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Adweek - May 07, 2018

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MAY 7, 2018
SAMANTHA
BEE IS LIT
THE FULL FRONTAL HOST HEADLINES OUR LIST OF
WOMEN WHO ARE BLOWING UP THE BARRICADES
OF GENDER DIVERSITY. BY STACY PERMAN
BI G IDEA vs. LONG IDEA
CREATING EFFECTIVE CONCEPTS THAT ENDURE
Advertisers are obsessed with the big idea. But what
is a big idea in today’s marketing world? Something
novel that breaks through the noise and has a
cultural impact? Or something with staying power
that reveals its value over time?
DEVIKA BULCHANDANI
COLLEEN DECOURCY
SAMANTHA DEEVY
CORINNA FALUSI
President, McCann New York
Chief Creative Officer, Wieden + Kennedy
Group Communications Strategy Director
Droga5
Partner and Chief Creative Officer
Mother New York
JASON HARRIS
FERNANDO MACHADO
EDDIE OPARA
President and CEO, Mekanism
Global CMO, Burger King
Partner-in-Charge, Creative Director
Pentagram
AND MORE!
PRESENTED BY
JOIN THE CONVERSATION THAT WILL ELEVATE THE INDUSTRY
GET TICKETS TODAY AT ADWEEK.COM/ELEVATE // TICKET SALES END MAY 28
THE W EEK IN MED
16
FEATURE
Samantha Bee, host of TBS’
Full Frontal, joins our list of
Disruptors who are burning
down the boys club.
6
TRENDING
Why brands are doubling
down on out-of-home ads.
14
DATA POINTS
How to create a mobile ad
that isn’t obnoxious.
33
PORTRAIT
At Terri & Sandy,
diversity is the norm.
34
LOOK BACK
The fearless, indomitable
Murphy Brown
C O V E R : P H O T O G R A P H E D B Y H O L L E N D E R X 2 F O R A D W E E K A T H U N D S O N Y A R D S L O F T; S T Y L I N G : E R I N D O U G H E R T Y ; H A I R / M A K E U P : E V A S C R I V I O ; T H I S P A G E : T O P A N D A G E N C Y : G E T T Y I M A G E S ; B I G N U M B E R : I S T O C K P H O T O
fr
TOP STORY
THE GLOBAL
RETAIL ROYALE
Jeff Bezos,
Amazon CEO
Doug McMillon,
Walmart CEO
WALMART’S LATEST PURCHASE HEATS UP THE
COMPETITION WITH AMAZON. BY ANN-MARIE ALCÁNTARA
Flipkart, the Indian ecommerce marketplace, on Friday agreed to sell about 75 percent of the company
to a Walmart Inc.-led group for approximately $15 billion, according to Bloomberg. Flipkart generated
$3.1 billion in revenue last year. This comes a day after CNBC reported that Amazon not only offered
to buy a majority stake in the company but also offered a breakup fee of $2 billion and a non-compete.
The competition between the two companies continues to heat up, with analysts pointing to Amazon’s
reported offer and interest in Flipkart as a necessary means to keep growing (and the size of India’s
massive marketplace doesn’t hurt). One of Walmart’s recent major ecommerce purchases was in August
2016, when it acquired Jet.com for $3 billion to compete head-on with Amazon. Currently, Walmart
has 11,700 retail stores across 28 countries; as of now, Amazon’s service is in only 13 countries.
AGENCY
MICROSOFT
AD OF
THE DAY
Teleflora
BIG NUMBER
Emotions run high in new Mother’s Day ads from
Teleflora that focus on moms raising their children
in situations that pose unique challenges. The flower
delivery service’s campaign, which introduces the
tagline “Love makes a Mom,” should come with its
own box of Kleenex. That said, sentimentality takes a
back seat, and straightforward storytelling carries the
day in affecting fashion. The minute-long ads, crafted
by The Wonderful Agency (the in-house marketing
unit of Teleflora parent The Wonderful Company), and
Wondros Productions directors Chris Riess and Amy
Hill, touch a nerve because they’re so real, unfiltered
and, ultimately, uplifting. —David Gianatasio
MOOD BOARD
330
million
TWITTER USERS
(BASICALLY
EVERYONE) URGED
TO CHANGE THEIR
PASSWORDS AFTER
A BUG STORED
PASSWORDS IN
PLAIN TEXT.
The Week in Emojis
GOOGLE
BUDWEISER
O S C A R M AY E R
RELEASED ITS FIRST
VIRTUAL REALIT Y
DOODLE.
R O L L S O U T PAT R I O T I C B R E W
T H AT I S I N S P I R E D B Y G E O R G E
WA S H I N G T O N ’S O W N R EC I P E .
LAUNCHES A BACONB A S E D C R Y P T O C U R R E N C Y.
O B V I O U S LY, I T ’ S B A C O I N .
Dentsu Aegis Network has
succeeded in defending
Microsoft’s global media
planning and buying business,
which is one of its largest
accounts. Multiple parties
close to the matter said the
technology giant announced its
decision earlier this week after
a closed review first launched
last December. Every major
holding group was involved in
what one source called a “Hail
Mary” pitch with the exception
of Omnicom, which could not
compete due to a conflict with
Apple. The tech giant spent
$1.5 billion on marketing last
year. A Dentsu spokesperson
deferred to the client, and
Microsoft’s PR firm had not yet
provided comment on the
news at press time.
—Patrick Coffee
How do you make a
great vertical video?
S TA RT W I T H A G R E AT V I D E O.
By 2021, 78% of all mobile traffic will be video. That’s a lot of video
to watch. And it’s a lot of video to make. So please make some
time to think about the ways people watch when they’re on their
phones. When you do, the result, and results, are pretty great.
6RXUFH&LVFR9LVXDO1HWZRUNLQJ,QGH[*OREDO0RELOH'DWD7UDIÀF)RUHFDVW8SGDWH²:KLWH3DSHU0DUFK
Tr
THIS WEEK’S INSIGHTS
Postmates is using OOH to introduce
the brand to picky New Yorkers.
The billboard industry
thanked 3 Billboards
Outside Ebbing, Missouri.
Facebook is
looking to do
damage control
with this OOH
campaign.
MARKETING INNOVATION
A SIGN OF THE TIMES
DIGITAL BRANDS LOOKING
FOR AN IRL PRESENCE ARE
FLOCKING TO THE MEDIUM.
BY KRISTINA MONLLOS
n late April, Postmates became the latest digitally native brand to go big with
an out-of-home campaign in New York.
The first efort, from 180LA, used poppy, bright colors with clever lines tailored to grab New Yorkers’ attention—a
move that recently has become increasingly
popular with startups and digitally native
brands like Casper and Brooklinen, which
want to make a big splash in a new market.
“As a tech company, Postmates has always
had a very strong digital and social advertising presence, but awareness-level marketing
is becoming increasingly more important as
the brand matures,” Lizz Niemeyer, director
of brand marketing, Postmates, explained.
“OOH is still one of the best ways to bring
your brand to life in a physical way.”
For outdoor media company Outfront, the
interest in OOH from venture-backed startups is growing. Last year, Outfront launched
campaigns with over 100 such firms, marking
I
6
a 30 percent increase from the prior year, according to a company representative.
Explaining OOH’s recent spike in popularity among digital brands, Outfront chief commercial oicer Andy Sriubas noted that OOH
provides a great creative canvas that often
over-delivers impressions relative to its cost, all
without the brand safety, ad bots or viewability
issues that plague many digital platforms.
Deutsch New York chief creative oicer
Dan Kelleher believes the rise of OOH work
from digitally native brands comes from a desire to have a tangible, real-world expression
of the brand that can make it stand out from
its competitors. “With so many digitally native brands popping up in the same verticals,
communicating in a more mass-scale medium
can create immediate legitimacy for a lesserknown brand,” noted Kelleher.
But the trend isn’t only coming
from lesser-known brands; marketers
like Lyft, Spotify and WeTransfer are
using the medium, too. Kelleher pointed to how these firms lack brick-andmortar locations to help keep their
brands top of mind. “Out-of-home
ads can become a touch point, giving
people a space to connect with the
brand when they are offline,” he said.
That doesn’t mean out of home
will work just because it’s out of home,
For Marvel’s latest Avengers film, digital shop Intersection took over
all of the LinkNYC kiosks below 125th Street in New York City.
cautioned Kelleher, explaining that it can be
harder to capture consumers’ attention with
OOH than digital. He recommended messaging be “single-minded, succinct and breakthrough—all in a span of about two seconds.”
But that could all change soon: OOH is in the
midst of a digital transformation with many
static billboards being switched out for digital
ones that allow for quicker, more time-sensitive
messages to get to eyeballs across major cities.
Outfront, for example, is working to revamp the
New York MTA’s out-of-home subway displays,
removing vinyl posters from walls and replacing them with roughly 54,000 digital screens.
“Digital inventory [OOH] units allow
brands to operate with more creative flexibility, lower production costs and without the
fear of creative messaging living in perpetuity,” said Dustin Engel, head of product strategy and new ventures at digital agency PMG.
Engel explained other benefits include
cycling through diferent messages, weaving
in contextual layers like weather to increase
relevancy and ending the campaign at the
exact desired moment.
Case in point: Late last month, for Marvel’s
latest Avengers film, digital shop Intersection
took over all of the LinkNYC kiosks below
125th Street in New York to drive awareness
and promote ticket sales using digital OOH
spots that not only told consumers to see the
film, but used Moviefone’s proprietary API—a
first—to tell consumers the location of the
nearest theater and the next show times.
“It’s really a signal of what we’re going to
see in the out-of-home space, which is thanks
to this incredible proliferation of digital
displays. You can do things like this for the
first time that feel scalable and repeatable,”
explained Dave Etherington, chief strategy
oicer, Intersection.
While things are sunny for OOH currently, some critics warn the market may be a bit
bullish and digital transformation may have
billboards go the way of the dodo.
“Walk down any street and any city
and people aren’t looking around
anymore; they are looking down at
their screens,” said Allen Adamson,
co-founder and managing partner
of Metaforce. “The magnetic pull
of people to look at smartphone
creens is more and more. Even
when you are outdoors, people are
not acting that way; they are on their
phones. Driverless cars will make
illboards irrelevant.”
MAY 7, 2018 | ADWEEK
ION TELEVISION
QUALITY SHOWS
It’s about more than just popular originals like Private Eyes. With guaranteed delivery
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TRENDING
MARKETING
The End Is Just
The Beginning
THE CUSTOMER
JOURNEY EXTENDS
BEYOND THE SALE.
