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Australian Photography - May 2018

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Making
a scene
COMPOSE YOUR OWN
STUNNING LANDSCAPES
PLAYING THE
MARKETS
Will stock libraries
make you money?
WIN!
TESTED
FUJIFILM FINEPIX
XP130 WORTH
$299. P82
PEAK DESIGN
EVERYDAY SLING
10L WORTH
$269.95 P22
Sony A7R III
Nya Evo Fjord
36 camera bag
AUSTRALIAN RESIDENTS ONLY
May 2018
Wild style
Secrets to dazzling
wildlife images
EDITOR’S NOTE
ESTABLISHED IN 1950
EDITORIAL
Editor: Mike O’Connor
mikeoconnor@yaffa.com.au
Contributing Editors: Mick Fletoridis,
Rob Ditessa, Drew Hopper,
Anthony McKee and Saima Morel.
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Customer Service Manager:
Martin Phillpott
Australian Photography
is published by Yaffa Media Pty Ltd.
ABN 54 002 699 354
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Surry Hills, NSW 2010.
Ph: (02) 9281 2333
Fax: (02) 9281 2750
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ADVERTISING
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BELOW: Two similar
compositions but two
very different results.
A TALE OF TWO CITIES
MIKE O’CONNOR, EDITOR
All mail to:
GPO Box 606, Sydney NSW 2001
Yaffa Photographic Group
includes:
Australian Photography, Capture,
www.australianphotography.com
www.facebook.com/
australianphotographymag
Publisher: James Ostinga
Marketing Manager: Sabarinah Elijah
Marketing Executive: Emilie McGree
Production Director: Matthew Gunn
Art Director: Ana Maria Heraud
Studio Manager: Lauren Esdaile
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All editorial contributions should be sent
to editor@australianphotography.com
Australian Photography welcomes freelance
contributions. Please check with the editor
before submitting your story. Editorial
guidelines are available via email and include
full details on all requirements for story and
image submissions. Please note that stories
should be embedded in the body of the email,
or supplied as email attachments in text format
(.txt), rich text format (.rtf) or Microsoft
Word format (.doc). Ideally, images should be
supplied in JPEG format (.jpg) with a separate
list of captions. JPEG compression should
be no lower than 9/12 (75%). Digital images
should be supplied at a resolution of 300ppi,
at a physical size of at least 20cm and not
larger than 42cm on the longest side.
ISSN 0004-9964
A
bove are two images shot in the same location at Sydney’s Observatory hill. The image
on the left was taken by regular AP contributor Drew Hopper, and the one on the right
was taken by me. We both used full frame camera
bodies, and the same lenses with a 24-70mm focal
length. Both images were shot at dusk, although I
believe the image on the right was taken a little later in the year than the one on the left. Drew took
his image in 2011, and mine was taken in 2016, so
it’s fair to say this part of Sydney hasn’t changed all
that much recently.
So two images with just about the same composition, that are both sharp where they need to be.
But which is the better one? I’d argue the shot on
the left is much more engaging than that on the
right – there’s more subtlety of tone, the light is
more dynamic, and the sky is a much more appealing colour than the dull sky blotted by that low
hanging cloud in the image on the right. There’s
a vibrancy and almost 3D feel to the image on the
left. Obviously both images have been edited to
taste, but I think Drew’s final image is a more attractive representation of the scene.
The big difference between the two then is differences in lighting and editing. Drew says his approach when shooting cityscapes is to always expose
for the highlights, which helps retain more shadow
detail in his images. I’ve typically metered for the
available light with the aim of capturing as much
tonal detail in the middle of the histogram as I can,
avoiding clipping in the shadows and highlights.
But even putting these technical aspects aside,
I think it’s the quality of the light that makes the
biggest difference here. It is possible that pesky low
hanging cloud has diffused the light in my image,
flattening the tones, and it’s also worth mentioning
that I tried to edit my image again to replicate the
tonal range in Drew’s shot and wasn’t even able to
get close, and Photoshop’s colour matching tools
also struggled to do so. As photographers we need to
be able to identify good light and bad, and I’d argue
even the best image editors can’t help with this.
Obviously with photography we all have our own
unique spin on how we shoot and edit our images,
and seeing others’ work can be both a blessing and a
curse, especially when you have shot the same scene
and thought you had something you were happy
with. But embrace the difference between your work
and others and use it to push you to get better. In
five years that scene at Observatory hill hasn't really
changed, so it's just a matter of returning when the
light is more favourable. Getting better at something
comes from a willingness to constantly improve.
Your images will be all the better for it. ❂
| 3 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
54 CALL OF
THE WILD
Alison Langevad shares
her road-tested tips
for maximising your
wildlife photography
opportunities.
64 TESTED: SONY A7R III
First the A9, now the A7R III. Sony’s high-end mirrorless
cameras continue to impress with their outstanding
feature-set. Dylan Giannakopoulos takes a look at the
option for photographers who like their images big.
24 WHAT’S IN STOCK
Many photographers will have considered the benefits of adding
work to a stock library to boost their profile and their bottom line.
Sam Edmonds takes an in-depth look at the world of stock library
photography to find out if it’s really worth your while.
CONTRIBUTORS
DEPARTMENTS
6 BEHIND THE LENS
Patiently waiting for a human element to
complete her vision, photographer Lisa Saad
captured this stunning image on her recent
trip to the US.
SAM EDMONDS
Sam is a photographer, writer
and guide focusing on ecology
and conservation. His work
has been published in National
Geographic, the Huffington
Post and more. See more at
samedmondsphoto.com
8 STRAIGHT SHOOTER
A printer may be the best camera accessory
you ever buy, explains Darran Leal.
12 QUICK SNAPS
The latest news and products from the world
of photography.
DYLAN FOX
18 YOUR BEST SHOT
34 SPOTLIGHT ON
COMPOSITION
Ever wondered what’s more important
in landscape photography; the light or
the composition? Pro photographer
Dylan Fox lifts his eye from behind the
viewfinder and shares his views for
maximising your landscape imagery.
Take a look at the best images from our
‘architecture’ photo competition.
72 APS GALLERY AND COLUMN
News, views and images from the Australian
Photographic Society.
Dylan is an award-winning
Australian Landscape
Photographer based out
of Perth and a long term
contributor to Australian
Photography. See more of his
work at dylanfox.com.au
78 FUJIFILM IMAGE DOCTOR
Saima Morel critiques a selection of readers’
images, and picks the winner of the Fujifilm
FinePix XP130 worth $299.
ANTHONY MCKEE
Anthony is a Melbourne
writer and documentary
photographer. In 2014 he
was named AIPP Australian
Documentary Photographer
of the Year. See more at
anthonymckee.com.au
ALISON LANGEVAD
44 CREATIVITY UNLOCKED
There’s being a photographer with a good
eye, and then there’s being a true creative.
Anthony McKee shows what it takes to
develop your own style and create images
with lasting appeal.
COVER
Abu Dhabi’s Rub Al Khali (Empty Quarter) desert
by James Relf Dyer. Canon EOS 6D,
EF24-70mm f/2.8L USM lens. 1/80s @
f10, ISO 160. See more of James’ work at
jamesrelfdyerphoto.com
Alison first became interested
in wildlife photography in 1995
while visiting Africa, and has
since returned many times to
photograph amazing animal
species. See more of her work
at alisonlangevad.com.au
BEHIND THE LENS
| 6 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
SPONSORED BY
THE NIGHT
WATCH
PHOTOGRAPHER: LISA SAAD
Always looking for inspiring architecture I stumbled upon this
building whilst we were travelling in the US last month.
The building was lit with this incredible red glow and the
formation of the waves of metal and the ominous presence of the
building really made me feel overwhelmed and overstimulated,
but also appreciate how the building sat within its environment.
The security guard would spend time on his two way radio
walking the perimeter under the enormous belly of the building
and I do remember being envious of him for being allowed to
experience such grandeur every night.
I wanted to emphasise the fluidity and movement of the
building but to also be in awe of its beauty and power. By doing
that I created this image predominately as a straight capture but I
also combined three other frames, which then gave us permission
to appreciate the intertwining metal, give us the sense of tension
and release and make us feel calm and safe. NIKON D5, TAMRON 24-70MM F2.8 LENS. 1/30S @ F4.5, ISO 1600.
Lisa Saad is a highly awarded Advertising and Commercial
Photographer and Director of Photography. She is the 2016 AIPP
Australian Professional Photographer of the Year as well as the 2017
& 2016 Victorian Professional Photographer of the Year. See more
of her work at lisasaad.com.
| 7 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
STRAIGHT SHOOTER
THE BIG PICTURE
Getting yourself a printer and seeing your own work sliding off
the tray is one of the great joys of photography and something
every photographer should experience believes Darran Leal.
I
was living on Norfolk Island in 1980
as the island’s photographer, shooting
everything from weddings to local
newspaper shoots, and trying to make
out I knew what I was doing. One night at
around 10pm, I dropped off a roll of film
in the studio to be processed from the day’s
shoots. In the darkroom I spotted one of
my negatives. I had watched the boss process film and print a couple of times before
– so I thought what the hell – and gave it
a go. I will never forget placing the negative into the holder, focusing, exposing for
a few seconds and then placing the paper
into the first tray – amazing! A little while
later, I had several B&W prints drying.
In the early 1990’s, I processed my own
E6 film and printed Cibachrome prints,
using a Durst enlarger and Jobo processing system. The next step was I started using digital technology for my photography
in 1994, shooting film and scanning. It
was not until I talked Steve Parish Publishing into buying an Epson A3+ printer
that all of the unique facets to digital photography came together. Everyone in the
art department was amazed at the quality
and ability to use the results as a pre-press
proofing option. The story could go on,
but after many years and a couple of more
Epson printers, I can’t recommend highly enough that you consider buying your
own printer and exploring the final step in
your creative art - using your images! Other brands like Canon and HP offer great
printers as well. I personally find Epson
usable straight out of the box and from
my current P600 to my old giant 9800
large format printer: super reliable. My
son Pearce uses the larger P800 printer.
I often hear - “but the ink is so expensive”! This is not true. Costs should be
worked out on a ‘per print’ basis. The cost
to print your own A4 image is about $5/6
| 8 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
each. The cost to print your own A3+
print is about $12/15. This is for high quality archival papers. Compare that to any
lab and you can see the value. You will
quickly pay off the printer, cover the ink
costs and be more creative as you are in
control of your great images – it’s also fun!
If you have been thinking about using
your images, then I highly recommend
that you print yourself, or use a professional print service. I mix my images with
professional framing and budget options.
Walls can be filled cheaply with basic
foamcore board mounted prints only - no
need for full glass frames. Or, for a good
alternative, check out places like OfficeWorks as they offer good frames and a
great price. Organising an exhibition, or
after the best quality and advice? Then a
professional framer is important.
I look forward to catching one of your
images on a wall somewhere, one day. ❂
STRAIGHT SHOOTER
ABOVE: My old Epson large format
printer paid for itself and made a profit
on its first job. Big is beautiful!
OPPOSITE: I printed these images for a
trade show years ago in Melbourne. I had
my local framer foamcore mount them.
LEFT: Warren Macris (www.highres.com.
au) is my mentor from my early photo
education work in 1981.
DARRAN LEAL
Darran has been
teaching photography
since 1981. His company
World Photo Adventures
takes small groups
of photographers on
professionally guided
photo tours around the world, including a
trip with AP in September 2017. More info:
worldphotoadventures.com.au
| 9 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
FOTO L!VE is a unique opportunity to get face-to-face with eight inspiring
photographers and learn the secrets of their success.
Whether you want to improve your shooting and editing skills; turn your photo
business into a lean, mean money-making machine; or get hands-on with the latest
gear; FOTO L!VE has something for photographers of all levels.
MASTERS OF LIGHT
Shooting and editing secrets of the pros
9.00am to 12.30pm
As photographers, we all have one simple goal – to take better images. In this unique
half-day session, you will have an exclusive chance to learn first-hand from four acclaimed
photography professionals about what it takes to create stunning images.
All four sessions are aimed at enthusiast photographers with a hunger to develop
and a desire to push their work forward. Our speakers will challenge and inspire you
to think visually and see with a photographer’s eye. But most importantly, you will be
left with real-world examples to help take your image-making to the next level.
FOTO L!VE is the event for passionate photographers in Sydney.
Program and speaker details announced soon
SPONSORS
SUN 05 AUG 2018
Monkey Baa,
Darling Harbour, Sydney
THE BUSINESS OF CREATIVITY
A masterclass for emerging and professional photographers
1.30pm to 5.00pm
Now more than ever, professional photography demands a unique balance between inspired
creativity and effective business skills. Smart business practices free up more time and energy to
hone your creativity; poor business practices consume excess time and take you away from doing
what you love – producing amazing images.
This session is designed to help you fine-tune these two pivotal elements of your professional life,
and help you not only harness your creativity, but make your business more efficient and effective.
In this practical half-day event presented by Capture, four leading lights of photography will share
their own real-world experiences and hard-won lessons. Find out how to unleash your creativity while
ensuring your business model works seamlessly to help you realise your financial and artistic goals.
