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AdNews - May 2018

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V ENERGY • DIGITAL OOH • EFFECTIVENESS OF SOCIAL MEDIA • 31ST AGENCY
‘RADICAL’ TRANSPARENCY • GLUE SOCIETY • ADLAND CONFESSIONS • SPORTS ADS
From mass multiplayers to gaming geeks
From chocolate pops to health nuts
From beer buddies to gin slingers
Connect with the right
audience, on the right screen,
at the right time.
Talk to the leaders in data-led
TV advertising.
.
.
Editor
Pippa Chambers
(02) 9213 8284
0411 592 390
pippachambers@yafa.com.au
News editor
Arvind Hickman
(02) 9213 8240
0447 243 466
arvindhickman@yafa.com.au
Publisher
James Yafa
(02) 9213 8293
jamesyafa@yafa.com.au
Associate publisher
Nicola Riches
0405 661 570
nicolariches@yafa.com.au
Digital editor
Lindsay Bennett
(02) 9213 8294
0430 155 925
lindsaybennett@yafa.com.au
Journalist
Josh McDonnell
(02) 9213 8308
0448 337 455
joshuamcdonnell@yafa.com.au
National sales manager
Paul Carroll
(02) 9213 8288
paulcarroll@yafa.com.au
8
Business development
manager – sponsorship
Amanda Wilson
(02) 9213 8292
amandawilson@yafa.com.au
26
S U B S C R I P T I O N S
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INVESTIGATION
AdNews runs the rule
over social media,its
effectiveness and how
success is measured
Managing director
Tracy Yafa
Advertising production
Kristal Young
(02) 9213 8301
kristalyoung@yafa.com.au
MEMBER
Published monthly by Yafa Media Pty
Ltd | ACN 54 002 699 354 | 17-21 Bellevue
Street, Surry Hills NSW 2010. All mail to
GPO Box 606, Sydney NSW 2001 Australia.
Founded in 1928.
TEL 02 9281 2333. FAX 02 9281 2750.
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EMAIL adnews@yafa.com.au
© Yafa Media 2018. All rights reserved.
No part of this magazine may be
reproduced without the written permission
of the copyright holder. ISSN 0814-6942
Marketing manager
Sabarinah Elijah
(02) 9213 8245
sabarinahelijah
@yafa.com.au
Digital manager
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(02) 9213 8336
Group production manager
Matthew Gunn
(02) 9213 8210
Customer service manager
Martin Phillpott
(02) 9213 8325
47
5
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
Contents
MAY 2018
36
Regulars
8
SPOTTED:
adland
AdNews’ monthly update on the faces of
NEW
14 SPOTLIGHT: We shine a light on smaller or more unique
agencies in the industry that are making a big impact
NEW
36 MEET THE TEAM: Creative indie The Glue Society are still
sticking to the unknown after 20 years
40 THE BIG QUESTION:
What is radical transparency and
who actually cares?
42 ADLAND SECRETS:
adman gone solo
Confessions of a media network
NEW
Creative
6
18
AGENDA
Digital out
of home explored
BEHIND THE COVER: Behind the creative brilliance that
is our May front cover NEW
12 THE WORK:
Behind V Energy and TKT Sydney’s
Wasteland with a V ad
47 CAMPAIGN REVIEW:
AFL versus the NFL: Who scores
when it comes to advertising?
Online
12
adnews.com.au
Go online to get the latest
news and analysis every day.
www.adnews.com.au
twitter.com/AdNews
facebook.com/AdNewsAustralia
AdNewsAustralia
youtube.com/adnewsaust
AdNewsAustralia
Behind the Cover
Make your own truth
A li m it e d
b e sp o ke e d it io n
tro p hy is Ad N ews ‘A’
a ls
g ra b s fo o u p fo r th e
r th e w in
n e r.
The creative
contingent of
adland sits at the
beating heart of the
industry. To fully
embrace that, and
with a mission to
create awesome and
inspiring covers,
each month AdNews
hand-picks an
agency to work their
magic. The cover
of the year is then
voted for by readers.
T
o reflect the current magazine's investigative feature here we have the
end product, by AdNews Agency of the Year 2017, CHE Proximity. AdNews
editor Pippa Chambers speaks with CEO of CHE Chris Howatson.
Credits
Thoughts on the social media brief?
Chris Howatson, CEO
The brief was interesting but there wasn’t an immediately evident theme.
It was about a fortnight before the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica news
broke. We briefed our media leadership team, Dan and Calvin in particular, and asked them what they care about when it comes to social. Within
30 minutes they’d suggested two territories. The irst was what counts as
viewable. The second was who measures efectiveness. In the absence of
third party auditors, many social platforms ‘mark their own homework’
when it comes to deliverability, so this felt like an interesting space as well.
From then what happened?
Usually we’d write a brief, then get together with a diverse group of
thinkers to conceive an idea, but there was a lot of work on and we were
short on time. We came up with the idea that the social platforms were
‘making their own truth’. Ant is brilliant at talking seemingly familiar
language and shaping it to be fresh, so he got us to the line and territory.
The take on the famous moon landing production was something we
found our way to. After UFOs and the shooting of JKF, there’s perhaps
no greater conspiracy in recent western culture than the moon landings.
How would you describe the cover?
We thought we’d create a modern take on the moon landing conspiracy,
with the heads of the social media families running the show. In the
shadows of the set you’ll see Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, Google
co-founder Sergey Brin, Twitter boss Jack Dorsey, Snapchat leader Evan
Spiegel and founder of LinkedIn Jef Weiner. Each with phones in hand,
documenting their own version of the truth.
People and execution, what was involved?
Sir John Hegarty famously said, advertising is 80% idea and 80% execution.
This was so true for us. We had a lovely idea that poorly executed would’ve
been a disaster. So we put our crafters to work. We called production company
Agency: CHE Proximity
Ant White, CCO
Andrew Drougas, COO
Brian Jefferson, Group Creative Director
Sam Dickson, Senior Copywriter
Cameron Bell, Senior Art Director
Tom Weller/Natalie Hort,
Production Managers
Production Company: Louis&Co
Photographer: Ian Butterworth
Retouching: Cream Electric Art
Studio: Carlotta Studios
Louis&Co and asked them to be
involved and have always admired
photographer Ian Butterworth’s
work. Then Sam, Cam, Nat and Tom
worked with their teams to make
it happen. We shot on a Sunday at
Carlotta Studios in Artarmon and
spent a week in retouching to convert
cardboard cut outs into real people.
Any big challenges or easy
wins?
Finding the location was key, as
having the existing staircase look
as close to the original as it did
meant we had a core base in which
to build the composition and gave
the visualisers at Cream Electric
Art a solid foundation to work
upon. The space suit was tricky.
We have all seen the cheap fancy
dress outits on the Halloween rack
and this just wouldn’t have cut it.
The suit itself we hired (the only
one in Sydney), but a lot of attention went into padding out the suit
with the model so that it felt like it
was illed with air.
The vintage film camera,
gyprock imitation lunar surface,
carefully selected body doubles,
extensive image searches for our
ive key social gurus as well as the
subtlety of the lighting and shadows all added to rich detail that
makes up the inal art.
Editor’s Letter
Welcome to the first full AdNews edition with our
new team fully settled in.
You’ll notice a few changes, a splash of fun and
a hint of mischief in this issue. We’ve handed over
our precious monthly canvas to the fine creative
minds that make the industry go around – with a
competitive edge to it of course. We’ve also added
a people of the industry focus in our new Spotted
spread, zoned in on smaller or more unique agencies in Spotlight, shot an injection of fun in with
our tongue in cheek illustration and have slid in a
cheeky confessions section
with Adland Secrets.
Not having all our content
online always frustrated me
in my former role as a greedy
digital editor at AdNews. I
wanted everything on the
website – everything. This
new role has made me think
harder about what we look
to the magazine to do for
us and the first thing that
jumped out at me was putting our front cover to better use. What better way to
E D I T
showcase the creative brilP
I
P
P
A
C H
liance from adland than
letting them loose on the
front cover – and what better
agency to use than our very own AdNews Agency
of the Year, CHE Proximity. I thought I was excited
about the idea, as in really excited, but after a few
chats with CHE, who were what I would describe
as pumped, energetic, positive and raring to go,
that my excitement rocketed to a whole other level.
It also got me thinking about the whole process
of clients, briefs, agencies pitching ideas and seeing that all come to life, and how (kind of ) being
amidst this process was such bloody good fun – and
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
actually largely in part due to the enthusiasm and
effort of the agency. Needless to say we are thrilled
with the cover. I hope readers feel the same and
standby for another six covers for 2018, including
our coveted AdNews Annual celebrating 90 years
of advertising.
In-print you’ll also get access to in-depth features, people stories, and much more. And as a
taster of what’s to come, there’s also a special New
Zealand issue in the works, Power 50 and much
more on people and culture.
The cover, our feature on
The Work and our Creative
Review, which sees senior
industry execs critique ads,
are just a few in-print items
focusing on the creative and
it’s an area we plan to ramp
up on even more.
As loyal AdNews magazine readers, it’s also important you know about the full
AdNews offering, not just
in-print.
For those that don’t know,
our revamped podcast, now
recorded at Universal Music,
O R
lands this month so take a lisA M B E R S
ten. Also, check out our ‘New
Frontier of Data Security’
event in Sydney on 6 June.
And for those that missed our Media & Marketing
Summit in Sydney, the Melbourne event is 25 July.
As the industry changes so must AdNews and
while changes are afoot, there’s always room for
more. I’m very much still in canvas mode and am
looking to hear more about what people want and
need from their favourite industry publication.
Whether it’s print or online or even our events –
AdNews is here to serve the industry and my mobile
is always on.
7
Spotted
Spotted
ADNEWS’ MONTHLY
UPDATE ON THE
FACES OF ADLAND
In this new section of the magazine, we’ll be
travelling around the weird and wonderful
world of adland and bringing you the best
snaps of events and a few social selfies along
the way.
W O R D S
J O S H
B Y
Working
out what
worked
The best of the best
Douglas Nicol, keynote speaker and creative partner at The Works,
packaged up 10 days of ideas into a 60-minute presentation with all the
highlights from SXSW.
Larking about
with Lund
M C D O N N E L L
Do you have a pic for our June edition?
Email adnews@yaffa.com.au
Turning on the Tech: The
Superpower of Creative
Marketplaces was a joint
event between Tribe and
Canva, all about talking
tech and how to harness
the power of creative marketplaces.
The man about town Jules Lund grabs a
quick selfie with Liz McKenzie, head of PR and
comms for Canva.
Jail time
Last year industry charity UnLtd raised $27k in a charity prison Bail Out
event. This year several familiar industry faces are brave enough to try
a stint in the big house. Mobiles are not permitted so there will be no
LinkedIn updates – you’ll have to keep an eye on AdNews for the details.
Our trusty news editor Arvind Hickman (most serious looking one in the
pic) will be there with bells on.
Don’t adjust your eyes,
this is a real book. I’m sure
the recipe for disaster is
in there.
A late April Fool’s?
Alan Jones & Mark Latham hosted a lunch at Manjit’s Wharf for
what was called a “story-filled lunch to celebrate the launch of
their upcoming cookbook ‘Conversations in the Kitchen’.”
It’s meant to
be a charity
event Arvind,
not your
audition
reel for the
next season
Prison Break.
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
Too cool
for water
Vice puts the
squeeze on content
Ex-adman turned TV hot
property, Todd Sampson,
took time out from adventuring to sit down with the good
folks at News Corp’s Wentworth Co
Vice hosted an event dedicated to the future of content as the
company continues to make strides in its content partnerships,
most recently launching ‘Illuminated’ presented by Nissan. It
dug into the creative process that’s not just making something
weird for the sake of it, but ultimately lands the brand message
and leaves a lasting impression. Oh, and did we tell you AdNews
has a branded content division too?
9
Ahh Todd, not getting in the
water and talking about it over
banana bread...think you’ve got
the Bondi lifestyle down pat.
No Country For Old Content pulled a crowd
We can all get along
ABOVE: Ryan from
Married at First
Sight gives us his
‘tight five’.....and
no that isn’t a joke
LEFT: PHD account
executive Beatriz
Grattan-Smith
took out the top
prize at The Voice
Agency Battle,
stunning everyone
with an amazing
rendition of Son of
a Preacher Man.
