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The Boston Globe – May 01, 2018

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Tu e s d a y, M a y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Mueller’s
questions
for Trump
revealed
Counsel seeks answers on
Russia, rationale for firings
By Michael S. Schmidt
NEW YORK TIMES
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Lovely Hoffman performed last week at the Black Market pop-up store in Dudley Square, which is in its second year.
Market volatility
Venues
for black
business
owners
yield a
chance for
profit —
and strife
By Janelle Nanos
GLOBE STAFF
Kai Grant had every reason to be riding high.
Her venture, Black Market, a Roxbury pop-up for
black business owners, was a smashing success in
its inaugural year, hosting 150 entrepreneurs, and
the recent opening of the second season drew
hordes of customers.
But the market’s return was marred by controversy after one of the vendors from its first year decided to open a market in the Seaport, which Boston magazine mistakenly heralded in a headline as
the city’s first black-owned pop-up.
This new market, which will launch inside District Hall on May 19 and is scheduled to run monthly throughout the year, has prompted conversations
about the role that such marketplaces can and
should play in Boston’s economy. Grant said she has
BLACK MARKET, Page A10
WASHINGTON — Robert Mueller, the special
counsel investigating Russia’s election interference,
has at least four dozen questions on an exhaustive
array of subjects he wants to ask President Trump
to learn more about his ties to Russia and determine whether he obstructed the inquiry itself, according to a list of the questions obtained by The
New York Times.
The open-ended queries appear to be an attempt
to penetrate the president’s thinking, to get at the
motivation behind some of his most combative
Twitter posts, and to examine his relationships with
his family and his closest advisers. They deal chiefly
with the president’s high-profile firings of the FBI
director and his first national security adviser, his
treatment of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, and a
2016 Trump Tower meeting between campaign officials and Russians offering dirt on Hillary Clinton.
But they also touch on the president’s businesses; any discussions with his longtime personal lawyer, Michael D. Cohen, about a Moscow real estate
deal; whether the president knew of any attempt by
Jared Kushner, his son-in-law, to set up a back channel to Russia during the transition; any contacts he
had with Roger J. Stone Jr., a longtime adviser who
MUELLER, Page A5
19 agencies fail
to post millions
in expenditures
Black Market was founded to fill a void left behind by
the importer A Nubian Notion, which closed in 2016.
‘Quasi-publics’ assailed
over lack of transparency
By Matt Rocheleau
In the news
Ray day
Tuesday: Clearing, warmer.
High 62-67, low 54-59.
Wednesday: Beautiful.
High 82-87, low 60-65.
High tide: 12:39, 1:10.
Sunrise: 5:40. Sunset: 7:43.
Complete report, B9.
Developer Don Chiofaro finally received a green light
from state environmental
regulators for a 600-foot
tower near the New England
Aquarium. C1.
Bill Cosby’s own comments,
made in a 2005 deposition,
provided the most incriminating evidence in his sex
GLOBE STAFF
A Medford side trip to visit a slice
of her father’s past ends in death
Realtor struck by
teen driver under
influence, police say
By Michael Levenson
and Jerome Campbell
GLOBE STAFF
Judy Moses described her work
as a calling. A realtor since 1986,
she took pride in mentoring others,
especially women, as a past president of the Women’s Council of Realtors and an owner of Pathway
Home Realty Group in Newton.
“I feel blessed to love what I do,”
Moses wrote on her website. “I feel
I was born to
help people buy
and sell homes.
It is my ministry.”
On Sunday,
Moses, 64, had
finished showing a house in
Medford when
PATHWAY HOME
REALTY GROUP
she stopped on
Spring Street on
Judy Moses
her way home,
her husband said, because her father had told her that he’d spent
part of his childhood there.
At about 4:49 pm, she was
struck and killed by a Toyota RAV4
driven by a 17-year-old who was
found to be operating under the influence of a drug, police said. The
crash happened near the intersection of Spring and Emerald streets.
After hitting Moses, the teenager, who had a learner’s permit but
no license, struck and seriously injured two pedestrians, a 28-yearold woman and a 27-year-old man,
and killed the couple’s dog before
crashing into a Citizen’s Bank near
Yeomans Avenue, the Middlesex
district attorney’s office said. The
couple, whose names were not released, remained hospitalized on
Monday.
At least 19 agencies in Massachusetts appear to
have flouted state law by failing to publish millions
of dollars in payroll and spending data on a state
transparency website as required by a 2010 law
that mandated the public disclosures.
All of the missing data belonged to so-called
quasi government agencies, which are established
by the state. They provide public services and receive state financial support but are legally structured to operate somewhat independently.
The agencies also operate with less public accountability than traditional government offices,
with their budgets largely kept separate and not
subject to legislative oversight.
Senator Mark C. Montigny, a Democrat from
New Bedford, blasted agencies for using their
quasi-public status “as a veil of secrecy.”
“At the end of the day, this is taxpayer money,”
Montigny said. “They all should operate with clear
transparency.”
Such lack of transparency has become an issue
since the Globe disclosed that parts of the State Police payroll were kept out of public view for years.
The State Police have since promised to overhaul re-
CRASH, Page B4
AGENCIES, Page A6
assault trial, a juror said. A5.
A string of bombings and
other attacks killed dozens
of people in Afghanistan,
including 11 children who
Celtics take Game 1
Baker’s rival ensnared in rights suit
Judge called Lively’s acts
against Ugandans ‘odious’
had gathered to play around
a NATO convoy, 10 journalists, and a US soldier. A3.
By Joshua Miller
Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu asserted
that secret documents
proved Iran lied about its
nuclear weapons program
GLOBE STAFF
Controversial pastor Scott Lively, whom
Republicans this weekend catapulted into
contention for the GOP nomination for governor, is embroiled in an active federal lawsuit
in which he was accused of conspiracy to de-
when it signed a 2015 nuclear deal. A4.
For breaking news, updated
stories, and more, visit our website:
prive gay people in the East African nation
of Uganda of their fundamental human
rights.
A judge last year called Lively’s efforts
and writings against lesbian, gay, bisexual,
transgender, and intersex people “odious”
and “crackpot bigotry.”
“The question before the court is not
whether Defendant’s actions in aiding and
abetting efforts to demonize, intimidate,
LIVELY, Page A7
Scott Lively
Court weighs ground rules in meningitis case
BostonGlobe.com
VOL . 293, NO. 121
By Maria Cramer
*
GLOBE STAFF
Suggested retail price
$2.50
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
The Celtics’ Al Horford slammed home 2
points as Boston overwhelmed
Philadelphia at TD Garden, 117-101. D1.
Dozens of people died and hundreds of others fell ill during the
2012 fungal meningitis outbreak
that began in a Framingham compounding pharmacy.
But should jurors in the latest
trial against former pharmacy em-
ployees hear the devastating details
of what is considered one of the
largest public health crises ever
caused by a pharmaceutical product?
Prosecutors and defense lawyers
for nine pharmacists, technicians,
and executives sparred over that
question Monday at a hearing in US
District Court in Boston.
The nine defendants are the
lesser-known actors charged in the
tragedy involving the New England
Compounding Center during the
summer of 2012, when prosecutors
say contaminated, expired, and untested drugs were mislabeled and
NECC, Page A7
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Daily Briefing
‘It’s ironic that they feel
they need to ban guns to
protect themselves.’
DAVID HOGG, Florida shooting survivor
When Trump
speaks, NRA
listeners won’t
carry weapons
Some activists
for gun control
call it hypocrisy
By Alex Horton
WASHINGTON POST
MATT YORK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thousands of teachers descended on Arizona’s state Capitol, where legislators were negotiating a new budget package.
Striking Arizona teachers hold mass protest at state Capitol for a third day
PHOENIX — Thousands of
Arizona teachers gathered at
the state Capitol for the third
day Monday to protest low pay
and school funding as many
schools around the state remained closed.
The rallies came as the Republican-controlled Legislature
began work on a budget package negotiated with Governor
Doug Ducey that would boost
teacher pay and some funding
but falls well short of educators’ demands.
The deal gives the first in-
stallment of a 20 percent teacher pay raise by 2020 and begins
to restore some of the nearly
$400 million in recession-era
cuts to a fund that helps
schools pay for books, buses,
and other capital expenses.
Republican House Speaker
J.D. Mesnard said he expects
that budget legislation will be
passed by the end of the week.
Leaders of teacher groups
have said that the announced
agreement is only a press release at this point, and that
their other concerns remain
unaddressed.
‘‘We have no bill,” Joe
Thomas, Arizona Education
Association president, and
Noah Karvelis, an organizer for
Arizona Educators United, said
in a joint statement. “We have
no deal. The devil is in the details.”
The job action began last
Thursday, resulting in closures
of schools that educate the vast
majority of Arizona’s 1.1 million public school students.
Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federa-
tion of Teachers, came to
Phoenix on Monday to support
the strikers.Weingarten spoke
at a rally and held a news conference next to the state Capitol, which is where members of
the #RedforEd movement congregated. Teachers also spent
part of the day meeting with
legislators.
Recent teacher protests in
Arizona and Colorado have followed similar job actions in
West Virginia, Kentucky, and
Oklahoma.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
US military saw
jump in reports
of sexual assault
WASHINGTON — More
than 6,700 Defense Department employees reported being sexually assaulted in fiscal
2017, the highest number
since the US military began
tracking reports more than a
decade ago, according to Pentagon data released on Monday.
The new data showed a 10
percent increase of military
sexual assault reports from the
previous fiscal year. The uptick
occurred amid a Marine Corps
scandal over sharing nude
photos and heightened public
discourse about sexual harassment in American culture.
Pentagon officials sought to
portray the increase as reflective of more troops and military civilians trusting commanders and the military’s judicial system enough to come
forward.
In all, 6,769 people reported assaults for fiscal 2017,
which ended Sept. 30. It was
the largest yearly increase
since 2014.
Roughly two-thirds of the
reports resulted in disciplinary
action, the data show. The remaining 38 percent were discounted because evidence was
lacking, victims declined to
participate in hearings, or other reasons.
NEW YORK TIMES
GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Central American migrants traveling in the “Migrant Via Crucis” caravan camped outside
“El Chaparral” port of entry to United States in Tijuana, Mexico, on Monday.
Asylum seekers denied US entry for a second day
TIJUANA, Mexico — About
200 people in a caravan of Central American asylum seekers
waited on the Mexican border
with San Diego for a second
straight day Monday to turn
themselves in to US border inspectors.
The inspectors said the nation’s busiest crossing facility
did not have enough space to
accommodate them. After a
monthlong journey across
Mexico under the Trump administration’s watchful eye,
the asylum seekers faced an
unexpected twist Sunday when
US Customs and Border Protection commissioner Kevin
McAleenan said San Diego’s
San Ysidro border crossing facility had reached capacity.
The agency said Monday
that it had no estimate when
the location would accept new
asylum application cases.
About 50 people camped
overnight in Tijuana outside
the Mexican entrance to the
border crossing. The crowd
grew Monday, assembled behind metal gates that Mexican
authorities erected to avoid
impeding the flow of others going to the United States for
work, school, and recreation.
Another 50 asylum seekers
were allowed past a gate controlled by Mexican officials to
cross a long bridge but were
stopped at the entrance to the
US inspection facility.
They waited outside the
building, technically on Mexican soil, without word of when
US officials would let them try
to claim asylum.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dust storm causes 29-vehicle crash in Neb.
NASA to probe Mars’s deepest mysteries
YORK, Neb. — One person
has died from injuries after a
dust storm triggered a 29-vehicle accident along an interstate highway in eastern
Nebraska, officials said Monday.
The State Patrol said visibility was reduced to nearly zero
Sunday as dust blew in from
farm fields along Interstate 80
near York, a city about 50
miles west of Lincoln.
The patrol said the conditions caused a chain-reaction
crash that injured 15 peoplel.
Patrol spokesman Cody
Thomas said Monday that one
of the injured had died. Thomas said he could not release
further details. Other injured
people were taken to hospitals
in Aurora and York.
NEW YORK — NASA’s Mars principal investigator.
InSight spacecraft, scheduled
He said that one of his colto launch on Saturday, is headleagues described it as “Kansas
ed to one of the most boring
without the corn.” Which is explaces on the red
actly what the scienplanet — unless you
tists want.
are a scientist.
InSight is in many
Its landing spot
ways a diversion from
will be Elysium
“follow the water,” the
Planitia, an idyllicalmantra that has kept
ly named expanse
NASA focused on the
that will most likely
possibility that the
be flat as far as the
planet may have once
spacecraft’s eyes can
been hospitable for
An artist’s
see — no mountains
life. This mission will
in the distance, prob- depiction of
instead probe the
NASA’s InSight mysteries of Mars’
ably not even many
large rocks nearby.
spacecraft.
deep interior and
“We picked somehelp answer geophysthing as close to a 100-kilomeical questions about the planter-long parking lot as we
et’s structure, composition and
could find anywhere,” said
how it formed.
Bruce Banerdt, the mission’s
NEW YORK TIMES
Winds gusts of 60 miles per
hour were reported in the area, where the crash closed a 2mile section of the interstate
for nearly three hours.
In Arizona on Monday, firefighters battling a wildfire in
the north-central part of the
state said winds and dry conditions may cause it to expand.
The US Forest Service said the
blaze grew to 13.5 square
miles as authorities worked to
remove residents.
Strong southwest winds are
expected to continue to be a
problem through Tuesday as
about 510 firefighters and 13
crews specializing in containing wildfires work to slow the
fire’s path in the Coconino National Forest.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — People
attending the National Rifle
Association’s annual meeting
in Dallas will be able to carry
their firearms — except during
the event at which President
Trump and Vice President
Mike Pence will speak Friday,
officials said.
The White House confirmed Monday that the president will take part. Pence had
already been slated to speak at
the group’s leadership forum.
The NRA posted a notice on
its website saying the arena
will be under the jurisdiction
of the Secret Service during the
forum.
The Secret Service routinely
bars firearms from being carried into places visited by the
people they protect, regardless
of state laws.
Ammunition, gun parts,
firearm magazines, knives,
drones, and even signs and
glass containers also will be
prohibited, the NRA said.
Some students at the Parkland, Fla., high school where
17 people were killed in February criticized the NRA on social media for what they see as
hypocrisy.
‘‘It’s ironic that they feel
they need to ban guns to protect themselves — especially after their main philosophy has
been more guns equals more
protection — yet they don’t
think they need to protect our
kids in the same way,’’ David
Hogg, a student at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High
School in Parkland, who has
pushed for stricter gun control
since the shooting there.
Trump’s speech to the NRA
will mark another return appearance before a group that
was one of his earliest and
most ardent supporters.
This will be the fourth year
in a row that Trump has addressed the NRA. Last year, he
became the first sitting president to address the group.
But this year’s appearance
will be the first since Trump
told lawmakers not to fear the
NRA in the wake of the Parkland shooting and floated
some responses opposed by
the organization, including
raising the legal age to buy certain firearms to 21.
In a rare occurrence, even
some NRA supporters have
voiced opposition to the gun
prohibition at the leadership
forum, even though the overall
meeting will include ‘‘more
than 20 acres’’ of firearms exhibits.
‘‘Firearms and firearm accessories, knives or weapons of
any kind will be prohibited in
the forum prior to and during
his attendance,’’ the NRA said.
It said lawfully carried firearms will be permitted during
other event at the convention
center and the host hotel.
‘‘Individuals determined to
be carrying firearms will not
be allowed past a predetermined outer perimeter checkpoint, regardless of whether
they possess a ticket to the
event,’’ said Shawn Holtzclaw,
a spokesman for the Secret
Service.
T h e N RA , b o l s t e r e d b y
Trump, has been a vocal proponent of allowing more guns
in public places, including
schools, but the exception for
the convention has raised eyebrows and prompted skepticism among students and at
least one parent who lost his
child in shooting at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas.
‘‘On so many levels, this is
enlightening,’’ Fred Guttenberg, father of slain student
Jaime Guttenberg, said Sunday on Twitter.
“According to the NRA, we
should want everyone to have
weapons when we are in public,’’ Guttenberg said. ‘‘But
when they put on a convention, the weapons are a concern? I thought giving everyone a gun was to enhance safety. Am I missing something?’’
The NRA did not respond
to a request for comment.
Matt Deitsch, who graduated from the Parkland school in
2016 and is the chief strategist
for the March for Our Lives
protest, expressed similar
skepticism.
‘‘You’re telling me to make
the VP safe there aren’t any
weapons around but when it
comes to children they want
guns everywhere? Can someone explain this to me?’’
Deitsch said Saturday on Twitter, before it was announced
that Trump would also attend.
Parkland student Cameron
Kasky simply said: ‘‘The NRA
has evolved into such a hilarious parody of itself.’’
Gun enthusiasts are displeased about the prohibition.
At Texas CHL Forum, a message board for gun owners,
people aired their frustrations.
‘‘Obviously, even Republicans and so-called leaders
don’t trust the ‘good guys.’ I realize it’s the VP, but still makes
our whole argument look foolish,’’ a commenter who said he
was an NRA member.
‘‘You may disagree . . . but
in my opinion the very people
that claim to protect the [Second Amendment] should never host an event that requires
disarming the good guys. Sad.
No exc uses for this. . . . It
makes us look stupid,’’ the
commenter said.
The NRA played a powerful
role in Trump’s 2016 election,
providing crucial support in
battleground states. It spent
more on behalf of Trump than
did any outside group, and began its advertising and other
efforts earlier than in any other
presidential cycle.
A comparison by The Washington Post of ad spending between 2012 and 2016 found
that the gun rights organization spent more than three
times as much to assist Trump
as it spent backing GOP nominee Mitt Romney in 2012.
‘‘You came through big for
me, and I am going to come
through for you,’’ Trump told
thousands of members attending the NRA’s annual convention last year in Atlanta. ‘‘The
eight-year assault on your Second Amendment freedoms has
come to a crashing end.’’
Reporting corrections
The Globe welcomes information about errors that call for
corrections. Information may be sent to comments@globe.com or
left in a message at 617-929-8230.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A3
The World
String of attacks kills dozens in Afghanistan
Second bomb
rips through
EMTs, media
By Mujib Mashal
NEW YORK TIMES
KABUL — At least 38 people died in a coordinated
bombing in Kabul and other
attacks across Afghanistan on
Monday, including 10 journalists, an American soldier, and
11 children.
A branch of the Islamic
State claimed responsibility
for twin bombings in Kabul
that killed 25 people, including nine journalists. It was the
deadliest single attack involving journalists in Afghanistan
since at least 2002 and one of
the most lethal ever worldwide, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists.
A 10th journalist, from the
BBC’s Afghan service, was shot
and killed in Khost province.
In another attack, a suicide
bomber rammed a vehicle into
an armored Romanian vehicle
beside a mosque outside the
southern city of Kandahar, sett i n g o ff a n e x p l o s i o n t h a t
killed 11 children and injured
16 others, officials said.
That attack had targeted a
NAT O c o n v o y b u t i n s t e a d
killed the children, who were
playing around it, the Associated Press reported.
In eastern Afghanistan, one
US soldier and several Afghan
security officers were killed,
the US Army said. Another US
soldier was injured.
In the two-stage attack in
Kabul, bombers detonated a
device during the morning
rush and a second one roughly
40 minutes later, killing emergency workers and journalists
who had by reached the site,
officials said.
The bombings came eight
days after the Islamic State affiliate in Afghanistan took responsibility for another explosion that killed 57 people lining up to register to vote.
A spokesman for the Afghan police, Hashmat Stanikzai, said the attacks in Kabul
on Monday had killed at least
25 people, including four police officers, and wounded 49,
but officials and witnesses at
the scene said the final casualty figures were likely to be
higher.
The dead journalists inc l u d e d a n A ge n c e Fra n c e Presse photographer, Shah
Marai, who had covered his
war-torn homeland for 20
years.
The Afghan government
MASSOUD HOSSAINI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Twin blasts targeted a
road (top) near the US
Embassy in Kabul
Monday. Among the dead
was Agence FrancePresse photographer
Shah Marai, whose coffin
was carried to his burial
in his village of Guldara.
RAHMAT GUL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
said the bombings constituted
an attack on Islam and described the targeting of journalists as “an unforgivable
crime.”
Monday’s violence was the
latest spasm of a conflict that
began more than a decade and
a half ago and shows no sign of
ebbing.
The war began in 2001 with
a US invasion that overthrew
the Taliban regime but never
entirely forced out the Taliban
or other emergent extremist
groups, such as the Islamic
State.
US and Afghan officials believe some attacks are the result of collaboration between
elements of both the Islamic
State and the Taliban.
Despite more than $100
billion in aid and the continu-
ous presence of American
t r o o p s i n t h e c o u n t r y, th e
Western-backed Afghan government has struggled to exert
full control over its territory,
its forces even losing control of
a major city twice. Parts of the
country remain beholden to
local strongmen.
Urban attacks on civilians
have become a fact of life and
have turned day-to-day existence into a lottery. More than
210 people have been killed in
public spaces since the start of
the year.
The Afghan president,
Ashraf Ghani, recently offered
a peace deal to the Taliban,
which controls or contests
more than 40 percent of Afghan territory, according to US
military data released in January. Weeks later, the Taliban
announced a new operation
targeting Americans and their
supporters.
The United States has renewed its commitment to the
counterinsurgency in Afghanistan. Despite initially promising to curb involvement in Afghanistan, President Trump
agreed to send more troops
here last summer.
US airstrikes in the country
have reached an intensity not
seen since 2012, according to
military records. More than
14,000 US forces are now stationed in Afghanistan, down
from around 100,000 in 2010
but up from 9,800 in 2015.
Around 2,400 US soldiers
have been killed on Afghan
soil since 2002, while research
by Brown University suggests
more than 31,000 civilians
have died from violence in the
same period.
According to Stanikzai of
the Afghan police, the chaos in
central Kabul began at 8 a.m.,
when a bomber on a motorcycle ble w himself up in the
Shah Darak district. The attack took place near a guarded
street behind the US Embassy
that leads to many offices, including those of the Afghan intelligence agency.
The second explosion,
which was described as considerably larger, hit as emergency workers gathered near
the police cordon blocking the
area. The second bomber was
disguised as a photographer.
Marai, the photographer,
was often among the first journalists to reach news scenes.
After a colleague was unable
to immediately reach the
scene of the first bombing
Monday, Marai sent a message
of reassurance, saying he was
at work at the site.
Moments later, the second
bomb exploded.
Four broadcasters for Afghan news outlets were also
killed. Radio Free Europe later
said three of its current or future employees had died.
The latest round of violence
raises fresh concerns about
whether the Afghan security
services can create a safe
enough environment for parliamentary elections that are
to be held in September.
Of Afghanistan’s 7,355 polling stations, nearly 1,000 are
outside government control.
Only 190,000 of an estimated 14 million voters registered
to vote in the first week of registration. Many voters are disappointed by the corruption
rife within Afghan politics and
by successive elections marred
by fraud.
Daily Briefing
Immigrants’ son is Britain’s home secretary
LONDON — Prime Minister Theresa May of Britain
moved swiftly to replace
Amber Rudd as home secretary Monday, promoting Sajid
Javid, a son of Pakistani immigrants, in a move that made
him the first nonwhite politician to hold one of the most
senior British Cabinet positions.
Rudd quit late Sunday,
amid a growing chorus of criticism over her handling of a
damaging immigration crisis
involving migrants from the
so-called Windrush generation, named for a passenger
liner that carried many people
from the Caribbean to Britain
decades ago.
Javid, who moved from his
job as secretary of state for
housing, communities, and local government, faces the urgent task of quelling the scandal affecting some of those
who came from former colonies to help rebuild postwar
Britain but were in recent
years declared unauthorized
immigrants, despite having
lived in the country for decades.
Javid, 48, whose parents arrived in Britain in the 1960s, is
the first black, Asian, or ethnic
minority to hold the post of
home secretary, and his appointment may reassure some
of the department’s critics.
NEW YORK TIMES
Interpol frees 350 victims of trafficking
PARIS — A police operation
across the Caribbean and
South America has freed nearly 350 people from human
trafficking networks and led to
the arrests of 22 people.
Those rescued included
children and adults working
in nightclubs, gold mines, factories, open-air markets, and
on farms, international police
agency Interpol said Monday.
Some were forced to work
without pay, or in spaces no
bigger than coffins. Interpol
said the traffickers took ad-
vantage of vulnerable populations seeking jobs across borders.
Interpol said that social
services and charity groups
are working to support the victims.
About 500 police were involved in the coordinated
raids earlier this month in
Brazil, Venezuela, Jamaica,
and 10 other countries in the
Caribbean. They seized computer equipment, mobile
phones and cash.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cardinal to face trial on sex abuse charges
MELBOURNE, Australia —
Australian Cardinal George
Pell, the most senior Vatican
official to be charged in the
Catholic Church sex abuse crisis, must stand trial on charges
alleging he sexually abused
multiple victims decades ago,
a magistrate ruled Tuesday.
Magistrate Belinda Wallington dismissed roughly half
the charges that had been
heard in the four-week preliminary hearing in Melbourne
but decided the prosecution’s
case was strong enough for the
remainder to warrant a trial by
jury. The number of charges
has not been made public
When she asked Pell how
he pleaded, the cardinal said
in a firm voice: ‘‘Not guilty.’’
When the magistrate left
the room at the end the hearing, many people in the
packed public gallery broke into applause.
Lawyers for Australia’s
highest-ranking Catholic had
argued all the accusations
were untrue, could not be
proved, and should be dismissed.
Pell, Pope Francis’ former
finance minister, was charged
last June with sexually abusing
multiple people in his Australian home state of Victoria.
The details of the allegations
against the 76-year-old have
yet to be released to the public
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Four climbers killed as storm hits Alps
GENEVA — An unexpected
snowstorm coupled with high
winds killed four climbers in
the Swiss Alps and left five
others in critical condition early Monday after they became
trapped overnight and
couldn’t reach shelter, officials
said.
Fourteen hikers from
France, Germany, and Italy
were stranded in the Pigne
d’Arolla region, police in Valais
canton said. Authorities deployed helicopters as part of
rescue efforts.
The climbers were caught
off-guard by high winds, snow,
and bitter cold, and were
forced to spend the night outdoors, Valais police spokesman
Markus Rieder said.
Several of those rescued
were suffering from hypothermia, and were rushed to
area hospitals. Police said
three people died in hospital,
and another apparently was
killed in a fall. Five others
were hospitalized in critical
condition.
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T h e
The World
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Israel says records prove Iran lied about bomb Raid hits
Iranian
fighters
in Syria
Document trove
allegedly shows
its nuclear goals
By Loveday Morris
WASHINGTON POST
JERUSALEM — Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on
Monday said Israel is in possession of tens of thousands of
documents and disks that prove
that Iran lied about the history
of its nuclear weapons program
when it signed the 2015 nuclear
deal.
In a televised speech from
Tel Aviv, Netanyahu dramatically pulled a curtain away
from a shelf of files that he said
were copies of some of the
55,000 documents that Israel
had obtained from Iran’s secret
nuclear archive.
Most of the documents, as
described, dated from 2003 and
before, when Iran had a clandestine weapons development
p r o g ra m d u b b e d ‘ ‘ Pr o j e c t
Amad.’’
The allegation comes at a
critical time for the nuclear
deal, just ahead of a May 12
deadline for President Trump
to decide whether to continue
to waive statutory sanctions
that were lifted as part of the
agreement.
Ne tanyahu has waged a
fierce campaign for the deal to
be changed or scrapped, often
repeating the mantra ‘‘fix it or
nix it’’ — concerned that it will
enable its archrival to come
closer to developing a nuclear
weapon.
Trump, speaking at a Washington news conference with
the president of Nigeria, said
N e t a n y a h u ’s r e v e l a t i o n s
‘‘showed that I’ve been 100 percent right’’ in describing the nuclear agreement as the ‘‘worst
deal’’ ever signed. ‘‘We’ll see
what happens,’’ he said of the
Reports suggest
Israel behind it
By Bassem Mroue
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEBASTIAN SCHEINER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu presented highlights of records that he said prove Iran pursued nuclear weapons.
upcoming deadline.
Richard Nephew, a former
senior State Department official who was part of the US
team that negotiated the deal
implemented in January 2016,
said Netanyahu’s revelations
were ‘‘interesting, and important for building a history of
[Iran’s] program. But it is not a
new revelation, at least in terms
of where the program was
when we were negotiating.’’
‘‘To put it another way,’’ he
said, ‘‘it is why we negotiated
the JCPOA,’’ or Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the official name of the Iran accord.
‘‘What he is revealing with
all this detail is not news,’’ said
Daryl Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control Association. ‘‘The fact that Iran has experimented with nuclear war-
head designs, and had at one
point an active weapons program, makes it all the more essential that the JCPOA remains
in place to prevent Iran from
quickly amassing enough fissile
material for even one bomb.’’
‘‘It is ludicrous to recommend . . . that the deal should
be dismantled, which would
open a pathway for Iran to pursue’’ a nuclear weapon, he said.
Iranian officials have said
that if the deal is canceled, they
would quickly increase both the
quantity and quality of centrifuges, now restricted under the
deal, which would allow them
theoretically to produce weapons-grade uranium.
In a dramatic presentation,
Netanyahu stood on a stage
with a pointer. To one side was
a bookcase filled with shelves of
files that he said were Iran’s secret nuclear records, apparently obtained through a covert operation by Israeli intelligence.
Standing in front of a screen,
Netanyahu showed slides from
the files that showed the
breadth of the Iranian nuclear
program. Iran has repeatedly
insisted that it never has had
and never would have such a
program.
The documents indicated
that Iran had been proceeding
with ‘‘five key elements of a nuclear weapons program,’’ he
said, including designing a
weapon, developing nuclear
cores and building implosion
systems, preparing test sites,
and integrating nuclear warheads on ballistic missiles.
‘‘This is just a fraction of the
total material we have,’’ he said.
He did not indicate when the
material had been obtained, although the timing of his presentation seemed designed for
maximum impact on Trump’s
decision.
Secre tar y of State Mike
Pompeo was apparently briefed
on the material during a visit to
Israel on Sunday, and Trump
and Netanyahu also spoke by
phone Sunday.
The International Atomic
Energy Agency, charged with
monitoring the deal, has said
Iran has complied with its
terms, an assessment the
Trump administration has not
disputed. But Trump is concerned about the sunset clauses
in the agreement, its verification provisions, and its failure
to address Iran’s ballistic missile program.
Trump willing
to meet N. Korean
leader in DMZ
Peace House
among handful
of possible sites
By Mark Landler
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — President
Trump said Monday that he
would like to meet North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un, at
the Demilitarized Zone that
separates North and South Korea, declaring that if their rendezvous is a success, “there’s a
great celebration to be had on
the site.”
In a tone that mixed ebullience about his coming diplomacy and playful speculation
about where the meeting will
be held, Trump said the two
sides had narrowed the choice
for a site to a handful of places.
Those included Singapore
and the Peace House in the
South Korean border town of
Panmunjom, where the leaders
of the two Koreas me t last
week.
Trump continued to raise
expectations for his meeting
with Kim, which is scheduled
for late May or early June.
And the president dismissed
suggestions that withdrawing
from the Iran nuclear deal, as
many believe he will do as early
as May 12, would jeopardize
the prospects for an agreement
with North Korea to surrender
its nuclear weapons program.
“The United States has never been closer to potentially
having something happen with
respect to the Korean Peninsula, that can get rid of the nuclear weapons, can create so many
good things, so many positive
things, and peace and safety for
the world,” Trump said during
a Rose Garden news conference with President Muhammadu Buhari of Nigeria.
Trump acknowledged that
not all his advisers share his enthusiasm for meeting Kim in
the Demilitarized Zone, a
2½-mile-wide, 160-mile-long
strip of land, marked by heavily-armed observation posts, razor wire, and barren hillsides.
“Some people maybe don’t
like the look of that, and some
people like it very much,” the
president said. “There’s something I like about if, because
you’re there, if things work out.
There’s a great celebration to be
KOREA SUMMIT PRESS POOL VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
The leaders of the two Koreas, Kim Jong Un and Moon Jae-in, met last week at the Peace
House in the South Korean border town of Panmunjom.
had on the site, not in a thirdparty country.”
White House officials have
privately played down the possibility of the Peace House, a
three-story structure built by
South Korea to hold meetings
with officials from the North.
The concern has been over
the optics of having the president travel to Kim’s doorstep.
The discussion comes after
dramatic images of Kim greeting South Korea’s president,
Moon Jae-in at Peace House.
Trump has heaped praise on
the meeting, and it has accelerated the momentum behind his
own encounter with Kim.
On Sunday, the South Korean government said Kim told
Moon that North Korea would
relinquish its nuclear weapons
if the United States pledged not
to attack it and endorsed a
peace treaty formally ending
the military conflict on the Korean Peninsula.
In a separate development
Monday, Moon endorsed the
idea that Trump should receive
a Nobel Peace Prize because of
his Korean initiatives.
Several months ago, South
Koreans considered Trump as
dangerous as Kim when the
two traded threats of nuclear
annihilation.
Now, commentators and
others in Seoul think Trump
deserves a Nobel for helping
start the unexpected peace process that is unfolding.
During a meeting of his senior staff Monday, Moon received a telegram from Lee
Hee-ho, a former first lady of
South Korea, congratulating
him for the successful summit
meeting with Kim and wishing
him a Nobel Peace Prize.
“It’s really President Trump
who should receive it; we can
just take peace,” Moon said.
Trump wants Nigeria to drop trade barriers on US firms
By Darlene Superville
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President
Trump said Monday that he
urged Nigeria’s president, Muhammadu Buhari, to remove
trade barriers to allow additional US investment in the African
nation.
Trump noted that the United States sends more than $1
billion in foreign aid annually
to Nigeria and said it should get
something in return.
‘‘We think that we are owed
that,’’ Trump said at a joint
White House news conference
with Buhari, the first African
leader to visit him at the White
House.
Tr u m p s a i d t h e Un i t e d
States ‘‘will be investing substantially in Nigeria if they can
create that level playing field.’’
Trump and Buhari held talks
earlier Monday that also focused on security issues.
The Nigerian president’s visit followed an uncomfortable
start to the Trump administration’s approach to the world’s
second-most-populous continent.
Trump stirred anger in Nigeria last year after reports that
he said during an Oval Office
meeting that Nigerians
wouldn’t want to go home to
their ‘‘huts’’ if they were permitted to visit the United States.
Nigeria was among the African nations that summoned the
US ambassador to explain
Trump’s comments that he
wanted less immigration from
‘‘shithole’’ countries in Africa
and more from places like Norway.
Trump denied using the vulgar term, but others who were
present said he used that language.
Asked whether he and Buhari had discussed the remark,
Trump said they had not.
‘‘You do have some countries
that are in very bad shape and
very tough places to live in,’’
Trump told Buhari. “But we
didn’t discuss it because the
president knows me and he
knows where I’m coming from.’’
Buhari deflected, saying he
was unsure about ‘‘whether
that allegation against the president was true or not.’’
‘‘So the best thing for me is
to keep quiet.’’ he added.
Buhari thanked the United
States for its commitment to
fighting terrorism and says
American action has helped his
JIM LOSCALZO/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
President Trump and
Muhammadu Buhari of
Nigeria met on Monday.
country a lot.
Boko Haram launched a violent insurgency in the Nigerian
northeast nine years ago with
the aim of creating an Islamic
state. Thousands of people have
been killed.
Mass abductions of school-
girls brought Boko Haram international notoriety and one
faction has declared allegiance
to the Islamic State.
In a separate development
Monday, the UN said 10 aid
workers had been released after
being abducted in South Sudan
almost a week ago.
Three UN staff and seven aid
workers, all South Sudanese nationals, vanished last week
when their convoy traveling in
Central Equatoria province was
hijacked.
The aid workers were flown
back to Juba by the International Committee of the Red Cross.
The workers are employed by a
variety of organizations, including the South Sudanese Development Organization, Plan International, and Action Africa
Help.
BEIRUT — A missile attack
on government outposts in
northern Syria killed more than
a dozen progovernment fighters, many of them Iranians, a
war monitoring group and an
Iranian news agency said Monday. The strikes came amid
soaring tensions between regional archenemies Israel and
Iran.
There was no official confirmation of the death toll or what
was the target. The Sunday
night strikes sparked speculation on who carried it out, with
most reports suspecting Israel
was behind it.
Israel, which rarely confirms
or denies its attacks, had no
comment on the reports.
Syrian state TV called it a
‘‘new aggression on military positions’’ in Hama and Aleppo
provinces but was not specific.
Activists said there was a spectacular explosion at an arms depot and military compounds
where Iranian fighters are
based.
The explosion was large
enough to be picked up by monitors as a magnitude 2.6 earthquake.
The Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights said 26 progovernment fighters were killed,
most of them Iranians, with only four Syrians among the dead.
It said the arms depot contained surface-to-surface missiles belonging to Iranian militias in Hama province. Another
attack hit near a military air
base in Aleppo province, the
Observatory said.
It added that the death toll
could rise because 60 fighters
were wounded and several others remained missing.
A member of an Iranianbacked Iraqi militia operating
in Syria confirmed the attack
on the Hama facility and put
the death toll at 36, including
10 Iranian advisers. The official
spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to the media.
Iranian media gave conflicting reports: One semiofficial
news agency said there were no
Iranians killed, while a second
one said 18 were killed.
The arms depot in Hama,
known as Brigade 47, is one of
the largest bases housing Iranian-affiliated forces and equipment, according to Jamil alSaleh, commander in the opposition Tajammu al-Ezzat rebel
group. He said the province has
at least five other bases where
Iranians are deployed alongside
Syrian- allied militias.
The two airstrikes were near
rebel areas, he added.
Lebanon’s Al-Akhbar daily,
considered close to the militant
Iranian-backed Hezbollah
group and the Syrian government, said the attack targeted
‘‘important arms depots used
by the [Syrian] army and Iran’s
Revolutionary Guards.’’ It said
the missiles used appear to
have been bunker busters.
Syria-based opposition media activist Mohamad Rasheed
said the base that came under
attack is about 7 miles outside
the city of Hama.
Tehran has sent thousands
of fighters to Syria to support
President Bashar Assad’s forces
in the seven-year civil war.
After the attacks, Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei said the time when
Tehran’s enemies can ‘‘hit and
run’’ is over, although he did
not specifically refer to Sunday
night’s strikes.
The attacks came hours after
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu talked by
phone with President Trump.
The White House said they discussed the threats and challenges facing the Middle East,
‘‘especially the problems posed
by the Iranian regime’s destabilizing activities.’’
Secre tar y of State Mike
Pompeo has ratcheted up the
Trump administration’s rhetoric against Iran and offered support to Israel and Saudi Arabia
in their standoff with Tehran.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
Mueller’s questions to Trump unveiled
Justices
consider
plea over
execution
uMUELLER
Continued from Page A1
claimed to have inside information about Democratic e-mail
hackings; and what happened
during Trump’s 2013 trip to
Moscow for the Miss Universe
pageant.
The questions provide the
most detailed look yet inside
Mueller’s investigation, which
has been shrouded in secrecy
since he was appointed nearly a
year ago. The majority relate to
possible obstruction of justice,
demonstrating how an investigation into Russia’s election
meddling grew to include an
examination of the president’s
conduct in office. Among them
are queries on any discussions
Trump had about his attempts
to fire Mueller himself and
what the president knew about
possible pardon offers to Michael Flynn, the ousted national security adviser,
“What efforts were made to
reach out to Mr. Flynn about
seeking immunity or possible
pardon?” Mueller planned to
ask, according to questions
read by the special counsel investigators to the president’s
lawyers, who compiled them into a list.
That document was provided to the Times by a person outside Trump’s legal team.
A few questions reveal that
Mueller is still investigating
possible coordination between
the Trump campaign and Russia. In one of the more tantalizing inquiries, Mueller asks
what Trump knew about campaign aides, including former
chairman Paul Manafort, seeking assistance from Moscow:
“What knowledge did you have
of any outreach by your camp a i g n , i n c l u d i n g b y Pa u l
Manafort, to Russia about potential assistance to the campaign?” No such outreach has
been revealed publicly.
Jay Sekulow, a lawyer for
Trump, declined to comment. A
spokesman for the special
counsel’s office did not respond
to a request for comment.
The questions serve as a reminder of the chaotic first 15
months of the Trump presidency and the transition and campaign before that. Mueller
wanted to inquire about public
threats the president made,
conflicting statements from
Trump and White House aides,
the president’s private admissions to Russian officials, a secret meeting at an island resort,
WikiLeaks, salacious accusations, and dramatic congressional testimony.
The special counsel also
sought information from the
president about his relationship with Russia. Muell er
would like to ask Trump whether he had any discussions during the campaign about any
meetings with President Vladimir Putin of Russia and whether he spoke to others about either American sanctions
against Russia or meeting with
Putin.
Through his questions, Mueller also tries to tease out
Trump’s views on law enforcement officials and whether he
sees them as independent inves tigators or people who
should loyally protect him.
For example, when FBI Director James B. Comey was
fired, White House officials said
he broke with Justice Department policy and spoke publicly
about the investigation into
Clinton’s e-mail server. Mueller’s questions put that statement to the test.
He wants to ask why, time
and again, Trump expressed no
concerns with whether Comey
had abided by policy. Rather, in
statements in private and on
national television, Trump suggested that Comey was fired because of the Russia investigation.
Many of the questions surround Trump’s relationship
with Sessions, including the attorney general’s decision to recuse himself from the Russia investigation and whether Trump
told Sessions he needed him in
place for protection.
Mueller appears to be investigating how Trump took steps
last year to fire Mueller himself.
The president relented after the
White House counsel, Donald
F. McGahn II, threatened to resign, an episode that the special
counsel wants to ask about.
“What consideration and
discussions did you have regarding terminating the special
A5
Inmate has fear
of choking threat
By Mark Sherman
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK TIMES FILE/2017
Robert Mueller, the special counsel, seeks to ask the president about possible obstruction in the Russian inquiry.
Trump critic, now a Democrat, will run for Franken’s seat
By Kyle Potter
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. PAUL — A former Republican White House lawyer
in President George W. Bush’s
administration and a prominent critic of President Trump
announced Monday that he
will run as a Democrat for Al
Franken’s Minnesota Senate
seat.
Richard Painter said he
plans to challenge Senator Tina Smith, who was appointed
to Franken’s seat after his January resignation, in a Democratic primary in August.
Painter ser ved as chie f
White House ethics lawyer
from 2005 to 2007 in the Bush
administration but has been a
visible critic of Trump since his
2016 election, making frequent appearances on CNN,
MSNBC, and other cable TV
networks.
Explaining his party swap,
Painter said it is clear to him
that there is no space for a Republican who opposes the
president. And while he rattled
off a handful of Democratic positions such as single-payer
health care and blocking mining projects in northeastern
Minnesota, he said he
wouldn’ t spend campaign
money to attack Smith.
He made clear that the primary motivation behind his
Senate bid was the president,
whose policies he called ‘‘autocratic.’’
‘‘I’m running against Donald Trump and every one of his
collaborators in the Republicounsel in June of 2017?” Mueller planned to ask, according to
the list of questions. “What did
you think and do in reaction to
Jan. 25, 2018, story about the
termination of the special counsel and Don McGahn backing
you off the termination?” he
planned to ask, referring to the
Times article that broke the
news of the confrontation.
Mu e l l e r h a s s o u g h t f o r
can Party,’’ he said. ‘‘I’m going
to put my country first. This
isn’t about party.’’
The special election for
Minnesota’s Senate seat was
triggered in January, when
Franken left office more than a
month after a slew of women
came forward with accusations of sexual misconduct.
The winner of the election will
ser ve out Franken’s term,
which ends in 2020.
Governor Mark Dayton, a
Democrat, appointed Smith —
then his lieutenant governor —
to take the seat, and Smith is
running this fall to keep it.
State Senator Karin Housley is
running unopposed for Republicans.
Painter had been exploring
a run since early April, but was
undecided on whe ther he
would run as a Republican,
Democrat, or an independent.
He works as a law professor at
the University of Minnesota.
He said he decided against
an independent bid out of concern he would poach votes
from Smith and ultimately
hand the election to a Republican.
‘‘I can’t be a spoiler, not this
year,’’ he said. ‘‘Our democracy
is at stake.’’
In a separate development,
political analysts and party colleagues said Senator Bob Menendez, Democrat of New Jersey, seems in good shape to
win a third term despite a
harsh rebuke from fellow senators who say he violated chamber rules and federal law.
months to question the president, who has expressed a desire, at times, to be interviewed,
viewing it as an avenue to end
the inquiry more quickly. His
lawyers have been negotiating
terms of an interview out of
concern that their client —
whose exaggerations, halftruths, and outright falsehoods
are well documented — could
provide false statements or eas-
generated from the trial appear to be more than offset by
the fact he has a ‘‘D’’ next to his
name in the Democratic
stronghold, said Patrick Murray, director of the independent Monmouth University
Polling Institute in New Jersey.
Monmouth’s polling this
month showed Menendez with
a 53 to 32 percent advantage
over his likely Republican challenger in November, former
Celgene executive Bob Hugin.
‘‘They’re not happy with his
behavior, but they seem to be
willing to overlook it,’’ Murray
said of New Jersey’s voters’ attitude about Menendez.
A poll from Quinnipiac University released in March
showed a similar result, 49
percent for Menendez and 32
percent for Hugin.
The Senate committee’s
findings certainly won’t help
Menendez, Murray said, but
‘‘he has a long runway to put
this behind him as long as no
new allegations come out.’’
There are, however, warning signs.
Menendez, 64, seems to be
hovering around 50 percent in
his head-to-head matchups
with Hugin, even with the vast
majority of voters not having
enough information to form
an opinion of the Republican.
Hugin, with much money
at his disposal, could persuade
most of those undecided voters
to move his way. Hugin has
lent his campaign $7.5 million
so far and has said he is willing
to add substantially to that.
GLEN STUBBE/STAR TRIBUNE VIA AP
‘I’m going to put
my country first.
This isn’t about
party.’
RICHARD PAINTER
Former White House lawyer
in George W. Bush’s
administration
The Senate Ethics Committee found that Menendez repeatedly accepted gifts of significant value, failed to report
them, and advanced the personal and business interests of
the donor who provided the
gifts.
The allegations were hardly
new to most New Jersey voters. Menendez’s federal bribery trial last fall centered on
those same accusations. It ended with a hung jury; prosecutors decided not to retry the
case.
Whatever negatives were
ily become distracted. Four people, including Flynn, have
pleaded guilty to lying to investigators in the Russia inquiry.
The list of questions grew
out of those negotiations.
Trump’s new lawyer in the
investigation and his longtime
confidant, Rudolph W. Giuliani,
met with Mueller last week.
Mueller’s endgame remains
a mystery, even if he deter-
mines the president broke the
law. A long-standing Justice Department legal finding says
presidents cannot be charged
with a crime while they are in
office.
The special counsel told
Dowd in March that though the
president’s conduct is under
scrutiny, he is not a target of the
investigation, meaning Mueller
does not expect to charge him.
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court agreed Monday to
review the case of a Missouri
death row inmate who says his
rare medical condition could
cause him to choke during an
execution.
The justices said they would
hear the appeal of inmate Russell Bucklew. The court blocked
Bucklew’s execution in March
after he argued that a tumor in
his throat is likely to rupture
and bleed during the administration of the drugs that would
be used to kill him.
Bucklew argues that subjecting him to lethal injection
would violate the Constitution’s ban on cruel and unusual
punishment.
Arguments in the case,
Bucklew v. Precythe, will be
heard place in the fall.
The issue is whether Bucklew has to show there is another method of execution available that would reduce the risk
of needless suffering.
Bucklew has proposed that
the state use lethal gas instead
of an injection of pentobarbital, if the execution is carried
out. Missouri law still provides
for the option of lethal gas, but
the state no longer has a gas
chamber and has not used the
method since 1965.
Bucklew says it is likely he
would essentially suffocate for
two to three minutes if he is
given a drug injection. The feeling of suffocation would last no
more than 30 seconds using
gas, he says.
But the f ederal appeal s
court in St. Louis ruled against
him and concluded that he did
not prove the alternate method
would reduce his suffering. The
Supreme Court has previously
ruled that inmates challenging
a method of execution have to
show that there’s an alternative
that is likely to be less painful.
None of the 20 inmates executed since Missouri began using pentobarbital in 2013 have
shown obvious signs of pain or
suffering.
Bucklew was convicted in
the 1996 killing of a man who
was seeing Bucklew’s former
girlfriend. He became angry
when his girlfriend, Stephanie
Ray, ended their relationship in
1996.
Missouri’s attorney general,
Josh Hawley, said in court filings that Bucklew slashed
Ray’s face with a knife, beat
her, and threatened to kill her.
She took her children and left.
Over the next two weeks, according to the court filings,
Bucklew stalked Ray, as he
stole a car, firearms, two sets of
handcuffs, and duct tape.
He eventually found out
where she was staying and
broke into the southeastern
Missouri trailer home of Michael Sanders, Ray’s new boyfriend, fatally shooting him.
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Juror says Cosby’s own comments led to guilty verdict
Admitted giving
another woman
quaaludes in ’76
By Matthew Haag
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — T he most
damning evidence in Bill Cosby’s sexual assault trial was not
the victim’s testimony or statements by five other women
who said he had also assaulted
them, a juror said Monday. It
was Cosby’s own comments.
The juror, Harrison Snyder,
said that Cosby’s remarks in a
2005 deposition — saying that
he had given sedatives to women he wanted to have sex with
— proved that he was guilty of
drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand at his
Pennsylvania home 14 years
ago.
That deposition was for a
lawsuit filed by Constand, who
had alleged he gave her three
blue pills before assaulting her.
“It was his deposition, really,” Snyder, 22, the youngest of
the 12 jurors, said in an interview that aired Monday on
ABC’s “Good Morning America.” “Mr. Cosby admitted to giving these quaaludes to women,
young women, in order to have
sex with them.”
In the 2005 deposition, Cosby acknowledged that he had
drugged another accuser, Therese Serignese, after they met at
a Las Vegas hotel in 1976. “I
give her quaaludes. We then
have sex,” he said in the deposition.
The conviction Thursday of
Cosby, who was found guilty on
three counts of aggravated indecent assault, was immediately viewed by many as a turning
point in the #MeToo movement
that would the tilt the balance
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‘It was his deposition, really.
Mr. Cosby admitted to
giving these quaaludes to
women . . . to have sex with
them.’
of power and influence in
courtrooms for female accusers.
But Snyder said, for him at
least, #MeToo did not weigh on
his mind during two days of deliberations last week at the
Montgomery County Courthouse outside Philadelphia. In
fact, he said he had not heard
of the movement until after he
left the courthouse Thursday
and read up on the news coverage of the trial.
“I really only found out
about it after I got home,” Snyder, who also said he had only a
vague understanding of Cosby’s
career before the trial, told ABC
News. “Then I looked online to
see what everything was.”
Snyder said he believed the
testimony of Constand, who
testified April 13 about the
night in 2004 she was assaulted
at Cosby’s house.
He said he also believed the
testimony of five other women
who said that Cosby had
drugged and sexually assaulted
them.
Prosecutors in the case had
successfully pushed Judge Steven T. O’ Neill to admit the
women to speak during the trial, allowing them to add their
stories to the account of Constand, a former Temple University employee. Cosby had faced
only one other accuser in his
first trial, which ended last
summer in a hung jury.
Snyder said he still would
have found Cosby guilty if the
five women had been barred
from testifying.
“In the deposition, he stated
that he gave these drugs to other women,” he said. “I don’t
think it really necessarily mattered that these other five
women were here, because he
said it himself, that he used
these drugs on other women.”
In a separate development
Monday, the Time’s Up campaign took aim at rock singer
R. Kelly over allegations that he
has sexually abused women.
The organization devoted to
helping women in the after-
math of sexual abuse issued a
statement urging further investigation into Kelly’s behavior,
which has come under closer
scrutiny over the last year as
women have come forward to
accuse him of everything from
sexual coercion to physical
abuse. Kelly has denied such
charges.
‘‘We demand appropriate
investigations and inquiries into the allegations of R. Kelly’s
abuse made by women and
their families for more than
two decades now. And we declare with great vigilance and a
united voice to anyone who
wants to silence us — their time
is up,’’ the statement said.
The statement was issued by
the Women of Color committee
within Time’s Up, which includes Oscar-nominated director Ava DuVernay, TV mogul
Shonda Rhimes and actress
Jurnee Smollett-Bell.
Agencies fail to disclose millions in spending
uAGENCIES
Continued from Page A1
cord-keeping, including payments made through MassPort,
which is a quasi public agency.
The 19 agencies — roughly
half of all quasi-public agencies
in Massachusetts — failed to
disclose data for at least one of
the past three years.
For example, the UMass
Building Authority, until the
Globe asked about missing records, had not published
spending data on the transparency website since May 2015. It
spends more than $500 million
annually. The Steamship Authority, which operates ferries
to Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket with a payroll topping
$30 million annually, has not
published any payroll records.
By contrast, all of the state’s
151 traditional departments
posted the required data, including, eventually, State Police.
The 2010 law calls for agencies, including quasi-public
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The lack of transparency by quasi-public agencies became
apparent after allegations of pay fraud at the State Police.
agencies, to provide financial
records to the state so they can
be posted online.
Making the information
readily available can help lawmakers when they make policy
and budget decisions, and it allows the public to keep an eye
on how public funds are spent,
including how employees are
compensated.
Deirdre Cummings, legislative director of the Massachusetts Public Interest Research
Group, a consumer advocacy
nonprofit, said the complex
structures of quasi-public agencies coupled with less stringent
oversight can create “a recipe
for disaster.”
“ The recent news says if
there’s nobody watching and
nobody asking then that’s an
opportunity for funny business,” Cummings said, referring
to recent scandals at the State
Police, including allegations of
pay fraud and stolen funds.
Many quasi-public agencies
generate significant revenue
from fees they charge to customers, such as tolls, fares, and
rent. The list of unreported financial data from some quasipublic agencies is long and includes the following:
R The Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, until
the Globe asked the agency
about missing records, had not
updated online payroll records
since fall 2016. Spending data
for the most recent fiscal year
were also missing from the public site. Its payroll is about $20
million a year. It spent about
$66 million last year.
R The Commonwealth Corporation, a workforce development agency, has not posted
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any payroll records. Only its fiscal 2017 financial statement is
available. Its annual spending
is about $55 million, which includes a payroll of about $3.5
million.
R The Massachusetts
Growth Capital Corporation,
which aims to promote economic development in underserved and low- to moderate-income communities, has not updated online payroll records
since fall 2015 and spending
data since fiscal 2015. Its yearly
payroll is about $1.7 million
and it spends another $1 million-plus annually.
‘This is taxpayer
money. They all
should operate
with clear
transparency.’
STATE SENATOR
MARK C. MONTIGNY
New Bedford Democrat
R Fourteen of the state’s 15
regional transit authorities had
also, until the Globe asked
them about missing records,
failed to publish some payroll
or financial records for at least
one of the past three years, including agencies that are calling for more state funding as
they consider hiking fares and
cutting service. Combined,
those agencies receive about
$80 million from the state annually.
Agencies cited various explanations for why the records
have gone unpublished, including technical issues that arose
after the state switched to a
new transparency website in
the fall of 2016.
Following questions from
the Globe, some agencies
moved to quickly post missing
records online, including the
UMass Building Authority.
That agency’s deputy director and general counsel David
P. Mullen in an e-mail blamed
the state comptroller’s office,
which runs the state’s transparency website, for failing to post
some data, while acknowledging other records weren’t published due to “staff changes”
within the authority.
Steamship Authority general
manager Robert Davis said the
agency’s reliance on a decadesold accounting system has
made it difficult to get records
online, but it is working to post
them soon.
Commonwealth Corp.
spokeswoman Erin Clark said it
expects to soon provide more
information for the state’s website as part of a broader effort
by the Executive Office of Administration and Finance to get
quasi agencies to disclose records.
Officials from the Baker administration’s Office of Administration and Finance declined
to say what, if anything, that
agency is doing to boost reporting. But officials there said that
while the state’s transparency
law requires quasi agencies to
publicly post records, it doesn’t
give state officials legal authority to force them to comply.
State comptroller Thomas
Shack said he, too, can’t force
compliance, but he urged more
agencies to step up. “Anybody
who uses or receives or converts
dollars from the public should
be making that data transparent,” Shack said.
State Representative Antonio F. D. Cabral, a New Bedford
Democrat who helped craft the
2010 transparency legislation,
said agencies flouting the statute can’t claim ignorance.
“This is not something that
was passed yesterday,” Cabral
said. “I’m hoping by now every
agency and every authority is
aware of their responsibilities
when it comes to reporting.”
Quasi-public agencies operating under the radar have run
into major financial problems.
For example, the quasi-public status of the now-defunct
Turnpike Authority allowed it
to function with less oversight
than traditional offices. It subsequently ran into major financial problems, including from
its management of the costly
Big Dig project, prompting the
agency’s downfall and saddling
other departments with its
massive leftover debt.
And, until a few weeks ago,
the Massachusetts Port Authority, another quasi-public agency,
had failed for years to disclose
pay records for the State Police’s
Troop F, which the authority
funds to patrol properties it
owns, including Logan International Airport in Boston.
The hidden records, revealed only after the Globe discovered they were missing,
showed that Troop F employees
were paid significantly more
than other State Police divisions, prompting state officials
to conduct a review looking for
ways to curb hefty overtime
spending.
The records also showed
Troop F staff receive special,
controversial payments for
driving their own cars — instead of cruisers — to work. The
Globe then found the state never paid taxes on that perk, leaving Massachusetts vulnerable
to a potentially massive bill
from the IRS.
In 2010, Cummings’s group,
MassPIRG, published a report
highlighting how many quasi
agencies struggled with transparency.
Since then, “the state has
done a pretty good job in getting some of the data on there,”
she said. But clearly some agencies still operate in the shadows. “We may have taken the
foot off the pedal and we may
have to strive again for meaningful transparency.”
