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The Guardian - April 25, 2018

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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:1 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:S
The age of
Amazon
Sent at 24/4/2018 21:51
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Inside the company that
conquered the world  Page 8
Wednesday
25 April 2018
Issue № 53,392
www.theguardian.com
£2.00
Fire tests in wake of Grenfell condemned
Method of testing cladding
‘inadequate’ and lab results
flawed, says insurers’ report
Robert Booth
The British system for fire-testing
building materials is “utterly
inadequate” and underestimates the
ferocity and spread of real blazes, a
study commissioned after the Grenfell
Tower disaster has claimed. Extensive
laboratory tests of the combustibility
of walls have been essential in assessing whether cladding on hundreds of
tall buildings meet regulations in the
wake of the fire that killed 71 people.
But they fail to reflect how materials
burn in the real world, according to a
highly critical report published today
by the Association of British Insurers.
It also alleges that some manufacturers have been gaming the tests
by reinforcing their systems in the
laboratory in a way that would not
happen in reality, for example using
rivets to stop flaming panels falling off
as happened at Grenfell.
The government is currently using
the test to determine whether tens of
thousands of people living in blocks
are facing a similar danger to Grenfell.
If correct, the ABI’s claims could mean
that buildings with supposedly less
risky cladding than the 306 that have
so far failed could also burn more
dangerously than laboratory results
have suggested.
The insurers commissioned experts
‘It is a matter of
urgency that we
create the right
testing regime that
replicates real
world conditions’
Huw Evans
Director general, the ABI
from the Fire Protection Association
to conduct their own experiments .
They revealed that if apartments contain plastic appliances and furniture,
and builders have left gaps in cladding or installed bathroom or kitchen
vents, a building is significantly more
flammable than the British Standards
Institution (BSI) test BS8414 shows.
With plastic added, fires burned
100C hotter than in lab tests based
just on wood fire – and when gaps in
the cladding system were
included, flames spread 2 
Windrush man
to start NHS
cancer care
Amelia Gentleman
Anne Perkins
Pippa Crerar
Albert Thompson, the Windrush scandal victim who was denied NHS cancer
care, has finally been given a date for
the treatment he was due to begin last
November before hospital staff questioned his immigration status.
Thompson, 63, said yesterday that
he was “very excited” to hear that
a 33-day radiotherapy programme
was scheduled to start on 1 May, but
was surprised by the sudden rush to
resolve the situation after six months
of extreme anxiety. “They are scared
of all the publicity in the media; it has
really shaken them up,” he said.
The news came as David
Lammy – the Tottenham 17 
•
The other
special
relationship
The French president, Emmanuel Macron, and his wife Brigitte with Donald
and Melania Trump getting ready for photographers at Mount Vernon, Virginia.
The Macrons return to France today after a three-day pomp-filled state visit, the
first by a foreign leader since Trump came to power, during which the French
president suggested a ‘new deal’ aimed at curbing Iran’s military might. Page 22
PHOTOGRAPH:
JONATHAN ERNST/
REUTERS
Champions
League
Salah shines
as Liverpool
beat Roma 5-2

Sport
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:2 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:34
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
Inside
Wednesday 25 April 2018
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
News
▼ Aleksandr Kogan is questioned in
parliament by MPs on the digital,
culture, media and sport committee
PHOTOGRAPH: HANDOUT/REUTERS
National Pages 5-21
Facebook’s claims to be outraged
over the Cambridge Analytica
scandal were simply “PR crisis
mode”, the academic at the centre
of the dispute told parliament.
Aleksandr Kogan said: “I think
they realise their platform has been
mined left and right by thousands
of others … but PR is PR and they’re
trying to manage the crisis, and it’s
convenient to … try to paint the
picture this is a rogue agent.”
Kogan also accused the former
Cambridge Analytica chief,
Alexander Nix, of “total fabrication”
in his evidence to parliament, which
claimed Kogan’s company GSR had
not supplied Cambridge Analytica
with information.
In written evidence to the culture,
media and sport select committee,
Kogan also said Facebook’s own
advertising system was a better way
to target individuals than using his
data. “The platform’s tools provide
companies with a far more effective
pathway to target people based on
their personalities than using scores
from users from our work,” he said.
month, Zuckerberg said he was concerned over the university’s approach,
telling a hearing: “What we do need to
understand is whether there is something bad going on at Cambridge
University overall that will require a
stronger action from us.”
But the newly published material
reveals that the university’s psychology research ethics committee found
the Kogan proposal so “worrisome”
that it decided to reject the project.
The panel said Facebook’s approach
to consent fell “far below the ethical
expectations of the university”.
Correspondence about the decision was released hours before Kogan
appeared before a Commons inquiry
into fake news. In written and oral
evidence to the committee, he said
all his academic work was reviewed
and approved by the university. But
he did not mention the ethics committee’s rejection of his proposed research
using the Facebook data in May 2015.
One member of the panel said the
Facebook users had not given sufficient consent to allow the research to
be conducted, or been given a chance
to withdraw from the project. The academic, whose name was redacted,
said: “Facebook’s privacy policy is
not sufficient to address my concerns.”
Appealing against the panel’s
rejection, a letter believed to have
been written by Kogan pointed out
that “users’ social network data was
already being downloaded and used
without their direct consent by thousands of companies who developed
apps for Facebook”.
Another panel member felt that
information shared with Facebook
friends should not be regarded as
public data. In a response to Kogan’s
appeal, the academic said: “Facebook
is rather deceptive on this and creates
the appearance of a cosy and confidential peer group environment as a
means of gulling users into disclosing
private information that they then sell
to advertisers, but this doesn’t make
it right to an ethical researcher to follow their lead.”
Kogan told the committee hearing:
“Fundamentally, I made a mistake by
not being critical about this. I should
have got better advice on what is and
isn’t appropriate.”
The tests have been used to
determine whether some limited
combustibility materials can be used
in cladding systems and still meet
building regulations, but the ABI’s
findings will increase pressure on
ministers to ban the use of combustible materials on buildings altogether
when they respond to Dame Judith
Hackitt’s independent review of building regulations which is due to report
within weeks.
The insurers also claim that the
testing regime has allowed “significant reinforcement” of systems to help
them pass – for example adding rivets
that are rarely used in reality.
The Building Research Establishment (BRE), which is paid by materials
manufacturers to conduct the tests at
its laboratory in Watford, denied there
was “any negotiation or any scope for
change or modification to these methods by the manufacturer”.
But Lord Porter, chair of the Local
Government Association, which represents councils across England,
some of which are struggling with
how to reclad 45 blocks of flats that
use Grenfell-style cladding, said:
“Using non-combustible material only
would provide clarity to all types of
landlords who remain unsure about
what they should use to re-clad and
insulate their buildings. The tragedy at
Grenfell Tower must never be allowed
to happen again.”
The report suggests the government should stop using the tests to
confirm the fire performance of systems already installed on buildings.
The BS8414 test is overseen by the
BSI, a private company appointed by
the government as the national standards body.
BRE, which carries out the tests,
is the former government building
research station that was privatised
in 1997.
The BSI said: “As with any feedback
we receive on a standard, we take it
seriously and arrange for the respective committee to review it.” But it
warned that any change to the standard would take up to 18 months.
It said it was “not aware of any cladding system tested to BS 8414 that has
performed poorly in a real fire”.
Revenue stream Earnings from CDs put in the
shade for the first time by new format | Page 7
Myanmar row Leeds United branded a
disgrace after announcing tour plans | Page 13
Transplant success Seven-year-old boy
receives five organs in one operation | Page 15
Strictly Ballroom Laborious musical remake
takes step in wrong direction | Page 19
World Pages 22-28
Egypt’s camel crackdown Hawkers who hassle
tourists face fine of more than £400 | Page 23
Cambridge panel rejected
Facebook research project
Fake news warning Europe threatens
social media giants with regulation | Page 29
Matthew Weaver
Macron in Washington President meets
president for talks on Iran deal | Page 22
Financial Pages 30-33
TSB turmoil Bank promises compensation
after online banking ‘meltdown’ | Page 30
Apple payout Tech giant to pay €13bn in
back taxes to Irish government | Page 32
Journal Centre section
Macron charms
Trump to win over
Europe, not the
e US
Natalie
Nougayrède
Page 1
A sticking plaster
won’t heal the
wounds of Windrush
Hugh
Muir
3
Page
P
G2 Centre section, tucked inside Journal
Decoding Meghan’s look Messy buns and
trouser suits point to serious intentions | Pagee 6
Raising Johnny Cash Comedian Frank
Skinner on a country music obsession | Page 10
Sport Back section
Continued from page 1
Hartley: I’ll be back England hooker vows to
return to national side after concussion | Page 44
Champions League The action from Anfield as
Liverpool take on Roma in the semi-final | Page 50
Puzzles G2, page 16 | Journal, page 12
Contact
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excluding public holidays, or email
guardian.readers@theguardian.com.
Letters for publication should be sent to
guardian.letters@theguardian.com or
the address on the letters page.
NEWSPAPERS
SUPPORT
RECYCLING
The recycled paper
content
of UK newspapers
in 2017 was 64.6%
A Cambridge University ethics panel
rejected research by the academic
at the centre of the Facebook data
harvesting scandal over the social
network’s “deceptive” approach to its
users’ privacy, newly released documents have revealed.
A 2015 proposal by Aleksandr
Kogan, a member of the university’s
psychology department, involved the
personal data from 250,000 Facebook
users and their 54 million friends that
he had gleaned via a personality quiz
app in a commercial project funded
by SCL, the parent company of Cambridge Analytica.
Separately, Kogan proposed an
academic investigation into how Facebook likes are linked to “personality
traits, socioeconomic status and physical environments”, according to an
ethics application about the project
released to the Guardian in response
to a freedom of information request.
The documents shed new light on
suggestions from the Facebook CEO,
Mark Zuckerberg, that the university’s controls on research did not meet
Facebook’s own standards. In testimony to the US Congress earlier this
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Cladding fire tests
in wake of Grenfell
deaths condemned
across the six-metre height of a test rig
rather than 1.5m when it was sealed.
Huw Evans, director general of the
ABI, said the building control system
was now broken. “This latest research
is yet more evidence that fundamental reform is needed to keep our homes
and commercial premises safe from
fire,” he said.
“It is a matter of urgency that we
create the right testing regime that
properly replicates real world conditions and keeps pace with building
innovation and modern design.”
The ABI says the current testing regime “may not give designers,
specifiers or insurers confidence that
cladding systems tested to it will
ensure the level of building fire safety
that is currently inferred by its use”.
‘PR is PR’
What Kogan told MPs
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:3 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:32
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
•
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
News
3
▼ Millicent Fawcett is portrayed with
a banner with a line from her speech
after Emily Wilding Davison’s death
PHOTOGRAPH: DAN KITWOOD/GETTY
▲ Millicent Fawcett campaigned for
60 years for women’s right to vote
Statue of Fawcett
‘makes us want to
get involved in
fighting for equality’
Alexandra Topping
Caroline Criado Perez went for a run on
International Women’s Day two years
ago. Weaving through the statues on
Parliament Square, she had a sudden
and depressing realisation: they were
all, to a man, of men.
That changed yesterday when an
2.5-metre (8ft 4in) bronze statue of the
suffragist campaigner Millicent Fawcett was unveiled in the shadow of the
Houses of Parliament after a campaign
led by Criado Perez, who set up a petition straight after she finished her run.
Speaking at a formal unveiling of the
statue, she said: “Women are still woefully under-represented in all areas of
British cultural and political life, not
least in its statues.”
Pointing out that less than 3% of
statues in Britain depicted real women
who were not in the royal family, Criado Perez added: “With this statue of
Millicent Fawcett … we’re making one
hell of a start on changing that.”
Theresa May told the crowd that
there would be no female MPs without the dedication of Fawcett, who
campaigned for more than six decades for women to get the vote. “This
statue will serve not just as a reminder
of Dame Millicent’s extraordinary life
and legacy, but as inspiration to all of
us who wish to follow in her footsteps,”
the prime minister said.
This year marks the centenary since
some women were granted the right to
vote in 1918. Fawcett, a campaigner
since her 20s, was 81 when from the
public gallery of the House of Commons she finally saw women given the
right to vote on the same terms as men
in 1928. She died one year later.
The London mayor, Sadiq Khan,
called the unveiling a historic event.
“The decision to commission this
statue was a no-brainer,” he said. “It
is vital that we fix the imbalance and
make sure more women are represented in our public spaces.”
The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn,
said there were more women who
deserved statues.
Harriet Harman, the former deputy
Labour leader, said she was delighted
▲▲ The artist Gillian Wearing and
Caroline Criado Perez, who launched
a successful campaign for the statue
▲ Cast members from the musical
Sylvia, about suffragette leader Sylvia
Pankhurst, performed a song
PHOTOGRAPH: AMER GHAZZAL/REX
PHOTOGRAPH: PAUL TAYLOR/WENN.COM
about the statue but warned against
feeling “too grateful”.
She suggested the statues in Parliament Square could be temporarily
moved to other locations in London,
and the square, which has been dominated by men for more than a century,
could feature only statues of women.
“These statues tell us that in culture, in politics and in society, there
is still a massive imbalance of power
[when] women make up half of the
population – why should that still be
the case?”
The Labour MP Jess Phillips said she
was “thrilled … It feels really great that
a group of women – and Sadiq – came
together and made this happen.”
As the crowds moved away and
the selfies with Fawcett commenced,
Betty Axtell and Suzy Ne nghor,
both 15 and from Westgate school in
Slough, said they felt inspired. “It
gave me goosebumps,” said Axtell.
“It was really empowering and it’s
made young women like us want to
get involved in fighting for equality.”
With a smile plastered across her
face, Nenghor said she had expected
the unveiling to be more solemn but
had loved the music at the event,
which was the first time she had visited Parliament Square. “Today was
absolutely fantastic,” she said. “But
it took too long – we’re right outside
parliament. How could they not have
even one woman here?”
The Fawcett statue, created by the
Turner prize-winning artist Gillian
Wearing, depicts the suffragist leader
as a 50-year-old, the age at which she
became president of the National
Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies.
She holds a banner that reads: “Courage Calls to Courage Everywhere”, an
extract from a speech Fawcett made
after the death of the suffragette Emily
Wilding Davison, who was killed after
she fell under King George V’s horse at
the Epsom Derby in 1913.
And while the statue is only one of
12 in Parliament Square, the artist has
achieved a little-noticed feat: there are
now more faces of women than men
in the square.
The plinth on which Fawcett stands
carries the images of 55 women – and
four men – who were part of the fight
for women’s right to vote.
Sam Smethers, chief executive of
the Fawcett Society, said it was fitting
that the statue was gazing across the
square at Winston Churchill, “a man
who opposed women’s suffrage”.
She added that the statue had to
be a springboard for change. “A fairer
society won’t just happen. It has to be
by design and at the moment it is still
designed for men. We have to make
change happen,” she said.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:4 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 19:24
•
4
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
News
▼ The body of a victim of the attack,
covered by a blanket, remains on the
street as police set up a cordon
PHOTOGRAPH: WARREN TODA/EPA
▲ The suspect, Alek Minassian, was
charged with 10 counts of murder
▲ Two people near the scene of the
attack react to the devastation
Toronto in shock as suspect
in van attack is charged
Ashifa Kassam
Leyland Cecco
Toronto
A man accused of using a rented
van to plough into a busy Toronto
pavement has been charged with 10
counts of first-degree murder and
13 of attempted murder as Canadian
authorities struggled to make sense of
what is thought to be one of the deadliest incidents in the country’s history.
Alek Minassian, 25, from Richmond
Hill, near Toronto, showed little emotion during a brief court appearance
yesterday. A man believed to be Minassian’s father sat in the first row quietly
weeping as the charges were read out.
The “horrific and deliberate attack”
had left Toronto in mourning, the city’s
mayor, John Tory, said. It took place at
lunchtime on Monday as crowds were
basking in the sun on one of the first
warm days of the year.
Shocked witnesses described
watching as a van jumped the kerb
of one of the city’s main arteries,
zigzagging as it barrelled into pedestrians and oncoming traffic.
“People started flying in the air,”
Henry Yang, who was driving behind
the van as the incident unfolded, told
the Toronto Star. “I started honking my
horn, making noises, trying to make
a commotion, trying to make people
aware that something was going on. I
rolled down my windows and started
Police Praise for officer who
decided not to use his gun
Ashifa Kassam
Toronto
A Canadian police officer is being
hailed for his restraint and professionalism in arresting the suspect in
the Toronto van attack without firing
a single shot.
The driver of the van was arrested
by a lone police officer in an incident
lasting less than a minute which was
caught on video by bystanders.
The arrest came as police forces
across North America – including in
Toronto – have been criticised for using
excessive force to subdue mentally ill
or unarmed suspects.
In the video, the officer shouts “Get
down,” before the man answers: “Kill
me. I have a gun in my pocket.”
The officer’s voice remains calm as
he again orders the man to get down,
warning that he will shoot if the man
does not cooperate. “Shoot me in the
head,” the suspect replies.
yelling at people, I wanted them to get
out of the way.”
The van crashed through crowds,
fire hydrants and a bus shelter. “It was
like he was playing a video game, trying to kill as many people as possible,”
Panna Patel told the Associated Press.
“He was looking people directly in the
eye … it was so scary.”
Authorities have yet to suggest a
possible motivation for the attack.
The prime minister, Justin Trudeau,
described it as a “senseless attack and
a horrific tragedy”. He downplayed a
possible link to terrorism, saying there
was no evidence to suggest there was
a “national security element”.
While police have not yet released
the names of those killed in the attack,
Weapon drawn, the officer advances
toward the suspect. The suspect steps
backwards, dropping what he is holding and raising his hands in the air.
The officer single-handedly arrests
the suspect.
Video of the dramatic confrontation was hailed on social media, where
the officer – yet to be identified – was
praised. Many said he deserved a
medal. Scott Gilmore, a columnist for
Maclean’s magazine, contrasted the
officer’s calm demeanour with the
chaos and horror that had unfolded
minutes earlier. “I am paid to explain
things and sound confident doing
so,” he wrote. “But I honestly don’t
know what to make of this terrifying,
remarkable moment.”
Anne Marie D’Amico has been identified as one of the victims, remembered
by her family as someone with a generous heart “who always did big things
for people”. Two South Koreans were
among those killed, with another seriously injured, officials in Seoul told
Agence France-Presse.
Yesterday a portrait was beginning
to emerge of Minassian. A computer
software student at a Toronto university, he had handed in his final project
weeks earlier. Joe Pham, who said he
had recently taken a programming
class with Minassian, described him
as someone who kept to himself. “He
was socially awkward but well-spoken,” Pham told the Guardian.
Shortly after Minassian’s arrest,
police descended on a brick home in
Richmond Hill. Calling the investigation “far from over,” Toronto’s police
chief, Mark Saunders, appealed to witnesses to come forward. “We need to
identify if there are more people, if he’s
working in concert with anyone, or if
this was just a lone act.”
Minassian was not previously
known to police, he said.
Canadian military officials said
Minassian had joined the armed
forces last August but was “voluntarily released” weeks later at his own
request, after completing just 16 days
of basic training.
The incident unfolded miles north
of Toronto’s central area in a neighbourhood that ranks among the city’s
most multicultural. Hours after the
attack, a makeshift memorial sprung
up near the path of devastation, with
residents leaving handwritten notes
offering condolences and support in
several languages.
“Each life had so much love,” said
Saman Tabasinejad as she left roses
alongside the messages. “I just want
to honour them.”
The 1.2-mile stretch of city streets
where the incident unfolded remained
closed to traffic. The area is expected to
stay cordoned off for several days. “We
are looking to what the exact motivation was for this particular incident,”
said Saunders. “We need every single piece of this puzzle so we can have
a fulsome picture and account as to
exactly what took place here.”
Mark Saunders, the city’s police
chief, credited the force’s high-calibre
training. “The officer did a fantastic
job,” he said.
Mike McCormack, the president of
the Toronto Police Association, said
the officer would have been justified
if he had fired at the suspect. “But this
officer looked at what was going on
and determined he could handle it
the way that he did,” he told the Globe
and Mail. “People are right: this guy
is a hero.”
He had spoken to the officer, who
was shaken by the incident. “He said,
‘Mike, I just did my job. What I did was
no big deal. But look at these poor people,’” said McCormack.
“That’s what everyone’s thinking:
great, he did his job and arrested this
guy and may have prevented further
deaths. But he’s more concerned with
10 people being dead, 15 people being
injured, why now and what’s happening in this city.”
▲ The officer has been hailed for his
restraint as he arrested the suspect
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:5 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Myanmar tour?
Leeds United plans
come under fire
Page 13
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:54
cYanmaGentaYellowbl
•
Strictly Ballroom
lroom
Show is step
p in
ction
wrong direction
Page 19
5
Universities
minister aims
to stop chiefs
setting own
high salaries
Sally Weale
Education correspondent
The universities minister, Sam Gyimah, has pledged a “laser-like” focus
on vice-chancellors’ pay in the face of
questioning from MPs on the education select committee.
The minister was answering questions amid concern about the inflated
salaries of university leaders and the
growing debt burden on graduates.
Gyimah told MPs steps were being
taken to remove vice-chancellors from
remuneration committees to prevent
them setting their own pay.
“What happened before was that
vice-chancellors sat on the remuneration committee and they would recuse
themselves when their own pay was
being discussed.
“But even in FTSE 100 companies
you can’t sit on a remuneration panel
and say: ‘I wasn’t in the room so it’s
nothing to do with me.’ They should
not be allowed to set their own pay –
and that’s action on pay.”
The issue has been a source of irritation for the government since Dame
Glynis Breakwell resigned as vicechancellor of the University of Bath
after it emerged she earned £475,000
in salary and benefits last year.
Gyimah told the committee: “I’m
not going to defend vice-chancellor
pay. What I have said is that I’m relaxed
about vice-chancellors earning more
than I do as the universities minister.
I understand that.
“They run large, complex organisations and we need people who are
capable of doing that. But they are also
public institutions. They are in receipt
of taxpayers’ funds and they should be
mindful of that.”
The minister told the committee
the new regulatory body, the Office for
Students, had “a real focus” on top pay
and universities would in future publish the number of staff earning a basic
salary of more than £100,000 as part
of their audited financial statements,
with details of bonuses, pension contributions and taxable benefits of
anyone earning more than £150,000.
MPs including the committee’s Conservative chair, Robert Halfon, also
pressed the minister on continuing
low graduate salaries.
Gyimah claimed that new figures
for graduate salaries show “the graduate premium is strong and still holds”.
He told MPs that new Department
for Education statistics published
yesterday showed that graduate salaries increased by £1,000 to £33,000
over 2017.
Jewish leaders say meeting with
Corbyn was missed opportunity
Labour leader’s proposals to
address concerns ‘fell short
of minimum level of action’
Peter Walker and Jessica Elgot
Jeremy Corbyn’s hopes of repairing
relations with the Jewish community
have suffered a blow after Jewish leaders labelled a key meeting last night
with the Labour leader over antisemitism “a disappointing missed
opportunity” with little achieved.
In a joint statement, the heads of
the Jewish Leadership Council (JLC)
and Board of Deputies (BoD) said Corbyn had failed to agree to any of their
demands in seeking to combat antisemitism within Labour.
“Words in letters and newspaper
articles will never be enough,” Jonathan Goldstein and Jonathan Arkush
said in a joint letter following a twohour-plus meeting with Corbyn and
others from Labour, including party
general secretary Jennie Formby. “We
welcome the fact that Mr Corbyn’s
words have changed but it is action
by which the Jewish community will
judge him and the Labour party.”
The meeting was set up after a demonstration by Jewish groups outside
parliament over what they felt was
Corbyn’s lack of action on the issue.
“Following that demonstration, we
wrote to Mr Corbyn to set out six areas
of concrete action he and the party
could take to address the antisemitism
that has grown under his leadership,”
the statement said, saying these were
“the minimum level of action the community expected after more than two
years of inactivity”.
They said: “We are disappointed
that Mr Corbyn’s proposals fell short
of the minimum level of action which
our letter suggested.”
Specific concerns centred on a fixed
timetable to deal with antisemitism
cases, and rapid action over cases such
as that of Ken Livingstone.
“In particular, they did not agree in
the meeting with our proposals that
there should be a fixed timetable to
deal with antisemitism cases; that
they should expedite the longstanding
cases involving Ken Livingstone and
Jackie Walker; that no MP should share
a platform with somebody expelled
or suspended for antisemitism; that
they adopt the full International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA)
definition of antisemitism with all
its examples and clauses; that there
should be transparent oversight of
their disciplinary process.”
They added: “Our sole objective
from this meeting was to build trust
with Mr Corbyn, but this will not be
possible until and unless he and the
party turn their many strong words
against antisemitism into equally
‘Words in letters and
newspaper articles
will never be enough’
Joint statement from
Jewish groups
▲ From left: Jonathan Goldstein
and Jonathan Arkush arrive for
a meeting with Jeremy Corbyn, below
PHOTOGRAPH: ISABEL INFANTES/EMPICS
strong actions in order to bring about
a deep cultural change in his supporters’ attitude to Jews.”
Spokespeople for the two groups
said they were surprised at the lack
of action, saying Corbyn’s team had
known their demands for some time.
In his statement after the meeting
Corbyn made no mention of differences, saying the meeting had been
“positive and constructive”.
He said: “I am absolutely committed to rooting out antisemitism from
our party and our society. When members of Jewish communities express
genuine anxieties, we must recognise
them as we would those of any other
community. Their concerns are not
‘smears’. Jews belong in the Labour
party and we are utterly committed to
making it a safe and welcoming place
for them.”
Before the meeting, Corbyn issued a
strong condemnation of antisemitism
saying the party’s structures were unfit
for purpose and that it must confront
the fact that a number of members
held antisemitic views.
Writing in the Evening Standard, Corbyn said: “We have not done
enough to get to grips with the problem, and the Jewish community and
our Jewish members deserve an apology. My party and I are sorry for the
hurt and distress caused.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:6 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:S
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:52
•
6
Police force
faces health
and safety
charge over
custody death
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
National
Steven Morris
A police force has been charged under
health and safety legislation over the
death of a church caretaker with mental health difficulties who collapsed
in custody after a webbing belt was
placed across his face.
The family of Thomas Orchard
expressed relief that Devon and Cornwall police would be asked to account
for its officers’ actions but said they
were disappointed that the force
would not face corporate manslaughter charges.
A Crown Prosecution Service
spokesperson said yesterday that,
following a referral by the Independent Office for Police Conduct, it had
decided to charge the office of the
chief constable of Devon and Cornwall
police with one count of exposing a
non-employee to a risk to his health or
safety contrary to sections 3 and 33 of
the 1974 Health and Safety at Work Act.
Last year, a sergeant and two
custody officers were cleared by a
jury of the manslaughter of Orchard,
who died after being restrained in
2012. Bristol crown court had heard
that Orchard, who had paranoid
schizophrenia, was arrested after a disturbance in central Exeter and taken
to the city’s Heavitree police station.
The officers insisted the US-made
emergency response belt (ERB) had
been used to stop Orchard biting or
spitting at them. Prosecutors alleged
the ERB had been wrapped around
Orchard’s face when he was placed
face down in a cell, and had restricted
his ability to breathe. He went into cardiac arrest and died a week later.
The Devon and Cornwall chief constable, Shaun Sawyer, said the force
took the health and safety charge seriously and would consider it in detail.
In a statement paying tribute to
a “much-loved son and brother”,
Orchard’s family said: “As a family we
can be nothing but dismayed by the
decision from the CPS not to prosecute
for corporate manslaughter. However,
we are pleased that Devon and Cornwall police will now need to account
for their actions in relation to their
approach to health and safety in connection with Thomas’s death.”
▲ Tom Evans speaks to the media at Alder Hey hospital PHOTOGRAPH: PETER BYRNE/PA
Parents of Alfie Evans fail
in last-ditch court appeal
Josh Halliday
North of England correspondent
The parents of Alfie Evans have lost a
last-ditch legal appeal to fly their son to
Italy in what a high court judge called
“the final chapter in the case of this
extraordinary little boy”.
A barrister for the child’s parents,
Tom Evans and Kate James, pleaded
for the judge, Mr Justice Hayden, at the
high court, to show “common humanity and commonsense” and allow the
seriously ill baby to leave Alder Hey
hospital in Liverpool.
The judge said all medical experts
agreed future treatment was “futile”
and that it would be against Alfie’s best
interests to fly to the Vatican’s children’s hospital in Rome. However, he
said there was a small possibility that
Alfie could be cared for at home or in
a hospice “for his final days or hours”.
The emergency high court hearing took place yesterday amid tight
security in Manchester’s civil justice
centre, hours after the 23-month-old’s
life support was withdrawn.
At the end of a highly charged threehour hearing, the judge ordered Alfie’s
parents to engage with doctors and
▲ Alfie Evans has spent 16 months in
the intensive-care unit at Alder Hey
construct a palliative-care plan that
could involve moving the child out
of the paediatric intensive-care unit
where he has spent the past 16 months.
Hayden said he rejected “with little hesitation” the suggestion of the
couple’s barrister, Paul Diamond, that
Alfie’s condition was better than previously thought. “But having rejected
it, it seems to me there is an alternative, more constructive case that can
be advanced on the parents’ behalf and
that is to explore creatively [other palliative-care arrangements].”
Hayden said there was “no substance” to the application by Diamond
that the boy’s condition was “significantly better” than realised.
A spokesman for the Christian
Legal Centre, an anti-abortion group
bringing the court action on behalf of
Alfie’s parents, said the seriously ill
baby had been able to breathe unaided
for six hours after his ventilation was
withdrawn at 9.20pm on Monday.
However, the court heard that Alfie
was then provided with hydration and
ventilation at 4am when he became
distressed and struggled to breathe.
In his ruling yesterday, Hayden
said: “Alfie Evans has been described
as a fighter, resilient, courageous and
a warrior. In the last 24 hours he has
proved himself once again to be worthy of all those descriptions.”
But he said Alfie’s undiagnosed
degenerative condition had “almost
entirely wiped out” his brain matter,
which he said was now little more than
water and cerebrospinal fluid.
