of “House Hunters” on
HGTV starting at 10. The world may be falling
apart, but that farm sink is gorgeous.
Tuesday April 24, 2018
7:00pm
2
WGBH Greater
PBS Boston
4
WBZ Wheel
CBS NEW
7:30pm
8:00pm
8:30pm
Steves
Civilizations (CC):
The human image.
Jeopardy NCIS: A poisoned
NEW
care package.
Movies
9:00pm
9:30pm
Sports
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
First Civiliz.: The
Frontline (CC) HD
premiere. TV-PG
NCIS: A 16-year-old Bull: A widow hires
cold case. TV-PG-LV Bull. HD TV-14-LV
Amanpour Beyond
100 Days
News
Late Sh.
NEW
Chronicle Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Deception (CC) HD
TV-14-V NEW
HD
News
(CC) HD
J Kimmel
NEW
6 WLNE ABC Daily
7
WHDH News
(CC) HD
In. Ed.
Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Deception NEW
F. Feud
News HD
Extra HD F. Feud
News HD
TV-PG
NEW
NEW
News
News
(CC) HD
J Kimmel
(11:35)
Extra
NBC Boston
Access
TV-G
The Voice (CC) Live. (9:01) Rise (CC) TV- Chicago Med (CC)
TV-PG-L
14-DLSV NEW
TV-14 NEW
News
(CC)
J Fallon
NEW
9 WMUR ABC N.H. Ch.
10
WBTS News
NBC (CC)
In. Ed.
Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Deception NEW
Extra HD The Voice (CC) Live. (9:01) Rise (CC) HD Chicago Med (CC)
TV-PG
TV-14-DLSV NEW
HD TV-PG-L
HD TV-14 NEW
News
News
(CC)
J Kimmel
J Fallon
NEW
11
WENH Greater
PBS Boston
Steves
12
WPRI Wheel
CBS NEW
Jeopardy NCIS: A poisoned
NEW
care package.
25
WFXT ET/
FOX Tonight
TMZ HD
TV-PG
27
WUNI Rosa de Guadalupe El rico y Lazaro
HD TV-14-D
(CC) HD
Papá a toda madre
(CC) HD
36
WSBE Upstart Are You/ Upstart Keeping
PBS Crow HD Served? Crow HD Up App.
As Time
Goes By
38
WSBK Big Bang Big Bang News HD
Theory
Theory
The X-Files (CC) HD The X-Files (CC) HD Seinfeld
TV-14-LV
TV-14-LV
TV-PG
Seinfeld
TV-PG
44
WGBX British Baking (CC): Call the Midwife
PBS Decorated biscuits. (CC) HD TV-14
Unforgotten (CC): A second
cold case. HD TV-14
NewsHour
50
56
WBIN I Survived... TV-14
I Killed My BFF
WLVI Goldberg Goldberg Flash (CC): Barry
CW
needs help. NEW
Monster (CC) HD
The 100 (CC) HD
TV-14-LV NEW
5
WCVB News
ABC (CC)
News
(CC)
64
WNAC ET/
FOX Tonight
68
WBPX Criminal Minds
ION (CC) HD TV-14-LV
Cinemax
Encore
Flix
HBO
TMZ HD
TV-PG
Civilizations (CC)
HD TV-PG NEW
Lethal Weapon HD
TV-14-DLV NEW
First Civiliz.: The
premiere. NEW
Frontline (CC) HD
NEW
Amanpour Beyond
NEW
NCIS: A 16-year-old Bull: A widow hires
cold case. TV-PG-LV Bull. HD TV-14-LV
News
-) Vegas
NEW
News
(CC)
Late Sh.
NEW
(11:35)
TMZ
Por amar sin ley
(CC) HD
News
(CC) HD
Noticiero
Uni
(10:01) Doc Martin:
Louisa returns.
BBC
News
Are You/
Served?
New Girl News (CC)
NEW
Wrong
Mans
Lethal Weapon HD
TV-14-DLV NEW
-) Vegas
NEW
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Last Tango/Hfx.
(CC) HD TV-14
Dr. G: Med/Exam
News (CC)
New Girl News
NEW
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Drugs Inc. TV-14-D
Modern Modern
Family
Family
(11:05)
Goldberg
Seinfeld
Private Eyes (CC)
HD
PREMIUM CABLE
(11:20)
(6:10) Central Intelli ★ Pink Panther (CC): A French (9:35) ★★ Down With Love (2003) (CC):
Rellik
(2016) PG-13
cop probes a murder. TV-PG
Feminist falls for a playboy. HD PG-13
★★★ Mission: Impossible (1996) HD
(10:53) ★★★
(7:01) ★★ General's D. (1999) (CC): A
PG-13
Talented/Ripley R
murder at a military base. HD R
★★★ What About Bob? (1991) (CC): A
(6:30) ★ Bulletproof ★★ Blue Chips (1994) (CC): A hoops
TV-14-DLV
coach recruits talent. HD TV-14-L
patient follows his doctor. HD TV-PG-LV
Real
Vice
Atomic Blonde (2017) (CC): Spy heads to Real Sports (CC)
The Fight Silicon
Time
News
1989 Berlin for a dangerous mission. HD R HD TV-PG NEW
Game
Valley
Tonight/ Wyatt
Oliver
Cenac
War for the Planet of the Apes (2017)
(CC): Caesar seeks revenge. HD PG-13
HBO 2
(6:50) Westworld
(CC) HD
(8:05) Real Time
(CC) HD TV-MA
Showtime
(6:00) Push (2009):
Telekinetic people.
