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Photography Week - 26 April 2018

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t h e w o r l d ’ s b e s t-s e l l i n g d i g i t a l p h o t o m a g a z i n e
26 A pr il-2 M Ay
i s s ue 292
inspir at ion ide a s in-dep th re v iews
X MArks
the
spot
we put FujiFilm’s new Flagship
X-h1 through its paces
W
e
l
c
o
m
e
JOIN THE CLUB...
Welcome to the world’s
No.1 weekly digital
photography magazine.
If you’re already a
reader, thanks for your continued
support and involvement; if you’re
new to Photography Week, you’ve
come to the right place! In addition
to expert advice, brilliant tips and
step-by-step tutorials, every issue
features interactive galleries of the
best new photos, how-to videos on
essential shooting and editing
techniques, and in-depth reviews
of the latest camera kit.
But that’s not the whole story.
Photography Week is more than
a magazine – it’s a community
of like-minded people who are
passionate about photography.
To get involved, just follow any
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We’re more than just a magazine – read on and discover the many
ways you can interact with and enjoy Photography Week
CONTENTS
Find out what’s inside this issue
NEWS
sigma lenses for sony
Art-series lenses for E-Mount
cameras to start shipping in May
F E AT U R E
Just add water
Top tips for capturing stunning
seascapes and coastal scenes
PHOTOS
gallery
Our pick of the best reader
images from around the world
F E AT U R E
I N S P I R AT I O N
PHOTOS
I N S P I R AT I O N
side view from space
Angled satellite photos capture
amazing cityscapes and more
CRASH COURSE
feel the flour power
Learn how to set up and shoot
a dynamic ‘flour cloud’ portrait
PHOTOSHOP
get the perfect blend
Master blending modes to create
a cool double-exposure image
CRASH COURSE
GEAR
fuJifilm
X-h1 review
We put Fujifilm’s
new X-series
flagship through
its paces to see
what’s changed
from the X-T2
PHOTOSHOP
Jus t
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w h at ’ s h o t
The week’s Top headlines in phoTography
Sigma’S Sony E-mount art
lEnSES arE on thE way
Ditch the adapter: the seven prime optics will begin shipping in May
U
sers of sony full-frame
that optimizes the autofocus drive and
mirrorless cameras will soon
maximizes the data transmission speed.
have seven fabulous sigma
the lenses will be compatible with
respectively, and in July by the 14mm
F1.8 DG hsM | art at £1,679.99 and
135mm F1.8 DG hsM | art at £1,399.99.
as well as these initial seven lenses,
art lenses to choose from. Previously, if
sony’s Continuous aF (aF-C) and high-
you had a camera like the alpha a7 III or
speed aF, and will also be compatible
sigma will also be launching the 70mm
a7R III and wanted to use one of sigma’s
with in-camera image stabilization and
f/2.8 DG Macro|art and 105mm f/1.4 DG
latest prime optics you had to buy its
in-camera aberration correction.
hsM | art at a later date.
Canon-fit lenses and invest in its MC-11
the 35mm F1.4 DG hsM | art, 50mm
If you’ve already invested in sigma
adapter for sony cameras. But now
F1.4 DG hsM | art and 85mm F1.4 DG
lenses in Canon’s eF lens mount and are
sigma is releasing seven art lenses in
hsM | art will be the first to arrive, in
using these in conjunction with an MC-11
sony’s full-frame e-mount fitting.
May, priced at £799.99, £749.99 and
adapter, you might like to be reminded
£1,199.99 respectively – Us pricing was
about sigma’s Mount Conversion
to be confirmed at the time of writing.
service, which will enable you to have
sigma says the lenses will offer the
same high-performance optical design
as other lenses in the art line, although
these will be followed in June by the
the mount changed over to sony
the e-mount models will feature a
20mm F1.4 DG hsM | art and 24mm F1.4
e-mount – for more information contact
newly developed control algorithm
DG hsM | art, at £859.99 and £799.99
your sigma subsidiary or distributor.
f
Ben
Kapur
Part landscape
photographer, part
YouTuber, 25-year-old
Ben was recommended
to apply for this Shootout as he’s local to
the area, and enjoys
shooting landscapes and
seascapes on the Devon
and Dorset coastlines.