A positive tune
for media agencies
Taking place at The Beresford in Sydney, nine of Sydney’s major
media agencies went head-to-head for vocal supremacy as Nine
hosted a Karaoke Battle for agency clients to celebrate the new
season of The Voice.
Starcom and the AANA hosted a presentation of findings from the
2018 Starcom Media Futures Survey. Starcom presented a new approach to creating brand value from human experience, based on the
emotional drivers of behavioural change.
Starcom’s Martin Hadley and Facebook’s
Tom Hosking apply the ‘buddy system’ at
Starcom’s ‘Media Futures’ event.
Picture This
This is your marketing
powered by programmatic.
AdNews Awards Winners
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
11
THE MONKEYS’
BEST YEAR YET
SCOTT NOWELL, MARK GREEN
FABIO BURESTI & JUSTIN DRAPE
It’s been a big year for The
Monkeys. The agency was acquired
by Accenture Interactive, launched
a Melbourne office, added a significant number of people to its team
and won the creative accounts
for Holden, CrownBet, Canadian
Club, Asahi Beer, Australia Post
and NRMA.
In fact, 2017 was the agency’s
biggest year in its 12-year history, as
revenue climbed and proit soared.
With the agency’s purpose to
“make provocative ideas happen”,
The Monkeys delivered a diverse
range of work that encompassed
beer brands to aeroplanes, bras to
pizzas, and meat to sports shoes.
And the proof is in the many
puddings, with The Monkeys’
string of award wins internationally and locally, at Cannes,
D&AD, the Eies and One Show.
Most recently, the agency was
named NSW Agency of the Year
at the AdNews Agency of the Year
Awards and took out AdNews’ irst
Efectiveness Award for its Meat
and Livestock Australia work.
For Group CEO Mark Green, he
struggles to pinpoint his proudest
moment of the past 12 months, but
said it always comes back to doing
ground breaking work for iconic
Australian brands, from Qantas
to Telstra and now NRMA, Holden
and Australia Post.
“For an Australian business
that built its way up in this country, it’s a proud moment when
you can look on your portfolio of
iconic Australian brands and see
big work you’ve produced that’s
The reason for
success? It always
comes back to “doing
iconic work for iconic
Australian brands”.
successful and liked in equal measure,” Green said.
“We never thought we wouldn’t
be here, but it’s one thing to have a
vision and a dream and it’s another
to have it realised – to start a business with three people and organically grow to the 160 odd people
that we are today.”
Ask any agency founder who
they admire in the industry and
‘The Monkeys’ is always top of the
list. It’s not hard to see why with
a highlight reel that boasts MLA’s
‘Celebrate Australia’ and ‘Spring
Lamb’ campaigns; the emotional
Qantas Dreamliner campaign on
the successful ‘Feels Like Home’
platform; and a new brand platform for IKEA: ‘The Best Day is
the Everyday’.
The agency produced its irst
work for Holden, and its work
for Berlei named and launched
a new kind of bra - Womankind.
For NRMA, it showed what gets
Australians on the road with a
heartfelt Christmas story and
launched a new brand platform for
CrownBet – A Better Way to Wager.
“There is no luck involved,” said
Green. “We have created our own
luck from the crazy commitment
from the founders and the consistency of the management team.”
It’s this consistency of leadership and creative ambition that
Green said has driven years of
success for The Monkeys, but the
agency certainly hasn’t become
complacent, giving up its independent title after a decade to
facilitate its next step.
Green described Accenture
Interactive as a “rocket ship” now
attached to the agency, allowing
it to add skill sets and explore the
best opportunities for growth and
expansion.
“People are griping about the
challenges the industry faces, but
we are seeing strong opportunity
and we aren’t taking any backwards steps.”
For Scott Nowell, group chief
creative oicer, seeing Celebrate
Australia contribute to the
national agenda through its commentary on the #changethedate
movement, its Berlei ad make the
news for having boobs banned
from Facebook and Qantas work
loved by the majority of Australia
– that’s what matters.
“You know you’re in a good
position when your work is talked
about on the streets,” Nowell said.
“Our aim is to always afect popular
culture.”
Winning the first AdNews’
Effectiveness award for MLA,
driving a 23% lift in sales during
the campaign period of Celebrate
Australia, The Monkeys know their
work works.
“Our work is all about making
provocative ideas happen and
that’s how we intend to continue.
We will keep making work that
doesn’t get ignored, that elicits
response and captures people’s
imagination to establish a meaningful brand connection,” Green said.
“We are in a great position to
take the industry into a truly exciting place,” Nowell added.
The work
Energy was experiencing declining sales and relevance
among 18 to 24 year–olds who had shifted their attention from TV to gaming platforms like Twitch. With gaming
now bigger than Hollywood, two members of TKT Sydney’s
creative team, Shaun Thomson
and Emil Cholich, who happen
to have a passion for gaming,
found the brand’s next foray.
Instead of diving into the
Wasteland with a V
overcrowded sponsorship space,
Agency: TKT Sydney
its strategy was to create playable content.
Brand: V Energy
Frucor Suntory marketing
director Mark Wiedermann was
W O R D S
B Y
wary about the venture and
L I N D S A Y
B E N N E T
wanted to avoid just slapping
the V Energy logo into a game.
“We knew gaming could be a great move for us, but I was
cautious how we got into that space because it is a real deep
passion point for a lot of people and has high level engagement,” he explained.
“If we got it wrong, we knew it could do more damage
than good and piss people off.”
Eventually it came down to the trust Wiedermann had
in TKT Sydney, having worked with the Clemenger–owned
agency for a number of years. He now celebrates the gaming venture as “one of the most successful things the brand
has done”.
TKT Sydney identified a game to become part of, with
millions playing it weekly. The game is a popular post–apocalyptic, role–playing video game. Best of all, it was open to
modding — the ability to change a game’s files and content,
bringing to life ‘Wasteland with a V’.
The campaign started with a covert post on Reddit asking
gaming fans how they would “improve the game a bit”. It was
a less than subtle reference to V’s branding which claims the
drink is “the hit that improves you a bit”.
Almost 100 responses informed the content for the game
mod — a file that edited the game itself. V Energy drinks were
added to the game and when players ‘drank’ it, all their in–game
attributes improved ‘just a bit’. V Energy was then found in
branded vending machines within the game, labelled Property
of Shameless Product Placement Inc.
Two top–tier Twitch streamers were enlisted to broadcast
TKT content to 600,000 followers. Thousands of Australians
spent their Friday night streaming more than four hours
of V–branded content, equalling 100,000 hours spent with
the brand.
Not only did it reach a new audience in an innovative way,
but the initiative also earned TKT Sydney the award for Best
Branded Content at the AdNews Agency of the Year Awards.
Wiedermann said now the brand has successfully
tested gaming as a new medium, it is exploring how it
can take it further — a move that he said gaming technologists are welcoming.
“My challenge now is going to be exploring how we can get
into gaming with all our brands at Frucor,” Wiedermann said.
“That said, I have a very passionate belief that brands can
overstate their roles in consumers’ lives, so unless our other
brands have a role to play, like V, then we’ll stay away.”
V
Wasteland with a V
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
What the agency says:
TKT creative directors Shaun Thomson and Emil Cholich
“The V Mod was a really great way for us to push ourselves to write and design for a
completely diferent format. Writing dialogue trees that branched out into hundreds
of options and designing texture for 3D objects are both exciting challenges for
copywriters and art directors, respectively. Learning new software, we think, also
gives you a really good understanding for how others work and we definitely can
work with the developers in the agency on a whole ‘nother level now’.”
13
Spotlight
31ST:SECOND coming up first
Spotlight shines a light on smaller or more unique agencies in
the industry that are making a big impact. This month’s agency
is 31ST:SECOND. Launched nine years ago and headed up by
directors Adele Te Wani, Vaughan Kerr and Rachael Egan, the
impressive 12–strong team has worked across clients including
Arnott’s, Sensodyne, Campbell’s, Jack Daniel’s and more.
W O R D S
J O S H
B Y
M C D O N N E L L
Why did you start this
company?
We launched in 2009, when below–
the–line agencies were generally
either promotional or experiential
agencies. We could see the evolution and increased importance of
the purchase journey discipline
and knew that we could do things
a little differently by creating an
insights–led specialist agency.
What services do you offer
and how has this changed
since you launched?
The marketing landscape continues
to change and evolve. Clients continue to take work in-house. Digital
disruptors impact retailers. FMCG
brands continue to be squeezed by
retail customers.
In response, we’ve developed a
full–service Purchase Experience
(Px) capability, to ensure that 31ST
is the trusted custodian of our
client brand’s purchase journey.
We’ve broadened our offering to
develop channel–agnostic purchase
journey solutions that deliver value
via strategic planning; branding
and packaging; channel–agnostic
big ideas; digital and social; live
brand experiences; and in–store
visibility and display.
What’syourpointofdifference?
31ST was also a finalist in the Small
Agency of the Year (independent)
category at this year’s AdNews
Agency of the Year Awards.
Our full–service Px capability
means that 31ST is the trusted
custodian of our client brands’
purchase journey. Px allows us to
leverage efficiencies via one point
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
15
What has been the agency’s
biggest challenge?
Vaughan Kerr
of contact; execute with excellence as the one team knows and understands our clients brand challenges; and seamlessly deliver campaign
consistency across all phases and touch points.
What makes your team unique?
As a collective, we’re a down–to–earth, curious and effective bunch of
purchase journey marketing specialists.
Agency Snapshot
NAME OF AGENCY: 31ST:SECOND
TOTAL NUMBER OF STAFF: 12
LOCATION BASED:
WATERLOO, SYDNEY
Who is your ideal client?
Without being super-cheesy, we’re genuinely lucky enough to have quite
a few of these already.
We’d define our ideal client as that who treats us as a partner in their
business — they take us along for the journey and share in their brand
challenge/s; ‘own’ their projects — they’re engaged, involved and all
over the detail, and expect the same from us.
They value our contribution to their business and appreciate that we
are specialists within our field. They understand the ROI for engaging
us, are happy to pay for our services, and they’re great fun to work with.
Often, it’s the people within the brand that we are most motivated to
work with and keen to push the boundaries with test and learns. The
big ideas keep us juiced so we love clients that want to go there with us.
LIST OF A FEW CLIENTS: CSR,
AUSSIE, LION, MARS, MASTERPET,
MEAT AND LIVESTOCK
AUSTRALIA, NESTLÉ, PANASONIC,
TAYLORS WINES, TAUBMANS
COMPANY MANTRA:
WE DESIGN SIMPLICITY
In a time of procurement–led,
centralisation of global communications networks, we’re an
independent small agency. We’ve
lost a couple of big clients over the
past couple of years as a result of
decisions made out of New York
(and not necessarily supported by
our local clients). Whilst deflating
at the time, we’ve worked through
these challenges to ultimately
become a better agency.
Our strategic and creative product is best–in–class, supported by an
outstanding account service team.
Oh, and that’s not just us beating
our own chest, we continually hear
this played back to us via participation in RFPs and from our clients.
Biggest highlight?
Winning our first pitch, a big multi-film summer campaign for 20th
Century Fox. It was our first–ever
pitch as an agency and we pitched
against some of the bigger agencies
and won. We knew at that point that
our business plan and proposition
stood up and we were away. We went
on to work with 20th Century Fox
for the next five–plus years. We’ve
also been so fortunate to work with a
truly great bunch of people throughout the journey — many of whom
have been with us for over five years
and are like family.
What’s the dream brief?
How do you view the
competitive landscape?
Regardless of the brand category/channel/sector, the scale and scope,
or the potential award–worthiness of the idea, no question, the most
fulfilling professional experiences are when we collaborate with our
clients to help resolve their brands business challenge/s.
Clients that engage us in their business challenges, get our morning
shower/driving to work mindspace — these are the ‘dream briefs’.
Many of our shopper marketing
agency competitors are finding it
tough out there at present.
FMCGbrandsareunderhugepressure/margin squeeze, which effects
their advertising and promotion
Why do you like working at the agency?
Strategy director
Taby Taylor-Ziane
“The people and the ideas are
what I love most about 31ST.
Culture comes first here and that
directly translates to the quality
of ideas — just a bunch of positive,
curious, down–to–earth people
getting together everyday to
create ideas that add real value
for our clients. I love hanging out
with them and getting to think,
create and make an impact — not
much beats that.”
Creative director
Dave Ridgley
“I had worked with Vaughan, Rach
and Adele at a previous agency and
jumped at the chance to get in on
the ground floor of 31ST as I knew
the culture they wanted to create.
