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The Sunday Times Sport — 7 January 2018

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SPORT
thesundaytimes.co.uk/sport
January 7, 2018
WAR OF WORDS:
CHELSEA BOSS CONTE
SLAMS ‘LITTLE MAN’
MOURINHO
PAGE 5
MARK HUGHES
SACKED AS STOKE
EXIT FA CUP
PAGE 3
REX FEATURES
The £142m
Cashing in:
Philippe Coutinho
sealed a move to
Barcelona from
Liverpool which
will make him the
second most
expensive player
in history
heist
Coutinho in Spain
to seal record move
from Liverpool
Murray
could need
double hip
surgery
Barry Flatman
Tennis correspondent
Concerns about the future of Andy Murray’s career are growing as it emerges
that the British tennis star is suffering
from pain in both his hips rather than just
the right as was widely presumed.
Murray, who has not played a competitive match since Wimbledon last summer
and is now back in Britain after aborting
his plans to contest the Australian Open,
told former Wimbledon champion Pat
Cash of his predicament when the pair
met at an exhibition tournament in Abu
Dhabi at the end of December.
“I was talking to Andy in Abu Dhabi
and told him I was getting pain in one of
my hips and he told me his problems
were in both hips,” said Cash, who was at
the Mubadala World Tennis Championship as a tournament ambassador. “He
was pretty open about it and I thought he
was resigned to the fact.”
Murray travelled to Abu Dhabi as a
training stop-off en route to Australia.
Murray: facing uncertain future
of this season. With the player’s representatives meeting Manchester City to
discuss a transfer, Barça were forced to
add an £88.6m sweetener (paid over
three years) to an after-tax annual salary
of £31m. Messi’s pay rise is expected to
spark further wage inflation. Cristiano
Ronaldo has made clear to Real Madrid
that he expects his pay to be increased to
at least match his rival’s terms, or for him
to be allowed to join a suitor such as Paris
Saint-Germain or Manchester United.
When Novak Djokovic withdrew from the
exhibition event with renewed problems
in his right elbow, the Scot agreed to
stand in as a replacement in a one-set
contest against Spain’s Roberto Bautista
Agut, losing 6-2. Murray then flew to
Melbourne before deciding that trying to
play 2018’s opening Grand Slam tournament was a futile exercise.
Cash added: “Andy has been a great
champion, but the way he has always
played, in a style that relies so much on
fitness and being stronger than the other
guy, and the way he has punished his
body, the end result was always going to
be something like this.”
Broadcaster Andrew Castle, who
underwent surgery during and after his
tennis career, said: “There is little chance
of [Murray] challenging for major titles
after hip surgery. If it is a full hip replacement, I cannot see any way he would be
able to face Nadal, Dimitrov, Djokovic
and Federer. When the ball comes to you,
it is OK. But the ball doesn’t come to you
when you are playing these guys.”
OFFER THEY COULDN’T REFUSE, PAGE 7
FUTURE LOOKS HOPEFUL, PAGE 15
Coutinho, with wife Aine and their child,
get ready to fly out to Barcelona last night
Barca spending hits £360m as Messi pockets £90m bonus
Duncan Castles
Liverpool have accepted a £141.9m bid
for Philippe Coutinho from Barcelona,
with the player last night flying out to
Spain to complete the move. The Brazilian is expected to be at Camp Nou for this
afternoon’s game against Levante. A Barcelona statement said he would “sign a
contract for the remainder of the season
and five more, and will have a buyout
clause of 400 million euros [£355m].”
The fee, coupled with a £88.6m signing-on bonus for Lionel Messi, who
agreed a new contract in November, and
the huge transfer fee for Ousmane Dembele, signed in August, means that the
Catalan club have now spent £360m
since last summer. The payment for Coutinho is expected to be split into an initial guaranteed sum of £106.4m
with a further £35.5m of obtainable bonuses.
Last night Liverpool manager
Jurgen Klopp said: “It is no secret
that Philippe has wanted this move
to happen since July, when Barcelona first made their
interest known. Philippe was insistent
with me, the owners and even his teammates this was a move he was desperate
to make happen. The club did everything
within our means to convince Philippe
that remaining part of Liverpool was as
attractive as moving to Spain. It is
with great reluctance that we — as a
team and club — prepare to say farewell to a good friend, a wonderful
person and a fantastic player.”
The transfer fee would establish a
record for a move in or out of
Messi: paid nearly £90m
sign-on fee by Barcelona
the Premier League. Coutinho’s purchase will also reset the La Liga record fee
Barcelona paid Borussia Dortmund for
Dembele in August. The France international, 20, was secured for £93.1m plus
£37m in bonuses.
Barcelona’s readiness to spend so
heavily on Coutinho is all the more
remarkable given the bonus the club is
understood to have paid Messi to secure
his signature on a hugely improved fouryear deal in November. The Argentina
international effectively held his employers to ransom by threatening to exercise
his right to leave as a free agent at the end
2
SPORT FOOTBALL: EMIRATES FA CUP
REX FEATURES
Wagner happy
with stand-ins
4-4-2
Boruc
A Smith
S Cook
Ake
B Smith
Mahoney
Hyndman
Surman
Fraser
BOLTON WANDERERS
Afobe
Derik 64
Mousset
HUDDERSFIELD TOWN
Grigg
Jacobs
James
Van La Parra 51,
Williams 52
Massey
Powell
Power
Morsy
Burn
Dunkley
4-2-3-1
Chris Brereton
Macron stadium
Byrne
Walton
2
2
BOURNEMOUTH
Mousset 55, S Cook 90+2
WIGAN ATHLETIC
Grigg 4, Hyndman og 29
F
Andrew Longmore
Vitality stadium
or the second year in succession, Bournemouth were facing
an embarrassing exit from the
FA Cup at the hands of a lower
league club. Last year, Eddie
Howe made 11 changes and his
side were comprehensively
beaten by Millwall; this time,
the Bournemouth manager
made eight changes from his
last starting line-up and for all but the
final minute were behind to a Wigan side
who led 2-0 at half-time and, in terms of
style and fluency, had more than
matched their Premier League opponents for long periods.
In a frantic finale, when Bournemouth
were pushing hard for the equaliser, Ivan
Toney broke away from the home
defence only to be nudged off the ball just
as he was about to round Artur Boruc and
secure a win for the League One leaders.
Toney went sprawling, referee Andy
Madley waved away vigorous Wigan protests and a minute later Steve Cook
headed home Marc Pugh’s beautifully
curled cross to bring Bournemouth the
lifeline of a replay. Paul Cook, the Wigan
manager, vented his wrath on the fourth
official and his assistant, Leam Richardson, was finally sent to the stands for prolonging the tirade, but when the dust had
settled both managers felt the result was
just.
“Of course we thought it was a penalty,” said Cook. “If we get the penalty
and we score, that’s the game over. It was
a simple decision but I don’t think our
lads could have done anything more.”
Cook is beginning to build up quite a
reputation not just for lifting teams but
for doing so with attractive passing football. Having taken Chesterfield from the
bottom of League Two into the League
One playoffs, he guided Portsmouth to
the League Two title before moving on to
Wigan where he has taken no time to
instil his philosophy of pass and move.
Before the match, Howe had expressed
his admiration for Wigan’s style, but he
perhaps had not bargained on going a
goal behind after just three minutes or on
being outplayed for large chunks of the
first half.
Wigan’s opening goal, neatly fashioned by Reece James and Nick Powell
and tucked away by Will Grigg, provided
ample evidence of the visitors’ quality.
Swap the shirts and no one could have
told the difference between a side 16th in
the Premier League and the League One
leaders. To be fair, even when nowhere
near their fluent best, Bournemouth still
created enough good chances to be on
level terms. But Christian Walton produced a series of fine saves in the Wigan
goal, notably from Lys Mousset’s closerange header and a double save, initially
from Mousset and then blocking Andrew
Surman’s follow-up shot with his legs.
When a free-kick by Powell looped off
Emerson Hyndman and over a stranded
Boruc to put Wigan two up on the halfhour, the locals were as restless as Howe.
Cook thwarts Wigan
“We were very slow out of the traps
and when you concede that early it
doesn’t help your confidence or the feeling in the stadium,” said Howe. “I thought
in the second half we had a better balance
and momentum.”
Howe made a double change at halftime, taking off Connor Mahoney, an
England Under-20 international making
his debut, and Brad Smith. The arrival of
FA CUP FOURTHH
ROUND DRAW
The FA Cup fourthround draw takes place
ce
at about 7.10pm
tomorrow, before
Brighton’s third-round
d tie
against Crystal Palace.
e.
The draw is televised
live on BBC2 and BT
Sport 2.
Jordan Ibe and Pugh certainly lifted the
home side, who took just 10 minutes to
penetrate a retreating Wigan defence.
Not for the first time this season, the frustratingly inconsistent Ibe was the provider while Mousset finally beat Walton
with a powerful strike from 10 yards. For
a while, Wigan were rocked, unable to
find any outlet or to mount much in the
way of a counterattack. “We knew that
B
Bournemouth’s
quality would shine
th
through
in the end and it did,” said Cook,
w
whose
Portsmouth side had come close
t knocking out Bournemouth in the
to
th round two seasons before.
third
Yet Wigan refused to buckle and
B
Bournemouth,
despite the introduction
o Callum Wilson for the ineffectual Benik
of
A
Afobe,
could not find a way past the
in
inspired
Walton. Steve Cook’s header hit
th bar, Dan Burn cleared a shot off the
the
li and the 2013 FA Cup winners began
line
t sense another famous victory. Max
to
P
Power
twice had chances to settle the outc
come
but blazed over and had another
s
shot
blocked as Bournemouth’s defence
Pardew enjoys win and tonic
EXETER CITY
WEST BROMWICH
Rondon 2, Rodriguez 25
0
2
Rob Cole
St James Park
In his previous match in the
FA Cup Alan Pardew hit the
headlines for doing a dance
on the touchline at Wembley
when his Crystal Palace side
took the lead against
Manchester United in the
2016 final.
He was not in dancing
mode at St James Park two
years on, but he was dancing
for joy on the inside after
recording his first win in
charge at West Brom at the
ninth attempt. In his own
words, it was “a really
professional job” and a result
that provided him and his
coaching staff “with a lot of
relief.”
Goals have been the
1
2
problem for Albion this
season — only 16 in the
Premier League and a mere
four in the previous eight
games under Pardew — and
they got their first after only
70 seconds. Salomon
Rondon’s terrific finish from
the edge of the area proved to
be the fastest goal of the
season in all competitions.
After Rondon’s early strike
there should have been a
hatful more in a game that
turned into a training run for
the first half at least. The
second half, on a tricky pitch
and a ground that had two
sides wide open, was a
tougher test.
Rondon had a second goal
ruled out for offside in the
26th minute, as did Ahmed
Hegazi early in the second
half, and Hal Robson-Kanu —
who replaced the injured
Kieran Gibbs in the 10th
minute — missed a penalty.
Quite why the Wales
international took the spotkick was a mystery and
Pardew pledged to get to the
bottom of it to ensure “it
never happens again”. By
then, Albion had doubled
their lead thanks to a Jay
Rodriguez tap-in from five
yards after the home team’s
centre-backs, Troy ArchibaldHenville and Danny
Seaborne, had failed for the
second time to clear a
Robson-Kanu cross from the
right.
While Christy Pym
continued to perform his
heroics in the home goal,
opposite number Ben Foster
only had one difficult
moment when he fumbled a
Liam McAlinden cross from
the left at his near post at the
end of the first half. That
presented the FA Cup’s top
scorer at the start of the third
round, Jayden Stockley, with
an open goal to shoot at, but
he could only hit the post.
Stockley then fired a free
kick from the edge of the area
just wide of Foster’s goal at
the start of the second half,
but that was as good as it got
for the home side. They did at
least give it a go in the second
half, but by then the Premier
inexplicably went missing. But it was left
to Cook to rescue the Premier League
side a minute from time with a firm
header from Pugh’s cross. “He’s always
had a knack of scoring important goals
for us,” said Howe.
A trip to the north west in between two
critical Premier League fixtures, against
Arsenal and West Ham, is hardly ideal for
struggling Bournemouth. In the midst of
their disappointment, Wigan can cling on
to one good omen: in 2013 they, then of
the Premier Leagaue, beat League One
Bournemouth in a replay and went on to
lift the cup.
Wigan peer:
Nathan Byrne
holds off his
Bournemouth
rival Marc Pugh
as the League
One side earned
a draw with the
Premier League
hosts
Star man: Christian Walton (Wigan)
Yellow cards: Bournemouth: A Smith
Wigan: Massey, Power
Referee: A Madley Attendance: 9,894
Bournemouth: Boruc 6, A Smith 6, S Cook 7, Ake 6, B
Smith 5 (Pugh h-t, 7), Mahoney 6 (Ibe h-t, 7), Hyndman
7, Surman 6, Fraser 6, Afobe 5 (Wilson 71min, 6),
Mousset 7 Substitutes: Federici, Gosling, Butcher,
Simpson
Wigan: Walton 8, Byrne 7, Dunkley 7, Burn 7, James 7,
Morsy 6, Power 6, Massey 7 (Roberts 83min, 6), Powell
7 (Perkins 57min, 6), Jacobs 6, Grigg 7 (Toney 65min,
7) Substitutes: Sarkic, Elder, MacDonald, Hunt
Huddersfield Town and their
head coach David Wagner
have defied expectation and
convention more than almost
any other team in the past 12
months. But not yesterday.
Like every Premier League
side in this era, Wagner
seemingly picked up his
Scrabble bag of player names
before this match, threw it on
his desk and picked whatever
landed in his sight.
Eight changes for the
visitors and six for Bolton
underlined where this tie lay
in their respective priorities,
and with an educated sixth
sense, fans stayed away in
their droves. The upper tiers
on three sides of the echoing
arena were not even open.
Do the fans stay away
because the clubs do not care
for the FA Cup? Or do teams
not care because their fans
concern themselves more
with league positions than
Wembley glory? Whatever
the answer is, and wherever
the solution lies, the Football
Association must be worried
about it.
Wagner claimed on Friday
that he “loves this
competition” and although
he had a funny way of
showing it, in mitigation
Huddersfield had won just
two of their previous 11
league matches so the
opportunity to renew and
refresh was one he would not
surrender. Eventually his side
repaid him with an anodyne
win in an anodyne match.
“We had five players who
had very little training and
minutes with the first team in
the last month and if you
have this in your mind, I’m
very satisfied with the
performance,” Wagner said.
“Everybody knows how
difficult it can be in the FA
Cup when you play an
opponent from the leagues
below you. To be honest, I
expected more difficulty
today because we had so
many players who had never
played as a unit together. If
you think about this, this was
a very professional, very solid
performance.”
The plentiful changes had
an inevitable impact on the
quality of the occasion and
when a foul throw by Sammy
Ameobi is the only
noteworthy moment in the
opening stages, little else
needs to be said.
After 45 minutes of almost
unbearable dreariness,
Bolton’s Filipe Morais
delivered the perfect cross for
an unmarked Aaron
Wilbraham just before halftime but his header from five
yards out was almost
laughably poor and missed
Joel Coleman’s goal by some
considerable distance.
Huddersfield restarted
after the interval with more
vim as Abdelhamid Sabiri’s
long-range effort wobbled
towards Mark Howard, who
watched it closely enough to
turn it around for a corner.
That raised hopes that the
second half would erase
memories of the first and,
quite unexpectedly, it did.
In no time at all
Huddersfield were 2-0 up as
Rajiv van La Parra — on for
the injured Collin Quaner —
turned in Sabiri’s corner from
very close range after 51
minutes, before a hugely
deflected long-range effort
from Danny Williams 45
seconds later beat Howard
and appeared to have killed
off a tie that had never been
alive in the first place.
Williams’ goal came after a
strong challenge by Sabiri on
David Wheater that Phil
Parkinson, the Bolton
manager, labelled “a legbreaker” but referee Roger
East missed the incident.
Despite the deficit, that
second goal re-energised
Bolton and they ensured a
nervy ending was in store for
the visitors when Derik was
left unmarked at the back
post to head Morais’s cross
comfortably past Coleman
with 26 minutes to go.
Michael Hefele, returning
after a long achilles tendon
lay-off, looked ponderous for
Huddersfield and narrowly
escaped a second yellow card
as moments of panic infected
the visitors near the end. But
although Bolton finished as
the stronger side, the touch of
quality required to raise
further cheer was absent. It
summed up the day.
Star man: Abdelhamid Sabiri
(Huddersfield)
Yellow cards: Bolton: Ameobi, Vela
Huddersfield: Coleman, Hefele
Referee: R East
Attendance: 11,574
Bolton: Howard 6, Little 6 (Hall 85min,
5), Beevers 6, Wheater 7, Vela 6 (King
85min, 5), Le Fondre 6, Robinson 6,
Derik 6, Wilbraham 6, Morais 7, Ameobi
5 (Noone 76min, 5) Substitutes: Taylor,
Alnwick, Darby, Earing
Huddersfield: Coleman 6, Smith 7,
Hefele 6 (Whitehead 85min, 5), Kongolo
6, Malone 6, Sabiri 7, Hogg 6, Williams
6, Lolley 6 (Billing 76min, 6), Quaner 5
(Van La Parra 39min, 7), Depoitre 6
Substitutes: Mounie, Green,
Hadergjonaj, O’Brien
GRAHAM CROWTHER
On target: Rajiv van La Parra, left, celebrates his goal
Saints survive scare to end barren run
FULHAM
SOUTHAMPTON
Ward-Prowse 29
Rondon: early opening goal
League side were in cruise
control and heading into the
fourth round with a moraleboosting first victory since
August.
Star man: James McClean (West Brom)
Yellow cards: Exeter: Sweeney,
Archibald-Henville West Brom:
Rodriguez
Referee: L Mason Attendance: 5,638
Exeter: Pym 7, Sweeney 6, ArchibaldHenville 5, Seaborne 5, Moxey 5, Taylor
6, Boateng 5 (James 63min, 5), Tillson 7,
Harley 6 (Jay 87min, 5), McAlinden 5
(Holmes 55min, 6), Stockley 5
Substitutes: Woodman, Simpson,
Jones, Byrne
West Brom: Foster 6, Nyom 7, McAuley
7, Hegazi 6, Gibbs 5 (Robson-Kanu
12min, 6), Krychowiak 6 (Livermore
85min, 5), Barry 6, Rodriguez 7 (Field
69min, 5), Brunt 7, McClean 8, Rondon
6 Substitutes: Myhill, Yacob, Burke,
Leko
0
1
Brian Glanville
Craven Cottage
After nine matches without
a win and having sold their
star turn Virgil van Dijk to
Liverpool for £75m,
Southampton won at last
against a Fulham team who
surprisingly, and arguably
expensively, omitted their
captain Tom Cairney from
the squad.
The explanation was that
he had played four games in
a row and needed a rest.
With Newcastle said to be
keen on signing him during
the transfer window,
perhaps there was another
explanation.
Fulham largely
malfunctioned without
Cairney’s clever positioning
and distribution in midfield.
Southampton deserved
their success against a
Fulham team who provoked
a solitary save from Alex
McCarthy and also escaped
in the second half when Jack
Stephens headed against the
bar.
Having omitted Cairney
with such negative effect
Fulham’s head coach,
Slavisa Jokanovic, hardly
distinguished himself either
with his formation or
substitutions. For the whole
of the first half, and some of
the second, Fulham had
only the ineffectual and
indifferent Rui Fonte up
front. It was 56 minutes
before they at last belatedly
brought on Neeskens
Kebano; 66 minutes before
they deployed Sheyi Ojo and
76 minutes before they
introduced Aboubakar
Kamara.
These substitutions gave
a lift and impetus to their
play, but against a
Southampton defence that
largely competed and
resisted well, there was but
that single save for
McCarthy to make. It came
on the hour at his near post
when he held an attempt by
Stefan Johansen, who
improved substantially
when he dropped deeper
after half-time.
In the first half there was
little to remember. A cross
from James Ward-Prowse
was missed by David Button
but Shane Long headed
wide. The decisive goal
came 10 minutes later when
Sofiane Boufal attempted a
one-two with Long. The
ball, however, hit Kevin
McDonald and WardProwse, left-footed, struck
the spinning ball past
Button for the winner.
Eight minutes into the
second half from Long’s
cross Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg
forced a save from Button.
In the 74th minute, from
Ward-Prowse’s corner, Long
flicked on and Stephens
headed against the Fulham
bar.
Two minutes later
Fulham could well have
been level. A free kick by
Oliver Norwood was
dropped by McCarthy but
Denis Odoi could do no
better than shoot over the
bar.
Fulham’s Ryan Sessegnon
was largely subdued in this
period but this was down to
not receiving the ball. He
was effective when he was
given it and his run and
cross on the 88th minute
provided Norwood with a
header at the back post, but
he could not find the target.
Star man: James Ward-Prowse
(Southampton)
Yellow card: Fulham: McDonald
Southampton: Bednarek
Referee: M Oliver Attendance: 17,327
Fulham: Button 6, Fredericks 6, Kalas 5
(Ojo 66min, 6), Ream 6, Odoi 6,
Norwood 5, McDonald 6 (Kebano
56min, 6), Johansen 7, Piazon 5, Fonte 5
(Kamara 76min, 6), R Sessegnon 7
Substitutes: Djalo, De La Torre, S
Sessegnon, Norman
Southampton: McCarthy 6, Bednarek
6, Stephens 7, Yoshida 6, Bertrand 7,
Romeu 6, Hojbjerg 6 (Lemina 80min, 6),
Ward-Prowse 7, Davis 7, Boufal 7
(Redmond 70min, 6), Long 6
(Gabbiadini 86min, 5) Substitutes:
Tadic, Targett, Sims, Forster
3
The Sunday Times January 7, 2018
Fleetwood come so close to an upset after Vardy sits it out
ALAN MARTIN
0
0
FLEETWOOD TOWN
LEICESTER CITY
Mike Whalley
Highbury stadium
Rarely can a person have
earned so much free pizza so
easily. Fleetwood Town’s
goalkeeper Chris Neal had
been offered a year’s supply
by a fast-food company if he
kept a clean sheet yesterday.
A much-changed Leicester
City side did not threaten that
prize, failing to register a shot
on target.
How the visitors missed
Jamie Vardy. The return of
Leicester’s leading scorer to
his former club was the main
point of interest when this tie
was drawn out, but a groin
injury prevented him from
playing. Instead, the England
forward watched from a box
in the main stand, with his
wife Rebekah and one-yearold son Finley Jaiden.
Without Vardy, and in a
team showing eight changes
from their previous match,
Leicester’s front line failed on
a bumpy pitch. They might
even have lost the match in
stoppage time when Ashley
Hunter attacked down the
right and hit a shot that
deflected off Yohan
Benalouane and bounced off
the post twice, the second
time via a touch from
goalkeeper Eldin Jakupovic.
“It was difficult to play on
the floor,” Leicester manager
Claude Puel said. “It was a
good thing to keep a clean
sheet but it was not enough to
win the game. We got a bit
lucky at the end when they
hit the post.”
Puel indicated that Vardy is
likely to be fit for the replay.
They may need him if they
are to avoid the
embarrassment of a third-
round exit against League
One opponents.
The return of Riyad
Mahrez would help too, after
he was left out of the squad
yesterday, but his future
looks increasingly uncertain
amid interest from Liverpool,
despite Puel’s insistence that
the winger is happy at the
King Power stadium.
Fleetwood manager Uwe
Rosler, who guided Wigan to
within a penalty shoot-out of
the FA Cup final four years
ago, could have been forgiven
for thinking of what might
have been. Instead, he chose
to focus on the remarkable
progress that has taken the
club from the ninth tier of
English football to League
One in less than 15 years.
This was their first
competitive meeting with a
Premier League club, and it
almost ended with a place in
the fourth round for the first
time. “How can I be
disappointed?” he said. “This
was the biggest game in the
club’s history, in front of a
sell-out crowd, and the club is
in the best position ever.”
Perhaps the one
disappointment for Rosler
and Fleetwood was the
absence of Andy Pilley, the
owner whose funding has
propelled the club to six
promotions in 13 years. Pilley
intended to return from a
Caribbean cruise with his
family for the game, but had
to abandon the plan after
becoming stranded in Haiti.
Pilley’s team might have
gone ahead in the first 10
minutes, as Leicester’s
centre-back Aleksandar
Dragovic overhit a back pass
and Jakupovic had to
scramble back to push it
around the post.
FOOTBALL RESULTS PAGE 14
Leicester had possession
but little momentum. It was
little wonder, given the
number of changes their
manager made. Up front they
laboured. Islam Slimani
miscued an early chance
wide and was rarely involved
after that, while Adrien Silva
looked rusty as he made his
long-awaited first start for the
club. Kelechi Iheanacho, the
striker for whom Leicester
paid £25m five months ago,
has seen his stock fall to such
an extent that he was only
deemed worthy of a 10minute appearance as a
substitute.
“I picked a team to win the
game, and I had to judge it on
the fitness levels of my
players after four games in 10
days,” Puel said. “We had a
good team on the pitch but it
was not enough.”
Leicester winger Harvey
Barnes, whose father Paul
once scored twice for York
City in a League Cup win at
Manchester United, had one
Fleetwood grew in
confidence; Devante Cole,
whose father Andy won the
FA Cup twice with
Manchester United, just failed
to connect with a free kick in
the final five minutes. By that
stage, Leicester would
probably have settled for a
replay. As it turned out, they
only just got it.
Fleetwood’s goalkeeper,
meanwhile, could savour his
pizza. “It’s an added bonus,”
he said. “Financially, this was
massive to the club and that
will increase even more when
we go back to their place.”
Back to earth: Adrien Silva falls after a Kyle Dempsey tackle
or two promising moments
on his first start for the club,
but he tired and was taken off
shortly before the hour.
In the first half, one Barnes
cross found a way to Demarai
Gray at the far post, for a shot
that was blocked by Neal,
while the winger later
snatched at a chance and saw
a shot deflected just wide.
Silva’s chief memory of the
match will probably be the
fierce challenge from
Fleetwood midfielder Markus
Schwabl that left the
midfielder in agony. At that
moment, the glory of winning
Euro 2016 with Portugal must
have seemed a very long way
away.
As the match went on,
Star man: Markus Schwabl (Fleetwood)
Referee: S Hooper Attendance: 5,001
Fleetwood: Neal 6, Coyle 6, Bolger 7,
Eastham 6 (Pond 15min, 6), Bell 7,
Schwabl 8, Glendon 7, Dempsey 7,
Burns 7 (McAleny 69min, 6), Cole 6,
Hunter 7 Substitutes: Cairns, Jones,
Biggins, Sowerby, Hiwula-Mayifuila
Leicester: Jakupovic 6, Amartey 6,
Dragovic 6, Benalouane 6, Chilwell 6,
James 7, King 7, Gray 7, Silva 5 (Okazaki
57min, 6), Barnes 7 (Albrighton 57min,
6), Slimani 5 (Iheanacho 80min, 6)
Substitutes: Hamer, Maguire, Ndidi,
Choudhury
PETER WHYTE
4-4-2
O’Brien
Grimmer
Willis
Davies
Stokes
MaguireDrew
Bayliss
Doyle
Shipley
Biamou
McNulty
Berahino
Diouf
Sobhi
Adam
Allen
Ireland
Wimmer
Zouma
Cameron
Edwards
4-4-2
Heading for fame: Jordan
Willis rises above Stoke’s
defence to give Coventry
an early lead over the
Premier League club
before Jack Grimmer,
inset, hit the winner
Butland
COVENTRY CITY
Willis 24, Grimmer 68
STOKE CITY
Adam 54 pen
2
1
M
Barry Flatman
Ricoh Arena
ark Hughes was sacked
after Stoke City were
knocked out of the FA
Cup by League Two side
Coventry. After the game
finished, Hughes insisted
that the defeat did not
make his position any
more precarious, but the
Stoke board had other
ideas. He was dismissed by chief executive Tony Scholes at the club’s training
ground after the team had returned
home after the defeat.
Stoke are 18th in the Premier League
and have endured a miserable run of
results, but this proved to be the final
straw. Hughes’ team played woeful football and the manager bore the expression
of a man who had simply run out of ideas
on how to reverse the trend as he arrived
to explain another humiliation. He had
become used to the feeling of late, but
after seeing Jack Grimmer’s shot from the
edge of the penalty area quell a Stoke
comeback, the former Wales striker said:
“This defeat is not a good one to take but I
don’t know if it has changed the situation
we found ourselves in after the league
defeat to Newcastle United on New Year’s
Day. Obviously we have again not got the
result we wanted. But when we wake up
on Monday morning, the reality has to be
improving our situation in the Premier
League and the fact we are out of the FA
Cup just might help us.” The task of turning the club’s fortunes around will now
fall to somebody else.
“The frustrating part from my point of
view is the same mistakes keep occurring,” Hughes said. “We need some clarity of thought in this situation to see
where things are going wrong. We need
to be good enough to nip them in the bud
before they start.”
Stoke dropped into the Premier
League relegation zone by losing seven of
their past 10 games. The shame of being
Hughes sacked by Stoke
well beaten by a side three divisions
below them, and in such an inept manner, proved to be the final nail in the coffin. Chairman Peter Coates, who
appointed Hughes to succeed Tony Pulis
in 2013, decided to take drastic action
immediately after the game and duly
sacked his manager. This is Stoke’s worst
season since 1984-85 in the old First Division, when Bill Asprey’s side were relegated and former England full-back Mick
Mills was brought in as manager. After the
defeat by Newcastle, fans had unfurled
banners demanding Hughes be sacked.
The Coventry fans took almost as
much delight in Hughes’ plight as they
did in their team registering an FA Cup
victory that may not quite be as glorious
as that revered win over Tottenham Hotspur at the old Wembley stadium in 1987.
Wolves earn
a second
crack at
Swansea
Off day: the Swansea
midfielder Leroy Fer
reacts to being shown a
red card for a cynical
trip after 67 minutes
WOLVERHAMPTON
WANDERERS
SWANSEA CITY
For them it was still an afternoon to
remember. “You’re getting sacked in
the morning,” chanted thousands of
Sky Blues supporters, many of whom
remember their team being on a par
with Stoke not too many years ago
before the club fell apart lamentably.
And it turned out that they were correct.
Hughes, as proud a manager as
any in the Premier League, stood
firm in his technical area, determined not to be provoked into any
response. Even before yesterday’s match, a poll in the
Hughes:
dismissed at
training
ground
0
0
Nick Townsend
Molineux
M
Championship runaway
leaders Wolves and
Premier League basement
club Swansea, both of
whom could be said to have
more pressing priorities,
contrived to produce the one
outcome that neither wanted.
Frankly, another fixture in
the schedule was not on the
wanted list of either, but that
was the consequence of an
outstanding display by
Swansea’s Swedish
goalkeeper Kristoffer
Nordfeldt, in for the rested
Lukasz Fabianski, some
indifferent finishing from the
hosts, and the disruption
caused by the dismissal of a
player from both sides,
Wolves’ Ruben Vinagre and
Swansea’s Leroy Fer.
Rarely can the FA Cup have
thrown together two sides
with such contrasting
outlooks on life. Most arrived
in the expectation of a
scintillating Wolves triumph,
even though Nuno Espirito
Santo, their manager, made
six changes, with the
absentees including Ruben
Neves, the Championship’s
most expensive player, and
Diogo Jota, the 21-year-old
Portuguese winger on loan
from Atletico Madrid, and
team’s local newspaper, the Stoke
Sentinel, declared with a banner
headline: “Hughes is the luckiest
man on earth to get a stay of execution.”
And it did not take long to
appreciate why the supporters were bereft of
confidence after Coventry’s early forward
thrusts, led by the
lively Marc McNulty.
Long crossfield passes
from proven midfielders Joe Allen and
Charlie Adam failed to
find their target.
The defence, minus
club captain Ryan Shawcross and Bruno Martins
scorer of 11 goals this season,
as he took the opportunity to
rest tired limbs and blood
fresh talent.
However, that didn’t
entirely go to plan for Wolves,
whose teenage full-back
Vinagre was dismissed just
before half-time and, as part
of Nuno’s reorganisation, 17year-old Morgan GibbsWhite, making his first start
of the season, was withdrawn
to make way for substitute
Barry Douglas. In the event,
Wanderers rarely settled into
their irresistible flowing style.
Nuno’s Portuguese
counterpart Carlos Carvalhal,
who only arrived at the
Liberty stadium 10 days ago,
believes the club has already
made positive moves. “I felt
we progressed another step,”
he said. “The commitment
Indi, looked nervous every time Coventry attacked, and Stoke’s attack was
toothless until Peter Crouch was introduced early in the second half.
Coventry took an early lead when
Grimmer flicked on a corner from
on-loan debutant Jordan Maguire-Drew
and Jordan Willis completed a clearly
rehearsed set-piece move. Stoke levelled
when Willis downed Ramadan Sobhi in
the area and Adam slammed home the
resultant penalty, only for Grimmer to
seal victory a quarter of an hour later.
Coventry manager Mark Robins, once
an understudy to Hughes at Manchester
United, enthused: “It was a hard-fought
win, but a deserved one. I thought that
we were magnificent and it’s a really
proud day for me. We had to defend
really well at times but if we’d have come
and attitude were good. Part
of the game we played with
good quality against a strong
team, with a good dynamic.
They created problems for
us, but we created problems
for them also.”
In the early minutes, Bright
Enobakhare tested Nordfeldt
as Nuno’s men cut City open.
Nordfeldt had to be at his
athletic best again as GibbsWhite seemed certain to
score. Before the interval,
Helder Costa unleashed a
vicious attempt from the edge
of the area and the keeper
was again well placed to block
Alfred N’Diaye’s header.
Enobakhare smashed the
follow-up wide.
For all Wolves’
domination, Martin Olsson
could have scored an unlikely
opener, only for his wickedly
in at half-time 3-0 up I don’t think anybody would have complained.”
Coventry look more than capable of
winning promotion back to League One
this season and Robins added: “The FA
Cup is an extra for us, I can’t tell you how
important it is for everybody. It brings
everybody together and that is massive
for us.”
Star man: Michael Doyle (Coventry)
Yellow cards: Stoke: Allen, Ireland
Referee: M Atkinson Attendance: 14,199
Coventry: O’Brien 6, Grimmer 8, Willis 7, Davies 7,
Stokes 6, Maguire-Drew 7 (Stevenson 63min, 6),
Bayliss 6, Doyle 8, Shipley 8 (Haynes 85min, 6),
Biamou 7, McNulty 8 Substitutes: Burge, Hyam,
Maycock, Finn, Ponticelli
Stoke: Butland 5, Edwards 6, Cameron 6 (Crouch
52min, 6), Zouma 6, Wimmer 5, Ireland 4 (ChoupoMoting 72min, 5), Allen 5, Adam 6 (Shaqiri 75min, 6),
Sobhi 6, Diouf 6, Berahino 4 Substitutes: Grant,
Afellay, Souttar, Fletcher,
struck free kick to glance off
the top of the bar.
But six minutes before the
break, the initiative shifted
when Vinagre was dismissed
for a poor challenge on
Nathan Dyer. The Swans, who
brought on an additional
attacker, Jordan Ayew, early
in the second half were
buoyed by Vinagre’s
departure. Wilfried Bony
came close but was thwarted
by Will Norris, in for John
Ruddy. However, the
complexion changed again
when Fer was dismissed by
the referee Anthony Taylor
for a foul on Costa — though
the offence, a cynical trip,
arguably merited only a
caution.
Almost immediately,
Kortney Hause should have
capitalised when presented
with a fine opportunity by
substitute Ivan Cavaleiro’s
free kick, but he inexcusably
headed over.
New signing Rafa Mir came
on and could have endeared
himself to the home crowd
but headed narrowly wide.
Star man: Kristoffer Nordfeldt
(Swansea)
Yellow cards: Swansea: Bartley, Bony
Red cards: Wolves: Vinagre
Swansea: Fer
Referee: A Taylor Attendance: 22,976
Wolves: Norris 7, Bennett 6, Coady 6,
Hause 7, Doherty 6, Gibbs-White 6
(Douglas 45min, 6), N’Diaye 6, Vinagre
5, Costa 7, Bonatini 6 (Mir 77min, 6),
Enobakhare 7 (Cavaleiro 65min, 6)
Substitutes: Burgoyne, Miranda,
Goncalves, Buur
Swansea: Nordfeldt 8, Roberts 7, van
der Hoorn 6, Fernandez 6 (Ayew 56min,
6), Bartley 7, Olsson 7, Routledge 6,
Sanches 6 (Carroll 34min, 6), Fer 6,
Dyer 6, Bony 7 (Mesa 75min, 5)
Substitutes: Narsingh, Mulder, Fulton,
McBurnie
4
SPORT FOOTBALL: EMIRATES FA CUP
Peterborough
shock Villa with
late goals
Nick Lucy
Villa Park
Marriott: scored twice
as Peterborough came
from behind to win
An FA Cup upset this may
well have been but on the
evidence of the match the
final outcome was hardly a
shock. Peterborough’s
eventual margin of victory
was no more than they
deserved.
