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Spotlight - Mai 2018

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EINFACH BESSER ENGLISCH
5 —
18
1
5
B
L
Ä
T
T
E
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N
!
1
M
Perfect
harmony
Meet
the worldfamous
King’s
Singers
1
U
Deutschland € 7,90
CH sfr 13,00
A·E ·I ·L · SK: € 9,00
Interview
with an
expert
Learning
English will
change your
life!
E
Simple ideas
to help you
improve
your English
T
TIPS
IT
31
T
L K
A
B
BESSER
ENGLISCH
LERNEN!
Jetzt interaktiv üben!
Abwechslungsreiche Übungen
mit Multiple-Choice, Lückentext
und Drag&Drop
Unmittelbarer Lerneffekt
dank direktem Online-Feedback
Neu!
Überall und jederzeit verfügbar:
per App oder im Web
Das neue digitale Sprachmagazin &
Übungsheft Plus
BESSER
ENGLISCH
LERNEN!
Simple ideas
to help you
improve
your English
PLUS
1
BESSER
ENGLISCH
Interview
with an
expert
Learning
English will
change your
life!
1 LERNEN!5
1
1
1
, Grammatik
Adverbs of frequency
, Wortschatz
On the road
E
U
M
B
L
Ä
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T
E
R
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!
1
, Land und Leute
All eyes on
Washington, DC
T
Perfect
harmony
Meet
the worldfamous
King’s
Singers
IT
SPOTLIGHT
5
—
18
B
TIPS
Deutschland € 7,90
CH sfr 13,00
A·E ·I ·L · SK: € 9,00
spotlight-online.de/digitalpaket
31
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L K
TAL K
A
EINFACH BESSER ENGLISCH
€ 4,80 (D) | € 5,30 (A) | sfr 7,30 (CH)
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5
—
18
SOCIETY Pakistan: behind the headlines • LANGUAGE Simply better English • TRAVEL Washington, DC
5 / 2018
EINFACH BESSER ENGLISCH
5
FROM THE EDITOR
Discover the joys
of learning English
T A L K
1
W
1
1
5
hat is the best way to learn a language? According to Vivian
Cook, emeritus professor of applied linguistics at Newcastle
University in the UK, find out what works for you and stick
with it. With that excellent advice in mind, we present dozens
of ideas for you to try out: from a trip in “English” to your local
supermarket to fun games for family and friends. “Simply better English”, which begins on page 14, includes a wonderfully
motivating interview with Professor Cook, and learning tips
from you, the reader. A big “thank you” to everyone who sent
in suggestions.
For those of you who like to learn digitally, we are proud to
present new versions of Spotlight magazine and Spotlight plus
where exercises can be done interactively — from gap-filling
to multiple choice. This feature is available immediately and
at no extra charge if you already have the digital version of the
product. You’ll find more at spotlight-online.de/interaktiv
Foto: Gert Krautbauer
Are you looking for Colin Beaven’s column Britain Today?
This month, he’s taken a trip through the magazine and landed on page 71. We are planning a longer journey for him and
needed some space to tell you about it. This year sees the
launch of Spotlight-Reisen. We are offering guided bilingual
trips to Devon in August and September, and one special
highlight will be an afternoon and evening in the delightful
company of Colin. Find out all about the trips on pages 11–13.
INEZ SHARP, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
i.sharp@spotlight-verlag.de
EDITORIAL
5/2018 Spotlight
3 Contents
May 2018
6
World Map M
A silly celebration of this month’s
royal wedding
8 I n the Spotlight E M A News and views from
around the world
76My Life in English M
Actress Inga-Gesine Horchler
15 Sprachseiten
I Ask Myself A US Amy Argetsinger on a woman who
has left President Trump
48 V
ocabulary M +
At the optician’s
50The Grammar Page M +
Using adverbs and phrases
of frequency
42Culture M Meet Britain’s King’s Singers
51 L
anguage Tips E M A
Simply better English
46American Life M US Ginger Kuenzel on
her mother’s life
53Lost in Translation A
A fun look at interesting words
+
47 A
rts M
Films and an exhibition
63Press Gallery A Comment from the
English-speaking world
64Artisans M An Englishman who makes saddles
66Short Story M US “The prince of the plantation”
68Around Oz A Peter Flynn on robots
69Living Language A
Why translation software is
just not enough
70Peggy’s Place M Visit Spotlight’s very own
London pub
54Everyday English M Stand-up paddling
+
56Spoken English M + How to use the verb “look” in
conversational English
57English at Work M Ken Taylor answers
your questions
+
58The Basics E
Easy English
60Words that Go Together E +
Play and learn:
the collocation game
62Crossword E M A
Find the words
and win a prize
34
All eyes on
Washington
M US +
With so much drama coming
out of the American capital
(or Capitol, pictured here),
it is easy to forget what a
fascinating city Washington, DC,
is to visit. US correspondent
Jessica Mann takes us there.
71Britain Today E Colin Beaven on a BBC drama
72The Lighter Side E
Jokes and cartoons
4 Spotlight 5/2018
CONTENTS
Fotos: Clarissa Leopold; Franzi/Shutterstock.com; Andi Robinson, Bulgac/iStock.com
22 A Day in My Life M US +
A park ranger in New England
33
74 F
eedback & Next Month E M A
Your letters to Spotlight
and upcoming topics
Neu: interaktiv üben
14
Simply
B E TT E R
3
1
1
1
1
English
MA
We talk to an expert about how learning English
can influence your view of the world — and have
lots of useful tips on how to improve your reading,
writing, listening and speaking skills. See page 51
for 31 tips to help you learn.
1
Sprachtraining
mit Spotlight
macht nun noch
mehr Spaß,
denn ab sofort sind
sämtliche Übungen
digital und interaktiv
verfügbar!
Ob Lückentext, Multiple
Choice oder Drag and
Drop – unsere Übungen
können Sie nun direkt in
Ihrem digitalen Sprachmagazin oder Übungsheft
plus lösen.
Es funktioniert ganz einfach: Öffnen Sie Ihre
Ausgabe in der App oder im Browser, bearbeiten
Sie eine Übung und erhalten Sie direkt Feedback
zur Lösung. Sie können die Übung bei Bedarf
beliebig oft wiederholen.
Üben Sie so jederzeit und überall: per App mit
Smartphone und Tablet oder am Computer.
24
Das Beste: Die neuen Funktionalitäten sind ab
sofort automatisch und ohne Aufpreis in der
digitalen Ausgabe Ihres Spotlight-Sprachmagazins
und des Übungshefts plus enthalten.
Pakistan
Als Abonnent der gedruckten Ausgabe erhalten
Sie das digitale Magazin schon für 1€ im Monat.
A
Political instability, religious tensions, poverty and gender
inequality — this is the image that most of us have of
Pakistan. But is that the whole picture and is there reason to
hope for a better future? Find out in our report.
Weitere Informationen unter: spotlight-online.de/
interaktiv
Wir wünschen Ihnen viel Spaß beim
Sprachtraining
Ihr Spotlight-Team
For more information and exercises, see:
www.spotlight-online.de
www.facebook.com/spotlightmagazine
ABOUT THE LANGUAGE LEVELS
The levels of difficulty in Spotlight magazine
correspond roughly to The Common European
Framework of Reference for Languages:
EASY MEDIUM ADVANCED
A2B1–B2C1–C2
CONTENTS
5/2018 Spotlight
5 WORLD MAP
Harry
to marry
Wir stoßen an auf all die tollen Frauen,
die über die Jahre hinweg vielleicht auch
als Harrys Auserwählte infrage gekommen
wären – zumindest in den Augen der
Spotlight-Redaktion. MEDIUM
UK
On 19 May, Prince Harry, 33, and now sixth in
line to the British throne, will marry American
beauty Meghan Markle, 36, at Windsor Castle.
Red-headed Prince Henry of Wales was
born to Diana and Charles in 1984. He attended the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and served in the British Army. His older
brother, William, second in line to the throne,
married Kate Middleton in 2011. That’s when
speculation went wild as to when Harry, “the
spare”, would stop partying and settle down.
The answer came late last year in the form
of Meghan Markle. The California-born actress (famous as Rachel Zane of the TV series
Suits) met Harry in 2016. The couple have had
a mostly warm welcome from the public, but
have also experienced some ugly reactions to
Markle’s mixed-race heritage.
This map takes a look at some of the women who have, over the years, caught the
prince’s eye, as well as some of those who, in
our editors’ humble opinions, might also have
made good matches for handsome Harry.
admiration [)ÄdmE(reIS&n] , Bewunderung
, bescheiden
battalion commander
mixed-race heritage
, Batallionskommandeur
, gemischte Herkunft
[bE(tÄljEn kE)mA:ndE] daring [(deErIN] humble [(hVmb&l] [)mIkst reIs (herItIdZ] settle down [)set&l (daUn] , kühn, gewagt
, niederlassen
divorcée [di)vO:(si:] , Geschiedene
socialite [(sEUSElaIt] , Partylöwe, -löwin
eligible [(elIdZEb&l] spare [speE] , frei, übrig; hier: von „an
, gefragt, begehrt
heiress [(eEres] , Erbin
Fotos: pinterest; Mike Marsland, David M. Benett, Roberto Ricciuti, Charles Eshelman/Getty Images; LINGTREN IMAGES, Ondrej Deml, s_buckley, pambudi /Shutterstock.com
Prince Harry, 33. Until
recently, one of the world’s
most eligible bachelors.
heir and a spare“ – ein Thronfolger und sein Ersatz
USA
Meghan Markle, 36, is the
American divorcée who won
Harry’s heart, as well as the
public’s admiration for her role in
the popular TV legal drama Suits.
Research by Inez Sharp and Claudine Weber-Hof
6 Spotlight 5/2018
WORLD MAP
Cressida Bonas, 29, an
aristocratic actress who
dated Harry from 2012 to
2014. She told the BBC that
the intense media attention
killed the relationship.
UK
Ellie Goulding, 31, an English pop
singer who was linked to the prince
after they were seen together at a polo
match. A romantic relationship was
never confirmed. They are said to be
good friends.
India Rose James, 26, a London
heiress whose grandfather made his
money in adult entertainment and
property, and who has never dated
Harry. Our editors think she would
have made a daring choice of partner.
Turkey
Norway
Israel
Camilla Romestrand, age unknown,
says she had a brief affair with Harry
after his break-up with Chelsy Davy
(below). The Norwegian singer was a
member of a British band at the time.
Oshrat Bachar, 40-ish,
the first female combat
battalion commander
in the Israeli Defense
Forces, has no connection to Harry and is
married. Were this not
the case, says a Spotlight
editor, she could have
made a cool match for
the prince.
Zimbabwe
Chelsy Davy, 32, whom Harry met in 2004, and with whom he had
his longest romantic relationship. The Zimbabwe-born socialite
and lawyer remained friends with him when their on-again-offagain relationship ended in 2011.
WORLD MAP
Elif Shafak, 46, a Turkish
novelist who has never
been linked to the prince.
One of our editors thinks,
despite the age difference,
the outspoken intellectual
would make a good choice
for Harry — if she were
single and interested.
North Korea
Hyon Song-wol, 40-ish,
has led the Moranbong
Band, “North Korea’s Spice
Girls”, and is said to be an
ex-girlfriend of dictator
Kim Jong-un. She’s married
and has no links to Harry.
Would a match here have
been good for world peace?
5/2018 Spotlight
7 IN THE SPOTLIGHT
NEWS AND VIEWS
California dreamin’? No, it’s
the new, more liberal reality
Where there’s smoke,
there’s money
EASY US
8 Spotlight 5/2018
Forget the California Gold Rush of the
1800s. This is the time of the California
green rush, thanks to the state’s marijuana industry, which is expected to be worth
more than $5 billion by 2019.
One of the people joining the green rush
is ex-boxer Mike Tyson. Tyson, 51, who has
said he used marijuana in his boxing career,
is building a resort for marijuana growers
and users on 40 acres in California City,
about 110 miles from Los Angeles. Half
the resort will be used to grow new strains
of marijuana and do research on the drug’s
medical benefits. There will be a school
for growers, luxury campgrounds, and an
amphitheater. California legalized medical
marijuana in 2005, and recreational marijuana at the start of this year.
acre [(eIk&r] , Morgen (4.047 m2)
billion [(bIljEn] , Milliarde(n)
recreational
benefit [(benIfIt] , Nutzen
gold rush [(goUld rVS] , Goldrausch
[)rekri(eIS&nEl] , für den Privat-, nicht
medizinischen Gebrauch
resort [ri(zO:rt] , Ferienort, Erholungsort
strain [streIn] , hier: Sorte, Züchtung
IN THE SPOTLIGHT
Fotos: smodj, Johny87/iStock.com; Petrovic-Igor/Shutterstock.com; picture-alliance/dpa; you tube
UNITED STATES
WALES
Emoji me
MEDIUM
Confess. Did you send a heart-eyes emoji
to your ex at 2 a.m.? If so, was it really an
accident? A psychologist from the University of South Wales says behaviour of
this kind is causing trouble in relationships.
“It can be something as simple as repeatedly ‘liking’ someone’s posts on Instagram or commenting on someone’s
Facebook,” Dr Martin Graff told Ireland’s
Independent.
Graff and his colleagues led a study to
look at small-scale online infidelity. Key
to deciding how serious the flirtations are,
writes Graff, are “context and intent”. But
such assessments are difficult for people
in relationships to make: if one partner
“likes” a photo posted by an old flame on
Facebook, but then fails to tell the other
partner about the communication, it can
leave a bad impression. The time of day
of such communication (worst is late at
night) can compound the problem.
assessment [E(sesmEnt] , Bewertung,
Einschätzung
compound [kEm(paUnd] , verschlimmern
How do you
change the
world? Bring
people
together. …
[T]he easiest
big place to
bring people
together? In
the work
environment.
confess [kEn(fes] , beichten
infidelity [)InfI(delEti]
, Untreue, Treulosigkeit
intent [In(tent] , Absicht
small-scale
[)smO:l (skeI&l] , hier: geringfügig,
vernachlässigbar
— Adam Neumann, co-founder of
WeWork, in The New York Times.
His start-up, a “co-working”
company which deals in shared
workspaces, is
valued at $20 billion.
THE NEWCOMER
Autumn Peltier
MEDIUM
Age: 13
From: Wikwemikong First Nation
reserve on Manitoulin Island in Ontario,
Canada
Known as: A water activist
Background: Peltier has been travelling
around Canada speaking about the importance of water protection since she
was eight years old.
Famous because: She has made a
presentation to Prime Minister Justin
Trudeau of Canada and spoken at a United Nations General Assembly in New
York City. She has also been nominated
for the International Children’s Peace
Prize.
Ambition: To become the prime minister of Canada, or the country’s minister
of environment
valued [(vÄlju:d] , geschätzt, bewertet
LIBERIA
A whole new ball game
Can a successful footballer become a successful president?
This is the question people have been asking since George
Weah became the 25th president of Liberia earlier this year.
Weah, 51, grew up in the slums of Monrovia and started
playing football as a teenager. When he was 21, he moved to
Europe, where he became one of the world’s greatest footballers. After his football career, he started working in politics, and
tried to become Liberia’s president for the first time in 2005.
IN THE SPOTLIGHT
EASY
Asked about his potential in his new position, he told the BBC,
“When I left here, people asked me the same question: ‘Will
you be successful in Europe?’ I told them that when I work
hard and believe in what I believe in, I show I can persevere.”
persevere [)p§:sI(vIE] , durchhalten
5/2018 Spotlight
9 SCOTLAND
Shopbot,
you’re fired
MEDIUM AUDIO
Write away
MEDIUM
Listowel, a town of 4,000 in south-west Ireland, is a place of great charm. Its castle, and
the way the little settlement sits so prettily on the River Feale, plus its history of resistance during the Irish War of Independence — all these aspects have inspired Irish
writers to pick up their pens. No wonder the Listowel Writers’ Week came into being.
Started in 1970, the oldest and best-known Irish literary gathering takes place this
year from 30 May to 3 June. For the mere mortal, meeting with accomplished writers such as short story author Paul McVeigh and novelist Catherine Dunn may seem
daunting. Take courage, though: the creative workshops they hold encourage writers of
all levels to try their hand at their chosen task, whether it be crime fiction, creating dramatic texts for the theatre or even poetry. There are direct flights from Berlin to County
Kerry for those travelling there from Germany. For more information, see writersweek.ie
accomplished
daunting
, versiert, vollkommen
, einschüchternd
[E(kVmplISt] [(dO:ntIN] gathering [(gÄDErIN] , Zusammenkunft,
Treffen
mere: the ~ mortal [mIE] , der gewöhnliche
Sterbliche
BRITAIN
Waiting for change
EASY
Women in the UK got the right to vote in
1918, the year that Joan Capel was born.
But it was a long time before women were
able to enjoy the same career opportunities as men.
Capel, who works at the bookshop at
the National Trust’s Erddig Hall in Wrexham, Wales, told the BBC that she wanted
to become a journalist but that “journalism for women was not on. It just wasn’t
a thing. If I’d said to my father, ‘I’d like to
10 Spotlight 5/2018
be a journalist’, [he would have said,] ‘Oh,
you can’t do that!’” Back then, there were
only three things that women could be: a
teacher, a nurse or a secretary.
Capel’s story is part of a new National
Trust programme called “Women and
Power” to mark the 100th anniversary of
female suffrage.
mark [mA:k] , begehen
suffrage [(sVfrIdZ] , Wahlrecht
aisle [AI&l] item [(aItEm] , Gang
, Artikel
burst: ~ into tears
steak-out [(steIk aUt]
ifml. , Wortspiel zu „stake
out“: Observierung
[b§:st] , in Tränen ausbrechen
cute [kju:t] , niedlich, süß
Texts by Talitha Linehan and Claudine Weber-Hof
IN THE SPOTLIGHT
Fotos: INTERFOTO / BahnmŸller; vladru/iStock.com
IRELAND
“What is it called when one cow spies
on another cow?” asked the robot.
After a pause came the answer: “A
steak-out.”
Cute as it was, the machine’s humour failed to help a shopper who
needed to find a wine to go with steak.
And so Fabio, a robot that spoke to
shoppers in sweet, childlike tones, was
fired. It had worked at an Edinburgh
supermarket for only one week.
The famous Interaction Lab at the
Scottish capital’s Heriot-Watt University had arranged for the robot’s job at
a Margiotta store as part of a test run
earlier this year.
The chain’s Elena Margiotta said
that bringing a “shopbot” into the
aisles to help customers find products
seemed like a fun addition to the consumer experience — until customers
began staying out of Fabio’s way.
“Conversations didn’t always go
well,” Margiotta told The Telegraph.
“An issue we had was the movement
limitations of the robot. It was not
able to move around the shop
and direct customers to the
items they were
looking for.”
Employees reacted differently,
though. When the
robot learned that
it was being fired and
sent back to the university,
it asked its human boss,
“Are you angry?” This
caused one shop assistant
to burst into tears.
Reisen ins Herz
Ihrer Lieblingssprache
Spotlight-Reisen | England
Neu!
Spotlig
htReisen
Herbst
2018
Liebe Leserinnen und Leser,
die neuen Reisen des Spotlight Verlags in Kooperation mit ZEIT REISEN bieten Ihnen ein unvergessliches
Erlebnis im Land Ihrer Lieblingssprache.
Mit unserem bilingualen Reisebegleiter und in einer
kleinen Gruppe Sprachbegeisterter lernen Sie bei
einer Vielzahl an Aktivitäten die britische Kultur, die
Sprache und die Menschen auf authentische Weise
kennen.
Ob beim gemeinsamen Spaziergang und Small Talk
mit dem Spotlight-Kolumnisten Colin Beaven über
seine Heimat Südengland oder beim gemeinsamen
Kochkurs: Ihre Lieblingssprache perfektionieren Sie
ganz nebenbei. Seien Sie dabei!
Mehr Informationen unter spotlight-reisen.de
Ihr Spotlight-Team
Spotlight-Reisen | England
Südengland – Faszination der
grünen Küste!
Cornwalls versteckte kleine Schwester ist Devon. Aber keinesfalls
weniger reizend. Eine wildschöne Küstenlandschaft, schroff und
vom Wind zerzaust – Bilder wie von Rosamunde Pilcher geschaffen. Erkunden Sie schmucke Dörfchen wie Clovelly, entdecken Sie
englische Landschaftsgärten in Rosemoor und unverfälschte Natur im Dartmoor. Besuchen Sie bunte Fischerdörfer und verwöhnen Sie Ihren Gaumen mit frischen Meeresfrüchten in Cornwalls
Kleinod Padstow sowie beim Kochkurs eines Masterchefs. Die
prächtige Kathedrale Exeters, urige Pubs und kleine Läden erwarten Sie. Und natürlich „the British way of life“. Selbstverständlich
wohnen Sie stilecht im Golf&Countryclub.
Termine: 23.08.–29.08.18 / 22.09.–28.09.18
Preis: ab 1.685 €
Informationen und Buchung: spotlight-reisen.de
Neu!
Spotlig
htReisen
Herbst
2018
In Kooperation:
Entdecken Sie unsere neuen Reisen:
Land, Leute & Kultur – Englisch lernen ganz nebenbei
Individuell für Sie gestaltetes Reiseprogramm
Persönliches Treffen mit Colin Beaven (Spotlight)
Mit bilingualem Reisebegleiter
Tel. 040 / 32 80 - 455
Jetzt unter spotlight-reisen.de
Weitere Reisen des Spotlight Verlags:
Adesso-Reisen | Italien
Toskana – La Dolce Vita mit
allen Sinnen genießen
Mitten ins Herz der Toskana führt diese Reise der italienischen Lebensart. Sie logieren auf einem edlen
Landgut und wandern entlang lieblicher Weinberge
zum „Gallo Nero“ im Zentrum des Chianti-Gebietes –
Verkostung inklusive. Florenz und seine Geheimtipps
zeigt Ihnen eine echte Insiderin, unsere Adesso-Chefredakteurin. Per E-Bike radeln Sie durch malerische
Landschaften, mit Picknick und Olivenölprobe am
Wegesrand. Siena und Montalcino betören Sie ebenso
wie kulinarische Genüsse, traumhafte Ausblicke, der
Duft von Pinien und Zypressen und die stilechte, italienische Lebensart. A presto!
Termine: 29.09.–05.10.18 / 13.10.–19.10.18
Preis: ab 1.875 €
Informationen und Buchung: adesso-reisen.de
Ecos-Reisen | Spanien
Madrid – Weltstadt und
kulturelles Erbe
Wo sonst lassen sich die Spanischkenntnisse besser
vertiefen als in Spaniens pulsierender Hauptstadt? Gemeinsam mit einer Madrid-Insiderin erkunden Sie verwinkelte Altstadtgassen, flanieren über großzügige
Plätze, traditionelle Märkte und kehren in urigen Tapaslokalen ein. Ein Besuch im Prado bringt Ihnen die Kunstgiganten El Greco, Goya und Velázquez nahe. Sie stellen
Ihre eigenen Tapas her, lauschen einem Geschichtenerzähler und können bei einem Bummel durch das Dichterviertel mit der Ecos-Redakteurin María Sánchez plaudern.