An Alder Hey clinician, who cannot
be named, said there would have to
be “a sea change” in the doctors’ relationship with Alfie’s family before they
could consider letting him go home.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:7 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
National
7
Stormzy and
Ed Sheeran
up for two
Ivor Novellos
▲ Ed Sheeran topped both the digital
single and album charts last year
Mark Brown
Music’s
new main
revenue
stream
puts CDs
in shade
Arts correspondent
Mark Sweney
Streaming music revenues surpassed
income from the sale of traditional
music formats for the first time last
year, as the booming popularity of services such as Spotify put an end to the
era of the CD.
Revenue from music fans paying
for services such as Spotify, Apple
Music and Amazon Music surged more
than 41% last year to $6.6bn (£4.7bn),
accounting for more than 38% of the
$17.3bn total global recorded music
market. The sale of physical formats,
primarily CDs, fell 5.4% to $5.2bn to
account for 30% of the global market.
The moment marks a tipping point
for the music industry, which has
depended on the income from CDs
since the 1980s. However, CD sales
have been in decline for years as the
industry was hammered by piracy,
and failed to make much money in
the early days of streaming.
Recorded music revenues enjoyed
a third straight year of growth in 2017,
up 8.1% to $17.3bn globally, but industry executives immediately went on
the attack, calling out YouTube for not
paying a fair share of royalties to labels
and artists.
Frances Moore, the chief executive
of IFPI, which represents record companies, said the industry was only just
getting back on its feet after 15 years
of decline.
“The race is far from won,” she said.
“There has [only been] three years of
recovery. There is a structural fault in
the market, a mismatch between what
user-upload platforms [such as YouTube] are making from music and what
they are returning to rights holders.
Until that is fixed, there will always be
a struggle to keep growth.”
Google-owned YouTube, which has
an estimated 1.3 billion users who regularly watch music videos, paid $856m
in royalties to music companies last
year – less than $1 per user annually.
By contrast, income from 272 million
▲ Taylor Swift is the third biggest
selling recording artist
PHOTOGRAPH: JOHN SALANGSANG/INVISION/AP
Streaming success
In 2017 streaming overtook
physical sales for the first time
as the largest source of global
recorded music revenue. The
top five recording artists were:
Ed Sheeran, Drake, Taylor Swift,
Kendrick Lamar and Eminem.
• Streaming • Physical • Other revenues
$25bn
20
15
10
5
0
2000
2005
2010
Source: IFPI Global music report 2018
2015
music fans who use paid and adsupported services, such as Spotify,
generated $5.57bn – about $20 per user
annually.
“We are still only two-thirds of our
peak size in 1999,” Moore said. “Our
future should look good but it requires
full and fair value for music.”
Last year, a leaked memo from Steve
Cooper, the chief executive of Warner
Music, said its new deal with YouTube
was so one-sided that it could not be
called a “free-market, willing buyer,
willing seller” negotiation.
In the UK, record labels and artists
earned more than double the royalties from the sale of 4.1m vinyl records
than they did from the 25bn music videos watched on YouTube last year.
Digital income – from streaming
subscriptions, downloads and ad
revenue around videos – grew 19% to
$9.4bn to account for more than half
of global revenues (54%) for the first
time last year.
The IFPI also expects products such
as Amazon’s Echo smart speakers and
Google Home – where asking for music
to be played is one of the most popular uses – to fuel a boom in revenues.
Last year proved to be the year of Ed
Sheeran, who was the biggest global
recording artist and topped the digital single sales chart with Shape Of
You and the album chart with Divide.
Stu Bergen, chief executive of
Warner Music’s international business, said his tour was so successful
that in New Zealand an estimated
one in 19 of the country’s population
went to one of his concerts, breaking a
record set by Dire Straits 32 years ago.
Bergen said that the way that digital services have democratised music
discovery by fans – and opened up
emerging world markets such as India,
China, the Middle East and Africa –
means the industry has plenty of scope
for growth.
“We are not getting complacent
– it has been hard fought to get here
after 15 years of decline but there is
still plenty of room to grow,” he said.
“We’re well aware that the next global
superstar could just as easily come
from São Paolo as Suffolk. We estimate
that only half the world’s population
live in a thriving music market, and
we want to bring the streaming revolution to everyone.”
The rise and rise of the British grime
superstar Stormzy continues with
two nominations in the UK’s most
prestigious songwriting awards.
Organisers of the Ivor Novello
awards, now in their 63rd year, yesterday announced shortlists for the
2018 awards which included two nominations for Ed Sheeran and two for
the Manchester-based art-poppers
Everything Everything.
One of the most intriguing categories is best contemporary song, which
sees Stormzy’s Don’t Cry for Me, a
reflection on the complex relationship
he has with the area where he grew up,
go up against Question Time by Dave,
the young south London rapper.
Question Time is as angry and political a song that has, perhaps, ever been
nominated. During seven minutes
he attacks Theresa May for the UK’s
involvement in Syria, her response to
Grenfell, the state of the NHS and her
treatment of health workers.
He also has messages for David
Cameron – “I mean you fucked us,
resigned, then sneaked out the firing
line/ I wanna know how you managed
it” – and Jeremy Corbyn – “Do you
really have the faith of your party? Do
you really have faith in the party that
will come with you?”
The third nominated song is completely different: an infectious dance
track called Cola by the house producers CamelPhat and vocalist
Elderbrook. It tells the story of a young
woman who gets a bit too drunk, can’t
get in to clubs, gets offered a cola by a
friendly bouncer so she can sober up,
but she still thinks it is a rum and coke.
Men dominate this year’s nominations. In the best song musically
and lyrically category, Sampha’s
emotional (No One Knows Me) Like
the Piano will compete with Elbow’s
Magnificent (She Says) and Everything
Everything’s Can’t Do.
In the most performed work category, two Ed Sheeran songs are up
against Human by Rag ’n’ Bone Man.
One of the few female nominees is
the indie folk singer-songwriter Kate
Stables, also known as This Is the Kit,
in the album category for Moonshine
Freeze. Also nominated are Everything
Everything for A Fever Dream and
Stormzy, winner of two Brit awards
this year, for Gang Signs & Prayer. The
winners will be announced on 31 May.
▲ Question Time, by the south London
rapper Dave, criticises the Tories
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:8 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
News
The age of
Amazon
8
Timeline
Amazon now has domains in
15 countries, with a potential
customer base of over half of
the world’s population
1995
1998
2000
2002
2004
Amazon.com launches in July
Amazon launches in the UK
and Germany in October
France and Japan go live
in August and November
Amazon Canada launches in June
Acquires Joyo.com in China
Amazon Prime Video has been investing in
original programming – and it’s paying off
... despite their combined
total market value of
$503bn, Amazon is still
worth $237bn more
Amazon is bigger than the
13 global retailers shown
right combined ...
Emmy
10.2
The Man in the High Castle
Golden Globe
Next
BAFTA
Goliath
Transparent
Mozart in the Jungle
$740bn
Amazon’s market value
37.7
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Oscar
Manchester by the Sea
Target
Amazon Studios
Prime Video’s recent spending
on acquisitions is at least $1.5bn
$250m
Lord of the Rings rights
$600m-$900m
Lord of the Rings budget
$250m
Grand Tour budget
$10m
UK rights to the ATP World Tour Finals
8.1
Sainsbury’s
6.2
$177.9bn
M&S
in net sales over 2017,
up from $136bn in 2016
32.6
$3bn
Tesco
profit in 2017, up from
$2.4bn in 2016
$50m
Thursday Night Football
‘Too much power in
the hands of too few’
The rise and rise of
a retail behemoth
With Amazon poised to report a 40% jump in
sales to $50bn over a single three month period,
we look at how it has transformed shopping
habits – and where it is headed now
Rupert Neate
Wealth correspondent
‘I
see them as kind of a great
white shark. You don’t
really want to mess with
them.” The words are
those of a former manager
at Amazon describing her
former employer.
It is an apt analogy. Amazon is
huge, worth $740bn (£530bn), but it
moves fast and is a lethal predator.
This week, the Guardian is
shining a spotlight on the company,
examining how it has disrupted an
ever-expanding range of industries
and the power it wields.
One of the 14 business principles
set out by its founder, Jeff Bezos,
who started the company in a Seattle
garage in 1994, is “think big”.
Amazon does exactly that. It
operates in nine of the 10 biggest
industrial sectors in the US and its
scale and control is such that it has
been compared to a private company
owning the road network. It has also
turned Bezos into the world’s richest
man, worth $130bn. The company’s
Prime service has 100 million paying
members. Half of US households are
subscribers. More than half of all
online shopping searches in the US
start on Amazon – not Google – up
from 18% less than a decade ago.
The company scoops up almost $1 of
every $2 US shoppers spend online.
Later this week Amazon, which
employs 560,000 staff worldwide,
is expected to report a 40% jump in
sales. Analysts say its revenues in
the first three months of the year will
hit nearly $50bn.
Amazon has fundamentally
changed the way hundreds of
millions of people across the world
shop for books, music, movies,
electrical gadgets, clothing and even
food. But it is now much more than
just a retail business.
Amazon Web Services controls
around 45% of the world’s cloud
computing capacity and provides
the web infrastructure on which
thousands of other huge businesses
and vital organisations are built
– from Netflix to the CIA to the UK’s
Ministry of Justice. The company
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:9 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
9
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2017
The Italian domain
launches in November
Amazon Spain follows
in September
Amazon Brazil
launches in December
Domains go live in India,
Mexico and Australia
The Netherlands store
launches in November
Singapore becomes the latest
domain to launch in July
$60bn
Amazon’s quarterly net sales
topped $60bn in 2017 ...
June 2017
Acquires Whole Foods
50
257.6
... and shares hit an
all-time high of
$1,598.4 on 12 March
2018
1,400
1,200
3.0
December 2016
Makes ‘first delivery’ with
drone service Prime Air
Sports Direct
26 July 2017
1052.8
40
0.9
Walmart
$1,600
1,000
JC Penny
0.7 0.3
AO
Sears
30
800
29 Dec 2015
694.0
51.8
September 2011
Introduces Kindle Fire, Kindle
Touch and Kindle Touch 3G
North
America
sales
600
20
TJ Maxx
December 2007
Launches Amazon Kindle
and Amazon Music
85.3
Costco
9.1
Macy's
Value of UK companies has been
converted to dollars for visual
comparison of size. Market cap data as
of 3pm 24 April
is blamed for driving traditional
retailers out of business and copying
other firms’ products and services;
it is accused of treating staff poorly
and avoiding tax by all legal means
possible, no matter how contrived
its offshore structures.
It knows where its customers live,
what they buy and what web pages
they browse. It has been accused of
not wanting to dominate the market
– but to own it.
Its scale and attitude to paying
tax has drawn the ire of Donald
Trump, the European Union and
the International Monetary Fund
(IMF), but the online behemoth and
its multibillionaire owner show no
signs of slowing down or bending to
the demands of politicians.
Amazon gets $1 of every
$2 spent online in the US
Last week, the head of the IMF,
Christine Lagarde, warned that
technology companies such as
Amazon had “too much market
power – in the hands of too few”. She
said the tech companies’ dominance
was “not helpful to the economy
or to the wellbeing of individuals”,
and said that in order to tackle their
hegemony “a lot of new thinking has
to be done”.
Trump has tweeted his anger
about Amazon six times so far this
year. Last month, he said: “Unlike
others, they pay little or no taxes
to state & local governments, use
our Postal System as their Delivery
Boy (causing tremendous loss to
the U.S.), and are putting many
thousands of retailers out of
business!”
But Amazon is focused on
further expansion – new countries,
new products (from Alexa voice
recognition speakers to healthcare
and home robots), into bricks and
mortar stores (some replacing
bookshops that Amazon had put
out of business) – and making even
more money.
21 Jan 2014
407.1
March 2005
Launches Amazon Prime
14 Oct 2011
246.7
10
December 2000
Opens camera and photo store,
introduces Amazon marketplace
June 1998
Acquires IMDB,
opens music store
400
200
10 Dec 1999
106.7
International
sales
AWS
0
96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Death by Amazon
No industry is safe from
the insatiable monster
Olivia Solon
Julia Carrie Wong
San Francisco
T
he computer on
which this article was
written sits on a laptop
stand that tells you
everything you need
to know about how
Amazon does business. At $19.99
(£14.99) a pop, the laptop stand
combines everything customers
love about Amazon: utility, price and
convenience. It is also a knockoff
of a laptop stand the San Franciscobased company Rain Design began
selling nearly a decade before
Amazon decided to make its own.
Amazon’s innovation was to
replace Rain Design’s raindrop logo
with its own smiley arrow – and cut
the price in half.
“All Amazon had to do was pick
the best one and copy it,” said Rachel
Greer, a former product manager for
Amazon who runs a consulting firm
for Amazon vendors.
Rain Design is not the first
company to fall victim to the
aggressive techniques Amazon uses
to achieve market dominance. Its
retail site is the most visible of its
business strands, but the $740bn
company has quietly stretched its
0
97
00
05
10
15 17
tentacles into an astonishing range
of unrelated industries. Google
and Facebook might have cornered
the online advertising market, but
Amazon’s business successes now
include groceries, TV, robotics, cloud
services and consumer electronics.
“If you try to measure power
by how many executives are up at
night because of X company, I think
Amazon would win,” said Lina Khan
of the thinktank New America.
Amazon has a restaurant delivery
service, a music streaming service
and an Etsy clone called Amazon
Homemade. It makes hugely
successful hardware and software;
it makes movies, television shows
and video games. It runs a labour
brokerage for computer-based work
and another for manual labour. It
publishes books, sells books, and
owns the popular social network site
for book readers GoodReads.com.
It sells nappies, baby food, snacks,
clothing, furniture and batteries.
It sells ads, processes payments,
and makes small loans. It is the
Continued on next page
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:10 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
10
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
News
The age of
Amazon
The Amazon
Snowmobile: a
physical vehicle
can be the best
way to move a
huge amount
of data
PHOTOGRAPH: AWS
Continued from previous page
unexpected owner of a huge number
of websites – everything from the
gaming site Twitch to the movie
database IMDb.
Of the top 10 US industries by
GDP (information, manufacturing
non-durable goods, retail trade,
wholesale trade, manufacturing
durable goods, healthcare, finance
and insurance, state and local
government, professional and
business services, and property),
Amazon has a finger in all but the
last. And how confident can the
property industry be that Amazon
will not one day allow people to buy
and sell homes on its platform?
“I see them as kind of a great
white shark,” said Greer. “You don’t
really want to mess with them.”
What makes Amazon so
frightening for rivals is that it can
use its expertise in data analytics to
move into almost any sector.
“Amazon has all this data
available. They track what people
are searching for, what they click,
what they don’t,” said Greer. “Every
time you’re searching for something
and don’t click, you’re telling
Amazon that there’s a gap.”
Amazon knows where you live,
who you live with, your current
location (if you use the Amazon
smartphone app), what TV shows
you watch, what music you listen to
and what websites you visit.
“It’s obsessed with understanding
its customers,” said the Harvard
Business School professor Vijay
Govindarajan. “The more you
understand every aspect of a
customer, the more it can satisfy
your needs.”
This obsession with knowing its
customers means Amazon is beloved
by them. It is viewed as cheap,
convenient and reliable.
“Amazon’s north star is to delight
the customer,” said Gene Munster,
a former Amazon analyst who runs
the investment firm Loup Ventures.
Despite its treasure trove of
personal data – the kind that allows
retailers to predict if their teenage
customers are pregnant before their
parents know – Amazon has mostly
avoided using that data in ways that
unnerve people.
But the consumer trust it has
built up does not reflect the damage
the company does to competitors,
partners and workers, according to
Khan. “Only looking at a consumer
side of a business’s power is totally
ludicrous. It slices the human in
half, not looking at them as a worker,
producer or supplier.”
Customers might be getting
superfast deliveries of cheap laundry
detergent and binge-worthy TV
programmes, but the same company
has also been accused of displacing
jobs in the locations where it builds
its huge “fulfilment centres”,
treating warehouse workers like
robots, aggressively undercutting
rivals and squeezing suppliers and
producers.
“The algorithms are designed
to serve up things that best serve
Amazon, steering us to some books
and not others,” said Stacy Mitchell,
co-director of the advocacy group
the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.
“You have a company that can shape
whether a particular author is able to
find an audience, and whether they
can even get published.”
That power means “people don’t
know if there’s something they’re
missing”.
The company does not even shy
away from competing with its own
investments. After pumping $5.6m
into the startup Nucleus and its
Alexa-powered video conferencing
tablet, Amazon released its own
suspiciously similar device, the Echo
Show.
“They probably copied us,”
Nucleus’s co-founder Jonathan
Frankel said last year. “When they
had the opportunity to extend their
▲ Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s CEO, has seen
the firm’s value rise 560% since 2012
tentacles into millions of homes,
they had to do it, even if it means
throwing us under the bus, even
if it means putting their whole
ecosystem at risk and letting people
know that they’re not necessarily a
trusted partner.”
Amazon declined to comment on
its investment in Nucleus or on the
design of its laptop stand, but noted
that Rain’s design remained the
bestselling stand on the site.
The company’s success has
produced panic among investors
in rival businesses. When Amazon
bought Whole Foods, other
supermarket chains’ stock prices
crashed. Two months later, when
Amazon announced it would cut
Whole Foods prices, grocery stocks
plummeted again.
The meal-kit maker Blue Apron’s
share price fell 11% after the news
that Amazon was filing for a meal-kit
trademark. A vague announcement
from Amazon that it was
collaborating with JP Morgan and
Berkshire Hathaway on some kind of
non-profit healthcare venture sent
healthcare stocks on a downward
slide.
Since 2012, the financial research
firm Bespoke Investment Group has
been tracking an index of 54 retail
stocks, known as the “Death by
Amazon index”, which it considers
most vulnerable to Amazon.
“It’s a somewhat melodramatic
title, we admit,” said George Pearkes,
a strategist at Bespoke. “But it
encapsulates what is going on in
retail quite well.”
Between February 2012 and
January 2018, Amazon’s value rose
560%, the S&P index rose 102%, and
the Death by Amazon index grew
just 42.8%.
Amazon still has a lot of room to
grow. It dominates e-commerce, but
that is only about 9% (according to
eMarketer) of the total retail market
in the US. With the acquisition of
Whole Foods and the launch of the
concept store Amazon Go – which
has no cashiers and no checkouts –
the tech giant can start to take on the
other 91%.
What is CEO Jeff Bezos’s
endgame? Khan said it could be
a “tax on all economic activity. If
you view it that way it’s difficult to
think about what sector he wouldn’t
touch,” she said.
The two-pizza rule
Secret formula
of small teams
and harsh control
Alex Hern
I
n the early days of Amazon,
Jeff Bezos instituted a rule:
every internal team should
be small enough that it can
be fed with two pizzas. The
goal wasn’t to cut down
on the catering bill. It was, like
almost everything Amazon does,
focused on two aims: efficiency and
scalability. Efficiency is obvious:
a smaller team spends less time
managing timetables and keeping
people up to date, and more time
doing what needs to be done. But it’s
scalability that matters for Amazon.
The thing about having lots of
small teams is that they all need
to be able to work together, and
to be able to access the common
resources of the company, to achieve
their larger goals. That’s what turns
the company into, in the words
of Benedict Evans, of the venture
capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, “a
machine that makes the machine”.
“You can add new product lines
without adding new internal
structure or direct reports, and you
can add them without meetings and
projects and process in the logistics
and e-commerce platforms,” Evans
notes. “You don’t need to fly to
Seattle and schedule a bunch of
meetings to get people to implement
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:11 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 19:03
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
11
support for launching makeup in
Italy, or persuade anyone to add
things to their road map.”
Amazon is good at being an
e-commerce company that sells
things, but what it’s great at is
making new e-commerce companies
that sell new things. The company
calls this approach its “flywheel”:
it takes the scale that can smother
a typical multinational, and uses
it to provide an ever-increasing
momentum backing up its entire
business. The faster the flywheel
spins, and the heavier it is, the
harder it is for anyone else to stop it.
Perhaps the best example of that
approach in action is the birth and
growth of AWS (previously called
Amazon Web Services). That’s the
division of Amazon that provides
cloud computing services, both
internally and for other companies,
including for competitors (both
Netflix and Tesco use the platform).
It started, like so many things at
Amazon, with an edict from the top.
Every team, Bezos ordered, should
begin to work with other teams only
in a structured, systematic way.
If an advertising team needed
data on shoe sales to decide how
best to spend their resources, they
could not email analytics and ask
for it; they needed to go to the
analytics dashboard themselves
and get it. If that dashboard didn’t
exist, it needed to be created.
That approach needed to cover
everything. From there, it was
almost an afterthought to take the
obvious next step, and let others use
the technology that Amazon made
available internally.
Those humble beginnings
spawned a beast so large it is now
10% of Amazon’s overall revenue. It
makes so much money that financial
regulations forced the company
to report it as a top-level division
in its own right: Amazon divides
its company into US and Canada,
International, and AWS.
AWS is large enough that it is dealt
with on the same tier as the entire
rest of the world and that Netflix,
which accounts for about a third of
all internet traffic in North America,
is just another customer. It is large
enough that in 2016 the company
released the “Snowmobile”, literally
a lorry for moving data.
The companies that work with
AWS move so much information
around that sometimes the internet
simply cannot cope. So now, if
you want to upload a lot of data
to Amazon’s cloud, the company
will drive a truck to your office, fill
it with data, then drive it back to
Amazon’s data centre. If you need
to upload 100 petabytes – roughly
5m movies in 4K resolution with
surround sound – it turns out there’s
no quicker way to do it than driving
it down the freeway at 75mph.
While AWS saw Amazon open
up its internal technology to
external customers, another part
of the company does the same with
Amazon’s actual website.
Amazon Marketplace launched
in 2000, allowing third-party sellers
to put up their own wares on the
site. The feature has expanded
over the years to become a major
plank in the company’s quest to be
the “everything store” – the one
destination on the internet you need
to go to buy anything. Marketplace
goes one better than the pizza rule,
allowing Amazon to expand into
new sectors without needing to take
on a single extra employee.
Tomorrow
Jeff Bezos The schoolboy
genius from New Mexico
who became the world’s
richest man – and now
plans to conquer space
Tax How Amazon has
used every (legal)
trick in the book to
outsmart the system
A distribution centre in Phoenix,
Arizona. Amazon has long faced
criticism for its treatment of workers
▼ The newly launched Amazon Go in
Seattle. The partially automated shop
could challenge the big supermarkets
PHOTOGRAPH: RALPH FRESCO/REUTERS
PHOTOGRAPH: LINDSEY WASSON/REUTERS
The variety of things sold on
Amazon is now so huge that its
internal computer scientists faced a
problem. “E-commerce companies
such as Amazon … process billions
of orders every year,” a team
of Amazon researchers wrote.
“However, these orders represent
only a small fraction of all plausible
orders.” The solution? Train an
artificial intelligence purely to
generate plausible fake orders, to
better guess how to market brandnew products.
Amazon reports the revenue it
makes from Marketplace as about
20% of its total income. But that
metric, which only counts the fees
paid to the company by third-party
sellers, understates the colossal
scale of the business. “Marketplace
is now around half of the total
volume of goods sold through
Amazon,” estimates Evans, of
Andreessen Horowitz’s. “In other
words, Marketplace means that
Amazon handles – but does not,
itself set prices for – double the share
of e-commerce that it reports as
revenue.”
Increasingly, then, Amazon
resembles less a big-box retailer,
such as Tesco or Walmart, sucking
up commerce and killing the local
high street, and more a shopping
mall: independent retailers can
exist and even make a tidy living,
but only if they get a slot in the mall
itself – and remember that the real
moneymaker is the landlord.
Since 2014, Amazon has added
a third flywheel to its business:
artificial intelligence. The company
has always been near the leading
edge of the industry, most obviously
in its neural-network-powered
recommendation algorithms. But,
until recently, that approach was
scattershot.
That changed when the company
decided to build the hardware that
would become the Echo. In classic
Amazon fashion, it started at the
end and worked backwards, writing
a “press release” for the notional
future product and then trying to
figure out what expertise needed to
be developed or bought to make it.
Need a personal assistant? Buy
Cambridge-based True Knowledge,
which was once working on a Siri
competitor, and you get Alexa.
Require far-field voice recognition,
letting you hear people on the other
side of the room? Start working on
that now, because no one’s really
cracked the problem.
Institutionally, the bulk of the
Alexa AI team still sits under AWS,
using its infrastructure and offering
another tranche of digital services
to third parties who want to build
speech control into their devices.
But the economies of scale that
come to AI are unique. There’s the
value to the data, of course: the
more people use an Echo, the more
speech samples it has to train with,
and so the better the Echo becomes.
And beyond that, machine-learning
technologies are so fundamental,
and so general purpose, that
every advancement ricochets
throughout Amazon, increasing
efficiency, opening up new fields,
and suggesting further avenues
of research.
But nothing lasts forever – and
even Amazon has its weak points.
The two-pizza rule, for instance,
may be a good strategy for building
an infinitely expandable company,
but it doesn’t lend itself to a
pleasant, stress-free working
environment.
Amazon has long faced criticism
over its treatment of warehouse
workers: huge valuations and
high-tech aspirations sit uneasily
alongside the low-paid, low-skilled
work that helps keep the company
ticking over.
Where Amazon differs from
companies such as Deliveroo,
Apple and Facebook is that the
highly skilled employees in its
headquarters have almost as many
complaints.
A New York Times exposé from
2015 described employees crying
at their desks and suffering nearbreakdowns from the pressure they
were under. The company’s rapid
employee turnover is legendary:
someone leaves, someone else
has to rewrite their code to make it
understandable to the people still
there, but by the time the rewrite
is finished, the person doing the
rewriting has also left, requiring
someone else to start the whole
process again.
But the one thing that’s been
true from day one is that Jeff Bezos
sits at the top of the food chain,
with direct control of a $740bn
(£530bn) business matched by few
other bosses. It would take a bold
gambler to bet against the company
right now.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:12 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 19:20
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
12
National
Councillor
arrested as
he ‘looked
like’ suspect
Steven Morris
A city councillor from a black and
minority ethnic background was
arrested after going to his local police
station to report a crime because officers were searching for a suspect who
“looked like” him.
Afzal Shah, a Labour councillor in
Bristol, has questioned whether white
colleagues on the police and crime
panel he sits on would have been
arrested in the same circumstances.
Avon and Somerset police have
apologised, but said officers were acting in good faith.
A constable from the same force
will be tried next month for allegedly
shooting one of its race relations advisers with a Taser electronic weapon.
Shah, who represents the Easton
ward – scene of the Taser incident –
described how he went to the Trinity
Road police station to report a crime.
cYanmaGentaYellowb
▲ Afzal Shah had been reporting a crime to police PHOTOGRAPH: BRISTOL POST/SWNS
He said that instead of taking his statement, officers believed he was a person
suspected of making threats of violence – and read him his rights.
He explained that he was a local
councillor and had been in council
meetings when the alleged crime he
was being arrested for took place. He
said this was ignored.
There are no custody cells at Trinity
Road, but he was put in the back of a
secure police car in the public car park
outside the police station. Police realised they had the wrong person and
de-arrested him.
Shah told Bristol Live he still has
unanswered questions. He said: “I
went to the police station to register
a crime on behalf of someone else.
I found myself arrested for making
threats, but I was nowhere near the
place this is supposed to have happened. I was in a council meeting.”
After he was freed he claimed police
told him the person they were looking
for had a similar appearance to him.
“I was told it was a misunderstanding, and that the person who they were
looking for looked like me.”
He continued: “I want clarity
from the police, and I’m also taking legal advice. It’s been extremely
serious. Given that I went in to report
a crime, what then transpired was
unbelievable.”
He added: “During my time as a
local Labour councillor – including as
a member of the region’s police and
crime panel – I have worked hard to
build bridges between communities
in Easton and our local constabulary.
“I sincerely doubt that many of the
other councillors who sit on the police
and crime panel would have received
the same treatment which I did.”
In a statement, Avon and Somerset said: “Police have apologised to
a man for the inconvenience and distress caused when he was arrested
and detained in a police car after being
wrongly identified by a victim as one
of the perpetrators of a crime.”
Supt Andy Bennett said: “Officers acted in good faith in arresting
Cllr Shah at Trinity Road police station after another man who was in the
station reporting an offence visually
identified him as one of the people
involved. This identification was later
found to be incorrect and Cllr Shah was
released without having been taken to
a custody unit.
“We are extremely grateful for
Cllr Shah’s contribution to community policing both as a councillor and
as a member of the police and crime
panel. We have apologised to him for
the distress and embarrassment … and
welcome this opportunity to clarify
this publicly.”
Record number
of EU nurses and
midwives leave in
advance of Brexit
Denis Campbell
Record numbers of EU nurses and
midwives left Britain last year, fuelling fears that a Brexit brain drain will
deepen the NHS’s staffing crisis.
A total of 3,962 nursing staff from
the European Economic Area (EEA)
left the Nursing and Midwifery Council register during 2017-18. The register
tracks who is eligible to work in the UK
in those areas of healthcare.
The figure was 28% more than the
3,081 who left in 2016-17 and three
times as high as the 1,311 who did so
in 2013-14.
At the same time, the number of
EU nurses and midwives coming to
work in the UK has fallen to its lowest
level. Just 805 joined the NMC register
in 2017-18 – 87% fewer than the 6,382
who did so the year before.
“It feels that efforts to boost the
number of nurses are being dragged
down by a botched Brexit,” said Janet
Davies, the chief executive of the Royal
College of Nursing (RCN).
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:13 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 17:34
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
National
13
Leeds United branded
disgraceful for tour to
‘blood-soaked’ Myanmar
Hannah Ellis-Petersen
South-east Asia correspondent
Leeds United have announced they
will play two matches in Myanmar in
a tour sponsored by a bank with close
links to the regime accused of ethnic
cleansing and human rights abuses
against its Muslim Rohingya minority.
Leeds will play two post-season
friendlies in May in the Myanmar cities
of Yangon and Mandalay.
Since August 2017 a campaign of
violence, described by the United
Nations as ethnic cleansing and as
genocide by Amnesty International,
has been carried out in the northern
state of Rahkine in Myanmar.
