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The i Newspaper – May 01, 2018

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QUA L I T Y, C O N C I S E – T H E F U T U R E O F I N D E PE N D E N T JOU R NA L I S M
‘Shocking’ increase in
UK asthma deaths
Rise of
the sex
robots
P26
Britain’s best
pollster on
the local
elections
P7
P21
TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
Number 2,319
Dr Foster
writer takes
on the press
P36
Javid
si nals
fresh
start at
Home
Office
» New Home Secretary ditches
‘hostile environment’ policy
and promises to do all he can to
support Windrush families
» PM now faces growing
pressure to reveal what she
knew about migrant targets
that brought down Rudd
P4
i@inews.co.uk
@theipaper
theipaper theipaper
Supermarket
merger ‘will
cut prices’
Klopp rocked
by loss of
deputy
Oily fish
‘may delay
menopause’
Lords in
Brexit
rebellion
P9
SPORT
P10
P6
PLUS YASMIN ALIBHAI-BROWN
P15
I PATRICK COCKBURN
P25
I NATURE
P32
I PUZZLES
P44
The
News
Matrix
ENVIRONMENT
Mystery of
Macron’s
missing White
House tree
solved
See p.23
The day at
a glance
TUESDAY
1
MAY
Quote of the day
Politics is supposed to
be the second-oldest
profession. I have come
to realise that it bears a
very close resemblance
to the first
RONALD REAGAN
Anniversaries
Friday 1 May 1931
US President Herbert
Hoover dedicates New
York City’s new Empire
State Building. At the time,
it was the world’s tallest
skyscraper, standing 102
storeys and 1,454ft tall to
the top of its lightning rod.
HEALTH
CONSUMER
ENVIRONMENT
PEOPLE
Price of motor
insurance drops
Young fish at risk in
‘silent’ coral reefs
Brand cancels tour
after mother injured
Theresa May has said her thoughts
are with the family of Alfie Evans,
but she believes medical experts
should be the ones to decide in such
cases. She was speaking on a visit to
a school in Greater Manchester. Alfie,
aged 23 months, died on Saturday
after his life support was withdrawn,
against his parents’ wishes.
The average price paid for motor
insurance has recorded its
first quarterly fall in two years.
Nevertheless, average costs in 2018
were the highest the Association
of British Insurers has seen at this
time of year. The average price paid
for private comprehensive motor
insurance was £478.
A hush on coral reefs damaged by
global warming is impairing the
ability of young fish to find a home,
through lack of communication.
Reefs are normally filled with the
clicks, pops, chirps and chattering,
but a study on the Great Barrier Reef
shows that the “coral orchestra” has
been quietened in damaged areas.
Russell Brand has cancelled the rest
of his tour following his mother’s
accident, saying she had sustained
“numerous, life-threatening
injuries”. Barbara Brand, 71, was
badly injured in a hit-and-run car
crash. Comedian Brand told fans
he was cancelling his tour in a video
posted on Twitter.
AFGHANISTAN
ENERGY
LATIN AMERICA
KUWAIT
Labour pledges to
pay for insulation
Police raids free
350 from traffickers
Minister defensive
BBC World Service
in Filipino abuse row reporter killed
Labour has pledged to save
households £1bn a year on
energy bills with funding for local
authorities to roll out “street-bystreet” insulation schemes. An
investment of £2.3bn a year would
provide financial support for
households to insulate their homes,
the party said.
A police operation across the
Caribbean and South America has
freed nearly 350 people from human
trafficking networks and led to the
arrests of 22 people. Those rescued
include children and adults working
in nightclubs, gold mines, factories,
open-air markets and on farms,
Interpol said. PAGE 24
Kuwait is ready to co-operate
with the Philippines to address
problems facing Filipino workers,
but a minister said it would “act
decisively” against attempts
to breach its sovereignty. The
Philippine President, Rodrigo
Duterte, has banned Filipinos from
going to work there after abuses.
INDUSTRY
The List
Cities where diners
are most likely to tip
The world is becoming
handmade by robots
One of the BBC’s Afghan reporters
has been killed in the eastern Khost
province. Ahmad Shah, 29, had
worked for the BBC for more than
a year. The BBC World Service
director Jamie Angus called it a
“devastating loss” and sent his
“sincere condolences to Mr Shah’s
friends and family”. PAGE 23
The rise of the machines has well and truly started. Data shows
that the pace of industrial automation is accelerating across much
of the developed world, with 66 industrial robots installed per
10,000 employees globally in 2015. A year later, that increased to
74. Europe has a robot density of 99 units per 10,000 workers.
Liverpool residents are the most
likely to leave a tip in a restaurant.
According to research from
OpenTable, 97.5 per cent of diners
in the city left a tip. The top 10
British cities for leaving a tip are:
1. Liverpool
2. Bristol
3. Cardiff
3. Edinburgh
3. Glasgow
4. Leeds
5. Manchester
6. Sheffield
7. Plymouth
8. London
9. Norwich
10. Newcastle
South Korea: 631 per 10,000 workers
Denmark: 211
Subscribe to i at
i-subscription.co.uk
United States: 189
France: 132
GLOBAL
AVERAGE
74
index
Crossword.............22
TV & Radio...........28
The 10 Best...........35
Business.................40
Puzzles.....................44
Weather...................47
Seals with thermometers attached
will measure water temperatures
in the Antarctic, where it is
feared a huge glacier is breaking
up. Thwaites Glacier in West
Antarctica, which is the size of
Britain, is losing around 50 billion
tons of ice annually. PAGE 13
May: medics must
decide in Alfie cases
Birthdays
Una Stubbs, actress, 81;
Jamie Dornan (below),
actor, 36; Antony Worrall
Thompson, chef, 67;
Wes Anderson, film
director, 49; Joanna
Lumley, actress, 72; Erol
Alkan, DJ/producer, 44
Seals aid study of
shrinking glacier
Singapore: 488
Italy: 185
Switzerland: 128
Germany: 309
Spain: 160
Japan: 303
Canada: 145
Australia: 83
UK: 71
*Selected countries
SOURCE: INTERNATIONAL
FEDERATION OF COUNTRIES
Newspapers support recycling
The recycled paper content of UK
newspapers in 2017 was 64.6%
©Published by Johnston Publications Limited, 2 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0PU, and printed at
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Glasgow. Also printed at Carn Web, Carn Industrial Estate, Portadown. Back issues available from Historic
Newspapers, 0844 770 7684. Tuesday 1 May 2018. Registered as a newspaper with the Post Office.
Select journalism in i is copyright
independent.co.uk and copyright
Evening Standard, beyond those
accredited as such.
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
3
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
ThePage3Profile
NATURE
KATE ADIE,
BAFTA WINNER
World’s oldest spider
dies after wasp sting
Nigel Morris
A female trapdoor spider thought to
be the world’s oldest has died after
being stung by a wasp, researchers
said. Known as Number 16, the
spider lived in the same burrow
in the central wheatbelt region of
Western Australia for all its life. It
had been observed for 43 years as
part of a long-term population study.
Javid appointment
is a smart move
Back in the news...
The veteran broadcaster Kate Adie will be awarded this
year’s Bafta Fellowship – the highest accolade bestowed by
Bafta on an individual for their work in their field.
Haven’t I seen her in a flak jacket?
Probably. Adie held the post of chief news correspondent
for the BBC for 14 years from 1989. Her big break came when
she covered the Iranian Embassy siege in 1980. Crouched behind
a car door she reported live and unscripted to millions. She
became known for her flak jacket; her calm, staccato
delivery; and her no-nonsense attitude. She was
made an OBE in 1993.
BELGIUM
Bike theft victims get
replacement on loan
A police force in Belgium has
announced a bicycle loan scheme for
victims of bike theft. The officers of
Veurne, in West Flanders, created
the programme in response to 75
reported bicycle thefts in 2017. When
people report their bikes missing,
they will be offered a replacement
bike to use for a week.
She’s been around a bit then?
She has reported from the Falklands, Libya,
Tiananmen Square, war in the Balkans, and
both Gulf wars. She also sustained injuries – a
bullet grazed her collarbone and her leg was
injured in Bosnia. It was said that squaddies
joked that if she was sent to their posting they
knew they were in trouble.
Her private life?
She keeps that relatively under wraps.
Born in Whitley Bay in Northumberland
in 1945, she was adopted by a Sunderland
pharmacist, John, and his wife, Maud. Adie
was educated privately. At university she
enjoyed performing in Gilbert & Sullivan
productions. She is a fan of Sunderland
football club.
VATICAN
Talks on Eucharist
for non-Catholics
Members of the Vatican’s doctrinal
watchdog and German churchmen
will meet on Thursday to discuss if
non-Catholic spouses can receive
Holy Communion. They will discuss
“possible access to the Eucharist”.
The issue could enflame conservative
Catholics displeased with what they
perceive as Pope Francis’s liberal tilt.
What is she up to now?
Aside from her work as the presenter
of BBC Radio 4’s From Our Own
Correspondent, Adie has written
several bestsellers, including her
autobiography, The Kindness of Strangers.
She also presented a series on adoption
called Found.
UNITED STATES
What did Bafta say about her?
Bafta chairwoman Jane Lush called
Adie a “true trailblazer”. Adie will
receive her award at a ceremony in
London on 13 May.
Student gains his
degree after 68 years
A Second World War veteran from
Ohio is set to graduate 68 years after
he was last in a college classroom. A
review of Bob Barger’s transcripts
from the late 1940s shows he had
completed enough classes to qualify
for a degree from the University
of Toledo, and the 96-year-old will
graduate on Saturday.
So how did the ice-cool Adie respond to
news of the award?
“It’s lovely to be awarded the Bafta
Fellowship. I feel very honoured,” said the
72-year-old. Succinct and to the point –
classic Adie.
Jane Clinton
Letter from the
Political Editor
i@inews.co.uk
If Theresa May had secured the
handsome Commons majority she
expected at the general election,
she would have jettisoned Sajid
Javid from her Cabinet.
Instead she has given him
a dramatic promotion to the
Home Office after Amber Rudd
fell victim to the mounting
evidence that she misled MPs by
insisting she did not know about
immigration deportation targets.
Her selection of the first person
of ethnic minority heritage to
occupy a great office of state
appears to be a smart move to get
to grips with the crisis within the
Home Office. But his appointment
was also a reminder that Mrs May
is a prisoner of circumstances,
unable to take decisive action to
stamp her authority. Her promise
during the election campaign
to lead a “strong and stable”
government now seems a distant,
rather unlikely memory.
So delicate is the balance
of opinion over Brexit within
the Cabinet that she had no
alternative but to replace Ms
Rudd with another Remainer,
although Mr Javid was less
enthusiastically pro-EU than
his predecessor.
The Prime Minister also needed
to bring in someone with “clean
hands” who had not been in the
Home Office and could not be
implicated in the policy bungles
now being exposed.
Mrs May has had such a
traumatic year – she needlessly
threw away her majority, her
conference speech ended in
disaster, she has lost four cabinet
ministers – that Ms Rudd’s
downfall will probably come to
be seen as a blip. But it could also
be the moment that Mr Javid’s
fortunes turn round and he
becomes a plausible contender to
succeed Mrs May.
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4
NEWS
COVER STORY
Javid pledges to ditch
‘hostile environment’ and
to review removal targets
By Nigel Morris
POLITICAL EDITOR
Sajid Javid disowned Theresa May’s
pledge to create a “hostile environment” for illegal immigrants as he
vowed to put his own stamp on policy as Home Secretary.
Appearing in the Commons just
six hours after replacing Amber
Rudd, he promised to do “whatever
it takes” to support members of
the Windrush generation wrongly
threatened with deportation by the
Home Office.
Mr Javid, whose parents were
born in Pakistan, was hastily drafted
into the crisis-stricken department
by the Prime Minister after she suffered her fourth departure from the
Cabinet in six months.
The first MP from an ethnic minority background to hold one of
the great offices of state, he has
been given the task of overhauling a
department reeling from the exposure of the Windrush scandal and
Ms Rudd’s resignation. He pledged
to strike out in a new policy direction, telling MPs he did not like the
phrase “hostile environment” in relation to immigration.
“I think the terminology is incorrect. I think it is a phrase that is unhelpful and it does not represent our
values as a country. So it’s about
a compliant environment,”
Mr Javid said.
He signalled that he
was ready to ditch some
of the policies he inherited from his two predecessors, Ms Rudd and
Mrs May, saying he had
put “my own stamp” on
every Whitehall department where he had worked.
Mr Javid also said he would take a
“further view” on the department’s
internal deportation targets which
proved fatal to Ms Rudd’s Cabinet career after she falsely denied
their existence.
He said he would “do right by the
‘In’ tray Windrush scandal is the first priority
In accepting the role of Home
Secretary, Sajid Javid takes up one
of the most demanding briefs in
Whitehall, and will be expected to
be on top of everything from the
Windrush affair to violent crime.
Here is a look at his “in” tray.
Windrush scandal Mr Javid has made
“righting the wrong” of the Windrush
scandal his first priority.
Immigration targets He does
not like “hostile environment”,
preferring “compliant environment”.
This may suggest he will drop the
controversial targets.
Brexit He will also have to manage
the UK’s post-Brexit immigration
proposals, including the status of
European Union citizens.
Violent crime Knife crime increased
by 22 per cent last year while gun
crime rose by 11 per cent. Tackling
this will be a major priority for
Mr Javid, who will have to decide
whether he should step up the
controversial stop-and-search
powers to fight it.
Counter-terrorism Mr Javid has to
decide whether to spend more on
anti-terrorism after recent attacks.
Windrush generation”, adding that
they should never have been forced
to struggle their way through the
immigration system.
He said: “I will do whatever it
takes to put it right.”
But Diane Abbott, the shadow
Home Secretary, said: “He will be
judged not on the statements
he makes this afternoon.
He will be judged on
what he does to put the
situation right and get
justice for the Windrush generation.”
The SNP’s shadow
home affairs spokeswoman Joanna Cherry
(inset) said Mrs May had
“created the fundamental reasons for the Windrush
scandal” and challenged Mr Javid
to scrap the policies he inherited
from her.
Mr Javid was replaced as the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government
by James Brokenshire, who stood
down from the Cabinet in December to undergo treatment for lung
cancer. He is a trusted ally of Mrs
May, having served under her at the
Home Office for several years.
The International Development
Secretary Penny Mordaunt is to
take on Ms Rudd’s former responsibilities as minister for women
and equalities.
The Home Office has
received 6,000 calls to its
Windrush hotline. Around 2,500
have been identified as Windrush
cases, 500 appointments
scheduled and more than 100
cases resolved, Mr Javid said.
Sajid Javid in
Westminster
yesterday; he said he
would ‘put his stamp on
immigration policy’ PA
PROFILE
From the son of a bus driver
to multimillionaire banker
By Sam Lister
Sajid Javid, the son of an immigrant
bus driver, is the first Home Secretary
from an Asian background.
His father, Abdul, arrived in Britain
in 1961 from Pakistan with just £1 in
his pocket and earned the nickname
“Mr Night and Day” because he
worked all hours.
Mr Javid Senior inspired a
devotion to Margaret Thatcher in his
son at the age of just 11.
The family lived in Rochdale
before moving to Bristol where
the future minister, now a father
of four, attended Downend School,
a comprehensive, before going on
to study politics and economics at
Exeter University.
A career in investment banking
followed, taking him to New York and
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
5
POLITICS
Now May is in the spotlight
over immigration targets
people are given the reassurance
that they need, but we also need
to ensure that we’re dealing with
illegal immigration.”
But Jeremy Corbyn insisted Mrs
May had “questions to answer”
about her time in the Home Office.
“Amber Rudd has been a human
shield for Theresa May – and now
she has gone. Theresa May now has
questions to answer about what she
actually did as Home Secretary. She
was presiding over, in her terms, the
creation of a hostile environment,”
the Labour leader said.
But Downing Street stressed that,
while Mrs May was aware of targets
for illegal immigrant removals during
her time as Home Secretary, she
ceased receiving this information
when she left the Home Office.
By Richard Vaughan
Singapore, as well as London. At 25 he
became the youngest vice-president
at Chase Manhattan Bank and was
later headhunted by Deutsche Bank.
Part of the 2010 parliamentary
intake,hewasquicklymadeamember
of the Work and Pensions Select
Committee and his background in
finance – he reportedly made more
than £20m during his banking career
– made him an obvious choice for a
job under former Chancellor George
Osborne. In 2012 he was appointed
economic secretary to the Treasury
and within two years, he became
Culture Secretary.
In 2015, he was made Business
Secretary and Theresa May gave him
the job of Communities Secretary
when she became Prime Minister.
His family heritage is Muslim,
but Mr Javid does not practise
any religion. His wife, Laura, his
childhood sweetheart, is a Christian.
He has a long record of fundraising,
drumming up £710,000 in one go for
the Disasters Emergency Committee
and heading a trek up Mount
Kilimanjaro for Help the Aged.
Despite experiencing bouts of
racism, Mr Javid describes Britain as
the “world’s most tolerant country”,
adding, “if you have talent, colour and
gender are less important”.
Theresa May is under mounting
pressure to spell out to MPs exactly
what she knew about removal
targets for illegal immigrants after
she admitted the policy was in place
during her time at the Home Office.
Questions are being raised as
to why the Prime Minister did not
intervene last week when Amber
Rudd claimed that targets for
removing illegal immigrants did
not exist.
Ms Rudd was forced to resign on
Sunday for misleading Parliament
when it was revealed that her office
had been made aware of the targets.
Speaking during a local elections
campaign visit in Manchester, Mrs
May said in a television interview:
“When I was Home Secretary,
yes, there were targets in terms of
removing people from the country,
who were here illegally.
“This is important. If you talk to
members of the public they want
to ensure that we are dealing with
people who are here illegally.”
Ms Rudd’s resignation now leaves
the PM increasingly exposed as
she is seen as being responsible
for introducing the “hostile
environment” that left the Windrush
generation struggling to prove their
right to remain in the UK.
But Mrs May attempted to
separate the issue of removal targets
from the Windrush scandal.
“If you look at what we’re doing as
a government, and have been doing
over the years as a government,
what we are doing is responding
to the need that people see for a
government to deal with illegal
immigration,” she said.
“Now, we have seen the Windrush
generation being caught up in way
that has caused anxiety among that
generation.” And she added: “They
are British, they are part of us. But
we deal with that, we make sure that
Theresa May leaving Brooklands
Primary School in Sale, near
Manchester, after a campaign visit
yesterday OLI SCARFF/AFP/GETTY
A 2017 letter to the PM in
which Ms Rudd spoke of
her plans to increase removals
“by more than 10 per cent over the
next few years”did not relate to a
target but to an “aim over a nonspecific period”, a spokesman said.
Balancing act The Cabinet
Sajid Javid’s appointment as Home
Secretary – and James Brokenshire’s
return to the Cabinet – will maintain
the balance of views over
Brexit in the government’s
top team.
Like Amber Rudd
(inset), Mr Javid
supported Remain in the
2016 referendum, albeit
with less enthusiasm
than his predecessor. Mr
Brokenshire opposed Brexit.
As Home Secretary, Mr
Javid is entitled to a place on the
Brexit Cabinet Committee, which
is discussing the Government’s
preferred option for Britain’s future
trading relationship with the EU.
It meets tomorrow to discuss Mrs
May’s proposal for a “customs
partnership” under which
Britain would collect
tariffs for Brussels on
EU-bound products.
Ms Rudd’s departure
reduces the number of
female cabinet members.
But a spokesman for
Mrs May said: “It remains
one of the most diverse
governments in history, with 37
female ministers, including the
Prime Minister.”
POLITICS
IMMIGRATION
LABOUR
Brokenshire back in Cabinet
following cancer operation
Abbott in TV clash over
Labour’s border policy
MP suspended
over sex claims
By Richard Wheeler
By Izzy Lyons
James Brokenshire, the newly
appointed Secretary of State for
Housing, Communities and Local
Government, has made a swift
return to Cabinet after
health concerns forced
him to resign earlier
this year.
The MP for Old
Bexley and Sidcup in
south-east London
(pictured) was appointed
Northern Ireland
Secretary when Theresa
May took power in 2016, but quit
in January ahead of an operation
to remove a cancerous tumour
from his right lung. He returned
to Parliament a month later
after “recovering strongly” from
the procedure and called for a
national screening programme for
lung cancer, saying his early
diagnosis saved his life.
Mr Brokenshire, 50,
has been a close ally
of the Prime Minister
since serving under
her from 2010-16 at the
Home Office, where he
was responsible for the
crime prevention, security
and immigration briefs.
The father of three was first
appointed shadow minister for
crime reduction in 2006.
By Andrew Woodcock
The shadow Home Secretary Diane
Abbott clashed with Piers Morgan
during a TV interview over the Windrush immigration row.
Ms Abbott told ITV1’s Good
Morning Britain she did not back
an amnesty of the kind floated by
Boris Johnson and said it was “not
Labour’s position” that up to a
million people believed to be living
illegally in the UK should be made to
go home.
But when the presenter Piers
Morgan pressed her for more
detail, the shadow Home Secretary
said only that she was working
on a policy which would make the
handling of migration “fairer and
more efficient”. She suggested that
viewers would be “surprised” that
Morgan did not want to discuss the
Windrush scandal.
But the presenter said they had
already spent some time talking
about that issue, telling Ms Abbott:
“I’m not trying to trap you, I’m just
trying to ask you a simple question.
“What do we do about illegal
immigrants in this country? Do
we let them stay? Boris Johnson
has suggested an amnesty, you say
no amnesty.”
On Twitter, Mr Morgan accused
the shadow Home Secretary of failing to give “a straight factual answer
to this fundamental question”.
An MP has been suspended
from the Labour Party after an
allegation of sexual harassment
was made against him.
John Woodcock, MP for
Barrow and Furness, is claimed
to have sent inappropriate texts
and emails to a former female
staff member between 2014 and
2016. He was told in December
last year that a complaint against
him was being investigated.
He denies sexual harassment.
Labour said yesterday that he
had been suspended pending the
inquiry’s ruling. Mr Woodcock
is regarded as a fierce critic of
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.
6
NEWS
PARLIAMENT
Lords inflict new
blow to May over
‘no-deal’ Brexit
By Nigel Morris
POLITICAL EDITOR
Theresa May suffered a fresh setback to her Brexit legislation after
peers overwhelmingly demanded
that Parliament is given extra
power to stop Britain leaving the
EU without a deal.
Nineteen Conservatives rebelled
as the Lords voted by 335 to 244
votes – a majority of 91 – for MPs
and peers to be automatically consulted if a deal with Brussels is re-
BREXIT
Fox: ignore the
myths and focus
on the benefits
By Richard Vaughan
Brexit will bring British
consumers more sauvignon
blanc wine from New Zealand
and coffee from South
America, Liam Fox
has claimed.
The International
Trade Secretary
(inset) warned that
trade deals with
countries outside
the EU risk being
scuppered by “myths
and wilful distortions”
perpetuated by the antifree trade lobby.
He called for a greater focus
on the advantages for trade
by leaving the EU, including a
wider range of produce along
with “greater choice, greater
competition and lower prices”.
jected by Parliament or Mrs May
fails to negotiate any agreement.
It was the Government’s seventh
defeat during the Report stage of
the EU (Withdrawal) Bill, and several more are forecast.
The Prime Minister has insisted
that MPs and peers would have a
choice between accepting an exit
deal or allowing Britain to leave
with no deal. But supporters of
yesterday’s move argue that MPs
should have the power to send Mrs
May back to the negotiating table if
they disapprove of her deal – or if
she cannot reach one.
The former Tory minister, Viscount Hailsham, said: “In democracies both Parliament and the
electorate have the right to change
their minds. Unchangeable decisions have no place in a democracy.”
Former deputy prime minister
Lord Heseltine and former cabinet
ministers Lord Patten of Barnes and
Lord Willetts were among peers
who voted against the Government.
The cross-party amendment is
opposed by Mrs May, who says it
would weaken her hand in
Brussels and could be a
ploy to keep Britain in
the EU.
Ministers now face
the dilemma over
whether to try to
overturn the vote in
the Commons next
month. Tory and Labour
sources regard it as the
most significant defeat to the
Brexit Bill in the Lords.
Sir Keir Starmer, the shadow
Brexit Secretary, said: “Under
no circumstances can the Prime
Minister be given a blank cheque to
crash the UK out of the EU without
a deal.”
Chief Brexit
negotiator,
Michel
Barnier (left),
with Irish
premier, Leo
Varadkar
(centre)
and Foreign
Minister
Simon
Coveney
in Dundalk
yesterday PA
IRELAND
Barnier demands agreement on border by June
By Michael McHugh
and Catherine Wylie
Michel Barnier has demanded
that Brexit negotiators reach
agreement on the Irish border
by next month.
Speaking during a two-day visit
to Ireland, the EU’s chief Brexit
negotiator said that Europe had
no intention of questioning the
UK’s constitutional order but was
seeking practical solutions to a
complex problem.
Many operational details have
yet to be resolved surrounding the
vexed question of the UK’s only
land border with an EU state
after Brexit and the issue is top
of the agenda in Brussels, Mr
Barnier reiterated.
“We need to agree by June on
the scope of all-island customs
and regulations, the safety and
controls that we need to respect
the single market,” he said.
This summer’s meeting of
European leaders in Brussels
would be a “stepping stone” for
the final summit in October, which
is the deadline for reaching an
agreement on withdrawal,
he added.
A joint report on the UK’s
withdrawal agreed in December
by Theresa May and the European
Commission’s president,
Jean-Claude Juncker, included
British proposals and a
“backstop” option which would
keep Northern Ireland in the
customs union.
Mr Barnier said: “We are
seeking practical and operational
solutions to a complex problem.”
nities to take part in exchanges and
foreign trips to the Continent must
not be affected by the UK’s decision to leave the European Union, it
was suggested.
An open letter, signed by the British Council and three teaching unions, also raises concerns that Brexit
will add to problems with recruitment and retention of teachers.
It says that with less than a year
until the UK’s EU exit, the potential impact of the departure on
schools and pupils should not be
under-estimated.
The letter, signed by the National
Association of Head Teachers, the
National Education Union and the
Association of School and College
Leaders, argues it is “important that
the prospects and opportunities for
school pupils in the UK are not reduced by the UK leaving the European Union. The benefits of exchange
programmes and foreign trips for pupils are widely accepted.”
TRAVEL
Warning over
school trips
to Continent
By Alison Kershaw
Brexit should not mean that pupils
are forced to apply for visas simply to
go on a day trip to France, campaigners have warned. Children’s opportu-
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HEALTH
Rise in asthma deaths in
UK ‘truly shocking’ with
air pollution blamed
Air pollution has also been blamed in preventing deaths from asthma,
for exacerbating the problem. Two- we think a lack of understanding
thirds of people with the condition could play a part.
The UK has one of the worst asthma say poor air quality makes their
“Asthma kills and we are urging
death rates in Europe with the ratio asthma worse, which puts them at the NHS to invest in better frontline
of people dying from an asthma at- higher risk of an attack.
asthma services, for people
A recent medical study
with asthma to make sure
tack increasing by more than 20 per
they take their medicacent in five years.
highlighted links betion properly, and for
Asthma UK said the death rate tween air pollution in
healthcare profesbetween 2011-15 was also almost 50 British cities and the
sionals to take asthma
per cent higher here than the aver- rise in emergency
The
death
rate
from
seriously, diagnose
age on the Continent. Only Serbia, hospital admissions
asthma in the UK is
asthma patients effecTurkey, Estonia, Spain and Cyprus for asthmatics, espe50 per cent higher
tively
and treat them
had worse rates.
cially in children.
than the average on
promptly.”
Dr Samantha WalkThe charity said the figures, rethe Continent
The rate of asthma
leased to mark World Asthma Day, er, director of research
deaths per 100,000 people
suggest patients could be missing and policy at Asthma UK,
in the UK was 1.83 in 2011 and
out on basic care and urged health- said: “It is truly shocking that
care professionals to “take asthma so many people in the UK are dying 2.21 in 2015, Asthma UK said. The
seriously” as it called for a boost in from asthma attacks and while UK average across the period was
funding to find a cure for the condi- other countries are improving, we 1.98, compared to 0.15 in Greece,
0.67 in Italy and 0.56 in the Nethertion. Around 1,400 people died from are lagging behind.
an asthma attack in the UK in 2015,
“While we don’t know for sure lands. The average across the Euwhy the UK is performing so poorly ropean Union was 1.32 deaths per
the most recent figures show.
100,000 people.
Like the UK, Spain and France
‘People don’t realise asthma can kill’
both saw an increase in asthma
death rates over the five-year period.
and catch her breath while I got her
Cathy Worboys, 49, a personal
Asthma UK said almost twoinhaler. By the time I got outside,
assistant from Ware in
thirds (65 per cent) of people with
she was unconscious. I called an
Hertfordshire, is calling for more
asthma are not receiving the basic
ambulance and our neighbour began care from healthcare professionresearch into asthma after her
CPR, then she was rushed to
19-year-old daughter Holly
als that they are entitled to, which
hospital. When doctors
died from an asthma attack
includes a yearly review, a check to
said Holly had died we
in January 2016.
ensure they are using their inhaler
were completely and
“Holly was a loving,
properly and a written asthma acutterly heartbroken.
supportive daughter
tion plan.
By Paul Gallagher
HEALTH CORRESPONDENT
50%
and sister, and full of
life. Her death has left a
gaping hole in our lives.
“Holly had asthma
from a young age but it
was mild, so it was a huge
shock when she appeared at
my bedroom door after a night out
saying she couldn’t breathe.
“She went into the garden to try
“People don’t realise
asthma can kill so this
World Asthma Day, I
want people to take it
seriously and make sure
they use their inhalers.
“But I also want more
research into a cure for this
horrible illness that took away my
beautiful daughter.”
Asthma UK said it was
“extremely worried”
that the National Review of
Asthma Deaths revealed that
two-thirds of asthma deaths
could have been prevented with
basic asthma care.
Peter Kay and
Sian Gibson have
ad-libbed an entire
episode of their
sitcom ‘Car Share’
TELEVISION
Unscripted ‘Car Share’ episode
will be a hoot, predicts Kay
By Adam Sherwin
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
Peter Kay, who had to cancel
his stand-up tour of the UK last
year because of “unforeseen
family circumstances”, has
spoken about the final episodes of
his hit comedy Car Share.
Car Share Unscripted is an
entirely improvised episode
featuring Kay and Sian Gibson,
ad-libbing as John and Kayleigh. A
final, scripted episode will follow.
Kay said: “I think It’s always
good to try and do something
original and I couldn’t think of
any other narrative comedies
HEALTH
Maintaining five habits including
healthy eating, regular exercise,
keeping a healthy body weight,
limiting alcohol and not smoking
during adulthood, could add more
than a decade to life expectancy,
according to a new study.
Research led by Harvard T.H.
Chan School of Public Health found
that women and men in the US who
maintained the healthiest lifestyles
were 82 per cent less likely to die
from cardiovascular disease and 65
per cent less likely to die from cancer
when compared with those with the
least healthy lifestyles.
The study, which collected 34
years worth of data, found that life
expectancy for people aged 50 years
increased by 14.0 and 12.2 years for
female and male adults respectively
‘Car Share Unscripted’ will be shown
on BBC1 at 10pm on 7 May
HEALTH
Five habits that could add years to your life Ovarian cancer
By Jane Clinton
that have ever made a fully
improvised episode. As Sian and
myself often ad lib when filming
we thought we’d give it a go for an
entire episode.”
Kay, who introduced the
episode at a charity screening in
Blackpool, added: “We reacted to
whatever came on the radio and
went with it, good or bad. ”
Gibson said of the improvised
episode: “We were always
laughing, and nearly all of the
laughter you see in Car Share is
completely genuine.”
One in five Britons reject weekly exercise target
Pounding the treadmill for 150
minutes a week is unrealistic,
according to one in five Britons.
Not having enough time, inclement
weather and work are the top reasons
given for people not exercising,
according to new data released today
by the charity Living Streets to mark
the start of National Walking Month.
Researchers found that nearly a
fifth (17 per cent) of UK adults believe
150 minutes of weekly exercise is
unachievable; that figure rises to
nearly a third (30 per cent) for those
aged 18-24. Women were found
to be less active because childcare
commitments often fell to them.
One in four adults in England and
Wales, and nearly one in three in
Scotland, is classed as obese.
compared with individuals who
adopted a zero low-risk lifestyle.
According to the study, moderate
alcohol intake was defined as up
to one 5oz glass of wine per day for
women and up to two glasses for
men, while exercise was set at 30
minutes or more of moderate to
vigorous physical activity daily. In
2015 the US ranked 31st in the world
for life expectancy, at 79.3 years.
The study, the first comprehensive
analysis of the impact of adopting
low-risk lifestyle factors on life
expectancy in the US, is published
online in the journal, Circulation.
cases ‘to rise by
15% over next
two decades’
By Paul Gallagher
HEALTH CORRESPONDENT
Ovarian cancer cases will rise by 15
per cent in the UK over the next two
decades, according to new figures.
The World Ovarian Cancer
Coalition (WOCC), a group of
patient organisations, revealed that
worldwide numbers will increase by
55 per cent over the same period,
largely due to the increase in elderly
people. Just over half of ovarian
cancer cases in the UK each year
are diagnosed in women aged 65
and over.
The coalition warned that
the global burden of the disease
will rise unless urgent action is
taken – ovarian cancer has the
lowest survival rate of all cancers
in females.
Global five-year survival rates
range between 30 and 50 per cent of
women and in most countries have
been slow to rise. By comparison,
in many countries, over 80 per cent
of women with breast cancer will
survive for five years or more.
Health experts do not know
exactly what causes the most
common type of ovarian cancer,
which is epithelial ovarian cancer.
But inherited faulty genes and
previously having breast cancer
– as well as old age – are potential
factors that can increase risk.
Annwen Jones, chief executive
of the UK charity Target Ovarian
Cancer and the WOCC vice-chair,
said: “We still lack the means
to diagnose it early and treat it
effectively. This is a global problem.”
8
NEWS
POLITICS
Corbyn’s ratings at lowest levels in year
By Sam Lister
Ratings for Jeremy Corbyn’s
leadership have dropped to their
lowest levels since last year at this
time, according to a poll.
The Labour leader fared better
with voters than Theresa May on
qualities such as honesty, being
less out of touch and having more
personality. But the Prime Minister
was viewed more positively on
patriotism, being a capable leader
and being good in a crisis.
T h e L a b o u r l e ad e r ’s n e t
satisfaction score fell to minus 27,
the same level as in May last year
and down 6 per cent since March.
M rs May ’s rat ing fe l l by
3 per cent over the month to minus
17, the Ipsos Mori Political Monitor
found.
Forty-six per cent of voters said
Mrs May was a capable leader
compared to 32 per cent for Mr
Corbyn. But the Prime Minister
is viewed as “out of touch with
ordinary people” by 64 per cent of
adults, compared to 39 per cent for
Mr Corbyn.
Ipsos Mori interviewed a
representative sample of 1,004
adults across Great Britain by
telephone between 20-24 April.
News, page 21
Jeremy Corbyn meets people of West Indian descent at a community group in
south London yesterday; he is seen as more ‘in touch’ than Theresa May PA
EDUCATION
Discriminate
against Etonians,
employers urged
By Richard Vaughan
EDUCATION CORRESPONDENT
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Employers should give preferential
treatment to a candidate from
an under-performing school over
a former student from an elite
public school, such as Eton, Justine
Greening has said.
The former education
secretary urged businesses
t o d o m o re t o b o o s t
social mobility by using
“contextual recruitment”,
whi c h l o o k s b eyo n d
academic results. Ms
Greening suggested that
a job candidate from a more
challenging background with
the same grades as one from
a wealthy background would be
more “impressive”.
Speaking at a summit on social
mobility organised by the Sutton
Trust in New York, Ms Greening
(inset) said: “Contextual recruitment
basically says when you’re looking at
As Education Secretary, Ms
Greening made increasing
social mobility her priority,
launching a “social mobility action
plan” last December.
someone’s grades who’s applied for a
job to you, look at in the context of the
school they went to. You can easily do
this – there’s software to help you as
a company.
“So if you get three Bs from Eton,
you’re probably not as impressive as
somebody who gets three Bs from the
school in a part of the country where
the school [wasn’t] doing well.
That needs to be much more
sophisticatedly used by
companies to start looking
at the quality of candidates
that are applying to them
for jobs.”
Us i n g c o n t e x t u a l
recruitment would mean
employers were no longer
“fishing in a talent puddle and start
fishing in a talent pool,” she claimed.
Julie Robinson, general secretary
of the Independent Schools Council,
which represents 1,200 private
schools, said: “It is important to
understand that school type is not of
itself an indicator of socio-economic
advantage. For example, many pupils
attending independent schools
receive means-tested bursaries.
“Therefore, wherever ‘contextual
recruitment’ is used, the process
must take a range of factors into
account in order to recruit the best
person for the job.”
TECHNOLOGY
Million premises have slow internet
By Rhiannon Williams
TECHNOLOGY CORRESPONDENT
Close to one million UK homes
and businesses are without decent
broadband speeds, while mobile
coverage in rural areas remains
patchy, a survey has found.
About 925,000 premises – or
around 3 per cent of properties in
the UK – are still without sufficient
broadband speeds, said Ofcom’s
latest Connected Nations report.
That number has fallen from 1.1
million in Ofcom’s December report.
The Government defines standard
broadband needs as a download
speed of at least 10 megabits per
second (Mbps) – the rate at which
data is downloaded and uploaded
over an internet connection – and an
upload speed of a minimum of 1Mbps.
