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Animal Talk - May 2018

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www.animaltalk.co.za
R
#281
MAY 2018
animaltalk
animaltalk
EXPERT ADVICE
Your guide to responsible pet ownership
WHAT IS YOUR
DOG THINKING?
P.08
• Does he feel emotions?
• Can dogs sympathise?
Divorce
The pet custody battle
14 points to consider
10 cool things
about the
GIRAFFE
Expert advice
• First aid - treating hypothermia
• How to choose an ideal boarding kennel
• 7 tips on choosing puppy food
• Can cats suffer from nightmares?
More on ... chewing, hairballs and vaccinations
Catslife
• Surviving kitty’s first night at home
• What food to choose for your kitten
• Balinese cat breed profile
KIDS’ PAGES
Collect your animal trump cards
Puzzles and activities
Vol 24 No 05 RSA R35.90 incl VAT
Other African Countries R31.22 excl TAX
pg80
Active dogs: Bearded Collie,
Belgian Shepherd, Puli
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ED’SNOTE
your guide to responsible pet ownership
Never give a puppy
or kitten as a gift,
unless you are 100%
sure that is what that
person wants.
OUR EXPERTS
KATHERINE BROWN
I am a dog and cat behaviour consultant,
with an honours degree in psychology
(UJ, 2008) and five qualifications
from Ethology Academy (2009). I am
pursuing an ADip in Canine Behaviour
Management (PetSense College).
I am a member of the ABC of SA.
SAMANTHA WALPOLE
I am an accredited behaviourist; secretary
and vice chair for the South African Board
of Companion Animal Professionals; and
full member with The Pet Professional
Guild. I also run my own behaviour
business, Be The Dog.
DR DORIANNE ELLIOTT
I qualified as a veterinarian from the
Onderstepoort Faculty of Veterinary
Science in 2002. I began working in
the Bird and Exotic Animal Hospital
directly after qualifying and am now
the head veterinarian.
DINO MONTEPARA
I am a director at Malherbe Rigg &
Ranwell Attorneys and have been with
the firm since 2004. I specialise in
divorce and family law while also being
actively involved in the general and
commercial High Court and Magistrate’s
Court practice of the firm.
VANESSA MCCLURE
I am a senior lecturer and internal
medicine clinician in the Companion
Animal Clinical Studies Department,
Faculty of Veterinary Science,
Onderstepoort.
If you can’t find the magazine at your
local bookstore or supermarket, visit
this link: www.panoramamedia.net/
cannot-find-favourite-magazine/
or scan this QR code
Love thy puppy
There is just something about puppies
and kittens that makes everybody’s
heart melt. The new bundle of joy,
whether he is furry or not, with his big
eyes and normally big ears, is just too
cute to ignore. And let’s not start with
puppy breath – there is just something
heart-warming about that smell.
Getting your first puppy or kitten is
as exciting as bringing a baby home.
At first, the new baby animal is so
adorable, but after a while, you realise
how much work it is. Experts advise that
people only get a new puppy or kitten
if they are sure that they are ready for
him, that they can afford the financial
obligations, and that they have the time
to spend training and loving the new
pet. And never give a puppy or kitten as
a gift, unless you are 100% sure that is
what that person wants.
In this issue, we focus on puppies and
kittens, their diets, vaccinations and
your kitten’s first night at home. Read
more about why puppies should eat
age-specific food and what puppy food
contains that makes it special
on page 20.
The first night at home can be
MAY 2018 VOLUME 24 NUMBER 05
ON THE COVER
Mixed breed dog
(photo: Mary Swift)
Animaltalk | May 2018
PUBLISHER Urs Honegger
EDITOR Mientjie Kleinhans | mientjie@panorama.co.za
SENIOR SUB-EDITOR Vanessa Koekemoer
SUB-EDITOR Nicolette Els
OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION MANAGER Paul Kotze
DTP STUDIO MANAGER Cronjé du Toit
TRAFFIC & PRODUCTION Juanita Pattenden
SENIOR DESIGNER Mauray Wolff
DESIGNER Perpetua Chigumira-Wenda
SALES MANAGER Gillian Johnston
SALES EXECUTIVE
Jackie Browning | jackie@panorama.co.za
Tel: 011 468 2090
BREEDERS & CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING
ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE
Nora de Vries | nora@panorama.co.za
SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@panorama.co.za
Tel: 011 468 2090 | Fax: 086 677 7100
www.animaltalk.co.za
www.coolmags.com
ACCOUNTS accounts@panorama.co.za
DISTRIBUTION Republican News Agency
ISSN 1023-9251
PRINTERS Business Print
daunting for both the new owner and
the kitten. While kitty is away from
her family for the first time, the new
owner might not know what to expect.
The article on page 38 takes a look at
what should be done to make kitty feel
welcome and comfortable.
Whether it is a new cat or dog, it
is a lifetime commitment to health,
nutrition, training, some lifestyle
changes and handling behavioural
issues. For those who need more
information on raising puppies into
well-balanced adult dogs, read Southern
Africa’s Dog Directory 2018, available at
leading newsagents.
As your puppy or kitten develops her
own personality, there might be times
when you look at her and wonder what
goes through her mind. Read the article
on page 8 if you need a few clues about
what your pet is trying to tell you.
Mientjie
Mientjie Kleinhans | Editor
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AnimaltalkMagazine
Animaltalk.co.za
Visit Animaltalk ’s new comprehensive website:
www.animaltalk.co.za
COPYRIGHT
Animaltalk is published monthly (12 issues per annum) and is available by subscription nationally
as well as at retail outlets countrywide. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this magazine in
whole or in part is prohibited without prior written permission of Panorama Media Corp (Pty)
Ltd. Copyright © 1994-2018 Panorama Media Corp (Pty) Ltd. The views expressed in Animaltalk
are not necessarily those of Panorama Media Corp and the acceptance and publication of editorial
and advertising matter in Animaltalk does not imply any endorsement or warranty in respect of
goods or services therein described, whether by Animaltalk or the publishers. Animaltalk will not
be held responsible for the safe return of unsolicited editorial contributions. The Editor reserves
the right to edit material submitted and in appropriate cases to translate into another language.
Animaltalk reserves the right to reject any advertising or editorial material, which may not suit the
standard of the publication, without reason given. Animaltalk published by Panorama Media Corp.
Jan-Mar 2018
10,045 (certified)
Published By Panorama Media Corp (Pty) Ltd.
Private Bag X4, Kyalami, 1684, South Africa.
92 Campolino Road, Kyalami.
Tel: 011 468 2090 | Fax: 011 468 2091
www.panorama.co.za
1
OF ANIMALTALK | TWO DECADES OF MAKING A DIFFERENCE ...
thismonth
FOCUS ON
08 What is my dog thinking?
Some answers to pertinent questions
MAY 2018 | VOLUME 24 NUMBER 05
ON THE COVER
WHAT IS YOUR DOG THINKING?
PG 08
PETTALK
12 Pet maintenance and support
Planning for an unpredictable future
PETTALK
lifestyle
lifestyle
DID YOU KNOW?
It is likely that animals think in
pictures rather than words.
Compiled by: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Jne Valokuvaus, Happy Monkey, Sinseeho, Nachaliti
Your dog might understand
your command in a different
manner to what humans
understand language
What kind of emotions do
dogs feel?
14 Relieving pain and need
Impacting lives to make a difference
What am I
thinking?
REGULARS
04 Your letters
Reader comments
Some answers to pertinent questions
W
hen you talk to your dog and
he looks you in the eyes, head
tilted to the side while his tail
wags slowly, do you sometimes wonder
what he is thinking? He might be giving all
sorts of body language signals to indicate
his feelings, but his actual thoughts might
be a mystery. Do animals in general
think in the same manner as humans?
According to researchers, animals most
likely think in pictures, and have a different
understanding of experiences.
Katherine Brown, a dog and cat behaviour
consultant, shares some of her thoughts on
how animals feel according to their behaviour.
06 Bits and bites
News you should know
28 Dog breeders’ gallery
Find your ideal dog
35 Cat breeders’ gallery
Find the cat you want
How do we know that animals
feel emotions?
While we are not able to ask an animal what he
is feeling – for example feelings like happy, sad
or angry – we are able to ask humans. Positron
emission tomography (PET) studies, which
8
Animaltalk | May 2018
link function to structure, have been done on
the brains of humans and various animals, and
show remarkable similarities in the regions
of the brain that are active when a human is
performing an activity that makes him or her
happy, or a dog who has been injected with a
drug that we know from human studies causes
a feeling of happiness.
Another way we know that animals feel
emotions is that emotions are the driving force
behind everything we do. If something makes
us feel happy, we will repeat the behaviour,
whereas if doing something makes us feel
fearful, we are very unlikely to repeat the
behaviour. Animals are exactly the same. If a
dog loves to play with a ball, he will continue
to bring the ball to be thrown because it is
reinforcing for him – it makes him happy. But
no matter how much you try to coax a dog with
food to go to a place where he has been badly
frightened before, he will be very unlikely to
go back there.
Dogs feel a full range of emotions, from
pleasure and even elation to frustration, which
can develop into anger and sometimes rage, or
else misery which can worsen into depression.
They also of course feel the full range of fearful
emotions, ranging from apprehension to fullblown terror and then that most reinforcing
emotion of them all – relief – when the lifethreatening situation has passed.
What are the most important
communication signals that
humans should pick up on?
Probably the most important signs that
humans need to take notice of are the signals
that the dog is not happy with what is
happening, and this could lead to a potentially
dangerous situation. These signals start off
with the dog often licking his lips and turning
his head away from whatever is worrying him
or giving whale eye – when the whites of the
eye can be seen all around the iris. A dog who
is uncomfortable in a situation will often freeze
– this can be for a very short time span – and
then of course lead to the growl, lifting of the
lip and the display of teeth and finally the bite.
His tail is wagging. Is he enjoying
himself, or is he just content?
Just a note here – a wagging tail does not
necessarily mean a dog is happy. If the tail
is held low and relaxed and the wag is a
gentle side to side, he probably is. If the wag
is frenetic due to the owner arriving home or
something similar then he is also probably
happy. However, if the tail is held up, is very
stiff and the wag is fast, then the dog is aroused
and should be approached with caution.
When a dog is relaxed and enjoying himself
he is likely to have an open mouth with a lolling
tongue, his ears will be relaxed, not pricked
(other than the Northern breeds), his eyes will
be soft, his whole body will look relaxed and his
tail will hang but not be tucked under his belly.
9
Animaltalk | May 2018
10 COOL THINGS ABOUT
THE GIRAFFE
PG 50
40 Your FREE poster
42 Crazy critters
Your pets in the spotlight!
45
Kids’ pages fun facts and activities!
50 10 cool things
About the giraffe
52 WILDTHINGS
Protecting livestock against predators
66 Agility
A young sport that needs to evolve
68 Animaltalk Top Dog 50 ratings
69 Book reviews and pet products
71 Pet mall
74 Classifieds
79 In the next issue
2
SPECIFICS TO LOOK OUT FOR WHEN
LOOKING FOR A PUPPY SCHOOL
PG 18
Animaltalk | May 2018
COM
PE
HOW TO SPEND THE FIRST
NIGHT WITH YOUR NEW KITTEN
PG 38
CATSLIFE
CATSLIFE
behaviour
behaviour
80 The adventures of Brak
Text: Gina Hartoog | Photography: Africa Studio
ome
Weolc
me kitty
h
The first night in a new home can be very
traumatic for a young kitten – it’s up to you to
make the transition a smooth one for her
W
hether you choose to buy your
kitten from a reputable breeder
or rescue a kitten from a shelter,
it’s a personal choice. Once your kitten is
ready to come home, it’s time for you to
take on a new role – that of responsible
kitty parent.
KITTY’S HOMECOMING: A DIARY
Liaising with the breeder or shelter
If you are getting a purebred cat and are
working through a reputable breeder, it could
take a number of months before you get your
new kitten. The process may take a week or
two with a local shelter. Once the collection
date is booked, you’ll need to get your home
ready for kitty.
“Aside from buying the essentials, it is
important to find a ‘safe space’ for your kitten
to settle into for the first few days,” explains
breeder Aimee Hendriksz, owner of BellAimee Siamese, Oriental & Peterbald Cattery.
“This can be a spare bedroom with food, water
and a litterbox set up for the new kitten. It
can be overwhelming for the kitten adjusting
to a new environment away from her mother
and siblings, so you do this to minimise the
stress levels.”
Aimee also advises kitty parents to check
that the house is secure, and if you plan to
allow your kitten into the garden, make sure
that it too is escape-proof. You can consider a
‘catio’ – an enclosed patio that allows your cat
to go ‘outdoors’ safely.
“If you have young children, now is
the time to discuss how a kitten is to be
handled,” advises Aimee. “Often children
can unintentionally be rough with kittens,
resulting in them getting scratched or bitten
and the kitten ends up being scolded.” See the
March 2018 issue of Animaltalk to find out if
your child is ready for a cat.
Night before
Set up the kitten’s bed and litterbox in the
chosen room. Place the litterbox in a quiet spot,
away from the feeding area. Decide on which
family members will accompany you to pick up
the kitten. Keep it to a minimum – the driver,
another adult or older child. Consider leaving
babies and smaller children at home.
If your new kitten is flying from the breeder’s
home in another province, you will need to
confirm the flight details. You will need to pick
up your pet at the airline’s cargo section. Make
sure of these details to avoid delays.
Thirty minutes before you leave
Do a last-minute check. If you have other pets,
they should be put somewhere they won’t be a
disrupting factor when you arrive home. Pack
the cat carrier in the car. If you are picking up
the kitten at the airport, call the breeder and
make sure the flight left on time.
At the breeder’s home or shelter
Get kitty settled in her cat carrier and collect
the vet card from the breeder. This is important
and shows which inoculations the kitten has
received. “Collect the kitten and go straight
home so she can start adjusting to her new
home,” says Aimee.
One to two hours at home
Place the cat carrier in the kitty room and
open the door. Don’t force her out. Call kitty
gently by her chosen name. The sights and
sounds are all strange to her, so give her time
to gain confidence and come out on her own.
Let her explore the room under your watchful
eye. Show her where her bed, water bowl and
litterbox are. If kitty seems tired, give her space
to find her bed and take a nap. Let her meet
the human family members only (no other
pets yet) and keep things very low key. For
more information, read the article on how to
introduce your new cat that featured in the April
2018 edition of Animaltalk.
Three to four hours at home
Allow your new kitten to
explore her new home at
her own pace
38
Animaltalk | May 2018
Follow the breeder’s advice as to how many
meals the kittens are currently eating. This may
be three or four small meals per day. When the
THINGS TO DO
Consider diet Call the breeder or shelter and ask what food
the kittens are currently eating. To prevent unnecessary tummy
upsets, it makes sense to keep your kitten on this food – at
least initially. You can make a gradual switch later on.
DOGTALK
Go shopping Get everything kitty needs. To start, this
includes a bed and some blankets, food and water bowls,
a few safe toys, a collar (you’ll need the correct size), a cat
carrier, a litterbox and litter, a small scratching post and a pet
first aid kit.
18 Finding a puppy school
Specifics to look out for
Set up a litterbox and bed Check with the breeder or
shelter as to what type of cat litter the kittens are used to and
buy the same type. Again, you can change later on if you so
wish, but some cats won’t use a litterbox that contains a litter
they are not used to. The change must be gradual.
Find a vet If you don’t have other pets, find a reputable vet
in your area. Ask friends and family for a referral. If you do
have a vet, book a check-up for three to four days after you
bring kitty home.
time is right, guide kitty to her bowl and let her
have her meal. You can also introduce a safe toy
for a play session before bedtime.
First night
The first night can be very tough for a kitten –
she is used to her mother and littermates and
their smells and warmth. Some kittens adapt
quickly, but others take time. Let her snuggle up
in a space she feels comfortable. Be patient and
loving without smothering her.
Second day at home
Plan to spend as much time with your kitten
as you can. Aimee says that bonding during
this period is important. “It determines your
relationship for the rest of your cat’s life,” she
says. “The first day is for her to settle and become
comfortable in the new environment. It is very
important that you don’t feel frustrated if your
kitten initially hides away from you. Once she
realises you’re not going to hurt her, she will relax
and come out. Be patient. Speak in a calm voice.
Try luring her out by playing with a toy. Playing
with your kitten will help her relax and help with
the bonding process. It is important not to force a
kitten to do anything she doesn’t feel comfortable
doing, as this will hinder bonding.”
Animaltalk | May 2018
5 TIPS FOR CHOOSING FOOD
FOR YOUR PUPPY
PG 20
TITIO
Win a H
NS
ill’s ham
per wor
th R500
Pg 4
Win a c
opy of
Encyclo The Royal Can
in Dog
pedia, V
olu
Pg 42 me 2
Win a
Tales fr copy of
om Trek
Pg 80 net
20 7 Puppy food tips
5 ‘happy tummy’ tips for first-time puppy parents
BREED PROFILES
24 Bearded Collie
26 Belgian Shepherd
27 Hungarian Puli
39
31 A dog named Elvis
Guide and Service Dogs changing lives
CATSLIFE
34 Breed profile
The Balinese
36 Feeding your kitten
Some food for thought
38 Welcome home, kitty
The first night in a new home can be very traumatic
for a young kitten
VETTALK
54 First aid
All about hypothermia
56 Puppy vaccinations
Prevention is better than cure
AGILITY IS A YOUNG
SPORT THAT NEEDS
TO EVOLVE
PG 66
58 Your questions answered
How do I select the right food? How much food
should I feed my puppy and how often? Puppies sleep
a lot. Why do they need to take a nap so often? Why
do cats prowl at night, and sleep all day long? How
do I choose the best goldfish? Do hamsters need
vaccinations as well?
OUT AND ABOUT
63 How to find the ideal kennel
WELFARE
64 Welfare news, animal shelters,
how you can help
Animaltalk | May 2018
3
HAVE YOUR SAY
Send your letters to:
The Editor, Animaltalk, Private Bag X4, Kyalami, 1684
or email: animaltalk@panorama.co.za
Please include your name and address.
We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity.
yourletters
Unusual friends
I’m not too sure when Bunny was born, as she
is a rescue. We found Bunny about two years
ago, just hopping around. My husband caught
her without any struggle.
We took her home and made her comfortable.
A month later, we were very surprised to find
that she had given birth to six beautiful little kits. It was after that, that my cat Pebbles and
Bunny bonded. Pebbles, born in October 2003,
played a part in caring for Bunny and her little
ones. I would guess that her motherly instincts
kicked in. Bunny did not mind at all when
Pebbles was there with them, and it seemed as
if they took turns in looking after the little ones.
All the babies were given to good homes and
Pebbles and Bunny are great friends.
Annette Larsen
Via email
▲
ING
WINNER
LETT
HEALTH, NUTRITION, BEHAVIOUR & TRAINING
FOCUS
spirocerca lupi
vettalk
Immediately take your
dog to the vet if you
suspect any illness
HEALTH, NUTRITION, BEHAVIOUR & TRAINING
▲
▲
An illustration of the
parasitic worm that
causes spirocercosis
Prevention
Text: Dr Vanessa Mcclure | Photography: S-F, Vitalii Hulai, Didesign021, Morphart Creation
SPIROCERCA LUPI (Esophageal worm)
– a dreaded disease
The silent killer that can be prevented
L
osing a beloved pet is heartbreaking,
especially if his death could have been
prevented. Not much can be done with
diseases such as cancer, but Spirocerca lupi,
although almost undetectable until it is too late,
can be avoided by taking certain precautions.
Not many people are aware of the dangers
of Spirocerca lupi, what it is or how dogs
are infected, let alone how to prevent it.
Therefore, education and information about
this condition is extremely important.