Matt Rocheleau
can be reached at matthew.
rocheleau@globe.com.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
Court weighs ground rules
in meningitis outbreak case
uNECC
Continued from Page A1
shipped to doctors, clinics, and
hospitals across the country.
They face charges that include mail fraud and racketeering in connection with the scandal and are scheduled to go on
trial in October. But their lawyers contend they had no role in
producing the batches of a contaminated steroid that caused
the deadly outbreak. Some had
worked for years at the company, while others had only been
there a few months when federal officials launched their investigation.
“The outbreak has nothing
to do with the charges against
them,” said Dana McSherry,
who is representing Joseph M.
Evanosky, a pharmacist who
worked at NECC from April
2011 to October 2012.
The nine defendants had
filed a joint motion asking that
US District Judge Richard G.
Stearns bar testimony about
the tainted vials of the steroid,
methylprednisolone acetate,
and the harm they caused.
The man responsible for
compounding that drug, pharmacy supervisor Glenn Chin,
was convicted last fall, defense
lawyers argued. Chin began
serving an eight-year sentence
for racketeering and fraud in
April. NECC’s former owner,
Barry Cadden, was convicted of
fraud a nd racke teering in
March 2017 and was sentenced
to nine years in prison.
“This is not Cadden-Chin,
round three,” McSherry said.
“These are different defendants, different charges.”
Cadden and Chin were both
acquitted of second-degree
murder charges.
Assistant US Attorney
George P. Varghese said it’s critical that jurors know about the
fallout of the steroid’s production so they can understand
why the federal government
launched a massive investigation into the pharmacy.
The remaining defendants
may not have been responsible
GLOBE STAFF/FILE
In this 2012 photo, federal
agents entered NECC offices
in Framingham.
for production of the steroid,
but Varghese said they used the
same unsafe practices to produce and ship other drugs.
“We are not seeking to inflame the jury,” Varghese said.
“We are trying to demonstrate
the story of what happened in
this case.”
Varghese said prosecutors
plan to seek testimony from
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention and Food and Drug
Administration officials but will
not call victims or their families
as witnesses.
Prosecutors have described
NECC as a “fraudulent criminal
enterprise” that produced substandard drugs and marketed
them as the safest in the country. They say many of the remaining defendants conspired
with Cadden and Chin to carry
out the scheme, but defense
lawyers say the government
went too far in charging their
clients for what are essentially
civil regulatory violations.
In 2012, investigators from
the CDC and the FDA found
that NECC sent out vials of
mold-tainted steroids that were
injected into the spines of patients, many of whom suffered
strokes. Those who survived
continue to be afflicted by pain,
headaches, and memory loss.
Many now rely on canes and
wheelchairs.
In 2014, prosecutors indict-
ed 14 people in connection with
the outbreak, which authorities
said caused the deaths of 64
people and infected about 800
patients.
Stearns seemed to agree
with defense lawyers that it
could be problematic to include
evidence of the deaths and illnesses at a trial for defendants
who were not accused of producing the deadly steroid.
But he said prosecutors have
a strong argument for why the
jury may need the context of
the outbreak to understand
why the pharmacy was investigated in the first place.
McSherry countered that it
is not necessary to tell the jurors of the deaths and illnesses
that occurred, since the defense
does not plan to argue that
there was no reason for federal
agencies to investigate the
pharmacy.
“That’s fair,” Stearns replied.
But Varghese said prosecutors need that background to
counter the likely defense argument that they overreached in
charging the defendants with
racketeering or conspiracy.
He alluded to the second-degree murder acquittals of Cadden and Chin to show that jurors in those trials, who were
shown photos of the victims
and heard wrenching testimony about how they died, were
still able to assess the evidence
objectively.
The government is seeking
almost $74 million from Cadden in restitution for the victims.
Besides Evanosky, the remaining defendants are Gregory A. Conigliaro, a former owner and director of NECC; Sharon P. Carter, former director of
operations; Scott M. Connolly, a
pharmacy technician; and five
other pharmacists: Chin’s wife,
Kathy; Gene Svirskiy; Christopher M. Leary; Alla V. Stepanets; and Michelle L. Thomas.
Maria Cramer can be reached
at mcramer@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @globemcramer.
G l o b e
Continued from Page A1
and injure LGBTI people in
Uganda constitute violations of
international law. They do,”
wrote US District Judge Michael A. Ponsor. It’s a view Lively vociferously disputes.
The case — now pending before the US Court of Appeals in
Boston — was publicly known
before Saturday’s Republican
convention but was not part of
the public deliberations when
nearly 30 percent of GOP delegates backed Lively over Governor Charlie Baker. Yet Lively’s
opinions about gay people will
likely be front and center during the primary campaign.
Already Baker has said
many of Lively’s views should
have no place in public discourse. “I’m no fan of his position on gay rights, and I’ll just
start there,” he added Monday.
Lively was sued by Sexual
Minorities Uganda, a gay rights
organization but he won the
first round of the Uganda case
last year. The judge dismissed
the lawsuit on jurisdictional
grounds, but in an unusual legal twist, Lively is now appealing the ruling in his favor.
Given that Ponsor decided
the court did not have jurisdiction over the matter, Lively argues, the judge did not have the
authority to opine on the merit
of the underlying allegation —
that he aided and abetted a
crime against humanity.
Lively’s lawyers believe they
have a good case.
“We think the law is very
clear: A court that lacks jurisdiction to determine the merits
of the case cannot determine
the merits of the case. It seems
pretty simple,” said Horatio G.
Mihet, Lively’s lead attorney
from the nonprofit Liberty
Counsel, which is representing
the pastor free of charge.
Moreover, Mihet said, Lively
has always maintained the accusations are based on fiction.
But the lawyers for Sexual
Minorities Uganda say Lively’s
appeal has no merit.
“It’s an absurd situation he’s
created, appealing his win to
censor the judge’s language,”
said Pamela C. Spees, the lead
attorney for the plaintiffs and a
lawyer at the Center for Constitutional Rights, which is representing the group for free.
Oral arguments for the appeal are scheduled for June 7.
The lawsuit, first filed in
2012, is drawing new attention
after Lively won enough support — 28 percent of delegates
— at the state GOP convention
on Saturday to gain access to
the Sept. 4 primary ballot. Lively says he is on track to submit
the 10,000 signatures he needs
to get to the secretary of state
next month to be on the ballot.
Party insiders had expected
Lively to fall short of garnering
the 15 percent of delegates he
needed to win ballot access.
But after a fiery speech in
which Lively emphasized his
conservative credentials and
did not mention gay people —
“I’m 100 percent pro-life. I’m
100 percent pro-Second
Amendment. I stand on the
original intent of the Constitution. I’m 100 percent proTrump” — he ended up getting
the votes of 626 delegates.
After the balloting, several
said they were animated by dismay over Baker’s moderate
views rather than any positions
held by Lively.
“This was: Delegates who
are conservative are just fed
up,” said Mary Lou Daxland, a
delegate from Westport who
voted for Lively and is president
of the conservative Massachusetts Republican Assembly.
Daxland ticked through a
multitude of complaints, from
Baker’s opposition to many of
President Trump’s policies to
the governor’s decision to sign a
transgender public accommodations bill into law in 2016.
“A lot of people feel: Why do
we even have a Republican governor if he’s going to be pushing
the Democrat agenda,” she said.
But Lively’s views on gay
people are poised to be in the
limelight.
In a sworn declaration made
as part of the lawsuit in 2016,
Lively makes what he sees an
important distinction:
“I am joyfully compelled by
Jesus Christ to love as individuals all persons who identify as
homosexual or commit the sin
of homosexuality,” he wrote.
“However, I am strongly opposed to the gay agenda because I believe the agenda is a
threat to the continuation of
historically Judeo-Christian,
marriage-based civilization as
God designed and intended it
for the benefit of mankind.”
The Springfield pastor, who
founded the Abiding Truth Ministries, says he has always been
opposed to violence against or
ridicule or vilification of people
who identify as homosexual.
But Ponsor’s 2017 decision —
hailed by the plaintiffs even as
their complaint was dismissed
and disparaged by the defendant even as he was victorious
— paints a different picture.
Ponsor ruled Lively “aided
a n d a b e tt e d a v i c i o u s a n d
frightening campaign of repression against LGBTI persons in
Uganda,” and the judge said
Lively “worked with elements
in Uganda who share some of
his views to try to repress freedom of expression by LGBTI
people in Uganda, deprive
them of the protection of the
law, and render their very existence illegal.”
The plaintiffs in the case had
tried to connect Lively’s visits to
Uganda, his speeches there,
and his work with activists to
persecution of gay people.
Among other books, Lively
is the author of “The Pink Swastika: Homosexuality in the Nazi
Party,” a revisionist history that
alleges the Nazi party was controlled by gay men who hid
their sexual orientation.
Ponsor pointed to Lively’s
writings, saying he “has tried to
make gay people scapegoats for
practically all of humanity’s ills”
— views that the judge calls
“crackpot bigotry.”
Still, the judge ruled that
Lively’s actions did not meet
the necessary legal standard to
be heard in a US court.
Globe correspondent Matt Stout
contributed to this report.
Joshua Miller can be reached at
joshua.miller@globe.com.
A7
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Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
Michelle Wolf ’s ‘mic drop’ on Flint was dead serious
T
he fiery backlash against the White House
Correspondents’ Association dinner held
on Saturday night continues, with one hot
take after another about whether the annual fête has become an anachronism (it has)
and whether comedian Michelle Wolf went too far with
her jokes (she did not).
And yet, what should have been the main takeaway
of the whole affair was a line that Wolf saved for the
kicker, appropriately. “Flint still doesn’t have clean water,” she said. But instead of focusing on Flint, Mich.,
media Twitter accounts were brimming with angst
about Wolf’s brand of humor. The hyperbole is particularly disingenuous when it comes from conservatives
who have consistently tolerated a vulgar, bullying president. But tough love from a comedian whose job was to
speak truth to power, and get some laughs in the process? An outrage.
The Wolf kerfuffle shows the high degree of attention-deficit disorder in the media, something that has
become extreme in an era of nano-punditry that spews
forth in torrents in response to President Trump’s latest
policy reversal or Twitter tantrum. Yet it has been four
years since the water crisis began in Flint, where residents were drinking tap water contaminated by lead
and other bacteria after city officials switched the water
supply in order to save money. A year after the switch, a
study revealed that Flint water was 19 times more corrosive than Detroit water; another report found that
the number of Flint children with unsafe lead levels in
their blood nearly doubled. The toxic water has been
linked to 12 deaths. Many
lawsuits were filed against
city and state officials; a
class-action lawsuit, for instance, claimed that some
local officials knew they
were exposing Flint residents, who are primarily black,
to toxic water. Eventually, some government officials
faced criminal charges, but the crisis is not over.
That’s what Wolf, in her roast on Saturday, wanted
to underscore. For every joke she landed, her remark
about Flint was dead serious. And the struggle is very
real for Flint residents — as real as the plight of Puerto
Ricans after Hurricane María, who are still facing the
aftershocks of a grossly inadequate disaster response by
the federal government.
Saturday’s correspondents’ dinner was also a reminder of how imperfect and awkward such affairs are
by design, with the national media mingling civilly
with the elected officials, politicians, and government
workers we’re supposed to be covering. The president
of the White House Correspondents’ Association, who
hired Wolf to perform the
roast, rebuked the comedian in a statement saying
that “the entertainer’s
monologue was not in the
spirit” of the group’s mission.
Full disclosure: The Globe had two tables at the dinner, and the invited guests included former White
House staffer Omarosa Manigault Newman and US
Senator Ed Markey. But perspective here is key, and
that’s what Wolf was offering with that “mic drop”
about Flint. Everything else is faux pearl clutching.
Some officials faced criminal
charges, but the crisis is not over.
Fighting
the assault
on liberal
democracy
LESLEY BECKER/GLOBE STAFF; ADOBE STOCK
T
he warning in Freedom House’s 2018
report is stark: “Democracy is under
assault and in retreat around the globe, a
crisis that has intensified as America’s
democratic standards erode at an
accelerating pace.”
This reverses what many assumed was
an irresistible global arc toward greater freedom,
tolerance, equity, prosperity, and opportunity. But history
tells us that human progress is neither irrevocable nor
inevitable.
That’s why I’ve joined with an international group from
B y R i c h a r d N o r t h Pa t t e r s o n
across the ideological spectrum in launching the Renew
Democracy Initiative. Founders and supporters include
acclaimed writer Mario Vargas Llosa, world chess
champion Gary Kasparov, Harvard Law School professor
Lawrence Tribe, New York Times columnist Bret Stephens,
human rights activist Natan Sharansky, African-American
studies scholar Henry Louis Gates, historian Jon
Meacham, and Washington Post columnists Max Boot and
Ann Applebaum. The group’s purpose is to unite the
center-left and center-right in opposition to the forces of
autocracy, hatred, tribalism, and unreason that threaten
liberal democracy worldwide — the dystopia personified,
but hardly originated, by Donald Trump.
In its most virulent form, this deadly convergence was
the genesis of World War II — in which the millions killed
by war were joined by six million murdered by hate. In
response, the United States joined with other nations to
build alliances, create international institutions, provide
foreign assistance, and advance the ideals of democracy
and human rights. Like America, this liberal democratic
order was far from perfect. But it created the relative
stability and peace necessary to expand freedom, and the
Cold War, and liberate Eastern Europe.
abcde
Fo u nd ed 1 87 2
JOHN W. HENRY
Publisher
BRIAN McGRORY
Editor
VINAY MEHRA
President
ELLEN CLEGG
Editor, Editorial Page
LINDA PIZZUTI HENRY
Managing Director
JENNIFER PETER
Managing Editor
Within America itself, we strove to achieve greater
social, racial, and economic justice. Despite grave lapses,
we became a model which inspired global aspirations to
democracy and human rights.
No more. Cosseted by Trump, autocrats around the
world kill or jail opponents. Rising anti-Semitism moves
bigots to kill Jews and governments to repress discussion
of the Holocaust. The separation between cults of
personality and the institutions of government erodes.
Nor does Trump distinguish between constitutional
governance and personal desire. He attacks our electoral
process, our law enforcement institutions, our courts, and
the media. He slanders and bullies
critics, stokes tribalism and distrust,
and pits one group of Americans
against another. And so our civic life,
already fraught, grows ever more
toxic. As noted in the mission
statement of Renew Democracy
Initiative: the “relentless partisanship
has led major parties to abandon
common cause, leading to the
debilitation of vital civic institutions
. . . Debates over immigration,
education, health care, trade,
national security ,and taxes have been
politicized to such extremes that the compromises needed
to craft sound, sensible solutions are unlikely to be
reached.”
America has become polarized and paralyzed — an
insular and dysfunctional country mired in scorched-earth
politics instead of a force for global betterment.
Thus our mission statement declares: “It is essential to
defend and refine the values and institutions of liberal
democracy before they are further crippled.” Among them
are the integrity of democratic elections; freedom of the
press; equal justice of the law; an independent judiciary;
and a humane immigration policy. These are not
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
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abstractions — they are the essence of an open and decent
society.
Nor are they merely American values. They offer hope to
people around the world. Thus our iniative emphasizes that
“Western proponents of the liberal-democratic order must
first promote these values at home, and defend them
abroad without paternalistically imposing them, or
repeating past errors such as uncritical alliances with
authoritarian regimes.” That posture, sadly, does not
characterize Donald Trump’s version of America.
But Trump is spurring Americans of goodwill across the
political spectrum to rediscover the moral framework we
share in common. Personally, I’m left of
center, and my colleagues to the right
often have a different view about
solving one problem or another — or
even, at times, about whether the
solution creates more problems than it
cures. But, as our mission statement
says, we “are still joined by a broad set
of common values, including respect
for free speech and dissent, a belief in
the benefits of international trade and
immigration, respect for law and
procedural legitimacy, a suspicion of
cults of personality, and understanding
that free societies require protection from authoritarians
promising easy fixes to complex problems.”
Equally fundamental, we believe in compromise, civility,
diversity, mutual respect, and a politics which appeals to
the best in us. Only through such values can America renew
its sense of purpose and Americans recover our sense of
common citizenship.
We hope you’ll consider joining us.
Trump is spurring
Americans of goodwill
across the political
spectrum to rediscover
the moral framework
we share in common.
Richard North Patterson’s column appears regularly in the
Globe. His latest book is “Fever Swamp.” Follow him on
Twitter @RicPatterson.
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T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A9
Inbox
A comedian walks into a
correspondents’ dinner . . .
Trump may
be losing
at home,
but he is
winning
abroad
S
By Niall Ferguson
ome teams — generally the ones I
support—tend to win at home and
lose away. The same is true of
some American presidents. Lyndon Johnson’s most enduring victories were legislative (civil rights and the
Great Society), yet his presidency was destroyed abroad, in Vietnam.
Woodrow Wilson was just the opposite.
He won abroad — ending the First World
War and establishing the League of Nations
— but lost at home, failing to get the League
ratified by the Senate and suffering a debilitating stroke in the process.
As things stand, a year and a half since
his historic election victory, Donald Trump
seems destined for domestic disaster.
Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia
investigation rolls inexorably onwards, its
scope expanding with every passing week
like a vast bone-chilling cold front. Former
FBI director James Comey is on his book
tour, dripping sanctimonious drops on the
president’s character in every interview he
does. Trump’s aptly-named old flame
Stormy Daniels is not done with the president either. Worst of all is the human cloud
that is Trump’s erstwhile consigliere Michael Cohen, who these days drifts around
Manhattan, heavy with the moist vapor of
potentially incriminating evidence.
That the president is oppressed by his local difficulties is clear. Last week he dialed
in to his favorite TV show, “Fox and
Friends,” to give vent to his frustrations. It
was a tirade that left even the show’s Trumpophile presenters looking groggy. And yet
all of this could be mitigated, if not negated,
by a few big away wins.
Like the mutant Pikachu he (from a distance) resembles, Trump has one Pokémon
superpower. Though in a state of permanent
distraction, he retains an unerring instinct
for the weakness of any counterparty. Jeb
After Trump’s stand­up act, it’s
Michelle Wolf who outrages?
Bush believed he was entitled to the Republican nomination; Trump zeroed in on his
“low energy.” Hillary Clinton believed she
was entitled to the presidency; Trump accused her of high crookery.
The same has applied in the realm of foreign policy. European leaders — especially
German Chancellor Angela Merkel — believed they were entitled to the American security umbrella, gratis. Then Trump hinted
that the US commitment to NATO might
not, after all, be unconditional. Immediately, those defense budgets increased.
The North Korean leader, Kim Jong Un,
believed he was entitled to test nuclear
warheads and intercontinental ballistic
missiles to his heart’s content. Trump
threatened him with “fire and fury,” while
at the same time leaning on China to impose and enforce economic sanctions on
Pyongyang. Lo and behold, “Little Rocket
Man” crossed the demilitarized zone on
Friday, taking the first steps toward peace
on the Korean peninsula.
Yes, I know, Kim wouldn’t be the first
North Korean leader to make a deal and then
cheat on it. Still, even habitual critics of the
president have been forced to acknowledge
that he has made more progress on the Korean question in a single year than his predecessor made in eight. It turns out that the
madman theory of diplomacy really works if
the world seriously thinks you’re mad.
Next up is the big one: China. The world
seemed to be going Xi Jinping’s way last
year. He was the toast of Davos, “the most
powerful man in the world” on the cover of
the Economist. Even Trump’s superpower
seemed to fail him at Mar-a-Lago, where he
stuck to the globalist script drawn up by the
Goldman Sachs alumni.
But then, on his way back from his Asia
trip last year, the president came to his senses. The most powerful man in the world was
not Xi. It was He, Himself, The Donald. And
the best way to prove that was to threaten
China with a trade war. The Chinese reaction — public pledges of retaliation, private
offers of concessions — tells you all you need
to know. They don’t like steel tariffs imposed upon them.
The foreign policy professionals will tell
you that Trump’s chronic lack of preparation will doom his Asian foreign policy to
failure. Maybe so. But the domestic politics
professionals said just the same about his
2016 campaign.
Richard Nixon did not have much of domestic record to campaign on in 1972. As
the Democrats controlled Congress, his legislative record was modest. He had imposed
wage and price controls in a misguided attempt to repress inflation, and his approval
rating was just north of 50 percent. But the
Democrats nominated a left-leaning candidate, Senator George “amnesty, abortion,
and acid” McGovern.
Nixon smashed McGovern with one foreign policy win after another. He visited
China and met with Chairman Mao in February 1972, then went to Moscow and
signed two agreements to limit nuclear
weapons in May. On October 26, Henry
Kissinger declared that peace was “at hand”
in Vietnam. McGovern won just one state.
Indeed, he won just 130 counties.
Trump may find himself in a similar
predicament in 2020, with the difference
that his impeachment may already have
started before he is up for reelection. Inflation will be up by then. But the Democrats will nominate a progressive candidate. Trump will have no choice to campaign on foreign policy.
He will have lost at home. But — with a
little bit of dragon energy and Pokémon superpower — he could still win on away
goals.
Niall Ferguson is senior fellow at the Hoover
Institution at Stanford University
JOAN VENNOCHI
Wynn Resorts’ attempted touch­up
doesn’t hide complicit enablers
T
he folks at Wynn Resorts
are betting on Massachusetts gaming regulators to
overlook what has been
called a famous porcine
proverb. You can put lipstick on a pig,
but it’s still a pig.
To demonstrate their break with
disgraced former chief executive Steve
Wynn, those company executives left
behind are dropping the Wynn name
from their $2.5 billion casino project
in Everett. It will now be called “Encore Boston Harbor” — a bow to what
current CEO Matt Maddox calls “cultural sensitivity.” Wynn, who has been
accused of sexual misconduct by multiple women, has sold his stake in the
company he founded, branded, and
nurtured. He also moved out of the
Wynn Las Vegas hotel villa where he
lived, surrounded by Picasso and Matisse artwork.
Three women were also added to
the Wynn board — a sure sign the
company is trying to transform its image from a place where a manicurist
was allegedly forced to have sex with
the CEO to a place where females are
supposedly valued for their intelligence and business savvy.
But the questions surrounding the
gaming license granted to Wynn Resorts go beyond one man. Gaming
commission investigators are supposed to be reporting back on what
other Wynn executives or board members knew about the allegations
against Wynn, including a $7.5 million
settlement paid to the manicurist.
From a distance, it looks like the commission is slow-walking the review, to
give Wynn Resorts time for not only a
little lipstick, but a shot of Botox.
What happened so far with Wynn
echoes the outcome in other #MeToo
CHARLES KRUPA
Steve Wynn.
stories. Powerful men have been exposed and brought down, at least for
the moment, by a wide range of sexual
misconduct charges. Their enablers,
meanwhile, escape accountability. Yet,
if they survive and hold onto top management positions, how much does
the corporate culture really change?
The explosive allegations against
Wynn — which he denies — were first
reported last January by the Wall
Street Journal. Based on interviews
with “dozens of people,” the Journal described behavior by Wynn “that cumulatively would amount to a decadeslong pattern of sexual misconduct.”
That behavior included pressuring employees to perform sex acts. According
to the Journal, Wynn set up a company
separate from Wynn Resorts to help
conceal a $7.5 million payment to one
woman who accused him of forcing her
to have sex. In follow-up reports, the
Journal said casino managers enabled
Wynn’s alleged misconduct for decades. And the Journal also raised
questions about the possible complicity
of other Wynn executives when it came
to covering up for Wynn.
Maddox and Kim Sinatra, the
company’s general counsel, were
both at Wynn Resorts when it applied
for the gaming license and failed to
disclose the $7.5 million settlement.
Both Maddox and Sinatra were also
investigated as “individual qualifiers”
by the Massachusetts Gaming Commission. That means their individual
suitability is part of the overall suitability designation Wynn Resorts
needed to get the license to build the
Everett casino. From the Journal: “According to filings in a court battle between Mr. Wynn and Elaine Wynn,
his ex-wife and a co-founder of the
company, Ms. Sinatra knew about the
allegations since at least 2009.”
Gaming commission investigators
completely missed the $7.5 million
payment when it conducted its suitability review of Wynn Resorts. Now
the commission has to square its finding of suitability with Wynn’s alleged
transgressions and the company’s handling of them. The pitch made by
Maddox at last week’s hearing was all
about convincing regulators the Wynn
brand has nothing to do with Wynn.
“This company is not about a man. It
hasn’t been about a man for 18 years,”
he told the commission. “I don’t want
people to think the name is associated
with the man. Yes, it is a man’s name,
but it’s also a brand.”
Yet, some key executives behind
that brand may have enabled Wynn,
protected Wynn, and failed to disclose
what they knew about Wynn. Call it
“cultural sensitivity” — but if Massachusetts is supposed to believe Wynn
Resorts is making more than a cosmetic fix, those executives also need to
go. All the lipstick in the world doesn’t
change that.
Joan Vennochi can be reached at
vennochi@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @Joan_Vennochi.
So much has been made of the White House correspondents’ dinner. Who cares? President Trump and his bullying
tactics have brought a new kind of normal in terms of language and behavior. Anything goes now.
Trump is free to call out, slander, and personally attack
anyone who happens to express different views from his.
The targets of these attacks and inappropriate tweets go
from Rosie O’Donnell, to Miss Universe, to a Gold Star
mother, to Maggie Haberman, to John McCain, to the FBI,
to the Justice Department, to Robert Mueller, to The New
York Times, to CNN, and the list goes on. And that doesn’t
even include the “Access Hollywood” tape.
And so the White House correspondents bring a self-defined edgy comedian to the dinner and expect something
other than what she is known to do? Michelle Wolf delivered the same kind of vitriol that the president delivers
hourly (without any complaints from his base), and he goes
crazy? Can you imagine Barack Obama or George W. Bush
behaving this way?
Get a grip.
ELLEN KAZIN
Waltham
We should expect better
than this crude display
Crude jokes about genitalia and abortion — is this how to
entertain White House correspondents? Apparently so, and
the more vulgar the better, judging from the laughter of
some of these elite journalists. Can’t we expect better than
this display of hate-filled profanity?
JOSEPH P. KONZEM
Weston
We should be expanding, not
restricting, access to college
State Representative Jay R. Kaufman’s proposal to consolidate the public higher education system is misguided
(“What should sustainable higher ed look like?” Opinion,
April 27). Consolidation would restrict, not expand, access
to college. Most public higher education students don’t
have the luxury of attending college far from home or
across state lines. They have jobs and family responsibilities to attend to, and the vast majority do not live on campus. In fact, all community college students are commuters,
and less than half of our four-year public college students
live on campus. Closing campuses would only make it harder for our Massachusetts students, particularly AfricanAmerican, Latino, and low-income students, to earn a degree.
In addition, businesses in the Commonwealth already
face an acute shortage of educated workers, and this problem will grow as baby boomers retire. Instead of the state
continuing to disinvest in public higher education, it
should increase investment. This way our public colleges
can expand opportunities for students from our Gateway
Cities, who represent the solution to our talent shortages in
the workforce.
Why is Kaufman turning the failure of a small private
college into an attack on public higher education? He is correct that there are 114 public and private higher education
institutions in Massachusetts. However, he fails to mention
that our 29 public colleges educate more than 70 percent of
Massachusetts high school graduates, while receiving only
a fraction of their funding from the state. Our Massachusetts public colleges and universities proudly offer highquality and affordable degree pathways to nearly 250,000
Massachusetts residents.
Representative Kaufman is simply wrong.
VINCENT PEDONE
Worcester
The writer is executive officer of the State Universities
Council of Presidents. He is a former Massachusetts state
representative.
Think of social­emotional learning
as a prerequisite for ‘happiness 101’
I’d like to offer a little background on the interconnectedness between the Boston area and Psyc 157, dubbed the
“happiness class” by students at Yale, other than the fact
that the professor is from New Bedford (“Happiness 101,”
Page A1, April 26).
Laurie Santos says she “brought together work on positive psychology and behavior change, then put it into applied form to create the class. The goal was to rewire the
way the students viewed the pursuit of happiness.”
This formula is being played out across school districts
in Massachusetts, including Boston Public Schools, under
the name social-emotional learning, the educational process that helps establish the emotional intelligence in people that is required for happiness.
Yet social-emotional learning teaches far more than a
road to happiness. It also gives students the needed skills
that form pathways for success in business, for building
long-term positive relationships with people, for living up
to the values required in every major religion, for having
empathy for those less fortunate and in need.
Bringing these important skills out of the corridors of
our schools and into the light of public knowledge is required to rewire the way we all think about our pursuit of
happiness.
MITCH LYONS
President
The Social-Emotional Learning Alliance for Massachusetts
Newton
Letters should be written exclusively to the Globe and
include name, address, and daytime telephone number.
They should be 200 words or fewer. All are subject to
editing. Letters to the Editor, The Boston Globe, 1 Exchange
Pl, Ste 201, Boston, MA 02109-2132; letter@globe.com
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The Region
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B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Pop-up markets for black business owners make splash
uBLACK MARKET
Continued from Page A1
plans to expand her market to
other parts of the city, and was
angry that the women running
the Seaport market didn’t collaborate with her.
This isn’t the first time the
city has witnessed a schism between markets: The organizers
of the SoWa Open Market and
t h e S o u t h E n d O p e n Ma r ket operated rival events and
entered into a legal battle before the South End Open Market ceased operations last
year. But factoring race into
the discussion has complicated the current conversation,
both for the markets’ founders
and the vendors they’re both
angling to support.
In an open letter on Facebook, Grant said the article’s
misleading headline was a
“slap in the face” that undermined her efforts to bring economic development to Dudley
Square’s struggling commercial district (the headline has
since been changed).
She and her husband,
Christopher Grant, opened
Black Market with a mission
to eradicate the $247,500
wealth gap between black and
white Bostonians that was
identified in “ The Color of
Wealth in Boston,” a 2015 report by the Federal Reserve
Bank of Boston, Duke University, and the New School.
The market’s goal, Grant
said, is to fill a void left behind
by A Nubian Notion, the longtime importer of African goods
in Dudley Square that closed
in 2016.
Quontay Turner, who has a
small business making clothing, jewelry, and objects out of
old vinyl records, was a vendor
at Black Market in 2017 and
worked with Laniesha Gray to
establish the Seaport pop-up.
Both women are leaders of the
Boston Young Black Professionals group and said the idea
arose directly from a story in
the Globe’s recent Spotlight series about the lack of diversity
in the Seaport.
According to census data,
only 3 percent of the develop-
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‘We’re not the
people who
typically get the
spotlight on us.’
KAI GRANT
Creator of Black Market, a
venue for black business owners
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Natasha Williams sold organic body butter products at the Dudley Square pop-up market.
ing neighborhood’s residents
are black.
The women said that they
regret the confusion the article’s headline generated and
that their goal wasn’t to compete with Black Market, but to
complement it, while also introducing black vendors to an
untapped audience.
“It was important to get in
front of other customers and
expand and provide more opportunities for businesses to
get their name out,” said Turner.
“ We’re not interested in
brewing up controversy,” said
Gray. “We’re hoping both markets can coexist in the best
way we can.”
The misleading headline
wasn’t the only controversy
that Grant dealt with recent-
ly. Within just days of responding to the news of the Seaport
marketplace, Grant discovered
“White Lives Matter” had been
scrawled on an exterior wall of
Black Market’s Roxbury building.
Once the news broke, Internet trolls pounced, questioning her claims about when the
vandalism occurred and calling it a “fake hate crime.”
The detractors then reported Black Market’s Facebook
page for “hate speech” and it
was temporarily taken down.
A Facebook spokesperson said
the page had actually
been flagged for inappropriate
content, which Grant says was
probably due to a promotional
i m a ge s h e h a d p o s t e d o f a
bare-chested woman in an African tribe.
T h e Fa c e b o o k p a g e h a s
been restored.
Grant said the back-to-back
controversies have helped
highlight a generational, and
geographic, divide that often
bifurcates Boston’s black community.
As a fourth-generation Roxbury resident, Grant said, she
h o n o r s t h e r o l e t h e c i t y ’s
black-owned stores have
played in the city’s history.
Despite what the pop-up
n a m e m i g h t i m p l y, “ w h a t
we’re doing isn’t considered
trendy,” Grant said. “We’re not
the people who typically get
the spotlight on us.”
She said that history is often lost on younger black Bostonians who don’ t live and
work in her community.
Grant called the week-long
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ordeal “exhausting” and said
that operating Black Market
has often meant defending
the concept from those who
say it discriminates against
white business owners.
“The counter narrative that
this is somehow racist and exclusionary to white businesses
is unfair, ludicrous, and ridiculous,” said Darrick Hamilton,
a n a u t h o r o f t he “ Co l o r o f
Wealth” study, which found
that blacks in Boston had a
median net worth of just $8.
He said that efforts such as
Black Market work to offset
the “ongoing structural factors
that can be traced historically,
as well as currently, that exclude black businesses.”
Yet he also acknowledged
the irony that as these efforts
become more commercially
mainstream, they too become
subject to the market forces of
capitalism, such as competition, he said.
“Socially just goals around
solidarity and pride and black
business are not immune and
insular to competitive forces,”
Hamilton said.
For some entrepreneurs,
the various controversies underscore the need for blackowned marketplaces, and the
conversations they can help
generate.
“Boston is a city that is built
on networks and I think with
[Grant], it’s great when you
have people of color that share
their networks,” said Anna
Foster, who worked with the
Grants to create Black Market
and runs the small-business
consultancy A Maven’s World.
“That hasn’t been as common
in the past.”
T here was some skepticism among Black Market vendors about how a Seaportbased market would be received.
“To be honest, I feel like the
Seaport doesn’t really cater to
black-owned businesses, so
it’ll be really interesting to see
how that’s going to work out,”
said Stephanie Voltaire, who
sells handbags under her Vlure Designs label.
Others were hopeful that
the controversy will do more
than pit the markets against
each other.
Bernette Dawson, a smallbusiness owner who runs the
organic skin-care company Made Organics, said she believes that “people are becoming more conscious about buying black.”
But that hasn’t necessarily
eased her own self-consciousness about being a black vendor.
Once, at a pop-up market in
Nahant, she said a customer
told her that the last time they
purchased whipped butter at a
market, “it smelled like fried
chicken.”
“I let them know that I
don’t make the product out of
my house; I have a facility,”
Dawson said. “I have to show
and prove myself.”
“Having the Black Market
is great because it helps the
community and it helps build
morale,” she said. “But the other market is helping the Boston community understand
black businesses.
“It’s not always about the
sale,” she said. “It’s always
about educating the customer.”
Janelle Nanos can be reached
at janelle.nanos@globe.com.
Follow her on
Twitter @janellenanos.
Metro
B
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T U E S DAY, M AY 1 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / M E TR O
Facilities for fighting overdoses sensible, yet illegal
Nestor Ramos
A blue tent
outside Harvard
Medical School
on Monday had
everything it
takes to make using heroin a lot
less deadly: a
clean needle, a
mirror, and medical supplies, Narcan, and a nurse
nearby. It turns out it doesn’t take
much to ward off the worst case scenario of a single hit.
But supervised injection facilities
aren’t yet legal, so the one set up in
Longwood by a coalition of area medical students and activists was just a
mock-up. Organizers passed out fliers
extolling the benefits, which are pretty
straightforward — keeping people
alive, for example, and preventing infections.
As solutions go, these Safe Injection
Facilities, as they’re called, are about
as pragmatic as it gets. Far too many
people die of deadly overdoses, so let’s
make overdoses less deadly and then
sort out the rest, right?
Not quite.
While supervised injection facilities
have broad support from advocacy
groups and the medical community —
and studies of such setups around the
A visitor to the Harvard School of
Public Health’s mock safe injection
site Monday checked out items,
including clean needles, on a
demonstration table set up
underneath a tent on the quad
near the medical school. Studies of
supervised injection facilities
worldwide show reductions in
overdoses, HIV infections, and
deaths, but Governor Charlie
Baker and Mayor Martin J. Walsh
have expressed skepticism.
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
RAMOS, Page B5
Former
inmate
seeking
damages
Says arrest was case
of mistaken identity
Conviction vacated
after new evidence
By Jenifer McKim
THE NEW ENGLAND CENTER
FOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Governor Charlie Baker shared a laugh with World War II veteran Sidney Walton, 99, and his son Paul at the State House Monday.
FINAL CALL OF DUTY
A
s Governor Charlie Baker pinned a
gold medal to the lapel of Sidney Walton’s blazer in the State House Monday, the 99-year-old World War II veteran grinned up at him from beneath
the brim of his baseball cap, mentally
checking another governor off his
list.
Massachusetts was the Army veteran’s second stop
on a nationwide “No Regrets” tour to visit every governor in the country before making his last stop at the
White House on Feb. 11, 2019, his 100th birthday. Accompanying him on the journey is his son, Paul.
“Before we started, we took him on a bucket list
tour” of the world, Paul Walton said. Then they decided
to embark on this tour.
Sidney Walton says his one regret in life is that he
had a chance to meet Civil War veterans at a gathering
in New York but decided not to go. Because he missed
that opportunity, he’s touring the states to make sure all
Voyaging
veteran pays a
visit to Mass.
governor. Now
he only has 48
more to go.
Koh begins cable TV ads
pushing House campaign
By Matt Stout
KOH, Page B5
LANEY RUCKSTUHL
Arraignment
Juana Rivera, 19, was arraigned on murder and other
charges on Monday in Norfolk
Superior Court stemming from
the death of Reina Rodriguez
in June 2017 in a hotel in
Braintree. B3
Remembering slain
officer in Maine
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Dan Koh is putting his massive cash advantage to
work in the crowded Third Congressional District.
Koh, an Andover native and former chief of staff to
Mayor Martin J. Walsh of Boston, launched a six-figure television ad buy Monday, opting to hit the cable
airwaves more than four months before the Sept. 4
primary and at a time when few voters have decided
on a candidate.
Koh was sitting on more than $2 million in campaign funds by the end of March, according to his latest finance report. It was nearly three times more
than any of the 12 other Democrats vying for the party’s nomination.
Doug Rubin, a campaign adviser, declined to specify how much cash Koh committed to the “significant,
six-figure buy” or how long he intends to run it.
But the timing is notable: No other major party
candidate in the state has rolled out television ads so
far this year, be it in the Third District or any other
contested federal or statewide primary.
50 governors have a chance to meet a WWII veteran.
Baker welcomed Sidney Walton to his office shortly
after 1 p.m. and presented him with a citation, declaring
appreciation for his service, as well as a Governor’s Medal of Merit. The two shared memories of Cambridge
(where Walton once lived) — despite their Ivy league rivalries.
“Aw, geez, he’s a Yalie?” Baker, a Harvard College
alumnus, joked.
“Aren’t you a Yalie?” Sidney Walton responded. The
room erupted in laughter.
Baker read his citation to the veteran and thanked
him for his service.
“Your tour serves as a true reflection of your character
and your patriotism,” Baker said.
Sidney Walton, a retired engineer from San Diego,
was all smiles and said the honor was “wonderful.” On
Wednesday, the Waltons will go to a Red Sox game before
heading to Maine to meet the next governor on the list.
Dan Koh’s TV ad
purchase is geared at
specifically targeting
Lowell, Lawrence,
and the rest of the
Third Congressional
District’s 37 cities
and towns on
stations like CNN,
MSNBC, and USA.
Sheryl Cole, whose husband,
Somerset County Deputy Corporal Eugene P. Cole, was
killed last week in Maine,
wrote a remembrance of him
on Facebook, recalling her life
with him and the last time she
saw him. The alleged shooter
was ordered held without bail
during his initial court appearance in a Maine courtroom
Monday. B3
School walkout
Students walked out of class at
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional
High School in response to an
alleged sexual assault that just
came to light. B4
Kevin O’Loughlin was convicted of
raping an 11-year-old girl in Framingham in April 1982, a horrific crime he
always insisted he didn’t commit.
Three years ago, his conviction was
vacated after evidence emerged that
he may have been the victim of mistaken identity. On Monday, the 55year-old was back in court seeking
compensation from the state for what
he contends was a wrongful conviction that changed the course of his life
— including the psychological damage
of a four-year stint in state prison and
a lifetime trying to escape the shame
of the crime.
“I was a convicted child molester,”
O’Loughlin told a 12-member jury in
Suffolk Superior Court, explaining
why prison was particularly terrible
for him. On the night of the crime, “I
was home with my sister,” he said.
A divorced father of two who lives
in Texas, O’Loughlin is seeking compensation under the state’s erroneous
conviction law, enacted in 2004 as a
means of repaying a “moral debt” to
those who can prove their innocence.
O’Loughlin’s case shows how difficult it is to win compensation even after a court has overturned a conviction. Last month, Governor Charlie
Baker increased the maximum compensation a plaintiff can win from
$500,000 to $1 million, but it is unclear whether the changes are retroactive.
The state attorney general’s office is
contesting O’Loughlin’s allegations,
saying he needs to prove his innocence
to win financial damages. Among exO'LOUGHLIN, Page B5
MBTA picks French firm
to operate Ride service
Five­year contract
will cost $57.5m
By Adam Vaccaro
GLOBE STAFF
The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority on Monday chose a
new company to dispatch vans and
taxis for riders with disabilities, after
service sharply diminished under a
previous vendor.
Transdev, a French company with
experience providing transit service
for riders with disabilities in locations
around the United States, will assume
scheduling and dispatching for the
MBTA’s Ride service in June, replacing Global Contact Services of North
Carolina.
The new contract ends a shortlived deal with Global Contact, which
the MBTA hired in 2016 to consoli-
date scheduling and dispatching that
had been performed by the three companies that also provide door-to-door
rides for riders with disabilities. Global Contact was to be paid $38.5 million over the roughly three years of
the contract, and the MBTA expected
to cut expenses by an equal amount,
$38.5 million, through better and
more efficient scheduling and routing.
But from the start, the Global Contact deal failed to benefit both riders
and the T. In 2017, shortly after Global Contact began operating out of a
call center in Medford, riders began
reporting a sharp increase in no-show
trips and long delays for pickups. After months of problems, the T announced in December that it would
replace Global Contact by June 1.
Moreover, the Global Contact deal
never produced the huge cost savings
THE RIDE, Page B4
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
TheMetroMinute
GET SMART
GLOBE FILE
State Police:
The perks
By Matt Rocheleau
GLOBE STAFF
The Massachusetts State Police has faced
widespread scrutiny following a series of revelations of hefty payouts, hidden payroll, and
generous perks for troopers.
Last week, the Globe revealed the state
has failed to pay taxes on tens of millions of
dollars doled out to troopers as part of a daily
$40 perk for driving their own car to work.
The commuting per diem is just one of
many benefits included in the union contract
covering most of the members of the state’s
largest law enforcement agency. Other perks
include:
R Long­distance
commuters: Employees who commute 75
or more miles oneway get $75 each
week.
R Clothing: Employees who work in
“civilian clothing” 10
days or more each
month get a stipend
of $62.50 per month.
R Days off: Employees who work a
five-day workweek
get an extra 17 days
off per year, in order
to be fair with those
who work four days
on duty, then get two
days off.
R Hazard bonus
pay: Staffers get an
annual $700 “hazardous duty bonus.” The
bonus doubled last
year.
R Sick time: Upon
retirement, staffers
can cash in 20 percent of all sick time
unused and accrued
since they started.
R Nights: Those
who work evening or
night shifts earn an
extra $1 per hour.
R On call: Those in
the investigative division, and anyone else
tapped by the colonel,
get an extra $40 each
week for being on
call.
R College courses:
Employees get tuition
reimbursement at
state colleges and
universities, a benefit
that extends to their spouses. Officials from
the troopers’ union, the State Police Association of Massachusetts, did not respond to requests for comment about perks outlined in
the collective bargaining agreement, which is
currently up for renegotiation. State Police
spokesman David Procopio said department
officials “expect negotiations on a new contact
will commence in the near future.”
News of generous State Police compensation has come as other money-related scandals raise questions about the agency’s oversight of taxpayer dollars, including allegations
that 30 troopers put in for hours they never
worked and that the agency’s head of payroll
stole department funds.
News of
generous
State Police
compensa­
tion has come
as other
money­
related
scandals raise
questions
about the
agency’s
oversight of
taxpayer
dollars,
including
allegations
that 30
troopers put
in for hours
they never
worked and
that the
agency’s head
of payroll
stole
department
funds.
JERRY BECK
Artist Jack Welch tested his cardboard paper airplane at the Fitchburg Municipal Airport. Launch date is June 12.
Fitchburg trying for paper plane record
W
By Elise Takahama
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
hen Jerry Beck’s then-8-year-old daughter came home
with a handmade paper airplane one day, he never
thought it would lead him down a path to breaking a
world record. Three years later, his project is just about to
come to fruition.
Beck, the founder of Fitchburg’s Revolving Museum — a collaborative
public art organization — and a team of more than 3,000 children, artists,
engineers, and residents from the region plan to launch the world’s largest
paper airplane on June 12 at the Fitchburg Municipal Airport.
The goal is to break a Guinness World Record — and remind the community of Fitchburg’s paper-making history.
“Everyone seemed real excited about building a paper airplane,” Beck
said. “It’s one of those activities that you learn early on in life that wows
you, that creates a sense of wonder. It’s the miracle of flight.”
The body of the 64-foot-long plane is mainly fashioned out of corrugated
cardboard — strong, 1-inch-thick material with a honeycomb-like inside —
while the outside is plastered with handmade art projects made of everything from old newspapers to hand-painted postcards to music sheets,
Beck said. It’s also made in part with rolls of donated paper from Fitchburg’s Crocker Technical Papers, a historic, once-famed mill that closed its
doors in 2015.
The current record-holder is a 59.7-foot paper plane crafted by German
engineers in 2013.
‘The question before the
court is not whether the
defendant’s actions in
aiding and abetting efforts
to demonize, intimidate,
and injure LGBTI people
in Uganda constitute
violations of international
law. They do.’
US DISTRICT JUDGE MICHAEL A.
PONSOR, writing about GOP gubernatorial
candidate Scott Lively.
Elise Takahama can be reached atelise.takahama@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter@elisetakahama.
AROUND THE REGION
AU G USTA, M A I NE
CA P E CO D
Advocates sue to force
Medicaid expansion
Sagamore lane closures Baker seeks US help
to end by this Friday
after March Nor’easter
Advocates filed a lawsuit Monday to force Governor Paul LePage’s administration to roll out Medicaid expansion as voters demanded in November. A legal aid group, health organizations and
individuals who could receive Medicaid coverage
filed a suit in state court against Maine’s Department of Health and Human Services and Ricker
Hamilton, its commissioner. LePage, a Republican, missed an April 3 deadline under the voterapproved law to file a federal application for
Maine to eventually receive about $525 million
in annual federal funding to expand Medicaid.
The lack of action has left funding to expand
Medicaid to upward of 70,000 low-income Mainers in limbo. Lawmakers return to work Wednesday to address LePage’s vetoes but have no plans
to address a bill to fulfill the governor’s demand
of providing $3.8 million from Maine’s general
fund for staffers to handle Medicaid expansion.
The expansion would apply to residents who
earn up to 138 percent of the federal poverty limit, about $28,000 for a family of three. (AP)
Sagamore Bridge lane closures that snarled Cape
Cod traffic well ahead of tourist season will wrap
up three weeks early. The US Army Corps of Engineers, which maintains the bridge, on Monday
said an ongoing refurbishment project that limited traffic to one lane each way will end by this
Friday at the latest. The project was originally expected to last until May 25, the Friday before Memorial Day — a schedule risked interfering with
a weekend that, for many, is the start of summer
travel season. Instead, the bridge will return to
four lanes just as the weather is finally warming
up. Motorists have seen long delays during the
bridge project, which began in early April. The
Army Corps says the work is necessary for “maintaining the structural integrity” of the bridge,
which is more than 80 years old. The other crossing to the peninsula over the Cape Cod Canal, the
Bourne Bridge, will also undergo similar work in
late summer and through the fall. That work is
scheduled to last several weeks longer than the
Sagamore project, and has sparked concerns
from tourism industry officials.
Matt Rocheleau can be reached at
matthew.rocheleau@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @mrochele
QUOTE OF THE DAY
The team, which includes students and faculty from Fitchburg State
University, Fitchburg High School, McKay Arts Academy, and Boston University’s College of Fine Arts, tackled a range of issues in creating their artwork, addressing topics such as bullying and violence in the workplace,
racism, global warming, ecology, women’s rights, and state history.
“The timing of this has come at a point where there’s such derisiveness
in America, and there’s a lot of issues that are really impacting kids. . . . We
want to emphasize that it’s not just art about art,” Beck said. “It’s art about
change.”
The project, called Project Soar, began to take form after Beck and his
daughter did some research on the city’s relationship with paper, discovering that Fitchburg was once one of the largest paper-making cities in the
United States, with a row of mills along the Nashua River.
“So we set a goal of 5,000 people to make the world’s largest paper airplane and try to ignite a new renaissance of community building, working
collaboratively, and dealing with both social and personal issues,” he said.
“We wanted to get as many people involved of all ages, backgrounds, and
abilities to build a sense of pride so that Fitchburg could be on the world
map again.”
The plane will launch off a specially designed trailer pulled by a truck.
The team will then bring the plane to a handful of the state’s airports. After
that, it will be permanently located in Fitchburg.
BOSTO N
Governor Charlie Baker on Monday asked the
federal government to formally declare the
March Nor’easter that ripped through the state’s
coastline a major disaster, a move that, if approved, could potentially open state and local
agencies to millions of dollars in federal aid. The
storm left two people dead and caused at least
$23.8 million in damage across six counties, Baker wrote in a letter to President Trump and the
Federal Emergency Management Agency. The
Nor’easter walloped the state starting March 2,
and at its height, left nearly 450,000 homes and
businesses in the dark. It brought wind gusts
that reached 97 miles per hour and destroyed or
seriously damaged nearly 150 homes, Baker said.
Quincy alone endured $10 million in damage,
and two neighborhoods were cut off from the
rest of the city for four days, according to the
governor. If Trump declares the storm a major
disaster, state and local governments, and certain private nonprofit organizations would be
able to have 75 percent of their eligible storms
costs reimbursed.
POLICE BLOTTER
R DOMESTIC VIOLENCE A Boston woman allegedly broke into her former girlfriend’s vehicle Sunday night in Randolph and then drove over her
twice, leaving the victim with leg injuries, prosecutors said. The allegations were disclosed Monday during the arraignment of Jessica Bruno, 32,
in Quincy District Court. Her lawyer, Patrick M.
Gioia, said Bruno “categorically denies” striking
the woman on purpose, adding that Bruno called
911 and waited for police to arrive during the incident, which occurred shortly after 11:20 p.m.
on Avalon Drive. Bruno was arraigned Monday
on charges of assault and battery on a household
or family member, assault and battery with a
dangerous weapon, and breaking and entering
into a vehicle. She was held without bail pending
a dangerousness hearing slated for May 7. A not
guilty plea was entered on her behalf. Assistant
Norfolk District Attorney Christine Billingsley
said during the brief hearing that Bruno allegedly forced her way into the woman’s apartment,
where a struggle ensued before Bruno was re-
moved from the property. Then, Billingsley said,
the woman and another witness saw Bruno inside the woman’s small Ford SUV with all the
doors open. The woman confronted Bruno, who
allegedly drove over her with the front tires,
stopped, and then drove over her again with the
rear tires, according to Billingsley. The victim’s
condition wasn’t immediately available Monday.
R MOTORCYCLE DEATH A 26-year-old Easton
man died Sunday evening after he was thrown
from his motorcycle in a multivehicle crash in
Quincy, police said. Nicholas Lombardi was traveling down Quincy Avenue near Howard Street
at 7:27 p.m. when he collided with a car, Quincy
police said in a statement, which stated he was
traveling at a high rate of speed. Lombardi was
“wallowing” — meaning he didn’t have control of
the vehicle — when he slammed into the car and
flew from his motorcycle, which then hit another
car, Quincy Police Captain John Dougan said. No
one else was hurt. Lombardi was taken to South
Shore Hospital, where he died of internal injuries, police said.
R BOY’S BODY FOUND The body of a 4-year-old
New Hampshire boy who was washed away by a
wave in North Carolina last week was found on
Monday, police said. Wesley Belisle, of Manchester, was swept away on Wednesday afternoon in Kitty Hawk, where he was vacationing
with his family, police in the town said in a statement. Police said his body was located at Carova
Beach, over 30 miles away. Belisle’s family is
making arrangements for his body to be transported back to New Hampshire. Police Chief Joel
C. Johnson said in a Facebook post Wednesday
evening that the boy was walking along the shore
with his mother when he was “carried away by
the current.” Over 50 police officers helped
search for Belisle in helicopters, Jet Skis, and
boats, Johnson said on Wednesday, but efforts
were made difficult by rough sea conditions.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
Woman allegedly lured teen into prostitution before slaying
Faces murder,
other charges
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
DEDHAM — A young Lowell woman lured 19-year-old
Reina Rodriguez into prostitution with the promise of money, but later conspired with
two men to rob her at a Braintree hotel, in a scheme that resulted in Rodriguez’s death,
prosecutors said
Monday.
Assistant Norfolk District Attorney
Lisa Beatty laid out
Reina Rodriguez the chilling allegadied in 2017.
tions during the arraignment of Juana
Rivera, 19, in Norfolk Superior
Court on murder and other
charges stemming from the
death of Rodriguez. She was
found naked from the waist up
with her hands and legs bound
by cellphone cords on June 22,
2017 inside a Hyatt Place Hotel room in Braintree, according to prosecutors.
Rodriguez’s mother, Sigryd
Garcia, told reporters after the
hearing that she hopes Rivera
lives “a miserable life” behind
bars for her alleged role in the
murder.
“She took the life of my
daughter,” an emotional Garcia said.
She added that her daughter had “a very good heart. She
was a beautiful girl.”
Beatty said Rivera initially
promised to show Rodriguez,
a former Lawrence resident
who was homeless, how to
make “a lot of money” through
prostitution.
But “significant animosity
and conflict” developed between the two, and Rivera allegedly hatched a plan with
two codefendants, Kentavious
Coleman and Kenyonte Galmore, to rob Rivera inside the
hotel room on the night of her
death.
A s tatement of the case
filed by prosecutors said Rivera became angry when Jason
McLeod, an alleged pimp who
took proceeds from Rodriguez’s sex work and who previously had a relationship with
Rivera, began a relationship
with Rodriguez.
On the day of the murder,
Rivera, posing as a client, set
up a meeting with Rodriguez
via text message and passed
along Rodriguez’s room number to Galmore, the filing said.
A witness identified only as
J.J. told a grand jury that after
the killing, Rivera confronted
Coleman and Galmore, who
claimed that “the victim struggled so they had to smother
her until she died,” the document said.
The medical examiner determined that Rodriguez died
from “homicidal asphyxia,” according to the filing.
Prosecutors said Galmore’s
DNA profile was found on a
GREG DERR/THE PATRIOT LEDGER
Juana Rivera pleaded not guilty to all charges Monday at Norfolk Superior Court. She is
accused of conspiring with two men in a scheme that resulted in Reina Rodriguez’s death.
cellphone cord that bound Rodriguez’s legs, in a red-brown
stain on the bed, and in Rodriguez’s finger nail clippings.
Galmore and Coleman are
in custody in Mississippi and
will be brought back to Massachusetts to face murder charges in the slaying, prosecutors
said.
Hotel surveillance footage
showed Coleman entering the
lobby with Galmore before the
murder, and a hotel clerk saw
them leave the lobby separately, according to prosecutors.
McLeod was arrested Friday in Maine and faces human
trafficking charges in connection with the case, officials
said.
“Defendant McLeod told
investigators that the first person he thought could be responsible [for the killing] was
Defendant Rivera,” the filing
said. “He said he called Defendant Rivera soon after finding
the victim and told her, ‘they
killed my girl.’ ”
Rivera was handcuffed and
wore a beige shirt and pink
pants as she pleaded not guilty
to all charges. She was ordered
held without bail and her next
hearing is scheduled for May
10.
She briefly shut her eyes as
the clerk read out the charges
but showed no obvious signs
of emotion.
Her attorney for the arraignment, John Amabile, did
not address the allegations in
court.
Rodriguez’s older sister,
Sigryd Rachad, also attended
the arraignment and fought
tears as she spoke to reporters
afterward.
“She didn’t get away with
this,” Garcia said of Rivera.
“Justice comes to everyone,
what goes around comes
around. . . . [Rodriguez] was
my best friend, but I know
she’s OK now.”
Marcos Rodriguez, the father of Reina Rodriguez, also
became visibly upset as he discussed the case. His daughter,
he said, loved horseback riding and roller skating.
He said she was “hanging
out with the wrong” crowd at
the time of her death.
“She was very caring,” Marcos Rodriguez said. “That’s all
I can say right now.”
John R. Ellement of the Globe
staff contributed to this report.
Travis Andersen
can be reached at
tandersen@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@TAGlobe.
Slain Maine officer honored; alleged attacker held without bail
By John R. Ellement
GLOBE STAFF
Sheryl Cole lost her husband, Somerset County Deputy Corporal Eugene P. Cole, to
gunfire last week in the small
town in Central Maine where
Cole lived and worked as a law
enforcement officer for the
past 13 years.
In a powerful remembrance
of him, Mrs. Cole wrote on Facebook about the last time she
saw her husband of 41 years
alive, how she spent her time
as police worked for four days
tracking down Cole’s alleged
killer, and how she is preparing for her own “new normal.”
“I am the wife of Corporal
Eugene Cole. I am not a widow
( I a l w ay s t o l d h i m t h e ‘ t i l
death do us part’ thing wasn’t
going to get him out of anything). I am not a victim,” she
wrote. “With the help and support of my family, my community, and my country, I will get
through this. I have to adjust
to what will become the new
normal.”
The alleged shooter, John
D. Williams, was ordered held
without bail during his initial
appearance Monday in an Augusta, Maine, courtroom. Williams was not required to enter a plea. The judge ordered a
mental health examination
and moved the case to Portland to ensure he gets a fair trial.
The Associated Press reported that Williams stared
ahead and quietly answered a
judge’s questions.
