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M A Y 2 0 1 8 �30
AIRPORT LOUNGES
100 compelling reasons
to arrive early
MYKONOS
Greek party island of the
rich and beautiful
HAMBURG
The docks are revitalising
the German port
HIGH
TIME
FOR
QUITO
Ecuador?s
capital takes off
PLUS
Tried and Tested ? Qantas?
London-Perth nonstop
Make Complex Corporate Travel Simple
0203 535 9290
Info@simplexitytravel.com
Simplexity Travel Management Ltd
5th Floor, 3 Hanover Square, Mayfair, London, W1S 1HD
CONTENTS
MAY 2018
R E G U L AR S
14
UPFRONT
Airline and hotel news
from around the world
22
INBOX
Your letters and online
comments
58 4 H O U R S I N . . .
MARRAKECH
A whistle-stop tour of
Morocco?s medieval city
66
OPINION
Do we want shopping-mall
airports, and why don?t
hotels do morning lets?
90
DEPARTURE S
A look back at business
travel in May 1983
F E AT UR E S
42
WINDSWEPT WONDER
An extraordinary journey by
military flight to an extraordinary
place, the Falkland Islands
46
TRIED AND TESTED
FLIGHTS
80
Qantas? business class nonstop
LHR-PER; Singapore Airlines? new
A380 first class suites LHR-SIN
84 T R I E D A N D T E S T E D
HOTELS
Amba Marble Arch and May Fair
hotels in London; Como The
Treasury in Perth, Australia
M A Y 2 0 1 8 �30
AIRPORT LOUNGES
100 compelling reasons
to arrive early
HAMBURG
MYKONOS
Greek party island of the
rich and beautiful
The docks are revitalising
the German port
PLUS
Tried and Tested ? Qantas?
London-Perth nonstop
HIGH
TIME
FOR
Ecuador?s
capital takes off
In continental Europe, rail sleeper
services are heading for the sidings.
But in the UK, the Caledonian
Sleeper is being spruced up
The future looks bright
in Quito, Ecuador
001 OFC BT MAY COVER QUITO.indd 1
60
26
RISING
C APITAL
QUITO
SLEEPER SUCCESS
17/04/2018 12:57
LIFE CYCLADES
Loved by pleasure-seekers since
the 1950s, a raft of new hotels,
restaurants and bars is ensuring the
appeal of Mykonos endures
72
G A M E , S E T A N D WAT C H
Patek Philippe has approached
?sports-luxe? watches with the
confidence of a Roger Federer serve
6
THE REPORT
ON TH E C OVER
82
30
TOP 100 AIRPORT
LOUNGES
Because not all destinations
are on the Departures board
85
86 T R I E D A N D T E S T E D
LO N D O N R E S TAU R A N T S
Brat; Roganic; plus three fun wine
bars with great options by the glass
88 S M A R T T R A V E L L E R
CARD, DOCUMENT AND
PHONE SECURITY
Smartphone, credit card and
identity theft ? how to minimise
the impact
M AY 2 0 1 8
86
50
Q UAY S TO S U C CE S S
Hamburg?s rejuvenated waterfront
is putting the city on the map
businesstraveller.com
WELCOME
A
short while ago I was lucky enough to fly on the new A380-800 superjumbo
from Singapore Airlines. Over a decade ago, the airline was one of the first
customers for the A380 along with Emirates, and it has now introduced new
seating in all four classes (economy, premium economy, business and first class).
Last month we reviewed business and premium economy, and on page 82 in this issue
you can read about the experience in the first class suites (all these reviews, including
the economy review, are available in greater depth at businesstraveller.com).
There are just six first class suites, one on either side of the aircraft with a corridor
running between and doors to each suite. If you are travelling as a couple, you can
choose to drop the divider between you and the suite in front (suites 1A and 2A or 1K
and 2K), but otherwise you have what luxury buys ? privacy, albeit with attentive
service from several Singapore Airlines staff throughout the journey.
It?s a wonderful experience, but what struck me (and not for the first time) is how
luxury is now equated with privacy. It?s not a criticism of these excellent designs,
because it is possible to drop the divider between the seats to travel with a friend or
loved one. But one memory of the flight is the conversation I had with a fellow
passenger in the corridor of the first class suites. It was nothing very profound, but it
was welcome, and coming back on an overnight flight in premium economy only a few
hours later, I spoke with several passengers, and enjoyed the conversations we had.
For that reason, I believe the best thing about travel is meeting other people. I invite
you to have a look at our new website businesstravellerevents.com, and I hope as a
result we meet one another soon, either here, or there.
8
Tom Otley Editorial director
IN THIS ISSUE
M AY 2 0 1 8
WINDSWEPT WILDERNESS
You can buy a seat on a military
jet going to the Falklands in the
South Atlantic. So we did.
(Page 42)
HARBOUR AMBITIONS
STUFF OF LEGEND
Hamburg?s port has been
redeveloped, and is now home to
the country?s top attraction.
(Page 50)
We discover what keeps the rich
and glamorous returning to the
Greek island of Mykonos.
(Page 60)
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
ILLUSTRATION: BENJAMIN SOUTHAN
LOUNGE ABOUT
We choose 100 top airport
lounges on five continents ?
with your help.
(Page 30)
CONTRIBUTORS
DANIEL SCHEFFLER
ANDREW EAMES
Born in Africa, raised in Europe and now based in New
York, writer Daniel Scheffler contributes to various
publications including The New York Times, GQ and
Wanderlust Travel. He is currently working on a coffee-table
book on hotels coming out in early 2019. For this
issue he spent some time in Quito, Ecuador?s rising capital,
and interviewed key players in the business world
there. Read about it on page 26.
A long-time contributor to Business Traveller, Andrew Eames
is a newspaper travel writer and Germany specialist, having
married a lass from Lower Saxony. That means an awful lot
of sauerkraut. Over years of family visits he?s been through
Hamburg many times, and watched its docklands project
grow, with the extraordinary new Elbphilharmonie its
crowning glory. For this issue he set off to Germany?s largest
port, to find out what makes Hamburg tick. See page 50.
10
NIGEL TISDALL
Jenny Southan was features editor at燘usiness Traveller爁or
ten years. Now freelance, she writes for publications
including燤r Porter,燭he燭elegraph,燜orbes and燙ity AM,
and also runs her own online travel trend forecasting
magazine燝lobetrender�(globetrendermagazine.com). In
search of sun, she recently took time out to visit the Greek
island of Mykonos, which proved to have just the right mix of
hedonism and tranquillity. Her feature is on page 60.
Nigel Tisdall is a travel addict who writes for many
leading UK titles including The Telegraph, Ultratravel,
Financial Times and Sunday Times Travel Magazine.
He spends a lot of time in airline lounges, which allows him to
catch up with the latest燘usiness Traveller, and爄s currently on
a three-month writing trip around South America,
which began with an 18-hour flight to the Falkland
Islands, described on page 42.
M AY 2 0 1 8
ILLUSTRATIONS: BENJAMIN SOUTHAN
JENNY SOUTHAN
businesstraveller.com
Moscow
Tokyo
Fly when you are dreaming
Dream when you are flying
The Full-Flat * seats in our new Business class cabin aboard Aeroflot?s ultra-modern Airbus A330-300**
and Boeing 777-300ER on long-haul routes recline to a fully horizontal position. Total comfort day
and night. You won?t even notice you?re not in a real bed!
aeroflot.com
* Full-Flat ? fully reclinable seats. ** Varies depending on configuration of aircraft type.
Install app:
Managing director Julian Gregory
Group publisher Rania Apthorpe
EDITORIAL
Editorial director Tom Otley
Managing editor Michelle Harbi
Art director Annie Harris
Consumer editor Alex McWhirter
Chief sub editor Guy Dimond
Online editor Mark Caswell
Deputy chief sub/staff writer Becky Ambury
Contributors Dominic Bliss, Marisa Cannon, Andrew Eames,
Chris Hall, Olivia Hultgren, Jeff Mills, Derek Picot, Daniel Scheffler,
Jenny Southan, John Stepek, Nigel Tisdall
ADVERTISING
Head of sales Chris Davies
Head of luxury and lifestyle Edith Collins
Sales manager Rebecca Fraser
ADMINISTRATION
Circulation and production manager Jamie Halling
Head of events Emma Gordon
Marketing executive Kirsty Clark
12
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M AY 2 0 1 8
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UPFRONT
F I R S T P R I N C I PA L S
14
THE FORMER RUSSELL HOTEL HAS REOPENED as the Principal London
following a � million restoration. Designed by Charles Fitzroy Doll (also
responsible for the dining room on the Titanic), it has 334 rooms, Fitz?s cocktail
bar with original features including a large fireplace and stained glass window,
all-day dining restaurant Neptune with a central oyster bar, and Burr & Co
coffeehouse. Further spaces will open during May and June, including the hotel?s
original ballroom, eight meeting and events spaces, and The Palm Court, with
a winter garden and an outdoor terrace looking out onto a living wall. Single
rooms start from around �8 in May. theprincipalhotel.com/london
KLM?s new business seat
DUTCH CARRIER KLM has
unveiled its new business class seat
for the B787-10 aircraft. KLM has
eight planes on order, and in June
2019 will be the first European
carrier to take this longest variant of
the Dreamliner series. The Venture
seat, by Japanese firm Jamco, will
be customised by Dutch industrial
designer Hella Jongerius and has a
fully-flat bed and an 18.5-inch IFE
screen. The fishbone configuration
gives all 38 business class passengers
direct aisle access. klm.com
M AY 2 0 1 8
Four
new
Chicago
hotels
businesstraveller.com
UPFRONT
COMIC RELIEF
BRUSSELS AIRLINES HAS UNVEILED the latest aircraft in its
?Belgian Icons? series, featuring characters from comic franchise
The Smurfs. The Aerosmurf design (named after the title of a
comic in which a character dreams of flying) features 19 Smurf
characters as passengers and crew, including Smurfette as the
captain and Papa Smurf as co-pilot. brusselssairlines.com
OPEN SEASON
The 152-room Nobu Hotel Ibiza Bay on the shores of
Talamanca Bay and a member of Small Luxury Hotels
of the World has reopened for the season. The hotel?s
Nobu restaurant has bento boxes and plates of sushi
and sashimi served against a soundtrack of live DJs
playing Balearic beats, but it?s not all hedonism. The
hotel also offers yoga and meditation sessions in the
Ibiza Bay Spa by Six Senses. A series of visiting
practioners will offer reiki, ayurveda, detox and
rejuvenation workshops and specialised treatments.
nobuhotelibizabay.com
THE ROBEY
One of Chicago?s newest hotels
occupies the art deco building
formerly known as the Northwest
Tower, a 12-storey landmark
on Damen Avenue. The Robey
boasts 89 rooms of two types:
Tower Rooms and Annex Lofts.
Guests can dine at the Cabana
Club on the sixth floor or the Caf�
Robey, which serves modern
American fare. therobey.com
businesstraveller.com
SHERATON GRAND CHICAGO
Recently joining Sheraton Hotels
and Resorts? group of Sheraton
Grand properties, this hotel
overlooks the Chicago River.
Minutes away from the city?s
business district, the Sheraton
Grand Chicago has 1,218 guest
rooms and a business centre
with a FedEx Office, 43 meetings
rooms and five restaurants and
bars. sheratonchicago.com
VICEROY HOTEL
Rebuilt from the old 1920s-era
Cedar Hotel in Chicago?s
Gold Coast neighbourhood,
the Viceroy Hotel puts a
modern spin on its historic
roots. Spanning 18 storeys, the
hotel offers 180 guestrooms
and suites plus views of the
skyline and Lake Michigan
from its rooftop bar and pool.
viceroyhotelsandresorts.com
ACE HOTEL
Settled in Chicago?s West Loop,
the Ace Hotel draws on the
city?s cultural renaissance and
millennial appeal, offering extras
such as vinyl turntables and
acoustic guitars in select rooms.
As well as skyline views, the
159-room hotel features various
event rooms and three eateries:
a restaurant, bar and coffee
shop. acehotel.com
M AY 2 0 1 8
15
UPFRONT
AIR MILE S
You fly with both diving and filming
equipment?
MALAYSIA-BASED
ROGER MUNNS
spends much of his
life in a wetsuit. As an
underwater wildlife
cameraman (recent
work includes the BBC
series Blue Planet II),
he takes more than 50
flights a year, many
within South East Asia.
16
On big shoots, camera equipment needs to travel
on what?s known as an ATA Carnet. This is like a
passport for gear, which gets checked and stamped
by customs into and out of every country. I have
to pay a 50 per cent deposit with the country?s
chamber of commerce, and it adds about an hour
to every check-in or arrival for the paperwork.
Lithium-ion batteries power most of my gear. The
number and capacity of the batteries is limited.
They must be carried by hand. Typically, my entire
hand-baggage allowance is batteries, all individually
wrapped in plastic with their contacts taped. I
find that security staff are often inconsistent and
sometimes uninformed of regulations ? especially in
smaller airports ? so I carry a printout of the rules
with me.
�
How do you reduce the cost of travelling
with equipment?�
I can be travelling with anything from 100kg to
300kg of check-in gear. I always do my research,
comparing the excess costs of different airlines.
At check-in I will always smile nicely and try to
negotiate. If possible, I use airlines that charge per
piece rather than by weight.
�
Most unusual place you?ve ever flown to?
A diving resort in the South China Sea called
Layang Layang. It?s a one-hour flight from Borneo
in a little Russian twin-propeller plane, landing
on a small concrete runway built on an atoll in the
middle of the sea.�
�
Indispensable travel gadget?
I have a $20 TaoTronics bluetooth transmitter that
plugs into the headphone jack in the seat armrest.
I can then use my bluetooth headphones to watch
movies on the flight cable-free.�
�
Loveliest souvenir?
I got some fantastically colour-saturated fabric in Sri
Lanka last time I was filming blue whales there.
�
Pipe-dream destination?
Galapagos is a place I have yet to visit. I?d love to
dive with those marine iguanas.
NEVER BEEN TO... LIECHTENSTEIN
IN 2007, SWITZERLAND ACCIDENTALLY
INVADED its tiny neighbour Liechtenstein. Well,
sort of. 170 Swiss soldiers wandered across the
unmarked border, about a mile into Liechtenstein
territory. They were carrying guns but, crucially, no
ammo. So no harm done. In fact, the Liechtenstein
authorities didn?t find out until later.
It?s an indication of just how chilled things are
in this tiny nation, the fourth smallest in Europe,
and the sixth smallest in the world. It won?t take
you long to drink in all 160 square kilometres of
this principality nestled between Switzerland and
Austria. You?ll enjoy the historical buildings of the
capital Vaduz and the gorgeous Alpine peaks that
surround it. And you?re unlikely to be troubled by
crooks since Liechtenstein has one of the lowest
crime rates on the entire planet. Indeed, many locals
don?t even bother to lock their front doors.
But it?s not all paradise. Women were only
granted the right to vote in 1984. And you can?t fly
here: the nearest major airport is two hours away,
across the Swiss border in Zurich.
M AY 2 0 1 8
businesstraveller.com
UPFRONT
SLEEPING
IN CARGO
AIRBUS AND ZODIAC have
revealed designs for lower deck
sleeping berths on the A330 and
A350 families of aircraft. The
modules, which would fit inside
the aircraft?s cargo compartments,
would allow the airlines to sell
additional sleeper berths to passengers.
The new passenger modules
are intended to be easily
interchangeable with regular cargo
containers, possibly as quickly
as during a typical turnaround,
Airbus says.
W E I R D W E AT H E R
WINDS
WESTERLY
WINDS
HAUTE STUFF
ROUX AT THE LANDAU has just been refurbished by the David Collins
interior design company, maintaining its place as one of London?s most
sumptuous hotel restaurants as it enters its second decade. The
haute cuisine menu also maintains its wow factor, as you might
expect from Michel Roux Jr, better known for Le Gavroche
in Mayfair; but its new chef is Nicolas Pasquier who is
creating dishes such as Cotswold White chicken gyoza
with monk?s beard (agretti) and lemongrass. Menu
prices start at � for two courses,
with the chef?s menu
costing up to �5 for
five courses with
a selection of
Coravin-preserved
fine wines.
rouxatthe
landau.com
businesstraveller.com
17
?The westerly wind was pinning my
hood hard against the back of my
head so it was a Force 7 or 8, on the
Beaufort scale. We were surrounded
by monstrous swells, each eight to ten
metres in height, which were themselves
being shredded by the wind.?
This is zoologist Matt Lewis facing
the full force of vicious winds in the
Southern Ocean, not far from Antarctica.
Describing them in his book Last Man
Off, he wasn?t exaggerating. This region,
between the 40th parallel south and
the Antarctic Circle (the Roaring Forties
and the Furious Fifties), where cyclonic
storms spin round the globe, sees the
strongest average winds anywhere on
the planet, sometimes exceeding 80
knots. In bad storms, waves can climb
to 20 metres high, as Lewis knows, to his
chagrin. In 1998, the vessel
he was working on, the Sudur Havid,
was flooded and eventually sunk by
enormous waves, forcing him and the
rest of the crew to abandon ship. He and
20 others were rescued, but 17 of his
crewmates weren?t so lucky.
M AY 2 0 1 8
UPFRONT
This time next year we?ll all be visiting...
YO KO H A M A , J A PA N
TOKYO?S NEIGHBOUR WILL EARN its
place on the sporting world map next year
when it hosts the English, Scottish and Irish
national teams during the Rugby World
Cup. The 72,000-capacity International
Stadium Yokohama (or Nissan Stadium)
will also see New Zealand and France in
action, as well as the tournament final on
November 2, 2019.
So what can rugby fans expect from
this city on Tokyo Bay, just 30 minutes by
train from Tokyo? Yokohama was the first
Japanese port to open up to the rest of the
world in 1859, following Japan?s centuries of
isolationist policy, so it has an international
feel. Visitors can relax in the Sankeien
Japanese gardens; create their own ramen
at the Cupnoodles Museum, which is
dedicated to the creator of instant noodles;
drink beer at the Kirin Brewery Company;
or get an adrenalin rush at Yokohama
Cosmoworld amusement park. A good spot
from which to contemplate all this is the
Sky Garden on the 69th floor of Landmark
Tower, the city?s tallest building. The lift to
the top whisks you up in just 40 seconds
and on clear days you can see Mount Fuji.
18
COMPETITION
This month, one lucky
reader (and friend) can
win three nights? meals and
accommodation at River
Bend Lodge in the Greater
Addo Elephant National Park
www.riverbendlodge.co.za.
The prize includes meals
and two game drives per day
to see elephants and other
wildlife. For more details and
to enter, visit businesstraveller.
com/competitions
M AY 2 0 1 8
WIN THREE NIGHTS ? S TAY
AT RIVER BEND LODGE
IN A SOU TH AFRIC AN
NATIONAL PARK
businesstraveller.com
be rewarded. be one.
As a ONEworld� traveller, wherever
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exclusive benefits of your preferred
ONEworld airline?s frequent flyer
programme. Emerald, Sapphire and
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ONEworld member airline benefits.
Make a smart choice in travelling with
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advantage of benefits you already
have.
Learn more at oneworld.com
an alliance of the world's leading airlines working as one.
American Airlines British Airways Cathay Pacific Finnair Iberia Japan Airlines LATAM
Malaysia Airlines Qantas Qatar Airways Royal Jordanian S7 Airlines SriLankan Airlines
ONEworld benefits are available only to passengers on scheduled flights that are both marketed and operated by a ONEworld member airline (marketed
means that there must be a ONEworld member airline?s flight number on your ticket). For information on ONEworld, visit www.oneworld.com. American
Airlines, British Airways, Cathay Pacific, Finnair, Iberia, Japan Airlines, LATAM Airlines, Malaysia Airlines, Qantas, Qatar Airways, Royal Jordanian, S7 Airlines,
SriLankan Airlines and ONEworld are trademarks of their respective companies. LATAM Airlines (Paraguay) is currently not a part of ONEworld.
UPFRONT
HE ATHROW
HOTEL
MARRIOTT?S MOXY BRAND
OPENED its largest UK hotel last
month and its third in the London
area. The 437-room property on
Bath Road, close to Heathrow, is
promoting a series of Park and Fly
packages with parking for up to 122
cars and the Heathrow Hoppa bus
linking to the Heathrow terminals
every 30 minutes. The hotel has two
bars and a Nordic fusion restaurant
due to open later in the summer.
Aberdeen was the first UK Moxy
hotel to be opened in December
2016; London Excel then opened
in March 2017, followed by
London Stratford in October 2017.
Moxy Milan Linate also opened last
month with Glasgow, Edinburgh
and York opening later in 2018.
Jobs in travel
M AY 2 0 1 8
ASCENT
BELGIUM CARRIER VLM has
relaunched flights between
Antwerp and Birmingham
following the resurrection of
services between Antwerp and
London City in October.
PREMIUM PLAZA GROUP has
opened its new Aerotel transit
hotel at Heathrow, within the
east wing of the Heathrow T3
Arrivals area ? with 30 per cent
off rooms during May.
DESCENT
ETIHAD AIRWAYS is to suspend
flights between Abu Dhabi and
Edinburgh from the start of
October and between Abu Dhabi
and Perth, Australia, from the
same date.
20
CAPTAIN YVONNE SUNGA has been
negotiating runways of one sort or
another her entire working life. Before
she joined the airline industry in
1990, she was a fashion model. Then
for 12 years she worked as cabin crew.
In 2004 she qualified as a commercial
pilot, and now flies international routes
for Philippine Airlines.
?The first time I stepped inside an
aircraft, I thought: ?This is it. This is
what I want to do?, ? says the 49-yearold from Manila. ?I knew the dynamism
of flying would give me fulfillment.?
Yvonne says the greatest challenge
of her job is the ?interaction between
the multi-million dollar machine,
human beings and nature. It?s a great
challenge to be the brain of the aircraft
on every flight.?
She admits it?s still rare to find a
female in the pilot seats of commercial
aircraft. ?But I think, in flying, there is
no gender. As long as there is respect,
gender is not an issue.?
FLIGHT NEWS
NORWEGIAN has suspended
flights from Cork, Edinburgh
and Shannon to Providence
airport (around 66km south of
Boston) from October, as well
as between Belfast and Stewart
International airport (around
115km north of New York City).
Yvonne Sunga,
captain with Philippine Airlines
Nevertheless, some of Philippine
Airlines' passengers are surprised to hear
a female voice over the PA system. ?They
confirm with the cabin crew if it?s really a
she on the flight deck,? Yvonne explains.
?After the flight, some families request a
chat; the parents tell me they want their
kids to be inspired to be a pilot some day.?
THOMSON AND EASYJET are
among the airlines who have
failed to pay �million in court
judgements to more than 10,000
delayed passengers, according
to data from the Registry Trust
Online. Thomson in particular
is named by Bott and Co
solicitors as an airline that has
?ignored or fobbed off? many
customers? claims.
businesstraveller.com
HOSPITALITY
MORE THAN JUST A WORD
True hospitality comes from the heart. It?s central to everything we do.
MORE THAN JUST MOVIES
AND GAMES
MORE THAN
JUST A MEAL
Hundreds of movies and
music albums, Live TV,
free Wi-Fi connection and
much more will be at your
fingertips.
During your flight, an
award winning fine dining
experience will take your
taste buds above the clouds
MORE THAN
JUST A VISIT
MORE THAN
JUST A TRANSFER
Private chauffeur driven
vehicles will take you to
or from the airport, with a
pleasant, luxury ride.
?The Best Business Class
Lounge? will refresh you
before your meetings with
five-star facilities such as
gourmet dining, suite rooms,
shower, piano, massage
therapy and mini golf.
TURKISHAIRLINES.COM
MORE THAN
JUST A SEAT
A special seat that turns
into a fully flat bed, an
abundant legroom, seat
separators for your
privacy, luxury amenity
kits and more. All for
your comfort.
INBOX YOUR LETTERS
Star letter
STAR LET TER
PRIZE
WHY ARE MEALS SERVED
AT STR ANGE TIME S OF DAY ?
However much comfort and service might improve in
business class, I still find one of the stresses of air travel
is being served meals at strange times of the day and
night that do not relate to the time at either origin or
destination. Some of this, such as dinner in the middle of
the night, is a largely unavoidable part of schedules but
there are things that I find puzzling or even inexplicable.
A common one is being served lunch at breakfast time
departures; but even weirder is being served breakfast
before an evening landing. For example, I recently flew to
both London and Sydney from Manila with Philippine
Airlines. The standard of cabin service was excellent.
These flights departed at roughly midday, after which
lunch was served. In both cases, though, the second ?light
meal? consisted entirely of breakfast dishes, even though
arrival was in the evening by both local time and the time
in Manila; and, more importantly, by my body clock.
Particularly on flights that are north-south, crossing few
time zones, why can?t meals match the time of day, as they
would if travelling on a train or ship?
Tony Hall, London
22
ONLINE HOTEL BOOKING
In his column on comparison sites in the February 2018
issue, ?Why paying a little more can be a good idea?, Derek
Picot says there are ?many independent travellers who tell
of disappointment upon arrival? when they have booked
through an online travel agent (OTA). The reason for this
(he says) is the hotel sees them as customers of the OTA,
rather than of the hotel itself; and that the hotel isn?t
making much money out of those customers, as it has to
pay the OTA commission. As a result, the hotel allocates
less desirable rooms to the OTA.
I would argue that many of those, including me, who
use OTAs have stayed at fabulous hotels and got a great
room and an upgrade on many an occasion at the lowest
rate. Why would I consider booking via a hotel website?
Often those who have booked directly with a respected
chain have been just as disappointed. I would argue that
hotel chains might also allocate a terrible room to guests
who book at the lowest rate on their own website.
Mr Picot thinks that the reason hotel chains are
consolidating and taking over each other is because ?of
the threat of OTAs?. Perhaps that is a factor, but it is also
to do with share prices, stock value, land and asset values,
global hotel dominance and reach. Takeovers and
M AY 2 0 1 8
This month?s Star
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to edit letters.
mergers are about growth acquisition, not
the perceived threat from an OTA.
Finally, when booking with an OTA,
a traveller has the choice of rooms and
hotels across the whole industry. They
do not want to be burdened with going
through individual hotel chains? websites.
I do agree with his final point ? always
be nice to the front desk staff? and always
ask for a better room, as it never hurts.
In fact be nice to all hotel employees and
associates. Salaries in general are terrible
in the industry, and employees work shifts
over long hours. I started in 1984 as a
receptionist, and did the night shift for
very little money!
Andrew Ashmore, The Maldives
NOT MY ?FAVOURITE AIRLINE?
I was due to fly BA from Munich to
Heathrow at 1440 on a Monday. I went
to check in on Sunday evening and could
not. While trying, and on hold to find out
why I could not check in, I received a text
saying that the flight had been cancelled. I
was offered an alternative of Innsbruck to
Gatwick at a slightly earlier time. But the
link given to book did not work, and I was
on hold for an hour.�
I was not offered a later flight (as
compensation would need to be paid).
I had no choice but to accept, as it was
now late on Sunday, and I needed to take
the flight out on Monday.
I have contacted customer services and
they offered to only partially cover my
costs incurred for the different journeys,
and only Avios or an e-voucher as a gesture
of goodwill.
To cap it all when on the flight, as I was
not able to check in, there was no meal
available. I would think that the least that
it could do would be to offer to cover the
extra costs that I incurred through no
fault of my own, and make a cash payment
for the distress and inconvenience that I
encountered. So much for the ?World?s
Favourite Airline?!
Kevin Brown, UK
B R I T I S H A I R WAY S R E P L I E S :
We do all we can to avoid cancelling
a flight, because we know this is
inconvenient for our customers. In this
case the service was one of a number
that couldn?t operate because of bad
weather. To try to get the passenger
businesstraveller.com
home as quickly as possible, we
re-booked him onto a flight departing
slightly earlier from a nearby airport,
which he accepted.
We always comply with our
obligations under EU261, but as his
original flight was cancelled because
of the weather, it does not qualify for
compensation. Offering an earlier flight
would not negate an airline?s legal
obligations. We have apologised and
offered a gesture of goodwill to
Mr Brown.
SECURITY CZECH
I recently passed through Prague airport
security. For footwear removal they
provided a seat, a foot mat and dedicated
trays to stop dirty soles spoiling other
items scanned by subsequent travellers.
This easy but thoughtful approach
ought to be adopted by other airports.