Defining Spirocerca lupi
Spirocerca lupi is a parasitic worm that affects
dogs. The adult worms are found in nodules
(lumps of tissue) in the oesophagus of infected
dogs. The larva of the worm is swallowed by
the dog and goes into the stomach, where it
undergoes a moult. The larva then moves into
54
the blood vessels of the stomach and migrates
in these vessels to the aorta.
From there the larva then migrates in the
aortic wall until it reaches the area in the
chest where the oesophagus is, and here it
migrates out into the oesophageal wall, where
it matures. The presence of the worm in the
wall of the oesophagus causes irritation and
inflammation, which results in the formation
of a nodule or lump. The female lays her
eggs, which pass out of a hole in the nodule
and get swallowed by the dog and pass out
in the faeces.
When the eggs pass out into the faeces of the
dog, they are eaten by dung beetles. Dogs get
infected with the parasite when they eat these
dung beetles or if they eat other carrier hosts
that have eaten the infected dung beetle, like
birds and lizards.
Stages
The life cycle of Spirocerca lupi takes between
four and six months from the time the dog eats
the infected beetle or host to when the worm
forms the nodule in the oesophagus. Dogs
will usually not show any signs of infection
until the nodule forms and starts to increase in
size. The most common signs that dogs display
will be regurgitation (passively bring up food),
but there are many other signs that they may
show, such as salivation, difficulty swallowing,
coughing, not eating and weight loss.
On rare occasions, the worm migrates to
abnormal places like the spinal cord or lung.
If this occurs, then the dog may show signs of
lameness, paralysis or difficulty breathing. If
the nodule is left untreated, it can transform
into a cancerous growth. Once this has
occurred, the prognosis is very poor.
Animaltalk | February 2018
One way to prevent your dog from contracting
Spirocerca lupi is by picking up dog faeces
every day so that the larva does not have
time to be eaten by the beetle, and this is
very important. Ensuring your dog does not
eat any lizards could help, but this is not very
practical. Advocate spot-on treatment can be
used monthly as a preventative treatment and
milbemycin oxime can also be used monthly
as a preventative measure.
Treatment
It is very important to ensure you have a
definitive diagnosis before you start treatment.
So if you are concerned your pet may have
spirocercosis, ensure you visit your vet.
Doramectin is one treatment that is used
for spirocercosis; however, its use is extralabel (the product is not registered for use in
dogs). Certain breeds, like Collies and Collie
crosses, can react negatively to this drug, so
it is important to discuss treatment with your
vet. Milbemycin oxime can be used weekly as
a treatment.
If possible, discourage your
dog from eating lizards, as
lizards eat dung beetles and
can be hosts as well
is more prevalent in certain areas like
Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal, and less in
the Cape provinces. The number of reported
infections does seem to be decreasing,
probably due to the fact that more people are
becoming aware of this worm and treating
prophylactically.
Responsible pet owners
Dung beetles are one of
the hosts of the parasitic
worm that infects dogs
WIN!
Spirocerca lupi has a worldwide distribution,
mostly occurring in warm climates. It
55
Troeteldiere laat mens ontspan
Ek kyk vanoggend na my dogter se hond op my
selfoon. Hoe kan ‘n mens nie lief wees vir haar
nie? Daar kom ‘n groot vertedering oor my as ek
haar sien. Sy het so ‘n groot leemte in my dogter se
hart kom vul. Die hondjie terg my twee Yorkshire
Terrier honde ongenadiglik as ons gaan kuier, val
sommer met haar nog lompe lyf op mens neer, en
soek hope en hope liefde en aandag.
Sy speel met die kinders, skeur klere met die
skerp baba tande en gaan lê op die eerste trappie
van die swembad as sy warm kry. Stadigaan
word sy deel van hierdie gesin en hulle sal altyd
met baie liefde aan haar dink.
Skaf ‘n hond of ‘n kat aan as jy nie ‘n troeteldier
het nie en sien hoe jou sorge saans en oor
naweke verdwyn. Gaan stap lang ente saam
4
Thank you so much for the comprehensive
article about Spirocerca lupi in the February
issue of Animaltalk.
I really believe that Spirocerca lupi remains
the silent killer, because so little is known
about it among dog owners in general,
and articles like the one featured in an
influential magazine like Animaltalk will go
a long way towards rectifying this situation.
Mandy Crerar
Via email
It is the responsibility of pet owners to observe
their pets and if something seems out of place,
to take the animal to the vet. Don’t wait for any
disease to reach a stage beyond treatment, and
take your dog to the vet for an annual check-up,
even if he seems to be in perfect health.
Occurrence
Animaltalk | February 2018
The silent killer
met die honde, geniet die natuur om jou en jou
depressie sal saam met jou sonskyn pilletjies soos
mis voor die son verdwyn.
Ons moet ‘n kultuur kweek waar mense respek
en liefde teenoor diere betoon en ook teenoor
mekaar. Hier waar ek werk is katte en ons almal
versorg hulle. Hoe kan ‘n mens God se skepping
waardeer as jy net nie omgee nie?
Soms is die daaglikse stryd om kos op die
tafel te sit net te groot en is daar nie geld om
vir ‘n hond of kat te sorg nie. Ons moet dan na
die Dierebeskermingsvereniging gaan en ons
liefde daar gaan uitstort en vir hulle help wat
ons liefde en sorg so nodig het. Kyk in hulle oë,
die lywe wat wil spring en speel en sê: “Wees
lief vir my.” Ons het weer nodig om lief te hê
The letter of the month wins
a prize hamper worth R500
from Hill’s, the pet food brand
recommended by veterinarians
worldwide.
en na aan die aarde te leef.
Kallie du Plessis
Via email
Animaltalk | May 2018
FOLLOW US ON
bits&bites
www.facebook.com/AnimaltalkMagazine
Battle of the Mascots
Tekkie Tax recently hosted the Battle of the
Mascots at the Randfontein Show to create
awareness for International Tekkie Tax Day
on 25 May 2018, and the various welfare
organisations who are involved in the
fundraising drive.
The mascots that participated are Tekkie
Tax’s Happy, Suid-Afrikaanse Vroue Federasie’s
Happy, Epilepsy South Africa’s Happy, Vita
Nova’s Happy, Cancer Association of South
Africa’s Toktokkie, Toys R Us’ Geoffrey Giraffe,
Azbiz’s Dinkies, Lollos’ Lollos and Buster & Bella’s
‘Buster die Hond’. The winner, Geoffrey Giraffe,
finished the obstacle course in the shortest time.
In the past five years Tekkie Tax has donated
more than R30 million to charities across
South Africa, and a total of 49 local animal
non-profit organisations actively participated
in and benefitted from the campaign over the
past two years.
Have you bought your shoelaces, sticker
or T-shirt yet? To find out where you can buy
your Tekkie Tax merchandise, send an email to
tekkietax@mweb.co.za.
300 dogs walked the Sea Point Promenade
6
At the third annual Paws on the Promenade
dog walk 300 dogs and 464 humans
participated in the fundraiser. The 5km walk
was hosted by Mdzananda Animal Clinic and
Vondi’s Holistic Pet Nutrition, and started off
at the Mouille Point lighthouse and extended
to the Sea Point swimming pool and back.
“This was our largest and most successful
Paws on the Promenade yet,” says Marcelle
du Plessis, event organiser. “We are so
On a budget of just R1,685 to put together
the event, Mdzananda was able to raise a
total of R29,000 in profit. The funds raised
will go towards medication and medical
consumable costs of the clinic based in
Khayelitsha. Mdzananda is an NPO animal
clinic that treats up to 700 pets per month
through its consultation rooms, hospital,
theatre, mobile clinics, animal ambulance and
stray pet re-homing.
grateful and excited about the wonderful
attendance of the dogs and humans. Dogs
of all shapes and sizes came from across the
Cape Peninsula to join us on this scenic walk.”
“We look forward to hosting our next Paws
on the Promenade in 2019 and hope for it
to grow in leaps and bounds every year,”
says Du Plessis.
Animaltalk | May 2018
BITS&BITES
news from the animal world
Supporting rescue dogs
New pet food plant
A pet food plant to the value of R150 million
recently opened in Randfontein and is one of the
largest facilities of its kind in South Africa. The
1,500m2 plant features innovative technology,
and RCL Foods believes investment will assist in
growing market leadership with a focus on the
‘premium’ segment.
Currently, the South African pet food retail
market is valued at R3 billion, with demand by
vets absorbing R1.2 billion. RCL Foods currently
holds a 40% market share in the retail segment.
“The new facility will also allow us to provide
our customers with an improved consistent
supply and enable us to deliver new exciting
innovations,” says Scott Pitman, MD of RCL
Foods Consumer Division.
With this new plant, the company will introduce
six internationally accredited capabilities to
the pet food retail sector, which include the
inclusion of fresh meat into the kibble-making,
vacuum-coated technology, kibble coated in
gravy powder, extract from real vegetables,
high levels of calcium, and increased moisture
in the kibble.
Companies to the rescue
Jaco Pieterse, General Manager Sandton SPCA and
Ade van Heerden, Miss SA. Photo: MasimbaSasa
A recent plight by the Sandton SPCA to
companies in the area for reliable transport
to get to incidents in time resulted in three
companies coming to the SPCA’s aid. Cell C’s
Animaltalk | May 2018
Acts of Kindness campaign, Abela Business
Leasing and Melrose Nissan collaborated to
rent a one-tonne bakkie on behalf of the SPCA.
The businesses will also carry the cost of the
annual licensing, and a full maintenance and
tyre replacement plan up to 120,000km for
three years.
“This will make a huge difference in the lives
of the many animals and the members of the
informal communities that we serve. As well
as assisting animals, we also need to educate
the public about animal welfare. If the youth is
educated, they end up building a better future
for animals in the country,” says Jaco Pieterse,
general manager of the Sandton SPCA.
A pet-friendly accommodation platform
announced that it will be supporting rescue dogs
through a new donation programme. Pet Places,
operated by Village n Life, will donate 10% of all
accommodation bookings through the platform
to Sidewalk Specials, who rescue dogs from
abusive or neglectful situations and euthanasia.
The platform’s goal is to donate R30,000 in 2018.
Pet Places first got involved with Sidewalk
Specials by fostering Cinders, a rescue from an
abusive puppy mill in Oudtshoorn. Their next
foster was Wolfgang, a beautiful Husky. Both
fosters now have loving homes. After Cinders
and Wolfgang, Pet Places took the leap to adopt
Bangers and Mash, a pair of dogs who were
dumped on the side of a highway. The pair now
live at Camps Bay Retreat and they are well loved
by the staff and guests.
One-stop pet centre
There is a new
pet experience
in Centurion,
Pretoria, where
pet owners can take care of their pets’ needs
in one convenient location. Family Pet Centre
recently opened their doors to offer pet owners an
array of pet services not seen in South Africa yet.
Whether owners want to stock up on pet
food, browse through lifestyle accessories, or
relax with something to drink, the centre has
it all. There is also a veterinary clinic in the
centre with easy access from the parking lot,
as well as a grooming parlour with a one-way
mirror where owners can see their beloved pets
without disturbing them.
“Where we can, we put the interests of the
animals first and we are assisting people in
becoming better pet owners. This is truly a
one-stop shop,” says Paul Jackson, managing
executive of Family Pet Centre.
To add on to the experience, the centre also
has an online store with delivery across South
Africa. Have a look at familypet.co.za. Family
Pet Centre is the new sponsor for the Animaltalk
Top Dog Animal Hero award.
7
PETTALK
lifestyle
Compiled by: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Jne Valokuvaus, Happy Monkey, Sinseeho, Nachaliti
Your dog might understand
your command in a different
manner to how humans
understand language
8
Animaltalk | May 2018
PETTALK
lifestyle
DID YOU KNOW?
It is likely that animals think in
pictures rather than words.
What kind of emotions do
dogs feel?
What am I
thinking?
Your dog’s behaviour could give you an
indication of what he feels if you pick up on his
communication signals
W
hen you talk to your dog and
he looks you in the eyes, head
tilted to the side while his tail
wags slowly, do you sometimes wonder
what he is thinking? He might be giving all
sorts of body language signals to indicate
his feelings, but his actual thoughts might
be a mystery. Do animals in general
think in the same manner as humans?
According to researchers, animals most
likely think in pictures, and have a different
understanding of experiences.
Katherine Brown, a dog and cat behaviour
consultant, shares some of her thoughts on
how animals feel according to their behaviour.
How do we know that animals
feel emotions?
While we are not able to ask an animal what he
is feeling – for example feelings like happy, sad
or angry – we are able to ask humans. Positron
emission tomography (PET) studies, which
Animaltalk | May 2018
link function to structure, have been done on
the brains of humans and various animals, and
show remarkable similarities in the regions
of the brain that are active when a human is
performing an activity that makes him or her
happy, or a dog who has been injected with a
drug that we know from human studies causes
a feeling of happiness.
Another way we know that animals feel
emotions is that emotions are the driving force
behind everything we do. If something makes
us feel happy, we will repeat the behaviour,
whereas if doing something makes us feel
fearful, we are very unlikely to repeat the
behaviour. Animals are exactly the same. If a
dog loves to play with a ball, he will continue
to bring the ball to be thrown because it is
reinforcing for him – it makes him happy. But
no matter how much you try to coax a dog with
food to go to a place where he has been badly
frightened before, he will be very unlikely to
go back there.
Dogs feel a full range of emotions, from
pleasure and even elation to frustration, which
can develop into anger and sometimes rage, or
else misery which can worsen into depression.
They also of course feel the full range of fearful
emotions, ranging from apprehension to fullblown terror and then that most reinforcing
emotion of them all – relief – when the lifethreatening situation has passed.
What are the most important
communication signals that
humans should pick up on?
Probably the most important signs that
humans need to take notice of are the signals
that the dog is not happy with what is
happening, and this could lead to a potentially
dangerous situation. These signals start off
with the dog often licking his lips and turning
his head away from whatever is worrying him
or giving whale eye – when the whites of the
eye can be seen all around the iris. A dog who
is uncomfortable in a situation will often freeze
– this can be for a very short time span – and
then of course lead to the growl, lifting of the
lip and the display of teeth and finally the bite.
His tail is wagging. Is he enjoying
himself, or is he just content?
Just a note here – a wagging tail does not
necessarily mean a dog is happy. If the tail
is held low and relaxed and the wag is a
gentle side to side, he probably is. If the wag
is frenetic due to the owner arriving home or
something similar then he is also probably
happy. However, if the tail is held up, is very
stiff and the wag is fast, then the dog is aroused
and should be approached with caution.
When a dog is relaxed and enjoying himself
he is likely to have an open mouth with a lolling
tongue, his ears will be relaxed, not pricked
(other than the Northern breeds), his eyes will
be soft, his whole body will look relaxed and his
tail will hang but not be tucked under his belly.
9
PETTALK
lifestyle
We think that when dogs lie on their backs
they are showing submission, but researchers
from Canada and South Africa looked into this
behaviour and found that it could actually also be
used as a fighting position during play.
Do dogs feel sorrow in the
same way that humans feel?
Yes, dogs feel sorrow at the loss of a loved one,
human or animal, the same way that humans
do. Tests have been done that show that the
same pathways in the brain are activated in
a human who is feeling sad and a guinea
pig who has been separated from his mate.
The typical signs of mourning are lethargy,
reluctance to eat, no desire to engage in play
even if encouraged, and the dog is likely to
become depressed.
Do dogs have
a sense of
fairness?
No, I don’t believe they do
– again this would be one of
the higher cognitive functions
that dogs are not capable of.
Have you ever seen one dog
gather up all the toys in a room
and then worry about if that was
a fair thing to do because the other
two dogs have none?
Do dogs sympathise with
humans and other dogs?
Do dogs have any
sense of time?
Dogs do not actually sympathise with humans
or other dogs – sympathy is to feel sorry for
someone and dogs do not have those higher
cognitive functions. However, they live in a
close social group with the family and they
are masters at the art of reading human body
language. So if you are sad, your shoulders
droop and you may be crying, so your dog
responds to these signals because they are
usually a good predictor of a cuddle.
With regard to other dogs in the home,
again it is all about reading the other dogs’
signals well. If the one dog is lethargic and
not wanting to play, the rest of the dogs in the
group are more likely to give that dog some
space, or alternatively lie next to him and even
lick him. It all depends on the character of the
individual dogs, how long they have known
each other and how well they get along.
Dogs and indeed most animals
have a good sense of time,
particularly regarding the
24-hour (circadian) clock. They
are sensitive to the amount of
light at dawn which wakes them
up, to the temperature which
peaks around midday, and to
the drop in temperature at dusk
and through the night. Knowing
when their dinner is due is more
likely to be attributed to their
feeling hungry than being able to
tell it’s 6pm so it’s dinner time.
Studies have been done that
show if the dog’s owner is
away for a longer period
of time (a number of
hours), they receive a
10
more enthusiastic welcome from the dog on
returning than if they have been out for 30
minutes. However, dogs are masters at picking
up on various cues, so it could well be that
they know you are coming home soon because
the clock has just chimed five times or the
neighbour just arrived home. Plus remember
a dog’s hearing enables him to detect a sound
four times the distance away that a human
can, so he hears your car when you are just
turning into your road and therefore he has
plenty of time to move to that specific spot to
wait for you!
Animaltalk | May 2018
PETTALK
lifestyle
*What other animals are thinking
A monkey clearly displayed his sense
of fairness in a research project
when his fellow mate received the
more favourable grapes
Do monkeys know
when they are
treated unfairly?
While monkeys like
cucumber, they prefer grapes.
Biologists Frans de Waal and
Sarah Brosnan from Emory
University (USA) conducted
an experiment in 2003 where
they gave one monkey the
coveted grapes and another
some cucumber. The one
who got the cucumber was
furious! He threw the food
out of his cage and refused
to co-operate anymore. Who
knew monkeys could throw
such temper tantrums?
Is my cat embarrassed?
When your cat jumps onto the table, without
noticing the piece of paper lying there, she
might slip on it and fall onto the floor. She
might start licking herself as if she meant to
do that all along and is now casually having
a bath. We might think that she is acting cool
while feeling embarrassed, but that’s not really
what’s happened, says Matthijs Schilder, a
pet researcher at Utrecht University in the
Netherlands. Your cat doesn’t have the ability
to be embarrassed because she cannot see
herself through the eyes of others after doing
something silly. It’s more likely she’s just
re-orienting herself after her fall.
Can rats feel regret?
Even rats know when they’ve made a wrong
decision. Researchers from the University of
Animaltalk | May 2018
Minnesota (USA) built ‘rat restaurants’ (four
fenced-in lanes that each led to a different
type of food). The rats would hear a tone at
the entrance of the restaurant that would
tell them how long they had to wait until the
food was available. They could then decide
to either wait for the food or move on to the
next restaurant.
Researchers observed that the rats were
willing to wait longer for the better food. But
they also learnt something else – the rats who
made the wrong choice by moving on to less
yummy food just because they weren’t willing
to wait seemed to regret their decision. How
would you know a rat is upset at his choice?
Researchers reported that the rats looked
‘disappointedly’ at the previous restaurant,
and when they got to eat their less-yummy
food, they scoffed it down quickly and left.
This as opposed to the rats who made the
better choice and ate their food slowly and
cleaned their coats afterwards.
Do rats feel sympathy?
Rats are very social animals and seem to care
for one another. Researchers at the University
of Chicago (USA) did an experiment where
they trapped a rat in a plastic tube. The
other rats tried their best to free their friend.
They were also observed sharing chocolate
when one was presented with it. Another
slightly mean experiment in 1958 saw rats
stop pushing down on handles that allowed
them to get food when they realised that, by
pushing it, they were also shocking another
rat. This was even the case when the rats
were very hungry.