That was eight or so years ago
and it’s a credit to them that while
the agency and the industry as a
whole has evolved, that foundation
culture has remained. There’s a
great bunch of people here all
working together to do really
strong work and our long–term
partnerships with clients are a
testament to both the culture and
the creativity it fosters.”
Senior designer
Hannah Le Cornu
“I’ve worked with 31ST for almost
five years, starting as a junior
designer and growing along side
31ST. Vaughan, Rach and Adele have
created an agency with creative, like–
minded, talented staff that all work
together to deliver a high standard of
work and a great culture that makes
it easy to come to work each day.”
Spotlight
budgets. Clients take more work in–
house. Mainstream creative agencies
continue to leverage their up–stream
client relationships to deliver big,
integrated promotional activations
(that were once the domain of agencies like us). Clean store policies
in grocery and big box hardware/
pharmacy continue to reduce our
campaign touchpoints/scope.
• Share and celebrate: Led by our ‘culture club’, we celebrate the
completion of big client projects, pitch wins, EOFY, Melbourne Cup,
Christmas, and even get the kids and pets together for a family day
once a year.
• Commitment to diversity: 31ST was founded by two female directors.
And our ECD is female. To this day, we continue to hire on merit,
with 75% of our employees being female.
What’s on the agenda for 2018?
Notable ‘people and culture’
efforts made by the agency:
Office pet
Huddy, described as “a welcome,
gentle soul in a chaotic office”.
Our people are a key driver and
central to our future success.
Good people are hard to attract
and super–important to keep. So
we attract, motivate and retain the
best talent with a bunch of employment/culture initiatives:
• Work life balance: We all need to
zip out to pay the rego, take the
morning off to go to the dentist,
leave early to pick the kids up from
school or even knock off early on
a Friday to go to the beach.
• Bonus days off: We gift all staff
their birthday and Christmas
break.
• Random acts of kindness: We gift
massages in recognition for the
‘overs’, give thank you gifts on
staff 31ST anniversaries, and we
often take staff out for impromptu
Friday lunches at the pub.
• Knowledge: We invest a bunch
on training, conferences, offsite
and education.
We’re excited to be on the move. We’ve been based in Danks Street,
Waterloo, since 2010 and are looking for a change of scenery (we have
our eye on a funky Redfern terrace). New business and some epic campaigns — lots in the pipeline for the likes of Lion, Nestlé, and Panasonic.
Why is the 31ST the one to watch in 2018?
Recently we pitched and won three of the biggest shopper marketing pitches in
the country for Lion, Nestlé and Brown–Forman. Each RFP pitched us against
eight to 12 of our competitors in a forensic/exhaustive process. We won all
three, with all clients citing our market–leading strategic and creative product
as setting us apart from every other shopper marketing agency in Australia.
31ST staff: Hard at work
Top three
What are the top three pieces of work
the agency has produced and why?
1
Arnott’s Lighter Lunch
The first of its kind and now in
it’s seventh year, Arnott’s Lighter
Lunch is a hugely successful
insights–led shopper marketing
campaign, developed by 31ST.
For the first time, Arnott’s
Lighter Lunch bought together
Arnott’s crispbread brands
(Cruskits and Vita–Weat),
Woolworths Fresh produce
(like tomatoes and avocados)
and Tassal Salmon to deliver an
inspiring, ease–of–shop lunch
solution conveniently located right
before shoppers hit the bread aisle.
The campaign was crafted to
deliver a unique three–way–win
for the brand, the shopper and
the customer. It continues to
be cited as the best–in–class
shopper marketing campaigns
and delivers enormous ROI for
Arnott’s some seven years later.
2
Jack Daniel’s
In 2017, we developed a
shopper–first platform that helped
Jack Daniel’s become the number
one spirit brand in Australia.
With every Tom, Dick and Archie
creating a craft spirit, it was time
for Jack, the original craft spirit
entrepreneur, to step up and own
his place as the original.
So, we designed a shopper-first
comms platform via integrated
on – and off-premise campaigns.
Every element was crafted to tell
the provenance story of our friend
Jack, who was suffering from a
serious case of mainstreamitis.
From handmade bottle cradles
crafted from the oak barrels that
matured the whiskey, pilgrimages
to Lynchburg (Tennessee) to
see and sample the whiskey at
its source, and one–of–a–kind
batches from a barrel hand–picked
by the master distiller, every
prize, experience and interaction
reinforced Jack’s credentials as the
original independent spirit.
Australia was on board with
our heritage and authenticity
message, and together we raised
Jack to the news that in 2017 Jack
Daniel’s was crowned the number
one spirit brand in Australia — a
result worth savouring.
3
Meat and Livestock
Australia
In the past four years that we’ve
been working with Meat and
Livestock Australia (MLA), we
brought the country together over
lamb on Australia Day, made beef
the ‘Greatest Meat on Earth’ and
helped sell thousands of tonnes
of Aussie meat. As part of an interagency team with The Monkeys
and MLA’s shopper marketing
agency, we led its retail campaigns
across butchers and supermarkets
nationally for the Australia Day
lamb and beef campaigns.
We engage audiences without interrupting them.
We have the most comprehensive national network.
We have quality in our DNA to ensure your ad is
delivered with impact all day, every day.
We are your next winning campaign.
It’s not outdoor without us.
www.apnoutdoor.com.au
Agenda
DOOH or die
In its dogged quest to bring the medium into the digital
age, the out of home industry is focusing on audience
measurement and independent campaign delivery
reporting for digital screens. AdNews explores how a
new measurement system should evolve.
W O R D S
A R V I N D
B Y
H I C K M A N
Agenda
ne of advertising’s oldest mediums, out of home (OOH), has
been modernising at breakneck
speed over the past few years.
When you drive on any city
motorway, visit an airport, or catch
public transport, chances are you’ll
notice plenty of bright, luminescent digital screens at key intersections along your journey, and
they’re sprouting up everywhere.
Moving to digital has unlocked
new opportunities for advertisers,
but it also presents the OOH industry with a fresh set of challenges.
Charmaine Moldrich, CEO of
Outdoor Media Association (OMA)
and MOVE, said the next stage has
to be “to prove the power and efficacy of that digital network to the
people who buy it”.
However, Val Morgan chief
executive, Dan Hill, who recently
took oversight of Val Morgan
Outdoor on top of the cinema
sales business, approaches the
industry with “fresh eyes”.
O
“There is an
arms race on for
technology and
data that vendors
use to provide a
reasonable outcome
to media agencies
and the client.”
Val Morgan chief
executive Dan Hill
“There is an arms race on for
technology and data that vendors
use to provide a reasonable outcome to media agencies and the
client,” Hill revealed.
“There’s no doubt the outdoor
industry, including ourselves, is
behind [other media categories].
The industry as a whole needs
some sort of metric that everyone
agrees on and we need to better
understand what agencies want.”
The transition from classic print
billboards to digital screens has been
rapid and relentless, driving high
levels of growth to outdoor vendors.
In the past five years, the share
of digital OOH revenue across OMA
members, which account for most
of the major vendors, has risen
from 11.3% ($61.92 million) to 47.4%
($373.4 million) in 2017. This has
helped the outdoor media sector
grow net media revenue by 6%
to $837.1 million, at a time when
most traditional media channels
are either struggling or in decline.
The proliferation of digital
screens has allowed the OOH industry to increase its audience by 23%
over the past seven years, well above
Australia’s population growth of
15%, reaching a critical mass that
allows digital networks to be truly
mass reach advertising platforms.
Moldrich said the industry has
primarily focused on building its
digital outdoor network as well as
working with governments on digital advertising regulations.
“We’ve been working with road
authorities to get them to a point
where they understand that the
digital network isn’t a risk to road
users,” she explained. “The reason why Australia is a little behind
other big Western nations who have
had a digital network up for quite a
while, is because we’ve had to deal
with government regulation. And
Australia has some of the strictest
road safety standards in the world.”
An example Moldrich gave was
the NSW Government only releasing its electronic sign guidelines
this year, indicating an industry
that is in its infancy when it comes
to digital screens and how they fit
into society.
Growing complexity
Last year, an AdNews report
revealed market concerns about
a lack of sophisticated audience
May 2018
measurement tools for digital
screens, as well as an independent proof of display reporting tool.
Unlike classic print billboards,
which have a 100% share of time
on display, digital screens can
host several ads at one time on
rotation. This means advertisers
can have as little as a 10% share
of time on display (10 rotations) to
full display, and several iterations
in between. But, a 20% share of
display (five rotations) is the most
common option.
“The issue that we face as an
industry is how do we move from
MOVE, which was built in a static
world when we are in this digital
world now with myriad amounts
of faces involved,” QMS Media
national sales strategy director
Christian Zavecz explained. “As
it stands, there’s no delineation
between digital and static.”
MOVE is the current audience
measurement system for OOH
advertising and tracks the likelihood a sign or screen is seen. It
works well for static advertising
that doesn’t change for long periods, but does not cater for screens
where advertising rotates.
Ooh!Media chief executive
Brendon Cook believes there are
several factors at play that can have
an impact on the effectiveness of
digital screens.
“When you bring digital in,
you’ve got to have not only model
data, but also real–time data, as
well as context to display luminosity and environment data,” he
revealed. “There’s a whole range
of new data sets that are needed
to truly bring to life the true power
of what the new OOH can deliver.
“We spent three years and hundreds of millions of dollars developing this digital opportunity, and now
we’ve got to equally spend as much
time, energy and money making sure
we get all these other factors right.”
The next MOVE
The OMA recently revealed it is
investing $10 million to “rejuvenate” MOVE to accurately measure
audiences for digital OOH signs.
OMA is working with the AANA
and MFA to set up a framework
and project guidelines, which are
due to come out later this month.
The peak industry body also
said it intends to standardise the
terminology and the way in which
share of display is priced for roadside billboards, which accounts for
around 40% of all outdoor revenue.
Moldrich couldn’t share any
further details with AdNews at the
time of writing, but indicated that
MOVE will “build on what we have”
and look at best practices abroad.
There are currently several
different types of data collection
techniques used around the world.
In the UK, the Route System uses
a GPS tracking device to monitor the
movements of a panel of people.
And in the US, Geopath is advanced
in the use of mobile data, which uses
smartphones to determine movement by tracking mobile, Wi–Fi and
GPS data from smartphones.
JCDecau x ch ief execut ive
Steve O’Connor told AdNews that
at the core of a good audience
measurement system is “very
robust consumer mobility data”.
He said he would like to see a
21
Agenda
combination of mobility data
sources to form a clearer picture
of audience movement.
“My view is that the consumer
mobility component of MOVE
needs to be addressed to provide
a lot more granular detail about
people movement,” he explained.
“From that, you can start measuring shorter periods of display,
which is what digital provides.”
Zavecz believes the industry will
end up with “an element of quantitative measurement, whether it is
mobile phone or SDK location forms
of data … overlaid with quantitative
studies about engagement, intent,
and the power digital can bring to
enhance communication platforms”.
Findingcommonground
Location–based data is important,
but it’s not the only issue the industry is grappling with.
Finding a level of consistency
in how digital outdoor advertising is sold is important for certain
categories and is another issue that
vendors and the OMA are working on.
APN Outdoor chief executive
James Warburton told AdNews it is
important to focus on standardisation in measurement methodology
and certain categories of assets,
such as roadside billboard, rather
than imposing an industry–wide
approach to outdoor media.
“It’s a matter of finding commonality in terms of the way you actually measure it. I think there’s a few
complicated areas,” Warburton said.
“So, what is the digital effect
versus a classic billboard? What
does that actually add in overall
impact and awareness? There’s
rotations — how did the rotations
work by different locations?
“You get a very different rotation
model on a freeway where you’ve got
a lot of billboards [and] you’ve got a
very different rotation at airports or
at train or bus stations, whatever it
may be. You’ve got to have a common
set of methodology across all of that.”
A media buyer’s perspective
Posterscope Australia strategy and
insights director Cassandra Thomas–Smith shares her view:
to bring better insight to their clients
with the ability to connect appearance results to business results.
How do you measure success on digital out of home
(DOOH), do you rely on
media owner reporting or do
you also have other sources?
What improvements would
you like to see on measurement and why?
Clients’ ultimate measure of success is business results, however,
accountability and assurance of
delivery are increasingly important.
