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Artists Palette - April 2018

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Artist’s
thE mAgAzinE foR All ARtiStS
Palette
No 158
BASic DRAWing
SkillS
hEAPS
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AnD ARt ADVicE
EDWARD SPESSot
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Contents
26
Issue No.158 2018
Features
22 Drawing Inspiration
A true test of an artist is not how
well they can paint ,but how well
they can draw.
42 Product Feature
Paper and canvas
INsIGHts
6 Jeane Carney
This retired teacher has discovered
an affinity with watercolours.
60 Gallerey Review
6
14 Robert Enemark
Describing himself as a ‘PainterPrintmaker’, Sydney artist Robert
Enemarkis forging an enviable
reputation.
.
26 Edward Spessot
Originally from Italy, this Sydney
oil painter displays a close affinity
with the great Australian outdoors
34 Julie Tremp
Years of patience, persistence and
practice have paid dividends for
this artist
.
52 Nichola Robinson
Despite being plagued by Chronic
Fatigue Syndrome, this artist has still
managed to pursue an obsession with
painting.
66 Rosie Jones
This Queensland pastellist believes
that her personal passage through
psychiatric turmoil has changed her.
Cover image: Edward Spessot
74 Robyn Gibson
There is always something in an artist’s
work that can spark an idea
.
demoNstratIoNs
66
52
10 Watercolour – The White Waratah
18 Etching -What is an Etching?
A fascinating look at a meticulous
artform. A notable Sydney etching
specialist conducts a guided tour of his
special process for creating pictures
30 Oils – Mitta Mitta River,Tallangatta
A camera is a constant companion
for this oil painter. He recently shot a
photograph to use as reference material
for this beautiful landscape work.
38 Oils – Fusion
This is a painting you can copy … or
you can choose to create your own
composition and make your own
picture using this artist’s methodical
technique.
.
52 Genesis Heat Set Oils – The Farewell
This artist gets a lot of inspiration from
manipulation artworks, as manipulation
artists often have the freedom to do
things in their art that traditional artists
rarely venture to attempt.
70 Pastels – Portrait of Emma
A considered approach to drawing from
life
78 Acrylics – Albury Countryside
An artist whose habit is to paint coastal
and river scenes.
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Jean Carney
An Enjoyable Process
Edited by Trevor Lang
This retired teacher has discovered an affinity with watercolours.
She takes pleasure in making charming pictures based on a
whole range of natural subjects.
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I N S I G H T
J
ean Carney Dip.Art.Ed. has worked
as an educator for much of her life,
and has taken advantage of many
opportunities to improve her own
knowledge and learn new skills.
As a painter, she loves watercolours.
She has developed her own style with
this medium and she favours floral scenes
and many other topics from Nature.
“Wildflowers and birds, rocky creeks
and the surrounding bush enjoyed during
long summer holidays, as well as my
mother’s paintings, give me motivation,”
she explains. “These are the things
which early established my attitude to
art; and they are the kinds of images
which inspire me to paint.”
A career in teaching and an
opportunity to study at the National Art
School in Newcastle led Jean Carney
into teaching art at Jesmond High
School, Newcastle Girls’ High School
and Killara High School. Sharing her
knowledge with students doubtless
helped her to define and polish her own
style during this time.
“Visits to galleries on the West Coast
of America, and in Europe – as well as
a summer school in Denmark – also
widened my horizons,” she relates.
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“On retirement, I spent time studying
Architectural Drawing and Interior
Design … and here I discovered how
NOT to watercolour,” she continues.
“Learning this difficult art led me on
and on – interested, intrigued,
frustrated and fascinated.”
A move from Sydney to a property
on the New South Wales central coast
at Wamberal brought Jean into close
contact with the abundant bird-life
which has inspired many of her
paintings. She joined the Central Coast
Art Society, demonstrating and
conducting workshops; and also
teaching classes from home.
An opportunity to help with the
launching and operation of the
Gateway Art and Craft Gallery in
Gosford (as a co-operative venture with
other artists) gave her an outlet for her
own works. The Gateway Art and Craft
Gallery functioned successfully for
almost a decade.
“My paintings have attracted local
awards and commendations over
the years,” Jean says. “Sales and
commissions have kept me fairly
busy. Last year, I joined a Botanical
Art Group … this interest (plus
family responsibilities and a keen
interest in playing bridge) now
happily fills my days.”
The enjoyment that Jean Carney
finds through creating her fine
watercolour pictures is inevitably
mirrored in the pleasure experienced
by the appreciative people who
view her works. ■
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DD EE M
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Watercolours
The White Waratah
By Jean Carney
An Aboriginal legend of
the Waratah flower tells
the story of a pair of
Wonga pigeons who
become separated. In
searching for her mate,
the female was attacked
by a hawk. As she died,
her blood fell on a stand
of White Waratahs,
staining them red.
M AT E R I A L S
• Arches 300gsm Rough
Watercolour Paper.
• HB pencil.
• Winsor & Newton paints:
FINAL STEP
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Aureolin; Cadmium Orange;
Indigo.
• Maimeri paints: Nickel Yellow;
Cadmium Yellow Warm; Raw
Sienna; Permanent Green;
Ultramarine Blue; Dragon’s
Blood (Earth Red).
• Artists’ brushes: Number 12,
Number 8 and Number 1.
D D E E MM OO NN SS TT R
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R A
STEP ONE
STEP ONE
A group of White Waratahs growing
near Fitzroy Falls inspired this
painting, but it had to wait until I was
able to purchase a bunch at a Waratah
farm at Bilpin, last Spring.
Drawing is the basis of all my
paintings and getting to know my
subject is an enjoyable part of the
process. The Waratah is complex. The
small flowers which make up the head
of the flower grow in a spiral. As my
approach is Botanical, I had to take
care to be as accurate as possible.
On completion of the drawing, I
transferred the image onto Arches
300gsm rough watercolour paper
(by light box) using a HB pencil.
To keep the work flat, the paper was
then stretched onto a board. While the
paper dried, I chose the colours
needed.
STEP TWO
STEP THREE
STEP TWO
The first washes were all pale –
searching for the light areas.
Wetting the top half of the flower
head, a pale wash of Aureolin Yellow
(plus a very small amount of
Permanent Green at the top) was
established. Next, the stems were done
with Pale Yellow on the light side and
Earth Red on the shadow side;
followed by a pale mix of Indigo and
a separate mix of Raw Sienna dropped
randomly into the wet leaf shapes. A
Warm Yellow wash, using a loaded
brush, went onto the bracts.
STEP THREE
The bracts were strengthened with
another wash of Warm Yellow and
some Earth Red on edges and points,
leaving light areas. The leaves were
treated in a similar way using Indigo
and Raw Sienna. Leaves showing
their reverse side were left pale at this
stage. Flower shapes were treated with
a warm mix of Ultramarine Blue and
Earth Red, very pale. A mix of Raw
Sienna and Permanent Green defined
the bracts beneath the flower head.
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I O
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STEP FOUR
STEP FOUR
Definition of light on the stems came
next – using a strong Ultramarine and
Earth Red mix, but placing a thin line
of water down the centre of the stem
only. This protected the light edge and
allowed the shadow side to remain
strong. Further work on the flower
head with the Warm Grey mix
followed – time-consuming but
enjoyable. Next, Earth Red on points
and edges of the bracts intensified
their colour. Stem and leaf joins were
defined with a Yellow-Green mix.
STEP FIVE
The bud received a Yellow Green mix
and some Earth Red; and the dark
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STEP FIVE
green leaf at the top was washed back.
The bracts received further washes of
Yellow Green or Warm Yellow and
Earth Red, in various mixes.
FINAL STEP
The stems were darkened further with
Earth Red and Indigo (mixed), and the
leaf joins were detailed with this mix
also. The composition was balanced
with the addition of further leaves. The
leaf backs had their veins defined with
Indigo and Raw Sienna. Leaf fronts
had their veins defined with an opaque
Light Yellow. Ultramarine shadows
were placed under the flower heads,
and also where leaves crossed stems.
When to stop? NOW! ■
MASTER HINTS
AND TIPS
• Use a HB pencil lightly for
transferring your composition
to watercolour paper. It avoids
grooves and can be erased easily.
• Test your colours on spare paper
of the same weight.
• Mix ample colour and load
your brush – which should
have a good point and be
generous in size.
• For strong colour, leave the area
dry; and wet around the outside.
This will create a soft edge.
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
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Robert Enemark
The Art of
Etching
Edited by Trevor Lang
Photographs by Nadine Saacks
Describing himself as a ‘Painter-Printmaker’, Sydney artist Robert Enemark
is forging an enviable reputation for himself as one of Australia’s finest
exponents of etching.
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H
aving turned his back on a
35-year career as a graphic
designer and art director
in the advertising and publishing
industries, Robert Enemark has
now turned his part-time interest
in painting and etching into a fulltime occupation.
Robert graduated in Commercial
Illustration (with Credit) from East
Sydney Technical College in the
late 1960s. After travelling overseas
and working in the advertising
industry, he became involved in
magazine design and worked as
art director on Cleo, Woman’s Day
and Wellbeing magazines.
In 1994, with his wife Kerry,
he formed Rob-Art Studios – a
small graphic design operation
specialising in desktop publishing
of magazines, newsletters,
brochures and advertising material.
Robert always used his spare
time to pursue his interest in fine art,
painting in oils and acrylics and
printmaking.
In the late 1970s he held two joint
exhibitions with well-known artist
Susan Cadby and taught silk-screen
printing at the Waverley Woollahra
Art Centre. He also attended etching
workshops at Waverley Woollahra
Art Centre and studied life drawing
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and painting at the Julian Ashton
Art School. He has entered various
local and school exhibitions, and in
2002 was awarded a ‘Commended’
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for an etching at the Drummoyne Art
Society show.
In 2001, Robert travelled to Europe
on a painting and sketching tour with
Melbourne artist Margaret Cowling,
where he painted in watercolours
on-site in Florence, Rome, Venice and
Paris. On his return he mounted an
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exhibition of works with fellow
artist Jo Josephsen at the Curtis
Gallery at Balmain – featuring oils,
watercolours and etchings inspired
by his time in Italy.
The following year, Robert joined
a group of painters travelling to
Kakadu, Katherine Gorge and
Litchfield National Park and on his
return again exhibited the results of his
trip at the Curtis Gallery. Two more
trips to Outback Australia (one to The
Kimberley and one to Cape York) have
provided inspiration for a series of oils,
etchings and watercolours reflecting
the unique beauty and colours of
Australia. Two successful exhibitions
at the GIG Gallery at Glebe followed
these trips.
Robert’s etchings have proved
popular and are now exhibited at
several print galleries around Sydney.
The Broken Hill Gallery has also
acquired an etching (selected for
the Outback Art Prize) as part of its
permanent exhibition.
In 2006, a trip to South Africa
provided a wealth of new material
and ideas, resulting in a series of
etchings and paintings of wild
animals – including cheetahs,
elephants, zebras and giraffes.
These works, and those inspired
by the Australian Outback, formed
the basis of Robert’s latest exhibition
‘Three Continents’ at the Marianne
Newman Gallery in Crows Nest.
In this issue of Artist’s Palette
magazine, Robert Enemark’s
demonstration article provides an
in-depth look at the skilful and
fascinating art of etching; with
photography by Nadine Saacks. ■
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Etching
What is an Etching?
By Robert Enemark
A fascinating look at a meticulous artform. A notable Sydney etching
specialist conducts a guided tour of his special process for creating pictures.
T
he process of etching involves biting
lines and textures into an acidresistant soft or hard ground covering
a metal plate, to create an image. Any acidresisting coating is commonly called a
ground. When the image is complete, the
plate is then immersed in acid, causing the
image to be ‘etched’ onto the plate. The
ground is then removed with mineral
turpentine. The whole plate is then inked; the
excess ink is wiped off; and the plate is then
ready to be placed on a printing press. A presoaked (still damp) piece of paper is laid on
the plate and rolled through the press,
producing a print.
FINAL STEP
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P R E PA R I N G T H E P L AT E
There are several steps to follow before
starting to etch.
1. Cut plate to desired size with a guillotine.
2. Bevel the edge at a 45-degree angle with a
metal file. This protects the felt blankets of
the printing press.
3. Polish the plate with Brasso and a soft rag.
This gets rid of surface scratches and reduces
plate tone, and removes any oxidation.
4. Clean with mineral turpentine to remove
Brasso.
5. Degrease with ammonia and whitening
powder, or alcohol and methylated spirits, or
vinegar and methylated spirits. It is important
to be sure that no greasy spots remain on the
plate surface – grease on an aquatint plate
will cause uneven tones in the print, and on a
hard ground plate it may cause the ground to
lift in the acid and ruin everything!
6. Water test. Place the plate under running
water; water will reject grease. Whitening
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STEP 1
STEP 2
STEP 3
powder must be removed in the
rinsing as it may cause streaking
tones. Handle the plate by the
edges after degreasing.
Practically all hard grounds contain
beeswax, Aspham and some sort of
varnish. When dry and cool, they
become hard and can only be removed
by an etching needle. Materials
required are liquid hard ground or
solid form hard ground; roller or paint
brush; and hotplate.
Liquid hard ground. Preparation:
Stand plate up; apply even coats of
ground; allow to stand to dry.
Solid hard ground. Preparation: Heat
plate; cover sufficient ground; roll
evenly with gel roller; remove to cool.
Soft ground. This is made by mixing
two parts liquid hard ground with one
part tallow as de-grease, or Vaseline.
Soft ground is soft, even when dry.
Preparation: Heat plate (slightly);
apply an even coat; roll evenly; allow
to cool – don’t touch with fingers. The
plate is covered with tracing paper and
a pen or pencil is used to draw the
image onto the paper. When the paper
is removed, the soft ground has been
removed where the image has been
drawn. This method can be used for
producing textures and fine detail.
Remember that even the slightest
fingerprint can be reproduced.
Aquatint. The Aquatint technique is
used to produce subtle tonal effects
and varied textures. First, prepare the
plate by placing bitumen on the areas
of the plate where the Aquatint is not
to appear. Then heat the plate and
place it in a large box containing pine
resin powder for two minutes. The
pine resin box has a propellor which is
cranked briskly, allowing the powder
to be evenly distributed over the plate.