In addition to being armed
with the right tools for
long-exposure seascape
work, Ben came armed
with extra kit for recording
video, as he’s an avid
video blogger.
http://tiny.cc/7rqqsy
E
A
T
U
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E
Shoot
out!
South Devon coaSt
We head to sunny Devon to shoot
a couple of coastal gems with
two keen photographers,
strong ND filters and
second-hand Bronicas
at the ready…
paul
haigh
After a decade working
around the world as a
freelance photojournalist,
several years ago Paul
switched to teaching
photography on the
UK’s Jurassic Coast.
Experimenting with
analogue photography,
mixed media and DIY
camera construction,
Paul enjoys fusing
traditional techniques with
digital ones – as well as his
Nikon D300S, he brought
along his medium-format
film camera and iPhone
http://tiny.cc/5tqqsy
f
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challenge 1 Get full-on creative on the beach at beer
Ben Kapur
Costal photography and clear midday
skies generally aren’t good bedfellows.
Not only can empty blue skies
be (whisper it) a bit boring, but
the wide dynamic range – from
the glare on the sea to the
shadowy backlit foreground
– can make it a challenge
to record detail throughout the
scene in a single take. But those were
the conditions we faced on one of the
(rare) sunlit early spring days we were
treated to when we hauled up in Beer.
The village is situated on the
Jurassic Coast, with its sheltered
Kit Sony Alpha 7 II with Zeiss
24-70mm f/4 lens at 24mm
ExposurE 13 secs at f/13, ISO50
pebble beach facing Lyme Bay. While
it isn’t one of the big Jurassic Coast
photography draws like Durdle
Door or Kimmeridge Bay, Beer
has variety of subjects to
shoot, from prominent cliffs
and pebble shores to colourful
huts and boats that have been
winched onto the beach – so you
can end up using everything from a
telephoto to a macro lens.
Ben was drawn to the shapes
formed by the cliff and tideline, and,
noticing an approaching cloud bank,
set up his tripod and fitted an neutral
density filter in anticipation of using a
long exposure to blur the movement of
the waves and incoming clouds.
“Compositionally I think this image
works really well, but the exposure was
the tricky part,” he says. “As we were
shooting in the middle of the day, we
had very hard harsh sunlight to deal
with, and it’s always difficult to manage
the exposure when you have an image
that requires a lot of dynamic range.
“In the end, it was a waiting game
until the cloud came in line with the
sun to give a slightly softer light and
reduce the harshness of the shadows.”
e xper t opinion
• Despite the familiar technique, Ben
has successfully put his own stamp on
things here • The distinctive colour
effect adds mood and intrigue • Ben’s
done well to retain a hint of the clouds
here – burning them in more would
perhaps give a more balanced result.
f
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challenge 1 Get full-on creative on the beach at beer
paul haigh
Paul worked the beach at Beer
like a photographer on a mission.
Rather than opting for a classic
long-exposure view, he experimented
with the Lomography Neptune
convertible lens system we were
testing, as well as using his regular
Nikon DSLR, an iPhone and a film
camera. This image, ‘Beer, Bronica
and Boats’, is a great example of how
Paul was attempting to approach a
familiar scene in a fresh way.
“Looking for unusual viewpoints
and striking compositions, like getting
low to shoot fishing boats hauled up
the beach, appealed to me,” he says.
“But the early afternoon light was flat,
offering little in the way of contrast or
shadows, and I felt the image needed
something else.
“Someone donated a broken
Bronica to me, which I’ve been trying
to fix, and I wondered if the viewpoint
offered by the Bronica’s screen might
enhance the composition. Upping the
contrast and bringing the highlights
down a little on the raw file produced
this image.”
e xper t opinion
We admire Paul’s desire to produce
•something
different – and to lug around
the extra kit
The dark, dense
treatment ensures the
image on the bright
screen is the real
focus
Would resting the
camera on a bed of
purely pebbles have
worked better?
•
•
Kit Nikon D300S with 17-55mm f/2.8
lens at 55mm
ExposurE 1/640 sec at f/6.3, ISO400
f
E
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challenge 2 Shoot the StackS at ladram bay
Ben Kapur
After a break for lunch we decided
to mix things up a bit and try a
different location for the
afternoon session. Being the
most local member of the
group, Ben came up with
some suggestions, and after
seeing his previous shots of
the sea stacks at Ladram Bay
it was an easy decision to make
the short drive along the coast.