Christopher Ruane, Lanark
BETTER BOARDING IDEA
As a frequent British Airways passenger,
I am delighted that there has finally
been some control introduced on the
boarding process [since December 12,
2017]. This level of organisation has
been long overdue ? on far too many
flights I have witnessed chaos at the
gates. In my experience, long-haul flights
were managed by the gate crew with a
clear boarding process based on ticket
class ? first, business then economy,
which everyone understood. But on
short haul, especially late-running
domestic flights, it was akin to survival
of the fittest as the gate crew quickly
abdicated any responsibility, leaving a
massive stampede. 牋
However, the new method also seems
to have a few issues, and does not really
result in swifter craft boarding. The new
process creates five distinct groups, who
board in order starting with Group 1,
flexible ticket holding passengers who
have paid the most for their tickets;
to Group 5, who have obtained the
cheapest tickets.
Now we have a Disney-style queue
system, which holds back the hordes
as the affluent glide on ? leaving the
disaffected masses in a walk of shame.
But does this approach make boarding
quicker? Not from what I can see.
As an alternative BA should consider
the following:
1. The Group 1 passengers board as a
priority ? a relatively small group.
2. Passengers board from the back, in
order of those sitting at a window then
middle then aisle.
Granted this may require some
additional marshalling and work by gate
staff, but if it allows a full flight to board
without delay, and a swift turnaround, it
can only be positive for the airline and
passenger alike.
Jim Gibb, London
EXECUTIVES ?LIVE IN A BUBBLE?
I read the article in last month?s Business
Traveller on hotel brands and their
proliferation with interest. It confirmed
my belief that corporate executives live
in a bubble remote from real world
travellers. As one who travels worldwide
extensively, I have become completely
baffled by the brand offerings. If I stay
with Brand A, will they have a decent
restaurant, a caf�, both ? or neither?
Or a gym? More importantly will they
be hosting a multi-national conference
taking 95 per cent of the rooms and
facilities (meaning I am treated, at
best, as an inconvenience); or are they
offering quaint premises appealing
largely to the local afternoon tea market,
retired golfers and chi-chi wedding
groups? Looking at the websites may
help determine some of the answers,
but an old school travel agent would
have spared me that. As to a corporation
having multiple brands, their strategy
meets their needs better than mine.
Benjamyn H Damazer, Lincolnshire
SPECS APPEAL
I recently travelled with BA from
Heathrow to Abu Dhabi and was very
impressed with the punctuality and
crew. After arriving at my hotel and
unpacking my case, I could not find my
glasses. I checked in for my return flight
six days later to find my glasses waiting
for me behind the BA counter! I had left
them in my seat on the outbound flight.
I was so impressed with the efficiency of
BA. BA will certainly have my business
in the future; well done to them!
Julie Bond, London
T E L L U S A B O U T Y O U R T R AV E L S AT TA L K TO U S @ B U S I N E S S T R AV E L L E R .C O M
businesstraveller.com
M AY 2 0 1 8
23
?
INBOX YOUR COMMENTS
Join the debate
READERS SHARE FIRST-HAND KNOWLEDGE, EXPERIENCES AND IDEAS
BUSINESSTRAVELLER.COM/FORUM
THE MADNESS OF
EX-EUROPE AIRFARES
? CEDRIC_STATHERBY
24
I wish to fly from London to Hong
Kong. Can anyone explain to me why
I have just been quoted nearly �500
less for a routeing that goes AMSLHR-HKG-LHR-AMS rather than [the
shorter] LHR-HKG-LHR (all flights on
British Airways)? I can therefore save
nearly �350 by hopping on a flight
to Amsterdam to take a flight from
Amsterdam back to London. Have
airlines not heard of the green agenda,
carbon footprints and the like? And
what happens if I simply don?t take the
last leg (back to Amsterdam)?
? FDOS_UK
The airlines love to attack each other?s
home markets. The EC sees protecting
consumer choice (and thus competition)
as of paramount importance. If you
skip the last leg on an occasional basis,
nothing will happen ? best to select flights
involving a change of airport, eg AMSLHR-HKG-LGW-AMS and then you have a
force majeure excuse, for example heavy
traffic. Like you, in a world where climate
change is a problem, I find it obscene.
? CEDRIC_STATHERBY
Thanks FDOS_UK. The EU may see this
as protecting customer choice, but surely
either the BA airfare ex-Amsterdam
is honest (in which case the fare from
London is gouging), or the fare ex-London
is honest (in which case the fare from
Amsterdam is artificially undercutting
KLM). They cannot both be true fares.
? LUGANOPIRATE
It?s mainly because ex-Europe fares are
much cheaper than UK fares which are
a bit of a rip off, sometimes especially in
the premium cabins. In order to compete
M AY 2 0 1 8
BA has to match those fares, or even
slightly better them, to make up for the
inconvenience of changing airports.
Another case in point is Zurich where
the fares are very high.
ZRH-JNB (Johannesburg) costs
CHF19,000 return in first, yet MXP-ZRHJNB (board in Milan) is CHF10,000 return
in first. All with Swiss. Mind you, even
that fare does not compare with Emirates
ex-MXP, which is about half the price.
As to carbon footprint, I suppose one
can always assuage one?s conscience
by paying the carbon offset fee, but from
a recent Business Traveller survey I see
very few people do that. I don?t know if
it?s still the case, but unbelievably Swiss
charged a service fee on top of the
carbon offset fee!
? CAPETONIANM
All of the above. Madness is a good
description. So is greed. Airlines will
compete to get traffic from non-home
markets. A nonstop flight will attract a
premium over a connecting flight; or if
you prefer, it?s gouging. For example:
1 BA429 12 APR AMS-LHR 1015 1040
2 BA059 12 APR LHR-CPT 2140 1010+1
3 BA058 22 APR CPT-LHR 1930 0630+1
4 BA432 23 APR LHR-AMS 1440 1700
The price for this journey, Amsterdam
to Cape Town and back, is �354. Yet
the price for just the middle segments
LHR-CPT-LHR (London to Cape Town
and back) is �614, which includes �6
for the UK Air Passenger Duty (APD).
The journey from AMS is exempt from UK
APD, as LON is a transit.
Albeit to a lesser extent, the same
applies here:
1 KL1000 15 APR LHR-AMS 0630 0900
2 KL597 15 APR AMS-CPT 1000 2115
3 KL598 23 APR CPT-AMS 2300 1045+1
4 K1017 24 APR AMS-LHR 1320 1350
This costs �826, whereas the direct
AMS-CPT-AMS is slightly dearer, priced
at �975.
It?s also about supply and demand.
I?ve just looked at prices for a trip to
Botswana. The prices of the tickets
between CPT and MUB (Cape Town
and Maun) are more than the price of
a (cheap) ticket to or from Europe.
Btw I used to work in revenue
management for an airline!
? F A R O F LY E R
Cedric_Statherby ? in your example BA
is trying to take passengers who would
otherwise have got on a KLM or Cathay
Pacific (CX) nonstop to Hong Kong (HKG).
You will see similar examples ex-Paris,
competing with Air France (AF) or CX.
Likewise KLM, AF, SAS and AY
(Finnair) have much lower fares ex-UK,
via their respective hubs, than they charge
nonstop from their home country hubs.
If you haven?t already used it, try
http://matrix.itasoftware.com/ and put in
all of the airports that you would consider
originating from and a range of dates.
You will see that it is not just BA going
crazy, but all airlines.
FDOS_UK?s advice regarding the last
leg is sound.
? MARTYNSINCLAIR
When I first starting travelling to Asia
around 14 years ago, I was using ex-UK
tickets via Germany on Lufthansa. I then
switched to ex-Europe tickets on BA. The
principle is the same: longer, non-direct
flights are cheaper ? fact.
What is also madness, but for different
reasons, is in real terms my travel costs
have reduced significantly over the years.
When I first started travelling to Asia,
my ticket costs, either ex-Europe/ex-UK,
were in business between �100 and
�600 and, in first, between �800 and
�200. My December 2017 trip cost �450
and my forthcoming trip in a month?s time
cost �650, both in business. I no longer
bother with first ? on BA there is not
really that much of a difference, as long
as I have the extra space in a window
seat upstairs on the A380 or B747.
Added to this are the Avios, 36,000 of
them, making the positioning flight free
businesstraveller.com
(apart from the taxes), and giving me
sufficient Avios for around another 5-7
European sectors for just taxes. In actual
monetary value, I believe BA is paying
me to fly.
So I agree with you Cedric, these
fares are madness, but probably for
slightly different reasons than your
thread intended.
As for the green footprint, I have to
laugh when I am asked whether I would
like to offset the carbon footprint, when
buying tickets on ba.com.
? STEVESCOOTS
All the carriers play this game to some
extent, several times in the past I have
done CAN-HKG-LHR (Guangzhou via
Hong Kong to London) on Cathay Pacific,
as it?s saved almost �000 on flying direct
HKG-LHR.
? ALEX MCWHIRTER
It?s something I?ve been writing about in
Business Traveller for decades. Another
fare anomaly I discovered recently was
with BA?s J class fares to New York.
If you choose the flights carefully
(times, arrival, airport, etc) it is cheaper
to fly J class (business) DXB-LHR-JFKLHR-DXB, ie adding in two London-Dubai
flights, for less than Heathrow to New
York J class return.
In this case, BA (as an indirect carrier
here) has to compete on price with the
Emirates non-stop DXB-JFK services.
? BUGADVISOR
Don?t forget the UK Air Passenger Duty
which doesn?t apply when the departure
point is outside of England [UK].
? CAPETONIANM
APD does not apply where there is a
transit via a UK airport. But if it?s more
than 24 hours, it is (generally) considered
a stopover, and the APD will apply.
? SWISSE XPAT
I, and a few people in my firm, have been
travelling from Zurich to New York quite
regularly. Return, we seem to pay around
CHF750 (approx �0) for premium
economy with BA. With all the other
carriers (direct) there is only either Y
(economy) or J (business), and J costs at
least CHF4,000. CHF750 is a great deal,
often cheaper than a basic economy ticket.
The routing accumulates 200 Tier
points and enough Avios for half an
upgrade to J, which I try to get on the
return leg. Looks like I am benefitting
from a very competitive market.
? TIREDOLDHACK2
I?ve been using Amsterdam (and
occasionally other European airports)
as departure points for years. It makes
no sense, but the savings can be epic.
For two people I just paid ?2,163 (�890)
return to Durban in November, including
ten days? car hire ? and the car hire
means you don?t have to pay immediately,
but in interest-free instalments.
Incidentally, it?s not just confined to
Europe. A friend in Santiago de Chile
(SCL), when he flies to Europe, starts his
journey in Mendoza, Argentina, a 40-minute
hop from SCL, and then transfers to the
direct LAN flight to Paris or Frankfurt. He
saves a fortune in J seats as well.
? ALEX MCWHIRTER
Indeed, it?s not just confined to Europe.
As we have written in the past, the
savings are worldwide. It depends on
where you start your trip, currency values,
airline marketing and so on. For example
if you are in Singapore it may be cheaper
to fly long haul out of Kuala Lumpur
because of the differing currency values.
I gave the example where a BA J class
ticket for DXB-LON-NYC-LON-DXB cost
less than LON-NYC. The value there is for
a traveller who has to make two trips (one
to DXB, another to NYC) and is able to
arrange them both at the same time.
I should add, if it wasn?t obvious, that?s
a business class fare I quote.
? MARCUSGB
Yes, many of us have experienced
this. KLM, for example, sells its flights
ex-UK through Amsterdam as its hub ?
worldwide business fares can be 50%
less departing that way. Airlines tend to
market lower prices outside of their own
country to gain flyers through their hubs.
Each airline wants to develop customer
loyalty in other countries, but KLM has
the advantage of 22 airports linking all
over the UK to its hub in under an hour.
As it does not have a domestic network
and Netherlands is quite a small country,
Europe is its domestic market, and it has
a very high reputation from all around
Europe to connect people through
Schiphol on its long-haul flights.
I notice it is certainly a popular airline
for arriving into Europe from places like
Australia, the Far East and China (huge
growing market on those routes), so
much custom comes from those travelling
into Europe, then going on from the
Schiphol hub, equally as Europeans are
doing so the other way round.
I tend to book a � return KLM flight
ex-LCY or LHR (but you can do the same
from any UK airport with KLM), separately
to my main KLM long-haul flights. I can
then hop on and connect for my longhaul flights much quicker than simply
getting to and flying out of LHR.
Fares in Euros ex-Amsterdam cost 25%
less, partly due to not paying the UK?s
departure taxes for premium cabins, so
you tend to save �0 per long-haul flight
at least. We all see the breakdown list
of charges for premium travel added on
once we buy an EU UK ticket.
For example, HKG and BKK tend to
be the very good fares into and ex-Asia,
starting from around ?1,550 business
class return. It also saves the uncertainty
of getting to and from LHR, the three
hours needed to be sure for long-haul
flights, cutting out time on return also.
It feels like I get 25%-40% off most of
my flights ? unless travelling to Oceania,
where the options with most airlines best
lie ex-LHR.
? IANFROMHKG
I have done that many times, but it is
inadvisable to do it too often in a short
period of time with the same airline, as
they reserve the right to reprice the ticket!
Anecdotally, the risk is higher if you book
through a travel agent, as the airline will
charge them. They (a) won?t want to be out
of pocket and (b) for relationship reasons
are less likely to challenge the airline. BT
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M AY 2 0 1 8
25
Not only is Quito
in Ecuador one
of the highest
altitude cities in
the world ? it is
also on the up
when it comes to
economic potential
RISING
C A P I TA L
26
M AY 2 0 1 8
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
WORDS DANIEL SCHEFFLER
27
?
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
M AY 2 0 1 8
D E S T I N AT I O N S
F
lying into Quito, the first
thing I notice is how much
more spread out it is than
I expected. The second is
that we still seem high up.
At 2,850 metres, the city
sprawls across the eastern
flank of Pichincha, an active volcano
? after Bolivia?s La Paz, it is the
second-highest altitude city in the
world. We cruise from the smart new
airport, opened in 2013, to the old
town, which has a quintessentially
colonial South American feel. In
1978, the historic centre was made
the first UNESCO World Heritage
Site, and its churches, convents and
public structures have recently been
meticulously reconditioned.
From the rooftop of the 16thcentury domed Metropolitan
Cathedral of Quito on the Plaza
Grande, the view is awe-inspiring.
The winged Virgin Mary, Loma
El Panecillo, surveys the city
from a neighbouring hilltop,
with greenery from the urban
Parque Metropolitano and snowcapped mountains in the distance.
Meanwhile, across town, the Bas韑ica
del Voto Nacional, an imposing neoGothic church, vies for attention.
28
A CHANGING CITY
VISITA QUITO, DANIEL SCHEFFLER, ISTOCK
Quito, home to around 2.6 million
people, is the centre of government
in Ecuador. The National Assembly is
here, as is the presidential palace. In
the past, Quito?s biggest international
players were oil companies, such as
Andes Petroleum and Halliburton,
but change is in the air thanks to a
surfeit of young entrepreneurs.
And with a new government elected
in 2017, it is preparing to receive
the world.
Some of the city?s most impressive
developments are already underway,
and building sites and cranes are
everywhere. For instance, the
employment-creating underground
metro will be opening mid-2019,
and a cross-city cable-car system is
planned for around the same time.
New tourist accommodation is
another facet of the city?s continued
M AY 2 0 1 8
reinvention. New design hotel
Carlota and luxury boutique property
Illa Experience hotel, are both in the
historic centre in period buildings
that have been beautifully and
sensitively modernised for the
21st-century traveller.
?Political and economic stability
were never Ecuador?s strength in
the past,? says Quito restaurateur
Jan Niedrau, whose restaurant Zazu
is a Relais & Ch鈚eaux member.
?Governments were frequently
overthrown by the people, corruption
has been an issue for a long time and
a devastating economic crisis has
struck the country.?
But as Niedrau points out,
Ecuadorians simply got used to this
instability. ?Quite frequently you will
hear people comment that Ecuador in
this sense is ?like a cork swimming on
water?. The waves will rock and shake
it, but it will always float?,? he says.
BUMPS IN THE ROAD
However, the road to real growth can
be winding. Research company Focus
Economics projects the GDP growth
slowing to 1.7 per cent in 2018,
while 1.3 per cent is already forecast
for 2019; good, but not great.
Which for President Len韓 Moreno,
who was recently granted a longsought-after mandate to implement
constitutional changes and pursue a
more global-facing agenda, must be
rather disappointing. The reduced oil
output, along with planned austerity
measures (to reduce the debt burden)
is impacting overall economic
activity. And according to the World
Bank, the nation?s high dependence
on external borrowing, paired with
not having its own currency (it
uses the US dollar), is what could
potentially jeopardise long-term
financial stability.
But the economic outlook isn?t
all doom and gloom. In 2017,
Ecuador joined the EU?s trade pact
with Colombia and Peru, agreeing
to eliminate high tariffs and tackle
technical barriers to trade. According
to the Council of the European
Union, the agreement ?includes
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Flower displays in Plaza
El Quinde; Plaza Grande in the colonial centre;
wall art in Plaza Borja Yerovi; Andean trails
above the city; Ecuadorians on horseback
WHY NOW?
Juan Fernando Molina, an
executive at automotive and
car hire company Corporaci髇
Maresa, thinks the greenfield
opportunities in services and
technology is what makes
Quito so special. ?International
companies that partner with
local knowledge will have a
competitive advantage,? he says.
?I believe that one of the
main advantages of the city is
its [small] size, which allows
you to do high-quality business
networking,? says Gonzalo
Chiriboga, president of the
Republica del Cacao. ?Many
multinational corporations now
use Quito as a pilot market for
new developments and products
launches due to its unique
consumer habits.?
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
commitments on the enforcement of
labour and environmental standards,
as well as rapid and effective dispute
settlement procedures.?
QUALITY OVER QUANTITY
?Historically, Ecuador was known as
a supplier of cheap raw materials ?
particularly products such as bananas,
roses and cacao, with prawns the
biggest ? in addition to oil,? says Jerry
Toth, co-founder of To?ak, a high-end
chocolate company based in Quito.
?This type of economy generally
presents a country with a very low
ceiling of economic development.
The government recognises this, and
for the last five years has encouraged
Ecuadorian businesses to steer
their focus towards ?finished goods?,
particularly from raw materials
that are produced in-country. This
isn?t the kind of thing a country can
change overnight,?say Toth, ?and
Ecuador still has a long way to go. The
country would sell its premium cacao
at bulk prices, with low margins, to
chocolate makers in countries such
as Switzerland and the US, who used
their specialised skills to produce the
?finished good? of chocolate, which
commands higher margins.?
NATURAL CHARMS
Ecuador, although a relatively small
country, has some of the world?s most
biodiverse areas ? from the Amazon
rainforest and the Andean mountains
out to the Galapagos Islands.
According to its official tourism
agency, it is home to 18 per cent of
the world?s bird species and orchids,
ten per cent of the world?s amphibians
and eight per cent of the world?s
mammals. But, this is under threat
from oil exploration, agriculture and
mining. Canopy Bridge, a non-profit
network based in Quito, aims to
help. It is connecting indigenous
farmers with buyers from the city and
runs many educational programmes
promoting better environmental
considerations for both Ecuadorians
and overseas visitors.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 76
M AY 2 0 1 8
29
30
M AY 2 0 1 8
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
LOUNGES
100
airp ort
Top
31
lounges
Arrive at the airport early ? these
lounges are destinations in their own right
WORDS GUY DIMOND
American Airlines
Flagship lounge,
New York JFK
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
?
M AY 2 0 1 8
LOUNGES
E
arlier this year, we asked Business
Traveller?s online Forum users
to recommend their favourite
airport lounges to fellow travellers.
This elicited many well-informed
responses ? almost as enthusiastic as
the suggestions for the worst airport
lounges (which can be read online at the address below).
Alongside your suggestions, we have added the best
lounges we at BT have visited, and included ?pay-toenter? lounges as well as airline ones. This list isn?t
definitive, but it?s a start. Feel free to let us and other
readers know which ones we have missed via the Forum.
When it comes to recommendations, we?d rather have a
list of 200 than 100. businesstraveller.com/forum.
UNITED KINGDOM
LONDON HEATHROW
BRITISH AIRWAYS CONCORDE ROOM, T5
Refreshed in November 2017, the Concorde
Room is for BA?s first class passengers and
Gold Guest List members. There?s an � la carte
restaurant for dining and a bar service.
32
EMIRATES, T3
Reviewed by BT last year (November 2017), this
well-equipped lounge has plenty of secluded
spots to work and relax, and has the advantage
of direct boarding of the plane from the lounge.
ETIHAD AIRWAYS, T4
Adjacent to the Terminal 4 Skyteam lounge, this
has free spa treatments (albeit in 15-minute
appointments), good food and a buzzy
atmosphere. It?s for first and business class
passengers combined.
LUFTHANSA SENATOR, T2
Lufthansa has more than one lounge at
Heathrow, one in the main Terminal 2 and one in
Terminal 2B. The Senator lounge is for first class
passengers and Star Alliance Gold Card holders.
MALAYSIA AIRLINES GOLDEN LOUNGE, T4
Both first and business class share a divided
space. Service is personalised and attentive, and
the food offering varied and of excellent quality.
United Airlines
Club lounge,
London
Heathrow
Terminal 2
M AY 2 0 1 8
NO1 HEATHROW, T3
Reviewed by BT in March 2017, this pay-for-entry
lounge has ?lots of amenities, contemporary
d閏or and good food?, and costs from � for
three hours if booked online. Showers cost an
extra �; ?sleep pods? from � for three hours.
PLAZA PREMIUM, T4
Plaza Premium has a strong presence at
Heathrow, and many of its six lounges are
impressive. For example, the T4 arrivals-side
lounge has 25 luxurious showers ($18/approx
� for 30 minutes use). Prices are charged in
US dollars, and lounge use starts at $37/approx
� for one hour.
QANTAS, T3
Opened in November 2017, this has Neil Perry?s
Aussie-style dishes, a cocktail bar, six shower
suites, workstations and more besides. For first
and business passengers class combined.
QATAR AIRWAYS PREMIUM, T4
BT Forum user Amanda says this is the best at
Heathrow: ?Has to be the Qatar lounge at LHR ?
service, food, facilities are all top notch.? It?s open
to Oneworld first and business passengers too.
UNITED AIRLINES CLUB, T2B
One of the three Star Alliance airline lounges in
Terminal 2B, the United lounge has good views,
a lovely atmosphere and a long bar with good
service and a wide selection of drinks.
VIRGIN ATLANTIC CLUBHOUSE, T3
There have been recent changes including
losing the spa bath, but this is still one of the top
lounges in the world, and a great advertisement
for the differentiation the Virgin brand has
brought to flying.
LONDON GATWICK
BRITISH AIRWAYS CLUB AND FIRST,
GATWICK SOUTH
With good views, a choice of wines and food
and a mezzanine level in the Club lounge,
these two newish lounges have been warmly
welcomed by BA passengers.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
?
SAME GREAT EXPERIENCE,
NEW PREMIUM NAME
Relax onboard with a glass of welcome bubbly, then stretch out in your
spacious leather seat, stay connected with WiFi* and enjoy a choice of
dishes and wine from our premium menu.
It?s still Premium. We?ve just changed the name.
For more information, please get in touch with your TMC.
*Available onboard from just �99
LOUNGES
FINNAIR SCHENGEN BUSINESS, HELSINKI
The Schengen lounge has good buffet food, and
is ?bright with plenty of seating?, as BT Forum
user Blanicka put it. You can buy entry for ?48.
AEGEAN AIRLINES NON SCHENGEN, ATHENS
A new option (opened December 2017) in
Terminal A, this small lounge serves local Greek
dishes such as spinach pie, plus Greek wines,
but lacks hot food options.
KLM CROWN, AMSTERDAM SCHIPHOL
This lounge for intercontinental business
passengers is undergoing an upgrade, but is
still open; completion is planned for 2019.
LUFTHANSA FIRST CLASS, FRANKFURT
This entire first class terminal is ?simply amazing
and remains my most memorable lounge
experience,? says BT Forum user MartynSinclair.
Lufthansa and Swiss frequent fliers are welcome.
Lufthansa first
class lounge,
Frankfurt
34
EUROPE
51ST & GREEN, DUBLIN
This is the pre-clearance business lounge for
flights to the US. You can pay for access ?35 per
person online爋r�39 at reception, though it is
complimentary to business class ticket holders.
AIR FRANCE LA PREMIERE,
PARIS CHARLES DE GAULLE
Opinions differ about Air France, but there is
a consensus about this classy lounge with its
Clarins spa, top wines and serene, peaceful
atmosphere.
AIR FRANCE BUSINESS HALL L,
PARIS CHARLES DE GAULLE
One of several refurbished or reinvented Air
France lounges opened in January 2018, this also
has a Clarins spa as part of the first phase; part
two will follow in July 2018.
ASPIRE APHRODITE, LARNACA, CYPRUS
Open to all travellers from �.99 per head. ?Good
food and drink, plenty of space, comfortable
seating, nice views, good internet and lovely
staff,? says BT Forum user ASK1945.
?My most
memorable
lounge
experience?
M AY 2 0 1 8
ASPIRE, ZURICH TERMINAL E
Aspire has two lounges at Zurich. This one
is that rare phenomenon ? a lounge with an
outdoor terrace, plus views of the apron, runway
and the main terminal. It?s a pay to enter lounge
(charged in US dollars), and costs from �.02
per visit.
THE LOFT, BRUSSELS AIRLINES, BRUSSELS
?Largeish with great tarmac views and super
comfy armchairs by the windows with power.
Decent food, drink and wifi and a nice feel
generally,? says BT Forum user Alex_F.
ARIKLASSI (BUSINESS), TALLINN
Passengers gain access for ?30; some business
travellers get in for free. ?Good selection of food,
quiet, outdoor terrace overlooking the aprons,?
says BT Forum user rferguson.
CALPE LOUNGE, GIBRALTAR
A Priority Pass lounge run by Lounge Club; you
can get access from US$29. The views of the
Rock are magnificent, and ?You could sit outside
on the sofas!? says BT Forum user Bath_VIP.
LUFTHANSA FIRST CLASS, MUNICH
Cigar lounge, gourmet restaurant, showers and
baths, and limousine service to the aircraft. Very
modern, with views over the aircraft. Open to
Lufthansa and Swiss frequent fliers.
MARCO POLO CLUB, VENICE
Pay for entry: ?40. BT Forum user travelsforfun
says, ?Several very nice spaces including small
outdoor selection.? Priority Pass members,
Diners Club and a few others get in for free.
SWISS FIRST, ZURICH TERMINAL A
This lounge reopened in March 2018 with great
food, bedrooms and an outside terrace in the
summer. It?s widely considered to be one of
the best lounges in the world.
CIBELES VIP, MADRID
For non-Schengen passengers, this lounge is
open to anyone for ?30.60. ?Nice large space
with great apron views and reasonable food
selection,? says BT Forum user travelsforfun.
SWISS FIRST, ZURICH TERMINAL E
Not as new as the Terminal A lounge but just as
luxurious featuring bedrooms, champagne bar
and two restaurants, plus an outside terrace.
EVENTYR, COPENHAGEN KASTRUP
Usually 250DKK to get into, this lounge also
permits BA, Emirates, Delta and Norwegian
flyers with the right status. It has showers and
?superb views?, says BT Forum user Bath_VIP.
TURKISH AIRLINES, ISTANBUL
It may be crowded, but this lounge is ?mindblowing for a long stay, loads of things to eat
and spaces to sit [and] fab drinks selection too,?
as BT Forum user norbert2008 puts it.
FINNAIR PREMIUM, HELSINKI
Great ?for the Finnish design, food and sauna?,
says BT Forum user travelsforfun. Exclusively for
Finnair Plus Platinum and Gold members,
or Oneworld Emerald cardholders.
VIP LOUNGE FRANKFURT
A luxurious燰IP area with limousine service,
restaurant, private rooms/suites and cigar
lounge. Premium services, bundled at premium
prices ? starting from around ?330 per person.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
?
RIGHT: Qatar
Airways Al
Mourjan lounge,
Doha
BELOW: Slow,
Cape Town
MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA
36
BIDVEST PREMIER, CAPE TOWN
?A good selection of ripe fruit, cooked breakfasts,
good espresso, interested staff and a quieter
upstairs section affording a lovely view,? says
BT Forum user barnacles.