Und auf einem Ausflug in die Drei-Kulturen-Stadt Toledo
begegnen Sie kulturellem Erbe und mittelalterlichem
Flair.
Termine: 18.09.–24.09.18 / 02.10.–08.10.18
Preis: ab 1.735 €
Informationen und Buchung: ecos-reisen.de
Écoute-Reisen | Frankreich
Südfrankreich – So geht
Lebensart!
Blau leuchtet das Meer – die Cote d’Azur trägt ihren Namen zu Recht! Von der Sonne verwöhnt, mit
klangvollen Namen dekoriert, ist es die Region des
„bien-être“. Tauchen Sie ein in die Prachtorte Cannes
und Nizza, natürlich mit Führung durch die Altstadt
und Marktbesuchen. Erkunden Sie die Bergdörfer und
Gärten von Èze, Grasse und Saint-Paul-de-Vence – zu
Fuß, per Fahrrad und mit dem Bus. Sie experimentieren beim Kochkurs oder Parfüm-Workshop mit Blüten
und Düften. Sie sind Grenzgänger beim Ausflug zur italienischen Riviera und Gourmet beim Abschiedsdinner
in Mougins. Was für ein Leben. Bienvenue!
Termine: 15.09.–21.09.18 / 06.10.–12.10.18
Preis: ab 1.675 €
Informationen und Buchung: ecoute-reisen.de
LANGUAGE
Simply B
Hinter dem Erlernen einer Sprache
steckt viel mehr als das bloße Wissen um
Wortschatz und Grammatik.
Im Spotlight-Interview sprechen wir mit
einem Sprachwissenschaftler darüber,
wie die Fremdsprache das eigene Denken
verändert. Und auf den folgenden Seiten
bietet VANESSA CLARK jede Menge
alltagstaugliche Tipps, mit denen
Ihr Englisch ohne viel Mühe
einfach besser wird.
AUDIO
3
E
T
T
E
R
ADVANCED
1
1
1
1
1
English
T
he advantages of learning
a second language go be­
yond basic understanding
and communication. It’s
great to be able to book a
hotel room in English or watch your fa­
vourite American TV series in the origi­
nal. In fact, though, there are benefits to
acquiring another language that go much
deeper. Here, Professor Vivian Cook,
emeritus professor of applied linguistics
at Newcastle University, describes how
your thinking, your world view and even
the way you speak your mother tongue is
altered by learning a second language.
Most native German speakers learn
English for travel or work, but are there
benefits to learning a second language
that go beyond this?
Language is for much more than commu­
nication and affects our thinking and our
lives in many ways. For example, recent
research shows that, among other bene­
fits, if you learn another language:
you will have a better memory
throughout your life;
you will learn better in noisy
conditions;
if you get Alzheimer’s disease, you are
likely to contract it a few years later
than other people;
you will be more creative at solving
maths problems;
you will organize areas of your mind
differently, such as dividing up the
world into colours.
Learning another language transforms
us so that our minds work differently
from those of people who speak only one
language — and nearly all of these chang­
es are benefits. The only exception I know
of is that bilinguals have fractionally slow­
er reaction times for some tasks, probably
a penalty for having a much larger vocab­
ulary.
Foto: privat
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
Is there a difference between someone
who is monolingual and someone who
learns a few words of a second language?
As children, we learn about language
through one particular language and as­
sume that what we know is true of all lan­
guages. Learning another language opens
our eyes to other ways of seeing the world
than through our first language.
Neurolinguistics research does show
changes in the human brain after learning
LANGUAGE
another language. One found a measu­
rable effect after 108 minutes of learning
colour words in another language and an­
other found effects after a year of French
at university. Even the brains of bilin­
gual babies look different in the first few
months of life. While long-term changes
may take years, some of the benefits of
learning another language may show up
after quite short periods of time.
How do we learn a second language?
When I asked my doctor how to stop get­
ting colds, he replied that if he knew the
answer, he wouldn’t be a humble general
practitioner. That is to say, no one has a
magic bullet for second-language learn­
ing, other than people trying to sell you
courses on Twitter.
Learning a language is probably the
most complex task we do in our lives
and is bound up with our development,
the language our parents speak to us, the
aspects of language that are already pro­
grammed into us, our personality and
other factors. Adding a second language
is even more complicated because most
learners are usually at different stages of
development, and experience a different
kind of environment, namely, the class­
room. In particular, students seem to vary
between those who approach it as an ac­
ademic task, and those who regard it as a
natural social process, suiting very diffe­
rent styles of language teaching.
acquire [E(kwaIE] humble [(hVmb&l] , bescheiden, einfach
affect [E(fekt] , beeinflussen, betreffen
magic bullet
, erwerben
bound up with
[)mÄdZIk (bUlIt] ifml. , Patentlösung
[baUnd (Vp wID] , verbunden mit
myriads of [(mIriEdz Ev] , unzählige
compartment
namely [(neImli] , und zwar, nämlich
[kEm(pA:tmEnt] , Fach
fractionally [(frÄkS&nEli] , minimal
penalty [(pen&lti] , Strafe, Bestrafung
general practitioner
[)dZen&rEl prÄk(tIS&nE] , Allgemeinmedizi-
ner(in)
Does learning a second language change
the way we use our mother tongue?
Absolutely. The mind does not have sepa­
rate compartments for each language but
myriads of connections at many levels.
Research shows that you can tell a French
person who can speak English from one
who doesn’t by how they pronounce their
“t”s in French, and that people who know
another language process sentences and
vocabulary in their first language slightly
differently from monolinguals. At a gen­
eral level, knowledge of another language
helps you to communicate whether you
are a Hungarian schoolchild writing es­
says, as one piece of research shows, or a
professional writer like Vladimir Nabo­
kov or Tom Stoppard.
What role does age play in a person’s
ability to learn a second language?
While being younger probably helps in
Monolingualism can
be cured: Professor
Vivian Cook believes
in the benefits of
multilingualism
5/2018 Spotlight
15 second-language learning, this has to be
qualified in many ways. The difficulty is
separating age out from all the other fac­
tors involved.
If everything else were equal, foreign
adults and native children would learn
in the same ways. But compared to chil­
dren, adults have more developed cog­
nitive processes and social relationships
that are bound to affect their learning.
Parents adapt their speech to children in
ways that teachers or native speakers do
not to adult learners. Above all, children
and adults live in different worlds, us­
ing language for different reasons. The
classroom can try to compensate for this
by imitating children’s activities and by
mimicking the simplified language of par­
ents but, if it goes too far, it may alienate
students who feel they are being infanti­
lized. Overall, the age of learning is a mat­
ter of swings and roundabouts.
Is it important to have a good understanding of the grammar of the second
language?
It really depends what you mean by
“grammar” and “understanding”. A major
part of any language is how it is organ­
ized. For example, we say “good book”
not “book good”, “Give peace a chance”,
not “Give a chance peace”, etc. This kind
of grammar is behind every sentence we
say, even if we are virtually unaware of it.
Grammar is also a formal system, de­
scribed in the rules of grammar books
and teaching materials, which we can
consciously understand and study. Many
linguists can talk about the rules of lan­
guages in which they cannot utter a word.
Transforming a conscious understanding
of formal rules into an unconscious abil­
ity to use them is possible only for a cer­
tain kind of academically inclined learner,
not the majority of language students.
teaching also happens during the teens,
when students are uncertain of their longterm goals and interests, not just about
learning a second language: for many, a
second language is just another arbitrary
lesson on the timetable.
My own feeling is that teachers should
use subject matter that caters to their
students’ actual interests, whether foot­
ball, Twitter, films, cookery or whatever,
far less superficially than polite enquiries
about your favourite sport or pop star that
feature in most coursebooks.
If you were to start learning a new language now, how would you go about it?
One of the characteristics of “good lan­
guage learners” (identified by David
Stern and his colleagues) is that they
know their own strengths and stick to
the kind of learning that suits them. Class­
room teaching has to overrule individual
learning preferences in favour of a sin­
gle form believed to suit most students.
This means feeling free to learn in your
own way in and out of a class rather than
­necessarily following the teacher’s path.
I prefer individual academic learning
rather than group work; others would
say the reverse. Ideally, I would prefer to
immerse myself in the second-language
environment following some interest at
the same time.
alienate [(eIliEneIt] , befremden, verunsichern
arbitrary [(A:bItrEri] , beliebig, willkürlich
bound: be ~ to [baUnd] , vorprogrammiert sein
mimic [(mImIk] , nachahmen
overrule [)EUvE(ru:l] , aufheben
snag [snÄg] , Haken, Hindernis
subject matter
cater to sb. [(keItE tE] , auf jmdn. ausgerichtet
sein
, Lernstoff
consciously [(kQnSEsli] , bewusst
[)su:pE(fIS&li] , oberflächlich
feature [(fi:tSE] swings: ~ and roundabouts [swINz] UK , gehupft wie gesprungen
, vorkommen
immerse [I(m§:s] , versenken
inclined [In(klaInd] , geneigt, ausgerichtet
infantilize [In(fÄntIlaIz] , wie ein Kind behandeln
[(sVbdZekt )mÄtE] superficially
utter [(VtE] , äußern, hervorbringen
virtually [(v§:tSuEli] , nahezu, praktisch
16 Spotlight 5/2018
Illustrationen: bygemima, RedlineVector/Shutterstock.com
Do attitude and motivation play a role
in how well we learn a second language?
Undoubtedly, attitude and motivation
play an important part in classroom
learning. The snag really is the extent to
which they can be influenced by teachers.
They arise out of the attitudes of parents
and teachers and the stereotypes about
speakers of other languages in a particular
society, which have more weight than the
teacher’s ability to motivate the students
during class. Much second-language
LANGUAGE
Learning
tips
In our interview on pages 15–16, Professor
Cook said you should feel free to “learn in your
own way”. And we believe there are many easy
but effective strategies to improve your read­
ing, writing, listening and speaking skills. On
the next few pages, we’ve collected a variety of
ideas (some of them from our readers) that are
easy to implement in your everyday life. On
pages 51–52, you’ll find a month’s worth of tips
to tear out and keep.
MEDIUM
R E AD
1
More than “just books”
When we talk about reading, we automatically think
of books (or e-books), but in our everyday lives, we
read more than just books. We read Facebook posts,
tweets, instructions for a new gadget, reviews on
shopping websites — many of them in English. Dur­
ing an average week, you probably read more English
than you realize, so become more aware of this!
Read in small bites
A big book is a lot to digest. So, read in small bites.
Short stories, and even simple poems, are perfect. The
British Council’s LearnEnglish website (learnenglish.
britishcouncil.org/en/stories-poems) has short stories and
poems graded at the B1/B2 and C1/C2 levels. It even
invites you to write a short comment.
Enjoy your hobby — in English
Do you have a special hobby or interest — perhaps
football, film, fashion or feminism? Then why not
try reading about it in English? Digital magazine
LANGUAGE
1
1
2
subscriptions make it so easy for international read­
ers to enjoy hobby magazines without having to pay
the cost of postage. Go to www.magazine.co.uk and look
for the “Digital-only subscriptions” section.
Try a book swap
Many English speakers living in Germany are keen
readers and organize book swaps. Simply arrive with
a book you’d like to pass on — and come away with
something new to try. It’s a great way to collect tips,
get free books and meet other people who love read­
ing in English. Check your local “what’s on” pages.
digest [(daIdZest] , verdauen
gadget [(gÄdZIt] , Gerät, technische Spielerei
graded [(greIdId] , eingestuft
implement [(ImplIment] , in die Tat umsetzen
keen [ki:n] UK , eifrig
Reader’s tip
“Start your
reading with
simple books;
try young adults’
books or authors
such as Agatha
Christie.” Sabine P.
pass on [pA:s (Qn] , weitergeben
postage [(pEUstIdZ] , Porto
subscription [sEb(skrIpS&n] , Abonnement
swap [swQp] , Tausch
5/2018 Spotlight
17 Reader’s tip
“Read children’s
books or English
magazines. Then
use a dictionary to
look up unfamiliar words.”
Christiane S.
Reader’s tip
“Read, read, read!
Do the tests on Spotlight
online. Read the BBC news.
Get reading material from
your local library.”
Imke M.
News — and so much more
News websites offer so much more than just the
news. Health information, science, culture tips, car
reviews... There’s something of interest for everyone.
Don’t try to read it all (unless you are on a very long
journey!) but choose one thing that interests you. Try
the BBC News website www.bbc.co.uk/news for a good
range of reliable information.
Read once, read twice
If you’re reading for enjoyment, or for key informa­
tion, just read once. If you want to read as a learning
experience, try reading again. The second time, you
will notice the details: perhaps a new word, an inter­
esting sentence structure or a beautiful example of a
grammatical structure. Write these down if you like,
use a highlighter or simply make a mental note of
them and move on.
The second
time you
read a text,
you will
notice the
details
Love your library!
Are you a member of your local public library? Does
it have an English-language section? If you don’t
know, go and find out! It often costs nothing to join
and you may be surprised how much there is on offer.
Simple English
If you find the information on the English-language
version of Wikipedia too long or complicated,
try reading the “Simple English” version (simple.
wikipedia.org). It’s written specially for learners of Eng­
lish and other people who prefer a clearer, simpler
format with easier vocabulary and shorter sentences.
browse [braUz] , stöbern
Illustrationen: Franzi, grmarc/Shutterstock.com
Shopping (with or without shipping!)
You don’t have to fly to New York to shop at Macy’s,
or to London to shop at Harrods — you can browse in
both stores from your sofa at home. Read the descrip­
tions of their beautiful luxury products. It won’t cost
you anything and yet you will get bags full of new
words and phrases. If you do actually want to buy
something, check out the “international shipping”
(N. Am.) or “international delivery” (UK).
highlighter [(haIlaItE] , Textmarker
unless [En(les] , außer
18 Spotlight 5/2018
LANGUAGE
WR I T E
4
Find an audience and a purpose
Only you know why you want to write: for work, to
make friends, to tell a story. And only you know who
you want to write for: for the public, for a friend or for
yourself. There are lots of ideas for different writing
tasks on the pullout card on pages 51–52. What­ever
your purpose or audience, these tips will help you to
write with confidence.
Don’t worry about making mistakes
Do you feel you have to be “more correct” when writ­
ing, compared to speaking? Many learners do. Your
mistakes are more obvious when they are in black
and white. But the important thing is to communi­
cate your meaning.
Put on your “fresh eyes”
If you have time, try to reread your writing with
“fresh eyes” before you send it to or share it with
someone. Imagine that you are reading something
someone else has written. Is it easy to read? Is the
main message communicated clearly? Are the ideas
organized in a logical way?
Writing is a process
No one writes perfectly the first time round. That’s
why we have erasers and wastepaper baskets. The im­
portant thing is to have a go at it. Write something,
leave it for a while and come back to it later. You may
be pleasantly surprised how good it is! And if you’re
not totally happy with it, then see what you can adapt
or change to make it better.
Get feedback
Ask a friend or colleague to look at your writing and
give you some feedback. It will help them (and you)
if you ask specific questions: not just “Is this OK?”
or “Can you correct my English, please?” but “Have
I explained the bit about xyz clearly enough?” or “Do
I sound polite?”
Write the way you speak
Writing seems to make people want to be more for­
mal. Perhaps this is because we all learned formal
­letter-writing phrases at school. But be reassured: you
can write to a person in the same way as you would
LANGUAGE
1
1
1
1
speak to them. Apart from using a couple of specif­
ic phrases to start and end an e-mail or letter (“I’m
writing to...” and “Best wishes” or “Kind regards”),
just write the way you speak.
Start in the middle
Staring at a blank piece of paper (or a blank computer
screen) is scary. Where to begin? What to say first?
One solution is to start in the middle. Write the part
you feel most confident about and then go back and
add the opening lines later.
Write for rights
Take part in a letter-writing campaign, such as Am­
nesty International’s “Write for Rights” campaign.
There are sample letters for you to adapt, so it’s very
easy. And it’s not just letters — it’s also petitions,
e-mails, tweets, Facebook posts, photos and postcards.
Amnesty says: “Your words really can change lives.”
Use “speech-to-text” software
If you really hate or have problems writing, try using
“speech-to-text” software. You speak, and the com­
puter writes. Magic!
Offer personal advice
Do you have useful life experiences to share? Read­
ers of The Guardian newspaper ask for help from fel­
low readers in the weekly “Personal Problems” fea­
ture. You can post your advice or experiences online
and the best answers are published in the newspaper
each week. See www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/series/
privatelives
Check your spelling
Your spellcheck can help you — that is, if you remem­
ber to change your settings to English.
, anpassen
adapt [E(dÄpt] reassured [)ri:E(SO:d] , beruhigt
blank [blÄNk] , leer, unbeschrieben
scary [(skeEri] ifml. , erschreckend, beängstigend
eraser [I(reIzE] , Radiergummi
wastepaper basket
feature [(fi:tSE] Reader’s tip
“I write difficult
words on sticky
notes and put
them up in
places where I
see them all the
time.”
Ursula K.
Reader’s tip
“Pick the right
language level,
otherwise
you might get
frustrated.”
Uwe H.
[)weIst(peIpE )bA:skIt] UK , Papierkorb
, hier: Artikel
5/2018 Spotlight
19 L I S T EN
1
1
1
1
Simple stories
Watching a whole film in the original English version
can be a big challenge the first time you do it. We sug­
gest you choose an action film or a romantic comedy,
where you can probably understand the story even
without the words. It’s better not to choose thrillers
or detective films with complex stories.
Reader’s tip
“I listen to www.
audible.de all the
time, sometimes
even when I’m
asleep!”
Ulrich B.
Prepare yourself
Before you go to the cinema, watch the online trailer
(preview) of the film you want to see, so you have a
good idea of the basic story and the main characters.
Reader’s tip
“Listen,
listen, listen …
something will
always stick,
even if you don’t
have much time.”
Daniela W.
Turn off the subtitles
Subtitles can be helpful, but many learners find that
they “hold on” to them, like a swimmer holding on
to the edge of a pool for safety. If you can “let go” of
the subtitles (turn them off), it will be more difficult
at first, but you will find that you can understand the
dialogue better and can “swim” without help.
Listen on the move
Your car offers an inbuilt learning opportunity
through its audio player. Or if you are travelling by
public transport, or walking, take some earphones
with you and start listening. Safety note: we don’t
advise you to listen while you are cycling.
Laugh and learn
If you live in a city, keep an eye out for English-­
language comedy nights in clubs or theatres. Standup comedy is popular in the English-speaking world,
and comedians are always looking for new audiences
to tell their jokes to. Could you be that audience?
Listen to a book
There are thousands of audiobooks available to
download or to buy on CD, including simple Eng­
lish ones for learners. Go to www.audible.de and take a
look at the Englische Hörbücher section. There are hun­
dreds of titles to choose from — not only classic and
modern literature, but also audiobooks on science,
fantasy, health, business, motivation and meditation.
Get sporty
Are you an “armchair sportsperson”? Then look
through the cable channels on your TV for an Eng­
lish-language sports channel. Then watch a match
with an English commentary. Why not watch a new
sport from the English-speaking world, such as net­
ball, rugby, American football or baseball?
Podcasts
Some podcasts are radio programmes produced by
professional broadcasters like the BBC; others con­
sist of someone sitting in their bedroom chatting
— and there’s everything in between, on every topic
you can imagine. If you haven’t yet tried podcasts,
open the podcast app on your phone and start search­
ing for something fun to listen to now.
Spotlight 5/2018
Reader’s tip
“The more often
you watch your
favourite film
in English, the
better you’ll
remember
certain words
and phrases.”
Astrid W.
Stay with Spotlight!
We at Spotlight produce our own in-house audio ma­
terial. With Spotlight Audio or Spotlight express, you
can improve your comprehension skills, expand your
vocabulary and practise listening to different English
accents. Visit www.spotlight-online.de/audio
broadcaster
[(brO:dkA:stE] , Sender
20 1
Illustrationen: nikiteev_konstantin, oksanda007/Shutterstock.com
1
subtitle [(sVb)taIt&l] , Untertitel
LANGUAGE
S P E AK
1
3
Walk and talk
Walking and talking with a friend is a great way to
de-stress — and an opportunity to practise your Eng­
lish together. It’s easy to chat when you’re walking
because there’s no eye contact and there are no dif­
ficult silences. Plus, you can always comment on the
weather or what you see around you. If you would
like to walk with an organized group, check your local
area for English-language walking groups.
Be your own commentator
When you are doing routine chores, keep a running
commentary going in your head about what you’re
doing. Imagine you are a TV commentator. Even if
you’re doing something boring, pretend that the
world is watching you — “He’s taken the socks out
of the washing machine. Will he find all the pairs?”
English and a pint
Have you been to your local Irish pub? The bar staff
are usually Irish, so you can order your drinks in Eng­
lish if you like — and have a chat if the pub is quiet.
Most Irish pubs have regular evenings of Irish music,
quizzes and other English-language events.
Organize a Stammtisch
It’s easy to organize a weekly or monthly Eng­
lish-speaking group — choose a time and a place
and hope that people come! It doesn’t have to be in a
cafe or restaurant; it could simply be at a table in your
workplace canteen at lunchtime.
Crafty chats
Do you enjoy a craft hobby, such as sewing, knit­
ting or scrapbooking? Look online for local Eng­
lish-speaking groups. Many have funny names like
“Knit and natter” or “Stitch and bitch”. They are a
popular way for Brits and Americans to meet up, but
all are welcome.
Befriending
There are several charities looking for volunteers
to support others by chatting to them either on
the phone or in person. Silbernetz in Germany and
Age UK want to connect lonely older people with
5
Organize
a monthly
Englishspeaking
group
volunteers who are happy to chat on the phone. Why
not see if there are any befriending organizations
near you that need English-speaking volunteers?
Brush up your vocabulary
Do you feel like you can never think of the right word
to use at the right time? Then give your vocabulary
a chance to expand by downloading Spotlight’s free
Word of the Day app (www.spotlight-online.de/spotlightwort-des-tages-app). Get a new word or phrase every
day, learn how to pronounce it correctly and see how
it is used in context.
Reader’s tip
“You get through
the language
barrier by
deliberately
getting yourself
into situations
where you
simply have to
use English.”
Almuth M.
Reader’s tip
“Don’t panic,
just talk!”
Ilka F.
A tip a day
Turn to pages 51–52
where you’ll find a
pullout card with a lot
more language-learning
tips — one for each day
in May!
bitch [bItS] ifml. , rummeckern, lästern
, Nähen
chore [tSO:] , Hausarbeit
staff [stA:f] , Personal, Mitarbeiter
craft [krA:ft] , handwerklich, Bastel-
stitch [stItS] , nähen
natter [(nÄtE] ifml. volunteer [)vQlEn(tIE] , Freiwillige(r)
, plaudern
LANGUAGE
1
1
sewing [(sEUIN] 5/2018 Spotlight
21 A DAY IN MY LIFE
Unweit von Boston, in Lowell, Massachusetts,
befand sich im 19. Jahrhundert die Wiege
der US-amerikanischen industriellen Revolution.