Program and speaker details announced soon
BOOK BY JUNE 29 & SAVE WITH EARLY BIRD PRICING
Early Bird tickets available until June 29, 2018
Full day: $169 includes Australian Photography L!VE (morning) and Capture L!VE (afternoon)
Half day: $104 choose Australian Photography L!VE (morning) or Capture L!VE (afternoon)
VISIT: fotolive.com.au
QUICK SNAPS
QUICK
SNAPS
NEW NATIVE SONY GLASS ON THE WAY
NISI have announced a new square filter kit for smartphones
and are looking for more native lens options: Sigma have announced nine prime lenses for E-mount in its Arts series, two
of which are brand new, including the the 70mm F2.8 DG
MACRO and the 105mm F1.4 DG HSM.
Sigma says the new lenses take advantage of a “newly developed control algorithm that optimizes the autofocus drive and
maximizes the data transmission speed.” Basically, this means
the autofocus system promises to offer similar performance to
other E-mount lenses,including native Sony glass.
The native lenses will also work with Sony’s Continuous AF
(AF-C) and high-speed autofocus capabilities, which weren’t
available before when adapting non-native Sigma Art lenses
using the Sigma MC-11 converter.
The full line-up includes: 14mm F1.8 DG HSM Art, 20mm
F1.4 DG HSM Art, 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art, 35mm F1.4 DG
HSM Art, 50mm F1.4 DG HSM Art, 70mm F2.8 DG MACRO
Art (new), 85mm F1.4 DG HSM Art, 105mm F1.4 DG HSM Art
(new), and 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art.
- the Proseries P1.
The P1 Kit includes a phone clip, GND8 (0.9) 3 Stop
Graduated Filter, polarizer, pouch, and holder.
NiSi says its clip is compatible with all smartphone models and can be used on rear or front facing mobile cameras.
The filter holder is built from the same aluminium used in
NiSi’s popular V5 Pro system and can be rotated 360 degrees to change between portrait and landscape orientation.
The two included filters are made of optical quality glass.
The Medium GND Filter helps to darken specific areas of
an image, such as bright skies, while allowing for a normal,
unaffected exposure in the other regions of the image. The
medium GND is designed to be moved up and down to
control these bright areas.
The HD Polariser help reduce reflections and glare by filtering out light that has become polarized due to reflection
from a non-metallic surface. It’s perfect for removing glare
on water, reflections when shooting through glass and provides greater colour and tonal saturation.
The new kit is available for pre-order from NiSi filters
Australia now for $59. Find out more
at nisifilters.com.au.
GOOD news for those who shoot Sony full frame E-mount
MAGNUM
WORKSHOPS
HEADING
TO AUSTRALIA
FOR the first time in
over five years, Magnum Photos will offer
two workshops in Australia this May.
Offered in partnership with the Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney, Magnum photographers Olivia Arthur and
Bieke Depoorter will lead a 5-day programme focused on developing personal story ideas and refining practical knowledge.
Known for their in-depth and intimate storytelling approaches, both photographers will share their experience and
advice in order for participants to advance their own practice,
personally and professionally.
Participants will work towards a final public projection of
their new body of work and group celebration. Workshops will
be held at the ACP, Sydney, from Tuesday 1 May to Saturday 5
May, 2018. Find out more at acp.org.au.
| 12 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
© BIEKE DEPOORTER | MAGNUM PHOTOS
BELOW: NiSi’s new
smartphone filter
kit brings the power
of long exposures
to your phone.
NISI ANNOUNCE SQUARE FILTER
KIT FOR SMARTPHONES
QUICK SNAPS
Get even
closer.
NOW AVAILABLE:
x1.4 and x2 teleconverters
LEFT:
Chris Rounds’
Intake tower,
Blowering
Reservoir,
NSW, Australia.
2018 SONY WORLD PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS CHOOSES
‘AUSTRALIA’S BEST PHOTOGRAPH’
IN a press release announcing Australia’s best
photograph, the Sony World Photography Awards
have awarded Sydney photographer Chris Round
the 2018 Australia National Award.
Round, a fine art photographer, won for a
photograph titled ‘Intake Tower, Blowering
Reservoir’, NSW, Australia.
The work was selected by an expert panel of
judges as the best single image taken by an Australian photographer submitted to the 2018 Awards. As a fine art photographer, Round is particularly interested in capturing landscapes that
feature human interventions. His work has
previously been shortlisted at the Sony World
Photography Awards and is commended in the
2018 Awards’ Open Architecture category.
The 11th edition of the Sony World Photography Awards saw 320,000 submissions by photographers from more than 200 countries and territories.
Describing the winning work, Round says:
“This image is part of an ongoing project concerning the Snowy Hydro Scheme and the
Snowy Mountains region in New South Wales.
It’s an exploration of the balance between nature
and man’s intervention upon it - vast structures
amongst epic landscapes, re-shaped waterways
and newly created ones. This is the Blowering
Reservoir intake tower taken in the early morning light. The brutalist structure creates an interesting juxtaposition with the surrounding environment and the soft-looking water – a result
of the need for a long exposure.”
As National Award winner, Round receives
the latest digital imaging equipment from
Sony. The winning work will be shown at the
Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition in
London from April 20 – May 6 and published
in the 2018 Awards’ book.
The success is announced today alongside the
winners all 63 National Awards, and the 10 categories of the Awards’ Open competition. The
overall and Professional category winners of the
Awards will be announced April 19.
For more details visit www.worldphoto.org.
| 13 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
SP 150-600mm F/5-6 Di VC USD G2
Caption xxxxx xxxxx
(Model A022)
xxxxx xxxxx xxx
For Canon and Nikon mounts.
xxxxxxx.
Di: for APS-C format and full framexxxxxxx
DSLR cameras
www.tamron.com.au
QUICK SNAPS
WINNERS OF THE NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAIT PRIZE 2018 ANNOUNCED
CHARLIE, captured by photographer Lee Grant
and depicting a young social housing resident
from Canberra, has been declared the winner of
the National Photographic Portrait Prize for 2018.
Speaking to the RiotAct, Ms Grant says she
met Charlie last year while working on a collaborative art project at the Ainslie Village social
housing community and knew immediately that
it was going to be good picture.
“I was excited when I went home and processed those pictures,” she said.
The highly commended award has been
awarded to Filomena Rizzo for her portrait titled My Olivia.
Dr Christopher Chapman, Senior Curator at
the Portrait Gallery and co-judge of this year’s
Prize, says it was the power of humanness that
shone through in the two award-winning portraits.
‘As the possible winners came into view from
within a very strong field, it felt like we were distilling something of the essence of portraiture, and the
winning portraits possessed that essence for us.’
Co-judge and Curator at the Art Gallery of Western Australia Mr Robert Cook appreciated that
both works depict a young individual making their
own way in their lives and into the wider world.
‘It’s like both subjects are facing futures that
are uncertain. And they’re doing so bravely. It’s
the bravery that you have when you’re afraid,
when you yourself might crumble and you figure there’s only a fifty-fifty shot at making it
through. What the artists have done here is present this dilemma, one we all get on some level,
with compassion, without artifice and without
false heroics,’ said Mr Cook.
Ms Grant will receive $30,000 cash from the
Portrait Gallery, lighting equipment from Profoto to the value of $15,000 and paper supplies
from Ilford to the value of $5,000.
Runner-up image My Olivia was taken by
Victorian photographer Filomena Rizzo in
the Redwood Forest, “a very magical place,”
she said. “I didn’t see the real significance of
the image until some weeks later. The image
shows vulnerability and sadness, but mostly I
see strength and a bond only we two share. My
girls are by far my greatest teachers,’ she added. ‘The portrait has come from a very personal
space and time. When you put so much into an
image and share it, it is wonderful that others
see it. I am truly humbled and grateful to have
won Highly Commended.’
The National Photographic Portrait Prize
opens to the public on Saturday 24 March and
is on display until Sunday 17 June 2018. For
venues and ticketing information, please visit nppp.portrait.gov.au.
| 14 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
TOP TO BOTTOM: Charlie
by Lee Grant, My Olivia by
Filomena Rizzo.
© Qing Lin (China) The Insiders (detail).
QUICK SNAPS
HUAWEI UNVEILS P20 PRO WITH TRIPLE
CAMERA AND 1/1.7-INCH IMAGE SENSOR
GOPRO’S NEW ACTION CAM WILL ONLY
SET YOU BACK $299
GOPRO has added a new HERO camera to its family of action
ABOVE: GoPro’s
new action cam
is only missing
4K video in its
$299 price. If
you’ve been
holding off
getting one, and
don’t need the
ultra high res
video, now could
be the time.
cameras. On sale now, the HERO features a 2-inch touch display, HD video at 1440/60p and 1080/60p, and is waterproof to
10M/30 feet. The notable omission is 4K video, which is available in the $429.95 HERO5 and $599.95 HERO6.
The new action camera also features voice control, electronic video stabilization, and is compatible with all the current
GoPro HERO mounting accessories on the market (including
30+ from GoPro itself).
Finally, the camera also features compatibility with the
GoPro and Quik Stories mobile apps, the latter of which
can automatically edit your captured footage into ready-toshare highlight videos.
“HERO is a great first GoPro for people looking to share
experiences beyond what a phone can capture,” says Meghan
Laffey, GoPro’s SVP of Product. “HERO makes it easy to share
‘wow’ moments at a price that’s perfect for first-time users.”
HERO is available now at retailers around the world and
on GoPro.com. HUAWEI has just unveiled its latest flagship smartphone: the
P20 Pro, the first smartphone to feature a triple camera setup.
Like with other Huawei models, the camera has been developed in cooperation with Leica. Inside you'll find a main 1/1.7inch RGB sensor, which is approximately twice the size of the
smaller sensors in most direct competitors and promises to capture around 20 per cent more light than most rivals too.
The sensor also features a Quad Bayer structure with a total pixel count of 40MP. This outputs data binned in 2 × 2 pixel units,
resulting in 10MP images promising better detail and lower noise.
The RGB sensor works both independently and in tandem
with a high-resolution monochrome sensor. When working together, the two sensors provide depth estimation for the simulated bokeh effect, and also improve detail and noise levels by
merging multiple shots. To help with subjects in the distance,
the P20 Pro also offers a third, dedicated tele-camera.
This optically-stabilized camera offers a 3x zoom factor—
approximately 80mm equivalent focal length—a significantly longer reach than the 2x zoom in the iPhone X and
Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus.
Inside, the P20 Pro is powered by Huawei's Kirin 970 chipset
and 6GB of RAM, and offers a 4,000
mAh battery with quick-charge and
128GB of internal storage.
Other imaging features include
phase detection, laser assisted
AF and zero shutter lag.
The smartphone can also shoot
up to ISO 102400.
The P20 Pro will be available in
Europe from April for 900 Euros
(approximately $1450 AUD). In addition to the P20 Pro, Huawei has
also launched the P20, which features the same chipset but comes
with a smaller 5.8-inch screen and
dual cameras. It will retail for 650
Euros (approximately $1048 AUD).
| 16 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
YOUR BEST SHOT
YOUR BEST SHOT
ARCHITECTURE
Architecture photography allows us to experience buildings we may never get to visit at a
specific moment in time. The secret to great architecture photography is communicating
buildings' relationships with their contexts, space and time. As such we weren't just looking for
the coolest building on the street, but something that tells us a little more about our subject.
| 18 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
YOUR BEST SHOT
JUDI THIES
Two red chairs
EDITOR’S COMMENT:
There’s echoes of famed designer
Dieter Rams in this strikingly
simple composition by Judi Thies,
proving that the smaller interior
details can tell a more interesting
story than the obvious external
ones. Taken at the Regency Park
TAFE in Adelaide, the resulting
image is nicely balanced; the
repeating vertical lines of that
yellow wood panelling help our
eyes to settle on the stars of the
show, the bold red chairs in the
bottom right. Well done.
TECHNICAL DETAILS
Olympus EM-1 Mark II, 12-100mm
lens. .6s@ f11, ISO 200.
Thanks to the team at Blonde
Robot, Judi Thies has won a
brilliant Peak Design Everyday
Sling 10L camera bag valued at
$269.95. The ultimate low-profile,
quick-access day bag for gear
minimalists, the Everyday Sling
10L redefines what a singleshoulder sling bag can be. The
ideal bag for photographers who
want to travel smarter and lighter.
WEIHONG LIU
The skyscraper upper-wards view of Sydney
HOW I DID IT
There’s some cool moody vibes in this image of the Sydney
CBD by Weihong Liu. “I have been fascinated by the skyscraper
upwards view, and this Chinese New year I got a chance to visit
Sydney city where I had a first try of taking a photo from this
angle,” he explains. We really enjoyed the humans-eye view of
this perspective as it helps emphasise the scale of the buildings
– they look like they really are scrapping the sky. The use of 16
stops of ND filters has allowed a massive 346s exposure - it can
have a powerful effect in architecture photography. By balancing
something unmoving (the buildings) against something moving
(the clouds), the result is a lovely soft and abstract feel in the sky.
TECHNICAL DETAILS
Nikon D810, Nikkor 16-35 mm f/4 lens, 346s @ f8, ISO 200. Lee
filters 10 and 6 stop ND filters stacked. Tripod. Post processed
with Lightroom and Photoshop.
MORE INFO: PEAKDESIGN.COM
| 19 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
YOUR BEST SHOT
BRAD SMITH
Burj Al Arab
HOW I DID IT
The Burj Al Arab is an iconic building in Dubai. We
were lucky enough to visit and enjoy a meal there.
