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Ladybug - May 2018

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Can you find 7 dragons playing
while Mr. Scaly reads the newspaper?
art © 2018 by Raffaella Bolaffio
Art by Raf faella
Bolaf f io
Answer on page 35.
I Spy
2
e o ut for us!
Keep an ey
We are go ing to roll
t
h
h
i
s
g
u
m
o
r
h
agazine w
t
ith yo u!
Max and Kate
Art by Brita Granström
Story by Mick Manning
Kate, Max, and Charlie are at the garden center
with Kate’s grandma. They are helping her choose
plants for a butterfly garden.
3
Kate picks out a butterfly bush. Charlie likes the
tall hollyhocks. Max chooses a globe thistle. “It's
prickly!” he says.
4
Hi!
They plant the flowers in Grandma's garden, and
they wait. “Where are all the butterflies?” asks Kate.
“They have to find us!” says her grandma.
5
Will this bring
the butterflies?
“I have an idea!” says Kate. Grandma helps her
make a sign for the garden.
“Great!” says Grandma. “Now let's go in for lunch.”
6
Well, there’s your
answer!
Later, they come outside and see lots of butterflies!
“Wow, your sign worked,” says Max with a laugh.
“And butterflies don’t seem to mind the prickles!”
7
Still Water Adventure
by Janet Gingold
Art by Julianna Swaney
clouds in the water!”
“Yes,” Daddy whispered, “the lake is so still
it’s like a mirror. When you jump on the dock it
makes ripples.”
The spreading ripples rumpled the cloud
pictures. Sophie stopped jumping. The ripples
vanished. Perfect clouds reappeared.
8
art © 2018 by Julianna Swaney
“Daddy!” Sophie shouted. “Look! There are
“Can we go in the canoe? Can I paddle?”
Sophie whispered.
“Yes.” Daddy smiled. He held out the
life jacket for her.
Sophie put on her jacket. Daddy clipped
her straps together.
“You get the front seat,” said Daddy.
The canoe wobbled when Sophie stepped in,
sending new waves across the lake.
Sophie sat quietly. The water was
still again. Daddy handed her a
paddle and showed her how to hold it.
Smoothly, he sat in the back seat and
pushed the canoe away from the dock.
“Let’s see how quiet we can be,”
he said.
9
Sophie dipped her paddle in the water. It gurgled
and splashed and banged against the canoe.
“Oops. Too loud.” Sophie giggled. She watched her
father slice the water silently with his paddle. Tiny
ripples spread out behind them as the canoe cut
through the water.
With a silky rustle, the canoe slid over a crowd of
green, heart-shaped leaves. They swirled in gentle
circles when she dipped her paddle. Peering over the
side, Sophie saw stringy stems tying each heart to
the pebbly bottom. Among the leaves, yellow
blossoms smiled at the sun.
10
The canoe glided away
from the lilies. A dragonfly
landed on Sophie’s paddle.
“Hello, Rainbow Wing,”
she said. It wiggled its tail
and flew away.
Sophie paddled as quietly
as she could.
“Let’s just float near the
shore,” said Daddy.
Sophie took a big breath
when a turtle plopped off a
log into the lake. Its short legs
stroked through the clear water.
When its head popped up
beside the canoe, Sophie
saw red and yellow stripes
on its neck. She looked deep
into its shiny black eye.
“You have four paddles.
We just have two,” she said.
She leaned closer to look at its
toes. The turtle disappeared
beneath the still surface.
11
“Look!” Daddy whispered. “A heron!”
The tall bird in the shallows stretched
its long, curved neck. It blinked a clear
yellow eye at Sophie. Sophie stretched
her neck and blinked back.
“I’m Sophie. Who are you?”
With powerful flaps of its great, grey
wings, the heron rose above them. It
folded its neck between its shoulders.
Its long legs pointed straight behind.
Too soon, it disappeared over the trees
on the far side of the lake.
“Oh, Daddy, was I too loud? Will it
come back?”
12
“Maybe it was time for it to go home. It’s time for
us to go home, too. We can come again tomorrow.”
Sophie placed her paddle in the water and pulled.
She watched little whirlpools float away. Water dripped
from her paddle, drawing tiny circles inside the big
circle carved by the canoe when they turned homeward.