HERE’S HOW TO
IMPROVE IT. BY ANNMARIE ALCÁNTARA
One of the worst parts about online
shopping today? Tracking a package.
Whether it’s copying and pasting a
dreadfully long tracking code or being
prompted to log in using an often
faulty link, the experience of following
the shipment of a purchase can be
tedious. Improving this process often
requires a heavy investment that many
retailers aren’t able to make.
That’s where companies like
Narvar, Shopify and Octane AI are
carving out a cottage industry in the
post-purchase experience (such as
package location tracking), which
is becoming increasingly necessary
as retailers and brands grapple with
retaining customers as part of their
bricks-and-clicks strategy. In a 2013
Econsultancy study, 70 percent of
companies surveyed said it’s cheaper
to retain a consumer than to keep
acquiring new ones.
“The post-purchase experience is
vital for online retailers because by
this point, they know more about the
customer, such as purchasing traits,
color preferences, stylistic choices,
delivery methods and much more,”
Neil Stewart, CEO of Wunderman
Commerce, said. “Brands can then
engage with the customer and offer
them tailored deals specific to them.”
In a new report by Narvar, a
customer experience company, 54
percent of shoppers stated they
would keep buying from a company
that accurately tells them when their
package will arrive—and it’s no surprise
why, given how many packages are
stolen from porches and steps.
Narvar works with more than
8
Arrive, a
location
tracking app
from Shopify,
sees the
average user
track two
packages
a week.
Narvar’s
products
make
package
location
tracking look
pretty—and
be useful.
Businesses are connected to more than
1 million people via Octane AI’s conversational
platform on Facebook Messenger.
450 retailers, offering them various
customer experience solutions such
as creating a landing page that tracks
packages and lets customers sign up for
updates via text or Facebook Messenger.
“Consumers expect more from the
retailer [and] they expect to be engaged
about ‘where is my package,’” said Amit
Sharma, founder and CEO of Narvar.
One of Narvar’s clients, Finish Line,
made post-purchase a priority in the
past year because it determined that
customers want a great end-to-end
buying experience.
“We have to continue to evolve
to not only meet but exceed our
customer expectations,” said Danielle
Quatrochi, svp of digital customer
experience and innovation at Finish
Line. “They are choosing where they
want to buy and so we have to give
them a reason to buy with us.”
For example, Finish Line used to
receive a high volume of customer
calls about package tracking. After
using Narvar’s Engage product to
give customers package-tracking
information, the company saw these
calls decrease by 50 percent. The
tracking page also highlights new items
that redirect to the brand’s website and
lets customers get tracking updates
via text. In the first six months of using
Narvar, Finish Line saw a 17.6 percent
opt-in rate for SMS updates and a 25
percent click-through rate. Arrive, an iOS
app from Shopify, pulls tracking codes
from any order email in a consumer’s
Gmail account into one handy app—no
need to click through to another website
or copy and paste anything. Released
in November 2017, some individual
users have tracked as many as 1,000
packages through Arrive, with some
averaging 200 deliveries a month.
“There’s no consumer who wants
to have 20 apps just to keep track of
their purchasing,” said Robleh Jama,
senior product manager at Shopify.
“It’s a unique problem that is going to
be very prominent in general as more
people go from casual online shoppers
to power online shoppers.”
With Arrive, shoppers can track
where their package is through a
map. If there’s a problem, a consumer
can contact the company directly
from the app.
“We tried to do the heavy lifting
for the buyers and consumers,” Jama
said. “We look at what we’re doing as
a way to take away that pain and extra
steps when you’re shopping.”
Then, there’s a company like Octane
AI, a bot platform that’s created
conversational commerce opportunities
for more than 100 stores and brands.
With Octane AI’s ecommerce offerings,
companies can automate responses to
common questions, help consumers
pick out the right product based on
what they like, remind consumers of
an abandoned cart and automatically
send package notifications and
receipts. Brands who use Octane AI’s
tools see an average of 7 percent to 25
percent increase in revenue and a 75
percent read rate on Messenger.
Moving the purchase experience
off cold marketing emails and into
chatbots and messaging gives
consumers more power by letting
them choose when to respond to
something—and helps brands form
a better relationship with them,
shared Ben Parr, co-founder and chief
marketing officer of Octane AI.
“Traditionally, it’s been an email
blast after purchase,” said Parr. “It’s
OK, but it’s also annoying and you’re
actually not personalizing anything or
learning anything new.”
MAY 7, 2018 | ADWEEK
A FORTUNE 50 CEO USES
DOMO 15 TIMES A DAY TO
RUN THE BUSINESS.
ON HIS PHONE.
WHEN WILL YOU?
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Connected to all your people.
Visit domo.com
TRENDING
Volkswagen and Innoactive
partnered to create VR
training programs for
employees.
[VR experience] and then don’t really
The number of people using VR
integrate this into the business,”
for commercial purposes within
explained The Glimpse Group CEO
enterprise firms could reach nearly 91
Lyron Bentovim. “But training and data
million by 2020, according to a recent
visualization can help because they do
report from Greenlight Insights, a
these things anyway.”
VR/AR research firm. Meanwhile,
Companies already using VR plan
enterprise VR spending is poised to
to expand their training efforts. Earlier
grow from a projected $1.9 billion this
this year, Volkswagen showed off its
year to $18.7 billion by 2022.
partnership with HTC, using the Vive
Enterprise VR will “dwarf” longheadset to show how VR can train staff
term consumer spending, predicted
for tasks on an assembly line. After
Greenlight Insights CEO Clifton
just a year, Volkswagen now plans to
Dawson, noting that the aviation and
train as many as 10,000 employees via
energy sectors are already maturing,
31 different VR programs that reach
while logistics, retail and architecture
into other areas beyond
are heating up. “There’s a
the factory floor such as
cross-sector recognition
customer service and
that these technologies
employee onboarding.
are value-adding in some
Estimated
While VR is improving
fashion,” Dawson said. “It
number of
companies’ efficiency,
hasn’t always been the
people using VR
it’s also helping hospitals
case where executives
for commercial
better treat patients. Some
understand the value that
purposes
of the most compelling uses
these technologies bring.”
by 2020.
of VR are in the healthcare
In late March, The
SOURCE:
sector, which has a growing
Glimpse Group—a holding
GREENLIGHT
INSIGHTS
need for hardware and
company for VR and AR
software. For example,
startups—acquired Early
a trial at Johns Hopkins found that
Adopter, which builds AR-based
using light controls to treat macular
software for the education sector.
degeneration—an eye disease that
While some VR firms are focused on
causes vision loss—improved sight in
R&D, others are working directly with
some patients from legally blind to
companies on specific projects.
20/30. In a different study at CedarsOne subsidiary is developing tech
Sinai in Los Angeles, a randomized
that lets a large pharmaceutical
trial found that people who used VR
company test prospective hires
saw a 52 percent reduction in pain
in VR on safety procedures used
than those who watched a TV.
to manufacture drugs. In another
According to Samsung chief
instance, the program allows a pizza
medical officer David Rhew, what
brand to immersively train employees
started as a way to distract kids
by having them watch the pizzagetting a shot or having a cast
making process in VR before stepping
removed has in just a few years
into a kitchen. The Glimpse Group is
expanded into other areas of hospitals,
also developing software to make data
including medical training, even
visualization more exciting by turning
longer-term therapy and experimental
spreadsheet data into a forest, where
treatment for anything from strokes
a tree’s height, location or color might
and concussions to PTSD and autism.
mean something different. After all,
“It’s a really exciting area for us,”
why not see the forest from the trees?
Rhew said, “because we start thinking
“Some companies have a one-off
about VR as a treatment tool to
improve functional status with those
with disability due to injury, illness or
advanced stage [disease].”
As VR gains traction in a variety
of established industries, there could
be an additional benefit: Much like
how the PC era began with computers
arriving in offices before entering
homes, the same could be true for VR
and consumers.
“Very, very soon we should expect
that VR as a medium will become a
true communication tool, and when
that does, that negative weight
that the industry feels will lessen,”
Dawson said. “And that’s much sooner
than people anticipate.”
91m
Mi Hiepa has been developing
a VR soccer program to help
players practice.
EMERGING TECH
VR GETS DOWN
TO BUSINESS
IT’S TRANSFORMING EVERYTHING FROM TRAINING
TO MEDICAL TREATMENTS. BY MARTY SWANT
The future of virtual reality might
look as much like a movie as it does
a spreadsheet.
For the past several years, VR
has been increasingly heralded as
an immersive medium unlike any
other, one that could transform the
way we watch shows, play games
and create art. But while brands
and media companies continue to
dabble with VR experiences as a
means of marketing or entertaining,
industries ranging from automotive
to healthcare are investing in uses
ranging from training and designing
to treating medical issues.
10
Doctors have begun
experimenting with VR
to treat everything from
pain to blindness.
MAY 7, 2018 | ADWEEK
TRENDING
ECOMMERCE
Let’s Chat
About
Mom
I L L U S T R AT I O N : C H E F B O Y R G
WHY CONVERSATIONAL
COMMERCE IS ON THE RISE—
AND PERFECT FOR MOTHER’S
DAY. BY LISA LACY
ith Mother’s Day right
around the corner,
many consumers are
frantically Googling
“2018 Mother’s Day
gifts” to come up with
last-minute ideas, often needing to sift through
pages of search results to find that perfect gift.
But what if that search could be interactive,
personalized and, well, conversational?
Conversational commerce could be the
future of shopping for more intimate holidays
like Mother’s Day and Valentine’s Day as chatbots and voice assistants are capable of establishing relationships with consumers and can
make purchasing the right gift easier.
According to the National Retail Federation, Americans are going to drop some coin
on Mother’s Day gifts this year with spending expected to exceed $23 billion—that’s
$180 per consumer. Within that Mother’s
Day total, consumers will shell out an anticipated $4.6 billion on jewelry, $4.4 billion
on outings like dinner and brunch, and $2.6
billion on flowers, per NRF.
Those categories are ripe for conversational commerce as consumers with Amazon
Echo devices, for example, can tap into skills
from 1-800-Flowers to order gifts, OpenTable
to make restaurant reservations and Allrecipes to figure out how to make breakfast in
bed, an Amazon rep said. (They can also ask
Alexa for ideas, as well as for a Mother’s Day
joke, haiku or rap.)
Mother’s Day is the largest single holiday
for 1-800-Flowers, which CMO Amit Shah
said will ship close to 12 million stems this
year. And, without conversational commerce,
this might not be possible.
Shah said the internet turned shopping
into a very structured experience.
ADWEEK | MAY 7, 2018
“For a long time, online mediums became
too clinical,” he added.