Williams is charged with
killing Cole last Wednesday on
a darkened road in Norridgewock, Maine. Officials say the
29-year-old Williams also stole
Cole’s cruiser and robbed a
convenience store. Williams
was captured Saturday outside
a remote cabin after a four-day
manhunt.
A Maine State Police affidavit filed in court Monday said a
police vehicle — it didn’t specify whether it was Cole’s — appeared in the early-morning
hours as friends were drop-
GABOR DEGRE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ping Williams off in front of a
house. Cole’s body was later
found outside the home. The
friends described Williams as
antsy and having body armor
with him.
The document alleged that
Williams confessed the crime
to a friend, but it didn’t clarify
Williams’s motive. A court-appointed defense lawyer told reporters that he wasn’t ready to
discuss specifics of the case.
John
Williams
(left) is
accused in
the fatal
shooting of
Eugene
Cole.
Mrs. Cole wrote in her Facebook post that at times people
who look in her direction will
see the loss she feels about her
husband’s death. “When you
look at me, you may see the
sorrow in my eyes, the reflection of a gold badge with the
number 1312 across it,’’ she
wrote, referring to the badge
number for her husband.
Williams was due in Haverhill District Court later on the
day Cole was shot to death. He
told a friend he did not want to
return to Massachusetts because he feared spending 10
years behind bars if convicted
for an illegal gun possession
charge.
The circumstances of Cole’s
shooting have not been publicly disclosed. The shooting took
place between 1 a.m. and 2
a.m. Williams allegedly then
robbed the store while using
C o l e’s c r u i s e r, w h i c h w a s
found around 5 a.m. on Martin Stream Road, police said.
Cole’s body was found around
7:15 a.m. on the lawn of a
woman in Norridgewock who
helped raise Williams.
In her Facebook posting,
Sheryl Cole did not discuss the
circ umstances of her husband’s death. Instead she foc u s ed o n h ow t h e s up p o r t
from neighbors, strangers, law
enforcement, and her relatives
buoyed her after Cole’s murder, and during the days Williams was on the run. She also
wrote that she read every word
she could find about her husband, with whom she raised
four children to adulthood.
“ The last five days have
been the purest form of hell
and torture,” she wrote. “The
waiting when they couldn’t
find his body, the finality when
they did, and the uncertainty
of the days that followed.”
She added: “I have read every single word. As sad it
makes me, and how hard it is
to read through tears, it touches my heart and gives it that tiny lift it so desperately needs
right now. So to you all — a
heartfelt thank you.”
Visiting hours will be held
Sunday at the Skowhegan Armory in Skowhegan. A celebration of Cole’s life will be held
May 7 at the Cross Insurance
Center in Bangor.
Material from the Associated
Press was used in this report.
John R. Ellement can be
reached at
ellement@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @JREbosglobe.
“MEREDITH IS HILARIOUS, SMART, AND—
AS YOU WILL LEARN—GIVES EXCELLENT
ADVICE WITHOUT JUDGMENT.”
—ALYSSA MASTROMONACO, New York Times bestselling author of Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?
Photo credit: Alex Teng
A disarmingly honest memoir about giving advice when
you’re not sure what you’re doing yourself.
LoveLettersBook.com
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B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Hundreds of students protest response to alleged assault
By Emily Sweeney
GLOBE STAFF
SUDBURY — Hundreds of
students at Lincoln-Sudbury
Regional High School walked
out of class Monday in response to a sexual assault that
allegedly occurred on the campus in November 2013 but did
not come to light until last
week.
The students, who have
criticized the school’s handling
of the alleged assault,
streamed out of the building
and walked to the athletic
fields behind the school,
where they held a moment of
silence and gave speeches.
Katie Kohler, one of the organizers of the rally, said the
turnout was larger than expected.
“ We were blown away by
how many students supported
this,” she said. “I would say
more than half of our school
came out. It just really shows
that the student body is here
to support any victims, any
survivors, and even if the administration doesn’t, the student body does, and I think
that’s really important to show
in our school.”
Sophia Fortunato, one of
the speakers at the rally, said
the walkout brought the issue
of sexual assault to the fore,
and she hoped it would spark
more conversations. “ This
walkout is not the end; this
walkout has to be the beginning of something,” she said.
The protest was planned after the students learned last
week that a former student
filed a federal discrimination
lawsuit against school officials, alleging that they failed
to properly investigate her accusations of sexual assault and
to discipline her alleged attackers. The school system has
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Hundreds of students walked out of Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School Monday to protest the school’s handling of a
sexual assault case. They heard speeches and held a moment of silence behind the school.
responded that school officials
took “prompt and appropriate
action” after the alleged assault, which was investigated
by Sudbury police.
Kristen Schuler Scammon,
the lawyer representing the
former student, said she was
not aware of any criminal
charges filed against the male
students. Sudbury police declined to comment on the case.
Scammon provided a statement that said, “The fact that
the students of Lincoln-Sudbury have responded in this
way to a lawsuit about events
that occurred a few years ago
may reflect a bigger problem
at the school. We support and
appreciate their efforts to
make their school safer for all
students.”
The former student was a
sophomore when she reported
that two male classmates sexually assaulted her during a
football game at the school in
November 2013, according to
the lawsuit. The assault allegedly occurred on some bleachers and in an unlocked shed at
the school’s athletic fields, and
after the girl reported it,
school officials separated the
15-year-old from her classmates, forcing her to sit by
herself in an area where students typically served suspensions and detention, the complaint alleges.
Ciara Conway, one of the
rally organizers, said learning
about the alleged assault from
2013 compelled students to
organize the demonstration.
“It really hit home and made it
personal for all of us,” she said.
Some students who participated in the walkout carried
signs bearing slogans like “No
means no” and “Stop blaming
victims and start holding attackers accountable.”
Lily Neuhaus, another organizer, said the demonstration was emotional.
“I thought it was the best
experience I’ve had at L-S in
my entire life,” said Neuhaus.
“There was so much cheering
. . . I saw people crying.”
After they returned to the
building, Neuhaus said, organizers set up a booth outside
of the cafeteria. There, during
lunchtime, they distributed information about sexual assault
and resources for victims.
They also handed out teal-colored ribbons for students to
wear to show their support for
survivors of sexual assault, she
said.
The district’s superintendent, Bella Wong, said she
thought the students who organized the rally “did a terrific
job.”
“I am very proud of how the
students comported themselves throughout — they were
respectful and attentive to
each other and the speakers,”
she wrote in an e-mail.
In an e-mail to the Globe on
Friday, a lawyer for the school
system said the reported assault was investigated by Sudbury police, school administrators, and employees respons i b l e f o r t h e d i s t r i c t ’s
compliance with Title IX, the
law prohibiting discrimination
on the basis of sex in federally
funded education programs.
The lawyer, John J. Davis,
said the Office for Civil Rights
at the US Department of Education investigated the complaints and found “ ‘insufficient evidence’ to conclude
that the school district had
‘failed to promptly and equitably respond.’ ”
The federal office notified
school officials that it had concluded its investigation in September 2017. Investigators
found that the alleged assault
took place “under the bleachers during a game of truth or
dare,” and that the accused
male students were both given
suspensions.
Laura Crimaldi of the Globe
staff contributed to this report.
Emily Sweeney can be reached
at esweeney@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@emilysweeney.
MBTA picks French firm Transdev to operate its Ride service
uTHE RIDE
Continued from Page B1
that the T had been counting
on.
A r e v i e w b y t h e M B TA
found Global Contact severely
lagged industry standards in
every category of operations,
including quality assurance
and training. The T and Global
Contact initially pledged to fix
the issues, and the company
even fired the general manager
at its Medford office. But in December, the MBTA decided to
move on after continued problems.
“The call center is something I think makes sense and
has the potential to provide
better service and more efficient service,” said Carolyn Villers, executive director of the
Massachusetts Senior Action
Council who often advocates
for Ride users. “Concept and
implementation are sometimes
very different things.”
Approved by the MBTA’s
oversight Monday, the five-year
contract with Transdev will
cost $57.5 million. It is for
more money, but over a longer
term than the one signed with
Global Contact. And the T is
not expecting short-term cost
savings under Transdev, according to the MBTA’s director
of transportation innovation,
Ben Schutzman.
But the system should help
control so-called paratransit
costs over the long term, officials said, while letting the T
experiment with other changes
to the Ride, such as offering
‘We’ll still get efficiencies in the future
without creating disruptions in service.
That’s the balance we want to reach.’
LUIS RAMIREZ, MBTA general manager
more rides through Uber, Lyft,
and taxi services.
“We’ll still get efficiencies in
the future without creating disruptions in service,” MBTA
general manager Luis Ramirez
said. “That’s the balance we
want to reach.”
Although officials say Global Contact was not suited to
run the system, Ramirez has also blamed the agency for failing to monitor the contractor
closely over the service issues.
The problems exposed a persistent and long-term problem for
the T: managing outside contractors.
To keep those issues from
recurring, Ramirez said the
Transdev contract has a more
detailed set of financial penalties, including different fines
based on the length of a delay.
Meanwhile, the T plans to
have staff members more close-
Victim lauded for her generosity, mentoring
uCRASH
Continued from Page A1
The driver, whose name was
not released because he is a juvenile, was charged Monday in
Cambridge Juvenile Court with
operating under the influence
causing serious bodily injury,
leaving the scene of an accident
causing death, operating to endanger, and unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, according to prosecutors.
Prosecutors did not disclose
what drug the driver was found
to be using, saying that is part
of an ongoing investigation.
Moses was a native Bostonian who lived in Brookline
with her husband of 21 years,
Charles Capace, and three
dogs. She was an accomplished
and well-known realtor and a
strong supporter of women’s
causes and animal welfare,
said Michelle Quinn, a colleague at Pathway Home Realty.
“We’re all in such shock,”
Q u i n n s a i d . “ S h e’s j u s t a n
amazing woman. She knows
everybody. Everybody loves
her.”
Moses had just held a fundraiser Friday for two local animal shelters, Quinn said.
“She was all about making
her clients’ lives better, which
is really what realtors are supposed to be doing,” Quinn said.
“She was the real deal.”
Moses initially worked as a
travel agent but felt she wasn’t
being sufficiently challenged,
ly oversee the contractor than
it did at the outset with Global
Contact. The agency discovered that the Ride service under Global Contact improved
once it assigned more employees to help the company.
“We have worked in the last
eight months since I’ve been
here on a lot of improvements
in both how we want to procure new contracts and new
services going forward, and also, in how we want to implement these new contracts moving forward,” Ramirez said.
The T only allowed companies with experience operating
similar systems to apply. Transdev said it runs a similar scheduling and dispatching system
in California’s Bay Area and
Pittsburgh. It was also the run-
News
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ner-up to Global Contact in the
2016 bidding.
“We understand the paratransit software system they
use,” said Dick Alexander, a
Transdev executive vice president. “We use a similar system
in some of our other operations. . . . We come in with a lot
of processes and procedures
and experience we can apply to
this operation.”
In a statement, Global Contact lauded its staff for continuing to operate amid uncertainty about the contrac t , and
wished Transdev “the best of
luck.”
Adam Vaccaro can be reached
at adam.vaccaro@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter at
@adamtvaccaro.
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J.D. CAPELOUTO FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
A memorial was set up at the scene of the fatal accident Sunday in Medford. In addition to
the death of Judith Moses, two other pedestrians were seriously injured.
so she worked nights and
weekends to make the switch
to real estate in the 1980s, according to an article about her
career that ran in Banker &
Tradesmen in 2007, the year
she was chosen to lead the
Women’s Council of Realtors.
“I didn’ t make money at
first but I’m very persistent
once I make up my mind,” Moses told the publication, describing herself as a self-motivated businesswoman.
Capace stood outside his
home Monday and pointed to
the window of the bedroom
where Moses began her business almost 15 years ago.
“She was a woman that
couldn’t be stopped and the en-
ergy coming out of her office
energized the whole house,” he
said. She went on to become a
savvy realtor, with the best inf o r m a t i o n o n t h e m a r ke t ,
neighbors said.
Her husband said she had
changed him the most.
“In every way possible that
you could make a person better, she did that for me,” said
Capace. “I don’t know what I’ll
do without her.”
Earlier Monday, Phyllis
Schacht, a family friend, recalled Moses as generous.
“I have known Charlie and
Judy for many years and can
tell you that Judy was a wonderful person who was loved by
everyone who knew her,” she
wrote. “She enjoyed mentoring, not only other businesswomen but also as a ‘Big Sister’
in the Big Brother-Big Sister organization. She was a loving
‘mother’ to three dogs. Her
family and her many, many
friends miss her terribly.”
Moses was also a member of
the Brookline Rotary Club, the
organization wrote in a tribute
to Moses on Facebook.
“She will be remembered
for her big heart, dedication to
literacy, love of animals, and so
much more . . . ” the Rotary
Club said.
Michael Levenson can be
reached at michael.levenson
@globe.com.
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T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B5
‘I think going up
on TV early gives
people more
information on
Dan and it’s going
to help our voter
outreach.’
DOUG RUBIN
Campaign adviser
Koh gets
an early
start on
TV ads
uKOH
Continued from Page B1
Koh, 33, is running the ads
on cable instead of through the
more-expensive Boston television market. Campaign aides
say that also allows them to specifically target Lowell, Lawrence, and the rest of the district’s 37 cities and towns and
on stations like CNN, MSNBC,
and USA.
“I think going up on TV early
gives people more information
on Dan and it’s going to help
our voter outreach,” Rubin said.
“ When we talk to people at
their doors and talk to them on
the phone, they’re going to
know more about Dan.”
The 24-second spot emphasizes Koh’s Korean and Lebanese roots, his work for Walsh
— including a photo cameo of
the mayor — and his campaign
theme of opposing President
Trump. It opens with him in
Lawrence, and Koh notes he’s
running “in his hometown,” an
apparent effort to underline his
connection to the Third District
amid criticism of his move back
to Andover from Boston for his
campaign.
“I’m ready to stand with you,
to stand up to this president
and fight for the values that
make the American dream possible for all of us,” Koh says in
the video.
Nearly 60 percent of voters
polled in a recent Boston
Globe/UMass Lowell poll said
they are still undecided about
who they would support in the
primary.
But spending big early appeared to help Rufus Gifford, a
former US ambassador to Denmark, who poured nearly
$400,000 into his campaign
through the end of March, including on mailings to prospective voters. The spending was
second only to Koh, who had already spent $524,519 by that
point.
Gifford scored a slim lead in
the poll with 11 percent of support, a sign he was building
name recognition in a district
in which he hadn’t lived before
moving to Concord as part of
his run.
Rubin said the poll results —
Koh had 4 percent — didn’t
push his campaign to go on the
air early; the video, he said, was
shot weeks ago.
But the strategy, especially
in a crowded race, could be a
good one, as long as Koh has
the money to sustain an expensive media campaign, said Tobe
Berkovitz, a political media
consultant and Boston University advertising professor.
“One of the problems running early media is, if you burn
through all of your money,
when it gets to be mid-August
and you really need it, you’re in
trouble,” Berkovitz said. “If he
has plenty of money — and if he
can keep raising money — it’s
really smart to get out early and
avoid all the political clutter.”
Koh’s massive cash advantage has made him a target for
his competitors, who have
knocked him for turning to donors outside the district, and
with business interests in Boston, to help bolster his coffers.
The race as a whole has been
a magnet for money. Lori Trahan, of Westford, was sitting on
$705,000 at the end of March,
Gifford had $504,000, and state
Senator Barbara L’Italien, of
Andover, had $402,000. Beej
Das, of Lowell, also had close to
$400,000 on hand, though he
has also poured $283,744 of his
own money into the race.
Reach Matt Stout at
matt.stout@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @mattpstout.
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
LAST OF THE APRIL SHOWERS — A couple embraced under an umbrella as they waited to cross Boylston Street on the last rainy day of April.
Tuesday’s forecast calls for intervals of clouds with some sunshine with some warmer temperatures on their way. Full report, B9
Baker not sold on supervised injection sites
‘The data is all
there. The
problem is the
stigma.’
uRAMOS
Continued from Page B1
world show reductions in overdoses, HIV infections, and
deaths — they still have not
overcome an amorphous sort of
skepticism here that feels almost Puritan.
“The data is all there,” said
Aubri Esters, a person who uses
drugs who cofounded SIFMA
NOW, a coalition that advocates
for supervised injection facilities. “The problem is the stigma.”
The idea makes people uncomfortable, said Bill Fried, another cofounder of SIFMA
NOW, because it appears to
normalize heroin use. Staffing
and funding injection sites
feels, to some, like rewarding
bad behavior.
The notion that Massachusetts might endorse or even encourage heroin use is potent
and visceral. And the two people perhaps best positioned to
make injection sites happen,
Governor Charlie Baker and
Mayor Marty Walsh — both of
whom have otherwise been
strong advocates for confronting the opioid addiction crisis
— have expressed skepticism.
Walsh, in a statement, said
the sites are federally illegal.
That’s true, but that hasn’t always stopped Massachusetts
from acting. Like, say, offering
to harbor undocumented immigrants inside City Hall.
Baker has said it’s not clear
whether the sites lead people
AUBRI ESTERS,
a drug user who cofounded
SIFMA NOW a coalition that
advocates for supervised
injection facilities
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Harvard medical student Kathleen Koenigs spoke with visitors Monday inside a tent
where the Harvard School of Public Health set up a mock safe injection site.
into treatment. But while it’s
difficult to study the extent to
which safe injection sites lead
directly to recovery, those services are particularly difficult to
access if you’re dead.
Baker has described himself
as “a hard sell” on the idea,
which is frustrating because the
governor has a reputation for
pragmatism.
Injection facilities have been
shown in places like Vancouver,
British Columbia, to save lives,
and have been shown in costbenefit analyses in other American cities to save millions of
dollars annually by offsetting
the alarming costs of emergency care for overdoses, infections, and other costs associated with opioid use.
Instead, intravenous drug
users here are jerry-rigging
their own safer sites, said Esters. That means shooting up in
emergency room bathrooms,
e m e r ge n c y c a l l c o r d s t i e d
around an arm, Esters said, or
using on a sidewalk in plain
sight, a sign asking others to
call for help if they appear to be
unconscious.
“Injection facilities exist al-
ready,” said Kathleen Koenigs, a
Harvard medical student and
member of the Student Coalition on Addiction, which
worked with SIFMA NOW on
Monday’s mock-up.
The reality of opioid use today makes arguments about
whether injection sites are enabling the dangerous actions of
people who use drugs seem
quaint. If people are willing to
use heroin openly on busy Boston sidewalks as the city strolls
by, then who exactly is doing
the enabling?
This same sort of objection
arose in the early days of a similarly pragmatic approach to
homelessness. Housing First, as
that once-radical idea is known,
sought to address chronic
homelessness in the most obvious possible way: by giving people a permanent place to live. It
addressed a confounding problem in a direct way, and was
similarly cost-effective, even if
it wasn’t perfect and didn’t
work for everyone.
Likewise, safe injection sites
are not some sort of panacea.
Nor do they claim to be. Rather,
they are a small part of whole
network. Of course we should
focus our resources on recovery
services. We need more recovery beds and transitional treatment and on-the-ground counseling.
But those services only work
on people who are alive.
Nestor Ramos can be reached at
nestor.ramos@globe.com.
Former inmate seeks compensation in rape case
uO'LOUGHLIN
Continued from Page B1
pected witnesses will be the victim, now in her 40s, who will
testify that she still believes
O’Loughlin was her assailant,
according to Assistant Attorney
General Abigail Fee.
“She did not doubt it then,
she hasn’t doubted it since, and
she does not doubt it today,’’
Fee said. “He must first meet
his burden of proof.”
O’Loughlin’s fight for exoneration was first chronicled by
the New England Center for Investigative Reporting in a story
published in The Boston Globe
two years ago. After evidence
that O’Loughlin’s conviction
may have been a case of mistaken identity, a Middlesex Superior Court judge vacated his conviction. Prosecutors decided
not to refile charges, saying
new evidence “casts real doubt
on the justice of the conviction,” court records show.
In December, the Framingham Police Department, which
was also sued by O’Loughlin,
settled for $900,000, according
to court records.
Problems with O’Loughlin’s
case were first discovered by a
Framingham police detective,
now retired, who learned that a
man who looked like O’Loughlin had been found guilty of
several sexual offenses before
and after the 1982 rape.
The man, identified in court
as Jeffrey Bartley, is currently
incarcerated on other charges.
Bartley was convicted of rape
in 1985, of open and gross
lewdness in 1980 and 1981 and
of charges related to child pornography in 2012, according to
the Se x O ffen der Regis tr y
Board.
On Monday, Kevin Slattery,
the retired police detective,
told jurors that he knew
O’Loughlin growing up, but
wasn’t close to him. He grew interested in the case after noticing that Bartley looked “remarkably” like O’Loughlin.
Slattery said he realized that
Bartley had also been convicted
of a 1994 rape of a 14-year-old
girl that had eerie similarities
to the 1982 sexual assault. In
that case, Bartley had threatened the victim with a knife
and used a sock to gag her, he
testified.
Slattery explained how he
drew a map of places Bartley
had been charged for criminal
offensesnear the home of the
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Kevin O’Loughlin waits for the jury to be seated Monday in
Suffolk Superior Court.
1982 rape. Jurors also heard an
interview Slattery conducted
with Bartley, in which the convicted sex offender said he
wasn’t sure if he committed the
1982 rape because he would
drink to the point of blacking
out.
“They are too similar for it
to be a coincidence,’’ he said on
the taped interview. “It is more
than likely that I did” it, he
said.
O’Loughlin’s sister Kathy
Beevers, also from Texas, testi-
fied Monday that she was with
her brother at home the night
of the crime and had woken
him up around 7 p.m. from a
nap. Incarceration changed her
brother permanently, she said.
“He wasn’t even Kevin,’’ she
said. “It’s like you take someone’s soul and rip it out. It was
devastating to see.”
Fee questioned whether
Beevers’ memory changed over
time to support his alibi. In previous testimony, Beevers said
she may have woken up her
brother earlier, Fee said.
Although O’Loughlin’s compensation claim was not discussed in court, the state also is
fighting it on the basis that he
already received a settlement
from Framingham and under
state law can’t recover duplicate damages. Prosecutors also
argue that he doesn’t qualify
for the raised cap on compensation, saying it is not retroactive.
The changes to the 2004 law
came after public defenders,
advocates, and former inmates
complained it set an unreasonable bar to acquire compensation, forcing many to settle
rather than fight a costly legal
battle. As of last fall, 67 people
had filed for compensation and
less than half had received any
money, according to state data.
The average payout was
$364,228.
O’Loughlin is expected to
continue his testimony on
Tuesday.
The New England Center for
Investigative Reporting is a
nonprofit news center based
out WGBH public radio and
Boston University. Jenifer
McKim can be reached at
jenifer.mckim@necir.org.
T h e
B6
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CHIARALUCE, Mary N.
(Bruni)
BY CITY AND TOWN
AVON
SHOPOV, John T.
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BRENNAN, Ernest J.
MacDONALD, Paul M., Jr.
BOSTON
FOLEY, William C.
MASCELLUTI, Patricia
McKINNELL, Jane D’Esopo
SHOPOV, John T.
SUAREZ, Patrice M. (Stivers)
YORK, Carl E., Jr.
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GOLDFARB, Maureen Anne (Costello)
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McKINNON, Sean R.
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SUAREZ, Patrice M. (Stivers)
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READING
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REVERE
IACOVIELLO, Florence M. (Giordano)
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SHOPOV, John T.
SOUTH BOSTON
WRICK, Marie E. (Higgins)
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VACHON, Raymond P.
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D’AMBROSIO, Angelo R.
SUNDSTROM, Warren E.
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SUAREZ, Patrice M. (Stivers)
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PACEWICZ, Patricia A. (Dagle)
WILSON, Thomas M. III
LYNNFIELD
McKINNON, Sean R.
MALDEN
DALEY, David A.
IACOVIELLO, Florence M. (Giordano)
MacDONALD, Paul M., Jr.
MARBLEHEAD
McKINNON, Sean R.
MARLBOROUGH
EAGLES, Jeanne Frances (Tucker)
MATTAPAN
GALLIVAN, Marion F.
MEDFORD
DALEY, David A.
PACEWICZ, Patricia A. (Dagle)
PIZZI, Antonio
MELROSE
D’AMBROSIO, Angelo R.
FERGUSON, Peter J., Jr.
METHUEN
D’AMBROSIO, Angelo R.
VACHON, Raymond P.
MILTON
FOLEY, William C.
LAWTON, Robert R. “Bob”
PECK, Russell F., Sr., Esq.
WALPOLE
CHICK, Parker N., Jr.
GALLIVAN, Marion F.
WALTHAM
BRENNAN, Ernest J.
SCHIAVONE, Ralph G.
WAYLAND
LEVISON, Muriel J. (Greenblatt)
WELLESLEY
BALBONI, Karen M. (Hagman)
WEST ROXBURY
SHOPOV, John T.
WESTON
BALBONI, Karen M. (Hagman)
WESTWOOD
GOLDFARB, Maureen Anne (Costello)
WEYMOUTH
O’CONNELL, Daniel J.
PECK, Russell F., Sr., Esq.
WILMINGTON
CHIARALUCE, Mary N. (Bruni)
WINCHESTER
PERRONE, Frank
SUNDSTROM, Warren E.
WINTHROP
McKINNON, Sean R.
OUT OF STATE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
WILSON, Thomas M. III
FLORIDA
GOLDFARB, Maureen Anne (Costello)
PERRONE, Frank
MAINE
YORK, Carl E., Jr.
MINNESOTA
PARKER, Sean D.
NEW HAMPSHIRE
VACHON, Raymond P.
NATICK
BALBONI, Karen M. (Hagman)
NEW YORK
LEVISON, Muriel J. (Greenblatt)
NEEDHAM
BALBONI, Karen M. (Hagman)
TENNESSEE
IACOVIELLO, Florence M. (Giordano)
ANTCZAK, Angelina J.
(Curcio)
BALBONI, Karen M.
(Hagman)
Of Chelsea, on April 29th. Beloved wife
of the late Wallace J. Antczak, having
shared 64 years of marriage. Devoted
mother of Josephine Stanton of Roslindale, Patricia Burge and her husband
John of Chelsea, the late Thomas W.
Antczak and Francis M., survived by his
wife Mary “Molly” Antczak of Reading.
Dear Sister of Henrietta Iebba of Chelsea, Lucy McGrath of Revere, the late
Mary Testa, Rico, Anthony, Edward and
Robert Curcio. Cherished grandmother
of Amy Isbell and her husband Peter
of Reading, Michael Antczak and his
wife Roseann of New Jersey, Thomas
Antczak and his wife Jennifer of
Wilmington, Andrew Antczak and his
wife Sarah of Andover, John T. Burge
and his wife Natasha of West Newbury,
Robert Burge and his wife Allison of
New Hampshire, Tricia Stanton of
Roslindale and Mary Stanton of Maine.
Also survived by 11 great grandchildren
and her nephew Armand Iebba and his
wife Gail of Wakefield.
Visiting Hours: Wednesday, May
2nd, from 4 - 8 P.M. at the Frank A.
Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, 718
Broadway, CHELSEA. Relatives and
friends are most kindly invited to attend. Funeral from the Welsh Funeral
Home on Thursday, May 3rd, at 9:00
A.M., followed by a Funeral Mass at St.
Michael The Archangel Chapel (Chelsea
Soldiers Home) 91 Crest Ave., Chelsea
at 10:00 A.M. Services will conclude
with Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery,
Everett. Funeral Home fully handicap
accessible, ample parking opposite
Funeral Home. Should friends desire,
contributions in her memory may be
made to the “Poor Clare Nuns”, Franciscan Monastery of Saint Clare, 920
Centre St., Jamaica Plain, MA 02130.
For directions or to send expressions of
sympathy, please visit
www.WelshFuneralHome.com
Of Natick, April 28. Former wife of
Thomas D. Balboni. Loving mother
of Tina M. Natale and her husband
Stephen of Glen Allen, VA, Brian J.
Balboni of Natick, Michael T. Balboni
of Wellesley. Loving grandmother of
Kenzlie, Joseph, and Gino. Sister of
the late Judith Allen. Services private.
Expressions of sympathy may be made
in Karen’s memory to the American
Cancer Society, 30 Speen St., Framingham 01701. For guest book
www.gfdoherty.com
Frank A. Welsh & Sons
Chelsea, 617-889-2723
CHICK, Parker N., Jr.
STONEHAM
McINTYRE, James E.
VACHON, Raymond P.
EAST BOSTON
WILSON, Thomas M. III
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley (781) 235-4100
BRENNAN, Ernest J.
Of Belmont, April 25, 2018.
Beloved husband of Loretta
B. Brennan (Deon). Loving
father of Ernest J. Brennan II, Cindy
Mello and Mark Brennan. Brother of
Mary Brennan, Butchie Bennett and
the late George, Jackie and Tommy.
Also survived by many nieces and
nephews. Visiting hours will be held in
the Brown & Hickey Funeral Home, 36
Trapelo Road, BELMONT on Wednesday, May 2nd from 4:00 - 7:00 PM.
Burial will be private. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in his memory
to https://www.afas.org. Late U. S. Air
Force Veteran. Online guest book at
www.brownandhickey.com
Funeral Services
CANNIFF MONUMENT
323-3690
(617)
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
FERGUSON, Peter J., Jr.
Of Wakefield, April 29, 2018, at age
75. Beloved husband of Beverly A.
(LeBlanc) D’Ambrosio with whom he
shared 54 years of marriage. Devoted father of Lisa M. Dente & her
husband David of Wakefield, Joseph
G. D’Ambrosio & his wife Terri of
Methuen, and Laurie A. Roy & her
husband Stephen of Wakefield. Dear
brother of Linda Papa & her husband
David of E. Hampstead, NH, Mark
D’Ambrosio of Manchester, NH, Ann
D’Ambrosio of Quincy, and the late
Joseph D’Ambrosio, Jr. Also survived by
5 grandchildren, 1 great-granddaughter
& several nieces and nephews. Relatives & friends will gather in honor of
Angelo’s life during visiting hours at the
Robinson Funeral Home, 809 Main St.,
MELROSE on Wednesday, May 2 from
4-8pm, and again on Thursday at 9am
before leaving in procession to Most
Blessed Sacrament Church, 1155 Main
St., Wakefield for his Funeral Mass
at 10am. Interment at Puritan Lawn
Memorial Park, Peabody. For more info:
RobinsonFuneralHome.com
Of Quincy, formerly of Melrose & Lynn,
April 29, 2018. Loving son of Maureen
E. (Clifford) Ferguson of Lynn & Peter
J. Ferguson, Sr. of Leominster. Caring
brother of David Ferguson of Rehoboth,
JoEllen Solano & her husband Kenny
of Melrose and Mackenzie Ferguson
of CA. Soulmate of Karin Pendergast
of Quincy. Also survived by nieces,
nephews, relatives & friends. Visiting
hours will be held at the Gately Funeral
Home, 79 W. Foster St., MELROSE on
Friday, May 4th from 4-8 PM. Procession from the Gately Funeral Home
on Saturday, May 5th at 8:45 AM,
followed by a Mass of Christian Burial
in the Church of the Incarnation, 425
Upham St., Melrose at 10 AM. Relatives
& friends respectfully invited to attend.
Burial in Wyoming Cemetery, Melrose.
For directions & to sign online condolence, visit: www.gatelyfh.com.
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose
(781) 665-1900
SOMERVILLE
CHIARALUCE, Mary N. (Bruni)
SUDBURY
PARKER, Sean D.
HAVERHILL
KNODEL, Patricia A.
Cota Family Funeral Homes And
Cremation Service
North Reading
781-944-1765 978-664-4340
ROWLEY
IACOVIELLO, Florence M. (Giordano)
DOVER
BALBONI, Karen M. (Hagman)
HANSON
PIZZI, Antonio
Of Somerville, April 28th. Beloved wife
of the late Raymond Chiaraluce. Mother
of Diane DiPhillipo and her husband
Fred, Raymond Chiaraluce and his
wife Wanda, Rosanne Angelo and her
husband Andrew and the late Rosemarie Chiaraluce. Grandmother of eight,
great grandmother of sixteen and great
great grandmother of one. Sister of the
late Elena Silva, Beatrice, Umberto,
and Rico Chiaraluce. Also survived by
many loving nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are most respectfully
invited to attend a Funeral Mass at St.
Ann’s Church, 339 Medford St., Somerville on Thursday, at 11 am. Visitation
at the Cota Funeral Home, 335 Park St.
(corner of Park St. and Rte. 28) NORTH
READING, at Reading line, on Wednesday, 5-8 pm. Interment at Cambridge
Cemetery, Cambridge.
www.cotafuneralhomes.com.
D’AMBROSIO, Angelo R.
Parker Newhall Chick, Jr.,
85, of Chatham, passed
away peacefully on Thursday, April 26, 2018 after a long illness.
He was the beloved husband of Priscilla
(Freeman) Chick for over 64 years. He
is predeceased by his parents Parker
Chick, Sr. & Katharine (Pearson) Chick,
and his beloved brother Peter Chick of
Tacoma, WA.
He was born in Cambridge, MA on
June 12, 1932. He attended Walpole
public schools and graduated from Walpole High School in 1951. He attended
New Hampton Preparatory School and
Wentworth Institute of Technology. He
then served in the United States Coast
Guard from 1953 to 1956.
Parker raised his family in Norwood
MA, Darien, CT, and Walpole MA. He
was a very active member of Epiphany
Episcopal Church in Walpole, serving
on the Vestry. He pursued his love of
community theatre through the Walpole Footlighters.
He began his long-time career working with diesel engines for Cummins
Engines Inc. He finished his career
retiring in 1996 from the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles as the
Manager of Document Control. He and
Priscilla retired to Chatham, MA. It
was then that he began to pursue his
love of the ocean and boating. He was
a member of the waterways committee
for the town of Chatham and an active
member of the Allen Harbor Yacht Club
in Harwich Port.
Parker loved his volunteer work.
He volunteered building houses with
Habitat for Humanity of Cape Cod. He
was a 50-year member of the Lions
Club. In addition, he volunteered with
the Chatham Drama Guild and the
Chatham Food Pantry. Besides his
family, his next biggest love was for
his church, St. Christopher’s Episcopal
Church in Chatham. There he served on
many committees including the vestry,
the Friday night grill, and the Gift and
Consignment Shop.
Parker was a warm and generous
friend to all. He was always ready and
willing to help others. He loved all
dogs and animals. He was beloved by
his family and friends for his warmth,
generosity, and especially his playful
sense of humor.
Besides his wife Priscilla, of
Chatham, he is survived by his children: Candace Chick & Mark Jalbert
of Dorchester, MA; Penelope Chick &
Rory Rothman of Ithaca, NY; and Pam
(Chick) & Dan Paterson of Westwood,
MA. He is also survived by 6 grandchildren: Kate, Oliver, Jade, Kyle, Emily,
Hannah, and his precious grand-dog
Murphy. Parker was also very fond of
his many nephews and nieces, and
their extended families.
Visitation will be from 4 to 7pm on
Friday, May 4th at Nickerson Funeral
Home, 87 Crowell Road in CHATHAM.
The Funeral Service will be held at 11
AM on Saturday, May 5th at St. Christopher’s Episcopal Church, 625 Main
St. Chatham. Burial will be private at a
later date.
Memorial donations may be made
to: St. Christopher’s Church, 625 Main
St, Chatham MA 02633, or Habitat for
Humanity of Cape Cod, 411 Main St.,
Suite 6, Yarmouth Port, MA 02675.
For online condolences, please visit
http://www.nickersonfunerals.com
DALEY, David A.
David A. Daley, of Malden,
April 29th. Beloved husband of Ann L. (Hamner)
Daley. Father of Diane Ruelle and her
husband John and David Daley and his
wife Valerie, all of Malden. Grandfather
of Kristina and her husband Todd, Danielle and her husband Rich, and Kiley.
Great grandfather of Jayden. He is also
survived by several nieces and nephews. David was raised and educated in
Malden. He served his country honorably in the United States Air Force during the Korean War. David worked as
a meat cutter at Purity Supreme, Stop
& Shop and the First National Stores
for over 50 years. He was also an avid
bowler and coin collector. Relatives &
friends are invited to attend visiting
hours at the Breslin Funeral Home,
610 Pleasant St., MALDEN on Tuesday,
May 1st from 4-8 PM and again on
Wednesday, May 2nd for a funeral
service conducted at 11 AM. Services
will conclude with interment in Forest
Dale Cemetery in Malden.
Gately Funeral Home
781-665-1949
FOLEY, William C.
Of Milton, April 29, 2018. Beloved husband of Natalie (White) Foley and the
late Adele (Darcy) Foley. Loving father
of William C. Foley Jr. of Dorchester,
Step-Father of John (Jay) Faherty of E.
Bridgewater, Elizabeth Mittl of MD and
Natalie Bondar of Dedham. Brother of
Rev. Thomas Foley of Regina Cleri, Bernard of Delaware, Richard of Canton
and the late John, James, Francis Foley
and Barbara Pickering. Also survived by
several grandchildren, nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated in St. Elizabeth Church,
Milton, Thursday at 10AM. Relatives
and Friends invited. Visiting hours
from the Dolan Funeral Home, 460
Granite Ave., MILTON on Wednesday
4 - 8 PM. Interment Milton Cemetery.
Donations in Bill’s memory may be
made to the Adele Foley Scholarship
Fund, c/o Francis Ouimet Scholarship
Fund, 300 Arnold Palmer Blvd, Norton,
MA 02766. For information, directions
and online guest book
www.dolanfuneral.com
GALLIVAN, Marion F.
Breslin Funeral Home
(781) 324-0486
www.breslinfuneralhome.com
EAGLES, Jeanne Frances
(Tucker)
88, a lifelong resident of Stoughton,
died peacefully at Sunrise of Norwood
on Saturday, April 28, 2018, after a
period of failing health. She was the
devoted wife of the late Donald A.
Eagles for over 60 years. Born in Boston
on August 13, 1929, Jeanne was the
daughter of the late John and Mary
Tucker. She graduated from Stoughton High School and was a dedicated
mother and homemaker. For over a
decade, Jeanne worked for the Stoughton Public Schools Food Service. She
enjoyed reading the daily newspaper,
clipping coupons, watching game
shows and always looked out for others.
Her greatest joy was spending time
with her family.
She was the beloved mother of Donald & his wife Barbara of NH, Robert
& his wife Karen of Bridgewater, Gary
& his fiance Cyndi Stepp of Stoughton,
Scott & his wife Sue of Canton, Jay &
his wife Valerie of Marlborough and
Sherri & her husband Raymond Berry
of Stoughton. She was the grandmother
of Peter, Paul, Amanda, Brian, Jake,
Angelina, Kyle, Jenna and Abby, as well
as great-grandmother of Violet. She was
the sister of Anne Andrews, Elizabeth
Switzer and Virginia St. Germain and
the late Mary Connolly and Dorothy
Sellars. She is also survived by many
nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend the funeral
from the Farley Funeral Home (www.
farleyfh.com), 358 Park St. (Rt. 27)
STOUGHTON on Thursday, May 3rd
at 9 AM followed by a Funeral Mass at
Immaculate Conception Church, 122
Canton St., Stoughton at 10 AM. Visiting hours will be held on Wednesday,
May 2nd from 4-8 PM. Interment will
take place at Evergreen Cemetery,
Stoughton. The family extends warm
thanks to the staff of Sunrise of Norwood and Compassionate Care Hospice
for their wonderful care and support.
Donations in Jeanne’s memory may be
made to the American Cancer Society at
www.cancer.org.
Of Dedham, Walpole and originally of
Mattapan, passed peacefully on April
28, surrounded by her loving family
at the age of 95. Daughter of the late
Patrick and Molly (O’Shea) Gallivan.
Cherished sister of Edward Gallivan
and his wife Margaret of Yarmouthport,
the late James Gallivan and his late
wife Mary, the late Charles Gallivan and
his surviving wife Maureen and the
late Patricia (Gallivan) Cronin and her
husband the late John F. “Jake” Cronin,
Jr. all of Dedham. Loving and devoted
“Aunt Marion” of her “perfect” nieces:
Kathleen Moser, Maryellen McHugh,
Maryann Gallivan, Patricia McNamara,
Mary Kate Haswell, Elizabeth Duggan
and her “perfect” nephews: Patrick,
Mark, Joseph, Michael, Stephen, Paul,
Edward, John, James and Brian Gallivan and Kevin and John Cronin and
all their spouses and partners; and also
survived by many loving grandnieces,
grandnephews and friends. Retired kindergarten teacher for the Boston Public
Schools and proud Boston College
graduate class of 1968 who would have
celebrated her 50th reunion this year.
Funeral from the Alexander F. Thomas
& Sons Funeral Home, 45 Common St.,
WALPOLE, Thursday morning at 9, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at
Blessed Sacrament Church, Walpole, at
10. Visiting hours Wednesday evening
from 4-8 at the funeral home. Relatives
and friends invited. Interment at St.
Joseph Cemetery, West Roxbury. Please,
at the family’s request, in lieu of flowers, all donations can be made to www.
bostonpartners.org or www.jdrf.org.
For directions and guestbook, please
visit: thomasfuneralhomes.com
Alexander F. Thomas and Sons FH
Walpole 508-668-0154
GOLDFARB, Maureen Anne
(Costello)
75, from Falmouth, and most recently
Palm Coast, FL, passed away April
28, 2018. Born August 19, 1942 to
the late Robert and Anne Costello,
she was a graduate of A.B. Davis High
School, Class of 1960. In her early
working years, she was employed as
a showroom model in the Garment
Center and as a flight attendant for
United Airlines. She also held a position
as a community liaison for patients at
Medfield & Westboro State Hospitals,
and simultaneously developed the first
visitation pet program and a thrift shop
for patients and staff called “Confetti.”
She then went on to become the Director of Development & Volunteer Services for MA Hospital School for over
20 years. In addition, she managed
Falmouth Vacation Rentals and worked
in merchandising for HomeGoods in
Falmouth. Predeceased by her husband
Burt. She is survived by her children,
Kevin Goldfarb (Bonnie Bystrek)
of Somerville, and Jennifer Draper
(Jeffrey) of Westwood, grandchildren
Nicholas and MacKenzie, and many
loving cousins and wonderful friends.
A memorial service will be held on
Friday, May 4, at 11:00 a.m. at Gillooly
Funeral Home, 126 Walpole St. (Rte.
1A), NORWOOD, MA, followed by an
urn committal at New Westwood Cemetery. Visiting hours will precede the
service from 9-11:00 a.m. at the funeral
home. The family would be honored
to have donations made in their mom’s
name to People For Cats, 44 Beagle Ln,
Teaticket, MA 02536 where she volunteered for many years or the Stanley R.
Tippett Hospice Home, 920 South St.,
Needham, MA 02492 where they took
such wonderful care of mom in her last
few weeks.
Gillooly Funeral Home
Norwood 781-762-0174
www.gilloolyfuneralhome.com
IACOVIELLO, Florence M.
(Giordano)
Of Revere, formerly of Chelsea, April
29, 2018, at age 99. Wife of the late
Frank J. Iacoviello. Beloved mother
of Rosemary Oakley and her husband
David of TN, Margaret “Maggie” Fay
of Chelsea, Frank J. Iacoviello and
his wife Kathleen of Rowley, Wayne
Iacoviello of Malden, John Iacoviello
and his wife Lourdes of CA and the late
Charles Iacoviello. Mother-in-law of
Ruth Iacoviello and the late Thomas
Fay, Jr. Dear sister of Thomas Giordano
of Saugus, Mary Desiderio of NY,
Frank Giordano of Revere and the late
Ralph, William, Joseph, Alfred, Philip,
Michael Giordano, Alice Crowe. Dear
family friend of Carmen Vega. Also
lovingly survived by 10 grandchildren,
Thomas Fay, III, Scott Fay, Amanda
Fay, Brian Iacoviello, Christopher
Iacoviello, Allison Oakley, Seth Oakley,
Angela Brannigan, John Iacoviello,
Jr., Christian Iacoviello and 10 great
grandchildren. Funeral services will be
conducted in the Carafa Family Funeral
Home, 389 Washington Ave., CHELSEA
on Thursday, May 3 at 10:30 AM.
Services will conclude with interment
at Woodlawn Cemetery in Everett.
Relatives and friends are kindly invited
to attend. Visiting hours will be held in
the Funeral Home on Wednesday, 4-8
PM. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to St. Jude Children’s Research
Hospital, 501 St Jude Place, Memphis,
TN 38105 or on-line at www.stjude.org.
KEATING, Edward Michael
Of Revere, formerly of Cambridge, April
27, 2018, Edward Michael Keating,
age 63. Father of Elizabeth Ann Keating. Devoted son of Joan F. (Plunkett)
Keating and the late Edward A. Keating. Loving brother of Brian Keating,
Stephen Keating, Jeffrey Keating and
Gail and Michael Klimas. Uncle of Lisa
Klimas, Kristin and Spencer Meehan,
Emily Kasinskas, Danny Keating and
Matthew and Jacqueline Keating.
Proud great uncle of Chloe Keating.
Visiting hours in the John C. Burns &
Sons Funeral Home, 305 Broadway,
CAMBRIDGE, Tuesday, May 1, from
4:00 – 7:00 PM., with a prayer service
at 7:00 PM. Relatives and friends invited. www.burnsfuneralhomes.com
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COHEN, Leah Barbara
Of Brookline, on Sunday, April 29,
2018. Loving daughter of the late Julius
and Rose (Krasnow. Dear sister of Joseph C. Cohen of Brookline. Graveside
services at the Chesed Shel Emeth of
Chelsea Cemetery, Buxton Road, Danvers on Wednesday, May 2 at 11:00am.
In lieu of flowers, remembrances may
be made to the charity of you choice.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
Funeral Services
Affordable Cremation
1310 complete
617 782 1000
$
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
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KNODEL, Patricia A.
Patricia Andrews Knodel, age 90,
passed away on April 29th, 2018, at
Penacook Place in Haverhill, MA. She
was born to the late Elmore Andrews
and Margaret Devine on September
14th, 1927. Patricia was raised in
Aiken, SC and Lawrence, MA before attending Peter Bent Brigham, receiving
her Nursing Degree in 1948. During
her nursing career, Patricia was a head
nurse at Symmes Hospital in Arlington,
MA, Nursing Director at a nursing
home in Waltham, MA and a dietician.
Patricia received a 50 year pin as an active member of Hancock United Church
of Christ in Lexington, MA.
Patricia is survived by her children
Kristene A. Turco of Brooklyn, NY,
David L. Knodel of Newburyport, MA
and Kathleen S. Leahy of Byfield, MA
and her grandchildren Rebecca, James,
and Asher Leahy.
A Memorial Service for Patricia
will be held at Central Congregational
Church, 14 Titcomb Street, Newburyport, MA on Saturday, May 5th at 12:00
pm. Reception in the church social hall
to follow. All are welcome.
Donations may be made, in Patricia’s memory, to Merrimack Valley
Hospice, 360 Merrimack Street, Bldg 9,
Lawrence, MA 01843.
Arrangements are by the
E.V. Jutras & Sons Funeral Home,
Amesbury
LAWTON, Robert R. “Bob”
Of Milton, passed away
peacefully April 29, 2018 at
home surrounded by his
five devoted children. Dedicated and
caring husband of the late Helen A.
(Brown). Wonderful father of Deborah
A. Feldman of Walpole, John P. Lawton
and his wife Claire of Milton, Donna M.
Lawton of Quincy, Robert “Bobby”
Lawton and his wife Ellen of Braintree,
and Linda T. Nichols and her husband
Kevin of Hingham. Loving brother of
Joan M. Connolly of Quincy, and the
late John “Jack” Lawton, Doris
McCarthy, and Eileen Hardiman.
Doting “Pa” to Christopher and Bridget
Feldman, Caroline Pierce and her
husband Tim, Catherine and John
Lawton, Laura, Jackie, Bobby, Kevin
and Brian Lawton, John, Daniel and
Emily Nichols. Funeral Mass at St.
Agatha Church, Milton Friday morning
at 10. Visiting hours at the Alfred D.
Thomas Funeral Home, 326 Granite
Ave Milton Thursday 4-8 pm. Burial
Milton Cemetery. Proud Army Veteran
of the Korean War. Expressions of
sympathy may be made in his memory
to St. Agatha School, 440 Adams St.,
Milton, MA. 02186. For complete
obituary and guest book please see
www.alfreddthomas.com
Alfred D. Thomas Funeral Home
Milton
(617) 696-4200
LEARY, Marie C. (Henriksen)
Of Canton, passed away unexpectedly
April 28th. Beloved wife of Alan M.
Mother of Laurie Manjikian and her
husband Raffi of Belmont, A. Michael
Leary of Canton and Diane Leary of
Mansfield. Grandmother of Haley and
John M. Bougas, Sara, Raffi, Christian and Steffen Manjikian. Sister of
Richard Henriksen of Canton. Visiting hours at the Dockray & Thomas
Funeral Home, 455 Washington St.,
Canton Wednesday from 4-7 pm.
Funeral Mass at St. John the Evangelist
Church, Canton Thursday morning at
10:30. Burial Knollwood Memorial
Park, Canton. Donations may be made
in her memory to St. Jude Children’s
Research Hospital, P.O. Box 50, Memphis, TN 38101-9929. For complete
obituary and guestbook see www.
dockrayandthomasfuneralhome.com
Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home
(781) 828-0811
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LEVISON, Muriel J.
(Greenblatt)
Of Chestnut Hill, passed away on April
29th, just one week shy of her 95th
birthday. She was married to the “love
of her life,” the late Malcolm B. Levison,
for almost 50 years. Dear sister of the
late Daniel Greenblatt. Much loved
mother to Nancy and the late Eric
Falkof and Lee and Barbara (Sherman)
Levison. Adored, proud and special
nana to Andy and Jenni Falkof, Beth
and Matt Millstein, and Ben, Sam and
Liza Levison. Loving great-grandmother to Mila and Estelle who brought
her so much joy. Burial will be private.
Shiva observed Wednesday, May 2nd
at 200 Estate Drive (formerly 197
Lagrange St), Chestnut Hill, 2:00-4:30
pm and 7:00-9:00 pm with a minyan
at 7:30 pm Shiva in New York City at
the residence of Lee and Barbara, 160
Riverside Drive, on Sunday, May 6th
from 2:00-5:30 pm. Donations to the
charity of your choice.
MacDONALD, Paul M., Jr.
McINTYRE, James E.
Of Stoneham, April 29, 2018 at age
80. Beloved husband for 50 years
of Paula (Keane) McIntyre. Devoted
father of James T. McIntyre and his
wife Denise, Paul McIntyre and his
wife Kerry and Shawn McIntyre and
his wife Jennifer. Cherished grandfather of Lauren, Erin, Julia, Conor and
Gavin. Loving son of the late Clarence
McIntyre and Eva (LeBlanc) McIntyre.
Also survived by many loving nieces
and nephews. Funeral from the Barile
Family Funeral Home, 482 Main St.
(RT 28) STONEHAM, Thursday, May
3rd at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral
Mass Celebrating James’ Eternal Life
in St. Patrick Church, 71 Central St.,
Stoneham at 10 a.m. Family and
friends are cordially invited to gather
and share memories with the Family on
Wednesday May 2nd from 4-8 p.m. in
the Funeral Home. Parking attendants
and elevator are available. Interment
Lindenwood Cemetery, Stoneham. In
lieu of flowers, please consider making
donations in James’ memory to the
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Donor
Services, P.O. Box 98018, Washington,
DC 20090-8010 or to the St. Patrick
Church Society of St. Vincent de Paul,
71 Central St., Stoneham, MA 02180.
For directions or to send a memorial
condolence www.barilefuneral.com or
www.facebrook.com/BarileFamily
FuneralHome
Barile Family Funeral Homes
Celebrating Life-Sharing Memories
781-438-2280
McKINNELL, Jane D’Esopo
Of Belmont, formerly of Malden, died
unexpectedly on Sunday, April 29,
2018, age 64, at Massachusetts General
Hospital, surrounded by his loving
family. Devoted husband of Shelley
(Manion) MacDonald, beloved son of
Paul and the late Gloria (Iacobucci)
MacDonald, stepson of Rosanne MacDonald, son-in-law of Michael Manion
and the late Ginger Manion. Loving
father of Jennifer (George) Foden, Melissa (Joseph) Rawson, Patricia (Chris)
Pupecki, Paul (Janice) MacDonald, III,
Dana MacDonald, Michael MacDonald
(Shannon Kyne, fiancée). Cherished
brother of Christine (Robert) Solano,
Douglas (Justine) MacDonald, Scott
(Patricia) MacDonald, Sr., and brotherin-law of Candy (Peter) Costas. Proud
grandfather of Ricky, Kendra, Gregory,
Ryan, Tyler, Alexis, Cameron, Isabella,
Emelia, Max, Julia, Rebecca, Sophia
and Paul, IV. Dearest uncle to many
nephews and nieces and much-loved
friend to many. Known for his quick
wit, his way with words, and his
unwavering devotion to his family, Paul
will be deeply missed by all. Calling
hours will be Wednesday, May 2nd,
4 pm to 8 pm at the Aram Bedrosian
Funeral Home, 558 Mt Auburn St.,
WATERTOWN, MA. Funeral service
will be held on Thursday, May 3rd, 11
am at St. James Armenian Church, 465
Mt Auburn St., Watertown. Burial will
be private. In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to the Dana Farber Cancer
Institute, Paul’s favorite charity.
MASCELLUTI, Patricia
Patricia (Chiasson) Mascelluti of Savin Hill, died
peacefully in her sleep on
April 26. Dear daughter of the late
Mary and Hubert Chiasson. Beloved
mother of Laura Mascelluti of Rome
and the late Luca Mascelluti. Loving sister of Ann (Robert) Beaton of Newton
and Charles (Susan) Chiasson of Arlington, TX. Devoted aunt of Christopher
Chiasson, Alex Beaton, Justine Beaton,
and Melissa Chiasson. Adored friend
and housemate of Chi Le and Christina
Carroll. Cherished member of the
Shaffer-DoCurral clan. Pat was a graduate of Boston College, class of 1971, and
Boston College School of Social Work.
She worked for many years as a social
worker and guardian ad litem for the
Commonwealth of MA, where she built
a network of devoted friends and colleagues. Pat was a beloved member of
All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church
of Braintree. She will be remembered
as a giving, generous soul who loved to
laugh, was unfailingly devoted to her
family and friends, and was a model
of courage and resilience in the face of
adversity. Visiting hours will be held
at the Peck Funeral Homes, 516 Washington Street, Braintree, on Thursday,
May 3, from 4 to 8 p.m. Memorial
service will be at the All Souls Unitarian
Universalist Church, 196 Elm Street,
Braintree, on Saturday, May 5, at noon.
Please consider donating in Pat’s name
to Childrens Extended Care Center at
www.sevenhills.org or Rosie’s Place at
www.rosiesplace.org
McGRAIL, Barbara M.
Of Cambridge, April 30, 2018, age 93.
Beloved daughter of the late Joseph
and Harriett McGrail. Sister of the
late Joseph and Ruth McGrail. Loving
aunt of Jean Leary of Waltham, Beth
Coughlin and her husband, John, of
Watertown, Ann Sheehan and her
husband, Timothy, of Dartmouth and
Joseph McGrail and his wife, Pam, of
Wayland. Also survived by great nieces
and nephews and great-great nieces
and nephews. Funeral from the John
C. Burns & Sons Funeral Home, 305
Broadway, CAMBRIDGE, Friday, May
4, at 9:00 AM followed by a funeral
mass in St. Mary’s Church, Cambridge
at 10:00 AM. Relatives and friends
invited. Visiting prior to funeral mass
from 9-10. Interment will be private.
www.burnsfuneralhomes.com.
Long time Beacon Hill resident, died
suddenly on March 30, 2018 at age 83.
She had stayed, as usual, optimistic
despite health setbacks during the
fall and winter and looked forward
to resuming life as she had known it.
Jane, or Janie to her closest family,
was born in New York City on March
30, 1935 to Elizabeth (Berrien) and
Donato Anthony D’Esopo. She grew up
in Tenafly, New Jersey and attended
Dwight Englewood School and Smith
College, graduating in 1956 with a BA
in English. After Smith she worked in
publishing in New York where she met
and married Michael McKinnell. They
moved to Massachusetts in 1963. Apart
from 16 years in Newton, Jane lived in
Boston, a city she cherished. A life-long
lover of the natural world and the built
environment, Jane received a Masters
in Landscape Architecture in 1981
from Harvard’s Graduate School of
Design in 1981. Professionally, she was
a bookkeeper, working for Kallmann
McKinnell & Wood, Inc. and other design firms and educational institutions.
Jane was a loyal and loving mother to
two daughters, a lifelong reader (and
lover of words), learner, and an active
member of her community. She enjoyed
the fellowship of Beacon Hill Village Association, courses at Beacon Hill Seminars and a multitude of arts and sports
events. For 10 years, she served as a
docent at Harvard University Art Museums. For 25 years, she was a member of
the volunteer gardeners’ Rose Brigade
in the Public Garden of Boston. A
member of Greater Boston Knitting
Guild for over 20 years, she was its
treasurer for 14. For several years, Jane
and her gray standard poodle Bobby
comforted patients at Massachusetts
General Hospital as visiting volunteers.
Jane shared her generous spirit with
each of these organizations. She was
also an avid player of all sorts of games;
she especially loved bridge and was
proud of her rank and Masterpoints.
Time spent at the family cottage in
Cape Breton, Nova Scotia was a source
of renewal for her; she loved swimming
in the Atlantic. Jane is predeceased by
her brother Peter B. D’Esopo, her parents and many aunts and uncles. She
is survived by her brother D. Anthony
D’Esopo, Jr., nieces and nephews and
her former husband Michael McKinnell. She leaves her daughter, Caitlin
McKinnell, son-in-law Daniel Klatz,
daughter Phoebe McKinnell, son-in-law
Mark Ventola and four grandchildren
Zoe Klatz, Henry Klatz, Bryden Ventola
and Teresa Jane Ventola. Jane leaves as
well many cherished friends and her
companion dog Jack who accompanied
her almost everywhere she went. In lieu
of flowers, please donate in Jane’s name
to the Friends of the Public Garden or
the Sierra Club. A memorial service
to celebrate Jane’s life will be held on
Friday, June 8 at 1:30 p.m. in the King’s
Chapel Parish House, 64 Beacon Street,
Boston.