Von DOUGLAS A. BOLDUC
MEDIUM US AUDIO PLUS
M
22 Spotlight 5/2018
y name is Resi Polixa. I am a park ranger
at the Lowell National Historical Park in
Massachusetts. I started here in 2010. I’m
28 years old.
I typically start my day at around 7 a.m.
After I wake up, I get dressed, then go out
to get a cup of coffee with milk. I come
back home and usually have yogurt and
granola for breakfast. I start my workday at 8:30 a.m. In the spring, I can sleep
in a little, because I live very close to the
park’s visitors’ center, where I have my
office. During the summer, I have to walk
to a different location in the city, which is
where our youth program meets.
When I start my day at the main office,
I take part in the morning meeting. That
is when we discuss whether we have any
large groups visiting the park and what
we may expect. It helps that I speak
German and French, because we get visitors from around the world. One group
comes every year from Quebec, Canada
— Lowell used to have a very big French-­
Canadian population.
During our meeting, we also go over
operational issues such as whether the
cash register is out of $1 bills. Our schedule changes every day, since it is a really
Our main museum is the Boott Cotton Mills Museum. The
first floor of that museum has a working weave room with historical looms from the 1920s. They still run. The cloth that we sell
in our bookstore is made in the museum. You can walk through
the weave room and get an idea of all the noise that used to exist
here, the vibration of the floors, and what the air felt like. You get
a very physical sensation when you are in there — some idea of
what the work would’ve been like in the city when the textile
factories were operating.
On the second floor of the museum, you find out how cloth
was produced in the Lowell factories. What makes Lowell so
unusual is that it was the first place in the United States where
you started with a raw piece of cotton on the first floor of the factory and got a finished bolt of cloth on the top floor. The whole
process was streamlined under one roof in Lowell. Near the
Boott Museum — but in another building — we have the Mill
Girls & Immigrants Exhibit. Lowell was one of the first places
in the United States where women found employment in large
­numbers.
When I am not at one of the museums, I spend my mornings
greeting people as they come into the visitors’ center. Otherwise,
we have time to work on projects at our desks. My projects include brochures and guide maps for the park.
I have lunch anytime from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. When it’s possible, I
like to go home to eat, because I live just two minutes away. After
lunch, we often get time to work on projects. If I’m not doing
that or leading one of our many guided tours, I staff one of the
museums in the afternoon.
In the evening, I like to take a long walk before heading home.
I like cooking, but when the time comes to do it, I sometimes
lose the desire. I do enjoy the process of putting the meal together, though, and I really like eating the end result. My partner is
part Middle Eastern, so we make a lot of Lebanese and Persian
food. That’s exciting, because it is different. I am part Filipino, so
I make a lot of Filipino dishes. On Tuesday evenings, I often go
to Trivia Night at a local Irish pub. We like to form a super team
of park rangers.
After dinner, we sometimes take a walk, or we watch TV or a
movie. We like to watch DVDs of shows that are no longer on
the air, such as Gilmore Girls, which was popular when I was in
college. We also like BBC dramas such as Call the Midwife. I usually go to bed around midnight.
bolt [boUlt] , Ballen, Rolle
cloth [klO:T] , Stoff, Tuch
cotton mill [(kA:t&n mIl] , Baumwollfabrikdesire [di(zaI&r] , Wunsch, Lust
granola
[grE(noUlE] N. Am. , Knuspermüsli
staff [stÄf] , (mit Personal)
besetzen
loom [lu:m] , Webstuhl
unique [ju(ni:k] , einzigartig, einmalig
operational issues
weave room
[)A:pE(reIS&nEl )ISu:z] , betriebliche Angele-
genheiten
[(wi:v ru:m] , Webraum, Websaal
A DAY IN MY LIFE
Fotos: Karin Holly; Evgeny Karandaev/Shutterstock.com; Safak Oguz, Denis TangneyJr, seen0001, li jingwang/iStock.com
Silicon Valley
of the past
big park. It’s also unique because we are in an urban location. We
don’t have any forests, but we do have a lot of buildings, a lot of
museums, and other historical sites that we staff.
Cotton
was a key basis
for industry in the
American Northeast
Lowell,
Massachusetts:
a center of the
US industrial
revolution
Coffee break:
working with
people is best
with a bit of
caffeine
What to
watch?
Popular shows
from the BBC
are a favorite
Loves her
work: Carrie
Goldberg
On the road:
truck driver
Michelle Kitchin
A roll of
fabric:
producing the
finished rolls
here was once
an innovation
Cooking
Persian food
is part of Resi
Polixa’s routine
at home
SOCIETY
Pakistan —
behind
the headlines
Bekannt aus den Schlagzeilen als Land wo politisches Chaos Alltag ist,
wo Terroristen – zumindest eine Weile lang – untertauchen können und wo
Geschlechtergleichstellung ein ferner Traum ist. Gibt es Hoffnung auf
Besserung? PAUL WHEATLEY macht sich auf die Suche.
ADVANCED
24 Spotlight x/2017
Fotos: XXX
Camel ride, anyone?
Karachi’s Clifton
Beach on
the Arabian Sea
RUBRIKTITEL
P
Fotos:Burhan
Foto:
XXX Ay/Shutterstock.com
akistan really is a land
of opportunity,” says
Kamran Khan, general secretary of the UK
Pakistan Chamber of
Commerce and Industry. “It has so much potential, it’s situated
in a strategic location, it has a very young
population and it is very dynamic.”
To hear Pakistan described as a “land
of opportunity” may come as a surprise
to some. Since the British left India in
1947 and partitioned the country, India
and ­Pakistan have struggled to recover
from the terrible violence and population
transfers that ensued: a million people
died and 15 million were displaced. Since
then, Pakistan has rarely appeared in the
media in a positive light.
The constant negative depiction of the
country is something that Khan, who has
spent 11 years in Britain as an entrepreneur, is pushing back against. “Pakistan is
not the way it is shown on CNN, the BBC
or any other media,” he says.
The media reports are often on Pakistan’s religious extremism and its patriarchal society; notorious, too, was its role as
the country where Osama bin Laden took
refuge before he was killed in Abbottabad
in 2011 by US troops. Khan doesn’t deny
that the country has challenges. He does,
however, insist that his country is by no
means a lost cause.
depiction [di(pIkS&n] , Darstellung
displaced [dIs(pleIst] , heimatvertrieben
RUBRIKTITEL
ensue [In(sju:] , folgen
partition [pA:(tIS&n] , teilen
5/2018 Spotlight
25 Opening up, going online
film or to see one of the popular BollyKhan is eager to highlight that there is an- wood films, many of which feature Pakiother Pakistan. He says that we just need stani actors.
Pakistan’s many food cultures are in
to make the effort to find it.
Perhaps Ramsha Jahangir stands for the spotlight, too, says Jahangir: city food
this other Pakistan. Initially, the young festivals are on the rise, and chefs across
journalist from Karachi found it difficult the country are having fun experimentto persuade even members of her own ing with traditional dishes. The ever-­
family that she ought to do the nightshift popular samosa — a triangle of pastry
at Dawn. The daily broadsheet published filled with spiced vegetables or meat —
in English is the oldest and most popular has recently been reworked as a dessert
English-language paper
filled with chocolate
in the country.
or fruit. While there is
“It’s about percepresistance in Pakistani
The birth of Pakistan
tion,” she says, “that
society to female chefs
Partition: 1947, the British
it’s not safe [for a womin restaurants, Jahangir
partitioned India, creating the
an] to go out at night
points out that they are
new nation states of India and
well represented at food
… and [should a female
Pakistan.
Migration: The partition caused
festivals and on TV cookeven] be working in the
millions of Muslims to head to
male-dominated indusing shows.
Pakistan and millions of Hindus
and Sikhs to settle in India.
try of journalism?”
Religion: Pakistan became a
Pakistani identity
Dawn has a high perMuslim-majority nation.
Kashmir: Both countries have
While film and TV are
centage of female emclaimed the Kashmir border
ployees. Jahangir puts
much-loved in Pakistan,
region since the partition, and
other modern forms of
this down to the fact
have been fighting over it off
and on since that time.
that they hold positions
the visual arts, such as
of power there: of the 12
painting and photography, are only slowly betop editorial positions,
four are held by women.
ing given their due.
Jahangir says that internet access has
Karachi-born artist and academic
had a big impact on society in Pakistan: Huma Mulji says that, compared to 20
people under 25 (she is 24) make up 63 years ago, attitudes have at least become
per cent of the population, with huge “more relaxed”. At home in both Pakistan
numbers of them adept at using new and the UK, Mulji recently finished a
technology and social media.
three-week residency in Khushaab, a city
“My age group is the social media generation. We’ve grown-up around technology and I think it’s changing things
for us,” she says. “Feminism is growing,
and a lot of women are finding a voice on
social media, and using such platforms to
share experiences, problems and find employment opportunities.”
Jahangir writes about culture, and she’s
convinced that Pakistan is making something of a cultural comeback, too, especially with the revival of the film industry. In
2016, documentary film-maker Sharmeen
Obaid-Chinoy became the first Pakistani
to win two Oscars.
Movies are a beloved pastime for people in Pakistan’s big cities, part of a lifestyle that sounds in some ways similar to
that in Europe or America. Families like to
shop at the local mall before heading off
to a favourite pizzeria, for example. The
evening out might also include a trip to
the cinema to take in the latest Pakistani
26 Spotlight 5/2018
The Wazir Khan Mosque in Lahore
(above); samosas, a popular dish that is
being reinvented with new fillings
adept [E(dept] , erfahren, geschickt
, Teig, Pastete
broadsheet [(brO:dSi:t] , großformatige Zeitung
, Wahrnehmung,
due: give it’s ~ [dju:] , beachtet werden
off and on [Qf End Qn] pastry [(peIstri] perception [pE(sepS&n] Sichtweise
rework [)ri:(w§:k] , hier: neu entwickeln
, immer mal wieder
SOCIETY
Languages in Pakistan
More than 60 languages are spoken in Pakistan. The national language is Urdu. English
is also an official language, and is widely used in government offices and schools.
Punjabi is spoken by about half of the population.
Urdu is a language related to Hindi, also with numerous Persian words. Many words used in
English have their roots in Urdu and Hindi. Here are a few.
bangle [(bÄNg&l] , Armreif
Blighty [(blaIti] ifml. , England oder Großbritannien
An adaptation of the
Urdu vilāyatī, meaning
“foreigner” or “European”.
bungalow [(bVNgElEU] , Bungalow
The origins of this word
lie in the Urdu term bangla, which means “house
in the Bengal style”.
Fotos: Burhan Ay/Shutterstock.com; subhodsathe/iStock.com Mariam Iqbal Desai
Political failures
in northern Punjab, where she was creating a new body of photographic work for
an upcoming exhibition. She is fascinated by issues of time, place and identity.
Her piece Arabian Delight from 2008 examined what she calls the “notion of the
‘Arabization’ of Pakistan”. The exhibition
looked at the “re-identification” of Pakistan as a Muslim country at the expense
of “its broader South Asian identity”.
­Independence at the end of British colonial
rule, explains Mulji, failed to “make up for
the trauma of partition from India”. This
still presents a challenge to the country’s
identity, blighting its relationship to India.
SOCIETY
cummerbund
khaki
, Kummerbund
, khakifarben
[(kVmEbVnd] In Urdu, kamarband is a
piece of cloth that you tie
around your middle. cushy: to have it ~
[(kUSi] UK ifml. , es bequem haben, eine
ruhige Kugel schieben
The term kushi means
“pleasure” in Urdu.
Pakistan has been hurt by generations
of corrupt and inept politicians, military
interference and religious radicalism. The
ongoing conflict with India is damaging,
both economically and culturally. With a
nationalist government in India and an
overbearing Pakistani military, a thaw in
the relationship seems unlikely. The nuclear powers seem determined to antagonize each other.
As a 2018 Human Rights Watch report
notes: “Security forces remained unaccountable for human rights violations
and exercised disproportionate political
influence over civilian authorities.” Violence from Islamist militants decreased in
2017, though “scores of people were [still]
killed in attacks”. The government continues to suppress “dissenting voices” from
NGOs and the media. The election on 15
July should see an unprecedented number of young people vote, but few people
expect genuine change.
The contradiction at the heart of Pakistani society can be seen in the case
of Marshal Khan, a university student
who was lynched by fellow students in
2017 after being accused of blasphemy.
The murder was captured on video and
shown round the world. It was also widely condemned by Muslim clerics. Another example is that of schoolgirl Malala
Yousafzai, who was shot by the Taliban
in 2012 for her outspoken views on women’s right to an education. After multiple
operations in the UK, she went on to win
[(kA:ki] This Urdu word means
“dust-coloured”.
punch
[pVntS] , Punsch
Panch means “five” in
Urdu, which refers to
a drink with five ingredients: alcohol, sugar,
lemon, water and tea or
spices.
antagonize
[Än(tÄgEnaIz] , sich bekämpfen
blight [blaIt] , verderben, zerstören
cleric [(klerIk] , Geistlicher
condemn [kEn(dem] , verurteilen
contradiction
[)kQntrE(dIkS&n] , Widerspruch
dissenting [dI(sentIN] pyjamas
[pE(dZA:mEz] , Schlafanzug
This describes a piece
of clothing worn around
the legs.
typhoon
[taI(fu:n] , Taifun
Toofaan is a type of storm
in Urdu.
notion [(nEUS&n] , Gedanke, Vorstellung
ongoing [(Qn)gEUIN] , fortlaufend, andauernd
outspoken
[aUt(spEUkEn] , offen, geradeheraus
overbearing
[)EUvE(beErIN] , allzu dominierend
scores of [(skO:z Ev] , zahlreiche
suppress [sE(pres] , widersprechend
, unterdrücken
inept [I(nept] thaw [TO:] , Auftauen
NGO (non-governmental organization)
unprecedented
, unfähig
[)en dZi: (EU] , nicht staatliche Organisation
[Vn(presIdentId] , beispiellos
upcoming [(Vp)kVmIN] , bevorstehend
The face of change: Ramsha Jahangir works for Dawn,
an important Pakistani daily newspaper in English
5/2018 Spotlight
27 An everyday sight
on the streets
of Pakistan:
an elaborately
decorated truck
28 Spotlight x/2017
RUBRIKTITEL
a Nobel Peace Prize and is now an internationally known human rights activist.
insurmountable. That said, many young
people in this diverse country are not
willing to accept the status quo. It will reModernizing the economy
quire energy and determination to push
Pakistan is a developing country and the country forward. In the eyes of some,
29.5 per cent of its population of 205 mil- this could be a chance for women to find
lion live below the poverty line. A 2017 a new role.
World Bank report noted that infant and
Lahore-based Maria Umar would
under-five mortality rates are high. In ad- agree. She began her working life as a
dition: “Gender disparities persist in ed- teacher, but when her application for
ucation, health and all economic sectors. maternity leave was refused, she started
Pakistan has one of the lowest female looking for work she could do from home.
labour force participation rates in the re- In 2010, she created the Women’s Diggion.” The report also noted that spend- ital League. The business has offices in
ing in Pakistan on health,
Karachi, Lahore and Penutrition and education
shawar, and has trained
Pakistan today
is much lower than in
hundreds of women in
Population: 205 million
most other countries,
rural Pakistan to do miBiggest cities: Karachi,
“now totalling three per
cro-tasks online, includpopulation 14.9 million, is the
cent of GDP”.
ing ghostwriting and sobiggest, followed by Lahore at
11.1 million;
However, not all the
cial media management.
Islamabad, the capital, ranks
As Muhammad Ali
news is bad: Pakistan’s
as the ninth-biggest with a
population of one million
Jinnah, the country’s
economic growth in
Religions: 96.4 per cent Muslim;
2017 is expected to be 5.2
founder and first govthe rest are Hindu, Christian
and other
per cent, its highest rate
ernor-general, said in
in nine years; poverty de1940, a few years before
clined significantly from
the country was born:
2002 to 2014. Pakistan’s relationship with “There are two powers in the world; one
China is set to boost its economy: the Chi- is the sword and the other is the pen.
na-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) There is a great competition and rivalry
is a development project with plans to in- between the two. There is a third power
vest up to $62 billion in modernizing elec- stronger than both, that of the women.”
tricity supplies, roads, railways and more.
Also, the number of Pakistanis using the internet reached 34.3 million in
2016. For journalist Jahangir, this is key
to change. In the manner of #MeToo,
“thousands of women in Pakistan now
feel comfortable telling their stories”, she
says, some openly on Facebook, others on
closed social media platforms.
boost [bu:st] , ankurbeln
diverse [daI(v§:s] , vielfältig
electricity supply
[i)lek(trIsEti sE)plaI] , Stromversorgung
gender disparity
[)dZendE dIs(pÄrEti] insurmountable
[)InsE(maUntEb&l] , unüberwindbar
labour force participa­
tion rate [)leIbE fO:s
pA:)tIsI(peIS&n reIt] , Erwerbsquote
maternity leave
[mE(t§:nEti li:v] , Geschlechterungleich-
, Mutterschutzurlaub,
Erziehungsurlaub
heritage site
persist [pE(sIst] , bestehen, andauern
heit
[(herItIdZ saIt] , Kulturerbestätte
infant: ~ and under-five
mortality [(InfEnt] , Sterblichkeit von Kindern unter fünf Jahren
Fotos: Piotr Snigorski, Burhan Ay/Shutterstock.com
Seeing the potential
If Pakistan is to become a “land of opportunity”, it has much to do. The country
could become attractive to international
tourists, with its traditional foods, dress
and customs. As it stands, tourists from all
over Pakistan visit the north of the country, travelling to places like the mountains
of the Swat District, known as the “Switzerland of Pakistan”, the Hunza Valley,
home to lovely Lake Attabad, and heritage
sites such as the Badshahi Mosque in Lahore and the restored Mughal-era Saidpur
village, near the capital of Islamabad.
From a Western perspective, the
challenges facing Pakistan can seem
SOCIETY
The Emporium in Lahore: the biggest shopping mall in Pakistan
5/2018 Spotlight
29 30 Spotlight x/2017
RUBRIKTITEL
Foto: Shahid Khan/ Alamy Stock Photo
An alpine vista:
Pakistan’s Swat District
in the country’s north
RUBRIKTITEL
x/2017 Spotlight
31 Out on the street
Artist Huma Mulji describes everyday life and gives us a taste of
local cuisine in Pakistan’s biggest city, Karachi.
When you visit a restaurant in Karachi
or cook your favourite meal, what do
you eat?
It’s such an ethnically rich city, which
makes this a hard question to answer.
Because it is a city of migrants, it’s
not homogeneous in any way. So, you
could have Hyderabadi, Parsi, Gujarati,
Burmese, Bombay, Sindhi, Afghani, Iranian, Chinese, Makrani (a coastal area) or
Mughal food. At home, our food culture
has lots of Bombay or Gujrat references.
The best place to sample a range
of Karachi food is Burnes Road. But
because the city is so huge, there are
now versions of Burnes Road in some
of Karachi’s satellite districts, including
the affluent Clifton coastal area, Defense
in the south and at Nazimabad, more to
the north. In these places, you’ll find barbecued meat of all kinds, biryani, korma,
nihari, dhokla and khow suey (originally
from Burma). Plus seafood and haleem,
and paratha flatbread, chaat, numerous
kinds of naan and spicy chapli kebabs.
Because of the recent influence from
the Middle East, we also have falafel
and hummus, though that is also more
a “global” food thing, as are the Italian,
Thai and French restaurants. The Chinese food culture is third generation and
it’s a very local fusion.
My nostalgic homage to my home
is always a kebab and chaat with paan,
sweetened desiccated coconut with lots
of other stuff wrapped in betel leaves.
Do you ever feel homesick for Karachi
when you are in the UK?
I don’t see it as homesickness, but I
sometimes still forget where I am — I
lift my head and can be surprised by so
many white faces on the street. In my life
with my husband (British artist David
Alesworth), we travel the world, so I
cook whatever fits. It could be something extremely Pakistani, but it could
also be Thai. Music is something that
moves me very deeply. I stick my headphones on and listen to qawwali or ghazal
when I really want to indulge my pining
for my beautiful Urdu language, which I
don’t get to speak enough.
affluent [(ÄfluEnt] flatbread [(flÄtbred] , wohlhabend
, Fladenbrot
aural [(O:rEl] , Gehör-; hier: akustisch
, Huldigung
barber [(bA:bE] , Herrenfriseur
pining [(paInIN] , Sehnsucht, Nachtrau-
beg [beg] , betteln
cobbler [(kQblE] , Schuster(in)
desiccated [(desIkeItId] , getrocknet
fancy [(fÄnsi] , modisch, schick
homage [(hQmIdZ] ern
sample [(sA:mp&l] , probieren
Fotos: Asianet-Pakistan/Shutterstock.com; Abraaj Group Art Prize
Describe a typical street scene in
Karachi.
There is always lots of activity on the
street. You see everything from limousines to chickens running across the
road. You might see men fighting, road
accidents, children begging, people
welding, food sellers, men doing nothing, women walking with children, boot
polishers and cobblers (no one really
wears fancy shoes), barbers cutting hair,
lots of plastic bags, vegetable stalls, old
men sunning themselves on chairs and
garbage. You hear all of this. It’s a real
aural overload.
stall [stO:l] , Stand
weld [weld] , schweißen
A street scene
in Karachi
32 Spotlight x/2017
SOCIETY
I ASK MYSELF
Here’s to Hope
Die Drehtür im Weißen Haus dreht sich weiter – und
macht auch vor Mitarbeitern nicht Halt, die bis
dahin nicht einmal im Rampenlicht stehen.
ADVANCED US
Fotos: picture alliance/AP images; Julia Albul, Levent Konuk/iStock.com
W
AMY ARGETSINGER
is an editor at
The Washington
Post, a leading
daily newspaper
in the US.
I ASK MYSELF
hat will become of Hope Hicks???” a friend wrote to
me in early March. Hicks, a longtime, loyal aide to
President Trump, had just stepped down from her
job amid growing controversy — the fifth White
House communications director to leave the position in just over a year. And yet, no one seemed particularly curious about what would happen to the
others who left.
I’ll go ahead and say it: Hope Hicks was probably
the most beautiful White House staffer in history. At
29, she was young for such a big job, though not all
that young — in previous eras, it had been done by
several hard-charging 30-somethings. Yet Hicks’s rise
to this demanding job was still surprising, as a former
model and fashion publicist who had no experience
in government or politics other than her longtime
work for the Trump family.
And have I mentioned the fact that Hicks was
­extremely beautiful? I bring this up not to cast
­aspersions on her abilities, but to explain the un­
usually immense amount of public interest in her.