Voice, on the other hand, still has a wow
factor in consumer interactions.
“If you think of the offline experience
with customers four decades ago [at founder
Jim McCann’s first flower shop in New York],
they’d walk in and you could have a conversation: ‘Aunt Sally is sick. She was close to me
growing up. I want to send something to her
to tell her I’m thinking of her,’” Shah said.
1-800-Flowers first embraced conversational commerce with the Facebook Messenger bot, Amazon Alexa Skills and IBM’s
GWYN (Gifts When You Need), an AI-powered online concierge. The company contin-
‘[We] are coming full circle
… It brings us back to
one-on-one conversations
with our customers.’
Amit Shah, CMO, 1-800-Flowers
ues to test new conversational commerce
technologies, most recently with launches
on Google Assistant, Google Rich Communications Services (RCS) and Apple Business
Chat. This, in turn, allows the brand to have
conversations like McCann did in 1976.
“[We] are coming full circle in these conversational commerce eforts we are doing. …
It brings us back to one-on-one conversations
with our customers,” Shah said.
Jonathan Shriftman, head of partnerships
at chatbot platform Snaps, said the one-onone nature makes chatbots particularly valuable during events and holidays.
“Once someone has chatted with a bot, a
brand can anticipate the consumer’s need
and intelligently remind them to purchase
a gift for their loved ones before a holiday,”
Shriftman said.
In fact, Shriftman said Snap chatbots
have open rates of 60 percent to 80 percent
and because many of the messages ofer personalized recommendations, conversion on
those messages are four times higher than
email marketing.
While some companies have seen positive
results in their first forays into conversational
commerce, Rachel Lowenstein, manager,
strategic innovation, Life+, Mindshare North
America, said that even though chatbots have
been successful at product recommendations,
there’s one key element preventing consumers from mass adopting these tools to shop.
“Right now voice tech just isn’t smart
enough to infer context or emotional states,”
Lowenstein said. “That’s a substantial reason
why big tech is making significant investments to make their voice assistants more
humanized and less robotic.”
It’s also early days in conversational commerce overall.
That being said, voice and assistive technology are already empowering consumers,
said George Manas, president of digital marketing agency Resolution Media.
“And, as a result, marketers must approach
the space with more pull than push,” he said.
“Similar to the search revolution that built the
internet as we know it today, the voice revolution will be consumer initiated and therefore
reward rational over emotional engagement.
This will make voice an increasingly powerful
medium not just for those looking to sell flowers on Mother’s Day, but just about anyone and
everyone looking to buy almost anything.”
11
VOICE
and their customers in this era of “you’re
either with us or against us” politics?
Here are six things to consider.
Focus on your enduring values
All brands honor a legacy and,
whether or not they refer to them
overtly, they likely live by a set of
unwritten values. Some are timeless.
Others appear and disappear based
on leadership changes, company
initiatives or societal progress. Values
may be traced back to the origin of
the company founders, or they may
be the result of a yearly planning
conversation. And if you’re not already
doing so, you need to bring your team
together to discuss the present day
relevance of your values and reaffirm
those which are immutable.
A Guide for Brands
In a Partisan World
MARKETERS SHOULD CONSIDER THESE SIX
MANAGEMENT PIVOTS BEFORE TAKING A STANCE
ON A SOCIETAL ISSUE, OR NOT. BY GRANT OWENS
I don’t think Tim Mapes, chief
marketing officer at Delta Air Lines,
woke up on Jan. 1 this year with the
idea that the new personification of
the Delta brand in 2018 would be an
unabashedly left-wing progressive.
I also don’t think he had a
standing meeting each week in 2017
scrutinizing each of the dozens
of brand partnerships his airline
established in order to repeatedly
track their political leanings. He likely
has a couple folks within his team that
do a quick gut check for overall brand
commensuration, and if the numbers
work on a deal, they strike it.
But circumstances for CMOs have
changed. I’d bet that on or around
Feb. 23 this year, Mapes conducted a
thorough audit of both of those topics
(i.e., Delta’s political persona and
its various associations). He wasn’t
given a choice.
12
Delta and many other brands were
unexpectedly dragged into the gun
control debate. The survivors of the
Stoneman Douglas massacre were
making sure their voices reached large
public podiums across the country and
globe, and they very smartly recognized
that some of the largest podiums on
which to be heard were brands—major
consumer brands that speak to millions
of potential voters every single day.
On gun control and many other
issues, marketing leaders are faced
with making seemingly political
decisions—something that until
recently only a few brands made part
of their mission, intentionally. Today, it
isn’t just Patagonia and Ben & Jerry’s
making statements on divisive issues;
it’s any brand with a connected and
vocal consumer base.
So, what can apolitical marketing
leaders do to protect their businesses
Do right by everyone
Over time your brand is going to
make a series of commitments and
promises—some of which won’t align
with every single individual’s deepheld beliefs and values. Your brand
will no doubt be rejected by some
segment of potential customers. And
while you may never be able to gain
everyone’s adoration, you can earn
their respect. Do so by putting in the
effort to listen and observe. Once
you’ve done your homework, take
clear action and explain why and how
you made those decisions.
And if you change your mind on a
topic, fine, just explain that, too.
Avoid talk of ‘public relations’
The political challenges and moments
of truth you may face aren’t simply
PR opportunities. They’re substantive
decisions that should affect more than
what you say and can shape many of
the actions your company takes from
that day forward. The next generation
of consumer will call bullshit on
efforts done only in the name of PR.
You can’t feign a lot of effort where
there is little.
Don’t pick every battle
There will be times when a decision
needs to be made, but other times
that, although it feels like a fork in
the road, it really isn’t. You don’t
always have to pick a side. There are
topics that are polarizing to some, but
not always of a magnitude that will
bring undue harm to the company,
its employees or its customers.
Prioritize the perceived forks in the
road appropriately, and to do so,
keep talking to your constituents. If a
two-sided topic comes at you, discuss
how it could impact your business and
whether or not it’s material to your
values. To use a sports metaphor,
don’t make unforced errors.
Specs
Claim to fame
Grant Owens, CSO at Critical
Mass, leads global strategy
teams focused on designing
meaningful customer
experiences.
Base New York
Twitter @grantowens
This week’s illustration was created
in partnership with students from
the Baltimore Academy of Illustration.
Go to Adweek.com/voice to see a full
gallery of their submissions.
MAY 7, 2018 | ADWEEK
I L L U S T R AT I O N : S E O N G E U N M A C FA R L A N E
OPINION
Be consequence driven
Bring your leadership together
and discuss the consequences of
your words and actions, not just on
quarterly profits, but on the health
and well-being of your employees
and customers. Workshop it out.
Talk through outcomes. Talk to
your customers about your planned
actions. Project the results not just
as you see them unfolding in the
press the next morning, but in a way
that is future focused. How will your
decisions affect the business and the
community in the next year, in the
next 10 years and well past your own
tenure in the organization?
Don’t debate the obvious
Then there are the things that
unquestionably cross society’s
lines—no-brainers so to speak.
Sexual harassment. Abuse. Minority
oppression. Don’t debate these topics.
No one is looking for you to tip the
scales on whether they are right or
wrong or aligned to your company
values. On these topics, and with allcompany leadership, talk about what
actions you could take to improve the
outcomes of these indisputable and
emotionally charged issues. What is
your organization uniquely qualified or
capable of doing that could help create
the change needed? Where can you
lend a hand for the greater good?
What’s your superpower? With 34
entry categories, we’ve got one for you.
CATEGORIES INCLUDE
Total Campaign
Best Use of Mobile
Best Use of AI/
Machine Learning
(New)
Best Use of
Native Advertising
Best Use of
Alternative Media
Best Use of
Branded Content/
Entertainment
Best Cause
Marketing Campaign
Best Use of Data
CELEBRATING THE UNSUNG HEROES OF THE INDUSTRY
Best Use of
Experiential (New)
Best Use of Insights
Best Use of
Out-of-Home (New)
Best Use of
Programmatic
Best Use of Social
Best Use of
Streaming
Media/OTT (New)
Best Use of Voice
(New)
Best Use of VR/AR
(New)
Best International
Campaign (Non-U.S.)
View the full list of categories and enter today
MEDIAPL ANOFTHEYEAR.COM
D ATA P O I N T S
Hotline Bling
NEW RESEARCH SHOWS THAT MOBILE ADS CAN BE EFFECTIVE—IF
YOU USE THEM THE RIGHT WAY. BY SAMMY NICKALLS
Mobile ads may be small in size, but done the right way they can be impactful. The key is for marketers to avoid making them obtrusive and obnoxious.
And according to research from IPG Media Lab and Magna Global, there are certain mobile ad formats that tend to be more favorable than others. While
slightly fewer respondents were able to recall brands from six-second ads (41 percent) versus 15-second ads (50 percent), they viewed the brands which
used shorter ads as more relevant, innovative and modern—especially when brands used a vertical format more fit for a smartphone than the standard
horizontal layout. “The results of this research prove that mobile demands its own customized ad formats, rather than simply repurposed versions of existing
assets that were developed and optimized for other platforms,” said Kara Manatt, svp, intelligence solutions and strategy at Magna Global. “For example,
six-second ads and vertical video were developed from the ground up for the mobile experience, and they have been extremely successful for advertisers.”
What consumers
look for in mobile ads
360° video ads
work—if used
the right way
Brands get
credit for
shorter ads…
Aided ad recall
Aided ad recall
Six-second non-skippable
15-second non-skippable
360° branded content
Standard branded content
37%
Entertaining
54%
360° video
less effective
at conveying
brand name
52%
Not too long/obtrusive
52%
61%
33%
46%
50%
Brand attributes
Completed 360° video
Skipped 360° video
Relevant brand
41%
Larger gains
if you get
people to
stick around
Innovative Modern
+10%
Relevant +10%
+7%
Relatable
-2%
-3%
31%
-4%
Ad opinions
Original
31%
Good story
27%
…especially
when they’re
vertical
360° branded content
Standard branded content
Seamless
51%
Well-known brand
23%
58%
Easy to avoid
Surprising
50%
15%
33%
Innovative
14%
Enhances experience
9%
Vertical
six-second
video ads
Standard
six-second
video ads
Pay for
more
+9%
Unique
story
+11%
+4%
+1%
-2%
14
SOURCES: IPG AND MAGNA
MAY 7, 2018 | ADWEEK
INFOGRAPHIC: CARLOS MONTEIRO
Innovative
+18%
Creative problem-solver
Results-driven
collaborator
Aspiring Power List
honoree
Follows Adweek
A qualified audience of qualified candidates.