Shameless (CC) HD Homeland: Saul's
TV-MA
mission is a go.
Showtime 2
All Star Comedy Jam (CC): Comedian Bill Extreme
Kirk Fox: That Guy Circus
(6:15) ★★ Golden
HD TV-14 Bellamy hosts. HD TV-MA-L
Movie
Child (CC) TV-14-V (CC) HD NR
(9:09) Howards End (10:10) Lord/Rings (2001) (CC): Hobbit
(7:11) ★★ John Q (2002) (CC): An ER is
(CC) HD TV-14
inherits a magic ring. HD TV-14
taken hostage. HD TV-PG
(6:25) Stolen (2009) The Boondock Saints (1999) (CC): Twin
Hell or High Water (2016) (CC): Two
(CC) HD R
brothers kill gangsters. HD R
brothers rob banks. HD R
Starz!
TMC
Billions (CC): Chuck Circus
Beyond
trades favors.
HD TV-14 the Opp.
SPORTS
Felger & Boston Sports Tonight (CC) Live. HD
Mazz HD
Comcast
SportsNet
(6:30) Early Edition
(CC) Live. HD
ESPN
NFL Mock Draft: NFL analysts
forecast Round 1. NEW
ESPN Classic
(5:00) Classic Fball
(CC)
ESPN 2
NFL Live (CC) HD
Golf
NBCSN
NESN
World Long Drive Tour Golf (CC) Live. HD Shotmakers (CC) HD TV-PG NEW
NHL Live Stanley Cup Playoff (CC): A first-round game. Live. HD
Overtime
MLB Baseball (CC): Boston at Toronto. Live. HD
Innings
Red Sox
FAMILY
Craig
Gumball King/Hill Am. Dad Cl/Show Am. Dad Burgers Burgers
Bunk'd
Gravity
Gravity
Bunk'd
Bunk'd
Stuck/
Stuck/
Bunk'd
HD TV-G HD TV-G Falls
Falls
HD TV-G HD TV-G Middle
Middle
Cartoon
Disney
Quick
Slants
Rookie
Rookie
Rookie
NEW
News
QB2QB/R. Wilson
(CC) HD NEW
College Football (CC): Alabama at Mississippi State. From
Davis Wade Stadium. Taped.
NFL Mock Draft (CC): NFL
Madden
analysts forecast Round 1. HD NEW
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
College Football
(CC) Taped.
NFL NEW Rookie
(9:01) ★★★ Dirty Dancing (1987) (CC): A
teen crushes on a dancer. HD TV-14
Loud H. Shaun the Sheep (2015) (CC) HD TV-G
Fresh P. Fresh P.
Shimmer Nella
Sunny
Peppa
Peppa
Peppa
Zoofari
Rookie
Long Drive Golf
Ninja Warrior TV-PG
Sports
Red Sox
Family Guy
Bizaard. Bizaard.
Freeform
Shadowhunters
(5:30) Grown Ups
(2010) HD TV-14-DL (CC) HD NEW
HD
Nickelodeon
Noggin
Loud H.
Bubble
Friends
Rusty R.
The 700 Club (CC)
TV-G
Friends
Top Wing
AMC
His imminent departure for basic training
adds an extra shot of passion/romance to your
relationship, just like his mettlesome ex. Now
that he is gone, you are wondering why you
were so invested in him. This relationship has
been driven more by external factors than internal ones. In the next two years the two of you
will spend more time apart than together,
sooooooo, maybe this long distance thing isn’t
for the two of you.
HEYITHINK
I think she’s putting a lot of outside expectations on what she should feel. Everyone has
their own experience. You can love someone but
still be OK when they have to be away from you.
I think that might say the relationship is stronger if she can trust him while he’s away. K1970
As long as you keep the correspondence honest, there’s no problem. Don’t overstate your
feelings, keep it light. Don’t feel like you should
boost his morale by telling him how much you
miss him, adore him, etc. Go on with your life
and see how you feel with time. Good luck!
COSMOGIRL
This was not a very long-established relationship. You don’t have to be a blubbering
mess in order to consider yourself a good girlfriend. The fact that you can cope just fine when
he’s away doesn’t reflect on your feelings.
WIZEN
^Def best comment.
JAR-VT
Column and comments are edited and
reprinted from boston.com/loveletters. Send
letters to meredith.goldstein@globe.com.
Specials
7:00pm
A&E
Stop over-analyzing. You’re looking for issues that aren’t really there. “I’m just worried
that there’s a lack of emotion on my end.” You’re
just being mature about it and not letting the
separation make you pathetic. It doesn’t mean
you don’t love the guy or aren’t passionate
about him. It just means you are dealing with
this well. He’s lucky to have you. So don’t beat
yourself up. All is well.