Although it took a flurry of
late goals, two of them from
highly-rated striker Jack
Marriott, the League One side
created countless
opportunities to turn the tie
ASTON VILLA
Davis 8
PETERBOROUGH
Marriott 75, 90+3 Tafazolli 83
1
3
on its head after Villa had
gained an early advantage
when Keinan Davis fired them
into an eighth-minute lead.
Roared on by a following of
almost 5,000 fans,
Peterborough were very
much in the mood to achieve
some FA Cup glory at their
Championship opponents’
expense and even that early
setback could not disrupt an
excellent overall
performance.
Eventually, their
persistence paid off as
Marriott took his tally to 23
goals in this breakthrough
season with two close-range
finishes either side of Ryan
Tafazolli’s header.
Grant McCann,
Peterborough’s manager, was
understandably proud of his
players. “I thought they were
outstanding. It was very
harsh on us to be a goal down
at half-time, but I said to them
‘keep playing and keep being
brave’.
“I felt the way we played
and the chances we created,
it was going to drop for us at
some stage. The composure
that the players showed
throughout the game was
excellent and credit to Jack
for coming up with two more
goals because he missed
some chances in the first
half.”
He added: “I know Villa
made ten changes, but they
still had a hell of a lot of
quality in their team. But our
boys enjoyed the challenge
and ensured they didn’t have
any regrets.”
It was no surprise that
Steve Bruce, Villa’s manager,
shouldered some of the
blame for the disappointing
exit, saying: “Maybe the
combination of playing too
many young players and
having too many returning
from injury was too much.
But to be fair, Peterborough
deserved to beat us on our
own patch and that is very
hard to take right now. The
best team won by a country
mile.”
Bruce could hardly have
seen what was coming,
however, as Davis made the
most of his early opportunity
to put Villa in front. Further
clear-cut chances fell the
home side’s way to build up a
comfortable advantage in the
opening stages.
But, urged on by their
noisy following,
Peterborough quickly
showed that they were not
going to lie down and Jed
Steer was kept busy, making a
number of crucial saves to
deny Marriott and seeing a
looping header from full-back
Liam Shephard rattle the bar.
Villa made a tactical switch
at the break to try to stem the
flow of Posh chances, but
McCann’s side were having
none of it as they continued
to look threatening. When
the impressive Chris
Forrester picked out Danny
Lloyd, his volley across goal
from the left was headed
home by Marriott to give Posh
just reward for their
endeavours. Even so, Villa
could have regained their
lead when Birkir Bjarnason
hit the bar.
That miss was to prove
costly as Peterborough went
in front seven minutes from
time when Tafazolli headed a
Marcus Maddison corner
goalbound, his effort taking a
deflection on its way in,
though nobody was going to
deny his claim to it.
With Villa throwing
caution to the wind in a
desperate attempt to salvage
a replay, they were caught by
a Posh counterattack as Lloyd
teed up a chance that left
Marriott with a simple finish
to crown their glorious cup
triumph.
Star man: Chris Forrester
(Peterborough)
Referee: R Jones Attendance: 21,677
Aston Villa: Steer 7, De Laet 6, Bree 5,
Terry 6, Taylor 5, Onomah 6, Hourihane
7, Bjarnason 6 (Hepburn-Murphy 80min,
5), Green 5 (Lansbury 45min, 5) O’Hare
5 (Grealish 80min, 6), Davis 6
Substitutes: Bunn, Elphick,
Elmohamady, Doyle-Hayes
Peterborough United: Bond 6,
Shephard 7, Tafazollli 7, Taylor 6,
Hughes 7, Forrester 8, Grant 6,
Maddison 7, Da Silva Lopes 6 (Morias
72min, 6), Marriot 7, Lloyd 7
Substitutes: O’Malley, Baldwin, Penny,
Kanu, Doughty, Anderson
VICTORIA HAYDN
Danilo
Stones
FA CUP THIRD ROUND
ROUND-UP
4-3-3
Bravo
Otamendi
Zinchenko
Fernandinho
Gundogan
D Silva
IPSWICH TOWN
Sterling
Aguero
Sane
SHEFFIELD UNITED
Chris Wilder, the Sheffield
United manager, was
‘immensely’ pleased with
his team’s victory over
Ipswich. His opposite
number, Mick
McCarthy,
experienced yet
another defeat in the
competition. He has
not won a tie during his six
seasons in charge at
Portman Road.
Ipswich never had a
meaningful shot on target.
The only goal of the
game came from Nathan
Thomas, inset, in the 25th
Vokes
Hendrick
Barnes Westwood
Taylor
Cork Gudmundsson
Long
Mee
4-4-1-1
Lowton
Pope
4
1
MANCHESTER CITY
Aguero 56, 58, Sane 71, B Silva 82
BURNLEY
Barnes 25
MILLWALL
W
David Walsh
Chief sports writer, Etihad stadium
hen Pep Guardiola
came to speak about
the game afterwards,
his first two words were
“so happy”. That is
now his default reaction to City performances. By the end it was
another emphatic win
for the runway leaders
in the Premier League but this FA Cup victory wasn’t as straightforward as the scoreline suggests.
For about 55 minutes City looked like a
team thinking they could actually lose a
game. It all changed in the 56th minute.
Burnley led 1-0 but had conceded a free
kick, 40 yards from their goal. Central
midfielder Ashley Westwood was five
yards away, wondering if referee Graham
Scott was going to blow his whistle when
David Silva took it quickly and played the
ball through to Sergio Aguero. City were
back on level terms and the momentum
was with them. A minute and a half later
they were 2-1 up.
Sean Dyche wasn’t moaning about
Scott but he knew the referee could have
seen it differently. “It [the first goal] was a
contentious one. I’ve spoken to the ref,
he said he doesn’t have to blow the whistle but when Ashley Westwood is standing five yards away, motioning, to say,
‘Are you going to blow the whistle’, and
he’s the man who should be in the slot
they’ve passed it to, I’m bound to be
aggrieved by that.
“I think sometimes in football, the rule
might be the rule but there’s a common
sense moment, especially from experienced refs when they think, ‘That is the
player that has to be in that slot and I’ve
just allowed it to be passed there when
he’s five yards away from the free kick,
motioning towards me, are you going to
blow the whistle.’”
As Aguero drilled his shot past Nick
Pope, some Burnley players were still
waiting for the free kick to be taken. They
looked like the man whose pocket has
been picked and they never recovered.
Dyche thought they were still punch
drunk when Aguero got the second goal
94 seconds later. City were then rampant,
everyone enthusiastic again and eager to
add to the lead.
How different it had been through the
55 minutes that preceded the opening
goal. Up to then City had played with the
BARNSLEY
Carrillo 37, Deeney 57
Capoue 85
BRISTOL CITY
3
0
John Aizlewood
Vicarage Road
Drizzly, windy and just above
freezing, it was hardly the
weather for a stroll, but
Watford defied recent form to
stroll past a second-string
Bristol City and into round
four, where they will surely
face a sterner test.
4
1
Aiden O’Brien fired Millwall
into the fourth round as his
brace inspired Neil Harris’
side to victory over 10-man
Barnsley.
After the visitors had
gone ahead early on, the
game turned during a 20minute spell either side of
half-time. O’Brien scored
two goals and created
another for Ben Thompson,
while Joe Williams was sent
off for a terrible late
challenge on winger Jed
BLACKBURN ROVERS
HULL CITY
Aguero turns it around
Sharpshooter:
Leroy Sane
scores
Manchester
City’s third goal
at the Etihad
stadium
hangdog weariness of a team fearing this
might be the afternoon their unbeaten
run ended. They had 10 shots in the first
half but only one that asked Pope to make
a save. Poor Leroy Sane, everything he
touched turned to an overhit cross or a
misplaced pass.
John Stones didn’t have much to do
and when Sam Vokes got his head to
Pope’s clearance in the 25th minute, it
wasn’t a situation that threatened danger.
Stones was 45 yards from his own goal as
the ball hopped towards him but he made
a terrible mess of the clearance, the ball
slicing off his left foot.
Ashley Barnes was onto it, heading the
ball on and then slashing it past Claudio
Bravo. “The mistake is not important,”
said Guardiola afterwards. “What is
important is the reaction to it and Stones’
reaction was excellent.” The key players
in City’s victory were the ones who
played well when the team wasn’t performing. Fernandinho was his usual efficient self but Raheem Sterling’s performance was the most admirable. He played
as he would in a Champions League tie, as
if his life depended on the result. The second was the best of the four City goals.
Burnley had chances to clear but didn’t
and Aguero got on the ball 25 yards from
goal. His pass found Ilkay Gundogan on
the edge of the area and with his back to
goal, Gundogan played an exquisite back
heel between two defenders and into the
path of Aguero. He went round Pope as if
avoiding a lamp post.
Danilo set up Sane for the third goal
and then Sane turned provider for Bernardo Silva to get the fourth. Aguero
thought it was Danilo’s best game for City
and you wouldn’t argue with that. Once
City got their noses in front, Guardiola
sent on Kyle Walker, Kevin de Bruyne and
Bernardo Silva which seemed his way of
telling Burnley not to even consider a
comeback. And to the City manager’s satisfaction, the game petered out after that.
Star man: Raheem Sterling (Manchester City)
Yellow card: Manchester City: Danilo Burnley:
Westwood , Cork
Referee: G Scott
Manchester City: Bravo 5, Danilo 7, Stones 6,
Otamendi 6, Zinchenko 6 (Walker 72min, 6), Gundogan
7 (De Bruyne 76min, 6), Fernandinho 7, D Silva 6,
Sterling 7, Aguero 7 (B Silva 79min, 6), Sane 5
Substitutes: Mangala, Ederson, Toure, Diaz
Burnley: Pope 5, Lowton 5, Long 6, Mee 6, Taylor 6,
Gudmundsson 5 (Walters 75min, 6), Cork 6 (Wells
69min, 6), Westwood 6, Barnes 7, Hendrick 6, Vokes 6
Substitutes: Marney, Defour, Ulvestad, Lindegaard,
Bardsley
Watford savour winning feeling against distracted Robins
WATFORD
0
1
Ola Aina’s first senior goal
gave Championship
strugglers Hull a win at
League One Blackburn.
The on-loan
Chelsea defender,
inset, rose highest
in the 58th minute
to head home the
goal which ended a
five-match winless
run. Paul Caddis hit the
crossbar for the hosts and
Danny Graham missed a
gilt-edged chance.
The first half was a dour
DONCASTER ROVERS
ROCHDALE
“We respected ourselves
and the competition,” noted
Silva. “We had an obligation
to qualify, we kept a clean
sheet and the more we win,
the more confidence
we’ll
have.”
With
Etienne
Capoue in
stringpulling mode
and Roberto Pereyra
having one of his more
lively afternoons,
Happy Hornet: Troy
Deeney scored
Watford’s second
Watford swept forward with a
certain elegance but their
first goal owed more to
efficiency than
exuberance. Pereyra
threaded into the
penalty area, where he
found Andre
Carrillo. The
Peruvian spun
and slotted the
ball neatly
under Luke
Steele.
After the
goal, it was
as you were.
Pereyra
curled a
20-yarder
against the bar and Steele
hurtled off his line to deny
Capoue.
Fifty-seven minutes in,
Tom Cleverley crossed from
the right and Troy Deeney
celebrated his return with a
low header that sailed past
Steele.
With Watford in sauntering
mode, bric-a-brac City never
looked like emulating their
Carabao Cup victory at
Vicarage Road in August but
they did craft a couple of
chances; Matty Taylor
headed Lloyd Kelly’s cross
wide then Gustav Engvall also
missed. When Deeney played
a neat one-two with Capoue,
the Frenchman’s first goal
since August allowed the
scoreline to more accurately
reflect Watford’s dominance.
Star man: Etienne Capoue (Watford)
Yellow card: Watford: Kabasele
Referee: C Pawson
Attendance: 13,269
Watford: Gomes 6, Janmaat 7, Wague
6, Kabasele 6, Zeegelaar 6, Doucoure 7
(Watson 81min, 4), Carrillo 6
(Richarlison 69min, 5), Cleverley 7,
Capoue 7, Deeney 7, Pereya 7 (Holebas
69min, 5)
Substitutes: Karnezis, Prodl, Gray,
Watson, Okaka
Bristol City: Steele 7, Vyner 6, Flint 6,
Magnusson 5, Kelly 6, Edwards 6,
Lemonheigh-Evans 6, Smith 6 (Pack h-t,
5), Eliasson 6, Taylor 5 (Engvall 63min,
7), Woodrow 5 (Hinds 76min, 4)
Substitutes: Fielding, Wright, Bakinson,
Holden
0
1
Calvin Andrew’s first-half
goal was enough to send
Rochdale into the fourth
round.
Andrew headed home in
the 18th minute as the
visitors gained revenge on
Doncaster for a 2-0 League
One defeat at the
Keepmoat stadium last
Friday. It was Andrew’s
fourth goal of the season as
the striker glanced in
Joseph Bunney’s free kick
from the left.
BIRMINGHAM CITY
BURTON ALBION
With 7,680 fans making the
trip to the Carabao Cup semifinal at the Etihad on Tuesday
and a promotion campaign
that had the aura of a bullet
train, City rested seven firstteamers. The game was lost
before it had begun. “We’re
all hurting,” sighed assistant
head coach Dean Holden.
“But there are no regrets: we
chose the team for the right
reasons and gave two players
debuts. We won’t look back.”
In contrast, Watford head
coach Marco Silva saw the
opportunity to staunch a
dismal run and rested only
Richarlison of his
guaranteed, fit starters.
0
1
1
0
Sam Gallagher, inset,
scored the only goal as
Birmingham continued
their recent revival. The
Southampton loanee’s
57th-minute strike
earned Birmingham
a third successive
victory without
conceding a goal,
having also toppled
Leeds United and
Reading to move off the
bottom of the
Championship table.
Burton were in good
form also, having picked up
three wins and a draw in
minute. His 25-yard strike
flew into the right corner of
Ipswich keeper Bartosz
Bialkowski’s net.
The result sent the 1,000strong visiting supporters
home happy while the
Ipswich faithful chanted
‘What a load of
rubbish’ at the fulltime whistle.
Wilder said: ‘The
consistency of the
attitude by my team
pleased me
immensely and I have
really enjoyed today.’
McCarthy said: ‘I can
only do my best to try to get
my team to win games and
if we do I guess we get
cheered, and if we don’t I
guess we get jeered.’
Wallace to remove any
hope of a comeback. Fred
Onyedinma added a fourth
to make sure as Millwall
ended a run of five straight
defeats against Barnsley in
emphatic fashion.
Steve Morison and Jake
Cooper both had chances
to extend the lead, but
Millwall largely seemed
happy with what they had.
Barnsley were the better
side in the first half hour.
They took the lead in the
11th minute when Adam
Hammill’s floated cross
sailed over the head of Tom
Bradshaw and fell kindly to
Brad Potts to fire in.
affair but Caddis almost lit it
up early on with a superb
strike that cannoned off the
crossbar. The visitors took
the lead when Jon Toral’s
deep corner was met by
Aina, whose header evaded
Jason Leutwiler in the
Blackburn goal.
Jarrod Bowen almost
scored a carboncopy goal a minute
later but hit the side
netting. Graham
should have
equalised but missed
the target with only
goalkeeper David Marshall
to beat as Blackburn’s 18match unbeaten run was
ended.
Doncaster were poor in
the first half and rarely
looked like getting back
into the game, but it was a
different story after the
break.
Only a miraculous save
from Josh Lillis kept
Rochdale in front as he
brilliantly blocked Alfie
Beestin’s effort from pointblank range before John
Marquis hit a post in the
66th minute.
The onslaught continued
as Andy Butler headed
wide. Tommy Rowe missed
another chance when he
blazed over from eight
yards.
their previous five games,
and they felt they were
unlucky to lose.
Steve Cotterill, the
Birmingham manager,
revealed: ‘I had a long chat
with Nigel Clough [the
Burton manager] before the
game. We both put out
unchanged teams as we
wanted to maintain
our recent
momentum and
fortunately for us
we were able to
win.’ Clough said:
‘We looked solid and
dangerous. Unfortunately,
Birmingham scored with
their only shot on target.
We are disappointed to be
out of the cup because we
should have got through.’
5
The Sunday Times January 7, 2018
REX FEATURES
Perez at double
for Newcastle
NEWCASTLE UNITED
Perez 30, 36, Shelvey 39
LUTON TOWN
Hylton 49
3
1
Martin Hardy
St James’ Park
Conte fuels Mourinho row
NORWICH CITY
CHELSEA
C
0
0
Paul Rowan
Carrow Road
Gunn
Hanley Zimmermann
Pinto
Tettey
Pritchard
helsea stuttered on the pitch
against Championship opponents but off it Antonio Conte
delivered
a
devastating
attack on Jose Mourinho,
clearly stung that his Manchester United counterpart
had raised the suspension
which Conte served in Italy
before being cleared of allegations relating to match-fixing.
The Chelsea manager appeared to be
calling his rival out before the sides meet
at Old Trafford next month. “Before you
make these type of comments you must
pay great attention, otherwise for sure
you are a little man,” he said . “I know him
very well from the past. He was a little
man in many circumstances, he is a little
man in the present and for sure he will be
a little man in the future. Also he wants to
try to change his behaviour but you know
him very well and the level is very low.”
Conte picked out Mourinho’s mockery
of former Chelsea manager Claudio Ranieri and then his change of mood when
Ranieri was sacked by Leicester City,
wearing a shirt bearing the initials “CR”.
“When Ranieri was sacked he put on a
shirt for Ranieri,” said Conte. “You are a
fake. I think you have good consideration
for a person or not. It doesn’t change
your opinion to be more sympathetic. If
you want to fight a person, you try to kill
this person. And then after two years you
try to help this person, because maybe
it’s good for you, for your profile.”
He added: “We are there, amnesia.
When you become to be older, there is
3-4-3
Pedro
Kenedy
Trybull
Maddison
Batshuayi
Lewis
Murphy
Willian
Bakayoko Drinkwater Zappacosta
Cahill
3-4-3
Klose
Luiz
Rudiger
Caballero
this type of risk. Also for me, and for you.
For all. The problem is if you show this. It
will be the opportunity in the game
against United when we go to Old Trafford. Me and him face to face. I’m ready. I
don’t know if he’s ready.”
The row overshadowed this goalless
draw, in which a second-half revival by
Chelsea after a lethargic first 45 minutes
was not enough to deny Norwich City a
replay back in Stamford Bridge.
The home side were neat and tidy in
the first half, without really threatening
goalkeeper Willy Caballero’s lack of competitive match practice. Chelsea looked
to catch Norwich on the break but barely
got a chance in the opening quarter.
Norwich threatened when left wingback Jamal Lewis fed Josh Murphy, whose
MOURINHO: WHINER, CHARMER
David Walsh on the Premier League’s
biggest draw, page 16
COSTA SCORES BUT THEN SEES RED
Pantomime season has reopened in La
Liga, and everybody’s favourite villain
is back, writes Ian Hawkey in Madrid.
Diego Costa, below, made the first
start of his latest spell as Atletico
Madrid’s chief snarling ridgeback
yesterday, clocking up his first
Liga goal since 2014 and in the
space of seven minutes
collecting two yellow cards.
The offence which
terminated his participation in
the 2-0 home win over Getafe
— Angel Correa had
given them an 18thminute lead — was
an overenthusiastic goal
celebration.
Having swept
shot from an acute angle was saved by
Caballero. David Luiz was then caught
dawdling in his own penalty area by Alex
Pritchard, but the ball ran away from the
former Tottenham player.
In playing from his own corner flag,
Kenedy gave the ball away in a dangerous
position and Pritchard managed to spin
Gary Cahill, who had Davide Zappacosta
to thank for covering the cross.
Chelsea simply couldn’t match Norwich’s intensity, repeatedly conceding
possession softly and failing to trouble
Norwich’s back three. Still the home side
could not capitalise, James Maddison
skipping past Danny Drinkwater but firing well over from the edge of the box.
That would be the last Norwich would
see of the Chelsea goal for some time as
the visitors emerged in the second half in
more positive mood. Kenedy found some
space on the left and his cross was
headed goalwards by Zappacosta but
Christoph Zimmermann hacked clear.
Sime Vrsaljko’s cross past Getafe
keeper Emiliano Martinez, Costa
rounded the goal at the south end of
the new Wanda Metropolitano
stadium to seek out his old, loyal
constituents. He leant over the
barriers to feel their embrace.
For that, he was cautioned:
yellow, then red.
Evidently, six months of
inactivity since Chelsea,
where he won two Premier
League titles, waved him off
have not visibly mellowed
Costa, who was obliged,
because Atletico were
serving a transfer ban until
last week, to wait half a
season for his official
comeback.
Making a point:
Antonio Conte
gesticulates as
Chelsea misfire
in attack; after
the match he was
highly critical of
Jose Mourinho in
the wake of the
latter’s recent
comments about
a match-fixing
scandal in Italy
Willian was also getting on the ball
more often, finding little pockets of space
in dangerous positions, and on 53 minutes he teed up Drinkwater, who was
stretching as he shot wide.
Caballero gave his side the jitters when
he attempted to punch away a Norwich
corner, but the ball landed at the feet of
Murphy in the penalty area and his volley
flashed wide. Only Conte was able to find
the target, and we await now the rematch
more keenly than the replay.
The orange queues weaved
their way down underneath
the Milburn Stand and the cry
was relentless: ‘Oh when the
Town, go steaming in!’
For an afternoon, St James’
Park had a new colour, a
different feel. The minibuses
and coaches snaked up
Barrack Road. Luton Town
had an army for their march
up to the north-east, more
than 7,500 of them.
Level 7 of the famous old
ground was theirs, a famous
old competition given a bit of
life. Rob Lee, a man who
captained Newcastle and
played for the club 379 times,
travelled with 30 members of
his family on a bus from
Hornchurch to watch his
boys, Olly and Elliot, play
against his old club.
You did not want for
romance on Tyneside, with
even the home side, after a
decade of indifference,
boasting their strongest XI. It
felt relevant. Rafa Benitez has
spoken of his desire to win
something. Not departing a
competition at the first
attempt is a start. Newcastle
wanted to win a cup tie.
To that end it felt, after 39
minutes, that the day could
be done. There was a
ruthlessness to everything
the home side did. Lee Snr
had warned that some
players melt at St James’ Park
through intimidation. Luton
manager Nathan Jones,
mimicking Joy Division’s Ian
Curtis in his pomp with his
pitchside movement, said his
team forgot to turn up.
Take no credit from
Newcastle. They were
consummate in their
professionalism in that half.
Luton were not given the
opportunity to find a
foothold, but still the opening
goal will make painful
viewing for Marek Stech.
The goalkeeper could only
fumble and let slip a 20-yard
free kick from Dwight Gayle,
straight into the path of Ayoze
Perez, who prodded in from
close range. Stech did better
six minutes later, this time
flying to his left to parry a
Gayle header, but again Perez
was there on the rebound.
And when, a further three
minutes later, a fine, flowing
move from the home side
ended with Gayle laying the
ball into Jonjo Shelvey, who
swept into the Luton goal, it
looked for all the world that
the game was over. The
travelling support went flat.
Something, however,
stirred in that visiting
dressing room at half-time.
Jones got into his players, and
his players got into the game.
By the 49th minute they had
scored. England Under-20
goalkeeper Freddie
Woodman’s clearance was
flicked on by Matt Ritchie, but
it fell to Glen Rae. He found
Danny Hylton and Woodman
had not recovered position as
the centre forward went
round him and scored.
Now it was a game. The
best chances still fell to
Benitez’s side. Perez and
Gayle could both have added
a fourth before the 59th
minute, when Hylton cracked
in what he thought was his
second of the afternoon.
The celebrations in Level 7
were real, and the player ran
to the corner flag with his
arms out wide. Even the PA
heralded his ‘goal’. There had
been a flag for offside that
was contested hugely by
Jones afterwards.
“It was definitely onside,”
he said. “We’re disappointed.
We scored a perfectly
legitimate goal that could
have changed the pathway of
the second half, it could have
been different. We were
excellent in the second half.
We gave ourselves a
mountain to climb in the first
with three really poor goals.”
It was as close as Luton
would come to putting the
real frighteners up their
hosts. There was time for
Elliot Lee, who did not start,
unlike his brother, to crack
the crossbar with a curling,
20-yard free kick, with 16
minutes remaining. That
would have made some
finish. Instead Newcastle
were wasteful with chances
for Ritchie, Jacob Murphy,
Perez and Gayle.
“I’m pleased with
everything,” said Benitez.
“I’m really pleased with the
first half and the way we were
managing the game, then
maybe because we were
three goals up we were a bit
more relaxed.
“They put us under
pressure and it was more
difficult. The fans enjoyed it.
We wanted to go through and
we did. It was an emotional
day.”
There was no denying that.
Star man: Ayoze Perez (Newcastle
United)
Yellow card: Newcastle United:
Dummett, Shelvey, Hayden Luton
Town: Hylton
Referee: N Swarbrick
Attendance: 47,069
Newcastle United: Woodman 6,
Manquillo 6, Lascelles 6 (Hayden
30min, 7), Clark 7, Dummett 6, Merino 7
(Saivet 80min, 4), Shelvey 7 (Diame
71min, 5), Murphy 7, Perez 8, Ritchie 6,
Gayle 7 Substitutes: Aarons, Joselu,
Haidara, Darlow
Luton Town: Stech 6, Justin 6, Rea 7,
Mullins 6, Potts 6, O Lee 7, Mpanzu 5
(Cornick 54min, 6), Berry 6, Shinnie 6
(Gambin 82min, 4), Collins 6 (E Lee
68min, 5), Hylton 7 Substitutes:
Stacey, Cook, Shea, Famewo
OWEN HUMPHREYS
Star man: Josh Murphy (Norwich)
Yellow cards: Norwich: Hanley, Tettey Chelsea: Luiz,
Cahill
Referee: S Atwell Attendance: 23,598
Norwich: Gunn 7, Hanley 7, Zimmermann 7, Klose 7,
Pinto 6, Trybull 7, Tettey 7, Lewis 6, Pritchard 7
(Wildschut 88min, 5), Maddison 7, Murphy 7 (Oliveira
83min, 5) Substitutes: Husband, Vrancic, Watkins,
Hoolahan
Chelsea: Caballero 6, Rudiger 6, Luiz 6, Cahill 7,
Zappacosta 7, Drinkwater 7, Bakayoko 6, Kenedy 5
(Musonda 77min, 5), Willian 7, Batshuayi 6 (Morata
74min, 5), Pedro 6 (Sterling 89min, 5) Substitutes:
Clarke-Salter, Eduardo, Ampadu, Hudson-Odoi
Breaking the deadlock: Ayoze Perez scores his first goal
Nolan’s Notts County revival ends Brentford’s Cup hopes
FA CUP ROUND-UP
Peter Wilson
Notts County’s revival under
Kevin Nolan has moved from
League Two to the FA Cup.
They won 1-0 at
Championship side Brentford
thanks to a goal from another
former top-flight player, Jon
Stead. The former Blackburn
and Sunderland striker
scored his seventh goal of the
season midway through the
second half.
Nolan, whose side are
second in League Two, said
the “special chemistry” at
the club was behind their
recent success. “I was
delighted for the fans, who
were behind us from start to
finish,” he said. “There is a
special chemistry at the club
right now between the
players, the fans and
management, and all of that
is working in our favour.”
Ousseynou Cisse scored
the winning goal as League
One MK Dons knocked
Championship side Queens
Park Rangers out with a
1-0 victory at Loftus Road.
Cisse scored on the hour
mark after a misplaced pass
from home midfielder Josh
Scowen, who kept the ball in
when it was heading out for a
throw. QPR equalled
Plymouth’s record of exiting
the cup at the third-round
stage on 49 occasions.
Ian Holloway, the QPR
manager, was not happy with
Scowen’s mistake. “To play it
square and then to keep it in
when it’s going out, I can’t
believe it,” he said. “That ball
is a package. You give it to one
of the QPR lads and tell him
where you want it. You don’t
ever take a package to the
post office without putting a
message on it where it’s got to
go, do you? Unfortunately
that’s cost us. It should have
been 0-0, we’d still be in the
cup and this would be a
result.”
League Two Carlisle
earned a replay with a 0-0
draw against Championship
side Sheffield Wednesday,
whose new manager, Jos
Luhukay, takes over
tomorrow. Championship
strugglers Reading went a
seventh match without a
victory after they were held
to a 0-0 draw at League Two
Stevenage. Darren Sarll, the
Stevenage manager, said
Reading were lucky to escape
Hertfordshire with a replay.
“There’s no
disappointment from us,” he
said. “Stevenage are the
winners today: we won the
game physically,
psychologically, technically
and financially. We may not
have got the score we wanted
but the players will go away
thinking that they’re
capable.”
Mansfield, another League
Two side, also earned a
JOHN CLIFTON
Winning strike: Stead celebrates his Notts County goal
replay after a 0-0 draw in
Wales with Championship
team Cardiff. Steve Evans, the
Mansfield manager, has
promised a hostile
atmosphere for the replay. “I
think the people of Mansfield
and the supporters will turn
out in big numbers,” he said.
“We want it to be a real
hostile atmosphere.”
Yeovil were unable to
name a starting XI just 48
hours before kick-off against
Bradford City, four loan
signings coming to their
rescue. One of them, Marcus
Barnes, who arrived from
Southampton, scored the
opener in the League Two
side’s 2-0 win against the
League One promotion
hopefuls. Jordan Green
added the second for the
lowest-ranked side still left in
the cup.
Rudy Gestede and Martin
Braithwaite scored in the first
half as Middlesbrough beat
northeast rivals Sunderland
2-0 at the Riverside stadium.
Chris Coleman, the
Sunderland manager whose
side are battling relegation
from the Championship, said:
“We’re in a dogfight and you
don’t go into a dogfight with
kittens, that’s for sure. I just
need whoever is ready for it,
and the boys today were
ready.”
Gestede took only 10
minutes to heap more misery
on the Championship’s
bottom club and
Braithwaite’s effort just
before the break effectively
ensured the visitors’ sole
remaining focus this season
will be avoiding a second
consecutive relegation.
Josh Harrop and Alan
Browne both scored twice as
Preston won 5-1 at Wycombe.
The visitors went in front
after just 87 seconds when
Harrop bent in a 25-yard free
kick. They doubled their lead
through Browne’s half-volley
in the 38th minute.
Wycombe came back into
the game in first-half
stoppage time when Luke
O’Nien’s low cross went in via
a deflection off Daryl Horgan.
The Preston winger
redeemed himself early in the
second half.
Browne made it four with a
78th-minute penalty after
Paul Huntington was fouled,
before Harrop headed in late
on.
IN TODAY’S SUNDAY TIMES
Premier League clubs in
betting controversy, News,
page 7
6
SPORT FOOTBALL: EMIRATES FA CUP
JON SUPER
RICHARD STANTON.
As two of his old clubs meet today, Viv
Anderson says next manager at City
Ground needs time. By Paul Rowan
A
s a former player who has
done it all, seen it all and
heard it all, Viv Anderson
was in a good position to
offer some timely advice to
Arsène Wenger on the eve of
the FA Cup third round tie
between two of his old clubs,
Nottingham Forest and Arsenal.
Even for one who had to quickly
develop a thick skin to survive some of
the abuse thrown at him as a young black
teenager in the 1970s, Anderson was
somewhat taken aback at Wenger’s comments that he would have “committed
suicide” had Chelsea scored a late winner
at the Emirates stadium on Wednesday
night in the Premier League game that
ended in a 2-2 draw.
“In the heat of the moment in a press
conference, you say things that you don’t
really mean. Suicide is a serious thing and
you can’t be flippant in that respect. I
would have thought that somebody of
Arsène’s experience would have thought
long and hard before he made those comments. A lot of people have been down
that road and his flippant comment
doesn’t help,” Anderson says.
Anderson chooses his words carefully,
knowing that the boundaries of what constitutes unacceptable comment and
behaviour are changing all the time. He
also speaks as somebody who roomed
with Justin Fashanu and saw at first hand
his Nottingham Forest teammate’s personal anguish, years before Fashanu
decided to take his own life in 1998.
Anderson’s current work with Playon
Pro, a company based in Greater Manchester that provides networking opportunities for top former professionals who
want to continue playing football and
socialising together, touches on some of
these sensitive issues.
“The statistics show that around two
out of every five Premier League players
who earn an average of around £40,000
per week face the threat of bankruptcy
within five years of ending their careers.
Divorce rates in that first year of retirement are incredibly high,” Anderson
says.
Wenger, who is today serving the first
part of a three-match touchline ban for
some other injudicious remarks, is in distinguished company. The greatest manager Anderson knew and played under,
Brian Clough — he rates him marginally
higher than another, Sir Alex Ferguson —
pushed the boundaries of acceptable
behaviour and comment continually and
sometimes overstepped them. There
was, however, method in most of what
Clough did and said.
Anderson remembers his second
game playing for Forest, as a 17-year-old
up at Carlisle United when Clough was
starting out on his Nottingham adventure
in the old second division. “I was sub and
an hour into the game he looked down
the line and says to me, ‘Anderson warm
up’. So I warm up and come back and sit
back down. He says, ‘I thought that I told
you to warm up’. I said, ‘I have boss, but
they are throwing all sorts at me;
bananas, pears everything’. He says, ‘Get
back out there and get me two pears and
a banana’. So I went back out.
“Clearly he did it for a reason but he
would never explain why. Later on, he
pulled me aside and said, ‘If you are going
to listen to them, you are no good to me. I
am going to pick somebody else ahead of
you if you are going to let them dictate to
you. You are here because you can play,
but you are no good to me if you don’t go
out there and play. Don’t worry about
anything else and just concentrate on
playing football’. I took that on board
from a very early age and just got on with
it.”
The medals, the international caps
— 30 of them — and the glory followed, though the FA Cup always
remained an elusive target for
Anderson. It was also the one
cup that eluded Clough at Forest. Anderson reached the 1993
final as captain of Sheffield Wednesday,
but was injured in the first drawn game
against Arsenal and then absent when the
Owls lost the replay. As Bryan Robson’s
assistant at Middlesbrough in 1997,
Anderson was still on the way out of the
Rod
Liddle
The arrival of the
video assistant is
all about money
— and it’s even
more of an
injustice to
our beloved
game than a
dodgy
penalty
or a
crass
dive
High hopes: Aristote Nsiala is thriving at Shrewsbury Town
Moyes reject
finds his feet
Shrewsbury defender
backs himself to keep
Andy Carroll quiet —
and do all he can to
beat West Ham today
John Aizlewood
ANDERSON’S
FOREST FIRE
I took on board
what Clough said
about the abuse
from a very early
age and just got on
with it
When Brighton take on Crystal Palace in
the FA Cup tomorrow evening, the game
will be refereed by Andre Marriner, with
Neil Swarbrick sitting in a small room
somewhere near Heathrow poring over
a video screen with the help of Peter
Kirkup. Mr Marriner will be linked to Mr
Swarbrick by means of a telephone
headset.
If he is required to make a difficult
decision during the fixture — such as, did
Wilfried Zaha take a dive just then (yes)
or was it a penalty (no) — he will alert the
man in the small room. And then Mr
Marriner will pretend that it is Boxing
Day and he is about to begin a
game of charades with close
members of his family. He will
mime to the crowd a
television screen, drawing the
outline of a box with his
hands. Then he will scamper
over to the side of the pitch
where a video screen for his
own use will have been set up,
and replay the incident
while discussing
the pros and
cons with the
man in the
small room
near
Heathrow.
At the end
of this
probably
lengthy
dressing room to the technical area when
Roberto Di Matteo struck after 42 seconds and Chelsea went on to win 2-0.
His experience as a Manchester United
player in 1990 was perhaps the toughest,
as he played throughout the competition
right up until the semi-finals, but was
then injured and did not receive a medal
when Ferguson won his first trophy at the
club in the fourth year of his tenure. That
was the year when Mark Robins’ goal in
the third round against Forest is believed
to have saved Ferguson’s job. Anderson is
adamant that Forest, in their current predicament — with a caretaker manager,
Gary Brazil, in place after sacking Mark
Warburton on New Year’s Eve — can learn
from the patience shown by United to
Ferguson all those years ago.
“Forest have had a phenomenal
amount of managers over the past 10
years,” he said. This is Brazil’s third stint
as caretaker, and there have been 10 fulltime appointments since Colin Calderwood left on Boxing Day in 2008.
“They have to carefully choose somebody and say, ‘Whatever happens you are
going to be here for the next five
years. You are going to build this
football club back to where we
want it to be’.
“They have thrown money at
certain people who have spent it badly
and that is why they are in their current
predicament. Also, they have too many
kids in the team this season and the lack
of experience means that they have suddenly hit a brick wall.”
Anderson would like to see two stalwarts from the Clough era who still have
roles behind the scenes at the club — John
McGovern and Frank Clark — play a more
active role in choosing the next manager.