Find your next new hire on Adweek Jobs.
WITH A MATCH IN HER HAND AND
A MISCHIEVOUS SMIRK ON HER
FACE, SAMANTHA BEE IS GETTING
HER INNER PYROMANIAC ON.
She’s in the middle of a photo shoot in
a loft not far from the Lincoln Tunnel in
New York, and it’s a fitting visual, given
that, since launching Full Frontal on
TBS three seasons ago, Bee has pretty
much burned down the nearly all-male,
mostly white late-night format.
For a half-hour each week, the
woman who Sen. Elizabeth Warren
said “is more than a comedian—she’s
an instigator and an advocate” fires
off brilliant insults and observations
Reilly, saying here was someone who
has “truly defied the odds: a white
male, Ivy League graduate who rose to
the top and now runs a TV network.”
A ratings hit, according to Nielsen,
the show averaged over 1.2 million
total viewers last year. Full Frontal
has garnered eight Emmy nominations
(and a win for Outstanding Writing for
a Variety Special in 2017) and was just
renewed through 2020.
Here Bee shares her thoughts
on changing late-night TV, gender
and diversity in media, branding
opportunities and creating the show
that she wanted to watch.
How so? I was in a female sketch
comedy troupe, the Atomic Fireballs.
It was very do-it-yourself. It laid a lot of
groundwork for what I do now. When
you do comedy, sketch comedy, you
don’t do it for money. You truly do it
for love. And also, it’s plucky. You have
a can-do attitude and you’re writing
for yourself and you’re creating and
learning every time.
Full Frontal launched with the
tagline “Watch or you’re sexist,”
setting a kind of confrontational
tone. Was that your intention? Well,
I just find that funny, actually. I mean
SAMANTHA BEE
THE WOMAN WHO SHOOK UP THE LATE-NIGHT BOYS CLUB.
BY STACY PERMAN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY HOLLENDERX2
Adweek’s
second annual
celebration
of women
championing
gender
equality and
diversity
in media,
marketing and
technology.
touching on everything from sexism
to social injustice. Her debut show
featured a segment on female veterans.
In another, she lambasted Kansas state
Sen. Mitch Holmes, the man behind a
women-only dress code at the state
capitol, in a segment she dubbed
“Elected Paperweight of the Month.”
Dispensing with the usual fawning
celebrity interviews, instead Bee, a
Toronto native who cut her teeth on
The Daily Show, has taken her “comedic
investigations” on the road, highlighting
Syrian refugees, Russian trolls and
child labor on Kentucky tobacco
farms. In March, Full Frontal aired an
hour-long special, The Great American
Puerto Rico, putting a spotlight on
the hurricane-ravaged island. Turning
political lemons into lemonade, Bee has
also transformed her potty-mouthed
rants into action: Her Nasty Woman
T-shirts raised $1 million for Planned
Parenthood. In Puerto Rico, Bee set up
a T-shirt manufacturing facility to raise
money for the Hispanic Federation. “It
felt very patriotic to me,” she says.
While hypocrisy is Bee’s main
target, no one is spared her acid-tinged
wit. During last year’s upfronts, she
introduced the president of TBS, Kevin
Before you came to the U.S. you
were working for an ad agency, is
that right? Yes. I worked in the print
shop part of the agency, so I wasn’t
a copywriter or anything—and I was
terrible. I’m so glad that I don’t work
there anymore.
Did working in advertising inform
your worldview? It taught me what
I don’t know for sure. It’s a good life
lesson in a sense that you shouldn’t try
to be president, if you don’t know what
you don’t know. There are certain jobs
that we’re probably not qualified to do.
When you auditioned for The
Daily Show, the story goes, they
were having trouble finding a
woman that they thought was
funny. Well, I think that they were
having trouble finding a woman that
they thought was right for the show.
They definitely were looking for
something really specific, which if I
can translate for myself, someone
who was funny but also seemed
seasoned, someone who could
credibly look like a grizzled reporter
and I was that person. My experience
in comedy made me grizzled.
it would surprise people to know that
I don’t think that I sat down and went,
“I’m going to be really confrontational.”
I definitely felt like OK, if we’re going
to do a show, we should always go full
bore all the time; just kick the door
in and never look back. Because you
never know how many shows you’re
going to have, so if you don’t do them
to the best of your ability every single
time, what are you doing? Get out of
television and do something else.
How did you come up with the
Full Frontal “Samantha Bee”
persona? And how different is she
from everyday Samantha Bee?
I don’t even consider it a character.
It’s just Samantha Bee adjacent. It’s
just all of the feelings that I always
feel crystallized into one 21-minute
moment per week. I don’t think that you
could live your life in that heightened
state all the time.
The show has been called “a
tragicomic feminist primal scream
in the Trump era.” Do you agree
with that characterization? I accept
that description of myself. I mean
listen, this isn’t the administration that
we thought we were getting, not that
the show would be supremely different.
We would still be doing the same
types of stories somewhat; it’s not like
all the problems of the world were
going to suddenly evaporate if we had
a different president. But I definitely
feel like we would be on a more stable
footing, which would be nice. You might
imagine in a Hillary Clinton world that
you could take your foot off the pedal
for one second and not key yourself
into the news.
You’ve described what you do as
“evidence-based comedy.” What do
you mean by that? We try to base the
show on knowledge. We hired a lot of
really great journalists. Every segment
is very well researched. We care a lot
about getting it right every time. If you
don’t have a real foundation of truth,
it’s hard to make these jokes.
After your segment on the rape
kit backlog, Georgia passed a bill
requiring DNA testing. Did you
expect that kind of tangible impact?
No. But also, I don’t claim it as our
victory at all. There were people
working on that for a really long time
and we kind of came in at the end and
gave it a little boost of attention. I
couldn’t say that we really moved the
needle and I don’t want to take that
onboard, but anytime we can, we shine
our light on something that feels like
it’s super important.
Everything about Full Frontal
breaks the late-night mold. Was
that the plan? Well, TBS was very
generous. They really did provide us
with a blank slate. I only want to do
the type of show that I would want
to watch, so I have to really just cut
away a lot of the old tropes of latenight comedy. I knew I didn’t want to
do a guest segment. It was always the
part that I was the least interested
in as a viewer. I knew that it would
be a terrible idea for me to sit behind
a desk because my face is really
expressive. If I was trapped behind
a desk and sitting down, the energy
of the show would be really wrong.
It felt scary to just have a big open
space with nothing separating me
from the audience. But I really only
wanted to make a show that I would
like, and so that’s what I did.
Samantha Bee was photographed
for Adweek at Hudson Yards Loft
in New York City. Styling: Erin
Dougherty; Hair/Makeup: Eva Scrivio.
You also only broadcast one night
a week. One hundred percent. Totally
on purpose. TBS was great about that.
I’m sure that they would love it if the
show was on four nights, five nights,
whatever. I just don’t want to do it
because I want to live my life. I have
kids. I like my life. It’s hard enough to do
it once a week … exactly the right way.
Your topics are not typical latenight fare, but you do more than
just focus humorous attention
on them. You often raise a call to
action, like fundraising. It became
apparent early on with the show
that you have a big platform. I still
have to make the kind of show that
I would want to watch, and if you do
segments about all of these issues
that you care about, you have to also
think about how you can use this tool
for good, whether it’s just bringing
attention to something, or whether
it’s trying to help through some other
effort. We don’t do it all the time.
We’re pretty selective. Mostly our
big call to action is to vote, which
obviously is a big one. But fundraising
calls to action, when we do them,
they’re usually really thought out and
successful on some level. I mean it’s
not a telethon, so you do have to be a
bit judicious about it.
What issues are you interested in
tackling next? We have a big board of all
the things that we’re interested in for the
future. It’s a very diverse set of stories.
There’s a pitch going around that’s about
badass librarians. We love librarians.
They’re at the frontlines of education, so
I’m very interested to do that. I want to
talk to some spicy librarians for sure.
Do you feel the weight of being one
of the only women on late night?
I try not to think about the gravity
of that. I think that would be very
paralyzing if I carried that weight every
day. I think it’s something I’ll reflect on
later in life when I look back on these
years. I’ll think, “Oh, wow—it is very
special.” And I know that it is, but I
separate myself from that a little bit
because I still have to make a show
and make people laugh or make myself
laugh. But the landscape is definitely
changing. It surprised me that not more
women were given shows sooner.
Why do you think that is? Honestly, I
cannot answer that question. I know a
few people who were asked and simply
didn’t want to do it. It’s a different type
of animal if it’s not your world; it can
feel false. But I do think that it behooves
the networks to give the reins back to
the creators. There was a long period
of time when I feel like television was
18
very crowd-sourced by the executive
point of view and a certain type of lens,
a certain type of advertiser. Most of the
projects that I lean toward are creator
driven, and so it takes a certain type of
network to let that unfold.
These are interesting times for
women, given #MeToo and Time’s
Up. Do you see these as moments
or movements? I don’t think it’s just
a moment. I do think it’s a movement. I
think it’s been a long time coming. It’s
a lifestyle change. Those take a long
time to roll out, and it couldn’t be more
needed for sure.
Have we reached an inflection
point? Well, you want to imagine that
as we’re having these conversations
that behind the scenes people are
I’ve read that your staff was 50
percent women and 30 percent
nonwhite. I don’t know if that’s up
to date, but we have definitely baked
diversity into the culture for sure.
Do you have blind hiring? What
do you do? For some positions.
Otherwise, we just always have an eye
to needing great women. It’s very much
a part of networking, too. It’s like, who
do you know? And just thinking about it
and putting it into the practice of hiring.
This doesn’t sound too difficult,
yet diversity remains a real
problem in the industry. It’s not
difficult. I don’t know how to say that
anymore clearly. It’s not difficult; you
just have to do it. You have to make a
commitment to it and do it.
‘I definitely felt like OK, if we’re going to do a show ...
just kick the door in and never look back.’
hiring women and making their
workforce a little more equal or at
least being thoughtful about it, hiring
more women, putting more women in
executive positions. It’s essential. So,
it can’t just be about talking about it.
There’s an action item, too. It made
our office, I think, a better place. You
can’t just have a stated goal and then
behind the scenes have it just be all
white dudes. That’s not going to do
anything. Again, it’s kind of what I was
thinking, it is a lifestyle change. It’s
not going to change overnight—you
have to change the conversation and
then people start thinking about it. You
have to keep bringing it up. You have to
hire blind. You have to do things a little
bit differently in practice.
Outside of your show are you
involved in any kinds of initiatives
that promote women and diversity?