KINDGUPPY
7:30pm
Powered by
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BASIC CABLE
F. 48 (CC): A welder The First 48: Love Kills (CC) HD TV-14-L
vanishes. HD TV-14 NEW
(5:25) Last Stand
(2013) TV-MA-LV
Animal Planet River Monsters
(CC) HD TV-PG
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
(10:01) Marcia Clark Investigates The
(CC) HD TV-14-DLV NEW
Escape Plan (2013) (CC): A man escapes from a
prison that he designed. HD TV-14
(10:35) ★★★ Batman (1989):
Caped Crusader vs. The Joker.
River Monsters (CC) River Monsters (CC) River Monsters
Jeremy goes to Fiji. The Lusca monster. (CC) HD TV-PG
Jeremy Wade (CC)
TV-PG
HD
BBC America
BET
Star Trek: Voyager ★★★ Gangs of New York (2002): A young man seeks revenge. TV-14-LSV Gangs/NY
In Contempt HD TV- (11:01) In Contempt
Bringing (7:27) Tyler Perry's Madea's Big Happy Family
HD TV-14
Down
(2011) (CC): Madea unites her family. HD TV-PG-L
14 NEW
Bravo
Housewives/BH
(CC) HD TV-14
HD
CMT
CNN
Comedy
Central
Last Man Last Man
Erin Burnett NEW
Office
Office
HD TV-14 HD TV-14
★★ Hope Floats (1998): A wife returns to her roots. HD TV-PG
Anderson Cooper
Anderson Cooper
CNN Tonight Live.
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Jim NEW
TV-14-DL TV-14-L TV-14-DL TV-14-DL NEW
CSPAN
CSPAN 2
Dest. America
Discovery
DIY
E!
Fit & Health
Food
(12:00) U.S. House of Live.
Politics and Public Policy Today
U.S. Sen Public Affairs Events: Public affairs events, congressional hearings, speeches, and interviews.
Haunted TV-PG-L
Haunted TV-PG-L
Haunted HD TV-PG Haunted TV-PG-L
Haunted TV-PG-L
Deadliest NEW
D. Catch NEW
D. Catch NEW
Last Outpost NEW Deadliest Catch
Buyers Bootcamp
Holmes: NextGen
Holmes NEW
Holmes NEW
Holmes NEW
E! News NEW
Wedding Ringer (2015) (CC) HD TV-14-DL Madea's Witness (2012) HD TV-PG NEW
Untold/E.R. TV-14
Untold/E.R.
Untold/E.R. TV-14
Untold/E.R.
Untold/E.R.
Chopped: The chefs Chopped (CC) HD
Chopped: Waffles
Chopped: Part 4 of Chopped (CC) HD
get Southern grits. TV-G NEW
are used. HD TV-G
5. Laila Ali. HD TV-G TV-G
Fox Movies
Fox News
FUSE
FX
Hallmark
Home &
Garden
Savages FXM
The Equalizer (2014): A man defends the downtrodden. TV-14 (10:45) Equalizer
MacCallum NEW
Carlson NEW
Hannity HD NEW
Ingraham Angle HD Fox News@Night
Malcolm Malcolm Parkers Parkers Parkers Parkers Paranormal Act. (2014) HD TV-14-DLSV
Termina. Thor/Dark World (2013): Thor teams up with Loki.
Legion NEW
(11:01) Legion
F. House F. House F. House F. House F. House F. House Middle
Middle
G. Girls
G. Girls
Fixer Upper: A 1927 Fix'r Up House H. Good Bones (CC)
House H. House
House
House
Tudor-style home. NEW
NEW
HD TV-G NEW
NEW
NEW
Hunters Hunters
History
Forged in Fire (CC)
HD TV-PG-LV
Forged in Fire: (CC) Forged in Fire (CC)
HD TV-PG-LV NEW
HD TV-PG-LV NEW
(10:03) Forged in
Fire NEW
(11:03) Forged in
Fire HD TV-PG-LV
HLN
HSN
ID
Crime & Justice
Healthy You TV-G
Homicide Hunter
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Forensic Forensic Forensic Forensic
Healthy You TV-G
Colleen Lopez TV-G
Homicide Hunter: A Web of Lies (CC)
bomb explodes.
HD TV-14-V NEW
Forensic Forensic
Colleen Lopez TV-G
Forbidden (CC) HD
TV-14-DLSV NEW
Forensic Forensic
Nearly Nude Sha
Homicide Hunter: A
bomb explodes.
IFC
(5:45) ★★ Scarface (1983) (CC): A refugee turns
drug lord in Miami. HD TV-MA-LSV
Lifetime
Lifetime Mov.
MSNBC
MTV
National
Geographic
Married/Sight
Married Married Married/Sight (CC) HD TV-14-DL NEW
Married Flight
Deadly Sorority
Deadly Ex: A married man kisses his ex. Girlfriend Kill (2017) (CC) HD TV-14-DSV
Hardball Live. HD
All In/Hayes Live.
Maddow NEW
Last Word Live. HD The 11th Hour Live.