*Source: Very Interesting Junior Magazine
11
PETTALK
lifestyle
Text: Dino Montepara* | Photography: michaeljung, Eric Isselee
e
c
r
o
v
i
D
s
t
e
rp
u
o
y
and
Legal aspects you should keep in mind when negotiating a divorce
or separation agreement
L
ife is unpredictable and we definitely
don’t commit to holy matrimony with
a future divorce in mind. Neither do
we bless our lives with adorable pets while
planning to one day fight over custody and
maintenance support. But in all reality, that
is exactly what we should be doing – plan
for a changeable future.
When the inevitable happens and a divorce
or separation is the only answer, the pets
shouldn’t have to suffer due to non-planning
by the pet owners. A professionally drawn up
antenuptial agreement that clearly states what
happens to the animals after a divorce, is the
ideal solution.
common for couples to include their pets in
an antenuptial agreement. In this instance,
spouses or couples will have to treat their pets
as assets forming part of their estates should
the marriage relationship fail.
Arranging to compile legal agreements
commences by scheduling an appointment
with a qualified Notary Public and then
drawing up an antenuptial agreement
regulating what would happen to the pets
in the event of a divorce or separation. An
antenuptial agreement is entered into by a
couple before they marry, stipulating what
will happen regarding the ownership of their
assets should the marriage fail.
Planning ahead
Divorce negotiations
There is, currently, no law in South Africa
that recognises the custody and maintenance
support for pets, but with pets being treated
more as highly adored members of the family
rather than just animals, it is becoming more
In the case where there is no antenuptial
agreement entered into, or any mention of
the pets in the agreement, couples do have an
alternative way of dealing with the situation.
During divorce and separation negotiations,
12
Animaltalk | May 2018
PETTALK
lifestyle
the custody and maintenance support for pets
could be negotiated and then incorporated into
the settlement agreement. In such agreements,
the couple can regulate sole or joint ‘parental
responsibilities and rights’ in respect of
the pets’ financial support, veterinary care
and health insurance, primary residence,
socialisation and training, grooming,
supervision and visitation rights.
The cos
to
to the li f a pet per mon
festyle t
th varies
he
a
include, pet is used to ccording
,
b
a
u
n
t
d
a
1. The p
et’s cho re not limited t should
ic
o
and med
:
e of food
icina
. 2.
required l costs. 3. Vacc Veterinary
. 4.
ina
5. Board Tick and flea p tions when
rogramm
ing kenn
els
e.
6. Beha
vioural a when required
.
nd train
ing fees
.
KEEP THIS IN MIND
There are a number of factors to keep in mind during the
negotiation of the divorce or separation agreement. As with
children, it is important to first of all keep the best interest
of the animal in mind. Consider the following:
1 | Who bought the pets? And how much money was paid
for the animals?
2 | Who is the primary caretaker and is responsible for
the pets’ basic daily needs?
3 | After the divorce, is the spouse going to stay in a
house or move to a small apartment? Do the dogs
need a big garden?
4 | After the divorce, is the spouse moving to a residence
that doesn’t allow pets?
5 | What will the lifestyle of the spouse be like?
6 | What are the income and financial means of the spouse
obliged to pay towards the maintenance of the pets?
7 | Do the pets have animal friends in
the neighbourhood?
8 | Moving abroad after the divorce makes it more
challenging to transport the pets. Will there be any
chance for visitation rights?
9 | What are the motivation for wanting to keep the pets?
10 | Are the pets used as bargaining tools to negotiate
a better financial advantage?
11 | What is the emotional attachment of the pets to
the spouse?
12 | Are there stress-related issues if the pets are removed
from the spouse to whom they are attached or if they
are rotated back and forth between homes?
13 | Is there any abuse from the other spouse toward
the pets?
14 | What is in the best interest of the pets?
For the pet’s sake
There are many cases where a pet prefers one
spouse over the other, and there is most likely a
special bond between the person and the animal.
Will it really be in the best interest of the pet to be
separated from that person?
Also, bigger breeds of dog require a spacious
garden, or at least comfortable living areas to
move in. If the living conditions change, the
spouse will have to ensure that the dog is regularly
exercised, for the sake of the dog. The same goes
for pets who need regular grooming, or expensive
specialised dog food. It is not the pet’s fault that
the marriage or relationship didn’t work out, and
therefore, the pet shouldn’t suffer as a result of a
dissolving marriage or relationship.
*Dino Montepara is a director at Malherbe Rigg &
Ranwell Incorporated Attorneys
Animaltalk | May 2018
13
PETTALK
veterinary excellence
Compiled by: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Supplied
Dr Kleynhans treats a donkey, one
of the main means of transport
for many Lesotho residents
▲
Impacting lives
Making a difference
D
r Le-Anne Kleynhans is the 2017
Animaltalk Top Dog Veterinary
Excellence award winner, an
honour that was bestowed on her for all
the right reasons. She goes out of her way
to relieve pain and need where she can and
wants to make an impact on as many lives
as she can. Making a difference is really
important to her.
Dr Kleynhans has two veterinary practices,
one in Bromhof, in the northern suburbs of
Johannesburg, and one in Broederstroom,
near Hartbeespoort Dam. The profits from
14
her two clinics go towards the outreach
projects that she is involved with.
Outreach projects
The Lesotho Outreach project is located in
south-central Lesotho. “I got involved in this
project while I was a student 12 to 13 years
ago. It started off with a group of medical
students travelling to Lesotho to compare
the differences between a hospital there
with a South African hospital. A veterinary
student friend accompanied the medical
students on their first trip, and realised that
not only were the people suffering, but the
animals were in a bad condition as well.
“The Lesotho winters are harsh with thick
snow. Not only do the animals struggle as a
result of the adverse weather, but they also
struggle with rabies, parasites and other
illnesses. They needed urgent help,” tells
Dr Kleynhans.
She explains how she joined the group
on the outreach trip for several years. They
were excited if they treated 100 animals on
such a trip. “We did anything from primary
healthcare to saddle sores on the horses. The
Animaltalk | May 2018
PETTALK
TALK TO US
Do you know anybody who should be the
next Veterinary Excellence award winner?
Nominate this person by sending an email
with all the contact details and information
to animaltalk@panorama.co.za.
veterinary excellence
▲
They treat as many animals
as they can on the Lesotho
Outreach project
Lesotho people really value their animals
as they are a source of food, income and
transport, and the dogs are protection for
the sheep and goats. And therefore it has
been fulfilling to see the appreciation from
both people and animals.”
Going back
In October last year, for the first time in five
years, Dr Kleynhans went back to Lesotho
and found that the European missionaries
who had grown and developed the facilities
had left two years prior. “The place has fallen
to pieces. The kids and animals suffered. But
the outreach project from South Africa has
grown during the time that I didn’t go to
Lesotho. I could see a significant difference
in the animals – their condition and quality
of life have improved.
“We went back in March this year with
food, clothes and basic necessities for the
orphanages and two vets accompanied
me on the trip: Dr Ettiene Basson and
Dr Daren Randall. These doctors worked
from sunrise to sunset for two full days to
treat as many animals as they could,” says
Dr Kleynhans, adding that they will visit
Lesotho twice a year.
Animal Allies
Dr Kleynhans also does work for Animal
Allies. “This organisation does animal
welfare differently. Instead of taking
animals out of the townships to re-home
elsewhere, they employ full-time health
technicians. They do primary healthcare in
designated areas of townships, vaccinate,
dip, do parasite control and basic education,
and make sure animals are looked after, are
not chained up and have fresh water,” says
Dr Kleynhans.
She adds that due to all the great work
Animal Allies does, she helps them as
much as possible. Twice a year they have
a sterilisation day in Katlehong township
with a team of 60 volunteers, which includes
vets, nurses and her entire team. “We work
off the school ground and we sterilise
as many animals as we can. At the last
occasion, we sterilised 180 animals per
Animaltalk | May 2018
day. We also do primary healthcare, treat
animals for ticks and fleas, and vaccinate
a couple of hundred animals. On average
eight to 10 animals will come back to the
clinic for further treatment.”
They also sterilise two animals a week
on behalf of Animal Allies and the drivers
will also take sick animals to the clinic
for treatment.
Liv Village
Dr Kleynhans and her husband, Julius, are
part of the committee that is starting up a
second Liv Village in Lanseria for orphaned
and vulnerable children, which is based on
the Matoto Village approach in Uganda.
“We take ladies from the area, train and
recruit them, work with them extensively,
and counsel them to restore their lives.
Such a lady’s full-time job is then to raise six
orphans with two of her own in the village
with the help of management.
“It is a Christian-based project, and we
already have 160 children in the Durban village.
The goal is that each village will be home to
1,000 children,” explains Dr Kleynhans.
Word of advice
As a veterinarian with two practices,
Dr Kleynhans wishes she could explain
to every pet owner the importance of
medical insurance for pets. “These are
difficult times and not all people can
afford veterinary healthcare for their pets.
In general, people don’t plan and budget
for their animals to fall ill. With so many
medical insurance companies offering
a variety of plans and options, there
shouldn’t be an excuse why pets shouldn’t
be covered,” concludes Dr Kleynhans.
15
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18
22
How to choose the
right school
Bearded Collie, Belgian Shepherd, Puli
20
31
What makes puppy
food special?
Living with a Guide Dog
PUPPY SCHOOL
PUPPY FOOD
BREED PROFILES
SOUTH AFRICAN GUIDE-DOGS ASSOCIATION
dogtalk
These pages help you
decide on the ideal breed
of dog for you, deal with
behavioural issues, improve
your dog’s wellbeing and
provide you with
training tips
If I bring you wood,
will you start a fire in
the fireplace?
GOOD TO KNOW
Photo: Natalia Fedosova
A fireplace can be cosy, but it can also be
a dangerous place for a pet. Make sure
that it is protected and always supervise
your dog when the fireplace is lit.
SA Guide-Dogs Association for the Blind breeds and trains dogs to be assistants to humans.
For more info visit www.guidedog.org.za or phone 011 705 3512.
Animaltalk | May 2018
17
DOGTALK
behaviour
Text: Gina Hartoog | Photography:
SpeedKingz
Find a
y
p
p
pu
school
Questions you should ask and factors to keep in mind
I
f you want to get off to the right start
with your new puppy, consider enrolling
at puppy school. Classes are crucial to
ensure proper socialisation of your puppy, a
key to holistic development.
If you want your dog to grow up to be a
well-mannered member of your family – to
go with you on outings and on holiday,
attend obedience classes or even take part
in dog sporting disciplines – the first step is
puppy school.
What to expect
Puppy classes are geared for education. There
is little point in starting off on the wrong foot,
only to find later that you have an unruly dog
and have to spend a number of frustrating
months undoing problem behaviour.
“Puppies have a window for socialisation
that closes at around 16 weeks and they
learn things during that period which they
will carry through the rest of their lives,
whether we teach them or not,” explains
18
senior lecturer Wendy Wilson of COAPE
SA. “If they are not enrolled at a good puppy
school, they can very easily learn that other
dogs and unknown people are scary and the
only way to keep them away is to resort to
aggressive strategies.”
The classes will provide a place for you to
introduce your puppy to different people and
objects. The more practice he gets now, the
more unlikely he is to react with fear when
encountering something unfamiliar later on
in life.
“Socialisation with other species should
also happen at a good puppy school,” says
Wendy. “For example, meeting cats is very
important because then the adult dog is far
less likely to chase and try to catch cats than
a dog who has never met cats before he is
four months old.”
Puppies are taught how to approach and
interact with others puppies and learn that
dogs come in all different shapes and sizes
and have different ways of playing.
“The instructor will monitor all the pups’
interactions closely and make sure no one is
allowed to bully or be bullied, thus helping to
ensure that the pups grow into confident adult
dogs who are good at reading communication
signals from other dogs and giving out the
right signals themselves,” says Wendy.
A good class will also include owner
education. For owners, especially those who
are new to the world of dogs, topics such
as general care of your dog, how to build
a strong bond with your new puppy and
problem behaviour at the start should be
covered.
Spot a good puppy school
Wendy suggests watching a class before you
enrol. Check the points indicated below and
make sure everyone is having fun!
1 Is the environment safe?
The premises must be clean and safe for
the puppies as they will be off lead at times.
Animaltalk | May 2018
DOGTALK
behaviour
first
safety
A puppy
n
sets of p eeds two of the
uppy vac
t
cination hree
starting
s
b
article o puppy school. S efore
ee the
n page 5
6
puppy va for more abou
t
ccinatio
ns.
The ideal age to start with
puppy school is 10 weeks
Vaccination certificates must be checked at
the start of the course. The area shouldn’t be
too big, but it should be comfortable for the
amount of puppies in the class.
2 Are the instructors qualified?
Ask about the qualifications of the instructors.
“You are quite within your rights to ask what
qualification they hold and then you can do
some investigation as to the training methods
they are following,” says Wendy. “Be aware
that because dog training is an unregulated
field, anyone can say they are a dog trainer
and open a school.”
Look for reputable organisations like COAPE
SA, COAPE Association of Applied Pet
Behaviourists and Trainers SA (CAPBT SA),
ThinkingPets or a practitioner who is a member of
the Animal Behaviour Consultants (ABC) of SA.
3 How are classes structured?
Ideally, classes should only comprise four to
six puppies under the care of one instructor
Animaltalk | May 2018
so that they are able to give everyone the
correct attention. Structure and control
are important.
“Puppies need closely monitored off-lead
playtime, so you need to find a school that
strikes a happy balance between teaching
basic obedience only and one that comprises
a class that is a free-for-all with masses of
unsupervised playtime – this allows bullying
and promotes unruly dogs,” advises Wendy.
Classes should:
• Include puppies under 16 weeks.
• Include dogs of all breeds – your puppy
needs to meet dogs of different shapes
and sizes.
• Use positive reinforcement and rewardbased training methods.
• Teach basic obedience, including simple
commands like ‘sit’, ‘down’ and ‘stay’ and
how to walk on a loose lead.
• Provide safe socialisation for puppies – with
each other, other animals and people from
GOOD TO KNOW
If puppy doesn’t yet have a collar, you’ll need
to introduce one before class. A leash or
harness can be introduced there.
different walks of life.
• Include owner education.
Warning signs:
• You are never asked to present your
vet card.
• The environment looks unkempt or unsafe
– faeces are not picked up or the area
is open.
• One or two instructors for a class of 15+
puppies (no control).
• Classes comprise basic obedience or free
play only.
• Outdated methods are used – choke
chains, spray bottles (water) or rolled-up
newspaper.
• Dogs up to the age of six months are in the
‘puppy’ class.
19
DOGTALK
nutrition
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Fesus Robert, Crystal Kirk, Eric Lam, April Turner, Artem Kursin
7 Puppy
food tips
for a healthy dog
What to consider when
feeding your puppy
O
ne of the things pet owners should never skimp
on, especially if you want your puppy to grow
into a healthy adult dog, is his food. It is important
to ensure that you feed your puppy the best food
that you can afford, and if you are unsure, speak
to your vet. But before you rush out to buy puppy
food, consider these tips.
1
Breeder’s food choice
Before collecting your puppy from the breeder or shelter,
find out what kind of food he is eating and buy the same
food. Once the puppy has settled in his new home, you
can gradually switch his food to the new type.
Special puppy food
2
Puppies need more protein and a nutrient-dense diet to support
growth, and therefore they need age-specific food. Some diets are
specially formulated for the various stages of your pet’s life, and
you can also choose a diet that takes the size of the breed into
consideration, such as mini, small, medium, large or giant breed.
The kibble size is also different for the various breeds, taking into
consideration the size of their mouth and teeth.
HOW TO CHANGE YOUR DOG’S DIET
The gradual diet change from the original food to the new food of your choice
can be done over a period of seven days:
Day 1 and 2: mix 70% of the usual diet with 30% of the new food.
Day 3 and 4: mix 50% of the usual diet with 50% of the new food.
Day 5 and 6: mix 30% of the usual diet with 70% of the new food.
Day 7: feed only the new food.
Breed-specific food
3
Different breeds may have different nutrient requirements based on
their genes, while others could need special food if they are prone
to health problems like joint issues, obesity or allergies. Large or
giant breed puppies need a diet which controls the rate of growth,
promotes normal skeletal development and has moderate levels of
calcium, phosphorus and calories.
20
Animaltalk | May 2018
DOGTALK
nutrition
4
Not only
are
specific there age- and
bre
foo
related ds, but also he edfood, su
althdogs wit ch as food for
h allerg
ies.
Monitor your puppy
Once your puppy is on a specific food,
monitor him and ask the following questions:
• Is he growing well?
• Is he too fat or too thin?
• Does he always seem hungry?
• Does he enjoy his meals?
If you are concerned, it is best to speak to
your vet to get a professional opinion.
5
Recommended portions
As manufacturers normally indicate on the packaging what the
portion size of the food should be, it is recommended to keep to
the instructions. Divide this recommended amount by the number
of times you feed your puppy during the day. Experts recommend
that puppies should be fed three times a day. Put your puppy’s food
down and call him to his bowl. Leave the food out for 15 to 20
minutes. If he loses interest and doesn’t finish his food, pick it up.
Definite no-no
6
The following items should be definite no-nos in your
puppy’s diet:
• Table scraps – some human foods are dangerous
for dogs and he might pick up weight from the extra
calories.
• Bones – bones can be dangerous to the puppy’s
teeth and intestines. Rather give him chew toys.
• Cow’s milk – this can upset his tummy. Ensure that
he has access to fresh, clean water at all times.
Animaltalk | May 2018
7
Treats
Of course you want to treat your puppy, and it is a great way
to train him as well. There are various treats available on the
market, and once again ensure that you follow the manufacturer’s
recommendations. But you don’t have to rush out to the shop to buy
treats for your puppy – part of his meal can be used as treats during
the day. And to keep him busy, why not fill a Kong with some of this
food? It will stimulate his developing brain and senses.
21
DOGTALK
breed profile
Compiled by: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Best Dog Photo, Eve Photography, Burina Olga, Alena Kazlouskaya, Angelique van Heertum, Willee Cole Photography
Athletic family dogs
Loving and active dogs with loads of energy
22
Animaltalk | May 2018
DOGTALK
breed profile
Belgian Shepherd – Malinois
Hungarian Puli
The Bearded Collie, Belgian Shepherd and Hungarian Puli
are all herding dogs who need daily exercise. These active
dogs are great jogging companions, who are quite athletic
as well. Due to their intelligence and trainability, all three
breeds do well in agility.
All three breeds feature a lovely coat that needs regular
grooming, but it all adds to the dogs’ beautiful looks.
If you want a family dog with good looks, brains, and who
is willing to go on regular runs and do a variety of exercise,
then have a look at these breeds.
Animaltalk | May 2018
23
DOGTALK
breed profile
The Bearded Collie
Alert, playful and loving
A
s a herding dog, the Bearded Collie
was bred to herd sheep and cattle, and
comes from the Scottish Highlands.
Due to his high levels of energy, this athletic
dog does well in dog sports such as agility, and
should be kept busy and mentally stimulated.
Staying active
Training is a good way to take care of your
dog’s needs, especially if it is done from a
young age. Although he is easy to train, keep
in mind that the Bearded Collie is sensitive
and can become bored. Therefore, you should
make the training fun and never use harsh
methods. Agility is a fun activity for both you
and your Bearded Collie.
When mentally and physically stimulated, the
Bearded Collie will be a happy dog. He needs a
lot of space to run around at home and should
be taken for regular walks. It is not a good idea
to leave him alone all day in a small area, as
he will become frustrated and noisy.