The military has razed villages,
killed men and abused women and
children, resulting in more than
700,000 people fleeing over the border to Bangladesh.
The Myanmar military and government, including the de facto leader,
the Nobel prize winner Aung San Suu
Kyi, have denied responsibility but the
leading UN human rights official has
called for Myanmar to be referred to
the international criminal court.
In a damning statement the organisation representing the Rohingya
community in the UK described Leeds
as disgraceful, adding: “Leeds is going
to play football on the grounds soaked
in the blood of innocent Rohingya children, women and people.”
Leeds will play an all-star team from
Myanmar’s National League and the
national team on a tour sponsored
by AYA, a private Myanmar bank
implicated in ethnic cleansing.
AYA bank is owned by the Myanmar
tycoon Zaw Zaw, who was blacklisted
by the US for being a crony of the
former military regime. The Leeds
owner, Andrea Radrizzani, has business interests in south-east Asia.
While fans expressed concern
over aligning the club with Myanmar,
the Leeds managing director, Angus
Kinnear, said the squad “are excited
to represent the club in Asia”.
PHOTOGRAPH:
SOTHEBY’S/SWNS
Modigliani’s reclining nude breaks record A painting by
Amedeo Modigliani is to be offered at auction with an estimate
in excess of $150m (£107m), the highest pre-sale figure for a
work of art. Simon Shaw, from Sotheby’s, which is holding the
auction, said Nu Couché (sur le Côté Gauche) was “radically
innovative” and had an important place in art history.
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:14 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 10:50
mono
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:15 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 19:59
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
National
Home Office app for EU
nationals fails to quell
MEPs’ fears over Brexit
Daniel Boffey Brussels
Lisa O’Carroll
A mobile phone app for EU nationals
seeking to stay in the UK after Brexit –
claimed to be as user-friendly as “an
online account at LK Bennett” – will
not work on iPhones, Home Office
officials have admitted.
At a meeting in Brussels to assure
MEPs of the device’s efficiency, officials from Amber Rudd’s department
conceded that a key function would
not work on the phones used by over
half of the adult population in the UK.
Catherine Bearder, a Lib Dem MEP
who attended the meeting, said one
Home Office official had suggested
iPhone users could borrow a phone
to complete the registration. “It is
beyond belief,” she told reporters.
The officials went to Brussels to
bolster MEPs’ confidence in the app.
Rudd has insisted using it will be
as easy for the 3 million EU nationals in the UK as setting up an online
account at LK Bennett, the clothes
retailer. She also said it had been
“extensively tested” but Home Office
officials admitted they had not yet
started “mass testing” of the app.
They also said they had yet to start
hiring 1,000 workers for a customer
service centre for the EU citizens.
The problem with Apple devices has
15
The UK will have to pay its
“divorce bill” of up to £39bn to the
EU even if no agreement is reached
on a future trade deal, the head of
the National Audit Office has said.
Sir Amyas Morse, head of
Whitehall’s spending watchdog,
said yesterday that if parliament
approves the withdrawal
agreement in a vote in the autumn,
it will become a legally binding
treaty regardless of the success of
separate trade talks.
His remarks are a blow for
Theresa May, who has said she will
not pay Brussels if it denies Britain
a post-Brexit trade deal.
Morse said: “As I understand
this, the treaty – once approved –
will pass into law in time for us to
leave the EU and then will become
legally binding. Therefore the
payments would fall to be paid no
matter what, under international
law.” Rajeev Syal
highlighted what many say is a poor
government record on technology.
EU citizens who have tested the app
say it requires a small amount of information, such as a scan of a passport,
address, email address and a selfie to
assess instantly an application.
However, Apple will not allow its
technology to read the chip on modern
passports, so the registration can only
be completed on an Android phone.
Sophie in ’t Veld, a Dutch Democrat
MEP, said: “The officials repeatedly
said that there would be a change of
their culture. They said they made a
mistake over Windrush. But it wasn’t
a mistake, it was the policy of having
a hostile environment. But they said
that will all change. We shall see.”
It is understood that the iPhone
compatibility issue was known about
at the app’s inception. “We’re speaking
to Apple to try and get this resolved,” a
Home Office spokesman said.
In its statement, the department
added that “technology will play an
important role” in the identification
element of registration, but it was also
making “non-digital” routes available.
other organs, is recovering at home
after receiving two new kidneys, a
pancreas, liver and small bowel during
the 10-hour operation at Birmingham
children’s hospital.
The operation, which became
necessary after the strain of continuous treatment became too much for
his body, has allowed him to swallow
food for the first time in his life.
His mother, Katie Freestone, 28,
said their relatives were “all absolutely
amazed at the incredible progress Jay
has made in a relatively short space of
time” after doctors said he was recovering well from the complex operation.
“There also aren’t enough words to
thank the donor and their family and
… we’re incredibly aware of the sadness and tragedy that another family
had to endure to make this possible,”
she said.
Jay said: “I want to say thank you
to my mum for looking after me and
my grandma and granddad, who have
been telling me every day that I’m
getting better.” Jay also thanked the
medical staff.
Khalid Sharif, a consultant surgeon
and the lead for transplantation, said:
“It’s incredibly rare for this many
organs to be successfully transplanted
at once and shows the difference that
organ donors make.”
UK ‘cannot escape bill’
Blenheim
blues
Blenheim
Palace in
Oxfordshire
this summer
hosts
paintings and
other works
by the French
artist Yves
Klein, pictured
in 1961 with
Blue Globe, an
example of his
trademark use
of an intense
ultramarine
that came to
bear his name.
PHOTOGRAPH:
HARRY SHUNK
AND JANOS KENDER
Seven-year-old boy is first child
to have five-organ transplant
Kevin Rawlinson
A seven-year-old boy has become
the first child to undergo a five-organ
transplant in a single operation.
Jay Crouch, who has suffered since
he was six weeks old from a condition
that left his small intestine twisted
and caused complications with
▲ Jay Crouch and his mother
Sketch
John Crace
The Rees-Mogg
view: socialism
of Tories begat
Windrush blot
F
or the past 10 days or
so, the government
struggled to provide
any convincing answers
about its treatment
of the Windrush
generation. It was just one of those
things that could have happened to
any government.
Nobody’s fault. Especially not
Theresa May’s or Amber Rudd’s. Just
something that had got a bit out of
hand, had mysteriously snowballed
into a large-scale deportation and
detention policy.
At an event organised by the
pro-Brexit campaign group Open
Europe, Tory MP Jacob Rees-Mogg
came up with a rather different
explanation. The Windrush
scandal was nothing to do with
the prime minister and home
secretary pursuing a racist agenda
with Go Home vans and “hostile
environment” legislation to achieve
arbitrary immigration targets.
No. It was far worse. Windrush
was directly due to the government
commitment to socialism.
A hush fell over the room as
Rees-Mogg expanded on this. The
state had put the interests of the
collective ahead of those individuals
who had come to Britain perfectly
legally prior to 1973, and it had been
more convenient for the Home
Office to make them prove who they
were and show their papers.
“This is socialism,” he repeated,
just in case anyone had missed it
the first time. It was like this. May
and Rudd had been part of a 1980s
KGB sleeper cell that had managed
to infiltrate the Tory party. Over the
years they had bided their time,
pretending to champion free-market
capitalism as they poked campaign
leaflets through letterboxes in the
hope of getting to parliament.
Having risen to the top they
were unleashing socialism on to
an unsuspecting country. If only
someone had told Jeremy Corbyn
about this he would have joined the
Conservatives. Britain was in the
middle of a Red Terror that no one
but Rees-Mogg had noticed.
Not that he was greatly concerned
to find himself in a Tory party
hijacked by a new breed of casually
racist Commies, but that’s mainly
because in many ways he evidently
considers himself its real leader. He
is polite in a rather condescending
way about May while damning
her with faint praise. She is his
“useful idiot”; he’s willing to turn
a blind eye to her militant socialist
tendencies so long as she delivers on
the real prize of his hard Brexit.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:16 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:49
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
16
cYanmaGentaYellowb
National
National
xSubjectxxxx
Windrush scandal
Home Office
Mistreatment
goes beyond
the Windrush
nationalities
Amelia Gentleman
A growing number of cases of Home
Office mistreatment of non-Caribbean
Commonwealth-born citizens are
emerging, indicating that the problem
is likely to spread beyond the so-called
Windrush generation.
Immigration charities and MPs
reported that many new cases had
been reported this week of individuals from countries as diverse as India,
Kenya, Cyprus and Canada.
As with the Windrush cases, where
even the Caribbean high commissioners initially had no clear understanding
of the severity and extent of the issue,
the scale of the problems experienced
by non-Windrush nations appears to
be only gradually emerging.
A spokesperson at the Canadian
high commission said: “To the best
of our knowledge, the high commission of Canada has not been contacted
by any Canadians seeking assistance in
matters related to Windrush.”
But Margaret O’Brien, 69, who
moved to the UK from Canada in 1971,
described battling for two years to persuade the Home Office to believe that
she was here legitimately. She was
threatened with removal to Canada,
where she has no surviving relatives,
and her disability benefits were suspended, leaving her impoverished.
Mary-Ann Astbury, who has lived
in the UK for 47 years, has received an
apology from the Home Office after
she was told she could not renew her
passport. Astbury told the BBC that
she had moved from Canada with her
adoptive parents in 1971. Home Office
staff said they had been in contact to
discuss her applying to be naturalised
as a British citizen.
The Migration Observatory calculates that up to 57,000 long-term
Commonwealth-born UK residents
had not formalised their status here,
and the problems extended “well
beyond” the Windrush nations. It
estimates there are about 15,000
Jamaicans and 13,000 people from
India in this situation.
Robert McNeil, deputy director of
the Migration Observatory at Oxford
University, said: “The issue of citizenship and residence rights for
Commonwealth migrants in the UK
who arrived before and during the
early 1970s does not just affect those
from the Caribbean.
“Tens of thousands of people from
other Commonwealth countries in
Asia, Africa, the Americas and elsewhere may also be in the same boat.”
Although the home secretary’s
announcement on Monday was entitled “Windrush Migrants”, her staff
said others would benefit from the
assistance package offered then. “The
offer will be available to people from
all Commonwealth countries, not just
Caribbean nationals,” they said.
Targeted for removal
‘My treatment was terrible.
I felt like dirt, humiliated’
Amelia Gentleman
M
argaret O’Brien
moved from
Canada to
Wolverhampton in
1971, got married,
had three children
and worked for the local council for
more than 25 years, variously as a
dinner lady, meals on wheels driver,
lollipop lady and cleaner.
A spinal injury a few years ago
meant she had to give up her job,
so she applied for benefits for the
first time. In 2015 she was told
her disability payments had been
suspended because she was an
illegal immigrant.
O’Brien, now 69, received a
letter stating: “Home Office records
indicate that you do not have
permission to be in the UK. You
should make arrangements to leave
without delay.”
The letter informed her “of our
intention to remove you from the UK
to your country of nationality if you
do not depart voluntarily”. It said:
“No further notice will be given.”
If she decided to stay, the letter
warned, her life in the UK would
“become increasingly difficult”; she
was liable to be arrested, prosecuted,
and face six months in prison.
Her case is significant because it
shows the Home Office treatment of
longstanding Commonwealth-born
UK residents has not been restricted
to the Windrush generation, and is
likely to extend to people from other
Commonwealth countries.
The letter to O’Brien arrived a
few days after her son’s wedding. “I
tried to call the telephone number
provided, but it was absolutely
impossible to get through. My son
was on honeymoon in New York. I
didn’t know what to do,” she said.
She sought legal advice but was told
it would cost £900 for initial work.
“I’m a disabled pensioner. I didn’t
have that kind of money.”
Not long afterwards she was
issued with a letter headed
“notification to a person who
is liable to be detained”. Her
photograph was above the words
“you are a person without leave who
has been served with a notice of
liability to removal”.
She gathered a large number of
documents as evidence that she
had lived in the UK before the 1973
Immigration Act came into force,
and was in the country legally.
After more than a year of trying to
convince officials, she was allowed
to meet a Home Office decisionmaker in person. She was ready to
show him her documents, but he
simply asked if there was anyone in
Canada who could house her.
“I don’t know whether they get
brownie points for the number of
people they can send back to their
own country,” O’Brien said.
O’Brien’s account stands out as
shocking even among the deluge
of revelations about Home Office
behaviour. But she said two years
of getting by without disability
benefit was nothing compared with
the stories of detention and forced
exile in Jamaica. “I was humiliated,
but there are so many people in
situations much worse than mine.”
She found the requirement to
report every three months at the
Home Office very difficult because
of her disability. She walks with a
frame and has to be accompanied
by someone when she goes out as a
health condition makes her prone to
collapsing unexpectedly.
The 25-mile journey by bus,
train and tram to the Home Office
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:17 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:49
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•
17
▼ Margaret O’Brien, who moved to
the UK from Canada, was labelled
an illegal immigrant 44 years later
PHOTOGRAPH: ANDREW FOX
Windrush cancer patient
denied NHS care now
given date for treatment
Continued from page 1
reporting centre in Solihull took
‘To them it
about two hours each way, she said.
is just a job.
On one occasion, she arrived only
Maybe they
to be told the office was closed for a
have to meet
training day; on another, she queued
numbers.
for more than two hours before
being asked to return another day.
You’re just
The waiting room was like a cattle
treated as
market, she said, crammed with
a number’
about 200 people, among them
Margaret
babies – and sometimes adults –
O’Brien
crying. People who were branded
overstayers, illegal immigrants or
refused asylum seekers had to hand
over all sharp objects, such as pens,
pencils and keys, as well as mobile
phones, at the door. Chairs were
screwed to the floor.
“It was very degrading. I’m a
disabled woman. Sometimes, I was
in a lot of pain,” she said. Travelling
to the centre cost about £40 each
time for herself and her grandson or
one of her children.
Her daughter, waiting, as
required, outside the reporting
centre, once saw a group of
Margaret O’Brien
people being bundled into a van,
presumably to be detained. The fear on her wedding
then was that O’Brien would be next. day in June 1971
O’Brien said the security guards
on the door were always kind to
her; she thought they felt sorry
for her because she was finding
it physically difficult to get to the
office. Inside the building, the Home
Office staff were less friendly, she
said. “To them, it is just a job. Maybe
they have to meet numbers, meet
a certain number of people a day.
You’re just treated as a number.”
O’Brien had first been informed
that she had a problem with her
paperwork when the council pointed
out in about 2008 that her Canadian
passport had expired and asked her
for an alternative document.
She had never applied for a British
passport and was not planning a
holiday, so decided to explain to
council staff that she had been in
the UK for decades and did not need
to prove a right to reside. This was
several years before the government
introduction of the “hostile
environment” policy, and staff let
the matter drop.
She was puzzled by the Home
Office’s decision to target her. “I
did feel British. When I came to
England, Canada was part of the
Commonwealth. It was so simple. I
went to the jobcentre, was issued a
national insurance [number] and got
a job. I was always in work.”
By the time of her retirement she
was juggling three jobs. When she
thought she might be deported, she
remembers wondering whether she
would get a refund for the money
she had paid in taxes.
O’Brien’s life savings were eaten
up during the period when she was
without money, and she had to rely
on her children.
Daniel Ashwell, her case worker
at the Refugee and Migrant Centre,
helped her find an indefinite leave
to remain stamp in her expired
Canadian passport that instantly
proved she was in the UK legally.
She had never noticed it or realised
its significance, and was profoundly
grateful for his help. After the Home
Office received this evidence, her
right to be in the UK was confirmed
and her benefits were paid.
“My treatment by the Home Office
was terrible. I felt like dirt,” she said.
Ashwell said that the case
demonstrated the way in which
“immigration policy has encouraged
Home Office officials to treat those
going through the immigration
system with distrust and a lack of
human dignity”.
In an emailed statement, the
Home Office said: “The new
dedicated team helping the
Windrush generation will be on
hand to assist undocumented longresident Commonwealth citizens.”
▲ A Home Office
letter telling
Margaret
O’Brien she
was liable to be
detained
or removed
PHOTOGRAPH:
ANDREW FOX
▼ The Refugee
and Migrant
Centre helped
her find an
indefinite leave
to remain stamp
in her expired
Canadian
passport
MP who has been building pressure
on the government over the Windrush
scandal – said he was still hearing
from people afraid that they will be
deported if they use the government
hotline but cannot meet the required
standard of proof.
“They have feared detention and
deportation if they raise their cases
with the Home Office,” Lammy said.
“Windrush children need a guarantee that this helpline will not be used
as an information gathering service for
immigration enforcement.”
In her Commons statement, Rudd
insisted information gathered in the
helpline would not be used to remove
people from the country, saying “its
purpose is to help and support”.
Last week, after Theresa May
announced that Thompson would
“get the treatment he needs”, the
Royal Marsden hospital appeared in
no hurry to start treatment. Thompson (not his real name) received a
letter inviting him for blood tests in
a few weeks. On Monday, however,
the hospital called to say an earlier
appointment had become free, and
sent a car to collect him. Yesterday
Thompson met his consultant, who
said the radiotherapy should begin.
Thompson arrived in London from
Jamaica as a teenager in 1973 to join his
mother who was working as a nurse.
He has been in Britain for 44 years,
working as a mechanic and paying
taxes until he became ill with cancer
and had to stop work.
Official suspicion about his immigration status led to his eviction and
three weeks of homelessness before a
charity housed him. When he arrived
for his first radiotherapy session he
was told he would have to pay for his
treatment unless he could prove he
was eligible for free NHS care.
Because he arrived in the UK a few
months after the cut-off date Thompson’s immigration status remains
uncertain, although he has an appointment to meet officials from the new
Windrush taskforce on Friday. It is not
clear what has prompted the rush.
“The Home Office has known about
my problems for years. I think this is
all down to the media noise,” he said.
‘The Home Office
has known about my
problems for years. I
think this is all down
to the media noise’
Albert Thompson
Windrush immigrant
Thompson said he did not blame his
consultant, but noted that he did not
get an apology or explanation for the
six-month delay. “There was no mention of me paying [for the surgery] this
time; everything is going to be on the
NHS,” he said.
At his appointment in November, he
was told the cost of treatment for those
ineligible for NHS care was £54,000.
“I’m not quite happy yet, not until I
get everything sorted. This has been a
very scary time. At least I am still here
to tell the story.”
Lammy welcomed the news that
Thompson’s treatment would begin
but asked: “Why has it taken newspaper exposés and questions at prime
minister’s questions for Albert to get
access to the NHS treatments he needs
– as is his right?
“Why has it taken so long for the
government to act to address this
Windrush scandal – shamed into
finally doing so after dragging their
feet for so many months?”
Lammy said nine Windrush cases
had come forward in his constituency in the last 12 hours. “Are each of
these individuals expected to go to the
media in order to get the rights that are
theirs and have been taken away from
them? This is not about a benevolent
government choosing to grant rights to
certain individuals – this is about Windrush children reclaiming the rights
that are theirs in the first place.”
A Royal Marsden spokesperson
said: “Mr Thompson has attended
the Royal Marsden this week to plan
the next stage of his treatment and has
a date to start his radiotherapy. He is
being treated as an NHS patient.”
Laura Stahnke, of Praxis, the
charity helping Thompson with his
immigration problems, said: “We are
all delighted. Nevertheless the fact
that he had to go through an endless
series of media interviews, having his
case debated in parliament, in order
to access his right to healthcare is
scandalous.”
Ministers discussed the fallout from
the Windrush scandal at the weekly
cabinet meeting yesterday, with Boris
Johnson understood to have called
for a broader immigration “amnesty”
for longstanding migrants from the
Commonwealth.
The foreign secretary told colleagues that the move – which did
not include those with criminal
records – would exempt other groups
of migrants from having to produce
reams of paperwork in future to prove
that they had already been living in
Britain for years.
The prime minister was said to have
responded “acidly” by pointing out
that Johnson, who is known to have a
liberal approach to the issue, had previously called for an amnesty for illegal
entrants, both during his time as London mayor and again during the EU
referendum campaign.
At that time, he argued that illegal
immigrants who had avoided detection for 10 years should be granted the
right to stay in Britain following Brexit,
suggesting the move would be both
economically beneficial and humane.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:18 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:S
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:19 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
National
19
▼ Left, Will Young as the Emcee;
below, Jonny Labey and Zizi Strallen
as Scott and Fran PHOTOGRAPHS: NILS
JORGENSEN; JAMES GOURLEY/REX
Theatre review
Laborious remake
takes a step in the
wrong direction
Strictly Ballroom –
The Musical
Piccadilly theatre, London
★★☆☆☆
Michael Billington
I
don’t know if it’s been spotted
already but Baz Luhrmann’s
Strictly Ballroom has strange
parallels with Wagner’s Die
Meistersinger: in both a young
hero, by defying hidebound
tradition, triumphs in a competition
and wins the heart of a woman. To
be honest, I find more fun in Wagner
than in this laborious attempt to turn
a once-charming 1992 movie into a
fully fledged stage musical.
This version, with a book by
Luhrmann himself and Craig Pearce,
is different in many ways from the
movie. For a start it comes equipped
with an Emcee who both acts as
a chorus and gets to sing many of
the show’s standards such as Love
is in the Air and Perhaps, Perhaps,
Perhaps. The role is played by
Will Young, who has an engaging
presence and who, in his sequinned
catsuit, resembles a louche version
of Bruce Forsyth. There is, however,
something irritating about the
character’s determination to
underscore all the jokes so that a
jaw-breaking plot twist is greeted
with “Well, that was unexpected”.
At the end, Young urges us, in the
tones of a holiday camp redcoat,
to “Feel free to stand up and dance
with us”. It not only manipulates a
standing ovation but seems oddly
bullying in a show that attacks the
didacticism of a previous era.
The storyline, however, remains
the same as in the film. The talented
young Scott bucks the rules imposed
in the 1980s by Australian dance
federations and invents his own
moves. Eventually he finds a willing
partner in the shy, awkward Fran.
I have no problems with a
Cinderella story and Jonny Labey as
Scott and Zizi Strallen as Fran show
themselves to be lithe and beguiling
dancers. But, while Drew McOnie
choreographs well, it is a sign of
‘Strallen is forced to
react to a kiss from
Scott with the wideeyed astonishment
of someone who has
lived in a nunnery’
▲ Justin-Lee Jones struts his stuff
as Jonathan Drench in a world of
corrupt ballroom competitions
PHOTOGRAPH: JM WARREN/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
the coarseness of his production
that Strallen is forced to react to a
kiss from Scott with the wide-eyed
astonishment of someone who has
spent her life in a nunnery.
While Fran’s self-fulfilment is
celebrated, Scott’s pushy mum is
played by the normally excellent
Anna Francolini with an orgy of face
pulling that would look excessive
in a gurning competition. Scott’s
Same words, different meaning? Actors to stage
gender swap mid-play in Shakespeare production
Mark Brown
Gender fluidity on stage will be taken
to the next level when the actors
Hayley Atwell and Jack Lowden alternate in the same role in a new version
of Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure.
The Donmar Warehouse in London
has announced what may be a theatrical first – both actors will play the parts
of the powerful deputy and the powerless novice in the production.
Josie Rourke, the theatre’s artistic
director, said the tale of sex and power
was “hugely relevant” to the times we
were living in. “It is an extraordinary
workplace drama,” she said.
“It is about someone being put in
charge of something they are underor overqualified to do, depending on
your moral standpoint. It is about what
happens when someone abuses power
in the workplace.”
Often seen as one of Shakespeare’s
so-called “problem plays”, the plot
centres on Angelo, a puritan hardliner on a mission to clean up the city
he is put in charge of, and Isabella, the
sister of a man sentenced to death.
After Isabella pleads for her brother,
▲ Hayley Atwell will alternate in the
play’s roles of Angelo and Isabella
initial partner, Liz, is also played as
a hard-faced egotist whose favourite
word is “wanker”. You get the sense
this is a show that doesn’t much like
women.
It does, however, yield the
moment of ecstasy I always look
for in a musical. That comes when
Fran’s father teaches Scott the paso
doble. Fernando Mira, with his
poker-back, drumming heels and
economy of movement, gives us a
masterclass in Spanish dance and,
unwittingly, upends the show’s
whole thesis by proving the value of
disciplined tradition. But while Mira
ushers us into another world, we are
soon back in that of corrupt ballroom
competitions.
It is a sign of the show’s
lazy liberalism that the dance
federation’s tradition-worshipping
president, played by Gerard Horan
in an orange wig, declares: “Maybe
I’ll go into politics.” Since Donald
Trump has got where he is by
breaking all the rules, the joke makes
little sense and symbolises the
production’s benign vulgarity.
Angelo offers to save him in return for
sex. Alternating the roles raises questions about how the audience judges
the characters’ morality. Rourke said:
“Do you judge this thing differently if
a woman is saying it and not a man?”
The role swap will probably take
place about halfway through, with
some scenes being replayed, including
the key moment when Angelo makes
the offer to Isabella.
Atwell and Lowden have impressive theatre pedigrees but are perhaps
best known for their film and TV work.
Atwell returned to the stage in February – in Dry Powder at the Hampstead
– after her film and TV success in the
Marvel cinematic universe as Peggy
Carter. She was also recently seen as
Margaret Schlegel in the BBC’s production of Howards End.
Lowden was a lead character in the
National Theatre of Scotland’s Black
Watch before winning an Olivier award
for best supporting actor for his role in
Ibsen’s Ghosts.
Since then he has been Nikolai Rostov in the BBC’s War and Peace and the
fighter pilot who was not Tom Hardy
in the movie Dunkirk.
Rourke said gender blindness on
stage was the right thing. “I think Harriet Walter playing Brutus [in Phyllida
Lloyd’s all-female Julius Caesar at the
Donmar] was the closest I’ve got to
an understanding of that character. I
think we’ve got a responsibility to live
in the present.”
The play will not open until September, so there is time to decide precisely
how it will all work. But Rourke, who
is stepping down as artistic director in
2019, promised the production would
not be confusing.
Until 21 July.
Box office: 0844 871 7630
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:20 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 18:49
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:21 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:03
•
National
Express guilty of stoking
Islamophobia – new editor
Jim Waterson
The editor of the Daily Express has
said that some of his newspaper’s
past front pages have been “downright offensive”, made him feel “very
uncomfortable”, and contributed to
In brief
Publishing
Adult literacy charity
closes for lack of funds
An adult literacy publishing scheme
credited with helping thousands
of adults to learn to read is to be
axed after failing to secure funding,
despite handing out almost 5m
books in prisons, hospitals and
workplaces.
Since its launch in 2005 Quick
Reads published more than 100
fast-paced and entertaining books
by authors such as Andy McNab,
Mark Billingham, Ann Cleeves
cYanmaGentaYellowb
an “Islamophobic sentiment” in the
media.
Gary Jones, who took control of the
newspaper last month, said he was
unhappy with some of his newspaper’s
past coverage and would be looking to
change the tone of the Express.
“Each and every editor has a
responsibility for every single word
and Dorothy Koomson. It was
established to appeal to the one in
six adults with reading difficulties,
and those who rarely pick up a book.
The titles were loaned from
libraries and distributed to readers
in prisons, colleges, NHS hospitals
and adult-learning organisations.
In 2016, Mars Galaxy withdrew
support and last year Arts Council
England funding ended. According
to the Bookseller, this year’s titles
were funded by publishers and
private donors, including Gail
Rebuck, who launched Quick Reads.
The Reading Agency charity has
run the initiative since 2014. Its chief
executive, Sue Wilkinson, said: “For
the past 18 months, we have sought
ongoing support for the programme,
but … we have sadly been unable
to secure the long-term investment
needed.” Alison Flood
Marathon
Thousands will run to
honour chef who died
More than 2,000 people have
pledged to run 3.7 miles in honour
of a chef who collapsed and died
that distance from the London
Marathon finish line. Matt Campbell
(pictured right), who was 29 and
from Kendal, collapsed at the 22.5mile mark during Sunday’s event,
which took place in record 24.1C
temperatures. No cause of death has
yet been announced. Donations will
go to the Cumbria-based Brathay
Trust. Frances Perraudin
Courts
BBC
Woman left ill mother,
86, in chair ‘for a year’
Editor has ‘no concerns’
on Cliff Richard footage
A woman who left her elderly
mother sitting in a chair, unmoved
for up to 12 months before she
died, was yesterday sentenced at
Stafford crown court to 20 months
in jail, suspended for two years,
after admitting gross negligence
manslaughter.
Doreen Shufflebotham, 86,
died on 6 September 2016. She
had an infected femur fracture, a
pulmonary embolism, sepsis, deepvein thrombosis and acute bacterial
meningitis, Staffordshire police said.
Three days after she died, her
daughter, Linda Farr, 68, of Stokeon-Trent, was arrested.
DI Dan Ison said: “Doreen’s
injuries were incredibly severe and
she must have experienced terrible
pain in her last few months as she
became increasingly ill.”
Press Association
A senior BBC editor has told a high
court judge he has no concerns
about the broadcasting of images
taken from a helicopter during
coverage of a police search of Sir
Cliff Richard’s home in 2014.
Jonathan Munro, head of
newsgathering at the BBC, told Mr
Justice Mann that he had reviewed
the footage and had no concerns.
Richard, 77, has sued the BBC
over coverage of the South Yorkshire
police search of his property in
August 2014 and is seeking damages
at the “top end” of the scale. Richard
said the coverage was a “very
serious invasion” of his privacy.
The BBC disputes his claims. It
said coverage of the search of the
apartment in Berkshire was accurate
and in good faith.
The hearing is expected to
conclude next week. PA
21
that’s published in a newspaper,” he
told the home affairs select committee,
which is investigating the treatment of
minority groups in print media.
“Cumulatively some of the headlines that have appeared in the past
have created an Islamophobic sentiment which I find uncomfortable.”
Jones, who was previously editor
of the Sunday Mirror and Sunday
People, replaced Hugh Whittow earlier
this year after Richard Desmond sold
his Northern & Shell newspapers to
Trinity Mirror in a £200m deal.
Both the Daily and Sunday Express
have been relentless in their support
for Brexit and in their campaign for
reduced immigration.
“I’ve gone through a lot of former
Express front pages and I felt very
uncomfortable looking at them,” Jones
told MPs. “There have been accuracy
issues on some of them and some of
them are just downright offensive.