Ofcom said there were “still too
many people in the UK who cannot
get a decent broadband connection”.
That criteria became a legal right
last month, with the introduction
of the Universal Service Obligation
for broadband which Ofcom is
responsible for executing.
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CONSUMER
Supermarket merger ‘will see prices cut by 10%’
By Cahal Milmo
CHIEF REPORTER
Sainsbury’s yesterday hit back at
criticism of its “game changer”
merger with rival Asda by insisting
that it would cut prices for shoppers
by 10 per cent as the competition
watchdog said the deal was “likely”
to trigger a review.
Unions and politicians raised
concerns that the £13bn deal to create
Britain’s largest supermarket chain
willresultinjobslosses,storeclosures
and a poorer deal for shoppers as
more power is concentrated in a
“duopoly” including current market
leader Tesco.
But Sainsbury’s chief executive
Mike Coupe insisted the merger,
which led to a 15 per cent rise in the
chain’s share price as the deal was
confirmed, would not mean closures
or redundancies. Instead, he said
cost savings of at least £500m would
allow the new group, which will
account for nearly £1 in every £3
spent on groceries, to reduce prices
by a 10th on many “everyday items”.
Mr Coupe was later forced to
apologise after he was caught on
camera singing “we’re in the money”
between interviews about the
merger announcement.
“It was an unfortunate choice of
song from the musical 42nd Street
which I saw last year. I apologise if I
have offended anyone,” he added.
Asda, owned by US-basesd
global groceries conglom-
Q&A What the deal means
Why are the two retailers merging?
Britain’s second and third-largest
supermarkets, Sainsbury’s and
Asda, have seen their market shares
challenged by Aldi and Lidl. They also
face the imminent arrival of Amazon
in the groceries sector. Both argue
their only way to prosper in the
future is to join forces.
What will it mean for consumers?
Sainsbury’s believes the resulting
cost savings will allow it to shave
10 per cent off the price of everyday
products. But critics say it will
erate Walmart, which will
retain a 42 per cent stake in the
new venture as well as receiving
£3bn in cash, and
Sainsbury’s are facing
pressure on their sales
from the burgeoning
success of budget
The Sainsbury’s chief
executive Mike Coupe
with Judith McKenna,
president and CEO of
Walmart, and Asda’s
Roger Burnley
simply amass more power in the
hands of huge retail firms, ultimately
working against the interests of
shoppers and smaller suppliers.
What will it mean for stores
and employees?
The two companies insist their plans
do not involve store closures. But
they were forced to acknowledge
that competition watchdogs could
well order the sale of a number of
stores. One analyst said at least 75
outlets could close with the future of
workers at those sites unclear.
brands such as Aldi and Lidl. With
Amazon now taking its initial steps
in grocery deliveries after acquiring
the upscale Whole Foods chain, the
companies argue they need greater
scale to prosper in the future.
But the deal will come under heavy
scrutiny, with the Competition and
One analyst said there
were at least 75 larger
Sainsbury’s and Asda stores in
close proximity to one another,
and it was highly likely that the
CMA would order the company
to sell them to a rival.
Markets Authority saying the merger
was “likely to be subject to review” to
assess whether the deal, which will
see Sainbury’s-owned Argos outlets
set up in Asda stores, would reduce
competition and choice.
Shadow Business Secretary
Rebecca Long-Bailey warned that the
deal would squeeze suppliers to the
brink of collapse. She said: “The
statement this morning promised to
bring prices down but it’s feared that
this will be at the expense of suppliers,
farmers and manufacturers, whose
prices and terms will be driven down,
pushing many to the edge of collapse.”
Outlook, page 41
WEATHER
Man dies after being swept off
harbour wall by storm wave
By Georgina Stubbs
A man died after he was washed
into a harbour by a large wave
as strong winds and heavy rain
battered parts of Britain.
Fallen trees blocked roads in
Kent, East Anglia and parts
of London, and rising
floodwater meant some
people had to be rescued
from their vehicles as
the River Thames burst
its banks.
The Met Office issued
a yellow warning for rain
and wind for most of South
East England, and said more than
a month’s worth of rain fell within
24 hours in some places.
In Kent, emergency services
were called to reports that three
people were in the sea near
Ramsgate pier. “It is believed that
all three people were washed off
the pier by a large wave,” said a
spokesman for the Maritime and
Coastguard Agency. Police were
called to the scene in the Royal
Harbour at about 11.30am to
assist the coastguard and lifeboat
teams. A police spokeswoman
said: “Three men were recovered
from the water, but one
was later pronounced
dead at the scene.
The other two were
taken to hospital for
treatment. ”
The Royal National
Lifeboat Institution
described conditions
at Ramsgate as
“atrocious”, with waves
breaking over the harbour wall.
Elsewhere in Kent, a couple and
their baby had to be rescued when
their car became stuck in flood
water near Maidstone.
Beach huts were smashed to
pieces by high winds and swept
into the sea at Minnis Bay.
Weather, page 47
Cars were stranded in floodwater as the Thames burst its banks, and high winds caused problems for tourists (left)
COURTS
Antiques dealer jailed for life for strangling seven-year-old daughter
By Emily Pennink
A mother told how she struggled
to come to terms with the murder
of her “beautiful” daughter at the
hands of her husband.
Krittiya Peters sat in court as her
cheating spouse Robert, 56, was
jailed for murdering seven-yearold Sophia at their £1m home in
Wimbledon, south-west London.
The Old Bailey was told that
“duplicitous” Peters was assessed
as no risk to others after two suicide
attempts. The antiques dealer and
former soldier, who was depressed,
pleaded guilty to Sophia’s murder
on the third day of his trial. He had
previously admitted manslaughter.
He strangled his daughter for up
to 30 minutes with her dressinggown cord in her bedroom while his
wife was out. He then phoned 999
to report what he had done. Sophia
Robert Peters called 999 to report
what he had done after killing Sophia
died in hospital the next day. Peters
had previously looked up childkilling online. He said he had killed
her to spare her the upset of his
bankruptcy, but police found that he
did not have financial troubles.
In a statement read to the court,
Mrs Peters said: “The third of
November 2017 is a day that my life
changed for ever… From the time
Sophia was taken to hospital I was
with her until she died. I could not
believe Robert killed Sophia because
I thought he loved her so much.
Sophia was a beautiful, loving, active,
adventurous, brave and outgoing
girl. She loved to dance and sing.
I would give anything to bring my
daughter back.
“I think to myself: if Robert was ill
why didn’t he kill himself, why did he
kill my innocent daughter?”
Peters was jailed for life with a
minimum of 24 years.
10
NEWS
SCIENCE
HEALTH
A diet rich in oily fish
could help to delay
the menopause
Middle-age
anxiety linked
to dementia
By Sally Wardle
A diet rich in oily fish could help delay
the menopause while carbohydrates
might quicken its onset, research has
found. An additional daily portion of
refined white pasta or rice was linked
with women reaching the menopause
around one-and-a-half years earlier,
according to a study by the University of Leeds.
However, an extra daily serving of
oily fish was associated with a delay
of more than three years.
The research, published in the
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, drew on data from
around 14,000 women in the UK, and
a follow-up survey four years later.
More than 900 women between
Omega-3 fatty acids are
thought to stimulate
antioxidant capacity while carbohydrates can increase the risk of
insulin resistance, interfering
with the activity of sex hormones.
the ages of 40 and 65 had experienced
a natural start to the menopause by
that time.
The average age of menopause was
51, but the researchers found certain
foods were associated with its timing.
As well as oily fish, a diet high in
fresh legumes such as peas and beans
was linked with women reaching the
menopause around a year later.
A higher intake of vitamin B6 and
zinc also appeared to delay the onset.
The researchers noted that women
who go through the menopause early
are at an increased risk of osteoporosis and heart disease, while those who
do so later are more likely to develop
breast, womb, ovarian cancers.
The study’s co-author Janet Cade,
professor of nutritional epidemiology
at the University of Leeds, said: “The
age at which menopause begins can
have serious health implications for
some women. A clear understanding
of how diet affects the start of natural
menopause will be very beneficial to
those who may already be at risk or
have a family history of certain complications related to menopause.”
By Paul Gallagher
HEALTH CORRESPONDENT
Eurovision advice not the Wurst
The UK’s Eurovision Song Contest
entry SuRie has said she received
some helpful advice from the
2014 winner Conchita Wurst
before taking to the stage for this
year’s final.
Singer-songwriter SuRie,
whose real name is Susanna
Marie Cork, will perform “Storm”
at the event in Lisbon on 12 May
and will hope to take the UK to
victory for the first time in more
than 20 years.
The 29-year-old said that she
recently spoke to the Austrian
drag queen, who won with the
song “Rise Like a Phoenix” in
2014, in the run-up to her own
stint at Eurovision.
JOEL ANDERSON/BBC/PA
Moderate to severe mid-life anxiety
may be linked to dementia in later
life. Mounting research suggests that
mental illness may be associated with
dementia in older age, but it is not
clear if it is part of initial dementia
symptoms or if having mental illness
raises your risk of getting dementia.
Experts in the online journal BMJ
Open analysed research databases
for studies looking at the association
between mid-life anxiety and
dementia. Only four out of more than
3,500 studies met these criteria, but
they involved nearly 30,000 people.
Theresearchteamsaidthefindings
back up recent evidence pointing
to a link between anxiety and a risk
of mild cognitive impairment, and
lend weight to the known association
between depression and dementia.
Dr James Pickett, head of research
at the Alzheimer’s Society, said:
“As well as anxiety, there are other
complex mental health issues that
can be seen in the early stages of
dementia. We need further research
to unpick the relationship between
these.”
HELPING BRITAIN
At Lloyds Banking Group, we’re committed to Helping Britain Prosper by:
Lending up to £10bn to help people move into their first home in 2018.
Increasing our net lending to SMEs and Mid-Market businesses by up to £2bn in 2018.
Supporting a further 700,000 individuals, SMEs and charities to develop their digital skills in 2018.
Lloyds Banking Group includes companies using brands including Lloyds Bank, Halifax and Bank of Scotland and their associated companies. More information on Lloyds Banking Group can be found at lloydsbankinggroup.com
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COURTS
HEALTH
Carer ‘guided sick
millionaire’s hand
to make new will’
Alcohol pricing
limits ‘must be
expanded’
By Tristan Kirk
A carer who guided the pen of a dying
millionaire as he signed over almost
half his fortune to her family has been
stripped of her windfall by a judge.
Donna Henderson was with retired
City banker Marcel Chu when he
signed a new will on his death-bed in
2014, handing over almost half of his
£1m estate to her and her children.
Howeve r, M r C h u ’s fa m i l y
challenged the validity of the will,
saying a document signed six years
earlier – before his health declined
and Ms Henderson came into his life
– held his true dying wishes.
Ms Henderson, who was Mr Chu’s
carer in the final year of his life,
admitted she had “guided his hand”
when he signed the new will on 9 May,
2014, two days before he died aged 73.
Judge Nigel Price ruled at the High
Court that the document was invalid,
and Mr Chu was possibly delirious as
Marcel Chu was struck
down with Morvan’s
syndrome, a rare auto-immune
condition which caused memory
loss and confusion.
well as suffering from memory loss
and confusion at the time.
After a handwriting expert found
the signature was not Mr Chu’s, the
judge stripped Ms Henderson of 40
per cent of the estate and handed her
a legal bill of up to £85,000.
The judge said someone can help
an ailing person when signing a new
will, but “the scope of such assistance
must be limited”.
“There is a distinction between
leading and steadying the hand”, he
said. “The distinction is to be drawn
when assistance goes so far as to lead
in the formation of the letters.”
Judge Price said due to his litany of
health problems, Mr Chu “could not
have been in any state to appreciate
what he was doing in relation to the
execution of this document”.
While Ms Henderson may have
expected to be left something by
the former banker, the “wholesale
change in the will... is surprising in all
the circumstances”, he said.
The judge made a costs order
against Ms Henderson, but admitted
the Chu family were unlikely to get
the money as she is a £60-a-day carer.
Ms Henderson did not attend the
hearing and was not represented in
court. EVENING STANDARD
By Jack Hardy
Tamsin Parker was in ‘floods of tears’ after being thrown out of the BFI
PEOPLE
Woman with Asperger’s syndrome
is ejected from cinema for laughing
By Jane Clinton
A woman with Asperger’s
syndrome was “forcibly
removed” from a film screening
by cinema security staff for
laughing too loudly.
Tamsin Parker was watching
The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
to celebrate her 25th birthday
at the British Film Institute
(BFI) on London’s Southbank on
Sunday when the incident took
place. Lydia Parker, Tamsin’s
mother, said her daughter was
left in “floods of tears”.
“There’s clearly a huge lack
of awareness about people
with autism,” Mrs Parker said,
adding that she was “shocked”
and “disgusted” by how her
daughter had been “humiliated”.
The BFI has apologised and
said it “must do better”.
NATURE
ENVIRONMENT
Rose DNA map has scent of success
River sheds
new light on
extinction crisis
By Jon von Radowitz
A new blueprint of the rose’s genetic code could lead to more
colourful,stronglyscentedandlongerlasting blooms.
Scientists have produced the first
high-quality genome of the garden
favourite, focusing on the biochemistry behind the plant’s fragrance
and beauty.
Due to extensive cross-breeding,
modern roses have complex DNA
sequences that are difficult to reconstruct. For this new work, researchers used advanced techniques to
sequence the genome of the species
Old Blush (Rosa chinensis), known for
its sweet scent and delicate clusters
of pink flowers.
The research, led by Mohammed
Bendahmane from the University
of Lyon in France and published in
Nature Genetics, is expected to help
manipulate rose flowering and colour,
strengthen scent or increase vase life.
By Jane Clinton
The genome of the The Old Blush
species was sequenced PA
One of the longest ever study of rivers has found that an important part
of the planet’s extinction crisis may
have gone unnoticed.
A 30-year study of Welsh rivers and
streams has found that the number
of specialist invertebrates are dwindling in what scientists described
as “an ongoing tragedy”. Specialist
organisms, like predatory flatworms,
certain stoneflies or caddis larvae,
are in sharp decline, according to the
work done by a team led by Cardiff
University researchers.
Changes in the climate and in
their environment cause numbers
to decrease, and once these species
become scarce they struggle to recolonise their habitats.
Freshwater species are found to
be lost twice as fast as species in any
other ecosystem. One species of flatworm has already been lost across
large areas of Wales.
Across
This Saturday, in your
Amanda Abbington
on dividing opinion in
‘Sherlock’, life after Martin
Freeman and why crime
dramas are so fascinating
More than 1,000 lives could be lost
if England fails to mirror Scotland’s
sweeping reforms to alcohol pricing
within five years, campaigners say.
Medical leaders have joined a
leading children’s organisation and
a homelessness charity to call for
minimum unit pricing (MUP) to be
implemented south of the border.
It is hoped that the changes,
coming into effect in Scotland today,
will curb alcohol-related death and
illnesses, while slashing crime and
lessening the burden excessive
drinking places on the health service.
The Alcohol Health Alliance UK
(AHA), a group of more than 50
medical organisations, said that a
delay of five years could lead to more
than 1,000 people dying in England
from alcohol-related problems.
MUP would not affect pubs but
it would push up the price of cheap
supermarket vodka and superstrength lagers which are popular
with street drinkers and other
vulnerable groups, the group said.
The chair of the AHA, Sir Ian
Gilmore, said: “Cheap alcohol is
wrecking lives and livelihoods in
England as well as Scotland.
“There are more than 23,000
deaths a year in England linked to
alcohol, and many of these come from
the poorest and most vulnerable
sections of society.”
No 2319
Solution, page 49
1
Models revised
infrequently (6)
3
I work in
Bournemouth
International Centre
making a film (6)
4
Avoid getting some
clothes chewed (6)
Down
1
Dismal Mexican
hat with 25 per
cent off (6)
2
Salah’s to overawe
City (6)
NEWS
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2-27
VOICES
14-18
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28-29
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BUSINESS SPORT
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SCIENCE
Thermometers are to be glued to
seals to measure water temperatures
in the Antarctic, where it is feared a
huge glacier is breaking up.
The Thwaites Glacier in West
Antarctica is one of the biggest in the
world but is quickly thinning, losing
around 50 billion tonnes of ice every
year, scientists say.
Researchers have begun a fiveyear project to determine why it is
melting so quickly and how rapidly
sea levels could rise as a result.
It is feared that the glacier, which
is the size of Britain, could vanish
within decades, and make the entire
West Antarctic Ice Sheet vulnerable
to melting.
Sea levels could rise by more than
a metre if Thwaites Glacier and Pine
Island Glacier – two of the biggest
and fastest retreating in Antarctica
– vanish, but if the whole ice sheet
disappears waters around the globe
could increase by three metres.
Measuring water temperatures
in the Antarctic is fraught with
On Saturday,
in your
d i f f i c u l t i e s , b u t by s t i c k i n g
thermometers to elephant and
Weddell seals scientists hope to get a
clearer picture of where and to what
extent warming is taking place.
Dr Lars Boehme, of the University
of St Andrews, said: “These tiny
sensors, which are temporarily
glued to the animals’ fur and fall
off during moulting, will allow us
to collect essential oceanographic
observations during the winter
time, as well as providing a better
indication of how vulnerable the seals
might be to climate change.”
His colleague, Professor Doug
Benn, added: “The Thwaites Glacier
is the Achilles’ heel of the Antarctic
ice-sheet. It is particularly sensitive
and indications are that the process
of collapse has already begun.”
Around 100 scientists
from the UK and US will
work with researchers from
Europe, South Korea and New
Zealand to analyse the changes.
13
Light
through
a lens
Sensors on seals will
monitor break-up
of massive glacier
By Lewis Smith
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
The Swiss artist Maya
Rochat is showing her
work ‘A Rock is a River’
at the exhibition ‘Shape
of Light: 100 Years
of Photography and
Abstract Art’ at the Tate
Modern in London.
It is the first major
show to explore the
relationship between
the two mediums
from the 1910s to the
present day.
SIMON DAWSON/REUTERS
PSYCHOLOGY
Antisocial behaviour is linked to ‘unusual brain wiring’
By Claire Hayhurst
The brains of young people with
the most severe forms of antisocial
behaviour are “wired differently”
to others, providing clues as to why
they struggle to control and regulate
their emotions, researchers say.
In a study published today in
the journal Social Cognitive and
Affective Neuroscience, neuroimaging
methods were used to examine
young people with the condition
conduct disorder, whose sufferers
exhibit symptoms ranging from
lying and truancy to physical
violence and use of weapons.
Scientists at Bath and Cambridge
universities and the US found
abnormal connectivity between
the amygdala and the brain’s
prefrontal cortex, the region
responsible for decision-making and
behavioural inhibition.
Researchers say this could help
explain why young people with the
condition struggle to control and
regulate their emotions, which may
make them more susceptible to
anxiety or depression.
14
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COMMENT FROM HOME AND ABROAD
THERESA MAY
CULPABLE?
NEW HOME
SECRETARY
AMBER RUDD
RESIGNATION
KOREAN
SUMMIT
RUSSIAN
TWITTERBOTS
APU IN ‘THE
SIMPSONS’
Much still to
answer for on
Windrush
Sajid Javid
seen as a safe
pair of hands
Civil servants
took revenge,
perhaps
How did Kim
Jong-un resist
smoking?
Are Labour
and Putin in
cahoots?
Show should
lead the way
on change
HuffingtonPost
BBC
TheEconomist
The Korea Times
Daily Mail
CBC
Will Theresa May have
the honesty to admit
what many suspect:
that in her drive to
cut immigration she
failed in a basic duty of
care to those who had
lived here for much of
their lives?
(Paul Waugh)
Sajid Javid is not
particularly a close ally
of the Prime Minister
herself. He is not
particularly an ardent
Remainer – although
his appointment
retains the balance
on the vital Brexit
Cabinet committee.
He’s an experienced
minister, who has been
at several departments
without major
calamities.
(Laura Kuenssberg)
The last straw was
the statement that
she knew nothing of
official targets for
immigration removals
– a claim quickly
undermined by leaked
correspondence
suggesting that in
fact both she and the
Prime Minister did.
Those leaks may well
have been payback
from Home Office civil
servants, whom Rudd
originally tried to
blame for the scandal.
(Editorial)
How could Kim
control his nicotine
cravings? Officials
said Kim was free to
smoke, but he didn’t.
One said Kim seemed
to avoid smoking
during the summit,
taking into account
the “magnitude of the
summit and etiquette
for Moon, who is
nearly double his age”.
(Park Si-soo)
Nothing like this has
happened during
any previous British
election. I’d hope this is
a Kremlin ploy which
has misfired, in the
sense that its being
made public will alert
more people to the
fact that Corbyn is
dangerously aligned
with a gangster regime.
(Dominic Lawson)
Hank Azaria says his
eyes have been opened.
The voice of Apu finally
said what so many
were waiting to hear.
“We have to listen to
South Asian people in
this country when they
talk about what they
feel and how they think
about this character,”
said Azaria.
(Eli Glasner)
Washington Post
The Times
The New YorkTimes
Corbyn was a regular
on RT, the Russian
state-television
channel, before he
became leader. John
McDonnell has since
said Labour MPs
should not appear
on the propaganda
station, but Corbyn has
refused to issue such
an order.
(Tim Shipman)
Keeping Apu in his
current form would be
a missed opportunity
for the show, which
has been one of the
most thoughtful voices
in addressing issues
like immigration,
discrimination and the
power of corporations
that most shows have
studiously avoided.
(Vikas Bajaj)
GQ
In her resignation
letter, Rudd was
conspicuously light on
praise for May – the
architect of this policy
of hostility. Methodical
and obsessed by
immigration – it
would be remarkable
if the Prime Minister’s
fingerprints weren’t
all over the principle of
targeted deportations
that lies at the core of
this shameful episode.
(Matt Kelly)
Channel4 Blog
Mr Javid’s support
for the Remain side
in 2016 surprised
many friends who’d
chatted to him over the
years and was at odds
with his consistent
Eurosceptic positions
of the past.
(Gary Gibbon)
John McDonnell
The Shadow
Chancellor on
Amber Rudd’s
resignation
TheDaily Telegraph
Rudd’s resignation
is important to the
Labour Party because
it is technically the
first such departure for
which they can actually
take some credit.
(Tom Harris)
LifeInBrief
Quote of
the day
You can
smell the
undoubted
odour of a
government
decomposing
The North Korean
leader, who was
reportedly chastised
for smoking too much
by his wife during a
dinner in Pyongyang
last month held as part
of a meeting to arrange
Friday’s summit,
only snuck out for a
cigarette once.
(Anna Fifield
POLLYANNA PICKERING ARTIST
Pollyanna Pickering, who has died at
75, was a renowned wildlife artist and
conservationist whose work adorned
the shelves of Harrods and the homes
of David Bowie and the actors John
Hurt and Virginia McKenna.
Born in Rotherham and educated
at the town’s art school and later the
Central School of Art and Design in
London, she was also an indefatigable
champion of environmental
conservation, both on the national and
international stage.
Before she had decided to focus
exclusively on wildlife, Bowie – who
had bought an industrial landscape
from her – asked her to go to Africa
with him, as an “artist-in-tow”. But her
daughter, Anna-Louise, was only seven
and afraid of snakes and spiders, so
she declined.
Instead, she became one of Europe’s
foremost wildlife artists, her paintings
reproduced on greeting cards, T-shirts,
notebooks and ceramics. The tote bag
she created for Harrods with a picture
of a West Highland terrier was a
perennial bestseller, and it was she who
painted the Christmas bear on to the
store’s gift range every year.
But she did not have an artistic
background – her father owned a
coffee business in Sheffield. However,
she recalled drawing something for a
teacher at primary school and being
asked to take it around the other
classes to show it off. Even so, when at
secondary school she announced that
she wanted to pursue art as a career,
her headmistress told her she would
never make a living from it.
Nevertheless, the foundation course
on which she enrolled at Rotherham Art
College set her on a course for life, both
professionally and personally.
It was there that she met her future
husband, the industrial designer
Ken Pickering. Her insistence on
painting only animals she had observed
in their natural habitats led her into
a series of expeditions to some of the
most inhospitable areas of the globe.
In 2007, she was granted a fellowship
from the Canada-based Artists for
Conservation Foundation to undertake
an expedition into Bhutan.
Her love of wildlife extended beyond
its representation as art. For 15 years
she ran a sanctuary from her home
in the Peak District, at first caring
for and rehabilitating injured and
orphaned raptors and later garden
birds and almost every species of
British mammal.
She estimated that many hundreds
of owls, hawks and falcons had
passed through her care. In 2001 the
Pollyanna Pickering Foundation was
established to continue her work.
The launch party was attended by
guests from Spain, Holland, France,
Germany and Japan, and the first
fundraising event, a celebrity garden
party, was held that summer. As well
as supporting wildlife, the foundation
helps to support an orphanage
in Ethiopia. Ken died in 1979 and
Pollyanna is survived by Anna-Louise,
who was also her business partner.
Born 30 July 1942
Died 28 March 2018
David Behrens
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i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
15
MyView
YasminAlibhai-Brown
Abandon empathy, all ye who enter
The Home Office has a record of turning MPs into monsters
T
he dependable Michael
Gove tweets: “[Rudd]
was a huge asset – brave,
principled, thoughtful,
humane, considerate and
always thinking of the impact of
policy on the vulnerable”.
Imagine your wounds being
licked by Gove’s long tongue. It’s
enough to make one feel for the
recently departed Home Secretary.
Gove’s exaggerated praise is
preposterous. On immigration,
Rudd brutally pursued targets and
got her department to victimise the
most defenceless. But after talking
to some Tory, Lib Dem and Labour
politicians, I am persuaded that
Rudd’s instincts were once liberal,
that she wasn’t a beast from the
right, that she had cosmopolitan
sensibilities, that she was more
humane than the robotic May.
So what happened to the woman
who was? It’s the job she accepted.
The Home Office is a muggy, closed
department which keeps out fresh
air and light. Almost every Home
Secretary seems to turn paranoid,
defensive and authoritarian. They
leave their liberal values, like
muddy boots, outside the door.
There have been a few
exceptions, some years when the
windows were thrown open and
progressive policies blew in. Willie
Whitelaw kept Margaret Thatcher
from turning the departmental
policies too tyrannical; Roy Jenkins
bravely introduced equalities laws
and civilised the Home Office. Ken
Clarke, when Home Secretary
chose not to become illiberal;
Douglas Hurd did so too.
But more often than not,
home secretaries, upon getting
the job, abandon empathy
and understanding.
The Conservative MP Kenneth
Baker was genial enough before
he went to the Home Office. Then
the ghouls got into him. He got
into serious trouble with the Court
of Appeal after deporting a man
to Zaire who was awaiting court
procedures. Michael Howard
was naturally ruthless and
authoritarian. The Home Office
under him became as it is now, a
factory of extreme intolerance.
I remember one prison I was
visiting where Howard had banned
the growing of plants by inmates.
Rehabilitation had become a dirty
word. David Blunkett loathed
the “liberati” and was accused
by Keith Best of the Independent
Immigration Advisory Service of
bringing “untold misery to some of
the most vulnerable in our society”.
As Home Secretary,
Amber Rudd met
Syrian refugees in
eastern Lebanon
earlier this year PA
John Reid was even more awful.
May and Rudd were part of that
reactionary, bullying tradition.
On Radio 4 yesterday morning
Chris Grayling accidentally called
the Government “the regime”.
Don’t know about the whole of
government, but that description
certainly fits the Home Office.
Almost as soon as she was
appointed, Rudd seemed to turn
into a female Farage. In October
2016, she ordered companies
to reveal the names of “foreign
workers” and accused employers
of failing British workers. Then
she announced a crackdown
on fee-paying foreign students
(without whom many of our
universities would perish) and made
wild promises that she would being
down immigration figures to the
tens of thousands. I don’t think this
was all about doing May’s bidding.
Rudd had turned hard right. As
May did before her. Remember the
PM’s stirring intervention in 2002
at the Tory party conference in
Bournemouth? She said back then;
“Our base is too narrow and so,
occasionally, are our sympathies,
Under Michael
Howard the place
became as it is
now, a factory
of extreme
intolerance
You know what some people call
us? The nasty party.” In 2010, she
became Home Secretary and made
her department follow the nastiest
anti-migrant policies ever.
Now Sajid Javid gets the job.
The son of a Muslim Pakistani bus
driver who became a millionaire
investment banker becomes the
first Home Secretary of colour. May
calculates the appointment will help
to make her party and government
appear anti-racist. The Tories badly
need a reputational makeover after
media exposure of how legitimate
Caribbean immigrants and their
families were seriously mistreated
by Home Office officials. And
predictably, Javid is making it all
sound deeply meaningful.
Now he tells The Sunday
Telegraph: “I thought that could be
my mum … my dad … my uncle … it
could be me.” So, he now gets that.
Or has it become expedient to
make it personal? People who look
like him, his mum and dad are stuck
in our detention centres. I doubt he
has ever thought about them.
After the passions over the
Windrush generation subside, it
will be business as usual. When
politicians get to the Home Office,
they go frenetic, they become tight
little Britons. Having a female in
Downing Street or the Home Office
didn’t mean the end of nastiness; so
it will prove to be with Javid.
He will try to be the brown son of
immigrants who really does bring
down immigrant figures. Hurrah
for diversity!
i@inews.co.uk
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Your
View
TWEETS
AND EMAILS
Getting it wrong
on Putin
The Rupert Murdochowned Sunday Times is
behaving more like its
downmarket relative
The Sun in its latest
propaganda offensive
against Jeremy Corbyn.
In a deliberate
attempt to replicate and
regurgitate allegations
made about Donald
Trump’s presidential
victory in 2016, the
newspaper suggests
Labour’s strong
showing in the 2017
general election may
be down to Russian
manipulation. The nonetoo-subtle insinuation
is that Corbyn is a tool of
Vladimir Putin’s Kremlin.
Putin is a billionaire
who heads a regime
for, and by, billionaires
in Russia. Putin and
his gangsters have no
love at all for socialists
or socialism - even
very minor “socialists”
like Corbyn. Quite the
opposite is the case.
JAMES ROBERTS
WALLASEY,
THE WIRRAL
Who fears
identity cards?
I see no problem with
personal identity cards.
They worked beautifully
during the last war
and are currently
required by the military,
police, certain official
representatives et al.
The parlous state of
things in this country
today make it essential
to have instant proof of
identity, for one’s own
safety as well as that
of others. One cannot
help thinking that those
opposing this facility
must surely have
something to hide.
Biometric passports
carry vast amounts of
personal information,
readily available to
authorities in countries
all around the globe.
How many of the ID
card objectors, I wonder,
are quite happy to own
one of these?
J A PORTER
DEAL, KENT
highlight instiutional bias
against much the largest
“faith group”, those of us
whose religion is “none”.
But there is a pressure
group attempting to
combat the relentless
favouring of religion
in our national life, the
National Secular Society.
JOHN COLE
DEVON
Referenda
not reversible
I am unable to share
Nancy Stedman’s
concern about possible
delays in getting
buried. After all, when
my turn comes, I am
unlikely to be tapping
my foot impatiently or
repeatedly consulting
my watch.
KAREN SADLER
BRISTOL
I am heartily sick of being
told we didn’t know
all the details of what
we voted for in the EU
referendum. That does
not invalidate my choice,
or are we supposed to
keep choosing until we
have the right answer
like the Irish and the
Lisbon Treaty?
When voting at a
referendum or general
election, it is akin to
going for a walk down an
unknown road. At a fork
or junction, one is faced
with a simple decision
based on what one sees
or hears. A certain path is
decided on not knowing
what is round the corner,
and it is too late to
change your shoes.
The path may prove to
be mucky, twisting, and
strewn with potholes,
and possibly exciting, but
anyone expecting it to
be paved with gold and
complaining when it is
not as hoped for is a fool.
LEN WOMACK
BRADFORD ON AVON,
WILTSHIRE
Imperial and
metric together
Dave Rigby answers
(Your View, 30 April)
“why not” to the question
of why tape measures
are marked in metric
and imperial. I will tell
Made to measure: crafters such as tailors and dressmakers need imperial and
metric measurements to cater for old designs and those from overseas GETTY
him why not. When
measuring inside
structures and in a
certain direction, one
is forced by geometry
to use one particular
edge of the tape. And,
of course, it is almost
invariably the wrong
edge: millimetres when
working in imperial;
inches in metric. Buy
the tape measure for
the system you are
comfortable with.
And, in practice, beer
is sold in metric units.
Today the pub pint,
in the ubiquitous rim
measured glass, usually
consists of 500mL of
beer and 68ml of froth.
DAVID C BROWN
DERBYSHIRE
One of the reasons for
tape measures still
having metric and
imperial on them is for
their use by international
crafters – dressmakers,
quilters, etc. Many
quilting patterns are
based on old designs
(some of American origin
who still use imperial
measures – but who
don’t use that word for
obvious reasons) and the
standard seam allowance
to fit the blocks together
is quarter of an inch
which cannot be
transcribed into metric
with enough accuracy for
the finished article to fit
precisely. We crafters
are quite happy with the
present situation so no
change is needed!
SYLVIA HARMAN
NORWICH
Should we
protest Trump?
In his letter, (Your
View, 30 April), Richard
Saddington spews
hatred for the duly
elected President of the
United States who will
face the American voters
in less than three years.
There are many people
far more dangerous than
Donald Trump.
For example, the
oligarch Xi Jinping has
just become “President”
of China for life. Then
there is “President”
Vladimir Putin (more
autocrat than oligarch)
with almost two decades
of controlling Russia
under his belt. Oh, the list
is endless.
Yet the leader of one of
Britain’s most important
allies is subjected
to abuse. There is
something wrong here.
SCOTT VARLAND
LONDON
Waiting for
burial
Nancy Stedman (Your
View, 30 April) is right to
Power ‘outage’
at Schiphol
In the UK we say “power
cut”. It is more concise,
more elegant and more
pleasing to the ear. Not
all Americanisms are
ugly but this one is;
please avoid it.
JON INGRAMS
ILKLEY,
WEST YORKSHIRE
Pat on the
back for i
The Amber Rudd
resignation story broke
at 10pm, yet there it is
on page 1 with full story
inside. A busy end to the
day, I suspect. Excellent
work and thanks to all.
ALAN URQUHART
MORE COMMENT oninews.co.uk
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How to get the most from the alphonso variety
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Twitter: @jess_barrett
Round-Up
Joke’sonyou
“I would kill for a really boring
policy thing, that we had
to work really hard
to make funny,
instead of just
being thrown
all of this,
essentially
just junk food.”
Comedian
Michelle Wolf,
who roasted the
Trump government
at the annual White House
Correspondents dinner, says it’s
just too easy to joke about Trump.
Hometruths
“I remember when I became an MP
four years ago … I turned to my
wife and said; ‘Laura, did you ever
imagine, in your wildest dreams,
that one day I would actually be
a Member of Parliament?’ And
she looked me in the eye and said:
‘Darling, in my wildest dreams, you
don’t feature at all.’” New Home
Secretary Sajid Javid, during a
speech in 2014.
Number oftheday
11
years since Benidorm began. The
current series of the comedy will be
its last, it was announced yesterday.
8 days
from on
l
£1,199pp y
Burgundy, River Rhône & Provence
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Selected departures up to October 2018
and April to October 2019
Destined for
a reunion?
Coachella festival was renamed
Beychella after Beyoncé stole
the show with her faultless
performance last month.
Causing a mass frenzy by
bringing out her former bandmates
from Destiny’s Child, Kelly Rowland
and Michelle Williams, onstage
during the show has led to rumours
that Beyoncé is now planning
to make the reunion a more
regular occurrence.
According to The Sun, Destiny’s
Child will reunite again on
Beyoncé’s tour with Jay-Z, On The
Run II, which kicks off on 25 June
in the United States, and comes to
the UK later in the summer. Kelly
Rowland and Michelle Williams
will join Beyoncé on stage for a
series of dates, under growing
pressure for the band to announce
an all-out reunion.
Kanye too keen
on Connect 4
Kanye West’s recent behaviour has
sparked understandable concerns
amongst his fans. A new song which
contains only the lyrics “poopity
scoop”, and a tweet which read
simply “I’m nice at ping pong” to
name just a few examples – it’s all
been happening in the last week.
But surely the weirdest thing to
emerge is Kim Kardashian-West’s
admission that her husband chose
to play Connect 4 instead of being
present while their third child
Chicago was born via surrogate
in January. Kardashian-West told
Ellen DeGeneres: “I made Kourtney
[Kardashian] be in the room — we
had a connecting room, and Kanye
was in there playing Connect 4 and
not really paying attention...”
That’s a game changer, surely.
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Visit to the Pont du Gard
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The true value of higher education is not about cash
UNIVERSITIES
Sam Leith
W
hen I was at university, the same bitter
joke went around and
around. “What do you
say to someone with an MA in English Literature?” “I’ll have a Big Mac
and fries, please.”
Hah-de-hah hah. What was, at the
time, a whimsical poke at humanities
students by contemporaries studying engineering or the law has, over
the past couple of decades, looked
more like the underlying rationale
for a direction in government policy.
This, if I read it right, is the fear
behind an open letter published
yesterday from Alan Bennett, Lord
Bragg, Baroness Warnock, Professor Quentin Skinner, Professor
Emeritus Tom Cobleigh and all.
They condemn plans to rank
individual university courses Gold,
Silver or Bronze. And with them the
“strong likelihood that the Government plans to link tuition fees to
these rankings”.