After removal from the box, the plate
is reheated to set the pine resin.
Aquatint can also be applied with a
resin bag or jar. When the plate has
cooled, it is placed in an acid bath.
The longer the plate stays in the acid
bath, the darker the tints become. The
plate is then cleaned with mineral
turpentine to remove the bitumen and
methylated spirits to remove the resin.
The plate is then ready to be placed in
the press and used for printing.
Drypoint. The drypoint is used
when the image is scratched directly
onto a plate with no ground. This is
also called ‘intaglio printing’.
Different tools can be used, including
needles, scrapers, burnishers, nails,
rollettes and abrasives. As the mark is
made into the metal it raises a furrow
– as a plough does. This is called the
‘burr’. The indentation in the metal is
negligible. The ‘burr’ is what will
hold the ink. Control of the thickness
or colour of the line is achieved by
the co-ordination of the pressure and
the angle of the instrument.
Remember that, with this method,
printing pressure is reduced to a third
of the normal pressure used for most
other techniques.
ETCHING
TECHNIQUES
I have used several different etching
techniques for this demonstration.
M AT E R I A L S
• Etching plate (zinc or copper).
• Scraper.
• Burnisher (curved).
• Sharpening stone
(Carborundum).
• Light machine (for sharpening).
• Acid trays (plastic or stainless
steel).
• Nitric acid.
• Glass measuring cup.
• Hard ground.
• Soft ground.
• ‘Wet and dry’ sandpaper
(very fine, and coarse).
• Fine steel wool.
• Metal cleaner (Brasso).
• Tarlatan cloth and rags.
• Whitening powder.
• Alcohol and mineral turpentine.
• Brushes: Two-inch Flat for
grounds; Number 3 or 4 Pointed
for stopping out.
• Pencils and litho crayons (soft).
• Tracing paper.
• Carbon paper.
• Metal files (coarse and fine).
• Hotplate.
• Rosin (powder or lump).
STEP ONE
Preparing the plate with a soft ground
to trace the image from sketch to
the plate.
STEP TWO
Bitumen and hard ground used in
preparing the plate, to block out areas
not to be bitten by the acid.
STEP THREE
Burnishing some areas of the plate to
make them lighter in tone.
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STEP 4
STEP 5
STEP FOUR
Wiping ink into the plate with a piece
of Tarlatan to spread the ink evenly
onto the plate.
STEP FIVE
Wetting a sheet of paper in a trough
of water, then damping down between
two towels.
STEP SIX
Taking a progressive proof in Sepia on
the printing press.
PROOF ONE
First of all, I cleaned (degreased)
my zinc plate with a solution of
ammonia and whitening powder.
Then I heated it on a hotplate and
applied a soft ground which was
rolled evenly across the plate into a
thin film. I then traced my original
drawing onto the plate with a
PROOF 1
ballpoint pen. The pressure of
the pen lifted the soft ground and
exposed the plate to be etched by
the acid. Next I placed the heated
plate in an Aquatint box (powdered
resin) for two to four minutes.
Then I placed it into an acid bath
(nitric acid – one part acid to eight
parts water) for ten minutes, where
the exposed lines were etched.
I inked the plate and took the
first proof.
PROOF TWO
I cleaned my plate with mineral
turpentine and reworked the plate,
adding details by blocking out
certain areas with bitumen paint and
spraying other areas with enamel
spray paint. I then re-etched the
plate in the acid bath for another
15 minutes and took another proof
on the printing press.
PROOF 2
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STEP 7
STEP 6
PROOF 3
PROOF THREE
I worked my plate, sanding back
certain areas with ‘wet and dry’
sandpaper. This technique enabled
me to knock back dark areas making
them lighter in parts. I then took
another proof.
PROOF FOUR
I again reworked my plate, by
burnishing back certain highlight
areas to make them whiter, and
also Aquatinting the sky and
cleaning up the white areas in the
print. I then took the final finished
proof and began experimenting
with coloured inks as well as black
and sepia.
To view more of Robert
Enemark’s etchings,
go to his website:
www.robertenemark.com.au
PROOF 4
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D E M O N S T R A T I O N
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D R A W I N G
I N S P I R A T I O N
Drawing:
Fundamental to Good Art
A true test of an artist is not how well they can paint
… but how well they can draw. Those that draw
well will naturally produce better art works because
they know form, proportion and balance; all the
things that drawing teaches.
B
Contributed by Brett ‘Mon’ Garling F.A.I.H.A. Dip. Ed.
orn with a fascination for
anatomy, Brett Garling gained
the nickname of ‘Monster’ at
age five due to his early collecting of
bones and animal specimens. ‘Monster’
was quickly shortened to ‘Mon’ and the
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name stuck. Brett is widely known as
‘Mon’ to friends and collectors alike.
‘Mon’ was born in Pambula in 1970.
He spent his childhood in rural towns
such as Lightning Ridge, Narrabri and
Dubbo where his love of the bush and
its characters was nurtured. These
themes now play a dominant role in
his work.
Completely self-taught, he takes great
pride in the fact that the influences of
the modern art world have not clouded
or plagued his development. He has
used the greats such as Streeton,
Roberts and Hoff as role models.
Brett Garling’s fascination with the
technical aspects of casting in bronze
has led him to establish his own
foundry where he casts his own
sculpting works. ‘Mon’ is now widely
regarded as an expert in the field of
sculpture and casting. He was awarded
a Fellowship in 2006 by the Australian
Institute of History and Arts in
recognition of his contribution to
‘Traditional Sculpture’.
Brett’s works are held in private and
corporate collections world-wide. In
2004 he opened his own gallery, where
he now exhibits a permanent collection
of his sculptures and paintings
alongside his foundry.
D R AW I N G A S A
BASIC SKILL
There are basic fundamentals to all
things in life. A baby must crawl before
it can walk, and walk before it can run
– each stage takes time to be mastered
before engaging in the next.
Drawing InspirationArt is no
different. Whether artists wish to work
in oils, acrylics, watercolours or clay,
there is a vital basic stage which is
often overlooked: Being able to draw
with conviction and confidence.
Brett Garling often views ‘bad’ work
and analyses it … to discover that it
has failed only due to inadequate
drawing at the outset.
As ‘Mon’ explains, “If the drawing is
bad, the work will have no framework
to support it – and poor results can
only follow.”
This is a problem faced by amateurs
and professionals alike. In their haste
to paint they miss the all-important
stage of ‘crawling’. They paint figures
with ape-like proportions and
landscapes with 15 vanishing points.
Anyone who has been to an art show
has seen such works.
Many true artists are defined by
how well they can draw. Those who
draw well will naturally produce
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D R A W I N G
I N S P I R A T I O N
from a distance. I don’t concern
myself with details at this point.
S TA G E T W O
Still using a HB pencil, I loosely place
in where my darks and lights will be –
building up the sketch as a whole,
rather than focusing attention on any
one area.
By establishing darks I am
automatically pulling into focus more
of the detail, giving form and depth to
the subject.
I leave highlights as raw paper.
better paintings and sculptures
because they know form, proportion
and balance … translating these
fundamentals into other mediums
leads to good art.
Brett Garling’s mother was a painter
and potter.
“Mum spent more time with a
pencil in her hand than a brush,” he
relates. “She was a role model for
me, and I followed her example.
Through her mastering pencil, she
was able to work convincingly in
oils, watercolours, pastels and clay.
So, for 35 years, I have drawn, drawn
and drawn.”
Most people who succeed in art
follow a long and arduous road to
success; they don’t settle for
mediocrity. Although the road is
long, the journey can be filled with
satisfaction and the joy that comes
with every achievement – no matter
how great or small.
know what the subject should look
like and what appearance should be
possessed by the final work.
Not everyone has a Gimp outfit, so
something quite simple (a vase or
some fruit) could suffice for your own
drawing exercise.
S TA G E O N E
Using a HB pencil and a loose grip,
I establish the subject – lightly
working out the larger proportions,
correcting as required but not
rubbing anything out (so as not to
retrace mistakes).
Proportions at this stage are crucial
if the drawing is to succeed. I stand
back from my work frequently, as
mistakes will be much more obvious
S TA G E T H R E E
Using a HB pencil and a 4B pencil, I
turn to the focus areas and bring more
detail to the face and arms.
When drawing on stark white, in
order to bring depth to the piece I
shade loosely in the background. This
helps to place the subject solidly on the
paper (instead of having the subject
‘floating’ on the paper). Creating
contrasts between dark and light areas
helps to delineate forms at this point.
S TA G E F O U R
I continue to detail the sketch,
strengthening contrasts to bring the
drawing forward and create form.
Although finished, all my initial
lines are still there – some visible,
some worked over. Throughout the
process I am careful not to ‘overwork’
the piece.
A D R AW I N G
D E M O N S T R AT I O N B Y
BRETT GARLING
The subject I have chosen for this
demonstration is myself, at work in
the foundry. Being a sculptor and
painter with my own bronze casting
foundry means that I spend endless
hours dressed as a Gimp! Therefore
I am completely familiar with the
subject. By drawing on the familiar
at the outset, you bring a degree of
confidence to the task … in that you
Artist ’s Palette
51
D R A W I N G
VA L U A B L E T I P S
• Draw as much as possible from life.
Your eye for proportions and
composition will develop much
faster this way than it would through
copying photographs.
• Start by drawing familiar subjects,
keeping to simple shapes. This helps
to build skills and confidence.
• Don’t strangle your pencil.
Remember you are drawing, not
writing a letter. Keep your grip high
and loose, at arm’s length.
• Don’t use cheap materials –
it will show.
• Try not to use an eraser. You are
more likely to repeat your mistakes
by erasing them. Leaving your
working lines can add to the finished
product’s spontaneity.
• Squint your eyes when looking at
subjects. This helps to reduce the
fiddly bits and helps you find the
important shapes.
• Draw, draw and draw. There is no
substitute for mileage.
52
Artist ’s Palette
I N S P I R A T I O N
• Keep a visual diary and draw in it
every day.
• Look at your subject more than your
work. Develop your observation skills.
• Don’t fall into the trap of using grids
and photographs to reproduce exact
copies of pictures. Train your eye to
see that proportions are correct.
• Minimise your pencil collection to
only one or two – this will cut down
on confusion when selecting. I use
HB and 4B only.
• Study only good art. You can only
pick up bad habits from bad art.
• Don’t be afraid to make mistakes …
it is the only way to learn.
• Visualise what your finished work
will look like before you begin.
Learn to see it on the blank paper.
• Most of all, enjoy what you do!
THE ARTRISTIC STUDIO EASEL
ENHANCES YOUR ART AND REMOVES
THE ACHES AND PAINS OF PAINTING
So Much Freedom
As I Paint
“I absolutely love painting
with this wonderful easel.
I can paint all four outside
edges of my canvas, rotate it as I
paint and leave it in any position at
a comfortable eye level”
VANESSA KATZ: USA ARTIST
I Am So Happy I
Found This Easel
“No more aching feet, legs
or back from bending over a table
because now I choose if I sit or
stand as I paint”
KAREN BUDAN: USA ARTIST
Yet To Meet An Artist That
Has Not Benefited From
Painting With An ARTristic Easel
“This amazing easel has revolutionized
my studio work and my travels around
the world as a performance artist.
Such a wide range of things it can do”
SARAH ROWAN DAHL: NSW ARTIST
“Umbrellas In Brisbane” 120 x 90cm
No Paint Touches It So No
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Painting
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TUITION
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THE
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Mixed Media
HOME
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“Serious well informed research has gone into
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An Australian invention for artists worldwide”
DALLAS
NYBERG: NSW ARTIST
Master
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and Tutor inLarge
all mediums
It’s Phenomenal.
Paintings Appear To Hover
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GAIL CHANDLER: USA ARTIST
SEE THIS EXTRAORDINARILY VERSATILE
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AP150
Artristic_HP.indd
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II N
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Edward Spessot
Attuned to
Open Spaces
Edited by Trevor Lang
Originally from Italy, this Sydney oil painter displays a close affinity with the
great Australian outdoors … through his rich and insightful landscape works.
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E
dward Spessot was born in
1937, at Gradisca in Northern
Italy. Gradisca is a small town
not far from Venice. In 1950, he left
Italy with his family – to settle in
the Sydney suburb of Pymble.
He completed his schooling in
Australia and found his first job with
the renowned Sydney sculpture house,
Pellegrini’s.
Displaying a natural talent, Edward
was encouraged to further his studies.
He chose to pursue woodcarving
and sculpture under the expert tutelage
of Lyndon Dadswell and William
Lamb (both well known Sydney
sculptors).
An appreciation of the Australian
landscape led Edward Spessot back
to his first passion: A passion for
painting.
His unique artistic background has
helped him to win awards at several
significant art shows, including several
first prizes.
His work displays a great intricacy
of detail coupled with a truly
insightful grasp of atmosphere and
lighting. Richness of colour is also
a hallmark of his magnificent oil
paintings. Clearly, the Australian bush
Artist’s Palette
27
I N S I G H T
and Australian rural scenes provide
him with a wealth of inspiration.
Edward is flexible in his approach
to art, too. No job is too big – as
demonstrated by his willingness to
tackle a range of formats from
standard sized canvases to enormous
larger-than-life mural works.
Recent significant awards received
by this artist include Artist’s Choice at
the 2002 Ku-ring-gai Art Exhibition;
First Prize at the 2000 Quota Rotary
Art Prize for his Australian Landscape
(Oils) ‘Road to Braidwood’; Viewers’
Prize for ‘Australian Artists at Venice’
at Norton Street Artists, 1999; First
Prize at the 1998 Quota Rotary Art
Prize for his Australian Landscape
(Oils) ‘Jouname Lookout, Talbingo’;
and First Prize at the 1996 Quota
Rotary Art Prize for his Australian
Landscape (Oils) ‘Macleay River’.
He was also commended at the
1997 Tumut Art Exhibition for his
landscape work ‘Three Kilometres
from Tumut’.