As OOH investment increases, proof
of delivery for both static and digital
is critical, and so is the ability to
aggregate massive volumes of data.
Media owners have historically provided varying degrees of
reporting on their own activity.
However, as the volume of DOOH
grows, the importance of aggregation and independent verification
required increases.
Companies, such as Seedooh,
are making progress in the field of
OOH accountability. They are independent, the verification process is
audited, and they have the ability to
provide aggregated reports at scale
across multiple media owners. With
this platform, agencies will be able
It is increasingly important for
advertisers to understand the difference in contacts (impressions)
for different DOOH share of time
on a screen, and how share levels
between environments impacts
their campaigns.
The same “share of screen”
would have vastly different “share
of the available audience” for a
train platform where audiences are
dwelling for five minutes, compared
to driving along an expressway.
New trading models need to
be developed to accommodate
different ways of planning and buying in DOOH to improve audience
targeting. It is likely that premiums
will accompany these tactics, but
this type of buying will not be considered (en masse) if the delivery
cannot be independently verified.
Ultimately, when this measurement becomes available, there will
be a shift from ‘buy by panel’ to
‘buy by audience’ and it will have an
impact on how packages are sold.
Do some media owners do a
better job of measurement
than others?
Most of the major OOH media owners have robust data plays they are
putting in place. They range from
sophisticated targeting according
to category buyers to geographic targeting by micro–location
profiling to site–level targeting by
audience viewing at that time.
The complication is that these
are all separate pieces of data available and this limits the ability to
target the same type of way across
a whole campaign.
Posterscope believes location–
based marketing is a massive opportunity for growth. OOH is one of
only a few media that can truly reach
consumers in a specific location, at
the right time, with a highly relevant
message — personalisation at scale.
What about the transparency of the figures; how would
you describe this and why?
The industry needs complete
transparency on digital measure-
ment and proof of delivery if it is
to move forward and continue to
compete with and integrate with
other media channels. Clients’
budgets are under pressure and
we need to be able to measure
OOH just as rigorously and transparently as other channels, and
more importantly prove
the effectiveness.
What sort of approach
should the industry take to
fix this?
The ideal lead should come from
the OOH industry body, OMA,
which does indeed have DOOH
measurement high on its radar. It
is not an easy challenge. Globally,
the issue of DOOH measurement
has not been adequately resolved
for all the different needs across
DOOH environments, formats and
share of screen variations.
There does need to be industry
standardisation. Without a unified
approach, media owners will be
‘checking their own homework’
and this will not create confidence
with agencies or clients, which in
turn will put the industry’s growth
trajectory at risk.
INTRODUCING
www.ayudasystems.com
Agenda
Warburton believes the goal
and objective is to give them much
deeper, transactional data and segmentation laid against all of the
sites, “so it gives them a much more
complex data set versus just saying,
‘here are the MOVE numbers or
here’s the reach and frequency’”.
Zavecz agreed that getting the
industry to work on a harmonised
approach would not work because
vendors that specialise in large
format assets have different measurement requirements to smaller
format vendors.
“All the vendors are building
the tools that complement their
asset base. It’s how we all bring
that together as an industry,”
Zavecz said.
Another important development for the outdoor industry is
“The reason why
Australia is a little
behind other big
Western nations who
have had a digital
network up for quite
a while is because
we’ve had to deal
with government
regulation.”
OMA and MOVE CEO
Charmaine Moldrich
solid progress towards embracing
independent proof of placement.
This provides a level of transparency and comfort to advertisers and
media agencies that the share of display they booked has been fulfilled.
Most of the major outdoor
vendors have committed to using
campaign delivery reporting platform Seedooh. It’s an independent
OOH ad tech platform that aggregates classic and digital screen
data with campaign booking
information to allow advertisers
and media buyers to monitor campaign delivery, providing confidence on the buying side.
“In a digital sense, Seedooh
reports what message appeared
on what digital sign, when and
where,” founder and CEO of
Seedooh Tom Richter said.
The platform gathers data
directly at the source from the different vendors rather than being
provided data through spreadsheets, which is an important layer
of independence.
The service launched with
Ooh!Media last July and has
gained the support of the majority
of the sector. In March, it formed
a partnership with Integral Ad
Science to provide enhanced
campaign delivery validation on
digital signs.
Independent campaign delivery
validation is the first step in what
promises to be a groundbreaking
year for the outdoor industry as it
takes steps to bring its audience
measurement capability in line
with a rapidly growing digital
media footprint.
CYCLISTS CAME OUT ON TOP AS THE
MOST FINANCIALLY SAVVY THINKERS*
(47:[\K`6J[
To engage with these savvy thinkers contact:
SARAH DAWES
T. 02 9213 8254
M. 0405 442 745
ZHYHOKH^LZ'`HɈHJVTH\
The Media Group for Australian Cyclists
Networks by design
delivering engaged audiences
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Find out more
valmorganoutdoor.com
On-the-go
Investigation
Make your own truth
In this special report, AdNews investigates how marketers use
social media, whether it is effective, and how success is measured.
W O R D S
L I N D S A Y
&
A R V I N D
B Y
B E N N E T T
H I C K M A N
Investigation
little over four years ago, you
or somebody you know probably watched ‘Kony 2012,’ the
YouTube video about Ugandan
rebel leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, Joseph Kony. The video suggested Africa’s longest–running conflict was still raging in
the country’s north. It went viral
and was viewed by more than 32
million people in four days.
However, Kony and the child
soldiers he kidnapped had actually f led northern Uganda six
years earlier. Kony dumbed down
a complex international political
issue for the sake of generating
widespread awareness and the clip
was riddled with misinformation
and factual inaccuracies, yet was
shared millions of times around
the world.
The clip was dubbed highly
irresponsible and totally misleading by the Ugandan Government
and gave a first glimpse into the
opaque world of social media.
Looking back, this was one
of the first truly viral sensations
with elements of ‘fake news’ and
marked the start of an era where
fact checking trailed behind a
hunger for likes, comments and
shares.
Today, the state of social media
is a lot more complex than it was
in 2012. There are more platforms
that are even more sophisticated,
including relatively new popular
platforms like the youth–skewed
Snapchat.
Another major shift is the
amount of marketing dollars being
invested into social media. This
year, investment in social media
advertising is predicted to grow
by 18.1% due to the rise of news
feeds, diversification of social
platforms, and increased mobile
usage, according to research by
Magna Global.
A 2017 Sensis study found
26% of small businesses, 35% of
medium–sized businesses and
42% of large businesses paid for
advertising on social media. For
SMBs this represents growth of six
points for smaller firms and 8% for
medium–sized entities.
But, chasing audiences on
social media platforms has
become wrought with risk for
some advertisers in the past year.
A
Ads have unwittingly run next to undesirable content on YouTube,
funded social media stars that have hit the headlines for the wrong
reasons, and the measurement of success has faced serious scrutiny
after several misreporting scandals. More recently, the data security of
social media platforms has faced parliamentary pressure in the wake
of the Cambridge Analytica affair.
Given the huge amount being invested in social media, AdNews
wanted to find out how marketers are using social media platforms
and measuring its effectiveness.
In a social media survey of 50 marketers, we found that around
26% of media budgets are being spent on social media platforms, with
nearly all marketers (98%) using Facebook, 56% on Instagram and 46%
on YouTube.
The platform where survey respondents spend the most is Facebook
(cited by 74%), followed by YouTube (12%), Instagram (6%) and LinkedIn
(6%). Marketers said they use social media to raise brand awareness
(cited by 78% of respondents), for engagement (58%), to drive traffic
to a website or call to action (52%), and drive sales conversions (42%).
This was followed by improving reach and frequency, and targeting
(both on 40%).
Marketers also perceived brand awareness, engagement, driving
traffic, increasing reach and targeting as the five strongest suits for
social. Interestingly, lead generation, driving sales, and store visits
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
“At a macro level
we need to look at
the bigger picture
and the role social
media plays.”
Matt Soulsby
Columbus
were not viewed as strong points
for social.
Although audience targeting
was regarded as ‘what social
media does best’ by 12% of marketers, it was cited as a major benefit
of social by 70% of respondents,
followed by reach and frequency
(48%), and low cost (50%).
This indicated that although
marketers appreciated the targeting social provides, they perceive
social performs better in raising
brand awareness, engagement and
driving traffic.
Matt Soulsby, the national
social strategy director of Dentsu’s
performance marketing agency
Columbus, told AdNews social
media is a particularly effective tool
to help brands “learn, listen and
adapt” their understanding of current and prospective consumers.
29
“This element of social is very under–utilised and removes a heavy
reliance on assumptive planning and can allow strategists to reduce
the level of extrapolating sample data to represent their desired population,” Soulsby said.
“When we start to look at social, we can remove the conscious level
of response that comes from surveys and start looking at a subconscious
level through the actions you are taking.
“Where social has been criticised in the past for what a view might
look like, media agencies are positioning effectiveness through people’s
actual intent and their want and willingness to interact with content
for a particular reason.”
Soulsby also cited the versatility of social media to perform several
roles across the marketing funnel or a full–funnel solution.
In terms of monitoring success, our survey found nearly two–thirds
of marketers use social media dashboards, while nearly 28% consult a
media agency partner or third–party and 24% rely on digital marketing
colleagues.
The most common metrics that marketers use to measure effectiveness are cost of impressions (CPMs) for 60%, cost of click–throughs
(54%), impact on sales (50%), and cost of conversions/acquisitions (40%).
This was followed by the number of shares/retweets of a post (34%),
number of likes to a post/page (30%), cost of completed video views
(26%), and cost of leads (24%).
Further down the list was how social media influenced a brand’s
market share (20%), followed in last position by an inf luencer’s fan
base as a measure of reach, which was monitored by nearly two out
of 10 marketers.
“If a business objective is to achieve growth nationally for its organisation, we’re not going to be immediately jumping into social media and
aligning that to ‘likes’ or ‘follows’ or ‘comments’ or ‘shares’,” Soulsby said.
“Those would be a micro–outcome, but at a macro level we need
to look at the bigger picture and the role social media plays, coupled
with other digital and traditional media platforms.”
When asked what marketers like about social media, many responded
it was “cost effective”, “easy to use”, “targets the right audience” and
allows brands to “engage with consumers”.
Interestingly, when AdNews asked marketers if they found social
media CPMs more cost–effective than other channels, 54% said “yes”
and 46% said “no”.
The aspects of social media that marketers are less content with
included a “lack of transparency and accountability”, “terrible viewability”, “brand safety concerns”, “reporting issues” and a “low ROI”.
The full survey we conducted can be found on our website.
Investigation
AdNews approached the major
social media platforms to find out
more about how brands are using
the platforms and where they can
add value. With so many different ways for marketers to measure success, we’ve attempted to
demystify each platform and see
how they compare when it comes
to measurement and independent
verification.
“Small companies can
now do what only
big brands were once
capable of doing —
video, animation, and
multiple formats are
now opportunities
for all brands.”
Facebook and
Instagram
Facebook has undergone several
challenges in the past 18 months
from trying to combat fake news,
to a slate of metrics misreporting mistakes it has amended.
More recently, the social media
platform has faced pressure to
tighten its data security policies to prevent app developers
from obtaining too much user
data after it was revealed that
an app developer working for
Cambridge Analytica harvested
87 million user profiles to help
serve advertising in the 2016 US
presidential elections.
On an advertising front, the
metrics misreporting revelations,
as well as allegations Facebook
had been exaggerating its reach by
millions when compared to census
data — first revealed by AdNews —
have done little to dim the appeal
of the platform to marketers.
Will Easton, Facebook
Who marks the homework?
Facebook provides marketers and agencies with several of its own tools
to measure the effectiveness of campaigns on its platforms. It has previously faced criticism, alongside Google, for operating in a walled garden
where it essentially marked its own homework rather than allowing an
independent verification to measure results at source.
Although it is still the case that Facebook reports its own figures,
it allows its data to be scrutinised by third–party verification firms
such as Moat, Integral Ad Science, ComScore and DoubleVerify, and is
working with the Media Ratings Council (MRC) to become accredited.
Last month, Facebook and Instagram revealed first–party served
Which social media platforms do you use for
marketing (select all that apply)?
Facebook
YouTube
Instagram
Snapchat
Twitter
LinkedIn
Other
20
40
Part of the reason why Facebook remains popular is that it provides
businesses of all sizes with a cost–efficient platform to reach targeted
audiences, according to Facebook Australia and New Zealand managing
director William Easton.