They’re right. How can you
compare university courses, if not by
valuing them in cash terms? But if
you do, what are you comparing?
Here’s the process we’ve gone
through. You start from the
principle that students ought to
pay for their degrees, where those
degrees demonstrably increase their
lifetime earnings.
I’ve risked falling out with some
friends by taking the view that this
isn’t a grotesque idea: asking for
the money up front would obviously
put those from poorer backgrounds
off further education; but longdeferred, means-tested repayments
surely aren’t unfair in principle.
The danger is the next step: that
you then make a hop to thinking
the value of any university course is
bound up with its direct effect on the
earnings of its individual graduates.
If you’re a government, this
becomes an attractive way to think:
here at last is what looks like a
nice concrete metric for assessing
university performances. And,
what’s more, here’s a way of seeing
how you might make universities
start to pay for themselves.
So before long you get into
ART
Jenny
Eclair
Tate puts
young people
in the picture
T
ate galleries recently
announced a free-to-join
membership scheme
for 16- to 25-yearolds, which will enable
young people to visit
ticketed blockbuster
shows for a fiver
rather than the usual
£20-plus.
Tate Collective, as
the initiative is called,
is open to anyone from
anywhere in the world and
any member can take in up to
three mates for just a fiver each –
and membership means discounts
in the cafes and shops. What’s not
to like?
Of course, you don’t need to pay
to enter any of Tate’s four galleries
in London, St Ives or Liverpool; the
ticket prices are reserved for the
big-name exhibitions, but for young
art lovers and backpackers on a
budget, the Collective is a brilliant
idea. To be honest, for anyone who
isn’t eligible for this scheme, most
art galleries are a bargain in
a situation where, rather than
trying to claw something back
from those who make money as a
direct result of their degrees, you
wonder whether there’s any point
in the degrees where people don’t
make money.
All of a sudden you’re giving the
hairy eyeball to philosophy, classics,
history of art and any number of
other subjects. That’s what we’re
seeing in the “stealth closure”
of dozens of arts and modern
languages courses.
You’re doubtless as bored as
I am of grumbles by humanities
graduates against the downgrading
and defunding of the humanities.
I won’t start musing, here, that
we need bread to live and art to
live for, or that a people ignorant
of its history is doomed to repeat
it. I won’t even try to claim that
the public good is served by
my having strong opinions on
Milton’s prosody.
There are good arts courses and
there are bad ones, just as there are
good engineering or law courses
and bad ones. But if all you see is
the cash, you are – proverbially –
comparing apples and oranges.
And to continue the food
metaphor you’ll end up – culturally
speaking – with a Big Mac and fries.
EVENING STANDARD
this country. And it’s not just London
that has culture coming out of its
ears. While schlepping around the
country on tour, I’ve been popping
into any gallery I can get to before
tea and mic-check time.
At the Manchester Art
Gallery (free, with contributions
encouraged), I snooped around
the pre-Raphaelites and was
transported back to the first time
I saw any of these paintings in the
flesh, aged 17 and on an A-level art
trip with our teacher Mr Grundy,
who wore corduroy trousers and let
us smoke in the minivan.
All teenage girls went through a
pre-Raphaelite phase at that time
and they probably still do. It’s the
hair – we all wanted waist-length,
rippling hair, and we all
imagined ourselves floating
like Ophelia down the
river with everyone
we’d ever known
standing on the banks
crying and regretting
how mean they’d been
to us.
I’ve grown out of
that phase but even at
the age of 58, seeing John
Waterhouse’s Hylas and The
Nymphs was like seeing a bunch of
old mates. “Hello, you glorious girls,”
I found myself muttering.
Manchester has changed so much
since I was a drama student that it
was quite reassuring to touch base
with a bit of Lowry and Valette to
remind me how smoggy and flat-cap
it was back in the day. OK, so I don’t
go as far back as the 19th or early
20th century, but back in the 70s the
city was a choking haze of fog and
fag smoke.
THE INDEPENDENT
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TELEVISION
CULTURE
From comedy gold in ‘Detectorists’
to a coach driver in Bognor Regis
Treasures
of the tower:
rare books
go on show
By Adam Sherwin
New season highlights
ARTS AND MEDIA CORRESPONDENT
By Sam Russell
Toby Jones, star of the awardwinning comedy series Detectorists,
will return with a new BBC2 sitcom
set in Bognor Regis as the seaside
town prepares for Brexit.
Detectorists, which featured Jones and Mackenzie Crook as a pair of metal
detectorists, has concluded after three series.
But Jones (inset), along
w i t h p l ay w r i gh t T i m
Crouch, has written Don’t Forget the Driver, in which the actor
plays Peter Green, a coach driver living a mundane life in a “dark comedy
set in sunny, seaside Bognor Regis”.
The Sussex resort voted for Brexit
and Don’t Forget the Driver explores
“what it means to live, work and
parent at a point when the entire
UK population is having to come
A documentary series,
Kibbutz, will take eight
British Jews on a journey to
Israel, where they will meet
people from across the religious
and political divide.
Chewing Gum star Michaela Coel
joins John Goodman (Roseanne) in
Black Earth Rising (left), an eight-part
BBC2 thriller about the prosecution
of international war crimes and
the West’s relationship with
contemporary Africa, written by
Hugo Blick.
BBC2 has also acquired Donald
Glover’s Golden Globe and Emmy
award-winning US series Atlanta.
The actor stars as Earnest “Earn”
Marks, a Princeton dropout who
returns to his hometown of Atlanta,
Georgia to discover his cousin Alfred
(Brian Tyree Henry) has become
Atlanta’s hottest new rap act.
to terms with the changing colour
of their passports”. Green lives
“a life of ordinary routine: clip-on
ties; limp packed lunches; vehicle
checks; roundtrip coach journeys
ferrying church groups to donkey
sanctuaries and Japanese tourists to
Canterbury Cathedral”.
The series follows a group of people “struggling with their place in the
world, their own sense of identity, and
reveals how, in one single moment,
even in the most ordinary of lives, an
accidental encounter can change the
course of everything”.
Jones, nominated in next week’s
television Bafta awards for his role
in Detectorists, said: “We hope that
Don’t Forget the Driver will be an unusually funny drama about small town
Britain and the joys of coach travel.”
BBC2 will also show Englistan, a land-
mark drama telling the story of three
generations of a British Pakistani
family, created by Emmy awardwinning actor Riz Ahmed.
Englistan follows the Latifs over
four decades, through “political
movements and economic boom and
bust, through gangland rivalries and
assimilation into the heart of the establishment, through spiritual soulsearching and religious conflict”.
LITERATURE
Irish writer takes £30,000 prize for debut book on transhumanism
By Sherna Noah
Author Mark O’Connell has scooped
a £30,000 book prize for his debut on
using technology to solve “the modest problem of death”.
The Irish writer won the Wellcome Book Prize, celebrating fiction
and non-fiction which engages with
health and medicine, for To Be A Ma-
chine. O’Connell “visited warehouses
of cryogenically frozen bodies” and
“Silicon Valley labs turning brains
into code” as part of his research.
To Be a Machine: Adventures Among
Cyborgs, Utopians, Hackers, and the
Futurists Solving the Modest Problem of Death is the first full-length
exploration of transhumanism,
a movement that seeks to cheat
mortality and use technology for
human evolution.
Artist and writer Edmund de Waal,
chair of the judges, said: “O’Connell
brilliantly examines issues of technology and singularity. He brings into
focus mortality, what it might mean
to be a machine and what it means to
be human.”
Kirty Topiwala, Wellcome Book
Prize manager, said: “This book is
fresh, funny and disquieting.”
Other titles in the running for the prize were Stay
With Me by Ayobami Adebayo,
The Butchering Art by Lindsey
Fitzharris, With The End In Mind by
Kathryn Mannix, Mayhem: A Memoir
by Sigrid Rausing and The Vaccine
Race by Meredith Wadman.
An Aladdin’s cave of books once
deemed of no interest to Cambridge University academics, including translations of The Hobbit
into Cornish (inset) and Hawaiian,
are to go on public display for the
first time.
The university’s library has
been entitled to a copy of all new
published books since the Copyright Act of 1710,
as part of the
university’s responsibility as
a copyright library, but those
classed as nonacademic were
hived off into
a tower.
The volumes,
including children’s literature, cookbooks,
car manuals and novels, were not
originally entered into the university’s main library catalogue.
Close to one million items have
been stored in a 17-storey tower,
built in the 1930s to provide extra
space for storage, and it is now almost full.
Its treasures will go on display
to the public when a free exhibition called Tall Tales: Secrets Of
The Tower opens tomorrow.
Many of the hundreds of thousands of items could only be found
by using catalogue cards until an
online archive project was completed in 2012. Items in the tower
include first editions of Casino
Royale and The Famous Five. Other
highlights include the first novel
about working-class black culture
in Britain (Samuel Selvon’s The
Lonely Londoners) and an array of
delightfully titled books such as Indoor Games For Awkward Moments.
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POLITICS
Education may
decide who
finishes first in
the second city
Theresa May speaks
to staff at Boss
Design in Dudley,
Birmingham GETTY
Richard Vaughan gauges opinions
in Birmingham ahead of the big test
T
rudging the sodden
streets of Birmingham’s
affluent suburb of Edgbaston, Matt Bennett is
delivering his last few
leaflets in the hope of winkling out
more votes.
The Tory council candidate
(inset) believes that Thursday’s
election is on a knife edge in the city,
despite the talk of Labour riding
the wave of success from last year’s
general election.
As he walks up the driveways of
the detached houses, he talks of
voters wanting more grammar
school places and parents’
concerns over good
secondary school places.
“We are really, really
keen to expand existing
grammar schools,” he
says. “Frankly, it is so
much more competitive
now than when I was
growing up. I would like to see
grammar school places keep pace
with the changing population.”
As a policy priority, it could not
be further from the immediate
concerns facing headteachers in the
UK’s self-styled “second city”.
Michelle Gay, head of Osborne
Primary School, has been forced to
cut her school week to four-and-ahalf days in a bid to save money. The
school, which sits just to the north
of the city, took the drastic decision
in September as rising costs began
to eat into its budgets.
“There are educational benefits
to giving teachers that time to plan
and prepare their lessons each
week. But another reason for doing
it was because it saves us £35,000
a year,” says Ms Gay, who was
speaking in a personal capacity.
Another
View
John
Curtice
Hard fight for
Labour away
from London
LOCAL ELECTIONS
As with much of the rest of the
country, Birmingham’s schools are
dealing with deepening real term
cuts to their budgets.
The issue of school funding was
largely responsible for Jeremy
Corbyn’s surprise performance
in last year’s general election, as
parents voted in their droves for
Labour’s promise of more
public spending. And
campaigners are hoping
that a similar message
will be equally successful
in the forthcoming
local elections.
According to the National
Education Union (NEU), 361
out of 364 schools in the area have
been affected by budget cuts.
Osborne, a single form entry
school with more than 40 per cent
of pupils on free school meals, has
seen 10 per cent of its annual budget
cut as a result of increased pension
contributions and changes to the
Government’s school funding policy.
“We’re aware that overall school
funding is increasing, but we now
have expenditures forced on us that
we didn’t use to have to pay. It means
we cannot offer the extra curricular
stuff like guitar lessons for one class,
or swimming,” Ms Gay said.
“These are things that a
disadvantaged community like mine
cannot afford to do, so they will miss
out on that broader curriculum.”
The city even hosted a major rally
organised by school leaders’ union
L
ondon has become
increasingly difficult
territory for the
Conservatives, not
least thanks to the
party’s difficulty in appealing
to the capital’s growing ethnic
minority population.
Meanwhile, polling of voting intentions for the borough elections
suggests there could be a swing of 4
to 5 per cent from Conservative to
Labour on Thursday.
But there is another set of
elections taking place on Thursday
– in 118 district councils outside
London, including in most of
England’s major cities. Current
polls, on average, put the
Elections around the country Who is voting
n More than 4,300 seats in 150
councils across England are being
contested on 3 May.
n All 1,833 seats in London’s 32
boroughs are up for grabs. All
the seats in Birmingham, Leeds,
Manchester and Newcastle
metropolitan authorities are also
being contested.
n Elections are being held for
one-third of the seats on 30
metropolitan authorities.
n 17 unitary councils are
holding elections, along with 67
district councils.
n Labour holds about 2,270 of the
seats being contested, the Tories
1,400 and the Liberal Democrats 470.
n There are also elections for the
first mayor of the Sheffield City
Region, and for the mayoralties
of Hackney, Lewisham, Newham
and Tower Hamlets in London
and Watford.
n There are no elections in Scotland,
Wales or Northern Ireland.
the National Association of Head
Teachers and the NEU, to protest
against the financial constraints
facing schools.
Kate Taylor, a parent from
Kings Heath, on the southern
outskirts of Birmingham, said
concerns were growing about
class sizes and that heads were
regularly asking for schools to make
financial contributions.
“The worry is that this becomes
the norm. That if more money isn’t
made available in the next year or
two then more schools will go down
to four-and-half-days a week. What
do working parents do then?”
Carl Rice, Labour’s cabinet
member for children, families and
schools in Birmingham, said he had
spent past few days canvassing at
the school gate and that continued
austerity was something that
continually came up among
Conservatives narrowly ahead of
elections. That pattern largely
Labour. So, if Theresa May’s party is explains why the Conservatives did
losing ground in the capital, it must
so badly last year in London, which
be gaining ground elsewhere.
voted by three to two in favour of
One reason for this
Remain, and why they are
divergence lies in the
still struggling there now.
way the referendum
But outside of
reshaped Britain’s
London, elections
electoral geography.
are taking place in
In last year’s general
districts where, on
The possible swing
election, Tory support
average, only around
away from the
Conservatives in
typically decreased in
45 per cent voted
Thursday’s
borough
those places that voted
Remain, a figure that
elections
heavily for Remain,
matches the outcome
but there was a net
of the referendum across
swing from Labour to the
England as a whole. Making
Conservatives where voters heavily progress in these elections looks
like a much tougher test for Labour.
backed Leave. A similar pattern
had emerged in the county council
Given how well entrenched
5%
parents. Mr Rice said he hoped
that this week’s election would give
the Conservatives a “bloody nose”
and prompt them into opening the
purse strings.
“People are sick and tired of
austerity,” he said. “But if you go
around the restaurants of London
do you see the bankers who caused
it tightening their belts? No. But
go around Birmingham and look at
the public realm and you will see
under-investment.”
Birmingham’s Conservatives
point the finger of blame for that
lack of investment squarely at
Labour, which strengthened its hold
on the council two years ago.
It would require a mighty upset
for Brum to turn blue on Thursday,
but Mr Bennett believes it will be
very close.
“I hesitate to make predictions.
We all had a big shock last year
and I have heard MPs saying
we’re going to be wiped out in
Birmingham. That’s just not
the case – it’s much more finely
balanced than that.”
Polls put the
Conservatives
narrowly ahead
of Labour
Labour is in many of the councils
it controls, a modest swing against
the party outside of London
could leave its tally of controlled
councils undiminished. But any
such movement could cost it gains
that the party might otherwise be
expected to make. THE INDEPENDENT
John Curtice is professor of politics
at Strathclyde University
22
NEWS
CRYPTIC CROSSWORD
No 2255 BY SCORPION
1
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Smartphone
app joins battle
against cancer
9
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MEDICINE
11
By Rhiannon Williams
12
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16
TECHNOLOGY CORRESPONDENT
19
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Solution to yesterday’s Cryptic
M I L L
A
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S CRU P L
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R E A
G M R
R E A S S U
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o
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step
Researchers have created an app
designed to aid the fight against
cancer by analysing data while
smartphones charge overnight.
The DreamLab app, developed
by researchers from Imperial College London in partnership with
the Vodafone Foundation, uses an
algorithm to search for drug combinations to combat cancer.
DreamLab’s research hopes to
create genetic profiles to tailor
treatment to individuals.
Once the app has been powered up, users are encouraged to
leave the app running and turn
their phone face-down overnight.
It takes advantage of the device’s
computing power to solve around
24,000 problems over six-hours.
A network of 100,000 smartphones running the app would be
able to process all the available
data within three months, the
researchers estimate. The same
amount of calculations would take
a desktop computer with an eightcore processor 300 years if running 24 hours a day.
3 Easy Steps
Step 1
Find your local parcel shop
Step 2
Enter your email & get a
barcode to your mobile
Step 3
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Take your parcel & barcode to
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returns.passmyparcel.com
After returning your order, you can track
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AFGHANISTAN
SOUTH KOREA
Isis double suicide bombing kills 25
and leaves 45 wounded in Kabul
Give Trump
Nobel prize
for peace,
says Seoul
By Rahim Faiez
IN KABUL
A co-ordinated double suicide
bombing by Isis hit central Kabul
yesterday, killing at least 25 people,
including nine Afghan journalists.
An Agence France-Presse photographer, a cameraman for the local
Tolo television station and several
reporters for the Afghan branch of
Radio Free Europe were among
those who died, police said.
At least 45 people were wounded
in the twin attacks, according to
Hashmat Stanekzai, a Kabul police
spokesman who also said four policemen were among those killed.
The attack was the latest in a
relentless string of deadly largescale bombings and assaults that
have struck Kabul and elsewhere in
Afghanistan so far this year.
And even as the Afghan capital
reeled from yesterday’s assault, a
suicide car bombing a few hours later
in the southern province of Kandahar
killed 11 children, a police spokesman
said. Eight Romanian Nato soldiers
The assaults underscore
Afghanistan’s struggle
in reining in the jihadists since
the US and Nato concluded their
combat mission in 2014.
By Hyonhee Shin
Security forces run
for cover after the
second bombing in
Kabul yesterday.
Right: victims of the
blast are taken to
hospital AP
IN SEOUL
BBC reporter shot
were wounded in that bombing.
On an Isis-affiliated website,
the terrorist group said two of
its members carried out the
Kabul bombings, targeting the
headquarters of the “renegade”
Afghan intelligence services.
The blasts took place in the central Shash Darak area, home to Nato
headquarters and a number of embassies and foreign offices – as well
as the Afghan intelligence service.
A police spokesman said the first
suicide bomber was on a motorcycle
while the second suicide attacker, on
foot, aimed to hit reporters and helpers scrambling to get to the scene of
the first blast.
Agence France-Presse said the
news agency’s chief photographer
in Kabul, Shah Marai, was among
those killed. AP
A BBC reporter has been killed in
an attack in the eastern Afghan
province of Khost.
Ahmad Shah, 29, had been
working for the BBC Afghan
service for more than a year as
well as Reuters.
BBC World Service director
Jamie Angus said Mr Shah was a
“respected and popular” journalist.
“This is a devastating loss and I
send my sincere condolences to
Ahmad Shah’s friends and family
and the whole BBC News Afghan
team,” he said.
Local police chief Abdul Hanan
said that Mr Shah had been shot by
unidentified armed men.
Locals told the BBC that Shah
had been on his bicycle when the
attack happened.
UNITED STATES
French President’s White House tree ‘put in quarantine’
By Luke Rix-Standing
The big reveal: Emmanuel Macron
and Donald Trump plant the tree AP
A tree that the French President Emmanuel Macron gave to President
Donald Trump has already disappeared from the White House lawn.
The pair planted the sapling, taken
from the site of a First World War battle in north-east France, last week.
Mr Macron said the tree would be a
reminder of “these ties that bind us”.
US authorities revealed it had been
MEXICO
Caravan of asylum-seekers
trapped at US border
By Elliot Spagat
IN TIJUANA
Nearly 200 Central American migrants attempting to seek asylum in
the US are stuck at the US-Mexican
border in a stand-off with officials,
who say there is not enough space to
accommodate them
Last week, President Donald
Trump vowed to stop the “caravan”
of people fleeing drug gangs and political violence. But the asylum-seekers have refused to leave the area.
About 50 were allowed past a gate
controlled by Mexican officials to
walk across a long bridge but were
stopped at the entrance to the US inspection facility at the other end.
They were allowed to wait outside
the building, on Mexican soil. Another 50 or so camped on blankets and
backpacks in Tijuana on the Mexican side. Minutes before they were
to walk to the border crossing, the
US Customs and Border Protection
Commissioner Kevin McAleenan announced that the San Ysidro border
crossing had “reached capacity” for
people without legal documents. AP
put in quarantine. The French President’s office said the oak tree sapling
he planted on the White House lawn
was lifted and placed in quarantine
like other plants or animals brought
into the US.
An official in Mr Macron’s office
said that Mr Trump insisted on holding a symbolic planting ceremony
during the French state visit, despite
the quarantine requirement – which
both sides knew about.
One-minute Wijuko
How to play Place 1 – 9 once
in the grid, obeying the sums
between pairs of squares
‘The ties that bind us’: Mr Macron’s
tree has been removed AP
UNITED STATES
‘Thor’ soldier can keep his beard
By John Haltiwanger
7
11
5
13
14
9
9
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
More puzzles
Pages 44-45
South Korean President Moon
Jae-in said US President Donald
Trump deserved a Nobel Peace
Prize for his efforts to end the
stand-off with North Korea over
its nuclear weapons programme.
“What we need is only peace,”
Mr Moon told a meeting of senior
secretaries, according to a
presidential official.
At a summit last Friday, Mr
Moon (inset) and North Korean
leader Kim Jong-un pledged to
end hostilities between their
countries and work toward the
“complete denuclearisation” of
the Korean peninsula.
Mr Trump is preparing for
his own summit with Mr Kim,
which he said would take place
in the next three to
four weeks.
Most experts
think there
remain huge
obstacles to
achieving
denuclearisation
and a lasting peace
on the peninsula.
The Trump
administration has led
a global effort to impose ever
stricter sanctions on Pyongyang,
and the US President exchanged
bellicose threats with Mr Kim
in the past year over North
Korea’s development of nuclear
missiles capable of reaching the
United States. But in a further
sign of the thaw between North
and South, Seoul will today
remove loudspeakers that blared
propaganda across the border,
while North Korea has said it
would shift its clocks to align with
its southern neighbour.
Seoul’s defence ministry said it
would take away the loudspeakers
today before television cameras.
North Korea is expected to
reciprocate. REUTERS
A bearded US Army soldier who
worships Thor, the Norse god
of thunder, is being permitted to keep his beard
as part of the military’s
effort to be more religiously accommodating.
In 2017, the Army decided to allow soldiers to
wear a turban, beard or
hijab for religious reasons.
But now it appears this new
policy also permits adherents of
the Norse pagan faith to keep their
beards. Unlike Sikhs, Norse pagans
are not required to wear beards as
part of their faith, but facial hair is
apparently encouraged.
A memo written by commander Colonel Curtis
Shroedero to a 795th
Military Police Battalion
soldier who reportedly
made the request, stated: “I grant your accommodation, subject to the
standards and limitations
described below. In observance of your heathen, Norse
pagan faith, you may wear a beard,
in accordance with Army uniform
and grooming standards.
24
NEWS
Panorama
Around the
world in
10 stories
IN RAMALLAH
MYANMAR
Envoys discuss
climate rules
UN team probes
Rohingya crisis
Diplomats and
environmentalists began
gathering in Bonn, Germany,
yesterday to keep working on
the rules governing the Paris
climate accord.
This week’s talks are in
preparation for December’s
climate summit in Katowice,
Poland, when the Paris
rulebook must be approved.
Among the unresolved issues
are how to ensure transparent
monitoring of emissions. The
rest of the world remains
committed to the deal, despite
the US’s withdrawal. AP
Members of a UN Security Council
team probing Myanmar’s crisis over
its Rohingya Muslim minority have
arrived in the country’s capital after
a visit to Bangladesh, where about
700,000 Rohingya who fled militaryled violence live in refugee camps.
The delegation will meet the
country’s de facto leader, State
Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi, then
travel to northern Rakhine state, the
area from which the Rohingya fled.
They are expected to see the
aftermath of the army’s crackdown
as well as the government’s
preparations for taking back the
refugees from Bangladesh.
Hundreds of
modern slavery
victims rescued
By Kieran Guilbert
IN BOGOTÁ
Hundreds of suspected victims
of modern slavery were rescued
in a crackdown on traffickers in
13 countries in the Caribbean
and Central and South America,
Interpol said yesterday.
Palestinian council meets
to bolster Abbas’s power
By Stephen Farrell
GERMANY
LATIN AMERICA
WEST BANK
About 350 possible victims of
sexual exploitation and forced
labour were discovered and 22
people arrested last month in
an Interpol-led swoop in nations
such as Barbados, Belize, Brazil,
Jamaica and Venezuela.
Men, women and children
were discovered working in
nightclubs, farms, mines,
factories and open-air markets,
having been lured across borders
by traffickers, Interpol said.
“We identified women being
forced to work out of spaces no
bigger than coffins, for example,”
said one Interpol official. REUTERS
A powerful but rarely convened assembly that calls itself the Palestinian
“supreme authority” met for the first
time in 22 years yesterday.
President Mahmoud Abbas is expected to use the four-day Palestinian
National Council meeting to renew
his legitimacy and to install loyalists
in powerful positions to begin shaping his legacy.
Mr Abbas has billed the meeting of
the Council, the de facto parliament
of the Palestinian Liberation Organisation, as a chance to establish a
united front after President Donald
The world’s first
floating nuclear
power plant leaves
St Petersburg in
Russia under tow
towards Murmansk.
The ‘Akademik
Lomonosov’, the first
in a series of floating
nuclear plants, will
be fuelled and tested
before being towed
5,000km for use near
the Arctic port town
of Pevek. REUTERS
THAILAND
Freed activist vows to continue calls for democracy
A high-profile Thai activist and
former magazine editor jailed for
insulting the country’s monarchy
vowed yesterday to keep pressing
his call for democracy after he was
released from prison.
Thailand’s military government,
led by former army chief Prayuth
Chan-ocha, has repeatedly delayed a
general election, with the latest date
set for February 2019.
“Calling for democracy, especially
elections, is good,” Somyot Prueksakasemsuk, 56, said outside the jail,
where about 100 supporters greeted
his release. “I will use my rights as a
Thai citizen to join this movement
and I invite people to support calls for
an election as soon as possible.”
Since the start of the year, there
have been sporadic, student-led
street protests calling for an election
and for the military government to
step down. REUTERS
NORWAY
UNITED STATES
MIDDLE EAST
Fish-farming tax
considered
Fruit accident
kills road user
Japan and UAE
boost trade ties
Norway will consider introducing
a tax on fish farmers because
of their use of the country’s
national resources, the finance
ministry said.
Fish farms, which mainly
raise salmon and rainbow trout,
tend to be located in deepwater
fjords along the country’s coast.
It is Norway’s second-largest
export industry after oil and
gas production, with sales of
63.7bnkroner (£5.6bn) in 2016. AP
Watermelons that spilled from an
overturned trailer on an interstate
off-ramp in the US city of Philadelphia hit a car on the road below, causing a deadly crash.
The watermelons spilled on to
southbound lanes of the interstate,
hitting a car and causing the driver
to lose control.
A passenger in that car, 61-year-old
Thanh Tam Nguyen, of Glenolden,
was killed in the crash. The driver
was hospitalised.
Japanese prime minister Shinzo
Abe is hailing relations between
his country and the United
Arab Emirates.
Mr Abe says Japan and the UAE
will sign an investment agreement
during his trip to the Emirati
capital, Abu Dhabi.
About a quarter of all oil
imports for Japan come from
the UAE, a federation of seven
sheikhdoms on the Arabian
peninsula. AP
IN BANGKOK
San Jose
Costa Rica will reach 200
years of independence in 2021
and the country’s Presidentelect plans to mark it with a
revolution of his own: a plan
to end the use of fossil fuels
in transport.
“When we reach 200 years
of independent life we will
take Costa Rica forward and
celebrate... that we’ve removed
[petrol] and diesel from our
transportation” plans, Carlos
Alvarado promised in his
victory speech this month.
The 38-year-old progressive
beat his rival Fabricio
Alvarado, an evangelical
preacher and musician, with
60 per cent of the vote in
second-round elections, and
will take office on 8 May.
The President-elect’s
promise marks the first time a
Costa Rican leader has backed
such a move, though green
organisations have previously
urged it. According to Mr
Alvarado’s environmental
advisers, no date has yet been
set for fully phasing out fossil
fuels in transport, but the plan
should be ready by 2021.
Achieving zero-carbon
transport quickly – even
in a Central American
country well-known for its
environmental commitment –
will be a significant challenge.
Jose Daniel Lara, a Costa
Rican energy researcher at
the University of CaliforniaBerkeley, said the plan would
speed up progress. REUTERS
Sebastian Rodriguez
Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as
Israel’s capital.
But the location, timing and attendance have been criticised from
Nuclear
plant
sets sail
By Aukkarapon Niyomat
Postcard
From...
Mahmoud Abbas is expected to install
loyalists in powerful roles GETTY
outside the PLO, and from within. Islamist groups, including Hamas are
boycotting it, and question the PLO’s
claim to be the “sole legitimate representative” of the Palestinian people.
Meanwhile, the new US Secretary
of State Mike Pompeo said yesterday
that a resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict remained a priority for
the Trump administration, despite
its recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and its planned move of
the US embassy to the holy city despite Palestinian protests.
Mr Pompeo also declined to criticise the Israeli military for its use of
live fire against Palestinian protesters along the Gaza border. REUTERS
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
25
ISRAEL
Netanyahu launches assault on Iranian ‘lies’
By Michael Day
Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu last night revealed what
he claimed were 100,000 Iranian
government files that proved Tehran
remained intent on building nuclear
weapons in defiance of the international nuclear deal.
US President Donald Trump has
threatened to withdraw from the
2015 agreement between Iran and
six global powers – the US, the UK,
Russia, France, China and Germany
- which granted Tehran relief from
economic sanctions in return for
ditching its work on building a nuclear bomb.
Last night’s surprise press conference by Mr Netanyahu appeared
designed to ensure that Mr Trump
follows through with his threat and
dumps the accord later this month.
Israel has long opposed the
agreement. Washington’s major
European allies have urged the
Trump administration not to
abandon it and argue that Iran is
abiding by its terms.
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani
and French President Emmanuel
Macron spoke by phone for more than
an hour on Sunday, agreeing to work
closely to preserve the agreement.
But Mr Netanyahu said yesterday:
“This archive shows that Iran intended to continue its work on nuclear
weapons at the highest level and with
the same personnel. The Iran deal
is based on lies. Iranian lies and deception.” He said he would be making the archive material available to
other countries and the International
Atomic Energy Agency.
Significantly, Mr Netanyahu
appeared not to provide any evidence that Iran was currently, engaged in researching or building
nuclear weapons.
Israel is widely believed to be the
Earlier yesterday, Israeli
MP Michael Oren accused
Iran of using the nuclear deal to
help it “systematically” cleanse
Syria of Sunni Arabs, and replace
them with Shias.
Benjamin Netanyahu revealing what he claims is Iran’s nuclear programme
at a speech at the defence ministry in Tel Aviv yesterday JACK GUEZ/AFP/GETTY
onlynuclear-armedstateintheMiddle
East, though it neither confirms nor
denies possessing atomic weapons.
Israel has also said it would do
whatever is necessary to prevent Iran
from establishing a military front
against it in Syria, though both countries recently played down prospects
that they could go to war over Syria.
On Sunday night, a suspected
Israeli missile attack targeting government outposts in Syria’s northern region killed 26 pro-government
fighters, mostly Iranians, amid soaring Middle East tensions between
Israel and Iran.
MIDDLE EAST
Israel is prime suspect for
strike on Iran depot in Syria
Tehran holds back from retaliation
– for now. By Patrick Cockburn
I
t is likely that Israel launched
the missile attack in Syria
that killed at least 26
pro-government fighters,
many of them Iranians, late on
Sunday night. The targets included
a ground-to-ground missile depot
that exploded with the seismic
impact of a small earthquake.
Iranian news outlets first
confirmed, and then denied,
that Iranian facilities had been
destroyed, suggesting that it
wants to deny the incident took
place because it does not intend to
retaliate against Israel just now.
Israel has not confirmed officially
that it was responsible but Israeli
media reports express no doubt
that Israel was behind the strikes.
Iran is likely to feel that
retaliatory military action against
Israel is not in its interests in
the days leading up to President
Donald Trump’s likely withdrawal
from the Iran nuclear deal on 12
May. Iranian leaders will
want to avoid providing
Mr Trump with an
excuse for his actions.
This will enable them
to put as much blame
as possible on the US
for pulling out of the
2015 agreement.
Israel may calculate
that it can expect to benefit from
Iranian restraint in Syria for a
few weeks or even months, even
if Israel escalates its air strikes
against Iran-related targets.
It is a risky strategy: much
depends on the extent of Israeli
ambitions in Syria. It can expect
In Saturday’s
strong support from the US and
the new hawkish US Secretary of
State, Mike Pompeo, had just left
Israel when the missile attacks
took place. But if the Israeli air war
in Syria continues and begins to
affect the balance of power in the
seven-year civil war, then Iran will
certainly retaliate. Iranian reaction
to any developments affecting its
interests in the Middle East –
such as the Israeli invasion
of Lebanon in 1982 and
the US invasion of Iraq
in 2003 – have tended
in the past to be long
delayed but effective.
Sustained Israeli
military action in Syria
could not single out Iranian
targets. It would draw in Russia,
which does not want to see the
military successes of its ally,
President Bashar al-Assad (inset),
reversed by Israel. Relations
between Israel and Russia are
already deteriorating.
THE INDEPENDENT
22 day
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Selected departures October 2018 to April 2019
Your tour includes...
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A dolphin-watching cruise in the stunning Bay of Islands
Visit the Te Puia, Rotorua’s geothermal wonderland with local Maori guides
Admire Napier’s beautiful Art Deco architecture on a guided walking tour
Sightseeing tour of Auckland, visit Christchurch and see snow-capped Mt Cook
Visit Nelson and cruise Abel Tasman National Park’s stunningly scenic coast
Cruise to the South Island with a vineyard visit and tasting in Marlborough
Cross the Southern Alps on the TranzAlpine train
Spectacular helicopter flight around the iconic Franz Josef glacier
Cruise awe-inspiring Milford Sound with the chance to see dolphins and seals
Return flights from the UK plus a two-day stopover in cosmopolitan Singapore
Hand-picked accommodation, with breakfast included
The services of our experienced and
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Author George RR Martin
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Prices are based on two people sharing and are correct at time of print. Single
supplements may apply. This holiday is operated by and subject to booking
conditions of Riviera Travel, ABTA V4744 ATOL 3430 protected. Subject to
availability. Additional entrance cost may apply. Images used in conjunction with
Riviera Travel. For further information please write to Riviera Travel, New Manor,
328 Wetmore Road, Burton upon Trent, Staffs, DE14 1SP.
Sarah Hughes looks into why it’s such a
big deal, what we can expect and what
this means for ‘Game of Thrones’
For more information or to book,
please call: 01283 523447
www.ipariviera.co.uk
ABTA No. V4744
26
NEWS
SCIENCE
Turned on F
to robotic
pleasure
Dr Kate Devlin believes that
advances in sex technology
are to be welcomed rather than
shunned. By Heather Saul,
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For more information or to book, please call:
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otherwise standard rates apply.
rom meeting a partner
via an app to using a
sex toy which can be
controlled remotely,
sexuality and technology
are becoming increasingly
intertwined. The term “digisexual”
has even been coined, to describe
people who consider technology
to be an integral part of their
sexual identity.
But with the development of
sex robots, which could soon
be available for sale, are things
going too far? If you are yet to be
introduced to the concept, these
machines are essentially sex
dolls with animatronics in their
head and an artificial intelligence
(AI) personality.
None have been released
commercially yet. But Harmony,
the first sex robot expected to
go on the market, is currently
being developed by the company
RealDoll – complete with blinking
eyes, a voice, the ability to smile,
and a realistic vagina.
The target audience is
predominantly men, and there
are fears that they will encourage
the objectification of women.
Some even speculate that they
could undermine or replace
human-to-human intimacy.
They are designed to be passive,
hypersexualised and sexually
submissive – and we have seen
in the past couple of decades
how quickly people have adapted
to living their lives through
the internet.
The mathematician and writer
Cathy O’Neil even argues that sex
robots could actually make men
obsolete. “I think it’s the men who
should be worried,” she wrote in a
Bloomberg article earlier this year.
“It’s entirely possible that robots
can outperform them.”
A sex doll “brothel”
in France recently
survived a
motion to
force its closure
by councillors
concerned it
was degrading
to women and
dehumanising.
Meanwhile, a
campaign by
British and Swedish
academics to ban
robots developed for
sex is underway.
But sex historian Hallie
Lieberman believes that sex
robots could be a useful vehicle
to teach men and women about
consent and sexual pleasure.
Among those examining the
industry and its trends is Dr Kate
Devlin, a former archaeologist
who is now a leading sex tech
researcher exploring what effect
such “advancements” will have
on our lives, and our pleasure.
As Dr Devlin (inset) prepares to
debate where AI, robotics, sex and
love all intersect in a conference
today at the Leeds International
Festival, she is well aware of the
ethical concerns. Thankfully,
she is sceptical their inception
could spell the end of human
relationships.
“There is fear around that,”
admits the senior computing
lecturer at Goldsmiths,
University of London. “But I think
there is fear with every piece of
technology that comes in that we
are going to lose control.”
“There is lots of talk about how,
as a society, we are going to be
isolated through technology – I
don’t think that’s necessarily the
case. We’re seeing communities
built up via technology.”
She points to online dating, and
how tech can help to facilitate
long-distance relationships. “I
don’t think we are all going to
end up with sex robots instead of
human partners.”