He mentions a couple more former players, Martin O’Neill and Roy Keane, the
management team who are currently out
of contract with the Republic of Ireland,
as one possible solution when it comes to
helping Forest rediscover their long-lost
mojo.
Despite being raised in Nottingham
and having conquered Europe and the
domestic English league with Forest,
Anderson is a Manchester United supporter and sits on the fence when it
comes to choosing a winner from this afternoon’s game at the City Ground
between his old clubs. A draw would
boost Forest’s coffers, he points out, at a
time when the club need every bit of
encouragement they can get.
digression he will, hopefully, send Zaha
off and the game can recommence.
Ladies and gentleman, this will be the FA
Cup debut of the Video Assistant
Referee.
Swarbrick is a senior figure from the
world of refereedom, not just somebody
who hates Crystal Palace, unfortunately.
He is there as a kind of divine arbiter
who must be invoked before he
dispenses his advice. He cannot simply
bellow into his own headset: “That was
offside, Marriner, you clown,” as
everybody in the stands will be doing.
He has to be summoned up out of the
ether.
I think it would be more fun if
Marriner had to stand in a pentacle
while summoning this deity and deliver
a demonic incantation, something like:
“Ahn’tal Ah’tan’tel. Regrezitahl. Me
Vaskalla Pert’ent’itzu”, which confers
upon the person doing the incantation
the status of being a living god. (I tried it
once and it worked really well).
Technology will not be held back —
onwards, onwards into the future we go.
England’s last friendly against Germany
used the ectoplasmic video assistant
referee and the whole thing has been
tried in the Bundesliga, where the video
assistant was kept in a small room near
Cologne airport. Later this month —
January 22 — a decision will be taken by
the International Football Association
Board (IFAB) as to whether the
technology can be used in Premier
League matches henceforth, and indeed
at the World Cup in Russia in June. From
there, it will surely percolate downwards
and children playing football with
jumpers for goalposts will nominate one
of their peers to sit beside the pitch with
a smartphone, ready to be called into
action for a swift adjudication.
Forgive my cynicism, please. I
suppose I am a Luddite. But I have to say
that I rather agree with the wonderful
Italian goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon, who
has said that technology is making the
game “ugly”.
My primary worry — as I have
mentioned here once or twice before —
is that it is another attempt to impose
science upon something which is
valuable principally for its flawed
humanity — flawed in the case of the
players, flawed in the case of the referee.
And that one should accept that these
flaws exist and get on with the game.
Football is not pristine, nor was it ever
meant to be.
Injustices happen and, in doing so,
more closely reflect the lives the rest of
us endure. That is a philosophical point
and I accept that it cuts no ice in a game
which these days is almost entirely about
money. When such huge amounts of
moolah are at stake you can see the
WATCH FA
CUP GOALS
Experience
counts: Viv
Anderson
wants John
McGovern
and Frank
Clark to help
choose next
Forest boss
ON TV
TODAY
Nottingham
Forest v Arsenal
3.30pm BT Sport
2, Kick-off 4pm
You can see video highlights from all this weekend’s
ties on our tablet and smartphone editions
IN NEWS
Counsellors to help refs handle
abuse — Page 7
In December 2009, Everton
were hosting BATE Borisov in
a dead rubber Europa League
clash. With 15 minutes
remaining, Tony Hibbert
picked up a knock and the
manager David Moyes
plumped for untried Aristote
Nsiala as a replacement.
Terrified, the church-going,
piano-playing teenager
stripped off, only to discover
his shinpads were missing. He
was stood down. The boy
born in Kinshasa, raised in
Paris and settled in Anfield,
where he was excluded from
a school where he was the
only black pupil, would never
again get so close to Everton’s
first team.
Today, Nsiala, the meanest
and most parsimonious of
Shrewsbury Town’s mean,
parsimonious defence, will
face Moyes’ West Ham United
in front of a sold-out crowd
and the TV cameras in the FA
Cup third round. “I hope the
ball goes near him so I can do
a sliding tackle and take him
out,” he jokes. “At Everton I
was so scared of him, I
couldn’t look when he walked
past. The main time I spoke to
him was when he told me and
Shane Duffy off because a
dinner lady was upset we’d
not said ‘thank you’.”
He was released by
Everton and joined
Accrington Stanley, where he
averaged more than one
yellow card every two games.
His football career was
seemingly over. He also had
to cope with his father Philip
being paralysed from the
waist down after suffering a
spine tumour. “You can’t
understand what it’s like to be
released by a Premier League
club, but what happened to
my dad was so hard on my
mum,” he says. “I was angry
all the time. I had a year
where I couldn’t get out of
bed.”
Nsiala found his way to
Vietnam’s second tier. When
the 6ft 4in foreigner took a
tumble after bumping his
head on the low ceiling of a
KFC and the locals laughed
loud and long, he booked a
flight home the next day.
Back home, he impressed
the Grimsby Town manager
Paul Hurst while at Southport
and the traveller became a
Mariner in 2014. The anxiety
and anger were still there, but
Hurst sent Nsiala to a
psychologist, who taught him
techniques to help find
himself. “Tote just needs to
attraction of presenting a game which is
devoid of judicial error.
Except, of course, that it won’t be. I
do not think for a moment that the video
assistant will eliminate controversy,
doubt and injustice. You will have heard
the pundits on Match of the Day and Sky
arguing the toss about some decision
made by a referee — and in most cases,
failing to agree with one another even
after having watched the incident
endlessly, in slow motion.
Ball to hand or deliberate handball?
That lunge – did he mean to cripple his
opponent, or was it simply badly timed?
Was that a dive, or was there contact —
and if there was contact how minimal
was it?
And slow-motion replays are not
always the most accurate means of
divining intent. The game is not played
in slow-motion, unless you’re a fan of
Middlesbrough or Manchester United.
And then there are the breaks in the
game to facilitate this new development.
Fifa has been trying to work out ways in
which supporters can be given more
bang for their buck.
There are suggestions that when the
ball is out of play, the clock should be
stopped. If that ever comes to pass, fans
will be leaving the ground at around 7pm
at the end of a game that kicked off at
3pm.
But still, it’s coming, and there’s
nothing much the rest of us can do about
it.
see he’s valued,” says Hurst,
“and he certainly is.” Hurst
sold him to Hartlepool
United, but re-signed Nsiala
for Shrewsbury a year ago.
“He’s more friend than
manager,” says Nsiala, a new
father and DR Congo
international.
He has a £100 wager with
the coaching staff that if Andy
Carroll plays today he will not
score and the defender will
finish without a black eye and
will win most of the headed
duels. “This game is a
massive building block for
me. My downfall has always
been self-doubt, but I want to
prove myself against the
best.”
Shrewsbury will field their
strongest line-up. “The
league is the priority but this
tie is reward, not distraction,”
notes Hurst. “It makes me
smirk when clubs who have
all the resources in the world
to get their players fresh
complain about schedules.”
After guiding Grimsby back
into the Football League,
Hurst moved to Shrewsbury
in October 2016. He joined a
club debt-free since 2007.
Roland Wycherley, their
chairman and majority
shareholder for the past 21
years, is a local patriarch
whose business empire began
with a solitary vending
machine. “I have to restrain
him when his heart rules his
head,” says CEO Brian
Caldwell, who joined on the
recommendation of Kenny
Moyes, David’s agent and
brother, with a brief to
increase the visibility of
Shropshire’s only league club
in the community: “If we get
one child from the school
groups we give tickets to,
that’s a season-ticket holder
for 60 years.” Next month,
they should become the first
English club to have a
designated safe-standing
area.
Shrewsbury were bottom
of League One when Hurst
arrived. “There was so much
wrong,” he says. “A few days
in, me and my assistant Chris
Doig sat in my room in
silence. If there had been
speech bubbles, they’d have
said, ‘We’ve messed up
coming here’.” The board
backed an extensive playing
staff overhaul and built new
training facilities. Slowly the
tide turned: today they are
second in League One.
“To get to where we are is
beyond the wildest dreams of
myself, the chairman, players
and fans. I’m not trying to be
something I’m not: that’s
important here,” says Hurst.
ON TV TODAY
Shrewsbury Town v West
Ham United
1.40pm BBC1, Kick-off 2pm
HOW VAR
WILL WORK
6 Tomorrow’s cup tie between
Brighton and Crystal Palace will be
the first competitive club match in
England to use Video Assistant
Referee (VAR) technology
6 The technology can only be used
to review three ‘game-changing’
situations: goals, penalties and
straight red cards. However, it can
also be employed to correct
instances when the referee may have
mistaken the identity of an offender
6 It was first deployed in an official
match in the United Kingdom when
England played a friendly against
Germany last November. That game
ended goalless and it was not
required by the referee
6 Since being used in the Club World
Cup in December 2016, following its
approval by the International
Football Association Board for a twoyear trial, it has been adopted in
domestic competitions such as the
Bundesliga and Serie A, as well as the
Confederations Cup. It will feature at
the African Nations Championship
later this month
7
The Sunday Times January 7, 2018
FA investigate racial abuse claims in Holgate-Firmino clash
Liverpool, criticised
for their handling of
the Suarez-Evra affair,
will fully co-operate
with authorities
Ian Whittell
The Football Association is to
launch an invesigation into
whether Everton’s Mason
Holgate was racially abused
by Roberto Firmino in Friday
night’s FA Cup Merseyside
derby at Anfield.
Whatever sense lip
readers, linguists and referee
Bobby Madley make of the
allegations, Liverpool
Football Club emerged with
some credit, having learnt
lessons of the past.
The scars left by Luis
Suarez’s eight-match
suspension for racially
abusing Manchester United’s
Patrice Evra still run deep at
Liverpool, who were widely
criticised for their handling of
the 2011 affair. This time the
Anfield club have moved
quickly.
“The club and the player
will fully co-operate with the
relevant authorities to ensure
the facts are established in a
thorough manner if deemed
necessary or requested,” read
a club statement. “While that
process is ongoing we will not
be making any further
comment.”
That was in stark contrast
to the day, 24 hours after
Suarez was found guilty in
December 2011, when
manager Kenny Dalglish and
his players controversially
wore T-shirts bearing Suarez’s
face while warming up for a
game at Wigan.
Liverpool’s sensitivity to
racial issues was
demonstrated last month
when the club facilitated an
interview with forward Rhian
Brewster in which he
revealed he has already been
on the receiving end of
multiple cases of racist abuse
during his young career.
Even manager Jurgen
Klopp, having initially done
the wrong thing in criticising
Holgate for his reaction
towards Firmino, quickly
backtracked when he learnt
of the accusations.
Unfortunately, making
sense of the incident and
allegations is likely to prove
far less straightforward.
Late in the first half,
Holgate pushed Firmino into
the front row of the main
stand while the pair
competed for a ball running
out of play — an act that
ANDREW POWELL
In the red corner:
Roberto Firmino
has words with
Mason Holgate
in Anfield
showdown
COUTINHO
brought no punishment from
Madley but which could have
led to the Everton defender
being shown a red card for
violent conduct.
Firmino reacted angrily
and, as Madley stepped in,
was seen to hurl abuse at
Holgate. Best efforts at lipreading suggested that
Firmino, a Brazilian, shouted
“Louco. Filho da puta,” in his
native tongue — “Crazy. Son
of a bitch.”
But the cameras did not
show all of Firmino’s words
and, in response, Holgate was
seen complaining to Madley
that he had been racially
abused, an accusation that
the fourth official, with whom
the referee spoke after the
incident, confirmed to Klopp
after the game.
Holgate was escorted out
of the ground by Everton staff
later and both managers
refused to comment in detail
about the accusations.
Thus it appears that
Madley’s report, including
any additional observations
from his assistants and fourth
official Jon Moss, will form
the basis of the FA’s
investigation before they
decide whether to take any
action against Firmino.
The incident
overshadowed an absorbing
cup tie, one which featured
an impressive debut from
Liverpool’s £75m record
signing Virgil van Dijk. The
world’s most expensive
defender turned in an
accomplished performance
at the back and scored the
winning goal. It was a debut
that left Klopp hugely
encouraged and expecting
even brighter things ahead
from the Dutchman.
“You don’t pay that
amount of money for a player
and think ‘OK, we can get
another 80%’, but of course
there is room for
improvement,” said Klopp.
“But the first improvement
will be to adapt to the team,
ANDREW POWELL
FOOTBALL’S MOST
EXPENSIVE TRANSFERS
Neymar
Barcelona
L
ess than six months after Liverpool were being proudly celebrated as the knights of a bold
new English resolve against
club football’s most predatory
armada, another star of the Premier League heads towards La
Liga. After Gareth Bale to
Madrid, and Luis Suarez to Barcelona, now Philippe Coutinho,
at a price that may end up as high as the
Bale and Suarez fees combined.
Barcelona expect to present Coutinho
as the most expensive recruit in their history — and also Spanish football’s history
— as early as tomorrow after an offer that
could, with add-ons, rise to £142m
resolved a transfer the Catalan club, and
indeed the player, have been pursuing
since the middle of last year. Coutinho
did not join the Liverpool party travelling
to Dubai this weekend for a warmweather training break and Barcelona
have kept VIP seats free for him at Camp
Nou for this afternoon’s Liga meeting
with Levante.
They expect to see him in the club’s
distinctive stripes, and part of an attacking unit including Suarez, who joined
from Liverpool in 2014, and Lionel Messi,
for the remainder of what looks a comfortable progression to the Spanish
league title, with Barcelona six points
ahead of second-placed Atletico Madrid
and with a game in hand. The 25-year-old
is understood to have been offered a contract until 2023.
Given that Barcelona would not be
able to use Coutinho for the rest of this
season in the Champions League — for
which he is cup-tied — the urgency of the
last phase of the chase, with the winter
transfer window not yet a week old and a
full summer of business to come, stands
in stark contrast to the impasse of last
summer, when Liverpool turned down
three Barcelona offers, the last of them
worth £118m. Barcelona pushed quickly
and hard until Liverpool said yes for several strategic reasons. First, to bring to an
end a saga that had frustrated Barcelona’s
Miedema
forced to
look on
bright
side
Miedema: believes
victory against Chelsea
today could change
Arsenal’s season
executives, who were left reeling by the
departure of Neymar to Paris Saint-Germain last summer. After PSG met Neymar’s €220m release-clause and the Brazilian superstar agreed to join the
ambitious Parisians, Barcelona sought
Coutinho as something close to a like-forlike replacement and as the sort of recruit
who would excite supporters. Despite
Coutinho’s obvious enthusiasm for the
switch, Liverpool stood firm until the
window closed in September.
Barcelona always intended to return
and targeted a January conclusion,
believing that to delay their next bid until
the summer risked an auction against
other heavyweight clubs, particularly
were the player to enhance his reputation further with Brazil at the World Cup.
While Barcelona remained persuaded of
Coutinho’s commitment to furthering his
club career with them, a successful rival
bid may have politically damaged the
club’s president, Josep Maria Bartomeu.
Barcelona lost prestige with Neymar’s
move to wealthy PSG; there is an awareness, too, that Real Madrid, the mirror by
which Barcelona measure success and
status, have been through three relatively
quiet summers in the market and have
earmarked large funds for recruitment
this June.
Barcelona spent a large tranche of
their Neymar yield in August, but the
£97m signing from Borussia Dortmund of
Ousmane Dembele, the 20-year-old
French international winger, was not
intended to compensate for Coutinho’s
non-arrival, or expected to satisfy the
Barcelona electorate, the fans who vote
for the club’s president. Many of them
were jeering Bartomeu at the beginning
of the season. Besides, Dembele sustained a hamstring injury in mid-September and has only just returned to full
training. Barcelona then watched Liverpool, despite their free scoring, fall away
from contention for the Premier League
title. Once the English club splashed out a
club-record £70m-plus on hiring Virgil
Van Dijk from Southampton, Barcelona
felt confident an offer that would shatter
the record any Premier League club has
received would be received more favourably than in August.
Barcelona’s head coach, Ernesto
Valverde, echoed Jurgen Klopp, the
Liverpool manager, in refusing to give
any updates on the Coutinho negotia-
Ousmane Dembele
Dortmund Barcelona, August 2017
Paul Pogba
Juventus Man Utd, August 2016
tions until an official confirmation of the
deal, but he did reference the Brazilian
yesterday: “Coutinho is a great footballer,” he said. “There is speculation about
great players everywhere but I prefer to
focus on the great players that we have
here.”
Yesterday was Spain’s Reyes festival,
when Christmas presents are traditionally given; Valverde smiled at the coincidence of that and a set of front pages in
the Barcelona-based sports newspapers
that declared a deal for Coutinho imminent. “I am not a Santa who can make
great promises,” he said. “But what Barcelona fans want are great players and to
see the team progressing.”
‘Pessimistic’
Arsenal striker
faces Chelsea in
vital clash today
Rebecca Myers
V
Vivianne
Miedema says she
is a pessimist. Don’t
expect much and you can
only be pleasantly
surprised. In the past four
years, she has twice won
the German league with
Bayern Munich, the
European Championship
with Holland, and become
a leading striker at Arsenal.
Not bad for a 21-year-old.
If any of it has taken her
by surprise, she does not
show it. Miedema is relaxed,
exchanging jokes with staff at
the Arsenal training centre.
She joined the club last
summer after three years at
Bayern Munich and is now
considering her club’s
prospects for today’s game
against Chelsea; the Gunners
are third in the league, three
points behind Chelsea and
five behind Manchester City.
“For me, they are the
favourites, so we’ll just see
how it goes down,” Miedema
says. “We’ve got a great
group, an amazing coach,
we’ve got everything we need
so it’s time to start showing
that. If we win, everything is
open again. I have got a good
feeling that there’s going to be
something good. We’re still in
all the cups. You never know
where it’s going to end.”
Miedema grew up in a
£m
198
142
136
89
Gareth Bale
Tottenham Real Madrid, September 2013
85
Transfers do not include Kylian Mbappe’s loan move from
Monaco to PSG which could become a £165m transfer
Money talks:
Liverpool resisted
Barcelona’s move
for Philippe
Coutinho last
summer but he was
determined to leave
Ruthless pursuit of Brazilian
by Spanish giants was part
of strategy to offer more rest
to Messi and Iniesta
Liverpool are now
in a market where
clubs know their
spending power
and can up prices
PSG, August 2017
Philippe Coutinho
Liverpool Barcelona, January 2018
How Barcelona made
Liverpool an offer
they couldn’t refuse
IAN
HAWKEY
how we deal in different
situations.”
The elephant in the Anfield
room was Philippe Coutinho,
who was, according to
reports, last night completing
his move to Barcelona. Just as
Klopp has addressed his
team’s glaring defensive
deficiencies in such
aggressive fashion, he seems
to have lost his best attacking,
all-round player.
For Everton, as they faced
up to a disappointing cup
exit, there was the
consolation of possibly
solving a glaring weakness of
their own. On Friday the club
completed the £27m signing
of Turkish forward Cenk
Tosun from Besiktas, a player
manager Sam Allardyce
described as the best in
Europe at that price. Tosun
has scored four Champions
League goals this season.
Valverde, in his first season in the job,
sees plenty of progress in the league
campaign and, after an unflustered
group phase in the Champions League,
will take on Chelsea in the last 16 of that
competition next month. He will welcome the opportunity of reinforcements
in the creative positions of Barcelona’s
squad, and envisages Coutinho playing in
a front three or in midfield. A Coutinho
ineligible for European matches but able
to play in La Liga allows Valverde to rest
Messi more often at weekends ahead of
Champions League dates and gives
Andres Iniesta, the club captain who
turns 34 in May, more recovery time
between matches in the business end of
the season.
As for Liverpool, they are about to find
themselves in a position Barcelona have
come to know: in a market where their
spending power is judged to be unusually
elevated, so asking prices are set higher.
What Liverpool do not have quite as
much of as Barcelona is an allure for leading players, an attraction Coutinho never
lost his appetite for through Liverpool’s
stubborn, proud postponing of his
departure.
football-mad house and
began playing aged five. “I
just used to kick everything
around in the house. If
something was on the floor, it
got a kick from me.”
She had made a name for
herself back home by the
time the Euros arrived, but
struggled in the first few
games. “Everyone had an
opinion about us, about me.
They were like, ‘Kick
Miedema out’. But I like that;
I need it. I need that so much
more than just playing a game
where nobody cares. I like
pressure.” When the
knockout stages began, she
came into her own, scoring
four goals, including two in
the final, when Holland beat
Denmark 4-2.
She was compared with
Arjen Robben when she
WHAT THE CLUBS SAID LAST NIGHT
Shortly after the 2017 August transfer
window when Liverpool successfully
resisted Barcelona’s bid for Coutinho,
Jurgen Klopp was asked about the
club’s transfer policy. His response
was clear: ‘I wasn’t manager when
Suarez was sold, I wasn’t
manager when Sterling was
sold. I’m manager now, and
we’re not selling Coutinho.’
Yesterday, Klopp, inset,
said: ‘It is no secret that
Philippe has wanted this
move to happen since July,
when Barcelona first made
their interest known. Philippe
was insistent with me, the owners
and even his teammates this was a
move he was desperate to make
happen. The club did everything
within our means to convince Philippe
that remaining part of Liverpool was as
attractive as moving to Spain.
‘It is with great reluctance that we —
transferred to Bayern. She is
disdainful of the comparison.
She’s seen Robben around,
they chat at parties. He is
often there with his wife and
children, “so it was more like
comparing how different our
lives actually are,” she says.
After their triumph at the
Euros, and the failure of the
men’s team to qualify for this
summer’s World Cup in
Russia, Miedema and her
teammate Lieke Martens led a
successful call for better pay.
“We’ve got a new deal and it’s
a really good deal. Where we
came from is a joke. If that
came out, everybody would
be like ‘what the ***’.”
If she was looking for
fellow trailblazers, she has
found the perfect match.
Arsenal made headlines
when they rebranded from
as a team and club — prepare to say
farewell to a good friend, a wonderful
person and a fantastic player’.
Barcelona also released a statement
saying that ‘the player will sign a
contract for the remainder of the
season and five more, and will
have a buyout clause of
€400m.’
It went on to say that he
was arriving at the club
‘after demonstrating his
class as a player with
Liverpool and the Brazilian
national side. Born on June
12, 1992 in Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil, Phillipe Coutinho is one of
the most talented midfielders in the
world with the potential to get even
better.
‘The Brazilian has shown his talent
and class at the highest level with
Premier League club Liverpool and
with the Brazilian national side.’
Arsenal Ladies. “We will,
wherever possible, refer to
our women’s team as, simply,
Arsenal, just as we do our
men’s team,” the club
announced.
Miedema is frank on the
subject of people who are
negative about women’s
football: “It’s OK for them to
hate it but at least just accept
that we’re coming. Just be
open, give it a chance. If you
still don’t like it, that’s fine,
but just shut up and don’t say
anything about it, you know
what I mean?”
She signed her first
contract aged 14 but knows
this story is a rare one in a
world where many players
are still scraping by with
several jobs to prop up parttime contracts. “We’re not
going to be like men’s football
any time soon and to be
honest I don’t want to be like
men’s football — it’s a sick
world. I don’t want a million a
year, because I don’t need it.
But it’s important that the
girls can just play football,
rather than having to work,
study, and then play football.
That is the next step.”
So, multiple title winner,
world’s best young striker,
equal pay campaigner. “Yeah,
I’m 21 and I’ve done quite a
lot. I want to play the
Olympics, I want to qualify
for the World Cup and I want
to win the Champions League
once.”
ON TV TODAY
Chelsea Ladies v Arsenal
1.15pm BT Sport 2, kick-off
1.30pm
8
SPORT FOOTBALL
Clubs reap benefits of going back to home front to develop talent
DAN MULLAN
Bristol City show
what can be done
when working
with local players
Jonathan Northcroft
Football correspondent
Joe Bryan, born in Bristol,
raised in Bristol, was made at
Bristol City, debuting as an 18year-old after emerging from
their academy. Loans to the
Blue Square Premier and
League Two helped his
development. Korey Smith,
Bristol City’s other scorer in
last month’s Carabao Cup
humbling of Manchester
United, came through at
Norwich, in League One.
Bristol City had four other
club-developed players in
their 18 for their Carabao Cup
heroics and 16 of that number
were English homegrown
players: a fairytale team
made the old-fashioned way.
These are boom times in
development in the Football
League and Bristol City are an
example of a trend, among its
clubs, of moving back
towards British and local
talent. Of England’s Under-17
World Cup winning squad,
29% of the players were EFL
registered, as were 20% of
England’s Under-20 World
Cup winning group, while
39% of England’s Under-19
European champions were
EFL players.
“If you look at the success
we had as a nation in the
summer, there were loads of
headlines about Phil Foden
and the other Manchester
City and Liverpool players
who starred,” said Dave
Wetherall, the EFL’s head of
youth development. “But a
substantial number of those
boys came through the EFL
system. And in the senior
England team are numerous
examples who started at EFL
clubs.
“The back five in England’s
last game [against Brazil]
began their careers in the EFL
and then there’s Raheem
Sterling, Adam Lallana, Dele
Alli, Jamie Vardy, Alex
Oxlade-Chamberlain.”
Wetherall, the former
Leeds and Bradford defender,
was the first Premier League
footballer to attain a firstclass honours degreewhile
playing. He knows a bit about
fulfilling potential, and
helped bring in measures
likely to further boost the
development boom. From
this season, each matchday 18
in the EFL must include a
minimum seven homegrown
players — those who,
irrespective of nationality,
were registered with an
English or Welsh club for at
least three years before
turning 21 (or the end of the
Local hero: Korey
Smith, who
scored against
Man United,
learnt his craft in
League One
CRYING
FOUL
season during which they
turn 21). From next season
there will be a further
requirement: every team
sheet will have to feature at
least one player developed by
the club itself.
To qualify as the latter, a
player must have been with
the club for at least a year
prior to the end of their
under-19 season. It represents
a small but significant
change, enshrining in EFL
rules the necessity for clubs
to produce their own talent.
No club can now simply
import — even at youth level —
players and no academy will
be left to go about its work
wondering if any of the boys
it is developing will ever get
near the first team. The
Premier League could learn a
lot.
“We wanted to establish a
pathway from academies to
first teams, and young players
can be assured somebody
who has been in the club’s
own system is going to be
around the first team,” said
Wetherall. “It empowers
academies, but also puts
them under pressure to
produce, which is a good
thing. The ‘seven
homegrown’ criteria is a
raising of the quota from
what it was before, six. We
wanted to draw a line in the
sand. The clubs had to vote it
in. They showed great
commitment [to youth] in
doing that.”
About 85% of EFL
teamsheets already feature
home developed players, so
clubs are moving in the right
direction. A year ago an
initiative called EFL Futures
was launched, where a prize
fund of £3m is shared prorata between clubs giving
England-qualified under-21
players first team
opportunities. The EFL are
proud of some of the figures
they’re achieving, such as
that 45% of EFL scholars now
win professional contracts.
Through League Football
Education, a partnership
between the EFL and
Professional Footballers
Association, youngsters being
released by clubs are given
W
ho would be a referee?
I ask myself this whenever a debatable officiating decision has a
major impact on a
game. Who, I wonder,
as I, the rest of the
media, fans and managers pore over countless replays as a prelude to tearing apart the individual in
question, would subject himself to such
scrutiny and, sometimes, contempt? I
know I couldn’t do it.
Yet there are people who do and they
are the ones we have to judge. That judgment has taken on an even more critical
level of late because of several flashpoints
over the Christmas period. Two of the
most absurd occurred during the past
week. First, we had the penalty awarded
to West Brom against Arsenal after Calum
Chambers was adjudged to have handled
the ball in the box. For once, Arsène
Wenger’s anger was justified. If that was
dubious, then words fail me on the spot
kick that Chelsea won for Hector Bellerin’s challenge on Eden Hazard on
Wednesday. The contact was minimal
and made no difference to the play, but
Hazard exaggerated its effect and
Anthony Taylor fell for it.
What worries me is that Taylor did not
look at how the Belgian went down. This
Rough justice:
Chelsea were
lucky to be
awarded a
penalty for
Hector Bellerin’s
challenge on
Eden Hazard
FOOTBALL
SHORTS
Jupp Heynckes said yesterday that
Chelsea target Arturo Vidal would not
be sold during the January transfer
window. The Bayern Munich coach
confirmed there had been no contact
between the Bundesliga and Premier
League champions over the 30-year-old
Chile international. ‘It’s just speculation.
Arturo Vidal is very motivated. He’s a top
player and we need him at his very best
if Bayern is to play well,’ Heynckes said
at the Aspire Zone in Doha, where
Bayern are on a winter training camp.
YORKSHIRE GRANTED
INTERNATIONAL STATUS
Vidal: Bayern
midfielder
linked to
Chelsea
Yorkshire are the world’s
newest international football
team after their
membership of the nonFifa Confederation of
International Football
Associations (Conifa) was
ratified yesterday. The
team, for whom only
players born in the county
are eligible, were formed in
July and are set to make their
debut with a friendly against
the Isle of Man at Hemsworth
on January 28. Conifa, which
was established in 2013,
describes itself as a
Man City v Bristol City
7.30pm Sky Main Event,
kick-off 7.45pm
rics to win a penalty or free kick, or to
ensure an opponent received a yellow or
red card, were the norm and not the
exception. I can put my hand on my heart
and say that I never once adopted that
approach. I had come from a culture
where the physical was permitted,
extolled even. I remember one game
when I complained to a ref that a tackle
against one of my teammates had been
outrageous. “Well,” he replied, “you’ve
got one go yourself, then.” That was typical of how the contact area was policed
back then.
Nobody wants to return to those days
but the physical side of sport as much as
the mental is what draws us to it. That’s
why boxing is still popular and mixed
martial arts has built an appeal. It also
remains the Premier League’s point of
difference from other continental leagues who look on enviously at its actionpacked drama and the popularity it
enjoys domestically and globally.
When Michel Platini was running the
European game, it seemed as if he was
trying to outlaw the very idea of going to
ground in the tackle. It still strikes me that
those running the game don’t under-
The referee had
a decent view
when Bellerin
went for the ball
but he still made
the wrong call
is crucial in judging whether a player’s
fall is natural or contrived. I don’t think
you need to have played to a top level or
have access to a video replay to make this
distinction. To the trained eye, it should
be obvious. It is also why I don’t view
Video Assistant Referee (VAR) technology as the solution to poor officiating.
Taylor was on the spot and had a decent
view as Bellerin went for the ball, but he
still made the wrong call.
It was the same on Friday when Liverpool won a penalty for a foul on Adam
Lallana. Again, I looked at the way
Lallana fell to the floor and it did not look
natural. These incidents coupled with
the failure to dismiss Jason Puncheon
and Dele Alli for reckless challenges on
Kevin de Bruyne in December have
prompted a debate about the quality of
Premier League referees. It’s difficult to
say categorically that they are less fit or
have deteriorated but you do worry
when it looks like no English official will
be at this summer’s World Cup.
With Hazard, you can take the view
that the Chelsea player is culpable for
effectively conning the ref. I don’t
because this is the culture of the Premier
League. Besides, as one of the best dribblers around, Hazard has the scars to
prove how often he has been the victim of
genuine fouls. It’s worth noting, too, that
another of today’s great dribblers, Lionel
Messi, stays on his feet for as long as possible. Messi remains an outlier in a world
when an attacker will respond to the
slightest touch by reaching for the grass.
I noticed this seeping into the Premier
League when I was a manager but I had
seen it first hand when I played in Italy.
You couldn’t fail to be aware that theat-
BAYERN’S HEYNCKES RULES OUT VIDAL
MOVE TO CHELSEA
ON TV TUESDAY
MARC ASPLAND
Referees have a tough job but some of
their mistakes are a cause for concern
GRAEME
SOUNESS
chances to continue their
careers elsewhere — there is a
placement programme with
Swedish clubs where released
EFL scholars can go to
Sweden for extended trials
and 33% of the lads involved
have won contracts.
But there’s nothing like
having a standard-bearer and
Bristol City, with Bryan,
Smith, Josh Brownhill, Aden
Flint, Bobby Reid, have
emerged at the right time to
showcase the direction the
EFL wants to move in.
Wetherall hopes the clubdeveloped quota may
increase as the years go on.
“There is financial sense in
developing players,” said
Wetherall, “and it helps root
clubs in their communities.
stand that a defender’s momentum
makes it almost impossible not to follow
through when making a proper tackle. All
it needs is the trained eye of an official to
distinguish between the reckless and the
strong challenge. One man who fell on
the wrong side of that distinction last
month was Paul Pogba. His challenge on
Bristol City’s Marlon Pack in the League
Cup tie could have earned him another
dismissal to go with the one he received
against Arsenal. Such a lack of discipline
may be related to the fact that Manchester United and the player himself have
still not worked out where he would best
be deployed.
I have the impression Pogba sees himself as a playmaker in the mould of
Andrea Pirlo. He is not. If he wants to
become a central midfielder of that ilk, he
should not be straying beyond the
18-yard line on either side of the pitch
unless it is to shut down an attack. Too
often, however, the Frenchman looks lost
in that role. For the moment, he is much
better when given licence to move into
wide areas, usually on the left, where his
dribbling skills and energy levels are best
used. He did this to good effect against
Everton on Monday. It is getting the best
out of Pogba rather than the spending
power of Manchester City or the thoughts
of Paul Scholes that should be occupying
Jose Mourinho’s thoughts.
federation for international teams ’from
nations, de-facto nations, regions,
minority peoples and sports isolated
territories’. Yorkshire join the likes of
Somaliland, Greenland and Quebec as
members of the organisation.
AFC WIMBLEDON WILL ‘GIVE IT A GO’ ON
WEMBLEY RETURN TO PLAY TOTTENHAM
Neal Ardley, the AFC Wimbledon
manager, said his side will ‘have a real
go’ in their FA Cup third-round tie
against Tottenham at Wembley today.
The club return to the venue of the
Dons’ 1988 FA Cup final victory
over Liverpool and their more
recent 2016 League Two
playoff final success against
Plymouth with no intention
of sitting back. ‘Sometimes
against Spurs having a real
go will not be pressing them
high up the pitch in the
corner because they will pick
you apart,’ said Ardley. ‘Having a
real go is being diligent to stay in the
game, giving the fans that excitement
of being one set-piece or chance away
from taking the lead or equalising.
Being in the game is not getting
overawed and getting picked off.’
MAZZARRI WINS ON TORINO DEBUT
Walter Mazzarri, inset, the former
Watford manager, won his first game
since taking charge at Torino, 3-0
against Bologna, who had a second-half
penalty saved. Former Inter Milan coach
Mazzarri, who was manager at Watford
last season, replaced the sacked Sinisa
Mihajlovic on Thursday. Ciro Immobile
scored four goals as Lazio won 5-2 at
SPAL to move into fourth place in Serie
A. League leaders Napoli won 2-0
against lowly Hellas Verona.
PLYMOUTH REVIVAL CONTINUES
WILSHERE IS TOP FLIGHT’S MOST FOULED PLAYER
He may have only just returned to first-team action, but Arsenal’s Jack Wilshere,
right, is already a target for over-zealous opponents
Player
Fouls won Minutes played Fouls won/90mins
Jack Wilshere (Arsenal)
22
536
3.69
Javier Hernandez (West Ham)
37
981
3.39
Richarlison (Watford)
70
1,896
3.32
Ashley Barnes (Burnley)
33
898
3.31
Eden Hazard (Chelsea)
39
1,117
3.14
Dele Alli (Tottenham)
54
1,660
2.93
Wilfried Zaha (Crystal Palace)
46
1,427
2.90
Ruben Loftus-Cheek (C Palace)
41
1,331
2.77
Hal Robson-Kanu (West Brom)
24
790
2.73
Alexis Sanchez (Arsenal)
43
1,417
2.73
Plymouth beat bottom club Bury, who
had Ryan Lowe sent off, to continue
their revival with a seventh
unbeaten match to move
further away from the
relegation places. Goals
from Toumani Diagouraga,
Graham Carey, from a
rebound after his penalty
was saved, and Antoni
Sarcevic moved Derek
Adams’ side closer to the
playoff positions than the drop
zone as Bury crashed to a sixth straight
defeat. Arsenal loanee Stephy Mavididi
started his second spell at Charlton with
his first senior goal to give his side a 1-0
win against Oldham.
Joe O’Toole gave the hosts the lead
before Jason Demetriou’s penalty
brought Southend level. Matt Grimes
converted a spot kick early in the
second half and substitute Alex Revell
hit a late third. Jonathan Obika’s 80thminute goal gave Oxford United a 1-0
win over Blackpool.
REVELL SECURES NORTHAMPTON VICTORY
ACCRINGTON CRUISE INTO PLAYOFF SPOT
Northampton gained a much-needed
boost with the 3-1 defeat of Southend to
edge closer to League One safety. John-
Accrington moved back into the League
Two playoff places with a 4-0 win
against lowly Chesterfield, who
returned to the relegation places after
Rueben Reid’s debut goal, a day after
signing from Exeter, gave Forest Green
Rovers a 1-0 win against Port Vale.