The first impression as you enter the foyer is these
fountain water spouts that flow perfectly from the
outlet pipe to the input pipe with no splashing at
all, in front of the amazing gold pillars and multicoloured ceilings. It is an architectural wonder.
Taken handheld as tripods were not allowed.
TECHNICAL DETAILS
Olympus OMD EM1, Zuiko.M 12-40 mm f2.8
Pro Lens. 1/40s @ f4.5, ISO 640. Cropped and
adjustments to contrast, exposure and clarity and
saturation in Lightroom 6. MARY JO
GOMEZJACKSON
The Sail - Marina
Bay Sands Hotel
HOW I DID IT
I took image of the Marina Bay Sands
Hotel last December. The rain had
just stopped and the sky opened
up. The cloud was a bit patchy. In
Photoshop I used the Radial Filter
to edit a long exposure effect for the
cloud. I used Nik Collection Silver
Efex Pro 2 to convert the image to
black and white.
TECHNICAL DETAILS
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, 2470mm f2.8 lens. 1/25s @ f11, ISO
100, tripod. Image cropped and
adjustments, contract, exposure
and clarity in both Lightroom and
Nik Collection.
| 20 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
Exquisite
performance.
Meticulous
details.
JOHN ROGERS
Mystery
HOW I DID IT
This subject screamed for a high key look. I also wanted to portray simplicity to
give a hint of mystery so the viewer would ask “what is that?” The image shows
the underside of an elevator leading up to the top floor of a shopping centre.
TECHNICAL DETAILS
Nikon D750, Tamron 24-70mm 2.8 lens. 1/800s @ f4.5, ISO 6400
PAT BARLOW
Differing Perspectives
Body noindent.
HOW I DID IT
Everyone takes the same photos
of the Opera House. You see all
the tourists taking that same shot
and I wanted to try something
different. I got right up close to
the wall and shot upwards over
the arch. The composition was
perfect, the leading lines, I was
so so happy with the shot straight
out of camera and editing in
Lightroom only made this shot
that much more perfect.
SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2
(Model A032)
For Canon and Nikon mounts.
Di: For full-frame and APS-C format DSLR cameras
TECHNICAL DETAILS
Nikon D750, Tokina 11-16mm 2.8
lens. 1/1600s @ f9, ISO 1250.
Processed in Adobe Lightroom.
| 21 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
www.tamron.com.au
YOUR BEST SHOT
HOW TO ENTER
YOUR BEST SHOT IS OPEN TO AP SUBSCRIBERS AND APS MEMBERS. TO ENTER AN IMAGE IN THE COMP,
CHECK THE COMPETITION THEMES AND INSTRUCTIONS BELOW AND EMAIL YOUR BEST IMAGE TO
YOURBESTSHOT@AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
UPCOMING
COMPETITION
THEMES
JULY ISSUE
BIRDS
AUGUST ISSUE
MOUNTAINS
SEPTEMBER ISSUE
KIDS
April 30, 2018
May 31, 2018
June 30, 2018
HOW TO ENTER
OCTOBER ISSUE
MOTION
NOVEMBER ISSUE
GOLDEN
July 30, 2018
August 31, 2018
• Send your entry to yourbestshot@australianphotography.com
• Include the name of the competition theme you are entering in
the email subject line, for example ‘Birds’ or ‘Mountains’.
• Please include the following details with your entry: your
name, image title (if there is one) and 80-200 words about how
you created your image. Please also include
technical details including camera, lens, focal length, shutter
speed, aperture, filter (if used), tripod (if used) and details of
any software manipulation.
• Entries may be submitted up to midnight on the evening of the
specified deadline.
• The winner will receive a prize from competition sponsor,
Blonde Robot – www.blonde-robot.com.au
FOR THE CONDITIONS OF ENTRY AND IMAGE
REQUIREMENTS VISIT: AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
| 22 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
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STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY
WHAT’S IN
BY SAM EDMONDS
CREDIT: PIXDELUXE/GETTY IMAGES
Are stock libraries the secret to making money
from your photography or a sure-fire way to devalue
the craft? Sam Edmonds discovers the secret to
what you can shoot and what you can sell.
| 24 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
It’s not an experience if you can’t share it.
Nikon D800e, Sigma 35mm f/1.4 ART
lens. 1/80s @ f2.8, ISO 400.
| 25 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
CREDIT OLGA KASHUBIN
irtually since the advent of photography, images
have been capitalised and monetised in a variety of
ways. With the aim of serving demand for fresh imagery, and an idea of quantity over quality, stock libraries and agencies were quick to emerge, with the likes
of Getty and Corbis setting the benchmark for decades.
But in recent years a number of smaller fish have
joined the pond and quickly grown in popularity. Couple
this with the age of visual media, and today the sheer
number of stock images is more immense than ever. Yet
however tempting it may for amateurs and semi-professionals to jump onboard the stock photography train, a
glance at the numbers involved certainly doesn’t paint a
picture of a lucrative practice. So is it worth the time for
budding snappers to contribute to Getty or Shutterstock? Here, we have a chat with some of those companies’ executives as well as some of their star contributors to take a peek behind the curtain of a successful
stock imagery flow and to find out what it takes to
make stock photography worthwhile.
V
GETTING AHEAD A quick google search about the usefulness of stock libraries to photographers (at least in a monetary sense)
will paint a fairly vivid picture of the meagre earnings
experienced by most when first trying their hand in the
stock world. Even despite the claim plastered across
many of Shutterstock’s webpages that they have “paid
over $500 million to its contributors”, it doesn’t take
much to divide that by the sheer amount of photographers on board to see the average income for an individual shrinks to next to nothing.
Even across the spectrum of agencies and libraries available for photographers to choose from, simply the number of people with DSLR’s in their hands
nowadays means that making any semblance of a
living from stock contributions is near impossible.
However, whilst you might not be able to pay the
bills with stock, many of the online platforms offer
sleek and minimal interfaces for uploads, meaning it
doesn’t take much effort to get your work online. And
as your portfolio increases and sales eventually grow,
it might just one day provide some easy background
cash for a new tripod or camera bag.
Indeed it seems that the allure of this kind of passive income is what keeps a substantial portion of
photographers interested in the idea of stock contributions but often it can be difficult to discern the
| 26 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY
LEFT: Sunrise Beach. Sony NEX-6, 16-50mm
f/3.5-5.6 lens. 1/10s @ f9, ISO 100.
CREDIT: OLGA KASHUBIN
BELOW: Sony NEX-6, 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 lens.
1/80S @ F5.6, ISO 100.
best path for getting started in this game and more
so when wading through the large number of libraries and agencies to choose from.
For many, the words stock photography are almost
synonymous with two others: Getty Images. For decades now, Getty has remained the stock image library, and to some extent has set the benchmark for
both image quality and the standard for photographers’ compensation. And in the last few years the giant of Getty has only grown; swallowing their primary
competition Corbis before birthing several offshoots
of their own, including iStock. But according to Getty’s Director of Creative Content, Andrew Delaney,
Getty’s growth hasn’t diminished the core values that
the company set out with and even today, the criteria
for successful images and successful stock photographers at Getty remain the same. “Artists are at the heart of everything we do and the
reason why Getty Images and iStock by Getty Images
has continued to be an important destination for stock
content,” says Delaney. “By providing a platform for
our artists to distribute some of the best stock content
in the world, we are helping them to transform their
lives by making a living through their art.” Responding from Getty’s headquarters in the USA,
Delaney has just returned from a tour from of Australia and New Zealand for “iStockalypse” – a series of
workshops and events that aims to train the next wave
of stock photographers in visual language, image production workflows as well as their ability to continually
produce useful, relevant content.
Perhaps the most interesting aspect of stock photography whilst also the most challenging for photographers is that the appetite of brands and publications
is always in flux. Core to any marketing and publication venture is the need to stay relevant; something
that trickles down to the need for photographers to
produce images that reflect this visually. As Delaney
explains, the last few years have seen a dramatic increase in the want for authenticity. As opposed to the
polished and refined content of decades past, editorial
and marketing now relies heavily on imagery that appears to be genuine and candid, so training the new
generation of stock masters in this language has become increasingly important. “People are highly critical of and vocal about advertising and imagery in a way they haven’t been before,” says Delaney. “Social media has had a huge im-
| 27 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY
pact on the type of imagery that resonates. Put simply,
people want to see authentic, real-life imagery. People are fed up with perfection.” And as he adds, this
has been particularly pertinent in Australia, where a
want for diversity and realism in images is in huge demand. “This is especially apparent with the need for
more authentic representation of Australians,” says
Delaney. “Over the past year we have seen the search
term ‘multicultural’ increase by over 100% year-onyear and the terms ‘indigenous Australian’ and ‘city life
authentic’ are up over 200%.” However, simply being aware of the type of content
that is demand is only half the battle when it comes
to starting out in stock. As most successful contributors will tell you, a large portion of time is dedicated
to brainstorming, planning, scheduling and logistics,
with actual time behind the lens comprising only a
very small percentage of total effort.
Getty contributor Josh Hodge has managed to
carve a good name for himself in the stock imagery
game, amassing an impressive portfolio on the Getty website spanning lifestyle and travel imagery very
much in line with Delaney’s sentiment for authentic
photographs. But as Hodge admits, this hasn’t come
without a considerable investment of both time and
money. For Hodge, “It all started with a trip to Africa
and using a new camera. I got some shots on that trip
that I uploaded to Getty Images via Flickr for fun,” he
says. “Within 18 months, after a lot of investment
and hard work, I had broken even and had a good
portfolio together generating very good income,” he
says – without omitting the need for good planning
and some basic meteorological knowledge: “I think
most of my time and effort is put into planning.
Reaching out to people and places, trying to get
things to align in a way that has authenticity, and the
weather, I’m always watching the weather. I find the
shoots that take the most time to put together and require the most patience often work out the best.” In addition to this, Hodge’s success seems to have
been built on a tripod of concepts: three rules that are
essential to follow for aspiring stock photographers.
Be ahead of the curve, shoot what you know and build
a large portfolio. Hodge draws particular attention to
the first two points, describing the need to know your
own style, develop your own photographic voice and
then to pre-empt the market as much as possible. “I've
always found that anything that is shot a little bit
ahead of the curve or ahead of what the majority of
other people are shooting tends to do better. I read all
of the creative briefs that Getty Images sends out and
some of them trigger my thinking and my passion to
shoot certain themes, either in a completely different
way, or sometimes, just with a slight adjustment,” he
says. “I try and give clients the themes and subjects
that they want to buy, shot in the best way that I know
how to. There is importance in shooting what you
know and what you are passionate about. Start with
what you know best and offer that to clients.” | 28 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
CREDIT PIXABAY/GETY IMAGES
STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY
ABOVE: Keep the connection wherever you are.
Nikon D800e, Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM |
Art (Nikon F) lens. 1/200s @ f2.5, ISO 100.
| 29 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK While the financial benefits of jumping on board with
a stock agency may not always be immediately promising, many amateur photographers still flock to larger
organizations like Getty simply for the ego boost of seeing your first published work or even by just updating
your email signature to “Getty contributor”. And there
is no shame in this. For many that are seriously considering turning the craft of photography into a profession, taking this route can be fruitful both in terms of
self-esteem and eventually a small amount of income.
For years, Getty remained the default selection for
young photographers because of their monopoly hold
on the market. But in more recent times, a number of
new names have appeared on the market and grown
rapidly. Adobe Stock, Stocksy, Crestock and Dreamstime are but a few of the names that have sprung
up in a relatively short amount of time, each offering
a unique take on the buyer/seller relationship and the
benefits for photographers. Stocksy, founded by Bruce
Livingstone, has radically altered the very idea of the
stock contributing model, raising the profit margin
for photogrpahers from Getty’s 20% to 50% as well as
the revolutionary idea of making all contributors stakeholders in the company itself. While Stocksy’s selection process is highly competitive, if you have the right
content and find yourself on board with them, you will
also find yourself benefiting from dividends and real
equity in the business you are contributing to. Perhaps most popular among these new kids on the
block however has been Shutterstock. Having seemed
to have found a happy medium between the traditional
Getty-esque model and a more sleek, modern, community oriented interface, Shutterstock now boasts a very
healthy depository of images, contributors and buyers.
But as has been evidenced across many of the new
stock libraries/agencies like those listed above, most
seem to be acutely aware of the need for more than a
monetary incentive for contributors. In the age of social media, constant communication and shared ideas,
many platforms have aimed to integrate sleeker, more
intuitive and faster interfaces for uploading (something
that Getty has been criticized for omitting) but also to
facilitate camaraderie rather than competitiveness as
web-based integrations like forums, user feedback, ratings and favorites are helping to demonstrate the importance of community in this setting.
But as Paul Brennan of Shutterstock says, this also applies to the company’s behind the scene's employees as
thorough feedback is given to photographers on a regular basis. “We have a team of reviewers who evaluate every piece of content submitted to us, and they determine
whether to approve or decline each one,” he says. “If we
decline something, the contributor receives specific feedback about the reason why it was rejected, which helps to
educate them on becoming a stronger artist. We help our
contributors to grow and get better at their craft.” In addition to this, Shutterstock publishes a regular guide – “The Shot List” that allows contributors
to keep up to date with what is happening across the
industry and facilitate photographers’ ability to cater
to the more immediate needs of image consumers.