Dr Devlin – whose book Turned
On: Science, Sex and Robots will be
published in October – believes
that there are potential benefits
of sex tech, such as helping
consenting adults who have
limited sex lives because of health
reasons.
Companion or care robots
could be fitted with a sexual
function of some kind,
she says, adding:
“We’ve seen sex toys
move into a very
abstracted and
beautiful design
phase. I think that
could be extended
further.”
She has
previously held sex
tech “hackathons”
at Goldsmiths to
explore how new pieces
of technology could
be used
PUBLIC HEALTH
Taking knife to watchdog
will not help food safety
Professors Erik Millstone and Tim Lang argue that
reforms to regulation could lead to worse standards
T
he UK’s food safety
regime is not working
properly. Statistics
show it is failing to
ensure an acceptably
safe food supply, and poisoning
rates are too high. Confirmed
cases of the Campylobacter
bacteria, for example, increased
by about 46 per cent from 2008
to 2012. Since 2014 the UK’s food
regulator, the Food Standards
Agency (FSA), has said that
poultry isn’t clean enough that
it can safely be washed without
the risk of spreading infection.
Meanwhile, consumer trust has
been understandably low since the
2013 horsemeat scandal.
Under government instructions,
the FSA is now planning a major
reorganisation, transferring
responsibility for many food safety
inspections and audits from the
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
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BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
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27
SOCIETY
I think it’s the
men who should be
worried. It’s entirely
possible that robots can
outperform them
Sex robots such as
‘Annabelle’ have
not been released
commercially yet
BENITA MARCUSSEN
public sector to private commercial nutrition and food labelling in
assurance providers. But we worry
2010. The FSA’s budget was cut
those firms will not primarily serve
by nearly 23 per cent from 2011-12
the public interest – they will
to 2016-17, and the number of
focus on their industry
samples taken for testing
clients’ interests,
by local environmental
creating conflicts
health officers fell by
of interests.
22 per cent.
The reason the
Brexit is another
FSA was created in
reason why
1999 was to address
Britain will need
How much the FSA’s
seemingly endless
a stronger FSA,
budget
was
cut
problems over
once reliance on
by between 2011
self-regulated food
the European Food
and 2017
safety, culminating in
Safety Authority
has ended, especially
the 1996 BSE crisis.
Food-related ill health
as a third of UK food by
value comes from within
is still a major source of
premature death. But ministers
the EU.
Yet, with the FSA’s
are accelerating a process of
responsibilities set to increase
weakening the FSA, which began
with Brexit, there are no plans to
with Andrew Lansley’s decision
increase its budget accordingly.
to deprive it of responsibility for
23%
to build more creative forms
of sex technology. The ideas
– some more bizarre than
others – produced by these
sessions moved away from the
human form to more immersive
experiences and wearable
experiences. These included a
hammock where tubes would
inflate to wrap around and hug
the person lying in them, and
shawls with stimulating sensors.
It is unlikely that the use of sex
robots in their current form will
ever become widespread, she
says. “It’s come out of the sex doll
market, and the sex doll market
is by and large by men for men. I
think we will see advances in sex
technology, but I don’t think it will
come by that route.
“I would be more inclined
to say that we look at the sex
toys that we have and we will
be making things that are more
extended, more immersive,
that kind of thing.” The biggest
misconception about sex robots
is that they already exist, she says
– at the moment there are merely
“mechanised sex dolls”.
Dr Devlin also argues that
these machines don’t have to be
built in a human image for us to
engage them with them a human
way. “My own theory is you can
build anything you like, because
that is the joy of having this
technology. There’s the push to
make these human looking ones
– but why, when you can make
anything you like?”
And besides, she adds,
“people are really bad at making
human-like robots”. That
statement, at least, is difficult to
argue with.
Leeds International Festival
runs until 12 May, showcasing 44
speakers across 52 events;
leedsinternationalfestival.com
Knives are sharpening to remove
what hardliners see as excessive
EU food regulations. But watering
down of rules has a clear record
of producing public outrage when
things go wrong.
We want to see a strengthened
FSA and properly resourced local
authorities. The reforms should
be stopped while a parliamentary
select committee reviews the
proposals, with ministers held
accountable. And standards need
to be enforced by a system that is
not compromised by commercial
conflicts of interest.
Erik Millstone is a professor of
science policy at the University of
Sussex and Tim Lang is a professor
of food policy at City, University
of London; read their full article at
TheConversation.com
Those pioneering
‘difficult’ women
deserve praise
It’s time to rip up the rule book on what it
means to be female. By Cheryl Strayed
T
he first difficult woman
I knew was named
Myrtle. Elderly and
white-haired, single and
childless, she lived next
door to my family when I was five. A
spinster, my father told me one day,
his tone so disparaging it sparked
my interest. She thinks she can do
whatever she wants, he said. Even at
five, I knew this to be in violation of
a cardinal rule in the unwritten but
widely known rule book of what it
means to be female.
Intrigued, I studied Myrtle from
afar, deeply curious about what a
woman who thought she could do
whatever she wanted to do might
actually do. But my findings were
a disappointment. Doing whatever
she wanted to do, at least in this
particular case, turned out to be
nothing more than to play her piano
in the early evenings – the melodic
thunder of it spilling from her
windows into our yard, where I did
gymnastics with my sister while
pretending not to be a spy.
I don’t recall a single conversation
with Myrtle, and yet the fact of her
existence stuck to me like a burr.
Even all those years ago, I knew I
wanted to be the kind of woman who
did what she wanted to do, too.
In my 20s, I named my truck
after Myrtle. I’m not generally
one to assign human qualities to
automobiles, but this truck was
different, and the name fitted. A
1979 Chevy LUV pickup, Myrtle
was more companion than vehicle,
more confidante than mass of
metal and machinery. In her I could
go anywhere, and did. From New
York to Alabama to Minnesota to
Wyoming to Arizona to California to
Oregon and points in between, that
truck was my home away from home
on countless low-budget road trips.
I slept alone amid the vast
darkness of national forests on
a futon I’d laid out in the truck’s
long bed, cooking dinner in smalltown parks on a camp stove. In
Myrtle’s rusted body – onto which
I’d plastered bumper stickers that
said things like Feminism Is the
Radical Notion That Women Are
People, and Question Authority, and
Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make
History – I had my first taste of what
it felt like to do what the original
Myrtle had done. I had defied one of
the cardinal rules in the unwritten
but widely known rule book of
what it means to be female: into the
wildest places, I’d ventured alone.
I thought of those two Myrtles and
They said no in a world
that expects women to say
yes, and yes in a world that
doesn’t even ask the question
Female pioneers: Dr Jane Goodall did
her early research in Africa GETTY
the two younger versions of myself
as I read a new book, In Praise of
Difficult Women, by Karen Karbo. It
is chock-full of people who remind
us, by the example of their lives,
that rules are powerful only if we
obey them. It explores many facets
of what it means to be female and
“difficult” – another way of saying
female and “brave enough to express
the full range of one’s humanity”.
From Vita Sackville-West to
Hillary Clinton, Amelia Earhart
to Janis Joplin – history shows
us inspiring examples of difficult
women who, instead of carrying
out the wishes of others, did what
they wanted to do, the way they
wanted to do it. Without apology,
they decided to be ambitious and
bold, adventurous and emotional,
brainy and defiant, incorrigible and
outlandish, determined and badass.
They said no in a world that
expects women to say yes, and yes in
a world that doesn’t even bother to
ask them the question. Their stories
matter because they teach us how to
live, much in the same way that old,
outdated-from-the-start rule book
on being female tried to do.
In learning more about the lives
of female pioneers, I feel like I finally
have the goods on the mysterious
woman who lived next door. There
was the young Jane Goodall, doing
her first research while camping
in the central African bush with
her mother; Frida Kahlo, whose
unflinching pain informed her
most exquisite paintings. Through
learning about their lives, we can
understand what it means to be like
Myrtle – and finally rip up that rule
book once and for all.
This is an edited
excerpt from Cheryl
Strayed’s foreword
to ‘In Praise of Difficult Women’ by
Karen Karbo (£18.99,
National Geographic)
Television Tuesday 1 May
CRITIC’S
CHOICE
Daytime
GERARD GILBERT
6pm
7pm
8pm
9pm
10pm
11pm
Late
PICK OF THE DAY
===
===
The Split
Hospital
My F-ing Tourette’s Family
9pm, BBC1
“Family is fragile and not everyone
is immune to it breaking… not even
you,” Nicola Walker’s divorce lawyer
Hannah (left) has been warned, and
as old flame Christie (Barry Atsma)
continues to rekindle the spark, Abi
Morgan’s beefily cast drama opens a
fresh storyline front. Hannah’s latest
case involves a pre-nup between a
footballer and his glamour-model
fiancée – the former represented by
Christie’s ex-wife. But then it’s
seemingly an incestuous world, this
high-end divorce work, because
Hannah’s husband Nathan (Stephen
Mangan) is hired to represent the
firm, while Hannah and her sisters’
estranged father Oscar (Anthony
Head) wants to meet up. Messy.
9pm, BBC2
“Every day feels like fire-fighting,”
says a South African surgeon at the
Critical Care unit at Queen’s Medical
Centre in Nottingham, before adding
a more global perspective: “There are
many other systems around the
world where it’s not like this… the
system is not good enough.” That, to
be fair, has been the overriding
message of both series of this
excellent documentary insight into
the workings of an NHS hospital. Is
anybody with the power to do
anything about it – Jeremy Hunt
perhaps – taking notes? Anyway, it’s
mid-February and bed manager
Holly is struggling to find space on
the unit for six new patients and
that’s before a road traffic accident.
9pm, Channel 4
Why does television love Tourette’s
syndrome so much? It can’t simply
be out of a crusading zeal to
enlighten the world about this
neurological disorder and the
suspicion is that there might be an
entertainment aspect to watching
sufferers’ inappropriate outbursts.
Anyhow, this documentary follows
an Oxfordshire couple and their
sons Spencer, 13, and Lewis, nine,
and the daily challenges of living
with the boys’ Tourette’s.
===
Tate Britain’s Great Art Walks
9pm, Sky Arts
Helena Bonham Carter travels from
Sussex to the Lake District with art
6.00 Breakfast (S). 9.15
Rip Off Britain: Food (S).
10.00 Homes Under The
Hammer (S). 11.00 A1:
Britain’s Longest Road
(S). 11.45 The Housing
Enforcers (S). 12.15
Bargain Hunt (R) (S).
1.00 BBC News At One;
Weather (S). 1.30 BBC
Regional News; Weather
(S). 1.45 Doctors (S). 2.15
800 Words (S). 3.00
Escape To The Country (S).
3.45 Flipping Profit (S).
4.30 Flog It! (R) (S). 5.15
Pointless (S).
6.00 Flog It! Trade Secrets
(R) (S). 6.30 A1: Britain’s
Longest Road (R) (S). 7.10
The Super League Show (S).
8.00 Sign Zone: Sea Cities
– Brighton (R) (S). 9.00
Victoria Derbyshire (S).
10.00 Live Snooker: The
World Championship The
first two quarter-finals
get under way in Sheffield
(S). 12.00 Daily Politics (S).
1.00 Live Snooker: The
World Championship The
remaining two quarterfinals get under way (S).
6.00 Good Morning
Britain (S). 8.30 Lorraine
(S). 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (S). 10.30 This
Morning (S). 12.30 Loose
Women (S). 1.30 ITV News;
Weather (S). 1.55 ITV
Regional News; Weather
(S). 2.00 Judge Rinder (S).
3.00 Tenable (S). 3.59 ITV
Regional Weather (S). 4.00
Tipping Point (S). 5.00 The
Chase (S).
6.00 Countdown (R)
(S). 6.45 3rd Rock From
The Sun (R) (S). 7.10 3rd
Rock From The Sun
(R) (S). 7.35 Everybody
Loves Raymond (R) (S).
8.00 Everybody Loves
Raymond (R) (S). 8.30
Frasier (R) (S). 9.00
Frasier (R) (S). 9.35 Frasier
(R) (S). 10.05 Ramsay’s
Hotel Hell (R) (S). 11.00
Undercover Boss USA (R)
(S). 12.00 Channel 4 News
Summary (S). 12.05 Coast
Vs Country (R) (S). 1.05
Posh Pawnbrokers (R) (S).
2.10 Countdown (S). 3.00 A
Place In The Sun: Home Or
Away (R) (S). 4.00 Escape
To The Chateau: DIY (S).
5.00 Four In A Bed (R) (S).
5.30 Buy It Now (S).
6.00 Milkshake! 9.15 The
Wright Stuff (S). 11.15
Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It
Away! (R) (S). 12.10 5 News
Lunchtime (S). 12.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors (R)
(S). 1.10 Access (S). 1.15
Home And Away (S). 1.45
Neighbours (S). 2.15 NCIS
(R) (S). 3.15 FILM: Running
For Her Life (Philippe
Gagnon 2016) Thriller,
starring Claire Forlani (S).
5.00 5 News At 5 (R) (S).
5.30 Neighbours (R) (S).
6.00 BBC News At
Six; Weather (S).
6.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.55 Party Election
Broadcast (S).
6.00 Eggheads Quiz
show, hosted by
Jeremy Vine (R)
(S).
6.30 Britain In
Bloom (S).
6.00 ITV Regional
News (S).
6.20 Party Election
Broadcast (R)
(S).
6.30 ITV News;
Weather (S).
6.00 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.30 Hollyoaks
Maxine is still
furious with
Adam (R) (S).
6.00 Home And Away
Ash is rushed
into hospital (R)
(S).
6.30 5 News Tonight
(S).
7.00 The One Show
(S).
7.30 EastEnders
Phil offers Max
a cash bribe
to leave the
Square (S).
7.00 Live Snooker:
The World
Championship
Coverage of
the concluding
session on day
11 (S).
7.00 Emmerdale
Frank shows his
commitment by
buying a ring (S).
7.30 Devon And
Cornwall Cops
(R) (S).
7.00 Channel 4 News
(S).
8.00 Holby City
Fletch clashes
with Abigail (S).
8.00 Top Of The
Shop With Tom
Kerridge Meat
producers
fight it out for
a place in the
final (S).
8.00 This Time Next
Year Featuring
a lady who
wants to be able
to smile for the
first time in 30
years (S).
9.00 The Split
Hannah faces
Christie’s exwife at work (S).
9.00 Hospital
Cameras follow
the critical
care team at
Nottingham
University
Hospitals (S).
10.00BBC News At
Ten (S).
10.30 BBC Regional
News (S).
10.45 Life And Death
Row: In Cold
Blood (S).
expert Gus Casely-Hayford to shed
light on the life and work of artist
Dora Carrington. The Sussex end
finds her at Charleston, country
home of the Bloomsbury set and
whither Carrington had gone in
pursuit of her beloved Lytton
Strachey. Soon after her marriage to
Ralph Partridge, Carrington
holidayed in the Lakes near Keswick,
and painted Farm at Watendlath,
which now hangs in Tate Britain.
===
Cunk on Britain
10pm, BBC2
Diane Morgan’s clueless alter ego
Philomena Cunk finally arrives at
what she calls “the arse end of
history” – a time when “archive
footage goes colour at last” and (of
the 1970s) “when power cuts became
The busy lives of staff
at the ‘Hospital’
9pm, BBC2
Helena Bonham Carter
embarks on one of
‘Tate Britain’s Great
Art Walks’
9pm, Sky Arts
Flashback: Diane
Morgan in the 1970s
10pm, BBC2
7.00 FIA World Rally
Championship
Highlights The
Rally Argentina
(S).
7.00 Beyond 100
Days; Weather
(S).
7.30 The Culture
Show: Wars Of
The Heart (S).
6.50 FILM: Congo
(Frank Marshall
1995) Jungle
adventure,
starring Dylan
Walsh (S).
8.00 Class Of Mum
And Dad It is
the last week of
term, and Class
6M are packing
in last-minute
cramming (S).
8.00 The Yorkshire
Vet Peter
Wright battles
to save a young
cow in labour
(S).
8.00 King Alfred And
The AngloSaxons The role
of Aethelstan
in creating a
kingdom of all
England (S).
9.00 The Royal Wives
Of Windsor
Part two of two.
Exploring the
responsibilities
of being a royal
wife (S).
9.00 My F-ing
Tourette’s
Family Cameras
follow an
Oxfordshire
family who live
with Tourette’s.
9.00 British Airways:
100 Years In The
Sky Part one
of a two-part
documentary
about the airline
(S).
9.00 The Story Of
The Jews The
Holocaust and
the creation
of the state of
Israel. Last in
the series (S).
10.00Cunk On Britain
Philomena finds
herself in Brexit
Britain. Last in
the series (S).
10.30 Newsnight (S).
10.00ITV News (S).
10.30 ITV Regional
News (S).
10.45 Harold
Shipman:
Doctor Death (R)
(S).
10.00Surviving The
Island With
Bear Grylls Last
in the series (S).
10.00Missing Flight
MH370: Inside
The Situation
Room The
disappearance
of the Malaysia
aeroplane (S).
10.00The Celts:
Blood, Iron And
Sacrifice With
Alice Roberts
And Neil Oliver
(S).
11.45 Obesity: The
Post Mortem (R)
(S).
11.15 Snooker:
The World
Championship
Highlights of the
evening session
at the Crucible
Theatre (S).
11.45 The Durrells
Henry Miller
comes to stay
with the family
(R) (S).
11.05 Flight HS13
Simon has
vanished and
Liv is filled with
doubt (S).
11.05 The Secret Life
Of The LongHaul Flight
The Airbus
A380’s flight
from London to
Sydney (R) (S).
12.45 BBC News (S).
12.05 Snooker: World
Championship Extra
(S). 2.05 Sign Zone:
MasterChef: The Finals (R)
(S). 3.05 Sign Zone: Secret
Agent Selection: WW2
(R) (S). 4.05 This Is BBC
Two (S).
12.35 Jackpot247 3.00
Loose Women (R). 3.45
ITV Nightscreen 5.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (R) (S).
12.00 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (R) (S). 12.55
One Born Every Minute (R).
1.50 The Supervet (R). 2.45
The Channel: The World’s
Busiest Waterway (R). 3.40
Come Dine Champion Of
Champions (R) (S).
12.30 Funniest Fails,
Falls & Flops (R) (S). 1.00
SuperCasino 3.10 Portillo’s
Hidden History Of Britain
(R) (S). 4.00 Britain’s Biggest
Mosque (R) (S). 4.45 House
Doctor (R) (S). 5.10 Wildlife
SOS (R) (S).
6.00 The Planet’s Funniest
Animals (S). 6.20 Totally
Bonkers Guinness World
Records (S). 6.45 Totally
Bonkers Guinness World
Records (S). 7.10 Who’s
Doing The Dishes? (S).
7.55 Emmerdale (S). 8.25
Coronation Street (S). 8.55
Coronation Street (S). 9.25
The Ellen DeGeneres Show
(S). 10.20 The Bachelorette
(S). 12.15 Emmerdale (S).
12.45 Coronation Street
(S). 1.15 Coronation
Street (S). 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (S). 2.35
The Jeremy Kyle Show
(S). 3.40 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (S). 4.50 The Jeremy
Kyle Show (S). 5.50 Take
Me Out (S).
7.00 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold
Comical clips
(S).
7.30 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold
(S).
8.00 Two And A Half
Men Charlie’s
daughter turns
up at Walden’s
beach house (S).
8.30 Superstore (S).
9.00 FILM: Crimson
Peak (Guillermo
del Toro 2015)
Gothic horror,
starring Mia
Wasikowska (S).
9.00 FILM: Knocked
Up (Judd
Apatow 2007)
Romantic
comedy,
starring Seth
Rogen (S).
11.00 The Mystery
Of Murder: A
Horizon Guide
An attempt to
understand why
people kill (S).
11.20 FILM: Stoker
(Chan-wook
Park 2013)
Thriller,
starring Mia
Wasikowska (S).
11.40 Family Guy
Peter and Lois
visit a psychic
(S).
12.00 Bombay Railway (S).
1.00 Top Of The Pops: 1983
(S). 1.30 Top Of The Pops:
1983 (S). 2.00 King Alfred
And The Anglo-Saxons (S).
3.00 The Story Of The Jews
(S). 4.00 Close
1.20 FILM: Excision
(Richard Bates 2012)
Comedy horror, starring
AnnaLynne McCord (S).
3.00 Close
12.10 Family Guy (S). 12.35
American Dad! (S). 1.05
American Dad! (S). 1.35
Celebrity Juice (S). 2.20
Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2
Nightscreen
NEWS
2-27
all the rage”. Among the experts
slowly reddening as they realise
they’ve been set up are Howard
Goodall answering questions about
The Beatles and the Sex Pistols, and
Robert Peston on Thatcherism, while
Cunk goes dressing up in the style of
Lucy Worsley – first in a Mary
Quant-style mini skirt and white
boots combo, and then as Thatcher.
FILM
CHOICE
LAURENCE PHELAN
===
Surviving The Island With
Bear Grylls
10pm, Channel 4
The presenter lands on the island for
the series debrief before they are
returned to their creature comforts.
Grylls’ most burning question is why
they chose to live apart, divided by
class, when clearly they would have
been stronger together.
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
29
FILM OF THE DAY
===
Knocked Up
The Fugitive
9pm, ITV2
(Judd Apatow, 2007)
A broke, bong-clutching and
overweight arrested adolescent
(Seth Rogen) and an upwardly mobile
television presenter (Katherine Heigl,
both left) have a one-night stand that
results in an unwanted pregnancy. It’s
hardly credible that this mismatched
couple would then try to make a go of
things, but it does allow for a bracing
comedy of contemporary manners.
For all that Heigl gets plenty of screen
time and funny lines, the predicament
is most definitely examined from
the man’s perspective. But the film is
really about the mismatch between
men and women’s expectations of
each other, and here it is both accurate
and perceptive.
9pm, ITV4
(Andrew Davis, 1993)
Harrison Ford plays a man accused of
murdering his wife, trying to stay one
step ahead of the marshal on his tail
(Tommy Lee Jones) while also proving
his innocence. A superior action
thriller, full of wit and suspense.
BBC iPlayer
Horribly compelling
dramatisation of the life and
crimes of Andrew Cunanan.
===
3%
Sunset Boulevard
Netflix
The dystopian Brazilian saga
set far in the future returns.
6pm, Sky Cinema Classics
(Billy Wilder, 1950)
A screenwriter (William Holden)
moves in with a highly strung, faded
silent film star (Gloria Swanson),
and gets to see past Hollywood’s
façade to all the broken dreams and
damaged lives. A noir masterpiece –
classy, savage and sad.
Radio
BBC Radio 1
6.00 Classic Coronation
Street (S). 6.25 Classic
Coronation Street (S).
6.55 Heartbeat (S). 8.00
The Royal (S). 9.00 Judge
Judy (S). 9.30 Judge Judy
(S). 9.55 Judge Judy (S).
10.25 Agatha Christie’s
Marple (S). 12.30 The Royal
(S). 1.35 Heartbeat (S).
2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (S). 3.15 Classic
Coronation Street (S). 3.45
On The Buses (S). 4.20 On
The Buses (S). 4.50 You’re
Only Young Twice (S). 5.25
George And Mildred (S).
5.55 Heartbeat (S).
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
6.00 Hollyoaks (S). 6.30
Hollyoaks (S). 7.00 Couples
Come Dine With Me (S).
8.00 How I Met Your
Mother (S). 8.30 How I
Met Your Mother (S). 9.00
New Girl (S). 9.30 New Girl
(S). 10.00 2 Broke Girls
(S). 11.00 Brooklyn NineNine (S). 11.30 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (S). 12.00 The
Goldbergs (S). 12.30 The
Goldbergs (S). 1.00 The Big
Bang Theory (S). 1.30 The
Big Bang Theory (S). 2.00
How I Met Your Mother
(S). 2.30 How I Met Your
Mother (S). 3.00 New Girl
(S). 3.30 New Girl (S). 4.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (S).
4.30 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(S). 5.00 The Goldbergs (S).
5.30 The Goldbergs (S).
8.55 Food Unwrapped (S).
9.30 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (S). 10.30 A
Place In The Sun: Winter
Sun (S). 11.35 Four In A
Bed (S). 12.05 Four In A
Bed (S). 12.35 Four In A
Bed (S). 1.05 Four In A Bed
(S). 1.40 Four In A Bed (S).
2.10 Come Dine With Me
(S). 2.40 Come Dine With
Me (S). 3.15 Come Dine
With Me (S). 3.50 Come
Dine With Me (S). 4.20
Come Dine With Me (S).
4.50 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (S). 5.55 Ugly
House To Lovely House
With George Clarke (S).
6.00 Animal 999 (R). 6.30
Animal 999 (R). 7.00
Meerkat Manor (R) (S). 7.30
Meerkat Manor (R) (S).
8.00 Monkey Life (R) (S).
8.30 Monkey Life (R) (S).
9.00 Motorway Patrol (R).
9.30 Motorway Patrol (R).
10.00 Road Wars (R). 11.00
Warehouse 13 (R) (S). 12.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (R) (S).
1.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S).
2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (R) (S).
3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (R)
(S). 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (R)
(S). 5.00 The Simpsons (R)
(S). 5.30 Futurama (R) (S).
6.00 The British (R) (S).
7.00 Storm City (R) (S).
8.00 Fish Town (R) (S).
9.00 The West Wing (R)
(S). 10.00 The West Wing
(R) (S). 11.00 House (R) (S).
12.00 House (R) (S). 1.00
Without A Trace (R) (S).
2.00 Blue Bloods (R) (S).
3.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
4.00 The West Wing (R) (S).
5.00 House (R) (S).
6.00 The Big Bang
Theory Sheldon
is forced to
work with
Kripke (S).
6.30 The Big Bang
Theory (S).
6.55 The Secret
Life Of The
Zoo Cameras
follow four
new fledgling
Humboldt
penguins (S).
6.00 Futurama
Bender
becomes a
wrestler (R) (S).
6.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.00 House A
performance
artist visits the
hospital (R) (S).
7.00 Murder, She
Wrote A
playwright’s
relative is
murdered (S).
7.00 Hollyoaks
Alfie makes a
life changing
decision (S).
7.30 Extreme Cake
Makers (S).
7.55 Grand Designs
A couple
who built a
contemporary
home near
Peterborough
(S).
7.00 The Simpsons
(R).
7.30 The Simpsons
Grampa gives
each member of
the family $50
(R).
7.00 CSI: Crime
Scene
Investigation
A volunteer
disappears
during a magic
act (R) (S).
8.00 Midsomer
Murders
A famous
illusionist’s
show takes a
tragic turn (S).
8.00 The Big
Bang Theory
Amy hosts a
Christmas Eve
dinner (S).
8.30 The Big Bang
Theory (S).
8.00 The Flash Barry
joins forces
with Citizen
Cold.
8.00 Blue Bloods
Jamie shoots an
armed man in a
tourist spot (R)
(S).
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast
Show With Nick Grimshaw
10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00
Greg James 5.45 Newsbeat
6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th With Charlie
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1am Annie Nightingale 3.00
Movies That Made Me: Jennifer
Lawrence And Samuel L
Jackson 4.00 Radio 1’s Early
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Roberts
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6am Dotty 10.00 Ace 12.45pm
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9.02 The 8th With Charlie Sloth
11.00 Jamz Supernova 1am
Annie Nightingale Presents
3.00 1Xtra Playlists 4.00 Jamz
Supernova
9.00 Gotham Bruce
tries to discover
the meaning
behind his knife
(S).
9.00 My Floating
Home A duo
who plan on
turning a
rusting 90ft
cargo hull into a
home (S).
9.00 The Blacklist
Red and the
gang track down
one of the Nash
syndicate’s
biggest
suppliers.
9.00 FILM: Paterno
(Barry
Levinson 2018)
Biographical
drama, starring
Al Pacino.
10.00Scott & Bailey
The body count
rises (S).
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Missouri enlists
the help of
Dean and Jody
to protect her
granddaughter
(S).
10.00Million Pound
Movers The
high-end
removals
industry in the
UK (S).
10.00The Late Late
Show With
James Corden:
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Week Highlights
of the talk show.
10.55 The Circus:
Inside The
Wildest
Political Show
On Earth
11.00 Scott & Bailey
The detective
duo investigate
the death of
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In A&E The
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was stabbed at
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North East A
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11.30 Westworld
Sci-fi drama,
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(R).
12.05 The Street (S).
1.20 The Street (S). 2.20
ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30
Teleshopping
12.00 Celebrity First Dates
(S). 1.00 Tattoo Fixers
(S). 2.05 Gotham (S). 2.55
Supernatural (S). 3.40 How
I Met Your Mother (S). 4.05
2 Broke Girls (S). 4.25 The
Goldbergs (S). 4.50 Couples
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Does Countdown (S).
1.10 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (S). 2.10
My Floating Home (S). 3.15
8 Out Of 10 Cats Uncut (S).
3.55 Close
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Kemp: Extreme World (R)
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12.40 West:Word (R). 1.10
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3.30 Happyish (R). 4.05 The
West Wing (R) (S). 5.00 The
West Wing (R) (S).
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6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken
Bruce 12noon Jeremy Vine
2.00 Steve Wright In The
Afternoon 5.00 Simon Mayo
7.00 Jamie Cullum 8.00 Jo
Whiley 10.00 Le Maire 10.30
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2.00 Radio 2’s Folk Playlist 3.00
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Workout 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
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6.30am Breakfast. 9.00
Essential Classics. 12noon
Composer Of The Week:
Copland. 1.00 News 1.02 Radio
3 Lunchtime Concert. 2.00
Afternoon Concert. 4.30 BBC
Young Musician 2018. 5.00 In
Tune. 7.00 In Tune Mixtape.
7.30 Radio 3 In Concert. 10.00
Free Thinking. 10.45 The Essay:
My Life In Music. Composer
Kerry Andrew reflects on her
musical kinship with her new
boyfriend. 11.00 Late Junction.
12.30am Through The Night.
A Late Night BBC Prom from
2015 featuring arias from
Handel’s operas and oratorios.
BBC Radio 4
6am Today 9.00 The Life
Scientific 9.30 One To One
9.45 Book Of The Week: The
Life And Rhymes Of Benjamin
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O’Clock News 6.30 Thanks A
Lot, Milton Jones! New series.
The return of the comedy. 7.00
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the rescue. 7.15 Front Row. Arts
programme. 7.45 Love Henry
James: The Wings Of The Dove.
Dramatised by Linda Marshall
ON DEMAND
The Assassination of
Gianni Versace
Fatberg Autopsy
All4
Scientists put a five-ton
“fatberg” liberated from a
sewer on to the autopsy table.
Griffiths. 8.00 The Invisible
Man Of Britain’s Far Right 8.40
In Touch. News for people who
are blind or partially sighted.
9.00 All In The Mind. The limits
and potential of the human
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With marine biologist Callum
Roberts. 10.00 The World
Tonight. With Ritula Shah.
10.45 Book At Bedtime:
The Valley At The Centre
Of The World. By Malachy
Tallack. 11.00 Richard Marsh:
Cardboard Heart. Will is asked
to be best man at a wedding.
Last in the series. 11.30
Today In Parliament. Political
round-up. 12mdn’t News And
Weather 12.30 Book Of The
Week: The Life And Rhymes
Of Benjamin Zephaniah 12.48
Shipping Forecast 1.00 As BBC
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By 8.30 The Men From The
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And The King Of Diamonds
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Steps 4.00 It’s Not What You
Know 4.30 The Wordsmiths
At Gorsemere 5.00 Stockport,
So Good They Named It Once
Pick
ofthe
day
Le Maire
10pm, BBC Radio 2
Chickens co-writer
Jonny Sweet
(above) penned
this sitcom pilot,
starring Rosie
Cavaliero and Tim
Key as an English
couple in a French
village, whose
idyllic life is about
to be shattered.
5.30 Love In Recovery 6.00
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6.30 The Palace Of Laughter
7.00 As Time Goes By 7.30
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The Trials Of Marshall Hall
8.30 Chopsticks At Dawn 9.00
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And The King Of Diamonds
10.00 Comedy Club: Love
In Recovery 10.30 Comedy
Club: Tom Wrigglesworth’s
Hang-Ups 11.00 Comedy
Club: ElvenQuest 11.30
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Sweeney Mix 12mdn’t The
Man Who Was Thursday
12.30 The Palace Of Laughter
1.00 John Mortimer Presents
The Trials Of Marshall Hall
1.30 Chopsticks At Dawn
2.00 The Secret History 2.15
Shakespeare’s Restless World
2.30 The Enchanted April 2.45
Sissinghurst: An Unfinished
History 3.00 The Thirty Nine
Steps 4.00 It’s Not What You
Know 4.30 The Wordsmiths At
Gorsemere 5.00 Stockport, So
Good They Named It Once 5.30
Love In Recovery
BBC 5 Live
6am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00
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Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5
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Money
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7am Nemone 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1pm Mark Radcliffe
And Stuart Maconie 4.00
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Music Recommends With
Tom Ravenscroft 1.00 From
Mento To Lovers Rock 2.00
Classic Scottish Albums 2.30 6
Music Live Hour 3.30 6 Music’s
Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
6am More Music Breakfast
9.00 John Suchet 1pm Nicholas
Owen 5.00 Classic FM Drive
7.00 Smooth Classics At Seven
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Catherine Bott pays tribute to
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Classics 1am Sam Pittis
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6am Christian O’Connell’s
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Dave Berry 7.00 Danielle Perry
10.00 Pete Donaldson 1am
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TalkSPORT
6am The Alan Brazil Sports
Breakfast With Ray Parlour
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And Bob Mills 1pm Hawksbee
And Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham And Darren Gough
7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1am Extra Time With Adam
Catterall
A
Nature
Flowers: friend or foe?
Vital ingredients for
medicines can come from
normally deadly plants
Page 32
Arts
Dr Foster’s creator
Mike Bartlett on his new
drama, picking apart
modern journalism
Page 36
‘What’s up,
Chapo?!’
iming his handgun
into the darkness, Andrew Hogan was worried. For nearly two
years the US agent
had been leading the operation to
capture the world’s most wanted
fugitive – Joaquin Guzman, the
drugs baron known the world over
as “El Chapo”. Now it looked like
Hogan and his team might finally
get their man, but Guzman was
the master of last-minute escapes.
The Mexican billionaire bandit –
accused of torturing and murdering countless enemies, and being
responsible for half of all the narcotics smuggled into the US – was
infamous for his Sinaloa cartel’s
tunnels, dug either to transport drugs under the border
into America or to evade capture. His nickname is Spanish
for Shorty, and Chapo’s 5ft 6in
stature came in handy when
slipping underground.
Guzman had done just that
to get away from Hogan and his
team only days earlier, scarpering down a hole that led to
a sewer. Instead of coming
away from that raid with
his target in handcuffs, all
Hogan left with was Chapo’s
black baseball cap.
It was now 5:30 on the
morning of 22 February 2014.
Wearing that same black cap as a
trophy, as well as camouflage gear
and a ski mask, Hogan – an agent
with the US Drug Enforcement
Administration – had arrived
outside the Miramar hotel
in the Pacific coastal resort
of Mazatlan together with a
squad of elite Mexican marines, led there by mobile
phone surveillance.
“As soon as we pinged the
phone and had it at Miramar, we were essentially
100 per cent certain that
he was there,” Hogan
tells i, recalling the pre-
Former DEA agent Andrew Hogan
tells RobHastings how he captured
the world’s biggest drugs baron,
El Chapo
dawn operation. “I was concerned
about our perimeter, about him
escaping again. He was in that
particular hotel for a reason – he
could have had a tunnel or an escape route.
“The marines flooded the hotel
while I was standing outside, looking up at the windows, waiting to
see the lights come on. It felt like
an eternity had gone by, and I said:
“If he’s escaping, he’s doing it right
now, at this very moment.” I was
going to run around the block to
make sure we were covered, when
I heard the excited radio chatter
that said they’ve got the target,
they need a vehicle down underneath in the parking garage.
“I drove down there. It was
dark but I could see a shirtless
man; they were just standing up, and I got out of my
vehicle and ran right
up to him and jumped
into his face and said:
‘What’s up, Chapo?’!”
Since revealing his
identity to tell the inside account of the mission in his new book,
Hunting El Chapo, Hogan
has told this story a few
times, but he still smiles
at that frat boy-ish victory
phrase. It seems hard to imagine him saying it now. With
chiselled features and the cool
demeanour of an action hero
ready to spring into attack or
defence mode at any moment,
the 37-year-old is dressed in
a smart blazer for our interview
over tea in a London hotel.
But Hogan says he is not embarrassed by his celebration of
completing a potentially deadly
operation (Guzman had an AK-47
assault rifle next to his bed that
night when he was awoken by the
marines, which he didn’t fire).
“That was essentially the buildup of my entire career,” he says. “I
hadn’t thought about what I was
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
31
From far left, the
tunnel El Chapo used
to escape from the
Altiplano penitentiary
in Mexico; Hogan
boarding a DEA jet
carrying $1.2m in cash
inside FedEx boxes;
with 2,513 kilograms
of cocaine seized in
Guayaquil, Ecuador;
Hogan with El Chapo in
custody; a newspaper
showing a picture of El
Chapo, right, shaking
hands with Sean Penn
AFP/GETTY
going to say to him, I didn’t even
know I was going to come face to
face with him. That’s just the first
thing that came out, I really don’t
know why.”