ODELUSI BACK TO HAUNT COLCHESTER
Sanmi Odelusi, whom Cheltenham
signed from Colchester on Friday, came
back to haunt his former club, scoring
the equaliser in his new side’s 4-1 away
win, all their goals coming in the second
half. Morecambe won 2-0 at Grimsby,
who have gone six games without a win.
9
The Sunday Times January 7, 2018
AKIRA SUEMORI
‘There is no happy end
with Parkinson’s. It is
a one-way street’
IN TODAY’S SUNDAY TIMES
MEET THE
NEW WORLD
CHAMPION
OF DARTS
Dave Clark refuses to feel sorry for
himself despite living for seven years
with condition that led to his father
taking his own life. By David Walsh
NEWS, PAGE 27
I
n the kitchen of his home in south
London Dave Clark is speaking
about Parkinson’s, the degenerative disorder he was diagnosed
with seven years ago. He talks without pity, his attitude to living with
the disease, the early fears that he
would lose his job as a Sky Sports
presenter and his determination to
keep battling it.
Then, without changing tone or mood,
he slips unsentimental reality into the
conversation. “There is no happy ending
with Parkinson’s, that is the problem,” he
says. “At the moment it is a one-way
street.” He would never say he walks this
street with his head up and his chest out
but this is nevertheless the case.
The specialist who gave him the bad
news on January 25, 2011, tried not to be
too blunt about it. “Do you have a mortgage, kids?” he asked. Clark laughs at the
memory, thinking the blunt route might
have been better. Back then the prognosis was for Clark to have two years of life
in front of the camera. Two, at most.
That was seven years ago. Last week
the 20-1 shot Rob Cross won the PDC
world darts championship at the Alexandra Palace in north London that for 16
days Clark presented for Sky Sports. You
could argue about whose was the greater
achievement.
With Parkinson’s there are days when
it’s OK, days when it’s not. For more than
two years after being diagnosed, Clark
kept his battle private. “I was diagnosed
in 2011. Two years later I was doing a
Ricky Burns world title fight in Glasgow,
the on-air clock was ticking down and I
was desperately trying to do my buttons
up but my hands weren’t working
because my meds hadn’t kicked in. I just
thought, ‘This is ridiculous’. There was
no one to help me because I hadn’t told
anyone. Not long after, I was interviewing
Phil Taylor, who’d won the world title,
and I could feel this internal shake which
I thought was visible though it wasn’t. But
I was thinking about my shaking, not the
questions I was asking Taylor. I was afraid
of being labelled disabled and losing my
job. I had a wife, two kids and a
mortgage.”
Soon Clark told his boss at Sky he had
Parkinson’s and he received more support than he’d imagined possible. He
then went public with his story and was
humbled by the degree to which people
cared. His disease is degenerative and life
in front of the camera gets harder, but
he’s still doing it. “When I am on air
sometimes I hold a pen,” he says. “That’s
to stop me shaking. Sometimes during
the world championship I had to jam my
hand down the side of the chair just to
stop it shaking. I am not embarrassed by
it but I just think for the viewers it would
be a distraction.”
Though diagnosed at 44, Clark has
lived with the implications of Parkinson’s
for much of his life. At 17 and an A-level
student at Ilkley near Leeds, he returned
home from school one afternoon to find
Fighting all the way: the Sky
Sports presenter Dave Clark
has helped to raise more than
£500,000 for Parkinson’s UK
When you are
going to lose your
ability to walk,
every step
becomes fantastic
Target man: Dave Clark struggled to
interview Phil Taylor in 2013
his dad Alan on the floor of the family
home. Afflicted with Parkinson’s, he had
taken an overdose with the intention of
ending his life.
“My dad used to be a paint salesman in
Bradford,” he says. “A sales rep who
people used to accuse of being drunk
because his Parkinson’s made him
unsteady.
“He lost his job, lost all of his self-confidence, lost his driving licence. You know,
terrible. Tried to kill himself. When I
found him I carried him upstairs. Two
weeks later he did kill himself.”
Alan Clark hid his Parkinson’s from
everyone except his wife and his older
boy. Dave recalls playing football and
rugby matches hoping that his dad
wouldn’t come to watch, and that his
friends wouldn’t see what Parkinson’s
was doing to him. When Alan ended his
life, the loss hit Dave hard.
“At his inquest, the coroner said he did
a brave thing. I thought, ‘It is not a brave
thing.’ I had lost my Dad. I understand
how the lack of dopamine causes
Parkinson’s and brings with it
depression. I know how Dad felt about
what he’d lost but I couldn’t see what he
did as brave. In a way, it’s helped me.
Made me stronger. It is another reason
why I try and do everything opposite to
what he did. I’m open about it. I talk
about it. This can affect people.
“I was doing Premier League darts in
Belfast last year and this guy came up to
me and said, ‘Thanks for saving my
uncle’. I said ‘what do you mean, saving
your uncle?’ He said that after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s his uncle had
given up, just sat on the sofa, shut himself
off from the world. ‘He read your story
and decided to get up and do something
about it. Started walking, started going to
the shops, started socialising.’”
Jaguars find their claws at last
AMERICAN
FOOTBALL
Tom Coughlin
oversees change
of fortunes for the
whipping boys
Nick Szczepanik
The announcement back in
2012 that Jacksonville Jaguars
would play a regular-season
home game at Wembley
every year until 2016 (now
extended to 2020) hardly set
pulses racing among British
NFL fans. Jaguars were not
one of the league’s
heavyweights, but a smallmarket team with little
pedigree. Winning seasons
were the exception rather
than the rule, while as for
their playoff chances, the less
said the better.
Little changed over the
course of their Wembley
residency, until this year. The
appointment 12 months ago
of former New York Giants
head coach Tom Coughlin as
executive vice-president of
football operations turned
around the fortunes of a team
whose record over the
previous five campaigns — 63
defeats and only 17 wins —
was the worst in the NFL.
They finished in first place in
the AFC South for the first
time and today London’sadopted team play their first
playoff game for 10 years, and
their first at home since 1999,
when they host Buffalo Bills
in the wild-card round.
Coughlin, twice a Super
Bowl winner when in charge
of the Giants, signed a group
of free agents rated the best in
the team’s 23-year history,
including three new
cornerstones of a defence
nicknamed “Sacksonville” —
defensive end Calais
Campbell, cornerback AJ
Bouye and safety Barry
Church. Coughlin also used
the team’s first-round draft
pick on running back
Leonard Fournette, who has
rushed for more than 1,000
yards — 100 of those and a
touchdown on his debut —
and given the team’s ground
game a valuable boost.
“What we lacked was
football IQ,” said Shahid
Khan, the team’s owner. “You
want somebody [for whom]
it’s not just a job, it’s a
passion, emotion and a drive.
Nobody personifies that
better than Tom Coughlin.”
The most controversial
decision was to pass on a
number of promising
quarterbacks in the draft and
instead take up a contract
option on Blake Bortles,
whose decision-making is
often questioned and who
tends to shine only in lowpressure situations. After a
mid-season surge, he seems
to be running back into poor
form at the wrong time,
throwing five interceptions in
his past two games. “When
his option was picked up, it
was like, ‘What are these guys
smoking?’” Khan admitted.
“You’ve got to stay the
course, but you have to have
the agility and the flexibility.
We are invested. We want him
to be successful.”
Khan’s long-term
intentions for Jaguars in
London are harder to read.
Originally, St Louis Rams,
owned by Arsenal owner Stan
Kroenke, looked likeliest to
take up the NFL’s invitation to
become an annual visitor to
Wembley. But Jaguars soon
had a London football
connection of their own
when Khan bought Fulham.
With the NFL admitting
that it hopes one day to have
a team permanently based in
the UK, plenty of people have
put two and two together and
assumed that Jaguars would
be that team, especially after
the lowest home attendance
under Khan’s ownership was
recorded this season. Khan,
though, has always denied it,
claiming that the London
project was aimed at
Accepting that he was on a one-way
street, Clark made changes to his life. He
had been a go-to presenter at Sky, boxing
one week, darts the next, football the one
after that. Wherever he was needed. Sky
understood the new need for a life more
evenly shared between work and his family. Besides, he wanted to spend more
time with his wife Carolyn and their two
boys George and Harry. He is married to
the right woman. “Carolyn was with me
when we got the diagnosis,” he says. “She
is a clinical psychologist so I am her case
study. She has been brilliant, fantastic.
Won’t let me slip downhill, gives me a
kick up the backside anytime I’m feeling
sorry for myself.”
They have travelled as a family. To the
Campbell River in British Columbia
where they stayed on a floating hotel and
watched bears pluck salmon from the
SHREWSBURY V WEST HAM
FA Cup 3rd Round commentary from 1pm
NOTTINGHAM FOREST V ARSENAL
FA Cup 3rd Round commentary from 3.30pm
increasing the team’s profile
beyond the northeast corner
of Florida. Moreover, they
have a long lease on their
EverBank Field stadium.
They are probably happy
to preserve the status quo.
Wembley has been a moneymaker, the crowd of 84,592
for this season’s game against
Baltimore Ravens a record for
the NFL’s overseas fixtures,
and the team estimate that
they make 15% of their annual
local revenue (as opposed to
league-wide profit-sharing) in
the UK.
But for once, a home game
in Jacksonville is as much of a
draw as a Wembley game.
Even without the donation of
1,000 tickets to refugees from
around the world, including
Puerto Ricans displaced by
Hurricane Maria, today’s
game is a rare sell-out.
Previously closed areas have
been reopened to increase
capacity and tickets are
changing hands for more
than $150 on the secondary
market. “Could you imagine
the hottest ticket in football is
right here, selling for five, six
times face value?” Khan said.
“Could you believe that
happening in Jacksonville?”
ON TV TODAY
Jaguars v Bills
6.05pm Sky Sports Action;
Sky Sports Main Event
water. They swam with turtles on the
Great Barrier Reef. They went to the
Masai Mara in Kenya where the elephants, lions, leopards, giraffes, zebras,
cheetahs, buffalos and hippos roam
freely. And Clark got to another Bruce
Springsteen concert. And then another.
“I am just living the moment a bit more.
Amazing how well Bruce has kept going,
a four-hour show and his optimism, his
brilliance, still makes him the man. Positive energy makes me feel good. Gets the
dopamine flowing, what little I have left. I
go to a Bruce concert and I feel great for
the next week. They reckon there is an
addictive nature to the drugs I am on as
well but my addiction to Bruce came long
before the Parkinson’s.”
Last year he walked from St Bees Head
in Cumbria to Robin Hood’s Bay in Yorkshire, a 200-mile trek that enabled him
and some friends to raise more than
£200,000 for Parkinson’s UK. Between
one thing and another, more than
£500,000 has been handed over to Parkinson’s UK since he was sentenced
seven years ago.
He trained with an SAS operative for
the coast-to-coast walk. Going up murderous Pen y Fan in the Brecon Beacons,
the SAS man didn’t say a lot and revealed
virtually nothing about himself. He did,
though, tell the exhausted Clark to stop
every once in a while and look down
below, just to see how far he’d climbed.
That became a metaphor for his life
with Parkinson’s. He knows the journey
ahead is going to be difficult, so he stops
as he goes to consider again how far he’s
come. At 14 he went to a local hospital in
Leeds and asked to work for the hospital
radio. That’s how much he wanted to be a
broadcaster. Sports broadcasting took
him to pretty much every event he’d
dreamt of covering. Along the way he
made a lot of friends. He met Gary Anderson recently and the darts player gave
him £1,000 for Parkinson’s UK.
People meet him in the street and
hand him £10 or £20. Beyond “thank
you” he doesn’t know what else to say.
Though his battle with Parkinson’s has
been intense and unforgiving, the disease has taught him things too. “It is a
mad thing but when you are going to lose
your ability to walk, every step becomes
fantastic,” he says. “I walk every day now.
It takes something to come along to make
you appreciate things. You take things for
granted, then something happens and
every sunrise becomes a big one.”
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SPORT CRICKET: THE ASHES
ENGLAND FIRE BLANKS
WILLIAM WEST
Latest humiliation confirms
that ECB cares more about
success in one-day game
SCOREBOARD
England: First Innings
SIMON
WILDE
A N Cook lbw b Hazlewood
39
M D Stoneman c Paine b Cummins
24
J M Vince c Paine b Cummins
25
*J E Root c M R Marsh b Starc
83
D J Malan c Smith b Starc
62
@J M Bairstow c Paine b Hazlewood
T
Cricket correspondent, Sydney
o get the bald scoreline from
the SCG yesterday out of the
way first: Australia 286 runs,
England two wickets. And if
that sounds like a familiar tale
of woe then that is because it
is. On other occasions in this
series, England managed one
wicket for 346 on the corresponding day of the Perth Test
and two for 160 on the final day in Melbourne, when Australia were intent on
defence.
This is a group of touring players for
whom this Ashes series long since lost its
novelty. They continue to travel, but
without hope or expectation. And really,
why should they? Their bowling lacks the
pace and, in the spin department, lacks
the guile — promising though the debutant Mason Crane has been. They are
effectively firing blanks.
Almost 12 months ago, Alastair Cook
resigned the Test captaincy because he
felt the team had not pushed on from the
series win in South Africa. But his departure has changed nothing. England
continue to be a force at home but remain
impotent on the road. In fact, they are
arguably getting worse. In Cook’s last
series in India, which was lost 4-0 (a
result that is likely to be replicated here)
their collective bowling average was
49.69. At close of play yesterday, the figure for this series stood at 51.12. The only
Ashes series since 1946-7 in which
England’s wickets have proved more
expensive is 2006-7, when they cost
52.77.
Pre-series, there was talk of Australia’s
batting being vulnerable beyond Steve
Smith and David Warner. Well, Smith
contributed only 39 to the run-tally yesterday, which was chiefly boosted by
Usman Khawaja, who converted a
maiden Ashes hundred into a 10-hour
stay worth 171, and Shaun Marsh, who
reached stumps on 98 not out, having
posted an unbroken stand of 104 with his
brother Mitch, whose average for the
series (141.00) even exceeds that of Smith
himself (137.40).
In the final Test in Chennai last winter,
India racked up 759 for seven declared
but even there England’s attack (of which
Stuart Broad and Moeen Ali are the only
survivors) managed four wickets on the
third day and three on the fourth. Karun
Nair, who scored a triple-century, was
dropped by India after only three more
appearances.
England are turning players with histories of struggling at international level
into world-beaters. What is disconcerting
is that there are no signs that the ECB
much cares. With the bowling needing all
the help it can get, the team has been
without bowling coaches since the second Test of the series. Three young bowlers in Craig Overton, Tom Curran and
Crane have made their debuts, and
Moeen has endured a crisis of confidence, yet all have been left scrabbling
for help where they can find it.
Is the Ashes even a priority? Tom Harrison, the ECB’s chief executive,
described 2017 as a good year for English
cricket. When Andrew Strauss took over
as managing director of England cricket
three years ago, he said it was his aim to
Crane
proves he
has the
patience
to thrive
at Test
level
5
M M Ali c Paine b Cummins
30
T K Curran c Bancroft b Cummins
39
S C J Broad c Smith b Lyon
31
M S Crane run out
4
J M Anderson not out
0
Extras (lb 2, w 2)
Total (112.3 overs)
4
346
Fall: 1-28, 2-88, 3-95, 4-228, 5-233, 6-251,
7-294, 8-335, 9-346
Bowling: Starc 21-6-80-2; Hazlewood
23-4-65-2; Cummins 24.3-5-80-4; Lyon
37-5-86-1; M R Marsh 7 0 33 0
Australia: First Innings (o/nt 193-2)
C T Bancroft b Broad
U T Khawaja st Bairstow b Crane
171
*S P D Smith c and b Ali
83
S E Marsh not out
98
M R Marsh not out
63
Extras (b 2, lb 3, w 1, nb 2)
8
Total (4 wkts, 157 overs)
479
THE ASHES
SERIES SO FAR
THE ASHES IN NUMBERS
No ordinary Mr Smith
Most minutes batted in a Test series
M Taylor (Aus) v Eng 1989
2,283
M Nazar (Pak) v Ind 1982-83
2,199
A Cook (Eng) v Aus 2010-11
2,151
S Smith (Aus) v Eng 2017-18
2,138
Highest batting average in Ashes series
G Boycott
D Bradman
S Smith
(Eng), 1977
(Aus), 1930
(Aus), 2017-18
Minimum 5 innings
56
To bat: @T D Paine, M A Starc, P J Cummins,
J R Hazlewood and N M Lyon
Fall: 1-1, 2-86, 3-274, 4-375
Bowling: Anderson 30-11-52-1; Broad
23-2-70-1; Ali 37-9-125-1; Curran 20-2-71-0;
Crane 39-3-135-1; Root 8-3-21-0
Umpires: H D P K Dharmasena (Sri) and
J S Wilson (WI)
Wide of the mark:
Australia captain
Steve Smith ducks a
bouncer from an
England attack that
had little success on
the third day of the
Sydney Test, taking
just two wickets
147.33 139.14
0
D A Warner c Bairstow b Anderson
137.4
662-9 dec
Australia’s first innings score in the
Perth Test was the highest total in
England-Australia matches in Australia
12
Number of players who took part in the
series who had not previously played
a Test in Australia
Eng
Aus
4
Number of tosses won by England
All figures are up to the end of day three of the fifth Test
Debutant had to
wait for first
wicket but showed
plenty of promise
MICHAEL
ATHERTON
You need patience in Test
cricket, the longest and most
challenging of games. Mason
Sidney Crane, the newest
member of the international
leg-spinning fraternity
(welcome, Mason), needed to
be patient, for sure: he had to
wait until his 184th legitimate
ball for his first wicket.
We were into the third
session by this stage and
Australia’s lead was growing.
From the moment Crane had
come into the attack in the
15th over, he had faced
Usman Khawaja, now on 171.
Khawaja charged; Crane
dropped a little shorter and
wider, deliberately so it
seemed, and Jonny Bairstow
did the rest.
A first Test wicket. What
9
3
get England to the top of the Test rankings. They were fourth then and will slip
to fifth should they lose 4-0 here.
In fact, the ECB’s not-so-secret mission
is to improve the white-ball teams, and
win the 2019 World Cup; this is seen as
the best way to secure the support of the
younger generation. Trevor Bayliss, who
won’t lose his job after this result, has lost
more Tests than he has won as head
coach but in white-ball games has a 42-22
win-loss record.
Most questionable is the brain-drain
towards Twenty20, which Strauss sees as
the best arena in which to forge strong
temperaments. But Jos Buttler (among
others) seems lost to Test cricket at a time
when his country may need him.
Although England conjured 10 first-innings wickets in Melbourne, Joe Root
seemed to have little faith in a swift repeat
when play resumed yesterday with Australia 193 for two. That was obvious from
him opening up with Moeen and waiting
for the second new ball 13 overs away (not
that that brought any fruit anyway).
James Anderson went round the wicket
to Smith with a packed off-side field. But
that was about it in creativity terms.
Smith looked a nailed-on certainty to
join Herbert Sutcliffe, Wally Hammond
and Don Bradman in scoring four hundreds in an Ashes series but having
reached 83 in the penultimate over
before lunch he skipped out to Moeen’s
first delivery of a new spell and, driving
against the spin, returned a low catch to
relief and joy. For the next
few overs Crane made the
next man in, Mitchell Marsh,
look clueless, as the ball
fizzed in the air and gripped
off the pitch, past the
batsman’s groping defence.
After a long wait, we were
reminded again of the value
of cricket’s most difficult art,
and full of admiration for the
20-year-old bowling it.
Not that Crane had bowled
poorly until then. There were
a couple of eye-popping bad
balls — his first as a Test
cricketer was a creaking longhop and there was one high
full toss that Steve Smith
thrashed to the leg-side
boundary — but, by and large,
his control of length and line
was admirable. Especially for
one so young.
Arthur Mailey, that most
whimsical of Australian legspinners, once said that
bowling maidens was a
“failure of imagination”, and
he had the figures to prove it.
In a Sheffield Shield match in
1926, when Victoria racked
up 1,107, Mailey bowled 64
eight-ball overs, with figures
of 4/362. There wasn’t a
maiden among them.
Leg-spinners are judged by
the wickets they take. That
Crane didn’t bowl his first
Trevor Bayliss
has lost more
Tests than he
has won as head
coach but will
not lose his job
the bowler.
Moeen, spared the axe by Chris
Woakes’ injury, deserved the wicket for
the greater accuracy he had shown, the
product of some coaching from Stuart
MacGill, the former Australia leg-spinner
who assisted Crane last winter when
Crane was playing grade cricket in Sydney and who joined him in the lead-up to
the game. However, Moeen late in the day
took some punishment from Mitchell
Marsh, who having taken 33 balls over his
first five runs added 45 from his next 31 as
English limbs flagged in the heat.
Crane had an eventful day, not bowling
a maiden until his 23rd over and waiting
until his 31st to pick up his first wicket. He
would have had Khawaja lbw on 132 had
he not overstepped by a few millimetres.
The arc of his heel was behind the line but
the part of his shoe that was grounded
was not. This was the third time in the
series an England bowler had lost a
maiden until his 23rd over
was not a big deal, but he
hadn’t taken a wicket, which
was. It was not for lack of
trying. On the second day,
during a lengthy 10-over spell
after tea, he found the edge of
Khawaja’s bat, only for the
ball to engineer its way at
catchable height between
Bairstow and Joe Root.
During the last over before
lunch on the third day, Crane
was twice close to getting off
the mark, agonisingly so.
First, a bat-pad from an
advancing Khawaja looped
up, only to fall fractionally
short of Crane’s dive; second,
a leg-before decision, against
Khawaja again, would have
been given out on review, had
his foot not landed on instead
of behind the front line.
Momentarily, he looked as
though he could have cried.
As all old leg-spinners
know, bowling wrist-spin is a
hard game, and you need a
thick skin to prosper. Time
and again, Crane pulled out
in his delivery stride so that
the crowd began to jeer and
goad him. He didn’t seem
bothered in the slightest. In
fact, Stuart Broad-like, he
seemed to revel in the
attention.
Capped at this famous
ground for New South Wales
and England, he has now
become part of a long and
beautiful thread: you can
recount almost the entire
history of wrist-spin through
a historical lens focused on
the Sydney Cricket Ground.
There must be something
in the air, or more likely the
soil, as many of Australia’s
most well-known leg-spinners
have played their cricket
here: Bill “Tiger” O’Reilly,
under whose stand Crane
received his cap on the first
morning, and who was the
best of the New South
Welshmen; Richie Benaud,
Stuart MacGill and Mailey.
That’s 699 Test wickets right
there for starters.
Nine wickets fewer than
Shane Warne, the greatest of
them all, of course, and even
though Warne is from
Victoria, it was here, at the
SCG, that he made his debut
for Australia in January 1992.
His figures supply a
cautionary tale for those
imagining that Crane’s
inclusion would bring
immediate dividend, but an
optimistic one for the future:
in 45 overs, Warne took one
wicket and conceded 150
runs. Benaud took a solitary
wicket on debut in 1952, also
wicket to a no-ball. As if they can afford
the luxury.
Shortly after tea, Crane fired the ball
past Khawaja’s outside edge as he
sashayed down the wicket and Jonny
Bairstow completed the stumping. He
subsequently bowled some good balls on
an increasingly responsive surface. As on
the previous day, Crane continued to pull
out of his delivery if he did not feel comfortable, to the regular jeers of the crowd.
Crane’s appetite for the fray is encouraging but England’s relationship with legspinners is a shaky one.
There was no 400th Test wicket for
Broad who, in a pathetic echo of Australia’s tactics of hammering out 90mph
bouncers when the ball isn’t moving,
managed once to hit Khawaja on the
shoulder with a short ball. It must have
felt like a slap in the face with a hanky.
And lastly, has there been a weaker
third seamer for England than Curran?
He generated a little swing but at such
gentle pace as to pose no real threat.
Were they not injured or suspended,
there are nine bowlers who would have
played here ahead of him. Someone who
could have done is Liam Plunkett, but
Bayliss is keeping him tucked away for
the one-dayers. Need more be said?
ON TV TODAY
Australia v England
fifth Test highlights
BT Sport 2, 11.45am
here at the SCG. Clarrie
Grimmett, a great leg-spinner
who played for South
Australia, bucked the trend,
taking 11 wickets on debut,
also at the SCG against
England in 1925. At the other
end of the scale came John
Watkins, a nervy leg-spinner
from Sydney, who played one
Test here in 1973 and never
played again.
Other New South
Welshmen to have bowled
this noble art include the
recently departed Bob
Holland, Colin McCool, Kerry
O’Keefe and the man who
was the first of the line and
who introduced leg-spinners
and googlies to Australia, HV
“Ranji” Hordern.
Leg-spin has rich and
fascinating history and it is
here in Sydney that you feel
closest to it. It’s early days,
but a suspicion is that,
despite the long wait for his
first wicket, Crane will be
more than just a footnote in
its continuation.
Of the three England
debutants in this series, he is
likely to play more Test
cricket than the others.
Forget the figures: for a 20year-old, it was, in its way, a
remarkably mature
performance.
First Test (Brisbane): Australia won
by 10 wickets (England 302 and 195;
Australia 328 and 173 for 0)
Second Test (Adelaide): Australia
won by 120 runs (Australia 442 for
eight declared and 138; England 227
and 233)
Third Test (Perth): Australia won by
an innings and 41 runs (England 403
and 218; Australia 662 for nine
declared)
Fourth Test (Melbourne): Match
drawn (Australia 327 and 263 for four
declared; England 491)
SOUTH AFRICA AHEAD
Hardik Pandya hit 93 runs off 95 balls
to keep India within sight of South
Africa on the second day of the first
Test in Cape Town. South Africa, who
scored 286 in their first innings, had
India 92-7 before Pandya’s heroics
took the visitors to 209 all out. South
Africa battled to 62 for two in their
second innings, extending their
advantage to 142 runs
HOW DID
ENGLAND FARE?
For a report and analysis
on the fourth day go to
THESUNDAYTIMES.CO.UK/SPORT
HOW LEG SPINNERS HAVE
PERFORMED ON THEIR DEBUTS
England’s Mason Crane took
one wicket for 135 runs on the
second day of his Test debut.
He need not worry. Some of
the great leg spinners of Test
cricket have had mixed
fortunes at the start of their
careers
SHANE WARNE
v INDIA, SYDNEY,
1992
Overs 45
Figures 1-150
Career 708 wkts @ 25.41
RICHIE BENAUD
v WEST INDIES, SYDNEY,
1952
Overs 4.3
Figures 1-14
Career 248 wkts @ 27.03
CLARRIE GRIMMETT
v ENGLAND, SYDNEY, 1925
Overs 31.3
Figures 11-82
Career 216 wkts @ 24.21
BILL O’REILLY
v SOUTH AFRICA, ADELAIDE, 1932
Overs 81.4
Figures 4-155
Career 144 wkts @ 22.59
11
The Sunday Times January 7, 2018
RYAN PIERSE
Mason Crane must be given chance to
develop his skills, especially in light of
problems experienced by Moeen Ali
GRAEME
SWANN
T
his is a match that has gone
from England’s to win to
England’s to save. The pitch at
Sydney has been the best of
the five because it has been
good to bat on — sadly, the
tourists did not post a big
enough first innings total —
but as the Test has progressed
it has offered assistance to the
spinners. That is as it should be, and it
neatly brings me on to Mason Crane.
I like what I have seen from the
20-year-old. The ball is coming out of his
hand nicely and his body language
reflects a player who is comfortable on
the international stage. Naturally there
were some bad deliveries, but Shane
Warne is the only leg-spinner I know who
managed to eliminate the rank ball from
his repertoire.
It was a shame then that some of the
SCG crowd — despite all the goodwill
associated with Jane McGrath Day —
thought it a good idea to boo Crane when
he pulled out of his run-up on a few occasions. I know where this trait has come
from. Stuart MacGill, who has coached
Crane, was a fine leggie but one who
could mix jaffas with junk. Late in his
career, the Australian realised that the
bad deliveries invariably came when he
wasn’t comfortable as he neared release.
So he did what was logical: stopped,
returned to his mark and went again.
Crane has adopted the same approach.
My advice to him is to ignore the boos of
spectators and carry on.
I know full well that if it had been an
Australian spinner doing the same at Edgbaston our fans would have given him the
same treatment. That would be just as
bad. I say this not because Crane is young
and should be treated with kid gloves but
because world cricket needs a great legspinner.
Can Crane become that? The signs are
good but he needs the selectors to show
faith. That means that he must play in the
Tests in New Zealand in March and April.
If he doesn’t, the Ashes experience will
be wasted, he will probably miss the Tests
of the early summer and we will be back
to square one. I’m not saying he has to
play every match but Crane should be in
the squad for every Test over the next two
years. He is worth that investment.
This is especially pertinent with the
current malaise of Moeen Ali. I fear Mo is
trapped in a vicious circle. Whether he is
excelling or failing, he doesn’t like to be at
the centre of attention. Unfortunately,
his faltering form with bat and ball mean
his technique and confidence are under
the spotlight like never before. That only
accentuates his problems.
The other big issue for England’s
immediate future is the captaincy of Joe
Root. My thoughts on the downside of
appointing him skipper are well documented. If, however, Andrew Strauss is to
stick with him in the role then he must be
given the team he wants. At the moment
he looks like he is trying to be a Michael
Vaughan-type leader in charge of Alastair
Cook’s side.
That needs to change. It is not surprising that he should try to emulate
Vaughan, a mentor at Yorkshire and one
of the best England captains, but he is not
as good a communicator as Vaughan.
Root will only be true to himself as a
leader and batsman when he has the
team he wants. Are the England management willing to grant him that authority?
However much say Root has in selection, I would like to think that Mark
Stoneman, James Vince and Tom Curran
would be part of his team. With one
innings left here, Stoneman only averages 29, but in his debut series he has
acquitted himself well against one of the
best Australia pace attacks of recent
years. He will never have faced such a
going over before and it will probably be a
while before he does so again. Knowing
PLAYER
RATINGS
by Simon Wilde
ED
SMITH
FAITH AND HOPE
Bright future:
Mason Crane can
play an important
role for England,
but cannot afford
to bowl no balls,
inset, as he did in
Sydney
MOEEN ALI
Big hundreds are standard
fare in Australia, so four
scores between 51 and 83
are a failure for someone of
his quality. Looked like an
inexperienced leader on a
formidable assignment
him as I do, I’m sure he will work hard to
eradicate the dismissals against the shortpitched ball we have seen over the past
two months.
Vince, meanwhile, has fallen victim to
“pretty 30” syndrome. Whether it’s consulting a psyschologist or taking guard
again when he gets to 25, he needs to find
a way through this because he is as skilful
a batsman as there is in county cricket. If
the selectors afford him the opportunity
to realise the talent that lies within then
he will be England’s most effective No 3
since Jonathan Trott.
As for Curran, I would simply say:
carry on as you are. It is impossible to
exaggerate how important self-belief is in
the Test arena and a team that included
him and Ben Stokes would not be short of
personality and pep.
When he has a moment, Vince might
look at how the Australians have batted in
this match, which has been watchful and
based on the steady accumulation of
runs. Strange as it might seem, though, I
would be concerned about their batting
3/10 JAKE BALL
Miserable tour and in line to be dropped for
Sydney had Chris Woakes not been injured.
Was tormented by Nathan Lyon’s wicket-towicket line, and side and finger injuries
meant he never got going with the ball
JAMES ANDERSON
JOE ROOT
CAPTAIN 6/10
‘Losing well’ in
Ashes damages
Test cricket
JONNY BAIRSTOW
Average
Econ rate
Moeen Ali
Wickets
Average
Econ rate
Mason Crane
Wickets
Average
Econ rate
18
31.1 2.48
4
132.5 3.34
1
Moeen
has been
dismissed
135
6
times
in
8
3.46
innings
by Lyon
Figures up until day three of fifth Test
4/10 CRAIG OVERTON
5.5/10
5.5
Showed the character but not quite the class
needed, often dashing to 20, slowing down
and then finding ways to get himself out.
Less assured after brutal working-over on day
one in Perth
7.5/10 JAMES VINCE
The batting success of the tour. Unlike
Stoneman and Vince, Malan dealt with the
short ball well and knows how to go about
building a long innings. May be an option to
move up to No 3
The list of
‘if onlys’ is a
long one but
does not
bear scrutiny
25 Tests on Australian soil.
All of which makes me
reconsider my previous
contention that England’s
management did not have a
strategy for this Ashes
series. Perhaps they did. It is
called acceptance. Roll out
an established side. Keep
that side essentially
unchanged. Keep the show
on the road. Avoid internal
splits and external leaks.
Develop a narrative of unity
and common purpose in the
media. Lose well, basically.
And they have. England
have tried, even when they
have not competed. The
wheels have not fallen off.
Rows have not spilt into the
public domain. So far, all the
Tests have made it into a
fifth day, for the first time
since 1994-5.
Whether you think that is
good enough will be a
personal matter. A counterintuitive question follows. If
you are uncritical of
England’s low-risk
approach, what does that
imply about your prognosis
for the future of Test
cricket? Yes, a hammering
in Australia, allegedly the
showpiece of the format.
But were the grounds not
packed, the newspaper
coverage copious, the
coffers full? For now, I
would add. For now.
Where the Ashes are
concerned, it is not just
England’s management that
is too prepared to keep the
show on the road — or, put
differently, to kick the can
down the street. It’s all of us.
5/10 CHRIS WOAKES
Gutsy debut in Adelaide, where he dismissed
Smith and scored unbeaten 41, and looked
the most dangerous bowler in Perth, but may
have promised more than he can deliver.
Cracked rib cut short his seriess
2/10
2
MARK STONEMAN
Called up as replacement for the injured
Steven Finn but even in English conditions he
is no more than fourth seamer; that he is the
third seamer in Sydney tells of a tour gone
wrong
5/10 DAWID MALAN
One great series apart, he has struggled
against Australia, and was surprisingly
ineffectual in the Tests that mattered. A
Melbourne marathon confirmed his game is
still up to it on slow pitches, but elsewhere?
THE SPINNERS COMPARED
Nathan Lyon
Wickets
Even given England’s meagre resources, it is
hard to believe that at 20 he is one of the two
best spinners in the country. But he showed
good temperament on his debut and will get
further opportunities
4/10 TOM CURRAN
Like Cook, failed to perform in the three
games that mattered and faced calls to be
axed. Came back with a strong all-round
performance in Melbourne but this tour could
yet prove to be beginning of the end
7/10
7
ALASTAIR COOK
Appeared to be distracted in the first Test by
fallout of ‘head-butt’ incident but recovered
well to score superb 119 in Perth. Otherwise
he failed to convert several good starts. Has
kept wicket well
1/10 MASON CRANE
The worst of the three players to be tried in
the spot that would have been filled by Ben
Stokes. So disappointing in Brisbane that he
was never tried again, being overtaken by
Overton and Curran
7.5/10
7
STUART BROAD
Confounded predictions that this might be a
tour too far with some brilliant spells, despite
conditions giving him nothing outside
Adelaide. Never leaked runs and caused
Smith more problems that anyone
line-up if I was an Australian fan. If you
were picking a best Australia XI from the
past decade, who from their current top
order, other than the superlative Steve
Smith, on whom they have been heavily
reliant, would come into contention?
David Warner certainly, though he has
not been at his best.
Beyond that, Shaun Marsh is the only
other name that comes to mind. Adam
Gilchrist, who knows him through his
Western Australia connection, was full of
praise for him at the start of the series and
I was sceptical. I’m a believer now. But his
brother Mitchell, Bancroft, Handscomb,
Khawaja? I’m not convinced. Mitchell
Marsh finished well yesterday but he was
in all sorts of bother against the turning
ball when he first came in. Khawaja’s
struggles against the spinners are known
too and while he went big yesterday, he
still hasn’t quite dispelled my doubts.
That said, I take nothing away from the
hosts, who have won the crucial
moments. Still, I would not put money on
them winning in England in 2019.
Superficially — and it is an
attractive idea for coaches
to indulge — England have
“competed well for
sessions” during this series.
If only they could cut out
the awful quarter-hours, so
the argument runs, they
would have been within
striking distance of
Australia. Not so much a
chasm, then, but a matter of
tightening up those little
lapses of concentration.
This Sydney Test almost
fits this narrative. Joe Root
and Dawid Malan made
batting look easy deep into
the final session of day one.
If only Root had been more
conservative against a new
ball, if only a
nightwatchman had
protected Jonny Bairstow.
Over a 25-day series, the list
of “if onlys” is extensive.
Sadly, the “nearly there”
theory does not bear much
critical scrutiny.
First, the ability to play
well for a long time is a
definition of Test cricket. If
Test teams are judged on
their ability to play well
briefly, Test cricket is dead.
Secondly, all elite sports
create the illusion that the
weaker team or player has
inexplicably buckled during
an otherwise balanced
contest. Beneath the
surface, however, a wider
gap is revealed. When the
contest is poised in
apparent equilibrium, the
stronger team breathe more
easily. Simultaneously, the
weaker team are burning
through mental and
physical energy. The
collapse, when it comes, is
not a series of isolated
mistakes, rather the
accumulation of a gradual
process.