Edward Spessot’s paintings
are exhibited at several notable
galleries, including the Ku-ringgai Art Society gallery; Morpeth
Gallery (New South Wales); and
Ronald Cole Investment Gallery. ■
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Artist’s Palette
I N S I G H T
Artist’s
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Artist’s
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DD EE M
O N
N SS TT RR AA TT I I OO N N
M O
Oils
Mitta Mitta River,
Tallangatta
By Edward Spessot
A camera is a constant companion for this
oil painter. He recently shot a photograph
to use as reference material for this
beautiful landscape work.
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Artist’s Palette
FINAL STEP
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
E
dward Spessot was born in
1937, at Gradisca in Northern
Italy. Gradisca is a small town
not far from Venice. In 1950, he left
Italy with his family – to settle in
the Sydney suburb of Pymble.
He completed his schooling in
Australia and found his first job with
the renowned Sydney sculpture house,
Pellegrini’s.
Displaying a natural talent, Edward
was encouraged to further his studies.
He chose to pursue woodcarving
and sculpture under the expert tutelage
of Lyndon Dadswell and William
Lamb (both well known Sydney
sculptors).
An appreciation of the Australian
landscape led Edward Spessot back
to his first passion: A passion for
painting.
His unique artistic background has
helped him to win awards at several
significant art shows, including several
first prizes.
His work displays a great intricacy
of detail coupled with a truly
insightful grasp of atmosphere and
lighting. Richness of colour is also
a hallmark of his magnificent oil
paintings. Clearly, the Australian bush
Artist’s Palette
31
DD EE M
O N
N SS TT RR AA T T I IO ON N
M O
STEP FIVE
STEP SIX
From the top of the canvas, I painted
down with negative painting – leaving
the darks and shadows untouched.
STEP SIX
6 8 Artist’s
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32
Palette
FINAL STEP
The sky was completed using White
and Lemon Yellow and a touch
of Rose Madder, while the distant
mountain was left untouched. I
softly emphasised the background
trees with Lemon Yellow and White
for definition.
I completed the middle ground
with Yellow Ochre, Viridian and
a touch of Burnt Sienna. I finished
the foreground using Yellow Ochre
and Viridian.
The gum tree came to life with
the application of Cobalt Blue,
Rose Madder and Lemon Yellow;
plus highlights in White and
Viridian Yellow. ■
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
Artist’s Palette
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II N
G HH TT
N S
S II G
Julie Tremp
Hard Work
brings Success
By Rob Ditessa
Years of patience, persistence
and practice have paid
dividends for this artist and
enabled her to conquer
many artistic difficulties
during a lengthy journey of
discovery and enhancement.
D
edication and determination have been
hallmarks of Julie Tremp’s career. She
has mastered a variety of styles and
mediums. She now operates a successful art
business and does many commissions.
“It is not very difficult to learn to do something
new, but learning to do it well involves hard
work,” she claims. “It’s a matter of what you are
prepared to put into it.”
Julie cautions that you should not to give
up when a project does not turn out right the
first few times. In her youth, figure drawing
was not one of her skills – but it was her
favourite form of art. “I sketched, and doodled,
and scribbled, and studied with a vengeance
until finally I broke through the barrier – and
I am now recognised for my work in this area,”
she says.
Over the years, Julie has found it increasingly
easier to master new things.
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G H
H TT
N S
S II G
“I am now at the point in my life
where nothing much fazes me, as I
know that if I apply myself, I can
master almost anything. Patience,
persistence and practice will conquer
any difficulties. I am on a journey of
discovery and enhancement.”
Julie cannot pinpoint the exact time
when she realised she wanted to do art.
The passion was always there, and art
came easily to her. Her parents
recognised her ability at a very early
age, and they bought her art materials
instead of toys to encourage her.
At her technical high school, Julie
majored in art from Year 8 onwards,
and at age 14 she received tutoring and
guidance from a commercial artist who
was a family friend. This led to a parttime apprenticeship during her school
days, until she enrolled in the North
Adelaide School of Art at age 16.
Although Julie now works solely in
the visual arts, she has worked in a
variety of areas including performing
arts, theatrical design, graphic arts and
fashion design. Working in one area
has informed her work in others. “The
common denominator is creativity and
aesthetics,” she says.
Julie has been painting for more than
30 years using many mediums, but she
cannot select a favourite because she
judges that it might limit her broad scope
and stifle her creativity. She enjoys being
versatile; adapting her art to suit different
tastes; and appreciating the special
characteristics of each medium and style.
Pastels have a velvety texture and are
tactile. Oils have a richness of colour.
Modern (good quality) acrylics allow for
quick painting, while watercolours travel
well and achieve some great effects.
“If I was pushed into a corner about
it, I guess I would ultimately choose
oils as a favourite due to their greater
versatility … but a favourite style
would be a bit of a grey zone because
I just love it all,” Julie enthuses.
Contemporary realist and abstract
painting presents Julie with differing
challenges. She enjoys replicating
nature and filtering it through her own
creative perspective, while retaining
the essence of the painted object. And
she is excited about the limitless
possibilities of ‘abstract’ because this
work is created purely out of her
imagination, and the only boundaries
are those she imposes upon herself.
Artist
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II N
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Which is more difficult to paint? The abstract painting is a
matter of personal interpretation, evolving entirely from the
imagination of the artist. While a ‘realist’ painting has certain
boundaries dictated by the appearance of the real object, an
abstract painting has no boundaries. “I would have to say that
realist work is more difficult to capture,” Julie reflects.
According to Julie Tremp, each project requires a different
method of working. A subject in front of the artist is best –
but that is not always possible. Julie works solely from
photographs when she is doing portraits.
When painting people or pets, she prefers to spend time on
their ‘home territory’ so she can gauge their personalities. “I do
very quick sketches using charcoal or soft pencils to get a feel
for the form and the most interesting features – the things that
make them the unique beings they are,” she explains.
“Photographs taken from all angles (for reference) help to
shorten the usual long sittings for portraits.”
Julie will sketch other subjects, loosely at first, to establish
general composition. For this she uses cheap sketch paper and
the closest medium to hand.
When looking to create an abstract work in a new style, she
moves the paint around and begins to work from a concept in
her mind, which sometimes is vague. “I brush the paint, splatter,
spread, throw, finger paint, wipe on with a sponge or rag, or
anything that strikes me at the moment. If you want to try this it
is great fun – but be prepared for some horribly lamentable
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Artist’s
I N S I G H T
I N S I G H T
results,” Julie warns. “However, it
is exciting when a masterpiece (or
a concept for one) tumbles out.”
Julie Tremp’s studio is a converted
light-filled sunroom in her home. It
has a floor-to-ceiling and wall-to-wall
‘easel’ with adjustable horizontal
beams that enable her to paint multiple
smaller works at one time, or large
canvasses up to 3 metres x 2.5 metres.
Industrial carpet on the floor and
heavy white vinyl wall linings allow
Julie freedom to make a mess without
worry. A large trolley, which is easy to
wheel about, contains shelves and side
compartments for her materials and
tools. A smaller trolley, which remains
by her side as she works, has a glass
top (used as a palette) and drawers
which hold paint tubes and containers
for turps, medium and water.
A connecting room serves as an
office – it has several large cupboards
to store materials, equipment, and
some small stretchers. Julie buys
canvas in bulk and stretches it herself.
She keeps a supply of watercolour,
pastel and sketching papers – along
with all the things she needs to work
in any medium at any time.
“I always prefer working at home
as I can paint when the mood hits
me, or in those moments when
there’s unexpected time available,”
she explains. “If I have larger
works to be done, I use a friend’s
warehouse space; or I hire a studio
or warehouse space for the duration.”
While colours, textures, and
moods inspire Julie, she says moods
inspire her the most. “Once I reach
the feeling that I am immersed in
creativity, the whole world and all
its problems just disappear. When
I’m in that private universe of mine,
even the sky is no limit.”
Painting is Julie’s full-time career,
and although commissions keep her
working constantly, she uses some of
her recreational time to teach dancing.
“Dance teaching keeps me fit, and
gives me plenty of social intercourse
outside of my painting – which is
pretty reclusive,” Julie explains. “It’s
a great balance!” ■
Artist ’s Palette
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Artist’s
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37
DD EE M
O N
N SS TT RR AA TT I I OO N N
M O
Oils
Fusion
By Julie Tremp
This is a painting you
can copy … or you can
choose to create your
own composition and
make your own picture
using this artist’s
methodical technique.
STEP ONE
I start by drawing small shapes and
sketches on sketch paper, until I have a
design I like. Then I decide what size
canvas to use and roughly sketch it
again to scale.
FINAL STEP
6 6 Artist’s
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38
STEP TWO
Using a light grey pastel pencil, I draw
onto the primed canvas – using set
squares and rulers to get the sketch
square, and string on the pencil to
create regular circular shapes (if
working small, a compass will suffice).
This painting is quite large (152 x 122
cm) but I’ve done them in all sizes –
right down to 42cm. They work just as
well on a small canvas, so the choice
is yours.
I mix all my colours before I start
painting because I use a small palette
and I know how much of each I will
use. I paint blobs on a scrap canvas
DD EE M
R AA TT I I OO NN
M O
O N
N S
S T
T R
M AT E R I A L S
• Oil paints in the following colours: Blue Violet;
Sap Green; Ultramarine Blue; Lamp Black;
Cadmium Orange; Viridian; Titanium White;
Zinc White.
• Stretched primed canvas.
• Number 4 medium.
• White pastel pencil or soft pastel stick.
• Very light grey pastel pencil or soft pastel stick.
• An old face washer or hand towel.
during the process to check the colours and their
relationships to each other; and also to determine how
thin or fat I want the paint. I generally work medium
thin to get a good even and flat cover.
For the background grey, I mix equal parts of Blue
Violet, Ultramarine Blue and Sap Green. Adding Zinc
White (starting with about one part white to six parts
of the mixed blue-grey), I lighten from there to achieve
the colour I want.
Orange is straight from the tube.
The dark green comprises about one part Viridian
Green to ten parts Sap Green with the addition of some
black to achieve a rich but dark green.
The dark blue is Ultramarine Blue with a touch
of black.
The dark purple is Blue Violet with a touch of
Ultramarine added, and black to darken.
STEP 1
STEP THREE
I start by painting in the orange section of the
rectangles and then the remaining colour for each
rectangle. I use a flat soft brush for the edges and paint
with long smooth strokes and paint on the inside edge
of the drawn lines, leaving a small gap between
colours. I paint freely, not using any rulers or mahl
sticks as I don’t want perfect edges or shapes. Some
crooked and slightly uneven edges add to the character
of the work.
STEP FOUR
While both colours are still wet, I gently drag a small
soft round brush along the edges of the orange –
pushing it into the green, blue or purple. I use long
even strokes and wipe or clean the brush after each
stroke so that I don’t muddy up the orange. I now
repeat this process on the green, purple or blue side of
the line. Where the white gap is not yet covered, I push
the brush a little to cover the white. With a large work,
I’ll now use a fan brush to blend the colours at the
edges – working the dark colour into the orange to keep
the orange as clean as possible. With a smaller work,
STEP 2 AND 3
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D E M O N S T R A T I O N
STEP 4
I’ll use a soft flat brush – softly running it up
and down the hard lines to soften them. I do
this to all the rectangular shapes.
STEP FIVE
I paint in the background using the same
technique – leaving a small gap at the edge
of the colours and then blending the edges.
In this section, I push the colours into the
background as I blend.
I repeat the whole process, giving a second
coat of paint to the entire painting so that a
good rich even cover is achieved. When doing
this second coat, I thin the paint a little more
and leave a wider gap at all edges to make the
blending a little easier.
STEP 5
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Artist’s Palette
STEP 6
STEP SIX
I leave painting to dry before applying the
white shapes. I usually leave it for at least a
week, even when working very thin. The
white paint is very thin and I use turps for
this – so if I try to work over paint that’s still
wet, it will soften and rub the colour off.
I draw in the white shapes on the dry
painting, using a white pastel pencil or
sharpened pastel stick. Again, I don’t try to be
mechanically perfect … remembering that
slight irregularities add character.
Mixing a very thin Titanium White using
lots of turps, I experiment on a scrap of
canvas to get the right viscosity before using
it on the painting. With a sharp edged soft flat
brush, I quickly brush the outline of one
shape – then fill it in completely. It does not
have to be evenly painted – I just ensure that
the canvas is covered. Using a face washer
wrapped over one finger, I wipe around the
edges of the shape I have painted, then wipe
all over the painted white shape. Then I
quickly form a small ball with a clean part of
the face washer and gently rub first one way,
then the other way, and then in circular
motions over the entire shape until the white
is rubbed into the canvas and has a semitransparent appearance. If I have rubbed off
too much or I am not happy with the finish, I
repeat this process straight away (the whole
process, not just a section).
I finish off each shape in white, and the
painting is completed. ■
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
Artist’s Palette
41
P r o d u c t
F e a t u r e
Paper and Canvas
Contributed
Different mediums require different surfaces and choosing the right one
isn’t always the easiest task. Whether you’re looking for quality watercolour,
printmaking or multimedia paper, or perhaps seeking hardboard panels or
linen canvases, Arthouse Direct breaks-down the options available so
you can choose the right surface for your next work of art.
WATERCOLOUR PAPER
Watercolour’s are a difficult medium
to work with. Using quality materials
makes the experience much easier
and the first place to start is with the
paper. There are two philosophies
when it comes to beginning
watercolourists and the choice of
paper. One thought is that a beginner
should start with an economy grade
paper so that they don’t have to worry
about wasting paper if the artwork
doesn’t suit them. This can encourage
practise and experimentation without
inhibition. The second perception is
that lower quality paper can be too
difficult to work with and cause too
much frustration and dis-encourage
a beginning watercolourist.
Watercolour paper is generally
Magnani Acquerello
42
Artist’s Palette
Magnani Annigoni Pad
made from either wood pulp, cotton
or a combination of both. Wood pulp
based papers are machine made and
tend to be less expensive. Wood
pulp papers can vary in quality
tremendously - from ‘economy’ grade
up to a ‘student’ or ‘leisure painter’
grade. The better quality wood pulp
papers are buffered with calcium
carbonate and are acid-free with
either a hot, cold or rough finish.