5
FACT FILE
BEARDED COLLIE
Scotland
Apartment living not recommended: he needs
space to run
12-14 years
Weight: dogs: 23kg, bitches: 19kg; height:
dogs: 53-56cm, bitches: 51-53cm
Great with children
Good with other dogs as well as cats if raised
with them
Highly trainable
Requires thorough weekly grooming
4
24
Animaltalk | May 2018
DOGTALK
breed profile
1
2
3
1
2
3
4
5
|
|
|
|
|
Soft and affectionate eyes
Medium-sized, drooping ears
Muscular, slightly arched neck
Toes arched and close together
Tail set low without kinks or twists
Family friend
The Bearded Collie is a popular family
companion and should never be left alone
to live outside. Although he will bark at
something strange, he is not an aggressive
dog and loves the attention of a family. He
is always ready for a game, but doesn’t
mind lying down quietly while you are
watching television.
He gets along well with children and will be
a good friend for them due to his social nature.
He also mingles well with different breeds of
dog. He does have a mischievous side, but is
loving and playful.
General care
The Bearded Collie is a gorgeous dog,
especially if his coat is well looked after. To
keep him looking gorgeous does take regular
care. The Bearded Collie has an all-weather
coat consisting of a harsh topcoat with a soft
undercoat. You will have to set some time
out for a proper grooming session about
once a week. Do not bath him every week,
as too much bathing will strip the coat of
its natural oils. Show dogs should not be
trimmed in any way.
Animaltalk | May 2018
25
DOGTALK
breed profile
Groenendael
Laekenois
The Belgian Shepherd Dog
Protective and loving
T
here are four varieties of the
Belgian Shepherd: the Groenendael,
Laekenois, Malinois and Tervueren.
Each of the varieties is named after the
towns and villages where they came from.
The main differences between the four we
know today are coat type and colour.
The Groenendael is probably the most
popular variety and is an all-black dog
with a long, straight coat. The Malinois is
a short-coated dog with very short hair on
the head and lower legs. The Laekenois has a
harsh, wiry, fawn coat with traces of black on
the ears and muzzle. The Tervueren sports
a thick, double coat in red, fawn or grey
with a black overlay. Both the Malinois and
Tervueren have a black mask on their faces.
Temperament
5
2
1
Belgian Shepherd Dogs are responsive,
intelligent and sensitive. They enjoy
personal attention and adapt well to family
life. They are observant and vigilant.
Their high intelligence adds to them
being highly trainable, and they excel in
1 | Flat and muscled cheeks
2 | Slightly elongated neck
3 | Medium-length tail that reaches at
least to the hock
4 | Dense coat with a woolly undercoat
5 | Slightly almond-shaped eyes
obedience. These dogs love the outdoors,
and outdoor exercise and regular mental
challenges are a must for this breed.
Whether hiking, jogging, swimming or
participating in various dog sports, the
Belgian Shepherd does so with great
enthusiasm.
Lifestyle
They are naturally protective of their family
and environment and are great companions
for people who love the outdoor life.
General care
The Laekenois, Groenendael and Tervueren
need thrice-weekly brushing, while the
Malinois needs a weekly brush, but requires
more brushing when shedding.
FACT FILE
BELGIAN SHEPHERD
DOG
Belgium
Needs space to run
10-14 years
4
Weight: 29-34kg; height: 57-63cm
3
A good family dog
Needs early socialisation to cope with
other breeds
Needs lots of exercise
Thrice-weekly brushing
Tervueren
26
Animaltalk | May 2018
DOGTALK
breed profile
The Hungarian Puli
Intelligent and energetic
T
his unusual-looking dog originated in
Hungary and was used as a herding
sheepdog. Fast-moving and energetic,
the Puli’s distinctive corded coat is his
crowning glory. The coat is able to withstand
cold and wet weather. Although black is the
most popular colour, the breed is also available
in any shade of grey, through fawn to apricot.
Temperament
General care
The coat is corded (not matted) and takes
a great deal of hard work to keep in order.
Bathing should only be done when necessary,
while the eyes and ears should be cleaned
regularly.
Exercise
Pulis should go on daily walks and should
be trained to walk alongside the owner on
Pulis are lively dogs and very loyal to their
owners. They make excellent companions and
adapt to almost any surroundings, but do need
some outdoor space to exercise. Pulis can be
wary of strangers and tend to bark a great deal.
a lead without pulling. They are energetic
and lively and do enjoy free runs in a secure
area. Pulis are generally intelligent and easy
to train and are good candidates for herding,
tracking, agility and obedience.
1
2
3
4
5
|
|
|
|
|
Small, black nose
Taught lips with dark pigmentation
Dark brown, medium-sized eyes
Coarser top coat with finer undercoat
Medium, muscled neck
Lifestyle
They are suited to all climates and adaptable
to various circumstances. They enjoy close
bonds with the family.
FACT FILE
HUNGARIAN PULI
3
1
2
5
Hungary
Happy to live in a townhouse, but needs
exercise
12-13 years
Weight: 10-15kg; height: 36-45cm
4
Enjoys close family bonds
May not like other breeds of dog
Needs a lot of exercise
Coat needs hard work to keep in order
Animaltalk | May 2018
27
DOG BREEDERS' GALLERY
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JULY’S BREED FOCUS
... GERMAN POINTER
Gauteng Eileen Ashton (Ashvale) 082 551 5282
(www.ashvalebeardedcollies.co.za)
KwaZulu-Natal Karen Furk (Westmilwunda) 082 707 9728
Western Cape Michael Alberts (Du Ventoux) 083 256 2351
“FOR THE BREED”
28
To showcase yours contact: Nora de Vries
011 468 2090 | nora@panorama.co.za
Animaltalk | May 2018
DOG BREEDERS' GALLERY
If you’re a breeder looking for serious buyers, the
2019 issue of Southern Africa’s Dog Directory is
the best place to advertise.
BOOKINGS NOW OPEN!
Contact our SALES TEAM
on 011 468 2090 or
email sales@panorama.co.za
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䌀漀渀琀愀挀琀㨀 椀渀昀漀䀀瀀愀渀漀爀愀洀愀搀椀最椀琀愀氀⸀挀漀⸀稀愀 簀 ㄀㄀ 㐀㘀㠀 ㈀ 㤀 Animaltalk | May 2018
29
DOGTALK
South African Guide-Dogs Association
info@guidedog.org.za or fundraising@guidedog.org.za
011 705 3512/0860 100 922
W
S A Guide-Dogs Association for the Blind
W
WW
WW
WW
WW
CONTACT INFORMATION
W
W
www.guidedog.org.za
Text: Chris Liebenberg | Photography: Supplied
A dog
named Elvis
My dream come true
I
vividly remember how I, as a young
boy, dreamed of one day having a true
friend who displayed absolute loyalty.
I longed to own a dog who would follow
me wherever I went and who would be my
constant companion. I wanted someone I
could play with, talk to and who would walk
by my side. Looking at my life, it is clear to
see that dreams do come true.
I am a qualified physiotherapist living and
practising in Worcester, a medium-sized town
in the Boland. I also live with vision loss.
One of the many pleasant things I enjoy
about living in Worcester is that I can just
about walk anywhere I need to go; very
convenient if you have limited eyesight and
cannot drive. Over the years I have managed to
live a relatively independent life in terms of my
mobility and I have clung to my independence
quite stubbornly. Once I reached my forties,
I found it increasingly difficult to avoid
obstacles in the road. I was an accident waiting
to happen.
My eyesight had deteriorated to the extent
that I sometimes found myself virtually
crawling along the sidewalk in an effort to
avoid bumping into the large black refuse bins.
I dreaded visiting the local mall or shops in
the town centre. I had to be frank with myself
and reassess my mobility status. I considered
the many ways in which I could improve
my situation; perhaps I should use a cane?
I shrugged off the idea and decided that if I
was going to consider such a drastic measure,
I might as well go the whole hog and apply
for a Guide Dog.
Animaltalk | May 2018
Waiting for Elvis
I had been on the waiting list for a Guide Dog
for almost two years when I was informed
that there was a dog who suited my needs.
I attended the training course at the Gladys
Evans Training Centre in Johannesburg and
met Elvis, an intelligent dog with a friendly
nature.
Elvis is named ironically. One would think
that if you are named after The King, you
would be dark. Elvis is a yellow Labrador, very
fair actually, almost white. It is easy to imagine
that he has The King’s moves. He is high on
the leg and is a keen worker.
As soon as Elvis entered my life, everything
changed. He guides me around obstacles and
assists me when crossing the road. Visiting
my local supermarket in town is an absolute
pleasure with Elvis by my side. The crowded
sidewalks seem to open up in front of us like
the Red Sea.
Although Elvis is my first Guide Dog, he isn’t
the only dog in the family. He has, however,
managed to fit seamlessly into the family and
adores my 14-month-old toddler.
Becoming famous
Before I met Elvis, I saw myself as nearly
invisible when walking on the sidewalk. I
had trouble recognising people I passed and
assumed that they couldn’t see me either,
much like an ostrich with his head in the sand.
Walking with Elvis, it’s a completely different
story. My life has gone from one of obscurity
to fame. Suddenly, people are making way
for me and we are often greeted with friendly
Chris Liebenberg with Guide Dog Elvis
▲
voices, sometimes even by name. We also
get preferential seating in coffee shops and
restaurants and Elvis is served complimentary
drinks (water in a bowl). We were even
featured in our local newspaper!
Elvis is more than just a Guide Dog. He
has given me my life back. He is everything
a boy could want in a dog and he has
certainly exceeded all my childhood dreams
and expectations. Elvis is still a youngster and
I still have a lot of kick in my legs. With Elvis
by my side, I intend to go wherever I need or
want to. Look out Worcester, Elvis is going to
rock this town!
31
AFRIC
A
LARG ’S
EST
PET
EVEN
T
34
38
The Balinese cat
Survival tips to cope
BREED PROFILE
KITTEN’S FIRST NIGHT
36
KITTEN FOOD
The importance of age-appropriate food
For people who share their
homes with cats. These
pages will help you choose
the breed that suits you
and your lifestyle best,
make life with your cat
more rewarding and give
you the information you’ll
need to keep your cat in
tip top condition
Sleeping through
the day, and playing
through the night, is
the name of the game
WINTER IS COMING
Animaltalk | May 2018
Photo: Esin Deniz
Cats sleep between 13 and 16 hours a
day, and prefer to sleep in a place that is
not only warm and comfortable, but also
secure. Your cat may be cosy in front of
the fireplace, but she will also be extra
snug and relaxed on your lap. Curling up
in a safe spot is a way for your cat to
fight the chill and feel safe.
33
CATSLIFE
breed profile
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Yura20187, Eric Isselee
The
BALINESE
Direct descendants
from Siamese cats
A
Siamese disguised in a longer,
silky coat is how you can describe
the Balinese cat. This cat shares
the same characteristics as the Siamese,
except for her coat and plumed tail. And it
is no wonder, as the Balinese was purposely
bred from long-haired Siamese cats.
Graceful dancers
Two breeders, Marion Dorsey of Rai-Mar
Cattery in California and Helen Smith of
MerryMews Cattery in New York, started
The Balinese is
basically a Siamese
cat in a silky coat
34
Animaltalk | May 2018
CATSLIFE
breed profile
DID YOU KNOW?
Balinese are not from Bali, but from
Thailand, due to their descendance
from Siamese cats
1
breeding the Balinese in the 1950s. Once
established, Helen named the new breed after
graceful Balinese dancers, due to their elegant
appearance. They weigh between 2.5 and 5kg.
1
2
3
4
5
|
|
|
|
|
Long, wedge-shaped head
Large, pricked ears
Medium, fine silky coat
Widely spaced, vivid blue eyes
Long, slim body
2
4
Array of colours
Due to the direct descendance from the Siamese,
the Balinese comes in similar colours as the
Siamese. There are two groups based on colour in
the USA: the Balinese point colours include seal,
chocolate, blue and lilac, while the remaining
colours fall under the Javanese point colours.
Balinese cats in South Africa come in four
traditional Siamese point colours: seal, blue,
chocolate and lilac. ‘New’ colours in this breed
include red, cream, tortoiseshell and tabby.
5
Attention seekers
JULY’S BREED FOCUS
... LA PERM
3
L’Exquisite
PERSIANS & EXOTICS
Brenda @ 083 448 4366
neukircher@lawcircle.co.za
www.lexquisite.co.za
To showcase yours contact: Nora de Vries
011 468 2090 | nora@panorama.co.za
Animaltalk | May 2018
L’Exquisite Snowflake NQ
Photographer Linn Currie
Balinese cats are all about love and attention. These
vocal cats use a range of sounds to communicate
with their owners, including meows, moans,
growls and hisses. As with Siamese cats, Balinese
are people-oriented cats who can be possessive.
They tend to bond with the family and also enjoy
the company of other felines.
Don’t ignore these cats and don’t leave them
on their own for long periods of time. They need
stimulating company, whether it is a human
companion or a feline friend. Balinese are
affectionate and lively cats.
35
CATSLIFE
nutrition
Text: Dr Guy Fyvie* | Photography: Marian Weyo
Some food for
thought
Feeding your kitten
H
earts melt at the sight of a kitten.
But that adorable bundle of fluff
you’re bringing home is going to
need looking after for her whole life. And
because cats can have nine lives, that’s a
long time! Giving your kitten a good start
in life is the best way to make sure you’ll
both enjoy many years of fun together.
During those early, vulnerable months
you’ll need to give her lots of care and
attention to help her settle smoothly into
life with your family.
Food for thought
Cats are not small dogs, especially when
it comes to nutritional needs. Kittens need
different levels of certain nutrients, like
protein, taurine and fats when compared to
dogs or puppies. Choosing an appropriate
kitten food is a big responsibility. After all,
it’s what will help her grow and develop
to her full potential. But to help her feel
secure, it’s best not to change her diet
straight away. Remember to find out what
Kittens have small stomachs.
Feed her several small meals,
rather than one big portion
36
Animaltalk | May 2018
CATSLIFE
nutrition
DID YOU KNOW?
Kittens can be left- or
right-pawed.
your kitten was eating before you became
her new owner, and feed the same food for
at least a week.
Not all kitten foods are the same – some
have much better quality ingredients than
others. This is why you might want to change
your kitten’s food to one recommended by
your vet. You’ll need to do this over a period
of five to seven days; your vet will advise
you on this process. Mix some of the new
food into her usual food, and gradually
increase the amount until only the new food
is being fed.
As you can imagine, a kitten’s stomach is
tiny, so to begin with, she’ll need small but
frequent meals. This means putting out fresh
food in a clean bowl often. Kittens aged from
eight to 12 weeks need four meals a day, three
meals from three to six months old, and two
meals when they are over six months old.
Food for kittens
By far the easiest and most successful way
to ensure your growing kitten is getting a
healthy, balanced diet is to feed a complete
premium food for kittens. There are two
types of complete foods available: dry or wet.
With dry food, your kitten can visit her food
bowl as often as she likes throughout the
day. Wet foods in cans or pouches, on the
other hand, are likely to lose their freshness
quickly once in the bowl, so need to be given
as separate meals throughout the day.
But just like with human food, not all
kitten foods offer the same quality and value
for money. A ‘complete’ kitten food will
provide all the vitamins and minerals your
kitten needs. Hill’s Science Plan Kitten
food is scientifically formulated to meet the
specific needs of kittens up to one year old.
Science Plan Kitten dry food comes in two
variants, chicken or tuna, and the selection
of wet food comes in pouches, cans, mousse
and a stew.
If you’re unsure which to buy, your vet will
advise you about which is best for your pet.
But whatever food you choose, follow the
feeding guide on the pack, and be careful
not to overfeed your kitten.
Believe it or not, kittens don’t need milk.
And for some cats, cows’ milk can actually
cause upset tummies. Make sure your kitten
has a bowl of fresh, clean water at all times.
Some cats may even prefer to drink from
flowing water sources, like dripping taps
or specially designed water fountains that
you can buy. If she’s eating dry, crunchy
food, she will drink more water than if she
is eating wet food.
* Dr Guy Fyvie, Veterinary Affairs Manager
at Hill’s Pet Nutrition
CATSLIFE
behaviour
Text: Gina Hartoog | Photography: Africa Studio
e
m
o
c
l
e
W
home kitty
The first night in a new home can be very
traumatic for a young kitten – it’s up to you to
make the transition a smooth one for her
38
Animaltalk | May 2018
CATSLIFE
behaviour
W
hether you choose to buy your
kitten from a reputable breeder
or rescue a kitten from a shelter,
it’s a personal choice. Once your kitten is
ready to come home, it’s time for you to
take on a new role – that of responsible
kitty parent.
KITTY’S HOMECOMING: A DIARY
Liaising with the breeder or shelter
If you are getting a purebred cat and are
working through a reputable breeder, it could
take a number of months before you get your
new kitten. The process may take a week or
two with a local shelter. Once the collection
date is booked, you’ll need to get your home
ready for kitty.
“Aside from buying the essentials, it is
important to find a ‘safe space’ for your kitten
to settle into for the first few days,” explains
breeder Aimee Hendriksz, owner of BellAimee Siamese, Oriental & Peterbald Cattery.
“This can be a spare bedroom with food, water
and a litterbox set up for the new kitten. It
can be overwhelming for the kitten adjusting
to a new environment away from her mother
and siblings, so you do this to minimise the
stress levels.”
Aimee also advises kitty parents to check
that the house is secure, and if you plan to
allow your kitten into the garden, make sure
that it too is escape-proof. You can consider a
‘catio’ – an enclosed patio that allows your cat
to go ‘outdoors’ safely.
“If you have young children, now is
the time to discuss how a kitten is to be
handled,” advises Aimee. “Often children
can unintentionally be rough with kittens,
resulting in them getting scratched or bitten
and the kitten ends up being scolded.” See the
March 2018 issue of Animaltalk to find out if
your child is ready for a cat.
The night before
Set up the kitten’s bed and litterbox in the
chosen room. Place the litterbox in a quiet spot,
away from the feeding area. Decide on which
family members will accompany you to pick up
the kitten. Keep it to a minimum – the driver,
another adult or older child. Consider leaving
babies and smaller children at home.
If your new kitten is flying from the breeder’s
home in another province, you will need to
confirm the flight details. You will need to pick
up your pet at the airline’s cargo section. Make
sure of these details to avoid delays.
Thirty minutes before you leave
Do a last-minute check. If you have other pets,
they should be put somewhere they won’t be a
disrupting factor when you arrive home. Pack
the cat carrier in the car. If you are picking up
the kitten at the airport, call the breeder and
make sure the flight left on time.
At the breeder’s home or shelter
Get kitty settled in her cat carrier and collect
the vet card from the breeder. This is important
and shows which inoculations the kitten has
received. “Collect the kitten and go straight
home so she can start adjusting to her new
home,” says Aimee.
One to two hours at home
Place the cat carrier in the kitty room and
open the door. Don’t force her out. Call kitty
gently by her chosen name. The sights and
sounds are all strange to her, so give her time
to gain confidence and come out on her own.
Let her explore the room under your watchful
eye. Show her where her bed, water bowl and
litterbox are. If kitty seems tired, give her space
to find her bed and take a nap. Let her meet
the human family members only (no other
pets yet) and keep things very low key. For
more information, read the article on how to
introduce your new cat to other pets featured
in the April 2018 edition of Animaltalk.
Three to four hours at home
Allow your new kitten to
explore her new home at
her own pace
Animaltalk | May 2018
Follow the breeder’s advice as to how many
meals the kittens are currently eating. This may
be three or four small meals per day. When the
THINGS TO DO
Consider diet Call the breeder or shelter and ask what food
the kittens are currently eating. To prevent unnecessary tummy
upsets, it makes sense to keep your kitten on this food – at
least initially. You can make a gradual switch later on.
Go shopping Get everything kitty needs. To start, this
includes a bed and some blankets, food and water bowls,
a few safe toys, a collar (you’ll need the correct size), a cat
carrier, a litterbox and litter, a small scratching post and a pet
first aid kit.
Set up a litterbox and bed Check with the breeder or
shelter as to what type of cat litter the kittens are used to and
buy the same type. Again, you can change later on if you so
wish, but some cats won’t use a litterbox that contains a litter
they are not used to. The change must be gradual.