OMAN AIR BUSINESS, MUSCAT
Day beds, showers, complimentary massage
and more besides. ?Full dining option ? food is
good. Nice bar area. Helpful business centre,?
says BT Forum user cwoodward.
BRITISH AIRWAYS GALLERIES/FIRST,
JOHANNESBURG OR TAMBO
BA?s First and Club lounges in Johannesburg
have a ?Great selection of fresh food? free
massages, good wine selection, good coffee,
lovely staff,? says BT Forum user miningguy.
QATAR AIRWAYS AL MOURJAN, DOHA
One of five Qatar lounges in the main terminal,
all sumptuous, this one has ?sheer space and
variety?, says BT Forum user Inquisitive.
BRITISH AIRWAYS, DUBAI
A new addition to the BA network, this one is
split into two distinct spaces, one being a small
Concorde Bar which is accessed by a key card
from the main business class lounge.
EMIRATES FIRST CLASS, DUBAI
The two Emirates lounges had a US$11 milion
refurbishment completed in 2016. Paid-for
access used to be for Emirates passengers, but
you can now (since 2017) buy your way into
first class for US$200, while the business class
lounge costs around half that price.
ETIHAD AIRWAYS FIRST, ABU DHABI
BT reviewed it in October 2016 and found the
service, food and drink first-rate. You take a
quick workout or spruce up at the barbers or
spa before the flight. You can pay to get in (from
US$200 for first class, US$100 for business).
M AY 2 0 1 8
QATAR AIRWAYS AL SAFWA, DOHA
Not content with having just one impressive
first class lounge, Qatar has two. The Al Safwa,
however, is exclusively for first class ticket
holders flying with Qatar Airways.
SAUDIA ALFURSAN GOLDEN, JEDDAH
For first and business passengers in the busiest
airport in Saudi Arabia. The international lounge
is open to anyone for SAR189 (around �).
SAUDIA ALFURSAN GOLDEN, RIYADH
Both first and business under one roof, with
first class more secluded. There?s a good buffet,
showers and Apple computers to use.
SLOW, CAPE TOWN
For domestic flights, including BA flights
operated by Comair. A fabulous lounge with
a huge selection of food and drink over two
levels, two bars including a cocktail bar and the
famous ?Loo with a view?.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
LOUNGES
ASIA
ALL NIPPON AIRWAYS FIRST CLASS,
TOKYO HANEDA
For first class ANA or Star Alliance guests.
?Amazing! At 6:50am they were running around
offering people champagne and Hibiki Japanese
whisky?, says BT forum user K1ngston.
AMERICAN EXPRESS THE CENTURION,
HONG KONG
For Amex Platinum Card and Centurion
members. The Centurion area features a menu
by chef Lau Yiu Fai of the Michelin-starred Yan
Toh Heen at the Intercontinental Hong Kong.
BLUE RIBBON, BANGKOK AIRWAYS,
KOH SAMUI, THAILAND
A small but delightful lounge on this Thai island.
?The most charming and relaxing place. Mostly
open-sided thatched cabanas. Well-appointed
and run,? says BT Forum user cwoodward.
CATHAY PACIFIC THE DECK, HONG KONG
Opened in March 2018, this replaces the Cabin
lounge. It?s for Cathay?s first and business class
passengers, Marco Polo Club Silver members,
plus Oneworld Emerald and Sapphire members.
CATHAY PACIFIC THE PIER FIRST, HONG KONG
Cathay Pacific has a number of lounges at Hong
Kong: The Wing, The Cabin, The Bridge and The
Pier. The Pier was refurbished in 2015, and the
BT review in 2016 called it ?superb?.
becoming Cathay trademarks. Facilities include
a noodle station, but no showers or tended bar.
and business class passengers, or you can pay
HK$350 (about �) for entry.
CATHAY PACIFIC, TOKYO HANEDA
Cathay uses Studioilse to create its distinctive
lounge designs, and this early revamp formed
the template. The made-to-order noodles, hip
looks and attractive wood surfaces are all there.
JAL FIRST, TOKYO NARITA
The first class lounge for Oneworld Emerald
members (the Sakura lounge is for business
class). It?s small, with a buffet section of
Japanese and Western food, plus showers.
CATHAY PACIFIC, SHANGHAI燩UDONG
The Cathay Pacific and Dragonair lounge is for
first or business travellers plus one guest; or for
Oneworld business class passengers.
MALAYSIA AIRLINES GOLDEN,
KUALA LUMPUR
Opened in March 2018, this smart lounge in
the international terminal is a showcase for
Malaysian food, with traditional Malay, IndianMalay and Sino-Malay dishes, plus Western food.
CHINA AIRLINES, TAIPEI TAOYUAN
An impressive, surprisingly large and stylish
business lounge with extensive food options,
showers, workstations and more. The buffet has
a mix of Chinese and Western dishes.
GVK, MUMBAI
Reviewed by BT in November 2016, this is ?a
well-equipped lounge to recharge and work?.
Access is free for business and first class
passengers of the many partner airlines.
HONG KONG AIRLINES CLUB AUTUS,
HONG KONG�
Opened in 2017 at a cost of more than �million,
there are showers, a huge buffet and great
views of the bridge to Macau. It?s free for first
Cathay uses
Studioilse to
create their
distinctive
lounge
designs
MIRACLE, BANGKOK
Part of the Priority Pass group. ?Big space, nicely
divided into areas and rarely seems busy?
spacious and immaculately clean,? is the verdict
of BT Forum user Travelling4Fun.
OMAN AIR, BANGKOK
?Fresh dates, wonderful appetiser-sized dishes
of hummus, hot dishes for main courses, and
?authentic? Arabic coffee,? says BT Forum user
barnacles. For first and business class.
PLAZA PREMIUM EAST HALL, HONG KONG�
This lounge takes paying guests, and also
business class for airlines without their own
37
Cathay Pacific
The Pier first
class lounge,
Hong Kong
?
CATHAY PACIFIC THE WING FIRST,
HONG KONG
Twenty-three shower rooms, workstations, a
noodle bar. ?While the Pier is cosier, this one has
private cabanas with baths? This alone wins it
for me?, says BT Forum user ThomasCox.
CATHAY PACIFIC FIRST/BUSINESS, MANILA
Opened in 2015, this well-designed lounge is
the ?Small sister to The Pier at Hong Kong. Good
bar and food. Very comfortable, even for a few
hours?, says BT Forum user cwoodward.
CATHAY PACIFIC, BANGKOK SUVARNABHUMI
Opened in 2015, reviewed by BT in June 2017,
for first and business passengers. ?Very
comfortable?, says BT Forum user MartynSinclair.
CATHAY PACIFIC, SINGAPORE CHANGI T4
Opened in 2017, this is one of the distinctive
Studioilse-designed lounges which are
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
?
M AY 2 0 1 8
LOUNGES
A highlight
is the ondemand
noodle bar
lounges at the airport. BT reviewed it in March
2017. There?s a twin lounge in the West Hall.
SATS PREMIER T1, SINGAPORE CHANGI T1
Open to Priority Pass holders, this lounge has a
buffet, showers and secluded booths where you
can work in relative comfort. It?s a busy lounge
though, and used by many regional airlines.
SKYTEAM, HONG KONG
Often busy, but a highlight here is the ?on
demand? noodle bar, which provides three types
of Chinese noodles that are cooked on order.
SINGAPORE AIRLINES SIVERKRIS,
SINGAPORE CHANGI T2
There are two Silverkris lounges in Terminal 2B
at Changi Airport ? left for first class, right for
business. ?[Business] beats some first class
lounges,? said Lady London on the BT Forum.
SINGAPORE AIRLINES SILVERKRIS FIRST
CLASS, SINGAPORE CHANGI T2
Business Traveller reviewed this first class
lounge in March 2018, and found it had good
service and everything you need. ?Discreet
luxury?, as BT Forum user Inquisitive put it.
38
THAI AIRWAYS ROYAL FIRST, BANGKOK
The feel is calm and friendly, and you can have a
complimentary one-hour full body massage. Just
make sure you don?t miss the plane.
BELOW: China
Airlines lounge,
Taipei
VIETNAM AIRLINES LOTUS,
HO CHI MINH CITY
A Skyteam lounge with good facilities, decent
wifi speed (for Vietnam) and even a ?pet lounge?,
because Vietnam Airlines allows domestic
passengers to carry their dogs on board.
THE AMERICAS
AIR CANADA SIGNATURE SUITE, TORONTO
Very chic, with a full-service restaurant that
includes a private dining room for small groups
or families. Exemplary food and beautiful use of
maple wood, but no showers.
AMERICAN AIRLINES FLAGSHIP, MIAMI
For first and business class, Oneworld Emerald
and Sapphire flyers. ?Very spacious with good
food and drink,? says the BT Forum user who
(presumably immodestly) calls himself ?christ?.
AMERICAN AIRLINES FLAGSHIP,
NEW YORK JFK T8
According to BT Forum user ThomasCox, ?Never
felt crowded. Comfy lounge chairs by the huge
floor-to-ceiling windows. There?s also a separate
First Dining Room for genuine first class tickets.?
AMERICAN AIRLINES FLAGSHIP, CHICAGO
?A cosy, comfortable space, especially charming
and helpful staff and a decent food display,? says
BT Forum user travelsforfun.
M AY 2 0 1 8
AMERICAN AIRLINES FLAGSHIP,
LOS ANGELES
The First Dining Room is a standout with its
impressive � la carte menu. There are currently
four Flagship lounges from AA; the next three
are Dallas/Fort Worth, Heathrow, Philadelphia.
AMERICAN EXPRESS THE CENTURION,
HOUSTON GEORGE BUSH
Reviewed in November 2017 by BT, ?a pleasant
surprise from start to finish, a simply excellent
lounge ? and an impressive benefit for Platinum
card holders (and Centurion ones).?
AMERICAN EXPRESS THE CENTURION, MIAMI
This lounge is currently undergoing expansion,
and will get new amenities including a wine bar
plus private phone rooms. But even while parts
of it are under wraps, it?s still very good.
BRITISH AIRWAYS, BOSTON LOGAN
BA is currently investing � million into its US
lounges. The Concorde Dining restaurant is one
of the visible highlights of this investment, and it
opened in 2017.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
39
BRITISH AIRWAYS CONCORDE ROOM,
NEW YORK JFK T7
For first class BA passengers. It?s a ?comfortable,
exclusive, spacious with friendly staff and
excellent wine,? says BT Forum user ThomasCox.
DELTA SKY CLUB, NEW YORK JFK T4
Primarily aimed at Delta Sky Club members,
anyone can get in for $50. This lounge boasts
an outdoor patio in warm weather, and there are
appealing shower facilities too.
BRITISH AIRWAYS CLUB/FIRST, CHICAGO
Access to First lounge is for Emerald members
or those travelling in first class. ?While small, has
lovely staff,? says BT Forum user ThomasCox.
ONEWORLD BUSINESS, LOS ANGELES
Customers can choose from eclectic and
international menus created by renowned
Australian fusion chef Neil Perry. There?s also a
cocktail bar and 16 shower suites.
BRITISH AIRWAYS CLUB/FIRST, HOUSTON
Also open to Emerald members and first class
passengers. ?Staff escort you to ensure you?re
first to board?, says BT Forum user ThomasCox.
BRITISH AIRWAYS GALLERIES, WASHINGTON
When reviewed by BT, we noted ?you can only
go into the Concorde Dining [room] if you are
flying First. Gold or Emerald Card won?t help.?
DELTA SKY CLUB, SEATTLE TACOMA SOUTH
This 2016 lounge has ?decent food and a view of
Mount Rainier,? says BT Forum user travelsforfun.
Non-Delta entry costs US$59 per person.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
ONEWORLD, SAO PAULO
Reviewed by Business Traveller in August 2015,
when ?the staff kept the buffet replenished
and the place tidy. There were at least three
attendants just looking after the six showers.?
QANTAS BUSINESS, LOS ANGELES
This Marc Newson-designed space is ?a modern
lounge with great � la carte food choices, and ?
as ever ? great wine,? says BT?s Julian Gregory.
STAR ALLIANCE, LOS ANGELES
One of the best lounges in the US, with an ?Open
terrace, ramp views, good food, wine ? what?s
not to like?? as BT Forum user trident3 puts it.
STAR ALLIANCE, RIO DE JANEIRO
Brazilian design is showcased at this attractive
lounge, run by the Plaza Premium Group. It?s
open to Star Alliance Gold status passengers as
well as business and first class ticket holders.
ABOVE LEFT:
Air Canada
Signature Suite,
Toronto
ABOVE: British
Airways
Galleries
lounge,
Washington
Dulles
UNITED POLARIS, CHICAGO
This is United?s flagship while more Polaris
lounges are under construction. There are
showers, daybeds, good food and cocktails.
VIRGIN ATLANTIC CLUBHOUSE,
NEW YORK JFK T4
BT Forum user Defcon5 likes the ?craft beer,
tapas?. It also has a spa, good workstations with
printers and British food on the menu.
VIRGIN ATLANTIC CLUBHOUSE, LOS ANGELES
Reviewed by BT in 2015, this �5 million
Clubhouse ?has also got the basics right ? and
enough food so that you can get on the flight
and sleep all the way home if you wish.?
?
M AY 2 0 1 8
LOUNGES
40
ABOVE: Etihad
Airways first and
business lounge,
Melbourne
RIGHT: Virgin
Australia lounge,
Brisbane
AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND
AIR NEW ZEALAND INTERNATIONAL,
AUCKLAND
Opened in 2015, the ANZ flagship lounge is for
ANZ business class passengers and travellers
with a lot of Airpoints. ?Comfortable ? very good
food and even better wine? close to all gates,
good IT,? says BT Forum user cwoodward.
ETIHAD AIRWAYS FIRST AND BUSINESS,
MELBOURNE
You can now (since January 2018) buy walk-in
access to this lounge for US$75; or for an
additional $40, you can get the VIP room and
live out your Bond villain fantasies sitting on the
chic furniture (Blofeld white cat not supplied).
therapy? and other jetlag-countering ideas for
travellers on long haul flights.
QANTAS FIRST, MELBOURNE
?Many people mention the QF First Lounge
in Sydney. I rather like its smaller cousin in
Melbourne, which is quieter but offers the same
service,? says BT Forum user TominScotland.
VIRGIN AUSTRALIA, BRISBANE
Like the Virgin Australia lounges in the bigger
cities, there?s a dedicated espresso and wine bar
in the centre of this lounge. The wifi is fast.
QANTAS INTERNATIONAL TRANSIT, PERTH
With the introduction of Qantas? nonstop flights
from London, this lounge focuses on ?wellness?
with wholesome food, yoga classes, ?bright light
VIRGIN AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY
The signature espresso and wine bar lies in the
centre of the room, but there are also meeting
rooms, and a huge range of reading material. BT
QANTAS FIRST, SYDNEY
?Hands down the most comfortable, most
spacious lounge with a great view, the best/
friendliest service and the tastiest food,? says
BT Forum user ThomasCox.
QANTAS FIRST, BRISBANE
Qantas started out in Queensland nearly 100
years ago, so their Brisbane lounge is special
with lots of natural light and smart design.
M AY 2 0 1 8
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
The new LOT Polish Airlines
737 Max 8 is now flying
from London to Warsaw
20 times per week.
lot.com
41
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
M AY 2 0 1 8
D E S T I N AT I O N S
WINDSWEPT
WONDER
42
WORDS NIGEL TISDALL
It takes one of the
most extraordinary
journeys by
military flight to
get there, but
the idiosyncratic
Falkland Islands
are well worth
the effort
ABOVE LEFT: Colourful
homes brighten the
capital, Stanley
THIS PICTURE: Penguins
heading inland
M AY 2 0 1 8
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
43
?
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
M AY 2 0 1 8
D E S T I N AT I O N S
C
ould this be the most
unusual airline route
in the world? Twice a
week, at precisely 2359,
a Ministry of Defence
charter flight slips out
of RAF Brize Norton
in Oxfordshire bound on a 18hour, 8,000-mile flight south to the
Falkland Islands. Windblown and
treeless, this remote archipelago of
778 islands lies around 400 miles east
of the southern tip of South America
and has a population of just 3,200 ?
plus an awful lot of sheep, penguins,
seals and seabirds.
Known as the South Atlantic
Airbridge, this epic service linking
the UK with the British Overseas
Territory has been operating for
more than 30 years and is a
collector?s item for fans of aviation
44
M AY 2 0 1 8
male soldiers with
severe haircuts and
camouflage-patterned
backpacks. Only 31
seats are generally made
available for ?Non Mil Pax? (nonmilitary passengers), as the green
luggage label tied to my
suitcase puts it. Nationals
from 13 countries ?
including Russia, China,
Taiwan and Vietnam
? are excluded from
purchasing tickets. On average only
five passengers per flight are tourists
like me, the rest of this select band
being business travellers, relatives
and islanders. Everyone is remarkably
friendly ? within minutes I?ve met
the local dentist and tanner and
already feel part of the community,
while the young soldiers are quiet,
courteous and helpful.
It is a long and tiresome wait to
get on board. Screens in the terminal
reveal the parallel universe of the
military, showing the time in Cyprus,
Dubai and the Falklands. The only
flight due for arrival is coming from
Kabul. The final security checks are
carried out alphabetically by surname,
while bus transfers to the plane are
organised by seat number.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
PHOTOGRAPHS NIGEL TISDALL
and adventure. While the flights are
primarily filled with personnel and
freight bound for the Mount Pleasant
military garrison on East Falkland,
a small number of civilians are also
allowed on board ? although getting
a seat is by no means easy.
There is no online booking system.
Potential passengers must first submit
a flight request to the Falkland Islands
Government Office in London well
in advance ? in my case, five months
ahead of travel, as I am using this
novel route as a way to explore these
far-flung islands before joining a
cruise south to Antarctica. During
the southern summer season from
October to March, the capital ?
Stanley ? is a popular port of call for
both large ships cruising the coast of
South America and expedition vessels
offering intrepid voyages to South
Georgia and the Antarctic Peninsula.
No tickets are issued for this
idiosyncratic flight, but ten days
before departure you will be given a
passenger reservation number and
told when to report at the airfield.
The MOD reserves the right to
change its schedules, and delays
seem to happen frequently. My flight
was put back a day at just 24 hours?
notice, but don?t expect anyone
to inform you of such a change
of schedule ? it is the passenger?s
responsibility to check the RAF Brize
Norton website to discover such
things, even though a one-way ticket
costs a handsome �111 per person.
The return fare is simply double
this, while residents of the Falkland
Islands pay around a third less.
Arriving at RAF Brize Norton
four hours before departure, it is
clear that I am catching one of the
most security-conscious flights in
the world open to civilians. After
being issued with a bright orange
pass permitting access to the heavily
protected base, we are taken by coach
to a functional terminal where I
meet my fellow passengers ? around
a hundred mostly young, principally
Everyone is
remarkably friendly
? within minutes
I?ve met the local
dentist and tanner
GETTING THERE
To book a seat on the South Atlantic Airbridge contact the Falkland Islands
Government Office (020 7222 2542; travel@falklands.gov.fk). For information
on the islands see falklandislands.com. Rainbow Tours (rainbowtours.co.uk)
offers package holidays and One Ocean Expeditions (oneoceanexpeditions.
com) has cruises from Stanley to South Georgia and the Antarctic Peninsula.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
OPPOSITE PAGE: The
Airtanker Airbus
A330-200 en route
in Sal, Cape Verde
CLOCKWISE FROM
ABOVE: King
penguins; Historic
Dockyard Museum;
memorial bust to
Margaret Thatcher
Operated by Airtanker, a British
charter airline that supports
the UK Armed Forces, our grey
Airbus A330-200 is surprisingly
comfortable, with 291 economy seats
in a 2-4-2 configuration plus two
hospital beds at the rear. The seat
pitch is a generous 34 inches, which
is better (by two inches) than the
economy seats on the new Qantas
787-9 Dreamliner service connecting
London and Perth, a journey of 17
hours. All seats are pre-allocated,
and there is no business class or
premium economy. IFE is limited
to TV screens that drop down from
the centre of the aircraft ceiling to
show films from days of yore, such
as Wall Street, so most passengers
bring their own tablets plus a back-up
power supply as there are no USB
sockets. Headphones, a cushion and
a rug are provided, along with an
Airtanker-branded amenity kit with
earplugs, eye-mask and socks. There
is no alcohol and the food ? which
ranges from basic (filled rolls and
muesli bars) to dire (battered cheese
and ham croquettes) ? is handed out
in white paper cartons with plastic
CONTINUED ON PAGE 77
M AY 2 0 1 8
45
RAIL
46
SLEEPER SUCCESS
WORDS ALEX MCWHIRTER
In contrast to mainland
Europe, the UK is
committed to investing
in its overnight
train services, with
older trains being
refurbished and new
rolling stock acquired
ABOVE: GWR's
Night Riviera
service has
had a revamp
M AY 2 0 1 8
W
hile taking the night train has
always had a romantic allure, over
in mainland Europe overnight
trains are in decline. Most have
been axed altogether. As well as
Germany?s Deutsche Bahn (DB),
we find that France?s SNCF has
also cut all its key services, including the hotelstandard Elipsos, which operated between Paris,
Barcelona and Madrid.
Thankfully, Thello (operated by Italy?s
Trenitalia rather than SNCF) remains in
operation, linking Paris and southern France
with cities in northern Italy. But Thello?s rolling
stock is not up to the latest standards (although
a number of premium cabins with shower and
toilet are now offered).
A good example of the UK?s renovation of
older sleeping cars can be seen at GWR (Great
Western Railway), whose Night Riviera service
has been given a new lease of life. A total of ten
sleeper coaches operate this service between
London Paddington and Penzance, with five
coaches operating the service in each direction.
Night Riviera departs Paddington just before
midnight, arriving into Penzance the following
morning at 0755. In the return direction it
departs Penzance 2145 Monday to Friday and
2115 on Sundays for an early morning arrival
into Paddington, with passengers allowed to
stay on board until 0700. There are numerous
en route stops at points not served by air travel.
GWR is refurbishing these coaches to a
high standard, bringing them in line with the
needs of today?s travellers. So alongside more
comfortable bedding, there are other touches
such as wifi, keycard door locks and improved
lighting. Adding to the appeal are lounges at
Paddington with others to follow this year
at Truro and Penzance. While some travellers
will miss the en suite toilets and showers, these
facilities are available at the Paddington lounge.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
?
Connecting business
across the UK
Arriva UK Trains? network reaches far and wide;
CrossCountry, Chiltern Railways, Grand Central,
Arriva Trains Wales and Northern operate a range
of services, from rural commuter lines to long
distance and inter-urban journeys. Arriva UK Trains
connects the three countries of Great Britain and
collectively runs 4,186 services each weekday.
Aberdeen
Connecting people and
communities to what?s
important to them.
Glasgow
We will always go the extra
mile for our customers.
Edinburgh
Newcastle
Sunderland
Carlisle
Barrowin-Furness
Delivering great service,
on great journeys across
Great Britain.
Bangor
Doncaster
Sheffield
Lincoln
Stoke-on-Trent
Nottingham
Birmingham
Oxford
Swansea
Cardiff
Aylesbury
Stansted
London
Bournemouth
We are passionate about
making sure that your journey
with us is a great experience.
Hull
Grimsby
Manchester
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We provide great value and
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remove the limits on where
businesses can go.
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York
Preston Leeds
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Holyhead
Middlesbrough
Guildford
Penzance
Explore ways to make your business rail travel more effective ?
connect with us at: arriva.co.uk/uk-trains
APRIL 2018
RAIL
48
Serving Scotland, the Caledonian Sleeper has
taken a different tack. Rather than refurbishing its
British Rail-era rolling stock, Serco (which holds
the franchise) has spent �0 million on a fleet of
75 state-of-the-art coaches the like of which have
never been seen in the UK. Part of this has been
funded by a � million grant from the Scottish
government. Hopes are that it will bolster tourism
to Scotland, especially from high-spending
overseas visitors.
The first batch of the new sleeper coaches
(which are built by CAF of Spain) has now
arrived in Glasgow, where they will be fitted out
prior to entering Lowlander service (see below)
in October 2018.
Caledonian Sleeper departs from London
Euston in either the mid- or late-evening
depending on the route. This gives either an
early- or mid-morning arrival in Scotland and
the same applies in the reverse direction.
Lowlander services (which will be the
first with new stock) operate to Edinburgh
The CAF sleepers
and Glasgow. Highlander services run to
offer hotel-standard
Aberdeen, Inverness and Fort William.
The big advantages of the Caledonian
interiors, the first
Sleeper are the savings on time (compared
time such luxury has
to daytime travel) and accommodation
been found in the UK
costs (especially in London), plus the fact
that the Highlander services call at many
towns and rural communities not served
by air travel. As such, the Highlander
services especially appeal to Scottish
parliamentarians, rural Scots with business
in the Big Smoke, plus leisure travellers;
Lowlanders are for inter-city business and leisure.
These CAF sleepers offer hotel-standard
interiors, and it will be the first time such luxuries
have been found in the
UK. That said, only
the more expensive
accommodation (Club
rooms and upwards)
will come with ensuite showers and
toilets. Other features
will include wifi and
charging panels. As with
the Penzance sleeper,
lounge use is available at
a number of stations.
FROM TOP:
Peter Strachan, chairman of Serco Caledonian
Austria?s
Nightjet
Scot, says, ?We believe the new Caledonian
sleeper (top
Sleeper trains will truly set a new standard in
and below);
overnight travel and we have worked closely with
CGI of the
Caledonian
Transport Scotland on their developments since
Sleeper's suite
BT
taking over the franchise in 2015.?
M AY 2 0 1 8
AUSTRIA?S OBB TO THE RESCUE
Two years ago Business Traveller reported that
Germany?s Deutsche Bahn (DB) would be axeing
all its overnight sleeper trains because they
were loss-making.
Our feature elicited much comment from readers
who were sad to see the trains being withdrawn.
It seemed the wrong decision in light of the green
agenda, the fact that DB?s international trains served
so many business routes and, last but not least, at
that time DB was operating the most modern and
comfortable overnight trains.
However, a saviour emerged late in 2016 in the
shape of OBB (the Austrian Federal Railways). OBB
absorbed the most important services from DB, and
also acquired the DB rolling stock. Services were
rebranded Nightjet.
It now means OBB is easily Europe?s largest
operator of international sleeper trains with a network
radiating from Austria and Switzerland to Germany,
Italy, Budapest and Slovenia.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
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50
M AY 2 0 1 8
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
D E S T I N AT I O N S
QUAYS to
success
Hamburg?s
renaissance is
centred on the
docks, but reaches
every street corner
WORDS ANDREW EAMES
T
here?s a new word on the streets of Germany?s second
biggest city: to ?cornern?. In our era of smartphones
and predictive text, where language gets mashed, this
piece of Denglish means to buy a beer from a kiosk
and stand on a street corner chatting with a group of
friends. It is something of a social phenomenon in the
trendier areas of Hamburg on sunny summer evenings.
Elements of Hamburg society don?t like this ?cornerning?,
and it certainly doesn?t sit comfortably with the staid,
buttoned-up image of the wealthy trading city. But then
this is also the city that has recently been declared the most
liveable in Germany (Economist Intelligence Unit), the
fourth best city destination in the world (Lonely Planet),
and home to the world?s best nightlife (Hostelworld).
Locals are slightly mystified by all these sudden accolades.
Hamburg has been like this for a long time, they say, but it
seems that the rest of us are only just cottoning on.
There?s a very big reason for this ?why now?? A reason
that rises proudly from among the former wharves. The
Elbphilharmonie, or Elphi for short, is a giant construct
of glass and brick, a radical wave-topped warehouse. This
hugely expensive concert hall/hotel/apartment block is
Hamburg?s equivalent of the Eiffel Tower, and it has attracted
a staggering four million visitors in its first year of operation.
And that includes an awful lot of bloggers and journalists
whose media coverage has put the city on the map.
51
Downtown
Sometimes fancifully called the Venice of the North thanks
to all its bridges and canals, Hamburg has always thrived
on its waterside location. Mariners navigating up the River
Elbe into Germany?s largest port have long appreciated the
fact that they can moor right next to downtown, rather
than be excluded to some distant, industrial no man?s land.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
M AY 2 0 1 8
?