As Brennan describes, while membership at a stock
agency/library like Shutterstock might not always
| 30 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
CREDIT: OLGA KASHUBIN
CREDIT: OLGA KASHUBIN
STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY
STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY
“WE HAVE A TEAM OF
REVIEWERS WHO EVALUATE
EVERY PIECE OF CONTENT
THAT IS SUBMITTED TO US AND
THEY DETERMINE WHETHER TO
APPROVE OR DECLINE EACH ONE.”
| 31 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
LEFT: Sheep traffic. Sony NEX-6, 16-50mm
f/3.5-5.6 lens. 1/160s @ f9, ISO 100.
BELOW: Beach kids. Sony A7RII, 24-35mm F2
DG HSM | Art 015 lens. 1/250s @ f8, ISO 160.
STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY
CREDIT OLGA KASHUBIN
LEFT: Ha Long Bay. Sony NEX-6, 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 lens.
1/400s @ f5.6, ISO 100.
ing a hassle-free way to monetise photographs that
might not have ever seen the light of day otherwise. An
advocate of this approach is Shutterstock contributor
Olga Kashubin whose database of imagery on the Shutterstock servers is comprised almost entirely of images
from her travels. Having camped around Japan, Vietnam and New Zealand for long stints of time, Kashubin says that she was looking for a way to potentially
monetise her swaths of images and found the answer
in stock contributing. “I always wondered where all the
material for travel guides, magazines and brochures
is coming from and how I could contribute,” she
says. “That is how I found stock libraries and Shutterstock in particular. It was easy to set up a contributor
account and start uploading. Now my portfolio consists
of thousands of pictures, all taken during my travels.” However, whilst Kashubin’s approach might be
considered much more passive than many in the
stock game, she is quick to caveat that her workflow
is not without a certain level of cognizance toward
techniques that will facilitate her success. Much like
Hodge, her efficacy as a stock contributor has been
built on a trio of principles. Here she draws attention
to the need to set expectations and be practicable, to
be familiar with legalities impacting photography and
to annotate and attribute your work well. On top of
this, Kashubin leaves a parting sentiment that speaks
volumes as to the nature of stock photography as after all, most clients will be utilizing images to speak to
an audience but also to compete within the currently
expected/accepted visual language of advertising and
media. “There are certain norms and quality standards
of processing accepted in the industry. It could be a
topic of lengthy discussion,” says Kashubin. “But in
brief, after going through thousands of photo reviews,
approvals and rejections I formed a workflow and a
style of editing that’s fitting my artistic view, as well as
the requirements of stock agencies and clients. IN A NUTSHELL provide a large amount of a photographer’s income, it
can certainly provide an important “piece of their financial puzzle” and in many ways it is the more interactive features of an agency like these that allow any
given photographer to take a more passive or active approach to interacting with their library. As opposed to
the early days of Getty and Corbis, stock agencies are
now almost customizable in terms of how much photographers choose to actively target certain niches. But having said that, there still exists a rather large
number of stock photographers who take a slightly
more backseat approach. Often simply relying on imagery they would have shot anyway, the intuitiveness
of modern upload interfaces has allowed photos to be
submitted from almost anywhere – essentially provid-
It would seem that whether you take a very passive or very
active approach to both shooting for and interacting with
your stock photo library, the core principle remains the
same. In essence, most images sold from stock libraries
are considered at length and then chosen for their ability
to communicate what advertisers or editorial clients need.
Just like the culture and subconscious-savvy minds
of marketing gurus and entrepreneurs, so the minds of
successful stock photographers must be acutely tuned
to the collective cultural wants and needs of consumers du jour. As analytics become less expensive, photographers’ ability to assess the relevance of their work
becomes increasingly important. And in many ways,
the key to success in the stock game can essentially boil
down to that one term alone: relevance. ❂
| 32 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: MASTER LANDSCAPE COMPOSITIONS
SPOTLIGHT ON
COMPOSITION
BY DYLAN FOX
Sure, there’s the fancy gear and the beautiful
locations. But in landscape photography, composition
is the thing that ties everything together.
Pro photographer Dylan Fox shares the secrets
for how he constructs his stunning images.
| 34 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
My initial plan this morning had been to find some wild
flowers to use as an anchoring foreground point with Bluff
Knoll centered in the background. I did find that, but not
quite to the look I was after. This tree instead caught my
attention as a balancing element to the frame and to add
foreground interest. Sony A7R Mark II, FE 16-35mm
F4 ZA OSS lens. 1/640s @ f8, ISO 500.
| 35 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: MASTER LANDSCAPE COMPOSITIONS
photograph. I would argue it’s much more important
than the equipment you’re using, or I would suggest,
the light nature presents you with.
A basic understanding of how to compose a photograph and some of the general guidelines is important and something that should be practiced. I
am going to go through a few of the things I look for
and consider when setting up a composition and also
the things that can further enhance how you have
arranged your shot through the use of lighting and
considerations in post-production.
THE CLASSIC COMPOSITIONS
hotographing nature can be a very rewarding
and fulfilling experience. A creative outlet
that depends on you escaping the confines of
the city and getting out and about in the natural elements. But it is also challenging. The location you are wanting to get to may be difficult to get
to, or being in the right location when the elements
line up may take numerous attempts. These are all
things we have little control over.
However when all of the elements do align, one
thing that cannot be overlooked is the importance
of a strong composition. Knowing how to place subjects within your frame is critical to making a great
P
I have no shortage of wide-angle photographs in my
collection. When I am using my 16-35mm lens I am
often looking for a few of the more traditional landscape photography elements. These being leading
lines, a balance from foreground to background, and
framing possibilities.
Leading lines can be literal and obvious. We have
all seen a dead straight highway or a jetty to lead
you into the frame. But there are many more ways to
lead the eye into the frame that may not appear so
obvious at first, or until you use them through the
distorted perspective of a wide-angle lens.
A fallen tree may provide a curving introduction
to a frame, leading your viewer through to the subject of your image. The crests of sand dunes or the
ripples below them can do the same. A little bit of
experience in experimenting with these things can
go a long way. You may be photographing near water
where the waters movement may not seem to offer
much at first, however with a slower shutter speed,
the movement of the water through the frame may
paint in some direction for the viewer.
While shooting these more traditionally composed landscape photographs, also consider maintaining interest through the foreground, mid-ground
and into the background. Determining which part
of your composition deserves the most attention
will help narrow down the options of where you will
need to stand and at what height you will need to
position your gear to capture your vision.
Generally speaking, you don’t need too much
dead space in an effective landscape image. Is there
too much space to the left or right of your subject? Is
there too much sky in your frame that really doesn’t
add to your image? It is useful to remember that
what you exclude from your composition is as important as what you choose to include. This craft of
balancing your photographs will come with practice
as well as studying what leading photographers do.
More commonly, when I throw a longer lens on
that will compress the scene, I am looking for repeating patterns, layering lines, or abstract compo-
| 36 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: MASTER LANDSCAPE COMPOSITIONS
“WHILE SHOOTING MORE TRADITIONALLY
COMPOSED LANDSCAPES, CONSIDER
MAINTAINING INTEREST THROUGH
THE FOREGROUND, MID-GROUND
AND INTO THE BACKGROUND”
| 37 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
LEFT: In person this is a very ordinary spot, but this image
shows the importance of composition. There is an obvious
leading line by following the water but also the contrast at the
edges of the water and rock, and the edges of the rock and sky.
All lead the eye directly to the one place. This image won the
International Black & White Landscape Photograph of the year
in 2016. Sony A7R, 16-35mm f/2.8 lens. 1/20s @ f22, ISO 50.
BELOW: I’ve used the motion blur of the clouds to appear to
spray out of the Apostle, the central anchoring part of the
image. To further enhance its power in the photograph, it is the
only area of strong colour and is a colour that contrasts the hue
of the rest of the frame. Canon 5D Mark II, EF16-35mm f/2.8L II
USM lens. 3.2s @ f8, ISO 50.
PHOTO TIPS: MASTER LANDSCAPE COMPOSITIONS
| 38 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
I’ve spent a fair bit of time photographing
Russell Falls in Mount Field National Park.
I found this fern leaf resting on a moss
covered tree that (in my mind at least)
could lead the eye from the fern along the
tree to the right and then to the base of the
next tree in the mid-ground, before finally
landing at the base of the falls. Sony A7R,
16-35mm f/4 lens. 1s @ f16, ISO 200.
| 39 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: MASTER LANDSCAPE COMPOSITIONS
“CREATING A SENSE OF CALM, SIMPLICITY AND
BALANCE IN THE NATURAL CHAOS OF NATURE
CAN PROVE TO BE CHALLENGING”
ABOVE: I inverted the centre column of the tripod so the camera was upside down and just centimeters from the sand to create the dramatic
foreground appearance of these ripples in the sand. All of them lead into a central point. Sony A7R, 16-35mm f/2.8 lens. 1/40s @ f11, ISO 200.
sitions. A common example of this is the layering
lines of sand dunes. There may be considerable distances between their peaks, however with a long
200mm lens for example, these distances appear
compressed. Sometimes these images start to move
towards a more abstract appearance. When attempting to create compelling abstract images, it is important to have a complete lack of an anchoring point.
Converse to the wide angle approach we considered
before, here you will likely be trying to have the
viewers eye simply wander through the image, not
really being drawn to one particular position.
Finding such compositions is much easier said
than done. Creating a sense of calm, simplicity and
balance in the natural chaos of nature can prove to
be challenging. For example, fallen autumn leaves
on a forest floor may look good to the eye, but deciding on what area to focus on may take some time.
Move around the scene with camera in hand before
settling on a composition. Look for a composition
that feels balanced through your viewfinder before
setting up your tripod.
Other than the physical elements of a photograph’s composition, it is important to also consider
the light falling on the subject. This will greatly influence where the eye wants to start and finish. The
use of brightness and darkness, colour and contrast
are all very significant. The eye will naturally go to
areas that are brighter, more colourful, or contrast
the surrounding elements. Contrasting the surrounding elements may actually mean that rather
than being the brightest point, it is the darkest, as it
contrasts an otherwise very bright frame. Similarly it
may mean it is a contrast of colour. An example may
be a red-leaved tree contrasting against a backdrop
of yellow-leaved trees.
This is why you may often see images with darker
foregrounds and skies both of which have little colour, while the peak of the mountain for example, is
in full colour and lit up by the last light of a warm
setting sun. Your eye can’t help but be drawn to the
peak, before then considering the rest of the image.
These are things you can also build on in your
post-production processes.
| 40 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
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PHOTO TIPS: MASTER LANDSCAPE COMPOSITIONS
LEFT: The hike up Bluff Knoll is a beautiful one, but I was exhausted
by the time I reached the top. I soon realized the scene I liked best
was further back down. Using the distant peaks as a backdrop, I
simply framed the scene to have lines through the foreground and
mid-ground simply to create interest in the frame. Sony A7R, 1635mm f/4 lens. 1.6s @ f11, ISO 100.
WHICH SHOULD YOU CHOOSE?
I would suggest the strong composition with ‘ok’ light
will often be a more compelling image than an average
composition with great light. How many photographs
have you seen of an insane sunset with little else of interest in the image? And how many photographs have you
seen of the milky way over an otherwise boring landscape? These aren’t the images that stay with you, and
I’d argue they don’t hold your attention for long either.
Some of my favourite photographs from my own,
and other peoples collections, always have a strong
composition. Of course sometimes they have some
extraordinary light too, but just as often the light
isn’t ‘epic’. It is just enough to compliment the scene
and in doing so, the result is a stunning photograph.
Now of course, with modern cameras if the light over
the scene your camera is pointed at really is flat and
lifeless, you might scramble to find something else, or
just return to the location another time in hope of better light. This is the joy of landscape photography.
THE WANDERING EYE
THE COMPOSITION OR THE LIGHT?
Sometimes you may have arrived to your location
nice and early. You may have already spent some
time scouting it and found a very strong composition. You setup your equipment and now you just
have to wait for the light to do its thing. However lets
say when the light starts to turn it on, its not happening over your composition. The great light may be
behind you, or to the right. So do you abandon your
composition and scramble to shoot a lesser composition with great light or do you commit to the ‘ok’
light but a top-notch composition?
Now of course our modern cameras make it a little easier to move around freely. However for argument’s sake, lets imagine you shoot on large format
film, so scrambling and quickly setting up a composition is a little more challenging.
So you’ve shot your image. But how do you know
if your image’s composition takes your viewers eye
through the image as you were hoping? You may now
have been looking at the image for hours on end, and
your perception of the image becomes a little distorted. I always suggested sitting on an image. Leave it
over night and come back in the morning with fresh
eyes. Often you won’t believe the things you missed
or that you have pushed way too far in post production. Your weary eyes the night before had become so
adjusted to it that it all looked good at the time.
Once you feel you are happy with the final product, a great way to confirm where your eye is naturally
drawn to is to flip the image upside down. Initially your
brain will struggle to register, rather than just going to
the focal point you’re used to looking for. And now the
strength of your composition will be revealed. This
will hopefully confirm or showing weaknesses in the
way your eye wants to wander through the image.