Hogan had been working “relentlessly” to catch Chapo since
2009, at one point even going
undercover with his partner to
deliver $1.2m to Guzman’s men
via a private jet. Despite insisting he never became “infatuated”
or “emotionally attached” to his
target, the way he sums up Chapo
underlines a personal obsession in
his hunt.
“He was the criminal that no
prison could hold. He had evaded
capture for over a decade, evading Mexican and US law enforcement, always escaping out the
back door, getting advance notice
of every operation, every raid
against him. He climbed to this
kind of legendary figure, almost
mythical figure, where people sing
songs about him, and people think
he’s untouchable.”
RISKY BUSINESS
Guzman is due to go on trial in
September. A 90-page memo filed
to the courts last month outlines
some of the evidence against him
– including claims that he used sicarios, or hit men, to kidnap competitors to be interrogated “bound
and helpless” by Chapo himself.
According to CNN, the document details one case involving
two suspected gangsters from the
Zetas cartel. “After having lunch,
the defendant interrogated them,
had them beaten and then shot
them both in the head with a long
gun,” it alleges. “In at least one instance, the defendant himself shot
the rivals at point-blank range.”
Chasing Guzman was as dangerous as it gets, and not just because of the warring gangs. Hogan
describes in his book how, not long
into his posting in Mexico City, two
CIA agents had their armoured
30-SECOND
BRIEFING
JOAQUÍN GUZMAN
Joaquin Guzman
was named Public
Enemy Number One
by the Chicago Crime
Commission in 2013, the
first outlaw to be given
that title since Al Capone.
The drugs kingpin has
hired a legendary lawyer
for his trial in September:
Jeffrey Lichtman,
famous for his successful
defence of the mafia boss
John Gotti Jr through
four trials in five years.
US prosecutors claim
‘El Chapo’ has $14bn
assets which they intend
to seize.
diplomatic car sprayed with more
than 100 machine gun bullets – by
corrupt police.
Hogan and his family could become targets. He admits he had
to discuss the situation “many
times” with his wife, as she had
to care for their young sons while
he was out chasing merciless
gangsters, but he says: “She was
a rock. She was standing next to
me, making those uncomfortable
life-changing decisions, every step
of the way.”
Hogan writes how she too had
to learn how to assess risks: “Look
everyone on the sidewalk in the
eyes quickly to judge them, and
decide: threat or not?”
As for his most fearful experience, the former agent says:
“Probably the scariest was being
in Culiacan, in Chapo’s stronghold,
without a gun – stuck in the middle of the lion’s den, not knowing
what’s around every corner, and
knowing that we could be in a gunfight around every corner. It was
all about survival.”
Revealing his identity is risky
even now. But Hogan – who will
only say of his life now that he lives
in the American Midwest, working as a private security consultant – is proud to finally be telling
his story.
“I’d always been in the shadows
and really downplayed the story
when people asked me about it. It
was time to step up and be proud.”
He says he has no regrets, but
admits the hunt changed his life
forever. “It’s hard for me to get
excited about things any more,
after accomplishing something
like that.”
Hogan is now in negotiations for
his book to be made into a film by
Sony Pictures, though he struggles to watch dramas about the
war on drugs – he only managed to
sit through two episodes of Narcos.
While he awaits trial, Chapo is
being held in a maximum security
unit at New York’s Metropolitan
Correctional Centre, a prison in
downtown Manhattan known as
“Little Gitmo”. The US authorities are taking no risks after his
incredible escape from Altiplano
Federal Penitentiary in Mexico in
July 2015.
Hogan, who had retired from
the DEA after his successful mission, remembers hearing the
news. “I was in Europe at the time,
heading to an airport in the back
of a taxicab when my wife texted
me and said C had escaped, he
was out. ‘C’ was our codename for
him. My initial reaction was: ‘Let’s
mount back-up, bring the band
back together and go get him.’ But
we obviously couldn’t do that, we’d
moved on.”
“It felt almost like the world was
conspiring against me,” he adds,
saying he wasn’t surprised by the
news because of the level of corruption in Mexico.
Guzman added to his notoriety
by inviting the Mexican TV star
Kate del Castillo to his lair while
still on the run – and granting a
controversial interview to the
Hollywood actor Sean Penn. The
article was published in Rolling
Stone magazine three months
later, the day after el Chapo
was recaptured.
He was the criminal
no prison could hold.
He had evaded capture
for over a decade
Asked if he saw Penn’s actions
as a betrayal, Hogan shakes his
head, but says the actors placed
themselves in mortal danger.
“They should have known that
they were going to be under surveillance, they’re lucky that they
[the authorities] didn’t launch
an operation while they were
there because they very well
could have.”
THE VIOLENCE GOES ON
Even without Guzman on the
streets, Mexico remains a battleground. Around 200,000 people in
the country have died as a result of
drugs-related violence in the past
decade, including 29,168 last year
alone – the worst on record. In
Cancun, a popular tourist destination, 14 people were murdered in
the space of 36 hours last month.
Mexico is holding elections for
its president and other positions
on 1 July, but a Reuters investigation last month found that at least
82 politicians and candidates
have been killed since campaigning began in September last year.
The presidential front-runner,
Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador,
a left-wing populist, has proposed
an amnesty for people in the drugs
business, saying: “You can’t confront violence with violence. You
can’t put out fire with fire.”
Nevertheless, Hogan maintains
that capturing Guzman did help
– and says the “war on drugs”
must continue.
“The argument is: OK, you take
out Chapo and even his cartel, but
then a new one moves in. Well, of
course a new one moves in every
time, but you have to apply the
same pressure and strategy and
resources to become successful in
targeting other cartels.
“Look at Medellin in Colombia,
for example. Under the reign of
Pablo Escobar in the 1990s, could
you walk into Medellin on vacation? No. Can you now? Absolutely. Colombia has become a tourist
destination. Why is that? Because
the Colombian government has
embraced the co-operation of the
US and built up its drug enforcement programme, where they
have successes day in and day out,
and they have improved the quality of life for their citizens. I think
the same thing can be applied
to Mexico.”
He adds: “You’re never going
to stop the flow of drugs, just like
you’re never going to stop the
murders and the killings in the
world – there will always be criminals, there will always be those in
pursuit of criminals, but nobody’s
immune to justice; their day will
always come.”
‘Hunting El Chapo’
by Andrew Hogan
and Douglas
Century (£14.99,
HarperCollins) is
out now
On Saturday, in your
Sydney city guide
Where to stay, what
to do and where to go
Plus
l Weekend TV
l Going out
l Films
l Books
l Comment
32
Nature
I
Secrets of nature
n the battle between plants
and the organisms that want
to eat them, plants have one
obvious vulnerability: they
can’t run away. Instead they
have evolved chemical defences.
Just as plants vary in their
growth form from tiny herbs to
giant trees, as well as in other
characteristics such as flower
colour and leaf shape, there is also
great variation in the defensive
compounds and the effects that
they cause. They can taste bad,
irritate, cause pain or a range of
other symptoms up to and including death, and they do this via an
array of different mechanisms
and targets within the body.
Our ancestors learnt which
plants and plant parts they could
eat without harmful effects, and
which they should avoid. But
they also found that the effects
of smaller amounts of some poisonous plants could be used as
medicines to treat the symptoms
of diseases or even to cure them.
The traditional systems of medicine that developed over time
therefore included some pretty
toxic plants. Their more serious
effects were avoided by specific
methods of preparation and administration, and control of the
amount taken.
The majority of people in the
COLCHICINE
Used for: stopping cell division
The fortunes of autumn crocus
as a treatment for gout have
varied over time. For a period
it was considered heretical, but
its use rallied in the early 19th
century, when colchicine was a
key ingredient of the medicine
known as l’eau médicinale
d’Husson, patronised by King
Digitalis has been
used to treat heart
conditions since the
18th century
world still rely on traditional herbal medicine for their health needs.
From a pharmacological point of
view, however, herbal medicines
are problematic.
The amount of an active substance in a plant can vary depending on growing conditions, plant
part and time of year, making it
difficult to dispense effective, yet
safe, doses repeatedly from different batches of herbal material.
This is particularly important
for substances in which there is a
narrow therapeutic window – in
other words, a fine line between
a safe and therapeutic dose and
a harmful and poisonous amount.
An example is the cardiac glycosides in foxgloves, or Digitalis
spp. Digitalis has been used to
treat various heart conditions
since at least the 18th century, and
still forms the basis of a group of
cardiac medicines today. Yet it is
a poison when taken incorrectly.
Western medicine has largely
rejected the use of whole herbs
or crude extractions in favour
of single compounds for which
it is easier to control the amount
prescribed.
The active substances from
plants have also been modified in
many instances with the intention
of improving their effectiveness
and reducing their toxicity.
Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid,
which is one of the most widely
used pharmaceutical drugs, is
gentler on the stomach than the
naturally occurring salicylates,
including salicin in willow from
which it is derived.
While the development of aspirin was intentional, serendipity
has played a part in the discovery
Killers that
can cure
For centuries humans have harvested some
of nature’s most poisonous plants for their
extraordinary healing powers. By
ElizabethDaunceyandSonnyLarsson
of other drugs such as warfarin, the blood-thinning medicine
originally derived from sweet clover, which was initially used as a
rat poison.
Some substances that play a
major role as modern drugs are
still directly derived from plants.
Colchicine, a treatment for gout,
was initially isolated from autumn
crocus and is now largely obtained
from the glory lily, in which it is
found in higher concentrations.
The defensive compounds in
plants have historically proved to
be useful in our fight against insects that feed on blood or attack
crops and possessions.
Extracts or dried leaves of the
neem tree have traditional uses
in soap and shampoo for lice, and
also as a pest control for clothes
and stored food, and we are once
more turning to it and other
botanical insecticides in a bid
to reduce reliance on synthetic
compounds.
The story of nicotine from tobacco shows that, as with chemical insecticides, the use of more
“natural” alternatives can itself
have unintended consequences.
So next time you are out in your
garden, a park or the countryside,
think about the battle for survival
that is going on all around you.
Elizabeth Dauncey
and Sonny Larsson
are the authors of
‘Plants That Kill:
A Natural History
of the World’s
Most Poisonous
Plants’ (£25, Kew
Publishing)
NEWS
2-27
George IV when he was Prince
Regent and suffered from gout.
Colchicine remained the first
line of treatment for gout until the
1960s and 1970s. It is also highly
toxic, with the potential to produce
the same effects as arsenic.
These days it has largely been
replaced by the development
of safer drugs that either
prevent gout developing or
treat the inflammation caused
by the condition. However, it
is still used today for the rare
inherited disorder familial
Mediterranean fever, in which the
sufferer experiences repeated
bouts of inflammation in the chest
and abdomen.
COUMARINS
Used for: thinning the blood
When North American farmers
introduced sweet clover species
from Europe in the early 20th
century as cattle feed, they did not
realise that they were also
importing a potential
source of poisoning.
Cases of a
previously unseen
haemorrhagic
disease were
soon occurring
in livestock,
with devastating
effects, ruining
the livelihoods of
many farmers.
The source was
eventually traced to the
sweet clover. When fresh, the
plant appeared to be harmless. The
problem arose when sweet clover
was fed to cattle in the form of
hay or silage, which when spoiled
due to mould caused spontaneous
and uncontrollable bleeding.
It took many years and several
important chance encounters for
the active compound in spoiled
sweet clover to be identified as the
toxin dicoumarol, which had been
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
converted from coumarin in the
plants during the spoiling process.
During the peak of research
into these plants, hundreds of
modified forms of coumarin had
been synthesised and these were
studied for their effectiveness as
rat poisons.
The most potent compound was
patented in 1948 under the name
of warfarin, and initially marketed
and used as a rat poison, the belief
being that it was too poisonous to
be used in humans.
The unsuccessful attempted
suicide of a naval recruit
by ingesting a large
quantity of warfarin,
and his subsequent
full recovery,
however, changed
the minds of
clinicians.
Warfarin
was found to
be an effective
anticoagulant and
when President
Dwight Eisenhower
suffered a heart attack in
1955 he was treated with the drug.
So the cow killer was replaced by
the rat poison, which soon became
the standard treatment for longterm thrombotic conditions.
NICOTINE AND THE
NEONICOTINOIDS
Used for: insecticides
Nicotine, which we all know as the
addictive compound in cigarettes,
has been used both as a pesticide
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
and as the model for a series
of synthetic insecticides called
neonicotinoids.
Due to their preferential
binding to receptors in the
nervous systems of insects
and not to those in mammals,
the neonicotinoids have been
considered to be safer options
than nicotine itself.
However, although they work
only against insects, they do not
discriminate between useful
species, such as honeybees, and
pests such as plant hoppers
or aphids. It is suspected that
neonicotinoids may contribute
to colony collapse disorder in
honeybees, and the EU is banning
their use in all open fields.
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NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
35
The10Best...
Lifestyle
Garden
benches
Are you sitting comfortably?
Richard Hood picks out
his top choices for those
outdoor gatherings
{1} CROCUS OBAN BENCH
Width 135cm x depth 54.4cm x
height 82.2cm
The carved, circular detailing on
the backrest lends a medieval
feel to this finely crafted piece of
garden furniture. This bench has
been pressure-treated and has a
PU waterproof coating. It is made
from sustainably sourced acacia.
The Oban range includes cushions,
chairs and tables.
£150, crocus.co.uk
{2} WINCHESTER DOUBLE OVAL
TWO-SEATER GARDEN BENCH
120cm x 62cm x 88cm
This classic seat has a modern
twist. A great choice for the
smaller garden. This one is made
from sustainably sourced teak.
£199, gardenbenches.com
{3} GARDEN TRADING
HAMPSTEAD BENCH
26cm x 71cm x 83cm
This Scandi-style bench has a
silvery bamboo body and black,
powdered steel frame. PE bamboo
is not fully weather-resistant so
keep it under wraps in winter.
£285, houseology.com
{4} IKEA APPLARO
TWO-SEAT OUTDOOR
160cm x 80cm x 73cm
This modern, low-slung bench
looks posh enough to keep
indoors, but the garden patio is
a preferred location. Made from
acacia, it is treated with a weatherresistant wood stain. You can
extend it with additional seats
and footstools.
£250, ikea.com
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{5} ALEXANDER ROSE PINE
FARMERS BENCH
180cm x 44cm x 45cm
A sturdy and weather-resistant
bench. It has been pre-treated, but
you can expect it to lighten with
age. Made of prime, responsibly
sourced Polish pine, it comes with
a three-year guarantee.
£149, gardensite.co.uk
{6} FOREST GARDEN
SLEEPER BENCH AND
REFECTORY TABLE SET
180cm x 76cm x 70cm
This eight-seater bench/table
combo is built from pressuretreated softwood sleepers and
is solid and sturdy. You can fit a
family of six around it. This set
comes with a 15-year guarantee.
£385, forestgarden.co.uk
{7} OFYR CORTEN STEEL WOOD
STORAGE BENCH
100cm x 45cm x 46.4cm
This minimalist bench doubles up
as a wood store for a barbecue. Its
frame from corten steel forms an
attractive rust-like coating when
exposed to the elements – the
wide seat platform is made from
rubber wood (an environmentally
friendly tropical hardwood).
£450, ofyr.co.uk
antique finish. Great value.
£120, greenfingers.com
{8} ELLISTER STAMFORD
CIRCULAR TREE SEAT
140cm x 92cm (inner diameter
56.5cm)
This weatherproof, tubular metal
bench seats up to five adults. The
inner pentagon offers up plenty of
trunk space, and the black tubular
steel has been treated with a green
{10} PEPE VILLA
TWO-SEATER SOFA
122cm x 45cm x 97cm
This bench has an adjustable rear
leg to flip this seat into an upright
position for dining. It is made of
treated Scandinavian redwood.
£325, pepegarden.co.uk
{9} BENTLEY GARDEN
WROUGHT IRON HEART BENCH
103cm x 54cm x 95cm
This neat two-seater looks elegant
– heart-shaped swirls adorn the
backrest, and the bench seat curves
slightly. Available in distressed
white or antique black.
£80, buydirect4u.co.uk
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Arts
F
If you’re
staying
in...
BOOKS
The Upstarts
BY BRAD STONE
The book
starts in early
2009. Brian
Chesky, Joe
Gebbia, Nathan
Blecharczyk,
Garrett Camp
and Travis
Kalanick all attend Barack
Obama’s inauguration.
The first three have just
started a room rental
business; the other two
have come up with an idea
for taxis. Now Airbnb and
Uber are worth $30bn and
$68bn, respectively.
DVD/BLU-RAY
Hostiles
CERTIFICATE 15, 134 MINS
Set during the
final years
of the war
between the
US army
and Native
Americans,
Hostiles is a
gritty Western starring
Christian Bale and
Rosamund Pike.
o r t h e l a s t ye a r,
Mike Bartlett has
been interviewing
journalists but now,
here we are in a café in
Dalston doing things
the normal way round, over a bowl
of Persian stew. The playwright
and screenwriter is following
his whipsmart examinations of
marriage (Doctor Foster) and the
monarchy (King Charles III) with
Press, a new six-part drama about
the media, which arrives on BBC1
later this year.
The series is set in two fictional
national newspapers – one a leftleaning broadsheet, the other
a right-ish tabloid – and follows
journalists as they cover the same
stories. The first episode is titled
“Death Knock” – the practice
of journalists contacting those
closest to someone who has died.
“What’s crucial is it’s not a
nostalgic look at journalism like
The Post. Or Ink, the brilliant play
[by James Graham]. It’s set now,
so it’s not all great. It hopefully
depicts journalists doing good and
bad things. But it’s all come from
research and a genuine desire to
explore what they do, why it is
important, how they do it and how
it affects them personally,” says
Bartlett. “It’s an exploration, not
an attack.”
For research, he spent time
at several newspapers. It wasn’t
always easy, he says, breezing into
The Sun as a “Guardian-reading
playwright, writing a show for the
BBC, glancing at the Page 3 girls
on the wall and asking, ‘What is
this?’ In that moment I knew what
the show was. It’s about people
who really care about the news but
from different angles and points of
view and for different reasons.”
Certainly, an exploration of
nuance in the news feels timely.
“There’s a feeling of constant
outrage but nothing changing.
If you’re constantly outraged,
you don’t have another DefCon
to go to. The BBC really needs to
sort out the gender pay parity,
but I still want the BBC to exist.
Journalism is in commercial and
existential crisis, but that doesn’t
mean it can’t come out the other
side being a brand new, brilliant
thing. Without it we’d be lost.”
The cast for Press includes Ben
Chaplin and Priyanga Burford
as the two editors, Charlotte
Riley as a deputy news editor,
Paapa Essiedu as a cub reporter
and David Suchet as the CEO.
Several journalists have noted
it is far more diverse than most
newsrooms, which, according to
2016 figures are 94 per cent white
and 55 per cent male. “That’s true
We need to
deconstruct
the idea of the
genius writer
Mike Bartlett talks to Alice Jones about reviving
his first play, his new BBC drama about the
media and what’s next for Doctor Foster
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
37
Last night’s
g
televis on
MICHAEL DAY
A look at the squalid
business of cocaine –
and a call to action
of journalism, it’s true of TV, it’s
true of theatre. Maybe [in Press]
we are a bit more diverse than the
real world but it’s really important.
I just write the characters I want
to see,” says Bartlett.
“It’s not just about having a
diverse cast, it’s about leads who
aren’t white. They do it much
better in America. I feel like
going forward, as a writer and
an executive producer, I’ve got to
insist on it.”
Bartlett,whohaswrittenaround
20 plays and five TV dramas in
the last 10 years, is increasingly
interested in the collaborative
writers’ room model. “You can
fill that room with a variety of
perspectives on the subject matter
– from all aspects, gender, race and
class. When you’re doing drama,
isn’t that exactly what you should
be doing?”
It is already common on
American dramas. “In the UK,
drama comes from a playwriting
tradition. But the danger of that
is the sense of the ‘genius author’,
one powerful voice that we laud
and praise. And I wonder if
that’s another thing we want to
start deconstructing while we’re
deconstructing lots of things.”
Fornow,Bartlett,37,isreturning
to his own playwriting tradition,
with the staging of the first play
he wrote, in 2005. Not Talking is
inspired by his grandfather, who
was a conscientious objector,
and the deaths at Deepcut army
barracks in the late Nineties.
It plays out as two overlapping
monologues, with two couples
telling their story – one coloured
by an affair, the other by a rape .
“A good play explores a
contradiction in oneself. I am
a pacifist and yet I totally get
why we need an army. Everyone
seems to have very strong, certain
opinions about everything at
the moment. I’m loving being a
playwright because I can explore
things I don’t know the answer to.”
Bartlett, who grew up in
Oxfordshire, the son of a
psychologist and a headmistress,
never wanted to be a writer. He
studied English and theatre at
Leeds, then applied for directing
jobs. “To get those jobs you have
to come in and be very articulate
about theatre and I was not. So
I was stuck at home, wanting
to be in theatre, didn’t know
anyone, and I thought, ‘I’ll
write a play.’”
He still feels most at home
in the theatre. “If TV went
horribly wrong, I’d shuffle off and
say: ‘I’m going to write a play,
please.’” He had a brush with
Hollywood when King Charles
‘Not Talking’ (left) and ‘King
Charles III’ (right); Suranne Jones
as Dr Foster (below); all by Mike
Bartlett (main) LIDIA CRISAFULLI
I like the idea
of trying to take
an audience
of 10 million
somewhere
challenging
III – his play about the death of
the Queen and the succession –
transferred from the Almeida to
the West End and Broadway and
Harvey Weinstein called him in for
a meeting. “He was just a horrific
man. We talked about Charles
– which he hadn’t read – and he
said, ‘We could get Pacino to play
Charles!’ Then someone brought
up the fact it was in verse and
he said, ‘Well, we won’t do that.’
I thought; this is a world I never
want to be part of. I’d rather go and
be a teacher than be part of that.”
With Press now in the edit, does
Bartlett find his thoughts turning
to a third series of Doctor Foster?
At the end of the second series,
warring couple Gemma and
Simon found themselves thrown
together once more, as their son
Tom goes missing. “Yeah, a bit.
Tom has disappeared so there’s
clearly scope for moving on.”
Bartlett refers to series one and
two of the drama as “two novels”
with distinct plots and purposes.
“I think if there’s a third version
of it, it would have to be a thing
in itself. And I don’t really know
what that is yet. After series one,
everyone said, ‘Why are they
bringing it back? They’re milking
it.’ So we’re not going to do it
unless it’s absolutely right.”
Was he surprised by the
strength of reaction to series
two? “I knew when it came back
it couldn’t just be five of the same,
it had to be something different.
I also like the idea of – let’s try
and take that audience of 10
million people somewhere more
challenging. Otherwise why am I
doing this? Some people liked it,
some people hated it. As long as
the ratings held steady, whatever
they thought of it, they were
still watching.”
He is now writing his first
Christmas play for the Old Fire
Station in Oxford, an arts
centre that shares its building
with the homeless charity
Crisis. “What appeals
creatively is asking, is there
another audience I can
find, a different place, a
different theatre? We’ve
got amazing writers at the
moment, but I’m thinking,
what next?”
‘Not Talking’, Arcola Theatre,
London, to 2 June (020 7503
1646); ‘Press’ will screen on
BBC1 later this year
» Britain’s Cocaine Epidemic Channel 5, 10pm
» Art on the BBC: The Genius of Leonardo da Vinci BBC4, 9pm
C
hannel 5 has done the
legwork for its threeparter Britain’s Cocaine
Epidemic. It hit the streets
to interview the recreational users,
addicts, middle-class dabblers,
pushers and wholesalers who
conspire to make this squalid
multibillion-pound business. Many
of us were probably already aware
how ubiquitous cocaine is. Some
viewers, though, might have been
surprised at the variety of users.
We heard of, or saw, middle-class
professionals, students, police
officers, social workers, nurses and
ageing swingers all snorting away.
The latter group was represented
by Tommy Mac, a 1970s discodancing champion, who was out on
the town for his 62nd birthday.
Intoxicated and tedious, Tommy
grabbed the club’s mic to boast
he’d been “in the bog all night
DOING COCAINE!” Still, he and
his florid friends were always
searching for the next line or a
new dealer. By the look of them,
they should have been asking for a
defibrillator or the mobile number
of a cardiologist.
The documentary’s most salient
comment came from a low-level
street dealer, who’d just bagged
£1,000 on an ordinary Friday night.
“It’s easy money... the customers
keep coming so I don’t see why I
should stop doing it.” Indeed.
Perhaps he should have thanked
the legislation that makes him rich
at our expense. Surely it’s time to
Itt’ss easy money...
the customers keep
coming so I don’t
see why I should
stop doing it
regulate it. Tax it. Discourage it.
Like cigarettes, in other words.
For those who have been living
on Mars, the criminalisation
of drugs has been the most
disastrous penal legislation in
history. Prohibition in the US was
the out-of-town tryout. Having
witnessed this abject failure,
the rest of the world perversely
created a global black market
in every other drug you’d care
to name.
“I sometimes think of the
problems and violence that have
gone into this,” said one cokesnorting student, before his
dopamine receptors beckoned
and he turned his attentions to a
new stash. If you’re aghast at the
In the front line: a scene from
‘Britain’s Cocaine Epidemic’
gang-related knife crime prompted
here by the drugs trade, spare a
thought for the shattered societies
of Mexico and Colombia.
This was not so much an exposé
as a call for action – action that
will never happen while our
policymakers are at the mercy of
five-year election cycles.
There’s been so much written
and broadcast about Leonardo da
Vinci that by now everyone’s an
expert. So what was the point of
BBC4’s Art on the BBC: The Genius
of Leonardo da Vinci?
According to our guide, the
Oxford University art historian
Janina Ramirez, the documentary
was to show us how television has
shaped our understanding of his
art. So, it was a programme about
the programmes about Leonardo?
That sounds a bit self-indulgent.
What we got, though, was
another run-through of the
triumphs of the great man’s
career with some nice clips from
the archive. Kenneth Clark in
Civilisation set the (repetitive)
tone, hailing “the most relentlessly
curious man in history”.
The late, great Australian art
critic Robert Hughes reminded us
how meta it has all become. The
Mona Lisa, he noted, passed the
final test of celebrity: “It is famous
for being famous.”
Another pundit wondered if the
colossal $450m (£327m) price tag
on Salvator Mundi relied more on
its status as a confirmed work of da
Vinci than artistic merit.
It all raised the crucial question:
does all the coverage (and the
programmes about programmes
about Leonardo), come at the
expense of other Renaissance
geniuses such as Masaccio or
Donatello, whose work was at least
as revolutionary?
Twitter: @theipaper
38
Michael Marquez in
Phoenix Dance Theatre’s
‘Windrush: Movement of
the People’
Arts
BRIAN SLATER
Arts
reviews
DANCE
Windrush: Movement of the People
PEACOCK THEATRE, LONDON
HHHHH
Created to mark an anniversary,
Phoenix Dance Theatre’s work has
become painfully topical.
In Sharon Watson’s dance, the
first generation of Caribbean
immigrants step out on to the
docks, coats huddled around them
against the cold of their often
ungrateful new home. Phoenix’s
fine dancers make you feel the chill
wind, and their courage in facing it.
Seventy years after the arrival
of SS Empire Windrush, and in the
middle of a new political scandal,
Watson’s work is both timely and
heartfelt. It starts in the Caribbean,
with dances of excitement and
hope under Luke Haywood’s
warm lighting, with bright period
costumes by Eleanor Bull.
This is the first narrative
work by Watson, the company’s
artistic director and herself a
descendant of the Windrush
generation. She shows a real
gift for confrontations between
characters. In one icy scene,
women in white masks bring
out laundry, letters on garments
starting to spell out racist slogans.
The whole theatre goes still when
the first letter is “N”, the start of
“No dogs, no blacks, no Irish”.
Then Aaron Chaplin’s
immigrant starts to dance with
Sandrine Monin’s masked white
woman. They peel off clothes
before the mask comes off, in
a duet full of connection and
mutual vulnerability. Vanessa
Vince-Pang and Prentice Whitlow
are gorgeous in the second duet,
a couple separated by the long
journey, then reunited in their
new country.
Watson sometimes falls into
vaguer illustration. Though the
opening scene is full of swivelling
hips and deep, juicy pliés, it
doesn’t do enough to establish
individual characters. There’s
a roar of recognition from the
audience at some of the party
scenes, but the finale – combining
church worship and celebration –
lacks punch. Windrush is uneven,
but at its best it has both lucid
anger and tender warmth.
It’s performed with two shorter
works, both crisply danced. Calyx,
by company dancer Sandrine
Monin, shows four dancers
emerging from boxes. They
undulate around each other, limbs
winding like the tendril patterns
on Emma James’ costume design.
With its 1940s frocks,
Christopher Bruce’s Shadows
evokes another movement of
people, preparing to leave an
oppressive homeland.
Touring until 16 November
(phoenixdancetheatre.co.uk)
ZOE ANDERSON
THE INDEPENDENT
VISUAL ARTS
Victorian Giants: the Birth
of Art Photography
NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY,
LONDON WC2
The first exhibition to examine
the relationship between four
groundbreaking Victorian artists
– Julia Margaret Cameron (181579), Lewis Carroll (1832-98), Lady
Clementina Hawarden (1822-65)
and Oscar Rejlander (1813-75) –
with material featuring sitters
such as Charles Darwin, Alice
Liddell, Dante Gabriel Rossetti,
George Frederic Watts, Ellen
Terry and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.
(020 7306 0055) to 20 May
FILM
Avengers: Infinity War
12A, JOE RUSSO AND
ANTHONY RUSSO, 149 MINS
The Russo brothers’ latest Marvel
Studios extravaganza is packed
with so much star power that
you think it will implode, but it
doesn’t. It’s a wildly ambitious
and entertaining ride in which
good old-fashioned teamwork just
about carries the day, even if the
odds are (as Doctor Strange tells
us) more than 14 million to one
against. Nationwide release
Beast
15, MICHAEL PEARCE, 104 MINS
Jessie Buckley gives a sly,
sympathetic and sometimes
creepy performance as the
troubled heroine in the writerdirector’s impressive debut
feature, set against the backdrop
of the search for a serial killer
on the Channel island of Jersey.
Beast is a very arresting debut
with a primal intensity about it
that atones for the occasional
clumsiness and contrivances in
the plotting. Limited release
POP
THEATRE
Funny Cow
Isaac Gracie
Strictly
Ballroom
15, ADRIAN SHERGOLD, 103 MINS
HACKNEY EMPIRE, LONDON
HHHHH
Isaac Gracie’s claims of nerves
would have rung a lot truer if
he wasn’t dressed in a mostly
unbuttoned tropical shirt, red
flares and stack heels. Here was a
man who intended to be looked at.
The 23-year-old from Ealing
must be getting used to it. His
song “Last Words” was a crackly,
ancient-sounding acoustic ballad
when he first put it online almost
three years ago. Now it has a
lustrous string section and is one
of Radio 1’s most played songs.
It hasn’t quite made a star of
him but more and more people are
noticing that this former choirboy
has a voice that goes all the way to
the rafters. He gained confidence
but he often struggled to peep
out from beneath his influences.
His rich vocals aped Jeff Buckley’s
emotional quiver, he covered Bob
Dylan’s “I Shall Be Released”, and
“Hollow Crown” recalled Leonard
Cohen’s stark poetry.
A couple of songs suggested
other directions for him, with
“Running On Empty” belatedly
allowing his trio to sound like
upbeat powerpop rockers.
DAVID SMYTH
EVENING STANDARD
Set in northern England in the
70s and 80s, Adrian Shergold’s
abrasive, tender and continually
surprising film tells the story of
“Funny Cow” (Maxine Peake),
now a successful comedian but
who started in the working men’s
clubs. In a bravura performance,
Peake plays her character as if
she is a cross between Marlene
Dietrich and Bernard Manning,
with a bit of Lenny Bruce thrown
in. Limited release
PICCADILLY THEATRE, LONDON
HHHHH
Baz Luhrmann has done the Baz
Luhrmann treatment on his own
material: that is, take a love story,
twist in mildly incongruous pop
songs, and shower it with sequins.
His 1992 film Strictly Ballroom
was hardly lacking in the latter
– but this stage version is even
more spangly.
The entire confection is as
garish as the bubblegum-hued
ostrich-trimmed ballgowns the
cast swirl about in. The world
of competitive “dance sport” is
rendered gleefully, grotesquely
ghastly. But if you get on board
with its outrageous camp and
gurning humour, the tale of a
maverick ballroom dancer and his
shy young Spanish rookie partner
is also loads of fun.
Will Young trots about in a
flared sequined jumpsuit singing
all the numbers as our MC.
While his role intentionally ups
the theatricality of the evening,
narratively it is hardly necessary.
Under Drew McOnie’s
direction, the first half is drumtight. And there’s some genuine
slow-burn chemistry between
Let the Sunshine In
15, CLAIRE DENIS, 95 MINS
Will Young sings all the numbers as the MC in Baz Luhrmann’s gleeful,
grotesque revival of ‘Strictly Ballroom’ JOHAN PERSSON
Zizzi Strallen’s dorky, adorable
Fran and Jonny Labey’s driven,
deadpan Scott.
The second half feels less
focused – largely due to some
lame attempts at political
resonance. And while most of the
eclectic song selections are cute
(you can guess which Bowie, Billy
Idol, and Whitney Houston tracks
with the word ‘dance’ in the title
are parped out by a scorching live
band), is there not an element
of bad taste in invoking “Get Up
Stand Up” and “Fight the Power”
in two white Australians’ struggle
against regulation ballroom
dancing moves? Still, it’s not a
show to take too seriously, and
there is much to enjoy, including
McOnie’s glorious choreography,
whether sending up cheesy
routines or firing up flamenco.
To 20 October (0844 871 7630)
HOLLY WILLIAMS
THE INDEPENDENT
Juliette Binoche stars as a Paris
artist with an extraordinarily
complicated love life in Claire
Denis’ comedy, apparently
inspired by Roland Barthes’
A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments.
Denis’ regular cinematographer,
Agnès Godard, keeps the camera
fixed throughout on Binoche, who
is such a compelling and mercurial
screen presence that she carries
the story. Limited release
TALKS & POETRY
Madeline Miller
VARIOUS VENUES
The author of the Orange Prize
for Fiction-winning The Song
of Achilles discusses her new
NEWS
2-27
Arts
agenda
THE CULTURAL HIGHLIGHTS
YOU HAVE TO SEE
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
Angel Olsen
COMEDY
UNION CHAPEL, LONDON N1
After the deep blues of Burn
Your Fire for No Witness, and
the exploratory pop smarts
of My Woman, the mercurial
singer-songwriter continues
on her wandering way. Here,
Angel Olsen follows the latter
album’s expansive tour with
an intimate solo shows.
(unionchapel.org.uk) tonight
WALES MILLENNIUM CENTRE, CARDIFF
Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s frank,
troubling show about a young
woman struggling to navigate life
in London makes the transition
back to the stage from the
small screen. Maddie Rice stars.
(029 2063 6464) to Sat
Kate Mosse
VARIOUS VENUES
The writer talks about her latest
novel, The Burning Chambers,
set in 16th-century Languedoc.
Linghams, Heswall (0151 342 7290)
tonight 7.30pm; Wynnstay Hotel,
Oswestry (01691 662244) Wed
7.30pm; French Protestant Church,
London W1 (020 7851 2400) Thur
6.30pm; Waterstones, Chichester
(01243 773030) Fri 6.30pm
Gary Younge
RON COOKE HUB, UNIVERSITY OF YORK
In his latest book, Another Day
in the Death of America, the
writer tells the stories of 10
youngsters who were killed in the
US by gunfire on one random,
unremarkable day, 23 November
2013. He talks about the book here.
(01904 620784) tonight 6.30pm
Robert Goddard
VARIOUS VENUES
ST PETER’S CHURCH, BROAD ST, ELY
“This is your time,” a voice says
at the start of the fifth album
from cult-ish alterna-rocker
Damon McMahon. Between
its psychedelic murk, warm
melodies, textured electronics and
glinting feelings, Freedom retools
McMahon’s ever-shifting remit for
wider access, all without a dash
of compromise. Headrow House,
Leeds (dice.fm) tonight; Omeara,
London SE1 (seetickets.com) Wed
The thriller writer discusses his
new novel, Panic Room. (01353
645005) tonight 7.30pm
Laura Bates
WATERSTONES, BRISTOL GALLERIES
The activist founder of the
Everyday Sexism Project
talks about Misogynation,
a new collection of essays.
(0117 925 2274) tonight 7pm
POP
Manic Street Preachers
VARIOUS VENUES
Trust the Manics to find the
sharp edges in nostalgia. Echoes
of their 90s anthemic peak
reverberate through Resistance Is
Futile, its big tunes and strapping
riffs weaponised with stalwart
reserves of introspective sting
and prickly intelligence. Venue
Cymru, Llandudno (gigsandtours.
com) tonight; First Direct Arena,
Leeds (gigsandtours.com) Wed;
SSE Arena Wembley, London HA9
(gigsandtours.com) Fri
First
Chance
Fleabag
Amen Dunes
novel, Circe, inspired by Homer’s
Odyssey. Waterstones, Deansgate,
Manchester (0161 837 3000)
tonight 6.30pm; Lecture Theatre
1, University of East Anglia,
Norwich (01603 508050) Wed 7pm;
Waterstones, Bristol Galleries (0117
925 2274) Thur 7pm
39
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
FILM
Tully
THEATRE
15, JASON REITMAN, 96 MINS
Legally Blonde
HIS MAJESTY’S THEATRE, ABERDEEN
Lucie Jones stars in Anthony
Williams’s brilliantly energetic
and witty production of the legal
musical, based on the 2001 film
and telling the story of how an
apparently air-headed California
valley blonde goes to Harvard
Law School and becomes a
seriously brilliant lawyer, without
ever giving up on her right to
wear pink at all times. (legally
blondethemusical.com) to Sat
CLASSICAL
Sonia Prina and
Vivica Genaux
Opening
this week
Frozen
Charlize Theron stars in this comedy
drama. Nationwide release
COMEDY
Machynlleth Comedy Festival
VARIOUS VENUES
Among the draws are Nish Kumar,
Sofie Hagen, Aisling Bea and Josie
Long. (machcomedyfest.co.uk) opens Fri
VISUAL ARTS
Corita Kent: Get with the Action
DITCHLING MUSEUM OF ART+CRAFT
Screenprinted banners and posters
by the Los Angeles nun-activist.