Blended and cotton based papers
are generally mould-made or
hand-made. They are usually more
expensive because of the cost of
the raw materials and cannot be
mass produced like machine made
paper. They are also of a better
quality. Cotton fibres are stronger,
more absorbent and durable than
wood pulp. All the highest quality
watercolour papers are manufactured
from 100% cotton and mould-made.
They are chlorine and acid-free and
generally have been buffered with
calcium carbonate and subjected
to mould resistant treatments
to ensure archival quality.
Blended papers create a bridge
between the cotton and wood pulp
papers. These papers possess all the
attributes of pulp and cotton based
papers and suits all applications for
artists, students and beginners alike.
P r o d u c t
F e a t u r e
Magnani Acquerello 100% Cotton
Fine Art Watercolour Paper
The Magnani name has become
synonymous with the production of
Fine Art Paper since they first began
production in 1404. During the 18th
century, the Magnani name became a
hallmark of quality and luxury with the
rich and famous of the time becoming
customers of the Magnani mill –
Napoleon Bonaparte chose Magnani
paper for his wedding stationery when
he married Maria Luisa of Austria.
Acquerello is an incredible sheet
which features one of the strongest
surfaces ever created for painting with
watercolours. It is free from optical
brighteners, internally and externally
sized, pH neutral, acid and chlorinefree for maximum archival quality.
Colours are easily lifted and reworked
as needed. Made entirely of 100%
cotton on slow rotating mould machines
using marking felts of an exclusive
Magnani design. The traditional off
white colour compliments and dignifies
virtually all art giving it a real rich
look. Use for all wet media including
watercolour, gouache, acrylics and
pen and ink. Use in mixed media
applications by combining washes with
pencil, pastel, charcoal and crayon.
Magnani Acquerello is available in 3
finishes – Portofino (Hot Press), Italia
(Cold Press) and Toscana (Rough).
All Acquerello papers are 300gsm
Double Externally Sized
Magnani Acquerello
Magnani has recently introduced
double-sized versions of the
Portofino, Italia and Toscana
papers. In addition to the traditional
internal and external sizing, the
double-sized versions have been
extra sized externally manually
through a gelatine bath. This
gives the papers a performance
equal to that of the benchmarked
watercolour papers such as Arches.
Magnani Annigoni 100%
Cotton Watercolour Paper
Annigoni 100% cotton watercolour
paper was specifically produced
Stonehenge
by Cartiere Magnani mill for the
Italian painter Pietro Annigoni,
best known for his painting of
Queen Elizabeth II in 1956. This
soft and smooth paper was used by
Annigoni for his portrait work.
This wonderful beige-toned paper
is 100% cotton, 250gsm and suitable
for a variety of overlapping mediums.
Its soft handle lends itself to all
printmaking and drawing techniques
and the surface has just enough texture
to take graphite (Annigoni used it for
all of his pencil renderings), pastel,
charcoal and light wet-media.
It is produced on a cylinder mould
and it’s composition of 100% cotton
with the addition of wool fibres and
colourants plus the absence of acids
and chlorine derivatives, ensures
resistance against aging and general
wear and tear. Annigoni is a truly
unique paper not found anywhere
else in the world, still made to the
exact specifications by the Magnani
mill on the original machine.
Magnani Antica Cartiera
Watercolour Paper
This paper is mould made using 100%
high alpha cellulose. It is 300gsm
with a soft texture and is off white in
colour. It is an ideal multimedia paper
– good results when using wet media
such as watercolours and gouache as
well as for drawing and sketching.
Stonehenge Aqua 100%
Cotton Watercolour Paper
Stonehenge Aqua watercolour paper
has evolved after several years of
collaboration with paper mills and
artists to create a high-performing,
cost-effective paper for watercolourists
that will exceed their expectations.
Wet-on-wet or wet-on-dry, it has a
wonderful crispness that anchors
beautiful work across every task and
technique. With Stonehenge Aqua
Watercolour Papers, blending is
effortless, lifting is no longer a chore.
This 300gsm, 100% cotton paper is
available in both cold-press and hotpress finishes. It is acid and chlorine
free, buckle resistant and features
the same surface on both sides.
Awagami Bamboo
Watercolour Paper
Awagami Bamboo Paper is a fine
organic choice for the watercolour
artist exhibiting notable benefits and
advantages over cotton based papers.
Awagami Bamboo papers luxurious
texture is similar to silk while softer than
cotton making it an excellent choice
for watercolour painting. Awagami
Bamboo Watercolour paper contains
70% bamboo fibre plus 30% recycled
Kozo (mulberry) fibre and is 100%
acid free and generously sized for all
water-based media. Made in Japan with
no fluorescent bleaching. Available
Artist’s Palette
43
P r o d u c t
Fabriano Studio Watercolour Paper
in popular 56x76cm (22x30”) sheets
of 250gsm in weight with two deckle
edges. Features a significantly strong yet
smooth/medium velvety textured surface
to best express and respond beautifully
to watercolourists’ brushstrokes.
Yupo Ultra Watercolour Paper
Yupo Ultra is a unique alternative to
traditional art papers. It is a synthetic
paper, made of 100% polypropylene
and is waterproof, stain resistant, and
extremely strong and durable. It features
a non-absorbent, ultra-smooth surface
that resists tearing and buckling and
remains perfectly flat, eliminating the
need for soaking, stretching or taping.
The non-absorbent surface allows
watercolours and acrylics to sit right on
top of the paper, providing beautiful,
watery affects that are unachievable on
any other paper. Pigments applied to the
ultra-white sheet retain their true clarity
and brilliance making the colours more
Fabriano Artistico
44
Artist’s Palette
F e a t u r e
vibrant and brilliant than standard papers
.Yupo synthetic paper can withstand
multiple erasures and it can even be
run under a tap to erase watercolours.
It also holds pen and ink lines with
razor sharp precision and markers
work beautifully on the unique surface
as well. It is also ideal for silkscreen
printing, drawing and offset printing
.Due the unique qualities of this paper,
dirt and oils can hinder its performance
so it is recommended that any spots
and/or fingerprints be removed with
soap and water before use. Yupo ultrasmooth synthetic paper is pH neutral,
flawlessly smooth and recyclable.
Fabriano Artistico 100%
Cotton Watercolour Paper
Fabriano have been manufacturing paper
since the 13th century, so they have had
plenty of time to refine and perfect their
manufacturing techniques. The result
is Fabriano Artistico watercolour paper
– a stunning watercolour paper that
delivers the purest bright white available
without the use of optical brighteners
or bleaches. Fabriano Artistico is
mould-made in the traditional way
using 100% cotton, are chlorine and
acid-free, pH neutral and archival.
It is internally and externally sized
using a synthetic sizing as opposed to
animal by-products that are often used,
making Artistico extremely absorbent.
Fabriano Artistico has 4 deckle edges
and is luxurious yet durable and can
handle lifting, scraping and other
techniques without compromising its
Fabriano Artistico
integrity. It is ideal for all watercolour,
gouache, acrylic and ink work.
Fabriano Studio Watercolour Paper
Fabriano Studio watercolour paper
is made of a mix of 25% cotton and
lignin free cellulose and produced
100% E.C.F. (Elemental Chlorine
Free) pulp, sourced from F.S.C.
certified forests that are responsibly
managed respectful of environmental,
social and economic standards and
manufactured using hydroelectric
power which significantly reduces
the emission of greenhouse gases.
Studio paper is acid-free and of
archival quality with a neutral PH.
Studio watercolour paper is also
internally and externally sized for the
optimum balance of water absorbency.
This affordable, high quality white
paper is perfect for artists, art students
and beginners. Ideal for watercolour,
gouache, acrylic, ink, charcoal and
drawing. The velvety matt finish
of the hot pressed paper allows a
high level of detail to be obtained.
Fabriano Torchon
Watercolour Paper
The Fabriano Watercolour 270gsm
“Torchon” (extra rough) paper for
watercolour presents a “round” grain
that allows pictorial and other special
effects to be obtained. It is manufactured
from the same raw materials as the
cold press studio paper and possesses
all the same features with the bonus of
a unique three dimensional surface.
P r o d u c t
F e a t u r e
PRINTMAKING PAPERS
Awagami Bamboo
Printmaking Paper
Awagami Bamboo Paper is a fine
organic choice for artist and designer
alike exhibiting notable benefits
and advantages over cotton based
papers. Awagami Bamboo papers’
luxurious texture is similar to silk
while softer than cotton, making it an
excellent choice for both letterpress
and relief printmaking. Awagami
Bamboo Printmaking paper contains
70% bamboo fibre plus 30% mixed
recycled fibre and is 100% acid free,
un-sized, 2 deckle edges and made in
Japan with no fluorescent bleaching.
Awagami Kitakata Paper
Awagmai Kitakata paper is often used
in restoration and bookbinding because
of its strength, Kitakata is also suitable
for all printmaking including block
printing and sumi ink. Off-white in
colour and silky in texture, Kitakata
is handmade from gampi fibre and
is acid-free with 4 deckle edges.
Awagami Mulberry Paper
Awagami Mulberry paper #38 is
soft, flexible, and long fibered and
possesses great wet strength for
its weight. Use it for mono and
block printing, etching, lithography
and as a traditional sumi paper.
Handmade with 4 deckle edges from
kozo fibre. Sheet size is a large
64x97cm and 48gsm in weight.
Magnani Pescia Printmaking Paper
This range of cotton fibre papers has
the distinction of being the first 100%
cotton grade specifically created
for printmaking by the Magnani
mill. Made on slow rotating mould
machines out of 100% cotton. All
sheets are acid-free and chlorinefree. The paper is smooth and supple
to the touch with internal sizing but
very little surface sizing, making it
ideal for all deluxe and demanding
printmaking processes. It is deckled on
all four sides and displays a running
watermark of the old CM logo.
Pescia is a favourite among those
doing intaglio, messotint, aquatint,
etching, woodblock, stone lithography,
etching and silkscreen. Its supple
surface is also ideal for all drawing
techniques and should not be
overlooked as an option for graphite,
coloured pencil, pastel or charcoal.
The paper is named after the
town of Pescia which is situated
in the beautiful foothills of the
Tuscany region of Italy. The
range consists of white, cream,
blue, soft white and grey.
Magnani Incisioni
Printmaking Paper
Magnani Incisioni paper is versatile
paper, perfectly suited to any form of
printing, but especially intaglio printing.
Incisioni is a 50% cotton, white paper
that is smooth with a slight tooth. It is
cylinder mould made from a blend of
cotton and high alpha cellulose using
an exclusive felt design. Each sheet
bears a watermark of the mills ancient
trademark. Its neutral pH and the
absence of chlorine derivatives endows
this paper with resistance against
yellowing from UV rays, guaranteeing
durability over the years and maximum
yield during use. It is internally sized
only. The absence of any surface
sizing enables it to take impressions
accurately – ideal for the printmaker.
Incisioni is highly recommended for all
copper plate printing techniques such
as etching, lithography, seriagraphy,
xylography and offset printing.
Awagami Kitakata
Magnani Corona Printmaking Paper
Magnani Corona is manufactured on
a cylinder mould machine using 50%
cotton and 50% high alpha cellulose
using an exclusive felt design. Each
sheet bears a watermark of the mills
ancient trademark. Its neutral pH and the
absence of chlorine derivatives endows
this paper with resistance against
yellowing from UV rays, guaranteeing
durability over the years and maximum
yield during use. Corona is suitable for
all printing techniques such as etching,
lithography, seriagraphy, xylography
and is perfectly suited for use with
watercolours, charcoal and pastel.
Magnani Revere Printmaking Paper
Revere is a deluxe fine art paper of
superior quality, consistency and
versatility. Mould-made in Italy by
the Magnani paper mill, Revere is
100% cotton, chlorine free, neutral
pH, internally sized with 4 deckled
edges (2 natural, 2 torn). Revere is
manufactured utilizing energy generated
by the mills own water turbines and
is composed of fibres from tree-free
100% cotton linters. It is ideal for all
printmaking processes including etching,
intaglio, blind embossing, stone, litho,
offset and metal plate, lithography,
woodcut, letterpress, engraving and
silk screen printing. Available as a
250gsm, sheet in 4 colours and 3
surfaces – Felt (textured), Suede
(medium textured) and Silk (smooth).
Awagami Mulberry
Artist’s Palette
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P r o d u c t
Fabriano Rosaspina Watermarked
Printmaking Paper
Mould made with 2 deckle edges
along the long sides and watermarked,
Rosapina’s high rag composition
and medium weight combined with
the regular medium surface sinish
create a paper of universal appeal. A
popular, general purpose, printmaking
paper which offers reliability superior
performance. Its modest cost belies
its high quality suitable for etching,
lithography, block printing, collagraphy
and in the colours white or cream.
F e a t u r e
Fabriano Tiepolo Watermarked
Printmaking Paper
Mould made with four deckle edges and
watermarked, Tiepolo’s composition
guarantees permanence and a high
degree of light resistance. Its substantial
weight and regular surface produce a
robust and inviting white paper which
offers superior performance, whatever
your printmaking style. Etching,
lithography, block printing, collography
or screen printing. Sheets are 290gsm,
100% cotton rag, neutral pH, chlorine
and acid-free with 4 deckle edges.
Speedball Arnhem 1618
Printmaking Paper
Arnhem 1618 100% rag, premium
printmaking paper offers a semi-smooth
surface with a substantial feel to the
touchThe subtle grain combined with a
smooth appearance allows a variety of
media to take to the paper, while remaining
a reliable surface for intricate detail.
Arnhem’s strong and highly absorbent
fibres make it ideal for dry or damp
printing, allowing it to accept multiple
layers of ink brilliantly. The 245gsm sheets
are available in white and warm white.
MULTI MEDIA PAPERS
Stillman & Birn Multi Media Papers
Stillman & Birn multi-media papers
is a unique range of sketching,
drawing and light wash watercolour
painting papers available in two
weights, two colours and three surface
finishes for all applications. These
archival quality papers feature both
internal and external surface sizing
with exceptional wet-strength that
withstands multiple erasures making
it suitable for all dry media and light
watercolour washes. When used with
light washes, pigments remains on
the sheet surface resulting in brilliant,
vibrant and glowing colours. The
Vellum (or soft press) surface has
a distinctive surface tooth that is
suitable for all dry media and will also
accept multiple light washes without
buckling and curling. The Cold Press
finish features exceptional strength
for all multi-media applications and
the Hot Press (or plate) finish is a
particularly smooth surface suitable
for pen & ink, graphite and colouring
pencils plus water-based markers.