If you still aren’t sure, one of the best solutions is to
show the image to other photographers who you admire,
and who will provide honest critique. Often they will
see distracting elements instantly that you could have
missed because you have become a little numb to them
after staring at the image for so long. Just be sure these
photographers you ask for critique also understand your
style and what you are trying to achieve. Otherwise, they
may just tailor your work to look more like theirs. ❂
| 42 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
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EXPERT ADVICE: FINDING YOUR STYLE
ubs have always been a robust forum for sharing
ideas and in the 1980s the Provincial Hotel in
Cashel Street, Christchurch was no exception.
Every Thursday, studio and news photographers
would meet at the Provincial for a beer after work and
often the talk would turn to photography.
One evening the discussion turned to the topic
of creativity and I mentioned that I occasionally
watched pop-videos on TV for creative inspiration.
Being the youngest in the group I was quickly ridiculed by a few of the photographers, but the next
day I was rather surprised when my mentor and boss,
Richard Poole mentioned over coffee that he too
watched music videos for inspiration.
Pop music might not have impressed everybody, but
the videos that accompanied them in the ’80s often contained some of the most creative and engaging imagery
of the era. Soon after MTV was launched in the early
1980s, music producers realised videos were essential for
promoting music and soon the industry was employing
some of the most creative minds from film and television to create music videos. Its no surprise then, that the
videos were often more inspiring than the music.
Creativity was important to those photographers enjoying a drink at the Provincial for one simple reason;
their careers depended upon it. Regardless of whether
they were shooting a front page for The Press or a billboard campaign for Canterbury Draught, their clients
(picture editors and art directors alike) always expected
creative and engaging imagery, and if those photogra-
P
phers failed to deliver it was almost certain the next
good assignment would go to another photographer.
Creativity is the culmination of many things, but
ultimately a truly unique idea can only be discovered,
not taught. No-one taught the Wright brothers how to
invent an aeroplane, or Edison to make the lightbulb,
and yet we know their original ideas were probably influenced by hundreds, even thousands of past lessons and
experiences that eventual inspired their inventions.
Art is no different. The best artists all have a very
unique vision of the world, and yet they too have
usually been inspired by past lessons, personal experiences and the occasional old master.
And therein lies the challenge; regardless of
whether we are inventors, artists or photographers,
we are all following in the footsteps of other great
talents who have gone before us.
Being a creative photographer is now more challenging than ever; digital cameras have made it possible for
anyone to explore their own creativity, and the internet
has made it just as easy to share (or poach) those ideas in
a moment. But exploring your own creativity is a wonderful journey; it is an opportunity to learn, experiment,
play and ultimately discover a lot about art - and yourself.
I once asked a top New Zealand professional what
they thought made the best photographer, and their
reply was “someone who has experienced everything”. It was great advice.
There are no shortcuts towards becoming a creative
photographer, but here are some ideas that can help.
| 44 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
EXPERT ADVICE: FINDING YOUR STYLE
PHOTO: DOC ROSS
This work, “The Empire is in
Ruins” was made by New Zealand
photographer Doc Ross for a recent
exhibition on the Christchurch
earthquakes in NZ. Doc Ross
began his career as an editorial
photographer for Fairfax but made
the move to full art photographer
about fifteen years ago.
| 45 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
EXPERT ADVICE: FINDING YOUR STYLE
EXPLORE THE PAST
The best creatives have a lot in common with the great
explorers; both know that to be successful they need to
look beyond what we already know of the world. That
is why before starting our own journey of creative discovery, it is worth knowing where other photographers
and artists have already gone before us, not just in recent
months and years but over the past century and beyond.
Photographers like Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946),
Man Ray (1890-1976), Jacques Henri Lartigue (18941986), Ansel Adams (1902-1984), Phillipe Halsmen
(1906-1979) and Arnold Newman (1918-2006) were
making photos long before most of us were born, and
many of their images would still be considered creative
even by today’s standards. Then there are the likes of
Jan Saudek (a Czech photographer who worked almost
exclusively in a small basement to avoid detection from
the secret police), Cindy Sherman (famous for her self
portraits), Sally Mann, Annie Lebovitz, Martin Parr,
Sarah Moon, David La Chapelle, the list goes on. All
of these photographers have helped create a strong
foundation for creative photography.
But where did these photographers get their inspiration from? Most would have been inspired by other artists of their era, cultural and political events, life experiences, writers, poets and numerous other influences.
Most of us are already inspired by the world around
us now, but given the chance it is well worth looking
back to the past to understand how far, and in many instances how little we have progressed over the decades.
ABOVE: Creativity is the culmination of many things, of which the
most basic is simply giving things a go. I made this photo in 1988
as part of the folio requirement to get into photography school. We
were asked to photograph household objects, and so inspired by
Excalibur, I asked a friend to spend half an hour under a table while
holding a can opener up through a can of spaghetti.
OPPOSITE: Lost City 3 is another work from Christchurch
photographer Doc Ross that uses multiple image techniques to
create a complex visual interpretation of the earthquake disaster.
There is a lot to consider when studying the works of other
photographers, like how they interpret a subject, and how
each photographer brings various elements together to
create a narrative. But what is just as important to consider
though, is the technique used in capturing those ideas.
How does each photographer light a subject? How
do they use highlights and shadows? What format do
they use and how does this influence their style? How
does the photographer use aperture and shutter to
manage depth-of-field and movement? How does the
photographer use the colour palette (saturated or desaturated, warm or cool), and how convincing are the
post-production techniques they use?
Technique is essential if you want to bring creativity
to your own picture making process. Yes, cameras can
make all the technical decisions for you nowadays, but
you will only start being a true creative when you start
making some of those decisions yourself.
EXPLORE NEW TECHNOLOGY
Photography has always been reliant on invention, and
each new invention has almost invariably created new
opportunities. David Hockney became famous for his
use of Polaroid instant photos, and Sarah Moon built
her style upon the unique tones of Agfachrome 1000
RS transparency film. In some instances though, there
are opportunities to be found beyond what even the
inventors might have imagined.
| 46 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO: DOC ROSS
PHOTO: ANTHONY MCKEE
STUDY GOOD TECHNIQUE
EXPERT ADVICE: FINDING YOUR STYLE
| 47 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
EXPERT ADVICE: FINDING YOUR STYLE
This photograph, A Secret Conversation was
made by three times winner of the NZIPP/
Epson New Zealand Professional Photographer
of the Year title, Richard Wood. The young
model, Emilie-Rose was photographed in
a furnished cave in a remote corner of New
Zealand while the ferrets were photographed in
a studio and added to the scene in Photoshop. | 48 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO: RICHARD WOOD
EXPERT ADVICE: FINDING YOUR STYLE
| 49 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
EXPERT ADVICE: FINDING YOUR STYLE
PHOTO: ANTHONY MCKEE
“REMEMBER, MOST PEOPLE
DON’T CARE ABOUT WHAT
CAMERA YOU USED TO MAKE
A PHOTO, THEY JUST CARE
ABOUT THE FINISHED RESULT.”
| 50 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO: KAYE DAVIS
EXPERT ADVICE: FINDING YOUR STYLE
ABOVE: Creativity is not just about boldness of vision. This work, Carrot Head and Leaf by New Zealand photographer Kaye Davis,
while simple in its design, has technical applications that subtly unite both traditional and contemporary photographic practices.
OPPOSITE: I made this portrait of Gabrielle in 1992 when being creative often meant dragging real props into the environment.
The photo was made at Birdlings Flat near Christchurch; location lighting, including a small flash in the desk lamp was used to
supplement the bright daylight conditions.
One of my favourite examples is the drone; most professional photographers and videographers use drones
as a camera platform, but for those who enjoy thinking
outside the square, a drone can also be useful for lighting outdoor environments. By mounting a strobe or super-bright LEDs beneath a drone, it is possible to paint
landscapes at night or selectively add light to a scene
that would otherwise be impossible to illuminate.
New toys and technologies are being released every
week, and while you do not need to know about all of
them, it is worth knowing what technologies might
suit your own creative purposes. Often we get seduced by the newest, most exotic lenses when in fact
a cheap plastic optic or filter might just give us the
look and style we want for creative effect. Remember,
most people don’t care about what camera you used to
make a photo, they just care about the finished result.
So should you.
SHOOT IN RAW MODE
Artists love a broad tonal palette to work with, and in
photography, the best way to achieve this palette is to
shoot in RAW mode.
To understand why RAW is better than JPEG mode,
just look at how the two file types are created; in JPEG
mode, the camera’s on-board computer takes the image
from the sensor and then slices and dices it down to just
256 shades of red, green and blue. Combined, this gives
you 16-million colours, but it does not give you much
latitude for correcting the exposure or colour afterwards.
By comparison, a 14-bit RAW file captures over
16,000 shades of red, green and blue, giving you more
than four trillion colours to work with over a much
wider dynamic range. Skies become a lot easier to
manage, shadows can be opened up to reveal stories,
and colours can be manipulated with much greater
control. You will need to convert these files, but the
| 51 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
EXPERT ADVICE: FINDING YOUR STYLE
PHOTO: ANTHONY MCKEE
BELOW: Looking at prints in a gallery or exhibition is one of the best ways to learn about other
photographers’ ideas and techniques. This is the Bill Henson exhibition at the NGV in Melbourne last year.
extended dynamic range of a RAW will give you a better palette to work with.
Most pros shoot exclusively in RAW, but if you learning you can always shoot in both RAW and JPEG
mode while you become confident with the process.
KNOW YOUR MESSAGE
Creativity is often an exercise in aesthetics, but it can
also be a strong vehicle for sharing your philosophical views. Countless writers, composers and painters
have shared their feelings through their art, and so too
have many great photographers. Listen to your internal
monologue, that voice inside you that most people never get to hear, and then ask yourself how you can illustrate those thoughts in your photography. Remember,
creativity does not have to rely on reality; this is your
opportunity to let your feelings and fantasies run free.
SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING NEW,
SOMETHING BORROWED, SOMETHING YOU
Stephen Wright, an American comedian, famously
said that “to borrow from one person is to plagiarise,
to borrow from many is to research”. It is good advice,
particularly in an age when original ideas are far and
few between. Don’t be scared to look at the work of
other photographers and try to emulate those ideas for
yourself; it is a great way to learn good technique and
improve your own skills. Once you are comfortable
with their style though, start looking to bring your own
ideas into the equation. Find your point of difference.
You might start blending the ideas of two or three favourites into you own style, or it might be that you leap
out in your own new direction. Who cares, so long as
you are building your own visual repertoire.
KEEP ON MAKING PHOTOS
Many years ago a colleague commented that if you get
to an assignment and struggle to find a photo, then just
start making photos anyway. It was great advice.
There are days when we do find ourselves in a situations where we know we have to be creative, and yet we
struggle to know where to stand, what to include in our
photo; decisions, decisions, decisions. The process of
looking through the camera and making that first photo,
any photo, not only helps us refocus ourselves on the job
at hand, but in that moment it also gives us an image to
review and compare back to reality. The next step is to
make another photo, and another, and with each new image decide what to keep in frame, and what to change.
To quote Einstein - “don’t keep doing the same thing
over and over, and expect different results”. With every
photo you make, ask yourself how you can improve it;
it might be as simple as moving the subject into better light, adding a design element, or even turning the
whole situation around 180-degrees. Shoot, ask questions, and then shoot some more.
BE YOURSELF
One of the most important lessons we were taught at
photography school was that it was better to be a “firstrate you”, than a “second-rate somebody else”.
It is tough trying to be a unique voice in a world of
six billion people, but it is possible. It just takes a little
creativity, and lots of time and effort. ❂
| 52 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
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| 54 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY
CALL OF THE
BY A L I S O N L A N G E VA D
Photographing wildlife can be both exhilarating and
satisfying but it is not without its challenges. Alison
Langevad shares her tips for getting your camera and
yourself ready for your next wildlife experience.
When this endangered white Rhino came
to drink at dusk I used the rule of thirds to
balance my composition. Canon 5D Mk III, 1635mm f/2.8L lens. 1/125s @ f2.8, ISO 100.
| 55 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY
After searching for an elusive leopard in the Serengeti, I was rewarded by this beautiful one that was not the least bit shy. I stabilized the
camera on a bean bag. Canon 5D Mk III, Canon EF400mm f/2.8 lens. 1/400s @ f/2.8, ISO 100. OPPOSITE: Making use of an animal hide gave
me the opportunity to shoot at eye level. Canon 5D Mk III, Canon EF70-200mm f2.8L lens. 1/320s @ f2.8, ISO 500.
ildlife photography is about revealing something to the viewer that they have never
seen - behavior, a display ritual, habitat,
even something as simple as the sheer size
of a creature. To do it succesfully involves capturing these moments and understanding your gear to
ensure you show them as best you can. Do these two
things, and you’ll be well on your way to capturing
exciting images. Let’s get started.
W
1
BE PATIENT AND QUIET
Wildlife photography is a waiting and
watching game. Animals have their own
schedule and if you quietly wait, you’ll
soon see that things have a way of unfolding in their own time. That bird that
was just sitting quietly may suddenly start
frantically bathing, or a sleeping lion may
wake and start hunting for dinner. Keep
in mind that when shooting in the wild,
animals are often skittish and nervous.
Their senses are often heightened and more often
than not they can easily see and hear us. The solution? Be quiet. Have your gear ready to go and avoid
making too much noise with bags and clothing. I’ll
even take into account the nature of the packaging
around my food - noisy wrapping or packets can scare
away skittish wildlife at crucial moments.