Imagine racing against a
fitter running partner. He is
cruising, you’re suffering.
Your opponent’s kick for the
victory line is an illusion:
the winner holds a steady
pace, you just hit the wall.
That is why the central
question, over a long series,
is which team has a higher
cruising speed. That
superiority manifests itself,
very often, suddenly and
dramatically. But it was
there all along.
As a Wales rugby union
fan, I have extensive
experience of watching this
phenomenon during
matches against the All
Blacks. Wales have suffered
a 29-match losing streak. In
many of those matches,
Wales competed hard and
well for periods, especially
during the first half —
fiercely contested scrums,
brave tackles, total
commitment, a push
towards destiny. Not much
between the teams.
But bitter experience has
taught me to resist that
sneaking emotion. For in
the second half, two
different stories emerge:
one on the scoreboard, the
second in your own mind, as
you recalibrate a hasty firsthalf assessment. The tries,
when they come, arrive in
depressing clusters. The
arm-wrestle, having briefly
wobbled in the balance,
thuds to an emphatic
conclusion.
In the final of the
Australian Open three years
ago, Andy Murray pushed
himself to the limit during
two gripping sets against
Novak Djokovic: 7-6, 6-7, one
set all. An even match? It
turned out to be an illusion.
An emotional first two sets
depleted Murray much
more than Djokovic. Murray
lost the fourth and final set
6-0, smashing three rackets
as a summary of events.
An intriguing example is
goal scoring at World Cups.
In every World Cup, as the
football writer Simon Kuper
has demonstrated, most
goals are scored in the
second half. It is no surprise
because scoring chances are
more common when
defences tire and
accumulated superiority
begins to tell. England are
an exception to the rule: 29
of their past 49 goals in
major tournaments came in
the first half. In critical
matches, the pattern is even
clearer. In the matches that
end in their elimination,
nine of England’s 10 goals
came in the first half.
“England perform like a
cheap battery,” Kuper
concluded.
Anxious teams find it
harder to remain patient,
and for good reason.
Conversely, superior teams
know how quickly they can
convert apparent equality
into dominance. This is
often described as “selfbelief ” or “determination”.
In fact, more rational forces
are often at play. A better
team, correctly appraising
their own superior
attributes, can stay
relatively calm, even when
they are being tested.
An England defeat here in
Sydney will complete a
bleak pattern: 19 defeats in
5/10
Wins prize for the biggest tease, playing
beautifully at times before nicking off to balls
he had previously put away. Batting him at
No 3 was always a gamble, and it has failed to
come off
4/10
An English-style cricketer who failed to adapt
to alien conditions. Take out his performance
in the day-night game in Adelaide (41 runs,
five wickets) and he averaged 14 with bat and
75 with ball
TREVOR BAYLISS
COACH 5/10
The impression grows
that he has what it
takes to shape teams
for white-ball cricket
but not Tests.
Reluctant to wield
the disciplinary stick,
which unfortunately
became a necessary
aspect of the tour
12
SPORT RUGBY UNION: AVIVA PREMIERSHIP
De Klerk puts the boot into plucky Quins after Marler sees red
SALE SHARKS
HARLEQUINS
30
29
Chris Jones
AJ Bell stadium
Joe Marler looks certain to
miss the start of England’s bid
for a third successive Six
Nations title after being sent
off for driving his shoulder
into the head of Sale flanker
TJ Ioane at a ruck. He faces a
second disciplinary hearing
this season.
Marler was banned for four
weeks — reduced to three —
earlier this season and missed
the Autumn test against
Argentina after being cited
for striking Wasps’ Will
Rowland with his elbow. With
England starting their title
defence against Italy in Rome
on February 4, coach Eddie
Jones will be looking for
TIM WILLIAMS
another loose head to back
up Mako Vunipola as Matt
Mullan and Ellis Genge are
injured.
The loss of Marler in the
57th minute dramatically
changed the momentum of
this match, allowing Sale to
regain their composure and
grab the win thanks to Faf de
Klerk’s late penalty. He took
over the kicking after outside
half Alan MacGinty suffered a
serious knee injury. Steve
Diamond, Sale’s director of
rugby, is preparing to bring in
temporary cover if the scan
confirms a lengthy recovery
period.
Even after De Klerk had
regained the lead for Sale,
Quins believed they had won
the game at the death with
Jamie Roberts crashing over
for what would have been his
second try. But TMO Keith
Lewis decided after a
ridiculously long period of
replays that Chris Robshaw
had made contact with the
touchline in the build up.
Coupled with the Marler
sending off, it was another
body blow for John Kingston
to accept and the Quins
director of rugby said, “ Joe
will be unbelievably
disappointed and upset about
the whole thing. This wasn’t
an isolated punch or a stamp
— it is a clear-out that isn’t
legal. He has taken someone
out without his arms,
dropped his shoulder and in a
physical game a lot of people
do that. The team did their
absolute utmost to bring the
thing home and Joe was
having an unbelievable game.
His form this week and last
has been outstanding.
“The TMO decision went
backwards and forwards for
five minutes and it came
down to an interpretation.
The sending-off clearly had
an impact on the game
because you are playing 14
versus 15 for 20 minutes. But
what unbelievable energy
and effort from the boys to
score a fourth try and then at
the end we go up the pitch
and — in inverted commas —
Fast start: Byron
McGuigan slides
in to score Sale’s
first try
score, then it gets taken away
from us.”
In a pulsating first half,
Sale found themselves with a
healthy 14-0 lead after just 11
minutes as first Byron
McGuigan on the left wing
and then Rohan Janse Van
Rensburg crossed for tries.
Quins were fast off the mark
with their line speed but were
undone by quick hands and
some bad luck. For the
second try MacGinty got a
hand in the way of an
attempted pass by David
Ward. The TMO decided it
had not gone forward, with
Van Rensburg barging his way
over, and McGinty added a
second conversion.
Quins responded with a
sustained attack featuring
bullocking charges from their
pack, only for the good work
to be ruined by Tim Visser,
who pulled De Klerk to the
ground by the neck of his
jersey to give away a penalty
on the Sale line. Visser made
amends with a strong run and
after Roberts had kicked
through, Alofa Alofa forced
his way over. MacGinty
kicked a penalty to keep Sale
ahead but then Diamond saw
his players start acting like
“rock stars” and move away
from the hard graft that put
them in front.
Quins capitalised and after
good defence, No 8 Mat
Luamanu kicked upfield and
wing Charlie Walker showed
his pace by outstripping the
defence to collect and race
over for Marcus Smith to
convert. Great footwork by
Alofa then opened the way
for Ross Chisholm to score
and Smith’s conversion and
penalty gave the visitors a
22-17 lead at half-time.
Despite Marler’s sending-off,
Quins bounced back from a
MacGintry penalty to put
Roberts in for the try, and
Smith converted. But Sale
fought back with another Van
Rensburg try, which De Klerk
converted. He then won a
remarkable game, with his
penalty leaving Quins beaten
but with two bonus points.
Star man: Rohan Janse Van Rensburg
(Sale Sharks)
Sale Sharks: Tries: McGuigan 6, Van
Rensburg 10, 67 Cons: MacGinty (2), De
Klerk Pens: MacGinty (2), De Klerk
Harlequins: Tries: Alofa 19, Walker 28,
Chisholm 34, Roberts 63 Cons: Smith
(3) Pen: Smith
Red card: Harlequins: Marler
Referee: M Carley (RFU)
Attendance: 7,242
Sale Sharks: O’Connor (Haley 51min);
Solomona, James, Van Rensburg,
McGuigan; MacGinty (Charnley 64min),
De Klerk; Harrison, Webber (Jones
51min), John (Aulika 69min), Evans,
Ostrikov, Neild (Ioane 51min), Curry,
Ross (capt)
Harlequins: R Chisholm; Walker
(Cheeseman 73min), Alofa, Roberts,
Visser; Smith (Lang 73min), Care;
Marler, Ward (capt), Sinckler, Merrick
(Matthews 62min), Glynn, J Chisholm
(Bothma 69min), Robshaw, Luamanu
(Boyce 59min)
DAVID ROGERS
NORTHAMPTON SAINTS
GLOUCESTER
22
19
Stephen Jones
Rugby correspondent
Franklin’s Gardens
F
orm is temporary, even class
can be a matter of opinion. The
only certainty at great rugby
clubs is passion. Northampton
had lost 11 games in succession
in all competitions, and a dire
eight in succession in the Aviva
Premiership. They have rocketed downwards. And yet at a
freezing Franklin’s Gardens,
the fervour in the way the team played
and the endless passion from the crowd
got them back on the winning trail, by the
skin of their gritted teeth, as they took the
lead with a dramatic penalty try in a hairraising attack that ended in success with
only 54 seconds remaining.
Gloucester will always tell themselves,
probably correctly, that they threw it
away. But some things are deeper than
errors and technical foibles. Northampton have weaknesses, not all of them
caused by a long injury list. They are too
small in their forwards, where Gloucester
had a significant edge. But their ability to
keep playing was excellent.
It was typified by Harry Mallinder at
fly-half. There is absolutely no way that
Northampton can plod their way out of
the mess, all they can do is play their way
out — and that is where Mallinder came
in. He simply refused to hide, to pass the
buck and the ball to someone else. He
made mistakes but he never stopped
being optimistic and attacking. Once or
twice the crowd murmured at him when
his kicks did not come off.
Was he downhearted? Deep in the second half, with Saints on their own line
and unable to escape, Mallinder executed an extraordinary kick sideways
across the face of his own posts, almost
across his own goal-line. It took a crate of
bottle, it could have gone horribly wrong
but as Northampton fans found their
hearts in their mouths, it almost came
off. Even after that, Mallinder had to kick
to touch from just inside his own half. He
needed to take it near the Gloucester fivemetre line but had no angle. So he opted
for an outrageous banana kick, which
again did not quite come off.
And he drilled a final kick into touch
five metres from the line on the other
touchline when Henry Trinder had been
penalised for sneaking round offside as
Nic Groom tried to get the ball away with
the clock ticking almost into the last minute. Tom Wood took the lineout, 13 of the
Saints went marching up to drive the
maul. It lumbered forward and Mike Haywood, who had been superlative as
replacement for Dylan Hartley, did cross
the line underneath a ton of bodies.
The referee judged that he had
crawled over illegally but that previous
offside play by Andy Symons had prevented a try that probably would otherwise have been scored. Mr Tempest refereed really well, and he had the courage to
make this final and horribly difficult call.
The seven points took Northampton
home.
Tigers
send Irish
one step
closer to
relegation
trapdoor
Over the line:
Ken Pisi of
Northampton
dives to score
the first try of the
game against
Gloucester
Saints grab dramatic late winner
Northampton still have ground to
cover, and they could do with two big forwards up front. But the likes of Mallinder,
Pisi and Ben Foden kept them churning,
their bench burned brightly and kept
them fighting and kept them hoping.
Gloucester are in the packed race for
the top four, which at least is better than
fumbling around in the lower half. James
Hanson and his front row looked and carried themselves like Gloucester forwards, and the combination in the second row of the powerhouse Ed Slater and
the elastic Mariano Galarza dovetailed
well. They have real quality behind the
scrum with smashing talent in Tom Mar-
LEICESTER TIGERS
LONDON IRISH
19
15
David Hands
Welford Road
One of these clubs, at least,
was due to start the new year
with a win after a run of
defeats that marred the
ending of the old year. That it
turned out to be Leicester
should have been no great
surprise, save for the feeling
that as time added on
stretched longer and longer,
the possibility of London
Irish snatching a win grew
ever stronger.
It would have meant so
much to them too, marooned
as they are at the foot of the
Aviva Premiership, but they
lacked the precision
required, even against a
Leicester side short of
confidence. Indeed, had
AVIVA PREMIERSHIP
Exeter
Saracens
Wasps
Gloucester
Bath
Sale
Leicester
Newcastle
Harlequins
Northampton
Worcester
London Irish
P
12
12
12
13
13
13
13
12
13
13
13
13
W
10
8
8
8
7
6
7
7
6
5
3
1
Leicester seen victory slip
away, they could have
blamed only themselves: in
the first quarter they were far
too ambitious in their own 22.
In the third quarter they
turned down penalty kicks at
goal in favour of close-range
lineouts from which, by and
large this season, they have
failed to score tries.
Three times here they tried
and failed to break a
determined Irish defence,
looking for a try bonus point
even before they had made
sure of victory. “You always
think ‘win the game first’ but
with the momentum in the
game, we needed to be a bit
more aggressive in our calls,”
George Ford, Leicester’s
captain, said. “Sometimes
you have to be a bit more
courageous with those calls.
We went to 19-8 and had 11
minutes to get a bonus point.
Unfortunately we weren’t
good enough to get it.”
D
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
L
2
4
4
5
6
7
6
5
7
8
10
12
B
10
8
7
6
9
9
4
4
8
6
7
6
Pts
50
40
39
38
37
33
32
32
32
26
19
10
shall and in the back three, even on this
day when they rested a few tired players.
Northampton came out looking businesslike, and a lovely flowing move
brought an early try from Pisi. But Gloucester came back powerfully. They were
awarded a penalty try when Api Ratuniyarawa collapsed a maul as Gloucester
were driving definitively for the score.
Not long afterwards, Gloucester had
another attacking lineout; this time the
ball went loose. Mallinder did kick a penalty to put Northampton into the lead but
a pedigree Gloucester try scored by Hanson took the visitors to 14-8 at half-time.
It seemed all over when a lovely break
Not that Tigers could
preserve that 11-point
advantage for more than two
minutes. From the restart
former Welford Road
employee Alex Lewington
beat two defenders to score
the second Irish try and give
his side more than a sniff of
their second Premiership win
four months after the first.
“It was a game we could
have won, we felt really
good at half-time, good
energy but there were
little errors at crucial
times,” Nick Kennedy,
the Exiles’s director of
rugby, said. “We’re chipping
away with a little rock
hammer at the moment,
we need to change to a
sledge hammer.”
Leicester move up the
table to seventh, six points
behind Gloucester who
currently occupy the fourth
play-off position, and they
took heart from another 80
May: scored his
11th try in all
competitions
and pass by Williams set up a try for the
charging John Afoa and it was suddenly
19-8.
But no one in the green was daunted,
wherever they were playing or standing.
Groom made a determined finishing
burst to bring it back to 15-19 and with
optimism now running rampant, Northampton surged for the final score, and
won. Relief came in waves big enough for
surfing.
Star man: Ken Pisi (Northampton Saints)
Northampton Saints: Tries: Pisi 11, Groom 56, penalty
try 80 Con: Mallinder Pen: Mallinder
Gloucester: Tries: Penalty try 15, Hanson 31, Afoa 53
Con: Williams
minutes played by Manu
Tuilagi in what could be the
most productive of centre
pairings with Matt Toomua.
Both, as it happened, scored
tries — Toomua his first for
the club, Tuilagi with an
athletic leap over a ruck to
mark his 100th appearance.
Irish took the lead through
Joe Cokanasiga, only to
concede it four minutes
before the interval when
Nick Malouf twisted
away from a defender
and fed Toomua for his
score.
Leicester extended
their lead shortly after
the break when Jonny
May crossed for his 11th
try in all competitions
this season. But they
made hard work of it from
then on.
Greig Tonks kicked a
penalty for Irish. Then
Tuilagi was held on the line
before he hurdled a pile of
Referee: I Tempest (RFU)
Attendance: 13,131
Northampton Saints: Tuala; Foden, Horne, Burrell
(Stephenson 49min), Pisi; Mallinder, Groom (Reinach
73min); Ma’afu (Van Wyk 64min), Hartley (capt)
(Haywood 55min) , Ford-Robinson (Brookes 47min),
Ratuniyarawa (Harrison 73min), Lawes, Wood, Gibson,
Harrison (Paterson 63min)
Gloucester: Marshall; Woodward, Trinder, Symons,
Halaifonua (Sharples 73min); Williams (Twelvetrees
66min), Heinz (capt) (Vellacott 61min); Hohneck (Orr
73min), Hanson (Matu’u 69min), Afoa (Balmain 13min,
Afoa 22min, Balmain 69min); Slater, Galarza (Savage
69min); Ackermann, Polledri, Morgan (Ludlow 61min)
IN TODAY’S SUNDAY TIMES
The joys of watching French rugby
Travel, pages 10-11
bodies to score. Lewington’s
late intervention ensured a
nervous finish for the hosts. It
is an indication of the
absence of shape that
pervades Leicester and which
must be overcome if they are
to take up residence in the
top half once more.
Star man: Mike Williams (Leicester
Tigers)
Leicester Tigers: Tries: Toomua 36,
May 42, Tuilagi 72 Cons: Ford (2)
London Irish: Tries: Cokanasiga 21,
Lewington 74 Con: Tonks Pen: Tonks
Referee: K Dickson (RFU)
Attendance: 20,845
Leicester Tigers: May (Tait 75min);
Malouf, Tuilagi, Toomua, Thompstone;
Ford (capt), Youngs (Harrison 73min);
Mulipola (Bateman 57min), Polota-Nau
(Thacker 57min), Cole (Bateman 57min),
Fitzgerald, Kitchener, M Williams
(Mapapalangi 57min), O’Connor,
Kalamafoni
London Irish: Tonks; Cokanasiga,
Fowlie (Tikoirotuma 75min), J Williams
(Brophy Clews 75min), Lewington;
Marshall, Steele (McKibbin 66min); Reid
(Franks 49min), Fainga’a (Woolstencroft
64min), Du Plessis (Hoskins 49min), Van
der Merwe, Paulo (De Chaves 64min),
Coman (capt), Cowan (Northcote-Green
49min), Treviranus
WEBB DOUBLE IN
OSPREYS WIN
Rhys Webb scored two
tries as Ospreys earned
only their fourth Pro14 win
of the season, 29-28
against Cardiff Blues.
Blues, who scored two
late tries, led 8-0 when
Nick Williams went over
but Ospreys replied with
two tries in four minutes
and never looked back.
Glasgow Warriors
made it 12 wins from 13
games with a comfortable
40-20 victory in Italy
against Zebre. Epalahame
Faiva came off the bench
for Benetton Treviso in the
40th minute and scored
two second-half tries in a
27-21 victory over
Cheetahs.
13
The Sunday Times January 7, 2018
Bath fly the flag as English clubs suffer meltdown in Europe
Champions Cup
sees Premiership
clubs struggle to
escape pools
STUART
BARNES
Two years ago Bath were the
only English club to miss out
on the European Champions
Cup knockout stages. It was a
vintage year for Premiership
clubs — four pool winners,
five quarter-finalists, three
semi-finalists and in
Saracens, the champions. As
we head into the final two
rounds of the 2017-18
tournament, Bath are the
only English club heading
their pool. There’s not even
another English club in the
top half of the pools. Three of
them prop up their respective
tables. Harlequins are
without a win. Northampton,
the tournament’s whipping
boys.
In rounds three and four,
the English clubs were beaten
6-0 by their Irish
counterparts. In 14 games
played, Aviva clubs managed
two wins, Bath at home to
Toulon, Wasps in Coventry
against a weakened La
Rochelle. This weekend, the
key cross-border derbies are
Anglo-Welsh. Bath, an
inconsistent Premiership
outfit, kick off proceedings
with a crucial home game
against Scarlets.
The reigning Pro 12 rugby
champions have a goodlooking win-loss record in
their conference but the
results are not a reflection of
the team. They are a shadow
of the side that romped to Pro
12 rugby glory with wins
against Munster and Leinster
in the semi-final and final
stages of last season’s
domestic campaign. The
departure of Liam Williams
has not been countered by
the arrival of Leigh
Halfpenny. The Welsh No 15
has turfed the Kiwi, Johnny
McNicholl, from the full-back
position where he caused
such damage last season. A
long-term injury to Jonathan
Davies has been another
serious blow.
They won their Christmas
derbies against Ospreys and
Blues but were not fluent.
Scarlets are at their best in
warmer spring weather. Bath
tackled them to a standstill in
the torrential rain of the
round two fixture. Scarlets
played a substantial part in
their own downfall by trying
JUAN
to play running rugby on one
of those nights when you
wouldn’t want your worst
enemy’s dog to be caught out
in the open. A memorable
Welsh try, the exception to
the rule of territory, only
convinced them to continue
down their suicidal tactical
running route.
Yet with a losing bonus
point gained in Toulon and 10
against Benetton, they are
still in contention. The
Recreation Ground and
Bath will not frighten
them. If the weather is set
fair, Bath could be in for a
game. The West Country
team were magnificent
against Toulon. Magnificent
but not immaculate. It was an
error-ridden epic. On their
day, Friday’s visitors pose a
greater threat than the giants
from the south of France.
Bath’s scrum has been a
weapon of late but this is the
Watson: in
sparkling form
for Bath
one area of Scarlets’ game
that has improved from last
season. If the Bath pack is
held and conditions allow
running rugby, this pool
might make it to round six as
one of the tightest in
European history. Bath have
13 points, the same as Toulon
(who face Benetton at home)
and one more than Friday’s
opponents.
In round six, Bath, with
their in-form wing
Anthony Watson, have a
tricky trip to Italy but
with a crucial one-point
superiority in the head to
head against Toulon and the
French away in West Wales,
any Bath victory leaves them
favourites to qualify,
probably the fifth-ranked
side.
An away tie is not ideal. All
four quarter-finals were won
by home sides last season. In
the past four years there have
SWNS
Stephen Jones
Springbok makes impression for
Wasps and believes his country
will soon do same on world stage
STEPHEN
JONES
D
Rugby correspondent
Driving force:
Juan de Jongh
can be pivotal for
Wasps today as
they face a
Saracens side
bolstered by the
return of Billy
Vunipola and
Maro Itoje
ON TV TODAY
Wasps v Saracens
2.30pm BT Sport
2, kick-off 3pm
culture. To understand the person makes
it easier for me to understand why he gets
cross when things don’t go his way.
“In a rugby team if you tell yourself
you’re just coming to work with the
group it’s not going to be fun, it is just
going to be effort. You want the team
culture to be effortless, and to see
enjoyment and smiles every day on the
faces of the guys.”
You wonder how such a proud Springbok will cope without a South African jersey, which he has worn 19 times, notwithstanding his commitment to new
surroundings. Their rule is that only Boks
with 30 caps or more will be chosen if
they play overseas. Heyneke Meyer, the
coach who departed after the most
recent World Cup, is said to have deemed
De Jongh too small — this is the man
whose tackles have their own online
segment.
“It was a tough period, four
years when I didn’t play too
much. To play for the Springboks is special, I scored a try
on my debut against Wales
and it’s not something you
do every day. You play with
guys who were childhood
heroes, such as Ricky Januarie, Victor Matfield and John
Smit. They were photos in my
homework book. And you never
forget playing the All Blacks.”
He had a warm relationship with
Meyer’s successor, Allister Coetzee,
but decided to move. “Allister told me he
didn’t want to stand in the way of what I
wanted to achieve and it is one of the best
decisions I have made.”
Will he ever play for his country again?
South Africa are in a dire situation by
their standards, with nearly 250 professionals playing outside the country, and
even if you deduct those who have
defected to other nations, you still have at
least 40 who would be powerful candidates for any South Africa squad.
Surely it must change. “I understand
what you are saying but to make rules
then take them away is not how you
should work. I believe they can use more
experience but if you don’t have 30 caps
SEASONS OF TWO HALVES
Games won/lost
Sept-Oct
Saracens
W
L
F
A
Points for/against
Wasps
8
1
346
157
Nov-Present
Saracens
84
85
228
8
214
8
Wasps
2
7
215
252
87
82
8
296
8
215
that’s just how it is. That’s why it’s important to close the door on the chapter.”
De Jongh is more positive on the process of transformation, ensuring the racial
mix of the Boks is more representative of
the country itself. It has seen players of
colour drafted in earlier than they might
otherwise have been. “It is good to see
these changes,” he says. “There will be a
delay in the result. You can’t put people
there just for the face, you can’t just have
a face looking beautiful on somebody
who does not play beautifully, so it’s
important for transformation selections
to be really good players. We will soon be
back to No 1 or 2 in the world when it all
comes together and then whoever gets
picked will be the best in their position.”
And what of South African politics?
Surely he is always dissecting the situation regarding the bitter controversies of
the Jacob Zuma years? “Wherever you go
there’s political stuff going on. Everyone’s got their problems. We’re having a
few speed bumps now but once we clear
that up the country is still the same, the
nature is still the same, the wonderful
part of the country is still the same.”
Today, Saracens come to the Ricoh
with Billy Vunipola and Maro Itoje
restored. “It’s going to be a cracker, it is a
game you watch and hopefully we can
make it a special one.” De Jongh is
impressive. It is more than his rugby talents, however, it’s a wish to use such talents as part of a life force. For team balance, Young has chosen well.
Europe they gave Saracens a
scare, going down 36-34 in
Barnet. They played with a lot
of control against Clermont
too. Against Northampton
they cut loose. Ospreys are
driven by Alun Wyn Jones
while the Welsh half-backs,
Rhys Webb and Dan Biggar —
both heading for richer
pickings next season — will
surely start in a game they too
must win to keep their hopes
alive.
The Welsh team will relish
the challenge of the
champions in a weekend
where the old-fashioned
Anglo-Welsh rivalry grabs the
headlines at the heart of
England’s European salvage
operation.
ON TV FRIDAY
Bath v Scarlets
7pm BT Sport,
Kick-off 7.45pm
Jones suffers
tunnel vision
England coach insists
Dylan Hartley is good
enough to captain his
country, but does
anybody else agree?
TO WATCH
avid Young, Wasps’ director
of rugby, is a hefty figure to
be walking a tightrope, but
that is one of his current
tasks. His team at their best
are the most compelling
attacking outfit since Jack
Rowell’s Bath teams of the
late 1980s and 1990s. Young
has helped let loose so much
glorious attacking talent — Messrs Wade,
Daly, Gopperth, Cipriani, Le Roux, Bassett, Robson, Simpson, Lovobalavu.
But part of the genie might need to go
back in the bottle. Maybe they sometimes
play too wide and bold. “Our first reaction is always to play and I don’t want to
curb that. I don’t want to stop them playing because we’ve got such talent,” Young
says. “But with five minutes to go and five
points ahead as we were at Bath, do we
really need to be still attacking? It is all a
balancing act.” There was a rueful smile.
“It’s a battle that I can’t say I’m winning.”
Enter Juan de Jongh, 29, a Springbok
from Wellington, not far from Stellenbosch, in the Western Cape. He went to
Huguenot High in Wellington. He is a
hero of Western Province from Currie
Cup campaigns and played nearly 10
years for Stormers in Super Rugby, so
probably has enough air miles to fly to
Jupiter. For two seasons he captained the
Stormers.
He and Simone, his girlfriend, just
spent their first Christmas away from
Wellington. “It’s a normal town in the
area, farming and wine. In the summer it
gets up to 45C, which is crazy.” And so
why, as driving sleet swept the training
ground last week, did he sound so at
home? Young tends not to be effusive
about individuals but he makes an exception when discussing De Jongh, comparing him with arguably the greatest
unsung great in Wasps history. “You look
at the Wasps teams of the past and somebody like Fraser Waters. He was making
all the headlines for England but he was
very fundamental, he was the glue. Juan
has really helped our defence, he
defends high, makes a lot of tackles, distributes really well. He doesn’t do huge
stand-out moments but keeps the team
together. He will be a big part of us.”
De Jongh’s rugby culture and commitment delves far deeper than his role as
an anchor on the field. He wanted
the Wasps contract for the wholelife experience it offered.
“When I was captain at Stormers we had coloureds in the
squad, also whites, Muslims, blacks. We had all
the different races with
one common goal so
there was a lot of ground to
cover in terms of the team, and the social
group.
“It was always good to go to the
mosque with the Muslim lads, to understand their traditions; and then maybe
go to a traditional black gathering, and
share the different types of food and
been only two away wins, and
both times it was Saracens. If
they are to make it a hat-trick
of titles, that is the route they
again will have to take. But
first they must escape their
pool, one in which Clermont
are in firm control with 18
points. Saracens lie third with
11 points. Anything less than
two wins and the chances of
them making it three away
quarter-final wins will be nonexistent.
They are Swansea-bound
for an awkward fixture
against Ospreys. Going into
this weekend, Saracens were
second in the Premiership
and Ospreys bottom of their
conference. A recent victory
against Newport Dragons is
not proof of recovery, but this
remains a threatening test for
Saracens.
Ospreys have been the
disappointment of their
domestic league but in
Whenever the figure in the
woolly hat appeared on the
big screens, they cheered.
The affection shown towards
Eddie Jones by the
Twickenham crowd last
Saturday was appropriate,
after one England defeat in 23
games. There are those of us
who insist that victory is
everything, that a 3-0 win
after a dire performance in a
gruesome game is to be
heralded way louder than any
kind of defeat.
It would be churlish to go
too far into the theory that
never in the history of
international rugby, with
South Africa, Australia,
France, Italy, Argentina,
Samoa and, until recently,
Scotland either poor or
downright pathetic — and no
fixtures against New Zealand
— has it been easier to be
dominant. Eddie Jones has
timed his reign splendidly.
But not everybody is with
him all the way. The evidence
is that he has little support for
insisting Dylan Hartley must
be his captain. Is it still a
measured rugby call, or an
entrenched position he does
not wish to reverse out of?
Last week, it seemed
almost that the job is
Hartley’s in perpetuity, like
some kind of feudal lord of
the manor. “He will be a fine
captain for us,” Jones said, as
if he meant to add the words
“no matter what.” Many beg
to differ. Lawrence Dallaglio
launched a fervent attack on
the choice last weekend, and
Will Greenwood and others
have weighed in. A social
media poll with a heavy
response came out with only
22% in favour of the Jones
choice of Hartley, with 78%
against — and there were no
“don’t knows”.
Jones referred to players
often praised in the
newspapers as “media
favourites”, as if widespread
opinion must cause you to
react against it. At the
moment it seems that we are
almost on track for an active
form of non-playing captain.
“He’s got a clear role with
England and that’s to be
captain and leader, he
understands that and his
value to us is as captain,” says
Jones of Hartley. No mention
of playing talent.
He also mentioned
Northampton’s problems.
“When you are captain of
a club that is struggling, a
club that has just sacked
their coach, it becomes a
difficult time. That has
been reflective of his
play but as the
very good
players do,
they
compar
tmenta
lise
things.
And he
has done
Hartley: the
Northampton
hooker is still
Eddie Jones’
preferred
choice as
England captain
that well, come in and led
with effervescence.”
Hartley’s problems in
terms of discipline,
leadership and playing
quality began way before
Northampton’s decline. He
does not have the presence,
power and biting quotability
of Martin Johnson, Dallaglio
or Brian O’Driscoll; or the
quiet aura of Sam Warburton,
or the menace of Sean
Fitzpatrick or, indeed, the
follow-me exuberance on the
field of Rory Best.
And what happened to the
theory that all teams need 15
leaders? The idea that one
man should be so responsible
for the leadership of a team
that a lack of form can be
overlooked is a sorry
comment on the rest of this
England squad.
In what might be called the
tabloid end of the market on
Friday, there was strong
support for the blizzard of
Jones’ selection philosophies,
which can intrigue, bewilder
and annoy. Sorry, but a
record of played 23, won 22
does make every
proclamation the acme of
wisdom.
It is harder to follow when
you see the transcript of
Jones on his match-watching
ethos. “I don’t watch club
rugby to assess how
somebody plays at clubs. I
watch club rugby to assess
how they are going to play at
international level, which is
Hartley is a
decent bloke,
but he is neither
a great player
nor a great
captain
completely different.”
We can leave aside that
ferocious non-sequitur.
“Some guys can be
outstanding club players and
poor at international level,”
Jones says. Indeed they can.
“Some guys can be poor club
players and outstanding
international players,” he also
says. I don’t agree.
Are the clubs meant to
suck it up when their players
come back after the
interminable international
sessions and games, and
hardly perform for them?
For Dallaglio, the measure
of a great player was not how
he played for his country. It
was how he reacted when he
took his stardom back to his
club. Dallaglio was a one-club
man, good enough and
arrogant enough and humble
enough to inspire
country and club, and
he has a perfect right
to disagree with the
assertion that a
mediocre club player
can be a great Test
player.
Dylan Hartley
is by all
accounts a
decent bloke
with a wide
streak of
humanity. He
is neither a
great player
nor a great
captain. One
day,
England
will need
him to be
both, and
they will
lose.
14
The Sunday Times January 7, 2018
SPORT FOOTBALL RESULTS
Newcastle Utd
Southampton
Stoke
Tottenham
Watford
West Brom
West Ham
5/5
2-2
20/1
3/2
5-0
4-3
3-3
25/2
1-3
1-0
7/4
31/3
2-1
2-0
10/3
2-0
21/4
2-1
1-2
0-1
7/4
2-1
4-0
0-0
0-4
1-2
21/4
24/2
1-1
3/2
5/5
10/3
0-2
17/3
3-3
0-0
20/1
0-0
1-1
7/4
31/3
1-5
0-2
5/5
1-0
1-1
2-2
24/2
21/4
1-0
3-1
3/2
17/3
1-0
3/3
0-0
14/4
1-2
3/2
20/1
1-0
24/2
1-0
2-0
0-3
1-0
0-1
1-1
10/3
2-0
21/4
13/1
5/5
0-1
1-0
3-1
1-0
5-0
1-0
31/3
4-2
12/2
7/4
2-2
0-3
28/4
31/3
0-0
3/3
4/2
0-1
2-1
0-2
26/2
2-1
13/5
2-2
2-0
31/1
7/4
31/3
0-2
21/4
5/5
1-0
3-1
0-3
3-2
20/1
4-0
1-1
30/1
1-2
2-1
1-0
0-0
1-1
10/3
0-4
14/4
1-0
13/1
2-3
0-2
2-2
7/4
21/4
24/2
3/2
2-1
20/1
1-1
5/5
14/1
0-0
3/3
3-0
28/4
5-0
4/2
17/3
0-0
24/2
7/4
20/1
2-1
7-2
21/4
4-1
3-1
31/1
2-1
4-1
0-0
15/1
31/3
1-0
13/5
14/4
4-0
2-1
13/1
0-2
0-3
28/4
3-0
3/3
0-0
21/1
0-2
1-0
3-2
2-1
7/4
31/1
3-1
0-3
1-2
1-0
3/3
28/4
1-1
1-1
3/3
2-0
Leicester
1 Man City
22 20 2 0 64 13
11 10 1 0 39 8
11 10 1 0 25 5
2 Man Utd
22 14 5 3 45 16
11 8 2 1 24 5
11 6 3 2 21 11 +29 47
3 Chelsea
22 14 4 4 41 16
11 8 1 2 21 7
11 6 3 2 20 9
Bournemouth
14/1
4 Liverpool
22 12 8 2 50 25
11 6 5 0 21 4
11 6 3 2 29 21 +25 44
Brighton
3/3
2-2
5 Tottenham 22 12 5 5 42 21
11 6 4 1 22 9
11 6 1 4 20 12 +21 41
Burnley
0-1
13/5
28/4
6 Arsenal
22 11 6 5 40 28
11 8 2 1 27 12
11 3 4 4 13 16 +12 39
Chelsea
0-0
31/1
2-0
2-3
7 Burnley
22 9 7 6 19 19
11 5 2 4 8 8
11 4 5 2 11 11
0 34
Crystal Palace
2-3
2-2
14/4
13/1
2-1
8 Leicester
22 8 6 8 34 32
11 5 2 4 16 14
11 3 4 4 18 18
+2 30
Everton
2-5
2-1
10/3
0-1
0-0
10/2
9 Everton
22 7 6 9 25 34
11 6 1 4 17 15
11 1 5 5 8 19
-9 27
Huddersfield
13/5
11/2
2-0
0-0
1-3
17/3
28/4
10 Watford
22 7 4 11 31 40
11 3 3 5 14 23
11 4 1 6 17 17
-9 25
Leicester
17/3
3/3
2-0
1-0
1-2
0-3
2-0
3-0
11 Huddersfield 22 6 6 10 18 35
11 4 4 3 10 12
11 2 2 7 8 23 -17 24
Liverpool
4-0
14/4
13/5
1-1
1-1
1-0
1-1
3-0
2-1
Man City
3-1
4-0
17/3
3-0
3/3
5-0
1-1
5/5
10/2
5-0
Man Utd
28/4
1-0
1-0
2-2
25/2
4-0
4-0
3/2
2-0
10/3
Newcastle Utd
14/4
0-1
0-0
31/1
13/5
1-0
0-1
31/3
2-3
1-1
0-1
11/2
Southampton
1-1
28/4
31/1
0-1
14/4
1-2
4-1
1-1
1-4
11/2
13/5
0-1
2-2
12 1 5 6 13 25 -15 22
Stoke
1-0
1-2
10/2
21/4
0-4
5/5
17/3
20/1
2-2
0-3
10/3
2-2
0-1
2-1
+25 46
12 Brighton
22 5 8 9 17 27
11 3 6 2 12 14
11 2 2 7 5 13 -10 23
13 Newcastle
22 6 4 12 20 30
11 3 2 6 9 13
11 3 2 6 11 17
-10 22
14 C Palace
22 5 7 10 20 33
11 3 4 4 14 18
11 2 3 6 6 15
-13 22
15 West Ham
22 5 7 10 25 40 10 4 2 4 12 15
TV Matches
Arsenal
1-2
10/3
Swansea
Man City
2-0
Man Utd
Liverpool
3-0
Huddersfield
Everton
+51 62
Crystal Palace
Away
P W D L F A GDPts
Chelsea
Home
P W D L F A
Burnley
HT: 1-0 Att: 21,677
Aston Villa: Steer, de Laet, Bree, Terry, Neil
Taylor, Onomah, Hourihane, Bjarnason
(Hepburn-Murphy 80), Green (Lansbury 46),
Davis, O’Hare (Grealish 80). Subs not used:
Elphick, Elmohamady, Bunn, Doyle-Hayes
Peterborough: Bond, Shephard, Tafazolli,
Taylor, Hughes, Forrester, Grant, Maddison,
Da Silva Lopes (Morias 72), Lloyd, Marriott.