I wouldn’t want to be party to any
newspaper that would publish such
material … I think there are limits as
to how far you should go in an honest
and fairminded society.”
The Sun’s managing editor, Paul
Clarkson, also appeared in front of
MPs and denied newspapers have a
problem with Islamophobia: “In the
mainstream media I don’t believe it
is an issue.”
The Labour MP Naz Shah held up
a Sun front page entitled “1 in 5 Brit
Muslims’ sympathy for jihadis”, and
said: “You chose to present an outright
lie as a fact because it supports your
editorial narrative which undeniably
stirs up hatred against Muslims.”
Clarkson apologised for mistakes in
that report but insisted it was not part
of a wider pattern.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:22 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:33
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The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
22
Macron tries to sell
Trump his ‘new deal’
for containing Iran
French president’s proposal
amid a day of pageantry
and awkward moments
Julian Borger and David Smith
Washington
Emmanuel Macron has proposed
negotiations on a “new deal” aimed
at curbing Iran’s military power and
regional activities, to exist alongside a
three-year-old agreement that restricts
the country’s nuclear programme.
Amid the pageantry of a state visit
laced with some characteristically
undiplomatic touches from Donald
Trump, the French president offered
the idea of a new deal at a joint White
House press conference with Trump as
a way of salvaging the 2015 agreement,
which Trump has threatened to leave.
The offer seemed calculated to
appease the US president’s discontent with the current agreement, the
2015 Joint Comprehensive Programme
of Action (JCPOA), by proposing a
broader initiative to tackle other elements of Iran’s activity in the region,
particularly its ballistic missile programme, and its military role in Syria.
“I always said we should not tear
apart the JCPOA and have nothing
else,” Macron said. “This would not
be a good solution.” But it was unclear
if Trump has agreed.
Macron is on the first state visit
to take place during Trump’s presidency. The two presidents have gone
out of their way to stress their personal
chemistry, planting a tree on the White
House south lawn, holding a dinner at
George Washington’s house at Mount
Vernon and hugging, hand-holding
and cheek-kissing at the White House.
But the intimacy took an awkward
turn yesterday when Trump took
Macron by surprise, ostentatiously
brushing what he said was dandruff
from the French president’s jacket.
“I’ll get that little piece of dandruff
off,” Trump said. “We have to make
him perfect – he is perfect.”
Saving the Iran nuclear deal would
be a diplomatic coup for Macron, who
has taken a political gamble in befriending Trump. At a joint press conference
in the east room of the White House,
Macron observed that while Trump
French flavours on the menu
First lady Melania Trump planned
a state dinner for French president
Emmanuel Macron incorporating
the gastronomy of New Orleans
– a city still famous for its French
Quarter – on a trip where French
and US symbols have been carefully
intertwined.
The Macron visit is the first state
visit of the Trump administration
and also the first major White House
event to be hosted by Melania
Trump, who speaks French.
The first lady had attended the
funeral of Barbara Bush alone
at the weekend, but yesterday
conspicuously stood next to her
husband on the White House lawn
in a gleaming white jacket and large
white hat.
The couples were last night due
to sit down to a main course of rack
of spring lamb and Carolina gold
rice jambalaya, “cooked in a New
Orleans tradition and scented with
the trinity of Cajun cooking – celery,
peppers and onions, and spiced with
herbs from the south lawn”, the
White House announced.
Wines include a Domaine Serene
chardonnay Evenstad Reserve
2015 – made from Burgundy vines
that thrive in Oregon’s volcanic soil
– and Domaine Drouhin pinot noir
Laurène 2014, which uses the motto
“French soul, Oregon soil”.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:23 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
•
Party in Armenia
a
But soon the hard
d
work must start
Page 24
Ch
Cheesed
off
Sp
Spanish makers upset
by manchego ruling
Pa
Page 25
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23
UN warns Idlib could be next
disaster in ‘marathon of pain’
Patrick Wintour
Diplomatic editor
Donald
Trump leads
Emmanuel
Macron by the
hand at the
White House
▲ The Trumps
greet the
Macrons
Trump attends
to Macron’s
‘dandruff ’,
saying: ‘We have
to make him
perfect - he
is perfect’
PHOTOGRAPHS:
LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP;
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/
GETTY; BRENDAN
SMIALOWSKI/AFP
Donald Trump was the first
president since Calvin Coolidge
in the 1920s to end his first year in
office without hosting a foreign
leader on a state visit. But as Macron
and his wife, Brigitte, arrived on
Monday for three days of pomp and
pageantry, downtown Washington
was festooned with US and French
flags. Photographs of Trump’s visit
to Paris last year – where he was
wowed by a military parade – adorn
the West Wing.
Trump caused embarrassment
on that trip when he told Brigitte:
“You’re in such good shape.”
The two couples planted a tree, a
gift from the Macrons, on the White
House south lawn. The sapling, a
European sessile oak about 4.5ft tall,
comes from Belleau Woods, where
more than 9,000 American marines
died in a first world war battle nearly
100 years ago. David Smith
saw the Iran nuclear agreement as “a
bad deal”, he believes it is “not sufficient”. He said that while the JCPOA
restricted Iran’s major nuclear activities until 2025, a new deal would go
further, imposing a permanent check
on those activities, while also limiting
the country’s development of ballistic missiles and its military operations
across the region, particularly in Syria.
The French president said his White
House discussions with Trump “make
it possible to pave the way for a new
agreement”. He also insisted: “France
is not naive when it comes to Iran. We
also have a lot of respect for the Iranian people … but we do not repeat
the mistakes of the past.”
In their remarks, Trump and
Macron both hinted heavily that they
were close to an understanding.
Referring to his decision on 12 May
on whether to continue signing presidential sanctions waivers, Trump
suggested he had confided his intentions to his French counterpart.
“Nobody knows what I’m going to do
on the 12th,” he said, turning to Macron
and adding: “Though Mr President,
you have a pretty good idea.”
“We can change and we can be flexible. In life, you have to be flexible,”
Trump concluded at the end of the
joint press conference.
At one point, however, Trump
issued a blunt warning: “If Iran threatens us, they are going to pay a price like
few countries have ever paid.”
The US president was also asked
about previous hints that he will withdraw US troops from Syria, where he,
Macron and Theresa May recently
coordinated air strikes in response to
the regime’s use of chemical weapons.
“I would love to bring our incredible warriors back home,” he said. “But
Emmanuel and myself have discussed
the fact that we don’t want to give Iran
open season to the Mediterranean.”
The US president’s forthcoming meeting with the North Korean
dictator, Kim Jong-un, was also in
the spotlight. In comments earlier
yesterday, he raised eyebrows by
describing Kim as “very open” and
“very honourable”.
The United Nations’ two most senior
Syria experts warned yesterday of an
Aleppo-style humanitarian catastrophe in Idlib as a European Union donor
conference aimed to raise as much as
$6bn (£4.2bn) to help Syrian refugees
inside and outside the country.
Idlib is the last major territory still
in rebel hands. It is partly held by
Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham, a jihadist group
regarded as a legitimate target by Russia and the Syrian government, even
as civilians and fighters who have fled
other parts of the country in evacuation deals pour in.
Jan Egeland, the head of the UN’s
humanitarian task force for Syria,
told the Guardian: “All my energies
currently and in coming weeks are
dedicated to averting a fresh humanitarian disaster in Idlib.”
He described the area as “one
giant area of displacement”, caused
by waves of refugees escaping Syrian
government attacks.
“More than half of the population
in Idlib of 2 million have already been
displaced, sometimes multiple times,
so there has to be a negotiated end to
the conflict in Idlib. You cannot have a
war in the midst of the largest cluster
of refugee camps and displaced people in the world.
“My fear is the Syrian government
will say the place is filled with ‘terrorists’ and therefore you can wage
war like they did during the sieges
in Aleppo and eastern Ghouta,” he
said. “Yes, there are bad guys wearing beards, but there are many more
women and children and they deserve
protection. You cannot wage war as if
everyone is a terrorist, or else it will be
a nightmare.”
His remarks were echoed by the
UN special envoy Staffan de Mistura,
who said Idlib was the “big new challenge”, adding: “We hope this would
be an occasion for making sure that
Idlib does not become new Aleppo,
the new eastern Ghouta, because the
dimensions are completely different.”
A Syrian government assault on the
area is likely to lead to mass movements of refugees, possibly towards
the Turkish border. As many as
300,000 internally displaced people
have reached Idlib province since last
August and 700,000 have been displaced across Syria since the start of
this year, according to UN figures.
Egeland said: “The Syrian civil
war has now lasted two years longer
than the second world war, and far
from 2017 and early 2018 becoming a
moment when the war wound down,
the crisis has escalated.
“I really thought 2017 would be the
last huge war-year, but the crisis has
continued at the same ferocity into
2018. This has become a tremendous
marathon of pain.”
Egypt aims to
protect tourism
via ‘pester’ fines
Ruth Michaelson
Cairo
Hawkers who pester holidaymakers
at Egypt’s tourist sites with offers of
trinkets or camel rides could face a
fine of more than £400 under a new
law aimed at protecting the country’s
fragile tourist industry
Sellers found to be bothering
tourists at archaeological sites and
museums, exhibiting what the law
calls “the intention of begging or
promoting, offering or selling, a good
or service”, could be fined a sum
equivalent to about £405.
The tourism industry makes up
12% of the Egyptian economy, and the
law is being introduced ahead of the
summer season.
Although tourists may feel that
being hectored to buy pieces of
parchment, a camel ride or alabaster
statue is all part of the experience, the
pressure is seen by some as potentially
damaging to the industry.
Oscar Saleh, who offers camel rides
▲ The pyramids of Giza, a site where
camel rides are a tourist attraction
next to the pyramids of Giza, a site
where many tourists are persuaded
to buy souvenirs and horseback rides,
denied there was a problem. “Go visit
the Egyptian Museum, go visit the
pyramids – no one will bother you.”
An Egyptian tour guide in Luxor,
who declined to give his name, said the
law would target people “fighting for
food, fighting to feed their families”.
Some MPs and former officials,
though, feel the punishment for bothering tourists should be far stricter,
and propose fines of up to £810.
Following Egypt’s political turbulence in 2011 and 2013 military coup,
tourist numbers fell from their high
of 14.7m in 2010. However, there was
some recovery in 2017, with arrivals jumping to 8.3m compared with
5.4m the previous year, according to
the Oxford Business Group.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:24 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 18:52
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
24
World
cYanmaGentaYellowb
▼ People celebrate in Yerevan
after Serzh Sargsyan resigned as
prime minister after mass protests
PHOTOGRAPH: ARTYOM GEODAKYAN/BARCROFT
Armenian revolution
A time to celebrate, but
hard work begins soon
Andrew Roth
Yerevan
D
espite the political
hurdles looming,
the afterglow from
Armenia’s peaceful
revolution has not
worn off just yet.
The morning after the Armenian
prime minister Serzh Sargsyan’s sudden resignation, Maral Aznauryan
skipped toward Yerevan’s central square with the red, blue, and
orange Armenian flag draped over
her shoulders. “I couldn’t sleep all
night, I was just yelling,” the 15-yearold girl said. “My brother, my
parents, we were all together in this.”
Hours later, she would be join
thousand marching to remember the
Armenian genocide. Some protesters said the annual day of mourning
would now also mark a milestone in
the country’s political progress.
Sargsyan’s departure after more
than a decade in power was the
triumph of a diverse resistance
movement of students, liberal politicians, workers, civil society leaders,
and even soldiers.
Sparked by Sargsyan’s decision to
take on the post of prime minister
after serving for more than a decade as president, the protest carried
on even as its leaders were detained
after 10 days of demonstrations.
“Above all, this was a victory for
the youth,” said Suren Eyramjyan
who was helping to clear up after the
crowd on the street the day before.
The weeks ahead will bring new
struggles, as the opposition seeks to
carry its momentum into the formation of a temporary government and
possible snap elections, with crucial
negotiations set for this morning.
But for the die-hard political
activists, who trace their struggle
back at least a decade, yesterday was
still a moment of euphoria.
“We spent our entire 20s in street
politics,” said Olya Azatyan, a civil
rights activist who protested with
friends under the banner Reject
Serzh. “It was totally worth it.”
The past 10 years have brought a
cycle of demonstrations in Armenia:
protests in 2008 against electoral fraud that ended in gunfire
and left 10 dead, demonstrations
over municipal services and pension reform, the mass protests in
2013 against Sargsyan’s re-election
as president, and against electricity
price increases in 2015.
Nikol Pashinyan, who co-heads a
liberal political party called Way Out
Alliance, has set out his road map for
political transition. The first step,
Sargsyan’s resignation, has been
achieved. The next steps may be
more complex: organising an interim
government that will carry out snap
elections his party hopes to win.
Pashinyan will hold negotiations
today with the new PM, Karen Karapetyan. But yesterday remained a
public holiday, as citizens marched
from the capital’s Republic Square to
the genocide memorial.
“Yesterday we took down a powerful man with no help from outside,
with no violence, the first time in
history,” said Aram, a pensioner in
the procession, who gave only his
first name and flashed a smile with
a gold tooth. “Today we remember
the dead.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:25 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 18:51
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
World
25
▼ Among the auction lots once owned
by Madonna, below, was a letter from
the late rapper Tupac Shakur
Mummy thought to
be of former Shah
unearthed in Tehran
Saeed Kamali Dehghan
Iran correspondent
A mummified body found near a Tehran shrine could be the early 20th
century Iranian monarch Reza Shah
Pahlavi, a polarising figure whose
reappearance would complicate life
for the country’s Islamic leaders.
Local news agencies have published
conflicting reports about this week’s
discovery at Shah Abdol Azim shrine,
close to a former royal mausoleum
south of the capital where Reza Shah
had been buried.
News agencies sympathetic to the
Iranian leadership have led the denials, which many say are linked to fears
of the memory of Reza Shah taking
hold in the public consciousness at
a time when the Islamic Republic is
struggling to defend its achievements.
Chants in support of the late shah,
not heard for decades, featured
strongly during weeks of unrest across
Iran earlier this year.
It is not clear if the mummified body
belongs to Reza Shah, but the location
of the discovery and the resemblance
between an image that has surfaced
of the mummy and an image showing Reza Shah before his burial have
given credence to the claim.
The mausoleum was destroyed
after the 1979 revolution that deposed
the Pahlavi dynasty, when an extremist cleric led a group that climbed its
tower and destroyed it in a rampage
using pneumatic drills.
Sadegh Khalkhali, later known as
the “hanging judge” due to his infamous summary executions, expressed
regret in his memoir that he had been
unable to find Reza Shah’s body.
Abbas Milani, director of Iranian
studies at Stanford University, said
the reappearance of Reza Shah’s body
would be “a nightmare” for the Iranian regime because “it is testament
to the fact that history is not written
by authoritarians equipped with force,
hypocrisy, shovels and bulldozers”.
Reza Shah was a force for modernisation despite his despotic rule.
Railways and educational institutions
were among his achievements, while
his controversial and forcibly implemented decree banning all Islamic
veils antagonised many in the majority Muslim nation.
He died in South Africa in 1944 after
being forced into exile following the
Anglo-Soviet invasion of Iran during
the second world war. His body was
taken to Egypt, where it was mummified before being taken to Tehran
and laid to rest at the now-demolished
mausoleum.
His son Mohammad Reza Shah succeeded him in 1941 and held the throne
until he went into exile in 1979.
Reza Shah’s grandson Reza Pahlavi
tweeted that he was closely following the news about the discovery. His
tweet also put an end to rumours after
the revolution that Reza Shah’s body
had been taken abroad.
“We are investigating the matter
and we expect to get clarity on the
issue in the coming days,” he said in his
tweet. “I warn officials [in Iran] against
any secrecy and lack of transparency
in their handling of the matter.”
It is not clear what happened to the
mummy after its discovery, with some
reports that it had been reburied.
Hassan Khalilabadi, the head of cultural heritage and tourism committee
at Tehran’s city council, told the staterun Irna news agency on Monday that
work had stopped on the site.
Madonna loses
legal bid to halt
public sale of
personal items
Laura Snapes
Gallipoli
remembered
Australian and
New Zealand
military units
gathered at
Canakkale
Martyrs’
Memorial, on
the Gallipoli
peninsula,
yesterday to
mark the 103rd
anniversary of
the first world
war campaign.
PHOTOGRAPH:
BERK OZKAN/
ANADOLU AGENCY/
GETTY IMAGES
EU seal for Mexican ‘manchego’
leaves Spaniards with sour taste
Sam Jones Madrid
Daniel Boffey Brussels
Makers and lovers of manchego,
Spain’s famous ewe’s milk cheese,
have vowed to fight an EU decision
that allows Mexican producers to carry
on using the same name to describe
their cheaper cow’s milk cheese.
A tug-of-war over ownership of
the name had held up a big trade
deal between the EU and Mexico for
months, but agreement was finally
reached over the weekend.
Under the new trade accord, queso
manchego made from cow’s milk in
Mexico has been granted protected
geographical indication status in
Europe and will sit on the shelves
alongside the Spanish cheese, which
has had protected status in the EU
since 1982.
The European commissioner for
agriculture, Phil Hogan, insisted that
careful packaging would make the different origins of the two cheeses very
clear. “The specific labelling provisions will ensure that there is no
confusion for the consumer as for the
origin and composition of the product,” he told reporters in Brussels.
“I think that farmers in Mexico in
relation to manchego cheese will be
happy; I think the Spaniards will be
happy too,” he said.
Spanish cheesemakers are, however, far from thrilled. They had been
seeking exclusive use of the word manchego, arguing it should only be used
to described their hard cheese.
“We will use any and all legal means
at our disposal to appeal this decision,”
said Martín Esteso, a spokesman for
Spain’s largest farmers’ union. “The
whole thing is just nonsense: they
can’t use our name for a cheese that is
not pure manchego cheese made from
the milk of manchega ewes.”
Spanish manchego sells at about $15
(£10.70) a kilo and is most often eaten
alone or with a quince paste, while its
Mexican namesake fetches about half
that and is used to stuff quesadillas.
Ismael Álvarez de Toledo, president of the Spanish Brotherhood of the
Manchego Cheese, said Hogan had put
“other international interests” ahead
of those of EU food producers.
“The word manchego, like the word
Scottish, Welsh, Riojan or Extemaduran, refers to a place. A manchego
can be a man from La Mancha or a
cheese from La Mancha. It can’t refer
to a man from Mexico or a cow from
Mexico or a cheese from Mexico.”
If the EU did not defend the products of its own producers, he added,
“what’s to stop someone from Guatemala or Paraguay deciding to call their
drink scotch whisky or their wine rioja
or bordeaux or champagne?”
Madonna has lost a legal battle to
prevent the auction of personal items
including a lock of her hair, underwear
and a breakup letter from a former boyfriend, the late rapper Tupac Shakur.
The singer had won a temporary
block on the auction of 22 pieces by
a former friend, Darlene Lutz, in July
2016. She told a New York City court
that her celebrity status did not obviate her right to privacy, “including
with regard to highly personal items”.
Judge Gerald Lebovits ruled that
the singer had misdirected her legal
action by targeting Lutz, who claimed
the pair’s disputes had been settled
in 2004. The judge questioned why
Madonna had pursued Lutz rather
than her own assistants, who Madonna
claimed had given her possessions to
the dealer.
The handwritten letter from Tupac,
who secretly dated Madonna in 1994,
was sent in January 1995 and explains
that he believed his image would suffer
if it was revealed he was in a relationship with a white woman. “Can u
understand that? For you to be seen
with a black man wouldn’t in any way
jeopardise your career. If anything it
would make you seem that much more
open & exciting,” he wrote in the letter,
previously obtained by the TMZ website. “But for me at least in my previous
perception I felt due to my ‘image’ I
would be letting down half of the people who made me what I thought I was.
I never meant to hurt you.”
The rapper died in 1996, aged 25, in
a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas.
The auction also contains a second
letter, sent from Madonna to “J”, in
which she describes Whitney Houston and Sharon Stone as “horribly
mediocre”.
Lutz’s lawyer, Judd Grossman,
called the decision “a total win”, saying: “Ms Lutz is now free to do with her
property as she pleases without any
continued interference by Madonna.”
The auction house Gotta Have Rock
and Roll has said it will continue with
the sale of the items in July. It said it
had been confident about the case
and had undertaken “substantial due
diligence” before announcing the
initial auction.
Madonna has yet to comment.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:26 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
•
26
Eyewitness
Sent at 24/4/2018 16:11
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:27 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 16:11
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
▼ Padang, Indonesia
Firefighters work to extinguish a blaze
in a warehouse that stores rubber and
palm oil products in West Sumatra
PHOTOGRAPH: ANDRI MARDIANSYAH/BARCROFT
27
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:28 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 16:46
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:29 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 17:50
•
World
European Union
29
Brussels tells social media to
stop fake news or face curbs
Jennifer Rankin
Brussels
Brussels may threaten social media
companies with regulation unless they
move urgently to tackle fake news
and Cambridge Analytica-style use
of personal data before the European
elections in 2019.
The EU security commissioner,
Julian King, said “short-term, concrete” plans, such as social media
companies signing a voluntary code of
conduct, had to be in place before voters in 27 EU member states elect MEPs.
Telling users why their Facebook
or Twitter feed is presenting them
cYanmaGentaYellowb
with certain adverts or stories and
accompanying political adverts with
information about who paid for them
are two areas under consideration.
“We want to see whether we can
rapidly reach agreement with key
platforms and stakeholders on a policy level, with them being a bit more
open about why you are seeing what
you are seeing,” King said.
“If we are not able to make fast
enough progress on a voluntary basis,
then, as we have done in some other
areas, we may have to view whether
or not we need to look at other alternatives, including of a regulatory nature.”
The ideas are expected to form
part of a European commission policy
paper on online disinformation, to be
published tomorrow.
A report by experts on online disinformation, commissioned by Brussels,
called last month for a huge expansion of media literacy in schools, as
well as greater collaboration between
fact-checkers. King said he would like
urgent action to “boost transparency,
traceability and accountability [of platforms], all of this without in anyway
falling into the trap of censorship”.
Tech companies are likely to welcome a voluntary approach but have
raised doubts over some proposals.
“For decades we have had a certain
group [of TV viewers] getting targeted ads, at certain times targeted to
certain programmes, and this is not
illegal, so we need to avoid an overreaction,” said Cecilia Bonefeld-Dahl,
head of DigitalEurope, the industry
lobby group.
However, a member of the expert
group warned that self-regulation
would not be enough. Monique Goyens, head of the European Consumer
Organisation, said: “The commission’s
dissection of the problem is spot-on
but its response lacks punch. If the
commission is serious about fighting
fake news it needs to address the fact
that the advertising business model
of big online platforms is an accelerant of the spread of disinformation.”
Different EU states are considering their responses to fake news. The
‘The commission is
spot on, but its
response lacks punch’
Monique Goyens
Consumer champion
French president, Emmanuel Macron,
wants electoral bodies to have emergency powers to take down fake news
during elections. Germany has introduced a law targeting hate speech and
fake news, in which social media companies can be fined up to €50m (£44m)
for failing to remove illegal content.
The EU has also been criticised over
its counter-propaganda unit, East
StratCom, which runs a site, EU vs Disinfo, intended to weed out false facts
about the EU and report true stories.
Earlier this year, the taskforce
made an embarrassing error in naming three Dutch websites as suppliers
of fake news, as a result of translation
errors. A newspaper, De Gelderlander,
the anti-EU blog GeenStijl and the Post
Online were removed from the EU v
Disinfo site this year after threats of
legal action. The episode exposed the
reliance of the taskforce on a network
of NGOs and journalist fact-checkers,
who may be using machine translators.
Looking beyond Brexit, King said:
“I hope the UK will continue to be
engaged with this work.”
Congressional
staff listen to
Facebook’s chief
executive, Mark
Zuckerberg, (on
screen, centre)
testifying to a
House committee
in Washington
on claims of
Russian misuse
of data
Analysis
Jon Henley
‘Laws can just
exacerbate the
root causes of
phenomenon’
PHOTOGRAPH: ERIN
SCHAFF/BARCROFT
I
n a world where false and
misleading information
reaches billions instantly,
and online manipulation
becomes ever more
sophisticated, governments
are increasingly turning to the law
to combat fake news. But unlike
hate speech, child pornography
or terrorism advocacy, fake news
is a tricky area for the law: it has
not, generally, been illegal, and
in democracies political speech
is seen as deserving the strongest
free-speech protection.
Lawyers, technology experts,
media representatives and anticensorship campaigners have
expressed fears that hastily drawn
up measures outlawing fake news
may at best prove ineffective, and
at worst counterproductive.
“All too often legislation focuses
on the trees, not the forest,” said
Alberto Alemanno, a professor of
EU law. “It’s quite likely to end
up being irrelevant or even to
exacerbate the root causes of the
fake news phenomenon.”
Infinitely easier and cheaper
to produce and spread than ever
before, fake news was also “lowhanging fruit” for politicians, he
said. “Tackling the underlying,
structural reasons why it’s so
pervasive in our society and media
environment is far, far, harder.”
From Europe to Asia, leaders are
rushing to adopt anti-fake news
laws. France aims to allow judges
to order deletion of false online
content before elections, oblige
social-media firms to name
advertisers financing content and
allow France’s broadcasting
authority to suspend media deemed
to be destabilising a vote – notably if
“influenced by foreigners”.
Germany this year introduced
an online hate-speech law, giving
platforms with more than two
million users 24 hours to remove
terror content, racist material and
fake news, or face fines of up to
€50m (£44m). Other EU countries,
including Sweden, Ireland and the
Czech Republic, are weighing or
implementing anti-fake news laws.
But as campaigners warn that
such laws could curb free speech
or lead to inadvertent censorship,
regimes often sensitive to media
criticism stand accused of using
such laws to silence free expression
and opposition groups. Malaysia
has passed a law with fines up to
£88,000 and jail terms of six years
for offenders who use traditional
news outlets, websites and social
media – including outside Malaysia
– to spread fake news. Opponents
have said the law takes the country
“one step close to a dictatorship”.
Thailand, too, has a cybersecurity
law making the spread of false news
liable to seven years in prison, and
the Philippines is mulling a 20-year
jail term for similar legislation.
India withdrew a sweeping order
– 24 hours after unveiling it in March
– that allowed suspension of any
reporter so much as suspected of
spreading fake news, after the
government was criticised for an
assault on mainstream journalism.
Other measures increasingly used to
counter fake news, such as checking
and debunking false stories, might
also not prove very effective,
Alemanno said. “Checkers don’t
step in until after publication, by
which time it’s too late.”
Lisa-Maria Neudert, of the Oxford
Internet Institute, who specialises in
countermeasures to computational
propaganda, said: “Will a factchecked story simply increase the
original’s visibility? Will it be seen
by the same people? Believed?
People don’t necessarily believe
mainstream media, political elites.”
The media freedom watchdog
Reporters sans Frontières has
launched the Journalism Trust
Initiative – a possible certification
system to promote rigorous
journalism through standards
covering transparency and
trust issues such as ownership,
independence, methods, revenue
sources and ethical norms.
“False and reliable information
now circulates in the same channels,
and ‘bad’ news circulates faster
than ‘good’,” said RSF’s director,
Christophe Deloire. “We have to
give a real advantage to those who
produce reliable journalism.” He did
not oppose “a good balance between
self-regulation and regulation”.
But as the EU prepares to unveil
a plan for voluntary self-regulation
by internet firms, with the threat of
laws to follow, experts doubt that
demanding “responsibility” makes
for a long-term solution. Neudert
wonders if social networks will take
that role. “What’s needed most is
more transparency all round. This is
a societal, media and technological
problem. Pointing the finger at just
one actor won’t help,” she said.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:30 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 19:49
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
30
Drop in deficit
by £3.5bn could
herald public
spending rise
‘What most
infuriates
me is the
statements
coming out
of the bank.
They are not
being honest’
Mac
TSB customer
Richard Partington
Britain’s budget deficit has dropped to
the lowest level since before the financial crisis, laying the ground for Philip
Hammond to raise government spending on public services later this year.
The Office for National Statistics
said public sector net borrowing,
excluding state-owned banks, fell by
£3.5bn to £42.6bn in the last financial
year, cutting the deficit to the lowest
since the year ending March 2007.
The shortfall between government
spending and tax receipts was £2.6bn
lower than that forecast by the Office
for Budget Responsibility. Although
the figures will be finalised later this
year, the government’s spending
watchdog said lower than expected
local authority borrowing helped to
explain much of the difference.
Last month the chancellor used
the spring statement to suggest there
could be spending increases in the
next budget should public finances
continue to improve. Hammond has
faced sustained pressure from Labour
and some MPs in his own party to
increase public sector pay after years
of austerity. There are also calls to raise
spending to soften the blow from Britain leaving the European Union.
The OBR forecasts the deficit will
fall to £37.1bn this year, about a quarter of what the government borrowed
between March 2009 and April 2010 at
the peak of the financial crisis.
Hammond said yesterday: “Thanks
to the hard work of the British people,
borrowing is the lowest in over a decade. Our economy is at a turning point,
with debt starting to fall and people’s
wages rising.”
But after years of austerity, economists questioned the strength of the
UK economy while political opponents
argue the cuts have severely damaged
the public sector. Samuel Tombs at
the consultancy Pantheon Macroeconomics said: “Low borrowing [is]
not indicative of a reviving economy.”
Stripping out capital spending, the
country’s current budget last year was
in surplus by £112m, the first positive
reading since the financial year ending in March 2002.
▲ Philip Hammond said borrowing
was at its lowest in over a decade
Some TSB
branches told
customers the
chaos could last
another two days
PHOTOGRAPH: JILL
MEAD/GUARDIAN
Customers locked
out of accounts for
fifth day at TSB
Patrick Collinson
Graeme Wearden
Julia Kollewe
TSB’s botched IT “upgrade” snowballed into a crisis yesterday that left
up to 1.9 million customers locked out
of their accounts for a fifth day, as MPs
demanded action and the bank faced
a potential multimillion-pound compensation bill and regulatory fines.
In one of the worst technology problems to hit Britain’s banking sector in
years, TSB took all of its internet and
mobile services offline for emergency
repairs after a transfer to a new IT system at the weekend went awry.