Indirectly, it may, in fact, be the reason she lost her
job. She quit amid two growing controversies. Most
recently, she had testified before a special prosecutor — who was investigating possible links between
the White House and Russian election meddling —
about charges that she had occasionally told “white
lies” on behalf of her boss, the president. She was
also under scrutiny for her attempts to provide a
White House defense for her boyfriend, Rob Porter
— ­another high-level presidential aide — after he was
accused of physically abusing his two ex-wives.
It’s my theory that the public fascination with
Hope Hicks is what led to her downfall. In late January, a gossip tabloid sent a photographer to follow
her on a date — which is how the news broke that
she and Porter were seeing each other. This, in turn,
increased public interest in Porter, and apparently
prompted someone to tip off journalists about his
allegedly violent past. Within a month, the two had
broken up and no longer had their White House jobs.
So what will become of Hope Hicks? She’ll prob­
ably land in a fine, lucrative job. Unlike her predecessors, who left the White House under a cloud, Hicks
does not have a toxic air about her. This is due to her
ability to stay in the background, even while the photographers were circling: She did not give press conferences. She did not appear on TV. She was a communications director whose voice was never heard
and therefore has no embarrassments on tape.
And then there’s something about her kind of
beauty — a wide-eyed, youthful quality that seduces
the brain. As a result, she appears sweet and reasonable, but vulnerable as well. This makes us want to protect her — even when we know nothing about her.
allegedly [E(ledZIdli] , angeblich, vermeintlich
predecessor [(predEses&r] , Vorgänger(in)
, inmitten
amid [E(mId] scrutiny [(skru:t&ni] , genaue Überprüfung
cast aspersions on sth.
special prosecutor
, über etw. abfällige Bemerkun-
, Sonderstaatsanwalt, -anwältin
[)kÄst E(sp§:Z&nz A:n] gen machen
gossip tabloid
[(gA:sEp )tÄblOId] , Klatschblatt
hard-charging
[)hA:rd (tSA:rdZIN] US , tatkräftig
meddling [(med&lIN] , Einmischung
[)speS&l (prA:sIkju:t&r] testify [(testIfaI] , als Zeuge, Zeugin aussagen
tip off [tIp (O:f] ifml. , einen Tipp geben
toxic [(tA:ksIk] , giftig, schädlich
vulnerable [(vVlnErEb&l] , verletzlich
white lie [waIt (laI] , kleine Notlüge
5/2018 Spotlight
33 Where Congress meets:
the Capitol Building with
its famous dome
34 Spotlight x/2017
TRAVEL
All eyes on
Washington
Das politische Drama in Washington, DC, lässt nicht nach – doch wer die
Hauptstadt besucht, erkennt schnell ihre wahre Seele
als monumental und tiefgründig, wie das neue Museum für afroamerikanische
Geschichte und Kultur beweist. Von JESSICA MANN MEDIUM US AUDIO PLUS
H
ome to the US federal government, Washington,
DC, is better known for its marble monuments and
­power-hungry politicians than for its own charms as
a city. But a visit to the capital reveals more than first
meets the eye — and many more sides of American
history and identity beyond just Democrat and Republican.
The city’s founding in 1790 is indeed rooted in a compromise between
two opposing sides. Politicians from the North and South conceived
the District of Columbia — often simply known as “DC” — as neutral
ground for the nation’s capital. Donated by Maryland and Virginia, the
land located along the Potomac River enabled the creation of the new
capital city, which does not belong to any of the 50 states.
Since then, Washington has both geographically and politically
bridged the gap between the North and South in the United States. But
beyond sth. [bi(A:nd] , über etw. hinaus
conceive sth. [kEn(si:v] , etw. auffassen
donate [(doUneIt] , spenden, schenken
eye: more than meets the ~
[aI] , mehr als auf Anhieb
Foto: Uschools University Images/iStock.com
erkennbar
marble [(mA:rb&l] , Marmor-
reveal [ri(vi:&l] , enthüllen, zeigen
that isn’t the only rift that exists within
its city limits. Just as victory and tragedy are remembered in its museums and
monuments, the city’s present is complex.
While DC attracts some of the nation’s
best educated citizens, its population
has a level of illiteracy well above the
national average. Washingtonians are at
once among the country’s most elite and
its most impoverished. And an ironic bit
of injustice plagues the city to this day:
Surrounded by monuments to democracy and taxed like all other Americans,
DC residents themselves do not have a
voting representative in Congress due to
their “stateless” status.
“I Have a Dream” speech as well as the
Women’s March on Washington that
took place in 2017. The symbolic space
has been used often in American history
as a gathering place for citizens to make
their voices heard.
To the south of the Mall is the Tidal
Basin, a well-designed, curving bay off
of the Potomac River. In the spring, the
blossoming cherry trees there — a gift
from Japan in 1912 — attract just as many
tourists as the Mall’s monuments.
As I begin walking around it, I come to
the Jefferson Memorial. Here, the most
famous quotes of Thomas Jefferson, the
country’s third president and one of its
“Founding Fathers,” are carved into the
towering walls surrounding an imposing
Day 1
36 Spotlight 5/2018
Protesting the new president: the January 2017
Women’s March on Washington took place on the two
days after the inauguration of Donald J. Trump
the states into the work by showing some
figures purposely looking away from
George Washington.
From the Rotunda, we move on to the
halls of the building, where the legislative
branch of the American government has
debated and decided the laws of the land
since 1800. Congress currently includes
435 members in the House of Representatives and 100 in the Senate. While
the chambers of the House and Senate
are closed for the day, the building seems
­anything but empty thanks to the presence of statues in every room.
11:15 a.m.
After my tour of Capitol Hill, I decide
to carry on exploring the National Mall
in the bright DC sunshine. The Capitol
Building is located at one end of the park
and is squared off by the Lincoln Memorial at the other, nearly two miles (3.2 km)
away. The center of the Mall features the
roughly 555-foot (169-meter) tall stone
obelisk known as the Washington Monument, and the grassy slopes beside it are
a favorite spot for flying kites. The most
famous memorials on the Mall, a space
originally planned by architect Pierre
L’Enfant, are iconic symbols of American
history and democracy in their own right.
As I walk toward the Lincoln Memorial, along the reflecting pool that stretches
out in front of it, I remember images I’d
seen of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 1963
blossoming [(blA:sEmIN] , blühend
carve [kA:rv] , einmeißeln
legislative body
[)ledZEsleItIv (bA:di] , Gesetzgebungsorgan
legislative branch
[)ledZEsleItIv (brÄntS] domed [doUmd] , überkuppelt
, Legislative
educated [(edZEkeItEd] , gebildet
, plagen
feature [(fi:tS&r] , darstellen, zeigen
gleaming [(gli:mIN] , glänzend, schimmernd
grand [grÄnd] , eindrucksvoll
grassy [(grÄsi] , grasbewachsen
iconic: ~ symbol
[aI(kA:nIk] , bekanntes Wahrzeichen
illiteracy [I(lItErEsi] , Analphabetismus,
Ungebildetheit
impoverished
[Im(pA:vErISt] , verarmt, arm
inauguration
[I)nO:gjE(reIS&n] , Amtsantritt,
Amtseinführung
kite [kaIt] , (Lenk-)Drachen
plague [pleIg] reminiscent: be ~ of sth.
[)remI(nIs&nt] , an etw. erinnern
resident [(rezIdEnt] , Einwohner(in)
rift [rIft] , Kluft
rotunda [roU(tVndE] , Rundbau
slope [sloUp] , Hang
squared off by sth.
[)skwe&rd (O:f baI] , hier: von etw. als
Gegenpol begrenzt
towering [(taU&rIN] , hoch aufragend,
gewaltig
vibe [vaIb] ifml. , Atmosphäre
voting representative
[)voUtIN repri(zentEtIv] , Stimmrechtsvertre-
ter(in)
TRAVEL
Fotos: Richard Ellis/Alamy Stock Photo; dkfielding/iStock.com
10:30 a.m.
I start my tour in the home of Congress
itself: the domed Capitol Building. The
tour begins in the visitor center. Completed in 2008, the Capitol Visitor Center
welcomes its guests in large theaters below the main building itself, past many
statues and paintings of important figures and scenes from American history.
A short film called Out of Many, One — a
translation of the Latin E pluribus unum,
the traditional motto of the United
States — gives visitors a quick overview
of the building itself. It also explains
the revolutionary nature of the US Congress’s beginnings and highlights the
role the ­legislative body has in American
life. Beyond its function as the home of
the legislature, the site is also important
for ceremonial purposes, as scenes from
presidential inaugurations and State of
the Union speeches emphasize.
After being divided into groups, we
make our way to the Rotunda at the
center of the building. The mainly ceremonial space gives off a grand vibe with
its high ceilings and gleaming walls reminiscent of classical architecture. Some
180 feet (55 meters) above our heads,
its ceiling features the first president,
George Washington, sitting among godlike figures up to 15 feet (4.5 meters) tall
who represent various ideals of American
democracy and innovation. The Apotheosis of Washington was painted by Italian-­
American artist Constantino Brumidi
over the course of nearly a year at the end
of the Civil War, in 1865. The artist is said
to have incorporated the struggle among
In the Rotunda:
a statue of Abraham Lincoln,
who freed the slaves; above,
The Apotheosis of Washington
makes a god of a great man
RUBRIKTITEL
x/2017 Spotlight
37 commuter [kE(mju:t&r] 1 p.m.
After all that walking, I’m finally ready for
some lunch. I make my way to Chopt, one
of many “fast casual” restaurants serving
the hungry lunchtime crowds in a city
whose population nearly doubles during
the workweek thanks to commuters from
the surrounding Maryland and Virginia
suburbs. Chopt serves delicious custom
salads and is clearly popular. I stand in
line, rubbing shoulders with hurried DC
workers in suits and on phones, feeling
like the most relaxed person in the room.
3:15 p.m.
After lunch, it’s time to swing by the president’s house, which happens to double
as the head of state’s workplace as well.
The White House is found at one of the
country’s best-known addresses: 1600
Pennsylvania Avenue. You can no longer
drive directly up to it, however, as Pennsylvania Avenue is open to pedestrians
only in front of the White House itself.
This leaves plenty of room for tourists to
take photos and activists to protest the
president’s politics — a daily event no
matter who’s in office.
5:30 p.m.
All that fresh air is finally getting to me,
so I decide to head indoors. The world-famous — and free — Smithsonian museums located along the Mall and all over
downtown DC are a perfect way to do just
that. With 19 museums in total, it can be
difficult to decide where to begin. But I
continue with the presidential theme.
Founded by Congress in 1962, the
National Portrait Gallery is known for
its collection of presidential portraits
and has commissioned new ones of each
outgoing president since the 1990s. I am
particularly intrigued by the painting of
Bill Clinton, created in a grid-based style
using a photo taken in 2005. The new
portraits of Barack and Michelle Obama
by Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, respectively (see page 40), are here, too, and
have been received warmly by critics and
regular Americans alike.
, Fußgänger(in)
etch [etS] , ätzen, gravieren
, unterstreichen
fountain [(faUnt&n] resonate with sth.
, Springbrunnen
gracing [(greIsIN] , schmückend, zierend
grid-based [(grId beIst] , rasterorientiert
head [hed] , sich auf den Weg
machen
punctuate [(pVNktSueIt] [(rezEneIt wIT] , etw. ausstrahlen
rub: ~ shoulders with
sb. [rVb] , dicht gedrängt stehen
suburb [(sVb§:b] , Vorort
term [t§:m] , Amtszeit
7:15 p.m.
One of the best areas in DC for a night out
is the Adams Morgan neighborhood in
Northwest. After a quick ride on the Metro — through stations in the transit system’s iconic brutalist design — I wander
Fotos: Coast-to-Coast/iStock.com; Alan Karchner for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture
statue of the man himself. Next along
the basin, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Memorial — large enough to be its own
park — honors the country’s only fourterm president, in office from 1933 to
1945, and his well-respected wife, Eleanor Roosevelt. Waterfalls and fountains
punctuate speeches etched in stone. At
night, the memorial is lit up, but even during the day, it resonates with a feeling of
peace and quiet. The final memorial gracing the Tidal Basin is the Martin Luther
King, Jr. Memorial. It opened in 2011 after
years of planning, particularly by the civil
rights leader’s former fraternity.
pedestrian [pE(destriEn] , Pendler(in)
Sunshine and cold
drinks: diners enjoy the
fine weather during the
annual Adams Morgan
Day celebrations
38 Spotlight 5/2018
TRAVEL
The National Museum of
African American History and
Culture and the tall, white
obelisk of the Washington
Monument
RUBRIKTITEL
x/2017 Spotlight
39 past Victorian row houses and make my
way to a street filled with restaurants. I
decide to try out a trend I’ve heard about
from friends and line up for some ramen
at Sakuramen. I order the “DC Miso.”
Another trend is planned for after dinner: the modern-day speakeasy. I walk
along 18th Street down to U Street, and
make my way to the unmarked door of
The Gibson. Without my friend’s description, it would have been tough to find. Inside, a reserved wooden booth and fancy
classic cocktails await me.
Day 2
10 a.m.
I start the next day on a different note:
The most recently opened Smithsonian museum, the National Museum of
African American History and Culture,
is dedicated to the African American experience. It is the only national museum
in the US with that focus, and its establishment by an Act of Congress in 2003
followed a struggle that began as early as
1915, when African American war veterans started to push for recognition on the
National Mall. The museum opened in
2016, and was inaugurated by President
Obama. In his speech, he quoted the African American poet Langston Hughes,
declaring, “I, too, am America.”
The museum is immensely popular
with visitors, and it can be difficult to get
a pass to visit it. I feel lucky to have been
able to get one, but I also know that the
visit itself will be difficult, as the exhibition looks head on at some of the most
horrific chapters of American history.
The first part of the historical section
begins in the recreated bowels of a slave
ship and leads ever upward, past artifacts
ranging from tiny shackles used on a child
to a reconstructed slave cabin and, later, a
segregated railroad car. A multimedia deli
counter shows images of the civil rights
movement.
The exhibition reveals the many years
of struggle following the end of slavery
and doesn’t shy away from the terror and
violence that defined much of that struggle. It also addresses the challenges faced
by African Americans now, as the fight for
racial equity continues.
The experience is extremely moving
and emotional. I feel transported to another place and time — a difficult one.
40 Spotlight 5/2018
1:30 p.m.
I don’t quite feel ready to move on from
the museum, so I stop for lunch at its restaurant, Sweet Home Café, a place with
dishes that highlight African American
culture in various regions of the United
States. The offerings are divided into regional groups, including “the agricultural
South” and “the creole coast.” I take comfort in the food and admire the photos on
the walls of the café. Then I head upstairs
to see the rest of the museum, which focuses on the achievements of African
Americans in the arts, sports, culture, and
society. It is full of memorabilia, such as
Chuck Berry’s Cadillac convertible and
one of Prince’s flashy costumes.
4 p.m.
My final stop of the day is a DC classic
that I remember from my own childhood.
The Bureau of Engraving and Printing is
where American paper currency is designed. On a guided tour, you can watch the
printing machines in action and see surprising amounts of cash in huge piles. This tour
of the “money factory” has a retro vibe to it,
conjuring up a feeling of endless wealth and
opportunity — or, at least, its illusion.
Feeling bold, I ask the tour guide if this is
all really necessary. Isn’t everything digital
nowadays anyway? He gives me a funny
look and explains that paper currency still
needs to exist to give value to its digital
cousin. I take a bit of comfort in his answer.
Perhaps there is still something backing up
the illusion after all.
artifact [(A:rtIfÄkt] , Gegenstand
booth [bu:T] , Nische
bowels [(baUElz] , Eingeweide, Innenleben
dedicated to sth.
[(dedIkeItEd tE] , speziell für etw.
vorgesehen
deli counter
[(deli )kaUnt&r] ifml. racial equity
[)reIS&l (ekwEti] , ethnische Chancen-
gleichheit
ramen [(rA:men] , eine japanische
Nudelart
recreated [)ri:kri(eItEd] , nachgebaut
row house [(roU haUs] , Reihenhaus
segregated
[(segrIgeItEd] , nach Rassen getrennt
shackles [(SÄk&lz] , Bedientheke
, (Fuß-)Fesseln
fancy [(fÄnsi] , ausgefallen, raffiniert
shy: ~ away from sth.
memorabilia
[)memErE(bIliE] , Erinnerungsstücke
offering [(O:fErIN] , Angebot
paper currency
[SaI] , vor etw. zurückschre-
cken
speakeasy [(spi:k)i:zi]
N. Am. ifml. , Flüsterkneipe (illegale
Kneipe während der
Alkoholprohibition)
[(peIp&r )k§:Ensi] take comfort in sth.
past [pÄst] , vorbei an
, sich mit etw.
pile [paI&l] , Stapel, Haufen
, nicht gekennzeichnet
, Papiergeld
[teIk (kVmf&rt] trösten
unmarked [)Vn(mA:rkt] If you go…
Getting there
Fly to Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD).
www.flydulles.com
Stay
At the Kimpton George Hotel, close to the Capitol
Building. www.hotelgeorge.com
What to do
Tours of the Capitol are best booked in advance.
www.visitthecapitol.gov/plan-visit/book-tour-capitol
Get tickets online for the National Museum of
African American History and Culture.
nmaahc.si.edu
See the new portraits of the Obamas (the former
president’s portrait is pictured left) at the National
Portrait Gallery. npg.si.edu
Eat and drink
Chopt serves up salads at locations all along the
East Coast. www.choptsalad.com
Go to The Gibson. www.thegibsondc.com
More information
See washington.org
TRAVEL
Gemälde: National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA; Foto: f11photo/iStock.com
admire [Ed(maI&r] , bewundern
The famous cherry blossoms
at the Tidal Basin with the
Jefferson Memorial in the
background
RUBRIKTITEL
x/2017 Spotlight
41 CULTURE
Making musical
magic
Seit 50 Jahren sind sie weltweit unterwegs: Die King’s Singers,
deren A-cappella-Repertoire eine unglaubliche Bandbreite
von Werken der Renaissance bis Pop bietet.
Von MARGARET DAVIS
Fotos: mauritius images/United Archives; GeorgePeters/iStock.com
MEDIUM
42 Spotlight x/2017
In the beginning: the
original King’s Singers were
formed in Cambridge in
May 1968
A
week in the life of The King’s Singers on their 50th anniversary tour:
Tuesday, Cambridge, England;
Thursday, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada; Saturday, Allentown,
Pennsylvania, USA; Sunday, New
York City; Tuesday, Athens, Georgia. And that was
just the first week. The second saw them with further
US dates, in Texas, North Carolina and Washington,
DC, before returning to Europe for concerts in Italy,
Germany and France. A week to catch their breath,
and then they were off to Singapore, Australia and
New Zealand — plus more concerts in the US.
While 2018 is an especially busy year, touring is
just part of the job for The King’s Singers, one of the
best-known vocal sextets in the world. The group was
officially formed in May 1968 by six choral scholars
from King’s College, Cambridge. It consisted of two
countertenors, two baritones, one tenor and one
bass, a formation that the group has retained over the
past 50 years, although the members have changed.
The newest member, 24-year-old Patrick Dunachie,
joined The King’s Singers in 2016. His fellow singers,
who range in age from 28 to 39, joined the group between 2004 and 2014.
Membership of the sextet is by invitation only, and
the auditions are gruelling, stretching over several
days. In the final stage, prospective singers are tested
for their ability to learn new pieces quickly, a necessity with the group’s extensive repertoire. Works by
Palestrina or Poulenc could very well share the stage
with popular songs by Billy Joel or KT Tunstall.
In addition to numerous live performances
— The King’s Singers are on the road for about
seven months a year — the group gives masterclasses, including a four-day residency at the
choral scholar [(kO:rEl )skQlE] , Chorstipendiat
countertenor [(kaUntE)tenE] , Kontratenor
gruelling [(gru:ElIN] , äußerst strapaziös
prospective [prE(spektIv] , künftig, angehend
residency [(rezIdEnsi] UK , Aufenthalt; hier: die
regelmäßige Verpflichtung eines
Musikers, an einem bestimmten
Veranstaltungsort aufzutreten
oder zu arbeiten
retain [ri(tein] , beibehalten
5/2018 Spotlight
43 provincial areas of China, people are not
quiet. They take loud phone calls in the
middle of concerts, which is not a problem for us, but you can see there’s this tension between members of the audience
who really want to listen. Different composers resonate more in some countries
than others. In Finland, for example, they
adore Sibelius. And people always like
it when you sing in their own language.
In Germany, there’s a wonderfully rich
heritage of composers who have written
choral music for a cappella singers. People have, therefore, grown up with choral singing, and they respond extremely
well to it. As for applause, there’s no right
or wrong here. At a concert in Norway,
everyone was very quiet, and we were
wondering if they were
actually enjoying it. But
at the end, people were
weeping. At the other
extreme, it’s rare not to
get a standing ovation in
America.
“You can
tell what
role singing
plays in a
culture by
how people
respond”
The King’s Singers are
very active on social media. Are you making a
conscious effort to reach
a young audience?
Jonathan Howard: Music is something that
should bring people joy,
and using social media is a
fantastic way of doing that. The advantage
of social media is that the response is immediate. If you’re prepared to adapt, you
can put yourself in front of your fans and
ask them, “What do you think?” Unlike
in real life, people are not scared of being
honest on social media.
Julian Gregory: Unlike some groups, for
The King’s Singers, the live experience is
very special and important. We pride ourselves on being live musicians. When we
do Facebook videos, we do them live and
sing for an audience of about 100,000 followers, which not many other artists do.
Our newest member is just out of university, so social media are very much a normal part of life. We are “digital natives”,
and this form of communication comes
naturally.
Do audiences in different countries respond differently to your music?
Howard: I think you can tell what role
singing and music play in different cultures by the way people respond. In
44 Spotlight 5/2018
How do you choose what
music to perform at your
concerts?
Gregory: We like to do
new compositions or new
arrangements of familiar
pieces. At the same time,
concert promoters request pieces that
they think local audiences will enjoy. We
have always prided ourselves on a varied
programme.
Howard: Yes, we do have a more diverse
repertoire than most groups. We like to
make a connection with audiences, and
that connection for me comes through actually talking to them and keeping them
engaged with clever programme ­choices
— for example singing a Renaissance
piece followed by something written in
1982 by Sting that complements it.
Would you ever consider adding a woman to the group?
Howard: We would love to collaborate
more with women, and we don’t want to
be seen as ignoring the amazing potential
that exists in adding more voices to the
group. But because our sound is inherently linked with the original formation
at King’s College, Cambridge, which was
all male, my hunch is that our core will remain male.