We arrived as the late afternoon
sun was striking the red rocks and
making both them and the gulls
lining them glow. We wasted
no time in setting up tripods
and fitting neutral-density
filters to help smooth the
surface of the sea.
“Having been to Ladram Bay
before, I knew the location well and
had a good idea of the compositions I
wanted to get,” explains Ben. “Superlong exposures work beautifully with
the sea stacks and can really enhance
the mood of the place, but the
sunlight was still relatively strong and
creating issues with contrast.
“One way of getting around this
is to shoot with a black-and-white
treatment in mind, and having shot
here before I knew this composition
would work well in monochrome.”
e xper t opinion
• The sidelighting brings out
the texture and form of the rock • Ben’s
put himself in just the right position to
centre the reflection in the frame • On
one hand it feels a shame to lose that
vibrant orange colour of the stack, but
the mono finish works a treat.
Kit Sony Alpha 7 II with Zeiss
24-70mm f/4 lens at 28mm
ExposurE 25 secs at f/11, ISO50
f
E
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T
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R
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challenge 2 Shoot the StackS at ladram bay
Kit Nikon D300S with 17-55mm f/2.8
lens at 17mm ExposurE 15 secs at
f/8, ISO100
SHOT OF THE DAY
paul haigh
It doesn’t have quite the same level
of variety in terms of subject matter
compared with Beer, but Ladram
Bay has some fine natural
architecture to explore with a
lens. Paul reached for a 10-stop
ND filter for this shot, captured
as the early evening light was
highlighting the stacks at the end
of the beach.
Paul says: “I crawled into a small
cave hollowed out of the cliff face.
Water cascaded over the entrance.
Using a Lee Big Stopper to extend the
length of the exposure, I composed
an image that I hoped would feature
both a misty waterfall and a smooth
seascape around the stack. Sadly
there wasn’t enough water
cascading over the entrance to
really show up as a substantial
misty trail, but I was pleased
with the composition.
“Using RNI’s Ilford Delta film
simulation preset for Lightroom
(reallyniceimages.com), I converted
the image to monochrome. I love
RNI’s film simulations: they’re about
the best I’ve tried, and the mobile app
works brilliantly too!”
e xper t opinion
Paul’s positioning reveals a useful framing device, and adds intrigue • The mono
•treatment
enhances the light pools • Revealing more or less of the vegetation at
the top would perhaps work better.
f
E
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get more at the Shore
Top tips for capturing striking seascapes and coastal scenes
1
2
high-contraSt optionS
Keep it freSh
Motion blur created by fitting a strong ND filter to the lens can
take the edge off glare on the sea – compare Ben’s image on
the previous page with the adjacent location shot. To retain more
detail in the sky a graduated ND filter could have been added
and angled to match the cliff, although shooting a second darker
shot to retain sky detail and blending the two exposures might
have been more preferable.
Take a leaf out of Paul’s book, and try something completely
different next time you visit a location you’re familiar with.
Perhaps set a slow shutter speed and intentionally move the
camera to create an abstract result. Try imposing restrictions
on yourself: only shoot with one focal length, or set a different
aspect ratio than you’d normally use. Or scour the online
auctions for cheap ‘experimental’ lenses you can try out.
3
3
3
long expoSureS
finD a frame
Shoot a vlog
A tedious aspect of using a square filter
system such as the Lee filters 100mm
range is screwing the adaptor ring off the
lens when you put your camera away,
then screwing it back on when you take it
out again. Lee, however, makes lens caps
that slip over the adaptor ring, so you can
leave it in place.
Using a foreground element to add
a frame to a shot, as Paul did in his
long-exposure image of Ladram Bay
on the previous page, has several
advantages. You can use it to fill
featureless areas or conceal distractions,
and to add context that gives your
pictures a better sense of place.