The clouds glowed pink and golden.
Sophie’s mother waved from the shore. Daddy
guided the canoe back to its place beside the dock.
“Mommy! We saw clouds and flowers and a
dragonfly and a turtle and the hugest heron, all in
one day! Tomorrow, you can come, too. But,” she
whispered, “you have to be very, very quiet!”
13
Can you do this?
I’m
Goldfish
o ra
ng e
O
as a pu
mpkin
by Cathy Cronin
Art by Linda Hill Griffith
rt
he
sun
sh
ine’s golden ray.
My body
shines and
shimmers.
I love to splash
and play.
14
I watch you a
s yo
uw
at
c
h
m
e.
We both stare
eye to eye.
With puckered lips,
I blow a kiss
yt
m
h
s
And swi
ye!
goodb
ai l
15
Best Friend
by Claire Boiko
Art by Dawn Beacon
He never criticizes me,
He’s always close at hand,
When I am out of sorts or sad,
He seems to understand.
He doesn’t give me good advice,
Or tell me not to fail,
But gives my hand a sticky lick,
And wags his little tail.
16
17
QQ QQ Q
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wag-on,
paint-ed blue;
paint-ed blue;
skip to my Lou;
skip to my Lou;
Q Q QQ QQ
Q Q QQ QQQ
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Q Q Q Q QQ Q Q
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art © 2018 by Diane Ewen
Lit - tle red wag-on,
Lit - tle red
Lou, Lou,
Lou, Lou,
Skip to my Lou, my
Lit - tle red wag-on,
Skip to my Lou, my
Lou, Lou,
dar-ling.
paint-ed blue;
dar- ling.
Q
Q
Q
Q
18
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
24
&2
& 42
& 24
&4
skip to my Lou;
A Traditional Song ø Art by Diane Ewen
Skip to My Lou
19
Do Veggies Smile?
My mom and I planted these veggies
in the community garden.
by Vin Vogel
plants!
lI ove
vegg
I love ies!
T he
y are colorful!
They taste good!
Cool!
Mom says that talking to
plants helps them grow.
Do you think
plants smile?
Does talking to them
make them happy?
I think
they do!
text and art © 2018 by Vin Vogel
20
text © 2018 by Storme Maynard, art © 2018 by Ramona Kaulitzki
Flitter Dee Dee
by Storme Maynard
Art by Ramona Kaulitzki
Flitter, flutter,
see the butterfly go flitting by.
Oops-a-diddle!
sings a fiddle
out across the sky.
Flitter up, diddle down,
dizzy spirals all around,
a giddy airborne dance-a-round,
flitter, flutter, fly!
21
Flutter to the Flower
Art by Jannie Ho
This butterfly wants to rest in a beautiful blossom.
With your finger, trace its path to the flower.
art © 2018 by Jannie Ho
22
Dragon in My Wagon
by Sheila Kerwin ★ Art by Daniel Griffo
text © 2018 by Sheila Kerwin, art © 2018 by Daniel Griffo
Come meet Deegan, my purple pet dragon!
He loves taking rides in my little red wagon.
He’s a good, loyal friend, dappled and dandy.
He doesn’t breathe fire, he puffs cotton candy!
23
Dragons
in the Garden
by Melanie Leavey
Art by Stephanie Roth
One sunny afternoon in June, Lionel was digging
up dinosaur bones in the garden.
“Lionel!” called his mother from the kitchen
window. “It’s bath time. Come inside and please
don’t dawdle!”
“But, Mom! I’ve just discovered a new dinosaur.
I don’t have time for a bath.”
“NOW!” his mother said, closing the window.
“Humph,” mumbled Lionel. “Who has time for
a bath? I don't want a bath.” He started up the garden
path. He was so busy grumbling, he almost didn’t see
the little bear sitting on an overturned flowerpot.
“Hello,” said the bear. “Why are you so grumpy?”
“Because I have to take a bath!” said Lionel.
“H’m,” said the bear, examining his toenails.
“Bears don’t take baths. We prefer to be dirty.”
“So do I,” said Lionel with a sigh. “But my
mother thinks I should be clean. What are you
doing in our garden?”