2
THE LENSES
A good starting point for your main
lens is something with a focal length
of 400mm or greater as it will help
‘reach’ distant wildlife. A zoom lens is
easier to work with for a beginner than
a prime lens, as it gives greater options
for framing images. It is not often wildlife will be too close to you, but having
the ability to zoom out when necessary
is an asset.
I first began shooting wildlife with a Sigma 150-500mm
f5-6.3 lens, as it was affordable, however I now use a Canon 400mm f/2.8L prime lens. This lens is more challenging to shoot with because the wildlife must be just the
right distance, but I find the image quality is better and I
can use it in much more varied light. One option is to use
extenders to get the extra distance if your budget is limited, but keep in mind you may lose a stop or two of light.
As well as a substantial zoom lens, something shorter
to cover mid distances and erratic action, such as a 70200mm, can be useful. Finally a wide-angle lens such
as a 16-35mm is great if you wish to include the habitat
of your subject or get the opportunity to be up close. Because wildlife is most often active in the morning and
evening, choosing a lens with a wide aperture will increase your chances of sharp shots at these times. A fast
lens, such as an f/2.8, is fantastic for assisting in low light.
| 56 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
| 57 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY
“TIME OF DAY AFFECTS HOW ACTIVE
A SUBJECT CAN BE...SOME ANIMALS
LOVE DAWN AND DUSK AND OTHERS
THE COVER OF DARKNESS.”
| 58 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY
Always ready to experiment,
these buffalo were the perfect
subject. I illuminated them with a
quick flash as they drank. Canon
5D Mk III, 16-35mm f/2.8L lens.
15s @ f/2.8, ISO 1600.
| 59 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY
3
WHAT MODE?
With wildlife photography it is not always necessary to shoot in manual as
your reaction time may be the difference between getting the shot or missing it entirely.
My advice is to shoot with a consideration for the result you want to
achieve. Aperture priority is often a
good choice for portraits when you
wish to manipulate the background but don’t need
to compensate for movement.
Shutter priority is perfect for when animals are
moving. I usually start with 1/800s for fast action as a
minimum, but increase that if shooting flying birds. At
times, I’ll shoot in manual but set the ISO to auto to do
the final balance for me. Decide beforehand what is
the maximum ISO you would be happy with.
Most importantly, become familiar with these functions instinctively so you can change them on the fly.
ABOVE: Nothing replaces great light. I rose early and waited for these giraffe to cross the river. Canon 5D Mk III, Canon EF400mm f/2.8 lens.
1/1000s @ f/3.5, ISO 100. OPPOSITE: This lion had been sleeping in the rain overnight, so I waited, knowing he would probably shake. 5D Mk III,
Canon EF70-200mm f2.8L lens @185mm. 1/1250s @ f2.8 ISO 800.
| 60 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY
4
UNDERSTAND AUTOFOCUS
Things can happen very quickly shooting wildlife so learn your camera settings and capabilities before you go out.
This includes knowing how to change
your autofocus settings quickly so you
don’t miss a shot.
There are two major autofocus settings that most wildlife photographers
use. On Canon, these are AI-Servo and
One Shot AF (on Nikon, they are called
Continuous/AF-C and AF-S). If my subject is moving,
I’ll use AI-Servo, and if my subject is static, I’ll use One
Shot AF. I have moved these settings into a personal
menu so I can find them and change them quickly and
easily. On most Canon DSLRs using the Q button on
the rear brings up a ‘quick menu’ of regularly changed
settings, including autofocus.
A good way to practice using these is choose a subject
that starts and stops erratically – a bird taking off and landing is a good example – and practice switching quickly
through the two AF modes as the subject stops and starts.
The other important consideration is the size of your
autofocus area. When shooting a subject that is relatively static, I like to focus on the eye where possible, as
this is what we are naturally drawn to when looking at
wildlife photos. Although almost all modern cameras
will default to a zone AF system, you shouldn’t rely on
this AF setting always choosing the eye to focus on.
Instead, use a single autofocus point (You can choose
this in AF point selection on Canon or AF-Area in Nikon)
as it will make hitting focus on the eye much more accurate
and give you full control over the point of focus. On most
Canon and Nikon DSLRs you’ll find a wheel or ‘joystick’
type control on the back that can be used to move the focus
point. Practice using this so it becomes second nature.
For moving subjects, Zone AF is a good starting
point as it will give you a greater chance that one of
the autofocus points will hit your moving subject and
produce a sharp shot.
5 6
TIME OF DAY
STORY TELLING
Time of day affects how active or inactive a subject can be. Wildlife can often
be sluggish during the day and sleep for
hours, while some animals love dawn and
dusk, and others the cover of darkness. If
dawn and dusk is traditionally when the
wildlife you are targeting like to feed and
move about, make use of the beautiful
light. If it is night time they favour, bump
up that ISO. Finally don’t forget midday
sun can often be harsh and hard to work with. Shadows
can play havoc and colours can appear washed out.
Wildlife photography can be used
to take the viewer on a journey. You
have the opportunity to show someone something they have never seen
before, so make the most of it and tell
a story in your pictures. Try to champion your subject and and reveal something about their habitat or behaviour
in your images. But always be accurate
in your depiction and honest in your
editing - for example a yawn can make an animal look
vicious when it is not.
| 61 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
PHOTO TIPS: WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY
7 8
GET YOUR COMPOSITION RIGHT
Choosing great subject matter is one thing,
but it is just as important to compose your
images in such a way that shows those
subjects off at their best. Like with most
genres of photography, the rule of thirds is
a great place to start. If i’m using it, I try to
divide the scene into thirds and place the
eye of the animal roughly on one of the
points where the lines intersect. It’s best
to do this in camera, but always try to give
yourself some space around your subject to play with later in post if you need it. With wildlife photography we
often find ourselves cropping anyway, but be careful not
to crop too tightly, especially with birds, unless you are
after a particular look or to show specific detail.
Finally to draw the viewer in, have your animal subject look into the image rather than out. One-shot AF
mode can help here when your subject is stationary. It
gives you the ability to focus on what you want, then,
while keeping the shutter button partially pressed, recompose your image.
By using a wide-angle lens from down low I got a unique perspective
of these elephants drinking in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. Canon 5D
Mk III, Canon EF16-35mm f/2.8 lens. 1/200s @ f4, ISO 100.
EXPAND YOUR HORIZONS
Stretch for ideas and do not let anything limit your imagination. Look for
different perspectives to make shots
more interesting.
Don’t lose heart if everything is then
not exactly as you had imagined. Perhaps
the weather has changed to rain or the animal you are chasing is nowhere to be seen.
Adapt and work with what you’ve got.
Try new techniques and experiment
with your settings. Never stop learning or think you
have seen and done it all. With wildlife photography
there is always a surprise around the corner. ❂
ONE SHOT VS AI SERVO: WHEN TO USE EACH
In most situations, One Shot AF (known as AF-S with
Nikon) is the best option when photographing a subject that
doesn’t move, for example, architecture or portraiture. For
moving subjects, AI Servo AF (Nikon: Continuous/AF-C) is
best for moving subjects like birds flying or cars driving.
Finally there is also AI Focus AF (Nikon: AF-A) It is
often said that AI Focus AF is a cross between One Shot
AF and AI Servo AF; it behaves like One Shot AF until the
subject moves, after which it behaves like AI Servo AF.
| 62 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
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TESTED: SONY A7R III
TESTED:
SONY A7R III
Late last year Sony released the successor to the
already popular a7R II. The Sony a7R III combines
high resolution, speed and a compact body. But is
it the best bet for megapixel hungry photographers?
Dylan Giannakopoulos takes an in-depth look.
A
t first glance, the Sony a7R III
looks nearly identical to the a9.
The dedicated drive and focus
mode dials, and the ethernet port
have been removed, but all the great ergonomic improvements including the
deeper grip, beefer and more responsive
buttons and dials have been brought
across to the a7R III. In comparison to
the Sony a7R II, the C3 and movie button have been repositioned and there is
now a dedicated AEL and AF-ON button. Similarly, the camera now features
a PC sync port, AF joystick, image rating function and features Sony’s Z series
battery which is approximately 2.2 times
the capacity of the W series battery
found in the a7R II. The camera also
features two SD card slots however just
like the a9, only one slot supports UHSII type SD Cards. The down side to this
is the much slower UHS-I slot creates a
bottleneck and significantly increases
the time it takes for the buffer to clear.
This effect will be particularly felt by
photographers who shoot RAW simultaneously to both SD cards.
To ensure the a7R III can handle the
weight of heavier, fast telephoto lenses,
Sony has increased the rigidity of the
lens mount and improved the bodies
dust and moisture resistance. In a first
for Sony E-Mount cameras, the a7R III
features a USB 3.1 Type-C connection
which opens the doors to a wider range
of compatible accessories and power
supplies. Studio photographers who
shoot tethered are going to appreciate
the USB 3.1 connection which enables
transfer speeds that are significantly faster than what were previously achievable
through the multi-terminal port.
The Sony a7R III uses a hybrid auto
focus system which includes 399 phasedetection and 425 contrast-detection
AF points, 400 more than the a7R
II. Combined, these AF points cover
roughly 68% of the image area. Auto
focus accuracy and tracking speed as
well as the much loved Eye AF, have
roughly doubled in performance when
compared to its predecessor. I found
the camera was able to reliably lock
onto and track moving subjects. There
is a noticeable improvement from the
a7R II, but when it comes to e-mount
cameras, the a9 is still the king of AF.
Whilst the camera uses the same 42.4
MP back-illuminated sensor found in its
predecessor, the a7R III features a new
front-end LSI and an updated Bionz X
processor which has nearly doubled the
readout speed of the image sensor. This
enables the camera to shoot at speeds up
to 10 fps (8fps in live view) using either
the mechanical shutter or in silent shoot| 64 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
ing mode. The a7R III doesn’t feature
the same anti-distortion technology that
is found in the a9, so I wouldn’t recommend using silent shooting mode to capture moderate to fast moving subjects.
My main complaint about the a7R II was
its small buffer and the inability to access
the menu or review your images whilst it
slowly cleared. Thankfully Sony has addressed these issues and can now shoot
approximately 76 compressed raw images, 53 more than the previous generation.
The Sony a7R III has a native ISO
range of 100 - 32,000 (expandable to ISO
50– 102400) and can produce images
with 15 stops of dynamic range at low
ISO settings. As a photographer who often shoots in conditions that are highly
dynamic, I was very impressed by how
much detail I could cleanly recover from
the shadows and highlights. Sony has also
improved upon the 5-axis in-body image
stabilisation and now gives 5.5 stops of
stabilisation, allowing you to shoot handheld at much slower shutter speeds.
In a first for Sony E-Mount cameras,
the a7R III features Pixel Shift Multi
Shooting mode. In this mode, the sensor
shifts by one pixel in each direction to
capture four images. When combined,
they produce an image which has significantly more detail, better colour accuracy and corrects for artefacts such a
✔
TESTED: SONY A7R III
LEFT Steavenson
falls - Marysville,
Victoria. Sony A7RIII,
16-35mm f/4 lens.
60s @ f11, ISO 100.
| 65 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
© World Photo Adventures
JOIN US ON BEAUTIFUL FRASER ISLAND!
“Fraser offers a bit of Africa in Australia. I say this as we use 4WDs as
mobile hides and ‘get up close’ to all sorts of birds from eagles to feeding
oystercatchers. We also enjoy magic sunrises on the eastern beach –
which offers amazing shoot opportunities!
At times dingoes are a special shoot and our many stops allow
photographers to enjoy the challenge of shooting everything from ship
wrecks to weird patterns, shapes and forms – with the chance to learn
‘how to tell a story’.
We are the most experienced photo tour operator on Fraser Island as we
have been working with Kingisher Bay Resort for over 15 years. After
visiting the island numerous times, I can say that it is one of the world’s
best locations to improve your photography and have a lot of fun. You
will be challenged each day to new creative levels!”
– Darran Leal
August 26-31, 2018
Join the teams from World Photo Adventures
and Australian Photography Magazine on World
Heritage listed Fraser Island – one of the most
photogenic locations on earth.
You can join the tour with regular lights to
Hervey Bay via Sydney or Brisbane.
The first ever World Photo Adventures and
Australian Photography tour in 2017 was a
sellout, so don’t miss this special 2018 event.
To book or find out more, visit
worldphotoadventures.com.au.
✔
TESTED: SONY A7R III
LEFT: Princess Pier, Port Melbourne.
Sony A7R III, Laowa 15mm f/2 FE
Zero-D lens. 45s @ f11, ISO 100.
SCORE
moiré and aliasing. The improvements
to image quality were so significant that
it was hard to believe that they were taken by the same camera. Unfortunately,
there are a few issues which limit the
potential of this otherwise great technology. To produce a pixel shifted image,
you must combine the images in Sony’s
Imaging Edge software which I’m not
a fan of. Not only does using an additional program slow down my workflow,
but worst of all, you can only export
the image as a TIFF or JPEG, forcing
you to edit within Imaging Edge. The
biggest improvement Sony could make
would be for the files to be combined
in camera, as a RAW file. This would
cause minimal disturbance to a photographer’s workflow, which in my opinion,
will ultimately lead to this technology
being more widely adopted.