If you’re going to be putting in the time
to wait for the right light on location, why
not shoot some video clips and create
a movie to post on YouTube? It’s a great
way of attracting people to your social
media channels or website and getting
more exposure for your photography.
s
u
b
s
c
r
i
b
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SubScr ibe today and enjoy
Photogr aPhy week For
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G
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XPOSURE
The week’s mosT inspiring reader phoTos
Maker ChurCh in the snow
NICK TURLEY
“i couldn’t believe my luck when the winter storm dubbed ‘the beast from the
east’ arrived, bringing heavy snow to Cornwall in late February and early March.
the strong winds created a nice effect in this scene, as the drifting snow got
stuck to the sides of the trees and church. i applied a simple black and white
conversion to the image to make it look like a sketch.”
http://tiny.cc/rd3cpy
G
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L
E
R
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The week’s mosT inspiring reader phoTos
attraCted by the sun
ALfAbILE SANTANA
“i took this shot of three girls
doing yoga on a beach at Praia
brava de itajaí in southern
brazil during a wonderful
dawn. i took several photos,
but this one was special
because it looks like the girls
are being attracted by the sun,
and their reflections appear in
the waters of the lagoon.”
http://tiny.cc/nebosy
duCk drool
DoNALD P WhITE
“this is a mallard drake
that I photographed in the
old Pennsylvania Canal at
wildwood lake, harrisburg,
Pennsylvania.”
http://tiny.cc/h7rgsy
G
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R
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The week’s mosT inspiring reader phoTos
VenFord Falls
RICh WALKER
“i took this shot of the Venford Falls double waterfall on a trip to dartmoor in devon, uk.”
http://tiny.cc/bvrgsy
G
A
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L
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R
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The week’s mosT inspiring reader phoTos
dandelion Core
TEDDY ALfREY
“i photographed this dandelion in my wife’s garden in our backyard – apparently, i’m not so hot at weeding!”
http://tiny.cc/lyrgsy
PhotograPhy week wants your Photos!
fACEbooK
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taken a portrait you’re particularly proud of? shot a sensational sunset you’d like to
show off? then join the Photography Week Facebook community and share your best
photos today! you’ll get feedback from fellow readers and the Photography Week
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I T ’ S C O O L , T H AT
Images © 2018 Planet Labs, Inc. and licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0
The besT Thing we’ ve seen This week
these images aren’t your
everyday satellite photos
Angled images taken from 280 miles up offer amazing views of familiar locations
ost satellite imagery captures the
world from a top-down perpective,
and while these images have all
kinds of useful applications they can’t
convey a sense of height. Capture images
from 280 miles up in space at an angle,
however, and the images look very different,
with skyscrapers, mountains and other tall
features rising up out of the landscape to
create striking three-dimensional scenes.
Satellite imaging company Planet has
done just that, using its constellation of 13
M
SkySat satellites to shoot a series of
“experimental, off-angle images that capture
some of the world’s most stunning vertical
features”. Unlike most satellites, Planet’s are
able to photograph locations on Earth at an
angle, as well as from directly above.
Shown above are,. clockwise from
top-left, Shanghai, Houston, Doha in Qatar
and Riyadh in Saudi Arabia. Click the link to
see more amazing images, and read about
the featured locations, in a post by Planet’s
Robert Simmon at Medium.
see mor e im age s
h t t p: // t iny. cc /m 0 t r s y
S
K
I
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L
S
craSh courSe
ESSENTIAL PHOTO SKILLS MADE EASY
feel the
flour
power
Create explosive action
photos by adding a
simple ingredient.
James Paterson runs
through the recipe for
setting up and shooting
a ‘flour cloud’ portrait
Shooting a moving subject
like a dancer throws up
several challenges, not least
Hours
of which is trying to convey
that sense of graceful motion in a still
image. But something as simple as a
handful or flour can show off the action
in a wonderfully atmospheric way. The
fine white powder hangs in the air,
shifting with the action and creating
dusty whorls that catch the light. It also
makes an almighty mess, but that’s
certainly a price worth paying for the
extra flavour the flour gives the shoot.
In this tutorial we’ll explain how
to get set up and shoot your own
evocative flour action portraits.
Lighting plays a big part, and a three
flashgun set-up here gives us beautiful
backlighting that emphasises the
shape of the subject’s body and lifts
the flour. What’s more, you don’t even
need a studio – any decent-sized
space will do, and you could even
shoot outdoors on a dry night.
2
S
K
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L
S
STEP bY STEP JuST ADD fLOur
1
find a dark space
We need a dim environment and a dark
backdrop, so we shot in a private underground
car park. arrange dust sheets to minimise the
mess, but be aware that their colour might
affect the light; here the reflected light from the
blue material gave us an intentionally cool cast.