Jersey Family TV-14 Teen Mom: Young
Teen Mom: Young
Challeng NEW
Ex on the Beach
(6:00) Fury (2014) (CC): A tank crew go
Genius (CC) HD TV- Genius: War strains (11:01) Genius (CC)
on a mission. HD TV-14-LV
14-DLV
a romance. NEW
HD TV-14-DLV
NatGeoWild
NECN
Ovation
OWN
Incredible Dr. Pol
Monster Fish HD
The Take Business The Take Business
★★ Conan the Barbarian (1982) TV-14
Undercover Boss:
Haves and the Have
Gerber Group CEO. Nots (CC) HD TV-14
Oxygen
Paramount
QVC
Science
Sundance
Chicago P.D. TV-14 Chicago P.D. TV-14 Chicago P.D. TV-14 Chicago P.D. TV-14 Chicago P.D. TV-14
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Ink Master NEW
Ink Master NEW
Ink Master TV-14
You're Home With Jill - Garden Edition Live. HD
QVC in the Garden (CC) Live. HD TV-G
What on Earth?
What on Earth?
Abandoned NEW
(10:04) Abandoned What on Earth?
★★ The Outsiders (1983) (CC): Rival
★★ Outsiders (CC):
(6:15) ★★ Point Break (1991) (CC): FBI
agent poses as a surfer. TV-14-DLSV
gangs fight. TV-PG-LV
Rival gangs fight.
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
TV One
USA
Nat'l Treasure
Big Bang Big Bang
Bhowani Junction
My Little Life
(6:00) I Am Legend
Bizarre Foods
Jokers
Jokers
M*A*S*H M*A*S*H
Cosby
Cosby
Modern Modern
Family
Family
G.I. Joe: Retaliation (2013) (CC) HD TV-PG Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama
Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang O.G.
Conan NEW
★★★★ Apartment (CC): Execs have trysts at a flat. (10:15) ★★ Cactus Flower
Little People NEW
Little People NEW
My Little Life NEW (11:04) Little People
NBA Playoff/To Be Announced (CC) Live. HD
NBA Playoff/TBA (CC) Live. HD
Bizarre Foods NEW Zimmern Zimmern Bizarre
Bizarre
Bizarre
Bizarre
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Adam
Gethard NEW
(8:12) Raymond
Raymond Raymond Mom
Mom
King/Qu. King/Qu.
★★ Soul Food: Estranged sisters reunite. ★★ Brown Sugar
Single
Single
(11:04) Law & Order
WWE SmackDown (CC) Live. HD
Unsolved: Tupac
HD TV-MA NEW
SVU HD TV-14-DV
VH-1
WAM
WE
Love & Hip Hop
(6:16) Bewitched
Law & Order TV-14
Love & Hip Hop
Love & Hip Hop
Teyana
Black Ink Crew
Leave It
★★ Home Alone (1990) TV-PG (9:44) Home Alone 2: A boy meets old adversaries.
Law & Order TV-14 Law & Order TV-14 Law & Order TV-14 Law & Order TV-14
Beverly Hills (CC)
NEW
Housewives/BH HD Housewives/BH
TV-14 NEW
(CC) HD TV-14
Watch
NEW
Real H.
★★ Hope Floats
CNN Tonight Live.
Daily
Klepper
NEW
NEW
★★ Scarface (1983) (CC): A refugee turns drug lord
in Miami after leaving Cuba. HD TV-MA-LSV
Wicked Tuna TV-14 Wicked Tuna TV-14 Monster Fish HD
necn News 9PM
necn News 10Pm
necn News 11PM
★ Conan the Destroyer (1984) (CC) TV-14
Haves/Have Nots
Haves and the Have Haves and the Have
(CC) HD TV-14-DLS Nots (CC) HD TV-14 Nots (CC) HD TV-14
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
T h e
D10
MOVIE STARS
New releases
YYY Grace Jones: Bloodlight and
Bami An iconic figure from the 1970s
and ’80s, Grace Jones has faded from
the limelight, but Sophie Fiennes’s immersive documentary of the singer, supermodel, and actress pursuing her
career as she nears 70 shows her as fiery, iconoclastic, and as entertaining
as ever, while providing insight into
the abusive childhood that shaped her
persona. (115 min., unrated).
(Peter Keough)
YY I Feel Pretty Amy Schumer plays
an insecure wreck who conks her head
and wakes up believing she’s a hot
number with newfound confidence.