, ansteckend
infectious [In(fekSEs] adore [E(dO:] , verehren, lieben
, von Haus aus
inherently [In(herEntli] complement , [(kQmplIment] ergänzen
pinpoint [(pInpOInt] , haarscharf
composer [kEm(pEUzE] , Komponist(in)
, loben
conscious [(kQnSEs] , bewusst
[(praId wVn)self] core [kO:] , Kern, Herzstück
crisp [krIsp] , klar
diction [(dIkS&n] , Artikulation
diverse [daI(v§:s] , vielfältig
engaged [In(geIdZd] , beschäftigt; hier:
begeistert
faultless [(fO:ltlEs] , einwandfrei
heritage [(herItIdZ] , Tradition
hunch [hVntS] , Vermutung
praise [preIz] pride oneself
, sehr stolz sein
rapport [rÄ(pO:] , harmonisches
Verhältnis
resonate [(rezEneIt] , Resonanz finden
tension [(tenS&n] , Spannung
tuck into sth.
[tVk (Intu:] ifml. , sich etw. schmecken
lassen
tuning [(tju:nIN] , Stimmung; hier:
Intonation
unlike [)Vn(laIk] , anders als
weep [wi:p] , weinen
Who are they?
Countertenor Patrick Dunachie, 24, joined
the group in 2016.
Countertenor Timothy Wayne-Wright, 35,
joined in 2009.
Tenor Julian Gregory, 28, joined in 2014.
Baritone Christopher Bruerton, 33, joined
in 2012.
Baritone Christopher Gabbitas, 39, joined
in 2004.
Bass Jonathan Howard, 31, joined in 2010.
Gabbitas and Wayne-Wright will be leaving
the group at the end of the 50th anniversary
year. Both of them are fathers of young
children, and they say that the touring
schedule is hard on their families.
See them sing
The King’s Singers are known for their
unconventional arrangements of popular
music. In this YouTube video, they perform
“And So It Goes” by Billy Joel in an
arrangement by former King’s Singer Bob
Chilcott.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVdt3x9jdOk
Find out more
Website: www.kingssingers.com (lots of
information, blogs, stories and concert dates)
Twitter: @kingssingers
Facebook: www.facebook.com/kingssingers
Instagram: www.instagram.com/kingssingers
CULTURE
Foto: Marco Borggreve
Schleswig-Holstein Musik Festival in
Lübeck, attended by a cappella groups
from all over the world. Its latest recording, Gold, is a three-CD production that
reflects the group’s 50-year history.
The Times praises their “pinpoint precision, total rapport, crisp diction, faultless
tuning and a seemingly effortless ability
to switch between different stylistic requirements”. That rapport is obvious in a
lively restaurant near the Bavarian Radio
studios in Munich. Tenor Julian Gregory and bass Jonathan (Johnny) Howard are tucking into lunch with hearty
appetites after a morning spent giving
radio interviews (both speak excellent
German). The young singers are polite,
friendly and thoughtful, with an infectious enthusiasm for their
work as members of the
award-winning ensemble,
which they often refer to
simply as “KS”.
adapt [E(dÄpt] , sich anpassen
We six Kings: from left to right, Julian Gregory, Patrick Dunachie, Christopher Gabbitas, Jonathan Howard, Timothy Wayne-Wright and
Christopher Bruerton are The King’s Singers
Gregory: I agree. One of our USPs is that
KS sound. All our music is written for that
unique combination of two countertenors, one tenor, two baritones and one bass.
Do you think there’s a difference between the kind of person who becomes
an ensemble singer and someone who’s
a soloist?
Gregory: The fundamental difference is
that in solo singing, you are training your
own voice. You are focusing on the sound
of one voice. In our singing, we often talk
about leaving one’s individual vocal ego
backstage. But the levels of artistry are the
same. As ensemble singers, you are striving to communicate, to emote, to take the
music off the page and to give audiences
this musical experience.
Howard: Yes. I think it’s interesting, because even as an ensemble singer, you
can still shape your future. We are each
CULTURE
partners in the business, as much as we
are members of the group. There is no
leader, and we are all equally responsible
for the rise and fall of our entity as The
King’s Singers. I am just as driven to be
a guiding and a leading force in trying to
make the group as good as I can. And I
don’t think that is hampered because I am
one of six — because I still have that drive,
that vision. What I feel is what everyone
else feels about the group — it’s wonderful training to care so passionately about
something. It depends on how much each
of us is willing to compromise; and to care
about something bigger requires self-­
discipline. It’s not about the music at all.
It’s about how you take six creative, performing people and say to them: to make
magic, you’ve got to work together.
artistry [(A:tIstri] , Kunstfertigkeit, künst-
, erschwert
drive [draIv] , Antrieb, Elan
strive [straIv] , sich bemühen,
bestrebt sein
driven [(drIv&n] , engagiert, begierig
, einzigartig
lerisches Schaffen
emote [i(mEUt] , Gefühle darstellen
entity [(entEti] , Gemeinschaft,
hampered [(hÄmpEd] unique [ju(ni:k] USP (unique selling
point) [)ju: es (pi:] , Wettbewerbsvorteil,
Alleinstellungsmerkmal
Unternehmen
5/2018 Spotlight
45 AMERICAN LIFE
The end
of time
Unsere Kolumnistin schreibt über den Tod ihrer
Mutter – über schwierige Zeiten und wie man sie sich
gemeinsam mit Humor erleichtern kann.
MEDIUM US AUDIO PLUS
Fotos: guvendemir, kyoshino/iStock.com
M
GINGER KUENZEL
is a freelance
writer who lived
in Munich for 20
years. She now
calls a small
town in upstate
New York home.
46 Spotlight 5/2018
om passed away recently. She was 97, and death at
that age isn’t exactly unexpected. But then again,
when the end does come, it’s still a jarring shock for
those left behind: so final. But at least she died the
way we would all like to go — quickly and painlessly,
according to the doctor.
Years ago, she said that she was ready to go whenever her time came. She wasn’t depressed about it,
just realistic. In fact, she made many preparations
during the final decades of her life. When Dad died
in 1982, she ordered a gravestone carved with both
his and her names and birth dates plus his date of
death. “You can just add my date of death later,” she
said. “It’s cheaper and easier that way.”
She also wrote her own obituary years ago. I
wondered if she didn’t trust us to get it right, or if
she was just trying to make things easy for us. As
for the photo to go with it, she wanted one in which
she looked good, but not too good. After all, she said,
people should know that she had lived to be as old as
she was. She hated reading the obituary of a woman
who was 90-something juxtaposed with a photo of a
glamorous young girl. We were not to do that for her,
she instructed.
As Mom grew older, her aches and pains became
debilitating, and her eyesight failed. She needed help
to get dressed, to go to the bathroom, and even to eat.
This downward spiral was hard on her, a woman who
had always been fiercely independent. But perhaps
the most difficult thing for her was when she s­ tarted,
over the past year, to lose her mental sharpness. Some
days were worse than others. At first, it was rather
comical, and she laughed with us about it. She saw
boxes and books everywhere in her apartment and
couldn’t stand the mess. We told her they weren’t
­really there, that she had only imagined them. She
said she knew it, but she still saw them. We joked
with her that, back in the 1960s, we had paid good
money for drugs to get us to the state she was in.
In the last months, she became obsessed with
time. While helping her organize the i­maginary
boxes and books one day, my brother and I found five
timers — along with many watches and clocks — in
drawers and on shelves. “What do you need all these
for, Mom?” we asked. “Well, I just want to be sure I
have plenty of time,” she replied with a wry smile.
We also found enough rubber bands and paper
clips to stock an office supply store. Perhaps she
needed these to hold things together as it all started
to fall apart. Our joking was not insensitive — she
laughed with us, finding humor in little things, even
when life got really tough. “Teach your children well,”
goes the song. And that’s what she did, showing us
how to live life to the fullest. Here’s to Mom, to a life
well lived — and to the memories that will always
live on.
ache [eIk] , Schmerz
obituary [E(bItSueri] , Nachruf, Todesanzeige
apart [E(pA:rt] , auseinander
obsessed [Eb(sest] , besessen, zwanghaft
carve [kA:rv] , hier: einmeißeln
, Büroklammer
debilitating [di(bIlIteItIN] , belastend, kräftezehrend
pass away [pÄs E(weI] , sterben, dahinscheiden
fiercely [(fI&rsli] , leidenschaftlich, hochgradig
rubber band [)rVb&r (bÄnd]
, Gummiband
insensitive [In(sensEtIv] , unsensibel, gefühllos
stock [stA:k] , ausstatten
jarring [(dZA:rIN] , irritierend; hier: schmerzlich
timer [(taIm&r] , Zeitschaltuhr
juxtaposed [(dZVkstEpoUzd] , neben, in Verbindung mit
wry [raI] , schief, verlegen
paper clip [(peIp&r klIp] AMERICAN LIFE
Dog days: some of the canine
characters in Isle of Dogs
ARTS
FILM PREVIEW | DRAMA
Rescue, redemption
and rebellion
Zwei Filme und eine Ausstellung über Menschen, die
gegen die Strömung schwimmen. Von EVE LUCAS
MEDIUM
Fotos: 20th Century Fox; Concorde Filmverleih; ©Pirkle Jones Foundation
FILM REVIEW | ANIMATION, ADVENTURE
It’s 20 years in the future. An epidemic of dog flu threatens human life in Japan. A local mayor decides to exile all dogs to Trash
Island — a stinking, dirty place where no humans live and dogs
fight over old food. Atari, a 12-year-old boy heartbroken because
his dog has been taken away, sets out to look for his pet. Flying
a small plane to Trash Island, he begins his search, helped by a
gang of puppies.
Isle of Dogs is not American director Wes Anderson’s first
animated film. His movie version of Roald Dahl’s Fantastic Mr
Fox was a box-office hit in 2009. In Isle of Dogs, Anderson again
uses the animated stop-motion technique, which involves the
use of real moving objects (not computerized drawings). The
results are wonderfully lifelike, enabling dogs and humans to
move realistically and allowing viewers to get under the skin
of Anderson’s characters. With actors such as Bill Murray and
Jeff Goldblum giving their voices to these brave and funny four-­
legged heroes, Anderson is free to run wild with his own story
and script. The moral of his film may be odd — love your neighbour even if it’s a dog — but Anderson succeeds in making it look
like an attractive alternative to the human-driven devastation of
our planet. Starts 10 May.
brave [breIv] , mutig, tapfer
devastation
[)devE(steIS&n] , Verwüstung, Zerstörung
ARTS
dog flu [(dQg flu:] script [skrIpt] British actor Rupert Everett believes that
telling the world he was gay damaged his
career. Perhaps some of his pain has gone
into the making of a film, The Happy Prince,
about Oscar Wilde — which he wrote, directed and also acts in. In addition to childhood memories of Wilde’s stories, Everett was able to explore
his interest in the famously gay playwright while acting in a play
based on the affair between Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas. Not
surprisingly, The Happy Prince presents Wilde not as an elegantly
witty social darling, but as a man made desperate by love and
suffering. Following Wilde as he travels around Europe during
the last months of his life, before dying penniless in Paris, this
film reveals a man less amusing — but probably more honestly
observed. Starts 24 May.
penniless [(penIlEs] , mittellos
playwright [(pleIraIt] , Bühnenautor(in)
EXHIBITION | PHOTOGRAPHY
German-born American photographer Ruth-Marion Baruch
and her husband, Pirkle Jones, met in the 1960s at the Cali­fornia
School of Fine Arts. Both became interested in the “flower-­
power” and counterculture movements developing on America’s
West Coast and worked on their photographic documentation.
In the late 1960s, the couple took a series of photos that recorded
the life and work of the Black Panthers, a movement dedicated to
defending the civil rights of black Americans. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s death in
1968, the Museum Ludwig in Cologne is
showing the couple’s remarkable photos
of Black Power activists and their environments in an exhibition titled “Black
Power — Flower Power”. Ends 3 June. To
find out more, go to www.museum-ludwig.de
, Hundegrippe
, Drehbuch
odd [Qd] , merkwürdig, seltsam
set out [set (aUt] , sich aufmachen
puppy [(pVpi] , Hundewelpe
stop-motion
commemorate
counterculture
, Zeitraffer-
, gedenken
, Gegenkultur-
[stQp (mEUS&n] witty [(wIti] , witzig, geistreich
[kE(memEreIt] [(kaUntE)kVltSE] dedicated [(dedIkeItId] , gewidmet, verschrie-
ben
5/2018 Spotlight
47 2
1
3
4
7
5
8
6
15
14
1.rimless glasses
[)rImlEs (glA:sIz]
2.eye chart [(aI tSA:t]
3.frames [freImz]
4.glasses case
[(glA:sIz keIs]
5.bifocals [)baI(fEUk&lz]
6.glasses cloth
[(glA:sIz klQT]
7.glasses [(glA:sIz],
spectacles [(spektEk&lz]
UK, specs [speks] ifml.,
eyeglasses [(aIglA:sIz]
N. Am.
8.bridge [brIdZ]
9.temple [(temp&l],
earpiece [(IEpi:s],
arm [A:m]
10.hinge [hIndZ]
11.nose pad [(nEUz pÄd]
12.lens [lenz]
13.disposable wipes
[dI(spEUzEb&l )waIps]
14.contacts [(kQntÄkts],
contact lenses
[(kQntÄkt lenzIz]
15.contact lens solution
[(kQntÄkt lenz
sE)lu:S&n]
9
13
10
VOCABULARY
At the
optician’s
Most people who wear glasses are
either short-sighted or long-sighted.
But glasses have also become a fashion
accessory. ANNA HOCHSIEDER
presents the language you’ll need to shop
at the optician’s.
MEDIUM PLUS
48 Spotlight 5/2018
11
Unter www.spotlight-online.de/
teachers/picture-it finden Sie
Übersetzungen und das gesamte
Vocabulary-Archiv
Buying glasses
Assistant: Can I help you?
Clare:Yes. I’ve just had my eyes tested. Here’s the prescription your
optometrist gave me.
Assistant: Ah, yes. Have you worn glasses before? Or contacts?
Clare:No, neither. I had 20/20 vision until recently. But lately, I’ve
been having difficulty reading, especially in dim light. My
husband keeps telling me to stop squinting.
Assistant:Ah, well, most people become long-sighted as they grow older.
Clare:I bought myself a pair of ready readers — you know, those
cheap reading glasses that you can find everywhere…
Assistant:We definitely don’t recommend those. You can ruin your eyesight with the wrong lenses. Have you thought about trying
varifocals? We have a special offer at just £199. That includes
scratch-resistant, reflection-free lenses…
Clare:Does that mean they’re tinted?
Assistant:No, no, the lenses are colourless. The offer comes with a spare
pair or a pair of prescription sunglasses. Why don’t you try on
a few frames to see what suits you?
VOCABULARY
Illustration: Martin Haake
12
All exercises in the
language section
can now be done
interactively,
in the digital edition of Spotlight
PRACTICE
Now try the following exercises to practise
talking about going to the optician’s.
Exercise 1
E
Odd one out: Cross out the one word in each line that
does not match the others.
Exercise 2
M
Complete each definition below with the correct form of
a suitable verb. You can find all the verbs in the dialogue
on the opposite page.
A. optometrist | ready readers | spectacles | sunglasses
B.reflection-free | scratch-resistant | short-sighted |
tinted
glasses or contact
A.If you have to
lenses, you probably have problems with your eyesight.
C.contact lenses | disposable wipes | glasses case | glasses
cloth
, you close your eyes slightly
B.If you
to try to see something better.
you, it makes
C.If a style of glasses
you look good.
Exercise 3
A
Match the sentence halves to define the words.
a pair of glasses, you put it on
D.If you
to see if it fits and how it looks.
A.“Glasses”
are…
1.lenses that you wear on your eyes
to help you see better.
your eyesight, it badly
E.If something
and permanently affects your ability to see.
B.“Bifocals”
are…
2.glasses with lenses that are not
surrounded by frames.
C.“Rimless
glasses” are…
3.the ability to see normally without
wearing glasses.
D.“Contacts”
are…
4.made up of two lenses on a frame
that rests on the nose and ears.
E.“20/20
vision” is…
5.glasses of which each lens consists
of two parts.
From far and near
If you cannot see things clearly that are far away from you, you
are probably short-sighted. The American English word is nearsighted.
If you cannot see things clearly that are close to you, you are
probably long-sighted, or far-sighted in American English.
Exercise 4
A
Complete the sentences with the words from the list.
hinges | nose pads | temples | wipes
A.These frames have flexible
, so you
can bend the arms beyond a 90-degree angle.
on these metal frames curve
B.The
around the ear, so they are ideal for doing sports.
C.The soft rubber
rest comfortably on your nose.
allow your glasses to
D.All our prescription glasses come with a stylish case and
a box of disposable
.
, Winkel
prescription glasses
odd [Qd] , unpassend
, Korrektionsbrille,
VOCABULARY
[pri(skrIpS&n )glA:sIz] Brille auf Rezept
4.
A.hinges
B.temples
C. nose pads
D.wipes
[Qp(tQmEtrIst] , Augenoptiker(in)
3.
A–4; B–5; C–2; D–1; E–3
angle [(ÄNg&l] optometrist
2.
A.wear
B.squint
C.suits
D. try on
E.ruins
affect [E(fekt] , hier: beeinträchtigen
1.
A.optometrist (the
others are different
kinds of glasses)
B.short-sighted (the
other adjectives
describe the features
of lenses)
C.contact lenses (the
other objects are
things you need if
you wear glasses)
Answers
5/2018 Spotlight
49 THE GRAMMAR PAGE
Adverbs and phrases
of frequency
ADRIAN DOFF presents and explains this key
point of grammar with notes on a short dialogue.
MEDIUM PLUS
Paula and Tony are in a restaurant. They’re talking about
losing weight.
Paula: How’s your diet going?
Tony: Not very well. I haven’t lost any weight yet.
Paula: Oh, dear!
Tony:I don’t understand it. I always1 have a light breakfast, I never1 eat cakes or biscuits, and I hardly
ever1 eat chocolate. I’m always2 careful about
counting calories, but it simply doesn’t help. I can
never2 seem to lose any weight.
Paula: Well, you do drink quite a lot of wine.
Tony:Not really. I usually3 have one glass in the
evening. Well, sometimes3 I might have two... or
maybe three occasionally3. And I have a few beers
now and then4 when I go out.
Paula: Maybe you need to do some exercise.
Tony:I do. I go running once a week4. It doesn’t seem to
make any difference, though.
Paula:Anyway, let’s order. I’m having a salad. What
about you?
Tony:I think I’ll have the Wiener schnitzel with roast
potatoes — and a beer.
50 Spotlight 5/2018
⋅⋅⋅⋅
⋅⋅
Beyond the basics
The adverbs seldom and rarely (= not often) are quite formal
and are usually used in writing. In conversation, it is more common to say not (very) often or hardly ever:
I don’t often go the cinema.
I don’t go to the cinema very often.
I hardly ever go to the cinema. (= almost never)
⋅⋅⋅⋅
⋅⋅
Exercise
Are the adverbs in the following sencences in the right
position? Correct them if necessary.
A. Often I visit my parents at the weekend.
B. Sometimes he’s friendly, but at other times, he’s quite
aggressive.
C. I twice a week go jogging.
main verb, or they can
come at the beginning or
end of the sentence. So
Tony could also say:
Usually, I have one glass in
the evening.
I have one glass in the
evening usually.
4.Instead of single adverbs,
phrases of frequency like
“now and then” or “once
a week” can be used. They
usually come at the end of
the sentence.
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
D. We’re not close friends, but we do meet for coffee
occasionally.
E. She always is late for work.
exercise [(eksEsaIz] , Training, Bewegung
Answers
A. Incorrect.
Correct word
order: I often visit
my parents at the
weekend.
B. Correct.
C. Incorrect.
Correct word
order: I go jogging
twice a week.
D. Correct.
E. Incorrect.
Correct word
order: She is
always late for
work.
1.These are adverbs of
frequency. They show
how often a person does
something. They come
before the main verb (for
example, always have,
never eat).
2.Adverbs of frequency
come after the verb be
or an auxiliary verb (am
always, can never).
3.The adverbs usually,
sometimes and occasionally can come before the
The adverbs always, never, often and hardly ever come in “mid
position”; in other words, they come after be or an auxiliary
verb, but before the main verb:
She always gets to work at exactly 8.30.
I’ve never seen a Shakespeare play.
You can often go swimming here in November.
The adverbs usually, sometimes and occasionally can come in
“mid position”, or they can come at the beginning or end of a
sentence:
I don’t usually enjoy football matches.
Sometimes we have breakfast in bed at the weekend.
I have lunch in a cafe occasionally.
⋅⋅⋅⋅
⋅⋅
Dialogue
Explanations
Remember!
THE GRAMMAR PAGE
SIMPLY BETTER ENGLISH
EASY MEDIUM ADVANCED
Your month of learning!
Make a shopping list
Here are 31 language-learning tips for the coming month — though you
can, of course, start whenever you like. Detach this page, stick it on your
fridge or on your office wall and read one tip every morning. When you’re
done, why not tell us which tips worked best for you? Write to us at
language@spotlight-verlag.de
Next time you go to the supermarket, why not write your shopping
list in English? Don’t forget to include the words for different types of
packaging, e.g. (z. B.) “a bottle of...”, “a packet of...”, “a jar (Glas) of...”.
Write a story
Do you have six minutes?
Day 2
Day 3
Try writing a short story. You still have until 31 May to take part in our
short story competition from last month’s issue. For more information, go
to www.spotlight-online.de/story-competition
Download the 6 Minute English podcast from the BBC World Service.
Interesting topics are presented in a simple way — and there’s a new
episode every week. See www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02pc9tn/
episodes/downloads
Leave a comment
False friends
Day 4
Day 5
Comment on a video you enjoyed on YouTube. It can be simple (“I like
this!”) or something longer.
False friends are those tricky (verzwickt) words and phrases that look similar in English and German (e.g. “actually” / aktuell) but actually (eigentlich)
have different meanings. Go to www.spotlight-online.de/may-tips to test
yourself.
The Moth
Get serious about series
Day 6
Read a recipe
Day 8
Day 10
Day 9
Start the day with a story
Day 11
Go to www.spotlight-online.de/may-tips to read the Spotlight crime story
“Waiting for Archie” — and practise your tenses (Zeiten) at the same
time. There’s a glossary to help you with new words.
If you’re interested in life in the USA, we recommend (logically) the
podcast This American Life. Go to www.thisamericanlife.org/listen
Play and chat
Say hello
Send a short text message to a friend. Perhaps there’s someone in your
English class or English book group who you could say hello to.
Foodnetwork.com has hundreds of ideas for simple, tasty (lecker),
healthy meals for any time of the week. Why not try one of their
“Weeknight Dinner” recipes tonight?
This American Life
Day 7
Ask friends to recommend an English-language TV series. With any luck,
they’ll offer to lend you their DVDs or tell you which streaming service to
watch it on. Then you can “binge-watch”; that is, watch a whole series in
a short time!
The Moth podcast features people talking about their personal
experiences. It’s sometimes serious, sometimes funny, but always
interesting. See themoth.org/podcast
➞ Austrennung an der Perforierung
Day 1
Day 12
Be inspired
Day 13
Organize an “English only” games evening with friends or students from
your English class. Go to www.spotlight-online.de/may-tips to download
our Spotlight game “Around the US in 80 questions”.