2
light the subject
our flashguns were positioned on light stands,
angled away from the backdrop to prevent spill,
and set to manual power. The front light was
fitted with a white shoot-through umbrella, the
back-left light with a silver umbrella and the
back-right one with a beauty dish.
3
set the exposure
We fired the flashguns using a wireless trigger
fitted to the camera and a receiver on one of
the flashguns; the others were set to optical
Slave mode. The camera was set to manual
with a shutter speed of 1/200 sec, then
we adjusted the aperture and ISo until the
exposure looked right.
Freezing with Flash
It’s not so much the shutter
speed that freezes the
motion here, it’s the flash
duration. When fired at full
power the duration may be
close to 1/200 sec, but at
1/16 power the duration will
shrink to around 1/8000 sec
or faster. So if you’re seeing
motion blur in your flash-lit
action shots lower the flash
power and bump up the ISo.
S
K
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L
S
STEP bY STEP JuST ADD fLOur
4
sprinkle the flour
We asked our model to hold flour in his hands
then release it as he danced and moved. To
show the movement in different parts of the
body try sprinkling flour over the shoulders,
arms and feet. If your subject has long hair,
you could try sprinkling it there too.
5
work the poses
It really helps if you can work with a subject
who knows how to move their body. If you can
trust them to get into interesting positions,
it frees you to concentrate on perfecting the
technique, timing and composition. even so, it
might take several attempts to nail the pose.
6
direct your subject
Strong back-lighting and side-lighting gives
us these bright highlights along both sides of
the body. We posed our subject to make the
most of this edge light, asking them to turn
their head and body one way or the other as
they moved.
Quick tip
You don’t need expensive flashes for this;
they only need to have manual power and
an optical slave mode, features that most
budget models will have
E
d
I
t
I
N
g
Ph otos h o P
LEARN ESSENTIAL EDITING SKILLS FAST!
d O W nl O a d T He
P r O j eC T F i l e s
h t t p : // t i n y. c c /4 r 6 m s y
On a PC Or maC
HOW TO...
masTer Blending mOdes
Learn how to get the most out of this simple yet versatile feature, and
see how you can blend two or more images for incredible results
n this video tutorial we’ll
show you how to create
a cool double-exposure
image with the help of blending
modes. Blending modes are a
powerful and versatile tool,
I
enabling you to combine images
in ways that aren’t possible with
other tools. they dictate the way
a layer interacts with the layers
below it based on brightness
and colour values, and while
some work in quite simple
ways others are more
complex, so it’s often
easiest to just experiment
with the different modes to
see what effects you get.
W aT CH T He V ideO
h t t p : // t i n y. c c / w f s d o y
WANT more phoToshop TuToriAls? check ouT prAcTicAl phoToshop
For more Photoshop tutorials, tips and advice subscribe to Practical Photoshop, the world’s premier Photoshop
magazine. each month you’ll find an array of inspirational tutorials and accompanying video lessons that will
help you master adobe’s industry-leading photo-editing software, plus amazing images from the world’s best
Photoshop creatives, free downloadable content, and a beginner’s guide to the basics.
ios: http://tiny.cc/99ehfy Android: http://tiny.cc/l8ehfy Zinio: http://tiny.cc/g65jiy
CSC TEST
ExpErt opinion on thE l atEst kit
FujiFilm X-H1
The X-H1 looks like an X-T2 on steroids, but there’s a lot
more to Fujifilm’s new X-series flagship than that
www.fujifilm.co.uk £1,699/$1,899 (body-only)
ositioned above the current
X-Pro2 and the X-T2, the Fujifilm
X-H1 is intended to be “the
highest-performance camera in the X
Series range of mirrorless cameras,”
according to the firm.
Key features in this latest arrival
include Fujifilm’s 24.3 megapixel X-Trans
P
CMOS III sensor and X-Processor Pro
processor, familiar from other models.
In the X-H1 these are teamed with
a new five-axis in-body stabilisation
system – a first for Fujifilm – which
works alongside its stabilised lenses
to provide up to an impressive 5.5 stops
of compensation for camera shake.