“By using our platforms, small– to medium–sized businesses are able
to use the same tools as some of the biggest brands in world,” he said.
“Small companies can now do what only big brands were once capable
of doing — video, animation, and multiple formats are now opportunities for all brands.”
Part of Facebook and Instagram’s appeal, Easton added, is that results
are “anchored” to business outcomes.
“Of course, not all of those sales happen immediately, some people
think about the purchase decision for many months, but that is why
our teams build for outcome–based marketing,” he revealed.
“We believe that campaigns should optimise for a real result, like a
sale or in–store visit. There are always things that lead up to this, such
as awareness or consideration, but we advise our partners to anchor
these to the end outcome.”
Looking ahead, Facebook said it will focus on innovations around new
ad units in Stories, e–commerce capabilities on Instagram Shoppable,
360–degree video and new sharable formats such as 3D posts.
“We have also recently announced new products such as Watch and
Marketplace,” Easton added.
“We’re focused on enabling outcome–based marketing to help businesses large and small achieve their business outcomes across brand,
content and direct response marketing themes.”
60
80
100
31
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
What they say:
Facebook &
Instagram
LOCAL WORKFORCE SIZE: WE
DON’T SHARE THIS BY COUNTRY
ANZ OFFICE LOCATIONS:
SYDNEY, MELBOURNE,
AUCKLAND
NUMBER OF USERS IN
AUSTRALIA: FACEBOOK:
15 MILLION MONTHLY,
INSTAGRAM: NINE MILLION
MONTHLY
USER GROWTH IN PAST FIVE
YEARS: WE DON’T HAVE THIS
INFO
ADVERTISING PRODUCTS:
GENERAL AD FORMATS
INCLUDE: IMAGE; VIDEO (5–15
SECONDS; 1:1, 16:9 AND VERTICAL
FORMATS); CAROUSEL;
SLIDESHOW; COLLECTION;
CANVAS. SPECIFIC AD FORMATS
INCLUDE: LEAD ADS; DYNAMIC
ADS; LINK ADS.
impressions had been accredited
by the MRC, which sets US standards on audience measurement
that are adopted around the world.
This is an important first step
towards greater scrutiny, but still
short of allowing independent
verification firms to measure
Facebook and Instagram data
at source through third–party
software development kit (SDK)
packages.
Facebook also allows partners
with measurement firms to provide additional measures beyond
its own reporting tool. This
includes measuring audience
with Nielsen Digital Ad Ratings,
brand with Kantar Millward
Brown and Nielsen brand lift
measurement studies.
In terms of sales lift, Facebook
said it works with Datalicious and
Neustar MarketShare to determine
multi–touch attribution modelling, and Accenture, Analytics
Partners, Annalect, Datalicious,
Ebiquity, GfK and Nielsen for market mix modelling.
Its mobile measurement partners include Adjust, AppFlyer,
Kochava, Localytics and Singular.
How do you measure success and the ROI of campaigns on social media?
Cost of impressions/reach (CPMs)
Cost of click-throughs (CPC or CTR)
Cost of potential leads (CPL)
Cost of conversions or acquisitions (CPA)
Cost of completed video views
Impact on sales
Changes in my brand's market share
Number of likes
Number of shares/retweets
Number of comments
Size of an inluencer's following
Other
10
20
30
40
50
60
Investigation
What they say:
YouTube
“Where social has
been criticised in
the past for what
a view might look
like, media agencies
are positioning
effectiveness through
people’s actual intent
and their want and
willingness to interact
with content for a
particular reason.”
LOCAL WORKFORCE
SIZE: GOOGLE AUSTRALIA
EMPLOYS 1300
ANZ OFFICE LOCATIONS:
SYDNEY, MELBOURNE AND
AUCKLAND
NUMBER OF USERS IN
AUSTRALIA: ACCORDING
TO NIELSEN, YOUTUBE HAS
MORE THAN 15 MILLION
ACTIVE MONTHLY USERS
AGED 18+ (79.4% REACH).
CONSUMERS SPEND AN
AVERAGE OF 20 HOURS PER
MONTH, WHICH RISES TO 26
HOURS FOR 18–39 YEAR OLDS.
Matt Soulsby,
Columbus
USER GROWTH IN PAST FIVE
YEARS: YOUTUBE WATCH
TIME IN AUSTRALIA GREW
MORE THAN 35% YEAR–ON–
YEAR IN THE 12 MONTHS
FROM H1 2016 TO H1 2017.
ADVERTISING PRODUCTS:
TRUEVIEW: SKIPPABLE ADS;
BUMPERS: 6–SECOND NON–
SKIPPABLE ADS; GOOGLE
PREFERRED: PREMIUM
INVENTORY ON TOP 5%
OF YOUTUBE CHANNELS
ORGANISED BY CATEGORY.
YouTube
Which platform do you spend the most budget on?
Facebook
YouTube
Instagram
Snapchat
Twitter
LinkedIn
Other
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Few media platforms have had a more challenging year than YouTube.
The user–generated video sharing platform has been in the news for a
series of brand safety issues, leading to a brand boycott in February 2017.
Major organisations such as Telstra, Tourism Australia, Holden,
Bunnings, Nestlé, Pepsi, McDonald’s, Foxtel and the Australian
Government, hit the pause button on YouTube advertising after it was
revealed their ads were unwittingly placed alongside videos made by
terrorist sympathisers, white supremacists and other inappropriate
content. Then there was the Logan Paul scandal, PewDiePie and also
sexualised videos of minors that plagued the platform.
YouTube has been quick to respond to the concerns of advertisers and
significantly beefed up brand safety controls and monitoring of content
on the platform. This included setting much tougher benchmarks for
videos that are able to be monetised, investing in AI technology and
removing up to 150,000 ads from two million videos.
Google director of brand, creative and media agencies, Kevin Ackhurst,
told AdNews that most of the advertisers that took a hiatus from YouTube
a year ago have come back on board.
“We feel that the platform is in a much better place now than a year
ago and that our relationship with advertisers is much stronger and
better than it was,” Ackhurst said.
“While we would have loved to be much faster in terms of the stuff
that we are doing, I feel we’ve gone a long way forward in being able to
commit to third–party verification, integration with third parties and the
investment that’s associated with the hiring of people to review the videos.”
Ackhurst pointed out it has taken YouTube a lot of work to better
understand the concerns of advertisers and adjust policies and product
development accordingly. One challenge is trying to find the right balance between being a freedom of expression platform and having the
right checks and balances in place to ensure YouTube remains a brand
safe environment.
“What might be very acceptable to one brand is highly unacceptable
to another brand, so trying to find that right balance in terms of platform
is a really challenging thing to do,” he said.
33
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
In the past two years, YouTube has been increasingly used as a search
platform and Ackhurst believes this provides an e–commerce opportunity
for products and ad units that support it.
“It’s not necessarily online purchases. One of the things we think
about is driving people between that online engagement and offline
engagement where they might go into a store,” he explained.
“So our product has evolved considerably into thinking about the
linkage between what they might be looking at on YouTube, store visits,
and the connections between those. It’s an evolving area for us and one
to watch over the course of this year.”
Ackhurst said the best results are when YouTube is integrated into
a holistic marketing mix and marketers are aware of how the platform
can drive different marketing outcomes like awareness, consideration,
purchase intent and so on, rather than just focusing on a traditional
video campaign.
After riding out a rocky 2017, it probably won’t be the only area advertisers are monitoring.
Who marks the homework?
“So what we’ve tried to do is put
in place the tools and mechanisms
that allow the advertisers with their
agencies to achieve an outcome that
is beneficial to them.”
Even through the ups and
dow ns, YouT ube rema i ned
incredibly popular with brands
using the platform to publish
videos or run advertising to segmented audiences.
How advertisers use
YouTube
YouTube claims it reaches more
than 15 million monthly users in
Australia, including 90% of 18 to 39–
year–olds. Advertisers of all sizes
use YouTube for different reasons
and in different ways and for different marketing goals.
YouTube said this includes driving ad recall, brand awareness, consideration, favourability, purchase
intent and brand interest. Ackhurst
revealed a recent interesting trend
in how brands are starting to realise
the benefits of bespoke creative for
the platform rather than shortening TVCs.
Google said YouTube’s new six–
second bumper ads are providing
value despite several industry
experts questioning whether such
short ads could prove effective.
YouTube provides advertisers, agencies and third–party verification
firms with results. It also allows preferred third–party vendors (Moat,
Integral Ad Science and DoubleVerify) and is MRC accredited for third–
party viewability reporting.
Google offers marketers use of its own ActiveView measurement tool.
Each of the integrations with third–party vendors undergoes an independent MRC audit, which validates the data Google says it is providing
is legitimate.
The audit validates data collection, aggregation and reporting for
served video impressions, viewable impressions, related viewability
statistics, and general invalid traffic (GIVT) across desktop and mobile
for each integration.
“Agencies and brands have an interest in a particular third–party
measurement scheme or mechanism,” Ackhurst said.
“What we are trying to do is create a little bit of an alignment so they
can actually measure using that third party rather than just rely on the
measurements we provide them, regardless of which platform they use.
“What I don’t know is if this is going to get more complex with more
measurement approaches in the future, but we are committed to third–
party measurement integration.”
What campaign objectives do you use social media for?
Raise brand awareness
Improve reach and frequency
Target speciic consumers
Drive traic to a website/call to action
Engagement
Lead generation
Drive sales or conversions
Drive store visits
Video views
App installs
Other
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Investigation
Twitter
Unlike Facebook and YouTube,
Twitter has managed to avoid ruffling the feathers of media owners
with constant news feed changes
and revenue–sharing models that
don’t deliver. Instead, it is focused
on creating premium partnerships
with publishers and TV networks,
which has fuelled an advertising
model that has attracted long–
term deals with brands chasing a
higher socioeconomic audience
like Optus, Samsung, ANZ and
Amazon.
Its sweet spot lies in sponsorship and events, which is evident
in its growing relationship with
Network Seven that has given
Twitter reams of Australian Open
content and last year attracted 11
advertisers.
Ironically, Twitter is probably
the social media platform that is
most like a TV network, with news
being a core focus and its advertising running in similar formats
alongside video content.
With Twitter’s Australian audience sitting at approximately 6.5
million monthly active users, it is
smaller than the big two (Facebook
and YouTube), but Twitter sales
director Angus Keene said this has
given it an advantage.
Twitter attracts advertisers
looking to connect with an influential audience that he claims
aren’t easily accessible on other
platforms, aside from LinkedIn.
Keene said Twitter users tend to
be more educated and its ad units
are considered more premium.
While there are benefits to a
small user base — it’s easier to
monitor and control dissemination of fake news — it also means
that marketers chasing eyeballs
haven’t always turned to Twitter.
Keene told AdNews he believes
the tide is turning and marketers
are beginning to realise the full
potential of Twitter to deliver real–
time news and reveal the full side
of a story, from news organisation
coverage to users on the scene.
“Advertisers have changed
how they are using Twitter and
that’s because we better defined
our platform for consumers,”
Keene said. “We’ve made our
platform about what’s happening
in the world and that has moved
What they say:
Twitter
LOCAL WORKFORCE SIZE:
WE DON’T SHARE THIS BY
COUNTRY
ANZ OFFICE LOCATIONS:
SYDNEY, MELBOURNE
NUMBER OF USERS IN
AUSTRALIA: ACCORDING
TO NIELSEN, THERE ARE 6.45
MILLION MONTHLY USERS
(47% FEMALE, 53% MALE).
USER GROWTH IN PAST
FIVE YEARS: WE DON’T
SHARE THIS BY COUNTRY,
BUT GLOBALLY TWITTER
HAS GROWN ITS USERS BY
62% FROM 204 MILLION TO
330 MILLION.
ADVERTISING PRODUCTS:
FIRST VIEW, TWITTER
NATIVE VIDEO ADS,
TWITTER VIDEO WEBSITE
CARD; IN–STREAM VIDEO
ADS, IN–STREAM VIDEO
SPONSORSHIPS, LIVE;
SPONSORED MOMENTS.
What they say:
Snapchat
LOCAL WORKFORCE SIZE:
40 STAFF
ANZ OFFICE LOCATIONS:
SYDNEY
NUMBER OF USERS IN
AUSTRALIA: 4.5 MILLION
DAILY USERS; OVER A
‘MULTI–WEEK’ AD CAMPAIGN
THE REACH IS 6 MILLION.