Papers are available in natural white
or ivory both in 150gsm and 270gsm
weights dependant on the finish.
Awagami Masa Multi Media Paper
Awagami “Masa” paper is used
as an inexpensive multi-media
drawing and printmaking paper.
Masa is a soft, white paper with
the traditional absorbency and feel
of handmade Japanese papers.
Machine-made of cellulose fibre
it is internally and surface-sized,
bright white and acid-free.
Masa is very smooth on one
side with more texture to the
other side. Great for drawing
applications, as well as, water-based
inks, digital imaging, silkscreen,
Stillman & Birn Multi Media Papers
46
Artist’s Palette
woodcut, linocut, etching, offset
and letterpress printing and is
often referred to as Hosho.
Fabriano 5 Classico Disegno
Multi Media Paper
This artists’ paper features a 50%
cotton content blended with carefully
selected raw materials to produce a
high quality fine art paper available
in various weights and finishes. It is a
bright white, mould made, acid-free,
internally and externally sized paper
making it ideal for all water based
applications including watercolour,
gouache and acrylic painting as well
pen and ink, all drawing media and
printmaking (relief, etching lithography
and screen printing) techniques.
This unique paper features two
natural deckle edges (short side)
and displays the watermark
“FABRIANO 5 50% COTTON”
on one longer edge.
Stonehenge 100% Cotton
Multi Media Paper
A traditional fine art and drawing
paper with a flawless vellum surface.
Originally created for printmaking
Stonehenge paper has become known
as one of the finest papers available for
pencil, watercolour, gouache, acrylic,
pastel and charcoal work. This paper
is made from 100% cotton and is
acid-free and is buffered with calcium
carbonate to help protect artwork
from contaminated environments.
P r o d u c t
F e a t u r e
DRAWING AND SKETCHING PAPERS
Fabriano Ecological
Fabriano Accademia
Awagami Shin Inbe
Awagami Shin Inbe is a single layer,
105gsm paper with a traditional
look and feel with a classic laid
pattern. Printable on both sides with
excellent light resistance. Made
from hemp, recycled washi and
wood pulp, Shin Inbe is ideal for
drawing, bookbinding, crafts, framing,
pastel, charcoal, silkscreen printing,
inkjet, laser and offset printing.
Fabriano Bristol
This 250gsm paper is produced
utilising hydroelectric power thus
reducing greenhouse gas emissions
into the atmosphere. Being acid-free
with an ultra-smooth surface it is
ideal for ink, solvent-based markers,
felt-tip pens, watercolour, gouache,
airbrush, and pencil and charcoal.
The smooth surface is resistant to
repeated erasure and scraping.
Fabriano Accademia Drawing Paper
Fabriano Accademia white drawing
paper is made of high quality ligninfree neutral pH and 100% acidfree cellulose, guaranteeing long
conservation over time. Its internal and
external sizing renders it resistant to
repeated erasures. It is recommended
for artists and students for sketching
and drawing with pencil, charcoal,
Richeson Pastel Surfaces
pastel, art crayons, coloured pencil
and ink and the 200gsm weight is
suitable for gouache and watercolour
work. Can also be used for felt
markers, airbrush, monoprints,
lithography and screen
printing. Available in weights
of 100g, 200g and 240g.
Fabriano Carrara Drawing
and Sketching Paper
An ultra-smooth, heavyweight
paper with a unique marbled effect
available in six popular colours.
Its 175gsm weight makes it ideal
for a wide range of uses including
drawing, calligraphy, light washes
and decoration. Fabriano Carrara
paper is manufactured using ECF
pulp and FSC certified materials
and is acid-free and archival.
Colours in the Carrara range
include Pastel Blue, Pastel Pink,
White, Cream, Sand and Grey.
Fabriano 4 Drawing Paper
The high quality sizing and optimum
resistance to erasers of any hardness
make this paper particularly suited
to graphic artists, architects and
students. A natural white, Fourdriner
made acid-free, neutral pH, 100%
cellulose, well-sized paper that can
withstand heavy use. Watermarked
Fabriano Ecological Drawing Paper
A white, acid-free, ‘ecological’
drawing paper from Fabriano,
produced with 100%, post-consumer,
recycled pulp. Ecological drawing
paper is available in two weights 120gsm and 200gsm. It’s Cold Pressed
surface is a bright white and its’
internal and external sizing makes it
ideal for sketches and drawing with
pencil, charcoal, pastel, graphite
and ink. The paper is labelled “FSC
100% recycled”, guaranteeing that
the product is made from postconsumer reclaimed material.
Fabriano Tiziano Sketching
and Drawing Paper
Tiziano is a unique heavyweight
160gsm, 40% cotton, pH neutral, acidfree drawing and pastel paper that is
also excellent for light watercolour
paintings. Available in a range of 40
colours with good ‘tooth’ and texture
for all dry media and a good surface
‘key’ and strength of a cold press
paper for watercolour work. The many
subtle earth colours work well with
transparent washes to create glowing
effects with good lifting properties.
Tiziano with its many vibrant and
dynamic colours is an ideal, medium
weight, card stock for all paper-craft
Artist’s Palette
47
P r o d u c t
F e a t u r e
acrylic and collage. Can also be
used for wax crayons, felt markers,
gouache, oil, monoprints, airbrush,
lithography and screen printing.
Richeson Pastel Surfaces
activities. These superb papers offer
a high degree of lightfastness and
display a sized surface treatment, grain
and texture second to none. Ideal for
artworks in pastel, pencil, charcoal, oil
pastels, art crayon, ink, watercolour,
Richeson Premium Pastel Surfaces
As a pastellist you want the surface
to interact with the pastel. Jack
Richeson & Co. has created a range of
premium pastel surfaces specifically
for pastel work. These pastel surfaces
are available on 3 substrates - Gator
board, hardboard and heavyweight
paper. Each surface is screen printed
with the sanded primer, ensuring
even and complete coverage.
Gator Board is one of the toughest,
most durable laminated foam panels
on the market. Gator board panels
are made from a durable core of rigid
polystyrene foam bonded on both
sides by resin impregnated wood fibre
veneers. The result is a laminated
foam panel with an exceptionally
hard, smooth surface that resists
dents, punctures and moisture while
remaining very lightweight, making
it ideal for plein air painting and for
workshop artists who work large.
Gator board is about 5mm thick. The
Hardboard substrate it is similar to 1/8
inch thick masonite. It is very rigid
and can easily be used in the studio
or outside for plein air painting. It is
also very easy to frame. The paper
substrate is a sheet of 300gsm, acidfree watercolour paper screen printed
with the specially formulated primer.
The texture of these pastel
surfaces is like no other. With an
exquisite ‘toothy’ finish, pastels can
be applied with ease as the surface
grabs and holds the pigment, layer
after layer, allowing the artist to
achieve great depth in composition.
These pastel surfaces are also
waterproof so the artist can apply
water to soften the edges of the
pastel without altering the surface.
You can also scrub around the colour
with a rag or any pastel-blending
product. Since it is waterproof,
inks, gouache, acrylics, oils and
even watercolours can be freely
JAPANESE PAPERS
Awagami Sumi Ink Paper
This Awagami Bamboo paper has
been specially developed for sumi-ink
painting. With superb ink absorbency,
Awagami Bamboo highlights the
expressive brushwork and ‘bleed’
of traditional sumi-ink painting.
Since Awagami Bamboo is a thick
250gsm sheet, it makes mounting
unnecessary. Interleaf pages are
included between each bamboo sheet
to prevent ink bleed-through between
pages. Awagami Sumi-ink Bamboo is
100% acid free, un-sized and made in
Japan with no fluorescent bleaching.
Awagami Asarakusui Paper 27gsm
The technique of ‘Rakusui’ (creating
gaps on the paper surface by dropping
water) has existed for years. In the
manufacture of 27gsm Asarakusui
paper, Awagami redefined this method
by adding hemp fibres in the paper
so that the gaps on the surface are
48
Artist’s Palette
emphasized and crisp. The hemp fibre
has natural gloss and the clear gaps
give the paper a refreshing and cool
effect. By utilizing the transparent
aspect, this paper is suitable for making
lampshades as well as many other art
and craft applications. Can also be used
as special purpose wrapping paper.
Awagami Kinwashi Colour 55gsm
Awagami Kinwashi paper is usually
used for decorative purposes and is
machine made from 100% hemp fibres
and hand-dyed producing a sheet that is
smooth on one side and textured on the
other with straw-like vegetable fibres.
It is translucent and acid-free. Usually
used for decorative purposes, Kinwashi
is machine made from manila fibres.
Awagami Washi Papers
The Awagami A4 Fine Art Washi
paper range is suitable for students and
professional artists alike. Each of the 5
collections have been chosen for their
supreme workability and feature a nice
range of weights, tones and surfaces for
printmaking, drawing and craft. Every
pack provides a great introduction to
the wonderful potential of making art
on traditional Japanese washi paper.
Awagami papers are all 100% acid-free.
Silk Pure White is manufactured from
85% alpha cellulose plus 15% recycled
washi and is 48 gsm in weight. An
excellent introductory washi paper for
budget-conscious students, printmakers
and designers. It is a warm white/
medium weight paper with two distinct
surface textures. Both sides may be
used to attain different creative effects.
Suitable for lithography, mono &
block printing, silk screening, pen &
ink, charcoal, pastels, pencil, markers,
collage, hobby & craft and bookmaking.
Inbe Thin Off-White is manufactured
from 84% alpha cellulose plus 16%
hemp fibre and 44 gsm in weight.
P r o d u c t
This is an extremely fine paper and
favoured by many woodcut artists,
illustrators and bookmakers. It is
surprisingly strong due to its hemp
fibre content and with its lovely tone,
exudes an organic sense that imparts
a natural warmth to artworks created
on it. Suitable for lithography, mono
& block printing, chin colle, silk
screening, pen & ink, pencil, markers,
hobby & craft and bookmaking.
Shirakaba is manufactured from
100% alpha cellulose and 100 gsm
in weight. This paper is an excellent
choice for etching, block printing
and mixed-media works. Illustrators
will enjoy drawing on the smoother
side while printmakers prefer the
paper’s softer side for its printing
and embossing qualities. Suitable
for lithography, etching, mono &
block printing, silk screening, pen
& ink, pencil, markers, collage,
hobby & craft and bookmaking.
Mingeishi is manufactured from
70% alpha cellulose plus 30% Kozo
fibre (mulberry) and 48 gsm in weight.
F e a t u r e
Awagami Kinwashi Colour
Although the surface of this paper is
fairly soft and the sheet lightweight,
this paper exhibits superior overall
strength and is highly resilient.
Suitable for lithography, etching,
mono & block printing, silk screening,
pen & ink, pencil, markers, collage,
hobby & craft and bookmaking.
Rayon Unryu White is manufactured
from 85% alpha cellulose plus
15% rayon fibre and 85 gsm in
weight. This paper features two
distinct surfaces; a smooth topside
with decorative swirling “unryu”
fibres and a softer, plain reverse
side. Both sides may be used to
achieve different creative results.
Suitable for lithography, mono
& block printing, silk screening,
offset printing, pen & ink, pencil,
markers, collage, hobby & craft,
invitations and bookmaking.
FREDRIX WATERCOLOUR CANVAS
Fredrix Watercolour Canvas
For years, watercolourists have
been restricted to painting on
watercolour paper. While many
great watercolour artworks have
been produced on paper, artists’
had to work within the limitations
of watercolour paper. Watercolour
papers have a tendency to buckle
when wet and require special
care such as stapling or taping
to a firm surface. It also can
tear quite easily when wet and
artists must be very careful
when practising traditional
watercolour techniques.
Previously, galleries have
been reluctant to acquire
and sell watercolour works
because they are on paper
and not of archival quality.
Tara Fredrix watercolour
canvas is made of 100% cotton
artist canvas covered with a
specially formulated acid-
free coating that performs similar to
a cold press or rough watercolour
paper while providing a distinctive
look that can only be achieved on
canvas. In addition, Artists’ can
use all the techniques that are used
with watercolour paper. Repairs and
adjustments can be performed easily
and when using pre-stretched canvas
and boards, there is no buckling –
even with the wettest of applications.
In the past, watercolourists have
been restricted in the size of their
painting due to paper size. The fact
that watercolour canvas is available
in rolls means there is now no
restriction on the size of watercolour
paintings. Artists’ will also find that
gallery acceptance of watercolours
may increase as they can now be
shown or hung in the same way as
an acrylic or oil painting and the
painting will stand the test of time as
it is painted on an archival surface.
Artist’s Palette
49
P r o d u c t
F e a t u r e
FREDRIX OIL PRIMED LINEN CANVAS
Oil Primed linen was one of the first
surfaces developed for ‘modern’
day painting. For hundreds of
years, oil painters have recognized
that traditionally prepared oilprimed Belgian linen is the ultimate
support for their artwork.
Linen is traditionally the preferred
fabric of painters. It offers the artist
the most permanency, strength and
beauty of any canvas material. It is
the most durable fabric to paint on.
Its warp and weft threads are equal
in weight and strength, making it
less susceptible to expansion and
contraction due to moisture. The
irregular character of the weave can be
seen through layers of paint, imparting
a sense of depth to the finished
painting. It retains its natural oils over
time, preserving fabric flexibility.
Oil paint is a combination of pigment
and linseed oil, which is derived from
Flax. Linen canvas is also made from
Flax, thus making oil paint and linen
highly compatible. The Oil Primed Linen
boards produced by Tara Fredrix are
a work of art in themselves. The pure
Belgian linen is prepared from start to
finish entirely by hand, using century-
old techniques in the Fredrix factory
in Jacksonville. Each canvas is first
stretched on large specially designed
frames and thoroughly picked over by
hand to remove irregularities. Then every
square inch of the canvas is smoothed
using volcanic pumice stone. The next
step is the application of warm animal
hide glue, carefully spread using long
stainless steel spatulas to seal the linen.