24
“Nothing much,” said the bear. “I was thinking
of digging for dinosaur bones.” He hopped off the
flowerpot.
“Try the vegetable patch,” said Lionel. “I discovered
a new one beside the cabbages.”
“Lionel!” called his mother. “Where are you? Your
bathwater is getting cold!”
“But, Mom! I’m talking to a bear. He says bears
don’t take baths. He says . . .”
25
“Enough, Lionel!” said his mother. “Bath! Now!”
The window slammed shut.
“Guess you’d better go,” said the bear. “Thanks for
the tip, though.” He wandered off toward the cabbages.
Lionel spun around, grumbling again. That was
when he tripped over the elephant.
“Hey! Watch where you’re
going!” squeaked a voice.
“Sorry. I didn’t see you
there,” said Lionel. “You’re
awfully small for an
elephant.”
“That, my grubby
friend, is because I am a
GARDEN elephant,” said
the elephant.
“Oh,” said Lionel,
puzzled. “I didn’t realize . . .”
“No, no, I’m sure you
didn’t,” said the elephant.
“Now run along. I’ve no time
to be chatting with a clumsy
little boy.” He peered at Lionel.
“And such a dirty one at that.” He
flapped his ears and stomped toward the azaleas.
26
“Wait!” called Lionel. “Do garden elephants
have to take baths?”
“Baths? Don’t be foolish!” replied the
elephant with an impatient wave of his
trunk. “Everyone knows that elephants
shower!” He disappeared into the
shrubbery.
Lionel sighed again.
“LIONEL FREDERICK
FITZGERALD!” called
his mother. “If you’re not
in here in two seconds . . .”
“Coming, Mom! I was
just asking the garden
elephant . . .”
“Garden elephant? Really,
Lionel, this is too much!
Into the tub NOW!”
The windowpane rattled.
Lionel decided it was a
good idea to walk faster. He
reached the kitchen door and
sat down to take off his
muddy sandals, also a good
idea, he thought.
27
“Bath time again?” asked a dragon. He was
sunning himself under the kitchen window,
picking his teeth with a twig.
“Yes,” said Lionel with another big sigh. (He sighed
a lot at bath time.) “I suppose dragons never have to
take a bath?”
“Nope,” came the reply.
“Water and dragons don’t
mix. Puts the fire out. No,
my young friend, we
just steam the dirt off.”
“Of course you
do.” Lionel thought
for a moment. “I
don’t suppose you’d
consider giving me a
steaming?” he asked
hopefully.
“Sorry, old chum.
Much too hot. You
need scales for that.
Besides, I think your
mother is going to give you
one if you don’t hurry up.”
28
“All right, all right! Don’t you start, too,” said
Lionel. “Anyway, you’ll be in worse trouble
if you eat any more of her marigolds.”
“Humph!” the dragon gave a snort.
“I was only having a little nibble.”
“LIONEL!” shouted his mother.
“Who on earth are you talking to
out there? Never mind. Get upstairs
right this minute. The water
will be ice-cold by now.”
“But, Mom!” said Lionel
as he went inside. “Maybe I
could steam myself clean like
dragons do.”
“Good grief, Lionel! There are no
such things as dragons.” She marched
him toward the stairs.
“But I was just talking to one! And a
bear and a garden elephant! And none of them
take baths! I really don’t see why . . .”
“Lionel.” His mother gave him a look. Lionel
knew that look. He sighed one last time.
“I know, I know. I’m a kid, and kids have to
take baths.”
29
Lionel looked back toward the garden. The
dragon appeared in the kitchen window, smiling
through a mouthful of marigolds. He blew a cheery
puff of steam and winked.
Lionel grinned. He waved at the dragon and
dashed up the stairs.
“Mom! Can I have bubbles? If dragons took
baths, I’m sure they’d have bubbles!”
30
Dragon Puppet
Art by Steliyana Doneva
What You’ll Need:
construction paper and/or markers
toilet paper roll
scissors
2 googly eyes or buttons
2 large pompoms or cotton balls
2 small pompoms or round stickers
paper streamers
glue
hole punch
craft stick or unsharpened pencil
What to Do:
1. With a grownup, cut a piece of construction
paper large enough to cover the roll. Glue it on.