Outside of the show there’s nothing left
of me. There’s no time as I’m raising
my three kids. I mean, I think that
absolutely my future, apart from the
show, will be very active, but for now
it’s literally all I could do—I’m spoken
for every minute of the day.
You mentioned your kids. Do you
find questions about juggling
parenthood and hosting a latenight show offensive? I’m not at all
offended by them. My husband [Jason
Jones], who has a TV show, too [The
Detour, TBS], he never gets asked and
he’s the one that’s offended because
he is a very motivated and active
dad. We actually could not do what
we do without each other. There’s
a really fluid parenting relationship
there. I think sometimes people
are disappointed that I want to talk
about my kids, but actually nothing is
possible without my kids. I don’t care
about anything more than I care about
my kids. I’m trying to make a good life
for them that’s balanced. I’m present
in their lives all the time, so that’s why
I don’t have any spare time. When I
work, I work super hard. When I’m with
my kids, I’m with my kids super hard,
so there’s nothing else.
What are your thoughts on
branding opportunities? We look
for ways to incorporate brands into
the show because it really can help
us. It’s actually amazing how direct
the impact of that is. We did a digital
integration for Buick. And it was very
seamless. I think that it has to be—
whatever we do—it has to be organic
to the show. TBS has been great about
not forcing us to do things that aren’t
right for us. When it came to Buick,
we just kept pitching stuff. We were
like, “OK, if we do this, will you give
10 cars to Distributing Dignity so they
can distribute tampons to homeless
women?” I mean, it’s funny that I’m
even laughing as I’m pitching Buick
on the idea of distributing tampons to
homeless women. Ultimately, what
we did was we unloaded boxes of bras
from the back of the car.
What’s your red line? Basically,
our standards are very high. But we
welcome anyone who wants to do
integrations because I think that it can
be another way to use the platform of
the show, help the show grow because
it is a business. But any time we’re
thinking about growing the business
you should also be thinking of the flip
side of that, which is how to leverage
that for something good. Otherwise it’s
just a business, and that’s boring for
me. That’s not how I see myself.
Given the topics you cover, have
you scared away any advertisers or
brands or perhaps attracted new
ones into the fold? I’m almost certain
that it has scared away some brands.
And I actually really can understand
why. We can’t change our content
to suit brands. I’d rather not be on
television than do that. We cannot have
a brand dictate the content of our show.
No thanks. I would exit TV. Bye. I’m too
old for that bullshit. But I do think that
there are brands out there who are
brave enough to advertise on our show
and are forward-thinking. There really
are. I have to believe that.
MAY 7, 2018 | ADWEEK
AGENCIES
Colleen DeCourcy and Susan Hoffman
CO-CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICERS, WIEDEN + KENNEDY
With storied reputations as creative innovators on a global
scale, DeCourcy and Hoffman have subtly but noticeably
entered a new phase of their careers. Part binary stars, part
colliding galaxies, the pair became co-CCOs in 2017, the
year W+K was named Adweek’s Global Agency of the Year.
Empowered by the rise of the #MeToo movement, women
across advertising looked for support from above, and found
it in Hoffman and DeCourcy. The two, heavily involved in the
launch of #TimesUpAdvertising alongside 200 female peers,
see different challenges and opportunities in this moment.
DeCourcy thinks first of mentorship and ending the unconscious
bias that’s inevitable when you “look at a creative department
and see five women in a sea of 100 men.” For Hoffman, it’s a
time to tear down the creative machine and usher in a new era
of storytelling. “The ballpark is not the same anymore,” she
says. “It’s upside-down and topsy-turvy and resurfaced and
maybe not even recognizable, allowing for a new game. It’s a
time of reinvention. It’s a time for change.” —David Griner
Madonna Badger
FOUNDER AND CHIEF
CREATIVE OFFICER,
BADGER & WINTERS
DECOURCY AND HOFFMAN: LEAH NASH; HAUBEGGER: GET T Y IMAGES
Badger made her mark in 2016,
when she launched a video
exposing the hyper-sexualized
way women are portrayed in
ads, along with the hashtag
#WomenNotObjects. The
initiative was a reaction to the
rampant sexist advertising
she and her business partner
Jim Winters found while
doing research for an Avon
campaign. While Badger
continues to speak out on the
issue, presenting research that
counters the “sex sells” myth
to convince other agencies
to end the objectification of
women, she’s also incorporated
the mission in her own work.
A recent JCPenney campaign,
“Style and Value for All,”
featured women of multiple
ethnicities and body types.
—Desa Philadelphia
Jill Gwaltney
FOUNDER, RAUXA
Rauxa is the Catalan word for “madness,”
and Gwaltney’s firm touts its “unbridled
emotion with a little touch of madness.”
Launched in 1999 with just four employees,
Gwaltney has since built the largest womanowned marketing agency in the country with
275 employees (56 percent female). Her
guiding principle also seems a little crazy:
transparency. But the desire to be open and
honest with clients about what was working
and where change was necessary led Gwaltney
to develop the data-driven approach that would
become her calling card. “I like to say we were
big into data before data was big,” she says.
Another priority: mentoring. The company’s
president and CEO, Gina Alshuler, started out
as Gwaltney’s assistant in 2001. —D.P.
Christy Haubegger
HEAD OF MULTICULTURAL BUSINESS, CREATIVE ARTISTS AGENCY
Haubegger has always worked to amplify minority voices. “I’ve had
a number of jobs and one career; my life work is telling our stories,”
she says. Growing up in the 1970s, Haubegger yearned to see more
substantive, Latinx characters on TV. In 2005, she joined Creative
Artists Agency where she reps clients Eva Longoria and Jennifer Lopez
while also providing insights on diverse markets, working to increase
inclusion. “We’re the only ones in the room everywhere—the one black
evp, the one Latino creative,” she says. “One is a token, two is a minority
and three is a good start.” A graduate of Stanford Law School and the
founder of Latina magazine, Haubegger, who also executive produced
the 2004 film Spanglish, says, “The most impactful thing I can do is
focus on trying to change who gets to tell stories in this industry and
how stories are told.” —Lindsay Rittenhouse
God-is Rivera
DIRECTOR OF INCLUSION AND CULTURAL RESONANCE, VML
God-is Rivera looked around her agency in 2016 and felt alone. In one week, police had killed two black men and a sniper
attacked Dallas police—and no one was talking about it. “I was like, ‘If I walk into one more place and I am one of two black
people out of 120 people, I cannot do this anymore,’” she recalls. “But I didn’t want to leave. I’m not a quitter. I wanted to
make it better.” So, the social strategist began a conversation with Mikey Cramer, director of social media, and her current
boss, Ronnie Felder, managing director of human resources, that led to her appointment as VML’s first director of inclusion
and cultural resonance. She’s since increased multicultural recruitment, led seminars about Black Twitter and developed
winning client strategies. “A lot of stereotypes and tropes that hurt people today were perpetuated by advertising … so now
we’ve got to undo all that,” she says. “But if we created it, we can absolutely undo it.” —Stephanie Paterik
ADWEEK | MAY 7, 2018
19
AGENCIES
Ruthie Schulder
and Jessica Resler
CO-FOUNDERS, CEO AND CCO,
THE PARTICIPATION AGENCY
Donnalyn Smith
PRESIDENT, NORTH AMERICA,
MOMENTUM WORLDWIDE
The job opportunities, when Schulder and Resler
graduated from NYU’s Stern School of Business
in 2011, “all felt like we were put in a box and they
clipped our wings and we were not allowed to do
fun stuff,” says Resler. Instead, they decided to
blaze their own trail in experiential marketing,
founding The Participation Agency in 2011. Early
work included an effort for Big Apple Circus
inspired by the Rolling Stones’ Rock and Roll
Circus. More recently, the agency, where 65
percent of the employees are female and hold all but two leadership roles, has focused
on bringing marketing insights to emerging markets. “We are risk takers and very much
have a rebellious nature and knew the type of work we wanted to do,” she adds. —L.L.
Since assuming her current role
in 2015, Smith has made gender
balance and diversity a prime
focus (while also implementing
flexible schedules and a health
and well-being program)—to
wit, the agency has seen a 58
percent increase in creative
female leadership. “We are in a
business that demands the best
creative product and we get
better work out of diverse teams
that are more representative of
the consumers and shoppers that
purchase the brands we support,”
she says. —Lisa Lacy
Tiffany R. Warren
SVP, CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER, OMNICOM AND FOUNDER, ADCOLOR
“I went to award shows and I didn’t see a lot of people of color being honored,”
says Warren, who started Adcolor, her “night job” as she calls it, in 2005 to
address that. “We were the first award show to include our LGBTQ brothers
and sisters,” she says. “We feel strongly, look for the marginalized to fit in the
center.” At Omnicom, Warren has sought to shake up the status quo. “What does
sameness get us?” she has asked, when faced with ambivalence about diversity
in the industry. Because of her persistence, issues of inclusion are now part of
Omnicom’s everyday conversation. A diverse workforce isn’t simply a nice thing to
have, Warren insists—it’s a business imperative that must inform “everything we
do: in data, the way we recruit talent, the way we work with our clients. It’s not a
stand-alone theory or idea; it should be weaved into everything.” —Sara Ivry
Pamela Adlon
CO-CREATOR, STAR,
WRITER, DIRECTOR,
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER,
SHOWRUNNER,
BETTER THINGS
Last year, Adlon became
the first women to direct
and star in every episode of
an entire TV season—and
plans to do the same thing
for the upcoming Season
3 of her FX comedy. As
showrunner, she makes
sure at least half her crew
is female (“My mandate
was women, women,
women, every chance I
get”) and the shooting days
are as efficient as possible.
“I just don’t like to waste
time,” says Adlon, who was inspired by watching Tracey Ullman
call the shots two decades ago, when she was a guest star on
Ullman’s HBO series, Tracey Takes On. “She had two kids and
said her goal was to be home by dusk every night, otherwise
what’s the point? I learned so much from her that day. On my
set, we don’t scrape the bone off the marrow.” —Jason Lynch
20
Savannah Guthrie, Hoda Kotb, Libby Leist
CO-ANCHORS AND EXECUTIVE PRODUCER, TODAY SHOW
When sexual misconduct allegations against Today co-host Matt Lauer surfaced last
November, the fallout was swift—Lauer was fired and the shake-up was groundbreaking:
an all-female lineup took over NBC’s morning show. Kotb joined Guthrie as co-anchor
and Leist was tapped as executive producer. “At this moment in history, it fits,” says
Kotb. “But we have a huge staff; we’re not the only elements in this.” Viewership soared.