It’s an amiable, jumbled empowerment comedy whose meaning gets lost
in a haze of mixed messages. With
Lauren Hutton, Rory Scovel, and Michelle Williams, who nearly steals the
movie as a high-powered CEO with a
kewpie-doll voice. (110 min., PG-13)
(Ty Burr)
YY½ Kodachrome The road trip
movie gets an unfiltered tone and a
uniquely anachronistic destination in
this weighty portrait of a son and fa-
B o s t o n
G l o b e
ther grappling with issues of artistic
ego and emotional unavailability. Jason Sudeikis and Ed Harris do strong
work, somehow pulling us close to
their harshly estranged characters before forced sentiment undercuts the
film. Elizabeth Olsen joins them on
their drive to a vintage-film processing
lab. (105 min., unrated) (Tom Russo)
Previously released
YYY Isle of Dogs A handcrafted stopmotion fable about exiled dogs on a
Japanese island. So it’s a Wes Anderson movie. His most political too, and
a film visually (and superficially) in
love with Japanese culture. A qualified
delight, with voicework by Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Scarlett Johansson, Bill Murray, and many others. (98 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
YYY A Quiet Place Listen up: This
taut, elegantly bare-boned monster
movie makes a virtue of silence, as a
rural family headed by John Krasinski
(“The Office”) and Emily Blunt fend
off carnivorous alien critters who are
drawn solely by sound. Hush now,
children. Smartly directed by Krasinski, it’s a movie to see in a crowded,
quietly freaked-out theater. (90 min.,
PG-13) (Ty Burr)
T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 4 , 2 0 1 8
YY½ Rampage Dwayne Johnson
might not do any Fay Wray shrieking
in this classic-video-game adaptation,
but his sensitive-souled primatologist
is the one person able to soothe the
story’s giant ape run amok. The engaging dynamic between our hero and his
gargantuan, computer-generated pal
is the movie’s best surprise. That and
the visually electrifying monster-palooza finale will make you forgive a lot
of the ham-handedness. (104 min.,
PG-13) (Tom Russo)
For movies coverage, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/movies.
()
INFO VALID 4/24/18 ONLY
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
()
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
G
5
8
Stadium Seating
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
Rear Window Captioning
6
K
Hearing Impaired
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
BEIRUT (R) 5:00, 7:40
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 4:15, 7:15
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 5:10, 7:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 4:45, 7:20
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 4:45, 7:10
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) Advance Tickets Available 7:00
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (12:45, 3:30) 6:30, 9:30
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (1:45, 4:45) 7:45, 10:30
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) (1:15, 4:15)
7:00, 9:50
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (1:00) 6:45
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) G (4:00) 9:45
BEIRUT (R) (12:40, 3:35) 6:35, 9:35
BLOCKERS (R) (1:35, 4:35) 7:50, 10:30
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) (1:30, 4:30) 7:15, 10:00
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (2:00, 5:00) 8:00, 10:25
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (12:30, 3:45) 6:50,
10:05
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (1:20, 4:20) 7:35, 10:20
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (1:50, 4:50) 9:55
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (12:50, 3:40) 6:40, 9:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (1:05, 4:05) 7:20, 10:10
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:35, 3:50) 7:05, 10:15
BELMONT
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
12:00, 3:00, 6:00
OCEANS 3D: OUR BLUE PLANET (NR) 10:00, 2:00,
4:00
PANDAS 3D (G) 11:00, 1:00, 5:00
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.REGmovies.com
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) Advance Tickets AvailI FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (12:40) 4:05, 7:10, 10:10
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (1:20) 4:10, 7:05, 10:05
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) (11:25,
2:05) 4:45, 7:35, 10:35
OCTOBER (NR) (12:30, 3:50) 10:00
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (12:50, 1:30) 4:30, 7:15, 7:45,
10:45
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) G 4:00, 10:15
BLOCKERS (R) (12:00, 3:10) 6:35, 9:50
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (11:30, 2:00) 4:40, 7:30,
10:30
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) RPX G (1:00, 3:40) 6:30, 9:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (11:40) 6:45, 10:20
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) G (3:05)
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (1:10) 4:20, 7:40, 10:50
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (12:20, 3:30) 6:40, 9:40
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (11:40, 3:20) 6:50, 10:25
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE 10
121 Grandview Rd.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:45, 7:45
BLACK PANTHER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:00, 4:45,
9:45
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:20, 1:50,
4:40, 7:40, 10:45
RAMPAGE (PG-13) G 11:40, 2:20, 10:40
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 3:10, 5:40, 7:50
BLOCKERS (R) 11:45, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:00, 11:30, 2:10, 3:45,
4:30, 7:00, 9:20, 10:00
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 11:20, 2:00, 5:00, 7:50,
10:30
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) G 11:00, 1:20, 4:20, 7:00,
10:15
TRAFFIK (R) G 11:00, 1:45, 5:20, 8:15, 10:30
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) G 11:30,
2:00, 4:30, 7:15, 10:45
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) 7:00
BROOKLINE
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 7:30
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) Advance Tickets Available 7:00
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (1:15) 4:10, 7:00, 9:55
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (1:30) 4:20, 7:15, 10:00
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) (12:00,
2:35) 5:05, 7:45, 10:20
OCTOBER (NR) 6:35, 9:20
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (1:00) 4:00, 6:55
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) G 9:40
BEIRUT (R) (1:20) 4:05, 7:10, 9:50
BLOCKERS (R) (1:25) 4:25, 7:05, 9:35
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) (12:50, 3:45) 7:20, 10:15
HÉCTOR EL FATHER: CONOCERÁS LA VERDAD (NR)
(12:10, 2:40) 5:10, 7:40, 10:10
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (12:05, 2:30) 5:00, 7:30,
10:05
THE MIRACLE SEASON (PG) (1:05, 3:50) 9:45
RANGASTHALAM (NR) 12:25, 4:15, 8:10
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (12:15, 3:30) 6:50,
10:05
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (1:10, 3:55) 6:40, 9:10
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (12:00, 2:25) 5:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:30, 3:35) 6:45, 9:45
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:10, 4:10, 7:20, 10:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 1:45, 7:40
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE
(PG-13) 12:45
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 4:50, 10:30
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 4:55
RAMPAGE: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 4:00,
6:45, 9:30
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 2:10, 7:55
BLOCKERS (R) 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 5:00, 7:45, 10:20