Subs not used: Baldwin, Penny, Kanu,
Doughty, Anderson, O’Malley. Booked:
Da Silva Lopes
Referee: R Jones (Merseyside)
BIRMINGHAM 1
BURTON ALB 0
Gallagher 56
HT: 0-0 Att: 7,623
Birmingham: Stockdale, Colin, Roberts, Dean,
Grounds, Gardner, Kieftenbeld, Maghoma
(N’Doye 88), Davis, Boga (Dacres-Cogley 80),
Gallagher. Subs not used: Jutkiewicz, Adams,
Jota, Morrison, Trueman. Booked: Kieftenbeld,
Grounds, Davis
Burton Alb: Bywater, Turner, Buxton,
McFadzean, Brayford (Sordell 74), Murphy
(Akpan 86), Naylor, Flanagan, Miller
(Sbarra 46), Akins, Dyer. Subs not used:
Warnock, Allen, Campbell, Barker. Booked:
Brayford, Turner, Sordell
Referee: J Simpson (Lancashire)
BLACKBURN 0
HULL 1
Aina 58
HT: 0-0 Att: 6,777
Blackburn: Leutwiler, Caddis, Nyambe,
Mulgrew, Williams, Bennett, Tomlinson (Dack
61), Evans (Travis 43), Conway, Nuttall
(Graham 61), Samuel. Subs not used:
Raya, Hart, Downing, Wharton. Booked:
Williams, Tomlinson
Hull: Marshall, Aina, Hector, Tomori, Clark,
Henriksen, Stewart (Meyler 80), Bowen, Evandro
(Irvine 61), Toral, Diomande (Campbell 76). Subs
not used: McGregor, Dicko, Clackstone,
Hamilton. Booked: Aina
Referee: O Langford (W Midlands)
BOLTON 1
HUDDERSFIELD 2
Osede 64
Van La Parra 51
Williams 52
HT: 0-0 Att: 11,574
Bolton: Howard, Little (Hall 85), Beevers,
Osede, Wheater, Robinson, Ameobi
(Noone 76), Vela (Jeff King 85), Morais,
Le Fondre, Wilbraham. Subs not used:
Andrew Taylor, Alnwick, Darby, Earing. Booked:
Vela, Ameobi
Huddersfield: Coleman, Smith, Kongolo,
Hefele (Whitehead 85), Malone, Lolley (Billing
76), Hogg, Williams, Sabiri, Depoitre , Quaner
(van La Parra 39). Subs not used: Mounie,
Green, Hadergjonaj, O’Brien. Booked:
Hefele, Coleman
Referee: R East (Wiltshire)
BOURNEMOUTH 2
WIGAN 2
Mousset 55
Grigg 4
Steve Cook +2
Hyndman 29 (og)
HT: 0-2 Att: 9,894
Bournemouth: Boruc, A Smith, S Cook, Ake, B
Smith (Pugh 46), Mahoney (Ibe 46), Hyndman,
Surman, Fraser, Afobe (Callum Wilson 71),
Mousset. Subs not used: Gosling, Federici,
Butcher, Simpson. Booked: A Smith
Wigan: Walton, Byrne, Dunkley, Burn, James,
Morsy, Power, Jacobs, Powell (Perkins 57),
Massey (Gary Roberts 83), Grigg (Toney 65).
Subs not used: Elder, MacDonald, Hunt, Sarkic.
Booked: Massey, Power
Referee: A Madley (West Yorkshire)
BRENTFORD 0
NOTTS CO 1
Stead 65
HT: 0-0 Att: 6,935
Brentford: Daniels, Clarke, Mepham, Barbet,
Chatzitheodoridis (Canos 77), Jozefzoon,
Mokotjo (Watkins 63), Macleod (Judge 70),
McEachran, Marcondes, Maupay. Subs not
used: Yennaris, Sawyers, Sorensen,
Balcombe
Notts Co: Fitzsimons, Tootle, Brisley, Duffy,
Jones, Grant (Walker 90+3), Yates, Hewitt,
Hawkridge (Noble 74), Stead (Smith 81),
Alessandra. Subs not used: Dickinson,
Pindroch, Forte, Hunt. Booked: Tootle, Duffy,
Jones, Noble
Referee: T Robinson (West Sussex)
CARDIFF 0
MANSFIELD 0
HT: 0-0 Att: 6,378
Cardiff: Murphy, Richards, Morrison (Damour
75), Ecuele Manga, Bennett, Paterson, Halford,
Tomlin, Mendez-Laing, Zohore (Pilkington 80),
Healey (Hoilett 77). Subs not used: Feeney,
Etheridge, Bogle, Mark Harris
Mansfield: Logan, Anderson, Pearce, Bennett,
Benning, Potter, Mellis (Atkinson 90+2),
MacDonald, Hamilton, Hemmings (Spencer ),
Angol (Sterling-James 75). Subs not used:
Digby, Olejnik, White, Butcher
Referee: L Probert (Wiltshire)
CARLISLE 0
SHEFF WED 0
HT: 0-0 Att: 7,793
Carlisle: Bonham, Liddle, Hill, Parkes, Brown,
Lambe (O’Sullivan 86), Jones, Devitt, Grainger,
Cosgrove (Bennett 78), Hope (Shaun Miller 78).
Subs not used: Tom Miller, Nabi, Ellis, Bacon.
Booked: Cosgrove
Sheff Wed: Wildsmith, Palmer, Frederico
Venancio, Loovens, Fox, Jones, Wallace, Boyd
(Rhodes 68), Reach, Nuhiu (Marco Matias 79),
Lucas Joao. Subs not used: Butterfield, Baker,
Dawson, Pudil, O’Grady
Referee: D Webb (Co Durham)
COVENTRY 2
STOKE 1
Willis 24
Adam 54 (pen)
Grimmer 68
HT: 1-0 Att: 14,199
Coventry: O’Brien, Grimmer, Willis, Davies,
Stokes, Maguire-Drew (Stevenson 63), Bayliss,
Doyle, Shipley (Haynes 85), Biamou, McNulty.
Subs not used: Burge, Hyam, Maycock, Finn,
Ponticelli
Stoke: Butland, Zouma, Cameron (Crouch 52),
Wimmer, Edwards, Allen, Ireland (ChoupoMoting 73), Adam (Shaqiri 75), Sobhi, Berahino,
Diouf. Subs not used: Afellay, Fletcher, Grant,
Soutar. Booked: Ireland, Allen
Referee: M Atkinson (W Yorkshire)
DONCASTER 0
ROCHDALE 1
Andrew 18
HT: 0-1 Att: 4,513
Doncaster: Lawlor, Blair, Butler, Baudry, Mason
(Garrett 79), Houghton, Kongolo, Rowe, Beestin
(Coppinger 64), Marquis, May (Mandeville 88).
Subs not used: Alcock, Marosi, Wright, Ben
Khemis. Booked: Marquis
Rochdale: Lillis, Daniels, McNulty, Ntlhe,
Cannon (McGahey 90+5), Adshead (Keane 64),
Henderson, Kitching, Bunney (Jordan
Williams 69), Andrew, Done. Subs not used:
Rathbone, Thompson, Inman, Moore. Booked:
McNulty, Daniels
Referee: A Woolmer (Northamptonshire)
EXETER 0
WEST BROM 2
Rondon 2
Rodriguez 25
HT: 0-2 Att: 5,638
Exeter: Pym, Sweeney, Archibald-Henville,
Seaborne, Moxey, Taylor, Boateng (James 63),
Tillson, Harley (Jay 87), McAlinden (Holmes 55),
Stockley. Subs not used: Jones, Woodman,
Simpson, Byrne. Booked: Sweeney,
Archibald-Henville
West Brom: Foster, Nyom, McAuley, Hegazi,
Gibbs (Robson-Kanu 12), Brunt, Krychowiak
(Livermore 85), Barry, McClean, Rodriguez
(Field 69), Rondon. Subs not used: Yacob,
Myhill, Burke, Leko. Booked: Rodriguez
Referee: L Mason (Lancashire)
FLEETWOOD TN 0
LEICESTER 0
HT: 0-0 Att: 5,001
Fleetwood Tn: Neal, Coyle, Bolger, Eastham
(Pond 15), Bell, Glendon, Schwabl, Dempsey,
Burns (McAleny 69), Cole, Hunter. Subs not
used: Jones, Hiwula, Cairns, Biggins,
Sowerby
Leicester: Jakupovic, Amartey, Dragovic,
Benalouane, Chilwell, Adrien Silva (Okazaki 57),
King, James, Gray, Slimani (Iheanacho 80),
Barnes (Albrighton 57). Subs not used: Hamer,
Maguire, Ndidi, Choudhury
Referee: S Hooper (Wiltshire)
FULHAM 0
SOUTHAMPTON 1
Ward-Prowse 29
HT: 0-1 Att: 17,327
Fulham: Button, Fredericks, Kalas (Ojo 66),
Ream, Odoi, Norwood, McDonald (Kebano 56),
Johansen, Piazon, Rui Fonte (Kamara 76),
Ryan Sessegnon. Subs not used: Djalo, De La
Torre, Steven Sessegnon, Norman. Booked:
McDonald
Total
P W D L F A
Brighton
Davis 8
PETERBOROUGH 3
Marriott 75, +3
Tafazolli 83
Bournemouth
ASTON VILLA 1
PREMIER LEAGUE
Arsenal
EMIRATES FA CUP
THIRD ROUND
16 Bournemouth 22 5 6 11 22 34
11 3 3 5 14 17
11 2 3 6 8 17
-12 21
Swansea
30/1
0-0
0-1
10/2
28/4
1-1
14/4
2-0
1-2
22/1
0-4
0-4
0-1
17/3
13/5
17 Southampton 22 4 8 10 21 32
12 3 4 5 14 17
10 1 4 5 7 15
-11 20
Tottenham
10/2
1-0
2-0
1-1
1-2
1-0
13/1
3/3
13/5
4-1
14/4
31/1
17/3
5-2
5-1
0-0
18 Stoke
22 5 5 12 23 47
11 4 2 5 13 20
11 1 3 7 10 27 -24 20
Watford
2-1
31/3
0-0
7/4
5/2
21/4
24/2
1-4
2-1
3-3
0-6
2-4
5/5
13/1
0-1
1-2
19 West Brom 22 2 10 10 16 30
11 1 7 3 10 15
11 1 3 7 6 15
-14 16
West Brom
1-1
1-0
13/1
31/3
0-4
0-0
0-0
24/2
10/3
21/4
2-3
1-2
2-2
3/2
1-1
7/4
5/5
2-2
20 Swansea
11 2 2 7 6 17
11 2 2 7 7 17
-21 16
West Ham
0-0
20/1
0- 3
10/3
1-0
30/1
13/5
2-0
1-1
1-4
28/4
17/3
2-3
31/3
14/4
1-0
2-3
10/2
22 4 4 14 13 34
SKY BET CHAMPIONSHIP
SKY BET LEAGUE ONE
0-2
1-1
0-0
2-1
SKY BET LEAGUE TWO
Total
Home
Away
P W D L F A
P W D L F A
P W D L F A
GD Pts
Total
Home
Away
P W D L F A
P W D L F A
P W D L F A
25 17 5 3 50 12
13 8 4 1 21 4
12 9 1 2 29 8
+38 56
GD Pts
1 Luton
26 16 6 4 62 25
13 10 1 2 41 13
13 6 5 2 21 12
+37 54
25 16 6 3 33 15
12 10 1 1 18 4
13 6 5 2 15 11
25 14 7 4 45 23
12 7 3 2 22 11
13 7 4 2 23 12
+18 54
2 Notts Co
26 14 8 4 44 26
13 9 4 0 26 10
13 5 4 4 18 16
+18 50
+22 49
3 Coventry
26 13 5 8 28 18
13 8 2 3 16 7
13 5 3 5 12 11
+10 44
13 7 4 2 17 9
13 7 3 3 20 13
+15 49
4 Accrington
25 13 4 8 42 30
13 6 1 6 18 19
13 9 2 2 24 15
+8 48
5 Wycombe
26 12 7 7 46 35
12 7 2 3 23 12
13 6 2 5 19 18
+12 43
13 7 3 3 27 18
13 5 4 4 19 17
26 13 2 11 33 30
13 9 1 3 21 8
13 4 1 8 12 22
+3 41
6 Lincoln C
26 12 7 7 35 24
+11 43
13 7 4 2 20 9
13 5 3 5 15 15
7 Rotherham
26 12 4 10 44 35
13 7 2 4 28 17
13 5 2 6 16 18
+9 40
7 Mansfield
+11 43
26 11 10 5 38 29
13 7 5 1 23 13
13 4 5 4 15 16
+9 41
8 Charlton
26 11 7 8 33 32
14 7 4 3 19 15
12 4 3 5 14 17
+1 40
+9 43
8 Exeter
25 13 3 9 35 32
12 9 0 3 19 11
13 4 3 6 16 21
13 5 5 3 15 14
+4 40
9 Peterborough
26 11 6 9 43 37
13 7 1 5 20 18
13 4 5 4 23 19
+3 42
+6 39
9 Colchester
27 11 8 8 36 31
14 6 5 3 22 14
13 5 3 5 14 17
13 5 3 5 22 21
+5 39
10 Oxford Utd
27 10 8 9 42 39
14 6 4 4 25 23
13 4 4 5 17 16
+5 41
+3 38
10 Swindon
25 13 2 10 38 34
13 4 2 7 14 24
12 9 0 3 24 10
+4 41
13 5 7 1 22 15
13 4 3 6 17 20
+4 37
11 Doncaster
26 9 7 10 29 28
13 5 5 3 19 14
13 7 2 4 23 14
13 4 1 8 16 25
0
12 Plymouth
27 9 7 11 29 34
14 6 2 6 18 21
13 4 2 7 10 14
+1 34
11 Newport Co
26 10 9 7 35 30
12 5 5 2 17 11
14 5 4 5 18 19
+5 39
13 3 5 5 11 13
-5 34
12 Cambridge Utd 26 10 7 9 25 31
13 8 2 3 18 11
13 2 5 6 7 20
26 9 7 10 26 31
13 4 5 4 14 14
13 5 2 6 12 17
-5 34
13 Fleetwood Tn
26 9 6 11 36 40
13 4 4 5 19 20
-6 37
13 5 2 6 17 20
-4 33
13 Carlisle
26 9 7 10 37 37
13 3 5 5 19 16
13 6 2 5 18 21
14 Nottm Forest
26 10 2 14 33 42
13 7 0 6 17 17
13 3 2 8 16 25
-9 32
14 Blackpool
27 8 8 11 34 38
0
13 5 3 5 20 21
14 3 5 6 14 17
-4 32
14 Cheltenham
27 9 7 11 37 39
13 6 3 4 19 15
14 3 4 7 18 24
-2 34
15 Millwall
26 7 9 10 28 29
13 7 3 3 22 14
13 0 6 7 6 15
-1 30
15 Bristol Rov
16 Sheff Wed
26 7 9 10 30 34
13 4 5 4 18 18
13 3 4 6 12 16
-4 30
16 Gillingham
26 10 2 14 36 43
13 8 0 5 23 18
13 2 2 9 13 25
-7 32
15 Grimsby
27 9 7 11 26 36
14 4 5 5 12 17
13 5 2 6 14 19
-10 34
26 7 10 9 27 29
13 2 7 4 15 15
13 5 3 5 12 14
-2
31
16 Stevenage
26 9 6 11 36 39
13 6 5 2 27 16
13 3 1 9 9 23
17 QPR
26 7 9 10 28 36
13 6 4 3 19 16
13 1 5 7 9 20
-8 30
17 Southend
-3 33
27 8 7 12 31 45
13 6 5 2 18 12
14 2 2 10 13 33
-14 31
17 Crawley Tn
26 9 6 11 25 31
13 4 2 7 11 14
13 5 4 4 14 17
-6 33
18 Reading
26 7 7 12 30 35
13 3 4 6 14 17
13 4 3 6 16 18
-5 28
19 Barnsley
26 6 8 12 27 37
13 3 4 6 12 17
13 3 4 6 15 20
-10 26
18 Walsall
25 7 9 9 31 34
13 4 6 3 18 16
12 3 3 6 13 18
-3 30
18 Port Vale
27 9 4 14 29 35
13 5 1 7 16 18
14 4 3 7 13 17
-6 31
19 MK Dons
26 7 8 11 28 38
13 4 6 3 15 16
13 3 2 8 13 22
-10 29
19 Crewe
26 9 2 15 29 41
14 6 2 6 19 21
12 3 0 9 10 20
-12 29
20 Bolton
26 6 7 13 25 43
13 5 2 6 16 19
13 1 5 7 9 24
21 Hull
26 5 9 12 39 44
13 4 4 5 30 23
13 1 5 7 9 21
-18 25
20 Oldham
27 7 7 13 39 49
13 5 2 6 22 21
14 2 5 7 17 28
-10 28
20 Morecambe
26 7 7 12 26 36
13 5 2 6 14 18
13 2 5 6 12 18
-10 28
-5 24
21 AFC Wimbledon 25 7 6 12 22 31
13 4 3 6 13 17
12 3 3 6 9 14
-9 27
21 Yeovil
26 7 6 13 36 47
13 5 4 4 19 14
13 2 2 9 17 33
22 Burton Alb
26 6 6 14 20 43
13 2 2 9 11 27
-11 27
13 4 4 5 9 16
-23 24
22 Northampton
27 7 5 15 23 47
14 5 2 7 12 21
13 2 3 8 11 26
-24 26
22 Forest Green
26 6 5 15 26 47
14 4 2 8 15 24
12 2 3 7 11 23
-21 23
23 Birmingham
26 6 5 15 15 35
24 Sunderland
26 4 10 12 29 43
13 5 2 6 8 13
13 1 3 9 7 22
-20 23
23 Rochdale
25 4 10 11 25 35
12 4 5 3 13 11
13 0 5 8 12 24
-10 22
23 Chesterfield
27 5 6 16 26 51
13 4 3 6 14 19
14 1 3 10 12 32
-25 21
13 1 5 7 13 21
13 3 5 5 16 22
-14 22
24 Bury
26 4 5 17 19 41
12 4 1 7 10 16
14 0 4 10 9 25
-22 17
24 Barnet
26 5 5 16 26 39
13 3 3 7 11 16
13 2 2 9 15 23
-13 20
Total
Home
Away
P W D L F A
P W D L F A
P W D L F A
GD Pts
1 Wolves
26 19 4 3 50 20
13 10 2 1 28 10
13 9 2 2 22 10
+30 61
2 Derby
26 14 7 5 41 23
13 8 2 3 22 9
13 6 5 2 19 14
+18 49
2 Shrewsbury
3 Cardiff
26 14 5 7 36 25
13 8 3 2 22 10
13 6 2 5 14 15
+11 47
3 Blackburn
4 Bristol C
26 13 8 5 40 31
13 7 3 3 20 13
13 6 5 2 20 18
+9 47
4 Scunthorpe
26 14 7 5 37 22
5 Aston Villa
26 12 8 6 38 24
13 7 5 1 22 10
13 5 3 5 16 14
+14 44
5 Bradford C
26 15 3 8 42 34
6 Leeds Utd
26 13 4 9 37 28
13 6 4 3 17 9
13 7 0 6 20 19
+9 43
6 Portsmouth
7 Sheff Utd
26 13 3 10 40 31
13 8 1 4 23 13
13 5 2 6 17 18
+9 42
8 Middlesbrough 26 12 5 9 35 26
13 7 2 4 15 10
13 5 3 5 20 16
9 Preston
26 10 10 6 30 26
13 5 5 3 15 12
10 Fulham
26 10 9 7 39 34
13 5 6 2 17 13
11 Brentford
26 9 10 7 39 35
12 Ipswich
26 11 3 12 39 39
13 Norwich
36
1 Wigan
34
Leading goalscorers: 15: Clarke (Sheff Utd). 14: Vydra (Derby). 12: Assombalonga (Middlesbrough);
Bonatini (Wolves); Grabban (Sunderland); Reid (Bristol C). 11: Adomah (Aston Villa); Bowen (Hull);
Jota (Wolves). 10: Hooper (Sheff Wed); Waghorn (Ipswich). 9: Madine (Bolton). 8: Dowell (Nottm
Forest); Garner (Ipswich); Hugill (Preston); Sharp (Sheff Utd)
Leading goalscorers: 17: Marriott (Peterborough). 13: Moore (Ipswich); Pitman (Portsmouth). 12: Doyle
(Preston). 11: Powell (Wigan); Wyke (Bradford C). 10: Cole (Fleetwood Tn); Dack (Blackburn). 9: Bodin
(Preston); Davies (Oldham); Eaves (Gillingham); Mulgrew (Blackburn); Oztumer (Walsall); Thomas (Oxford
Utd). 8: Beckford (Bury); Payne (Shrewsbury); Taylor (AFC Wimbledon); Vassell (Blackpool)
Leading goalscorers: 15: Hylton (Luton). 14: Kee (Accrington). 13: Grant (Notts Co). 12: Akinfenwa
(Wycombe); Dennis (Chesterfield); Doidge (Forest Green). 11: Collins (Luton); Eisa (Cheltenham); Pope (Port
Vale); Szmodics (Colchester). 10: Norris (Swindon); Rose (Mansfield). 9: Godden (Stevenage); Ikpeazu
(Cambridge Utd); McNulty (Coventry); Newton (Stevenage)
Southampton: McCarthy, Bednarek,
Stephens, Yoshida, Bertrand, Romeu, Hojbjerg
(Lemina 80), Ward-Prowse, Davis, Boufal
(Redmond 70), Long (Gabbiadini 86). Subs not
used: Tadic, Targett, Sims, Forster. Booked:
Bednarek
Referee: M Oliver (Northumberland)
IPSWICH 0
SHEFF UTD 1
Thomas 25
HT: 0-1 Att: 12,057
Ipswich: Bialkowski, Iorfa, Chambers, Knudsen,
Kenlock, Connolly, Hyam (Waghorn 61), Sears,
Bru, Celina, McGoldrick. Subs not used: Skuse,
Garner, Crowe, McLoughlin, Webber, Drinan.
Booked: Chambers
Sheff Utd: Blackman, Carter-Vickers, Stearman,
Wright, Baldock, Carruthers, Thomas (Slater
46), Basham, Lafferty, Sharp (Fleck 88), Lavery
(Donaldson 72). Subs not used: Moore,
Stevens, O’Connell, Norrington-Davies.
Booked: Basham, Wright, Carter-Vickers
Referee: M Jones (Cheshire)
MAN CITY 4
BURNLEY 1
Aguero 56, 58
Barnes 25
Sane 71
Bernardo Silva 82
HT: 0-1
Man City: Bravo, Danilo, Stones, Otamendi,
Zinchenko (Walker 72), Gundogan (De Bruyne
76), Fernandinho, Silva, Sterling, Aguero
(Bernardo Silva 79), Sane. Subs not used:
Mangala, Ederson, Toure, Diaz. Booked: Danilo
Burnley: Pope, Lowton, Long, Mee, Taylor,
Gudmundsson (Walters 75), Cork (Wells 69),
Westwood, Barnes, Hendrick, Vokes. Subs not
used: Marney, Defour, Ulvestad, Lindegaard,
Bardsley. Booked: Westwood, Cork
Referee: G Scott (Oxfordshire)
MIDDLESBROUGH 2
SUNDERLAND 0
Gestede 10
Braithwaite 42
HT: 2-0 Att: 26,399
Middlesbrough: Randolph, Shotton, Ayala,
Gibson, Friend (Christie 90), Leadbitter,
Howson, Traore (Johnson 81), Braithwaite
(Clayton 65), Downing, Gestede. Subs not
used: Konstantopoulos, Assombalonga,
Fletcher, Forshaw. Booked: Leadbitter, Traore
Sunderland: Steele, Jones, Browning, O’Shea,
Wilson, Oviedo, Honeyman, Love, Robson
(Embleton 81), McManaman (Asoro 53), Maja
(Vaughan 74). Subs not used: Galloway, Ruiter,
Beadling, Gamble. Booked: Honeyman, Love
Referee: C Kavanagh (Lancashire)
MILLWALL 4
BARNSLEY 1
O’Brien 35, 56
Potts 11
Thompson 47
Onyedinma 61
HT: 1-1 Att: 5,319
Sent off: Joe Williams (Millwall) 52
Millwall: Martin, McLaughlin, Hutchinson,
Cooper, Craig, Wallace (Twardek 75),
Thompson, Williams, Onyedinma (Romeo 85),
Morison (Gregory 72), O’Brien. Subs not used:
Archer, Meredith, Tunnicliffe, Saville
Barnsley: Davies, Cavare, Pinnock, Lindsay,
McCarthy, Gardner, Joe Williams, Potts
(Mallan 73), Isgrove (Moncur 64), Bradshaw,
Hammill (Thiam 64). Subs not used:
Townsend, Brown, Ben Williams, Smith.
Booked: Cavare, Gardner
Referee: D Bond (Lancashire)
NEWCASTLE UTD 3
LUTON 1
Perez 30, 36
Hylton 49
Shelvey 39
HT: 3-0 Att: 47,069
Newcastle Utd: Woodman, Manquillo,
Lascelles (Hayden 31), Clark, Dummett,
Shelvey (Diame 71), Merino (Saivet 80), Murphy,
Perez , Ritchie, Gayle. Subs not used: Aarons,
Joselu, Haidara, Darlow. Booked: Dummett,
Shelvey, Hayden
Luton: Stech, Justin, Mullins, Rea, Potts, Olly
Lee, Ruddock (Cornick 54), Berry, Shinnie
(Gambin 82), Collins (Elliot Lee 68), Hylton.
Subs not used: Stacey, Cook, Shea, Famewo.
Booked: Hylton
Referee: N Swarbrick (Lancashire)
NORWICH 0
CHELSEA 0
HT: 0-0 Att: 23,598
Norwich: Gunn, Zimmermann, Hanley, Klose,
Ivo Pinto, Trybull, Tettey, Lewis, Pritchard
(Wildschut 87), Maddison, Murphy (Oliveira 83).
Subs not used: Husband, Vrancic, Watkins,
Hoolahan, McGovern. Booked: Hanley, Tettey
Chelsea: Caballero, Luiz, Cahill, Rudiger,
Zappacosta, Drinkwater, Bakayoko, Kenedy
(Musonda 78), Willian, Batshuayi (Morata 74),
Pedro (Sterling 89). Subs not used: ClarkeSalter, Eduardo, Ampadu, Hudson-Odoi.
Booked: Luiz, Cahill
Referee: S Attwell (Warwicks)
QPR 0
MK DONS 1
Cisse 60
HT: 0-0 Att: 6,314
CHARLTON 1
ACCRINGTON 4
QPR: Smithies, Baptiste (Hall 11), Onuoha,
Robinson, Cousins (Wszolek 46), Chair (Eze 61),
Scowen, Freeman, Bidwell, Smyth, Smith. Subs
not used: Lynch, Lumley, Samuel, Oteh.
Booked: Freeman
MK Dons: Nicholls, B Williams, Walsh, Cisse,
Wootton, Brittain (Ebanks-Landell 80),
McGrandles, Upson, Muirhead (Agard 77),
Aneke, Ugbo (Thomas-Asante 90+1). Subs
not used: Sietsma, Seager, Nombe,
Kasumu. Booked: Muirhead, McGrandles,
Wootton, Nicholls
Referee: J Linington (Isle of Wight)
STEVENAGE 0
READING 0
HT: 0-0 Att: 3,877
Stevenage: Tom King, Henry, Jack King,
Wilmot (Franks 89), Martin, Pett, Jonathan
Smith, McKee, Kennedy (Samuel 73), Godden,
Newton. Subs not used: Fryer, Wilkinson,
Whelpdale, Gorman, Gray. Booked:
Newton, Pett
Reading: Jaakkola, Bacuna (Gunter 90+3),
Richards, McShane, Tiago Ilori, van den Berg,
Evans, Edwards (Swift 81), Kelly, McCleary
(Kermorgant 65), Barrow. Subs not used:
Mannone, Aluko, Clement, Blackett. Booked:
Richards, Bacuna
Referee: B Toner (Lancashire)
WATFORD 3
BRISTOL C 0
Carrillo 37, Deeney 57, Capoue 85
HT: 1-0 Att: 13,269
Watford: Gomes, Janmaat, Wague, Kabasele,
Zeegelaar, Pereyra (Holebas 69), Capoue,
Cleverley, Doucoure (Watson 81), Carrillo
(Richarlison 69), Deeney. Subs not used:
Prodl, Gray, Karnezis, Okaka. Booked:
Kabasele
Bristol C: Steele, Vyner, Magnusson, Flint,
Kelly, Eliasson, Smith (Pack 46), Edwards,
Lemonheigh-Evans, Woodrow (Hinds 77), Taylor
(Engvall 62). Subs not used: Fielding, Wright,
Bakinson, Holden
Referee: C Pawson (South Yorkshire)
WOLVES 0
SWANSEA 0
HT: 0-0 Att: 22,976
Sent off: Vinagre (Wolves) 40; Fer (Swansea) 67
Wolves: Norris, Bennett, Coady, Hause,
Doherty, White (Douglas 45+1), N’Diaye,
Vinagre, Helder Costa, Leo Bonatini (Mir 77),
Enobakhare (Ivan Cavaleiro 65). Subs not
used: Burgoyne, Roderick Miranda,
Goncalves, Buur
Swansea: Nordfeldt, Roberts, Fernandez
(Ayew 56), Van der Hoorn, Bartley, Dyer,
Fer, Sanches (Carroll 34), Olsson, Routledge,
Bony (Roque 75). Subs not used: Narsingh,
Mulder, Fulton, McBurnie. Booked:
Bartley, Dyer
Referee: A Taylor (Cheshire)
WYCOMBE 1
PRESTON 5
O’Nien 45+1
Harrop 2, 85
Browne 38, 78 (pen), Horgan 50
HT: 1-2 Att: 4,928
Wycombe: Brown, Bean, Scarr, El-Abd,
Jacobson (Cowan-Hall 79), Saunders (De
Havilland 46), O’Nien, Bloomfield (Kashket 71),
Freeman, Akinfenwa, Tyson. Subs not used:
Gape, Southwell, Mackail-Smith, MakabuMakalamby
Preston: Rudd, Woods (Andrew Boyle 79),
Clarke, Huntington, Cunningham, Browne,
Welsh, Harrop, Horgan, Robinson (Gallagher
84), Bodin (Johnson 79). Subs not used:
Vermijl, O’Connor, Hudson, Barkhuizen.
Booked: Andrew Boyle
Referee: P Bankes (Merseyside)
YEOVIL 2
BRADFORD C 0
Barnes 61, Green 76
HT: 0-0 Att: 3,040
Yeovil: Krysiak, James, Mugabi, Nathan Smith,
Dickson, Gray, Green, Bird (Wing 78), Khan
(Santos 90+4), Zoko, Barnes (Whelan 85).
Subs not used: Maddison, Golubickas.
Booked: Bird
Bradford C: Raeder, Hanson, Kilgallon
(Thompson 46), Vincelot, Robinson, Gilliead,
Law, Dieng (Devine 70), McCartan (Poleon 75),
Wyke, Taylor. Subs not used: Gibson, Patrick,
Sykes-Kenworthy. Booked: Vincelot,
Robinson, Dieng
Referee: J Brooks (Leics)
Played Friday
LIVERPOOL 2
Milner 35 (pen)
Van Dijk 84
HT: 1-0 Att: 52,513
MAN UTD 2
Lingard 84, Lukaku 90
HT: 0-0 Att: 73,899
EVERTON 1
Sigurdsson 67
DERBY 0
Replay dates
Kick-off 7.45pm unless stated
Jan 16: Chelsea v Norwich; Leicester v
Fleetwood Tn; Mansfield v Cardiff; Reading v
Stevenage (8pm); Sheff Wed v Carlisle;
Swansea v Wolves. Jan 17: Wigan v
Bournemouth
OLDHAM 0
Mavididi 27
HT: 1-0 Att: 9,972
Charlton: Amos, Konsa, Bauer, Lennon, Dasilva, Kashi,
Aribo, Marshall, Mavididi (Ahearne-Grant 81), Holmes
(Jackson 90), Magennis. Subs not used: Reeves,
Phillips, Sarr, Dijksteel, Hackett-Fairchild. Booked:
Mavididi, Bauer, Konsa
Oldham: Placide, Dummigan, Gerrard, Brian Wilson,
Hunt (Maouche 80), Gardner (Obadeyi 54), Green,
Fane (Duffus 89), Nepomuceno, Davies, Holloway.
Subs not used: Kyeremeh, Sam Edmundson, Omrani,
Banks. Booked: Green, Nepomuceno, Placide
Referee: L Swabey (Devon)
NORTHAMPTON 3
SOUTHEND 1
O'Toole 19, Grimes 49 (pen)
Demetriou 26 (pen)
Revell 90
HT: 1-1 Att: 5,267
Northampton: Ingram, Facey (Moloney 90), Poole,
Taylor, Buchanan, Crooks, Grimes, Hoskins, O’Toole,
Foley (Hildeberto 64), Long (Revell 87). Subs not used:
Cornell, Waters, Richards, S McWilliams. Booked: Crooks
Southend: Oxley, Demetriou, Turner, Kyprianou, Coker,
Kightly (McGlashan 61), Yearwood (Timlin 61),
Wordsworth, McLaughlin, Cox (Pitoula-Wabo 74),
Fortune. Subs not used: Ba, Bishop, Robinson, Bwomono
Referee: M Salisbury (Lancashire)
OXFORD UTD 1
BLACKPOOL 0
Obika 80
HT: 0-0 Att: 6,775
Oxford Utd: Eastwood, Carroll, Mousinho (Williamson
66), Martin, Tiendalli, Payne (Mowatt 79), Ledson,
Ruffels, Van Kessel (Henry 86), Obika, Thomas. Subs
not used: Dickie, Shearer, Fernandez Codina, Napa.
Booked: Tiendalli
Blackpool: Mafoumbi, Mellor, Robertson, Tilt, Turton
(Philliskirk 83), D’Almeida (Cooke 67), Spearing,
Longstaff, Solomon-Otabor, Delfouneso (Quigley 88),
Daniel. Subs not used: Aimson, Anderton, Ryan,
Allsop. Booked: Mellor, Tilt
Referee: K Johnson (Somerset)
PLYMOUTH 3
BURY 0
Diagouraga 14, Carey 42, Sarcevic 78
HT: 2-0 Att: 9,139
Sent off: Lowe (Bury) 60
Plymouth: Matthews, Threlkeld (Miller 88), Edwards,
Bradley, Sawyer, Sarcevic, Fox (Wylde 88),
Diagouraga, Carey, Taylor, Lameiras (Jervis 87). Subs
not used: Songo’o, Ainsworth, Grant, Cooper.
Booked: Diagouraga, Fox
Bury: Ripley, Jones (Edwards 59), Cameron, Clarke,
Leigh, Ismail (Lowe 30), Dawson, Danns, Mayor, Bunn,
Hanson. Subs not used: O’Connell, Reilly, Laurent,
Smith, Fasan. Booked: Danns
Referee: T Kettle (Rutland)
CHESTERFIELD 0
Hughes 19, McConville 32
Ramsdale (og) 47, Kee 89
HT: 2-0 Att: 1,655
Accrington: Chapman, Johnson, Hughes, RichardsEverton, Donacien (Dunne 52), Clark, Nolan, Brown,
McConville, Kee (Sykes 90), Jackson (Leacock-McLeod
75). Subs not used: Stryjek, Ogle, Hmami, Watson.