FROM LEFT:
Cycling along
the dockside
in HafenCity;
Landungsbruecken
U-bahn (rapid
transit train) is the
best way to reach
the docks
52
Hamburg?s central docklands make them feel welcome,
ships and cranes silhouetted like question marks against
although fast turnaround times these days mean they
the sky, and to your left, warehouses and the Elphi. And
barely get the chance to go ashore.
it?s towards the left that Hamburg?s gravity has shifted
It was the port that created the original urbanisation
in the past decade, expanding the city centre by some 40
along a web of streets between the banks of the Elbe
per cent. Not long ago HafenCity?s docklands became
and the Alster lakes. Here, the remaining Hanseatic
too small for the new generation ships; now it is one
warehouses and shipping company headquarters have
of the largest urban developments in Europe, and one
been transformed into banks and exclusive boutiques.
which has taken care to mix offices with residential and
The key cultural institutions such as the Kunsthalle art
cultural institutions. And to make sure it is sustainable
gallery are here, as are the famous St
and accessible, planning rules here insist
Michael?s church and the Rathaus,
that any residential projects must be one
The Hanseatic
the neo-Renaissance style town hall.
third for sale, one third rentable, and
warehouses have
The city centre is pleasant enough,
one third social housing.
especially on the terraced lakeside
All this new development, with its
been transformed
at Jungfernstieg, where white and
sleek modern architecture, is behind the
into banks and
red cruisers pick up passengers for a
initial barricade of the Speicherstadt,
exclusive boutiques
saunter out onto the stippled, swantwo massive and elegant UNESCOrich waters of the two Alster lakes.
registered rows of brick-built warehouses
The Outer Alster, in particular, is
dating back 100 years, separated by a
lined with coffee houses and fine villas.
finger of water. Originally for storage of
Around Uhlenhorst, along the eastern shore,
spices and coffee, these now house tourist
it looks like some luxury seaside resort
attractions such as Miniatur Wunderland,
with joggers, cyclists and picnickers
a miniature model world which has topped
making the most of the waterside
the list of Germany?s most popular attractions
greenery. But there?s far more to
for the past two years, beating centuries-old
Hamburg than this.
historic sites (see page 54).
Beyond Speicherstadt are the various quays in
HafenCity
their new configurations, particularly Grasbrookkai
The best approach to Hamburg?s waterside is the
and Sandtorkai, with waterside bars, restaurants and
elevated U-bahn, which runs out through Baumwall
prestigious commercial tenants. The city?s cruise
to Landungsbruecken, the busy landing stage for all
terminal (cruising is huge here) is on Strandkai, and
the harbour cruises and ferries. There?s a new elevated
a collection of historic ships rubs gently against the
walkway here, too, with a unique view: to your right, big
pontoon in Sandtorhafen.
M AY 2 0 1 8
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
D E S T I N AT I O N S
Dominating this whole dockscape is the ?800 million
Elphi, which sits out on the end of Kaiserkai, drawing a
constant stream of visitors. Designed by Swiss architects
Herzog & de Meuron, its audacious concept meant
that its construction was fraught with budget-busting
delays, but that?s all water under the bridge, now that it?s
finished. At its heart is an organically shaped concert
hall with 2,100 seats and a wide programme of different
types of music. Some of its concert tickets are only
available to locals, and most sell out, but everyone can
come up to what is called the Plaza (at busy times you
need to pre-book through the visitor centre), on the
intersection between the original giant brick warehouse
and the flowing glasswork on top. Positioned right at the
point of the quay, the Elphi offers a magnificent view in
all directions; this concert hall has its feet in the water,
and its head in the clouds.
St Pauli and beyond
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
PHOTOGRAPH ANDREW EAMES
ABOVE: Elbgold
Rostkaffee in
Sternschanze
LEFT: A canalside
corner of the
Speicherstadt,
or Warehouse
District
Hamburg?s reputation as nightlife destination is
traditionally associated with the salty Reeperbahn,
but these days the table-dancing clubs are going out
of business. There?s still an ?over 18s
only? shutter across Herbertstrasse,
the heart of the prostitution zone,
and stag parties still come swaying
down the streets, but more people
come here these days for music, and
musicals; this is, after all, where the
Beatles started out and perfected their
craft from 1960-62. There?s now a
big music festival every September.
Locals are here, too, but not on the
main drag; the side streets around
the Reeperbahn are home to large
numbers of public relations companies
and discreet restaurants such as Krug
in Paul-Roosen Strasse, or Chug on
Taubenstrasse which serves taster
flights of innovative cocktail creations.
For the many locals heading for a
night out, the early evening hangouts
are further inland, to the north,
in the up and coming districts of
Karolinenviertel and Sternschanze.
This is where all that trendy
?cornerning? is going on.
Karolinen is essentially just a couple
of streets of local fashion designers
and quirky shops and caf閟. Its main axis is Marktstrasse,
with shoemakers, pottery shops and street art.
The biggest landmark building in this area is the huge
World War II bunker on Feldstrasse, which currently
hosts all kinds of creative organisations, but is slated to
become a hotel with a roof garden and a museum. Next
door is a fine conversion already completed: the brickM AY 2 0 1 8
53
?
D E S T I N AT I O N S
54
built Rindermarkthalle, a former cattle market, now
with an open-plan interior housing pop-up stores and
food outlets at the centre and supermarkets around the
edges (though not the usual German discount stores).
Sternschanze sits to the northwest
of the Rindermarkthalle. Its main
axis, Schulterblatt Strasse, is a mix
Until as recently as
of shops and manifestations of
1871 the Hanseatic
typical Hamburgian alternative
living, particularly in the iconic
city of Hamburg
squat of Rote Flora, a former music
was staunchly
hall now festooned in banners and
independent
rechristened Achidi-John-Platz after
an African immigrant who died in
suspicious circumstances. There?s a
squatter stockade of campervans around
the corner, and the wide pavements create a
big gathering point on summer evenings.
This part of town is a focal point
for the young, the creative and the
upwardly mobile, many of whom
gravitate a couple of streets north to the
Schanzenhofe, a hipsterish conversion
of brick-built, market-style buildings.
Here, there?s a big craft brewery (Ratsherrn) beer
garden, a coffee roaster cum meeting place caf� (Elbgold
Rostkaffee) and the Bullerei, a big restaurant run by TV
chef Tim M鋖zer, Germany?s equivalent of Jamie Oliver.
Altona and Ovelgonne
Until as recently as 1871, the Hanseatic city of
Hamburg was staunchly independent, and it was
surrounded on the north and west by Denmark. Its
western axis, Altona, was under Danish rule, and so the
adjoining region of Ottensen is distinctively low-rise,
ABOVE:
Model airport
at Miniatur
Wunderland
RIGHT:
Scale model
train and
landscape
LEFT:
Schanzenhofe
beer garden
M AY 2 0 1 8
MINIATUR WUNDERLAND
At first sight, the departures board of this German airport seems
normal enough. It must be one of the big hubs, for there are
imminent flights to the likes of New York, Johannesburg, Osaka
and Panama City, with airlines like Lufthansa, United and Condor.
But also coming up is a flight to Kilimanjaro, which strikes an
odd note: surely the tiny Kilimanjaro airport doesn?t have direct
flights departing from Germany? And then, at 1425, the killer entry:
destination Death Star, serviced by the Millennium Falcon. And there
it is, parked up on the apron among the A380s and the B777s: the
Star Wars? Falcon, an ugly duckling among the beautiful big birds. It?s
a geek moment the model-makers couldn?t resist.
As you might have guessed by now, this is not a real airport. This
is Knuffingen, in Hamburg?s Miniatur Wunderland, but half-close
your eyes and you can barely tell the difference. In the distance,
planes are taking off and landing. Arrivals are taxiing to the gates,
led by ?Follow Me? vehicles and attended by passenger buses and
baggage crews. Fire engines circle the perimeter, and the whole
thing is a blaze of lights, especially when ?night time? falls.
For aviation enthusiasts, the realism and detail of Knuffingen
airport is mesmerising, especially when you see the lift system
that shuffles the departed aircraft back to the arriving queue, and
all the apron vehicles bringing themselves into recharging docking
stations when they sense their battery power is getting low. Its
ambition and complexity are breath-taking.
For the past couple of years, Miniatur Wunderland, which is
housed in Hamburg?s UNESCO-registered Speicherstadt
warehouses where downtown meets docklands, has been
Germany?s most popular tourist attraction. This is slightly to the
consternation of the national tourist board, because cultural icons
such as Neuschwanstein Castle and the Brandenburg Gate are
being trumped by what is essentially a model railway.
Wunderland doesn?t need special promotion; word of mouth has
always done it proud. The annual throughput of 1.4 million people
is already a struggle within the
confined space available, and at
the busiest times you can wait
for many hours if you haven?t
reserved in advance. Sometimes,
in the height of the summer, the
doors stay open until the early
hours of the morning to give
everyone a chance.
It is clear from the entrance
that the project is still very much
home-grown; there?s none of the
flashy presentation associated
with big entertainment
corporations. Inside, a screen
shows the origins of its 16.5
million visitors since it started
17 years ago. The big numbers
are the Germans, Austrians,
Swiss, Dutch, Brits and
Americans; the small numbers ?
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D E S T I N AT I O N S
56
with Scandinavian-influenced
It?s an unusual
architecture and sociable triangular
town squares that could be out of
place to build your
Paris?s Montmartre. This is still an
sandcastles, in the
independent thinking part of town,
shadow of passing
and with the shops along Ottenser
Hauptstrasse (starting with big
supertankers
brands and ending with quirky
independents, delis and bakeries)
there?s enough going on for locals
not to need to go downtown for their needs.
A short walk south from Ottensen?s
centre you find yourself back on the
banks of the river. This exclusive
northern bank is a place of big villas
built for merchants and sea captains,
ABOVE LEFT:
Elbstrand
while down towards the water?s edge
beach RIGHT:
are pretty rows of Danish-influenced
Miniatur
cottages. Here, at Ovelgonne, is one of Hamburg?s
Wunderland?s
Venice BELOW:
biggest surprises: the Elbstrand beach along the river
Venice by night,
bank. This long stretch of sand, with fish restaurants
in miniature
and beach bar Strandperle, is a destination for families
on hot summer days. It?s an unusual place to build
sandcastles, in the shadow of passing supertankers.
Despite its distance downstream, Elbstrand and
Ovelgonne are part of Hamburg?s public transportation
system. In fact, route 62 back to Landungsbrucken
must be one of the travel bargains of the world. Who
needs a harbour cruise when this ferry, which runs every
ten minutes, charges down the Elbe, with the Elphi
looming up out of the haze? BT
M AY 2 0 1 8
are Tonga (six visitors so far) and the Vatican City (five ? and it
doesn?t say whether one was the Holy Father himself).
Miniatur Wunderland is the brainchild of twin brothers Frederik
and Gerrit Braun, who both remain fully involved in the project.
When they first went to the tourist board with their idea, all those
years ago, they were turned down, on the basis that model railways
appeal only to men and boys. And yet today, says marketing officer
Thomas Cerny, it is female visitors who declare themselves most
satisfied, probably because they ?come with the lowest expectations?.
Certainly the statistics are impressive. Aside from the airport,
some 270 model trains are simultaneously threading their way
through a variety of national landscapes (Germany, Switzerland,
Denmark, Italy, etc), along with 9,250 cars, 260,000 model people
and 385,000 LED lights. There are even ships on real water bringing
themselves into docks guided by working rudders and propellers.
But what makes it work for everyone, and not just trainspotter
types, is the detail; the little touches of humour, such as the water
skiing penguins and the two monks gazing through the trees at a
naked sunbather. There are over 100 figures making love in these
landscapes. And there?s lots of social observation: the wannabe
suicide being talked down off a clifftop, the long queues of women
at the toilets in the pop concert, and the Hamburg hipster pulling his
bed out of the wall in his studio flat when night falls.
And night does fall. Every 15 minutes the mood and the lighting
changes. Several after-dark set pieces include the eruption of Vesuvius,
complete with smoke and lava, which took years to perfect. And the
opening up of the Elbphilharmonie, Hamburg?s extraordinary wavetopped concert hall, with tiny moving figures in the orchestra.
All of this is run by a team of around 370 people, which includes
the two cleaners who have to walk over the displays like delicatetoed King Kongs between 4am and 6am, wielding vacuum
cleaners; dust is the biggest enemy of something with so many tiny
electrically powered moving parts, and it takes them three weeks to
clean the whole thing, before they
start again.
Miniatur Wunderland is
clearly a hugely, and maybe
unexpectedly, successful
enterprise. The Brauns have just
turned 50, and their next plan is
to open up a France and England
section, but with no room left in
the current warehouse, they?ve
submitted plans to do so in its
sister building across the canal.
That?ll mean a bridge between
the two, but that also brings
the model makers up against a
new obstacle: Speicherstadt?s
UNESCO World Heritage status.
So the next chapter in
its development starts with
UNESCO versus Miniatur
Wunderland, something of a
David and Goliath battle. There?s
probably a model in that.
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
A D V E R T I S E M E N T F E AT U R E
CITY LIVING
Adagio?s aparthotels offer central,
modern apartments with hotel amenities
A
parthotels ? a hybrid of apartments and hotels ?
give travellers the best of both worlds. They
combine the independence of an apartment stay
with the service of a hotel environment ? and Adagio
Aparthotels is the European market leader in this innovative
type of accommodation.
Adagio?s properties fuse the facilities of a hotel ? such as
24-hour reception, breakfast, gym, free wifi and housekeeping ?
with the homely feel of a modern, spacious apartment and a
fully-equipped kitchen.
With more than 100 aparthotels in central locations all over
Europe, Adagio?s guests have easy access to key business
districts and social hotspots. What?s more, the longer the stay, the
less you pay. Adagio aparthotels? tiered pricing from the fourth
night onwards is a cost-efficient option for business travellers
working on a long-stay assignment in a new city.
Aparthotel Adagio Birmingham City Centre
Aparthotel Adagio Liverpool City Centre
ADAGIO IN THE UK
Aparthotel Adagio Liverpool City Centre
Located in Liverpool?s iconic Lewis?s building, formerly the city?s
leading department store, this property?s public areas
have historic d閏or. The former restaurant now houses the
aparthotel?s breakfast room, lounge and meeting space.
Aparthotel Adagio Edinburgh Royal Mile
Aparthotel Adagio Birmingham City Centre
Adagio Birmingham is part of the Beorma Quarter Development
scheme in the trendy district of Digbeth. This central location is
an ideal base for business travellers ? within walking distance
from both Colmore Row business district and New Street station
which has excellent connections to Birmingham Airport.
Aparthotel Adagio Edinburgh Royal Mile
Aparthotel Adagio Edinburgh Royal Mile is the first Adagio
property with the brand?s new-look apartments ? featuring a
lighter, brighter and more dynamic
design. It?s also the first Adagio
to have a new communal area
concept, where guests can meet and
collaborate. The property is a short
walk from Edinburgh Waverley
train station.
Visit adagio-city.com
businesstraveller.com
M AY 2 0 1 8
3
58
Marrakech
WORDS MARISA CANNON
There is so
much to
see in this
medieval
Moroccan
city, it pays
to know
where
to go if
you are
exploring
with
limited
time
M AY 2 0 1 8
1
Bahia Palace
Start your journey at one of the city?s
crowning architectural glories ? a
spectacular 19th-century palace once
home to the wives and concubines
of the Grand Vizier to the sultan.
Spanning eight hectares, the 150room riad is a maze of interconnected
harems, adorned with vibrant
mosaics and cedar wood archways
embellished with Quranic verses and
Berber designs. In the courtyards,
ferns, banana plants and orange trees
flourish, while slender pathways
lead visitors into the high-ceilinged
halls. It?s worth investing in a city
guide who knows the key attractions
well if you?ve got limited time to
explore (Abercrombie & Kent offers
city break packages including a
guide from �0 for three nights;
abercrombiekent.co.uk).
palais-bahia.com
2
The souks
Head north and you?ll stumble into
a labyrinth of terracotta-coloured
alleyways inlaid with haphazardly
assembled market stalls. This is where
you?ll find some of the best shopping
in North Africa. The stall owners
tout everything from leather bags and
jewellery to scarves and slippers, plus
Moroccan-inspired iterations of the
latest fashion from the high street.
Native to Morocco, argan oil is also
sold in bulk here, though much of
what you?ll see won?t be good quality
? head instead to Assouss Argane on
Rue Mouassine, which sells qualityregulated creams, serums and oils for
use on the skin and hair. In the souk,
haggling is sport, and shopkeepers
know how much their pieces fetch
elsewhere. Playful banter can go a long
way, but never pay more than 50 per
cent of the asking price.
3
Le Jardin Secret
After an hour?s bartering you?ll feel
like you need a cool drink. Head
to Caf� Sahrij at Le Jardin Secret
for a pick-me-up in this oasis of
lush greenery, water features and
pavilions spread across a complex
dating back 400 years. Built by
the 16th-century Sultan Moulay
?Abd-Allah, the gardens fell into
disrepair in the early 20th century,
reopening in 2016 after a decade of
restoration. Today, they thrive with
tropical foliage, cacti and flowering
plants alongside gurgling fountains
originally used for bathing before
prayer. Order a pot of mint tea and
the tarte du jour from Le Jardin?s
outdoor caf� and enjoy the sun on
your face away from the chaotic
medina outside. There?s a Dhs 50
(� entrance fee to the garden.
lejardinsecretmarrakech.com
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
4 HOURS IN...
5
3
2
1
MARRAKECH
1
4
4
2
59
4
Les Bains de Marrakech
No trip to Marrakech is complete
without a visit to a hammam. A
common tradition in the Islamic
world, the Moroccan ritual uses a clay
known locally as ghassoul, taken from
the Atlas mountains and combined
with natural oils to soften the skin
before being scrubbed off with a rough
mitt. There are a number of these spas
dotted across the Medina (walled
part of the old town), but they vary
in standard. If you?re after guaranteed
luxury and faultless service, head to
Les Bains de Marrakech, a 20-minutewalk south of Le Jardin, where you
can unwind in a soaking tub strewn
with rose petals before your treatment.
If you?ve just got an hour, opt for the
45-minute hammam (�), which you
can combine with an algae wrap for
the same price.
lesbainsdemarrakech.com
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
5
Mus閑 Yves Saint Laurent
Launched last October, this tribute
to the pioneering French designer
has raised Marrakech?s cultural
profile. Yves Saint Laurent fell in
love with the city after his first visit
in 1966, and shortly after bought
a holiday home where he would
spend a month each year working
on his haute couture collections. He
credited the city with much of his
sartorial inspiration for decades to
follow. Designed by Studio KO, the
museum chronicles Saint Laurent?s
life from his early days as creative
director of Christian Dior to his
retirement show in 2002, featuring
a display of 50 defining garments
alongside sketches, photography and
video that give insight to his life and
career. Don?t miss the spectacular
portraits of Catherine Deneuve.
museeyslmarrakech.com BT
5
M AY 2 0 1 8
D E S T I N AT I O N S
LIFE
CYCLADES
Mykonos has an ancient charm, and new
beach clubs, bars and restaurants ensure its
appeal continues today
WORDS JENNY SOUTHAN
60
M AY 2 0 1 8
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
61
?
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
M AY 2 0 1 8
D E S T I N AT I O N S
62
S
corpios beach club is like
a sun-kissed, al fresco
Soho House. Positioned
on a Mars-like rocky
outcrop next to the bay of
Paraga, there are day beds
scattered over the sand and
under the striped shade of timber
awnings. Transcendental chill-out
music pumps a steady beat as barefoot
staff ? more akin to sun-bronzed
Greek gods and goddesses, clad in
frayed organic cotton robes and
mirrored sunglasses ? run around
delivering iced water.
Life?s a beach
Launched in 2015, Scorpios is one
of the most popular beach clubs
in Mykonos; and while you may
M AY 2 0 1 8
Since the 1950s,
Mykonos has
been known as
a glamorous,
hedonistic escape
or may not want to
party, dining at its
rough-hewn, open-air
restaurant should be
experienced. Under
sackcloth awnings,
people recline at driftwood
tables and order up platters
of scorpion fish with Kalamata
olives and chilli, lobster linguine
and wood-fired tiger prawns with
garlic oil. As the sun begins to set,
speed boats begin arriving, offloading
the ?Rich Kids of Instagram?, who
stroll along the jetty and up to the
club. Here they order giant bottles
of Belvedere vodka to be delivered
to their cabanas. By this point, the
ethno-electric beats are getting louder
and the outfits more dazzling.
ABOVE: Scorpios
beach club by
Paraga bay is
prime territory
for relaxing in
the sun
First impressions
Since the 1950s, the Greek Cycladic
island of Mykonos has been known
as a glamorous, hedonistic escape
in a similar vein to Ibiza. But at just
100 sq km (versus Ibiza?s 570 sq km)
and with just two million annual
tourists (versus more than seven
million for Ibiza in 2016), there is a
more boutique feel. And there isn?t
the same 24-hour clubbing vibe. ?If
you start partying in the afternoon
you are in bed by midnight and
then have the next day ahead of
you,? says Stelios Koumantakis,
general manager of the Mykonos
Blu hotel. ?We want people to come
and feel completely relaxed.?
Mykonos Town ? or simply
?Chora? (meaning ?town?), as
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
WHERE TO STAY
MYCONIAN KYMA
Opened in May last year, this hotel is perched
high on a hill overlooking the Aegean Sea and
Mykonos town, and is about 15 minutes? walk from
the centre. A member of Design Hotels, the Myconian
Kyma has 52 fresh, minimalist rooms and 29 suites
from 26 sqm to 40 sqm, all with terraces or balconies
and some with plunge pools. As with many of the
hotels on the island, the Cycladic architecture
is that familiar mix of whitewashed walls with
splashes of ultramarine, but here you?ll also
find iridescent pots and Scandi furniture.
There?s a spa and two outdoor pools next to
the restaurant and bar, and a generous buffet
breakfast in the morning. Rooms from ?300 in
May. designhotels.com
MYKONOS BLU
INFORMATION
scorpiosmykonos.com
baosmykonos.com
capriceofmykonos.com
belvederehotel.com
nammos.gr
syachting.com
bill-coo-hotel.com
jackieomykonos.com
visitgreece.gr
it?s known locally ? is where you?ll
find the main concentration of bars
and restaurants, although there are
other gems dotted around such as
Kiki?s Tavern on the northern coast.
Just a ten-minute drive from the
airport, one of the first photo stops
for visitors are the windmills of Kato
Mili, on a hill overlooking the Chora.
Continue down to the waterfront and
you come to Little Venice, where you
can sit with a pine-scented fresh basil
and Mastika mojito and watch the
water lap at the base of the sea wall
just a few feet away. (Favourite bars
include Caprice and Bao?s.)
After watching the sunset deepen
to a dark bruise on the horizon, the
sea as smooth as opal yet broken up
in places by islands of jet black, the ?
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
Part of Grecotels, this stunning hotel is well
positioned above Psarou beach, about ten
minutes from Mykonos town. Painted brilliant white
both inside and out, it has dazzling turquoise lagoon
pools and impressive views of the bay. There are two
restaurants ? L?Archipel and Aegean Poets ? which
serve exceptional contemporary Greek cuisine. The
food available to people on loungers at the beach
is also delicious (think jars of fresh tzatziki and
smoked aubergine dip with flatbread). There
is a wide array of rooms and suites across
Island Bungalow, Island Suite and Blu Villa
categories. If you feel like splashing out, the
125 sqm two-floor Deep Blu Villa (from ?1,832
a night) is a staggering place to stay, with its
own pool on one terrace and spa bath on the
upper one, as well as carved stone ottomans and
a ?blue grotto? bathroom. Rooms from ?220 in May.
mykonosblu.com
MYCONIAN VILLA COLLECTION
Midway along the southern coast of Mykonos is a
cluster of resort hotels high above Elia beach (you
need to take a minibus down and up). There are
five styles of property. The Myconian Utopia
and the Myconian Villas are a mix of two- to
six-bedroom luxury villas, plus there are guest
rooms from 30 sqm to 40 sqm, all with sea
views. The highlight is the infinity pool, while
attractive fine-dining Cabbanes restaurant has
a Mediterranean menu. A generous American/
Greek champagne buffet breakfast is available
every morning at Nouveau. Rooms from ?265
in May. myconianvillas.gr
M AY 2 0 1 8
63
D E S T I N AT I O N S
BEFORE YOU GO...
64
Restaurants and hotels open seasonally, so Mykonos is best visited in
June or September as August gets unbearably crowded. Be warned that
when leaving the island, the airport check-in hall is tiny ? prepare for
queues outside. It?s also important to think carefully about the location of
your hotel, as there aren?t many taxis on the island ?爕ou will either need
to walk, take a bus, or hire a vehicle (car, motorbike or quad bike). A new
app, Aegean Taxi, is similar to Uber and worth downloading.
With the sea to
yourself, you can go
snorkelling before
drinking sparkling
wine on the deck
evening is an idyllic
time to wander
pretty winding
streets lined with
souvenir shops and
designer boutiques.
Houses are painted
white and blue, with
vibrant pink and purple
bougainvillea tumbling
over garden walls. Packed
Greek tavernas, with patrons
drinking wine at tables outside, are
plentiful. But for something a little
more jetset, Matsuhisa restaurant
from chef Nobuyuki ?Nobu?
Matsuhisa at the Belvedere hotel is
a romantic choice. Tables are placed
in an oasis around a swimming pool
illuminated by overhead lanterns,
M AY 2 0 1 8
while the delicious
Japanese-Peruvian
dishes are presented
like miniature works
of art.
All at sea
Once it?s time to really
unwind, a boat trip
is unbeatable and
SYachting has five
vessels available for
charter. If you?re lucky,
you will have Captain Zoe at the
helm ? one of the few female captains
in the whole of Greece. With the
sea to yourself, you can dive off
into the water to go snorkelling
before enjoying fresh canap閟 and
drinking sparkling wine on the deck.
ABOVE: Iridescent seas
and whitewashed
walls dripping with
bougainvillea in
Mykonos Town
Upon returning to the shore, you?ll
be back just in time for another
sunset party ?燡ackie O?s beach club
does drag shows, while Nammos on
Psarou beach regularly sees revellers
dancing in the surf. Both have
outstanding garden restaurants, too
?爐he latter known for its seafood
priced by the kilo, Kobe beef burgers,
and methuselahs of Ch鈚eau HautBrion Blanc for ?26,000 a pop.
If it?s peace you?re after, head to the
serene Bill & Coo Suites and Lounge
hotel for a massage, followed by a gin
and tonic mixed at a trolley beside the
infinity pool. At night, its gourmet
restaurant offers dazzling views of
the stars over the Aegean. Come to
think of it ? almost every location is
Mykonos is picture-perfect. BT
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
OPINION
Don?t buy that
villa just yet
Now may not be the best time to invest in global property,
even if sunnier climes tempt
T
66
M AY 2 0 1 8
THE BACKLASH
countries. Locals have been priced out of their
This loose monetary policy is now reversing.
own cities. So governments across the globe
Central banks have either ended QE or are
? from Vancouver to London to Shanghai
talking about doing so, while interest rates
? have introduced tighter restrictions and
? most notably in the US ? are on the way
higher taxes on purchases by foreigners. New
up. As debt grows more expensive, so the
Zealand ? possibly sick of being the subject
yield required from an income-producing
of billionaires? zombie apocalypse fantasies
asset needs to rise. That means either rising
? is looking at banning sales of property to
rents (which seems unlikely, given low wage
?foreign speculators?. This sort of move is
inflation) or falling prices; or a bit of both.
unlikely to make houses any more affordable
It?s not just about tighter monetary policy,
for locals in London?s Zone 2, say, but it does
however. It?s also about politics. Another big
assuage some of the voter anger.
tailwind pre-financial crisis was the embrace
More importantly, politicians ? keen to
of globalisation, and the idea that money,
raise funds to plug the gaping holes in balance
goods and people should be able to flow freely
sheets ? are increasingly talking about wealth
across the world without restriction. That?s
taxes. Few forms of wealth are as easy to tax as
changing, slowly but surely.
property. You can hide your
For many of the world?s
global income; you can stash
Governments and
ultra-wealthy, property in
your art in a vault in Zurich;
voters are increasingly you can carry gold coins and
prime locations in global
cities became a safe haven
hostile to the footloose diamonds with you. But your
after the financial crisis. You
property is stuck where it is,
elite and the forces
couldn?t trust the banks.
highly visible. That makes
of globalisation
You didn?t know which
it a prime target for cashcompanies were going
strapped politicians.
to survive. Even highly
In short, debt is getting
indebted governments might be in trouble.
more expensive, and
So bricks and mortar in desirable global
governments and voters are
boltholes seemed a good bet.
increasingly hostile towards
But property is becoming less
the footloose elite and the forces
attractive to the elite. There?s
of globalisation. That?s not a
a perception (largely justified)
promising backdrop for residential
that policies adopted to save
property as an investment. Indeed, prime
the financial system ?爓hile
property in London has been falling in value
perhaps necessary, at least at first ? favoured
for a couple of years now. I?m not saying you
the wealthy, by driving up asset prices. That
shouldn?t buy that pied � terre you?ve had your
perception has helped to fuel voter anger,
heart set on; but I am suggesting that if you?re
giving rise to a new, global era of populism.
looking at property purely as an investment,
As a result, there has been a significant
it might well be better to wait until this
backlash in even ostensibly pro-globalisation
particular cycle has reached its nadir. BT
businesstraveller.com
ILLUSTRATION: BENJAMIN SOUTHAN
here are many good reasons
to buy property overseas. For
frequent travellers, or those
who live and work in more than
one location, it can be about
convenience. For those who perhaps plan to
retire to a well-loved holiday destination, it
can be about forward planning and a dash
of romance. But what about the investment
outlook? Is now a good time to buy residential
property abroad, purely as an investment?