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:00, 1:15, 2:20, 3:40, 4:45,
6:15, 7:15, 8:35, 9:45
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 4:40, 7:10,
9:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 1:00, 2:15, 3:45, 5:00, 6:30,
9:15, 10:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 7:45
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:30, 2:00, 3:10, 4:45,
5:50, 7:30, 8:30, 10:15
TRAFFIK (R) 12:40, 3:05, 5:30, 8:00, 10:25
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) AMC Independent 1:35,
4:15, 6:55, 9:40
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (R) AMC Independent 12:40, 3:00, 5:25, 7:50, 10:10
BEIRUT (R) AMC Independent 1:30, 4:05, 6:50, 9:35
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 12:25, 2:50,
5:15, 7:40, 10:05
DUDE'S MANUAL (NR) AMC Independent 1:55, 4:25,
7:05, 9:55
DANVERS
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 4:15, 7:00
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 4:00, 6:45
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:30, 3:00, 6:30, 9:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 12:15, 6:45
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE
(PG-13) G 3:45
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 2:45
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:00, 1:45, 4:15
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 3:45, 10:15
RAMPAGE: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) G
10:15, 1:00, 7:00, 9:45
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 11:15, 6:15, 9:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15
BLOCKERS (R) 10:15, 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:00
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 3:00
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) AMC Independent G 10:30, 1:00, 3:30, 6:15, 8:30
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 10:30, 1:15, 4:15, 7:30, 10:15
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 10:45, 1:15, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:30,
10:15
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 11:15, 1:45,
4:30, 7:15, 9:45
THE LEISURE SEEKER (R) AMC Independent 1:05
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 10:45, 11:30, 1:30, 2:10,
4:15, 5:00, 7:00, 7:45, 9:40, 10:20
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) G 11:30, 2:30, 5:15, 6:45,
8:00, 9:30, 10:30
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:00,
12:45, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (R) AMC Independent G 11:00, 1:30, 4:00, 6:45, 9:15
BEIRUT (R) AMC Independent 10:30, 1:15, 4:30, 7:15,
10:00
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) G 11:45,
2:45, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30
THE MIRACLE SEASON (PG) AMC Independent 10:00,
12:30, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30
DEDHAM
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
GRACE JONES: BLOODLIGHT AND BAMI (NR) 11:45,
2:15, 7:30
LEAN ON PETE (R) 11:00, 1:45, 4:00, 7:15, 9:30
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (R) 1:30, 4:30,
7:20, 10:00
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 11:30, 2:00, 4:15, 7:00, 9:15
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 11:15, 4:45, 9:45
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:35, 3:55, 7:05, 10:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:35, 4:25, 7:10, 9:45
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:50, 3:00, 6:25, 9:35
BLOCKERS (R) 10:55, 1:30, 4:10, 7:00, 9:30
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:40, 2:10,
4:50, 7:35, 10:20
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 1:25, 1:50, 4:05, 4:45, 6:45,
7:30, 9:25, 10:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:35, 1:45
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 12:50, 1:20, 3:30, 4:00, 6:10, 6:40,
8:50, 9:20
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) 7:00
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20,
10:05
ACRIMONY (R) 4:30, 6:50, 9:40
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 11:45, 2:30, 5:10, 7:40,
10:25
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
BEIRUT (R) 1:15, 4:20, 9:40
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) 11:10
TRAFFIK (R) 12:55, 3:25, 6:15, 8:45
20 South Ave.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:05, 4:10, 7:15, 10:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:00, 3:30, 10:00
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:10, 6:50
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:10, 4:15, 9:50
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:45, 6:55
BLOCKERS (R) 11:45, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:30, 2:00, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 2:10, 4:30,
9:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:20, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:25, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50,
10:20
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) AMC Independent 11:05,
1:50, 4:30, 7:20, 9:55
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:10, 1:40,
4:20, 6:50, 9:15
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) G 7:00
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.applecinemas.com
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) G 1:05, 3:10, 5:15, 7:20, 9:25
BEYOND THE CLOUDS (NR) G 9:40
BHARAT ANE NENU (NR) G 3:25, 6:45, 10:00
BLOCKERS (R) G 1:00, 5:35, 7:45, 10:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 1:00, 3:20, 5:25, 7:45,
10:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) G 3:15
RAMPAGE (PG-13) G 1:00, 3:15, 5:25, 7:40, 9:50
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 1:00, 4:00, 7:00,
10:00
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) 4:35
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 2:30
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) G 1:00, 3:20, 5:35, 7:40,
9:45
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 1:45, 4:00,
6:45, 9:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) G 1:05
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 7:00
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 5 (2:00, 4:30) 7:15, 9:45
KODACHROME (NR) 5 (1:55, 4:30) 7:05, 9:35
A BAG OF MARBLES (NR) 5 (1:50, 4:20) 7:00, 9:30
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 5 (2:00, 4:35) 7:10, 9:35
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 5 (1:30, 4:00) 6:45, 9:25
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 5 (1:40, 4:10) 6:50, 9:20
BEIRUT (R) 5 (1:35, 4:15) 6:50, 9:25
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
100 Independence Way
www.nationalamusements.com
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
LEXINGTON
LEXINGTON VENUE
5 DOL DSS
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
BURLINGTON
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 11:30, 1:30, 4:30, 7:30,
10:15
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) G 11:30, 12:15, 2:45, 5:10,
7:40, 10:10
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 6:40, 9:20
TRAFFIK (R) 2:35, 5:00, 7:40, 10:05
TRAFFIK (R) 11:30
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) AMC Independent 1:30,
4:15, 7:00, 9:35
BEIRUT (R) AMC Independent 4:50, 10:00
BEIRUT (R) AMC Independent 11:50
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 1:20, 4:00,
7:30, 9:00
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) G 7:00
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
www.coolidge.org
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
www.amctheatres.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 8:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:00, 2:30, 6:00, 9:30
BLOCKERS (R) 11:40, 3:00, 6:30, 9:00
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:20, 2:00, 4:30, 7:30,
10:20
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 1:30, 5:00, 8:00, 10:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