Find a vet If you don’t have other pets, find a reputable vet
in your area. Ask friends and family for a referral. If you do
have a vet, book a check-up for three to four days after you
bring kitty home.
time is right, guide kitty to her bowl and let her
have her meal. You can also introduce a safe toy
for a play session before bedtime.
First night
The first night can be very tough for a kitten –
she is used to her mother and littermates and
their smells and warmth. Some kittens adapt
quickly, but others take time. Let her snuggle up
in a space she feels comfortable. Be patient and
loving without smothering her.
Second day at home
Plan to spend as much time with your kitten
as you can. Aimee says that bonding during
this period is important. “It determines your
relationship for the rest of your cat’s life,” she
says. “The first day is for her to settle and become
comfortable in the new environment. It is very
important that you don’t feel frustrated if your
kitten initially hides away from you. Once she
realises you’re not going to hurt her, she will relax
and come out. Be patient. Speak in a calm voice.
Try luring her out by playing with a toy. Playing
with your kitten will help her relax and help with
the bonding process. It is important not to force a
kitten to do anything she doesn’t feel comfortable
doing, as this will hinder bonding.”
39
interesting
VERY
quest for knowledge
the magazine that surprises
Photography: Sergey Uryadnikov
Refresh your mind
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Animaltalk | May 2018
Send in your picture!
Send your digital pictures to: animaltalk@panorama.co.za with ‘Animaltalk Crazy Critter’ in the subject line.
Please include full contact details. If your picture does not appear in the magazine, look out for it on www.animaltalk.co.za.
TIME TO
WIN
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Alma Noon
www.petdialog.co.za
brought to you by
Animaltalk | May 2018
43
DOWNLOAD
NOW!
TRACK YOUR PET’S HEALTH!
Get the free app that helps manage your
pet’s health and well-being with your vet.
FOR ANIMALS. FOR HEALTH. FOR YOU.
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LF/8MAR2018
g
a
P
Mothers are natural protectors of their young and it is no
different in the animal world. Most animal mothers nurture
their children up to a certain age.
WHAT DO YOU CALL THE BABIES?
1. A baby cow is a
2. A baby pig is a
3. A baby horse is a
4. A baby goat is a
5. A baby lion is a
6. A baby cat is a
7. A baby dog is a
8. A baby elephant is a
DIFFERENT NESTS
Answers: 1. Calf, 2. Piglet, 3. Foal, 4. Kid, 5. Cub, 6. Kitten, 7. Puppy, 8. Calf
’
s
d
i
K es
A MOTHER’S LOVE
Animals who lay eggs normally need a nest. In many cases, the father builds the
nest. See if you can figure out which nest belongs to which animal.
2
3
4
a
b
c
d
Answer: 1 – c, 2 – a, 3 – b, 4 – d
1
Animaltalk | May 2018
45
CONNECT THE DOTS
and then colour in the picture
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e mo rab that resh
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Ther cies of c a or in f
spe n the se land.
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46
Animaltalk | May 2018
BUILD YOUR OWN COLLECTION
This is the second in a series
of TRUMP CARDS that you can
collect. Simply cut them out
and paste them on cardboard.
Each edition will contain trump
cards that you can collect, so
DON’T MISS OUT!
FIND 10 DIFFERENCES
See if you can find all the differences between the
pictures of the mother beaver and her kit.
Answer
HOW TO PLAY
Two or more people can play
the game. Shuffle the cards and
deal all the cards face down.
Hold the pack so that only
one card is visible at a time.
The starting player reads out
one of the lines of information.
The person with the highest
number of the corresponding
information takes all the cards
and places them at the bottom
of their pack.Where there is
more than one winner, all the
cards are placed in the middle
until there is a winner.
The person with the most or
all of the cards is the winner.
PIG
HORSE
oink
Average lifespan:
Estimated weight:
Approximate height:
Top speed:
Average feed:
Level of cuteness:
8 years
318kg
90cm
17km/h
2kg
7
Animaltalk | May 2018
FUN FAC
Pigs are so T
ci
animals an al
d
are highly
intelligent.
*Information based on the Clydesdale breed
*Information based on the Landrace breed
4
Average lifespan:
Estimated weight:
Approximate height:
Top speed:
Average feed:
Level of cuteness:
20-25 years
900kg
163-183cm
32km/h
22kg
8
5
DONKEY
Whinny
Hee-haw
FUN FA
Just over a CT
ce
ago, horses ntury
mainly usedwere
transportatiofor
n.
Average lifespan:
Estimated weight:
Approximate height:
Top speed:
Average feed:
Level of cuteness:
6
8 years
FUN FAC
4kg
Some donk T
47cm
guard sheeeys
p,
14.5km/h
while ot
0.11kg
donkeys ar her
e pets.
7
47
MAZE
It is cold and time for this cute dog to take a nap. Help him to find the correct way to the dog house.
FIND THE CORRECT SHADOW
See if you can find
the correct shadow
from the original
picture
48
Animaltalk | May 2018
Barbie and her
sisters love spending
time together and
having sleepovers in
Barbie’s room! It’s time
to get ready
for bed!
Sister
SLEEPOVER
c
a
SMILE!
Can you match the
stars to the gaps
in the big picture?
d
1
b
2
Two pictures don’t match at all!
Can you tell which ones?
Answer: a-5, b-3, c-1, d-6
3
Animaltalk | May 2018
4
5
For more cool Barbie activities be sure to get the latest issue of Barbie
Magazine, on sale at leading retailers or www.coolmags.com now!
6
49
KIDSPAGES
fun facts
Text: Saskia Steyn | Photography: Mientjie Kleinhans, Yuval Navot, Juli Hansen, EcoPrint, Carlos Caetano, Tim Booth
THINGS ABOUT
GIRAFFES
1. Tall beauty
The giraffe is the tallest land
mammal in the world, with
legs reaching up to 1.8m in
height. The giraffe also has
the longest neck, reaching
heights of over 1.7m, and the
longest tongue, which can
grow to a shocking length of
46cm – that’s longer than an
average ruler. His tongue is
also dark-coloured to protect it
from sunburn.
3. Abnormally similar neck
You would think that the giraffe’s neck would have
more than the usual number of neck vertebrae, but
the opposite is true. Giraffes and people share the
same amount of neck vertebrae, both having only
seven. Obviously, they are not the same size – one
giraffe vertebra is about 25cm long.
4. Helpful valve
Because of the giraffe’s size, it can be expected
that he will have an enormous heart. His heart
is 60cm long and can weigh up to 12kg.
Furthermore, the jugular veins comprise a series
of one-way valves that avoids excess blood
flowing to the brain when the giraffe is bending
down to drink water.
5. Tired feet?
2. Uncomfortable
way of rehydrating
Even though the giraffe has an
astonishingly long neck, it is still too
short to reach the ground when bending
down. Giraffes have developed a way
of drinking water by spreading their
front legs to a comfortable position and
bending them at the knees to reach
the water, enabling them to drink. This
position places a giraffe in a vulnerable
situation, and therefore giraffes never
drink water without one or two lookouts.
These lookouts ensure that they are safe.
Giraffes take turns between drinking and
being the lookout.
50
Giraffes spend most of their lifetime standing
up. The cow gives birth to a calf while
standing – the fall for a calf can be up to
1.8m. After birth, a calf can walk by himself
within an hour. It is established that giraffes
can sleep while standing up as they don’t
need much sleep. They only need five to 30
minutes of sleep in a 24-hour period, which
they achieve through taking short naps of one
to two minutes. Sometimes, when a giraffe is
exhausted, he will take a vulnerable six-minute
nap while lying on the ground.
6. What are those?
Males and females both have small furry horns
on top of their heads. These horns are called
ossicones, are situated between the ears and
have dark tips. Bulls use these horns when
fighting with other males. Females do not use
them as much as males.
Animaltalk | May 2018
9. Lovers or fighters
Giraffes aren’t always the gentle giants
we’d like them to be. Males participate in
what is called ‘necking’ – they swing their
heads violently at each other. To a giraffe,
this action can be fatal when he strikes with
a wrong angle. This behaviour is done to
compete with other bulls for dominance in
a certain area, which enables them to mate
with the cows within that region.
10. Not that thirsty
7. Fast when in danger
Giraffes aren’t seen as great runners – they cruise at a
speed of 16km/h. But when they are threatened, they’re
able to run as fast as 56km/h, and they can also deliver
a fatal kick with their hind legs. Predators are known
to have died of these kicks, which in turn made them
be beyond careful during a pursuit. Giraffes don’t walk
identical to other quadrupeds; they tread by moving
their front and hind legs of the same side simultaneously,
called pacing.
Giraffes eat most of the day, about 34kg worth
of nourishment. They use their lengthy tongues
to reach the higher leaves and wrap their
tongues around them to pull them down. They
only drink water once every few days due to the
dangers when drinking water. They get a lot of
their water through the juicy leaves they eat.
8. Stolen pelt
Males are known as bulls and females as cows. The
ancient Greeks believed that the giraffe is a camel
wearing a leopard’s pelt, and that is where his
scientific name, Giraffa camelopardalis, originates
from. Very much like a leopard’s spots, no two
giraffes have the same markings – similar to a
human’s fingerprint.
Animaltalk | May 2018
51
wildthings
Joseph Hlako with
puppy Maluti, who took
part in the programme
▲
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Supplied
g
n
i
t
c
e
t
Pro
k
c
o
t
s
e
liv
from
predators
The Carnivore Conservation Programme
T
o protect both carnivores and
farmers’ livestock, the Endangered
Wildlife Trust (EWT) came up with
the Carnivore Conservation Programme,
which is running in various parts of the
country. The programme involves trained
livestock guarding dogs (LGDs) who protect
the livestock from carnivores, and indirectly
protect the carnivores, who are then less of
a threat to the farmers.
Since 2006, the EWT and other nongovernmental organisations have placed
197 dogs with farmers in the programme.
“And there are many indicators that this
programme has proved to be successful.
There are currently 15 dogs in the one-year
custodianship agreement with farmers in the
field,” says Derek van der Merwe, Carnivore
Conservation Programme: Limpopo regional
co-ordinator from the EWT.
The main areas where the programme is in
place are the Waterberg and Soutpansberg
regions in Limpopo, Magaliesberg in the North
West Province, Wakkerstroom in Mpumalanga,
and Upington in the Northern Cape.
Project phases
There are four phases in the training
programme, and the puppies have to be
genetically healthy and from proven working
lines. The first phase is when the dog is
between six and 16 weeks old. He will then
stay in a small camp or kraal with a small
group of livestock to build a bond with these
animals. During this phase, the farmer will
ensure that the puppy is properly supervised
for obvious reasons.
“The next phase is between 16 and 20
weeks, when the puppy will be exposed to
the rest of the livestock camp or kraal. There
is an ‘escape gate’ to the puppy’s place of
safety where the puppy can crawl through
to if there are any signs of aggression from
the livestock,” explains Derek.
The third phase ranges from 20 weeks to
12 months. Once the puppy and livestock
have bonded, the puppy will accompany
the livestock when they go out to graze.
The puppy will be monitored closely for the
52
Animaltalk | May 2018
WILDTHINGS
DOGTALK
conservation
great dogs doing great things
Once the dogs are ready, they protect
livestock in the field from predators
▲
first few days, as he might come into contact
with other wildlife, such as warthogs and
baboons.
The last phase is when the puppy is 12
months or older. The dog needs limited
supervision and this is when the EWT signs
the dog over to the farmer.
In the field
Once in the field, the LGD’s main task is
to protect livestock from larger carnivores,
such as leopard, cheetah and brown hyena,
and smaller, but more common carnivores,
like jackal and caracal. The dog will stay
with the livestock in the field, which means
that the dog is exposed to parasites such as
ticks and fleas.
“To protect these dogs, even as puppies
in the small camps, is crucial and therefore
Bravecto sponsors the dogs with Bravecto.
It is a tablet that you give dogs once every
three months and they will have no fleas or
ticks on them if they ingest this product,”
says Derek.
The programme co-ordinators also advise
the farmers so that the LGDs only eat the
best possible food to ensure that their health
stays in excellent condition.
Thanks to the livestock protectors chasing
off and protecting the livestock, as a tool to
minimise carnivore conflict, the carnivores
are safer from farmers.
CONSUMER UPDATE
ORIJEN wins Brand
of the Year award
O
RIJEN Freeze-Dried Dog Food has
been named Brand of the Year 20172018 in the Global Awards tier at the
World Branding Forum in Vienna.
Animaltalk
| May 2018
53
Over 800 brands from 35 countries were world participated during the voting period. The
nominated for the 2017-2018 Animalis Edition award recognises brands with a presence in 10 or
of the Awards in multiple categories, and more countries across three or more continents.
more than 60,000 consumers from around the
“Our successes start and finish with our
employees and partners,” says Peter Muhlenfeld,
chief brand officer. “Their efforts, commitment
and energy make everything possible.”
Unlike conventional pet foods, which are
cooked at high temperatures, ORIJEN FreezeDried foods are prepared without cooking with
the aim of retaining ‘the natural properties of
authentically fresh ingredients’.
This award puts Champion Petfoods in
league with other global award winners such
as Facebook, Google, Coca-Cola and Apple,
and is a sign of how far their commitment to
pet lovers has taken them – and will continue
to take them.
53 2018
Animaltalk | May
HYPOTHERMIA IN PETS
DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT
What is hypothermia?
Hypothermia is a medical condition that
is characterised by an abnormally low
body temperature. It occurs when an
animal is no longer able to maintain a
normal body temperature, causing the
body temperature to drop, which results
in a depression of the central nervous
system (the brain and spinal cord).
Hypothermia can result in:
•
•
•
•
•
•
A disordered immune system
An irregular heartbeat
Difficulty breathing
Impaired consciousness
Coma
Death
Pets’ average body temperature
Beware of
hypothermia
in winter
What to do
01
02
03
54
Dogs
Cats
Birds
Rabbits
Guinea Pigs
37.8 to 39.2°C
37.8 to 39.3°C
38.8 to 39.5°C
38.5 to 40°C
37.5 to 39.5°C
If you suspect hypothermia, get your animal to
the vet as soon as possible.
On the way to the vet, keep your animal warm.
Make a hot water bottle and put it against the
animal’s abdomen (wrapped in a cloth to avoid
burns). Blankets can also help.
Hypothermia can be
prevented by avoiding
any prolonged exposure
to cold temperatures.
Animaltalk | May 2018
Go to www.coolmags.co.za/
hypothermia to download a PDF
Three phases
Hypothermia is split into three phases: mild, moderate
and severe. The symptoms of hypothermia vary with the
severity of the condition.
Mild hypothermia:
weakness,
shivering and
lack of mental
alertness.
Moderate hypothermia:
muscle stiffness, low
blood pressure, altered
consciousness and slow,
shallow breathing.
Severe hypothermia:
fixed and dilated
pupils, difficult to find
heartbeat, impaired
breathing and coma.
At the vet
Treatment
• Temperature will be monitored (checked with
a thermometer, or a rectal/oesophageal
probe in extreme conditions).
• Heart rate and breathing will also be
monitored for any irregularities.
• An electrocardiogram (ECG), which records
the electrical activity of the heart, may also be
performed.
• Urine and blood samples are taken to
look for alternative causes of low body
temperature and unresponsiveness (for
example: infection, hypoglycaemia, metabolic
disorders, anaesthetics or sedatives).
• The animal will also be examined for
frostbite, which can develop in extremely cold
temperatures.
• Hypothermic animals are treated until normal
body temperature is reached.
• Movement is reduced to prevent further heat loss,
and to reduce the risk of the heart entering an
abnormal rhythm.
• Mild hypothermia is treated passively with thermal
insulation and blankets to prevent heat loss.
• Moderate hypothermia is treated with active
rewarming, using external heat sources like
heating pads.
• For severe hypothermia, invasive core warming
will be necessary, such as the administration
of warm water enemas and warm IV fluids. In
animals with severe hypothermia, breathing aids
such as oxygen and IV fluids for cardiovascular
support may be required.
More vulnerable to hypothermia
Newborns
Smaller breeds
Older animals
Animals with hypothyroidism
Animaltalk | May 2018
Underweight animals
Animals under anaesthetic
Animals with diseases of the hypothalamus
55
vettalk
It is easier to keep a
healthy puppy happy
Brought to you by:
Puppy
▲
Text: Vanessa Mcclure | Photography: otsphoto, Africa Studio
VACCINATIONS
Prevention is better than cure
T
he last thing any pet owner wishes for
is an ill dog, or worse, a puppy who
has fallen ill while it was possible to
prevent him from contracting a disease. It is
far better to prevent certain diseases than to
treat it, and vaccination is one of the safest
and most cost-effective means of preventing
certain infectious diseases.
Core and non-core vaccines
Vaccines are divided into core and non-core
vaccines. Core vaccines are used against
56
diseases that are readily transmissible, carry
high rates of morbidity and/or mortality, are of
public health concern, or may be abundant in the
environment. These vaccines are recommended
for all dogs regardless of the animal’s lifestyle.
In dogs, the vaccines that fall into the core
category are parvovirus, distemper, adenovirus
(type I and II) and rabies.
Non-core vaccines are vaccines that are
designed to prevent diseases that may be mild
or self-limiting, making the risks associated
with administering the vaccines greater
than the actual disease, or they are vaccines
with limited efficacy. They are also often
vaccines against organisms that are not readily
transmissible or may have limited geographic
distribution or prevalence. The use of non-core
vaccines will depend on the individual animal
and his lifestyle and risk factors.
Puppy’s immunity
The very young puppy gets his immunity
from his mother via passive transfer. Passive
transfer of immunity occurs when the mother’s
Animaltalk | May 2018
VETTALK
vaccinations
▲
Protecting your puppy
with vaccines against core
diseases may save his life
antibodies are transferred to the puppy before
and after birth. A small amount of the mother’s
antibodies will be transferred via the placenta,
but the majority of the transfer occurs when
the puppy suckles and ingests colostrum in the
first eight to 12 hours after birth. This maternal
immunity will provide protection against many
diseases, but only if the mother is healthy and
fully vaccinated herself.
Maternal immunity will protect the puppy in
his first few weeks of life, but it starts to decline
and lose its ability to protect against diseases
as the puppy gets older. The level of decline
of the maternal antibodies differs in different
puppies, even in puppies from the same litter,
so by the time the puppies reaches between six
and 16 weeks, most of them will have maternal
antibody levels below protective levels. This is
when vaccination becomes important.
The problem arises when the puppy has
low levels of maternal antibodies that are not
protective but the levels are still high enough
Animaltalk | May 2018
to interfere with the vaccine by neutralising the
vaccine antigen, or by preventing the puppy’s
immune system from recognising the antigen,
making the vaccine ineffective. This is why
multiple, sequential vaccines are recommended in
puppies until they are at least 14 to 16 weeks of age.
Puppies less than 16 weeks of age should be
given the core vaccine (not rabies) at six weeks
of age followed by the same vaccine every two
to four weeks until the puppy is 16 weeks of age.
A booster should then be administered within
one year following the last dose, and subsequent
boosters should then be administered at intervals
of three years.
If the puppy is more than 16 weeks of age and
the vaccination status is not known, then two
vaccines two to four weeks apart can be given and
then the same protocol will be followed as above.
Rabies
The rabies vaccination is the only vaccine that
is required by law. This vaccine is administered
at 12 weeks of age and then boosted within
one year of the initial vaccination, and then
administered yearly after that.
Unique situations
The non-core vaccines will be administered
according to the puppy’s risk of exposure,
geographical location and probability of travel.
The decisions regarding which of the non-core
vaccines should be administered should be
made by the veterinarian in consultation with
the pet owner. Therefore, it is important to be
honest with the vet.