The short answer is probably not. While
every market is unique, and I am making
generalisations, a lot of the tailwinds that have
helped to drive prime property prices higher
in recent years are turning into headwinds.
There?s no doubt that property in prime
locations has been a good investment since
the days of the financial crisis. As Yolande
Barnes of upmarket estate agency Savills
points out, prices in most global cities have
soared since 2012. Prices in Shanghai have
more than doubled. San Francisco, Dublin,
Amsterdam, Vancouver and Sydney are
among several cities to have seen prices
rise by more than 60 per cent in that same
period. That has left many residential markets
looking expensive, certainly by historical
standards, and on measures such as local
income to price multiples.
What?s been driving this? The most obvious
factor is monetary policy. After Lehman
Brothers collapsed in September 2008, central
banks around the world slashed interest rates
and printed money, using quantitative easing
(QE). Those who were able to borrow money
could get it very cheaply. As a result of this
loose monetary policy, asset prices worldwide
? particularly anything associated with a
reliable income, such as property ? shot up.
JOHN STEPEK
E XECUTIVE EDITOR OF
MONEYWEEK MAGA ZINE
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and Best Middle Eastern Airline. Singapore Airlines爓on three
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Carrier, had the Best Frequent Flyer Programme, and Best Airport
Lounge for its Concorde Room at London Heathrow T5. In the
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OPINION
In for
the long mall
Rather than user-friendly conduits for getting from A to B,
airports are designed to part travellers from their cash
W
68
FIT FOR PURPOSE?
So why can?t airports be made to work
better? If we were once able to build stations
that were ideal for their function, suitably
attractive and long-lived additions to the
landscape, why do we have so much trouble
M AY 2 0 1 8
doing the same with airports? The airport
has been given to extracting a profit from a
authorities may argue that they have got it
captive audience.
right ? and, commercially, perhaps they have.
The airport operators may claim that
Many modern international airports, those in
facilities are better than ever. There are VIP
the UK included, must be among the most
lounges where you can relax or do business;
efficient moneymaking machines in the world.
there are decent restaurants. At some, you can
But despite acres of retail space, restaurants,
even visit a spa or gym or use a meeting room
bars and the rest, many of them are ugly and
before you board your plane.
unpleasant to use.
But the question remains, is this really
Several of the UK?s airports started out as
what travellers want? If you are doing business
little more than a wartime runway, or a flying
wouldn?t you rather do it in the office than
club, with a few huts. They
the airport lounge; wouldn?t
have been developed over
you rather go shopping in a
the years with commercial
town centre? This highlights
Too much thought
considerations taking
another problem faced by
has been given to
precedence over aesthetic
airport designers; the conflict
extracting a profit
or logistical ones.
between business travellers,
What seems to be
who generally want to get
from a captive
overlooked is that airports
through the airport and onto
audience
exist because people need
their flights as quickly as
to travel. Small wonder
possible without distractions
there are times when
such as meandering routes
business travellers or holidaymakers
through shops; and leisure
feel as though they are the least
travellers, who often treat the
important element in an
airport experience as part of their
airport?s operation.
holiday experience.
It is true that many of
Perhaps it?s time to re-think
the world?s most modern
airports. How about building attractive
airports, such as those in
but simple-to-use terminals right by the
Bangkok, Dubai, Hong
planes, with nothing but the essentials for
Kong, Singapore, even Keflavik,
those ? such as business travellers ? who just
look fine from the outside, having been
want to arrive, check-in and go. London
conceived on the drawing boards of top
City airport springs to mind as a model. I
international architects and designers. But
suspect I?m not alone in preferring a clear
what about inside, the part that travellers
run to the departure gate without having to
actually have to use?
navigate the shopping malls and fast-food
It is easy to see why some have been
outlets. And don?t get me started on the
described as little more than giant shopping
bureaux de change and their ?interesting?
malls, where little thought has been given to
exchange rates. I?ll steer clear of them until
the passengers, but perhaps too much thought
I feel the need to be mugged. BT
businesstraveller.com
ILLUSTRATION: BENJAMIN SOUTHAN
hen the Victorians built
the railway network
throughout the UK and
what was then the British
Empire, almost every
major line started and finished in a spectacular
terminus designed to signal to the world that
civilisation had arrived.
You can still see many of these termini in
daily use. London, for example, has Charing
Cross, King?s Cross, St Pancras, Marylebone,
Euston, Victoria and Waterloo. There are
grand examples in York, Edinburgh and other
major business centres. Then there are those
in overseas cities: the majestic railway station
in Kuala Lumpur; Flinders Street station in
Melbourne; the vast Victoria Terminus station
in Bombay (like Mumbai, now renamed,
as the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus), and
many other slightly less extravagant versions
throughout the Commonwealth.
But it wasn?t just as symbols of power that
these stations were built; they had a very useful
purpose, too. They served the needs of the
travelling public who used them day after day,
and they were ? and still are ? spectacularly
successful in meeting those needs.
Today, the big international airports have
taken over the role of major transport hubs.
Where once city fathers could be proud of
the grand Victorian Gothic structures of the
stations, now it is the concrete, steel and glass
of the airports that fulfil this role.
JEFF MILLS
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MYKONOS
Greek party island of the
rich and beautiful
HAMBURG
The docks are revitalising
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69
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M AY 2 0 1 8
OPINION
Crossing
time zones
There are few things worse than being jet-lagged with nowhere
to go. Maybe it?s time reputable hotels let rooms by the hour
Y
70
ou don?t need me to tell you
about the pain of business
travel when flying east. The
prospect of landing at an
uncivilised hour, with the
knowledge that your hotel room will not
be available until the afternoon is a familiar
experience for the jet-lagged businessperson.
Hoteliers hate early arrivals. They clutter up
the lobby, expect all the guests from the night
before to leave after breakfast, and look as if
they have just left the set of a horror film.
Often long-haul travellers have been up all
night, so why don?t more hotels cater properly
for early bird business travellers? They must
know a proportion of guests will arrive before
check in. Yet the focus has always been on full
rate overnight stays. Hotel management rarely
considers how much revenue could be made
from selling rooms for a half-day or hourly
rate. Even the most basic space with a small
bed would be welcome for those who have
been up all night.
M AY 2 0 1 8
than the Bordeaux. Breakfast is essential, and
For the traveller with insomnia, one
an early arrival at your hotel provides the
London hotel is offering a ?Sleep Bracelet?.
opportunity to take in all the benefits of eggs
This claims to act as an antenna, connected
and bacon, freshly baked goods, juice and
to an embedded ?Natural Frequency
buckets of coffee ? assuming your hotel serves
Technology disc?. The makers claim it tunes
a good breakfast, and if it doesn?t, why are you
out bad frequencies from electronic devices
staying there?
and encourages only the good ones, thus
Thirdly, and more generally, it is my
presumably aiding the path to sweet dreams.
suggestion that you take your keep-fit gear or
I have yet to try one, and wonder what
swimsuit with you, and use the hotel health
constitutes a ?good frequency? rather than
facilities for an hour or so. I?m not necessarily
a ?bad? one. Rather than struggle with that
advocating a hard workout, rather a little
conundrum, thankfully some less esoteric
time in the hotel pool, perhaps a sauna and
sleep aids are being offered by savvy hoteliers.
a steam. After that take the opportunity to
Among the sleep aids I have encountered
rehydrate, but this time with some mineral
are calming tinctures by the bedside, such as
water. Many quality hotels with these types of
a ?relaxing pillow mist? from a perfumery in
facilities can also offer you a
Provence. One innovative
massage at varying rates, the
property is also offering a
Find a comfy chair,
cost of which unfortunately
jet-lag package including a
take your shoes off
can seldom be expensed. So
music programme that of
you may, with planning, be
relaxing bedtime themes
and clutter up the
better off choosing a hotel
and an automatic volume
lobby. They?ll soon
that recognises the needs of
reducer that fades as you
find a room for you...
exhausted arrivals and offers
drift off. Hotels are not yet
a free massage experience.
permitted to offer sleepAt Las Ventanas al Paraiso, a
deprived guests any form
Rosewood Resort in Los Cabos,
of ?knock-out drop?. This
Mexico, you are offered a ten-minute
despite the unspoken wish of
neck and foot massage at
receptionists who are badgered
check-in; and the welcome
by tired and irritated early
at Halekulani in Honolulu,
morning arrivals demanding a bed.
Hawaii, includes a free 15-minute
Finally, if you are told your
foot or scalp massage.
accommodation is not available until
The jury will be out on
mid-afternoon and you?ve arrived at 8am, I
whether a massage is going to ease sleep
suggest you go ahead and really clutter up the
deprivation ? in fact, it will probably send
lobby. Find a comfy chair, take your shoes off,
you to sleep rather than wake you up ? but
stretch your legs out, put on a pyjama top and
it?s an enjoyable way to kill time before your
pretend to go to sleep snoring loudly. They?ll
room passes the housekeeping check and is
find you a room soon enough. It always works
ready for occupation.
perfectly for me. BT
businesstraveller.com
ILLUSTRATION: BENJAMIN SOUTHAN
EASING THE PAIN
There are various strategies you doubtless
employ to try to combat jet lag, but I have a
few of my own suggestions as to how to ease
your discomfort at your destination.
As you might expect, hoteliers are keen to
suggest you think about travelling a day or so
earlier in order to aid recovery. Although this
sounds like an extra cost, it may be cheaper for
your company to fly you in economy over the
weekend and take a discounted rate at a hotel,
rather than take an overnight Sunday (to
Monday morning) business flight.
Secondly, what you eat and drink should be
a focus, and hotels can help. Everyone knows
that it should be water on the flight rather
DEREK PICOT
A HOTELIER FOR MORE THAN 30 YE ARS
A N D A U T H O R O F H O T E L R E S E R VAT I O N S
The Principal London:
brand new, since 1898.
WE?LL STAY WITH YOU
The Principal London | 1-8 Russell Square, London WC1B 5BE | 020 7123 5000
@ThePrincipalLondon | book online at theprincipalhotel.com
WATC H E S
72
M AY 2 0 1 8
businesstraveller.com
WATC H E S
GAME,
SET AND
WATCH
WORDS CHRIS HALL
Patek Philippe reminds
the world it?s a serious
player in the ?sports-luxe?
league with new Nautilus
and Aquanaut models
LEFT AND ABOVE:
Patek Philippe
Nautilus Perpetual
Calendar 5740 ?
front and back
businesstraveller.com
A
t Baselworld, the
watch industry?s largest
annual fair, there are
two stands that draw a
constant crowd from the
moment the turnstiles
open: Rolex, and Patek
Philippe. Everyone from extravagantly
tailored European executives to athleisureclad Instagram influencers flock to see what
creations these two have released. Many
raise their phones hypnotically to the twostorey screens showing images of the same
watches in lavish detail, snapping away
without breaking step.
燩atek Philippe ?燬wiss, 179 years old
this year, and without doubt the most
prestigious watch brand at the show
?爎evealed two watches that reinforce its
presence in the ?sports-luxe? arena: the
Nautilus Perpetual Calendar (also called
the 5740; Patek nerds refer to models
by their four-digit references) and the
Aquanaut Chronograph (ref. 5968). If
73
?sports-luxe? conjures up images of men
awkwardly attempting to play tennis in a
suit or suchlike, worry not. The entire watch
industry?s use of the phrase ?sports watch?
to describe anything that is relatively sturdy
of form and cased in stainless steel (or these
days, titanium, carbon fibre, or ceramic)
dates back to the 1950s and 60s, when
that kind of thing was used for practical
purposes. Then at the start of the 1970s,
the Italian market expressed a demand for
something a bit more refined that you could
still wear to the beach, and ?sports-luxe? was
born with the likes of the Royal Oak, the
Laureato, Vacheron Constantin?s 222 and
?爄n 1976 ?爐he Patek Philippe Nautilus.
The Aquanaut, a tilt at a yet-sportier,
younger and more ?entry-level? (such things
are relative) market, appeared in 1997.
�
SPECIALIST IN ALL STYLES
Part of the Patek Philippe magic is the
brand?s ability to wear multiple guises.
?
For many, it exudes old-school elegance
M AY 2 0 1 8
WATC H E S
LEFT AND BELOW:
Patek Philippe
Aquanaut
Chronograph
5968
74
and craftsmanship of the highest order,
expressed via perpetual calendars, splitsecond monopusher chronographs (with
one button for start, stop and re-set), and
minute repeaters (watches that chime the
the minute on request, using tiny hammers
and gongs). At the same time, there is a
totally separate Patek Philippe customer
for whom it is all about the Nautilus, now,
forever and always. Here, to an extent,
those two worlds collide, as Patek Philippe
equips the Nautilus with a perpetual
calendar movement for the first time this
year. It?s a combination that might sound
bizarre on the face of it ? a so-called sporty
design with the most conservative, classical
movement inside ? but Patek Philippe?s
perpetual calendars are so highly regarded
(the brand was the first to use the function
in a wristwatch, in 1925) and the Nautilus
shape so spot-on that this was always going
to be something of a holy grail watch.
燭hankfully, Patek has not bungled
this hybrid design. The limited edition
M AY 2 0 1 8
The Seventies-inspired match
of brown and orange on the dial
is enough to stand out
pieces brought out to mark the
Nautilus?s 40th anniversary in
2016 were politely criticised
as being somewhat overstated
? with the embossed text ?1976 40 - 2016? writ large across
the centre of the dial. But here the
execution is delicate, adeptly marrying
the dense display of information with
the strong horizontal striping common to
all Nautiluses. The date display is slightly
larger than the others (day of the week
and 24-hour dial at 9 o?clock; month and
leap year at 3 o?clock), and the correctors
to adjust everything have been smartly
integrated into the 8.4mm thick case so
as to leave no unsightly protuberances.
To emphasise its status at the top of the
Nautilus family, it is cased in solid white
gold, including the bracelet and clasp that ?
happily ? Patek Philippe has reengineered
to reduce the chance of it falling off your
wrist. It has a retail price of �,150, but
if you were by some miracle to have one in
your possession, there are probably buyers
who would hand over double that on the
spot, such is the waiting list and their rarity. �
Should you be infatuated with the Nautilus?s
elliptical shape and yet struggling to lay your
hands on nearly a hundred grand right away,
the brand still has something for you. For
a mere �,510, you can get your name on
the waiting list for the reference-numbered
5968A-001 Aquanaut chronograph. It?s the
first time a chronograph has graced Patek
Philippe?s less expensive range ? and it?s an
in-house flyback (while timing, the second
hand will at the press of the 4 o?clock pusher
fly back instantly to zero and recommence
timing all in one action).
BRIGHT COLOURS�
What really seals the deal for me with the
5968 is the design. The Seventies-inspired
match of brown and orange on the dial
is enough to make it stand out, but the
real punch comes in the orange rubber
strap, supplied as an optional extra with
the standard black. By the standards of
such an august manufacture, that?s not just
loosening one?s tie, it?s wrapping it around
your head and jumping fully clothed into
the nearest marble pool ? and I respect
them all the more for it. BT
businesstraveller.com
A D V E R T I S E M E N T F E AT U R E
Making complex
travel simple
Simplexity Travel Management?s unrivalled
resources, experience and commitment to
quality will ensure every trip runs smoothly
O
ne of the UK?s leading travel
management companies,
Simplexity Travel counts
household names from the worlds
of sport, music, fashion, film and TV among
clients ? A-listers and HNWs all with one
thing in common: a need for ?innovative, costeffective and well-executed? travel solutions.
Launched in 2011, Simplexity Travel?s
Mayfair-based team is headed up by
Mark Smith, head of business development.
Together, he and his team enjoy more than
50 years of combined travel experience,
ensuring they have a thorough understanding
of their clients? needs.
Trust has always been an important
factor in successful business, and the same
applies when choosing a partner to plan
your travel ? one of the reasons that Simplexity
Travel highlights its recently granted ABTA
accreditation. (The company now boasts
membership of three of the market?s
pre-eminent organisations, including
IATA and ATOL.)
?Simplexity Travel has always prided itself
on offering the highest standards, but the extra
security this accreditation gives our customers
is invaluable,? says Smith.
Whether it is handling flight tickets and
transfers, booking accommodation or
transferring equipment, Simplexity Travel offers
a one-stop shop for ?all things travel-related?.
That means no more having to waste precious
time by arranging everything piecemeal: ?Just
one phone call to a company with limitless
resources and global contacts who will ensure
businesstraveller.com
that no detail of an itinerary, no matter how
complicated, is overlooked,? he says.
Each client is assigned a dedicated travel
manager, who is available 24/7, 365 days a
year. Moreover, as Smith reveals, ?Unlike
many of our competitors, we won?t charge
an additional fee for this service.?
The company?s unrivalled relationships
with a global network of leading hotels,
airlines and private jet and yacht specialists
means clients have access to a wide array
of VIP amenities, upgrades, experiences,
preferred rates and complimentary extras
not available to the public. Meanwhile its
partnership with Virtuoso, an organisation
of top travel agencies, travel providers and
destinations worldwide, allows Simplexity
Travel to team up with more than 75 of the
world?s top commercial and private air carriers,
car rental companies and leading luxury cruise
lines, meaning further advantages in the form
of pricing and upgrades.
?The company's travel managers use our
contacts to help plan a client?s itinerary down
to the last detail. We also monitor airline
promotions and reduce stopovers to make
business trips not only more cost effective,
but less exhausting too,? says Smith.
Simplexity Travel works extensively in
industries synonymous with complex logistics
such as film and TV production, music and
theatre tours and sport.
Top-flight football clubs have increasingly
made use of its services, and in 2016 the
company was retained by Norwich City
Football Club as its official travel management
MARK SMITH,
HEAD OF
BUSINESS
DEVELOPMENT
partner, responsible for handling all travel
requirements for the club?s first team and
academy, at home and abroad. This year
also saw Simplexity Travel form a similar
partnership with Brentford Football Club.
Determined to present clients with an
all-encompassing service, Simplexity Travel
also boasts an events division that offers
everything from single tickets to bespoke
itineraries for the most sought-after concerts,
festivals, sporting events, film premieres and
fashion shows from around the globe.
Simplexity Travel is proud to be one of the
few official Wembley Stadium overseas travel
agents. Clients are afforded rare access to the
private facilities at both Wembley Stadium
(where the company holds a 12-seat, long-side
box with a prime position between the half-way
line and the penalty box) and the SSE Arena.
Concludes Smith, ?With the coming year
set to be our most successful yet, Simplexity
Travel Management really does make a
difference to business travel.?
? For more information on
Simplexity Travel Management,
visit simplexitytravel.com or
contact Mark Smith on 020 3535 9290
M AY 2 0 1 8
75
CONTINUED...
QUITO, ECUADOR
RISING C APITAL
continued from page 29
...SILICON ANDES
76
Quito is also the brain of what you could
call the ?Silicon Andes?. The Yachay Tech
University, with a campus just outside the
city, is part of a government project to
establish a hub for technological innovation
and knowledge-intensive businesses. The
idea is that the university uses its $400
million annual budget to collaborate with
public and private research institutions.
But there is much more going on beyond
this. In the past year, the emergence of food
and beverage startups are most evident,
particularly craft beer and chocolate. Now
there are many dozens of Ecuadorian beer
brands, all of which are small and local, but
as Toth points out, ?legitimately good?.
?Quito has always been important to
me, for many reasons; the first of which is
that I?m from Quito,? says businessman and
ecologist Roque Sevilla. ?Secondly, I was
mayor of Quito from 1998 to 2000, so I?ve
got to know it even better.?
?For Quito the era of digitalisation is
gaining momentum and, once it goes into
full force, it will help facilitate companies
and businesses here, in a big way.? It also
helps that internet and mobile connectivity
in the capital are among the fastest on the
continent, according to mobile phone
provider Movistar.
Patricio Alarcon, the president of the
Chamber of Commerce, says the city has
a developed entrepreneurial ecosystem,
with many coworking, innovation spaces
and incubators. ?IMPAQTO [coworking
community]is one of the most developed
coworking spaces, renting out part of its
M AY 2 0 1 8
infrastructure to companies such as Spain?s
vehicle hire company Cabify,? he adds.
Currently, around 50 startups based in
Quito are listed on the Startup Ranking
website (which has global coverage), with
e-learning platform Cuestionarix and
human resources specialist Evaluar.com
ranking highest in Ecuador (points
are given for importance on the
internet and social influence). So
it?s no wonder I can find activities
such as Start Up Weekend (which
took place in April), and business
initiatives from organisations such as Kruger
Corporation, which supports and motivates
new enterprise via its lab for startups.
LESS BUREAUCRACY
In the World Bank?s Ease of Doing Business
index, Ecuador currently ranks 118 out of
190 countries ? one slot behind Argentina
and four ahead of Uganda. This is an
improvement from five years ago when
it was ranked 139. ?In 2006, before the
start of former President Rafael Correa?s
government, I remember waiting in lines
for hours on end and having to hire a
tramitador (middleman) for even the most
trivial paperwork,? says Marcel Perkins,
owner of the Illa Experience hotel. ?This
was usually a friend or partner of the person
behind the desk at public offices. Nowadays
most paperwork can be done online or
quickly without having to pay anyone
for these services. You can incorporate
a company in a few days and be up and
?Quito has become a
metropolitan capital
with cosmopolitan
views that embrace
modern lifestyles?
running with your business ideas quickly.
Trademarks can be registered easily, there
are several mediation and arbitration
chambers to help solve problems and that
business goes smoothly in general.
?In the tourism industry, infrastructure
has moved on in leaps and bounds, and
Ecuador has gone from being a potholeridden country that would destroy the
sturdiest 4x4s, to having some of the best
roads in South America,? adds Perkins, who
also owns Latin Trails, a local tour operator.
And now, with the larger, improved
airport, which opened outside of the city
five years ago, many airlines feel comfortable
to use it. Quito recently welcomed Jetblue,
United Airlines and Air Europa, while from
summer this year Condor is planning direct
flights from Frankfurt International.
THE FUTURE
?Over the past few years a sense of pride
has grown in the younger population. New
graduates are studying gastronomy, tourism,
hoteliering, arts and music ? all related to
rescuing Ecuador?s heritage,? says Perkins.
The result is the rise of many restaurants
offering haute cuisine and international
fusion with local ingredients, interesting
music venues showcasing local artists, micro
breweries that use local grains, new types of
city tours that involve unique experiences
and eclectic boutique hotels.
?The city of Quito has become a
metropolitan capital with cosmopolitan
views that embraces modern lifestyles; the
city is inclusive to minorities and, with
Ecuador?s no visa policy, it has become
home to citizens from several nations
around the globe,? adds Perkins.
The talk on the street is the need for
more crowdsourcing, a free-trade area near
the airport for the logistics industry and
pedestrianising the old town to encourage
more visitors ? all good ideas for the near
future. ?With a solid business idea and
plenty of passion, you will find few places of
this size in the world that can compete with
Quito,? says Niedrau. BT
businesstraveller.com
FALKL AND ISL ANDS
WINDSWEPT WONDER
continued from page 45
...RAF cutlery by uniformed (nonmilitary) flight crew who are polite and
efficient. You won?t go hungry ? in a
lifetime of travel, this is the first flight I?ve
been on where you get offered seconds of
the main meal.
Until June last year, this globe-spanning
flight touched down to refuel on Ascension
Island, another British Overseas Territory
lost in the South Atlantic Ocean. As a result
of problems with the island?s runway, this
routing has been suspended until 2020.
Instead, after a six-hour-20-minute night
flight, we touched down on the pancake-flat
desert island of Sal in Cape Verde, off the
coast of West Africa. The two-hour break
inside its modern commercial terminal
created a mad dash for the smoking zone
and power-charging points, while some
soldiers ? clearly used to all this ? unroll
their sleeping bags and grab some kip on
the floor. As dawn breaks, we look out
wistfully at the palm trees and blushing sky
and savour the rising tropical heat ? in the
sub-Antarctic Falkland Islands, the average
summer temperature is 10篊, falling to a
mere 2篊 in winter.
SEA FOR MILES
Back on board, we now face a day flight of
ten hours 20 minutes. ?If you like looking at
the sea you?re in for a treat,? Captain Oliver
drolly comments, ?because there?s nothing
else to see.? By now the flight is only halffull ? some passengers bound for Ascension
Island have disembarked to catch a smaller
plane that is capable of landing there ?
which allows the remaining travellers to
businesstraveller.com
spread out. Yet more food comes, followed
by plentiful jugs of water and lemon
squash as if it?s school sports day. While
this isn?t the most pampering of flights, the
Airbridge serves its purpose well, providing
you factor the likelihood of delays into your
travel plans. The only other way to reach
the Falkland Islands is a round-the-houses
route via Chile that involves stops in
Santiago and Punta Arenas. This can be
cheaper, but takes more than 24 hours
? and the once-a-week connection
on to Mount Pleasant Airfield is often
sold out well in advance during the busier
summer season.
At long last, we begin our final descent to
these enigmatic specks on the other side of
the world. Constructed after the 1982 war
with Argentina, Mount Pleasant Complex
is home to some 1,300 servicepeople who
live as a self-contained community 38 miles
west of Stanley. Transfers to the capital are
initially on unsealed roads bordered with
peaks and bays that became familiar names
during the 74-day conflict in 1982. Wireless
Ridge, Mount Tumbledown, Bluff Cove...
this traumatic episode may have happened
more than 35 years ago, but it is fresh in
the minds of many islanders. It?s well worth
booking a half-day battlefield tour to learn
about what went on. Along with three local
civilians, 255 British and 649 Argentine
troops died in a grim struggle fought in
severe winter conditions. The remains of
destroyed helicopters and hill-top dug-outs
used by the invading troops can still be seen,
while abundant memorials pay tribute to
those who were lost.
WOOL, FISH , OIL AND TOURISM
These days the Falkland Islands are a much
happier place. The excellent Historic
Dockyard Museum in Stanley tells the story
of its growth from an isolated band of sheep
farms to a thriving, self-sufficient economy
(excluding defence services) primarily based
on fishing. Oil was discovered offshore in
2010, and while its current low price has
stalled exploitation, it promises revenue.
According to statistics issued by the
Falkland Islands Tourist Board, the annual
number of business travellers to the islands
has bubbled around 1,500 for many years,
with a similar amount of land-based leisure
visitors. The latter is forecast to grow by five
per cent by 2020, while cruise ship visitors
average around 55,000 a year. Most of these
only spend a few hours here ? admiring the
king penguins at Volunteer Point, sipping
pints of Iron Lady IPA in the Victory Bar,
taking selfies beside Stanley?s red phone
boxes and bust of Margaret Thatcher ? but
anyone who stays longer will discover
somewhere very special.
RED, WHITE AND BLUE
Few people realise how large the Falkland
Islands are ? they are almost the size of
Northern Ireland and laced together by
This traumatic
episode happened
more than 35 years
ago, but it is fresh in
the minds of islanders
a plucky combination of ferry, supply
ship and domestic flights operated by
the Falkland Islands Government Air
Service. These use a venerable fleet of
ten-seater twin-prop Britten-Norman
BN-2 Islander aircraft, originally built in
the Isle of Wight, that sport a smart livery
of red, white and blue. Flying low across
an austere landscape of peat fields and
sheep-speckled hills, their destinations
include grass strips on outlying islands
such as Pebble, Carcass and Sealion that
are home to deserted white sand beaches
and a glorious array of wildlife including
elephant seals, sea lions, five species of
penguin and huge colonies of blackbrowed albatross. While the Falkland
Islands might take some reaching, once
you get here you?ll never regret it. BT
M AY 2 0 1 8
77
Need good
advice?