“Because the Today show is and always has been first and foremost a news show, we are
at our best when we are relevant, setting the agenda and leading the way in terms of the
day’s news,” says Guthrie, who along with Kotb and Leist spent decades covering hard
news. They bring a honed attention to detail, whether it’s breaking news or reporting
the latest fashion trends. “Today is a 24-hour operation with changes being made
to the last minute,” says Leist, so everyone has to be passionate about covering the
news. “Literally it’s why we get up in the morning,” says Guthrie. —D.P.
MAY 7, 2018 | ADWEEK
W A R R E N : S A S H A M A S L O V ; A D L O N : G E T T Y I M A G E S ; G U T H R I E , K O T B , L E I S T: N B C U N I V E R S A L
MEDIA AND ENTERTAINMENT
Every day we move
millions of people.
You move even more.
Together, Tina Brown and Toyota have
showcased 22 women innovators through
the Mothers of Invention program,
positively impacting 155 million people
worldwide. Congratulations, Tina, for
helping women entrepreneurs go places.
MEDIA AND ENTERTAINMENT
Tina Brown
Alma Har’el
FOUNDER, CEO,
WOMAN IN THE WORLD
FOUNDER, FREE THE BID
In 2016, after directing commercials for brands like Airbnb and Stella Artois, Har’el
realized that most of the directing opportunities were going to white men. So, Har’el
founded Free the Bid, a nonprofit initiative that works to get more women behind
the camera by asking agencies and brands to open up the bidding process, and to
ensure that at least one of the three bids go to a woman. “It’s encouraging to see
how the ad agencies and brands are starting to learn that listening to intersectional
perspectives yields better work that more accurately reflects consumers,” says
Har’el, who is currently working on her first feature film. She notes that pledges
from agencies and brands to hire female directors have jumped 400 percent. “The
potential opportunities for women’s work to be discovered, developed and financially
compensated are endless,” she says. —Kristina Monllos
BROWN: BRIGITTE LACOMBE
Trail-blazing journalist
Brown admits she has
“always been someone
who didn’t listen to
received wisdom.”
Ever at the forefront of
shifting political and
cultural tides, the firstever (and to date, only)
woman editor of The
New Yorker, founder of
Talk and the Daily Beast,
and author, she sensed
the onset of a new era
of women’s activism
nearly a decade ago. Brown responded the best way she knew how: by
building something. Women in the World includes a news site, day-long
salons in cities worldwide and an annual three-day summit in New York
where writers, activists, politicians and marquee names like Melinda
Gates, Oprah Winfrey and Meryl Streep examine all sorts of issues facing
women today.
“Sexual harassment is a horrendous story, but there
are women in countries with no access to education,” Brown says. “There
are still women who have to deal with honor killings. … Pay equity is a
much more important issue than almost anything else, especially for
African-American women. These are things we have to deal with.” —S.I.
HP IS PAVING A NEW
PATH FOR WOMEN
IN TECHNOLOGY
Thanks to
Lesley Slaton-Brown for leading the way.
2018 Adweek Disruptor Honoree.
Tarana
Burke and
Alyssa Milano
B U R K E A N D M I L A N O : G E T T Y I M A G E S ; L E E : S TA N E VA N S
FOUNDER, METOO
AND ACTRESS,
ACTIVIST
When Tarana Burke
launched the “me too”
movement in 2006, her
goal was to help young
women of color who
were survivors of sexual
assault find resources
for support and healing.
She hoped she could
change her community.
When actress Alyssa
Milano asked her
Twitter followers
to reply #metoo if they had been sexually harassed and assaulted, in
October 2017, she hoped to change the mind of anyone who doubted
the magnitude of the problem. “To me, sending that tweet was to put
the focus back on survivors. It was really a way for women to stand up,”
says Milano. Together, they inspired survivors around the world to speak
up in droves. In a recent speech, Burke said she is traveling the country
trying to bring the conversation back to the need for resources to help the
“hundreds” of people she hears from every day who “feel like they finally
have an outlet and there is nothing to help them.” —D.P.
Debra Lee CHAIRMAN AND CEO, BET
African Americans watch more television than any
other group. But for a long time, BET, where Lee has
been an executive for 32 years, was the only TV network
specifically targeting their $1.2 trillion in buying power.
There’s more competition now, but Lee says BET will
“continue to be the megaphone for our community …
not only in programming but in news and public affairs
and community service projects.” As for Lee, since 2010
she has organized Leading Women Defined, an annual
invitation-only gathering where high-profile black women
discuss the issues of the day and strategize responses.
This year, guest of honor Michelle Obama’s remarks about
her time as first lady and sidestepping Washington’s many
political pitfalls made global headlines. —D.P.
THE AAF CELEBRATES
TIFFANY
for continuing to disrupt our industry by creating a
place for people of color, the LGBTQ community
and women. Congratulations Tiffany R. Warren!
The American Advertising Federation promotes and supports
diversity and inclusion in the advertising industry. To learn
more about our initiatives, visit AAF.ORG.
#TimesUpAdvertising
MEDIA AND ENTERTAINMENT
Ellen Pompeo
ACTRESS, PRINCIPAL AT CALAMITY JANE
There’s arguably no more apt symbol of the equal pay
component of the #TimesUp movement than Pompeo. At the
end of 2017, the Grey’s Anatomy star signed a new contract
with ABC for $20 million, making her the highest paid
dramatic actress on TV. The deal also guarantees Pompeo
a seven-figure signing bonus, back-end equity points likely
to yield an additional $6 million to $7 million, real estate on
a Disney lot for her production company, as well as network
pilot commitments. What has surprised and delighted many,
in addition to the contract terms, is Pompeo’s willingness
to break social taboos and to speak candidly about salaries,
efforts to pit women against one another and the need to
demand one’s worth in the marketplace. “It’s really important
to encourage each other, encourage other women,” she told
Ellen DeGeneres in March. “To stand up and be strong and
know we’ll be OK, and we have each other’s backs.” —S.I.
Rachel Morrison
CINEMATOGRAPHER
Dee Rees DIRECTOR
Throughout her career, Rees has made a point of, as she puts it, “surrounding
herself with a very female ‘village of artists,’” made easier, she adds, by working
on independent films. “I think it destroys the false narratives of ‘not being able to
find talented women for xyz craft’ and ‘women aren’t interested in xyz genre,’”
she says. This year, Rees made history: She was the first black woman to be
nominated for best adapted screenplay for Mudbound; her cinematographer (see
Rachel Morrison) also earned a nomination for her work on the film. Rees gave a
nod to those accomplishments in her gorgeous Samsung spot that aired on Oscar
night—and she made a point of hiring women for her commercial crew, too. “I’m
just continually hiring talented black and brown people and LGBTQ people and
women that are interesting and trying to give them access,” says Rees, “to let my
productions be a first stepping-stone ‘in’ to an industry that’s not welcoming—
especially if you’re standing at the intersection of many ‘isms.’”—K.M.
BRANDS AND MARKETING
Tory Burch
Antoinette Clarke
FASHION DESIGNER
AND FOUNDER, TORY
BURCH FOUNDATION
VP, BRANDED ENTERTAINMENT
AND MEDIA INNOVATION, CBS
When Burch opened her first
boutique in 2004, her business
plan included an anomalous
proposal: to start a foundation
to empower other women
with entrepreneurial dreams.
Established in 2009, the Tory
Burch Foundation inaugurated
a fellowship for female small
business owners that provides
access to capital, education
and networking opportunities. Each fellowship class also takes part
in a pitch competition that awards a single winner an investment of
$100,000. Burch’s vision is grander still. She mounted a worldwide
#EmbraceAmbition campaign aimed at changing the way society views
and values the drive and determination of women and girls. Earlier
this spring she led the foundation’s Embrace Ambition Summit, with
speakers addressing barriers to equality. “If we confront the biases and
stereotypes that hold people back,” wrote Burch in an op-ed, “we can
create new norms that will allow us all to embrace equality.” —S.I.
24
Clarke has worked to reimagine integrations
in daytime TV—where the audience is
68 percent female—and change brands’
perceptions about those viewers as “women
who are sitting at home and not really
doing much,” she says. To that end, she
attracted new brands to daytime, including
Autotrader, which she cold-called and
convinced to do an integration on The Talk.
“It definitely resonated with the audience,
and they felt enough of a return on their
investment to come back and do three
integrations after.” However, Clarke wants to
do more than just sell a product: “We want
take-aways for all the integrations we do.
It’s about trying to elevate the woman who’s
watching also.” She and her twin sister Tricia
Clarke-Stone are also writing Double Down,
a “remixed rule book” to inspire women
coming up in the business, which will be
published next February. —J.L.
MAY 7, 2018 | ADWEEK
M O R R I S O N : D AV I D B O M B A ; P O M P E O A N D B U R C H : G E T T Y I M A G E S ; R E E S : K U R T I S WA R I E N K O / N E T F L I X ; C L A R K E : AV I VA K L E I N
Earlier this year, Black Panther director
of photography Morrison became
the first woman to be nominated for
an Oscar for best cinematography,
for her work on Mudbound. The nod
spotlighted a problem that many didn’t
know existed. “A lot of people didn’t
realize there had never been a woman
nominated for best cinematography
and really I think that put a magnifying
glass up to this industry, which is sexist
in all ways,” says Morrison. Currently
mulling over her next project, Morrison
believes that “diverse representation
across all spectrums within [film set]
departments” is important, “so that
we’re reflecting the world that we live
in and not some weird, messed-up
Hollywood version of it.” —K.M.
Devoted mother.
Accomplished leader.
Generous mentor.
True trailblazer.
And now, Adweek Disruptor.
Congrats to Donnalyn Smith
President, Momentum North America
BRANDS AND MARKETING
CEO, GRAYCE & CO
Audrey Gelman and Lauren Kassan
CO-FOUNDERS, THE WING
Inspiration for The Wing—part co-working space,
part social club—came from the women’s social club
movement dating back to the 1890s. Since opening their
first location in New York in 2016, Gelman and Kassan
have strived to provide driven women with a space to
network, attend speaker sessions, work or even relax. To
date, they’ve raised over $40 million in venture capital
and membership runs in the thousands, according to
Gelman, who says, “Every day is International Women’s
Day at The Wing. It’s not about breaking the glass ceiling
but building a new house.” (In March, the New York
Human Rights Commission opened an investigation into
The Wing to determine whether its women-only policy is
discriminatory.) With three current locations, The Wing
plans to open seven more sites (including in Seattle and
Toronto) in the coming months. —Katie Richards
After successful stints at mcgarrybowen and
Ogilvy & Mather, Griffith launched Grayce
four years ago to focus on women-centric
business strategies. “I like to start everything
with a higher-order vision or mission,” she
says, “and everything we have been doing
is rooted in the same mission, which is to
represent women as equals, and in doing so
have the world learn to treat them as equals.”