It is generally agreed that canine vaccines
have an excellent safety record and severe
adverse reactions are not very common. The
risk of an animal contracting a life-threatening
disease like parvovirus or distemper virus is
much higher than the animal having an adverse
reaction to the vaccination. If you are concerned
about adverse effects, then rather discuss this
with your veterinarian.
57
vettalk
tip!
Brought to you by:
The first visit to the vet is crucial
to build a relationship between
you, your dog and the vet
*This article first appeared in Southern Africa’s Dog Directory 2018
Make
vet’s sure that
pract
the
i
and c ce is tidy
lean.
Compiled by: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Africa Studio
A
visit to
the vet
What to expect from the vet and
what the vet expects from you
T
he first visit to the veterinarian with your
puppy should ideally be two or so days
after he arrived at his new home. This
visit is to start a relationship with the vet, and
also to take your puppy for his first health check.
Here is a list of what to expect from your
veterinarian, and what your vet expects
from you.
What to expect from the vet
• When the vet sees your pet, he or she should
examine him for any lumps, listen to his
heart and check his teeth.
• Find out if the practice has emergency care,
or where the closest hospital is and if the vet
is affiliated to the hospital.
• Find out if there is another vet in the
practice who will be able to see you if your
vet is busy, and see if you are comfortable
with them.
• Get the vet’s rates and compare them with
other practices in the area.
• Discuss your puppy’s health and well-being
and any vaccination, deworming and other
programmes, and remember to take all the
puppy’s records with you to the vet.
58
What the vet expects
As much as you have certain expectations of
your vet, they also have a few expectations of
you. These include the following:
• You must supply them with as much
information as possible when they consult
with you. If your dog is sick, they need to
know what the symptoms are. For instance:
Is he vomiting? What is his temperature? Why
do you think your dog is sick? Remember, the
vet sees a patient who cannot talk for himself.
• Your vet doesn’t want to be afraid of your dog,
and therefore socialisation classes for your
puppy are important.
• Your vet will have to examine your dog. Make
sure your puppy is used to this poking and
prodding by feeling him over regularly.
• Your vet wants you to be satisfied and as
happy as the patient. Therefore, it is important
to communicate with him or her if there is
anything that you are unhappy with.
• Please do ask questions, but do not question
your vet’s prognosis, unless you are 100% sure
that your vet is wrong.
• You want your vet to be professional and
friendly, and so they want the same in return.
HOW DO I SELECT THE RIGHT FOOD?
When taking your puppy to the vet for his first check-up, speak
to the vet about the best food options. There are many dog
food brands that claim to have all the right ingredients for
puppy health, but not all of them get the balance right.
A food that is specially formulated for mini, medium and
large breeds and provides antioxidants, such as vitamins C and
E, helps your puppy build a strong, healthy immune system.
Hill’s Science Plan contains these antioxidants plus high
levels of DHA, a vital fatty acid to support a healthy brain
and learning abilities in puppies. The ingredients are easily
digested, which helps your puppy to absorb more nutrients
from the food.
HOW DO I START MY PUPPY ON NEW FOOD?
It’s important not to start your puppy entirely on the new food,
as it may cause an upset tummy. Mix your pet’s current food
with the new food and increase the amount gradually while
decreasing the old food over at least a seven-day period. Once
you’ve moved on to providing your pet with a full portion of the
new food, you can continue to do so.
Also see the article with tips on how to choose and introduce
your puppy to new food on page 20.
Make sure that your dog doesn’t only see
the vet for ‘nasty’ injections and examinations.
Take him to visit the practice and say ‘hi’, and
let everyone give him some treats while there.
Also, make your dog used to trips in the car. You
don’t want him to associate trips in the car with
a visit to the vet.
Animaltalk | May 2018
&
QA
HAVING PROBLEMS WITH YOUR PET’S HEALTH, BEHAVIOUR, OR
JUST HAVE A QUESTION? Write to our panel of experts who will
endeavour to answer as many questions as possible.
Send your questions and a photograph of the ailment, if possible, to:
Animaltalk Vet’s Advice, Private Bag X4, Kyalami, 1684 or
email: animaltalk@panorama.co.za
Suffering from
nightmares
Q Do dogs and cats suffer
from nightmares as well?
Puppy chewing cushions
Q Our 18-month-old puppy always chews up the older dog’s cushions
at night and when we’re away. How do we prevent this?
A Your young dog is having his own private
‘party’ with the cushions and the behaviour
is highly rewarding for him. The antics stop
when you are present as he has more than
likely learned from history that he will be told
off. Remove the temptation by not allowing
him access to the dog’s cushion when he is on
his own. You could try purchasing a completely
different type of bed, such as a sturdy, covered,
high-density type. There is a risk that he
might ‘attack’ this bed too, but you may also
find that he doesn’t see this hard type bed as
rewarding as the cushions. Allow him access to
the changed bed under supervision for about a
week, as you want the novelty of the different
bed to wear off before leaving him unattended.
Simultaneously, redirect his alone-time antics
onto a conglomeration of safe toys or chews
that he is allowed to destroy. Additionally, you
can also keep a part of his dinner aside and
Animaltalk | May 2018
give it to him by means of a slow interactive
feeding game, such as a stuffed Kong, just
before going out. This will encourage him to
lie down and engage with a host of new items.
Chewing and licking is a relaxant. We don’t
want to stop his need to chew, but instead
redirect the behaviour onto items that he is
allowed to chew.
If you find that your young dog will destroy
any type of dog bed, create a puppy-proof
area for sleeping time, give him a collection
of safe items to chew, and leave him with
the destroyed bed. Don’t replace it until he
is older and his chewing days have subsided.
If the inappropriate behaviour continues or
increases, I would highly suggest you contact
an accredited behaviourist as there may be
more to the behaviour than boredom or reward
in destroying the cushions.
A Yes. Dogs and cats are not dissimilar
to humans when it comes to sleep cycles,
as their brains are similar at a structural
level. We all go through a phase called
rapid eye movement (REM) sleep – a cycle
of sleep where we replay memories of prior
activities. It is not uncommon to see our
pets twitch, quiver and vocalise. We can
also see their eyes moving underneath
their lids watching the replay of a memory.
If your pet experienced a traumatic or
unpleasant event that day, the event could
be replayed during the REM cycle, and
you might recognise this through fearful
body movement and vocalisation, such
as growling, snapping and/or quivering.
As we all know, nightmares can be very
scary, and therefore I would suggest you
wake your dog up gently by calling his
name repeatedly. Don’t touch him as this
may startle him and he may unknowingly
react by snapping at you.
If your pet is having frequent nightmares,
try and capture some video footage of the
nightmares. Show this footage to an
accredited behaviourist for assistance. As
night terrors and seizures can sometimes
look similar, you might want to consult a
veterinarian as well.
Samantha Walpole, behaviourist
Samantha Walpole, behaviourist
59
HEALTH, NUTRITION, BEHAVIOUR & TRAINING
your questions answered
Constantly hungry dog
Q My 15-year-old dog weighs 10kg and is
constantly hungry. Should I feed him bit by bit
every 30 minutes or so, or should I set out
scheduled feeding times?
A If your dog is losing weight or has a poor body
condition score due to weight loss and is still always
hungry, he could have an underlying disease, like
diabetes. Ideally you should have him evaluated
by your vet. If he is healthy, then you can start to
change his feeding programme.
A proportion of animals over the age of 12 years
are underweight as they may have a reduced ability
to digest nutrients, particularly proteins and fats,
which results in weight and muscle loss. Protein
requirements increase in older animals, so if your
dog is healthy but still hungry, I would suggest
you change him over to a good quality senior diet.
These diets have been specifically designed for the
geriatric animal. The amount of food per day should
not be increased, but the volume can be divided
into smaller meals more often.
Dr Vanessa Mcclure, veterinarian
On a high
Q Why do cats love being elevated high up?
A Instead of seeing our cats as the fluffy
companions who wake us in the early hours
for food, take a moment to consider their wild
heritage and what they would have to adapt
to in a situation in the wild. Being high up
would provide many advantages: safety is
probably the main benefit, but a high vantage
point would also allow a cat to spot potential
danger as well as potential prey. Raised areas
allow a broader view of an environment. For in
house-cats, this means being able to see other
animals and people in the home, or the lizard
scurrying through the grass. Cats are natural
observers, rather than participants.
60
It also means being secure, as a raised
position allows a cat to avoid any other animals
with whom they may not feel like interacting.
It’s important to provide cats with areas
where they can gain height. This is especially
significant for fearful or anxious cats, or cats
who need a getaway from rambunctious dogs
or younger cats. Cats can be encouraged to use
higher spaces by putting catnip or food in those
areas. Scientific evidence suggests that cats
prefer raised areas, so whether you’re running
a cat shelter, or have cats in your home, make
sure they have access to elevated territories.
Katherine Brown, behaviourist
Animaltalk | May 2018
HEALTH, NUTRITION, BEHAVIOUR & TRAINING
FOCUS
your questions answered
Sleeping puppies
Q Puppies sleep a lot. Why do
they need to take a nap so
often?
Hairballs in dogs
Q Do dogs also struggle with
hairballs?
A Cats spend much time grooming
themselves, which predisposes them
to getting hairballs. Dogs don’t groom
as excessively as cats do, and therefore
they don’t ingest as much hair. We
have diagnosed hairballs in some
dogs with severe flea infestations,
which cause severe itching and
triggering the dogs to continually
lick and chew their skin and hair.
Dr Vanessa Mcclure, veterinarian
A Just like human babies need sleep, so
do puppies. Puppies need about 18 to 19
hours of sleep in a 24-hour period – the
younger they are the more sleep they need.
Puppies grow and develop physically very
quickly. They are also constantly learning
new things, and all this uses energy.
Puppies usually get some of their sleep
during the day in the form of short naps,
but they should sleep the majority of the
19 hours at night.
Dr Vanessa Mcclure, veterinarian
Feeding goldfish
Q How often should I feed my
goldfish?
Vaccinations for
hamsters?
Q Do hamsters need
vaccinations as well?
A Hamsters don’t need
vaccinations, but a yearly
check-up and possibly parasite
treatment by your exotic animal
veterinarian is recommended.
Dr Dorianne Elliott, veterinarian
A Most fish only need a small amount of
food twice daily. Do not overfeed your fish!
Any food left over after two to three minutes
should be removed to avoid contaminating
the water.
Dr Dorianne Elliott, veterinarian
Animaltalk | May 2018
61
HEALTH, NUTRITION, BEHAVIOUR & TRAINING
your questions answered
Night-time prowl
Q Why do cats prowl at night, and sleep all
day long?
A The cat’s wild ancestors are largely nocturnal, tending
to hunt more during the night than during the day. Although
domestication has resulted in our cats shifting towards a more
diurnal lifestyle, many cats still retain their wilder habits. This
may be more pronounced in some breeds than others, and
is usually more apparent in young cats, who may spend the
night stalking their territory, searching for small creatures to
chase, or playing.
This translates to much sleeping during the day. Cats, on
average, spend about 15 hours a day napping – in some this
may be as much as 20 hours. If your cat is not provided with
activity during the day, she’s much more likely to keep you
awake with night-time shenanigans. Although they retain
generally nocturnal habits, it is possible to encourage your cat
to sleep during the night by allowing her opportunities for
play and activity during the day. A simple teaser toy, catnip or
some chasing games with a rolled-up piece of paper, followed
by an evening meal, should all help your cat relax into a nighttime sleeping routine. If you find your cat is not just awake
at night but restless and vocal as well, it’s a good idea to take
her to your vet to rule out a health issue.
Katherine Brown, behaviourist
Choosing a fish
Q I would like to buy my son a goldfish as a pet. How do I choose the best fish?
A The most important fact to consider is
the welfare of the fish. Goldfish are actually
fairly complex to care for and should under
no circumstances be kept in a bowl. They
62
need a properly equipped aquarium with a
good biological filter. Also, remember that
a healthy goldfish can live for 20 years and
will grow very large.
Please set up and cycle your tank two
weeks before purchasing your fish. The filter
needs to mature before the water is safe for
fish. There is much information available on
the internet regarding the setting up of an
aquarium, or see the January 2018 edition of
Animaltalk. Your local pet store will also be
able to advise you.
The ideal fish to start up with include
guppies, white cloud mountain minnows
and Siamese fighting fish. When you buy fish
from a reputable pet shop, always choose fish
with smooth, perfect scales and no blemishes,
such as slimy or fuzzy patches on the skin
or tiny, white, ‘salt grain-like’ spots. These
lesions are signs of disease. The fish chosen
should also be active and lively.
Dr Dorianne Elliott, veterinarian
Animaltalk | May 2018
OUTANDABOUT
travel
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans
How to
FIND THE IDEAL KENNEL
F
6 questions to ask
inding the ideal kennel can be daunting,
as this is the place where your beloved
pets have to stay while you are away.
There are some horror stories out there, but
there are also reputable kennels that will
look after your pets well while you are away.
We’ve asked Stuart Imrie, owner of BKC Pet
Boarding, to give us some tips.
The ideal kennel “Choosing a kennel or boarding facility
for your pets is a very personal experience.
It should be conveniently located or offer
collection and drop-off for ease of access, as
well as provide all the necessities to make
your pets’ stay as comfortable as possible
while they are away from the family.
“Choose a boarding facility that has access
to vet care, and offers ample room inside and
outside so that your pet has good ventilation
and an opportunity for exercise. Make sure
that the staff is courteous and respectful to
both you, as the pet owner, and the animals,
and ensure that the environment is a clean
and healthy one,” advises Stuart.
Questions to ask
When visiting a potential kennel, it is wise
to ask the manager at the kennel a few
questions. Stuart says that you should ask
the following questions: 1. What are the operating hours? Is there staff
at the facility 24 hours a day looking after
the pets?
2. What types of food are offered and can I
provide my own?
3. If my pet requires medication or medical
care, how will this be managed?
4. What are the exercise and playtime
schedules like?
5. What immunisations should my pet have?
6. Do they offer other services such
as grooming?
Also see the article Finding a reputable kennel
in the March edition of Animaltalk.
ADVERTORIAL
Next best place to home
B
KC Pet Boarding offers pets ideal
boarding kennels at affordable prices.
Without compromising on service
and quality, these kennels offer a range
of services to ensure that your pet is well
looked after while you are away.
Q What makes BKC the ideal boarding
kennel?
A BKC is situated on the outskirts of Benoni
in a quiet and serene area, making it
ideal to drop off your pets when going
for a weekend getaway or holiday out
of Johannesburg. We offer private and
family size boarding kennels, some of
which have underfloor heating for those
chilly Gauteng nights.
There are individual gardens for the
pets to play in during the day, as well as
a much larger exercise garden where our
trained and loving staff spend much time
playing fetch with the animals.
Animaltalk | May 2018
On hot summer days, we add in splash
pools for those doggies who love to cool
off in style. For our long-term boarders,
families can keep an eye on their furbabies by following our social media
pages as we regularly update it with fun
pics of our visitors playing and having a
good, relaxed and stress-free time.
BKC offers full care and love to all pets
who visit. We have our local vet visit daily
to check in on all animals, and staff who
stay on the premises so that your pets are
never alone. We also offer a collection and
delivery service to our clients.
All kennels should be clean and tidy and
health and safety standards should be
met at all times. This is non-negotiable.
Q What are the non-negotiable factors when
it comes to animal health at the kennels?
A All vaccinations should be up to date
before any pet stays over.
Animals should be checked daily to
ensure they are comfortable, eating well
and are unharmed.
63
welfare
ANIMAL HERO
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Supplied
Meet Jerry Selwane
Facing danger every day to save animals
▲ Jerry Selwane, the 2017
▲
Animaltalk Top Dog Animal Hero
W
alking in Jerry Selwane’s shoes
isn’t for everyone, as he goes
where angels fear to tread. Jerry,
founder of the Soweto Animal Rescue and
Advisory Centre (SARAC), was awarded
the 2017 Animaltalk Top Dog Animal Hero
award for his efforts to save animals and for
fighting for animals’ rights.
Jerry wears many hats. He looks after
rescued dogs, trains pet owners on how
to be responsible, trains youth to educate
community members and works on
organised crime cases of dog fighting and
theft syndicates. He is a qualified animal
welfare assistant and a private investigator.
While he is busy with all these tasks, he is
also building an animal clinic on the SARAC
premises with a potential mobile clinic to
serve community members who can’t reach
the only other available clinic that is 20 to
25km away.
64
Organised crime fighting
Of all the activities that keep him busy
throughout the day, Jerry spends much time
on fighting organised crime that involves
animals and animal abuse. He says that dog
fighting and dog theft are on the increase in
South Africa.
“It is the same people who are involved in
the syndicates. The culprits force youngsters
to steal dogs and then force the animals
to fight with each other, and they are very
sneaky in the way they do it.
“They target youngsters and they look
for children who walk their own dogs in
a neighbourhood, as these children are
obviously good with dogs. The kingpins
befriend the children over time, and once
they are friends and trusted, they force the
children to fight their own dogs. When the
children fight their own dogs, the kingpins
send the children out on the streets to steal
Some of the kennels where the
rescue dogs are housed
other dogs,” explains Jerry.
He says that the culprits are clever in that
they never keep any of the stolen dogs,
or dogs used for fighting, on their own
premises. They might have a well-lookedafter family pet on the premises, which
means that there is no evidence against
that person.
“The culprits stay all over South Africa,
even in affluent suburbs such as Sandton. But
they mainly infiltrate township communities
as they are under the impression that it
is easier to target children from these
communities,” says Jerry.
Dog fighting
It is terrible to think that there are people
who can be so heartless to not only force
dogs to fight each other, but force young
children to become so violent and to be
a part of the dog fighting. “Backyard
Animaltalk | May 2018
WELFARE
▲
#animaltalkcares
Sometimes, other animals stay
over for various reasons
fighters are cruel people. They do all sorts
of unthinkable things to a dog so that the
owner won’t recognise his own dog. Besides
mutilating certain parts of an animal, they
will ‘pump’ the animal with steroids and
make the dog aggressive until he is ready
to go into the ring to fight with other dogs,”
says Jerry.
He adds that there is a big market for
Rottweiler, Boerboel and Pit Bull dogs.
The culprits breed with the Rottweiler and
Boerboel dogs to sell the puppies, but use
the Pit Bulls to fight.
Jerry advises that victims should follow
the protocols in reporting stolen dogs and
immediately open a case at the nearest
police station. “If you don’t report the
crime, then there is no case against the
perpetrators. For some reason, people don’t
report the crime and that makes life difficult
for us when we are looking for evidence
against these people,” explains Jerry.
Threats
Due to all the arrests and crime-fighting
activities that Jerry is involved in, he has
received various threats against his life and
his family. “When it comes to the fighting
syndicates, my life is in danger. I’m vigilant
wherever I go, because the people involved
in the syndicates are ‘untouchable’, and
they are feared by people. These people can
make you disappear,” says Jerry. And yet,
Jerry doesn’t give up that easily.
Jerry’s rangers
Jerry has about 90 youngsters ranging
between the ages of six and 25 years to
assist him in townships all over South
Africa. He calls them Jerry’s rangers. “I
N
NG SOYOS,
OPENIU
A
W
R
IN FO E GATE
CAP UBAI
&D
empower these children with dog training
skills, general animal knowledge, and to
identify some animal diseases and basic
signs of ill health.
“These rangers then patrol their
communities and educate pet owners
where they can about responsible pet
ownership. Most of these children come
from underprivileged families, and even
though their own circumstances are
heartbreaking, their commitment to the
animals is amazing. These rangers are our
most effective way of addressing animal
cruelty. If they see something suspicious in
the township, they inform me,” says Jerry.
It is clear that Jerry has a soft heart for
animals and does everything in his ability
to fight for animals and against animal
abuse. What he has to go through to achieve
his goals makes him a true animal hero.