TSB’s chief executive, Paul Pester,
apologised and promised yesterday
morning that services would be “back
up later this afternoon” and “no one
will be left out of pocket as a result of
these service issues”. But at the end of
the working day – with TSB branches
closed – customers were still unable to
access their accounts online.
Those calling its phone-banking
service reported waiting times of
more than an hour. Small businesses
said they were unable to pay salaries
or manage transactions, while some
account holders found all their direct
debits had disappeared. Lee MacDonald, a locksmith and actor who played
Zammo in Grange Hill, said his business had “literally stopped”.
Some customers who visited
branches were told it could be another
48 hours before they could access their
accounts properly, while the bank’s
website said some issues, such as onetime passwords and Isa transfers, will
only be fixed “by the end of April”.
The crisis began on Friday night,
when TSB began a long-planned move
of 1.3bn customer records from its former parent company, Lloyds Banking
Group, to a platform constructed by
TSB’s new Spanish owner, Sabadell.
The job should have been completed
by 6pm on Sunday.
Pester admitted that 402 customers
“could see some data that we would
not normally not show them online”.
While most account holders were
able to use their debit cards to make
payments and withdraw cash from
ATMs, many customers alleged that
the problems were deeper than the
bank was admitting.
Mac, outside a branch in the City of
London, said he was “appalled” at the
bank’s problems. “All my direct debits have disappeared,” he said. “They
were there yesterday, but gone today.
‘Access issues’
The upgrade meltdown
How many customers are
affected?
TSB has about 5 million customers,
and about 1.9 million are active
mobile and internet banking users.
Why was TSB conducting an
upgrade in the first place?
TSB was carved out of Lloyds
Bank and then bought in 2015 by
Spain’s Banco Sabadell. Initially,
Lloyds continued to handle its IT
infrastructure, but this upgrade
was about moving 1.3bn customer
records over to a new banking
platform designed by Sabadell.
Will I be compensated?
TSB said: “No one will be left
out of pocket as a result of these
service issues.” Anyone affected
should keep all paperwork, visit a
branch or call the bank and explain
you want to reclaim your money.
Will TSB be penalised?
Very possibly. Following an IT
meltdown at RBS in 2012 that left
some people locked out of their
accounts for several days, the bank
paid out £70m in compensation to
UK customers.
Why do these meltdowns happen?
Part of the problem, say experts, is
complicated legacy systems that
have become unwieldy following
mergers and takeovers. New
payment technologies such as
contactless and Apple Pay have
added further pressure.
Rupert Jones
And there’s something saying the last
payment was in 2099.
“They have told me that it will be
sorted out in 48 hours from today, but
I don’t know what to believe”
“The thing that most infuriates me
is the statements coming out of the
bank. They are not being honest. They
keep saying it’s ‘intermittent’ when it’s
not. At first I tried to phone. I was on
the line for an hour but then gave up
and came down here.”
Alex, who runs a consultancy, said
outside the branch: “I have salaries to
pay today. I’ve had to come down here
to arrange for a bulk transfer over to
HSBC, and we’ll have to pay the salaries from there. I tried calling their
helpline, but after a while the line just
goes blank.”
Many have called for compensation
along the lines of the £70m that RBS
paid out after the last major banking
IT meltdown in 2012.
Nicky Morgan, the Conservative
MP and chair of the Treasury committee, has demanded answers from
Pester and will contact the Financial
Conduct Authority (FCA). “This is yet
another addition to the litany of failures of banking IT systems,” she said.
“Warm words and platitudes will
not suffice. TSB customers deserve to
know what has happened, when normal services will resume, and how
they can expect to be compensated.”
Multimillion-pound bonuses to
Pester and 30 other senior TSB staff
were linked to the IT migration and
are now under threat. The payouts,
including a £1.6m bonus for Pester,
were frozen after TSB was forced
to delay the move from Lloyds to
Sabadell last year.
Both the FCA and the Information
Commissioner’s Office said they were
looking into the problems.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:31 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:02
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•
31
FTSE 100
All share
Dow Indl
Nikkei 225
+
+
-
+
7425.40
4086.96
24053.02
22278.12
26.53
8.01
395.67
Business view
Nils Pratley
£10m-a-month
IT ‘rent bill’
meant TSB
could not
afford to wait
for upgrade
I
t will be no consolation
to those TSB customers
suffering under the botched
IT “upgrade”, but the bank
had originally planned to
do the work last November,
when one assumes it would have
been even more badly prepared.
The chief executive, Paul Pester,
said at the time the main reason
for the delay was a likely rise
in interest rates, which indeed
materialised. TSB, supposedly,
didn’t want to leave itself unable to
offer mortgage quotes.
The explanation sounded thin
at the time – more so now. Those
who have watched Royal Bank of
Scotland’s labours with IT over
the years know these big transfers
of data on to a new platform
rarely run smoothly. Maybe TSB
suspected it needed more time.
But, if one takes Pester’s line at
face value, it could be that TSB
was now in a hurry to press the
button. The next rate rise could
arrive next month and it would
be embarrassing to miss another
window for “migration”.
Whatever the thinking, TSB and
its Spanish parent, Sabadell, were
plainly working under financial
incentives to move quickly. Pester
put the cost of the original delay at
£70m and one can understand his
calculations. Under the terms of
its separation from Lloyds Banking
Group in 2014, TSB in effect pays
rent to use its old IT system. The
cost of this agreement soared
last year from £91.8m to £214m,
according to 2017 accounts. Delay
was costing £10m-plus a month.
“We would never rush if we
didn’t think we were ready,” said
TSB. Banking and data regulators
will want to test that statement
in detail. As it is, Sabadell’s
declaration on Monday that it
had “successfully completed” the
transition and achieved “a new
milestone” was nonsense.
Brexit talks: faster please
One of the easier areas for Brexit
negotiators to reach agreement,
you might assume, would be
financial services. This is territory
£/€
190.08 1.1433
+0.0018
£/$
1.3964
+0.0015
Ireland to begin collecting
€13bn unpaid tax from Apple
where – on day one, at least – the EU
probably has more to lose than the
UK does.
After all, as the governor of the
Bank of England, MarkCarney, has
put it many times, the UK is “the
banker for Europe”.
There are cost benefits for EU
companies and governments
in having bond clearing, equity
underwriting and currency trading
concentrated in London. In a messy
divorce, costs of capital would
probably increase.
It is alarming, therefore, to hear
Andrew Bailey, chief executive of
the Financial Conduct Authority,
vent his frustration about how
slowly talks are progressing.
His speech yesterday made a
strong technical case for why a
regulatory system based on “mutual
recognition” is better than the EU’s
current “equivalence” regime. But
his main message was that the talks
need to speed up.
The crucial passage was this:
“While it is necessary to have
unilateral actions in place for the
UK, this is nonetheless a distinctly
second-best solution to the UK and
the EU authorities working together
to deal with the risks. Let’s get on
with it, please.”
Bailey was being polite. It is safe
to assume that behind that “please”
lies deep frustration among UK
regulators, coupled with incredulity
that EU authorities seem reluctant to
talk about a permanent arrangement
before a transitional deal is settled.
These discussions are clearly not
going well.
No-brainer for CityFibre
It’s a shame to see CityFibre
depart from the stock market. This
interesting upstart, which has
the potential to become a serious
irritant to BT Openreach in the
supply of full-fibre broadband in
the UK, is being bought by a couple
of infrastructure investment funds,
including one that is managed by
Goldman Sachs, for £538m.
The takeover price represents a
93% premium to Monday’s share
price, so was virtually impossible for
CityFibre’s board to resist.
But the company’s founder and
chief executive, Greg Mesch, argues
that private ownership in its own
right brings other benefits, in the
form of committed capital and
10-year thinking.
Let us hope he is right. CityFibre
has signed a 20-year partnership
with Vodafone and is aiming to
provide a full-fibre service to 20%
of the UK market by 2025. If those
roll-out plans are actually realised,
BT Openreach would face stiffer
competition and be obliged to pull
its finger out.
It is uncomfortable for the nation
to have to rely (in part) on Goldman
Sachs for faster broadband sooner –
but that’s where we are.
Staff and Reuters
The Irish government has said it is
to start collecting €13bn (£11.3bn) in
unpaid taxes from Apple, as it confirmed that its joint appeal with the
US technology firm against a EU ruling
demanding the money be paid will be
heard this autumn.
Paschal Donohoe, the Irish finance
minister, said yesterday that the sum
would be paid by Apple in a series of
payments starting in the second quarter of this year, with all funds in place
by the end of September.
In March, the Irish government
appointed managers for an escrow
account to hold the payments until
the outcome of the appeal against
▲ Paschal Donohoe: autumn hearing
the ruling, made in August 2016 by
the European commission, which
said that Apple had received unfair
tax incentives.
Donohoe said the fund would make
low-risk investment decisions, and
Irish taxpayers would be protected.
“Any loss from the fund will reside
with the fund, not the taxpayer.”
The Dublin government and Apple
are appealing against the original ruling, saying that the iPhone maker’s
tax treatment was in line with Irish
and EU law.
Donohoe said yesterday: “How long
the hearings will last will depend on
the [overseeing] judges and it could be
open to either party after that to take
any further actions.”
The European commission told
Ireland to collect €13bn in back taxes,
a figure Ireland’s finance department
estimated last year could reach €15bn
with EU interest.
Interest due for payment by Apple
would be calculated after the initial
€13bn was collected, Donohoe said.
Last October the commission said
it was taking Dublin to the European
court of justice over delays in recovering the money.
Ireland built its economic success on being a low-tax entryway for
multinationals seeking access to the
EU, and is concerned that collection
of the back taxes could dent its attractiveness to firms.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:32 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 12:16
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:33 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 18:51
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•
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Financial
33
▼ Cooling towers at the coal-fired
Eggborough power station in North
Yorkshire, which also burns biomass
PHOTOGRAPH: MURDO MACLEOD
UK power
mix free
of coal for
three days
in a row
Fashion chain
East to cease
trading as Toys R
Us finally closes
Zoe Wood
Adam Vaughan
The UK has been powered without coal
for three days in a row, setting a new
record and underlining the polluting
fuel’s rapid decline.
Coal has historically been a cornerstone of the UK’s electricity mix, but
last year saw the first 24-hour period
when the country ran without the fuel
since the 19th century.
Last week, there was no power
generated by burning coal for
nearly 55 consecutive hours. That
milestone in turn was passed on
Monday afternoon, and the UK hit
the 72-hour mark at 10am yesterday.
The coal-free run came to an end after
76 hours.
Without the fossil fuel, nearly a
third of Britain’s electricity was supplied by gas, followed by windfarms
and nuclear on about a quarter each.
The rest came from biomass burned
at Drax power station in North Yorkshire, French and Dutch imports, and
solar power. Drax said it expected to
go without coal yesterday.
The coal-free records are a reversal
of the recent highs for coal plants during the “beast from the east” cold snap.
During the cold weather in February
and early March, demand for gas to use
for heating pushed up its price, which
brought coal power stations online.
However, overall power demand is
now much lower following the recent
warm weather, making it easier for
gas, renewables and nuclear power
to cover much of the UK’s needs.
Metro Bank founder
sees off shareholder
revolt over spending
Nick Fletcher
Vernon Hill, the flamboyant US
founder of Metro Bank, has fended
off a shareholder revolt, despite
concerns about the close relationship between the bank and his wife’s
architectural business, and his use of
a £120,000-a-year travel allowance.
Ahead of yesterday’s annual meeting, the Metro Bank shareholder Royal
London Asset Management had said it
would vote against Hill’s re-election as
chairman after the bank paid £4.5m
last year to Shirley Hill’s firm InterArch
for design and marketing services, and
£21m in all since 2010.
But shareholders at the meeting in
London, representing more than 96%
of the votes cast, backed Hill.
Doubt cast on fracking contribution
More than 6,000 shale gas wells
would be needed to replace half
the UK’s gas imports over 15 years,
according to a new report.
The nascent UK fracking
industry has said that growing
reliance on gas from Norway and
Qatar – as well as recent arrivals of
Russian gas by ship – necessitates
developing homegrown supplies in
addition to North Sea production.
But analysis by Cardiff Business
School, for Friends of the Earth,
found that at least one well would
need to be drilled and fracked daily
between 2021 and 2035 to replace
even half of gas imports.
Rose Dickinson, a campaigner at
the green group, said: “This would
mean an industrialisation of our
countryside at a rate that nobody
has yet fully appreciated and
would put many more communities
in the firing line of this dirty and
unwanted industry.”
The work for Friends of the
Earth found 6,100 wells would
take up around 3,560 hectares,
based on analysis of government
figures, National Grid forecasts and
other data.
But no one expects there to be
that many wells. The most bullish
estimate was in 2013 by the Institute
of Directors, of 4,000 by 2032.
The government admits its most
recent estimate of 155 wells by 2025,
produced last year, is out of date.
Ken Cronin, chief executive of
shale trade body, UK Onshore Oil
and Gas, dismissed the report as
“poor quality”, using productivity
data “which is years out of date”.
Adam Vaughan
National Grid has forecast that electricity demand this summer will
be lower than last year, with minimum demand expected to be 17GW
and peaking at 33.7GW. Demand
yesterday was expected to peak at
about 35GW.
Experts expect more milestones
to be passed this year. “Ever-rising
renewable capacity in the UK will see
these records fall more and more frequently,” said Jonathan Marshall, of
the Energy & Climate Intelligence Unit.
However, one observer warned
that the shift away from coal could be
a false dawn if it was just replaced by
gas. Andrew Crossland, who tracks
electricity generation on MyGridGB,
said: “Shifting to gas is likely to make
our electricity market more volatile as
our energy price becomes increasingly
locked to international gas markets.
That will only hurt consumers.”
The government has set a deadline
of October 2025 for entirely phasing
out coal for power stations.
The high street is braced for another
wave of job losses as a result of the final
demise of Toys R Us and fashion chain
East and fresh speculation about the
future of the struggling department
store chain House of Fraser.
The handful of Toys R Us stores still
trading closed their doors for the last
time yesterday, ending the US retailer’s three-decade presence in the UK.
The toy chain, which had 3,200 staff,
collapsed in February. The restructuring firm Moorfields failed to find a
buyer and the entire 100-store chain
has now shut.
Tough high-street trading conditions have also scuppered the
50-strong fashion chain East. It went
bust in January and its restructuring
firm, FRP Advisory, has also failed to
find a buyer. The retailer’s 314 staff are
now likely to lose their jobs.
“After exploring opportunities to
agree a sale of all or parts of the business, we have been unable to secure
a buyer,” said a spokesperson for FRP.
“East Lifestyle Ltd is due to cease trading on 4 May, with all employees being
made redundant.”
House of Fraser’s parent, Sanpower,
confirmed yesterday that it was in talks
to sell a controlling stake to another
Chinese group, C.banner International
Holdings, a footwear group that owns
the upmarket toy chain Hamleys. Last
month the Sanpower subsidiary that
owns House of Fraser had said it was
in talks to sell a 51% stake to Wuji Wenhua, a Chinese leisure group.
Sanpower acquired 89%of House
of Fraser via its department store arm,
Nanjing Cenbest in 2014. House of
Fraser said the share sale would have
no impact on the daily operations,
declaring: “It is business as usual.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:34 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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•
34
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
Society
▼ The Trussell Trust’s new
chief executive, Emma Revie, at
Westminster food bank in London
PHOTOGRAPH: SARAH LEE FOR THE GUARDIAN
Food poverty
‘The Trussell Trust
will never become
a pseudo-safety net
for the welfare state’
Patrick Butler
T
he Trussell Trust is
arguably one of the
charity “success”
stories of the austerity
years. Against a
backdrop of escalating
poverty, an obscure outfit giving
out bags of food to a handful of
hungry people in Wiltshire has
grown, in less than a decade, into
a highly visible campaigning voice
overseeing a national network of
more than 1,200 food bank outlets,
staffed, largely, by thousands of
volunteers, giving out more than
a million food parcels each year.
Its rapid rise is both impressive and
alarming, and Trussell itself realises
it has reached a watershed moment:
at what point does endless growth
represent mission failure for an
anti-poverty charity?
“You get up each day trying to
put yourself out of business,” says
Trussell’s new chief executive,
Emma Revie. But, as she recognises,
it’s not quite that easy. The demand
for charity food parcels from people
with no money to buy food shows
little sign of abating. Indeed, as
Trussell’s latest research, published
yesterday, shows, recent months
have seen referrals turbo-boosted
by the rollout of universal credit.
In the year to the end of March 2018
it distributed 1,332,952 three-day
emergency food parcels in the UK, a
13% increase on the previous year.
Demand for charity food bags grew
by 52% in areas where universal
credit was fully rolled out.
The seemingly unstoppable rise
in demand has created the logistical
1.3m
The nuber of of three-day food
parcels given out by the trust in the
year to March 2018, a 13% increase
£9m
The amount of money donated by
Asda supermarkets to the Trussell
Trust over three years
52%
The increase in demand for
charity food parcels in areas where
universal credit was fully rolled out
headache of how to ensure enough
food is available in food banks to
cope with this new wave of hunger
and destitution. But it also raises
more profound questions: should
Trussell continue to try to run
even faster to catch the increasing
numbers of people falling through
the gaping cracks in the welfare
state safety net? Is it in danger
of becoming an informal part of
a dysfunctional social security
system? And, even if it wants to
reverse the expansion of recent
years, how can it possibly do that
without abandoning its core,
faith-driven mission of feeding
the poor?
“What I love about the Trussell
Trust approach is that there is not
an acceptance that we are a safety
net that will always be there,” says
Revie, who joined the trust this year
after a career in youth and overseas
aid charities. “We have to be there
because the statutory safety net has
too many holes in it. We will catch
as many as we can, but we want to
not be here.” Trussell, she says, will
never become “a pseudo-safety net
that lets the state off the hook”.
In practice, she accepts the trust
cannot unilaterally walk away
from its emergency role. Countless
studies – and Trussell’s own data
– have shown food bank activity
broadly follows the dynamic of
government welfare cuts. For
Trussell to do less ultimately means
a more generous social security
policy. “What system-wide change
needs to take place so that I’m
not talking about a 13% increase
in the need for emergency food,
I’m talking about a 20% decrease?
That’s where we are at the moment.
I can’t get away from the fact there
is still a crisis. But we can’t accept
the premise ‘It just is’. How do we
stop this?”
Trussell was for some years
ostentatiously ignored by
Department for Work and Pensions
ministers for whom food banks
were a political embarrassment;
now, says Revie, “very effective
communications channels” are
in place. Although for years the
government has doggedly resisted
changing course on welfare, Revie
points to Trussell’s recent success –
alongside many other organisations
– in demonstrating how the flawed
design and implementation of
universal credit was driving debt,
hunger, ill-health and eviction
among the poorest claimants. That
forced the government to introduce
a few relatively minor tweaks to the
system. It is too early to tell whether
these have had any effect on food
bank use. Revie – who says universal
credit is “not fit for purpose” as
a safety net – is clear that further
changes are crucial.
Trussell’s approach is threepronged: to support its food bank
outlets to provide emergency food;
to expand its food bank-based More
Than Food services to provide debt,
benefits and health advice to tackle
some of the underlying issues that
create food bank reliance; and, in the
form of its forthcoming three-year
State of Hunger research project,
to build a powerful evidence base
to demonstrate what policy changes
need to take place to end the need
for food banks.
For some campaigners,
however, Trussell’s exit strategy
looks less credible following its
‘I can’t get away
from the fact there
is still a crisis. But
we can’t accept the
premise that it just is.
How do we stop this?’
decision earlier this year to accept
£9m over three years from the
supermarket giant Asda. At a stroke
this grows Trussell’s annual income
by roughly 50% – not obviously
a sign of a charity wishing to abolish
itself. The danger, say critics, is that
such funding helps prop up food
banks – and offers corporate funders
an opportunity to “whitewash” their
own shortcomings; for example,
on paying poor wages.
Revie admits it was a “hard
decision” to partner with Asda. But
ultimately, she argues, it brings
in “transformational” levels of
resources, with no strings attached.
“Obviously there is a benefit to Asda
from that relationship but we have
not signed up to stop speaking truth
to power – we will continue to.”
One of the concerns of poverty
campaigners is that food banks, five
years ago such an appalling novelty,
are now becoming grimly accepted
as a “normal” part of the austerity
scenery. Revie believes that the
British public are still discomfited
by the idea of food banks, and wants
Trussell to ensure this remains so.
“It’s really important to continue to
be affronted by the fact people are
having to go to food banks because
they don’t have enough money to
buy food,” she says. “We will keep
telling that story.”
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:35 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 23/4/2018 18:46
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•
35
Domestic
violence
Abuse is
a growing
problem in
older couples
In plain view
Frances Ryan
We need more disabled
politicians but the
government is hellbent
on having fewer
Dawn Foster
S
hortly before she reached
retirement age, Marie
Burke’s husband had
a stroke. After a week
in intensive care, he
was moved to a care
home to aid his recuperation. So
that he didn’t have to go into care
permanently, Burke (not her real
name) agreed to leave her job two
years early and become his full-time
carer. Then the problems in their
relationship began.
Her husband would pore over
bank statements, demand she hand
over receipts for all expenditure and
raise his voice if she couldn’t account
for any small sums. The controlling
behaviour escalated: her trips
outside of the home were timed,
and all but non-essential outings
were banned. Barely a day went
by without her husband shouting
at her. “He even said my breathing
was too loud and kept him awake,
so I slept on the sofa.” Until then,
Burke had considered her marriage
of 40 years to be a happy one.
Burke, it turns out, is by no
means alone. Domestic violence
is a growing problem among older
couples, but it is not always taken
seriously. The latest Femicide
Census – research collated by
Women’s Aid on women killed by
male partners – found that 11.5%
of women killed by a partner or
ex-partner in England, Wales and
Northern Ireland were aged 66
or over. According to a 2016 report
by domestic abuse charity Safe
Lives, an estimated 120,000 women
over 65 had experienced at least
one form of abuse. Older victims
▲ A still from the Women’s Aid film, Do You See Her?, about the domestic abuse
that an older woman suffers at the hands of her husband behind closed doors
are less likely to leave abusive
relationships than younger people.
Whereas more than two-thirds of
victims aged under 60 left their
abuser in the year before seeking
help, barely a quarter of older people
did. And a third of victims over 60
were still living with their abuser
while seeking help, compared with
just 9% of younger victims.
“Because this abuse doesn’t fit
the image of what most people
think of when they hear domestic
abuse, older people can often be
hidden from services,” says Suzanne
Jacob, chief executive of Safe Lives.
“Generational attitudes can also
mean that, sadly, people can have
been living with abuse for decades
without ever being able to name it
as abuse.”
Jacob wants to see more targeted
publicity in places like GP surgeries
and bus stops. “No one should live
in fear, whatever their age,” she says.
Few services focusing exclusively
on domestic violence and older
people operate in the UK, but
victims are encouraged to contact
national or local helplines, such
as the National Domestic Violence
helpline, or to speak to doctors,
social services and the safeguarding
teams at their local council for help.
Burke began to realise that what
she was experiencing was abuse
when she saw her GP about panic
attacks. A poster on the door of
the surgery’s toilet listing abusive
patterns of behaviour encouraged
her to mention her situation. But,
she was afraid to seek practical help.
Clare in the community Harry Venning
“There was no way I could leave
without a legal battle over the house,
I didn’t think I could start a whole
new life, he’d always be in my life.
And I was his carer. If I left, who
would look after him every day?
I didn’t want to live this way, but
I didn’t want him to suffer,” Burke
explains. After five years of abuse,
her husband suffered a second
stroke and died a day later.
Burke’s situation is mirrored in
Do You See Her?, a film produced
by Women’s Aid. It depicts an older
couple hosting a happy family meal,
and goes on to show the abuse that
happens when their children and
grandchildren aren’t present.
Katie Ghose, chief executive of
Women’s Aid, says: “We need to
challenge the perceptions about
who abuse happens to. Any woman,
of any age, can be forced to live in the
invisible prison of domestic abuse –
including those with adult children
and grandchildren. We want to send
a clear message to all older women
experiencing abuse that you are not
alone, we’re here for you.”
Burke now volunteers from
home on a helpline for all victims
of domestic abuse in her region.
“I want to tell other people it’s not
their fault,” she says. “I wish I’d been
braver. I want to help people realise
they don’t deserve this, they should
ask for help. I thought my friends
wouldn’t believe me. But they did.
You will be believed.”
The National Domestic Violence
helpline is on 0808 2000 247
W
ith only a week to go until the local
elections in many parts of England,
there’s one electoral shakeup the
government wasn’t counting on:
the fight for equality for disabled
politicians. This month, three
would-be MPs from across the political spectrum – each
of them with a disability – launched a legal challenge
against the government to force it to reinstate the access
to elected office fund, the £2.6m pot of money intended
to help disabled candidates campaign on an equal
footing to any non-disabled rival.
To really understand why this matters, we need
to go back to 2012 when the fund was launched. For
three years, disabled candidates were offered grants of
between £250 and £40,000 to help meet any potential
additional costs incurred in standing for election as a
local councillor or MP. The money could be used for
anything from assistive technology for blind people, to a
British Sign Language (BSL) interpreter, or a mobility car.
But in 2015, the government froze the fund. This
happened just as ministers
brought in a range of policies that
‘While around 16%
disproportionately hurt disabled
people. Three years later, the fund is
of the working age
still “under review”. This is despite
adult population
the Green party’s Caroline Lucas
leading calls by MPs from across the
has a disability,
political spectrum in 2016 for the
they make up less
fund to be reinstated “as a matter
of urgency” and a recommendation
than 1% of MPs’
by the Equality and Human Rights
Commission for it to reopen.
During last year’s general
election, I reported on the consequences of freezing
the fund for candidate Mary Griffiths Clarke, who has
ME and was living out of her agent’s caravan because
she couldn’t afford a hotel, and Emily Brothers, who is
blind and hard of hearing, and was unable to run again
because she had no way to pay a sighted guide to help
her on the campaign trail.
It was this that led Brothers to be part of the legal case
launched this month, led by the campaign group More
United. The others are Liberal Democrat David Buxton,
who was Britain’s first ever deaf candidate who used
sign language in his 1997 campaign, and Simeon Hart,
who is also deaf and stood for the Green party in Oldham
West and Royton for the 2015 byelection. Because the
access fund had just been closed, Hart had to crowdfund
to help raise more than £4,500 that he needed to hire a
BSL interpreter for three weeks. Disabled people are already direly represented in
politics. While around 16% of the working age adult
population has a disability, they make up less than
1% of MPs. Fawcett Society data published this week
shows that only two female MPs identify as disabled.
Things are better at local level: the Local Government
Association (LGA) found in 2013 that 13.2% of
councillors had a long-term health problem or disability.
The fight for the access to elected office fund is
about fairness – but really, it’s as much about what sort
of politics we want. Too often, white, non-disabled,
wealthy men dominate power because of their
advantage, not merit. Strip disability funding away and
we simply lose more talented would-be politicians. This
legal case may ensure that, come the next election, the
only thing that matters is who’s the best candidate for
the job.
Frances Ryan writes on disability and social affairs
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:36 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
36
The Guardian Jobs Public Services
MILLCOM (TANZANIA) N.V. .................................. APPLICANT
VERSUS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
JAMES ALAN RUSSELL BELL
GOLDEN GLOBE INTERNATIONAL SERVICES
QUALITY GROUP LIMITED
MIC UFA LTD ............................................. RESPONDENTS
MILLCOM INTERNATIONAL CELLULAR S. A.
MIC TANZANIA LIMITED
TO.
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FLAT 4, PARK FARM COURT,
82 ICKHAM COURT ROAD,
BECKENHAM, BR 36 QH.
TAKEN NOTICE that the Revision suo moto to examine the correctness, legality
or propriety of the proceedings, judgment and degree of the High Court of Tanzania
at Dar es Salaam in Civil Case No. 306 of 2002 and Misc. Civil Application No. 338
of 2014 has been opened by the Court and that the hearing of the said Revision
will take place at Dar es Salaam on the 11th day of May, 2018 at 09:00 am in the
fore noon.
If no appearance is made on your behalf, by yourself your pleader or by
someone by law authorized to act for you in this Revision, it will be heard and
decided exparte (in your absence).
Given under my hand and the seal of the Court this 21st day of March, 2018.
J.R. KAHYOZA
REGISTRAR
COURT OF APPEAL
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:37 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
The Guardian Jobs Public Services
37
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:38 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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cYanmaGentaYellowb
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:39 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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Section:GDN 1N PaGe:40 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
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The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
40
Weather
Wednesday 25 April 2018
UK and Ireland Noon today
Forecast
Sunny Mist
Low 6 High 11
The toad’s soft yellowishness suggested
readiness for a party that had not begun;
it was reluctant to take the plunge
Journal Country diary Page 7
Around the UK
London
Fog
996
10
Sunny intervals
Lows and highs
Precipitation
Air pollution
Tomorrow
6
14 60%
Low
60%
Low
50%
Low
60%
Low
60%
Low
60%
Low
12
60%
Low
12
60%
Low
Manchester
Mostly cloudy
15
Shetland
Inverness
1000
Overcast/dull
Sunny showers
6
13
11
16
12
Birmingham
Slight
Edinburgh
Low 5 High 11
12
Sunny and heavy showers
Glasgow
Friday
1004
Light showers
5
12
Leeds
Newcastle
ca
11
6
Rain
Sleet
Belfast
Light
snow
Slight
11
13
Newcastle
York
1008
Snow showers
12
Heavy snow
Dublin
Liverpool
rpoo
ol
13
Ice
35C
Thundery rain
5
11
Birmingham
ming
30
There will
be scattered
showers across
the UK on
Thursday, and
rain throughout
on Friday.
Norwich
25
20
Thundery showers
1012
11
14
1
15
L
London
Cardiff
Ca
12
10
X
Dover
5
Temperature,
ºC
0
14
1016
-5
13
-10
Wind speed,
mph
Atlantic front
There will be
low pressure
north-west of
Scotland.