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Brighton 617-782-1000
Funeral Services
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
Celebrate
their lives
Honor your loved ones
with a photo in the
Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
McKINNON, Sean R.
At 53 years, unexpectedly in Revere formerly of Peabody & Lynnfield on April
27. Beloved husband of 14 years to
Laurie A. (Krassnoff) McKinnon. Dear
son of the late Harold McKinnon & the
late Jane P. (Ryan) McKinnon-Edwards.
Adored brother of John “Jack” McKinnon & Eleanor Hebert & her husband
Jeffrey all of Las Vegas NV & Kevin J.
McKinnon & wife Kelly J. of Winthrop.
Devoted son-in-law to Louis “Larry” &
Rita Krassnoff of Revere & cherished
brother-in-law of Paul J. Krassnoff &
husband Juan Gonzalez of Waltham,
David M. Krassnoff & wife Jackie of
Revere & Lisa M. Young & husband
Gregory “Greg” of Everett. Also lovingly
survived by many nieces, nephews,
grand nieces & grand nephews. Family
& friends are invited to attend the funeral on Thurs. May 3 at 11 a.m. from
the Vertuccio & Smith Home for Funerals, 773 Broadway (Rte. 107) REVERE
followed by a Funeral Mass in the
Immaculate Conception Church (corner
of Beach St & Winthrop Ave) Revere
at 12 noon, immediately followed by
interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. Visiting hours are in the funeral
home on Wed. May 2 from 5-8 p.m.
Parking available left of the funeral
home. By profession, Sean was a finish
carpenter & by avocalion he was an
avid meticulous gardener. Please visit
www.vertuccioandsmith.com. In lieu of
flowers remembrances may be made to
the Arthritis Foundation (MA Chapter)
29 Crafts St, Newton, MA 02458-1287
or to the BIA-MA (Brain Injury Assoc.
of MA) 30 Lyman St, Westborough, MA
01581.
O’CONNELL, Daniel J.
Of Weymouth, formerly of Dorchester,
on April 29, 2018. Beloved husband
of Catharine Zink O’Connell. Loving
father of Samantha O’Connell. Dear
step-father of Stephanie Bower, and
Stephen Tobin. Devoted son of Cornelius O’Connell and his wife Nancy of FL
& the late Theresa O’Connell. Caring
brother of Patty Lee, Mary Ann Conlon,
Katherine O’Connell, Ellen O’Connell,
and the late Noreen McLaughlin.
Also survived by many loving nieces,
nephews, aunts, uncles, and friends.
Visiting hours in the John J. O’Connor
& Son Funeral Home, 740 Adams St.
(near Gallivan Blvd.) DORCHESTER,
Wednesday from 4-8 pm. Funeral
Mass in St. Ann’s Church, Neponset,
Thursday morning at 10 o’clock. Relatives & friends are respectfully invited.
In lieu of flowers, remembrances may
be made, in Daniel’s name, to Camp
Fatima, 32 Fatima Rd., Attn: Michael
Drumm, Gilmanton Iron Works, NH,
03837. Interment in Cedar Grove Cemetery. For directions & expressions of
sympathy: www.oconnorandson.com.
PACEWICZ, Patricia A.
(Dagle)
83, of Lynn, loving wife of the late
Victor W. Pacewicz, entered eternal
peace on April 29th. Born in Medford,
the daughter of the late Charles & Mary
(Miller) Dagle. Devoted mother of Russell Pacewicz & his wife Sherry, Catherine R. Pacewicz & James C. Pacewicz
& his wife Roane. Loving grandmother
of 5 & great grandmother of 5 & several
nieces & nephews. She was predeceased
by her sister Jean Grinell & great nephew Michael Francis Grinell. Relatives &
friends are invited to attend the funeral
from the Nadworny Funeral Home, 798
Western Ave., LYNN Thursday at 9:30
AM followed by her Mass of Christian
burial in St. Mary’s Church at 10:30
AM. Interment in St. Joseph’s Cemetery,
Lynn. Visiting hours Wednesday from 4
PM-8 PM. In lieu of flowers, contributions, in her memory, may be made
to The Make a Wish Foundation, 1
Bulfinch Pl., Boston, MA 02114, for the
hope of someone to go to Disney World.
For guestbook & directions, please visit:
www.nadwornyfuneralhome.com.
PARKER, Sean D.
On Thursday, April 26, 2018, Sean D.
Parker, son, brother, partner and friend,
passed away suddenly at the age of 32.
Sean will be forever remembered by his
parents, Jeffrey and Michele Parker;
his siblings, Seth Parker, Ryan Parker
and Laura Macklin; his sisters-in-law
Reinee Parker and Becky Kucsan,
brother-in-law Justin Macklin, as well
as his numerous nieces and nephew.
Sean was devoted to his predeceased
beloved, Ashley Henningsen.
A member of the class of 2004 at
Lincoln-Sudbury High School, Sean was
a voracious reader of history, avid snow
boarder, weightlifter, soccer player,
mountain biker, video gamer and scuba
diver. He regularly volunteered at the
Humane Society and was an active
member of AA.
A memorial service will be held Friday, May 4th at 2PM at the Memorial
Congregational Church, 26 Concord
Road, Sudbury, MA. In lieu of flowers,
donations can be made to Faces &
Voices of Recovery.
For additional information,
tributes and guestbook please visit:
Duckett-Waterman.com
Duckett - J.S. Waterman & Sons
Home of Memorial Tribute
Sudbury, MA
(978) 443-5777?
PECK, Russell F., Sr., Esq.
PIZZI, Antonio
Age 84, passed away at St. Francis of
Assisi Church, in Braintree, on Sunday
April 29th, 2018. He was born in
Milton in 1933. He attended Thayer
Academy, graduating second in his
class. Russell then attended Wesleyan
University in Connecticut and transferred to the University of Minnesota
Medical School, where he majored in
Mortuary Science and Funeral Directing. He received his Massachusetts
state embalming and funeral directing
license in 1954. He then served as a
PFC, in the United States Army during
the Korean Conflict. After his military
service, he attended Boston University
School of Law and received his Juris
Doctorate degree in 1960.He was
admitted to the Mass Bar Association
in 1961. He passed the Bar in the top
5%. As a lawyer, he worked tirelessly
for the former Braintree Savings Bank
as a Real Estate and Mortgage Attorney
helping local families for thirty years.
Russell was the attorney that was
instrumental in securing the Federal
Grant for the Union Towers, Elderly
Housing in Weymouth, under the
Nixon Administration, which Russell
donated his time and his expertise, pro
bono. He has actively practiced law
up to this very last weekend. Russell
also has run the family funeral business
since the death of his father Mortimer
Peck. He was the longest standing
member of the Braintree Rotary Club,
which he had been a member of since
1958. He was recently honored with
the Paul Harris Fellow award which is
the highest Honor the Rotary Club can
bestow. He won his perfect attendance
award for Rotary, this past year. He was
a former trustee of Emmanuel Church.
He was an active member of the Braintree Men’s Club. He was an honorary
member of Delta Lodge of Masons in
Braintree and the Odd Fellows Lodge
of Weymouth. He loved summering in
Plymouth on Great Herring Pond with
his wife, son and family. He especially
enjoyed the Plymouth Harbor Fourth
of July celebrations with the fireworks.
He was the son of Mortimer N. Peck,
who died in 1968, and his wife Julia E.
(McLennan) Peck, who died in 1988.
He was the beloved husband of the late,
Paula H. Peck, who was a school teacher in Woburn and who had worked at
the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Paula died in 2013. He is survived
by his son, Russell F. Peck, Jr., Esq., and
his wife Silvana. He is also survived
by a nephew, Roger Lamson and by a
niece, Kimberly Scholz and many nieces
and nephews. Russell was the brother
of the late Clifford Peck. Russell loved
his cats Charlie and Tiger. As a Funeral
Director, Russ served the community
for an amazing 60 continuous years
of community service. Visiting hours
celebrating his life will be held from
2 to 8 PM on Friday May 4, 2018. A
gathering at the Braintree Peck Funeral
Home, will take place this Saturday,
May 5th at 8:00 A.M. to be followed by
a Funeral Mass at St. Francis of Assisi
Church, 856 Washington St., South
Braintree Square at 9 A.M. The Mass
will be celebrated by Father Paul Clifford. A funeral procession will follow
to the Mount Wollaston Cemetery in
Quincy for burial, in the Peck Family
Lot. Mr. Peck had a number of cats and
dogs over the years, and donations may
be made to the Quincy Animal Shelter,
Broad St., Quincy, MA 02169.
Of Medford, formerly of Miranda, Italy,
April 30. Beloved husband of the late
Angiolina (Marucci) Pizzi. Devoted
father of Filomena and Lucia Pizzi,
both of Medford. Loving grandfather of
Gerald Vasquez and his spouse Christopher Spoon of Medford. Dear brother of
Angelo Pizzi and his wife Anna of Medford, Dominic Pizzi and his wife Teresa
of Hanson, and the late Maria Ferrante
and Santina D’Agostino. Survived by 13
loving nieces and nephews. A Funeral
Mass will be celebrated in St. Francis
Of Assisi Church, 441 Fellsway West,
Medford, Saturday, May 5 at 11:30 AM
followed by burial at Oak Grove Cemetery, Medford. Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited to attend and
may visit with family at the Dello Russo
Funeral Home, 306 Main St., MEDFORD, 9-11 AM. To leave a message of
condolence visit www.dellorusso.net.
Dello Russo Family Funeral Homes
Medford-Woburn-Wilmington
SCHIAVONE, Ralph G.
Lifetime Newton resident,
age 92, April 29, 2018. Beloved husband for 62 years
to Loretta (Ciccone) Schiavone. Devoted
father of Ralph G. Schiavone II and his
wife Kim, and Ronald, Richard and
Randall Schiavone. Loving grandfather
of Lisa and Robert Schiavone. Dear
brother of Dorothy Fernald and the late
Marie Marshall and Leonard Schiavone.
Also survived by many nieces and
nephews. Veteran of WWII, Corporal
US Marine Corps. Visiting hours Wed,
May 2, from 4-7pm in the Magni
FH, 365 Watertown St., Newton, and
again Thursday morning at 9:30AM
before proceeding to Our Lady Help of
Christians Church, 573 Washington St,
Newton for a 10:30AM Funeral Mass.
Burial Private. In lieu of flowers, donations in Ralph’s name may be made to:
Robert D. Donahue Scholarship Fund,
16 Kenyon St, Newton, MA 02465.
Andrew J. Magni & Son FH, Newton
www.magnifuneralhome.com
SHOPOV, John T.
Of West Roxbury, April 27, 2018.
Dear and devoted husband of Vasilka
(Carcarevska). Loving father of Mary
Shopov Padovano and her husband
Anthony of Avon and Dr. Theodore
Shopov of Cambridge. Funeral from
the Kfoury Keefe Funeral Home, 8
Spring St. (at the corner of Centre St.)
WEST ROXBURY, Thursday at 9 a.m.
Funeral Service at 10 a.m. at St. Andrew Ukrainian Orthodox Church, 24
Orchardhill Rd., Jamaica Plain. Visiting
hours Wednesday 4 - 8 p.m. Relatives
and friends respectfully invited to attend. In lieu of flowers, contributions
in John’s memory may be made to the
charity of your choice. Interment Mt.
Benedict Cemetery, West Roxbury.
Guestbook and other information at
www.KfouryFuneral.com.
Kfoury Keefe Funeral Home
West Roxbury 617-325-3600
PERRONE, Frank
76, died Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at
Bethesda Hospital in Boynton Beach,
FL following an illness. He leaves his
son and daughter-in-law, Frank and
Melissa Perrone, daughter and sonin-law, Lee-Anne and Jay Brooks, four
grandchildren and many close friends
and family. Born in Gaeta, Italy, the son
of Pasquale Perrone and Maria Libera
Camelia. He graduated Somerville High
School in 1961, where he met his lovely
wife Rosalie Zappulla. He received
his undergraduate degree at Northeastern University, and worked as an
accountant and controller for several
companies. In his later years, Frank
lived in Delray Beach, FL, and could be
found sharing stories with friends at
the Seagate Hotel. Frank was an avid
gardener and cook, learned from his
time as a boy in Italy. He was a true example of the American Dream. A wake
will be held on Friday, May 4th at Lane
Funeral Home, 760 Main St. (Rte. 38)
WINCHESTER from 4-8 pm. A Mass
of Christian burial will be celebrated
on Saturday, May 5 th at St. Eulalia’s
Church Winchester at 10 am. Relatives
and friends are kindly invited to attend.
Interment Wildwood Cemetery, Winchester. In lieu of flowers, donations,
in his memory, may be made to the
Stepping Stone Fdtn., One Appleton St.,
Boston, MA 02116 or to Seeds of Solidarity, 165 Chestnut Hill Rd., Orange,
MA 01364. For online condolences,
please visit: www.lanefuneral.com.
Lane Funeral Home
Winchester
781-729-2580
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SUAREZ, Patrice M.
(Stivers)
Age 61, of Braintree, died peacefully,
Thursday, April 26, 2018, at home,
surrounded by her loving family, after
a courageous battle against cancer. Pat
was born in Boston to the late Everett
S. and Gloria J. (Swinderman) Stivers.
She was raised in Holbrook and was
a graduate of Holbrook High School.
She earned her Bachelor’s degree from
Bridgewater State College and her
MBA from Suffolk University. She had
lived in Braintree for over twenty-five
years, previously in Quincy. Pat was
employed as a Human Resource Manager for Maxim Healthcare Services
in Plymouth for seven years. Prior to
this, she had also worked for John
Hancock, Centrus Premier Home Care,
and Fisher Pierce. She was an active
parishioner of Saint Thomas More
Church in Braintree where she served
as a religious education teacher. Pat
enjoyed tending to her flower garden
and working around her home. She
also enjoyed traveling, especially to
Cape Cod and Europe. Beloved wife for
twenty-six years of George M. Suarez.
Devoted mother of Alexander G. Suarez
of Quincy. Loving sister of Laure Cruz
and her husband Tony of Maryland,
and her twin, Paul Stivers of Oregon.
Dear aunt of Travis, Ford, and Taryn
Cruz, Michele and David Stivers. Pat
is also survived by her sister-in-law,
Christine N. Suarez and her children,
Colin, Gaelen, Tristan, and Perry, as
well as many loyal friends, including
Pearl Keinath and Maryanne Doyle. Funeral from the Sweeney Brothers Home
for Funerals, 1 Independence Avenue,
QUINCY, Saturday, May 5th at 9 a.m.
Funeral Mass in Saint Thomas More
Church, 8 Hawthorn Road, Braintree
at 10 o’clock. Relatives and friends are
invited to attend. Visiting hours at the
funeral home Friday 4 – 7 p.m. Interment in Blue Hill Cemetery, Braintree.
For those who wish, donations in Pat’s
memory may be made to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 849168,
Boston, MA 02284-9168 or by visiting
www.dana-farber.org. The Suarez family would like to acknowledge the staffs
of the Melanoma Department at the
Dana Farber Cancer Institute, South
Shore VNA, and Hospice of the South
Shore for their compassionate care. You
are invited to visit www.thesweeneybrothers.com or call 617-472-6344.
SUNDSTROM, Warren E.
WHITE, Doris I. (Baker)
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Obituaries
Carrie Dearborn, 63, activist for the disabled
By Bryan Marquard
GLOBE STAFF
Of Canton passed away at home April
30th surrounded by her loving family.
Beloved wife of Martin J. Mother of
Marc J. White and his wife Kathleen
of Franklin and Michael J. White and
his significant other Ann Foley-Collins
of Canton. Grandmother of Quinton
and Dylan White. Sister of Paul Baker
and his wife Terry of Easton, Mary
Paton of Weymouth, Rita Hardy of ME,
John Baker and his wife Pat of Walpole
and the late Katherine Allen, Willis
Baker, and Jeanette Freudenberg. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends invited to attend
a Funeral Service at the Dockray &
Thomas Funeral Home, 455 Washington St., CANTON, Friday morning at 11.
Visiting hours Thursday 4-8 p.m. Burial
Knollwood Memorial Park, Canton.
Donations may be made in her memory
to the Canton EMT Assn, 99 Revere St.,
Canton, MA 02021. For complete obituary and guestbook see
dockrayandthomasfuneralhome.com
Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home
(781) 828-0811
WILSON, Thomas M. III
In Washington, DC of East Boston,
unexpectedly on April 27 at the age of
21. Funeral and visitation Wednesday
May 2 from 4-8. For more info, please
visit www.ruggieromh.com
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston 617-569-0990
WRICK, Marie E. (Higgins)
Of South Boston, passed away peacefully, Sunday April 29, 2018. Beloved
wife of the late James R. Wrick. Beloved
mother of James Wrick, his wife Rose,
Brian Wrick, his wife Doreen, John
Wrick, his wife Cindy, Mary (Wrick)
Ryan, her husband Kenny, and the
late Mark Wrick. Cherished grandmother of ten grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren. Dear sister of
Lillian Riley, Ronald Adams, Roberta
Anglin, John Adams, the late Edna
Abbott, Marilyn Rubnich, Daniel
Higgins, Robert Adams, and Richard
Adams. Also survived by many loving
nieces, nephews, relatives and friends.
Visiting hours in the O’Brien Funeral
Home, 146 Dorchester Street, SOUTH
BOSTON on Thursday from 4-7 PM.
Funeral Mass in St. Monica Church,
331 Old Colony Ave., South Boston on
Friday at 10:00 AM. Interment Blue
Hills Cemetery, Braintree. Relatives and
friends are invited to attend all services.
In lieu of flowers, donations, in Marie’s
memory, can be made to the Marian
Manor Nursing Home, 130 Dorchester
Street, Boston MA 02127.
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
When telling jokes on stage,
Carrie Dearborn spoke deliberately, her ad-libs sidestepping
words her mouth had difficulty
forming. Gesturing with her
one working arm while sitting
in a wheelchair she called Gertrude, she paused now and then
as her agile mind outdistanced
the rest of her.
“My brainstem is injured,”
she told an interviewer after
one performance in the late
1990s. “It takes longer for messages to reach me — they have
to go the long way.”
A stroke in 1981 placed Ms.
Dearborn on a more challenging path through life, turning a
ski instructor and computer operator into an advocate, writer,
and occasional sit-down comic
whose piercing humor offered a
blunt dose of reality to “nons”
— the nondisabled people upon
whom she often had to rely.
She called her first comic
piece “My Ten Years as a Rolling
Vegetable.” Her memoir “Quiet
in the Tornado: A Disability
Primer,” published several years
ago, includes chapters such as
“Wheelchair Flying: My Favorite Sport.”
“Since I became disabled,
I’ve had to make my life up,” she
told Barbara Beckwith for a
1998 piece in Sojourner. “I’ve
become very inventive.”
Ms. Dearborn, who had volunteered with the Boston Center for Independent Living and
Health Care for All, died March
20 of pneumonia. She was 63
and had lived in Jamaica Plain.
“In the 1980s, disabled people were treated as though we
were completely nonhuman,”
she wrote in an essay published
on the Wellesley Centers for
Women website. “We were still
riding in the back of the bus
and were only 25 years out of
back rooms, and it hadn’t yet
become obvious that people of
color were more rapidly becoming disabled than whites.”
That was the reality that
awaited Ms. Dearborn when, at
27, she suffered a stroke due to
an arteriovenous malformation
— a tangle of abnormal blood
vessels in her brain. She slipped
into a coma and wasn’t expected to live, because few with that
diagnosis did at the time.
Life offered little when she
awoke unable to speak, para-
Ms. Dearborn was an
occasional sit-down comic
whose piercing humor
offered a dose of reality to
nondisabled people.
lyzed, and heavily medicated
with painkillers, anti-inflammatories, and pills to prevent
seizures. “The meds dulled everything but the pain,” she told
Beckwith.
From that foggy period of
her life she emerged with resolve. “I was barely out of a coma when I tried writing a book.
I wanted to create one for newly
disabled people,” she wrote in
the introduction to “Quiet in
the Tornado.”
The book “would have short
but interesting articles. Large
print. Heavy paper,” she added.
“It could lie flat, but it could be
held easily. Or better yet, be on
tape. (That was about the extent of technology for disabled
people at the time. I discovered
early that the technology was
there, but ridiculously expensive.)”
After the arduous work of
learning to speak, Ms. Dearborn went on to write for a
number of publications, among
them Lambda Book Report and
Gay Community News in the
LGBTQ community, the feminist periodical Sojourner, and
disability rights publications
such as New Mobility, The Disability Rag, and This Brain Has
a Mouth.
Though she had been a writer before the stroke, she forged
a different relationship with the
pieces she prepared. “I can’t afford to be as adjectival as I used
to be,” she quipped to Beckwith.
“She had wanted to be a
writer since she was a young
child and kept working at it,
even though it was hard to
work a computer and find the
money to keep it in repair,” said
her friend Loie Hayes of Boston. “She was real persistent.”
Beckwith, who cochairs the
Boston chapter of the National
Writers Union, noted that Ms.
Dearborn was an activist in that
group, too. “She held us to our
professed commitment to be
accessible. That’s how change
gets made,” Beckwith said. “We
would no longer have an event
that was not completely accessible to someone in a wheelchair.”
Carol J. Dearborn, known to
all as Carrie, was born in
Schenectady, N.Y., the daughter
of Neil and Jean Dearborn. Her
father was a metallurgist and
her mother, after raising three
children, worked as emergency
room nurse.
While growing up in
Cheshire, Conn., where she
graduated from Cheshire High
School, Ms. Dearborn took
years of piano lessons and was
good enough that “she played
the piano without music,” recalled her brother Russell of
Colorado Springs.
“She especially loved reading,” he added. “She would just
burn through books and enjoyed amassing that knowledge.”
Ms. Dearborn also acquired
a love of the outdoors early on.
“Her earliest memory was of being with her father, at age 3, in
the woods somewhere tracking
deer, and hearing an adult deer
stomping around,” Hayes said.
As a girl in Cheshire who
spent vacations at Lake Sunapee in New Hampshire, Ms.
Dearborn became a competitive
ski racer. In the years before her
stroke, she taught skiing at
Mount Sunapee in New Hampshire and at Blue Hills in Canton.
She graduated in 1976 from
New England College with a
bachelor’s degree in philosophy.
Moving to Boston, she wrote for
the Women’s Yellow Pages,
eventually began working with
computers, and was midway
through writing a novel when
the stroke occurred.
“I was an athlete who
couldn’ t walk, a lover who
couldn’ t love, a writer who
couldn’t write,” she told Beckwith.
In 1991, Ms. Dearborn par-
Of Wakefield (formerly of Winchester)
on April 26, 2018. Beloved husband
of Joyce (Starnes) Sundstrom. Loving
father of Laura (Christopher) Diemer
and Todd (Jennifer) Sundstrom.
Adored Grandfather of Adam, Grady,
and Benjamin Diemer; Kendall, Molly
and Logan Sundstrom. Brother of Roy
(the late Dorothy) Sundstrom and
Stanley (Barbara) Sundstrom. A funeral
service will be held at the Lutheran
Church of the Redeemer, 60 Forest
Park Rd, Woburn, MA on Friday May
4th at 10 a.m.Visiting hours will be
held at the Lane Funeral Home, 760
Main St. (Rte.38) WINCHESTER on
Thursday May 3rd, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Should friends desire contributions
may be sent to the Corrigan Minehan
Heart Center at Massachusetts General
Hospital: https://www.massgeneral.
org/heartcenter. For online condolences
please visit www.lanefuneral.com
Lane Funeral Home
Winchester
781-729-2580
VACHON, Raymond P.
Age 91, of Tewksbury,
passed away April 25, 2018.
WWII Army Vet., retired
sales representative for Nestle Foods.
Beloved husband of Mona (Soucy).
Father of Derek P. Vachon and his wife
Kimberly (Dukeshire) of Stoneham, and
Kimberly Vachon and her husband
Robert Marques of Methuen.
Grandfather of Colby and Jaslyn
Marques, and Hannah and Gabrielle
Vachon. Brother of Doris Hiscock of
Plymouth, and Pauline Gemetti of
Berlin, NH. He also leaves many nieces,
nephews, and extended family
members. Relatives and friends will be
received on Thursday, May 3, from 4-8
p.m. at the Farmer & Dee Funeral
Home, 16 Lee St., TEWKSBURY. Family
and friends are invited to meet on
Friday, May 4 at 10:30 a.m. at St.
William’s Church, 1351 Main St., Rte.
38, Tewksbury for his Funeral Mass.
Interment will take place at the New
Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery at
a later date. At the request of the
family, please Omit Flowers. Donations
in his memory may be made online at
www.jimmyfund.org or mailed to Dana
Farber’s Jimmy Fund, P.O. Box 849168,
Boston, MA 02284. farmeranddee.com
84, of 4 Linden Lane,
passed away Thursday,
April 26, 2018. He was
born May 13, 1933 in Oakland, ME a
son of the late Carl E. and Rena (Togni)
York. He served in the Army during the
Korean War and graduated from
Bentley University. He worked as a
Financial Advisor for many years before
retiring. He will be remembered for the
love he had for his wife and his family.
He enjoyed sports, fishing, boating and
spending time at his camp in Belgrade,
ME, Hawaii and Disney World. He
leaves 3 sons, Carl E. York, III of York,
ME, James E. York and his partner
Geoff Andrews of Wakefield, NH and
Donald S. York and his wife Julie of Bar
Harbor, ME; a brother Carroll York and
wife Nancy of Augusta, ME and a sister
Bonnie Kinsey of Hallowell, ME; 6
grandchildren, Carl, Katherine,
Nicholas, Natalie, Emily and Samuel; 2
great-grandchildren Ivan and Adelina;
many nieces and nephews.
Calling hours will be held from 5 to
7pm on Thursday, May 3rd in the Lucas
& Eaton Funeral Home, 91 Long Sands
Rd., YORK, Maine. A Funeral Mass
will be celebrated at 11am on Friday,
May 4th in St. Christopher Church, 4
Barrell Lane, York, Maine. Burial will
take place at 11am on Friday, May 18th
in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Manchester,
Maine. Memorial contributions may be
made to Mass General Hospital. Visit
www.lucaseatonfuneralhome.com
Honor your loved one with a
photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director
for details.
Bryan Marquard
can be reached at
bryan.marquard@globe.com.
Michael Anderson, 98, acclaimed director
By Adam Bernstein
YORK, Carl E., Jr.
ticipated in a nine-day State
House protest with dozens of
disabled demonstrators who
held a sleep-in to protest Governor William Weld’s plans to reduce Medicaid funding. The
cuts would have affected the
ability of Ms. Dearborn and
others to have personal care assistants, or PCAs. Weld relented
and promised not to trim that
funding, but Ms. Dearborn
wrote in her Wellesley Centers
for Women essay that funding
and pay for PCAs “remained an
embarrassment.”
Along with her activism, Ms.
Dearborn was a committed gardener, sharing a Mission Hill
community plot with Hayes.
“Every winter we’d be talking about seeds and what to
plant, and every summer outside she’d be corralling someone to reach someplace she
couldn’t reach,” said Hayes,
who added that her friend was
attuned to the smallest details
that might affect the healing
properties of herbs.
Those included “what time
of day to cut the plants and
whether it was appropriate to
plant today or three days from
now, depending on the moon
cycle,” Hayes said. “Her father
had taught her how to garden,
so she cherished that hand-medown from him.”
In addition to her brother
Russell, Ms. Dearborn leaves
her other brother, David of
Grand Junction, Colo.
Friends and family will gather to celebrate Ms. Dearborn’s
life at 11 a.m. May 12 in Old
South Church in Boston.
Whether Ms. Dearborn was
performing at a comedy club or
fund-raiser, or just having a casual conversation, “she had a
wicked sense of humor,” Hayes
said.
Upon meeting Ms. Dearborn
for the first time, some concluded incorrectly that she had significant cognitive impairments
because the stroke had slowed
her speech.
“Yes, she was speaking more
slowly than other people do and
struggled to put some words together,” Hayes said, “but then
she’d whip out some zinger that
would show you she was right
on top of everything.”
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — Michael
Anderson, a British director
whose 1955 film ‘‘The Dam
Busters’’ became one of the
most popular wartime dramas
ever made and launched him
to a filmmaking career that included the all-star Oscar-winner ‘‘Around the World in 80
Days’’ and the sci-fi fantasy
‘‘Logan’s Run,’’ died April 25 at
his home on the Sunshine
Coast of British Columbia. He
was 98.
His family announced the
death and said the cause was
heart disease.
Mr. Anderson was born into an acting family and entered British cinema as an errand boy and movie extra. He
became an assistant to directors Noel Coward and David
Lean on the first-rate World
Wa r I I f i l m ‘ ‘ In W h i c h We
Serve’’ (1942) and began his
professional rise after service
in the British army’s Royal Signal Corps.
His breakthrough was ‘‘The
Dam Busters,’’ about the 1943
British raid against the Ruhr
dams in Germany’s industrial
heartland.
The mission involved the
dropping of ‘‘bouncing
bombs,’’ which skipped along
the surface to avoid torpedo
netting, hit the dam, and exploded many meters down.
The British Lancaster bombers, flying at the perilous
height of 60 feet above water,
were raked by German antiaircraft fire, and 53 of the 133
men in the aircrews were
killed.
Mr. Anderson began filming a decade after the war, at a
time when the British moviegoing public had wearied of
screen propaganda about stiffupper-lip bravery in combat.
In a depar ture, ‘‘ T he Dam
ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE
Mr. Anderson spoke with Sophia Loren on the set of
“Operation Crossbow” in 1964.
Busters’’ emphasized the rigors of scientific trial and much
error as well as the understated, sardonic humor among the
principal players, which included Michael Redgrave as
aeronautical engineer and
bouncing-bomb mastermind
Barnes Wallis and Richard
Todd as Wing Commander
Guy Gibson, who led the
squadron on the mission.
To recreate the sortie over
the Ruhr, the Lancasters had
to fly far lower even than on
the actual raid. ‘‘Sixty feet
didn’ t photograph like 60
feet,’’ Mr. Anderson later told
an inter viewer. ‘‘It photo-
graphed like 200 feet. We had
to go down to 30 feet in some
cases.’’
For all its primitive special
effects, the attack sequence
was said to have been echoed
in the climax of ‘‘Star Wars: A
New Hope’’ (1977) when rebel
pilots fly into the heart of the
Death Star.
‘‘The Dam Busters,’’ Britain’s top-grossing film of the
year, vaulted Mr. Anderson to
the attention of Hollywood
producers.
He was recruited to showman Mike Todd’s big-budget
adaptation of Jules Verne’s
‘‘Around the World in 80 Days’’
(1956), starring David Niven
as balloonist and adventurer
Phileas Fogg and Cantinflas as
his trusty manservant.
The film was a bloated affair, shot in more than 100 locations worldwide and with
c a m e o s b y Fr a n k S i n a t r a ,
Buster Keaton, and Marlene
Dietrich providing much of
the thrust. But it garnered five
Academy Awards, including
best picture, and earned a best
director Oscar nomination for
Mr. Anderson.
One of Mr. Anderson’s finest mid-career efforts was
‘‘Conduc t Unbecoming ’’
(1975), based on Barry England’s play about an officer in
colonial India accused of rape.
It starred Michael York. ‘‘Its
taut construction, mounting
tension and polished performances make for a fascinating
entertainment,’’ New York
Times film critic A.H. Weiler
wrote.
The next year, Mr. Anderson directed York in ‘‘Logan’s
Run,’’ a special effects-laden
drama about a futuristic society that encourages hedonistic
abandon by young people —
until they are killed at age 30,
to control population growth.
It was a commercial smash but
critical flop.
Mr. Anderson’s journeyman
career included several horror
film credits, among them ‘‘Orca’’ (1977), as well as the religious dramas ‘‘The Shoes of
the Fisherman’’ (1968), with
Anthony Quinn as a Russian
who becomes pope, and ‘‘The
Jeweller’s Shop’’ (1988), starring Burt Lancaster and based
on a 1960 play about the
sanctity of marriage by Karol
Wojtyla, who became Pope
John Paul II.
In 2 0 1 2 , Mr. A n d e r s o n
received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Directors Guild of Canada.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B9
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Intervals of clouds and
sunshine with a nice
and milder afternoon;
warmer inland. Some
clouds around early at night then
clearing late.
HIGH
62-67
LOW
54-59
NOON
THURSDAY
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
High pressure will promote plenty of sunshine
and much warmer air;
breezy at times. After
a nice evening, it will be partly
cloudy at night.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Some morning sunshine
will give way to increasing clouds as a cold front
nears from the west. It
will remain breezy and warm. A
shower at night.
HIGH
82-87
LOW
60-65
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
HIGH
69-74
LOW
51-56
HIGH
71-76
LOW
57-62
7
6
6 P.M.
Intervals of clouds and
sunshine with a gusty
breeze at times; a
comfortable afternoon.
Partly cloudy and remaining mild
at night.
Cloudy and not as
warm with a shower or
thunderstorm crossing
the area. A shower or
thunderstorm may linger into
the early evening.
HIGH
80-85
LOW
61-66
3
SATURDAY
FRIDAY
4
6
9
7
3
15
10
15
6
2
5
30
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
WEDNESDAY
TODAY
2
1
8
5
Difficulty Level
5/01
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
TODAY: High pressure building into the area will promote a
nicer day with more in the way of sunshine and milder air.
TOMORROW: It will be breezy and much warmer
across the area ahead of an approaching cold front;
some showers will cross parts of the north.
EXTENDED: A cold front moving through
the area Thursday will trigger showers and
thunderstorms. More showers and thunderstorms will be around Friday.
Tides
A.M. P.M.
High tides
A.M. P.M.
High tides
A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
12:39 1:10
10.8 10.0
6:55 7:08
-0.5 0.4
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
12:39
12:39
12:43
12:46
12:50
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
1:41
1:42
12:53
12:45
High tides
Old Orchard ME 12:33
Hampton
Beach NH
12:47
Plum Island
12:53
Ipswich
12:32
1:05
1:19
1:21
1:04
12:33 1:03
---12:02
12:2312:54
Boston’s recent climate
Yesterday
High/low
48/40
Mean
44
Departure from normal -9
Departure for month -83
Departure for year +30
5 p.m. rel. humidity 86%
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
1:10
1:10
1:16
1:15
1:17
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
19
Normal Temperatures
April readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
52.9
37.8
37.2
Record Temperatures
Norm.
55.6
40.6
36.8
1942
Yesterday’s high 48°
Record
high
86
80
Normal
high
61
60
Normal
low
45
40
New England marine forecast
Wind
Boston Harbor
W 6-12 kts.
Seas
Temp
1 ft.
64/57
East Cape
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
Seas
Temp
Vineyard
SW 7-14 kts.
2-4 ft.
59/47
Record
low
31
20
Yesterday’s low 40°
Martha’s
Cod Canal
N 6-12 kts.
1-3 ft.
62/52
Nantucket
SW 7-14 kts.
2-4 ft.
56/48
Buzzards Bay
W 6-12 kts.
1-2 ft.
62/51
Provincetown
N 6-12 kts.
1-3 ft.
59/50
0
31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
March
Almanac
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
5:40 a.m.
7:43 p.m.
14:04
9:26 p.m.
2.0"
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Snow showers
Visibility
1/16 of a mile
Wind
northeast at 21 m.p.h.
High/low temperature
34/22
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
12.0”
0.11
FIRST
May 21
Moon and Jupiter – A. MacRobert
FULL
May 29
The waning gibbous moon rises this evening as the
last of twilight fades away. The bright “star” upper
right of it is Jupiter. Very high above them shines
Arcturus, pale ginger-ale color.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You could be forced to see a situation differently. You might fight
your sixth sense, but it is more
on than off. A partner demonstrates his or her caring. The efforts you have made to regulate a
partnership stem from a need to
detach. Tonight: Be positive
when looking ahead.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
You have decided to go your own
way, despite some objections. A
loved one seems to want the exact opposite of what you want.
You can imagine what problems
could develop. Listen to the other party's ideas and thoughts. Tonight: Let a friend in more closely.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
You'll want to get as much done
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, May 1, the
121st day of 2018. There are
244 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Singer Judy Collins
is 79. Singer Rita Coolidge is
73. Actor Dann Florek is 67.
Hall of Fame jockey Steve Cauthen is 58. Country singer Tim
McGraw is 51. Movie director
Wes Anderson is 49.
ºIn 1707, the Kingdom of
1.0"
0.2
0.21
0.01
T
0.06 T
0.04
0.23
0.54
0.21
Great Britain was created as a
treaty merging England and
Scotland took effect.
ºIn 1786, Mozart’s opera
‘‘The Marriage of Figaro’’ premiered in Vienna.
ºIn 1931, New York’s 102-story Empire State Building was
dedicated.
ºIn 1941, the Orson Welles
movie ‘‘Citizen Kane’’ pre-
March
0.15
Yesterday
Precip days in April
0.0"
April
24 Hr. Precipitation
0.15”
16
South
♠ AQ5
♥753
♦ 83
♣ A 10 8 5 2
East
Pass
Pass
Pass
All Pass
South
Pass
3♣
3♠
West
1♥
Pass
Pass
North
Dbl
3♦
4♠
Opening lead — ♣ K
Here’s another deal from my monthly game in
Birmingham, Alabama, with old friends and teammates.
Our deals always have points of interest.
When North doubled West’s opening bid of one heart,
South’s three clubs invited game. North’s three diamonds
was forcing. South’s next bid promised only three spades;
with four, he would have bid spades earlier. North raised
to four spades when he might have cue-bid four hearts. All
passed, East quite happily with his six trumps.
South took the ace of clubs and led a diamond to dummy
and a trump to his ace. West’s discard was a shock, but
South continued with a diamond to dummy and a third
diamond. East ruffed with the seven, and South overruffed,
took the Q-A of hearts, and led a fourth diamond from
dummy.
East ruffed in and led a club, but South ruffed in dummy
for his eighth trick. When dummy led still another diamond, East could win only one more trick. Making five!
The last laugh was on North-South. They could make six
diamonds.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ K J 6 2 ♥ A Q ♦ A K 7 6 4 2
♣ 3. You open one diamond, your partner responds one
heart, you bid one spade and he tries 1NT. What do you say?
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
4.57”
Norm. month to date 3.74”
East
♠ 10 9 8 7 4 3
♥ 10 9 6
♦ Q9
♣76
0.5"
0.05
31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
NEW
May 15
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
May 1, 2018:
This year you seem to get past
many of your issues because of a
willingness to relate intensely
and take smart risks. You will
gain insight as a result, and also
put a problem or two to bed. If
you are single, you will attract a
different type of person than
usual. Take your time getting to
know this person before committing. If you are attached, the two
of you become much closer, as
you are more willing to let your
feelings be known. Your vulnerability appeals to your sweetie; he
or she finds you absolutely
charming. SAGITTARIUS helps
you see the big picture when you
seem confused.
1.5"
0.72
0.47
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday,
1.57
Moon phases
LAST
May 7
1874
April
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
West
♠ None
♥K J 8 4 2
♦ J 10 5
♣K Q J 9 4
1:44 2:29
1:13 1:36
9:4410:03
9:37 9:56
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
21
583
510
5188
5366
4903
100
2:25
2:24
1:24
1:17
East dealer — N-S vulnerable
North
♠ KJ62
♥ AQ
♦ AK7642
♣3
Year to date
18.33”
Norm. year to date 14.67”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
ANSWER: The play at 3NT may be taxing, especially if
partner’s clubs are weakis or if he has no help for your diamonds. Jump to three diamonds, encouraging but not forcing. If partner passes, be satisfied to try for a plus score.
as possible in the morning.
Someone could come along in
the evening and force you to rethink a decision. Try to stay light
and easy when dealing with a
problem. You will resolve the issue on your time. Tonight: Consider different points of view.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Your creativity and understanding resolve problems and push
possibilities into a positive
realm. You will want to really
study a loved one's suggestion in
order to make an informed decision about it. Open up to a new
idea that works for you mentally.
Tonight: Decide to relax.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You might have to switch gears
or rethink a decision, especially
if it involves a creative enterprise. You realize that not everything is written in stone. Be
more direct in how you handle a
child or someone you care about.
Tonight: So what if it is only
Tuesday? It's time to play!
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You will be clear about your expectations, yet you might wonder what you need to do. Open
up to new ideas, especially if you
would like more stability on the
homefront. Someone could question you, but only if you allow it.
Tonight: Weigh the pros and
cons of a risk.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Allow your imagination to take
the lead, as you might want to
try a new approach or do something very differently. You'll
want to keep firm control over
your finances, as tempted as you
might be to spend money. Consider your alternatives carefully.
Tonight: Pay bills first.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You are personality-plus in the
morning. If there is something
you want, the time is now to go
for it. You are more likely to become extravagant in the evening.
Honor your goals, and maintain
a firm sense of discipline. You
know what is right. Tonight: Buy
a gift for a loved one.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
You could feel off in the morning, so save important conversations for the evening. Only then
will you be able to focus in the
way that you like and deserve. Be
sensible about what you need.
Do nothing halfway, especially if
it involves an important matter.
Tonight: Out late.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Don't be so skeptical about
someone's kind gesture. You
could be wondering what this
person's expectations are. Take
another look at what you want
from a personal matter that
could be affecting you. You
might decide to veer a bit off
course. Tonight: Opt for togeth-
miered in New York.
ºIn 1959, work started on the
Lieutenant William F. Callahan Jr. Tunnel connecting
downtown Boston with East
Boston; it was completed Nov.
12, 1961.
ºIn 1960, the Soviet Union
shot down an American U-2
reconnaissance plane over
Sverdlovsk and captured its
pilot, Francis Gary Powers.
ºIn 1967, Elvis Presley married Priscilla Beaulieu at the
Aladdin Hotel in Las Vegas.
(They divorced in 1973.)
ºIn 1998, Eldridge Cleaver,
the fiery Black Panther leader
who later renounced his past
and became a Republican,
died in Pomona, Calif., at age
62. Former Rwandan Prime
Minister Jean Kambanda
pleaded guilty to charges
stemming from the 1994
genocide of more than half a
million Tutsis. (Kambanda
was later sentenced to life in
prison.)
ºIn 2008, Deborah Jeane Palfrey, 52, the so-called ‘‘D.C.
Madam’’ convicted of running
a prostitution ring, hanged
herself in Tarpon Springs,
Fla. Philipp Freiherr von Boeselager, a member of the inner circle of plotters who attempted to kill Adolf Hitler,
died in Altenahr, Germany, at
age 90.
ºIn 2011, President Obama
announced the death of Osa-
erness.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
You might want to rethink a personal matter. A friend will encourage you to be more welcoming. Understand where you are
coming from. Pace yourself, and
you'll cover as much ground as
possible. Remain optimistic.
Others become more observant.
Tonight: Close to home.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Look at what is happening behind the scenes, and follow
through on your priorities. Do
not allow a key person in your
life to steal your thunder. You enjoy every moment of being in the
spotlight. Use this special time to
move an important project forward. Tonight: A must show.
Jacqueline Bigar is at www.jacquelinebigar.com.
(c) 2018 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
ma bin Laden during a US
commando operation (because of the time difference, it
was early May 2 in Pakistan,
where the Al Qaeda leader
was killed).
ºLast year, erasing the threat
of a disruptive government
shutdown, the White House
and top lawmakers endorsed a
$1.1 trillion spending bill to
carry the nation through September 2017.
B10
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
9
8
7
3
6
2
4
5
1
4
6
5
1
7
8
9
3
2
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
3
2
1
5
4
9
8
6
7
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
2
3
6
7
9
1
5
4
8
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
5
4
9
8
2
6
1
7
3
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
7
1
8
4
5
3
6
2
9
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
6
9
3
2
8
5
7
1
4
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
1
5
4
9
3
7
2
8
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POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
8
7
2
6
1
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3
9
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ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B11
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
ZIPPY “Pod Promenade” by Bill Griffith
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
A plugger makes sure the print in her grandchild’s
storybook is large enough before she has to go find a
pair of reading glasses.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
SMALL CHANGE BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Snow vehicle
5 Copying
10 Soft mineral
14 “Meter”
attachment
15 Place Mead
studied
16 “... and others,”
briefly
17 Car renter,
big-time
18 Slimy creature
19 “Golden Fleece”
ship
20 Modern
annoyance
23 Dispatch vessel
24 Rent kin
25 A.M. meal choice
28 “It’s ___ cry
from ...”
30 Gem for Libras
31 Place for
shampoos
33 Suffix with
“symbol”
36 Airy, small car
40 Play segment
41 “The Ram”
42 Light gas?
43 Get ready
44 Coquettes
46 Bullfighters’
procession
49 GPS suggestion
51 Changing place,
miss?
57 Opera
highlight
58 Historic record
59 “Cogito, ___ sum”
60 Squeal
61 Use a sense
62 “Bics” prefix
63 Some poems
64 Like candy
65 Some deer
DOWN
1 Filtered
messages
2 Name on many
waists
3 Musician
Clapton
4 Former
British PM
5 Attack
6 Twinges,
as of hunger
7 Cricket’s stage
8 French black
9 Powerful wind
10 “Coming
next” ad
11 Airy lobbies
12 Nigerian city
13 Exact
duplicate
21 Eggs, fancy
22 Make italics
25 Unconscious
state
26 Colossal
27 “Rave”
companion
28 Beer types
29 “... ___ spacious
skies”
31 Cutting
sound effect
32 Bye, in
old Rome
33 Goat variety
34 Wild plum
35 “... that try ___
souls”
37 December tune
38 Good rock?
39 It’s important to
balance
43 Flower parts
44 ’80s hairstyle
45 For what worth link
46 Teacher of
Aristotle
47 Was broadcast
48 Fence crosser
49 Clean,
as vegetables
50 Address
a crowd
52 Munches
53 Munch,
rat-style
54 Popular cookie
55 Fictional beast
56 Typical farm
sounds
2
3
1 6 7
2 3 9
1 4 3
9
4 8 7
3
7
3 6 1
2
2 7 4
8 7 1
6 4 9
5
9
T h e
B12
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Cambridge student wins scholastic gold
Reading financial aid forms is a
common after-school activity for a lot
of high school seniors as they decide
where they might go to college. For
17-year-old Sam Wachman of Cambridge, funding his future was made
easier by pursuing his passion.
Wachman, who attends Cambridge
Rindge and Latin High School, has
been awarded a national Gold Medal
for his writing portfolio at the
2018 Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, administered by
the national nonprofit Alliance for Young Artists and
Writers.
“There’s a Yiddish verb, to
‘kvell,’ which means to derive immense pride from your kid’s achievement,” said Wachman. “My mom has
been the very embodiment of kvelling
since that phone call. I took the phone
call on speakerphone and my mom
was listening in, and we were both
jumping up and down and screaming.”
One of 16 high school seniors to receive the award, Wachman won a
$10,000 scholarship to fund his higher
education. He’ll be attending Brandeis, where he plans to study creative
writing.
Wachman was recognized first at
the regional level in Massachusetts,
which was presented by the Boston
Globe Foundation in partnership with
the School of the Museum of Fine Arts
at Tufts University. His portfolio, “The
Sketchbook,” included coming-of-age
stories with a LGBTQIA focus.
“When I was beginning to discover
that I was gay, I started to crave
books where I could see myself
reflected in the pages, and
there weren’t enough out
there,” Wachman said. “It’s
so, so important for kids to
be able to see themselves in
media. It’s normalizing. It
makes you feel like you’re a part of
the world at a time in your life when
you tend to feel at odds with it.
“That’s why I focus on LGBT
themes in my work,” he said. “I want
to take my experiences finding my
place in the world as a gay person and
use them to help others find their
places.”
What’s next for the young writer?
He’s working on the first draft of a
novel for his senior project.
The award will be presented to Wachman and the other winners at Carnegie Hall in New York City on June 7.
Guerrero to host podcast about women
Actress and author Diane Guerrero, the
Boston native best known for her roles on
“Orange Is the New Black” and “Jane the
Virgin,” is hosting a new podcast produced
by actress Reese Witherspoon.
Entertainment Weekly reports that Guerrero will host “How It Is,” a podcast focused
on the first-person stories of women. The
first season of the podcast will include five
30-minute episodes, featuring stories from
Tarana Burke, Krista Tippett, Gabrielle
Union, Glennon Doyle, Ellen Pao, and Lena
Waithe, among others, discussing issues
such as anger, power, and freedom.
“ ‘How It Is’ will feature powerful, personal stories told by a diverse group of high-profile women,” Witherspoon’s company, Hello
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Sunshine, said in a statement. “The episodes
will present women — celebrities, activists,
Diane Guerrero (above) will
and ordinary people with extraordinary inhost “How It Is,” produced by
actress Reese Witherspoon.
sight — as experts on their own lives, claiming their power by telling their stories.”
Guerrero, whose memoir “In the Country We Love: My Family Divided” recounts how her immigrant parents were deported from the United States when
she was just 14, will be in town in a few weeks to deliver the commencement address at Regis College in Weston.
TOM FITZSIMMONS
Lithgow takes the stage at JFK Library
Actor John Lithgow is not a politician, but he played one on “The Crown.” Indeed, for our money, his portrayal of
Winston Churchill on the popular Netflix series was the equal of Gary Oldman’s performance as British prime
minister in the movie “Darkest Hour.” Over the weekend, Lithgow was at the JFK Presidential Library, where he
talked about his long and distinguished career — the guy has two Tonys, six Emmys, two Golden Globes, and two
Oscar nominations — with WBUR’s Robin Young. The event was sponsored in part by the Mass Cultural Council.
Notables attend screenings
at Independent Film Festival
Oscar winner Chris Cooper and his wife, Marianne Leone
Cooper, were at the Independent Film Festival Boston for a
screening of “Intelligent Lives,” director Dan Habib’s film focused on three young adults with intellectual disabilities
who challenge perceptions of intelligence as they navigate
high school, college, and the workforce. (Cooper narrates
the film.) . . . Other VIPs at the IFFBoston included celebrated screenwriter/director Paul Schrader, who attended
the screening of his new movie, “First Reformed,” and Rafa­
el Casal and “Hamilton” actor Daveed Diggs, whose new
film, “Blindspotting,” screened at the festival.
Chris (left) and Marianne Cooper with Dan Habib.
MORE CELEBRITY NEWS
Foy to receive back pay
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Team owners cheer Celtics to playoff victory
Anyone else notice that the owners
of three of the four major Boston
sports teams were sitting together
at the Celtics playoff game the other night? C’s owner Wyc Grous­
beck and wife Emilia Fazzalari
picked a good game to host Patriots owner Robert Kraft and Ricki
Lander, and Red Sox boss John
Henry and his wife, Globe managing director Linda Pizzuti Henry.
(Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs,
whose team played earlier in the
day in Tampa, was MIA.) We’re told
that Kraft, Lander, Grousbeck, and
Fazzalari dined at Scampo before
the game. . . . Meanwhile, former
Patriots receiver Danny Amendola
is still around despite signing with
the Dolphins. Amendola stopped into the Back Bay Social Club over
the weekend, having a salad and
and chowder — and a glass of Pinot
noir — with a pal. . . . Pats defensive back Duron Harmon and his
girlfriend dined at Empire in the
Seaport. . . . And 1980 Olympic hero Mike Eruzione celebrated his
son’s 30th birthday party at King
Seaport. . . . Clay Cook, a multiinstrumentalist in the Zac Brown
Band, did a pretty fair rendition of
the national anthem on Autism
Awareness Day at Fenway Saturday. Cook will be back soon because the ZBB performs at the ballpark June 15 and 16.
Globe correspondent Sophie Cannon
contributed. Read local celebrity news
at www.bostonglobe.com/names.
Names can be reached at
names@globe.com or at 617-9298253.
Unconditionally
REGINALD THOMAS II/BOSTON RED SOX
Actress Claire Foy will get what she
deserves after all.
The Daily Mail reports that Foy, 34,
will receive about $275,000 in back
pay after it was revealed that Foy, who
plays Queen Elizabeth II on “The
Crown,” earned less than her costar
Matt Smith, who played her on-screen
husband, Prince Philip, over the
course of two seasons.
The sum is designed to make up for
the wage disparity between the two.
Last month, producers Suzanne
Mackie and Andy Harries said at a
panel at the INTV Conference in Jerusalem that Smith, 35, received a bigger
paycheck because of his higher profile
coming off “Doctor Who.”
“Going forward, no one gets paid
more than the queen,” Mackie said at
the time.
The UK production company behind the Netflix drama later issued an
apology for putting the stars in the
middle of a pay equity debate.
“We want to apologize to both
Claire Foy and to Matt Smith, brilliant
actors and friends, who have found
themselves at the center of a media
storm this week through no fault of
their own,” Left Bank Pictures said in a
statement, according to Deadline.
The statement continued: “As the
producers of ‘The Crown,’ we at Left
Bank Pictures are responsible for budgets and salaries; the actors are not
aware of who gets what, and cannot
be held personally responsible for the
pay of their colleagues.”
Foy recently told Entertainment
Weekly that she was not surprised that
the news drew so much attention.
“I’m surprised because I’m at the
center of it, and anything that I’m at
the center of like that is very very odd,
and feels very, very out of ordinary,”
she said. “But I’m not [surprised about
the interest in the story] in the sense
that it was a female-led drama. I’m not
surprised that people saw [the story]
and went, ‘Oh, that’s a bit odd.’ But I
NETFLIX
Claire Foy will reportedly receive
about $275,000 in back pay for
work on the Netflix drama “The
Crown.”
know that Matt feels the same that I
do, that it’s odd to find yourself at the
center [of a story] that you didn’t particularly ask for.”
Smith told The Hollywood Reporter that he supports his costar completely.
“Claire is one of my best friends,
and I believe that we should be paid
equally and fairly and there should be
equality for all,” he said. “I support her
completely, and I’m pleased that it was
resolved and they made amends for it
because that’s what needed to happen.
Going forward, I think we should all
bear in mind that we need to strive to
make this better and a more even playing field for everyone involved — but
not just in our industry, in all industries.”
Foy and Smith won’t reprise their
roles for future seasons, with the role
of Queen Elizabeth being taken by
“Broadchurch” actress Olivia Colman
and Prince Philip by Tobias Menzies
of “Game of Thrones.” (The Daily
Mail/People Magazine)
‘When you get hit sideways, you get hit sideways. You don’t pick who
you fall in love with.’ ORLANDO BLOOM, actor, talking about his romance with singer Katy Perry
Business
C
T H E B O S T O N GL OB E T U E SDAY, M AY 1 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N GL OB E .C O M /B US I N E S S
Hiawatha Bray
TECH LAB
Sprint, T­Mobile merger
is still a bad connection
E
nough with the sequels.
I didn’t like it the first
showing, and remain opposed as ever to “The Deal
That Wouldn’t Die,” otherwise known
as the resurrected plan to merge the
nation’s third- and fourth-largest cellphone companies, T-Mobile US Inc.
and Sprint Corp.
We went through this last fall,
when the two companies came very
close to tying up. Then, as now, the
deal makes lots of sense for Sprint,
which has about 41 million subscribers, and T-Mobile, with 59 million.
Everyone has a cellphone, so the two
companies are about as big as they’re
ever going to get. A combined T-Mobile-Sprint will have about as many
customers as the top two companies,
AT&T Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc.
But the deal would leave the United States with just three nationwide
wireless carriers, rather than four.
That will almost certainly mean higher prices and fewer innovative services. Back in 2011, when the US Justice
Department refused to allow AT&T to
TECH LAB, Page C4
JUSTIN LANE/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/SHUTTERSTOCK
Marcelo Claure (left), Sprint’s CEO, and John Legere, CEO of TMobile, shared some high spirits during an interview in New York.
‘We think this is a good start and we’re looking forward to working with everyone to make a great project.’
DON CHIOFARO, developer who received permission to move forward on a 600-foot tower near the New England Aquarium
NICHOLAS PFOSI FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
State environmental regulators gave a go-ahead for a new zoning plan for a 42-acre stretch of the Boston waterfront running from Long Wharf to the Moakley Bridge.
Harbor
zoning
approved
Tower allowed near
Aquarium, also at
Hook Lobster site
By Tim Logan
GLOBE STAFF
It only took a decade, but zoning for a
key stretch of Boston’s downtown waterfront finally got the green light from state
environmental regulators Monday, giving
developer Don Chiofaro long-awaited permission to move forward on a 600-foot
tower near the New England Aquarium.
Now comes round two.
State Environmental Secretary Matt
Beaton approved the city of Boston’s new
zoning plan for a 42-acre stretch of the
waterfront running from Long Wharf to
the Moakley Bridge. The new rules will allow larger buildings on two sites in particular, the Harbor Garage on Atlantic where
Chiofaro would place a $1.3 billion skyscraper, and the Hook Lobster site at the
foot of the Northern Avenue bridge,
where the Hook family is partnering with
developers to propose a 305-foot tower.
The plan would also set aside more
open space in the area, including funding
for a “signature” park along the historic
Chart House on Long Wharf.
The state essentially endorsed a city
plan that came after five years of public
meetings and closed-door wrangling. The
developers must now go back to City Hall
and file specific building proposals, probably inviting yet more pushback from
neighbors and interest groups.
Chiofaro said he expects to file specifics for his tower “pretty quickly.”
“We think this is a good start and we’re
looking forward to working with everyone to make a great project,” Chiofaro
said. “We’re eager to get going.”
The state approval also enshrines a
deal that Chiofaro struck to protect the
Aquarium from lost business if construction makes it too difficult for visitors to
get to the popular attraction. He has
agreed to create a fund worth up to $30
million to recoup lost revenue, and to permanently set aside parking for Aquarium
visitors in his new building, as well as
contribute $10 million to proposed a
“Blue Way” park the Aquarium plans to
build on Central Wharf.
The Aquarium said in a statement that
it appreciated Beaton “taking the time to
understand our concerns” and working
them into the agreement.