Booked: Jackson, Johnson, Richards-Everton
Chesterfield: Ramsdale, Talbot, Maguire, Nelson,
Binnom-Williams (McCourt 46), Rowley (Kellett 70),
Reed, Weir, Kay (German 80), Hines, Dennis. Subs not
used: Dimaio, De Girolamo, Parkin, Ofoegbu. Booked:
Maguire, Hines, German
Referee: C Sarginson (Staffordshire)
COLCHESTER 1
Guthrie 40
CHELTENHAM 4
Odelusi 57, Atangana 70
Sellars 79, Eisa 83
90), Wright (Odelusi 46), Eisa (Lloyd 89). Subs not used:
Boyle, Bower, Graham, Lovett. Booked: Sellars, Atangana
Referee: S Oldham (Lancashire)
FOREST GREEN 1
PORT VALE 0
Reid 61
HT: 0-0 Att: 2,437
Forest Green: Bradley Collins, Monthe, Gunning,
Rawson, Laird, Lee Collins, Osbourne, Wishart, Brown
(Grubb 62), Doidge, Reid. Subs not used: Whittle,
Marsh-Brown, Simpson, Pickering, James, Stevens
Port Vale: Boot, Gibbons, Smith, Davis, Pugh, Kay
(Barnett 63), Tonge, Worrall, Whitfield (Montano 46),
Harness (Angus 75), Pope. Subs not used: Lainton,
Forrester, Regis, Kelly. Booked: Pope
Referee: K Stroud (Hampshire)
GRIMSBY 0
MORECAMBE 2
HT: 1-0 Att: 2,886
Sent off: Reid (Colchester) 44
Colchester: Walker, Jackson, Eastman, Kent, VincentYoung (Kpekawa 46), Drey Wright, Lapslie, Comley
(Loft 68), Reid, Guthrie, Mandron (Hanlan 74). Subs
not used: Ogedi-Uzokwe, Szmodics, Murray,
Gilmartin. Booked: Eastman, Lapslie
Cheltenham: Flinders, Moore, Onariase, Grimes,
Winchester, Dawson, Atangana, Morrell, Sellars (Storer
Ellison 10, Old 41
HT: 0-2 Att: 3,104
Grimsby: Kean, Mills, Clarke, Collins, B Davies, Dembele,
M Rose (Jaiyesimi 83), Summerfield, Woolford, Jones
(Hooper 61), Matt (Vernon 76). Subs not used: Dixon,
Berrett, Osborne, Killip. Booked: Summerfield
Morecambe: Roche, Lavelle, Muller, Old, McGowan,
Kenyon, Rose, Conlan, Lang (Wildig 61), Oliver, Ellison
(Thompson 90). Subs not used: Brough, Campbell,
Lund, Maher, McGurk. Booked: Lavelle, Kenyon
Referee: A Backhouse (Cumbria)
Ladbrokes Scottish Premiership
Women’s Super League One
Next fixtures (7.45pm): Jan 23: Partick Thistle v
Celtic. Jan 24: Dundee v Hibernian; Hamilton v
Hearts; Kilmarnock v St Johnstone; Motherwell v
Ross Co; Rangers v Aberdeen
Top six
P W D L F A GD Pts
Celtic
22 15 6 1 48 15 33 51
Aberdeen
22 13 4 5 33 24 9 43
Rangers
22 12 4 6 41 25 16 40
Hibernian
22 9 8 5 31 27 4 35
Hearts
22 7 9 6 21 19 2 30
Kilmarnock
21 6 8 7 25 28 -3 26
First round: Bristol C 2 Everton 1; Liverpool 8
Yeovil 0; Sunderland 3 Birmingham 0
0 All other matches postponed
OTHER FOOTBALL
Vanarama National League
BARROW 1
Harrison 5 (pen)
HT: 1-0 Att: 1,470
BROMLEY 0
TRANMERE 1
Norwood 90+3
AFC FYLDE 1
Muldoon 28
HT: 0-1 Att: 1,239
DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE 4
HARTLEPOOL 2
Sparkes 39, 81, Cheek 65
Woods 59, 84
Okenabirhie 79
HT: 1-0 Att: 1,290
DOVER ATH 1
ALDERSHOT 2
Parry 45+1
Kellerman 45, Kabamba 67
HT: 1-1 Att: 1,237
EASTLEIGH 4
GUISELEY 2
Miley 2, Zebroski 36
Liburd 18, Roberts 79
Yeates 58, Howe 65
HT: 2-1 Att: 2,001
EBBSFLEET UTD 0
CHESTER 1
White 20
HT: 0-1 Att: 1,389
Sent off: Bubb (Ebbsfleet Utd) 85
GATESHEAD 0
SUTTON UTD 2
Wright 74, 81
HT: 0-0 Att: 493
LEYTON ORIENT 0
BOREHAM WOOD 0
HT: 0-0 Att: 4,094
MACCLESFIELD 0
SOLIHULL MOORS 0
HT: 0-0 Att: 1,771
MAIDENHEAD UTD 0
HALIFAX TN 0
HT: 0-0 Att: 1,229
WOKING 4
MAIDSTONE UTD 4
Ferdinand 21
Lewis 25, 53
Effiong 34
Reason 41 (pen)
Carter 50
Pigott 42
Banton 60
HT: 2-3 Att: 1,874
WREXHAM 4
TORQUAY 0
Holroyd 9, 37, 89
E Smith 30
HT: 3-0 Att: 4,242
P W D L F A GD Pts
Macclesfield
29 16 7 6 38 26 12 55
Aldershot
29 14 9 6 46 30 16 51
Sutton Utd
29 14 7 8 42 34 8 49
Wrexham
28 13 9 6 31 22 9 48
Dover Ath
29 11 12 6 38 23 15 45
Dagenham & R
28 12 9 7 44 32 12 45
Tranmere
28 12 8 8 42 26 16 44
Boreham Wood
28 11 11 6 37 27 10 44
Bromley
29 12 8 9 46 37 9 44
Ebbsfleet Utd
28 9 12 7 39 32 7 39
AFC Fylde
26 10 8 8 42 36 6 38
Maidenhead Utd
29 9 11 9 37 40 -3 38
Maidstone Utd
27 9 11 7 34 38 -4 38
Woking
27 10 5 12 38 43 -5 35
Eastleigh
28 7 13 8 40 42 -2 34
Halifax Tn
29 8 10 11 31 38 -7 34
Hartlepool
28 8 9 11 31 38 -7 33
Gateshead
26 7 11 8 32 28 4 32
Leyton Orient
29 8 8 13 35 42 -7 32
Barrow
Chester
Solihull Moors
Guiseley
Torquay
29
27
29
27
28
7 10 12 36 40 -4
5 10 12 24 43 -19
6 6 17 26 45 -19
4 10 13 25 50 -25
4 8 16 23 45 -22
31
25
24
22
20
North
Blyth Spartans 4 Gainsborough 0; Boston Utd 3
Tamworth 1; Bradford PA 1 Spennymoor Tn 2;
Chorley 0 Harrogate Tn 1; Darlington 1 York 2;
Leamington 1 Kidderminster 1; North Ferriby Utd 0
Alfreton Tn 3; Nuneaton 0 Brackley 2; Stockport Co
2 Salford C 2. Leading standings: 1 Salford C 24-52;
2 Harrogate Tn 24-50; 3 Brackley 25-48; 4
Spennymoor Tn 24-44; 5 Blyth Spartans 24-42; 6
Kidderminster 24-39
South
Bath C 0 Truro C 0; Braintree Tn 4 East Thurrock 0;
Concord Rgrs 1 Dartford 1; Gloucester 1 Weston-sMare 3; Hampton & Richmond 0 Hemel Hempstead
0; Hungerford Tn 1 Oxford C 2; St Albans 2
Chelmsford 1; Welling 3 Eastbourne Boro 0;
Whitehawk 2 Bognor Regis Tn 2. Leading standings:
1 Dartford 25-46; 2 Braintree Tn 25-44; 3 Hampton &
Richmond 25-44; 4 Havant & Waterlooville 23-43; 5
Truro C 25-43; 6 Chelmsford 24-41
Evo-Stik League Northern
Premier Division: Ashton Utd 3 Marine 0; Coalville
Tn 4 Sutton Coldfield Tn 2; Farsley Celtic 0
Altrincham 1; Halesowen 1 Grantham 3; Matlock Tn
0 Barwell 2; Nantwich Tn 1 Hednesford 5;
Stourbridge 1 Mickleover Sports 1; Warrington Tn 1
Buxton 0; Whitby 0 Lancaster C 5
Evo-Stik League Southern
Premier Division: Banbury 1 Hitchin 0; Basingstoke
3 Kettering 2; Biggleswade 1 Frome 1; Kings Langley
0 St Ives Tn 3; Kings Lynn 3 Dorchester 0; Redditch
7 Farnborough 1; Royston 5 Gosport Boro 0; Slough
2 Hereford 2; St Neots Tn 2 Stratford Tn 2; Tiverton 1
Chesham 2; Weymouth 1 Bishop’s Stortford 1
Bostik League
Premier Division: Billericay 1 Margate 1; Dulwich 4
Folkestone Invicta 3; Harlow 2 Tooting & Mitcham 1;
Harrow Boro 3 Needham Market 2; Kingstonian 0
Thurrock 1; Leiston 1 Leatherhead 2; Met Police 1
Brightlingsea 1; Staines Tn 3 Burgess Hill Tn 1;
Tonbridge 2 Lowestoft Tn 2; Worthing 2 Enfield Tn 2
FA Vase
Fourth round: Blackfield & Langley 3 Bracknell Tn 2;
Cogenhoe Utd 2 Wolverhampton Sporting
Community 3; Desborough Tn 2 Stourport Swifts 4;
Eastbourne Tn 1 Windsor 3; Horley Tn 1 Chichester C
2; Leighton 5 Norwich CBS 2; Melksham Tn 2
Crowborough Ath 1; Newcastle Benfield 1 Coleshill
Tn 1; Stockton Tn 2 West Auckland Tn 1; Thatcham
Tn 2 Biggleswade Tn 1; Tring Ath 5 Hullbridge Sports
1; Westfields 1 Hamble Club 4; Wisbech Tn 1
Bromsgrove Sporting 3. Today: 1874 Northwich v
Pontefract Collieries. Jan 13: Marske Utd v Hinckley;
Newport (IoW) v Bradford Tn. Replay: Jan 9:
Bracknell Tn v Blackfield & Langley
Spain
Brechin 1 Morton 1; Dumbarton 0 Dunfermline 1;
Falkirk 6 Dundee Utd 1; Livingston 0 Queen of South
1; St Mirren 1 Inverness CT 0. Leading standings:
1 St Mirren 21-45; 2 Dundee Utd 20-39; 3
Dunfermline 20-32; 4 Queen of South 20-30; 5
Livingston 19-30; 6 Morton 19-28
Atletico Madrid 2 Getafe 0; Las Palmas 1 Eibar 2;
Sevilla 3 Real Betis 5; Valencia 2 Girona 1. Today:
Athletic Bilbao v Alaves (5.30pm); Barcelona v
Levante (3.15pm); Celta Vigo v Real Madrid
(7.45pm); Leganes v Real Sociedad (11am); Villarreal
v Deportivo de La Coruna (5.30pm). Tomorrow:
Malaga v Espanyol (8pm)
Top six
P W D L F A GD Pts
Barcelona
17 14 3 0 45 7 38 45
Atletico Madrid
18 11 6 1 27 8 19 39
Valencia
18 11 4 3 38 18 20 37
Real Madrid
16 9 4 3 30 14 16 31
Sevilla
18 9 2 7 23 27 -4 29
Villarreal
17 8 3 6 24 20 4
27
League One
Italy
Airdrieonians 0 East Fife 0; Alloa 3 Albion 1; Ayr 1
Arbroath 2; Queen’s Park 2 Stranraer 2; Raith 2
Forfar 1. Leading standings: 1 Raith 19-45; 2 Ayr 2144; 3 Alloa 19-31; 4 Arbroath 19-30; 5 Stranraer 2026; 6 Airdrieonians 20-25
AC Milan 1 Crotone 0; Benevento 3 Sampdoria 2;
Cagliari 0 Juventus 1; Genoa 1 Sassuolo 0; Napoli 2
Verona 0; Roma 1 Atalanta 2; SPAL 2 Lazio 5; Torino
3 Bologna 0. Played Friday: Chievo 1 Udinese 1;
Fiorentina 1 Inter Milan 1
Top six
P W D L F A GD Pts
Napoli
20 16 3 1 44 13 31 51
Juventus
20 16 2 2 49 15 34 50
Inter Milan
20 12 6 2 35 15 20 42
Lazio
19 12 4 3 48 24 24 40
Roma
19 12 3 4 30 14 16 39
Sampdoria
19 9 3 7 36 29 7 30
Ladbrokes Scottish Championship
League Two
Annan Ath 0 Montrose 1; Cowdenbeath 0 Edinburgh
C 2; Elgin 2 Clyde 1; Stenhousemuir 1 Peterhead 4;
Stirling Alb 2 Berwick 0. Leading standings: 1
Montrose 20-41; 2 Peterhead 18-40; 3
Stenhousemuir 19-32; 4 Stirling Alb 18-30; 5 Annan
Ath 20-28; 6 Elgin 19-27
Press & Journal Highland League
Buckie Thistle 2 Brora 2; Fraserburgh 7 Fort William 0
Ferrari Packaging Lowland League
Cumbernauld Colts 2 Edinburgh Univ 1; Dalbeattie
Star 0 East Kilbride 2; Gala Fairydean 1 Selkirk 2;
Gretna 2008 0 Edusport 3; Spartans 1 Civil Service 0
JD Welsh Premier League
Cardiff Met 1 Aberystwyth 1; Carmarthen 0 Cefn
Druids 1; Connah’s Quay 3 Barry 0; Llandudno 1 Bala 1
Tennent’s Irish Cup
Fifth round: Ards 4 Crumlin Star 1; Ballinamallard
Utd 4 Immaculata 2; Ballymena 4 Moyola Park 0;
Carrick 1 Glenavon 3 (aet); Cliftonville 4
Warrenpoint Tn 3 (aet); Coleraine 7 Lisburn Distillery
0; Crusaders 2 Maiden C 0; Dungannon 4 Limavady
0; Knockbreda 0 Institute 2; Larne 3 Dergview 0;
Linfield 5 Glebe Rgrs 0; Loughgall 4 PSNI 1; Lurgan 1
Glentoran 2; Newry 2 H&W Welders 0; Portadown 1
Ballyclare 2 (aet); Queen’s Univ 0 Dundela 1
Southern Amateur League
First Division: Wilsonians 2 Alleyn Boys 0;
Winchmore Hill 2 Owens 0. Second Division: Ibis
Eagles 2 Alexandra Park 2; Norsemen 3 Finchleians
6. Third Division: Blues 1 Broomfield 0; Weirside 2
South Bank Cuaco 1
Germany
0 Winter break until Friday
Top six
P W
Bayern Munich
17 13
Schalke
17 8
Borussia Dortmund 17 8
Bayer Leverkusen 17 7
Leipzig
17 8
Borussia M’gladbach 17 8
D
2
6
4
7
4
4
L
2
3
5
3
5
5
F
37
28
39
34
27
27
A
11
21
24
23
25
28
GD Pts
26 41
7 30
15 28
11 28
2 28
-1 28
D
2
2
5
5
3
3
L
1
4
2
3
6
8
F
58
46
46
38
18
24
A
15
19
20
22
18
29
GD Pts
43 50
27 41
26 41
16 38
0 33
-5 27
D
1
2
2
6
5
4
L
2
3
4
3
3
5
F
49
54
34
26
37
27
A
21
17
19
21
16
28
GD Pts
28 46
37 41
15 38
5 33
21 32
-1 28
France
0 Winter break until Friday
Top six
P W
Paris Saint-Germain 19 16
Monaco
19 13
Lyon
19 12
Marseille
19 11
Nantes
19 10
Nice
19 8
Holland
0 Winter break until Jan 19
Top six
P W
PSV Eindhoven
18 15
Ajax
18 13
AZ Alkmaar
18 12
PEC Zwolle
18 9
Feyenoord
17 9
Utrecht
17 8
FIXTURES
Today
Kick-off 7.45pm unless stated
FA Cup: Third round: Newport Co v Leeds Utd
(noon); Nottm Forest v Arsenal (4pm); Shrewsbury v
West Ham (2pm); Tottenham v AFC Wimbledon
FA Cup: Third round: Brighton v C Palace
FA Women’s Cup: Third round (1pm unless stated):
Blackburn v Portsmouth (2pm); Cardiff v Burnley;
Chichester v Luton; C Palace v Coventry (2pm);
Derby v Brighouse; Fylde v Plymouth (2pm);
Huddersfield v Lewes; Ipswich v Charlton; Keynsham
v Brislington; Leicester v Bradford; Middlesbrough v
Liverpool; Newcastle v The New Saints
Women’s Super League One: Chelsea v Arsenal
(1.30pm); Reading v Man C (4pm). League Two
(2pm unless stated): Aston Villa v London Bees;
Millwall v Sheffield; Oxford Utd v Durham (noon);
Tottenham v Brighton; Watford v Doncaster (3pm)
Women’s Premier (2pm) North: West Brom v
Nottm Forest. South: Swindon v QPR; West Ham v
Gillingham
Tomorrow
Tuesday
Carabao Cup: Semi-final: First leg: Man City v
Bristol C
Vanarama National League: AFC Fylde v Chester;
Dagenham & Redbridge v Boreham Wood; Guiseley
v Gateshead; Maidstone Utd v Ebbsfleet Utd
Ladbrokes Scottish Championship: Inverness CT v
Falkirk
Wednesday
Carabao Cup: Semi-final: First leg: Chelsea v
Arsenal (8pm)
Friday
Sky Bet Championship: Sheff Utd v Sheff Wed
Kick-off 3pm unless stated
Saturday
Premier League: C Palace v Burnley; Chelsea v
Leicester; Huddersfield v West Ham; Newcastle v
Swansea; Tottenham v Everton (5.30pm); Watford v
Southampton; West Brom v Brighton
Sky Bet Championship: Barnsley v Wolves;
Birmingham v Derby; Brentford v Bolton; Bristol C v
Norwich; Burton Alb v QPR; Cardiff v Sunderland
(12.30pm); Hull v Reading; Ipswich v Leeds Utd;
Middlesbrough v Fulham; Millwall v Preston; Nottm
Forest v Aston Villa (5.30pm). League One:
Blackburn v Shrewsbury; Blackpool v Bristol Rov;
Bradford C v Northampton; Bury v Charlton;
Doncaster v Plymouth; Gillingham v Rochdale; MK
Dons v AFC Wimbledon; Oldham v Rotherham;
Portsmouth v Scunthorpe; Southend v Fleetwood
Tn; Walsall v Oxford Utd; Wigan v Peterborough.
League Two: Cambridge Utd v Mansfield; Carlisle v
Crewe; Cheltenham v Accrington St; Chesterfield v
Luton; Crawley Tn v Barnet; Exeter v Coventry;
Grimsby v Newport Co; Lincoln C v Notts Co;
Morecambe v Stevenage; Port Vale v Yeovil;
Swindon v Forest Green; Wycombe v Colchester
Vanarama National League: AFC Fylde v Guiseley;
Torquay v Eastleigh; Woking v Tranmere
Ladbrokes Scottish Championship: Brechin v
Livingston; Dumbarton v St Mirren; Dunfermline Ath
v Dundee Utd; Inverness CT v Queen of South;
Morton v Falkirk. League One: Arbroath v Queen’s
Park; East Fife v Alloa; Forfar v Albion Rov; Raith Rov
v Ayr; Stranraer v Airdrieonians. League Two:
Berwick v Annan Ath; Clyde v Stenhousemuir;
Edinburgh C v Montrose; Elgin v Cowdenbeath;
Peterhead v Stirling Alb
Sunday
Premier League: Bournemouth v Arsenal (1.30pm);
Liverpool v Man City (4pm)
15
The Sunday Times January 7, 2018
SPORT TENNIS
Life after
Murray?
Loffhagen
is GB’s
best hope
McHugh:
one of three
young British
tennis players
being tipped
for the top
PHIL SHEPHARD-LEWIS
British tennis has a group
of youngsters who could
eventually make their
mark in the Grand Slams
W
Barry Flatman
Tennis Correspondent
orld-class British tennis players with the
potential to win Grand
Slams do not simply
come off a production
line. Filling the void left
by Andy Murray will
never be an immediate
process. After all, there
was a 70-year gap
between the era of the Scot and those
sepia-tinted images of Fred Perry, clad in
long trousers, hurdling the net in
triumph.
Yet there is no reason to extinguish all
optimism. While it would be crass to suggest another Wimbledon or US Open
champion may be just around the corner,
there is no harm speculating on who
might step up as a British star in years to
come. Later this month at the Australian
Open, three British juniors will look to
emulate the exploits, 25 years ago, of
James Baily, who surprised himself
when he came back with the boys’
title.
According to several who know
a thing or two about developing
top-flight players, the trio of
George Loffhagen, Jack Draper and
Aidan McHugh have sufficient skill
and determination to convince British tennis fans that there are more
reasons to look to the future than simply Kyle Edmund and Johanna Konta.
ON TV TODAY
ATP tennis
8am Eurosport 2
TODAY’S RACING
Flemenskill 57 (H)
5 320-0
W Greatrex6-11-2.......................R Johnson
Game On 29
6 0/4-42
Mrs L Wadham6-11-2.....................L Aspell
Glen Rocco 31 (S)
7 P/1-65
N Gifford7-11-2...........................T Cannon
I Am Sam 29 (H)
8 P3-P00
Miss E Lavelle7-11-2 ................ N Scholfield
Larry 40 (S)
9 10-6U4
G L Moore5-11-2.........................J E Moore
Neyja Blue 20
1036-3P6
C Gordon6-11-2..........................D Noonan
Going: Heavy
NOVICES’ HURDLE
£5,393: 1M 7F 195Y (14)
Marley Firth 30 (D,G,S)
D Skelton6-11-11.........................H Skelton
Abbey Street 37
2 3-2F00
Paul Henderson7-11-5..................T O’Brien
Age Of Wisdom 84F (P)
3
G L Moore5-11-5 ...................... Josh Moore
Cassivellaunus 12
4 4/0-00
D Steele6-11-5........................M Batchelor
Cockney Seagull 34 (V)
5 60
Mrs L Jewell5-11-5...................T Garner (3)
Havisham 20 (H,T)
6 56
J Snowden6-11-5......................G Sheehan
Hier Encore 271F
7
N Dunger6-11-5 ........................... R Dunne
Jaisalmer 30
8 62U-44
M Bradstock6-11-5................N De Boinville
Lost History 18
9 30
J Spearing5-11-5 ........................ J E Moore
Mr Magill 193F (H)
10
Nick Mitchell6-11-5 ................. N Scholfield
Paddy’s Poem 20
1103-03
N Gifford7-11-5.............................L Aspell
Rebel Collins 20
12022/00
N Mulholland7-11-5 ....................... N Fehily
Miss Adventure 17 (H)
1332-25
P Middleton6-10-12...............D Sansom (7)
Miss Tynte 24 (T)
1424-04
D Pipe6-10-12.......................T Scudamore
1 1-14
Betting: EvensHarefield, 11-4 Game On, 8-1 Larry,
10-1 Flemenskill, 12-1 Cintex, 14-1 Glen Rocco, 33-1
Ballintara, I Am Sam, 66-1 Bigdeal, Neyja Blue
2.05
Stolberg 29 (T,S)
Dai Williams10-11-12 .................... D Crosse
Project Mars 27 (P)
2 -F5062
N Gifford6-11-12 ................... M Bastyan (5)
Tzar De L’Elfe 33 (T)
3 P04-3F
R Rowe8-11-11.....................A Glassonbury
Champion Chase 95 (BF)
4 335-40
M Bosley6-11-11.........................J Nixon (7)
Clondaw Westie 27 (T,P,S)
5 /005-3
Mrs L Hill7-11-8.........................A Coleman
Snippetydoodah 49 (H,T,CD,S)
6 2P12-0
Michael Roberts10-11-8 ............... T O’Brien
Jully Les Buxy 603
7 432/0Nick Mitchell8-11-8 ................. N Scholfield
Bact To Black 17 (BF)
8 6-U00
R Walford6-11-7...............................J Best
Heluvagood 17 (T)
9 006-P4
V Dartnall6-11-5 .................. C Gethings (3)
Cafe Au Lait 20 (T,P,BF,S)
101230-3
D Skelton8-11-4 ......................... H Skelton
Yukon Delta 12 (V,CD,G,S)
112-0564
G L Moore11-11-2......................Josh Moore
Majingilane 16 (P)
12000U-0
W Greatrex6-11-0 ..................... G Sheehan
Chivers 35
13040-0P
D Steele7-10-12 ......................M Batchelor
Breaking Ground 24 (T,P)
14600050
R Ford6-10-12............................D Noonan
NOVICES’ CHASE
£7,343: 2M 214Y (4)
Rather Be 17 (D,G,S)
N Henderson7-11-5.....................J McGrath
Hab Sab 34
Mrs L Jewell6-11-0......................T Cannon
Gregarious 30 (H,T,D,S)
3 110-P4
Mrs L Wadham5-10-10...................L Aspell
San Pedro De Senam 34 (T,D,S)
4 62-023
G L Moore5-10-10....................Josh Moore
1 2U10-1
2 402-50
Betting: 11-4 Cafe Au Lait, 9-2 Clondaw Westie, 6-1
Bact To Black, 8-1 Project Mars, 9-1 Tzar De L’Elfe,
10-1 Champion Chase, 14-1 Heluvagood, Stolberg,
Yukon Delta, 16-1 Majingilane, Snippetydoodah, 25-1
Jully Les Buxy, 33-1 Chivers, 50-1 Breaking Ground
Betting: 1-4 Rather Be, 11-2 Gregarious, 8-1 San
Pedro De Senam, 66-1 Hab Sab
1.35
HANDICAP HURDLE
£3,119: 2M 4F 114Y (14)
1 00-000
Betting: 4-7 Marley Firth, 5-1 Jaisalmer, 10-1 Lost
History, Miss Adventure, 14-1 Miss Tynte, 16-1 Age
Of Wisdom, 20-1 Paddy’s Poem, 33-1 Havisham,
Rebel Collins, 50-1 Abbey Street, 66-1 Hier Encore,
100-1 others
1.05
IN TODAY’S SUNDAY TIMES
MURRAY’S
TORMENT
NEWS,
PAGES 26-27
Djokovic. I work with him on court and
watch him in action and there’s so much
that is exciting.
“He’s so fast across the court but he
has also got control. He not only defends
well but can develop a point, knowing
when to attack. As he has grown, his
serve has become more of a weapon and
he’s got a real class backhand that can
hurt opponents, either coming low up
the line or going crosscourt.
“Of course he is still very young.
There’s a few things temperament-wise
that I would like to see George improve,
and in some ways he is still extremely
immature. He is rather inclined to sulk if
things are not going well for him but the
good thing is that he’s a perfectionist and,
as we have seen with Andy Murray
through his great years, that is no bad
thing.”
The strength of British men’s tennis
had suffered of late, with Aljaz Bedene
returning to represent Slovenia and Dan
Evans remaining suspended for the use
of cocaine until late April. But with the
trio of Loffhagen, Draper and McHugh all
determined to fill the gap there are good
reasons not be too downhearted by the
sad news of Murray’s battle to regain full
fitness.
RACING RESULTS
Plumpton (Jackpot meeting)
12.30
Loffhagen, 16, is the name that really
sparks the imagination, by virtue of a
massive surge up the junior rankings in
the past year from a place close to the
1,000 mark to his current position of
world No 24. Last summer at Wimbledon, Rafael Nadal asked Tim Henman to
suggest a British junior who might serve
as a worthwhile practice partner and
without too much hesitation, Loffhagen
was put forward.
“I’m not just saying this to exaggerate
but this kid could turn into something
very, very special,” said Alan Jones, the
man who was first tasked with coaching
Loffhagen when the youngster was only
eight years old. This year will be Jones’
50th as a coach at Wimbledon and in that
time he has seen many British youngsters
fail to fulfil their promise, while others
have overachieved. But Jones, who
Loffhagen: world juniors
No 24 ‘could be very, very
special’ says respected
coach Alan Jones
guided Jo Durie to the world’s top five 34
years ago, is convinced that Loffhagen
has the quality to become Britain’s best.
“He’s got so many things going for
him,” said Jones. “He’s a phenomenal
athlete who puts me in mind of the
French player Gael Monfils. He hits the
ball very hard off both forehand and
backhand and he’s got considerably
stronger and bigger in the last year or so.”
Loffhagen comes from Ealing, the
same West London suburb where Stockport-born Perry lived when he won his
three Wimbledon titles, before he turned
professional and moved to the United
States, lured by the glamour and riches of
Hollywood. Loffhagen’s father is a senior
lawyer with IMG, so he might easily have
ended up at the company’s revered Nick
Bollettieri tennis academy in Bradenton,
Florida, where the likes of Andre Agassi,
Monica Seles, Jim Courier and Maria
Sharapova hit their formative strokes.
Instead, due to the influence of Jones,
he joined JTC, an independent academy
based at Chiswick and Northwood in Middlesex, which is fronted by Henman’s
former coach and LTA performance
director David Felgate. Since last summer, Jones’ son Ryan has taken over the
role of coach after previously working
with a couple of top 50 players, the Croatian Borna Coric and Edmund. The pair,
along with regular JTC practice partner
Draper, flew to Australia on Friday. The
younger Jones has high hopes for the trip
that begins on Monday next week in the
Victorian country town of Traralgon
before heading to Melbourne.
“George is the obvious one to look at
and having spent the past five months
with him, it’s very clear he has so many
very good attributes,” said the coach.
“Dad talks about him being like Monfils
but I’d go a step higher and compare
many aspects of his game to that of Novak
2.35
NOVICES’ HURDLE (QUALIFIER)
£6,498: 2M 4F 114Y (10)
HANDICAP CHASE
£18,134: 3M 4F 102Y (13)
Henri Parry Morgan 43 (T,P,F,G,S)
P Bowen10-12-0..........................S Bowen
Milansbar 29 (P,S)
2 PPP-63
N King11-11-12......................W Hutchinson
Clondaw Cian 15 (P,S)
3 0-322P
Miss S Smith8-11-12..................G Sheehan
Rathlin Rose 29 (B,G,S)
4 11P-3P
D Pipe10-11-8.........................Non-Runner
Shotgun Paddy 8 (V,D,S)
5 3P-55P
Miss E Lavelle11-11-6......................J Banks
1 060-2U
Harefield 46 (S)
A King5-11-8........................W Hutchinson
Ballintara 54
2 F30-0
Mrs D Grissell6-11-2.................M Goldstein
Bigdeal 18
3 00U
G L Moore5-11-2 ...................... Josh Moore
Cintex 20
4 2-3620
N Mulholland6-11-2.......................N Fehily
1 24-41
Shanroe Santos 23 (B,G,S)
6 -633U2
Mrs L Wadham9-11-5.....................L Aspell
Vinnie Lewis 40 (S)
7 42-341
H Whittington7-11-5.................H Bannister
Leo Luna 27 (P,G,S)
8 P/02-3
G L Moore9-11-0 ........................ J E Moore
Bears Rails 20 (B,S)
9 0P-P22
C Tizzard8-10-10........................H Cobden
Big Meadow 29 (P,S)
1023-462
N King7-10-9..............................T Whelan
Coolking 30 (B,C,D,F,G,S)
1111P-PP
G L Moore11-10-7 .....................Josh Moore
Bindon Mill 30 (S)
1214-40F
V Dartnall9-10-7 .....................N Scholfield
Frank N Fair 20 (C,G,S)
13-P2U11
Miss Z Davison10-10-0 .......... T Dowling (5)
Betting: 7-2 Henri Parry Morgan, 11-2 Shanroe
Santos, 13-2 Milansbar, 7-1 Frank N Fair, Vinnie
Lewis, 9-1 Big Meadow, 14-1 Bears Rails, Clondaw
Cian, Leo Luna, Shotgun Paddy, 16-1 Coolking, 20-1
Bindon Mill
3.10
Going: Heavy
12.30 (2m 3f 100yd hdle) 1 Diablo De Rouhet
(M D Grant, 33-1); 2 Just Don’t Ask (8-1); 3
Jaunty Flyer (9-2). Also ran: Jammin Masters
15-8 fav. 16 ran. 3l, 2¾l. J Hughes. Tote:
£54.40; £9.50, £2.70, £1.80. Exacta: £695.10.
CSF: £271.76. Trifecta: £1,356.90
1.00 (2m 7f 131yd ch) 1 Another Venture (M
Hamill, 13-8 fav); 2 Souriyan (9-1); 3 Socksy (51). 6 ran. 2¼l, sh hd. K C Bailey. Tote: £2.30;
£1.40, £4.30. Exacta: £16.10. CSF: £15.24.
Trifecta: £63.80
1.35 (2m 11yd hdle) 1 We Have A Dream (D A
Jacob, 8-11 fav); 2 Sussex Ranger (3-1); 3
Mercenaire (10-1). 5 ran. 1½l, 11l. N J
Henderson. Tote: £1.60; £1.20, £1.40. Exacta:
£3.00. CSF: £3.42. Trifecta: £9.00
2.05 (3m 5f 110yd ch) 1 Raz De Maree (James
Bowen, 16-1); 2 Alfie Spinner (33-1); 3 Final
Nudge (12-1); 4 Vintage Clouds (7-1 fav). 20
ran. 6l, 9l. G P Cromwell. Tote: £17.40; £3.40,
£6.50, £2.80, £2.30. Exacta: £631.10. CSF:
£474.15. Tricast: £6,430.19. Trifecta:
£6,139.00
HANDICAP CHASE
£5,289: 2M 3F 164Y (6)
Bramble Brook 78 (T,BF)
C Tizzard8-12-1..........................H Cobden
Ramore Will 30 (H,CD,F,G,S)
2 211344
C Gordon7-11-12.........................D Noonan
Whispering Harry 18 (S)
3 6P-0F6
H Oliver9-11-11 .......................... R Johnson
Spock 22 (CD,F,G,S)
4 064021
Lady Brooke13-11-0..........Miss L Brooke (7)
Sir Hubert 40
5 2643-3
R Rowe8-10-10....................A Glassonbury
Finnegan’s Garden 20 (CD,S)
6 31-521
Miss Z Davison9-10-0............T Dowling (5)
1 5P-223
Betting: 15-8 Finnegan’s Garden, 5-2 Bramble
Brook, 11-2 Spock, 13-2 Sir Hubert, 7-1 Ramore Will,
15-2 Whispering Harry
3.45
Chepstow
2.45 (2m 7f 131yd hdle) 1 Flemcara (Patrick
Cowley, 11-2); 2 Shantou Bob (4-1); 3 Eminent
Poet (6-1). Also ran: Court Frontier 3-1 fav. 8
ran. NR: Kris Spin, Zeroeshadesofgrey. ½l, 7l.
Miss E C Lavelle. Tote: £5.70; £1.90, £1.40,
£1.80. Exacta: £21.10. CSF: £27.72. Tricast:
£135.28. Trifecta: £74.80
3.20 (2m 3f 98yd ch) 1 Pressurize (Charlie
Deutsch, 4-1); 2 Templehills (8-1); 3 Rock On
Rocky (11-4). Also ran: Play The Ace 9-4 fav. 6
ran. NR: Kayf Adventure. 15l, 14l. Miss V
Williams. Tote: £5.20; £2.50, £4.40. Exacta:
£37.60. CSF: £30.79. Trifecta: £131.40.
Jackpot: Not won - pool of £4,794.37 c/f to
Plumpton today
3.55 (2m 11yd) 1 Good Boy Bobby (Sam
Twiston-Davies, 11-10 fav); 2 Gwalia (3-1); 3
Mount Rushmoore (4-1). 8 ran. 9l, 6l. N A
Twiston-Davies. Tote: £2.00; £1.10, £1.40,
£1.30. Exacta: £5.60. CSF: £4.85. Trifecta:
£10.30
HANDICAP HURDLE
£5,289: 1M 7F 195Y (9)
Placepot: £471.80
Tara Bridge 300 (S)
C Gordon10-12-2................Paul O’Brien (5)
Atlantic Storm 8 (H,T,D,S)
2 14-6F0
D Skelton6-12-0.........................H Skelton
Not Never 215 (D,BF,G)
3 4061-2
G L Moore6-11-12........................J E Moore
Soulsaver 38 (T,BF,S)
4 52-312
A Honeyball6-11-5.....................A Coleman
Hold The Bucks 748 (CD,S)
5 104PP/
D Steele12-11-4....................T Greatrex (7)
Briac 34 (P)
6 0/20-4
M Pattinson7-11-4 ................ S Houlihan (7)
Tee It Up Tommo 25F (T)
7 0P/00D Steele9-10-11 ...................... M Batchelor
Landscape 20 (T,P,D,S)
8 324-P2
D Steele10-10-10.......................R Johnson
Sixties Idol 27 (B,T)
9 506025
Sheena West5-10-3.................M Goldstein
1 363F1-
Quadpot: £40.50
Lingfield Park
2.55 (5f 6yd) 1 Galloway Hills (S M Levey, 11-8
fav); 2 Nomorecalls (3-1); 3 Queen Of Desire (21). 6 ran. ¾l, 2½l. D R C Elsworth. Tote: £2.40;
£1.10, £2.00. Exacta: £4.50. CSF: £5.94.