Her consultancy helps established companies
improve marketing
to women, and
helps women
entrepreneurs find
new customers.
This year Griffith
is launching Build
Like a Woman,
a platform for
startups that offers
business tools and
the same brandstrategy advice she
provides Fortune
500 companies,
but for just $99
per module. —D.P.
Jaclyn
Johnson
CEO, CREATE &
CULTIVATE
A few years ago, attending
a conference typically
meant a stuffy ballroom
at a nondescript hotel
with generic food and
lackluster programming.
That is, until Johnson
decided to start Create &
Cultivate—a conference
turned online platform
for young, ambitious
female entrepreneurs.
“Conferences can
be beautiful and
Instagrammable,” she says.
“You can go to a conference
and get your hair done
and also sit with a VC and talk about venture
capital.” Launched in 2011, recently, C&C
has drawn such speakers as Gloria Steinem
and Glossier founder Emily Weiss, along with
such brand partners as Fossil, Microsoft and
QuickBooks. Next up: the launch of Work Party,
a book, podcast and tour targeted at younger
millennials and Gen Z entrepreneurs. —K.R.
Whole, human & strong.
Thank you, Madonna Badger
for your powerful and purposeful
portrayal of all women.
Congratulations on being named
an Adweek Disruptor.
JOHNSON: CAROLINE LEE
Kathleen Griffith
LY N E : G E T T Y I M A G E S
Sarah Miyazawa
LaFleur
Susan Lyne
FOUNDER AND CEO, MM.LAFLEUR
PRESIDENT, FOUNDING
PARTNER, BBG VENTURES
Back when LaFleur worked in
private equity, she dreaded going
to clothing stores. For professional
women, LaFleur felt, shopping was a
patronizing experience: “The fit and
the fabric were terrible,” she says, not
to mention the “female markup” on
the price. Rather than wait for a new
brand to correct that situation, LaFleur
did it herself. In 2013, she launched
MM.LaFleur, a store that works like an
atelier, where a client “simply shows
up, is offered a glass of wine and her
stylist presents options to try.” Minutes
later, it’s done, the selections shipped
to the customer’s home. MM.LaFleur’s
retail model is changing the $48 billion
women’s apparel market. And the
executive suite too: The team is made
up of three women and three men and
the company provides equal maternity
and paternity leave. “It’s important
to me that we create an environment
of equality,” she says. “When women
succeed, the world is a better place.
—Robert Klara
Susan Lyne says that she has a thing for ignoring
the stereotypical rules set by society while also
focusing on female consumers. It’s fitting then that
she now heads up BBG (an acronym for Built by
Girls) Ventures. At a time when roughly 8 percent
of investment partners are women, BBG—an Oathbacked company—currently invests in 54 femalefounded businesses,
from Glamsquad to
Zola. Previously, the
CEO of Gilt Groupe
and president and
CEO of Martha
Stewart Living,
Lyne now spends
her days meeting
ambitious women
who want to change
people’s lives. “They
are all incredibly
optimistic, despite
the fact that getting
VC funding is still
significantly tougher
for women,” she
says. —K.R.
CELEBRATING JILL GWALTNEY.
RAUXA IS PROUD TO CALL YOU OUR
FEARLESS FOUNDER AND A TRUE LEADER.
CHEERS TO A WELL-DESERVED HONOR
FOR YOUR HEAD, HEART, AND HUSTLE.
BRANDS AND MARKETING
Karen Okonkwo
Donna Speciale
CO-FOUNDER, TONL
PRESIDENT,
TURNER AD SALES
In college, Karen Okonkwo ran a sorority
blog with some friends. They wrote
about everything from health and beauty
to fitness. But they couldn’t find any
images—stock or otherwise—of black
women to include with their posts. When
Okonkwo searched for a basic image
of a black woman drinking coffee, “it
took about five hours to find something
that was halfway decent. That really
bothered me,” she says. Okonkwo joined
up with photographer friend Joshua
Kissi to launch TONL—a collection of
stock photography highlighting only
minorities. Since its launch in August
2017, TONL has partnered with big
brands including Facebook, Google
and PopSugar to spread a message
of equality and diversity, and in the
process, making stock photography a
better reflection of society. —K.R.
After recently joining
the board of directors
for feminist media brand
Makers, the ad sales chief
has worked to make good
on her pledge to increase
Turner’s representation of
women and people of color
in the company’s overall
leadership roles. Now,
nearly half of her direct
reports are female, and
Speciale has championed
diversity at all levels—from senior management to summer
interns. Says Speciale: “It’s been amazing watching meetings
be so different now, with just having people come from different
places. It’s getting everybody to think differently and we’re
getting a lot better work from it.” As she explains, “I believe that
unless you have all voices represented, the product is never
going to be what it truly needs to be.” —J.L.
Leslie Berland
Lesley Slaton Brown
CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER, TWITTER
CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER, HP
In January, Berland and a handful of other
prominent CMOs from Chase, HP and Quantcast
noticed that the lineup at the Consumer
Electronics Show was lacking in women
keynote speakers. So, Berland and her team
created their own female empowering event
and the hashtag #HereWeAre. All told, 150
changemakers including GE CMO Linda Boff
attended, while 2 million watched the livestream
on Twitter. “What we wanted to communicate
is that we’re all one—we’re all in this together,”
she says. Leveraging the momentum, Berland
took the #HereWeAre campaign to the Oscars
with a powerful TV ad featuring Issa Rae and
Ava DuVernay, among others. Going forward,
Berland sees the campaign—and Twitter’s role in
changing the lack of diversity in leadership—as “a
shared platform. It belongs to all the people who
are involved.” —Lauren Johnson
In November 2015, HewlettPackard spun out into two separate
companies: HP Inc. and HP
Enterprise. Post-split, the personal
computer giant had some more
news: It named four women and two
people of color to each of the new
boards, making it the most diverse in
the tech industry. “We didn’t do that
just to do it. We did it because we
know that there’s greater influence,
there’s greater revenue generation,”
says Brown. The company also
provided unconscious bias training to
hiring managers and made business
partners pledge to be inclusive.
Last year it launched a series of videos on diversity. Branded “reinventing
mindsets,” the series exposes unconscious biases and features Brown
delivering the tagline: “HP is hiring, and talent is our only criteria.” —D.P.
Denise Colella SVP, ADVANCED ADVERTISING PRODUCTS AND STRATEGY, NBCUNIVERSAL
When Colella joined NBCU in 2015 from Maxifier, where she had been one of the first female CEOs in ad tech,
“my role didn’t exist at the time, and the group didn’t exist, and it was important for me to look broadly across
the industry and set an example for other women that were looking to make a difference,” she says. Leading
all development and strategy behind NBCU’s data-driven ad targeting platform, Audience Studio, she’s
opening advertisers’ eyes about gender targeting (“women are the ones who are out there shopping, whereas
brands thought, I’m developing a razor, so I should look at men”) while participating in a variety of events,
like the Villanova Council for Marketing Intelligence, “to show women what a typical career could look like.
That’s a way to get women interested in the engineering concepts and coming to our company.” —J.L.
28
MAY 7, 2018 | ADWEEK
OKONKWO: NIKKI CLOSSER; SPECIALE: COURTESY OF TURNER; BERLAND: JON CARMICHAEL; COLELLA: HEIDI GUTMAN
TECH
TECH
Susan Fowler
FORMER UBER ENGINEER,
WHISTLEBLOWER
With a single blog post, Fowler
all but christened the #metoo
movement, disrupting not just
the ride-hailing industry, but
nearly every other one, too.
The engineer’s frank account in
February 2017 described being
propositioned by her supervisor
and provided details about a
company where sexual advances
as well as discrimination were
entirely commonplace, and
complaints about them to
management entirely ignored.
Fowler’s outspokenness shed
light on the toxicity of the bro
culture that typifies Silicon
Valley. Her whistleblowing forced
accountability at Uber, whose
CEO thereafter resigned, and
encouraged women elsewhere
to speak up and out about
harassment and discrimination in
their own workplaces. —S.I.
Kirsten Green
FOUNDER, MANAGING DIRECTOR,
FORERUNNER VENTURES
Last year alone, Green was anointed one
of the 100 most influential people in the
world by Time magazine, a Top Women
Investor in VC by Forbes and VC of the Year
by TechCrunch. Not bad for someone who
once spent hours auditing meat inventory
in a supermarket freezer. The former
CPA turned stock analyst stands out not
just for grit, though, or for being wildly
successful in a male-dominated field.
It’s her knack for spotting and backing
winners that sets Green apart. After her
angel investments in Warby Parker and
Bonobos paid off, Green’s Forerunner
became the only VC firm to back Jet.com
and Dollar Shave Club, both of which were
acquired last year in billion-dollar deals
by Walmart and Unilever, respectively.
A champion of female entrepreneurs,
Green has also staked Draper James,
Reese Witherspoon’s clothing line. She
honors that commitment on home turf at
Forerunner, too, where six out of the seven
top people are women. —S.I.
GOD-IS RIVERA
VML Director, Inclusion &
Cultural Resonance
Katrina Lake
F O W L E R : S H A L O N VA N T I N E
FOUNDER, CEO, STITCH FIX
One of a handful of women at the helm in
corporate America, Lake was the only one to take
a tech company public in 2017. Stitch Fix, which
uses algorithms along with personalized, stylistcurated apparel delivered to customers’ homes,
was valued at $1.46 billion after its November IPO.
In March, Lake reported it had 2.5 million users
and $295.9 million in net revenue. Outspoken, she
has voiced reservations about being identified as
a “woman CEO,” rather than simply as CEO, and
clearly prizes diversity: half of her executive team
are women. She wants such equity to become
the norm, so that a broader range of ideas may be
presented and realized. At a Makers conference
last year, Lake recounted the rejections she
received from more than 50, mostly male, wouldbe funders, who didn’t believe in her idea or were
unconvinced it could work. The dismissals only
propelled her, and her inclusion in the unicorn club
does nothing if not prove them wrong. —S.I.
ADWEEK | MAY 7, 2018
You help us see more of everyone.
Your leadership enables us all to see more clearly. We
appreciate everything you do to shine a light on the
many ways our differences make us stronger.
Pers
tive
ON THE ORIGINS OF BR ANDS AND THE PEOPLE WHO BUILD THEM
La-Z-Boy
Recliner
«
HOW A QUIRKY IDEA AND AN
OLD ORANGE CRATE GAVE
AMERICA THE PERFECT PIECE
OF TV-WATCHING FURNITURE.