(01273 844744) opens Sat
WIGMORE HALL, LONDON W1
THEATRE ROYAL HAYMARKET,
LONDON SW1
TALKS & POETRY
Newcastle Poetry Festival
Two modern stars of Baroque
opera, the Italian contralto Sonia
Prina and the Alaskan mezzo
Vivica Genaux, revel in the vocal
rivalry between 18th-century
superstar castrati Farinelli and
Senesino via music by Handel
and such contemporaries as
Porpora, Bononcini and Hasse.
Lars Ulrik Mortensen directs
Concerto Copenhagen.
(020 7935 2141) tonight 7.30pm
Bryony Lavery’s award-winning
1998 play takes a close, insightful
look at the moral and emotional
consequences of one horrific case
of child abduction and murder.
In Jonathan Munby’s revival,
Suranne Jones stars as the mother
in what is effectively a threehander, concentrating on her,
the paedophile serial killer
and a criminal psychologist.
(020 7930 8800) to Sat
VARIOUS VENUES
If you only see
one thing today
Highlights include Shami Chakrabarti
and Emily Berry. (newcastlepoetry
festival.co.uk) opens Wed
DANCE
Hofesh Shechter Company
BRISTOL OLD VIC
Show revolves around anarchic
performers in a circus of comedy and
murder. (0117 987 7877) opens Fri
The Bathing Aid
that will change
your life, not
your bathroom!
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VISUAL ARTS
Langlands & Bell
IKON GALLERY, BIRMINGHAM
Ben Langlands and Nikki Bell mark the 40th anniversary of their artistic partnership with
a new series of relief sculptures, installations, digital animations and portraits exploring
the influence of the global Internet companies. The highlights are the precise, scaleddown versions of the headquarters of the major companies, including Google, Apple and
Facebook, all handmade from white card by the artists. (0121 248 0708) to 10 Jun
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Business
Business Editor Elizabeth Anderson
+4420 7361 5718
business@inews.co.uk
HOUSING
Last-time buyers ‘trapped
in homes too big for them’
By Laurie Havelock
Older property owners who have no
intention of moving will own £1trn of
the UK’s housing stock by the end of
this year, according to new research
which highlights how many homes
are held by “last-time buyers”.
A survey of homeowners carried
out by financial services group
Legal & General and economics
consultancy CEBR found that socalled last-time buyers – those
aged 55 or older who live in a house
too big for their needs – currently
own £938bn worth of UK property,
representing 3.1 million households.
According to Phil Bayliss, head of
“later living” at Legal & General, this
demographic is being underserved in
terms of new properties available to
older people, despite their potential
to “unlock” the wider UK housing
market. “If rightsizers were able to
move to a property more aligned to
their desired lifestyle and needs, vast
swathes of homes would be freed
up for growing families and secondsteppers,” he added.
The most recent housing market
data from Halifax suggests that
confidence in the UK housing market
has remained at an all-time low, with
only half of Britons anticipating a rise
in house prices.
Legal & General’s research also
found that 45 per cent of last-time
The proportion of lasttime buyers who say they
are unable to downsize to a more
suitable home has doubled, says
Legal & General, from 25 per cent
in 2015 to 49 per cent today.
buyers have lived in their home for at
least 30 years, while 29 per cent still
live in the first property they bought.
An Institute for Fiscal Studies
report from February found that
home ownership among 25- to
34-year-olds has fallen to just 27 per
cent in 2016 – down from 65 per cent
in the 1990s.
Mr Bayliss described much of the
property held by last-time buyers
as “under-occupied”. He added that
building more homes for over-55
buyers could help solve the UK’s
housing crisis.
He also cited health benefits
that are “proven to come with ageappropriate housing” that could ease
pressure on the NHS. Over-55s in
such accommodation saw a 50 per
cent reduction in visits to their GP.
The news comes alongside new
analysis by the BBC that finds that,
Confidence in the UK housing market
‘remains at an all-time low’ GETTY
on average, full-time workers will
spend every penny they earn until
the first week of May on rent alone.
A middle-income earner in England
would have to work for 86 days to
afford the rent on an average two-bed
home – five more days than in 2011.
Legal & General said last week
that it was launching an affordable
housing business with the aim of
providing 3,000 new homes a year
within four years.
ADVERTISING
WPP reports
4 per cent
decline in
revenues
By Ben Chapman
Quote of
the day
It will be British
shoppers that
suffer from rising
prices and that
may be fearing for
their jobs if it goes
ahead without
oversight
Rebecca Long-Bailey
The shadow Business
Secretary on Sainsbury’s
proposed Asda merger
The 30
Second
Briefing
BORDEAUX
RAIL LINK
British travellers to Bordeaux
may be able to make the journey
in under five hours by the end of
2020, according to plans unveiled
yesterday by HS1
The firm,which owns and operates
the High Speed 1 link from London
St Pancras to Folkestone, says
it is “in advanced planning with
three other international railway
operators along the proposed route”,
which takes in the Channel Tunnel
and a 188-mile high-speed line
from Tours to Bordeaux that was
built last year, owned by Lisea. The
new service will be a collaboration
between Lisea, infrastructure owner
SNCF Réseau and Eurotunnel,
which owns the undersea link.
How much time will it save?
Estimates are rough so far, but Dyan
Crowther, HS1’s chief executive,
hopes to shave around an hour off
the current five hour and 25 minute
journey time, which currently
includes a complicated crossover
in Paris between Gare du Nord and
Gare Montparnasse.
Will it be a busy line?
It is estimated that 1.2 million people
fly each year between London
and Bordeaux, while the French
city is also served from Belfast,
Birmingham, Bristol, Edinburgh
and Southampton. Crowther says
that there is “real demand” for a
train service to provide a more
comfortable and better-connected
service than air can offer, however.
“The route is almost ready for a train
operator to turn up and turn the
key as soon as the UK and French
governments agree on border
controls,” she added.
And next?
HS1 says it is also working on direct
routes to Geneva and Frankfurt.
Advertising giant WPP said revenues
fell 4 per cent to £3.6bn in the first
quarter, in its first trading update
since the shock departure of its
founder, Sir Martin Sorrell.
Sir Martin left this month amid
allegations of “personal misconduct”
after leading the firm for 33 years.
WPP said yesterday that after
removing exchange-rate movements,
revenues were up 2 per cent and likefor-like revenues had edged up 0.8 per
cent. It also billed for $1.7bn (£1.3bn)
of new business in the first quarter.
Analysts have speculated that the
sprawling group of companies could
break up now that Sir Martin is no
longer at the helm.
Some investors believe WPP would
be significantly more valuable as the
sum of its parts than as a collection
of firms. The company’s new bosses
said they would not pursue a
full break-up but did not rule out
selling off businesses.
The chief executive of one of the
group’s companies, data and market
research firm Kantar, is alleged to be
in talks with backers over a potential
£3.5bn buyout.
WPP’s share price jumped 8.6 per
cent by the close of trading yesterday.
Mark Read and Andrew Scott,
WPP’s joint chief operating officers,
have sought to allay fears that WPP
would be damaged by the departure
of Sir Martin.
“In the last two weeks we have
focused on spending time with our
clients and people, and the response
has been very encouraging,” they
said. THE INDEPENDENT
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
OUTSOURCING
RETAIL
Interserve tumbles after
‘mistakes’ lead to losses
300 jobs at risk
as Carpetright
eyes 81 stores
for closure
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
41
From the
business
pages
By Ravender Sembhy
By Ravender Sembhy
Shares in Interserve tumbled yesterday as the troubled outsourcer fell
deeper into the red after its chairman
bemoaned “self-inflicted mistakes of
the past”.
The group saw losses more than
double to £244.4m in 2017, and the
figures come amid a tumultuous
period that has seen the company
issue a profits warning and seek
emergency financing.
Chairman Glyn Baker said:
“Interserve has suffered unprecedented levels of disruption and faced
a number of significant challenges.
“The company was affected by
general market headwinds and
external events; however much of
this resulted from self-inflicted mistakes of the past.”
Revenue was broadly flat at
£3.25bn, but Interserve’s shares
were down 12 per cent by close of
trading yesterday. The company was
hit by disappointing trading in July
and August, and in October warned
over profits and a potential breach of
its banking covenants as it grappled
with escalating staff costs, squeezed
margins and a flagging performance
from its justice business.
Fears had risen that the fallout
from the collapse of fellow outsourcer Carillion could engulf the
sector. Interserve holds several
Interserve
worked on the
refurbishment
of London’s
Albert Bridge
GETTY
government contracts and employs
some 80,000 people.
It is responsible for British military
bases in Gibraltar and the Falklands,
and holds several contracts with
local authorities, the London Underground and for Whitehall offices.
But earlier this year, the outsourcer received a lifeline from its lenders
that will put it on a more secure financial footing.
Chief executive Debbie White, who
is overseeing a turnaround of the
group, said: “2017 was a difficult year
for Interserve, but it was also a year
of significant progress.”
Interserve has already
agreed a £300m
refinancing deal - £196.6m in
cash and £95m in bonds – with
HSBC, Lloyds, RBS and Barclays.
GAMBLING
Rank appoints veteran O’Reilly to top role
By Joanna Bourke
Casinos operator Rank Group has
named gaming veteran John O’Reilly
as its new chief executive.
The 57-year-old will start the role
on 7 May, succeeding Henry Birch
who resigned in March to take the
Outlook
JAMES
MOORE
Promise that may
not amount to a
hill of baked beans
T
o pull off his Asda coup,
Sainsbury’s boss Mike
Coupe needs to sell the
supermarket merger as a
win for the consumer.
His “great deal for everyone”
will create a monster that the
Competition and Markets Authority
(CMA) is almost bound to take a
top job at online retailer Shop Direct.
The appointment comes as Rank
seeks to grow online to offset the
slowdown at its venues. It also wants
to attract younger players.
Mr O’Reilly previously led
Ladbrokes’ digital operations and
worked to relaunch the Coral brand
online. Since January 2017 he has
been a non-executive director at
William Hill. He will step down from
the board.
The company has also appointed
Alan Morgan, retail managing
director, to the board as executive
director. EVENING STANDARD
chunk out of just to prove that it still
exists. Convincing the watchdog that
the consumer wins is the best way of
limiting that.
To give some context to just how
big this retail Godzilla will be if
the deal completes, consider the
numbers. Asda has 630 retail units,
Sainsbury’s 1,412. Add in the 845
Argos stores Sainsbury’s owns and
the new top dog of the supermarket
sector will boast 2,800 outlets. As at
March 2018 the combined share of
grocery market the pair enjoyed was
a punchy 31.4 per cent. That’s more
than the 30 per cent or so the sector’s
current King Kong, Tesco, boasted
when it was being described as “the
supermarket that ate Britain” under
Sir Terry Leahy.
In the hopes of limiting the CMA’s
impact, the big promise is 10 per cent
off prices. Well, some prices.
To pull that off, Mr Coupe will have
to leverage the vast buying power
of the combined group. Even if the
consumer wins this isn’t good news for
suppliers. Already feeling the pinch,
they’re going to get squeezed again.
Sainsbury’s representatives,
meanwhile, had suspiciously little
to say about what 10 per cent off the
“many of the products customers buy
regularly” will mean in practice other
than pointing me to everyday items
such as bread, milk, eggs, etc.
These items are already quite
keenly priced, given supermarkets
Th
he deal will create a
monster – a retail Godzilla –
that the CMA is almost
bound to take a chunk out of
compete hard on them. They keep
them cheap in an attempt to draw
people in to buy other things that
offer better margins. There are real
grounds for questioning whether that
promise will ever amount to anything
more than a hill of cheap-ish baked
beans when the dust has settled.
Carpetright has said it will book
annual losses of up to £9m after
the struggling retailer’s shareholders rubber-stamped a mass store
closure programme.
The group said that it expects a
full-year underlying pre-tax loss of
between £7m and £9m, which compares with a £14.4m profit last year.
It comes as investors approved its
Company Voluntary Arrangement
(CVA), a process that will allow it to
shut loss-making outlets and secure
rent reductions.
Carpetright has earmarked 81
stores for closure as part of the
restructure, with rent on another 113
set to be slashed by up to 50 per cent
as part of the plan.
A total of 300
jobs are at risk
as a result of
the CVA.
Last week
the company
secured the
backing of
c re d i t o rs a n d
landlords for the
CVA and attention
will now be turned to efforts for an
equity fundraising.
Carpetright is attempting to raise
around £60m through a rights issue
to put the company on a firmer
financial footing.
Chief executive Wilf Walsh said:
“The CVA proposal will enable us to
take the tough but necessary actions
needed to restore our profitability.”
The group also bemoaned difficult
trading in the final quarter, which
saw like-for-like sales plummet
10.5 per cent.
For the full year, comparable sales
dipped 3.6 per cent.
The retail sector has already seen
thousands of jobs axed following the
collapse of well-known names Toys R
Us and Maplin.
It is worth considering that, before
Aldi and Lidl really started motoring,
Sainsbury’s boasted operating
margins that were comfortably above
5 per cent. These days supermarket
bosses look at figures like that and
sigh. If only! Currently the forecast
for Sainsbury’s this year, per Digital
Look, is for something like 2 per cent.
What the watchdogs need to
consider is how much danger there
is of this deal returning the sector to
the oligopoly that existed in the past,
when the big four players weren’t
competing to the level they liked
people to think they were.
Mr Coupe will argue that there’s no
chance of that because the market has
changed. In addition to Aldi and Lidl,
a revived Co-op, the growth of online
where Ocado lives; Amazon’s out
there too... And Godzilla’s not really
scary. He’ll be giving free back rubs at
Sainsbury’s and Asda’s, just you wait
and see. But then he would say that,
wouldn’t he. EVENING STANDARD
Unions oppose
fixed basic income
Deutsche Welle
Trade union leaders in
Germany have criticised plans
to implement a universal basic
income, which would see all the
country’s citizens get a fixed
monthly stipend whether they
work or not. Reiner Hoffmann,
head of the German Trade
Union Federation, said calls in
support of the policy were “a
complete disorientation” and
insisted that pursuing a job was
a crucial part of people’s lives.
Call for more action
by troubled AMP
The Sydney Morning
Herald
The resignation of Catherine
Brenner, chairman of crisishit bank AMP, has failed to
appease angry investors who
have called for more directors’
heads to roll and for executive
bonuses to be clawed back.
The firm’s remaining directors
have already agreed to a 25 per
cent pay cut under AMP’s new
chairman, Mike Wilkins.
T-Mobile pursues
$26m Sprint deal
The Wall Street Journal
T-Mobile’s proposed $26m
(£18.9m) deal to buy fellow
mobile operator Sprint will,
if approved by antitrust
regulators, create a wireless
market in the US controlled by
three major players as they race
to control new 5G networks.
The transaction represents the
third time in the last four years
that the two rival firms have
attempted to join forces.
India ‘needs policy
to curb emissions’
The Economic Times
Economist Montek Singh
Ahluwalia has called for New
Delhi lawmakers to adopt a
clear strategy on efforts to cut
carbon and pollutant emissions
in India, and suggested that
revamping the energy taxation
system could discourage the
use of coal. He also called for an
end of subsidies to kerosene fuel
producers and for regulators to
consider a wide-ranging carbon
dioxide tax on those companies
that emit it.
42
BUSINESS
The
Business
Matrix
The day at
a glance
FTSE 100 up 7.1 at 7509.3
Company
Price
Chg
High
3i Group
Admiral
Anglo Amer
Antofagasta
AB Foods
Ashtead Group
AstraZeneca
Aviva
BAE Systems
Barclays
Barratt Dev
BHP Billiton
BP
BAT
Berkeley Grp Hldgs
British Land
BT
Bunzl
Burberry
Carnival
Centrica
Coca-Cola HBC
Compass
CRH
Croda Intl
DCC
Diageo
Direct Line Ins
Easyjet
Evraz
Experian
Ferguson
Fresnillo
G4S
Glencore
GSK
Halma
941.6
1993.0
1709.4
972.4
2704.0
2033.0
5103.0
529.0
611.0
207.2
558.0
1544.0
538.0
3999.0
4072.0
672.4
249.4
2111.0
1823.5
4725.0
153.8
2444.0
1560.0
2581.0
4461.0
7000.0
2589.0
374.3
1590.0
458.2
1667.0
5580.0
1275.0
258.9
350.7
1461.4
1223.0
-1.4
-2.5
+10.2
+18.4
+4.0
-22.0
+20.0
+4.0
-2.4
-1.7
-4.0
+9.4
+0.6
-31.5
+7.0
+0.4
+1.4
+13.0
+1.5
-7.0
+0.9
-35.0
+5.5
+10.0
-39.0
—
+31.0
+0.5
-16.5
+4.6
-1.0
-36.0
-6.5
-2.7
-18.3
-3.8
+1.0
975.0
2184.0
1870.0
1071.0
3387.0
2185.0
5520.0
550.0
682.5
220.2
705.5
1662.4
538.0
5643.6
4270.0
695.0
318.0
2472.0
2024.0
5435.0
213.0
2711.0
1765.9
2955.0
4691.0
7762.5
2735.5
411.3
1698.7
468.9
1708.0
5722.0
1746.0
342.6
416.9
1724.5
1341.0
Low
793.5
1766.0
950.1
11.1
2386.0
1476.0
4260.0
482.2
533.5
177.3
6.3
1103.0
436.9
3553.0
3031.0
589.0
216.4
1918.5
1481.5
4427.0
119.7
2136.0
1396.5
27.0
3612.0
6445.0
2224.0
340.0
1136.0
169.8
1428.0
4427.0
1150.5
233.8
270.0
1179.4
1045.0
Company
Price
Chg
High
Hargrve Lans
HSBC Hldgs
IAG
Imperial Brands
Informa
IntCont Htls
Intertek
ITV
Johnson Matth
Just Eat
Kingfisher
Land Secs
Legal & Gen
Lloyds Bk Gp
Lon Stock Ex
Marks&Spen
Mediclinic Intl
Melrose Ind
Micro Focus Intl
Mondi
Morrison (Wm)
National Grid
Next
NMC Health
Old Mutual
PaddyPwrBetfair
Pearson
Persimmon
Prudential
Randgold Res
Reckitt Ben
RELX
Rentokil Initial
Rio Tinto
Rolls-Royce
RBS
Shell A
1789.5
725.4
630.2
2604.5
739.0
4589.0
4901.0
151.7
3294.0
773.8
303.8
988.4
270.0
64.7
4300.0
287.7
671.0
228.0
1253.0
2026.0
243.1
842.8
5256.0
3568.0
251.6
7180.0
833.8
2715.0
1874.5
5868.0
5702.0
1554.5
307.0
3946.0
840.0
270.2
2531.0
+14.0
+5.8
—
-10.0
+2.2
+12.0
+3.0
+2.0
-7.0
+7.8
+1.8
+2.0
+1.6
-0.1
-18.0
+1.1
-3.0
+0.4
-21.0
-4.0
+3.1
+1.1
+26.0
-32.0
-3.1
+65.0
+11.6
-15.0
+9.5
-46.0
+44.0
+1.0
+0.5
-32.0
+0.6
+1.8
-0.5
1935.0
798.6
680.6
3828.5
773.0
4944.0
5470.0
212.3
3511.0
906.0
369.8
1217.1
279.9
73.6
4371.0
397.8
890.2
261.9
2970.5
2145.0
254.4
1174.3
5355.0
3728.0
260.3
8967.0
836.8
2901.0
1992.5
8255.0
8110.4
1784.0
338.8
4226.6
994.5
304.2
2579.5
Low
1258.0
635.7
543.5
2298.0
638.0
3656.0
4052.0
141.0
2681.0
544.0
285.3
900.2
244.3
62.2
3305.5
262.0
495.4
2.1
26.8
1684.0
203.3
733.0
3565.0
1940.0
185.5
6027.4
563.0
2214.0
1692.0
5540.0
4973.4
1399.0
248.7
2882.5
800.0
239.6
1996.0
Company
Price
Chg
High
Shell B
Royal Mail
RSA Insur
Sage
Sainsbury(J)
Schroders
Scot Mort Inv Tst
Segro
Severn Trent
Shire
Sky
Smith&Neph
Smith (DS)
Smiths Gp
Smurfit Kappa Grp
SSE
Stan Chart
Standard Life Aber
St James Place
Taylor Wimpey
Tesco
TUI AG
Unilever
United Utilities
Vodafone
Whitbread
WPP
2601.5
581.2
657.4
635.2
309.0
3301.0
474.6
646.2
1940.0
3866.0
1378.0
1396.0
522.4
1597.5
3094.0
1381.0
767.0
365.3
1136.5
191.8
235.9
1645.5
4077.5
743.2
211.6
4281.0
1247.5
+5.5
-1.8
-0.2
-5.8
+39.2
+12.0
—
-0.8
-20.5
-28.0
+5.5
+4.0
-3.0
-3.5
-4.0
-2.5
+5.3
+0.5
+5.5
-2.2
-2.2
+6.0
+26.5
-5.6
+1.1
+27.0
+99.0
2617.0
589.0
672.5
825.2
339.9
3784.0
480.0
654.2
2575.0
5021.0
1402.0
1442.0
565.0
1697.0
3254.0
1554.0
864.2
448.6
1279.5
211.9
242.7
1687.9
4557.5
1078.0
239.7
4340.0
1762.0
Low
2038.0
367.8
590.5
536.2
222.4
3069.0
372.4
477.3
1664.0
2940.5
11.4
1173.0
5.3
1354.0
1712.7
1176.5
688.6
349.4
1051.0
173.0
165.3
1098.0
3678.5
648.6
190.1
3499.9
1074.0
For enquiries call +44 (0)20 7825 8300
1512.0
+3.1
Dow Jones *
24314.8
+3.6
S&P 500 *
2661.4
-8.5
Nasdaq *
7082.2
-37.6
DAX
12612.1
+31.2
CAC 40
5520.5
+37.3
Hang Seng
30808.5
+527.8
Nikkei
22467.9
+148.3
EURO/
POUND
DOLLAR/
POUND
GOLD
OIL
Per troy ounce,
London pm fix
+$0.39
FTSE Eurofirst300
$74.95
+3.8
+13.4
$1,317.4
4127.7
-$4.04
20285.0
FTSE All Share
-0.30¢
FTSE 250
$1.3754
+7.1
-0.09¢
7509.3
€1.1377
Markets
FTSE 100
Brent crude,
per barrel
FOOD & DRINK
INSURANCE
McDonald’s sales
beat expectations
Aviva agrees £14m
goodwill payout
UK and German restaurants
have boosted quarterly sales for
McDonald’s, the fast food firm
reported yesterday, with a 5.5
per cent growth outstripping
analysts’ estimates. Net income
rose to $1.4bn (£1.02bn), thanks
largely to higher US pricing,
though the group’s international
revenues fell by 9 per cent
to $5.1bn.
Insurer Aviva is set to shell
out £14m worth of “goodwill
payments” to shareholders
who lost out after the company
cancelled a new issue of
preference shares worth £450m
earlier this year. The group said
it recognised the “uncertainty”
the move caused shareholders
and said the payout was the
“right thing” to do.
EMPLOYMENT
BANKING
Delivery drivers
take legal action
TSB faces grilling
over IT fiasco
A group of drivers have lodged
legal action against Hermes,
the delivery company, claiming
they have been denied basic
workers’ rights by being forced
to declare as self-employed. The
case is the latest that promises
major ramifications on labour
rights in the “gig economy”
after cases were brought
against Uber and Addison Lee.
MPs are set to grill executives
from TSB and its Spanish
owner, Sabadell, over last
week’s IT meltdown which
affected millions of its
customers. A committee led by
MP Nicky Morgan will question
TSB chief executive Paul
Pester and chairman Richard
Meddings to determine how to
prevent the incident recurring.
INVESTMENTS
TELECOMS
Advised assets
boost for Quilter
Elliott backs CEO
of Telecom Italia
Quilter, the asset manager
set for a spin-off from parent
company Old Mutual this
summer, has recorded strong
growth so far this year, with its
financial planning and advice
division proving the most
profitable. The unit contributed
£1.1bn of the company’s £1.5bn
in net client inflows.
Activist fund Elliott has said
that it will support the current
chief of Telecom Italia, Amos
Genish, in setting a new
strategy for the formerly
state-owned firm. Elliott has
grabbed a 9 per cent stake in the
firm and is encouraging other
investors to help wrest control
away from top investor Vivendi.
CHARITIES
ENERGY
Young people give
more to the needy
Centrica to trial
shared technology
Research from Barclays has
found that younger donors
gave more to charities than
those aged 55 or older. People
aged 35 to 54 say they gave an
average of £265 last year to
charities, followed by £246 from
under-35s. In contrast, over-55s
only gave £168.
Centrica, the British energy
supplier, says it will trial
using blockchain technology
to shore up energy trading
transactions and peer-to-peer
trading between 200 businesses
and residential participants.
The group says the move will
“revolutionise” the sector.
the
markets
The FTSE 100 had edged up by 0.1
per cent at the close of trading
yesterday, gaining 7 points to hit
7,509.3. Perhaps unsurprisingly,
the biggest riser of the day was
Sainsbury’s, which saw its stock
price soar by 14.5 per cent to reach
309p. Elsewhere, WPP gained 8.6
per cent to reach 1,247.5p after the
good news in yesterday’s market
update. The furthest fallers were
Glencore (down 4.96 per cent at
350.7p), and Micro Focus (down
1.65 per cent at 1,253p).
***
The pound fell to a two-month low
against the dollar yesterday, down
0.22 per cent to $1.375.
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
43
BANKING
Labour vows to cap
overdraft fees and
interest payments
By Laurie Havelock
The Labour Party has said it will cap
the total amount that can be paid
in bank overdraft fees or interest
repayments in a bid to tackle
spiralling household debt.
John McDonnell, the shadow
Chancellor, said new measures would
take aim at the “national scandal” of
families trapped by debt.
Labour’s own figures estimate
that the policy could help 2.7 million
people in the UK who are saddled
with permanent overdrafts, saving
them an average of £86 per year.
Mr McDonnell said: “Too many
families are having to rely on
borrowing just to get to the end of
the month, and are facing huge costs
from our high street banks.
“The national scandal of the low
paid debt trap has to end. More
needs to be done to level the playing
field and bring greater fairness in
consumer finance.”
The party said those with
permanent overdrafts will probably
use them more than 85 per cent of
the time, incurring charges that
could end up being four times higher
than those charged by a payday loan.
The proposed policies would see
regulators impose a limit of £24 per
month per £100 borrowed on any
interest, fees or charges that could
be levied in relation to a customer’s
overdraft. This would be roughly
equivalent to the current cap on what
payday lenders can charge.
According to the Treasury, several
steps have already been put in place
to protect debtors and to crack down
on products with disproportionate
interest rates, such as payday loans.
Labour’s proposals were welcomed
by Michael Sheen, the actor and
founder of the campaign group End
High Cost Credit Alliance.
He said: “Millions of people across
the UK are also trapped in their
overdrafts by extortionate rates of
interest charged by reputable high
street banks.”
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THE LAST OF THE HALF CROWNS
Sunny outlook for Thomas Cook
The holiday operator Thomas Cook
was flying high yesterday on the
back of a strong first quarter in
2018 as revenues grew by 7 per cent
to £1.75bn. The news prompted
analysts at Jefferies to upgrade
Thomas Cook’s stock to a “buy” amid
hopes of a busy summer holiday
season. By close of trading, shares
were up 3 per cent at 123.6p.
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money
Savers looking to high-street banks
in search of a good deal may get
better returns by looking at other
providers, according to an analysis
of the best deals by Moneyfacts.
The advice group estimates that the
difference between the best account
on the market and the worst “big bank”
rate could cost savers £250 a year in
interest, based on a £20,000 deposit.
Some of the best rates offered
include those from the RCI Bank’s
Freedom account (1.3 per cent
interest), Kent Reliance’s Easy Access
(1.3 per cent) and those offered
by Yorkshire Building Society,
Shawbrook Bank and Bank of Cyprus
UK (all 1.25 per cent). At the other end,
of the scale, HSBC pays 0.05 per cent
on its easy access product.
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H12547
ieat
Games&Puzzles
daily recipe
Individual Scotch beef Wellingtons
with black pudding
Kakuro
Zygolex® In i every day
How to play Fill the white squares so that the total in each
across or down run of cells matches the total at the start
of that run. You must use the numbers from 1-9 only and
cannot repeat a number in a run. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Find the missing words by following the RHYME, LETTERS and MEANING links
– eg, a word that rhymes with ‘cheek’, has one letter different from ‘pear’ and
has the same meaning as mountain, would be ‘peak’. Full rules at zygolex.com.
Solution, page 49
RHYME LETTERS
13
14
6
24
7
TAD
17
7
6
CATTLE
17
30
CUSHION
14
17
MEANING
25
30
PARCEL
3
SAC
8
6
4
6
CUTLERY
3
4
4
9
27
22
7
GR
PA EA
RT T F
IE O R
S
15
3
OBSERVED
7
15
4
PORK
16
16
10
17
6
4
4
22
SERVES 4
4 fillet steaks
80g black pudding
50g chestnut mushrooms
1tsp wholegrain mustard
3g fresh thyme
375g ready rolled puff pastry
1 medium egg
Sea salt and black pepper
A little sunflower oil
10
4
4
4
BROW
4
RICE
4
4
4
CHOP
Jigsawdoku
4
IMPOLITE
How to play Place the numbers 1-9 once in each row, column
and bold-lined jigsaw region. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
MATURE
NAPE
RUSE
RHYME
RIBBON
LETTERS
MEANING
6
Pre-heat the oven to 220°C/425°F/Gas
Mark 7. In a frying pan, brown the steaks
on both sides in some oil. Allow the
steaks to cool completely.
Finely chop the mushrooms and
thyme. Add them both to a bowl and
crumble over the black pudding and the
mustard and mix well.
Divide the mixture into four and put
one portion on top of each of the steaks.
Unroll the pastry and cut into four
pieces. Lightly roll out each oblong to
make them slightly bigger. Cover each
steak with a piece of the pastry and fold
underneath the steak to make a parcel.
Put them on a large baking sheet and
glaze with the whisked egg yolk. Make
a couple of slits on the top of each – to
allow the steam to escape.
Bake in the oven for 12 minutes to
achieve a medium steak. Leave to rest for
a few minutes before serving.
> 3 >
∧
∨
>
∧
∧
Futoshiki
4 2
7
9
6
8
7
8
7 4
3
2 9
2 9 8
∧
How to play
Place the numbers
from 1-5 exactly
once in each row
and column. The
greater than and
less than signs
(‘>’ and ‘<’) indicate
where one cell is
greater/less than
the adjacent
cell indicated.
Solution:
minurl.co.uk/i
1
∨
∧
Recipe from aldi.co.uk
Tomorrow
Andalusian baked cod
12
8
15
4
6
21
12
9
5
13
15
7
9
10
21
7
9
✂
10
13
1
1
3
13
1
1 0 1
4 3 1
5
10
3
2
1
4
1
4
1
7
0
2
2
1
2
3
5
13
12
0
11
6
4
3
4
1
2
1
0 1
2
0 1
1
1
2
1
0
3
1
1
1
0
2
2
15
8
0
1 1 1
8
7
15
How to play Find all the mines in the grid. Numbers in certain squares indicate how
many mines there are in the neighbouring squares, including diagonally touching
squares. Mines cannot be placed in squares with numbers. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
11
3
12
13
Minesweeper
17
18
∨
∨
2 <
Killer Sudoku No 1276
How to play Each row, column and 3 by 3 box must contain
each number (1 to 9) only once. The sum of all numbers
contained in a dotted area must match the number printed
in its top-left corner. No number can appear more than
once in a dotted area. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
<
1
1
1
0
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
Maths Puzzle
Codeword No 1997
How to play Fill the empty squares with
numbers that will make the across and
down calculations produce the results
shown in the grey squares. Each numeral
from 1 to 9 must only appear once. The
calculations should be performed from
left to right and top to bottom, rather than
in strict mathematical order.
How to play The numbers in the grid correspond to the letters of the alphabet.
Solve the puzzle and fill in the letters in the key as you discover them.
Three letters are provided to give you a start. The solution will be printed in
tomorrow’s paper, the solution to yesterday’s codeword is on page 49.
17
13
18
8
Easier
x
-
4
x
28
+
-
x
-
-8
+
5
32
11
9
÷
2
-
x
9
6
10
7
25
19
14
5
25
11
5
14
25
9
6
1
19
1
12
21
4
1
14
16
18
17
6
6
19
5
3
11
25
7
25
6
6
18
10
11
4
20
11
15
17
5
2
6
19
19
17
23
6
9
19
7
6
20
14
9
3
19
20
11
14
2
2
15
14
18
3
14
9
17
6
3
COWL
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
SONG
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Need a little help getting started? Then call for up to four extra clue letters on
0901 292 5204. Calls cost £1 plus your telephone company’s network access charge
(if you are having trouble with the phone service, call the helpline: 0333 202 3390).
Or text THEI CLUE to 85100 to receive your clues. Texts cost £1 plus your
standard network charge (if you are having trouble with the text service, call the
helpline: 0333 335 3351). Clues change each day at midnight.
-1
DOWN
2 Inhabitant of this
planet (9)
3 Military fabric
colour (5)
4 Network of fine
threads (3)
5 Songbird (7)
6 Type of grouse (9)
7 Appear (4)
9 Fanciful and
unrealistic
(Informal) (4-5)
12 Business
expenses (9)
14 Kneecap (7)
17 Representative (5)
18 Explosive device (4)
20 Owing (3)
1
6
2
ALL NEW SUDOKUS!
4
5
7
8
9
10
11
13
12
14
HYPE
17
19
21
Terms &
Conditions
18
20
22
The i Book of Sudoku
Featuring 200 new sudokus and
idokus, with easy, medium and
hard ratings.
Available on Amazon
for £4.99.
See inews.co.uk/sudoku
Other i books include:
Mixed Puzzles Vol 2 (inews.co.uk/puzzles2),
Codewords Vol 2 (minurl.co.uk/codewordsvol2)
Crosswords Vol 2 (minurl.co.uk/crosswordsvol2)
Maths Puzzle,
Word Ladder, Word
Wheel, Kakuro,
Minesweeper,
ABC Logic, Killer
Sudoku, Futoshiki,
Codeword,
Jigsawduko and
Wijuko created by
Clarity Media.
For more
puzzles,
see clarity-media.
co.uk
15
16
Stuck on the concise crossword?
For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3590.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble
accessing this number, please call our helpdesk
on 0333 202 3390.
3
Solution to yesterday’s Concise Crossword
ACROSS 1 Myrrh, 4 Made (Mermaid), 8 Transgression, 9 Omit, 10 Magnolia, 12 Sherry,
13 Stereo, 16 Overhaul, 18 Sari, 20 Exhibitionist, 21 Item, 22 Logic.
DOWN 1 Meteor shower, 2 Realise, 3 Hasp, 4 Myriad, 5 Disunity, 6 Will, 7 Antagonistic,
11 Prohibit, 14 Roaming, 15 Custom, 17 Echo, 19 Pool.
Today’s other puzzles Cryptic Crossword, page 22;
Five-Clue Cryptic, page 11; One-Minute Wijuko, page 23
Puzzle solutions See page 49 and minurl.co.uk/i
How to play Each numeral from 1 to 9 must
appear (once only) in the squares forming the
red letter i. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
4
1
6
9
8 2 5
5
4
5 3
5 1
4 7
5 1
7
9
2
5
4
6 3 2
8
3 2 6
8
4 9
7 2
7
6
3
9
2
8
7
9
6
8
5
3
8
4
1
9
1 7
5 4
5
1 3 7
Tomorrow: Harder
Concise Crossword No 2319
ACROSS
1 Smell (4)
4 Compass point (4)
8 Ursa Major (3,5,4)
10 Outer edge (3)
11 The common
people (3,6)
13 Weaken (6)
15 Room for
manoeuvre (6)
16 Celebrity’s
signature (9)
18 Long thin scarf (3)
19 Large heavy
tool (12)
21 Walk through
water (4)
22 Nonsense
(Slang) (4)
idoku Exclusive to i
Sudoku Easier
3
O
45
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
RUBY
5
6
Q
How to play
Convert the word
at the top of the
ladder into the
word at the bottom
of it, using only
the four rungs
in between. On
each rung, you
must put a valid
four-letter word
that is identical
to the word above
it, apart from a
one-letter change.
There may be more
than one way of
achieving this.