“We expect to move forward as firm
advocates for these and related survivability points in our ongoing conversations
with the developer,” the Aquarium said.
Other opposition remains.
However, the plan does little to mollify
Chiofaro’s other neighbors — particularly
residents of the Harbor Towers condominiums, who are concerned about parking, open space, and other impacts that
Chiofaro’s tower could have on the bustling patch of waterfront. Lee Kozol, who
chairs a committee of Harbor Tower residents, said he was “disappointed” in the
state ruling, saying it failed to protect
public access to the waterfront.
HARBOR GARAGE, Page C4
Middle­class wages lag Hackers get $10,000 in bitcoin ransom
as others begin to rise after cyberattack on Leominster schools
Factors creating
discrepancies
remain unclear
By Evan Horowitz
GLOBE STAFF
Behind all the good economic news of recent years,
from rising GDP to shrinking
unemployment,
QUICK there has been one
STUDY stubborn and persistent sign of weakness: limited wage gains for
US workers. But that may finally be changing — at least,
for those outside the middle
class.
Average wages in the private sector rose nearly 3 percent between the early 2017
and the beginning of 2018, according to data released Friday
by the L abor Depar tment .
That’s vastly better than the
roughly 2 percent annual raises that have typified our long
recovery since 2010.
Even better, the gains seem
to be spreading across regions
and industries, with benefits
to higher-wage and lowerwage earners alike.
Nearly ever y area of the
country saw wage gains approaching that 3 percent figure, from the Northeast to the
Deep South — and up and
down the West Coast.
And it’s not just executives,
managers, and other high-income folks who are benefitting. Some of the biggest gains
are flowing into the pockets of
low earners.
Over the past year, lowerwage workers have actually
seen their paychecks rise
slightly faster than those at the
top — and far faster than those
in the middle. The gap is espeQUICK STUDY, Page C5
Officials say
they had no
choice but to
meet demands
By Andy Rosen
GLOBE STAFF
The hackers were hunting
for vulnerable computer systems and in mid-March they
found a mark: the Leominster
public schools.
With their system locked
down by a ransomware attack
that encrypted data and froze
e-mails, Leominster school officials said they had no choice
but to pay $10,000 to a suspected ring of international
hackers.
The relatively small-scale
attack is an example of a growing threat to municipal bodies
RITCHIE B. TONGO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
A ransomware cyberattack captured on a laptop.
and small organizations from
so-called ransomware, which
is a type of malicious software
that hackers use to hold vulnerable systems hostage. Ransomware was used in spectacular worldwide attacks such as
the 2017 “WannaCry” bug that
hit workplac e s and users
across the globe. But researche r s s ay t h e r e h av e b e e n a
steady stream of less-noticed
incidents such as the one in
Leominster.
“The target has changed,”
said Ross Rustici, senior direc-
tor of intelligence services at
the Boston cybersecurity startup Cybereason. “Municipalities are really the low-hanging
fruit . . . because they don’t
have the cybersecurity budgets
that corporations do.”
Though WannaCry triggered concern around the
world, a computer programmer in England discovered a
“kill switch” that significantly
slowed the spread of that malware.
A ransomware attack laid
low Atlanta’s entire computer
system for six days in March,
preventing the city from conducting even the most basic
business, such as collecting for
parking tickets and other bills.
And a ransomware assault hit
Baltimore’s 911 dispatch system around the same time.
S u c h att a cks c a n c om e
RANSOMWARE, Page C4
C2
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Decision on tariffs on allies is delayed
By Ana Swanson
NEW YORK TIMES
WA S H I N G T O N — T h e
Trump administration has delayed a decision about whether
to impose steel and aluminum
tariffs on the European Union,
Canada and Mexico for another
30 days, giving key allies a reprieve as the countries carry
out further negotiations, a person familiar with the discussions said Monday evening.
The 25 percent tariffs on
steel and 10 percent on aluminum were set to go into effect
May 1. The administration,
which granted temporary exemptions to a handful of countries in March, has also reached
initial agreements with Argentina, Australia, and Brazil that
will allow them to avoid, at
least for now, the tariffs. Details
of those agreements will be finalized in the next 30 days, the
person said.
President Trump’s decision
temporarily puts off a controversial announcement that
could have imposed stiff tariffs
on close US allies and prompt-
LEGAL NOTICES
ed swift retaliation on American products in return.
The Trump administration
had been seeking concessions
from these countries in exchange for not allowing the tariffs to go into effect, betting that
the threat of tariffs would pressure allies and trading partners
to renegotiate trading terms in
America’s favor. But while the
threat of tariffs had helped finalize a continuing deal with
South Korea, there has been little indication that nations like
the European Union would fold
to White House demands.
European officials have held
firm to its insistence that the
trade measures violate international trading law. The temporary extension is unlikely to satisfy the European Union, whose
leaders have said they do not
want to negotiate under threat
and have demanded a permanent and unconditional exemption from the tariffs.
If the tariffs do go into effect
after the 30-day reprieve, Europe has promised swift retaliation. It has drawn up a lengthy
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
Premises: 152 Callender Street, Unit #1, 152 Callender
Street Condominium Dorchester (Boston), MA
By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Priscilla V. Graham
to Shawmut Mortgage Company and now held by Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency, said mortgage dated
December 20, 1990, and recorded with the Suffolk County
Registry of Deeds in Book 16641, Page 253, said mortgage
was assigned from Shawmut Mortgage Company to Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency by assignment dated
December 20,1990 and recorded with said Registry of
Deeds in Book 16641 at Page 288, for breach of the conditions in said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing
the same will be sold at Public Auction on May 15, 2018 at
11:00 AM Local Time upon the premises, directly in front of
the building in which the unit is located, all and singular the
premises described in said mortgage, to wit:
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
STATE OF VERMONT
SUPERIOR COURT
CIVIL DIVISION
RUTLAND UNIT
DOCKET NO. 229-6-17 Rdcv
City of Newton
Legal Notice
Tuesday, May 15, 2018
KILLINGTON TOWNHOUSES
CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.,
PAUL KAUFMAN and GREGORY J. CAVA
Plaintiffs
v.
INTERVAL OWNERS OF KILLINGTON
TOWNHOUSES
Defendants
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF SERVICE BY PUBLICATION
Name
the unit (“Unit”) Number 1 of the 152 Callender Street
Condominium (the “Condominium”), located in Dorchester
Massachusetts, which Condominium was created pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter l83A by the recording of a Master
Deed (the “Master Deed”) dated September 20, 1990 and
recorded on October 19, 1990 with Suffolk Registry of
Deeds, in Book 16544, Page 001, and amended December
18, 1990, recorded herewith as Instrument No.
Carol Luttrell
Said Unit contains approximately 1,088 square feet and is
shown on the floor plans of the Building recorded with the
Master Deed on the floor plan attached hereto and made
a part hereof, to which is affixed with verified statement in
the form required by said Chapter 183A, Section 9.
Said Unit is hereby conveyed together with:
1.
An undivided 33 1/3 percent (%) interest in the Common Areas and Facilities of the Condominium, as it may be
amended pursuant to provisions of the Master Deed:
2. The exclusive right to use Parking Spaces on an
unassigned basis:
3.
The exclusive right to use those Common Areas and
Facilities appurtenant to said Unit as set forth in the Master
Deed:
4. All other rights, easements, agreements, interests and
provisions contained in the Master Deed, the Declaration
of Trust of the Condominium recorded with said Registry of
Deeds in Book 16544, Page 030 (the “Declaration of Trust”)
and the Rules and Regulations adopted pursuant thereto
(the “Rules and Regulations”), as any of the same may be
amended from time to time pursuant to the provisions
thereof.
Said Unit is conveyed subject to and with the benefit of:
1. The provisions of Chapter l83A as the same may be
amended from time to time:
2. The provisions of the Master Deed (including, without
limitation, the title matters set forth in Exhibit A to the Master Deed and the Grantor’s rights to add additional phases
to the Condominium as set forth in the Master Deed, the
Declaration of Trust and the Rules and Regulations, in each
case as the same may be amended from time to time pursuant to the provisions thereof:
3. Real estate taxes assessed against the Unit and the
Common Areas and Facilities which are not yet due and
payable:
4. Provisions of existing building and zoning laws.
Subject to the covenant for Affordable Housing and Buildable Lot Deed Rider set forth in a Deed from the City of
Boston, dated October 25, 1988, recorded with said Deeds,
Book 15182, Page 1, subject to the covenant for Affordable Housing as set forth in Deed Rider A which is attached
hereto and incorporated herein by reference.
The rights, agreements, easements, restrictions, provisions
and interests set forth above, together with any amendments thereto shall constitute covenants running with the
land and shall inure to the benefit of and bind, as the case
may be, any person having any time any interest or estate
in the Unit, his agents, employees, licensees, visitors and
lessees as though the same were fully set forth herein.
The description of the property contained in the
mortgage shall control in the event of a typographical error
in this publication.
For Mortgagor’s Title see deed dated December 18,
1990, and recorded in the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds,
in Book 16641, Page 234.
Said Unit will be conveyed together with an undivided
percentage interest in the Common Elements of said
Condominium appurtenant to said Unit and together with
all rights, easements, covenants and agreements as contained and referred to in the Declaration of Condominium,
as amended.
TERMS OF SALE: Said premises will be sold and
conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes,
tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which
take precedence over the said mortgage above described.
FIVE THOUSAND ($5,000.00) Dollars of the purchase
price must be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by
the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be
paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s
check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Shechtman Halperin Savage, LLP
1080 Main Street
Pawtucket, RI 02860
Attorney for Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency
Present Holder of the Mortgage
(401) 272-1400
NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S OF REAL ESTATE
Premises: 113 Sumner Street, Unit 72, Carlton Wharf
Condominium, East Boston (Boston), MA
By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained
in a certain mortgage given by Kristin M. Langone to City
of Boston Credit Union, said mortgage dated July 16, 2007,
and recorded with the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in
Book 42150, Page 192, for breach of the conditions in said
mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will
be sold at Public Auction on May 15, 2018 at 12:00 PM Local Time upon the premises, directly in front of the building
in which the unit is located, all and singular the premises
described in said mortgage, to wit:
Unit 72 in the Carlton Wharf Condominium established
by Master Deed dated April 15, 2005 recorded with the
Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 37009, Page 97,
together with a 4.14 percent undivided interest in the common areas and facilities of the Condominium as set forth in
the Master Deed and such other privileges and obligations
including an easement for the exclusive use of certain
common areas of the Carlton Wharf Condominium, all as
further described in the Master Deed.
The unit is also subject to the provisions of the Declaration of Trust of Carlton Wharf Condominium dated April 15,
2005 and recorded with said Deeds in Book 37009, Page
116.
The property contains approximately 956 square feet
of floor area and has a property address of 113 Sumner
Street, Unit 72, East Boston, MA 02128.
A deed conveying the unit from Gary Fanjiang to Kristin M.
Langone is recorded herewith.
The description of the property contained in the mortgage shall control in the event of a typographical error in
this publication.
For Mortgagor’s Title see deed dated May 29, 2007, and
recorded in the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds, in Book
42150, Page 186.
Said Unit will be conveyed together with an undivided percentage interest in the Common Elements of said
Condominium appurtenant to said Unit and together with
all rights, easements, covenants and agreements as contained and referred to in the Declaration of Condominium,
as amended.
TERMS OF SALE: Said premises will be sold and conveyed
subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles,
municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.
FIVE THOUSAND ($5,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price
must be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or
cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the
purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid
in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check
within thirty (30) days after the date of sale.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Shechtman Halperin Savage, LLP
1080 Main Street
Pawtucket, RI 02860
Attorney for City of Boston Credit Union
Present Holder of the Mortgage
(401) 272-1400
list of US products it would penalize if the tariffs went into effect, including orange juice,
cranberries, motorcycles, and
bluejeans. It has also asked to
join a dispute China brought at
the World Trade Organization
against the US steel and aluminum tariffs.
An extension of the tariff
deadline was more widely expected for Canada and Mexico,
which are still entrenched in
negotiations with the United
States over the future of the
North American Free Trade
Agreement. Though differences
of opinion remain, officials
from the countries insist they
are making quick progress toward a goal of concluding their
talks by the end of May.
Meanwhile, China says it
will refuse to discuss Trump’s
two toughest trade demands
when US officials arrive in Beijing this week, potentially derailing the high-level talks.
The Chinese government is
publicly calling for flexibility on
both sides. But senior Beijing
officials do not plan to discuss
Interval #
C3-1
Michael Towlsen D1-30 &
B2-5
Kevin Gibbs
A2-8
Albert Eng
C3-18
Estate of
Elliott Black
D3-20
Paul Nutile and
Christin. Diruzza C2-30
Last Known Address
131 Main St., Apt. 1,
Boston, MA 02127
27 North St.,
West Warren, MA 01092
18 Townline Rd.,
Franklin, MA 02038
51 Cotter Lane,
Chestnut Hill, MA 02467
19 School Street,
Ipswich, MA 01938
44th Street
Newbury, MA 01951
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF PARTITION ACTION
Buildings B, C, and D, and the Administrative Office of the
Killington Townhouses Condominium located at 48 Innsbruck Lane in Killington, Vermont were destroyed by fire on
March 6 and 7, 2015, and Building A was damaged by the
fire. According to the records of the Killington Townhouses
Condominium Association, you are listed as the owner of
the above-referenced Interval at the Killington Townhouse
Condominium. Pursuant to the Killington Townhouses
Declaration of Condominium and 27A VSA §2-124, Plaintiffs have commenced a partition action that involves you
and the other Interval Owners at the Killington Townhouses
Condominium. A copy of the Plaintiffs’ partition action is
on file and may be obtained at the office of the Clerk of
this Court, 83 Center Street, Rutland, Vermont. Plaintiffs
seek to partition of the condominium property, authorize
the Board of Directors of the Association to sell the condominium property, determine the net proceeds of insurance paid as a result of the fire and the proceeds of sale of
the condominium property, pay the Association’s costs of
this action including its attorney’s fees, distribute the net
proceeds of insurance and the net proceeds of sale of the
condominium property to the Interval Owners, subject to
adjustment for delinquent assessments, and terminate the
common interest community.
If you desire to participate in this suit, each of you is
summoned to give or mail a written response, called an
Answer, to the Plaintiffs within 42 days after the date on
which this Summons and Notice was first published, which
is June 12, 2018. If you choose to participate in this action
you must send a copy of your Answer to A. Jay Kenlan, Esq.,
the Plaintiffs’ attorney, at 25 Washington Street, Rutland, VT
05701. You must also give or mail your Answer to the Court
located at: Vermont Superior Court, Rutland Unit, 83 Center
Street, Rutland, VT 05701.
ORDER
The Affidavit of Jaye Thompson filed in this action shows
that service of the partition action cannot be made on you
with due diligence by any of the method provided in Rule
4(d)-(f), (k), or (l) of the Vermont Rules of Civil Procedure,
and that service by publication is appropriate. Accordingly,
it is ORDERED that service of the Summons set forth above
shall be made upon the above-named Defendants by publication as provided in Rules 4(d)(1) and 4(g) of those Rules.
This Order shall be published once a week for two (2)
weeks at least seven (7) days apart beginning on May 1,
2018, in the Boston Globe, a newspaper of general circulation in Massachusetts.
Dated at Rutland, Vermont, this 26th day of April 2018.
SAMUEL HOAR, JR.
/s/ Samuel Hoar, Jr.
Presiding Judge, Superior Court,
Civil Division, Rutland Unit
City of Newton
Legal Notice
Tuesday, May 8, 2018
Public hearings will be held
on Tuesday, May 8, 2018
at 7:00 PM, second floor,
Newton City Hall before the
Land Use Committee of the
Newton City Council for the
purpose of hearing the following petitions at which
time all parties interested
in the items shall be heard.
Notice will be published
Tuesday, April 24, 2018 and
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 in The
Boston Globe and Wednesday, May 2, 2018 in the
Newton Tab, with a copy
posted on the city’s website
at www.newtonma.gov and
in a conspicuous place at
Newton City Hall.
#213-18 Special Permit Petition to extend nonconforming front setback at 140 Windermere Rd
JOHN AND DANIEL ARONE
petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL to
FURTHER EXTEND NONCONFORMING SETBACK by constructing a second-floor deck
above the existing sunporch,
extending the existing nonconforming setback vertically
at 140 Windermere Road,
Ward 4, Auburndale, on land
known as Section 43, Block
08, Lot 19, containing approximately 12,445 sq. ft. of land
in a district zoned SNIGLE
RESIDENCE 2. Ref: 7.3, 7.4,
3.1.3, 7.8.2.C.2 of Chapter
30 of the City of Newton Rev
Zoning Ord, 2015.
#214-18 Special Permit Petition to exceed FAR and lot
coverage at 458 Woodward
Street
STEFFI AND ERIC KARP petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE
PLAN APPROVAL to relocate
stairs and enclose an existing porch, further increasing
the existing nonconforming
lot coverage and nonconforming FAR to .63 where .59
exists and .44 is allowed at
458 Woodward Street, Ward
5, Waban, on land known as
Section 53, Block 26, Lot 16,
containing
approximately
6,276 sq. ft. of land in a
district zoned SINGLE RESIDENCE 2. Ref: 7.3, 7.4, 3.1.3,
3.1.9, 7.8.2.C.2 of Chapter
30 of the City of Newton Rev
Zoning Ord, 2015.
#215-18 Special Permit Petition to allow a rear-lot subdivision at 156 Otis Street
156 OTIS STREET LLC petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE
PLAN APPROVAL to allow a
rear lot subdivision to create two lots, raze the existing
single-family dwelling and
construct single-family dwellings on each lot at 156 Otis
Street, Ward 2, West Newton,
on land known as Section 24,
Block 13, Lot 14A, containing approximately 43,700 sq.
ft. of land in a district zoned
SINGLE RESIDENCE 2. Ref:
7.3, 7.4, 3.1.5, 3.1.10 and
5.4.2.B of Chapter 30 of the
City of Newton Rev Zoning
Ord, 2015.
***
You may call the City Council
Office at 617-796-1210 for
information.
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Public hearings will be held
on Tuesday, May 15, 2018
at 7:00 PM, second floor,
Newton City Hall before the
Land Use Committee of the
Newton City Council for the
purpose of hearing the following petitions at which
time all parties interested
in the items shall be heard.
Notice will be published
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 and
Tuesday, May 8, 2018 in The
Boston Globe and Wednesday, May 9, 2018 in the
Newton Tab, with a copy
posted on the city’s website
at www.newtonma.gov and
in a conspicuous place at
Newton City Hall.
#217-18 Petition to amend
Order #275-14 to allow for-a
learning center at 320 Needham St FUSION EDUCATION
INC./320 NEEDHAM DE, LLC.
petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL to
amend Special Permit Board
Order #275-14 to allow a forprofit learning center in the
existing office space, at 230
Needham Street, Ward 8,
Newton Upper Falls, on land
known as Section 83, Block
31, Lot 26, containing approximately 97,600 sq. ft. of land
in a district zoned MULTI USE
1. Ref: 7.3, 7.4, 4.4.1, 6.3.14,
5.1.13 of the City of Newton
Rev Zoning Ord, 2015.
#216-18
Special
Permit
Petition to amend Council
Order#96-17 for Washington
Place MARK NEWTONVILLE,
LLC petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL to
amend Council Order #96-17
to allow for a substitution
of the previously approved
plans for the 140-unit development option with plans for
a revised 140-unit development option, which results
in a hybrid between the
originally approved 140-unit
development option and the
160-unit development option
by adding a fifth floor to the
middle building fronting on
Washington Street, and reducing massing at the rear
of the east building along
Walnut Street. The additional
massing along Washington
Street reflects what was already approved for the 160unit scheme. The proposed
amendment results in an
overall increase of 1,970 sq.
ft. to the 140-unit plan to accommodate the new layout
but there is a total reduction
of 14,575 sq. ft. compared
with the approved 160-unit
development option.
The
proposed amendment adds
170 sq. ft. of commercial
square footage and relocates two at-grade parking
stalls to the underground
parking garage. In addition,
the petitioner is requesting
an amendment to Condition
24(i) to make the provision
of a final Inclusionary Housing Plan and Affirmative
Fair Marketing and Resident
Selection Plan a condition
precedent to the issuance
of a temporary certificate of
occupancy instead of a building permit at 22 Washington
Terrace, 16-18 Washington
Terrace, 10-12 Washington
Terrace, 6-8 Washington Terrace, 875 Washington Street,
869 Washington Street, 867
Washington Street, 861-865
Washington Street, 857-859
Washington Street, 845-855
Washington Street, 245-261
Walnut Street, 241 Walnut
Street, 22 Bailey Place, 14-18
Bailey Place, an unnumbered
lot on Bailey Place, and the
private way known as Bailey
Place, also identified as Section 21, Block 29, Lots 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18,
19, 19A, 20, 21, 22, and 23,
containing
approximately
123,956 sq. ft of land in a district zoned BU1, BU2, Public
Use (Board Order #95-17 approved for MU4 upon exercise of #96-17) Ref.: Sections
7.3, 7.4 of Chapter 30 of the
City of Newton Revised Zoning Ordinances, 2015.
***
You may call the City Council
Office at 617-796-1210 for
information.
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE.
Notice is hereby given that
PODS Enterprises, LLC will
sell the contents of certain
containers at auction to the
highest bidder.
Auctions
will be held at 625 University Ave, Norwood, MA 02062
on May 16, 2018 starting at
12PM. Contents to be sold
may include general household goods, electronics, office & business equipment,
furniture, clothing and other
miscellaneous
property.
Contents are stored by the
following persons: Maria
Cabral, Patrick Brennan,
Joseph Timmons and Matthew Hadley.
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Section.
powered by
the two biggest requests that
the Trump administration has
made over the past several
months, according to people involved in Chinese policymaking.
Those include a mandatory
$100 billion cut in the United
States’ $375 billion annual
trade deficit with China and
curbs on Beijing’s $300 billion
plan to bankroll the country’s
industrial upgrade into advanced technologies like artificial intelligence, semiconductors, electric cars, and commercial aircraft.
The reason: Beijing feels its
economy has become big
enough and resilient enough to
stand up to the United States.
A half-dozen senior Chinese
officials and two dozen influential advisers laid out the Chinese government’s position in
detail during a three-day seminar that ended here late Monday morning. All of the officials
and most of the advisers at the
seminar insisted on anonymity
because of diplomatic sensitivities.
CEO of
Keryx has
resigned
By Jonathan Saltzman
GLOBE STAFF
The chief executive of Keryx
Biopharmaceuticals Inc., Gregory P. Madison, has resigned,
the company said Monday, but
did not provide a specific reason for his departure.
Madison, who also gave up
his seat on the board, had
served as CEO of Boston-based
Keryx since April 2015, and
joined the company the previous year as president and chief
operating officer. Keryx is in
the Seaport District and develops medicines for kidney diseases.
“On behalf of the entire
board, I would like to thank
Greg for his contributions to
Keryx over the past four years,
in particular for his role in
transitioning Keryx from a development-stage organization
to a commercial entity,” Michael Rogers, chairman of the
board of directors, said in a
news release.
Jodie Morrison, a board
member and former CEO of
Tokai Pharmaceuticals Inc.,
will be Keryx’s interim chief executive while the company
searches for a replacement.
Madison could not be
reached for comment. The
company’s stock closed down
7.3 percent, to $4.43 on the
Nasdaq exchange, giving it a
market valuation of $528 million.
A company spokeswoman,
Amy Sullivan, said that he resigned last Friday and that
“there are no improprieties
surrounding Greg’s resignation.”
Reni Benjamin, an analyst
with Raymond James & Associates Inc., said he too was reassured by Keryx chief financial
officer, Scott A. Holmes, that
the resignation “wasn’t due to
any impropriety. But that’s all
we know.”
Keryx is expecting to report
revenue for the first quarter of
2018 of $21 million to $22.5
million, including at least $20
million in net US sales of Auryxia, a kidney disease drug.
“The revenues were in line
with analysts’ expectations,”
said Benjamin, who remains
bullish on Keryx and believes it
will soon top $100 million in
annual sales.
The Food and Drug Administration approved Auryxia in
2014 for chronic kidney disease patients on dialysis. Last
November, the FDA expanded
its use to include the treatment
of iron deficiency anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease who weren’t on dialysis.
Madison, who holds a business undergraduate degree
from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is a veteran
of the biopharma industry. His
prior employers include AMAG
Pharmaceuticals of Waltham
and Genzyme Corp. of Cambridge.
Jonathan Saltzman can be
reached at jsaltzman@
globe.com
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Bold Types
A powerful inspiration
As she hands out $10,000 donations to various nonprofits,
PowerOptions chief executive Cindy Arcate wants you think
about Newman’s Own.
Salad dressing and New England’s energy market don’t have
much in common. But Arcate sees a kinship with the late actor
Paul Newman’s namesake food company, which is known for
distributing its profits to charities.
“My new mantra is, ‘We’re the Newman’s Own of the energy
business,’ ” Arcate says. “We still
have to make sure our salad
dressing tastes good but we
also have to diversify our
product line and go into
popcorn and tomato
sauce. We’re giving back
to our members, and we’re
still very much a business.”
Boston-based PowerOptions celebrates its 20th
anniversary this year. To
mark the occasion, the energy-buying cooperative is
donating $10,000 to 20 organizations and electric vehicle
chargers to another 20. The
festivities kick off on Tuesday
at the Charles River Center, a
Needham organization that
serves developmentally disabled individuals and is one of
the winners.
Arcate will be joined by US
Representative Joe Kennedy CHRIS MORRIS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
and Charles River Center CEO
Anne­Marie Bajwa. Other recipients are located all over the
state, from the Animal Rescue League in Boston, to the Ecotari­
um in Worcester, to Bay Path University in Longmeadow.
In at least one important way, PowerOptions has been giving
back to its nonprofit and public agency clients since its inception
around the time the Legislature deregulated the electricity market two decades ago. PowerOptions uses the combined purchasing power of its membership — which includes a number of big
universities and hospitals — to negotiate good deals on electricity.
Since Arcate joined PowerOptions in 2009, the organization’s
budget has grown from less than $1 million to $2.5 million, and
its staff grew from three to 10 employees. (Arcate joined when
PowerOptions was being spun off — it was once a program run
by a now-defunct quasi-public agency — to become a standalone
nonprofit.) She has helped expand its offerings, including introducing a successful solar program for members. — JON CHESTO
Bureau more diverse
The Greater Boston Con­
vention & Visitors Bureau has
added three people of color to
its 13-member, all-white, strategic planning committee.
Carole Copeland Thomas,
Rafael Torres, and Robin
Parker were appointed last
week.
Their appointments come
after the bureau was forced to
restart a search process for a
new leader when the Globe
began reporting that no people of color had made the
short list. The strategic committee played a role in the
search process.
Thomas, Torres, and Parker sit on the bureau’s board,
and all three are also members of the bureau’s multicultural committee, which works
to attract minority conventions and meetings to Boston.
Thomas is a diversity consul­
tant and speaker; Torres is
owner of Don Quijote Tours;
and Parker is from Harvard
University’s Office of Public
Affairs.
Thomas, who chairs the
multicultural committee, said
the new strategic committee
members plan to make their
voices heard.
“We are not going to be tokens,” said Thomas. “We’re going to be actively participating.” — SHIRLEY LEUNG
Aid for CJP building
By his own admission,
Robert Kraft is not one to
spend money sticking his family’s name on buildings. As far
as philanthropy goes, he says
he prefers to pay for direct services to help people in need.
Kraft says he makes an exception when a particular
building has ties to spirituality. His latest endeavor fits that
description — and also helps
people in need.
The renovated Combined
Jewish Philanthropies building on High Street will now be
known as the Kraft Family
Building.
On Friday the New Eng­
land Patriots owner took an
oversized pair of scissors to a
ribbon in front of the building, which underwent a $17
million modernization. He
was joined by two of his sons,
Jonathan and Dan, Dan’s wife,
Wendy, and departing CJP
president Barry Shrage.
Kraft was the largest donor, with a $10 million gift.
Among the new features: the
Myra Kraft Boardroom,
named after Kraft’s late wife, a
regular visitor to the nine-story building that CJP acquired
in 1994.
Kraft briefly met with reporters before heading inside.
They were asked to keep questions to the CJP project. “We
need more spirituality in this
country at this time,” Kraft
said.
He grew wistful as he talked about how he thought of
his wife, as he toured the remodeled space. “I saw her everywhere,” Kraft said. “I hope
she’s with us today.”
— JON CHESTO
Honoring the Kings
Coretta Scott King last visited the New England Conser­
vatory, her alma mater, to give
the commencement address
in 2004. She died two years
later.
Her impact on the school,
however, has been permanent.
NEC last week unveiled a donor-funded bronze sculpture of
the civil rights activist, who
met future husband Martin
Luther King Jr. while both were
studying in Boston. (MLK was
at Boston University, earning
his doctorate in theology.)
The goal of the sculpture:
to recognize her longstanding
efforts towards diversity, inclusion, and equality.
“The presence of her bust
at the library, in a prominent
location, [shows] that these
kinds of things are important
for us to be talking about,”
says Tom Novak, the conser­
vatory’s interim president.
The sculpture’s arrival coincides with a more ambitious
project, initiated by entrepre­
neur Paul English, to honor
the Kings and their time in
Boston. English has already
committed $1 million to the
initiative and hopes to raise at
least another $4 million. He
says interest has grown and
the project may involve more
than one location in the city.
English says he’s excited
about the NEC sculpture. “It is
impossible to tell the MLK
story without mentioning
Coretta. She was not only his
number one supporter during
his life, but she continued his
work in the decades after his
death.”
Novak says NEC officials
didn’t know about English’s
project when they began planning their own. The timing, he
says, is fortuitous.
“To many of our students,
the 1960s seem like a very
long time ago,” Novak says,
“and yet we are still facing
some of the same issues today.” — JON CHESTO
Can’t keep a secret? Tell us. Email Bold Types at
boldtypes@globe.com.
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
C3
TALKING POINTS
HEALTH CARE
AMERICAN WELL
ACQUIRES
ANOTHER FIRM
IN TELEHEALTH
INDUSTRY
ENERGY
MARATHON
PETROLEUM
TO BUY RIVAL FOR
$23.3B IN LARGEST
OIL REFINER DEAL
Agenda
American Well, a Boston company that provides technology for doctors to consult with
patients via videoconferencing, has acquired another firm in the so-called telehealth
industry, Avizia. While American Well focuses on connecting doctors to patients who don’t
have access to in-person health care or certain specialties, Avizia focuses on remote
communication directly between clinicians. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Avizia is
based in Virginia and reports more than 1,300 hospital deployments, while American Well
said its products are used by 75 health systems. The goal of the acquisition is to allow
American Well to not only connect health care providers with patients wherever they are,
but also to connect local clinicians with specialists to consult about a patient’s specific
issues. “You may have a rural hospital that needs a neurologist but doesn’t have one on
staff,” said American Well chief executive Dr. Roy Schoenberg. “Bringing them together
allows us to create a much broader switchboard of live health care services that can be
rendered around the country.” — MARGEAUX SIPPELL
Marathon Petroleum Corp. agreed to buy rival
Andeavor for $23.3 billion in the biggest-ever
deal for an oil refiner that would create the
largest independent fuel maker in the United
States. The offer, payable in either cash or
shares, values Andeavor at about $152.27 a
share, the companies said in a statement
Monday. That represents a 24 percent premium
over Friday’s closing price. Marathon shares
sank as much as 8.9 percent in early trading
with analysts at RBC Capital Markets seeing
the deal done at “peak refining bullishness.” Andeavor rose as much as 18 percent. Shares of
Andeavor, Marathon, and other independent refiners have soared to record highs this year.
Growing fuel demand, both in the United States and Latin America, and a shale boom that’s
expanded access to relatively inexpensive domestic supply have given American refiners a
leg up against foreign competitors. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
Tuesday, May 1
➔ SUMMIT
Get an edge
on the food industry
Brands looking to get a foothold in the
burgeoning food industry are invited to
attend the Food Edge Summit. There will
be speakers and workshops exploring
trends and strategies on how to get an
edge in the marketplace. Tuesday, 2 to 9
p.m., CIC Boston, One Design Center
Place, Boston. $99. Register online or go
TIME SHARING
MARRIOTT
TO BUY RIVAL ILG
FOR ABOUT
$4.7 BILLION
Marriott’s timeshare business is buying rival ILG in a cash-and-stock deal valued at about
$4.7 billion. ILG has more than 250,000 owners in its Vistana Signature Experiences and
Hyatt Vacation Ownership portfolios. The combined company will have the rights to
develop, market and sell under the Hyatt Vacation Ownership programs. The combined
company will include approximately 650,000 owners and seven upscale and luxury brands.
ILG shareholders will receive $14.75 in cash and 0.165 shares of Marriott Vacations
Worldwide stock for each ILG share. Marriott Vacations Worldwide Corp. said Monday that
its board will expand from eight to 10 members to include two ILG directors. The deal is
expected to close later this year. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
➔ NETWORKING
Mix and mingle
Join the North Shore Technology Council
for an evening of networking with fellow
FAST FOOD
MCDONALD’S
SALES RISE
ON FRESH
PATTIES
AND NEW
VALUE MENU
SEAFOOD
MAINE COMPANY
TO USE GRANT TO
FOCUS ON GROWING
SCALLOPS FASTER
RETAIL
WALMART SELLING
BRITISH UNIT
TO LOCAL RIVAL
SAINSBURY’S
FOR $10.1B
Higher prices on McDonald’s menu led to surprisingly strong
comparable-store sales during the first quarter, sending shares up
sharply Monday. The company worked to grow its US business
with new initiatives, like swapping out frozen beef patties for fresh
ones in its Quarter Pounder burger. It also launched a new value
menu earlier this year, reviving its once-popular Dollar Menu, but
with items priced at $1, $2 or $3. Sales rose 2.9 percent at
established restaurants in the United States, the company’s biggest
market. Worldwide, that figure rose 5.5 percent, which is a lot
stronger than the 3.6 percent increase that industry analysts had
forecast, according to a survey by FactSet. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
business professionals. Tuesday, 5:30 to
7:30 p.m., 9 Wallis Theater, 9 Wallis St.,
Beverly. Free. Register online or go to the
business agenda at bostonglobe.com.
A Maine firm is set to receive a $300,000 grant to work on a scallop farming technique that
has helped the valuable shellfish grow faster in Japan. Coastal Enterprises Inc. will receive
the money via The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, which is a nonprofit
corporation set up by the farm bill in 2014. Coastal will investigate the economic viability of
the Japanese technique, which Pingree says has also been shown to grow larger, meatier
scallops. The money is part of a round of grants from The Foundation for Food and
Agriculture Research that will be matched by five companies, an industry group and three
universities. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Walmart is selling its British unit, Asda, to local
rival Sainsbury’s for 7.3 billion pounds ($10.1
billion), a deal that lets the world’s largest
retailer focus on online sales in countries where
it has stronger growth prospects and faces lessintense competition. The cash and stock deal
will reshape Britain’s supermarket industry. It
combines the No. 2 and No. 3 supermarket
chains, with a total 31.4 percent share of the
market that would put it ahead of the current
leader, Tesco, according to data from Kantar Worldpanel. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wednesday, May 2
➔ WORKSHOP
Entrepreneurial
pitches
Entrepreneurs, funders, and community
members are invited to visit the BUild Lab
at Boston University for their monthly 1
Million Cups event, a national program to
MEDIA
DISNEY AND TWITTER
TEAM UP TO CREATE
LIVE SPORTS
PROGAMMING,
OTHER CONTENT
ECONOMY
AMERICANS
INCREASED THEIR
SPENDING
SLIGHTLY IN MARCH
Walt Disney Co. is working with Twitter Inc. to create live sports programming and other
content for the social-media platform, part of a push to turn Twitter’s service into a
destination for premium streaming video. Twitter and the Disney-owned ESPN sports
network will announce specific live shows in development this week at their NewFront
presentations, the companies said in an e-mailed statement. Disney’s media portfolio
includes television networks ABC, Disney Channel, and Freeform; the Disney Digital
Network; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures; Radio Disney; and the Marvel comic-book
universe. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
educate and connect local entrepreneurs.
Young entrepreneurs will pitch ideas
according to this month’s theme: Creative
Entrepreneurial Ventures. Wednesday, 8
to 10 a.m., BUild Lab IDG Capital Student
Innovation Center, 730 Commonwealth
Ave., Brookline. Free. Register online or go
to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
Americans boosted their spending by 0.4 percent in March,
the best showing in three months. Meanwhile, a key gauge
of inflation closely watched by the Federal Reserve rose at
the fastest pace in more than a year. The March increase in
consumer spending followed two months of very weak
readings with no gain in February and only a 0.2 percent
increase in January, the Commerce Department reported
Monday. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
➔ WORKSHOP
Intro to Google
Adwords
Those looking to get more out of their
business’ online sales are invited to
MEDIA
NEW YORK TIMES
TO EXPAND ITS
TELEVISION SHOWS
AND PODCASTS
The New York Times plans to expand its roster of television shows and podcasts, retooling
popular columns and behind-the-scenes tales of its journalism to help attract subscribers
who may have never read an article in the newspaper. Buoyed by the success of “The Daily,”
a hit podcast hosted by Michael Barbaro, Times executives see new storytelling tools as a
gateway to audiences who may be coaxed into signing up for the newspaper, executives told
advertisers at an event Monday in New York. Projects include a podcast for kids and
“Caliphate,” an audio series that tells the story of a Times reporter covering the Islamic
State. The licensing fees and ads from TV shows and podcasts will be small at first, and
unlikely to approach the revenue the company gets from traditional sources. But Times
executives see them as tools to attract more subscribers, which now total 3.6 million,
including customers for its crossword puzzle and cooking product. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
attend a workshop on how to create a
Google ad campaign. Wednesday, 6:30 to
9:30 p.m., General Assembly Boston,
125 Summer St., 13th floor. $75.
Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
Events of note? E­mail us at
agenda@globe.com
C4
Business
T h e
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
Markets
Telecom firms drag down stocks
Stocks fell moderately on Monday, giving up an early gain,
but still ended April higher. It was the first monthly increase for the market since January as company earnings
have come in better than many expected. Indexes were
weighed down by losses for telecom stocks and other areas
of the market. McDonald’s jumped 5.8 percent to $167.83
after it reported healthier profit and revenue than analysts
expected for the first three months of the year. Sales at its
restaurants open more than a year were much stronger
than Wall Street had forecast. Just over half the companies
in the S&P 500 have reported their earnings for the first
three months of the year, according to FactSet. That would
be the strongest showing since the summer of 2010. At the
center of the buyout news was Sprint and T-Mobile. The
pair announced a $26.5 billion deal to merge. Investors are
unsure whether this attempt will get the necessary approvals from US regulators. Sprint dropped 13.7 percent to
$5.61, and T-Mobile lost 6.2 percent to $60.51. Other telecom stocks also fell, with Verizon giving up 4.3 percent to
$49.35 and AT&T falling 1 percent to $32.70.
DOW JONES industrial average
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Sprint, T-Mobile merger a bad deal
uTECH LAB
Continued from Page C1
buy T-Mobile, the result was a delightful surge of competition, as a
desperate T-Mobile began upgrading its wireless network, cutting
prices, and devising smart promotional gimmicks that other networks were forced to match. By
vowing to merge, Sprint and T-Mobile are betting that the Justice Department will walk back one of its
most effective decisions in years.
So why mess with success?
Sprint and T-Mobile say that by
hooking up, they can ensure a more
competitive market five or 10 years
from now, as 5G wireless networks
begin rolling out.
With 5G, wireless data networks
can deliver the kind of speed now
confined to wired or fiber services
like those of Comcast Corp. or Verizon. I have one-gigabit Internet running over a wire into my home, but
my 4G cellular service can’t come
close to that speed. With 5G, it will.
President Trump has elevated 5G
to a matter of national security. In
March the administration blocked
Broadcom Inc. from acquiring Qualcomm Inc., the nation’s leading developer of 5G tech. The fear? That
Broadcom would slash research and
development spending at Qualcomm, which would allow Chinese
companies to dominate in 5G.
So Sprint and T-Mobile are pitching their combination as a guarantee of American 5G leadership. As
separate companies, each may lack
the deep pockets needed to fund the
5G transition. An analyst at Ovum
Ltd. estimated last year that it
would cost T-Mobile $25 billion to
upgrade its network; I’m guessing
the cost to Sprint will be similar.
That’s a massive layout for any company. But it’s a heavy burden for
Sprint and T-Mobile, as each will
have to spread the costs over a
smaller customer base. Combined,
they could roll out 5G on an equal
footing with Verizon and AT&T.
JEENAH MOON/NEW YORK TIMES
That would mean three strong nationwide 5G networks instead of
two strong ones and a couple of second-rate offerings.
Anyway, that’s the argument,
and it has some merit. But 5G won’t
be widely available for years. In the
meantime, what happens to healthy
competition in our wireless market
right now? You might suppose three
rivals would keep the competitive
fires burning. But it didn’t work that
way when General Motors, Ford,
and Chrysler dominated the US auto business. Instead, the industry
settled into decades of comfy mediocrity, interrupted only when ferocious competition from Japan ravaged the lot of them. But who needs
Toyota? America already has an independent and aggressive T-Mobile
to keep the rest of the industry honest.
The bigger worry is Sprint, now
the weakest of the wireless carriers.
What will become of it if the Justice
Department says no? One thing’s for
sure: It won’t just disappear. Even in
its feeble condition, Sprint has a
vast national infrastructure and a
big library of underused wireless
frequencies licensed from the Federal Communications Commission.
Somewhere in there, you’ll find the
makings of a strong wireless com-
petitor, should Sprint be acquired
by a well-funded suitor. Last year,
the company talked about it with
Comcast and another cable company, Charter Communications. The
idea, which came to nothing, was
that Comcast and Charter would
each own half of Sprint, instantly
turning the cable guys into major
wireless providers.
Instead, Comcast is selling wireless service in partnership with Verizon, and Charter is set to do the
same later this year. But there’s
nothing to prevent either or both cable companies from taking a second
look at Sprint. And there are other
possible acquirers. The parent company of Google — Alphabet Inc. —
comes to mind. Alphabet is working
on wireless projects of its own, with
an emphasis on 5G.
Any of these alternative deals is
better for consumers, because we
would end up with four wireless
networks, rather than three. Besides, the on-again-off-again romance between T-Mobile and Sprint
is starting to remind me of “Justice
League.” It sounded good on paper,
but most of us weren’t interested.
A merger
between the
wireless
companies
Sprint and TMobile would
leave the
United States
with just three
nationwide
wireless
carriers, rather
than four,
almost
certainly
resulting in
higher prices
and fewer
innovative
services.
Hiawatha Bray can be reached at
hiawatha.bray@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @GlobeTechLab.
Zoning
plan for
waterfront
gets OK
uHARBOR GARAGE
Continued from Page C1
“We will consider our options,”
Kozol said.
Beaton also had concerns about
the Hook Lobster site, specifically
whether a short in-fill section of the
Harborwalk would be submerged at
times because of rising sea levels.
Rather than a walkway running below the Moakley Bridge — as was
first proposed — Beaton suggested
improving pedestrian access along
Atlantic Avenue. He also recommended the developer provide $3
million for a new park and water
transportation terminal on Long
Wharf.
Boston Planning & Development
Agency’s director, Brian Golden,
ESSDRAS M. SUAREZ/ GLOBE STAFF
hailed Beaton’s ruling, noting that
four years, and 40-plus public meetings, went into the plan in a bid to
balance new development with access to Boston Harbor.
“The significant amount of community and stakeholder input resulted in a plan that will strengthen
Boston’s downtown waterfront for
decades to come,” he said in a statement. “The plan ensures that new
development along the waterfront
promotes public access, activates
the public realm, and creates new
open space.”
Tim Logan can be reached at
tim.logan@globe.com.
Don Chiofaro
(right) said he
expects to file
specifics for his
proposal for a
tower on the
waterfront
“pretty
quickly.”
Leominster school officials pay $10k to hackers
uRANSOMWARE
Continued from Page C1
NASDAQ Composite index
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
through infected files or attachments, or through incursions into a
computer system. In Leominster, interim police chief Michael Goldman
said the hackers likely found their
way into the school department’s
computers through an open port,
the digital equivalent of an unlocked
door.
He said the case should serve as a
reminder to communities and other
organizations to assess their vulnerabilities. “Protect yourself,” Goldman said. “If you’re a company or a
municipality, make sure your IT
company is protecting you properly.”
Interim Leominster superintendent Paula L. Deacon said the attack
happened April 14.She contacted
Goldman, who said he determined
that there was not much he could
do. He counseled Deacon to pay up.
“Most of these are international
attacks, and they’re coming from
overseas,” Goldman said.
Officials did not say when they
made the payments, which was
made to a bitcoin digital currency
account, making it nearly impossible to trace the hackers.
On Monday, IT crews in Leominster were working to get the system
back online. Deacon did not respond to requests for further comment.
“Thank you for everyone’s pa-
RITCHIE B. TONGO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
tience while LPS and the city feverishly worked through some very difficult technology issues these last
couple of weeks!” said a Facebook
post by the Leominster public
schools.
Leominster school officials reported the incident to the FBI,
which declined to comment. But the
agency said in a statement that its
Boston office gets about one report
about ransomware each week, and
many more are not reported.
“The threat of ransomware is
growing and evolving. The number
of ransomware reports is increasing,
and we’re seeing different kinds of
ransomware, different deployment
methods, and coordinated distribution,” the FBI said.
Many antivirus companies offer
programs that block ransomware attacks, and some firms also provide
off-site backup for important files
that might be held hostage in the
event of attack. Cybereason makes
RansomFree, no-cost software that
looks for and blocks such threats,
and Rustici said organizations
should also be looking for security
risks like open ports.
Andy Rosen can be reached at
andrew.rosen@globe.com.
A programmer
shows a sample
of decrypting
source code in
Taipei last year.
A ’ ransomware
cyberattack hit
thousands of
computers in
99 countries at
that time,
encrypting files
from affected
computer units
and demanding
bitcoin
payments to
decrypt the
files.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
C5
Wages of middle­class workers lag as others begin to rise
uQUICK STUDY
Continued from Page C1
cially pronounced among lower-wage women, whose earnings have jumped a remarkable 4.6 percent since last
year.
The one group cut out from
this boon is the American middle class. Wages for such workers rose less than 2 percent in
the past year — and a bleak 1.6
percent for men.
It’s hard to know why, exactly, the middle class is struggling. Perhaps they’re concentrated in industries — such as
health and education — that
are lagging behind the wagegrowth trend.
Or it could be a temporary
blip, a final pause before middle-class workers get their
share of today ’s economic
growth — especially if the labor market continues to tighten and businesses need to
poach already-employed workers using tantalizing pay packages.
But the latest wage figures
suggest this is the one task left,
before our long recovery can
be rightly celebrated as the
best of economic times: end
the stagnation that has held
down median wages for decades.
Evan Horowitz digs through
data to find information that
illuminates the policy issues
facing Massachusetts and the
United States. He can be
reached at
evan.horowitz@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeHorowitz
Some
industries such
as health care
have not been
part of the
trend of rising
wages.
NEW YORK TIMES FILE
()
INFO VALID 5/01/18 ONLY
()
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
G
5
8
Stadium Seating
6
Hearing Impaired
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
K
Rear Window Captioning
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (R) AMC Independent 11:45, 2:00, 4:20, 6:40, 9:05
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:45, 2:10,
5:00, 10:10
KINGS (R) AMC Independent 11:40, 2:05, 4:30, 7:05,
9:25
LABYRINTH (PG) G 7:00
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D (NR) 10:00, 2:00, 4:00
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
4:00
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
5 6 8 I K DIG
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 3:40, 5:00, 7:00,
www.REGmovies.com
8:05
LABYRINTH (1986) (NR) Advance Tickets Available
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
LIKE ARROWS (NR) Advance Tickets Available 7:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G (12:30, 1:10,
1:30, 4:30, 4:50) 7:10, 7:50, 8:10
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (12:50,
3:50, 4:10) 7:30, 10:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (12:45, 3:30) 6:40, 9:40
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (1:35, 4:20) 7:25, 10:10
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (1:00, 3:35) 6:55, 9:45
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) (1:15, 4:00) 7:00, 9:50
7:00
LIKE ARROWS (NR) Advance Tickets Available 7:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G (11:00, 11:30,
1:15, 3:00, 3:30) 7:00, 7:20, 8:45, 9:15, 9:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (10:30,
2:30) 5:00, 6:30, 7:40
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RPX G (10:00,
2:00) 6:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RPX G 10:00
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (12:05, 3:15) 6:40, 9:50
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (12:25, 3:05) 5:50, 10:40
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (12:35, 3:50) 7:45, 10:30
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (10:40, 1:10, 3:45) 6:20,
10:50
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (1:00) 4:30, 10:15
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (12:10, 3:15) 10:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (10:50, 1:40) 4:40, 10:35
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (11:45, 2:50) 6:10, 9:30
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (1:50, 4:45) 7:45, 10:15
BRAINTREE
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (12:35, 3:40) 6:45, 9:55
AMC BRAINTREE 10
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (2:00, 5:00) 8:00, 10:25
121 Grandview Rd.
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (1:45) 10:20
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:40, 3:45) 6:50, 10:00
5 6 DIG
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (1:20, 4:15) 7:15, 10:05
www.amctheatres.com
BELMONT
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:00, 1:00,
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 10:15, 7:15
2:30, 3:30, 6:00, 9:30, 9:50
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
10:00, 10:30, 12:30, 1:30, 4:00, 5:00, 7:30, 8:30,
www.studiocinema.com
10:10, 10:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 4:30, 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:10
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
2:30, 3:10) 4:20, 7:00, 8:00, 10:00, 10:20
ACHARI AMERICA YATHRA (NR) (1:05) 4:15, 7:25,
TRAFFIK (R) 10:45, 1:10, 3:30, 6:00, 8:20
LIKE ARROWS (NR) 7:00
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
www.coolidge.org
GRACE JONES: BLOODLIGHT AND BAMI (NR) 11:00
THE RIDER (R) 11:30, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00
LEAN ON PETE (R) 11:15, 2:00, 7:00
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (R) 4:45, 9:50
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 11:45, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9:30
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 1:45, 4:15
DAMSEL (NR) 9:30
(12:20, 2:40) 5:00, 7:25, 9:40
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (12:30, 2:50) 5:10, 7:40,
DISOBEDIENCE (R) 7:00
10:00
BURLINGTON
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (11:20, 2:30) 5:45, 9:00
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (11:00, 1:35) 4:05, 6:40, 9:15
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (1:20) 4:25, 7:25, 10:30
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
www.artsemerson.org
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
20 South Ave.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 10:25, 1:25, 7:55, 10:55
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 10:45, 11:15,
12:30, 2:45, 4:00, 6:15, 7:30, 9:45, 11:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
10:15, 12:00, 1:45, 3:30, 4:30, 5:15, 7:00, 8:45,
10:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 1:10, 7:40
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:00, 4:20,
10:55
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:00, 1:15, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30
www.amctheatres.com
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 10:30, 2:10, 4:25, 6:45, 9:10
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:20
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 7:45,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30
10:40
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:45, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 1:30, 2:15,
5:15, 6:00, 9:00, 9:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERI-
10:30
ENCE (PG-13) G 11:30, 3:15, 7:00, 10:45
CAMBRIDGE
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
11:00, 2:45, 6:30
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
12:30, 4:15, 8:00
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
10:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 1:45, 7:35
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:00, 4:40,
10:30
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:10, 5:00, 10:40
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 2:05, 7:50
BLOCKERS (R) 11:50, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:05, 11:15, 1:35, 1:40,
4:00, 4:10, 6:30, 7:45, 9:10, 10:05
7:00, 10:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 10:30, 6:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) G 2:15, 9:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
11:00, 2:45, 4:00, 6:30, 10:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:45, 6:15
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 3:00, 9:45
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 10:15, 12:45, 3:15, 6:00,
8:30
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:15, 3:45, 9:15
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:00, 6:30
BLOCKERS (R) 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00
SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO (PG) AMC Independent 11:15, 1:45, 4:15, 9:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 10:00, 3:15, 8:45
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:45,
10:30
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 11:15, 1:45,
4:15, 6:30, 10:00
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 10:30, 11:30, 1:15, 2:15,
4:15, 5:00, 7:00, 7:45, 9:45, 10:30
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) G 11:45, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00,
10:30
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:00,
12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:00
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (R) AMC Independent 12:45, 6:15
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 10:15,
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 5:20, 10:35
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 2:45, 8:00
BLOCKERS (R) 1:30, 4:00, 6:45, 9:20
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:00, 2:20
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 2:40, 4:15, 6:40, 7:50, 9:50,
10:10
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 11:50, 5:05
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:00
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:20, 3:15, 6:30, 9:15
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:30, 10:20
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 2:00, 4:30, 7:30
TRAFFIK (R) 3:00, 3:30
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) AMC Independent 12:05
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) AMC Independent 4:45,
7:20
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 9:55
LIKE ARROWS (NR) G 7:00
LEXINGTON
LEXINGTON VENUE
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
5 DOL DSS
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (R) 4:30, 7:00
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 4:15
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 6:45
LITTLETON
O'NEIL CINEMAS AT THE POINT
7:10, 8:15, 10:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) 5 4:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) 5 10:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 5 11:30, 3:15,
6:45
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 10:35, 1:45, 7:35
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 5 11:15, 1:55
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 5 10:25, 12:45, 3:00, 5:25,
8:05, 10:25
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 5 4:55, 10:35
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 5 4:50, 10:40
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 5 11:45, 2:15, 5:00, 7:55,
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:45, 1:30, 4:10, 6:45, 9:25
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:35, 2:15, 4:55, 7:20, 9:50
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 10:20, 1:20, 4:05, 6:35,
9:15
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:40, 3:25, 6:05, 9:00
TRAFFIK (R) 4:30, 7:15, 9:30
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:20
LIKE ARROWS (NR) 7:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 3:25, 9:50
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:30,
10:45, 11:15, 11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:20,
2:50, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 4:50, 5:20, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00,
7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:45, 10:10, 10:40
BLOCKERS (R) 11:50
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 2:25, 9:55
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:10, 2:30, 4:45, 7:40,
10:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:30, 1:40
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 1:20, 4:05, 6:55, 9:40
LABYRINTH (PG) 7:00
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20,
10:05
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 4:00, 6:45, 9:20
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:00, 3:05, 6:00, 9:10
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
LOWELL
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:15, 6:20, 9:40
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 11:10, 1:40,
RAMPAGE (PG-13) G 7:00
4:10, 6:45, 9:15
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:15, 12:45, 3:30, 6:10,
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 8:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 1:00, 4:00
8:45, 10:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 1:00
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:55, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) G 1:15, 4:00, 6:15, 9:30
TRAFFIK (R) 11:25, 1:55, 4:25, 6:50, 9:20
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:30, 3:30, 6:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
9:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 3:45, 10:10
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:15, 7:00
BLOCKERS (R) 11:05, 7:20
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 10:30, 1:05,
3:40, 6:15, 8:45
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:55, 2:15, 4:45, 7:10, 9:40
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 10:55
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:40, 1:20, 3:55, 6:35, 9:15
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:30, 1:50, 4:10, 6:40, 9:20
ACRIMONY (R) 1:40, 9:55
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:35, 1:25, 4:05, 6:50, 9:30
TRAFFIK (R) 12:05, 2:30, 4:55, 7:25, 10:00
READING
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
58
www.jordansimax.com
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 12:10
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 3:30, 6:50, 10:10
REVERE
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:05, 6:20, 9:35
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:15,
11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:25, 1:50, 2:50, 3:20,
3:50, 4:20, 4:50, 5:00, 5:30, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00,
8:30, 8:45, 9:10, 10:10, 10:40
BLOCKERS (R) 12:40, 7:25
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 1:30, 4:10,
6:45, 9:20
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:35, 12:05, 1:55, 2:25,
7:20, 9:40, 10:05
7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:10, 10:40
BLOCKERS (R) 11:05
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 1:35
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:40, 2:10, 4:25, 6:55, 9:20
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 10:05, 12:05
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20,
10:05
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:55, 1:45, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
MILLBURY
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DSS
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:00
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:05, 1:05, 1:35, 3:45, 4:15, 6:50,
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:55, 3:40, 6:25, 9:05
ACRIMONY (R) 1:10, 9:15
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 4:00, 6:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:55, 11:25, 1:40, 2:10,
4:25, 4:55, 7:15, 7:45, 10:00, 10:30
TRAFFIK (R) 11:30, 2:05, 4:30, 6:55, 9:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 2:20, 6:05, 9:45
SOMERVILLE
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
5 6 I DIG
http://somervilletheatre.com/
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
www.showcasecinemas.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:20, 6:20, 9:20
TAUNTON
LIKE ARROWS (NR) 7:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 1:50, 7:10
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:00,
10:00, 10:30, 11:15, 11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45,
2:40, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 4:40, 5:10, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00,
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30
BLOCKERS (R) 11:20
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:50, 2:15,
4:55, 7:35, 10:05
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 10:10, 12:25, 2:10, 2:50,
4:25, 5:20, 7:40, 9:25, 9:55
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 1:10
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:20, 1:00, 4:00, 6:50, 9:35
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:10, 2:45, 5:15, 7:50,
10:25
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:50, 11:30, 1:50, 4:15,
7:15, 9:50
TRAFFIK (R) 4:50, 10:10
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
58
www.jordansimax.com
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 12:20
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 3:35, 6:50, 10:05
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
11:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
12:15, 2:30, 4:00, 6:15, 7:45, 9:45
7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:45, 10:10
4:35, 5:05, 7:05, 9:25, 9:55
www.amctheatres.com
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 1:15, 3:45, 6:15, 8:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:15,
10:45, 11:15, 11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:20,
2:50, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 4:50, 5:20, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:00,
10:45, 11:00, 11:15, 11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:30, 2:05,
2:20, 2:50, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 5:00, 5:30, 6:05, 6:30,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G 1:30, 4:45,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 1:10, 4:15, 10:15
LIKE ARROWS (NR) 7:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 2:15, 5:20, 8:35
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
BHARAT ANE NENU (NR) G 8:30
LIKE ARROWS (NR) 7:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 4:05, 9:50
5 6 8 I K DIG
3:00, 4:15, 5:15, 6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:50, 3:00, 6:10, 9:10
LIKE ARROWS (NR) 7:00
22 Flutie Pass
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 1:00, 2:00,
www.nationalamusements.com
10:20
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) G 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:45, 3:00, 6:15, 9:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:30, 12:00,
1:45, 3:15, 5:15, 6:45, 7:00, 8:45, 10:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 1:00, 5:00, 8:30
5 6 8 DIG
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
www.applecinemas.com
8:00
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
10:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 5 11:05, 1:40, 4:25, 7:25,
www.nationalamusements.com
10:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:00, 2:10
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
FURNITURE - READING
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 10:40, 1:50, 7:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 5 10:30, 2:30,
5 6 8 DIG
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:35, 3:55, 7:05, 10:10
LIKE ARROWS (NR) 7:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:25, 7:10
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:05, 3:15, 9:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:05,
10:10, 11:15, 11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:50,
3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 4:50, 6:10, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00,
8:30, 9:35, 10:05
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 4:00, 9:40
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 10:50, 1:50, 4:45, 7:35,
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 1:05, 4:15, 7:15, 9:55
www.oneilcinemas.com
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
10:05
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45
LABYRINTH (PG) G 7:00
DEDHAM
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 1:10, 4:05, 7:10, 9:45
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:00, 2:35, 5:05, 7:35,
1208 Constitution Ave 978-506-5089
12:45, 3:10, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30
THE MIRACLE SEASON (PG) AMC Independent 10:45,
www.nationalamusements.com
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:10, 1:40, 4:10, 6:40, 9:10
56
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) (10:55, 1:30) 4:15, 10:10
HÉCTOR EL FATHER: CONOCERÁS LA VERDAD (NR)
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 10:00, 12:15,
1:30, 5:00, 7:30, 8:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:30, 3:15,
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:15, 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 10:15
12:10, 3:50) 6:15, 7:30
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (11:10, 1:45) 4:30, 7:20, 9:55
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:30, 3:00, 6:30, 9:45
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (10:50,
2:25) 5:00, 7:30, 10:05
www.amctheatres.com
5:20, 7:40, 10:40
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
10:25
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) (12:00,
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
10:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (11:15, 1:50) 4:30, 7:10, 9:45
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (12:35, 3:05) 5:35, 8:00,
DANVERS
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:00, 1:50, 4:25, 7:00, 9:30
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 10:15, 12:40, 3:00, 4:30,
LIKE ARROWS (NR) Advance Tickets Available 7:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G (11:30, 12:50,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 2:30, 8:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:20, 5:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:00,
12:00, 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:20
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 4:00, 7:15
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
PANDAS 3D (G) 11:00, 1:00, 5:00
OCEANS 3D: OUR BLUE PLANET (NR) 10:00, 2:00,
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 4:55, 7:20
55 Boylston St.
100 Independence Way
6 I DIG
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 7:30
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
12:00, 3:00, 6:00
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 4:15
CHESTNUT HILL
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:10, 3:05, 6:10, 9:20
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
www.REGmovies.com
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G (11:00, 11:15,
2:30, 2:45, 3:00) 6:00, 6:15, 9:30, 10:05
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (11:30,
11:45, 3:35) 6:30, 6:40, 9:50, 10:00
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (11:20, 2:05) 4:50, 7:40,
10:30
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (11:25, 2:10) 4:45, 7:20,
10:10
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) (12:30)
4:40, 7:15, 9:55
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (12:20, 3:25) 6:35, 9:40
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (11:20, 2:00, 3:30) 7:25,
10:25
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (12:25, 3:55) 7:05,
10:15
WESTBOROUGH
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:20, 6:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 3:30, 9:40
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:00,
10:45, 11:00, 11:15, 11:30, 11:45, 12:15, 12:45,
2:20, 2:35, 2:50, 3:05, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 6:05, 6:15,
6:30, 6:45, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:45, 9:55, 10:10,
10:25, 10:40
BLOCKERS (R) 7:45
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 2:30, 5:05,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:15,
11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40,
4:10, 4:40, 5:10, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:00,
9:30, 10:00, 10:30
BLOCKERS (R) 1:20
10:20
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 9:50
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:20, 2:50, 5:15, 7:50,
10:15
10:10
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:20, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 10:00
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:40, 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:15
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:25, 1:40
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:00, 2:25, 5:00, 7:40,
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 4:05, 6:35, 9:05
T h e
C6
B o s t o n
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
LOVE LETTERS
PRESENTED BY
BY MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN
BY MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
Seeking advice for a friend
Q. I’m writing on behalf of a friend I’ll call
“Claire.” For the past year, she’s shared details of an evolving relationship with “Brian.”