992
L
L
L
H
1000
1016
1008
L
Cold front
1024
Warm front
1016
L
H
1016
L
H
L
1008
1008
Trough
Jet stream
Direction of
jet stream
Average speed, 25,000ft
110-159kph
210-259
Around the world
L
H
160-209
7
Specieswatch
1024
H
The jet stream
will remain
over the UK on
Wednesday,
leading to
unsettled
weather.
Cardiff
5
The Channel Islands
1024
Occluded front
10
24
-15
H
5
Edinburgh
Plymouth
Moderate
-20
12
Bristol
Nottingham
tting
tt
Atlantic Ocean
Atlan
260 and above
Forecasts and graphics provided by
Accuweather, Inc ©2018
Britain’s mountain hare Lepus
timidus should presently be turning
from white to grey-brown with a
blue tinge as the breeding season
starts. Spring is a dangerous time;
the snow disappears and adults need
to blend in to avoid eagles or a fox.
Unlike brown hares and rabbits
the mountain hare is a true
native species, but is increasingly
threatened by climate change as it
has to climb higher to find suitable
habitat. There are mountain hares as
far south as Derbyshire and on the
Pennine Hills, where they have been
introduced, but their true home is in
alpine Scotland.
Not all mountain hares turn white
– the temperature seems to be the
trigger. In Ireland, where it snows
less and is warmer, there is a subspecies that stays mostly brown.
Numbers in Scotland vary
enormously, with peak populations
on a 10-year cycle, the cause of
which is unexplained. When they
are not shot by gamekeepers they
gain from grouse-moor management
because it provides suitable heather
habitat for them. There are fears for
the future because in some areas
hares have almost disappeared.
A count is under way as part of a
conservation effort. Paul Brown
Algiers
22
Lagos
32
Ams’dam
13
Lima
23
Athens
28
Lisbon
22
Auckland
18
Madrid
27
B Aires
24
Malaga
21
Bangkok
35
Melb’rne
20
Barcelona
21
Mexico C
25
Basra
32
Miami
30
Beijing
26
Milan
26
Berlin
17
Mombasa
30
Bermuda
21
Montreal
11
Brussels
15
Moscow
13
Budapest
26
Mumbai
35
C’hagen
12
N Orleans
27
Cairo
24
Nairobi
23
Cape Town
21
New Delhi
42
Chicago
12
New York
14
Corfu
25
Paris
17
Dakar
23
Perth
23
Dhaka
37
Prague
21
Dublin
11
Reykjavik
7
Florence
26
Rio de J
29
Gibraltar
20
Rome
23
H Kong
26
Singapore
32
Harare
25
Stockh’m
14
Helsinki
10
Sydney
25
Istanbul
24
Tel Aviv
21
Jo’burg
25
Tenerife
20
K Lumpur
33
Tokyo
22
K’mandu
27
Vancouv’r
18
Kabul
25
Warsaw
22
Kingston
30
Wash’ton
18
Kolkata
36
Well’ton
17
L Angeles
23
Zurich
23
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:41 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 18:10
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Cricket
Football
Middlesex’s
women make it
to Lord’s – at last
Meet the Fifa
player of the year:
ns
Lieke Martens
Page 42 Page 46 41
the Oval, this competition’s not for you, likewise if you
subscribe to Sky, listen to TMS, are a county member,
part of the Barmy Army or in the ballot for tickets to the
Lord’s Test. When Cricket Australia was setting up the
Big Bash its consultant, Dan Migala, felt “everyone in the
room should feel a little uncomfortable”. If the fans were
uneasy, that only meant the plans were radical. “What
you have to remember,” Migala said, “is that there’s a lot
more people who know nothing about this sport than
there are people that love it.”
And that’s the audience the ECB is after, the many
more who know nothing about the sport. This is an
attempt to fix the mess it made when it sold the TV rights
to Sky back in the 2000s. English cricket has never been
more popular than it was in 2005, when 22.65m people
watched at least 30 minutes of the Ashes series, and
never been less popular than it is in 2018. The ECB’s own
survey of schoolchildren showed that three in five didn’t
even rank cricket in their top-10 favourite sports, and
adult participation in club cricket dropped by 64,000.
S
▲ The T20 Blast
already provides
popular short-form
entertainment, as
shown by the success of
last year’s finals day
DAN MULLAN/GETTY IMAGES
Silly point
There may even be
100 reasons why
not to like the
ECB’s new big idea
Andy Bull
E
ach county ground has its own
soundtrack, subtly distinct from
every other. At the Oval there are the
schoolchildren playing at the other side
of the Harleyford Road, the high jet
planes on the approach to Heathrow,
and the gravelly shouts of “C’mon the
’rey” from the gruff fan who sits at the
back of the Peter May stand. These last few days, while
Surrey have been playing Hampshire, there has been
a new undertone to it, murmurs, mutters, disgruntled
chuntering about the England and Wales Cricket Board.
It is not an entirely unfamiliar sound, but it is louder
and more insistent than before. And unlike those other
notes, these aren’t unique to the Oval.
As you know by now, the ECB wants to launch a new
format of the sport, 100 balls a side, split into 15 six-ball
overs and another, at the end, of 10 balls. Which means it
would need to change the Laws of the sport. The rest of
us have been chewing this over for the best part of a week
now, and it hasn’t got any easier to swallow. The ECB has
achieved the difficult feat of bringing English cricket into
broad agreement. Almost everyone thinks its idea stinks,
whether they’re from Middlesex, Surrey, Lancashire or
any one of the four corners of Yorkshire, whether they
love T20 or Tests. The most enthusiastic responses run to
lukewarm caution.
Which, the marketing men will tell you, is exactly the
reaction the ECB wanted. Because if you already go to
o the ECB has taken Migala’s principle
and run with it. It is so desperate to get
back into the mainstream that it is willing
to alienate, and infuriate, the millions of
fans who have stuck with it so they can
try and sell the sport to an audience who
either don’t know it or don’t like it. And it
is going to marginalise, and even scrap, the
competitions which serve its existing market, the County
Championship, the T20 Blast, the one-day cup, and the
women’s Super League, to do it.
Which leaves it in the challenging position of trying
to sell cricket to people who don’t like it, when it can’t
even satisfy the people who do. In its wisdom, it has
been decided that the complexity of the sport is the
big barrier to entry. As England’s director of cricket,
Andrew Strauss, said in a clumsy interview last Sunday,
it wants to “attract a new audience” of “mums and kids
in the school holidays” by making the game “as simple
as possible for them to understand”. Because mums are
incapable of understanding overs. Obviously.
The ECB seems to believe that the public are too
simple to understand any of the Laws but the one which
awards six runs for a big hit. Which is why, as Tom
Harrison, the ECB’s chief executive, wrote in the latest
Wisden, people who come to watch the new competition
“won’t need to know the ins and out of the lbw law or
even how many balls are in an over”, just so long as they
enjoy watching “sixes fly”. You wonder exactly what
kind of audience Harrison imagines he is pitching this
to. People who won’t even notice
that their favourite player has left
The
the middle because he was hit on
ECB has
the pads, who can’t grasp 20 six-ball
overs, but can understand 15 with
achieved
of 10, at the end.
the difficult another
Shrewd observers will have noticed
that cricket already has a format
feat of
which is designed to appeal to a mass
bringing
audience, to provide sixes, wickets,
English
and athletic catches. It is called
T20, and it is the most popular form
cricket
of the sport in every other cricketinto broad playing country. The ECB actually
agreement. runs a pretty serviceable version of it
already. If the broadcasters need the
Almost
ECB to fit games into a two-and-a-half
hour window, fine, bring in stringent
everyone
punishments for slow play. If the
thinks its
ECB wants to attract a new family
idea stinks audience, great, improve the facilities,
stop encouraging so much boozing at
the grounds, and change the marketing campaign.
Instead we have The Hundred, an idea no one in
cricket likes, and no one outside cricket knows they
want. Harrison and Strauss have so little faith in their
own sport they don’t believe it’s fit for purpose, so little
respect for their own fans they are sure they can afford
to upset them, and so little regard for the general public
they believe they can flog them cricket for idiots.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:42 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:06
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
42
cYanmaGentaYellowb
Sport
Cricket
Lord’s milestones
• 1976 First women’s match
Rachael Heyhoe Flint captained
England to victory over Australia
in a one-day international but it
was another 11 years before the
home of cricket hosted another.
• 1993 World Cup final
A crowd of 5,000, including
16-year-old future captain
Charlotte Edwards, saw England
defeat New Zealand by 67 runs.
• 1998 MCC membership
A historic vote, with 69.8% in
favour, ended 200 years of maleonly membership at Lord’s.
• 2009 World Twenty20 final
Held on the same day as their
male counterparts, Edwards
helped England to victory over
New Zealand again.
• 2014 MCC v Rest of the World
Australia’s Meg Lanning and
India’s Mithali Raj stole the show
for the visitors as part of Lord’s
200th birthday celebrations.
Better late than
never: Lord’s and
Ladies join forces
to make history
Middlesex women finally get
to play at home of cricket
after ‘bashing down the door’
for landmark MCC match
Adam Collins
Lord’s
‘W
hat are
culottes?” It
was a question
Middlesex’s
Australian
import
Hayleigh Brennan put to her new
team-mates as they looked out over
Lord’s, where they would later step
out for their county’s first match at
the ground. Shoulders were shrugged
until one cautiously replied: “A skirt
with shorts?” She was right. Until two
decades ago, it was with practically
bare legs and high socks, rather than
trousers, that women were permitted
to play the game.
When Charlotte Edwards made
her 1996 debut for England, she
was in culottes. The first two times
she turned out at Lord’s women
were not permitted to be members.
Yesterday she led MCC against
Middlesex. Sure, there are many
moments that stand out as markers
of how far the women’s game has
evolved since Edwards, the former
World Cup winning captain, started
her journey. Middlesex’s belated
invitation to play at HQ qualifies as
another.
“To walk out again and be captain
of MCC it was a very proud moment,”
she said at stumps. Her teams lost
a tight contest, unable to defend
a total of 145 for three they made
batting first and the winning runs
being struck with a ball to spare.
But to Edwards the result of the
exhibition match was less important
than the fact it happened at all.
“We were allowed in for the
day,” she recalled of those less
enlightened days. “So now every
time I come here the hairs on my
neck stand up because it is the best
venue in the world and to think now
this is normal for women’s cricketers
to be playing at Lord’s and hopefully
also for domestic cricketers. That’s
‘After the World
Cup win someone
clocked the balance
has changed’
Middlesex Women play in front of
the Lord’s members for the first time
ADAM DAVY/PA
the special thing about today.”
It is significant, too, that only
12 months ago Angus Fraser, the
Middlesex managing director of
cricket, cooled expectations of a
domestic women’s game at Lord’s.
“You have to look at it realistically,”
he said then, noting the logistical
challenges of finding space to play
on cricket’s busiest piece of real
estate. But then came the watershed
summer of 2017.
“With last year’s World Cup win,
someone, somewhere has clocked
that the balance has changed,” said
Isabelle Westbury, who captained
Middlesex from 2014 to 2016 and
unsuccessfully lobbied for a Home
of Cricket fixture throughout. “It
would not have reflected well had
the Middlesex women still not
played at Lord’s.”
That the curtain-raiser was
played between sides nicknamed
the “Maidens” and “Ladies”
was a reminder the MCC is still
an organisation steeped in
conservatism. But that did not
detract from the welcome parts
of the Lord’s tradition, with the
pavilion bell rung by Anne Savoury,
who represented Middlesex
for nearly two decades. Inside,
volunteers who served women’s
cricket far before it was fashionable
dined in the committee room.
In the grandstand school children
were invited in their thousands in
an attempt to break the record for
the best attended domestic women’s
game in England. It might have
helped if it had been scheduled at a
weekend but there was no doubting
the efforts of the club to make the
occasion feel right. “This is a proud
moment for a few of us who have
been bashing down the door for a
women’s game,” said Rob Lynch, the
Edwards hits out
Former captain wants
England back at Lord’s
Charlotte Edwards ( below),
the former England captain, has
admonished the ECB for failing to
schedule an international fixture at
Lord’s the year after England won
the World Cup in front of a sold-out
crowd at the ground.
“I’m really disappointed there’s
not an international here this
summer after last year was such an
incredible experience,” she said after
captaining an MCC side at Lord’s
yesterday.
“There should be a women’s
international every year at Lord’s.
For the touring team, it is a once in
a lifetime opportunity and we did
have one for a number of years.”
England’s women first played at
Lord’s in 1976 under the leadership
of the late Rachael Heyhoe Flint.
Each summer between 1997 and
2013 included a match at the Home
of Cricket but the only one since
then was the World Cup final last
July, attracting an attendance in
excess of 26,000.
In recent years, the ECB has
opted for county venues. That plan
continues when England host New
Zealand and South Africa in June
and July. Adam Collins
Middlesex commercial director.
From the playing ranks the
veteran Beth Morgan, who was in
the team at Lord’s when England
won the World T20 trophy in 2009,
said she never imagined getting the
chance to turn out at the ground
again. Fran Wilson, who played
in last year’s World Cup win, was
quickly taken back to the euphoria
of the sold-out ground for the July
final when walking through the
famous old gates. As for the excited
teenagers in the XI, they spoke with
hope of a time when turning out at
Lord’s will be second nature.
T
aken as a whole,
women’s county cricket
needs a lot of work with
the ECB still weighing
up how to transform
a bloated competition
with too many amateur qualities,
especially compared with domestic
50-over cricket in Australia, which
is semi-professional. For Edwards
the presence of Lord’s and other
Test venues can contribute in
lifting those standards. “You hope
Middlesex will get a game here every
year,” she said, “and hopefully it
can now be a County Championship
game rather than an exhibition
match.”
There was another first for the
Middlesex women at Lord’s, wearing
new uniforms specifically tailored
to them rather than being asked to
wear male sizes. “It’s actually really
important,” the world champion
Wilson said. “There’s nothing worse
than feeling uncomfortable in kit
down to your knees.”
A long way from the culottes of
old, progress for the women’s game
continues to arrive in all shapes and
sizes.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:43 Edition Date:180425 Edition:03 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 23:00
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•••
Sport
43
Cricket
Ball tampering was
suspected during
Ashes, says Cook
Ali Martin
Alastair Cook has admitted to suspicions among the England team of
ball-tampering by Australia during the
Ashes series.
Steve Smith, David Warner and
Cameron Bancroft are all serving
lengthy bans after the latter was
caught using sandpaper on the ball
during the Cape Town Test against
South Africa in a premeditated plan
to obtain reverse swing.
Smith, the Australia captain ,
insisted it was a one-off. Asked if he
believed that to be the case, Cook
pointed to the third Ashes Test, where
England were bowled out on a final
day that had been delayed by rain, as
one instance that was queried by his
team-mates during their 4-0 defeat.
“We did think in Perth, when the
outfield was wet after the rain, they
managed to get the ball reversing. I
didn’t see anything,” Cook said. “But
there’s also that thing about whether
reverse swing comes the quicker you
bowl. Back in 2005 we had Simon
Jones and Freddie Flintoff, who were
quicker than the Aussies – they managed to get reverse swing and the
Aussies didn’t, so we have to be very
careful there.
“We were curious in that series at
certain moments but we couldn’t get
the ball up to 90mph and they consistently could. No one really understands
[reverse swing].”
Cook will make his return for Essex
at Hampshire on Friday in preparation for what will be a 13th summer
of international cricket. But, though
the sport’s landscape is shifting and a
new selector is in place, his hunger is
unabated. By his own admission the
recent tour of New Zealand passed by
Cook somewhat with a top score of 14
in four innings. And while he gorged
on 244 not out during the Boxing Day
Ashes Test, his winter overall was one
of fleeting time spent at the crease.
As a result the 33-year-old accepts
that murmurs have again resurfaced
as to his longevity but, while there is
‘We did think
in Perth, when
the outfield was
wet, they got
the ball reversing ’
Alastair Cook
England opening batsman
Cook’s recent form
Alastair Cook has not averaged
over 50 with the bat in successive
series since playing Pakistan and
Sri Lanka in 2016
2018
2017-18
2017
2017
2016-17
2016
2016
2016
2015/16
2015
2015
New Zealand (a)
Australia (a)
West Indies (h)
South Africa (h)
India (a)
Bangladesh (a)
Pakistan (h)
Sri Lanka (h)
South Africa (a)
Pakistan (in UAE)
Australia (h)
5.75
47.00
60.80
33.60
36.90
22.25
60.42
50.71
43.39
47.36
45.08
a new man in Ed Smith heading the
selection process, Cook insists his own
challenges remain the same.
“My job never changes,” said Cook,
speaking at an event to mark the return
of Yorkshire Tea national cricket week
(18-22 June). “It’s to score runs at the
top of the order. If someone taps me
on the shoulder and tells me they don’t
want me to open for England, it is going
to hurt because I want to carry on.
“The hunger and desire is still there
but no one has a God-given right to
play for England. You have to score
the runs to justify your place. Since
I’ve come home I’ve started to look at
my preparation. Have I got it right? Do
I need to change things? Because that’s
the right way to do it.”
With a paucity of alternatives it
still seems a given that Cook will take
the field when England host Pakistan
at Lord’s next month and, should he
do so, he would equal Allan Border’s
record of 153 consecutive matches.
It would be the latest testament to
the fitness and mental obduracy of
England’s record run-scorer but in an
era of Twenty20 – or even the ECB’s
proposed new 100-ball tournament –
the question remains as to where the
next Test players will come from.
Cook has been pondering the same
thing. He said: “Why would you put
yourself through the stresses and
strains of the five-day game when
you can play three hours or two and a
half hours of crash-bang-wallop? For
a deep-down cricket fan, it’s very different from what we know. But that
doesn’t mean it can’t go back the other
way. There are a few guys now just
playing white-ball cricket but there’s
very few who can do that. For most
people, to earn a living you’re going to
have to play four-day cricket as well.”
Cook believes there is a decent talent pool from which Ed Smith can
construct a Test side but he believes
patience will be needed if they are to
match the side who last beat Australia
away in 2010-11.
“ There are a lot of unanswered
questions,” he said, “but I do think
the talent is there.”
▼ Alastair Cook (right) with Steve
Smith of Australia at the MCG
SCOTT BARBOUR/GETTY IMAGES
▲ Paul Townend (right) steers Al Boum Photo around the final fence and takes
Finian’s Oscar out of the race LORRAINE O’SULLIVAN/INPHO/REX
Racing
Jockey claims
he heard a
shout before
missing fence
Chris Cook
Punchestown
A raceday that was merely tense and
exciting at Punchestown became
submerged in inexplicable drama
when Paul Townend took the wrong
course aboard Al Boum Photo in the
Champion Novice Chase, victory having seemed in his grasp.
The astonishing aberration, which
could cost Willie Mullins his champion trainer’s title, was apparently the
result of a shout the jockey thought he
had heard, which convinced him he
had to bypass the final fence and which
left him mortified and facing a 21-day
ban for dangerous riding.
Seconds earlier, as the favourite,
Monalee, crashed out at the secondlast, this race had seemed set to cap
an excellent day for Mullins, who had
already won three others and had
two contenders fighting out another
finish. But the sprawling Monalee
hampered his Invitation Only, who
unseated David Mullins. Townend’s
extraordinary brain-fade on the other
Mullins runner then followed.
Reacting to some call unheard by
others, the jockey stood up in the
stirrups and looked over his right
shoulder. He tried to steer his horse
to the right, round the edge of the final
fence, colliding with Finian’s Oscar
and taking that horse with him out
of the contest. Because of that bump,
Al Boum Photo crashed into the wing
of the fence, unseating the hapless
Townend.
And so, instead of being a Mullins
benefit, the race was dropped wholesale into Gordon Elliott’s lap, the challenger ending up with the first three
home, led by The Storyteller under a
nonplussed Davy Russell. “I’d have to
have another look at it, I don’t know,”
Russell said, when asked what had
happened. “It’s great to get a rub of
the green.”
For hours mystery surrounded the
reason for such an extraordinary climax. Mullins and Townend left the
racecourse without offering a comment. But the jockey was first hauled
before the stewards, whose damning
verdict was he was guilty of dangerous
riding, a rare offence.
For that, his punishment starts a
fortnight from now with a 21-day suspension but will not end there. “I’d say
his head’ll be fried by this,” said one
racing insider and Townend may find
it hard to return for the next four days
of the festival meeting.
The stewards published a skimpy
verdict which shed no light on the reason for Townend’s action. However,
it is understood the jockey told stewards he thought he had heard a shout
directing him to bypass the fence.
He accepted that none of the formal
bypass procedures were in place.
It was the concluding act to a long
day of drama, in which the centrepiece
ought to have been Un De Sceaux’s victory over his stablemate Douvan in the
Champion Chase. Both are Mullinstrained stars and the immediate future
was bright, at that point, for the man
who has dominated Irish jump racing
for the past decade, as he had hacked
Elliott’s lead down to €226,000, half
what it had been before racing.
“For a horse that wasn’t going anywhere in the first half of the race, he
just seemed to warm up,” Mullins said
of Un De Sceaux. “I thought that was a
hell of a performance.”
And the trainer gave an insight into
what this week’s defence of his title
means, describing the tunnel vision he
has forced on himself in order to keep
his focus. “I honestly didn’t look at the
racecard from the time I declared them
at 10 o’clock yesterday morning. I was
only hoping for the best.”
One hour later Mullins was badly
let down by luck, or by the judgment
of his jockey. Elliott’s lead is back to
€405,839 but there are four days left
in this Irish jumps season and anything
can happen.
Chris Cook’s tips
Catterick 1.50 Coiste Bodhar
2.25 Viking Way 3.00 Talaaqy 3.30 Zig Zag
4.05 Wishing Well 4.35 The Golden Cue
5.10 Explain 5.40 Presidential
Epsom 2.10 Midnight Malibu
2.45 James Cook 3.20 Native Fighter
3.55 Contango (nap) 4.25 King Of The Sand
5.00 Christopher Wood (nb)
Lingfield 4.50 Great Shot Sam 5.20 Black
Sails 5.55 Time Stands Still 6.25 Caspar The
Cub 6.55 My Target 7.25 Emblazoned
7.55 Speculator
Perth 1.30 Lovely Schtuff 2.00
Catchthemoonlight 2.35 Scorpion Sid 3.10
Uhlan Bute 3.45 Late Date 4.15 Shanroe
Street 4.45 Morning With Ivan
Taunton 5.15 Cockney Wren 5.45 Darcy Ward
6.15 Royal Act 6.45 Eric The Third 7.10 Hija
7.40 Bennachie 8.10 Southfield Torr
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:44 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sport
Rugby union
some I’ll be back next season to help
my respective teams push on. Thank
you for your support.”
Hartley has not played since the
defeat by Ireland in the final match of
the Six Nations on 17 March, having
also been concussed in the 2016 grand
slam-clinching win against France. He
later conceded he had no memory of
the trophy presentation held on the
pitch and questioned whether another
substantial head knock could result in
his early retirement.
Hartley said in 2016: “Every time
that you see your kid you think ‘if I
hit my head again what’s that going
to mean?’
“If I got another one now I’d be worried. I would probably start looking
at other careers, or stuff like that, or
maybe a long lay-off.”
Hartley hits
out with ‘I’ll be
back’ message
Ed Aarons
Dylan Hartley has vowed to return
next season after being ruled out of
England’s summer tour to South Africa
because of concussion. The 32-yearold posted a message of defiance on
Instagram in response to what he
described as “so-called experts” who
have questioned his absence.
In a post titled “Dylan Hartley statement on Dylan Hartley” beside a photo
of him singing the national anthem,
the Northampton hooker, who has
captained England in all but one Test
under Eddie Jones, said: “Believe it
or not this is a photo of me singing
and not what is rumoured to be a fat
lady (difficult to tell apart I know). I
see there’s a lot of so-called experts
out there in newspapers, pubs and
podcasts recommending what I do
with my career.
“Funnily enough I’m only listening to the medical professionals and
myself. Fortunately/unfortunately for
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
44
Sent at 24/4/2018 18:11
Last orders for Habana
Bryan Habana is to
retire at the end of the
season after being
unable to force his
way back into Toulon’s
team. The 34-year-old wing is
South Africa’s leading try-scorer
with 67 from 124 games. “The
inevitable moment has come
knocking on my door and I’ve
welcomed it in for a drink,” he
wrote on Instagram. PA
ROB PRANGE/REX/
SHUTTERSTOCK
Sharapova shattered Maria Sharapova was dumped out of the Stuttgart
Grand Prix after Caroline Garcia hit back to win their first-round match 3-6, 7-6
(6), 6-4. The Russian will now drop out of the world’s top 50 after losing four
matches in a row. The five-times grand slam champion showed glimpses of
her old form in the first set but Garcia came from 4-2 down in the second to level
and then took advantage of Sharapova’s errors in the third.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:45 Edition Date:180425 Edition:03 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 23:10
•••
Results
Sport
Boxing
Only a death will stop
drug cheats – Saunders
Kevin Mitchell
The unbeaten world middleweight
champion Billy Joe Saunders says
only a ring death will jolt boxing into
a proper crackdown on fighters using
performance-enhancing drugs – and
he believes such a tragedy should be
regarded as murder.
Saunders and Martin Murray – the
Merseysider who challenges him
for his WBO title at the O2 Arena in
south-east London on 23 June – have
joined the growing chorus of condemnation being poured on Saúl “Canelo”
Álvarez, who has received a derisory
six-month ban for the presence of
clenbuterol in his system. His transgression led to the rearrangement of
his 5 May rematch with the majority title-holder at 11st 6lb, Gennady
Golovkin, which almost certainly will
still go ahead in September, when the
Mexican’s ban runs out.
“The only time something’s going to
be done is when someone passes away
in the ring and his opponent is proved
to have taken Peds,” Saunders said. He
added, facetiously, that if authorities
cannot control the problem, maybe
everybody should be allowed to use
banned drugs. “Let everybody do it.
They’ve all got kids and families to go
home to. Give them half a chance and
let them take it. But if somebody dies
in the ring at the hands of a drug cheat,
it is murder, 100%.
“It’s diabolical, absolutely atrocious for someone of his stature to get
banned for [just] six months. There
was a perfect [opportunity] for the
boxing world to make an example of
a drugs cheat. You couldn’t have had
a higher-calibre fighter to make an
example of – and they didn’t. I can’t
see them doing much more.”
Murray later told iFL TV: “Any other
fighters, they’d get a longer ban, but
he’s such a high-profile fighter and he
generates so much money. Boxing’s
bent. If there was a lifetime ban for
everybody, no matter what, maybe
that would change it.
“I predicted beforehand he’d get a
six-month ban so he can fight Golovkin
in September. You can bang your drum
‘It’s diabolical
for someone of
Canelo’s stature to
get just six months’
Billy Joe Saunders
WBO middleweight champion
about it all day but you’ll get nowhere.
It’s just the way the sport is. It’s situations like this that make [other fighters] want to do it, knowing they’ll get
off with a slap on the wrist.”
Saunders agrees. “Any young fighters coming up and seeing a fighter of
Canelo’s stature, they might think:
‘Well, it will get me there and, when
I’m there, I’ll take a six-month ban.’
It’s not a punishment.”
While Saunders believes drug
cheats are rife in the US, he says more
stringent testing in the UK has largely
kept the problem in check. “I think
England is more on top of it than anywhere else. I think we respect the game
more than others.
“It’s never going to be fair when
drugs are involved. My last opponent
was David Lemieux and I insisted on
VADA testing [which operates in the
United States and Canada]. As long as
they sign up for VADA for the 12 weeks,
then you can’t assume everybody’s on
it, because you wouldn’t box anyone.
Canelo [might] take Peds again for
the fight against Golovkin – and get
banned for another six months. I am
sure he would sign up for that today.
“But it brings a cloud over boxing.
It puts a big downer on the game. And
I know one million per cent I’ve boxed
someone who was on Peds. There is a
big problem in the game. If someone
with Canelo’s profile is doing it, then
it needs looking into.”
As for where these banned substances come from, he said: “Ring your
local crack dealer, I suppose. They’ll go
and get it if you want it. Look, I don’t
know. You get these people now and
bringing all these sports scientists in,
so it’s not hard to get hold of stuff, I’d
imagine.”
Billy Joe
Saunders (left)
and Martin
Murray go face
to face at their
fight promotion
under the gaze
of Frank Warren
PETER CZIBORRA/
ACTION IMAGES
45
Football
UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE
Semi-final: First leg
Liverpool
(2) 5
Salah 36 45
Mané 56
Firmino 61 69
SKY BET CHAMPIONSHIP
P W
Wolves C
44 30
Cardiff
44 26
Fulham
44 24
Aston Villa
44 24
Middlesbrough
44 21
Derby
44 19
Millwall
44 18
Brentford
44 18
Preston
44 17
Bristol City
44 17
Sheffield Utd
44 19
Leeds
44 16
Norwich
44 14
Ipswich
44 16
Sheffield Wed
44 13
QPR
44 14
Nottingham Forest 44 15
Hull City
44 11
Reading
44 10
Birmingham
44 12
Bolton
44
9
Barnsley
44
8
Burton Albion
44
9
Sunderland R
44
6
Derby
Jerome 69 90
Vydra 82
(0) 3
Nottingham Forest (2) 3
Tomlin 26
Brereton 36
Velios 90
SKY BET LEAGUE ONE
P
Wigan P
44
Blackburn P
44
Shrewsbury
44
Rotherham
44
Charlton
44
Scunthorpe
43
Plymouth
43
Portsmouth
44
Peterborough
44
43
Bradford
Blackpool
44
Southend
44
Bristol Rovers
44
Doncaster
43
Fleetwood
44
Oxford Utd
44
Gillingham
44
AFC Wimbledon
43
Rochdale
44
Walsall
43
Oldham
44
Northampton
44
MK Dons
44
Bury R
44
W
28
27
25
23
19
17
18
19
16
18
15
16
16
13
15
14
12
13
10
12
11
12
10
7
Snooker
Ding puts his foot on
the gas at the Crucible
Ding Junhui underlined his world
championship ambitions by
closing out victory over his Chinese
compatriot Xiao Guodong in little
more than an hour in the first
round at the Crucible in Sheffield.