We’re now in an exciting era where
photographers no longer need to purchase
different camera bodies for different applications. The Sony a7RIII is what I consider to be the ultimate combination of
speed and resolution. From landscapes to
products, portraiture and even sports and
wildlife, when paired with a great lens, the
a7R III is able to produce images with outstanding colour and detail. ❂
8.8
RESULTS
HANDLING: ★ ★ ★ ★ ★
The redesigned body is a dream to use. Everything from
the deeper grip, to the addition of the AF joystick has
improved the camera’s handling.
SPECS
Size
127 x 96 x 74mm
Weight
657g (incl. battery)
FEATURES: ★ ★ ★ ★
Sensor
Full frame CMOS
Plenty. That said I would have liked to have an
intervalometer and for some unexplained reason the
Sony PlayMemories app has been removed.
Sensor size
861.6mm2 (35.90mm x
24.00mm)
Sensor format
35mm
AUTO FOCUS: ★ ★ ★ ★
Megapixels
42.4
Fast and reliable. Whilst it’s not quite at the same level
as the Sony a9 or flagship DSLRs, for most situations it
does a fantastic job.
Lens mount
Sony E
Autofocus
The image quality of the Sony a7R III is outstanding!
With the addition of Pixel Shift Shooting mode, image
quality is on another level.
Fast Hybrid 4D AF with 399
focal plane phase-detect
points and 425 contrastdetect AF points
Movie resolution
3840x2160 (30p/25p/24p)
1920x1080 (120p/100p/60p/6
0i/50p/50i/30p/25p/24p)
VALUE FOR MONEY: ★ ★ ★ ★
Viewfinder
EVF: 1.3 cm (0.5 type) 3,686K-dot
Quad VGA color OLED, 100%
coverage, 0.78x magnification
Display
1,440,000 dots (360,000 px)
Native ISO
100 (Minimum)
32,000 (Maximum)
Storage
Dual card slots. MS PRO Duo /
SD / SDHC / SDXC. UHS-II
Price
$4,999, body only
IMAGE QUALITY: ★ ★ ★ ★ ★
Whilst I find it difficult to call any camera that sells for close
to $5,000 ‘value for money’, considering the camera’s
specs and its closest competitor, the Nikon D850, sells for
roughly $300 more, I believe it is reasonably priced.
FINAL WORD
The Sony a7R III is impressive and powerful in a compact
package. With the addition of dual SD card slots and
increased battery capacity, photographers previously
hesitant to make the switch should now be put at ease.
| 67 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
✔
T E S T E D : N YA E V O FJ O R D 3 6
TESTED: NYA EVO
FJORD 36 ACTION PACK
With more and more of us seeking to take the road less travelled with our camera kit, the demand for
gear that will protect our precious stuff in unforgiving conditions is greater than ever. Mike O’Connor
takes a look at a feature-rich camera backpack aimed at adventure seeking photographers.
must admit I don’t often bring an
ice-axe with me when I take my
camera out, but I do often take
my bike helmet, and amazingly,
Nya Evo’s new FJORD action pack has
holders for both. They’re just two of the
clever features of this do-it-all outdoor
camera bag that is overflowing with
smart, well-made touches.
Based in Hong Kong, Nya Evo is the
brainchild of three photography enthusiasts who sought to create a durable
pack for transporting camera gear outdoors with a negligible environmental
footprint. The team began developing
prototypes in 2016 before launching
the backpack-style Fjord 36, which we
were sent for review, on Kickstarter. As
a mark of its popularity, crowdfunding
raised an impressive $37,000, smashing
the $25,000 goal.
The Fjord 36 is available in four colours (graphite, powder, midnight and
pine), and can be sent anywhere in the
world. As tested with three inserts, the
bag retails for US $419.
I
THE OUTSIDE
From the outside, the Fjord is a fairly
typical looking urban-style backpack.
On the sides, there’s stretchy pock| 68 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
ets for water bottles, but these could
be repurposed to hold a tripod or tent
poles if you needed them to. There’s
also straps on the front for the aformentioned ice axe or even bigger loads –
I’ve seen images showing skis and even
70ft long ropes being strapped to them
– so there’s no shortage of options here.
I’ve been using the bag for the last
two weeks on my daily cycle commute
of about 10km from my place to the
train station. It’s not often you go out
on your pushy hoping for bad weather,
but the Fjord is certainly up for the
task, and even on a day of persistent
rain my gear stayed dry inside. Made of
Nylon 210 Denier Ripstop with a water-repellent coating on the front and a
highly water resistant 0.1mm TPU film
laminate on the backside, there’s also
a waterproof rubberised fabric (Hypalon) on the base. If you’re paranoid,
or find yourself caught out in torrential
rain, the bag ships with an integrated
rain cover that is seam taped for good
measure. However because the base
of the bag is rubberised, it’s also quite
effective at repelling water onto your
clothes. It’s something to consider if
you plan to cycle with it or use it in very
wet conditions.
✔
T E S T E D : N YA E V O FJ O R D 3 6
I’ve been storing my bike helmet in the
clever stretchy pocket that tucks away in
the front and clips to straps on the shoulders or the loops on the base, but Nya Evo
reckon this is also a great storage option for
a drone as well. With its metal frame the
back is rigid and well padded, and unzips
to reveal the main compartment, which
you can seperate from the smaller top compartment with an included fabric liner.
Add in the glove-friendly waterproof
zippers, waist strap with a stretchy
pocket for snacks or a waller, along with
the compression straps to help pack
your load down, and the result is a bag
that despite being quite heavy at 1700g,
certainly feels up to the task of bushbashing or hitting the slopes.
THE INSIDE
Recognising that we don’t always want
to carry all our camera gear with us all
of the time, the Fjord comes with a selection of different padded inserts that
Nya Evo calls RCIs – Removable Camera Inserts. In essence, you choose an
insert for the size of your photography
load. The large RCI will comfortably
hold two DSLR bodies, a 70-200mm,
three midsize lenses like a 16-35mm or
24-70mm and a flash. The small RCI
by comparison will hold one DSLR, a
| 69 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
flash and three lenses. The RCIs are
contained in their own bags, fold down
close to flat and are suitably padded on
all sides with stretchy straps to ensure
your gear doesn’t fall out when you
open the main compartment zip.
The RCIs are a practical solution
that means you can use the bag without them if you’re not carrying camera
gear, and if you are, space isn’t wasted
in the rest of the bag with padding you
don’t need. The RCIs have handles and
anchor D-rings so they can be used on
their own too, quite handy if you want
to put the bag down and climb up
something for a better view.
LEFT The outside of
the Fjord 36 has plenty
of straps for carrying
just about anything.
ABOVE: Without the
RCIs to bulk up the
shape, the Fjord looks
nondescript. But even
with them, few people
will realise you’re
wearing a camera bag.
✔
T E S T E D : N YA E V O FJ O R D 3 6
The Nya Evo Fjord
36 is not the largest
camera bag at just
50cm high, but is still
able to fit a suprisingly
large volume of gear.
However with the additional cost of the
RCIs I imagine most users would probably
not bother buying more than one. I was lucky
to be sent all three sizes with our review bag,
and I found myself settling for the medium
size for shuttling cameras and lenses around
most of the time. It’s worth considering how
much gear you generally take when packing
your camera and using that to help decide
which is the best option for you.
The front pocket is my favourite part of
the bag as its probably the section that bag
designers struggle to optimise the most.
Not with the Fjord. It’s quite roomy and offers two separate pockets, one of which is a
dedicated laptop sleeve that fits up to a 15”
MacBook Pro, and doubles as a storage space
for a camelbak bladder. There’s also a seperate mesh pocket for valuables, and a pouch
that can take A4 size documents. I found this
pouch in particular perfect for storing a few
copies of AP mag as I whipped across town
for meetings, with the corners arriving safe
and sound and dog ear free.
find the excess of straps and heavy duty waterproofing a bit overkill, and once you add in
the RCIs, the Fjord isn’t cheap. But the bag
itself can be purchased on its own and you
could choose to buy just one insert to keep the
cost down if you’re penny pinching.
Nya Evo describe the Fjord 36 as a bag
that’s ‘as versatile as you want it to be’, and
its hard to argue with this. You can strip out
weight by ditching the inserts, and use it like
I have, lugging a change of clothes and my
laptop while out on the bike, or add an insert
for your camera, strap on a tent and head out
to the bush. If it suits your needs, few backpack style camera-bags offer the functionality and spaciousness of the Fjord 36. I recommend it highly.
Find out more at www.nya-evo.com. ❂
SPECIFICATIONS
SPECS
Volume:
36 litres
Weight stripped 500 g / 3.30 lbs
down:
OVERALL
The Fjord 36 is an impressive camera bag. It’s
sturdy, exceptionally well-made and packed
with smart features that help make it really
versatile. That said, if your favourite type of
photography trip is less mountain climbing
and more mountain admiring, you might
Weight loaded:
1700 g/3.75 lbs
Dimensions:
32 (W) x 50 (H) x 25 (D) cm
Material:
Nylon 210 Denier Rip-stop
fabric, Polyester 200 Denier
lining, Hypalon base
| 70 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
APS GALLERY
BEST LAID
PLANS
Despite it taking more than 25 years
to actually get round to joining
a camera club, John Conway has
been making up for lost time ever since.
W ITH JOH N CON WAY
M
y first foray into photography came when
I was about 12. My family had emigrated
to Australia and while living at the hostel I
took images of those newly arriving. They
would send these home, and in exchange give me
stamps from their home countries. Although it's
fair to say I was more into stamp collecting than
photography, it did peak my interest.
It wasn’t until my late teens when I bought a second hand Yashica TL that my interest really took off.
It was manual everything of course, but worse, the
light meter didn’t work, so there was plenty of guess
work along the way. I found I could judge light to fall
within a ballpark region of exposure, but my frustration grew as I had no guidance, none of my friends
took photos and all I had to rely on were out of date
photography magazines from the UK.
There were lots of photos but little in the way of
education so I decided to join a local camera club.
However I had gained an apprenticeship with a
newspaper, so that was put on hold.
Fast-forward 25 years and my wife bought
me a Sony digital point and shoot. Lunchtime walks away from work enabled me to see
things and go back to work and print on our digital
printer. I was hooked again.
Away from work I was very much into landscape
for its peace and quiet. In more recent years I’ve
enjoyed Sports and People, and some Creative
work. There's still so much to learn, but now with
like-minded people and information only a key
stroke away, I’m making up for lost time.
Oh, and I ended up joining Geelong Camera
Club, some 30 years later. Better late than never!
| 72 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
A make-up artist was looking for some promo type
shots for her course portfolio, plus it gave me an
opportunity to increase mine. The gold leaf was to
be applied as part of the make up on the face, but we
arranged to have it spread out over a wider area. We had
the model lie down while I shot from above on a step
ladder. I think the hair arrangement plus the gold is what
catches the eye first. Canon EOS-1D Mark IV, 24-105mm
f/4L lens. 1/200s @ f11, ISO 200.
| 73 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
APS GALLERY
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT:
Death from above; Red; Time and tide.
ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER
You can see more of John
Conway’s work on Facebook
at www.facebook.com/
chromagraphics.photography.
THE AUSTRALIAN PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY
Membership with the Australian Photographic Society caters for enthusiasts, amateurs and professionals
in photography.
The APS can help you improve your photography, increase your level of satisfaction and achievement with
your images, and make lasting friendships with other photographers throughout Australia. All that is required
is that you take two steps; the first, joining the society; the second, becoming involved in what it has to offer.
Find out more about the APS at www.a-p-s.org.au.
| 74 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
APS FOCUS
THE
MEMORY
TEST
CREDIT XPETER MANCHESTER
How many ‘original’ images do we
see these days, and how many do
we actually remember?
WITH PETER MANCHESTER
E
very year APSCON (the annual conference
of the Australian
Photographic Society)
is organised in Australia. In 2018 the conference, which will be held from the 11th
to 16th September, is at the Gold Coast.
In 2017 I attended APSCON in Forster/Tuncurry to be part of the amateur
photographic community and to view
imagery that may be innovative and
new, and possibly help me determine
my future directions in photography.
After attending fifteen or more lectures
six months ago, I now find myself reflecting and asking, ‘What images did
I see that were memorable?’ And ‘what
were those images that have remained
in my mind that I will keep remembering as “wow” photographs?’
We are bombarded by photographic
images every day. They go into our mind,
perhaps for a few seconds, and then out
again. Many photographers are active
viewers of Facebook, and Instagram, and
it appears to be part of our daily routine to
see what other people are photographing.
How can we as photographers take
an image that will never be forgotten?
This certainly is a leading question. Per-
sonally, I must admit I do not remember many nature photographs, photos of
sunsets, mountains, lakes or seascapes.
Algorithms occur in mathematics
and computer science, but is there an
algorithm that will help to recognise
memorable photographs? Do our ‘eyes
and mind’ with experience, develop
an unambiguous specification of what
could be a memorable photograph?
One that is memorable to me is the
dolerite columns on Wellington Range
photographed by Peter Dombrovskis.
But why is this image memorable?
In a research paper by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT),
they have developed an algorithm for
their training courses for journalists,
photojournalists and media editors to
recognise memorable photographs.