Use a picture as inspiration to write a paragraph in English. You can
simply describe what you see, or use the picture as the inspiration for the
opening paragraph of a story.
Sing along
Walk and write
Day 14
If you enjoy listening to music, why not use it as a way to improve your
English at the same time? You can download lyrics (Liedtext) online,
check the meanings of unknown words and sing along to your favourite
songs.
Day 15
Go for a walk and choose three things you see that you don’t know the
word for in English. Photograph them and look up the words online. Write
a sentence on your phone about each one.
SIMPLY BETTER ENGLISH
In the supermarket
Day 16
Get your daily dose
Day 17
Next time you are at the shops, have a conversation with yourself in your
head in English, such as: “Here’s the mineral water. I need six bottles.
Good that it’s in glass bottles…”
Subscribe to (abonnieren) a service in English that sends you a word, a
quotation (Zitat) or a joke every day, such as Oxford Dictionary ’s “Word
of the Day” at en.oxforddictionaries.com/explore/word-of-the-day
“And the award goes to…”
Read a review
Day 18
Day 19
Make your own award acceptance speech. Could you be “employee of
the month” or “mum of the year”? Remember to thank everyone for their
support.
If you’ve experienced some English-language culture this weekend (a
book, a song, a film, a TV series or a theatre show), why not find and read
a review online afterwards? Do you agree with it?
Time for tea
Be a poet
Day 20
Day 21
Invite some friends round to teatime, that time-honoured English
tradition. All you need is a fresh tablecloth (Tischdecke) on your dining
table, some cakes — and cups of tea, of course. Go to www.spotlightonline.de/may-tips to find a lovely recipe for Victoria sponge cake
(Biskuitkuchen).
A poem doesn’t need to rhyme or have a clever structure. Simply choose
some nice words to describe an object and end with the name of the
object, like this:
White. Elegant. Swimming slowly. Swan (Schwan).
Change your settings
Write your first journal entry today
Day 22
Day 23
All your tech devices (Gerät) — phone, tablet, computer — have the
option to run in English. Go to “settings” and find “language preferences”
and simply change over to English.
Writing a journal can create a wonderful personal archive of memories —
of holidays, special occasions and just the little things that happen every
day. Journal apps (such as Day One and Journi) make it so easy.
Start with what you know
Write a review
Day 24
Day 25
If a whole new film in English is too much for you, you could start by
watching short clips of favourite films that you are already familiar with
in German. Search on YouTube for your favourites.
Write a review of a product you have bought, e.g. (z. B.) on Amazon. Say
what is good about it (e.g. “good quality”, “value for money”) and what
isn’t so good about it (“poor quality”, “disappointing”).
Play “Articulate”
Cook and eat together
Day 26
Day 27
In this game, you have to give definitions of items (Gegenstand) on a
card for your partner to guess. If you don’t have the board game, you
can just choose words (people, places, objects) at random (wahllos,
blindlings) from the newspaper.
Get your family and/or friends involved and cook something new together.
Make a whole English evening, with an “English only” rule in the kitchen
and at the table. Enjoy your meal!
Be active on eBay
Pay a visit to Peggy’s Place
Day 28
Day 29
Next time you list something on eBay, write your item description
(Artikelbeschreibung) in English as well as in German to reach a wider
market. Check out the listings of similar items on ebay.co.uk or ebay.com
and copy the style.
Go to www.spotlight-online.de/may-tips to read and listen to an episode
of Peggy’s Place, Spotlight’s very own London pub. And continue to enjoy
new episodes in the future!
Love the memes!
Speech bubbles
Day 30
Internet memes (Mem) are short and funny — a picture with a few words.
They are perfect for a quick read and a quick laugh. Search online for
“memes”. We like the “Can’t get fired” guy.
Day 31
Find a picture of two people in an advert, perhaps in a newspaper or
magazine, and write speech bubbles (or thought bubbles) for them. You
can make them as funny or as serious as you like.
LOST IN TRANSLATION
Every month, WILL O’RYAN turns his attention
to a particularly interesting word or expression
that could be a challenge to translate.
ADVANCED
wont
adjective, noun
wEUnt | N. Am.: wO:nt
Example
“...the Foreign Secretary — as is his
wont — departed slightly from the
published text.”
Usage
In modern English, the noun is pretty much limited to the collocation “as is/was somebody’s wont” (for example: “As was his
wont, he arose early that morning.”). The adjective is used attributively with a following infinitive: “be wont to do something”
(as in: “She was wont to arrive at work an hour early.”). Outside
highly formal speech or writing, the use of “wont” generally
adds a somewhat humorous effect to what is being said. A direct
translation of the noun would be Gepflogenheit, but you’ll hardly
find occasion to translate it that way. Perhaps the closest translation of “as is his wont” would be wie er es (immer) zu tun pflegt.
Scotchwhisky.com, 19 January 2017
This quotation is from an article about
Boris Johnson, Britain’s gaffe-prone
foreign minister, and some of the embarrassingly incorrect things he said about
Scotch whisky in a speech he made during an official visit to India last year.
Background
The adjective, meaning “accustomed”, is a Middle English contraction of Old English (ge)wunod, the past participle of wunian,
which meant both “dwell, inhabit” and “be accustomed/used
to”. Not surprisingly, the word is etymologically related to German wohnen, gewöhnen, Gewohnheit, etc. “Wont” first appeared as a
noun referring to one’s customary behaviour about 1400. Modern dictionaries label the verb “wont” (which meant “make, be
or become accustomed to”) as archaic, which is another way of
saying that it is no longer used in today’s language.
accustomed: be ~ to sth. [E(kVstEmd] , etw. gewohnt sein
gaffe-prone [(gÄf prEUn] , zu verbalen Ausrutschern neigend
Exercise
customary [(kVstEmEri] , üblich, gewohnheitsmäßig
inhabit [In(hÄbIt] , bewohnen
In which of these contexts would “wont” make sense?
depart: ~ from sth. [di(pA:t] pretty much
, hier: von etw. abweichen
dwell [dwel] , wohnen
[)prIti (mVtS] ifml. , so ziemlich
A. “Peter is extremely
A
to his wife.”
B.“Grandfather went straight to bed after dinner, as was
.”
his
Answer: B
LOST IN TRANSLATION
5/2018 Spotlight
53 EVERYDAY ENGLISH
Stand-up paddling
DAGMAR TAYLOR presents four dialogues about a
popular water sport. Read them and try the exercises
on page 55.
MEDIUM AUDIO PLUS
Carol and her friend Peter are making plans for the weekend.
feeling of freedom you have
out on the water is amazing.
Peter:But isn’t it a bit difficult? What
if I fall in? The water’s bound
to be really cold.
Carol:You can wear your wetsuit if
you’re worried about falling in.
Peter:OK. I hope it still fits. Where
should we go paddling?
Carol:Bassenthwaite Lake. It’s only
20 minutes from here.
⋅⋅
Tips
2. What do you want to do?
Carol has been trying to arrange the paddle-board hire.
Carol:OK, I just talked to the guy
from the SUP place. We can
either just hire the boards
or, if you prefer, you can do a
course. Board hire costs £10 an
hour. The course costs £45 and
lasts three hours.
Peter:But you don’t need to do a
course. Why don’t you show
me the basics, and if I like it,
I’ll do a course at a later date?
Carol:Yeah, OK.
cord [kO:d] , Leine
54 Spotlight 5/2018
diver [(daIvE] , Taucher
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
If people or animals are cooped up,
they are kept inside a building or a
small space. The expression is usually
used in the passive.
When people refer to the (great)
outdoors, they mean the countryside,
away from busy, built-up areas.
If you give something a go, you try to
do it or to see if you like it.
You can use bound to be to say that
something is certain or likely to be
the case.
A wetsuit is a piece of clothing made
of neoprene that fits the body closely
and keeps you warm. It’s usually worn
by divers and surfers.
Peter:So, what do we need? A board
and a paddle, obviously.
Carol:That’s right. You also need a
leash — and a life jacket if you
can’t swim. But you can swim,
can’t you?
Peter:Of course I can swim! I just
hope I don’t have to today.
Carol: (laughs) Well, let’s get there
first. Are you ready to go?
Peter:Yes, let’s do this!
drift [drIft] , treiben
float [flEUt] , treiben, schwimmen
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
SUP stands for “stand-up paddling”,
and place is used in compounds and
phrases that refer to a building or area
of land used for a particular purpose.
The basics are the most important
and necessary facts or skills that you
should learn or deal with first.
When people talk about some time
in the future that is not a specific day,
they might say at a later date.
A leash is a cord that connects you to
your board. If you fall off the board,
the leash prevents it from drifting
away from you.
A life jacket, or “buoyancy aid”
[(bOIEnsi eId], helps you float in water.
Foto: Romanno/iStock.com
Peter:I’ve been cooped up in my office all week, and the weather’s
been so fantastic. I need to get
out this weekend and enjoy
the great outdoors.
Carol:What’s the weather forecast
like? Is it going to stay nice?
Peter:I think so. According to my
weather app, it’s going to be
pretty sunny.
Carol:Then why don’t you give
stand-up paddling a go? The
⋅⋅
Tips
1. The great outdoors
pretty [(prIti] , hier: ziemlich
EVERYDAY ENGLISH
⋅⋅
Tips
3. Is it hard?
Carol and Peter are on their way to the lake.
Peter:Isn’t it really hard to keep your
balance on the board?
Carol:Well, maybe at the beginning,
or if the water’s choppy. But
you’ll soon get used to it.
You’ll see. And the wider the
board, the less wobbly it feels.
Peter:I didn’t realize the boards
come in different sizes.
Carol:Oh, yeah. There are different
boards for different conditions. There are even inflatable boards for river paddling
and for taking on holiday with
you.
Peter:Oh, right. Do you know what
kind of boards we’ll be hiring
today?
Carol:I think they’re inflatables.
They’re probably all-rounders,
which are great for starting
on, because they’re nice and
wide. I hope I remembered to
pack the suncream. It’s a real
scorcher today.
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
If you keep your balance, you are
able to remain steady, with your body
weight evenly spread so that you
don’t fall.
Choppy is an adjective used to
describe water (in the sea or in a lake)
when the wind causes a lot of small
waves.
When you get used to something,
you become familiar with it and
accept it as normal.
An inflatable board needs to be filled
with air before it can be used.
A scorcher (ifml.) is a very hot day.
Tips
4.On the water
Carol and Peter are paddling on Bassenthwaite Lake.
Peter:Woohoo! I’m getting the hang
of it. I’m not as wobbly as I
thought I would be.
Carol:Stretch your arms out straight
in front of you. That way, you’ll
be able to make longer strokes
and go faster.
Peter:Like this, you mean?
Carol:Yes, but hold your paddle the
other way round. The blade
should slope away from you.
Peter:Oh, yeah. Sorry! You’ve mentioned that a few times now.
Carol:
(laughs) It’s normal. There’s a
lot to think about when you
start. What do you feel so far?
Do you like it?
Peter:It’s amazing! You’re right. It’s
fantastic actually being on the
water, free to go wherever you
want.
When you get the hang of some­
thing, you learn how to do or use it.
A stroke is a repeated movement in
paddling, swimming or rowing.
Most adverbs are formed by adding
-ly to an adjective. However, fast(er)
does not follow this rule.
The blade is the flat, wide part of the
paddle that goes in the water and
pulls you forward.
When you remark or say something
briefly or indirectly, you mention it.
Exercise 1
Exercise 2
What are the words that belong in the spaces below?
Add the missing words.
A.You can wear your w
about falling in.
A. I’ve been cooped
if you’re worried
B.You also need a l
can’t swim.
j
C.There are even i
river paddling.
b
D.The b
for
B. I’ll do a course
a later date.
C. You soon get used
it. You’ll see.
D.I’m getting the hang
it.
should slope away from you.
Answers
briefly [(bri:fli] , kurz
2.
A. up
B. at
C. to
D. of
1.
A. wetsuit
B. life jacket
C. inflatable
boards
D. blade
if you
in my office all week
EVERYDAY ENGLISH
row [rEU] , rudern
slope [slEUp] , geneigt sein
wobbly [(wQbli] , wackelig
steady [(stedi] , ruhig, sicher
5/2018 Spotlight
55 SPOKEN ENGLISH
Look out!
Phrasal verbs
Exercise 1
Match the expressions with look below (A–D) to their
meanings (1–4):
A. Look out!
1.You’ve seen something
nice.
B. I’m looking for it.
2.There’s danger ahead.
C. I’ll look it up
3.You’ve lost something.
D.I like the look of it.
4.You don’t know the
meaning of something.
Basic meanings
The verb look is intransitive (= it isn’t followed by an object),
so it is used either on its own:
Look! I can swim!
...or it can be followed by a preposition:
Look at that dress. It’s beautiful! (not: Look that dress.)
I looked out (of) the window and saw that it was raining.
“Do we have any milk?”
— “I don’t know. I’ll look in the fridge.”
You can also say look for (= search):
I’ve looked everywhere for my glasses, but I can’t find them.
She’s still looking for a job.
Or you can look after people and things (= care for them):
She had to stay at home to look after her grandmother.
I’ll look after the garden while you’re away.
⋅⋅
⋅⋅⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅⋅⋅
⋅⋅⋅⋅
In conversation, the word look is often used when a person is
explaining something:
OK, look! First you turn the printer on, then you press this
button...
Or it can be used to show that you’re annoyed:
Look! I’m trying to read. Can you please stop talking?
Look can also be a noun, in the expression have a look (at):
Can I have a look at your new phone? (= look at it for a short
time)
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
Look can mean appear. So someone may look happy or tired,
or a friend may look like your mother, or may look as if she is
going to cry.
56 Spotlight 5/2018
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
Other expressions with “look”
If you look on the bright side, you try to be optimistic about
something:
Oh, well, let’s look on the bright side. He’ll be president for
only three more years.
If you like the look of something, you think it looks good:
We really liked the look of the hotel, so we decided to stay
there for a few days.
I don’t like the look of those black clouds. (= I’m worried
that it’s going to rain.)
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
Exercise 2
Choose the correct word in each of the sentences below.
A.My sister always looked down on/to me because I
didn’t go to university.
B. Don’t be sad. Let’s look on the right/bright side.
C. I don’t like the look/looks of that bridge. Is it safe?
D. I’ve just painted my room. Do you want to get/have
a look?
E. Could you look after/over our cats while we’re away?
admire [Ed(maIE] , bewundern
Answers
2.
A. on
B. bright
C. look
D. have
E. after
MEDIUM PLUS
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
1.
A–2; B–3;
C–4; D–1
How do you use the verb “look” in conversational
English? Look at the examples, read the explanations
and try the exercises. By ADRIAN DOFF
The verb look is used in many phrasal verbs.
If someone tells you to look out, you should be careful:
Look out! There’s a car coming.
If you look in on people, you visit them for a short time:
I’ll look in on your father on my way home to make sure he’s
OK.
If you look something up, you may look in a dictionary or on
the Internet:
“What’s the speed of light?” — “I don’t know. I’ll look it up.”
If you look someone up, you visit that person:
Do look me up if you’re ever in Manchester. (= come and see
me)
If you look up to someone, you admire him or her:
I always looked up to my elder brother. I thought he was so
clever.
If you look down on someone, you don’t think that person is as
good as you:
There’s no reason to look down on them just because they
don’t have very much money.
SPOKEN ENGLISH
ENGLISH AT WORK
Dear Ken
Any
questions?
Communication expert KEN TAYLOR answers your
questions about business English. This month, he looks
at sources of Brexit vocabulary and suggests a structured
approach to writing e-mails.
Send us your workrelated queries and
win a book!
MEDIUM AUDIO PLUS
Dear Ken
I often have visitors from the UK at work, and the
subject of Brexit inevitably comes up over coffee
or lunch. Unfortunately, I don’t feel comfortable
taking part in the conversation, as I seem to be
lacking the right vocabulary.
Where can I find and learn some of the keywords,
so that I can take part in these conversations?
Regards
Andreas L.
Dear Andreas
Your mail has prompted me to write a Brexit exercise for Spotlight Audio, where I take up some
of the key vocabulary. If you subscribe to that
product, the exercise would give you the chance
to practise some of the words you need.
Dear Ken
I do not write many e-mails in English, but when
I do, it is important to get them right. I find it hard
to start mails and to organize my thoughts in English. Do you have some tips that might be of help
to me?
Regards
Lena D.
Foto: Gert Krautbauer
Dear Lena
I understand your situation. It is not easy to write
well in a second language if you do it only occasionally. The one advantage of writing over speaking is that you can take your time to go back and
correct and edit your text.
It also helps if you have a simple structure to organize your thoughts. One such structure is the
“four-box” approach. It works like this:
1. Purpose
What is your mail about? Why are you writing to
the reader?
Open with the main idea.
Use a short paragraph that can be read in a few
seconds.
⋅⋅⋅⋅
ENGLISH AT WORK
Newspapers like the Financial Times or The Economist frequently have articles on Brexit, too. Or you
could subscribe to The Guardian Weekly, where this
topic is often discussed.
You could also install the BBC or CNN app on
your phone. On the websites of both organizations, you will find articles and interviews about
Brexit. And many news agencies have articles
on their websites, like Thomson Reuters, which
have a special Brexit blog (blogs.thomsonreuters.com/­
answerson/everything-need-know-brexit).
Do remember, though, that talking about politics
can be tricky, especially when people hold very
firm opinions. So approach these discussions
carefully and with sensitivity.
All the best
Ken
2. Background or explanation
Why? How? Who? When? Where?
Support or explain the main point.
Use as many paragraphs as necessary, but be
sure to include only one key idea in each.
3. Details
Does your reader need more details?
Keep this section as short as possible. Don’t
overload the reader with too many details.
If possible, move this information to an
attachment.
4. What’s next?
What is to happen next?
Restate or summarize the main ideas.
State what you expect the reader to do next.
End politely, but try to avoid clichés and
platitudes.
Having a simple structure like this will help you
organize your message. It also gives you a structure on which to “hang” your language.
Those occasional e-mails in English should now
be easier to write.
All the best
Ken
⋅⋅⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅⋅⋅
⋅⋅
KEN TAYLOR
is a communication
consultant and
author of 50 Ways
to Improve Your
Business English
(Summertown).
Contact:
ktaylor868@aol.com
Send your questions
about business English
by e-mail with “Dear
Ken” in the subject line
to: language@
spotlight-verlag.de
Each month, I answer
two questions Spotlight
readers have sent in.
If one of them is your
question, you’ll receive
a copy of my book: Dear
Ken... 101 answers to
your questions about
business English. So
don’t forget to add your
postal address.
approach [E(prEUtS] , behandeln, angehen;
Methode
attachment
[E(tÄtSmEnt] , hier: E-Mail-Anhang
edit [(edIt] , bearbeiten
lack [lÄk] , fehlen
overload [)EUvE(lEUd] , überlasten, überladen
platitude [(plÄtItju:d] , Gemeinplatz, Plattheit
prompt sb. [prQmpt] , jmdn. veranlassen
restate [)ri:(steIt] , umformulieren
sensitivity
[)sensE(tIvEti] , Feingefühl
subscribe to sth.
[sEb(skraIb tE] , etw. abonnieren
summarize [(sVmEraIz] , zusammenfassen
tricky [(trIki] , knifflig, heikel
5/2018 Spotlight
57 THE BASICS
Easy English
Here, you’ll find an interview, together with facts and
exercises related to it, at the A2 level of English — basic
language points you may have forgotten or missed before.
By VANESSA CLARK
EASY
Show and tell
Now, find out more about something that Chris told us about:
campaign furniture.
The word “campaign” in “campaign furniture” refers to a military
campaign.
Campaign furniture was used by army officers. Officers needed desks, tables and chairs to do their work, even in war. Special
furniture was made for them. When the army travelled, the furniture could travel with them. It could be broken down, packed
up and was ready to go.
worker
ham, wood
Chris Bore
British army officers in the time of the British Empire had many
beautiful pieces of wooden furniture — not only desks and
chairs, but beds, wardrobes, sofas, dining tables and mirrors, too.
It was a status symbol for them to have a lot of elegant furniture
— and men to carry it. The Times newspaper wrote of one officer
in India in 1858: “Sir Colin Campbell’s baggage etc. extended for
18 miles when he came down from Lucknow.”
Cabinet of curiosities
Interview
This month, we talk to Chris Boreham, a woodworker.
What do you make?
I make all sorts of wooden furniture: chairs, tables,
bookcases, cabinets and wardrobes.
Did you do woodwork at school?
No, I wasn’t allowed to do woodwork at school. I wanted to do it, but the clever boys had to do graphic design
and IT. I studied furniture design at university.
What inspires your designs?
The wood itself. It’s a beautiful material. When I find
a nice piece of wood, I look at its shape, its colour, its
style and I take ideas from it. I design as I work.
Where do you work?
At the Sylva Wood Centre in Oxfordshire, England.
The building was an old potato store, but now it’s an
eco-friendly centre for woodworking.
What do you enjoy about your job?
The dust and the noise. And I’m always building on
what I’ve done before and working towards a goal.
What are you making at the moment?
Something for myself. I’m interested in campaign
furniture and I’m making a cabinet in that style.
58 Spotlight 5/2018
bookcase [(bUkkeIs] , Bücherregal, Bücherschrank
, umweltfreundlich
break down [breIk (daUn] , hier: zerlegen
extend [Ik(stend] , sich erstrecken, ausdehnen
campaign [kÄm(peIn] woodworker [(wUdw§:kE] , Holzarbeiter(in); hier: Schreiner(in)
, Feldzug-
eco-friendly [)i:kEU (frendli] THE BASICS
Puzzle
Write the names of the pieces of wooden furniture (A–G)
into the crossword — and build the “cabinet” .
C
A.
A
B.
B
C.
I
D.
N
E.
F.
E
G.
T
B.
A.
E.
C.
Grammar
D.
⋅⋅⋅⋅
It’s a beautiful material.
I look at its shape, its colour, its style.
“It’s” (with an apostrophe) is the short form of “it is” (or sometimes also “it has”). “Its” (without the apostrophe) is a possessive pronoun, like “my”, “your” or “his”. So “its shape” means “the
shape of the wood”.
Exercise 1
A.It’s / Its near the village of Long Wittenham in
Oxfordshire.
B. It’s / Its a great place to work.
C. It’s / Its website is sylva.org.uk
D.It’s / Its roof has solar panels.
2.
A.false (He
wasn’t allowed
to do it at
school. He
learned it at
university.)
B.true
C.true
D.false (They
had men to
carry it for
them.)
1.
A.It’s
B.It’s
C.Its
D.Its
Answers
THE BASICS
F.
E
Choose “it’s” or “its” to complete these sentences about
the Sylva Wood Centre, where Chris works.