Trifecta: £8.90
3.30 (1m 2f) 1 Miss Minuty (Jason Watson,
5-1); 2 Nurse Nightingale (11-4 jt-fav); 3
Assanilka (11-4 jt-fav). 10 ran. 1¼l, nk. J Scott.
Tote: £5.50; £2.30, £1.60, £1.10. Exacta:
£24.90. CSF: £19.50. Tricast: £46.02. Trifecta:
£53.70
Placepot: £109.90
Quadpot: £27.20
Sandown Park
12.15 (1m 7f 216yd hdle) 1 Crucial Moment
(Sean Houlihan, 3-1); 2 Mister Chow (11-4); 3
Glorvina (12-1). Also ran: Echo Watt 6-4 fav. 5
ran. NR: We Have A Dream. 2¾l, 27l. W G M
Turner. Tote: £3.40; £1.60, £1.80. Exacta:
£11.80. CSF: £11.51. Trifecta: £32.80
2.10 (2m 5f 82yd hdle) 1 Dashing Perk (Harry
Cobden, 6-4); 2 Criq Rock (4-1); 3 Big Time
Frank (100-1). Also ran: Rhaegar evens fav. 4
ran. 22l, 15l. Dr R D P Newland. Tote: £2.30.
Exacta: £11.00. CSF: £7.60. Trifecta: £27.50
2.40 (2m 4f 35yd ch) 1 Kayf Adventure (T J
O’Brien, 15-8); 2 O Maonlai (6-1); 3 Uhlan Bute
(8-1). Also ran: Antartica De Thaix evens fav. 4
ran. NR: Play The Ace, Pressurize. 7l, 3¼l. P J
Hobbs. Tote: £3.20. Exacta: £13.40. CSF:
£11.38. Trifecta: £29.40
3.45 (2m 5f 82yd hdle) 1 Head To The Stars
(Mr H F Nugent, 8-1); 2 Daytime Ahead (8-1); 3
Zeroeshadesofgrey (16-1). Also ran: Edvardo
4-1 fav. 12 ran. NR: Dubawi Island. 1¼l, 1½l. H D
Daly. Tote: £8.90; £3.20, £2.30, £5.40. Exacta:
£88.40. CSF: £71.02. Tricast: £1,009.58.
Trifecta: £1,042.90
12.45 (2m 3f 173yd hdle) 1 Poppy Kay (R
Johnson, 15-8 fav); 2 Midnight Jazz (9-2); 3
Hitherjacques Lady (3-1). 4 ran. NR: Dusky
Legend. ½l, 8l. P J Hobbs. Tote: £2.20. Exacta:
£7.70. CSF: £9.72. Trifecta: £10.90
Placepot: £668.10
Quadpot: £76.50
Kempton Park
1.20 (2m 4f 10yd ch) 1 Chef D’Equipe (Mr D
Maxwell, 7-1); 2 Masterplan (7-1); 3 Never Up
(14-1). Also ran: Perfect Pirate 5-2 fav. 11 ran.
Nk, 3¼l. P J Hobbs. Tote: £8.40; £2.60, £2.00,
£3.70. Exacta: £51.10. CSF: £51.72. Tricast:
£666.32. Trifecta: £458.20
Going: Standard
5.45 (7f) 1 Morning Has Broken (Hollie Doyle,
7-2); 2 Sweet Symphony (11-4 jt-fav); 3 Mrs
Benson (8-1). Also ran: Short Head 11-4 jt-fav.
11 ran. 6l, ½l. D Elsworth. Tote: £3.80; £1.10,
£1.50, £3.00. Exacta: £15.50. CSF: £13.29.
Trifecta: £70.70
1.50 (1m 7f 119yd ch) 1 Speredek (Sean
Bowen, 10-11 fav); 2 Gino Trail (3-1); 3
Overtown Express (4-1). 4 ran. NR: Rock On
Rocky. 8l, 11l. N J Hawke. Tote: £1.90. Exacta:
£4.50. CSF: £3.94. Trifecta: £4.90
6.15 (7f) 1 Sayf Shamal (Tom Marquand, 11-4);
2 Be My Angel (5-1); 3 Lulu Star (33-1). 8 ran.
NR: Cosmic Love, Peace Terms. 5l, 1¾l. C
Appleby. Tote: £3.10; £1.10, £1.20, £12.50.
Exacta: £17.60. CSF: £18.59. Trifecta: £271.10
2.25 (1m 7f 216yd hdle) 1 Summerville Boy (N
D Fehily, 8-1); 2 Kalashnikov (2-1); 3 Mont Des
Avaloirs (4-1). Also ran: Western Ryder 7-4 fav.
5 ran. NR: Sussex Ranger. 4l, 9l. T R George.
Tote: £8.90; £2.50, £1.70. Exacta: £24.20.
CSF: £24.59. Trifecta: £131.10
6.45 (1m) 1 Dor’s Law (Rob Hornby, 7-2 fav); 2
Living Leader (6-1); 3 Tarseekh (12-1). 13 ran.
NR: Satchville Flyer. 1l, 1½l. D K Ivory. Tote:
£3.50; £1.50, £1.40, £3.50. Exacta: £21.40. CSF:
£22.83. Tricast: £230.15. Trifecta: £152.50
12.05 (1m 1yd) 1 Rusper (D C Costello, 5-2); 2
Joe’s Spirit (12-1); 3 Zalshah (9-4 fav). 5 ran. ½l,
¾l. J A Osborne. Tote: £2.80; £1.50, £3.40.
Exacta: £18.20. CSF: £25.98. Trifecta: £101.60
12.40 (1m 1yd) 1 Hasanoanda (R Havlin, 11-4);
2 Ambient (13-2); 3 Craving (evens fav). 11 ran.
Nk, 1l. J H M Gosden. Tote: £3.70; £1.10, £1.30,
£1.10. Exacta: £18.00. CSF: £22.20. Trifecta:
£33.00
3.35 (1m 7f 216yd) 1 Call Me Lord (Nico de
Boinville, 5-2 fav); 2 Our Merlin (7-2); 3 Gassin
Golf (7-1). 10 ran. 3¼l, 3l. N J Henderson. Tote:
£3.30; £1.60, £1.60, £2.50. Exacta: £12.60.
CSF: £12.35. Tricast: £54.87. Trifecta: £115.30
1.15 (7f 1yd) 1 Toriano (Tom Marquand, 7-2); 2
Varsovian (6-1); 3 Samarmadi (5-1). Also ran:
Presumido 2-1 fav. 9 ran. Hd, 2l. N P Littmoden.
Tote: £4.30; £1.10, £1.90, £2.30. Exacta:
£30.00. CSF: £23.79. Tricast: £105.92.
Trifecta: £157.10
Placepot: £473.50
Going: Standard
1.40 (3m 1f 30yd ch) 1 Crank Em Up (David
Bass, 7-1); 2 Bobonyx (14-1); 3 Goosen
Maverick (9-2). Also ran: Cucklington 11-4 fav.
9 ran. NR: Goodnightirene. 2l, 13l. David
Dennis. Tote: £7.60; £2.40, £2.20, £2.00.
Exacta: £66.70. CSF: £85.53. Tricast: £486.31.
Trifecta: £447.90
3.15 (2m 4f 35yd ch) 1 Le Boizelo (James Best,
7-4 fav); 2 Bill And Barn (9-4); 3 Walt (100-30). 5
ran. 10l, 1¾l. R Walford. Tote: £2.60; £1.40, £1.40.
Exacta: £7.50. CSF: £6.10. Trifecta: £15.50
Going: Heavy (soft in places)
3.00 (3m 37yd ch) 1 Buywise (L P Aspell, 121); 2 Pete The Feat (12-1); 3 Gas Line Boy (11-2).
Also ran: Houblon Des Obeaux 5-1 fav. 14 ran.
NR: O’Faolains Boy. 2l, 3l. Evan Williams. Tote:
£10.30; £3.40, £4.00, £2.40. Exacta: £159.20.
CSF: £150.07. Tricast: £896.46. Trifecta:
£1,491.20
1.45 (1m 2f) 1 Easy Tiger (L P Keniry, 7-1); 2
Eltezam (12-1); 3 General Hazard (7-2). Also
ran: Towerlands Park 5-2 fav. 7 ran. Nk, nk. M S
Saunders. Tote: £7.40; £2.60, £4.40. Exacta:
£61.10. CSF: £83.40. Trifecta: £193.90
Betting: 100-30 Soulsaver, 4-1 Landscape, 9-2
Not Never, Tara Bridge, 8-1 Atlantic Storm, Sixties
Idol, 12-1 Briac, 20-1 Tee It Up Tommo, 25-1 Hold
The Bucks
2.20 (1m 1yd) 1 Arcanada (M Harley, 4-6 fav);
2 Gabrial (11-2); 3 In The Red (100-1). 6 ran.
1¾l, 1½l. Tom Dascombe. Tote: £1.50; £1.10,
£2.40. Exacta: £4.40. CSF: £4.98. Trifecta:
£126.80
7.15 (1m) 1 Sheriff (A Kirby, 5-2); 2 Carp Kid
(6-4 fav); 3 Golden Image (7-1). 6 ran. NR:
Black Medusa. 6l, 1l. M L W Bell. Tote: £4.00;
£1.90, £1.40. Exacta: £9.80. CSF: £6.84.
Trifecta: £24.70
7.45 (1m) 1 Titan Goddess (Nicola Currie,
8-1); 2 Ventura Blues (5-1); 3 Hidden Steps (152). 6 ran. 4l, ¾l. M Murphy. Tote: £7.90; £2.80,
£2.40. Exacta: £37.90. CSF: £42.46. Trifecta:
£233.90
Going: Heavy
8.15 (1m 7f 218yd) 1 Lord George (Daniel
Muscutt, 5-2 fav); 2 Haines (20-1); 3 Sunblazer
(4-1). 9 ran. NR: Gwafa. 2½l, nk. J R Fanshawe.
Tote: £3.30; £1.40, £5.80, £1.50. Exacta:
£44.70. CSF: £55.47. Tricast: £193.04.
Trifecta: £211.30
1.05 (1m 7f 65yd hdle) 1 Rainy Day Dylan (T J
O’Brien, 5-2 jt-fav); 2 Irondale Express (10-1);
3 Run Don’t Hide (12-1). Also ran: Jaune Et
Bleue 5-2 jt-fav. 6 ran. 7l, 1½l. N P Mulholland.
Tote: £3.60; £1.70, £3.20. Exacta: £21.50.
CSF: £24.37. Trifecta: £166.00
8.45 (6f) 1 Choice Encounter (Cameron
Noble, 5-4 fav); 2 Our Man In Havana (7-1); 3
Mother of Dragons (25-1). 5 ran. NR: Musical
Theatre. 1¼l, 2¼l. M L W Bell. Tote: £2.30;
£1.20, £2.60. Exacta: £5.70. CSF: £10.22.
Trifecta: £63.90
Quadpot: £64.30
Wincanton
9.15 (1m 2f 219yd) 1 Thaqaffa (M Harley, 5-1); 2
Conkering Hero (6-1); 3 Bogardus (16-1). 13 ran.
NR: The Gay Cavalier. 2½l, nk. Miss Amy Murphy.
Tote: £5.80; £1.70, £3.00, £5.60. Exacta:
£48.80. CSF: £37.01. Trifecta: £1,131.30
Placepot: £178.50
Quadpot: £27.20
Cork
Going: Heavy
12.20 (2m hdle) 1 Chatham Street Lad (L P
Dempsey, 15-8 fav); 2 Wait Here (5-2); 3 Ale
Ambrosio (7-2). 5 ran. NR: All Good Things.
3¾l, 4½l. Michael Winters. Tote: €3.10; €1.20,
€1.70. Exacta: €10.50. CSF: €7.07. Trio: €11.70
12.50 (2m hdle) 1 Schindlers Ark (J W
Kennedy, 6-1); 2 Galtymore (10-1); 3 Tildas
Icon (25-1). Also ran: Aldawayfornothing 3-1
fav. 14 ran. NR: Deal With It. Hd, 1¾l. Gordon
Elliott. Tote: €5.10; €2.10, €2.60, €5.90.
Exacta: €48.20. CSF: €64.54
1.25 (3m hdle) 1 Guided By You (J M Moore,
11-4); 2 Therellalwaysbeone (12-1); 3 Stoneford
(15-8). Also ran: Pearl Dragon 7-4 fav. 7 ran. 3l,
4½l. Noel Meade. Tote: €3.10; €1.20, €3.50.
Exacta: €24.00. CSF: €30.01. Trio: €88.50
1.55 (2m 4f hdle) 1 Lite Duties (M A Enright,
25-1); 2 Indian Monsoon (10-1); 3 Montys
Meadow (4-1). Also ran: Westerner Point 7-2
fav. 12 ran. 1¾l, ½l. C Byrnes. Tote: €46.30;
€9.60, €3.60, €1.80. Exacta: €750.20. CSF:
€259.94. Tricast: €1,228.25. Trio: €836.70
2.30 (2m 4f ch) 1 Livelovelaugh (P Townend,
4-7 fav); 2 Drumconnor Lad (14-1); 3 Burgas
(100-30). 10 ran. 3l, 18l. W P Mullins. Tote:
€1.50; €1.02, €2.80, €1.40. Exacta: €12.10.
CSF: €11.07. Trio: €37.90
3.05 (2m 4f ch) 1 Smokey Joe Joe (D F
O’Regan, 9-1); 2 Routes Choice (13-2); 3 Inch
Rise (4-1 jt-fav). Also ran: Consharon Boy 4-1 jtfav. 9 ran. 7½l, 2¾l. S J Mahon. Tote: €7.30;
€2.50, €1.90, €1.50. Exacta: €29.80. CSF:
€65.91. Tricast: €272.66. Trio: €468.90
3.40 (2m) 1 Squadron Commander (P W
Mullins, 4-6 fav); 2 Love N’ Peace (7-1); 3 Buck
A Trend (8-1). 9 ran. 4¼l, 2¼l. W P Mullins. Tote:
€1.40; €1.02, €2.20, €2.10. Exacta: €6.10. CSF:
€6.56. Trio: €34.60
This week
Today: Plumpton (12.30pm); Naas (12.40pm).
Abandoned: Newcastle
Tomorrow: Fontwell Park (1.15pm, inspection
8am today); Hereford (1.30pm);
Wolverhampton (A/W, 4.15pm)
Tuesday: Doncaster (12.25pm); Southwell
(A/W, 12.15pm); Taunton (12.35pm)
Wednesday: Ayr (1pm); Kempton Park (A/W,
4.15pm); Lingfield Park (A/W, 1.10pm); Ludlow
(1.20pm)
Thursday: Catterick Bridge (12.30pm); Leicester
(12.45pm); Newcastle (A/W, 1.55pm); Chelmsford
City (A/W, 6.30pm); Clonmel (12.35pm)
Friday: Huntingdon (1.30pm); Lingfield Park
(A/W, 12.50pm); Newcastle (A/W, 5.45pm);
Sedgefield (1.10pm); Dundalk (5.30pm)
Saturday: Kempton Park (12.20pm); Lingfield
Park (A/W, 12.50pm); Warwick (12.40pm);
Wetherby (12.30pm); Wolverhampton (A/W,
5.45pm); Punchestown (12.25pm)
Flat meetings in bold
RUGBY UNION RESULTS
Aviva Premiership
Leicester
Northampton
Sale
Exeter
Saracens
Wasps
Gloucester
Bath
Sale
Leicester
Newcastle
Harlequins
Northampton
Worcester
London Irish
Guinness Pro14
19
22
30
P W
12 10
12 8
12 8
13 8
13 7
13 6
13 7
12 7
13 6
13 5
13 3
13 1
London Irish
Gloucester
Harlequins
D
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
L
2
4
4
5
6
7
6
5
7
8
10
12
F
345
382
347
294
341
326
296
226
354
297
252
219
A
196
221
283
320
307
295
306
278
349
362
379
383
15
19
29
B
10
8
7
6
9
9
4
4
8
6
7
6
Pts
50
40
39
38
37
33
32
32
32
26
19
10
Greene King IPA Championship
Bristol
Ealing Trailfinders
Yorkshire Carnegie
Bedford
Doncaster
Nottingham
Cornish Pirates
Jersey
Richmond
London Scottish
Hartpury
Rotherham Titans
P W
13 13
13 11
13 8
13 6
13 5
13 6
13 5
13 6
13 6
13 4
13 4
13 0
D
0
0
1
2
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
L
0
2
4
5
7
6
8
6
7
8
8
13
F
583
479
321
408
339
338
372
246
279
320
250
228
A
257
264
335
348
352
343
369
260
393
417
310
515
B
12
11
6
11
12
7
11
3
5
9
8
3
Pts
64
55
40
39
34
33
31
29
29
27
26
3
National League Division One: Caldy 71
Loughborough Students 14; Hull Ionians 13
Birmingham Moseley 29; Old Elthamians 55 Fylde 10;
Ampthill & District 21 Blackheath 14; Coventry 52 Old
Albanians 5; Rosslyn Park 44 Esher 37. Division Two:
North: Blaydon 34 Macclesfield 52; Leicester Lions 0
Hinckley 27; Sheffield Tigers 16 Sale 27; Wharfedale
34 Luctonians 15; Sedgley Park 26 South Leicester 21;
Chester 22 Otley 21; Huddersfield 29 Tynedale 20;
Stourbridge 41 Sheffield 17. South: Barnstaple 12
Taunton Titans 53; Old Redcliffians 24 Bury St
Edmunds 14; Redingensians 39 Worthing 26;
Tonbridge Juddians 17 Clifton 10; Wimbledon 33
Redruth 28; Broadstreet 12 Canterbury 7; Cinderford
34 Henley 6; Chinnor 20 London Irish Wild Geese 35
Benetton Treviso
Ospreys
Zebre
Leinster
Munster
27
29
20
38
39
Cheetahs
Cardiff Blues
Glasgow
Ulster
Connacht
21
28
40
7
13
Conference A
Glasgow
Munster
Cheetahs
Cardiff Blues
Connacht
Ospreys
Zebre
P W
13 12
13 8
11 6
13 5
13 4
13 4
13 3
D
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
L
1
5
5
8
9
9
10
F
407
389
320
281
260
211
271
A
192
239
312
328
285
327
367
B
10
11
6
5
8
5
5
Pts
58
43
30
25
24
21
17
Conference B
Scarlets
Leinster
Ulster
Edinburgh
Benetton Treviso
NG Dragons
Southern Kings
P W
13 11
13 11
13 8
13 8
13 6
13 2
11 0
D
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
L
2
2
4
5
7
10
11
F
379
399
336
286
232
239
170
A
216
213
327
230
272
444
428
B Pts
9 53
7 51
6 40
5 37
5 29
4 14
4
4
SSE Swalec Welsh National League: Division One
East: Abertillery B G 26 Croesyceiliog 27; Brecon 16
Dowlais 6; Brynmawr 52 Ynysybwl 0; Nelson 19
Risca 28; Pontypool 39 Caerleon 8. West:
Aberystwyth 14 Gowerton 19; Gorseinon 22
Crymych 15; Penclawdd 10 Tenby 21. North:
Bethesda 19 Bro Ffestiniog 7; Caernarfon 6
Llangefni 13; Dolgellau 13 Bala 19; Nant Conwy 71
Mold 15; Ruthin 85 Colwyn Bay 0
BT Scottish Premiership
Melrose
Currie
Hawick
Watsonians
12
41
24
64
Ayr
Boroughmuir
Heriot’s
Marr
20
7
23
5
Scottish National League Division One: Edinburgh
Acads 85 Musselburgh 17; GHA 31 Jed-Forest
38; Selkirk 22 Dundee HSFP 25; Stewart’s Melville
FP 15 Cartha QP 46; Gala 38 Falkirk 12; Kelso 14
Aberdeen Grammar 12.
MOTORS
Division Two: Dumfries 33 Lasswade 0; GHK 43
Preston Lodge FP 20; Howe of Fife 17 Hamilton 11;
Whitecraigs 15 West of Scotland 21; Peebles 10
Biggar 15
Division Three: Ardrossan Acads 21 Perthshire 13;
Glasgow Acads 60 Hillhead Jordanhill 0;
Gordonians 36 Haddington 12; Highland 39
Murrayfield Wanderers 5; St Boswells 39 Dalziel 5
Registration Numbers
51 OW
Ulster Bank Division One
Section A
Cork Constitution
Dublin University
Lansdowne
UCD
Buccaneers
St Mary’s College
Clontarf
Terenure College
0
10
8
31
25
28
18
15
Naas
Ballymena
Banbridge
UL Bohemians
3
13
15
17
Section B
Shannon
Ballynahinch
Old Belvedere
Old Wesley
30000 o.n.o. 07552231124
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Fixtures
Today
Aviva Premiership: (3pm) Newcastle v Exeter;
Wasps v Saracens
Friday
Champions Cup: Pool Five: Bath v Scarlets (7.45pm)
Challenge Cup: Agen v Gloucester (6.30pm);
Edinburgh v Stade Francais (7.35pm) British & Irish
Cup: Ospreys v Bedford (7.30pm); Nottingham v
Munster A (7:45pm); Ulster A v Cornish Pirates
(5pm) Jersey v Newport Dragons (7.45pm)
Saturday
Champions Cup: Pool One: Ulster v Atlantique Stade
Rochelais (1pm); Harlequins v Wasps (5.30pm).
Pool Two: Northampton v Clermont Auvergne
(5.30pm); Ospreys v Saracens (7.45pm).
Pool Three: Exeter v Montpellier (3.15pm)
Challenge Cup: Pool One: Bordeaux Begles v
Dragons (8pm). Pool Two: Sale v Lyon (3pm).
Pool Three: Pau v Zebre (5pm). Pool Four: London
Irish v Krasny Yar (3pm). Pool Five: Worcester v
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16
The Sunday Times January 7, 2018
SPORT COMMENT
David Walsh
DAVID DAVIES
Jose Mourinho’s bitter spat with Chelsea’s Antonio
Conte is par for the course for the enigmatic
Portuguese, who is a whiner but also a charmer
I
JOHN PETERS
f this were a Shakespearean
tragedy, and goodness knows it
may well be, there would be a
couple of sentences in italics
setting the scene. Friday night,
late. Media conference room at Old
Trafford. The room is two-thirds
full. Jose Mourinho takes his seat at
the centre of a long desk, facing
those who have come to hear his
words. He seems calm, relaxed almost.
Earlier in the day Antonio Conte had
been asked about Mourinho’s comment
that the Portuguese no longer danced
like a clown on the touchline, suggesting
that others (Conte) do.
When it was dangled in front of him,
Conte grabbed the bait with open
mouth, saying that Mourinho had senile
dementia and might be suffering from
amnesia. What is certain is that when
this to-and-fro begins, journalists will
keep it going for as long as they can
because there is nothing like personal
animosity to offer a view beneath the
veneer of mutual admiration. If the right
button is pressed, they sometimes tell us
what is real.
Those who listened to Conte at
Chelsea’s training ground understood
like never before that the Italian does not
have a lot of time for Mourinho. That
impression was enhanced yesterday
when Conte described Mourinho as a
“little man” and a “fake” in an
extraordinary tirade after Chelsea’s
goalless draw with Norwich City. This
isn’t a position that causes Conte to feel
isolated. Mourinho was always going to
react to the accusation that such a
young, handsome and successful
manager as himself could be losing his
marbles.
It was the second question. Into that
room at Old Trafford Mourinho had
walked like Clint Eastwood silently
brushing through the doors of a saloon
in one of those old spaghetti westerns.
Eastwood would order a whiskey and sip
it without so much as looking over his
shoulder. That meant he had come to
end someone’s life. The victim had
about two minutes to enjoy the rest of
his life. Mourinho just poured himself a
water, smiling benignly before dealing
with the first question, something about
whether he was confident that his team
would eventually get the goals that
dispatched Derby County from the FA
Cup. You never really know, he said,
recalling the Southampton game where
his team had plenty of chances but could
not get a goal.
When the second question came, he
was ready: How did he react to Antonio
Conte’s disparaging comments? He
chose his words with care. We reprint
them precisely as he uttered them.
“Look, I don’t blame him, honestly I
don’t blame him. I think the press
should apologise to him and to me
because the question that comes to him
is completely wrong and because of that
he had that out-of-control reaction. But I
don’t blame him at all. I was asked about
my passion and you know, because you
were in my press conference, I was
speaking about myself and then the
question to the Chelsea manager was
like I told that he behaves likes a clown.
Probably the journalist wants to say that
but doesn’t have the courage to say that,
so he told that Mourinho say you behave
Teenage dream: James Bowen shows off the silverware
National glory
for 16-year-old
jockey Bowen
RACING
Youngster lands
Welsh marathon
aboard veteran
Raz De Maree
David Parsons
Centre stage: no
matter how many
times you try to
work Jose
Mourinho out, no
truth emerges
like a clown, so I don’t blame the Chelsea
manager and I understand his reaction.
“I was speaking about myself, I was
saying I don’t need to behave like a
clown to show passion, that I control my
emotions in a better way. Everybody
knows I don’t need the Chelsea manager
to say I made mistakes in the past, and I
will make in the future hopefully, I know
that I celebrate goals running 50 metres,
I celebrate goals sliding on my knees, I
got celebrations jumping to the crowd. I
am not free of that, especially if we score
a winning goal in a specific moment. I
am not free of having an out-of-control
reaction, but what I was trying to say was
that I behaved bad a few times and in
this moment I behave much better.
Doesn’t mean that my passion is not the
same. So wrong question and obviously
a strong answer but I don’t blame him.
“The only thing I want to say to end
the story is that yes, I made mistakes in
the past on the touchline, yes I will make
less but I will still make a few. What
never happened to me, and will never
happen, is to be suspended for matchfixing.”
Reading Mourinho’s words you will
have no sense of how his tone changed
when he uttered the sentence “What
never happened to me, and will never
happen, is to be suspended for matchfixing.” His delivery slowed, became
more deliberate, you could actually hear
him putting every word in capitals.
encountered some difficulty
in their attempts to make
him an effective team
player. Too often Barkley
gave the ball away at the
wrong moment and put his
team in trouble. At times
Koeman seemed
exasperated.
It would be easy to say
that Barkley’s future
depends solely on the player
himself. But that presumes
he has the wherewithal to
develop into the complete
player that Conte says he
now is. By the way, the
Chelsea manager also says
Barkley will need some time
to adapt to his new club, the
suggestion being that he
won’t be starting a lot of
first-team games during the
second half of this season.
I watched Danny
Drinkwater’s early days at
Chelsea and remain
unconvinced that he will
ever be a regular firstteamer. It won’t be any
easier for Barkley but good
luck to him.
Raz De Maree, runner up to
Native River in last season’s
Coral Welsh Grand National,
went one place better under
teenage jockey James Bowen
in yesterday’s renewal at
Chepstow.
The 13-year-old, trained in
Co Meath, Ireland, by Gavin
Cromwell, is only three years
younger than his rider and
the pair proved the perfect
combination to land the
marathon chase, which was
rescheduled from Dec 27.
Raz De Maree had failed to
complete the course in tilts at
the English, Scottish and Irish
Grand Nationals, but this
three and three-quarter mile
slog in the mud was just his
cup of tea. He became the
oldest winner of the race
since it was first run at
Chepstow in 1949 and on a
good day for the old-timers,
he was followed home by
another 13-year-old, Alfie
Spinner.
There was a scare for
Bowen at the first fence when
Emperor’s Choice fell in front
of him but 16-1 chance Raz De
Maree gradually warmed to
his task on the second circuit
and, after taking command at
the second-last fence, he
stayed on doggedly for a sixlength success.
Alfie Spinner, who belied
his 33-1 odds with a bold run,
finished nine lengths clear of
Final Nudge in third with the
gambled-on 7-1 favourite
Vintage Clouds a remote
fourth. In a gruelling contest,
13 of the 20 starters failed to
finish, with perhaps the
unluckiest being Wild West
Wind, who appeared to be
travelling strongly in the lead
when taking a crashing fall at
the 12th of the 18 fences.
Bowen, who is in his first
season riding under rules,
said: “It’s amazing, you grow
up watching these races and
it’s great just to be a part of it.
I would have been happy to
get round, but he’s still in love
with the game and did it well.
“It wasn’t the plan to be
that far back, but you can’t
use him up too early and once
he started passing horses he
got better and better.”
Cromwell was naturally
delighted to have booked the
services of Bowen, who
claimed a valuable 5lb off Raz
De Maree’s back. “He gave
him a peach of a ride,” he
said. “He was flat to the
an advantage’. Man City,
Arsenal and Chelsea have
two-legged EFL cup semifinals in January. Spurs have
three games in six days. The
top six had European games
in December. Stoke’s festive
schedule was pretty benign.
Nicholas Binns, Wirksworth
I was flabbergasted to read
Stephen Jones’ comparisons
of Bernard Laporte to Papa
Doc Duvalier (last week).
Duvalier was responsible for
the deaths of more than
60,000 Haitians and it is
ridiculous to draw any
parallels with the president
of the French rugby
federation.
Daniel Adams,via email
time I have seen him carry
out similar tackles in the past
year, with no penalty. My
concern rose when I heard
commentators the next day
say ‘Roberts had a good
game with two big hits.’ If
rugby is serious about
dealing with head injuries,
something must be done
about this type of tackle.
Peter Lee, via email
I was horrified to see the
Harlequins centre Jamie
Roberts produce a front-on
crash tackle against
Northampton, resulting in a
concussion injury to his
opponent. This is the third
In response to Dave Read’s
views about refereeing in
rugby and football (letters,
last week), let’s see football
mic-up referees as rugby has
done.
Nick Derbyshire, via email
On rare occasions
Mourinho can
seduce you into
seeing him as a
likeable bloke
Arising out of an Italian investigation
into match-fixing, Conte was initially
suspended but later exonerated of all
wrongdoing. Mourinho was not
explicitly linking his rival to matchfixing. He’s more subtle than that, but
not much more. “OK, any more
questions on the game?” said United’s
press officer Karen Shotbolt as she tried
to hurry the conversation into safer
places. Shotbolt, that’s a good name for
someone working with the current
manager of Manchester United.
Mourinho has always been and
continues to be an enigma. No matter
how many times you try to work him
out, no absolute truth emerges. He is a
whiner but also a charmer.
There have been times when I have
thought him a crass narcissist, other
times when I’ve marvelled at how he
infuses his players with his will-to-win.
He is a proven winner, which is
admirable, but his need to constantly
remind us of his record is wearying and
reflects insecurities that lie at the core of
his effectiveness as a manager.
There have been other occasions,
admittedly not that often, when he
seduces you into seeing him as a likeable
bloke. Speaking of Shakespearean
tragedies, what a critic once said of
Hamlet is equally true of Mourinho. The
difficulty is that every time we look at
him, he is different. Our perceptions
depend on what we bring to our inquiry
and our relationship to him changes
each time we visit him.
“Hamlet,” wrote the critic, “never
ceases to surprise us. Therein lies the
secret to the enduring love affair
audiences have with him. They never
tire of the intrigue.” Could not the same
be said of Mourinho? He came to that
press conference feeling as Hamlet felt
on the night the life of Claudius was
ended. Antonius became Claudius and
the Chelsea manager understood he was
messing with the wrong man. They say
Mourinho might not stay more than
three seasons at Manchester United. If I
were Richard Scudamore, chief
executive of the Premier League, I’d be
tempted to do a deal with the
Portuguese. For every season after the
third, an extra £10m. We are talking here
of the Premier League’s top drawing
card. There will be a movie about his
time at Old Trafford. The difficulty will
be that no one could play Mourinho as
well as Jose.
Barkley has it all to do to prove he is ‘complete player’
Last May Everton football
club valued Ross Barkley at
£50m. They weren’t rushed
off their feet by clubs
stampeding to take the
attacking midfield off their
hands. Tottenham, Arsenal
and finally Chelsea were
reported to be interested.
Towards the end of the
summer Chelsea offered
£35m, and that deal would
have gone through had the
player not got injured.
Last week Chelsea got
their man for £15m. You
LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
Send your letters to:
The Sports Editor,
The Sunday Times,
1 London Bridge St
London SE1 9GF
email: sportletters
@sunday-times.co.uk
could say the injury cost
Everton £20m but my
preference is for suggesting
that it saved Chelsea £20m.
The reason Everton had to
accept a knockdown fee for
Barkley is that he will be a
free agent at the end of the
current season and £15m
now was better than
nothing later.
So far, Barkley has
promised more than he’s
delivered. He has the ability
to beat a man, which is
important. He’s also got
Is it time to start penalising
footballers who go down as
if they have been shot after a
fair tackle, only to get up and
rejoin play when they realise
no action has been taken by
the referee?
Rowan Gorrie, Ramsbottom
Jonathan Northcroft
highlighted improvements
made at Arsenal (last week).
Many fans will look at a
squad that lacks quality in
depth and scoff at the
appointments. Any
sustained improvement will
come well after this year. It is
vital that those with proven
track records, such as Sven
good acceleration, he is
strong on the ball and will
occasionally score. Antonio
Conte welcomed him to
Chelsea by hailing him as “a
complete player”. You could
accuse Barkley of many
things but not that.
He is 24 now and the
move south is the fork in his
career. There is no certainty
that the change will work for
him. Previous managers,
especially David Moyes and
Ronald Koeman, were well
aware of his talent but
Mislintat and Raul Sanllehi,
stay after Arsène Wenger
goes to ensure continuity.
David Rimmer, Hertford
Heath
I would have sympathy for
Arsène Wenger’s anger with
Mike Dean after West Brom’s
generous penalty if I heard
him complain on one of the
many occasions bad
decisions have benefited his
team.
Damien Mackinney,
Stourbridge
Has anyone else noticed that
it appears Arsène Wenger
has hated every minute of
Barkley: career crossroads
every one of his recordbreaking 811 games in the
Premier League?
David James, Crewe
Recently two horrendous
fouls were committed on
Manchester City players.
Each offender was shown a
yellow card, preventing
further action by the FA.
Lesser offenders, shown no
card, were suspended after
retrospective action. This
rule makes the FA look an ass
and should be amended
Hans Eirew, Manchester
Mark Hughes said the TV
schedules ‘give bigger clubs
The most heartwarming part
of the holiday games was
seeing Pep Guardiola and
Roy Hodgson sharing a joke.
The difference between
Manchester City and
Manchester United is that
one manager has class – and
the other is Jose Mourinho.
Philip Moger, West Sussex
boards down the back but he
didn’t panic and stayed on.
“Last year if you had taken
Native River out of it he would
have been an impressive
winner. But being a year
older and a pound up at the
weights against a horse who
was eight, it was a huge ask.
“Once he jumped the last
two, because he stays so well,
there was nothing going to get
by him at that stage. He won’t
stop. If anything, maybe he
got there a bit too soon.”
Earlier in the Coral Future
Champions Finale Juvenile
Hurdle, We Have A Dream
was made to work hard by
Sussex Ranger before landing
odds of 8-11 by a length and a
half.
He was not entered in the
original race due to be run
two days after Christmas,
which was abandoned due to
waterlogging. Connections
took advantage of its
rescheduling and picked up a
Grade One in the process.
Jockey Daryl Jacob
reported: “The ground is
hard work, it’s dead and we
didn’t go quick. He likes a
nice, even gallop, he jumps
better when they go a stride
quicker but we wanted to
teach him something today,
winning at the same time.
He’s got to learn his trade and
what happened today was
perfect.”
The winner was trimmed
to 7-1 from 8s by Paddy Power
for the Triumph Hurdle at
Cheltenham in March.
At Sandown, Summerville
Boy sprang a minor surprise
in the 32Red Tolworth
Novices’ Hurdle when
turning earlier Cheltenham
tables on Western Ryder.
Tom George’s six-year-old
seemed to relish the strong
gallop set by Mont Des
Avaloirs, and despite a
sketchy jump at the last, Noel
Fehily was able to gather his
mount up and keep the 8-1
shot going for a four-length
win. Kalashnikov stuck on
gamely for second, with Mont
Des Avaloirs back in third.
The disappointment of the
race was Western Ryder, the
7-4 favourite who was being
ridden along before the home
straight and was beaten at the
second-last flight.
“At Cheltenham it was a
false-run race and he was
very free,” said Fehily,
explaining the reversal in
form with Western Ryder. “It
was an even gallop today and
that suited him. I was hoping
no one would notice I lost an
iron at the last, he got into the
bottom of it, but luckily he
won really well.
“I think he’ll get further,
but he’s a big baby. Tom has
been minding him and the
reason he’s been running in
good races is to keep him as a
novice for next year if he
didn’t win.”
I took umbrage at Richard
Husband linking Australia’s
use of bouncers with Phillip
Hughes’ untimely death
(letters). It smacked of being
a poor loser at a time when
England would be better off
rallying and continuing to
salvage pride from the lost
series.
Tim Gill, via email
If cricket boards are serious
about keeping Test cricket at
the forefront of the game,
they must agree suitable
preparation matches for all
tours worldwide and address
the issue of drop-in pitches.
David Wythe, Bray
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