At first, it was about navigating the early
stages of a relationship — different communication styles, habits, accommodating
schedules, defining the relationship, etc.
Gradually, it’s shifted toward something
I’m uncomfortable hearing. A few months in,
Brian sent Claire a series of dark messages
related to her relationship history. They’d
discussed past partners, in broad strokes, at
his request. Claire hasn’t dated a lot. But
from that conversation, Brian seemed to
make a number of bizarre judgments about
her behavior and character, and in his emails accused her of sleeping around, lying,
and misleading him. Claire took a step back,
but eventually decided to give him another
chance. Brian apologized, said he would
work to change, etc. However, it doesn’t
sound like that’s happening. One day Claire
will gush about something thoughtful Brian
has done, and the next she’ll mention that he
has accused her of cheating; showed up to
her house to give her the silent treatment; rewritten a previous encounter (blatant gaslighting); or inserted chaos whenever he
doesn’t feel like the center of attention.
Throughout this, I’ve tried to walk the
line between letting her know when Brian’s
behavior isn’t OK, while still supporting her
decisions. I don’t want to put her in the position of needing to choose between her boyfriend and her friend. At the same time, I also don’t want to make her feel bad for giving
him additional chances. She loves him and
hasn’t given up on his ability to change. I
don’t know how to be a good friend to her
through this. Is it enough to reinforce her reality — to help her trust in her own memory,
and her qualities and strengths? Am I doing
her a disservice by holding back on harsher
criticisms of a bad guy? Are there other ways
to help her without overstepping?
A CONCERNED FRIEND
SHUTTERSTOCK/UNPICT
Major scoops
It’s been real, Critic’s Corner; but the master of
the house is back tomorrow. I need to vacuum the
couch, delete a bunch of “Ancient Aliens” from the
DVR, and leave the keys in the mailbox.
But before I go, I want us to have one last special moment together. So tonight, I’m taking you
for ice cream.
More specifically, “The Ice Cream Show,” a conspicuously non-controversial new series on Viceland that neither shows nor requires teeth, and offers proof that Viceland’s interests occasionally extend beyond weed and sex, and into the things you
might eat in between smoking weed and having
sex.
Hosted by Isaac Lappert (owner of the family-
run Californian/Hawaiian Lappert’s Ice Cream
chain), “The Ice Cream Show” is just what it says
on the pint — a deep, satisfyingly chunky scoop into every aspect of the industry.
In the series premiere, Lappert visits the Ben &
Jerry’s HQ — including its graveyard of “dearly depinted” flavors (Sugar Plum we hardly knew ye!) —
and sits down with Jeni Britton Bauer of Jeni’s Ice
Cream, whose background in essential oils led her
to view ice creams as “an edible perfume” ( just
with chunks of raw cookie dough). Spoiler alert:
You will likely want some ice cream while watching.
And in Tuesday night’s episode, Lappert digs into the world of vegan, raw, organic, and low-calorie
ice cream. So, much like a cone in the summer sun,
that was fun while it lasted.
Tuesday May 1, 2018
7:00pm
2
WGBH Greater
PBS Boston
4
WBZ Wheel
CBS NEW
7:30pm
8:00pm
Movies
8:30pm
Steves
9:00pm
9:30pm
Sports
Frontline: The crisis Amanpour Beyond
First Civilizations
100 Days
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DLV NEW
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Access
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(CC) HD
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(11:35)
Extra
Voice: A contestant (9:01) Rise (CC) TV- Chicago Med (CC)
is eliminated. Live. 14-L NEW
TV-14-V NEW
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(CC)
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10
WBTS News
NBC (CC)
In. Ed.
Roseanne Middle
Blackish Split
People NEW
Extra HD Voice: A contestant (9:01) Rise (CC) HD Chicago Med (CC)
TV-PG
is eliminated. Live. TV-14-L NEW
HD TV-14-V NEW
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NEW
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Steves
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WPRI Wheel
CBS NEW
Jeopardy NCIS (CC) HD TVNEW
PG-LV NEW
25
WFXT ET/
FOX Tonight
TMZ HD
TV-PG
27
WUNI Rosa de Guadalupe El rico y Lazaro
HD TV-14-D
(CC) HD
Papá a toda madre
(CC) HD
36
WSBE Upstart Are You/ Upstart Keeping
PBS Crow HD Served? Crow HD Up App.
As Time
Goes By
38
WSBK Big Bang Big Bang News HD
Theory
Theory
The X-Files (CC) HD The X-Files (CC) HD Seinfeld
TV-14-LV
TV-14-V
TV-PG
Seinfeld
TV-PG-S
44
WGBX British Baking (CC): Call the Midwife
PBS Sweet challenges.
(CC) HD TV-14
Unforgotten (CC): A body is
discovered. HD TV-PG
NewsHour
50
56
WBIN I Survived... TV-14
I Killed My BFF
WLVI Goldberg Goldberg Flash (CC): Gypsy
CW
helps Barry. NEW
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100: An unlikely ally News (CC)
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Modern Modern
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(11:05)
Goldberg
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HD
PREMIUM CABLE
Four Christmases: Couple have ★★ Indian Summer (1993)
(11:10) Rellik (CC)
(6:10) ★★★ Royal
HD TV-MA
Tenenbaums (CC) R crazy Christmas. TV-14-DL
(CC) HD PG-13
(5:54) ★★★ Notting White Princess (CC) White Princess (CC) (9:56) ★★★ Runaway Bride (1999) (CC):
HD TV-MA
HD TV-MA
A woman jilts her grooms. HD PG
Hill (1999) TV-PG
Mist (CC)
(6:25) ★★ 54 (1998) ★★ Employee of the Month (2006) (CC): Superhero Movie (2008): A
nerd becomes a superhero. NR TV-14-LV
(CC) HD R
Guys compete for a date. HD TV-14-DL
Real
Vice
Kong: Skull Island (2017) (CC): Group
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TV-MA
Time
News
journey to Skull Island. HD PG-13
Valley
Real Time (CC) HD
TV-MA
Wyatt
Cenac
Showtime
(6:35) ★★★ Open
Water (2003) HD R
Al Madrigal (CC): Al
Madrigal performs.
Shameless: Frank
starts a business.
Homeland: Carrie
and Saul's mission.
TMC
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befriends an alien.
Starz!
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Mans
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Lies (2000) TV-14
(6:25) Fair Haven
(2016) (CC) HD NR
Real Sports (CC)
TV-PG
HD
Tonight/ Westworld (CC) HD
Oliver
Best in
(10:05) Billions (CC) (11:05)
Circus
Sex:
HD TV-MA-LS
★★ Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest
The Pirates of (2017) (CC): A
(2006) (CC): A pirate avoids Davy Jones. HD TV-PG look at Somalian pirates. HD R
(7:58) ★★ Happyness (2006) (CC): A man (9:58) Howards End Girlfrnd Girlfrnd
(CC) HD TV-14
NEW
NEW
tries to raise his son. HD TV-PG
The Light Between Oceans (2016) (CC): A couple
raise an orphan. HD PG-13
(10:15) ★★★ Illusionist (2006):
A magician woos a duchess.
SPORTS
Boston Sports Tonight (CC) Live. HD
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Quick
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Classic College Football (CC): From 1995:
Mississippi State at LSU. The host Tigers won 45-38. Florida State at Florida.
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Innings
Red Sox Sports
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FAMILY
Gumball Gumball King/Hill Am. Dad Cl/Show Am. Dad Burgers Burgers Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
(6:20) Diary/Wimpy DuckTales: A visit
(8:55) Diary/Wimpy Kid (2010): Stuck/
Raven's Bunk'd
HD TV-G
Kid (2010) TV-PG
to McDuck Manor. Boy deals with middle school. Middle
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News
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
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Religion and art.
Jeopardy NCIS (CC) HD TVNEW
PG-LV NEW
5
A. People will say this isn’t a love letter, and I
suppose it isn’t, but this is a “support people
through love” letter, and I think we should
discuss it. It’s a challenge to advise a friend
who needs relationship help when you just
want to tell the person to leave their partner.
It sounds like Claire wants you to share her
optimism . . . but you don’t have to fake it.
My advice for giving advice is to ask all of
SportsCenter Special: Draft Grades (CC): SportsCenter (CC)
Team-by-team draft analysis. Taped. HD Live. HD
Top Rank Boxing: Main Event (CC): Jessie E:60 (CC) HD
Magdaleno vs. Isaac Dogboe. Taped. HD
(9:01) Zookeeper (2011) (CC): Talking
animals play cupid. HD TV-PG
Freeform
(6:00) House Bunny Shadowhunters
(2008) TV-14
(CC) HD NEW
Nickelodeon
Noggin
Henry D. Henry D. ★★ Miss Congenial.: An FBI agent goes undercover. Fresh P.
Bubble
Shimmer Nella
Sunny
Peppa
Peppa
Peppa
Zoofari
Rookie
The 700 Club (CC)
TV-G
HD
Friends
Rusty R.
Friends
Top Wing
AMC
READERS RESPOND:
Tell her that men come in “as-is” condition.
ST-AUGUSTINE
I was the listener for a friend who’d been
in a toxic relationship for years. I heard
about the same issues over and over and over
again and nothing ever changed. Finally I
told her I just couldn’t be the person she talked to about it anymore. I don’t know if my reaction had anything to do with it but she
ended the relationship soon after. It’s one
thing to be a friend, but at a certain point listening becomes enabling.
PHATALISTIC
This reminds me of the “Sex and the City”
episode when Carrie breaks up with Big for
the millionth time.
HAPPYDAZED
I would have given different advice in my
twenties than I am now giving in my fifties,
now that my filter has faded and I’m not so
worried about what people think.
ASH
Ah, the lack of a filter and aging. That’s
what is happening to me.
WHOOPIE!!! MHOUSTON1
Column and comments are edited and
reprinted from boston.com/loveletters. Send
letters to meredith.goldstein@globe.com.
Specials
7:00pm
A&E
the right questions. “How does that make
you feel?” “Is his behavior improving?”
“What kind of partner do you want in the future?” Sometimes talking about these things
— out loud to a friend — helps with clarity.
Also know that you can share concerns
about the relationship without stating them
as a list of criticisms. As in, “I’m worried
about how much you’re doubting yourself.”
That’s more productive than “Brian is the
worst.”
Know that when it comes to abusive behavior, you can — and should — be honest.
Validate her memory and all of her strengths,
but also let her know that what she’s describing isn’t healthy.
It does sound like you’re doing a good job,
by the way. If you doubt yourself, you can always ask the most basic and important question: “How can I help?”
MEREDITH
7:30pm
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F. 48: A man is shot First 48/Killer (CC): Featuring a case in
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(5:30) Last Stand
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Animal Planet River Monsters
(CC) HD TV-PG
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
(10:01) Fir. 48: A
(11:03) The First 48
90-year-old war hero. (CC) HD TV-14
★★ Twister (1996) (CC): Scientists track tornadoes
in Oklahoma. HD TV-PG-L
River Monsters
(CC) HD TV-PG
(10:35) ★★ Twister: Scientists
track tornadoes. TV-PG-L
Killer Whales: The Mega Hunt (CC):
Dolphins are pursued. HD TV-PG
River Monsters (CC)
Jeremy goes to Fiji.
BBC America
BET
Casino Royale
Quantum of Solace: James Bond action adventure. ★★★ Casino Royale TV-14-LSV
In Contempt HD TV- (11:01) In Contempt
Coach
This Christmas (2007) (CC): An estranged family
HD TV-14
Carter
gathers for a yuletide reunion. HD TV-14
14 NEW
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HD
CMT
CNN
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Central
Last Man Last Man
Erin Burnett NEW
Office
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★★ Mr. & Mrs. Sm. (2005): Married assassins. HD TV-14-DLSV
Cooper NEW
Cooper NEW
CNN Tonight HD
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
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Malcolm Malcolm Sister
Sister
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Transfor Guardian/Galaxy: Cosmic outlaws face a villain.
Legion NEW
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Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man Middle
Middle
Middle
Middle
G. Girls
G. Girls
Fixer Upper: A
Fix'r Up House H. Good Bones (CC)
House H. House
House
House
family of four. TV-G NEW
NEW
HD TV-G NEW
NEW
NEW
Hunters Hunters
History
Forged in Fire (CC)
HD TV-PG-LV
Forged in Fire: (CC) Forged in Fire (CC)
HD TV-PG-LV NEW
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(10:03) Forged in
Fire NEW
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ID
Crime & Justice
Healthy You TV-G
Pandora's Box: (CC)
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young Army recruit.
Forensic Forensic
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TV-14-LSV NEW
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Electronic Con.
Forbidden (CC): A
young Army recruit.
IFC
(6:00) Chronicle
(2012) TV-14-DLV
★★★ Rush Hour (1998) (CC): Mismatched ★★ Rush Hour 3 (2007) (CC): Cops hunt
cops team up. HD TV-14-DLV
Triads in Paris. HD TV-14-DLSV
Lifetime
Lifetime Mov.
MSNBC
MTV
National
Geographic
Married NEW
Married NEW
Married/Sight TV-14-DL NEW (10:32) Love at Flight NEW
Girl in the Box
Wrong Neighbor (2017) (CC) HD TV-14-LV Infidelity in: A housewife has an affair.
Hardball Live. HD
All In/Hayes Live.
Maddow NEW
Last Word Live. HD The 11th Hour Live.
Teen Mom: Young
Jersey Shore Fa
Jersey Family TV-14 Challeng NEW
Ridic.
Ridic.
Captain Phillips (2013) (CC): Captain surrenders to pirates so Genius (CC) HD TV- Genius: Picasso's
that his crew will be freed. HD TV-14-DLV NEW
14-DLSV NEW
Blue Period begins.
NatGeoWild
NECN
Ovation
OWN
Incredible Dr. Pol
Alaska Grizzly HD
Wicked Tuna TV-14 Wicked Tuna TV-14 Alaska Grizzly HD
The Take Business The Take Business necn News 9PM
necn News 10Pm
necn News 11PM
★★ Eraser: A marshal protects a witness. NEW
★★★★ Glory (1989): Story of black soldiers. TV-14
Undercover Boss
Haves and the Have Haves/Have Nots
Sweetie Pie's (CC) Haves and the Have
(CC) HD TV-PG-L
Nots (CC) HD TV-14 HD TV-14 NEW
HD TV-14-L NEW
Nots (CC) HD TV-14
Oxygen
Paramount
QVC
Science
Sundance
Chicago P.D. TV-14 Chicago P.D. TV-14 Chicago P.D. TV-14 Chicago P.D. TV-14 Chicago P.D. TV-14
★★★ 300 TV-14-V
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Ink Master TV-14
IT Cosmetics (CC) Live. HD
The Find With Shawn Killinger (CC) Live. HD
Unearthed TV-PG
Unearthed TV-PG
Abandoned NEW
(10:04) Abandoned (11:06) Unearthed
Cahill: A lawman's
(5:30) Cahill (1973) ★★★ The Cowboys (1972) (CC): A cattleman works with kids
sons go astray.
(CC) TV-PG
after his regular crew abandons him. TV-PG-LV
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
TV One
USA
(5:30) G.I. Joe/Rise
Big Bang Big Bang
(6:15) ★★ The Slave
Little People NEW
(5:45) I Am Legend
Bizarre Foods
Carbon. Carbon.
M*A*S*H M*A*S*H
Single
Single
Modern Modern
Family
Family
Men in Black: Secret agents track aliens. Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama
Big Bang The Big
Big Bang The Big
Big Bang O.G.
Conan NEW
★★★ Blondie (1938) (CC) TV-G ★★ Blondie/Boss (1939) TV-G ★★ Blondie/Vaca.
Little People (CC) HD TV-PG NEW
My Little Life NEW (11:08) Little People
NBA Playoff (CC): A conference semifinal. Live. HD NBA Playoff (CC) Live. HD
Bizarre Foods NEW Zimmern Zimmern Bizarre
Bizarre
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Jokers
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Jokers
Jokers
TalkShow TalkShow
(8:12) Raymond
Raymond Raymond Mom
Mom
King/Qu. King/Qu.
The Manns (CC) HD Rickey Smiley
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G. Times G. Times
Modern Modern
WWE SmackDown (CC) Live. HD
Unsolved: Tupac
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Law & Order TV-14
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Cloudy/Meatball (2009) TV-PG (9:31) ★★★ Ferris Bueller (1986) TV-PG
Ftloose
Law & Order TV-14 Law & Order TV-14 Law & Order TV-14 Law & Order TV-14
Beverly Hills (CC)
NEW
Housewives/BH
(CC) HD TV-14
Forensic Forensic
Juicy Couture TV-G
Web of Lies HD TV14-DLV NEW
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
Sell It Like Serhant
(CC) HD TV-14
Watch
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CNN Tonight HD
Daily
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TV HIGHLIGHTS
Baseball: Royals-Red Sox, 7:10 p.m., NESN
NHL playoffs: Capitals-Penguins, 7:30 p.m., NBCSN
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Listings, D9
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D
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T U E S DAY, M AY 1 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
Lightning all over Bruins
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
Lightning 4 TAMPA — The Bruins
shuffled out of
Bruins
2 Amalie Arena Mon-
day night, lookin’ for love and upside
down in all the wrong places.
Short on goal scoring, and short
on overall offensive chances, they suffered a 4-2 loss to the Lightning in
Round 2 of the Stanley Cup playoffs,
leaving both sides with one win
apiece in their best-of-seven series.
The Black and Gold were outshot
(31-20), outchanced (54-38), and resoundingly outhit (42-24) on a night
when the Bolts, embarrassed by their
Game 1 effort (a 6-2 loss), rebooted
their game and evened the series on
goals by Yanni Gourde, Tyler Johnson, Ondrej Palat, and Brayden Point.
NHL PLAYOFFS
Bruins vs. Lightning
Series tied, 1-1
“You want to sweep every series,
obviously,” said defenseman Charlie
McAvoy, who potted his first career
playoff goal to pull the Bruins into a
1-1 tie in the first period. “But how
attainable is that? We’re down to the
last eight teams in the league and every team that’s here belongs here.
These guys are a great team. We were
battling with them all year for first
place . . . we know that they’re a good
team, but we’re a good team as well.
So this is going to be a tight series.”
The win, on a night the Bolts never trailed, guaranteed that Game 5
will be back here on Sunday (3 p.m.),
following Games 3-4 at the Garden
on Wednesday and Friday (faceoff
each night at 7:15).
The Bolts, the Eastern Conference
regular-season champs, took coach
Jon Cooper’s challenge and responded to a T. Following the Game 1 loss,
the articulate Cooper made it clear
his club’s effort was, at best, spotty.
Good teams, he noted, make the other team uncomfortable, miserable.
Based on Game 1, he figured, the
Bruins would be only too happy to
face that same effort as an encore.
“A challenge is a challenge,” he
said at the end of Game 2. “And they
rose to the occasion.”
The same could not be said for the
officiating crew, particularly referees
Kelly Sutherland and Eric Furlatt.
BRUINS, Page D2
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Bruin Rick Nash (61) wasn’t able to capitalize on this opportunity as
Lightning goalie Andrei Vasilevskiy keeps his eyes on the puck.
Long shots
Shorthanded
Celtics romp
past 76ers
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
Celtics 117 Celtics forward Jayson Tatum sat at his
76ers 101 l o c ke r s o a k in g h i s
feet in a large bucket of ice late Monday night as Al Horford, whose stall
sits just two away, walked over.
“Playoff Al,” Tatum said, shaking
his head admiringly. “That’s what I’m
going to start calling you. Playoff Al.”
Horford smiled.
“See,” he said to the 20-year-old
rookie, “these games are a lot different than the regular season.”
These young Celtics are realizing
that a little more each day. Their season could have ended against the
Bucks on Saturday, but it didn’t. InCELTICS, Page D4
NBA PLAYOFFS
Celtics vs. 76ers
Celtics lead, 1-0
Dan Shaughnessy
It could be
just like the
good old days
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Terry Rozier, who led the Celtics with 29 points in Game 1, gestured to the TD Garden crowd after splashing a first-half 3-pointer against the 76ers.
Boston-Philadelphia. Basketball
wars.
The Celtics are playing the Philadelphia 76ers in the second round of
the NBA playoffs and it is a renewal
of hostilities that goes back 60 years.
This is the 20th postseason meeting
between Boston and Philadelphia. It
is as close to Red Sox-Yankees as you
are going to get in any Celtic spring.
In one of their more impressive
wins of the season, the undermanned
Celtics (no Jaylen Brown, no Kyrie Irving, no Gordon Hayward, no Malcolm Butler) thrashed the white-hot
Sixers, 117-101, in a 48-minute Game
1 frenzy that honored six decades of
playoffs featuring the Colonial rivals.
It’s odd that this is only the third
SHAUGHNESSY, Page D5
Bogaerts’s grand slam keys Sox rally
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
Red Sox 10 Xander Bogaerts had
14 hits in the first nine
Royals
6 games of the season,
nine for extra bases. When he broke a
bone in his left foot on April 8 and had
to go on the disabled list, the fear was
that a promising season also had been
fractured.
The Red Sox shortstop was hitting
well last season until he was hit on the
right hand by a pitch in early July. He
returned too soon and struggled the
entire second half.
The approach was different this
time. As his foot healed, Bogaerts
stood at the plate when teammates
Rick Porcello and Eduardo Rodriguez
threw in the bullpen between starts.
That helped keep his eyes sharp.
Bogaerts also played in a game for
Triple A Pawtucket then had to convince manager Alex Cora he was ready
to return.
Bogaerts was activated last week
and nothing has changed. His breakout season continued Monday night
with a game-changing grand slam as
the Sox came back from a three-run
deficit to beat the Kansas City Royals,
10-6.
Bogaerts was 3 for 5 to raise his batting average to .412 and OPS to 1.171.
He has 15 RBIs in 12 games.
Since coming off the disabled list,
Bogaerts is 7 of 13.
“We’ve always known how good Bogey can be,” Hanley Ramirez said.
“Now he’s showing everybody.”
Mitch Moreland also homered and
drove in two runs for the Sox, who collected 13 hits off three Kansas City
pitchers.
The 21-7 Red Sox have won four of
their last six games. Their 19 victories
in April were a franchise record. Not
since the 2003 Yankees has a team
won 21 games before May 1.
Red Sox starter Eduardo Rodriguez
had a dreadful 35-pitch first inning
against the 7-21 Royals.
After Whit Merrifield reached on a
RED SOX, Page D7
INSIDE
Similar
numbers
Statistical comparables for
current Sox
lineup. Finn, D8
Brady will
be back
Patriots QB
confirms he is
playing in
2018. D9
Curry in
Game 2?
MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
Xander Boagerts (right) celebrates his third-inning
grand slam with J.D. Martinez on Monday at Fenway.
Warriors guard
eyes return
Tuesday. D9
D2
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
NHL Playoffs
They gained an advantage
Even after a Game 2 loss, Bruins leave Florida with a series split, shifting the pressure onto Lightning
Tara Sullivan
TAMPA — There’s little
doubt Brad Marchand will
hang onto the egregious no-call
on his breakaway opportunity
late in a Game 2 loss in Tampa
and let it fuel the little ball of
anger roiling inside him, fuel it
all the way to the puck drop of
Game 3 Wednesday night at TD
Garden. And there’s similarly
little chance the rest of the Bruins won’t have departed Florida’s sunny shores without a
hint of regret for the slow start,
the sluggish early play, and the
occasional lack of physicality
and offensive aggressiveness
that led to their 4-2 loss in the
second-round playoff series
with the Lightning.
But there’s something else
the Bruins will take home with
them to Boston, and when you
peel away the layer of frustration that comes with a night
when so many things didn’t go
their way, it might just matter a
whole lot more.
“It’s 1-1,” Marchand said.
“We’re in the middle of the
playoffs. You’re not going to
walk through teams. We have
home ice advantage now and
we go home.”
We have home ice advantage.
So sure, there is disappointment in the wake of missed opportunity, regret for a night
they got pushed around,
knocked down and outskated
for the majority of two-plus periods, but the reality after the
two-game swing through Tampa? The Bruins did what they
came to do, leaving town with a
split, tilting the home-ice advantage their way, taking a
game from the conference’s
top-seeded team in their own
building, putting the pressure
squarely on Tampa to do the
same in Boston. After Saturday
afternoon’s lopsided 6-2 win (a
game even Lightning coach Jon
Cooper admitted should have
been 7-2 but for a bad disallowed goal call), was there ever
any doubt the Lightning would
be blasting from the word go?
Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy
preached that message hard
and loud. And still the Bruins
were on their heels for a good
10 minutes to open the game,
alive on the scorecard thanks
only to a majestic series of
Tuukka Rask saves, scrambling
and skating just to avoid falling
into too deep a hole to escape.
“They’re a good team. They
lost, 6-2, at home. They didn’t
Bruins vs. Lightning
Series tied, 1­1
GAME 1 — Saturday, April 28
Boston 6 .................. at Tampa Bay 2
GAME 2 — Monday, April 30
At Tampa Bay 4....................Boston 2
GAME 3
Tampa Bay at Boston
Wednesday, May 2, 7 p.m., NBCSN
GAME 4
Tampa Bay at Boston
Friday, May 4, 7 p.m., NBCSN
GAME 5
Boston at Tampa Bay
Sunday, May 6, TBA
GAME 6*
Tampa Bay at Boston
Tuesday, May 8, NBCSN
GAME 7*
Boston at Tampa Bay
Thursday, May 10, NBCSN
* If necessary
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Tempers flared early as Bruins Patrice Bergeron, David Pastrnak, and Brad Marchand tussled with Lightning players.
feel good about their game. So
you’ve got to expect they’re going to go out and play hard,”
Cassidy said. “We can discuss it
all we want before the game.
The players had to live it and
they did for the first 10 minutes. We were fortunate we
weren’t out of it because we
could have been with all the
chances they generated. We expected that. They’re a very
good team and we expect it in
Game 3 moving forward.”
Still, there has to be something comforting about returning home with that safety net in
hand, the one that says win all
your games here, and Pitts-
burgh or Washington awaits.
And safety on one side means
there is some uncertainty on
the other. Plant a seed of doubt
and you never know what advantage might sprout.
“This series is going to be
tight. I think everybody forecasted that,” said defenseman
Charlie McAvoy, who tied the
game at 1-1 with a first-period
blast. “We knew in this room
we were going to get a great effort out of them tonight. You
can’t kid yourself about that.
They come out hard, we maybe
didn’t play our best game,
didn’t get enough shot opportunities, whatever you want to
say. But at the end of the day
we’re 1-1 heading back to Boston.”
“We’re going to go home to
our fans, in a building where
we’re a confident bunch. We’re
excited.”
That these two great teams
are battling head to head in
Round 2 of the playoffs flies in
the face of logic, at least in this
corner. Any format that has the
Eastern Conference’s second
and third seeds meeting in the
first round (the Maple Leafs
were third) and the winner advancing to face the top overall
seed seems unfairly punitive for
finishing high. Still, if the Bru-
ins, who finished 1 measly
point behind Tampa in the final
standings, do somehow stay on
this road all the way to Lord
Stanley’s Cup, they sure will
have earned it the hard way.
“I’ve heard some upheaval
about the format and the same
sort of things going on in the
West with Winnipeg and Nashville, the two top point getters
during the regular season finding themselves in a matchup in
the second round where one of
those teams is going home,”
forward David Backes said.
“You know what? To win a
Stanley Cup you’ve got to beat
the best teams and Tampa is
one of the best teams. As much
as you want to change that, as
much as you may want to talk
about 1 through 16 for the
whole league, travel, building
rivalries, whatever it is, when
it’s your season on the line,
your win or go home against an
opponent, it doesn’t matter.
The intensity is going to be
high.”
That it was, particularly on
Monday night, when multiple
fisticuffs broke out throughout
the game, and a total of 13 penalties for a combined 26 minutes were called. They ultimately proved too much for the
visiting team to overcome, especially after Marchand went
unrewarded for a slash to his
hands courtesy of Anton Stralman inside the three-minute
mark, a no-call that almost immediately followed Torey
Krug’s goal that had cut the
deficit to 3-2. That proved to be
Boston’s last stand, and
Brayden Point’s empty netter
made it final.
And yet the visitors get to go
home now with a game in
hand. That’s not bad.
“Yeah, a hundred percent,”
Pastrnak said. “We got one win
but you know how it is in life,
you got something that you
want, you get it and then you
want more right? We wanted to
leave here 2-0, it didn’t happen,
so we got to think about
Wednesday now.”
Tara Sullivan is a Globe
columnist. She can be reached
at tara.sullivan@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@Globe_Tara.
Lightning shut down Bruins offense in Game 2
uBRUINS
Continued from Page D1
Their inconsistency was especially vexing for the Bruins,
who watched Anton Stralman
hack at the hands of Brad
Marchand on a breakaway late
in the third, the Li’ l Ball
o’Hate with a chance to pot the
3-3 equalizer. No call. And
soon, no chance, when Point
slid home his empty-netter
with 26 seconds to go.
“I just think it’s unacceptable to miss that call,” said
Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy,
usually reserved in his opinion
on officiating. “It’s one thing if
it ’s a judgment call on the
stick. But on the hands it’s automatic. So that was disappointing.”
The Lightning made the
Bruins miserable from the
start. The Bruins didn’t land
their first shot on net until
14:02 of the opening period
when Patrice Bergeron managed a meager forehander that
A n d r e i Va s i l e v s k i y e a s i l y
choked off at the bottom of the
left post. Time after time, the
Bruins were hemmed in their
own end.
“It’s on us,’’ said Bruins
winger David Pastrnak, who
made one of the turnovers that
led to a Tampa goal. “That’s
unacceptable from me, a
tough game. But that’s what’s
good about the playoffs — be
better on Wednesday.”
The Bolts jumped out to a
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
A shot by Ondrej Palat (not pictured) trickles past Tuukka Rask for Game 2’s deciding goal.
1-0 lead at 11:47, their first
lead of the series, when rookie
Gourde knocked one home
from the left wing circle. Point
made it happen, with a crossslot feed that connected with
Gourde in prime shooting territory. With defenseman Adam
McQuaid out of position and
goalie Tuukka Rask (27 saves)
late to come across on the
shot, Gourde had his shot in
the net.
Things began to change for
the Bruins with Bergeron’s
shot and the help of a minor
penalty (roughing) on Johnson. Only 15 seconds later, Ryan McDonagh followed Johnson into the box when he exploded on Marchand on the
rear boards. It set up the Bruins with a 5-on-3 power play
for 1:45.
Cassidy made a fundamental change on his power-play
unit with the two-man advantage. He pulled Rick Nash off
the front line and added David
Krejci at the left point. Pas-
trnak, a fixture at left point,
moved down to a wing position. The power play not only
failed to deliver a goal, it barely presented a scoring threat.
But finally with 1:30 left in
the period, McAvoy finished
off a nifty 5-on-5 passing play
off the rush with his postseason goal No. 1. Trailing deep
into the offensive end, he finished off with a 10-foot sweep
shot after receiving a pinpoint
feed from Bergeron.
The 1-1 tie was somewheat
demoralizing for the Bolts.
When Gourde scored the goahead goal, they owned a 10-0
shot lead as well as all the air
in the building. By the intermission, the score was even
and they had not managed another shot on net.
The Bolts scored the only
goal in the second, again keeping the pressure in the Boston
end most of the period, the
Black and Gold mustering but
five shots on net.
Johnson, assuming the rule
of a checker in this series,
scored the go-ahead (2-1) goal
with 10:14 gone in the period,
burying a wrister off the rush
on a tape-to-tape pass from
Point. Point rushed down the
left side, put on the brakes
when he hit the left wing circle
and snapped his pinpoint feed
across the slot for Johnson to
bury.
Palat opened up a 3-1 lead
with 5:52 go in regulation, for
what looked like the jawbreaker, but then Torey Krug responded a minute 50 seconds
later for his third of the postseason, wiring one by Vasilevskiy from the outer edge of the
right wing circle.
Marchand followed off the
next faceoff with a breakaway,
the last good Boston chance,
but justice on this night came
with the four blind eyes of the
two refs.
“They were all over us,” said
Pastrnak, reviewing the early
Lightning 4, Bruins 2
At Amalie Arena, Tampa
FIRST PERIOD
Penalty — Boston, Backes, served by DeBrusk,
double minor (roughing) 5:30
Penalty — Tampa, Paquette (roughing) 5:30
Penalty — Boston, Krug (slashing) 10:00
Tampa 1, Boston 0 — Gourde 2 (Point, Ser­
gachev) 11:47 (pp)
Penalty — Tampa, Johnson (roughing) 14:02
Penalty — Tampa, McDonagh (roughing) 14:17
Tampa 1, Boston 1 — McAvoy 1 (Bergeron,
Marchand) 18:30
SECOND PERIOD
Tampa 2, Boston 1 — Johnson 3 (Point, Palat)
10:14
Penalty — Tampa, Hedman (holding) 10:31
THIRD PERIOD
Penalty — Tampa, Stralman (cross check) 3:18
Penalty — Boston, Miller (boarding) 3:18
Penalty — Boston, Krug (roughing) 3:18
Penalty — Tampa, Gourde (roughing) 3:18
Penalty — Boston, Pastrnak, double minor (hi
stick) 7:31
Tampa 3, Boston 1 — Palat 2 (Point) 14:08
Tampa 3, Boston 2 — Krug 3 (Pastrnak, March­
and) 15:58
Tampa 4, Boston 2 — Point 2 (Hedman) 19:34
(en)
SCORE BY PERIOD
Boston .................................... 1
0
1 —
2
Tampa Bay ............................ 1
1
2 —
4
SHOTS BY PERIOD
Boston .................................... 8
5
Tampa Bay .......................... 10
8
7
13
—
—
20
31
Power plays — Boston 0 of 3; Tampa Bay 1 of 4.
Goalies — Boston, Rask 5­4­0 (30 shots­27
saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 5­2­0 (20 shots­18
saves).
Referees — Kelly Sutherland, Eric Furlatt.
Linesmen — David Brisebois, Brad Kovachik.
Attendance — 19,092 (19,092). Time — 2:36.
going when the Bruins
couldn’t buy a ticket out of
their own end.
“It’s on us. Tough. We had
chances to shoot the puck on
net, and when we finally decide [to shoot], we miss the
net.
“Tough for us . . . but this
game is over.”
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at
kevin.dupont@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeKPD.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
D3
NHL Playoffs
Rask’s lost blade to be addressed in future
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
TAMPA — Tuukka Rask, after taking a day away from the
rink Sunday, was back in net
for the 4-2 loss
BRUINS
in Game 2
NOTEBOOK Monday night,
and he kept
both skate blades under him.
In Game 1, Rask lost his left
blade with about 13:15 gone
in the second period, leading
to a crazy scramble that ended
only when Mikhail Sergachev
fired a puck by him to cut the
Boston lead to 3-2.
Bruins president Cam Nee­
ly said here Monday that general manager Don Sweeney
will bring up the lost-blade incident at the next league GM
meetings, with an eye on such
incidents leading to an immediate stop in play. The NHL
rulebook currently allows refs
to call for a stop in play only
when a goalie loses his headgear.
“I think they’re going to
have to look at this,” said Neely. “Maybe if we’d gained possession of the puck, they might
have blown it down, I don’t
know. But what, the goalie’s
going to take his mask off if his
blade comes off?”
Or knock the net off its
moorings, it was suggested to
Neely. “Then you’ve got a potential two-minute penalty,”
said Neely. “It’s going to be up
for discussion, I imagine,
among the GMs. If a goalie
doesn’t realize his blade’s off,
and he goes to push off, he
could rip a groin. So it’s something that they’re definitely
going to have to look at.”
League protocol for a rule
change is that GMs must first
agree on a proposal, then advance it to the Board of Governors for ratification.
According to Rask, the officiating crew Saturday told him
that they never heard him yelling that he was under duress.
“They didn’t hear him?”
said an incredulous Anton
Khudobin, Rask’s reliable
backup. “Heck, I was sitting on
the bench, halfway across the
ice, and I heard him.”
Tightening up
Time and space were not
the Lightning’s friend in Game
1. Time and again, too much
of both led to Boston goals in
what became a 6-2 blowout
Saturday in the opener of the
best-of-seven Round 2 series.
The Lightning’s mission in
Game 2: Take away time, take
away space.
“You talk to any goal scorer,” noted Lightning coach Jon
Cooper, “or any offensive guy,
the more time and space they
have, the more room they have
out there, the more confident
they are. The high-IQ hockey
players are going to make
plays.”
Such was the case in the
opener when Rick Nash and
Patrice Bergeron each potted
a pair of goals and David Pas­
trnak notched four assists.
Boston’s top line of Brad
Marchand-Bergeron-Pastrnak
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
With quick reflexes and a long stretch, Tuukka Rask makes
an impressive pad stop in the first for one of his 27 saves.
finished the day with a beefy
3-8—11 line, while the Lightning’s top guns all went home
with clean sheets.
“These elite players,” mused
Cooper, whose roster includes
offensive stars such as Steven
Stamkos and Nikita Kucherov,
“if things don’t start going well
for them in the first period,
then it’s the second period and
they don’t think they are getting anything done, frustration can set in. And that’s what
we want to set in. We want
that [to happen to Boston].
And I just don’t feel we did
anything close to that in Game
1.”
Tampa’s bid to contain
Bergeron & Co. rested in the
checking skills of a containment line of Brayden Point,
Ondrej Palat, and Tyler John­
son, who left Amalie Arena
with an eyesore minus-12,
burned time and again by the
skilled Bruins forwards who
turned time and space into
goals and assists.
The Tampa trio did a much
better job Monday night, with
the line combining for 7
points.
Not to be overlooked, however: The Lightning held a decided advantage in shots on
net (36-24) and overall more
than doubled Boston’s total
shot attempts (78-37) in Game
1, and again in Game 2 (31-20
in shots).
The only shots that really
count are those that go in the
net, but the numbers made
clear that the Lightning possessed the puck enough to win
and the Bruins, despite the
margin of victory, easily could
have seen the score go upsidedown.
“We have to expect they’ll
have a plan in place to limit
that [top line],” said Boston
coach Bruce Cassidy before
Game 2. “So that’s where the
[David] Krejci line and even
our third and fourth lines and
our D will have to contribute
some offense.”
By Cassidy’s eye, the Bruins
“gave them a lot of puck possession, and that’s going to be
dangerous if we go down that
road every night.”
Schaller or Noel Acciari might
have been under the spotlight.
Schaller finished with two
shots on net, while Acciari
didn’t attempt any.
Bruins fans have been eager
to get another look at rookie
Ryan Donato in the lineup. But
with a 36-24 shot disparity in
Game 1, the more defensiveminded Tommy Wingels
might have been the one Cassidy and crew were considering.
Off night at the dot
Tremendous trio
Bergeron went 11 for 23
(48 percent) in the faceoff circle in Game 2, an off night for
Patrice The Thief. Meanwhile,
Riley Nash won 8 of his 12
drops.
The Bruins landed only 20
shots on net and Bergeron had
five of them, equaling the five
that Tyler Johnson put on
Rask.
Ex-Ranger Ryan McDonagh
dealt out six hits, including
one that decked Adam Mc­
Quaid with 5:27 gone in the
first period.
With an assist on Torey
Krug’s goal, Pastrnak took the
lead in playoff scoring with 18
points (5-13-18).
Marchand ranked No. 4 (411-15), followed by Bergeron
in fifth at 3-9-12.
In the Bruins’ successful
Stanley Cup march of 2011,
Bergeron collected 20 points
over the four rounds, while
Marchand logged 19.
Cassidy, who has been
coaching for some 20 years,
said he has not seen a line produce like his MarchandBergeron-Pastrnak trio.
“When they’re on, boy, are
they on,” he said. “I haven’t see
that with my own eyes, up
front, behind the bench.
Thinking back over the
years, Cassidy recalled the
highly-potent Jari KurriWayne Gretzky-Dave Semen­
ko line with the great Oiler
teams and the Al Secord-Denis
Savard-Steve Larmer trio in
Chicago, during his short stint
trying to become a regular on
the Blackhawk back line.
No lineup changes
Cassidy, after noting that he
is “not a guy who only changes
the lineup when you lose,”
used the same lineup in Game
2 he used in both the opener
Saturday and in Game 7 vs.
the Maple Leafs last Wednesday.
Nonetheless, Cassidy added
that the coaching staff considered a change after Game 1.
No telling what they may have
considered, but either Tim
No­call leaves Marchand, Cassidy frustrated
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
TAMPA — The Little Ball of
Hate was rolling toward the net
with the puck on his stick and
visions of tying things up — and
silencing the hatred of Amalie
Arena crowd. .
As Brad Marchand collected
Zdeno Chara’s pass through the
middle, he had a semi-breakaway and barreled at goalie Andrei Vasilevskiy. Anton Stralman, chasing in desperation,
did the only thing he could do.
He chopped down on Marchand’s hands and the pucks skittered off his stick. Marchand
immediately lifted his hands
and turned his head in a
“ Where’s the whistle?” moment.
It never blew.
The threat, which came with
3:57 left and just seconds after
Torey Krug’s wicked short-side
wrister somehow squeezed between Vasilevskiy and the post
and pulled Boston within 3-2,
was over. And for all intents
and purposes, so was the game
— an eventual 4-2 win that
evened the second-round Stanley Cup playoff series at 1-1.
The non-call infuriated the
Boston bench, which rose and
groaned simultaneously as referee Kelly Sutherland turned a
blind eye.
What made the call sting a
little extra was the Lightning
scored their first goal of the
game on the power play as
Krug sat in the box because of a
slash that was not nearly as
egregious. It was the kind of
harmless love tap you see 100
times a game.
“That’s the kind of play that
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Bruins players watch a replay of Brayden Point’s empty-net goal that sealed Tampa’s win.
they called earlier in the game.
They called that all year — a
slash up around the hands, I
mean, that’s automatic. It’s a
penalty shot let alone a penalty,’’ said Marchand, who clearly
hated the call but also wasn’t
looking to dwell on it. “So,
tough one there, but I mean, we
had some chances on the power
play and we have to capitalize.’’
Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy
was a little more steamed after
a night in which he felt his club
was “on the wrong side of three
or four calls that impacted the
game.’’
The Krug penalty was one.
David Pastrnak’s four-minute
high sticking on Victor Hedman in the third period — replays showed that it was Hedman’s own stick that bloodied
the defenseman’s face — was
another. A non-icing call just
before that hack on Marchand
was one more.
Cassidy could have lived
with most of the calls, but the
Marchand call was the only
that really didn’t sit well.
“Obviously,’’ he said. “He
slashed him right on the hands.
I just think it’s unacceptable to
miss that call — it’s a hit on the
hands. It’s one thing if it’s a
judgment call on the stick but
on the hands is usually automatic. So that was disappointing.’’
Reliving the play brought
back memories of the other
calls that Cassidy felt could
have been called another way.
“Even the icing before [the
Marchand no-call], it’s a judgment call but I mean, Torey’s
there first. Eventually we do get
that puck out and bring it back
in, so that’s on us, we have to
manage the puck but they impacted the game and that’s
what’s frustrating,’’ said the
coach.
“Even the Hedman one, we
thought it was Hedman’s own
stick that cut him. Now you’re
down four minutes. Now we
killed that but at the end of the
day, [Marchy’s] breakaway — I
think that should be called in
my estimation. I disagree with
the non-call. He hit him on the
hands and he clearly loses possession of the puck and that’s
an infraction.’’
The chance to tie the game
up would have been a measure
of revenge for Marchand, who
not only hears the heaviest
boos whenever he touches the
puck in Tampa, but whose late
turnover led to Ondrej Palat’s
eventual game-winner.
It was the most costly turnover on a night full of them.
“We didn’t play great — especially early,’’ said Marchand.
“We turned some pucks over
against a good team they’re going to capitalize at some point.’’
Cassidy, who felt good about
the way his team played in general after weathering the first
10 minutes, agreed that it came
down to the turnovers.
“We mishandled a couple of
pucks tonight around the offensive blue line and even right at
the end and it kind of cost us a
bit,’’ he said. “But they finished.
You’ve got to give them credit.’’
Jim McBride can be reached at
james.mcbride@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globejimmcbride.
Led by Point, Lightning checking line matches up
By Erik Erlendsson
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
TAMPA — Brayden Point
missed the mark in the opening
game of the second round of
the playoffs.
In Game 2, the Lightning
center — along with linemates
Tyler Johnson and Ondrej Palat
— put one right on the bull’seye to lead Tampa Bay to a 4-2
victory against the Bruins Monday night.
The series is tied at a game
apiece heading to Boston for
Game 3 on Wednesday.
The performance by the
Point line is the main reason.
Point finished the night with
4 points on a goal and three assists to tie a franchise playoff record for points in a game, and
he set a personal best for most
points in a game, regular season or postseason. Johnson had
a goal on a team-high five shots
and Palat scored the winner
late in the third period and finished with 2 points.
Their showing in Game 2
was a reversal of fortune from
the first game, when the trio
was a combined minus-12
while matched up against the
Patrice Bergeron line.
“We are a confident line,’’
Johnson said. “I thought the
last game wasn’t really our best
game, obviously, and I felt we
needed to have a bounce back,
we needed to have an answer. I
thought we did that today, I felt
we competed really hard, I felt
we played well and we got re-
warded with some chances and
some opportunities.’’
Point in particular had the
most noticeable difference. After being on the ice for five
goals against in Game 1, the
sophomore center appearing in
his first Stanley Cup playoffs
registered a point on all four
Lightning goals and sealed the
victory with an empty-net goal
with 26 seconds remaining.
“Last night you go minus-5
and tonight your line puts up
points,’’ Point said. “That’s the
playoffs. You can’t get too high
or too low.’’
In the day off between
games, the constant story line
focused on the Point line vs. the
Bergeron line, which finished
with 11 points in Game 1. Point
has been the Lightning’s matchup center all season, so if they
were not going to be able to
slow down Boston’s top line, it
was going to spell trouble for
Tampa Bay.
But Lightning coach Jon
Cooper didn’t hesitate to go
back to the same matchup for
Game 2, putting Point and Co.
on the ice to take the opening
faceoff, announcing right away
there was no thought of changing things around despite the
struggles to start the series.
“I honestly didn’t,’’ Cooper
said when asked if he considered a change. “I have been
asked that question quite a bit
in the past three days. But we’ve
watched him check the best
lines in the league all year so
there was no reason to sit and
say that after one game we need
to panic and say they can’t do it.
We have faith in them and I
thought they were outstanding
tonight.’’
To get his point across, Cooper did something he rarely
does — issue a public challenge
through the media to his best
defensive line. On Sunday, Cooper said Bergeron’s line had too
easy of a night and his players
needed to be harder on them if
they wanted to have success.
If that was the public challenge, behind closed doors it
was more to the point.
“A challenge is a challenge,’’
Cooper said with the hint of a
grin. “That was it and they rose
to the challenge.’’
NHL playoffs
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Penguins, Capitals tied at 1
Thursday, April 26
Pittsburgh 3..................................at Washington 2
Sunday, April 29
At Washington 4.................................Pittsburgh 1
Schedule
Tue., May 1 at Pittsburgh................................7:30
Thu., May 3 at Pittsburgh..................................... 7
Sat., May 5 at Washington..............................TBA
*Mon., May 7 at Pittsburgh.............................TBA
*Wed., May 9 at Washington..........................TBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Jets, Predators tied at 1
Friday, April 27
Winnipeg 4.........................................at Nashville 1
Sunday, April 29
At Nashville 5.............................Winnipeg 4 (2OT)
Schedule
Tue., May 1 at Winnipeg.......................................8
Thu., May 3 at Winnipeg..................................9:30
Sat., May 5 at Nashville....................................TBA
*Mon., May 7 at Winnipeg...............................TBA
*Thu., May 10 at Nashville...............................TBA
Knights, Sharks tied at 1
Thursday, April 26
Vegas 7....................................................San Jose 0
Saturday, April 28
San Jose 4....................................at Vegas 3 (2OT)
Monday, April 30
Vegas......................................................at San Jose
Schedule
Wed., May 2 at San Jose.....................................10
Fri., May 4 at Vegas.............................................10
*Sun., May 6 at San Jose.................................TBA
*Tue., May 8 at Vegas......................................TBA
* If necessary
PREDATORS 5, JETS 4
Sunday night game
Winnipeg ......................2
Nashville .......................1
0
2
2
1
0
0
0 —
1 —
4
5
First period — 1. Nashville, Johansen 3 (Fors­
berg, Subban), 0:27. 2. Winnipeg, Byfuglien 1
(Scheifele), 12:47. 3. Winnipeg, Scheifele 7
(Stastny, Laine), 13:16 (pp). Penalties — Hen­
dricks, Wpg (interference on the goaltender),
7:08. Hartman, Nsh (tripping), 10:00. Wheeler,
Wpg (tripping), 10:52. Arvidsson, Nsh (interfer­
ence), 12:33.
Second period — 4. Nashville, Subban 1 (Fors­
berg, Arvidsson), 5:04 (pp). 5. Nashville, Arvids­
son 3 (Forsberg, Ellis), 18:41. Penalties — Little,
Wpg (tripping), 4:01. Ekholm, Nsh (slashing),
7:46. Hendricks, Wpg (interference), 13:46.
Scheifele, Wpg (roughing), 20:00. Ellis, Nsh
(cross check), 20:00. Bonino, Nsh (roughing),
20:00.
Third period — 6. Winnipeg, Tanev 3 (Little),
5:11. 7. Nashville, Johansen 4 (Arvidsson), 5:45.
8. Winnipeg, Scheifele 8 (Wheeler, Byfuglien),
18:55. Penalties — None.
Overtime — None. Penalties — None.
Second overtime — 9. Nashville, Fiala 3
(CSmith, Turris), 5:37. Penalties — None.
Shots on goal — Winnipeg 9­13­14­12­2 — 50.
Nashville 9­9­7­13­3 — 41.
Power plays — Winnipeg 1­4; Nashville 1­4.
Goalies — Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 5­2­0 (41
shots­36 saves). Nashville, Rinne 5­3­0 (50
shots­46 saves).
A — 17,274 (17,113). T — 3:42.
Predators
keep up
with Jets
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASHVILLE — The Nashville Predators and Winnipeg
Jets put on a fast-paced, thrilling playoff show that reminded
everyone why they finished
ahead of everybody else in the
NHL’s regular season.
Thanks to Kevin Fiala, the
Presidents’ Trophy winners go
to Winnipeg breathing a little
easier.
Fiala scored off a 2-on-1 5:37
into double overtime to give the
Predators a 5-4 victory over the
Jets on Sunday night in Game
2, tying the Western Conference
semifinal series at a game
apiece.
D4
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
NBA Playoffs
Celtics’ trio too
much for 76ers
uCELTICS
Continued from Page D1
stead, it continued on to these
conference semifinals against
a 76ers team that surged into
TD Garden having won 20 of
its last 21 games.
This, many reasoned, was
where the undermanned Celtics would finally run out of
baskets and hope. And then it
was announced an hour before
game time that they would
have to continue on without
yet another star, as Jaylen
Brown’s strained hamstring —
despite his protestation — was
deemed too strained for this
game.
But if there is one thing this
team has grown accustomed
to during this increasingly
stunning season, it is finding a
way to win no matter who is
available and who is not.
So without Brown, without
Kyrie Irving, without Daniel
Theis, and, of course, without
G o r d o n Hay w a r d , B o s t o n
blitzed the 76ers with a barrage of 3-pointers and surged
to a 117-101 win that they
mostly controlled throughout.
“People think we’re weak
and we’re not as strong as a
team because we don’t have
certain players,” guard Marcus
Smart said. “But we’re all professionals, we’ve all been here,
we all work, and we all have
the same goal in mind, and
that’s to win. Regardless of
who we have or don’t have, we
go out there and play.”
The good news for the Celtics was that the y did have
Playoff Al, they did have the
rookie who was soaking his
feet in the ice bucket, and they
did have their brash young
point guard, Terry Rozier, who
showed up to the game wearing a Drew Bledsoe Patriots
jersey.
All three were spectacular,
and they mostly had to be for
the team to have a chance. Rozier had 29 points, 8 rebounds,
and 6 assists, Horford added
26 points and 7 rebounds, and
Tatum had a career-high 28
points. The trio combined to
go 29 for 46 from the field and
15 for 16 from the foul line.
Despite those flashy numbers, though, the Celtics were
most proud of how they kept
Philadelphia doing something
similar against them.
“We all got together yesterday, and we had a plan,” Rozier
said. “Our plan was ways that
we could stop these guys, no
matter who’s on the court.”
The 76ers made just 5 of 26
3-pointers and were kept at an
a r m’s l e n g t h o r f a r t h e r
throughout the game’s final 30
minutes.
Joel Embiid had 31 points
and 13 rebounds, but he did
not receive nearly enough
help.
It could have simply been
viewed as an off night for a
team that had been idle since
finishing off its series against
the Heat last Tuesday. But
coach Brett Brown made it
clear that the struggles were
not simply self-inflicted.
“To look at this game, defensively, offensively, this isn’t
who we are,” he said. “This is a
very poor game for us, and I
give the Celtics a lot of credit
for producing that.”
Despite the powerful performance, Celtics coach Brad
Ste vens said his team will
need to do more moving forward.