Your pet
means
the world
to us!
www.vet-world.co.za
www.petworld.co.za
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wild birds
small
animals
fish
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N1 Value
Centre
7 Solly Smiedt Street
CW Advertising
Goodwood
Petworld, Vetworld & Pawstar Pet Groomers
Tel: 021 595 1985
Email: n1city@petworld.co.za
We also stock a large
variety of Marine,
Tropical & Pond fish
www.petworld.co.za
Somerset
West
Cnr. Forsyth Road & Jigger Avenue
(opp. Checkers Hyper, Helderberg Centre)
Petworld, Vetworld & Groom World
Tel: 021 851 6006
Email: somerset@petworld.co.za
D!
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Roodepoort
Princess Crossing Shopping Centre
54 Ontdekkers Road, Roodepoort
Petworld, Vetworld & Groom World
Tel: 011 764 2648
Email: roodepoort@petworld.co.za
TRADING HOURS MONDAY TO THURSDAY: 9 AM - 6 PM | FRIDAY: 9 AM - 7 PM
SATURDAY: 9 AM - 5 PM | SUNDAY & PUBLIC HOLIDAYS: 9 AM - 3 PM
Visit our Facebook page for more info about Adoption Days & times.
PA M P E R .. .
T
Y O U R P Er
at ou
Grooming.
Parlours
hone
Walk in, p or
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Shop 10, Ground Floor, 277 Main Road, Sea Point
Petworld, Vetworld & Mini Groom World
Tel: 021 433 0439
TRADING HOURS MONDAY TO THURSDAY: 9 AM - 6 PM
FRIDAY: 9 AM - 7 PM | SATURDAY: 9 AM - 5 PM
SUNDAY & PUBLIC HOLIDAYS: 9 AM - 3 PM
TOPDOG
agility
Dogs performing
in agility are
hardworking athletes
Text: Yolan Friedmann | Photography: Tamryn White
▲
Canine athletes
in agility
A young sport that needs to evolve
A
gility as a formal sport has not
been around that long. Its origins
trace back to the 1978 Crufts show
in which agility was first demonstrated to
entertain audiences between the more serious
and formal obedience and conformation
classes.
Of course, that has all changed now and
the rapid growth of the sport has resulted in
national kennel unions globally adopting the
sport (the first being as early as 1980), with
variations of rules that govern it, as well as
several forms of world championships being
held annually. Apparently, there is even talk
now of the possibility of it becoming an
66
Olympic sport. The sport is even influencing
breeding standards and the ‘ideal agility dog’
is now an ambitious breeding goal of many
kennels around the world. The agility world
is evolving fast and in just 40 years, the sport
is constantly updating its rules, equipment
standards and course designs.
Room for improvement
But there is room for improvement. If we
lean across the table and take heed of what
our fellow animal-sports competitors have
learned, we may be able to cut some corners
and get ahead of the game, for both the
dog and the game itself. From our equine
athletes, we have learned a lot about how to
support and assist our partners in the game.
Whether it’s while competing when the
horses wear tendon boots, leg bandages or
shoes; or after work when they stand under
infrared globes or in ice baths; or before
work when they warm up for upwards of
20 minutes in walkers, on a ‘long and low’
rein or by work riders. Or even between
competitions when they hack out as part of a
strict routine of mixed work based on physical
fitness, psychological welfare and mental
conditioning. The equine athletes of the world
have a lot more going for their welfare and
protection than our canine athletes do.
Animaltalk | May 2018
▲
The health and well-being of
dogs taking part in agility
should start at home
Even insofar as the surfaces on which our
horses must perform have undergone radical
transformations costing millions, our dogs
still perform on whatever cheap, accessible
surface we have access to, be it sand, grass,
carpet or fibre, if you are lucky. This all affects
their performance, their health, and above all,
their enjoyment of the sport.
Hardworking athletes
Agility dogs cannot wear any form
of leg or joint support, the science is
lagging substantially on the supplements
and veterinary treatments available or
recommended for the sport dog, and the
understanding and knowledge of agilitybased injuries is only starting to gain
momentum in very limited veterinary circles,
most of which are not in South Africa.
The valid argument for this is that agility
is an amateur sport, with no prize money,
no financial backing and no investors able
or willing to spend millions on fine-tuning
the performance of their athletes in the
knowledge that they may get a return on
either the sale of the animal, or his or her
progeny one day. That aside, the effort and
performance required of our canine athletes
is no less strenuous than that of a professional
equine athlete – and I would venture to say
that it may be even more in some cases.
More competitive
As the sport becomes more competitive,
handlers ask for tighter turns, more abrupt
front crosses, faster accelerations and more
complex sequences at faster speeds than ever
recorded in the sport before. I have yet to see
a horse being asked to do a ‘go-round’ or be
asked to slice a hurdle such that he literally
‘takes paint off the wing’ to the enthusiastic
gasps and delight of the other handlers. Yes,
one can write pages about the differences
between horses and dogs, the need to not use
bandages on dogs which may hide wounds,
and why our rules still ask a dog who is
12cm high to climb the same A-frame that a
60cm-high Shepherd must climb. My point in
this is to recognise that the sport must evolve
with the welfare and health of the athletes
as the primary driver. Not the ambitions of
the handlers and the entertainment of the
audience, albeit that is where it all began.
I know that the sport is young, has no financial
backing and cannot compete realistically with
other sports such as showjumping. But my
point here is to highlight that our dogs are
not less important or any less hardworking
athletes just because the science is lagging
and the money is missing. As handlers, we
must stand up for our dogs. We must demand
rule changes that see more open courses, less
sharp turns and possible leg supports that
protect our dogs well into those years when
they stop jumping.
We must insist on sufficient warm-up
time and learn how to warm up and cool
down our dogs well. We must feed the right
supplements, monitor their hydration and
energy levels and be brave enough to decline
an entry to a showground that has a poor
running surface.
As agility has evolved, we have been asking
more from our canine athletes. It is therefore
beholden on us to make sure that the health
and well-being of our hardworking partners
keeps pace, and that we always put them
first, starting with us at home and extending
to the rules, course designs, surfaces and
equipment that must constantly evolve for
the benefit of the dog.
Let’s keep this conversation alive by posting
your comments on this issue on the Gauteng
Agility Facebook page. I look forward to
hearing from you!
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR 12 WEEKS
TICK AND FLEA PROTECTION
EXPECT THE EXTRAORDINARY
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20 Spartan Road, Spartan, 1619, RSA | Private Bag X2026, Isando, 1600, RSA, Tel: +2711 923 9300, Fax: +2711 392 3158, Sales Fax: 086 603 1777
www.bravecto.co.za
TOPDOG
100 ratings
The Animaltalk Top Dog 100 Ratings are hugely popular with
dog show enthusiasts, and the coveted title of Top Dog is highly
sought after. The winners will be honoured at the Top Dog
function which will be held on 26 January 2019. As always, the
Top Dog, Top Bitch, Top SA-Bred Dog and the Group winners will
all be individually recognised.
Check out the latest Top 100
results and show events online at
www.animaltalk.co.za
Queries should be addressed to
Carol Immelman by fax 086 671 9956 or
email cruella@iafrica.com
BOLD print indicates group leaders
RED indicates imported dogs
Rnk Pts NAME
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
18
18
21
22
23
24
25
25
27
27
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
36
38
38
40
41
1277
567
442
332
324
282
170
150
149
141
140
135
134
115
108
102
92
85
85
85
83
82
81
75
74
74
71
71
70
69
66
65
64
63
62
61
61
60
60
55
54
WHITE SQUALL SEASYDE OLIVIERO
BUBBLETON POLICY OF TRUTH AT MERRYMEAD
FIN DE SEICLE FANDANGO POLZAND
BASSEFIED ETIENNE OF LAGEN
KELEV MORNING STAR
FAITH OF THE DEVIL
KONPARA ALTA MODA OF CAPREESE
WAYDACK THE WOW FACTOR
LIGHTFOOT AZULAY
SHODAN QUEEN NALA
FAIRMOOR MUST BE MADISON OF VOM DANOIS
DALLMALLI DUCKS IN A ROW
GENTLY BORN HOT KISS
ANNAN BURNING AMBITION
UNDER THE STARS OF HELLO YORKIES
TULLAMORE AUGUST RUSH
SHARRAZAR DEMON WALKER
GWENEVRE KLASSY LADY OF BAYNEST
TODDINGTON DONEGAN OF BALLYASKETILL
SLEEPYHOLLOW CLOUD DANCER
NONSUCH MEET JOE BLACK AT BELLSTONE
DAMARANLOR WIND DANCER OF KAPERJOLLE
JUMARCHA MAXIMILLION
ELAMIR CLASSIC DESIGN FOR FLEETWIND
GATEBEAUTIFUL RIVER JORDAN
IPON BLACK GODDESS
FROSTY-CHAMPIONS CLENMORANGIE SIGNET
SHILUAN SHARU
HONEYTASTE MR TAG HEUER OF TANGLEHOOD
VILLANDA BLUES ON THE BAYOU
MYSTICLIGHT LOVE ME FOREVER
KAMCHATKA A GOLDEN STAR
QUILLQUEST MOWGLI
BALLYLANE ADRIADNE OF DANLYN
NONSUCH MARDI GRAS AT DU VENTOUX
CRAIGNAIR PICTURE PERFECT
CRAIGNAIR SWEET CAROLINE OF LETHANWOOD
SYMARUN’S CAN’T BUY ME LOVE
WHIRLWINDS STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN
MIDNIGHTDREAM BEST BEST
UN LOVE STORY VON SHINBASHI OF KAIKOURA
As at 8 March 2018
Errors & omissions excluded
BREED
POINTER
PULI
GIANT SCHNZR
BASSET HOUND
STAFFORD
TOY POODLE
AFGHAN
SH DACHSHUND
AZAWAKH
BULL TERRIER
GREAT DANE
DALMATIAN
GIANT SCHNZR
SAMOYED
YORKIE
GSP
STAFFORD
SNT BERNARD
WOLFHOUND
WHIPPET
SKYE
PHARAOH
STAFFORD
SALUKI
WEIMARANER
BULL TERRIER
SIBERIAN HUSKY
ROTTWEILER
BEARDIE
AUST SHEPHERD
AUST SHEPHERD
SIBERIAN
GOLDEN
STD POODLE
BEARDIE
LABRADOR
LABRADOR
SHIH TZU
YORKIE
SHIH TZU
CRESTED
Rnk Pts NAME
41
43
44
45
46
47
47
47
50
50
50
50
54
55
56
57
58
58
60
60
62
63
63
65
65
67
68
69
69
69
69
69
74
75
76
77
78
78
80
81
54
53
52
51
50
48
48
48
46
46
46
46
44
43
42
40
39
39
38
38
36
34
34
33
33
32
29
28
28
28
28
28
27
25
23
20
17
17
14
12
BREED
SHARAZZAR BAYETE NKOSI
LAROUSHA BREAKING GOLD
WYLWIND ON CLOUD NINE
PIPER PAUL VON SHINBASHI
XANTAH DOUBLE IMPACT
CHEQUERPEI DALLAS DOROPER
CALMADY PLAYIT AGIN SAM
CHALDONNE RAKA
JABBARI LEAVE A LEGEND
CANTALIBRE THELASTTANGO OF RAVILAIS
SCOTTSDALE WHO’S WHO
DIAMONT’S GIRLS CAN’T HELP IT
CRAIGNAIR DESERT FLYER OF STAGMANSKOP
TANJO WAR LORD
MACSNEST ROYAL JAMES OF MOSSGIEL
BELDIGO NEVER Y NEVER
SOLINOS UP TO SOMETHING AT FLEETWOOD
DOTCOM SINNERINSECRET
ARIES KHAN MAXIMUS MERIDIUS FOR NOMVUYO
LIASHASUE ECHOINTHEVALLEY
MIDNIGHTDREAM BLAZING VICTORY
XANTAH RETURN OFE ROAR OF LITTLEJEWELS
BULLRAGE BENTON AT VAN EDBERG
ASHLAREN AMAZING GRACE AT GATEBEAUTIFUL
SHARBARA TEMPTING TIFFANY
DENNEGEUR EUGENIOS EUGEN OF CHITEM
CROCVALLEY NEW EDITION OF BRORO
SUMMERSIM BLACK N GOLD
VON EDBURG FUSION IN RED
KASSINJA IPON
SUMMERSIM STRIKE A POSE
TANJO JEDI KNIGHT
LEIASLAIR TYSON
UBHOVA SEBASTIAN
LIASHASUE TKMETOTHERIVER
LUCIA’S DREAM STEELSHEEN AT TARTANSKYE
LYNNSTO SPECIAL ENVOY OF WESTJOY
OLDOAK XPRESS DELIVERY TO MICHANDRE
HEATHERBELL SHOW STOPPER
HAZELMERE LADY MILLICENT
STAFFORD
FR BULLDOG
SHELTIE
CRESTED
POM
SHAR PEI
PEKINGESE
DOBERMANN
BOSTON
IG
BEARDIE
SIBERIAN
LABRADOR
ENG SPRINGER
NORFOLK
IRISH SETTER
CRESTED
STD POODLE
RIDGEBACK
AUST SHEPHERD
SHIH TZU
POM
MS DACHS
WEIMARANER
MIN POODLE
MIN PIN
SCOTTIE
PUG
MS DACHS
FR BULLDOG
PUG
ENG SPRINGER
BOXER
BULLDOG
AUST SHEPHERD
SCOTTIE
WESTIE
OES
JACK RUSSELL
PEM CORGI
Rush, the German Shorthaired Pointer
Fun, playful and full of energy
The energetic Rush
C
68
h Tullamore August Rush, aka Rush
– his name says it all! Rush is a twoyear-old male German Shorthaired
Text: Jo-dee Tarr | Photography: Supplied
Pointer, handled by breeder and owner
Jo-dee Tarr.
There is something special about Rush. For
me, he typifies the breed. He is a fun dog,
striking without a doubt, with a wonderful
happy-go-lucky attitude, always playful,
super funny and full of energy. He is a real
pleaser, and is a Velcro companion who loves
to go wherever I go. Rush is super smart and
will be anybody’s best friend – especially
when you have a snack or if you spend time
with him playing in the garden with his
favourite toy.
Show career
In his young show career thus far, Rush has
done so much to promote the breed. His
accomplishments include multiple awards at
All Breed Shows in the following categories:
Best Baby Puppy, Best Puppy, Best Junior,
Reserve Best in Show winner and at the end of
2016 was awarded Northern Areas Provincial
Council All Breeds Puppy of the Year.
Rush will continue his show career in
2018 and continue to entertain with his
playful attitude and silly antics in and out
of the ring. Animaltalk | May 2018
shoptalk
Animaltalk’s news hound found these
products and books for you
’
s
e
h
c
t
a
P uys
best b
Patches has taken over from Sammy, Animaltalk’s editorial
assistant. He also has a lifetime’s experience in everything
dog related, and his area of expertise is definitely food! He is
here to share some of his favourite doggy stuff.
MILK REPLACER AND SUPPLEMENT FOR KITTENS
KittyMilk is a comprehensive nutritional supplement and milk replacer for kittens. It is used as a food
source for orphaned or rejected kittens, and also for those needing supplemental feeding, including
pregnant and lactating queens and convalescing cats.
The benefits of KittyMilk:
• It contains taurine and amino acids that are essential for the healthy growth and function of cats.
• The milk replacer contains biotin, folic acid and fluoride for healthy bone, tooth and skin
development and maintenance.
• It is high in zinc, which is important for healthy skin and fur.
• KittyMilk has been formulated to supply the nutrient and energy requirements of young, growing
cats or geriatric cats with poor appetite or recovering from illness.
• Cats and kittens love the taste of this supplement and milk replacer.
For more information go to www.kyronlabssa.co.za or send an email to kyron@kyronlabs.co.za.
BEHAVIOUR AND TRAINING BURSARY ON OFFER
Pet Sense College, a correspondence school for education in canine and feline behaviour sciences, is
offering a bursary to three lucky shelter employees or volunteers who would like to enhance their love of
dogs with better understanding and a qualification. The bursary is for a part-time Canine Behaviour and
Training Instructor’s Diploma, which is the only course that Pet Sense College offers that combines classes
and practical sessions.
Once the course is completed, the student will be able to competently train a dog to a basic standard
of obedience and run effective and professional classes. The course is run over a three-month period,
three Saturdays a month. The only catch – you must have a dog to work with. It’s fine if it’s not your own.
To apply for the bursary, please send your motivational letter and details to Celia at celia@
petsensecollege.co.za.
Animaltalk | May 2018
PORTRAIT OF YOUR PET
Would you like an oil painting or a pencil
drawing of your beloved pet to display in
a special place in your house? Samantha
Matthews is an artist who captures the
characteristics of your pet from a highresolution photograph.
If you would like to spoil someone special,
or yourself, with a long-lasting image, send
an email to samanthamatthewsart@gmail.com
or go to www.samanthamatthews.co.za for
more information.
69
On sale NOW
Everything you’ve ever wanted to know about dog breeds, how to
take care of your new puppy and so much more. No dog lover should
be caught without this must-have book in their collection.
Available countrywide at Woolworths, Pick n Pay, Spar, Exclusive Books and other newsagents.
Or go to www.coolmags.com to get a copy delivered to you.
PET MALL
Welcome to PET MALL
In the pet mall section we offer you, the reader, a variety of
products and services that you may need to make life easier
for you and your beloved pets. Whether you need a vacuum
cleaner to clean after your furry friend, a grooming parlour or
specialised food – we list them here for you.
The classifieds also offer a range of products and services,
including breeders of purebred animals.
Please support the advertisers who bring you specialised
products and services.
ONLINE SHOPPING FOR ALL
YOUR PET & VET SUPPLIES
+27 (021) 934 9556/7
info@animal-travel.com
+27 (021) 934 9570
animal-travel.com
Animaltalk | May 2018
Unit A5, CTX Business Park,
Freight Road,
CTP International Airport
thevet@vetproductsonline.co.za
“Best prices & delivery service of your choice.”
www.vetproductsonline.co.za | Tel: 033 263 1608
71
PET MALL
PRO-PET
DOGGIE TREATS
...the Xtreme in
natural feeding
Trade Enquiries:
Email: Info@pro-pet.co.za
Web: www.pro-pet.co.za
Tel: 011 673 9921 | Cell: 082 573 0694 | Fax: 011 673 9921
72
Animaltalk | May 2018
PET MALL
since 1995
SPOTLIGHT 2018
The leading magazine in animal care for 23 years
PET OWNERSHIP
over 2 in 5
BY ANIMALTALK READERS
readers own birds
(42%)
95% are multipet households
1 in 3
readers own fish
83%
own dogs
57%
PER MONTH
10,429
CERTIFIED OCT - DEC 2017
7,767 FOLLOWERS
Animaltalk | May 2018
ONLINE 3,233
ua
ranteed
ED
AUDIT
C 2017
C
ir
OCT-DE
o
culati
n
DISTRIBUTED AND SOLD MAGAZINES
G
own cats
73
CLASSIFIEDS
ANIMALTALK CLASSIFIEDS
The classifieds offer a range of services and products, from animal behaviourists and training, hydrotheraphy, kennels
and catteries, pet-friendly accommodation and restaurants, to travel and a wide range of breeders.
200 SERVICES
202 ANIMAL BEHAVIOURISTS & TRAINING
Want to become a Behaviourist
or work with dogs in a Shelter?
All you need to start a career with dogs.
Practical Sessions
Comprehensive Theory
One on One & Group Sessions included
*Courses recommended by ABC of SA
www.fods.co.za
admin@fods.co.za
073 735 0469
Tellington TTouch
Training:
Works gently with
cats, dogs & equine
for both behavioural
& health related
problems.
LANSERIA BOARDING KENNELS
AND CATTERY, FOR POSH PETS.