MIT tells us that amateur photographers with dreams of taking memorable
images shouldn’t go to national parks
and obsess over the best composition
and shutter speed. They should venture
(as an example) to a quirky second hand
store or hang around a protest rally. So
what is really memorable? Weird and
counterintuitive images do well, according to the algorithm. A road sign
showing an “echidna crossing”, a peculiar chair, or a clown driving a bus.
| 75 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
Conflict and suspense are often memorable, like road rage, or a surfer shooting a large wave. Photos of bedrooms or
gardens generally induce yawns.
Apparently to gauge the memorable
photos, 720 people were shown hundreds of photos and were then asked
which images they would like to see a
second time. Images that were recalled
on their second appearance were considered memorable. The results from
were used to train a computer system.
The algorithm then began to realise
the underlying traits that made the image memorable to humans.
You can upload your photographs to
see how they score at memorability.csail.
mit.edu. I recently captured a great sunrise and it was ranked “very low” on the
memorability scale. A shot showing the
demolition of a high rise building was
mid-range but a ceramicist moulding a
female torso scored very high.
The researchers’ found that memory
improves when people are shown a higher percentage of memorable images.
Textbooks and teaching aids could start
to use visual aids that have been proven
to “stick” in our minds.
So did my attendance at APSCON 2017
give me any memorable images? Probably
only a couple, but that’s another story! ❂
My image of
Remarkable Bay in
Tasmania scored
realatively low in the
MIT algorithm. But is
it a memorable image?
MARKETPLACE
A GUIDE FOR PHOTOGRAPHY ENTHUSIASTS
MARKETPLACE
TO ADVERTISE CONTACT JODIE REID ON 02 9213 8261 OR JODIEREID@YAFFA.COM.AU
| 76 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
MARKETPLACE
A GUIDE FOR PHOTOGRAPHY ENTHUSIASTS
MARKETPLACE
TO ADVERTISE CONTACT JODIE REID ON 02 9213 8261 OR JODIEREID@YAFFA.COM.AU
| 77 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
IMAGE DOCTOR
IMAGE DOCTOR
Images need a pick me up?
The doctor will see you now.
BY SAIMA MOREL
TIMELESS
Michael Smee wrote: “This is
a photograph of my granddaughter, Mae, in my garden. It
was an overcast afternoon and
this a fairly shady situation, so
there was not a lot of available
light. This was a rare moment,
as my grand-daughter is usually
smiling and moving. I did some
adjustments in Lightroom,
including the addition of a dark
vignette, to give the image
more atmosphere.”
I really like this image, and
the monochromatic touch adds
a slightly sinister feel to all that
shade, those eyes like black
holes and the child’s intense
expression. It is also extremely
sharp and well-exposed, so there
is a lot to look at in the details in
the leaves and the child’s hair and
dress. The choice of mono gives
a great sense of timelessness. It
could have been set a hundred
years ago, except perhaps for
the shortish length of the dress.
It is a shame that while you were
making adjustments, you didn’t
clean up her grubby mouth area
which is not quite in keeping with
the beauty of her face and hair or
the moodiness of the scene.
SAIMA’S TIP: Colour images
can tend to date themselves,
while black-and-white seems to
transition through time better.
TITLE: Mae
PHOTOGRAPHER: Michael Smee
DETAILS: Fujifilm X-T10, 18-55mm
XF Fuji lens @ 24.3mm focal
length,1/160s @ f5, ISO 400.
| 78 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
TITLE: Smoky Sunset
PHOTOGRAPHER: Ian Smith
DETAILS: Canon SX30 @
150.5mm focal length,
1/320s @ f5.8, ISO 80.
WORK ON SILHOUETTES
According to Ian Smith, when it was really smoky up at Etna creek in
Queensland, he grabbed his camera and raced out to capture the sun going
down in the thick haze. This is a spectacular image of the sun, and the
great thing is that it is not a burnt-out hole in the sky - as most direct shots
of the sun are. That haze acted as an effective filter. I also like the fact that
there is some silhouette interest in front of the sun. The shame is that it
wasn’t a more striking or sharply dramatic outline than the fuzzy bushes,
rooftops and a pole. If you had had more time to explore different shooting
locations, there might have been even better or more interesting “scene
within the scene” to be had. One easy improvement to this image would be
to crop the bottom of the frame as there is far too much black in the frame.
This would make that sun even more prominent and dramatic.
SAIMA’S TIP: A simple subject generally needs to occupy the frame well.
TITLE: Sister
PHOTOGRAPHER: Amelia Racz
DETAILS: PENTAX K-50 @ 33mm
focal length, 1/10s @ f5.6, ISO 200
NOT JUST TONES
Amelia Racz took this picture of her sister sitting in a tree during an evening
walk. “I love how photogenic she is and was happy with the composition.
However, when I take portraits there is always a red tinge to the skin tone.
I find it difficult to capture the colours I can see, especially at sunset. I find
this mostly in nature and landscape photography where I can never seem to
capture oranges, pinks and purples. Before making any colour decisions, you
need to get the exposure and brightness right. Underexposure will give richer
colour so just brightening up a shot will take away some of that redness. In this
case, the backdrop is very light and bright, while your sister’s face is slightly
underexposed. On the left side of her face where more light is reaching, it is
lighter and so the skin is more golden than red. You need to brighten up her
face. Your white balance requirements will also change depending on the time
of day and the weather conditions. With sunset images, you are shooting at the
‘red’ end of the day, so the image will be naturally much warmer in tones.
SAIMA’S TIP: Automatic white balance in modern cameras works
quite well most of the time, and, when it doesn’t, shooting in RAW
allows colour correction.
| 79 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
IMAGE DOCTOR
SENSATIONAL SUNRISE
Peter Muldoon took this shot on a trip
to Port Stephens as part of a weekend
photography tour. He said: “We went to
a local beach for a sunrise shoot, but the
weather gods had other ideas with heavy
clouds and the threat of rain. I realised the
sunrise was out of the question, so I moved
to another spot along the beach next to a
lonely piece of driftwood. The 10-stop ND
filter allowed me to smooth out the water
and blend the colours.”
Well, I am glad a sunrise was nonexistent, so you had to look elsewhere.
Having made the effort to get up early,
people often feel they have to shoot a
sunrise, regardless of how average the
lighting and colour are. This is a lovely shot
and ticks a whole lot of boxes: beautiful
clean, sandy beach, nice bit of driftwood as
foreground subject, lovely streaky clouds
as a counterpoint to the smoothness of
the water and sand, neat rule-of-thirds
composition, smoky-looking water, nice
gradation with the colour and loads of
mood. My only comment would be to make
it a little lighter to get that sand brighter
and whiter-looking.
SAIMA’S TIP: When a sunrise or sunset
is average, look for shooting interest
elsewhere.
TITLE: Untitled
PHOTOGRAPHER: Peter Muldoon
DETAILS: Canon 5D MK IV, Canon 16-35mm lens, 90s @ f11, ISO 100.
Lightroom used to adjust sharpening, highlights and clarity.
| 80 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
SUBTLE SUNSETS
This shot was taken on the Tagus River in Lisbon. Glenda Gore had just arrived at sunset and raced
to the riverbank to try and get some slow water
shots. She said: “As a new comer to photo processing
I endeavoured to achieve some basics, such as
removing dust spots, some surplus people on the jetty
and straightening. I also attempted some dodging on
the rocks. I feel the image though is still a little flat, any
advice appreciated.”
While I agree that the image lacks a bit of oomph,
it certainly ticks a few other boxes. At 100 ISO, it is
noise-free, and that dry ice effect in the foreground is
effective. The problem is that it probably wasn’t such
a great sunset. Ideally, less of the cloud cover and
better-shaped clouds would have helped get more
colour in and make that sky more interesting. There
are also a few tell-tale halos around some of those
rocks in the foreground that are a sign that your postproduction ‘dodging’ needs to be more subtly done.
SAIMA’S TIP: As a guide to see how heavy-handed
or subtle your software adjustments are, use the
before/after, undo/redo or history panel to compare
the original and your final image.
TITLE: Tagus Blues PHOTOGRAPHER: Glenda Gore
DETAILS: Canon 760D, EFS 24mm f/2.8; 13s @ f22;
iso 100; tripod; Affinity photo used for editing.
AI SERVO FOR MOVEMENT
Peter Kornek wrote: “I caught this pelican
taking off after an apparently heavy lunch.
I had to crop the original and I know this
reduces the resolution.” He said that, given
the lens at the time, there was no other option
without the bird appearing too small, and he
was happy with the crop. Other issues were
the lighting, being close to midday, and his
shooting location, which was limited to a
spot near the wharf at Narooma. He wrote:
“I applied the Microsoft photo processing tool
and found it to be just as good as the Adobe
product LR6 and PSE 12.”
Shooting subject matter on the move can be
tricky. The result in this case is that very little in
the frame is sharp - only about one inch in the
foreground - and the main subject is not in the
foreground. I suggest that you try continuous
focus (AF-C (Nikon) or AI Servo (Canon)) to ensure
sharpness when shooting active wildlife. With
this setting, you select the target, then press the
shutter down to set the focus and then just keep
following the bird. The camera will continuously
adjust the focus distance as the subject moves
within the frame so you greatly improve the
percentage of sharp images. It obviously doesn’t
help you to get a bigger bird in the frame. For that
you need a longer lens or need to get much closer.
SAIMA’S TIP: The backs of heads or bodies,
are usually the least interesting viewpoint of a
person or animal, especially at a distance.
TITLE: Cleared for Take-Off
PHOTOGRAPHER: Peter Kornek
DETAILS: Canon EOS 6D, 24-105 F4L lens, 1/400s @ f4, ISO 100, circular
polarising filter, sharpened slightly, noise reduced with slight adjustments
to exposure, contrast, clarity and saturation.
| 81 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
IMAGE DOCTOR
LOVELY LIGHT
Trevor Wilkinson took this
photo on a visit to Western
Australia in the Stirling Ranges
west of Bluff Knoll, late in
the afternoon and just after
some rain. He wrote: “ As the
sun reappeared behind the
mountains, the opportunity for
a shot became very apparent.
I like the lovely variance in
shades and contours, together
with the aftermath of the
weather above the mountains.” The layered look is lovely,
especially since the contours are
softened with hazy lighting from
the weather and time of day.
The combination has provided a
more gentle, subtle tonal range.
That said, you could boost
the contrast just a little as the
whites are a little muddy and the
shadows a tad flat. Another way
to improve this image would be
to crop the bottom of the frame,
with all that flat foreground bush
area, by at least half, to draw
those mountain shapes even
closer to the viewer. This is one
of those images that would also
work well in black-and-white.
TITLE: Untitled
PHOTOGRAPHER: Trevor Wilkinson
DETAILS: Nikon D90, Nikkor 18-300mm lens @
230mm focal length, 1/1600s @ f6.3, ISO 200,
minor adjustment in lighting and contrast.
SAIMA’S TIP: Sun reappearing
soon after a spell of rain
can provide magical lighting
conditions for shooting.
HOW TO SUBMIT AN IMAGE
Find out more at
fujifilm.com.au
C O M PE T I T
I
S
• Email entries to: imagedoctor@
australianphotography.com with
‘Image Doctor’ in the subject line.
• Include your name, image title and up to
150 words about how you created it.
• Only one image per person per month.
• Images must be saved in JPEG format.
Maximum file size is 5MB. Include your
name in the filename of the image.
• An Australian address is required in
order to receive the prize.
• Employees of Yaffa Publishing or the
sponsor are not eligible to win the prize.
• The editor’s decision is final and no
correspondence will be entered into.
TO
ON
Thanks to Fujifilm, Michael Smee has won a brilliant
Fujifilm Finepix XP130 camera valued at $299.
Integrating four rugged protection features, the XP130 is
waterproof to 65ft/20m, freezeproof to 14°F/-10°C, shockproof
to withstand drops from 5.8ft/1.75m, and dustproof to keep out
sand and other foreign particles. Inside you'll find a 16.4 megapixel
1/2.3"-inch BSI-CMOS sensor. The camera automatically adjusts
shooting settings according to the scene, and features 10 frames
per second high-speed continuous shooting. The widest setting
of 28mm on the versatile Fujinon 5x optical zoom lens is perfectly
suited to close up action shots and beautiful natural scenes. Clear
portraits are easy using the 5x optical zoom and you can get even
closer using the 10x Intelligent
Digital Zoom. The XP130 also
features a large 3-inch highdefinition 920K-dot LCD and
Bluetooth connectivity.
PH O
A FUJIFILM FINEPIX XP130 VALUED AT $299
LOOKING FOR MORE
GREAT PHOTO CHALLENGES?
JOIN ONE OF OUR
ONLINE PHOTO
COMPETITIONS AT
WWW.AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
| 82 | MAY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
Focal Length: 210mm Exposure: F/5.6 1/250sec ISO: 1600
Reach out and capture the beauty.
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www.tamron.com.au
IS PROUD
OF EACH AND EVERY ONE OF OUR CAMERA PEOPLE.
We are humbled and incredibly proud to announce the winner of the
CAMERA HOUSE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR COMPETITION
“MACRO” CATEGORY AS CHRISTIAN BYRT FROM BUNBURY CAMERA HOUSE
for exquisitely capturing this amazing moment in
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This award has been proudly supported by our partner
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