56
CAMBRIDGE
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
55 Boylston St.
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
www.artsemerson.org
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
able 7:00
www.studiocinema.com
BERLIN
LEAN ON PETE (R) 5 (1:45, 4:25) 7:05, 9:20
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (R) 5 (2:15, 4:45)
7:10, 9:40
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:45, 3:50, 7:05, 10:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 12:50, 6:30
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 2:25, 9:50
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:05, 3:20, 6:35, 9:45
BLOCKERS (R) 11:50, 2:20, 5:00, 7:45, 10:20
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:25, 1:50,
4:30, 7:00, 9:35
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:15, 12:55, 2:30, 3:30,
4:45, 6:15, 7:30, 9:10, 10:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:35, 1:45
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:40, 1:20, 2:15, 4:05, 4:50, 6:55,
7:40, 9:40, 10:15
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) 7:00
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20,
10:05
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 1:15, 3:55, 6:40, 9:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:15, 1:55, 4:00, 4:35, 6:45,
7:15, 9:25, 9:55
BEIRUT (R) 3:35, 9:05
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) 12:10
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.amctheatres.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:20, 9:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 4:00, 10:15
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:45, 7:05
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 1:15, 3:30
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 2:00, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:30, 3:10, 6:10
BLOCKERS (R) 2:05, 4:40, 7:20, 9:00, 10:00
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) AMC Independent 12:00
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:40, 1:55, 2:15, 3:00, 4:20,
5:20, 6:40, 7:45, 9:35, 10:05
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 1:00, 3:45,
6:50, 9:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30
LITTLETON
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 4:00, 6:35
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:05, 3:10, 6:10, 9:30
BLOCKERS (R) 11:40, 2:20, 4:55, 7:25, 10:05
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:00, 1:40,
2:30, 4:20, 5:05, 7:35, 9:45, 10:15
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:05, 11:50, 1:25, 2:05,
3:50, 4:15, 6:15, 8:35, 9:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:20, 1:35
RAMPAGE (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:20, 11:25, 1:05, 2:00,
3:45, 4:10, 4:30, 6:20, 6:45, 7:10, 8:50, 9:20, 9:55
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) 7:00
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:35, 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:35
ACRIMONY (R) 10:15, 1:00, 3:55, 6:50, 9:40
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 10:40, 1:20, 4:05, 7:05,
9:50
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) 11:45
BHARAT ANE NENU (NR) 9:25
TRAFFIK (R) 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:30, 10:20
READING
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - READING
O'NEIL CINEMAS AT THE POINT
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
1208 Constitution Ave 978-506-5089
58
www.oneilcinemas.com
www.jordansimax.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 11:45, 3:00, 6:50, 10:05
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 5 11:15, 1:50
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 5 10:55
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 12:00, 3:30, 7:00
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 5 10:15
BLOCKERS (R) 5 11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 7:55, 10:30
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 5 4:35, 7:35, 10:00
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 5 2:05, 4:45, 7:45, 10:25
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) 5 10:40
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 5 1:20, 4:15, 7:25, 10:10
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 5 11:05, 1:40, 4:25, 7:15,
10:20
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 5 10:25, 12:45, 3:10, 5:25,
8:05, 10:25
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:15, 6:20, 9:40
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 11:40, 2:25, 10:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:55, 3:10, 6:25, 9:45
BLOCKERS (R) 1:15, 3:55, 6:45, 9:35
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:45, 2:10,
4:50, 7:35, 10:30
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:35, 12:10, 2:05, 2:35,
4:25, 5:00, 6:55, 7:25, 9:20, 10:10
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 10:00, 12:05, 2:15
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:10, 11:50, 1:50, 2:20, 4:30,
4:55, 7:10, 7:40, 9:50, 10:20
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) 7:00
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20,
10:05
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 4:05, 6:40, 9:10
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
BEIRUT (R) 4:45, 7:45, 10:25
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) 10:35,
12:45
BHARAT ANE NENU (NR) 5:00, 8:30
MILLBURY
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DSS
RAMPAGE: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 1:30,
4:30, 7:30
REVERE
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:00, 6:10, 9:10
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 3:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 1:15, 4:25, 8:00