As the glue cools, the linen tightens. It
is pumiced smooth again. Next a fine
preparation of old-world lead white is
applied. Made from a carefully prepared
mixture of lead whiting and linseed
oil, this oil priming applied over the
carefully prepared linen yields a surface
prized by oil painters everywhere.
Artists who have painted on
well-made oil-primed linen have
experienced the highly receptive
quality of its surface. The tactile,
sensual feeling of painting on Oil
Primed linen is unique. No other
surface accepts paint quite like it. The
oil paint and ground seem to “know”
each other like long-lost brothers,
and the finished painting exudes
a rich, luxurious quality prized by
knowledgeable buyers and collectors.
Fredrix Oil Primed Linen boards are
the closest you can come to painting
on a surface like the Old Masters.
RICHESON UNTEMPERED ARTISTS’ HARDBOARD
PANELS – FORMALDEHYDE FREE
What is Hardboard (Masonite)?
Hardboard is high density; wood
based fibreboard, or engineered
timber, first invented by William
H. Mason in 1924. Hardboard is
manufactured by breaking down
100% certified FSC timber into its
basic fibres then rearranging the
fibres to form engineered panels
that are stronger, denser and harder
than the original timber. Using the
“wet-dry” process the fibres are
randomly oriented in 2 dimensions
with all fibres remaining parallel
to the surface to create a 3.2mm
50
Artist’s Palette
thick panel with an exceptionally
smooth finish of superior paintability
without the use of chemicals.
Richeson Untempered Artists
Hardboard Panels offer artists a
rigid and smooth painting which
allows you to produce fine details.
As they are untempered, paints
will adhere completely. They can
also be primed with gesso for oils
or acrylics or add gel and impasto
mediums to build a unique surface.
These boards can also be used as
palettes and are ideal for stretching
and taping watercolour paper.
P r o d u c t
F e a t u r e
COTTON CANVAS PANELS
Cotton is the most popular artist
grade canvas fabric. Cotton fibres
stretch more than linen, allowing for
a tighter mounted canvas with less
straining Cotton canvas panels offer
the artist an inexpensive, versatile and
portable canvas to paint on. They are
constructed from finely woven cotton
canvas mounted onto heavy cardboard
backing, usually with acid-free glue.
The glue provides a barrier between
the board and canvas, helping to
maintain longevity. The surface of the
canvas panel usually has a very definite
paint-gripping ‘tooth’ with minimum
absorption, providing a perfect painting
support for oil, acrylic, gouache and
tempera colours. All sides of the
canvas panel are glued and turned in,
to prevent fraying and separation.
RICHESON TEMPERED AND GESSOED HARDBOARD PANELS
To produce tempered hardboard,
untempered hardboard is further
treated with a thin coating of
linseed oil and then heat-treated in a
circulating hot-air oven for several
hours to cure the oil. This produces
a hardboard surface with maximum
adherence and scratch resistance of
subsequent painted finishes. The
3.2mm thick tempered hardboard
is then coated with two coats of
artists’ quality, acrylic gesso using
the “waterfall” application method to
produce the ultimate, lightly toothed,
read-to-use, formaldehyde-free,
painting substrate for all media. The
properties of the Richeson tempered
hardboard surface ensures that the
gesso bonds perfectly to the board
ready to accept all media thus making
it the perfect panel for all painters –
professional and students alike. Finally
all gessoed panel surface edges are
bevelled and the panels individually
labelled and shrink-wrapped to
protect the painting surface.
Arthouse Direct has an extensive
range of papers and canvas for
all your drawing, printmaking,
craft and painting needs. All
papers and canvas featured in
this article are available from
Arthouse Direct. Please visit
www.arthousedirect.com.au
during June to take advantage
of some excellent savings during
our month long paper sale!
FREDRIX “NATURECORE” PAINTING BOARDS
New from Fredrix! Fredrix Painting
Boards are a new, eco-friendly painting
surface. They are boards manufactured
using Naturecore – a combination of
vegetable and recycled components –
and stretched over with either 100%
Belgian Linen or 100% Fredrix Artist
Cotton Canvas. These lightweight
boards are durable, easy to transport
and ideal for plein air painting.
They are pre-primed with acid-free
titanium gesso so you can begin
painting immediately. The Belgian
Linen painting boards are ideal for use
with acrylics, oils, alkyd and tempera
paints. The 100% Canvas board s are
a true mixed-media painting board.
They work well with watercolour, oil,
acrylic tempera, gouache and other
aqueous based media such as ink.
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Nichola Robinson
The Pursuit
of Perfection
Edited by Trevor Lang
Despite being plagued by Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, this artist from Dubbo
in western New South Wales has still managed to pursue an obsession with
painting … and enjoyed significant success.
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N
ichola Robinson has been
interested in art throughout
her life. As a child, she always
wanted to be an artist. At some point
in her childhood she realised that
being an artist was not considered
(by many adults) to be a ‘real job’ or
a viable way to make money; so she
let go of the dream.
About the age of 15 years, she started
to consider art as a career again. She
started painting at local Dubbo artist
Peter Mortimore’s studio, and he
encouraged her. She was extremely
grateful for the support … especially
with all the trials that were to come.
In 2000, at the age of 16, Nichola
contracted a virus which eventually
turned into Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
She had to leave school, and she has
been sick ever since. Chronic Fatigue
Syndrome is a difficult illness because
there are many misconceptions about it.
Because of its misleading name, people
assume its just tiredness – but the reality
is there are many symptoms and it can
be very painful and very debilitating.
Even though Chronic Fatigue
Syndrome has severely limited Nichola’s
life, she has still managed to paint. She
has participated in two local exhibitions;
and in 2002, she won the Mosman Youth
Art Prize which was a year’s scholarship
to the Julian Ashton Art School (she
attended during 2003 and 2004).
Unfortunately her CFS illness prevented
her from studying full-time, and living
away from home was difficult.
Understanding parents have always
supported Nichola’s art. They have
believed in her and supported her
emotionally and financially.
“I have always enjoyed painting
realism, although I do also do some
abstract work, and at the moment I’m
moving away from traditional realism,”
Nichola says. “I live in the country, and
in order to sell paintings I have had to
cater to what country people want to
buy – which is usually landscapes of
country scenes. I have also been
commissioned to paint houses or
properties. I didn’t want to fall into the
trap of always painting the same thing,
and during this past year I have
branched away from earlier subject
matter. It is much more enjoyable for
me to paint what I really want to paint.
I like all my paintings to have a story to
them, and mythology and history are
things that influence me a lot.”
A recent painting ‘After the Ball’
was the result of an obsession with the
Regency Period and (as with her other
paintings) she created a whole back
story to the image and a much deeper
meaning to it. She developed her own
style very early on, and has never been
afraid to use black or dark colours.
“I just use what colours feel right
at the time of painting, and often I
subconsciously pick certain ones to
express my feelings and emotions,”
Nichola explains. “I have always had
my own style and have never sought
to copy anyone’s work or artistic
approach. Even my early work differed
greatly from that of the artists who
were guiding me.”
Being quite sick for the past six years
has been challenging, because of a
restricted social life. Nichola is very
grateful for the internet. Websites like
www.deviantart.com are brilliant for
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displaying work and communication
with artists from all around the world.
This keen artist loves to view other
artists’ work, and she feels that artists
who are not using the internet are
severely missing out.
She has done ‘a bit of modeling’
for other artists – both traditional artists
and photographers. It is something she
enjoys when she is well enough to do it.
When Nichola Robinson started
painting, she mostly used acrylics,
which was good for her style of
working in many layers (and needing
the paint to dry quickly). But she
wanted to have a more ‘oil-like’ texture
and style, and found that traditional
oils were messy and accompanied by
too many problems. She now uses
Genesis Heat Set Oils.
“Because of the instant drying time
with the heat gun, I can still work in
my own style, but have the effect of
oils,” she enthuses. “Also the fact they
are non toxic is a big bonus as I can’t
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afford to further damage my health.
Because these paints only dry with
a heat gun, I can leave paint on my
palette for as long as I want; and any
unused paint left on there can just be
used (in time) on another painting. It
is very convenient for me – especially
when there is a deadline and there is no
time to wait for paint to dry.”
“My poor health also unfortunately
limits the amount of time I can spend
on painting, and I have to be very
careful to not overwork myself,” she
continues. “I am a perfectionist when
it comes to my art, and there have been
many times when I have pushed myself
too hard and suffered relapses.
However, I am determined to always
be an artist and I can’t imagine doing
anything else.”
She has had people ask her if she
is ‘still painting’. It astounds her that
they might even think for one moment
that painting is something she could
just give up. Painting is her passion
… and she can’t just give up a
passion. She feels bound to it for
the rest of her life, through the hard
times and the good times.
Nichola enjoys working on album
artwork for bands, as she likes to branch
away from just traditional painting.
She is planning a move to Sydney, to
achieve independence closer to friends
and better opportunities. During coming
months she intends to work on paintings
for an exhibition, while looking for
places to exhibit in Sydney. One of her
aspirations is to own a gallery in
Sydney, where she can exhibit her own
work alongside that of other artists.
Although Nichola loves the scenery
in country areas, she has never felt
quite at home in Dubbo. She has an
ambition to travel around Australia –
painting on location as well as taking
photographs for artworks. Art is the
passion of her life.
Her website can be found at
www.nicholarobinson.net ■
I N S I G H T
When was the last time something really
significant was invented for painters?
It’s more than 50 years since acrylics were introduced but many professional
painters have had difficulty in working with them because they darken as they
dry and the consistency has often been too wet and soft.
Artists’ Acrylic is arguably the most important breakthrough since the
invention of acrylics. By combining the many facets of colour making expertise
with new resins, artists can now use stronger, brighter colours which have
virtually no colour shift when dry, and the consistency is stiffer and ‘buttery’.
Previous resin formulation
which was more milky
NEW clear resin
The range consists of a wide and balanced spectrum of 80 colours including
new pigments that are unique to acrylic painters.
For more product information, visit
www.winsornewton.com.
For your nearest stockist details,
visit www.jasco.com.au.
Sample Offer for
Professional Artists
If you are a Professional Artist who understands that working with the best
materials is so important, you should be using the most exciting and innovative
acrylics in the world – Winsor & Newton Artists’ Acrylic Colour.
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Simply email your name and address details, along with a copy of your Professional
Artist Business card or Website details to
winsor&newton@jasco.com.au. We will then send you a complimentary
6 x 20ml set of Winsor and Newton Artists’ Acrylics, valued at $29.95rrp.
Offer applies to Professional Practising Artists in Australia only. Requested
proof of Professional Artist status is required. Offer ends 31st May 2011
or while stocks last.
Australian
Artist’s Palette
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1800 676 155
DD EE M
O N
N SS TT RR AA TT I I OO N N
M O
Genesis Heat Set Oils
The Farewell
By Nichola Robinson
This artist gets a lot of inspiration from manipulation artworks, as
manipulation artists often have the freedom to do things in their art
that traditional artists rarely venture to attempt.
FINAL STEP
M AT E R I A L S
• Genesis Heat Set Oils: Carbon Black; Titanium
White; Burnt Umber; Raw Umber; Dioxazine
Purple; Raw Sienna; Yellow Ochre; Diarylide
Yellow; Bismuth Yellow; Genesis Yellow;
Quinacridone Crimson; Pyrrole Red; Burnt
Sienna; Ultramarine Blue; Sap Green; Pthalo
Blue; Cobalt Blue; Pthalo Green; Permanent
Green; Gray; Flesh 08.
• Genesis Glazing Gel.
• Odourless Solvent.
• Stretched and primed canvas with a coat of
gesso (550 x 765 mm).
• Palette knife.
• Palette.
• Paper towels.
• Heat gun.
• Brushes of various sizes.
• Masking tape.
STEP ONE
The first thing I do is draw up the image on the
canvas. I take extra care when drawing the boat;
having as much detail drawn in to begin with will
help later on. With Raw Sienna and Raw Umber
mixed with some solvent I loosely paint light and
dark areas to get an overall feel of the painting.
Then I dry it with the heat gun.
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STEP ONE
STEP TWO
For this stage I use Genesis Yellow,
Bismuth Yellow, Diarylide Yellow,
Pyrrole Red, Yellow Ochre,
Quinacridone Crimsom, Cobalt,
Ultramarine Blue, Burnt Umber,
Titanium White, Gray, Carbon Black,
Dioxazine Purple and Sap Green. I
like to have almost every colour out
on the palette just in case. I also use
odourless solvent to thin the paint
where I need to.
First I paint in the yellows with
some white in the lower sky part.
Then I blend in the browns and reds
at the sides. I dry it with a heat gun;
then I paint the small clouds over the
top, using white, Ultramarine Blue
and Burnt Sienna with white and the
yellows for around the edges. Some
clouds have a touch of Quinacridone
Crimson. For the clouds that blend
into the higher and darker ones, I
use Cobalt Blue and white with a
STEP TWO
touch of a yellow to get the greenish
tinge. I also use some Ultramarine
Blue, Gray and Burnt Sienna for
darker bits. Again, I dry the work
with the heat gun.
For the large clouds, I use all the
above listed colours and a palette
knife to put them on. I use nice
squarish brushes to blend them. When
I paint I don’t have different brushes
for different colours; I just use
whatever feels right at the time. It’s
not that hard to simply wipe a brush
if it’s been used for another colour,
plus often a touch of another colour
in the brush stroke can give an
interesting affect. There is a lot of
green throughout this painting and I
use Sap Green throughout the clouds,
as well as a lot of Quinacridone
Crimson. For the darkest part of
the clouds I use Carbon Black and
Dioxazine Purple and Ultamarine
Blue. I use a small thin brush to paint
in some cloud lines. I also blend any
cloud that needs to be blended into
the yellow parts of the sky. I then dry
the whole sky area. I am not afraid of
using dark colours or black and I
think they are very much needed in
this painting as it is quite dramatic
and is displaying such a strong
undercurrent of tragedy and sadness.
STEP THREE
I use masking tape to tape the bottom
of the mountains to get a straight line.
Then I paint the mountains with a
mix of Burnt Umber, Carbon Black
and Burnt Sienna. I mix a touch of
white with these colours to highlight
a few parts of the tops of the
mountains and then dry. Sap Green
is used as a base colour for the water,
painting just a few centimetres around
the boat; then I dry with the heat gun.