USER GROWTH IN PAST FIVE
YEARS: WE DON’T SHARE
THIS BY COUNTRY, BUT
GLOBALLY SNAPCHAT ADDED
8.9 MILLION DAILY ACTIVE
USERS IN THE Q4 OF 2017.
ADVERTISING PRODUCTS:
VIDEO: SNAP ADS (SHORT–
FORM) AND STORY ADS
(LONG–FORM); AR LENSES
AND FILTERS; APP INSTALL;
LONG–FORM VIDEO VIEWS.
advertisers from not having a full
understanding of how to use the
platform, to leveraging Twitter in
a number of ways, from launching
products to aligning with events.”
Keene’s prediction of the
tables turning for Twitter is so
far on the money. In February
this year, almost 12 years after it
launched, Twitter finally became
profitable for the first time.
Who marks the
homework?
Twitter partners with major
measurement partners I AS
and Moat for video viewability
and attention metrics. It partners with Nielsen DAR for audience verification, DoubleClick
Campaign Manager and Innovid
for ad serving, and Nielsen for
brand lift studies. Nielsen also
provides independent audience
verification metrics for Twitter’s
mobile app.
Twitter has agreed to an MRC
audit, which is due to conclude
in the first half of this year. The
audit includes gross and net tweet
impression counts (including
earned impressions), as well as
Twitter’s measurements of viewable video impressions, tweet sessions and video sessions, as well
as related duration metrics.
Snapchat
It’s no secret that Snapchat has
had a rough time. In 2016, it was
heralded as the next social media
darling, the next battleground for
the lucrative millennial dollar
— and big brands f locked to its
ephemeral format.
Its momentum first took a
hit when Instagram announced
it was launching its own Stories
feature. This marked the beginning of a series of unfortunate
events, including a failed venture into wearables, an IPO that
Fortune called a “huge flop”, and
most recently, the introduction
of a confusing redesign that led
to celebrities like Kylie Jenner
and Chrissy Teigen declaring
the platform “dead”. It has also
come under fire for brand safety
issues, with a game promoting
domestic violence featured on
the platform.
So, is Snapchat dead? Should
marketers move on and drop it
from their social strategies?
The platform may have copped
some negative attention of late,
but its metrics show it is growing. Every day, Snapchat said
more than 4.5 million people in
Australia access the platform,
and it’s an audience that analytics company App Annie found
isn’t on other platforms. It identified 31% of Snapchat users aren’t
on Instagram and 69% can’t be
reached on YouTube.
In its first Australian case
study, Snapchat drove a 6% lift
in purchase intent for Maxibon,
a 9% lift in brand awareness, and
reached two million Australians.
35
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
Snapchat Spectacles
LinkedIn
Snapchat boasts reach as one of its core campaign objectives, alongside
installs and time spent.
Snapchat has been working hard on building out its ad offering
over the last 12 months, moving into self–serve, carving out augmented
reality ad units, breaking into gaming ad integration, and adding pixels
to allow advertisers to better track their campaigns, among a slate of
other updates.
Snapchat GM Kathryn Carter said by taking on board agency and ad
partner feedback, the platform has developed its solutions to service
the full marketing funnel.
“We now can say Snapchat is an excellent place, not only for pure
reach and awareness, but also to use new targeting to drive app installs,
and track e–commerce sales with the new Snap Pixel,” she said.
Carter revealed that advertisers like Suncorp Australia, Woolworths,
David Jones, Holden and Telstra, are seeing the value of the platform
and moving towards an always–on approach to Snapchat.
And the platform is still at the beginning of its journey. It’s only six
years–old and while it’s still operating at a loss (Twitter took 12 years to
become profitable), it still has a few years and more tricks up its sleeve.
On the controversial redesign, Carter added “it’s not over”, hinting that
the platform is taking on board user feedback.
Who marks the homework?
Snapchat works with major measurement partners across viewability (Moat, Innovid, Sizmek), mobile measurement (Appsf lyer, Tune,
Kochava) and reach/resonance (Nielsen, Millward Brown).
It opened its ads API to 26 partners and in February 2018 opened
its marketing API to allow agencies and advertisers to create tools that
both pull reporting and allow them to create campaigns. But, Snapchat
has not agreed to an MRC audit.
What they say:
LinkedIn
LOCAL WORKFORCE SIZE:
280 STAFF
ANZ OFFICE LOCATIONS:
SYDNEY AND MELBOURNE
NUMBER OF USERS IN
AUSTRALIA: MORE THAN
NINE MILLION MEMBERS
USER GROWTH IN PAST
FIVE YEARS: HAS GROWN
FROM 4 MILLION IN 2013 TO 9
MILLION IN 2018.
ADVERTISING
PRODUCTS: SPONSORED
CONTENT (NATIVE ADS
ACROSS DESKTOP AND
MOBILE); SPONSORED
INMAIL (ADS SERVED IN
LINKEDIN MESSENGER);
TEXT ADS; DYNAMIC
ADS; PROGRAMMATIC
DISPLAY ADS.
LinkedIn has avoided the brand
safety issues, data breaches and
fake news fiascos of the other social
media platforms, largely as its platform is designed for professional
content, rather than user–generated
content of cats.
Its sweet spot is sponsored content that it revealed has lured advertisers like NAB, St George Bank and
Telstra, which aim to get in front of
the nine million Australians using
the platform, of which a significant
amount are high earners.
LinkedIn director of marketing,
Prue Cox, said the pivot to content
came from the influencer program
the platform introduced, which
encouraged top execs to produce
their own content. This in turn has
led to greater investment in content
marketing and thought leadership
from brands that wish to have their
content run alongside articles from
CEOs and CMOs.
“We are starting to see B2B
marketers embrace video and
understand the thought leadership and brand awareness it can
drive,” Cox said. “We are seeing
the trend of funnelling the majority
of spend into lead generation and
understanding they need a 60/40
split in the upper funnel and brand
awareness to lead conversions.”
Who marks the
homework?
LinkedIn would not respond to our
questions about measurement and
third–party verification.
Meet the Team
Glue: A cohesive bunch
THE GLUE SOCIETY
STICKING TO
THE UNKNOWN
A lot has changed in the 20 years The Glue Society has been
operating in Australia, but it’s fair to say the agency has not lost
its individuality along the way. It still remains on a path that is
unchartered, working on some of Australia’s biggest brands
and moving into the unknown territory of experiential.
W O R D S
L I N D S A Y
B Y
B E N N E T T
he Glue Society opened its Sydney office in early 1998 with a
space that co–founder Jonathan
Kneebone said was just “three
desks, a laptop and a couch”. Now,
the agency is on the brink of celebrating its 20th birthday, graduating from its teenage years having
worked on some of Australia’s biggest brands, from NAB to Virgin
Mobile. Not to mention a spate of
awards from across its two decades of operations.
From its humble beginnings,
The Glue Society had the desire
to do things differently and defy
conventions. Frustrated by the limitations of working at a traditional
agency, Kneebone, David Johnson
and Gary Freedman, decided to set
up their own shop, which would
work on a project basis with whoever they liked, however they
liked – a simple concept that is still
unique in adland today.
T
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
Two decades later, The Glue Society still describes itself as a
“creative collective” rather than a traditional agency, and has collaborated with agencies to execute and direct some of the world’s
most awarded and unconventional projects.
This includes NAB ‘Break Up’ with Clemenger BBDO, ‘ANZ GAYTMs’
with TBWA Melbourne, ‘NRMA Car Creation’ with TBWA Sydney, and
Cochlear’s ‘Hearing Test In Disguise’ with CHE Proximity.
Many of The Glue Society’s most memorable projects were produced with Host, which was established in the same era. It was
through Host that The Glue Society landed one of its most successful
campaigns ‘Warren’ for Virgin Mobile in 2003, which earned the
agency a Grand Prix at Cannes Lions.
The ad had a number at the end of it which unexpectedly, received
more than one million calls. It’s this feedback that seems to motivate
The Glue Society the most.
“‘Warren’ opened our eyes to the fact that if you have an interesting idea, it can start a conversation,” Kneebone said. “That’s the
opportunity that advertising has always had, even before technology
— to share ideas that people can contribute to.”
The Glue Society’s model also allows the agency to still pursue
its passion projects and balance commercial work with creative initiatives. Kneebone said the work he is most proud of actually falls
outside the advertising remit — a sketch comedy–horror show called
Watch with Mother.
Kneebone believes that often working on projects outside of adland
allows the agency to spend more time with a project, with the pace of
advertising not always allowing the opportunity to make real change.
“There’s a lot less time to do anything these days, and more
urgency. Your opportunity to contribute, and have those deeper
conversations is much narrower,” he revealed.
“It’s a shame for those entering the business now because they’re
not getting a chance to really make a name for themselves.”
Kneebone said he’d like to see more egos emerge in the next
wave of agencies, and networks stop stamping out the individual names behind campaigns. It’s one of the reasons The Glue
L U K E
N A T O
•
C R E A T I V E
“Events give you a
very potent way of
connecting with your
real fans ... It’s an
exciting space and
somewhere we want
to play.”
Co–founder
Jonathan Kneebone
37
Society has chosen not to lose its
independent status, and Kneebone
added he has no ambitions to sell
at the moment.
Breaking new ground and
choosing to remain independent
rather than conform to a network’s
rules was always part of its DNA.
Kneebone said the business made
a decision early on to not chase
profit, but chase interesting projects instead.
However, that doesn’t mean the
agency is complacent. Last year,
The Glue Society opened in New
Zealand and through its partnership with production agency Will
O’Rourke, it’s doing more work in
the US and UK.
It also wants to expand more
into the burgeoning area of experiential advertising, with Kneebone
revealing his goal has always
been to produce a segment of the
Olympics Opening Ceremony.
“I think in five years’ time we
will be doing more complicated
brand experiences,” he said.
“Events give you a very potent
way of connecting with your real
fans in the immediate space, but
then you’ve also got the legacy of
the event, where everyone watches
it. It’s an exciting space and somewhere we want to play.”
P A R T N E R
What’s your previous experience in
the industry?
After a few years working in the
early days of digital, I was keen to
break into creating more layered
experiences for people. I was lucky
enough to be invited to join The
Glue Society in 2006.
I spent a number of years on
creative and direction projects
at Glue before setting of on
some global adventures, agency
freelance, and writing a bunch of
feature screenplays. A few years
later, I was welcomed back to
The Glue Society in 2016. And the
timing was right.
What was it like switching up
agency life for client side at IAG?
Looking back, I think it was more
a career anomaly rather that a
deliberate step in that direction.
That said, it was illuminating to
see how things work from the other
side. Decisions are made very
diferently in a massive corporation
of 15,000–plus people.
It made me realise how lucky a
position we find ourselves in at The
Glue Society, because we’re a small
collective and able to really work
together to find the right creative
solution for a problem.
What does your day–to–day role
look like?
For most of what I do, there’s both
an interactive experiential element,
and a film direction to represent
that experience. Being able to think
through the two concurrently is
very helpful in bringing a creative
vision to life, whether the idea is our
own, or that of a partnering agency.
There’s lots of thinking,
collaboration with our wider team,
and paper sketches before we
move into 3D renders and actual
production. In the end, it’s about
creating an emotional experience
for the audience. Something they
will remember.
What’s the most exciting change
you see coming for the advertising
industry?
The blurring between reality
and a digital reimagining of an
experience. More than anything,
I see a massive opportunity to
subvert these technologies into
something unexpected.
Meet the Team
P E T E R
B A K E R
•
P A R T N E R
How have you seen The Glue Society
evolve over the last 13 years?
Despite the fact that several of us
have been here for over a decade,
part of the reason we stay is
because The Glue Society is always
changing. I joined straight out of
AWARD School in 2004 as an art
director and was immediately
confronted by the quality of the
work. Back then we were working
on the creative for campaigns such
as Elle Macpherson Intimates and
Virgin Mobile.
There was a real energy about
the place, the people and work that
I hadn’t experienced before and
has never gone away. And, over
the years we’ve been encouraged
to grow as individuals, despite
working as a collective.
These days most of my work
is as a director of both film and
installations (recent work I
directed includes ‘The Hearing
Test in Disguise’ for Cochlear/
CHE Proximity, ‘The Unforgotten
Soldiers’ for The History Channel/
DDB NZ, and the first four years
of the GAYTMs and GAYNZ (as
artistic director).