He said the defense was not
as good as it was in any of the
last three games against the
Bucks, and that slice included
one game in which Milwaukee
made 50.7 percent of its shots.
“There were parts about it
that were good, but we have to
clean up quite a bit,” Stevens
said. “They exposed us in a lot
of areas.”
Of course, the return of Jaylen Brown could help. About
90 minutes before the game,
he was on the phone with
members of the team’s medical
staff, looking for a way to play.
But he was eventually ruled
out.
The fact that such a long
time passed before the final
decision was made figures to
be a good sign for Brown moving forward, particularly with
CELTICS 117, 76ERS 101
At TD Garden, Boston
PHILADELPHIA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F
Covingtn..27
0­6
3­3
0­2 1 1
Saric.........33 5­11
2­2
5­7 4 2
Embiid......35 12­21
5­6 1­13 5 2
Simmons .42 6­11 6­11
0­7 6 4
Redick......34 7­13
4­5
1­3 3 4
Johnson ..... 5
0­0
0­0
0­0 0 1
Belinelli....28
3­9
4­4
0­1 1 2
Ilyasova ...21
2­9
2­4
3­9 2 1
Andersn..... 5
0­1
0­0
0­2 0 2
Bayless ...... 2
0­0
0­0
0­0 0 0
Holmes ...... 2
0­1
0­0
0­0 0 0
McConnll ... 6
0­1
0­0
1­1 0 0
Totals ....... 35­83 26­35 11­45 22 19
Pt
3
12
31
18
20
0
11
6
0
0
0
0
101
PPG
8.3
15.8
21.8
18.2
20.0
4.3
15.7
10.0
1.6
0.0
0.0
2.5
FG%: .422, FT%: .743. 3­pt. goals: 5­26, .192
(Covington 0­4, Saric 0­4, Embiid 2­5, Redick 2­7,
Belinelli 1­2, Ilyasova 0­3, Anderson 0­1). Team re­
bounds: 13. Team turnovers: 12 (23 pts.). Blocks:
2 (Covington, Simmons). Turnovers: 12 (Embiid 3,
Simmons 7, Redick, Ilyasova). Steals: 7 (Coving­
ton 2, Saric, Embiid, Simmons 2, Ilyasova).
Min
Horford ....33
Tatum ......40
Baynes.....29
Smart .......32
Rozier.......35
Ojeleye.....22
Morris ......28
Larkin.......18
Nader ......... 2
Yabusele.... 2
Totals .......
BOSTON
FG
FT Reb
M­A M­A O­T A F
10­12
4­4
0­7 4 3
8­16 11­12
0­3 2 1
2­4
0­0
1­6 1 4
3­12
1­1
2­3 9 4
11­18
0­0
2­8 6 2
1­4
0­0
0­1 0 1
5­12
0­0
0­5 1 2
1­6
2­2
0­3 4 3
0­0
0­0
0­0 0 0
0­1
0­0
0­0 0 1
41­85 18­19 5­36 27 21
Pt
26
28
6
9
29
3
11
5
0
0
117
PPG
19.1
17.0
5.4
7.3
19.0
2.3
13.0
4.6
1.2
0.5
FG%: .482, FT%: .947. 3­pt. goals: 17­36, .472
(Horford 2­3, Tatum 1­5, Baynes 2­3, Smart 2­8,
Rozier 7­9, Ojeleye 1­3, Morris 1­4, Larkin 1­1).
Team rebounds: 8. Team turnovers: 10 (16 pts.).
Blocks: 4 (Tatum, Baynes, Rozier, Morris). Turn­
overs: 10 (Horford 2, Tatum 4, Baynes, Smart, Ro­
zier 2). Steals: 4 (Smart, Rozier 2, Ojeleye).
Philadelphia .................. 22 23 30 26
Boston ............................ 25 31 31 30
—
—
101
117
A — 18,624 (18,624). T — 2:22. Officials — Marc
Davis, Ed Malloy, Bill Spooner.
two days off before Thursday’s
Game 2.
“One of the things when I
talked to him I was like, ‘Hey,
we obviously really need you
out there, but we need you for
the long run and we need you
to be healthy and to feel
good,’ ” Horford said.
And if Brown is not back,
there is no doubting this
team’s confidence in its ability
to push on without him.
“This isn’t our first rodeo
with things like this,” Smart
said. “We’ve had injuries before. We’ve come back from
deficits you shouldn’t be coming back from. So this team,
we’re so high on each other, if
things are thrown at us, we
just look at it as another challenge. When it’s time to get out
there, we just go out there and
do it.”
Before Game 1, Brett
Brown acknowledged he was
unsure if the long layoff could
hurt his team.
He had tried to balance
practice time for Embiid —
who already had a lengthy absence due to his orbital fracture — with rest for the others.
But he just did not know how
it would all look.
Then the game began and
Philadelphia fired up one errant shot after another. At the
start, most of them were open,
but then Celtics made them
more difficult, and the misses
kept coming anyway.
“I don’t know if the time off
hurt us,” Brown said, “but it
looked like we were playing a
good team today.”
The 76ers overcame a slow
start and actually took a 29-27
lead on an Embiid jumper
with 9:32 left in the second
quarter.
But they faded quickly after
that.
W i t h 3 : 1 2 l e f t , Ta t u m
drilled a catch-and-shoot 3
from the left corner, and two
minutes later slid along the
baseline and put in a twohanded dunk, helping the
Celtics take a 56-45 lead to
halftime.
Embiid found a rhythm inside early in the third quarter,
but the Celtics were resilient,
and they were also happy to
receive some long-range contributions from unlikely sources.
Smart, who had been 0 for
11 on 3-pointers in this postseason, finally hit one midway
through the period, and then
Aron Baynes, who had just
four regular-season 3-pointers
in his career, hit his second of
this game, helping Boston
stretch its lead back to 72-58.
W it h 40 .9 s ec on ds le f t ,
Smart soared and grabbed an
offensive rebound over Embiid
and then converted a circus
shot as he was fouled. The free
throw gave Boston an 87-70
lead, its largest.
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at adam.himmelsbach
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Marcus Smart makes himself at home diving across the floor to save a ball from going out of bounds in the first half.
Lined up perfectly
Successful strategy took aim at the Sixers’ long­range shooters
Gary Washburn
ON BASKETBALL
With less than 48 hours to
prepare for a team that brought
completely different challenges
than the Milwaukee Bucks, the
Celtics won Game 1 of the Eastern Conference semifinals
against the favored Philadelphia 76ers with a tenacious defensive effort and their best offensive performance of the
postseason.
Meanwhile, another Celtics
starter sat on the sideline looking dapper in street clothes.
Jaylen Brown watched from the
bench in a nice turtleneck after
his pleas to play, despite a
strained hamstring, were denied.
That even lessened the Celtics’ chances to win, apparently.
But, somehow, they led this
game for the final 30:42 in a
stunningly impressive 117-101
win.
The game left the 76ers
wondering whether they are
ready for the intensity of the efficient Celtics after handling
the undisciplined Miami Heat
NBA playoffs
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Raptors vs. Cavaliers
Schedule
Tue., May 1 at Toronto........................ 8
Thu., May 3 at Toronto........................6
Sat., May 5 at Cleveland................8:30
Mon., May 7 at Cleveland..............8:30
*Wed., May 9 at Toronto............... TBA
*Fri., May 11 at Cleveland.............TBA
*Sun., May 13 at Toronto...............TBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Warriors lead Pelicans, 1­0
Saturday, April 28
At Golden St. 123.....New Orleans 101
Schedule
Tue., May 1 at Golden State....... 10:30
Fri., May 4 at New Orleans.................8
Sun., May 6 at New Orleans.........3:30
*Tue., May 8 at Golden State....... TBA
*Thu., May 10 at New Orleans.....TBA
*Mon., May 14 at Golden State....TBA
Rockets lead Jazz, 1­0
Sunday, April 29
At Houston 110......................... Utah 96
Schedule
Wed., May 2 at Houston.....................8
Fri., May 4 at Utah........................10:30
Sun., May 6 at Utah.............................8
*Tue., May 8 at Houston................TBA
*Thu., May 10 at Utah....................TBA
*Mon., May 14 at Houston............TBA
* If necessary
PLAYOFF SCORING LEADERS
Not including last night’s game
G Pts. Avg
James, Cle .......................6 241 34.4
Harden, Hou....................6 186 31.0
Davis, NO.........................5 153 30.6
Westbrook, OKC .............6 176 29.3
Durant, GS .......................6 167 27.8
Mitchell, Utah .................7 192 27.4
DeRozan, Tor...................6 160 26.7
Wall, Was.........................6 156 26.4
Antetoknmpo, Mil ..........7 180 25.7
McCollum, Por................4 101 25.2
Middleton, Mil ................7 173 24.7
George, OKC....................6 148 24.7
Holliday, NO ....................5 122 24.4
Celtics vs. 76ers
Celtics lead series, 1­0
GAME 1 — Monday, April 30
At Boston 117.........Philadelphia 101
GAME 2
Philadelphia at Boston
Thursday, May 3, 8:30 p.m., TNT
GAME 3
Boston at Philadelphia
Saturday, May 5, 5 p.m.
GAME 4
Boston at Philadelphia
Monday, May 7, 6 p.m.
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Sixers big man Joel Embiid got the worst of a collision with
Shane Larkin (background) in the second half Monday.
rather easily.
Knowing the 76ers love to
launch 3-pointers and surround gifted big man Joel Embiid with premium shooters,
the Celtics spent the evening
running J.J Redick, Dario Saric,
Marco Belinelli, Robert Covington, and Ersan Ilyasova off the
3-point line. They turned that
quintet into drivers, figuring
correctly that allowing 2 points
is better than allowing 3.
The 76ers made 57 3-pointers in the five-game series with
the Heat. They made 5 of 26
Monday, including a combined
3 for 20 from those aforementioned five.
The Celtics’ strategy was to
allow Embiid to have anything
he could muster with one-onone coverage and he led all
scorers with 31 points. But the
Celtics outscored Philadelphia
by 6 points with him on the
floor. With Embiid the lone
76ers shooter to consistently
make buckets, Philadelphia
struggled to score.
Meanwhile, the Celtics
countered with 17 3-pointers,
their most since Feb. 23 as they
seemingly made every big shot
in staving off every Philadelphia run.
But the masterpiece started
with defense.
The Celtics decided to 1)
force Embiid to score in the
paint and 2) turn pass-first Ben
Simmons into more of a shooter. Since Simmons doesn’t
shoot threes – he’s missed all
12 of his attempts as an NBA
player – the tradeoff was 2’s for
3’s. The Celtics gladly accepted
that deal.
“You’re going to have to balance that as the series goes on,”
Celtics coach Brad Stevens said.
“You could get 31 [points in]
isolation, but if you’re doubling
and everything else you’re giving up [more points] because
you’re leaving shooters. It’s a
fine line, a balancing act. It’s
what makes it really hard because they’re so talented.”
The Celtics have spent this
season being a team that loves
to shoot the three (10th in the
NBA in attempts) and skilled at
making the three (second in the
NBA). But Boston made just 35
percent of its 3-point attempts
in that grinding seven-game series with Milwaukee.
In Game 1 against the 76ers,
they made 47.2 percent, including a playoff career-high seven
threes from Terry Rozier, who
shot the ball with confidence
and in rhythm. It was one of
those nights when he appeared
to know the shot was going to
fall.
Jayson Tatum added 28
points and, most important,
was able to get to the free
throw line a career-high 12
times.
The Celtics felt mighty comfortable attacking the rim with
Embiid defending away from
the basket.
“My objective is basically to
not let anyone get to the rim,”
Embiid said. “But when you
play defense on guys like Al
Horford and Marcus Morris
that are able to stretch you off
so much, you just got to respect
it and make adjustments.
“If I have to switch on a
guard, I mean I feel like I’m
pretty good defensively. I’m going to do my best to stop them.
In those situations, I thought
we didn’t execute well. That’s
something we have to correct a
lot. They were pretty wide open
on a couple of those possessions. I feel like that killed us a
lot tonight. Next game we just
have to be able to kind of like
switch everything and find
something or blitz.”
While Philadelphia presents
myriad issues with its shooting,
it seemed the Celtics were relieved not to have faced a scoring forward like Milwaukee’s
Khris Middleton, who couldn’t
GAME 5*
Philadelphia at Boston
Wednesday, May 9, TBA
GAME 6*
Boston at Philadelphia
Friday, May 11, TBA
GAME 7*
Boston at Philadelphia
Sunday, May 13, TBA
* If necessary
be defended in the previous series. The 76ers lack that scoring
forward who can score at ease
from midrange, so the Celtics
countered by blitzing the 3point line and forcing their
shooters to create off the dribble. That is a better matchup
for the Celtics because they
don’t need size to defend the 3point line. Marcus Smart, Terry
Rozier, and even Shane Larkin
were chasing shooters off their
shots.
Stevens disagreed when
asked if was their best defensive game of the playoffs, but
indeed it was. The 76ers averaged 114 points in their series
against Miami. They were able
to score at will because the
Heat couldn’t defend their
shooters.
“On the defensive end, we
really wanted to try to contain
them the best that we could,
and not giving them any easy
looks,” Horford said. “I felt like
we understood Philadelphia is
too good of a team if you’re
stagnant offensively and one of
things we wanted to do is play
with pace.”
The Celtics looked like the
better team Monday. They
came in with a brilliant game
plan despite fatigue from a seven-game series with the Bucks.
The 76ers had six days off and
played as if they weren’t ready
for the moment.
The Celtics were more than
ready. But then again, we
shouldn’t have expected anything different.
Gary Washburn can be reached
at gwashburn@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GwashburnGlobe.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
D5
NBA Playoffs
Renewed rivalry could be
just like the good old days
uSHAUGHNESSY
Continued from Page D1
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Joel Embiid (31 points, 13 rebounds) faced armed aggression from the Celtics in Game 1.
76ers lost their touch,
and focus, after layoff
By Owen Pence
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
At one point during Monday
night’s throwback playoff duel
between the Celtics and 76ers,
Aron Baynes banked in a 3pointer. Meanwhile, three of
Philadelphia’s renowned shooters — Robert Covington, Dario
Saric, and Ersan Ilyasova —
didn’t hit a shot from behind
the arc all evening.
The 76ers shot as if the rim
was laced with repellent, hitting just five 3-pointers on 26
attempts during a 117-101 loss
in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. For a team
that averaged 11 treys per
game in the regular season,
Monday’s struggle caused perplexed looks among the Philly
ranks.
Was Philadelphia’s poor
shooting the byproduct of rust,
having sat for six days following its Round 1 clincher? Or
perhaps it was the result of
Boston’s top-ranked defense, a
swarming, switching bunch
that received but one memorandum from coach Brad Stevens: “No threes.”
“I give the Celtics credit for
getting to our shooters,” said
P h i l a d e l p h i a c o a c h B r e tt
Brown. “ We did have an off
night shooting, but I think a lot
of that you can attribute to
their good defense and them
getting to shooters.”
Boston switched on almost
every screen, closed out against
briefly unattended Sixers with
verve, and enjoyed a quintessential defensive effort from
the recently reactivated Marcus Smart. Philadelphia mid-
season pickup Marco Belinelli
was one of Smart’s many victims, hitting one of the Sixers’
five 3-pointers, but shooting
just 3 of 9 from the field to go
with some lethargic defensive
play.
“[Smart] is a great defender,” said Belinelli. “Strong body.
We just need to push him back
[and] try to use the screens to
move without the ball.
“They have a good team. We
didn’t come ready to play. I
think we didn’t really compete.
They kicked our [butts] tonight.”
The whooping began in the
early going and never relented.
Celtics forward Al Horford
spent a significant portion of
the game guarding Philadelphia rookie Ben Simmons, with
Baynes drawing the 7-foot
wonder, Joel Embiid. The two
Celtics expertly walled off Simmons at the top of the key on
numerous occasions, preventing him from gaining steam
downhill and collapsing Boston’s defense. Looks that usually present themselves to Philadelphia’s shooting brigade simply weren’t there.
After almost a week of
lounging, the Sixers weren’t
their usual dynamic selves in
transition. In the rare moments that Philadelphia did exhibit an urgency to increase the
pace, it was rewarded.
Usually efficient out of timeouts, Boston turned the ball
over following a break with less
than 10 seconds left in the
third quarter. Simmons corralled the rock, advanced it to
J.J. Redick, and watched the
ball massage nylon as time expired, leaving the Sixers with a
12-point deficit.
Redick was one of the few
bright spots amid an otherwise
bleak evening for Philly. The
Duke alum scored 20 points,
hitting two threes and moving
without the ball in creative
fashion. Just seconds into the
third quarter, Redick faked as
if meandering into a dribblehandoff, then jutted backward,
fooling Smart, who was too late
to recover and fouled Redick
for three free throws. Redick
sank them all.
“They’re going to switch a
l o t o f s t u f f,” s a i d R e d i c k .
“They’re going to blow up dribble-handoffs. It’s not a secret
how they’re going to defend.”
In the eyes of point guard
phenom Simmons, lack of ball
movement was also to blame
for Philadelphia’s woes.
“We were just trying to find
a rhythm and we couldn’t find
it,” he said. “We didn’t move
the ball as we usually do. That’s
one of the things that we need
to look at and reassess.”
Philadelphia will have ample time to do just that before
Game 2 on Thursday evening
at the Garden. Transitioning
from Monday’s lackadaisical
mind-set into a fiercer demeanor is paramount.
“Some of it was us being
over here,” Redick said, motioning to the empty space
above his head, “and the game
happening right there.
“We weren’t there.”
Owen Pence can be reached at
owen.pence@globe.com.
time the cities have dueled in
the NBA tournament in the
last 33 years. Celtic fans of a
certain age remember when it
seemed like Boston and Philly
jousted in the playoffs every
spring.
This is the rivalry that gave
us Wilt Chamberlain vs. Bill
Russell (Russell made a rare
appearance at the New Garden
for Game 1). This is the rivalry
that gave us “Havlicek Stole
the Ball” and Sam Jones picking up a photographer’s stool
to defend himself against a
charging Chamberlain. This is
the rivalry that gave us Cedric
Maxwell going after a fan at
the old Spectrum, and Larry
Bird wrestling with Julius Erving on the Garden parquet
floor. Boston vs. Philadelphia
gave us Red Auerbach challenging Moses Malone to a
fight, Kevin McHale blocking
Andrew Toney’s shot, and Celtic fans chanting “Beat LA!’’
when the Sixers eliminated the
Celtics to go to the Finals in
1982.
“Those were good days,’’
McHale recalled before Game
1 (he is here working for TNT).
“And I think the rivalry is going to be back for a while now.
These two teams we are seeing
in this series have a chance to
be relevant for the next six or
seven seasons and that’s hard
to do. That’s about what our
real window was from 1981-88
and I think they might be going back to that.’’
I asked McHale which Sixer
he routinely guarded back in
the day when the Celtics met
Philadelphia almost annually
i n t h e p l ay o ff s a n d h e a n swered, “Whoever the best guy
was. You don’t think Larry was
going to take him, do you?’’
Max had pretty much the
same response.
“Did you guard Julius when
y o u p l ay e d t h e s e g u y s ? ’ ’ I
asked Max.
“ What do you think?’’ he
answered, smiling. “Larry? No
way!’’
To m m y H e i n s o h n f i r s t
played against the Philadelphia Warriors in the playoffs in
1958 and remembers his favorite moment at Convention
Hall in the 1960 conference finals.
“That was Wilt’s first season [37.6 points, 27 rebounds
per game],’’ said Heinsohn.
“ We beat them in the final
game of the playoffs [119-117]
when I made a tip-in of Bill
Sharman’s shot at the buzzer.
Wilt was all lined up to block a
shot, but I shut up 11,000 fans
all at once. You know how
tough that is to do?
“They had famous hecklers.
One guy was on me before a
game one night and I went
over to him and said, in a stage
whisper, ‘No one is allowed to
talk to me like that unless his
fly is up.’ The guy was so embarrassed, he never came
back.
“ There was another guy
who sat right under the basket
and was brutal to us year after
year. One night Jack Nichols
and Cooz hatched a plan at
halftime. While we were
warming up for the second
half, Nichols stood in front of
the fan and called for a ball
from Cousy, who was standing
at the foul line. Cooz wound up
and threw his fastball and
Nichols stepped aside and
Cooz hit the guy right in the
head!’’
Good times.
The modern-day Sixers are
coached by Brett Brown, a 57year-old basketball lifer from
South Portland, Maine, who
played four years of college
ball on Commonwealth Avenue at Boston University for
Rick Pitino. Brown and his dad
are both in the New England
Basketball Hall of Fame and
the Sixer boss has a true grasp
of what this rivalry was and
could be again.
“I personally grew up with
this rivalry,’’ said the coach. “It
was right on my doorstep
growing up.’’
Brown is supposed to have
the better team in this series.
The “Trust The Process” Sixers,
who went 75-253 (average season, 19-63) over the last four
seasons, broke out in a good
way this year and earned theNo. 3 seed in the Eastern Conference. Philly won 24 of its
last 28 games and wiped out
the Miami Heat in five games
in its first-round series.
The Sixers had not played a
game in six days when they
took the floor Monday and it
showed. Tatum scorched them
for 16 of his career-high 28
points in the first half and the
Green led, 56-45, at halftime.
Tatum kept the heat on in
the second half and became
the first Celtic rookie with
three straight 20-point playoff
games since Bird did it four
times in 1980. Meanwhile, the
estimable Brown was just another Prunty speedbump for
Brad Stevens.
“Defensively, offensively,
this isn’t who we are,’’ Brown
said after the loss. “This was a
very poor game from us. To
think that this game is a reflection of what we’ve been doing
the last few months would be a
mistake.’’
The Celtics had a lot to do
with Philly’s woes. And yet Stevens, in Belichickian fashion,
said it was not one of Boston’s
better games.
It looked pretty good to all
of us.
Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid
— a legitimate big man cut in
the mold of Wilt the Stilt — led
the visitors with 31 points and
13 rebounds.
But the Sixers lost. As Russell, Heinsohn, McHale, Maxwell, and Danny Ainge nodded
in approval.
It just like the old days at
the New Garden.
Dan Shaughnessy can be
reached at
dshaughnessy@globe.com.
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Some physical defense by J.J. Redick didn’t slow down Jayson Tatum, who had 28 points.
It was touch and go before Brown was asked to take a seat
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
About 90 minutes before the
Celtics faced the 76ers in Game
1 of this Eastern Conference
semifinal MonCELTICS
day, forward
NOTEBOOK Jaylen Brown
was on the
phone with members of the
team’s medical staff, trying to
talk them into letting him play
despite his strained right hamstring.
About 30 minutes after that,
Brown walked slowly through
the locker room wearing Celtics
warm-up gear.
Brown’s status was finally
decided about 45 minutes before tipoff, when he was ruled
out. It was a blow, but his teammates persevered for a 117-101
victory. With Game 2 scheduled
for Thursday, the team remains
optimistic that Brown will be
able to return for that one.
Marcus Smart started in
place of the second-year forward on Monday night and
contributed 9 points and a
game-high nine assists.
“He went through stuff this
morning, though they cut him
short from going through the
whole workout,” Celtics coach
Brad Stevens said before
Brown’s status had been decided. “He feels a lot better because he’s anxious to play, so
that’s part of the discussion.”
Brown, who averaged 17.9
points and 4.7 rebounds in Boston’s first-round series against
the Bucks, suffered the injury
when he was making a pass to
guard Terry Rozier late in the
second quarter of his team’s
Game 7 victory Saturday. He
was later cleared to return, but
with the game mostly in hand
and the extent of Brown’s injury not fully known, Stevens
elected to keep him on the
bench.
True colors
Rozier gave one final nod to
his mini feud with Bucks point
guard Eric Bledsoe, arriving for
Game 1 wearing a Drew Bled­
soe No. 11 Patriots jersey.
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
If you missed it, after Boston’s victory over the Bucks in
Game 1 win, Rozier inadvertently referred to Eric Bledsoe
as Drew Bledsoe. When Bledsoe was asked about Rozier after Game 2, he used an expletive as he claimed he did not
even know who Rozier was.
The two then had a mild dustup during Game 5, bumping
each other several times.
Cedric
Maxwell (left)
shared a
pregame
moment with
Celtics legend
Bill Russell,
who made his
presence felt
in Game 1
from his
courtside seat
at TD Garden.
Rozier said “a long-lost
friend” gave him the Drew
Bledsoe jersey after Game 2 of
the Bucks series.
“Just had to wait for the
right time to wear it,” he said
Monday.
During Game 7, the Celtics
showed a video of Drew Bledsoe in which he referred to
himself as “the original Bledsoe,” and the TD Garden crowd
went wild. Fans serenaded Eric
Bledsoe with “Who is Bledsoe?”
chants throughout the game.
When the game ended,
though, Rozier and Bledsoe
shared a cordial embrace near
midcourt.
Nevertheless, Rozier and
Drew Bledsoe will probably
now be linked for years to
come.
“That’s my guy,” said Rozier,
who had 29 points, 8 rebounds,
and 6 assists in Monday’s win.
“I’ve never even had a conversation, but that’s my guy. I
think he knows who I am and I
know who he is.”
Russell on hand
Celtics legend Bill Russell
was in attendance for Monday’s
game. This year marks the 50th
anniversary of Boston’s Eastern
Conference finals win over the
76ers in which Russell and
76ers legend Wilt Chamberlain
dueled for seven games.
In that series, the Celtics
overcame a 3-1 deficit and Russell had 12 points and 26 re-
bounds in Boston’s 100-96 win
in Game 7. (Chamberlain had
14 points and 36 rebounds in
the loss at The Spectrum.)
The Celtics went on to beat
the Lakers in the NBA Finals.
Fraternal order
Stevens and 76ers coach
Brett Brown made their mutual
respect clear. In addition to appreciating each other’s styles
and successes, the two have
spent a bit of time together
away from coaching, too.
“We bump into each other
in summer leagues,” Brown
said. “We go to the gyms with
our kids. Last year in Vegas, he
and I took our kids into a gym
and had some good workouts
and spoke a lot since then. I
think he’s class. I think he’s a
terrific coach and look forward
to competing against the Celtics.”
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at adam.himmelsbach
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
Sports
D6
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Baseball
AL
RED SOX NOTEBOOK
EAST
Boston
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
W
21
18
16
13
8
L
7
10
12
14
20
Pct.
.750
.643
.571
.481
.286
GB
—
3
5
7½
13
Div. Last 10
14­5
5­5
9­8
9­1
6­8
4­6
5­9
9­1
4­8
3­7
Streak
W2
L1
W2
W1
W1
CENTRAL
Cleveland
Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City
W
15
11
9
8
7
L
12
16
15
18
21
Pct.
.556
.407
.375
.308
.250
GB
—
4
4½
6½
8½
Div. Last 10
7­2
6­4
6­7
3­7
2­1
1­9
5­6
4­6
6­10
3­7
Streak
W1
L2
L2
L2
L1
WEST
Houston
Seattle
Los Angeles
Oakland
Texas
W
20
16
16
14
11
L
10
11
12
14
19
Pct.
.667
.593
.571
.500
.367
GB
—
2½
3
5
9
Div. Last 10
10­7
7­3
5­5
7­3
10­3
3­7
8­12
6­4
7­13
4­6
Streak
W3
W2
L4
L2
L2
NL
EAST
New York
Atlanta
Philadelphia
Washington
Miami
W
17
16
16
13
10
L
9
11
12
16
18
Pct.
.654
.593
.571
.448
.357
GB
—
1½
2
5½
8
Div. Last 10
10­4
5­5
11­7
6­4
5­10
5­5
5­7
4­6
2­5
5­5
Streak
W1
W2
L3
W2
W3
CENTRAL
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
W
16
17
17
15
7
L
10
12
13
12
22
Pct.
.615
.586
.567
.556
.241
GB
—
½
1
1½
10½
Div. Last 10
9­5
8­2
8­2
5­5
7­11
6­4
11­7
5­5
3­13
4­6
Streak
W5
L1
W1
L3
L1
WEST
*Arizona
Colorado
*San Francisco
*Los Angeles
*San Diego
W
19
15
14
12
10
L
8
15
14
15
19
Pct.
.704
.500
.500
.444
.345
GB
—
5½
5½
7
10
Div. Last 10
13­5
7­3
7­6
4­6
9­11
7­3
8­11
4­6
8­12
3­7
Streak
L1
L3
W2
L2
L1
* — Not including late game
RESULTS
MONDAY
At Boston 10
Kansas City 6
Tampa Bay 3
at Detroit 2
Texas 5
At Houston 2
NY Yankees 1
At Cleveland 7
At Chi. Cubs 3
Colorado 2
At Washington 3
Toronto 7
Pittsburgh 2
Milwaukee 6
at Cincinnati 5
At Miami 8
Philadelphia 4
at Minnesota 5
LA Dodgers
at Arizona
San Diego
at San Francisco
SUNDAY
At Boston 4
Tampa Bay 3
At Baltimore 5
At Toronto 7
Milwaukee 0
NY Mets 14
Arizona 1
at San Diego 2
At San Francisco 4
at Philadelphia 1
At Pittsburgh 5
Chi. White Sox 4
At Chi. Cubs 2
at Cleveland 4
At Washington 3
Oakland 4
At Kansas City 5
Colorado 0
Seattle 10
at Minnesota 2
At Houston 8
Texas 2
At Miami 3
Atlanta 10
Cincinnati 8
Detroit 3
NY Yankees 2
LA Dodgers 2
at LA Angels 1
St. Louis 0
TUESDAY’S GAMES
........2018........ Team .......2017 vs. opp ....... .......Last 3 starts .......
Odds
W­L
ERA
rec.
W­L
IP
ERA
W­L
IP
ERA
KANSAS CITY AT BOSTON, 7:10 p.m.
Junis (R)
Sale (L)
+245
­305
3­2
2­1
3.34
2.31
3­2
4­2
0­0
1­0
0.0
8.1
0.00
3.24
1­2
1­1
18.1
18.0
5.89
3.50
3.93
2.56
2­2
3­2
2­1
0­0
21.0
6.0
3.43
1.50
0­2
1­0
13.1
19.0
4.73
3.79
4.55
1.62
3­2
5­1
0­1
0­0
4.0
3.1
13.50
0.00
2­1
3­0
17.0
19.0
4.24
2.37
4.23
2.86
2­3
5­1
1­2
0­0
16.2
6.0
2.70
0.00
0­0
0­0
17.1
18.2
4.15
1.93
2.86
4.19
4­2
0­6
0­0
2­1
6.1
21.0
4.26
4.71
2­1
0­1
18.2
17.2
2.41
5.09
—
1.00
0­0
1­2
0­0
1­0
0.0
7.0
0.00
10.29
0­0
1­0
0.0
17.0
0.00
0.53
6.61
2.74
4­2
1­3
1­0
0­0
11.0
0.0
4.91
0.00
1­1
0­1
16.0
17.0
7.31
3.18
5.79
3.10
2­4
2­3
0­0
0­1
0.0
6.1
0.00
2.84
1­2
2­1
16.2
18.0
5.94
2.50
TEXAS AT CLEVELAND, 6:10 p.m.
Fister (R)
Clevinger (R)
+160
­190
1­2
2­0
PITTSBURGH AT WASHINGTON, 7:05 p.m.
Kuhl (R)
Scherzer (R)
+205
­255
3­1
5­1
ATLANTA AT NY METS, 7:10 p.m.
Newcomb (L)
Syndergaard (R)
+170
­200
1­1
2­0
MILWAUKEE AT CINCINNATI, 7:10 p.m.
Anderson (R)
Bailey (R)
­135
+115
2­2
0­3
PHILADELPHIA AT MIAMI, 7:10 p.m.
Eflin (R)
García (L)
­115
­105
—
1­0
TAMPA BAY AT DETROIT, 7:10 p.m.
Archer (R)
Boyd (L)
­140
+120
2­1
0­2
COLORADO AT CHI. CUBS, 8:05 p.m.
Gray (R)
Hendricks (R)
Off
Off
2­4
2­1
NY YANKEES AT HOUSTON, 8:10 p.m.
Montgomery (L)
Verlander (R)
+145
­170
2­0
4­0
3.76
1.36
4­1
5­1
0­1
0­0
11.1
0.0
5.56
0.00
2­0
2­0
17.0
21.0
3.18
1.29
6.00
3.33
3­2
3­2
2­0
2­0
14.0
12.2
3.21
4.97
1­2
0­1
14.0
16.2
9.00
4.86
6.14
3.62
2­3
4­1
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
0­2
3­0
17.2
17.2
6.11
2.55
2.84
1.93
2­4
1­1
2­0
0­0
15.1
0.0
0.59
0.00
1­2
1­0
19.0
12.0
3.79
2.25
13.11
4.67
0­3
1­2
1­1
0­0
15.0
0.0
3.00
0.00
0­3
1­2
11.2
17.1
13.11
4.67
4.70
4.96
4­1
4­2
0­1
2­0
10.2
12.0
5.91
0.75
1­0
1­1
12.1
17.2
6.57
3.57
Ross (R)
+115
2­2
3.64
3­2
0­0
0.0
Suárez (L)
­135
0­1
6.75
0­1
0­0
0.0
Team rec. — Record in games started by pitcher this season
0.00
0.00
1­1
0­1
17.2
5.1
2.55
6.75
TORONTO AT MINNESOTA, 8:10 p.m.
Estrada (R)
Gibson (R)
+120
­140
2­2
1­1
CHI. WHITE SOX AT ST. LOUIS, 8:15 p.m.
Shields (R)
Wacha (R)
+195
­245
1­3
4­1
LA DODGERS AT ARIZONA, 9:40 p.m.
Kershaw (L)
Koch (R)
­225
+185
1­4
1­0
BALTIMORE AT LA ANGELS, 10:07 p.m.
Cobb (R)
Tropeano (R)
+155
­185
0­3
1­2
OAKLAND AT SEATTLE, 10:10 p.m.
Triggs (R)
Hernández (R)
­105
­115
2­0
3­2
SAN DIEGO AT SAN FRANCISCO, 10:15 p.m.
LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Not including Monday night’s game
BATTING
AB
R
H Avg.
MMachado, Bal .............. 108 14 39 .361
Altuve, Hou ..................... 114 16 40 .351
Betts, Bos .......................... 90 29 31 .344
MSmith, TB ....................... 76
9 26 .342
Gregorius, NYY................. 94 24 32 .340
Lowrie, Oak..................... 115 13 39 .339
JMartinez, Bos.................. 97 15 32 .330
HRamirez, Bos.................. 92 18 30 .326
Cabrera, Det ..................... 89 13 29 .326
Correa, Hou..................... 100 20 32 .320
HOME RUNS
Trout, Los Angeles...........................................10
Haniger, Seattle................................................10
Gregorius, New York.......................................10
Davidson, Chicago.............................................9
MMachado, Baltimore.......................................9
Gallo, Texas.........................................................8
Alonso, Cleveland.............................................. 8
Moustakas, Kansas City...................................8
Betts, Boston.......................................................8
.............................................................. 5 tied at 7
RUNS BATTED IN
Gregorius, New York.......................................30
Lowrie, Oakland...............................................27
Haniger, Seattle................................................27
GSanchez, New York.......................................24
KDavis, Oakland...............................................23
JMartinez, Boston............................................ 22
MMachado, Baltimore.....................................22
Segura, Seattle.................................................21
Cabrera, Detroit................................................21
Span, Tampa Bay............................................21.
PITCHING
Porcello, Boston..............................................4­0
Verlander, Houston........................................4­0
Happ, Toronto.................................................4­1
Snell, Tampa Bay............................................4­1
Severino, New York........................................4­1
Carrasco, Cleveland.......................................4­1
Kluber, Cleveland........................................... 4­1
McCullers, Houston........................................4­1
Tanaka, New York..........................................4­2
Manaea, Oakland............................................4­2
Not including Monday night’s games
BATTING
AB
R
H Avg.
Pham, StL.......................... 88 22 30 .341
Cabrera, NYM................. 100 20 34 .340
OHerrera, Phi.................... 95 16 32 .337
Hoskins, Phi ...................... 85 16 27 .318
Belt, SF............................... 82 13 26 .317
Dickerson, Pit ................... 95 15 30 .316
FFreeman, Atl ................. 102 19 32 .314
Arenado, Col..................... 83 12 26 .313
DPeralta, Ari ..................... 94 15 29 .309
Cervelli, Pit........................ 75 10 23 .307
HOME RUNS
Albies, Atlanta....................................................9
Blackmon, Colorado..........................................9
Harper, Washington..........................................8
Villanueva, San Diego.......................................8
Thames, Milwaukee...........................................7
DeJong, St. Louis................................................7
JBaez, Chicago....................................................7
Schwarber, Chicago.......................................... 7
.............................................................. 8 tied at 6
RUNS BATTED IN
JBaez, Chicago..................................................26
Cespedes, New York....................................... 25
Pollock, Arizona................................................21
Albies, Atlanta..................................................20
Franco, Philadelphia........................................20
Cervelli, Pittsburgh..........................................20
............................................................ 5 tied at 19
PITCHING
Scherzer, Washington....................................5­1
Corbin, Arizona............................................... 4­0
McCarthy, Atlanta..........................................4­0
TWilliams, Pittsburgh.................................... 4­1
Wacha, St. Louis.............................................4­1
Godley, Arizona...............................................4­1
........................................................... 9 tied at 3­0
Sale’s mechanics
‘work in progress’
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
Chris Sale has a 2.31 earned run
average and 0.97 WHIP. He’s also averaging 11.6 strikeouts per nine innings. There’s certainly nothing
wrong with any of that.
But the lefthander hasn’t quite
been the same pitcher he was last
season. His average fastball velocity
has dropped from 95.1 miles per
hour last season to 93.5. He also
hasn’t felt the same confidence in
what is usually a killer slider.
Sale faces the Kansas City Royals
on Tuesday night and manager Alex
Cora expects to see some changes.
“We talked a little bit about mechanics. He’s not there yet,” Cora said
on Monday. “He’s worked hard with
[pitching coach Dana LeVangie]
breaking down video. He feels he’s
getting close.”
Sale threw only 14„ innings
against major league teams in spring
training, the Red Sox preferring lessstressful minor league games as a
way of building up. That could explain why tweaks are needed.
“I think he’ll be fine,” said Chris­
tian Vazquez, who has caught five of
Sale’s six starts. “He’s getting people
out and making pitches. You know
he’s going to get better over time. I’m
not worried.”
Sale was not available for comment on Monday. But the lefthander
said after his last start that his slider
was not breaking with the same bite.
“His slider hasn’t been there the
whole season. He feels that way,” Cora said. “It’s a work in progress and
it’s getting close.”
Sale has been effective changing
speeds and getting poor swings at elevated fastballs. Opponents are hitting only .203 against him.
“He competes with every pitch.
That’s how I feel,” Vazquez said.
“Once he locates that slider, it’ll only
be better. You’re going to see it soon.”
Sale has thrown 10„ fewer innings and 71 fewer pitches than he
did through six starts last season.
A Pedroia plan?
Dustin Pedroia told The Athletic
website that he is targeting a May 25
return to the majors. He has been on
the disabled list recovering from surgery on his left knee.
According to Pedroia, he will start
a rehabilitation assignment with Triple A Pawtucket on May 12.
This came as news to Cora.
“How many days does May have?
31 days? Put [down] May 32nd,” the
manager said. “We’ll see. It’s a work
in progress. Whenever he’s ready,
he’ll be here.”
When Pedroia had surgery in October, the Sox said his return would
likely come in late May or early June.
Pedroia has been working out at
the team facility in Fort Myers, Fla.,
for two weeks.
“People think it’s only the knee.
But now that he’s moving around and
doing all the stuff, it’s all the soreness
that comes into the equation,” Cora
said. “Jason [Varitek] always said you
can work out all you want in the offseason and do everything, but you
can’t prepare for standing up for
three hours in spikes. That’s part of
his process.”
Cora feels a true return date can’t
be determined until Pedroia starts to
play games.
“There’s going to be some soreness
and we have to see how he reacts to
it,” Cora said. “Not only his knee but
his hamstrings and everything. . . .
We’ll have to be patient.”
Field issue in Portland
Double A Portland postponed its
fourth consecutive game on Monday
because of a problem with the infield
dirt. The Sea Dogs have not played
since Wednesday.
Sports Turf Specialties conducted
a planned renovation of the infield on
April 20, using 28 tons of sand, silt,
and clay, according to The Portland
Press Herald.
Sea Dogs general manager Geoff
Iacuessa said the infield has yet to
settle. Every home game since Friday
has been postponed.
Portland is planning on a 6 p.m.
doubleheader against Trenton on
Tuesday assuming the field can be repaired in time.
The team issued a statement
thanking fans for their understanding and patience.
Thornburg gets started
In his first game outside of spring
training since 2016, Tyler Thornburg
threw a scoreless inning for Triple A
Pawtucket. After the first batter
reached on an error, Thornburg
struck out the side. He threw 11 of 16
pitches for strikes. The righthander is
returning from a shoulder injury that
required thoracic outlet surgery and
caused him to miss all of last season
. . . Brock Holt, who went on the disabled list last week with a left hamstring strain, took ground balls before the game and is improving. “It’s
looks like it’s not going to be something that takes a while,” Cora said.
Holt is eligible to return on May 8 . . .
Andrew Benintendi went into Monday’s game with a 1.011 OPS at home
and .533 OPS on the road. “Maybe
I’m a cold-weather player,” he said.
“Other than that, I have no idea. I
need to play better.” . . . The Red Sox
players, particularly the pitchers, are
devotees of the video game Fortnite.
One corner of the clubhouse has been
outfitted with four monitors and
Monday afternoon found Matt
Barnes, Carson Smith, David Price,
and Eduardo Rodriguez playing on
the same squad in the 100-player Battle Royale version of the game with
Sale, Benintendi, and Craig Kimbrel
watching. The Sox players won the
game.
Peter Abraham can be reached at
pabraham@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @PeteAbe.
Dodgers’ Seager needs
surgery, out for season
He said he was at peace with the deThe Los Angeles Dodgers’ difficult cision after dealing with the arm probApril got a lot worse Monday with lem for so long.
news that two-time All-Star shortstop
‘‘You always think if the day would
and 2016 NL Rookie of the Year Corey come,’’ Seager said. ‘‘You always hope
Seager will undergo seait doesn’t come. I’ve kind of acson-ending Tommy John
cepted it now. It’s just nice to
surgery.
know it’s finished. It’s done
Dodgers manager
with. No more decisions to be
Dave Roberts said the opmade.’’
eration will be performed
Seager said he did not reFriday in Los Angeles to
gret deciding against surgery
repair a right ulnar colin the offseason, saying there
C. SEAGER
lateral ligament sprain.
were other options then and
‘‘It’s a big blow,’’ Rob- Had elbow pain
the arm wasn’t as bad.
erts said.
‘‘It would have been a
The 24-year-old infielder had been forced thing,’’ he said. ‘‘It wasn’t the
bothered by a sore elbow since the right step to just go ahead and do it. It
middle of last season but had tried to was still in that kind of middle ground
deal with the problem with rest and where the first step should have been
rehabilitation rather than surgery.
rehab and see if you could take some
Seager spoke to reporters in the time off and it would be all right.’’
dugout before the Dodgers played NL
The new MRI, he said, showed the
West rival Arizona on Monday night. injur y had gotten ‘‘much, much
He said he felt pain and numbness af- worse.’’
ter a couple of throws in the recently
Seager was hitting .267 with two
completed series at San Francisco.
homers and 13 RBIs. Roberts said
‘‘I had a few bad throws over the Chris Taylor would move from the outweekend and went and got an MRI field to become the everyday shortthis morning and it was necessary to stop.
have surgery,’’ he said.
The Dodgers entered their fourThere was no doubt surgery was game series at Arizona with a 12-15 reneeded, Seager said, calling it ‘‘cut and cord, seven games behind the NL
dried.’’
West-leading Diamondbacks.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BLUE JAYS 7, TWINS 5
ASTROS 2, YANKEES 1
TORONTO
Granderson lf
Hernández rf
Smoak 1b
Solarte 3b
Pillar cf
Martin c
Morales dh
Gurriel Jr. 2b
Díaz ss
Totals
AB
2
5
5
5
5
4
3
5
4
38
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 1 3 2 .306
1 1 0 0 0 .306
2 1 2 0 0 .255
1 3 1 0 0 .250
1 1 0 0 0 .305
1 1 1 1 2 .156
0 0 0 2 1 .160
0 2 1 0 1 .267
0 1 0 0 1 .183
7 10 6 6 7
NY YANKEES
Gardner lf
Gregorius ss
Stanton rf
Sánchez dh­c
Hicks cf
Andújar 3b
Walker 1b
Torres 2b
Romine c
Judge ph
Holder p
Totals
AB
4
4
4
3
4
3
3
2
2
0
0
29
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO
1 1 0 2
0 0 0 3
0 0 0 3
0 0 1 2
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
1 0 1 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
3 1 3 14
MINNESOTA
Dozier 2b
Mauer 1b
Rosario lf
Escobar 3b
Kepler cf
Grossman rf
Morrison dh
Garver c
Adrianza ss
Totals
AB
5
4
4
5
5
4
3
4
3
37
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 0 3 .248
1 1 0 1 0 .291
1 1 0 1 0 .231
1 1 2 0 0 .301
1 3 1 0 0 .299
1 2 0 1 0 .222
0 0 1 0 0 .145
0 2 1 0 1 .281
0 0 0 1 1 .216
5 10 5 4 5
HOUSTON
Springer cf­rf
Altuve 2b
Correa ss
Gurriel 1b
Marisnick cf
Reddick rf­lf
Bregman 3b
González lf­1b
McCann c
Gattis dh
Totals
AB
4
4
3
4
0
3
1
3
3
3
28
R
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 1 .267
1 0 0 0 .347
2 1 1 0 .330
1 1 0 1 .224
0 0 0 0 .143
0 0 0 0 .233
0 0 2 0 .259
0 0 0 2 .232
0 0 0 0 .271
0 0 0 1 .200
5 2 3 5
Toronto......................020 310 001 — 7 10 0
Minnesota..................000 121 100 — 5 10 2
E—Dozier (4), Rosario (4). LOB—Toronto
10, Minnesota 10. 2B—Hernández (7), Pillar
(10), Kepler 2 (9), Grossman (5). 3B—Kepler
(1). HR—Smoak (4), off Lynn, Martin (3), off
Lynn, Escobar (4), off Sanchez. SB—Adrianza
(1). CS—Gurriel Jr. (1).
Toronto
Sanchez W 2­2
Loup
Barnes
Clippard
Osuna S 7
Minnesota
Lynn L 0­3
Hildenberger
Pressly
Curtiss
IP
6
‚
„
1
1
H
6
1
1
0
2
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 3 2 4.06
1 1 0 0 4.22
0 0 1 0 1.98
0 0 0 3 1.88
0 0 0 0 2.19
IP
5
2
1„
‚
H
7
0
3
0
R ER BB SO ERA
6 6 5 4 8.37
0 0 0 2 4.15
1 0 1 1 0.59
0 0 0 0 0.00
Inherited runners­scored—Barnes 1­1,
Curtiss 2­0. IBB—off Lynn (Morales). HBP—by
Sanchez (Morrison). PB—Garver. NP—San­
chez 93, Loup 8, Barnes 19, Clippard 20, Osu­
na 12, Lynn 98, Hildenberger 17, Pressly 33,
Curtiss 7. Umpires—Home, Adam Hamari;
First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Dan Bellino;
Third, Phil Cuzzi. T—3:13. A—16,456 (38,649).
RAYS 3, TIGERS 2
TAMPA BAY
Span lf
Cron dh
Duffy 3b
Miller 1b
Robertson ss
Wendle 2b
Gómez rf
Smith cf
Sucre c
Totals
AB
3
4
4
4
4
4
2
3
3
31
R
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 0 .256
1 2 0 1 .269
2 0 0 0 .307
1 1 0 1 .230
0 0 0 3 .333
0 0 0 0 .329
0 0 1 1 .173
0 0 0 1 .329
0 0 0 0 .281
4 3 2 7
DETROIT
Jones cf
Candelario 3b
Castellanos rf
Martinez dh
Martin pr­dh
McCann c
Hicks 1b
Machado 2b
Iglesias ss
Reyes lf
Goodrum ph
Totals
AB
3
3
3
4
0
4
3
4
3
2
1
30
R
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 1 .273
1 0 1 2 .283
1 0 0 0 .309
1 2 0 0 .232
0 0 0 0 .271
0 0 0 2 .244
0 0 1 1 .179
0 0 0 0 .204
1 0 0 0 .223
0 0 0 0 .118
0 0 0 1 .217
5 2 2 7
Tampa Bay................000 000 003 — 3 4 0
Detroit........................000 000 002 — 2 5 0
LOB—Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 5. 2B—Castel­
lanos (6), Iglesias (7). HR—Cron (7), off
Greene, Miller (2), off Greene. SB—Jones (4).
DP—Tampa Bay 1.
Tampa Bay
Faria W 2­1
Roe
Alvarado S 1
IP
8
‚
„
H
3
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 6 4.60
2 2 0 1 4.91
0 0 1 0 2.57
Detroit
Zimmermann
Stumpf
Greene L 1­2
Farmer
IP
7
1
‚
„
H
2
0
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 5 5.81
0 0 0 1 1.59
3 3 1 0 5.73
0 0 0 1 5.54
Inherited runners­scored—Alvarado 3­2.
HBP—by Roe (Castellanos, Jones). WP—Far­
ia. NP—Faria 112, Roe 17, Alvarado 21, Zim­
mermann 93, Stumpf 13, Greene 18, Farmer 8.
Umpires—Home, Stu Scheurwater; First,
Marvin Hudson; Second, Chad Whitson;
Third, Gary Cederstrom. T—2:52. A—19,398
(41,083).
NATIONALS 3, PIRATES 2
PITTSBURGH
AB
Frazier 2b
4
Polanco rf
4
SeRodríguez cf
3
Bell 1b
4
Dickerson lf
4
Cervelli c
3
Moran 3b
2
Mercer ss
3
Taillon p
2
RiRodríguez p
0
Marte ph
1
Crick p
0
Totals
30
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 2 .250
1 0 0 0 .198
0 0 1 0 .156
0 0 0 0 .232
1 1 0 0 .313
1 0 0 0 .308
0 0 1 1 .280
1 0 0 1 .247
1 1 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .286
0 0 0 0
—
6 2 2 4
WASHINGTON AB
Turner ss
4
Zimmerman 1b
4
Harper rf
2
Kendrick 2b
4
MAdams lf
4
Kintzler p
0
Taylor cf
4
Wieters c
3
Difo 3b
4
Roark p
2
Stevenson ph
1
Madson p
0
Bautista lf
0
Totals
32
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO Avg.
3 1 0 0 .284
0 0 0 0 .184
0 0 2 2 .247
0 0 0 2 .287
1 0 0 1 .260
0 0 0 0
—
1 0 0 0 .222
1 0 1 0 .220
2 1 0 1 .233
1 1 0 0 .154
0 0 0 1 .400
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .000
9 3 3 7
Pittsburgh..................000 010 100 — 2 6 1
Washington...............010 200 00x — 3 9 0
E—Frazier (4). LOB—Pittsburgh 3, Wash­
ington 8. 2B—Taillon (1), Turner (6), Taylor
(7). HR—Dickerson (3), off Roark. CS—Polan­
co (1). DP—Pittsburgh 1; Washington 2.
Pittsburgh
Taillon L 2­3
RiRodríguez
Crick
IP
6
1
1
H
7
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 2 5 4.83
0 0 1 1 1.29
0 0 0 1 1.42
Washington
Roark W 2­2
Madson
Kintzler S 1
IP
7
1
1
H
6
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 2 4 3.55
0 0 0 0 5.79
0 0 0 0 4.20
IBB—off Taillon (Harper), off RiRodríguez
(Harper). WP—Taillon. NP—Taillon 101,
RiRodríguez 13, Crick 16, Roark 105, Madson
9, Kintzler 11. Umpires—Home, Bruce Dreck­
man; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Eric Coo­
per; Third, Chad Fairchild. T—2:34. A—20,879
(41,336).
CUBS 3, ROCKIES 2
COLORADO
Desmond 1b
Blackmon cf
Arenado 3b
Story ss
Iannetta c
Parra lf
Cuevas rf
Valaika 2b
Dahl ph
Freeland p
Ottavino p
CGonzález ph
McMahon pr
Totals
AB
5
3
4
3
4
4
4
2
1
2
0
1
0
33
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 0 .178
1 1 1 1 .281
1 1 1 2 .310
0 0 1 1 .236
1 0 0 1 .216
0 0 0 1 .222
3 0 0 0 .278
0 0 1 0 .096
0 0 0 1 .261
0 0 0 2 .091
0 0 0 0
—
1 0 0 0 .246
0 0 0 0 .180
7 2 4 9
CHICAGO
Almora Jr. cf
Báez 2b
Bryant 3b
Rizzo 1b
Contreras c
Zobrist rf
Russell ss
Happ lf
Lester p
Farrell p
Schwarber ph
Strop p
Duensing p
Cishek p
Totals
AB
4
4
3
4
2
3
3
3
2
0
1
0
0
0
29
R
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 0 1 .289
0 0 0 2 .280
1 0 1 0 .291
0 1 0 1 .149
0 0 1 1 .264
1 0 0 0 .327
2 1 0 0 .250
1 0 0 1 .246
0 0 0 1 .091
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .273
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .500
6 3 2 7
Colorado....................000 020 000 — 2 7 1
Chicago......................010 011 00x — 3 6 2
E—Story (3), Báez (7), Bryant (5). LOB—
Colorado 10, Chicago 4. 2B—Arenado (5), Zo­
brist (2). 3B—Bryant (2). HR—. S—Freeland.
DP—Colorado 2; Chicago 1.
Colorado
Freeland L 1­4
Ottavino
Chicago
Lester
Farrell W 1­0
Strop
Duensing
Cishek S 1
IP
7
1
H
6
0
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 1 5 4.24
0 0 1 2 0.56
IP
5„
1‚
1
‚
„
H
5
0
1
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 0 3 5 2.73
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 0 0 2.25
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 1 1 2.70
Inherited runners­scored—Farrell 2­0,
Cishek 1­0. HBP—by Lester (Blackmon). NP—
Freeland 99, Ottavino 18, Lester 106, Farrell
19, Strop 7, Duensing 12, Cishek 11. Um­
pires—Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Laz Diaz; Sec­
ond, Andy Fletcher; Third, Manny Gonzalez.
T—2:57. A—35,922 (41,649).
Avg.
.210
.327
.230
.202
.231
.289
.165
.323
.276
.317
—
NY Yankees...............000 000 010 — 1 3 0
Houston..................... 100 100 00x — 2 5 0
LOB—NY Yankees 4, Houston 5. 2B—Torres
(3), Correa (9), Gurriel (6). HR—. SB—Torres
(1). DP—NY Yankees 1; Houston 1.
NY Yankees
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gray L 1­2
6 4 2 2 3 4 6.67
Betances
1 0 0 0 0 1 4.91
Holder
1 1 0 0 0 0 7.04
Houston
Morton W 4­0
Peacock
Devenski
Giles S 3
IP
7„
0
‚
1
H
2
0
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 10 1.72
0 0 1 0 2.84
0 0 0 1 0.73
0 0 0 3 1.80
Peacock pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. In­
herited runners­scored—Peacock 1­0, Deven­
ski 2­1. Balk—Gray. NP—Gray 97, Betances
12, Holder 9, Morton 102, Peacock 6, Devenski
4, Giles 13. Umpires—Home, John Tumpane;
First, Mark Wegner; Second, Alfonso Mar­
quez; Third, Jim Reynolds. T—2:31. A—30,061
(41,168).
MARLINS 8, PHILLIES 4
PHILADELPHIA
Hernández 2b
Hoskins lf
Herrera cf
Altherr rf
Santana 1b
Kingery ss
Hunter p
Curtis p
Franco 3b
Alfaro c
Arrieta p
Ríos p
Williams ph
Ramos p
Florimón ss
Totals
AB
4
4
4
3
4
4
0
0
3
4
1
0
1
0
1
33
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 1 0 .283
0 0 1 1 .303
2 0 1 0 .343
0 0 1 1 .192
0 0 0 0 .153
1 0 0 0 .225
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
1 2 1 0 .266
2 2 0 1 .213
1 0 1 0 .143
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .185
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 1 .211
8 4 6 4
MIAMI
Realmuto c
Prado 3b
Castro 2b
Dietrich 1b
Anderson rf
Maybin lf
Rojas ss
Brinson cf
Straily p
Shuck ph
Gonzalez p
Rivera ph
Barraclough p
Guerrero p
Bour ph
Ziegler p
Totals
AB
5
4
3
4
4
4
4
4
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
35
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 2 0 0 0 .357
1 1 0 0 1 .250
2 3 1 1 0 .312
1 1 1 0 2 .241
2 3 4 0 0 .265
1 1 0 0 0 .213
0 1 1 0 0 .234
0 1 1 0 1 .167
0 0 0 1 0
—
0 0 0 0 1 .244
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 1 .100
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0 .247
0 0 0 0 0
—
8 13 8 2 6
Philadelphia..............020 200 000 — 4 8 0
Miami.........................014 100 20x — 8 13 0
LOB—Philadelphia 8, Miami 5. 2B—Hernán­
dez (5), Kingery (8), Realmuto (1), Castro 2
(6), Dietrich (3), Anderson (6). HR—Franco
(4), off Straily, Alfaro (3), off Straily, Ander­
son (2), off Hunter. SB—Rojas (2). CS—Herre­
ra (2), Realmuto (1). DP—Philadelphia 1; Mi­
ami 1.
Philadelphia
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Arrieta L 3­1
3„ 8 6 6 2 2 3.49
Ríos
1‚ 1 0 0 0 1 2.84
Ramos
1 1 0 0 0 2 0.71
Hunter
1 2 2 2 0 1 4.91
Curtis
1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Miami
Straily
Gonzalez W 2­0
Barraclough
Guerrero
Ziegler
IP
4
2
1
1
1
H
6
1
1
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 4 1 9.00
0 0 0 0 4.50
0 0 2 1 2.13
0 0 0 2 4.40
0 0 0 0 7.11
Inherited runners­scored—Ríos 1­0. WP—
Barraclough. NP—Arrieta 79, Ríos 11, Ramos
21, Hunter 18, Curtis 11, Straily 78, Gonzalez
27, Barraclough 28, Guerrero 12, Ziegler 10.