The world No 3 held a healthy 6-3
overnight lead and reeled off four
frames in a row to win 10-3. PA
Price, said: “Ben will see a specialist
on Thursday.” PA
Rugby league
Froome confirmed
for Giro d’Italia by Sky
Warrington worry over
Currie’s knee injury
Warrington are sweating over the
fitness of the second-row forward
Ben Currie. Currie, who played
more games for England than for
his club in 2017, limped out of
Saturday’s 54-6 Challenge Cup win
over Bradford and went for scans on
Monday. The Wolves coach, Steve
Cycling
Chris Froome will ride for Team
Sky in the Giro d’Italia next month
despite the investigation into his
adverse doping test. Froome is
fighting to clear his name after
an increased dosage of asthma
medication at the Vuelta a España
last year threw up an adverse finding
from a urine sample. Reuters
Roma
Dzeko 81
Perrotti 85pen
51,236
D
8
8
13
10
9
14
15
14
16
15
9
9
15
8
14
11
7
15
13
7
13
14
11
16
L
6
10
7
10
14
11
11
12
11
12
16
19
15
20
17
19
22
18
21
25
22
22
24
22
F
82
67
76
71
63
65
55
61
54
65
59
56
46
51
54
55
49
69
48
34
36
45
35
48
(0) 2
A
36
39
42
40
43
56
43
49
45
55
52
62
54
58
59
67
62
67
66
64
70
68
79
78
GD
+46
+28
+34
+31
+20
+19
+12
+12
+9
+10
+7
-6
-8
-7
-5
-12
-13
+2
-18
-30
-34
-23
-44
-30
Pts
98
86
85
82
72
69
68
68
67
66
66
57
57
56
53
53
52
48
43
43
40
38
38
34
Cardiff
Paterson 28
30,294
(1) 1
Barnsley
(0) 0
23,633
D
10
12
11
7
11
16
11
6
13
7
14
11
9
15
9
11
16
11
18
12
15
10
12
11
L
6
5
8
14
14
10
14
19
15
18
15
17
19
15
20
19
16
19
16
19
18
22
22
26
F
87
80
59
71
57
60
54
55
66
55
59
56
59
52
57
58
44
44
47
51
56
41
42
38
A
28
38
37
51
50
49
51
55
58
63
53
62
65
51
66
63
52
55
55
63
73
74
67
69
GD
+59
+42
+22
+20
+7
+11
+3
0
+8
-8
+6
-6
-6
+1
-9
-5
-8
-11
-8
-12
-17
-33
-25
-31
MK Dons
Pts
94
93
86
76
68
67
65
63
61
61
59
59
57
54
54
53
52
50
48
48
48
46
42
32
Bradford
Dieng 12
Knight-Percival 80
(1) 2
(0) 0
Bristol Rovers
Sercombe 28
8,414
(1) 1
Wigan
Colclough 80pen
(0) 1
Doncaster
10,443
(0) 0
Blackburn
Mulgrew 80
(0) 1
Oldham
(0) 0
Southend
Robinson 5
Cox 52 56
(1) 3
Rochdale
Delaney 55
2,760
(0) 1
Plymouth
Grant 53
(0) 1
Shrewsbury
Beckles 59
Payne 73
John-Lewis 90
(0) 3
Peterborough
Edwards 14
(1) 1
19,192
3,362
Sport
In brief
cYanmaGentaYellowb
4,666
SKY BET LEAGUE TWO
P
Accrington P
44
Luton P
44
Wycombe
44
Exeter
44
Notts County
44
Lincoln City
44
Coventry
44
Mansfield
44
Swindon
44
Carlisle
44
Colchester
44
Cambridge Utd
44
Newport County
43
44
Crawley
Stevenage
44
Cheltenham
44
Crewe
44
Port Vale
44
Yeovil
44
Forest Green
44
Morecambe
44
Grimsby
44
Barnet
44
Chesterfield R
43
W
28
24
22
23
21
20
21
17
19
16
16
16
15
16
13
13
15
11
12
13
9
11
10
9
D
6
12
12
8
13
14
8
17
7
15
13
13
15
10
13
12
5
14
11
8
18
12
10
8
L
10
8
10
13
10
10
15
10
18
13
15
15
13
18
18
19
24
19
21
23
17
21
24
26
F
75
91
76
62
70
63
58
63
64
59
53
50
53
56
57
65
58
48
56
53
41
37
42
45
A
43
45
59
51
46
46
46
49
65
52
51
58
55
63
63
65
73
60
71
71
55
65
65
78
GD
+32
+46
+17
+11
+24
+17
+12
+14
-1
+7
+2
-8
-2
-7
-6
0
-15
-12
-15
-18
-14
-28
-23
-33
Pts
90
84
78
77
76
74
71
68
64
63
61
61
60
58
52
51
50
47
47
47
45
45
40
35
Coventry
Bayliss 16
Shipley 39
13,115
(2) 2
Lincoln City
Rhead 1
Palmer 38 44
Frecklington 67
(3) 4
Morecambe
992
(0) 0
Cambridge Utd
(0) 0
Newport County
Amond 30
Nouble 85
(1) 2
Accrington Stanley
Kee 90
2,370
(0) 1
Yeovil
2,789
(0) 0
Forest Green
(0) 0
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE
Bromley 0 Barrow 0; Gateshead 2 Ebbsfleet Utd 5;
Leyton Orient 0 Maidenhead 1; Torquay 3 Guiseley 4;
Tranmere 1 Solihull Moors 2
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE NORTH
Blyth Spartans 2 Curzon Ashton 1; Nuneaton P Boston Utd P;
Spennymoor Town 1 Telford 2
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE SOUTH
Bognor Regis 0 Chelmsford 1;Braintree 0 Oxford City 0;
Concord Rangers 1 Hungerford 0; Poole 1 Whitehawk 1
Welling 0 Bath City 2; Weston-Super-Mare 0 Truro City 2
BOSTIK PREMIER LEAGUE
Billericay 2 Harlow 0; Dorking 0 Harrow Borough 4;
Leiston 2 Needham Market 0
EVO-STIK NORTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE
Altrincham P Marine P; Barwell 1 Stourbridge 1; Grantham 0
Warrington Town 0; Lancaster City 1 Buxton 1;
Matlock Town 1 Ashton Utd 2; Nantwich 2 Shaw Lane 3;
Stalybridge P Workington P; Whitby 2 Rushall Olympic 3;
Witton Albion 1 Farsley Celtic 4
EVO-STIK SOUTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE
Biggleswade Town 0 Dunstable 2; Bishop’s Stortford 4
Merthyr Town 0; Kettering 2 Tiverton 3; Royston Town 0
Slough 4; St Ives Town 0 Chesham 2
LADBROKES SCOTTISH CHAMPIONSHIP
Livingston 0 Inverness CT 1
LADBROKES SCOTTISH LEAGUE TWO
Berwick 2 Stenhousemuir 2
PRESS & JOURNAL HIGHLAND LEAGUE
Cove Rangers 0 Nairn 3; Strathspey 1 Fraserburgh 4
FERRARI PACKAGING LOWLAND LEAGUE
Whitehill Welfare 3 Hawick Royal Albert 1
JD WELSH PREMIER LEAGUE
Prestatyn Town 0 Barry Town 0
EA SPORTS LEAGUE OF IRELAND CUP
Second round Shamrock Rovers 0 Longford Town 1;
Shelbourne 7 Drogheda United 2
FA WOMEN’S SUPER LEAGUE
Arsenal 3 Liverpool 0
Rugby union
GREENE KING IPA CHAMPIONSHIP
Nottingham 41 Bedford 21
Cricket
INDIAN PREMIER LEAGUE
M W
L
T NR
RR Pts
Punjab
6
5
1
0
0 0.39 10
Chennai
5
4
1
0
0 0.74 8
Hyderabad
6
4
2
0
0 0.49 8
Kolkata
6
3
3
0
0 0.57 6
Rajasthan
6
3
3
0
0 -0.80 6
Bangalore
5
2
3
0
0 -0.49 4
Mumbai
6
1
5
0
0 0.01 2
Delhi Daredevils
6
1
5
0
0 -1.10 2
Mumbai Hyderabad 118. Mumbai 87 (SA Yadav 34;
S Kaul 3-23). Hyderabad beat Mumbai by 31 runs.
Tennis
ATP BANC SABADELL BARCELONA OPEN (Spain)
First round: R Carballés Baena (Sp) bt A Haider-Maurer
(Aut) 6-2 6-4; G Pella (Arg) bt P Gojowczyk (Ger) 6-4 6-4;
M Klizan (Svk) bt F Delbonis (Arg) 6-3 6-7 (5-7) 6-4;
G Simon (Fr) bt I Ivashka (Blr) 6-2 6-3; B Fratangelo (US)
bt A Vatutin (Rus) 7-5 5-7 6-3; J Munar (Sp) bt J Sousa
(Por) 6-4 3-6 7-5.
Second round: D Goffin (Bel) bt M Granollers (Sp) 4-6 7-6
(7-2) 6-2; M Jaziri (Tun) bt E Escobedo (US) 6-4 6-3;
R Bautista Agut (Sp) bt I Karlovic (Cro) 6-7 (4-7) 6-2 6-4;
A Mannarino (Fr) bt P Cuevas (Uru) 6-4 7-6 (7-5); F López
(Sp) bt D Lajovic (Ser) 6-4 2-6 6-4.
ATP GAZPROM HUNGARIAN OPEN (Budapest)
First round: J-L Struff (Ger) bt J Zopp (Est) 2-6 6-4 7-5;
A Bublik (Kaz) bt D Istomin (Uzb) 6-7 (6-8) 7-6 (7-5) 7-5;
M Marterer (Ger) bt V Troicki (Ser) 3-6 6-4 6-4; Y Maden
(Ger) bt M Fucsovics (Hun) 4-6 6-3 6-2; N Basilashvili (Geo)
bt P Lorenzi (It) 6-4 6-2.
WTA BNP PARIBAS ISTANBUL CUP (Turkey)
First round: I-C Begu (Rom) bt D Jakupovic (Slo) 7-5 6-0;
V Tomova (Bul) bt V Ivakhnenko (Rus) 7-5 6-4;
Y Putintseva (Kaz) bt S Cirstea (Rom) 0-6 6-1 6-0;
P Parmentier (Fr) bt A Aksu (Tur) 6-2 6-2; D Kovinic (Mnt)
bt A Kalinskaya (Rus) 6-3 6-3; A Rus (Neth) bt Zhang S
(Chn) 6-2 6-3; D Vekic (Cro) bt A Radwanska (Pol) 6-1 2-0
ret; M Sakkari (Gr) bt C Buyukakcay (Tur) 7-5 6-2;
C Wozniacki (Den) bt E Alexandrova (Rus) 6-2 6-2.
WTA PORSCHE GRAND PRIX (Stuttgart)
First round: M Kostyuk (Ukr) bt A Lottner (Ger) 6-4 6-1;
K Pliskova (Cz) bt K Bertens (Neth) 6-2 6-2; C Garcia (Fr)
bt M Sharapova (Rus) 3-6 7-6 (8-6) 6-4; M Vondrousova
(Cz) bt J Görges (Ger) 6-2 6-2; L Siegemund (Ger) bt
B Strycova (Cze) 6-4 3-2.
Cycling
TOUR DE ROMANDIE (Switzerland)
Prologue (Fribourg; 4km time-trial) 1 M Matthews (Aus)
Sunweb 5min 33sec; 2 T Bohli (Swi) BMC Racing +0:01;
3 P Roglic (Svn) LottoNL-Jumbo; 4 R Dennis (Aus) BMC
Racing both s/t; 5 V Campenaerts (Bel) Lotto Soudal +0:05;
6 G Thomas (GB) Team Sky s/t; 7 W Clarke (Aus) Cannondale
+0:06; 8 D Rosa (It) Team Sky; 9 P Latour (Fr) AG2R both s/t;
10 G Izagirre (Sp) Bahrain-Merida +0:09.
Snooker
BETFRED WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP (Sheffield)
First round: B Hawkins (Eng) bt S Carrington (Eng) 10-7;
Ding J (Chn) bt Xiang G (Chn) 10-3; R Walden (Eng) bt
L Brecel (Bel) 10-6; J Lisowski (Eng) bt S Bingham (Eng) 10-7.
Fixtures
Football (7.45pm unless stated)
Uefa Champions League
Semi-final: First leg Bayern Munich v Real Madrid
Vanarama National League North
Brackley Town v Chorley; Darlington v Southport
Vanarama National League South
Havant & Waterlooville v East Thurrock
Press & Journal Highland League
Deveronvale v Fort William; Rothes v Brora (8pm)
Ferrari Packaging Lowland League
Selkirk v Vale of Leithen (7pm)
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:46 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 18:04
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
46
Sport
Football
we scored really quick, and then we
got the lead, 2-1, then before halftime it was 2-2. I remember at halftime we said to each other, ‘Come on
girls, we really believe we’re going to
do this’, and we won 4-2. The trust
was so big during the tournament.”
At no point did she believe they
would fall short: “Even when we
conceded in the final, it was the first
time we had gone behind, but I had
no worries, nothing, that we would
lose that game.”
The Netherlands were outsiders,
ranked 12th in the world. Germany,
France and England were the
favourites. So at what point did the
host country realise they could win
it? “We felt good after the group
stage – we had nine points, we won
all the games. I really felt then that
something was possible. When we
beat England 3-0 in the semi-final I
thought: ‘Right, now we have to win
this final.’”
T
MANUEL QUEIMADELOS ALONSO/GETTY IMAGES
‘Ronaldinho
was my idol …
long hair,
great dribbles’
Lieke Martens, the Fifa and
Uefa player of the year, is
loving life at Barcelona and
fast becoming a role model
Suzanne Wrack
T
he girl playing football
in the small Dutch town
of Bergen in the late
90s did not know there
was a women’s game.
Instead her idol was
Ronaldinho. Why? “Because I was
a Barça fan,” says Lieke Martens.
“He had long hair like me and
great dribbles. I loved him. He was
technical, made a lot of goals.”
Watch the Netherlands and
Barcelona midfielder now and one
can tell why she is a fan of the Brazil
great. Her Cruyff turn, back to goal,
to take out two Belgium players,
leaving one on the floor, as she drove
forward at Euro 2017, is a taste of the
cYanmaGentaYellowb
25-year-old’s ability to trick and turn
her way out of the tightest gaps.
The European Championship,
hosted in her home country,
catapulted Martens into the spotlight
but in women’s football her talent
was well known. With 20 goals in 29
games for Rosengard she could have
had her pick of Europe’s top sides but
when the Catalan club swooped, the
decision was easy. “I played against
Barcelona in the quarter-final of the
Champions League with my previous
club – the way they played I really
liked it,” she says.
With Barcelona’s investment
in their women’s team a new
development, the signing of
Martens, the English forward Toni
Duggan, María Pilar León from
Atlético Madrid and Élise Bussaglia
from the German champions,
Wolfsburg, was a statement of intent.
“I signed before the Euros,” Martens
says. “For me it was really important
to sign before, so I was clear in my
head and free for the Euros.”
Martens shone from the first
whistle and when her flighted pass
from the corner of the box found the
head of Shanice van de Sanden to
hand the Netherlands a victory over
Norway, it was just the start.
She was chosen in the team of
the tournament, named player of it,
and in the final she squeezed a shot
between two Denmark players to
give the Oranje Leeuwinnen (Orange
Lionesses) a 2-1 lead after they had
trailed to a Nadia Nadim penalty.
“Playing a final is amazing,” she says.
“There’s even more pressure but I
really trusted the team. When we
went behind to the penalty I think
▲ Lieke Martens shows off her player
of the tournament award at Euro 2017
he opening match in
Utrecht was attended
by 21,732 people and
as momentum built,
a sea of orange would
flood the streets before
games. “That was amazing, the
whole tournament was amazing,”
she adds. “The first game was sold
out and during the tournament we
got more and more people really
happy and wanting to see us play. In
Utrecht the big celebration day was
amazing. We really felt the support
[for] the whole tournament.”
A remarkable 4.1 million watched
the final on Dutch TV and more than
110,000 watched their six sold-out
matches at the stadiums. “Players
get recognised in the street now,”
Martens says. “Some players are
famous. We’re role models for a lot
of girls now and some boys. A lot are
fans of us over the men’s team.”
It has not stopped – 30,238
watched the 7-0 win over Northern
Ireland in a World Cup qualifier in
Eindhoven this month. Martens,
who has played for clubs in five
countries, won the Best Fifa
women’s player award and was
Uefa women’s player of the year
for 2017, and for the latter she flew
to Monaco in a private plane with
Lionel Messi before receiving the
trophy alongside the men’s winner,
Cristiano Ronaldo.
Martens is currently focused
on getting to France 2019 (the
Netherlands are top of their group)
and on catching Atlético, who are
one point ahead of Barça with five
games to play. “We’re going to do
everything to win – that’s all we can
do. We are independent of them. I
hope they are going to drop some
points. It would be great to win the
title in my first season in La Liga.”
The girl who dreamed of being
Ronaldinho is the poster girl for
young female players, and it is
a role she does not take lightly.
Martens will use any platform to
show women can play, and is taking
part in Uefa’s #PlayAnywhere
competition (part of the @
WePlayStrong campaign), which
ends on 30 April, where girls post
videos of themselves playing in
unusual places. “When I was young,”
she adds, “I had no idea there were
women players or what I could
achieve and now we are role models.
Of course I wanted to be involved.”
Chelsea’s Kirby
wins inaugural
football writers’
women’s award
Fran Kirby has won the inaugural
women’s footballer of the year award
from the Football Writers’ Association.
The Chelsea and England striker has
scored 22 goals for the Women’s Super
League leaders across all competitions
this season.
The 24-year-old former Reading
player secured more than 50% of
the vote, with the Euro 2017 Golden
Boot winner, Jodie Taylor, finishing
second.
Kirby told the FWA website: “I was
really proud to be nominated in the
first place but to actually win is a real
honour. To be the first recipient of this
honour and award is so special.”
Kirby, who was nicknamed “Mini
Messi” by the former England Women
manager Mark Sampson during the
2015 World Cup in Canada, has established herself as a key figure in the
national team under Phil Neville.
The accolade came two days
after Kirby won the Professional
Footballers’ Association’s women’s
player of the year award.
As well as their WSL title pursuit,
Chelsea are chasing silverware in the
Women’s FA Cup and face Arsenal in
the final on 5 May.
They will also be hoping to turn
around a 3-1 deficit when they play
Wolfsburg in Germany on Sunday in
the second leg of their Champions
League semi-final.
The FWA chairman, Patrick Barclay,
said: “I can’t help thinking of our first
footballer of the year vote in 1947,
when the winner was one of England’s
most admired players of all time, Sir
Stanley Matthews.
“Now, after Stan, comes Fran – she’ll
always be first in what will become a
long list of women’s footballers of the
year.”
Kirby will collect the award at the
FWA dinner in London on 10 May. PA
‘I was proud just to
be nominated. To
win and be the first
recipient of this
award is so special’
Fran Kirby
Chelsea and England
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:47 Edition Date:180425 Edition:03 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 23:38
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•••
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sport
Football
▼ Cameron Jerome
celebrates after pulling
Derby level at 1-1
47
CATHERINE IVILL/GETTY
Champions League
Heynckes savours
chance to beat Real
in quest for history
German is looking for third
Champions League title, as is
his old friend and foe, Zidane
Sid Lowe
Munich
Sky Bet Championship
Rowett hoping curse
of Derby is lifted after
Cardiff are frozen out
Derby County
3
Jerome 69 90, Vydra 82
Cardiff City
Race for second place
1
Paterson 28
Paul Doyle
Pride Park
For most of this match Cardiff looked
set to tighten their grip on the Championship’s second automatic promotion
spot but by the end Derby fans were
crooning merrily about dreaming of a
white Christmas.
That was a cheeky reference to the
fact this game, originally scheduled
for last month, had been postponed
due to snow at an unseasonal but
very convenient time for Derby, who
were suffering from several injuries.
Neil Warnock had vented his anger at
that postponement, which came as
his team hoped to go 10 points clear
in second place. Now they are only
one point ahead of third-place Fulham, with Aston Villa are also lurking
dangerously.
“Well, I can’t blame the weather for
the goals we conceded,” said the Car-
Rovers return
Blackburn Rovers were celebrating
promotion to the Championship
last night after they beat
Doncaster 1-0 at the Keepmoat
Stadium. Rovers needed to match
Shrewsbury’s result to seal a
top-two finish in League One and
Charlie Mulgrew’s goal 10 minutes
from time sealed promotion.
Shrewsbury beat Peterborough 3-1
but, ultimately, it did not matter.
In League Two Chesterfield’s
relegation was confirmed.
Wolves C
Cardiff
Fulham
Aston Villa
P
44
44
44
44
W D L F A GD
30 8 6 82 36 46
26 8 10 67 39 28
24 13 7 76 42 34
24 10 10 71 40 31
Pts
98
86
85
82
Remaining games
Cardiff Sat Hull (a), 6 May Reading (h)
Fulham Fri Sunderland (h), 6 May B’ham (a)
A Villa Sat Derby (h), 6 May Millwall (a)
diff manager sardonically after seeing
his team defend with uncharacteristic sloppiness to allow Derby to score
three times in the second half.
While casting doubt on Cardiff ’s
promotion hopes the result breathed
new life into Derby’s, as two goals from
Cameron Jerome either side of one by
Matej Vydra lifted Gary Rowett’s side
into the play-off places. At one point
this season Derby looked a good bet
to go up automatically but the way
their challenge had dwindled in recent
months led to Rowett suggesting the
club is cursed.
“I was just trying to get myself
out of the firing line by saying it was
a curse,” admitted Rowett after this
win. “It’s difficult to put your finger
on why it’s happened five seasons in
a row but until we can change it and
get promoted that’s always going to
be levelled at Derby.”
It did not look like changing here
when Callum Patterson gave Cardiff
the lead in the 28th minute with a
crisp volley after a cross from the left
by Joe Bennett. Scott Carson, Derby’s
goalkeeper, had barely had a meaningful touch up to that point but Cardiff
nearly beat him again two minutes
later when Junior Hoilett went close.
The visitors might have also gone
further ahead before half-time if the
referee had blown for a penalty after
the ball struck Bradley Johnson’s hand
in the box. Cardiff were looking sturdy
even if Derby’s pace on the break was
a concern. By the hour Rowett had
decided it was time for a new approach
so cast on Vydra to forage behind
Jerome.
Still the home team struggled to produce enough precision to unhinge the
well-organised visitors. Gary Madine
was guilty of inaccuracy, too, in the
65th minute, as he skewed a shot wide
from nine yards after a Cardiff break.
The cost of that miss soon increased.
Derby’s equaliser was surprisingly
straightforward. After messy defending by the visitors, Richard Keogh sent
a header into the box and Jerome held
off Sean Morrison before diverting the
ball past Etheridge from six yards.
Vydra completed the turnaround by
lashing into the net from 12 yards after
a cut-back by Wisdom. Jerome made
sure of the result in the last minute,
pestering Morrison into another mistake before shooting past Etheridge.
They now face a trip to Aston Villa and
their final game is at home to Barnsley.
“That [defending] is not like us,”
said Warnock, whose last two games
are at Hull and home to Reading. “It’s
a match we should have won but every
team in the league apart from Wolves
would love to be where we are. And
at least we know what we have to do
now: win the last two games.”
No one is more experienced than
Warnock at navigating through nervy
run-ins. He is aiming for his eighth
promotion in a managerial career
spanning more than three decades.
When he achieved his first by leading
Scarborough out of the Conference in
1987, Rowett was still coming to grips
with secondary school.
After this result there is still a chance
of them being classed together in next
season’s Premier League. “The run we
were on has been incredibly deflating
but we’ve retained belief and this win
is a massive boost for us,” said Rowett.
Derby
3-4-2-1
Carson; Keogh, Davies,
Forsyth; Wisdom,
Huddlestone, Johnson,
Olsson (Vydra 60);
Weimann (Pearce 88),
Lawrence (Hanson 88);
Jerome
Subs not used
Roos, Palmer, Ledley,
Nugent
Cardiff
4-4-1-1
Etheridge; Manga•,
Morrison, Bamba,
Bennett•; Paterson•,
Ralls•, Gunnarsson, Ward
(Wildschut 74); Hoillet
(Pilkington 74); Madine
(Zohore 67)
Subs not used
Murphy, Mendez-Lang,
Peltier, Grujic
Referee Andy Madley Attendance 30,294
“Nobody had any intention of me
being here,” Jupp Heynckes said, sitting at a desk at the Allianz Arena, a
microphone tilted towards him, the
board behind splattered with sponsors, a card in front saying: “Uefa
Champions League”.
It turned out he was not finished
after all but at 72 this really will be the
last time, one more European night in
Munich. Six months after being pulled
from retirement, called by his old
friend Uli Hoeness and asked to coach
Bayern for a fourth time, he leads his
club into another semi-final. In front of
him stands another club with which he
has won this competition, Real Madrid.
Returning was, Heynckes said then,
“a question of the heart”. But if he
was coming back, it was to compete.
Bayern recovered: the league title is
won, the cup awaits and another treble
is possible, as in 2013. “I adore football
and, if I do a job, I do it 100 per cent,”
he said here. “These are the games you
work for and lots of coaches never get
the chance to play one of these in their
lives. I came back at a very old age and
now I have the privilege of being successful again. I am confident.
“Football has changed but my style
of leadership, my approach, hasn’t.
The game has progressed but in the
end they are still people out on the
pitch, people with different personalities and feelings.”
The best example has been James
Rodríguez, on loan from Madrid.
Bayern will make the deal permanent
at the end of the season. “He was a
bit down, not in good physical shape
either, but I have talked to him a lot
and his confidence came back. He is
more free now and our fans love seeing him play: he has fantastic vision,
he’s integrated into the team, happy
in Munich. The team that wins the
Champions League is the one that is
most united.”
Toni Kroos, who was part of Bayern’s
2013 Champions League winning team
and plays for Madrid, said: “Heynckes
is able to make the collective function;
the atmosphere within a team is very
important. It’s not just about tactical
issues; it’s also good to keep everyone
happy. We’re here to change that a bit.”
And that is the thing. For all
Heynckes’s confidence, for all that he
responded to questions about how he
could stop Cristiano Ronaldo by replying, “I might ask you how they can
stop Robert Lewandowski,” he was
quick to note Madrid are formidable.
The chance to win this trophy a third
time awaits, something achieved only
by Bob Paisley and Carlo Ancelotti.
But the team standing before him are
Real Madrid and, as Kroos put it, “the
Champions League releases special
powers” in them.
Zinedine Zidane, like Heynckes,
is seeking his third European Cup
as a manager. It took him 18 months
to win two, the first manager in the
Champions League era to win consecutive titles; it is 20 years since
Heynckes first won it, five since his
last. In 1998 he won it with Madrid. On
the other side, playing for Juventus,
was Zidane, 27 years his junior.
“He is a coach I have maximum
respect for,” Zidane said. “He has
done great things, he’s admirable. I
only have good words for this man.”
The feeling is mutual; there was
warmth in Heynckes’s words. “I have
always been a great admirer of Zidane
as a player and a coach,” he said. “I love
how Real Madrid play and his calmness on the touchline, not playing to
the gallery or the TV cameras.”
There is something more than
finance, Heynckes noted. There was
also a sense of vindication when it is
considered these teams, though no
paupers, faced Paris Saint-Germain
this season and are still there. “A team
has to respect itself. You can’t buy the
Champions League,” he said. You cannot buy moments like this either.
Bayern Munich
•
Ulreich
•
Boateng
•
Kimmich
Real Madrid
Today 7.45pm
Semi-final, first leg
• Bayern Munich
Subs from Starke,
Süle, Rafinha, Bernat,
Mai, Rudy, Alcântara,
Rodríguez, Tolisso,
Wagner, Wriedt
Doubtful Alaba, Tolisso
Injured Coman, Neuer,
Vidal
• Real Madrid
Subs from
Casilla, Vallejo, Nacho,
Hernández, Hakimi, Bale,
Vázquez, Llorente,
Asensio, Kovacic,
Ceballos, Mayoral
Doubtful Nacho
(probable teams)
Venue Allianz Arena
Referee Björn Kuipers (Neth)
TV BT Sport 2 Radio BBC 5 Live
22°
•
Hummels
•
Martínez
•
Müller
•
Robben
•
Ribéry
•
Benzema
•
Ronaldo
•
Marcelo
•
James
•
Lewandowski
•
Kroos
•
Isco
•
Casemiro
•
Varane
•
Alaba
•
Navas
•
Modric
•
• Carvajal
Ramos
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:48 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 20:26
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
48
Sport
Football Champions League
▼ James Rodríguez (right) has been
reinvigorated since joining Bayern,
adding extra craft in attack
CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Heynckes savours
chance to beat Real
in quest for history
German is looking for third
Champions League title, as is
his old friend and foe, Zidane
Sid Lowe
Munich
“Nobody had any intention of me
being here,” Jupp Heynckes said, sitting at a desk at the Allianz Arena, a
microphone tilted towards him, the
board behind splattered with sponsors, a card in front saying: “Uefa
Champions League”.
It turned out he was not finished
after all but at 72 this really will be the
last time, one more European night
in Munich. Six months after being
pulled from retirement, called by his
old friend Uli Hoeness and asked to
‘Great coach,
great person’
Michel dies
aged 70
coach Bayern for a fourth time, he
leads his club into another semi-final.
In front of him stands another club
with which he has won this competition, Real Madrid.
Returning was, Heynckes said then,
“a question of the heart”. But if he
was coming back, it was to compete.
Bayern recovered: the league title is
won, the cup awaits and another treble
is possible, as in 2013. “I adore football
and, if I do a job, I do it 100 per cent,”
he said here. “These are the games you
work for and lots of coaches never get
the chance to play one of these in their
lives. I came back at a very old age and
now I have the privilege of being successful again, reaching a semi-final
and possibly going through to the final.
I am confident.
“Football has changed but my style
of leadership, my approach, hasn’t.
Henri Michel, who guided France to
an Olympic gold medal and third place
in the World Cup, has died at the age
of 70.
Michel managed the team who won
gold at the Los Angeles Olympics in
1984. Under him, France made the
semi-finals of the World Cup in Mexico
two years later where they lost 2-0 to
West Germany before beating Belgium
4-2 to seal third place.