Puzzle
A.bookcase
B.chair
C.wardrobe
D.mirror
E.bench
F.desk
G.stool
Fotos: privat; donatas1205/Shutterstock.com; ConstantinosZ, Petek Arici, L. Steward/iStock.com; Christopher Clarke Antiques; Illustrationen: Martin Haake
Now, have another look at two things Chris said:
G.
Exercise 2
E
How carefully have you read this double page? Test
yourself here by deciding whether the sentences below
are true (T) or false (F).
TF
Chris Boreham learned woodwork at
A.
school.
B.
He likes his loud workplace.
C.
He’s making a cabinet for himself at the
moment.
D.
Army officers carried their own campaign
furniture.
5/2018 Spotlight
59 WORDS THAT GO TOGETHER
The collocation game
Words that are often used together are called “collocations”.
Learning such word combinations will help you read and
speak more fluently. This month, we look at collocations with
the words “road” and “street”. By CLARE MAAS
EASY PLUS
road
Right up your street!
1.
crossroads
2.
This month, we take a look at
collocations formed with the
words road and street. Read
our tips on page 61 and decide whether the words and
­phrases in the list below collocate with “road” or “street”.
Then match the collocations
to the pictures. We have done
the first one for you. When
you’ve finished, try the exercises on the opposite page.
3.
apples
street
art
block
4.
cross roads
furniture
5.
lights
one for the
party
performer
safety
slip
vendor
works
6.
7.
match [mÄtS] 8.
, zuordnen
60 Spotlight 5/2018
WORDS THAT GO TOGETHER
Exercise 1
E
Complete the text below with the words road(s) or
street.
To get to my house from the motorway, you will need to
come down the (A) slip
at the (B) cross
and turn left
. But because of the
party celebrating the queen’s birth-
(C)
block. So turn
day, there will be a (D)
art and
right after the wall with the (E)
vendors. But be
drive past all the (F)
lamps.
bin [bIn] UK , Abfallbehälter
droppings [(drQpINz] , Pferdeäpfel
motorway [(mEUtEweI]
UK , Autobahn
passer-by [)pQ:sE (baI] , Passant(in)
postbox [(pEUstbQks]
UK , Briefkasten
referred: be ~ to as sth.
[ri(f§:d] , als etw. bezeichnet
werden
surface [(s§:fIs] , Oberfläche
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
road
A road is a long route with a hard surface along which
vehicles travel, so most of the collocations that include the
word “road” refer to driving.
If you want to get from a normal road to a motorway, you’ll
need to drive along a slip road (UK).
The point where two roads cross — and where you might
need to turn a corner — is called a crossroads. The word
“crossroads” is also used metaphorically to describe a
situation in which a decision has to be made about what
direction to take in the future.
If a road is being built or repaired, there will be roadworks
(UK) along the way. Traffic may also be stopped here by a
temporary barrier — or roadblock — across the road.
People being taught how to drive carefully or how to cross
the road safely are learning road safety: “The government
has started a new road-safety campaign in schools.”
In most countries, a car can legally drive on the road only if
the owner has paid road tax.
Road apples is a North American slang term for droppings
left on the road by a horse. Animals killed on roads by cars or
other vehicles are referred to as roadkill.
One for the road is a final drink you have before leaving a
place by car. Correctly speaking, though, you should have
none for the road when driving .
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
9.
street
A street is a public road usually with buildings on both
sides. Most of the collocations that go with the word refer to
things found in this sort of situation.
For example, a street performer is an artist or musician
who performs in a public place, usually collecting money
from passers-by; and a street vendor sells things to passersby in the street: “It would be quicker to buy a hot dog from a
street vendor.”
Street art is visual art created and displayed in public places,
often by an anonymous artist.
Roads may be lined with street lamps or street lights, and
you might find street furniture, such as signs, benches, bins
and postboxes there.
Some communities like to hold street parties (UK),
which often take place outside people’s houses: “We had a
traditional street party for Prince William’s wedding.” In
North American English, this is called a “block party”.
If people have the skills to deal well with difficult or
dangerous situations, they may be described informally as
streetwise or street savvy.
If you say that something is right up your street, it means
that you like or enjoy it very much.
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
10.
11.
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
12.
WORDS THAT GO TOGETHER
13.
1.
A. slip road
B.crossroads
C. street party
D.roadblock
E. street art
F.street
vendors
G. street lamps
Answers
Right up your
street!
1.crossroads
2.street
furniture
3. slip road
4.street
performer
5.roadworks
6. road apples
7.one for the
road
8. street party
9.roadblock
10.road safety
11. street art
12.street vendor
13.street lights
Fotos: Owen Smith, JJarquitectos, Valentyn Volkov, tepic, Juanmonino, Bestgreenscreen, Culture RF, ViewApart, Michael Luhrenberg, isarescheewin Babro Bergfeld/Shutterstock.com, Geoff A. Howard/Alamy Stock Photo
careful: there are no (G)
Tips
5/2018 Spotlight
61 CROSSWORD
Solution to puzzle 4/18:
Robots down on the
farm
popularity
F
C
I
A
T E A M
A
R
W
A
I
N O D
E
S O A R
I
C
E
O
R
E
P
The words in this puzzle are taken from this month’s Around Oz.
You may find it helpful to refer to the text on page 68.
EASY MEDIUM ADVANCED
L U B
T
M
P
U
I
N
R
R E
E M U
L E
N J O Y
R
M
I
X A G G E
I
L A N
G
A P
A
D
D
L I E F
N
N G T H
H
A T E
A
R A T E
R
A M E
Across
2.
4.
1.
3.
7.
5.
6.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
10.
13.
15.
17.
14.
16.
18.
19.
Down
20.
Competition
Mitmachen und
gewinnen!
How to take part
Congratulations to:
Form a single word from the
letters in the coloured squares.
Send it on a postcard to:
Redaktion Spotlight, “May Prize
Puzzle”, Postfach 1565,
82144 Planegg, Deutschland. Or
go to www.spotlight-online.de/
crossword
Sandra Greiner (Sindelfingen)
Brigitte Rem (Radevormwald)
Dorli Billeter (Schönenberg)
Eva-Maria Zwyer (Rüti)
Reinhard Gruber (Lauterach)
Helga Brandt (Engelsberg)
Barbara Kaller (Hainburg)
Gerd Budilovsky (Ratingen)
Matthias Geiß (Ortenberg)
Gerhild Rachor-Hossner
(Mainaschaff)
Ten winners will be chosen from
the entries we receive by 16 May
2018. Each winner will be sent a
copy of London Underground
by courtesy of Reclam. The
answer to our March puzzle was
harassment.
62 Spotlight 5/2018
1. Reports of current events that appear in various media.
3. Regular work that a person does to
earn money.
5. A plant that is grown in large
amounts commercially.
6. Cows and bulls kept for their milk
and meat.
8. To make animals move together in a
certain direction as a group.
gluten-free food.”
10. “I eat only
13. “In the future, many jobs will be lost
.”
because of
14. A young cow or bull.
16. “Both politicians received an
number of votes.”
19. A powerful vehicle used for pulling
farm equipment.
20. “Some plants don’t grow well in
conditions.”
(Issue 3/18)
2. A place where something happens —
in reality or on the stage.
4. Malt whisky is made from this cereal.
7. “Since having the accident, she has
.”
responded well to
of
9. “When costs are cut, the
products can suffer.”
10. All the people who live in a particular
area and who have many things in
common.
11. To remove some plants to make
room for others to grow.
12. “The house was surrounded by a tall,
.”
wooden
15. A stream of hot, burning gas.
17. “He preferred to listen to news from
area.”
the
in the
18. “Clifford runs a dairy
county of Devon.”
CROSSWORD
PRESS GALLERY
The Charity Commission:
guarantor of public generosity
Über neun Milliarden Pfund werden jährlich von spendenwilligen Leuten ausgegeben, die Gutes tun wollen. Ihr Ver­
trauen in die Aktivitäten von Wohltätigkeitsorganisationen muss deswegen durch rigorose Kontrollen gestärkt werden.
ADVANCED AUDIO
Foto: interTopics/ddp
T
he Charity Commission
has launched a statutory
inquiry into Oxfam as part
of its duty to promote trust
and public confidence in
charities. That is necessary.
But the Commission also has to reassure
an increasingly sceptical audience that its
own regulatory culture is rigorous and
sceptical enough to deserve trust and
confidence. ...
The Commission accuses Oxfam of
being less than open; but in the end, the
inadequacy of the response to sexual exploitation by senior aid workers in Haiti
must lie at the regulator’s door. In the
light of its response, it is little surprise
that in November parliament’s auditors,
the NAO, found there was still work to be
done, five years after an excoriating report
revealed that the Commission was failing
to use the powers it has to hold charities
to account, or to tackle abuse effectively.
Its new chair, the Tory peer Tina Stowell,
will face some hard questions when she
appears before MPs...
PRESS GALLERY
Lady Stowell [pictured above] ... will
need to shake off past loyalties if she is to
bring an unbiased approach to her new
organisation’s struggle to police 160,000
registered charities after a budget cut of
40%, followed by a four-year freeze. Yet
the acute cash shortage is not enough on
its own to explain the degree of regulatory capture that appears to have blunted its
response to the Oxfam scandal.
Like a cancer, the damage this terrible saga has done spreads out beyond
the charitable sector. Undermining confidence in the work of one aid agency
plays directly into the anti-aid narrative
of a populist right that believes charity
doesn’t just begin at home, it ends there
too. ...
Oxfam, the charity started in 1942 to
campaign against Churchill’s naval blockade of occupied Greece that was leaving
thousands of people to starve, has been a
champion of “good aid”. Now it might lose
more than £60m of funding as both the
UK and the EU reconsider their support. ...
© Guardian News & Media 2018
account: hold sb. to ~
naval [(neIv&l] [E(kaUnt] , See-
tung ziehen
peer [pIE] , Mitglied des House
, jmdn. zur Verantwor-
aid worker [(eId )w§:kE] , Entwicklungshelfer(in)
auditor [(O:dItE] , Prüfer(in)
blunt [blVnt] , (ab)schwächen
capture [(kÄptSE] , Vereinnahmung
of Lords
police [pE(li:s] , hier: überwachen
reassure [)ri:E(SO:] , beruhigen
reconsider [)ri:kEn(sIdE] , überdenken
cash shortage
regulator [(regjuleItE] , aufsichtsführende
Person, Aufsichtsinstanz
excoriating
, enthüllen
[(kÄS )SO:tIdZ] , finanzieller Engpass
[Ik(skO:rieItIN] , vernichtend
exploitation
reveal [ri(vi:&l] rigorous [(rIgErEs] , streng, strikt
[)eksplOI(teIS&n] senior [(si:niE] , leitend
freeze [fri:z] , hier: Nullrunde
statutory [(stÄtSUtEri] , satzungsgemäß,
gesetzlich vorgeschrieben
, Ausbeutung
MP (Member of Parliament) [)em (pi:] UK , Abgeordnete(r)
narrative [(nÄrEtIv] , Geschichte
tackle [(tÄk&l] , bekämpfen
unbiased [Vn(baIEst] , unvoreingenommen
5/2018 Spotlight
63 1
2
3
5
Fotos: Jake Curtis; Baines; Michael Westhoff, Duncan1890, Bill Oxford/iStock.com
4
1 Baines’s workshop
2 Frank Baines
3 The finished product
4 Master craftsmanship
5 Tools of the trade
64 Spotlight 5/2018
ARTISANS
ARTISANS
The saddler
Auf diesen Seiten stellen wir Ihnen Handwerksmeister und Kunsthandwerker aus der
englischsprachigen Welt vor. Diesen Monat hat sich Spotlight mit dem Sattelmacher
Frank Baines unterhalten. Von DAGMAR TAYLOR
MEDIUM
W
alsall, a town near
Birmingham in
England’s West
Midlands has been
famous for making saddles since the 19th century. Frank
Baines Saddlery, one of the UK’s leading
makers of handmade saddles, has had
connections with the industry for about
200 years. The company works with customers from all over the world to create
­custom-designed equestrian products
made from all sorts of leathers and skins
— even ostrich and swordfish skin.
“It’s absolutely fascinating working
with people who have got fantastic ideas
for making the saddle more comfortable
for the horse and providing closer contact
for the rider,” Frank Baines told Spotlight.
As a boy, Frank was close to his grandfather, a bridle maker. Young Frank enjoyed using his hands to create things and
went on to do a six-year apprenticeship at
a saddlery. “I was taught by a wonderful
elderly craftsman about the important
points of making saddles,” Frank explained. Later, when the factory where
he designed saddles burnt down, he was
given the opportunity to set up his own
business. Frank and his wife, a leather
machinist, made saddles in their kitchen.
They won several awards for their products, and the business kept expanding.
Eventually, they moved out of the kitchen
and into a factory.
Today, Frank’s son and daughter run
the business. Frank has retired, but he
is working together with the Worshipful Company of Saddlers — a kind of
guild of the trade — to set up a training
­programme for young people.
“There’s a shortage of young people
who look on saddler as a career for the future,” Frank said, “but it is quite an interesting future for people who like working
with their hands.”
apprenticeship
, älter, betagt
elderly [(eldEli] guild [gIld] , Zunft, Gilde
, Mangel
equestrian [I(kwestriEn] , Reitsport-
ostrich [(QstrItS] , Vogel Strauß-
swordfish [(sO:dfIS] , Schwertfisch
eventually [I(ventSuEli] , schließlich
run [rVn] , führen, leiten
[E(prentIsSIp] , Lehre, Ausbildung
bridle [(braId&l] , Zaumzeugcraftsman [(krA:ftsmEn] , Handwerker
ARTISANS
shortage [(SO:tIdZ] 5/2018 Spotlight
65 SHORT STORY
The prince of the plantation
Die meisten Eltern wollen ihre Kinder vor allem Schlechten bewahren. Manchmal gehen sie zu
weit. Dann kann die Realität ein Schock sein. Von TALITHA LINEHAN
MEDIUM US AUDIO
H
appy Birthday, Mathias,” said Miss
Chung in Mandarin. She gave him
a Chinese delicacy. She’d bought it
that same day in Shanghai, where
they had gone to celebrate his sixteenth birthday. He thanked her in English, the language of his childhood.
He thought about his childhood now, as he did
every birthday. His memories of that time, of his life
in America, were sparse but vivid. They all centered
around one person: his beloved father. He could see
his father now, sitting in their grand house on the
plantation. His father referred to it as their palace,
and he called Mathias his little prince.
There were other children who lived on the plantation. Their skin was a different color and they never
looked as happy as he was. His father told him they
were unfortunate in life, but he, his little prince, was
rich and free.
There were other adults on the plantation, too.
There was a woman who he saw regularly and who
always smiled at him. And there was a man who he
seldom saw and who never smiled. Mathias’s father
told him never to speak to any of them. This was his
most important rule.
Mathias’s life was simple and happy, until the day
when everything changed. That was the day he broke
his father’s rule for the first time, and also when he
saw his father for the last time — two things that
Miss Chung said were not related.
“His accident was not your fault,” she always said.
His father was busy that day with Miss Chung and
her father, a rich merchant, who were visiting from
China. Mathias was told to play alone. But when he
saw the other children playing together, he couldn’t
stop himself joining in.
At first, the children looked at him strangely. But
they soon accepted him, and they played together
all afternoon. He told them about his father and said
he was sorry they were so unfortunate. They looked
confused and said they didn’t understand. Then, the
man who never smiled arrived and shouted at them.
The other children ran home, and Mathias ran away
and hid.
When Mathias went home that night, his father
was lying on the bed bleeding, and Miss Chung was
beside him, crying. She told him his father had had an
accident, that he was dying. And she said she’d try to
be the mother to him that he’d never had.
Mathias held his father, crying uncontrollably. His
father spoke: “She will take you. She will give you a
good life. Go now, my little prince.” They were the last
words he ever said.
Mathias cried again at the memory. He had a good
life in China with Miss Chung. She lived in a grand
house, too, and she treated him like a son. But like
his father, she kept him isolated. They travelled to
the city only once a year, and whenever they went
out together, people looked at him strangely. She
said that was because he looked different, because
he was American.
Miss Chung had gone to bed early that night, but
Mathias wasn’t tired. He left their hotel room and
walked along the corridor. He heard voices coming
from another room. They were the voices from his
childhood: men speaking English with an American
accent.
He knocked on the door and a man opened it. He
and the other men looked shocked at first, and as he
spoke, more and more outraged.
“Gentlemen,” said Mathias, “do excuse me. I heard
your voices and recognized them as the voices of my
comrades. I, too, am American.”
Confused by their expressions, he tried again to explain himself. He was speaking when one of the men
back off [bÄk (O:f] intervene [)Int&r(vi:n] , zurückweichen
, eingreifen
beloved [bi(lVvId] , geliebt
, Händler(in)
crack [krÄk] , Knall
delicacy [(delIkEsi] , Spezialität, Leckerei
merchant [(m§:tSEnt] outraged [(aUtreIdZd] , aufgebracht
Illustration: moopsi/Shutterstock.com; Foto: zhaojiankang/iStock.com
BOOK REVIEWS
punched him in the face. Then the other men joined
in, shouting, saying words he didn’t understand.
There was a loud crack. Miss Chung was at the
door, with a pistol in her hand.
“Leave him or I’ll shoot you all,” she said.
The men backed off, still shouting, and Miss
Chung helped Mathias to his room.
“I’m so sorry,” she said, washing the blood from his
face. “I should have told you.”
“Told me what?”
“Why those men hate you. It’s simply because of
the color of your skin.”
“My skin?” Mathias tried to understand the concept. Naturally, he’d known his skin was darker than
that of most people he saw. “Why would they hate
me because of that?”
Miss Chung sighed. “I made sure you never read
books about racism or slavery. I didn’t want you to
find out that way.”
“Find out what?”
“Who you were in your homeland. You and your
father, Mathias. You were slaves.”
Mathias laughed, despite the pain. “No, we weren’t.
We were rich. We were free.”
“No. This is what your father wanted you to believe. The house you describe as a palace, it was a hut.”
“But the other children, they were the poor ones.”
“Relatively speaking, yes. Their father had lost all
their money to gambling. That’s why there were no
other slaves. Your father told you that you were rich,
and you were. You were loved. And you were free in
spirit. That man was heartless, what he did to your
father when he saw you with his children…”
“He beat him,” Mathias realized with horror. “He
beat him to death. It was my fault.”
“No. It was the fault of hundreds of years of evil
and ignorance, and the fault of one bitter man. Your
father said it was the best day of his life, because then
you’d be free. That man wanted to beat you, too, but I
intervened. I offered him money.”
“You bought me?”
“I bought your freedom. And I promised your
father not to tell you who you were until you knew
who you were inside. That’s why I kept you isolated.
But now you know. Now, you can truly be free. This
is what your father wanted you to have more than
anything. So, happy birthday, little prince.”
punch [pVntS]
, schlagen, boxen
unfortunate [Vn(fO:rtSEnEt] , unglücklich, bedauernswert
sigh [saI] [pVntS]
, seufzen
, lebhaft
sparse [spA:rs] , spärlich
vivid [(vIvId] HISTORY
The award-winning film Darkest Hour
has led to renewed interest in Winston Churchill’s performance as wartime prime minister. In his book Asia
Betrayed: How Churchill Sacrificed the Far
East to Save England, John Bell Smithback examines Churchill’s strategy
when it came to supporting British
colonies in Asia. With great attention
to detail, Smithback shows how Great
Britain and its allies left the Pacific
temporarily exposed — encouraging
Japanese expansionism. Smithback’s
suggestion that Churchill failed Asia is
closely tied to his analysis of Churchill’s focus on territory — and
not on the human cost of defending it. Quoting US Secretary of
State Henry Stimson as saying “there are times when men have to
die”, Smithback makes clear that war is the evil we accept to guarantee not only peace but power. Earnshaw Books Limited, €18.03.
ally [(ÄlaI] , Alliierte(r)
exposed [Ik(spEUzd] , ungeschützt
renewed [ri(nju:d] , erneuert, erneut
EASY READER | AUDIOBOOK
Abigail Baxter is a young detective inspector in Liverpool. She is invited to
the wedding of a school friend. Sylvia
Blenkinsop is getting married at the
home of her wealthy parents in the
countryside. Everything looks perfect:
the bride is beautiful and the champagne is flowing. Only the bridegroom,
Trevor, doesn’t fit into the perfect picture. In the middle of the wedding celebrations, he begins to act strangely. He
talks and laughs very loudly and flirts
with other women. Then, before the
wedding is over, one of the guests discovers Trevor dead in the toilet. Abigail springs into action, but as she begins work on the crime
scene, a local detective arrives and tries to take over. Black Wedding is
an A1 level crime story. The CD comes with a book that includes exercises, translated words and language tips. Compact Verlag, €9.99.
bridegroom [(braIdgru:m] , Bräutigam
crime scene [(kraIm si:n] , Tatort
5/2018 Spotlight
67 AROUND OZ
Can robots
do it all?
Sind automatisierte Helfer auf australischen
Farmen wirklich die Investition wert?
ADVANCED
PETER FLYNN is a
public-relations
consultant and
social commentator who lives in
Perth, Western
Australia.
68 Spotlight 5/2018
For centuries, though, agriculture has been developing in a less labour-intensive direction. Milkmaids
were replaced by machines more than 100 years ago,
as were horse-drawn ploughs, oil lamps and kerosene
refrigerators. For decades, Australia’s biggest beef
farmers have used helicopters and quad bikes to herd
cattle, while computers and satellite technology facilitate long-distance learning and medical treatment.
The other sad reality is that farmers are an ageing
population, struggling to get their own kids to take
over their property, quite apart from attracting and
keeping good workers. There will be more and more
agricultural robots (“agbots” for short), simply because the demand for food continues to increase.
Still, I loved the sight of those young horsewomen
helping their dad herd 200 cattle and calves. Outback
New South Wales was dry at the time, and this farmer and his girls were exercising their legal right to
graze their herds on the plentiful grass on both sides
of the highway. Surely robots couldn’t do that.
barley [(bA:li] prospect [(prQspekt] , Gerste
, Aussicht
, Großstädter
city slicker [(sIti )slIkE] ifml. repetitive [ri(petEtIv] , monoton
crop [krQp] , Feldfrucht, Erntegut
, Einzelstrang-
discerning [dI(s§:nIN] single-strand [)sINg&l (strÄnd] sound wave [(saUnd weIv] , anspruchsvoll
, Schallwelle
grazing land [(greIzIN lÄnd] talk-back caller
herd [h§:d] , hüten, weiden
dung mit Hörerbeteiligung
, Weideland
moisture sensor [(mOIstSE )sensE] , (Boden)Feuchtesensor
plough [plaU] , Pflug
[(tO:k bÄk )kO:lE] , Anrufer(in) bei einer Radiosen-
thin [TIn] , ausdünnen
weeds [wi:dz] , Unkraut
AROUND OZ
Fotos: Vakherson, ryasick/iStock.com
A
n unforgettable sight from my recent long drive
across Australia and back was of two teenage girls
on horseback driving a herd of cattle next to a busy
highway, a scene that might soon be replaced by robots doing the same job.