26
3
A
Word
Ladder
14
2
10
-2
19
19
1
÷
+
12
24
4
2
x
14
14
16
14
11
÷
x
15
7
16
18
26
+
5
10
5
10
Harder
+
4
18
3
-
5
x
22
12
+
x
108
19
4
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
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ABC Logic
How to play Place the letters
A, B and C exactly once in each row and
column. Each row and column has two
blank cells. The letters at the edge of a row/
column indicate which of the letters is the
first/last to appear in that row/column.
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
A
C
A
C
B
A
A
B
C
B
A
B
A
C
Word Wheel
This is an open-ended puzzle. How many
words of three or more letters, each
including the letter at centre of the wheel,
can you make from this diagram? We’ve
found 31, including one nine-letter word.
Can you do better?
H
D
E
E
X
T
O
O
R
HARDY PERENNIAL
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48
SPORT
RACING
BRIGHTON
‘Best-bred’
Elarqam has
blueprint for
Guineas success
3.25
1
2
3
4
5
Declarations for this weekend’s 2000
Guineas and 1000 Guineas were
released yesterday and among those
standing their ground are three Middleham-trained three-year-olds bidding to chalk up rare Classic victories
for the north.
Mark Johnston, who trained the
last northern-based winner of the
2000 Guineas, Mister Baileys in 1994,
runs Card Sharp and Elarqam on
Saturday, while Karl Burke saddles
Laurens in Sunday’s 1000 Guineas.
Card Sharp is the 100-1 outsider,
but Elarqam is a best-priced 6-1 after
winning both his starts last year in
the style of a horse going big places.
He is by Frankel out of Attraction,
also trained by Johnston and the last
northern-trained winner of the 1000
Guineas in 2004.
“If you could draw a blueprint of
what a colt out of Attraction would
look like, you’d draw him,” said Johnston. “He’s the best-bred horse I’ve
ever trained [in 30 years]. The implications of how popular he might be as
a stallion if he won the 2000 Guineas
don’t bear thinking about.”
Burke, whose Libertarian finished
runner-up in the 2013 Derby, thinks
Laurens – the winner of a Group Two
and Group One as a juvenile – has
been underestimated in the fillies’
Classic, but she has been backed this
past week and is a top priced 10-1.
Aidan O’Brien’s September is
a notable absentee from the 1000
Guineas list, but Soliloquy and Dan’s
Dream have been supplemented.
Godolphin’s Soliloquy won the
Nell Gwyn Stakes at Newmarket recently, while Dan’s Dream persuaded
her owners, including cricket and
rugby legends Sir Ian Botham and
Sir Gareth Edwards, to stump up the
necessary £30,000 after landing the
Fred Darling at Newbury.
2-9230
296-05
228878
325-10
6628-2
3.55
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
BEST BET
Ripp Orf
(3.45pm, Yarmouth)
Improving with every run on
all-weather and looks good on
turf debut.
NEXT BEST
Corelli
(2.40pm, Yarmouth)
Promising colt. Derby entry.
Dettori’s only booked ride of day.
ONE TO WATCH
Frontispiece will be all the better
for his encouraging comeback
run at Doncaster and could be
winning something decent soon.
EBF STALLIONS BREEDING WINNERS FILLIES’
HANDICAP (CLASS 3) £15,500 added 1m 2f
327541/1024247104-48
37548-42424
3217-
CANBERRA CLIFFS (D) G L Moore 4 9 7 ............J Watson (5) 7
PRECIOUS RAMOTSWE (D) J Gosden 4 9 6.............. R Havlin 2
WHITE CHOCOLATE (D) D M Simcock 4 9 3........H Bentley 5
DECCAN QUEEN (D) J Osborne 4 8 13..........................D Costello 3
FLYING NORTH (D) R Hannon 4 8 11 ..................... T Marquand 4
CHAMPAGNE PINK (BF) K Burke 4 8 9...........................L Morris 6
CARAVELA (BF) M Channon 4 8 7................................ C Shepherd 1
- 7 declared BETTING: 13-8 Precious Ramotswe, 4-1 White Chocolate, 5-1 Champagne
Pink, 6-1 Caravela, 8-1 Canberra Cliffs, 12-1 Flying North, 14-1 Deccan
Queen.
KEMPTON
7.15
1
2
3
4
5
32RED/BRITISH STALLION STUDS EBF CONDITIONS
STAKES (CLASS 3) £15,000 added 7f
JALLOTA (D) C Hills 7 9 9.....................................................James Doyle 3
AROD D M Simcock 7 9 2............................................................O Murphy 5
CHESSMAN (CD) Archie Watson 4 9 2.................E Greatrex T 2
MAGILLEN C Hills 4 9 2............................................................ C Shepherd 1
POET’S VANITY (D) A Balding 4 8 11 ............................. D Probert 4
- 5 declared BETTING: 11-8 Arod, 3-1 Poet’s Vanity, 4-1 Jallota, 11-2 Chessman, 12-1
Magillen.
7.45
32RED.COM HANDICAP (CLASS 3) £15,000 added 2m
1
95-237
2
3928-0
3
924-36
4
85-155
5
336-76
6
2153-1
7
535-34
8
335199
6155-8
10 2535611 4351712 312346
HAINES (CD) A Balding 7 9 10 ........................................... W Cox (5) C 3
GRACELAND (D) M Bell 6 9 7.................................................L Steward 9
AMAZING RED E Dunlop 5 9 6......................................James Doyle 4
REGICIDE J Fanshawe 5 9 5.................................................O Murphy 10
JACOB CATS (C) W Knight 9 9 3.............................. J Watson (5) C 8
CHOCOLATE BOX (D) D Loughnane 4 9 1 ...............L Morris C 6
GAVLAR (CD) W Knight 7 9 0...............................................C Shepherd 2
ARTY CAMPBELL (CD) B J Llewellyn 8 9 0......... D Probert 12
ZAKATAL (D) R M Whitaker 12 8 12....................L Edmunds (3) 1
KING CALYPSO (CD) D Coakley 7 8 10................... Fran Berry 11
STEAMING R Beckett 4 8 7.........................................................H Bentley 7
MAMBO DANCER (D) M Johnston 4 8 6.......................F Norton 5
- 12 declared BETTING: 7-2 Chocolate Box, 13-2 Haines, 15-2 Amazing Red, Regicide, 8-1
Steaming, Gavlar, 10-1 Graceland, Mambo Dancer, 12-1 others.
NOTTINGHAM
3.35
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
GOING:SOFT
BRITISH STALLION STUDS EBF FILLIES’ HANDICAP
(CLASS 3) £25,000 added 1m
RED TEA (D) P Hiatt 5 9 8 .........................................Finley Marsh (5) 2
SEDUCE ME (D) K Burke 4 9 7...........................................J Crowley C 5
PATTIE (D) M Channon 4 9 2........................................................J F Egan 1
MAMA AFRICA (D) T D Barron 4 8 11............. Jane Elliott (5) 3
KYLLACHYS TALE (D) R Teal 4 8 10 ................................J Mitchell 6
FEATHERY (BF) C Fellowes 4 8 9...........................R Kingscote T 7
PRYING PANDORA (D) R Fahey 5 8 5.....................P Mathers C 4
- 7 declared BETTING: 9-4 Red Tea, 4-1 Mama Africa, 5-1 Seduce Me, 6-1 Prying
Pandora, 7-1 Pattie, 8-1 Kyllachys Tale, 10-1 Feathery.
6039-2
1346-8
-16420
011-42
2108-6
02-330
2509-7
FORM VERDICT
The assistance of Finley Marsh’s 5lb claim may help Red Tea build on his
Newmarket reappearance when second and there is every chance he can
run well again despite having found this career high rating too much to
handle in the past. However, preference is for the filly MAMA AFRICA,
who goes well for jockey Jane Elliott and proved to be in fine heart when
returning from a break at Southwell. Seduce Me has been partnered by
Jim Crowley on two of her three wins so the leading rider returning to
the saddle could be a positive, while Pattie is foolish to discount with
Mick Channon in fine form.
4.35
1
2
3
4
5
CRICKET
Worcester woes
go on as in-form
Ball helps send
Notts top of table
By Gareth Cox
GOING:STANDARD
53124020051/22720/
/3748-
Nottinghamshire piled on the misery
for bottom-placed Worcestershire as
they triumphed by an innings and 41
runs to go top of the County Championship Division One.
Worcestershire had overhauled
their opponents in the finishing
straight last summer with four successive victories to lift the Division
Two crown – including an emphatic
eight-wicket victory at Trent Bridge.
But revenge was sweet for the
visitors in the clash at New Road
who outplayed their opponents in all
departments and bowled them out
twice in just 64.5 overs.
A swift 38 from England bowler
Stuart Broad helped Notts to 300-9
declared, giving the visitors a
lead of 190 and a minimum of
80 overs to force a result.
Jake Ball was
Wo r c e s t e r s h i r e ’s
main tormentor, with
five for 59 – taking his
season tally to 21 wickets from
three matches – as the home
side were skittled out for 149,
and he said: “We started this
block of five games like going
into a Test series and we are
2-1 up and hopefully we
can kick on again.
It is always good
to contribute to four-day wins. They
don’t come around that often.”
Somerset’s seamers bowled them
to a 118-run victory over Yorkshire at
Taunton and a second win in as many
County Championship games this
season – the first time since 1993 that
they have managed the feat.
Craig Overton (three for 43),
Lewis Gregory (two for 59), Tim
Groenewald (two for 51) and Tom
Abell (two for 15) shared the finalday wickets as the visitors were dismissed for 202, chasing 321 to win.
Middle-order batsman Jack Leaning offered most resistance with 68.
Somerset director of cricket Andy
Hurry said: “It was a tougher game
than our first win over Worcestershire and it took a real team effort to
come out on top.”
Yorkshire coach Andrew Gale said: “The
difference between the
teams was our first-innings batting. I thought
our approach was poor.”
Alastair Cook began his
summer with a composed 84
to allay worries over his form
as Essex drew with Hampshire
at the Ageas Bowl.
Opening batsman Cook appeared in complete comfort
against Hampshire’s bowling attack, which boasts international
Notts bowler Jake
Ball celebrates after
taking the wicket of
Worctershire batsman
Travis Head GETTY
BET & WATCH AT 188BET.CO.UK HANDICAP (CLASS 4)
£13,200 added 1m 6f
0/26005556/
40140948-65
16458-
SLUNOVRAT (CD) D Menuisier 7 9 7..............................J Crowley 2
ROMAN FLIGHT David Dennis 10 8 13......................................G Lee 5
THISTIMENEXTYEAR Richard Spencer 4 8 13 ..S Levey H 3
MULTELLIE T Easterby 6 8 9..........................................................D Allan 1
ZENAFIRE (D) Sarah Hollinshead 9 8 5................P Mathers C 4
- 5 declared BETTING: 11-10 Roman Flight, 7-4 Slunovrat, 8-1 Thistimenextyear, 10-1
Zenafire, 14-1 Multellie.
5.05
top
tips
ROA/RACING POST OWNERS JACKPOT HANDICAP
(CLASS 4) £9,750 added 5f
ROSE BERRY (D) C Dwyer 4 9 7........................L Edmunds (3) H 5
SUPER JULIUS (CD) Eve J-Houghton 4 9 5................C Bishop 3
NAUTICAL HAVEN Suzi Best 4 9 5..................................D Costello 2
LIBERATUM (D) Mrs R Carr 4 9 1.........................................L Morris 4
MR POCKET R Cowell 4 8 9 ........................................................F Norton 1
- 5 declared BETTING: 2-1 Rose Berry, 9-4 Mr Pocket, 10-3 Super Julius, 6-1
Liberatum, 10-1 Nautical Haven.
By Jon Freeman
RACING EDITOR
GOING:GOOD TO SOFT
1
2
3
4
CHAMPIONS LEAGUE BETTING AT 188BET HANDICAP
(CLASS 4) 3YO £11,200 added 5f
12-457
24106772-13
213-37
ROCKIES SPIRIT D P Quinn 9 9 ................................................J F Egan 2
DAHIK (D) M W Easterby 9 8................................................................G Lee 3
DOTTED SWISS (D)(BF) R Hannon 9 8...............................S Levey 4
LITTLE BOY BLUE (D) W G M Turner 9 7...................................................
....................................................................................................................Finley Marsh (5) 5
5
2550-8 ANGEL FORCE (D) D C Griffiths 9 7..................................D Allan H 1
6
223111 SAMOVAR (CD) S Dixon 9 4...................................................K O’Neill B 8
7
187-27 THE GOLDEN CUE (D)(BF) Steph Hollinshead 8 10........................
.............................................................................................................................. Toby Eley (7) 7
8
71182- FLO’S MELODY B Leavy 8 3......................................................P Mathers 6
- 8 declared BETTING: 3-1 Samovar, 10-3 Dotted Swiss, 5-1 Little Boy Blue, 6-1 The
Golden Cue, Rockies Spirit, 10-1 Flo’s Melody, 12-1 Dahik, 14-1 Angel
Force.
YARMOUTH
2.40
1
2
3
4
5
GOING:GOOD TO SOFT
YARMOUTH RACECOURSE NOVICE STAKES (PLUS 10)
(CLASS 3) 3YO £15,000 added 1m 3f 104yds
41-2
610-1
822-2
3
ANTONIAN J Gosden 9 8...............................................................N Mackay 1
CORELLI J Gosden 9 8...................................................................L Dettori T 3
JETSTREAM C Hills 9 8............................................................... R Winston 2
BLAME CULTURE G Margarson 9 2..................................T Queally 5
KITTILEO M Johnston 9 2..................................................P J McDonald 4
- 5 declared BETTING: 5-4 Corelli, 4-1 Jetstream, 9-2 Blame Culture, 5-1 Antonian,
8-1 Kittileo.
3.45
1
2
3
WEATHERBYS GLOBAL STALLIONS APP HANDICAP
(CLASS 3) £11,500 added 7f
62172- MOUNTAIN RESCUE (D) C Wall 6 9 7.............................T Queally 7
00-346 AFANDEM M Johnston 4 9 1......................................... P J McDonald 1
-50388 SUZI’S CONNOISSEUR (D) S C Williams 7 9 1.....................................
....................................................................................................................... J P Spencer T,V 2
4
3-2120 MAJESTIC MOON (D) Miss J Feilden 8 9 1 ...............................................
...............................................................................................................Shelley Birkett (3) 4
5 180550 LONDON (D) P McEntee 5 9 1 ............................. Nicola Currie (5) 5
6
11312- SALT WHISTLE BAY (D) R Guest 4 8 12....................... M Harley 3
7
2/2212 RIPP ORF D Elsworth 4 8 12 ................................................ S De Sousa 6
- 7 declared BETTING: 9-4 Ripp Orf, 5-2 Salt Whistle Bay, 4-1 Mountain Rescue, 7-1
Afandem, 10-1 Suzi’s Connoisseur, 14-1 London, Majestic Moon.
Koxa on crest of wave with record ride
Brazilian surfer Rodrigo Koxa
was named a world record
holder at the weekend after
riding an 80-foot (24.38m)
wave in Portugal last year.
Koxa won the “Biggest Wave”
award for successfully
managing the huge swell off
Nazaré on Portugal’s Silver
Coast on 8 November, with a
judging panel deciding he had
bettered American Garrett
McNamara’s record of 78 feet at
the same break in 2011. .
Read more at: https://inews.
co.uk/sport/other/surfingworld-record-biggest-wavevideo-rodrigo-koxa/
Watch the video at
inews.co.uk/sport
NEWS
2-27
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
49
RUGBY LEAGUE
Hardaker banned for
14 months but can
play from November
By James O’Brien
Former Castleford full-back Zak
Hardaker has been banned for 14
months by UK Anti-Doping for failing a drugs test.
The 26-year-old will not appeal
against the punishment, which has
been backdated to September 2017,
when he tested positive for cocaine.
The decision means Hardaker will be
free to join a new club in November.
Hardaker’s solicitors said in a
statement: “We believe the correct
verdict has been returned and we
would like to thank the tribunal for
their professionalism. This was a
truly exceptional case, where the
drug use was never linked to performance enhancement.
“In this regard, Zak would never
take any substance to achieve an
unfair advantage and we are pleased
that the decision of the tribunal has
quality in Kyle Abbott, Fidel Edwards
and Brad Wheal, but he fell short of
three figures.
In a match decimated by rain and
bad light, Hampshire had declared
their first innings on 351 for seven,
with beanie-hat wearing Aussie
bowler Peter Siddle (left) claiming
three for 62.
Essex reached 300 for six at the
close, with Ravi Bopara hitting an
unbeaten 84 off 125 balls.
Cook said: “I would have liked to
have scored a hundred but you can’t
always have your way.” Surrey batted out the evening session to secure
a draw in their match against Lancashire at Old Trafford.
The Red Rose could only claim
two of the required six wickets in
the evening session and remain
without a win after three games of
their campaign.
Mark Stoneman opener managed
29 before being caught behind down
the leg side. The England opener has
scored 57 runs in four Championship
innings for Surrey this season.
x
4
-
x
7
-
6
+
-
2
+
5
+
x
-8
5
+
x
x
RUBY
SONG
RUBS
LONG
ROBS
LONE
ROWS
LOPE
COWS
HOPE
COWL
HYPE
7
1
108
9
÷
2
4
÷
x
4
32
5
-
9
12
-
9
+
x
x
8
3
3
28
8
2
÷
+
-2
6
10
-1
ZYGOLEX
LEFT TO RIGHT:
pad; castle; saw;
fork; paw; fort;
foot; soot; sort;
food; type; chow;
ripe; rude; tape
5-CLUE CROSSWORD
Across: 1 Seldom*, 3 B-I-Op.-IC, 4 es-chew
Down: 1 Sombre(ro), 2 Mo’s-cow
WORD WHEEL
NINE-LETTER WORD heterodox
OTHER WORDS deter, dot, dote, ether, exert,
exhort, exhorted, hereto, hoot, hooted, hooter,
hot, other, root, rooted, rot, rote, tee, teed, the,
thee, there, three, toe, toed, too, tor, tore, tree,
trod
YESTERDAY’S CODEWORD 1996
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
V N M B F
L
D P Y G H W
E
I
T
ZakHardaker was sacked by with
four years left on his Cas contract
it was revealed he failed a drugs test
after a Super 8s game against the
Rhinos in September. In 2014, while
at Leeds he was banned for five
games after being found guilty of
homophobic abuse during a match
and a year later he agreed to take an
anger management course after admitting assaulting a student.
Hardaker, who was shortlisted
for the Man of Steel award last year,
was also left out of England’s World
Cup squad following the failed
drugs test.
SNOOKER
Century break
seals Trump’s
place in quarters
Judd Trump has secured his
place in the World Championship
quarter-finals by beating Welshman
Ricky Walden 13-9.
World No 4 Trump sealed a last-
eight clash against four-time winner John Higgins with a final-frame
clearance of 103.
The pair were locked at 8-8 overnight, but Trump, 28, won five of
their six frames yesterday with the
help of three half-century breaks.
World No 27 Walden, 35, won yesterday’s opening frame to edge 9-8
ahead, but Trump took the next five
with runs of 66, 70, and 66 before finishing with his fourth century in the
last. China’s Ding Junhui sealed his
place in the last eight with a 13-4 win
against Anthony McGill.
The world No 3, who had built a
commanding 12-4 overnight lead,
won the opening frame in yesterday morning’s session and will play
Barry Hawkins in the last eight.
Mark Williams will now take on
Ronnie O’Sullivan’s conqueror Alli
Carter, after a routine 13-7 win over
English qualifier Robert Milkins.
Results Service
Puzzle solutions
1
recognised this fact. He was commended by the tribunal for his impressive comprehensive evidence
and the fact that he made no attempt
to downplay his conduct and was utterly frank with them. The last two
years have been an extremely difficult period for Zak who, away from
the public eye, has bravely battled a
number of personal traumas.”
Castleford announced in February that Hardaker had been sacked
with four years left on his contract.
The Tigers initially suspended
Hardaker last October after dropping the England international
for the Super League Grand Final
against Leeds, the club he left for
Castleford in a loan deal in 2016.
He joined the club on a permanent
contract in June with Daryl Powell’s
side cruising to League Leaders’
Shield success. But his chequered
career took another dark turn when
X C K Z U
O S A Q R
J
PREMIER LEAGUE
Tottenham (1)..............2 Watford (0) .................. 0
Alli 16
Att 52,675
Kane 48
P W D L F A Pts
Man City
35 30 3 2 102 26 93
Man Utd
35 24 5 6 67 27 77
Liverpool
36 20 12 4 80 37 72
Tottenham
35 21 8 6 68 31 71
Chelsea
35 20 6 9 60 34 66
Arsenal
35 17 6 12 67 48 57
Burnley
36 14 12 10 35 32 54
Everton
36 13 9 14 42 54 48
Leicester
35 11 11 13 49 52 44
Newcastle
35 11 8 16 35 44 41
Crystal Palace 36 9 11 16 41 54 38
Bournemouth 36 9 11 16 42 60 38
Watford
36 10 8 18 42 62 38
Brighton
35 8 13 14 32 47 37
West Ham
35 8 11 16 43 67 35
Huddersfield 35 9 8 18 27 56 35
Swansea
35 8 9 18 27 52 33
Southampton 35 6 14 15 35 54 32
Stoke
36 6 12 18 32 65 30
West Brom
36 5 13 18 30 54 28
CRICKET
Hampshire v Essex: Specsavers County
Championship - Division One, The Ageas
Bowl: Hampshire(11pts)drewwithEssex
(10pts)
Essex elected to bowl
HAMPSHIRE — First Innings 241-4
(Adams 87, Amla 52)
First Innings Contd
R R Rossouw c Harmer b Siddle................. 10
L A Dawson not out.................................................34
†L D McManus c Foster b S J Cook.............16
K J Abbott c & b S J Cook......................................43
C P Wood not out..................................................... 10
Extras (b7 lb9 w1 nb6)..................................................23
Total (for 7 dec, 108.4 overs) ..................351
Fall: 1-54, 2-134, 3-227, 4-241, 5-241, 6-272,
7-340.
Did Not Bat: B Wheal, F H Edwards.
Bowling: J A Porter 29-4-86-1, S J Cook 227-87-2, P M Siddle 29-7-62-3, R S Bopara
9.4-2-37-0, S R Harmer 18-3-59-1, D W
Lawrence 1-0-4-0.
Essex — First Innings
N L J Browne c Adams b Wheal.....................26
A N Cook c McManus b Wood....................... 84
T Westley c Amla b Wheal ...................................0
D W Lawrence lbw b Abbott ...............................6
R S Bopara not out.................................................. 84
*R N ten Doeschate lbw b Edwards ..........24
†J S Foster b Dawson ............................................ 46
S R Harmer not out.................................................21
Extras (b1 lb8)...........................................................................9
Total (for 6, 70.5 overs) ........................... 300
Fall: 1-54, 2-54, 3-61, 4-148, 5-175, 6-251.
DidNotBat: S J Cook, P M Siddle, J A Porter.
Bowling: K J Abbott 17-3-42-1, F H Edwards
16-4-63-1, C P Wood 17-1-72-1, B Wheal
12.5-3-63-2, L A Dawson 8-0-51-1.
Umpires: Paul Baldwin and Robert Robinson.
Lancashire v Surrey: Specsavers County
Championship - Division One, Emirates
Old Trafford: Lancashire(12pts)drewwith
Surrey(8pts)
Surrey elected to bowl
LANCASHIRE — First Innings 439-9 dec.
(Clark 78, Mennie 68no, Bailey 66, Chanderpaul 65, Croft 62, Virdi 4-80)
SURREY — First Innings 231-9 (Borthwick 79, Bailey 4-54)
First Innings Contd
R Patel not out................................................................4
A Virdi c Vilas b Onions ..........................................4
Extras (b8 lb6 nb4)..........................................................18
Total (89.4 overs).......................................235
Fall: 1-2, 2-100, 3-131, 4-171, 5-202, 6-217,
7-218, 8-228, 9-231.
Bowling: T E Bailey 22-5-54-4, G Onions
19.4-6-49-4, L S Livingstone 18-4-36-1, J
M Mennie 16-2-47-0, J Clark 12-4-32-1, S
J Croft 2-0-3-0.
Surrey — Second Innings
*R J Burns c Jennings b Livingstone .......33
M D Stoneman c Vilas b Bailey.....................29
S G Borthwick b Bailey............................................0
D Elgar c Vilas b Clark ...........................................14
†B T Foakes c Vilas b Bailey .............................57
O J Pope c Livingstone b Bailey ....................41
S M Curran not out.....................................................9
R Patel not out................................................................9
Extras (lb7) ...................................................................................7
Total (for 6, 90.3 overs)............................199
Fall: 1-53, 2-53, 3-68, 4-90, 5-176, 6-177.
Did Not Bat: J W Dernbach, M P Dunn, A
Virdi.
Bowling: T E Bailey 19-12-13-4, G Onions
19-6-41-0, J Clark 12-3-29-1, J M Mennie
15-5-44-0, L S Livingstone 22.3-5-59-1, S
J Croft 3-1-6-0.
Umpires: Peter Hartley and Richard Kettleborough.
Somerset v Yorkshire: Specsavers
County Championship - Division One,
Taunton: Somerset (20pts)beatYorkshire
(3pts)by118runs
Yorkshire elected to bowl
SOMERSET — First Innings 216
(Renshaw 112, Brooks 5-57)
YORKSHIRE — First Innings 96
SOMERSET — Second Innings 200
(Abell 82, Coad 4-61)
YORKSHIRE — Second Innings 49-1
Second Innings Contd
A Lyth c Hildreth b Groenewald...................34
C A Pujara c Davies b Gregory ..........................6
*G S Ballance c Davies b Gregory ..............19
J A Leaning c Renshaw b Overton...............68
M J Waite c & b Overton ........................................6
†A J Hodd lbw b Overton........................................1
T T Bresnan lbw b Abell.......................................21
J A Brooks c & b Groenewald..........................21
B O Coad c Trescothick b Abell .........................2
K Carver not out............................................................0
Extras (b2 lb7) ...........................................................................9
Total (86.1 overs).......................................202
Fall: 1-26, 2-49, 3-67, 4-81, 5-99, 6-103,
7-159, 8-188, 9-191.
Bowling: L Gregory 23-7-59-2, C Overton 21.1-7-43-3, J H Davey 7.5-4-12-1, T D
Groenewald 19-5-51-2, D M Bess 9.1-5-130, T B Abell 6-2-15-2.
Umpires: Alexander Wharf and Michael
Burns.
P W L D Bt Bl Pts
Notts
3 2 1 0 4 9 45
Somerset
2 2 0 0 2 6 40
Hampshire
3 1 1 1 6 8 35
Essex
3 1 0 2 3 5 34
Yorkshire
3 1 1 1 2 6 29
Surrey
2 1 0 1 2 5
28
Lancashire
3 0 2 1 4 9
18
Worcestershire 3 0 3 0 1 9 10
DIVISION TWO
Leicestershire v Derbyshire, Grace
Road: Leicestershire 381 (96.0 overs;
P J Horton 66, C N Ackermann 65, E J
Eckersley 54). Derbyshire 251-8 (68.0
overs; G C Wilson 64no). Leicestershire
(11pts) drew with Derbyshire (10pts).
Middlesex v Glamorgan, Lord’s:
Middlesex 194 (42.1 overs; S S Eskinazi
94; M G Hogan 5-49, T van der Gugten
4-63). Glamorgan 38-4 (15.5 overs; T J
Murtagh 4-12). Middlesex (6pts) drew
with Glamorgan (8pts).
Northamptonshire v Durham,
Northampton: Match abandoned
without a ball bowled.
Northamptonshire (5pts) Durham (5pts)
Sussex v Gloucestershire, Hove: Sussex
145 (47.0 overs; P D Salt 63; R F Higgins
5-21) & 204 (58.5 overs; D J Worrall
4-45). Gloucestershire 183 (57.1 overs; D
Wiese 5-48, O E Robinson 4-67) & 108-6
(43.2 overs). Sussex (8pts) drew with
Gloucestershire (8pts).
P W L D Bt Bl Pts
Warwickshire 2 1 0 1 5 6 32
Derbyshire
2 1 0 1 4 6 31
Glamorgan
2 1 0 1 3 6 30
Gloucestershire 3 1 1 1 1 7 29
Middlesex
3 1 1 1 1 7 29
Sussex
3 0 0 3 7 7 29
Kent
2 1 1 0 0 6 22
Leicestershire 2 0 0 2 7 4 21
Northants
3 0 2 1 0 5 10
Durham
2 0 1 1 0 3
8
TOUR MATCH
Pakistan v Kent, Canterbury (Today;
11am): Pakistan 168 (55.2 overs; Imam-ulHaq 61; W R S Gidman 5-47). Kent 39-1
(15.0 overs). No play Monday due to rain.
HORSE RACING
SOUTHWELL
6.50 (1m13yds h’cap): TREATY OF ROME
(P Mathers 5-1) 1; Best Tamayuz (11-2) 2;
Fieldsman (11-2) 3. Red Touch 3-1F. 8
ran. shd, 11/4l. (D Shaw). Placepot: £27.50.
Quadpot: £11.90.
SALISBURY
3.40 (1m4f5yds h’cap): PRETTY JEWEL
(K O’Neill 5-4F) 1; I’m A Believer (101) 2; Lady Bergamot (5-2) 3. 5 ran. nk,
41/2l. (I Williams). NR: Flight Of Fantasy.
Placepot: £3,960.40. Quadpot: £63.60.
THIRSK
4.05 (6f h’cap): BLACK ISLE BOY
(Daniel Tudhope 16-1) 1; My Name Is
Rio (33-1) 2; Pennsylvania Dutch (7-1)
3. Kupa River 13-2F. 15 ran. nk, shd.
(D O’Meara). NRs: Henley, Short Work.
5.05 (7f218yds h’cap): ODDS ON OLI
(P Hanagan 7-2F) 1; Consultant (5-1)
2; Amity Island (12-1) 3. 10 ran. nk,
31/4l. (R Fahey). Jackpot: Not won, pool
of £4,390.01 carried over. Placepot:
£2,422.10. Quadpot: £343.50.
WOLVERHAMPTON
3.15 (7f36yds h’cap): TIVOLI (R Havlin
11-10F) 1; Line House (14-1) 2; Ortiz
(7-2) 3. 5 ran. 1/2l, 3l. (J Gosden). NR:
Cirrus Minor. 4.55 (1m4f51yds h’cap):
SKY EAGLE (A Atzeni 11-10F) 1; Agent
Gibbs (11-1) 2; Star Ascending (9-2) 3.
9 ran. 11/4l, 33/4l. (Ed Walker). Placepot:
£16.40. Quadpot: £4.40.
WINDSOR
7.10 (1m2f h’cap): CHANCE TO DREAM (J
P Spencer 4-1) 1; Zzoro (15-2) 2; Man Of
Harlech (5-1) 3. Past Master 11-4F. 8 ran.
/2l, 1/2l. (J Best). 7.40 (1m3f99yds h’cap):
ENVOY (R Tate 25-1) 1; Quothquan (9-1)
1
2; Hawridge Flyer (9-2) 3. Petitioner 3-1F.
13 ran. hd, 31/4l. (J Eustace). NR: Gassin
Golf. Placepot: £42.00. Quadpot: £12.70.
SNOOKER
BETFRED WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP,
CRUCIBLE THEATRE, SHEFFIELD: Second round: D Junhui (Chin) bt A McGill
(Sco) 13-4; J Trump (Eng) bt R Walden
(Eng) 13-9; M Williams (Wal) bt Robert
Milkins (Eng) 13-7.
TENNIS
WTA J&T BANKA PRAGUE OPEN,
CZECH REPUBLIC: First round: A
Schmiedlova (Slovak) bt H WATSON
(GB) 6-1 6-3.
TODAY’S FIXTURES
(7.45pm unless stated)
FOOTBALL
UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE SEMI-FINAL
SECOND LEG
Real Madrid (2) v Bayern Munich (1)...............
SKY BET LEAGUE ONE
Bradford v Walsall.........................................................
Doncaster v AFC Wimbledon..............................
Scunthorpe v Plymouth ...........................................
SKY BET LEAGUE TWO
Chesterfield v Newport Co.....................................
LADBROKES SCOTTISH PREMIERSHIP
PLAY-OFF QTR-FINAL 1ST LEG
Dunfermline v Dundee Utd...................................
LADBROKES SCOTTISH LEAGUE ONE
PLAY-OFF SEMI-FINAL FIRST LEG
Stenhousemuir v Queen’s Park..........................
LADBROKES SCOTTISH LEAGUE TWO
PLAY-OFF SEMI-FINAL 2ND LEG
Spartans (0) v Cove Rangers (4) ..........................
50
SPORT
FORMULA ONE
BOXING
Red Bull drivers are
warned: No repeat of
Baku crash debacle
crash while Dr Helmut Marko, the
team’s consultant and head of drivRed Bull have decided against er development, said that they will
implementing team orders for implement measures to ensure it
the rest of the season, despite the does not happen again.
disastrous race-ending collision
“I don’t care who is to blame,”
between Daniel Ricciardo and Max Marko said on Sunday when the
Verstappen in Sunday’s Azerbaijan two stricken Red Bull cars were left
Grand Prix.
in a pile of used parts. “Both drivers should have enough
What looked to be a
certain points finish – and
brain to avoid such an acIt’s a
potential podium opporcident. We will take measures to guarantee it won’t
tunity – unravelled badly fine line –
when Ricciardo smashed competition
happen again.”
into the back of Verstap- is what people
But a more reserved
Horner – once the team
pen’s car at near 200mph.
Before the final crash want to see
had held a full debrief
took place, the pair had and we want
– admitted that they
been told to calm down to allow the
will not impose team orafter nearly coming to- drivers to race ders on Ricciardo and
gether on a couple of oc- each other
Verstappen so long as
casions. The final collision
they do not repeat their
had been coming.
Azerbaijan antics.
A furious Christian Horner, the
He also said that both drivers
Red Bull team principal, refused will be made to apologise to the 800
to comment immediately after the Red Bull staff members ahead of the
Spanish Grand Prix next weekend
to ensure they know that they are
“in the doghouse”.
“They’re equally responsible,”
said Horner. “What’s obviously
annoying is that we’ve given away
an awfully large amount of points
today, so both drivers will be
apologising to all the members of
staff who work so hard to put these
cars together.
“It’s a fine line – competition is
what people want to see, and we
want to allow the drivers to race
each other. For the last two years,
they’ve done a very good job of that.
“We will discuss things prior
to Barcelona, but we want to continue to allow the drivers to race.
But they have to ensure that, if
they are going wheel-to-wheel, they
Daniel Ricciardo crashed into the
allow each other enough space.”
By Jack de Menezes
back of team-mate Max Verstappen
THE INDEPENDENT
Hamilton remains short on
hope despite opening win
By Phillip Duncan
Lewis Hamilton says his victory in
Azerbaijan has not provided him
with renewed hope that he can beat
Sebastian Vettel to this year’s Formula One world championship.
Hamilton (right) will contest the opening leg of
the European season
in Barcelona a week
on Sunday with a fourpoint lead over Vettel
after ending his sixrace losing streak on
Sunday. The 33-year-old
British driver did so, however, in the most fortunate of
circumstances as he took advantage of a number of incidents.
Ferrari, in Vettel’s hands, remain
the team to beat with Hamilton
struggling to get on top of this year’s
Mercedes. Vettel should have departed Baku at least 12 points clear
of his rival, but will head to Spain
trailing. The German may have had
an even healthier cushion had Max
Verstappen not wiped him out of the
Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai.
Hamilton warned that both
he and Mercedes must
raise their game to stand
any chance of for him to
win a fifth world crown.
“I currently don’t feel
that way,” said Hamilton
when asked if his victory
in Baku had provided him
with hope he could win the
title. “Being in the lead of the
championship is great, but if we
continue on the trajectory we are
on, then we would need tricky races
like this one in Azerbaijan to keep
us in the fight.”
Ken Buchanan (left)
during a sparring session
with Ralph Charles in
1972. Below: Arriving at
Heathrow Airport a year
earlier after successfully
defending his world
lightweight title against
Panama’s Ismael Laguna in
New York GETTY
Once an exile in his
own city, time for a
fitting tribute to the
brilliant Buchanan
Steve
Bunce
T
he men sat in a tight
circle, five veterans of
hostile foreign wars,
trading tales, comparing
scar tissue and admiring
their damaged hands.
On Friday night in Edinburgh,
Ken Buchanan was honoured at a
dinner in the Hilton, flanked by Jim
Watt, John Conteh, John H. Stracey
and Barry McGuigan. All five held
rare versions of genuine world titles
in the Seventies and Eighties and
had gathered at Ken’s table to raise
funds for a statue in his hometown.
Buchanan is arguably Britain’s
finest fighter and a statue is overdue
in a city where two giraffes, that
most Scottish of wild beasts, have
their towering perch, but the boxer
has gone under the radar for far
too long. The giraffes are lovely, by
the way. In 1970, Buchanan won
the WBA lightweight title when he
mystical home, to fight Roberto
fought under a merciless sun, in
Duran in front of 18,821 in a fight that
heat tipping 120 degrees, to outpoint set a cash record for lightweights of
Ismael Laguna over 15 torrid rounds $225,000 at the venue. Duran won
in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
when he kneed Kenny in the groin
Buchanan arrived back in
in round 13; Buchanan remains
Edinburgh wearing a sombrero,
adamant he could have continued
smiling, rehydrated, a
even with the damage.
hero returning but he was
Buchanan fought for
I took
greeted by just two people,
another 10 years, often
some tape
his wife and son. He then
brilliant in exile and even
fought and dominated at
went on the unlicensed
and divided
Madison Square Garden
the room with circuit when he finally quit
where he was adopted by a line on the
in 1982.
the savvy fight crowd in
was harsh
floor. I told him onRetirement
New York City.