Umpires—Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Jeremie
Rehak; Second, James Hoye; Third, Quinn
Wolcott. T—3:06. A—5,415 (37,446).
INDIANS 7, RANGERS 5
TEXAS
AB
DeShields cf
4
Choo dh
4
Profar ss
5
Mazara rf
4
Rua pr
0
Gallo lf
4
Kiner­Falefa 3b
3
Guzman 1b
3
Chirinos c
4
Robinson 2b
4
Totals
35
R
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
5
H BI BB SO
2 0 1 2
1 0 1 2
2 1 0 0
2 2 1 0
0 0 0 0
0 1 1 1
0 0 1 2
0 0 0 3
1 1 0 2
1 0 0 2
9 5 5 14
Avg.
.256
.241
.243
.284
.192
.216
.258
.227
.182
.176
CLEVELAND
AB
Lindor ss
5
Kipnis 2b
5
Ramírez 3b
5
Encarnacion 1b
4
Alonso 1b
1
Gomes dh
3
Guyer rf
1
Brantley ph
1
Naquin rf
0
Davis lf
3
RoPérez c
4
Zimmer cf
3
Totals
35
R H BI BB SO
2 3 1 0 1
0 2 1 0 2
2 2 2 0 1
0 0 0 0 1
0 1 2 0 0
0 1 0 1 2
0 0 0 2 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
1 2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 3
2 1 0 1 1
7 12 6 4 11
Avg.
.245
.178
.267
.160
.234
.258
.146
.343
.294
.186
.121
.240
Texas..........................000 100 121 — 5 9 1
Cleveland...................000 110 14x — 7 12 0
E—Robinson (4). LOB—Texas 9, Cleveland
10. 2B—DeShields (3), Profar (5), Mazara (4),
Kipnis (7), Ramírez (5). HR—Chirinos (6), off
Bauer. SB—Davis (5). CS—Gallo (1). S—Davis.
DP—Texas 1; Cleveland 1.
Texas
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Hamels
5 4 2 1 3 8 4.08
Leclerc
1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
Cláudio
0 3 1 1 0 0 7.50
Jepsen
1 0 0 0 1 0 4.50
Martin BS 2; L
„ 4 4 4 0 0 5.14
0­1
Chávez
‚ 1 0 0 0 1 5.63
Cleveland
Bauer
Olson
CAllen W 2­0
Beliveau S 1
IP
6„
„
1‚
‚
H
4
3
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 3 11 2.45
2 2 0 1 4.66
1 1 2 1 2.13
0 0 0 1 0.00
Hamels pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Cláudio pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inher­
ited runners­scored—Leclerc 2­0, Jepsen 2­0,
Chávez 2­2, CAllen 1­0, Beliveau 2­0. IBB—off
Bauer (Mazara). HBP—by Hamels (Gomes),
by CAllen (Guzman). WP—Hamels 3, Olson.
NP—Hamels 104, Leclerc 12, Cláudio 7,
Jepsen 13, Martin 19, Chávez 8, Bauer 122, Ol­
son 19, CAllen 41, Beliveau 7. Umpires—
Home, Gerry Davis; First, Pat Hoberg; Sec­
ond, Mark Carlson; Third, Brian Knight.
T—3:56. A—12,851 (35,041).
BREWERS 6, REDS 5
MILWAUKEE
Cain cf
Yelich lf­rf
Braun 1b­lf
Shaw 3b
Santana rf
Hader p
Piña c
Villar 2b
Arcia ss
Woodruff p
Aguilar 1b
Chacín p
Jennings p
Barnes p
Pérez ss
Totals
AB
4
5
3
4
4
0
4
3
3
0
1
2
0
0
2
35
R
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
6
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 2 1 0 .290
2 0 0 1 .271
1 0 2 0 .258
0 0 1 0 .243
1 2 0 1 .237
0 0 0 0 1.000
1 1 0 0 .196
1 0 1 1 .271
0 0 0 1 .190
0 0 0 0
—
1 0 0 0 .378
1 0 0 0 .091
0 0 0 0 1.000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .185
9 5 5 4
CINCINNATI
Winker lf
Peraza ss
Votto 1b
Schebler rf
Suárez 3b
Barnhart c
Blandino 2b
Finnegan p
Brice p
Gennett ph
Peralta p
Hughes p
Duvall ph
Iglesias p
Hamilton cf
Totals
AB
5
4
1
4
4
1
4
2
0
1
0
0
1
0
4
31
R
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
5
H BI BB SO
2 0 0 1
0 1 0 1
0 0 2 1
2 0 0 1
2 4 0 1
0 0 3 0
0 0 0 3
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 2
7 5 5 12
Avg.
.305
.288
.270
.320
.327
.228
.234
.000
.000
.298
.000
—
.175
.000
.172
Milwaukee.................000 120 300 — 6 9 0
Cincinnati.................. 000 230 000 — 5 7 1
E—Barnhart (1). LOB—Milwaukee 7, Cin­
cinnati 6. 2B—Santana (3), Winker (7),
Schebler (3), Suárez (4), Hamilton (2). HR—
Cain (4), off Finnegan, Piña (2), off Finnegan.
SB—Cain (8), Yelich (1), Braun (4), Villar (5),
Pérez (2). CS—Barnhart (1). SF—Peraza. DP—
Milwaukee 2; Cincinnati 1.
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Chacín
4‚ 5 4 4 3 1 4.54
Jennings
0 1 1 1 1 0 2.08
Barnes
„ 1 0 0 0 1 1.13
Woodruff W 1­0 1‚ 0 0 0 0 2 3.86
Hader S 4
2„ 0 0 0 1 8 1.00
Cincinnati
Finnegan
Brice
Peralta L 1­2
Hughes BS 1
Iglesias
IP
5
1
„
1‚
1
H
5
1
1
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 3 2 7.27
0 0 0 2 3.24
3 3 2 0 4.40
0 0 0 0 1.69
0 0 0 0 2.19
Jennings pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. In­
herited runners­scored—Jennings 1­0,
Barnes 3­2, Hughes 2­2. HBP—by Chacín
(Votto). NP—Chacín 62, Jennings 7, Barnes
13, Woodruff 16, Hader 37, Finnegan 89, Brice
25, Peralta 19, Hughes 15, Iglesias 14.
T—3:02. A—9,536 (42,319).
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
Bogaerts’s grand slam keys Sox rally
uRED SOX
Continued from Page D1
bloop single, Rodriguez walked Jorge
Soler, hit Mike Moustakas, and walked
Salvador Perez to force in a run.
Rodriguez then walked Lucas Duda
with one out to force in another run as
rain fell and the crowd booed.
“I didn’t have command of the ball,”
Rodriguez said. “That’s kind of frustrating for everybody.”
When Jon Jay grounded to the right
side, Eduardo Nunez couldn’t make the
play as a third run scored.
The Red Sox started their comeback
when Moreland (3 for 4, two RBIs)
homered to right field in the second inning against Jason Hammel. Then
came a five-run third inning.
With two outs and nobody on, Andrew Benintendi singled. Ramirez followed with a ground-rule double to
right field as the ball got stuck under
the wall.
J.D. Martinez and Moreland drew
walks to force in a run and leave the
bases loaded for Bogaerts.
Bogaerts worked the count full,
fouled a pitch off, then got a two-seam
fastball that stayed high in the strike
zone. He unloaded, sending the ball
high over the billboard closest to the
foul pole in left field.
The shot was measured at 430 feet
and left the bat at 110 miles per hour.
Bogaerts faced the ball as he went
down the line a few steps, but no Pudge
Fisk body language was needed.
As the pitches added up, Bogaerts
settled in until he got a pitch he could
hit hard.
“ You feel more comfortable,” he
said. “That’s for me, I guess. Not saying
you’re going to be successful when you
put the bat on the ball. You just feel
more comfortable seeing so many
pitches.”
At 25, Bogaerts has discovered his
power with a more balanced setup at
the plate. A positive mind-set has
helped, too.
“Continue to focus on your swing
every time in the cage,” he said. “Trusting it.”
It was the sixth grand slam for the
Sox, tying the 1996 Montreal Expos for
the most before May 1 in major league
history. The Red Sox record of 11 grand
slams was set in 2005.
The Sox did not have any grand
D7
Red Sox 10, Royals 6
KANSAS CITY
Merrifield 2b
Soler rf
Moustakas dh
a­Almonte ph­dh
Perez c
Cuthbert 3b
Duda 1b
Jay cf
Gordon lf
Escobar ss
Totals
BOSTON
Benintendi cf
Ramirez dh
Martinez lf
Moreland 1b
Bogaerts ss
Devers 3b
Núñez 2b
Bradley Jr. rf
Vázquez c
Totals
At Fenway Park
AB
R H
5
1
3
4
1
1
0
1
0
4
0
0
4
0
1
4
0
0
3
0
0
4
0
1
3
1
0
4
2
3
35
6
9
AB
4
5
4
4
5
4
4
3
4
37
R
1
1
2
3
1
1
0
1
0
10
H
1
2
2
3
3
0
1
0
1
13
BI BB SO
2
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
1
2
0
0
2
1
1
1
1
0
2
0
0
2
1
0
0
6
3 13
Avg.
.266
.304
.302
.250
.265
.213
.207
.238
.250
.227
BI BB SO
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
1
0
4
0
0
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
9
3
3
Avg.
.242
.330
.337
.305
.412
.257
.240
.195
.187
Kansas City..................................300 200 001 — 6 9 1
Boston...........................................015 110 20x — 10 13 0
a­flied out for Moustakas in 2nd. E—Cuthbert (3).
LOB—Kansas City 7, Boston 7. 2B—Merrifield 2 (6), Esco­
bar 2 (8), Ramirez (5), Martinez (7), Moreland (6). HR—
Moreland (3), off Hammel, Bogaerts (3), off Hammel.
SF—Benintendi. Runners left in scoring position—Kan­
sas City 4 (Almonte, Perez, Gordon 2), Boston 2 (Bo­
gaerts, Bradley Jr.). RISP—Kansas City 3 for 10, Boston 4
for 10. Runners moved up—Núñez. GIDP—Gordon. DP—
Boston 1 (Núñez, Bogaerts, Moreland).
Kansas City
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Hammel L 0­3
4„ 8 8 8 3 2 107 4.91
Hill
‚ 0 0 0 0 0
3 3.60
Barlow
3 5 2 1 0 1 45 3.00
Boston
Rodríguez
Velázqz W 4­0
CSmith
Johnson
IP
4
2
1
2
H
5
1
1
2
R ER BB SO NP
5 5 3 6 88
0 0 0 3 24
0 0 0 2 20
1 1 0 2 31
ERA
4.78
2.05
5.19
4.76
Inherited runners­scored—Hill 2­0. HBP—by
Rodríguez (Gordon, Moustakas). Umpires—Home, CB
Bucknor; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Brian O’Nora;
Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T—3:13. A—31,314 (37,755).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
J.D. Martinez, who had a pair of hits, follows the path of his slicing double down the right-field line in the fifth.
slams last season.
“I didn’t hit a grand slam in my career, by the way,” Cora said. “It’s not because of me.”
True enough, Cora had 75 career atbats with the bases loaded without a
home run. But he was creative even
then, getting hit by pitch five times.
Bogaerts is the first Red Sox shortstop with two grand slams in the same
season since Nomar Garciaparra had
two on May 10, 1999.
Handed a 6-3 lead, Rodriguez
seemed determined to give it away. He
hit Alex Gordon with one out in the
third inning then gave up RBI doubles
to Alcides Escobar and Merrifield on
poorly located fastballs.
“It was a struggle for him,” Cora
said.
With Rodriguez at 88 pitches, Hector Velazquez took over for the fifth inning, as Cora refreshingly did not chase
a win for his starter.
Velazquez (4-0) threw two scoreless
innings and struck out three. He
dropped his earned run average to 2.05.
“I did feel we needed somebody else
there in that spot,” Cora said. “He did
an outstanding job. . . . He’s not just a
guy in the bullpen. He’s very important
for us. This guy can pitch.”
Mookie Betts, who pulled his left
hamstring on Saturday, sat out his second consecutive game. But he was
available if needed and will probably
start on Tuesday. Chris Sale is set to
start that game.
Peter Abraham can be reached at
pabraham@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @PeteAbe.
FIRST INNING
ROYALS — Merrifield singled to center. Soler walked
on a full count, Merrifield to second. Moustakas was hit
by a pitch, Merrifield to third, Soler to second. Perez
walked on four pitches, Merrifield scored, Soler to third,
Moustakas to second. Cuthbert struck out. Duda walked
on a full count, Soler scored, Moustakas to third, Perez
to second. Jay hit an infield single to second, Moustakas
scored, Perez to third, Duda to second. A.Gordon
grounded into a double play, second baseman E.Núñez
to shortstop Bogaerts to first baseman Moreland, Jay
out.
SECOND INNING
RED SOX — Almonte in as designated hitter. Moreland
homered to right on a 1­0 count. Bogaerts flied out to
center fielder Jay. Devers flied out to center fielder Jay.
E.Núñez grounded out, pitcher Hammel to third base­
man Cuthbert to first baseman Duda.
THIRD INNING
RED SOX — Bradley Jr. grounded out, first baseman
Duda unassisted. C.Vázquez grounded out, shortstop
A.Escobar to first baseman Duda. Benintendi hit an in­
field single to second. Ramirez hit a ground­rule double
to right, Benintendi to third. J.Martinez walked on a full
count. Moreland walked on a full count, Benintendi
scored, Ramirez to third, J.Martinez to second. Bogaerts
homered to left on a full count, Ramirez scored, J.Marti­
nez scored, Moreland scored. Devers struck out.
FOURTH INNING
ROYALS — Jay struck out. A.Gordon was hit by a
pitch. A.Escobar doubled to center, A.Gordon scored.
Merrifield doubled to left, A.Escobar scored. Soler
struck out. Almonte struck out.
RED SOX — E.Núñez popped out to second baseman
Merrifield. Bradley Jr. walked. C.Vázquez singled to cen­
ter, Bradley Jr. to third. Benintendi hit a sacrifice fly to
center fielder Jay, Bradley Jr. scored. Ramirez grounded
out, pitcher Hammel to shortstop A.Escobar to first
baseman Duda.
FIFTH INNING
RED SOX — J.Martinez doubled to right. Moreland
flied out to center fielder Jay. Bogaerts singled to left,
J.Martinez to third. Devers struck out. E.Núñez singled
to right, J.Martinez scored, Bogaerts to third. Hill pitch­
ing. Bradley Jr. grounded out, shortstop A.Escobar to
first baseman Duda.
SEVENTH INNING
RED SOX — Moreland doubled to left. Bogaerts sin­
gled to left, Moreland to third. Devers grounded into
fielder’s choice, first baseman Duda to shortstop A.Es­
cobar, Moreland scored, Bogaerts out. E.Núñez ground­
ed out, catcher Perez to first baseman Duda, Devers to
second. Bradley Jr. safe at first on fielding error by third
baseman Cuthbert, Devers scored. C.Vázquez lined out
to third baseman Cuthbert.
NINTH INNING
ROYALS — A.Escobar doubled to left. Merrifield dou­
bled to center, A.Escobar scored. Soler flied out to cen­
ter fielder Benintendi. Almonte flied out to center fielder
Benintendi. Perez struck out.
Sports
D8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Comparatively speaking
We examine how each member of the Red Sox matches up historically through their ages last season
By Chad Finn
GLOBE STAFF
In his quest to make sure no Red Sox hitter pulls within
2,625 games of Cal Ripken Jr.’s iconic consecutive-games
streak (2,632), manager Alex Cora has been systematically
resting even the most integral players in the lineup.
Well, he’s either doing that, or he believes ample rest in
April will lead to a roster that isn’t fighting fatigue at the
end of the long season. I’ll let you decide which theory you
believe.
For whatever odd lineups Cora has submitted — and
resting Mookie Betts and Hanley Ramirez on the same day
(a 4-1 loss to Oakland on April 22) was pushing the limits of
logic — it is impressive that he comes up with lineups similar to this:
1. Grady Sizemore
2. Dave Winfield
3. David Wright
4. Jason Bay
5. Jim Fregosi
6. Adrian Beltre
7. Josh Reddick
8. Tim Naehring
9. Jim Essian
I know, you’re asking a question with which I am rather
familiar: What in the world are you talking about, Finn?
Of course the Red Sox cannot have that lineup, though
it’s a dang good one. The players are of different eras. One of
them, Fregosi, is deceased. I do believe Bartolo Colon has
faced every one of them.
This is actually pretty simple. Maybe you even figured it
out, since I try to write this column each year.
Per baseball-reference.com, the aforementioned players
are all the top statistical comparison in baseball history for
current Red Sox at their age as of the 2017 season.
What follows is a look at how each member of the Red
Sox roster really compares with his top statistical comp.
Some are perfect. Some are bewildering. Many add context
on what a player has done already, and what he might do in
seasons to come.
Lead it off, Mookie . . . and Grady:
Hitters
MOOKIE BETTS
Comp through age 24: Grady Sizemore
Sizemore is one of the sadder what-ifs of recent generations, his
stellar career abbreviated by a relentless run of injuries and finally
over at age 32. But the comp makes sense. From ages 22-25, he was
one of the most complete players in the game, averaging 27 homers
and 29 steals for the 2005-08 Indians while posting an .868 OPS
and playing a sensational center field. The cruel irony: He was one
of the most durable players around, averaging 160 games during
that stretch, before it all broke down. Stay healthy, Mook.
ANDREW BENINTENDI
Comp through age 22: Dave Winfield
Clearly height is not figured in to any formula, huh? This one
ought to make Red Sox fans feel better about his slow start. You
thought Benintendi got to the majors fast (151 minor league games
over two seasons)? Winfield’s next minor league game will be his
first. Winfield went from being a three-sport star at Minnesota
straight to the San Diego Padres in 1973. Twenty-eight years, 465
homers, and 3,110 hits later, he was a first-ballot selection to the
Baseball Hall of Fame.
HANLEY RAMIREZ
Comp through age 33: David Wright
I can see it: Two All-Star-caliber hitters whose careers were too
often interrupted by injury. It should be noted that Ramirez’s best
career comp every year from ages 26-31 is Troy Tulowitzki — another All-Star-caliber hitter whose career was too often interrupted
by injury. Also, Ramirez’s most similar player at 24 was Nomar
Garciaparra, another All-Star-caliber . . . well, you know.
J.D. MARTINEZ
Comp through age 29: Jason Bay
I figured because Martinez was a late bloomer — his breakthrough came at age 26 when he hit .315 with 23 homers for the
2014 Tigers, a year after the Astros released him — he’d have an array of similarity scores that might not represent how excellent he
actually is. But Bay is a fitting comp, and check this out. At age 30,
Martinez’s current age, Bay submitted a monster season in his first
full year with the Red Sox, hitting 36 homers and driving in 119
runs for a team that captured the 2009 AL wild card.
XANDER BOGAERTS
Comp through age 24: Jim Fregosi
There have been a couple of golden ages of young shortstops
over the last few decades. Alan Trammell, Cal Ripken Jr., and Robin Yount were contemporaries in the American League East for
years. Garciaparra, Alex Rodriguez, and Derek Jeter dazzled in the
mid ’90s. Baseball fans are fortunate to watch Carlos Correa, Francisco Lindor, and two-time Silver Slugger winner Bogaerts now. It
was easy to assume that a more recent player would line up with
Bogaerts. But that’s not to say Fregosi is a bizarre result. He received MVP votes in his first eight full seasons, all with the Angels,
from 1963-70, his age 21-28 seasons. But his greatest contribution
to the franchise is bringing Nolan Ryan in return when he was
traded to the Mets after the 1971 season.
RAFAEL DEVERS
Comp through age 20: None.
Devers, who slashed .284/.338/.482 with 10 homers in 58
games as a rookie last season, doesn’t have enough data yet to register a comp by baseball-reference.com’s guidelines. So if you don’t
mind, I’ll just note right here that as a 20-year-old for the 1999
Dodgers, Adrian Beltre slashed .275/.352/.428 with 15 homers in
152 games. He turned out OK.
JACKIE BRADLEY JR.
Comp through age 27: Josh Reddick
Bradley is a tough player to compare. He’s productive but maddeningly inconsistent as a hitter. And much of his value comes
from his ability to save runs with his glove; the Red Sox have had
some excellent defensive center fielders, but Bradley is the best I’ve
seen. Reddick isn’t the first player I’d think of, or even the 50th, but
it makes sense. He swung at anything thrown in his general direction in his early turn with the Red Sox, but he’s the rare hitter who
has learned better plate discipline and become a steady, respected
regular.
EDUARDO NUNEZ
Comp through age 30: Tim Naehring
Didn’t see that one coming. Naehring was a popular, dependable third baseman for the early ’90s Red Sox. The problem was he
couldn’t always be depended upon to play. Back problems plagued
him early in his career, and his playing days ended abruptly with
an elbow injury during the 1997 season. In his eight seasons, he
played more than 80 games twice, and never more than 126. His
stats are similar to Nunez’s but not much else. Nunez has become a
much better hitter as he’s aged. And Naehring is probably a better
defensive player than him right now.
CHRISTIAN VAZQUEZ
Comp through age 26: Jim Essian
I bet you thought Vazquez was younger than this, didn’t you?
He’s actually 27 now, and turns 28 in August. There are probably
1,000 catchers in baseball history who come close to his career
slash line through last season of .261/.311/.355. Essian, who
played for five teams in a 12-year career spanning 1973-84, slashed
.257/.350/.365 through age 26.
Starting pitchers
CHRIS SALE
Comp through age 28: Cole Hamels
Gotta admit, I thought it would be
someone more decorated and dominant. That’s not to dismiss the lefty’s
accomplishments; he’s made four AllStar Games, finished in the top eight in
Cy Young voting four times, and won
the NLCS and World Series MVP
awards in 2008. But Hamels has never
been truly dominant to the degree Sale
has the past couple of seasons. In his
12 seasons prior to this one, he led his
league in just two categories — WHIP
in 2008 (1.082) and shutouts in 2009
(two). In his seven full seasons as a
starter, Sale has led the league in one
category or another 14 times. Last
year, he struck out 308 batters, 92
more than Hamels’s career high.
Hamels isn’t Sale. He’s Jon Lester. I
prefer the healthy version of Sale’s No.
2 comp, Johan Santana.
DAVID PRICE
Comp through age 31: Jered Weaver
I’ ll admit it. I expected a bigger
name, though that’s probably because
Weaver was such a slopballer the last
two seasons (in 2016 and ’17 with the
Angels and Padres, he gave up 53 homers in 220‚ innings) that it became
easy to forget how good he once was.
He won 20 games once, 18 twice,
pitched a no-hitter, and finished in the
top five in Cy Young voting three
straight years. There are bigger names
down Price’s comp list, including Max
Scherzer, Santana, and Lester.
RICK PORCELLO
Comp through age 28: Jon Garland.
Garland was a mediocre (career
103 ERA+), reliable (he made at least
32 starts nine straight seasons), lanky
righthander who could be homerprone and gave up a ton of hits, but
had occasional stretches of exceptional
pitching, including an 18-win All-Star
season for the champion 2005 White
Sox. Sounds like Porcello to me. No. 2
on his list? Eck.
EDUARDO RODRIGUEZ
Comp through age 24: Martin Perez
Perez is 27 now, and has a 43-45 career record, a 4.60 ERA, and a scar on
his pitching elbow from Tommy John
surgery. With good health, E-Rod
should fare better than this.
DREW POMERANZ
Comp through age 28: Danny
Duffy
Duffy, 2011-17: 45 wins, 43 losses,
3.73 ERA, 158 games, 130 starts, 113
ERA+, 7.8 K/9, 3.2 BB/9.
Pomeranz, 2011-17: 42-42, 3.67
ERA, 170 games, 111 starts, 118
ERA+, 8.8 K/9, 3.7 BB/9.
There are twins who are less similar.
Relief pitchers
en
CRAIG KIMBREL
Comp through age 29: Kenley Jans-
Kimbrel’s career rate stats: 4.9 hits
per 9 innings, 3.3 walks per 9, 0.90
WHIP, and 14.7 K/9, including a ridiculous 16.4 last year, when he struck
out nearly half the batters he faced. He
has an argument as the most overpowering closer of all time, and his comps
reflect that — Jensen, Jonathan Papelbon, Aroldis Chapman, and a bunch of
other guys who caused radar guns to
smolder.
MATT BARNES
C o m p t h ro u g h a g e 2 7 : Ke v i n
Jepsen
Kevin Jepsen. Average reliever (career 102 ERA+) who is still kicking
around at age 33 with the Rangers.
Not to be confused with Kenley Jansen. And he won’t be.
JOE KELLY
Comp through age 29: Steve Comer
Well, this is an interesting one. You,
me, and Tyler Austin’s rib cage think of
Kelly as a fireballer, and his fastball
does heat up to triple digits. But he’s
never been much of a strikeout pitcher
— just 6.9 per nine innings over his career — which adds to his enigma image. Comer, who won 28 games for the
1978-79 Texas Rangers, was an extreme pitch-to-contact guy, mostly because he didn’t have the stuff like Kelly
to blow hitters away. In his seven-year
career, Comer pitched 701„ innings
and struck out 245 — a 3.1 K/9 rate.
Statistical similarities don’t necessarily
mean there are aesthetic similarities.
HEATH HEMBREE
Comp through age 28: Mike James
No, not the Mike James who never
once gave up the ball on a two-on-one
break for the 2003-04 Celtics. This
Mike James was a long-haired middle
reliever with a good fastball who had
some decent success for the late-’90s
Angels. Sounds like a decent match to
me.
Bench
BROCK HOLT
Comp through age 29: Jim Bucher
I’d have guessed Rex Hudler. Had to
look up Bucher. He spent five years in
the majors (1934-38), then got a fiveyear relegation to the minors before
spending two seasons with the Red
Sox (1944-45). He died on Oct. 21,
2004 — the day after the Red Sox
bounced the Yankees from the ALCS.
SANDY LEON
Comp through age 28: Wiki Gonzalez
A catcher who had a .666 OPS for
parts of seven seasons beginning in
1999, Gonzalez’s full name is Wiklenman Vicente Gonzalez. So no, it’s not
Wikipedia. I checked. The other names
on Leon’s comp list are a cornucopia of
scrub catchers: Kelly Stinnett, Gregg
Zaun, Joe Nolan. There is nothing in
baseball more similar than the limitations of backup catchers.
MITCH MORELAND
Comp through age 31: Rico Brogna
Lefthanded-hitting first baseman,
decent power but not a true slugger,
not a hitter for high average, quality
defender. This couldn’t be more perfect if they were related. What’s notable is that Brogna’s career was over at
31. Moreland is still what he has always been, and that should buy him a
few more years.
DUSTIN PEDROIA (DL)
Comp through age 33: Michael
Young.
This isn’t one I would have thought
of — I would have guessed someone
like Ian Kinsler or Jose Vidro — but it
fits. Young was a seven-time All-Star, a
batting champ, an All-Star Game MVP,
and a Gold Glove winner, though he’s
not close to Pedroia’s league as a defender. Young had six 200-hit seasons
and currently is one of the best baseball follows on Twitter.
Not enough MLB service time to
compare: Carson Smith, Tzu-Wei Lin,
Brian Johnson, Blake Swihart, Hector
Velazquez.
Chad Finn can be reached at
finn@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeChadFinn.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
All clear: Brady set to play
Quarterback definite
about his 2018 plans
By Andrew Mahoney
GLOBE STAFF
In case there was any doubt about
whether he would play in 2018, Tom
Brady erased it while participating in
a question-and-answer session at the
Milken Institute Global Conference in
Los Angeles on Monday.
Asked by Jim Gray if he would be
playing next season, Brady said he definitely would.
Two weeks ago, ESPN reported
Brady had not committed to playing in
2018, while adding that those close to
Brady believed he would be back.
There is no requirement that players declare their intention to play. Brady’s absence for the start of the Patriots’ voluntary workouts have led some
to speculation that the quarterback is
unhappy with New England. Contributing to those suspicions was the
Globe’s report that coach Bill Belichick
stripped Alex Guerrero, Brady’s close
friend and business partner, of his
special privileges, such as flying on the
team charter to road games and receiving credentials to work the side-
FILE/JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Despite rumblings to the contrary,
Tom Brady will soon be in uniform.
lines of every game.
Guerrero works out of the TB12
Center, just outside of Gillette Stadium in Patriot Place, and has treated
players there with his alternative
methods.
Brady touched on other topics during the session. When asked about losing the Super Bowl, Brady responded,
“Last year sucked.”
Gray asked Brady if he was happy,
to which Brady replied, “I have my
moments.”
Brady was also asked about the issue of players kneeling for the national anthem.
“You have to have respect for everyone’s opinions . . . Sports for me has
been the most unifying part of my life
. . . Never forget that.”
Brady made similar statements
about the anthem during the season
in an interview with WEEI.
“I have a lot of respect for the players around the league and for obviously my teammates,” he said. “I said after
the game I just love my teammates
and it takes a lot to play in the NFL.
“The guys that have played in the
past really paved the way for us and
what I thought in that post is that is
what makes this game great — players, coaches that come together for
one goal, to try and go out there and
do the best we can do every week.
“It certainly is not an easy game.
It’s intense. You sacrifice a lot. We’re
all making a choice to do that. We love
doing that and I love being out there
playing with my teammates. It’s a
great blessing in my life. That’s kind of
how I felt.”
Follow Andrew Mahoney on Twitter
@GlobeMahoney
No. 2 Notre Dame holds off Norwell
By Ryan Hathaway
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
After 50 minutes of steady, pouring
rain and a brisk wind, second-ranked
Notre Dame Academy was still standing on the soaked turf
SCHOOL
in Hingham on MonROUNDUP
day afternoon after its
16-11 nonleague girls’
lacrosse win against No. 6 Norwell.
But neither team was as steady as
the rain.
Notre Dame (9-1) showcased its
high-powered offense in the first half,
jumping out to a 12-4 lead. But the
Cougars had to weather the storm in
the second half as the Clippers (8-2)
scored five goals in seven minutes.
In a game of runs, however, Norwell
took too long to make its surge.
“Our first half we just deferred and
reacted instead of being proactive out
there,” said Norwell coach Kara Connerty, whose squad handed top-ranked
Cohasset its first loss last week.
“Lacrosse is a game of momentum,
you just have to play for 50 minutes, especially against a Division 1 program
like NDA.”
Notre Dame-bound Madison Ahern
scored her sixth goal of the day for the
Cougars with 14:20 to play. But then
the junior midfielder was sent to the
sideline to serve a yellow card for swip-
ing at a Norwell attacker with her stick.
Junior captain Lily Warendorf immediately capitalized on the absence of
NDA’s longest defender and freshman
Allie Connerty connected, too. Ahern
attempted to get back on the field as
her penalty expired, but she was forced
to wait at midfield to check into the
play.
Senior captain Murphy McDonough
won the draw for Norwell, but the Clippers put the ball on the ground just beside the net and NDA pounced.
Sophomore speedster Cara Charette
found the back of the net at the other
end and the threat was silenced.
Archbishop Williams 12, Bishop Fen­
wick 8 — Junior Haley Mullen netted
five goals and added two assists and
freshman Mel McClay had four goals
and a pair of assists for the victorious
Bishops (7-2).
Foxborough 21, Bishop Feehan 9 — Junior Maggie Roberts made 19 saves for
the Warriors (6-3).
Needham 9, Concord­Carlisle 7 —
Sophomore Lilly Callahan stopped 14
shots for the Rockets (7-3).
Baseball
St. John Paul II 16, Martha’s Vineyard
0 — Sophomore southpaw Colby August fired a no-hitter with eight strikeouts and no walks for the host Lions
(5-1) in Hyannis. August, who combined with Aaron Cole on a no-no
against Rising Charter on April 10, was
backed by a stellar over-the-shoulder
catch by center fielder Andrew Cassidy
in the third inning. Will Good (3 for 4,
triple, 3 RBIs) and Sean Raycroft (2 for
3, double, 3 RBIs) led the offense.
Lincoln­Sudbury 5, Concord­Carlisle 0
— Senior lefthander Jacob Pullen
pitched six shutout innings and struck
out nine for the Warriors.
Belmont 3, Arlington 0 — Ace Nate Espelin led the Marauders (4-3) with a
shutout. The senior had 12 strikeouts
and allowed one hit in the bottom of
the seventh inning.
Softball
Saugus 12, Lynn English 0 — Caitlyn
Wood and Leah Ventre combined for
the two-hit shutout for the Sachems.
North Reading 6, Lynnfield 5 — Junior
Cassandra Pascucci hit a walkoff single
for the Hornets.
Marblehead 2, Danvers 1 — Charlotte
Plakans struck out 11 and gave up just
two hits and also added a pair of hits
and an RBI for the Magicians (7-1).
For more highlights, go to
bostonglobe.com/schools. To report
scores, call 617-929-2860/3235 or
email hssports@globe.com.
SportsLog
Warriors’ Curry probable to play Tuesday
Just as the Golden State Warriors
had hoped, Stephen Curry is poised to
return from a left knee injury to play in
Game 2 of the Western Conference
semifinals Tuesday night against New
Orleans. Coach Steve Kerr listed the
two-time MVP as probable Monday
with the idea that he will play as long as
no issues arise with Curry’s sprained
left knee in the morning shootaround
or before the game. Kerr didn’t say
whether Curry would start or come off
the bench but he won’t have a minutes
restriction. Curry participated in his
first full-contact practice in more than
a month last Thursday.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
UMass extends Whipple
The University of Massachusetts extended the contract of football coach
Mark Whipple through the 2020 season. Whipple, the school’s all-time leader in wins (61), is in his fifth season
coaching the independent FBS program, and 11th year overall as the leader of the team. “I am excited about the
future of this University of Massachusetts football program and especially
the young men we have in our program,” said Whipple, who began his
UMass tenure in 1998, leading the
Minutemen to the Division 1-AA national championship in his first year.
NFL
Millen has ailing heart
Former NFL player and general
manager Matt Millen, 60, said he was
being treated for amyloidosis, a rare
disease that has left his heart functioning at just 30 percent. Millen told the
Morning Call in Allentown, Pa., the lifethreatening illness, for which he has received chemotherapy, may force him to
seek a heart transplant . . . . The Vikings
re-signed cornerback Terence New­
man, the NFL’s oldest active defensive
player whose 42 career interceptions
Capitals with an apparent leg injury,
could return for Game 3 after he practiced fully Monday in Pittsburgh.
BASEBALL
Rangers LHP Perez on DL
FILE/BUTCH DILL/GETTY IMAGES
Mark Whipple, signed through ’20,
is UMass’s all-time leader in wins.
are most among active players in the
league. He will return for a 16th season
five days after he turns 40 . . . The Steelers released safety J.J. Wilcox just days
after selecting a pair of safeties in the
NFL Draft: Virginia Tech’s Terrell Ed­
munds in the first round and Penn
State’s Marcus Allen in the fifth . . .
The Texans re-signed running back Al­
fred Blue, a sixth-round pick in 2014,
to a one-year deal . . . Elissa Ennis, the
ex-girlfriend of 49ers linebacker Reu­
ben Foster, submitted a video to prosecutors to support her statement that
she lied when she told authorities Foster had hit her.
NHL
Leafs GM Lamoriello out
Toronto Maple Leafs general manager Lou Lamoriello, 75, will not return
to the role next season. Team president
Brendan Shanahan said he does not
have a timeline for filling the GM position . . . The Carolina Hurricanes terminated the contract of demoted GM and
Hall of Fame player Ron Francis. The
move came two months after Francis,
55, was reassigned to president of
hockey operations . . . Evgeni Malkin,
who missed the first two games of Pittsburgh’s semifinal series against the
The Rangers placed lefthander Mar­
tin Perez on the disabled list because of
right elbow discomfort. Perez had
arthroscopic surgery on his non-throwing elbow in December after breaking a
bone. He fell on his ranch in Venezuela
after being spooked by a bull. Perez has
a 9.67 ERA in his five starts . . . The Diamondbacks placed lefthander Robbie
Ray (strained oblique) on the 10-day
DL.
OLYMPICS
Whistleblower files suit
Grigory Rodchenkov, the whistleblower who exposed Russia’s scheme to
cheat at the 2014 Olympics, filed a motion to dismiss a libel lawsuit brought
on behalf of three Russian biathletes
whose medals were stripped from the
Sochi Games for doping. Rodchenkov
also filed suit against Brooklyn Nets
owner Mikhail Prokhorov, claiming
Prokhorov’s support of the biathletes
was little more than a ruse to reveal
Rodchenkov’s whereabouts in the US,
where he has been living in hiding.
MISCELLANY
Trump lobbies for Cup
President Donald Trump called on
African countries to get behind the
joint North American bid to host the
2026 World Cup. Trump made the appeal during a press conference with Nigerian president Muhammadu Buhari
. . . Martin Klizan rallied to surprise
Germany’s Florian Mayer, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3,
in the first round of the Munich Open
. . . Top-seeded Karolina Pliskova withdrew from her home country’s Prague
Open because of a right thigh injury.
Scoreboard
Y
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
KC
7:10
NESN
KC
1:05
NESN
TEX
8:05
NESN
TEX
8:05
NESN
TEX
8:05
NESN
TEX
3:05
NESN
5/1
5/2
5/3
5/4
TB
7:00
NBCSN
5/5
TB
7:00
NBCSN
D9
5/6
Y
Y
MON
5/7
TB
3 p.m.
PHI
8:30
TNT
PHI
5:00
ESPN
PHI
6:00
TNT
MON
1:00
NBCSB
Home games shaded
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI­FM 93.7; Bruins, Celtics, and Revolution, WBZ­FM 98.5
ON THE AIR
BASEBALL
7:10 p.m. Kansas City at Boston
8 p.m.
NY Yankees at Houston
NESN
MLB
NBA PLAYOFFS
8 p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto
10:30 p.m. New Orleans at Golden State
TNT
TNT
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
7:30 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh
8 p.m.
Nashville at Winnipeg
NBCSN
CNBC
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
FS1
Champions: Real Madrid vs. B. Munich
Latest line
NBA
Tuesday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At Toronto............ 6½ .............Cleveland
At Golden State.10½ ....... New Orleans
Wednesday
At Houston..........11 ......................Utah
National Hockey League
Tuesday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At Pittsburgh. ­141 Washington...+131
At Winnipeg...­129 Nashville........+119
Transactions
Schools
BASEBALL
BAY STATE
Natick 3...................................Norwood 2
DUAL COUNTY
Lincoln­Sudbury 5... Concord­Carlisle 0
Weston 4.................................Waltham 1
EIL
Beaver CD 9............................ Bancroft 0
Lex. Christian 8....................Landmark 3
HOCKOMOCK
Stoughton 11.......................King Philip 5
MIDDLESEX
Belmont 3...............................Arlington 0
SOUTH COAST
Bourne 13..............................Wareham 5
SOUTH SHORE
Rockland 9..............................Mashpee 2
TRI­VALLEY
Bellingham 9.................................Millis 8
NONLEAGUE
Barnstable 12........................Falmouth 3
E. Boston 3..................... Mystic Valley 2
St. John Paul II 16......Martha’s Vnyd. 0
Sandwich 9...................E. Bridgewater 1
GOLF
GIRLS
MASS. BAY
Duxbury 3½............................ Nauset 2½
Hingham 4½.......................Braintree 1½
Hingham 3½.......................Braintree 2½
Hingham 4.................................Saugus 3
Saugus 4.................................Braintree 2
NONLEAGUE
Wellesley 27½.................Westboro 26½
LACROSSE
BOYS
COMMONWEALTH
Mystic Valley 15................Minuteman 5
Shawsheen 12......................... Whittier 5
HOCKOMOCK
Canton 12..........................Oliver Ames 6
Canton 12..........................Oliver Ames 6
MAYFLOWER
Southeastern 13....................Blue Hills 9
Tri­County 17..................Sacred Heart 8
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Central Cath. 8...................N. Andover 7
PREP­PRIVATE
Pingree 13...................................BB&N 12
TRI­VALLEY
Dover­Sherborn 13.................Medway 6
NONLEAGUE
Bridge.­Raynham 12............Mansfield 6
Hull 16.........................................Bourne 3
Wellesley 9...............................Melrose 5
Weston 10........................Framingham 4
Weston 10........................Framingham 4
GIRLS
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Abp. Williams 12..............Bp. Fenwick 8
HOCKOMOCK
Mansfield 21............................Canton 13
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Andover 17..........................Tewksbury 3
Central Cath. 13...............N. Andover 10
PATRIOT
Silver Lake 12.............. Whit.­Hanson 10
PREP­PRIVATE
BB&N 16.....................................Pingree 8
Dexter Southfield 6........Milton Acad. 4
TRI­VALLEY
Norton 11..........................Bellingham 10
NONLEAGUE
Foxboro 21..........................Bp. Feehan 9
Monomoy 16...........Dennis­Yarmouth 8
Needham 9................Concord­Carlisle 7
Notre Dame (H) 16................Norwell 11
Shawsheen 20............... Whittier Tech 1
SOFTBALL
CAPE ANN
N. Reading 6...........................Lynnfield 5
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
St. Mary’s 15...............Arlington Cath. 3
HOCKOMOCK
Stoughton 14.......................King Philip 3
Taunton 16.................Foxboro 1 (5 inn.)
MIDDLESEX
Wakefield 13..........Stoneham 1 (5 inn.)
NORTHEASTERN
Gloucester 4..................Lynn Classical 3
Marblehead 2.......................... Danvers 1
Saugus 12.........................Lynn English 0
SOUTH COAST
Digh.­Rehoboth 5.........Old Rochester 0
TRI­VALLEY
Bellingham 6.................................Millis 3
NONLEAGUE
Middleboro 7.........................Wareham 1
Whit.­Hanson 19........E. Bridgewater 12
TENNIS
BOYS
CAPE ANN
Manchester 3..............Ham.­Wenham 2
ISL
Lawrence Acad. .....................Middlesex
GIRLS
NONLEAGUE
Mystic Valley 5.........Coyle & Cassidy 0
VOLLEYBALL
BOYS
BAY STATE
Natick 3...................................Braintree 0
Needham 2.............................Brookline 1
COMMONWEALTH
Somerville 3........................Essex Tech 2
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Haverhill 3................................Andover 1
Lawrence 3...............................Billerica 1
NONLEAGUE
Concord­Carlisle 3........Madison Park 1
Winchester 3..............................Norton 0
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/high­
schools.
Tennis
ATP ESTORIL
Singles
First Round
Pedro Sousa def. Gilles Simon, 6­3, 4­6,
7­6 (4).; Alex de Minaur def. Gastao
Elias, 6­3, 6­1.; Frances Tiafoe def. Ten­
nys Sandgren, 3­6, 7­6 (5), 7­6 (4).
WTA RABAT
Singles
First Round
Sara Sorribes Tormo def. Yulia Putint­
seva, 7­6 (4), 6­0.; Johanna Larsson def.
Rebecca Peterson, 2­6, 6­3, 6­1.; Jana
Fett def. Sachia Vickery, 6­2, 3­6, 6­3.;
Kirsten Flipkens def. Petra Martic (3),
3­6, 6­2, 6­4.; Sara Errani def. Zarina Di­
yas (6), 6­4, 6­4.
Baseball
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
North Division
W
L
Syracuse..................13
8
Pawtucket ...............11 10
Lehigh Valley..........11 11
Rochester ..................9 10
Buffalo .......................7
8
Scranton/W­B.........10 13
Pct. GB
.619 —
.524
2
.500 2½
.474
3
.467
3
.435
4
South Division
W
L
Durham....................12 10
Norfolk .....................11 10
Charlotte .................10 13
Gwinnett....................8 14
Pct. GB
.545 —
.524
½
.435 2½
.364
4
West Division
W
L
Toledo ......................15
7
Indianapolis ............11 10
Columbus ................10 12
Louisville ...................9 11
Pct. GB
.682 —
.524 3½
.455
5
.450
5
MONDAY'S GAMES
Rochester 5......................... Pawtucket 1
Louisville 7............................Columbus 2
Buffalo 6........................Scranton/W­B 2
Durham 4...................................Norfolk 2
Indianapolis 10...........................Toledo 7
Gwinnett 5..............................Charlotte 0
Syracuse 5......................Lehigh Valley 4
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Rochester at Pawtucket...................6:15
Columbus at Louisville.....................6:30
Buffalo at Scranton/W­B..................6:35
Durham at Norfolk............................ 6:35
Indianapolis at Toledo......................6:35
Gwinnett at Charlotte.......................7:04
Syracuse at Lehigh Valley...............7:05
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Rochester at Pawtucket.............. 12:05a
Buffalo at Scranton/W­B.............10:35a
Indianapolis at Toledo..................10:35a
Syracuse at Lehigh Valley...........10:35a
Columbus at Louisville......................11a
Gwinnett at Charlotte...................11:05a
Durham at Norfolk............................ 6:35
Rochester 5, Pawtucket 1
at McCoy Stadium, Pawtucket, R.I.
ROCHESTER AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Buss cf
5 0 1 0 0 2 .235
Reginatto 3b 5 2 2 0 0 1 .242
Cave lf
2 1 0 1 2 0 .188
Astudillo c
5 1 3 2 0 0 .333
Stassi dh
5 0 2 1 0 2 .226
Curtis 1b
4 0 1 1 0 1 .212
Featherstn 2b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .158
JRamsey rf
3 0 1 0 1 1 .143
GPetit ss
4 1 1 0 0 0 .293
Totals
37 5 11 5 4 10
PAWTUCKET AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
RCastillo rf
4 0 2 1 0 0 .333
De Jsus Jr. 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .233
4 0 1 0 0 0 .260
Olt 1b
Ohlman c
4 0 1 0 0 1 .267
Barfield dh
4 0 0 0 0 1 .138
RFlores lf
3 0 1 0 1 1 .172
JBetts 3b
3 0 0 0 1 0 .211
ATavarez cf
3 0 0 0 0 0 .224
MMiller ss
2 1 0 0 1 0 .213
Totals
31 1 6 1 3 3
Rochester
300 100 010 — 5 11 0
Pawtucket 001 000 000 — 1 6 0
LOB—Rochester 11, Pawtucket 6.
2B—Reginatto (6), Astudillo (3), Buss
(3). SB—Reginatto (2), GPetit (3). SF—
Cave. GIDP—Ohlman. DP—Rochester 2,
.
ROCHESTER IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Enns W 1­3
6 4 1 1 1 1 4.50
Baxendale
2 1 0 0 1 1 0.00
Melotakis
1 1 0 0 1 1 3.38
PAWTUCKET IP
Shephrd L 0­23„
Buttrey
1‚
RoScott
1
Thornburg
1
KMartin
2
H
7
1
0
1
2
R
4
0
0
0
1
ER BB SO
4 2 4
0 2 1
0 0 0
0 0 3
1 0 2
ERA
7.36
4.22
1.04
0.00
2.57
HBP—by Buttrey (Curtis). WP—Enns,
Shepherd, Thornburg. T—2:57.
A—2,275.
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Rochester at Pawtucket.............. 12:05a
Buffalo at Scranton/W­B.............10:35a
Indianapolis at Toledo..................10:35a
Syracuse at Lehigh Valley...........10:35a
Columbus at Louisville......................11a
Gwinnett at Charlotte...................11:05a
Durham at Norfolk............................ 6:35
EASTERN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W
L
New Hampshire .....14
7
Trenton ....................12
9
Binghamton ............11 10
Hartford...................12 11
Reading......................8 13
Portland.....................6 12
Pct. GB
.667 —
.571
2
.524
3
.522
3
.381
6
.333 6½
Western Division
W
L
Richmond ................14
9
Akron........................13 10
Altoona ....................11 10
Bowie .......................11 11
Harrisburg.................9 13
Erie .............................8 14
Pct. GB
.609 —
.565
1
.524
2
.500 2½
.409 4½
.364 5½
MONDAY'S GAMES
Trenton at Portland...........................ppd
Erie 6.............................................Bowie 2
Hartford 10..........................Harrisburg 6
Altoona 3...............................Richmond 1
Akron 7..............................Binghamton 5
New Hampshire 7...................Reading 2
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Trenton at Portland................................6
Bowie at Erie......................................6:05
Hartford at Harrisburg.....................6:30
Altoona at Richmond........................6:35
Binghamton at Akron....................... 6:35
Reading at New Hampshire............ 6:35
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Hartford at Harrisburg.................10:30a
Altoona at Richmond....................10:35a
Reading at New Hampshire........10:35a
Bowie at Erie..................................11:05a
Trenton at Portland................................6
Binghamton at Akron....................... 6:35
MLS
SATURDAY, APRIL 28
Atlanta United FC 4.............. Montreal 1
Chicago 2............................Toronto FC 2
Philadelphia 3.................... D.C. United 2
Columbus 2.............................San Jose 1
NEW ENGLAND 1..............Sporting KC 0
Minnesota United 2................Houston 1
New York 3...........................LA Galaxy 2
SUNDAY, APRIL 29
Orlando City 2........................Colorado 1
New York City FC 3..............FC Dallas 1
Los Angeles FC 1.......................Seattle 0
FRIDAY, MAY 4
Philadelphia at Toronto FC...................8
SATURDAY, MAY 5
NEW ENGLAND at Montreal................. 1
New York City FC at New York............2
Vancouver at Minnesota United..........2
Columbus at Seattle.............................. 4
FC Dallas at Los Angeles FC.................4
Atlanta United FC at Chicago......... 8:30
Colorado at Sporting Kansas City..8:30
LA Galaxy at Houston.......................8:30
Portland at San Jose.......................10:30
SUNDAY, MAY 6
Real Salt Lake at Orlando City.............5
BASEBALL
Baltimore (AL): Optioned LF Joey Rick­
ard to Norfolk (IL).
Boston (AL): Signed 3B Tony Renda to
a minor league contract. Sent P Tyler
Thornburg to Pawtucket (IL) for a re­
hab assignment.
Detroit (AL): Placed P Daniel Norris on
10­day DL. Recalled P Chad Bell from
Toledo (IL).
Kansas City (AL): Optioned P Eric Stout
to Omaha (PCL).
Minnesota (AL): Recalled P John Cur­
tiss from Rochester (IL).
Texas (AL): Placed P Martin Perez on
10­day DL. Recalled P Jose Leclerc
from Round Rock (PCL).
Atlanta (NL): Released OF Peter Bour­
jos.
Colorado (NL): Placed 2B DJ LeMahieu
on 10­day DL, retroactive to April 28.
Optioned P Jeff Hoffman to Albuquer­
que (PCL). Reinstated OF Carlos Gon­
zalez from 10­day DL.
Los Angeles (NL): Recalled INF­OF
Breyvic Valera from Oklahoma City
(PCL). Placed SS Corey Seager on 10­
day DL.
Miami Marlins : Placed P Tyler Cloyd
on paternity leave. Reinstated P Dan
Straily from 10­day DL.
Philadelphia (NL): Placed P Victor Ara­
no on 10­day DL. Recalled P Zac Curtis
from Lehigh Valley (IL).
Washington (NL): Optioned P Austin
Voth to Syracuse (IL). Recalled P Wan­
der Suero from Syracuse.
FOOTBALL
NFL: Suspended Minnesota Cayleb
Jones for the first four games of the
2018 regular season for violating the
NFL policy on performance­enhancing
substances.
Arizona (NFC): Signed FB Austin
Ramesh; DE Alec James; QB Chad
Kanoff; PK Matt McCrane; DT Owen
Obasuyi; TEs Alec Bloom and Andrew
Vollert; Ss A.J. Howard, Jonathan Ow­
ens and Zeke Turner; CBs Elijah Battle,
Deatrick Nichols and Tavierre Thomas;
OL Will House, Austin Olsen and Brant
Weiss; LBs Matthew Oplinger, Dennis
Gardeck, Frank Ginda and Mike Need­
ham; and WRs Trent Sherfield, Jalen
Tolliver, Jonah Trinnaman and Corey
Willis.
Cincinnati (AFC): Waived LBs Carl
Bradford and Connor Harris.
Cleveland (AFC): Signed QB Joel Stave.
Exercised their fifth­year option on DB
Damarious Randall. Waived WR Matt
Hazel, DB Kai Nacua and WR Kasen
Williams.
Green Bay (NFC): Released QB Joe Cal­
lahan.
Houston (AFC): Re­signed RB Alfred
Blue. Released TE Zach Conque, CB
Bryce Jones, TE Ryan Malleck and LB
Gimel President.
Jacksonville (AFC): Released P Brad
Nortman and WR Jaelen Strong.
Signed OL Tony Adams; DT Michael
Hughes; DE Lyndon Johnson; OT KC
McDermott, S C.J. Reavis; WRs Allen
Lazard and Dorren Miller; CBs Dee Del­
aney, Tre Herndon and Quenton
Meeks; and LBs Reggie Hunter, Darius
Jackson and Andrew Motuapuaka.
Minnesota (NFC): Re­signed CB Ter­
ence Newman. Exercised their fifth­
year option on CB Trae Waynes.
Signed DE Jonathan Wynn, QB Peter
Pugals, FB Kamryn Pettway, S Tray
Matthews, DT Curtis Cothran, G Chris
Gonzalez, TE Tyler Hoppes, RBs Mike
Boone and Roc Thomas, CBs Holton
Hill and Trevon Mathis, LBs Garrett
Dooley and Hercules Mata'afa and
WRs Jeff Badet, Armanti Foreman, Ko­
rey Robertson and Jake Wieneke.
Pittsburgh (AFC): Released S J.J. Wil­
cox.
San Francisco (NFC): Exercised the
fifth­year option on DL Arik Armstead.
Signed WR Steven Dunbar, TE Ross
Dwelley, QB Jack Heneghan, OL Alan
Knott, OL Jamar McGloster, DL Niles
Scott and S Terrell Williams. Waived
LB Jimmie Gilbert, LB Boseko Lokom­
bo, DB Dexter McCoil, LB Donavin
Newsom and CB Channing Stribling.
Tampa Bay (NFC): Waived OT Avery
Young. Signed QB Austin Allen, OL Cole
Boozer, FB/TE Tanner Hudson, PK
Trevor Moore, RB Shaun Wilson, Ss
Godwin Igwebuike and Josh Liddell,
WRs Sergio Bailey and Ervin Phillips,
TEs Donnie Ernsberger and Jason Re­
ese and DEs Demone Harris, Evan Perr­
izo and Antonio Simmons.
Tennessee (AFC): Waived QB Alex Tan­
ney, DL Johnny Maxey and RB Khalfani
Muhammad.
Washington (NFC): Released DL A.J.
Francis, Montori Hughes and Terrell
McClain. Waived TE Chris Bazile, LB
Cassanova McKinzy and DB James
Sample.
HOCKEY
Carolina (NHL): Terminated the con­
tract of president of hockey operations
Ron Francis. Announced the resigna­
tion of pro scout and adviser Joe Nieu­
wendyk.
Toronto (NHL): Announced general
manager Lou Lamoriello will leave that
role next season and transition to se­
nior adviser.
COLLEGE
Nebraska: Announced junior men’s
basketball G Dachon Burke is transfer­
ring from Robert Morris.
Virginia: Announced graduate senior
DL Dylan Thompson has transferred
from Ohio State.
AHL
Division Finals
(Best of 7)
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
Lehigh Valley vs. Charlotte
Fri., May 4 at Lehigh Valley.............7:05
Sat., May 5 at Lehigh Valley........... 7:05
Tue., May 8 at Charlotte.......................7
Wed., May 9 at Charlotte......................7
x­Sat., May 12 at Charlotte...................6
x­Mon., May 14 at Lehigh Valley....7:05
x­Tue., May 15 at Lehigh Valley.....7:05
North Division
Toronto vs. Syracuse
Thu., May 3 at Toronto..........................7
Sat., May 5 at Toronto...........................4
Sun., May 6 at Syracuse........................7
Tue., May 8 at Syracuse........................7
x­Sat., May 12 at Toronto.....................4
x­Mon., May 14 at Syracuse.................7
x­Wed., May 16 at Toronto...................7
Western Conference
Pacific Division
Tucson vs. Texas
Wed., May 2 at Tucson.................... 7:05
Fri., May 4 at Tucson........................7:05
Mon., May 7 at Texas............................7
Wed., May 9 at Texas............................7
x­Fri., May 11 at Texas..........................7
x­Sun., May 13 at Tucson................ 7:05
x­Mon., May 14 at Tucson...............7:05
x — if necessary
D10
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, M A Y 1 , 2 0 1 8
Auto Dealer Directory
Kelly Chrysler*
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
Honda Village*
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Audi Shrewsbury
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016
herbchamberslincoln.com
Herb Chambers RAM of Danvers*
107 Andover Street, Route 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers RAM of Millbury*
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
Mirak Hyundai
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
2060 Washington St, Hanover
781-570-5200
infinitiofhanover.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Route 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Boch Maserati*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
Kelly Ford*
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Quirk Ford*
540 Southern Artery, Quincy
617-770-0070
quirkford.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Mirak Chevrolet*
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Lev Kia of Framingham*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington*
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St,
Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.*
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
Cityside*
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
VillageSubaru.com
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
Toyota of Watertown*
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
Kelly Nissan of Danvers*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyauto.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95,
Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
340 Mystic Ave, Medford
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
smart center Boston
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
smart center Lynnfield
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Mirak Genesis
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
Kelly Jeep*
Herb Chambers Genesis*
Best Chevrolet*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
Framingham Ford*
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Infiniti of Hanover
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Kelly Infiniti*
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti
Westborough*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
Kelly Maserati*
Ferrari Of New England*
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
Kelly Honda*
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
volvoofnorwood.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
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128 Boston <ost /oa6, /o3te 20, .36834C, MA 01%%6
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Herb Chambers BMW of Boston
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02134
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