I’ve been lucky enough at Glue
to earn my stripes as a director,
originally starting by directing my
own work and then being asked
to direct for other agencies. I’ve
been encouraged and allowed to
find my voice, but I also know that
being part of The Glue Society
comes with an expectation of a
certain type of work. We always
want to out–do ourselves and, to a
healthy degree, each other. We’re
incredibly supportive of each
other, but we also always want to
keep pushing ourselves too.
As well as evolving what we
do, we also shook things up a few
years ago when we moved to our
studio space in Alexandria. It’s a
warehouse that’s fully kitted out
with a photographic studio, edit
and online suites, and an art studio
and workshop, which means we’re
quite self–suficient. We often
invite agencies into the space to
mix things up, which keeps things
interesting too.
Last year, we also took on
three new staf who each bring
something new to Glue (we have
an artist, a documentary filmmaker
A L E X
H A R R O D
•
and a writer/art director). Again,
it’s a way of keeping us all on our
toes and injecting new life into the
team, forcing ourselves to look
at things from new perspectives
(although I’m sure like the rest of
us, these newbies will be around
for some time).
What has been the most exciting
thing you’ve worked on and why?
The past few years have been
incredibly rewarding. Starting with
the GAYTMs (and subsequently
the GAYNZ Liberace–inspired bank
branch), we’ve had a good run
that eventually led to last year’s
emotional ‘Hold Tight’ campaign
D I R E C T O R
What is the most rewarding aspect
of your role?
I think I get a fair bit of flow from
the filmmaking process and Glue
allows me to do that day–to–day.
How do you see the role of
production agencies evolving in
the industry?
It’s probably a bit early into the
advertising world for me to say. I do
think there’s so much to learn and
explore in answering the inherent
goals of the industry.
Perhaps if there are some ad and
production agencies that could
together re–assess, with maybe
a bit more first principles–style
thinking, and focus on the work,
this could break some of the
antiquated assumptions that keep
us in that perceived safe space.
Maybe providing some new thing
that kills of the old thing. Is that
evolution?
What attracted you to the agency?
I started on a fellowship with Glue a
bit under two years ago on a hunch
I could sponge knowledge and tech
from work I liked. I had an operator/
editor background and it’s ended
up a bit of a gateway drug into stuf
I didn’t know that I didn’t know.
And I’m allowed to work with some
talented, good people.
film, which I also directed. That
project led to ‘The Unforgotten
Soldiers’ campaign for The History
Channel which was a chance to
combine my graphic installation
skills with emotional, performance–
based film.
Working with great theatre
actors is something I jump at
and this project demanded
incredible actors, as well as the
best craftspeople I could find.
‘The Hearing Test in Disguise’
for Cochlear was an incredibly
rewarding project to direct and
one that’s quite personal as I
injected a lot of my own life into the
screenplay and characters.
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
L U K E
C R E T H A R
•
What’s your previous industry
experience?
I started in advertising at a place
called Pure Creative, initially
in the print studio when Quark
Express was still kicking around.
From there, I was fortunate
to move into the creative
department, with a lengthy stint
at Leo Burnett in Sydney, before
moving across to Glue, where
I’ve been for the past 13 years.
What’s the most exciting thing about
the creative industry right now?
The diversity of thinking and
multitude of diferent avenues
available to fulfil an idea. And
if there isn’t an outlet for a
particular execution then these
days you can just make one,
and that’s pretty exciting.
S E N I O R
39
W R I T E R
Consumers interact with brands
diferently; they want more
sophisticated contact at all levels,
and the brands that acknowledge
that, are the ones most interesting
to work on. You have to be
more creative in the ways you
approach people, which makes
communicating with them more
interesting.
was a challenge to begin with,
over the years the blurred nature
of my role makes it more exciting
and anything but repetitive, which
I love. I sometimes even get to be
a copywriter again.
How do you explain what you
do to people who aren’t in
the industry?
Because we work on projects
in many different capacities
at Glue, it’s never easy to
summarise my job in a few
sentences. Showing a piece of
work that we’re responsible for
goes some way to explaining
our craft. At least I can then talk
directly about the role I had in
the project. Half the time they’ll
still walk away with a confused
look on their face though.
What’s the most challenging part
of your role?
Working at Glue, I’ve learnt
not to get too attached to one
particular role. Having arrived
as a copywriter, I’ve morphed
along the way to allow for
creative work on many levels,
from concept development,
production, direction, film editing,
installation, and music. While it
A L I C E
C O G A N
•
A R T
D I R E C T O R
What made you want to get into
advertising?
I had a really amazing tutor at
Curtin University in Perth, Allyson
Crim; she encouraged me and a lot
of other girls to do advertising. She
has a roster of successful students
who have gone on to win lots of
awards and do great things.
How did you land your role at The
Glue Society?
I landed the role at Glue through
the fellowship program. I had met
Jonathan a few years before at the
D&AD Brief to Broadcast event that
Glue hosts every year and then
when I heard about the fellowship
I applied straight away. I had seen
a glimpse of what Glue was like
from the D&AD events and knew I
wanted to work here.
How does Perth’s advertising
market compare to Sydney’s?
Perth’s advertising market was
rough. When I was there, we were
going through a major recession
from the end of the mining boom
(they still are). For me, the juice
just wasn’t worth the squeeze.
When there’s no money, people
get nervous and stop pushing
for bold ideas. It drains the fun
away from what we do and it was
burning me out. It’s a shame,
because there’s so many talented
people in Perth but so many of
us end up moving to Sydney and
the east coast because there are
the budgets and the clients to do
great work.
What do you love about your job?
I love my job because I’m not
defined by a title. None of us at
Glue have a singular role, we do it
all. I could be directing on set one
day, managing clients and budgets
the next, and writing a script the
day after. There’s no limitation on
what were allowed to do.
The Big Question
‘RADICAL
TRANSPARENCY’
— WHAT DOES IT
MEAN AND WHO
SHOULD CARE?
W O R D S
P I P P A
M I T C H
W A T E R S
Radical transparency is generally accepted to mean removing all
barriers to free and easy public access to information.
What does radical transparency look like within the digital advertising ecosystem? For a start,
all parties within the supply chain
would have access to transparent
information around fee structures
and services. There’s nothing particularly radical about that (well,
there shouldn’t be).
I think a lot of marketers have
taken a simplistic view that by
moving their buying in–house or
B Y
C H A M B E R S
•
T R A D E
D E S K
Transparency hit fever pitch last year, gaining
prominence across the world with ANA’s report
on media rebates, as well as Facebook and
Google misreporting metrics. Despite the rise
and subsequent drop in talkabilty, it shows no
sign of leaving adland’s just lexicon yet.
ust when we thought the ubiquitous ‘transparency’ word had taken
a short break, having slid off a few LinkedIn posts, it seems its close
relative ‘radical transparency’ has taken its place. Be it black or white,
or more fittingly grey, talk of the subject and its various guises continues to evolve, but by prefacing the word with ‘radical’ — as many now
do at conferences and across varying online platforms — will we take it
more seriously? What does ‘radical transparency’ mean to people and
should we be taking this topic more radically serious?
At our AdNews Live Tackling Transparency event last year, we got
100 people in the audience to vote on three solutions to tackle adland’s
transparency problems. Keep an eye on AdNews June edition for our
follow-up on how far we’ve actually come as an industry on this. In the
meantime, we put this new talk of ‘radical’ transparency to three ad
tech execs to get their view.
J
G E N E R A L
M A N A G E R
A N Z
using only one tech stack, they are cutting out the middle men and solving their transparency problems.
Ironically enough, being radically transparent sometimes requires
more people in the supply chain — like third–party viewability and ad
fraud vendors. Having a third party as part of the supply chain ensures
marketers aren’t judging campaigns solely by their tech providers’ own
metrics — the ad–tech equivalent of marking your own homework.
If we as an industry are going down the path of radical transparency,
we need to take a long hard look at objectivity. Objectivity means the
ability of your tech provider to objectively assess all media and assign
your spend appropriately and without bias.
The industry’s transparency issue is exacerbated because so many ad–
tech companies look more like media companies. Many have business models where they represent both the buyer and the seller at the same time.
This creates an internal conflict that leads to a lack of transparency. It also
means these players could bias their own media. Not very radical, right?
“If we as an industry
are going down
the path of radical
transparency, we
need to take a
long hard look at
objectivity.”
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
J U N E
The transparency conversation
isn’t a new one, yet it continues to
evolve. The past 18 months have
seen a steady influx of transparency challenges that have left major
brands with big questions.
At its core, transparency addresses the loss of trust between a
brand and a consumer. With signiicant revenue impact hinged on reputational damage, trust becomes
an emotion with a dollar sign.
The industry is calling for radical transparency because the
conidence of the brand in their
chosen partners is critical for success, given the nature of programmatic advertising.
P E T E R
•
G R A P E S H O T
A N Z
V P
Radical transparency afects the entire ad tech ecosystem and each of
us is responsible for creating a more transparent environment through
the way we do business, including agency fees, billing models, data origins, cookie tracking, etc.
A true commitment is expected from everyone — brands, agency partners, publishers and tech vendors — to think about transparency from consumers’ perspective, how their data is collected and
used. It’s a good thing to see laws such as The General Data Protection
Regulation (GDPR) and Privacy Act coming into play, which puts the
power back into consumers’ hands and measures taken if their data
is compromised.
At Grapeshot, we see advertisers are getting more and more savvy in
asking the right questions. With our Contextual Intelligence Platform,
we are able to demonstrate our methodology, how we do things, with no
black box or cookie tracking. This provides a lot of comfort to our clients
and keeps us compliant. We believe in this new age of media, regardless
of where you are in the supply chain, anyone who can’t adapt will be
left behind.
B A R R Y
Ask anyone in our industry what
the current hot topics are and you
can be sure that one consistent
answer will be “transparency”.
Transparency can mean many
things — what sites an ad appears
on, what advertisers appear on
your site, fee disclosure between
tech partners and advertisers/
publishers, and so on.
The ad tech industry has taken
great leaps forward recently. Ads.
txt (and in the future, ads.cert)
empowers advertisers with the
knowledge that they are buying
inventory from legitimate sources. PubMatic ofers a fraud–free
guarantee to buyers to further re–
assure them that their dollars are
ending up where they should.
The removal of buy side fees
has cleared up the supply chain,
C H E U N G
•
P U B M A T I C
C O U N T R Y
M A N A G E R
“The industry is
calling for radical
transparency because
the confidence of
the brand in their
chosen partners is
critical for success
given the nature
of programmatic
advertising.”
A N Z
which is great news for both buyers and publishers. These developments
have come about in the last 12 months, and, while there is more to do,
much of the opaqueness previously associated with programmatic has
now been dealt with.
Some companies have put forward the concept of ‘radical transparency’ to promote mass disclosure of customer fee rates. While this may
sound good, the reality is that business arrangements are too complex,
and companies’ product capabilities are too varied to make it practical.
Mass fee disclosure could unfortunately result in a single, isolated commercial term becoming the dominant driver of technology decisions.
A viable path forward requires a mentality shift for decision–makers.
The way to achieve trust is to move the industry towards a mature software procurement approach that is transparent, lowers costs for everyone, and creates healthy relationships. At PubMatic, we have recently
introduced new pricing models that are no longer based on rev–shares,
but on subscription models. This leads to a ixed cost base for publishers
and allows for more complex transaction methods like PMP and header
bidding.
Trust between publishers, advertisers and vendors is achievable, but
not through headline grabbing and impractical suggestions like radical transparency. To accomplish this, clear, mature pricing models are
needed.
“A viable path
forward requires a
mentality shift for
decision–makers.”
41
Adland Secrets
Confessions of a media
network adman gone solo
Under cover of anonymity, the worst of human nature is revealed along with
“impossible” strategies, dire comms and duped clients in the first of a series of
raconteurs to bend the ear of AdNews.
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
The best thing about leaving
the big media network game is?
Not having to deal with the politics or
CEOs who you have limited respect
for, but are experts in the politics of
business. I had at least three or four
of them within my network. These
people pushed their own agenda
rather than that of their staff, their
clients and their business.
What’s the best part of network
agency culture that you miss?
The elaborate network Christmas
celebrations. Seriously, I can’t
think of anything I really miss.
And the worst bit?
The politics. Lack of integrity.
The strategy of internal hubs/
silos versus the one group
‘holistic’ approach. What
works and what doesn’t?
43
What key things are overlooked in agency world?