78
When your business needs expert
advice provided by a qualified,
reliable and trustworthy legal
team ? use a solicitor
Solicitors. Here to help
Talk to your solicitor or visit www.lawsociety.org.uk/here-to-help
The Law Society
OCTOBER 2017
@LawSocietyFAS
businesstraveller.com
the
eport
Tried,
Tested,
Tasted.
TRIED AND TESTED
TRIED AND TESTED
SMART TRAVELLER
PLUS
London to Perth in
Qantas business class
Singapore Airlines?
new first class suite
Avoiding and dealing
with theft on trips
Two London hotels
84
80
82
88
Como hotel, Perth, Australia
85
New London restaurants
86
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
M AY 2 0 1 8
79
TRIED AND TESTED FLIGHT
Qantas B787-9
business class
HEATHROW-PERTH
B A C K G R O U N D At 14,500km, this is the
third-longest commercial flight currently in
operation, and the first scheduled nonstop
service between the UK and Australia.
It?s served daily by a B787-9 from London
Heathrow Terminal 3.
The new route means that Qantas now
has three routes between Australia and
London ? the direct Perth-London service
on the B787-9 Dreamliner; a reinstated
Sydney-Singapore-London service on the
A380; and London via Dubai from Brisbane,
Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide or Perth with
partner airline Emirates on a mix of A380
and B777 aircraft.
80
B O A R D I N G The boarding took place
from Gate 1. There was priority boarding for
business class passengers, after children
and the elderly. Business class is spread
over two cabins in a configuration of 1-2-1
(A-EF-K). My seat was in the front cabin.
The aircraft is configured for 236 passengers
in three classes: 166 economy, 28 premium
economy and 42 business class seats.
T H E S E A T I was in row 2 in a centre seat,
2E. The seat is a Thompson Aero model
and allows every passenger to have direct
aisle access. It has a staggered seating
configuration, so that when the seat is fully
reclined, the feet of the passenger slide
below the side table of the seat in front
(sounds weird, but works well). The window
seats are either close to the window, or
slightly further away and closer to the aisle.
The seat has a 46 inch seat pitch, 80 inch
bed seat length, and either a 23-24 inch seat
width or a 24-25 inch bed width.
The seat can be in a reclined position
from take-off right through to landing,
because there is an over-the-shoulder strap
as well as waist strap for safety (which you
only have to wear for take-off and landing).
The seat is very spacious, with a large
amount of storage space, a side table with
storage and a good-sized armrest on both
M AY 2 0 1 8
sides. The centre seats have a divider, which
is up when you enter the cabin, but that
can be lowered if you want to chat with
the passenger in the neighbouring seat.
There is more storage under the side tables,
though the exact location of this depends
on which seat you are in. There?s an area for
magazines and a bottle of water, which was
waiting at the seat when I boarded.
There is a single washroom at the front,
and two washrooms at the rear between
the two business class cabins. These
washrooms are small, and changing into
pyjamas in the privacy of the washrooms
requires at least a nodding acquaintance
with the basics of yoga.
B E S T S E A T The front row ? row 1 ?
has only two seats, the window seat 1A
and 1K, and is best avoided because it?s
too close to the galley. The first full row is
row 2, and there the front two seats, being
bulkhead seats, have more leg room.
These two front seats are good for those
travelling as a couple, though at the front
there are no overhead lockers over the
middle seats because of the crew rest being
Changing into pyjamas
in the washrooms
requires at least a
nodding acquaintance
with the basics of yoga
overhead, so you will store your bags in
the overhead lockers above the window
seats. Seat 2E has a side area by your
feet where you can keep your hand
luggage during the flight.
The best window seats are those
close to the window and away from the
aisle, and these are seats 3A, 5A, and
7A, though 7A is quite close to the rear
galley. On the other side of the aircraft
go for 3K, 5K or 7K.
T H E F L I G H T Once on board we were
offered water and champagne (Jacquart
Brut Mosaique), and our jackets were taken.
After take off, we were offered Martin Grant
sleepsuits. There were also washbags in
two colours, darker colours for men, pink
for ladies, with designs by Warakurna
artist Polly Butler-Jackson. Further drinks
weren?t offered until 1500 and the lunch
service took two hours from this time, so we
finished eating at around 1700. I think this
was because it was the inaugural flight, as
service was much quicker on the return.
There was an appetiser of bubble and
squeak ? tasty, but we were given no cutlery.
When I asked for a fork I was only given a
napkin. I chose crab cakes to start, which
were moist and full of flavour, served with
businesstraveller.com
TRIED AND TESTED FLIGHT
corn salsa, chilli and rocket. For a main I
chose grilled chicken with mustard seed
carrots, basmati rice and coriander yoghurt.
The portions were generous and it was
delicious. Desserts included ice cream,
rhubarb trifle or cheeses. If you want to
pre-order from a bigger menu, Qantas
calls this service Menu Select.
Snacks offered throughout the flight
included mozzarella, olive and spinach
calzone; bacon sarnie with brown sauce;
or beef cottage pie with peas.
I worked for a few hours and then reclined
the bed; the flight attendants can do this for
you. There?s a mattress topper, which you
slip over the headrest to keep it in place.
There?s also a good-sized pillow and duvet.
The bed has enough room by the side that
you can keep drinks and objects next to you
and the IFE allows the screen to be dimmed
so there?s just a message in a low light
telling you how much flight time remains.
The bed is good for sleeping, though once
fully reclined to turn from your back onto
your side isn?t easy because your knees jam
against the top of the alcove.
Once reclined you can raise the bed a
little and read until it?s time to go to sleep (or
watch the IFE). I slept for a couple of hours.
I then got up to fetch a snack and drink,
before going back for a longer sleep.
businesstraveller.com
I woke about three hours before
landing and filled in the breakfast card.
The care taken over the food is best
shown by the breakfast selection, which
included omelette and corn fritter, with
pickled mushrooms, pancetta and
tomato and chill relish; cardamon pears
with coconut yoghurt, quinoa, almonds,
hazelnuts, blueberries and honey; smoked
salmon, or soba and raw courgette strips
with ponzu dressing. There?s a choice of
juices including spinach, cucumber, apple,
celery and lemon.
A R R I V A L We landed 20 minutes early
into Perth and then made our way to
immigration where there was no queue.
V E R D I C T This is a historic new service
and it was a pleasure to be on the inaugural
flight to Perth. Once on board it didn?t seem
different from many other long-haul flights,
with the extra three or fours hours not really
adding any discomfort. That might not be
the case in economy or premium economy,
one of the reasons Qantas has increased
the number of premium seats on this
aircraft. I hope the service is commercially
successful, because being able to reach
Perth so easily is a great start to a visit to
Western Australia. Tom Otley
81
WHAT ?S NEW
This is the first commercial
non-stop flight from London
to Australia.
WHAT ?S NOT
The B787-9 Dreamliner is flown
by many airlines in various
seating configurations.
BEST FOR
This is the fastest way to
get to Australia from the UK,
and you get to Perth directly.
PRICE
The internet rate for a return
business class flight from London
to Perth costs �883.
FLIGHT TIME
16 hours 45 minutes
(17 hours return).
CONTACT
qantas.com.au
M AY 2 0 1 8
TRIED AND TESTED FLIGHT
Singapore Airlines
new A380 first class suites
LONDON-SINGAPORE
be turned so that it is directly in front of the
table for dining or working, or kept slightly
to one side if you just want to rest things
on it. As you can imagine, there is a huge
amount of personal space, and you can
get up and walk around if you feel like
stretching your legs without ever walking
out into the corridor.
The suites have sliding doors for privacy,
and though they don?t reach to the ceiling,
they are useful; if you keep the door open
you will be eye to eye with your fellow
passenger on the other side of the aircraft.
The suites have a number of charging
points, including one power point in the
wide table for when you are working and
another by the bed, so you could keep
two devices charged that way, and a third
through the USB socket.
In the wardrobe there are socks and
slippers, and I was also given a Lalique
washbag containing a few useful items
along with a candle and a bar of soap. I
SIA is retiring the oldest
A380s and welcoming
five new ones, each with
a revamped layout, cabins
and new seat products
82
B A C K G R O U N D Singapore Airlines is
in the process of introducing new seats
on its A380s in all four classes: economy,
premium economy, business and first. These
will be fitted to its entire Airbus A380 fleet,
including retrofit work on 14 aircraft that
are already in service, starting in late 2018
and targeted for completion in 2020, as
well as the five new aircraft entering service.
The new aircraft configuration carries
six first class suites. The A380s currently
serve Auckland, Beijing, Frankfurt,
Hong Kong, London, Melbourne, Mumbai,
New Delhi, New York, Paris, Shanghai,
Sydney and Zurich.
T H E L O U N G E There are two Silverkris
lounges in Terminal 2B at Heathrow, and
you will be directed to the left for first class.
The lounge has a traditional look, with a
self-service wine bar and plenty of areas
for sitting, working and dining in privacy.
The staff are friendly and helpful.
B O A R D I N G There were dedicated queues
for both business class and the first class
M AY 2 0 1 8
suites. The suites are on the upper deck at
the front of the aircraft, and since they are
in front of the engines they are very quiet
during the flight.
T H E S U I T E The layout of the suite takes
a little getting used to. There is a leather
armchair facing forward, and then running
perpendicular to this in front of you is the
bed, which is folded up when you first board.
Along the side of the cabin by the
windows are several storage spaces for
magazines and bags, and there?s a private
wardrobe for hanging your clothes and
storing wheel-on bags, though larger bags
are stowed at the front by the two separate
washrooms at the end of the corridor.
The leather seat (21-inches wide) can be
swivelled either towards the two windows,
or towards the table area and television. I
was so busy moving it around that only later
did I realise you can also recline the seat
and raise the leg rest if you simply want to
sit back and read.
The table comes out of the side of the
cabin and is very large and stable, and can
businesstraveller.com
TRIED AND TESTED FLIGHT
asked for some pyjamas, which are also
Lalique, and after take-off changed
into these for the flight and hung my
suit in the wardrobe.
There was only a slight delay in taking off
because of bad weather and the need for
the aircraft to be de-iced.
W H I C H S U I T E T O C H O O S E Each seat
is a separate suite, so if you are travelling
as a couple you can choose either 1 and 2A
or 1 and 2F. These two seats have a divider
that slides down, allowing you to spend time
together and make a double suite with a
double bed. Alternatively, if travelling with a
colleague, you can have the divider down
to chat, and then raise it and have separate
beds when it?s time to sleep. I was in 3F and
this is one of the two suites that does not
have that option.
T H E F L I G H T The choice of food is
huge, and on top of this you can also
select from an even wider selection of
dishes online prior to flying, using a
service called Book the Cook. The � la
carte menu includes a selection of dishes
created by Milanese chef Carlo Cracco,
and I decided to try these.
An appetiser of prawns came with a
shaved pumpkin and radish salad; a starter
of pea cream soup with mussels and squid
ink; and a main course of seared Iberico
pork loin with apple pur閑 and pork jus. This
was followed by Italian ice cream. Other
options included Singaporean dishes and
a cheese course. Overall I was impressed
with the food and the presentation ? each
course was served by flight attendants with
an explanation and I was asked if I?d like to
change my choice of drink.
Singapore Airlines did very well in our
most recent Cellars in the Sky wine tastings,
winning three gold medals, including Best
Overall Cellar. On boarding we were offered
a choice of vintage champagnes ? Krug
2004 or Dom P閞ignon 2006. The whites
and reds were well-chosen for altitude with
many ?name? producers, and all excellent of
their type.
During the flight other snack and light
meal options included char kway teow
(noodles) with chicken, black mushroom
and oriental chicken stock; sandwiches,
chocolates and snacks such as crisps and
assorted nuts; as well as fresh fruit.
Although it?s tempting to make the most
of the extensive offering and eat and drink
businesstraveller.com
for the whole flight, this was landing in the
early morning in Singapore; so I was keen to
get a few hours? sleep.
On request, the flight attendants come
into the suite and lower the bed from
the side wall, put a mattress topper on it,
prepare the pillows and then the duvet on
top. Once you get into the bed there are
some thoughtful touches such as a lever by
the side of the bed allowing one end to be
raised so you can read in bed and watch
the television in comfort, then lowered to
horizontal when it?s time to sleep. The bed
is 76 inches long, so most flyers will have
enough room.
There is a separate headphone jack by
the side of the bed, and the lights by the
side of the bed are easy to use with pre-sets
including off, night, low, medium and high.
There?s also a Do Not Disturb button and a
call button, and if you like you can raise the
window blinds during the flight.
The safety belt for the bed goes across
your chest and I found this troublesome,
partly because it?s difficult to find the slot to
secure it into, and also because it is quite
tight across your chest, so much so that I
found it a struggle to turn over because I
was almost secured to the mattress. This is
a good thing for safety, perhaps, though not
if passengers decide to undo it during the
night because it?s uncomfortable.
I slept for a few hours and then watched
films on the IFE system ? the 32-inch
screen is high definition, and the Bose
noise-cancelling headphones make it a very
pleasant experience.
About two-and-a-half hours before
landing we were offered breakfast. There
was a wide choice including seafood noodle
soup, citrus French toast, masala dosa,
murgh keema (spicy minced chicken), or
eggs ? baked, scrambled or hard boiled.
A R R I V A L We landed ahead of schedule,
and there were no delays in disembarking.
I was quickly out into Changi Terminal 3.
V E R D I C T It?s hard to see how these
suites could be bettered. There is lots of
room, plenty of storage space, impressive
food and drink, superb service, and a
comfortable seat and separate bed. The first
100MB of wifi is free, and there are several
power points for keeping things charged.
If you?ve flown much on an A380 you
are likely to have been impressed by
how smooth and quiet it is on board, and
nowhere more so than at the front in one of
these suites. Simply excellent. Tom Otley
WHAT ?S NEW
The luxurious first class suites in
the new A380s.
WHAT ?S NOT
Not all the A380s are new but they
are all gradually being refitted to
this new configuration.
BEST FOR
Privacy, comfort, space, excellent
food and drink and great service.
PRICE
Internet rates for a return first
class suite from London to
Singapore in mid-June ranged
between �014 and �914.
FLIGHT TIME
13 hours 5 minutes
CONTACT
singaporeair.com
M AY 2 0 1 8
83
TRIED AND TESTED LONDON HOTELS
Amba Marble Arch
W H A T ? S I T L I K E ? This
84
BEST FOR
692-room hotel, close to Marble
Arch tube station and Hyde
Park, rebranded as an Amba in
2015 (it was previously a Thistle).
GLH, which runs this Amba and
another above Charing Cross
station, is London?s biggest hotel
group with six brands including
Guoman, Thistle and Every. GLH
has more than 5,000 rooms in 17
London locations, plus 130 event
spaces.
The art deco fa鏰de is
distinctive, but inside it?s a mishmash of old woods and new
furnishings (more modernisation
is being considered). A lift brings
guests up to reception from the
ground floor concierge.
My studio apartment
(one of 31) had a sofa and
kitchenette beyond the Smart
TV that followed the curving
window. The room contained
a Nespresso machine and free
minibar. Alongside a bedside
Ipad (with free wifi) were several
modern London landmark
artworks. The bathroom had two
showers in a bath with gels, and
I slept well in the double bed.
many nationalities. The Deli to
the right of reception serves
drinks and snacks, and you
can order food to your room
(I ordered a pizza one evening,
�). Another key attribute is
the bulk of services ? not only
the food, bar and reception but
also 15 meeting spaces ? are
all on the same floor, while you
can find an executive lounge
and gym on the second floor.
Staff were helpful.
F A C I L I T I E S The Grill?s
buffet breakfast was
comprehensive and busy with
V E R D I C T Decent four-star
option in a popular location.
Dominic Ellis
M AY 2 0 1 8
First floor convenience.
DON?T MISS
The Grill?s power
breakfast.
PRICE
From �9 per night
in June inclusive of
breakfast.
CONTACT
Bryanston Street, W1H
7EH; 0800 330 8523;
amba-hotel.com/
marble-arch
The May Fair Hotel
W H A T ? S I T L I K E ? Tucked
away in Mayfair near Green
Park tube, the May Fair (sic) is
a classy five-star hotel. It first
opened in 1927, and these days
needs little introduction to Arab
travellers; our stay coincided
with Crown Prince Mohammed
bin Salman?s official visit and
the hotel was holding Saudi
investment-related meetings.
The Family Rooms and
Studio Suites (44/45 sqm) are
spacious for central London,
and I was lucky to experience
a Studio Suite for one night ?
complete with large TV, lounge
area and vast bathroom. I last
visited two years ago and the
�0-million refurbishment
carried out in 2006 appears to
be wearing well.
Not many hotels boast a
royal plaque in reception. In
addition, the hotel recently
announced a year-long
partnership with fashion
designer Emilia Wickstead
? who will add ?bespoke
touchpoints? ? to mark its 10th
year as The Official Hotel of
London Fashion Week.
F A C I L I T I E S The private
cinema is the most unexpected
feature, but my favourite space
remains the intimate May Fair
Terrace, which can be hired
for events. I went up to have
a look at the opulent 200 sqm
Penthouse where you can see the
London Eye from the terrace,
and there are seven themed
suites (Saffron, Opium, Amber,
Amarillo, Schiaparelli, Azure and
Ebony) and three duplex suites.
The May Fair Kitchen served
up a decent breakfast, and I
took a seat by the window as
the tide of commuters made
their way to work.
V E R D I C T Spacious suites
and good range of facilities.
Dominic Ellis
BEST FOR
Luxurious city centre
hospitality.
DON?T MISS
A drink on the roof
terrace.
PRICE
From �6 per night in
June; suites typically
double this price.
CONTACT
Stratton Street, W1J
8LT; +44 20 7769 4041;
themayfairhotel.co.uk
businesstraveller.com
TRIED AND TESTED PERTH HOTEL
BEST FOR
Como
The Treasury,
Perth
B A C K G R O U N D In the centre of Perth
(Western Australia), at the point from which all
distances in Perth are measured, the Como Hotel
is part of a multi-million pound refurbishment
of the 19th-century State Buildings by
Perth property developer Adrian Fini of FJM
Property. The buildings formerly served as a
post office, land titles office and treasury. After
lying empty for 20 years, the restoration has
created the hotel behind the grand Victorianera fa鏰de as well as several restaurants, bars
and high-end shops set around an arcade.
Como Hotels is a small group of luxury fivestar properties, including The Metropolitan
hotels in London, Miami and Bangkok.
W H E R E I S I T ? On the corner of St
Georges Terrace and Barrack Street in the
Perth central business district opposite
Stirling and Supreme Court Gardens, about
a 20-minute drive from the airport.
W H A T ? S I T L I K E ? A liveried doorman
greets guests at the main entrance, which
is opposite the West door of St George?s
Cathedral and features flamboyant NeoRenaissance style columns and cantilevered
balconies. The restoration project has
returned 95 per cent of the buildings to
their 19th-century origins, including the reinstallation of dormer windows and Victorian
roofs finished with copper trimmings.
The ?Guest Arrival Lounge? is to the right in
one of several elegant rooms on the ground
floor, which then merges through a series of
open doorways into the Treasury Lounge and
Bar with artworks from Art Collective WA,
illustrations on the bar walls from the Cape
Arid art collection and lighting by Flynn Talbot
and Brendan van Hek.
R O O M S The 48 rooms and suites over four
floors are former offices and are generously
sized with high ceilings. Designed by Kerry
Hill to create a sense of serenity and a home
away from home, they are decorated in a soft,
cocooning palette: beiges, whites, limed oak
furniture, pale travertine, with bronze and
leather trims. The grey-greens are reminiscent
businesstraveller.com
The huge rooms,
luxury furnishings
and large range of
food and beverage
options coupled with
great service.
DON?T MISS
of the colours found in the landscapes of
Western Australia.
There are handcrafted modern European
furnishings, beds with sheets of Egyptian
cotton, large windows, complimentary
private bar replenished daily, Samsung LED
television/IPTV, multi-line VOIP phones
with voicemail, laptop-size private safe,
multimedia hub, in-room technology with
dual built-in USB ports, and complimentary
wifi. Rooms also have Illy coffee and tea
making facilities, large windows, which can
be opened, electronic sheers and blackout
blinds or curtains. The bathrooms have
Rooms are
designed by
Kerry Hill to
create a sense
of serenity
and a home
away from
home
Taking a swim in the pool
? it?s not rooftop but feels
like it ? and dining in the
Wildflower restaurant.
PRICE
From �0 per night in
June; �8 for a suite.
CONTACT
Como The Treasury, 1
Cathedral Avenue, Perth;
+61 8 6168 7888
comohotels.com/
thetreasury
85
showers and Kaldewei Duo bathtubs, twin
vanities, travertine stone tiles, heated floors
and towel rails, and aromatherapy-based
Como Shambhala at Home amenities.
Rooms range in size from entry-level City
Rooms, an average of 55 sqm, to the 120
sqm of the Como Suite.
cocktails and bar snacks. In the basement
is Long Chim, where you?ll find Thai dishes
from renowned chef David Thompson.
F O O D A N D D R I N K Post, the former
General Post Office, is now an all-day
osteria serving Italian food. Wildflower,
located on the top floor, serves fine Western
Australian cuisine. It is an outstanding
venue for an evening meal. The wider
development also includes several excellent
options including Petition Kitchen, while
Petition Wine Bar & Merchant and Beer
Corner serve everything from local beers to
L E I S U R E A small but light-filled gym is
located on one of the upper floors and there
is also a 20-metre swimming pool with
views out onto the surrounding streets. The
spa is a Como Shambhala Urban Escape.
M E E T I N G S There are several good
spaces for meetings including the
boardroom for up to 20 guests.
V E R D I C T This hotel is outstanding.
Despite its central location, there is a
feeling of serenity and luxury. Worth the
expense. Tom Otley
M AY 2 0 1 8
T R I E D AN D T E S T E D LO N D O N R E S TAU R A N T S
GREAT
Roganic
?THE OTHER
NAUGHTY PIGLET
Usefully placed
between Victoria and
Westminster, this
theatre wine bar serves
tasty small plates and
excellent wines.
theothernaughty
piglet.co.uk
This is chef Simon Rogan?s latest attempt to crack
the London market after the unanimous acclaim
of his restaurant in the Lake District, L?Enclume.
It has many of his signature approaches: foraging,
fermentation, molecular cooking and multi-course
menus of small plates. The high prices make it
a temple of gastronomy best suited to special
occasions and celebrations, yet the dining room
is modest, the service casual.
Highlights of our six-course meal included
appetisers of fermented raspberry tart, tender
sous-vide pork, and plenty of surprises along the
way such as little parcels of raw beef wrapped in
thin slivers of kohlrabi. There are various menu
options, starting at a � business lunch up to
�5 for the tasting menu; the latter has the option
of paired wines for an additional � per head.
These prices are excluding service, so dinner can
easily top �0 per person.
86
Brat
WINE BARS
The City of London?s stratospherically high
restaurant bills have been edging steadily
eastwards for some time, and Brat is the
fashionable restaurant capitalising on diners who
think nothing of spending � on a whole turbot.
But despite the prices, this is a friendly, bohemian
place, set in one of Shoreditch?s repurposed
workshops. There?s as much focus on the wines as
the food, and it even calls itself a ?wood grill and
wine bar?; there?s a long bar (no reservations), plus
more seating at shared tables for diners with the
foresight to book online. Basque-style small plates
might include rabbit, blood sausage and beans,
or langoustines cooked on the wood-fired grill;
the same grill that?s used for cooking many of the
dishes, from beef chop (� for the large version)
to Dover sole (�). The wines are supplied by the
team behind Noble Rot wine bar, and are expertly
chosen; the selection by the glass is exemplary.
VERDICT For City diners who are looking for
something a little more interesting than the usual
corporate haunts, this retro-looking dining room
has bags of charm, and good cooking that belies
its humble appearance. Guy Dimond
?VINOTECA
A small chain of
wine bars with an
uncommonly wellchosen selection of
wines by the glass.
The large branch at
King?s Cross is worth
a detour for its
outdoor terrace.
vinoteca.co.uk
VERDICT Chef Simon Rogan?s best venture in the
Big Smoke so far, though it doesn?t approach
the sublime experience that makes L?Enclume
in the Lake District one of the best restaurants in
the UK ? and the world. Guy Dimond
PRICE
CONTACT
Tue-Sat 12-2pm,
6.30-10pm.
Six-course set
lunch, � per
head; tasting
menu, �5 per
head.
5-7 Blandford
Street, W1U 3DB;
+44 (0)20 3370
6260;
roganic.uk
GUY DIMOND
HOURS
M AY 2 0 1 8
?THE WINEMAKERS
CLUB
This series of
archways below
Holborn Viaduct
has been turned
into a wonderfully
atmospheric curiosity.
thewinemakersclub.
co.uk
HOURS
PRICE
CONTACT
Tue-Wed noon3pm, 6-10pm;
Thur-Sat noon3pm, 6-11pm; Sun
1pm-8pm.
Meal for two with
wine and service,
around �0.
First floor, 4
Redchurch
Street, E1 6JL;
bratrestaurant.
com
FULL RE VIEWS AND MUCH MORE ON BUSINESSTRAVELLER .COM
businesstraveller.com
St. Ermin?s Hotel, 2 Caxton Street,
London SW1H OQW +44 (0) 207 222 7888
www.sterminshotel.co.uk
sterminshotel
Talk shop, then
hit the shops
Business stays like
87
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NEWS AND
REVIEWS
YOUTUBE half page.indd 9
16/03/2018 12:37
SMART TR AVELLER
Card, document and
phone security
How to minimise the risk and impact of theft while travelling
T
heft, especially credit card and
identity theft, has been a longstanding problem for business
travellers abroad. BeTravelwise,
a UK-based travel risk management
organisation, deems petty non-violent crime
to be one of the most common risks business
travellers face. According to Financial Fraud
Action, lost and stolen credit cards cost
UK cardholders �.3m in 2016, while
counterfeit card fraud cost �.9m. So how
can you avoid falling victim to it?
88
own wording ? ?Only for hotel registration
purposes?, for example ? across the page, to
deter identity theft.
PHONE SECURITY
Pickpockets target expensive-looking mobile
phones. In countries with high street crime such
as Brazil or South Africa, it can make sense to
use a cheap local phone and SIM while there
and keep your valuable phone back at the hotel
or well hidden, not brandishing it in public.
Before leaving, make sure you back up your
mobile phone. Iphone users should also set the
MAKE COPIES
inbuilt ?Find My Iphone? function to work (via
Theft or loss of credit cards and other
Settings: Your Name: Icloud: Find My Iphone:
important documents can happen no matter on), so that you can erase the information
how careful you are. One of the best ways of
on it remotely if you need to, as soon as your
reducing stress and inconvenience if this does phone either has service or is connected to wifi.
happen is to make paper copies of important This can be done by signing into Icloud via an
documents, travel and financial, before leaving internet browser, finding your phone under
home. These usually include passport, credit ?All Devices? and selecting ?Erase Iphone?. As
cards, driving licence, hotel reservations and
for Android devices, there are free apps such
insurance documents. Seasoned travellers
as ?Find My Device? (on the Google Play app
recommend making two copies of each ? one store) that work in a similar way ? but make
to take with you, and the other to leave at
sure you install them first. If your phone does go
home with a family member or colleague.
missing, call your phone provider immediately
When making copies of passports or
so they can trace or block it.
emailing/faxing them, some travellers
suggest adding a watermark to the document D I V E R S I F Y Y O U R A S S E T S
Do not keep all of your money or documents
for added security. Microsoft Word has a
in one place. Many travellers advise stowing
watermark function, and you can add your
cash and cards
separately. Others
suggest taking one
credit/payment card
out with you
and keeping the
others in the hotel
safe. Storing cash in
concealed pockets on
your person is also a
good idea.