BY ROBERT KLARA
THE BACK
A tilting back
integrated with a
rising footrest is the
signature feature of
the Reclina-Rocker,
which was introduced
in 1960 and is still a
brisk seller.
THE HANDLE
THE ARMREST
Pull on the lever
and—easy!—the
chair tips back. For
an extra $75, the
company will put it
on the left side of the
chair for you.
La-Z-Boy recliners
often resembled
marshmallows with
all that padding. The
contemporary Maxx
model boasts wood
arms and a sleeker
profile.
P R E V I O U S PA G E , F O U N D E R S A N D P R O D U C T I O N L I N E : C O U R T E S Y L A - Z- B O Y
According to Nielsen data, the number of homes
receiving a TV signal (broadcast, cable or broadband)
stands at 96 percent. And despite studies that show
we’re watching less TV, American adults still
take in over fi ve hours of it every day. Too bad media
firms don’t track what all those butts are sitting on,
too, but here’s a guess: The La-Z-Boy company of
Monroe, Mich., turns out something like 30,000
pieces every week.
Which means: If the La-Z-Boy isn’t the most
popular piece of furniture for watching the tube,
it’s gotta be close.
For the uninitiated, La-Z-Boy makes a reclining
easy chair—the first, and after nearly a century, still
the leader. “La-Z-Boy has a 90-year heritage built
on providing quality and comfort,” said the brand’s
marketing vp Eli Winkler. “Those values are no less
important to consumers today than they were 90
years ago.”
Spoken like a true marketer, but the comfort isn’t
just a talking point—it’s the reason the brand is famous.
In 1927, two cousins named Edwin Shoemaker
and Edward Knabusch decided to go into business
together. Knabusch had worked in a cardboard factory
but had little enthusiasm for his job; his cousin was a
farmer and had even less for his. Both men’s hearts
were in woodworking, and they began designing novelty
furniture, notably a combination chair-telephone
stand called “The Gossiper.”
Casting about for new ideas, Shoemaker broke
down an orange crate and built a reclining porch chair,
its seat and back connected by a hinge allowing them
to move in consort. “Nature’s way of relaxing,” they
called it—and it was. But it was also just a warmweather porch chair, which wasn’t going to fly during
Michigan winters. Fortunately, a local store owner
named Arthur Richardson suggested the pair
upholster the chair, effectively making it an indoor
piece of furniture.
Knabusch and Shoemaker proved to be gifted
marketers—by raising a circus tent and serving
refreshments, they made plenty of sales—but
“Automatic Adjustable Chair” wasn’t a terribly
catchy name. After holding a contest for a new name
(suggestions included the Slack Back and the Sit-NSnooze), the founders settled on La-Z-Boy.
La-Z-Boy was a Michigan success story, but it
would take the postwar boom to make it a national
name. After weathering WWII by making seats for tanks,
the brand returned to consumer production right around
the time that TVs were hitting the market and the epic
wave of suburbanization was starting to roll. The year
1960 saw the debut of the Reclina-Rocker, a springdriven rocking chair with an anchored base, combined
with a footrest-equipped recliner activated by a side
lever. The company didn’t market its chairs as a TV
accessory per se, but it didn’t have to. For Americans
lounging in the glow of their Zeniths and Philcos, a
La-Z-Boy was the perfect accessory.
“The chair was like magic,” the founders said.
“It sold well from the beginning. The problem was
making enough of them.” Between 1961 and 1970,
sales skryocketed from $2 million to $50 million.
These days, La-Z-Boy makes a full line of
furniture, but its recliners remain the signature
product—which lends itself to reading, napping and
smartphone tapping as well as anything else. After
all, the company tagline is “Live life comfortably,”
and if there’s one thing Americans like doing more
than watching their screens, it’s being comfortable
when they do it.
ADWEEK | MAY 7, 2018
Fast
Facts
$489 Recliner
starting price
350 Retail
locations
50m La-Z-Boys
sold in the U.S.
Full tilt La-Z-Boy still builds all its chairs
in the U.S. (2), just as company founders
Edward Knabusch and Edwin Shoemaker (1)
did in the early days. Cultural references to
the famous recliners still abound, such as
Stranger Things’ Mike showing Eleven his
father’s La-Z-Boy (3). Indeed, while company
marketing targets women, the chair is
classically associated with Dad (4).
Back track La-Z-Boy’s marketing was innovative
from its earliest years, selling recliners under a big top
complete with refreshments and entertainment. In the
postwar period, the brand began hiring household-name
endorsers like Bing Crosby, who settled into his recliner
in one 1967 ad and said, “Man, this is really relaxing.”
But the most famous face of La-Z-Boy was star
quarterback Joe Namath (r.), who spent the decade of
the 1970s showing Americans how to wear a butterfly
collar and tilt back in style.
31
TA L E N T P O O L
Curriculum
Vitae
President, Watch, Nielsen
2017-present
President, product
leadership and
international media,
Nielsen
2015-2017
Evp, Watch product
leadership
2013-2015
Managing director, media,
Asia/Pacific/Middle East/
Africa
2011-2013
Managing director,
Nielsen Digital, Pacific
region
2009-2011
Product specialist,
Nielsen
2004-2009
Job Profile
Megan Clarken leads
Nielsen’s U.S. media
and international Watch
commercial teams, along
with its global Watch
product leadership
organization. She was
appointed to this role in
August 2017.
PRESIDENT
Megan Clarken
HOW A FORMER TRACK AND FIELD STAR BECAME ONE OF
THE MOST IMPORTANT FIGURES IN MEDIA. BY A.J. KATZ
32
successful track and field
star, setting New Zealand
records in the long jump
at the age of 14. She never
graduated from high school
after dropping out to pursue
her dream of becoming
an Olympian; though she
qualified for the 1988 Seoul
Olympics in the long jump,
her dream was cut short at
age 19 when a severe knee
injury prevented her from
competing.
Now, she uses that
Olympian drive at Nielsen.
“Sports gives you an
awareness of how what
you’re doing has an impact
on the world around you,”
said Clarken. “It’s provided
me with the knowledge of
how to get things done, how
to work with people to have
them want to get things done
and feel passionate about
getting things done.”
Nielsen is under
increasing pressure from
advertisers and networks
to embrace cross-platform
measurement and account
for nonlinear viewing. The
company has become a
de facto piñata for the
media industry’s growing
frustration with Nielsen
systems in the face of
changing consumption
patterns. But that isn’t
stopping Clarken. Over the
next 12 months, her top
priority is bringing unity to
an extraordinarily complex
media marketplace.
“That means comparable
measurement across what is
becoming a very fragmented
environment,” said Clarken.
“We are continuously
innovating and rolling out
solutions for clients that are
helping them to grow [or]
protect their media spend in
the marketplace.”
Since becoming president
of Watch in August 2017,
Clarken has made a point of
bringing people together from
diverse backgrounds and skill
sets to Nielsen. “I’m focusing
on making sure we have
balance and equality across
gender inside of my team,”
said Clarken. “I bring a strong
female voice to the table at
the executive level, and I
bring a strong profile
externally to our clients.”
“Over time, I have worked
my butt off and gotten
myself to where I am
today,” Clarken said. “It
has been a pretty quick
train ride that has taken
me through a bunch of
different roles, and I have
worked pretty hard at it.”
Pro Tip
“The market is complex
and changing fast,” she
said. “Do your homework
and understand how it
works in detail and what
the real challenges are.
Have an opinion and don’t
be afraid to express it.
Nothing is off the table in
a dynamic and disruptive
environment. Be bold.”
COURTESY OF NIELSEN
It’s lucky that Megan Clarken
has always thought globally.
A native New Zealander,
Clarken spent years going
back and forth between
the U.S. and Australia for
Nielsen, analyzing audiences
from all parts of the globe
during a 14-year tenure at
the data behemoth. Now,
Clarken is global president
of Nielsen’s Watch, which
provides Nielsen’s media and
advertising clients audience
measurement services
across all devices—TV, radio,
web and mobile—where
content is consumed.
Clarken was raised in
a middle-class home in
Auckland, New Zealand,
where she played sports.
She became an incredibly
How She
Got the Gig
PORTRAIT
Specs
Who Terri Meyer and
Sandy Greenberg, cofounders and co-CEOs
What Boutique ad agency
Where New York
1 Gerber’s “Anything for
Baby” campaign embraced
parents’ desire to give their
infants only the best.
2 In response to
discrimination against the
trans community, T&S
reimagined the barber pole
for inclusive shops.
3 For Hain Celestial’s
MaraNatha nut butters, “Too
Good for Jelly” centered
on the romantic breakup of
peanut butter and jelly.
1
AGENCY
Breaking Barriers
SAM SALUM
TERRI & SANDY FOUND SUCCESS BY BUCKING INDUSTRY
NORMS, PROVING THAT DIVERSITY AND COMPASSION
CREATE WINNING WORK. BY ROBERT KLARA
Terri Meyer fondly recalls the time she called up the executive creative director at D’Arcy Masius
Benton & Bowles and laid down the law. “Are you getting me that birthday present I want?”
she demanded. And he did. A few days later, the present was waiting in the lobby. It was Sandy
Greenberg. Meyer and Greenberg are unique in the world of advertising. They ascended the ranks
of the agency world as co-creative directors in the 1980s, when many women were kept from
ascending at all. Now, they run their own shop that, despite its small size (50 employees), boasts
mega clients including Disney, Gerber and The Hartford—the latter of which just signed the agency
as its AOR last Tuesday. Big brands sign for the Eie-winning work, but also for a culture that bucks
industry norms: Women comprise 60 percent of Terri & Sandy’s leadership, and diversity is the
standard. Meyer described her team as “like-minded, compassionate and passionate, hardworking
people who want to do great work and aren’t assholes.” It shows. When Meyer heard about the
discrimination transgender people face in barber shops, the agency cooked up Strands for Trans,
which reimagined the barber pole (pink, white and blue) to mark accepting shops. Within two
weeks, it went national. “When you do this for a living,” Meyer said, “you want to give back.”
ADWEEK | MAY 7, 2018
2
3
33
LOOK BACK
1988
CBS VIA GETTY IMAGES
Murphy Brown
It’s the year of the TV reboot. In January, CBS gave a 13-episode
series order to the 1988 comedy two decades after the Emmy Awardwinning program ended in 1998. Candice Bergen, who starred as
fictional TV newsmagazine FYI’s marquee reporter Murphy Brown, is
reprising her famous role and also will serve as executive producer.
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34
MAY 7, 2018 | ADWEEK
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