The X-H1’s body is made from
a magnesium alloy that’s some 25%
thicker than that used in the X-T2, and
which is weather-sealed for protection
against the elements. Fujifilm has
additionally fitted the new camera with
a 3.69-million-dot electronic viewfinder,
which has a 0.75x magnification (in
CsC tEst FujiFilm x-h1
35mm terms) and a 100fps refresh
rate, while the 3-inch tilting LCD
screen has a 1.04 million-dot panel
and is touch-sensitive – it also has
a sideways tilt action.
There’s an LCD panel on the top
plate, too, for displaying key shooting
and exposure information. This is
the first time such a panel has been
incorporated on an X-series camera,
though the medium-format GFX
50S has one.
At first glance the X-H1 doesn’t seem
to be any more sports-orientated than
the X-T2. However, it comes with a new
optional grip accessory: the VPB-XH1
Vertical Power Booster. In addition
to boosting battery life and making
portrait-orientation shooting easier, the
VPB-XH1 also increases the maximum
burst rate of the mechanical shutter to
11fps, and features a headphone port
for audio monitoring while recording
video. With the help of this grip, the
X-H1 becomes a pretty serious sports
and action camera.
02
01
Build and handling
Compared with the X-T2, the biggest
control layout change is a more defined
grip and the 1.28-inc LCD screen on
the top-plate. Like other higher-end
X-mount Fujifilm cameras, the X-H1
uses a traditional control layout, with a
shutter speed dial on the top plate and
a lens aperture ring on the lens itself
(though not on all lenses). There’s no
03
1 The X-H1 is easier to hold than the X-T2,
and better balanced with Fujifilm’s ‘red
badge’ pro lenses.
2 The X-H1 uses the same 24mP X-Trans
Sensor Pro as other Fujifilm models, but now
it’s attached to an in-body stabilisation
system.
3 The rear screen is touch-sensitive and tilts
up and down; it also has a sideways tilt
action for low-angle shots with the camera
held vertically.
4 The X-H1’s top plate has a welcome status
lCD for showing camera settings.
04
CsC tEst FujiFilm x-h1
01
02
03
1 Image noise
The X-H1’s X-Trans sensor offers very good
noise control, even at high iSOs.
2 Detail rendition
With no low-pass filter over the image sensor,
the X-H1 delivers crystal clear images.
3 Colour rendition
Fujifilm’s Film Simulation modes closely match
the properties of its classic film emulsions.
need for the mode dial you typically
find on other cameras, since the regular
‘PASM’ exposure mode options can
be achieved by setting either the lens
aperture ring or the shutter speed dial
to the A position and adjusting the other
manually – or you can set both to A for
Program AE mode.
The rear LCD maintains the X-T2’s
three-axis pivoting design, which is
especially useful when you’re shooting
in a portrait orientation. The screen
works well, although it’s not always
easy to see clearly when you’re
outdoors in bright light. It’s touchsensitive too, although perhaps not
quite as responsive as touchscreens on
some rival cameras; this isn’t necessarily
a bad thing, though, as you’re less likely
to inadvertently press it with a stray
finger or, indeed, your nose.
Both the front and rear command
dials on the X-H1 move easily, and
click into the body to perform certain
functions (such as instantly zooming
into the image upon playback). It is
possible to ‘click’ sometimes when you
meant to ‘spin’, but the X-H1’s dials have
a pretty firm action, so in practice this
shouldn’t happen very often.
The main surprise is the shutter
release. It’s extremely light – much
lighter than on any other camera we
can remember testing – and it could be
some time before your trigger finger
adapts to the very light touch needed
to half-press the button for focusing,
or the very slight extra pressure needed
to fire the shutter.
The second surprise is the uncanny
quietness of the shutter. Fujifilm says
it has incorporated a new shockabsorption system for what it calls
“almost silent” operation. We’ve heard
this kind of claim from camera makers
many times before, but this time it’s
CsC tEst FujiFilm x-h1
The X-H1’s rich colours and subtle tones are
just what we’ve come to expect from Fujifilm
X-mount cameras.
true: the X-H1’s shutter action is not
truly silent, but it’s way softer and
quieter than any mechanical focal
plane shutter should be.
Performance
The in-body image stabilisation system
greatly enhances the X-H1’s low-light
shooting capabilities.
The X-H1’s autofocus system looks
complex, but it’s actually quite
straightforward. You can choose from
single-point autofocus, zone AF (you
can change the size and position of the
zone) and wide-area AF. You switch
between single-shot AF, continuous AF
and manual focus with a lever on the
front of the camera, and in continuous
AF mode the wide-area AF option
becomes a tracking mode.