Buchanan. There is
[Muhammad
On one night at the
no convenient subterfuge
Garden, he let Muhammad Ali] to keep to to disguise the various
Ali share his dressing
horrors; now, he is
his side
room when they were both
surrounded by some great
fighting. “I took some tape
people and his Foundation
and divided the room with a line on
is dedicated to getting a statue
the floor,” said Buchanan. “I told him erected in the city.
to keep to his side. That was some
On Friday night, a sharp medic
night, that was.” Yes, Buchanan was
with a probing doctor’s torch would
that big.
have easily read the suffering left
After two defences, one a full
behind from the ring exploits on the
unification of the world title, he
faces of the gathered fighters. They
was back at the Garden, boxing’s
probably have, from reading my
NEWS
2-27
FOOTBALL
Sunderland
takeover
could take
months
By Damian Spellman
There is no fixed timescale for Stewart Donald’s proposed takeover at
Sunderland to be completed.
Current owner Ellis Short announced on Sunday that he had
agreed to sell the club to an international consortium headed by the
Eastleigh chairman, who in turn is
to relinquish control of the National
League outfit.
However, the new owners would
have to gain EFL approval before the
deal could go through and that process could take days, weeks or in extreme cases, months.
The EFL does not comment
on individual cases, but its rules
require football club owners to
provide information about the
financial consequences of a change
of ownership and “evidence
of the source and sufficiency of any funds”
to be invested.
In the meantime, first-team
The number
co ac h Ro b b i e
of managers
Stockdale will
Sunderland have
had under owner take charge for
the final ChampiEllis Short
onship game of the
season against Wolves
on Sunday.
Short has been looking to offload
dusty cuttings, 300 stitches between the Black Cats for some time and has
paid off the existing debt, understood
them from a total of 240 fights.
to amount to in excess of £110m, to
Some of the greatest fights and
pave the way for a fresh start.
nights in British boxing history.
The departures of manager Chris
At Buchanan’s side and in his
Coleman and assistant Kit Symons
ear for five hours was Jim Watt.
on Sunday cleared the decks for a
They once fought for just £7,136
new charge.
pounds over 15 rounds for the
The Welshman was the 11th manBritish lightweight title in Glasgow.
ager of the Texan’s reign, following
Buchanan won on points; two years
in the footsteps of Roy Keane Ricky
later Watt finally won the British
Sbragia, Steve Bruce, Martin O’Neill,
title and then, nine years after
Paolo Di Canio, Gus Poyet, Dick AdBuchanan was world champion,
vocaat, Sam Allardyce, David Moyes
Watt won the same title. Jim had
and Simon Grayson.
hired Ken as a sparring partner.
Should Donald and his investors
“I’ve been sitting next to Ken all
receive approval, their mission will
night,” said Watt on Friday. “And
be to revitalise a club which has caI was thinking: ‘F***, I never got
reered out of control as it has slipped
this close in 15 rounds’.” Watt was a
from the middle of the Premier
brilliant champion and truly decent
League into League One under Short.
man. The truth is they could all do
with a little more love.
In the auction, there was a threefoot black and white photograph
of Buchanan sitting in truly
desperate isolation after a fight. In
the haunting picture, Buchanan
has his head dipped, a tiny bloodstained towel is across his naked
lap, his body is impossibly thin. Last
year, Buchanan had shown me the
picture, I had assumed it was after
his Duran loss. I was wrong: “It’s
the Laguna fight in Puerto Rico,”
he told me. “I could barely talk,
the heat was so intense – I couldn’t
even celebrate.”
In 1970, he returned to Edinburgh
as the world champion, Britain’s only
one at the time, he was anonymous
and disgracefully ignored, an
outsider in exile in his city – on
Chris Coleman left Sunderland on
Friday, Buchanan came home in
Sunday after the club was sold
some style. THE INDEPENDENT
11
VOICES
14-18
TV
28-29
IQ
30-39
BUSINESS SPORT
40-43
48-56
i TUESDAY
1 MAY 2018
51
SamCunningham
FOOTBALL CORRESPONDENT
Wembley sale will hasten
football’s break for the border
I
t is 2068. Manchester FC, the
amalgamation of Manchester
United and Manchester City,
are playing the season at their
home ground in America. Next
year, Manchester FC will play
their home games in China. The
year after, Myanmar.
They will hop around the
globe playing at the homes of
Merseyside FC, London FC and
NewUnderland, only one of which
will actually play in England
each season; in Londinium,
only accessible by plane due to
the vast moat carved in place
of the M25, reinforced by a high
security wall. While this all
paints a rather grim, exaggerated
dystopian image of a future
Premier League, the idea is not so
far-fetched.
Jacksonville Jaguars faced the Baltimore Ravens at Wembley last year GETTY
As Fulham’s PakistaniAmerican owner Shahid Khan
The future is, quite clearly,
stands on the verge of buying
on these shores. It has taken
overseas. In America, Hong Kong,
Wembley Stadium for almost
over everyone and everywhere.
China, Japan, Brazil, India.
£1billion, potentially moving
Even a decade ago, the game’s
Arsenal, for example, prioritise
his NFL team, the Jacksonville
domination of society was being
overseas media for time with
Jaguars, over to London
parodied in a brilliantly accurate
their players, over traditional,
permanently – American football
Mitchell and Webb sketch.
non rights-holding English
digging up one of its 32 roots
“You can catch all of that
and replanting it in England –
media. Manchester United
football here, where we’ll be
are obsessed with Twitter and
the move represents a major
showing all the football, all the
Facebook followers, factoring
step towards “English” football
time,” comedian David Mitchell
the global social marketability
eventually going global.
says, marching alongside a
of players into making their
Khan is a modern-day sporting
pitch in a suit and tie, growing
biggest signings. Manchester
Christopher Columbus venturing increasingly maniacal. “You
City are filming a £10million-plus
into the unknown, only with a
can catch all of the constantly
documentary for Netflix.
finely-tuned, pointy moustache
happening football here. It’s all
The “Big Six” are already
and an NFL brand rather than
here and it’s all football, always.
a fleet of ships and the constant
It is impossible to keep track of all fighting for more of the money
from abroad. They argue that
fear of imminent drowning. But
the football, but your best chance
they are the clubs driving
where Khan goes, others
is here. Thousands and
popularity of the Premier League
will follow when he
thousands of hours
Richard
worldwide, so they should receive
strikes gold.
of football, each more
Scudamore is climactic than the last. a bigger portion of any TV rights
Richard Scudamore,
desperate to
money. The “Small Fourteen” –
the Premier League’s
Constant, dizzying,
as that would consequentially
chief executive and
24-hour, year-long,
play league
make the rest – claim that the
nowadays the most
endless, every kick of it
matches
competitiveness of the league, of
powerful man in English abroad – he is massively mattering to
which they play a significant part,
football, is desperate
someone, presumably.
envious of the
to play league matches
“Watch it all, all here, is what makes it so popular.
NFL expansion all the time, forever,
Football clubs are already in
abroad. He is envious
overseas
the hands of the domestic TV
of the NFL and NBA
it will never stop, the
rights holders, who pump the
for their expansion
football is officially
most money into them. Yet the
overseas and frustrated
going on forever, it will
closer the foreign TV rights
by opposition to the concept over
never be decided who has finally
package value reaches to the
here.
won the football, there is still
Scudamore told an audience
everything to play for, and forever figures for domestic rights, the
stronger the argument for those
at an event during the Premier
to play it in.”
broadcasters overseas gets to
League’s Asian Trophy in 2015 – a
“The football” has increased
host matches in their country, or
tournament which has been held
infinitely since then;
having a say over kick-off times.
in Hong Kong, China, Malaysia
unrelentingly broadcast on our
What if the overseas TV rights
and Thailand – that the appetite
TV and radio stations, there
holders exceeds the domestic
of fans could not be satisfied
are more football podcasts than
value? Then who calls the shots?
by friendlies between Premier
you could listen to in a week, it
dominates newspapers and news
It is 2068, it’s gone 10pm. You
League clubs, but by proper live
websites.
are tired and have an early start
games worth Premier League
Overseas represents the only
and another long day tomorrow,
points. It is, also, the exact reason
growth market now: the only
but you really want to watch your
why English supporters, already
place on which the Premier
team play live, even if it is only
being priced out of live football,
League’s dark tentacles have
on telly, so you set your alarm for
are so resistant to moving games
not fully secured their suction
3.30am for the kick-off in Beijing.
abroad.
pads and have yet to haul into its
As you drift off to sleep, you
But Scudamore knows that
sharp, jagged-teeth-filled mouth.
wonder: how did it come to this?
the Premier League is saturated
52
Football
SPORT
CHAMPIONS LEAGUE: REAL MADRID v BAYERN MUNICH
ROMA v LIVERPOOL
Zidane insists his job
does not depend on
European success
Zinedine Zidane says his future
as Real Madrid coach does not Real Madrid
depend on winning the Champions
League for the third successive seaNavas
son. Zidane has come under pressure following a poor La Liga title
defence. Real, who saw Barcelona
Ra s Varane Nacho M rcelo
take their domestic crown on Sunday, are well placed to lift the ChamKroos
Casemiro
Modric
pions League trophy for the fourth
time in five years and take a 2-1 lead
Bale
sensio
into tonight’s semi-final second leg
at home to Bayern Munich.
Ronaldo
Zidane insisted he was fully
focused on the clash with the
wandow i
Bundesliga champions and dismissed suggestions that failing to
Ribery
Müller
Rodriguez
win the competition would determine his fate.
Thiag
sso
“It’s independent of that,” the
45-year-old Frenchman said yesterday. “Today I’m the coach and I Rafin a Hummels Sule Ki mich
want to continue at this club. But
it’s not important. What matters to
Ulreich
everyone is thinking about tomorBayern Munich
row’s game and that’s it.”
Goals from Marcelo and Marco Possible teams for tonight’s match at the Bernabeu
TV BT Sport 2 (from 7pm).
Asensio earned Real’s victory at Kick-off 7.45pm
the Allianz Arena last week after Referee C Cakir (Turk)
they had fallen behind to a strike
from Joshua Kimmich. Those away the Champions League is a positive
goals mean Bayern must score at that is equivalent to those two or
least twice at the Bernabeu to have even more. For me it would be two
a chance of progressing to the final great seasons, theirs and ours.”
in Kiev.
Bayern boss Jupp Heynckes
Despite holding the upper hand, has defended top-scorer Robert
Zidane has urged his players to Lewandowski following his lack
start with an attacking mentality. of Champions League goals. The
“The key for us is to go out to win Polish striker has scored 39 times
the game,” he said. “No need to take in all competitions this season but
chances, to play on the back foot, failed to find the net in his last four
nor to do anything strange.
European games.
We’ve got to go out and
Heynckes, a striker in his
get an early goal. It’s
playing days, has backed
a semi-final and we
his star forward. “Lewy
know the imporhas my complete suptance of the game.
port. Every striker,
European Cup/
We know what we
including myself, has
Champions League
have to do.”
phases where they
trophies
won
by
Speaking about
don’t score,” said
Real
Madrid
the potential of
Heynckes. “But he has
reaching a third final
scored a lot of goals this
in a row and setting up
season and you can’t fora meeting with Roma or
get that he once scored four
Liverpool, Zidane added: “The
goals against Real in the semionly thing we’re thinking about is final of the Champions League for
going out and giving everything to Dortmund. So who knows what’ll
make it to the final. It’s what drives happen tomorrow.”
us all on, the fans, the club, the team
Bayern’s cause is not helped by
want to give everything to get to the injuries to key players Arjen Robfinal.”
ben and Jerome Boateng who will
Defender Nacho should be avail- be unavailable, although Javi Marable having returned to training fol- tinez and David Alaba, who have
lowing injury, but playmaker Isco
had injury problems, did travel.
and full-back Dani Carvajal are
Bayern have lost six in a row
doubts.
against Real. Heynckes, howReal Madrid captain Sergio
ever, is unconcerned. “The
Ramos (inset) believes winpast isn’t important,” he said.
ning the Champions League
“We have to be more
would top Barcelona’s doefficient than in the
mestic double. Barca sealed
first leg. We’ve
the La Liga title on Sunday
scored goals all
with four games to spare
season and I
having already lifted the
hope we’ll see
Copa del Rey. “Barca
that clinicalhave had a great year,
ness tomorthey have won two titles;
row that’s
winning the cup has
been a mark
merit and the league even
of our game
more,” said Ramos.“Winning
all year.” PA
12
“T
he best transfer I
have made and will
ever make,” was how
Jürgen Klopp once
described Zeljko
Buvac, the assistant coach who has
stepped away from his duties at
Liverpool until at least the end of
the season.
Those remarks may have come before the signing of 43-goal Mohamed
Salah for €42million last summer, but
right-hand man Buvac is so integral
to Klopp’s management process, they
probably still stand.
The Bosnian-Serb is the quiet
counterpoint to his boss loud personality, more of a tactician and technician than a leader or motivator. He
has commonly been referred to as
“the brain” of Klopp’s operation. The
fear now is that, two days before a
Champions League semi-final, Liverpool have been lobotomised.
Yet it would be surprising if this unfortunate episode prevented Klopp’s
side from reaching the final in Kiev
tomorrow night, not least because of
their three-goal head start on Roma.
It should not precipitate a collapse
to a fifth-place finish in the Premier
League, either.
The timing may be terrible but
Buvac has honed Liverpool’s counter-
press at Melwood for two-and-a-half
years now, imparting principles that
will not be lost overnight, even if he
is not there to share polite reminders
of them. The muscle memory will last
these final few weeks.
The real concern should be whether Buvac’s absence turns from temporary to permanent, with no adequate
replacement found during this summer’s truncated pre-season. Yesterday’s significant development may
mark the end of one of those long professional relationships that are rarely
seen in the modern game, the type
that are almost impossible to replace.
Klopp and Buvac made a pact to
work together in management while
playing at Mainz in the early 1990s.
Whoever earned a degree of autonomy in a decent coaching role first
would find a job for the other. Buvac
left for lowly Neukirchen in 1995 and
later took charge there, but returned
Angry Salah in dispute with
Egypt’s FA over image rights
» Continued from back page
key player Salah, who has scored
43 goals for Liverpool this season,
becoming involved in a row
with the Egyptian FA about his
image rights.
Salah is furious they are using
a huge picture of him playing
for Egypt on their private jet,
next to a telecoms company
that sponsor the team, and are
putting up further billboards and
adverts using his image without
his permission. It is in particular
conflict with his own sponsorship
deal with Vodafone. Less than two
months before Salah is to play for
Egypt at the World Cup, he has
grown increasingly frustrated
with the EFA.
The EFA claimed to have
entered discussions with Salah
but Ramy Issa, Salah’s agent and
lawyer, says they have not been
contacted to find a resolution.
Salah said: “The way this has
been dealt with is extremely
insulting. I was hoping dealings
would be classier than this.”
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53
PREMIER LEAGUE
Jürgen Klopp
and Zeljko
Buvac have
worked
together for 17
years GETTY
Brutal attack on Sean
Cox leaves fans wary of
making trip to Rome
ground on arrival and bussed back
to the airport after Liverpool beat
As the rain fell, Sean Cox lay on
Roma on penalties.
the concrete of Walton Breck
The buses were trailed then by
Road. The screech of police sirens; a cavalcade of men on scooters,
the blare of arriving ambulances,
who tried to bring the bus to a
the sound of their brakes. They
halt by throwing glass bottles
were meant to be inside Anfield
underneath the wheels of the
just yards away. The attack on
moving target. What may have
Sean happened not long before
happened then does not bear
kick-off.
thinking about, considering the
He was on a stretcher when the
stabbings that had taken place
Kop was in full voice, just as the
elsewhere in the city in the hours
teams came out. Witnesses say
before and what happened years
the ambulance doors were
later when, in 2009, a
closing. You’ll Never
similar tactic was used to
Walk Alone will take
board a bus of Arsenal
on a new meaning
supporters, one of
for Sean’s brother
whom was knifed.
now. We do not
Nicolson does
The
number
of
years
know yet whether
not attend many
since Liverpool
Sean will be able to
European
away
reached for the
remember anything.
games with
Champions League
Liverpool are close
Liverpool any
final when they lost
to qualifying for their
more but there was
to AC Milan
first Champions League
never any chance of
final in 11 years. This team’s
him going to this one.
emergence under Jürgen Klopp
“Historically, Rome presents too
has been spectacular. In normal
many problems,” he explains. “I’m
circumstances, supporters would
concerned for my friends who are
be starting to arrive in a foreign
going. To be honest, I’m concerned
country today excited about all of
for everyone, especially after
the glorious possibilities: drinks
what happened last week. If a
in the sun, being with friends,
group can run down a street and
about Kiev as well – where the
attack someone outside the Kop,
Champions League final will
you do wonder what they might do
be played.
over there.”
Instead, thoughts are laced
David Woods has been to
with concern. Sean too must have
each of Liverpool’s Champions
imagined all of these
League away matches
possibilities as he made
this season. “Great
his way to Anfield last
times, had lots of fun…
If a group
Tuesday night. Having
can run down we booked our flights
undergone a major
to Rome but we’re not
a street and
operation, today he will
going now,” he says. The
attack
a
fan
be brought out of his
decision has lost him
outside
the
medically induced coma
hundreds of pounds but
Kop, you
at Walton Hospital’s
he doesn’t mind.
neurological centre.
“A lot of older guys I
wonder what
Liverpool officials have they might do know had advised not to
held what was described over there
book the flights when the
as an “extraordinary”
draw was made because
summit in Rome but
of the trouble in Rome
similar meetings were held weeks
in the past. We ignored them –
surely it couldn’t be that bad. But
in advance of a game in 2001
after the trouble last Tuesday, we
when Liverpool went there for a
decided not to go. It’s not worth it.
Uefa Cup game. On that occasion,
There’s five of us.”
14 fans returned home with
Travelling independently also
stab wounds.
means different concerns.“We
John Nicolson is a Liverpool
had an Airbnb but we didn’t know
supporter of 50 years. In 1984, he
travelled to Rome for the European what the area was like… it could
just be the case of walking down
Cup final as part of an official trip.
the wrong street.” THE INDEPENDENT
It involved being bussed to the
By Simon Hughes
11
to second-division Mainz as Klopp’s about his backroom staff and talked
assistant in 2001. For the last 17 up their contributions. “I am nothing
years, the pair have enjoyed an un- without them,” he said last summer,
broken stretch of success, their stars and it is the type of thing you might
rising together and their relationship expect from Klopp – a coach who
overcoming inevitable fallings-out.
stresses the importance of the colIn Rafael Honigstein’s excellent lective over the individual.
biography of Klopp, Bring the Noise,
Those words were sincere, though.
Mainz’s former sporting
Unlike certain other mandirector Christian Heidel
agers, Klopp is reluctant to
Buvac
remembers colourful disabuy into the myth of his own
greements between the is very
greatness. His success is
pair. “Buvac is very emo- emotional.
dependent on the coaches
tional,” he says. “‘Kiss my He’d leave the alongside him helping to
ass! Shit!’ He’d leave the room and slam shape a strategy and the
room and slam the door.
players beneath him buying
And five minutes later, the door. Five into it. He knows he needs
minutes
later,
they’d be in each other’s
help and that his style must
they’d be in
arms again.”
be complemented, hence
“In each other’s arms” each other’s
why he gravitated towards
is probably not an exag- arms again
the more composed, cergeration, either. Klopp can
ebral Buvac.
often be seen hugging Buvac or Peter
Whatever happens now, Liverpool
Krawietz, the third member of his will end this campaign without two
inner circle, both before games and key members of staff that started it after goals. He wants them in close Buvac, on leave due to “personal reaproximity. When the Anfield hierar- sons”, and Pep Lijnders, formerly the
chy took the opportunity to extend coaching staff’s rising star, who left
Klopp’s contract just nine months to manage in the Netherlands earlier
after his appointment, Buvac and this year. How they are replaced – if
Krawietz’s terms were renewed to they are replaced – will have a greatthe same date.
er bearing on future success than it
In interviews about Anfield’s new might at other clubs, under different
bootroom, Klopp has spoken openly managers. THE INDEPENDENT
There was a
boisterous
atmosphere
among some
Liverpool fans
before last
week’s first leg
against Roma
at Anfield AP
Moyes to ‘deal
with’ Carroll
after early exit
By Ken Dyer
David Moyes promised to “deal
with” Andy Carroll after the
striker angrily left the side
of the pitch and disappeared
down the tunnel at the
London Stadium before the
end of Sunday’s 4-1 defeat by
Manchester City.
Carroll was annoyed at not
being sent on when Moyes
made a triple substitution in
the second half. West Ham
were already 4-1 down and
Carroll (below left his seat to
head down the tunnel shortly
afterwards but a
club spokesman
said the matter
would be
dealt with
internally.
Moyes
said: “It’s
something I’ll
deal with. In this
situation what you
need is everybody to
be a team member so if he has
done that, I’ll look at it and I’ll
deal with it.”
On a miserable day for
Moyes, sections of the
home crowd booed when he
substituted Manuel Lanzini in
the second half. However, the
manager was unrepentant. He
said: “Everybody should look at
the fourth goal and then they’ll
maybe see why. The players
here have got to understand,
we pick players to keep the ball,
to defend. Manu had a great
chance to keep the ball for us
and we end up losing the fourth
goal for it.” EVENING STANDARD
NEWCASTLE UNITED
Slimani might
have played
last Toon game
By Damian Spellman
Loan signing Islam Slimani
could have played his final
game for Newcastle after being
charged with violent conduct.
The 29-year-old Leicester
striker has been handed a
Football Association charge
after appearing to kick out at
defender Craig Dawson during
Saturday’s 1-0 Premier League
defeat by West Bromwich.
Referee David Coote did not
see the incident and Slimani
was not punished at the time,
but he faces a three-match
ban if he either admits or is
convicted of the alleged offence.
The Algeria international
arrived on Tyneside in January
on a short-term deal until
the end of the season. He has
started just one game and made
three substitute appearances.
54
Football
SPORT
PREMIER LEAGUE
Alli and Kane get
sluggish Spurs a
step closer to
European target
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR
Alli 16, Kane 48
2
WATFORD
0
By Ian Baker
Tottenham Hotspur
Lloris
Trip er Sanchez Vertonghen D vies
AT WEMBLEY
When Tottenham Hotspur and their
supporters look back at their year
exiled at Wembley Stadium it is
unlikely they will remember much
about this match. Dele Alli continued
his goalscoring form following a goalkeeping mistake and Harry Kane
kept the pressure up on Mohamed
Salah by scoring a second as Spurs
moved to within touching distance
of Champions League qualification.
That was about as good as it got.
This was not pretty, a disjointed
affair played in a subdued atmosphere with just 52,675 turning up
at the national stadium. Those that
stayed away probably had the right
idea.
There was still very much to play
for both these sides, Tottenham still
not certain of a Champions League
place and Watford needing a victory
to be assured of safety. But try telling
that to supporters who seemed lacking in interest with plenty of empty
seats at Wembley.
Kane, who started the day five
goals behind Salah in the race for
the Golden Boot, had an early effort
straight at Orestis Karnezis saved.
Eric Dier then headed over from
Mousa Dembélé’s cross but it was a
very subdued start from both sides
apart from that.
Mauricio Pochettino’s side were
gifted the opener after 16 minutes
by a howler from Karnezis, who is
keeping Heurelho Gomes out of the
Watford side. The on-loan Udinese
goalkeeper failed to catch a simple
Kieran Trippier cross with Christian Eriksen passing to Dele Alli who
coolly fired home away from the attentions of four visiting defenders.
The
Sport
Matrix
The stories you
need to know
Dier
Dembélé
Eriksen
Son
Kane
Gray
Richarlison
Holeb s
Feminia
Hughes
Douco
oue
Kabasele Cathcart Ma iappa
Karnezis
Watford
Subs: Tottenham Hotspur Wanyama (Dembele, 63),
Sissoko (Son, 74), Lamela (Alli, 83); Watford Deulofeu
(Femenia, 64), Deeney (Gray, 64), Carrillo (Hughes, 83).
Booked: Tottenham Hotspur Wanyama; Watford
None.
Man of the Match Kane. Rating 6/10.
Possession: Tottenham Hotspur 61% Watford 39%.
Attempts on target: Tottenham Hotspur 3 Watford 5.
Referee M Oliver (Ashington).
Attendance 52,675.
It was a fourth goal in five Premier League matches for Alli who
has hit form at the right time from
an England perspective ahead of the
World Cup. Dier went close to a second shortly afterwards but the utility player’s error nearly presented
Watford with a similar gift. Etienne
Capoue retrieved a stray pass by
Dier and played in Andre Gray, making his first league start under Javi
It was a fourth goal in five
League matches for Alli who
has hit form at the right time
from an England perspective
FOOTBALL
FA condemn Burnley
fans for booing Bong
The Football Association has
condemned the Burnley supporters
who booed Brighton defender
Gaetan Bong during Saturday’s
Premier League game at Turf Moor.
Bong accused former Burnley
player Jay Rodriguez, now with
West Bromwich, of racially abusing
him during a match in January.
The FA said yesterday that the
behaviour was “unacceptable” as
Bong’s complaint had been made “in
absolute good faith”.
Harry Kane beats Orestis
Karnezis for the second
time but on this occasion he
is denied by an offside flag
and (below) Moussa Sissoko
blazes a late shot over the
bar REUTERS/GETTY
Gracia, but the former Burnley striker shot straight at Hugo Lloris.
Watford grew in confidence with
Abdoulaye Doucoure unable to beat
Lloris after the ball fell to him inside
the area while at the other end Jan
Vertonghen had two shots blocked
from Ben Davies’ corner.
The visitors should have levelled
just before the break when Gray
played in Richarlison but the Brazilian’s shot was straight at Lloris
who was also alive to Doucoure’s run
shortly afterwards.
Tottenham and Kane were to put
the game beyond Watford three minutes into the second half though. The
England striker slipped over when
CRICKET
TENNIS
Malan calls for pink ball try out
Watson’s poor run
continues in Prague
Middlesex captain Dawid Malan
wants the ECB to experiment
with a pink ball in the
County Championship
to prevent more early
season washouts.
Only 58 overs
were bowled during
Middlesex’s Division
Two clash against
Glamorgan at Lord’s,
with rain on the final
morning ensuring the match
was abandoned as a draw.
Malan (below) said: “We could
have had a full day if we’d had a
pink ball because there was
no rain around. We were
literally sitting around for
four hours of bad light.
“We’re lucky that we’ve
got lights now – we never
had them before – but we
still got hardly any cricket
in. It might be worth the
ECB looking at using pink
balls this time of the year.”
» Countycricket, p48-49
Heather Watson’s poor form
continued with a straight-sets defeat
to Anna Karolina Schmiedlova in
the Prague Open first round. Watson
is without a win since defeating
Donna Vekic in the quarter-finals of
the Hobart International in January
– a run of eight successive matches.
The 25-year-old British player was
beaten 6-1, 6-3 in one hour and 26
minutes against Schmiedlova, who
won the Claro Open Colsanitas in
Bogota two weeks ago.
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55
MANCHESTER UNITED
Match-winner Fellaini eyes league
title next season as new deal looms
By Simon Peach
Marouane Fellaini has not put pen to
paper on a new deal, but the Manchester United midfielder is already
looking ahead to a “big season” and
an improved Premier League title
tilt.
The 30-year-old has been a divisive figure since arriving at Old
Trafford in 2013 but has regularly
proven his worth, such as his matchwinning influence from the bench
against Arsenal on Sunday.
The stoppage-time header underlined what an important option Fellaini is for Jose Mourinho, who has
praised the midfielder regularly and
backed him after being jeered by his
own fans.
Negotiations over a new contract
have been at an impasse for most of
the season. But there now appears
to have been a breakthrough as
Mourinho is confident Fellaini will
stay, while Sunday’s match-winner
has spoken of ending the season
with FA Cup glory and more silverware next season.
“I think it is good for the team,”
the midfielder said after the 2-1 win
against Arsenal. “We have the three
points, we are sure to participate in
the Champions League. We have to
continue, we have three games to
Marouane Fellaini celebrates his
winning goal against Arsenal
prepare for the final. Of course, a
club like Man United have to be in
the Champions League. But we have
to improve. I think next season is a
big season for us. It will be the third
year of the manager (at the club) so
we have to try to win the league.”
Fellaini snatched victory against
much-changed Arsenal after Henrikh Mkhitaryan had cancelled out
Paul Pogba’s opener. Mkhitaryan
was one of Mourinho’s first signings but left for Arsenal in January
having failed to win over the Portuguese, but he did not celebrate
in respect for the club. “He scored
a good goal and I think he is a quality player,” Fellaini told MUTV. “We
know that. I think he will do well at
Arsenal. I hope for him he continues
like that.”
Mkhitaryan was one of eight
changes made by Arsène Wenger
as he led Arsenal at Old Trafford for
the final time.
Thursday’s Europa League semifinal second leg at Atletico Madrid
took priority, meaning the outgoing
Gunners boss gave some of his upand-coming stars a run out. Konstantinos Mavropanos looked solid
on his Arsenal debut, while Reiss
Nelson and man-of-the-match Ainsley Maitland-Niles continued to
impress.
“Niles is slowly getting to the player I think he can be in the defensive
midfield, and he can create as well,”
Wenger said. “Mavropanos in training has shown top qualities, but then
you have always a question mark as
long you don’t see that under pressure in a big game. You don’t know.
“Certainly, my successor will
watch this game today and hopefully he will come to a positive conclusion for the players because I think
for them it is (a case of) can they be
part of the future of Arsenal Football Club?”
MANCHESTER CITY
Guardiola to make ‘right
decision’ on Hart future
trying to get on the end of Heung- with the goal at his mercy from subMin Son’s cross but made no mistake stitute Troy Deeney’s header down.
when Trippier retrieved the ball, Kane was then frustrated having a
slotting home comfortably.
goal disallowed after straying
Dembélé was forced off
marginally offside from
shortly afterwards with
Vertonghen’s pass.
a knock, being replaced
This game became
by Victor Wanyama,
more akin to a trainwho was booked withing ground exercise
Away goals scored
in seconds of his arrivlate on as a half empty
by Watford since the
al. Vertonghen then
stadium became less
start of 2018
headed an Eriksen
than a quarter empty
free kick against the
a long time before the
bar with Kane unable
final whistle. Tottenham
to make proper connecshould have scored a third
tion on the rebound. Watford
with Kane’s superb pass pickwere still causing problems on the ing out Moussa Sissoko who missed
break with Richarlison blazing over the target from the perfect position.
1
FOOTBALL
Club programmes
put to vote by EFL
EFL clubs are set to vote on the
future of the matchday programme
in June. The EFL revealed several
of its members have queried the
requirement for clubs to offer a
physical version of their product.
Those clubs have reported a drop in
sales and there will now be a ballot
on the issue at the summer meeting.
Whatever the outcome the EFL will
continue to produce a programme
for the Carabao Cup, Checkatrade
Trophy and play-Offs.
Andy Sims
Manchester City manager Pep
Guardiola says he will take the
“right decision” for Joe Hart if West
Ham opt not to sign the goalkeeper
on a permanent deal.
Hart’s future is uncertain as he
nears the end of his loan spell with
the Hammers, with boss David
Moyes insisting no decision will be
made until the end of the season.
The 31-year-old has a year left
on his City contract but has little
chance of re-establishing himself as
No 1 after Guardiola decided to send
him out on loan.
Guardiola admitted: “I think that
Raheem Sterling’s superb form this
season has been down to getting
him on the ball as much as possible.
“What I like most, as a manager, is
that the players provide [Sterling]
was the toughest decision I’ve made with as many balls as possible,”
since I was a manager.
Guardiola said.
“He was an incredible profession“My first target as a manager, is
al when we were together,
not to forget that they are
and there are no doubts
football players, they
about his quality. But
are football players to
I am here to make
touch the ball.
decisions, sometimes
“That is the reagood, sometimes not.
son why all the
The
number
of
We will find out in the
players, from the
years goalkeeper
future.
academy, from six,
Joe Hart has left on
“He’s our player
seven,
eight, nine
his Manchester City
and, if he does not conyears old, because
contract
tinue here next season,
they like to play with
we will talk. We are going
the ball.
to speak with the club and
“So always we provide
will take the right decision for him.” them to be in touch with the ball, as
Meanwhile, Guardiola has said much as possible.”
1
BOXING
FOOTBALL
Bellew: Haye fighting for career
Britons fail to make
World Cup VAR team
Tony Bellew claims David Haye
is fighting for his career on
Saturday when the two
British heavyweights
clash in a rematch at
London’s O2 Arena.
In a low-key
pre-fight press
conference in
Liverpool, Haye (right)
admitted he was not
as “angry” as in previous
media engagements.
Bellew was also composed
as he delivered a warning to
the 37-year-old former world
heavyweight champion.
Bellew said: “On Saturday,
it comes to an end, it really
does. For the first time
in your career you are
fighting for your career.
“If this goes wrong,
nothing can save you.”
Haye said: “Last time
round I was a bit angry, this
time round, not so much. I’ve
trained very hard.”
No Britons have been selected in the
list of 13 specialised video assistant
referees named by world governing
body Fifa for this summer’s World
Cup. The VAR system has generated
lots of debate in its worldwide
trials, with some arguing it has
created additional controversy
over decision-making rather than
reducing it. There will be no match
officials from England, Scotland,
Wales or Northern Ireland, nor the
Republic of Ireland at Russia 2018.
Sport on tv
Snooker: World Championship
BBC One, 10am, 1pm & 7pm
Tennis: Prague Open
BT Sport 1, 10am
Cycling: GP Frankfurt
Eurosport 2, 1pm
Cricket: Royal Challengers v Indians
Sky Sports Cricket, 3pm
Football: Real Madrid v B Munich
BT Sport 2, 7pm
Football: Scunthorpe v Plymouth
Sky Sports Football, 7.30pm
Baseball: Indians v Rangers
BT Sport/ESPN, 11pm
56
SPORT
Cazorla eyes
return this
season after
injury lay off
By Gareth Cox
Arsenal midfielder Santi Cazorla
hopes to be able to play again before
the end of the season. The 33-year-
old has not featured for the Gunners
since October 2016 because of an
Achilles problem which needed
several surgeries, including
a skin graft from his arm.
Cazorla (right), though,
has been stepping up his
rehabilitation and did
some training out on the
Emirates Stadium pitch
ahead of last week’s Europa League first leg against
Atletico Madrid. It remains to
be seen whether Cazorla, signed
from Malaga in August 2012, will
return to action over the closing
weeks of what will be the last season
in charge for Arsène Wenger.
Cazorla confirmed his intentions to try to get back
into action this season,
after which his current
deal at Arsenal is set to
expire.
“I’ve still got some way
to go, because after being
sidelined for 18 months,
everything has to be done in its
own time. But the sensations I have
keep getting better and I’m feeling
optimistic about the future,” said
Cazorla, quoted by Spanish media
outlet, AS.
“The objective is to play some
part with the team before the season ends, but we have to take things
carefully. After being out for so long
it will take a while to get back into
form, it’s a real struggle, but when
you have been out like I have, you
also notice pains elsewhere – apart
from what I’ve had with my tendon.
“But all of that must mean that I
am doing things right, and I hope to
be back as soon as possible.”
Sport
Dynamic duo
Alli and Kane on
target as Spurs
down Hornets
» Match report, 54-55
01.05.18
P55
FOOTBALL
Fellaini hints
that he’ll still be
a United player
next season
Tottenham’s Dele Alli
celebrates scoring his
team’s first goal with
Harry Kane at Wembley
last night REUTERS
P50
STEVE BUNCE
Why Edinburgh
needs to honour
the brilliant
Ken Buchanan
Liverpool in turmoil as
Klopp loses trusted aide
Buvac departure and Salah dispute disrupt preparations for Roma clash
By Sam Cunningham
FOOTBALL CORRESPONDENT
P48
CRICKET
In-form Ball
helps Notts
to top of
the table
Liverpool are in turmoil on the eve
of their Champions League semifinal second leg against AS Roma,
with manager Jürgen Klopp losing
his right-hand man, Zeljko Buvac,
and star forward Mohamed Salah
embroiled in a dispute with his own
country’s Football Association.
Buvac (right), Liverpool’s assistant coach, has stepped away from
the club for “personal reasons” and
will not be on the touchline with
Klopp, with whom he has worked
since 2001, nor involved in the buildup to their match at the Stadio
Olimpico in Rome tomorrow night.
Liverpool hold a 5-2 lead and
are expected to progress, but
reaching the final is not a foregone conclusion after Roma
recorded a shock 3-0 home win
against Barcelona in the
quarter-finals to overturn a three-goal deficit
and knock the La Liga
champions out. Bosnian Buvac, 56,
and Klopp have been close friends
since they played at Mainz together
and he was the German’s assistant
at Borussia Dortmund before following him to Merseyside in
October 2015. Buvac, known
as “The Brain” and once
described as “Klopp’s twin”
by a former player, signed
a six-year contract alongside
Klopp and his other assistant Peter Krawietz in
July 2016. Liverpool said
in a statement yesterday: “Zeljko is
spending some time away from the
first-team environment, between
now and the end of the season, for
personal reasons.
The club considers the matter
to be private and therefore will not
be making any further comment.
Zeljko remains a Liverpool employee and his position at the club is not
affected by this absence.” Preparations have been further disrupted by
» Continued on p52
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