A very small brush is used to paint
little lines of Ultramarine Blue,
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D E M O N S T R A T I O N
STEP THREE
Carbon Black, Bismuth Yellow,
Genesis Yellow, Pyrrole Red and
Burnt Sienna over the top of the
green; but leaving small parts of
the green showing through. I also
paint in the bottom of the boat so
there is a distinct line. Then I dry
the work again.
STEP FOUR
I redraw any lines that are not as
clear now on the boat, and block in
colour. I paint the sails of the boat
Titanium White and dry them with
the gun. Odourless solvent is used to
thin the paint and I use Diarylide
Yellow, Raw Umber, Bismuth Yellow,
Genesis Yellow and Raw Sienna to
put colour into the flags. I like to
paint these bits thinly so the white
underneath still shows through. I use
a mix of Pyrrole Red, Burnt Sienna
and Burnt Umber for the darker bits;
then dry with the heat gun. Pyrrole
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STEP FOUR
Red and Burnt Sienna are used for
the masts, plus a mix of Raw Umber
and black for the outline and shading
of them. I also use masking tape to
help in achieving straight lines for the
masts. I use the smallest brush and a
mix of Carbon Black and Raw Umber
to paint the rigging, but touches of
Titanium White and Pyrrole Red are
needed to highlight some ropes. I also
paint in the flag at the top of the
tallest mast (and the red and blue one
hanging lower), before drying with
the heat gun again.
I use Carbon Black and Burnt
Umber for the hull of the boat, but
then paint a thick line of white and
(while wet) mix some Burnt Sienna,
Raw Umber and black into it to give
a worn, stained, rustic look. Pyrrole
Red, Burnt Sienna and Carbon Black
are used for the other parts of the
boat, as well as touches of white.
Then I dry the work again.
STEP FIVE
I paint the rest of the water Sap Green
with a large brush. I dry it with the
heat gun but not completely, so that
when I put paint over the top, it will
mix very slightly.
Ultramarine Blue, Carbon Black,
Bismuth Yellow, Genesis Yellow,
Pyrrole Red, Burnt Sienna, Diarylide
Yellow, Pthalo Blue, Permanent Green
and Pthalo Green are all used for the
water. The yellows are also sometimes
mixed with white. I work with a very
small brush, painting lots of little
lines. A mix of Ultramarine Blue and
Carbon Black is used for the large
ripples. I start at the back and work
my way forward – and the closer the
water is, the bigger the lines are and
the more detail I put into them.
To the right side of the painting,
the lines become more sloped and the
pattern changes. To the left there is
more yellow and smaller dark lines.
I N S I G HD TE M O N S T R A T I O N
A lot of the darker colours are used in the reflection of the
boat but there are touches of lighter colours.
At the bottom of the painting, before I paint the detail of the
water, I use a mix of Ultramarine Blue and Carbon Black and
paint the whole area in this dark colour. At this point I dry
what I have painted with the heat gun. I use a mix of the
greens with a tiny bit of white to paint the pattern of the water
at the bottom of the painting. I join it up with the other water,
adding what colours need to be added and painting the ripples
around where the rocks will be. It is then dried again. I mix
Ultramarine Blue with some glazing gel and paint over the
water and the bottom on the painting to give it a more watery
look, then dry it with the gun.
STEP SIX
Now I paint the rocks. I like to use short square-shaped
brushes for this, as it involves lots of dabbing. I use Burnt
Umber to block in the colour, but before drying anything I use
Raw Sienna, Yellow Ochre, Burnt Sienna and a bit of Carbon
Black to put in the colour, dabbing to get the texture. Then I
use a small brush and, using black, I paint in the cracks and
crevices on the rocks. I also use a bit of Diarylide Yellow to
highlight some parts of the rocks. It is then dried.
STEP SEVEN
I now paint the figure of a woman standing on the rocks. I
start with her skirt, which I paint white but then mix a tiny
bit of Carbon Black and Burnt Umber into the wet paint on
the canvas. I use a small brush and draw in the creases and
folds of the fabric with a mix of black and Raw Umber. Then
I use white to highlight some of the seams and folds of the
skirt. I mix white with a tiny bit of Diarylide Yellow and
paint along the side of her, where the evening light is hitting
her. The skirt is then dried.
I use Quinacridone Crimson and Pyrrole Red for the
woman’s shawl, blocking in the colour first then using
black and Burnt Umber to paint in the lines and shadow
of the material. I use white and Diarylide Yellow, thinned,
to paint the bits of light on her shoulder and arm. It is
dried with the heat gun again.
For the small part of her face that is showing, the colour
Flesh is used, but with a bit of Burnt Sienna and Burnt Umber.
I outline the back of her ear with Burnt Umber too. I use many
colours for her hair (most of the brown colours), using a small
thin brush and making sure it looks like the wind is catching
her hair and blowing it. Diarylide Yellow with white is also
used to highlight where the strongest light is touching her hair.
I dry the work again with the heat gun.
STEP EIGHT
The painting is almost finished at this point, but I go back
and touch up anything I think needs to be touched up. I add
some more lines to the water, darken some of the woman’s
skirt, and adjust the colours of the clouds a bit. I make sure
it is all dry, again using the heat gun; and then use Genesis
Air Dry Varnish to finish it. ■
STEP FIVE
STEP SIX
Artist’s Palette
59
F E A T U R E
In the Galleries
Art galleries are scattered all over our wonderful country, hosting and
promoting the works of Australia’s diverse exponents of art. On the pages of
Artist’s Palette magazine we plan to showcase a range of these fascinating
venues, while possibly also looking at specific events of interest within them.
Here are the first two …
F E A T U R E
B O Y D F I N E A RT
D I S P L AY S L O C A L
TA L E N T T H R O U G H
‘ M Y PA L E T T E ’
Earlier this year, the gallery known
as Boyd Fine Art (at Harrington Park
near Narellan, just south of Sydney)
staged an exciting and innovative
themed event titled ‘My Palette’.
A list of accomplished painters were
invited to submit paintings rendered
on actual painters’ palettes, to
demonstrate their individual styles in
an imaginative and interesting manner.
Well-known artists who participated
in this initiative included David Lake,
Lynn Naismith, Brian Stratton, Bill
O’Shea, John Cornwell, Kym Hart,
Velia Newman and Peter Browne.
Work by most of these people is
regularly featured at Boyd Fine Art.
When approached by gallery operator
Malcolm Boyd, they were all keen to
be involved in his engaging ‘My
Palette’ art show.
Malcolm was proud to promote
his unique event with due praise
for the participants.
“It is often said in the art world,
that the palette reveals the artist,” he
explained. “Well, that was true in this
case – as each artist used the palette
in a different way. Their own way.”
“Several prominent artists came
together with a unique exhibition of
their art,” he continued. “It was called
‘My Palette’ and each artist painted
their own palette with a very typical
work that they are well recognised for.
They included some old brushes, used
to paint the palettes; framed the results
and put on a show. It could have been
called ‘The Tools of the Trade Show’.”
The result was an unusual exhibition
of very collectable works from very
collectable artists. As the show came
together, it was not difficult to realise
that each of the works stood out on its
own as an art piece. Each will
doubtless become a talking point at
its final destination.
According to Malcolm Boyd, the
palette show idea is not unprecedented.
“Back in the 1930s in the United
States of America, a man called Max
Grumbacher put together (over many
FI N
E A
S T
I GU HR TE
years) a collection of 300 artists’
palettes,” he revealed. “He was a paint
manufacturer, and he was trying to
promote his wares during the
Depression. Over 30 or so years he
assembled a ‘museum quality’
collection of some of the USA’s finest
artists … a collection which now
exhibits in many American museums.”
The ‘My Palette’ collection at Boyd
Fine Art comprised somewhat less than
300 works – but in recognition of their
uniqueness each of the paintings was
complete with a Certificate of
Authenticity and a signed photograph
of the artist who produced it.
A selection of the beautiful paintings
is shown here.
Boyd Fine Art in the Struggletown
Fine Arts Complex is located in
Sharman Close, Harrington Park NSW
2567. Gallery hours are Wednesday to
Sunday from 10.00 am to 5.00 pm.
Malcolm Boyd can be contacted by
telephone on 02 4648 2424.
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FI NE SA IT GU HR T E
A RT I S T I C L I C E N S E G A L L E RY A N D S T U D I O
Located in North Adelaide, Artistic
License Gallery and Studio is a vibrant
city art centre with an emphasis on
contemporary Australian art including
paintings, sculptures and ceramics.
The establishment of the Artistic
License Gallery and Studio fulfilled a
long-held ambition of Gallery Director,
Julie Emery. It is an exciting gallery
in Adelaide’s art scene.
Ideally situated at 48 Melbourne
Street, North Adelaide, its
cosmopolitan location adds stimulus
to an already vibrant and colourful
art area. It is set amongst stylish
boutiques, upmarket restaurants, and
cafes providing organic produce …
surrounded by ambience and
atmosphere.
The aim of the gallery’s staff is
to promote local emerging and
established artists, and to provide a
positive environment for local and
overseas people to view and acquire
Artist ’s Palette
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FI N
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unique art works in Adelaide. Some
examples are included on the
gallery’s website.
“We delight in helping people to find
special paintings or sculptural pieces
for their homes or offices,” says Julie
Emery. “We also conduct workshops
and classes, and we strive to make
them unique social experiences …
as well as informative and visually
rewarding. We believe that art should
be enjoyed by everyone. All levels of
painters are welcome and the teachers
are selected for their enthusiasm as
well as their art abilities.”
Work by surreal artist Paul Ford
(who turns 80 next March) is featured
prominently at the gallery. Paul is still
a highly motivated multi award
winning artist who won the 2007
Alexandrina Art Prize. He was part of
the joint exhibition ‘From Real to
Surreal’ at the gallery earlier in the
year. Paul Ford grew up in England in
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Artist
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Rosie Jones
The Right Side
Edited by Trevor Lang
This Queensland pastellist believes that her personal passage through
psychiatric turmoil has changed her from being a left-brain dominant thinker
to a right-brain dominant thinker … or perhaps endowed her with a better
balance between the two.
F
or Rosie Jones, memories of the
first painting she ever did are
very strong.
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Artist
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“I was sitting on the balcony of a
beautiful apartment on Queensland’s
Sunshine Coast, overlooking a lush
rainforest and the vibrant greens of the
fairways of a golf course. My father
was bringing me glasses of fresh
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water and snacks whenever I
requested, and I painted for three
hours without pause,” she relates. “It
sounds blissful and romantic – but the
truth was far different.”
“I was 37 years old; my fourth baby
had been born four months previously;
and I was in the depths of a raging,
devastating psychosis. My mental state
was severely altered and I was painting
in an attempt to quell the torrent of
bizarre thoughts that were occupying
my mind.”
Rosie found that the concept for the
painting emerged easily and flowed
effortlessly onto the paper. She didn’t
know how to paint (aside from the
rudimentary lessons gleaned from
childhood) and the paint-set she was
using was a basic watercolour one, a
fact she discovered a year later when
she happened to actually read the labels
on the tubes.
So began a foray into the art
world – on February 1, 2005.
Rosie’s psychosis was cured by a
visit to an amazing spiritual healer
(another story in itself) and assistance
from a metaphysical healer who told
her that she was undergoing a
spiritual awakening.
“My creativity and intuition were
certainly awakened,” says Rosie.
“The experience was frightening and
fascinating at the same time. I had
entered the state of ‘satori’ which David
Suzuki in his book ‘An Introduction to
Zen Buddhism’ describes ‘… satori
means the unfolding of a new world
hitherto unperceived’. My new world
became a very different place to the
one I had known until that point in
time. I had a strong yearning to paint
and to learn more about art – a strong
departure from my previous career
as a General Practitioner.”
After Rosie returned with her family
to their home in St George in southwestern Queensland, she obtained her
great-aunt’s art materials. Rosie’s late
relative had loved to paint, mainly in
oils. In her collection she had a
wonderful book by Betty Edwards:
‘Drawing Using the Right Side of
Your Brain’.
Artist
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“I related well to the book,” Rosie
explains. “Not only because of my
medical knowledge – but through the
process of the psychiatric turmoil I had
experienced, I’m sure I changed from
being a left-brain dominant to a rightbrain dominant thinker; or perhaps
found a better balance between the two.”
“By following the book I taught
myself to draw. I could not draw
previously and I found it completely
astounding that I was learning how to
do so. I painted (when time permitted)
with acrylic paints on canvas, and
read as much as I could in magazines
and books.”
Later that year in a weekend
workshop at St George, with artist Lyn
Diefenbach, Rosie Jones had her first
introduction to pastels. With the ability
to create a beautiful painting in vibrant
colours in a short space of time – with
little preparation and clean-up – pastels
seemed an ideal medium (great when
you have small children).
A few months later, artist Maxine
Thompson taught a weekend workshop
on ‘Portraiture in Pastels’ and Rosie
painted a little Aboriginal girl, ‘Ruby’,
from one of Maxine’s photographs.
“This work was a big boost to my
confidence,” she says. “It unleashed
a passion for capturing people’s
expressions, characters, and heritages
in pastels. I love painting the human
form … and studying what it is in
people’s expressions that lends them
their uniqueness.”
In 2006, Rosie was able to attend the
McGregor Summer and Winter Artists’
Retreats in Toowoomba. They gave her
excellent opportunities to be immersed
in art, to be surrounded by like minds
and to benefit from excellent teaching
and the chance to do life-art drawing.
Fortunately, her husband is
encouraging and supportive; and
capable of looking after small
children on his own! Without him,
and her extended family, she wouldn’t
be able to dedicate as much time to
her artwork.
Rosie Jones was thrilled to receive a
commission at the end of last year, to
paint from life.
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“A friend asked me to paint
her nude, in the eighth month of
pregnancy, as a birthday present for
her husband,” she relates. “It was an
honour and a beautiful thing to do.
It was the first painting I had done
with a live subject outside of the
McGregor School class. The prospect
was a little daunting – and my
proportion and perspective went a bit
haywire – but the challenge was good.
And the feeling captivated by a
painting done in that setting was
inevitably more powerful than what
I could have achieved if working from
a photograph.”