OUTSMART THE THIEVES
Among the measures you can take to prevent
petty theft from happening, there are also
ways to outsmart your assailant in the event
that it does. ?Skimming? credit cards is
the practice where your card is taken out
of your sight for a minute or so, read by a
special electronic reader, and cloned before
being returned to you. The simple solution
to this is to not let the card out of your
sight ? admittedly that?s not always as easy
as it sounds. Some travellers recommend
scratching the CCV codes off the back
of credit cards to render them useless to
criminals who steal cards. Either remember
the final three-digit code or write it down and
store it in a safe, separate spot.
An old trick that is simple, but effective
is to carry a fake wallet to hand over
during a robbery. One could even fill it
with out-of-date credit cards to make the ruse
all the more convincing.
Another tried and trusted tactic is to
conceal valuables in a money belt underneath
your clothing.
BE AWARE
Above all, being aware of your surroundings
is key to staying safe as a business traveller.
This includes the standard warnings of
avoiding dark, unpopulated streets and
ignoring strangers who might try to harass
you, even if the strangers appear to be well
dressed and sophisticated.
Most importantly, know the local
emergency phone numbers. Although the
European Commission advocates 112 as
an emergency phone number across the
European Union, some countries in the
EU have their own numbers (in the UK it is
999, for example). In the US the emergency
number is 911. Olivia Hultgren
To join the discussion on travel precautions, visit
businesstraveller.com/forum.
M AY 2 0 1 8
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From the archive
1983
Bull fighting, gentlemen?s clubs
and communism in Poland
90
SOME THINGS
NEVER CHANGE.
Our cover story for
May 1983 was about
the horrors of being a
business traveller who
is also an anxious flyer.
Boeing had released
figures showing that
one in every six adult
Americans had aerophobia,
and over several pages the
phenomenon was examined, with
helpful advice offered alongside case
studies. The tales are timeless, though
thankfully, in the intervening 35 years,
aviation safety has improved.
The suggestion
to see bull fighting
in Spain probably
dates the piece
Another piece by Ian Wooldridge looked
at how it might be possible to organise a
work itinerary so you could ?hit the high
spots of the year?s sporting calendar?
(Wooldridge was a well-respected
Daily Mail sports journalist). It might
be tempting to do this today with the
FIFA World Cup in Moscow in 2018 and
the Rugby World Cup in Tokyo in 2019,
although the suggestion that one of the
must-see sports events was bull fighting
in Spain probably dates the piece. BT
M AY 2 0 1 8
HIGHLIGHTS
Adverts
An ad for BA?s Concorde, showing a
bleary-eyed businessman: ?So you?ve
just saved �5 by not flying Concorde
Mr Spearman, it?s obvious no one?s
going to put anything over on you.?
People Express
The launch of the American airline was
approaching, with the promise of a �
(return) transatlantic fare.
Corruption
Poland?s economic crisis under
communism was creating a scramble
for dollars, and some entrepreneurial
Poles were operating on the wrong side
of the law. Communism lasted another
six years in Poland.
Private clubs
Before the advent of Soho House
and the Groucho, gentlemen?s clubs
were indeed men-only, and used by
businessmen on their London trips.
businesstraveller.com
CLASSIQU E 7147
HISTORY IS STILL BEING WRITTEN ...
N A P O L � O N B O N A PA R T E ( 1 7 6 9 - 1 8 2 1 )
I C O N I C B R E G U E T C L I E N T ? W W W. B R E G U E T. C O M
AMIN SOUTHAN
hen the Victorians built
the railway network
throughout the UK and
what was then the British
Empire, almost every
major line started and finished in a spectacular
terminus designed to signal to the world that
civilisation had arrived.
You can still see many of these termini in
daily use. London, for example, has Charing
Cross, King?s Cross, St Pancras, Marylebone,
Euston, Victoria and Waterloo. There are
grand examples in York, Edinburgh and other
major business centres. Then there are those
in overseas cities: the majestic railway station
in Kuala Lumpur; Flinders Street station in
Melbourne; the vast Victoria Terminus station
in Bombay (like Mumbai, now renamed,
as the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus), and
many other slightly less extravagant versions
throughout the Commonwealth.
But it wasn?t just as symbols of power that
these stations were built; they had a very useful
purpose, too. They served the needs of the
travelling public who used them day after day,
and they were ? and still are ? spectacularly
successful in meeting those needs.
Today, the big international airports have
taken over the role of major transport hubs.
Where once city fathers could be proud of
the grand Victorian Gothic structures of the
stations, now it is the concrete, steel and glass
of the airports that fulfil this role.
JEFF MILLS
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69
QUITO
Ecuador?s
capital takes off
001 OFC BT MAY COVER QUITO.indd 1
17/04/2018 12:57
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and gain membership of BT Plus
offering a range of benefits including
FREE platinum membership of
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This offer includes access to the digital edition (worth �.49).
visit businesstraveller.com/gha
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M AY 2 0 1 8
OPINION
Crossing
time zones
There are few things worse than being jet-lagged with nowhere
to go. Maybe it?s time reputable hotels let rooms by the hour
Y
70
ou don?t need me to tell you
about the pain of business
travel when flying east. The
prospect of landing at an
uncivilised hour, with the
knowledge that your hotel room will not
be available until the afternoon is a familiar
experience for the jet-lagged businessperson.
Hoteliers hate early arrivals. They clutter up
the lobby, expect all the guests from the night
before to leave after breakfast, and look as if
they have just left the set of a horror film.
Often long-haul travellers have been up all
night, so why don?t more hotels cater properly
for early bird business travellers? They must
know a proportion of guests will arrive before
check in. Yet the focus has always been on full
rate overnight stays. Hotel management rarely
considers how much revenue could be made
from selling rooms for a half-day or hourly
rate. Even the most basic space with a small
bed would be welcome for those who have
been up all night.
M AY 2 0 1 8
than the Bordeaux. Breakfast is essential, and
For the traveller with insomnia, one
an early arrival at your hotel provides the
London hotel is offering a ?Sleep Bracelet?.
opportunity to take in all the benefits of eggs
This claims to act as an antenna, connected
and bacon, freshly baked goods, juice and
to an embedded ?Natural Frequency
buckets of coffee ? assuming your hotel serves
Technology disc?. The makers claim it tunes
a good breakfast, and if it doesn?t, why are you
out bad frequencies from electronic devices
staying there?
and encourages only the good ones, thus
Thirdly, and more generally, it is my
presumably aiding the path to sweet dreams.
suggestion that you take your keep-fit gear or
I have yet to try one, and wonder what
swimsuit with you, and use the hotel health
constitutes a ?good frequency? rather than
facilities for an hour or so. I?m not necessarily
a ?bad? one. Rather than struggle with that
advocating a hard workout, rather a little
conundrum, thankfully some less esoteric
time in the hotel pool, perhaps a sauna and
sleep aids are being offered by savvy hoteliers.
a steam. After that take the opportunity to
Among the sleep aids I have encountered
rehydrate, but this time with some mineral
are calming tinctures by the bedside, such as
water. Many quality hotels with these types of
a ?relaxing pillow mist? from a perfumery in
facilities can also offer you a
Provence. One innovative
massage at varying rates, the
property is also offering a
Find a comfy chair,
cost of which unfortunately
jet-lag package including a
take your shoes off
can seldom be expensed. So
music programme that of
you may, with planning, be
relaxing bedtime themes
and clutter up the
better off choosing a hotel
and an automatic volume
lobby. They?ll soon
that recognises the needs of
reducer that fades as you
find a room for you...
exhausted arrivals and offers
drift off. Hotels are not yet
a free massage experience.
permitted to offer sleepAt Las Ventanas al Paraiso, a
deprived guests any form
Rosewood Resort in Los Cabos,
of ?knock-out drop?. This
Mexico, you are offered a ten-minute
despite the unspoken wish of
neck and foot massage at
receptionists who are badgered
check-in; and the welcome
by tired and irritated early
at Halekulani in Honolulu,
morning arrivals demanding a bed.
Hawaii, includes a free 15-minute
Finally, if you are told your
foot or scalp massage.
accommodation is not available until
The jury will be out on
mid-afternoon and you?ve arrived at 8am, I
whether a massage is going to ease sleep
suggest you go ahead and really clutter up the
deprivation ? in fact, it will probably send
lobby. Find a comfy chair, take your shoes off,
you to sleep rather than wake you up ? but
stretch your legs out, put on a pyjama top and
it?s an enjoyable way to kill time before your
pretend to go to sleep snoring loudly. They?ll
room passes the housekeeping check and is
find you a room soon enough. It always works
ready for occupation.
perfectly for me. BT
businesstraveller.com
ILLUSTRATION: BENJAMIN SOUTHAN
EASING THE PAIN
There are various strategies you doubtless
employ to try to combat jet lag, but I have a
few of my own suggestions as to how to ease
your discomfort at your destination.
As you might expect, hoteliers are keen to
suggest you think about travelling a day or so
earlier in order to aid recovery. Although this
sounds like an extra cost, it may be cheaper for
your company to fly you in economy over the
weekend and take a discounted rate at a hotel,
rather than take an overnight Sunday (to
Monday morning) business flight.
Secondly, what you eat and drink should be
a focus, and hotels can help. Everyone knows
that it should be water on the flight rather
DEREK PICOT
A HOTELIER FOR MORE THAN 30 YE ARS
A N D A U T H O R O F H O T E L R E S E R VAT I O N S
The Principal London:
brand new, since 1898.
WE?LL STAY WITH YOU
The Principal London | 1-8 Russell Square, London WC1B 5BE | 020 7123 5000
@ThePrincipalLondon | book online at theprincipalhotel.com
WATC H E S
72
M AY 2 0 1 8
businesstraveller.com
WATC H E S
GAME,
SET AND
WATCH
WORDS CHRIS HALL
Patek Philippe reminds
the world it?s a serious
player in the ?sports-luxe?
league with new Nautilus
and Aquanaut models
LEFT AND ABOVE:
Patek Philippe
Nautilus Perpetual
Calendar 5740 ?
front and back
businesstraveller.com
A
t Baselworld, the
watch industry?s largest
annual fair, there are
two stands that draw a
constant crowd from the
moment the turnstiles
open: Rolex, and Patek
Philippe. Everyone from extravagantly
tailored European executives to athleisureclad Instagram influencers flock to see what
creations these two have released. Many
raise their phones hypnotically to the twostorey screens showing images of the same
watches in lavish detail, snapping away
without breaking step.
燩atek Philippe ?燬wiss, 179 years old
this year, and without doubt the most
prestigious watch brand at the show
?爎evealed two watches that reinforce its
presence in the ?sports-luxe? arena: the
Nautilus Perpetual Calendar (also called
the 5740; Patek nerds refer to models
by their four-digit references) and the
Aquanaut Chronograph (ref. 5968). If
73
?sports-luxe? conjures up images of men
awkwardly attempting to play tennis in a
suit or suchlike, worry not. The entire watch
industry?s use of the phrase ?sports watch?
to describe anything that is relatively sturdy
of form and cased in stainless steel (or these
days, titanium, carbon fibre, or ceramic)
dates back to the 1950s and 60s, when
that kind of thing was used for practical
purposes. Then at the start of the 1970s,
the Italian market expressed a demand for
something a bit more refined that you could
still wear to the beach, and ?sports-luxe? was
born with the likes of the Royal Oak, the
Laureato, Vacheron Constantin?s 222 and
?爄n 1976 ?爐he Patek Philippe Nautilus.
The Aquanaut, a tilt at a yet-sportier,
younger and more ?entry-level? (such things
are relative) market, appeared in 1997.
�
SPECIALIST IN ALL STYLES
Part of the Patek Philippe magic is the
brand?s ability to wear multiple guises.
?
For many, it exudes old-school elegance
M AY 2 0 1 8
WATC H E S
LEFT AND BELOW:
Patek Philippe
Aquanaut
Chronograph
5968
74
and craftsmanship of the highest order,
expressed via perpetual calendars, splitsecond monopusher chronographs (with
one button for start, stop and re-set), and
minute repeaters (watches that chime the
the minute on request, using tiny hammers
and gongs). At the same time, there is a
totally separate Patek Philippe customer
for whom it is all about the Nautilus, now,
forever and always. Here, to an extent,
those two worlds collide, as Patek Philippe
equips the Nautilus with a perpetual
calendar movement for the first time this
year. It?s a combination that might sound
bizarre on the face of it ? a so-called sporty
design with the most conservative, classical
movement inside ? but Patek Philippe?s
perpetual calendars are so highly regarded
(the brand was the first to use the function
in a wristwatch, in 1925) and the Nautilus
shape so spot-on that this was always going
to be something of a holy grail watch.
燭hankfully, Patek has not bungled
this hybrid design. The limited edition
M AY 2 0 1 8
The Seventies-inspired match
of brown and orange on the dial
is enough to stand out
pieces brought out to mark the
Nautilus?s 40th anniversary in
2016 were politely criticised
as being somewhat overstated
? with the embossed text ?1976 40 - 2016? writ large across
the centre of the dial. But here the
execution is delicate, adeptly marrying
the dense display of information with
the strong horizontal striping common to
all Nautiluses. The date display is slightly
larger than the others (day of the week
and 24-hour dial at 9 o?clock; month and
leap year at 3 o?clock), and the correctors
to adjust everything have been smartly
integrated into the 8.4mm thick case so
as to leave no unsightly protuberances.
To emphasise its status at the top of the
Nautilus family, it is cased in solid white
gold, including the bracelet and clasp that ?
happily ? Patek Philippe has reengineered
to reduce the chance of it falling off your
wrist. It has a retail price of �,150, but
if you were by some miracle to have one in
your possession, there are probably buyers
who would hand over double that on the
spot, such is the waiting list and their rarity. �
Should you be infatuated with the Nautilus?s
elliptical shape and yet struggling to lay your
hands on nearly a hundred grand right away,
the brand still has something for you. For
a mere �,510, you can get your name on
the waiting list for the reference-numbered
5968A-001 Aquanaut chronograph. It?s the
first time a chronograph has graced Patek
Philippe?s less expensive range ? and it?s an
in-house flyback (while timing, the second
hand will at the press of the 4 o?clock pusher
fly back instantly to zero and recommence
timing all in one action).
BRIGHT COLOURS�
What really seals the deal for me with the
5968 is the design. The Seventies-inspired
match of brown and orange on the dial
is enough to make it stand out, but the
real punch comes in the orange rubber
strap, supplied as an optional extra with
the standard black. By the standards of
such an august manufacture, that?s not just
loosening one?s tie, it?s wrapping it around
your head and jumping fully clothed into
the nearest marble pool ? and I respect
them all the more for it. BT
businesstraveller.com
A D V E R T I S E M E N T F E AT U R E
Making complex
travel simple
Simplexity Travel Management?s unrivalled
resources, experience and commitment to
quality will ensure every trip runs smoothly
O
ne of the UK?s leading travel
management companies,
Simplexity Travel counts
household names from the worlds
of sport, music, fashion, film and TV among
clients ? A-listers and HNWs all with one
thing in common: a need for ?innovative, costeffective and well-executed? travel solutions.
Launched in 2011, Simplexity Travel?s
Mayfair-based team is headed up by
Mark Smith, head of business development.
Together, he and his team enjoy more than
50 years of combined travel experience,
ensuring they have a thorough understanding
of their clients? needs.
Trust has always been an important
factor in successful business, and the same
applies when choosing a partner to plan
your travel ? one of the reasons that Simplexity
Travel highlights its recently granted ABTA
accreditation. (The company now boasts
membership of three of the market?s
pre-eminent organisations, including
IATA and ATOL.)
?Simplexity Travel has always prided itself
on offering the highest standards, but the extra
security this accreditation gives our customers
is invaluable,? says Smith.
Whether it is handling flight tickets and
transfers, booking accommodation or
transferring equipment, Simplexity Travel offers
a one-stop shop for ?all things travel-related?.
That means no more having to waste precious
time by arranging everything piecemeal: ?Just
one phone call to a company with limitless
resources and global contacts who will ensure
businesstraveller.com
that no detail of an itinerary, no matter how
complicated, is overlooked,? he says.
Each client is assigned a dedicated travel
manager, who is available 24/7, 365 days a
year. Moreover, as Smith reveals, ?Unlike
many of our competitors, we won?t charge
an additional fee for this service.?
The company?s unrivalled relationships
with a global network of leading hotels,
airlines and private jet and yacht specialists
means clients have access to a wide array
of VIP amenities, upgrades, experiences,
preferred rates and complimentary extras
not available to the public. Meanwhile its
partnership with Virtuoso, an organisation
of top travel agencies, travel providers and
destinations worldwide, allows Simplexity
Travel to team up with more than 75 of the
world?s top commercial and private air carriers,
car rental companies and leading luxury cruise
lines, meaning further advantages in the form
of pricing and upgrades.
?The company's travel managers use our
contacts to help plan a client?s itinerary down
to the last detail. We also monitor airline
promotions and reduce stopovers to make
business trips not only more cost effective,
but less exhausting too,? says Smith.
Simplexity Travel works extensively in
industries synonymous with complex logistics
such as film and TV production, music and
theatre tours and sport.
Top-flight football clubs have increasingly
made use of its services, and in 2016 the
company was retained by Norwich City
Football Club as its official travel management
MARK SMITH,
HEAD OF
BUSINESS
DEVELOPMENT
partner, responsible for handling all travel
requirements for the club?s first team and
academy, at home and abroad. This year
also saw Simplexity Travel form a similar
partnership with Brentford Football Club.
Determined to present clients with an
all-encompassing service, Simplexity Travel
also boasts an events division that offers
everything from single tickets to bespoke
itineraries for the most sought-after concerts,
festivals, sporting events, film premieres and
fashion shows from around the globe.
Simplexity Travel is proud to be one of the
few official Wembley Stadium overseas travel
agents. Clients are afforded rare access to the
private facilities at both Wembley Stadium
(where the company holds a 12-seat, long-side
box with a prime position between the half-way
line and the penalty box) and the SSE Arena.
Concludes Smith, ?With the coming year
set to be our most successful yet, Simplexity
Travel Management really does make a
difference to business travel.?
? For more information on
Simplexity Travel Management,
visit simplexitytravel.com or
contact Mark Smith on 020 3535 9290
M AY 2 0 1 8
75
CONTINUED...
QUITO, ECUADOR
RISING C APITAL
continued from page 29
...SILICON ANDES
76
Quito is also the brain of what you could
call the ?Silicon Andes?. The Yachay Tech
University, with a campus just outside the
city, is part of a government project to
establish a hub for technological innovation
and knowledge-intensive businesses. The
idea is that the university uses its $400
million annual budget to collaborate with
public and private research institutions.
But there is much more going on beyond
this. In the past year, the emergence of food
and beverage startups are most evident,
particularly craft beer and chocolate. Now
there are many dozens of Ecuadorian beer
brands, all of which are small and local, but
as Toth points out, ?legitimately good?.
?Quito has always been important to
me, for many reasons; the first of which is
that I?m from Quito,? says businessman and
ecologist Roque Sevilla. ?Secondly, I was
mayor of Quito from 1998 to 2000, so I?ve
got to know it even better.?
?For Quito the era of digitalisation is
gaining momentum and, once it goes into
full force, it will help facilitate companies
and businesses here, in a big way.? It also
helps that internet and mobile connectivity
in the capital are among the fastest on the
continent, according to mobile phone
provider Movistar.
Patricio Alarcon, the president of the
Chamber of Commerce, says the city has
a developed entrepreneurial ecosystem,
with many coworking, innovation spaces
and incubators. ?IMPAQTO [coworking
community]is one of the most developed
coworking spaces, renting out part of its
M AY 2 0 1 8
infrastructure to companies such as Spain?s
vehicle hire company Cabify,? he adds.
Currently, around 50 startups based in
Quito are listed on the Startup Ranking
website (which has global coverage), with
e-learning platform Cuestionarix and
human resources specialist Evaluar.com
ranking highest in Ecuador (points
are given for importance on the
internet and social influence). So
it?s no wonder I can find activities
such as Start Up Weekend (which
took place in April), and business
initiatives from organisations such as Kruger
Corporation, which supports and motivates
new enterprise via its lab for startups.
LESS BUREAUCRACY
In the World Bank?s Ease of Doing Business
index, Ecuador currently ranks 118 out of
190 countries ? one slot behind Argentina
and four ahead of Uganda. This is an
improvement from five years ago when
it was ranked 139. ?In 2006, before the
start of former President Rafael Correa?s
government, I remember waiting in lines
for hours on end and having to hire a
tramitador (middleman) for even the most
trivial paperwork,? says Marcel Perkins,
owner of the Illa Experience hotel. ?This
was usually a friend or partner of the person
behind the desk at public offices. Nowadays
most paperwork can be done online or
quickly without having to pay anyone
for these services. You can incorporate
a company in a few days and be up and
?Quito has become a
metropolitan capital
with cosmopolitan
views that embrace
modern lifestyles?
running with your business ideas quickly.
Trademarks can be registered easily, there
are several mediation and arbitration
chambers to help solve problems and that
business goes smoothly in general.
?In the tourism industry, infrastructure
has moved on in leaps and bounds, and
Ecuador has gone from being a potholeridden country that would destroy the
sturdiest 4x4s, to having some of the best
roads in South America,? adds Perkins, who
also owns Latin Trails, a local tour operator.
And now, with the larger, improved
airport, which opened outside of the city
five years ago, many airlines feel comfortable
to use it. Quito recently welcomed Jetblue,
United Airlines and Air Europa, while from
summer this year Condor is planning direct
flights from Frankfurt International.
THE FUTURE
?Over the past few years a sense of pride
has grown in the younger population. New
graduates are studying gastronomy, tourism,
hoteliering, arts and music ? all related to
rescuing Ecuador?s heritage,? says Perkins.
The result is the rise of many restaurants
offering haute cuisine and international
fusion with local ingredients, interesting
music venues showcasing local artists, micro
breweries that use local grains, new types of
city tours that involve unique experiences
and eclectic boutique hotels.
?The city of Quito has become a
metropolitan capital with cosmopolitan
views that embraces modern lifestyles; the
city is inclusive to minorities and, with
Ecuador?s no visa policy, it has become
home to citizens from several nations
around the globe,? adds Perkins.
The talk on the street is the need for
more crowdsourcing, a free-trade area near
the airport for the logistics industry and
pedestrianising the old town to encourage
more visitors ? all good ideas for the near
future. ?With a solid business idea and
plenty of passion, you will find few places of
this size in the world that can compete with
Quito,? says Niedrau. BT
businesstraveller.com
FALKL AND ISL ANDS
WINDSWEPT WONDER
continued from page 45
...RAF cutlery by uniformed (nonmilitary) flight crew who are polite and
efficient. You won?t go hungry ? in a
lifetime of travel, this is the first flight I?ve
been on where you get offered seconds of
the main meal.
Until June last year, this globe-spanning
flight touched down to refuel on Ascension
Island, another British Overseas Territory
lost in the South Atlantic Ocean. As a result
of problems with the island?s runway, this
routing has been suspended until 2020.
Instead, after a six-hour-20-minute night
flight, we touched down on the pancake-flat
desert island of Sal in Cape Verde, off the
coast of West Africa. The two-hour break
inside its modern commercial terminal
created a mad dash for the smoking zone
and power-charging points, while some
soldiers ? clearly used to all this ? unroll
their sleeping bags and grab some kip on
the floor. As dawn breaks, we look out
wistfully at the palm trees and blushing sky
and savour the rising tropical heat ? in the
sub-Antarctic Falkland Islands, the average
summer temperature is 10篊, falling to a
mere 2篊 in winter.
SEA FOR MILES
Back on board, we now face a day flight of
ten hours 20 minutes. ?If you like looking at
the sea you?re in for a treat,? Captain Oliver
drolly comments, ?because there?s nothing
else to see.? By now the flight is only halffull ? some passengers bound for Ascension
Island have disembarked to catch a smaller
plane that is capable of landing there ?
which allows the remaining travellers to
businesstraveller.com
spread out. Yet more food comes, followed
by plentiful jugs of water and lemon
squash as if it?s school sports day. While
this isn?t the most pampering of flights, the
Airbridge serves its purpose well, providing
you factor the likelihood of delays into your
travel plans. The only other way to reach
the Falkland Islands is a round-the-houses
route via Chile that involves stops in
Santiago and Punta Arenas. This can be
cheaper, but takes more than 24 hours
? and the once-a-week connection
on to Mount Pleasant Airfield is often
sold out well in advance during the busier
summer season.
At long last, we begin our final descent to
these enigmatic specks on the other side of
the world. Constructed after the 1982 war
with Argentina, Mount Pleasant Complex
is home to some 1,300 servicepeople who
live as a self-contained community 38 miles
west of Stanley. Transfers to the capital are
initially on unsealed roads bordered with
peaks and bays that became familiar names
during the 74-day conflict in 1982. Wireless
Ridge, Mount Tumbledown, Bluff Cove...
this traumatic episode may have happened
more than 35 years ago, but it is fresh in
the minds of many islanders. It?s well worth
booking a half-day battlefield tour to learn
about what went on. Along with three local
civilians, 255 British and 649 Argentine
troops died in a grim struggle fought in
severe winter conditions. The remains of
destroyed helicopters and hill-top dug-outs
used by the invading troops can still be seen,
while abundant memorials pay tribute to
those who were lost.
WOOL, FISH , OIL AND TOURISM
These days the Falkland Islands are a much
happier place. The excellent Historic
Dockyard Museum in Stanley tells the story
of its growth from an isolated band of sheep
farms to a thriving, self-sufficient economy
(excluding defence services) primarily based
on fishing. Oil was discovered offshore in
2010, and while its current low price has
stalled exploitation, it promises revenue.
According to statistics issued by the
Falkland Islands Tourist Board, the annual
number of business travellers to the islands
has bubbled around 1,500 for many years,
with a similar amount of land-based leisure
visitors. The latter is forecast to grow by five
per cent by 2020, while cruise ship visitors
average around 55,000 a year. Most of these
only spend a few hours here ? admiring the
king penguins at Volunteer Point, sipping
pints of Iron Lady IPA in the Victory Bar,
taking selfies beside Stanley?s red phone
boxes and bust of Margaret Thatcher ? but
anyone who stays longer will discover
somewhere very special.
RED, WHITE AND BLUE
Few people realise how large the Falkland
Islands are ? they are almost the size of
Northern Ireland and laced together by
This traumatic
episode happened
more than 35 years
ago, but it is fresh in
the minds of islanders
a plucky combination of ferry, supply
ship and domestic flights operated by
the Falkland Islands Government Air
Service. These use a venerable fleet of
ten-seater twin-prop Britten-Norman
BN-2 Islander aircraft, originally built in
the Isle of Wight, that sport a smart livery
of red, white and blue. Flying low across
an austere landscape of peat fields and
sheep-speckled hills, their destinations
include grass strips on outlying islands
such as Pebble, Carcass and Sealion that
are home to deserted white sand beaches
and a glorious array of wildlife including
elephant seals, sea lions, five species of
penguin and huge colonies of blackbrowed albatross. While the Falkland
Islands might take some reaching, once
you get here you?ll never regret it. BT
M AY 2 0 1 8
77
Need good
advice?
78
When your business needs expert
advice provided by a qualified,
reliable and trustworthy legal
team ? use a solicitor
Solicitors. Here to help
Talk to your solicitor or visit www.lawsociety.org.uk/here-to-help
The Law Society
OCTOBER 2017
@LawSocietyFAS
businesstraveller.com
the
eport
Tried,
Tested,
Tasted.
TRIED AND TESTED
TRIED AND TESTED
SMART TRAVELLER
PLUS
London to Perth in
Qantas business class
Singapore Airlines?
new first class suite
Avoiding and dealing
with theft on trips
Two London hotels
84
80
82
88
Como hotel, Perth, Australia
85
New London restaurants
86
b u s i n e s s t r a v e l l e r. c o m
M AY 2 0 1 8
79
TRIED AND TESTED FLIGHT
Qantas B787-9
business class
HEATHROW-PERTH
B A C K G R O U N D At 14,500km, this is the
third-longest commercial flight currently in
operation, and the first scheduled nonstop
service between the UK and Australia.
It?s served daily by a B787-9 from London
Heathrow Terminal 3.
The new route means that Qantas now
has three routes between Australia and
London ? the direct Perth-London service
on the B787-9 Dreamliner; a reinstated
Sydney-Singapore-London service on the
A380; and London via Dubai from Brisbane,
Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide or Perth with
partner airline Emirates on a mix of A380
and B777 aircraft.
80
B O A R D I N G The boarding took place
from Gate 1. There was priority boarding for
business class passengers, after children
and the elderly. Business class is spread
over two cabins in a configuration of 1-2-1
(A-EF-K). My seat was in the front cabin.