Clients generally
have very limited
understanding of
media. They are
easily influenced and
because of that, are
easily duped.
Clients. Big networks have shareholders/stakeholders to appease and
clients and staff in many cases (not all) were the ones to suffer.
Who holds the power and influence within the agency/network
and does anyone else matter?
The companies/individuals in the networks that make the money. On a
few occasions the HR person can have a strong influence with the CEO,
but ultimately the CFO/COO holds many of the cards as they’re not in
the firing line if it all goes wrong. However, they’re happy to be the king
once the ‘king is dead’.
Innovation. Is it happening?
The best part of networks is the opportunity to leverage what other
markets are doing globally, and using those innovations to bring back
to Australia. On many occasions we would talk a great game, but would
never realise it due to clients not being prepared to take a risk or release
funds to make it happen. There was action though, but limited to the biggest clients who had the budget to take that leap of faith. Agencies themselves were rarely prepared to take that risk without revenue attached.
What needs to change to improve agency culture?
It is impossible to make the one
group holistic in approaching
work. Even if you have the best
intentions, which our network
did, it is impossible to deliver
due to scale, company/individual KPIs, and ultimately politics.
All agencies I‘ve worked at have done so much for their staff to improve
culture, but turnover continues to remain at over 30%. I put this down
to a lack of skilled staff in Australia and with new 457 laws it isn’t going
to make it any easier any time soon. However, they could do more with
flexibility for return-to-work mums. The agencies I worked at always had
more female staff. Losing so many great people because of workloads,
socialising to keep up with their male equivalents, and balancing home
life makes it too difficult for mums. I’m sure equal pay also comes into
this, but it’s not something I was exposed to.
How good was internal
communication?
What are the strengths and weaknesses of the client
understanding of media planning?
Terrible, having worked at four of
the big six, they were all the same.
You would hear about very senior
people leaving the agency from
reading articles in AdNews or even
from competitor agencies. I understand the need to keep things quiet
and to control the comms for the
good of the staff and the clients, but
it was always leaked. I could never
understand why they didn’t have a
process to deal with this, and if they
did why they always left it too late.
Clients generally have very limited understanding of media. They are
easily influenced and because of that, are easily duped. Many clients
at a particular agency will now be feeling that. That said, the larger the
client the better their understanding as they can afford to employ media
specialists. For the rest, which is the majority, they struggle to keep up
with the pace of media. However, this is why media agencies exist. Also,
the importance of clients being diligent when selecting their agency
ensuring they are one they can trust to do the right thing for them.
Typical agency politics that got
you down or got in your way?
People who only thought about
themselves and what they needed
to do to get themselves ahead at the
expense of others in their agency.
Unfortunately that is the worse of
human nature. I worked in large
networks for over 15 years and was
successful by showing integrity,
being honest, driven, and building strong relationships.
Do agencies take advantage of these gaps? For example,
everyone talks about arbitrage in programmatic trading and
media buying, etc.
Yes. The need for transparency has never been greater, but network
agencies aren’t at any time soon going to give up that revenue. You can
look at a smaller network agency a few years ago where the leadership
team was basically sacked for attempting to be transparent too quickly.
Sounds ridiculous, but in any business with shareholders they aren’t
going to be happy to take significant cuts in revenue unless you can
find a way to replace it.
What would you like to see happen to create a healthier media
buying ecosystem?
I would like to see clients better understand media planning and buying so they can make a more informed decision, but understand they
may need to pay more for the services they receive, which could be the
first step to ensuring improved transparency across the industry.
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Campaign Review
VML senior art director
LOUISE MCQUAT
Sport advertising is typically very formulaic, with lots of tackles,
cheering and hype. This year both the NRL and AFL have departed
from these clichés and made work for the channels where people
are viewing. These new campaigns address social responsibility
with human stories while contrasting the competitive nature of the
games with a sense of inclusivity and community. It’s good to see.
Meerkats senior creative
RIKKI BURNS
2018 marks a small shift in a
category traditionally built on
energy, hype, and star power
wallpaper. Human stories
are coming to the forefront,
effort in the face of adversity
is celebrated, and diversity is
not just part of the story — it is
the story.
AFL VERSUS THE NFL: WHO SCORES
WHEN IT COMES TO ADVERTISING?
Both the AFL and the NRL have taken bold new
creative approaches this year, appointing new
agencies and shaking up their messages. Here, we
asked some of the industry’s best creatives to review
their ads and rule who scored the winning try when it
comes to sports advertising.
W O R D S
L I N D S A Y
BWM Dentsu ECD
AMY HOLLIER
What a difference a year can make. This light
speed change in self–awareness from both the
AFL and the NRL proves old dogs can learn
new tricks, and gain new audiences. Now
they’re tackling some of sport’s biggest issues
head–on and proving they know what makes
us tick; they’ve figured out how to motivate
not just my son, but my daughter too.
B Y
B E N N E T T
Campaign Review
NRL 2017
Creative Agency
Archibald Williams
LM: This isn’t the most creative
ad in the world, but it’s a great
pump–up for the sport, showing
how each team and its fans have
their own rituals and cultures
that make the team who they are.
The graphic social commentary
overlaid throughout worked to
show the passion from the fans
across all the teams. Purely based
on building excitement for the
upcoming season, I liked it.
RB: The 2017 NRL spot starts with
the promising introduction of a
fan versus player concept, but
quickly becomes a hype montage.
The intended message to fans is
“you’re a big part of all this”, but
NRL 2018
Creative Agency
R/GA
LM: The film seems to speak more
to true fans with a lot of assumed
knowledge of the players and their
teams. So some of the nuances went
over my head; hopefully they were
only looking to talk to existing fans. I
think it’s shot well and demonstrates
the tribal nature of the teams and
cultures through the fans and home
grounds well. Overall it had a great
energy, but most of the story they
were trying to tell was missed by me.
that potential somehow turns into
“people use social media these
days”. This category generally
expects mandatory spectacular
action shots, equal representation
of all teams, a reminder of sport’s
emotional highs and lows, a nod
to the importance of fans, a tie–in
to the overall campaign line,
an interesting human insight,
a strategy that builds on the
previous campaign, and a new
and exciting way of expressing all
of the above — so this particular
type of creative glue is the logical
progression. Wouldn’t it be more
interesting if we could just blow
all of that out of the water? On
the bright side, “History doesn’t
just happen, history is made” is a
killer line.
RB: We’re still firmly in the hype
arena with the new “This is How
We League” spot, though this time,
a creative concept peeks through.
Again we’re talking about pride,
diversity, loyalty, and overcoming
adversity. With an interview
approach, James Tedesco’s story
could have easily slipped into the
AFL campaign. But, as a standalone
driving spot, it’s beautifully
shot, energetically edited, and
cleverly hits a lot of proof points
along the way. The team murals
commissioned across Sydney
extend the concept off–screen,
blurring the lines of the film and real
world in a memorable way. Racial
diversity continues to be inherent,
but does the casting of the driver
reinforce racial stereotypes? Or
is it a win for diversity? A post–
diversity–casting reverse–racial
anti–statement? I can’t tell anymore.
It’s not as purposeful a shift as the
AFL example, but a creative step
forward with a tough brief. No doubt
it’ll get fans hyped, and hopefully
we can expect big things next year.
AH: Hmm … a kind of forgettable
clips package. I’m afraid I had to
watch this twice because I kept
drifting off and thinking about
the ads I’d watched before. Not
much to comment on here in
terms of narrative or core idea.
I’m sure it helps if you know or
can remember every one of these
moments and the importance they
had in the season, but then you’d
be a true fan, rather than using
broadcast as a medium to gain a
broader audience, and elevate the
sport above the basics, which its
2018 compatriots do so beautifully.
AH: What an intoxicating tribal
chant. Energetic, engaging, with
nice changes of pace and playful
elements to keep you entertained.
The best thing about this film is the
way the NRL have made it real for
fans, with powerful murals in their
neighbourhoods and a sense of
inclusiveness through ‘real time’
social media commentary woven
throughout. The combination of
the players and the younger fans
makes for fascinating viewing too,
as it feels like you have two different
perspectives simultaneously. I’d
love to see the NRL keep exploring
the notion of tribes. But don’t forget
there are girls in your tribe too.
www.adnews.com.au | May 2018
LM: As an AFL fan, this piece didn’t
do much for me, it felt like they
were trying to target non–fans or
people who know nothing about
the sport. I think using Hemsworth
distracted from the excitement of
the game and upcoming season,
and made it feel a bit glossy and
unfulfilling.
million Aussie best mates
understand. Sure, in 2018 we’re a
bit Hemsworthed–out, but in early
2017 this was a smart alignment
with a beloved super–fan at the
height of his fame. Half the work
was already done. 2017 also saw
the return of the classic 1994 “I’d
Like to See That” line for both the
AFL and the AFLW. But, what was
such a clever and inspiring way
to launch the AFLW (presumably
without the Hemsworthy budget),
ultimately became just a likeable
and funny spot for the AFL. Goes
to show you that a true emotional
insight beats star power any day.
RB: Aussies love a Hemsworth,
especially when he’s making
jokes that only he and his 24
AH: This is a great idea; what
a shame about the lacklustre
execution. It feels like an epic
AFL 2017
Creative Agency
Cummins&Partners
AFL 2018
Creative Agency
Clemenger Melbourne
LM: Racism has plagued
Australian sport in recent years
and the AFL often finds itself in
the spotlight. I think these films
are a great way to demonstrate
inclusivity and tackle racism and
ignorance head–on. It’s nice to see
the films focus on telling the story
and not making something that
just works for TV. ‘Don’t believe
in never’ is a great way to frame
the journey these people have
been on, and I hope these pieces
can do a lot to change minds
and perceptions of Australian
multiculturalism.
49
without the sense of epic. And, as
is often the case, it feels far too
long for what it is. You get the idea
in 15 seconds, but then you have
another 45 just to make sure you
got the message. With this budget,
I feel like they could have made an
actual Hollywood–style trailer for
‘AFL The Movie’. Oh hold on, that’s
what Tourism Australia just did for
The Super Bowl, with Hemsworth.
It was awesome.
RB: ‘Don’t Believe in Never’ moves
the AFL from comic patriotism
to human stories of dedication,
passion and perseverance. While
not breaking any new ground
creatively, these stories do
something else. They manage to
cross barriers of race, religion,
self–worth, culture, and (gasp) team
affiliation. Diversity is obviously
on trend, but let’s be honest, the
Venn diagram of footy fans and
intolerant dickheads does have a
cross–over. In this campaign we’re
seeing a much–needed shift from
hero worship to changing the
expectations for who and what
constitutes a hero. With budget
comes responsibility. Or at least
opportunity. My only criticism is
for the obscure posters featuring
portraits of minorities with the
word “NEVER” and the logo. In our
current media landscape, we can no
longer rely on our audience seeing
one piece of communication in
order to understand another. When
playing on this particular field,
the connotations are potentially
inflammatory.
AH: Wow. Finally the AFL shows
it understands why we love the
game so much. And it’s not about
men. Or beer. Or aggression.
It’s about hope and belonging.
And using sport as a common
language to cross all manner of
boundaries and differences. It’s
good timing as well. In the wake
of concerns and tensions around
Nauru and Manus Island, it feels
like Oz needs reminding of the
powerful and numerous benefits
that migrants can bring to our
country, and the importance of
making everyone feel welcome.
Exquisitely crafted and achingly
authentic, this catapults the AFL
into super–brand status for me. A
brand to believe in. More please.
The Download
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DATA • PRIVACY • GDPR • AUDIENCE TARGETING
SOCIAL & CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY
In light of recent revelations, never has the issue of customer, or user,
data been hotter. Facebook’s slip-up is just one part of a much larger
story about the willingness of people to part with their data, how that
data gets used for commercial and non-commercial initiatives, and now,
how their data can be harnessed.
As GDPR attests - maybe there is a tightening of controls underway.
How brands will be able to access and commercialise data could be
poised for a global, but also local overhaul.
Is your agency or brand ready?
6TH JUNE 2018
MONKEY BAA THEATRE
DARLING HARBOUR, SYDNEY
FOR SPONSORSHIP CONTACT
AMANDA WILSON • amandawilson@yaffa.com.au • 02 9213 8292
FOR SPEAKING OPPORTUNITIES CONTACT
NICOLA RICHES • nicolariches@yaffa.com.au • 02 9213 8201
adnews.com.au/adnews-live-data-security
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