Rural radio in outback Australia is full of stories
about automation on farms. (Yes, I could have listened to music podcasts, but I chose to tune into the
local news instead.) In Britain, a project called “Hands
Free Hectare” has eliminated human labour in growing barley. Robots, drones and driverless tractors are
used for planting, supervising and harvesting.
The machines are almost autonomous and produce quality crops equal to those achieved with traditional human-intensive farming techniques. Moisture sensors in the ground signal when, where and
how much water is needed, while patrolling robots
kill weeds they have learned to recognize and thin
the early crop for an optimal harvest.
In Australia, we already have robots that can herd
cattle. We have virtual fences that create a barrier
with sound waves (we used to think the mobile,
­single-strand electric fence was high-tech); and we
use drones extensively to monitor grazing land and
the welfare of animals.
I’ve seen robots at their discerning best on certified organic farms, killing weeds with hot steam or
flames rather than chemical sprays. Work robots can
be taught. They are best at repetitive jobs and don’t
care what time of day or what day of the week it is.
Talk-back callers on the radio in the bush, however,
say that a lot of farmers and rural workers are not happy about the prospect of being replaced by machines.
Some think it’s an evil plot by university-educated
city slickers to kill off dying regional communities.
Others fear for the job prospects of their farmworkers. Nostalgia plays a role, too.
LIVING LANGUAGE
How do you say “21”?
Wie gut übersetzt eigentlich der Computer? Wir lassen eine deutsche Textstelle von einem
kostenlosen Online-Programm ins Englische übertragen und sind gespannt, was dabei herauskommt.
Von Google Übersetzer und PETRA DANIELL
ADVANCED
Media
Deutsch perfekt, issue 2/18
Warum heißt es einundzwanzig
statt zwanzigundeins?
Schon vor 4000 Jahren wurde ein I für eine
Eins und ein X für eine Zehn geschrieben –
und IXX* war 21. Das war lange fast in ganz
Europa so, auch die Engländer sagten oneand-twenty. Vor mehr als 500 Jahren kamen die
arabischen Ziffern nach Europa. Viele Völker
änderten ihre Art zu zählen. Die Deutschen
aber nicht – sie sagen bis heute einundzwanzig.
Why is it twenty-one instead of twenty?
Already 4,000 years ago, an I was written for a
one and an X for a ten — and IXX was 21. That
was long the case in almost all of Europe, even
the English said one-and-twenty. More than
500 years ago, the Arabic numerals came to
Europe. Many peoples changed their way of
counting. The Germans are not — they say to
this day twenty-one.
Why do speakers of German say einundzwanzig
(“one-and-twenty”) rather than zwanzigundeins
(“twenty-and-one”)?
As far back as 4,000 years ago, “one” was written as
“I” and “ten” was written as “X” — IXX, therefore,
was 21. For a long time, this was the case in almost
all of Europe. Even the English said “one-andtwenty”. More than 500 years ago, Arabic numerals
came to Europe. Many peoples changed their way
of counting, but the Germans didn’t — German
speakers say einundzwanzig to this day.
LIVING LANGUAGE
• This month, our text excerpt is
challenging, not because of the
language it uses, but because of
the concept that is discussed in it
— language. The moment you use
language to talk about language,
things tend to become tricky.
• How do you differentiate between what it is you’re talking
about and what you are saying
about it? In written language, we
often use inverted commas or
other typography to do this. In
the sentence “The word ‘word’ is a
noun and a verb”, the word we’re
talking about is put in inverted
commas. In our German text, the
words that are being discussed
appear in italics.
• These typographic signals are,
of course, lost in any translation
program. Some programs we tried
left the (non-existent) German
word zwanzigundeins unchanged,
thus giving the reader a chance
to see that this text is not about a
mathematical question (“Why is
it twenty-one instead of twenty?”), but about how one counts in
German.
• The confusion increases if you
read to the end of the online translation, where you find out that
German speakers — to this day
— say “twenty-one”. The reaction
ascending: in ~ order
[E(sendIN] , in aufsteigender Reihen-
folge
carve [kA:v] , schnitzen
differentiate [)dIfE(renSieIt] , differenzieren, unterschei-
den
of an English speaker would probably be along the lines of: “And
what’s so special about that?”
• To a human translator, it is immediately obvious that the German
text hinges on internal word
structure: in order for it to make
sense in English, it requires a
structural translation of einundzwanzig, “one-and-twenty”, not a
correct (semantic) translation,
“twenty-one”.
• Remarkably enough, by translating the word einundzwanzig
perfectly correctly, the software
loses the message of the original
text. We therefore end up with the
false claim that German speakers
say “twenty-one” — which is
exactly what they don’t do.
• In our own translation, we elaborated a bit (“Why do speakers of
German say...?”): we translated the
individual parts of the numerals
rather than the numerals themselves and generously added
italics and inverted commas to
indicate foreign and unusual
words. We hope the English text
now makes a lot more sense.
* These symbols (not Roman numerals) were
usually carved into wood: one line for a one,
two lines for a two and so on. Two crossed
lines stood for the number 10. The symbols
were written and read in ascending order
from left to right.
elaborate [i(lÄbEreIt] , näher ausführen
excerpt [(eks§:pt] italics [I(tÄlIks] , Kursivschrift
numeral [(nju:m&rEl] , Auszug
, Zahl
hinge on sth. [(hIndZ Qn] thus [DVs] , dadurch, somit
, von etw. abhängig sein
inverted comma
[In)v§:tId (kQmE] UK , Anführungsstrich
5/2018 Spotlight
69 PEGGY’S PLACE
Romance in the kitchen?
Sean, der Küchenchef in unserem ganz eigenen Londoner Pub, hat eine
Agentin für sein Buch gefunden. Von INEZ SHARP
MEDIUM AUDIO
Sean
Peggy: What time is the agent coming?
Sean: Any minute now. How do I look?
Phil: Who exactly put you in touch with
this person?
Sean: The agent? Her name is Lillian, and
it was Jane who set up the meeting today.
Phil: Jane? My stepdaughter, Jane?
Sean: What’s the problem?
Phil: I just never saw Jane as a networking
businesswoman.
Sean: She said that Lillian often comes
into the hotel where she works and meets
authors for lunch. Jane got chatting to her
one day and mentioned that she knew an
aspiring writer.
Peggy: How much do you know about
this Lillian woman?
Sean: Not much, but this is just an informal meeting to see if we can work together. That must be her now. Hello! Lillian?
I’m Sean O’Connor.
Lillian: Sean, lovely to meet you. I hear
you have a hot manuscript that you want
to share with me.
Sean: I’m not sure you’d call it hot exactly.
Lillian: Oh, come on! Don’t be so modest.
Jane was raving about your writing style.
I think the word she used was “steamy”.
Sean: Well, I suppose in the context,
“steamy” is rather a nice word. Please take
a seat. Can I get you a drink?
Lillian: A glass of Pinot, please. I must say
it’s unusual to have a man working in this
genre.
70 Spotlight 5/2018
Phil & Peggy
Helen
George
“I hear you have a hot
manuscript”
Sean: Really? I thought there were lots of
famous...
Lillian: This could be a selling point for
you.
Sean: If you say so.
Lillian: So, tell me first: what inspired
you?
Sean: Actually, my inspiration comes
from my travels...
Lillian: Ah, I get it! A young man out discovering the world. He finds something
dishy in every port.
Sean: Er,... sort of.
Peggy: Excuse me! Sorry to interrupt. I’m
Peggy, Sean’s boss. I thought you might
like to try some of his delicious handmade
crisps.
Lillian: Thank you so much. A man of
many talents!
Sean: No, just one talent, to be honest.
Lillian: Now, tell me. Just how spicy is
this manuscript? Do you have a copy with
you?
Sean: Yes, but I should make it clear. It’s
completely international, so in some
­places, there’s more spice and in others...
Lillian: Look, Sean. I need to know: are we
talking about innocent romance — some
kissing and canoodling — or full-on sex in
your stories?
Jane
Sean: Sex? There’s no sex in my recipes.
Lillian: Recipes? Your manuscript is a
cookery book?
Sean: Yes, I thought Jane told you that.
Lillian: Look, sunny boy! I’m agent to
some of the best romance fiction writers
in Britain. Why would I waste my time
with a cookery book — which, by the way,
is a notoriously hard market to get into.
Sean: I’m sorry. It was a mix-up.
Lillian: You got me all the way out here
to look at a collection of recipes? You’re
damn lucky that I’m not charging you for
my time.
Peggy: Hey! You can’t leave without paying for your wine.
Lillian: Can’t I? Just watch me!
aspiring [E(spaIErIN] , ehrgeizig, aufstrebend
canoodling
notoriously
[nEU(tO:riEsli] , bekanntermaßen
, Knutscherei
[kE(nu:d&lIN] ifml. rave [reIv] , schwärmen
charge [tSA:dZ] , in Rechnung stellen
set up [set (Vp] , arrangieren, einrichten
crisps [krIsps] UK , Kartoffelchips
dishy [(dISi] UK ifml. spicy [(spaIsi] , pikant
steamy [(sti:mi] , knackig, attraktiv
, heiß
modest [(mQdIst] , bescheiden
suppose [sE(pEUz] , annehmen, vermuten
PEGGY’S PLACE
BRITAIN TODAY
A BBC drama
Die BBC wird oft liebevoll als „Auntie Beeb“
bezeichnet. Das Tantchen ist allerdings nicht immer
ganz fair, wenn es um weibliche Angestellte geht.
EASY AUDIO Fotos: Vac1, Alasdair Thomson/iStock.com
W
COLIN BEAVEN
is a freelance
writer. He lives
and works in
Southampton on
the south coast
of England.
BRITAIN TODAY
hat do we think of the BBC — the “Beeb”, as it is
known? We generally have mixed feelings about Britain’s national broadcaster. Are its programmes any
better than the ones we see on commercial channels,
whether they’re free ones, like ITV, or one we have to
pay for to watch Game of Thrones?
Overall, they probably are. But why must the BBC
give its top people so much money? It gets its income
from what we pay for our TV licences, and a lot of it
goes to overpaid bosses, presenters and journalists.
As for its journalists, are they as independent as
they like us to think? They get very cross if you suggest that they’re too close to the state. On the other
hand, Conservative politicians like to accuse the
BBC of being anti-government. And it’s true that the
BBC is a home for satirical programmes like Have I
Got News for You, which is a good source of political
jokes and attacks on the government.
So, in spite of everything, we’re fond of it. When,
for example, a popular programme like The Great British Bake Off left the BBC for Channel 4 — to earn more
money — we all felt let down. Bake Off is a competition to find out who bakes the best cakes, scones and
so on. I’m surprised that, when it moved to Channel
4, it wasn’t renamed Game of Scones.
When it comes to equality, though, the BBC does
shoot itself in the foot. A while ago, there were complaints that it replaced older female presenters with
younger ones, while it continued to employ older
males. The latest gender issue was (un)equal pay.
Not everyone who works for the BBC is overpaid, it
seems. Some women presenters earn much less than
their male colleagues and have protested.
Members of Parliament were worried when they
heard about possible gender discrimination. The director general of the BBC had to go to Westminster
to answer questions that were asked by a committee
of MPs. A woman reporter who had protested went
along, too. It was a meeting with a gender agenda.
Whenever there’s a national scandal, MPs need to
find someone they can blame. Since things go wrong
so regularly, they get lots of practice at sitting in committees and asking difficult questions. It’s ironic.
There aren’t enough women in the British Houses
of Parliament. So if MPs criticize you for gender inequality, you are definitely in trouble.
It’s also ironic because you’d expect reporters to be
asking politicians questions, not the other way round.
Perhaps MPs are secretly hoping for jobs with the
BBC. Would they like to be on TV every night, holding a microphone under other politicians’ noses?
They’d certainly earn more if they had jobs as top
BBC journalists. But they have too much to lose,
since MPs are the ones who make the rules. If, for
example, they thought the BBC went too far with
its attacks on the government, then the government
could also threaten attacks, like a tax on BBC salaries
— ideally, though, only on the men’s.
, beschuldigen
accuse [E(kju:z] gender issue [(dZendE )ISu:] , Gleichstellungsfrage
broadcaster [(brO:dkA:stE] , Sender
let down [let (daUn] , im Stich lassen, enttäuschen
cross [krQs] , verärgert, sauer
MP (Member of Parliament)
[)em (pi:] UK , Abgeordnete(r)
fond: be ~ of sth. [fQnd] , etw. lieben
foot: shoot oneself in the ~
[fUt] ifml. , sich ins Knie schießen, sich ins
eigene Fleisch schneiden
gender discrimination
[(dZendE dIskrImI)neIS&n] , Geschlechterdiskriminierung
presenter [pri(zentE] , Moderator(in)
salary [(sÄlEri] , Gehalt
scone [skQn] , engl. Teegebäck
source [sO:s] , Quelle
5/2018 Spotlight
71 The Argyle Sweater
Good doggy!
I was down at
the park with
my dog one day,
when I got chatting to a man
there. He said
his dog was able
to bring back
a stick from
10 kilometres
away. I said I
thought that
was a bit farfetched.
“I have noticed that the
people who are late are
often so much jollier than
the people who have to
wait for them.”
E. V. Lucas (1868–1938), English writer
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
Correct!
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
Andy is appearing on a TV quiz show. He
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
has already won €500,000 and now has the
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
chance to win a million euros. “You’ve done
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
very well so far,” says the show’s presenter.
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
“But will you risk everything for the big
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
prize?” “Sure,” says Andy. “I’m feeling lucky
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
today.” “All right, then,” says the presenter.
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
“Here’s the question. Which of the follow.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
ing birds does not build its own nest? Is
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
it (­­A) a buzzard, (B) a flamingo, (C) a con.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
dor or (D) a cuckoo?” “I don’t know,” says
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
Andy. “Remember that you can still phone
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
a friend,” the presenter reminds him. “Good
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
idea!” says Andy. “I’ll phone my brother,
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
Mike. He knows everything.” So Andy calls
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
Mike and repeats the question to him as
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
quickly as possible. “That’s an easy one,”
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
says Mike. “It’s the cuckoo.” “Are you sure?”
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
Andy asks. “Absolutely,” says Mike. So Andy
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
chooses “cuckoo” as his answer and wins
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
one million euros. The next day, Andy visits
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
his brother to thank him. “But tell me, Mike,
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
how did you know that the cuckoo doesn’t
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
build its own nest?” Mike smiles wisely:
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
“Because it lives in a clock, of course.”
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
.........................................................................................
Peanuts
72 Spotlight 5/2018
by Scott Hilburn
Man alone
My friend’s wife left
him last week. She
said she was going
out to get some milk,
and she never came
back. I asked him
how he was managing. He said, “Not
too badly. I’ve been
using some of that
powdered stuff.”
Special sounds
Every couple of weeks, my ex-girlfriend
used to change the sound of her morning alarm-clock call. I wonder what she’s
­getting up to nowadays.
cuckoo [(kUku:] , Kuckuck
far-fetched [)fA: (fetSt] , weit hergeholt
jolly [(dZQli] , fröhlich, vergnügt
presenter [pri(zentE] , Moderator(in)
get up to sth. [get (Vp tE]
UK ifml. , (Wortspiel)
etw. anstellen, etw. treiben;
zu etw. (hier: einem Weckton) aufstehen
Compiled by Owen Connors
When I grow up...
A teacher is asking the children in the class what they want to be when
they grow up. “I’m going to follow in my father’s footsteps,” says Tom,
“and be a police officer.” “I didn’t know your father was in the police
force,” says the teacher. “He’s not,” replies Tom. “He’s a thief.”
by Charles M. Schulz
THE LIGHTER SIDE
Cartoons: © 2018 Scott Hilburn/Distributed by Universal Uclick/Bulls Press; © 2018 PEANUTS Worldwide LLC, Dist. by Universal Uclick/Bulls Press; Illustration: wektorygrafika/istock.com
THE LIGHTER SIDE
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FEEDBACK
Spotlight 1/18
Dear Mr Schofield
In our Wednesday morning English
course, we read your short story, “The
barrow king” — a Ms Winslow investiga­
tion. We enjoyed the story very much and
discussed the content, such as the secret
of the grave, in a lively and eager manner.
But after we had read the final sentences
of chapter three, when Dorothy suggests
that Isadora should have a hot chocolate
and a chat, your story ends rather sudden­
ly. We found the ending to be a bit too
abrupt for our taste, and therefore some­
what disappointing.
We would like to ask you, please, to
write another chapter and to continue
the story so as to develop another sequel.
In regard to the narrative, there are some
questions which we think need to be ad­
dressed:
Isadora lives in Paris; how does her
life develop there?
Tobias Zöllner is described as
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
⋅⋅
an unscrupulous businessman:
heartless, and with bad manners.
Does his life change in any way?
Does the archaeological team from
the University of Speyer find any
more treasures in the barrow other
than the coins?
Is Dorothy also sometimes a spirit
medium?
Why does the young couple enter the
room at exactly that moment?
What is the nature of the relationship
between Armin von Weiden and
Dorothy? Is this the beginning of a
romance?
Best regards
suggestions for a sequel. I have passed
the ideas on to the author, James Scho­
field. Let’s see if he picks up on any of your
ideas. We are sure of one thing, though:
he will be delighted to know that Spotlight
readers have engaged with his stories.
There will definitely be another Ms
Winslow story in Spotlight this year.
Let’s see what happens on her next visit
to Heroldstein.
Kind regards
Inez Sharp, editor-in-chief
Ortrud Wendler, by post
Dear Ms Wendler
Thank you for your letter. We were so
pleased to hear that everyone in your
class enjoyed reading the Ms Winslow
story. Thank you also for the excellent
WORDPLAY
casual racism
Racism that creeps into conversations
under cover of not being racism at all.
EASY
Example:
“Mexicans bring all that crime over the
border into the US. Trump is kind of right
about that.”
— Heard on the street in Munich. The speaker
was unhappy, too, about the presence of foreigners in Germany.
casual [(kÄZuEl] , beiläufig
creep [(kri:p] , sich einschleichen
disparage [dI(spÄrIdZ] , herabsetzen, verunglimpfen
penchant [(pentSEnt] , Vorliebe, Hang
Casual racism — we’ve all experienced it:
people are sitting together having a nice
chat when one of them makes an unkind
comment about immigrants or people
with dark skin. Everyone laughs, but
some just out of nervousness, because
the conversation has just taken an unex­
pectedly ugly turn.
Someone else at the table then tells a
“joke” disparaging a particular cultural or
religious group, adding some ill-informed
impressions about this group’s supposed
penchant for crime. No one has yet said,
“Yes, we really do hate foreigners, don’t
we?”, but it’s in the air. Hate has taken a
seat at the table. What happens next?
supposed [sE(pEUzd] , vermeintlich
turn: take an ugly ~ [t§:n] , eine hässliche Wen-
dung nehmen
by Claudine Weber-Hof
74 Spotlight 5/2018
FEEDBACK
NEXT MONTH
The perfect weekend
Join Spotlight for “the perfect weekend”, an
odyssey in three parts: Britain Today columnist Colin Beaven takes us to Torquay
on the English Riviera; travel writer Lorraine Mallinder gives us a tour of Edinburgh, capital of Scotland (pictured here),
with her kids. Last stop? Bavaria, where
you can use your English at a spa hotel,
and in the atelier of a contemporary artist.
The language of phone calls
Picking up the telephone shouldn’t be a
problem — and yet, many of us hestitate
before making a call, especially in English.
Help is at hand in June’s language feature,
where we present key phrases and the
­expressions you’ll need to make different types of calls. You will become a cool,
capable and confident caller.
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5/2018 Spotlight
75 MY LIFE IN ENGLISH
Inga-Gesine Horchler
Die Schauspielerin Inga-Gesine Horchler erzählt uns, wie sie als
Kind ihre eigene Version englischer Songtitel entwarf.
MEDIUM
Why is English important to you?
It’s a help in my job and allows me to communicate with people across the world.
version of the song “Hungry Eyes” was
“Howy Ice” — so basically, complete
­gibberish.
When was your first English lesson, and
what can you remember about it?
It was in fifth grade. My English teacher
worked on the side as a beekeeper, and he
sold fir trees. I remember he liked to talk
about bees.
Which person (living or dead) from
the English-speaking world would you
most like to meet?
Princess Diana. I always thought she was
special. Today, I’d like to meet President
Trump and ask him if he is really serious
about some of the stuff he is doing.
Who is your favourite English-language
author, actor or musician?
I’d like to answer all of those. I like the
work of English writer C. S. Lewis. He
wrote The Chronicles of Narnia, seven fantasy novels for children. I think there is a
lot of truth in his writings. I love watching Julia Roberts, Meryl Streep, Jessica
Chastain and Kate Winslet. My favourite
male actors are Viggo Mortensen, Morgan
Freeman, Keanu Reeves and — unforgotten — Robin Williams. In fact, quite a few
of my colleagues’ acting moves me. My
taste in music is varied. I like unknown
musicians, but also famous artists such as
Nina Simone, Coldplay and Alicia Keys.
Finally, and this will make my friends
smile, “Ghetto Supastar” by Pras, Mýa and
Ol’ Dirty Bastard.
Which is your favourite city in the
­English-speaking world?
New York. I like the feeling that there are
no limits in that city, and I love the art
scene there.
If you found yourself in that city with a
free afternoon, what would you do?
I’d go to the Shake Shack burger joint to
see what the food is like. Then I’d take in
a musical, after which I’d walk the streets
and just do some people watching.
Have you ever worked in an Englishspeaking environment? If so, for how
long, and what was it like?
Yes, I have. Actually, I’m currently jobbing
in a concept store called Sois Blessed. The
customers come from all over the world.
What is your favourite food from the
English-speaking world?
I like eating burgers, and I love chips.
Where in the English-speaking world
would you like to be right now?
New Zealand — its landscapes must be
spectacular. I’ve only heard about it from
friends.
What was your funniest experience in
English?
When I was a child and I watched the
film Dirty Dancing (1987) for the first
time, I just sang along to the songs without knowing what the lyrics meant. My
76 Spotlight 5/2018
Do you practise English, and if so, how?
If I’m watching English films and series,
then I’ll watch the original versions.
beekeeper [(bi:)ki:pE] , Imker(in)
joint [dZOInt] ifml. , Laden
fir tree [(f§: tri:] lyrics [(lIrIks] , Liedtext
gibberish [(dZIbErIS] , Kauderwelsch,
Quatsch
weird [wIEd] , sonderbar, schräg
, Tannenbaum
Is there anything from the Englishspeaking world in your home?
Yes, shoes and a hat.
What would be your motto in English?
In fact, I have two: know yourself, and
never give up!
MY LIFE IN ENGLISH
Fotos: Bernd Willenberg; igoriss/iStock.com
What is your favourite word in English?
“Weird.” A friend of mine from Texas
taught it to me. I like the way it sounds.
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