Tested with Fujifilm’s ‘red badge’
16-55mm f/2.8 lens, static autofocus
speeds are very fast. If you accidentally
give the super-light shutter release
a full press instead of a half-press
The X-h1’s shuTTer aCTIon
is not truly silent, but it’s
way softer and quieter than
any meChanICal foCal plane
shuTTer shoulD be
you might think the camera has fired
without focusing. It hasn’t – it’s just
very fast, and very quiet. Older, less
sophisticated lenses like the 23mm f/2.8
pancake lens are slower and noisier, but
that’s the lens, not the camera.
In continuous shooting mode the
autofocus system keeps up very well,
both for single-point, zone and widearea tracking – although in tracking
mode very erratic subject movements
can cause the autofocus to lose contact
with the subject.
CsC tEst FujiFilm x-h1
Colour error
FujiFilm X-H1
-1.3
NiKON D500
1.6
PANASONiC G9
1.7
-3.5
SONY AlPHA 6500
sCores Closer
To zero are
beTTer
-5
0
5
10
15
20
We compared the X-H1’s lab results with those from
three rival cameras: the Nikon D500, the Panasonic G9
and the Sony A6500. The X-H1 produced the lowest
colour error out of this quartet.
Fujifilm’s secret weapon is its extended dynamic range mode. This can produce raw files with a huge
tonal range, as shown by this edited image.
raw sIgnal-To-noIse raTIo
50
VerDiC T
Some might be disappointed
that the X-H1 appears to be only
a modest upgrade over the X-T2,
but Fujifilm’s enhancements are
aimed squarely at professionals
and experts, and tick the few
remaining boxes that the X-T2
left unchecked. The new in-body
stabilisation alone is enough to
justify the modest price increase
over the X-T2.
Rod Lawton
40
DeCIbels
The noise levels are equally
impressive. Even at ISO6400, real-world
images still look remarkably sharp,
textured and noise-free.
When you factor in Fujifilm’s
excellent film simulation modes –
the black-and-white Acros mode is
especially impressive – you have a
camera that doesn’t just perform well
as a device, but produces first-rate
photographic quality too.
30
20
10
0
hIgher sCores are beTTer. raw resulTs
use Images ConVerTeD To TIff
100
400
1,600
6,400
25,600
The X-H1 and the Panasonic G9 come out on top
for noise. The G9 is very slightly better at low
ISo settings, which is surprising given its smaller
micro Four Thirds sensor.
raw DynamIC range
sensor 24.3mP X-TrANS CmOS iii,
23.5 X 15.6mm Image proCessor X
PrOCeSSOr PrO af poInTs 91/325-POiNT
HYbriD CONTrAST/PHASe AF Iso range
200-12,800, eXPANDAble TO iSO 10051,200 maX Image sIze 6,000 X 4,000
PiXelS meTerIng zones 256 VIDeo
4K 4K AT 30FPS, uHD AT 30/25/24FPS
VIewfInDer OleD eVF, 3.69 milliON
DOTS memory CarD 2 X SD/SDHC/SDXC,
uHS ii lCD 3-iNCH TilTiNG TOuCHSCreeN,
1,040k doTS maX bursT 8FPS (11FPS
wiTH OPTiONAl GriP), 14FPS eleCTrONiC
SHuTTer ConneCTIVITy wi-Fi sIze 140
X 98 X 86mm weIghT 673G (bODY-ONlY,
wiTH bATTerY AND memOrY CArD)
14
eXposure Value
The X-H1’s regular JPEGs and raw
files offer good dynamic range, but the
camera’s secret weapon – common
to all the Fujifilm models – is its
expanded dynamic range modes,
which can be set to 200% or 400%,
or left on ‘automatic’. Expanding the
dynamic range pushes up the base
ISO level by 1 or 2EV, which some
photographers may not like, but the
payback is raw files with a huge range
of tonal information.
12
10
8
6
hIgher sCores are beTTer. raw resulTs
use Images ConVerTeD To TIff
100
400
1,600
6,400
25,600
Again, the Panasonic G9 is a surprise winner in
this test. But the Fujifilm X-H1 is a close second,
tying very closely with the Nikon D500 for
dynamic range.
A
P
P
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