You could also color the roll with markers.
2. Glue one googly eye or button to each
large pompom or cotton ball. Now glue
these eyes in place on your puppet.
3. Glue the small pompoms, or nostrils, in
place. You could also use stickers for nostrils.
4. Cut the streamers into 6 or 7 strips. Each
strip can be 1/2 inch wide and 6 to 12 inches
long. Glue strips inside the bottom of the roll.
No
ai
w
e
l
h
e
t
t
?
or
h fire
blo your
ug
o
r
drag
w
e
on puppet swirl th
th
thr
rea
oug
b
h it.
it
Can you make
r
5. Use a hole punch or scissors to make a hole
in the bottom of the puppet. Push the craft
stick or unsharpened pencil through the hole.
art © 2018 by Steliyana Doneva
31
H
I’ll lookety-l
oo
an d fin k ev
d a er yw
here —
fos
sil i
n my han d!
l to mo ve the r
ho ve rocks an d ubble,
s
san d!
my es an d
s
’
n
o
e
er d st
n
a
d
d
u
l
e
M
,
,
&
g
u
T
b
h
y
u
d
a
d
L
Muddle, how did you get
interested in these digs?
What are
fossils?
My friend Rosalie
took me on one!
She knows all about
rocks and fossils.
Fossils show us what plants and
animals looked like a LONG time ago—
more than ten thousand years ago!
We can learn a lot
by digging around.
We have to be
careful, though.
Really old things
are very delicate.
32
by John Sandford
We brush away the dirt and stones, and we go slowly.
sniff. Uh, UH, ahSniff,
This takes
patience.
Ladybug, you
are a natural
fossil finder!
Look at
that!
That was a dino-sized sneeze!
33
The Rose
by Monica A. Andermann
Art by Cindy Revell
Rose knows
to bloom
in early June.
She likes to
open up her buds
and hear the robin’s tune.
34
art © 2018 by Cindy Revell
Answer to puzzle on page 2. Did
you find all 7 playful dragons?
4
3
James M. O’Connor, Director of Editorial; Kathleen Andersen, Associate Editor; Maria Hlohowskyj, Assistant Editor; Suzanne
Beck, Senior Art Director; Shavan Spears, Designer; Kristen Scribner, Digital Art Director; John Sandford, Artist, LADYBUG
bugs; David Stockdale, Permissions Specialist. May/June 2018, Volume 28, Number 8, Copyright © 2018, Carus Publishing
dba Cricket Media. Editorial Office, 70 East Lake Street, Suite 800, Chicago, IL 60601. All rights reserved, including right of
reproduction in whole or in part, in any form. Not associated with LADYBIRD Books, Inc. For information regarding our privacy
policy and compliance with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, please visit our website at cricketmedia.com or
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submission guidelines and submit manuscripts online at cricketmag.submittable.com.
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7
6
Grateful acknowledgment is given to the following publishers and copyright owners for permission to reprint selections
from their publications. All possible care has been taken to trace ownership and secure permission for each selection. Cover
art © 2007 by Mike Wohnoutka; “Goldfish,” art © 2012 by Linda Hill Griffith; “Best Friend,” art © 2011 by Dawn Beacon; 20
(bkg) - Attitude/Shutterstock.com; “Dragons in the Garden,” art © 2007 by Stephanie Roth, 24 (LC) Avene/Shutterstock.com,
(inset) Anna Poguliaeva/Shutterstock.com; “Molly and Emmett” text and art © 1992 by Marylin Hafner.
Check out our online Teacher Guides at
cricketmedia.com/teacher-resources.
Printed in the United States of America.
art © 2015 by Ian Joven
1st printing Quad/Graphics Midland, Michigan
April 2018
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To subscribe, call Customer Service at
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35
Molly and Emmett
I’m planting a vegetable
garden today, Em.
Volume 28
Number 8
cricketmedia.com
We’ll have radishes
and peas
and beans
and carrots
and . . .
$6.95
I thought I was
helping!
Oh,
Emmett!
Never mind, Em. It will
be more fun not to know
what’s growing.
Cover art by Mike Wohnoutka
May/June 2018
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