400 CATS
WWW.DOGSDOGS.CO.ZA
Sharron Brown
082 830 7291
401 CLUBS
SACC
Pets Paradise
Pet Boarding, Grooming
Parlour and Pet Shop.
Cell: 073 308 4673
Email: petspar@iafrica.com
Web:www.petparadise.co.za
215 PET PORTRAITS
SOUTHERN AFRICA CAT COUNCIL
For Cattery / Stud / Kitten Registrations
Forms in connection with the above
Information on Breeders and Studs
Availability of Kittens
Show related enquiries
Affiliated Cat Club Information
THE SOUTH AFRICAN CAT REGISTER
P.O. Box 28732, Kensington, 2101. 5 Stanmore Rd, Kensington
Tel:- 011-616 7017; Fax 011-622 6301;
e-mail: sacatreg@iafrica.com
www.tsacc.org.za
(Office Hours: Mon. to Thurs.:- 09h00 - 16h00. Fri 09h00 - 13h00)
Pet Portraits by Sam
For a beautiful portrait of your
beloved pet
please contact Samantha
072 822 1355
samanthamatthewsart@gmail.com
www.samanthamatthews.co.za
Samantha Matthews Artist
011 884-3156 | info@ttouch.co.za | www.ttouch.co.za
203 ANIMAL HYDROTHERAPY
“Just give me a comfortable couch,
a dog, a good book, and a woman.
Then if you can get the dog to go
somewhere and read the book,
I might have a little fun!”
Groucho Marx
217 PET-FRIENDLY ACCOMMODATION
Doggypaddle offers physical therapy for:
•
Recovery after an operation.
•
Recovery after an injury.
•
Relief from arthritis.
•
Weight loss.
To advertise, contact Nora on 011 468 2090
Doggypaddle also offers boarding for post
operative recovery.
Website: www.doggypaddle.co.za
Email: alison@doggypaddle.co.za
Tel: 011 708 6628
Cell: 082 787 2680
Hydrotherapy
Acupuncture & Physiotherapy
Chiropractic & Shockwave Therapy
Rehab, Recovery & Exercise
Laser Therapy
0215584518
www.petwellnessworx.co.za
reception@petwellnessworx.co.za
206 BOARDING KENNELS & CATTERIES
✓ Luxurious Kennels in
Austinview, Midrand
✓ Beautiful Surroundings
✓ Owner Managed
Tel: 011 057 5577 | Mobile: 084 777 5577
Email: info@austinviewkennels.co.za
www.austinviewkennels.co.za
"If cats could talk, they wouldn’t." Nan
74
MAGOEBASKLOOF
BENGALS
KURISA MOYA NATURE LODGE: Forest Cabins,
Farmhouse sleeping 10 or Cottage with views.
7 walking trails through forests and mountains, rivers
and dams. Lisa 071 658 6980 / 082 200 4596 /
www.krm.co.za
MPUMALANGA
DULLSTROOM
THE 6 SLEEPER FARMSTEAD & 2 SLEEPER
THE NEST is nestled among rolling hills, waterfalls &
streams on THE FARM FIELD & STREAM. Fishing,
hiking, mountain biking & clay-pigeon shooting.
Greg 083 443 4567 fieldandstream@mweb.co.za
In Chinese culture, dogs represent
faithfulness.
MAINE COON
MAINE EMBLEM CATTERY
218 PET-FRIENDLY RESTAURANTS
DOGS
WELCOME!
coffee books jams waffles
For pedigreed Maine Coon Kittens
Contact: Joos or Barendina
Cell: 082 333 7231 or 074 201 5187
Tel: 012 800 1296
E-Mail:joos.esterhuizen@up.ac.za
www.mainecoonkittens.co.za
Equifox Park, 137 Crocus Road, Kyalami, 073 100 9282
224 VETS DELI
Ilze
082 445 6906
roguespawsomebakery@gmail.com
www.roguespawsomebakery.co.za
Photo: Ronnie Magic
Sr.Alison Fantin (dip vet nurse; Certified
Canine Rehabilitation Practitioner)
403 BREEDERS
LIMPOPO
PERSIANS AND EXOTICS
&
EL’Vee Persians
Exotics
CFSA Registered
Kittens sometimes available.
Contact Lisa Venter
Cell 071 602 0515
www.el-vee.com
Photo: Linn Currie
Doggypaddle Animal
Hydrotherapy
Centre.
Animaltalk | May 2018
BIEWER TERRIERS
CHIHUAHUAS
Bronties Chihuahuas
Long and Smooth coat
Chihuahua Breeders
www.bronties.co.za
Hettie – 072 478 3471
Marieza – 071 013 5612
Email – hettiev@gmail.com
CFSA registered kittens available
Charles Pieterse
Contact Number 071 124 6682
Email Charlsie.persians@gmail.com
ChiPupski
Chihuahuas
SIAMESE AND ORIENTALS
CLASSIFIEDS
Il Trovatore Persians
Breeders of smooth coat
Chihuahuas
BOERBOEL
Contact Debbie or Elize (KUSA Nr 1020247)
011 753 3820 / 083 283 0380
elizechrz@webmail.co.za | debbiepeyper1@gmail.com
Chitem
072 426 7810
aimee@bellaimeecattery.com
www.bellaimeecattery.com
Long & Smooth
Coat Chihuahuas
082 897 9820
www.chitem.co.za
salome@ergolinesa.co.za
Contact Alex on 0812696258 or
valinorstud@gmail.com
BOSTU
BOERBOELS
SABBS No: 0667975
Chereen Boshoff & Chris Boshoff
Cell +27 82 449 4889 | Cell +27 82 608 3644
www.bostuboerboels.com
bostuboerboels@gmail.com
OR follow us on at Bostu Boerboele
DID YOU KNOW?
If your pet has fleas, it is usually
not enough to treat the pet only.
You’ll have to treat the environment
(your home, carpets and furniture)
too, as most of the fleas and eggs
usually hide here.
DACHSHUNDS: LONG-HAIRED & MINIATURE
BULLDOGS
www.healthybulldogs.co.za
Louise: 082 888 1248
Healthy
English
Bulldogs
4 Families
Free range
breeding
techniques
600 DOGS
603 BREEDERS
CAIRN TERRIERS
BEAGLES
SANTITIA Chihuahuas - KUSA registered, long
coat and smooth coat out of imported and champion
stock. Vaccinated and dewormed. Puppies occasionally
available. Contact Sandra Nieuwoudt at 082 550 2476.
CHRISBE BEAGLES
Top quality registered puppies.
Imported and Champion bloodlines.
PELINA KENNELS DACSHUND PUPS.
Contact Tharina 076 284 1912 / 072 872 1481
Email: tarina@lantic.net website: www.primepups.com
SANTITIA Miniature dachshund puppies. KUSA
registered. Long haired and smooth haired from
imported stock. Vaccinated and dewormed. Contact
Sandra Nieuwoudt at 082 550 2476
ZILLENBERG DACHSHUNDS miniature smooth
haired. Kusa Registered Tel Caroline Barclay
011 967 2350 / 082 325 3521
GERMAN SHEPHERD DOGS
Chris 083 258 9970
chrishartman0@gmail.com Pretoria
SILBERSCHATTEN
GSDs
• Federation registered, vacc.& dew. pups:
Thalu Kennels
Registered Cairn and West
Highland Terrier pups available
Thariza van Rensburg
Cell 083 379 7111
Email 1969thariza@gmail.com
Animaltalk | May 2018
Mark von Sendling VA (SA)
• SABLE, PITCH-BLACK, BLACK & TAN;
• Lovingly home-reared for superb
temperament as ideal family companions;
• Our GSDs' HIPS AND ELBOWS “A” GRADE;
• Excellent imported German Show and
Working bloodlines;
• Pre- & post-sales advice & support;
• Pups placed with approved dog-lovers only.
GISELA: 072 555 7123 / 072 080 3278 (near JHB)
A heart beat at my feet. Edith Wharton
75
Booking deadline for August 2018 – 08 June 2018
Breeders of show quality
Somalis in all colours.
CLASSIFIEDS
Conkasha
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
LABRADORS
KUSA registered
Kusa membership number 042897
Puppies from imported and local
champion bloodlines sometimes available.
Pups
sometimes
available
all three
colours.
Susan Lombaard 0824494491
Email: susan@forsantoypoms.co.za
Website: www.forsantoypoms.co.za
www.dogsdogs.co.za
Barbara Cell 082 255 1635 Fax 0866961438
Website: www.dogsdogsdogs.co.za
Pets are beneficial to our health.
Sharron Brown – Lanseria
For Type & Temperament
Lizette 083 555 5480
lambrada@telkomsa.net
MUIREND IRISH
TERRIERS.
JACK RUSSELL TERRIERS
THE JACK RUSSELL TERRIER Club of SA
Home of the Original Jack Russell.
www.jackrussellsa.co.za
CHARLMAR KENNELS. Registered pups. Short leg.
Imported bloodlines. Tan & White, Innoc, Springs
073 162 2624
JAPANESE CHIN
Japanese Chins
YukiSan
Japanese Chins
Delightful companion
dogs, only bred on order
Stephanie D Olivier
(YukiSan Team Leader)
Cell: +27 (83) 387 3575
Stephanieolivierster@gmail.com
www.YukiSan.co.za
"No man can be condemned for
owning a dog. As long as he has
a dog, he has a friend; and the
poorer he gets, the better friend
he has." Will Rogers
LABRADOR RETRIEVER
www.lambrada.co.za
Marsabet
IRISH TERRIER
PUPPIES OCCASIONALLY
AVAILABLE TO APPROVED
HOMES.
PHONE ANNE 021 671 8463
082 575 1000
Pomelene Pomeranians
“Home of quality Pomeranians and many homebred
Champions from our Ch. Import and/or local Ch. bloodlines”
LAMBRADA LABRADORS
GREAT DANES
BROLLOXON GREAT DANES. Quality registered
puppies occasionally available. Contact Estelle Nienaber
083 793 0403. Email brolloxongreatdanes@icloud.com
To advertise, contact Nora on 011 468 2090
FORSAN POMERANIANS
Labrador Retrievers
Contact
Annette
083 375 1565
secdogs@mweb.co.za
Contact Charlene Booysen
082 785 0894
pomelenepoms@gmail.com
www.pomelene.co.za.
“Most popular colours are
available including rare
blacks and whites”
XANTAH POMERANIANS. For that special
companion. Renee Fourie 083 268 2417.
rcfourie@intekom.co.za www.xantah.co.za/poms.htm
POODLES
WAYLOR
TOY & MINIATURE POODLES
All dogs are KUSA registered
Breeders of top quality pups.
BARDALE LABRADORS. KUSA reg. puppies
inoculated, microchipped & dewormed. Yellow/Black
males & females for sale. Dale 082 425 4019.
www.bardale.co.za. Bardale Labradors
Lorraine 083 459 9785
waylorpoodles@hotmail.com
NEAPOLITAN MASTIFFS
DID YOU KNOW?
We breed since 1994, for
quality and distinction and
strive for excellent true
Italian type and sound
temperament. We recently
imported various new dogs
from Italy and Belgium, to
enhance our breeding.
Bookings essential.
Contact
Linda @ 072 650 2726 or
info@delpicasso.com
visit us at
www.neapolitan.co.za
Dogs have a fantastic internal clock. They
know when it’s time for walks, play, dinner,
bed and always, always, when you come
home from work.
Picasso
RHODESIAN RIDGEBACKS
Kulima Rhodesian Ridgebacks
NEAPOLITAN MASTIFFS
MASTIFFS
NEAPOLITAN
Bred for quality
and temperament
PAPILLON
SOLPOSTE KENNELS
Obrè van Heerden
Papillon puppies occasionally
available to approved
homes only
Tel 082 859 2790
Contact Michael/Theresa
Tel: 011 673 9921
Cell: 082 374 5251
Email: info@pro-pet.co.za
POMERANIANS
Daintaranians
Puppies available occasionally
Kusa registered
Michelle 076 580 1053
“A House is Not a Home Without a Pommy!”
obre@isat.co.za
www.kulima.co.za
ROTTWEILERS
www.deliemersrottweilers.co.za
Bernardina 083 268 4917
Follow us on facebook.com/deliemersrottweilers
50km from Pretoria and 50km from Johannesburg
e of
Lov
the ers...
r
o
F
weil
all
Rott us a C
!
e
Giv y time
an
DID YOU KNOW?
A securely-tied pillowcase is a good way
of transporting a distressed cat when
there isn’t a cat cage available – it calms
most cats.
76
Animaltalk | May 2018
SINCE 1990
YORKIE BREEDERS
Bred and raised with love
KUSA Registered
Breeder of happy and healthy Black and Silver, and Salt and
Pepper Miniature Schnauzer puppies. KUSA Registered
Anneli du Preez Cell nr. 082 567 8093
Email address: anneli.dupreez.adp1@gmail.com
Website address: www.mutterliebeschnauzers.com
MIJOY
Yorkshire & Biewer Terriers
SHIBA INUS
Imported Biewer Terriers
is
i
ing
p • Pocket •
eacu
M in
n T Call Joyce
iat
u
s
All pups are registered and carry
health guarantees.
r
ize
072 234 0791
Email mijoy@wam.co.za
es
SHILUAN SHIBA INUS. KUSA Registered
Puppies sometimes available to approved homes.
Anita 021 856 3231 Cell 082 659 3231
rottlerhof@webmail.co.za
www.shiluanshiba.moonfruit.com
i al
KUSA registered puppies
sometimes available
Contact Details
Anita Esterhuizen
T: 021 856 3231 | C: 082 659 3231
Email rottlerhof@webmail.co.za
www.rottlerhof.co.za
ec
Pursuance of excellence a breed of dignity
KEYSTONE. Miniature Schnauzer puppies from the
best show lines in the world occasionally available to
approved homes. Raised in a loving home.
www.miniatureschnauzers.co.za 0833423734 – Francois
Sp
Rottlerhof Rottweilers
Contact: Ina Jansen Van Vuuren
Cell: 072 267 3527
love.them.all.yorkies@gmail.com
www.lovethemall.co.za
CLASSIFIEDS
LOVETHEMALL
MUTTERLIEBE KENNELS
“He is your friend, your partner,
your defender, your dog.
You are his life, his love, his leader.
He will be yours, faithful and true,
to the last beat of his heart.
When
only the
BEST will do
www.mijoy-yorkies.co.za • www.mijoybiewerterriers.co.za
You owe it to him to be worthy
of such devotion.”
Author unknown
YSTERBERG MASTIFFS
SHIH TZU
KOBCO
STUD
Kobus 072 424 5328
Corrie 072 454 3278
kobco@acenet.co.za
www.kobcoysterbergmastiffs.webs.com
www.facebook.com/kobcoysterbergmastiff
KUSA Reg No 150315
SCHNAUZERS
KISSAKI
SHIH TZU
www.kissaki.co.za | kissaki.shihtzu@gmail.com
Martin Erwee Cell: 072 200 7212
Expose your breed
to 136,000 people
nationwide
YORKSHIRE TERRIER
IRMADU KENNELS
YORKSHIRE TERRIERS
& BIEWER TERRIERS
DID YOU KNOW?
When training your puppy to walk on a
lead, use positive reinforcement – lots of
praise and treats.
Animaltalk | May 2018
DR IRMA BAILEY
CELL 083 276 5069
TEL 012 664 5774
www.yorkie.co.za
Kusa Member No 49934
Contact Nora 011 468 2090
There is no better way to keep your kennel
foremost in potential puppy buyers' minds than
with a regular advertisement and high quality
picture of your dogs in Animaltalk
77
Booking deadline for August 2018 – 08 June 2018
CAMELWEST ROTTWEILERS. KUSA reg puppies,
breeder for 35 years. Susan 082 953 7134
www.camelwestrottweilers.co.za
IRMADU ROTTWEILERS. Beautiful KUSA registered
puppies available from top breeding lines. HD/ED
certificates available. Dr Irma Bailey 083 276 5069.
animals@icon.co.za.
Dogs have colour vision similar to a
human’s, but without red or green.
CLASSIFIEDS
CLASSIFIED/ONLINE CATEGORIES
200 SERVICES
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
Alternative therapy
Animal behaviourists and training
Animal hydrotherapy
Animal rescue schemes
Animal welfare
Boarding kennels and catteries
Dog walkers
Genetic testing
Grooming parlours
Insurance
Obituaries
Online pet and vet shops
Pet / house sitters
Pet cremation / funerals
Pet portraits
Pet shops
Pet-friendly accommodation
Pet-friendly restaurants
Pet-friendly jobs
Pet-friendly property for sale /
to let
Photography
Quarantine stations
Travel
Vet delis
Veterinarian practices
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
Microchipping
Pet containment (fencing)
Pet doors and steps
Pet food suppliers
Pet leads, collars and harnesses
Pet strollers
Sleeping / bean bags
Software
Thundershirts
Toys
Trailers
Trophies and rosettes
400 CATS
401
402
403
Clubs
Associations
Breeders
500 EXOTIC PETS
501
502
503
Clubs
Associations
Breeders
600 DOGS
601
602
603
Clubs
Associations
Breeders
To advertise, contact Nora on 011 468 2090
300 ACCESSORIES /
PRODUCTS
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
Animal deterrents
Bedding
Books
Bowls and stands
Cat litter and trays
Clothes
Feeders
First aid kits
Food containers
Gifts
Kennels, carriers, crates and motor
vehicle seats
For your bookings contact Nora de Vries 011 468 2090
www.animaltalk.co.za
78
Animaltalk | May 2018
nextissue
The issue that answers your questions
JUNE ISSUE ON SALE 21 MAY 2018
AVAILABLE AT ALL GOOD NEWSAGENTS, PICK N PAY, CHECKERS, WOOLWORTHS, SPAR, FOOD LOVER’S MARKET, CNA AND PNA
PET NUTRITION
• Is my pet overweight?
• What is the ideal food for my pet?
• How often should I feed my pet?
WILDTHINGS
•
•
•
•
Which South African mammals are on the endangered list?
Why are some animals more endangered than others?
How can domestic animals conserve wild animals?
What are the differences between cheetahs and leopards?
101
+
ALL ABOUT DOGS
•
•
•
•
What does your dog’s ‘number two’ tell you?
Do dogs get emotional?
When should I train my dog?
Can dogs suffer from dementia?
ANSWERS
TO YOUR
QUESTIONS
KIDS’ PAGES
• Are dolphins scared of sharks?
• How do wild animals camouflage
themselves?
• Why do dung beetles eat dung?
• Where do crocodiles lay their eggs?
OTHER PETS
MORE ABOUT CATS
• Why is milk bad for your cat?
• What is the best way to introduce other pets to my new cat?
• Why do cats like to be elevated high up?
▲
BREED PROFILES
• Can parrots suffer from diarrhoea?
• How can I tell if my rabbit has
dental disease?
• What could be making my cockatiel
scratch himself?
• Why do hamsters run on a wheel for
hours on end?
Some dogs are more adapted to living in townhouse environments than other dogs. We take a look at the Chinese Crested,
Miniature Schnauzer, Boston Terrier, Great Dane, Pug and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and answer questions on why they are
ideal townhouse dogs. Ever wondered where the Burmilla cat originated?
ANSWERS TO THESE QUESTIONS WILL BE AVAILABLE IN THE JUNE ISSUE.
BRAKTALK
the adventures of Brak
B ak’s friend
WIN WITH BRAK
Brak is such a humoristic character with a unique personality. He has the looks, the brains and the attitude.
But if you had to choose a special friend for Brak, what would he or she look like?
Send an email to animaltalk@panorama.co.za with your suggestions, which could be a drawing or a
photograph, and if we like your suggestion the most, you will win a copy of Tales from Treknet – the comic
strip where Brak was born. Entries close 31 May 2018.
80
Animaltalk | May 2018
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