Rosie is pleased to describe the
inspiration she has gleaned from the
pages of our magazine, too.
“In an edition of Artist’s Palette
magazine last year, I was mesmerised
by the wonderful work of another
Queensland artist – Anna Rubin,” she
says. “I contacted Anna and we have
since become good friends. Anna gives
me lots of excellent advice which has
been useful in establishing a career in
art. I have found that it really helps to
be in contact with other artists and to
benefit from their experience …
especially when you live in a rural
or remote area.”
“I would like to learn to use oils
and acrylics; and more watercolour
techniques. I want to try these
mediums, to evaluate what best
suits my style.”
For the emerging talent of Rosie
Jones, it is exciting to know that there
is so much more to come. ■
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Pastels
Portrait of Emma
By Rosie Jones
A considered approach
to drawing from life …
an emerging
Queensland pastellist
describes the methods
that have led her to
artistic success.
M AT E R I A L S
FINAL STEP
3 0 Artist’s
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• Dark Tones: Raw Umber
Rembrandt 234.3; Art Spectrum
P550, V550, X550; Rembrandt
234.3; Gold Ochre Rembrandt
231.5; Caput Mortum
Rembrandt 343.8, Art Spectrum
P554, T554; Caput Mortum
Red Rembrandt 343.5 Dress:
Flinders Blue Violet Art
Spectrum D520, N520, P520,
V520. Light Tones: Burnt
Umber Rembrandt 409.8,
409.9; Caput Mortum Red
Rembrandt 343.8.
• Carbothello 1400: 640, 645,
706, 750, 760.
• Paper: Colourfix Burgundy.
• Kneadable eraser
D E M O N S DT ER M
A O
T N
I OS N
T R A T I O N
STEP ONE AND TWO
STEP THREE
STEP ONE
When setting up for the portrait, I
choose a space that provides a
pleasant ambience with good lighting;
music (if preferred); and minimal
interruptions or distractions. I meet
the subject and get a feel for their
character; and I ascertain what the
person commissioning the painting is
expecting from the portrait.
I ask the subject to bring a few
different choices in colour of clothing
so I can choose one that suits the
mood of the portrait. I select the
colour of the paper and also have an
idea at this stage of the pastel colours
I would use to enhance the skin tones
of the model.
I arrange the lighting and
positioning to create shadows and
highlights that compliment the
subject. We decide on a pose that is
comfortable, since they will be
holding the same position for a few
hours (with breaks).
I have all my equipment on a bench
next to me, so that trying to find a
particular pastel doesn’t break the
flow of painting.
STEP TWO
Here I explain what I require from
the subject. We decide on a point
they can focus on; and I ask them to
hold their focus as much as possible.
I also ask them to memorise their
position so they can resume it easily
after a break.
At this stage I take some
photographs without flash, for future
reference. Taking the photographs
with a flash gives a whole different
set of shadows and the resulting
pictures can’t be used to recreate the
same expression.
STEP FOUR
STEP THREE
I do a sketch with a charcoal pencil.
Initially, I look at the proportion of
three distances (a method taught by
Lyn Diefenbach): From the top of
the forehead (or bottom of the
fringe) to the top of the eyebrow;
the top of the eyebrow to the tip of
the nose; and from the tip of the
nose to the bottom of the chin. Then
I look at lots of levels and points
relative to each other, to arrive at a
preliminary sketch.
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STEP FOUR
The main formula which I follow is to go from darks to lights.
Initially, on this picture, I played around a bit to establish the colours
and tones and started freaking out – thinking ‘this is going to be a big
mess’! But I carried on, and it was okay. Emma has a lovely energy
and I hoped to capture this in the painting.
STEP FIVE
I painted the colours in Emma’s purple dress early, knowing that
these would influence the colours in the rest of the painting. I used
Flinders Blue Violet ranging from D540 for the darks. I find that if
I can get a good tonal contrast it enhances the drama of the painting.
STEP SIX
STEP SIX
Next was the hair. Working on this element started to balance the
painting. I did some work on the facial features (with refinements to
follow later on).
STEP SEVEN
In the beginning, I had planned to include Emma’s hands in the
portrait – but they were taking too much time … so I decided that
the bottom of the painting would finish at a point above the level
of her hands.
STEP SEVEN
STEP EIGHT
A blend of various tones of Caput Mortum, Gold Ochre, Burnt
Umber and Caput Mortum Red brought out some of the beautiful
highlights in Emma’s tanned skin. Later I returned to the painting to
look at it with fresh eyes. If in doubt, I refer to photographs and make
corrections.
When my son said, “She looks like a witch with that green skin,”
I toned down some of the greens coming from the Umbers by lightly
going over those areas with Caput Mortum Red (Rembrandt 343.5).
I added Emma’s black pearl and diamond necklace (a graduation
gift from her parents).
My inclination is to keep on correcting areas of the painting –
sometimes to the detriment of the painting. ■
MASTER HINTS
AND TIPS
• As a friend of mine said: “The painting is inspired by the
subject. If you prefer an identical likeness, take a photograph!”
• Set your intention when you begin a painting. Choose to create
a beautiful work of art.
• Creative expression is beneficial for your wellbeing and for
maintaining a harmonious balance of mind, body and spirit.
• Practicing meditation or something like Tai Chi or Yoga is a
great way to enhance creative flow.
• If your painting doesn’t work out, it doesn’t mean anything …
it just didn’t work out! Do another one.
• Appreciate life and what’s around us – all the time.
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Artist’s Palette
STEP EIGHT
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
EUAN MACLEOD. Alice. Archival Oils on canvas, 2006, 137 x 180 cm
Image courtesy of Watters Gallery. www.wattersgallery.com
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Artist’s Palette
73
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Robyn Gibson
Aspiring to
Change
Edited by Trevor Lang
According to this New South Wales painter, there is always something in
an artist’s work that can spark an idea – whether it is the subject chosen,
a colour, a line or a texture. She loves to see the work of other artists.
52
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R
obyn Gibson always loved
drawing and painting as a child.
She knew that one day she
would paint, when she found the time.
Early in her busy life, the priorities
were sport, work and socialising.
Then her family came along. When
her two daughters started pre-school,
she began to attend two hour painting
lessons each week. She did this for
a couple of years, but never found
sufficient time to practise. Two more
years went by before she decided to
make a real effort.
“I needed a place to paint – where
everything was set up and ready to
go; otherwise it would all become too
difficult,” she relates. “I converted the
back of our garage to make my own
studio – complete with carpet, a
cupboard, a bench and an easel.”
The next thing she needed was time.
“I cut down on my sports and set
aside a couple of days for painting
time. Then I needed some lessons
because I had no idea about the
‘correct’ way to paint,” Robyn says.
“I began lessons with a very
traditional artist who was very
methodical and structured. I tried
to paint this way but found it really
draining and constrictive.”
About six years ago, she attended a
five day course with Patrick Carroll and
became liberated. She could scarcely
believe that painting could be so free
and exciting.
“I gained more confidence and began
to experiment with the application of
paint,” she enthuses. “I used plastic
wrap, cards, squeegees, rulers, and
even sticks.”
Artist
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12:47 PM
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I N S I G H T
I N S I G H T
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Artist’s Palette
Over the next couple of years she entered
a few local art exhibitions and received some
prizes. She entered an interstate competition
and was rewarded with an exhibition at Made
From Australia Gallery in Canberra.
The rapid progress made Robyn feel better
about herself and her art.
“I’ve heard people say that you only need
to paint for yourself and not worry about
what people think; but I believe you still
need some approval and some acceptance
to build your confidence and give you the
desire to keep painting,” she explains.
“Change is my greatest ambition. I want
to keep improving and changing. I’m not
content to keep painting the same way … I
want to try new techniques with new colours
and new subjects. There is always something
in another artist’s work that can spark an
idea. I love to see other artists’ work –
whether in an exhibition, a book, a magazine,
or on the internet. Painting can be very
isolating. You get so involved in your own
little world for long periods of time. Talking
and mixing with other artists is important to
help you develop and improve your skills.”
Robyn Gibson paints in acrylics. She finds
this medium easy to apply using any
implement, and says that you can work over
acrylics. You can scratch into the medium;
draw over it; or use it as a wash. She paints
on paper or canvas.
“I live on the coast, so my subject choices
are usually the beach or the river, and the
figures I find there,” she says. “I belong to
a life drawing group which provides great
practise for my drawing skills; and great
artistic company. I am aiming to expand
my subject choices to include still lifes
and suburban scenes.”
Robyn works from sketches and
photographs. She loves exploring places
and taking pictures. Looking for things
to photograph makes her think about
compositions.
“When I first started painting, the photograph
ruled me – I painted everything from it,
including the colours,” she relates. “Now it
just helps me to find an interesting subject.
The composition is altered and new colours
are created.”
“Painting is so exciting … with the
prospect of so many things to try. All I
need is more time!” ■
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I N S I G H T
Water Mixable Oil
Georgian Water Mixable Oil colours offer you the possibility
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All Georgian Water Mixable Oil colours offer high levels of
lightfastness, pigment load, and durability. The viscosity and
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traditional oil colours and like traditional Georgian Oils,
they offer the same high pigment loads and dependable
lightfastness. Georgian Water Mixable Oils can be used for
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transparent glazes and wash effects similar to watercolours.
They surface-dry between 5 and 7 days, and exhibit no colour
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Artist’s Palette
77
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Acrylics
Albury Countryside
By Robyn Gibson
An artist whose habit is to paint coastal and river scenes has turned her
attention to the rural area of Albury on the New South Wales/Victoria border
to create this spectacular landscape work.
FINAL STEP
5 6 Artist’s
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D E M O N S T R A T I O N
M AT E R I A L S
• Stretched canvas – 60 x 75 cm.
• Acrylic paints (Matisse and
Finity): Titanium White,
Ultramarine Blue; Cadmium
Yellow; Yellow Ochre; Rose
Madder; Alizarin Crimson and
Burnt Sienna.
• Cling wrap.
• Squeegee.
• Card.
STEP ONE
STEP ONE
The canvas was primed with gesso
but not textured. Usually I like to
work on a textured canvas which can
give nice shapes and lines to work
with. I texture thick acrylic with
cards, sometimes using the
movement I feel in the subject.
I used a small squeegee to mark in
the basic lines and movements of the
composition. I used a combination of
Ultramarine Blue, Burnt Sienna and
Alizarin Crimson.
STEP TWO
I began to work from the sky down.
This was unusual for me, as I usually
work the painting up as a whole.
This painting seemed to flow, doing
it this way. I used plastic wrap to
apply the paint.
The sky was done with Ultramarine
Blue and Titanium White; the distant
grasses were Burnt Sienna, Titanium
White and Yellow Ochre (mixed with
white). In the foreground I used
Ultramarine Blue, Rose Madder,
Titanium White and Burnt Sienna
(mixed with white). I added some
Ultramarine Blue/Cadmium Yellow
to the trees.
STEP TWO
STEP THREE
I added more grasses to the
foreground using Burnt Sienna,
STEP THREE
Artist’s Palette
79
I O
DD EE MM OO NN S ST TR RA AT TI O
N N
STEP FOUR
MASTER HINTS
AND TIPS
• Try using various ways of
applying paint (other than
brushes). This tends to
loosen up your painting
style.
• Try scratching and drawing
into paint and over paint.
• Paint the directions and
movement of your
subjects.
5
808
Artist ’sPalette
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Artist’s
Ultramarine Blue/Rose Madder,
Yellow Ochre, and Ultramarine
Blue/Cadmium Yellow.
I moved the cling wrap in the direction
of the grasses – longer strokes in the
foreground and shorter strokes in the
distance.
STEP FOUR
I reinforced the directional lines and
added to the distant hills.
I also added more colour and thickness
to the grasses, applying highlights in
Burnt Sienna (mixed with white) and
stick marks of various light and dark
colours using a card.
FINAL STEP
Still using plastic wrap, I added more
to the sky – lighter with a little Burnt
Sienna closer to the horizon; and
deeper blue higher in the sky. I added
more height and more distinguishing
marks to the distant hills. I applied
some Yellow Ochre (mixed with
white) in the distance, and added some
marks to suggest distant trees using
Ultramarine Blue/Alizarin Crimson.
I added some directional highlights to
the grasses, using various contrasting
colours including Burnt Sienna, Yellow
Ochre and Ultramarine Blue/Rose
Madder as well as Titanium White. ■
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
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Artist’s Palette
81
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Ph: 1300 731 529
www.creativityunlimited.com.au
Cheques and money orders to be made payable to S&S Wholesale Pty. Ltd.
Offer only valid in Australia & while stocks last – allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. Limit one set per order.
Professional Quality Artist
Grade Acrylic paint and Mediums
Full rich impasto for striking textured
effects .
Thinner viscosity free flowing for a
low-sheen and good levelling qualities.
Intense, vibrant colours including
several uniquely Australian
colours.
Artwork by Ian Sax
Derivan Pty Ltd
AUSTRALIAN
MADE &
OWNED
ABN 36 003 273 925
Unit 4/23 Leeds St Rhodes NSW 2187
T: +61 2 9736 2022 F: +61 2 9736 3637
derivan@derivan.com.au
www.derivan.com.au
IDRIS MURPHY. Weipa Harbour, Storm Clouds. Atelier Interactive on board, 120x120cm, 2005.
Image courtesy of King Street Gallery on William http://www.kingstreetgallery.com.au
Professionals Choose
Atelier Interactive
To see more artwork by Idris Murphy and other leading artists from
around the world visit the gallery section of the Chroma website at:
www.chromaonline.com/gallery
CHROMA AUSTRALIA PTY.
LTD. MT KURING-GAI NSW 2080
Free Call: 1800 023 935
www.chromaonline.com
FREES!
BONU
DVD*
USING INTERACTIVE DVD
This DVD shows just how easy and helpful the new Atelier
Interactive techniques really are!
Professional Artist Mitch Waite demonstrates Atelier
Interactive and gives lessons on composition, drawing, tonal
values, portraiture and colour mixing.
* When you purchase the Mitch Waite DVD it comes with a FREE 90
minute painting demonstration by Keith Norris.
Call Chroma on 1800 023 935 to Order
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