The aircraft is configured for 236 passengers
in three classes: 166 economy, 28 premium
economy and 42 business class seats.
T H E S E A T I was in row 2 in a centre seat,
2E. The seat is a Thompson Aero model
and allows every passenger to have direct
aisle access. It has a staggered seating
configuration, so that when the seat is fully
reclined, the feet of the passenger slide
below the side table of the seat in front
(sounds weird, but works well). The window
seats are either close to the window, or
slightly further away and closer to the aisle.
The seat has a 46 inch seat pitch, 80 inch
bed seat length, and either a 23-24 inch seat
width or a 24-25 inch bed width.
The seat can be in a reclined position
from take-off right through to landing,
because there is an over-the-shoulder strap
as well as waist strap for safety (which you
only have to wear for take-off and landing).
The seat is very spacious, with a large
amount of storage space, a side table with
storage and a good-sized armrest on both
M AY 2 0 1 8
sides. The centre seats have a divider, which
is up when you enter the cabin, but that
can be lowered if you want to chat with
the passenger in the neighbouring seat.
There is more storage under the side tables,
though the exact location of this depends
on which seat you are in. There?s an area for
magazines and a bottle of water, which was
waiting at the seat when I boarded.
There is a single washroom at the front,
and two washrooms at the rear between
the two business class cabins. These
washrooms are small, and changing into
pyjamas in the privacy of the washrooms
requires at least a nodding acquaintance
with the basics of yoga.
B E S T S E A T The front row ? row 1 ?
has only two seats, the window seat 1A
and 1K, and is best avoided because it?s
too close to the galley. The first full row is
row 2, and there the front two seats, being
bulkhead seats, have more leg room.
These two front seats are good for those
travelling as a couple, though at the front
there are no overhead lockers over the
middle seats because of the crew rest being
Changing into pyjamas
in the washrooms
requires at least a
nodding acquaintance
with the basics of yoga
overhead, so you will store your bags in
the overhead lockers above the window
seats. Seat 2E has a side area by your
feet where you can keep your hand
luggage during the flight.
The best window seats are those
close to the window and away from the
aisle, and these are seats 3A, 5A, and
7A, though 7A is quite close to the rear
galley. On the other side of the aircraft
go for 3K, 5K or 7K.
T H E F L I G H T Once on board we were
offered water and champagne (Jacquart
Brut Mosaique), and our jackets were taken.
After take off, we were offered Martin Grant
sleepsuits. There were also washbags in
two colours, darker colours for men, pink
for ladies, with designs by Warakurna
artist Polly Butler-Jackson. Further drinks
weren?t offered until 1500 and the lunch
service took two hours from this time, so we
finished eating at around 1700. I think this
was because it was the inaugural flight, as
service was much quicker on the return.
There was an appetiser of bubble and
squeak ? tasty, but we were given no cutlery.
When I asked for a fork I was only given a
napkin. I chose crab cakes to start, which
were moist and full of flavour, served with
businesstraveller.com
TRIED AND TESTED FLIGHT
corn salsa, chilli and rocket. For a main I
chose grilled chicken with mustard seed
carrots, basmati rice and coriander yoghurt.
The portions were generous and it was
delicious. Desserts included ice cream,
rhubarb trifle or cheeses. If you want to
pre-order from a bigger menu, Qantas
calls this service Menu Select.
Snacks offered throughout the flight
included mozzarella, olive and spinach
calzone; bacon sarnie with brown sauce;
or beef cottage pie with peas.
I worked for a few hours and then reclined
the bed; the flight attendants can do this for
you. There?s a mattress topper, which you
slip over the headrest to keep it in place.
There?s also a good-sized pillow and duvet.
The bed has enough room by the side that
you can keep drinks and objects next to you
and the IFE allows the screen to be dimmed
so there?s just a message in a low light
telling you how much flight time remains.
The bed is good for sleeping, though once
fully reclined to turn from your back onto
your side isn?t easy because your knees jam
against the top of the alcove.
Once reclined you can raise the bed a
little and read until it?s time to go to sleep (or
watch the IFE). I slept for a couple of hours.
I then got up to fetch a snack and drink,
before going back for a longer sleep.
businesstraveller.com
I woke about three hours before
landing and filled in the breakfast card.
The care taken over the food is best
shown by the breakfast selection, which
included omelette and corn fritter, with
pickled mushrooms, pancetta and
tomato and chill relish; cardamon pears
with coconut yoghurt, quinoa, almonds,
hazelnuts, blueberries and honey; smoked
salmon, or soba and raw courgette strips
with ponzu dressing. There?s a choice of
juices including spinach, cucumber, apple,
celery and lemon.
A R R I V A L We landed 20 minutes early
into Perth and then made our way to
immigration where there was no queue.
V E R D I C T This is a historic new service
and it was a pleasure to be on the inaugural
flight to Perth. Once on board it didn?t seem
different from many other long-haul flights,
with the extra three or fours hours not really
adding any discomfort. That might not be
the case in economy or premium economy,
one of the reasons Qantas has increased
the number of premium seats on this
aircraft. I hope the service is commercially
successful, because being able to reach
Perth so easily is a great start to a visit to
Western Australia. Tom Otley
81
WHAT ?S NEW
This is the first commercial
non-stop flight from London
to Australia.
WHAT ?S NOT
The B787-9 Dreamliner is flown
by many airlines in various
seating configurations.
BEST FOR
This is the fastest way to
get to Australia from the UK,
and you get to Perth directly.
PRICE
The internet rate for a return
business class flight from London
to Perth costs �883.
FLIGHT TIME
16 hours 45 minutes
(17 hours return).
CONTACT
qantas.com.au
M AY 2 0 1 8
TRIED AND TESTED FLIGHT
Singapore Airlines
new A380 first class suites
LONDON-SINGAPORE
be turned so that it is directly in front of the
table for dining or working, or kept slightly
to one side if you just want to rest things
on it. As you can imagine, there is a huge
amount of personal space, and you can
get up and walk around if you feel like
stretching your legs without ever walking
out into the corridor.
The suites have sliding doors for privacy,
and though they don?t reach to the ceiling,
they are useful; if you keep the door open
you will be eye to eye with your fellow
passenger on the other side of the aircraft.
The suites have a number of charging
points, including one power point in the
wide table for when you are working and
another by the bed, so you could keep
two devices charged that way, and a third
through the USB socket.
In the wardrobe there are socks and
slippers, and I was also given a Lalique
washbag containing a few useful items
along with a candle and a bar of soap. I
SIA is retiring the oldest
A380s and welcoming
five new ones, each with
a revamped layout, cabins
and new seat products
82
B A C K G R O U N D Singapore Airlines is
in the process of introducing new seats
on its A380s in all four classes: economy,
premium economy, business and first. These
will be fitted to its entire Airbus A380 fleet,
including retrofit work on 14 aircraft that
are already in service, starting in late 2018
and targeted for completion in 2020, as
well as the five new aircraft entering service.
The new aircraft configuration carries
six first class suites. The A380s currently
serve Auckland, Beijing, Frankfurt,
Hong Kong, London, Melbourne, Mumbai,
New Delhi, New York, Paris, Shanghai,
Sydney and Zurich.
T H E L O U N G E There are two Silverkris
lounges in Terminal 2B at Heathrow, and
you will be directed to the left for first class.
The lounge has a traditional look, with a
self-service wine bar and plenty of areas
for sitting, working and dining in privacy.
The staff are friendly and helpful.
B O A R D I N G There were dedicated queues
for both business class and the first class
M AY 2 0 1 8
suites. The suites are on the upper deck at
the front of the aircraft, and since they are
in front of the engines they are very quiet
during the flight.
T H E S U I T E The layout of the suite takes
a little getting used to. There is a leather
armchair facing forward, and then running
perpendicular to this in front of you is the
bed, which is folded up when you first board.
Along the side of the cabin by the
windows are several storage spaces for
magazines and bags, and there?s a private
wardrobe for hanging your clothes and
storing wheel-on bags, though larger bags
are stowed at the front by the two separate
washrooms at the end of the corridor.
The leather seat (21-inches wide) can be
swivelled either towards the two windows,
or towards the table area and television. I
was so busy moving it around that only later
did I realise you can also recline the seat
and raise the leg rest if you simply want to
sit back and read.
The table comes out of the side of the
cabin and is very large and stable, and can
businesstraveller.com
TRIED AND TESTED FLIGHT
asked for some pyjamas, which are also
Lalique, and after take-off changed
into these for the flight and hung my
suit in the wardrobe.
There was only a slight delay in taking off
because of bad weather and the need for
the aircraft to be de-iced.
W H I C H S U I T E T O C H O O S E Each seat
is a separate suite, so if you are travelling
as a couple you can choose either 1 and 2A
or 1 and 2F. These two seats have a divider
that slides down, allowing you to spend time
together and make a double suite with a
double bed. Alternatively, if travelling with a
colleague, you can have the divider down
to chat, and then raise it and have separate
beds when it?s time to sleep. I was in 3F and
this is one of the two suites that does not
have that option.
T H E F L I G H T The choice of food is
huge, and on top of this you can also
select from an even wider selection of
dishes online prior to flying, using a
service called Book the Cook. The � la
carte menu includes a selection of dishes
created by Milanese chef Carlo Cracco,
and I decided to try these.
An appetiser of prawns came with a
shaved pumpkin and radish salad; a starter
of pea cream soup with mussels and squid
ink; and a main course of seared Iberico
pork loin with apple pur閑 and pork jus. This
was followed by Italian ice cream. Other
options included Singaporean dishes and
a cheese course. Overall I was impressed
with the food and the presentation ? each
course was served by flight attendants with
an explanation and I was asked if I?d like to
change my choice of drink.
Singapore Airlines did very well in our
most recent Cellars in the Sky wine tastings,
winning three gold medals, including Best
Overall Cellar. On boarding we were offered
a choice of vintage champagnes ? Krug
2004 or Dom P閞ignon 2006. The whites
and reds were well-chosen for altitude with
many ?name? producers, and all excellent of
their type.
During the flight other snack and light
meal options included char kway teow
(noodles) with chicken, black mushroom
and oriental chicken stock; sandwiches,
chocolates and snacks such as crisps and
assorted nuts; as well as fresh fruit.
Although it?s tempting to make the most
of the extensive offering and eat and drink
businesstraveller.com
for the whole flight, this was landing in the
early morning in Singapore; so I was keen to
get a few hours? sleep.
On request, the flight attendants come
into the suite and lower the bed from
the side wall, put a mattress topper on it,
prepare the pillows and then the duvet on
top. Once you get into the bed there are
some thoughtful touches such as a lever by
the side of the bed allowing one end to be
raised so you can read in bed and watch
the television in comfort, then lowered to
horizontal when it?s time to sleep. The bed
is 76 inches long, so most flyers will have
enough room.
There is a separate headphone jack by
the side of the bed, and the lights by the
side of the bed are easy to use with pre-sets
including off, night, low, medium and high.
There?s also a Do Not Disturb button and a
call button, and if you like you can raise the
window blinds during the flight.
The safety belt for the bed goes across
your chest and I found this troublesome,
partly because it?s difficult to find the slot to
secure it into, and also because it is quite
tight across your chest, so much so that I
found it a struggle to turn over because I
was almost secured to the mattress. This is
a good thing for safety, perhaps, though not
if passengers decide to undo it during the
night because it?s uncomfortable.
I slept for a few hours and then watched
films on the IFE system ? the 32-inch
screen is high definition, and the Bose
noise-cancelling headphones make it a very
pleasant experience.
About two-and-a-half hours before
landing we were offered breakfast. There
was a wide choice including seafood noodle
soup, citrus French toast, masala dosa,
murgh keema (spicy minced chicken), or
eggs ? baked, scrambled or hard boiled.
A R R I V A L We landed ahead of schedule,
and there were no delays in disembarking.
I was quickly out into Changi Terminal 3.
V E R D I C T It?s hard to see how these
suites could be bettered. There is lots of
room, plenty of storage space, impressive
food and drink, superb service, and a
comfortable seat and separate bed. The first
100MB of wifi is free, and there are several
power points for keeping things charged.
If you?ve flown much on an A380 you
are likely to have been impressed by
how smooth and quiet it is on board, and
nowhere more so than at the front in one of
these suites. Simply excellent. Tom Otley
WHAT ?S NEW
The luxurious first class suites in
the new A380s.
WHAT ?S NOT
Not all the A380s are new but they
are all gradually being refitted to
this new configuration.
BEST FOR
Privacy, comfort, space, excellent
food and drink and great service.
PRICE
Internet rates for a return first
class suite from London to
Singapore in mid-June ranged
between �014 and �914.
FLIGHT TIME
13 hours 5 minutes
CONTACT
singaporeair.com
M AY 2 0 1 8
83
TRIED AND TESTED LONDON HOTELS
Amba Marble Arch
W H A T ? S I T L I K E ? This
84
BEST FOR
692-room hotel, close to Marble
Arch tube station and Hyde
Park, rebranded as an Amba in
2015 (it was previously a Thistle).
GLH, which runs this Amba and
another above Charing Cross
station, is London?s biggest hotel
group with six brands including
Guoman, Thistle and Every. GLH
has more than 5,000 rooms in 17
London locations, plus 130 event
spaces.
The art deco fa鏰de is
distinctive, but inside it?s a mishmash of old woods and new
furnishings (more modernisation
is being considered). A lift brings
guests up to reception from the
ground floor concierge.
My studio apartment
(one of 31) had a sofa and
kitchenette beyond the Smart
TV that followed the curving
window. The room contained
a Nespresso machine and free
minibar. Alongside a bedside
Ipad (with free wifi) were several
modern London landmark
artworks. The bathroom had two
showers in a bath with gels, and
I slept well in the double bed.
many nationalities. The Deli to
the right of reception serves
drinks and snacks, and you
can order food to your room
(I ordered a pizza one evening,
�). Another key attribute is
the bulk of services ? not only
the food, bar and reception but
also 15 meeting spaces ? are
all on the same floor, while you
can find an executive lounge
and gym on the second floor.
Staff were helpful.
F A C I L I T I E S The Grill?s
buffet breakfast was
comprehensive and busy with
V E R D I C T Decent four-star
option in a popular location.
Dominic Ellis
M AY 2 0 1 8
First floor convenience.
DON?T MISS
The Grill?s power
breakfast.
PRICE
From �9 per night
in June inclusive of
breakfast.
CONTACT
Bryanston Street, W1H
7EH; 0800 330 8523;
amba-hotel.com/
marble-arch
The May Fair Hotel
W H A T ? S I T L I K E ? Tucked
away in Mayfair near Green
Park tube, the May Fair (sic) is
a classy five-star hotel. It first
opened in 1927, and these days
needs little introduction to Arab
travellers; our stay coincided
with Crown Prince Mohammed
bin Salman?s official visit and
the hotel was holding Saudi
investment-related meetings.
The Family Rooms and
Studio Suites (44/45 sqm) are
spacious for central London,
and I was lucky to experience
a Studio Suite for one night ?
complete with large TV, lounge
area and vast bathroom. I last
visited two years ago and the
�0-million refurbishment
carried out in 2006 appears to
be wearing well.
Not many hotels boast a
royal plaque in reception. In
addition, the hotel recently
announced a year-long
partnership with fashion
designer Emilia Wickstead
? who will add ?bespoke
touchpoints? ? to mark its 10th
year as The Official Hotel of
London Fashion Week.
F A C I L I T I E S The private
cinema is the most unexpected
feature, but my favourite space
remains the intimate May Fair
Terrace, which can be hired
for events. I went up to have
a look at the opulent 200 sqm
Penthouse where you can see the
London Eye from the terrace,
and there are seven themed
suites (Saffron, Opium, Amber,
Amarillo, Schiaparelli, Azure and
Ebony) and three duplex suites.
The May Fair Kitchen served
up a decent breakfast, and I
took a seat by the window as
the tide of commuters made
their way to work.
V E R D I C T Spacious suites
and good range of facilities.
Dominic Ellis
BEST FOR
Luxurious city centre
hospitality.
DON?T MISS
A drink on the roof
terrace.
PRICE
From �6 per night in
June; suites typically
double this price.
CONTACT
Stratton Street, W1J
8LT; +44 20 7769 4041;
themayfairhotel.co.uk
businesstraveller.com
TRIED AND TESTED PERTH HOTEL
BEST FOR
Como
The Treasury,
Perth
B A C K G R O U N D In the centre of Perth
(Western Australia), at the point from which all
distances in Perth are measured, the Como Hotel
is part of a multi-million pound refurbishment
of the 19th-century State Buildings by
Perth property developer Adrian Fini of FJM
Property. The buildings formerly served as a
post office, land titles office and treasury. After
lying empty for 20 years, the restoration has
created the hotel behind the grand Victorianera fa鏰de as well as several restaurants, bars
and high-end shops set around an arcade.
Como Hotels is a small group of luxury fivestar properties, including The Metropolitan
hotels in London, Miami and Bangkok.
W H E R E I S I T ? On the corner of St
Georges Terrace and Barrack Street in the
Perth central business district opposite
Stirling and Supreme Court Gardens, about
a 20-minute drive from the airport.
W H A T ? S I T L I K E ? A liveried doorman
greets guests at the main entrance, which
is opposite the West door of St George?s
Cathedral and features flamboyant NeoRenaissance style columns and cantilevered
balconies. The restoration project has
returned 95 per cent of the buildings to
their 19th-century origins, including the reinstallation of dormer windows and Victorian
roofs finished with copper trimmings.
The ?Guest Arrival Lounge? is to the right in
one of several elegant rooms on the ground
floor, which then merges through a series of
open doorways into the Treasury Lounge and
Bar with artworks from Art Collective WA,
illustrations on the bar walls from the Cape
Arid art collection and lighting by Flynn Talbot
and Brendan van Hek.
R O O M S The 48 rooms and suites over four
floors are former offices and are generously
sized with high ceilings. Designed by Kerry
Hill to create a sense of serenity and a home
away from home, they are decorated in a soft,
cocooning palette: beiges, whites, limed oak
furniture, pale travertine, with bronze and
leather trims. The grey-greens are reminiscent
businesstraveller.com
The huge rooms,
luxury furnishings
and large range of
food and beverage
options coupled with
great service.
DON?T MISS
of the colours found in the landscapes of
Western Australia.
There are handcrafted modern European
furnishings, beds with sheets of Egyptian
cotton, large windows, complimentary
private bar replenished daily, Samsung LED
television/IPTV, multi-line VOIP phones
with voicemail, laptop-size private safe,
multimedia hub, in-room technology with
dual built-in USB ports, and complimentary
wifi. Rooms also have Illy coffee and tea
making facilities, large windows, which can
be opened, electronic sheers and blackout
blinds or curtains. The bathrooms have
Rooms are
designed by
Kerry Hill to
create a sense
of serenity
and a home
away from
home
Taking a swim in the pool
? it?s not rooftop but feels
like it ? and dining in the
Wildflower restaurant.
PRICE
From �0 per night in
June; �8 for a suite.
CONTACT
Como The Treasury, 1
Cathedral Avenue, Perth;
+61 8 6168 7888
comohotels.com/
thetreasury
85
showers and Kaldewei Duo bathtubs, twin
vanities, travertine stone tiles, heated floors
and towel rails, and aromatherapy-based
Como Shambhala at Home amenities.
Rooms range in size from entry-level City
Rooms, an average of 55 sqm, to the 120
sqm of the Como Suite.
cocktails and bar snacks. In the basement
is Long Chim, where you?ll find Thai dishes
from renowned chef David Thompson.
F O O D A N D D R I N K Post, the former
General Post Office, is now an all-day
osteria serving Italian food. Wildflower,
located on the top floor, serves fine Western
Australian cuisine. It is an outstanding
venue for an evening meal. The wider
development also includes several excellent
options including Petition Kitchen, while
Petition Wine Bar & Merchant and Beer
Corner serve everything from local beers to
L E I S U R E A small but light-filled gym is
located on one of the upper floors and there
is also a 20-metre swimming pool with
views out onto the surrounding streets. The
spa is a Como Shambhala Urban Escape.
M E E T I N G S There are several good
spaces for meetings including the
boardroom for up to 20 guests.
V E R D I C T This hotel is outstanding.
Despite its central location, there is a
feeling of serenity and luxury. Worth the
expense. Tom Otley
M AY 2 0 1 8
T R I E D AN D T E S T E D LO N D O N R E S TAU R A N T S
GREAT
Roganic
?THE OTHER
NAUGHTY PIGLET
Usefully placed
between Victoria and
Westminster, this
theatre wine bar serves
tasty small plates and
excellent wines.
theothernaughty
piglet.co.uk
This is chef Simon Rogan?s latest attempt to crack
the London market after the unanimous acclaim
of his restaurant in the Lake District, L?Enclume.
It has many of his signature approaches: foraging,
fermentation, molecular cooking and multi-course
menus of small plates. The high prices make it
a temple of gastronomy best suited to special
occasions and celebrations, yet the dining room
is modest, the service casual.
Highlights of our six-course meal included
appetisers of fermented raspberry tart, tender
sous-vide pork, and plenty of surprises along the
way such as little parcels of raw beef wrapped in
thin slivers of kohlrabi. There are various menu
options, starting at a � business lunch up to
�5 for the tasting menu; the latter has the option
of paired wines for an additional � per head.
These prices are excluding service, so dinner can
easily top �0 per person.
86
Brat
WINE BARS
The City of London?s stratospherically high
restaurant bills have been edging steadily
eastwards for some time, and Brat is the
fashionable restaurant capitalising on diners who
think nothing of spending � on a whole turbot.
But despite the prices, this is a friendly, bohemian
place, set in one of Shoreditch?s repurposed
workshops. There?s as much focus on the wines as
the food, and it even calls itself a ?wood grill and
wine bar?; there?s a long bar (no reservations), plus
more seating at shared tables for diners with the
foresight to book online. Basque-style small plates
might include rabbit, blood sausage and beans,
or langoustines cooked on the wood-fired grill;
the same grill that?s used for cooking many of the
dishes, from beef chop (� for the large version)
to Dover sole (�). The wines are supplied by the
team behind Noble Rot wine bar, and are expertly
chosen; the selection by the glass is exemplary.
VERDICT For City diners who are looking for
something a little more interesting than the usual
corporate haunts, this retro-looking dining room
has bags of charm, and good cooking that belies
its humble appearance. Guy Dimond
?VINOTECA
A small chain of
wine bars with an
uncommonly wellchosen selection of
wines by the glass.
The large branch at
King?s Cross is worth
a detour for its
outdoor terrace.
vinoteca.co.uk
VERDICT Chef Simon Rogan?s best venture in the
Big Smoke so far, though it doesn?t approach
the sublime experience that makes L?Enclume
in the Lake District one of the best restaurants in
the UK ? and the world. Guy Dimond
PRICE
CONTACT
Tue-Sat 12-2pm,
6.30-10pm.
Six-course set
lunch, � per
head; tasting
menu, �5 per
head.
5-7 Blandford
Street, W1U 3DB;
+44 (0)20 3370
6260;
roganic.uk
GUY DIMOND
HOURS
M AY 2 0 1 8
?THE WINEMAKERS
CLUB
This series of
archways below
Holborn Viaduct
has been turned
into a wonderfully
atmospheric curiosity.
thewinemakersclub.
co.uk
HOURS
PRICE
CONTACT
Tue-Wed noon3pm, 6-10pm;
Thur-Sat noon3pm, 6-11pm; Sun
1pm-8pm.
Meal for two with
wine and service,
around �0.
First floor, 4
Redchurch
Street, E1 6JL;
bratrestaurant.
com
FULL RE VIEWS AND MUCH MORE ON BUSINESSTRAVELLER .COM
businesstraveller.com
St. Ermin?s Hotel, 2 Caxton Street,
London SW1H OQW +44 (0) 207 222 7888
www.sterminshotel.co.uk
sterminshotel
Talk shop, then
hit the shops
Business stays like
87
SEE THE LATEST
NEWS AND
REVIEWS
YOUTUBE half page.indd 9
16/03/2018 12:37
SMART TR AVELLER
Card, document and
phone security
How to minimise the risk and impact of theft while travelling
T
heft, especially credit card and
identity theft, has been a longstanding problem for business
travellers abroad. BeTravelwise,
a UK-based travel risk management
organisation, deems petty non-violent crime
to be one of the most common risks business
travellers face. According to Financial Fraud
Action, lost and stolen credit cards cost
UK cardholders �.3m in 2016, while
counterfeit card fraud cost �.9m. So how
can you avoid falling victim to it?
88
own wording ? ?Only for hotel registration
purposes?, for example ? across the page, to
deter identity theft.
PHONE SECURITY
Pickpockets target expensive-looking mobile
phones. In countries with high street crime such
as Brazil or South Africa, it can make sense to
use a cheap local phone and SIM while there
and keep your valuable phone back at the hotel
or well hidden, not brandishing it in public.
Before leaving, make sure you back up your
mobile phone. Iphone users should also set the
MAKE COPIES
inbuilt ?Find My Iphone? function to work (via
Theft or loss of credit cards and other
Settings: Your Name: Icloud: Find My Iphone:
important documents can happen no matter on), so that you can erase the information
how careful you are. One of the best ways of
on it remotely if you need to, as soon as your
reducing stress and inconvenience if this does phone either has service or is connected to wifi.
happen is to make paper copies of important This can be done by signing into Icloud via an
documents, travel and financial, before leaving internet browser, finding your phone under
home. These usually include passport, credit ?All Devices? and selecting ?Erase Iphone?. As
cards, driving licence, hotel reservations and
for Android devices, there are free apps such
insurance documents. Seasoned travellers
as ?Find My Device? (on the Google Play app
recommend making two copies of each ? one store) that work in a similar way ? but make
to take with you, and the other to leave at
sure you install them first. If your phone does go
home with a family member or colleague.
missing, call your phone provider immediately
When making copies of passports or
so they can trace or block it.
emailing/faxing them, some travellers
suggest adding a watermark to the document D I V E R S I F Y Y O U R A S S E T S
Do not keep all of your money or documents
for added security. Microsoft Word has a
in one place. Many travellers advise stowing
watermark function, and you can add your
cash and cards
separately. Others
suggest taking one
credit/payment card
out with you
and keeping the
others in the hotel
safe. Storing cash in
concealed pockets on
your person is also a
good idea.
OUTSMART THE THIEVES
Among the measures you can take to prevent
petty theft from happening, there are also
ways to outsmart your assailant in the event
that it does. ?Skimming? credit cards is
the practice where your card is taken out
of your sight for a minute or so, read by a
special electronic reader, and cloned before
being returned to you. The simple solution
to this is to not let the card out of your
sight ? admittedly that?s not always as easy
as it sounds. Some travellers recommend
scratching the CCV codes off the back
of credit cards to render them useless to
criminals who steal cards. Either remember
the final three-digit code or write it down and
store it in a safe, separate spot.
An old trick that is simple, but effective
is to carry a fake wallet to hand over
during a robbery. One could even fill it
with out-of-date credit cards to make the ruse
all the more convincing.
Another tried and trusted tactic is to
conceal valuables in a money belt underneath
your clothing.
BE AWARE
Above all, being aware of your surroundings
is key to staying safe as a business traveller.
This includes the standard warnings of
avoiding dark, unpopulated streets and
ignoring strangers who might try to harass
you, even if the strangers appear to be well
dressed and sophisticated.
Most importantly, know the local
emergency phone numbers. Although the
European Commission advocates 112 as
an emergency phone number across the
European Union, some countries in the
EU have their own numbers (in the UK it is
999, for example). In the US the emergency
number is 911. Olivia Hultgren
To join the discussion on travel precautions, visit
businesstraveller.com/forum.
M AY 2 0 1 8
businesstraveller.com
T !
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From the archive
1983
Bull fighting, gentlemen?s clubs
and communism in Poland
90
SOME THINGS
NEVER CHANGE.
Our cover story for
May 1983 was about
the horrors of being a
business traveller who
is also an anxious flyer.
Boeing had released
figures showing that
one in every six adult
Americans had aerophobia,
and over several pages the
phenomenon was examined, with
helpful advice offered alongside case
studies. The tales are timeless, though
thankfully, in the intervening 35 years,
aviation safety has improved.
The suggestion
to see bull fighting
in Spain probably
dates the piece
Another piece by Ian Wooldridge looked
at how it might be possible to organise a
work itinerary so you could ?hit the hi
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