BLOCKERS (R) 1:05, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:05,
11:35, 1:40, 2:10, 4:15, 4:45, 7:00, 7:30, 9:30, 10:00
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:00, 11:25, 1:35, 2:05,
3:55, 4:50, 6:55, 7:25, 9:45
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 10:55, 1:10
RAMPAGE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:10, 11:40, 1:20, 1:45,
2:20, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 6:40, 7:10, 7:40, 9:20, 10:10,
10:20
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) 7:00
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:20, 1:30, 2:00, 4:10,
4:40, 6:50, 7:20, 9:35, 10:05
ACRIMONY (R) 3:30, 6:35, 9:50
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 12:30, 3:15, 6:15, 8:55
VENENO (NR) 3:35, 9:05
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:15, 1:25, 1:55, 4:05, 4:35,
6:45, 7:15, 9:25, 9:55
BEIRUT (R) 1:00, 6:30
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) 12:45
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 12:10, 2:50, 5:30, 8:10
BHARAT ANE NENU (NR) 9:30
TRAFFIK (R) 11:30, 1:50, 4:20, 7:05, 9:40
SOMERVILLE
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
5 6 I DIG
http://somervilletheatre.com/
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 7:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 7:10
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 7:20
www.showcasecinemas.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:10, 3:25, 6:25, 9:40
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 4:45, 7:45, 10:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:00, 3:15, 6:30, 9:45
BLOCKERS (R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:50, 2:15,
5:00, 7:30, 10:00
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:55, 12:25, 2:20, 2:50,
4:35, 5:15, 6:50, 7:40, 9:25, 10:10
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:20, 2:35
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:45, 1:10, 3:40, 4:10, 6:40, 7:10,
9:20, 9:50
FRAGMENTS OF TRUTH (NR) 7:00
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:05, 2:40, 5:05, 7:35,
10:05
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 1:45, 4:20, 9:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:40, 1:15, 2:25, 4:15, 5:10,
7:15, 7:50, 9:55, 10:25
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) 11:35
TRAFFIK (R) 12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 7:55, 10:15
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
58
www.jordansimax.com
RAMPAGE: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 1:30,
4:30, 7:30
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:10, 3:05, 6:10, 9:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:45, 3:50, 6:55, 10:15
BLOCKERS (R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:00
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 1:20, 4:20,
7:20, 9:50
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:55, 12:25, 2:15, 2:50,
4:45, 5:15, 7:00, 7:50, 9:40, 10:10
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:00
RAMPAGE (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:10, 1:40, 4:10, 4:50,
7:10, 7:40, 9:45, 10:20
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:05, 12:35, 2:35, 5:05,
7:05, 7:35, 10:05
ACRIMONY (R) 9:35
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 2:10, 4:40, 7:05
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 1:15, 3:45, 4:15, 7:15, 9:55,
10:25
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 10:10, 1:15, 4:25, 7:40
TAUNTON
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (1:15) 4:00, 6:55, 9:35
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (1:30) 4:15, 7:20, 9:50
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) (1:40) 4:20,
7:30, 10:00
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (1:10, 3:50) 4:30, 6:30, 9:10
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) G (1:45) 7:25, 10:05
BLOCKERS (R) (1:25) 4:10, 7:00, 9:45
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) (1:20) 4:05, 6:35, 9:15
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (1:35) 4:25, 7:10, 9:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (1:00, 3:25) 6:15, 9:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (1:05, 3:55) 6:45, 9:05
WALTHAM
EMBASSY CINEMA
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 5 (12:45, 3:45, 6:40)
BEIRUT (R) 5 (1:00, 4:00, 7:00)
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 5 (1:05, 4:05, 7:05)
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 5 (1:15, 4:15, 7:15)
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 5 (1:10, 4:10, 7:10)
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 (12:50, 3:50, 6:45)
WESTBOROUGH
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:45, 3:55, 6:55, 10:10
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 4:10, 6:35, 9:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 10:15
BLOCKERS (R) 11:30, 2:05, 4:45, 7:25, 10:00
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:35, 2:10,
4:40, 7:05, 9:40
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:45, 12:15, 2:00, 2:30,
4:25, 4:55, 6:50, 7:20, 9:15, 9:45
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:25, 1:45
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:10, 11:40, 1:50, 2:20, 4:30,
5:00, 7:10, 7:40, 9:50, 10:20
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:50, 2:15, 4:50, 7:30,
10:05
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 11:00, 1:30, 4:00, 6:40,
9:20
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:15, 1:25, 1:55, 4:05, 4:35,
6:45, 7:15, 9:25, 9:55
BEIRUT (R) 12:00, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:25
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) 11:05
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