He made more than 500 appearances for Nantes and won three league
titles in a 16-year career with the club
that ended when he retired in 1982.
The midfielder earned 58 caps from
1967-80 and scored four goals. He was
The game has progressed but in the
end they are still people out on the
pitch, people with different personalities and feelings.”
The best example has been James
Rodríguez, on loan from Madrid.
Bayern will make the deal permanent
at the end of the season. “He was a
bit down, not in good physical shape
either, but I have talked to him a lot
and his confidence came back. He is
more free now and our fans love seeing him play: he has fantastic vision,
he’s integrated into the team, happy
in Munich. The team that wins the
Champions League is the one that is
most united.”
Toni Kroos, who was part of Bayern’s
2013 Champions League winning team
and plays for Madrid, said: “I have the
feeling they are much better off with
Heynckes. Physically they look to be
in good shape, you can see there is a
good atmosphere in the team and the
whole club.
“Heynckes is able to make the
collective function; the atmosphere
within a team is very important. It’s
not just about tactical issues; it’s also
good to keep everyone happy. We’re
here to change that a bit.”
And that is the thing. For all
Heynckes’s confidence, for all that he
responded to questions about how he
also selected for France’s 1978 World
Cup squad.
Michel managed eight national
teams and was in charge of three more
sides at the World Cup: Cameroon
(1994), Morocco (1998) and Ivory Coast
(2006). His last assignment was with
Kenya in 2012. He also managed Ivory
Coast, Equatorial Guinea and UAE.
Mido, whom Michel managed at
Zamalek in Egypt, tweeted: “He was
a great person and a great coach.”
Reuters and Guardian sport
Henri Michel with Luis Fernandez
after France beat Brazil at Mexico 1986
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
could stop Cristiano Ronaldo by replying, “I might ask you how they can stop
Robert Lewandowski,” he was quick to
note Madrid are formidable.
The chance to win this trophy a third
time awaits, something achieved only
by Bob Paisley and Carlo Ancelotti.
But the team standing before him are
Real Madrid and, as Kroos put it, “the
Champions League releases special
powers” in them. The man occupying the other bench also has a special
relationship with this competition and
in which he has admitted to feeling he
has some kind of guiding “star”.
Zinedine Zidane, like Heynckes,
is seeking his third European Cup
as a manager. It took him 18 months
to win two, the first manager in the
Champions League era to win consecutive titles; it is 20 years since
Heynckes first won it, five since his
last. In 1998 he won it with Madrid,
ending the club’s 32-year wait to be
European champions again – “a liberation,” Heynckes called it, although
he insisted he had never watched the
video. On the other side, playing for
Juventus, was Zidane, 27 years his
junior.
“He is a coach I have maximum
respect for,” Zidane said. “He has
done great things, he’s admirable. I
only have good words for this man.
And Bayern is not just a good team,
it’s a great club.”
The feeling is mutual; there was
warmth in Heynckes’s words. “I
have played against great players
and coaches: Sacchi, Cruyff, Lippi,
Happel and I have always been a great
admirer of Zinedine Zidane as a player
and a coach,” he said. “I love how Real
Madrid play and his calmness on the
touchline, not playing to the gallery or
the TV cameras. For 90 minutes he follows what is happening on the pitch.”
There is something more than
finance, Heynckes noted, something
deeper that has revived. And while he
was clearly enjoying this, there was
also a sense of vindication and his line
sounded perhaps more pointed when
it is considered these teams, though
no paupers, faced Paris Saint-Germain
this season and, unlike the French
champions, are still there. “A team has
to respect itself, have human qualities.
You can’t buy the Champions League,”
he said. You cannot buy moments like
this either.
Bayern Munich
•
Ulreich
•
Boateng
•
Kimmich
Real Madrid
Today 7.45pm
• Bayern Munich
Subs from Starke,
Süle, Rafinha, Bernat,
Mai, Rudy, Alcântara,
Rodríguez, Tolisso,
Wagner, Wriedt
Doubtful Alaba, Tolisso
Injured Coman, Neuer,
Vidal
Semi-final, first leg
• Real Madrid
Subs from
Casilla, Vallejo, Nacho,
Hernández, Hakimi, Bale,
Vázquez, Llorente,
Asensio, Kovacic,
Ceballos, Mayoral
Doubtful Nacho
(probable teams)
Venue Allianz Arena
Referee Björn Kuipers (Neth)
TV BT Sport 2 Radio BBC 5 Live
22°
•
Hummels
•
Martínez
•
Müller
•
Robben
•
Alaba
•
James
•
Ribéry
•
Lewandowski
•
Benzema
•
Ronaldo
•
Isco
•
Kroos
•
Marcelo
•
Casemiro
•
Varane
•
Navas
•
Modric
•
• Carvajal
Ramos
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:49 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 21:53
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
Sport
Football Champions League semi-final first leg
49
Verdict
Barney Ronay Anfield
That majestic Salah
spring just keeps
rolling along for
relentless Liverpool
T
en minutes before
half-time Mohamed
Salah did the best
thing, so far, of the
many wonderful
things contained in
an impossibly dreamy Liverpool
season.
By that stage the stadium was
in one of those periods of constant
uproar, jiggled and tickled and
dragged into a state of pure
intoxication as Liverpool battered
and pummelled the Roma defence.
It is no secret this Liverpool
team play in surges, moments
when the day seems to turn a
shade of deep red, and when that
front three becomes a whirl of
malevolent action, gorging itself
on the will of the crowd.
This, though, was something
new on a night when Liverpool
and Salah did not just take the tie
away from Roma, they absolutely
eviscerated them.
This was not just a beating. It
was almost cruel at times, a beating
handed out in relentless waves. Of
five Liverpool goals in a 5-2 victory
Salah scored two and provided
three assists for Roberto Firmino,
twice, and Sadio Mané.
This was that rare thing, an
athlete at the top of his profession
finding new heights, new
levels in an already vertiginous
talent. There may be a more
breathtakingly brilliant attacking
performance in Europe this season
but, given the game, the stage,
there has not been one yet.
For the Premier League’s
players’ player of the year this is
▲ Edin Dzeko sparks Roma’s
fightback by making it 5-1
genuinely elite territory, the kind
of performance that ends up on
stage in Zurich draped in a terrible
tuxedo holding a golden bauble
and beaming with that rare glaze of
sporting ultimacy.
Best of all it began with the most
vital beautiful goal of a season
of beautiful goals, one of those
moments when the game can still
seem to stop just for a fraction of a
second.
The score was still at 0-0 when
Salah took the ball inside the
penalty area and found himself
with the tiniest pocket of space. A
shift of feet, the tiniest look and he
produced a shot that did that rare
thing, hanging, stopping, sucking
the air out of the
stadium as it arced
under the bar,
crashing down over
the line to draw just
the tiniest of gasps
before the stadium
exploded.
For Salah it was
the first marker in
a 15-minute spell
where the mind,
already boggled by
his achievements,
starts to wonder exactly where all
this surplus brilliance is heading.
Best of all it came after a slightly
angsty, bitty start. For 25 minutes
this had been a different kind of
night as Roma’s calmness on the
ball, the physical power of this team,
perhaps even the loss of momentum
caused by a bad injury to Alex
Oxlade-Chamberlain, took the
crackle out of the air.
Liverpool found their jump-start
in the 26th minute, sparked by a
hacking foul on Mané. At which
point: ignition. Welcome to the Mo
Zone.
If it was Salah who provided the
assassin’s eye, this was a team surge,
an exhilarating 20-minute spell of
murder ball. First Mané missed a
glorious chance, galloping through
after some lovely work by Firmino,
then spooning a shot over the bar.
Roma had, as predicted , come
prepared, with three white shirts
bubbling up around Salah whenever
he looked like firing up the jets.
Steadily, though, he began to find
his little pocket of space, skating in
from that left-hand side with vicious
intent, playing now in his own little
clear pool of light.
‘This wasn’t just
a beating. It was
almost cruel at
times, a beating
handed out in
relentless waves’
The goal was coming, hammering
at the walls, moaning through
the keyhole. Liverpool are simply
relentless in those periods, shaking
and ragging this Roma team in their
jaws like a terrier with an old leather
slipper.
If that shot into the top corner
to make it 1-0 brought Anfield to its
feet, the finish for Salah’s second just
before half-time was utterly distinct.
Again it was Firmino with some
sublime approach play. But this time
the finish from Salah was a caress, a
dink over Alisson that drew coos and
gurgles in among the roars.
Salah left the field to a vast
ovation with 15 minutes left. At
which point Roma rallied, showing
their own qualities, and scored
two away goals that complicate the
second leg just a little. If only a little.
They will, lest we forget, have to face
Salah again next week.
What to say about him now, in a
season that simply keeps on rising
higher and higher, beyond the peaks
and through the clouds. It is easy to
forget this was exceptionally pointed
occasion for Salah personally, newly
crowned as player of the year and
now facing the biggest club game
of his career, against his former
employer and with the burden of
driving this Liverpool team on:
unarguably the star, against an
opponent forewarned and prepared.
For now that majestic Salah spring
on Merseyside just keeps rolling
along, with 22 goals and nine assists
now in his 19 starts since Boxing Day.
More significant than the numbers
▲ Jürgen Klopp celebrates
Mohamed Salah’s opening goal for
Liverpool against Roma
TOM JENKINS/THE GUARDIAN
is the spectacle, the basic joy in
Salah’s free-running interpretation
of the inside-forward role, a
combination of preternatural
quick feet, fearless, head-up speed
and a creative, gymnastic range
of movement, that rare ability to
make the game up in front of him.
He was too much for Roma here,
as he has been for so many others
this season. Defensive jitters
may have let the visitors back in
towards the end. But Liverpool
will travel to Rome with real
confidence, driven on by their own
majestic ace.
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:50 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 21:55
cYanmaGentaYellowb
The Guardian Wednesday 25 April 2018
•
Sport
Football Champions League semi-final first leg
50
36’
PETER BYRNE/PA WIRE; CHRIS BRUNSKILL LTD/GETTY; TOM JENKINS/THE GUARDIAN; CLIVE BRUNSKILL/GETTY; OLI SCARFF/AFP/GETTY
1–0
Spellbinding Salah lights up
Anfield on night for the ages
Liverpool
5
Salah 36 45, Mané 56, Firmino 61 68
Roma
2
Dzeko 81, Perotti 85pen
Possession
Liverpool
51%
Roma
49%
Shots on target
15
6
Total attempts
20
10
Daniel Taylor
Anfield
Of all the mesmerising nights Liverpool have experienced under Anfield’s
floodlights in European competition,
where does this one stand? Up there,
surely, with Saint-Étienne in 1977, the
take-a-bow goal from Steven Gerrard
against Olympiakos in 2005 and the
fightback against Borussia Dortmund
in 2016. Liverpool have put themselves
in command and, barring an almost
implausible feat of escapology, can
start looking forward to the final in
Ukraine on 26 May.
The only possibly note of caution
could be that Roma have already overcome a 4-1 first-leg deficit in the Stadio Olimpico against Barcelona in the
quarter-finals. On that basis, Jürgen
Klopp will be dismayed by his team’s
carelessness when they had a 5-0 lead.
Perhaps the manager made a mistake
of his own by withdrawing Mohamed
Salah, who had scored two and set
up another couple. Roma promptly
scored twice and, somehow, Liverpool managed to combined scoring
five times with a nervous climax to
an extraordinary night.
Ultimately, though, it was another
triumphant night for Klopp’s men
and they will go into the return leg in
a position of considerable strength.
True, it might not have been the position they anticipated when they led by
five goals and were threatening to add
even more. But what does it say that
they could win so thrillingly and still
end up looking a shade disappointed
at the final whistle?
When Manchester City came here in
the quarter-finals Liverpool inflicted
the damage with a blitz of three goals
before half-time. This time, Klopp’s
men restricted themselves to Salah’s
double and for almost half an hour
Roma created the illusion that they
might actually be more streetwise
opponents than Pep Guardiola’s team
– not so easy on the eye, but a different
kind of challenge, quick to the ball, and
strong in the tackle.
That, however, turned out to be
a deception and it was a remarkable
spell from Liverpool once they found
their rhythm, attacking from every
angle, with Salah at the hub of everything. That was the period when the
Egyptian scored his 42nd and 43rd
goals of the season but Liverpool, if
anything, might have felt aggrieved
not to have added more. Sadio Mané
squandered two golden chances in
quick succession before Salah curled
in a beauty to open the scoring. At 1-0,
Dejan Lovren headed a corner against
the crossbar. Liverpool, once again,
were looking for a quick kill and the
volume was turned to its highest.
Those were the moments when we
were reminded why Roma have won
only one of their last 14 Champions
League excursions and not kept a clean
sheet in 26 away games in this competition. There is only Celtic, with 30,
who have gone longer and Liverpool
are merciless when they sense weakness in the opposition defence. Mané’s
finishing might have been erratic but
he quickly realised he had the beating
of Federico Fazio, formerly a Tottenham Hotspur reserve. Roberto Firmino
rarely disappoints on the big occasions
and then, of course, there was the little
guy holding up his palms in front of the
away end to apologise for his goals.
Salah scored 34 times in 83 appearances for Roma but his performance
here was another reminder that he is
now playing at a different level. His
first goal was a peach but the second
one was not too shabby either. Firmino
slipped the pass through the middle
and once Salah reached the ball first
there was a sense of inevitability about
what would happen next. He took a
touch to steady himself, then lifted the
ball over Alisson as if it was the easiest
thing in the world.
One downside for Liverpool came in
the form of the injury suffered by Alex
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:51 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Wednesday 25 April 2018 The Guardian
Sent at 24/4/2018 21:58
•
‘The goal was coming,
hammering at the walls,
moaning through the keyhole’
Barney Ronay Page 49 2–0
3–0
Results
51
Football
45’
56’
UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE SEMI-FINAL FIRST LEG
Liverpool
(2) 5 Roma
(0) 2
Salah 36 45
Dzeko 81
Mané 56
Perrotti 85pen
Firmino 61 69
SKY BET CHAMPIONSHIP
P W
Wolverhampton C 44 30
Cardiff
44 26
Fulham
44 24
Aston Villa
44 24
Middlesbrough
44 21
Derby
44 19
Millwall
44 18
Brentford
44 18
Preston North End 44 17
Bristol City
44 17
Sheffield United
44 19
Leeds United
44 16
Norwich
44 14
Ipswich
44 16
Sheffield Weds
44 13
QPR
44 14
Nottingham Forest 44 15
Hull City
44 11
Reading
44 10
Birmingham
44 12
Bolton
44
9
Barnsley
44
8
Burton Albion
44
9
Sunderland R
44
6
61 ’
4–0
Derby
Jerome 69 90
Vydra 82
(0) 3
Nottingham Forest (2) 3
Tomlin 26
Brereton 36
Velios 90
SKY BET LEAGUE ONE
P
Wigan P
44
Blackburn P
44
Shrewsbury
44
Rotherham
44
Charlton
44
Scunthorpe
43
Plymouth
43
Portsmouth
44
Peterborough
44
Bradford
43
44
Blackpool
Southend
44
Bristol Rovers
44
Doncaster
43
Fleetwood Town 44
Oxford Utd
44
Gillingham
44
AFC Wimbledon
43
Rochdale
44
Walsall
43
Oldham
44
Northampton
44
Milton Keynes Dons 44
Bury
44
68’
5–0
W
28
27
25
23
19
17
18
19
16
18
15
16
16
13
15
14
12
13
10
12
11
12
10
7
10
Mo Salah’s goals in this season’s
Champions League – a club record
in a single European campaign
43
His 2017-18 Liverpool goals in all
competitions, outstripping Roger
Hunt (42) but behind Ian Rush (47)
5
He has scored in five Champions
League starts in a row. At Liverpool
only Steven Gerrard has done that
0
African players with more goals
in a Champions League season
Oxlade-Chamberlain when he slid in
to challenge Aleksandar Kolarov in the
first half. His knee took the impact and
it was obvious straight away that the
midfielder was in a lot of distress. He
was taken off on a stretcher and his
chances of being involved in Rome
look minimal. Indeed, Oxlade-Chamberlain seemed so badly hurt there
have to be concerns it might be a more
serious lay-off for the England international. Oxlade-Chamberlain has a
World Cup starting in two months and,
almost certainly, a Champions League
final he will not want to miss.
Klopp, of course, will not be so presumptuous but Roma disintegrated
once Liverpool, to use one of the manager’s sayings, started to play “pressing from another planet”. In those
moments it was easy to pity Eusebio Di
Francesco’s side. They were taking an
almighty chasing, outclassed in every
department, and one of the more alluring traits of this Liverpool side is that
when they are in a winning position
they always go looking for more goals.
Another team might have prioritised a
clean sheet in the second half. Liverpool, on the other hand, sensed a rout.
Mané added the third goal from
one of Salah’s expertly placed centres
and Firmino made it 4-0. Again, it was
Salah who set it up, eluding Juan Jesus
before picking out his team-mate.
When Firmino headed in James
Milner’s corner for the fifth goal it
needed a few moments to take in the
fact Salah had not been involved. But
then Liverpool’s chief tormentor was
withdrawn and Roma suddenly found
momentum. Edin Dzeko pulled the
first back after Lovren missed a header
and Diego Perotti added another four
minutes later from the penalty spot
after Milner’s handball. Liverpool,
incredibly, were hanging on by the
end – but surely the eighth final in the
club’s history awaits.
Liverpool
4-3-3
Karius; AlexanderArnold•, Lovren•,
Van Dijk, Robertson;
Oxlade-Chamberlain
(Wijnaldum 18),
Henderson•, Milner;
Salah (Ings 75), Firmino
(Klavan 90), Mané
Subs not used
Mignolet, Clyne,
Moreno, Solanke
Referee Felix Brych (Ger)
Roma
3-4-2-1
Alisson; Fázio•, Manolas,
Jesus• (Perotti 67);
Florenzi, De Rossi
(Gonalons 67), Strootman,
Kolarov; Ünder
(Schick h-t), Nainggolan;
Dzeko
Subs not used
Skorupski, Pellegrini,
Peres, El Shaarawy
D
8
8
13
10
9
14
15
14
16
15
9
9
15
8
14
11
7
15
13
7
13
14
11
16
L
6
10
7
10
14
11
11
12
11
12
16
19
15
20
17
19
22
18
21
25
22
22
24
22
F
82
67
76
71
63
65
55
61
54
65
59
56
46
51
54
55
49
69
48
34
36
45
35
48
A
36
39
42
40
43
56
43
49
45
55
52
62
54
58
59
67
62
67
66
64
70
68
79
78
GD
+46
+28
+34
+31
+20
+19
+12
+12
+9
+10
+7
-6
-8
-7
-5
-12
-13
+2
-18
-30
-34
-23
-44
-30
Pts
98
86
85
82
72
69
68
68
67
66
66
57
57
56
53
53
52
48
43
43
40
38
38
34
Cardiff
Paterson 28
30,294
(1) 1
Barnsley
(0) 0
D
10
12
11
7
11
16
11
6
13
7
14
11
9
15
9
11
16
11
18
12
15
10
12
11
L
6
5
8
14
14
10
14
19
15
18
15
17
19
15
20
19
16
19
16
19
18
22
22
26
F
87
80
59
71
57
60
54
55
66
55
59
56
59
52
57
58
44
44
47
51
56
41
42
38
A
28
38
37
51
50
49
51
55
58
63
53
62
65
51
66
63
52
55
55
63
73
74
67
69
GD
+59
+42
+22
+20
+7
+11
+3
0
+8
-8
+6
-6
-6
+1
-9
-5
-8
-11
-8
-12
-17
-33
-25
-31
Pts
94
93
86
76
68
67
65
63
61
61
59
59
57
54
54
53
52
50
48
48
48
46
42
32
(1) 2
MK Dons
(0) 0
Bristol Rovers
Sercombe 28
8,414
(1) 1
Wigan
Colclough 80pen
(0) 1
Doncaster
10,443
(0) 0
Blackburn
Mulgrew 80
(0) 1
Oldham
(0) 0
Southend
Robinson 5
Cox 52, 56
(1) 3
Rochdale
Delaney 55
2,760
(0) 1
Plymouth
Grant 53
(0) 1
Shrewsbury
Beckles 59
Payne 73
John-Lewis 90
(0) 3
Peterborough
Edwards 14
(1) 1
4,666
SKY BET LEAGUE TWO
P
Accrington P
44
Luton P
44
Wycombe
44
Exeter
44
Notts County
44
Lincoln City
44
Coventry
44
Mansfield
44
Swindon
44
Carlisle
44
Colchester
44
Cambridge Utd
44
Newport County
43
Crawley Town
44
44
Stevenage
Cheltenham
44
Crewe
44
Port Vale
44
Yeovil
44
Forest Green
44
Morecambe
44
Grimsby
44
Barnet
44
Chesterfield R
43
W
28
24
22
23
21
20
21
17
19
16
16
16
15
16
13
13
15
11
12
13
9
11
10
9
D
6
12
12
8
13
14
8
17
7
15
13
13
15
10
13
12
5
14
11
8
18
12
10
8
L
10
8
10
13
10
10
15
10
18
13
15
15
13
18
18
19
24
19
21
23
17
21
24
26
Newport County
Amond 30
Nouble 85
(1) 2
Accrington Stanley
Kee 90
2,370
(0) 1
Yeovil
2,789
(0) 0
Forest Green
(0) 0
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE
Bromley 0 Barrow 0; Gateshead 2 Ebbsfleet 5;
Leyton Orient 0 Maidenhead 1; Torquay 3 Guiseley 4;
Tranmere 1 Solihull Moors 2
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE NORTH
Blyth Spartans 2 Curzon Ashton 1; Nuneaton P Boston Utd P;
Spennymoor Town 1 AFC Telford 2
VANARAMA NATIONAL LEAGUE SOUTH
Bognor Regis 0 Chelmsford 1;Braintree 0 Oxford City 0;
Concord Rangers 1 Hungerford 0; Poole 1 Whitehawk 1
Welling 0 Bath City 2; Weston-Super-Mare 0 Truro City 2
EVO-STIK NORTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE
Altrincham L Marine L; Barwell L Stourbridge L; Grantham L
Warrington Town L; Lancaster City L Buxton L;
Matlock Town L Ashton Utd L; Nantwich L Shaw Lane L;
Stalybridge L Workington L; Whitby L Rushall Olympic L;
Witton Albion L Farsley Celtic L
EVO-STIK SOUTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE
Biggleswade Town L Dunstable L; Bishop’s Stortford L
Merthyr Town L; Kettering L Tiverton L; Royston Town L
Slough L; St Ives Town L Chesham L
BOSTIK PREMIER LEAGUE
Billericay 2 Harlow 0; Dorking 0 Harrow Borough 4;
Leiston 2 Needham Market 0
LADBROKES SCOTTISH CHAMPIONSHIP
Livingston 0 Inverness CT 1
LADBROKES SCOTTISH LEAGUE TWO
Berwick 2 Stenhousemuir 2
PRESS & JOURNAL HIGHLAND LEAGUE
Cove Rangers L Nairn L; Strathspey L Fraserburgh L
FERRARI PACKAGING LOWLAND LEAGUE
Whitehill Welfare 3 Hawick Royal Albert 1
JD WELSH PREMIER LEAGUE
Prestatyn Town 0 Barry Town 0
23,633
Bradford
Dieng 12
Knight-Percival 80
3,362
Salah’s landmarks
cYanmaGentaYellowb
F
75
91
76
62
70
63
58
63
64
59
53
50
53
56
57
65
58
48
56
53
41
37
42
45
A
43
45
59
51
46
46
46
49
65
52
51
58
55
63
63
65
73
60
71
71
55
65
65
78
GD
+32
+46
+17
+11
+24
+17
+12
+14
-1
+7
+2
-8
-2
-7
-6
0
-15
-12
-15
-18
-14
-28
-23
-33
Pts
90
84
78
77
76
74
71
68
64
63
61
61
60
58
52
51
50
47
47
47
45
45
40
35
Coventry
Bayliss 16
Shipley 39
(2) 2
Lincoln City
Rhead 1
Palmer 38 44
Frecklington 67
(3) 4
Morecambe
992
(0) 0
Cambridge Utd
(0) 0
EA SPORTS LEAGUE OF IRELAND CUP
Second round: Shamrock Rovers 0 Longford Town 1;
Shelbourne 7 Drogheda United 2
FA WOMEN’S SUPER LEAGUE
Arsenal 3 Liverpool 0
Rugby union
GREENE KING IPA CHAMPIONSHIP
Nottingham 41 Bedford 21
Cricket
INDIAN PREMIER LEAGUE
Mumbai: Mumbai Indians 87 all out (Yadav 34, Pandya 24);
Sunrisers Hyderabad 118 all out (Williamson 29, Pathan
29); Sunrisers won by 31 runs
Tennis
ATP BARCELONA OPEN BANC SABADELL (Spain)
First round: R Carballés Baena (Sp) bt A Haider-Maurer
(Aut) 6-2 6-4; G Pella (Arg) bt P Gojowczyk (Ger) 6-4 6-4;
M Klizan (Svk) bt F Delbonis (Arg) 6-3 6-7 (5-7) 6-4;
G Simon (Fra) bt I Ivashka (Blr) 6-2 6-3; B Fratangelo (US)
bt A Vatutin (Rus) 7-5 5-7 6-3; J Munar (Sp) bt
J Sousa (Por) 6-4 3-6 7-5. Second round: D Goffin (Bel) bt
M Granollers (Sp) 4-6 7-6 (7-2) 6-2; M Jaziri (Tun) bt
E Escobedo (US) 6-4 6-3; F López (Sp) bt D Lajovic (Ser) 6-4
2-6 6-4; R Bautista-Agut (Sp) bt I Karlovic (Cro) 6-7 (4-7)
6-2 6-4; A Mannarino (Fr) bt P Cuevas (Uru) 6-4 7-6 (7-5)
ATP GAZPROM HUNGARIAN OPEN (Budapest)
First round: J-L Struff (Ger) bt J Zopp (Est) 2-6 6-4 7-5;
A Bublik (Kaz) bt D Istomin (Uzb) 6-7 (6-8) 7-6 (7-5) 7-5;
M Marterer (Ger) bt V Troicki (Ser) 3-6 6-4 6-4; Y Maden
(Ger) bt M Fucsovics (Hun) 4-6 6-3 6-2; N Basilashvili (Geo)
bt P Lorenzi (Ita) 6-4 6-2
WTA PORSCHE GRAND PRIX (Stuttgart)
First round: M Kostyuk (Ukr) bt A Lottner (Ger) 6-4 6-1;
Karolina Pliskova (Cze) bt K Bertens (Neth) 6-2 6-2;
C Garcia (Fr) bt M Sharapova (Rus) 3-6 7-6 (8-6) 6-4;
M Vondrousova (Cze) bt J Goerges (Ger) 6-2 6-2;
L Siegemund (Ger) bt B Strycova (Cze) 6-4 3-2
WTA BNP PARIBAS ISTANBUL CUP (Turkey)
First round: I-C Begu (Rom) bt D Jakupovic (Slo) 7-5 6-0;
V Tomova (Bul) bt V Ivakhnenko (Rus) 7-5 6-4;
Y Putintseva (Kaz) bt S Cirstea (Rom) 0-6 6-1 6-0;
P Parmentier (Fr) bt A Aksu (Tur) 6-2 6-2; D Kovinic (Mne)
bt A Kalinskaya (Rus) 6-3 6-3; A Rus (Neth) bt S Zhang
(Chn) 6-2 6-3; D Vekic (Cro) bt A Radwanska (Pol) 6-1 2-0
ret; M Sakkari (Gr) bt C Buyukakcay (Tur) 7-5 6-2;
C Wozniacki (Den) bt E Alexandrova (Rus) 6-2 6-2
Snooker
BETFRED WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP (Sheffield)
First round: B Hawkins (Eng) bt S Carrington (Eng) 10-7;
D Junhui (Chn) bt X Guodong (Chn) 10-3;
R Walden (Eng) bt L Brecel (Bel) 10-6;
J Lisowski (Eng) bt S Bingham (Eng) 10-7
Cycling
TOUR DE ROMANDIE (Switzerland)
Prologue (Fribourg, 4km time trial): 1 M Matthews (Aus)
Sunweb 5min 33sec; 2 T Bohli (Sui) BMC at 1 sec; 3 Primoz
Roglic (Slo) LottoNL-Jumbo; 4 R Dennis (Aus) BMC at same
time; 5 V Campenaerts (Bel) Lotto-Soudal at 5sec
Basketball
NBA PLAY-OFFS
Western Conference: First round Minnesota Timberwolves
100 Houston Rockets 119 (Houston lead series 3-1); Utah
Jazz 113 Oklahoma City Thunder 96 (Utah lead series 3-1)
Baseball
MLB
Baltimore 1 Cleveland 2; Chicago White Sox 10
Seattle 4; Cincinnati 10 Atlanta 4; Colorado 5 San Diego 13;
Houston 0 LA Angels 2; LA Dodgers 2 Miami 1;
New York Yankees 14 Minnesota 1; San Francisco 4
Washington 2; Texas 4 Oakland 9 .
Fixtures
Football (7.45pm unless stated)
Uefa Champions League
Semi-final: First leg Bayern Munich v Real Madrid
Vanarama National League North
Brackley Town v Chorley; Darlington v Southport
Vanarama National League South
Havant & Waterlooville v East Thurrock
Section:GDN 1N PaGe:52 Edition Date:180425 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 24/4/2018 21:44
cYanmaGentaYellowb
•
Sports newspaper of the year
The Guardian
Wednesday 25 April 2018
Match report
Daniel Taylor
Page 50
Liverpool
Roma
5
2
Salah 36 45, Mané
56, Firmino 61 68,
Dzeko 81,
Perotti 85pen
Sensational Salah
Reds in the driving seat
… but Roma have hope
Barney Ronay ‘Anfield was in one of those periods of
n’
constant uproar, dragged into a state of pure intoxication’
Page 49 ▲ Mo Salah takes the
acclaim for scoring
Liverpool’s first goal
PHOTOGRAPH:
PETER BYRNE/PA
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